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Full text of "Delicate dishes : a cook book"

THE BEST SILVER PLATED KNIVES, FORKS 
SPOONS, etc., made in this country are stamped 

WalHn^ford, Ct 

Be sure that the labels on each package read 

WM. ROGERS, 

with Wallingford, Conn., as the place of manufacture, 
and you will have goods warranted to give satisfaction. 

Ask Your Dealer \y \i/ w 
for this Brand.... ^'"^ ^'^ ^ 

and if he does not keep it write to the manufacturers, 

Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co. 

SII-VERSMITHS, 

Wallingford, Conn; or Chicago, 111. 



For High Grade Silver Plated Hollow Ware, 
ask for Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co.'s Quad- 
ruple Plate. Stamped 




Tea Sets, Waiters, Water Sets, Bread Trays, etc., in 
Sterling and Plate. 




Silver and 
Nickel 

Chafing Dishes 

Send for 

Special Circular 

showing 

patterns and 

prices. 



Address, 



Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co., 



Cordova Pattern. 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



J. G. BUTLER. 



J. J. BUTLER. 



TELEPHONE OAKLAND 42. 



BUTLER BROTHERS, 

Sanitary pid(T\bi95, Qas pittif}? & Seu/er Btjildi^^, 

5214 Lake Avenue, 

Jobbing Promptly Attended to. i^, CIIICACO. 



FEILCHENFELD BROS. 

CASH PURVEYORS OP 

GROCERIES . 
and MEATS, 

312-315 55th St., Hyde Park. 



TEL. OAK. 233. 

WISLER & SEITZ, 

Leaders in First-Class 
STAPLE AND FANCY 

Groceries. Meats, 

AT LOW PRICES. 
55lh St. and .Jefferson Ave., Chicago. 



MRS. M. S. HOLMES. 



E. G. HOLMES. 



Mrs. Holmes Home Baking Co. 

142 E. 53cl Street. 

Home Made Bread and Rolls. Maccaroons. Lady Fingers. Pate 

Shells. Charlotte Russe, Doughnuts. Cream Puffs Eclairs. 

Boston Brown Bread. Baked Beans. 

Cakes of all kinds to order. Bread and Rolls Delivered Before Breakfast. 



DON'T FAIL 

to give us a trial ^^ ■■ AX rj" ^^ 

when in ueed of ^^ ^t Vi/ Cb ^D 

WE AIM TO PLEASE. 

A. J. Saohtleben, 

274t E. 55th St. 

Certainly we do repairing. 



John A. Ettierington, 

■:-Eastlake Market,- :■ 

54 Thirty- First Street, - CHICAGO 

Telephone, South 162 

15 Forty-Serenth St., - KENWOOD 

Telephone, Oakland 322, 



PATENT APPLIED FOE 




THE ROYAL 

COMBINED WAIST AND HOSE SUPPORTER 

Made in Black and White and in Sizes to fit All Children 
from 2 to 10 Years of Age. 

These garments have an advantage over all others by being ADJUSTABLE, j 
The slide on the suspender straps makes them longer or shorter as it is moved s 
up or down, and the suspender straps in the back being ELASTIC, prevents the ; 
buttons being torn off; and another superiority is their being made of GOOD \ 
material and first-class workmanship. They support the whole weight of 
skirts, drawers and pants, as well as the stockings, from the shoulders, anc. 
to allow of THAT, the waist band should be LOOSE and EASY. They are two . 
garments in one. They should be found at all First-Class Dry Goods Stores 
EVERYWHERE. But if not found there, they will be sent by mail, to any 
address, upon receipt of price. Fifty Cents. State size wanted — No. 1, No. 2, 
No. 3 or No. 4. 

G. W. HOYT & CO., 



Sole IVIanuf3Cturers, 



243 Monroe Street, 



CHICAGO. 



Delicate Dishes. 



A COOK BOOK 

Compiled by 

Ladies of St. Paul's Church, 

/ 
CHICAGO, . ILLINOIS. 

1896 

> ( APR x^\m] 

ENTERED ACCORDING TO ACT OF CONGRESS, IN THE YEAR 1 e»6, -^ 

BY W. H. FRENCH, W\ * 

IN THE OFFICE OF THE LIBRARIAN CONbRCSS, 



IN WASHINGTON 



Q^b 




PRESS OF 
^ EARL B. SMITH & CO. ^ 

PRINTERS 
350 DEARBORN STREET, CHICAGO 



TEL. HARRISON 11 



^>-f> 



PREFACE 




.^ 



j^. 



T is with much pleasure that'the ladies of 
a^St. Paul Parish.,^ commend this little 
volume to the public^s notice.*^ 

No claim of originality is made for it. 
It contains no hitherto unpublished secrets 
of the culinary art^ routed from obscurity 
by energetic hands, and dusted for our 
delectation....!^ Each housekeeper has 
simply selected a few of her choicest re- 
cipes and added them to the collection, 
that her ^ friends may enjoy with her 
these ** Delicate Dishes.'^ As each one 
bears the hall mark of the sender's name, 
no further recommendation need to be added. 

The committee in charge wish to thank those without 
whose prompt and o^ generous co-operation ^ such a book 
would nave been impossible. ^ Each one has given of the 
best of her store, and given it gladly. "With this in re- 
membrance, ^ tiiey feel confident that not only will the 
collection itself prove a success, but it may be the means of 
bringing into even warmer and closer relationship those 
who are bound together by a common interest, and work- 
ing together for a common cause. 
Chicago, Easter J 896. 



s 



MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMAAMMMMAAAAMM( 



'^WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWY^ 



'There is a knack in doing many a thing, 
Which labor cannot to perfection bring ; 

Therefore, however great in your own eyes, 
Pray do not hints from other folks despise, 



SOUPS. 

"A genial savor 

Of certain stews; 

Things which in hungry mortals' eyes find favor." 

CREAM OF PEA SOUP. 

Press I can of French peas through a colander. Put 
I quart of milk in double boiler; when boiling, add the 
peas. Rub one tablespoonful each of butter and flour 
together, add them to the boiling milk and stir until it 
thickens. Salt and pepper to taste. 

Mrs. B. R. Wells. 

CELERY CREAM SOUP. 

One quart of rich milk, y^ cup of flour, 2 heaping 
teaspoonfuls of celery salt, ^ pint of whipped cream, 

Mrs. J. M. Taylor. 

CREAM OF CELERY SOUP. 

Four pounds of stewing veal, i veal soup-bone, 2 
tablespoonfuls of salt, ^ teaspoonful of pepper, i 
soup bunch, without celery, 3 small onions, 4 whole 
cloves, 4 whole allspice, 3 quarts of cold water. Heat 



\m^ 



VALENTINE & GOMPflNY, 

Coacb and Car Varnisbes and Colors. 



6 SOUPS. 

slowly and boil gently until reduced one-half. Strain 
and cool, then remove fat and keep warm. Heat in 
double boiler i quart of milk. Melt in a thick-bottomed 
pan 4 tablespoonfuls of butter, add i large bunch of 
celery, using the outside only. Brown well, and add 
5 tablespoonfuls of flour, mix well and add the hot 
stock, a pint at a time. Stir until smooth, add enough 
milk to make the soup creamy, strain and do not boil 
after the milk is put in. 

Mrs. George Mehring. 

CREAM OF CORN SOUP. 

One pint of grated corn, cooked in i pint of hot 
water J^ hour. Boil quart of milk and i slice of onion, 
rub I heaping teaspoonful of flour with 2 of butter, add a 
little boiling milk, and when smooth, stir into the milk 
and onion and cook 8 minutes. Remove the onion, add 
corn and salt and pepper. 

TOMATO BISQUE. 

Put I quart of milk on to boil. Rub 2 tablespoon- 
fuls of butter, 2 of flour and J^ teaspoonful of soda 
together. Boil i quart can of tomatoes and stir into it 
the above mixture. Stir until it boils, then add 
to it the boiling milk, with i teaspoonful of salt and i 
of sugar. Mrs. Russell H. Stevens. 



SOUPS. 7 

CREAM OF ASPARAGUS SOUP. 

Wash and tie up one bunch of asparagus, put it in 
boiling water and boil gently ^ hour. Remove, cut off 
the tips and lay them aside. Put i quart of milk on to 
boil in double boiler, press the stalks through colander 
and add to the milk. Rub i tablespoonful of butter 
and 2 of flour together, put into the milk and stir con- 
stantly until it thickens. Add the asparagus tips, salt and 
pepper to taste. Mrs. M. E. Dayton. 

CREAM POTATO SOUP. 
Boil 5 good sized potatoes. Boil ii^ pints of milk 
and stir into it % pound of butter, a little salt and nut- 
meg. Mash the potatoes and pour this over them. 
Stir and strain through a sieve. Stir over the fire until 
it boils again, pour into tureen over 6 Boston crackers, 
split and toasted. Selected. 

TURTLE BEAN SOUP. 
One pint of black beans soaked over night in cold, 
soft water, % pound of salt pork, }4, pound of fresh 
beef, I onie^f , i gallon of soft water, i grated carrot. 
Boil until tender, 3 or more hours, strain through col- 
ander, return to kettle, add a few cloves, forcemeat 
balls, sliced lemon, hard-boiled eggs, chopped; salt and 
pepper. Mrs. F. H. Radford. 

l/ALEUTINrO YflLENTINB & GOMPflNY; 
VMr n ISHLO Coacb and Car Varnishes and Colors. 



8 SOUPS. 

BLACK BEAN SOUP. 
One quart of black beans, soaked over night. Boil 
until soft with 2 pounds of beef, pepper and salt, good 
sized onion, with 3 cloves in it, a little lemon peel. 
Strain and pour it over 2 hard-boiled eggs, sliced thin, 
juice of ^ a lemon and a wine glass of sherry wine. 

F. C. Van Wyck. 
BOUILLON. 
Pour I quart of cold water over 2 pounds of lean beef, 
chopped fine. Let it simmer 4 hours. Strain, cool and 
stir in the beaten white of i egg. Boil until clear, 
season with salt and white pepper, color with i tea- 
spoonful of burnt brown sugar, strain and serve. 

Mrs. Miller. 

SALSIFY, OR OYSTER PLANT SOUP. 

One dozen salsify roots, scraped, sliced and put into 
one pint of boiling water; boil slowly until tender, add 
I quart of milk i tablespoonful of butter, 2 of flour, 
rubbed together, 6 whole allspice, i blade of mace, i 
bay leaf. Stir until it boils. Add salt and pepper, 
and let it stand ten minutes on the back of the stove. 
Remove bay leaf and serve. Selected. 

VERT PRE. 
Cook I quart of spinach leaves with a teaspoonful 
of salt in ^ pint of water for 10 minutes, drain, return 

"Use Imperial French Poultry Seasoning." 



SOUPS. 9 

to kettle, add 2 tablespoonfuls of butter, }4 pint of 
peas, I bay leaf, i sprig of parsley, 1 small onion and 
3 pints of stock. Cook ^ hour, press through sieve 
and return to kettle. Moisten 2 tablespoonfuls of arrow- 
root, add, stir, and as soon as it boils add % pint of 
cream, salt and pepper. Serve with fried bread cut in 
small squares. 

CREAM OF CELERY SOUP. 

Boil I large head of celery in i pint of water ^ 
hour. Boil i pint of milk with i large slice of onion, a 
blade of mace; mix i tablespoonful of flour smoothly in 
a little cold milk and stir into the boiling milk. Mash 
the celery in the water in which it was cooked, and 
cook ten minutes longer; then stir it into the boiling 
milk, add i tablespoonful of butter, salt and pepper and 
serve at once. Mrs. E. G. Gilbert. 

BISQUE OF OYSTERS. 

One quart of fair-sized fresh oysters, i quart of rich 
milk or cream, 8 soda crackers, rolled, a teaspoonful of beef 
extract, a saucerful of finely minced celery, 2 tablespoonfuls 
of butter, worked into an equal quantity of flour, the yolks 
of 3 eggs, salt and pepper to taste, with a sprinkle of cay- 
enne. Chop the oysters, put into stewpan with their own 
liquor and a pint of water, the celery, beef extract, crackers, 

l/ALEUTlNrC VALENTINE & COMPflN/, 
YMrIiISHLO Coach and Car Varnishes and Colors. 



10 SOUPS. 

salt, pepper and a little parsley. Boil slowly for 20 min- 
utes. Rub through a sieve until all moisture has been 
pressed through. Return to stove, add milk and simmer 
again for 10 minutes. Set back and very carefully stir in 
the beaten yolks of the eggs; serve at once. 

CELERY SOUP WITH OYSTERS. 

Cut 3 heads of celery into small pieces, using both 
roots and stalks; add a piece of onion as large as a hickory 
nut and a sprig of parsley; put into a saucepan with a 
pint of boiling water and boil ^ an hour; put one quart of 
milk into a double boiler; rub to a smooth paste a heaping 
tablespoonful of flour, and add to it, a little at a time, ^ 
cup of warm milk; pour this into the hot milk and stir until 
it is smooth and creamy; remove the parsley and rub the 
remaining contents with water through the colander and 
add this to the milk; add a teaspoonful of salt and >2 a 
teaspoonful of pepper; as soon as it boils add 2 dozen nicely 
washed oysters; when it reaches the boiling point again re- 
move from the fire and serve. C. R. R. 

BISQUE OF CLAMS. 
Wash and chop i quart of clams. Put into a stewpan 
with ^ pint of white stock (or water), i slice of onion, 
2 blades of celery, a tiny bit of mace, a bay leaf and a sprig 
of parsley. Cover; cook gently half an hour. In another 
saucepan have a pint of stock and a scant pint of stale 

"Use Imperial French Poultry Seasoning." 



SOUPS. 11 

bread crumbs. Let this cook very slowly 20 minutes. 
When the clams have cooked Y^ an hour strain the liquor, 
from them into the pan with the bread crumbs. Stir and 
rub through a sieve. Return to the fire, add 3 tablespoon- 
fuls of butter and 2 of flour rubbed together, 2 teaspoonfuls 
of salt, one-third teaspoonful of white pepper, one pint 
of milk and one of cream (or 2 pints of rich milk) heated to 
a boiling point. Let it boil up once, strain again and serve. 
With it pass the 

PROFITEROLES. 

Into a saucepan put 2 tables poonfuls of butter and ^ 
a cup of boiling water. Put on the fire, and when it boils 
add three-fourths cup of flour, and beat well 2 minutes. 
Remove from the fire, and when cool break into it 2 eggs; 
beat for 10 minutes, add one-half teaspoonful of salt, make 
into balls size of a pea, put them into a slightly buttered 
pan; bake in a moderate oven 10 minutes. 

ANDALUSIAN SOUP. 

Three quarts of soup stock, 2 cupfuls of dry stewed 
tomatoes (if canned tomatoes are used they must be drained 
before stewing), i cupful of minced soup vegetables, 
mostly onions; i small cupful of butter and same of flour. 
Fry the minced vegetables in the butter, until the latter has 

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12 SOUPS. 

become a light brown, mix in the flour and set the pan 
inside the oven for the mixture to brown thoroughly without 
burning. Then scrape the contents of the pan into the 
soup stock, throw in 8 cloves, half a bay leaf, a teaspoonful 
of black pepper; simmer half an hour and strain; add the 
tomatoes rubbed through a colander and set the soup pot on 
the back of the stove to slowly boil a half hour longer; skim 
occasionally. Season with salt. The soup should be of the 
consistency of thin brown sauce and is delicious enough to 
pay for the trouble of making. 

PIQUANT PEA SOUP. 

One pint of green dried peas — or fresh ones. If dried 
scald in a solution of saleratus water, blanch them thoroughly 
and cook gently in 2 quarts of water until tender and soft. 
Pass them through a sieve. Chop 2 onions and fry in 2 
tablespoonfuls of butter, add 6 cloves and i bay leaf and 
then stir all together. Put in a tablespoonful of salt and a 
cup of either canned or whole tomatoes. Let the whole 
cook very slowly for an hour, when, if it seems too thick, 
add a little boiling water and let it cook a little longer. 
Then add a pinch of red pepper and a tablespoonful of 
butter, and just before serving, a cupful of squares of bread 
which have been fried brown in butter until of a pretty 
golden hue. Mrs. Ryan. 

"Use Imperial French Poultry Seasoning." 



SOUPS. 13 

ALMOND SOUP. 

One cup of rice, i tablespoonful sugar, 5 pints of milk, 
y^ teaspoonful of salt, ^ pound almonds. Wash the rice, 
put in a farina boiler with i quart of milk. Cook slowly 
till every grain is tender. While the rice is cooking shell 
and blanch the almonds, chop very fine and then pound 
them in a mortar, adding a few drops at a time a half cup of 
milk, forming a smooth paste. Place the paste with the 
sugar and remaining quantity of milk in a double boiler and 
simmer for thirty minutes. When the rice is done turn it 
carefully into the soup tureen, pour over it the almonds 
and milk, season with teaspoonful of salt and serve. 

R. A. R. 

VEGETABLE SOUP. 

Take 8 or 10 cupfuls of stock, in which almost any 
kind of meat has been boiled — the richer the better. Skim 
off most of the fat. Almost every kind of vegetable can be 
used. Take a piece of each and cut into dice shapes. Boil 
the hard vegetables, such as carrots, turnips, onions, celery, 
etc., together in a pint of water an hour in a little sauce- 
pan; drain off the water, put them into the stock and add 
the easy cooking kinds, such as cauliflowers, potatoes or 
whatever may be at hand, and simmer ^ hour. At last 
add a half cup tomatoes, small teaspoonful salt, half tea- 

yiLEklTINro VALENTINE & GOMPflNY. 
VM R n ISHLw Coach and Car Yarnishes and Colors. 



U SOUPS. 

spoonful pepper and a tablespoonful cornstarch mixed in a 
cup of cold water. Cook five minutes and serve. 

C. E. C. 

CAULIFLOWER SOUP. 

Select good- sized head of cauliflower. Wash and pick 
apart. Put in quart of boiling water with teaspoonful of 
salt and simmer for half hour. Drain and add to the water 
I pint of milk, with a teaspoonful of onion juice and a bay 
leaf; rub together i large tablespoonful of butter, 2 even 
tablespoonfuls of flour, stir carefully into hot mixture until 
it comes to boiling point. Add the cauliflower and serve at 
once. 

SPANISH SOUP. 

Soak I pound of white beans over night, boil them the 
next morning till tender, add i small white cabbage, which 
has been cut up fine, a bit of bacon, a whole red pepper and 
some salt; boil the whole for an hour. Heat some lard or 
drippings in a saucepan and fry in it a sliced onion; put in 
the soup little by little; stir often with a wooden spoon. A 
little olive butter and garlic makes this a perfect represen- 
tative of the favorite soup kept for all travelers in Spanish 
climes. Selected. 

SCOTCH BROTH. 

Two pounds scraggy neck of mutton. Cut meat in 
small pieces and put in soup pot with 2 quarts of water, i 

"Use Imperial French Poultry Seasoning." 



SOUPS. 15 

turnip, 2 carrots, i onion and a stalk of celery, all cut fine 
Simmer two hours. Cook i tablespoonful of flour and i of 
butter together until perfectly smooth; stir in soup, and add 
a teaspoonful of chopped parsley; season with salt and 
pepper. 

PUREE OF POTATOES. 

Boil and mash in 2 quarts of water 4 large potatoes, a 
small onion, 2 stalks of celery and a sprig of parsley. 
When done pass through a sieve, return to the fire, add salt 
and pepper to taste, and 2 generous teaspoonfuls of butter 
rubbed into one of flour. Boil up once and pour into a 
soup tureen over a cupful of rich milk. 

OATMEAL SOUP. 

Two quarts of any meat broth, ^ can tomatoes, i me- 
dium-sized onion, salt and pepper to taste, a stalk or two of 
celery (if at hand), i ]^ teacupfuls of oatmeal. Put broth, 
vegetables and seasoning over the fire together and let come 
to a boil; then throw in the oatmeal and stir smooth. Boil 
until as thick as cream, then strain through a colander and 
serve. Miss Campbell. 



VA^R^Nl^^iES 



VALENTINE & GOiftPflNy. 

Coach and Car Yarnishes and Colors. 



SALADS AND SAUCES. 



" Epicurean cooks sharpen .... 
with cloyless sauce his appetite. " 

OYSTER SALAD. 

One quart of oysters, boil up once, drain and cool. 
Cut in halves between the thick and thin parts; cover 
with vinegar and stand over night. Next day chop 
cabbage and celery, mix with oysters and pour over the 
following 

DRESSING. 

Yolks of 4 fresh, raw eggs and two hard boiled ones 
rubbed together until smooth. Add 4 tablespoonfuls oil, 
a few drops at a time, and mix well; then add two heap- 
ing teaspoonfuls salt, i of pepper, i of made mustard 
and 2 tablespoonfuls vinegar, added gradually. 

Mrs. F. Chapman. 

MACEDOINE SALAD. 

One cup of chopped boiled beets, i cup of peas, i 
cup of string beans, y^ cup of asparagus tips, 10 drops 
of onion juice, i cup of chopped celery, mayonnaise 
dressing. Mrs. E. M. Dunbar. 

"Use Imperial French Poultry Seasoning." 



SALADS AND SAUCES. 17 

ENGLISH WALNUT SALAD. 

One pint of English walnut meats, boiled until 
slightly softened, with i slice of onion, i bay-leaf and i 
teaspoonful of salt, drain and cool. Put a saltspoonful 
of salt and a dash of white pepper in a bowl; add a tea- 
spoonful salad oil and lo drops onion juice; rub until 
the salt is dissolved; add 2 tablespoonfuls of oil and i 
tablespoonful of vinegar; beat until whitish and thick. 
Serve on lettuce. Garnish with orange slices cut into 
% points. Mrs. H. Lockwood. 

POTATO SALAD. 

Boil and slice as many potatoes as are necessary. 
Salt them and stir in a few capers. Cut fine i small 
slice of onion and mix with the potatoes. Rub the 
yolks of 3 hard boiled eggs fine and mix with the yolk 
of one raw egg ; add ^ teaspoonful of mustard, a pinch 
of red pepper, a little salt. Stir in oil until quite thick; 
add the whites, cut fine, and 3 tablespoonfuls of vinegar. 

Mrs. G. D. Cook. 

SPANISH SALAD. 

Two cups of bits of bread, 2 cups of olives cut fine, 
I cup of chopped cucumber pickles; mayonaise dressing. 

Selected. 



vfistms 



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Coach and Car Yarnisbes and Colors. 



18 SALADS AND SAUCES. 



CUCUMBER SALAD. 



Pare and cut in rather thick slices 50 fresh cucum- 
bers of medium size. Put in a crock with 12 small onions, 
sliced, and i pint of salt. Let them stand all night. 
Strain and add i teacupful of white mustard seed, i of 
black, 3^ cup of celery seed and i cup of olive oil. Mix 
and cover with cold vinegar. Mrs. Rising. 

FRENCH SALAD DRESSING. 

A French salad dressing, made of 3 tablespoonfuls 
of olive oil, mixed well with ^ teaspoonful of pepper, 
i/^ teaspoonful of salt and when the mixture is well 
blended, add i tablespoonful of vinegar. If the salad 
dish is rubbed with a clove of garlic or a slice of onion, 
the dressing is improved. This is intended for simple 
salads of lettuce, cucumbers or string beans. 

MARGUERITE SALAD. 

Boil 6 eggs 20 minutes, rub yolks through sieve, 
and chop whites fine; moisten with boiled dressing or 
mayonnaise. Serve in cups of lettuce leaves, putting in 
each I teaspoonful of the yolks and around them the 
chopped whites. 

POTATO PEPPER SALAD. 
Put a layer of chopped cold potatoes in a dish and a 

"Use Imperial French Poultry Seasoning." 



SALADS AND SAUCES. 19 

layer of chopped green peppers, removing the seeds ^ 
pour over i tablespoonful of oil; fill the dish in this way 
and pour over it a mixture of i^ cup of white vinegar, 
with 2 tablespoohfuls of water and ^ teaspoonful of 
sugar. 

POTATO SALAD. 

Cut fine 6 cold boiled potatoes and 4 hard boiled 
eggs. Sprinkle over i teaspoonful of chopped parsley 
and one teaspoonful of onion juice, obtained by press- 
ing a cut onion hard against a coarse grater. Serve with 
mayonnaise or cooked dressing. 

Mrs. E. M. Dunbar. 

TOMATO AND ONION SALAD. 

Six firm, ripe tomatoes, peel and slice %. inch thick; 
slice very thin a Bermuda onion, arrange in layers in a 
salad bowl; pour over a dressing composed of 2 table- 
spoonfuls of salad oil, 2 tablespoonfuls of vinegar, % tea- 
spoonful of salt, ^ teaspoonful of pepper. Use at once. 

Mrs. Cockrill. 

TURNIP SALAD. 
Three sliced, cold, boiled turnips, 3 sliced beets, i 
sliced egg, hard boiled, i sliced onion; mayonnaise. 

A salad may be made of grape fruit, oranges or 
lemons, by using the pulp only, serving it upon beds of 



l/lLEUTINrr YflLENTlNE & GOiftPflNY. 
VMrII ISHLV Coacli and Car Yarnisbes and Colcrs. 



20 SALADS AND SAUCES. 

lettuce, with a simple dressing of 3 tablespoonfuls of oil 
to I tablespoonful of vinegar, a little salt and pepper. 

CELERY SALAD. 

Grate a cocoanut and pour over it i pint of boiling 
water; let it stand until cool, squeeze the cocoanut dry, 
throwing it away. Strain the milky water and let it 
remain until a cream rises. Cut the tender white parts 
of celery quite fine and put in the salad bowl, scatter 
over it a tablespoonful of grated onion, a dash of cay- 
enne and a little salt. Skim the cream from the cocoa- 
nut milk and pour it over the celery; add i tablespoonful 
of lemon juice. ^ A Friend. 

CABBAGE SALAD. 
One-third head of cabbage, Ys Spanish onion, 3 
stalks celery; chop fine; 3 eggs, well beaten, )^ tea- 
spoonful of mustard, i tablespoonful of sugar, 2 table- 
spoonfuls of melted butter, small cup of vinegar; stir all 
together and cook until thick over boiling water and 
pour over salad while hot. 

Mrs. F. B. Hooker. 

VEGETABLE SALAD. 
Equal quantities of celery, cabbage and pickled 
beets, cut fine; pour over them remoulade sauce, made 
by adding to the mashed -yolks of 3 eggs, which have 

"Use Imperiai French Poultry Seasoning." 



SALADS AND SAUCES. 21 

been boiled 20 minutes, ^ teaspoonful of made mustard; 
salt and pepper to taste; add yi tablespoonful of tarragon 
vinegar and mix well; add, drop by drop, 3 tablespoon- 
fuls of olive oil, stirring one way all the time; then, 
I raw yolk, and when well mixed, y^ tablespoonful of 
tarragon vinegar the last thing. 

Mrs. J. B. Daniels. 

COLD SLAW DRESSING. 

Mix the yolks of 4 eggs, i teaspoonful of mustard, 2 
tablespoonfuls of sugar, )^ cup of strong vinegar, weak- 
ened with three tablespoonfuls of water, a piece of but- 
ter the size of a walnut, and ^ teaspoonful of salt thor- 
oughly together. Cook in double boiler until thick and 
pour over the cabbage when cold. 

Mrs. Walter R. Comstock. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

A FRENCH RECIPE. 

Beat into the raw yolk of an 0.%% enough oil to make 
the mixture as thick as cream. Cook 2 teaspoonfuls 
of corn starch in ^ cup of water, add 3 saltspoonfuls of 
salt, I of mustard, i of sugar and 3 tablespoonfuls of 
vinegar. Beat all together. Miss Fisher. 

l/ALEUTINrC VALENTINE & GOMPflNY. 
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22 SALADS AND SAUCES. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

One tablespoonful of flour, butter J^ the size of an 
egg, small teaspoonful of mustard, a little salt, a little 
red pepper, i teaspoonful sugar, ^ coffeecup of water, 
5^ coffeecup of vinegar. Cook thoroughly over boil- 
ing water, then beat the yolks of 3 eggs, stir in and cook 
a minute longer; then stand until thoroughly cold, when 
thin with cream. Mrs. F. B. Hooker. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

One-half pint of cream, 3 eggs, ^ cupful of vinegar, 
y^ cupful of butter, melted, i teaspoonful of salt, i level 
teaspoonful of sugar. Mustard and pepper may be 
added if desired. Boil in double boiler until it thickens, 
taking care it does not curdle. Bottle and keep cool. 

Mrs. J. B. Wheatley. 

MAYONAISE DRESSING. 

