(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Delta of Sigma Nu Fraternity"

Google 



This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for general ions on library shelves before il was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 

to make the world's books discoverable online. 

Il has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 

to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 

are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often diflicult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other marginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 

publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing this resource, we have taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parlies, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 
We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the plus We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attribution The Google "watermark" you see on each file is essential for informing people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a b<x>k is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 

countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means il can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's hooks while helping authors ami publishers reach new audiences. You can search through I lie lull text of this book on I lie web 
at |http : //books . qooqle . com/| 



t". 

» 



* 



./V-thf 



s* 1 



WWHK 




The SigmaNu Fraternity 

A NATIONAL SOCIETY OF COLLEGE MEN 



A MAGAZINE DEVOTED TO 

FRATERNITY AND COLLEGE 

INTERESTS 



VOLUME THIRTY-SIX 

OCTOBER 1918 TO MAY 1919 



Copyriiht, 1918 and 1919 

by 

Edwin W. Dunlavy 




THE DELTA INDEX 

VOLUME THIRTY-SIX 



Note the following abbreviations: — 
I Hub. — Illustrated. 
Kd.-— Editorial. 
Sec. T. — Secretary's Table. 



Adventures overseas, by Brothers over there, 591. 
Akron Alumni Chapter — 

Utter. 94, 275, 074. 
\lden. . v |»c»iccr Thomdyke, Death of ((iamiiiu Nil* 
* Gamuia Theta), 118, 108. 
Aldrich, Ralph Johnston (Delta Eta), 701. 
Allen. Albert Silas (Delta Zeta), 350. 
Allln. George It. (Beta Mu), 505. 
Alpha Chapter — 

Soldier roll, 122. 300, 498, 714. 
Alfton, A. H., Sr., 450. 

Alumni Chapter Letters. 94. 275. 401. 074. 
AJnmni Chapter, The (Kd.), 400. 
AJnmni interest. 157, 530, 583, Oil. 713. 755. 

750. 
Alumni interest (Ed.). 234. 405. 
Alumni notes. 101. 27S. 400, OKI. 
Alumni. The. 91. 274. 459. 07o. 
Alumnus treasurer plan. The. by John Clarence 

HoMhor, ooo. 
Alumnus treasurer, The, By Harry Angevin 

ttider. 000. 
Alumnus treasurer (Sec. T ). 013. 
American drive would end the war, by C. C. 

I,} on (lllus ). IV 
America's home-coming, by Archie Austin Coates, 

005. 
Amex Forces Alumni Chapter — 
Applied Fraternity. 394, 597. 
First dinner in France, 10. 

First Sigma Nu banquet in Germany, by Law- 
rence C. Brewer, 590. 
Our Chapters at French universities, 595. 
Our first word from Germany, by Samuel 

Calloway Uibben. 391. 
Secretary's letter, 109, 393, 594. 
Watch on the Rhine, The, 3X9. 
Amory. Thomas Itewlre, Death of (Alpha-Gamma 

Theta), 482. 540. 
Angell, Norman H. (Delta Gamma), 10. 92, 40O. 

672. 
Applied Fraternity, by Albert H. Wilson. 394, 

597. 
Armsby, Henry Prentiss (Delta Delta). 459. 702 
Art and the soldier, by Robert Cutter Matlock, 

Jr.. 591. 
Athletes, The. 70, 207. 453. 058. 
Aydelotte, Frank (Beta Eta), 91. 073. 

B 

Back, Koscius Harlow, death of (Delta lota), 

120, 108. 

Reported alive, 120. 
Badge, war (Sec. T.), 50. 
Badge, war, 157. 

Baldwin, Joseph Addison (Gamma Gamma). 544. 
Baldwin, Lawreuce Merrill (Gamma Lambda). 

544. 
Baltimore Alumni Chapter — 

Letter, 94, 270, 401, 074. 
Barden. Eldred Stewart (Delta Zeta), 481. 
Barron. Harold Earl (Delta Delta). 704. 
Beckett, John Wesley (Gamma Zeta). 71. 2G7. 
Bel la k, Joseph Faussett, death of (Beta Rho). 

305 355 
Bennoii, Thatcher Wyllys, death of (Nu), 483. 

54G. 700. 
Berrien, Edward G. (Beta Upsilon), 459. 
Beta Chapter — 

Alumni notes, 278. 

Initiate roll, 73. 

Letter, 230, 411, 018. 

Soldier roll, 122, 301). 498, 714. 



Beta Alpha Chapter — 

Soldier roll, 127. 315, 505, 722. 

Beta Beta Chapter — 

Alumni uotes. 101, 280, 409, 081. 

Initiate roll, 74. 

letter, 05. 244, 419. 020. 

Soldier roll, 127, 149. 315. 340, 505. 582, 722. 
754. 
Beta Chi Chapter — 

Soldier roll, 132, 321. 512, 729. 
Beta Eta Chapter — 

Alumni notes, 101, 287, 409, 085. 

Initiate roll, 73. 

Letter, 244, 421, 027. 

Second generation club, 450. 

Soldier roll. 128, 310, 500, 723. 
Beta lota Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 102. 281. 409, 085. 

Initiate roll, 75. 

Letter, 00, 240. 422, 029. 

Soldier roll, 129, 150, 317, 340, 507, 532, 724, 
754. 
Beta Kappa Chapter — 

Alumni uotes. 281, G85. 

Initiate roll. 75. 

Letter. 00, 240. 423, 029. 

Soldier roll, 129, 317, 508, 532, 725, 754. 
Beta Mu Chapter — 

Alumni notes, 409, 085. 

Initiate roll, 70. 

Letter, 24(5. 423, 030. 

Soldier roll, 130, 150, 318, 508. 725. 
Beta Nu Chapter — 

Alumni notes, 102. 281. 409, 080. 

Alumnus treasurer, 000. 

Initiate roll, 70. 

Letter, 240, 424, 030. 

Little Journeys of the Editor, 54. 

Soldier roll. 130, 318. 340. 509, 533. 720, 754. 

Beta Phi Chapter — 

Alum nl notes, 281. 

Initiate roll, 77. 

Letter, 00, 248, 427, 033. 

Soldier roll. 132, 320, 340, 511. 533, 729, 754. 
Beta Psi Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 281, 470, 087. 

Initiate roll, 77. 

Letter, 00, 248, 427, 033. 

Soldier roll, 133, 321, 512, 730. 
Beta Rho Chapter — 

Alumni notes, 102. 

Initiate roll, 70. 

Letter. 248, 425, 031. 

Soldier roll, 131, 319, 510, 727, 754. 
Beta Sigma Chapter — 

Alumni notes, 470, 080. 

Initiate roll, 77. 

Letter, 248, 425, 031. 

Soldier roll, 131, 320, 510, 728, 754. 
Beta Tau Chapter — 

Comments, 543. 

Initiate roll, 77. 

Letter, 248, 420, 032. 

Soldier roll. 132, 320. 511, 729. 
Beta Theta Chapter — 

Alumni notes, 085. 

Initiate roll, 75. 

Letter. 00. 245, 422. 028. 

Soldier roll, 128. 310. 507. 723. 
Beta Upsilon Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 102, 281, 470. 

Initiate roll, 77. 

Letter, 248, 427, 032. 

Soldier roll, 132. 820, ftU, V2.W 



Hi 



The Delta 



Beta Xi Chapter — 

Alumni notes, 102, OSG. 

Initiate roll. 70. 

Letter, 66, 247. 425, 630. 

Soldier roll. 130. 311), 510, 727. 
Beta Zeta Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 101, 280. 

Initiate roll, 75. 

Letter. 05, 244. 420, 620. 

Soldier roll, 128, 31G, 506, 723, 754. 
Bishee, Karl Bronson, death of ((in mam Sigma), 

491 549 
Bland'. Oscar E. (Beta Eta). 93, 274. 
Bollinger, Lynn L., death of (Beta Beta), 540. 
Bookshelf, Chapter, 159. 345. 537. 

Be«>»ett, Rawson (Nu) ; Navys of the world, 
538. 

Coates. Archie Austin (Delta Gamma) ; City 
tides, 536. 

Hedges. William Saxby, Editor (Gamma Rho) ; 
The Pilot, 159. 

Hunt, Frazier: Blown in by the draft, 159. 

Keppell. Frederick P. : The undergraduate 
and his college, 159. 

Murphey, Clarence Wainright (Lambda) : 
March on to victory, 159. 

Sigma Nu Fraternity, General catalogue of 
the. 345. 

Zane Grey, 345, 538. 
Boone, James Lunsford (Delta Mu), 697. 
Boyd, Wayne, death of (Delta Theta), 350. 550. 
Braswell, Louis B. Jr., death of (Theta), 482, 546 
Breck, Theodore. Jr. (Delta Zeta). 481. 
Bridges, Howard Leonidas (Xi), 92. 
Brown, Harry Lawrence (Beta Iota), 544. 
Brown. Snnford Miller, death of (Beta Xi-Rho), 

305, 355, 489. 
Bush, Robert Durell, death of (Xl-Mu), 700. 
Bryant Park eagle hut and Brother. Alvhi E. 

Gillett (Gamma Gamma), The (Illus). 7. 
Buckley. John Harold, Death of (Gamma Kap- 
pa). 300. 356. 491, 
Building a national Fraternity, by Grant Wood- 
bury Harrington. 217, 380, 578. 
Burr, Borden H. (Theta- Lambda), 9. 
Bush. Robert Durell (Xl-Mu). 400. 
Byrns. Robert Aiusworth (Beta Zeta), 479. 



Caldwell, Perry DeFord (Delta Zeta), 349. 
Calhoun, Hall McCoy, death of (Theta), 540. 
Callen, Speer Woodson, death of (Nu), 546. 
Camp Clayton, France, by Alfred Alexander 

Grant, 398. 
Carlson. Oscar Fred (Delta Omicron), 296. 712. 
Case, Mervin, death of (Gamma Theta), 490, 548 
Casualty list (Ed.), 57. 
Catalogue (Sec. T.), 57. 

Catalogues, the first and second, by Grant Wood- 
bury Harrington, 602. 
Chapter letters, 236, 411, 618. 
Chapter standing (Ed), 616. 
Chandler, George A. (Gamma Lambda), 346. 
Chandler. George A. (Sec. T.), 230. 
Chapter Bookshelf — 

See Bookshelf, Chapter. 
Chapter House clubs (Sec. T.), 231. 
Chapter House Fire — 

See Fire, Chapter House. 
Chapter publications (Sec. T.), 50, 402. 
Chapter survey, 65. 
Charlton. Donald Hopple, death of (Beta Nu). 

118, 167, 489. 
Chicago Alumni Chapter — 

Banquet, 664. 

Letter, 461. 
Chi Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 280, 684. 

Soldier roll. 127, 315. 505, 722. 
Clayton, Bertram Tracy, death of (Theta), 717, 

167, 497. 
Clayton, Bertram Tracy (Theta), 87, 898. 
Clayton Brothers, The, by Thomas M. Owen, Sr. 

(Ulus.), 86. 
Clayton, Henry DeLamar (Theta), 86, 93. 275. 

351. 
Clayton, Junius Pugh (Theta). 87. 
Clemans. Carl Lane (Chi-Beta Chi), 459. 
Clem me r, Frank, death of (Lambda), 713. 



Cleveland Alumni Chapter — 

Banquet, 005. 

Letter. 94, 276, 675. 

Meetings. 409. 

Membership, 759. 
Clippings and comment, 154, 343, 758. 
Coates, Archie Austin (Delta Gamma), 759. 
College notes, 72. 268, 660. 
Cone, William Alexander, death of (Delta 

494, 550. 
Conventions and rallies, 88, 273, 457, 664. 
Conventions, Division (Sec. T ), 57, 402. 
Cowart, Albert Hansford, death of (Beta Th 

709. 
Cowell, Horace Baxter, death of (Psl), 708. 
Cowell, William Harold (Nu-Gamma Mu), 

267. 
Crawford. Thomas Lansden (Nu), 481. 
Credit, Chapter (Sec. T), 401. 
Creed of a sportsman, The, by Zane Grey, 4< 
Crossing on a transport, by Homer J. Schln 

203. 
Crossley, Moses Leverock (Delta Lambda), 1 

D 

Dare, Mark Donald, death of (Delta Ka] 

494. 550. 
Daven. Herman James (Sigma), 453. 
Davis, Westmoreland (Alpha) (Illus.), 878, 
Deaths, 107. 355. 540 
Debts, Alumni (Sec. T.), 57, 012. 
Delta Alpha Chapter — 

Alumni notes, 283. 473. 

initiate roll, 81. 

Letter. 257, 440, 043. 

Soldier roll. 142. 331, 523. 743. 
Delta Beta Chapter — 

Alumni notes, 092. 

Initiate roll, 81. 

Letter, 258. 441. 044. 

Soldier roll. 142, 332, 524. 744. 
Delta Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 681. 

Soldier roll. 122, 309, 498, 715. 
Delta Chi Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 108, 288, 478, 695. 

Initiate roll. 84. 

Letter, 00. 200. 451, 650. 

Soulier roll, 149, 150. 339. 340, 532. 533, 

755. 
Delta Comments — 

Cndot. John Julius (Gamma Eta), 759. 

Chandler. George A. < Gamma Lambda), 3 

Harrington, Grant Woodbury (Nu), 566. 
Delta correspondents (Ed.), 407, 536. 
Delta Delta Chapter — 

Alumni notes, 105. 283, 473, 692. 

Alumnus treasurer, 008. 

Initiate roll. 87. 

Letter, 259, 442, 045. 

Soldier roll. 144, 150, 333, 340, 525, 533. 
754. 
Delta Delta's treasury guard, by John Fi 

Kell, OO.s. 
Delta Epsilon Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 283. 

Initiate roll. 81. 

Letter, 08, 259. 442. 040. 

Soldier roll, 144, 150. 333, 340, 525, 033, 
754. 
Delta Eta Chapter — 
Alumni notes. 475. 

Initiate roll, 81. 

Letter, 260, 444, 048. 

Soldier roll, 145, 150, 334, 340, 527. 533, 
754. 
Delta Gamma Chapter — 

Alumni notes, 105, 283, 473. 

Club, 007. 

Comments. 224. 

Initiate roll. 81. 

Letter. 07. 258, 441. 045. 

Soldier roll. 143, 332. 524. 745. 
Delta Gamma Club, The, by William Horl Br 

Jr.. 607. 
Delta History — 

Eight years of Delta history, by Grant W 
bury Harrington, 587. 

Mailing list (Ed.). 616. 



iv 



Index 



Our ambition, 566. 
Publication dates (Ed.). 615. 
Delta Iota Chapter — 
Alumni notes, 604. 
Initiate roll, 82. 
Letter, 08, 262. 440, 649. 

Soldier roll, 145, 150, 335, 340, 527, 533, 74S. 
754. 
Delta Kappa Chapter — 
Alumni notes, 286, 475. 
Initiate roll. 82. 
Letter. 202, 446. 650. 
Soldier roll, 140, 335. 528. 748. 
Delta Lambda Chapter — 
Alumni notes, 280. 
Comment. 300. 
Initiate roll, 82. 
Letter. 203, 440, 650. 

Soldier roll, 140, 150, 330, 340, 528, 533. 741). 
755. 
Delta Mu Chapter — 
Alumni notes. 280, 004. 
Initiate roll, 82. 
Letter. OK. 263. 447, 651. 

Soldier roll. 140, 330. 340. 528. 533, 740, 755. 
Delta Nu Chapter — 
Initiate roll, 82. 
Utter 203. 448, 051. 
Soldier roll, 147, 330, 529. 740. 
Delta Omicron Chapter — 
Alumni notes, 287, 477. 004. 
Initiate roll. 83. 
Letter, 68. 204. 448, 051. 
Soldier roll, 147. 337. 530. 750 
Delta Phi Chapter- 
Alumni notes, 47S. 
Initiate roll, 84. 
Letter, 450, 656. 

Soldier roll, OS, 200. 330, 340, 532. 533. 753, 
755. 
Delta Pi Chapter — 
Alumni notes. 106, 2S7, 477. 
Comments. 224. 
Initiate roll, 83. . 
Letter, 204, 448, 053. 
Soldier roll. 148, 337. 530. 751. 
Delta policy (Ed.), 407. 
Delta Psi Chapter — 
Alumni notes. 280, 478. 096. 
Initiate roll, 85. 
Installation Ollus.). 23. 
Letter. 00, 200, 451. 057. 

Soldier roll, 140. 330. 340. 532. 533, 753. 755. 
Delta Rho Chapter — 
Alumni notes. 477. 
Initiate roll, 83. 
Letter, 204, 440. 053. 

Soldier roll, 148, 150, 338, 340, 530, 533, 751, 
755. 
Delta Sip ma Chapter — 
Alumni notes, 100. 287, 477, 095. 
Initiate roll. 83. 
Utter. OS. 264, 440, 654. 
Soldier roll. 148, 150, 338, 340, 531, 533, 
755. 
Delta subscription contest (Sec. T), 612. 
Delta subscription contest (Announcement), 
Delta Tau Chapter — 
Alumni notes, 477. 
Initiate roll, 84. 
Letter. 08, 205, 440. 054. 
Soldier roll. 149. 338, 531, 752. 
Delta Theta Chapter — 
Alumni notes, 694. 
Initiate roll, 82. 
Letter, 261. 445, 648. 

Soldier roll. 145, 335. 527. 533, 748, 754. 
Delta Upsllon Chapter — 
Alumni notes, 287, 695. 
Initiate roll, 84. 
Letter. 205. 449, 055. 

Soldier roll, 149, 339, 340. 531, 533, 752, 755. 
Delta. Volume thirty-six (Ed.), 04. 
Delta, Volume thirty-flve bound (Sec. T.), 231. 
Delta. December, 1918 (Ed), 234. 
Delta Xi Chapter — 
Alumni notes, 477. 
Initiate roll, 83. 
Letter, 08, 203, 448 
Soldier roll. 147, 337. 520. 



7V> 



01' 



T.), 402, 502. 



Delta Zeta Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 105, 283, 473, 092. 
Initiate roll, 81. 
Letter. 68. 200, 443. 646. 
Soldier roll, 144. 334, 526, 747. 

Den ham, Donald Power, death of (Gamma Theta). 

548. 
Denver Alumni Chapter — 

Letter, 05. 
Detchon, Almar Hunt, death of (Beta Iota), 700. 
Detroit Alumni Chapter — 

Letter. 075. 
Dickey, Frank Alexander (Delta Gamma), 072. 
Dlffenderfer, Davis Alcorn, death of (Gamma 

Nu), 549. 
Directory — 

Alumni Chapter. 172, 301. 554. 

Collegiate Chapter. 109, 358, 551. 

Sigma Nu Fraternity, 169, 358, 551. 
Dobbyn, Earl Dyster. death of (Beta Iota). 713 
Dode, Henry Edward (Gamma Psi), 293. 
Donaldson, Clark (Gamma Alpha), 460. 
Dreisback, Clyde F. (Beta Eta), 112, 294. 
Duncan, Joseph Gray, death of (Beta Zeta). 480, 

547. 
Dysart, Lloyd Butler (Gamma Chi), 295. 

E 

Editor. Little Journeys of the — 

See Little journeys of the Editor. 
Editor's miscellany, 156, 344, 535, 759. 
Edmonds, George Peck (Gamma Iota), 274. 
Education — 

Cornell University president's report, 061. 
Recount ruction and the college curricula, by 
Harlev F. Wilson, 574. 
Ellis, Ward, death of (Nu), 3o3, 355. 

Reported alive. 304. 
Emerson, Karl Albert, death of (Beta Sigma), 

548. 
Employment Bureau, 370. 
Employment service (Sec 
Epsilon Alpha Chapter — 
Comments. 225, 226. 
Initiate roll, 85. 
Installation, 33. 
Letter, 207, 452. 057. 

Soldier roll. 140, 150, 330, 340. 532, 533, 753, 
755. 
Epsilon Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 278, 406, 681. 
Double brothers. 450. 
Letter. 05. 230. 412, 010. 

Soldier roll, 122, 140, 300. 339. 499, 532, 715, 
753. 
Eta Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 400, 681. 
Initiate roll, 73. 
Letter. 05, 237. 412. G19. 
Soldier roll, 123, 310, 499. 715. 
Extension — 

Beta Theta Pi and expansion, 758. 

Building a national Fraternity, by Grant 

Woodbury Harrington, 217, 380, 578. 
Building a national Fraternity (Ed.), 234. 
Facing facts (Ed.). G14. 
Look-in on Arizona, A, by Herschell A. Auxler, 

226. 
National Sigma Nu, by Albert H. Wilson, 585. 
Sigma Nus bear acquaintance, by Lorenz F. 

Logan. 224. 
Sigma Nu in Dixie, by J. Pope Warson, 225. 
Size, but what else? Bv Albert Russell Kneale. 
584. 

F 

Father's approval. A., 308. 

Fiftieth anniversary (Ed). 03, 233, 400. 

Fiftieth anniversary (Sec. T.), 23L 

Finance, Chapter (Sec. T), 230, 401. 

Finger. Raymond Herman (Chi), 14, 298. 

Finish of hunism, The, by Walter J. Sears 

(Illus), 181. 
Fire, Chapter House — 

Nu. 377. 

Psi. 377. 
Fisher. Wilhelm Rudolph, death of (Nu), 70G. 
Fitzpatrick. William S. (Delta Kappa). 481. 



The Delta 



Fletcher. ltolaud Ezra, death of (Delta Xu), 495, 

550. 
Folsom. Leon Lamar, death of (Mu), 700. 
For Faith and Flag, by Walter J. Sears. 121. 
Founders' day (Sec. T.). 50. 
Founders' day in France, bv Pcrcv Llewellvn 

Harris, 590. 
France and the French, by Lawrence Leonard 

Hopkins, 599. 
Fraser, Harry Carlton (Delta Gamma), 11. 
Fraternal service, 370, 502. 
Fraternal ties abroad bind close, 13. 
Fraternities and the college — 

Cornell university president's report. 601. 
French universities. Our chapters at. 595. 
From Peru to Chill, bv Edward B. Berrien 

(Illus), 43. 
Fry, Charles Philip, death of (Theta), 107. 

<; 

(jiininiii Alpha Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 102, 282. 47o, GS7. 

Initiate roll. 77. 

Letter, 00, 24S. 428. (533. 

Soldier roll. 133. 322. 513. 731. 
Gamma Beta Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 102. 087. 

Editor, Little journeys of. 53. 

Initiate roll, 77. 

Letter, 248, 428, 034. 

Soldier roll, 134. 322, 513, 099. 731. 
Gamma Chi Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 091. 

Initiate roll. 80. 

Letter. 257. 439. 043. 

Soldier roll, 141. 15o. 331. 34o, r,22. 533, 742. 
754. 
Gamma Delta Chapter — 

Initiate roll. 7s. 

Letter. 00. 250, 429. 034 

Soldier roll. 134. 323. 514. 733 
Gamma Epsilon Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 282, 471, 088. 

Initiate roll, 78. 

Letter. 250, 429. 035. 

Soldier roll. 135. 323. 515. 733. 7 45. 
Gamma Pita Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 282. 741. oss. 

Initiate roll, is. 

Letter, 07. 251. 430. 630. 

Soldier roll. 135. 324. 515. 734. 
Gamma Gamma Chapter — 

Alumni notes, I02, 47o. 

Editor, Little Journeys of the, 52. 

Initiate roll. 77. 

Letter, 60, 249, 428. 634. 

Soldier roll, 134, 150, 323, 34o, 514, 533, 732. 
754. 
Gamma Iota Chapter — 

Alumni notes, 471, 088. 

Initiate roll, 78. 

Letter, 07. 251, 430. 037. 

Soldier roll. 135, 325. 517. 533, 735, 754. 
Gamma Kappa Chapter — 

Alumni notes. (588. 

Initiate roll. 78. 

Letter. 252. 432, 038. 

Soldier roll, 137, 150. 320, 340. 517. 533. 730. 
754. 
Gamma Lambda Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 103, 282, 471, 089. 

Initiate roll, 79. 

Letter. 252. 433. 038. 

Soldier roll, 137, 150. 326. 340. 517. 533, 730, 
754. 
Gamma Mu Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 105, 282, 472, 090. 

Initiate roll, 79. 

Letter, 253. 433, 030. 

Soldier roll. 138, 327. 518. 738. 
Gamma Nu Chapter — 

Alumni notes, 282. 472, 090. 

Double brothers, 003. 

Editor, Little Journeys of the. 53. 

Initiate roll, 79. 

Letter, 254. 434. 639. 

Soldier roll, 138. 327. 519. 738. 
Gamma Omicron — 

Alumni notes, 282. 



Initiate roll, 79. 

Letter. 07. 254, 435, 640. 

Soldier roll, 139. 328, 520, 739. 
Gamma Phi Chapter — 

Initiate roll, 80. 

Letter, 257, 438. 642. 

Soldier roll. 141. 330, 522, 742. 
Gamma Pi Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 282, 472. (Mil. 

Initiate roll. 79. 

Letter. 07. 255. 430. 040. 

Soldier roll. 139. 328. 520. 739, 754. 
Gamma Psi Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 105, 2*3, 473, 092. 

Initiate roll, 80. 

Letter. 257. 440. 043. 

Soldier roll. 142. 331. 523. 743 
Gamma Kho Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 282, 472. 

Breakfast. 0(55. 

Editor, Little journeys of the. 54. 

Initiate roll. 79. 

Letter, 07. 255, 430. 041 

Soldier roll. 140, 329. 520. 740. 
Gamma Sigma Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 283. 091. 

Initiate roll, so. 

Letter. 250, 437. 041. 

Soldier roll. 140. 329. 521. 740. 
Gamma Tan Chapter — 

Alumni notes, 091. 

Initiate roll, so. 

Letter. 250. 438. 042. 

Soldier roll. 14o. 329, 521. 741. 
Gamma Theta Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 102. 

Initiate roll. 78. 

Letter, 07. 251. 430. 037. 

Soldier roll. 130. 325. 510. 731. 
Gamma Cpsilon Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 2S3. 

Initiate roll, 80. 

Letter. Hi. 250. 438. 042. 

Soldier roll. 141. 1 5o. 33>, 340. .V21. 533. 741. 
754. 
Gamma Xi Chapter — ■ 

Alumni notes. 472. 090. 

Initiate roll. 79. 

Letter. 07. 254. 435. 040. 

Soldier roll. 139. 328. 519. 739. 754. 
Gamma Zeta Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 470. 

Initiate roll, 78. 

Letter, 251. 429, 030. 

Soldier roll. 135. 324. 515, 733. 754. 
Gates, Don Shepard, death of (Delta Beta), 549. 
Gettman. Earl John, death of (Delta Sigma). 108. 
Gihhs. George Sabin (Beta Mu). 505. 
Gibson, Thomas Kobert (Gamma Mu), 480. 
Gill. Thomas Andrew (Beta Eta). 207. 
Gillett. Alvin E. (Gamma Gamma). 7. 
Girls, here's tip on correct war to write buddie, 

bv C. C. Lvon. 302. 
Givan. Clinton Ilodell (Beta Eta). 274, 350, 400. 
Goedecke. Albert Philip, death of (Delta Delta), 

350. 
Going aeross via hydroplane, by C. Frank Schllt, 

2o4. 
Goodrich, Dana Bicknell. death of (Beta Sigma). 

548. 
Goodrich. James Edward (Rho), 071. 
Grant, Alfred Alexander (Beta Kappa). 291. 750 
Grant. Edward John (Delta Gamma), 0o7. 
Grav. Leon Kov. death of (Beta Beta). 480, 547. 
Greek News, bv Albert 11. Wilson, 152. 342, 757. 
Greek News (Ed.). 408. 
Greer, Alexander Vivian, death of (Gamma Psi), 

307. 350. 
Grundhocffer, Edward Franz (Delta Delta). 008. 

H 

Iladesty. George Boyd. Jr. (Delta Delta), 290. 
Hall. Benjamin Mortimer, Jr. (Gamma Alpha). 

071. 
Hall, Elmer Edwards (Gamma Zeta), 71. 
Hull. Warren Estely (Gamma Alpha). 071. 
Hambv, Leonard Christopher, death of (Gamma 

Upsilon), 492. 549. 
Hamel, Alfred Kickert. death of (Delta Kappa). 

212, 108. 



vi 



Index 



Hanley. Richard Edgar (Delta Iota). 71. 
Harrington, Grant Woodbury (Nu), (Illus.), 270. 
Harrington, Grant Woodbury (Nu), 572. 
Harrington. Harris (Nu) (Illus.), 271. 
Harringtons. The (Illus.), 270. 
Harrinirton. Wynne Powers (Xu-Beta Chi), 202. 
Harrington, Wynne Powers (Xu-Beta Chi), by 

Burton Pea body Sears (Illus.), 292. 
Hartford Alumni Chapter — 

Letter. 95, 277. 403. 070. 
Hanbensack, James Harold, death of (Gamma 

Theta). 492. 549. 
Haydon, George Lloyd, death of (Gamma Iota), 

MS. 
Hcaly. Jefferson Aloyslus. by Archie Austin 

Cottes, 119. 
Hetly, Jefferson Aloyslus. death of (Delta Gam- 
ma). 119. 10& 
Hutarty. Thomas Alexander, death of (Beta Iotn- 

Drita Gamma). 488. 547. 709. 
Helme. William Kay, death of (Delta T'psilon). 

550. 
Help the world sweet pence wen re, bv Kichard 

Emmett Pet tun. 205. 
Herrick. Harold Wilbur (Gamma Epsllon), 099. 
He'i a hero in his own home town, by William 

& Hedges, 302. 
Htei Council Meeting — 

Sew York. June 11-12. 1918 (Illus). 19. 
High school fraternities (Ed). 03. 
HUlli, Roger Whitman, death of (Delta Pi). 121. 

1*8. 490. 
History of Sigma Xu — 

Bailding a national fraternity (Ed.). 234. 

Building a national fraternity, by Grant Wood- 
bury Harrington. 217. 384), r>78. 

Catalogues. The first and second, by Grant 
Woodbury Harrington, 002. 

Eight years of Delta history, by Grant Wood- 
bury Harrington, 587. 

Inter-Fraternity contests, 231. 

My first decade hi Sigma Xu, by Rnwson Ben- 
nett. 570. 

Some notes and queries, by Rnwson Bennett. 
221. 

Synopsis of history of Sigma Xu, by Hurt on 
Peabody Sears, (Illus), 209. 
Hokenson. Thomas Olef. death of (PI), 480, 540. 
Holland. William Robert (Beta Xi). 10. 
Holloway. Webster Wntterson (Xu). 073 
Home-coming. By Archie Austin Coates, 4 in. 
Hopkins. Kichard Joseph (Xu), 070. 
Hopwood. Hnrrv L. (Beta Nu). 54. 93, floo. c>73. 
Hifhes. Earl Franklin (Gamma Phi), Too 
Hunt, Claude J. (Beta Beta). 70. 

I 

Indianapolis Alumni Chapter — 
1-etter. 070. 
Rally, 665. 
Initiation ceremonies (Sec. T.I. 01.°,. 
Initiation fees (Sec. T). 013. 
Initiations. War (Sec. T.). r>0. 
Inipertors (Sec. T.), 402. 
Inspectors' conference (Sec. T). 401 
Inapertors. Our new (Illus.). 570. 
Inttallation — nn active man's review (Epsllon 

Alphn). by T Dewltt Tn linage. (Illus.). 41. 
Inttallation — Bowdoln and Arizona (E<1.). 02. 
iBftallstiou from n local viewpoint (Delta Psi), 

by Clyde E. Stevens (Illus ). 29. 
Installation. Impressions of the (Delta Psl). by 

H. A. Randall (Illus.). 28. 
hmtallation notes (Delta Psl), by Edson K. Smith. 

32. 
Initallatlon notes (Epsllon Alpha), by J. F. Mr 

Kale (Illus.). 40. 
Inttallation of Delta Psi Chapter, by Seth F. 

Arnold (Illus.). 23. 
Installation of Kpsllou Alpha, by Billie B. Bush 

(Illus.). 33. 
Inter-Frnternity conference (Ed.) 233. 
Inter- Fraternity conference, Tenth. 378. 
Interview with Hindenburg. by C. C. Lyon, 409. 

567. 
In war- time Italy, by Victor Hugo Friedman, 

199, 38.%. 
Iota Chapter — 
Alumni notes. 279. 400. 
Editor. Little Journeys of the, 010. 



Initiate roll. 73. 
Letter, 413, 020. 
Soldier roll. 123. 23s, 311, 000. 710. 



Jenkins, Covington Drnue, deuth of (Beta Theta), 

709. 
Jindra, Anton J., death of (Gamma Beta), 548. 
Joiner, Manly Richard (Iota-Gamma Kappa), 570. 
Jones, Charles Richards, death of (Delta Kappa), 

856. 
Jones, Walter Converse, death of (Delta Xu). 

495. 550. 

K 

Kappa Chapter — 

Alumni notes, 279, 407, 6S2. 

Initiate roll, 73. 

Letter. 414. 621. 

Soldier roll, 124, 238. 311. 500, 717. 
Keenan. Gerald James, death of (Delta Pi). 168. 
Kendrick, Edward Hazen. death of (Nu). 355. 
Kindred Brothers, (Illus.). 80, 270, 454, 002. 
Kindred Brothers (Ed). 235. 
Kirk. George Edwin, death of (Delta Xu). 495, 

550. 
Knights afield and at home, bv Walter J. Sears. 

150. 341. 534. 
Knights of the Republic, 122. 309. 498, 714. 

Pledges, 149, 339, 532. 753. 

Summary, 151. 341. 534, 750. 
Knights of the Republic (Ed.), 405. 
Knights of the Republic (Sec. T.), 50 
Knode. Robert Troxell (Delta Phi), 453. 
Krull. Donald Carl (Gamma Mu). 801. 300. 400. 



Lnfitte. Edward F. (Gumma Alpha), 70. 

La Flam mo. Arthur William, death of (Beta Rho). 

300. 355. 
Lambda Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 279. 407. 

Initiate roll, 73. 

Letter, (55. 239, 414. 021. 

Soldier roll. 124, 311. 501. 717, 753. 
Lambert. Charles A. (Delta Delta), 13. 
Lee. Howard Shields, death of (Beta Chi), 355. 
Lenderman, Watson Bentty. death of (Beta Rho), 

709. 
Leo-'-Td. »fo'-trd Grorge. death of (Delta Gam- 
ma), 307, 350. 

"Lei .* go ( Ed ». ISO. 

Lewis. Allen Dodge, death of (Delta Beta). 711. 
Lippitt. Maxwell Wnlthour (Gumma Theta). 87. 
Little journeys of the Editor (Illus.). 52, 009. 
Little journeys of the Editor (Ed), 234. 
Look-in on Arizona, A, by Herschel A. Auxier, 

220. 
Lovelette, Count de Rochambeau. death of 

(Gamma Rho). 549. 
Loyaltv to Sigma Nu (Ed). ISO. 
Lvon, Clarence Calvin (Beta Eta). 93. 291. 297. 

299. 

M 

MacGregor, Ray Edson (Beta lota). 544. 
McClellan. John Murray, death of (Gamma Theta), 

490, 54N. 
McCormick, John Kernan, death of (Delta Giiin- 

ma), 494, 550. 
MeGrew. Charles Judsou, death of (Beta Beta), 

185, 304. 355. 
McKale, James Fred (Gamma Gnmmn), 70, 059. 
McKinstry, John Alexander, death of (Delta 

Rho), 712. 
Makepeace, Lewis Benjamin (Beta Nu), 301. 
Making of an Alumnus. The, by Ilarrell Vernon 

Baily. 583. 
Marriages. 160, 353. 545. 

Marston, Henry White (Delta Kappa). 453. 
Martin. Merle Vandever, death of (Nu). 304. 

355. 484. 
Martin, Richard Thomas, deuth of (Gamma 

Theta). 491, 548. 
Mathis. John Dawkltis, death of (Gamma Al- 
pha), 118. 108, 490. 
Maury, Leo Gen mire, death of (Gamma Beta). 

356. 
Memorial tablets. 497. 699. 
Memorial tablets, (Sec. T.), 402. 



vlf 



The Delta 



Merner. Carl John (Beta Kappa), 207. 208, 060. 
Merrill, John Franklin, death of (Gamma Delta- 
Gamma Lambda), 401. 548. 
Me tcnl f, Henry Harley (Beta Nu), 705. 
Mlchell, Henry Frederick, 2d, death of (Delta 

Delta), 120. 
Mlllfl. Harold Collhurst, death of (Delta Chi). 

168, 497. 
Minter, Paul Bryans, death of (Mu), 303, 335, 

482. 
Monte'll, Edgar Whiting (Delta Tau), 701. 
Montgomery Alumni Chapter — 

Banquet. 006. 

Letter, 95. 
Morrison, George Bnln (Gamma lota). 702. 
Morrison, William Francis (Beta Mu), 500 
Morse, Ira Floyd, death of (Beta Sigma), 548. 
Nu Chapter — 

Alumni notes, 101, 407, 082. 

Initiate roll, 74. 

Letter, 415, 021. 

Soldier roll, 124, 239, 312, 501. 532, 717. 753. 
Murphey, Clarence Wainwright (Lambda), G71. 
Murphy, Will Samuel, death of (Nu), 304. 335, 

484. 
Murray, Robert Frank (Beta Eta), 459. 
Murray, Seldon Howe, death of (Beta Xi), 489, 

548 701 709. 
Mutty, Louis Peter, death of (Delta lota). 121. 

16&. 
My castle on the Rhine, by Sam Galloway Hib- 

ben, 388. 
My first decade in Sigma Nu, by Kawson Bennett, 

576. 
Myers, George Frazier, death of (Delta Sigma). 

496, 550. 
Myers, Walter Edward (Beta Iota). 073. 

N 

National Sigma Nu, by Albert II. Wilson. 585. 
Newby, Errett Rains (Delta Omicron), 073. 
New York Cltv Alumni Chapter — 

Banquet, 000 

Letter. 97, 277. 453, 077. 
Noble, Elmer John, death of (Gamma Chi), 494, 

549, 711. 
Novices in chivalry, 73. 
Novices in chivalry (Sec. T), 58. 
Nu Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 279, 407, 682. 

House fire, 377. 

Initiate roll, 74. 

Kindred Brothers, 003. 

Letter, 05, 245, 415. 022. 

One hundred per cent, record, 292. 

Soldier roll, 125, 312, 502, 718. 
Nulsen, Herbert Spencer, death of (Beta Zeta). 

647. 

o 

O'Daniel. John Wilson (Delta Kappa), 703. 
Odle, Robert George, death of (Beta Mu), 488, 

548. 
Official Jeweler to Sigma Nu — 

Official announcement, 4, 178. 

Official jewelers (Sec. T.), 57, 231, 402. 
Oklahoma Alumni Chapter — 

Letter, 97. 463, 678. 
Oliver, Frank John, death of (Gamma Rho), 300. 

356. 
Omaha Alumni Chapter — 

Letter 98 464 
On the way 'to Berlin (Illus.), 109, 219, 479, 097. 
Our boys are coming back, by Richard Emmett 

Pettus, 760. 
Our first word from Germany, Samuel Galloway 

Hibben, 891. 
Owen, Benjamin Gilbert (Delta Epsilon), 207. 



Panama Alumni Chapter — 

Letter, 98. 
Parents and the Fraternity, 407. 
Parsons. Philip Archie (Gamma Psi), 400. 
Payne, Bruce Ryburn (Beta) (lllus.), 454. 
Payne, Maxwell Carr (Sigma), 298. 
Payne, Maxwell Carr (Sigma) (Illus.), 455. 
Paynes, The (Illus.), 454. 
Pay ton, James M., (Gamma Lambda), 700. 



Pegues, Samuel F. (Theta), 8. 

Pelouze, Robert Foray the, death of (Beta Chi). 

300. 350. 

Reported alive. 489. 
Pendley, Charles (Kappa), 303, 355. 
Peterson. Chester William, death of (Delta Gam- 
ma), 494, 550. 
Phi Chapter — 

Alumni notes, 101, 408, 084. 

Initiate roll, 74. 

Letter. 243. 419, 025. 

Soldier roll. 127. 315. 504. 721. 
Phi Delta Theta Schroll (Ed.), 64. 
Pi Chapter — 

Alumni notes, 101, 279, G83. 

Initiate roll, 74. 

Letter, 241. 417. 023. 

Soldier roll, 125, 313, 503. 719. 
Pickwick club, 100. 340. 539. 
Pihlgard, Eric Frederick, death of (Gamma Mu), 

710. 
Pillow, Robert Lee, death of (Sigma-Upsllon- 

Sigma), 540. 
Piracy, Journalistic, 154. 758. 
Pittsburgh Alumni Chapter — 

Daily luncheon, 155. 

Letter, 98. 278, 404, 078. 

Rally, 45S. 
Pledge lifting (Sec. T). 012. 
Poems — 

America's home-coming, by Archie Austin 
Coates, 0<>5 

Help the world sweet peace secure, by Richard 
Emmett Pettus, 205. 

I Ionic-coming, nv Archie Austin Coates, 410. 

.!. A. II., by Archie Austin Coates. 119. 

My castle on the Rhine, by Sam Hibben, 388. 

Our bovs are coming back, by Richard Em- 
mett Pettus. 700. 

Thanks, by Archie Austin Coates, 198. 

They'll guard the golden streets, 71. 

Where does the sky begin? by Christopher E. 
Sherman. 5N9. 
Pomeroy, Orange Barker (Delta Zeta), 701. 
Prayer before battle. A. by Victor L. Kebler, 151. 
Present in spirit, by Evan J. Darrenouge, 207. 
Presents from Prussia. 20. 
Presents from Prussia (Ed.), 00. 
Psl Chapter — 

Alumni notes, 280, 409, 0S4. 

Initiate roll, 74. 

Letter, 243, 419, 020. 

Soldier roll, 127, 315. 505, 722. 
Pulliani. Keeling Gaines, Jr. (Gamma Iota), 479. 

R 

Randall. William Leslie (Delta Eta), 571. 
Rawleigh, Wilbur Thomas, death of (Gamma 

Beta), 490. 548, 710. 
Reconstruction and the college curricula, by Har- 
ley F. Wilson, 574. 
Records, Chapter (Sec. T.), 50, 230. 
Regent in France, The (Illus), 9. 
Regent in France, The (Ed.). 59. 
Regent in France, The, by Borden Burr, 185. 
Regent's dinner, The, by Brothers over there. 

200. 
Regent's dinner, by Dale Allen Hartman (Illus.), 

10. 
Regent's story, The, by Robert Martin Brookes, 

579. 
Regrets from Italy, by Victor Hugo Friedman, 

207. 
Reunion in Paris, by Earl J. Dickenson. 200. 
Reunions — 

Camp banquet (Ed.), 61. 

First dinner in France. 10. 
Rho Chapter — 

Alumni notes, 101, 407, 083. 

Initiate roll, 74. 

Letter. 05, 242. 417. 024. 

Second generation club, 0G3. 

Soldier roll, 120, 314, 503, 720. 
Rhodes, Roscoe Bryan, death of (Delta Eta). 

494, 550, 000. 
Robinson, Isaac Poitevint (Lambda). 21, 275. 
RodgerB, Ira Errett (Gamma Pi), 71, 458. 
Romance of business. The, by a Sigma Nu sales 

manager, 227, 399. 



viii 



Index 



Rosequist, Curl Oscar, death of (Delta Theta). 

120 168 30T 404 
Hupp,' David. 3d, death of (Beta Rho), 306, 355. 
Rushing (Ed.), 404. 



Salt Lake Alumni Chapter — 

Letter, 405. 079. 
Sanford, Willis Sulzer, death of (Delta Zeta), 

550. 
Saunders, George Goewcy, death of (Delta Up- 
silon), 356. 
Schaeffer, John Floyd (Beta Xu- Delta Alpha). 

700. 
Scholar In la belle France. A, by Kenyon Steven- 
son. 202. 
Scholarship, 200. 661. 

After-the-war scholarship (Ed.), 404. 

Fraternity scholarship, by Charles H. Rich- 
ardson. 268. 

Scholarship (Sec. T.), 612. 
Schultz, Oscar T. (Beta Eta), 11. 
Scobell, Henry John, death of (Delta Sigma), 

407 550 712. 
Scott,' Mrs.' John C. death of, 235. 
Scott, Thomas Blair (Delta Zeta), 352. 
Seattle Alumni Chapter — 

Letter, 680. 
Secretary's table, 56, 230, 401, 012. 
Shaw. Cedric Hadaway, death of (Beta Kappa), 

488 548. 
Shaw.' Charles Edgar (Delta Gamma). 268. 
Shelton. Kemper (Gamma Pi). 70, 453. 
Sheridan. Philip BrinRloy, death of (Delta Nu), 
* 496. 550. 

Sherman, Christopher E. (Beta Nu), 662. 
Sherman, Robert Bruiting (Beta Nu), 662. 
Shlvely, Russell Lowell, death of (Epsilon), 335. 
Siberia, A. E. F.. 585. 
Slbson, Horace E. (Gamma Theta), 570. 
Sigma Chapter — 

Alumni notes. 101. 279, 408. 683. 

Initiate roll, 74. 

Letter 242 417 624 

Soldier rolT, 126^ 149, 314, 339, 504. 532, 720. 
754. 
Sigma Nu in Dixie, by J. Pope Watson, 225. 
Sigma Nus bear acquaintance, by Lorens Foard 

Logan, 224. 
Simms, Shefdon W., death of (Epsilon), 713. 
Sim pk in 8, James Claude, death of (Gamma Phi), 

463, 549. 
Size but what else, by Albert Russell Kneale, 

584. 
Size but what else (Ed). 614. 
81aymaker. Harry Clean, death of (Nu), 485. 546. 
Smart, Lawrence Landon (Delta Kappa), 698. 
Smith. Edward Marcus, death of (Xi-Alpha- 

Beta Rho). 707. 
Smith, Robert Nelson, death of (Gamma Kappa), 

168. 
Smythe, Cyrus Field (Upsilon), 294. 
Snapshots on the way over, by Benjamin Andrew 

Hoffeditz. 593. 
Snare, Femey George, death of (Delta Xi), 308, 

356. 
Some notes and queries, by Rawson Bennett, 221. 
Song Contest — 

Announcement, 2, 366, 558. 

Constructive Critic, A., 538. 

Jazzin' roun' a pa in ! 696. 

"Piper on songs", 663. 

Special cables, by Warren Piper, 387. 

Special instruction, by Warren Piper, 229. 
Sororities, 758. 

Spiker. Claude Carl (Gamma Pi), 704. 
Spokane Alumni Chapter — 

Letter, 465. 
State of the Order — 

Over here (Ed.), 01, 403. 
Stlllinaii. Walter Martin, death of (Delta Gamma- 
Beta Nu), 494. 550. 
Stoner, Chester Krumroy (Delta Zeta). 347, 348. 
Straw, Charles Stuart (Beta Rho), 92. 
Students' Army Training Corps, 69, 108. 
Students' Army Training Corps (Ed.), 60, 232. 
Students' Army Training Corps (Sec. T.), 58. 
Students' Army Training Corps. Instructors, 700. 
Swain, IJ. Nathan (Beta Beta), 705. 



Swlney, John Daniel, death of (Gamma Sigma), 

491, 549. 
Swlnk, Ralph Snowden, death of (Delta Rho), 

356. 
Sylvester, George Lee, death of (Delta Omlcron), 

712. 

T 

Tate, Edmund Brewer, death of (Mu), 482, 546. 
Terrell, Frank Hixon (Mu). 703. 
Thanks, by Archie Austin Coates, 180. 
Theta Chapter — 

Alumni notes, 101, 279, 466, 682. 

Editor, Little journeys of the, 611. 

Initiate roll, 73. 

Letter, 413, 620. 

Soldier roll, 123, 237, 410, 499, 715. 
Those Ignorant Yanks. 409. 
Three pals of Beta Mu, by William Lyle Glana- 

gan '(lllus.), 565. 
Tillman. Fred Allen (Gamma Usilon), 609. 
Toole, William Brlce (Gamma Phi-Delta Iota), 

701. 
Topeka Alumni Chapter — 

Letter, 080. 
Townsend, William nenry, death of (Delta Beta), 

119. 
Tucson Alumni Chapter — 

Letter, 080. 
Turner, Alfred Cullen, death of (XI), 486, 546. 
Twining. Simon Emlle, death of (Beta Eta), 547. 
Upsilon Chapter — 

Almii"! notes. 101. 6S4 

Initiate roll, 74. 

Letter, 05. 243. 418, 624. 

Soldier roll, 127, 149, 314, 340. 504, 532, 721. 
754. 

V 

Van Glnkel, Joseph G. (Beta Rho), 268. 
Vaughan. Eugene Robbins, death of (Beta Theta), 

487, 547. 

Van Vliet. Earle Raymond (Beta Rho), 274. 
Venereal Disease Campaign — 

Appeals for clean morals, 21. 

Health and sex hygiene (Ed.), 405. 

Message from the Surgeon General, 569 

Presents from Prussia, 20. 

Presents from Prussia (Ed.), 60. 
Vestre, Willard Edwin, death of (Gamma Tau), 

710. 
View and review, 59. 232. 403. 014. 
Visitor's register, 126, 535. 759. 

w 

War conditions (Ed), 232. 

War initiations (Sec. T.), 56. 

Ware, Harold Bacon, death of (Pi), 486, 546. 

707. 
Warner, Don (Gamma Sigma), 705. 
Washington Alumni Chapter — 

Letter, 99, 080. 
Watch on the Rhine, The, 389. 
Watklns, George Francis (Delta Beta), 699. 
Wat kins, George Francis, death of (Delta Beta), 

711. 
Welcome reminder, A., by John F. Merrill, 207. 
Wells, Edmond David, death of (Beta Kappa), 

304, 355. 
Welty, Henry Stanley (Gamma Epsilon), 698. 
Weybrecht, Edgar Charles, death of (Beta Iota), 

488, 547. 

What the university demands, 061. 

Where does the sky begin? by Christopher E. 

Sherman, 589. 
Whipp, Homer, death of (Epsilon Alpha), 713. 
Whistle, Sigma Nu, by Clarence W. Murphy, 157. 
White, Jasper William, death of (Beta Nu), 489, 

548. 
Whit sett, George P. (Rho), 480. 
Why grow old? by Richard Emmett Pettus, 289. 
Williams, Asa Ell wood (Beta Eta). 547. 
Williams, Ernest Lee (Gamma Kappa), 572. 
Williams, Henry D. (Gamma Theta), 91. 
Williams, Paul F. (Beta Zeta), 274. 
Williams, Thomas Lawrence, death of (Beta Pel), 

490, 548. 
Wilson, Albert H. (Beta Iota), 290. 
Wilson, Harley F. (Gamma Lambda). 292. 
Wilson, Herman Evans (Gamma Pl>, 104. 



Ix 



The Delta 



Wise, Lloyd Wilbur (Beta Xu), 702. 
With Military Honors, 117. 303. 482, 706. 
Wolf, Emmi uel Myrou, death of (Beta Psi), 107. 
Woodruff, Lorenzo Ferguson (Theta), 352. 
Woodward, Ward Norris, death of (Gamma Iota), 

493. 541). 
Word to the active Chapters, A, by George A. 

Chandler, 107. 



XI Chapter — 

Alumni notes, 407. 
Letter, 65, 241. 410. 622. 
Soldier roll, 125, 313, 503, 719. 



Post secretary and his hut. The, Ray H. Finger 
(Chi) (lllus.), 14. 

Sigma Nus in Y. M. C. A. war work (lllus.), 12. 

Trains the "Y" men for service overseas 
(lllus.), 10. 
Y. M. C. A. work as a vocation, by Alvin E. Gil- 

lett, 17. 
Young, Chauucey Tyler, death of (Beta Rho), 

489, 548. 
Young, Paul Schminke, death of (Delta Eta), 

350. 
Young, Thomas Gorsuch (Beta Rho), 072. 



Yells. Sigma Nu, 156. 
Y. M. C. A., Army — 

Brvant Park eagle hut and Brother Alvin E. 
Gillett (Gamma Gamma), The, (lllus), 7. 



Zeta Chapter — 

Soldier roll. 123, 310, 494, 715. 
Zewadski Brothers, 003. 
Zieget. Julius (Gamma Theta), 673. 
Zwiebel, Stanley A. (Pi), 673. 



INDEX TO AUTHORS 



Arnold, Seth T. — 

Installation of Delta Pal Chapter (lllus.), 23. 
Auxlcr. Herchel A. — 

Look-in on Arizona. A., 226. 

B 

Bally. Hnrrell Vernon — 

Making of an Alumnus. The. 583. 
Bennett. Rawson — 
My first decade in Sigma Nu, 576. 
Some notes and queries, 221. 
Berrien. Edward B. — 

From Peru to Chili (lllus.). 43. 
Braun, Edward Magnus — 

Military feat. 352. 
Brewer, Lawrence C. — 

First Sigma Nu banquet in Germany, 500. 
Brookes. Robert Martin — 
Regents story. The, 578. 
Brown, Henry Samuel (Beta lota). 

Mt. Union plays Mt. Union, 544. 
Brown. William Hori, Jr. — 

Delta Gamma Club, The, 6<>7. 
Burr, Borden — 

Regent in France, The, 185. 
Bash, Blllle B. — 
In8tallntlon of KpHilou Alpha Chapter (lllus.), 
83. 

c 

Chandler, George A. — 

Sure. It's "our" Fraternity, 611. 

Togo stories, 162, 347, 542. 

Word to the active chapters, A.. 107. 
Coatea, Archie Austin — 

America's home-coining, 605. 

Home-coming, 410. 

J. A II., 110. 

Thanks. 108. 
Cofer. John Daly — 

At military inspection. 350. 

Texas steer in camp, A., 161. 
Cooper, Charles Morgan — 

"Close-up" of war. A., 542. 

Spirit is willing, The. 163. 

D 

Darren ouge, Evan .1. — 

Present in spirit, 207. 
Dickenson, Earl J. — 

Reunion in Paris, 206. 
Dnnlavy, Edwin W. — 

Little Journeys of the Editor (lllus.). 52, 234, 
609. 

F 

Flanagan, William Lyie — 

Three pals of Beta Mu (lllus.). 565. 
Fraser, Harry Car let on — 

Delta Gamma Alum hum goes loco! A., 160. 
French, John Wymond — 

Privileges of rank. The, 164. 
Friedman. Victor Hugo — 

In war-time Italy. 100. 385. 

Regrets from Italy, 207. 



Gillette, Alvlu E— 

Y. M. C. A. work as a vocation, 17. 
Grant, Alfred Alexander (Beta Kappa) — 

Camp Clayton, France, 308. 
Grey, Zane — 

Creed of a sportsman, The, 408. 

H 

Harrington, Grant Woodbury — 
Building a national Fraternity, 217, 380, 570. 
Eight years of Delta history, 587. 
First and second catalogues, 602. 
Ships that pass in the night, 350. 



Harris, Jesse Eugene — 

Sibson. Horace E., 570. 
Harris, Percy Llewellyn — 

Founders' day in France, 596. 
Hartman, Dale Allen — 

Delta Beta men in old troop A, 348. 

Regents dinner, The (lllus.), 10. 

Shellshock, 530. 

University of Polttlers Chapter, 595. 
Hedges, William S.— 

He's a hero in his own home town, 302. 
Hibben, Samuel Galloway — 

Freshmen pranks, 541. 

My castle on the Rhine. 388. 

Our first word from Germany, 301. 
Hoffeditz, Benjamin Andrew — 

Snapshots on the way over, 503. 
Hopkins, Lawrence Leonard — 

France and the French, 559. 
Hosher, John Clarence — 

Alumnus treasurer plan, The, 606. 



Johnson, Howard Archie — 

Amex Forces Alumni Chapter letter, 100. 393. 

K 

Kebler, Victor L. — 

A praver before battle, 151. 
Kell. John Fisher- 
Delta Delta's treasury guard, 608. 
Kenny. Ernest Floyd — 

Randall. William Leslie. 571. 
Kneale. Albert Russell — 

Size but what else, 584. 
Krippner, Arthur Frederick — 

Williams. Ernest Lee. 572. 
Krnll, Donald Carl — 

Hoosier in Ioway, A.. 543. 

Sergeant Lightweight, 340. 



Logan, Lorens Foard — 

Sigma Nus bear acquaintance, 224. 
Lyo». Calvin C. — 

American drive would end the war (lllus.), 18. 

M 

McKale, J. F — 

Installation notes (Epsilon Alpha) (lllus.). 40. 
Matlock, Robert Cutter, Jr. — 

Art and the soldier, 501. 
Merrill. John F. — 

Welcome reminder, A.. 207. 
Murphey. Clarence W. — 

Sigma Nu whistle, 157. 

o 

Owen, Thomas M., Sr. — 

Clayton Brothers. The (lllus), 86. 
Patterson, Ian David — 

Nuptials of Brothers Baldwin, 544. 
Pethtel. Zadock Howard — 

Foreign travel, 541. 
Pettus, Richard Emmett — 

Help the world sweet peace secure, 205. 

Our boys are coming back, 760. 
Piper, Warren — 

Special instructions for song contest, 229. 

R 

Randall, H. A.— 

Impressions of the installation (Delta Psi) 
(lllus.), 28. 
Richardson, Charles II. — 

Scholarship, Fraternity, 268. 
Rider, Harry Angevin — 

Alumnus treasurer. The, 606. 
Rightor, Chester E. — 

Davis, Westmoreland, 376. 



xi 



The Delta 



Samuel 8, 
Myron 

Schilt, C. 
Going 



204. 



Maurice Victor — 
Wolf. 167. 
Frank — 

across via hydroplane, 
Schlamcr, Homer J. — • . 

Crossing on a transport, 203. 
Sears, Burton Peabody — 

Harrington, Wynne Powers (lllus.), 272. 

History of Sigma Nu, Synopsis of the (lllus.). 
2t>9. 
Sears. Walter James — 

Finish of hunism. the (lllus.). 181. 

For Faith and Flag, 121. 

Knights afield and at home, 15o. 
Shea, Mortimer Joseph, .lr. — 

Sigma Nu calendar for rushees. 
Sherman, Christopher E. — 

Where does the sky begin? 5S9. 
Shreffler, Robert Ll'vanta — 

Nose spins in the mens room, 540. 
Smith, Edson K. — 

Installation notes <l»elt:i Psi). 32. 
Stevens. Clyde E. — 

Installation from ;i IoimI viewpoint (l>elta Psi) 

(lllus.), 29. 



10 



».). 



Stevenson, Kenyon — 

Scholar in la belle France, A., 202. 
Stouer, Chester Krumroy — 

All in a day's work, 347. 

Back to the farm, 348. 

Battle of Fort Sill, The, 351. 

Why postmen must take exams, 350. 
Super, Charles Judson — 

First-class fighting men, 348. 



Talmage. T. Dewitt — 

installation — an active man's review (Illua 



41. 



w 



Watson. .1. Pope — 

Sigma Nu in Dixie, 225. 
Williams. Ernest Lee — 

"All men are liars", 104. 
Wilson, Harley F. — 

Reconstruction and the college curricula. 574 
Witson, Albert H. — 

Applied fraternity, 394, 597. 

Creek news. 152, 342. 757. 

National Sigma Nu, 5S5. 



xii 



INDEX TO ILLUSTRATIONS 



cer Thorndyke (Gaiuiua Nu-Ganima 

S. 

ph Johnston (Delta Eta), 701. 

Iversity of, 33. 

B 

th Faussett (Beta Itho), 30G. 

•8 Lunsford (Delta Mu), 097. 

liege, 22. 

in Harold (Gamma Kappa), 491. 

n (Theta- Lambda), 9, 184. 

•rt Ainsworth (Beta Zeta). 479. 



•ups — 
56. 

26. 

lpha, 35. 
i, 58. 
L. 
ises— 

24. 

lpha, 86. 
imma, 51. 
L. 

>nald Hopple (Beta Xu), 4S9. 
tram Tracy (Theta), 117. 
nry De Lamar (Theta), SO. 
ilas P. (Theta), 80. 

D 

ii orel n ml (Alpha). 372. 
Myde Floyd (Beta Eta), 112. 
eph Gray (Beta Zeta), 487. 



ry Carlton (Delta Gamma), 11. 



re Sabln (Beta Mu). 564. 

mas Robert (Gnmma Mu). 480. 

I E. (Gamma Gamma), X. 
9n Hodell (Beta Eta), 274. 
d A. (Beta Kappa), 291. 

H 

Grant Woodbury (Xu), 271. 
Harris (Nu), 271. 

Wynne Powers (Xu-Beta Chi), 271. 
ale A. (Delta Zeta), 10. 

II and General Office™, 19. 
111am Robert (Beta Xi). 10. 
mes Frank (Alpha), 208. 

iwrence Leonard (Delta Alpha), 114. 
hard Joseph (Xo), 070. 



Lyon, Clarence C. (Beta Eta) (cartoon), 18. 
Lyon, Clarence C. (Beta Eta), 297. 

M 

McGrew, Charles Judson (Beta Beta), 185. 
Maun, Berthald Charles (Gamma Lambda), 659. 
Murphy, Will Samuel (Nu), 484. 
Mutty, Louis Peter (Delta Iota), 121. 



Payne, Bruce Ryburn (Beta), 454. 
Payne, Maxwell Carr (Sigma), 454. 
Peruvian Scenes, 42. 
Plattsburg training camp Sigma Xus, 113. 

Q 

Quarles, Greenfield (Alpha), 210. 

R 

Randall, William Leslie (Delta Eta), 572. 
Rawleigh, Wilbur Thomas (Gamma Beta), 710. 
Riley, James M. (Alpha), 212. 
Kosequist, Carl Oscar (Delta Theta), 120. 



Scobell, Henry John (Delta Sigma), 712. 

Scott, John C. Jr., 535. 

Sears, Walter J. Jr., 535. 

Sherman, Christopher E. (Beta Nu), 662. 

Sherman, Robert Bruning (Beta Nu), 662. 

Sibson, Horace E. (Gamma Theta), 571. 

Slay maker, Harry Blean (Nu), 485. 

Smart, Lawrence Landon (Delta Kappa), 689. 

Snare, Ferney George (Delta XI), 308. 

Spiker, Claude Carl (Gamma Pi), 704. 

Steiner, Bernard (Theta), 110. 



Tate, Edmund Brewer (Mo), 483. 
Terrell, Frank Hixon (Mu), 703. 
Toole, William Brice (Gamma Phi-Delta Iota), 
701. 

w 

Ware, Harold Bacon (Pi), 707. 

Wells, Edmund David (Beta Kappa), 305. 

Weybrecht, Edgar Charles (Beta Iota), 488. 

Williams, Ernest Lee (Gamma Kappa), 573. 

Wilson, Albert H. (Beta Iota). 290. 

Wise, Lloyd Wilbur (Beta Nu), 702. 

Wrlston, Roscoe Caleb (Beta Sigma), 111. 



y Richard (Iota-Gamma Kappa), 570. 
K 

Busey, Jr. 



rd 
ert 



(Iota-Theta). ISO. 
Troxell (Delta Phi), 453. 



Y. M. C. A. Army Hut, New York City- 
Exterior, 6. 
Interior, 8. 

Y. M. C. A. dugout, Entrance to, 12. 



\ 



xiii 



\ 



Fraternity Supplies 

1 




Sigma Nu Song Book Card Cases for Alumni 

$1.00 Ta Copy ReJ Ualha, 75c Each 



The Creed of Sigma Nu 

Fie* on Rcjjuttl 

Mtagi oar *nt*IL loi ihc iiuii-ou' 



Initiates' Badges 
$5.00 Each 

Orders must be placed 
thru the general office 



SIGMA NU FRATERNITY 

BUILDING -■ INDI 




VOLUME XXXVI 



OCTOBER 1916 



mmh 



Published By 

The Sigma Nu Fraternity 




ae Ml Genet.] Office* «r *e 

Leipcke Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 




Devoted to Fraternity and College Interest!, Published 
on the first day» of October, December, March and May 



EDWIN W. DUNLAVY. 



Coprrifht. 1918. by Edwin W, Dunlmy 



«foriHi)bsit*j>*<»lnt. D Jp»Ui.pn>TKJcd (or in Section 1 103. fetal Oct:}. nV',*MsWaH*}5i sVNVh. 



m 



•*+* 



752H3OT 




yve Announce 

tfe Second Sigma Nu 

Song Content 



BY the time this announcement is 
read our Chapters will have re- 
ceived copies of the songs that won 
the prizes in the first contest. We 
now announce the opening of the 
Second Contest, and every Sigma Nu 
is cordially invited to submit lyrics 
and melodies of Sigma Nu Songs. 
We suggest nothing — but we demand 
originality. The winning songs in the 
Second Contest will be published by 
the Fraternity, and suitable prizes 
awarded to the writers and com- 
posers. The contest will be governed 
by the same rules which applied to 
the First Song Contest. 

The Song Committee 

Warren Piper, Gamma Beta 
Chairman 

Peter E. F. Burns Archie Coates 

Gamma Chi Delta Gamma 

Address All Communications to Sigma Nu General Offices 



s 



98 






,» • # 



• /• •• 






Contents 



Tage 

Official Jewelers to Sigma Nu 4 

The Bryant Park Eagle Hut and Brother Alvin E. Gillett 7 

Pegues Goes Through a Bombing 8 / 

The Regent in France 9 

Regent's Dinner 10 

First Sigma Nu Dinner in France 10 

Trains the "Y" Men for Service Overseas 10 • 

Harry Carleton Fraser 11 

Dr. Oscar T. Schultz Enlists 11 

Sigma Nus in Y. M. G. A. War Work 12 

Fraternal Ties Abroad Bind Close 13 

The Post Secretary and His Hut — Ray H. Finger 14 

Y. M. C. A. Work as a Vocation, by Alvin E. Gillett 17 

American Drive Would End the War, Says Lyon 18 

High Council Meeting 19 

Presents From Prussia 20 

Installation of Delta Psi Chapter 23 

Installation of Epsilon Alpha Chapter 33 

From Peru to Chile, by Edward B. Berrien 43 

Little Journeys of the Editor 52 

Secretary's Table 56 

View and Review 59 

Chapter Survey 65 

The Athletes 70 

College Notes 72 

Novices in Chivalry 73 

Kindred Brothers 86 

Conventions and Rallies 88 

The Alumni 91 

Alumni Chapter Letters 94 

Alumni Notes 101 

On the Way to Berlin 109 

With Military Honors 117 

Knights of the Repubic 122 

Greek News, by Past Regent Albert H. Wilson 152 

Clippings and Comment 154 

Editor's Miscellany 156 

Chapter Book Shelf 158 

Pickwick Club 160 

Marriages 166 

Deaths 167 

Fraternity Dipxctory 169 



Twenty-five Cents the Copy One Dollar the Year 



Send all subscriptions and remittances to the General Offices, Sigma Nu Fraternity, Lemcke 
Building, Indianapolis. 

The annual per capita tax paid by members of Alumni Chapters entitles the member to a 
year's subscription to The Delta. Such tax should be sent to the Alumni Chapter Treasurer, 
who will transmit it to the General Secretary. 

Alumni not members of Alumni Chapters should send their subscriptions and remittances 
to the General Secretary, Lemcke Building, Indianapolis. 

Advertising rates given upon request to the General Secretary. 



Official Announcement 



Official Jewelers to Sigma Nu 

By Contract with the Fraternity 

J. F. Newman 
L. G. Balfour Co. 

^^ «. 

To the Active Chapters of Sigma Nu Fraternity : 

Pursuant to the action of the Eighteenth Grand Chapter, the High 
Council has entered into a contract with J. F. Newman and L. G. Balfour 
Co., making these two concerns the sole Official Jewelers to the Fraternity, 
and granting them all rights and privileges pertaining thereto. 

These Official Jewelers hold entirely different and distinct relation to 
the Fraternity than those who were formerly known under that title. 

Under our contract they become really Official Jewelers — the interests 
of the Fraternity and of our members are conserved and the Fraternity 
has a direct means of control over their actions. 

Two Official Jewelers were selected, because : 

First — The smaller number of jewelers makes the exclusive rights 
more valuable to each party, and therefore more enforceable by the Fra- 
ternity. 

Second — The competition will insure what the contract provides, since 
each concern will wish to build up its own trade. 

The terms of the contract provide that : 



Advantages to the Fraternity 

First, the jewelers agree to maintain the standards of design, accord- 
ing to and in agreement with the Law and Customs of the Fraternity. 

Second, the jewelers agree to maintain the regular standards of 
value in all Sigma Nu jewelry and novelties. 

Third, the jewelers agree to keep their prices at the level of the 
market prices prevailing at this time, and not to raise their prices during 
the limits of the contract. 

Fourth, the jewelers agree to make prompt shipment of all orders, 
and to keep on hand a supply of their goods adequate to take care of 
the demand. 



In brief, our Chapters and our Alumni can purchase standard goods 
at fair prices and made according to the Law of the Fraternity. If there 
is any dissatisfaction, the Brothers have recourse through the General 
Office. 

In return for this service: 

First, the Fraternity has pledged exclusive rights of sale in our 
Chapter Houses to our Official Jewelers. 

Second, the Fraternity will expect that all members shall individu- 
ally observe the spirit of this contract in their purchases. 

For the business of our Fraternity in the matter of jewelry and 
novelties, these two Official Jewelers will turn in a percentage of their 
receipts to the general fund of the Fraternity. This revenue will be used 
for the good and welfare of Sigma Nu, subject to the order of the Grand 
Chapter. 

The foregoing does not apply to the Official Standard or Regulation 
Badge and Pledge Pin, which by law all Chapters and Initiates are re- 
quired to buy from the General Office. 

The spirit of' this contract is binding upon all Sigma Nus, whether 
active or Alumni. It is not only to the advantage of the Fraternity that 
you confine your dealings to our Official Jewelers — it is to your own benefit 
as well. 



To Chapter Officers: 

Specffic Duties 

1. Post the Official Placard in a conspicuous place on or near 
the Chapter's bulletin board. 

2. Send all orders for Pledge Pins and Initiates' Badges to 
the General Office, as heretofore. 

3. Extend all courtesies and privileges involved in this con- 
tract to the salesmen of the Official Jewelers, and to them only. 

4. Do not permit the salesman of any other companies to 
display or sell their goods in the Chapter House or to the active 
men. 

5. Report to the General Office at once any salesman not of 
these two concerns, purporting to be official salesman. 

6. Make reports to the General Office, promptly, on the forms 
provided, of all sales of jewelry and novelties made in the Chapter 
House or to the members of the Chapter. 





" fl ! 

tut; ~* C33 


i, 


jiff Bj" OB^. 

WvJdp - ' J 


y 


,1 n'nir. ■ - 


r 



Volume XXXVI 



OCTOBER. 1918 



Number 1 



THE DELTA 




YMCA 




The Bryant Park Eagle Hut 

and Brother Alvin E. Gillett 

Gamma Gamma 



At the corner of Bryant Park, just 
back of the Public Library, where 
Forty-second street and Sixth avenue 
meet— one of the most congested cor- 
ners in New York City — stands the 
Eagle Hut. A port of embarkation, 
as every one knows, sees every day 
thousands of soldiers and sailors 
from our camps and fleet passing 
through. Most of these boys get 
leave to visit the city on their way to 
the front. Hence the Y. M. C. A. 
war hut is placed downtown for their 
headquarters. 

One picture shows the Eagle Hut 
as you approach, of simple and yet 
artistic design, which fits in appro- 
priately with the neighboring build- 
ings and is yet similar to the camp 
huts. Our frontispiece gives a 
glimpse indoors, with everything in 
session, as it is all the time. (Take 
a good look at Brother Gillett, who 
is "at leisure" — you ought to see him 
when he is busy!) The hut and fur- 
nishings were designed by experts, 
and it is said to be the most attract- 
ive Y. M. C. A. in the world. Plans 
are being made to duplicate the colors 
and furnishings in other huts here 
and abroad. 

Here all men in uniform find a 
homelike atmosphere where they can 
write letters, listen to music, buy re- 
freshments at the canteen, which is 
jerved by women like Mrs. W. K. 



Vanderbilt, Jr., Mrs. Jay Gould, Mrs. 
Robert Bacon, and many other prom- 
inent New York women. There are 
provided guides to show the men 
around the city. Rooming places are 
secured for them. In fact, the secre- 
tary and his staff try to serve all the 
needs of the men who are off duty 
while they are in New York. 

And that brings us to an interest- 
ing phase in this article. Persons 
interest more than things, and their 
work without themselves lacks vital- 
ity. Brother Reader, meet Brother 
Gillett. (A fine-looking, upstanding 
man he is. Plenty of vitality in him 
and around him. His work attests 
this, too, to you who have never seen 
him.) 

From the pine woods of northern 
Michigan Alvin Gillett went to Al- 
bion College, where he modestly says 
his Brothers did more for him than 
he can ever do for others. Here he 
decided to give his efforts to human 
service. For eight years he was di- 
rector of social work at the West Side 
Y. M. C. A. in New York City, an 
association of 8,600 members — the 
largest in the world — and of high 
reputation throughout the country 
for its successful work and energetic 
staff. 

When the Bryant Park Eagle Hut 
was built Brother Gillett was solic- 
ited as the secretary. It is hardly 



8 The : 

necessary to tell about it, since we 
are all familiar with camp "Y's." At 
this point of passage, however, his 
opportunity was unique on this side 
of the Atlantic, and we can say he 
lived up to it. 

Recently Brother Gillett was re- 
quested to go to Waterbury, Conn., 
and organize the Y. M. C. A. work 



Pegues Goes Through a Bombing 

Brother Pegues, the loved and honorable 
guardian of our treasury, knows the experi- 
ences of his Brothers in the hospitals of 
France. He has been through a bomb raid 
— and escaped injury, we gladly hasten to 




for the Chase Companies, which are 
engaged in government war work, 
employing 7,000 men. He is also a 
leader in the Waterbury Community 
Sings. 

Besides being a Sigma Nu and a 
Y. M. C. A. secretary, Brother Gillett 
is a thirty-second degree Mason, a 
member of the Waterbury Chamber 
of Commerce, and a man of ideas and 
leadership. 



It came just as a bell in the dome of the 
building struck 3:10 o'clock. The force of 
the blast tore the radiator from its fasten- 
ings and hurled it twenty feet, where it 
struck and killed a horse, smashed desks, 
tore up great slabs of marble from the walls 
and ground the woodwork into splinters. 

This outrage might have directly affected 
the Sigma Nu Fraternity. Where would we 
find another "Sam Pegues"? His office is 
in the Engineers Department, 308 Federal 
Building, and near enough to get all the 
sensations of a bomb raid and its dangers. 



The Regent in France 

[This communication has just been received from i 
for his safe return about the time this magazine reaches o 
a most interesting article from him for the December number. — The Editor.] 



American Y. M. C. A. 
On Active Service with the American 

Expeditionary Forces. 
My dear Dunlavy : 

iMlI -reach. New York the latter 
part of September and before leaving 
will cable you about what date I will 
arrive so you can meet me in New 
York if you think well of it. 

Have met a great many Sigs, been 
with them everywhere; saw one 
Brother die as he was rallying his 
men on an attack against a nest of 
machine guns. The boys over here 
are playing the part of men — there 
must be a tightening up at home ! 

Have not time to write more. 
Fraternally, 

Aug. 5, 1918. Burr. 



Borden Burr Wins Fame 

Birmingham Attorney With Y.M.C.A. 
Does Gallant Service in France 

BORDEN BURR, prominent at- 
torney of Birmingham, in Y. M. 
C. A. work, making a tour of 
the American sector on the battle- 
fields in nance, who went over the 
top with ■ several of the companies, 
which included Birmingham and Ala-. 
bama soldiers, during the lighting in 
July, seeing tie driver of one of the 
ambulances killed, mounted the seat 
of the machine, took the wheel, drove 
into the thickest of the fight, helped 
gather in the dead and wounded, 
drove back to the first line hospital 
and made two more such trips on to 
the battle grounds: 

Borden Burr showed the greatest 
daring of any man not actually en- 
gaged in the fighting ever seen, ac- 
cording to the letter. The driver of 
the ambulance fell during the midst 
of the great over-the-top drive. Un- 
daunted Mr. Burr grabbed hold of 



the wheel and went forward. He 
assisted in placing the dead and 
wounded into the ambulance and 
wheeling around dashed for the hos- 
pital. The flying bullets, the burst- 
ing shells, the whizzing machine gun 
shrapnel and lead had no terror for 
him. For a second and even a third 
time he drove the ambulance back on 
the field and assisted in gathering up 
the unfortunate young men. 




Burr led two other ambulances to 
the field and showed the drivers the 
easiest way to reach the portion of 
the field where many of the boys 
from his home section had been 
stricken. Nothing caused him fear. 
He would not desist, but bravely 
went to the front, after going over 
the top. It was the most remarkable 
showing of bravery ever heard of. 

Exactly when Mr. Burr is to re- 
turn is not stated in the letter, but be- 
fore leaving here several weeks ago 
he announced that he would endeavor 
to be back by October and that he 
would be able to give personal de- 
scription of conditions. His predic- 
tion has come true. Going over the 
top was tame as to what else the 
Birmingham attorney did in the 
great fighting on the Marne. — Birm- 
ingham, Ala., newspaper. 



REGENT'S DINNER IN PARIS 

Dear Brother Rider, M. P. C: 

A copy of the Herald (Paris edition) 
came into my hands today and about the 
first thing I saw was: 

Sigma Nu Fraternity 
"Alt members of the Sigma Nu Frater- 
nity who can so arrange are invited to 
meet the Regent of the Fraternity for din- 




lie H. Rubicam, Gamma Chi 153, telling me, 
among other things, of a banquet held the 
evening before the letter was written. He 
said that nine good Sigma Nus, all in the 
18th Engineers, Railway, had sat down to 
a Sigma Nu banquet and had a Sigma Nu 
time and expected to do so again! Anyway, 
it is good to know the boys are getting 
together there, no matter who gets there 
first, or how often. 
CAPT. FREDERICK H. RICHARDSON, 
Gamma Chi. 



In the big Y. M. C. A. Overseas Training 
School, New York City, the Colonel of the 
Battalions, that drill every afternoon on 
the West Meadows of Central Park, is Will- 
iam Robert Holland, of the Beta Xi Chap- 
ter, William Jewel College, Liberty, Mo. 
Brother Holland is not only a wonderfully 
busy man, but he is a universally liked gen- 
tleman. The following from the "Kit Bag," 
published by the Y. M. C. A. men while 
waiting for their passports, is self explain- 



Now as to where I am in France, the cen- 
sors wont let me tell (and, to tell the truth, 
I haven't a very good idea of just where I 
am); so we'll drop that. Now, I don't know 
whether 111 be present on the 26th at Paris 
or not. This soldier life is darned uncer- 
tain, you know — the 26th may find me 
breaking stones in Berlin or "pushing up 
the daises." You never can tell. 

DALE HARTMAN, Delta Zeta. 



First Sigma Nu Dinner in France 

I am particularly interested in the ac- 
count of the "Amex Forces" Alumni Chap- 
ter, and I hope to soon meet some of the 
boys over there. However, I am wondering 
if theirs was the first such meeting there. 
Sometime last fall — in October or Novem- 
ber — I received a letter from Brother Les- 




1 headquarters training Y. M. C. . 



ing and shows how well established this 
brother has become in the hearts of the 
men with whom he is laboring. The pre- 
sentation was made on the drill grounds just 
at the close of the afternoon's maneuvers 
with Mrs. Holland standing with her hus- 

"Mrs. Holland decided a S2nd degree 
Masonic ring would be the best thing for 
Col. Holland. Lieut. Colonel Burleigh will 



The Regent In France 



present it to him Friday after drill. It's 
safe to say that the Colonel will not appre- 
ciate the handsome gift one bit more than 
the "Y" men appreciate the opportunity of 
being able to contribute to the friend which 
purchased it." — "Kit Bag." 

Be Just Wouldn't Be Kept Out of the War 

Mr. Holland hails from Clare mo re, Okla., 
where, until he got into the war, he was the 
head of a big wholesale grocery house. He 
is a former officer in the National Guard 
and became a captain in the National Army 
when the latter was organized. He was 
crippled in an accident while training at 
Camp Foote, Little Rock, Ark., and was dis- 
charged for phvsical disability. But that 
couldn't keep him out of the fighting zone. 
He hooked up with the Y. M. C. A. and soon 
will be on the other side. There are many 
like him among the secretaries who arc 
being sent to France, to England, Italy, 
Mesopotamia and in fact everywhere there 
is fighting. — New York Evening World. 



Harry Carleton Fraser 

Delta Gamma 
Brother Harry Carleton Fraser is chap- 
lain in the 79th Field Artillery. Brother 
Fraser enrolled at Pratt Institute after pre- 




paring for college at the Mt. Hermon 
School. He then went to Columbia College, 
where he was initiated into Delta Gamma 
Chapter. He left there at the middle of his 
junior year for Iowa Wesleyan, where he 
graduated. 



Brother Fraser served four years at the 
Army and Navy Y. M. C. A. in Brooklyn, 
and was then made General Secretary of 
the Y. M. C. A. in Manila, holding this posi- 
tion for six years. In December, 1916, he 
was nominated by Governor General Har- 
rison of the Philippines for a chaplaincy in 
the Regular Army, and returned to the 
United States. He could not qualify for 
this position, however, until after ordina- 
tion by the Wyoming Conference of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church in April. 1917. 
The 79th Field Artillery was a crack cav- 
alry regiment, but was changed along with 
many others to Field Artillery, in October, 
1917. 

"Camp and Field," the army cantonment 
paper, reports Brother Fraser as equally 
alert in making a ringing speech at the 
Sunday morning camp service as in staging 
a boxing bout under Y. M. C. A, army 
auspices. 

[Brother Fraser is respectfully referred 
to the Pickwick Club, page 144, for his let- 
ter of protest. We trust that we have now 
fulfilled his expectations and he will with- 
draw his complaints (!) We congratulate 
him on his accuracy of aim for his letter 
to his Chapter brought us a Chapter letter 
from the reporter without a call this time. 
Other Alumni! take heed, and if your Chap- 
ter doesn't send in enough news, "punch" 
'em up. — The Editor.] 



Dr. Oscar T. Schultz Enlists 

Dr. Oscar T. Schultz, Beta Eta, is now a 
captain in the Medical Reserve Corps. In 
the early summer he was stationed at Pratt 
Institute, New York, and on July 1 he was 
transferred to the Army Medical School at 
Washington, D. C, for duty, and "after 
that," he says, "no one knows." With his 
family he will made his home at Baltimore, 
Md. 

Captain Schultz was formerly a member 
of the Faculty of the Nebraska Medical 
School. Before that for years he was pro- 
fessor of pathology in the Western Reserve 
Medical School. 

In Cleveland, he was an enthusiastic 
member of the Alumni Chapter, a "regular" 
attendant at every meeting. His friends 
there will always remember his genial face 
and cheery ways. He was always relied 
on as one "to keep things going, and no 
meeting at which he was present ever grew 
listless or soporific Captain Schultz estab- 
lished a precedent in making "the shortest 
speech" in record, which did not detract in 
any way from his popularity. 



, ... take it, 

and one of Sigma Nu should be justly 
proud of the part we are taking In it. 



E < '■* \ 




f j f,m mm 






v< I. A' tZMWs 

v J? i! NIB*-'' 

nil ; iiy 

mi i yn 


mW* ■ 




i^^^^" --^^BR^^^Ir?? 



m-H'*U o/ I'Hbliritii lli,i 



Sigma Nus in Y. M. C. A. War Work 

Here and Over There 



We have been aaked by the Nation- 
al War Work Council of the Y. M. 
C. A. to feature their work in this 
issue of our magazine, and we are 
glad to do every possible thing which 
this organization, so magnificent in 
service, asks us to do. 

Brother Alvin E. Gillett's article 
on the work at the Eagle Hut in New 
York City — in Bryant Park, just 
back of the Public Library — has ap- 
peared on the editor's desk at a most 
appropriate time. In order to round 
out the description of the Red Tri- 
angle and to present it from all 
angles, we are also publishing in this 
issue Brother Gillett's contribution 
in our vocational series — Y. M. C. A. 
work as a profession for college men. 
Its war work is but a part of its regu- 
lar affairs and bears a definite rela- 
tion to the home organization. The 



Y. M. C. A. is doing for our soldier 
boys in the field only what it pro- 
fesses to do for all young men, at 
home or abroad. 

In requesting the co-operation of 
the fraternities and their magazines, 
Mr. Albert B. Elliott, of the Bureau 
of Publicity of the National War 
Work Council, writes us : "I am in- 
terested in the number of Sigma Nus 
who are in France in Y. M. C. A. 
work." Indeed, the list of Sigma Nu 
Brothers in this issue who are acting 
as Y. M. C. A. secretaries, though 
incomplete, of course, is nevertheless 
impressive and indicative of our re- 
lation to this organization. And 
while we are writing this article our 
Regent, Brother Burr, is on an in- 
spection tour of the western front, 
preparing to give his time this fall to 
the nation-wide Y. M. C. A. drive for 



Fraternal Ties Abroad Bind Close 



13 



$112,000,000, and our Past Regent 
Albert H. Wilson is on the seas going 
for duty as hut secretary in France. 

Here we are glad to present a roll 
of Sigma Nus in Y. M. C. A. war 
work. This roll is far from com- 
plete, but is indicative of the close 
relation which Sigma Nu bears to 
this important service : 



Howard Arthur Blanning. 

Hugh Cory. 

Stanton Chapman Crawford. 

Frederick Marsh Gordon. 

Carl J. Ramsey. 

Homer E. Sala. 



Elmer Lee Ford. 
Theta-Lambda — 

Borden H. Burr. 

Sigma— 

Willard Burnett Anthony. 
Ray John. 



Raymond Herman Finger. 

Beta Beta- 
Wiley Rogers Comstock. 
Arthur Hamilton Newbanks. 
Herbert Morris Woods. 

Beta Eta— 

Thaddeus Hiram Stonecipher. 

Beta Iota- 
Raymond J. Jeffreys. 
Frank Lee Johnson. 
Louis Matthew McKnight. 
Samuel Clark Riker. 
Karl Stanley Warstler. 
Albert Hughes Wilson. 



Beta Rh< 

Frank R. Hean. 

Gamma Gamma — 

Alvin Elias Gillett. 
Robert Newell Ogden. 
Ralph Lorenzo Peterson. 
Edgar Alfred Steele. 
Joseph Leland Utley. 

Gamma Theta — 

Alfred Vernon Jannotta. 
William Kenneth Patterson. 

Delta Gamma — 

Norman Hoag Angell. 
Clarence Edward Winchell. 

Delta Delta— 

LeRoy Evans. 
Delta Upsilon — 

Albertus Homer DeFriest. 

The Y. M. C. A. is coming to its 
own in the testing fire of this great 
war. It has apparently taken a 



world calamity to make the general 
public understand something of the 
value of this organization. General 
Pershing has personally endorsed the 
statement sent out from his head- 
quarters, which says : "Give me 900 
men and the Y. M. C. A. and I will 
have a more effective fighting force 
than 1,000 men without it." 

Aside from this value to the fight- 
ing force of our country the Amer- 
ican people are now beginning to un- 
derstand through the boys who are 
over there that the value of this or- 
ganization in many other ways is al- 
most inconceivable. Its part in the 
great victory to come, as well as in 
giving comfort to our boys, is simply 
beyond measure. 



Fraternal Ties Abroad Bind Close 

Sigma Nu Fraternity: 

It is indeed most interesting and gratify- 
ing to learn that our Chapters are in such 
a flourishing condition and I trust we may 
keep them so, through this period of un- 
precedented conditions. 

When the boys come home there will be 
many who will see Sigma Nu in a new light 
and our organization should be materially 
strengthened. I knew of no pleasanter re- 
union than that of many that will take 
place between our Brothers on the battle- 
fields of Europe. 

Some years ago it was my opportunity 
to visit the Philippine Islands and upon my 
arrival, although enjoying the scenery and 
the wonders of a new country, still I felt 
like a stranger in a strange land. You 
can not imagine my delight upon meeting 
a Brother Sig, one Carl Fraser, from Co- 
lumbia, who introduced me to about fifteen 
others from our Chapters from coast to 
coast. How much more will such meetings 
be appreciated "Over There"? 

There are a number of five pointed 
badges around Wilmington, but there has 
been no "get together" since my arrival 
here, about two months ago. It has been 
my pleasure, however, to employ four from 
our Delaware Chapter for work at our 
powder plants, and I hope I can get more 
from this or other colleges. 

I have never been in Indianapolis except 
to pass through, but some day I shall sur- 
prise you and myself by dropping in for 
a real visit, and you will have an enemy 
in the Brotherhood if you ever get within 
hailing distance of Delaware without "slip- 
ping me the grip." 

Fraternally, 

C. A. LAMBERT, Delta Delta. 

Wilmington, Del., July 22, 1918. 




The Post Secretary and His Hut 

Ray H. Finger, at Fort Des Moines, Iowa 



[Through Brother Don Krull we are able 
to give a brief glimpse of the Y. M. C. A. 
work at one of our camps. We have pieced 
this account together from clippings from 
the Fort Des Moines Post, of which Brother 
Krull is associate editor, which will account 
for any inadequacies in the writing. For 
the same reason, written by the soldier 
journalists, these portray the "Y" as the 
soldiers themselves see it, which may be 
the more interpretative. — The Editor.] 

"Soldiering keeps a fellow pretty 
busy and makes a fellow appreciate 
what an easy time he had in civilian 
life," says Don Krull. "The hardest 
worker in this camp is a Sigma Nu 
named Ray Finger, from Cornell 
College, Iowa (Chi Chapter). He's 
the Y. M. C. A. secretary here and 



a regular fellow, with all the good 
qualities a man would want. Hence 
the fellows swear by him and are 
back of him to the limit in anything 
he starts. It's merely the same old 
story of 'Sigs' always in the lead." 

New "Y" Building 
The new Y. M. C. A. building, 
which has been under construction 
for the past four weeks at Fort Des 
Moines, has just been completed and 
was opened last Saturday by Mr. 
R. H. Finger, Post "Y" secretary. 
The building consists of a large wing, 
115 feet by 44 feet, in which the 
auditorium is located, and a smaller 
wing, 56 feet by 30 feet, which is to 
be the social room. The two wings 



The Post Secretary and His Hut 



16 



are connected by a corridor. Mr. Fin- 
ger has been pushing the construc- 
tion and states that the new quarters 
are well equipped with all the conven- 
iences necessary for the work of the 
Y. H. C. A. and that he will be able 
to give the men the best of service. 

Wants to Give Men a Home 

"What we want to do is to give the 
men a home and keep them in such 
condition that when they do go home 
they will be just as good if not better 
men, mentally, physically and mor- 
ally." 

He praised the way in which the 
American people have been giving 
their money to the organization and 
expressed the hope that when the 
next drive begins they will more than 
"go over the top." 

Auditorium 

The auditorium will be used for 
plays, concerts and moving pictures, 
and has a seating capacity of one 
thousand. It is equipped with writ- 
ing tables capable of accommodating 
six hundred people at once. The 
stage, located in the rear end of the 
auditorium, is 24 feet by 24 feet, 
with a front platform four feet wide. 
On either side of the stage is a small 
but convenient room to be used for 
classes. In the front end of the large 
wing are three rooms — ladies' rest 
room which is well fitted for its pur- 
pose, a store room where .advance 
supplies will be kept, and the secre- 
tary's quarters. There are quarters 
on the second floor equipped to ac- 
commodate six secretaries and will 
be occupied by the three workers who 
are expected to come here soon. 

Club Rooms 

The whole small wing is to be used 
as a social room. It is well furnished 
for that purpose with writing tables, 
easy chairs, two library stacks, maga- 
zine and newspaper racks, and sev- 
eral game tables for such interesting 
pastimes as checkers, shuffle board 
and crokinole. The social room is to 
be connected with the hospital corri- 



dor next fall so that patients may 
enter without going into the cold. 

The service desk, where stationery 
and stamps will be furnished the 
men, is located in the corridor con- 
necting the two wings. To the rear 
of the desk are the secretaries' office 
and the store room for immediate 
supplies. There are three entrances 
to the auditorium and one to the 
social room, each opening into large 
vestibules. 

Plans of "Y" Camp Work 

The aim of the Fort Des Moines 
Y. M. C. A., as explained by Mr. 
R. H. Finger, post secretary of that 
organization, is to help make the men 
as efficient soldiers as possible and to 
accomplish this end the work has 
been divided into four different de- 
partments, religious, educational, so- 
cial and recreational. It is expected 
that three more secretaries will be 
assigned here in the near future, and 
as soon as they come each one will be 
put in charge of a department, under 
the supervision of Mr. Finger. 

Religious Department 

Under the direction of the religious 
department, Sunday services will be 
held in the morning and evening and 
it is also planned to hold mid-week 
services. Arrangements have been 
made whereby the best pastors in 
Des Moines will speak at the morn- 
ing services. The evening services 
will take the form of song services. 

Hospital ward visiting will be done 
on a much greater extent as soon as 
more secretaries arrive. It is planned 
to visit all the patients three times a 
week, to hold personal interviews 
with them, and to supply them with 
stationery, stamps and whatever else 
they may need. 

Educational Work 

The educational department has 
met with great success. Approxi- 
mately 240 men have attended the 
French classes, which were instruct- 
ed by Professor Constant of Drake 
University. A large number of men 
have been enrolled in the English and 



16 The ] 

typewriting classes, but this particu- 
lar phase of the educational depart- 
ment is to expand as soon as more 
help arrives. 

Social, Recreation, and Sport 

With the opportunity and conven- 
ience offered by the new Y. M. C. A. 
building, the social phase of its work 
will be greatly developed. There is 
to be an entertainment for the men 
every evening of the week. It is 
planned to have moving pictures 
twice a week, one concert, one "stunt 
night" and one social evening. 

The recreational department will 
have in charge the promotion of 
games for the benefit of the men dur- 
ing their leisure time. The purpose 
of this is not so much to develop 
teams in the different athletic sports, 
though that may come about inciden- 
tally, but more to give every man an 
opportunity to take part in some 
form of athletics for the sake of the 
pleasure and enjoyment derived. 



Volley ball, hand soccer ball, foot- 
ball and tennis are some of the games 
in which the men will be given a 
chance to spend their leisure periods. 
The Y. M. C. A. has now over $400 
worth of athletic goods of all kinds 
and efforts are being made to obtain 
more. There will be handball, volley 
ball and basketball courts in the au- 
ditorium of the new Y. M. C. A. 
where the men can play in the winter. 

The report of "Fort Des Moines 
Balltossers' " organization meeting 
relates: "R. H. Finger, the cheery 
secretary of the Y. M. C. A., offered 
to provide the necessary bats and 
balls, and this offer was gladly ac- 
cepted." In every way the "Y" offers 
to the men a good time as a prescrip- 
tion against homesickness and idle- 
ness. 

To quote Brother Krull a second 
time, "Though he puts in fifteen or 
sixteen hours a day, the camp secre- 
tary is ever accommodating, always 
cheerful, obliging to the limit and al- 
ways in the front van. Brother Fin- 
ger is a typical Sigma Nu." 



A Treasure "Over There" 

Many of the boys in France write of their 
pleasure in reading The Delta, with its in- 
teresting reports of Grand Chapter pro- 
ceedings and minor convention affairs. A 
copy of The Delta "over there" is a treas- 
ure indeed, and circulates from hand to 
hand, being oftentimes enjoyed by mem- 
bers of other fraternities as well. 
SERGEANT GEORGE A. CHANDLER, 

Gamma Lambda. 
July 29, 1918. 




Norman H An sell 



To Help Sell Thrift Stamps 

The picture shows Norman H. An g ell, 
Delta Gamma, of the Baltimore Y. H. C. A. 
force, wearing a gas mask and trench hel- 
met brought to Baltimore by a Baltimore an 
with the United States naval force, and 
now on his way back to France. The 
French soldier who wore this outfit at the 
front was killed by a bullet which passed 
through the helmet from front to back, the 
photograph showing the hole made by the 
fatal projectile. The gas mask is complete 
with respirator, fastened to the wearer's 
chest.— Baltimore (Md.) Star. 



Y. M. C. A. Work as a Vocation 

By Alvin E. Gillett, Gamma Gamma 



Just a few thoughts to my young 
Brothers who are looking forward to 
life's start. I want to tell them why 
I chose the Y. M. C. A. as my voca- 
tion. Dare I say profession? Now 
I am not a writer. I might get away 
with a talk on this subject, but to put 
it down in black and white looks 
rather brutal toward you readers. 

First, you must bear in mind the 
fact that I am talking to you as col- 
lege men, which means that you are 
one of that fortunate group of two or 
three per cent, of the total men in the 
country who have had the special ad- 
vantage of a college education. I do 
not see how any man can go to col- 
lege and sit week after week under 
the teaching and leadership of choice 
men without catching some of their 
spirit of service, the spirit of want- 
ing to pass on to others some of the 
good things he has been privileged 
to learn. If a man does not catch 
this spirit in college I think he has 
missed one of the best things in col- 
lege life, and particularly in college 
fraternity life. 

One of the great things Sigma Nu 
did for me was to teach me the value 
of friendship. My close friendship 
for the men of our little group of 
twenty men increased my desire for 
friendship for the larger group of 
men, and it gave me a desire to be of 
some service to them. 

The Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation was started in 1844 by a 
young man named George Williams, 
who organized an association among 
the group of men with whom he 
worked. The purpose of this associ- 
ation was to do personal religious 
work. At first its work centered on 
the religious and social activity. The 
movement was developed very large- 
ly in this country to its present state 
by such men as Richard Morse, Rob- 
ert McBurney, Edwin F. See, John 
R. Mott, and others. 

In my mind, one great appeal of 
Young Men's Christian Association 



secretaryship is the fact that in it 
you can use every talent you possess. 
If you have ability as a teacher, there 
is unbounded opportunity in its edu- 
cational department. There have 
been 5,200 men in educational classes 
in the West Side Branch of the Young 
Men's Christian Association, New 
York City, during the last year. They 
range from the foreigner, who does 
not speak a word of English, and 
comes to study English and Amer- 
icanism, to the college or business 
man who wants to study business 
psychology, salesmanship, first aid, 
or aeroplane mechanics. 

Have you talent as an orator or 
speaker? If so, you can use it until 
you are pumped dry in the religious 
work department in their large num- 
ber of meetings held in and out of 
the building. This association holds 
meetings in about thirty-five shops 
each week. Good music is arranged 
and some competent speaker pro- 
vided, who will give an inspirational 
message to the group. 

Have you ability as an organizer? 
In the Y. M. C. A. you have a field 
which is composed of the best young 
and middle-aged men in the commun- 
ity where you are located. 

Are you a salesman ? What better 
selling proposition is there than a 
Young Men's Christian Association 
membership, which is bound to make 
a man better fit to do his daily work ? 

Do you enjoy finance? There is 
plenty of chance for you in the rais- 
ing and handling of money for the 
benefit of the young manhood of your 
town. 

Are you fond of detail? You will 
find lots of it in the monthly and an- 
nual statistical reports and daily de- 
tail work of the association. 

Are you fond of business manag- 
ing? It is no small job to handle a 
plant worth from one to two millions 
of dollars and employing two to three 
hundred paid workers. 



18 



Most men like to use their talents 
to the utmost. I believe that an in- 
creasing number of them are being 
attracted into Y. M. C. A. work for 
this reason. 

There is quite a large class of col- 
lege men, and especially men of the 
small colleges, who feel that they 
would like to do some definite Chris- 
tian work, but are not especially 
qualified for the ministry. To this 
group of men the Y. M. C. A. offers 
an opportunity for unlimited service 
in Christian work. 

Every one connected with the Y. M. 
C. A. work feels that it is on the eve 
of its greatest growth. A large num- 
ber of men who have been served by 
the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion in the army cantonments and 
huts are going to take an active part 
in the associations when they come 
back to civilian life. 

What a privilege to have a part in 
a program which deals with men ana 
not mere things, and what an oppor- 
tunity and responsibility men in as- 
sociation work are to have when 
these soldiers and sailors come back 
and expect the same sort of service 
and fellowship which the Y. M. C. A. 
hut provided them while in uniform. 



what they will do, what the people back 
home can expect when America gets into 
the war with its full strength. And this is 
what Lyon says: 

"If the United States will put 2,000,000 
bayonets on the western front within the 
next few months and pull off a real of- 
fensive, in co operation with the French and 
the British, this war will be over in a 
jiffy. 




AMERICAN DRIVE WOULD END THE 

WAR, SAYS LYON 
Nothing Can Stop Army of Two Million 

Yankees, Once They Get Started Toward 

the Rhine, Declares Correspondent, 

Back After a Year at the 

Battle Front. 

Fresh from the firing line in France, C. 
C. Lyon, staff correspondent of The Citi- 
zen, returned to Columbus Tuesday morn- 
ing for a vacation, exactly one year to the 
day after he started to the front 

Having spent weeks in the American 
trenches, slept with. American boys in their 
dugouts, stood guard with them in their 
lookout posts, seen them go over the ton 
with fixed bayonets, and looked on while 
some of them were killed or wounded by 
the Huns, Lyon knows the American sol- 
dier as he really is. 

Yankee Morale Is Good 



dreds of them, 
thinking about. He knows what they have 
done and, biggest thing of all, he knows 



Want a Real Fight 

"Instead of a tit-for-tat affair, with 
neither side suffering much damage, the 
American craves a knock-down, drag-out 
light. He thinks the quickest way to end 
this war is to give the Germans his hard- 
est licks in the shortest possible time. 

"The only fear that many American sol- 
diers have is that the war will be over 
before they get the chance of pulling off 
a tremendous offensive of their own. 

Huns Fear Yankees 

sneer at the 
present in a 
French battalion headquarters, just on the 
left of an American battalion, when sev- 
eral German prisoners who had deserted, 
were brought in. 



"'And get killed?' answered one of the 
Germans. "Those wild men havent any 
more sense than to kill us if they get a 
chance.'" — Columbus (Ohio) Citizen. 



High Council Meeting 

New York, June 11-12, 1918 



The High Council met on June 11-12, 
1916, at the Hotel Waldorf-Astoria, New 
York City. The occasion was a farewell to 
Regent Borden Burr, who was on the eve 
of his departure to France, in the service 
of the Y. M. C. A. The necessity of his 
presence in New York at that time led to 
Us selection as a meeting place. 

Business affairs of more magnitude than 
usual were discussed and settled at this 
meeting. 

The official jeweler contracts were let. 
This matter is explained in detail on pages 
4 and 5, this Delta. All revenue derived 
(herefrom is to be put in a separate fund 
for disposal by the Grand Chapter. 




A number of delinquent debtors were ex- 
pelled. We cannot give their names in our 
magazine, but the list will be sent to the 
Chapters. 

The practice of Brothers owing their 
Chapters when they leave college, refusing 
or ignoring these debts, is coming to a sud- 
den stop. True Sigma Nus will keep their 
obligations, fraternal or financial. The 
brand that merely "totes" the badge will be 
left outside. 






Mi 



n.. um ...■■.-. i:. 

Ta»e» ai In.llai ,,.,.. II. i ■ . 
— Harry A Rl I r V«or«v A. 
y. Unfortunately Kaoi F. 1'ri 



■, Walter E. Myem. 
.'tirly truin home. 



The condition of our Chapter House 
Building Associations based o nthe reports 
submitted according to the Grand Chapter 
decree. 

The policy of the editor was approved by 
the following resolution: 

"We express our pleasure at the make-up 
of the Del.ta both from literary and mechan- 
ical standpoints, and recommend that it be 
maintained at its present standing." 

[Hence we make in this issue no cut from 
the last volume in number of pages and 
illustrations, quality of paper stock or other 
matter of content or appearance, cost what 
it may under the rising scale of prices. — 
The Editor.] 



New York Alumni, June 11, 1918, at the 
Geneva International Club. Brothers R. E. 
Sawyer, Maurice V. Samuels and Inspector 
Henry A. Theis welcomed the High Council 
to its first official visit to New York. Re- 
gent Borden Burr and Grand Treasurer 
Walter Edward Myers responded. Vice Re- 
gent George A. Smith, being also a New 
Yorker, spoke for both sides. Many men in 
uniform were present and Brother Burr 
was bidden God-speed in the true manner 
of our Military Order. 

Unfortunately there was no opportunity 
to secure a photograph of the dinner, but 
here is a picture of the High Council taken 
last April, at the High Council meeting in 
Indianapolis. 



Presents from Prussia 



Issued by Army Section, Social Hygiene Division Commission on Training 

Camp Activities, Washington, D. C. 

[The following article is based on an article appearing originally in "The 
Garnet and White" of Alpha Chi Rho. It is printed here by request of the United 
States Commission on Training Camp Activities. We congratulate our sister 
magazine on taking the lead in this matter. — The Editor.] 



AT the last meeting of the Inter- 
Fraternity Conference, a repre- 
sentative of the United States 
Government presented some startling 
statistics as to the prevalence of ve- 
nereal diseases not only in the army 
and navy but among the civilian pop- 
ulation, and appealed to the frater- 
nity workers to aid the government 
in checking their ravages. The gov- 
ernment approaches the old problem 
from no narrowly religious or moral 
viewpoint. It simply faces facts — 
facts which show that in Europe, be- 
fore preventive measures were 
adopted, there was more loss of mil- 
itary efficiency through venereal dis- 
eases than from any other cause ex- 
cept casualties in the line. The gov- 
ernment is bound to do everything 
in its power to win the present war, 
and with this end in view must crush 
anyone or anything affording "aid 
and comfort" to the enemy. 

There is a legend that, when Alex- 
ander the Great approached a certain 
remote province of India, the king 
had his daughter, Yzdra, inoculated 
with a deadly poison, and sent her to 
the western conquerer as a present. 
Thus every prostitute in the neigh- 
borhood of a camp or cantonment, 
who is a carrier of either syphilis or 
gonorrhea — and most of them are in- 
fected with one or both — may be re- 
garded as a potential ally of the 
Kaiser, a "present" from the Prus- 
sians. 

Simply to promote efficiency, then, 
— to put an end to this "aid" to the 
enemy — the government has already 
taken drastic measures in and about 
training camps to protect our soldiers 
and sailors from the fate that threat- 
ened Alexander. The territory 



within an effective radius of such 
camps has been cleaned up, and is be- 
ing stringently policed. Dispensaries 
and stations for prophylaxis and 
clinics for the treatment of infected 
persons have been established. State 
laws and city ordinances for the re- 
pression of prostitution have been 
encouraged. Lectures on venereal 
diseases and their terrible sequelae, 
attendance at which is compulsory, 
are given in all cantonments by a 
staff of specially trained speakers. 
Literature is distributed. Graphic 
exhibits are displayed. Even elabo- 
rate film plays are produced to drive 
home the same imperative lesson. 
And now the government appeals to 
all of us stay-at-homes to interest 
ourselves in the fight, not only as it 
effects the armed forces directly, but 
also as it may effect indirectly those 
younger men in our charge who are 
with us today in civil life, but who 
tomorrow may be in the uniform of 
Uncle Sam. How can we, members 
of Sigma Nu do this? 

In the first place we can write let- 
ters to our boys, our Brothers, at the 
front, urging them not only for their 
own sake, but for the sake of those 
with whom they may be associated, 
to give their active support to the 
government's program. While fra- 
ternity men are comparatively few 
in number, they are the potential 
leaders in any group of community, 
and should be able to exert a far- 
reaching influence. Not only should 
our general secretary send letters to 
members of Alpha Chi Rho in the na- 
tion's service, but every man among 
us who has a younger fraternity 
Brother in either army or navy, 
should write personally to him on this 
subject. Even a father cannot talk 



Presents From Prussia 



21 



to a son as one of these "older Broth- 
ers" can talk to a boy on matters re- 
kiting to sex, and never was there a 
time when full, frank, brotherly dis- 
cussion on these matters so essen- 
tial as it is today, with the whole 
world at war, and the United States 
making every effort to bring its full 
military power to bear on the side of 
our allies at the earliest possible mo- 
ment. 

Again, we can take the campaign 
up and carry it into the Chapters of 
our Fraternity. Every undergrad- 
uate member of a Chapter today is 
a potential soldier. However young 
at present, he is more than likely to 
be called upon to render military 
service in one way or another before 
the war is over, and it is not too early 
to make him begin to feel now his 
responsibility to himself and to his 
country. He, too, should be required 
to give his active support to the gov- 
ernment's program. This he can do 
by keeping himself clean and "Fit to 
Fight" so that when the time comes 
for his personal participation, he 
may not be a "slacker" because of 
easily avoidable physical disability 
incurred through the senseless pur- 
suit of pleasure. 

Sigma Nu feels that it is its duty to 
take a definite and determined stand 
on this matter of physical and moral 
standards. It uncompromisingly ad- 
vocates, for all its members, complete 
chastity outside the bond of mar- 
riage, not as a distant, unattainable 
ideal, but as an actual standard of 
conduct. Such a standard involves, 
certainly, a considerable exercise of 
will-power, but, in the judgment of 
the most eminent medical authorities 
it is thoroughly practicable and is en- 
tirely compatible with health. The 
Fraternity warns all its Brothers, and 
particularly those already in uni- 
form, or in Class 1, against venereal 
diseases. Far more, then, it warns 
them against every form of sexual 
immorality, without which such dis- 
eases would soon disappear. It is one 
thing to treat the result. It is an- 
other to remove the cause. The 



former is the work of trained spe- 
cialists. The latter is something in 
which we can all take a hand and 
render yeoman's service. The Brother 
who lives up to the standard which 
we propose is participating directly 
in this vitally important work, and 
is not only behaving as a loyal 
Knight of our Order, but is likewise 
serving well this great country of 
ours in time of war. In this sense 
now, as never before, loyalty to the 
Fraternity is loyalty to the United 
States. 



Appeals for Clean Morals 

With the American Army in 
France, August 20 (by the Asso- 
ciated Press). — In a general order, 
General Pershing addresses the army 
frankly on the social evil and urges 
continence as "the plain duty of 
every member of the American ex- 
peditionary forces, both for the vig- 
orous conduct of the war and the 
clean health of the American people 
after the war." 

General Pershing directs the com- 
manding officers to urge moral clean- 
liness on the men as their duty as 
soldiers and the best training for en- 
forced cleanliness of life at the front. 
The order prescribes more rigid con- 
trol of leaves of absence and directs 
courts-martial to exercise severity in 
dealing with infected men. It makes 
all immoral resorts "off limits" and 
in co-operation with the French po- 
lice, both military and civil, takes 
steps to repress clandestine evasion 
of the order. — Indianapolis News. 



Suppresses Venereal Disease 

Brother Isaac P. Robinson, Lam- 
bda, who has been long located at 
Baltimore, Md., has a new address. 
Dr. Robinson has accepted an ap- 
pointment with Surgeon General 
Rupert in the U. S. Public Health 
Service, with headquarters at Fort 
Leavenworth, Kansas. He is in 
charge of venereal disease control, 
with the title of acting assistant sur- 
geon. 



Installation of Delta Psi Chapter 

Bowdoin College 



Through the Eyes of An Old 

Alumnus 

By Db. Seth F. Arnold, Beta 

Upsilon and Boston Alumni Chapters 

IT has been suggested that I say a 
few words to you in regard to the 
installation at Bowdoin, at which 
it was my privilege to be in attend- 
ance. 

Nature was kind, and in mid-after- 
noon of a perfect spring day we re- 



very impressively and expeditiously 
inducted the thirty-four candidates 
into the secrets and mysteries of 
Sigma Nu. I must pause to pay a 
most deserved tribute to Inspector 
Edson K. Smith, of Beta Iota, Delta 
Lambda, and Providence Alumni 
Chapters. Upon Brother Smith came 
the responsibility of the arrangement 
of details for the installation and 
banquet. As Eminent Commander 
he conducted the ceremonies with 
despatch, dignity, and delight from 




Art Building. Bow. 



paired to the basement of the new 
Art Building for the ceremonies. 
Seven men were given the pledging 
rites in a very impressive manner by 
the Delta Lambda team, ably assisted 
by the Delta Lambda quartet While 
the audience, which consisted of 
Brother Segur, of Trinity, and my- 
self, was not unappreciative up to 
this point, we were very glad to wel- 
come a delegation from Fort Wil- 
liams, all in uniform, led by Brother 
First Lieutenant Randall from the 
University of Maine. With the aug- 
mented gallery, the installing team 
with, what ts more important, genu- 
ine impressiveness to the initiate. As 



the standpoint of the spectator, but 
toastmaster at the banquet his keen 
wit and good humor contributed 
much to the success of the event. I 
take off my hat to "Kirk" as a 100 
per cent. Sigma Nu. 

Brother Paul Young, Delta Psi, re- 
sponded very pleasantly to a toast of 
welcome on behalf of the baby Chap- 
ter. Professor Paul Nixon, acting 
dean, welcomed the delegates on be- 
half of the faculty, and we all could 
not help but feel that Bowdoin men 
were very fortunate in having such a 
delightful personality in intimate as- 
sociation with them. 



Installation of Delta Psi Chapter 




I Cbapel. Bnird. 



A similar spirit was manifested 
later in the evening by a few well- 
chosen words from Professor Hanun. 
(Sigma Nu is close to the throne in 
Bowdoin. ) 

A true inspiration to the new men, 
as well as awe akin to reverence on 
the part of the older members, were 
the feelings elicited by the recital of 
the Creed of Sigma Nu by Brother 
Segur. Here is a Sig of a month who 
will bear watching. It would have 
done Walter Sears's heart good to 
have been present during those mo- 
ments. 

I strongly feel that Sigma Nu has 
gained much by the addition of this 
Chapter in Bowdoin, and in conclu- 
sion just a word of warning to you 
fellows in the other parts of the coun- 
try. It behooves you to look well to 




your laurels, as the Eighth Division 
is coming strong. 

April 29, 1918. 

Bowdoin College 

Bowdoin College was incorporated 
in 1794, while Maine was still a part 
of the commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, and more than a quarter of a 
century before she was admitted into 
the Union as a separate State. It is 
unsectarian in its government, ad- 
ministration and instruction. 




(iyuiiimliim Interior, Bowdoin College 



Whlttler Atliletlc Kleld 



The college was named in honor of 
James Bowdoin, a distinguished Gov- 
ernor of Massachusetts, of Huguenot 
descent, a member of the first Conti- 
nental Congress in Philadelphia, and 
a close personal friend of Washing- 
ton. He was the first president of 
the American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences, and was a valued friend 
and correspondent of Benjamin 
Franklin. 

An early patron of the college was 
the Hon. James Bowdoin, son of the 
Governor, who, while minister of the 






•ft*- &-£* 
4|^ MP* 



Installation of Delta Pai Chatter 



27 



United States at the Spanish and 
French courts during President Jef- 
ferson's administration, collected a 
valuable library, a most interesting 
gallery of paintings and drawings by 
old and modern masters, a fine cabi- 



tional banks, seven churches, a free 
public library, and a carefully graded 
and ordered public school system. 
The climatic conditions are most 
healthful ; its water supply is of un- 
usual purity; it is nrovided with a 




Gymnasium and Athletic Building Bowiluln College 



net of minerals and fossils, all of 
which, together with lands and 
money, he gave or bequeathed to the 
college. 

The college is situated at Bruns- 
wick, a town of about eight thousand 
inhabitants, on the Androscoggin 
river, and is easily accessible by both 



complete sewerage system, and has 
electric lights. 

The buildings, sixteen in number, 
are grouped upon a spacious campus 
of about forty acres, five minutes' 
walk from the railroad station, one 
mile from the Androscoggin river 
with its picturesque falls, and a few 




Searlca Science Building Bowdolu College 



steam and electric railroads to all 
parts of the State and New England 
as well, being upon the main line be- 
tween Boston and the Provinces of 
Canada. There are several large 
manufacturing establishments in the 
town, a weekly newspaper, three na- 



miles from various attractive resorts 
on the shores of Casco Bay. A cen- 
tral heating and lighting plant fur- 
nishes heat and electric lights to all 
the college buildings, which are also 
connected with the water and sewer- 
age systems of the town. 



Impressions of the Installation 

By Lieutenant H. A. Randall 
Delta Nu 

When I received a letter from 
Brother E. K. Smith asking me to 
write a short item for the Delta giv- 
ing my impressions of the initiation 
and banquet of Delta Psi Chapter, I 
at once realized that I was up against 
a hard proposition. In the first place, 
I am not a writer, and in the second, 
I know I cannot find words that will 
half express the wonderful impres- 
sion the affair made on me. But I 
feel it my duty to try and tell the 



stalling team. I have no doubt that 
the initiates will be as loyal Sigma 
Nus as we have in the Fraternity, 
due, to a large extent, by the first in- 
sight they had in the Fraternity as 
the officers in charge. I felt, as I 
know every one else present did, that 
I sure was a member of the grandest 
Fraternity in the world and that I 
would make a stronger endeavor to 
live up to its ideals. That is just why 
shown them by the perfect work of 
every Sigma Nu should attend an in- 
itiation every possible chance he gets, 
for we are apt to forget and should 
constantly be reminded of our vows. 




Brothers what they missed, so here 



I am going to give the impressions 
1 received in the order in which they 
came. I, with four other loyal Sigma 
Nus, arrived a little late, so we did 
not have a chance to meet the initi- 
ates before we saw them ride the 
snake. So the first impression I got 
was of the installation ceremonies, 
and believe me, Brothers, the snake 
stood right up on its tail in fine style. 
As I sat there and heard again the 
wonderful teachings of Sigma Nu, I 
think they were brought home to me 
with a greater force than ever be- 
fore. This was due to the manner in 
which the work was put on by the in- 



After the ceremonies were over, 
we had a chance to meet the initiates 
and get acquainted with them. My 
next impression pertained to them 
and was as satisfying as the first. I 
never saw a finer bunch of men and 
I am sure they will every one be an 
honor to the Fraternity. They were 
a healthy, bright-eyed, clean bunch, 
ready for hard work for their college, 
their Fraternity, and their Country. 
For they already have several men in 
the service and every man in the 
House is a member of the military 
unit connected with Bowdoin College, 
preparing himself for the call when 
it comes. It was this fighting spirit 
that made them Sigma Nus and will 
carry them on in their fight with the 



Installation of Delta Psi Chaptee 



29 



outside world and bring themselves 
and the Fraternity many trophies. 
Their hospitality also left a strong 
impression on me, for they made a 
fellow feel as though he was right at 
home, and it was like bidding good- 
by to your family when you left. 

My third impression was of the 
banquet, and since it was about 9 
o'clock before we sat down you may 
rest assured that it was a very strong 
impression that I had. However, that 
wore off as the different courses came 
on and before the last one arrived I 
was very well satisfied. The banquet 
was held at the Eagle Hotel, in a 



tice to have some Brother of every 
Chapter learn the Creed and give it 
at the initiations. I was glad that 
there was a member of the Faculty 
on the toast list, for I always like to 
hear an outsider give his opinion of 
the Fraternity. Brother Segur very 
on Inter-Fraternity relations, anoth- 
ably expressed the Fraternity's stand 
er thing which the Sigma Nu Frater- 
nity is a leader in, I am proud to 
state. 

The banquet closed with many 
rousing cheers for the different col- 
leges represented, and thus ended a 
time long to be remembered. In sum- 




room very appropriately decorated, 
and there was a pure white rose at 
every plate, which again reminded 
me of the Sigma Nu teachings. 

The banquet was followed by a 
number of very excellent toasts con- 
ducted by our toastmaster. Inspector 
E. K. Smith. My impressions were 
very many during the toasts, but the 
one thing that stood out the strongest 
was the reading of the Sigma Nu 
Creed by Brother Segur, Delta Chi. 
I, as I suppose all other Sigma Nus 
have done, have read the Creed over 
many times, but I did not grasp it the 
same as I did when I heard Brother 
Segur give it so forcefully. I think 
it added a great deal to the installa- 
tion and think it would be a grand 
scheme to make it a universal prac- 



marizing my impressions of the 
whole installation, all I can say is, it 
was the best one I have ever seen and 
every Sigma Nu that missed it was 
out of luck for fair, for he would 
have seen an initiation that would 
have made him a better Sigma Nu 
and would have made him thank his 
lucky stars that he was asked to wear 
the Badge of a Knight of the Legion 
of Honor. 

From a Local Viewpoint 

By Clyde E. Stevens, Reporter 
Delta Psi 

There are two dates in the history 
of Delta Psi which will remain in the 
minds of all Brothers of the Chapter. 
The first is April 13, 1918, when the 



members of the local Fraternity, Beta 
Chi, at Bowdoin College, received 
their first step toward becoming Sigs, 
the pledging ceremony. The other 
date is April 27, when the final step 
was taken and the charter in Sigma 
Nu was formally presented to the 
new Chapter. 




On the afternoon of Saturday, 
April 13, Inspector Edson K. Smith, 
Beta Iota, and Commander H. S. Sla- 
baugh of Delta Beta Chapter arrived 
in Brunswick and proceeded to put 
twenty-nine members of the Beta Chi 
local through the pledging ceremony. 
In the evening the final arrange- 
ments for the installation itself began 
to take shape, and a new charm came 
to the familiar "burning of midnight 
oil" in the desire to get things work- 
ing smoothly for the final rites which 
were to come two weeks later. 

The first section of the installation 
team arrived Friday afternoon, April 
26, coming all the way from Provi- 
dence by auto. This party consisted 
of Arthur E. Kenyon, Harold A. 
Campbell, Harold E. Marr, Clifton I. 
Munroe, and Stanton A. Burdick, of 
Delta Lambda, and Glenn C. Car 
baugh, of Beta Xi. The following 
morning dawned with the sun beam- 
ing forth, resplendent in its glory, 
seeming to extend its greetings to the 
new Chapter about to be chartered. 
The visitors, with the local Frater- 
nity men, got busy promptly and ar- 
ranged the initiation hall, which was 
in the lecture room in the Walker Art 



Building. This hall proved to be an 
ideal place for such an event, setting 
off, as it did, the various emblems 
and insignia of the shrine of Sigma 
Nu. 

Early in the afternoon, Inspector 
Edson K. Smith, Beta Iota ; Dr. Seth 
F. Arnold, Beta Upsilon; John W. 
Haley, Commander of Delta Lambda, 
and Raymond H. Segur, Delta Chi, 
appeared upon the scene of action, 
and things immediately began to 
hum. The ceremonies of initiation 
occupied the entire afternoon, and it 
was nearly 7 o'clock before the bunch 
returned to the home of Delta Psi to 
await the banquet. Meanwhile, the 
forces had been increased by the ar- 
rival of five loyal Sigs wearing the 
uniform of the Army, Brothers J. E. 
Hammond, Beta Nu, and H. A. Ran- 
dall, R. A. Ranger, P. M. Burnham, 
and T. S. Whitehouse, all of Delta Nu. 
These Brothers are all stationed in 
the nearby city of Portland, at Fort 
Williams. 

Upon our return to the chapter 
house we found the delegation from 
the University of Maine Chapter, 
which had been unable to reach 
Brunswick in time for the initiation. 
These delegates were Roger B. Hill, 
Gordon W. Johnson, and S. C. Fraser. 

The banquet at the Hotel Eagle 
was the final step in the day's festivi- 
ties, and the after-dinner speeches 
brought out the true worth and merit 
of the Fraternity. Cheers for the 
several colleges represented at the 
banquet were given by the new Sigs, 
and they in return were cheered by 
the visiting delegations. The echoes 
of Hi Rickety were still resounding 
in the banquet hall when the happy 
throng adjourned at an early hour on 
Sunday morning. 

Bowdoin has need of Sigma Nu, 
and the presence of such a strong ad- 
dition to the list of national fraterni- 
ties represented at this institution 
will prove of great value. Even as 
this story of the installation is being 
written, come evidences that Delta 
Psi Chapter is to become a leader in 
the Greek world of Bowdoin. The 



Installation of Delta Psi Chapter 



31 



value of the Fraternity and Bowdoin 
are alike, and it is only fitting that a 
college with the traditions and splen- 
did reputation of Bowdoin should be 
placed upon the rolls of Sigma Nu, a 
Fraternity which likewise has its tra- 
ditions and fine reputation through- 
out the Greeks of the world. Sigma 
Nu means even more to the local 
Chapter than to the college, for with 
the prestige and strength of its effi- 
cient national organization behind us 
our service and power in the college 
will be increased. We shall strive to 
make Delta Psi Chapter the leading 
Fraternity Chapter at Bowdoin, and 
do her bit in maintaining the strength 
of Legion of Sigma Nu. 

The Banquet Toasts 

Toastmaster, Inspector Edson K. 
Smith, Beta Iota-Delta Lambda; 
"Welcome," Paul C. Young, Delta 
Psi ; Presentation of Charter, Arthur 
E. Kenyon, Delta Lambda ; Response, 
G. Stuart DeMott, Delta Psi; "Wel- 
come to the College," Professor Paul 
Nixon, Phi Nu Theta, Bowdoin Col- 
lege; "Effective Alumni Work," Dr. 
Seth F. Arnold, Beta Upsilon; "The 
Delta Psi Alumni," Chester C. Ma- 
guire, Delta Psi; "Inter-Fraternity 
Relations," Raymond H. Segur, Delta 
Chi; Greetings from the Chapters: 
Beta Nu, Ohio State University, 
Lieutenant J. E. Hammond ; Beta Xi, 
William Jewell College, G. C. Car- 
baugh; Beta Upsilon, Rose Polytech- 
nic Institute, Dr. S. F. Arnold ; Delta 
Lambda, Brown University, J. W. 
Haley; Delta Nu, University of 
Maine, R. B. Hill and Lieutenant H. 
A. Randall; Delta Chi, Trinity Col- 
lege (Conn.), R. H. Segur. Professor 
R. J. Hamm, Bowdoin College, A. 
Redheffer, Wesleyan College, and C. 
E. Stevens, K. V. Palmer and E. C. 
Palmer, all of Delta Psi, also re- 
sponded to toasts. 

The Committee on Arrangements 

To the chairman of the installation 
committee, George Stuart DeMott, 
'18, must be given much of the credit 
for the successful carrying out of the 
plans for the ceremony and banquet. 



He was ably assisted in his duties by 
Clyde Ellerton Stevens, '19; George 
Horace Blake, '18; Robert Cressey 
Rounds, '18, and Edwin Clarence 
Palmer, '20. 

Thirty-four Initiates 

The local Beta Chi had an active 
membership of twenty-eight at the 
time of the change to Delta Psi Chap- 
ter of Sigma Nu, and all of these men 
were introduced into the mysteries of 
the Cross with the exception of one 
man, who was out of the State with 
the Varsity baseball team. Seven 
Alumni of the old local were also 
given an insight into the shrine of 
Sigma Nu, giving a total roll of 
thirty-four men in Delta Psi Chapter. 
Other Alumni are to be initiated as 
soon as possible until the full mem- 
bership of Beta Chi has become that 
of the new Chapter. The men who 
were initiated at the installation of 
Delta Psi Chapter of Sigma Nu are : 
(1) Karl Vernon Palmer, '18; (2) 
Henry Marshall Howard, '18; (3) 
Chester Corbin Maguire, '17; (4) 
Hendrie Walter Grant, '18; (5) 
George Horace Blake, '18; (6) 
Dwight Linley Libbey, '18; (7) Wal- 
ter Huron Lane, '18; (8) William 
Haley VanWart, '18; (9) Wilfrid Ol- 
iver Bernard, '18; (10) Ralph Archie 
Stevens, Jr., '19; (11) Clyde Ellerton 
Stevens, '19; (12) Eric Melville Sim- 
mons, '19; (13) Rufus Clarke Tuttle 
'19; (14) Robert Cressey Rounds 
'18; (15) Hugh Waldo Blanchard 
'18; (16) Paul Campbell Young, '18 

(17) James Sumner Draper, '20 

(18) Douglass Arno Haddock, '20 

(19) Leslie Everett Norwood, '20 

(20) Albert Edwin Hurrell, '20 

(21) Edwin Clarence Palmer, '20 

(22) Charles Leo Thebeau, '20; (23) 
Arthur Albert Demuth, '20; (24) 
George Stuart DeMott, '18; (25) 
Harry Nelson, '21; (26) Roy Bart- 
lett King, '21; (27) Reginald Webb 
Noyes, '21; (28) Philip Henry Mc- 
Crum, '21; (29) Clarence Ralph 
Lindner, '20; (30) Allan William 
Constantine, '21; (31) Carroll Her- 
bert Keene, '21; (32) John Woodford 
Hone, '21; (33) Forest Hallie Rogers, 
'21; (34) John Garnett Young, '21. 



Beta Chi Becomes Sigma Nu 
By Clyde E. Stevens, Delta Psi 

[Although The Delta's policy is not to re- 
innt articles, we take pleasure in adding 



E. Stevens, Delta Psi, which appeared 
that college paper. It has some points not 
contained in the foregoing reports of the 
installation. — The Editor.] 

Saturday afternoon, April 27, 
Sigma Nu Fraternity received into 
its Brotherhood the former local Fra- 
ternity, Beta Chi, now the Delta Psi 
Chapter of Sigma Nu and the sev- 
enty-eighth active member of the Na- 
tional Fraternity. The admission of 
Delta Psi at Bowdoin makes it the 
sixth in the New England Division 
and the second in Maine of the Sigma 
Nu Fraternity. Initiation ceremo- 
nies were held in the afternoon by a 




team selected from the Boston and 
Providence Alumni Chapters and 
from the Delta Lambda Chapter at 
Brown University. Edson K. Smith, 
Inspector of the Eighth Division, of 
which the new Chapter is a member, 
acted as Eminent Commander; Ar- 
thur E. Kenyon, Chapter Adviser for 
Delta Lambda Chapter, served as 
Lieutenant Commander; Glenn C. 
Carbaugh of Beta Xi Chapter, Wil- 
liam Jewell College, was Marshall; 
Harold A. Campbell of Delta Lambda 
was Sentinel; Clifton I. Munroe of 
Delta Lambda was Chaplain ; the 
other members of the team John W. 
Haley, Harold E. Marr, and Stanton 
A. Burdick, all of Delta Lambda. — 
Bowdoin Orient. 



Installation Notes 

By Inspector Edson k. Smith 

Eighth Division 

The Delta Psi installation really 
began in the little State of Rhode 
Island when Brother Campbell 
driver of the official installation auto- 
mobile special, awakened Chapter 
Adviser Brother Kenyon by pound- 
ing on his house door and yelling. 
This was shortly after dawn on Fri- 
day. To the best of our recollection, 
this is the first time Brother Kenyon 
was ever found asleep on the job, at 
least a Fraternity job. In spite of 
a late start the special made good 
time and rolled into Brunswick Fri- 
day evening. Trains and other auto- 
mobiles brought the other visiting 
Sigma Nus at various times on Sat- 
urday. 

Brothers from eight Chapters com- 
prised the fifty odd who were pres- 
ent, which means a warmer feeling 
between the Chapters themselves be- 
cause their representatives have en- 
joyed a good time together. A real 
benefactor of his Fraternity would 
be that wealthy Brother who would 
provide means for increasing the at- 
tendance at such functions by bring- 
ing Brothers from far and near. 
Close fellowships are thus formed. 

No Brother could fail to enjoy such 
an occasion. At the installation cere- 
mony itself Brothers eager to impart 
our fraternal teachings found the 
new Brothers even more eager to re- 
ceive them. The banquet was what 
all banquets ought to be, a gathering 
of Brothers with the menu as an ex- 
cuse and fellowship as the real rea- 
son. The toasts, the catchy songs by 
the Delta Lambda quartet, the yell- 
ing of "Hi-Rickety" as led by that 
wild western Brother, "Brick" Car- 
baugh of Beta Xi, the words of the 
Creed which Brother Segur of Delta 
Chi has learned by heart and recited 
to us— all these gave the new Broth- 
ers something of an idea of Sigma Nu 
spirit and enthusiasm. 

Cordial greetings were received 
from President Sills of the College. 



Installation of Epsilon Alpha Chapter 













































































































i 






















/ 




. 


















/ 

1 




























„ 




















,. 


i »i v eh; rt"\ • 


ARIZ 


3NA 










/ 








cHOVTII N 


zk "E 


\RS 










/ 








X 














/ 


/ 




„ 


T 
















/ 






i^ 




















-I TCTA. 


JECS 


TRATJO 


vj 






/ 






. 


1 — COLLFX 


: 












' / 








-— — PREPAR 


won 


t 








/ 


■ ; 








SJIOR1 1 


'CCI 


SE 








/ 


' 






. 
















i 


















/ 




1 




-■■ 




t 










f 


■- 




/ 




m 


1/ 


























-"S 


'V 




/ 
















\ 


-- 






/ 






, 


* ML JZ 






■> 






y 










-$zmzz±? 










. 


- 


\- 






















.- 





Installation of Epsilon Alpha Chapter 

University of Arizona 



By Bilue B. Bush, Xi 



WHILE America is fighting for 
humanity °n the battle fronts, 
the Sigma Nu Fraternity is 
holding up her high and lofty ideals 
at home, furnishing her loyal sons to 
this great cause. In addition to her 
past glorious record, her recent ad- 
vent into the fraternity field at the 
University of Arizona not only 
meant a great blessing to the nineteen 
worthy novices who were made 
Sigma Nus on the 3d of June, but 
will be a blessing to hundreds of fu- 
ture Alumni of the University of 
Arizona. 



the other two being Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon and Kappa Sigma. 

June 3 opened auspiciously for the 
nineteen neophytes who desired to 
worship at the shrine of Sigma Nu, 
though two of the prospective candi- 
dates were unable to be present. In 
the afternoon, at the Citizens Hall. 
Brother William E. Turner of 
Gamma Alpha, acting as Command- 
er, together with the assistance of 
Brothers McKale, Pusch, Bush and 
Hannah, led the lambs to the slaugh- 
ter. 



Sigma Nu is the third national At 8 p. m., at the Old Pueblo Club, 
Fraternity to enter the university, a delightful banquet was greatly en- 



<> iB 



Installation op Epsilon Alpha Chapter 



<V«_P 



f^PP 010? fr *tf 



$$9f>^ 



I Beta Fraternity, t 



joyed by the Brethren initiated and 
other Sigma Nus present. 

The speakers', program follows: 
Toastmaster, Brother Billie B. Bush. 
Speakers, Brothers J. F. McKale, 
"Athletics at U. of A."; Wilson B. 
Wood, "Future of Epsilon Alpha 
Chapter" ; T. DeWitt Talmadge, 
"Sigma Nu in the War"; George W. 
Wright, "Sigma Nu in Politics"; 
Harry K. Steele, "The Ladies"; Ro- 
loff W. Reeves, "Loyalty," and 
George Pusch, "Old Timers." 



Other short but splendid talks were 
made by the members present, in- 
cluding Brother Williams of old 
Theta Chapter. Brother Bush, the 
toastmaster, proposed toasts to the 
President of the United States, "the 
boys in the trenches" and to the 
"High Council." 

It was a source of disappointment 
to the initiates, as well as to the old 
Sigma Nus, that the High Council 
was not represented. However, we 
extend a cordial invitation to the 



Be a 


3i 

1 

- 
i 

i 

8 



Installation of Bpulon Alpha Chaftk 



37 



members and all Sigma Nus wher- 
ever they may come from to visit our 
home on East Fifth Street. 

Epsilon Alpha Chapter will return 
about twelve of the initiates, which 
is a magnificent nucleus with which 
to have a rousing good Chapter the 
incoming year. The finances of the 
Chapter are in first-class condition, 
while the Chapter House is the best 
at the university. 

The university is at present a Gov- 
ernment training camp and is becom- 
ing more popular not only in this 
State, but in the Southwest, and we 



hew, Robert S. Beaton, David Cole, 
Jr., Bruce H. Hannah, Wilson B. 
Wood, George W. Wright, Walter F. 
Pusch, L. Russell Jacobus, T. DeWitt 
Talmadge, Harry K. Steele, Charles 
D. McCauley, Francis H. Lysons, Ro- 
loff W. Reeves, Ralph V. Verfurth, 
Jack W. Still, Edward Belton, Edwin 
L. Sines, R. Pilcher. 

After the banquet Brother Ralph 
B. Verfurth proceeded to run away 
and get married. Even though it was 
a Gretna Green affair, a number of 
the newly made Sigma Nus were 
present. Brother Verfurth is now 




Agricultural Building. Unlverilt; 



are looking for an increased attend- 
ance this fall despite the fact that 
attendance will be necessarily small 
due to the demands of the war and 
the sacrifices attendant, which all 
good Sigma Nus and good citizens 
gladly make. 

Epsilon Alpha owes her existence 
to Daddy McKale, the coach of the 
University of Arizona, more than to 
any one else. Daddy, or "old man 
McKale," as he is affectionately 
called, he being about thirty-one, is 
a great fellow, has a magnificent wife 
and is gradually growing a nice 
Sigma Nu family. 

The names of the initiates are : 
John H. Gardiner, Henry M. May- 



located at Bisbee and has gone in 
business for himself and will not re- 
turn to the university this fall. 

Brother David Cole, Jr., rode a 
flivver about four hundred miles in 
order to be on hand to be made a 
Sigma Nu. 

July 24, 1918. 

Tucson, Arizona. 

The University of Arizona 

The University of Arizona is situ- 
ated at Tucson, a city of twenty-two 
thousand inhabitants, on the main 
lines of the Southern Pacific Railway 
and the El Paso and Southwestern 
System, three hundred twelve miles 



west of EI Paso, Texas, and five hun- 
dred miles east of Los Angeles, Calif. 
The city lies in a broad valley at an 
elevation of 2,400 feet above sea level 
and is surrounded by mountains. 

The act of legislative assembly 
making possible the University of 
Arizona was passed in 1885. By 1890 
three of the departments for which it 
is provided, the Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, the College of Agricul- 
ture, and the College of Mines and 
Engineering, were organized, and in 



schools throughout the State, the un- 
versity refused to admit to its pre- 
paratory department students com- 
ing from communities large enough 
to support local high schools. By 
1911 the State was so well provided 
with such schools that the university 
announced its intention of closing the 
preparatory department by with- 
drawing each yedr the work of the 
lowest class of the preceding year. 
The first step towards the execution 
of this policy was taken in 1912-'13, 
and in June, 1915, the permanent 




1891 the university was opened to 
students. The history of the Univer- 
sity of Arizona for the first twenty- 
five years of its existence has been 
closely related to the educational his- 
tory of the State. When it was 
opened in October, 1891, with a Fac- 
ulty of eight professors and instruct- 
ors, only thirty-one students, all told, 
matriculated, and only nine of these 
were of Freshman rank ; the remain- 
ing twenty-two were taken care of 
in a preparatory department. For 
the first eighteen years the prepara- 
tory students outnumbered the uni- 
versity students. But in order to en- 
courage the growth of the high 



closing of the preparatory depart- 
ment was effected. 

The increase in the number of col- 
lege students has been more than suf- 
ficient to offset the decrease in the 
number of preparatory students. The 
membership of the university proper 
has shown a steady, normal growth 
gratifying in a pioneer State, in 
which the industrial basis that makes 
the privilege of higher education a 
matter of course is still in process of 
establishment. To secure this growth 
and develop a university worthy to 
rank among older State universities 
and competent to offer to the youth 



Installation op Epsilon Alpha Chapter 



m/Q 


|l 


! 


*$;* y^" "4^, ^ 




lifj 



of the commonwealth just education- 
al advantages, Arizona has been 
obliged rapidly to expand and enrich 
the various departments of instruc- 
tion in the university, and to that end 
has provided a Faculty and academic 
equipment of high order for a College 
of Letters, Arts and Sciences, a Col- 
lege of Mines and Engineering, and 
a College of Agriculture. 

The following new buildings have 
been recently provided for and are 
or will be completed the coming fall : 
Mines and Engineering building, 
$200,000 (nearly completed) ; dormi- 
tory, $100,000; astronomical observ- 
atory, $60,000 ; hospital, $8,000 ; me- 
chanical shops, $15,000 (nearly com- 
pleted). 

The university campus, consisting 
of sixty acres, is situated upon high 
ground about a mile from the busi- 
ness center of Tucson, with which it 
is connected by an electric car line. 
On every side it commands a view of 
mountain scenery of remarkable ex- 
tent and grandeur. Carefully laid 
out in drives, lawns and gardens, 
with a large number of palm, olive, 



ash, umbrella, pepper, bagota and 
cottonwood trees, the campus has the 
air of a well-kept park. 

The university has its own water 
supply system for fire protection, ir- 
rigation, laboratory and domestic 
purposes. The water is drawn from 
deep wells, and is of exceptional 
purity, chemically and bacteriolog- 
ically. A new well, drilled in 1915, 
has a capacity of 1,500 gallons a min- 
ute, ample for the needs of the insti- 
tution for many years to come. The 
campus has a complete sewer system 
connecting the buildings with the 
city mains at the university gate. 
The buildings are lighted by elec- 
tricity. 

The university has an annual in- 
come of $634,694.46. 

The library contains over twenty- 
five thousand bound volumes exclu- 
sive of public documents, and several 
thousand unbound bulletins and re- 
ports. The present appropriations 
provide for an annual increase of 
about one thousand two hundred 
volumes. 



40 



The Delta 



A banquet was held that same eve- 
ning at the Old Pueblo Club, where 
places for twenty-two were set. The 
evening turned out very successfully, 
regardless of the fact that three of 
the Brothers had already departed 
for the service. After the dinner a 
number of appropriate speeches were 
made by all the Alumni members of 
Sigma Nu Fraternity that were pres- 
ent and ten or twelve of the newly 
made Brothers. Billy B. Bush as 
toastmaster and J. F. McKale as 
chief speaker of the evening gave 
very interesting talks and impressed 
upon us the true spirit of Sigma Nu. 

At the close of the dinner Brother 
Ralph Verfurth put the finishing 
touches to the evening by getting 
married, much to the surprise of the 
Brothers. He started his honeymoon 
that evening by an overland trip to 
Phoenix and then returned to his 
home in Bisbee, where he is now man- 
ager of the Independent Fuel and 
Feed Company. Some of us Brothers 
made a recent trip to Bisbee and 
found him a confirmed old married 
man. 

The next day all the Brothers left 
for their homes, and we hear from 
them at odd intervals. 

We will feel greatly insulted if any 
of our Sigma Nu Brothers fail to stop 
over when passing through Tucson. 
We have already had one visitor, 
R. S. Parks, from Dartmouth, and we 
hope and trust that we will be able to 
see more of our Brothers in the fu- 
ture. 

Installation Notes 
By J. F. McKale, Gamma Gamma 

Brother William E. Turner, Epsi- 
lon Alpha, acted as Commander at 
the pledging and installation cere- 
monies. Of the six "old boys," 
Brother Turner was the only one 
who had been present at an initiation 



under the new ritual. His work was 
clever in every particular. 

We were happily surprised to have 
with us on Installation Day Brother 
Leland D. (Red) Adams, Beta Psi. 
Adams is so filled with Sigma Nuism 
that it is infectious. He happened to 
be in Tucson, unaware that a charter 
was granted the petitioners. Five 
minutes was his entire warning be- 
fore he was taking part in the pro- 
ceedings. Brother Adams was one of 
the original boosters of Epsilon 
Alpha. 

The petitioners and Alumni were 
disappointed because the General 
Secretary was not present. Illness 
in his family necessitated Brother 
Dunlavy remaining at home. The 
Inspector was notified too late to 
make conections. However, Brother 
Dunlavy has promised to visit us the 
coming fall. 

Brothers George Pusch, Gamma 
Sigma ; Billie B. Bush, Xi ; J. F. Mc- 
Kale, Gamma Gamma, and Williams 
of Theta filled the minor offices. 

Three of the boys came long dis- 
tances to be at the installation. John 
Gardiner and Henry Mayhew trav- 
eled six hundred miles to become 
Sigma Nus, while David Cole estab- 
lished a record, driving a Ford the 
length of Arizona in twenty-four 
hours. 

Several of the new Brothers are 
now in the Army, but a dozen will re- 
turn to aid in making Epsilon Alpha's 
initial year prosperous. 

Within six hours of the time the 
vote on the Arizona petition was af- 
firmed, Sigma Nu had twenty new 
pledgemen. 

The Tucson Alumni Chapter will 
now be a regular active association. 
When the war started, six of the orig- 
inal members left for service and 
since then it has had a struggle for 
existence. 



Installation of Epsilon Alpha Chapter 



41 



An Active Man's Review 

By T. DEWlTT Talmage 
Epsilon Alpha 

When word was received from the 
General Secretary saying that the in- 
dividual Chapters had passed on our 
petition, it is needless to say that 
there was great rejoicing at the 
Sigma Phi Beta Fraternity. The 
telegram arrived on the afternoon of 
the 27th of May while exams were 
at their height. The good news was 
carried to the Brothers who were 
taking examinations, regardless of 
the strong protests made by the vari- 
ous professors in charge of the exam- 



due to the fact that the examinations 
were at hand and many of the fellows 
were in the service it was decided to 
do away with most of this. 

The pledging ceremony took place 
at our Fraternity House. Members 
of the Tucson Alumni Chapter 
(Brothers McKale, Turner, Bush, 
and Pusch) officiated. This was held 
on Wednesday evening and on the 
following Sunday morning we were 
examined by Brother McKale as to 
our knowledge of the Sigma Nu laws, 
Chapter names, etc. Since our House 
was deemed too small for the initia- 
tion, the "Citizens Hall" was rented 
and it was held there. The initiation 




JtJ of Arizona 



ination rooms. That evening night 
letters were sent to those of our 
Alumni who had expressed a desire 
to enter Sigma Nu along with us at 
that time. Not many of them were 
able to attend the initiation, however. 

Two of the boys who were at Camp 
Kearney in Uncle Sam's service were 
able to obtain a five days' leave of 
absence. One fellow bumped in his 
little "flivver" all night long over 
these Arizona roads in order to be on 
hand for the real celebration. 

It was originally planned by the 
Tucson Alumni to hold a week of so- 
cial activities, with a dance, a ban- 
quet, and social gatherings, etc., but 



proved to be very successful, nine- 
teen men in all being put through. 
At the close we held our first meet- 
ing, at which Wilson B. Wood was 
elected Eminent Commander; T. De- 
Witt Talmage, Lieutenant Command- 
er; "Jack" Reeves, Reporter; Harry 
K. Steele, Recorder ; Ed Sines, Treas- 
urer; Walter F. Pusch, Chaplain; 
Charles D. McCauley, Marshal, and 
Ed Belton, Sentinel. The other 
Brothers initiated were Henry H. 
Mayhew, John H. Gardiner, George 
W. Wright, Russell H. Jacobus, Fran- 
cis H. Lyons, Ralph Verfurth, and 
Jack Still. Our Alumni who were 
initiated were: Ted Fox, Robert 
Pilcher, Bruce F. Hannah, and Tracy 
Cole. 




Cathedral. Arequipa 



From Peru to Chile 

A Sigma Nu's Trip in Western South America 
By Edward B. Berrien, Beta Upsilon 



Oroya, March 31, 1918. 

DEAR Enrique: Your letter of 
February 7 was here when I got 
back from my trip and, needless 
to say, I was very glad to hear that 
you arrived in New York safely ; also 
that you agree that New York is 
sdme place. I have always thought 
we had a very nice country north of 
Mexico, and now that you agree I see 
no reason for any others to doubt it. 
Naturally I sympathized with you 
when I learned that you were delayed 
some four hours on one of our rail- 
roads, but you must remember that 
we are at war. On my trip from La 
Paz to Antofogasta I was delayed 
fifty-six hours. The trip should have 
taken thirty-eight hours, but this 
time it took us ninety-four hours. 
Further, the country between La Paz 
and Antofogasta is not at war. So 
you see that you really have no kick 
coming. 

Very kind of you to want to know 
about the trip and if you promise not 
to be angry at the length of the letter 
I will start off from here (Oroya) . 

I had intended taking the passen- 
ger from here to Lima to catch the 
boat sailing on the 13th, but they 
postponed the sailing date for five 
days and I had to take a freight train 
down to enable me to catch the "S. S. 
Imperial" sailing on the 12th. The 
trip down was very interesting (but 
not so comfortable as one would like, 
as there are no cabooses on freight 
from here to Ticlio ( 15,665 feet eleva- 
us by people along the route who 
trains here). Stayed on the engine 
deemed it a fitting manner of cele- 
brating carnival. At some of the sta- 
tion), as we left Oroya at 3 :30 in the 
morning and it was far from warm. 
The sun was out when we got to 
Ticlio and from there down to the 
sea level I stayed on a flat car loaded 
with copper. 



Due to its being carnival time, I 
stopped about thirty gallons of water 
along the way — this being thrown at 
I will start off from here (Oroya). 
tions we were given a shower of flour. 
This, mixed with the water, was very 
nice — for those who did the work. 
Should I ever have to make the trip 
on a freight at carnival time I will 
take to the inside of an empty tank. 
No matter, I got to Lima just before 
dark. 

Lima, too, had on her carnival rags 
and quite a little water was being 
given away. No one wants to work 
during carnival in Lima — and few do. 
I could get something to eat all right, 
but there were no papers and none 
had been printed for two days. In- 
asmuch as everything seemed to be 
shut up, and I had previously shipped 
my trunk to Callao, I thought it best 
to go to Callao and find out if I would 
be able to get my trunk. The agent 
at Callao assured me that carnival 
was for the frivolous and that he was 
on the job continually. I then beat it 
back to Lima and tearfully parted 
with 62 soles ($31) for a ticket to 
Mollendo. This fare used to be 40 
soles, but the war has caused the ship 
owners to think it is worth 50 per 
cent, more to ride on their fifth-class 
boats. 

The Imperial is a wonderful boat. 
It can roll more than any boat ever 
built — and not sink. My ribs were 
terribly sore from rolling up against 
the guard rails on the berth. Two 
nights of this, too. The food was 
quite bad. To charge a man 62 soles 
for a ride on the Imperial from Cal- 
lao to Mollendo is just like charging 
$62,000 from New York to New Or- 
leans. There were several excellent 
kickers on the boat and for awhile I 
thought I would not be in the run- 
ning, but when the papers were 



44 



graded I was given 100. I like to 
ride on the ocean, but it was a pleas- 
ure to leave the Imperial — even if it 
was to get off at Mollendo. 

Mollendo is not much to look at — 
much less to be in. One of the pas- 
sengers remarked, "This 'ere 'eat is 
'ot as 'ell," and I don't think he missed 
anything but a few "Haitches." Quite 
a sea was running and we had to be 
lifted out of our small launch in 
chairs. A ateam crane supplies the 
motive power to lift the chairs. No, 
it did not groan when it started lift- 
ing me. Mollendo is sadly in need of 
several things to make it attractive. 



quipa at 1 o'clock. Yes, Enrique, we 
took that train. 