Yolk of I hard boiled egg, powdered, add i raw yolk, 
i/^ teaspoonful each of salt and mustard, a little cayenne 
Stir this well and add by degrees salad oil, constantly 
beating. When nearly done, add vinegar or lemon 
juice, a small quantity. Set in a cool place. 

Mrs. W. D. McKey. 

SAUCE TARTARE. 
One teaspoonful of mustard, 3 tablespoonfuls of 



SALADS AND SAUCES. 23 

vinegar, i tablespoonful of melted butter, i t^aspoonful 
of salt, a dash of cayenne, 3 eggs beaten separately, 
whites added last. Cook until it thickens. When cold, 
add I cupful of whipped cream and some capers. 

Mrs. W. F. Parish. 

PARSLEY SAUCE. 

One cupful of butter, 2 tablespoonfuls of chopped 
parsley, juice of 2 lemons, i tablespoonful of flour, cay- 
enne and salt to taste. Boil a few minutes. 

Mrs. F. H. Radford. 

WHITE SAUCE. 

Into a frying pan put 3 tablespoonfuls of butter, i of 
chopped onion, i of chopped carrot, 2 of chopped celery, 
a bay leaf, a sprig of parsley and a sprig of thyme. Simmer 
slowly for ten minutes, being careful not to brown; then 
add 3 tablespoonfuls of flour, and stir until smooth and 
frothy. Draw the pan back to a cooler place and gradu- 
ally add a pint of white stock. Stir until smooth, and 
add salt and pepper. Boil for five minutes and add ^ a 
cupful of cream or milk. Boil up once and after strain- 
ing, use it. This is good for boiled fish or poultry, and 
is also a nice sauce in which to heat cold fish or meat. 

Mrs. H. p. Knapp. 

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YMrIiISHEiO Coach and Car Varnisiies and Colors. 



24 SALADS AND SAUCES. 

TOMATO SAUCE. 
Stew fresh or canned tomatoes until tender, then 
pass through a fine sieve. Return to saucepan, add i 
tablespoonful of flour and i of butter, rubbed together. 
Add yz cup of stock or milk. Salt and pepper to taste. 
Simmer 25 minutes. Fine with veal cutlets. 

Mrs. a. E. Taylor. 

SAUCE PIQUANTE. 
Beat to a cream ^ cup of fresh butter; stir it over 
the fire until melted, adding finely chopped parsley and 
chives, and finishing with i tablespoonful of tarragon 
vinegar. Mrs. E. M. Dunbar. 

CARAMEL SAUCE. 
One tea cup of brown sugar and ^ a cup of butter, 
put in a warm skillet and let it melt gradually, then boil 
until almost candy. Have ready 2 tablespoonfuls of 
flour, dissolved in a little cold water; pour a pint of 
boiling water over the candy, then add as much of the 
flour to make it the consistency you like. Flavor with 
vanilla. Mrs. W. H. French. 

FOAMY SAUCE. 

FOR STEAMED PUDDINGS. 

Stir together ^ cup of butter, i cup of powdered 
sugar, I teaspoonful of vanilla, 2 tablespoonfuls of wine or 
fruit juice. Just before serving add y^ cup of boiling 

"Use Imperial French Poultry Seasoning." 



SALADS AND SAUCES. 25 

water; stir well, then add the beaten white of i egg and 
beat until foamy. Miss Edith A. Stevens. 

PUDDING SAUCE. 

One-third cup of butter, i cup of sugar, yolks of 4 
eggs; cook until ropy, then add the whites of eggs, well 
beaten. Flavor with vanilla and serve hot. This is 
delicious with cottage pudding or any steamed pudding. 

Mrs. G. D. Cook. 

SABYLLON MRS. HENDERSON. 

Beat well 2 yolks and i whole egg with 5^ teacup of 
sugar in a pan; set in boiling water; add )^ teacup of 
sherry wine, beating briskly until it thickens. Remove 
from the fire and add a little lemon juice. 

Mrs. J. P. MoNTROSs. 

SAUCE FOR BOILED TONGUE. 

Brown i tablespoonful of butter, add i tablespoon- 
ful of flour and brown, add ^ pint of stock, stir until it 
boils; take from fire, add )^ teaspoonful of salt, a dash 
of pepper, i tablespoonful of mushroom catsup, i 
of tomato catsup. Bring to boiling point, pour over 
tongue and serve. * 

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26 SALADS AND SAUCES. 

FISH SAUCE. 
One tablespoonful of butter, i teaspoonful of flour^ 
rubbed together, i small grated onion, % pi^t of milk, 
salt and pepper to taste; i teaspoonful of horse radish. 
Boil 15 minutes. Mrs. F. H. Radford. 

SAUCE MAITRE d'HOTEL. 
Stir in a saucepan over a slow fire a scant ^ pound 
of good butter, with salt and pepper and juice of ^ of 
a lemon, until the butter is nearly melted. Draw from 
the fire and stir until very smooth. Add the yolk of an 
egg and if not quite thick enough add a small teaspoon- 
ful of flour. Fine with chops or fish. 

SALAD CREAM. 

Heat 4 tablespoonfuls of butter and stir into it i table- 
spoonful of flour, being careful not to brown it. Add i cup 
of milk, stir until smooth and boil up once. Put the pan 
into hot water, beat 3 eggs with i teaspoonful of salt, i of 
dry mustard and a speck of cayenne pepper. Add 5^ cup 
of vinegar and stir into the boiling milk until it thickens. 
Add I grated onion and 2 tablespoonfuls of minced parsley 
if this is used for potato salad. Mrs. J. L. Rhodes. 

SWEETBREAD SALAD. 

Select 2 large sweetbreads, let them lie in tepid water 
5^ hour, then boil in salted water 20 minutes, have water 



SALADS AND SAUCES. 27 

boiling before putting them in, than drop in cold water to 
harden; draw off the outer casing, remove the little pipes 
and cut into small dice. Cut into small pieces J^ pint of 
mushrooms and enough celery to equal both. Mix mayon- 
naise by putting the yolks of 3 eggs into a bowl, beat well 
and add a few drops of oil, stir until it disappears in the 
yolks, add a little more and so on, stirring until the last oil 
is blended into the yolks before adding more. When it is a 
pale opaque yellow "it has come" and oil can be added in 
larger quantities. In five minutes more it should be as 
thick as butter and cling to the spoon. Add a few drops 
of vinegar — this whitens it — stir a few seconds and it will 
look like cream, and then add oil until it is very thick again. 
Then add a dessertspoonful of vinegar, a saltspoonful of 
salt and a little white pepper; if liked a sprinkle of cayenne. 
Pour over the above mixture, reserving a little for the top. 
Toss and mix thoroughly. Spread the remainder over the 
top and garnish with white celery tips and olives 

F. S. M. 

OYSTER SALAD. 

Two dozen fresh oysters, 2 heads of celery, with part 
of their green tops, about >^ as much tender, white cab- 
bage, mayonnaise salad dressing. After washing the celery 
and cabbage throw them into boiling salted water, let boil 
5 minutes, then drain and chop them fine. The green eel- 



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28 SALADS AND SAUCES. 

ery leaves will acquire an intenser green in the boiling 
water and add to the appearance of the salad. Drain the 
liquor from the oysters and boil and skim it. Add an equal 
quantity of vinegar, some broken peppercorns, pepper sauce 
and salt. Put in the oysters and keep shaking the pan 
while they are scalding, that they may set in round and 
plump shape. Do not let them boil. Drain and set them 
away in a dish to become ice cold. When to be served 
season the chopped celery and cabbage slightly with oil 
and vinegar. Spread part of it in a dish or in individual 
dishes, place the oysters in it side by side and the rest of 
the celery on top of them. Smooth the top a little and pour 
mayonnaise over just thin enough to run. 

Mrs. Crawford. 
OLIVE SAUCE. 
Place 2 dozen olives in an earthen bowl. Pour over 
them enough hot water to cover and let remain Yq, hour to 
draw out the brine. Place 2 tablespoonfuls of butter in the 
frying-pan. When it commences to color add one table- 
spoonful of flour; stir until smooth, and after it has cooked 
for 2 minutes add i pint of stock and place in a gentle heat 
to simmer. Pare the olives round and round, the same as 
paring an apple, leaving the pulp in a single strip. If this 
is done carefully the olives will retain their shape. Place 
the olives in the sauce; add a dash of salt and pepper and 
a teaspoonful of lemon juice. Simmer 20 minutes. Skim 
carefully and serve. 

"Use Imperial French Poultry Seasoning." 



SALADS AND SAUCES. 29 

CELERY AND NUT SALAD. 
One cup each of chopped celery and English walnuts, 
a little salt, ^ cup of mayonnaise dressing, to which has 
been added i cup of sweet cream. Serve in a bed of 
blanched celery leaves. D. M. E. 

OYSTER SAUCE. 

Two tablespoonfuls of butter in a saucepan, i tea- 
spoonful of minced onions and parsley; fry lightly; add i 
cup of oyster liquor, i cup of oyster meats and the yolks of 
2 eggs, a little salt and pepper; stir till thick, but do not let 
boil. 

WALNUT FISH SAUCE. 

Work into a cup of nice butter as much lemon juice as 
it will take. When creamy add ^ teacupful of chopped 
pickled walnuts or pickled cucumbers with a little minced 
parsley. 

APRICOT AND FIG SAUCE. 

Cook until soft a pint of dried apricots; scald and chop 
y2 dozen layer figs and add them to the apricots. Let 
them cook together 15 minutes, adding a cup of white su- 
gar. The combination is very pleasant. 

SAUCE A LA GENOESE. 
Melt slowly 3 ounces of butter, juice of a lemon, well 
beaten yolks of 2 eggs, grated rind of ^ lemon, salt and 

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30 SALADS AND SAUCES. 

pepper, a suspicion of garlic. Stir until thick and use at 
once. This is for cutlets, steaks, etc. 

Mrs. J. E. Brown. 

RASPBERRY OR STRAWBERRY SAUCE. 

Boil a large cup of fresh berries, J^ pint of water, 2 
tablespoonfuls of sugar, strained juice of >^ lemon, until 
soft, rub through a sieve, add a tablespoonful of brandy 
and serve. In winter, jam can be used and sherry instead 
of brandy. Mrs. Crawfod. 

FRUIT JUICE FOR PUDDING SAUCE AND 
JELLIES. 
Four pounds of red raspberries, i ^ ounces of cream 
of tartar, 15^ quarts of cold water, 2]^ pounds of sugar, to 
I quart of juice. Mash berries and cream of tartar to- 
gether, add the water and let stand 24 hours. Strain, and 
add 2i^ pounds of sugar to every quart of juice. Let it re- 
main on the stove until it just comes to a boil, then take 
off. When cold put into bottles. Tie a muslin cloth over 
the bottle. Do not seal. Mrs. C. W. Crary. 



BREAKFAST. 

"Dinner may be pleasant, 
So may social tea 
But yet, methinks the breakfast 
Is best of all the three" — Anon. 

RICE MUFFINS. 
One cup of milk, i^ cups of flour, ^ cup of cold boiled 
rice, 2 scant teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking powder, a pinch 
of salt, a teaspoonful of sugar, a heaping teaspoonful of 
butter and i egg. Mix the dry ingredients and rub them 
through a sieve into a bowl. Melt the butter and beat it 
into the rice. Beat the egg and add it to the milk. Add 
this mixture to the dry ingredients, then stir in the rice, 
beating all together quickly and well. Bake in gem pans 
25 minutes in a moderate oven. Mrs. E. Jones 

BREAKFAST PUFFS. 

Sift together ^ pint of flour, pinch of salt, 2 table- 
spoonfuls of Cameo baking powder. Stir into this gradu- 
ally a gill of milk. Add the yolks of two eggs, then the 
whites whipped to a foam. Pour into gem pans and bake 
\n a quick oven. 

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32 BREAKFAST. 

RICE PANCAKES. 
One pint of soft boiled rice; stir in 2 tablespoonfuls of 
butter while rice is hot, and let cool; and ^ cup of milk, 
y2 cup of flour and 2 eggs well beaten; bake at once on 
hot griddle. Miss Emily White. 

BENJAMIN. 

For this dish a round thick cracker must be used. 
Split, toast, butter each half and put into a deep, hot 
dish. Heat to boiling point enough rich milk to cover 
your crackers; melt in this a scant teaspoonful of butter, 
salt to taste, and thicken very little. Just before serving 
pour this over the crackers, cover closely and do not let it 
wait a minute before being eaten. 

RAISED HOMINY WAFFLES. 

The small hominy is best for these. To a coffee cup 
of boiled hominy add i pint of boiled milk and i table- 
spaonful of butter, i pint of flour, t teaspoonful of salt, i 
tablespoonful of sugar and a scant half-teacup of yeast. 
Beat well, cover, set in a warm place over night. In the 
morning add 2 well-beaten eggs, yokes and whites separ- 
ately. Bake in waflle irons. This recipe answers as well 
for muffins if it is not convenient to made waffles. 

Contributed. 

"Use Imperial French Poultry Seasoning." 



BREAKFAST. 33 

FRIED HOMINY CAKES. 
One large cup of cooked coarse hominy, i tablespoon- 
ful of flour, I egg or 2 yolks. Take cold hominy that has 
been well cooked and is dry and pound with a potato 
masher to make it adhesive; mix in egg and flour. Make 
it out in flat biscuit-shaped cakes with floured hands and 
fry brown in a frying pan. 

BREAKFAST BUNS. 
Two cups of flour, ^ cup of corn meal, ^ cup of short- 
ening, 5^ cup of sugar, 2 eggs, i cup of sweet milk, 2 
teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking powder. Bake 20 minutes 
in hot gem pans. Cottolene will shorten these buns as 
nicely as butter, but remember to use only half the given 
quantity. 

SOUTHERN SLAPPERS. 

Stir a quart of southern meal into a bowl; add a tea- 
spoonful of salt and i of sugar; pour in boiling water, stir- 
ring as you pour, till the meal is well moistened, but not 
thinned. Let stand a few minutes to swell, then add cold 
sweet milk sufficient to make a rather thin batter, break 2 
eggs into the batter, beating briskly with the spoon. Fry 
upon a hot, well-greased griddle. M. W. 

WAFFLES. 
Mix I pint of sifted flour with ^ of a pint of milk un- 
til a smooth paste; beat in a tablespoonful of melted butter 

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34 BREAKFAST. 

and a little salt, and lastly 2 eggs beaten light. Have 
waffle iron hot and ready greased, pour in enough batter to 
cover the lower side and close the upper one gently down 
upon it. Keep over fire half a minute and turn over for 
same length of time. Remove and place in oven a few 
moments to crisp. 

CORN MEAL SLAP JACKS. 

Scald over night 2 cups of Indian meal with a quart of 
boiling milk or milk and water mixed, adding i tablespoon- 
ful of butter, i tablespoonful of brown .sugar or molasses. 
Cover closely and let it stand until morning, when add yolks 
of 2 well-beaten eggs, i scant cup of flour and i teaspoon- 
ful of salt. Heat and grease the griddle, and then add to 
the batter i teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a little hot 
milk; and, last of all, whites of 2 eggs beaten stiff, stirred 
in lightly. If the batter is too stiff in the morning, stir in a 
little cold milk. L. A. 

LAPLANDERS. 

One pint of milk, i pint of flour, 2 eggs, small tea- 
spoonful of salt. Mix the salt with the flour, add part of 
the milk slowly until a smooth paste is formed. Add a 
piece of butter — melted — the size of the bowl of a table- 
spoon and the remainder of the milk with the beaten yolks, 
and, lastly, the whites beaten to a stiff froth. Cook in well- 
buttered gem pans in a quick oven until they are brown 

"Use Imperial French Poultry Seasoning." 



BREAKFAST. 35 

and well popped over, which will be in about 20 minutes. 

GRIDDLE ROLLS. 
Prepare an ordinary wheat-cake batter; have the grid- 
iron hot; bake each cake the size of a lunch plate. Soon as 
each cake is done, quickly spread with butter and cover 
with maple sugar, roll into a neat roll, lay in a covered 
dish, placed over boiling water till all are done, and then 
serve. A Vermont Friend. 

FLANNEL CAKES. 

Sift together 1^2 pints of flour, i tablespoonful of 
brown sugar, 2 tablespoonfuls of Cameo baking powder, 
and I teaspoonful of salt. Add 2 beaten eggs and 1% 
pints of milk and beat into a smooth, thin batter, adding a 
tablespoonful of melted butter. Bake on hot griddle to a 
rich brown color and serve with maple syrup. These 
should never be larger than a tea saucer. 

World's Fair. 

RICE CAKES. 
Two cups of boiled rice, 2 eggs, a pinch of salt, i tea- 
spoonful of sugar, I of butter, beat all well together. Add 
I teaspoonful of Cameo baking powder, a cup of milk and 
flour enough to thicken so that the cakes will turn easily. 
Drop by spoonfuls into a frying pan half full of hot lard, 
and fry light brown. 



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Coach and Car Varnishes and Colors. 



36 BREAKFAST. 

GRAHAM PUFFS. 
Two cups of Graham flour, i tablespoonful of melted 
butter, 2 eggs, I quart of milk, ^ teaspooonful of salt, i 
teaspoonful of Cameo baking powder. Sift together the flour 
and baking powder; add butter and salt to the milk and 
drop in the eggs, without beating. Beat into this the pre- 
pared flour, making a smooth paste as stiff" as for griddle 
cakes. Drop into hot and well greased gem pans and 
bake at once in a hot oven. 

SYRUP FOR WAFFLES. 

Boil 2 cups of sugar and a little water until it is a 
thick, rich syrup; about 5 minutes. Add i tablespoonful of 
butter and allow it to melt, then remove from the fire and 
stir in 2 tablespoonfuls of cinnamon. Serve immediately. 

Mrs. J. R. Flood. 

CORN BREAD. 

Put I quart of milk on the fire, in a double boiler ; 
when it comes to a boil stir in 4 large kitchen spoonfuls of 
cornmeal and cook 5 minutes — stirring all the time. Re- 
move from the fire and stir once or twice as it cools. When 
cool add 3 eggs well beaten with 2 tablespoonfuls flour, I 
tablespoonful butter, i pinch salt. Pour in a greased dish 
and bake 35 minutes. Serve immediately with napkin 
around dish. 

"Use Imperial French Poultry Seasoning." 



BREAKFAST. 37 

GRAHAM BISCUITS. 

One pint of graham flour and V2 pint of wheat flour, 
I tablespoonful of lard or butter, i teaspoonful of sugar, i 
saltspoonful of salt, 2 teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking 
powder, sifted in with the wheat flour (do not sift brown 
flour); mix with enough very cold water to make a smooth 
paste to roll on the board ; roll out ^ an inch thick, cut 
and bake in very hot oven. 

FOAM GRIDDLE CAKES. 

One-half pint of sour milk, pinch of salt, yolk of i 
egg, a piece of butter size of a hickory nut, enough flour to 
make a batter; beat all together for 5 minutes, then add Yi 
of a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in i tablespoonful of 
boiling water, and lastly the white of the egg, beaten to a 
stiff froth and stirred in slowly and carefully as for sponge 
cake. Bake immediately on a hot griddle. The nicest way 
to grease a griddle is to use a large piece of beef suet tied 
in a thin cloth. Mrs. F. H. Wait. 

CORN MUFFINS. 

One cup yellow cornmeal, ^ cup of flour, i large 
tablespoonful of sugar, i^z teaspoonfuls Cameo baking 
powder, i beaten egg, i^ cups of sweet milk, a saltspoon- 
ful salt; bake in hot greased gem pans. 

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YMr PI ISHLO Coach and Car Varnishes and Colors. 



38 BREAKFAST. 

HOT ROLLS. 
Pare, boil and mash 2 white potatoes with 2 spoonfuls 
of lard; stir in a cupful of scalded milk, with i^ of yeast 
cake, dissolved in the milk after it cools; a teaspoonful of 
salt, 2 of sugar, i egg, beaten light, flour enough to make 
a firm dough ; set to rise over night; in the morning work 
and roll out on your bread board to an inch thick, cut with 
a biscuit- cutter, put in your pan an inch apart, set to raise 
for ^ an hour, bake in a quick oven. Mrs. H. M. D. 

RAISED FLANNEL CAKES. 
Boil a pint and a half of sweet milk and let it stand till 
lukewarm. Add 2 large tablespoonfuls yeast and pour 
upon I pint flour, ^ pint cornmeal, i teaspoonful salt and 
I tablespoonful sugar, mixed well together. Cover closely 
and put in a warm place. In the morning add 2 eggs, 
beaten separately. Let the batter stand 15 minutes, if 
convenient, after adding the eggs. Bake on a hot griddle- 

DROPPED BISCUIT. 
With a pint of flour sift 2 teaspoonfuls of sugar, ^ a 
teaspoonful of salt and 1% teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking 
powder; rub in a dessertspoonful of butter or lard and add 
milk till too stiff" for stirring but still too soft for kneading, 
and drop in small mounds on a buttered tin. Leave some 
space between the biscuits and bake 10 or 12 minutes in a 
quick oven. F. G. S. 

"Use Imperial French Poultry Seasoning." 



BREAKFAST. 39 

FLAPJACKS. 

Make a batter of i pint of sour milk, r even teaspoon- 
ful of baking soda and a little salt, with wheat flour enough 
to thicken sufficiently to fry nicely. Fry in cakes the size 
of an ordinary breakfast plate. Butter each cake and 
sprinkle it with sugar, piling them one on top of another. 
A little grated nutmeg improves them. Have the batter 
as thin as it is possible to turn the cakes well. These are 
delicious, especially if sour cream is used. 

SALLY LUNN. 

Set to rise over night a stiff batter made of a pint of 
new milk warmed, t tablespoonful butter, I tablespoonful 
sugar, a little salt, i teacup yeast, 2 well beaten eggs and 
flour to stiffen. Put in a warm place. In the morning add 
flour to knead, and work it until smooth — about 15 minutes. 
About 2 hours before luncheon roll to a 5^ inch thickness and 
cut the size of a round jelly-cake tin. Put into a greased tin, 
rub over with melted butter, and lay upon it another round, 
likewise rubbed with butter. When light bake in a 
moderate oven; raise the upper part just before sending to 
table and butter between the layers. Cut in triangles as 
you would a pie. C. W. A. 



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VMr n ISHLO Coach and Car Varnisbes and Colors. 



40 BREAKFAST. 

MUFFINS. 

One tablespoonful of soft butter, 2 tablespoonfuls of 
sugar; rub to a cream; 2 beaten eggs, a saltspoonful of salt, 
I cup of sweet milk, 2 rounding teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking 
powder, 2 cups of flour. Bake in buttered muffin rings. 

HOMINY GRIDDLE CAKES. 

To I pint of warm boiled hominy add i pint of sour 
milk and i pint of flour. Beat 2 eggs and stir into the 
batter, a pinch of salt and soda enongh to cover point of 
teaspoon. 

HOT BISCUIT. 

Rub into i quart of flour 2 tablespoonfuls of butter 
and lard, equal parts; add i tablespoonful of white sugar, 
^ teaspoonful of salt and 2 heaping teaspoonfuls of 
Cameo baking powder. Put all these things through a 
sieve 3 times ; then with a wooden spoon stir lightly in 
sufficient milk or milk and water to make a thick batter, or 
rather a thin dough; turn out upon a well floured molding 
board, flatten lightly with the bowl of the spoon until about 
an inch thick and cut out with a very small-sized cooky 
cutter; lightly place in a greased baking-tin, barely touching 
each other, and bake in a hot oven. Delicious and diges- 
tible if quickly and lightly handled. Mrs. G. W. N. 

"Use Imperial French Poultry Seasoning." 



BREAKFAST. 41 

LUNCH ROLLS. 

Sift together i pint of flour, i teaspoonful of Cameo 
baking powder and Vz a tablespoonful of salt; work in i 
teaspoonful of lard and add 3^ pint of milk; mix to a 
smooth dough; roll out to ^ inch thickness, cut into cir- 
cular shapes and bake in moderate oven. 

SQUASH GRIDDLE CAKES. 

One cup boiling milk, i cup sifted squash, i table- 
spoonful of butter, i tablespoonful of sugar, ^^ teaspoon- 
ful of salt, I egg, 2 teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking powder 
and I cup of flour. Pour the boiling milk into the squash; 
add the butter, sugar and salt. When cool add the egg, 
well beaten, then the baking powder mixed with the flour. 
Fry a delicate brown. 

SINGING HINNEY. 

Take i quart of flour and sift 2 teaspoonfuls of Cameo 
baking powder into it; rub in i tablespoonful of lard ; add 
I teaspoonful of salt and i well-beaten egg. Moisten with 
just enough sweet milk to make into dough, not too stiff" ; 
roll out and bake on greased griddle ; when it is cooked on 
one side turn it over and let it cook till a pale brown on the 
other side; then split it open, butter it and put together 
again ; cut it into 3 cornered pieces and serve it hot. 

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YMr R ISHLO Coacb and Car Varnishes and Colors. 



42 BREAKFAST. 

PANCAKES. 

Soak 2 or 3 slices of dried bread in a pint of sour milk 
over night; in the morning add a small half teaspoonful of 
baking soda and salt, one egg, flour enough to make a thin 
batter. Serve with syrup. 

HOMINY MUFFINS. 

Hash I cup of boiled hominy fine with a fork, add i 
cup of corn meal, half a cup of milk, 2 teaspoonfuls melted 
butter, 2 teaspoonfuls sugar, i egg, i teaspoonful Cameo 
baking powder. Beat thoroughly and hard. Put into gem 
pans and bake fifteen minutes. A. R. 

CORN MUFFINS. 

Beat 2 eggs very light, add i teaspoonful of melted 
butter, I tablespoonful of brown sugar, 2 teacupfuls corn 
meal, i heaping tablespoonful of flour, to which add i tea- 
spoonful of Cameo baking powder and a cupful of milk. 
Mix thoroughly, pour into greased muffln tins and bake in 
a quick oven. 

FLANNEL CAKES. 

One egg, well beaten, butter size of a walnut, % pint 
of sour milk, }4 teaspoonful of soda, 3 tablespoonfuls of 
flour, I tablespoonful of corn meal, a little salt. 

M. F. Reeves 



"Use Imperial French Poultry Seasoning." 



BREAKFAST. 43 

RICE WAFFLES. 

To a pint of soft-boiled rice add i teaspoonful salt and 
a pint of flour, into which 2 teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking 
powder has been sifted. Beat the whites and yolks of 2 
■eggs separately; add to the yolks a large cup sweet milk and 
pour into the rice with a teaspoonful melted butter. Add 
the beaten whites last. Beat gently until smooth and bake 
without delay. 

SPANISH BUNS. 

Two eggs, 2 cups brown sugar, ^ of a cup of butter, 
I cup of milk, 2 teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking powder, 2 
teaspoonfuls ground cinnamon, 2 teaspoonfuls ground 
cloves, 2^ cups of sifted flour. Cream the butter and 
sugar, add the eggs, well beaten, then the milk, and lastly 
stir in the flour, sifted with the cinnamon, cloves and bak- 
ing powder. Form into small rolls and bake in inoderate 
oven twenty minutes. For frosting use the whites of 2 
eggs, I teaspoonful of cinnamon, i of cloves and thicken 
with brown sugar. Mother's. 

BREAKFAST SHORTCAKE. 

Sift and mix thoroughly a scant quart of flour, 2 
heaped teaspoonfuls Cameo baking powder, i teaspoonful 
of salt, I teaspoonful sugar; rub into this i tablespoonful 
each of lard and butter and add sweet milk enough to form 

llALEUTINrr VflLENTIN& & COMPflNy^ 
YMr n ISHLO Coach and Car Varnisbes and Colors 



44 BREAKFAST. 

a dough just stiff enough to roll out; roll rather less than 
half an inch thick and bake in light layer cake pans; have 
ready 2 teacups of finely chopped meat and ;^ teacup 
chopped or mashed cold potato; heat this on a skillet, with 
a large tablespoonful of butter, a half teacup water, a cup 
milk, a quarter teaspeonful salt, a good pinch of pepper; 
thicken this with a teaspoonful each of flour and butter 
rubbed together; split the cakes, butter them and spread 
the creamed meat between; there will be three thin layers, 
and if liked one can be reserved to have a layer of berries,, 
peaches, prunes or other fruit between and sprinkled with 
sugar while hot. D. 

FRIED CORNMEAL MUFFINS. 

Mix I pint sifted Indian meal with i teaspoonful salt 
and I tablespoonful sugar; pour gradually on this i pint 
boiling water; cover after beating well and set away until 
morning; add 2 well beaten eggs; beat thoroughly; dip a 
tablespoon in cold milk and with the wet spoon dip up the 
batter by the tablespoonful and fry in boiling lard; turn 
each one while cooking. Selected. 

GRAHAM GEMS. 

One and one-half cups graham flour, i cup wheat 
flour, I tablespoonful butter, i teaspoonful sugar, 2 



"Use Imperial French Poultry Seasoning." 



BREAKFAST. 45 

large teaspoonfuls Cameo baking powder, 2 eggs, i tea- 
spoonful salt, 2 cups milk. Bake twelve minutes. 

Mrs. William L. Shide. 

DIXIE BISCUIT. 

Three pints flour, 2 eggs, 2 tablespoonfuls lard, i 
cup milk, yeast. Mix at 11 o'clock a. m. Roll out at 
4 o'clock and cut with 2 sizes of cutters, putting the 
smaller one on top; let it rise until time to get dinner 
and bake 20 minutes. Mrs. Ben Williams. 

JOHNNY CAKE. 

One cup corn meal, i of flour, i of sweet milk, ^ 
of butter, ^ of sugar, 2 eggs, a little salt, 2 teaspoon- 
fuls Cameo baking powder. Mrs. F. B. Hooker. 

HOT CORN BREAD. 

One pint sour or buttermilk, yi cup sugar, 2 of 
corn meal, i of flour, i egg, i teaspoonful soda, 5^ of 
salt, butter size of an egg. Mrs. B. R. Wells. 

SOUR CREAM BISCUIT. 

One large cup sour milk, ^ cup sour cream, i tea- 
spoonful soda, a little salt, flour enough to mix soft. 

Mrs. Arthur Smith. 

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40 BREAKFAST. 

ROLLS. 

One pint scalded milk, ^ cup butter, i tablespoon- 
ful sugar, 1^ yeast cake, dissolved in warm water; 2 
whites of eggs beaten well. Rub butter and sugar to a 
cream, add egg, milk, then flour. Mrs. A. G. Jones. 

BALTIMORE BISCUIT. 

To I quart flour add i teaspoonful salt and a table- 
spoonful lard, with water enough to moisten to a stiff 
dough. This must be worked or pounded an hour. 
Roll by hand into round balls, flatten slightly and prick 
with a fork. Mrs. Geo. L. Paddock. 

POTATO ROLLS. 

Two cups boiled potato, pressed through a colan- 
der, 2 eggs, i^ cup lard, i cup yeast, 2 tablespoonfuls 
sugar, a little salt. Mix this in the morning; when 
light, add flour enough to make into dough and let it rise 
again. Roll out and cut into cakes, place in a pan, not 
too close together. Let it rise again and bake 8 or 10 
minutes. Mrs. J. F. Dickson. 

RICE BISCUIT. 
Stir 2 eggs into i pint boiled rice while warm, make 

"Use Imperial French Poultry Seasoning." 



BREAKFAST. 47 

into small biscuit with the hands, roll in flour, bake on 
buttered tins in a quick oven. Eat hot with butter. 

Mrs. F. H. Radford. 

CORN MEAL MUFFINS. 

One cup boiled rice, i of flour, ^ of milk, 2 eggs, 
2 tablespoonfuls corn meal, i of melted butter, i (heap- 
ing) of sugar, 2 of Cameo baking powder, i of salt. 

Mrs. J. Y. Scammon. 

RICE MUFFINS. 

One cup milk, i of boiled rice, 2 teaspoonfuls 
Cameo baking powder, i tablespoonful sugar, a scant 
pint of flour. Mrs. L. B. Turrill. 

RICE MUFFINS— NO. 2. 

Beat hard i cup cold boiled rice, 2 eggs, i pint 
flour, I tablespoonful lard or butter, i teaspoonful salt, 
enough milk to make a thin batter. Bake in quick oven. 

Mrs. M. L. Bradley. 

WAFFLES. 
One pint sweet milk, 3 eggs well beaten, i table- 
spoonful melted butter, 2 teaspoonfuls Cameo baking 
powder, salt, flour enough to make a thin batter. Bake 
in hot waffle irons, which should never be greased. 

Mrs. Arthur Smith. 

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48 BREAKFAST. 

VIENNA PUFFS. 

Crumble }^ yeast cake into i cup warm water, add 
% teacup sugar and set it in a warm place until it rises 
to the surface, add to it i pint flour, one tablespoonful 
butter, % teaspoonful salt, i tablespoonful sugar and i 
egg'^ mix all well together, cover and let it rise until 
morning; butter gem pans, fill half full and bake quickly. 

A. F. S. 

TEA BREAD. 

Beat a piece of butter the size of an egg to a cream 
with % cup sugar and add the yolks of 2 eggs well 
beaten. Beat vigorously and add 2 cups milk. Sift 4 
cups flour with 2^ teaspoonfuls Cameo baking powder. 
Pour the above mixture into the flour until smooth and 
beat the batter until it blisters; then fold in the beaten 
whites of the eggs and bake 20 minutes in 2 pans. 

M. E. D. 

NEWPORT LOAF. 

Cream together a half cup each of butter and sugar, 
add the yolks of two eggs and i cup sweet milk, add 1 5^ 
pints sifted flour, with 2 teaspoonfuls Cameo baking 
powder. Stir in lightly the beaten whites of 2 eggs. 



"Use Imperial French Poultry Seasoning." 



BREAKFAST. 49 

CORN BREAD. 

Cream ^ cup sugar and j^ cup of butter, add 3 
well-beaten eggs, a little salt and i pint sweet milk. 
Mix together 2 cups flour and i scant cup corn meal; 
sift this with 3 teaspoonfuls Cameo baking powder and 
add it to the first mixture. Butter muffin pans and fill 
half full. Bake in quick oven. M. H. W. 

POTATO BISCUIT. 

Heat I cup of milk and 2 cups of water, add 2 table- 
spoonfuls of butter, i tablespoonful of sugar and i table- 
spoonful of salt. When just warm add t pint of mashed 
potato, into which one egg has been stirred, flour to make a 
stiff dough, add 3 tablespoonfuls of yeast, or ^ compressed 
yeast cake. Let rise, make into biscuit, and raise again, 
bake in a moderate oven. Mrs. W. H. H. Peirce. 



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LUNCHEON. 



Some hae meat that canna eat, 
And some would eat that want it; 
But we hae meat and we can eat, 
Sae let the Lord be thankit — Burns. 



SALPICON. 

Brown lightly i tablespoonful of butter and i of 
flour, add i cup of stock and a glass of white wine, also 
a bouquet of herbs, salt and pepper, cook a few minutes 
and add equal portions of any cold meats, game, ham, 
tongue, cook over a slow fire, remove the herbs, thicken 
with a little flour, serve in vol-au-vents or pates. 

Mrs. F. H. Wait. 

ENTREMET. 

Put into a dish i% cups of cold mashed turnip, i^ 
of mashed potatoes, i cup of cream, i tablespoonful of 
melted butter, beaten yolks of 2 eggs, salt and pepper. 
Strew crumbs over the top with bits of butter and bake 
20 minutes. 



"Use Imperial French Poultry Seasoning." 



LUNCHEON. 51 

MEXICAN POTATOES. 

Pare and halve large potatoes, scoop out the center 
and fill with a mixture made as follows: boil 2 eggs 20 
minutes and mash the yolks fine, chopping the whites 
ver}' fine. Mix with them finely chopped meat, i raw 
egg, beaten, i tablespoonful of minced parsley, i of 
grated onion, and one of melted butter. Heap the mix- 
ture in the potatoes and sprinkle over the top crumbs 
and grated cheese. Bake to a brown and pour tomato 
sauce around them. 

STUFFED ROLLS. 

Cut off the end of a roll and remove the inside. Fill 
with a mixture of cheese, minced ham or chicken, cov- 
ering the top with the small piece cut off. 

MOCK HARE. 

Mix I pound of sausage meat with ^ pound of fine 
chopped beef, soak 3 slices of bread in cold water until 
soft, press out all the water, place i tablespoonful of 
butter and i chopped onion in a pan, stir and cook with- 
out browning 5 minutes, remove and when cold, add it 
to the meat; add i egg, pepper and salt to taste, form 
into a long, round loaf, brush it over with water, place 



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52 LUNCHEON. 

3 slices of thin pork in a pan, lay the loaf upon it, put 
3 slices on the roll, bake about ^ an hour. Baste with 
stock or gravy. 

VEAL PIE. 

Two pounds of veal, not too fat. Remove the bone 
and put it with the fat and refuse bits such as gristle 
and skin, in a saucepan, with a large teacup of cold water 
to make grav}^ Cut the veal into thin, even slices and 
lay it in the bottom of a pudding dish, co\ er with a 
layer of hard-boiled eggs, sliced, buttered and peppered; 
next, a layer of very thin strips of salt pork or ham upon 
which a few drops of lemon juice have been squeezed. 
Continue until the dish is full. Line the sides with good 
pie-crust and pour over the gravy, which should be sea- 
soned with pepper, salt and herbs, and strained. Cover 
with crust and bake 2 hours. Mrs. F. H. Wait. 



PHILADELPHIA SCRAPPLE. 

Four pounds of lean, raw pork, from the shoulder, 
1 1^ pounds of calf's liver, i^ pound of leaf lard. Put 
in cold water and boil until tender. Chop fine, add 2 
large tablespoonfuls of salt, pepper to taste, both red 
and black, season with sage or sweet marjoram, return 

"Use Imperial French Poultry Seasoning." 



LUNCHEON. 53 

to kettle and thicken with equal parts of buckwheat 
flour and corn meal. Rinse the pan with cold water, 
pour in the mixture and when cold, slice and fry. 

Miss. M. L. Byllesby. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

Boil 2 chickens, with i carrot, i onion, and 6 whole 
cloves; chop fine. Rub 2 tablespoonfuls of flour into i 
of butter and stir it into a cup of the chicken broth, 
which must be boiling; add the chopped meat with a 
dash of nutmeg. Put it aside to cool. When cold, 
shape, dip in beaten egg and throw grated breadcrumbs 
at them until covered. Chopped mushrooms improve 
them. Fry light brown. Mrs. J. M. Taylor. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES.— No. 2. 

Chop fine 2 sweet breads and 2 pounds of chicken. 
Melt 2 tablespoonfuls of butter and stir into it i table- 
spoonful of flour, add by degrees i gill of cream, stir 
until it boils, add i dessertspoonful of minced parsley, 
% teaspoonful of grated onion, pepper and salt to taste. 
Take from the fire and add the meat, stir well and cool. 
When cold and firm form into oval shape, dip in beaten 
white of egg, roll in cracker dust. Set aside for an hour, 
then place in frying basket and brown. 

Mrs. R. S. Thompson. 

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54 LUNCHEON. 

CURRIED EGGS. 

Boil I quart of peas in salted water lo minutes 
press through a colander free from water, return to pan, 
add I tablespoonful of butter, i of stock, ^ teaspoonful 
of salt and keep hot. Cut 6 hard boiled eggs in slices 
and lay in center of hot dish. Put i gill of cream in 
pan, add i teaspoonful of onion juice and i of curry- 
powder, stir until it boils, pour it over the eggs, put the 
puree around and serve. Mrs. J. P. Montross. 

SCALLOPED CHICKEN. 

Cut up a large chicken and stew gently until tender, 
then remove the bones, cutting the meat small. Return 
to saucepan, adding stock seasoned with pepper and 
salt. Put in i pint of small mushrooms, simmer 15 
minutes, thicken with flour, put into baking dish, cover 
with cracker crumbs, wet with melted butter, brown in 
the oven and serve hot with boiled rice and currant 
jelly. This serves six persons. Mrs. James Hewitt. 

CAPE MAY CLAM FRITTERS. 
Four tablespoonfuls of sifted flour, i^ teaspoonfuls 
of Cameo baking powder, i egg, ^ cup of milk, 2 dozen 
clams chopped very fine. Fry in plenty of boiling lard. 

Mrs. R. S. Thompson. 



A. N. WSrnBrOb uO.}53rdSt.&LakcAye.,Cliicago 



LUNCHEON. 55 

PILAF. 

One pound of Hamburg steak fried and separated 
while frying, so it is like hash. Season. One-half can of 
tomatoes stewed and seasoned, i cup of boiled rice. 
Stir all together thoroughly, turn into baking dish, cover 
and bake nearly 2 hours. Serve hot, or mold and slice 
when cold. If preferred, maccaroni may be used in- 
stead of rice. Mrs. H. L. Humphrey. 

PARSNIP NUTS. 
Boil the parsnips and mash fine. To i pint add i 
teaspoonful of salt, 2 tablespoonfuls of melted butter, a 
dash of pepper and 2 tablespoonfuls of milk. Mix well 
over the fire and when very hot add a well beaten egg 
and spread out to cool. Take the meat of an English 
walnut and envelop it in the parsnip pulp. Roll in egg 
and crumbs and fry light brown. Selected. 

VITELLA. 
Melt I tablespoonful of butter in a saucepan but 
do not brown it, add i tablespoonful of flour and stir 
until smooth, season with salt and pepper and gradually 
mix with it % pint of stock or boiling water. When it 
thickens and is quite smooth add i cup of veal cut in 
Small, thin slices. Just before serving stir in the beaten 
yolk of an egg and do not let it boil again; serve imme- 
diately. Selected. 

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56 LUNCHEON. 

A DELICIOUS DISH. 

Cut the tops from 6 large tomatoes and remove the 
inside pulp. Mix 2 tablespoonfuls of bread crumbs, i 
of chopped parsley, }^ pound of finely minced ham, % 
tablespoonful of butter, the juice of 54 a lemon, cayenne 
and salt to taste; add the white of an egg, well beaten, 
and the pulp from the tomatoes. Stuff the tomatoes 
with this mixture, replace the tops and lay them in a 
well buttered dish, bake a %' hour, lay each one on a 
slice of toast, well buttered, garnish with parsley and 
serve hot. Mrs. Ben. Williams. 

SPAGHETTI ITALIENNE. 

Procure the yellow spaghetti which comes in coils. 
Put it in a colander set in hot salted water and boil ^^ 
hour. Allow one heaping tablespoonful of grated Edam 
cheese to each plate. Make a sauce of i quart can of 
tomatoes, i small chopped onion, a dozen cloves. Boil 
until thick. Put it through a sieve, return to the fire, 
add butter, salt, a little cayenne pepper, a dash of Wor- 
cestershire sauce and a few chopped mushrooms. In 
serving, first put spaghetti on the plate, then a small 
butter ball, a heaping tablespoonful of the cheese and 2 
of the sauce. The spaghetti and sauce should be hot. 

Mrs. Harry L. Ashton. 



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53r(l St. & Lake Ave., Chicago 



LUNCHEON. 57 

MACCARONI WITH SAUCE A LA MILANESE. 

Melt 2 tablespoonfuls of butter, add 4 cloves of 
garlic, brown well and skim out, add 10 tablespoonfuls 
of cooked tomatoes and simmer down ^. Have ready 
boiled maccaroni about i cupful, stir it into the sauce 
with a few shredded olives and pour it all over fried veal 
cutlets. Mrs. F. H. Wait. 

SALMON LOAF. 

One large can of salmon, i cup of bread crumbs, 4. 
Gggs, 3 tablespoonfuls of butter, pepper and salt. Steam 
1^4 hours and serve with tomato sauce. 

Miss Helen M. Topping. 

FRICANDELLE. 
Chop fine 5^ pound each of veal, fresh pork and beef, 
add 3 eggs well beaten, 2 cups of moist bread crumbs, a 
small minced onion, % cup of melted butter, salt and 
pepper to taste. Mix well and form into a loaf. Put a 
tablespoonful of melted butter in a pan, lay in the loaf, 
bake i^ hours, basting often and adding water if dry. 
Make brown gravy to serve with it. 

Mrs. O. H. Ward. 

SALMON A LA CREME. 
Boil I pint of cream, mix one tablespoonful of flour, 
heaping, in cold milk, with parsley and a small white 

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58 LUNCHEON. 

onion and put it in the milk. Let it boil a few minutes, 
then strain out the onion and parsley and add i table- 
spoonful of butter. Butter a deep dish and fill it with 
alternate layers of flaked salmon, salt, pepper and the 
dressing. Sprinkle bread crumbs over the top and bake 
I hour. Mrs. A. C. Guion. 

FOR LUNCHEON. 

Round steak nearly an inch thick. Cut in small 
pieces about an inch square. Put a layer of meat in the 
bottom of a baking dish. Season with pepper and salt 
and dredge thickly with flour. Repeat, seasoning and 
dredging each layer, until the dish is about ^ full. 
Cover with water which has been seasoned with i^ cup 
of tomato juice, or i^ teaspoonful of Worcestershire 
sauce, or a little onion. Cover and bake 2 hours in a 
moderate oven. Mrs. H. L. Humphrey. 

CUCUMBER AND SHRIMP. 

A CREOLE RECIPE. 

Use 4 short, thick cucumbers and i can of shrimp. 
Mince shrimp very fine; add 4 common soda crackers, 
rolled very fine; 3 tablespoonfuls of melted butter, a 
pinch of cayenne pepper, ^ cupful of milk and a pinch 
of salt, if necessary. Halve the cucumbers, scoop out the 

A.N.Warner&Co.l =""^'"" 



53rd St. & Lake Ave., Chicago 



LUNCHEON. 59 

seeds and add to the shrimp mixture. Fill the cucumber 
shells with the mixture, adding a little water, if not 
moist enough. Sprinkle with cracker crumbs and place 
in the oven 20 minutes. Put a whole shrimp on the top 
for effect. Mrs. F. W. Norwood. 

SALMON IN A MOULD. 

Drain the liquor from i can of salmon, and remove 
the bones and skin. Chop fine and rub into it until 
smooth, 4 tablespoonfuls of melted butter, season with 
salt, pepper and minced parsley, also a little celery, if 
liked. Beat 4 eggs well, add Y-z cupful of cracker crumbs, 
mix all well and thoroughly. Put into a buttered mould 
and steam one hour. 

SAUCE. 

Boil I cupful of milk and thicken with i tablespoon- 
ful of corn starch; add to the liquor from the salmon, i 
tablespoonful of butter, i egg, and i teaspoonful of 
catsup. Put the egg in last and very carefully. Boil i 
minute. Turn the salmon out of the mold and pour the 
sauce around. Mrs. L. B. Mason. 

TURBOT OR ESCALLOPED FISH. 
Steam or boil a large whitefish with 2 bay leaves, 4 
cloves and a small sliced onion, until the fish is done; 



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60 LUNCHEON. 

about i^ an hour. Boil i pint of milk, thicken with 2 
tablespoonfuls of flour, and add ^ pound of butter, salt, 
pepper and minced parsley. When cool add 2 beaten 
eggs. Pick the fish to pieces, laying it in a buttered 
dish, covering each layer with the sauce, until the 
dish is full; cover the top with bread crumbs, dot 
thickly with bits of butter and bake until brown. 

Mrs. Elmer Washburn. 



LYONNAISE POTATOES. 

Cut into cubes enough cold boiled potatoes to make 
I quart, add i large teaspoonful salt and ^ of pepper. 
Put 3 tablespoonfuls butter into frying pan, add i table- 
spoonful minced onion and i of minced parsley, cook 
3 minutes, stirring constantly; add the potatoes and stir 
with a fork, very carefully, until brown and hot. 

Mrs. Homer P. Knapp. 

CHICKEN SOUFFLE. 

Put I tablespoonful of butter in a saucepan and 
when melted, stir in i tablespoonful of flour until smooth, 
add I pint of milk and stir until it boils. Add ^ cup 
of stale bread crumbs; cook i minute. Take from the 
fire, add y^, teaspoonful of salt, 2 dashes of pepper, i 



A. N. W3rn6r06 UChardSt &LiikeAve.,Chicago 



LUNCHEON. 61 

tablespoonful of chopped parsley, i can of chopped 
chicken and the well beaten yolks of 3 eggs. Beat the 
whites to a stiff froth and stir them in, carefully. Butter 
a baking dish, pour in this mixture and bake 20 minutes; 
serve quickly. Mrs. B. R. Wells. 

EGG PLANT, FRENCH STYLE. 
Boil a large egg plant until tender, peel and mash 
smooth, season with butter, pepper, salt and a little 
thyme. Chop fine 2 hard boiled eggs and ^ an onion, 
add 2 tablespoonfuls of bread crumbs. Mix well, put 
into buttered dish, put bread crumbs oyer the top with 
bits of butter and bake in quick oven until brown. 
Mrs. Walter R. Comstock. 

TOMATOES WITH EGGS, SPANISH STYLE. 
Put 3 tablespoonfuls of tomatoes in pan, add an 
onion, cut fine, a little parsley, salt and pepper, let it 
simmer. Fry eggs in another pan, basting them with 
the butter. Place the eggs on a platter and pour the 
sauce over. Mrs. F. H. Wait. 

SCALLOPED SWEET POTATOES. 

A SOUTHERN RECIPE. 

Parboil sweet potatoes (yams preferred) and cut in 
transverse slices; cover the bottom of a pudding dish 



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62 LUNCHEON. 

with these. Add a little butter, a little sugar and nut- 
meg. Strew over this a very few bits of orange peel, 
and add a little juice of the orange. Fill the dish in 
this manner. Bake about half an hour. A dish fit for 
an epicure. Mrs. A. W. Knight. 

BAKED CORN OR CORN PUDDING. 

Cut kernels off 12 ears of tender uncooked corn, 
add yolks and whites, beaten separately, of 4 isggs, i 
teaspoonful of sugar, same of flour, mixed with table- 
spoonful butter, salt and pepper and i pint milk. Bake 
about ^ or ^ of an hour. Mrs. Florence Chapman. 

BAKED SALMON. 

Add to I pint salmon 2 beaten eggs, 3 tablespoon- 
fuls of cream, salt and pepper. Put in a dish, set in a 
pan of water and bake 20 minutes. Turn out on a hot 
platter, garnish with potato balls and pour around it a 
sauce made of i tablespoonful of butter, i of fiour and 
I cup of boiling milk; add a tablespoon of chopped 
parsley. 

SANDWICHES. 

Yolks of 4 hard boiled eggs powdered very fine with 
a fork, ^ cup of butter warmed just enough to pour, i 



A. N. W3rnGr06 LO.l5:MSUlakeAve.,(;iib<;o 



LUNCHEON. 63 

teaspoonful of mustard. Mix thoroughly and spread 
the bread with this mixture. Have the whites chopped 
very fine and well mixed with i can of potted ham. 
Put this between the slices. Very fine for parties. 

Mrs. Anna W. Knight. 

EGG TIMBALES. 

Beat 6 eggs, i teaspoonful of chopped parsley, i of 
salt, i^ of onion juice, pepper to taste, mix thoroughly 
together, and add 3 gills of milk. Pour the mixture 
into buttered moulds and stand them in pan of boiling 
water, up to the edge. Bake 20 minutes, or until firm 
in middle. 

SAUCE FOR ABOVE. 

Put 3 tablespoonfuls of butter in saucepan, add 2 
tablespoonfuls of ilour, stir until smooth, gradually add 
I pint of milk, stir until it boils, add i teaspoonful of 
salt, ^ of pepper, 4 drops of onion juice and i table- 
spoonful of minced parsley. Mrs. J. E. Hayes. 

CORN .OMELET. 

Beat the yolks of 5 eggs until thick and add i gill of 
milk or cream, stir into i pint of grated corn, season' 
with salt, beat the whites well, and stir in lightly. Put 

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9 



64 LUNCHEON. 

3 tablespoonfuls of butter in a fry pan and when hot, 
add the mixture; fry light brown and turn over. 

Mrs. D.' H. Champlin. 

EGG NESTS. 

Beat the whites of as many eggs as you wish to 
serve and put the beaten white of each egg on a slice of 
toast, leaving a hole in the center. Into this, put 
butter, salt and pepper, with the yolk of an egg on top. 
Set in the oven until brown. Garnish with parsley. 

Mrs. R. p. Lamont. 

EGG VERMICELLI. 

Boil 3 eggs 2o minutes, separate the yolks and chop 
the whites fine. Toast 4 slices of bread, cut ^ into 
squares and J^ into triangles. Make a sauce of i cup 
of cream or milk, i teaspoonful of butter, i (heaping) 
of flour, ^ of salt, i saltspoonful of pepper. Stir the 
whites into the sauce and while hot, pour it over the 
toast. Rub the yolks through a fine strainer over the 
whole, garnish with toast triangles and put a bit of 
parsley in the center. Miss Edith A. Stevens. 

CAULIFLOWER. 
A new way of cooking cauliflower. Divide the 

A. N.Warner& Co.! Underwear. 



LUNCHEON. 65 

vegetable into little boquets and cook in salted water. 
Strain and cool. Season with salt, white pepper, chop- 
ped parsley and sprinkle with flour. Dip in beaten egg 
and plunge into boiling lard. 

BOSTON SANDWICHES. 

Boil I pint of chestnuts and 2 large chicken livers 
until tender. Remove the brown skin from the nuts by 
pouring over them boiling water after they are shelled. 
Pound to a paste and season with salt, lemon juice and 
pepper. Spread upon thin slices of white bread. 

Mrs. J. E. Brown. 

BEACH SAUSAGES. 
Two pounds of veal, ^ pound of fat salt pork, chop- 
ped very fine. Add i pint of oysters and chop. Dredge 
in a little flour and pepper and fry. . 

Mrs. M. E. Brown. 

LUNCHEON NEST. 
Chop fine whatever cold meat, fowl or fish you have 
Season and add half as much agam mashed potato; moisten 
with gravy, if possible, or rich milk; mold into egg shape, 
then dip into beaten egg, roll in cracker or bread crumbs; 
fry a delicate brown. Fill a hot dish with enough fried po- 
tatoes, sliced like straws, to represent a nest. Lay your 
croquettes in this and serve at once. S. F. A. 

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66 LUNCHEON. 

OYSTER SHORTCAKE. 

Make a rich but delicate shortcake dough, using sweet 
milk and Cameo baking powder. Bake in jelly cake tins, in 
rather thin layers and lightly butter each as it comes from 
the oven. Drain i quart of oysters, putting the liquor on to 
scald. Heat a cup and a half of milk and a tablespoonful 
of butter. Rub smooth a tablespoonful of flour in a little 
cold milk, and add this to the scalding milk, stirring until 
it thickens. If half a cup of cream can be had add it to 
the milk; it is a great improvement. Put a teaspoonful of 
butter into the oyster juice after it is skimmed, salt and 
pepper to taste, add the oysters, let them scald until they 
"ruffle," which will be very soon. Then take them out, lay 
them on a layer of shortcake; pour the juice into the milk, 
stir well, put a spoonful of this filling over the oysters, lay 
on another layer of shortcake, then add more oysters , pour- 
ing the hot filling over the whole. The dish should be very 
hot, and it should not stand a minute after being prepared 
and served. If the cakes are very thin and crisp, three 
layers may be used instead of two. Selected. 

SAUSAGE DUMPLINGS. 

Cook some sausages until thoroughly done, but do not 

brown too much. Then roll out a crust; cut in squares. 

On each square lay a sausage; fold the corners across, 

pressing them together. Then place in a pan and bake in 



A.N.Warner&Co.l°^^^^"*'^"° 



SUPPLIES. 



LUNCHEON. 67 

a hot oven until the crust is done. Place on a hot plate 
and pour the sausage fryings, to which has been added a 
little water, around the cakes in the dish. 

CAULIFLOWER AU GRATIN. 

Dress i large-sized or 2 small-sized cauliflowers. 
Place in a saucepan with a tablespoonful of salt and ^ 
dozen peppercorns; cover with cold water; boil half an 
hour; drain and place in a baking dish. Pour over a pint 
of cream sauce, with 3 tablespoonfuls of grated cheese 
stirred in. Sprinkle 3 tablespoonfuls more over the top, 
then a light layer of bread crumbs. Set in a brisk oven 
for about 20 minutes, or until a rich golden brown. 

A Friend. 

• CODFISH IN CREAM. 

Shred and soak >^ cup of salted codfish over night. 
In the morning drain, place in a stewpan, cover with cold 
water; when it boils, drain; cover again with water and 
simmer gently 15 minutes; add i cup of rich milk. Rub 
I spoonful of flour smooth in i spoonful of butter; add to 
the codfish; mince i hard-boiled egg, stir into the mixture; 
add a pinch of pepper and a teaspoonful of minced parsley. 
Boil up once. Serve. Mrs. Wilson. 

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VMr 11 ISHLv Coacb and Car Varnishes and Colors. 



68 LUNCHEON. 

RUMBLED EGGS. 
Take a small teaspoonful of butter and 2 of cream or 
milk, warm in a frying-pan. Break 4 eggs, or more if 
needed, in the pan and stir until slightly cooked; then add 
4 sardines broken in small pieces, from which the skin and 
large bones have been removed. Pour over ^ teaspoonful 
of Worcestershire sauce and serve hot. A good recipe for 
cooking in a chafing dish. 