The train (Southern Railway) was 
a good one. Very comfortable parlor 
car — and very clean chicken sand- 
wiches. A little after 6 we arrived 
at Arequipa. The trip up is through, 
or gather over, a barren country, and 
the only interesting thing on the way 
up was the sand dunes. They are 
wonderful. These sand dunes are of 
a bluish color and sit on dirt of an- 
other color. Was told that the wise 
men claim this sand has been blown 
up from the seashore. Well, it had 
quite a trip, believe me. However, 




Sniul mined Between Mollendo n 



It is hilly, sandy and smelly. The 
buildings are unattractive. I would 
say that Mollendo had about ten thou- 
sand inhabitants. They claim about 
forty. We went to the best hotel for 
lunch. It was far from good. We 
only had to pay a sol for the lunch, 
but it was the best obtainable. If 
they could put on a meal for three or 
four soles it might be worth while, 
but they hold to a sol and give you 
poor food. One of the inhabitants 
tried to prevail upon us to stay over 
two days, assuring us that it would 
be quite cool in the evening. Our 
plans were to be some seven thousand 
feet above Mollendo by nightfall. 
The good part of Mollendo, to us, was 
that a train would leave for Are- 



I was told that these dunes are con- 
tinually moving. In fact we were 
told that a tired man lay down beside 
one for a night's sleep. When he 
awoke he found that the dune had 
passed over him and was on its way. 
This did not sound too good to us — 
the dunes are about one hundred fifty 
feet from tip to tip, forty feet thick 
and some fifteen feet high. 

Arequipa, the second city in Peru, 
is said to have anywhere from sev- 
enty to one hundred twenty thousand 
inhabitants. Quite a nice place, too, 
some seven thousand feet above sea 
level. Plenty of automobiles and 
cheap fare. When you get tired rid- 
ing you can sit and look at Mt. -Misti, 



From Peru To Chile 



46 



It is said to be 17,000 feet and 19,000 
feet elevation. Inasmuch as there is 
but one mountain named Misti, I put 
it down as 18,000 feet. 

The best hotel at Arequipa was full 
up when we arrived. It seems that 
the train from Cuzco came in an hour 
before our train. After going to 
some six or seven places, we finally 
got rooms. The rooms were clean, 
but no running water. No bath to 
be found. However, we had the best 
rooms and only paid a sol and a half. 



My word that it was bright and 
clean. Then, too, they have a dining 
room and it did not take me long to 
find it. The meals were excellent. 
How they put them up for one sol 
fifty is beyond me. Immaculate table 
linen and good, clean, nongreasy food 
— that's the dining room at the Club 
de Arequipa. The wine was good, 
very reasonable and apparently with- 
out a kick. However, I fell asleep in 
the moving picture after dinner and 
know it was friend wine doing its 
duty. Say duty, as the picture was 





Why kick? This hotel did not differ 
from so many others down here. The 
toilet arrangements are bad — yes, 
very bad. 

We went over to the "best hotel"' 
to eat. May the Lord help the worst 
one! It was a la Mollendo. How- 
ever, my luck was due for a change — 
and change it did. Met a friend who 
put me up at the Club de Arequipa. 
Gracious, but it was good to see that 
club. Just as nice a club as one would 
care to find anywhere. And clean. 



one of these "Adventures of Myra," 
and a person is not supposed to stay 
awake when this film is being shown. 

They tell me that the best baths in 
South America, for gout and rheu- 
matism, are located about three miles 
from Arequipa. The name of these 
baths — Jesus Baths. Surely an odd 
name to give to a bath. This water 
is bottled and sold all over Peru. It 
was quite funny to give the waiter an 
order for some "Jesus water." It 
surely is a fine drinking water. For 



some unknown reason the people at 
Arequipa have not built a hotel at 
the Jesus baths. There are quite a 



This horseback stunt don't sound too' 
good — especially if one is suffering 
from gout or rheumatism. They say 




few private houses there, but no ac- 
commodations for the traveler. The 
only way a traveler can take these 
baths is to go there in an auto (over 
very poor roads) or on horseback. 



that a good hotel will be put up next 
year. Let's hope so. 



Arequipa, like Lima, is full of 
churches. The carvings in some of 



From Peru To Chile 



47 



these churches are very beautiful, but 
could stand considerable more care. 
The streets in Arequipa are about on 
par with those of Lima — not good. 

The trip to Puno, where we took 
the boat for our trip on Lake Titi- 
caca, was uneventful, other than that 
we had to cross another summit. This 
summit was about 14,500 feet. From 
the summit we dropped gradually 
down until we came to Puno, a "port" 
on Lake Titicaca. This lake is 12,500 
elevation and an honest-to-goodness 
lake. We went right on the boat, 
and as I happened to be with an as- 
sistant general manager of a railroad 
I was given a cabin to myself, which 
is no little consideration when one 
sees the small cabins. However, the 
berths are clean, but a little too nar- 
row and quite too hard. No matter, 
we were on the lake, and that was 
what we came for. 

It seemed funny to be on a boat at 
such an elevation, but we had good 
weather and were really quite com- 
fortable. The food on the boat was 
better by far than at the hotels in 
Mollendo and Arequipa. Our boat 
had accommodations for forty pas- 
sengers and was a hundred and sev- 
enty ton affair. The lake was quiet 
and our boat did not rock a bit. There 
is another fast boat, "The Inca," 
which makes the trip across the lake 
overnight. The Inca is of seven hun- 
dred tons capacity. Our boat is what 
we would call a "coast boat," as it 
makes about seven stops before we 
get to the other end of the lake. Took 
this boat so that I might see some- 
thing. At each stop we were allowed 
to go ashore and see the native Indian 
villages. They are quite interesting 
and at Cocabana there is quite a large 
cathedral, but like others it is very 
poorly taken care of and it is shame- 
ful. A statute of the Virgin is the 
interesting part of this particular ca- 
thedral, pilgrimages being made twice 
yearly to this Virgin and many mir- 
aculous cures claimed. 

The chapel in this cathedral is very 
clean and has a sort of straw matting 
on the floor. The intention of the 



padres is to keep the chapel clean, 
there being a number of signs on the 
walls, "Don't spit on the floor" (Es 
prohibido escupir en el suelo). When 
we got there a mass was being said. 
The choir was making so much noise 
that I decided to investigate. Two 
musicians (cornet and violin) were 
going along faintly, in fact could 
hardly be heard, but the singers, two 
in number, were both blind. What 
they lacked in sight they made up in 
voice. Can hear them yet. 

In the main part of this cathedral 
is probably the largest altar in South 
America. Was told so, anyhow. The 
lesser altars are very gaudy and plas- 
tered with the loudest wall paper im- 
aginable. There are at least fifteen 
of these smaller altars. Outside of 
the church are three crosses, made of 
solid stone, the largest of which is 
twenty feet high. Around the bases 
of these crosses are thousands of very 
small crosses, made of wood, wool, 
cloth, etc., which the Indians have 
brought in as their offering. 

Some six hours after leaving Coca- 
bana we arrived at Guagi (Bolivia), 
after having passed through two 
straights of the lake. Quite interest- 
ing. We were told that at 8 :00 the 
following morning we would take the 
train for La Paz. I was quite anxious 
to see La Paz, but would have liked 
to spend another two or three days 
on the lake. The trip is a delightful 
one and the captain and purser of the 
Yaravi particularly nice. 

The only interesting thing on the 
trip to La Paz is the town of Tia- 
guanaco, where are situated the Pre- 
Inca ruins. For some reason we 
were allowed a stop of but two min- 
utes at Tiaguanaco. Giggling seemed 
to be the chief form of amusement of 
the lady passengers. Mack and I 
could not make it out. 

At Alto we made ready to go down 
to La Paz. The business of making 
ready consists of taking off our small 
steam engine and hooking on to an 
electric car. After the brakes are 
tested and several men say "Muy 



bien" about a dozen times, the train 
pulls out and we go toward the edge 
and in about fifteen minutes we see 
La Faz some fifteen hundred feet be- 
low us. It was a very bright day and 
La Paz, owing to the number of cor- 
rugated iron roofs, looked like a pile 
of tin. But La Paz is not a tin scrap 
heap. Not by a long shot. It is a 
very substantial city and has some 
very pretty office buildings. Not sky- 
scrapers, to be sure, but two and 
three-story affairs. The town is 
hilly. Kansas City is positively level 
in comparison with La Paz. Walked 
right in from the street to a building 
and went through to the next street, 



sive — and listen, they have the ho- 
tel. It is the Hotel Paris, and a real 
affair. Had a nice bedroom, running 
water, sitting room and excellent 
meals, all for ten Bolivianos (Bolivi- 
ano is about thirty-nine cents). The 
Hotel Paris is said to be the best 
hotel on the coast. 

La Paz, like all first-class cities, 
has its residence section and the 
houses are very pretty. 

The Indian woman (Chola) is the 
most picturesque sight in La Paz. 
They are everywhere, have charge of 
the main market, own property and 
are said to be quite well to do. They 




Steamer In Dry Dock, T.i 



but I had to go down two floors to 
get out on the street. This will give 
you some idea of the grade. Then, 
too, the coaches have four horses to 
draw them and the horses seem will- 
ing to stop without any coaxing. 

Lots of automobiles in La Paz, and 
they go right up the grades, but you 
have plenty of time to get out of the 
way if you see one coming up. Going 
down you keep the door open a little 
to jump if the brake fails. 

La Paz has lots of nice things in 
store for the visitor. Curios (silver- 
ware to the contrary) are not expen- 



dress well — short skirts, high-heeled 
shoes, silk shawls and a hat that is 
very funny. This straw hat has a 
brim about two inches wide and the 
crown from eight to ten inches high. 
The hat is highly glazed — and in 
most cases it is clean. Yes, Enrique, 
the La Paz Chola is a lot better 
dressed than her Peruvian sister — ■ 
and a lot cleaner. You do not want 
to confuse the Peruvian Chola with 
the Peruvian women, neither do you 
want to confuse the La Paz Chola 
with the Bolivians. They are two 
distinct races. The Indian is called 
the Chola and the Peruvian or Bo- 
livian women are the "tipper ten." 



From Peru To Chile 



49 



The 6. L. P. Railway station at La 
Paz is quite large, handsome and 
clean. Baskets are everywhere that 
one may throw any paper or fruits, 
and guards are everywhere to see 
that the paper, etc., is thrown in the 
baskets and not on the floor. "Don't 
spit on the floor" signs abound. Peru 
could use some of these signs to great 
advantage. 

If you are traveling over the Anto- 
fogasta-La Paz Railway it does not 
pay to have any excess baggage. 
They allow fifty kilos free, but my 
trunk weighed fifty-three kilos — 
seven pounds overweight. To facili- 
tate matters, in figuring, they do not 
figure anything except in tens, so 
that I had to pay on ten kilos over- 
weight. It cost me about $1.40 real 
money and I turned loose all the po- 
lite words I knew, but the inspector 
said it was the rule, brought out a lot 
of rules and insisted on reading them 
to me, so that in the end I had to pay 
the $1.40 and also lost about half an 
hour listening to friend inspector 
read the rules. 

The ride from La Paz to Antofo- 
gasta (Chile) is a tiresome one. The 
train is a good one, carrying sleepers, 
dining car and first and second-class 
coaches. The meals on the diner are 
good and very reasonable — three Bo- 
livianos. The sleeping cars are clean, 
but the berths quite narrow in com- 
parison to our Pullmans. I had the 
upper berth in our compartment and 
the berths ran crosswise of the car. 
There were no guard rails on the 
berth and I had a time staying in the 
berth when the engineer made a sud- 
den stop. 

The railroad is a meter gauge af- 
fair for about five hundred kilome- 
ters. That is narrow enough for any 
one, but the second part of the jour- 
ney, some six hundred kilometers is 
a thirty-inch gauge. With this small 
gauge the train runs along very 
smoothly, but not near as fast as one 
would like. 

The trip from La Paz to Antof o- 
fasta is supposed to take thirty-eight 
hours. When we got to Calama 



(Chile) we were told that the road 
was washed out. The Frenchman 
and I were the only ones who had 
through tickets and sleeping car tick- 
ets. The railroad officials wired up 
from Antofogasta and informed us 
that we might be there four days. 
The traffic manager, named after the 
Mayor of Chicago, wired up that we 
might stay in our compartment until 
5 :00 the next morning. At that hour 
we were to get out, as they wanted to 
send the sleepers back up the line. 
The Frenchman was crazy mad, and 
I was a little worse than the French- 
man. Nothing doing about getting 
out of our berths, as far as we were 
concerned, until we got to Antofo- 
gasta, unless the railway made suit- 
able preparations. Railway said 
nothing doing and we then advised 
them that we would not get out, and 
went over to go to bed. A man came 
after us and said that arrangements 
had been made for us to sleep in an- 
other car, so we moved to another 
car. 

We took our meals at the "leading 
hotel of Calama." They were very 
good meals, as we ordered everything 
extra except the soup. A chicken for 
three persons, $3.50 gold. Not so 
bad, when you learn that a cold bath 
will cost seventy-eight cents gold and 
if heated a little the charge will be 
$1.30 real money. Needless to say 
that we did not bathe. We took a 
walk down to the river and gave it 
the once over. This once over busi- 
ness was free and we were going to 
do the same thing the next day, but 
word reached us that the train might 
pull out. Well, it didn't, but we 
stayed close. 

Calama is the getting off station 
for the Chile Exploration Company 
mines and smelter at Chuquicamata. 
Went up there the first day (Sunday) 
and took the place in. It is very in- 
teresting to look at for one time, but 
if they depended upon my services to 
keep the place running, I am afraid 
they would have to shut down. The 
racing season was on at Chuquica- 
mata and we went to the races. The 
races were a lot better than my judg- 



50 



The Delta 



ment. Lost six good American dol- 
lars — and all on account of that 
washout. 

You are, no doubt, wondering if we 
are ever to arrive at Antofogasta. 
Well, amigo mio, we did arrive. The 
hotel register shows that. Antofo- 
gasta is one nice place right around 
the business section and select resi- 
dence district, but the other outskirts 
are not much. The streets are said 
to be the best on the west coast of 
South America. It has been so long 
since I have seen a good street that I 
am willing to go them one. better and 
say that the streets of Antofogasta 
are the best in the whole world. 
These streets were put in by an 
American concern and the streets are 
good. 

The Frenchman and I stopped at 
a hotel that sits half on a poor street 
and half over the water. The poor 
street has spread its curse to the 
hotel. Only stayed there one night. 
There are two other, good, hotels in 
Antofogasta. The Frenchman rec- 
ommended this first hotel as he had 
stopped there fifteen years before. 
But I cannot say anything about the 
Frenchman, as he had the address of 
an excellent French restaurant. Don't 
remember the name, but the food I 
will not forget. We ate well, drank 
well and felt well on 25 pesos (about 
$6) of our money. The music was 
good, in fact everything was good, 
until the Frenchman decided he 
wanted some cheese. He went with 
the waiter to select it. The French- 
man said it was tres bien, but I, and 
others sitting near, thought it was 
tres mauve. Believe me, if I ever 
travel with him again I will make 
sure there is no cheese to be had if 
we go to his restaurant. 

Antofogasta is the only place of its 
size (about one hundred thousand) 
that I have seen that does not have 
street cars. No street cars in Anto- 
fogasta, but they have an auto-bus 
which is quite good (although I did 
not try it) and the fare reasonable. 
These busses seem to do a thriving 
business. The automobile hire in An- 



tofogasta is very cheap and it is a 
pleasure to ride around in them on 
the good streets. 

The S. S. Quilpue (Pacific Steam 
Navigation Co.) was due to sail, so 
I went around to see the agent. He 
never cracked a smile when he told 
me it would cost $72.50 (£14.500) to 
get me to Callao. However, I had to 
take the boat or wait three days, so 
I took it. 

The Quilpue is an English boat, 
built, no doubt, shortly after Balboa 
commenced looking around in this 
neighborhood. There were a number 
of cows aboard. No, I did not see 
them, but every one knew they were 
on board. No charge was made for 
the smell. If a charge had been made 
for the smell I am afraid none of us 
could have paid our fare. 

The cows were bound for Iquiqui, 
and when we got there I got off with 
the cows to take in the town. Iquiqui 
is quite a sandy affair, has funny 
street cars (horse cars), owns about 
60 per cent, of the heat on the Pacific 
coast and has some remarkable odors. 
Quite a different one for each block 
that I passed. Stopped passing them, 
after two had gone by, and backed up 
to the boat. 

The boat, some six hours after we 
left Iquiqui, took on another air and 
the trip the balance of the way was 
all right. The Quilpue rolls quite a 
bit, but the food is all that could be 
desired. It is really good. 

We stopped at Arica for a few 
hours and I took the place in. Arica 
seems to have leased quite a bit of 
heat from Iquiqui. Same sort of a 
town, but not smelly. The only 
thing "new" that I saw in Arica was 
a pair of oxen drawing small freight 
cars (on rails) in the Customs House 
yard. 

The fourth day we arrived at Cal- 
lao and I got off and smiled pleas- 
antly at the customs officials. Had 
to spend three days in Lima to have 
my glasses fixed (delay due to power 
being off). Well, nobody ever ob- 
jected to staying three days in Lima, 



52 



The Delta 



unless they were broke. I was not 
broke, as I went to the office immedi- 
ately after my arrival. Otherwise I 
might not have cared to stay in Lima 
at all. 

Am back on the job and busy, so I 
am going to close and hope to hear 
from you soon. Let me know how 
you are getting along at Blooming- 
ton. 

Kindest regards and best wishes. 
Sincerely yours, 

Eduardo. 



How Do You Like Our Style? 

This new volume of the Delta is 
being printed by The Art Press, of 
Indianapolis. 

This company is noted for its ex- 
cellent typographical work and fine 
halftone and color printing, as is evi- 
denced by a number of the leading 
college annuals. 

The former typographical excel- 
lence of the Delta is expected to be 
surpassed in this volume. 



Little Journeys of the Editor 



Gamma Gamma 

WE can imagine nothing harder 
on all good resolutions con- 
cerning summer work than to 
visit the State of Michigan in the last 
days of May. The never-ending va- 
riety of forest, lake and stream, to 
say nothing of the beautiful farms 
and commercial orchards, is a per- 
petual invitation to folks who love 
the out-of-doors. 

How the .Albion Brothers keep up 
the splendid college and Fraternal 
record which is theirs we do not 
know. Their Chapter House lawn is 
washed by the beautiful Kalamazoo 
river (see frontispiece). The barn 
has been made over into a boathouse 
and the favorite week-end journey is 
twenty-five miles down the river by 
canoe to Battle Creek for dinner and 
back home in the evening by trolley. 
We know now why so many of the 
Gamma Gamma Brothers get their 
wives from among the coeds. The 
Editor dropped into see the Chapter 
unexpectedly and the last canoe party 
of the season was just on. It was 
the time, the place, and the Brothers 
offered to furnish the girl, but alas 
the Mrs. Editor was waiting in a 
nearby city and the Mr. Editor con- 
cluded that discretion was still the 
better part of valor. 

Gamma Gamma in spite of war 
conditions has kept up her wonderful 
record by having a clean year finan- 



cially. Brother Sam Pegues says 
(and Brother Pegues knows) that 
during his entire period as treasurer 
(who knows how many years?) 
Gamma Gamma has never failed to 
report promptly and has never been 
in arrears to the General Office. We 
found the secret of this in part when 
we met the Chapter Adviser, Brother 
Robert Baldwin. He is a business 
man of Albion, a trustee of the col- 
lege, and yet finds time to drop in to 
the House at least once every "week 
and usually more often than that. He 
is father confessor to every Brother 
who needs him, and watches closely 
every activity of the Chapter. 

Albion is one of our small schools 
with a student body of five hundred. 
It has just been successful in com- 
pleting an endowment campaign for 
a million dollars. Our Chapter there 
has always maintained high Frater- 
nal and educational standards. We 
found there a unique Chapter activity 
in the maintenance of a complete or- 
chestra with the exception of the 
drums, under the efficient leadership 
of Brother William H. Perkins. We 
wish this fact had been known to the 
Committee on Arrangements for the 
Cleveland Grand Chapter and wish 
some of our larger Chapters would 
take note. This orchestra serves as 
the college orchestra and has a spirit 
of pride and unity which is the great- 
er because of its being a fraternal 
organization. 



Little Journeys of the Editor 



5S 



Gamma Nu 

From Albion we journeyed over to 
Ann Arbor and surprised the Broth- 
ers of Gamma Nu. We found them 
all busy with term examinations, but 
not too busy to receive us with true 
Sigma Nu hospitality. 

Michigan is one of the greatest of 
our American universities. It 
showed no sign of suffering by the 
war. With the utilization by the 
Government of the school equipment 
for military training the campus had 
the appearance of a military camp. 
The new library construction was 
being pressed steadily forward, the 



the dinner table and were impressed, 
by the questions asked, with the in- 
telligent interest which this strong 
Chapter has in all the general affairs 
of Sigma Nu. The trouble with so 
many of our strong Chapters is that 
they are likely to be consumed with 
the traditions and ideals of their own 
great institution and their local 
Chapter. Gamma Nu has all these 
ideals and traditions, but at the same 
time betrays a keen interest in Sigma 
Nu as "A National Society of College 
Men." 

Gamma Bets 

With all due remembrances of the 
beautiful homes of Rho at the Uni- 




new Y. M. C. A. building had just 
been opened, and the Student Union 
was nearing completion. This build- 
ing, costing more than one million 
dollars, is said to be the most com- 
plete plant of its kind in America. 

Gamma Nu owns her own home, 
which she purchased some years ago, 
and is now planning to build a splen- 
did home after the war. We found 
this Chapter in fine spirits frater- 
nally and in splendid shape finan- 
cially. The house had not been run 
not only- without loss, but with an 
actual profit 

Gamma Nu felt certain of a suc- 
cessful year in 1918-19 unless the 
draft age should be lowered. We 
spoke informally to the Chapter at 



versity of Missouri and of Gamma 
Lambda at Wisconsin, we are com- 
pelled to say that the most artistic 
Chapter House which we have ever 
yet visited is the Gamma Beta at 
Northwestern. From the dining 
room in the basement to the com- 
modious lodge room on the fourth 
floor this home gives the impression 
of having been designed by architects 
who knew with exactness what an 
ideal Chapter House should contain. 

We found that the secret not only 
of the completeness of our own 
House, but also of the beautiful 
quadrangle of Fraternity Houses, of 
which ours is but one, lay in the 
policy of the Trustees of Northwest- 
ern University. 



54 



The Delta 



We wish to urge upon every college 
administration perplexed over its 
housing or fraternity system a close 
investigation of the Northwestern 
system. It seems to us rather an 
ideal solution of both these problems. 
The university authorities have set 
apart a beautiful quadrangle of 
ground facing the fashionable North 
Shore drive on one side and Lake 
Michigan upon the other. Here the 
fraternities are given ground upon 
which to build. The money is fur- 
nished by the university, which also 
prepares the plans, which are adopt- 
ed along one general scheme. The 
Chapter pays back the cost of the 
House through a term of years and 
in the end the university has a beau- 
tiful group of homes on the campus, 
where they are an ornament to the 
institution, a help in its housing prob- 
lem and a means of better supervi- 
sion of the fraternity life. 

Gamma Beta has the honor shared 
by all of our Chapters in being hard 
hit by the war, but the younger 
Brothers who have been compelled to 
take the responsibilities are deter- 
mined to show the Alumni that they 
can very decidedly make good. We 
found the finances in splendid shape 
and the Brothers full of courage as 
they look forward to the next year. 

Gamma Rho 

Brother Roberts, our most efficient 
Inspector of the Ninth Division, 
called for us and took us out to din- 
ner with the Brothers of Gamma 
Rho. Brother Roberts has recently 
removed from the neighborhood of 
the Chicago Chapter, but not being 
able to get very far away from one 
or the other of his Chapters, has 
bought a beautiful home on the North 
Side, where he passes the Gamma 
Beta Chapter every day. 

Gamma Rho Chapter has made a 
real progress last year under very 
hard circumstances. This Chapter is 
constituted of a fine body of real 
Sigma Nu Brothers and is deserving 
in a special sense of the unqualified 
support of our Brothers everywhere. 
This Chapter has all the difficulties 



which are common to the war situa- 
tion everywhere and then in addition 
a number of problems which are dis- 
tinctly associated with Chicago Uni- 
versity and with the history of the 
Chapter. These Chicago Brothers 
are a credit to our Brotherhood. They 
are working unusually hard. They 
deserve the best of success, and we 
bespeak for them the sacrificial in- 
terest and support of every Alumnus 
in Chicago who loves Sigma Nu and 
the help of our Brothers everywhere 
in notifying this Chapter of good 
men who are going to enter Chicago 
University. 

Beta Nu 

It has never been our privilege to 
view a more inspiring sight than that 
which took place in front of the great 
library building of the Ohio State 
University, when on Alumni Day 
they unfurled their service flag with 
nearly three thousand stars (the sec- 
ond largest in the United States). 
We were the guest of the university 
on that day by the invitation of the 
general chairman of arrangements, 
Brother H. L. Hopwood, the efficient 
Adviser of Beta Nu Chapter. 

Beta Nu Chapter has a commodi- 
ous home in Indianola, the beautiful 
residence suburb of Columbus, and 
close to the University. This Chap- 
ter, founded by Brother Walter 
Sears, has furnished a splendid ga- 
laxy of leaders in Sigma Nu. Harry 
Junk, who joined the Chapter Grand 
in the very beginning of his life 
work, would have been a gift worthy 
of one Chapter if there had been no 
other. When we name Sears, Hey- 
wood, Hopwood, Sherman, we are 
only beginning a list marked by il- 
lustrious service to our Brotherhood. 

We found here an interesting ex- 
ample of kindred Brothers. Brother 
C. E. Sherman, Dean of Engineering 
and well known to the older genera- 
tion of Sigma Nu workers, has a son, 
Robert, who is the Commander of his 
own and his father's Chapter. We 
also had a very interesting visit with 
Dr. Thompson, the popular President 
of Ohio State. We had met Dr. 



Little Journeys of the Editor 



Thompson in other years at educa- 
tional conferences. He was not too 
busy even in commencement times to 
invite us into his office for a half 
hour's conference over local frater- 
nity administration and some con- 
templated changes therein. The in- 
creasing co-operation between the 
college administration and the fra- 
ternities bespeaks not only a better 
understanding on the part of the one, 
but also an increasingly higher sense 
of responsibility on the part of the 
fraternal organizations. 



"Forward our warriors go 
Fronting the sullen foe — 

God be their guard ! 
Lo, here, in memory 
Of their young chivalry, 
Our banner floating free, 

Thrice thousand-starred I" 

The occasion of our visit did not 
lend itself to any opportunty to meet 
the local Chapter as such, but con- 
ferences with the local officers and 
inspection of the books revealed a 
splendid condition in spite of the 




The war conditions made the at- 
tendance of Alumni smaller than 
usual, but a great throng of students 
and citizens stood with bowed heads 
when Brother Hopwood gave the sig- 
nal and the great flag was unfurled. 
The closing words of the presenta- 
tion speaker reflected the evident 
feeling of every person present when 
he said: "Its colors may fade and 
its stars may grow dim, but the spirit 
in which we dedicate it, and our faith 
in the things that are true, and hon- 
est, and just, and pure, and lovely, 
and of good report, that glows re- 
splendent from its every fold, will 
last throughout all the years." Many 
voices were choked with tears before 
they reached the last verse of the 
presentation hymn, which was as fol- 
lows; 



large number of stars on the great 
service flag which represented the 
Sigma Nus. 

Beta Nu returned only seven men 
last year, and of these four soon left 
for the service. From this beginning 
the Chapter initiated twenty-five 
men, paid all bills and closed the year 
in splendid shape. This kind of rec- 
ord, which, fine as it is, can be dupli- 
cated times without number, should 
inspire every Alumnus of Sigma Nu 
in these days who is too old for active 
service to his country to resolve to 
sustain these younger Brothers who 
are fighting so superbly to keep all 
our Chapters alive. Visit the boys, 
take The Delta, support the active 
Chapter and suddenly find yourselves 
twenty years younger than you 
thought you were. 




iiillffllnflni'fliflilim iHE 



wmammBttm 



Secretary's Table 




Founders Day 

The first regular meeting of the 
Alpha Chapter of Sigma Nu of which 
we have any record was held on Jan- 
uary 1, 1869. 

Wednesday, January 1, 1919, ought 
therefore, as the fiftieth anniversary 
of our founding, to be celebrated by 
appropriate exercises in every Chap- 
ter. These exercises need not be nec- 
essarily of great preparation and ex- 
pense, but some form of Founders 
Day exercises should be celebrated 
in every Chapter. It would be well 
at these meetings to connect the his- 
tory of the founding of the local 
Chapter with that of the National So- 
ciety and invite the Chapter founders 
to attend wherever this is possible. 

War Initiations 

We wish again to call attention to 
the specific and old method of special 
war initiations. Please note that the 
following special conditions must be 
observed : 

First — The pledge must have the 
written consent of his Chapter, ad- 
dressed to the General Secretary. 

Second — The initiating Chapter 
must have consent of the General 
Secretary for such initiation. 

Third — The pledge must have 
been an actual matriculate to the col- 
lege where his Chapter is located. 

Fourth — The initiating Chapter 
must fill out the forms, leaving the 
initiate's number blank — these forms 
to be completed by the initiate's own 
Chapter. 

Unless greater care shall be exer- 
cised by Chapters initiating soldier 
pledges it may become necessary to 
ask the High Council to suspend this 
privilege. 

Our Soldier Records 

The list of the "Knights of the 
Republic" continues to grow ; also, we 
are proudly sad to say, that of "Im- 
mortal Dates/' 



It is a matter of the keenest of re- 
gret that there seems no way by 
which we can make these lists abso- 
lutely complete. Brother Lieutenant 
Tussing, Beta Nu, writes us, sending 
in some additional names for his 
Chapter and pleads for some one, 
active or Alumnus, in every Chapter 
who will take upon himself this labor 
of love. We also note with gratitude 
special work in compiling his Chap- 
ter roll by another of our soldier 
Brothers, Sergeant George Chandler, 
Gamma Lambda. These Chapter 
lists should be etaoin engraved on 
bronze tablets and occupy the hon- 
ored place in every Chapter House at 
the close of this war. 

Check your Chapter list in this is- 
sue and send us at once every name 
which should be there and is not. 

Sigma Nu War Badge 

Some of our Brothers have written 
the General Office suggesting that 
some form of Sigma Nu War Badge 
should be adopted by the Fraternity 
to be worn by our "Grand Army of 
the Republic." 

These Brothers most richly deserve 
any special recognition which the 
Fraternity can give them. As the 
reports come in it would seem that 
practically every Brother who can 
possibly come under the regulations 
is in service or going in this fall. 
Whether there should be some dis- 
tinguishing addition to the badge for 
War Service we think should be 
largely left to "The Knights of Chiv- 
alry" themselves. What say you? 

A Word to Chapter Officers 

One of the greatest difficulties of 
general administration in war times 
lies in the necessarily rapid changing 
of the Chapter officers. Our system 
was designed with the expectation of 
systematic training of men for each 
of these places. This under present 
conditions is, of course, impossible. 



Secretary's Table 



57 



We are constantly dealing, therefore, 
with new officers. 

We wish to specially request the 
old officers, on leaving, to make all 
records for which they are respon- 
sible. Failure to do so not only leads 
to endless confusion, but may invali- 
date the historic record of some one 
or more Brothers. 

New officers should take the earli- 
est opportunity to familiarize them- 
selves with their duties and responsi- 
bilities. Read the law carefully, also 
all instructions as to accounting and 
forms. Above all, keep in touch 
with us. 

"Stalling" Your Debts 

We have been astonished at the 
number of Brothers who seem to 
feel, in spite of the dire war need of 
their Chapters, that they are justified 
in any sort of recourse by way of 
excuses in order to avoid a prompt 
and businesslike settlement of their 
fraternal obligations. Very few men 
look with complacency upon the final 
charges which are to sever them 
from the fraternal and college associ- 
ations, which are, after all, among 
the most precious things in life. They 
will, however, beg and plead and send 
installments as a last resort, which, 
if sent in the first place, with a busi- 
nesslike promise to continue the 
same, would have avoided all trouble. 

Brothers cannot make this office 
specious promises, then refuse to sign 
notes guaranteeing small payments 
upon admitted indebtedness to a 
needy Chapter, and avoid charges of 
expulsion from our Brotherhood. 
Therefore the list of expulsions, we 
regret to say, is growing. 

Division Conventions 

During the last college year many 
of our Inspectors did not call their 
Division Conventions. This was 
largely due to the fact of the Grand 
Chapter having been held last year 
and also to the laudable desire to 
keep down the expenses of the local 
Chapters as far as possible. 

We are convinced, however, in the 
light of events, that there is no real 



economy in this kind of saving. Al- 
most without exception the Divisions 
which held their conventions as usual 
last year betray an efficiency which 
is not seen elsewhere. Let us hold 
the Division Conventions this year. 
Set the date as early as possible and 
notify the General Office of such date 
as soon as it is determined upon. It 
will be often possible for us to have 
a representative with you. 

Sole Official Jewelers 

The active Chapter officers are es- 
pecially urged to read carefully the 
full announcement elsewhere con- 
cerning our new jewelry contracts. 
All kinds of camouflage will be 
thrown out by disgruntled salesmen. 
Under the old system we ourselves 
detected a salesman of a house which 
had refused to take an "ad" in The 
Delta representing his firm as "Offi- 
cial Jeweler." There will be more of 
this now. It will be the duty of the 
officers of the active Chapters to see 
that the proper notices are posted 
and the Law of the Fraternity in this 
respect is strictly obeyed. This is in 
justice to the Chapter as well as to 
our Brotherhood. 

• 
The Directory 

The Sigma Nu Directory is at last 
on the press. This venture has been 
in the hands of a private concern, 
R. L. Polk & Company, who make a 
business of publishing volumes of 
this kind. They have a skilled corps 
of personal investigators who are 
sent out to investigate personally 
where other efforts fail to procure 
the required information. The proof 
of this volume has been read in our 
office. It is a regular Who's Who of 
Sigma Nu and will be the most com- 
plete compilation of Sigma Nu data 
which we have ever had. The price 
of the volume may seem high, but the 
work done is invaluable. 

Individuals may order through this 
office if more convenient. A suffi- 
cient number of volumes have been 
purchased by contract of the General 



\ 



58 



The Delta 



Fraternity to furnish each active 
Chapter with a volume from this 
office. 

Do not place orders directly for the 
volumes intended for the Chapters. 

Novices in Chivalry 

We publish again in this issue the 
list of our initiates. This list is not 
only valuable as a matter of refer- 
ence, but also as a checking list for 
the records of the local Chapter. It is 
possible that some initiations toward 
the close of the year were not report- 
ed to the General Office. Please note 
the law in this respect. Until our 
records are clear in the office these 
Brothers are not recognized as Sigma 
Nus. 

The total number of initiates for 
the fiscal year closing July 1, 1918, is 
965. This is an increase over the 
previous year, which recorded a total 
of 954. There was necessarily a con- 
siderable decrease in the number of 
old men returned to college, thus af- 
fecting the income of the Fraternity 
to that degree. 

No more pertinent comment on the 
vitality of the Sigma Nu spirit in the 
younger men could be made than the 
fact of this increase of initiates. 

Here is the standard, Brothers of 
1918-1919! What will your rec- 
ord be? 

Chapter Publications 

We wish to call the attention of 
each Chapter to the action of the 
Eighteenth Grand Chapter, specify- 
ing that "Whenever any active or 
Alumni Chapter shall issue or circu- 
late any Chapter news letter, or book- 
let, a copy shall be mailed to the 
Grand Historian and to the General 
Secretary. 

Strange as it may seem, this is a 
matter very commonly overlooked 
because of the fact of these letters or 
papers being specifically intended for 
Alumni of the local Chapter. These 
publications always convey informa- 
tion which should be in the General 
Office. 

Put us on your mailing list. 



College Army Plan and the Fraternities 

Just as we go to press the War De- 
partment has made public its plans 
concerning the Students' Army 
Training Corps. The purpose of the 
new plan is declared to be "to utilize 
the executive and teaching personnel 
and the physical equipment of the 
colleges to assist in the training of 
our new armies." 

As the men in the college training 
corps will be compelled to live in bar- 
racks, all college life will be revolu- 
tionized. Chapter homes will general- 
ly be vacant. In many cases these 
buildings are being taken over by the 
college authorities for us€f as barracks 
after the furniture has been stored. 
In some other cases they are being 
taken over as girls' dormitories. The 
regular dormitories being used as 
barracks. 

Where neither of these uses is pos- 
sible, the problem of leasing the 
houses will sometimes be serious. 

It is the understanding of the Gen- 
eral Office on what seems to be re- 
liable information, that fraternity 
life will not be interfered with any 
farther than is absolutely necessary. 
It will be possible in many cases for 
the Brothers to retain the house for 
use as a club room and thus have a 
welcome retreat from barracks life. 

The new law will be helpful to the 
fraternities in that an unusually 
large number of men will enter col- 
lege in order to obtain the advantages 
of the S. A. T. C. 

Our Chapters ought to be unusually 
large this year thus laying a great 
foundation for the work of our 
Brotherhood when the war is over, 
which we hope will be within another 
year. 



Instructor in History Wanted 

Brothers who have specialized in 
history and who would desire a chair 
in a relatively small but strictly high 
grade college, are asked to communi- 
cate with the General Secretary. This 
place is open for the year beginning 
September, 1919. 




The Regent 
in France 



Few men in our Brotherhood have 
ever set a higher standard of un- 
selfish public service 
than has Brother 
Borden H. Burr. 
Though he has achieved an enviable 
record as one of the leading attorneys 
of the South, he has seemed to always 
have made his law practice secondary 
to the call of the great common inter- 
ests of us all, as signified by his ac- 
tivities as State Senator, State Chair- 
man of his party and National Com- 
mitteeman, and worker in the Boy 
Scouts, Red Cross and Y. M. C. A. 

Brother Burr has been his State 
Chairman of the Red Cross, direct- 
ing the manifold war activities of 
this wonderful organization and 
leading its financial campaigns to 
success. He has now been selected 
by the National War Council of the 
Young Men's Christian Association 
as one of their speakers in the nation- 
wide capaign for one hundred mil- 
lion dollars, which is to take place 
this fall. In order to prepare for 
this campaign Brother Burr went to 
France early in June to spend the 
summer inspecting the work of the 
Y. M. C. A. along the western front. 
Brother Burr expects to return to 
this country about October 1st in 
time for the Y. M. C. A. drive. 

Sigma Nu eminently justifies her 
existence as long as she can claim any 
part in the production of men of the 
ideals of our Regent. 



This issue records a large increase 
in our record of "Immortal Dates/' 

of Brothers of 

The Lfct ualty w h ° m lt is re " 

corded : 

"Far hence he died, before his time 

was ripe; 
Howbeit a soldier, for his country's 
cause." 

When the war broke out upon an 
unprepared world four years ago, the 

colleges of Great Britain poured 
forth almost their entire body of 
men as part of that "contemptable 
little army" whose sacrifice contrib- 
uted so much to save the freedom of 
the world. 

In the past year our American col- 
lege boys have shown that they are 
fundamentally of the same stuff as 
those English lads. In the first eight 
months more than 150,000 college 
students flocked to the colors. For- 
tunately for us we were able to profit 
by England's experience and through 
the officers' training camps have been 
able to conserve the value of our 
trained men more than England was 
able to do in those opening months. 

We cannot escape, however, pay- 
ing a heavy price in the sacrifice of 
these, our best, who are doing pre- 
cious parts for the freedom of the 
world. 

• 

For generations to come memorials 
of conspicuous and appropriate build- 
ings will be constructed as fountains 
of inspiration for generations of col- 
lege men yet unborn. 

It is the supreme duty as well as 
the high privilege of every Chapter 



60 



TH1 Dblta 



and every Brother to see that no "Im- 
mortal Date" is left without adequate 
notice in this magazine and also re- 
corded as a precious heritage in the 
records of the active Chapters. These 
names should be recorded when this 
war is over in tablets of bronze and 
placed upon the walls of every Chap- 
ter. What now is constituting our 
greatest losses will then constitute 
our most precious heritage. 



As we write these lines we note 
with a deep sigh of relief that the 
~ „ o* j * » Government has 

College Students' 

Array Training stopped all volun- 

Corps teering for the pres- 

ent. With the discussion in Congress 
of the lowering of the draft age to 18, 
there has been such an avalanche of 
volunteers as to threaten seriously 
the future supply of trained men. 

Our college boys do not yet seem 
to grasp the portent of the request 
of the President and the Department 
of Education that the boys should by 
all means get into college and stay in 
college until their country calls them. 
If the age limit is lowered it will not 
mean that these young boys will be 
called except as a last resort. 

The Government is in process of 
organizing the students' army train- 
ing corps, composed of college stu- 
dents between the ages of 18 and 21. 
During the school year the student 
will have the status of a private in 
the National Army on furlough with- 
out pay. Uniforms and equipment 
will be supplied by the Government, 
and during the summer vacation each 
soldier student will receive six weeks 
of intense military instruction. The 
corps is designed for the purpose of 
meeting future demands for trained 



Presents from 
Prussia 



specialists and to provide material 
for officers' training camps. 

In these supreme days it is not a 
question of what we most want to do, 
but of where we can best serve. At 
the present time the place, beyond 
all doubt, where every young man 
under 21 can serve best is in college. 

* * * 

We are reprinting in this issue, by 
request of the Bureau of Information 

of the United States 
Government, an ar- 
ticle on the above 
subject which is based on an article 
appearing originally in Garnet and 
White of Alpha Chi Rho. 

This matter was taken up at the 
last Inter-Fraternity Conference by 
a representative of the Government, 
who spoke before that body, asking 
the earnest co-operation of the Col- 
lege Fraternity men in this great 
campaign, as a supreme obligation of 
patriotic service. 

The Government makes the aston- 
ishing statement that "in many in- 
stances European armies lost the 
services of more men through ve- 
nereal diseases than through bullets, 
shrapnel, hand grenades and all the 
other destructive agencies combined, 
and asks the co-operation of the Col- 
lege Fraternities in two great aims of 
the Government — first, to make the 
men necessary parts of a perfect 
fighting machine ; and secondly, to re- 
turn them to civil life, to their fami- 
lies, in as good if not in better con- 
dition than when they entered the 
service. 

As a result of this campaign in 
part, and also in larger part than is 
usually given credit for, in the ideals 
and teaching of other years, the Gov- 



View and Review 



61 



ernment makes the statement that in 
the United States Army at present 
there is not only far less venereal 
disease than in other army in the 
history of the world, but that the per- 
centage is also actually far below that 
of civil life in our own country. 

It is believed that in this first con- 
structive attempt to handle this 
greatest of all scourges a foundation 
is being laid which will be permanent. 

No one can live the Ideals of Chiv- 
alry towards womanhood inculcated 
by Sigma Nu and not live a clean life 
sexually as the practical standard of 
his own life. We trust that not only 
every Brother wearing khaki will be 
true to these ideals, but that the act- 
ive Brothers in college, who are likely 
at any time to be called into the serv- 
ice of their country, will be found 
every one physically clean and "fit" 
when that time comes. 



4- 



We are glad to note the increasing 
number of informal dinners by our 

Sigma Nu Brothers 
^* m P in the training 

camps. We recog- 
nize that it is very difficult for the 
Brothers to get together in any large 
numbers at a given time. These 
gatherings, however, are not meas- 
ured in value by the number of men 
who are present. Fraternity bonds 
are cemented together in single hours 
of comradeship which will last be- 
yond all time. 

We shall never forget sitting about 
the table at Camp Taylor with 
twenty brothers, officers and pri- 
vates, Brothers all, knowing that 
within a few days they would be sep- 
arated going over seas. There was a 
note of brotherhood in that little con- 



ference which shall always be sacred 
to the Brothers who were fortunate 
enough to have part therein. 

We can sometimes be of great as- 
sistance to Brothers wishing to call 
the men together in a given camp. 
We shall be glad to furnish such 
names as we may have by telegram if 

necessary. 

* * * 

We have had a number of letters 
recently from Brothers in France, 

anxiously inquiring 
concerning the 
prospects for the 
coming year in our Brotherhood. 



Over 
Here 



That we are entering upon a most 
critical year in the history of Sigma 
Nu is beyond all doubt. Had not the 
Government stopped all volunteering 
(and if this ban should be removed), 
we fear for the existence of many 
colleges, to say nothing of the Fra- 
ternities. 

We were most agreeably surprised 
last year at the splendid record of 
our Chapters. Initiations were 
slightly increased rather than de- 
creased. The younger men felt their 
responsibilities and the most of our 
Chapters were able to approximate 
the report of Beta Iota when she said 
at the close of the year, "No active 
man Owes us a penny." 

Beyond all doubt, however, the 
strain upon us this coming year will 
be much more severe than last year. 
A far larger per cent, of the men 
under draft age have volunteered. 
The appeal for industrial service was 
never so strong to the boys coming 
out of the high schools. 

As these lines reach the Chapters 
they will be in the midst of the most 



62 



The Delta 



"strenuous" spike they have ever 
known. Very much will depend upon 
the discretion and the energy of the 
few Brothers returning to college. 

The evident responsibility of all 
Alumni Brothers is also greatly in- 
creased. If every one of us will be 
resolved to do something for our own 
Chapter we will be able to pull 
through. 

As we swing into the second year 
of this world war for Liberty things 
are going increasingly better "over 
there." Let those of us who must re- 
main "over here" give every ounce of 
energy to supporting our Country. 
Not the least of these responsibilities 
is connected with our colleges and our 
own Chapters. 



This Delta presents accounts of 
the installation of two new Chapters. 

These Chapters are 

A°r£M.Ued ™ deJ y grated *» 

distance, but close 

together in time and enthusiasm. 
Delta Psi at Bowdoin College and 
Epsilon Alpha at Arizona officially 
entered the Fraternity on April 27th 
and June 2d, respectively. It is in- 
teresting to note in connection with 
these charter grants that the actual 
favorable vote broke all previous rec- 
ords. The percentage of our Chap- 
ters actually recording their affirma- 
tive votes by Chapter action instead 
of by default was the largest of any 
in the history of the Fraternity. 

The May issue contained a brief re- 
port of the pledging of our Delta Psi 
Brothers and of the special satisfac- 
tion felt on the part of our Eastern 
Alumni. Herein we chronicle the 
successful installation of the second 



New England Chapter under the 
skillful leadership of Brother Edson 
K. Smith, the wide-awake and zeal- 
ous Inspector of the Eighth Division. 
Brother Seth Arnold, past president 
and charter member of the Boston 
Alumni Chapter, and Brother Harold 
W. Slabaugh, last year's Commander 
of Delta Beta Chapter, present from 
different angles the cordial welcome 
of New England to her new Brothers. 

Since the May Delta appeared, we 
have entered the Epsilon series of 
.Chapter names, the Alpha falling 
upon the University of Arizona. The 
history of this petition, as well as 
that of the Tucson Alumni Chapter, 
will forever be connected with the 
name of Brother J. F. McKale, 
Gamma Gamma, faculty athletic di- 
rector of the university, who has fa- 
thered this movement from the be- 
ginning, and who most appropriately 
had charge of the installation. 

We have liked the spirit of these 
Western men, now our Brothers, 
from the very first. We have had 
some knowledge of the rapid develop- 
ment of their school through a per- 
sonal acquaintance with the young 
and vigorous President Kleinsmidt. 
The repord of the installation and 
some of the difficulties overcome in 
order that the initiates might be 
present can scarcely be conceived by 
our Eastern men. 

% This school is strategically located. 
The State has made a favorable be- 
ginning by concentrating all its sup- 
port on one institution, large grants 
of mining lands insure a large income 
in the future, and its health condi- • 
tions will make it attractive to stu- 
dents throughout the country. One 
of our older Alumni has just written 



View and Review 



63 



that he contemplates sending his two 
sons from the Middle West to this 
school. 

* 

Rudyard Kipling said, "Oh, East 
is East and West is West, and never 
the twain shall meet/' but in these 
two Chapters the East and West of 
our own land join hands in this our 
"National Society of College Men." 



The Sigma Chi Quarterly for May, 

1918, gives in full a very interesting 

decision of a Dis- 
High School trict Court of Iowa 

Fraternities Again „ A „ ' 

afterward affirm ad 

by the Supreme Court of the State. 
This decision upholds the right of 
the Board of Directors of the 
School District of Des Moines in sus- 
pending members of high school fra- 
ternities. The decision also upholds 
the law of the State of Iowa forbid- 
ding high school fraternities in the 
State. 

This decision discloses that laws 
have been enacted in Ohio, Indiana, 
Washington, Kansas, Illinois, and 
Other States, either absolutely for- 
bidding them or placing them under 
the control of boards of education. 
Also that "an examination of the 
cases arising under these laws and 
local regulations discloses that the 
courts of last resort in recent years 
have uniformly held such statutes and 
rules valid and constitutional." 

This decision unmistakably records 
a steady growth of public sentiment 
against these organizations as a 
harmful influence in the high school 
life of our country. 

We think the Inter-Fraternity 
Conference could well take notice of 
this evident growth of public senti- 
ment and reflect the same in Inter- 



Fraternity Conference action. We 
believe that the last session of this 
Conference took a backward step in 
this matter. 



The next (December) issue of The 
Delta will be the Fiftieth Anniver- 
sary number. We 

Fiftieth Anniver- ^, attention to the 
sary Number 

obligation of proper 
celebration of the day (January 1st) 
in the Secretary's Table of this issue. 

In this special number we hope to 
give, in addition to an epitome of our 
fifty years of history, some personal 
reminiscences from Brothers who 
have had to do with our earlier ac- 
tivities. 

We have repeatedly urged upon a 
number of these Brothers the neces- 
sity of putting down historic facts 
and personal experiences which they 
alone possess. They seem, however, 
to have been overwhelmed with 
timidity in this matter. They now 
have on this occasion a special oppor- 
tunity to do so. If they do not em- 
brace this we know of no further 
argument by which to influence them. 

Will not every older Brother who 
is placed in a reminiscent mood by 
the theme of the next issue put down 
now the facts concerning the early 
days of your own Chapter, which 
have doubtless never been recorded? 
And will not the younger men bring 
such pressure upon the Fraternity 
Fathers so as to make secure for all 
time these historic facts? 

What do you have to contribute to 
this issue? 



64 



The Delta 



The Scroll of Phi Delta Theta in 
its May issue, under Recent Fra- 
ternity Convention, 
? u TJS om J? lim ^II t8 gives a most com- 

to 'The Scroll" * * * * _™* 

plete digest of the 
proceedings of the Eighteenth Grand 
Chapter of Sigma Nu, including a 
summary of legislation, a part of the 
speech of Brother Burr in accepting 
the Regency, the Sears Creed and 
Brother Woods' presentation of the 
same, and a generous selection from 
"Remarkable Remarks" in the con- 
vention number of The Delta. Our 
former opinion of "The Scroll" as one 
of the best of our Fraternity maga- 
zines is naturally not lessened by this 
article. 



This issue opens a new and most 
important volume of the Delta. 

Changes will be 
Volume 36 noted in arrange- 

ment and in style, 
which will involve some economies 
and we believe an improved appear- 
ance as well. 

We have widened the printed page 
thus giving more matter to the page. 
This relieves somewhat the conges- 
tion on the Editor's desk and on the 
Editor's brain without additional cost 
and as we think with improvement 
in appearance. Notice also that we 
have converted the form of the mag- 
azine into double column throughout. 
The shorter line not only gives more 
words to the page but also is more 
easily read. Certain departments 
have been changed in location so that 
they will appear in smaller type again 
slightly enlarging the capacity of a 
given number of pages. All depart- 
ments relating to the active chapters 
will be found located more conven- 



iently together. This is also true of 
all departments relating to the 
Alumni. Only articles on subjects of 
specific interest and treated at 
length will appear in the more prom- 
inent type. 

Our plans for the new volume as 
for the last far outrun our ability to 
compass them within the limits of 
our pages and budget. It is the wish 
of the High Councils as well as of 
numbers of our leading Alumni that 
if possible we do not lower the stand- 
ards of excellence already set for our 
magazine in order to save expense. 
It is possible that this may finally be 
necessary unless we can rally a larger 
support of Alumni subscribers. 

* 

In the new volume a number of ar- 
ticles of travel and of life work which 
are written by Sigma Nus or about 
Sigma Nus will continue to appear. 
The department of Kindred Brothers 
begun in the last volume is attracting 
unexpected attention. It is especially 
surprising to see the relative large 
number of fathers and sons who are 
Sigma Nu Brothers. The Knights of 
Chivalry is the department which 
now constitutes our greatest burden. 
We have finally determined, how- 
ever, that this department will not be 
dropped even if it forces out of our 
pages a number of others. It is now 
with our sister department, On the 
Way to Berlin, the most popular part 
of our magazine and in future years 
will be of inestimable historic value. 

The interests of our Alumni in the 
Delta have grown into three sections 
in addition to the Alumni Chapter 
Letters and Alumni Notes of former 
days. 



Chapter Survey 

By Harry A. Rider, Assistant General Secretary 



BETHANY COLLEGE 
Epsilon Chapter 

The college enrollment for 1918-19 will 
probably be slightly less than that of 
1917-18 1917-18. Out of twenty-three men 
in the Chapter last year, ten intended to 
return. 

The prospects for Chapter operation are 
good. The actual expenses for House up- 
keep are small, although the Chapter owns 
its property. The small amount of Chapter 
indebtedness is more than covered by debts 
to the Chapter. 

A little financial aid may be expected 
from several of the "active" Alumni, who 
are also lining up men for the coming year. 
There are about forty-five Epsilon men in 
service, which includes most of the younger 
and active Alumni. 



MERCER UNIVERSITY 
Eta Chapter 

While many of the men have not returned, 
the number of pledges already will raise 
the Chapter to its usual strength. 

WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY 

Lambda Chapter 

Commander A. S. Watkins answered our 
questionnaire, but says, "It is impossible for 
me to answer the numerous questions with 
any satisfaction where I am now (in the 
Navy) .' 



»> 



UNIVERSITY- OF KANSAS 
Nu Chapter 

Professor E. F. Engle, the Chapter Ad- 
viser, writes these encouraging words: 
"The prospects for this fall are fine and we 
have spent about four hundred dollars in 
repairs and improvements on the house." 

EMORY COLLEGE 
Xi Chapter 

This college is in process of being re- 
moved to Atlanta, Georgia, under a new 
endowment, which insures that this insti- 
tution will be one of the great Universities 
of the South. The professional schools are 
now in Atlanta. The College of Liberal 
Arts will not be moved to the new plant now 
being prepared until the fall of 1919. In- 
spector Oscar Palmour writes: "Although 
this makes conditions exceedingly unfavor- 
able here, I believe we will be able to de- 
velop a scheme in which this Chapter may 
be held together until conditions improve. 



UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI 
Rho Chapter 

A reduced college enrollment is certain. 
Out of thirty-one men in the Chapter last 
year, twenty are expected to return. 

A heavy payment falls due to the House 
Corporation this year. Also old accounts 
remain to be paid. Though a large Chap- 
ter is necessary to pay the expenses, 
enough men will be back to open up well, 
including a commissary and a treasurer, 
both experienced. 

The Alumni came to the rescue last year 
financially and enabled the Chapter to pull 
through in fine shape. They may be count- 
ed on in a necessity, but the active men feel 
that it won't be necessary. 

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS 
Upsilon Chapter 

"School closed with very little excite- 
ment, but with the loss of three more men 
to the army. I expect to enter during the 
summer myself. It does not feel very good 
to be sitting around holding the sack while 
other people are doing so much. I am the 
only man in the Chapter at present that 
was here when war was declared last 
spring. I was only nineteen then and could 
not get in the training camp with the bunch. 
But now the naval aviation looks good and 
if I don't lose any more weight, I ought to 
be in Boston by fall. We will have some 
eight or ten men back out of nineteen total 
in last year's Chapter." 

JOHN D. COFER. 

DEPAUW UNIVERSITY 
Beta Beta Chapter 

Brother Royal E. Davis writes: "I be- 
lieve that we will open school this fall with 
a larger and better bunch of Freshmen than 
this Chapter has had for a long time. All 
the Brothers that are left are enthusiastic 
over the prospects. The indications at the 
present time are that there will be nine old 
men back and six pledges in addition/' 



n 



PURDUE UNIVERSITY 
Beta Zeta Chapter 

The college enrollment for 1918-19 will 
be twenty per cent, less than that of 
1917-18. Out of thirty-two men in the 
Chapter last year, about eighteen will 
return. 

The boys are enthusiastically setting to 
work for the fall and the Chapter has never 
been in better condition. Prospects are ex- 
ceedingly bright. 



66 



The Delta 



ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 
Beta Theta Chapter 

The college enrollment for 1918-19 will 
be slightly under that of 1917-18. Out of 
thirty-four men in the Chapter last year, 
nineteen will return. 

The House expenses will approximately 
be the same as last year. The Chapter has 
no creditors, but has a small balance of 
debts to itself. 

The outlook for the Chapter is most hope- 
ful. The Alumni are willing to help in any 
way they can. 

MOUNT UNION COLLEGE 
Beta Iota Chapter 

The college enrollment for 1918-19 is 
about the same as for 1917-18. Out of a 
total of thirty-six men in the Chapter last 
year, twenty-nine stayed in college the 
whole year, and twenty-four are expected 
to return. 

The Chapter has practically no , debts 
either way — owed to or by the Chapter. 

The burden will fall principally on 
Sophomores and Juniors, with possibly 

three Seniors. Prospects are very bright. 

The Alumni have backed the Chapter in 

the past to perfection and will so continue. 

KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL 

COLLEGE 
Beta Kappa 

The college enrollment for 1918-19 will 
be materially less than 1917-18. Out of 
twenty-eight men in the Chapter last year, 
seventeen will probably return. 

The expenses will be about the same as 
last year. The small indebtedness of the 
Chapter is more than covered by the few 
debts owed by recent Alumni. The Chap- 
ter House this summer was under the man- 
agement of the matron and was rented to 
officers' wives, bringing in about $25.00 
weekly. This money goes into the house 
repair fund. 

Prospects are as good this fall as last 
year, which may well be considered success- 
ful. 

The Alumni contributed about $200 
toward house repairs last year and they 
can be depended upon for aid if needed. 

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE 
Beta Xi Chapter 

The college enrollment for 1918-19 will 
be only about two-thirds of that for 1917-18. 
Out of twenty-two men in the Chapter last 
year, eleven will return and also four 
pledges. 

The Chapter owes nothing and has only 
a small outstanding account due to it. Fac- 
ing conditions such as last year, the pros- 
pects for Beta Xi are encouraging. To 
quote one of the Alumni, Brother A. D. 
Brandom, "Keep the quality up even if you 
run a small Chapter. • We will give you 
assistance, even financial." 



TULANE UNIVERSITY 

Beta Phi Chapter 

The college enrollment for 1918-19 will 
be slightly under that of 1917-18. Out of 
the twelve men in the Chapter last year, 
nine will probably return. 

The Chapter owes nothing and has but 
few debts outstanding. 

No house has been maintained by the 
Chapter the past year. The prospects are 
better for the coming year. 

A little help may be expected from the 
Alumni. 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 

Beta Psi Chapter 

Many of the active men have gone into 
the service, but prospects are better than 
at this time last year. 

GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY 

Gamma Alpha Chapter 

The college enrollment for 1918-19 will be 
the same as for the past year, 1917-18. Out 
of thirty-one men in the Chapter last year, 
sixteen will return with probably five others. 

The rent for the Chapter House will be 
increased, other expenses remaining about 
the same. The small indebtedness of the 
Chapter is covered about five times by the 
debts due to it. Prospects for next year 
are fair. 

The Alumni have helped in the past and 
could reasonably be expected to help now. 

ALBION COLLEGE 

Gamma Gamma Chapter 

The college enrollment will be practically 
the same for 1918-19 as during the year 
1917-18. Out of twenty-four men in the 
Chapter last year, fifteen will return with 
possibly two pledges. 

The Chapter has m> debts outstanding, 
with a small amount yet to come in. Finan- 
cially, the Chapter ended the summer about 
clear and the expenses for next year will 
not be materially increased. With several 
strong men coming back this fall, the pros- 
pects are excellent. 

As to aid from the Alumni, the Chapter 
answers, "Nothing." 

STEVENS INSTITUTE OF 
TECHNOLOGY 

Gamma Delta 

The college enrollment for 1918-19 will 
be practically the same as for 1917-18. Out 
of thirty-two men in the Chapter last year, 
fifteen will be back. 

The expenses for the coming year will 
probably not be increased, and the Alumni 
debts will be decidedly lessened. Prospects 
for Chapter operation are good. 

The Commander says, "I feel safe in say- 
ing that we can depend on our Alumni for 
help/ 



»> 



Chapter Survey 



67 



COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES 
Gamma Eta Chapter 

The college enrollment for the year 1918- 
19 will be increased about one-third over 
that of 1917-18. Out of seventeen men in 
the Chapter last year, eight will return. 

The rather large indebtedness of the 
Chapter is covered by the Alumni debts. 
No statement of expenses is given, but the 
commander says that "Prospects are very 
poor." 

The majority of the Alumni are in the 
army or out of touch with the Chapter. 
This is surely the time for men in Colorado 
to get busy. 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
Gamma Theta Chapter 

The college enrollment for 1918-19 is not 
reported. Fourteen men will return out of 
twenty-four men in the Chapter last year. 

The Chapter owes nothing, although it 
has a rather heavy list of Alumni debts 
unpaid. Expenses will depend on the num- 
ber of men returning. 

The Commander says that prospects are 
good — with a small amount of cash surplus 
to begin the year on and all current bills 
are paid. 

The Chapter does not expect to need any 
financial help from the Alumni and the 
active men seem uncertain as to what to 
expect from them. However, the Alumni 
have never failed in the past to direct the 
Chapter rightly. 

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY 
Gamma Iota Chapter 

College authorities state that the enroll- 
ment will be larger for the current year 
than for the preceding one. Out of eleven 
men in the Chapter last year ten will re- 
turn, with two pledges. 

The Chapter has rented a new Chapter 
House which is nearer the college. Pros- 
pects are good. 

Alumni support is always forthcoming. 
To quote one of the active men, "When need 
arises, the Alumni chip in and stand back 
of the Chapter fine." 

MISSOURI SCHOOL OF MINES 
Gamma Xi Chapter 

The college enrollment for 1918-19 is 
slightly under that of 1917-18. Out of 
seventeen men in the Chapter last year, 
only nine will return. 

The Alumni debts are too large, but there 
is a small amount owed by the Chapter. 
The expenses will be about the same as last 
year and prospects are very good. The 
winter supply of coal is in, which makes 
the future look warmer. 

This Chapter is the only one to answer 
affirmatively as to financial aid from the 
Alumni. 



WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 
Gamma O micron Chapter 

College enrollment for 1918-19 will be 
considerably less than for 1917-18. Out of 
eleven men in the Chapter last year, five 
will be back with three probably affiliating 
and two pledges. 

The Chapter owes nothing, but the 
Alumni debts are rather heavy. 

The prospects are good for pledge ma- 
terial. The only fear of the Chapter is on 
account of "old men." 

The Alumni have not been active during 
the past year. 

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 
Gama Pi Chapter 

The enrollment for 1918-19 will be slight- 
ly less than that of 1917-18. Out of twen- 
ty-three men last year, eleven will return 
with possibly three more. , 

The Chapter owes nothing and has prac- 
tically no debts due it. The expenses for 
next year will be about the same as in the 
past. Prospects are good. 

UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 
Gamma Rho Chapter 

College enrollment for 1918-19 not re- 
ported. There were nineteen men in the 
Chapter last year with only eleven ending 
the year and the same number will probably 
return. Officers have changed many times 
during the past year. 

The Chapter is in good health and pros- 
pects are good for next year. 

"Co-operation of the Alumni," says the 
Commander, "has been little in number, but 
good in quality." 

UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS 
Gamma Upsilon Chapter 

The college enrollment for 1918-19 will 
be about one-third less than for last year. 
The Chapter roll was twelve last year and 
will undoubtedly be fully as large, as at 
the opening of college this fall* four pledges 
have returned in addition to initiated men. 

The prospects for Chapter operation are 
better than a year ago. 

The Alumni are not in close touch with 
the active Chapter. 

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 
Delta Gamma Chapter 

No statement as to enrollment. The 
Chapter began the year of 1917-18 with six 
active men and ended with eighteen. The 
total Chapter roll during the year was 
twenty-eight. Fourteen men are expected 
to return. 

During the year the Alumni banded to- 
gether paying dues and this Alumni Club 
greatly aided the Chapter. The Chapter 
especially mentions Brothers Romagn& > 



68 



The Delta 



Grant and Dickey, together with Past Re- 
gent Wilson as frater-aides. Brothers 
Grant and Dickey are Registrars at the 
University. Other Alumni have been of 
great inspiration as well as service. For 
example, nine Delta Gamma soldiers at one 
of the camps sent back a large contribu- 
tion to the Chapter. 

The Alumni report in brief is as follows : 
"We are about to make arrangements to 
give up our Chapter House at Columbia 
University' until after the war. It is not 
a matter of quitting but of keeping Sigma 
Nu forceful at the University. We will 
lease from the University a suite of rooms 
in the campus dorms. 1 



» 



UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA 
Delta Epsilon Chapter 

Enrollment for college is about the same 
as last year. Seventeen men will return 
out of twenty-eight men in the Chapter last 
year. 

Prospects seem fairly good for next year. 

WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY 
Delta Zeta Chapter 

The college enrollment for 1918-19 will 
be about the same as for 1917-18. Out of 
thirteen men in the Chapter last year, eight 
will probably return. 

Finances are in excellent shape with a 
large surplus ahead. 

The Alumni take an active interest in the 
Chapter and will undoubtedly take care of 
any emergency. 

STATE COLLEGE OF WASHINGTON 
Delta Iota Chapter 

The college enrollment for 1918-19 is the 
same as for 1917-18. Out of nineteen men 
last year, four will return. 

The expenses will be about the same as 
last year. Payments to the House Corpora- 
tion under present war arrangement will 
be just what the Chapter is able to pay. 

The Chapter has had a rule against 
pledging before matriculation, although 
there are no inter-fraternity rules against 
"prep" pledging, but this year it was sus- 
pended and the Chapter has already twelve 
pledges. 

The Alumni have done more than their 
share by assuming the rent. 

STETSON UNIVERSITY 
Delta Mu Chapter 

The college enrollment for the next year 
is about the same as for 1917-18. Out of 
twenty men in the Chapter last year, four 
will return with probably three or four 
pledges. 

The Chapter owes nothing. 

There is no great opportunity for much 
pledge material in sight for next year. 

Several Alumni near Stetson University 
are always an aid to the Chapter. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA 

Delta Xi Chapter 

"Our first semester opens on September 
5 and the indications now are that very few 
boys will be registered," according to Chap- 
ter Adviser Charles S. Knight, who is the 
dean of agriculture. 

UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO 
Delta Omicron Chapter 

The enrollment for 1918-19 in the college 
is practically the same as 1917-18. Out of 
thirty-one men in the Chapter last year, 
seventeen will probably return. 

Expenses are about the same. Although 
the Chapter indebtedness is high, there is 
a considerable amount outstanding in 
Alumni debts. 

Prospects for the rushing season are good 
considering war conditions. Four pledges 
have already been secured. 

Most of the Alumni are in the service, but 
all write frequently and the Chapter ex- 
pects their strong support. 

CARNEGIE INSTITUTE OF 
TECHNOLOGY 

Delta Sigma Chapter 

The college enrollment for 1918-19 is 
slightly under that of last year. Out of 
thirty-two men in the Chapter last year, 
twenty-two will return this year. 

The expenses are rather high, but have 
been estimated in a businesslike fashion. 
Rather heavy Alumni debts cover the 
amount of Chapter indebtedness. It is also 
expected that the House will be rented dur- 
ing the summer, thereby making up a part 
of the year's rent. 

The Engineering School is likely to have 
a good Freshman class from which they can 
draw. 

The Alumni can be depended upon and 
they have heretofore shown unusual in- 
terest. 

OREGON AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 
Delta Tau Chapter 

The college enrollment for the year 
1918-19 will be slightly under that of last 
year 1917-18. Out of twenty-seven men in 
the Chapter last year, about thirteen will 
return. 

The expenses for the coming year will 
be somewhat heavier. The debts of the 
Alumni will more than cover the amount 
which the Chapter owes. The outlook is 
promising. 

The Chapter says, "Our Alumni body is 
small in numbers, but will back the Chapter 
to the limit." 

MARYLAND STATE COLLEGE 
Delta Phi Chapter 

The college enrollment for 1918-19 is 
slightly more than that for 1917-18. Out 
of twenty-eight men in the Chapter last 
year only five will return. 

The Chapter has no debts either way. As 
this is a new Chapter, the Alumni roll is 
small and nearly all of them are in service. 



Chapter Survey 



69 



TRINITY COLLEGE 
Delta Chi Chapter 

The college enrollment for 1918-19 will 
be about the same as for last year. Eleven 
men will return this year, out of fourteen 
in the Chapter last year. 

Prospects are good and four pledges are 
announced already. 

The Hartford Alumni Association is 
solidly behind the new Chapter. 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 
Delta Psi Chapter 

The enrollment for the college will be 
about one-third less than for last year. Out 
of twenty-five men in the Chapter in 
1917-18, fourteen will probably be back this 
year. 

The expenses are light and will probably 
not increase. The prospects are good. 



CHAPTER CONDITIONS SUMMARY 

The reports on the current year's pros- 
pects of our Chapters are meager. The 
war has upset college affairs to such an ex- 
tent that the Chapter officers gave only 
estimates and approximate answers. 

In man" cases the commanders and re- 
porters had left college early and our let- 
ters reached them in training camps far 
away from their Chapter records and out of 
touch with actual conditions, so fast they 
change. 

It is correct to state, however, that our 
Chapters are in £ood condition in the face 
of war uncertainties. Never was there such 
a fighting spirit among the active men, a 
seeking for co-operation and harmony, a 
determination for Fraternity service. 
Among Alumni comradeship has acquired a 
new meaning and Fraternity a living sig- 
nificance. We can look at the future with 
one certainty, at least — that Sigma Nu, de- 
spite all vicissitudes and dangers, will 
march in the stride set by the Brothers who 
have gone out into the service of the larger 
Brotherhood of the nations. 

Others did not reply at all, probably from 
the same reasons. We have been trying to 
reach their officers and members of the 
Chapter where responses have not come, 
but, as copy for this Delta dates only to 
August 15th, many gaps are left in this 
survey. If your Chapter is missing, send 
them word delinquincy. You Alumni can 
greatly aid the General Office by "punch- 
ing up" your Chapters. 

As we go to press, the new government 
regulations, enrolling college students in 
the army adds to the perplexities of Alumni 
in their Chapter House Building Associa- 
tions and render necessary a readjustment 
of our Chapters to fit into the needs of mil- 
itary service. 



Fraternities and Army Training 

Corps 

Upon receipt of the government's an- 
nouncement concerning the establishment 
of the Students' Army Training Corps and 
the conversion of colleges into army posts, 
the General Secretary immediately sent to 
our official staff and Chapter officers the fol- 
lowing letter: 

SIGMA NU FRATERNITY 
Indianapolis 

September 5, 1918. 

To All Inspectors, Chapter Advisers and 
Chapter Commanders: 

Dear Brothers: 

Let us call your immediate attention to 
the possibilities of the new Registration 
Law, just passed by Congress, providing for 
the Students' Army Training Corps. 

Up to this time our prospects for next 
year were much brighter than we had 
hoped for at the close of the last college 
year. What this new law will do to us is 
problematical. It ought to increase the 
number of men in college this winter. We 
understand, however, that these men must 
live in barracks. This may effect our Fra- 
ternity life seriously. 

We wish to call your attention especially 
to the fact that many of the colleges are 
taking over the Fraternity Houses to be 
used as barracks. We urge and direct the 
heartiest co-operation in the offer of our 
buildings where such is necessary. We 
hope that this will be done without any 
controversy anywhere as to financial re- 
turns. We should offer the use of our 
property trusting the colleges and the gov- 
ernment to see that we get sufficient re- 
turns for the use of these buildings to pay 
the interest on our mortgages and preserve 
the proDerty. 

Please get into communication with the 
presidents of your own colleges at once, and 
keep the General Office advised. 

Fraternally yours, 

EDWIN W. DUNLAVY, 
General Secretary. 

The prompt co-ordination of our college 
organizations and their workers will aid the 
government in the war and give to the col- 
leges and fraternities a safe basis for the 
reconstruction period. We shall need then 
every college facility preserved in its work- 
ing efficiency and in its esprit du corps. 



We are called upon as Americans and as 
Sigma Nus to play a man's part in a man's 
game, 

BORDEN BURR, ThetA-Lw&bd*. 



The Athletes 



SIGMA NU COACHES 

It is worthy of remark that Sigma Nu 
has four college athletic coaches. We can 
only mention tnem now, in a later issue we 
hope to have a more extended account of 
their activities. 

At West Virginia University, Brother 
Kemper Shelton, Gamma Pi, was baseball 
coach last Spring. 

The University of Washington and the 
University of Arizona each has a director 
of athletics as Faculty members. At 
Seattle is our Inspector Claude J. Hunt, 
Beta Beta. At Tucson is Brother J. F. Mc- 
Kale, Gamma Gamma, who is both Secre- 
tary of the Alumni Chapter and Chapter 
adviser of our baby Chapter, Epsilon Alpha. 
These two men supervise all athletics at 
their institutions and put out last year first- 
class football teams despite the disadvan- 
tages of war times. 

At New Hampshire State College, 
Brother W. H. Cowell, Nu-Gamma Mu, 
answers to the euphonius title of physical 
and athletic director. 



KING SEES ED LAFITTE, GAMMA AL- 
PHA, LOSE GAME 



Former Cracker Hurls for Army Nine 
Against Navy in London and Is Beaten. 

An old former Cracker pitcher was one 
of the chief attractions at the baseball 
game between the Navv and Army teams 
in London, on July 4, which was played be- 
fore King George, the Queen and a large 
crowd of "coming English baseball fans." 

Ed Lafitte, the big right-hander, former- 
ly one of the mainstays of the Atlanta and 
Brooklyn pitching staffs, who is in the 
dental corps, is "over there," and he pitched 
in this game. 

Ed was on the slab for the Army nine, 
and he was opposed by Herbert Pennock, 
former southpaw of the Athletics and Red 
Sox. Pennock hurled the Navy boys to a 
2 to 1 victory, in an interesting pastime. 

Arlie Latham, old Giant performer, 
wrote the following story of the game for 
the Universal Service: 

London, July 5. — John McGraw's New 
York Giants had nothing on us Americans 
over here when it came to celebrating the 
grand old Fourth of July. With the grand- 
stand filled with royalty, we put on a show 
that was good enough for the New York 
Polo Grounds or any other ball park in the 
United States, and we did not have a reg- 
ular baseball diamond on which to play, 
either! It was a football field. 

As the greater part of the crowd was not 
equipped with opera glasses like Queen 



Mary, and with their eyes really aching 
to see a ball game, they just naturally 
swarmed down on the field, and formed on 
the side lines. The goal posts were some- 
what of an inconvenience and the field 
itself was built on a sort of a bowl-like 
pattern, which made it more or less incon- 
venient to play ball on. 

Many of the Army and Navy lads were 
on the side lines to see the show, and, being 
schooled in the game, did not interfere with 
the playing. 

There was plenty doing for me. I had 
to tackle the job of umpiring single handed, 
shake hands with Kinj? George oef ore the 
game started and engineer the whole pro- 
ceedings. 