BIRD'S-NEST TOAST. 

Separate the white of i egg from the yolk, leaving yolk 
unbroken. Beat the white to a stiff froth and lay in circu- 
lar form on a flat pan. Drop yolk of egg in center of white 
and place in oven, allowing it to brown slowly. Dust with 
salt and pepper and serve on hot dish, allowing 5 eggs 
and 5 slices of toast to each 5 persons. 

''DEVIL" FOR SLICES OF GOOSE. 

Scald I cup of milk; while it is scalding mix with a 
heaped tablespoonful of bread crumbs, i teaspoonful of 
made mustard, y^ teaspoonful of salt, % teaspoonful of 
pepper; add to this i large tablespoonful of butter and i 
teaspoonful of catsup. Rub i tablespoonful of flour and i 



A. N.Warner& Go.} CORSETS. 



LUNCHEON. 69 

of butter together and stir into the scalding milk; when it 
thickens add gradually to the other mixture, and lastly, i 
beaten yolk of egg. Return to the fire, heat through, re- 
move at once and spread on each slice of goose. 

Miss M. E. Wright. 

EGG FLOWERS. 

Toast as many pieces of bread as there are persons. 
Dip an instant into hot cream and place on a hot platter 
while the eggs are preparing. Put a tablespoonful of lard 
into an iron skillet; let it become very hot. Break each 
egg carefully into a saucer and slip into the smoking fat. 
When the white is set tip the skillet slightly and baste the 
eggs with the hot grease until the yolks are covered with a 
thin white veil. Take up carefully and place an egg on 
each slice of toast. Season lightly with salt and pepper. 
Garnish with parsley. 

OYSTERS AND MACARONI. 

Boil macaroni in salted water until done, then put a 
layer of it in a deep dish and over this a thick layer of oys- 
ters. Season with butter, cayenne pepper, salt and a 
little grated lemon rind. Add a gill of cream or milk to a 
quart dish. Strew top with bread crumbs and butter, and 
bake in a quick oven. 

l/ALEUTINrr VALENTINE & GOittPflNy. 
VMr n ISHLO Coach and Car Varnishes and Colors. 



70 LUNCHEON. 

LUNCHEON POTATOES. 

Into a tablespoonful of butter made hot stir ]^ of an 
onion and brown it; add 2 cups cold potatoes chopped or 
thinly sliced and let them brown. Just before taking them 
up sprinkle them with a quarter teaspoonful each of salt 
and dry mustard. 

CURRIED EGGS. 
Boil 4 eggs half an hour, remove the shells and slice 
eggs into a shallow dish; fry i teaspoonful chopped onion 
in a tablespoonful of butter, being careful not to burn; add 
I heaping tablespoonful of flour and ^ tablespoonful of 
curry powder, pour on slowly i cup of milk, season with 
salt and pepper and a piece of butter the size of a walnut, 
simmer until onions are soft, then pour the mixture over 
the sliced eggs, cover with a layer of bread crumbs, brown 
in the oven and serve hot. 

CRACKER OMELET. 

Break i quart of oyster crackers into small pieces, 
pour over them i pint of hot milk, with half teaspoonful 
salt; stir in 3 eggs well beaten and put into a hot buttered 
skillet. Cook slowly ten minutes, stirring frequently. 

Chop together fine i pound veal and i pint oysters; 
season with salt and pepper and fry in hot butter. 

A. N.Warner& Go J gloves. #^ 



LUNCHEON. 71 

CHEESE FRITTERS. 
Mix 2 tablespoonfuls of grated cheese with 2 dessert- 
spoonfuls of bread crumbs, ^ teaspoonful of dry mustard, 
a dessertspoonful of butter, a speck of cayenne and the 
yolk of an egg; pound with a potato masher till smooth and 
well mixed, make into balls the size of small walnuts, flat- 
ten a little. Make a batter with a cup of sifted flour, a 
tablespoonful of melted butter, a scant cup of warm water, 
salt to taste and the white of an egg well beaten. Drop 
the fritters onto this and then from a spoon into very hot 
fat, cooking as you would croquettes. A. M. D. 

PERFECTION SALSIFY. 
Boil the roots, after scraping, in salted water until 
tender. Mash fine, adding a large spoonful of fresh butter, 
salt and pepper and the beaten yolk of i egg; flour to make 
stifl" as for fritters. Beat thoroughly; drop by the spoonful 
into hot lard and fry a delicate brown. By making them 
just moist enough to handle, shaping them like oysters, and 
rolling them in salted cracker dust before frying, the oyster 
delusion is well-nigh complete. 

CHESTNUT CROQUETTES. 
Use 50 chestnuts, 2 gills of cream, 3 tablespoonfuls of 
butter, saltspoon of salt, 4 eggs and some sifted bread 
crumbs for breading. Shell the chestnuts, put into a stew- 

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YMr n ISHLO Coacb and Car Yarnisbes and Colors 



72 LUNCHEON. 

pan with enough water to cover them. Boil 30 minutes. 
Drain off the water and pound the nuts until very fine; add * 
I tablespoonful of the butter and pound until well mixed; 
add balance of butter and the salt and pound lo minutes, 
then add the cream, a little at a time. When it is all 
worked in rub the mixture through a sieve. Beat 3 eggs 
until light and stir into that which has been strained. 
Place in a double boiler and cook 8 minutes, stirring con- 
stantly. It should by this time be smooth and thick, if the 
water in the outer boiler has been boiling rapidly. Spread 
on a large platter to cool. When cold butter the hands 
and mold into balls or cones. Dip into the fourth egg, then 
into the bread crumbs; fry a minute and a half. Arrange 
on a warm napkin and serve. Mrs. Bates. 

TRIPE A LA CONTANCE. 
One pound of thin tripe, Yt, pound of bacon, i small 
carrot, juice of 5^ lemon, i small onion, bouquet garni, 
parsley, « ounces of butter, i tablespoonful of Worcester- 
shire sauce, I ounce of flour, i pint of stock. Wash the 
tripe in cold water and then blanch it — that is, put it on in 
cold water and let it come to a boil — take it out of the stew 
pan, throw the water away, dry it with a clean cloth and 
cut it into strips 2 inches wide and 4 inches long. Cut the 
bacon into very thin slices the 'same size as the strips of 
tripe. Chop up the parsley fine, lay the strips of bacon on 



A.N.Warner&Go.}LAGES. 



-^^ 



LUNCHEON. 7B 

the tripe, sprinkle a little parsley on each, roll them up to- 
gether and tie round with string. Cut up the onion and 
carrot and put them with the bouquet garni into a stewpan 
with the rolls of tripe and i pint of stock, and let all sim- 
mer for 2 hours, then take out the rolls of tripe. Mix 2 
ounces of butter and i ounce of flour together in a stewpan, 
strain the stock into it, stir till it thickens, add the lemon 
juice and Worcestershire sauce, also the rolls of tripe, long 
enough to get hot through. Arrange the tripe in a circle 
around mashed potatoes and pour the sauce around. 

Selected. 

FISH OMELET. 

Cook together i level tablespoonful of flour and i 
of butter; add gradually ^ cup of hot milk and a little 
pepper. Pour boiling water on a ^ cup of shredded cod- 
fish, drain and mix with the thickened milk, then add 2 
cups of cold boiled potatoes chopped fine. Melt table- 
spoonful of butter in a spider; when hot turn in fish and 
cook slowly until a thick crust has formed; then fold over 
and serve on hot platter. A. R. 

LITTLE PIGS IN BLANKETS. 

Season large oysters with salt and pepper. Cut fat 
English bacon in very thin slices, wrap an oyster in each 

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VMr n ISHLv Coach and Car Yarnisbes and Colors. 



74 LUNCHEON. 

slice and fasten with a wooden toothpick. Heat a frying 
pan and put in the little pig. Cook just long enough to 
crisp the bacon, about two minutes. Place on slices of 
toast that have been cut into small pieces. Do not remove 
the skewers; garnish with parsley. Have the pan very 
hot before the pigs are put in and shake continually; do not 
not burn. 

EGGS POACHED IN MILK. 

Three pints of milk in a porcelain-lined skillet heated 
to a boiling point. Break your eggs into the poacher, set 
in the skillet and cook slowly on the back of the range until 
firm. The milk neutralizes the sulphur of the eggs, mak- 
ing them much more wholesome to people of bilious tem- 
perament. 

POTATO HILLOCKS. 

Whip boiled potatoes very light; to a pint of mashed 
potato add a scant tablespoonful of butter, a tablespoonful 
of hot milk or cream, ^ teaspoonful of salt, i^ teaspoonful 
of pepper. Beat in a raw egg, shape into small conical 
heaps; put in a greased pan on a hot oven, and as they 
brown glaze them with butter. Have the oven very hot; 
also have a very hot platter. Slip a cake- turner under each 
one and transfer to the hot dish. 

A. N. Warner & Go.} Embroideries. 



LUNCHEON. 75 

GRAS A l'AMERICAINE. 

Boil 2 pounds of calf's liver until very tender; save the 
juice. Pick the liver over, pulling out all the strings and 
fat. Mash with potato masher to pulp, adding gradually 
the juice from the liver. Add 2 tablespoofuls of melted 
butter, salt to taste, a little cayenne, juice of 2 lemons, ^ 
teaspoonful of allspice; ^ of cinnamon, ^ of cloves. Put 
it into a mold and let it stand in a cold place 24 hours. 
Slice and serve. Miss Clara Williams. 

POTATO TIMBAL. 

Pare 8 good sized potatoes, cover with boiling water 
and cook 30 minutes. Drain and mash smooth and light. 
Add 3 tablespoonfuls of butter, 2 of finely chopped parsley, 
salt and pepper to taste. Gradually beat into this i cup of 
milk, hot; stir hard and beat in 3 well beaten eggs. Butter 
an oval basin and cover it thickly with fine crumbs, fill with 
the prepared potato and bake in a moderate oven y^ hour. 
Let the dish stand a few minutes after taking from the oven 
then invert upon a hot platter. J. S. P. 

BAKED RICE WITH TOMATOES. 

Boil I cup of rice till tender, when done mix with a 
can of tomatoes. Add a little onion chopped very fine and 

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YMr ll ISHLv Coacb and Car Yarnisbes and Colors. 



76 LUNCHEON. 

a small piece of butter. Season with pepper and salt to 
taste. Put in a well buttered dish, lined with bread 
crumbs and bake to a golden brown. 

FRIED TOMATOES. 

Slice fresh ripe tomatoes in half, sprinkle a little salt 
and pepper over each piece and roll in flour. Put butter 
in frying pan and when hot put in tomatoes with skin side 
down, turn, and when cooked make a gravy by pouring over 
them milk, and simmer, till thick. A green pepper, sliced 
and fried with them improves the flavor. 

EGG-PLANT. 

One large egg-plant, 3 eggs, well beaten, 4 or 5 crack- 
ers, rolled fine, i tablespoonful of chopped onion, i of 
celery, butter the size of a walnut. Boil egg-plant in salt 
water till tender. Beat well and add ingredients. Put in 
a well buttered mold and bake. 

Mrs. S. E. Bagshawe. 

STUFFED EGGS. 

Boil 6 eggs 20 minutes, remove the shells and cut 
carefully lengthwise. Remove the yolks and put the whites 
of each egg separate, so they will fit nicely. Mash the 
yolks and add i teaspoonful of soft butter, half as much 

A.N.Warner&Co.} Fancy Goods. 



LUNCHEON. 77 

deviled ham as you have egg. Season to taste with pepper, 
mustard and a little vinegar. Fill the whites with the mix- 
ture, smooth them and press the two halves together. 
Spread the remainder of the yolks on a shallow dish and 
place the eggs on it. Cover with a thin white sauce. 
Sprinkle buttered bread crumbs over the whole and bake 
until a delicate brown. This is a fine dish for Sunday tea. 

Mrs. T. J. Hudson. 

VEAL CROQUETTES. 

Chop fine some cold veal; season highly with salt, 
pepper, onion juice, celery salt and parsley. Moisten with 
beaten egg and white sauce, shape in rolls. Roll in bread 
crumbs, then in beaten egg and again in the crumbs. These 
are nice for luncheon, served with peas. If canned peas 
are used, pour off half the liquor in the can. Add milk, 
let them boil, season with butter, pepper and salt. Thicken 
a little with flour. Mrs. T. J. Hudson. 



VA'XSES 



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DESSERTS. 



*'There is a knack in doing many a thing 
Which labor cannot to perfection bring; 
Therefore, however great in your own eyes, 
Pray do not hints from other folks despise." 

SAUCE FOR PLUM PUDDING. 

Cream together i cup of sugar and % cup of butter. 
When light and creamy add the well-beaten yolks of 4 
eggs. Stir into this i wine glass of brandy, a pinch of salt, 
and I large cupful of hot cream or rich milk. Beat this 
mixture well, place it in a saucepan over the fire, stir until 
it cooks sufficiently to thicken like cream. Be sure and do 
not let it boil. Delicious. Mrs. G. W. Hoyt. 

DANISH PUDDING. 

Soak I cup of tapioca all night Cook i hour in 
double boiler with 3 pints of water, stirring often. Add 
Yi teaspoonful of salt, ^^ teacupful of sugar, a tumbler of 
bright jelly; mix thoroughly, mould, and when hardened, 
serve with cream. Mrs. Chas. A. Knorp. 



A.N.Warner&Go.lTrtinKs 



DESSERTS. 79 

MINCE PIE MEAT. 

Boil and chop fine 2 pounds of beef, powder and free 
from strings i pound of suet, pare and chop 5 pounds of 
apples, 2 pounds of raisins (seeded), i pound of Sultana 
raisins, 2 pounds of currants, ^ pound of citron, 2 large 
oranges, 2^ pounds of brown sugar, 2 lemons, juice of 
both and grated rind of i, 2 tablespoonfuls of cinnamon, 2 
of mace, i of cloves, i of allspice, i of fine salt, i quart of 
sherry wine, i pint of brandy, i teaspoonful of nutmeg, 
enough good cider and syrup from pickled fruit to thor- 
oughly moisten the mixture. Mrs. J. B. Daniels. 

WHIPPED PEACHES. 

Beat I cup of chopped peaches with ^ cup of sugar 
and the beaten white of i egg for a half hour. Serve ice 
cold with cream. Mrs. C. J. Swan. 

MOCK PINEAPPLE. 

Pare, core and slice crosswise rather thinly 2 nice apples. 
Pare and remove white skin from 3 nice oranges, slicing 
them crosswise, and lay a slice of the apple upon i of the 
orange, saving every drop of juice. Sugar plentifully and 
squeeze on it the juice of a lemon and a glass of sherry 
wine. Serve ice cold. 



YMr ni ISHLv Coach and Car Varnisbes and Colors. 



80 DESSERTS. 

FRUIT COMPOTE. 
Pare and chop fine 3 good apples; slice thin 3 bananas; 
mix together. Boil to a syrup i cup of sugar with ^ cup 
of milk. Flavor with the juice and grated rind of ^ a 
lemon, pour over the fruit and serve cold. 

APPLE JOHN. 
Sift I pint of flour with 2 teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking 
powder, add two tablespoonfuls of butter and i cup of 
milk. Pare and cut i quart of apples into eighths, put 
them into a deep pie-plate, lay the crust over and bake. 
When done, invert it upon a large plate and season well 
with sugar, butter and spice. H. M. W. 

ROSE PUDDING. 
Scald I quart of milk in a double boiler and add 5 
tablespoonfuls of sifted flour, mixed smooth in cold milk 
with a pinch of salt. Stir well and boil until thick, then 
add 4 well-beaten eggs. Flavor with 3 or 4 drops of 
strong rose extract. Pour into mould, and when cold and 
firm turn out and surround with a rim of berries of some 
kind. Serve with sugar and cream. 

Mrs. C. J. Swan. 

FESTINA DESSERT. 
Take i quart can of best blackberries, or a quart of 
fresh ones, and set in a cold place while 4 soda crackers 

A. N.Warner& Go.} Valises. 



DESSERTS. 81 

are being crushed to a fine powder by the rolling pin. 
Place upon the table in separate dishes. Serve by putting 
the berries upon a saucer, covering with a dessert spoon- 
ful of the cracker powder, and eat with cream and sugar, if 
desired. Mrs. Tennant. 

OLD MAID'S PUDDING. 

Cream 5^ cup of sugar with butter the size of i egg, 
add 2 eggs well beaten, a pinch of salt, 2 cups of flour, 
into which sift 3 teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking powder. 
Steam or bake. 

SAUCE. 

Cream ^ cup of butter with i^ cups of brown sugar, 
and add 2 tablespoonfuls of flour, put on the fire and add 
boiling water, stirring until it is thick; add a large cup of 
black raspberries or the same amount of canned raspberries, 
and serve immediately. Mrs. G. W. Hoyt. 

CARAMEL CUSTARD. 
Dissolve I cup of granulated sugar in an iron sauce- 
pan until it scorches a little. Add ^ cup of water and 
melt until like a thin brown syrup. 

Make a custard of i quart of milk, 4 eggs well beaten 
and a pinch of salt. Add the above syrup and bake in 
cups set into water in a dripping pan. 

Mrs. M. W. Hartwell. 



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82 DESSERTS. 

STUFFED DATE PUDDING. 

Remove seeds from i^ pound of dates, and stuff with 
chopped nuts. Make a custard of i quart milk, yolks 
4 eggs, I tables poonful corn starch, i teaspoonful van- 
illa. Put in a baking dish and bake for ten minutes. 
Remove from oven and cover the top with the stuffed dates 
and a meringue made of the whites of 4 eggs and 4 table- 
four tablespoonfuls of pulverized sugar. Return to the 
oven and brown the meringue. Mrs. Joseph Gregg. 

GRAHAM PUDDING. 

Two cups graham flour, i cup molasses, i cup sweet 
milk, I cup chopped raisins, i small teaspoonful soda; 
steam three hours. Serve with hot sauce, any flavor de- 
sired. Mrs. a. E. Coleman. 

FANCY PUDDING. 
Soak I box gelatine in i pint sherry, add i pint boil- 
ing water and i cup sugar. Put in a mold, and when 
beginning to stiffen add 2 oranges sliced, i bananna 
sliced, a few figs, cut, % pound candied cherries, and if 
liked, ^ pound chocolate creams. Serve with whipped 
cream sweetened and flavored with wine. A. W. K. 

NICE PLAIN PUDDING. 
Three eggs well beaten, 3 tablespoonfuls sugar, 2 

A.N.Warner&Go.} Neckwear. 



DESSERTS. 33 

of butter, i cup sweet milk, i of raisins, i teaspoonful 
Cameo baking powder, flour to make as thick as cake; 
steam 30 minutes. Serve with sauce. 

Mrs. V. M. Harper. 

IMPERIAL PUDDING. 
Wash % cup rice, put on to boil in i quart cold 
water. When it begins to boil, pour off all: the water 
and add i pint milk. Cook in a double boiler i hour. 
Then add ^ box gelatine soaked in ^^ cup of water; i 
cup sugar, )^ teaspoonful of salt, 4 tablespoonfuls of 
wine. Stir in rice till thick, then add i quart cream, 
(whipped). Serve with the following strawberry sauce : 
Beat y^ pint of thick cream till very thick, add ^ cup 
jam. Sweeten to taste. 

Miss Gertrude A. Hubbard, 

SWISS CREAM. 
Boil I pint cream with rind of 2 lemons cut very 
thin and ^ cup sugar. Mix the juice of the lemon with 
a heaping teaspoonful of flour and pour upon it the 
boiling cream, stirring all the time. When nearly cold 
pour it over 6 maccaroons which have been dipped in 
wine. Serve very cold. If the lemons are large and 
quite juicy, i will be enough. 

Mrs. Earl W. Spencer. 



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YMr n ISHLO Coach and Car Yarnisbes and Colors. 



84 DESSERTS. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 

Chop fine i^ pound suet. Add i pound sugar, i 
pound eggs, i of raisins, 2 of currants, ^ of flour, ^ 
of bread crumbs, i pint milk, i glass brandy, i of wine, 
2 nutmegs, 2 tablespoonfuls of ginger, little salt and 
cinnamon. Tie in a bag and boil 6 hours. 

Mrs. J. P. MoNTRoss. 

APPLE CITRON PIE. 

To make i pie, take 3 tablespoonfuls of flour and i 
of lard, with i teaspoonful of salt; mix with ice water, 
rather dry. Line the pie plate with crust, and fill with 
sliced apples, sprinkling over them i ounce of finely cut 
citron; add 3 tablespoonfuls of sugar and i teaspoonful 
of butter in small bits. Cover with crust and bake in 
moderate oven. 

PRUNE PIE. 

Soak ^ of a pound of prunes all night in water 
enough to cover, cook until tender and but little juice; 
pit them. Line the pie plate with crust, put in prunes, 
^ of a cup of sugar, i teaspoonful of butter in bits, 
grated rind and juice of ^ a lemon, a little salt and a 
sprinkling of flour. Cover and bake i^ hour. 

A. N.Warner& Go.) Perfumery. 



DESSERTS. 85 

APPLE COBBLER. 
Slice juicy cooking apples and fill a small biscuit 
pan. Strew over bits of butter, 3 large spoonfuls of 
sugar, nutmeg, cinnamon to taste, and add y^ cup of 
water. Make a crust of J^ pint of flour, ^ tablespoon- 
ful of butter and lard mixed, a little salt and i teaspoon- 
ful of Cameo baking powder mixed with ice water to a 
soft dough, spread the crust over the apples and bake 
in moderate oven. Invert upon a platter and serve with 
the following sauce: 

SAUCE. 

One dessertspoonful of butter, 3 tablespoonfuls of 
brown sugar, i cup of boiling water, i heaping tea- 
spoonful of corn starch, flavor with vanilla or wine. 

Mrs. John Underwood. 

COCOANUT PIE. 
Cream ^ cup of butter with 2 of sugar, add 2 cups 
of milk and 2 grated cocoanuts; 4 eggs. Flavor with 
lemon extract. Bake in open shells of paste. 

Mrs. J. S. Sargent. 

LEMON PIE. 
Beat the yolks of 3 eggs with the juice and grated 
rind of a large lemon, add i^ cup of sugar, i cup of 
milk, I teaspoonful of corn starch dissolved in milk. 

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VMr R ISHLO Coacb and Car famishes and Colors. 



86 DESSERTS. 

Beat the whites of the eggs with 4 teaspoonfuls of pow- 
dered sugar for the meringue and spread over and brown 
when the pie is baked. Mrs. J. B. Daniels. 

MILK SHERBET. 
One quart of milk, i pint of sugar, juice of 4 lem- 
ons, or a pint of mashed strawberries. Put milk in 
freezer, freeze 20 minutes, stir in sugar and fruit juice; 
freeze. Mrs. W. H. French. 

ICE CREAM. 
Heat I quart of milk to boiling, add 2 heaping 
tablespoonfuls of corn starch, wet with cold milk and 
cook until thick. When cool add i quart of cream, 2 
cups of sugar and flavoring. Mrs. W. E. Ritchie. 

EMMA HARDY'S RECIPE FOR ICE CREAM. 
Two quarts of cream, 2 cups of sugar, 2 eggs, 
whites and yolks beaten separately, i tablespoonful of 
flavoring. Boil one cup of the cream, dissolve i teaspoon- 
ful of Bermuda arrowroot in a little cold milk and stir it 
into the hot cream. Thicken, remove from the fire and 
stir it into the cold cream, add sugar and flavoring and 
the beaten yolks. Strain and put into freezer. Do not 
turn the crank for 15 minutes, then stir in the beaten 
whites and beat the whole well. Remove the dasher 
and set aside for 2 hours. At the end of an hour loosen 



A. N.Warner& Go.l Imms. 



DESSERTS. 87 

the cream from the sides and beat again. In making 
chocolate cream, omit the arrowroot. In making straw- 
berry, omit the yolks of the eggs, use i quart of cream, 
and when partly frozen add i quart of strawberry juice. 
Apple sauce strained and the beaten whites of eggs and 
sugar added is delicious. 

SHERBET. 
One pint of fruit juice, i pint of sugar, i pint of 
water in which i tablespoonful of Knox's gelatine has 
been properly dissolved. Freeze same as cream. 

Mrs. I. M. Bennett. 

ICES. 
One pint of the strongest coffee, i pint of richest 
cream. Sweeten and freeze. 

Mrs. W. H. French. 

One quart of rich cream, i quart of crushed rasp- 
berries. Sweeten and freeze. 

Mrs. W. H. French. 

FROZEN PUNCH. 

Boil I quart of water with i quart of sugar to a 

thick syrup, pour it over i quart of chopped pineapple, 

while boiling. Let this stand over night. Next day 

add the juice of 4 lemons and the whites of 4 eggs, 

yALEklTINr^ YflLENTINE & GOMFflNY. 
VMr n ISHLv Coach and Car Yarnislies and Colors. 



88 DESSERTS. 

frothed; add i large cup of wine and a tablespoonful of 
brandy. Freeze. Mrs. S. P. Douthart. 

ICE CREAM. 
Mix I can of condensed milk with i quart of fresh 
milk; beat the yolks of 2 eggs and add; then the whites, 
frothed; sweeten to taste, flavor and freeze. If too rich, 
add milk. Mrs. Willard. 

APPLE FRITTERS. 
Two eggs, I quart of flour, i cup of sugar, ^^ cup 
of currants, 2 even teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking powder, 
i^ pints of milk, ^ teaspoonful of cinnamon, ^ of all- 
spice, I quart of chopped apples. Make into shape and 
fry in lard. Mrs. John A. Grier. 

WINE JELLY. 
(without boiling.) 
One package of Coxe's gelatine. Pour over it i 
pint of cold water, and let it stand 2 hours. Squeeze 
into it the juice of 6 lemons; add lyi pounds of sugar, i 
pint of wine and i pint of boiling water. Strain and 
pour into moulds. Mrs. A. C. Guion. 

RAISIN PUFFS. 
Two cups of flour, i of raisins, % of butter, i of 
milk, 2 eggs, 2 tablespoonfuls of sugar, 3 teaspoon 

A. N.Warnerft CoJ dresTgoods 



DESSERTS. 89 

fuls of Cameo baking powder. Steam % an hour. 
Eat with liquid sauce. Mrs. W. C. Ritchie. 

FRUIT BALLS. 
Chop 2 ounces of suet fine, add 4 ounces of bread- 
crumbs, white of i egg, 5^ cup of currants, i^ of chopped 
raisins and a little citron; form into balls the size of a 
walnut. If dry, add white of another egg. Drop the 
balls in boiling water and cook slowly until they rise, 
lift with skimmer, dish and pour over a rich brandy 
sauce, in which have been stirred the yolks of 2 eggs. 

Selected. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 
Soak 3 tablespoonfuls of tapioca over night, add i 
quart of sweet milk and cook half an hour; beat the 
yolks of 4 eggs, i cup of granulated sugar and 3 table- 
spoonfuls of grated cocoanut; stir into the tapioca and 
milk and cook ten minutes. Pour into large pudding 
dish, cover with the well-beaten whites of 4 eggs, 3 tea- 
spoonfuls of pulverized sugar, sprinkle top with cocoa- 
nut and brown slightly in oven. Serve cold. 

Miss Blanche Longmire. 

APPLE CUSTARD PUDDING. 
Four apples, pare and slice them, put in a dish and 
cover with i cup of water, ^ cup of sugar, a little cin- 



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90 DESSERTS. 

naition, and butter the size of an egg; bake until done. 
Beat 2 eggs, ^ cup of sugar, a little salt, and i pint of 
milk; pour over the apple and bake one-half hour. 

Mrs. Harry N. Day. 

PERSIAN CREAM. 
One quart of sweet milk, ^ box of Coxe's gelatine or 
i^ box of Boston Crj^stal gelatine (the latter preferred), 
I cup of sugar, 4 eggs. Put milk in double boiler, 
and when almost boiling hot, add gelatine (dry). Stir 
until dissolved; then add yolks of eggs and sugar well 
beaten together. Cook until the consistency of boiled 
custard. Remove from fire, and add i teaspoonful of 
vanilla and well beaten whites of the eggs. Stir thor- 
oughly. Pour into moulds; serve with cream. Do not 
use until the day after making. Mrs. O. H. Ward. 

VICTORIA MOULD. 
Cut some sponge cakes in slices, dip them in white 
wine or sherry, place them in layers in the center of a 
mould with jam between each layer, soak j{ ounce of 
gelatine in a little cold water, make a custard with the 
yolks of 4 eggs and a pint of milk, flavored with vanilla; 
mix while hot with the gelatine, strain and stir occasion- 
ally until the custard is cool; then fill the mould, so that 
when turned out the custard appears as a crust around 

A. N.Warner& Co.} Table Linins. 



DESSERTS. 91 

the cake. When cold turn into a glass dish and garnish 
with red currant jelly and whipped cream. 

Mrs. J. H. R. Bond. 

TIPSY SQUIRE. 
Saturate a thin sponge cake with sherry wine. Or- 
nament the top thickly with split blanched almonds. 
Pour over it a rich custard made of i quart of milk, 
yolks of 6 eggs, whites of 2, i teacupful of sugar. Whip 
a pint of cream until thick. Put over the cake and 
custard alternate spoonfuls of the beaten whites of 
4 eggs and the whipped cream. 

Mrs. Joseph Gregg. 

CIDER JELLY. 
One box of gelatine dissolved in i pint of cold 
water; add 11^ pounds of sugar 1% pints of cider, juice 
and grated rind of i lemon, i pint of boiling water. 
Strain into moulds. Mrs. E. L. Hale. 

WINE JELLY. 

Soak I box Cox's gelatine in i pint of cold water % 
hour, add i % pints of boiling water and % pound cut loaf, 
juice of 3 lemons, i quart bottle of sherry wine and the 
whites of 2 eggs, well beaten, and with the shells stir in the 
mixture to clarify it. Let it come to a boil, strain and 
mould. Mrs. H. W. Bridge. 

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«2 DESSERTS. 

TAPIOCA CREAM. 

Soak 3 tablespoonfuls of tapioca in water all night. 
Put this into i quart of milk and boil half an hour. Beat 
the yolks of 4 eggs with i cup of sugar, add 3 table- 
spoonfuls of fresh grated cocoanut, add to the milk and 
boil 10 minutes longer. Beat the whites of the eggs 
stiff and add 3 tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar. Put 
this over the top and sprinkle over it 3 tablespoonfuls of 
cocoanut, and slightly brown in the oven. Serve very 
cold. Mrs, C. W. Chandler. 

A BEAUTIFUL DESSERT. 
Put I quart of milk on the fire, and while heating, 
mix 5 small tablespoonfuls of corn starch, 4 of sugar, and 

4 of grated chocolate, with a little cold milk, add to the 
hot milk and stir until it thickens. Pour into a mould 
and cool. Make a boiled custard with i quart of milk, 

5 eggs, leaving out the whites of 2, and 2 tablespoonfuls 
of sugar. Pour this, when cold, around the former mix- 
ture in a shallow dish. Beat the whites of the 2 eggs 
left out with two tablespoonfuls of pulverized sugar, and 
drop from a spoon over the pudding and custard, shap- 
ing like kisses; a little bright jelly may be laid upon 
each kiss, or part of the egg froth colored with fruit 
syrup and a little piece put upon the top. 

Mrs. John A. Grier. 

AJUVarner&CoJpupSrNoT. 



DESSERTS. 9^ 

OLD-FASHIONED BLACKBERRY MUSH. 

Put in a kettle 3 quarts of berries, i cup of mo- 
lasses, I cup of sugar; when warm add i cup of flour, 
mixed with a little water. Boil 3 to 4 minutes. Serve 
cold with cream. Mrs. R. P. Lamont. 

LEMON MERINGUE. 

One lemon, i cup of sugar, i cup of water, yolks of 
2 eggs, I slice of bread without crust, i medium table- 
spoonful of butter. Grate the yellow from the lemon, 
squeeze the juice and pulp; beat the yolks and sugar to- 
gether with the bread and lemon. To this add the cup of 
water, or just enough to fill the pie. Bake with an 
under crust. Mrs. Russell H. Stevens. 

PEACH COBBLER. 
Line side of a pudding dish with pie crust; no bot- 
tom crust. Fill with peaches and nearly a pint of cold 
water, (have some of the peaches whole), and a coffee- 
cup of light brown sugar. Have a dessert spoonful of 
flour, well mixed with butter, the size of an egg; place 
this among the peaches; cover with pie crust; cut slits 
into it and bake half an hour. 

Mrs. W. D. McKey. 

PRUNE PUDDING. 
Cook 3 cups of prunes until tender; when done, 

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M DESSERTS. 

Strain juice and all through colander, add i cup of 
sugar, 2 teaspoonfuls of corn starch, stirred together; 
beat 3 eggs separately, putting in the whites last. Put 
all into a tin pudding dish; then into a dripping pan 
filled with water (boiling) and bake ^2 hour. 

Mrs. B. F. Ray. 

STEAMED PUDDING. 
One cup of sugar, 3 tablespoonfuls of melted but- 
ter, i4 cup of sweet milk, i egg, i ^ cups of flour, 2 tea- 
spoonfuls of Cameo baking powder. Steam ^of an hour. 
To be eaten with whipped cream or lemon sauce. 

A. E. S. 

LEMON SAUCE. 

FOR STEAMED PUDDING. 

One coffeecup of sugar, small }^ cup of butter, i 
egg, I large lemon, all the juice and half the rind, i 
teaspoonful of nutmeg, 3 tablespoonfuls of boiling water. 
Cream the butter and sugar, and stir in the egg beaten 
light; the lemon and nutmeg next. Beat hard lo minutes, 
and add a teaspoonful at a time the boiling water. Put 
in a double boiler and let the sauce get hot and thick, 
but not boil, stirring constantly. A. E. S. 

HEAVENLY HASH. 

One-half box of gelatine dissolved in i ^ pints of 
water, % cup of sugar, ys cup of candied cherries, i/^ 
cup of mixed nuts, blanched and chopped, % cup of 



DESSERTS. 9$ 

raisins and citron, mixed; a little vanilla. Boil, and when 
cold, chop it fine. Serve with whipped cream. 

Miss Nellie Harper. 

FRIAR'S OMELETTE. 
Make a sauce with a dozen apples, add % pound of 
butter, i^ pound of sugar, 4 eggs. Put into a deep, 
well-buttered dish, thickly strewn with bread crumbs, 
in layers, crumbs for the top layer. Add the grated 
rind and part of the juice of one lemon. When baked 
turn it out and put sugar over the top. Eat cold with 
cream. Mrs. W. D. McKey. 

EASY CHARLOTTE. 
To every teacup of cream allow the white of i egg, 
and ^ cup of powdered sugar. Keep eggs and cream 
icy cold. Whip them well, then add the sugar daintily, 
flavor with vanilla, and pour into a dish lined with 
pieces of sponge cake or split lady fingers. Put in a 
cold place to <'set. " * 

PINEAPPLE DESSERT. 
Make thin sandwiches of home-made bread and 
canned grated pineapple. Pour the juice over them and 
let stand until well soaked, then cover with sweetened 
whipped cream and serve very cold. 

Mrs. G. L. Paddock. 

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96 DESSERTS. 

CARAMEL CUSTARD. 
One-half cup of sugar, melted .over a slow fire; do 
not stir it, or touch a cold spoon to it; when a good 
brown color, add ^ cup of water, boiling hot — bubbling 
hot. Simmer 2 or 3 minutes, strain through wire into i 
pint of warm milk, and cool. Beat together 4 eggs, i 
pint of cold milk, i teaspoonful of vanilla, a pinch of 
salt. Add all together and bake slowly, like any other 
custard. This part can be made the day before using, 
as it is to be eaten cold. When wanted, cover the dish 
^ inch deep with whipped cream. Eat with caramel 
sauce as follows: One-half cup of sugar, melted and 
browned, ^ cup of boiling water. Simmer 10 minutes. 
Serve in small pitcher. Mrs. A. W. Knight. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 
Whip I quart of cream to a stiff froth, whites of 8 
eggs, a little less than ^ of a box of gelatine, dissolved 
in a very little water. Stir the froth of the eggs into the 
cream, sweeten with powdered sugar and flavor with 
vanilla. Add the gelatine the last thing, then turn into 
dish lined with lady fingers or slices of sponge cake. 

Mrs. Eugene C. Long. 

BLANC-MANGE. 

Wash a very small handful of Carrageen moss (sold 
at drug stores), put it in i quart of milk. Put in a 
double boiler and stir frequently, until the moss is nearly 
dissolved. Strain through cheese-cloth; sweeten to taste 



DESSERTS. 97 

and add vanilla. Put into moulds, and serve with sugar 
and cream. Mrs. J. B. Wheatley. 

RICE PUDDING. 
Wash in several waters Yz cup of raw rice, put it 
into 2 quarts of sweet milk with y^ cup of white sugar, 
a little salt and i teaspoonful of vanilla. Bake slowly 2 
or 3 hours, stirring every 15 minutes. Eat cold with 
cream. Mrs. George L. Paddock. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 
Wash 10 tablespoonfuls of tapioca and soak it 3 
hours, drain, and put it into i quart of rich milk. Set 
the pan into boiling water and stir until it thickens; add 
2 tablespoonfuls of butter, 6 of white sugar, i lemon, 
juice and grated rind (or vanilla extract.) 

Mrs. Willian L. Shide. 

APPLE SNOW. 
Pare, core, and steam until tender 6 good sized 
apples. When done put them in a dish, and whip until 
light; then set aside to cool. When very cold add i 
cup of powdered sugar and juice of i lemon. Mix very 
gently. Beat the whites of 6 eggs to a stiff froth, then 
add to them by spoonfuls the apples, moving the beater 
backwards and forwards lightly until the apples and 
eggs are thoroughly mixed. Serve very cold in glasses. 

Mrs. John A. Grier. 

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98 DESSERTS. 

FRUIT SALAD. 

Slice 6 oranges, 6 bananas and i pineapple, and mix 
together. Squeeze the juice of 3 more oranges over. 
Sprinkle with powdered sugar and add sherry wine, if 
desired. Mrs. Irwin Simpson. 

ORANGE SHERBET. 

Two or 3 oranges (depends on size and juiciness), 
2 cups of pulverized sugar, 3 cups of water, whites of 
2 eggs. Grate the rind of i orange (if good size) and 
pour over it i cup of boiling water (the sugar may be 
put in this. ) Squeeze the oranges to a pulp and put 
right in with the water and sugar. Put the rest of the 
water in cold and strain. Beat the whites of the eggs 
very light and stir in when half frozen. All the water 
can be boiling and put in if there is plenty of time to 
cool before freezing. Leave rind in the water until cold. 

Mrs. Russell H. Stevens. 

SPANISH CREAM. 

One pint of milk and 5^ box of gelatine heated 
together, yolks of 3 eggs and 5 tablespoonfuls of sugar 
beaten together added to the above mixture, remove 
when it thickens, and stir in the whites of the eggs, 
beaten to a stiff froth; flavor and put into molds; to be 
eaten cold with cream. Mrs. W. F. Parish. 



DESSERTS. 9» 

FRUIT SHERBET. 
One dozen oranges, i dozen bananas, ii^ pounds 
white grapes, J4 pineapple (preserved), i pint cherries 
(candied or maraschino), i pint sherry wine, 2 cups 
sugar boiled in a little water. The oranges are cut in 
dice shape and mixed with the other fruit. This quantity 
will serve for 24 persons. Mrs. M. N. Burchard. 

STEAMED GRAHAM PUDDING. 

One and a half cups ''Akron" graham flour, ^ cup 
sweet milk, ^ cup melted butter, ^ cup stoned and 
chopped raisins, ^ cup currants, ^ cup molasses or 
sugar, I egg, i teaspoonful of soda, i teaspoonful of 
cloves, I teaspoonful of cinnamon, pinch of salt. Steam 
2 hours, serve hot with liquid sherry wine sauce. This 
is a delicate pudding and dyspeptics can eat it with 
comfort. Mrs. E. B. Myers. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 

One pound suet chopped line, i pound currants, i 
pound raisins, seeded; i pound brown sugar, y^, pound 
citron, yz pound rolled crackers or bread crumbs, i^ 
pound flour, i tablespoonful of ground ginger, i nut- 
meg, I wineglass of brandy, 8 eggs. Mix well and put 

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fOO DESSERTS. 

in mould. Most be kept boiling constantly for 5 hours 
or even longer. Much depends on this point. 

Mrs. a. E. Walker. 

OLD ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 
Beat 10 eggs very light, add i pound of sugar and 
beat well, stir in i pound suet finely chopped; next, i 
pound of flour, then i pound stoned raisins, i pound 
currants and y^ pound citron, shredded. Add spices 
to taste, nutmeg, cinnamon and a very little cloves. 
Lastly, add i wineglass of brandy. Tie in a cloth and 
boil 6 or 7 hours. Eat with brandy sauce. 

Mrs. Walter R. Comstock. 

PRESIDENT PUDDING. 
Two large tablespoonfuls of butter, i cup sugar, 
yolks of 4 eggs, 5^ loaf baker's bread crumbed fine, 
rind and juice of i lemon, i teaspoonful of vanilla. Put 
half this in a small pudding dish, spread on a little pre- 
serve, cover with the rest of the pudding. Bake ^ an 
hour. Make a meringue of the whites of the eggs and 
I cup sugar, vanilla. Brown this. Serve cold. Best 
the second day. Mrs. E. G. Gilbert. 

FIG PUDDING. 
One cup of beef suet chopped fine, i cup of sugar, 
yolks of 2 eggs, i cup milk, 3 cups of flour, i teaspoon- 
ful of Cameo baking powder, i pound of figs chopped fine, 
salt. Steam 2 hours. Mrs. F. A. Neal. 



DESSERTS. 101 

PINEAPPLE PUDDING. 
One quart milk sweetened and flavored with vanilla^ 
2 dozen lady fingers separated and dipped in the milk. 
Lay them in a pudding dish and spread over a layer of 
grated pineapple, dot it with jelly and fill the dish in 
this way. Beat the whites of 3 eggs well with 3 table- 
spoonfuls of sugar, put over the top and brown. Eat 
with cream if liked. Mrs. M. Cockrill. 

RICE PUDDING. 
One cup boiled rice, 3 cups milk, )^ cup sugar, i 
tablespoonful of corn starch, 2 eggs. Flavor with 
vanilla. Heat the milk in double boiler, dissolve corn 
starch in cold milk, then stir into hot milk. Beat yolks, 
add sugar, stir into milk, add rice, and cook until thick 
like custard, then pour into buttered dish. 

MERINGUE. 
Beat the whites of 2 eggs stiff, add 2 tablespoonfuls 
powdered sugar. Put it on top of the pudding, then 
place it in the oven and brown a little. 

Miss Edith A. Stevens. 

PRUNE PUDDING. 
One-half pound of prunes, stewed, stoned and 
chopped fine, whites of 7 eggs, beaten very light, 7 table- 

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102 DESSERTS. 

spoonfuls of powdered sugar. Mix together, stirring in 
the prunes last. Bake 40 minutes ; to be eaten with 
cream. Mrs. B. R. Wells. 

PRUNE PUDDING. 

One pound of prunes cooked (without sweetening) 
until tender. Put through colander, then add i cup of 
white sugar; beat hard ^ an hour. Then beat whites of 4 
eggs to a stiff froth and add to prunes and eggs, stirring 
well. Place in a pudding dish and set in a pan of boiling 
water. Bake in a moderate oven 20 minutes. Serve with 
whipped cream. Mrs Rhodes. 

MILK SHERBET. 

Three cups of sugar, 3 lemons, 3 pints of milk. Put 
the milk into the freezer and let it stand until very cold. 
Mix the sugar and lemon juice, add to the milk and freeze. 
Serve with candied ginger or fruits, preserved or fresh. 

ORANGE TRIFLE. 

One pint of whipped cream, i cup of powdered sugar, 
Vz box of gelatine, yolks of 3 eggs, juice of 2 sweet oranges, 
grated rind of one, i cup of boiling water. Mix juice, rind 
and sugar, pour the hot liquid over. Heat within a vessel 
of boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent curdling. 

Mrs. Rhodes. 



DESSERTS. 103 

FROZEN PEACHES. 

One can of peaches, i heaping pint of sugar, i quart 
of hot water, 2 cups of whipped cream. Boil the sugar 
and water together 12 minutes, then add the peaches and 
cook 20 minutes longer; then run through a sieve and cool. 
Freeze; when nearly frozen remove the cover and add the 
cream. Let stand one hour before serving. Apricots may 
be used instead of peaches. Mrs. Rhodes. 

FIG PUDDING. 

Six ounces of suet, or i full pint, a scant quart of 
bread crumbs, 4 tablespoofuls of moist sugar, ^ pound of 
figs, I egg, I cup of sweet milk, Yi nutmeg. Mix first the 
bread and suet (chopped fine), then figs (chopped fine) and 
sugar. Add nutmeg, egg (well beaten) and milk. Steam 
four hours. 

SAUCE FOR FIG PUDDING. 

One cup of sugar, ^^ cup of butter; boil together. Add 
y^ cup of brandy before removing from fire, then add beaten 
yolk of I egg, and stir in the beaten white just before serv- 
ing. Mrs. O. H. Ward. 

SPONGE PUDDING. 

Mix thoroughly 2 table spoonfuls of butter, 4 of sugar, 
and 4 rounding table spoonfuls of sifted flour. Wet this 



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Coacb and Car Varnishes and Colors. 



104 DESSERTS. 

with a part of a quart of milk and put the rest on to boil. 
When boiling, mix all together, and stir until boiled and 
thickened. Allow it to become cold, then add 4 eggs, 
beaten separately. Stir in the yolks first and when well 
beaten, the whites. Bake an hour, setting into hot water. 
Delicious with creamy sauce. Mrs. E. M. Dunbar. 

INDIAN PUDDING. 

Wet I cup of corn meal with part of 3 pints of milk 
and put the rest on to boil. When boiling, add the meal 
and stir until it thickens. Remove, put in i cup of New 
Orleans molasses and a tablespoonful of cinnamon with i 
tablespoonful of salt. Pour this mixture into a buttered 
dish, add 2 cups of cold milk and bake 4 hours in a slow 
oven. Mrs. D. H. Champlin. 



SPANISH CREAM. 

One pint of sweet milk, i large spoonful of gelatine 
dissolved in the milk, 3 eggs, 3 tablespoonfuls of sugar. 
Beat the yolks of the eggs and the sugar together, and stir 
in the milk. Cook as for a custard, being careful not to 
cook too long and take from the fire. Beat the whites of 
the eggs to a stiff froth, and add to the custard. Season as 
desired and turn into a mould till cold. Whip cream and 
turn over the custard, when ready for the table. 

Mrs. C. W. Crary. 



DESSERTS. 105 

POTATO PIES. 

One pint of mashed potatoes, 3 eggs, beaten separately, 
sufficient milk to make a thin batter, the juice and rind of i 
large lemon, a wineglassful of brandy and a large piece of 
butter. Bake with under crust only enough for 2 large pies. 
Salt to taste. M. L, Byllesby. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 
One pint of cream, before it is whipped, whites of 2 
eggs, I tablespoonful of sugar put in the whites of eggs and 
whipped cream, ^ teaspoonful of vanilla. Line the dish 
with lady fingers. Mrs. Neeld. 

GINGER SHERBET. 
One-fourth pound of sugar, put on to boil in a pint of 
water. Chip the rind from 3 lemons and i orange. Add 
to the sugar; boil 5 minutes and set away to cool. To the 
remaining rind and juice of the fruit, add the juice of an- 
other lemon; mix with the cold syrup, strain and freeze. 
Pound 4 ounces of preserved ginger to a smooth paste and 
press through a sieve. Cut 2 ounces into small bits; mix 
altogether and stir with i tablespoonful of ginger syrup into 
the frozen ice. Repack. 

ORANGE PUDDING. 

Beat the whites of 5 eggs very stiff, add 5 tablespoon- 



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Coach and Car Yarnislies and Colors. 



106 DESSERTS. 

fuls of powdered sugar, ^ level teaspoonful of cream of 
tartar, J^ saltspoonful of salt and the pulp of 2 large 
oranges last. Serve with whipped cream or custard. 

E. W. E. 
LEMON PIE. 

PASTRY FOR ONE PIE. 

A heaping cup of pastry flour, i saltspoonful of Cameo 
baking powder, i saltspoonful of salt, from ^ to 5^ a cup 
of butter and lard mixed. Mix the baking powder and salt 
with the flour, rub in the shortening and mix quite stifl" with 
ice water. For the filling: Mix i tablespoonful of corn 
starch, i cup of sugar, V^ saltspoonful of salt and add to i 
cup of boiling water; boil 5 minutes. Add juice of 2 lemons; 
when cooked a little add yolks of 2 eggs and i tablespoon- 
ful of butter. Beat the whites stiff with 2 tablespoonfuls of 
powdered sugar. Pile on the pie and brown. E. A. S. 

JELLIED PEACHES. 

One dozen good sized peaches, ^ box of gelatine, ij^ 
cups of sugar, i^ pints of water. Soak gelatine in ^ cup 
of water until soft, then put the sugar and the rest of the 
water in a stewpan and boil five minutes. Put the peaches 
in and cook 10 minutes, in taking the stew pan from the 
fire turn the gelatine into it, then add a tablespoonful of 
good brandy. Set in a dish of cold water to cool, and stir 
gently once in awhile to keep the peaches from settling at 
the bottom. When beginning to set put into a mould and 
put on ice. Serve with whipped cream. 

Mrs. T. J. Hudson. 



CHAFING DISH. 



As that historic barque, long known as Noah's Ark, 
Was filled with choice samples of fowl, flesh and fish;* 

So we in modern ages, conning these printed pages, 
Compass like miracles with the Chafing Dish. 
*By '* poetic license." 




MANUFACTURED BY SIMPSON, HALL, MILLER & CO. 

LOBSTER A LA NEWBURG. 
One large lobster, i tablespoonful of butter, i wine 
glass of sherry, 3 eggs, i^ pint of cream. Take the 
nicest part of the lobster cut in small pieces, put in 
chafing dish with butter, season with pepper and salt, 
pour wine over it, add the beaten eggs and cream. Let 
all come to a boil and serve immediately. Sufficient for 
£ve persons. Mrs. James Hewitt. 



108 CHAFING DISH. 

SCOTCH SQUIRREL. 
Spread anchovy paste thinly on crackers. Scram- 
ble in the chafing dish, 8 eggs, with i cup of cream, a 
pat of butter, and a little salt. Pour this mixture over 
the crackers and serve. Miss Annie Bennett. 

CREAMED OYSTERS. 

Put into the upper part of the chafing dish i table- 
spoonful of butter. When it melts add i tablespoonful 
of flour; stir till it thickens, then add i cup of cream, 
season with salt and pepper to taste. Add the oysters 
drained and cook till the oysters are plump. Serve on 
hot toast. Miss Kate S. Benton. 

VENISON IN A CHAFING DISH. 
One coffee cup of claret; when hot add i dessert- 
spoonful of butter, i coffee cup of sherry, i tablespoon- 
ful of currant jelly, i dessertspoonful of Worcestershire 
sauce, a shake of red pepper. When the sauce comes 
to a boil put in the venison cut in strips five or six inches 
long, not more than two pieces at a time, and cook for 
about one minute. Mrs. Eberman. 

CREAMED OYSTERS. 

Mix well together i tablespoonful of butter, 3 
teaspoonfuls of flour, put in a chafing dish, add a little 
milk or cream and salt to taste and stir constantly till 



CHAFING DISH. 109 

thoroughly cooked. As it thickens add more milk till 
a proper consistency is attained. Put in i pint of oys- 
ters and cook till their edges curl. Serve on toast. 
This cream is also used for Lobster Newburg. 

Mrs. Isaac Bennett. 

OYSTER PAN ROAST. 
Melt 1 tablespoonful of butter, and as it creams add i 
dozen large oysters, Y^ pint oyster liquor, salt and pepper. 
Cover and cook about 2 minutes. Put 6 of the oysters on 
a thin slice of toast on a hot plate, with sufficient liquid to 
moisten the toast, and serve. Mrs. C. H. Bixby. 

PANNED OYSTERS. 

Put into a chafing dish a heaping tablespoonful of 
butter and i of flour. Stir well, then add ^ cup oyster 
liquor, season, and when very hot add the oysters and cook 
a very few minutes. Serve on hot buttered toast. 

Miss Kate S. Benton. 

Heat in the chafing dish 2 tablespoonfuls of butter, 5^ 
teaspoonful of salt, i teaspoonful of lemon juice and i of 
currant jelly. Add to this, slices of cold lamb or mutton 
and serve hot. If curry is liked add it to taste and serve 
with boiled rice. 

POTATOES RECHAUFFE. 

Slice 6 cold boiled potatoes, put them in the chafing 
dish with i tablespoonful of butter and y^. pint cream; 

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110 CHAFING DISH. 

simmer 5 minutes and stir in i teaspoonful of lemon juice, 
pepper, salt and the beaten yolks of 2 eggs. Let it sim- 
mer and serve hot. Mrs. W. H. Wells. 



HAM A LA ESPAGNOLE. 

Put I tablespoonful of butter in the dish and when 
melted, a thick slice of ham. Brown well and remove, mix 
with the fat in the dish 2 tablespoonfuls of very fine bread 
crumbs, ^/^ gill good cider, pepper and a little chopped 
parsley. Put back the ham, serve when hot. 

Mrs. Atkinson. 



CREAMED SHRIMPS. 

Cook together 2 tablespoonfuls of butter and i of 
flour with I pint of milk until smooth. Add i can of 
shrimps, salt and paprika; simmer until heated through 
and serve. Lobster may be cooked in the same manner, 
adding the juice oi % a lemon. Miss Longmire. 



LOBSTER WITH VINEGAR SAUCE. 

Boil 2 eggs 20 minutes. Put lobster in the blazer with 
a cup of vinegar and water, % cup of butter, salt and 
pepper. Cook until heated through; add the eggs cut in 
slices; serve. 



CHAFING DISH. Ill 

OYSTERS A LA POULITTE. 

Cook together i pint of cream, i tablespoonful of 
butter and i of flour, stirring constantly. Put in 30 oysters 
and cook 5 minutes; add salt, pepper and 3 grates of nut- 
meg. Serve on toast. Mrs. Adelaide G. Walter. 

KIDNEYS WITH BACON. 
Split lamb kidneys in half and skewer them open with 
wooden toothpicks. Cook in the blazer 6 thin slices of 
bacon, draw to one side and put in the kidneys. Cook 6 
minutes, turning often, until brown and tender; add to the 
gravy i teaspoonful of Worcestershire sauce and serve a 
slice of bacon on toast with each portion of the kidney and 
a little gravy. Mrs. C. H. Bixby. 

SWEETBREADS SAUTE. 
Parboil and blanch the sweetbreads ; cut them in Y^ 
lengthwise and each V2 into 2 pieces. Sprinkle with salt 
and pepper, beat an egg with i tablespoonful of water and 
dip the slices first in this, then in cracker dust and brown 
in the blazer with 2 tablespoonfuls of butter. 

Mrs. D. H. Champlin. 

CALF'S LIVER SAUTE. 
Heat 2 tablespoonfuls of butter in the blazer with i 
teaspoonful of minced onion ; add ^ pound of calf's liver, 
sliced thin, sprinkled with pepper and salt and coated 

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118 CHAFING DISH. 

thickly with flour. Cook to a light brown, turning often. 
When done, draw to the side ; add 2 tablespoonfuls of 
sherry and i of mushroom catsup; boil up once and serve. 

Mrs. Eberman. 



CHICKEN A LA VOLAILLE. 

One tablespoonful of butter melted in the chafing dish, 
I tablespoonful of flour rubbed smoothly into it; add i cup 
cream and stir constantly until it thickens. Cut i cup 
white chicken meat into dice, and 8 button mushrooms cut 
in 4 pieces; add a little celery, cut fine. 

Mrs. V. N. Jones. 

CREAMED OYSTERS. 

Melt in a chafing dish i tablespoonful of butter ; add 
I tablespoonful of flour and stir until smooth. Pour in i 
cup cream and stir until smooth; add salt and pepper and 
if too thick, a little oyster liquor. Put in i pint of oysters 
and cook until the edges are well curled. About 2 minutes 
before serving add a small bunch of celery, cut fine. 

Mrs G. T. Smith. 

MACCARONIED EGGS. 

Melt I tablespoonful of butter over hot water; add J^ 
pint milk and stir in 5 eggs, slightly beaten. When they 
thicken add >^ cup boiled spaghetti chopped into inch 



CHAFING DISH. 113 

lengths, ^ cup button mushrooms, cut in halves, pepper 
and salt and i tablespoonful of chopped parsley. Cook 3 
minutes and serve on rounds of toast garnished with parsley. 

Mrs. a. Emery. 