It had been all framed up for the King 
to throw out the first ball, but as the 
ground keeper had put some tennis netting 
up in front of the royal box, where the 
King was seated, in an antique gilt chair, 
the King wrote his name on the pellet ana 
came down and handed it to me, while 
about a dozen photographers and movie 
operators gathered around. 

Wilson Cross then introduced the King 
to Mims, the Army captain, and McNally, 
the Navy captain, and myself. He shook 
hands with all of us and then handed me 
the league baseball, which he had auto- 

fraphea, and which is to be sent to Presi- 
ent Wilson. You know the original plan 
was to auction it off, but that stunt was 
called off because it wouldn't be according 
to Hoyle with royalty. 

"I am delighted," King George said to 
me — just like Theodore Roosevelt, only he 
has a beard so you can't see his teeth — "to 
see Americans and English drawn so close 
together in national sport." 

"We hope to make it international 
sport," I replied. 

"How long have you played baseball?" 
the King then asked me. 

"Forty years." 

"What position did you play?" 

"I played third base for thirty years." 

"I have read a lot about you," continued 
the King. "I take a great interest in base- 
ball. Recently I have been reading the 
sporting pages of your newspapers, for- 
warded to me by the Y. M. C. A., and have 
also been reading 'The Stars and Stripes.' " 

My statement that I had played baseball 
for forty years evidently puzzled King 
George, for he then asked me how old I 
was, adding that he hoped he was not ask- 
ing an impertinent question. I replied 
that I was 63, and he then said that I did 
not look to be over 35. He then went back 



The Athletes 



71 



to his box so we could start the game, 
which was some affair, with emphasis on 
the some. 

Both Lafitte and Pennock pitched a 
splendid game. Fuller was the real star. 
It was his batting that gave the Navy the 
victory by a score of 2 to 1. 



GRID STARS WIN SPURS 



Johnny Becket and Elmer Hall Made 

Lieutenants 

Gamma Zeta 

Johnny Beckett and Elmer Hall, former 
well-known University of Oregon football 
heroes, who enlisted in the marine corps in 
1916, have been commissioned second lieu- 
tenants at the marine officers training camp 
at Ouantico, Va., according to information 
reaching Portland. 

Beckett attained fame as a member of 
the University of Oregon 1916 football 
squad, which, under the watchful eye of 
Coach Hugo Bezdek, defeated the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania at Pasadena, Cal., 
during the tournament of roses, New Year's 
Day, 1917. 

Beckett is regarded as one of the greatest 
tackles in the country. Last season he cap- 
tained the famous Mare Island marines 
eleven, which defeated all collegiate and 
independent teams on the Pacific coast and 
walked away with the Pacific coast grid- 
iron championship. 

Elmer Hall, who was sent from Mare 
Island with Beckett to the Quantico train- 
ing camp, is another graduate of the 
Eugene institution, where he was consid- 
ered an apt student and a nervy football 
player. Hall enlisted with Beckett and was 
a member of the Mare Island marines foot- 
ball team last season. Hall hails from 
Baker, Oregon. — Spokane Spokesman Re- 
view, July 19, 1918. 



RODGERS, GAMMA PI, NAMED CAP- 
TAIN OF NINE, THOUGH IN ARMY 

Though these items are the same in con- 
tent, you can see how country-wide fame 
travels. 

Morgantown, W. Va v June 3. — As a 
tribute to West Virginia's great athlete, 
who is now in the service, Ira E. Rodgers 
today was elected captain of the 1919 
Mountaineer baseball team. Although it is 
not anticipated that he will be here to lead 
the team before the war ends, it was a 
foregone conclusion that Rodgers would be 
captain of all three varsity teams at West 
Virginia in his senior year, so his team- 
mates today decided to go through with the 
arrangement, although Rodgers already is 
in training at Camp Lee. — Pittsburgh Post. 



Morgantown, W. Va., June 6. — Ira E. 
Rodgers, shortstop, has been elected captain 
of the West Virginia Baseball Team for 
next year. Rodgers is now in Camp Lee 
in the service and there is no likelihood 
that he will be here, but having made the 
greatest record of any mountaineer athlete 
in years he was given the honor, even 
though it was known he could not serve. 
Rodgers had previously been elected cap- 
tain of football and basketball for next year 
at West Virginia. — New York Times. 



FOOTBALL STAR IN MARINES 
Richard Hanley, Delta Iota 

The photograph shows Dick Hanley, cap- 
tain-elect of the Washington State College 
Football Team, in the uniform of the 
United States marines. Hanley enlisted 
with the "soldiers of the sea" about two 
months ago and since then has been sta- 
tioned at Mare Island. He is in the north- 
west on a fifteen-day furlough scouting for 
material for the marines. Football ma- 
terial is what interests Hanley most and 
he already has succeeded in coaxing his 
brother, Leroy, and Mike Moran to enlist. 

Hanley, who played on the Washington 
State College Team in 1915, 1916 and 1917, 
says that the marines will have a football 
team this year that will take the measure 
of anything on the Pacific coast. He con- 
tends that it will be even better than the 
great eleven led by Johnny Beckett last 
season. 



THEY'LL GUARD THE GOLDEN 
STREETS 

This is the famous Battle Hymn of the 
Marines, the song that inspires the Marines 
in every battle they fight. 

From the Halls of Montezuma, 

To the shores of Tripoli, 
We fight our country's battles 

On the land as on the sea. 
First to fight for right and freedom 

And to keep our honor clean, 
We are proud: to claim the title 

Of United States Marine. 

Our flag's unfurled to every breeze 

From dawn to setting sun. 
We have fought in every clime or place 

Where we could take a gun; 
In the snow of far-off Northern lands 

And in sunny tropic scenes, 
You will find us always on the job-*- 

THE UNITED STATES MARINES. 

Here's health to you and to our corps 

Which we are proud to serve, 
In many a strife we have fought for life 

And never lost our nerve; 
If the Army and the Navy 

Ever look on Heaven's scenes, 
They will find the streets are guarded by 

THE UNITED STATES MARINES. 



College Notes 



American Council of Education. 

Edmund J. James of the University of 
Illinois and one of the greatest of our col- 
lege presidents, is state director of the com- 
mittee on Student War Service of the 
American Council of Education, called a 
conference of educators at the Auditorium 
Hotel, Chicago, to urge the slogan among 
the young people, "Finish the High School, 
Enlist, and Go to College." 

This conference was composed of repre- 
sentatives of all the colleges of Illinois, all 
normal schools, high school principals, rep- 
resentative city superintendents, county 
superintendents, agricultural directors, sec- 
retaries of Rotary clubs and associations of 
commerce. 

The purpose of the conference was to 
push a wide publicity campaign to keep the 
young men in college until drafted and to 
close with a college enlistment day to be 
set apart by President Wilson. 

Bethany College Receives Foreign Legacy 

A very interesting bequest case has been 
decided favorably for Bethany College by 
the English House of Lords. It involved 
about $15,000 and was made by the late 
Robert McDongald of Edinburg, Scotland. 

Government Encourages College Enrollment 

The President of the United States and 
the Department of Education have author- 
ized a nation-wide campaign during the 
past two months on behalf of student en- 
rollment in the colleges. This campaign 
has been conducted by the Emergency 
Council of Education, which represents all 
the educational associations of national 
scope. 

No More Kultur For Us 

Some one has well said, "There should be 
a century of disinfection before another 
American student enters a German univer- 
sity." 

Undergraduates in War Service 

In a recent number of the New York 
Times President Thwing of Western Re- 
serve, has an article setting forth tabula- 
tions of 150,000 undergraduates who have 
gone into war service. The omission how- 
ever in the tabulation of a number of insti- 
tutions makes certain that the total num- 
ber is much larger than this article states. 

Howard College Endowment 

The Rockefeller Foundation has just 
given $100,000 to Howard College, Birming- 
ham, Ala., to complete an endowment of a 
new department in the college of $300,000. 
That will mean a great thing to our Iota 
Chapter. Howard is a grand old college 



and will yet remain to make Sigma Nu ap- 
preciate the kind of Alumni we have from 
that college and Chapter. 

A 11- Year- Round Courses at Brown 

Staid Old Brown has yielded to modern 
industrialism and war-time pressure and 
has adopted a modified "Gary School Plan" 
— utilizing the college buildings and equip- 
ment every month of the year. 

To quote its new bulletin "Brown Uni- 
versity Reorganizes for the War": 

"Brown University will become an all- 
year-round college when it opens in Sep- 
tember, and will render it possible for stu- 
dents to complete their courses in three in- 
stead of four years, as a result of action 
taken by the faculty and Board of Fellows 
to make the university "not a pensioner, 
but a great and unique source of strength" 
during these war times. 

"There will be three college terms, each of 
16 weeks. The student during his first year 
will be expected to take courses largely pre- 
scribed, but planned to insure an early ac- 
quaintance with correct methods of doing 
college work, to open the eyes of the stu- 
dent to new interests and to help him de- 
cide upon his course of study in the subse- 
quent college years." 

The change will embody the announced 
conviction of the faculty that the old order 
of instruction should be materially altered to 
make the university more useful to the 
country in this time of unprecedented 
stress. Last year what is characterized as 
an "opportunist" policy prevailed at Brown. 

The main purpose of the changed courses 
is to emphasize the relationship of the 
classroom, workshop and laboratory to life, 
particularly life under present conditions. 
Every department, it is said, will conform 
its instruction to war-time requirements. 

A new military department has indeed 
been in operation for some months, and one 
of the few naval units thus far planned for 
any American college will begin work in 
the fall. This does not mean that the so- 
called "cultural" studies will be abandoned 
or that there will no longer be any attempt 
to give the student a well-rounded college 
course. But it does mean that the way is 
to be cleared for him to select naturally 
affiliated subjects of instruction for himself 
and so prepare himself more fully for a 
successful after career. 

Maryland College Faculty Enlarges 

Ten new professors have been added to 
the staff of Maryland College for next year. 
Over 200 freshmen applications are filed at 
the registrar's office — all boys. 



Novices in Chivalry 



"To believe in the life of love; to win in the fresh morning of our youth 
the loyal love of faithful friends, who will go with us unmoved into the dark- 
ening shadows of life 9 8 closing day; and so to seek and to find, to have and to 
hold the friendships that will abide. * * . * And so to be true to the Knighthood 
of Love' 9 — The Creed of Sigma Nu. 

A list of our initiates for the college year 1917-1918 : 



UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA 
Beta Chapter 

186 Expelled. 

187 Bass, Percy Bruce. 3310 East Broad St., 

Richmond Va., October 15, 1917. 

188 Chiles, George Glasgow, Strausburg, Va., 

October 15, 1917. 

189 Woods, Edward Anderson, 2519 Grandln 

Road, Cincinnati, Onio. 

190 Cobb, Joseph Murphy, 1539 I St., Washing- 

ton, D. C, October 15, 1917. 

191 Moore, Paul Percy, Bennettsvllle, S. C, De- 

cember 5, 1917. 

192 Jackson, Roderick Humes, Bennettsvllle, S. 

C, February 10, 1918. 
198 Jennings. Otto Dunkel, 2104 Hanover Ave.. 

Richmond, Va., March 3, 1918. 
194 Ralph, Daniel Paul, 1246 Newton St., N. 

E., Washington, D. C, May 4, 1918. 



BETHANY COLLEGE 

Epttllon Chapter 

142 Slayter, Richard Eugene, 4826 Gaston Ave., 

Dallas, Texas, December 21, 1917. 

143 Spragg. Edgar David, K. 2, Adena, Ohio, 

December 21, 1917. 

144 Chapman, John William, 9204 Hough Ave.. 

Cleveland, Ohio, January 16. 1918. 

145 Hoover. Charles Evans, St. Louisville, Ohio, 

January 16, 1918. 

146 Bixler, Lovd Ellsworth, Mitchell. Md., Feb- 

ruary 22, 1918. 

147 Ballard. John Cox Hupp, Triadelphia, W. 

Va., February 22, 1918. 

148 Houston, Ralph Dicky. R. 1, Cameron, W. 

Va.. February 23, 1918. 

149 Walker, Dean Everest, Bethany, W. Va., 

February 23. 1918. 

150 Hershberger, Donald Rickard, 43 Wells st., 

Forty Fort, Kingston, Pa., February 23, 

1918. 
J 51 Robeson, Royal Dewey, Canville, Ohio, May 

28. 1918. 
162 Bross, Raybernal, R. 1, Danville, Ohio, May 

28, 1918. 
158 Price, Charles Omer, Rock Bottom, W. Va., 

May 30. 1918. 



MEBCEB UNIVERSITY 
Eta Chapter 

282 McCall, Henry Sterling, Ogeeghee, Ga., 

October 24, 1917. 

283 Newbourn, Lloyd Roberson, Blberton, Ga., 

December 18, 1917. 

284 Mewbourn, William Howard, Blberton, Ga., 

December 18, 1917. 

285 Roberts, John Yancy, 74 New St., Macon, 

Ga., January 14, 1918. 

286 Ralney, Den net te Isiah, Monticello, Fla., 

January 14, 1918. 

287 Hopkins, Joseph Jackson, 659 Craymer St., 

Milwaukee, Wis., January 16, 1918. 

288 Henderson, Lester Devere, Monticello, Fla., 

January 16, 191b. 

289 Park, Charles Lanier, 212 Clisley Place, 

Macon, Ga., January 16, 1918. 

290 Ingram, Reese Morton, 726 Collage St.. Ma- 

con, Ga., January 16, 1918. 



UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA 
Theta Chapter 

407 Batson, George Charner, 1819 Dartsmouth 
Ave., Bessemer, Ala., December 8, 1917. 

418 Shreve, James Wilfred, Jr., 38 B. Three 
Notch, AnduluBia, Ala., December 8, 1917. 

409 Hods, John Mark, Mil port, Ala., December 

8, 1917. 

410 Kldd, John Leon, Harpersville, Ala., De- 

cember 8, 1917. 

411 Blue, Ernest Lee, Jr., Union Springs, Ala., 

December 8, 1917. 

NORTH GEORGIA AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Kappa Chapter 

308 Vickery, Eugene Benton, Dahlonega, Ga., 

September 8, 1917. 

309 Nunnally, Alonzo Harris, Statesboro, Ga., 

September 8, 1917. 

310 Long, Clarence S., Jasper, Ga., September 

30, 1917. 

311 Wynne, Morgan Theodore, 196 Cleburne 

Ave., Atlanta, Ga., September 8, 1917. 

312 O'Shields, Roy Printeton, Oglethorp, Ga., 

December 20, 1917. 

313 Porter, George Homer, Jr., Atlanta, Ga., 

January 8, 1918. 

314 Long, Charles Reid, Jasper, Ga., January 

20, 1918. 

315 Faucett, Farris Carter, Marietta, Ga., Jan- 

uary 30, 1918. 

316 Brown, Samuel Ross, Dahlonega, Ga., Feb- 

ruary 7, 1918. 

317 Christopher, Samuel Horton, Dahlonega, 

Ga., February 7, 1918. 

HOWARD COLLEGE 
Iota Chapter 

260 Kay, John L., Jr., Gaylesville, Ala., Octo- 

ber 8, 1917. 

261 Langston, Manly Frost, Llneville, Ala., No- 

vember 5, 1917. 

262 Price, Sidney Lanier, Gastonburg, Ala., No- 

vember 5, 1917. 

263 Price. James Arthur, Newville, Ala., No- 

vember 5, 1917. 

264 Bell, Robert Jackson. Ramer, Ala., Novem- 

ber 5, 1917. 

265 Walker, Douglas Clyde, 2419 Ave., B., Ens- 

ley, Ala., January 28, 1918. 

266 Barrentine, Harry Marlon, Millport, Ala., 

April 22, 1918. 

WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY 
Lambda Chapter 

187 Hillje. Louis Adolph, 724 Nolan St.. San 

Antonio, Texas, September 26, 1917. 

188 Owens, James Dean, Rome, Ga., September 

26, 1917. 

189 Bdmondson, John Sims, 1875 S. Parkway, 

Memphis, Tenn., November 4, 1917. 

190 Truedail, Edwin Sterrett, 101 W. Wash- 

ington St, Camden, Ark., January 19, 
1918. 

191 Hill, James Pittman, Jr., 134 Colby St., 

Eufaula, Ala., January 19, 1918. 

192 Compton, Floyd Damon, Brunswick, Md.. 

April 2, 1918. 

193 Henry, Freeland Alfred, Jr., Ripley, Tenn.. 

May 4, 1918. 

194 Polk, Edward Winfleld. 1823 Broadway, 

Little Rock, Ark., Mfl^ ^ \&W 



74 



The Delta 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Ma Chapter 

328 Malone. George Rulin, Sandersvllle, Ga., 

September 22, 1917. 

329 Morris, Benjamin Irby, Waycross, Ga., Sep- 

tember 22, 1917. 

330 Rice, William Brooks, Jr., Dublin, Ga., 

September 22, 1917. 

331 Buck, Frederick Blumer, Jr., 1801 Arling- 

ton Are., Bessemer, Ala., September 26, 
1917. 

332 Minis, James Willie, Colquitt, Ga., Septem- 

ber, 29, 1917. 

333 Gibson, Sterling Bussey, Thomson, Ga., 

May 14, 1918. 

UNIVERSTY OF KANSAS 

Na Chapter 

300 Cunningham, Robert Brown, Caney, Kan- 

sas, January 20, 1918. 

301 Harms. Marvin William, 138 S. Martenson, 

Wichita, Kans., January 20. 1918. 

302 Hobbs, Russell Eugene, 316 N. Topeka, 

Wichita, Kans.. January 20, 1918. 

303 Hill, Roland Vaughn, 1202 North Emporia, 

Wichita, Kans.. January 20, 1918. 

304 Sturges, Russell, Concordia, Kans., Jan- 

uary 20, 1918. 

305 Munch, George Dell. 224 E. Fifth St., Con- 

cordia, Kans.. January 20, 1918. 

306 Hudson, Edward Francis, 127 S. Seventh 

St., Fredonla. Kans.. January 20, 1918. 

307 Noid, Arthur, 1020 Qulncy, Topeka, Kans.. 

January 20. 1918. 

308 Vermillion, Frank Howard, Lyons, Kans., 

January 20, 1918. 

309 Schoonover, Ansel John, Lyons, Kans.. 

April 7, 1918. 

310 Barter, Leland Lasater, Dodge City, Kans., 

April 7. 1918. 

311 Barter, Harry Absalom, Dodge City, Kans., 

April 7, 1918. 

LEHIGH UNIVERSITY 
Pi Chapter 

187 Not reported. 

188 Stanier, John Stewart, Tarentum, Pa., 

October 28, 1917. 

189 Rourke, John Joseph, Farmlngton, Conn., 

October 28, 1917. 

190 Shaw, Hugh C, address not reported, Octo- 

ber 28, 1917. 

191 Berger, Edgar Milton, 445 Linden St, Al- 

lentown, Pa., October 28, 1917. 

192 Goldcamp, Cyril Finton. 1211 S. Sixth St.. 

Ironton, Ohio, October 28, 1917. 

193 Melick, Raymond Henry. 430 Russel Ave., 

PhillipBburg, N. J., October 28, 1917. 

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI 
Rho Chapter 

297 McKim, Horace Walton, Jr., La Belle, Mo., 

(Aft*, from Beta Xi 156), October 26, 
1917. 

298 Mackey, James Thurmon, Louisiana, Mo.. 

January 11, 1918. 

299 Ewing, John Boyd, 1303 W. Cherry St., 

Nevada, Mo., January 11, 1918. 

300 Bradford, William Leslie, Sedalia, Mo., 

January 11, 1918. 

301 Gray, Harry Palmore, Blairstown, Mo., Jan- 

uary 11, 1918. 

302 Jarrell, James Clarence, Mount Vernon, 111., 

March 2, 1918. 

303 Shore, Benjamin Rice, Jr., 813 College, Co- 

lumbia, Mo., March 2, 1918. 

304 Stlllwell, John David, 303 N. Sixth St, 

Hannibal, Mo., March 2, 1918. 

305 Morrison, George Brooks, 904 W. Cherry 

St., Nevada, Mo., March 2, 1918. 

306 Roth, Louis Llnan, 5062 Kensington Ave., 

St. Louis, Mo., March 2, 1918. 

307 Steele, Robert Edwin, 805 W. Cherry, Ne- 

vada, Mo., March 2, 1918. 
108 Greenley, John Anderson, Novelty, Mo., 
March 2, 1918. 



309 Shepard, Van, Jr., 2826 Forest Ave., Kan- 

sas City, Mo., March 2, 1918. 

310 Schneltter, Lee, 5418 Anderson Ave., Kan- 

sas City, Mo., May 25, 1918. 

VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY 
Slffma Chapter 

244 Owen, George Wllliford, 953 Raymer St.. 

(Aft*, from Gamma Upsilon 81), May 17. 
1917. 

245 Coker, Battey Belk, Rome, Ga., January 31, 

1918. 

246 Gilbert, Joseph Pilmoor, Nashville, Tenn., 

April 15, 1918. 

247 Leath, William Alexander, Kerrville, Tenn., 

April 20, 1918. 

248 Marley, Everitt Armlstead, 1184 College, 

Memphis, Tenn., June 7, 1918. 

249 Bushart, Will Hayes, Martin, Tenn., June 

7 1918. 

250 Salsburg,' Melvin, Central City, Ky., June 

7, 1918. 

251 Thomas. Julian Johnson, 2188 Courtland 

St., Memphis, Tenn., June 7, 1918. 

252 DeLay, William Dewey, 1207 Broad, Rome, 

Ga., June 7, 1918. 

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS 
Upsilon Chapter 

209 Tobin, James Frederick, 311 W. 4th St, 

Bonham, Texas. October 7, 1917. 

210 Lipscomb, John Clayton, Grapevine, Texas, 

October 7, 1917. 

211 Pugh, Chester S., Corslcana, Texas, Octo- 

ber 7, 1917. 

212 Jarvis. Julian Long, Troup, Texas, October 

1, 1917. 

213 McWorter, Owen, Lubbock, Texas, October 

28. 1917. 

214 Knight, Otis, not reported. 

215 Barnhart, William Thomas, Roann, Texas, 

December 15, 1917. 

216 Ralston, John Matthew, 110 B. University 

Ave., Waxahachie, Texas, February 17, 
1918. 

217 Swinny, John Boen. Sinton, Texas, Feb- 

ruary 17, 1918. 

218 Conley, Ernest Alfred, Lubbock, Texas, 

March 15, 1918. 

219 Powers. Albert Hawes, 1010 Ruok Ave., 

Houston, Texas, March 27, 1918. 

LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY 
Phi Chapter 

191 Collins, George Fred, 635 Lafayette St, 

Baton Rouge. La., October 17, 1917. 

192 Jones, Loe Stuart, 812 Convention St, Ba- 

ton Rouge, La., February 18, 1918. 

193 Benoit, Richard Leroy, Shreveport, La., 

February 18, 1918. 

194 Morgan, Harry Ivan, Shreveport, La., Feb- 

ruary 18, 1918. 

195 Alder son, Thomas Crittenton, K&ty, Texas, 

February 18, 1918. 

196 Waddill, Philip Burg, 648 North St, Baton 

Rouge, La., February 18, 1918. 

197 Cason, Clopton Lampton, Melville, La- 

March 20, 1918. 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Psl Chapter 

183 Tayloe, Joshua, Washington, N. C, Jan- 
uary 31, 1918. 

DEPAUW UNIVERSITY 
Beta Beta Chapter 

217 Boyd, Hobart, Indianapolis, Ind., June 5, 

1917. 

218 Elwyn, Foss, Greencastle, Ind., October 1, 

1917. 

219 Pitkin, William Asbury, Shelby ville, Ind., 

October 1, 1917. 

220 Brown, Norval E., East Washington St. 

Winchester, Ind.. October 21, 1917. 

221 Gray, Leon, Quincy, Ind., December 14, 

1917. 



Novices In Chivalry 



io 



222 Zimmerman, John Joseph, N. Van Buren 

St., Auburn, Ind., December 14, 1917. 

223 Cook, Clyde Owen, 119 E. Franklin St., 

Greencastle, Ind., December 14, 1917. 

224 Harrigan, William Richard, Gosport, Ind.. 

January 19, 1918. 

225 Hibbs, Virgil Charles, Wingate, Ind., Jan- 

uary 19. 1918. 

226 8talker, George Lowell, 1321 W. Main St., 

Westfleld. Ind., January 19, 1918. 

227 Briles, Ralph Henry, 3709 Central Ave., 

Indianapolis, Ind., March 2. 1918. 

PURDUE UNIVERSITY 
Beta Zeta Chapter 

243 Norris, Paul Burrows, Robinson, 111., (Aff. 

from Beta Eta 238), December 16, 1917. 

244 Massengill, William Kenneth, Henderson, 

Tenn., December 16, 1917. 

245 Scott, George Randolph, Edinburgh, Ind., 

'December 16, 1917. 

246 McLeod, Paul Angus, 713 Owen St., La- 

fayette, Ind., December 16, 1917. 

247 Woodburn. James Gelston, 519 N. College 

Ave., Bloomlngton, Ind., (Aff. from Beta 
Eta 188). February 26, 1918. 

248 Winterateen, Herbert Paul, 701 S. Four- 

teenth St., New Castle, Ind., April 1, 1918. 

249 Hodges, Smith Lynn, 3044 Ruckle St., 

Indianapolis, Ind., April 1, 1918. 

250 Hoppmire, Willis Smith, Aurora. Ind.. 

April 1. 1918. 

251 Clay. Daniell Turney, R. 2, Paris, Ky., 

April 1, 1918. 

252 Clay, John Carter, 132 Duncan Ave., Pari8, 

Ky., April 1, 1918. 

253 Seelinger, Horace Dennison, 1502 W. Wal- 

nut St., Washington, Ind., April 1, 1918. 

254 Calkins, Richard Andrew, 2941 Washing- 

ton Blvd., Indianapolis, Ind., April 1, 
1918. 

255 Smith, Harold Hornnday, Zlonsvllle, Ind., 

April 1, 1918. 

256 White, Dale Luciuu, Zionsville, Ind., April 

1, 1918. 

257 Niblack, John Lewis. Wheatland, Ind.. 

April 1, 1918. 

258 Shepard, Robert Oscar, 222 W. Fourth St., 

Seymour, Ind., April 1, 1918. 

259 Potter, Henry Laurel, R. 1, West Lebanon, 

Ind., April 1, 1918. 

INDIANA UNIVER8ITY 
Beta Eta Chapter 

238 Norris. Paul Burrows, Robinson, 111.. (Aff. 

to Beta Zeta 243), May 31, 1917. 

239 Faust, Frank Feizler, Covington, Ind., Octo- 

ber 16, 1917. 

240 Moffat, James Ernest, Bloomlngton, Ind., 

October 29, 1917. 

241 Wilson, Francis Reuben, 3 Hastings St., 

Davenport, la., February 10, 1918. 

242 Mays, Lewis Victor, Pendleton, Ind., Feb- 

ruary 10, 1918. 

243 Stonecipher, Hiram Elijah, Zionsville, Ind., 

February 10, 1918. 

244 Anderson, Lawrence Carl, Englewood, 111., 

February 10, 1918. 

245 McCan, William Glass, 255 W. Sixtieth St., 

Chicago 111., February 10, 1918. 

246 Neff, Floyd Raymond, 1618 Broadway, 

Logansport, Ind., February 10, 1918. 

247 Sallade, Andrew Phillips, 312 Washington 

St., Goshen, Ind., February 10, 1918. 

248 Leonard, John Edward, 6034 Wallace St., 

Chicago, 111., February 10, 1918. 

249 Reed, William Leo, Parker, Ind.. February 

10, 1918. 

250 Richardson, Donald Walter, 451 E. Pearl 

St., Greenwood, Ind., February 10. 1918. 

251 McCorkle, Charles Loyd, Letts, Ind., Feb- 

ruary 10, 1918. 

252 Sinclair, Robert Basil, 312 E. Woodland 

Ave., Fort Wayne, Ind., February 10, 
. 1918. 



ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 
Beta Theta Chapter 

235 Johnston, Eugene Rhodes, 1015 S. Seven- 

teenth St, Birmingham, Ala., September 
15. 1917. 

236 Reid, Cyrus Eugene, Jr., 805 S. Court St, 

Montgomery, Ala., September 15, 1917. 

237 Wade, James Dallas, Jr., 430 S. Court St., 

Montgomery, Ala., September 16, 1917. 

238 Newton, James Dannelly, 411 N. Foster St., 

Dothan, Ala., September 15, 1917. 

239 Hill. Benjamin Hartwell, 503 N. Oats St. 

Dothan, Ala.. September 15, 1917. 

240 Sellers, Ira Jackson, 1500 Beech St, Birm- 

ingham, Ala., September 23, 1917. 

241 Gayle, Albert Derrlngton, Selma, Ala., Sep- 

tember 22, 1917. 

242 McFarlln, Henry Curtis, Quincy, Fla., Sep- 

tember 22, 1917. 

243 Vaughan, Eugene Robbins, 2050 N. Broad 

St, Selma, Ala., September 16, 1917. 

244 Martin William Burress. 232 Greenville St. 

Anderson, S. C, September 23, 1917. 

245 Ray, Ped, Andalusia, Ala., September 16, 

1917. 

246 Lollar, Love Wilson, Jr., Jasper, Ala., Sep- 

tember 23, 1917. 

247 Brown, Paul Jones, 521 Oak St, Decatur, 

Ala.. September 23, 1917. 

248 Buchanan, James Lake, Riverton, Ala., Sep- 

tember 10, 1917. 

249 Adams, David Clopton, Jr., Albany, Ala., 

September 10, 1917. 

250 Anderson, James Hugh, Oxford, Ala., Sep- 

tember 10, 1917. 

251 Meriwether, George Michael, DemopolU, 

Ala., January 13, 1918. 

252 Poole, Rufus Ellsha, Greenville, Ala., Jan- 

uary 13, 1918. 

253 Kelley, William Plene. Huntsville, Ala., 

January 27, 1918. 

MOUNT UNION COLLEGE 
Beta Iota Chapter 

265 Anderson, John Byron, 508 Center Ave., 

Steubenville. Ohio, December 10, 1917. 

266 Cocklln, Stanley Arvine, Aultman, Ohio, 

December 10, 1917. 

267 Harrington, James Shelton, 136 Elm St, 

Leetonia, Ohio, March 14, 1918. 

268 Ryiner, Ho sea Russell, Columbiana, Ohio, 

March 14, 1918. 

269 Knoll. George Henry, R. F. D. 1, Alliance, 

Ohio. March 14, 1918. 

270 Daugherty. Charles Westfall, 6276 St Clair 

St., Cleveland, Ohio. March 14, 1918. 

271 Cheney, John Richard, 10 Monroe St, Mai- 

den, Mass., March 14, 1918. 

272 Shively, David Ellis, Rogers, Ohio, March 

14. 1918. 

273 Baughman, Stanley Oswald, 498 Schiller 

Ave., Akron, Ohio. March 14, 1918. 

274 Stevenson, Francis Willis, Macedonia, Ohio, 

March 14, 1918. 

275 Hipsley, Roland White, 320 Frederick Ave., 

Sewickley, Pa., March 20, 1918. 

276 Nelson. Harry Hamilton. 2749 S. Union, 

Alliance, Ohio. March 25, 1918. 

277 Helwlck, Adrian Carl, Bolivar, Ohio, April 

29 1918. 

278 Hunt, Glen Arthur, 140 Taylor Ave., Den- 

nison, Ohio, April 29, 1918. 

279 Evans, David Edward, 2422 W infield Way, 

Canton, Ohio, April 29, 1918. 

280 Weaver, Homer Virgil, 541 S. Linden Ave., 

Alliance. Ohio, April 29, 1918. 

KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 
Beta Kappa Chapter 

143 Hestwood, Charles Warren, 1404 N. Waco, 

Wichita, Kans., December 17, 1917. 

144 Barringer, Carroll Miller, Canover, N. C, 

December 17. 1917. 

145 Lawrence, Russel Orlando, Thayer, Kans., 

December 17, 1917. 

146 Meeker, Bruce Paul, 723 S. Main St., Wich- 

ita, Kans., March 2, 1918. 

147 Burton, Hartsell, 140 S. Green, Wichita, 

Kans., March 2, 1918. 



76 



The Delta 



148 Epperson, John Harold, R. F. D. 1, Hutch- 

inson. Kane., March 2, 1918. 

149 Schemonski, Benjamin, Belleville, Kans., 

March 2, 1918. 

150 Hamilton. Lloyd Lee, 333 Sherman, Wich- 

ita. Kans., May 1, 1918. 

151 Stuewe, Arthur Herman, Alma, Kans., May 

1, 1918. 

152 Neely, Thomas J., R. F. D. 1. Abilene, 

Kans., May 28. 1918. 

153 Anderson, Neil Williams. 144 X. Grove St., 

Wichita, Kans., May 28, 1918. 

154 Sahlberg, Arthur John, Osage City, Kans., 

May 28. 1918. 

155 Youngnieyer, Harold Martin. 1825 X. 

Hydraulic St., Wichita, Kans., May 28. 
1918. 

156 Brewer, Chester Clerin. 805 Poyantz, Man- 

hattan, Kans., May 28, 1918. 

UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 

Beta Mu Chapter 

2-7 Barlow. Marshall James. 212 Fifteenth St., 

X. W., City and State not reported, De- 
cember 7, 1917. 

218 Draper, Ernest Linn, Afton, Iowa, March 

9 1918. 

219 Kaufmann, Robert John, 225 W. Eleventh 

St., Davenport, Iowa. March 9, 1918. 

220 Charlton, Clyde B., Rolfe, Iowa, March 9, 

1918. 

221 Janes, Hayne Barton. 4423 Third Ave.. 

Sioux City. Iowa. March 9. 1918. 

222 Smith, Robert Turner. Granger. Iowa. 

March 9. 1918. 

223 Newcomb, Lowell Smith, 314 Summit, Iowa 

City, Iowa, March 9, 1918. 

224 White, Leland Cobb, Harlan, Iowa, March 

9 1918. 

225 Meyrick, Carl II., Decora h. Iowa. March 9, 

1918. 

226 Flanagan. William Lyle, 415 Third Ave., 

Clinton. Iowa, March 9. 1918. 

227 Maloy, Wayland Hoyt, Blocton, Iowa. 

March 9. 1918. 

228 Torstenson. Xansen Carl, Milford, Iowa. 

March 16. 1918. 

229 Magee, Carlton Cole. Jr.. 1409 Baltimore. 

Tulsa. Okla.. (Aft. from Delta Epsilon 
86), February 1, 1918. 

230 Lohman. Fred Herrington, 1026 Third St., 

Fort Madison. Iowa. April 12, 1918. 

231 Hall, William Earl, Jefferson, Iowa, April 

12 1918 

232 Elel.' John," Buffalo Center, Iowa, April 12. 

1918. 

233 Wilcox. Albert Craig. Iowa City. Iowa, June 

7, 1918. 

OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY 
Beta Nu Chapter 

227 Charlton, Donald Hopple, Bucyrus, Ohio, 

August 7, 1917. Killed in aeroplane ac- 
cident at Fort Worth, Texas. 

228 Hamilton. Walter Harold. 153 Twelfth Ave., 

Columbus, Ohio, August 7, 1917. 

229 Expelled. 

230 Swoish, William Raymond. 115 E. Duncan 

St., Columbus, Ohio. August 7. 1917. 

231 Smith, Harry Marcellus. Canal Winchester, 

Ohio, August 25, 1917. 

232 Westerman, Frank L., 144 S. Walnut St., 

Chillicothe. Ohio. August 25. 1917. 

233 Luxon, Norval Nell, 187 Park Ave., New 

London, Ohio, September 15, 1917. 

234 Abbott, Will Jenniugs, Shelby, Ohio, Sep- 

tember 15, 1917. 

235 Blschoff, Eugen Carl. 158 S. Cedar Ave., 

Oberlin, Ohio, September 15. 1917. 

236 Sherman, Robert Bruning, 141 Thirteenth 

St., Columbus, Ohio, September 15, 1917. 

237 Wieche, Robert Herman, Hamilton, Ohio, 

September 15, 1917. 

238 Cummings, Charles Milton, 91 S. Cedar St.. 

Oberlin, Ohio. (Aff. from Gamma Lambda 
174). September 15, 1917. 

239 Lilley, Vernon Scott, Clrclevllle, Ohio, Octo- 

ber 15, 1917. 

240 Overturf, Marion Cundlff, LucaBville, Ohio, 

October 15, 1917. 



241 Relchelderfer, Roy, Circleville, Ohio, Octo- 

ber 15, 1917. 

242 Motz, James Carter, 388 E. Buchtell Aye.. 

Akfon, Ohio, October 15, 1917. 

243 Lewis, William James, 434 N. Jefferson 

Ave., Columbus, Ohio, October 16, 1917. 

244 Wise, Lloyd W., 145 Sylvester St., Bar- 

berton, Ohio, November 12, 1917. 

245 McCauley, John Eugene, 2452 Weaver Ave., 

Columbus, Ohio, January 20, 1918. 

246 Dyer, Jay Norton, 76 W. Framlus Ave., Co- 

lumbus, Ohio, February 10, 1918. 

247 Call, Harry Gilbert. Mt Sterling, Ohio, 

February 10, 1918. 

248 Hower, Robert Edwin, 166 S. Arlington St., 

Akron, Ohio. 

249 Dean. David Gail. Wooster St., Lodi. Ohio, 

February 27. 1918. 

250 Baker, Joseph Nending, 162 W. Mound St, 

Circleville, Ohio, February, 27, 1918. 

251 Force, Ralph Shepard, 930 E. 147th St.. 

Cleveland, Ohio, February 27, 1918. 

252 Grant, Gerald Lucas, 109 Orchard Lane, 

Columbus, Ohio, May 20, 1918. 

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE 
Beta XI Chapter 

175 Xorris, Will Victor, Liberty, Mo., Novem- 

ber 24, 1917. 

176 Richmond, Paul Prescott. 603 Arthur St, 

Liberty. Mo., January 6, 1918. 

177 Cook, Paul West, 420 Leonard St, N. Lib- 

erty, Mo.. January 5. 1918. 

178 Eby, Herbert. Holt, Mo., January 5, 1918. 

179 King, Henry Mason, Lee Summit, Mo., Jan- 

uary 5, 1918. 

180 Burkdale, Edward Hamilton, Slater, Mo., 

January 19, 1918. 

181 Smith, Robert Clarence, Garden City, Mo.. 

January 19. 1918. 

182 Cooper. Ray D.. Plattsburg, Mo., January 

16, 1918. 

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 
Beta Rho Chapter 

196 Woodcock. Rives Way, Macon, 111., March 

27 1917 

197 Cook, William Alvln. 22 Shufeldt St, 

Kingston. X. Y., April 25, 1917. 

198 Morrison, Donald Ricker, 1121 Park St, 

Grinnell. Iowa, December 4, 1917. 

199 Dickel, William Henry, Sharpless Ave., Mel- 

rose Park, Pa., December 6, 1917. 

200 Xewitt. Erwin Sprague, 44 Union St, Dor- 

ranceton, Pa., December 6, 1917. 

201 SeSald, John Leland, 3904 Maine Ave., For- 

est Park, Baltimore, Md., December 6, 
1917. 

202 Arnold, Franklin John, 1307 Market Ave., 

N., Canton, Ohio, December 6, 1917. 

203 Schutt, Merton Knight, 151 Pearl St., 

Rochester, N. Y., December 6, 1917. 

204 Strickland. Gilbert Edward, 25 S. Sham- 

okln St., Shamokin, Pa., December 6, 
1917. 

205 Carlson, Elmer Leonard, 117 Clay St, Kane, 

Pa., December 6, 1917. 

206 Clark, Gilbert Anderson, 5039 Kirkwood 

St, Pittsburgh, Pa., December 6, 1917. 

207 Black. Frederick Wibur, Bluefield, W. Va., 

(Aff. from Gamma Pi 140), February 11, 
1918. 

208 Wolff, Charles Richard. 315 Carlisle St. 

Hanover, Pa., March 26, 1918. 

209 Minnerly, Walter Francis, Roxbury, N. Y., 

March 26, 1918. 

210 Griesmer, Paul Jacob, 309 S. Washington, 

WilkeBbarre, Pa., March 26, 1918. 

211 Williams, Arthur John, 111 Abbot St, 

Plains, Pa., March 26, 1918. 

212 Frey, Chester Millinger. 317 Walnut St, 

Hanover, Pa., March 26, 1918. 

213 McCloskey, Bernard. 414 Broad St, Johns- 

town, Pa., March 26. 1918. 



Novices In Chivalry 



77 



UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT 
Beta Sigma Chapter 



184 Wriston, John Clarence, 88 N. Main St., 

Flprence, Mass., November 24, 1917. 

185 Bartlett Leonard Stephen, 416 S. Wlnooskl 

Aye., Burlington. Vt, November 24, 1917. 

186 Good now, W 11 lard David. Park Ave.. Dal- 

ton, Mass., November 24, 1917. 

187 Jennings, James Robert, St. Albans, Vt.. 

November 24, 1917. 

188 O'Nell. Samuel Joseph, 12 Ross St, West 

Rutland, Vt., November 24, 1917. 

189 Plimpton, Homer Allen, Brattleboro. Vt, 

November 24, 1917. 

190 Thrall, William North, West Rutland, Vt.. 

November 24, 1917. _ ti 

191 Towle, Fred Smith. R. 3. Enosburg Falls, 

Vt, November 24, 1917. 

192 Whltcomb. Edward McKensle. Essex Junc- 

tion, Vt, November 24, 1917. 

193 Lord. Donald Lymon, 196 Howard St, Bur- 

lington, Vt. December 17, 1917. 

194 Carson, Francis X., 17 Kelso Ave., West 

Springfield. Mass.. February 11, 1918. 

195 Goodrich, Dana Bicknell, Essex Junction, 

Vt. April 1. 1918. ^ 

196 McGreevey, Gerald Henry, 207 S. Wlnooskl 

Ave., Burlington. Vt, April 1, 1918. 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

Beta Tan Chapter 

158 Childs. Frederick Sherwood, Lincolnton, N. 
C. March 12, 1918. 

ROSE POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 
Beta Vpsllon Chapter 

Cash, Robert O., Hume, 111., November 15, 
1917. 

Brown* George Lee, 1429 N. Eighth St. 
Terre Haute. Ind., November 22, 1917. 

Brooks. George William, Center Point. Ind., 
March 6, 1918. 

Brophy, Thomas AnderBon. 1601 First Ave., 
Terre Haute. Ind., March 6, 1918. 

Pence, Clyde Harry, Springboro, Ohio, Feb- 
ruary 6, 1918. m n „ f 

Green baum, Lloyd, 1430 Second St., Louis- 
ville. Ky., March 6, 1918. 

Rosenbaum, Arthur Goodman. 215 W. Bur- 
nett St, Louisville, Ky., March 6, 1918. 

Eppesie, Gilbert E., Box 167, Indianapolis, 
Ind., March 18. 1918. 

Sllger. Herbert Boyd. 1474 S. Seventh St., 
Terre Haute, Ind., March 18, 1918. 

Bolt Harry Edward, 731 Collinsville Ave.. 
East St Louis. 111.. April 29, 1918. 

Maxwell, Glenn Nicholas. 414 Poplar St.. 
Terre Haute. Ind., April 29. 1918. 

Reinklng, Jacob Fred, 321 N. 9th St., Terre 
Haute, Ind., May 22, 1918. 

TULANE UNIVERSITY 
Beta Phi Chapter 

Lloyd William Kiddoo. 1011 Leighton Ave., 

Anniston. Ala., October 14, 1917. 
LeBourgeois, Arthur LeClaire, New Iberia, 

La., October 14, 1917. 
Talbot, Edmond Earl, Ruston, La., October 

14, 1917. 
Gentling, Harold Arthur, Rochester, Minn., 

March 1, 1918. 
Gentling, Gregory Philip, Rochester, Minn., 

March 1, 1918. 
Carter, Clarence Strouse, Bunkie, La., 

March 1, 1918. 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 

Beta Psl Chapter 

Not reported. 

Vaughan, William Edwin, 1572 Union St. 

Alameda, Calif., September 8, 1917. 
Downer, Irvin Clyde, 1013 Thirteenth St, 

Modesto, Calif., September 8, 1917. 
Dougherty, Samuel Kim m el, 200 Sixth St, 

Petuluma, Calif., September 8, 1917. 



147 

148 

149 

150 

151 

152 

153 

154 

155 

156 

157 

158 



137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
142 



223 
224 

225 

226 



227 Jaynes, Walter Charles. 721 Flower St, 

Bakersfield, Calif.. September 8. 1917 . 

228 Hoppe. Arthur Scrivner, 2300 Sacramento 

St. San Francisco, Calif., September 8. 
1917. 

229 O'Shaughnessy. Francis John, 2732 Vallejo 

St, San Francisco, Calif., September 8. 
1917. 

230 Barr, Willard. 514 Seventeenth Ave., Sau 

Francisco, Calif., September 8. 1917. 

231 Gallakher. Andrew Thomas, 354 Vernon St., 

Oakland. Calif., September 8. 1917. 

232 Weiking. William Henry, 829 Grove St. 

Oakland. Calif., September 8. 1917. ' 

233 Harter, Robert Lawrence, 125 Prospect 

Park, West Brooklyn, N. Y., (Aff. from 
Gamma Delta 125). October 29, 1918. 

234 Lum, Donald Dyer. 1200 San Antonio Ave., 

Fort Collins, Colo., (Aff. from Delta Rho 
57), January 29, 1918. 

GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY 
Gamma Alpha Chapter 

236 Jervis, John Rawlins. 307 Fourth Ave., 

Rome, Ga.. September 29, 1917. 

237 Rees, Joel Franklin, Ellaville, Ga., Sep- 

tember 29, 1917. 

238 Weston. Clement Walker, Logtown, Miss., 

September 29, 1917. 

239 Pitts, William Ceby Hudson, Jr., Waverly 

Hall, Ga., September 29, 1917. 

240 Hubert Harmon Barrington. Y. M. C. A., 

Atlanta, Ga., October 7, 1917. 

241 Dortch, Nathaniel Foster, Hawkinsville, 

Ga., October 7, 1917. 

242 Brock, Harry Blackwell, Jr., Fort Payne, 

Ala.. (Aff. from Iota 255), October 8, 
1917. 

243 Darling. Charles Le Count, Waycross, Ga., 

October 12. 1917. 

244 Wellington. W infield Scott, 2312 Carolina 

St, Houston, Texas, (Aff. from Beta Phi 
125), November 5, 1917. 

245 Pearsall, Leon Moulton, 68 TeBean St, 

Waycross. Ga., November 9, 1917. 

246 Pye. John Cornelius, Thomaston, Ga., Feb- 

ruary 8, 1918. 

247 Morrison. Will Cummins, Dickson, Tenn., 

February 8, 1918. 

248 Fox, Marcus Phelps. Seventh Ave., Dawson. 

Ga., February 8, 1918. 

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 
Gamma Beta Chapter 

188 Peters, Elmer Hobart, Bramwell, W. Va., 

February 17, 1918. 

189 Martin, Raymond Ellsworth, Wlnfleld, 

Kans., February 17, 1918. 

190 Hagin, Dan Willett 528 Jefferson Bldg., 

Peoria, 111., February 23, 1918. 

191 Stolp, Ernest Edgar, 3439 W. 63rd Place, 

Chicago, 111., February 23, 1918. 

192 Ely, Vincent Driggs, 414 Green leaf St., 

Evanston, 111., February 23, 1918. 

193 Harrison, Joseph Eugene, 490 College Ave., 

Appleton. Wis., February 23, 1918. 

194 Boland, Emil Roland, Hedrick, Iowa, Feb- 

ruary 23, 1918. 

195 Clifford, Connell, 728 Madison Ave., Ke- 

wanee, 111.. February 23, 1918. 

196 Anderson; Leroy McKlnley, 1259 University 

Ave.. Chicago, 111., February 23, 1918. 

197 Moulton, Clarence James, 811 Eastwood 

Ave., Chicago, 111., February 23, 1918. 

198 Moore, Carl Leslie, 312 W. Ninth St, Con- 

cordia, Kans., February 23, 1918. 

199 Sturtz, William Howard Prescott, Albert 

Lea. Minn., May 6, 1918. 

200 Walker, Wayne Rose, Grantsburg, 111., 

May 6. 1918. 

201 Not reported. 

202 HuralBton, Carroll Crego, Sugar Grove, 111., 

June 3, 1918. 

ALBION COLLEGE 
Gamma Gamma Chapter 

191 Sargent, Charles Douglas, Shelby, Mich., 

November 17. 1917. 

192 Kenaga, Russell Fred, Royal Oak, Mich., 

November 17, 1917. 



78 



The Delta 



193 Rogers. Fairbanks Wakefield, 82 Larch- 

mont Ave., Detroit, Mick., December 8, 
1917. 

194 Tuxworth, Roy Harold, Birmingham, Mich., 

December 8, 1917. 

195 Perkins. William Henry. 1174 Fourteenth 

St., Detroit, Mich.. December 8. 1917. 

196 Tullar, Hilton Woods. 101 N. Eighteenth 

St., East Orange, N. J., December 8, 1917. 

197 iBbell, Egbert Raymond, 482*6 Pingree, 

Detroit, Mich., January 11, 1918. 

198 Hatch, Harland Langston, Morton, Mich.. 

February 2, 1918. 

199 Greene. Chart Ennls, Brooklyn, Mich.. Feb- 

ruary 2, 1918. 

200 Winegar, Wilber Ray, Birmingham, Mich., 

February 16, 1918. 

201 Sheehan. John William, 411 Main St.. St. 

Joseph, Mich., March 1, 1918. 

202 Walker, John Monroe, 106 State St., Charle- 

voix, Mich., April 8. 1918. 

203 Otis, Ford Jesse, Fairgrove, Mich., April 8, 

1918. 

STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 
Gamma Delta Chapter 

134 Morehouse, Julius Stanley, Sharon, Conn., 

November 9, 1917. 

135 Buchanan, Archibald Abercrombie, 76 De- 

catur St., Brooklyn, Mass., November 9. 
1917. 

136 Bigger, William Maule. Jr.. 12 MorriB St., 

Yonkers, N. Y., November 9, 1917. 

137 Fisher, De Witt, 16 Highland Place, Maple- 

wood, N. J., November 9, 1917. 

138 Pillett, Staats Morris, Hamburg, N. J.. No- 

vember 9, 1917. 

139 Fengar, Fredrlc Eugene. 14 Cleveland St.. 

New London, Conn., November 9, 1917. 

140 Paulsen, Edward Herman, 66 Cumberland 

St, Brooklyn, N. Y., November 9. 1917. 

141 Weigele, Walter Lawrence, West Nyack, 

N. J., November 9, 1917. 

142 Grubb. Walter Cuthbert, 212 S. Second St.. 

Bangor, Pa., November 9, 1917. 

143 Phillips, William Davidson, 3300 Eighth 

St., Meridian, Miss., February 16, 1JL7. 

144 Iliff, Fred Cox, 173 Spring St.. Nvwto i, 

N. J., February 16, 1918. 

145 Bannell, Clement Wilton, Clinton, X. ,1., 

February 16, 1918. 

LAFAYETTE COLLEGE 

Gamma Epnilon Chapter 

157 Shirer, Raymond P.. 901 McCartney St., 

EaBton, Pa.. December 17, 1917. 

158 Hagey, Theodore Knauss, Hellertown, Pa., 

December 17, 1917. 

159 Keller, Fred Lamar, Perkasie, Pa., Decem- 

ber 17, 1917. 

160 Grazier, Allen Capron, Camerson Ave., Ty- 

rone. Pa., December 17, 1917. 

161 Wilson. Lester Ramon, 121 Washington St., 

Phlllipsburg, N. J., February 4, 1918. 

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON 
Gamma Zeta Chapter 

141 Hollenbeck. Willard Fletcher, Battle Ground, 

Wash., February 15, 1918. 

142 Gilbert Warren Everett, Mapleton, Oregon. 

February 15, 1918. 

143 Rambo, William Huber, 818 Ninth St, Kla- 

math Falls. Ore., February 15, 1918. 

144 Starr. Silas Elijah. R. F. D. No. 1, Dallas, 

Ore., February 15, 1918. 

145 Matheson, John Evan, Powell River, B. C, 

February 15, 1918. 

146 Bentley, Edward E., Newport, Ore., March 

22, 1918. 

147 Bentley, Owen W., Newport, Ore., March 22. 

1918. 

148 Carter, Sprague Hanna, 1435 Second St., 

Baker, Ore., May 30, 1918. 



COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES 
Gamma Eta Chapter 

138 McKenna, William James, 412 W. Platte. 

Colorado Springs, Colo. (Aff. from Delta 
Rho 55), December 7, 1917. 

139 Miller, Guy Edwin, 401 Sherman Ave., 

Canon City, Colo., December 8, 1917. 

140 Farlow, Clarence Alfred. 1007 Claremont 

Ave., Pueblo, Colo., December 8, 1917. 

141 Hopkins, Walter Knox, 2915 High St., 

Pueblo, Colo., December 8, 1917. 

142 Bowers, Ernest Elton, 2008 N. Nevada Ave., 

Colorado Springs, Colo., December 8, 
' 1917. 

143 Lynch, Victor John, 516 W. Bijou St. Colo- 

rado Springs, Colo., December 8, 1917. 

144 Robertson, John, Jr., 1111 Grand Ave., 

Pueblo, Colo.. April 25, 1918. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
Gamma Theta Chapter 

204 Fogg, Russell Harding. 208 Irving St., To- 

ledo, Ohio (Aff. from Gamma Lambda 
196), September 3, 1917. 

205 Raffloer, William Rudolph Frederick, 717 

West End Ave., New York, N. Y., Octo- 
ber 3, 1917. 

206 Johnson. Douglas Harold. 130 W. 104th St, 

New York, N. Y., October 3, 1917. 

207 Schneider, Jerome George, 423 W. 120th St., 

New York, N. Y., October 3, 1917. 

208 King, Walter Gray, 25 Claremont Ave., New 

York, N. Y.. October 3, 1917. 

209 Crawford, Robert Patterson, 546 W. Eighth 

St., Erie, Pa., October 3, 1917. 

210 Root, Douglas Lee, 8 Chestnut St, Coopers- 

town, N. Y., October 22, 1917. 

211 Nugent. Paul Fordham, Southampton, L. 1., 

October 22, 1917. 

212 Medlong. Frederick William, 161 E. Sev- 

enth St., Oswego, N. Y., November 13, 
1917. 

213 Estes. Wellborn. 944 Maple Place, St Louis, 

Mo., December 13, 1917. 

214 MucDouKall, James Campbell, Phoenlxville, 

Pa., .January 6, 1918. 

215 Jacobs, Charles Burrows, 908 Franklin St. 

Wilmington, Del., February 8, 1918. 

216 Beacx*, Stafford Bacon, West Palm Beach, 

Fla., February 8, 1918. 

217 Sanders, Kdward Berrien, Ritter, S. C, Feb- 

ruary 8. 1918. 

218 Martin. Edmund. 139 Brainbridge St, 

Brooklyn, N. Y., February 8, 1918. 

219 Gale, William McClure, care of J. Fred 

Arundell, Kiverdale-on-the-Hudson, N. Y., 
April 28, 1918. 

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY 
Gamma Iota Chapter 

108 Coleman, John Winston, Jr., R. 7, Lexing- 

ton, Ky., December 21, 1917. 

109 * Auxier, Herschel Ainsworth, Edinburg, Ind., 

December 21, 1917. 

110 O'Sullivan, Sylvester Darwin, Brandy Sta- 

tion, Va., December 21, 1917. 

111 Young, Clarence Caldwell, Nelson, Ky., De- 

cember 22, 1917. 

UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO 
Gamma Kappa Chapter 

157 ChriBtensen, Clarence Melvin, 960 Uni Ave., 

Boulder, Colo., January 14, 1918. 

158 Robinson, Clarence William, San Acacio, 

Colo., January 26, 1918. 

159 Simon, John Dewey, Florence, Colo., Janu- 

ary 26, 1918. 

160 Hale, George Newton, 323 E. Fifth St., Flor- 

ence, Colo., January 26, 1918. 

161 Wastfleld, Walter Bivins. 68 W. Maple Ave., 

Denver, Colo., January 26, 1918. 

162 Sells, Chester Bernard, 2545 W. Forty -fourth 

St., Denver, Colo., January 28, 1918. 

163 Solt, Leland, 2315 Clermont St.. Denver. 

Colo., April 24, 1918. 



Novices In Chivalry 



79 



200 

201 

202 

203 

204 

205 

206 

207 

208 

209 

210 
211 

212 

213 

214 



205 

206 

207 

208 

209 
210 

211 
212 
213 
214 
215 
216 
217 
218 

219 
220 
221 
222 
223 
224 



207 
208 
209 



UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN 
Gamma Lambda Chapter 

Sanders. Edward Willard, 200 Chicago Bvd., 
Detroit, Mich.. December 9, 1917. 

Wolfe. Frank Tisch. 723 Prairie Ave., Ke- 
nosha. Wis., December 15, 1917. 

Jones. Howard Palfrey. 515 Park PL. Mil- 
waukee. Wis., December 15, 1917. 

Phillips, Harry Alexander, 1336 Chase Ave., 
Chicago, 111., December 15, 1917. 

Fanning, Willis Moore, 1058 Pearl St., Den- 
ver. Colo., December 15, 1917. 

Dorries, Charles Wetsel. 887 N. Ferry St, 
Buffalo, N. Y., December 15, 1917. 

McCartney, Malcolm. 212 Fifth St, Hins- 
dale, HI., December 15. 1917. 

Smith, David William. Mozomonle. Wis., De- 
cember 15, 1917. 

Bloodgood, David Wheeler, 276 Knapp St., 
Milwaukee. Wis., January 13. 1918. 

Youngren, Ralph Louis, 258 Twenty-eighth 
St, Milwaukee. Wis., February 16. 1918. 

Not reported. 

Duecker, Hubert Carl. Kiel. Wis., March 25. 
1918. 

Brothers, Wellington. 848 Ridge Blvd., Ev- 
an st on, 111., March 25. 1918. 

Spies, Gerald Augustus. 1313 Stephenson 
Ave., Menominee. Mich.. May 6, 1918. 

Bmel, Ralph Carlyle, Sullivan. HI., June 9. 
1918. 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
Gamma Ha Chapter 

Harbicht, Harlan Carl, 1101 Lynn St. Han- 
nibal, Mo. (Aff. from Gamma XI 108). 
September 27, 1917. 

Farr, Noel Clifton. 29 Gibson St.. North 
Bast. Pa. (Aff. from Delta Delta 125). 
September 27, 1917. 

Harlan, Avery Stark, 2324 N. Capitol Ave.. 
Indianapolis, Ind. (Aff. from Beta Zeta 
226), September 29. 1917. 

Watson. Malcolm Hamilton, 509 W. Wash- 
ington Blvd., Urbana. 111. (Aff. from Delta 
Xi 34). 

Gast, Walter Ferdinand. 3621 S. Jefferson 
Ave., St. Louis. Mo., December 9. 1917. 

LaBier. Clarence Russell, 88 Potomac Ave.. 
Edgewood Grove, Terre Haute, Ind., De- 
cember 9, 1917. 

Wilkinson, Scott Jackson, Bethany, 111., De- 
cember 9, 1917. 

Misener, Glenn Edgar, 3214 Maple Ave., 
Berwyn, 111.. December 9, 1917. 

Turner, Harold Horton, 6415 Kimbark Ave., 
Chicago, 111., December 9, 1917. 

Russell, William Bradford. 308 X. Broad 
way, Joliet, ill., December 16. 1917. 

Illsley, Ralph William, 7330 Harvard Ave.. 
Chicago, ill., December 16, 1917. 

Baumunk. Ross Sonnefied, 127 E. Jackson 
St, Brazil. Ind., December 16, 1917. 

Weilepp, Paul Francis, 631 W. Prairie Ave., 
Decatur, 111., December 16, 1917. 

Stockham, Douglas William, 1231 N. Thirty - 
second St, Birmingham, Ala., December 
16, 1917. 

Proelss, Otto, Jr., 509 Morton Ave., Meunds- 
ville, W. Va., February 20, 1918. 

Clark, James Glen, Moweaqua. 111., Febru- 
ary 20, 1918. 

Williams. Raymond Clendenin, Ava. 111., 
March 27, 1918. 

Eaton, Ralph Melvin. Mt Carniel, 111., May 
5, 1918. 

Utley, Theodore Henry, 509 W. Third St., 
Sterling, 111.. May 5. 1918. 

Smith. Cecil Maxey, 329 East Broadway. Mt 
Vernon, 111., May 5, 1918. 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 
Gamma Nu Chapter 

Welford, Harry, 205 S. Belvldere Blvd., 
Memphis, Tenn., October 18, 1917. 

Smith. Harold Snoner. 7 Marston Ave., De- 
troit Mich., February 16, 1918. 

Connell, Wade Park, 632 Quapaw Ave., Hot 
Springs, Ark., February 16, 1918. 



210 Bailey, Allen Ransom, 703 Washington St., 

Cedar Falls. Iowa, February 16. 1918. 

211 Hammer, Ralph Adolph, Cooperstown, N. D.. 

February 16, 1918. 

212 Randall, Alfred Hayden, 917 College St.. 

Fort Wayne. Ind., February 16, 1918. 

213 Finley, John Tooker, 1928 Eye 8t N. W.. 

Washington, D. C, February 16. 1918. 

214 Oren. Chase Osborn. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., 

February 16, 1918. 

215 Fletcher, Frederic, 120 Chandler Ave., De- 

troit, Mich., February 16, 1918. 

216 Linderman, Watts Francis, 75 E. Utica, Os- 

wego, N. Y., February 16, 1918. 

217 Hawks, Harold, 2311 N. Tejon. Colorado 

Springs, Colo.. February 16. 1918. 

218 Kurle. Ernest Charlie. 1519 N. Nevada Ave., 

Colorado Springs, Colo., February 16. 
1918. 

219 Shoup, Paul Leo. 605 S. Seventh St.. Go- 

shen, Ind.. April 27. 1918. 

220 Smith. Schuyler Brower. 1221 Sixth St., 

Port Huron, Mich., April 27, 1918. 

MISSOURI SCHOOL OF MINES 
Gamma Xi Chapter 

127 Patterson, Harold Ford, 508 N. Holden St.. 

Warrensburg, Mo., November 1, 1917. 

128 Hollingshead, Homer Archer, 2207 Felix St.. 

St. Joseph, Mo., January 19, 1918. 

129 Wilson, Joseph Mortland, Rock Rapids. 

Iowa, January 19, 1918. 

130 Wilson, James Mortimer, 210 S. Maple, 

Hannibal, Mo., January 19, 1918. 

131 Millar, Charles James, 416 N. Ball St., Webb 

City, Mo.. January 19, 1918. 

132 Stevens, Thomas Adnan, 201 Spring St.. 

Caney, Kns., January 19. 1918. 
WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 
Gamma Omlcron Chapter 

103 Deal. Russell It. Cape Girardeau. Mo.. De- 

cember 15, 1917. 

104 Green. William Carlton, 722 S. Eleventh St.. 

Muskogee, Okla., April 6, 1918. 

105 Voris. Bryant B.. Waterloo, 111.. April 6, 

1918. 

UNIVERSITY OF WEST VIRGINIA 
Gamma Pi Chapter 

147 Valentine. Arthur Jay, Jr., Parsons, YV. Va., 

December 14, 1917. 

148 Curry, Dorsey Jefferson. 107 Walnut St., 

Grafton, W. Va.. December 14. 1917. 

149 Star key, Shirley Leland. Ravenswood, W. 

Va., December 14, 1917. 

150 Robinson, J. French, 284 Second St.. Mor- 

gantown, W. Va., December 14, 1917. 

151 Nefflen, William Elliott, Keyster. W. Va., 

December 14, 1917. 

152 Valentine, Mark Twain. Parsons. W. Va., 

February 27, 1918. 

153 Ball, Walter Frank, 217 McGraw Ave.. 

Grafton. Pa., February 27. 1918. 

154 Maxwell. George Ralph, 79 Grand View 

Ave., Morgantown, W. Va., February 27, 
1918. 

155 Ash, Horace La Rue, Box 27, Anmore, W. 

Va., February 27, 1918. 

156 Ritchie, William Smith, Ravenswood, W. 

Va.. February 27, 1918. 

157 Nefflen. Paul Ewald, Elklns. W. Va., Feb- 

ruary 27, 1918. 

158 Walker. Reford Bond, Williamson. W. Va., 

February 27. 1918. 

159 Hutchinson. Orland C, Ravenswood, W. Va., 

February 27, 1918. 

160 Marr, Norval Mason, Barnsley, Pa., May 13, 

1918. 

UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 
Gamma Bho Chapter 

124 Fisher, Lewis Lathrop. 5733 Kenwood Ave.. 

Chicago, 111., October 5. 1917. 

125 Oliver, Frank John, Onawa, Iowa. Novem- 

ber 20, 1917. 

126 Harrington. Raymond James, 3909 Third 

Ave., Sioux City. Iowa, December 3, 1917. 

127 Palmer, Edgar Henry. 6405 Paulina St.. 

Chicago, HI., January 12, 1918. 



80 



The Delta 



128 Schuyler, George Lynn, Osage, Iowa, Janu- 

ary 12, 1918. 

129 Rose, Ralf Douglas. 5758 S. Park Ave., Chi- 

cago, 111., January 12, 1918. 

130 Schlomer, Homer Jessie, 1229 Montana St., 

Chicago, 111., January 12, 1918. 

131 Little, William James, Kingsley, Iowa, 

February 13, 1918. 

132 Tim mine, Louis Paul, 6618 Normal Blvd., 

Chicago, 111., February 22, 1918. 

133 Hoglund, Elis Sterner, 743 Walnut St., Fort 

Wayne, Ind., February 22, 1918. 

134 Schueneman, Ralph Edward, Crystal Lake, 

111., March 23, 1918. 

135 Crabtree, Clayton Mack, Crystal Lake, 111., 

March 23, 1918. 

136 Leseman, Maurice Tiemann, 656 E. Fifty- 

first St., Chicago, 111., May 25, 1918. 

137 Smith, Gallord Ewan, Florence, Kas., May 

25, 1918. 

138 Hall, Joseph Bates, 515 W. Sixty-fifth PL, 

Chicago, 111., May 25, 1918. 

IOWA STATE COLLEGE 
Gamma Sigma Chapter 

120 Root. Harold Shepard, 7610 Nelson St., New 

Orleans, La., January 24, 1918. 

121 Whittemore, John Weed, 2110 Jackson St.. 

Sioux City. Iowa, March 11, 1918. 

122 Donham. Charles Raymond, 1422 Lynch 

Ave. E.. St. Louis, Mo.. March 29, 1918. 

123 North, Henry Frank Aiden, LaPort, Iowa, 

March 29, 1918. 

124 Kloppenburg. Walter August, Everly, Iowa. 

March 29, 1918. 

125 Nagle. John C, Brookston, Ind., March 29. 

1918. 

126 Clay, Lawrence Arthur. Gilman, Iowa, 

March 29, 1918. 

127 Mayers, Leland Albert, 717 S. Sixth St., Salt 

Lake City, Utah, May 4, 1918. 

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA 

Gamma Tau Chapter 

119 Kinney, Frank William, 2500 University 

Ave. N. E., Minneapolis, Minn., January 

24, 1918. 

120 Miller. Milo Vernon, Bismarck, N. D., Janu- 

ary 24, 1918. 

121 Palmer, Robert Everett Allan, LeRoy, Minn., 

January 24, 1918. 

122 Janzen, William Henry. Mountain Lake. 

Minn., January 24, 1918. 

123 Bather. Edward Charles, Fulda, Minn.. May 

5, 1918. 

124 Gilmore, Merville Levu. Webster City, Iowa. 

May 5. 1918. 

125 Phillips. John Ford. Princeton. Minn., May 

25, 1918. 

126 Gruve, Ralph Emerson. Winthrop, Minn., 

May 5, 1918. 

127 Blunt, James Keenann, Bismarck, N. D., 

May 5, 1918. 

128 Bollenbach, Willard Marshall, 1817 Emer- 

son Ave. N., Minneapolis, Minn., May 5, 
1918. 

129 Beithon, Elmer Julius. 8 Thayer St., Bis- 

marck, N. D., May 30, 1918. 

UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS 
Gamma Upsllon Chapter 

125 McRae. Kenneth Gilbert, Jr., Hope, Ark., 

May 10, 1917. 

126 Reed, Lloyd Mace. 609 E. Pine St.. Russell- 

ville, Ark., October 2, 1917. 

127 Wood, John Andrew, Ashdown, Ark., March 

24. 1918. 

128 Steele, John Russell, 513 Court, Muskogee, 

Okla., April 16, 1918. 

129 Taylor, Austin Blackwood, 2312 Broadway, 

Little Rock. Ark., April 16, 1918. 

130 Maxwell, Blan Raymond, Osceola, Ark., 

May 23. 1918. 



UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA 
Gamma Phi Chapter 

119 Not reported. 

120 Hauck, Herman Lawrence, Phillipsburg, 

Mont, May 6, 1918. 

121 Mooney, Guy Hastings, Judith Gap, Mont., 

May 6, 1918. 

122 Clarke, Stedman Kendrick, Manhattan, 

Mont, May 6, 1918. 

123 Dawes. John Arthur, Hamilton, Mont, May 

6. 1918. 

124 Marsh, Russel L., Deer Lodge, Mont, May 6, 

1918. 

125 Christensen, Earle Arthur, 437 S. Fifth St. 

Missoula. Mont, May 6, 1918. 

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON 
Gamma Chi Chapter 

203 Foran, William Thomas, 1616 E. Forty- 

seventh St., Seattle, WaBh., October 14, 
1917. 

204 Macfarlane, Alan Walter, 1616 E. Forty- 

Beventh St, Seattle, WaBh., January 20, 
1918. 

205 Shannon, Edward, 1700 Fifteenth Ave., Se- 

attle, Wash., January 20, 1918. 

206 Morris, Edward Evans, 2606 Twenty-sixth 

and Main Sts., Olympia, Wash., January 
20 1918 

207 Howe, Harold Maxwell, 4213% Fourteenth 

Ave. N. E., Seattle, Wash., January 20, 
1918. 

208 McMorris,, Harold Edington, 1911 Fourth 

Ave. N„ Seattle, Wash., January 20, 1918. 

209 Phillips, Norris WilBon, 1105 American 

Bank Bldg., Seattle, Wash., January 20, 
1918. 

210 Knettle, Lemyrt Dix, Pomeroy, Wash., 

April 1, 1918. 

211 Simpson, James Richmond, Stevensvllle, 

Mont, April 28, 1918. 

212 Daly, Milton Joseph, Kltchlkum, Alaska, 

April 28, 1918. 

213 Coats, Marion, Raymond, Wash., April 28, 

1918. 

214 Townsend, Frank Simeon, 3012 Spring St, 

Seattle. Wash., April 28, 1918. 

215 Turner, Howard Rees, 2025 Palouse St, 

Walla Walla. Wash., April 28, 1918. 

216 Lewis, Raymond. 520 May St, . Raymond, 

Wash., April 28, 1918. 

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY 
Gamma Psl Chapter 

143 Ludecker, Irving Brown, Nyack, N. Y., May 

18 1917. 

144 Terry, Gerard Williamson, Mattituck, N. Y., 

October 5, 1917. 

145 Montanye, Frazier, 309 Bryant Ave., Syra- 

cuse, N. Y., October 5, 1917. 

146 Yordon, Wesley James, 720 Bear Ave., Syr- 

acuse. N. Y., October 5, 1917. 

147 DiesBeroth, Albert Christian, Middletown, 

N. Y.. October 26. 1917. 

148 Thompson. Leslie Mortimer, 721 Chamber 

of Commerce, Rochester, N. Y., October 
26, 1917. 

149 Holley, Henry Mason, Fulton, N. Y., Oc- 

tober 26. 1917. 

150 Kent. Bion Holly, 608 Walnut Ave., Syra- 

cuse, N. Y., October 26, 1917. 

151 Schaefer, William Robert, 921 Myrtle St, 

Syracuse, N. Y., November 26, 1917. 

152 Harrington, Russel Edgar. Baldwinsville, 

N. Y., November 26, 1917. 

153 Simpson, Worthington W., Redwood, N. Y., 

November 26. 1917. 

154 Grieb,, Clarence George, 513 Court St, Syra- 

cuse, N. Y.. March 13, 1918. 

155 Knapp, Frederick Malcolm, 200 W. Ken- 

nedy St. Syracuse, N. Y., March 13, 1918. 

156 Emerson, Lee Earl, Barton, Vt, March 13, 

1918. 

157 Fivaz, Alfred Edward, Fulton, N. Y.. March 

13, 1918. 

158 Renn, Alfred Joseph, 129 E. Ninety -second 

St.. New York, N. Y., March 13, 1918. 



Novices In Chivalry 



81 



159 Muldowney, Thomas Francis, 

vllle. Pa., March 13, 1918. 

160 Welch, Hamer Fayette, Sandy Creek, 

March 13, 1918. 



Heckscher- 



145 



N. Y., 146 



85 
86 
87 
88 
89 



CASE SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCE 
Delta Alpha Chapter 

Wallace, Clarence William, 1321 E. 112th 
St, Cleveland. Ohio, February 24, 1918. 

McCullough, John Nagely, 315 W. Bath Ave., 
Ashland, Ky., February 24, 1918. 

Meyers, Charles Willis, 257 E. Ave., New 
Philadelphia. Ohio. February 24, 1918. 

Knowlton, Neil Hunter, 4 King St., Ashta- 
bula, Ohio, February 24, 1918. 

Carlson, Conrad Theodore. 9138 Wade Park 
Ave., Cleveland, Ohio, February 24, 1918. 



160 
161 
162 
163 
164 
165 
166 
167 
168 
169 
170 
171 



126 



127 



129 
130 



131 
132 
133 
134 
135 
136 
137 
138 
139 



141 
142 
143 
144 



DARTMOUTH COLLEGE 
Delta Beta Chapter 

Bu8chmann, John Frederick, 14 Union Ave., 
Westfleld, Mass., November 18. 1917. 

Wilkinson, Henry Fielding, 141 Whitney 
St, Hartford. Conn., November 18. 1917. 

Quincey, Josiah Edmund, 4 Pickman St, 
Salem, Mass., March 3. 1918. 

Alger, Dolph Porter, 7 Courtland St, Mld- 
dleboro, Mass., March 3, 1918. 

Foster. Francis Budlong, 9 Phillips St, 
Westboro. Mass., March 6, 1918. 

Hart, Clifford Francis. 851 Eastern Park- 
way. Brooklyn, N. Y.. March 9, 1918. 

Reynolds, George Lawriat, Jr., 101 Central 
Ave., Hyde Park. Mass.. March 9, 1918. 

Stanley, Gordon Story, 150 Manning St, 
Needham, Mass., March 9, 1918. 

Abbott, Darien, Conn., 



70 Gilford 
1918. 
1039 



Teaton, Kenneth 

March 6. 1918. 
Page. Edwin Warren Little, 

Laconia. N. H.. March 9, 
Parks, Reginald Sylvester, 

St. Brooklyn, N. Y., March 21, 
Kadison. Norman. 204 W. 110th 

York, N. Y., April 17, 1918. 

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 
Delta Gamma Chapter 



Ave. 



Prospect 
1918. 
St, New 



McCormick, Francis Donald, 237 E. Forty- 
eighth St, New York, N. Y., October 22, 
1917. 