TOMATOES AND MUSHROOMS. 
Two cups canned tomatoes, i tablespoonful of bread 
crumbs, i cup sliced mushrooms, i tablespoonful of butter, 
salt and pepper. Put the tomatoes in the chafing dish first, 
then the bread crumbs and seasoning; cook a few moments; 
add the mushrooms, he^t through and serve on toast. 

Mrs. J. M. Marshall. 

Chop fine 4 veal kidneys with ^ pound calf's liver; 
season with pepper and salt. Heat a piece of butter in a 
chafing dish, put in the meat and toss about until done. 
Remove from the fire and stir in the beaten yolk of i egg 
and 5^ teaspoonful of lemon juice. Spread on toast and 
serve. 

VEAL KIDNEY SAUTE. 

Chop an onion fine and brown in butter. Cut the kid- 
ney in thin slices; add salt and paprika, cook until tender 
and serve with slices of lemon. 

SUNFLOWER. 
Boil 4 eggs 20 minutes and cool before removing shell. 

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114 CHAFING DISH. 

Make a cream sauce with i pint of milk, i tablespoonful of 
flour and i of butter, rubbed together and stirred into the 
boiling milk. Add the whites of the eggs, chopped fine. 
Season with salt and white pepper. Grate the yolks over 
the top and serve on a green salad dish, which completes 
the idea of a sunflower. Miss Helen M. Topping. 

BARBECUED HAM. 
Cut rather thick slices of cold boiled ham; lay them in 
the blazer and let them fry. When they begin to crisp, 
draw to one side of the dish and add i teaspoonful of vine- 
gar, small teaspoonful of white sugar, a saltspoonful of mus- 
tard and a little pepper. Mix well and cook about 2 
minutes. Mrs. M. W. Hartwell. 

VEAL WITH ASPARAGUS TIPS. 
Boil 2 eggs 20 minutes; rub the yolks with i tablespoon- 
ful of butter to a paste, and heat it with ^ pint of milk in 
the blazer. Stir until blended, then add 2 cups of veal, cut 
fine, and i cup of cooked asparagus tips. Season with salt 
and pepper and cook 5 minutes, adding the chopped whites 
of the eggs. * 

CREAMED CHICKEN. 
Rub 2 tablespoonfuls of butter and i large one of flour 
together, add i cup of milk or cream and i cup of chicken 
stock. Cook over hot water until smooth; add 2 cups of 
cold chicken, cut fine, with salt and white pepper. Cook 3 
minutes and serve. A little chopped parsley is an addition. 

Mrs. J. B. Daniels. 



CHAFING DISH. 115 

CREAMED POTATOES. 
Make a sauce of 2 tables poonfuls of butter, i of flour, 
and % pint milk; season with salt and pepper. When 
thick and smooth add cold boiled potatoes, cut into cubes. 
Heat through and serve hot. This should be done in the 
blazer set into hot water. * Miss Harper. 

DEVILLED TOMATOES. 

Cut the tomatoes into thick slices, without peeling and 
fry in butter. Keep them hot while adding to the butter in 
the blazer i tablespoonful of butter, 1 of vinegar, i tea- 
spoonful of onion juice, i of sugar, % each of made mus- 
tard and salt and a little papsika. Put in drop by drop the 
beaten yolks of 2 eggs, stirring all the time. Lay the 
tomatoes in and serve hot. Mrs. Charles Ingram. 

SHAD-ROES SAUTE. 
Cook the roe 10 minutes in boiling salted water with 1 
teaspoonful of vinegar, throw them in cold water for a few 
minutes, then roll them in flour. Put 2 tablespoonfuls of 
butter in the blazer and lay in the roe, cut into several 
pieces. Cook until done. Serve with melted butter and 
slices of lemon. Mrs. A. G. Walter. 

CREAMED SALMON. 
Prepare a sauce of i tablespoonful each of butter and 
flour, stirred smoothly into i cup of milk. Add i can of 



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116 CHAFING DISH. 

salmon, freed from bones and skin. Season with salt, pap- 
sika and minced parsley. Miss Atkinson. 

RECHAUFFE OF TURKEY. 
Make a sauce of i tablespoonful of butter and i of 
flour with Y2 pint of stock. Stir until well blended, add 
small slices of turkey meat, salt, paprika and 2 tablespoon- 
fuls of sherry wine. Cook 2 minutes longer and serve. 

Mrs. a. E. Taylor. 

EGGS A LA ITALIENNE. 

Melt I tablespoonful of butter in ^ pint of milk. Stir 
in 5 eggs, well beaten, and when they begin to thicken, add 
Yt, cup of boiled spaghetti, chopped, Yt, cup of mushrooms, 
sliced, I tablespoonful of minced parsley, salt and paprika 
to taste. Cook 3 minutes and serve. 

Mrs. J. B. Wheatley. 

STIRRED EGGS. 

Melt I tablespoonful of butter in the blazer, add i gill 
of brown gravy or stock; when hot, stir in 5 eggs beaten, 
salt and pepper, also i tablespoonful of minced parsley. 

CREAMED EGGS. 

Beat together i gill of chicken or veal stock, i of 
cream, salt and pepper. Beat 4 eggs; add; stir until thick. 
Serve. 



CHAFING DISH. 117 

FRICASSEE OF DRIED BEEF. 
Put into the blazer over hot water i pint of milk, i 
tablespoonful of butter and i cup of dried beef, chopped 
fine. Cook 5 minutes and add very slowly 2 well beaten 
eggs. Stir until thick and serve on toast. A Friend. 

CHICKEN WITH MUSHROOMS. 

Make a sauce over hot water of 2 tablespoonfuls of 
butter, I of flour with i pint of milk and i gill of mush- 
room liquor, add i pint of cold chicken. Cook 3 minutes, 
put in i cup of canned mushrooms, sliced. Cook 2 min- 
utes longer and add very slowly the yolks of 2 eggs, salt 
and pepper, stirring all the time. Serve as soon as the 
same is smooth. Mrs. M. W. Hartwell. 

WELSH RAREBIT— No. 1. 
Melt 3 parts of butter in a chafing-dish, then add i 
coff'eecup of grated cheese, 3 tablespoonfuls of beer, i tea- 
spoonful of prepared English mustard, salt to taste. Stir 
constantly. When completely melted add two well beaten 
eggs. Cook one minute and serve on hot buttered toast. 

Mrs. I. M. Bennett. 

WELSH RAREBIT— No. 2. 
Melt ^ tablespoonful of butter in the chafing-dish and 
when very hot add >^ pound of American cheese, grated, 



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118 CHAFING DISH. 

and a little imported ale. As it cooks and shows a tendency 
to stick to the dish, add more ale until the mixture is 
smooth and velvety. Add a heaping teaspoonful of pap- 
rika, and when creamy put a spoonful of it on hot toast. 
Hot plates are absolutely necessary. 

Miss Kate S. Benton. 

WELSH RAREBIT— No. 3. 

One wine glass of cream, i pound of New York cheese' 
I teaspoonful of butter, 2 eggs, i teaspoonful of Worcester- 
shire sauce. Cut the cheese in small pieces. Put butter 
in chafing-dish; when melted add cheese and cream. Stir 
until melted. Add eggs beaten very light, stir all the time 
and serve on hot toast. Care must be taken that eggs do 
not curdle. Mrs. James Hewitt. 

OYSTER STEW. 

Two tablespoonfuls of bread crumbs and ^ cup of 
water, cooked for a few minutes. Add 18 oysters and sim- 
mer until the edges are slightly curled; add 1 tablespoonful 
of butter and Yo cup of cream. Season with parsley, lemon 
juice, salt and pepper. Mrs. C. H. Bixby. 

SCRAMBLED EGGS. 
Beat lightly 6 eggs, yolks and whites separately. Then 
mix and season, adding about ^^3 cup of milk. Cook in 
upper dish, stirring lightly as it thickens. 

Miss Kate S. Benton. 



CHAFING DISH. 119 

FRESH MUSHROOMS. 

Clean and peel the mushrooms, put them in a pan 
with melted butter and a very small piece of garlic; pep- 
per and salt to taste. Let them cook a few minutes, 
pour in one cup of sweet cream and let them simmer 
slowly for ten minutes. Serve very hot. 

Mrs. B. S. Arnulphy. 



CHICKEN. 

A large tablespoonful of butter, stir into it a heap- 
ing teaspoonful of flour. Before it browns add i^ cup 
of white stock, stir a minute, add a little lemon juice, 
white pepper, salt and ^ cup of cream. Boil up once 
and add a pint of chicken, cut in small pieces. Reduce 
the flame and simmer eight minutes. 

Miss Standart. 



FROG'S LEGS FRICASSEE. 

Put 3 pats of butter in the chafing-dish, when melted 
add a little salt and 2 teaspoofuls of lemon juice or vine 
gar. Put in 3 dozen frog's legs, cover the dish and 
cook 13 minutes but do not burn. Drain off the juice, 

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120 CHAFING DISH 

add i}i cupfuls of white sauce, and if too thick, thin 
with the juice. Cook three minutes and serve. 

L. F. E. 

SCRAMBLED EGGS AND SARDINES. 

Take 6 eggs and 2 small.pats of butter and scramble 
together. When almost done, add 4 tablespoonfuls of 
cream and % of Worcestershire sauce. Drop in 6 
skinned sardines, broken into small pieces. 

E. S. W. 

SALMON CREAMED. 

Into a pint of boiling milk stir slowly i}4, table- 
spoonfuls of butter, with the same quantity of flour 
rubbed in, adding ^ teaspoonful of salt, 2 eggs, well 
beaten, then a pint of cold boiled salmon, broken into 
pieces. Simmer five minutes. 

CREAMED EGGS. 

Hard boiled yolks, having half as many bread 
crumbs as eggs, and half as much cheese, season with 
salt and pepper, melted butter. Make into balls, put 
on platter, cover with creamed sauce, sprinkle over with 
bread crumbs and cheese. Put into oven and brown; 
seasoned with onion improves. This is a good way to 
use yolks after making angel cake. Miss Standart. 



CAKE. 

If you would have delicious cake. 

The greatest care, friend, you must take, 

Both how you mix and how yon bake. 

Separate beat the eggs, you know. 

The whites quite light, to look like snow, 

And in the flour, put Cameo. 

With heat intense, should oven glow, 
A pan of cold water will temper it so 
That your cake will never burn, ah! no! 

A COLONIAL DAME'S RECIPE FOR CONNECTI- 
CUT LOAF CAKE. 
(150 years old.) 
Three pounds flour, 2 pounds butter, 2 pounds 
sugar, 6 eggs, 2 pounds of fruit, raisins and citron, nut- 
meg to taste, y^ pint wine and brandy mixed. Make 
sponge over night with ^ pint best yeast, mix in i^ the 
butter. Mrs. E. L. Hale. 

MRS. HENDERSON'S SPONGE CAKE. 

Ten eggs, i pound pulverized sugar, ^ pound 
flour, juice and grated rind of ^ a large lemon. Have 

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122 CAKE. 

one person beat the yolks with y^ the sugar and another 
the whites of the eggs for i^ an hour. Then beat the 
yolks into the whites, stir in lightly the remainder of 
the sugar, then the flour and lemon by degrees, i 
pound of sugar is 3 cupfuls, ^ pound flour is 2^ cups. 

Mrs. J. P. MoNTROss. 

ENGLISH SEED CAKE. 

Stir I cake yeast into i pint warm milk, rub 4 
ounces of butter lightly into 2 pounds flour; add i 
ounce caraway seed, y^ ounce allspice and ^ pound 
sugar; add the milk to this, mixing well and kneading 
into a light dough. Line 2 cake tins with buttered 
paper, pour in the cake and let it stand in a warm place 
for more than an hour, then bake in a well heated oven 
i^ hours. Mrs. J. H. R. Bond. 

SUNSHINE CAKE. 

Yolks of II eggs, 2 cups sugar, i of butter, 3 of 
flour, i^ teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking powder. 
Beat the yolks very light, cream the butter and sugar; 
add flour and baking powder last. 

Mrs. R. Longmire. 

QUEEN OF ALL CAKES. 

Bake angel's food in jelly tins, about ^ an inch 
thick, and allow to become perfectly cold. Whip i 
pint sweet cream, sweeten and add vanilla and i pound 



CAKE. 128 

almonds, blanched and chopped fine. Spread very 
thick between the layers. Powdered sugar over the top. 

Mrs. Anna W. Knight. 

ENGLISH SEED CAKE. 

One pound flour, ^ of butter, ^ of sugar, 2 eggs 

well beaten, ^ pound seeds (caraway) or ^ pound 

raisins and a little candied orange peel; enough milk to 

make a thin dough. Put into 2 pans and bake i}( hours. 

Mrs. Earl W. Spencer. 

RAISIN CAKE. 
One cup brown sugar, % of butter, % of sour 
milk, 1% oi sifted flour, i of chopped raisins, 2 eggs, 
or yolks of 4, cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg to suit the 
taste. Mrs. Neal. 

CUP CAKE. 
Four cups flour, 3 of sugar, i of butter, i of sweet 
milk, 5 eggs. Flavor with any preferred extract, 3 
teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking powder sifted in the flour, 
Mrs. Virginia M. Harper. 

SPONGE CAKE. 
Four eggs, 2 cups sug'ar, 2 cups flour, fz cup boil- 
ing water, 2 teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking powder, 
lemon. Mrs. S. H. Stevens. 

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124 CAKE. 

RIBBON CAKE. 

Beat together to a cream ^ cup butter and 2 of 
sugar; add 3 cups flour, into which has been sifted 2 
teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking powder; stir in i cup 
milk and the whites of 6 eggs beaten to a froth. Bake 
in 3 layers and for the middle layer take out 4 table- 
spoonfuls of the mixture and add to it i tablespoonful 
of molasses, y^ cup flour, i cup chopped raisins, i^ tea- 
spoonful of cloves, ^ of soda, i teaspoonful of cinna- 
mon and the yolks of 2 eggs. Put this layer between 
the other 2 with jelly or soft icing and ice the top. 

Mrs. J. F. Dickson. 

BLACK AND WHITE CAKE. 
(Black Part.) 
Cream ^ cup butter and i of sugar; add y^ cup 
milk and the yolks of 4 eggs, well beaten; sift i tea- 
spoonful of Cameo baking powder with ij^ cup of 
flour and stir in, then i cup chopped raisins, i of currants, 
I teaspoonful of cloves, i of cinnamon, i of allspice 
and i^ a nutmeg. Bake y^ an hour, then pour over the 
top the following: 

WHITE PART. 

Cream ^ cup butter and i of sugar; add %, cup 
milk and the whites of 4 eggs, well beaten; sift i tea- 
spoonful of Cameo baking powder with i}4, cups of 



CAKE. 125 

flour and add, pour this mixture over the black part and 
bake until done. Ice with boiled icing. 

Mrs. R. Longmire. 

POUND CAKE. 
Beat I pound butter to a cream and add i pound 
powdered sugar gradually. Beat 14 eggs without sepa- 
rating until very light and stir in, beating vigorously; 
add I pound sifted flour, }l teaspoonful mace and a 
wineglass of brandy. Bake 1 5^ hours in a moderate 
oven. Mrs. F. W. Norwood. 

PINEAPPLE CAKE. 
Cream ]4 cup of butter with i cup of powdered 
sugar, and ^ cup of milk, 2 cups of flour and 2 table- 
spoonfuls of corn starch, into which has been sifted 2 
heaping teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking powder. Add 
the whites of 4 eggs, beaten. Selected. 

FILLING. 

Beat the whites of 2 eggs to a stiff froth, add i cup 
of powdered sugar and spread between the layers. 
Drain the juice from a can of pineapples and chop fine, 
sprinkling it over the frosting. Shell % pound of pecan 
nuts and put them over the frosting. Whip cream with 
powdered sugar and spread over top and sides 

Miss Gertrude A. Hubbard. 

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126 CAKE. 

FRELINGHUYSEN CAKE. 

Cream i cup of butter with i^ of sugar, add i cup 
of molasses, i of milk, 4^ of flour, 3 eggs, i teaspoon- 
ful each of soda, cloves and cinnamon, i nutmeg, 2 
cups of seeded raisins, and i large cup of nut meats, if 
desired. Mrs. A. F. Sargent. 

SPONGE CAKE. 
Beat 2 cups of sugar with the yolks of 6 eggs until 
foamy, add gradually 4 tablespoonfuls of cold water. 
Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, add a pinch 
of salt. Mix all well together with 2 scant cups of sifted 
flour. Flavor with lemon. Mrs. S. W. Sea. 

SPICE CAKE. 
Mix I yz cups of brown sugar with i of butter, i of 
milk, 3 eggs, 2 heaping teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking 
powder, sifted with 1^2. cups of flour, i teaspoonful of 
cinnamon, a little nutmeg, a pinch of allspice, i cup of 
raisins; vanilla flavoring. Bake in an angel food pan in 
a slow oven. Mrs. Edward Carry. 

MRS. GOODRICH'S BERRY CAKE. 

Two cups of sugar, scant ^ cup of butter, i of 
milk, 4 of flour, 2 or 3 eggs, 3 teaspoonfuls of Cameo bak- 
ing powder, i box of blueberries or raspberries. Flour 
the berries and stir in lightly the last thing. Is good hot 
for tea or cold for lunch. Mrs. H. L. Humphrey. 



CAKE. 127 

NELLIE'S CAKE. 
Whites of 8 eggs, 2 cups of sugar, i of butter, 3 of 
flour, 2 even teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking powder, i cup 
of milk. Flavor to taste. Cream the butter and add, 
alternately, the milk and 2 cups of flour, a little of each 
slov;ly. Beat the whites of eggs and sugar together, until 
smooth, like icing, add flavoring, then the last cup of 
flour, into which the baking powder has been well mixed, 
alternately with the eggs and sugar, until all is 
thoroughly mixed. Bake in a loaf or 2 layers. 

Miss Nellie Harper. 

EGOLESS CAKE. 
One and one-half teacups of sugar, y^, of butter, i 
of sour milk, 3 of sifted flour, 2 of chopped raisins, 1 
teaspoonful of soda. Cinnamon and nutmeg to taste. 

Mrs. F. Chapman. 

WALNUT CAKE. 

Two and one-half cups of flour, i ^ of powdered 
sugar, % of butter, whites of 6 eggs, frothed, 2 tea- 
spoonfuls of Cameo baking powder, 5^ cup of milk, i 
large cup of walnuts. Mrs. F. B. Hooker. 

CARAMEL CAKE. 
Boil Yz cake of Baker's chocolate, i cup of sugar, 
i^ of sweet milk and the yolk of i ^g% until it thickens, 

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128 CAKE. 

then let it cool. Cream cup of butter with i of sugar, 
add the yolks of 2 eggs, beaten, i cup of milk, then stir 
in the above mixture, if cool, then 2^ cups of flour, 
into which 2 teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking powder have 
been sifted and i teaspoonful of vanilla. Bake in 4 
layers. 

FILLING. 

Boil 2 cups of sugar, a small piece of butter and ;/3 
cup of milk 4 minutes, then stir constantly until it 
thickens. Should it thicken too much add a few drops 
of milk, until it will spread easily. 

Mrs. George Mehring. 

NUT CAKE. 

Beat y^ cup of butter and i^ of sugar to a cream, 
add y^ cup of milk and 2 of flour, into which has been 
sifted i^ teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking powder. 
Flavor and add i tumbler of nut meats. 

Mrs. a. G. Jones. 

WHITE FRUIT CAKE. 

Beat to a cream i cup of butter, add 2 cups of pul- 
verized sugar; beat well. Sift into 3 cups of flour 2 tea 
spoonfuls of Cameo baking powder, add to the creamed 
butter and sugar, alternately, with the beaten whites of 
6 eggs. Bake in jelly cake tins and while hot put be- 
tween the layers the following filling: Chop fine y^ 



CAKE. 129 

pound each of figs, seeded raisins, citron, blanched 
almonds, and stir them into 3 whites of eggs, well 
beaten, i teacup of powdered sugar and the juice of i 
lemon. Ice the whole with i white of egg, well beaten 
with the juice of ^ a lemon and i cup of powdered 
sugar. Mrs. D. H. Champlin. 

ANGEL FOOD FRUIT CAKE. 
Use any angel food recipe and bake in jelly tins, 
not greased. Filling: One-fourth pound candied pine- 
apple and cherries, the pineapple sliced very thin and 
the cherries halved. Make a boiled icing, flavor with 
lemon; spread over the cake and lay the fruit upon it. 

Mrs. Morehouse. 

WHITE CAKE. 
Cream i cup of butter with 2 of sugar, add i of milk 
and I cup of flour, not sifted. Beat the whites of 7 
eggs and add ji to the mixture, then i cup of flour with 
I teaspoonful of Cameo baking powder mixed in it, and 
another ^ of the egg, then mix in lightly the remainder 
of the egg and another cup of flour. Flavor and bake 
in a moderate oven. Mrs. Florence Chapman. 

ORANGE CAKE. 
Cream i cup of butter with 2 of sugar. Mix 3 even 

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130 CAKE. 

teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking powder with 4 scant cups 
of sifted flour, add i cup of milk and the whites of 8 
eggs, stiffly beaten. 

FILLING. 

Boil until quite thick the juice of 4 oranges, i^ 
lemons, 8 egg yolks and 3^ pound of sugar rubbed to- 
gether. Just before removing from the fire add the 
whites of 4 eggs, well beaten. Let it cool and spread 
between the layers. Cover with boiled icing and orna- 
ment with slices of thinly cut orange. Miss Knapp. 

BANBURY CAKES. 

Cut very fine ^ pound fresh candied orange peel, J^ 
pound candied lemon peel, i pound currants, % ounce 
cinnamon, 3^ ounce allspice, ^ pound butter, creamed; 
mix these ingredients well together and keep in glass 
jar. Make a rich pie crust of i heaping tablespoonful 
lard, 3 of flour, a teaspoonful salt, blend with ice- 
water, not too wet; cut from this paste round pieces as 
large as a saucer, put a large teaspoonful of the above 
mixture in the middle, fold over and pinch the edges 
together; turn them over, brush with the whites of eggs 
and dust fine granulated sugar over them. Bake in 
moderate oven. Mrs. Ben Williams. 

CHRISTMAS FRUIT CAKE. 
One pound butter, i pound sugar, i pound flour, 10 



CAKE. 131 

common sized eggs or 12 small ones, 2 pounds raisins 
(stoned), 2 pounds currants, 2 pounds citron (chopped 
fine), I cup molasses, i large glass of wine (sherry); 
spices to the taste. Mrs. E. C. Long. 

BLACKBERRY JAM CAKE. 

One cup sugar, i j^ cups flour, ^ cup butter, i cup 
blackberry jam, 3 eggs, i teaspoonful soda mixed in 
cream, 2 whole nutmegs, cinnamon to taste; stir alto- 
gether; bake in two layers, with icing between when 
cold. Mrs. A. E. Coleman. 

CHOCOLATE COFFEE CAKE. 
One cup of brown sugar, ^ cup of butter, y^ cup 
of weak coffee, i small teaspoonful of soda, 2 eggs, 2 
cups of flour; then grate i cup of chocolate, put with 
half cup of coffee and i of brown sugar and i yolk egg; 
cook in a custard boiler and add to the above. Make 
into layers and use boiled frosting between. 

Miss Helen M. Topping. 

GRANDMOTHERS' JUMBLES. 
One pound flour, y^, pound sugar, ^ pound butter, 
a little cream, the rind of three lemons with the juice of 
two, all made into a paste; roll in long rolls size of lit- 
tle finger, then wind round and round till size of ordi- 
nary cookies; roll in sugar. Mrs. E. L. Hale. 

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ISa CAKE. 

KUCHEN. 
Three-quarter pound flour, i^ pound butter, ^^ 
pound sugar, a little salt; mix well, then roll out and 
cut with a wineglass; brush each cookie with Qgg, and 
sprinkle with sugar and cinnamon before baking. 

Mrs. W. H. Benton. 

VANILLA WAFERS. 
One cup butter, 2 cups sugar, y^ cup cold water, i 
teaspoonful soda, 2 teaspoonfuls vanilla; mix stiff, roll 
thin and bake quick. Mrs. F. B. Hooker. 

SAND CAKES. 
Sift 2 cups flour and add 2 cups sugar, break in 2 
eggs, add i cup butter, mix as soft as possible; roll thin 
and cut out. 

ICING. 

Take whites of 2 eggs, add powdered sugar and 
cinnamon, put 3 blanched almonds on each cake and 
drop icing in center from spoon; sift flour over the cake 
tins. Bake and let them stand a few minutes after tak- 
ing from oven. Mrs. F. C. Swett. 

BACHELOR'S BUTTONS. 

One and one-half cups of flour, 2 even tablespoon- 
fuls of butter rubbed together, i scant cup of sugar, 
whites of 2 eggs. Divide the dough into pieces the size 
of walnuts; roll in sugar and bake on paper. 

Mrs. W. H. French. 



CAKE. 133 

SUGAR COOKIES. 
A cup of butter, 2 of sugar, yi of sour milk, with 
I teaspoonful soda dissolved in it; 2 eggs; flavor with 
nutmeg and caraway seeds; roll granulated sugar on 
top. Mrs. J. Y. Scammon. 

HERMITS. 

Cream together 2 cups of sugar and i of butter, add 
3 eggs, ^ teaspoonful of soda dissolved in 3 tablespoon- 
fuls of milk, I cup of raisins, seeded and chopped, i 
nutmeg, i teaspoonful each of cloves and cinnamon, 5 
cups of flour; roll out i/^ inch thick, cut with round cutr 
ter, bake in a quick oven 12 minutes. 

Mrs. J. H. Reeves. 

Oakland, Cal. 
JUMBLES. 
One-half pound of butter, 10 ounces of sugar, 12 of 
flour, 2 eggs, I tablespoonful of milk, soda the size of a 
bean. Save half the sugar to roll the jumbles in and 
flavor to taste. Mrs. W. H. Low. 

CRULLERS. 
One cup of sugar, ^ of butter, ^ of sweet milk, 3 
eggs, 2 teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking powder, flour 
enough to roll out. Fr}^ in hot lard. 

Mrs. Virginia M. Harper. 



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Coacb and Car Varnisbes and Colors. 



134 CAKE. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

One cup of sugar, i of sweet milk, 2 eggs, i table- 
spoonful of melted butter, 3 teaspoonfuls of Cameo bak- 
ing powder, a little salt. Roll out as soft as possible. 

Mrs. W. H. Low. 

CRULLERS. 
Cream 2 tablespoonfuls of soft butter and 8 of pul- 
verized sugar, add 3 eggs wel 1 beaten, y^ teaspoonful of 
salt, and 6 tablespoonfuls of milk or 2 tablespoonfuls of 
milk may be left out and 2 of sherry wine put in. Sift 
2 level teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking powder into flour 
enough to roll out lightly, fry in boiling lard and sift 
fine sugar over them. Mrs. E. J. Myers. 

MADELINES. 
Cream a small cup of butter with 2 of powdered 
sugar, add i cup of milk and sift 3 small teaspoonfuls 
Cameo baking powder with 1 cups of flour and % of 
corn starch. Beat 4 eggs separately, leaving out 2 of 
the whites for icing, add with i cup of currants and 1 of 
nut-meats to the cake and bake in small tins. Flavor 
with almond and vanilla. Mrs. E. M. Dunbar. 

MATILDA'S FRUIT CAKE. 
One cup each of sugar, molasses, seeded raisins 
and milk, 3 tablespoonfuls of butter, 3 eggs, 3^ cups 
of flour, with 2 teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking powder, 
I teaspoonful of vanilla. Mrs. Chas. A. Knorr. 



CAKE. 135 

CURRANT CAKE. 
Cream together i cup of butter, 2 of sugar, add 5 
eggs, 4 cups of flour, i of milk, i pound of currants, 
washed, dried and floured, added the last thing; 2 scant 
teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking powder mixed with the 
flour. The grated rind of a lemon and a little almond 
extract greatly improves the cake. This quantity will 
make 2 loaves. Mrs. Harry Gower. 

ROCKS. 
Mix together like cake i cup of butter, 1 14 of sugar, 
2^ of flour, 2 of raisins chopped, 3 eggs, i teaspoonful 
of cinnamon, i of soda in a little warm water, i pound 
of English walnuts broken into small pieces, a pinch of 
salt. Drop from spoon on buttered tins and bake in 
quick oven. Mrs. Helen Atkinson. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

Four cups of flour, 2 cups of brown sugar, i cup of 
butter, 4 eggs, i cup of molasses, i cup of sour milk, >3 
wineglass of brandy, 1 teaspoonful of soda, 2 tablespoonfuls 
of cinnamon, 2 of cloves. 2 pounds of raisins, Yz of currants, 
y^ of citron, >^ cup of flour to sprinkle over fruit before 
putting in mixture. Bake 3 hours in moderate oven in a 6 
quart pan. Mrs. Standart. 