Salmon, Louis Joseph AloyBlus, 166 Sands 
St, Brooklyn, N. Y., October 22, 1917. 
128 Jones, Ernest Wallace, 90 McLean Ave., 
Yonkers, N. Y., October 22, 1917. 

Shaw, Charles Edgar, Louisville, Kas., Oc- 
tober 22, 1917. 

Schentzow, George Albert, 120 E. Third St., 
Oswego, N. i. (Aff. from Gamma Psi 
114), October 22, 1917. 

Doubleday, James Stewart, 204 Hempstead 
Ave., Lynbrook, N. Y., October 22, 1917. 

Brown, Russell, 250 W. Ninety-fourth St., 
New York, N. Y., October 22, 1917. 

Sibley, Horace Norman, Wendell, Mass., Oc- 
tober 22, 1917. 

Prlmm, Walter Rogers, 215 B. Mt Vernon 
St., Springfield. Mo., October 22, 1917. 

Katcenmeyer, Charles William, Box 215, 
Vicksburg, Miss., October 22. 1917. 

Bedford, John Hoge, 94 Hamilton Place, 
New York. N. Y., October 22, 1917. 

Co kef air, Allen Jerome, 104 Radford St, 
Yonkers. N. Y., October 22, 1917. 

Noble. Walter Helper, 145 B. Thirty-fifth 
St., New York, N. Y., October 22, 1917. 

Cusack, John Tracy Patrick, 19 B. Eightieth 
8t, New York, N. Y., October 22, 1917. 
140 O'Neill, Robert Neuland, 15 S. Ball St.. 
Webb City, Mo., December 3, 1917. 

Bulkier, Edward Atkinson, 90 Bruce Ave., 
Yonkers, N. Y., December 3, 1917. 

Relyea, Harold Arthur, 105 Clinton St., One- 
onta, N. Y.. March 4, 1918. 

Carroll, James Edward, 7 Pa reel 1 St, Elm- 
hurst, L. 1., New York, March 4, 1918. 

Chapman, William Lewis, Jr., 114 Lafayette 
Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y., March 4, 1918. 



127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 
136 
137 



138 
139 
140 



119 
120 

121 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 



82 



83 
84 
85 
86 



Haussen. Eilif Carl. 461 Ovington Ave., 
Brooklyn, N. Y„ April 8. 1918. 

Belswenger. Gustav Adam Julius, 1533 Com- 
monwealth Ave.. New York, N. Y., April 8, 
1918. 

PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE . 
Delta Delta Chapter 

Kell, John Fischer. 203 S. George St, Yak, 

Pa., September 30, 1917. 
Keen, Frank Adams, 2008 Spruce St, Phil- 
adelphia. Pa., December 9. 1917. 
Weinman, Louis Frederick. 161 Dixon Ave., 

Ben Avon. Pa., February 3, 1918. 
Bennett. William Lewis. 401 Garfield 

Square, Pottsville. Pa., February 3, 1918. 
Caldwell. John Blair, 335 S. Linden Ave., 

Pittsburgh, Pa., February 3, 1918. 
Pringle, Arthur Edward, Wincote, Pa., 

February 3, 1918. 
Ely. Frederic Gilbert. 32 Hinchman Ave., 

Dover. N. J.. February 3. 1918. 
Hager, Rollin Darwin. Union town, Phillips 

Mine. Pa., February 3. 1918. 
Weinschenk, Joseph, Iddings, New Castle, 

Pa., February 3, 1918. 
Baily, Robert Westley, Carmichael. Pa., 

February 3. 1918. 
Riebenack. Max, S. E. Corner Thirty-fourth 

St. and Powelton Ave., Philadelphia, Pa., 

February 3. 1918. 
Oberholser, Edward Haines, Llonville, Pa., 

March 31. 1918. 
Lives. Walter Howat, 17 Forbes Terrace, 

Pittsburgh, Pa., March 31. 1918. 
Tnbbs. Edward II, 2439 Columbia Ave., 

Philadelphia. Pa.. March 31. 1918. 

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA 
Delta Epnllon Chapter 

Bechtold. Earl Raymond. Perry, Okla., De- 
cember 12. 1917. 

Bosworth. Harold William. 420 W. Eleventh 
St. Oklahoma City. Okla., December 12, 
1917. 

Jones. Clifford Ellsworth, Hugo. Okla., De- 
cember 12, 1917. 

Harris, Sam Lowe. 421 W. Eleventh, Okla- 
homa City. Okla., December 17, 1017. 

Clarke, Carl William. 721 Broadway, Heniy- 
ette, Okla.. December 17. 1917. 

Norton, Sam, Jr., Earlesboro, Okla., Feb- 
ruary 23. 1918. 

Curtis, Joe Wheeler, 312 W. 
Norman, Okla., February 23, 

Darrough, Forrest M., Hugo, 
ruary 23. 1918. 

Young. Chester Elmer. Carmen, 
ruary 23, 1918. 

Vahlberg, Ernest Oklahoma 
February 23, 1918. 



Commerce, 
1918. 
Okla., Feb- 

Okla., Feb- 

City. Okla., 



WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY 
Delta Zeta Chapter 



Wagner, Harold Weining, 218 N. Eighth 
St.. New Philadelphia, Ohio, February 24, 
1918. 

Burton, Paul Howard. 1373 E. 89th St.. 
Cleveland, Ohio. February 24. 1918. 

Shlssler, John Lewis, 417 Highland Ave., 
Johnstown, Pa.. February 24, 1918. 

Krock, Frederick Henry, Upper Sandusky, 
Ohio. February 24. 1918. 

Rolli. Donald. 504 W. Fair St, New Phila- 
delphia, Ohio, February 24, 1918. 
87 Suhr, James Vernon. 17 8. Gerden St., Nor- 
wald, Ohio, February 24, 1918. 

UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA 
Delta Eta Chapter 

101 Taylor, Melville Heman, Plainview, Nebr., 

October 7, 1917. 

102 Teter, John Franklin. Bartley, Nebr., Octo- 

ber 22, 1917. 

103 Landale, Jack Alex, 819 N. Forty-third, 

Omaha, Nebr., February 10, 1918. 

104 Parsons. Clarence Usher. 1915 S. Tenth. 

Omaha, Nebr., February 10. 1918. 



82 



The Delta 



105 Mackey, Thomas, Ansley, Nebr., February 

10, 1918. 

106 Young, Paul Sehmlnke, Nebraska City, 

Nebr., February 10, 1918. 

107 Habn, Oscar William, Clarkson, Nebr., 

February 10, 1918. 

108 Krahnlik, Lambert, 1127 8. Twenty-seventh. 

Omaha, Nebr., February 10, 1918. 

109 Noh, Robert Henery, Clarkson, Nebr., Feb- 

ruary 10, 1918. 

110 Munn, Wade T.. 327 N. Seventeenth, Lin- 

coln, Nebr.. February 10, 1918. 

111 King, Russell, Tllden, Nebr., May 12. 1918. 

112 Warner, J. Laird, Ten Sleep, Wyo., May 12. 

1918. 
118 Ohde, John Jacob, Manning, Iowa. May 12, 
1918. 

114 Goodfellow, Sidney Robert, Greenwood, 

Nebr., May 12, 1918. 

LAMBABD COLLEGE 
Delta Theta Chapter 

168 Stokes, Glenn Allan, Glenn Blyn, 111., May 

23 1917. 

169 Wilson, Claud Frederick, Colchester, 111., 

December 13, 1917. 

170 Stokes, Charles Arthur, Lamed, Kans., Jan- 

uary 24, 1918. 

171 Anderson, John Russell, 606 Joy St., Red 

Oak, Iowa, February 6. 1918. 

172 Anderson, Lawrence Everett, 309 Lyle St., 

Kewannee, 111., February 6, 1918. 

173 Hughes, Henry Loren, R. F. D. 3, Table 

Grove, 111., February 6. 1918. 

174 Graham, Harold William, Atkinson. 111., 

February 21, 1918. 

175 Bates, Harold Storey, Yates City, 111., Feb- 

ruary 21, 1918. 

176 Peden, Donald Charles. 612 S. Grove St. 

Kewanee, 111., May 2. 1918. 

WASHINGTON STATE COLLEGE 

Delta Iota Chapter 

125 Leigh, Walter Mason, Address not reported, 
November 6, 1917. 

127 Woodland, Leonard Freeman, Sherwood. 

Oregon, November 6, 1917. 

128 Edwards, Lloyd Graham, Dayton, Wash., 

January 18, 1918. 

129 Kuykendall, M. Lorraine. Pomeroy. Wash., 

January 18, 1918. 

130 Moran, Leo Michael, Republic, Wash., Jan- 

uary 18, 1918. 

131 Miller, William Maxwell, Pullman, Wash.. 

January 18, 1918. 

132 Cisna, Richard E., E. 1006 Desmet, Spo- 

kane, Wash., January 15, 1918. 

133 Riggs, John Isham, W. 2928 Dean, Spokane, 

Wash., May 11, 1918. 

134 Knight, Leroy Bills, Eugene, Ore., May 11, 

1918. 

DELAWARE COLLEGE 
Delta Kappa Chapter 

115 Sharp, Hugh Rodney, Dupont Bldg.. Wil- 

mington, Del., October 31, 1917. 

116 Barnard, John Arnold, Jr., Wyoming, Del., 
' October 31, 1917. 

117 Cooch, Francis Ollyn, Jr., Newark, Del., 

October 31, 1917. 

118 Shane, Herman Edward, Georgetown, Del., 

October 31, 1917. 

119 Downes, John Schoch, State St, Dover, 

Del., October 31, 1917. 

120 Wilson, Joseph Samuel, Perryvllle, Md., 

October 31, 1917. 
117 Cooch, Francis Allyn, Jr., Newark, Del- 
October 31. 1917. 

122 Alexander, Howard Benton, 9 E. Blssell 

Ave., Oil City, Pa., October 31, 1917. 

123 Sutfln, Charles Ide, 703 W. Twenty-third 

St, Wilmington, Del., November 27, 1917. 

124 Hemphill, William Albert, Delaware City. 



ipn 
el.. 



Del., November 27, 1917. 

125 Dare, Mark Donald, Jamesburg, N. J., No- 

vember 27, 1917. 

126 Price, John Fletcher, Carney's Point. N. J., 

February 26, 1918. 



DELAWARE COLLEGE 
Delta Kappa Chapter 

127 Lindsay, Walter David, Providence, Md., 

February 26, 1918. 

128 Jones, Harry Herman, Woodside, Del., Feb- 

ruary 26, 1918. 

129 Mitchell, Henry Burton, R. F. D. 2, Mills- 

boro, Del., April 17, 1918. 

130 Dare, Charles Rubon, Jamesburg, N. J., 

April 17, 1918. 

131 Carey, Lawrence Sherwood, Georgetown, 

Del., April 17. 1918. 

132 Cantwell, Garrett Reed, Elsmere, Del., May 

15, 1918. 

BROWN UNIVERSITY 
Delta Lambda Chapter 

85 Gallup, Henry Ezra, 162 Main St., Daniel - 

son, Conn., February 11, 1918. 

86 Grindel, Harold Lee. Arlington, N. Y., Feb- 

ruary 11, 1918. 

87 Hathaway, Floriman Mason, Clinton, Me., 

February 11, 1918. 

88 Irving, William Roland, 267 Winthrop 

Ave., New Haven, Conn., February 11, 
1918. 

89 Lovenberg, Clifton Norman, 102 Irving 

Ave., Providence, R. I., February 11, 
1918. 

90 MagnuBon, Harold Einar, 49 Central St., 

Pontiac, ft. I., February 11, 1918. 

91 McKendall, Benjamin William, 31 Dennison 

St., Providence, R. I., February 11, 1918. 

92 McKenny, Robert Charles, 39 N. Hermitage 

Ave., Trenton, N. J., February 11, 1918. 

93 Stevens, John Randolf, 66 Hudson St.. 

Providence, R. I., February 11, 1918. 

STETSON UNIVERSITY 
Delta Mu Chapter 

72 Cook, William Crosby, Tallahassee, Fla.. 

October 11, 1917. 

73 Curry, Luther n Earl, Miami, Fla., October 

11, 1917. 

74 Harris, Samuel Henry, St. Petersburg, Fla., 

November 6, 1917. 

75 Harris, John David, St Petersburg, Fla.. 

November 24, 1917. 

76 Harkness, Robert Morris, DeLand, Fla.. 

December 1. 1917. 

77 Cameron, Ralph Henry, Jr., 390 N. Fourth 

Ave., Phoenix, Ariz.. December 11, 1917. 

78 Barger, George Mayuard. Jr., 924 Wayne 

St, Bluefleld, W. Va.. December 11, 1917. 

79 Shallene, Wilbert Engdahl. 642 Tenth St. 

Mollne. 111., December 18, 1917. 

80 Landls, Erkine Weaver, 144 W. New York 

Ave., City and State not reported, Jan- 
uary 16, 1918. 

81 Sanderson, Herbert Converse, 244 W. Tenth 

Ave., Columbus, Ohio, January 23, 1918. 

82 Miller, Rufus Stanley, Deland, Fla., Jan- 

uary 30, 1918. 

83 Marrow, Drury Hunter, Union Level, Va., 

February 13, 1918. 

84 Hoffner, Eugene Charles, Pine Castle, Fla.. 

April 23. 1918. 

85 Westfall, John Carey, DeLand, Fla., May 

30. 1918. 

. UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 
Delta Nu Chapter 

122 Wifrht, Willard, 90 Wight St.. Berlin, N. H.. 

November 26, 1917. 

123 Riley, Edwin Alden, 63 Main St. Llve*rmore 

Falls, Me., November 26, 1917. 

124 West Frederic Roland, 14 Park St., Mllo. 

Me., November 26, 1917. 

125 Carlton, George Melven, Woolwich, Me., No- 

vember 26, 1917. 

126 March, Lindsay Jackson, Oldtown, Me.. No- 

vember 26. 1917. 

127 Sewall, Howard Howe, Llvermore Falls. 

Me., November 27, 1917. 

128 Treworgy, Harold Eugene. Blsworth, Me.. 

November 27, 1917. 

129 Cole, Frederic Leslie, Jr., North Brooklln. 

Me., November 27, 1917. 



Novices In Chivalry 



83 



130 Oakes, Vance Elder, Rangeley, Me., Novem- 

ber 27, 1917. 

131 Reed, Lewis Hersey, Springfield, Me., No- 

vember 27, 1917. 
i32 Mai one, Gordon John, 132 Pleasant Ave., 
Woodfords, Me., November 27, 1917. 

133 Bailey. Philip Raymond, Foxcroft, Me., No- 

vember 27, 1917. 

134 Fraser, Simon Chandler, Eastern, Me., No- 

vember 27, 1917. 

135 Gregory, Augustas Philip, Fairfield, Me., 

November 27. 1917. 

136 Chapman, Arthur Raymond, 212 Hancock 

St., Rumford, Me., February 18, 1918. 

137 Scott. Harold Franklin. 265 Main St, 

Orono, Me., February 18, 1918. 

138 Johnson. Gordon Woodbury, Longfellow 

St., Westbrook Me., February 18, 1918. 



85 Tlbbitts, Gordon Chase. 321 Essex Ave.. 

Chevy Chase, Md., October 20, 1917. 

86 Rommel, Royal Robert, 668 W. Lonther St., 

Carlisle, Pa., December 26, 1917. 

87 Taylor, James Norman, 1906 N. St, N. W., 

Washington, D. C, December 26, 1917. 

88 Wolter. Louis Christian. Jr., 3814 Basel 

Ave., South Norwood, Ohio, January 19, 
1918. 

89 Harris. William Wilen, 1756 Church St. 

N. W., Washington, D. C, January 19, 
1918. 

90 Nicholson, John Turnbull, 832 S. Frank- 

lin St., Wilkesbarre, Pa., January 19, 
1918. 

91 Klemme, Roland Metsler, 3409 Chestnut St, 

Philadelphia, Pa., (Aff. from Beta Rho 
172), February 3, 1918. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA 
Delta XI 

44 Not reported. 

45 Not reported. 

46 Boyle, Douglas Mitchell, Reno, Nev., Sep- 

tember 15, 1917. 

47 Scoular, Robert, Reno, Nev., September 15. 

1917. 

48 Hardin, Sam, Alameda, Calif., September 

15, 1917. 

49 Manson, James, Reno, Nev., September 15, 

1917. 

50 Harris, Gordon B., Reno. Nev., September 

15, 1917. 

UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO 
Delta Omicron 

71 Davison, Maurice Vere, Moscow, Idaho, De- 

cember 5, 1917. 

72 Carder, lyilliam Henry, 128 S. Howard St.. 

Moscow, Idaho, December 5, 1917. 

73 Kennedy, Rom Lee, Fort Hall, Idaho, De- 

cember 5. 1917. 

74 Rooker, William Abner, Pocatello, Idaho. 

December 5, 1917. 

75 Cornelison, Boyde Wallace, 825 W. Sixth 

St, Moscow, Idaho. February 16, 1918. 

76 Burnside, Walter, 915 Eighth Ave., Lewis - 

ton, Idaho, February 16, 1918. 

77 LeClair, Titus George, 701 Sixth Ave., Lew- 

iston, Idaho, February 16, 1918. 

78 Graf, Albert John, 203 Indiana St, Coeur 

d' Alene, Idaho, February 16. 1918. 

79 Gochnour, Ralph Jamison, Burley, Idaho. 

February 16, 1918. 

80 Wood, Arthur Garde, Payette, Idaho, Feb- 

ruary 16, 1918. 

81 Albert Marvin Douglas, Payette, Idaho. 

February 16. 1918. 

82 Hunter. Kenneth Melrose, 417 Foster St., 

Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, February 16, 1918. 
(3 Gilchrist DeMoin Wallace, Moscow, Idaho, 
February 16. 1918. 

84 Westover, Richard Melvin, 234 Howard St. 

Moscow, Idaho. February 16. 1918. 

85 Hege, Harl Theodore. 1421 . Eighth Ave., 

Spokane, Wash., May 16, 1918. 

86 Patten, Verne Wheeler, 217 Polk, Moscow. 

Idaho, May 16, 1918. 

87 Spiker, Emmett Elmer, 715 Tenth St, Lew- 

lston, Idaho, May 16, 1918. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 
Delta PI Chapter 

79 Sutllff. Milo Joseph. 1727 Euclid St., Wash- 

ington, D. C. October 20, 1917. 

80 Gessiord, Rodger Dunn, 2536 Fourteenth 

St, Washington, D. C, October 20, 1917. 

81 Swem, See Allan. 905 Massachusetts Ave., 

N. E., Washington, D. C, October 20, 
1917. 

82 Sheriff. George Rothwell, 1462 Newton St, 

N. W., Washington, D. C, October 20, 
1917. 

83 Mulligan, William Miles, 1519 Enslow Ave., 

Richmond, Va., October 20, 1917. 

84 Chamberlain, Herbert Avery, 1602 Emer- 

son St, N. W., Washington, D. C, Octo- 
ber 20, 1917. 



COLORADO AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 
Delta Rho Chapter 

66 Taylor, Walter, 1309 Palmer Ave., Pueblo, 

Colo., February 17, 1918. 

67 Curtiss, John Watson, Paonia, Colo., Feb- 

ruary 17, 1918. 

68 Bader, Orla Williams, R. F. D. 2, Loveland. 

Colo., February 17, 1918. 

69 Van Deren, Coe Lipsey, Paonia, Colo., Feb- 

ruary 19, 1918. 

70 Graham, James, Loveland, Colo., February 

17 1918. 

71 Bode, ' Carl August 801 Washington, 

Pueblo, Colo., February 17, 1918. 

72 Grant Lawrence Edward, 132 E. Seventh 

St, Leadville, Colo.. February 17, 1918. 

73 Feldman, Gordon Glenn, Paonia, Colo., 

March 3, 1918. 

74 Nebeker. Irvine Lewis, Richfield, Utah, 

March 3, 1918. 

75 Atteberry, James Clark, Farmington, New 

Mexico, March 3, 1918. 

76 Nicholson, William Donald, 120 W. Eighth 

St.. Leadville, Colo... March 3. 1918. 

77 Roberta, Paul Jones, Palms Hotel, Denver, 

Colo., March 3, 1918. 
73 Dean. Marshall Speer, Las Animas, Colo., 
March 24, 1918. 

79 Mott, Maxwell Roscoe, Grey bull, Wyo., 

March 24, 1918. 

80 Knapp. Frank White, 722 Remington, Fort 

Collins. Colo., March 24, 1918. 

81 Sweet, Walden Eubanks, Carbondale, Colo., 

March 24, 1918. 

82 Wells, Allan Tech em ere, 1901 Elisabeth St, 

Pueblo, Colo., March 24, 1918. 

CARNEGIE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Delta Sigma 

59 Hayes, James Byers, 657 Maple Lane, Se- 

wickley, Pa., July 25. 1917. 

60 McCaugbey, William Franklin, Jr., 705 E. 

Third St., Greenville, Ohio, August 8, 
1917. 

61 Fleming, Richard Knowlson. Jr., 315 S. 

Highland Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa., Septem- 
ber 21, 1917. 

62 Simpson, Hugh Evan, 928 W. Wayne St, 

Lima, Ohio, October 22. 1917. 

63 Barrow. John Ralph. 820 K St, N. B., 

Washington, D. C., (Aff. from Delta PI 
60), May 18, 1918. 

64 Lobr, Allen Wellman, 33 You St, N. W., 

Washington, D. C, December 15, 1917. 

65 Fair, Marcus Alblnus, 12 N Jand St, Du- 

bois, Pa., December 15, 1917. 

66 Howell, William Ross Lewin, 5901 Ken- 

more Ave., Chicago, 111., December 15, 
1917. 

67 Bleach, Charles August, 6809 Wade Park 

Ave., Cleveland, Ohio, December 15, 1917. 

68 Zobel, Carl George Frederick, 701 Rock 

Creek Church Road, Washington, D. C, 
December 15, 1917. 

69 McClean, Cleland Feuer, 4910 Baum Blvd., 

Pittsburgh, Pa., December 15, 1917. 

70 Clayton, Harold Oliver, 715 Lawrence St, 

Brookland, D. C, December 15, 1917. 

71 Hershey, Jacob WUmer, Francis and Mar- 

tha Aves., Lancaster, Pa., December 15, 
1917. 



84 



The Delta 



72 Clarke. Charles Hays, Oakland Ave.. Wash- 

ington Court House, Ohio, December 15. 
1917. 

73 Frazier, William August. 811 K St., N. E.. 

Washington. D. C, December 15, 1917. 

74 Leet, Arthur Frank, 409 Pendergast Ave.. 

Jamestown, N. Y., December 15. 1917. 

75 Wade, Harry Henchell, 3420 Beechwood 

Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa., December 15. 1917. 

76 McKee, Uay Agastus, 714 S. Pine St.. 

Aberdeen, S. D., December 15, 1917. 

77 Barnhart, Donald Bryson, Leisenring. Pn.. 

December 15, 1917. 

78 Roberts, Harold Frederick. 150 Columbia 

Court, Barberton. Ohio, March 10. 1918. 

79 NicholB, Newton Young, 29 Maple Ave.. 

Wheeling, W. Va., March 10, 1918. 

80 Hiller, Harvey Robert, 41 East Ave.. At- 

tica. N. Y.. March 10, 1918. 

81 Campbell, Neal, 3839 Botanical Ave.. St. 

Louis, Mo., March 10, 1918. 

82 Dougherty, William Edward, Cherry St.. 

Tarentum, Pa., May 18, 1918. 

83 Mauer. Clarence Augustus LeRoy. 353 N. 

Fourth St., Lebanon. Pa.. May 18, 1918. 

84 Johnston. Samuel Paul, 201 S. Craig St.. 

Pittsburgh, Pa., May 18. 1918. 

85 Mawhinny. Matthew Holmes. 17 Mawhinny 

St., Pittsburgh. Pa., May 18. 1918. 

OREGON AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 
Delta Tau Chapter 

41 Moore, Ralston Temple. 907 Savler St., 

Portland. Ore.. November 10, 1917 . 

42 Hart, Scott Park, 1109 W. Ninth St., Al- 

bany, Ore., November 24, 1917. 

43 Hallock, Joseph Homer, 127 N. Twenty-sec 

ond St., Portland, Ore.. January 1, 1918. 

44 Watson. Clifton Howe, 415 W. Park St.. 

Portland, Ore., January 1, 1918. 

45 Frame. Dana Selby, Talent, Ore., February 

24 1918. 

46 Henderson, Winfield Lester, 1146 Williams 

Ave., Portland. Ore., (Aff. from Delta 
Omicron 59), February 25. 1918. 

47 Peterson, Sigurd Harlan, Corvallis. Ore., 

February 25. 1918. 

48 Stewart, Robert Alexander. 400 E. Fifteenth 

St.. Portland, Ore., March 2, 1918. 

49 Kramien, Lionel Clarence, Newberg, Ore., 

March 2, 1918. 

50 Kyle, Hugh Wallace, 29 E. Forty-third St., 

N., Portland, Ore., March 2, 1918. 

51 Benner, Robert Lenox. 370 Thirty-fourth 

St., Portland, Ore., March 2, 1918. 

52 Glennon, Fenton James, 245 McMillan St., 

Portland, Ore., March 2, 1918. 

53 Taylor, Hugh Lenger. N. Ninth St., Cor- 

vallis, Ore., March 2, 1918. 

54 Boetticher, Marion Louis, 324 Calapovia St., 

Albany, Ore., March 2, 1918. 

55 Sharkey, Clement John, 4227 Fifty-second 

Ave., S. E.. Portland Ore.. March 2, 1918. 

56 Anderson, Edward Gill. 716 E. Second St., 

Albany. Ore.. April 21, 1918. 



COLGATE UNIVERSITY 
Delta Upsllon Chapter 

35 Noble, Harold Daniel, 793 Ellicott St., Buf- 

falo, N. Y., October 5, 1917. 

36 Boughton, John Scott. 178 Stanley Place, 

Hackeneack, N. J., October 5, 1917. 

37 Nunemaker, John Horace. 332% Present 

St., Harrisburg, Pa., December 5, 1917. 

38 Ford, Harrison Franklin, Johnson City, N. 

Y., December 15, 1917. 

39 Stoddard, Harold Frank, 252 Fulton St., 

Jamestown, N. Y., February 2, 1918. 

40 Cooley, George Ralph, 87 Seventh Ave., N., 

Troy, N. Y., February 2, 1918. 

41 DempBey, James. Jr., 116 Depew St., Peek- 

skill, N. Y., February 2, 1918. 

42 Fish, Charles Roland, Spencer, N. Y., Feb- 

ruary 2, 1918. 

43 Holcomb, Albert Winfield, 68 S. Allen St., 

Albany, N. Y., February 2, 1918. 

44 Kirk, LaGrande Francis, Youngstown, N. 

Y„ February 2. 1918. 

45 Morgan, Justin Colfax, 97 Howard Place, 

Buffalo, N. Y.. February 2, 1918. 



46 Parks, Calvin Goodwin, Suffleld, Conn., 

February 2, 1918. 

47 Totman, John Andrew, Boston, Mass., Feb- 

ruary 2, 1918. 

48 Benson, Ivan B., Ely, Minn., April 17, 1918. 

49 Chamberlin, Veil Burrows, Franklin, N. Y., 

April 27, 1918. 

50 Wikoff, William Rufus, Cooperstown, N. 

Y.. April 27, 1918. 

MARYLAND STATE COLLEGE 
Delta Phi Chapter 

1 Arthur, Reginald Wright, 801 S. Wash- 

ington St., Havre de Grace, Md., Novem- 
ber 27, 1917. 

2 Clark, Percival Ellsworth, La Plata, Md., 

November 27, 1917. 

3 Horn, Paul Valentine, Mt Airy, Md. f No- 

vember 27, 1917. 

4 Chichester, Peter Wood, Aquasco, Md., No- 

vember 27, 1917. 

5 Duvall, William Henry, Jr., Croome. Md.. 

November 27, 1917. 

6 McLean, David Laughlin, 224 W. Lafayette 

Ave., Baltimore, Md., November 27, 1917. 

7 McDonald, Alexander, 622 Florida Ave., N. 

E., Washington, D. C, November 27, 
1917. 

8 Fletcher, Andrew Edward, 1110 W. Tenth 

St., Erie, Pa.. November 27, 1917. 

9 Hamill, Francis Joseph, Clifton Park, Bal- 

timore, Md., November 27, 1917. 

10 Diggs. Austin Campbell, 2101 Erdman Ave,, 

Baltimore, Md., November 27, 1917. 

11 Day. Hanley Everitt, 1204 Balton St, Bal- 

timore, Md., November 27, 1917. 

12 Taliaferro, John Earl, Gloucester, Va., No- 

vember 27, 1917. 

13 Calvert, George Henry, Jr., College Park, 

Md.. November 27, 1917. 

14 Spence, Thomas Humphreys, College Park, 

Md.. November 27, 1917. 

15 Chichester, Frederick Skinner, Aquasco, 

Md., November 27, 1917. 

16 Merrick. Ezeliah John, Sudlersville, Md., 

November 27, 1917. 

17 Williams. William Preston, Don caster, Md., 

November 27, 1917. 

18 Powell. Edwin Emerson, Montgomery & 

Haddon Ave., Baltimore, Md., November 
27, 1917. 

19 Kuode. John Stuart. 812 W. King St.. Mar- 

tinsburg, W. Va., December 16, 1917. 

20 Knode, Robert Troxell, 802 W. King St, 

Martlnsburg. W. Va., December 16, 1918. 

21 McHenry, Ralph Frank, Frederick, Md., De- 

cember 16, 1917. 

22 Sullivan, Jeremiah Henry, 30 Franklin St, 

Newbury port, Mass., April 17, 1918. 

23 Jester, William Clayton, 1302 Ninth St, 

Wilmington, Del.. April 17, 1918. 

24 Bopst, Leslie Edward. 200 N. Market St., 

Frederick. Md., May 13, 1918. 

25 Towles, LeRoy Chowning, College Park, 

Md., May 13, 1918. 

26 Sawyer, Earle Milton, College Park, Md., 

May 13, 1918. 

27 Bomberger. Frank B., College Park, Md., 

May 26, 1918. 

28 Howard, Dowell Jennings, College Park, 

Md., May 26, 1918. 



TRINITY COLLEGE 
Delta Chi Chapter 

1 Francis, George Seymour, Wethersfleld, 

Conn., March 16, 1918. 

2 Allison. Nathan King, Granby, Conn., 

March 16, 1918. 

3 Brockett, Howard Ray, Bristol, Conn., 

March 16. 1918. 

4 Segur, Raymond Hubbard, 67 Farmington 

Ave., Hartford, Conn., March 16, 1918. 

5 Sporer, Maximilian, 112 Park Terrace, 

Hartford, Conn., March 16, 1918. 

6 Smeathers. Eugene Goodwin, 4 Trinity St, 

Hartford, Conn., March 16, 1918. 

7 Woodward, Raymond West, Carlisle Court 

Washington, D. C, March 16, 1918. 

8 Brand, Smart, 130 Putnam St, Hartford, 

Conn., March 16, 1918. 



Novices In Chivalry 



85 



9 Williamson. Harry David, 61 Allen Place, 

Hartford. Conn.. March 16. 1918. 

10 Grime, William. Cheshire. Conn., March 16, 

1918. 

11 Markham, Judson William, Chester, Conn., 

March 16, 1918. 

12 Barber, Harmon Tyler. 3 Fales St., Hart- 

ford. Conn.. March 16, 1918. 
IS Smeathers. Ralph Emerson. 4 Trinity St.. 
Hartford, Conn., March 16. 1918. 

14 Valentine. Henry Woodhouse, 33 Browuell 

Ave.. Hartford. Conn.. March 16, 1918. 

15 Vogel. Frederick George. 92 Pearl St., Hart- 

ford. Conn.. March 16. 1918. 

16 Schortmann. Edward Charles. 227 La ban 

St. Providence, R. 1.. March 16. 1918. 

17 Bruce, Robert Greenleaf, Berlin. Conn., 

March 16. 1918. 

18 Sanford. George Adrian. 116 Fairfield Ave., 

Hartford. Conn.. March 16, 1918. 

19 Saunders. George Louis, 119 Whitman Ave., 

West Hartford. Conn., March 16, 1918. 

20 Warner, Phillips Brooks, Bridgewater, 

Conn.. March 16. 1918. 

21 James, Alfred Nichols, Windsor, Conn., 

March 16. 1918. 

22 Whalen. Martin Edward. 20 Vernon St., 

Hartford. Conn., March 16. 1918. 

23 Cahill. William James, 992 Broad St., Hart 

ford. Conn.. March 16, 1918. 

24 Reitemeyer. John Reinhart, Jr., Rahway, 

N. J.. March 16. 1918. 

25 Trotter, Alton Victor, 501 Garden St., Hart- 

ford. Conn., March 16, 1918. 

26 Matthews, Arthur Newton, Windsor. Conn., 

March 16, 1918. 

27 Barber, William Pond, Jr.. 3 Fales St.. 

Hartford. Conn., March 24, 1918. 

28 Stansfleld, Joseph Wurts, Address not re- 

ported. March 24, 1918. 

29 Churchill, Alvord Barnes. 9 Foot Guard 

Place. Hartford, Conn.. March 31, 1918. 

30 Racioppi. Joseph Anthony, 68 Sullivan St., 

New York. N. Y.. April 5. 1918. 

31 Johnston, Russell Zlebell, 254 Jefferson St.. 

Hartford, Conn., April 17, 1918. 

32 Segur, Gerald Hubbard. 67 Farmington 

Ave., Hartford. Conn., May 22, 1918. 

33 Smith, Allan Kellogg. 94 Buckingham St.. 

Hartford. Conn., May 29, 1918. 

34 McCoid. Chester Bailey, Fort Rodman, New 

Bedford. Mass.. May 29, 1918. 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 
Delta Psl Chapter 

1 Palmer. Karl Vernon, 66 Glenwood Ave.. 

Woodfords, Me.. April 27. 1918. 

2 Howard. Henry Marshall, East Andover. 

Me.. April 27. 1918. 

3 Maguire, Chester Corbln, 18 Fairmount 

Terrace, Maiden, Mass., April 27, 1918. 

4 Grant. Hendrie Walter, Calais, Me., April 

27. 1918. 

5 Blake, George Horace, Mt. Vernon. Me.. 

April 27, 1918. 

6 Libbey. Dwight Linley, Scarboro, Me., April 

27, 1918. 

7 Lane, Walter Huron. 19 Gray St., Portland. 

Me.. April 27. 1918. 

8 VanWart William Haley, Cherryfield, Me.. 

April 27. 1918. 

9 Bernard. Wilfrid Oliver, 48 Third St., An 

burn. Me.. April 27. 1918. 

10 Stevens, Ralph Archie. Jr., 78 Readville, 

Mass., April 27. 1918. 

11 8teven8. Clyde Ellerton. 192 Limerock St.. 

Rockland. Me.. April 27. 1918. 

12 Simmons. Eric Melville. Union, Me., April 

27, 1918. 

13 Tuttle, Rufu8 Clarke, Freeport, Me., April 

27 1918. 

14 Rounds, Robert Cressey. 29 Main St., Gor- 

ham, Me., April 27. 1918. 

15 Blanchard, Hugh Waldo, Cumberland 

Courts, Me., April 27, 1918. 

16 Young. Paul Campbell, Cleburne, Texas, 

April 27, 1918. 

17 Draper. James Sumner, Wayland, Mass.. 

April 27. 1918. 

18 Haddock. Douglass Arno. Calais, Me., April 

27. 1918. 



19 Norwood. Leslie Everett. 59 Pine St.. South 

Portland, Me.. April 27, 1918. 

20 Hurrell. Albert Edwin, Westbrook St., 

South Portland. Me., April 27, 1918. 

21 Palmer, Edwin Clarence, Fort Fairfield, 

Me., April 27, 1918. 

22 Thebeau, Charles Leo, 12 South St, Bath. 

Me., April 27. 1918. 

23 Demuth, Arthur Albert. Lisbon Falls, Me.. 

April 27. 1918. 

24 DeMott, George Stuart. 201 State St., Port- 

land. Me.. April 27. 1918. 

25 Helson. Harry. 532 Main St.. Bangor, Me., 

April 27, 1918. 

26 King. Roy Bartlett, Caribou, Me.. April 27 

1918. 

27 Noyes. Reginald Webb, Stonington, Me., 

April 27, 1918. 

28 McCrum. Philip Henry. 26 Neal St. Port- 

land, Me.. April 27. 1918. . 

29 Lindner. Clarence Ralph, Lawrence, Mass., 

April 27, 1918. 

30 Constantine. Allan William, Richmond. 

Me., April 27. 1918. 

31 Keene, Carroll Herbert, Wiscassett, Me., 

April 27. 1918. 

32 Hone, John Woodford, Presque Isle. Mc., 

April 27, 1918. 

33 Rogers. Forest Hallle, Bath, Me., April 27, 

1918. 

34 Young. John Garnett. Cleburne, Texas. 

April 27. 1918. 

35 Racine. Wilfred Phillippe, 10 High St., 

Brunswick. Me.. May 15. 1918. 

36 Gorbam, Lee Sumner, 4th Co.. Fort Preble. 

Portland. Me.. May 15. 1918. 

37 Richardson. Raymond Miller, 28 Vaile St, 

E., Deering. Me., June 1, 1918. 

UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA 

Epsllon Alpha Chapter 

1 Mayhew. Henry Hart, 405 W. Franklin, 

Tii8con, Aria., June 3, 1918. 

2 Gardiner, John Haines. 124 E. Third St, 

Tucson, Ariz.. June 3, 1918. 

3 Hannah, Bruce Frank. 733 E. Fifth St., 

Tucson. Ariz., June 3, 1918. 

4 Wood. Wilson Barbour. 514 N Fifth St.. 

Phoenix, Ariz.. June 3. 1918. 

5 PuBch, Walter Feldman. 428 S. Fourth Ave., 

Tucson. Ariz., June 3, 1918. 

6 Wright, George William, Box 846, Wins- 

low. Ariz., June 3. 1918. 

7 Jacobus, Lawrence Russell. 502 E. Fourth 

St., Tucson, Ariz.. June 3. 1918. 

8 Talmage, Thomas Dewitt, 378 N. Main St., 

Tucson, Ariz., June 3, 1918. 

9 McCauley, Charles Dewey, Wlnslow, Aria., 

June 3. 1918. 

10 Reeves, Roloff Wright, Toltec, Ariz., June 

3 1918. 

11 Belton, Edward Robert. 706 E. Seventh St, 

Tucson, Ariz.. June 3, 1918. 

12 Verfurth, Ralph Bryan. Care Independent 

Fuel & Feed Co., Bisbee. Ariz., June 8, 
1918. 

13 . Lyons. Francis Hughes, Jerome, Ariz., June 

3. 1918. 

14 Sines. Edwin Louis. Prescott. Ariz., June 

3. 1918. 

15 Steele, Harry Kirkland, AJo, Ariz., June 3, 

1918. 

16 Still. Jack Wilkinson. 415 E. Second St. 

Tucson. Ariz., June 3, 1918. 

17 Cole. David. Stoddard. Ariz., June 3. 1918. 

18 Pilcher, Robert Osborn, 522 E. Fourth St, 

Tucson, Ariz., June 8, 1918. 

19 Fox. Edward Louis. 824 E. Third St, Tuc- 

son. Ariz.. June 3. 1918. 



To You! 

Don't wait for the other fellow to do it! 
Save wheat, meat, gasoline, paper, cloth, 
metals. Every worker or manager of work- 
ers can save not only in personal consump- 
tion, but in industrial waste. 

It is every American's duty to help win 
this war. 



The Clayton Brothers 

ThcU 

By Thomas M. Owen, Sb., Theta 



It is an interesting reflection that this JUDGE HENRY DE LAMAR CLAYTON. 
Brotherhood contains on its rolls groups of 
brothers in the flesh, or by ties of kinship. 
An examination of the table of relation- 
ships which appears in the old fraternity 
catalogues is confirmatory of the appeal of 
Sigma Nu. There are more than one hun- 
dred croups of brothers, varying in num- 



was the first to enter Sigma Nu, 1876, 
initiated in the first two years of the Chap- 
ter history, and therefore in a sense one of 
the founders. He was born February 10, 
1857, near Clayton, Barbour County, Ala- 
bama, and is the son of Major- General 




ber from two to six. Theta Chapter per- 
haps leads in such relationships, its roster 
showing five Foster brothers, three Clay- 
ton brothers, three Lee brothers, and three 
Parker brothers. 

Of these, whatever may be said of the 
others, there is no more interesting or 
splendid group than the Claytons, repre- 
sented by Judge Henry De Lamar Clayton, 
1876; Colonel Bertram Tracy Clayton, 1884, 
and Junius Pugh Clayton, 1888. 

It is interesting to note another Kindred 
Brother in the person of a nephew. Max- 
well W. Lippitt, an active man of Gamma 
Theta. 



Henry D. Clayton and wife, Victoria V. 
Hunter. The father was of an old Georgia 
family, a graduate of Emory and Henry 
College, Virginia, a lawyer of distinction 
and a Major- General in the Confederate 
Army. The wife of General Clayton, and 
the mother of Judge Clayton, was the 
daughter of General John L. Hunter, a fam- 
ily of notable connections throughout the 
South. 



... the town of his nativity, entered t... 
University of Alabama in 1876, and was 
initiated the same year. After graduation 
in 1877 with his bachelor's degree, he took 



Kindred Brothers 



87 



a law course, which was completed in 1878. 
He at once entered upon the practice in 
Eufaula* where he had a large clientele. 
In a political way he has had a conspicu- 
ous career, serving as a member of Local, 
State and National Executive Committees, 
a delegate to the National Democratic Con- 
vention of 1888: a member of the Ala- 
bama House of Representatives 1890-91, in 
which body he was chairman of the Judi- 
ciary Committee; was United States Dis- 
trict Attorney, Middle District of Alabama, 
from 1893 to 1896; and a Democratic presi- 
dential elector, 1888 and 1892. He entered 
the larger field of national life as a Repre- 
sentative in the Fifty-fifth Congress, and 
served in each succeeding session through 
the Sixty-third Congress, and until his ap- 
pointment May 2, 1914, to his present posi- 
tion as Federal Judge of the Middle and 
Northern Districts of Alabama. He was 
permanent chairman of the Democratic Na- 
tional Convention at Denver in 1908. When 
the Democrats came into power, he was 
advanced to the position of chairman of 
the Judiciary Committee of the United 
States House of Representatives, and his 
name is associated with the Clayton Trust 
Act, and other notable legislation. 

Judge Clayton has been twice married: 
(1) to Virginia B., daughter of Major-Gen- 
eral W. W. Allen, of Montgomery, Ala.; 
and (2) to Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel 
Marshall Davis, of Georgetown, Ky. 

Of him O. O. Stealey, in his attractive 
volume, entitled "130 Pen Pictures of Live 
Men" (1910), says: 

This man would be prominent in any 
company, political or social, of which he 
was a member. He is not only gifted with 
intellect, but he has a force of character 
that will not be denied. Balzac says that 
one most propel himself through this life 
like a cannon-ball, or glide through it like 
a pestilence. Henry D. Clayton is the can- 
non-ball. The son of as gallant a soldier 
as ever led his division to the charge in the 
great war of 1861-65, and of a woman who 
might have been 'wife to Hercules,' as one 
will discover who reads her charming book, 
descriptive of master, or rather mistress, 
and slave during that trying period, en- 
titled: 'White and Black Under the Old 
Regime.' Mr. Clayton is a Southerner of 
Southerners, and reminds one of the fig and 
the vine. He is a man on the threshold of 
the prime of life, and he is one of the lead- 
ers of his party in Congress, of which he 
has been a distinguished member seven 
terms. He is of a lawyer as well as a. 
soldier race. His father was as able at the 
bar as he was intrepid in the field, and he 
is a nephew of that grand old -jurist, James 
L. Pugn, who was so long a leading legal 
luminary of the United States Senate, sec- 
ond even to none in that body as a consti- 
tutional lawyer. Henry Clayton is a hand- 
some and commanding man, as well as a 
forceful personality. He is a leader, too, 



because of a marked individuality, a strong 
will, a clear conception and a powerful 
conviction of right. That would force in- 
tegrity upon him if he were not so richly 
endowed with that attribute by nature as 
well as by environment. Indeed, his hon- 
esty is so blunt that sometimes the stranger, 
for a while, is repulsed by the candor ana 
perhaps the dogmatism of his speech, but 
soon that charming personality sets all 
aright, and every one beholds in Mr. Clay- 
ton a man who strives to serve his country 
and who does serve it as God has given 
him the light to see his duty." 

COLONEL BERTRAM T. CLAYTON 

Whose tragic death in France on May 
30, 1918, is fresh in the memory of the peo- 
ple of the entire country, was the second 
of the name to be enrolled with the Knights 
of the Legion of Honor. He was born 
October 19, 1862. His name appears in the 
Catalogue as initiated in 1884. He en- 
tered the University of Alabama in 1880. 
but before completing his course entered 
West Point, 1882, from which he gradu- 
ated with honor in the class of 1886. The 
story of his life is told under "With Mili- 
tary Honors." 

JUNIUS P. CLAYTON 

The third brother, was born May 28, 
1871; entered the University of Alabama 
in 1887; and was initiated in Theta Chap- 
ter January, 1888. He graduated in 1891, 
as Second Lieutenant on the battalion staff, 
and as treasurer and business manager of 
his class. The same year he was elected 
principal of the Geneva Public Schools; 
served as deputy clerk of the Circuit Court 
of that County 1892; again elected princi- 
pal of the Geneva schools, and admitted to 
the bar for the practice of law in August, 
1893. After practicing there a short time, 
he removed to Oklahoma and later to 
Arkansas. He is now and has been for a 
number of years in the active practice of 
his profession at Ozark. He is one of the 
most earnest supporters of the Government 
and a friend reports that he is a 'terror" 
to slackers ana disloyalists. On August 
22, 1897, he was married to Jessie S. 
Hunter, of Muscogee, Okla. 

MAXWELL W. LIPPITT 

Sigma Nu Fraternity: 

An uncle of mine, a Sigma Nu, who was 
a Colonel in the Ordnance Department, 
was killed by an aerial bomb last week. 
His name is Bertram T. Clayton, of the 
Alabama Chapter and the Panama Alumni 
Chapter. He is one of our highest officers 
killed so far. He is the brother of Brother 
Henry D. Clayton, U. S. Judge, also a 
Sigma Nu. 

Fraternally, 

M. W. LIPPITT, Gamma Theta. 

Thunderbolt, Ga. 



GEORGIA BARBECUE ENJOYED BY 

SIGMA NU 



Down Along the Old Savannah Road Sol- 
diers of Sigma Nu Hold Miniature Na- 
tional Convention. — Exercise the 
Fish Before the Dinner. — 
Augusta Alumni the 
Hosts. 

On two trucks, nicely bedded with straw, 
crawled thirty boys from Camp and city 
and started for CarmichaeFs Fishing Club 
for one of those famous Georgia barbecues. 
The ride out the famous Old Savannah 
Road with a stiff breeze abl owing, at once 
relieved our minds from the intense heat 
of the afternoon, and when we arrived at 
Carmichael's the coolness of that delight- 
ful spot charmed us at once. 

First crack out of the box, some one 
wanted to exercise the fish in the pond and 
so the necessary fishing tackle was un- 
earthed and out on the pond in the old flat 
boat went the ambitious Izaak Waltons. 
However, the fishing as far as catching 
anything went, was not a success, but 
Brother Bales attempted some aquatic 
stunts that was voted highly successful. 
Sitting on a cracker box he leaned too far 
to one side and backed off into the water, 
getting slightly moist for the rest of the 
afternoon. He hung himself up to dry and 
appeared O. K. for dinner. 

But it was the dinner that got the boys. 
A genuine barbecue. We had heard of 
those famous dinners before landing in the 
State, but an opportunity to enjoy one 
never had presented itself. But through 
the generosity and hospitality of the 
Augusta Alumni of Sigma Nu, the boys at 
camp were given the chance of their life- 
time. I cannot describe that meal, but oh, 
boy, she was a jim dandy. Eat — say, we 
cast reflections on the mess sergeant of 
every company represented. Everything 
was good, new to our palates, and abun- 
dant. 

Hon. Samuel F. Garlington acted as the 
official toastmaster. Speeches were not in- 
dulged as the diners were too full for 
utterance, but several stunts were pulled 
off that got the boys. In the first place 
there was a nice, ice cold keg of "Queen" 
on tap^-the Augusta Beverage Co.'s fam- 
ous drink. Around that keg many of the 
bar-flies hung. The novelty of the flow- 
ing bowl—the drink that exhilirates but 
does not intoxicate — attracted everyone. 
Then the waiters continually replenished 



the mugs with the "liquid food" so that no 
one suffered from a parching thirst. 

A census was taken of the men present 
and from the thirty men who were at the 
dinner, 23 different chapters were repre- 
sented, the men hailing from nineteen dif- 
ferent States. It looked like a national 
convention. 

Too soon we had to leave for camp. We 
could have stayed there forever, it seemed. 
But back to camp we had to go. So with 
long "Hi Rickety" for the Augusta Sigs, 
we boarded the trucks and were soon back 
in dear old Hancock. 

The following were present: 

Lieutenant H. M. Gillespie, Co. 5, C. O. 
T. S. 

Lieutenant G. L. Sears, M. G. T. S. 

Lieutenant J. S. Boughton, Co. B, M G. 
T. S. 

Ed. E. Neill, Co. A, O. S. S. 

C. V. Austin, Cd. E, O. S. S. 

R. L. Fitts, Co. A, M. G. S. 

R. G. Sterling, Co. A, O. S. S. 

J. P. Fleming, Co. A, M. G. S. 

H. T. Ross, First Co., 5th Bn. 1st Regt. 

W. R. Primm, Co. A, O. S. S. 

O. C. McCandles, Infirmary No. 1. 

R. H. Gorrell, Co. 1, 5th Bn. 1st Regt. 

G. L. Green, Co. A, 0. S. S. 

M. G. Batley, Co. G, O. S. S. 

L. Welter, Co. G, O. S. S. 

E. R. Sawyer, Co. E, O. S. S. 

F. Larsen, Co. 4, C. O. T. S. 
R. K. Brown, Co. E, 0. S. S. 
W. R. Holbert, Co. E, 0. S. S. 

R. M. Riley, Co. A, 116 M. G. Bn. 
W. H. Bales, Co. 1, 5th Bn. 1st Regt. 
I). L. Slayton, Co. A, M. G. S. 
F. R. Hean, Army Y. M. C. A. No. 79. 
Stewart Harris, city. 
W. C. Davenport, city. 
S. F. Garlington, city. 
Joe Herman, city. 
A. F. Schweers, city. 
W. R. McLeod, city. 
— Trench and Camp (Camp Hancock, 
Augusta, Ga.). 



DELIGHTFUL DINNER FOR SIGMA NU 



Members of Fraternity at Camp Hancock 
Made Merry at Lenwood 

The members of the Sigma Nu Fraternity 
who are now located at Camp Hancock 
gathered at the Lenwood Hotel one even- 
ing recently, where they again renewed old 
time acquaintances and talked about the 
days when the gang about the "House" 



Conventions and Rallies 



89 



made things hum on the campus. The boys 
were largely from the West and Middle 
West, just a sprinkling of fellows from 
the "effete" East. And I guess we will 
have to hand it to those lads from the 
West. They sure did pull off the dinner in 
great style. Many of the men in camp 
who are "Sigs" could not be reached be- 
cause the date for the dinner was arranged 
on so short a notice, but the next affair 
will be given more lengthy advertisement. 

Lieutenant Gillespie acted as the toast- 
master and his delightful manner in 
handling the stunts of the evening doubly 
added to the pleasure of the occasion. 

Any Sigma Nu in camp who has not been 
reached and who will drop a card or visit 
Army Y. M. C. A. 79 and ask for F. R. 
Hean, will be put next to the Sigs who are 
in camp. 

SIGMA NU, IN KHAKI NOW, AT FRA- 
TERNITY FEED 

The members of the Sigma Nu Fraternity 
who are now located at Camp Hancock 
gathered at the Lenwook Hotel on Wednes- 
day evening. June 26th, where they again 
renewed old time acquaintanceships and 
talked about the day when the gang about 
the "House" made things hum on the cam- 
pus. The boys were largely from the West 
and Middle West, just a sprinkling of fel- 
lows from the "effete" East. And I guess 
we will have to hand it to those lads from 
the West. They sure did pull off the dinner 
in great style. Many of the men in camp 
who are "Sigs" could not be reached be- 
cause the date for the dinner was arranged 
3n so short a notice, but the next affair 
will be given more lengthy advertisement. 
Lieutenant GHlespie acted as the toast- 
master and his delightful manner in 
handling the stunts of the evening doubly 
added to the pleasure of the evening. 

Naturally the gang had to "bust" into 
songs — and the good old stuff that used to 
make the House reverberate was again 
hauled forth from memory's storehouse. 
Of course - the toastmaster had to call on 
the silver-tongues and from the sunburnt 
lips of the Khaki Brothers poured forth the 
humor, pathos and reminiscence that has 
been preserved from Fraternity dinner to 
Fraternity dinner. 

M. G. Bately of Oregon State opened her 
up with a rattling good talk. His journeys 
into the days when he was a freshman and 
comparing them to these days when he is, 
as he said, "an acting buck private," set 
the gang off into howls of delight. 

A. J. Schweers followed with a short talk 
that made the hit of the evening. And this 
is why. He said that if on Sunday after- 
noon at 4 p. m., July 7th, the boys would 
meet at the Administration Building of the 
Army Y. M. C. A., corner of Wrightsboro 
and Wheless Road, he would provide trucks 
to haul them out to Carmichael's Fishing 



Club, where a great old Georgia meal would 
be served. That suggestion just about hit 
everybody in the rigftt place. And, by the 
way, any Sig whose identity in camp is still 
a dead secret, wants to let Hean of Army 
Y. M. C. A. No. 79 know where he is hiding. 
To miss the party for July 7th is to miss 
the time of your young life. 

Joe Herman of Augusta naturally in- 
vited the entire crowd around to his home 
any time at all. If the Sunday morning 
breakfasts don't suit you, just hop a jitney 
and travel down to Joe's home and he prom- 
ised to fix you up in a style that would 
make you come again. 

F. R. Hean urged the fellows to scout 
around and line up any Sig that might 
be lurking in the sticks. The more we have 
on our correspondence list, will make the 
stunts to be pulled off all the more success- 
ful. He was appointed the secretary, as 
it were, of the Army Sigs in this Camp, 
and he would appreciate the names and ad- 
dresses of any Sigma Nu not listed in the 
following names. Call, phone, or drop a 
card to him at the Army Y. M. C. A. No. 79. 

Lieutenant Gillespie closed the feast of 
"reason" with an inspiring talk and the 
dinner was brought to a close in plenty 
of time to hit the camp before taps. — 
Trench and Camp (Camp Hancock, Augus- 
ta, Ga.). 

FORT SHERIDAN MEETINGS 

Dear Brother Dunlavy: 

The boys who attended the R. 0. T. C. 
camp at Fort Sheridan were for the most 
part men who will return to school next 
year, and were not in the regular service, 
but were sent to the camp at the expense 
of the Government. I happen to be en- 
listed in the Aviation section, flying, how- 
ever, and am waiting call to ground school. 

The organization we effected while at 
Sheridan was not very strong, because we 
could get together so seldom, but we ac- 
complished more, I believe, in the way of 
getting together, than most of the fra- 
ternities — I might say "any other." The 
first Sunday of the camp we had a gath- 
ering down on the beach of twenty-eight 
men. The second Sunday meeting thirty- 
two came around, and the third Sunday we 
threw our dinner at the Moraine, which 
was a splendid success. Warren Piper was 
kind enough to come out and I'm sure he 
deserves a lot of thanks. We couldnt have 
done without him. He gave us a short talk 
which was very much to the point and I am 
sure made every man think — about the 
Fraternity in war time. We also heard 
from Brother Brewer of Beta Kappa, and 
what he had to say about fraternity spirit 
and sticking to school will long remain in 
my own memory. 

On the whole, we certainly accomplished 
something by our meetings. Outside of 
the pleasure of mixing with such a splen- 



did bunch of men, a direct benefit to the 
Fraternity will be the result of the acquain- 
tanceships formed there. 

I might ask you to put a small notice in 
the Delta that those who failed to get their 
copies of the picture may get them Dy send- 
ing sivty-five cents to Brand, Photographer, 
Highland Park, III. 

The boys out at Fort Sheridan now are 
getting together in some way, and I shall 
see that they keep in touch with you in 
regard to activities. 

Sincerely and fraternally, 
H. A. PHILLIPS, Gamma Lambda. 

Chicago, 111., July 31, 1918. 



how they got started, and about the inex- 
pensive banquet because at that time of the 
year the finances of each man were pretty 

That letter makes us all who are active 
members, glow with pride that we are Sig- 
ma Nus. How can we help but go along 
and improve with such loyal Alumni back- 
ing . us up? Such deep interest as our 
Alumni have in us makes us want to do 
all we can for Beta Iota to keep her on top. 

Several new Brothers are anxious to 
meet their Alumni Brothers and become 
better acquainted. We are counting on 
your love of the Fraternity to bring you 
back again. — Beta Iota Bulletin. 




BETA IOTA ALUMNI BANQUET 

Since 1892 the Beta Iota Chapter of Sig- 
ma Nu has held a banquet at the end of 
the school year to make it a fitting climax 
of the year's work. As the years rolled on 
and new men came into school and those 
with the right stuff in them became Sigma 
Nus, our number of Alumni increased so 
that now there Is enrolled on our record 
about 280 men. These yearly banquets be- 
came to be banquets for the Alumni mem- 
bers, so that at least once a year they could 
come back to the old Fraternity and renew 
friendships that were gained by the golden 
tie that binds. 

This week we received a letter, a fine 
one, too, from one of our founders, Ed- 
mund Lee Nicholson, who is now in Ar- 
gonia, Kansas. He is sorry that he can- 
not get here for the banquet and he goes 
on and wonders how it will compare with 
the first one that was held in 1892, with 
trie nine founders and Past Regent Walter 
J. Sears present. That was the night they 
became Sigma Nus and this Chapter was 
given its name. Brother Nicholson tells 



EAST AND WEST MEET 

At Camp Hancock, Ga. 

By an Eastern Sig. 

Especially noteworthy is the fact that 

from such a group of men as assembled 

last week, the large number of Chapters 

and various States were represented. I 

assure you it quite a pleasure to meet men 

from the far West from Chapters I had 

heard so much about and get first-hand 

what the Western Sigma Nu is doing. 

When the 28th Division were here in 
camp, the Sigs were made up almost en- 
tirely of Eastern boys, particularly from 
Pennsylvania, but now the entire country 
has representatives in this camp. 

I notice that the Western Sig does a heap 
more singing than the Eastern Sig. He 
knows more songs and is able to sing them. 
We fellows from the East just have to tag 
along when the song-fest commences. Too 
bad that such a condition exists. We sure 
are lacking in not having a National Song. 
Fraternally, 

FRANK R. HEAN, Beta Rho, 
Secretary, Y. M. C. A. No. 79. 




immq uiiuyEuuiui^ ' i l l l llll l l llllll l ll l ll llll l l l llll lUim mmiiiiiiim 1111 " 1 " 111 Ml f 



The Alumni 



'mnimMMTHrnmnirmnirnnfiinnni^^ ■ ' 



DUTY CALLS ASSEMBLYMAN 

Hon. H. D. Williams, Gamma Theta, Enlists 
in U. S. Marine Corps 

Leaves for Paris Island Soon 

Assemblyman in First District Places Ap- 
peal of Uncle Sam Above Politics and 
Joins Branch of Service Which Has Won 
Fame on Battle Fields of France— Enlist- 
ment a Surprise to His Many Friends. 

Greater than the call of politics has come 
the appeal of Uncle Sam to Assemblyman 
Henry D. Williams of the First District of 
Oneida County. This popular and well 
known local attorney has enlisted in the 
United States Marines, and he will leave 
for the marine training station at Paris 
Island, S. C, in the very near future. This 
announcement will come as a surprise to 
his many friends in this vicinity, for in spite 
of the rumor that he was to enlist in the 
army there has been no official announce- 
ment on the assemblyman's part that he 
had decided to postpone a political career 
in order to do his full bit for this country 
in the ranks of the United States Marines. 
He is enlisting as a private, but it will 
probably not be very long before his capa- 
bility is rewarded by his advancement to a 
higher rank. While he has not as yet been 
sworn into the service there is little or no 
doubt but that this will be done within a 
week or ten days, for he has passed all re- 
quirements. 

Assemblyman Williams applied at the 
local Marine Corps recruiting station in 
the Mann Building about a week ago, but 
as he had certain important matters to 
settle before leaving he did not wish his 
enlistment made public. Sergeant W. E. 
Cooper, in charge of the station, was, of 
course, preatly pleased to sign up such a 
distinguished resident of the city. Mr. Wil- 
liams nas been a member of the Republican 
party since the time when he was first able 
to vote, and since then he has been one of 
the leaders in the work of the party here. 
He is a resident of Utica and has made this 
city his home for the greater part of his 
life. He was educated in the local schools, 
and is a graduate of Cornell University. 
After graduating he entered the office of 
Charles G. Irish. Later he practiced law 
for himself, and soon became one of the 
leading attorneys of the city. He is the 
son of Henry R. Williams, vice-president 
of the First National Bank, and is in the 
prime of life. For some time he has been 
a member of the Republican Club, and has 



as a true friend every member of this club. 
They, along with many others wish the 
patriotic assemblyman the best of luck in 
his venture. 

Before the draft. Assemblyman Williams 
enlisted in the Officers' Training Camp at 
Madison Barricks. but due to an attack of 
appendicitis at that time was unable to 
train at the school. Following his recov- 
ery he continued his efforts to enlist with 
the result that he is now, or soon to be, a 
regular member of the United States 
Marines. 

The enlistment of Mr. Williams is another 
proof of the fact that this country is 
wholeheartedly back of the war, and that 
young men from every walk and station of 
life are willing and ready to take part in 
the great work of making the world safe 
for democracy. While the whole commu- 
nity will feel keenly the temporary loss of 
one of its prominent citizens, utica is proud 
that another of her sons has entered the 
service. Mr. Williams has the approval of 
every patriotic Utican in the step which he 
has taken, and on his return he will be 
warmly welcomed. — Utica, N. Y., News- 
paper. 



WAR CHANGES FOR RHODES 
SCHOLARS 

New Honor for Frank Aydelotte, Beta Eta 

Changes, both temporary and perma- 
nent, in the organization of the Rhodes 
scholarships were discussed by Dr. George 
R. Parkin, organizing secretary of the 
Rhodes Trust, just before he started back 
to England a few days ago, after a long 
tour among universities and colleges of 
America. 

'The trust has found it advisable to post- 
pone all new elections to the scholarships 
till the end of the war," he said, "not only 
in the United States, but in all the British 
colonies from which scholars are drawn. 
The university life of Oxford has been so 
broken up by the almost universal accep- 
tance of military service by the students 
that scholars from abroad cannot get from 
it what they do in normal times. 

"Besides this, in all the United States 
and the dominions men qualified to com- 
pete for scholarships are qualified to be- 
come soldiers and ought to do so, hence 
elections have to be deferred till the war 
is over. The postponed scholarships will 
be filled up as soon as circumstances per- 
mit, and in the meantime the usual quali- 



92 



The Delta 



fying examinations will be held in October 
in any State where candidates present them- 
selves if due notice is given." 

It is probable that as time goes on ex- 
Rhodes scholars in America will be asked 
to take a larger part in the work of choos- 
ing new scholars. In the meantime Dr. 
Parkin has arranged for the appointment 
of an American secretary, to have charge of 
general American interests of the Rhodes 
Trust. 

This position has been accepted by Frank 
Aydelotte, professor of English in the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who 
was a Rhodes scholar from Indiana from 
1905 to 1908. He studied at Indiana Uni- 
versity and at Harvard, and is the author 
of a number of books, including "The Ox- 
ford Stamp," a collection of essays on Eng- 
lish university life. — New York Times. 



ANGELL, DELTA GAMMA, MAKES REC- 
ORD FOR BIGGEST MONTH 

Last month was the largest May, as far 
as memberships and financial returns from 
memberships are concerned, that the Balti- 
more Y. M. C. A. has known in four years. 
May is generally the best month of the 
twelve in the matter of getting new mem- 
bers and renewing expired membership 
cards and this last May has eclipsed all 
others. 

Beginning last January the Y. M. C. A. 
has been on the gain, though at first it was 
believed that the war would interfere with 
getting new members. Instead of inter- 
fering it seemed to help. 

In explaining the increase in membership, 
Norman H. Angell, membership secretary, 
said: "Baltimore men are realizing that 
they must prepare for the days ahead, so 
that when they are called to the colors they 
will be physically ready." — Baltimore (Md.) 
Star. 



CHARLES STUART STRAW, BETA RHO, 

APPOINTED SECOND ASSISTANT 

PROSECUTOR OF CAMDEN 

COUNTY 

Strong character seldom fails to select 
its pathway in the direction of honor and 
usefulness for which its talents are best 
adapted, and this fact has been often illus- 
trated in the lives of men who have emi- 
nently succeeded to their own satisfaction, 
as well as to the necessary advancement of 
the integral interests of society, as may be 
found in the active legal career of Charles 
Stuart Straw, Esq., a prominent and influ- 
ential member of the New Jersey Bar, who 
was honored several days ago by an ap- 
pointment as Second Assistant Prosecutor 
of Camden County. Mr. Straw's appoint- 
ment to the place in question was an emi- 
nently fitting choice of a man especially 
qualified by wide legal training and experi- 



ence, and he will undoubtedly discharge the 
duties and responsibilities devolving upon 
him in a capable, intelligent and praise- 
worthy manner. 

Second Assistant Prosecutor Straw is a 
son of the Rev. C. W. Straw, D. D., Su- 
perintendent of the North District of Phila- 
delphia Conference of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, and is a man of many 
fine qualities of personal character. He 
studied law in the offices of Judge Lewis 
Starr and the late Judge John G. Horner, 
applying himself with diligence and zeal, 
and supplemented this excellent Instruc- 
tion by a further course of study at the law 
school of the University of Pennsylvania, 
from which he graduated in 1914 with the 
degree of LL.B. While a student at the 
above institution he was president and man- 
ager of the University of Pennsylvania 
Combined Musical Clubs, a member of the 
Wilson Law Club, Sigma Nu Fraternity, 
Philinathian Society and the Navy Club. 

At the present time Mr. Straw Is first 
lieutenant and adjutant of the Camden 
Battalion, State Militia Reserves; chairman 
of the 9 Associate Legal Advisory Board of 
the Third City District of the Camden Draft 
Board; chairman of the Fourth District 
City Gardens Committee, of Camden, and a 
member of the First Methodist Episcopal 
church, of Camden. — Philadelphia Journal 
of Commerce, March 23, 1918. 



HOWARD L. BRIDGES 
Xi 

Mrs. Howard L. Bridges and two chil- 
dren, Miss Leonna and H. L. Bridges, Jr., 
of Leesville, S. C, are the guests of Mrs. 
Russell Bridges, at 145 Penn Avenue. Mr. 
H. L. Bridges, who left for France last 
August to take a responsible position with 
the American Red Cross, spent the winter 
in Paris, but is now in London, having 
been promoted to the position as general 
accountant, and will visit all the Red Cross 
headquarters "over there," systematizing 
the books. — Atlanta Constitution. 

The above clipping discloses the where- 
abouts of Brother Howard L. Bridges, of 
Xi Chapter. He comes from a family of 
Sigma Nus, and was connected with his 
brother, S. R. Bridges, also a well known 
and enthusiastic Sigma Nu, in the manage- 
ment of the Alkahest Lyceum System, lo- 
cated in Atlanta, Ga., before his entry into 
the war work of the Red Cross. Four of 
the Bridges brothers are Sigma Nus, H. L., 
B. L., E. L. and S. R. Bridges, all of Xi 
Chapter, Emory College. — W. L. Kemp. 



PROFESSOR CROSSLEY TO LEAVE 

Delta Lambda 

The student body of Wesleyan will hear 
with regret that Professor Moses L. Cross- 
ley, Ph. D., associate professor of chem- 



The Alumni 



93 



istry, has resigned from the Faculty and 
will not return to his chair next year. Pro- 
fessor Crossley, who has enjoyed no small 
popularity and esteem among Wesleyan 
men ever since he came to the University 
in 1913, has accepted the position of Direc- 
tor of Research for the Calco Chemical 
Company at Bound Brook, N. J. He will 
also be associated with the Yale Chemistry 
Department. Professor Crossley is a Fel- 
low of the American Association for Ad- 
vancement of Science, the American Chem- 
ical Society, and the Eighth International 
Congress of Applied Chemistry. Although 
his going is a distinct loss to Wesleyan, his 
talents will find a merited success in the 
wider industrial field. — Wesleyan Argus. 



HARRY L. HOPWOOD 

Alumni Day Chairman, Beta Nu 

No account of the Alumni Day cere- 
monies would be complete without some 
mention of the genial and gentle general 
chairman of the occasion, Harry L. Hop- 
wood, '07, and his indefatigable efforts to 
make the day a success. 

Columbus people do not need any intro- 
duction to Harry Hop wood — nor do many 
Ohio State University people. They know 
all about him, for if there is a Liberty Loan 
to be floated, a Community War Chest 
drive, a Red Cross or a Y. M. C. A., or 
any other kind of campaign his team is 
always in the lead and HE is the LEADER. 
He has a way with him. YOU KNOW! 

Harry is an industrial lawyer— when he 
isn't on some sort of campaign or drive — 
and owns a section of those elegantly ap- 

S tinted offices in the new First National 
ank Building, dedicated to the Ohio State 
firm of Doud, Crawfis, Bradford and 
Dones. He started to work for Alumni 
Day sometime early in April. He organ- 
ized his committees, kept open house for 
them in his office, dictated hundreds of let- 
ters, had the telephone going day and 
night, rounded up fellows who nadn't been 
back to the campus since they graduated, 
bagged several new members for the Asso- 
ciation, talked reunion at the Athletic Club 
and elsewhere and finally had the crowd 
coming this way. Between whiles he said 
good-bye to the State boys at Camp Sher- 
man, leaving for the trip overseas, watched 
over the welfare of the Sigma Nus, to 
whom he is alumni adviser, and superin- 
tended the thousand little details that go 
to make up a great occasion. 

Nor did he once lose his temper or his 
smile or his optimism. He gave his time, 
himself, his money, and enjoyed doing it. 
Harry Hopwood does not expect thanks. 
He does things just for the love of doing 
them. 

Hats off to him, everybody! May he 
live long and prosper! — Ohio State Uni- 
versity Monthly. 



CONGRESSMAN BLAND, BETA ETA, 
TELLS OF VISIT TO FRANCE 

Oscar Bland, a member of congress 
from the Fifth Indiana district, at an 
open air meeting here, said that the 
American soldiers who have been wound- 
ed and are being cared for in hos- 
pitals in France are receiving the best med- 
ical attention it is possible to obtain for 
them and that the American soldiers are 
in Europe to stay until Germany has been 
subdued. He asserted that he would never 
cast a vote for any peace that would leave 
the kaiser in a position to renew the war 
in future years. Mr. Bland returned from 
France recently and in his talk here he 
described conditions as he found them in 
the fighting zone. — Indianapolis News. 



FROM AGATE TO ZINC 
Henry D. Clayton, Theta 

When I was Democratic Minority Leader, 
Representative Henry D. Clayton, subse- 
quently chairman of the great Committee 
on the Judiciary, now a Federal Judge, gave 
out a flaming interview declaring that he 
would offer a substitute tariff bill covering 
every item from "Agate to Zinc." The last 
three words were winged words, and were 
headlined in every newspaper in the land, 
and this interview reached into the re- 
motest corners of the country. The papers 
hammered on it until a great uproar was 
created — in fact, a perfect furore, outside 
of Congress — and a vast volume of talk in 
Congress. It was the resounding theme 
of every tongue. Of course the thing was 
unheard of till then. 

I hope that my illustrious friend, Judge 
Henry D. Clayton, may live many years full 
of happiness and prosperity, but if he 
reaches the age of Methuselah and is inter- 
viewed every day the chances are a thou- 
sand to one that he will never utter any 
three words which will be so widely quoted 
or create such a hubbub as did "Agate to 
Zinc."— Champ Clark's Autobiography in 
Hearst's Magazine. 



HOME, SWEET HOME 

The first thing War Correspondent Lyon 
did after leaving ship in New York was — 
report to his office? No. 

He drank two chocolate ice cream sodas! 

The second thing he did was — telegraph 
his wife? No again. 

He went into a restaurant and drank 
three glasses of milk! 

"The first I've had since I put foot on 
French soil," said Lyon. 

Then he filled his pockets full of good 
old American cigars — the French smokes 
are something awful, he explained — and 
within an hour both his wife and his office 
knew he was back. — Columbus (Ohio) 
Citizen. 



Alumni Chapter Letters 



AKRON ALUMNI CHAPTER 

The Akron Alumni Chapter activities 
have been rather curtailed, due mainly to 
the inroads the war has made upon our 
members. The meetings have been aban- 
doned during the summer months. We in- 
tend to resume our meetings this fall, hop- 
ing to have enough of the home guards to 
warrant us holding our monthly meetings. 

Brother Frank W. Fox, Delta Zeta, with 
the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, 
and Brother Jones, with the B. F. Goodrich 
Co., are two new Sigs to join our fold. 

Brother Frederic J. Wenk, Gamma Rho, 
and Reginald F. Kitchingman, Gamma 
Lambda, have received their call and are 
located at Columbus, Ohio. 

W. W. SCHALLER, Secretary. 
1009 W. Exchange St. 
Akron, Ohio, August 12, 1918. 



BALTIMORE ALUMNI CHAPTER 

You will be glad to hear that Past Regent 
I. P. Robinson left Baltimore on July 5 for 
war service in this country. Although he 
was beyond the usual age for appointments, 
he offered his services from a spirit of 
patriotism to the Government. In the last 
week of June Surgeon General Rupert Blue 
telegraphed Brother Robinson to come to 
Washington for an interview. The Gov- 
ernment needed at once a specialist at the 
State Industrial Farm at Leavenworth, 
Kansas. The interview was so satisfactory 
that the appointment of Acting Assistant 
Surgeon in the U. S. Public Health Service 
was given Brother Robinson. He returned 
to Baltimore, at once closed his office and 
responded to the call of the Government. 
His present address is, care Post Office 
Bldg., Leavenworth, Kansas. 

Professor Roy Foley of Colgate Univer- 
sity and I spent the Fourth of July at the 
Edgewood Arsenal, Edgewood, Md. Pro- 
fessor Foley is giving his vacation for Y. 
M. C. A. work in the camps around Balti- 
more. At Edgewood all the "gas" is made. 
It is a camp where very few visitors come. 
The boys at this place had a big athletic 
field day which Professor Foley and I tried 
to run off. We were invited to dinner at 
Mess B. At the close of it a splendid Sigma 
Nu introduced himself to me. He was 
Brother A. E. Webster, of our Syracuse 
Chapter, and who, by the way, was Com- 
mander of his Chapter last year. 

In the different camps around Baltimore 
we figure that we have over eighty thousand 
men. Naturally a large number come to 
Baltimore on leave. Of this number one is 
sure to find a few Sigma Nus. Last week 



I had the pleasure of meeting Brother Leslie 
J. Bosworth in our "Y" building here. 

Brother Bosworth comes from Manley, 
Iowa, and is a member of our Gamma 
Lambda Chapter. He is stationed at Camp 
Holabird, Md. 

I also hear that there is another Sigma Nu 
at this same camp, Brother Carl M. Aldrich, 
Delta Eta, though I haven't had the pleasure 
yet of meeting him. 

Fraternally yours, 

NORMAN H. ANGELL. 
July 21, 1918. 



CLEVELAND ALUMNI CHAPTER 

Albert S. Allen, alias Si Allen, has mi- 
grated to Washington, D. C, his address 
being 1106 Thirteenth Street. 

Arthur Carr, Beta Iota, who formerly 
taught at South High, is now in Alliance, at 
522 South Arch Street. I don't know what 
he is doing. 

Carl Jacobsen, Delta Alpha, is now lo- 
cated in Madison, Ohio. Occupation ditto. 

Carl B. Jones, Delta Zeta, is now in 
Girard, O. 

J. F. Taddiken, Beta Phi, has left us. He 
stole a march on everybody, got married 
and "beat it." I had a letter from him 
stating that he was in San Francisco, still 
working for the National Sugar Refineries. 
We miss him, as he was a good, faithful 
worker. We must give him a lot of credit 
for his work in financing the Grand Chapter. 

H. L. Cornelisen, Beta Zeta, has left us. 
His address is Bulletin Bldg., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

The following are new additions to our 
Honor Roll: 

"Dad" Clark, Delta Zeta, Naval Reserves. 

R. C. Floyd, Beta Upsilon, was only with 
us a short time. 

Byron E. Jackson, Epsilon, is an aviator, 
at present at Armorers School, Wilbur 
Wright Field, Fairfield, O. 

Robert N. Smith, Gamma Kappa, died 
after a short illness — pneumonia got him. 
About a dozen of us attended the funeral. 
He left a widow and one small child, I be- 
lieve. Smith was a real Sig, a plugger, and, 
believe me, we feel his loss keenly. 

I heard yesterday that Corporal Russ 
Pease, Delta Zeta, is "over there." He is 
what they call an "obstacle man." 

Just learned Fred Snell, Delta Alpha, has 
received commission as first lieutenant in 
Quartermaster's Department of Construc- 
tion. He will be stationed at Camp Sher- 
man. 

MILES E. EVANS, Secretary. 

July 10, 1918. 



Alumni Chapter Letters 



95 



DENVER ALUMNI CHAPTER 

Regular meetings have been discontin- 
ued throughout the summer months. Spe- 
cial noonday luncheons are held frequently 
on the call of the secretary, Brother P. S. 
Jolley. Brother Jolley's address is 411 
Symes Building, Denver. Phone Main 833, 
and all visiting Sigs are particularly re- 
quested to comunicate with nim. 

Inspector Williams advises that the Colo- 
rado Chapters are in good condition as re- 
gards the past year, and plans are being 
made to help out more than ever during 
the coming season in order that they may 
all be recruited to proper strength to enable 
them to carry, on the work in the proper 
manner. At some of the schools plans have 
already been made by some of the fra- 
ternities to combine two at least in one 
house. It has not as vet been thought 
necessary to consider this as regards our 
own Chapters. 

Brother O. S. Fowler is, as usual, lead- 
ing the list on fish stories (and actual fish) 
for the season. 

Brother A. F. Krippner seems to be find- 
ing plenty of business excuses for extended 
trips throughout Colorado and adjoining 
States in his Packard roadster. 

Brother P. S. Jolly is the very proud dad 
of a fine daughter, just arrived. 

Denver Alumni are looking forward to 
Brother Dunlavy's promised visit this fall 
and an effort will be made to give as many 
as possible an opportunity of meeting him. 

Business conditions in this section remain 
very good; very few loafers and many pro- 
ducers. With our coal mines, metal mines, 
extensive agriculture and manufacturing, in 
all of which our Brothers are widely repre- 
sented, we feel that we are trying to do our 
share in the production of material and 
food for the winning of the war. 

O. S. MOORE, Secretary. 



HARTFORD ALUMNI CHAPTER 

The first Alumni Chapter of the Sigma 
Nu Fraternity in the State of Connecticut 
is now organized and ready for service. 

The officers of the Hartford Alumni 
Chapter are as follows: President, Graham 
H. Anthony, Beta Tau; Vice-President, Ed- 
win B. Judd, Delta Beta; Secretary, Ray- 
mond H. Segur, Delta Chi; and Treasurer, 
Edward C. Marsden, Gamma Delta. 

Two of our Charter Members, Brothers 
Brand and Francis, are now in our coun- 
try's service, while Brother M. L. Crossley 
has resigned from the Wesleyan faculty 
to enter the industrial field. 

We feel that we are especially fortunate 
in having a collegiate chapter at Trinity. 
This will give us an opportunity to mingle 
in the life of a chapter house and should 



be of advantage both to us and to the mem- 
bers of Delta Chi Chapter. 

The Chapter would be glad to welcome 
any Sigma Nu at its monthly dinner at the 
University Club, 30 Lewis Street, on the 
second Wednesday of each month, at 6 
o'clock. We do most cordially invite all 
brothers who are living in this part of New 
England where Sigma Nu is comparatively 
unknown, to affiliate with the Hartford 
Alumni Chapter. 

RAYMOND H. SEGUR, Secretary. 



MONTGOMERY ALUMNI CHAPTER 

The Montgomery Alumni Chapter has not 
been particularly active in recent weeks. 
However, its members have been doing their 
full part, not only in their usual avocations, 
but also in all forms of war activity. It 
should be a cause of lasting congratulation 
to all loyal Sigma Nus that so large a pro- 
portion of the membership of the Legion of 
Honor is represented on the rolls of the 
great armies of Democracy. How my heart 
swelled with pride at the news that every 
Chapter had already given a large per- 
centage of its membership, and that in 
many cases the percentage was greater 
than that of any other Fraternity. 

We can all now more fully grasp the 
value of the spiritual and patriotic teach- 
ings of our noble Order. While appreciat- 
ing the personal and social values of Sigma 
Nu, for one I have always given the first 
place to the high ethical and civic ideals 
inculcated. 

Every Sigma Nu a Friend and Brother, 
how splendid the appeal! Every Sigma Nu 
a Patriot, how much more compelling and 
wonderful the challenge! 

While scores of Sigs are in uniform and 
are fighting under the immediate inspira- 
tion of the flag, on the Western front and 
elsewhere, or are in training camps pre- 
paring for overseas service, either in the 
field or in the air, there are many others 
who from age or other disqualifications 
cannot share m that form of service. They, 
however, are not unmindful of the oppor- 
tunity for activity in a civic way, and they 
are found leading in Red Cross, Y. M. C. A., 
Y. W. C. A., Liberty Loan, Food Adminis- 
tration, secret service, library and other 
campaigns, cheerfully giving time and 
treasure toward winning the war. 



General Activities 

Of our Chapter there is no one who is 
doing more toward stimulating a loyal sup- 
port of the Government, in encouraging 
obedience to law and order, in ridding the 
country of slackers and in a general sup- 
port of all Government policies than Jud$e 
Henry D. Clayton, a sketch of whom will 
be found elsewhere in this issue. Camp 



96 



The Delta 



Sheridan, located at Montgomery, has 
brought within his jurisdiction large num- 
bers of men in uniform, who have not yet 
been naturalized. These have been formed 
by Judge Clayton into classes, and formal 
ceremonies of naturalization have been con- 
ducted by him in a most impressive and 
dramatic manner. 

Another member of the Chapter, Judge 
Ben P. Crum, is active in all war work, and 
he is now serving as President of the 
Bankhead Club, which is engaged in the 

gatriotic task of re-electing Hon. John H. 
iankhead, senior Senator from Alabama, 
to the United States Senate. Senator Bank- 
head has been in public life in Alabama 
almost fifty years, thirty of which he has 
been either a Representative, in Congress 
or a member of the Senate. 

Judge E. Perry Thomas, Assistant Dis- 
trict Attorney of the L. & N. Railroad, is 
now, by virtue of Government control, one 
of the trusted servants of Uncle Sam, and, 
apart from his regular duties, he is doing 
everything possible by way of assisting the 
Government in meeting the immense prob- 
lems of transportation. 

W. Temple Seibels is a candidate for re- 
election as Solicitor for the Fifteenth 
(Montgomery) Judicial Circuit, in the pri- 
mary of August 13, 1918, with every show 
of success. 

Floyd Powell has left Montgomery, at 
least temporarily, and is now located at 
Dothan, Ala. He represents the Reliance 
Life Insurance Co. 

Stuart May and Feagin Rainer more than 
a year ago purchased the confectionery 
business of Duncan May, which they con- 
ducted for some months. Later they dis- 
solved, and each is now at the head of sep- 
arate establishments, and each is enjoying 
a high degree of prosperity. 

Eason Cook, on the death of his father, 
left the jewelry establishment of Leo Klein, 
and took over the management of the large 
planting and stock raising interests left by 
his father. 

Eugene Reid and James Wade, both un- 
dergraduate members of Beta Theta, are 
on the road this summer with the Redpath 
Chautauqua, the former as cashier and ad- 
vance agent, and the latter as property 
manager. 

Joe Frank Lassiter is now employed in 
Government work at Akron, Ohio. 



him for handling problems of army organ- 
ization, and his advice is constantly in 
requisition by the Division with which he 
is associated. 

Roy Cox, located at Washington City for 
some years in the office of Louis L. Jeffries, 
General Counsel of the Southern Railway, 
after a law course in the George Washing- 
ton University, located at Mobile. Re- 
sponding to the call to the colors, he was 
assigned to duty at Camp Sheridan as an 
army field clerk. He is one of the most 
accomplished office men in the army, and 
much of the completeness of the organiza- 
tion of headquarters at Camp Sheridan is 
due to his experience and skill. 

Harwood Bowman has recently com- 
pleted a special course, with high honors, 
at Fort Sill, Okla., and has been promoted 
to First Lieutenant, 117th Field Artillery, 
at Camp Wheeler, Macon, Ga. 

Henry C. Meader, a Lieutenant in the 
307th Field Signal Battalion, American Ex- 
peditionary Forces, is somewhere in France. 
His mother in Montgomery has advices of 
his safe arrival and good health. 

Thomas J. and George G. Miles, brothers, 
are in uniform, the former in training at 
the Reserve Officers' Training Camp, Camp 
Taylor, Louisville, Ky., and the latter as a 
Sergeant in the 113th Aero Corps, Aero 
Supply Department, Middletown, Pa. 

Forbes Yarbrough, still a member of 
Iota, is in the Reserve Officers' Training 
Camp at Camp Taylor, Louisville, Ky. 

The gratifying news has been received 
by relatives that Lorenzo F. Woodruff 
(Fuzzy) has arrived safely in France. 

Thomas M. Owen, Jr., recently trans- 
ferred to the 313th United States Cavalry, 
with his old rank as First Lieutenant, and 
stationed at Del Rio, Texas, is now on tem- 
porary detail at Camp Perry, Ohio, in at- 
tendance upon the School of Instruction in 
Small Arms. 



Representation in the U. S. Army 

The Chapter has a fine representation 
in the United States Army. General R. E. 
Steiner continues in command of the 62nd 
Brigade, 31st (Dixie) Division, at Camp 
Wheeler, Macon, Ga. Brother Steiner 
ranks very high in army circles. His previ- 
ous training as a lawyer has specially fitted 



State Service 

The Chapter has the following repre- 
sentatives at the State Capitol: Ormond 
Somerville and Lucien D. Gardner, Justices 
of the Supreme Court; Graff J. Hubbard, 
Adjutant General; Lawrence H. Lee, Re- 
porter to the Supreme Court and Court of 
Appeals; Judge Charles E. McCall, Chief 
Examiner of Public Accounts; and Dr. 
Thomas M. Owen, Sr., Director, Department 
of Archives and History. 

It has been the policy of Montgomery 
Sigma Nus to cooperate with all active 
Chapters by bringing to their attention the 
names of desirable young men preparing? for 
college from year to year. It is believed 
that the number of worthy young men who 
will apply for admission to higher institu- 
tions of learning this year will not fall 
short of previous years, notwithstanding 



i 



Alumni Chapter Letters 



97 



the large demands for all forms of service 
both under arms and in agriculture and in- 
dustry . The policy of the Government in 
giving preference, other things equal, to 
men of college training and equipment, has 
served to emphasize the importance of such 
training, ana young men are showing their 
appreciation of the significance of this 
action on the part of the Government by a 
determination for better equipment for life 
through our higher educational institutions. 
Plans have already been projected for se- 
curing the names of all young men who will 
leave Montgomery this fall, and they will 
be advised as to the high claims of Sigma 
Nu. 



THOMAS M. OWEN, SR. 



July 25, 1918. 



NEW YORK CITY ALUMNI CHAPTER 

On Tuesday evening, July 11, the New 
York Alumni Chapter had the pleasure and 
honor of entertaining the members of the 
High Council, who were holding a meeting 
for the first time east of the Alleghenies. 
After a reception and informal dinner at 
the International Geneva Club, at 143 West 
Forty-fourth Street, we began to absorb 
some of that Sigma Nu Spirit and even 
though we thought we had a pretty full 
system we soon found that we had room 
for lots more. We hope that the High 
Council will see fit to favor us with another 
visit in the near future. 

Since our last letter our Treasurer, 
Brother Edgar Rogers, Gamma Theta, left 
to accept a position in Washington. Brother 
Samuef Ketchum has been elected to fill 
his place. 

Brother Kobak, our Secretary, also left 
for a permanent residence in Chicago. He 
worked wonders during the short time he 
was Secretary and we were very sorry to 
see him go. Brother Ralph E. Sawyer was 
elected to fill the vacancy. 

Brothers Lane and McCormick, both of 
Delta Gamma, recently commissioned at 
Fortress Monroe, dropped in to one of our 
Thursday luncheons recently. We shall be 
glad to welcome any of the other brothers 
who can find time to do this on their way 
across. These luncheons are held at the 
same old place, Machinery Club, Hudson 
Terminal Building, 50 Church Street. 

Brother Alvin E. Gillett, Gamma Gamma, 
who had charge of the Y. M. C. A. war 
hut in Bryant Park, left the first of July to 
take charge of a similar hut at Waterbury, 
Conn. 

Brother George A. Smith, the Vice-Re- 
sent, is acting as Regent while Regent 
Borden H. Burr is in France. 

Sigma Nu lost a devoted Brother on May 
27, 1918, when Chas. P. Fry was called by 
death. 



Brother "Bert" Wilson, Beta Iota, has 
enlisted as a Y. M. C. A. Secretary and ex- 
pects soon to go across the pond and carry 
our greetings to the Brothers "Over There. 
We shall miss Brother Wilson a great deal, 
but wish to congratulate the boys in the 
service upon having such an able and effi- 
cient Secretary working for them. Any 
Brother who has ever met Brother Wilson 
just knows that he will make the best Red 
Triangle man in the world, baring none. 

It is rumored at present that this same 
Brother Wilson has a monopoly on all Sig- 
ma Nu marriage ceremonies around New 
York City, and is using some magic means, 
whether fair or foul we are unable to say 
at this writing, for inveighing Sigs into 
double blessedness. Just look at tne list. 

Brother Archie Homewood Dean and 
Miss Maude Shuman were married at the 
home of the bride in New York City, on 
the evening of June 15th. 

Brother Henry ("Henny") A. Theis, 
Gamma Epsilon, the new inspector of the 
Seventh Division, was the next to fall. He 
neglected to send the Secretary an an- 
nouncement of his marriage, so we must 
punish him by not telling anyone who the 
lucky woman was. Don t forget to send 
the card next time, Henny. 

Brother "Bill" Brown, Jr., and Miss 
Emma Aline Gauthey were united in mar- 
riage at the home of the bride on July 6th. 

RALPH E. SAWYER, Secretary. 

July 30, 1918. 



OKLAHOMA CITY ALUMNI CHAPTER 

The Alumni Chapter feels that, under the 
conditions prevailing, it has faithfully car- 
ried out the trust reposed in it during the 
past year and only hopes that it may jus- 
tify its existence in the future as well. 

In January the Alumni Chapter gave a 
dance for the active Chapter at Norman, 
which was held in the ball room of the 
Lee Huckins Hotel in this city, and at 
which was represented not only the active 
men and city Alumni, but also many 
Brothers from the forces at Camp Doni- 
phan and Fort Sill. 

In February the Chapter at Norman and 
this Chapter put on a banquet, smoker and 
initiation at the Lee Huckins Hotel here, 
which was a pronounced success, with a 
large attendance from all parts of the 
State as well as neighboring States. 

The regular monthly luncheons at the 
Savoy Cafe, on the first Saturday of each 
month, have been held regularly and have 
been the source of much profit to the order 
and to the individuals present. 

Our membership has gradually dwindled 
until few of the faithful remain. We give 



98 



The Delta 



the addresses of those in the service as 
far as possible, as follows: 

Lieutenant Geo. Puterbaugh, Gamma Up- 
silon, Camp Pike, Ark. 

Major W. P. Lipscomb, Sigma, 132nd Field 
Artillery, A. E. F., France. 

Lieutenant Keely West, Delta Epsilon, Med- 
ical Corps. 

Captain W. M. Sanger, Sigma, Medical 
Corps. 

Lieutenant J. C. Thompson, Delta Epsilon, 
Aide to Gen. R. P. Hoffman, A. E. F., 
France. 

Paul Darrough, Delta Epsilon, U. S. Navy. 
Clarence McKinney, Delta Epsilon, Radio 

Training School, College Park, Maryland. 
Lewis Morris, Delta Epsilon, Army. Ad- 
dress unknown. 

The remaining Sigma Nus who can be 
counted as faithful members are as follows: 

0. E. Jones, Delta Epsilon, Attorney, Col- 
cord Building. 

C. D. Bennett, Psi, Attorney, Col cord 
Building. 

Solon W. Smith, Nu, Attorney, American 
National Bank Building. 

1. D. Taylor, Nu, Attorney, Referee in 
Bankruptcy, Baum Building. 

C. Edgar Honnold, Gamma Beta, Bond 
Broker, State National Bank Building. 

John H. Dunkin, Gamma Xi, Assistant 
Manager Rorabaugh-Brown D. G. Com- 
pany. 

O. E. McCartney, Beta Mu, President Okla- 
homa National Life Insurance Company. 

H. D. Canfield, Delta Epsilon, Bond Broker, 
Insurance Building. 

There are a few others here who have 

not been active in the work of the Alumni 
Chapter. 

We have kept in close touch with the 
active Chapter at Norman, and are pleased 
to report that it is in excellent condition. 
This is largely due to the watchful care of 
Brother Inspector E. R. Newby, who lives 
at Norman and keeps his hand on the Sig- 
ma Nu pulse at all times of night and day. 

If the draft age is lowered to eighteen 
undoubtedly the Norman Chapter will have 
to close, but under present conditions we 
feel certain that it will maintain a very 
virile existence throughout the war. 

SOLON W. SMITH, Secretary. 

July 26, 1918. 



OMAHA ALUMNI CHAPTER 

The call to the "colors" has been so 
strong for so many members of the Omaha 
Alumni Chapter that its ranks have been 
sadly depleted and its activities curtailed. 
Eighteen former members have gone into 
the service and this of course takes the 
younger and more active men. We are 
proud of the record of the Chapter and the 



few of us that are left are trying to "keep 
the home fires, burning" till we meet again, 
and listen to their wonderful stories of 
their share in the conflict for liberty and 
democracy. 

Earle Carse, our former president, is 
now in the navy, stationed at the Great 
Lakes Naval Training Station. The trans- 
fer of the Infantry from Fort Crook to 
Camp Funston took four Sigs, who were 
all officers, with it. These boys, we under- 
stand, will soon leave for "over seas." 

E. A. Roehry has been transferred to 
Peoria, 111., thus taking another one of our 
more active members. 

Hugh H. Drake was lately married to 
Miss Gretchen Langdon, in Omaha, and 
will make their home at Manhattan, Kan- 
sas, near where Brother Drake is stationed 
until he receives his "over seas" orders. 
Brother Claire H. Murphy, formerly of 
Omaha, was in the city for about a week 
before leaving for Camp Dodge to enter 
the service. 

No regular meetings of the Alumni Chap- 
ter are being held this summer, but with the 
coming of the winter we expect to meet 
to reorganize and elect a new quota of 
officers. The weekly luncheons have also 
been given up for the summer. 

WM. L. RANDALL, 

Temporary Secretary. 



PANAMA ALUMNI CHAPTER 

I regret that the Panama Alumni Chap- 
ter of Sigma Nu is at present in a state of 
innocuous desuetude. I believe that I am 
the only member of the Fraternity now re- 
maining on the Isthmus. Under the cir- 
cumstances it will not be possible to write 
any Chapter letters, as there is no one but 
myself to nominate a reporter and it would 
be most immodest for me to do so and then 
declare myself elected. 

Regretting that I shall be unable to com- 
ply with your requests, but sincerely hop- 
ing that a flock of Sigma Nus will arrive on 
the Isthmus so that this tropical Chapter 
may be revived, I am, 

Fraternally yours, 

STEVENS GANSON. 
May 3, 1918. 



PITTSBURGH ALUMNI CHAPTER 

The nation today stands before the bul- 
letin boards and is interested chiefly iv 
matters other than local, and any report 
dealing with the men of Pittsburgh's 
Alumni Chapter must be primarily a rec- 
ord of Knights gone out to battle, rather 
than a recital of events here at home. An 
examination today of the Alumni Chapter's 
mailing list in force last spring, shows 
thirty-eight men known to be in uniform 



y. 



Alumni Chapter Letters 



99 



and some half dozen others in Government 
service elsewhere than Pittsburgh. The 
Alumni Lodge — intended to house ten or 
eleven men — now boasts a service flag of 
nineteen stars; the rapid growth of this 
constellation during the early summer is 
threatening the necessity of a special as- 
tronomical observer to keep the new stars 
in their places. 

Among those most keenly missed in 
Pittsburgh is L. L. Hopkins (Case), former 
inspector of the Fifth Division, and for 
two years manager of the Alumni Lodge. 
Hopkins is with the 305th Engineers, now 
in France. 

Lieutenant S. G. Hibben (Case) was one 
of the founders of the United Service Club 
in Washington and now lives at the club 
in DuPont Circle. Before entering mili- 
tary service, Hibben was prominent in the 
modern profession of illuminating engi- 
neering, and he is now engaged in the 
development of improved types of search- 
lights to detect hostile aeroplanes. Hib- 
ben has made an interesting collection of 
war posters, domestic and foreign. Sev- 
eral hundred of these posters are now on 
exhibition in Pittsburgh. 

Clinton G. Reed (Purdue), who was re- 
cently commissioned a captain in the Ord- 
nance Bureau of the army, is now in Can- 
ada. His work will probably be in Toronto 
and Sherbrooke. 

I. A. Nicholas (Lafayette), formerly 
chief chemist at the Clairton Works of the 
Carnegie Steel Co., has recently been ap- 
pointed chief chemist of the Steel Cor- 
{>oration's new coke plant near Clairton, the 
argest and most modern by-product coke 
plant in the country. 

A. W. Dann (Cornell) treasurer of the 
Dravo Contracting Co., and G. B. Taylor 
of the United States Bureau of Mines, — 
both charter members of the Pittsburgh 
Alumni Lodge — have recently returned to 
Pitsburjrh. Among the Sigs new to this 
region is C. M. Means (Lafayette), now 
doing chemical work at Homestead, Pa., 
for the Ordnance Bureau of the navy. All 
the Sigs mentioned in the above paragraph 
are young married men who have moved 
their families here. 

Dr. Wilbur M. Holtz (Mount Union) who 
was recently commissioned a captain in the 
Medical Reserve Corps of the U. S. Army, 
has received orders for active service. Dr. 
Holtz is a veteran of the Spanish American 
War. For eight years he has been chief of 
the medical bureau of the Pittsburgh Rail- 
ways Co. Prior to taking up medical work 
he was engaged in reportorial and editor- 
ial capacities on Pittsburgh newspapers. 

On April 13th the Pittsburgh Alumni 
Chapter congregated at the Fort Pitt 
Hotel for what proved to be one of the 
most successful meetings in the history of 
the organization. This meeting was in- 
formal and purely social in character — 



business matters being absolutely forbid- 
den by the enterprising Chairman, C. T. 
Dabney and his Committee — Addams, King, 
D. A. Moran and Staehle. Fifty-four Sigs 
were in attendance and the enthusiasm 
displayed surpassed that any other meeting 
of recent date. At the last meeting of the 
season, on May 11th, the following officers 
were elected for the ensuing year: C. T. 
Dabney, President; A. W. Dann, Vice 
President; E. H. McClelland* Secretary; 
H. F. Braddock, Treasurer; D. A. Moran, 
* Sergeant-at-Arms. 



Engagements 

Miss Ruth Hogan of Pittsburgh to Rob- 
ert E. Lee Wildman (Carnegie Tech.) of 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Miss Clara Louise Berlin of Pittsburgh 
to Lieutenant D. R. McNeal (Delaware 
College) of Newark, Del. 

Miss Alida Frye Bradford of Wilkins- 
burg, Pa. to Carl D. Kester (Lehigh) of 
Spencer, N. C. 

E. H. McCLELLAN, Secretary. 



WASHINGTON ALUMNI CHAPTER 

The present administration of the Wash- 
ington Alumni Chapter of Sigma Nu, be- 
gan January, 1918, when the following offi- 
cers were elected; Albert L. Harris, Presi- 
dent, and Mark Finlay, Secretary-Treas- 
urer. Shortly after the election, Brother 
Finlay was called to service. To fill this 
vacancy, the president appointed Brother 
Marvin, Secretary, and Brother Mehurin, 
Treasurer. 

As there was a large number of Sigma 
Nu's working in the various government 
departments and in the camps near the 
city, in addition to those in the house, it 
was decided at the first joint meeting of 
the active Chapter and Alumni in February, 
to give a series of entertainments for the 
out of town Brothers. Two smokers at 
the Chapter House and a dance at the Ken- 
esaw Apartments, formed the main part of 
the entertainment. 

The attendance at the smokers was un- 
usually good. This was due in a large part 
to Brother Norman M. Shaw, whose care- 
fully kept list of the Sigma Nus in and 
around Washington, enabled us to reach 
many men who otherwise would have been 
overlooked. 

The active Chapter furnished the enter- 
tainment, consisting of some fine music and 
several very lively boxing and wrestling 
matches. In addition to this, Brother Oscar 
S. Bland, of the Second Indiana Congres- 
sional District, gave a splendid talk on our 
entrance into the war and all it would prob- 
ably mean in sacrifice as well as glory. 
Excellent refreshments brought the even- 
ing to a close. 



SBSSa 



100 



The Delta 



The second smoker, held two weeks later, 
was equally successful, there being nearly 
sixty men present. Many of the men who 
visited us on the occasion of the first 
smoker, were missed at the second, having 
been sent to sea, to new training camps, or 
transferred to other cities. Brother John 
M. Evans, Congressman at large from Mon- 
tana, gave an inspiring talk on several 
phases of the war. The remainder of the 
evening was spent in singing Fraternity 
songs and in getting acquainted. 

The dance, given by the Alumni and 
Active Chapters, held April 12th, was a de- 
lightful affair, entirely successful from 
every standpoint. One novel feature of the 
dance, was a black leather souvenir card 
case, with the letters Sigma Nu stamped 
on it in gold, which served as a cover for 
the program. 

Good music, a congenial company and a 
delicious supper made the evening one long 
to be remembered by the thirty-five or 
forty couples present. This delightful se- 
ries of entertainments was made possible 
through the untiring efforts of a committee 
consisting of Brothers Kelley, Swem, Sut- 
liff, Sullivan of the active Chapter, and 
Brothers Marvin, Mehurin, Comboye and 
Hubert of the Alumni Chapter. As the 
warm weather was upon us, it was decided 
to discontinue further efforts along this 
line until fall. 

However, in order not to lose touch al- 
together, with the visiting Alumni, Brother 
Norman Taylor was made chairman of a 
lunch committee. This committee arranged 
for the local and visiting Alumni to meet 
every Thursday at the National Club for 
luncn. An announcement was also carried 
in the daily papers stating that Sigma Nus 
would find congenial company on Thursdays 
at the National Club. In this way new men 
were constantly coming in, some on their 
way to other cities, some located here in 
the government service. 

These luncheons were very pleasant and 
served to keep up an interest in the Fra- 
ternity work. Unfortunately, however, we 
were unable to continue them as the dis- 
tance from the government buildings was 
too great to permit employes to maintain 
the strict half hour lunch period, enforced 
by the government. It is hoped, however, 
that in the fall a more convenient place 
may be found so that we may continue 
this delightful custom. 

The active Chapter deserves the greatest 
credit for the whole-hearted manner in 
which they opened their House to visiting 
Brothers. They have rendered a most pa- 
triotic and fraternal service. Only those in 
touch with the work can realize the bur- 
den this imposed on the active men. 

They provided comfortable quarters and 
good meals for these men, many of whom 
could not find accommodations, owing to 
the present crowded conditions of the city. 



Every man who has been able to get into 
the House has been enthusiastic in his 
praise of the cordial manner in which they 
were received, the splendid spirit of wel- 
come enjoyed while they were in the House 
and the heart-felt Godspeed when duty 
called them away. 

Delta Pi is one of the younger Chapters 
of the Sigma Nu, but she had proven to 
the Fraternity that she stands ready to do 
her part in the great struggle and is ever 
ready to hold out a hand of welcome and 
to provide a home for the stranger Sigma 
Nu, in Washington, D. C. Come and see 
for yourself. 

ALBERT L. HARRIS, President. 

President of the Alumni Chapter. 



Brother Chester E. Rightor, Gamma 
Lambda, is in town with the Income Tax 
Bureau, Treasury Department. Busy? 
Sure, but time to talk to a Sig always. 

Captain Arthur P. Walsh (Washington 
State College), of the Seventeenth Field 
Artillery, has just returned from France, 
for duty as an instructor at Camp Jackson, 
S. C. (Called to see me this A. M.) 

John B. Maynard (Colorado State Col- 
lege) is a Lieutenant in the Coast Artillery 
Corps. 

Thomas A. (Bull) Durham, Washington 
State, is an assistant paymaster in the 
Navy, and is on duty with Naval Aviation 
Headquarters, Paris. 

Word has just been received from Brother 
R. W. Hillis, Delta Pi. After being rejected 
by all of the recruiting services in the 
United States, he enlisted in the Canadians, 
trained in England for some time and has 
lately been sent to France, and when writ- 
ing was being sent up to the line with 
other replacement troops to join his unit. 
He signs himself "Pte. ,r (which is the Brit- 
ish for private), and his address is: "Pte. H. 
W. Hillis, 2137468, 29th Battalion, Cana- 
dian Engineers, British Expeditionary 
Force. Don't forget the number after the 
name. 

First Lieutenant Homer B. Vanderblue, 
Gamma Beta, passed through Washington 
a short time ago. He was on detail at a 
special school at Camp Meigs for ten days, 
but he might have been anywhere else, so 
far as most of us knew, for his time was 
so taken up that there was no chance for 
calls. He has since been detached from 
the 341st Infantry, Camp Grant, and is as- 
signed to the Depot Brigade, Camp Green, 
Charlotte, N. C. 

Brother Nederhauser, Delta Pi, is now 
living at 1902 Fourth St., S. E., Canton, O. 
Canton Sigs, dig him out. 

The weekly lunches of the Washington 
Alumni at the National Club, 607 Four- 
teenth Street, N. W., third floor, are great 



Alumni Notes 



101 



business. Noise it around a bit, the table 
is big enough for a few more. 

Brother Robert W. Voeth, Nu, captain, 
Marine Corps, serving with the Marine Bri- 
gade in France, has been reported as seri- 
ously wounded. 

Brother H. B. Ware, Pi, who enlisted in 
the Aviation Section of the Marine Corps, 
has gone overseas with his organization. 



Dear Brother Editor, isn't this enough 
foolishness for this time? I could tell you 
lots more, but the censor would get you for 
printing military secrets. A lot of Sigs 
have gone over lately, but lots of this can- 
not be given out. 

NORMAN M. SHAW. 

June 3, 1918. 



Alumni Notes 



UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA 
Theta Chapter 

I havejust ascertained that Brother J. Q. 
Smith, Theta, has been nominated by the 
Democratic primary of Alabama, which 
means an election, for Attorney General of 
Alabama. It was a close race, but on the 
official count Brother Smith came out con- 
siderably ahead. 

It is also pleasing to note that our Re- 
gent, Brother Burr, received the highest 
number of votes in the same election for a 
membership on the State Executive Demo- 
cratic Committee from his county. 

Fraternally, 

MANLY A. JOINER. 

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 
Mu Chapter 

A future Sigma Nu, born to Brother and 
Mrs. W. M. Watson today, June 27th. 
Brother W. M. Watson, Mu, is a second lieu- 
tenant, fighting for Uncle Sam, "Some- 
where in France." 

Here's hoping that "Bill Jr." will make 
as good a Sig as the one before him. 

Brother J. Pope Watson, who was a "vol- 
unteer inspector" of our Georgia Chapters 
last year, will now conduct official visita- 
tions among our Southern Chapters. He is 
the representative of L. G. Balfour Com- 
pany, one of our official jewelers. 

LEHIGH UNIVERSITY 

Pi Chapter 

Brother Percy B. Storey has received the 
commission of captain in the Engineer 
Corps, and has been ordered to report at 
camp for training on August 10, 1918. Cap- 
tain Storey is leaving the position of 
checker in the Engineering Department of 
the Gifford Wood Co., Hudson, N. Y. 

ELWOOD F. MESCHTER. 

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI 

Rho Chapter 

Brother Thomas N. Jarrell is associate 
publicity director of the National War 
Work Council, S. E. Dept., Y. M. C. A. of 
the United States, and is stationed at At- 
lanta, Ga. 

VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY 

Sigma Chapter 

Brother Nobel Van Ness has left tonight 
for Fort Thomas, Cincinnati, and from 



there will be transferred to Camp Cody, 
Gettysburg, Pa., where he has been assigned 
as a topographer in the tank corps. He 
has been a sergeant in the Fourth Tennes- 
see regiment. 

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS 

Upeilon Chapter 

Brother A. E. Amerman is mayor of 
Houston, Texas. 

LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY 

Phi Chapter 

Brother W. T. Helm is chief clerk to su- 
perintendent of the Edenborn Line, Louisi- 
ana Railway and Navigation Company, at 
Shreveport, La. 

DEPAUW UNIVERSITY 

Beta Beta Chapter 

Brother O. E. Maple, Beta Beta, is sec- 
retary of the Florida State Y. M. C. A., 
with headquarters at Jacksonville. 

Brother Leslie E. Harris, Gary, Ind., is 
the proud father of a daughter, born Au- 
gust 14, 1918. 

PURDUE UNIVERSITY 

Beta Zeta 

Past Vice Regent James W. Noel is one 
of the men conducting the hearing of the 
Indianapolis Street Railway Company, 
which has applied for a raise in rates be- 
fore the Indiana Public Service Commis- 
sion. Brother Noel represents the Chamber 
of Commerce and is acting with the city 
solicitor and other civic representatives who 
have charge of the public's interest. 

INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Beta Eta Chapter 

Brother Loring W. Mellette was candidate 
for judge of the Juvenile Court of Indian- 
apolis in the Republican primary, May 7, 
1918. His card is a most attractive one, 
bearing simply his picture and name with 
this word of advice: "Voters are not so 
much interested in how candidates talk, as 
to how they will do." 

Brother Clinton H. Givan, candidate for 
State representative in the Indianapolis 



102 



The Delta 



District, won nomination by handsome 
plurality and is looking forward to a suc- 
cessful election campaign this fall. 

Brother Thaddeus Hiram Stonecipher has 
gone into Y. M. C. A. work. He was for- 
merly superintendent of schools at Zions- 
ville, Ind. 



MOUNT UNION COLLEGE 

Beta Iota Chapter 

Rev. David E. Scott, Beta Iota, pastor of 
the Finley Methodist Episcopal Church of 
Steubenville, O., is leaving the pulpit to 
serve as an army chaplain in Europe. He 
had been pastor of the church for about 
three years and was accounted one of the 
city's ablest preachers. His family will re- 
main in Steubenville. — Pittsburgh Gazette- 
Times. 

Brother Harry F. Hazlett, who, hereto- 
fore, has been known to us as Major Haz- 
lett, has been promoted to the rank of Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel and adjutant of the 37th 
Division of the National Guard. Brother 
Lieutenant-Colonel Hazlett is now with his 
division stationed at Camp Lee, Va. We 
extend our best wishes to Harry and hope 
he may go higher and higher as we hear he 
sure is deserving of it. 

Brother E. Kirk Smith, who graduated 
from Harvard law school in the class of 
1917, has successfully passed the examina- 
tions and has been admitted to the bar in 
the State of Rhode Island. 

Brother Homer H. Moore, pastor of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church at Grafton, N. 
D., and Brother D. Elwood Scott, pastor of 
the Finley Methodist Church of Steuben- 
ville, recently went to Camp Zachary Tay- 
lor to train for chaplainships in the United 
States Army. 

Brother Frank W. Reinoehl recently re- 
signed the super intendency of the Larimore, 
N. D., schools to become manager of the 
Elk Valley Farming Co. He has under his 
supervision over 12,000 acres of land and 
twenty-four tenants. 

Chaplain Bowen Bruere, Beta Iota, leaves 
for Bombay, India, shortly to have charge 
of the English speaking church in Bombay, 
and also to act as chaplain among the Eng- 
lish troops stationed there. Brother Bruere 
is a fine chap and his father is now a mis- 
sionary in that part of India. 

Reverend W. Stanley Smith, brother of 
Inspector Edson K. Smith, of the Eighth 
Division, is pastor of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church at Welshfield, Ohio. 



WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE 

Beta Xi Chapter 

E. V. Holland, Denver, Colo., has won the 
nomination for Congress. He is a brother 
of Colonel W. R. Holland. 



OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY 

Beta Nu Chapter 

Brother H. L. Hopwood writes: "This 
day I received a letter from Captain Frank 
A. Hunter, 330th Infantry, Company I, 
American Expeditionary Forces, via New 
York City, saying he expected to leave Eng- 
land soon for France." 

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

Beta Rho 

Lieutenant Donald A. McClure has been 
severely wounded on the Marne salient. He 
was a junior when he enlisted. 

ROSE POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 

Beta Upsilon Chapter 

Brother George M. Maier is with the 
American Radiator Company in their Re- 
search Department called the Institute of 
Thermal Research, at Buffalo, N. Y. 

GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY 

Gamma Alpha 

Brother Joe W. Dalton was the only 
Sigma Nu at the University of Florida 
last year, where he has attended college 
the past two years. He is assistant busi- 
ness manager of the Seminole, the Uni- 
versity Annual. 

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 

Gamma Beta Chapter 

Brother Charles Kieffner has just been 
commissioned second lieutenant, Signal Re- 
serve Corps, Aviation Section, Reserve 
Military Aviator (Second Lieutenant, Sig- 
nal Reserve Corps, A. S., R. M. A.). He 
is still stationed at Rich Field, Waco, Tex. 

ALBION COLLEGE 

Gamma Gamma Chapter 

Brother Alvin E. Gillett, social work di- 
rector of the West Side Y. M. C. A., 318 
W. 57th Street, New York City, has been 
granted a leave of absence of four months 
From his work. Brother Gillett will be 
secretary in charge of a war hut which has 
been built in Bryant Park directly back of 
the New York Public Library. 

Later. — Brother Gillette, after a strenu- 
ous summer in New York, has gone to the 
Y. M. C. A. at Waterbury, Conn. 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY 

Gamma Theta Chapter 

Brother Ellington Neill writes that the 
Sigma Nu Alumni of Augusta gave the 
Brothers in Camp Hancock a royal time 
and hopes that they may understand his 
appreciation which he could not fully ex- 
press in words. 



Alumni Notes 



103 



UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN 
Gamma Lambda Chapter 

[These notes were collected and written 
by an Alumnus in service as an adjunct to 
Gamma Lambda's War Directory, printed 
elsewhere in this issue. — The Editor.] 

George I. Middleton reports that he is 
engaged in food production at Markesan, 
Wisconsin. "Mitty" graduated from the 
Ag. School in 1915, so he is eminently well 
fitted to carry on this important phase of 
war work. 

Carl Bougere, an affiliate from (please 
look up; I think it is either Phi or Beta 
Phi), was married last February at his 
home in Covington, Louisiana, has since 
lived in Jacksonville, Illinois, and is now 
located at Indianapolis, from which point 
he covers considerable territory for the 
Coons Cypress Silo Company of Patterson, 
La. 

Wirt Faust, who has been teaching in 
one of the Indianapolis high schools, has 
accepted an appointment to teach English 
at St. John's Military Academy, Delavan, 
Wisconsin, for the coming year. 

Russell Fogg, who affiliated with Gamma 
Theta last winter, is attending the agri- 
cultural college at Cornell and is so deeply 
interested in his work in dairying that he 
is remaining at Ithaca all summer. From 
him we learn that Cornell and Wisconsin 
are neck-and-neck rivals, and that the 
chapters of Sigma Nu at these two schools 
are each a credit to the Fraternity. 

Don Willison, the busy secretary-treas- 
urer of our building corporation, has left 
the Land Department of the C, M. & St. 
P. Railway in Milwaukee to become cashier 
of the Farmers Savings Bank in Palmyra, 
Wis. Thus a valuable man is lost from the 
councils of the Milwaukee Alumni, but his 
new location will serve to make Don more 
valuable to the active chapter, because of 
the short distance to Madison. 

Rex Welton, formerly president of the 
Hollister Drug Company in Madison, now 
seems to be at least part-owner of about 
half the first rate garages and auto sales 
companies in Madison. Hope he can help 
the boys out once in a while during rushing 
season. 

Many of the boys in France write of 
their pleasure in reading the "Delta," with 
its interesting reports of Grand Chapter 
proceedings and minor convention affairs. 
A copy of the "Delta" over there is a treas- 
ure indeed, and circulates from hand to 
hand, being oftentimes enjoyed by mem- 
bers of other fraternities as well . 

Ken Clark writes from Sault Ste Marie, 
where he is aboard one of the Sectional 
Patrol vessels: "We are on dispatch work 
about two miles above the locks. . . . 
It is the coldest job on earth. This is the 
first of July, but the temperature is 35 



degrees, the wind about 50 m. p. h., and 
it has rained 48 hours without a pause. We 
are to be given a pilot house and a steam 
heater, but in the meantime— WOW!" As 
quartermaster his duties are to keep the 
log. do the signal work, act as helmsman, 
and direct the deck work. Ken and Brig 
Young, who, together with two others own 
the steam yacht "Yarrow," turned it over 
to the Government over a year ago and 
started out as its first crew. Brig is now 
an ensign in the Navy, on board a tanker 
in the overseas service of the U. S. Mer- 
chant Marine. 

Don McCandless, writing from a French 
camp where he is stationed with a Wiscon- 
sin field hospital unit, says: It's a queer 
feeling to be riding in a large Packard and 
pass a typical French cart with two or 
three horses hitched tandem hauling a load 
of farm produce to a nearby town. It 
seems like the 16th or 17th century. . . . 
We have running drinking water in every 
ward (evidently a base hospital), a complete 
sewage system, and electric lights every- 
where. The sergeants sleep in iron beds 
with mattresses, sheets, and pillows — but 
this will be over next week." This unit is 
now known to be in active service, probably 
along with the rest of the Iron Jawed Divi- 
sion, the 32nd National Guard (Michigan 
and Wiscinsin), in the Alsace-Lorraine re- 

fion, on German soil. Brothers Wetherby. 
chantz, H. Niss, Gregory and Bloodgood 
are also with this division and are proba- 
bly seeing good service now. 

"Stubby" Cummings, who affiliated with 
Beta Nu at Ohio State, is now a full- 
fledged aviator and is probably across the 
sea by this time. He spent two months 
at San Diego, "toddling around in the air," 
and had no more serious mishap than land- 
ing upside down in the Pacific Ocean and 
smashing his "ship." His brother "Doc," 
who tried hard to become a farmer while 
at Wisconsin, is also in aviation and has 
probably graduated by this time. In his 
course in gunnery at Selfridge Field he 
fired from the air "at floating targets— 
both moving and stationary — and then at 
the shadows of another ship. Later we 
take up camera fighting, in which you fire 
at an attacking ship with the gun camera. 
Each week we get a long reconnaisance 
trip during which time we have to guide 
the pilot and see that he keeps to the 
course we are mapped to follow. The re- 
quirement is "to bring in photographs of 
certain school houses or other objects some 
fifty miles away." 

"Bozz" Whitney, a member of one of the 
sanitary squads attached to headquarters 
of the 85th Division, recently arrived over- 
seas, tells of his work: It "consists of su- 
pervision of refuse diposal, drainage, water 
supply, billeting, and general sanitation 
measures that cannot be taken care of by 
the individual units, and the inspection of 
quarters, stables, supply depots, etc., as 
regards sanitation. We do our daxrudsst 



104 



The Delta 



to eradicate the flies and mosquitoes by 
oiling ponds and seeing that everything or- 
ganic is kept covered. We supervise the 
construction of field latrines, seepage pits, 
field incinerators, and so on. In general, 
we take all possible measures to prevent 
disease through insanitary living condi- 
tions." His first sergeant is also a Sigma 
Nu, "Pete" Perrot of Gamma Gamma; the 
other members of the squad are all college 
men, and among them several members of 
other fraternities. The group has their 
"jazz orchestra, immature glee club, house 
rules, and all the discomforts of a frat 
house." 

Al Booth, who won his R. M. A. at San 
Diego, has for several months been in 
charge of all dual flying at Call Field, 
Wichita Falls, Texas. Omar Gregory, 
"Iggie" Merrill and Jimmie Payton are 
also aviators, while Russ Lindsay, Hap 
Phillips, Ray Kitchingman, Al Storrs and 
Tom Rose are in various stages of prepara- 
tion leading to appointment as "sky pilots." 

Vin Cartier was a dispatch rider with the 
184th Aero Squadron and was on the eve 
of sailing overseas from Camp Hempstead, 
New York, when he was operated on for 
appendicitis, making it necessary for him 
to remain in this country for a time. 

Miss Ruth Mildred Barr of Racine, Wis- 
consin, to Clarence Addison Hibbard, at Ra- 
cine, June 20. Hib is now engaged in spe- 
cial psychiatric work at the Great Lakes" 
Naval Training Station. 

Bob Curd announces the arrival on July 
13 of Robert Franklyn, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. 
Curd live in Birmingham, Alabama, where 
he is connected with the Sherwin-Williams 
Company. They also have a little two- 
year-old daughter, June. 

The following members of Gamma 
Lambda are temporarily members of the 
U. S. Army: Howard P. Jones, Malcolm 
Mecartney, and Frank Wolfe. These men 
are taking a three months' course of very 
intensive training at Ft. Sheridan this 
summer and will be returned to the Uni- 
versity in the fall to act as assistant in- 
structors in military tactics. 

Later. — C. Don Willison, secretary-treas- 
urer of the Wisconsin Sigma Nu Building 
Corporation, has just severed his connection 
with the Farmers Savings Bank of Pal- 
myra, Wisconsin, the cashiership of which 
he had held only a month, to accept a com- 
mission in the Corps of Engineers, U. S. 
Army. His address is C. D. Willison, First 
Lieutenant, Eng. R. C, Camp Humphries, 
Va. 

Brother Maklem W. Gregory, Field Ar- 
tillery, A. E. F., France, writes: "At last 
Don (Brother Donald S. McCandless) and 
I have made connections. He is situated 
about six or seven kilometers from me, and 
right now it is rather hard to make con- 
nections. I tried several times to see him 
and at last succeeded. He was just com- 
ing forth from a sumptuous feed given to 



the sergeants by the three 'sous^lieuten- 
ants' whom they were relieving. We. 
spent a most pleasant afternoon. I see 
Dave (Brother David W. Bloodgood) quite 
often and there is a chance that he'll soon 
be a member of this detachment. We are 
in a beautiful country, German Alsace, in 
fact. For the first time I am reaping the 
benefits of my two years' study of that 
tongue. It is mountainous here, and as I 
have a fine young chestnut mare, an occa- 
sional charming ride falls to my lot. There 
was a big Fourth of July celebration only 
4-5 kilometers from here." 

Brother Donald S. McCandless, Field 
Hospital No. 127, 32nd Division N. G., A. 
E. F., writes: "We had quite a celebration 
here the Fourth of July when the French 
soldiers and the people in a little town back 
from here a short distance helped us cele- 
brate. In the morning the French and 
American troops put on a parade and then 
were reviewed by their respective generals; 
in the afternoon the Y. M. C. A. put on a 
vodvil show in a temporary theater which 
had been erected for the occasion. The en- 
tertainers were mostly professionals from 
the U. S., who have come over here to help 
entertain us. It was mighty fine to see 
the enthusiasm which all our new friends 
manifested, and now day after tomorrow, 
July 14th, we are going to turn the trick 
and help the French celebrate their na- 
tional holiday. Last night the men in this 
part of the line were entertaineed by Elsie 
Janis. She had made eight other stops 
during the day, so that she was nearly 
'all in,' saying that we found her 'at the 
end of a perfect day'. She sang several of 
our popular songs which she then rendered 
in French, much to the enjoyment of our 
numerous friends in blue uniforms." 

Prof. H. F. Wilson, Gamma Lambda's 
Chapter adviser, who is taking a two 
months' course of intensive military train- 
ing at Ft. Sheridan, 111., writes interest- 
ingly of his experiences: "We are sure 
having a strenuous time. We get up at 5 
a. m. and emit at 9 a. m. Last week I was 
on K. P. (kitchen police) and we had to 
scrub the floors and tables and all the pots 
and pans for three meals. Then we had to 
peel two boilers of potatoes. A gay life?" 

Brother Vincent Cartier is a private in 
an Aero Squadron, A. E. F., France. He 
also reports a Lieutenant Robert Watt, Co- 
lumbia '16, as a Brother Sig attached to 
this squadron. Lieutenant Watt's military 
designation is almost certain to be that 
given above for Kieffner. 

Brothers Stanley R. McCandless and 
Walter E. Mueller, active members of 
Gamma Lambda, are now located at the 
Fourth Officers' Training Camp, Camp 
Grant, Illinois. 

Brother Arthur Frederickson, Gamma 
Lambda '18, is a first-class petty officer in 
Naval Aviation, Great Lakes Naval Train- 
ing Station, Great Lakes, Illinois. 



Alumni Notes 



105 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
Gamma Mu Chapter 

Brother Helton E. Heinecke is how at the 
U. S. Military Academy, West Point, N. Y. 
He is a member of the fourth class, having 
entered June, 1917. He "prepped" at 
Marion Institute and attended the Univer- 
sity of Illinois, where he was initiated into 
Sigma Nu. Brother Heinecke is making 
an athletic record at West Point — last win- 
ter he was captain of the "plebe" basket- 
ball team and also played on the Varsity 
baseball squad. 

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY 

Gamma Psi 

Since leaving Syracuse, Brother Charles 
A. Slater has been employed by the local 
Shade Tree Commission, a period covering 
a little over two years, first as assistant 
city forester in 1916, and remaining until 
the fall of 1917. He left to fill another 
position in Delaware, but in December re- 
turned to fill the vacancy caused by former 
City Forester Brother A. G. Henn, Gamma 
Psi, who had been called to the colors. At 
present he has charge of completing a 
planting plan for the entire city. Mount 
Vernon, a suburb of New York, is noted 
for its shade trees and spends about ten 
thousand dollars a year on their upkeep. 
This averages a little less than one dollar 
per tree. Few of our American towns and 
cities appropriate more than twenty-five 
cents per tree for this work. He already 
has one prospect for Gamma Psi in Charles 
A. Slater II, who is celebrating his birth- 
day today, age nine months. From ap- 
pearances he will fill his father's shoes on 
the baseball and football teams at Syra- 
cuse. 

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Delta Gamma Chapter 

I have just received the May "Delta" and 
upon looking through the list of "Knights 
of the Republic," I find that Clift Cornwall 
from the Columbia University Chapter, is 
incorrectly located, as since the first of the 
year he has been oh the other side and his 
address and location should be First Lieu- 
tenant. Engineers Officers Reserve Corps, 
A. E. F. 

After graduating from the first O. T. C. 
at Fort Myer with a commission of first 
lieutenant in the Engineers Officers Re- 
serve, he was assigned to Camp Lee at 
Petersburg, and later transferred to Camp 
Dix at Wnghtstown, N. J., and at the end 
of the year was assigned to foreign duty 
on the other side ana since that time has 
been over there. 

I am forwarding his "Delta" to him and 
no doubt he will be glad to receive the 
same and trust that by this time he has 
gotten in touch with Ammex Forces Alumni 
Chapter at Paris. 

I have not as yet had a chance to really 
go through this issue, but from all appear- 
ances it seems the best yet, and I congrat- 



ulate you and your staff uDon the appear- 
ance and contents of this issue, ana with 
best wishes for many more like the same, 
I am, 

H. F. CORNWALL. 

PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 
Delta Delta Chapter 

Don M. Brown, instead of being in the 
Marine Corps, is an ensign in the Naval 
Reserve Force. 

WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY 

Delta Zeta 

Brother Eldred Barden has been com- 
missioned second lieutenant at the Third 
Officers Training Camp, Camp Sherman. 

Walter D. Clark, of the Naval Reserves, 
is home on sick leave. His troubles have 
centered in his eye, but except for his 
"looks" he is quite normal. It might seem 
that vaudeville and the navy were distinct 
branches of service, but we understand 
"Dad" can give naval exhibitions in the 
Central Armory that bring tears to the 
eyes of his officers, seasoned tars though 
they are. 

It's Captain Starkes now! Culley is a 
commissioned M. D. and stationed at 
Panama. 

Bernard J. Alten is still with Ernst and 
Ernst, though he threatens to enlist as 
soon as he can camouflage his admirable 
personality, and persuade the doctors to 
give Jiim a Christian Science examination. 
"Doc" persistently wants to give the ger- 
mans hell. 

Wilbur C. Hunter is entertaining his 
brother Howard at his country-place. It is 
remarked in Montville society that no 
greater event has taken place since last 
summer. 

Howard K. Hunter is spending his sum- 
mer vacation with his Brother Bill, "on 
the dear old farm." Howard is the cham- 
pion long distance farmer in these United 
States, as well as Akron and other foreign 
parts. To look at him* however, you can 
see nothing but the distinguished and pol- 
ished pedagogue (unless you catch him in 
a Chardon restaurant). 

Stanley E. Roth is running the street 
car company when he is not running his 
automobile. As to running his family, 
well, there is Mrs. Roth — Well, anyway, 
he reports that his son thinks his dad is 
the wisest and greatest of men. 

H. Samuel Amidon is permanently en- 
trenched as city solicitor of Painesvifle, at 
least, all who have seen his office state he 
has thrown up earthworks of law-books, 
documents, newspapers, magazines, and 
agricultural reports, until it would be im- 
possible to reach him except with a guide. 

Carl R. Dietsch has resigned as superin- 
tendent of schools at Hudson. He is with 



106 



The Delta 



the Gravity Carburetor Company, Cleve- 
land, this summer, and is living in his 
West Side home. 

Perry D. Caldwell was elected city coun- 
cilman last fall, carrying every precinct in 
Ward 19 except two, over the popular and 
long-termed Democratic candidate. There 
is no doubt of our Perry's abilities and 
personal qualifications. (Don't everybody 
try to get a city job.) 

Virgil C. Barch is dispensing ten-penny 
nails and other hardware at his emporium 
on Euclid Avenue. 

Gurth Baldwin is in the electrical fixture 
business in Erie. He is awaiting call to 
the army. 

Frank W. Fox has been transferred to 
the general offices of the Goodyear Tire and 
Rubber Company, in Akron, and has moved 
back to Ohio with his family. 

Malcolm S. Nichols is general secretary 
of the Associated Charities in New Lon- 
don, Conn. 

Miles E. Evans, attorney-at-law, with 
Patterson & Nielding, Cleveland, is getting 
"fat and a little fatter." His good humor 
sticks .out in many parts, otherwise his 
rotund and protuberant personality is sol- 
idly encased by many lawyers of fleshy 
substance that add greatly to the weight of 
his arguments. We are told he originated 
the famous Hooverism, "Eat all you can, 
but don't waste anything." 

Milo C. Newton is a public accountant in 
Cleveland. He lives with his wife and fam- 
ily, and is a regular home-body as befits a 
man of his natural inclinations. 

T. Blair Scott is still with the James & 
Manchester Company (life insurance). He 
resides in Lakewood, and his chief mental 
recreation is staying in nights. 

Dwight E. Wertz, attorney-at-law, is a 
member of the United States Department 
of Justice, as assistant to the district attor- 
ney. His cares are greatly increased due 
to the paternal instincts of his young 
daughter and son, and the fraternal habits 
of his partner, Sherman Arter. Between 
the three of them, he is worried so much, 
he can scarcely hear an invitation to drink 
an ice cream soda. He stayed at the Chap- 
ter House during June, and his wife en- 
joyed a rest in the country. 

Tom Scott sends a clipping from the 
Cleveland News, showing a Reserve "in- 
structor" in the war nursing course, dem- 
onstrating a microscope to a Red Cross can- 
didate. The caption to the photograph 
reads: "Laboratory work has a big place 
in the war nursing course being given by 
Western Reserve University. Here one of 
the students is shown learning the fine 
points about microscope study from Dr. 
Edward G. Patton. 

PERRY D. CALDWELL. 



GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 
Delta Pi Chapter 

Robert Y. Yates is now a lieutenant in 
the Civil Engineers Corps of the navy and 
located at the public works office of the 
Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland. He 
will be stationed here until further notice, 
which will not prabably be for several 
months to come. 



CARENGIE INSTITUTE OF TECH- 
NOLOGY 

Delta Sigma Chapter 

It will be of interest to know that "Sun- 
ny" Kesner has been transferred to the 
aviation branch "over there." "Sunny" 
will give a good account of himself, of that 
we can be sure. 

At the end of last year, there were 
twenty members and one pledge living in 
the Chapter House. There are eight active 
men anH two pledges living outside of the 
House, Easton, being the only senior in the 
present membership, there is every indica- 
tion of a good turnout for the coming year. 
Two of the men, however, Willoughby and 
Clark, expect to be called in the coming 
draft. A lease has been signed for another 
year for the present Chapter House. Within 
a very short time, the biggest portion of 
the upper floor is to be redecorated. 

Brother Stockdale left on March 18th for 
Dayton, Ohio, where he takes up a civilian 
position with the Production Engineering 
Department of the Signal Corps. This 
work will be in connection with the produc- 
tion of aeroplanes and their equipment. 

Brother Dick Fleming has been accepted 
in the draft and expects to be called in the 
near future. 

Bill Diehl has been made an ordnance 
sergeant. This rank is equivalent to bat- 
talion sergeant-major and higher than top 
sergeant. 

Brother Tom Carlisle joined the ranks 
of the benedicts recently, taking as his 
bride, Miss Caroline Bowman. Shortly after 
the marriage, Tom left for Camp Lee. 

Brother Mike Sweeney has been called 
for naval aviation and is now in Boston. 

Brother Ed McKee writes from France 
stating that he is enjoying the game to the 
limit. 

Brother Brockman also advises of good 
health and happiness, stating that Pop 
Stewart, Sunny Kesner and he were to- 
gether. A rumor to the effect that Sunny 
Kesner was killed got enough of a start 
about the Pittsburgh district, that his his- 
tory was written in the sporting pages to- 
gether with a large picture showing nim in 
football togs. We are glad to advise, how- 
ever, that so far as can be ascertained, 
there is no grounds whatever for the state- 



Alumni Notes 



107 



ment. In fact, from all information, Sunny 
is still very much alive and able to give a 
good account of himself. 

April 13th was the occasion of a very 
well attended meeting of the Pittsburgh 
Alumni Chapter held at the Fort Pitt 
Hotek The entire active Chapter attended 
and the meeting was a great success. The 
features were an entire absence of a busi- 
ness session and a cabaret program to take 
its place. 

Your correspondent announces the ar- 
rival of Miss Ruth Mary Haaren on March 
26, 1918. The time was when he was as 
much as one-half of his family, but now he 
is .only one-fourth. Such is life. 

Brother Chick Traver is librarian at 
Camp Merrit, embarkation camp, in New 
Jersey. Chick tried to enlist in several 
branches of the service but was turned 
down. His present work is right in his 
line and he fits in very well. His library 
at present contains about 12,000 volumes 
with more coming. His address is Ameri- 
can Library Association, Library War Serv- 
ice, Merrit Hall, Camp Merrit, N. J. 

Brother Howard McCandless writes from 
California sending a check for the second 
note in advance. Howard holds the record 
for House Building Notes paid in advance. 

In a very well written and intensely in- 
teresting letter to Biz King, J. B. Hays 
tells at length about the doings of him- 
self and Simpson Who are working together. 
They are certainly getting everything that 
is to be gotten out of their experience and 
it makes one long to be with them to hear 
of their experiences, such as the censor al- 
lows them to tell. The editor is also in re- 
cept of a letter dater March 30th in which 
comes the news of the transfer of both 
Jabe and Simpson to the engineers. Both 
are delighted with the development which 
means that they will continue to work in 
the line which so far has proven so inter- 
esting to them. The new address is Pri- 
vate J. B. Hays, Attached to Co. B, 503d 
Engineers (Service Battalion, A. E. F. Base 
Hospital No. 27). 

A card from Brother Button advises that 
he is still running an architectural office 
"over there." 

Inspector L. L. Hopkins of the division 
in which Delta Sigma Chapter is located, 
has resigned to enlist in the service. His 
successor is Perry D. Caldwell, 433 Wil- 
liamson Bldg., Cleveland, Ohio. Brother 
Stockdale who has been Alumni Adviser of 
Delta Sigma has resigned because of his 
change of position and in his place has 
been appointed Frank H. Haaren, now of 
Parnassus, Pa. 

Andrews is in charge of the drafting 
department of the Naval Radio School in 
Cambridge, Mass. 

"Marty" Boyer is in charge of the draft- 
ing at the Naval Training Station in Gulf- 
port, Miss. 



Brockman, "Sunny" Kesner, "Pop" Ste- 
wart have all been over in France with the 
15th Regiment Engineers for a period of 
nearly a year. 

Paul Beckert is still located in Pitts- 
burgh. 

Lamont Button, "Jabe" Hayes and Rus- 
sell Simpson are all following architecture 
with Hospital Units in France. 

Curtis Colwell is quartered in Washing- 
ton Barracks, D. C. 

Carroll is traveling inspector and con- 
struction engineer for the Scaife & Sons 
Co., Oakmont, Pa. 

Tom Carlisle is an inspector of aeroplane 
equipment. 

Bert Colmery is at present working for 
the Peoples Gas Co. ? but is still Instructor 
of Mathematics during the school session. 

W. E. Carr is working on munitions in 
New York State. 

R. M. Crosby is an ensign in the navy, 
his brother Bill is practicing architecture 
in Oil City, Pa. 

Bob Crawford is still manufacturing T. 
N. T. in New Castle, Pa. 

Dillenback is a lieutenant in the aviation, 
last heard of in England. 

Bill Diehl is a sergeant of ordnance in 
Washington, D. C. 

Bob Dake is an aviator, present where- 
abouts unknown. 

Al Dyer is doing business at the old 
stand for the Electric Controller Co. 

Dick Fleming is in an Engineers' Re- 
placement Division in Camp Humphreys, 
Va. 

Russel Green is a corporal in the 25th 
Engineers in France. 

"Dutch" Grotenfend is manager of the 
Production Department of the U. S. Alumi- 
num Co., New Kensington, Pa. Haaren is 
manager of the Cost Department of the 
same firm. 

Art Vail is manager of the Rod Mill of 
the U. S. Aluminum Co., Massena, N. Y. 

"Dutch" Gettman is successfully selling 
Fords from his Centre Avenue Garage. 

"Punny" Graham is associated with the 
American Collapsible Tube Co., New 
Brighton, Pa. 

Frank Hieberger is with the Hospital 
Corps in Camp Hancock, Ga. 

George Hays is selling auto supplies in 
Sewickley, Pa. 

Haynes is with the National Guards, now 
in England. 

Kilgore is conducting a successful con- 
tracting business in Canton, Ohio. 

Kirk is a commissioned officer in the 
navy. 

Kingsbury when last heard of was re- 
ported to have been wounded in France. 

"Bill" King is practicing Mcfoftfectostfe. 



108 



The Delta 



Frazer Myers is located in Washington, 
D. C. 

"Lefty" Manker is with the American 
Incandescent Heat Co., in Boston, Mass. 

Phil Marshall from last reports is still 
at Camp Lee, Virginia. 

Ed McKee when last heard from in 
France was awaiting an operation. 

McCandless is a lieutenant in infantry, 
at present in San Francisco, Cal. 

Cliff McMillen is expecting his call to 
the draft very soon. 

McCaughy is instructor in architecture, 
University of Illinois. 

Reisinger is doing very well in his work 
at the Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md. 

Hugh Simpson and Paul Simpson are 
both now abroad flying for Uncle Sam. 

Stockdale is located in the Production 
Department of Governmental Aeroplane 
Construction; is now working in Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Scobell is servingas a commissioned offi- 
cer somewhere in France. 

Traver is librarian at the embarkation 
camp, Merritt, New Jersey. 

Warring is training in a camp in Ohio. 

Weigler is trainng for avation in At- 
lanta, Ga. 

Wildman, who is about to be married, is 
working with his father in Harrisburg, Pa. 

Warren Walker is associated with the 
American Cotton Oil Co., Guttenburg, New 
York. 

Willoughby was called for service before 
the school year was over. 

Hershey is located in Cleveland, O., and 
is staying at the Simu Nu House. 

Bamhart is doing engineering work near 
his home, Leisenring, Pa. 

FRANK H. HAAREN. 



TRINITY COLLEGE 

Delta Chi Chapter 

Brother N. K. Allison has entered the 
engineering department of the Travelers 
Insurance Company. 

Brother H. R. Brockett and Miss Marion 
E. Bennett, of Meriden, Conn., have an- 
nounced their engagement. 

Brother R. E. Smeathers has left the 
home office of the Travelers Insurance Com- 

Sany for their branch office at Newark, 
few Jersey. 

Brother E. G. Smeathers is working for 
the Standard Aircraft Corporation at 
Elizabeth, N. J. 

Brother A. K. Smith has been appointed 
a special assistant U. S. District Attorney 
for Connecticut. 



WAR DEPARTMENT PLAN FOR COL- 
LEGE STUDENTS 



Details of Reserve Corps System Are Made 

Public 

Young men who enter colleges this fall 
which have qualified for United States stu- 
dent army reserve corps may enlist in the 
corps on entering the institutions, be fur- 
loughed immediately and may continue their 
studies until the government deems it nec- 
essary to call them for active war service. 

For Highly Trained Men 

The Government's announcement reads 
as follows: 

"The importance of this plan for com- 
bined military and collegiate training, if 
we are to meet in the future the urgent 
needs of the army for highly trained men, 
is so great that the war department most 
earnestly requests the colleges, councils of 
defense, and other patriotic societies to 
co-operate in bringing it to the attention of 
the young men of the country and urging 
them to do their part to make it a success," 
the announcement says. It adds: 

"The purpose of the plan is to provide 
for the very important needs of the army 
for highly trained men as officers, engi- 
neers, doctors, chemists and administrators 
of any kind. The importance of this need 
can not be too strongly emphasized. The 
plan is an attempt to mobilize and develop 
the brain power of the young men of the 
country for these services, which demand 
special training. Its object is to prevent 
the premature enlistment for active service 
of these men who could • by extending the 
period of their college training multiply 
manifold their value to the country. 

Equipment is Provided 

"The boy who enlists in the students' 
army training corps will be a member of 
the army of the United States. He will 
be provided by the war department with 
uniform and equipment, but will be on fur- 
lough status and will not receive pay. He 
will undergo regular military training as a 
part of his course during the college year, 
will attend a six weeks' camp for rigid and 
intensive military instructions at private's 
pay, and will be subject to the call of the 
President for active service at any time, 
should the exigencies of the military sit- 
uation demand It. 

"The policy of the government, however, 
will be to keep members of this corps in 
college until their draft age is reached, 
and the war department will have the 
power to order such men to continue in 
college even after their draft age is reached 
whenever their work is such that the needs 
of the service, e. g. for doctors, engineers, 
chemists and the like, are such as to make 
that course advisable." — Indianapolis News. 



On the Way to Berlin 

Shells From the Front and Training Camps 



tu 



To be steadfast in the performance of every trust; * * * to be content 
to live the ancient Faith that our Honor is dearer to us than our lives; to emulate 
the chivalrous deeds of courtesy, * * * And so to be loyal to the Knighthood 
of Honor." — The Creed of Sigma Nu. 



AM. EX. FORCES ALUMNI CHAPTER 

Your letter of May 3 is at hand. I hope 
that by now you have received my letter 
of April 14, which was delayed a little by 
going through the base censor. 

There is nothing new to relate except 
that Fullington Payton, Gamma Lambda, 
and I, Beta Kappa, are here at the French 
Army Aviation School. New censorship 
regulations allow me to say that we are at 
Chateauroux, Indre. 

Since writing my last letter to you, I 
have heard of the following Sigs, all at 
Base Hospital No. 12, B. E. F. (British 
Expeditionary Forces): Privates David 
Millar, Beta Omicron; Lee P. Gay, Rho; 
Thos. R. Hunt, Noah W. Hunt and Seldon 
H. Murray, Beta Xi; and Captain W .R. 
Rainey. Lieutenant John R. Smiley, Beta 
Xi, is also a Sig. 

Many Sigs here have already won their 
first foreign service chevron for six months' 
service; in fact, I believe that all the men 
I have heard from are now wearing it. I 
put mine on day before yesterday. 

I have received all the Deltas now ex- 
cept December, and would be glad to see 
that number. I am keeping the ones sent 
me in the hone of finding some Sig at my 
next station that has not seen them. 

I hope that by now our Fraternity has 
taken membership in the American Univer- 
sity Union at Paris. That is about the only 
practical way of keeping Sigs in France to- 
gether. 

The three of .us here expect to win our 
Brevet and R. M. A. in about a month and 
then go to the acrobatics school at Issondun 
for the finishing touches. Don Hughes, 
Beta Kappa, left for that place two weeks 
ago with his Brevet, and is probably now 
at work on wing-slips, reversements and all 
the little tricks of the air game. 

Best regards to all. 

Fraternally, 

HOWARD A. JOHNSON, Gamma Phi. 

A. E. F., U. S. A., P. O. 738. 
May 25, 1918. 



SIGS AT ELLINGTON FIELD 

Sigma Nu Fraternity: 

Thanks for sending me those Deltas so 
promptly. They were surely manna to me. 

I have run onto auite a few Sigs since 
coming here. I shall name over as many 
as I can: Crosthwaite. from Michigan 
Aggies; J. A. Franklin, from Pennsylvania 



State; Bratton, from Maryland State, and 
one of the founders of our Chapter at Van- 
derbilt, N. S. West. We have had some 
good times together, and I took a picture 
of some of us, but someway it did not 
turn out well. 

It is so hot here that all we can do in 
the middle of the day is to sit and gasp. 
As the fellows say, "Anywhere but Texas. 91 

Fraternally yours, 

LIEUTENANT MERRITT S. BEACH, 

Beta Zeta. 

Engineering Dept., Ellington Field, 
Houston, Texas, July 19, 1918. 



GLIMPSES OF SIGMA NU IN THE 

CAMPS 

Sigma Nu Fraternity: 

Just a bit of news so that you can in- 
clude another name in the Sigma Nu honor 
roll. 

Attended School of Military Aeronautics, 
Atlanta, Ga. (Georgia Tech.), as a cadet, 
from January 26, 1918 to March 28, 1918. 
Appointed second lieutenant Aviation Sec- 
tion, Signal Reserve Corps, March 29, 1918. 
Commanding? officer of lines in the Trades 
Division, First Training Brigade, Kelly 
Field No. 1, South San Antonio, Texas, 
April 6, 1918 to May 26, 1918. Asked for 
transfer to combatant service, so was re- 
lieved from duty at Kelly Field May 23, 
1918, and assigned to the Armorers School, 
Wilbur Wright Field, Fairfield, Ohio (near 
Dayton), where I am being trained to be 
an expert on guns and bombs, etc I will 
be here four or five weeks more and then 
expect to go to France at once as an aerial 
gunner, installation, maintenance, arma- 
ment or supply officer. 

The school work at Georgia Tech. was 
pretty stiff, but I got through with high 
marks and was one of the first few of my 
class to be commissioned. 

Here at the Armorers School the in- 
struction is highly technical, yet very prac- 
tical. My first examination here comes to- 
morrow. 

I had an announcement published in the 
Kelly Field Eagle while at San Antonio, 
Texas, trying to get all the Sigma Nus 
together, but I left the field the day the 
notice was published. 

Walter Reller, a Sig. from Missouri, was 
my sergeant major on Line 14, First Train- 
ing Brigade, Kelly Field No. 1, for twenty- 
four hours. Just as we were pulling the 



covers over us that night in bed, Keller 
said, "Are you a frat man?" I said, "Yes, 
are you? What frat?" "Sigma Nu." 
"You are." We didn't go to sleep for some 
time. 
Saw Bernie Alten in Cleveland two weeks 



otic. 

Some Sigma Nu left this field for France 
about the time I came. While I was look- 
ing for quarters I found a copy of the 
Delta on his baggage, but his name was not 
on anything. 

Another old Sigma Nu pal expects a 
captaincy soon as a chaplain. He would 



enough to have fifty of the boys. We have 
thoroughly enjoyed having had the boys 
with us just as often as we could and it is 
with sincere regret that we will have to 
lose them in a few days. 

Top row, left to right: Percy Jackson, 
Olinger, Starns, Canaga and Kester. Bot- 
tom row, left to right: John Jackson, 
Slates, Harris and Trump. The Y. M. C. A. 
man in center was unfortunate enough to 
attend Ohio Wesleyan, where he had no 
opportunity of joining Sigma Nu. All 
these men are from Beta Iota except 
Canaga, who is a Beta Nu man. 




make a corking good man for the job and 
if he gets it I'll notify you. 
Fraternally, 
BYRON EDWARD JACKSON, Epsilon. 
Second Lieutenant, S. R. C. A. S. 

P. S. — Was made a thirty-second degree 

Mason at San Antonio recently. 
Armorers School, Wilbur Wright Field, 
Fairfield (near Dayton), Ohio. 



MOTHERS' DAY AT CAMP SHERIDAN 



Sigma Nu Fraternity: 

On May 12, Mothers' Day, Mrs. Steiner 
and I had the pleasure of entertaining for 
dinner eight men from Beta Iota and one 
from Beta Nu, and a happier day we never 
spent. I have a picture of the group that 
I can send you if you wish. Our only re- 
that our home was not large 



gret 



The Ohio boys have about left us and the 
few remaining will be off in a few days. 
The boys in the photo left yesterday and 
Mrs. Steiner and I feel like we have lost 
part of our family, as they had endeared 
themselves so much to us. 
Fraternally, 
BERNARD STEINER, Theta. 