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136 CAKE. 

MY GREAT-GRANDMOTHER'S RECIPES. 

WEDDING CAKE. 

Three pounds of flour, 3 of sugar, 3 of butter, 6 of cur- 
rants, 3 of raisins, 2 of citron, i ounce of mace, i of cinna- 
mon, I of nutmeg, }4 of clove, % pint of brandy, 2 dozen 
eggs. Cream butter and sugar, add the eggs, which have 
been previously beaten, and the brandy. Mix the spice and 
fruit with flour and stir all thoroughly together. Bake in 6 
loaves about 4 hours. 

SUGAR GINGERBREAD. 

One cup of sugar; 3^ cup of butter, 2 eggs, yi tea- 
spoonful of soda, ^ of cream, about 2 large cups of flour, 
ginger and vanilla. Rub butter and sugar to a cream and 
add the eggs and soda dissolved in the cream, also the 
flavoring. Then knead in flour enough so that it can be 
rolled out. Roll thin on tin sheets and sprinkle a little 
sugar on the top. 

GINGER SNAPS. 

One cup of molasses, 2^ cup of sugar, ^3 cup of butter, 
yi teaspoonful of soda, % teaspoonful of ginger, j4 tea- 
spoonful of cinnamon, flour. Stir molasses, sugar and but- 
together and boil about 3 minutes. Remove from the stove 
and add the ginger and soda (dry soda). Begin at once to 
stir in flour with cinnamon added. Stir till the mass cati 



CAKE. im 

be put upon the moulding board and knead till it can be 
rolled out smooth and thin. It can be rolled on tin sheets 
and cut in squares or shapes before baking. 

NEW YEAR'S COOKIES. 

Three- fourths of a pound of butter, i pound of sugar^ 
3 eggs, I cup of sour milk, i teaspoonful of saleratus, % 
cup of caraway seed, a little mace, flour. Rub butter and 
sugar to a cream, add the eggs, milk, saleratus, mace, cara- 
way seeds and flour to make it stiff" enough to roll thin. 
Roll with a little sugar, cut in shapes, and bake about ten 
minutes. Miss Noyes. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Beat until light i cup of butter with 3 of brown sugar, 
add I cup of milk and 4 of flour with 3 teaspoonfuls of 
Cameo baking powder. Put in also the yolks of 7 eggs and 
9 tablespoonfuls of grated chocolate. Mrs. A. W. P. 

CARAMEL CAKE. 

Large cup of sugar, i^ of bi^itter, 3 eggs, beaten sep- 
arately, 2 teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking powder, put 
into flour enough to make stiff, flavor with vanilla; bake 
in 3 layers. Filling: Boil 2 coffeecups of ''C* sugar 
with I cup of milk and butter the size of an egg until 



ynsmz 



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Coach and Car Varnishes and Colors. 



138 CAKE. 

waxy, but not too hard; flavor with vanilla, stir until 
cool and spread between the cakes. 

Mrs. J. L. Rhodes. 

HICKORY NUT JUMBLES. 

One-half pound of butter, ^ pound of sugar, 3 eggs, 
y^ pound of flour, 2 cups of hickory nut kernels, flavor 
with vanilla; bake in a moderate oven. M. L. B. 

FEATHER CAKE. 

Two cups of sugar, J^ cup of butter, 3 cups of flour, 
3 eggs, 3 teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking powder, juice 
and rind of i lemon. Ice with soft icing and serve with 
tea or chocolate the day they are made. 

Mrs. J. H. Long. 

ALMOND LAYER CAKE. 

Two cups of pastry flour or i ^ cups of bread flour, 

2 teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking powder, i cup of gran- 
ulated sugar, y^ cup of butter, y^ cup of milk, whites of 

3 eggs. Cream butter with hand, slowly, add sugar, 
then milk, drop by drop, alternating with flour, lastly, 
the beaten whites of the eggs. Divide mixture into two 
pans, bake one plain; over the other sprinkle i/^ cup of 
blanched sliced almonds, dust over with a little pow- 
dered sugar; allow 12 minutes for baking. Filling: One 
cup of granulated sugar, i^ cup of water; boil; white of 
I egg, beaten stiff, beat into mixture, add ^ cup of 
chopped almonds. Mrs. Standart. 



CAKE. 139 

BREAD CAKE. 

Take i cup light bread sponge, mix to it i cup of 
sugar, ^ of buttfer, ^ of sour milk, i^ of flour, 2 eggs, 
i^ teaspoonful of soda, 2 cups of raisins, spice; let it 
rise. M. W. S. 

ALMOND CAKE. 

Beat to a cream i pound of powdered sugar and i^ 
pound of butter, add 8 eggs, beaten separately and very 
light; add to I pound of flour 2 teaspoonfuls of Cameo 
baking powder. Blanch and beat fine i cup of almonds, 
with a little rosewater and add a teaspoonful of bitter 
almonds and i wineglassful of brandy. 

FIVE CAKE. 

Cream i cup of butter with 2 of pulverized sugar, 
add 5 eggs, beaten separately, Yi cup of milk, 3 cups of 
flour and % teaspoonful soda, dissolved in the milk. 
Flavor with vanilla. L. W. A. 

DOUGH CAKE. 

Four teacups of raised dough, 2 cups sugar, i of 
butter, 2 of raisins, 4 eggs, spice to taste, i wineglass of 
brandy. Let it rise in the pans, until light. Bake 
slowly. Mrs. B. Smith. 

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140 CAKE. 

COFFEE CAKE. 

Cream i cup of butter and i of sugar, add i of mo- 
lasses, I of strong coffee, 2 of raisins, ^^ of milk, i tea- 
spoonful of soda, I quart of flour. Spices. 

M. D. E. 

SILVER CAKE. 

Cream i cup of butter with i of powdered sugar, 
add 3 cups of flour, whites of 8 eggs, 2 teaspoonfuls of 
Cameo baking powder, 24 almonds, blanched and chop- 
ped. Flavor with extract of bitter almonds. 

GOLD CAKE. 

Cream i cup of butter with 2 of sugar, add 4 cups 
of flour, I of milk, yolks of 8 eggs, i teaspoonful of 
Cameo baking powder, nutmeg and citron. 

Miss Mary E. D. 

ORANGE CAKE. 

Beat to a cream i/^ cup of butter with 2 of sugar, ^ 
cup of milk, 2^ of flour, 5 eggs, beaten separately. 
Bake in layers. Take the white of one of the eggs 
and beat to a stiff froth, beat in powdered sugar and the 
juice and grated rind of i orange, until thick enough to 
spread between the layers. Miss Nellie H. 

HICKORY NUT CAKE. 
Cream together ^ cup of butter with i ^ of sugar. 



CAKE. 141 

3/1 cup of milk, 2 of flour, 2 teaspoonfuls of Cameo bak- 
ing powder, whites of 4 eggs, i cup of hickory nut meats. 

Miss Susan J. F. 

CITRON CAKE. 

Cream 2 cups of butter with 3 of sugar, add i cup 
milk, 5 of flour, 6 eggs, i teaspoonful of soda, sliced 
citron. 

SHURDIE CAKE. 

Cream i cup of butter with 2 of sugar, add i cup of 
milk, 2 eggs, and 4 cups of flour, into which sift 2 tea- 
spoonfuls of Cameo baking powder. Put in i tumbler- 
ful of nuts and flavor with lemon. 

Mrs. J. W. Harrison. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

Beat together i cup of white sugar, yolks of 3 eggs, 
I cup of milk, butter the size of an egg, small teaspoon- 
ful of salt, the beaten whites of the eggs, and 3 tea- 
spoonfuls of Cameo baking powder sifted into enough 
flour to roll out soft. Fry in lard and dust with sugar. 

Mrs. J. H. Rhodes. 



VOSSES 



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Coacb and Car Yarnishes and Colors. 



142 CAKE. 

SUGAR COOKIES. 

Two cups of sugar, i of butter, 2 eggs, ^ cup of 
sour milk, level teaspoonful of soda, nutmeg or lemon 
extract. Mrs. Roosevelt. 



GINGER COOKIES. 

Boil up once 2 cups of molasses, ^ of sugar, i of 
butter, I tablespoonful of ginger and a little cinnamon. 
When cool add 2 well beaten egg^ and i teaspoonful of 
soda. Mix rather soft with flour and do not roll very 
thin. Mrs. Neeld. 



RAISED CAKE. 

Two heaping cups of raised bread dough, 2 cups of 
sugar, I of butter, i of seeded raisins, ^ teaspoonful of 
soda, lemon extract, cinnamon and nutmeg. 

Mrs. Neeld. 



FRIED CAKES. 

Rub to a cream i teacup of sugar and i heaping 
tablespoonful of butter, 3 eggs, beaten separately, i coffee 
cup of sweet milk, 4 teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking pow- 
der, put into flour, and flour enough to rollout very soft. 

Miss Clara Williams. 



CONFECTIONERY, 



Roly-poly, isn't he fat? 

Plump as a peach, yes, more than that; 

Candy was his hourly cry, 

Candy was his bosom's sigh. 

CREAM PATTIES. 

The whites of 2 eggs beaten, 2 tablespoonfuls of cold 
water. Stir in sifted confectionery sugar slowly until stiff 
enough to mould in patties. Flavor with peppermint^ 
vanilla, wintergreen or chocolate. To color them pink for 
wintergreen flavoring, use the juice from stewed cranberries. 
Miss Harriette A. Richardson. 

MARSHMALLOWS. 

One-half pound white gum arabic dissolved in i pint 
of water and add 5^ pound fine sugar, place over the fire 
until it thickens ; add the whites of 4 eggs beaten stiff. 
Flavor with vanilla, pour in tins, sprinkle lightly with corn 
starch. 



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VMrIi ISHLO Coach and Car Varnisbes and Colors 



144 CONFECTIONERY. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

One and a half pounds of sugar, i teaspoonful of 
vanilla, J^ pound "Baker's" chocolate, i^ pound butter, i 
cup cream. Grate the chocolate and put it on the stove 
with the cream ; stir the sugar in gradually, then add the 
butter, boil well for lo minutes and add i teaspoonful of 
vanilla before taking off the fire. 

Mrs. E. a. S. Clark. 

FUDGES. 

One and a half pounds pulverized sugar, ]^ pound 
"Baker's" chocolate, li pound butter, i teaspoonful of 
vanilla, i cup cream. Grate the chocolate, add the cream, 
then the butter and sugar. Boil until the mixture is thick, 
stirring frequently; before removing from the fire, add the 
vanilla. Pour into a buttered pan and cut in squares. 

Mrs. W. H. Benton. 



VASSAR FUDGES. 

Boil, stirring constantly, 2 cups granulated sugar, i of 
milk, butter the size of an egg, Yz cake "Baker's" chocolate, 
until the spoon parts the boiling candy so that the bottom 
of the chafing dish can be seen; add i tablespoonful of 
vanilla and stir until nearly stiff, pour into buttered pans 
and mark into squares. Miss Katharine Smith. 



CONFECTIONERY. 145 

FUDGES. 
Put into a saucepan 2 cups of sugar, i of milk, a 
piece of butter as large as an English walnut and i^ cake 
chocolate cut fine. Boil 20 minutes, add i teaspoonful of 
vanilla; stir in a cool place until stiff; put into buttered 
pans an inch thick and cut into squares. 

Miss Evadnah Williams. 

PEANUT CANDY. 

Melt 2 cups sugar, stirring constantly; add i cup 
chopped peanuts ; pour into shallow pans to cool and cut 
in squares or long pieces. Miss Louise Gregg. 

BUTTER SCOTCH. 

Boil I cup sugar, 5/2 of water, 3 tablespoonfuls of 
vinegar and i of butter until it becomes brittle in water. 

Miss Louise Gregg. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS 

Boil T cup molasses, i of brown sugar, i of milk, 
butter the size of an egg, i tablespoon of glycerine; when 
nearly done add i cup "Baker's" unsweetened chocolate, 
grated. Test it in cold water. Pour into buttered tins 
and when cool cut into squares. Mrs. A. W. Knight. 



y/^stms 



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Coacb and Car yaroishes and Colors. 



146 CONFECTIONERY. 

COARSE CARAMELS. 

Three cups light brown sugar, i of milk, ys of butter, 
4 squares "Baker's" chocolate. Mrs. James Hewitt. 

MOLASSES CANDY. 

Boil 2 cups molasses, i of sugar, i tablespoonful of 
vinegar and I of butter until it becomes hard in water. 
When nearly done add a pinch of soda. Pour into shallow 
tins and when cool, pull until a light brown color. 

Miss Louise Gregg. 



CREAM CANDY. 

Two cups of sugar, i cup of water, i teaspoonful of 
butter, I small teaspoonful of cream tartar, i teaspoon- 
ful of vanilla. Boil without stirring until it wall harden 
in cold water. After taking from the stove stir in the 
vanilla and turn out on a greased platter. Begin to pull 
as soon as you can handle it. Mrs. Rhodes. 

NUT CANDY. 

Two cups of New Orleans molasses, ^ cup of 
brown sugar, i coffeecup of walnut meats. Boil sugar 

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CONFECTIONERY. 147 

and molasses until it will harden quickly in water. Add 
a piece of butter and walnut meats just before removing 
from fire. Pour in shallow pans to cool. 

CREAM CARAMELS. 

Two cups of light brown sugar, ^ cup of sweet 
cream. Let this boil hard 5 to 10 minutes, then beat it 
to a cream; add vanilla. Pour into a buttered pan, flat- 
ten out and cut in squares. 

COCOANUT CANDY. 

Two cups of cocoanut, i cup of sugar, 2 tablespoon- 
fuls of corn starch, whites of 2 eggs. Mould in little 
balls and put on buttered paper. Dry in a slow oven. 

MAPLE SYRUP CANDY. 

Two cups of maple syrup, ^ teaspoonful of cream 
of tartar, 5^ of vanilla, 15^ cups of hickorynut meats. 
Boil the syrup and cream of tartar till a little of the 
syrup dropped in cold water will form a ball in the fin- 
gers. Remove from the fire and cool. When luke- 
warm stir till it becomes creamy, add the vanilla and 
nuts and pour immediately into a buttered tin pan. It 

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148 CONFECTIONERY. 

is better to have the candy at least J^ inch in thickness 
when poured out in the pan. Miss Noyes. 



WHITE TAFFY. 

Two pounds of sugar, i pint of water, i^ tea^poon- 
ful of cream of tartar, vanilla. Boil sugar, water and 
cream of tartar till, when tested in cold water, it will 
snap. Pour out on buttered marble slab to cool. Drop 
a little vanilla on the top and when it has cooled suffi- 
ciently to make it white and glossy, pull into strips 
and cut into small pieces. ' Miss Noyes. 



CREAM PEPPERMINTS. 

Three pounds of granulated sugar, i cup of water, 
i^ teaspoonful of cream of tartar, oil of peppermint. 
Boil sugar, cream of tartar and water rapidly till, when 
a little is dropped in cold water, it will just form into a 
soft ball in the fingers. Be sure not to stir the syrup 
after it has commenced to boil or it will grain. When 
the '-soft ball" will form, remove instantly from the fire 
and allow it to become lukewarm. Then stir with a 
wooden paddle, always in the same direction, adding a 
few drops of oil of peppermint, until it has become per- 

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CONFECTIONERY. 149 

fectly smooth and creamy. If the candy grains water 
can be added and it can be boiled again. Drop on par- 
afine paper, a marble slab or plate of glass. 

CREAM WINTERGREENS. 
These are made the same as the peppermints, ex- 
cept that oil of winter green is substituted for oil of pep- 
permint. Miss Noyes. 




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PICKLES AND PRESERVES. 



COMING FRUIT. 

If fruit you jelly, preserve or can 

Take care that you skin it, close as you can, 

See that every bubble is out of the jar, 

If those are left in, they, the best fruit, will mar; 

Follow close this rule and there is in reason 

Why you can't have fresh fruit at every season. 

WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE. 

(Genuine.) 

Two ounces of cayenne pepper pods, 2 ounces of white 
mustard seed, 2 ounces of ground cloves, y^ ounce of 
ground mace, i^ pounds of shalots, 4 cents worth of gar- 
lic, i^ pound of horse radish, 1 gallon of brown vinegar. 
Mix all together in a jar, stirring every day for a month; 
boil and strain. It will be fit for use in a week, 

Mrs. C. G. F. Wells. 

CUCUMBER SAUCE. 

Take 36 large, green cucumbers, 4 large, white onions, 
peel and chop fine; add i^ cups of fine salt and let them 
drain 8 hours in a hair sieve. Then add ^ cup of black 

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PICKLES AND PRESERVES. 151 

mustard seed, Y^ cup of black pepper; mix well together, 
put in a stone jar, and cover with hot cider vinegar. After 
standing a week, drain several hours, and cover with fresh 
boiling vinegar. Put in Mason jars and seal while hot. 

Mrs. B. R. Wells. 

TOMATO BUTTER. 

Four pounds of ripe tomatoes, 4 pounds of brown 
sugar, I pint of vinegar, ground spices to taste, cinnamon, 
cloves and allspice. Peel and heat the tomatoes; when 
softened press through a colander, add the other ingredients 
and boil until thick. Very nice with meats. 

Mrs. J. F. Dickson. 

TOMATO SOY. 

One peck of tomatoes peeled, i quart of vinegar, i 
pound of sugar, i even teaspoonful of ground cloves. Boil 
down one-half. Mrs. C. G. L. Kelso. 

GOOSEBERRY CATSUP. 

Nine pounds of gooseberries, 6 pounds of sugar, 3 
quarts of vinegar; boil the fruit alone and strain, add sugar 
and vinegar, with cloves, cinnamon and allspice to taste; 
boil one hour. Mrs. S. H. Stevens. 



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Coacb and Car Yarnisbes and Colors. 



152 PICKLES AND PRESERVES. 

SWEET GREEN TOMATO PICKLES. 
Eight pounds of tomatoes, 2 pounds of sugar, 3 pints 
of good cider vinegar, i ounce of cloves, i ounce of cinna- 
mon, Yz ounce of allspice, y^. ounce of mace, J^ of a tea- 
spoonful of salt. Chop the tomato and cook it a few min- 
utes, (it may be cooked by steaming) scald the spices and 
sugar in the vinegar and pour upon the tomato. 

Mrs. H. L. L. Ladd. 

. CHOW CHOW. 
One-fourth of a peck of green tomatoes, i^ of a peck 
of white onions, i^ of a peck of pickling string beans, i 
dozen large, green peppers, i large head of cabbage, i 
pound box of mustard, i^ of a pound of white mustard 
seed, I ounce of celery seed, ^ ounce of turmeric, ^ ounce 
of cinnamon, 4 tablespoonfuls of black pepper, 2 pounds of 
sugar. Chop the vegetables, remove the seeds from the 
peppers, sprinkle each layer with salt, let it stand over 
night, then strain and rinse in clear water. Put in a por- 
celain kettle a layer of vegetables and a layer of spices; 
cover with the best cider vinegar and boil 20 minutes. Can 
be used immediately. Mrs. Walter R. Comstock. 

MANDRAM. 

Equal parts of onions, cucumbers and green peppers 
(without seeds) served with a French dressing. 

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PICKLES AND PRESERVES. 153 

CHILI SAUCE. 

Twenty-four large, ripe tomatoes, lo medium sized 
onions, 3 large red peppers, 10 small long peppers, 5 table- 
spoonfuls of salt, 5 tablespoonfuls of sugar, 2 tablespoonfuls 
of cinnamon, r large tablespoonful of celery salt, i tea- 
spoonful each of cloves and allspice, i ounce of mustard 
seed, 7 cups of vinegar. Chop onions and peppers, skin 
the tomatoes, boil 2 hours. Mrs. Harry Gower. 

ORANGE MARMALADE. 

Slice 13 large oranges and 5 lemons very thin, remov- 
ing the seeds and about ^ the rind of the oranges, cover 
with water and let it stand 36 hours; then boil slowly 4 
hours, add 7 pounds of sugar and boil 20 minutes. 

Mrs. S. a. Houston. 

PARISIAN APPLE SAUCE. 
Boil until soft i pound of finely sliced apples, i gill of 
water, i ounce of butter, grated yellow rind of ^ a lemon, 
2 bay leaves, 2 ounces of sugar, pass through a sieve, siir 
in I tablespoonful of orange flower water and i of apricot 
jam. Mrs. B. B. Bryan. 

CUCUMBER AMD ONION PICKLES. 

Chop and salt separately 25 cucumbers and ^ peck of 
onions. After 24 hours squeeze out the brine and cover 

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154 PICKLES AND PRESERVES, 

with weak vinegar over night. Drain and pack in layers 
in stone jar, sprinking upon the layers mustard and celery 
seed, with whole cloves, until the jar is full. Cover with 
good vinegar over night. In the morning drain and heat 
the vinegar with 2 cups of brown sugar. Pour hot upon 
the pickles. Do this twice before storing. 

Mrs. Chas. A. Knorr. 



TOMATO CATSUP. 

Boil I bushel of tomatoes until soft, put thetn through 
a fine wire sieve, add 2 quarts of vinegar, i pint of salt, 2 
tablespoonfuls of cloves, i^ pound of allspice, 2 ounces of 
cayenne pepper, 3 tablespoonfuls of black pepper, 3 quarts 
of onions boiled soft enough to rub through a sieve, 5 heads 
of garlic, skinned and separated. Mix all together and boil 
about 3 hours or until reduced one-half. Bottle without 
straining. Mrs. George H. Cook. 

TOMATO CONSERVE. 

Gently boil 3 pounds of tomatoes with 3 pounds of 
sugar for 3 hours, adding 2 lemons, peeled and sliced thin, 
the peel cut into bits, and 2 inches of preserved ginger root 
cut very fine. H. M. W. 

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PICKLES AND PRESERVES, 165 

WATERMELON PICKLES. 

Cut the pared rind into thick slices, put into large 
stone jar and cover with boiling water in which is just 
enough powdered alum to make it pretty bitter — an ounce 
at least. Let it stand several hours on back of stove, 
take out into cold water, and when cold boil a half hour in 
syrup, or till tender. Syrup — 8 pounds of fruit, 4 pounds 
of best brown sugar, 3 pints of vinegar, i cup of mixed 
whole spices, stick of cinnamon, cloves and allspice (less 
of cloves). Tie the spices in a bag and boil with the 
sugar and vinegar; skim well and add fruit. 

Mrs. S. H. Stevens. 

PICKLED WATERMELON RIND. 

Pare off the thin green rind, cut the white in pieces, 
cook in clear water until tender, take from the water and 
drain. To i quart of good cider vinegar add 3 pounds of 
sugar, 4 ounces of cinnamon, and 2 ounce of cloves (tie the 
spices in a muslin bag), boil five minutes, put in the melon 
and boil fifteen minutes. Mrs. H. L. L. Ladd. 

NEW YORK CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

Make a brine of i pint of salt to i gallon of water, and 
pour boiling hot over small cucumbers, and let them stand 

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VMr 11 ISHLv Coach and Car Yarnislies and Colors. 



156 PICKLES AND PRESERVES. 

twenty-four hours. Rinse and drain the cucumbers, and 
pack in glass jars. In each jar put a small piece of horse- 
radish, a small white onion, and a teaspoonful each of 
black and white mustard seed, celery seed, and juniper 
berries. Fill the jars with boiling vinegar, and seal quickly. 
To each gallon of vinegar allow ^ a pound of sugar. 

Mrs. a. L. Guion. 

A good recipe for canning peaches, apricots and berries 
is to make a syrup of equal parts of sugar and water. Sktm 
well and put in all the fruit it will hold. Cook slowly till 
tender. 

Cotton batting tied over fruit in stone jars, while hot, 
makes a good air-tight covering. 

A glass of claret added to a kettle of peaches just 
before taking them from the fire, gives them a delicious 
flavor. 

SPICED GRAPES. 

Seven pounds of Malaga grapes, seeded, 4 pounds of 
sugar, I pint of vinegar, i ^ teaspoonfuls each of ground 
cinnamon, cloves and allspice. Make a syrup of the vine- 
gar, sugar and spices (put in bags). After skimming thor- 
oughly put in the grapes and cook till tender. 

Mrs. J. J. Reeves, 

Redlands, Cal. 

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PICKLES AND PRESERVES. 157 

APPLE-BANANA JELLY. 

Boil crabapples in a little water till thoroughly tender; 
strain the juice through a flannel bag and boil twenty min- 
utes. For each glass of syrup add a glass of sugar and boil 
five minutes, or till jellied. Pour out In a pitcher and add 
Burnett's banana flavoring to taste. Pour into glasses and 
set to cool. 

APPLE-STRAWBERRY JELLY. 

Use apples as above and add strawberry flavoring in- 
stead of banana. Mrs. W. E. Reeves, 

San Bernardino, Cal. 

ONE-TWO-THREE JAM. 

One pint of currant juice, 2 pounds of ripe currants, 3 
pounds of raisins, 4 pounds of sugar, 6 oranges. Seed 
raisins and chop fine; chop rather fine the peel of four of 
the oranges. Cook all together until soft. 

Mrs. J. H. Rhodes. 

SWEET PICKLE PEARS. 

Boil 10 pounds of pears until soft, using good solid 
fruit. Make a syrup of 2 pounds of sugar, i quart of vine- 
gar. Pour out fruit and can in glass. Mrs. Rhodes. 

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BEVERAGES. 



GRAPE JUICE. 

Wash and pick from the stems 14 pounds of grapes 
and put them in a kettle with i pint of water; scald enough 
to extract the juice, stirring occasionally; squeeze and 
strain, add i quart water and 3 pounds sugar; scald 5 min- 
utes and bottle at once; scald the corks until thoroughly 
swelled, drive them in level with the bottle, and seal air- 
tight. Mrs. a. p. Moore. 

FRUIT PUNCH. 

Squeeze and strain 6 oranges and 4 lemons, add ^ 
can of grated pine apple, sugar to taste and fruit coloring 
to make it pink; add nearly a gallon of water, but in doing 
this the juiciness of the fruit must govern. Make this in 
the morning to use at night. Mrs A. P. Moore. 

GINGER ADE. 
Dissolve 3 pounds loaf sugar in 2 gallons water, add 
the well-beaten whites of 3 eggs and 2 ounces of ground 
Jamaica ginger moistened with a little water; bring slowly 



min^ 



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BEVERAGES. 159 

to the boiling point, skim and settle; when cold, add the 
juice of a large lemon and J^ yeast cake, dissolved in 2 
tablespoonfuls warm water; mix, strain, bottle, tie the corks 
down and in two days it is ready for use. 

Mrs. F. Fairman. 

CLARET CUP. 

One bottle of claret, juice of 3 or 4 lemons, a dash of 
Jamaica rum; ApoUonaris water. Mrs. J. Y. Scammon. 

CURRANT CORDIAL. 

Pour I quart best whiskey upon i pound bruised cur- 
rants and I ounce white ginger root, bruised; let it stand 
24 hours, then strain through a flannel bag; add i^ pounds 
loaf sugar, and bottle when the sugar is dissolved; excel- 
lent for a chill. Mrs. G. A. Soden. 

CLARET PUNCH. 

Juice of 3 lemons, i teacup of sugar, i coffee cup of 
made black tea, drawn cold, i orange peeled and sliced 
thin, one lemon peeled and sliced thin, 2 strips of cucum- 
ber rind added, for 30 minutes before serving and then 
removed; i quart best claret, i quart of Apollinaris water 
or champagne; ice. 

Mrs. C. M. Pepper. 



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160 BEVERAGES. 

CIDER PUNCH. 

Mix I cup of sugar, Y^ of water and i of sherry wine; 
slice in 2 lemons, stir until the sugar is dissolved and add 
J quart best cider. H. M. W. 

RASPBERRY SHRUB. 

This should be made of very ripe berries. Soak 3 
quarts of berries in i of pure cider vinegar for 24 hours; 
strain, and add to liquid 3 quarts fresh berries; after 12 
hours strain again and boil 20 minutes, adding i pound 
sugar to each pint of the liquid. Bottle, and when using, 
put one tablespoonful in each glass of water. 

Mrs. J. W. Harrison. 

CHOCOLATE. 

Put into the double boiler 3 pints rich milk; when it 
comes to a boil stir in ^ pound grated chocolate; continue 
stirring constantly for five minutes at least; beat the yolks 
of 3 eggs thoroughly and pour the boiling chocolate upon 
upon them, stirring all the time; add i teaspoonful whipped 
cream to each cup when served. Mrs. H. 



VA'r'NSSES 



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BEVERAGES. 161 

VIRGINIA EGG NOG. 