It is appropriate to reprint from the 
Mav Delta, this tribute of Brother Percy 
W. Jackson, Beta Iota, to the Southern 
hospitality of Brother Steiner and the 
Montgomery Alumni: 

"On arriving at Camp Sheridan, Ala- 
bama, we lost no time, but immediately 
started out on a hunt for Sigs. We first 
met Brother Bernard Steiner, president of 
the Montgomery Alumni. We at once felt 
as though we had met a strong Sigma Nu. 
Brother Steiner has in more than one way 
made us feel and apreciate Sigma Nu. We 
soon became acquainted with many 
Brothers, and the sometime dullness and 
monotony of a soldier's life has been driven 
away through their kindness and efforts." 



On the Way To Berlin 



ill 



Sigma Nu Fraternity: 

I have had it on. ray mind to write to you 
for some time to tell you where I am and 
what I am doing, but until now the favor- 
able opportunity has never presented itself. 
Soon after returning to work at Ohio State, 
after participating in our very successful 
Grand Chapter, the school was changed to 
an adjutants training school, and we were 
sent to various other ground schools in 
aviation. 



New Faces But a Familiar Badge 
Some one hundred and fifty of us, includ- 
ing Nick Carter, Cummings, Tussing, and 
myself, were sent to Berkeley, California, 
to finish ground school work. Carter comes 




from Case School and Brothers Cummings 
and Tu&sing from Ohio State Chapter were, 
[ think, both at the convention. 

nd a won- 
It 

is a beautiful State and I have nothing but 
praise for the many pleasures of San Fran- 
cisco. We soon graduated, however. All 
but one of the four above mentioned were 
sent to San Diego for flying. I was sent 
with my squadron to Camp Dick, Dallas, 
Texas. Of which, more anon. Before 
leaving California I must give the role of 
valiant Sigs whom we found there. They 
are: Raymond Buckley, Washington ; Ster- 
ling Spellman, Oregon; Ralph Boone, Wash- 
ington State; Harrold Grady, Oregon; Nor- 



man McLeod, Washington; Lymert Knet- 
tle, Washington pledge; Preisker, Stan- 
ford; and Geo. D. Roberts, University of 
California. We also had word that Brother 
Robert Hawkins, Washington, would soon 
be up. I am sure no other Fraternity beats 
that record for men at S. M. A. Berkeley. 
We visited the California Chapter House 
often and found always the congenial bunch 
and the real Sigma Nu welcome. 

Up in the Air 

Camp Dick, to which I was sent, is an 
aviation concentration camp, both for 
cadets and for officers. Here we accumu- 
lated to the number of nearly 4,000 until 
an opportunity offered at the overcrowded 
flying fields. We drilled from morn till 
night and when not drilling we were being 
inspected. The most rigid army discipline 
prevailed. When volunteers were called 
for for bombing, I welcomed it as a relief 
from drill, and with some one hundred 
others was sent to this field. Here we are 
being taught flying and scientific bomb 
dropping, as well as the accurate use of 
the machine gun. We have really landed 
in a pretty good thing, the first on the field 
in bombing. 

We hope to get our commissions soon and 
take some part in the present campaign. 
We have a pilot assigned to us and we 
have no driving to do unless pilot is in- 
jured. I have done a lot of flying and 
have handled the controls often, but have 
not yet had the ship up alone. Needless 
to say I enjoy it all immensely. Have not 
had any of my night flying yet, but expect 
to get it soon. Ill inclose a snap recently 
taken showing how we doll up for flight. 
Fraternally, 
ROSCOE C. WRISTON, Beta Sigma. 

Ellington Field, Houston, Texas. 

April 26, 1918. 



FIRST AID DETAIL 

Sigma Nu Fraternity: 

Just a word to let you know I'm still 
alive and kicking and like the army despite 
its rigors and discipline. It's all toward 
licking one Bill HohenzoUern, and as you 
know all good Sigs want to back Uncle Sam 
to the limit. 

I havent met any Sigs in camp as yet, 
either at Jefferson Barracks or here, but I 
intend to run up to Ames over some week- 
end and visit the boys there. 

The Deltas you sent out to California 
were forwarded to me here and I promptly 
went through them — hungrily. 

Should you desire the information, I'm 
attached to the Post Hospital here and am 
in the Medical Department of the army. 
Most fraternally and sincerely, 

DON KRULL, Gamma Mb. 
Post Hospital, Fort Des Moines, Iowa. 
May 6, 1918. 



COLONEL DREISBACH WRITES 
Dear Brother Dunlavy: 

It has been too many years since last we 
met. I know you have lost track of me, 
for my name does not appear among the 
list of Beta Eta men who are in service. 

Inasmuch as I was in the Spanish War 
and in the Indiana National Guard ever 
since preparing for just such an emer- 
gency as has arisen, I would like my name 
among those who are in service. My mili- 
tary preparation has extended over twenty 
years. 

Second Lieutenant D wight M. Park, 
Beta Eta, is in this camp in the 152nd In- 
fantry.' He came down with the drafted 




men in October and I got him admitted to 
the Third 0. T. C, where he won a com- 
mission. 

Clarence E. Zinn, Beta Eta, is also in 
service. He is in the Quartermaster's 
Corps. 

I am in the Infantry, but at present am 
on special duty in command of the Deten- 
tion Camp, where the drafted men are held 
for completion of examinations, records, 
and preliminary instructions. I had six 
thousand men here last month and will 
have 8,000 this month. 

My wife and two children are here with 
me and live in the "Squaw Camp." 
Fraternally, 

"DRESSIE." 
(LIEUT. COL. CLYDE F. DREISBACH.) 
Ho. Detention Camp, Camp Shelby, Miss. 
July 12, 1918. 



DREISBACH, BETA ETA, AGAIN 

HONORED 

Appointed Commander of Detention Camp 

at Shelby 

Lieutenant Colonel Clyde F. Dreisbach 
has been appointed for the important post 
of commander of the divisional detention 
camp at Camp Shelby, Hattiesburg, Miss. 
The popular Fort Wayne officer, who was 
only recently advanced to the rank of lieu- 
tenant colonel, will take charge of the 6,000 
national army men who will arrive direct- 
ly into Camp Shelby this week. It will be 
his duty to supervise the adjusting of the 
raw recruits from civilian life to the life 
of a soldier. 

This work is regarded as highly impor- 
tant by army officers, as it Is pointed out 
that the future efficiency of a soldier is 
largely dependent upon the instilling of a 
proper spirit of discipline and harmonious 
co-operation in the formative period of his 
military career. — Fort Wayne News and 
Sentinel. 



CAPTAIN SHERMAN CORK RAN 
GASSED 

Captain Sherman Corkran, U. S. Field 
Artillery, and with Pershing in France, 
was severely gassed in the recent drive of 
the Allies and has been ordered home for 
attention. He is now at his father's home 
in Wilmington, Delaware. Brother Cork- 
ran has Seen in France since the first 
American troops went abroad and won his 
captaincy for distinguished service in the 
field. 

LEARNING TO BE OFFICERS 

Sigma Nu Fraternity: 

There are quite a few men down here, 
but we are so busy that there is little time 
to devote to "get-togethers" outside of the 
company. However, shortly before we 
(W. W. Koch, Gamma Lambda, and I) ar- 
rived Sigma Nu had a large party and it 
created quite an impression. 

S. R. McCANDLESS, 
Gamma Lambda. 
Camp Hancock, Ga., 



Sigma Nu Fraternity: 

I am leaving in a week or two for Wash- 
ington, D. C, where I will be stationed 
with the Forest Engineers (Road and 
Bridge Battalion). I expect to get a month 
or so of training there and then get "over 
there" and do what I can toward "trimming 
Fritz." 

Fraternally, 
LEROY H. ADDINGTON, Rho. 

St. Louis, Mo. 



On the Way To Berlin 



113 



PLATTSBURG TRAINING CAMP 

Sigma Nu Has Largest Number of 

Fraternity Candidate* 

When the military training camp for 
members of the Senior Division of the Re- 
serve Officers' Training Corps opened here 
on June 3, it afforded another opportunity 
for Sigma Nu history to be made in connec- 
tion with the present world war. Fortu- 
nately (or unfortunately) the honor of re- 
cording this bit of history, has been thrust 
upon me and I feel sure you would like to 
have it for the Delta. 

For College Men Only 
The camp established here is solely for 
college men, which is probably a unique 
event in itself. During the past college 
year, many of the colleges in the East have 
formed units in the R. 0. T. C, with a view 



Of course, the Y. M. C. A. at the post 
was the gathering place for the men right 
from the start and it was not long before 
a fraternity roll book was started. And 
that was where Sigma Nu began Us history. 

We were fortunate right from the start, 
for one of the hustling "Y" secretaries 
turned out to be Brother R. L. Peterson of 
Albion College. Naturally, that gave us the 

Jump on the other Greeks and Broker 
'eterson has certainly demonstrated "the 
fifth point to all of ua. 

Sigma Nu Leads 



more representatives at the camp than any 
other national Fraternity. Sixty-seven 
"Sigs" from twenty-one different colleges 
were on the roll. While fourteen of the 
colleges were in the North, the seven from 
the South furnished a full quota. The col- 



*Ji»7*j^ M 


JJjLf 2 J Ir 






■- - j w- - ; . 


i 



undergo a thorough course of military 
training at their various colleges during the 
academic year and are all more or less 
familiar with military tactics. 

But just as practical training Is essential 
in all peaceful lines of work, so it is essen- 
tial in the military, and for that reason the 
summer camp at this place was established. 

At the camp here, which will close on the 
3rd, there have been no less than 26 col- 
leges and universities represented. The 
total number of men here has been close to 
3,000, and every one a college man. 

Peterson, Gamma Gamma, at "Y" 

Now you will probably wonder when I am 
going to return to the subject of Sigma Nu. 



leges represented were: University of 
Georgia, Albion, North Carolina State Col- 
lege, University of Pennsylvania, Lehigh, 
Cornell, University of Virginia, North 
Georgia Agricultural College, Brown, Penn 
State, Carnegie Tech, University of Florida, 
Delaware State, Maryland State, Georgia 
Tech, Maine, Vermont, Washington and Lee, 
and the two younger sisters. Trinity and 
Bowdoin. 

A Reunion Dinner 
Naturally when that many "good fellows 
get together" there is bound to be a ban- 
quet and this was no exception. The din- 
ner came off two nights ago and there were 
about thirty-five present. Unfortunately, 
sickness and quarantine kept many of the 
others away. But we had a real dinner and 
plenty of "pep" and of course the main topic 
of conversation was Sigma Nu. 



In a* day or so now the camp will close. 
Many of the boys have been recommended 
for officers training camps in the fall and 
many expect to accept. The others are per- 
haps too young as yet or wish to finish 
college before "going over," so they will 

?>robably return to their chapters in the 
all. 

For myself, I can only say that to have 
met the Brothers that I have up here is in- 
deed an inspiration. A finer bunch I never 
saw, and it surely made me proud to know 
that I was a Sigma Nu. Many of them have 
been "Sigs" but a short while, yet they are 
already showing the real spirit of Sigma 
Nu and as long as we have such staunch 
workers in our chapters we need feel no 
anxiety for the future. 

I realize that this is but a poor account 
of our doings up here, but I have tried to 
bring out some points of interest. Please 
feel free to edit this in any way you wish 
and use as much or as little as you desire. 
GEORGE W. SULLIVAN, Delta Delta. 

Plattsburir Barracks, Plattsburg, N. Y. 

July 1, 1918. 



Sigma Nu Fraternity: 

I have finally been compelled to leave 
the boys at Purdue and take a step to 
prevent my being drafted into the army. 

After looking all branches of the serv- 
ice over thoroughly, I picked the Naval 
Reserve as a prospective radio operator. 
So I am now in detention camp here at the 
Naval Training Station, for a period of 
three weeks, at the end of whicn time I 
will be sent to school at the main camn 
for a period of about two months. I will 
then be sent to Cambridge, Mass. (Har- 
vard), to complete my course in radio oper- 
ation. From there I will be shipped. 

This is the first time I have ever been 
cooped up, and it goes pretty tough. I 
haven't seen a soul in five days that I ever 
saw previous to last Tuesday. But the 
grub is pretty good and we have warm 
clean quarters. 

Yours frater nally , 

J. L. BREWER, Beta Zeta. 

Great Lakes, Illinois. 

Dec. 1, 1917. 



LYON RETURNS FROM WAR ZONE 

C. C. Lyon, Citizen war correspondent, 
who has been with Pershing's expeditionary 
force in France for the past year, arrived 
at New York Sunday. 

Be will reach Columbus Tuesday morn- 
ing. 

Lyon "went over" with the first Amer- 
ican contingent and was with the American 
troops on different sectors.— Columbus 
(Ohio) Citizen. 



"OVER THERE" AND BACK AGAIN 

Sigma Nu Fraternity: 

In the May number of the Delta my ad- 
dress was given as a member of the former 
"Norton-Hayes Ambulance Corps." Last 
year, from May until November, I served 
with the Norton-Hayes Ambulance Corps 
in France, working with the French Army. 
Please change my address to Flying Cadet 
Paul H. Dunnavan, Love Field, Dallas, 
Texas. 

While in Paris I met several fine Sigs 
whom I met through the Inter-Fraternity 
register, which is kept in the Paris Y. M. 
C. A. club rooms. 

Yours fraternally, 
PAUL H. DUNNAVAN, Gamma Tau. 
Dallas, Texas, May 19, 1918. 




Sigma Nu Fraternity: 

Just a scribble to you and all my other 
Sigma Nu friends. Havent time for more. 
At any rate, you can advise them that I 
am here, and well. Also I am still as 
skinny as ever. 

Havent run into any other Sigs as yet, 
but have not covered much territory yet. 
Besides, they are a bit difficult to identify 
these days. 

Hope all the Chapters will be able to 
"make the riffle" in spite of war conditions. 
Am sure our organization is now in prime 
shape to further such a condition. 



On the Way To Berlin 



115 



Would be glad for a word from you let- 
ting me know how things are moving. 

Fraternally, 

L. L. HOPKINS, Delta Alpha. 

France, July 2, 1918. 



MOTOR MECHANICS' PAN-HELLENIC 
IS ORGANIZED 

It was anything but a bunch of joy- 
killers that met in the mess hall of the 
5th Co., 4th Reg., on Thursday evening, 
May 2, and organized the Motor Mechanics' 
Pan-Hellenic. No hint of anything like the 
Army Blues. In fact, after transacting 
some necessary business, they went willing- 
ly to work on the proposition of giving a 
dance in the near future. The meeting was 
well attended, and the men present repre- 
sented a wide range of fraternities and 
colleges. 

W. K. Mullins, Delta Epsilon, was elected 
president. Some college wit proposed the 
election of a duty-sergeant and a mess ser- 
geant; the first was promptly ruled out, 
but it took the august interference of the 
chair td stop consideration of the second. 

All men of the Third and Fourth Regi- 
ments who are members of a Greek letter 
fraternity, including professional fraterni- 
ties, are urged to be present at 8 o'clock 
next Thursday evening in the mess hall of 
Fifth Company, Fourth Regiment .^-The 
Propeller, Camp Greene, N. C. 



Later Bulletin 

The Pan-Hellenic dance of which I wrote 
you some time ago came off as per schedule 
and everybody had a big time. There were 
some sixty-five or seventy Fraternity men 
present, made up of officers and enlisted 
men. 

Fraternally yours, 

W. K. MULLINS, Delta Epsilon. 

Camp Greene, N. C, June 25, 1918. 



ELMER PONDER AWARDED FRENCH 
CROSS FOR BRAVERY 

Sigma Nu Fraternity: 

In the Pittsburg (Penn.) Chronicle Tele- 
graph, dated June 20, 1918, I find the fol- 
lowing concerning Brother Elmer C. Pon- 
der, Delta Epsilon, University of Oklahoma: 

"In the war news of yesterday mention 
was made of the French war cross having 
been awarded to Lieutenant Elmer C. Pon- 
der for bravery in action. Ponder is a 
former Pirate pitcher, having played with 
the club last year. He enlisted and after 
preliminary training was sent to France 
with a commission of lieutenant. He is 
the first baseball player to be honored with 
the French war cross." 

W. K. MULLINS, Delta Epsilon. 



"BIG JEFF" HEALY WOUNDED 

Lieutenant Jefferson A. Healy, Infantry, 
who was captain of the Columbia Univer- 
sity Football Team of 1916, and who went 
to France with the Third Division of the 
regular army, has been wounded in action 
and is now at a base hospital near Paris. 
Healy, who was known to all Columbia 
men as "Big Jeff," is a Plattsburg training 
camp graduate and, like Lieutenant Cross, 
was in the first contingent of Plattsburgers 
transferred to the regulars. Healy's home 
is in Chicago. At Columbia he was noted 
for his spectacular fashion of catching for- 
ward passes. He was also noted as a Latin 
scholar and as an orator. Healy is twenty- 
three years old and is a brother of Edward 
Healy of the 1917 Columbia Football team. 
The cablegram announcing that Lieutenant 
Healy had been wounded did not state 
whether or not the wound was serious. — 
New York Times. 



IN THE "FOURTH" DEPARTMENT, 

ARMY 

Sigma Nu Fraternity: 

I have taken to letter writing lately and 
each evening I dash off a letter that is long 
due or worse, so don't be surprised to get it 
or to get it after so long a time. I have 
moved, shifted around and been in quaran- 
tine for a month and in the meantime I 
didn't write letters or receive any because 
I thought every day I would leave. Now I 
feel as though I'd be settled for at least a 
little while. 

I transferred for the aviation department 
and came here five weeks ago. I was more 
than surprised when I got here because I 
was reduced to the plane of a raw recruit 
and had to go through all the torture that 
a man gets when he first gets into this in- 
stitution. Seeing what I was up against 
and the slim chance to get what I expected, 
I immediately took advantage of an invita- 
tion to transfer to the medical department. 
I thought when I left that department at 
Camp Sherman that I'd never get back, but 
here I am. I was put in a special detach- 
ment of several hundred men to go to Day- 
ton, Ohio, but the transfer was first, so I 
got out of the detachment. It sounded 
pretty good to think that I would get back 
to the greatest State in the Union again so 
near home, but I'm not sorry I'm here. I'm 
a dental assistant now. It's one of the 
nicest army jobs I have ever seen. I only 
fear it won't last long, for it is rumored 
that two-thirds of the dentists will soon 
leave and can't take the assistants along. 
That will put me out of a job and maybe 
give me one that I would despise. But such 
is the Army, and whatever comes 111 have 
to put up with it. 

Before I forget to mention, I sure have 
appreciated the Deltas that somebody is re- 
sponsible for sending. It reads a lot mots. 



116 



The Delta 



interesting than it did when I was in school, 
and that is saying a good deal. I have taken 
some addresses out of the last one of men 
who are or at least were in this camp. I am 
going to try to find a few of them when I 
get a little spare time. I haven't met a Sig 
since I left Camp Sherman. 

I am now in the fourth department of 
the Army. I mean that I have been in four 
— Infantry, Field Ambulance, Aviation of 
the Signal Corps, and Dental. Guess I've 
seen a little. 

I was pretty sore that I couldn't get a 
pass at the time of the Convention. I might 
have gotten it, but so many fellows were 
bothering the officers and at last they 
turned a deaf ear. But it evidently went 
perfectly well without my presence. 

I can imagine that Chapters are having 

some time to keep alive. Pity they don't 

come under the war department so they 

could get all the necessities for the asking. 

Fraternally, 

C. K. STONER, Delta Zeta. 



CAMP GORDON TRAINING CAMP 

Best Fraternity in the World: 

Please send me a dozen creeds for my- 
self and some of the other boys in the 
Forty-fifth. 

Chapters on the Way 

As you will learn by this, we have 
changed stations, the whole regular brigade. 
We're whipping into shape now for over- 
seas service. 

We have visited the active Chapter in 
Atlanta (Georgia Tech) and they have a 
fine bunch of young fellows. While in 
Washington on "leave" last week, I spent 
one evening with the George Washington 
Chapter. Saw some old faces and met a 
number of new ones. Washington is the 
most interesting place in America now — 
something popping all the time, and uni- 
forms of many nations to be seen on all 
hands. 

German Prisoners 

Last week we inspected the motley crew 
of German prisoners, at Ft. McPherson, 
just out of Atlanta. They are just the 
kind one would expect to find on the U-58, 
or on captured Kron Prinz Wilhelms. Some 
of them came from those boats and others 
direct from France. 

Here are addresses of the boys here who 
changed stations with our brigade: 

All in Camp Gordon, Atlanta, Ga. 

« 

Forty-fifth U. S. Infantry: Lieutenant 
Karl Henion, Case, Delta Alpha: Lieuten- 
ant Samuel C. Gist, Jr., Cornell, Gamma 
Theta; Lieutenant Roger E. Prosser, Gam- 



ma Epsilon; Lieutenant Frank L. Yates, 
West Virginia, Gamma Pi. 

Lieutenant Robt. W. Dathie, West Virginia, 
Gamma Pi. 

Twenty-sixth M. G. Bn.: Lieutenant 
Harry Curry, West Virginia, Gamma Pi. 

One Hundred and Fifty-seventh Depot 
Brigade: Lieutenant Clyde W. Hague, 
West Virginia, Gamma Pi; Captain Sidney 
Smith, V. M. I., Alpha. 

With all best wishes, I am, 

Yours fraternally, 

FRANK L. YATES. 

Camp Gordon, Atlanta, Ga. 

May 16, 1918. 

Forty-sixth U. S. Infantry: Lieutenant 
Jno. W. Easley, West Virginia, Gamma Pi; 



THE ARMY AND NAVY FOREVER! 

June 12, 1918. 

Sigma Nu Fraternity: 

Having a little time I thought it would 
be a good idea to send in some news that 
might interest you. 

I received a letter from Frank Erben a 
few weeks ago. He is a warrant officer now 
in the navy. He is on a five weeks 9 trip to 
France and back. Frank will then take an 
exam, for a commission as ensign. 

I have joined the army and am at a 
radio school about nine miles outside of 
Washington, D. C. 

While I was down at the Columbus Bar- 
racks enlisting I came across a Sigma Nu 
by the name of Bishop. He is stationed 
there. After I had been here a week one 
of the boys in the room in which I sleep* 
asked me if I was a Sigma Nu. I told him 
I was. He said that he was a Sigma Nu 
from Wisconsin. He has been out of school 
about nine years. His name is Jones. He 
has been sent to Fort Sill, Oklahoma. I 
am now trying to get in touch with the 
Alumni at Washington. 

My brother, W. Edward Kneale, Delta 
Alpha, has been detached from the U. S. S. 
Vermont and has been sent to England. 
He had a ten days' leave to go home. Sat- 
urday, I received a telegram from him that 
he could not come down to see me as he 
expected, and he said that he would leave 
Tuesday. I immediately left for New York 
and spent all Sunday morning with him. 
We certainly had a fine time. He is a 
lieutenant, junior grade. His promotion 
was dated January 1. 

Fraternally yours, 
RALPH KNEALE, Delta Alpha. 

U. S. Radio School, 

College Park, Md. 

P. S.— Davis, a Case Sigma Nu of 16 
class, just came in. He was transferred 
from the camp in Georgia. 



With Military Honors 



Here We Write 



'Immortal Dates 



Thinking of our Fraternity not only as a Brotherhood of militant force, but alto as 
-'--■- force for the apiritual development of men." — The Creed of Sigma Nu. 

After his graduation, he served as a lieu- 
tenant in the army for several years in the 
West, in Dakota and elsewhere, while the 
Indians were being subdued by United 
States troops. 



LIEUTENANT COLONEL BERTRAM 
TRACY CLAYTON 

Theta 
Telegrams received in Montgomery late 
Tuesday afternoon by Judge Henry D. 
Clayton, of the United States Court, con- 
tained the official announcement of the 
death of judge Clayton's brother, Lieuten- 
ant Colonel Bertram Tracy Clayton, U. S. 




A., in action in France. Colonel Clayton 
was a Bon of Major General Henry D. Clay- 
ton, C. S. A., and president of the Univer- 
sity, and was bom October 19, 1862, on 
the old Clayton plantation near the town 
of Clayton, Ala. 

Colonel Clayton was educated at the 
University of Alabama and in 1666 was 
graduated from the United States Military 
Academy, at West Point, where he was a 
classmate of General John J. Pershing. 



Leaves the Army 

Later he resigned his c 
army and took up the pursuit of the pro- 
fession of civil engineering in Brooklyn, 
N. Y.j while there he became colonel of the 
14th Regiment of New York National 
Guard. At the outbreak of the Spanish- 
American war Colonel Clayton organised 
Troop C of the New York (Brooklyn) Cav- 
alry and went with it to Fort Alger, near 
Washington, D. C., and was put in com- 
mand of the New York squadron, composed 
of Troops A, B and C, of the New York 
Cavalry. 

Goes to Porto Rico 

He went with General Miles' army to 
Porto Rico, and commanded the advance 
guard of the army in Porto Rico, and his 
troop was engaged in action at Coamo and 
Aibonito, P. R., just before the protocol 
was proclaimed. Upon Col. Clayton's re- 
turn to New York after the Spanish-Amer- 
ican war, he was nominated by the Demo- 
crats of the Third New York District for 
Congress and was elected to the Fifty-sixth 
Congress by more than three thousand 
votes in a Republican district. 

Appointed a Captain 
At the expiration of his service in Con- 
gress he was appointed a captain in the , 
regular army by President Theodore Roose- 
velt. He served three years as quarter- 
master in the Philippine Islands and after- 
wards superintended the erection of the 
army barracks at Fort Jackson, near New 
Orleans. He also served several years as 

Siartermaster at West Point and while 
ere superintended the completion of the 
new academy buildings. 

Colonel Clayton served several years in 
the Quartermaster's Department at Wash- 
ington and was afterwards sent as quarter- 
master to Panama. At the outbreak of the 
war with Germany he was detailed to serve 
as second in command <at 'C&fc \xvt«yrtt 



service at New York. He requested an ap- 
pointment to the line and asked to be sent 
to France to serve his country there. 

Lieutenant -Col onel 

He was promoted to lieutenant-colonel 
but was kept in the Quartermaster's De- 
partment because of his large experience 
and sent to France. Shortly after Major 
General Robert Lee Bullard, an Ala- 
bamian, took command of the First Divi- 
sion on the firing line, Colonel Clayton was 
made quartermaster of that division, suc- 
ceeding Cot. Cheatham. 

It is interesting to note that Major Gen- 
eral Cheatham. C. S. A., father of Colonel 
Cheatham, and Major General Henry D. 
Clayton, C. S. A., father of Colonel Clay- 
ton, both commanded Confederate divisions 
in General Stephen D, Lee's corps of the 
C. S. A. 

A Regular— Not a Hero 

Colonel Clayton was every inch a soldier, 
tall, erect and muscular, he was of distin- 

Sished appearance. Doubtless he could 
ve stayed in the transport service at 
New York, but he was anxious to see active 
service and begged to be sent to France. 
In the language of General I.awton, who 
was himself a fighter. Colonel Clayton "was 
a regular and not a hero." He has died 
on the soil from which his ancestor, Thomas 
de Clayton, one of the soldiers of William 
the Conqueror, went with the Conqueror to 
England in 1066. 

Is First to Go 

General and Mrs. Victoria Hunter Clay- 
ton left surviving seven sons and four 
daughters and Colonel Clayton is the first 
of their children to die. He met the su- 
preme test and made the supreme sacrifice 
and poured out his life's blood as a "liba- 
tion to liberty's cause." 

Colonel Clayton is survived by his widow, 
two sons, six brothers, two of whom are 



DONALD H. CHARLTON 
Beta Nu 

An air-pocket, dreaded by aviators, is 
blamed for the death of Donald H. Charl- 
ton, of Bucyrus, Ohio, who died in a fall 
on Taliaferro Field, near Fort Worth, 
Texas. The body was immediately sent to 
his home, where a public service was held 
with soldiers and sailors as active pall- 
bearers, and with a corps of honorary pall- 
bearers. 

The fatal fall had not crushed the young 
man so dreadfully as has been the ease in 
some similar accidents. Both legs were 
broken and a terrible wound inflicted at 
the throat, where he was thrown against 
some part of his machine, but his features 
were practically unm aired. 



The city ilag hung at nail -mast all 
through the service. Four young men from 
Sigma Nu Fraternity of Ohio State Uni- 
versity were also in attendance. — Bucy- 
rus (Ohio) Journal. 

LIEUTENANT JOHN DAWKINS 
MATHIS 

Gamma Alpha 

Lieutenant John D. Mathis was killed in 
action in France, June 6, 1918. His brother, 
Lieutenant Evan T. Mathis, Jr., Gamma 
Alpha, is also in France, having gone over 
several months after Lieutenant John 
Mathis, who was one of the first of a large 
party of American officers sent to France 
early in the war to study European meth- 
ods of warfare. He was a graduate of the 
first officers' training school at Fort Mc- 
Pherson, a young man of splendid business 
qualifications, and a member of one of the 
most prominent families in this section. 

The war department telegram announc- 
ing the death of Lieutenant John Mathis 
gave no details rnnrrrning the manner in 
which he met death except to state that he 
was killed in action. — Atlanta Constitution, 




SPENCER THORNDYKE ALDEN 
Gamma Nu-Gamma Theta 

Ensign Spencer Thorndyke Alden, Gam- 
ma Nu-Gamma Theta, instructor in naval 
aviation, was killed by a fall while flying 
with a pupil at Great South Bay, Long 
Island, New York, on May 4, 1918. 

Brother Alden's home was in Fort 
Wayne, Indiana, but he had prepared for 
college at Michigan High Council, Ami Ar- 
bor, and entered the University of Michi- 
gan in 1913, where he was initiated into 



With Military Honors 



119 



Sigma Nu. Two years later he transferred 
to Cornell, taking the agricultural course. 
He had an exceptionally good bass voice 
and was a member of the Glee Club and 
also of the Savage Club. He left college 
in April, 1917, and enlisted at Newport, 
R. I., as a second class machinist's mate in 
the Naval Reserves. 

His record shows him as one of the first 
six out of a class of fifty-seven at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He 
was commissioned in the Naval Aviation 
March 14, 1918, as an ensign. 

His progress was rapid and after only 
seven hours instruction he was allowed to 
solo (fly alone). He was transferred from 
Pensacola to the Bay Shore Station, where 
he expected to have charge of squadron fly- 
ing, Dut the C. 0. (officer in charge) was 
anxious to train thirty-eight new men in 
their primary lessons and he was assigned 
to instruction work. In one week he 
turned out four new men ready to solo 
and then began giving advanced instruc- 
tion. 

Here they had a few large sea planes 
known as R-6's. He was driving one of 
these to New York City during the Liberty 
Bond Advertising Campaign, when some- 
thing went wrong and he landed at Rock- 
away, returning in a second plane. The 
next day Brother Alden went out with a 
student who had already soloed for twenty 
hours. Suddenly the plane started a spiral 
down from about two thousand feet ele- 
vation. At about four hundred feet above 
the water it went into a side slip and fell. 
It seemed to commence regaining position 
before it crashed to pieces on the water. 
Another officer who saw the accident says: 
"From what I know of the work and what 
I saw, the student after safely spiralling 
down most of the distance for a practice 
landing on spiral, failed to bank and the 
aero naturally side slipped. As the fall 
began, Alden took the control, but had in- 
sufficient distance to right the aero so its 
descent could be changed into level or 
ascending flight. From appearances, I think 
he would have succeeded had he had even 
a hundred feet more dropping distance." 

WILLIAM H. TOWNSEND 
Delta Beta 

I have received a letter today from Mrs. 
W. H. Townsend, of Wyoming, Illinois, 
whose husband was in the Class of 1915, 
and a member of Delta Beta Chapter of 
Sigma Nu, and in it she gives an account 
of her husband's death in France. 

The following extract from the letter you 
may like to publish: 

"We have heard rather indirectly that 
he was shot down by an anti-aircraft gun. 
They were returning from a bombing ex- 
pedition in the early evening; they had been 
severely arched but were all safe and were 
landing. He was the last one down and 



was only one hundred feet up when his 
machine burst into flames; he was thrown 
out unconscious and died an hour and a 
half later. His observer was killed in- 
stantly. He was apparently hit by a shell, 
although I don't see how they could shoot 
so far behind the lines. He had been at 
the front but three weeks. Left for France 
April 1 and was killed April 23. He re- 
ceived his commission in October and sailed 
for England November, 1917. Sometime in 
March ne was made first lieutenant." 

CHARLES J. WESTON. 
[See the Delta, May, 1918, page 832, for 
our first account of Brother Townsend's 
death.] 

JEFFERSON A. HEALY 
Delta Gamma 

Just received word that Brother Jeffer- 
son A. Healy, Columbia Chapter, died from 
wounds received in France. This word 
came to me today, August 23. "Jeff" was 
a splendid man and had taken both his col- 
lege and law degrees at Columbia Univer- 
sity. Brother Healy paid the price for the 
cause of freedom and his devotion shall not 
be forgotten. I cannot say, in words, how 
deeply this thing has touched me. I can 
see him right now tearing up and down the 
football field at Columbia using every inch 
of his six feet and every ounce of his 
weight, in perfect abandon, to bring victory 
to Columbia. There is no doubt in my 
mind but that was the way he fought and 
died for the cause of America. 

A. H. WILSON, Beta Iota. 

J. A. H. 
Dead in France, August, 1918 

Sunny Jeff! Whose heart and hands were 
great 

Holding all kindness in them, and joy of 
youth, 

We shall remember you, who died for 
truth; 

You shall remain in all hearts incarnate, 
What you had been in those old days when 
you 

Came to the House with laughter and with 
jest 

Fresh from the field, surrounded by the 

rest 
Who sought to learn the fellowship you 

knew. 

Honest you were and kind — no kinder grew 
Among the Legion that the bright Star led. 
(And eyes upon the stars, you fought, and 

bled 
And past the stars your great warm spirit 

new.) 
We saw you come to us, and smile, and 

pass — 
So short your draught — but oh, how rich 

your glass! 

ARCHIE AUSTIN COATES, 

Delta Gamma, 
D. G., U. S. N. R. F. 



The sad news of the death of Henry F. 
Mitchell, 2d, was received in Philadelphia, 
April 9, through the following brief an- 
nouncement from the War Department: 
"Your son Harry died from drowning, in 
line of duty, on April 7, 1918." Harry was 
23 years old. He was born in Philadelphia, 
and for nearly two years he studied 
scientific agriculture at State College and, 
last July, enlisted in the Engineers Corps, 
entering the class then receiving instruc- 
tion at the - University of Pennsylvania. 
His corps went to France July, 1917. The 
dispatch from Washington did not give de- 
tails of how the young engineer met his 
death, simply stating he had been drowned 
on April 9. The presumption of his friends 
is that he was engaged in bridge building 
or similar operation at the time. 




Lieutenant Carl O. Rosequist, Infantry, 
died May 10, 1918, from wounds received 
in action. He was among the first to be 
sent across for experience in French and 
British training camps. After short visits 
at several of these camps he was given 
charge of a company of British soldiers 
stationed in the first line trenches. Lieu- 
tenant Rosequist worked with the "Tom- 
mies" until the regular army men of the 
United States arrived, when he was ap- 



pointed as first lieutenant, U. S. A. It was 
while in this capacity in the front line 
trenches that he met his death. 
Brother Rosequist was twenty-four 

fears old. He was born in Evans ton, 
llinois. and in his high school days de- 
veloped into an athlete of ability. Entering 
Lombard College he won both athletic and 
scholarly distinction. Here he joined Delta 
Theta Chapter. He was captain of the 
football, baseball and basketball teams, 
and during his senior year was the director 
of athletics for the college. After gradu- 
ation in 1916, he taught mathematics and 
English at the Fulton County High School, 
Lewis ton t Illinois, also serving as director 
of athletics there. From this place he en- 
tered the first officers training camp at 
Fort Sheridan, where he was commis- 
sioned. 



A seventh gold star was added to the 
State college service flag today when word 
was received of the death in action of Cap- 
tain Roscius Harlow Back, until the school 
year of 1916-17 a student in the depart- 
ment of hydro- electrical engineering. Cap- 
tain Back was a son of Judge and Mrs. 
R. H. Back of Vancouver, Wash., and was 
associated with the Sigma Nu Fraternity 
while in college. As a student he took a 
keen interest in military affairs and at- 
tained the rank of first lieutenant. He left 
college several months previous to Amer- 
ica's declaration of war to enlist in the 
regular army. Upon the entrance of the 
United States into the war he was assigned 
to Camp Green, Charlotte, N. C, as a mem- 
ber of the Fourth Division, Eighth Brigade. 

His advancement in military life was 
rapid, due to his preliminary training and 
natural aptitude and he was advanced to 
the rank of first lieutenant before sailing 
for France nearly a year ago. Soon after 
arriving on foreign soil he was granted a 
captain s commission, and went to his death 
in action we 
— Spokane, 

JUDGE BACK'S SON LIVES 

Captain Roscius H. Back Is Reported Alive 

and Well in France 

Just as we were "pulling page proof" 
comes the cheering message given below. 
Since it was too late to change the black 
border around his name in the Knights of 
the Republic, we are leaving the notice of 
Brother Back's death stand as corrected, 
as follows: 

On July 31 last a telegram from the War 
Department addressed to Judge R. H. Back 
of the circuit court here announced that his 
son, Captain Roscius H. Black, had died in 
France of wounds received in action. Today 
a cablegram received by relatives of the 
captain announced that he was alive and 
well. 



With Military Honors 



LOUIS P. MUTTY 
Delta Iota 

Brother Louie P. Mutty was killed in an 
airplane accident at Miami, Fla., July 10, 
1918. No details have been furnished us. 

Brother Mutty was a senior in the college 
of agriculture, State College of Washing- 
ton, Pullman, Washington, when he an- 
swered the call to the Colors, choosing the 
navy. He. was assigned to the naval avia- 
tion corps and was sent to San Diego, Cal- 
ifornia, for training, later going to Florida 
to complete his air schooling. 

Brother Mutty was prominent in student 
activity while in college, being a member of 
the varsity tennis team three years and 
captain of the team one year. 




mediately sent across. After a short stop 
in London his regiment went directly to the 



"You'll know about Roger long before 
you receive this, but I thought you'd like 
to learn the particulars. I was his closest 
friend here in the army, and he left a list 
of addresses for me to write to in case he 
'went West.' He was every inch a man and 
yet he had the highest ideals and cleanest 
mind of any boy I ever knew. I can under- 



"We volunteered for a raid, and we were 
lying together in a small shell hole out in 
'No Man's Land' waiting for the barrage 
to open up when a 'Fntzie' machine gun 
made a casual sweep and Roger fell back 
in my arms with a bullet through his heart. 
He didn't suffer any and died wonderfully 
game, trying to tell me something with his 
last breath, but 1 couldnt catch it quite. 
Private C. C. Mathews. 

"P. S. — You may like to know that his 
commission was coming through, and he'd 
soon have been an officer." 

Brother Hillis spent his first two years 
in college at Oberlin, where he was captain- 
elect of the 1917 team. Nevertheless, he 
transferred to George Washington Univer- 
sity, being elected captain of the football 
team there, too. He also played guard on 
the basketball team and was considered one 
of the best athletes in college. At George 
Washington he joined Sigma Nu. 



ALFRED RICKERT HAMEL 
Delta Kappa 
Brother Alfred Rickert HameL captain, 
Infantry, France, was killed in action in 
the drive at Chateau Thierry. Brother 
Hamel was initiated at Delaware State 
College in 1911, and was a prominent man 
while there. He was captain of both the 
football and basketball teams in his junior 
year. His home is near Philadelphia, Pa. 

SOGER WHITMAN HILLIS 
Delta Pi 

Brother Roger W. Hillis is reported 
killed in accident in France. When war 
was declared he left the employ of the 
Goodyear Rubber Company and tried to 
enlist in the service. Every recruiting 
office in Akron and Cleveland, Ohio, turned 
him down, and also at Seattle, Washington. 
He then went across the border and joined 
the Canadian Engineers and was almost im- 



FOR FAITH AND FLAG 

Already we have begun to mourn for our 
heroic dead — for those who have fallen on 
the fields of honor across the seas, fighting 
for the Cross and the Faith. But more than 
sorrow fills our hearts — rather a solemn joy 
and pride in the peerless and unwavering 
purpose of these sons of Liberty to free the 
world of its wrong. For them the transi- 
tion of death was an incident — to face the 
wrong and destroy it — this was the firm 
and unyielding compulsion of their souls. 

Already we have written their namee 
upon the historic scrolls of our Knighthood. 
Henceforth they shall be as a Lamp to our 
feet, a Pillar of Fire (o our eyes— calling 
us to high endeavor, to steadfast Loyalty 
for our Faith and for our Flag. 

Knightly sons at once of the Republic 
and the Fraternity: You have realised in 
death the ultimate ideal of your lives — the 
unselfish ministry of service — and in doing 
so you have achieved the fullness of oil 
worldly success, leaving to us a cherished 
memory of a strong and fearless life, given 
freely to others. 

WALTER J. SEARS, No-Beta Nu. 



Knights of the Republic 

"To guard with jealous care * * * the ancient rights of human freedom, 
in whose name we shall destroy all wrong and oppression, * * * And so to be 
faithful to the Knighthood of Truth. 19 — The Creed of Sigma Nu. 

[Our thanks are due to the Chapter Reporters and Alumni correspondents who are 
taking a keen interest in keeping our Honor Roll up-to-date and complete. Every reader, 
your co-operation is necessary to an accurate record. 

The War Department has asked that mil itary addresses be not published, and hence 
they are to be hereafter omitted. But we must have them in all cases, for our mailing 
list, to insure every Sigma Nu Knight-in- Arms the regular receipt of his Delta. 

The initiate's number following each name stands only as a verification. More than 
two hundred names have been sent in which do not appear on our membership list. As 
our correspondents' information is sometimes incomplete we expect this confusion, but we 
would ask you to specify initiate or pledge to give his chapter and not to use nicknames 
or initials. 

Remember we often have several men of the same name, so that as full information 
as you can obtain about a man is sometimes necessary for identification. — The Editor.] 



VIRGINIA MILITARY INSTITUTE 

Alpha Chapter 

AMORY, GEORGE SULLIVAN. (161) [Aff. to 
Gamma Theta (136)] 

BALD1NGER, OKA M.,* major, Signal Corps. 
(133) 

CARTER. CHARLES SPURGEON, second 
lieutenant. (165) 

CLARKSON, BENJAMIN BLANDY. (193) 

DEXHAM. JAMES LAMB IE, second lieutenant, 
Marines. (134) 

EASTHAM. KENNA GRANVILLE, captain, 
Cavalry. (142) 

EWING, JOHN DUNBRACK. Reserve Corps. 
(164) 

EWING, TOULMN HUNTER, Field Artillery. 
(185) 

GAYLE, LESTER TEMPLETON, first lieu- 
tenant. Infantry. (150) 

HITT, WALTER LYMAN, captain, Reserve 
Corps. (201) 

JACKSON, HOWARD STANLEY. (141) 

LEE, HARRY PITZHUGH, Reserve Corps. 
(144) 

MILLER. JOHN CRAIG, JR. (175) 

NASH, EDGAR, JR., first lieutenant, Coast 
Artillery Corps. (167) 

NOWLIN, JOSEPH CHRISTIAN, JR. (169) 
[Aff. to Beta (134)] 

PURDIE, KENNETH SINCLAIR, first lieu- 
tenant, Coast Artillery, (146) 

ROUNTREE, ANDREW JACKSON. (168) 
[Aff. to Gamma Alpha (181)1 

SINCLAIR. JESSE LOWRY, captain, Coast 
Artillery Corps. (135) 

SMITH. SIDNEY CLEMENT, captain. (154) 

8NIDOW, ROBERT CHAPMAN, second lieu- 
tenant Aritllery. (140) 

SPESSARD. RUTHERFORD HOUSTON. (196) 

WILMER, THOMAS WILSON, second lieuten - 
ant. (189) 

WILSON, ROGER MURCHINSON, second 
lieutenant. Infantry. (155) 

WILSON, ROGER SCOTT, Infantry. (136) 

UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA 
Beta Chapter 

BECKWITH, CHESTER CARROLL. (128) 

BERKELEY, SCOTT BRUCE, Aviation Corps. 
(181) 

BRASFIELD, GEORGE FREDERICK. Ambu- 
lance Corps. (183) 

CALHOUN, JOHN CALDWELL, JR. (113) 

CHARTERS, GEORGE PRICE, captain. (100) 
[Aff. from Kappa (100)] 

DICKEY, NELSON FORD. (151) [Aff. to XI 
(294)] 

FENWICK, EDWARD GULAGER. Ambulance 
Corps. (182) 

GRAYSON. LAWRENCE AYRES, Aviation 
Corps. (178) 



HAMBLEY, LITTLETON CLEMAN FLEM 
ING, first lieutenant, Quartermaster Corps, Rec- 
lamation Officer. (87) 

HARRIS, STEWART BROOKS. (88) [Aff. to 
Mu (246)] 

HEATH. HARLETON FLEMING, JR., Ambu- 
lance Unit. (173) 

HOLLAND, FRANK.* (132) 

HYDE. LEROY WALTER, first lieutenant. 
Medical Corps. (142) 

JERRY, ROLLAND LEWIS. (136) [Aff. to 
Beta Sigma (142)] 

NOWLIN. JOSEPH CHRISTIAN, JR.. Reserve 
Corps. Beta (134) [Aff. from Alpha (169)] 

PAYNE, BRUCE RYBURN, regional director 
training college men for Army officers. (81) 

REEVES, WILLIS WARD, second lieutenant. 
Infantry. (139) 

ROUND. ROSWELL EMORY. (169) 

ROWLETT, JEFFERSON DAVIS. JR.. Signal 
Corps. (129) 

STANTON. FORREST QUITTIAM. (123) [Aff. 
from Beta Pel (132)] 

STEPHENS, ROBERT GRIFFIN, lieutenant, 
Aviation Corps. (162) 

THORNTON. ALLAN. (163) 

VAN SCTVER. HARRY BLYTHE. (103) 

WALLER. LUTHER HILL. (172) 

WHITE. JAMES LIVINGSTON, first lieuten- 
nut. (144) 

WOODSON, RICHARDSON BOATRIGHT. 
Navv. (184) 

YOUNG. WILLI AM Til ADDEUS. (119) [Aff. to 
Gnminn Iota (59)] 

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 

Delta Chapter 

JOHNSON. .1AMES MONROE, major. Engi- 
neers. (50) 

BETHANY COLLEGE 

Epttllon Chapter 

BIXLER. VINSON HEBER. Infantry. (136) 

B LAN N ING. HOWARD ARTHUR. Army Y. 
M. C. A. (94) 

BOWERS, FORNEY LORRAINE, sergeant. 
(80) 

BROOKS, ROBERT MARTIN, first lieutenant, 
Infantry. (90) 

BROWN, ORV'LLE JAMES. (102) [Aff. to 
Delta Gamma (107)] 

BULLARD, LUTHER TODD, Evacuation Hos- 
pital. (122) 

CANAGA, WILBUR WAIGHT. (100) [Aff. to 
Beta Nu (177)] 

CHAPMAN, CLARENCE NEIGHBOR. (124) 

CHAPMAN, JAMES HODGENS, first lienten- 
ant, Infantry. (65) 

COLVIG, JOHN BAPTIST, Aviation Corps. 
(108) 

COPE, WALTER ALEXIS. (97) 



Knights of the Republic 



128 



COR WIN, WILLIAM FLOYD. Aviation Corps. 
(72) 

CORY. HUGH. Army Y. M. C. A. (138) 

CRAWFORD, STANTON CHAPMAN, Army Y. 
M. C A- (130) 

DARSIE. HUGH DWIGHT, Field Artillery. 
(134) 

DUNN. FINIS WILLIAM, sergeant. Field Ar- 
tillery. (137) 

GATES, JOHN CALHOUN. JR.. Signal Corps. 
(104) 

GORDON. FREDERICK MARSH. Army Y. M. 
C. A. (12) 

GRIMES. VANCE THOMAS. (107) [ACT. to 
Delta Delta (84)] 

HARMON, EARNEST EMERY, Aviation 
Corps. (93) 

HARMON, FRANK HENRY. Aviation Corps. 
(117) 

HELMICK. CLYDE DAVID, Signal Corps. 
(103) 

HOOVER. WILLIAM PENN, JR., Hospital 
Corps. (128) 

HUNT. ALBERT HENRY. Chemical Welfare 
Corps. (135) 

JACKSON. BYRON EDWARD, lientenant. 
Aviation Corps. (47) 

KAISER. CHARLES WARNER, corporal. In- 
fantry. (126) 

LUMPKIN. JOHN ROANE. Aviation Corps. 
(132) 

MAHAN. THOMAS NESSLY. (95) 

MARSHALL. HAROLD. (59) 

METZNER. ROBERT BRAKMANN. (106) 
[Aff. to Pi (155)] 

MOLDEN, HARRY THEODORE. Tank Serv- 
ice. (105) 

MORNES. ARTHUR CUNNINGHAM. (Ill) 

PORTER. SIDNEY CLARK. Engineers Corps. 
(91) 

PRICE, CHARLES OMER, Aviation Corps. 
(153) 

RAMSEY. CARL. Army Y. M. C. A. (71) 

REID. RAYMOND SAMUEL, sergeant. (140) 

ROSENBERG. RUSSELL HAMILTON. (141) 

SALA. HOMER E.. Army Y. M. C. A. (32) 

SCHOLES. WALTER SCOTT. Ambulance 
Corps. (137) 

8EIBERT. RUSSELL EDWIN. (118) 

SHUTTLEWORTH. WILLIAM S.. first lieu 
tenant. Reserve Corps. (85) 

SUTTON, PAUL BERYL, corporal. Field Artil- 
lery. (129) 

TENER. JOHN KINLEY. (92) 

THOMPSON. SAMUEL MORRIS. (123) [Aff. 
to Delta Delta (116)] 

WEBSTER. JOHN BURNS. (99) [Aff. to 
Gamma Pi (129)] 

WELLS. JOSEPn MAHAN. (89) 

CENTRAL. UNIVERSITY 
Zeta Chapter 

BURTON. ROBERT LEE. (62) 

MERCER UNIVERSITY 

Ets> Chapter 

ANDERSON. DUDLEY BABCOCK. (155) 
CHRISTIAN. SAVIAS TALMON, Signal Corps. 

Aviation Section. (251) 
COCHRAN, GEORGE HUGH. (241) 
CRAWFORD, ERROLL MARION. Infantry 

Band. (258) 

HOWELL. HENRY GORDON. (205) 
JACKSON. ARTHUR LANE. (244) 
JENNINGS, HENRY LEE. (263) 
KING. HILLYBR CLARK. Navy. (274) 
McCURRY, SPEED.* Navy. (279) 
McMANUS, METTEANER. lieutenant (271) 
NORMAN. JOHN BROADUS. (197) 
PAULLIN, JAMES EDGAR, major. (109) 
RENTZ, THOMAS HENRY, Aviation Corps. 

(266) 
RHODES. LEWIS BOLING. (208) [Aff. to 

(ismma Pi (76) and Beta Zeta (193)] 

SNEAD. JOHN WOOLSEY. first sergeant. In- 
fantry. (221) 



UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA 
Theta Chapter 

ALSTON, AUGUSTUS HOLMES, sergeant, Ma- 
chine Gun Company. (308) 

BIRCH, ALEXANDER CLETH&RALL. (168) 
[Aff. to Lambda (67)] 

BOWMAN. HARWOOD CHRISTIAN, lieuten- 
ant. Field Artillery. (356) 

BRADLEY, LEON CRUMPTON. first lieuten- 
ant. Infantry. (346) [Aff. from Iota (176)] 

BURNETT, HUNTER TENNILLE. first lieu- 
tenant. (378) 

BURR, BORDEN HOUSTON. (184) [Aff. to 
Lambda (69)] 

CARMICHAEL. ALBERT AUGUSTUS. Field 
Artillery. (394) 

CARMICHAEL. CHARLES ELMORE. (358) 



CLAYTON. BERTRAM TRACY, lieuten- 
ant-colonel. Quartermasters Corps. Killed 
in action. France. June 4, 1918. (47) 



CORY. CHAPPELL. JR., second lieutenant. 
(362) 

CURRY. JOHN COTTINGHAM, second lieu- 
tenant. (343) 

DORTCH, WILLIAM PRICE, ensign. Navy. 
(376) 

DOWE. JAMES ELWOOD. JR., Field Artil- 
lery. (386) 

EDWARDS. BRYANT BENJAMIN, first lieu- 
tenant. Medical Corps. (287) 

FERGUSON, BURR, major. Hospital Corps. 
(124) 

FREEMAN. JOHN INZER, lieutenant, Infan- 
try. (374) [Aff. from Iota (230)1 

FULLER. JAMES ALLEN. (375) 

GRIFFIN. VIRGIL CHILDERS, lieutenant. 
Naval Aviation. (289) 

HAYS. WILLIAM DALTON, major, Field Ar- 
tillery. (213) 

HERREN, THOMAS WADE, lieutenant. Cav- 
alry. (370) 

HOPE, OFFNERE. captain. (186) 

HUFF. BONNIE, lieutenant. (320) 

JONES. JOHN PAUL, JR. (333) [Aff. to Beta 
Phi (114)] 

KELLY, RICHARD BUSSEY. JR.. lieutenant, 
Infantry. (365) [Aff. from Iota (198)] 

LEACH. JOHN WARREN, first lieutenant, 
Aviation Corps. (345) 

LELAND. WILLIAM ARCHIBALD, JR. (383) 

LONGSHORE, WILLIAM LEVI, sergeant, In- 
fantry. (33) [Aff. from Iota (182)1 

MARTIN, JOHN THOMAS. (866) [Aff. from 
Beta Theta (155)] 

MEADOR. HENRY CARLETON, lieutenant 
(379) 

OAKLEY, WALTER FLAKE, JR. (835) 

O'NEAL, MAX LAMAR, first lieutenant. (350) 

OWEN. THOMAS McADORY. JR., first lieu- 
tenant, Field Artillery. (359) 

PARISH, EMMETT OATBS. (369) [Aff. from 
Beta Theta (159)1 

PARKER. HOWARD ARRINGTON, second 
lieutenant, Infantry. (377) 

PBTTUS, HERBERT AUGUSTU8. (802) 

POOLE, CALVIN,* second lieutenant (381) 

RABB, HARRY HENDERSON, lieutenant. In- 
fantry. (372) [Aff. from Beta Theta (168)] 

ROGERS: ISAAC JASPER. (380) 

SOMERVILLB, WILLIAM GLASSELL, Medi- 
cal Corps. (57) 

STANLEY, ROBERT H..* Medical Corpa (77) 

STBINER, ROBERT EUGENE, brigadier- 
general. Infantry. (31) 

SUGG. HARRY BURGESS. Quartermaster's 
Corps. (353) 

THOMPKINS. THOMAS PLANT, second lieu- 
tenant (403) 

VIDMER. GEORGE.* (122) 

WALLACE. PERCY EDWARD, JR. (847) 
[Aff. from Iota (222)] 

WILLIAMS, ELLIOTT TUTTLE. (331) 

HOWARD COLLEGE 

Iota Chapter 

ABERCROMBIE, WILLIAM ROBERT. (244) 
BARRETT, EDWARD LINDSAY, Ambulance 
Corps. (241) 



124 



The Delta 



BENTLBY, BENNIB OLIVER, Medical De- 
partment. (177) 

BRADLEY, HARRY BROOKS, ■ergeant, Field 
Artillery. (214) 

BRADLEY, LEON CRUMPTON. (176) [Aff. to 
Theta (346)] 

CARLISLE, ARTHUR DAVIS, Aviation Corps. 
(238) 

CAUSEY, OSCAR SAMUEL. (231) 

DAVIE, BUNYAN, JR., Hospital Corps. (217) 
[Aff. from Beta Tbeta (147)] 

DOHERTY, DRAYTON HOWARD, Medical 
Corps. English Army. (195) 

DONALDSON, HENRY RUTLEDGE, major. 
Naval Surgeon, Hospital Corps. (84) 

FORD. ELMER LEE, Army Y. M. C. A. (246) 

FREEMAN, JOHN INZER. (230) [Aff. to 
Theta (374)] 

KELLY, RICHARD BUSSEY, JR., (198) [Aff. 
to Theta (365)] 

KELLY. SAMUEL BLEDSOE, first lieutenant, 
Infantry. (229) 

LECK E, ROBERT GOWER. (237) 

LKFTWCH, LEWIS. (232) 

LINDSAY, PERR1EN FANCHER, Electrical 
Training School, Navy. (248) 

LiNDSEY, WILLIAM RUPERT, company 
clerk, 'nfantry. (250) 

McPHAUL, RAYMOND LACY. (218) [Aff. to 
Beta Theta (197)1 

LONGSHORE, WILLIAM LEVI. (182) [Aff. 
to Theta (33)] 

MARTIN, FRED FRANKLIN. Hospital Corps. 
(257) 

MULLTNS. WILLIAM KENION. (212) [Aff. 
to Delta Epsllon (67)] 

PARKER. WFLL'AM TORPLEY. (249) 

RAY, GUY WALTER. (242) 

R LEY. ROBERT MiDDLETON. Machine Gun 
Company. (211) 

SM TH, EDGAR VALENT'NE. (62) 

SORRELL. HERBERT SUMEROL. (201) 

THOMPSON, HERMAN WINKLER, captain. 
(126) 

WALLACE. PERCY EDWARD, JR. (222) 
[Aff. to Theta (347)] 

NORTH GEORGIA AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Kappa Chapter 

ALEXANDER, LEMUEL GILBERT. (387) 
[Aff. from Mu (279) and to Gamma Alpha (209)] 

BAKER. RUFB ED, second lieutenant. (262) 

BOND. JONES TURNER. (307) 

BROOKSHER, PAUL FRANK, first lieuten- 
ant, Ambulance Corps. (263) 

CANNON, AUGUSTUS CARL. (212) [Aff. to 
Xi (193)] 

CAVENDER, FREDERICK CARLTON, first 
lieutenant. (238) 

CAVENDER, THOMAS MAYES, first lieuten- 
ant (250) 

CHARTERS, GEORGE PRICE. (202) [Aff. to 
Beta (100)] 

DURHAM. FRANK COLLTNS. Navy. (293) 

FLEMING, WAYLAND OLIVER. (157) [Aff. 
to Mu (170)] 

GAINES, WALTER BUFORD. (284) 

OAINEY. JESSE JAMES, second lieutenant. 
(282) 

GOBER. HENRY FORD. (300) 

HALL, ORViLLE HARMON, colonel. Infantry. 
(114) 

HAMMONTREE, JAMES DAVID, Navy. (303) 

HARRIS, SM TH AARON, major. (150) 

HIGG1NS, HERSCHEL FRED. (305) 

JACKSON, WALTER LEE. (232) 

KEITH, HURBERT WILEY, first lieutenant. 
(274) 

LONGSTREET. ROBERT LEE, captain, Adju 
tant General's Office. (23) 

MORRIS. JOHN BENNETT. (244) [Aff. to 
Mu (288)1 

NICHOLSON, EMBER, sergeant. (281) 

NICHOLSON, EUGENE. (285) 

O'SH'ELDS, ROY PR1NSTON. (312) 

PALMOUR, EMERSON HOMER. (280) 

PENDLEY, CHARLES, first lieutenant. (258) 

PR'CE, FREDERICK SINGLETON LUCAS, 
lieutenant-colonel. (130) 

RILEY, ALONZO CHURCH. (192) 

ROGERS. ROBERT LEE. first lieutenant. 
(266) 



TERRELL. RALPH DUPOIX. first lieutenant 
Field Artillery. (296) 

TODD, JOHN IKE. (256) 

TRIPP. RICHARD HEAD, second lieutenant 
(275) 

WILEY, MILES CARTER, first lieutenant. 

<&71) 

WILSON. JOSEPH HARVEY, first lieutenant. 
Medical Corps. (188) 

WOOTEN, VERNON.* (289) 

WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY 

Lambda Chapter 

ALLEN, ROBERT H.,* major, Infantry. (32) 

BEALL. CHARLES RALPH, second lieuten- 
ant, 'nfantry. (151) 

BELL. HENRY VENABLE. first lieutenant 
Aviation Corps. (178) 

BINFORD, LEE GRIFFITH, Ambulance 
Corps. (80) 

B RCH, ALEXANDER CLETHERALL. (67) 
[Aff. from Theta (168)] 

BURR, BORDEN HOUSTON, Army Y. M. C. 
A. (69) [Aff. from Theta (184) J 

CHARLTON, JOHN FELDER, Infantry. (98) 

GLASS, HENRY BOCOCK, Infantry. (130) 

HAGOOD, RUFUS HANSOM, JR., major. 
(100) [Aff. to Sigma (148)] 

HARPER. THOMAS. (157) 

JACKSON. GEORGE PRESTON, lieutenant, 
Infantry. (152) 

JENKINS. STEWART ROBSON, captain, In- 
fantry. (168) 

JOHNSON. KARL HILMER. first lieutenant. 
Ambulance Corps. (179) 

LEDBETTER. LOUIE RANDOLPH. (135) 

McGiNN S. JAMES HEREFORD, second lieu- 
tenant, Infantry. (140) 

M LLER. JOHN ABRAHAM. (167) 

M TCHELL, JOHN WATSON. (105) 

MOORE, CARL CARSON, first lieutenant Am- 
bulance Corps. (144) 

MURPHEY, CLARENCE WAINWRIGHT, cap- 
tain, Quartermaster's Reserve Corps. (6) 

OQUIN, JOHN CLAUDE, captain. (122) 

OQU'N, LEON. (132) [Aff. to Phi (167)] 

PEAKE, JURRINS BEW, second lieutenant. 
Infantry. (155) 

QlhNN. JAMES JOSEPH, Field Signal Corps. 
(172) 

ROBINSON. ISAAC POITEVINT, acting as- 
sistant surgeon, Medical Corps. (1) 

TUCKER. JOHN HELLUMS, JR. (113) [Aff. 
to Phi (183)] 

WADE, THOMAS HARTWELL. (160) 

W ATKINS, ALEXANDER SPRUNT, Naval 
Reserves. (162) 

WATKWS, IRVINE BEAUFORT. Naval Re- 
serves. (163) 

WHITESIDE, WARREN WEBSTER, captain. 
(63) 

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



Mu Chapter 



GILBERT. (279) 

— ) 



ALEXANDER. LEMUEL 
[Aff. to Kappa (387) and to Gamma Alpha (209) 

CLEVELAND. PHILIP McLAIN, captain, Re- 
serve Corps. (214) 

DALEY, WALLACE THOMAS. (192) 
DALEY, WALTER EARLE. (281) 
ENGLISH, LOU S CAPLE. (269) [Aff. from 
Gamma Alpha (132)] 

F'TZGERALD, JOHN EDWARD. (176) 
FLEMING. WAYLAND OLIVER, first lieuten- 
ant (120) [Aff. from Kappa (157)] 
FOLSOM, LEON.* (277) 

FOLSOM, MARION BAYARD, first lieutenant 
(238) 

FREDERICK, JAMES LORATNE. (286) 
GRAY. JOSEPH FRANCIS. JR. (255) 
HARRIS, STEWART BROOKS. (246) [Aff. 
from Beta (88)] 

IIAUTMAN, YORK. (311) 
HOWELL. JAMES MALACHI. (300) 
JENNINGS, HENRY SMTH. (296) 
KYTLE, HANSEL CURT' NO. (299) 
LAIRD, ROBERT ALEXANDER, captain. 
(262) 

LEE, EDWARD MORGAN. (308) 
MINTER, PAUL BRYANS. (313) 



Knights of the Republic 



125 



MORRIS, JOHN BENNETT, first lieutenant 
(288) [Aff. from Kappa (244)] 
PAGE, JAMES EDWARD. (327) 
PEACOCK, ERLB EWART. (266) 
RAIPORD, ROBERT SHELDON. (237) 
RILET, HOWARD WADE. (256) 
ROGERS, JOHN JAMES, lieutenant (216) 

SMITH, THOMAS JEFFERSON, second lieu- 
tenant (289) 

TATE, EDMUND BREWER, JR., second lieu- 
tenant Infantry. (284) 

TATE, HOWARD,* captain. (175) 
THURSTON, HUGH KING ALLEN. (247) 
[Aff. from Gamma Alpha (86)1 
WADE. JOHN DONALD. (260) 
WARD, JAMES ANDERSON. (325) 
WATSON, W1LLTAM MOBLET, second lieu- 
tenant Infantry. (283) 

WELCHEL, HOYT HENRY. (257) 
WHIPPLE, ULYSSES VIRGIL, Field Artil- 
lery. (316) 

WH TE. WILLIAM OSMOND, second lieuten- 
ant. (294) 

WILLIS. JAMES ELLTNGTON. (300) 
WILLIS, LEONARD WAMBACHER. (244) 

UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS 

No Chapter 

ASHBY. THOMAS ALBERT, Forestry Depart- 
ment (252) 

ATWOOD, CLARENCE C.,* Aviation Corps. 
(265) 

BANKER, LOU T S WALDO, Infantry. (235) 

BARTELL, ALBERT RAYMOND, corporal. 
Infantry. (261) 

BEAUCHAMP, WILBUR, lieutenant (198) 

BENSON, THATCHER WYLLYS, corporal, 
Field Sljrnal Corps. (243) 

BIGELOW. JAMES LEE, Aviation Concentra- 
tion Camp. (247) 

BLANTON, EDGAR POWELL. Aviation Corps. 
(253) [AiT. to Rho (284)] 

BORNG. JAMES WILSON. (205) 

BOWMAN, WILLIAM WALTER, Field Artil- 
lery. (254) 

BROWNFTELD, MARO,* sergeant, Ammuni- 
tion Train. (295) 

BURNS, FRANK, Infantry. (181) 

CLAWSON. MILLARD EDWARD, master 
electrician, Signal Corps. (274) 

CL1NE. OWEN CLARK, Quartermaster's 
Corps. (228) 

CODDING, JOHN SULLIVAN, second lieuten- 
ant, Infantry. (212) 

CRAWFORD, THOMAS,* assistant paymaster. 
Navy. (290) 

ELLIS, WARD,* captain, Infantry. (141) 

ENGLE. HERMAN BUSCH, Medical Depart- 
ment (277) 

FALLOON, FRANK G.,« sergeant. (183) 

FITCH, BURDETTE MASE, second lieutenant. 
(272) 

FOWLER. WAYNE AMOS. (226) 

FRANCISCO. CLELL,* Medical Department. 
(294) 

FRATER, ROBERT ALLAN, Engineer's Corps. 
(280) 

GOLDEN, REED HOLLISTER, sergeant (26 % 7) 

GREEN, WILLIAM A.,* major, Infantry. 
(137) 

HARMON. GLEN DEWTTT. captain. (217) 

HARRINGTON. WYNNE POWERS. (89) [Aff. 
to Beta Chi (28)] 

H'GLEY. HAROLD JAMES. (230) 

HOLLOW AY. WEBSTER MATTERSON, lieu- 
tenant Provost Marshal General's Department. 

HUMPHREY. C. B.« (89) 

HYER. ALBERT EDWARD.. Ordnance De- 
partment (271) 

JONES. JAMES EDWARD, first lieutenant 
Navy, (281) 

KERSHNER, JESS KING, first lieutenant In- 
fantry. (275) 

KLIPPEL. PHILIP CHESTER, Machine Gun 
Company. (268) 

LOVELESS. FLOYD LESTER. (244) 

McCANDLESS. ORVILLE CALNON, Ordnance 
Department (269) 

MCPHERSON, EARL WALDO. Ambulance 
Corps. (283) 



NANCE. VALE LAWRENCE, lieutenant. Ar- 
tillery. (178) 

NEWCOMER, EARL THOMAS, first lieuten- 
ant, Engineers. (258) [Aff. from Gamma Lambda 

< 124 1L 
NORTON, JAMES GERALD, Naval Reserves. 

(255) 

NUTTING, WILLIAM DEAN, Aviation Corps. 
(287) 

OLLIVER, M. DONO, sergeant Signal Corps. 
(298) 

ROBERTS, HAROLD MOORE. (296) 

RUSTENBACH, FRED,* sergeant. Engineers' 
Corps. (284) 

SLAYMAKER, HARRY BLEAN, lieutenant 
Infantry. (192) 

SMITH. CHARLES WILLIAM. JR., Marines. 
(234). 

SM'TH, SOLON WILLIAMS. (142) 

STEPHENSON, THOMAS JEFFERSON, In- 
fantry. (177). 

TERRELL, FRANK HIXSON. first lieutenant. 
Infantry. (276). 

VAN METER, ABRAM LEE, first lieutenant. 
Medical Department (189). 

VOETH. BERT WILLIAM, captain. Marine 
Corps. (133) 

WILLIAMS, DICK. (250) 

WILSON, AMOS EVANS. (236) 

EMORY COLLEGE 

XI Chapter 

ALMAND, BOND.* (243) 

ASHLEY. JUL' AN MOXLEY. (226) 

BOND. EUGENE ALVA. (211) [Aff. to Gamma 

Kappa (74)] 

BREWTON, WILLIAM WADE, color sergeant 

Infantry. (242) 

CANNON. AUGUSTUS CARL. (193) [Aff. from 

Kappa (212)] 

CHESTER. OSCAR BRADLEY. (220) 
DARL NG, ALPHONSO COUNCIL. (280) 
DICKEY, NELSON FORD, second lieutenant. 

Infantry. (294) [Aff. from Beta (151)] 
FULLER, ALV N ELMO, Navy. (270) 
GOODRICH, HENRY.* (165) [Aff. to Phi 

(106)] 

HEARN. SAM BERTO. (248) 
PAGE. R1NALDO BURRUS. (230) 
ROGERS. LEONARD PHINIZY. (268) 
STALLINGS, HENRY ARNOLD. (203) 
THOMPSON. CARL, Navy. (289) 
WELLS, JAMES THOMAS, Navy. (283) 
WHALEY. W LL1AMS ELDR D. (267) 
WHEELER. WESLEY TAYLOR. (208) 
WILL'AMS, CHARLES HADON, Naval Radio 

Station. (276[ 

WILLIAMS, CRANSTON GULLATT. (247) 

LEHIGH UNIVERSITY 
PI Chapter 

ALLEN, ELWOOD MARWELL, Engineers. 
(165) 

BERGER, EDGAR MILTON, Naval Reserves. 
(191). 

BORNEMEN, WALTER AUGUST, corporal. 
Engineers. (156) [Aff. from Gamma Delta (88)] 

BUXTON, EDWIN ABELL, Ambulance Corps. 

CLARKE, RUSH, II, Naval Reserves. (18&) 
COVELL, EDWARD HALL. Ordnance Corps. 

(163) 

DOBBINS. JOHN PAUL, JR. (137) 
FLEMING, ANDREW ELLETT, sergeant 

(158). 

GLESSNER, HARRY HARBAUGH. (68) [Aff. 

to Gamma Epsilon (1), to Beta Chi (83), and to 

Beta Psi (87)] 

GUARD. RUSSELL ANTHONY, Navy. (179) 
HAZELT1NE, FREDERICK GORDON BUR- 
HAM. (171) 

HUMMELL, EDGAR CARROLL, Aviation 

Corps. (151) 

MARSHALL, JOHN NOBLE. (180) 
MAYERS, ALTON RULON. (161) [Aff. to 

Gamma Theta (158)] 

MESSERSM1TH, Paul Lee, warrant officer, 

Navy. (178) 

MBTZNER, ROBERT BRAKMANN. (155) 

fAff. from Epsilon (106)] 



126 



The Delta 



MILLER, ROLAND KLINE. (170) 

MILLER, RUSSELL GEORGE, Ambulance 
Corps. (175) 

PERKINSON, ARTHUR ANGUS, Ambulance 
Corps. (167) [Aff. from Gamma Delta (90)] 

QUINN, HERBERT THICKINS, corporal, 
Field Artillery. (115) 

PIKE, DONALD E. (184) [Aff. from Beta 
Iota (216)] 

RAABE, CHARLES EDWARD, Coast Artillery 
Corps. (183) [Aff. from Gamma Delta (116)] 

RITCHIE. FRANK WEYMAN, sergeant, En- 
gineers. (12) 

ROBERTS, EVERETT BRYON, Aviation 
Corps. 185) [Aff. from Beta Theta (210)] 

SCHULER, JOHN HAMILTON, second lieu- 
tenant, Ordance Corps. (173) [Aff. from Beta 
Theta (214)] 

SHAW, HUGH C.* (190) 

SHELLENBERGER, HENRY. (139) 

SHERMAN, JOHN,* Engineers' Reserve Corps. 
(169 [Aff. from Gamma Alpha (213)] 

STANIER, JOHN STEWART. (188) 

STORY, PERCY B.,« captain, Engineers Corps. 
(98) 

WALLS, HENRY RIGBY, Gas Defense Service. 
(164) 

WARE, HAROLD BACON, Marine Aviation. 
(176) 

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI 
Rho Chapter 

ADDINGTON. LEROY HICKS, captain. Engi- 
neers' Corps. (263) 

AVERY, CHARLES McEVAN, second lieuten- 
ant (260) 

BASKETT, EDGAR SEBREE, Aviation Corps. 
(219) 

BASSETT, ARTHUR,* major Judge-advocate. 
(110) 

BLANTON, EDGAR POWELL. Aviation Corps. 
(284) [Aff. from Nu (253)] 

BODINE, ROBERT NALL, JR., major, Coast 
Artillery. (163) 

BOSWELL, CLAY CARLTON, master engi 
neer. (224) 

BROWN. JOSEPH EVERINGIIAM. (218) [Aff. 
from Beta XI (100)] 

BROWN, SANFORD MILLER, second lieuten- 
ant. (243) [Aff. from Beta XI (119)] 

BUCKLEY, CHARLES DAYTON, second lieu- 
tenant. Infantry. (231) 

COLLIER. HENRY ALLTSON. chairman. 
County Committee of Fuel Administration, Mis- 
souri. (147) 

COOK, LEWIS HOOD, second lieutenant. (213) 

CORUM, MARTENE WINDSOR, second lieu 
tenant. Infantry. (253) 

COSGROVE, DANIEL WATSON. (148) 

COX. HAROLD ARGUS. (251) 

DICKSON, FRANK PAUL, JR. (221) [Aff. 
from Gamma Xi (60)] 

DUNNEGAN, JOHN, Infantry. (240) 

GAY, GEORGE, captain, Cavalry. (274) 

GAY, LEE PETTET, Ambulance Corps. (233) 

GRAY, LAWRENCE HENRY, second lieuten- 
ant (210) 

HACKNEY, EARL NEWELL, major, Infantry. 



[Aff. from 



(182) [Aff. to Gamma Nu (124)1 
HALDEMAN, JOHN J.* (283) 

Beta Xi (148)] 

HALL, JOHN TYLER. Aviation Corps. (280) 
HARRIS. JOHN STERLING. Infantry. (237) 
HAZARD, LELAND WALKER, first lieuten- 
ant Field Artillery. (246) [Aff. from Beta Xi 

(1211 

HOGG, ROBERT VINCENT, first lieutenant, 

Machine Gun Company. (230) 

JACKSON. GEORGE DYER, second lieutenant. 

(229) [Aff. from Upsilon (193)] 
JOHNSON, WILLAM CANE. (232) 
KELLY, OATHER ALLEN, first lieutenant, 

Dental Corps. (291) 

KING, JOSEPH CHOATE, major, Artillery. 