Beat thoroughly the yolks of 8 eggs with i pound 
granulated sugar; add ^ gal. fresh, rich milk, pour upon 
it very slowly, and stirring briskly, i% pints best Jamaica 
rum; beat the whites of the eggs with a little pulverized 
sugar to a stiff froth; stir into the whole and finish with a 
finely grated nutmeg. 

CREAM BEER. 

Boil together for five minutes 2 ounces tartaric acid, 3 
cups white sugar, juice of i lemon and i quart of water; 
when nearly cold add the whites of 3 eggs, well beaten, ^ 
cup of flour and ^ ounce wintergreen essence; bottle and 
keep cool; when served, put 3 tablespoonfuls in a glass of 
ice water; add a little baking soda and drink while foaming 

F. W. 

GINGER BEER. 

Slice a lemon, bruise % ounce ginger root, i^ pounds 
white sugar, i ounce tartaric acid, 2^ gallons water, boiled 
and poured over the ingredients; when cool add a yeast 
cake and let it stand in a warm place for twelve hours; bot- 
tle and tie down the corks; use in two days. 

Mrs. Lockwood. 



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162 BEVERAGES. 

LOWLE. 

One hal£ dozen lemons, y^. dozen oranges, i pint of 
claret, i gill of brandy, sugar to -taste. Cut the oranges 
in slices and squeeze the lemons and put in sugar, then 
I quart of chopped ice; let stand in cold place until ready 
for use, and then add claret and brandy. 

Mrs. C. a. Williams. 



FRUIT PUNCH. 

Juice of 6 lemons, juice of 3 oranges, j4 oi sl pine- 
apple, chopped very fine, ^4 cup of strawberries, chop- 
ped ice, sugar to taste. 




MISCELLANEOUS. 163 

STEAMED BATTER PUDDING. 

One egg, i cup of milk, 1% oi flour, pinch of salt, 
I teaspoonful of Cameo baking powder, i tablespoonful of 
meled butter. Mix thoroughly, put in pudding dish and 
steam 20 minutes. 

SAUCE. 

One-half cup of butter, i of pulverized sugar, i 
tablespoonful of cream; stir until very light. Stir into 
this I quart fresh strawberries. Let stand one hour and 
serve on hot pudding. 

PICKLED PEACHES. 

One pint of vinegar, 3 pounds of sugar to i gallon 
of fruit. After fruit is cooked boil the syrup until thick; 
cinnamon and cloves. Use cling peaches, pare and re- 
move seed. 

SPICED GOOSEBERRIES. 

Five quarts of gooseberries, 3 pounds of brown 
sugar, I pint of vinegar, i teaspoonful of ground cloves, 
I teaspoonful of ground cinnamon. Pick berries out 
and boil altogether 3^ of an hour. Take out the goose- 



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164 MISCELLANEOUS. 

berries and boil to a syrup ^ of an hour longer. Serve 
with roast meats. Mrs. Rhodes. 



GINGER COOKIES. 

One egg, i cup of sugar, i cup of molasses, i cup 
of shortening, part butter and part lard, i tablespoon- 
ful of soda, I tablespoonful of ginger, i tablespoonfu- 
of vinegar. Flour to roll. Roll thin. 

Mrs. C. C. Beatty, 

Redlands, Cal. 



CHEESE WAFERS. 

One cup of butter, 2 cups of flour, i cup of grated 
cheese, salt and cayenne pepper in water. Take puff 
paste, roll out, and spread with above mixture, fold 
over, roll out again, cut into any shape desired, and 
bake in a quick oven. Mrs. J. W. Eleming, 



FRUIT FRITTERS. 

Make a batter of i egg, i teaspoonful of Cameo baking 
powder, a pinch of salt, a little milk and flour to make 

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MISCELLANEOUS. 16$ 

stiff batter. Dip each piece of cooked fruit in the batter 
and fry in butter to a golden brown. 

Mrs. E. L. Houston, 



PERFECTLY WHITE DRESSING. 

White of 2 eggs, juice of 2 lemons, 2 tablespoonl 
fuls of water. Heat lemon juice and water, stir in the 
well-beaten whites of eggs and beat continually with 
Dover beater while cooking. When it looks like white 
custard, stir in a tablespoonful of butter and season to 
taste. ^ Kate D. Fleming. 

EGG GEMS. 
Mix together chopped meat and bread crumbs, with 
butter, pepper, salt, and a little milk. Fill some but- 
tered gem pans with the mixture, break an egg care- 
fully over the top of each, sprinkle some very fine 
cracker crumbs over the top. Bake 8 minutes. 

BAKED CABBAGE. 
Cook cabbage until tender, drain, cut fine and bake 
in a buttered pan, covered with a white sauce and but- 
tered bread crumbs. Bake until the crumbs are brown. 



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166 MISCELLANEOUS. 

FRENCH BEEF ESSENCE. 
One half pound of chopped lean beef, j^ pint of 
iukewarm water, 4 drops of muriatic acid. Put all 
together in a glass fruit jar, cork tight, shake every 15 
minutes for 3^ hours, then strain, season with salt and 
pepper to make it palatable, keep in cool place. Dose, 
y^ teaspoon hourly, and more, if patient desires. 

Mrs. H. p. Knapp. 

RASPBERRY FLOAT. 

Whip the whites of 4 eggs stiff, add ^ of a cup of 
powdered sugar, beat well, then add i cup of raspberry 
jam and beat with a spoon for 40 minutes. Pile on a 
glass dish and serve with whipped cream. 

Mrs. Rhodes. 

FLOOR POLISH. 

One quart of boiled linseed oil, ^ pint of turpentine, 
^ pint of shellac. Mix well and put on hardwood floor 
with a flannel cloth. Mrs. Rhodes. 

PROPER GARNISHES. 

With roast beef or veal serve horse radish. 
With roast mutton currant jelly. 

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MISCELLANEOUS. 167 

With boiled mutton, caper sauce. 

With roast pork, apple sauce. 

With boiled chicken, egg sauce. 

With roast lamb, mint sauce. 

With roast turkey, oyster sauce. 

With Venison, or duck, black currant jelly. 

With boiled fresh mackerel, stewed gooseberries. 

With boiled trout, butter sauce. 

With compote of pigeons, mushroom sauce. 

With fresh salmon, green peas with cream sauce. 

With roast goose, apple sauce. 

THINGS WORTH KNOWING. 

Rubbing tough meat with cut lemon. 
Bacon fat for frying chicken or game. 
Dipping sliced onions in milk before frying. 
Heating crackers before using. 
Heating dry coffee before making. 
Pouring vinegar over fish before scaling. 
Fried sweet apples with liver and kidney. 
Putting a little lemon juice into the water in which 
rice is boiled. 

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168 MISCELLANEOUS. 

RAISIN ROLL. 

Mix with milk until soft enough to roll out, 2 cups 
of flour, into which 2 teaspoonfuls of Cameo baking 
powder has been sifted, 2 tablespoonfuls of butter and 
a pinch of salt. Spread with a mixture of i cup of 
raisins, seeded, the grated rind and juice of a lemon i^ 
cup of sugar, Steam i hour and eat with sauce. 

Mrs. B. F. Ray. 

FRUIT SUET PUDDING, 

One teaspoonful of soda, ^ teaspoonful,of salt, ^ 
saltspoonful of cinnamon, ^ of nutmeg sifted into 21^ 
cups of flour; rub in yi cup of butter and i of chopped 
suet, add i cup of chopped raisins and currants. Mix i 
cup of milk (or water) and i cup of molasses, stir it into 
the dry mixture. Steam 3 hours in a buttered mould- 

Miss Edith A, Stevens. 

LEMON TARTLETS. 

The grated rind and juice of 2 lemons, ^ pound of 
granulated sugar, 2 well beaten eggs, and a large table- 
spoonful of butter, melted. Mix well and bake in puff 
paste in pate pans. This makes i dozen tartlets. 

Mrs. H. Geower. 



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MISCELLANEOUS. 169 

PLAIN PLUM PUDDING. 

Two cups of very fine bread crumbs (of bread a day 
old) pressed down, ^^ cup of flour, i cup of suet, i of 
chopped apple (also very fine) i cup of stoned raisins, 
^ cup of currants, i of sugar, rind and juice of a lemon, 
a little candied peel and 3 eggs. Work well together 
and steam 4 hours. Mrs. H. Grower. 




HOUSEHOLD HINTS. 



Darn table cloths with linEn ravelings. 

It is healthful to drink a glass of water before break- 



fast. 



Here is a recipe for one of the best, if not the best, 
tooth powder obtainable: 

Tooth Powder — Take one ounce of powdered borax, 
two ounces precipitated chalk and one ounce powdered cas- 
tile soap. 

An excellent domestic remedy for sore mouth and sere 
throat is a weak solution of borax and water used freely. 

A solution of borax and soda used as a gargle for the 
throat and mouth, and as a wash for the face, neck, hands 
and arms, when going out and on returning to the house, 
and especially when visiting the sick, is considered very 
efficacious in warding off contagious diseases. 

A solution of borax and soda will remove tan. 



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HOUSEHOLD HINTS. 171 

A weak solution of borax makes an excellent wash to 
remove dandruff. 

Washing the mouth and teeth frequently with a weak 
solution of borax tends to sweeten the breath. 

A piece of borax the size of a pea allowed to dissolve 
slowly in the mouth will greatly relieve the hoarseness 
caused by colds, or by long speaking or reading aloud. 

To cleanse nursing bottles and tubes, wash them in 
weak borax water. If two are used — which is the best plan 
— keep the one not in use full of weak borax water. 

To starch collars, cuffs, shirt bosoms and fine muslins 
so that they will look like new, add to each quart of made 
starch one-half teaspoonful of borax and a tiny bit of but- 
ter or lard. 

To keep ants from the pantry sprinkle powdered borax 
upon the shelves. 

To remove the shiny look common to some complex- 
ions add a pinch of borax to the water in which the face is 
bathed. 



mstais 



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172 HOUSEHOLD HINTS. 

A pinch of borax added to the water in which infants 
are bathed tends to strengthen the skin and prevent 
chafing. 

A weak solution of borax is highly recommended as a 
wash for sore eyes, redness of the edges of the lids, etc. 

A weak solution is excellent as a healing lotion for 
slight cuts and scratches. 

The strength of the solution may vary somewhat, ac- 
cording to the purpose for which it is to be used. A tea- 
spoon level full of powdered borax to a pint of water is not 
too strong for most uses; but for infants and very small 
children it may be made weaker. 

Mothers will experience much relief from the burning 
and smarting of the nipples, caused by baby's nursing, if 
they will wash ihe nipples at once in borax water. 

To soften and whiten the hands bathe them in hot, soft 
water, to which a good sized pinch of borax has been added. 

To remove the odor of perspiration, dust powdered 
borax — with a powder puff — under the arms after bathing. 

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HOUSEHOLD HINTS. 173 

Carpets may be kept clean by going over them once a 
week, with a broom dipped in hot water, to which a little 
turpentine has been added. Wring a cloth out in the hot 
water and wipe under the pieces of furniture which are too 
heavy to be moved. 

To take varnish, paint or pitch from cotton goods, 
apply oil of turpentine. Wash off in soap suds. 

For neuralgia oil of peppermint will usually relieve the 
pain; wet it in well, but do not get it near the eyes. 

Kerosene will soften boots and shoes which have been 
hardened by water, and render them as pliable as new. 

Ripe tomatoes will remove ink and other stains from 
the hands. 

Keep the teakettle bright by rubbing with kerosene 
and polishing with dry flannel. 

Gold Medal Oil Polish — Twelve pounds Spanish 
whiting, one- half pound of light brown English castile soap, 
three ounces aqua ammonia, two ounces olive oil, one ounce 

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174 HOUSEHOLD HINTS. 

sassafras oil, one pint soft, warm water. Shave the soap 
fine and dissolve in part of the water, add both of the oils 
and the ammonia. Mix well with the hands, put in half of 
the whiting — which must be sifted through a flour sieve 
Mix thoroughly with the hands, and add the rest of the 
whiting gradually and the water very sparingly, until all the 
whiting has been worked in. You may think, for awhile, 
that it is not going to mix and a little more water may be 
necessary, for it will be very crumbly; but if you keep at 
work it will gradually soften and mix all right. When you 
get it into a solid mass, knead it on a board like bread 
dough. Roll it out about an inch in thickness, cut into 
cakes any size desired and put on a board in a dry place, 
till thoroughly dry, then pack in a box. The above will 
cost you about 75 cents; and will make twenty- five good 
sized cakes. So you see it would not cost you more than 3 
cents per cake. 

Stuffed Apples — Shell and blanch twenty-four al 
monds. Chop them fine. Seed and chop a quarter of a 
pound of raisins. Measure and pick over a half cup of 
dried currants. Put the almonds, raisins and dried cur 

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HOUSEHOLD HINTS. 175 

rants into a saucepan, add a half cup of water, a half cup 
of sugar, with a teaspoonful of lemon juice, and the grated 
rind of the lemon. Simmer gently for at least thirty min- 
utes. In the meantime, pare and core six large apples, 
keeping them perfectly whole. Stand them in a baking pan, 
sprinkle over about two tablespoonfuls granulated sugar, 
and bake slowly until the apples are tender and slightly 
brown. Take from the oven, put them in a glass dish 
Now, boil the fruit mixture and syrup together for at least 
ten minutes; that is, boil it hard. Take it from the fire, 
fill in the spaces from which the cores of the apples have 
been taken, and baste the syrup over the outside. Stand 
away to cool. When ready to serve, heap around the out- 
side of the dish, banking it up towards the apples, cream 
whipped to a stiff froth. Dust the whole with powdered 
sugar and serve. 

To prevent cake from burning, set a pan of water in 
the oven. 

Put a lump of butter in a pan, and when it begins to 
brown add a little chopped onion. Cut veal kidneys in 

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176 HOUSEHOLD HINTS. 

slices and saute them until a light brown. Eat with let- 
tuce, dressed with French dressing. 

To remove the tops of fruit jars that cannot be 
started by hand, dip a cloth in very hot water and apply 
to the outside of the cap. This will cause it to expand. 

A little lemon juice stewed with prunes adds flavor 
to them. 

Always boil maccaroni, tapioca, etc., before putting 
them into soup. 

Soak gelatine in cold water; dissolve it in boiling 
water. 




TESTIMONIALS. 



After giving the Cameo Baking Powder a fair test, 
I do not hesitate to say that hereafter in our family we 
will use no other, when Cameo is to be had. 

Mrs. Irwin Simpson. 



I cheerfully recommend Cameo Baking Powder. 

Mrs. H. L. Humphrey. 



We use Cameo Baking Powder and like it very 
much. Mrs. G. W. Hoyt. 



The best baking powder which I have ever used. 

Mrs. J. B. Daniels. 



After using Cameo Baking Powder, I have decided 
to use no other. It gives perfect satisfaction. 

Mrs. W. H. French. 



I have used Carrteo Baking Powder, and find it 
equally good with Royal or Price's. 

Mrs. Jos. Gregg. 



178 TESTIMONIALS. 

Cameo is carrying the day in our family. We use 
no other. Mrs. W. F. Parish. 



I have used Cameo Baking Powder, and found it 
equal, if not superior, to ail others. 

Mrs. Chas. A. Knorr. 



For making cake, biscuit, etc., I find Cameo Bait- 
ing Powder excellent. Have given it a good trial. I 
cheerfully recommend it. Mrs. R. Longmire. 



I cheerfully recommend Cameo Baking Powder. 

Mrs. J. F. Marshall. 



I have used Cameo Baking powder with good suc- 
cess, and am glad to recommend it. 

Mrs. C. H. Bixy. 



Cameo is exactly as good as any other baking pow- 
der, and much cheaper. Mrs. V. M. Harper. 



The lightest and whitest of biscuits and the best oi 
cakes are made with Cameo. Mrs. F. A. Neal. 



TESTIMONIALS. 179 

Use Cameo if you want the best results. 

Mrs. F. H. Waite. 



Have found the Cameo Baking Powder as good, i| 
not better, than any I have ever used. 

Mrs. C. H. Ingram. 




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HUSBANDS. 



"Sirs, respect your dinner, idolize it, enjoy it, and you will be 
many hours in the week, many weeks in the year, and many years in 
your life, happier." 

A RECIPE FOR COOKING HUSBANDS. 

One of the lecturers before the Baltimore Cooking 
School recently gave this recipe for cooking husbands : 

"A good many husbands are utterly spoiled by mis- 
management. Some women go about as if their husbands 
were bladders, and blow them up. Others keep them con- 
stantly in hot water. Others let them freeze by their care- 
lessness and indifference. Some keep them in a stew, by 
irritating ways and words; others roast them. Some keep 
them in a pickle all their lives. It cannot be supposed 
that any husband will be tender and good, managed in this 
way, but they are really delicious when they are properly 
treated. 

" In selecting your husband, you should not be guided 
by the silvery appearance, as in buying a mackerel, nor in 
the golden tint, as if you wanted a salmon. Be sure to 
select him yourself, as tastes differ. Do not go to the market 



HUSBANDS. 181 

for him, as the best are always brought to your door. It 
is far better to have none, unless you^ill patiently learn 
how to cook him. 

"A preserving kettle of the finest porcelain is best, 
but if you have nothing but an earthenware pipkin, it will 
do, with care. See that the linen in which you wrap him 
is nicely washed and mended, with the required number of 
buttons and strings tightly sewed on. Tie him in the 
kettle by a strong silk cord called Comfort^ as the one called 
Duty is apt to be weak. 

" Make a clear steady fire out of Love, Neatness and 
Cheerfulness. Set him as near this as seems to agree with 
him. If he sputters and fizzes, do not be anxious, — some 
husbands do this till they are quite done. Add a little 
sugar, in the form of what confectioners call kisses, but 
no vinegar or pepper, on any account. A little spice im- 
proves him, but it must be used with judgment. Do not 
stick any sharp instrument into him to see if he is becom- 
ing tender. Stir him gently, watching the while, less he 
lie too flat and close to the kettle, and so become useless 
You cannot fail to know when he is done. 

'* If thus treated, you will find him very relishable, 
agreeing nicely with you and the children, and he will keep 
as long as you want, unless you become careless and set 
him in too cold a place." 

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HOUSEHOLD HINTS. 

(continued.) 

HOME ENGRAVING ON GLASS. 

Spread the place with melted parrafine. When hard, 
trace through it the desired design. Then pour over it 
hydrochloric acid; allow it to remain about 20 minutes. 
Wipe all off, when it will be prettily done. Desirable for 
glove or handkerchief boxes. 

REMEDY FOR WHOOPING COUGH OR SEVERE 

COLD. 

One tablespoonful of cod liver oil, i tablespoonful of 
glycerine, 2 tablespoonfuls of honey, wineglass of whiskey. 
Shake well and give at any time cough comes on as often as 
needed. Mrs. E. L. Hale. 

FOR CLEANING SILVER. 

Dissolve I pound cyanide of potassium in 2 gallons 
of water. Dip the silver in and wipe off immediately. It 
should be added to this, that the above is a deadly poison. 

MAPLE SUGAR ICING 
Scrape the sugar, put it into a granite pan and stir 



HOUSEHOLD HINTS. 18S 

until hot. To each J^ pound allow i tablespoonful of 
boiling water. If it seems too thick, add more water. 

CURIOUS EFFECTS OF CAMOMILE. 
A decoction of the leaves of common camomile will 
destroy all species of insects, and nothing contributes so 
much to the health of a garden as a number of camomile 
plant dispersed through it. No greenhouse or hothouse 
should ever be without it, in a green or dried state ; either 
stalks or flowers will answer. It is a singular fact, that if 
a plant is drooping and apparently dying, in nine cases out 
of ten, it will recover, if you plant camomile near it. 

A DELICIOUS GRUEL. 
Boil I tablespoonful of rolled oats in a pint of water, 
adding more water if necessary, with a small pinch of salt. 
When the oatmeal is thoroughly cooked, put through a 
strainer ; to the jelly thus obtained, add ^ cupful of sweet 
cream and the whites of 2 eggs that have been beaten stiff, 
as for frosting; sweeten and flavor to taste; if nutmeg or 
vanilla is used, be careful to flavor delicately. 

K. B. D. 

TURKISH PILAF. 
One cup of stewed, strained tomatoes, i cup soup 
stock highly seasoned with salt, pepper, and minced onion. 
When boiling add i cup of cooked rice, stir lightly till the 
liquor absorbs it, then add ^ cup of butter. Set it on the 
back of the stove in double boiler for 20 minutes. This is 
used as a vegetable. 



184 HOUSEHOLD HINTS. 

ORANGE TARTLETS ARE TEMPTING. 

Orange tartlets make a dessert which the young people 
are sure to appreciate. Take the juice of 2 Havana oranges 
and the grated peel of i ; ^ of a cup of sugar or ^ cup 
if the oranges are very sweet ; i tablespoonful of butter, 
the juice of ^ a lemon to wet i teaspoonful of corn starch. 
Beat all well together and bake in tartlet shells without" 
cover. 

FOR QUICK FREEZING. 

Place the preparation to be frozen in a tin pail set in 
bucket containing a weak solution of sulphuric acid and 
water; into this throw a handful of Glauber's Salts and 
freeze rapidly. Mrs. James Hayes. 

SOUTHERN WAY OF COOKING RICE. 
Wash a cup of rice in several waters until the milky 
look is gone. Have ready a kettle full of boiling water (3 
or 4 quarts), salted. Put in the rice and stir until the 
water boils again that it may not stick to the bottom. Keep 
up the hard boiling until a grain feels soft between the 
fingers. Strain the water off and serve in a hot dish. 
Every grain having had room to ''kick" will be separate. 

Mrs. a. W. Knight. 

DRESSING FOR TURKEY. 
Use the crumb of a loaf of bread, V^ a grated onion, 
^ cup of melted butter, a pinch of sage, salt and pepper to 
taste. This makes a dry dressing; if preferred moist, add a 
little milk. Mrs. J. L. Van Uxem. 



HOUSEHOLD HINTS. 185 

PLUM STUFFING. 
Chop 2 large apples fine, 3 handfuls of bread crumbs, 
^ cup of raisins, y^. of currants, i of pitted prunes, i 
tablespoonful Of cinnamon, i of melted butter; sugar to 
taste. Mrs. Ben Williams. 

Scratches on varnished wood may often be removed 
by laying a coarse cloth, saturated with linseed oil, over 
them, allowing it to remain awhile ; polish with a dry 
flannel. 

HOW TO SERVE CHEESE SALAD. 

Even an epicure will not scorn a well-made cheese 
salad. Here is one of the most attractive ways in which it 
may be served: 

Use cream cheese and mix with it a very little green 
coloring paste. Then roll the cheese into balls the size of 
birds' eggs. This can be easily done by using the back or 
smooth side of butter-pats. Get fresh young lettuce 
leaves; wet them with French dressing and arrange on a 
flat plate in little groups to look like nests. Into these 
nests put a few cheese balls and serve out one to each 
guest. 

COUGH MIXTURE. 

Half an ounce of antimonial wine, the same quantity 
of stick licorice and glycerine, i ounce of paregoric, i of 
gum arabic, 5 cents' worth of rock candy, dissolved in i 
quart of water. One tablespoonful four times a day is a 
dose for an adult. Mrs. S. H. Stevens. 



186 MEMORANDUM. 



The cook deserves a hearty cuffing 
Who serves roast fowl with tasteless stuffing, 
For fowls, like women, are at their best 
When well and seasonably dressed. 



J^fc^ 



0, hour of all hours, the most blessed upon earth. 
Blessed hour of our dinners ! 



"^r^ 



:sT" 



UmiilAN I^USSHIl, TRADE MARK. 

IWADfifllH fiOI^DICfi. 



^ 



Isadoite f^ush, Delia Fox, 

l^lavie tTansen, Josephine I^napp, 

And many others noted for beauty, 

use and endorse Patented May 31, 

1894. 

fll>a&ame flee^bella 

TURKISH BATH OIL AND TOILET PREPARATIONS 

rOR THE COMP1.EXION. 

MADAME ISE'BELLS Retail Parlors for Facial Treatments, 
Hair Dressing, Shampooing, Manicuring and Chiropodist 
Work, Removed to 

15 East Washington St., Suite 42, 

Over French & Potters. In Woman's Clnb B'ld'g. 

By mentioning this advertisement, you can obtain consultation on facial 
blemishes and a trial treatment of Turkish Bath Oil without charge. 




Armour's V Star V Ham 

Is always Branded in the Skin as 
shown in cut. 

Nothing Finer can be Produced. 



ARMOUR'S ir STAR 

BREAKFAST BACON. 

SELECTED AND SLICED. 

Guaranteed the Choicest Selection from 
Young and Healthy Pork. 

PERFECTION IN CURE AND FLATOR. 

For sale in one-pound boxes by leading Gro- 
cers and Marketmen. 

The Bacon can also be obtained in strips 
from 4 to 6 lbs. each. 



51^- 



We may live without poetry, music and art ; 

We may live without conscience, and live without heart ; 
We may live without friends ; we may live without books ; 

But civilized man cannot live without cooks. 

We may live without hope, — what is hope but deceiving? 

We may live without love, — what is passion but pining? 
But where is the man that can live without dining? 



"^Sr 



BLACKALL'S BH COFFEE, 

83/ l_bs. for $1.00 



DOUBLE CONE COFFEE POTS. 



lOS Madison Street, 



CHICAGO. 



G. C.KNAUSS, 

Grocery and Market 

BEST HAM AND BACON 

IN MARKET. 

Michener Bros. & Co.'s 

5141 - 5143 LAKE AVE. 



We haye Remoyed to 

30 WASHINGTON ST. 

Opposite Marihall Field & Co. 

€l?e ^leapfast [hosiery C^o. 

E. W. Peck, Mgr. 

CHICAGO. NEW YORK. 

SPECIALTIES: HOSIERY, UNDER- 

WEAR, BABIES' SHOES. 



T. VAN CRABNENBROECK. 



F. TAN CRAENENBBOECE. 



XDlniversitig Ibaberbasbers, 

Latest Styles 0! Hats and Gents' FnrnisbiDg Goods, 

3«e FIFTY-FIFTH ST. 

AO'TS FOR A. e. SPALDING & BROS.' SPORTING GOODS. 



C.L.RAIFF&CO. 

Grocery •> 
and Market, 

124-126 35th Street. 



GRUBB'S 
GUT RATE DRUG STORE, 

Cor. Lake Aye. and 53d St. 

Department Store iprlcee. 



FINEST SODA WATER IN HYDE PARK. 



^i^^^^^^ 



TESTIMONIAL. 



The distinguishing feature of the stove on the oppo- 
site page is its excellent broiler, superior to any we have 
ever used — unsurpassed for steaks, chops, or toast. 

Mrs. J. B. Daniels. 



w^^^^m^ 




Family Electric Gas Range, 

With our Patent Broiler attacFied to one end, which Broils 
Both Sides at the Same Time. 



NATURAL GAS. ILLUMINATING GAS. FUEL GAS. 



—•^Manufactured l»y^—- 

The E1.ECTRIC Gas Stove Co., 

DETROIT, MICH. 
Ask Your Dealer for the above Range. Write for Catalogue. 



INDIA. CEYI-ON. 



* MONSOON *■ 



YELLOW LABEL 40c per lb. 
WHITE *' 60c 



TEA. 



S2_I?^ CARR BROS., 

5311 and 5313 l-ake Ave., 

Tinware, Granite, Aluminum, JUki^'K^sa "' 

Also Jewel Gas Ranges, Bissell Carpet 
Sweepers, Perfection Filters, 

Or anything else you may want in House Furnishings. 

B. M. PARKER. L. A. PARKER. 

PARKE^R BROS., 

Livery and Boarding Stables, 

5317 to 5325 Lake Avenue. 

(^arrifl^es Furnished at Short Notice. Telephone, Oakland 835. 



/,UG 20 1947 



state Mutual life Assurance Company 

OF WORCESTER, MASS. 

A. G. BULLOCK, H. M. WITTER, 

President. Secretary. 

Incorporated 1844.— Purely IVIutual. 



ASSETS, THIRTEEN MILLION DOLLARS 



Makes ANNUAL DIVIDENDS of Surplus; the 

first when the second premium is paid. 

Paid-up policies share in 

the dividends. 



Pays under the MASSACHUSETTS LAW, 
ANNUAL CASH VALUES, which are en- 
dorsed on all policies, or gives PAID- 
UP insurance at the option of 
the insured. 



Chicago Office, 85 Dearborn St. 

BEN. WILLIAMS, Manager Western Dept. 

GEORGE L. WRENN & SON, General Agents. 
TELEPHONE, MAIN 3823. 



-g^ y:^ r^ e: c^