(282) 

LIKINS, FRANK HOLMAN. Navy. (258) 
McCASLIN, FRANK JAMES, captain. (116) 
McDANIELR. GUY QUISSENBERRY. Field 

Artillery. (226) 



McNEBLY, JOHN DOWD, colonel, Infantry. 
(91) 

MILLER, WINLOCK, W., JR.,« second lieu- 
tenant, Quartermasters' Corps. (220) [Aff. from 
Gamma Omicron (50) and from Gamma Xi (58)] 

MORROW, SAMUEL ROY, second lieutenant. 
(161) 

MORROW, WILLIAM THOMAS. (196) 

MOULTON. HENRY HARPER. (267) 

MOULTON. WESLEY KILLMAN, sergeant- 
major, Infantry. (268) 

NEIL, WALLACE MILL1KEN, sergeant En- 
gineers. (244) 

NIEDERMEYER, FREDERICK WILLIAM, 
JR., second lieutenant, instructor. Aviation Corps. 
(264) 

NIEDERMEYER. FREDERICK WILLIAM. 
SR., State Advisory Board. St Louis. Mo. (44) 

POWELL, WILLIAM D..* second lieutenant 
Infantry. (238) 

RUTHERFORD. HENRY IIOLCOLM, major. 
Medical Corps. (77) 

STEEL. JOHN OLIVER. (271) 

STEPP. W. DALE.* major. Infantry. (70) 

WALLENDORF, JACOB JOSEPH. Navy. (278) 

WHITE. ALLEN COOKE, Medical Depart- 
ment. (203) 

WHITSETT, GEORGE P., major judge-advo- 
cate. (32) 

WIGGINS. PHILLIS NELSON, Aviation 
Corps. (235) 

WILLIAMS, HAROLD EDWARD, Ordnaace 
Corps. (245) 

W1LLSON, HARRY CLIFFORD, first lieuten- 
ant Infantry. (209) 

WILSON. DONALD FRANCIS, Naval Avia- 
tion. (262) 

WINDSOR. JOHN HORACE, first lieutenant 
(183) 

WINDSOR. WILBUR CUNNINGHAM, second 
lieutenant. Infantry. (214) 

WOODLTEF. HAROLD BOYD, Quartermasters' 
Department. Field Artillery .(275) 

VANDEKBILT UNIVERSITY 
Sigma Chapter 

ANTHONY, WILLARD BURNETT, Army 
Y. M. C. A. (81) 

DELCHER, HARRY RAY, Navy. (227) 

DUNN. MERLE ARNA, Aviation Section, Naval 
Reserves. (212) 

EVERETT, EDWARD BUSEY, first lieutenant 
(204) 

EWING. NORRIS. (167) 

GILBERT, JOSEPH P1LMOOR, Medical Corps. 
(246) 

HAGOOD, RUFUS HENSON, JR., major. (148) 
[Aff. from Lambda (100)] 

JOHN, RAY. Army Y. M. C. A. (199) 

K1LVINGTON. LYLE GEORGE, Quartermas- 
ters' Corps. (217) 

LANZ, CHARLES HENRY, yeoman, Navy. 
(234) 

LEATHERS, HARRY ROWAN. Engineers* 
Corps. (222) 

McMILLION. JOHN DIBNELL, Medical Re- 
serve Corps. (218) 

MILAM. DANIEL FRANKLIN, Hospital 
Corps. (224) [Aff. from Delta Mu (15)] 

MILAM, ERNEST BOWLING, Naval Reserves. 
(223) 

MORRIS, BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. (146) 
[Aff. from Beta Phi (67)] 

NOEL. WALTER MILLER, Quartermasters' 
Corps. (205) 

OWEN, GEORGE WILLI FORD, Medical 
Corps. (244) [Aff. from Gamma Upsilon (81)] 

PAYNE. MAXWELL CARR. O. R. T. C. (240) 

SANGER, FENTON MERCER, lieutenant (30). 

SHARPE, JOHN BENJAMIN. (211) 

SIFFORD, LYNN DEWITT, first lieutenant 
Infantry. (237) 

SMITH, DANE FARNSWORTH, Field Artil- 
lery. (208) 

THOMAS, DANIEL REES, Medical Reserve 
Corps. (235) 

VAN NESS, NOBLE, topographer, Tank Corps. 
(226) 

WINSETT, ALFRED IOL. (170) 



Knights of the Republic 



127 



UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS 

Upsllon Chapter 

BEAKLEY, GEORGE CARROLL. (167) [Aff. 
to Bete Psi (194)] 

BEAKLEY, WJLLIAM PERRY. (168) [Aff. 
to Beta Pal (193)] 

BLOCKER. TOM BROWN, second lieutenant. 
Field Artillery. (158) 

CONLEY, ERNEST ALFRED. (218) 

GIESECKE, WALTER ULRICH. (192) 

JACKSON, GEORGE DYER, first lieutenant. 
(198) [Aff. from Rho (229)1 

KELTNER. EDGAR HARLAND, first lieu 
tenant. (195) 

LAIRD, JOHN ARTHUR, JR., Aviation Corps. 
(207) 

LANGE, ERWIN WILLIAM. (190) 

MILLER, WILLIAM BROWN. (129) 

OHEIN. CURT LEWIS. (194) 

PETERSON, EDWIN EANES. (206) 

SCARBOROUGH. WILLIAM TERRY, lieuten- 
ant, Aviation Corps. (164) 

SCHMIDT. AUGUST CARL, cadet, Aviation 
Corps. (151) 

SMYTHE. CYRUS FIELD, Instructor, Aviation 
Corps. (172) 

TAYLOR. Q. C.« (154) 

UHL, ARTHUR GUSTAV. (181) 

WERNER, MAX GEORGE. (188) 

LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY 

Phi Chapter 

FUQUA, STEPHEN OGDEN, major. (30) 
GOODRICH, HENRY.* (106) [Aff. from Xi 
(165)] 
JARMAN. SANDERFORD,* major. (92) 
LOBDELL. JOHN RANDOLPH, captain-adju- 
tant, (121) 

MASON. ALEXANDER DYER, Engineers' 
Corps. (188) 
MATTA, LANOUE. first lieutenant. (147) 
MORRIS, JOHN ERNEST, lieutenant-colonel. 



(46) 

N, 



ALLAN, Engineers' 



lADLER, JOSEPH 
Corps. (172) 

O f QUIN, ARTHUR. (168) 

O'QUIN, LEON, captain. Artillery. (167) [Aff. 
from Lambda (132)] 

PORTER, CHARLES VERNON. JR.. major 
judge-advocate. (124) 

READ. ALVAN C* lieutenant-colonel. (23) 

SENTELL, NEWTON WASHINGTON. (120) 
[Aff. to Beta Pbi (93)] 

SMITH, ROBERT CECIL. (187) 

STUBBS, FRANK PALMER. (20) [Aff. to 
Beta Phi (23)] 

TUCKER. JOHN HELLUMS, JR.. first lieu- 
tenant (183) [Aff. from Lambda (113)1 

WILKINSON, WILLIAM SCOTT. (165) 

CORNELL, COLLEGE 
Chi Chapter 

DENIO, EARL WILLIAM. Aviation Corps. 
(150). [Aff. to Beta Mu (169)] 

FINGER, RAYMOND HERMAN, Army Y. M. 
C. A. (152) 

WESTCOTT, ORV1LLE DEWITT, major, 
Medical Corps. (90) 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 
Put Chapter 

ALEXANDER, EMORY GRAHAM, major, 
chief surgeon, Hospital Corps. (50) 

BOYLAN, WILLIAM MONTFORT, first lieu- 
tenant. Quartermasters' Corps. (95) 

BREM, WALTER VERNON, major, Medical 
Corps. (27) 

CLARK, WALTER, JR., captain. Field Artil- 
lery. (85) [Aff. from Beta Tau (48)] 

CLEMENT, DONALD,* first lieutenant, In- 
fantry. (102) 

CLEMENT, EDWARD BUEHLER, surgeon. 
Medical Corps. (61) 

COWBLL, HORACE BAXTER, captain, In- 
fantry (175) 

DAVIS, ROBERT COWAN, second lieutenant. 
Field Artillery. (166) 



BAMES, RICHARD DAVIS, second lieutenant. 
Aviation Corps. (103) 

EDMUNDSON, Paul Burs, Infantry. (181) 

FENNER, JAMES SMITH PAULL, first lieu- 
tenant, Coast Artillery. (149) 

FORE, CLYDE LATHROP, second lieutenant. 
(162) 

GRIMSLEY, HARRY BARNETTE, second lieu- 
tenant. Field Artillery. (133) 

HAWKINS, URIAH VAUGHAN, second lieu 
tenant. (182) 

HENDERSON, JOHN STEELE, JR., expert 
with Council of Defense, Washington, D. C. (52) 

JONES, JOHN HAYWOOD, Navy. (160) 

McKENZlE, BENJAMIN WHITEHEAD, Med- 
ical Corps. (165) 

MURPHY. JAMES BUMGARDNER, captain. 
Medical Corps. (75) 

MURPHY, WILLIAM WORTH, captain. Med- 
ical Corps. (86) 

SCHENCK. SAM MOORE, sergeant, Medical 
Corps. (176) 

SIMMONS, ENOCH SPENCER, captain, Ar- 
tillery. (170) 

TAYLOR, JOHN COTTON, second lieutenant, 
Infantry. (177) 

TURN AGE, ALLEN HAL, second lieutenant. 
Marine Corps. (148) 

WILLIAMS, BUFORD FRANKLIN, captain. 
Field Artillery. (105) 

WILSON, CARL B.+ captain. (140) 

WILSON, FRANK WILEY, captain. (100) 
[Aff. from Beta Tau (65)] 

WILSON, JOHN NESTOR, JR., second lieu 
tenant, Infantry. (171) 

YALE UNIVERSITY 
Beta Alpha Chapter 
ANDREWS, WILLIAM A. P. (3) 

DEPAUW UNIVERSITY 
Beta Beta Chapter 

ANDERSON, FRANCIS CLYDE, second lieu- 
tenant. (196) 

ASBURY, CHARLES EMERY. (127) 

ASBURY, JOSEPH MAHAN. (142) 

ASBURY. TAYLOR LANDSDALE. (130) 

BALES, RALPH WINTER, first lieutenant, 
Ordnance Corps. (181) 

BALES, WILLIAM HENRY. Ordnance Corps 
(205). 

BROWN, NORVAL E.* (220) 

BRUDER, BERT.* (186) 

BURNS, RAY LELAND, Hospital Corps. (202) 

DOWNING. DODD.* (169) 

ELWYN, FOSS, corporal, Engineers' Corps. 
(218) 

FINCH, CHARLES M.,« corporal, Medical 
Corps. (170) 

FRANCIS, GEORGE ENISON. chaplain, Field 
Artillery. (150) 

GORRELL, RALPH HENRY, Ordnance Corps. 
(208) 

GRAY, LEON ROY. (162) 

JARVIS, JOSEPH CLARENCE. (160) 

JENKINS. CHARLES BURNAP, Hospital 
Corps. (212) 

JONES. HEROLD ADDISON. (203) 

KATTERHENRY, HAROLD SHULTE. (185) 

KOEN1G, PAULUS FREDERICK BENJAMIN, 
second lieutenant. Infantry. (147) 

LEITH, HERMAN BASCOM, lieutenant. (195) 

LEWIS, WILLIAM REGAN, Infantry. (173) 

LOCKWOOD, ROY CLIFT. (183) 

Mcdonald, Joseph dole. (200) [Air. 

from Beta Eta (201)1 

McGREW, CHARLES JUDSON. (142) 

McGREW. ELMER.* (177) 

MARK, FRANCIS LEWIS. (182) 

NEWBANKS. ARTHUR HAMILTON, Army 
Y. M C. A. (126) 

O'BRIEN, CECIL O* (140) 

O'HAIR. CLARENCE GRADY, captain. (151) 

PEVLER. OMER GEORGE, sergeant. (211) 

POWELL, JOHN SHERMAN. (123) 

RECORD, CLAUDE MATTHEWS, Infantry. 
(152) 

REED, FENWICK THOMAS, JR.. Coast Ar- 
tillery. (201) 

ROSS, HEROLD TRUSLOW. (198) 

SESSIONS, DON RINN. (171) 



128 



The Delta 



SESSIONS, HAROLD PALMER, Aviation 
Corps. (166) [AIT. from Gamma Gamma (92)] 

SWA1M, NATHAN. (166) 

THOMAS, CHARLES EDMUND, Aviation 
Corps. (188) 

WOODS, HERBERT MORRIS, Army T. M. 
C. A. (144) 

YOUNG, HENRY LESLIE. (192) 

YOUNG, ULYSSES S..* second lieutenant. (163) 

PURDUE UNIVERSITY 
Bete Zeta> Chapter 

BAKER, PAUL THOMPSON, second lieuten- 
ant Infantry. (221) 

BEACH. MERRITT STEPHEN, lieutenant, 
Engineers' Corps. (230) 

BENBOW, HARRY BEEDE, Ordnance Corps. 
(222) 

B.DDLE, HOWARD JAMES, Coast Artillery 
(219). 

BLISS, ROLAND REED, second lieutenant. 
(177) 

BREARLEY, DONALD, second lieutenant. 
Quartermasters' Corps. (194) 

BREWER, JOSEPH LINTON, Navy. (228) 

BURGESS, CHARLES HALL. (79) [Aff. to 
Gamma Nu (3)1 

BYRNES, ROBERT A..* first lieutenant (22) 

COOLEY, WILLIAM BREWER, second lieu- 
tenant, Coast Artillery. (196) 

DiXON, CHARLES ELLIOTT, Ambulance 
Corps. (211) 

DiXON, DONALD RE'D. (209) 

DUNCAN, JOSEPH GRAY, captain. (98) 

PITCH, HENRY EBEX. (216) 

GALEY. FLOYD STANTON. (213) 

HAESKE, CHARLES FREDERICK CLYDE. 
(152) 

HEALD. HAMILTON OUTHET. (156) 

McKlNLEY, ROBERT HAROLD, second lieu- 
tenant. Field Artillery. (218) 

NUSSBAUM, HERMAN BERNARD. (180) 

PARKER, AUSTIN ALLEN, brigadier-general. 
(46) 

RATHBUN, WILLIAM SARGENT, Field Ar- 
tillery. (168) 

REED, CLINTON GARDNER, captain, Ord- 
nance Corps. (87) 

RICHTER, ALBERT KEITH, second lieuten- 
ant (208) 

RHODES, LEWIS BOLING. (193) [Alt. from 
Eta (208) and Gamma Pi (76)] 

ROBERTS, CHARLES GLENN, lieutenant, 
Field Artillery. (223) 

SCHULTZE, EDWARD BURCH, Aviation 
Corps. (241) 

SHAW, CARROLL STUART, Aviation Corps. 
(238) 

TOWNSEND, WILLIAM FREEMAN. (200) 

TRAXLER. CARL D.* (233) 

WALDRON, LOUIS DAVIS, captain, Engl- 
neers (90) 

WOODBURN, JAMES GELSTON. (247) [Aff. 
from Beta Eta (188)1 

WYGANT, HENRY SOLLET. (55) [Aff. to 
Zeta (57)] 

YORK, CALEB LEWIS, Aviation Corps. (234) 

INDIANA UNIVERSITY 
Bete Eta Chapter 

ADKTNS, WILLARD E.* (145) 

ANDERSON, FREDERICK NORMAN, first 
lieutenant Infantry. (177) 

ANDERSON, ROY OLTO, Aviation. (180) 

AYDELOTTE, WILLIAM E., JR.* (108) 

BAKER, HAROLD SEiBER. (213) 

DR1BSBACH, CLYDE FLOYD, lieutenant- 
colonel, Infantry. (64) 

EWERT, HOWARD WILLIAM, Navy. (235) 

FARR, FRED EDWARD. (226) 

FRENCH, JOHN WYMOND, Marine Corps. 
(210) 

GARD. WILBUR VEDDER, second lieutenant. 
(211) 

HANNY, FRANK MATHEW, sergeant, Ambu- 
lance Corps. (230) 

HUERING, BYRON. (216) 

JACKSON, EARL WELLINGTON. (173) 

LEWIS, ROBERT WELCH, Quartermasters' 
Corps. (232) 

LYON, CLARENCE CALVIN, war correspond- 
ent (76) 



Mcdonald, joseph dole. (201) [Aff. to 

Beta Beta (200] 

McFARLAND, WILFRED MEYERS. (228) 

McGTNNIS, ALAN R.* (217) 

MATTHEWS, FRED STEARNS, corporal, Ma- 
rine Corps. (231) 

MORRIS, GEORGE WILLIAM, first sergeant. 
(150) 

NEWTON, HARRY VIRGIL, sergeant. (68) 

PHILLIPPE, RALPH CLINTON, sergeant- 
major. (183) 

SCHULTZ, OSCAR THEODORE, captain, Med- 
ical Reserve Corps. (14) 

SHANK, GEORGE EDWARD, JR., corporal. 
Artillery Band. (212) 

STEINHILBER, WILLIAM ALBERT, Infan- 
try. (155) 

STEVENSON, KENYON. sergeant (223) 

STUART. WILLIAM RUSSELL, Naval Radio 
Station. (194) 

THOMSON, RONALD MACDONALD. chair- 
man, County Committee of Fuel Administration, 
Missouri. (91) 

WILEY. GEORGE DUDLEY. (220) 

WOODBURN. JAMES GELSTON. (188) [Aff. 
to Beta Zeta (247)1 

Z T NN, CLARENCE E.,« Quartermaster's Corps. 
(175) 

ZOLLER, KARL HENDRICKS, second lieu- 
tenant (197) 

ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 
Beta Theta Chapter 

ADAMS, JOHN COOPER, captain, Field Artil- 
lery. (180) 

BLOCK, WALTER STEELE, first lieutenant. 
Infantry. (198) 

BREWER, SAMUEL BRAGG, ensign, Navy. 
(164) 

BRONOUGH. JAMES BRUCE. (208) 

CARY, ARMSTRONG,* lieutenant, Infantry. 
(215) 

CASEY, HENRY ROZTER, lieutenant-colonel, 
Quartermaster's Corps. (26) 

CHR ST'AN. WALTER PAYNE. (138) 

COLLIER. BENJAMIN TAYLOR, Engineers 
Corps. (121) 

COWART, ALBERT HANSFORD. (124) 

COX, ROY R.« (105) 

DAVIE, BUNYAN, JR. (147) [Aff. to Iota 
(217)] 

DEER, JOHN FLEMING. (219) 

DUMAS, ALBERT HUGH, lieutenant. (231) 

HALL, W1LMER EUGENE, lieutenant, Avia- 
lon Corps. (172) 

HICKS. DE WITT.* (193) 

HOUSTON, FRANK MARCHANT. (211) 

JELKS, WILLIAM OLIVER, Aviation Corps. 
(115) 

JERVTS. JOHN STANLEY, lieutenant (128) 

KYLE. PONSANBY, Navy. (206) 

LEONARD, JULIAN PORTER. (194) 

LONG. HUBERT DENT. (94) 

LOVELACE, JONATHAN BELL, Coast Artil- 
lery. (184) 

McCRARY, ALVA PTNKSTON. (182) 

McPHAIIL, RAYMOND LACY, Aviation Corps. 
(197) [Aff. from Iota (218)] 

MARTIN, JOHN THOMAS. (165) [Aff. to 
Theta (366)1 

M LES. THOMAS JASPER. (127) 

MOORE, DENN T S MARKETTE. (120) 

PARR'SH, EMMETT OATES. (169) [Alt. to 
Theta (369)] 

POLLARD, EMMETT EUGENE, lieutenant, 
Medical Corps. (152) 

POLLARD, IRBY RHEUL, Veterinary Corps. 
(130) 

RABB, HARRY HENDERSON. (168) [Aff. to 
Theta (372)] 

RANDALL, LUTHER HILL. (183) 

ROBERTS, ARCHIBALD BRADSHAW. (143) 
[Aff. to Gamma Theta (135)1 

ROBERTS, EVERETT BRYON. (210) [Aff. 
to Pi (185)] 

SCHULER, JOHN HAMILTON. (214) [Aff. to 
Pi (173)] 

SPARKMAN, SIMEON STEVEN. (176) 

SPENCE, HENRY TURNER, lieutenant (164) 
[Aff. from Gamma Alpha (117)1 

STANLEY, JOHN GLENN. (149) 

TURNER, ARTHUR PEARCELL, Ordnance 
Corps. (170) 



Knights op the Republic 



TURNER, HOMER HBRDE. Ordnance Corpa. 

(1*9) 

WALKER, GEORGE VINCENT, captain, Avla- 

tloa Carpi. (205) 

WARD. JOHN K.." corporal, Qii»rtermii»t»r'i 

Corpa. (117) 

WARE. JAMES KiTTRELL. (209) 
WILSON, BVERAKD MEADE, Navy. (228) 
WYCHB, GEORGE TAYLOR, infantry. (166) 
YEATMAN. 03CAR BRADFORD, Ambulance 

Corp*. (191) 

MOUNT UNION COLLEOR 
Beta Iota Chapter 
ANDERSON. JOHN BYRON, Machine Oon 
Com pan jr. (266) 

BRAUN. WALTER MARTIN, aergeant, Infan- 
try. (248) 

BROWN, HARRY LAWRENCE, Anibnlnnce 



CARTER. HARRY WILLIAM. (817) [AB. to 
COPTU.OHNE. WILLIAM ASHLEY, captain. 

i'i'ix. i'I.ak'e'nte HERBERT, aere;eant. Cam- 



EA1LKKMAN, CiEOIiiiB SHOEMAKER, lieuten- 
ant (17T) 

BSTERLY. CLIFFORD PEARL. Brat lieuten- 
ant. (222) 

EYVON, CHARLES CHESTER (SIS). 

GIBBONS. HEROLD CLINTON, corporal. En- 



GREEN. RUSSELL ERNEST. (244) [AS. 
Delta Sla-ma {Bill 

GW1NNER. RlJi 
(ISO) 

HARRIS, PERCY LLEWELLYN. Field Artil- 
lery. (3331 

HAWKINS. SAMUEL FRANKLIN, captain. 
(128) 

HAZLETT. HARRY FOUTS. lieu tenant- col- 
onel-adjutant. (105) 

HEGARTY. THOMAS ALEXANDER. (238) 
[AH. to Delta Gamma (118)] 

HOLTZ. WILBUR MEADE, captain. Medical 
Reserve Corps. (Ill 

HOOVER-, FRANK WOODARD, 
(•HI 

BUDD. SAMUEL LESLIE, 



RIKER. SAMUEL CLARE, Army Y. M. C. A. 
(121) 

RITCHIE, BARYY ELDER., O. R. T. C. (Ill) 
ROBINS, CARL HAVEN, chaplain, Field Ar- 
tillery. (206) 

SCOTT, DAVID ELWOOD, chaplain. (91) 
SCOTT, RALPH WARREN. Field Artillery. 
(235) 

SHARP, McKINLHY, Field Artillery. (848) 
SHOEMAKER, HARVEY JOY, lieutenant. Ma- 
chine Gun Company. (1891 

SLATES, MARION LOVELL, corporal. Field 
Artillery. (229) 

SMITH. WILLIAM CHESTER, Cavalry. (167) 
SPRANKLE, LeROY. (810) 
SPRINGER. ALLEN MOFFIT. (218) 
STAMBAUGH, MERLE LLOYD, Field Artil- 
lery. (221) 

STARN, CRAIO ROLAND, Field Artillery, 

STOLL. NORMAN RUDOLPH. (209) 
STOUT. CHARLES JOSEPH, QiiarterraaaWr's 
Corpa. (104) 

TRUMP. FLOYD LEVI, corporal, Field Artll- 

VICK, WALTER BENJAMIN, lieutenant. Field 
Artillery. (234) 

WABSTLER, KARL STANLEY, Army Y. M. 
C A. (262) 

WEAVER, W. ORESTES,* captain. Inatructor. 

WEST. RALPH MELVILLE. (269) 
WEYBRECHT, CHARLES EDGAR, Infantry. 

(104) 

WILSON, ALBERT HUGHES. Army Y. M. C. 

A (18) 

KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 
Bet* Kappa Chapter 
ADAMS, DELBERT ANSEL, militant pay 
HOWARD, lieutenant. ADAMS, RAYMOND VOILES, aaalatant pay- 



', Navy. .__. 

AUBEL, CLIFFORD ERRETT. lecoud lieuten- 
ant, Cavalry. (126) 

BARTLETT, THOMAS REED, Brat lieutenant. 



lery. (287) 

JACKSON, JOHN ALEXANDER, captain. 

JACKSON, JOHN McCLINTOCK, corporal 

JACKSON, PERCY WILLIAM, Field Artillery. 

(loss 

JEFFRYS, RAYMOND J..' Army Y. M. C. A. 

•or p oral, Engi- 
iant, Infantry. 



int, Machine Gun Company. (128) 

BORING, JOHN MILTON, second lieutenant, 
luartermaater'a Corpa. 1105) 

CAMPBELL. WILLIAM McKINLEY. aerseant 

;110) 

DUDLEY. HUGH BYRON, battalion- adjutant. 
Infantry. (70) 

EWERS. HAROLD CLAY, Brat lieutenant, 
Ordnance Corpa (87) 

FEHI.MAN, WARREN PENNSYLVANIA, yeo- 
man. (84) 

FULLINOTON, DEWEY MASON, Aviation 

OAISER. WILLIAM PAUL, Infantry. (102) 
GILLESPIE. HOWARD MQTT. lieutenant. 

GRANT. ALFRED ALEXANDER, aecond lieu- 
tenant. Aviation Corpa. (124) 

GROSS. LAWRENCE GAYLORD, Coaat Artll- 
lerv. (76) 

INEY. GEORGE RANDOLPH, Second lleD- 



JOHN8. J. EDWARD, 

(128) 
JOHNS. WILLIAM DeL'PLANCE. (258) 



JOHNSON, FRANK LEE, Army Y. M. C. A. 
ONES. ROLAND W. I 



KINO, PAUL, aecond lieutenant. Field Artil- 
lery. (04) 

LEWIS. CLYDE LIVINGSTON, Navy. (74) 
LOW, OTTO MONTROSE, second 11 

McMillan, claudb. Navy. (iiT) 

MACMILLAN, ROSCOE IRWIN, drat lleuten- 



MARLOWE. EDMUND FRANCIS, lieutenant. 
Aviation Corpa. (221) 

MOORE, HOMER HAVEN, chaplain. (99) 

RIS, / •""" ■'- ' '■""" 

ER. B 
„. (238) 

OLINGER. LESTER COUSIN, corporal, Field 
Artillery. (264) 

PIKE. DONALD E.« (210) _[Aff. to PI (184)] 

QUIGLEY. SHARON MA TEE It, aecond -Claaa 
quartermaater. Navv. (269) 

REED, CLARENCE C* (214) 



Infantry. (881 

MERNER, CARL JOHN, captain. (118) 

Q.UINLAN, ARTHUR WILLIAM, sergeant 
118) 

SHAW, CEDRIC HADAWAY, Drat lieutenant. 
02) 

WELLS. EDMOND DAVID, aecond lieutenant, 
ifantry. (118) 

WILSON, Rii 
Infantry. (58) 



130 



The Delta 



UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 
Beta Ma Chapter 

ACRES, EDWARD LAWRENCE, sergeant, In- 
fantry. (167) 

ALLEN. GEORGE R.* (47) 
BENSON, JOSEPH LAMBERT. (201) 
BRUECKNER, LEO JOHN. (161) 
BUCK, NAT, Ordnance Corps. (155) 
CASSADY. EDWARD MIKE. (Ill) [Aff. to 



Gamma Sigma (52)1 

~ T prf 

Artillery. (173) 



CHARLTON. 



ANNON,* lieutenant, Field 



DENIO, EARL WILLIAM. (169) [Alt. from 
Chi (150)] 

DWIGHT, JAMES OGDEN, Field Artillery. 
(159) 

ENGELDINGER, KARL, captain, Infantry. 
(156) 

ENGLEBERT, LEON MILFORD, Cavalry. 
(195) 

HOBBY, EDWIN ELMER, captain, Medical 
Corps. (25) 

McWAlD, RALPH ARTHUR. Navy. (190) 

MOON, BARCLAY JAY, Engineers. (185) 

NORRIS. THOMAS TOOGOOD, Ambulance 
Corps. (208) 

ODLE, ROBERT GEORGE, Infantry. (191) 

PIKE, ROBERT BAXTER. Infantry. (102) 

SHEPHERD, ALLEN RAMSEY, Quartermas- 
ter's Corps. (143) 

STETSON, RAYMOND CLIFFORD, Infantry. 
(178) 

STILLMAN, WALTER MARTIN, lieutenant. 
Machine Gun Company. (198) [Aff. from Delta 
Gamma (70)] 

VAN ALSTINE. LESLIE REGINALD, lieuten- 
ant, Infantry. (206) 

WHITING, CHARLES G1DDINGS. (150) 

WILSON, JOHN MAX, second lieutenant, 
Field Artillery. (168) 

OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY 
Beta Nu Chapter 

ABBOTT, WILL JENNINGS, Aviation Corps. 
(234) 

ATWELL, NORBERT SMITH, Aviation Corps. 
(187) 

BEARDSLEY, DTCK BLACKFORD. (175) 

BROOKS, HAROLD HAYES, second lieuten- 
ant. (180) 

BROWN, FRANK KENNEDY, Engineers. 
(216) 

CANAGA, WILBUR WRIGHT, Infantry. (177) 
[Aff. from Epsilon (100)] 

CARRUTHERS, JOHN LISTER, Aviation 
Corps. (201) 



CHARLTON, DONALD HOPPLE, sec- 
ond lieutenant, Aviation Corps. (227). 
Killed in accident at Fort Worth, Texas. 



CUMMINGS, CHARLES MILTON, second lieu- 
tenant. Aviation Corps. (238) [Aff. from Gamma 
Lambda (174)] 

DAVIS, JOHN CHARLES. (214) 

DOLE, PARR HORATIO, junior lieutenant. 
Navy. (43) 

DURBIN, WILLIAM O'CONNOR, lieutenant, 
Engineers Corps. (144) 

ESTABROOK, DWIGHT GODDARD. (165) 
[Aff. to Gamma Nu (168)] 

EYLER, JOSEPH WILKINS. (210) 

FISHER, Infantry. (197) 

FULLINGTON, JAMES FITZJAMES, Ameri- 
can Field Service, awarded French Cross for 
bravery. (182) 

GILMORE, SAMUEL GORDON. (220) 

HAMMOND, JOHN EDGAR, first lieutenant, 
Coast Artillery. (127) 

HENRY, FREDERICK MOORE, secretary to 
State Fuel Administrator, St. Louis Mo. 

HOFFMAN, FELIX WARREN, first lieuten- 
ant, Coast Artillery. (120) 

HOGUE, LEVI LORAN, sergeant-major, Field 
Artillery. (212) 

HUNT, SPENCER SHIPLEY, second lieuten- 
ant. Aviation Corps. (207) 

HUNTER, FRANK ANTHONY, captain, Infan- 
try. (125) 

KREITER, FRED WILLTAM. Ambulance 
Corps. (143) 



KREITER. LOUIS HENRY, Infantry. (198) 
L1LLEY, VERNON SCOTT, Navy. (239) 
LUXON, NORVAL NEIL. Navy. (233) 
McCANN, HAROLD WEBSTER. (140) 
McCAULEY. JOHN EUGENE. Radio Wireless 
Service, Aviation Corps. (245) 

McCOY, EARL WARNER, first lieutenant. En- 
gineers Corps. (126) 

McNAMAR, JOHN DALE. Navy. (217) 
MAKEPEACE, LEWIS BENJAMIN. (194) 
METCALF, HENRY HAN LEY, Aviation Corps. 
(179) 
MILLER, GALEN.* Aviation Corps. (226) 
MILLER, HENRY.* first lieutenant, Medical 
Corps. . (93) 

moore, lawrence levi. (215) 
nash, paul Mcmullen. (196) 
neer, lester cook. (213) 

NICHOLAS, GEORGE WARNER, second lieu- 
tenant. Field Artillery. (209) 

NORTON, KENNETH BAIN, American Field 
Service (199) 

NUDD, CHARLES HOWARD. (218) 

OVERTURF, MARION CUNDTFF. (240) 

PARSLEY, KENNETH McKAY, Ordnance 
School. (206) 

PALMER, JOSEPH HUBERT, second lieuten- 
ant, Coast Artillery. (181) 

PROCTOR. DELANO LIGHTNER. first lieu- 
tenant. Veterinary Corps. (203) 

REAMER, TOLMAN HERN DON, Ambulance 
Corps. (211) 

REICIIELDERFER, ROY,* Radio Training 
School. (241) 

REMY, CLAYTON LEROY. Aviation Corps. 
(185) [Aff. from Gamma Xi (82)] 

RUSSELL, JOHN EVAN, Field Artillery. 
(191) 

SAMSEY, JOHN WILLIAM, lieutenant. Field 
Artillery. (188) 

SCATTERDAY, SAMUEL ALLEN, American 
Field Service. (136) 

SMITH. HARRY MARCELLUS. (231) 

THISTLE,. SAMPSON. Aviation Corps. (169) 

TUSSING. EARL BYR1N, second lieutenant. 
Aviation Corps. (205) 

WESTERMAX, FRANK L..*Signal Corps. (232) 

WILCOX, CLARENCE PETERS, first lieuten- 
ant. Aviation Corps. (192) 

WILCOX. JAMES WILSON, second lieutenant, 
Aviation Corps. (193) 

WISE. LLOYD W..* second lieutenant, Infan- 
try. (244) 

WOLF, HARRY DANIEL. (104) 

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE 
Beta XI Chapter 

BROWN, JOSEPH EVERINGHAM. (100) 
[Aff. to Rho (218)] 

BROWN. SANFORD MILLER, JR. (119) 
[Aff. to Rho (243)] 

CHURCH. CLYDE CLIFTON, Ambulance 
Corps. (150) 

CREEL, JEWELL DEAN, Field Artillery. 
(155) 

DEAN, WALTER FERNANDO. (3) 

DUDLEY, JAMES ROGERS, Medical Corps. 
(160) 

GRAVES. WILLTAM CARUTHERS. (129) 

HALDEMAN, JOHN J.* (148) [Aff. to Rho 
(283)] 

HANEY, J. R., Quartermasters Corps. 

HANEY. ROY EMMETT, lieutenant. (137) 

HARLE, ERNEST GLEN, first lieutenant 
(283) 1 

HARRTS. JAMES MARTIN, Quartermasters 
Corps. (145) 

HAZARD. LELAND WALKER, first lieuten- 
ant. Field Artillery. (121) [Aff. to Rho (246)] 

HUNT. NOAH,* Hospital Corps. (135) 

HUNT. PAUL FOSTER, Hospital Corps. (170) 

HUNT, THOMAS RUSSELL, Hospital Corps. 
(149) 

JONES. ERNEST STLER. Tnfantry. (164) 

KIRTLEY, GEORGE SYLVESTER, senior 
radio operator. (174) 

MURRAY, SELDON. Hospital Corps. (115) 

PATRICK, FREDERICK IRVING, Aviation 
Corps. (165) 

PERRYMAN, CURTIS BARBEE. first lieuten- 
ant. Cavalry. (153) 

PIERCE. STEVE CLARK, JR. (140) [Aff. to 
Gamma Zeta (128)] 



Knights of the Republic 



131 



PUCKETT, BAY JUDSOX, Hospital Corps. 
(151) 

SMILEY. JOHN RAY, first lieutenant. Infan- 
try. (130) 

TROTTER. PETE, JR.,* Quartermasters 
Corps^ (138) 



(146) 



LSON, CHARLES RALPH, Field Artillery. 



WOLFE, IRA CLAY, sergeant, Medical Corps. 
(166) 

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 
Bete Rho Chapter 

AUSTIN. CHARLES VEDDER. (144) 

BELLAK. JOSEPH FAUSSETT, ensign, Navy. 
(81) 

BROOKS. FERN LEY THOMPSON, Engineers 
Corps. (164) 

CALDERWOOD. GEORGE INAY, second lieu- 
tenant. Ordnance Corps. (142) 

DAVIS, THOMAS EDWIN. Navy. (126) 

DORSEY, FRANCES JOSEPH, second lieuten- 
ant (165) 

DYKE, JOHN TALBOTT, first lieutenant. 
(166) 

FELT, HOWARD EVERETT, first lieutenant, 
Cavalry. (138) 

FISHER. ELLWOOD CORSON, Motor Truck 
Company. (122; 

FRANKLIN. JOHN ARMFIELD. (99) 

HARVEY. LAWRENCE, ensign, assistant pay- 
master. Navy. (109) 

HAUPT, CASPER WISPAR. lieutenant. (108) 

HEAN, FRANK R..* Array Y. M. C. A. (130) 

HERMAN, JOSEPH LEO. (70) [Alt. from 
Beta Upsllon (73)] 

JAMES. BENJAMIN ESCOTT. (194) 

JOHNSON, THOMAS JOSEPH. (157) 

LEE, ALBERT E.» (133) 

McCLURE. DONALD ARMSTRONG, lieuten- 
ant. Infantry. (156) 

McCONNELL, SAMUEL PARKER, Hospital 
Corps. (171) 

McCREIGHT, WALTER NORTH, Aviation 
Corps. (190) 

McELNEA. WILLIAM HERBERT, lieutenant. 
(134) 

MAITLAND, JOHN JOSEPH, ensign. Navy. 
(112) 

MELLON, ALBERT EMERSON, captain. Field 
Artillery. (88) 

MIHM. FRANK BERNARD, Aviation Corps. 
(136) 

MILLER. CHARLES EUGENE, lieutenant. 
(152) 

MORRISON, DONALD RICKER, Artillery. 
(198) 

OLDHAM. LAWRENCE EDWIN. (153) 

OLSTON. FRANCIS MICHAEL, second lieu- 
tenant. Artillery. (119) 

PENDLETON, WILFRED ALLAN, lieuten- 
ant (141) 

RAFFTERY, LYMAN THOMAS CLEMENT, 
lieutenant. Coast Artillery. (155) 

RILEY. EDWARD FRANCIS, Hospital Corps. 
(173) 

RITER, MICHAEL MILLER, first lieutenant. 
(69) 

RUPP, DAVID. III. captain. (33) 

SAHM. ROY. sergeant. (51) 

8CHULER. HARRY FREDERIC, first lieuten- 
ant (40) 

SECHLER, JAY WILLIAM, second lieutenant. 
(86) 

SPARKS, THOMAS,* Cavalry. (114) 

TROSS, LUDWIG CONRAD, Aviation Corps. 
(181) 

VAN GINKEL. JOSEPH G.,* Machine Gun 
Company. (170) 

YATES. WILLLTAM PARMENTER. (75) 

YOUNG. CHAUNCEY TYLER, Infantry. (176) 

UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT 
Bet* 8l*ma Chapter 

ANDERSON, ROY MELVILLE, assistant pay- 
master. Navy. (145) 

BARKER, HARRY, captain. Engineers Corps. 
(49) 

BARROWS. LUCIUS CROSBY, Photographic 
Division. Aviation Corps. (167) 

BARTLETT, DWIGHT MONROE, first lieu- 
tenant. Aviation Corps. (120) 



BLOOMER. ASA SCHOONOMAKER. Aero Ob- 
servation Corps. (110) 

BLOOMER. CARLTON RICHMOND, Engi- 
neers Corps, Navy. (141) 

BLOOMER. HARRY CLIFFORD, Aviation 
Section, Signal Corps. (89) 

BOOTH, MYRES LANDON. (161) 

BOWEN, JOHN FRANK, first lieutenant. Med- 
ical Reserve Corps. (40) 

BURKE. JAMES FRANCIS, lieutenant, Infan- 
try. (153) 

CUSHMAN, RAYMOND JOSEPH, Aviation 
Section. (162) 

DEYETTE, DWIGHT CHARLES, Aero Con- 
struction Squadron. Signal Corps. (78) 

DOW, SHERIDAN PHILIP, corporal, Machin* 
Gun Company. (182) 

FAGAN, EMMETT LAWRENCE. (178) 

FR1EBUS. REGINALD THEODORE, second 
lieutenant, Engineers Corps. (129) 

GENEREUX, JOSEPH ARTHUR, corporal, 
Engineers Corps. (169) 

GILMORE, ARTHUR FOSTER, first lieuten- 
ant, Coast Artillery Corps. (150) 

GOLDTHWAITE, WILLIAM LAWRENCE, 
Aviation Section, Naval Reserve. (172) 

HOLCOME, RANSOM HOLCOME, assistant 
surgeon, Naval Reserves. (90) 

JERRY, ROLLAND LEWIS, lieutenant, Ord 
nance Corps. (142) [Aff. from Beta (136)] 

JOHNSON, PHILIP REYNOLDS, boatswain's 
mate. Naval Reserve. (163) 

JONES, WALLACE DA VIES, lieutenant. Avia- 
tion Section, Signal Corps. (144) 

KNIGHT, ROBERT EARL, second lieutenant, 
Infantry. (155) 

LAMB. GEORGE EUGENE, Quartermasters 
Corps. (34) 

L1NNEHAN, JAMES WILLIAM, second lieu- 
tenant, Infantry. (138) 

LOGAN. JOSEPH ANDERSON, second lieu- 
tenant. Infantry. (107) 

LOGAN. JOHN HAROLD. Signal Corps. (164) 

LOGAN. ROY GORDON, yeoman. Aviation Sec- 
tion, Signal Corps. (173) 

LOUD. DONALD LYMON. Signal Corps. (193) 

MARTIN, STODDARD BROCK. (135) 

MILLER, FLOYD ASHLEY, first lieutenant, 
Aviation Corps. (30) 

MOREY. PHILLIP JOHNSTON, first lieuten- 
ant Signal Corps. (148) 

OLZENDAM. RODERIC MARBLE, Aviation 
Section. Naval Reserves. (131) • 

ORCUTT, JOHN CALEB, captain. Quarter- 
masters Corps. (48 ) 

PARKER. CHARLES SnERMAN, second lieu- 
tenant. Infantry. (157) 

RANSOM, PAUL LEWIS, captain, Machine 
Gun Company. (134) 

RAYMOND. FRED NEW. second lieutenant. 
Cavalry. (128) 

ROBERTS, DOUGLAS JAMES, first lieuten- 
ant Medisal Corps. (22) 

ROBERTS, JOHN RANDALL, first lieutenant 
Field Artillery. (117) 

ROSS, JACOB JOHNSON, first lieutenant 
Medical Reserve Corps. (44) 

SALMOND, JOHN. Aviation Corps. (118* 

SCHOPPE, RAY LONGFELLOW, Junior lieu- 
tenant. Naval Reserve Forces. (105) 

SHUTTLEWORTH. BLAND DOUGLAS, Avia- 
tion Section. Signal Corps. (147) 

SLACK. JULIAN MILTON. (56) 

SLAYTON. PERCY LINCOLN, Machine Gun 
Company. (140) 

SMITH, RODERIC WALKER, second lieuten- 
ant. Infantry. (154) 

SUNDERLAND. HARVEY HASKELL, aecond 
lieutenant Infantry. (160) 

TEACHOUT. WILLIAM TRAFFORD, second 
lieutenant. Infantry. (170) 

THAYER. HARRISON SMITH, first claw yeo- 
man. Naval Reserves. (103) 

THOMAS, EARNEST ORMSBY. second lieu- 
tenant Infantry. (171) 

THOMPSON, FRANK STEVENS, Aviation 
Corps. (156) 

TYLER. EDWARD JUDSON, JR., Aviation 
Corps. (176) 

WILLIS ARTHUR NATHANIEL, second lieu- 
tenant. T nfantry. (139) 

WOOD HAROLD NELSON. (97) 

WRISTON, JOHN CLARENCE. Medical Corps. 
Nnrv. (184) 

WRTSTON. ROSCOE CALEB. Aviation Corps. 
(143) 



132 



The Delta 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

Beta Tan Chapter 

BOST, CHARLES CARROLL, JR. (110) 
CLARK, WALTER, JR. (48) [Aflf. to Pal 
(85)]. 

CONSTABLE, HENRY BACON, Aviation 
Branch, Navy. (128) 

FORD, RUFUS JR., assistant paymaster, Navy. 
(101) 

GEITNER, JOHN GEORGE HARVEY. (138) 
HAYDEN, CLAUDE JACQUES, JR., flrat lieu- 
tenant (154) 

HICKS, RUFUS WILLIAMS. (103) 
LIPSCOMB, W. THOMAS,* major, regimental 

surgeon, Infantry. (72) 

PRICE, WILLIAM WEYMAN. (155) 
ROGERS, WILLIAM HAYWOOD, JR. (147) 
ROYSTER. HORACE RALPH. (148) 
RUSS, WILLIAM MARCELLUS, sergeant. 

(146) 

SIGMON, ORIN WARREN, master engineer. 

(112) 

WILSON, FRANK WILEY. (65) [Aff. to Psi 

(100)] 

ROSE POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 
Beta Upsilon Chapter. 

BBAUCHAMP, JAMES MERCER, second lieu- 
tenant. (88) 

BORDNER, CECIL LYLE. Engineers Corps. 
(129) 

BYRD, ROBLEE COOK. Army Transfer Serv- 
ice. (104) 

CHARMAN, HOWARD ROSS, Field Artillery. 
(116) 

FLOYD, RAYMOND CORYDON. (90) 

GOLDSMITH, FREDERICK CARR, Meteor- 
ology Section, Signal Corps. (120) 

GRAfE. PAUL JOHN. (134) 

HANSEN. ARTHUR CHRISTOPHER, first 
lieutenant, instructor, Engineers Corps. (98) 

HERMAN, JOSEPH LEO. (73) [Aff. to Beta 
Rho (70)] 

HICKMAN, JACK RAYMOND NELSON, pay- 
master. Navy. (67) 

KURFESS. LELAND STACY, Machine Gun 
Company. (141) 

ORR. JAMES EWING, Navy. (140) 

PUCKETT, EDWARD LEE, Aviation Corps. 
(79) 

SCHWEERS, AMBROSE JOSEPH. (74) 

SCOTT, JOHN THERON, second lieutenant, 
Infantry. (103) 

SHEARER, WILLIAM ALBERT. (93) 

WAGNER, WILLYS PECK. (146) 

TULANE UNIVERSITY 

Beta Phi Chapter 

BOOTH, GEORGE WASHINGTON, lieutenant, 
Infantry. (98) 

CONNELL, EVAN SHELBY, first lieutenant. 
Medical Corps. (107) 

COUSIN, GEORGE JOSEPH, JR. (115) 
COUSIN, SUMTER,* second lieutenant. (108) 
GETZEN, WILLIE LEE. Engineers. (134) 
JONES, CLEAVES ALBERT, cadet, Aviation 
Corps. (113) 

JONES. JOHN PAUL, JR. (114) [Aff. from 
Theta (333)] 

LAZZO. JOHN JR..* Field Artillery. (132) 
SENTELL, NEWTON WASHINGTON, first 
lieutenant. Hospital Corps. (93) [Aff. to Phi 
(120)] 

STARR. HOMER HURD. JR. (21) 
STUBBS, FRANK PALMER. (23) [Aff. from 
Phi (20)] 

WALKER, JAMES CHARLES, assistant sur- 
geon, Navy. (106) 

WALKER, JOHN MILTON, lieutenant, assist- 
ant surgeon, Naval Reserve Corps. (105) 

LELAND STANFORD UNIVERSITY 
Beta Chi Chapter 

ALLEN, ANSON.* (160) [Aff. to Gamma Zeta 

(97)] 

AVERT LL, JAMES PAUL, JR., second class 

seaman. Navy. (177) 

BAUMGARTNER, FRANK LEROY. (180) 



BUCKLEY, RAYMOND JAMES. (178) [AIT. 
to Gamma Chi (177)] 

CRAM, WILLIAM HENRY, Aviation Corps. 
(189) 

CRANE, WILLIAM WHITEFIBLD, second 
lieutenant. Infantry. (179) 

CURTIS, MEREDITH ANDERSON, Infantry. 
(182) 

DAVIS, HERBERT LESLIE. (196) 

D1NGLEY, ROBERT GARDNER, Ambulance 
Corps. (171) 

EVANS. CHARLES BORDOE, sergeant, Quar- 



termasters Corps. (128) 

FOSTER, 
serve. (135) 



<Jorpi 
, CL 



ARENDON A. JR.,* Naval Re- 



GARDNER, JOHN HENRY, Aviation Corps. 
(207) 

GLESSNER, HARRY HARBAUGH. (83) [Aff. 
from Pi (168), Gamma Bpsilon (1), and to Beta 
Psi (87)] 

GRAU, FRITZ SEYMOUR, Quartermasters 
Corps. (153) 

HARRINGTON. WYNNE POWERS. (21) 
[Aff. from Nu (39)] 

HOBBS, CHARLES STEINMETZ, Quartermas- 
ters Corps. (197) 

HUBBARD, GORDON ALDEN, Marine Corps. 
(210) 

JENSEN. NORMAN RAMSEY, first lieutenant. 
Marines. (174) 

KEESLING, HECTOR.* first lieutenant, Sig- 
nal Corps. (119) 

KEESLING, LOUIS ANSELM, Naval Reserve 
Forces. (142) 

KELLOGG, WILLIAM SCRIPPS, Signal 
Corps. (201) 

LEE, NAYLOR C* second class seaman, Navy. 
(168) 

LITTLE, KENNETH KEITH. (198) [Aff. to 
Beta Psi (221)] 

LULL. L1NFORD COREY, second lieutenant, 
Signal Corps. (139) 

McCORMACK, LINCOLN, JR., Engineers. 
(190) 

McGILVRAY, MALCOLM CANMORE. (172) 

McLELLAN, DOUGLAS HULL, ensign, Navy. 
(181) 

McMILLAN, PERCY WALTON, Engineers 
Corps. (150) 

McMILLAN, WILLIAM BRUCE, first lieuten- 
ant, instructor, Engineers. (147) 

MICKLE, JOHN LLOYD, Naval Reserves. 
(151) 

MONTGOMERY, JAMES EVANS, Aviation 
Corps. (199) 

MURRAY. GEORGE HARVEY, sergeant-ma- 



jor, Aviation Corps. (161) 
, DON 

(211) [Aff. from_ Gamma Zeta ( 



NEWBURY, 



RANSOM, provost sergeant 
[ima Zeta (111)] 
BLE, WARHAM M.* (212) [Aff. from 
Gamma Phi (98)] 

PELOUZE, ROBERT FORSYTHE, Aviation 
Corps. (203) 

PREISKER, WILLIAM HENRY, Aviation 
Corps. (147) 

ROBERTS, GORDON ARTHUR, first lieuten- 
ant. Infantry. (200) 

ROSE. FRANKLIN ORTH, first lieutenant, 
Engineers. (175) 

SCHLESINGER, LEE,* first lieutenant, Artil- 
lery. (193) m „ A 

SHERMAN, RICHARD WADE, first lieuten- 
ant. Infantry- (185) m mm 

SMITH, RODERICK ARBUCKLE, second lieu- 
tenant. Infantry. (213) 

SMITHSON, FRANK EMERSON, Cavalry. 
(170) [Aff. to Gamma Sigma (98)] 

SNOOK. WALTER BONNERD, first lieuten- 
ant. Aviation Corps. (209) 

SPEERS, ROLAND ROOT, first lieutenant. 

(187) 

SPENCER, ALLAN THOMAS. (93) [Aff. to 
Beta Psi (103)] „ ,. * 

SWETT, WILBUR FRANK, second lieutenant, 
Artillery. (173) 



TAYLOR. PALMER WILKINSON. Reg- 
ister No. 74864, Cadet Wing, R. F. C, 
Toronto. Can.; died of scarlet fever, Fort 
Hicks, Texas, January 2, 1918. (202) 



TOOLE, JOSEPH PORTER, first lieutenant, 
Infantry. (205) 



Knights of the Republic 188 

walleh. lawrence waits. (hi) taff. spencer. allan thomas. (102) [a6t. 



WARE. FLBTCHB1 
[AS. from Gam 

UNIVERSITY OF CAUFOBNIA 
Bete F*l Chapter 
ABADIE, EMILE RECTOR. JR. (7E) 
ADAMS. LELAND DREW. (120) 
ANBWALT. HENRY PHILIP. (200) 
ASHE. FARRAGUT DAVID, enllatcd Speclal- 

Uti School, Radio Section. (2151 
AYRES. HAYWARD.* (199) 
BAKER, ROBERT FRANCIS, corporal (111) 
BANGS. EDWARD GEOFFREY VAN DYKE. 

(1(1) 

BANGS. FRANK VAN DYKE. (129) 
BARTLETT, DONALD SALISBURY. (108) 
BEAKLEY. GEORGE CARROLL. (181) [AIT. 

from Upellon (107)1 

BEAKLEY, WILLIAM PERRY. (19!) [AS. 

from Upallon (1(18)] 

BELL. FRANK COOVER. (ISO) 
BENSON. JOHN PATY. (SI) 
CAM1NNETTI, ANTHONY, JR. (119) 
CAMPBELL. DONALD LORENZO, Ambulance 

Corpi. (179) 



|14<) 

DAVIS, NORR1S KING. (22) 
DEREMER, SAMUEL TEEL, 



(180) 

DOW, EDGAR LAURENCE. (182) 
DOWNER, 1RVIN CLYDE, HoaplUI Cor pi. 

(225) 

FORCE, JAMBS ADOLPHUS. (100) [Ad. 

from Gamma Eta (20)1 

GAGE. ARTHUR GLOVER. (BS> 
GARRETT, VERNON 



Corps. (219) [AIT. from Gamma Zcta (91)] 
GEARY. WILLIAM DUEACHET. (95) 
GHlRAnELLL LOUIS LEGLER. (118) 
GLESSNEB, HARRY HARBAUGH. (87) [Aff. 



I (SB), Gamma Epallou (1), 

GRUBER. EDWIN ALBERT. (176) [A 
!rom Gnmnni Chi HH'Hl jiilI to U.irumi Chi (103 
HALL. CHANMNG-* (1171 
HAUi'KU. aiAULEs FRANKLIN. Marin 



"S: 



STANTON, FORREST QUILLIAM. (1*1) 
Aff. lo Beta (121)1 
STKW'ABT. .TAMES WILL, captain. (140) 



_t.i Edit liK WALDO, lien 



IIAUI1IS. MYRON WILFRED. (138) 
HI1I.V FREDERICK DAY. (156) 
HILL. ALBERT EDWAKI1. 117*1 
HILL KRt.'LX i\\MI'BELL. (189) 
'■'■■ CLARENCE WALL. <l£l) 
SON. VIRGIL WILIi T '"" 
...._.'. RABRl'B HAI.nil 
..HIKiiKB, rilAKLES MILO. .. . 
LIMlSAV. CHARLES IlliNNKlt. (190) 
LINDSAY. i;i:ni;i;i; itiioRK, Ambulance 
Corps. 1185) 

LITTLE, KENNETH KEITH. (121) [Aff. 
from Beta Chi (198)] 

LLOYD, HARRY EDISON. Hospital Corps. 

McCANDLESS, HOWARD FRANCIS. (ISO) 

(AIT. to Delta Slrma (12)1 

MEAD. STEPHEN KENT. (145) 

MITCHUM. ALBERT DUDLEY COL1S, lieu- 
tenant. Marine Corpa. (169) 

NEWSOM. NOBLE." (141) 

PAYNE, CHARLES WILLIS. (128) 

PIKM. JOHN.* (114) 

REIMBRS, FRED HOLBERG, lieutenant 
(183) 

RENZ, CARL ALBERT, Engineers Corpa 



RICE. THOMAS 1 - 

ROBERTS. GEORGE DOWNING. Aviation 

Corpa. (184) 

RONEY. HARVEY.* lieutenant. (173) 
HCANTLIN, THOMAS EDGAR, JR. (187) 

[Aft. from Delta lota («»)] 
SNOOK, PRESTON EDWARD. (201) 
SNOOK, WILLIAM SAYER. (181) 
SPECK. HARRY LEON. (188) [Aff. from 

Gamma Zeta T»4)] 



W1IKATLKY. I'.M'L VAN HEVANTER, Aria- 
on Corps. (7!) 

WIIISMAN. HENRY S.« (IBS) 
MII.LUMs, TIli'M \S LAWRENCE I 191) 
WOOLSEY, CHESTER HOWARD. (10) 

GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY 

Gamma Alpha Chapter 
ALEXANDER. LEMUEL GILBERT. (209) 
[Aff. from Mu (279) and from Knppa (287)] 
CONRAD. THOMAS WILLARD. (198) 
DASHER. ANDREW RUSSELL. (191) 
ENGLISH, LOUIS CAPLE. (132) [Aff. to Mu 
(269)] 

ENGLISH, ROBERT HENRY. (77) 
FIELDER, KENDALL JORDAN. eecoDd lieu- 
tenant. Macblne Gun Company. (189) 

FORRESTER. DON MONTELL, first lieuten- 
ant. Engineers Corps. (1S7) 

FRASEUR. FENEL HIGHTOWER. (214) 
HALL. BENJAMIN MORTIMER, JR.. Brat 
lieutenant Engineera. (114) 

HALL. WARREN ESTERLY, captain. Engi- 
neers. (42) 

HAMILTON. LEWIS AUGUSTUS. (184) 
HARDIN, ERNEST EUGENE. (197) 
HIGHTOWER. JULIAN THOMPSON, Naral 
Reserves. (220) 

HOUSEAL, JAMES WALTER. (73) 
HUBERT, EDWARD HATCH, second lieuten- 
ant. Engineers Corps. (14S) 

JEKVIS. ROBERT HOWELL. (213) 
JEWELL. DANIEL ASHLEY, JR. (142) 
JOHNSTON, PAUL NELSON. (177) 
KRONER. HAYES ADLAI. (122) 
LAFITTE, EDWARD FRANCIS, captain. (96) 

lamkin. alonzo church. (166) 
legq. milton franklin. (108) 
lewis, florence courtney. (119) 
Mcdowell, thomas henry. (129) 

MALSBY. JOHN DeKALB. (162) 

MATHIS, EVAN THOMAS, lieutenant. (199) 



MATH IS, JOHN DAWK1NS, lleute 



PRITCHETT. JAMES HENRY. (18) 

BEES. JOEL FRANKLIN. (227) 

ROBERT. ALEX PIERCE. (128) 

KOUNTREE. ANDREW JACKSON, Field Ar- 
tillery. (Ill) (Aff. from Alpha <1M)1 

SHARPS, DOUGLAS BETELS. (176) 

SHERMAN, JOHN. (211) [*" *" "' 

SINGLETON. MACAJAH TB 

SMITH, MeLELLAN. (201) 

SNYDER, WILLIAM ROBERT, flrat lieuten- 
ant. Ordnance Corp*. (106) 

SPBNCE, HENRY TURNER. (17) [Aft. to Beta 
Tneta (164)1 

STARR. JAMBS HENRY. (194) 

TATE, JEAN JUDSON. (151) 

THURSTON. HUGH KING ALLEN. (86) 



NORTH WESTERN UNIVERSITY 

Gamma, Beta Chapter 
AVRES. GARL I..,* Signal Corps. (1751 

ii'i«M.i\. i.evliiette ei.i.swortii. a 

L.-iil OI.mtv.t. .Whirl, .n c., rl ..~. iir.'i 

juiAin.KV. cii a i:i.i;s lmmett, a via 

Corpa. (136) 

CIIAI'MAN. JOHN VAN I.1EW. (162) 
cook. J.HI IS RAYMOND. (133) 

i'how, Horace " ■ 



FOX, MDRKAY CHALLtS. corporal. (1(1) 
FRENCH, CHARLES WALLACE. HolplUl 

Co rim. (SO) 

FRENCH, RANDALL WHITE BOBN3, Hoi 

piliil I'liriiB. (151) 

GARDNER. WILLIAM ELDRIDGE. Naval Re- 
Jervea. 1133) 

G1LLETT, ALV1N ELTAS, Army Y. M. C. A. 

GOODRICH, FREDERICK HARRISON, Aral 
lieutenant, Infantry. (189) 

HARTMAX. ERNEST VALENTINE, captain. 



HABWOOD, 
Field Arllllery. (IIS) 

HKAn. I'LOYU slMUO.v-i. M. .ileal Supply 
Depot. (601 

.lOlINSdN". riEt.l'.EKT KIMMONS. Field Ar- 
tillery. 1101) 

KEITH AM. CLirFOltLI THItllBER. Navy. 
(151) 

RIEi'NElt. rilAi;Li;s i;iAV.\lin. second lieu- 
tenant Slmial Krac-rvi' Cur [is. Aviation Section. 

nr>.-,i 

K' 

LOCY.' FRANCIS EASTMAN, Junior grade 
lli-uti'iitint. .M..'Lli"!il Corps. OB) 

MARTIN. KAVMmNH ELLSWORTH. (189) 

MKYF.it, cil Alil.l:- I- l;lllii;i;n.'. Aviation 
Corps. (158) 

MlI.I.Elt ISEET1IAI: 

Avbi i Corpa. <]"' 

K. LeRO 



Mi'tllcal Cm. 

I SHELL. 
Corpa. — - 

KEE 



EGBERT RAYMOND, 



t lieutenant, 

"mTll'ek" LeROY FREDERICK. Marine Corpa. 

Navy. ■ 
IMT) 



MOTJLTON. ri.AUENCB TAMES, Navy. (1ST) 
MCl.CH. HENRY CARL, corpn—' 
■- Navy. (144 



HoaplUl 

EELER,' KENNETH BLAKE, Medical Corpn. 

KENAGA, RUSSELL FRED. Avlaiion Corpa. 

LAKE. LESTER CLARK, Cavalry. (178) 

LOTT, KARL WILLIAM, second lieutenant. 

Infantry. (161) 

McKITCHIE. DAVID KENNETH Of) 
MERR1TT. HARRY JOHN. Aviation Corpa. 

MILLER, LYLE HOLCOMBE. captain. Marine 
Corpa. (SI) 

OQDBN, ROBERT NEWELL. Army Y. M. C 

I'ERUoTT. AliTIiri: ni'Klt, (1241 
PETERSON. RALPH LORENZO, Army Y. M, 

BIGGS, HAROLD WALTER. (IBS) 
SEA It I.. ['RED NELSON, Navv. (157) 

sessions iiAiiviUi palmer. (92) [Aff. to 



OLSON. LEW.. . 

OVERMAN LION MARK 
Infantry. (125) 

PETERS. 111. Mill: liOUART. signal Corpa. 
(18BI 

PORTER. CLIFFORD S.,* Avlatl.ia Corpa. 



RANDOLPH. c.T'Y DEWEY. Aviation Section. 

' 'kENIi'lEMAN. 'V. 1-'.- first II. >n(.'i t. (1051 

SANDERSON, WALTER GODFREY, yeoman, 

' sZtJBB, HAROLD D.. Hospitnl Corps. (106) 

sCHWI'.ser, iIAIiOI.I) GHoltoE. Mrat Hen- 
tenant. (138) 

SHAW. NORMAN messenger, captain, Ma- 



.,.. . H.-tlon. Signal Corps. (1461 
TEHCAI1DEN. WENDELL HEKSIIEY. 

'"t'etEK. JOSEPH PARK. Miirlnp Corns. ( 

VANin'.uiii.t e. nnMi:i; iinvs, m-ntcti 

(HI) 

VANDFIiKUHPT, El.liov LEONARD, lieu 
a pit. Siilntiiiriiii' ScF-vli-e. (83) 

VAI G11AN. FRANK IlltlliCS. 1(11 
Corps, (183) 

WEI IN. GEORGE." lil'Ul 

WERMDTH, ARTHUR WILLIAM, iirat lieu- 
Icikhii Fi.'l.l \nill.Ti-. (74) 

WOODWARD. MALCOLM COI.MAN, lieuten- 
ant, Infantry. (166) 

ALBION COLLEGE 

Gamma Gamma Chapter 
BALDWIN. JOSEPH ADDISON, first lleuten- 



■ 'U'lSSTllMAITI;. ROBERT ORVILLE, 



, Fiel.l Artillery. 



s)L 



(165) 
Y. M. ( 



UTLEY, JOSEPH LELAND, Army Y. M. C. 
WADE. DAVID EBER. Infantry. (145) 

""* *" ROBERTS. 



(101) 



STEVENS 



r TECHNOLOGY 
Gamma Delta chapter 

ADAMS. FRANCIS FLOYD. (121) 
ANHERStiN. Ii.li -II.MIU TERHUNE. (1) 
ARMS. NEWTON TAYLOR. (46) [Aff. to - 

Gamma Tliot.i <102i] ' 

HALKO. GHoRGi: ANTHONY, warrant officer 

Naval K*ael*Bf, (10S) 

ItOiiSTEDT. WALTER .11 LUIS, corporal, Sle- 

nal Corps. (93) ■ 

PoR.NEMaN. WALTER Al'GUST. (8!) [Aft 

BUUTENSUAW. CHARLES DAVID. Slfnil 

CAW LEY. GEORGE," Nitrate Division, Ord- 

minn. ('..rim. (80) 

CONIIIT. KENNETH HAMILTON, (53) [Aff 

1" Dvlla Gammii rr.sn l 

DOWNEY HAROI.n KENNETH, eecond-clan 



Gallagher; frank wooLSEY.'Enginiera. 

_GRAESSER, CARL FUOBOSE, macblnlat. 
ViREENlDGE, ERNEST THOMAS P RAKER 

' KARES. IliiH'AllD HENRY RICHARD. Avia- 

ii.Fi Cuitih. 11(101 
KARST. I'AIT. FABER. Bullion Section. Sig- 

KELLEY, ' WALTER MORTON', lieutenant, 
irdniiTii'" Corps. (78) 
LYONS, ROBERT FREW. Aviation Corpa. 

McGDINNKSS. JOnN. JR.." lieutenant Naval 

^ MERRILL. JOHN FRANKLIN. (78) [Aff. to 



Knights of the Republic 



135 



PAULSEN, ALFRED AUGUST, second-class 
machinist. Naval Reserves. (106) 

PERK IN SON, ARTHUR ANGUS. (90) [Aff. 
to Pi (167)] 

PIQUET. HENRY WILLIAM, second-class 
machinist. Naval Reserves. (118) 

PLIMPTON, KENNETH DEPAU. (124) 

RAABE, CHARLES EDWARD. (116) [Aff. to 
PI (183)1 

SCHMIDT, WILLIAM KRAMER, Naval Re- 
serves. (95) 

SCHOCH, FLOYD WILLIS. (45) 

SMITH, CHARLES HOWARD, first-class ma- 
chinist's mate, Navy. (112) 

TAFT, HAROLD WOODWORTH. Infantry. 
(122) [Aff. from Gamma Theta (149)] 

THORNE, FREDERICK ALBERT, second- 
class machinist. Naval Reserves. (113) 

VIEDT. HAROLD BERTRAM. (83) [Aff. to 
Gamma Theta (134)] 

WANDEL, CARLTON,* first lieutenant, Ord- 
nance Corps. (57) 

WEIGELE. WALTER LAWRENCE, Aviation 
Section, Signal Corps. (141) 

WELCH, LOUIS ALTON, Aviation Section, 
Signal Corps. (129) 

WELTER, LESTER LONGLEY. (86) 

LAFAYETTE COLLEGE 
Gamma Epsilon Chapter 

ALEXANDER, GEORGE LEHNER, Aviation 
Corps. (Ill) 

DIEFENDERFER. PHILIP ALONZO. (151) 

ENGLISH, WILLIAM JOHNSON, ensign, 
Naval Reserves. (112) 

EYERLY. EDWARD GRONE. Tnfantry. (119) 

GILBERT, WILLIAM ELWOOD. (121) 

GLESSNER, HARRY HARBAUGH. (1) [Aff. 
from Pi (68), and to Beta Chi (83), and to Beta 
Psi (87) ]_ 

HOLBERT, WILLIAM RODNEY. (94) 

KILLOUGH, THOMAS LESTER, newspaper 
censor, Navy. (93) 

MAGEE, JOHN WESLEY. (82) 

MEANS, CHARLES McCORD, Ordnance Corps, 
Navy. (13) m , 

MILLER, ROBERT HASTINGS, Aviation 
Corps. (153) 

PAULES, PARVIN ELWOOD, Aviation Corps. 
(95) [Aff. to Gamma Theta (122)] 

PHENNICIE, GEORGE DEWEY, Signal Corps. 

PROSSER, ROGER,* lieutenant, Infantry. 
(104) 

PRUTZMAN, STUART E..* Field Artillery. 

(154) 

SCHMIDT. VICTOR RAYMOND. (77) 
SMITH. HENRY JACOBS, lieutenant. Aviation 

Corps. (132) 

STEELE. THOMAS F1NDLEY. (92) 
WALTON. THOMAS FRANKLIN, corporal, 

Infantry. (62) 
WELTY. HENRY STANLEY, Ambulance 

Corps. (125) 

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON 
Gamma Zeta Chapter 

ALLEN, ANSON,* Medical Corps. (97) [Aff. 
from Beta Chi (160)] 

ALTON. ROBERT MINT1E. (66) [Aff. to 
Gamma Nu (148)] 

BATTEY, MERLIN GEORGE. (95) 

BEACH, FRANK LOOMIS, assistant paymas- 
ter. Navy. (100) 

BEAN, HAROLD CEDRIC, first lieutenant, 
Ambulance Corps. (64) 

BECKETT, JOHN WESLEY, sergeant. Marine 
Corps. (101) 

BENSON, WALLACE GILBERT, first lieuten- 
ant Field Artillery. (79) 

BENTLEY, EDWARD EDWARD E.* (146) 

BERRY. CARL EVAN. (117) 

BROWN. WALTER DANIEL, first lieutenant 
(138) 

COLLINS. RUSSBL EVERETT, first lieuten- 
ant. Observation Corps. (116) 

COLTON. GEORGE THERON, Navy. (107) 

DeBAR, BRYANT GRAVES, corporal, Marine 
Corps. (83) 

DODSON, RALPH MOORE, first lieutenant, 
Hospital Corps. (49) 



DUDLEY, GLENN GERALD, Ordnance Corps. 
(105) 

DYMONT, DONALD ST. CLAIR. (131) [Aff. 
to Gamma Chi (198)] 

FARLEY, KENNETH CLAIR. Hospital Corps. 

FARRBLL, FRANK PARNELL, assistant pay- 
master, Navy. (129) 

FOX, RUSSELL ALSEY. Aviation Corps. 
(123) 

GARRETT. VERNON GEORGE. (91) [Aff. to 
Beta Psi (219)] L 

GATES. GEORGE EUGENE, corporal. (120) 

GEARY, ARTHUR McCORNACK, second lieu- 
tenant, Signal Corps. (54) 

GEARY, EDWARD ANDREW. (82) [Aff. to 
Gamma Lambda (149)] 

GEARY, ROLAND WOODBRIDGB, Aviation 
Training School. (102) 

GRADY, HAROLD HENDERSON. Aviation 
Corps. (84) 

GREEN, GARNET LITLER, Ordnance Corps. 
(133) 

HALL, ELMER EDWARDS, sergeant Marine 
Corps. (78) 

HART, HENRY FLOYD, sergeant, Aviation 
Corps. (134) 

HENDERSON, LOUIS ALFRED, captain, En- 
flfineer Corns (25) 

HUSTON, OLIVER BRUCE. Ambulance Corps. 
(48) 

KIDDLE, FRED EDWARD, Ordnance Corps. 
(106) 

JETT, GEORGE LAYTON. first sergeant. (75) 

McCORNACK, ROBERT DE HUFF, Aviation 
Corps. (81) 

McCOWAN, ERNEST KINGSLEY, Ambulance 
Corps. (93) 

McLEAN, JOSEPH SCOTT, first- sergeant, Am- 
bulance Corps. (118) 

MALARKEY. HUNTINGTON.* (121) 

MALARKEY, ROBERT.* Infantry. (126) 

MITCHELL, CLIFFORD LEO, sergeant, Ma- 
rine Corps. (115) 

MOORE. HARRY RUFUS, lieutenant. Ambu- 
lance Corps. (61) 

MORF1TT, NEIL LEWIS, first lieutenant 
Aviation Corps. (125) 

NEWBURY, DON RANSOM. (Ill) [Aff. to 
Beta Chi (211)] 

NORMANDIN. HERBERT.* (98) 

PARSONS, JOHN FREDERICK, Aviation 
Corps. (86) 

PIERCE. STEVE CLARK. JR.. Aviation Corps. 
(128) [Aff. from Beta XI (140)] 

RADER, DONALD RUSSELL, Aviation Corps. 
(85) 

RIGLER, HOWARD McCALMONT. Medical 
Corps, Navy. (77) 

ROSS. SPENCER IVER, Naval Reserves. (124) 

SCHAFER. MAX,* corporal. (136) 

SCHWAN, WILLIAM JOSEPH. (99) 

SPECK, HARRY LEON. (94) [Aff. to Beta 
Psi (188)] 

SPELLMAN, STERLING BARTHOLOMEW, 
Aviation Corps. (103) 

STEIWER. FREDERICK.* first ljeutenant, 
Field Artillery. (31) 

STEIWER, KARL,* first lieutenant, Field Ar- 
tillery, (50) 

STEWART, RALPH.* (62) 

TAYLOR CHARLES MELVILLE, first lieu- 
tenant. Dental Corps. (53) 

TEGART. RICHARD LLOYD, assistant pay- 
master, Navy. (109) 

TRACY. JOHN EDMUND. (135) 

VAN DUSEN, ARTHUR,* Navy. (47) 

WALKER. RAY M..* first lieutenant. (51) 

WARE. FLETCHER KIRKLAND, Field Ar- 
tillery. (92) [Aff. to Beta Chi (192)] 

WINSHIP, GEORGE ANDREW, sergeant In- 
fantry. (114) 

COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES 

Gamma Eta Chapter 

BOWERS. ERNEST ELTON. (142) 
BROUSSEAU, ANDREW RINGGOLD. (99) 
DICKINSON, EARL JAMES. (115) 
FEGAN, THOMAS DUNCAN, Engineers Corps. 

(135) 

FERGUSON. KENNETH SEARS, Marine 

Corps. (108) 

FORCE. JAMES ADOLPHUS (20) [Aff. to 

Beta Psi (100)] 



136 



The Delta 



FUSHEY, JESSB JAY, lieutenant, Engineers 
Corps. (126) 

GALLOWAY JAMBS VIRGIL, sergeant, Engi- 
neers. (137) 

GRIFFEN, JOHN DANIEL MERR1TT. (117) 
[Aft*, from Delta Gamma (91)1 

HIGGINS, ROBERT.* Engineers Corps. (112) 

LAVENDER, HARRISON M* (103) 

LEE, EDWIN HATHOWAY NORTON. (129) 

LYNCH, VICTOR JOHN. (143) 

McNEILL, NEAL MERLE, Engineers Corps. 

(87) 

NOLAN, PHILIP EDWARD. (90) 
PAGE, WALTER CHATF1ELD, first lieuten- 
ant, Infantry. (109) 

ROBERTSON, FITCH* Engineers Corps. 

SCHADE, ROGER MYRON, Engineers. (122) 
SCHNEIDER, CHARLES MATTHEWS. (125) 
SCHOENSIEGEL, ALBERT DAVID. (121) 
TRAVER, WILL MERTON. (113) 
WEEKS, GEORGE WALDO. (71) [Aff. to 
Beta Psi (164)] 

WILLIAMS, WILLIAM HENRY, Infantry. 

(Ill) 

WORTH, LEE KENNEDY. (114) 

CORNELL UNIVER8ITY 

Gamma Theta Chapter 

ADDAMS, WILLIAM, JR.,* Infantry. (151) 



ALDEN, SPENCE THORNDYKE, en- 
sign, instructor, Naval Aviation. Killed by 
air-plane accident, Great South Bay, Long 
Island, N. Y., May 4, 1918. (198) [Aff. 
from Gamma Nu 161)] 



AMORY, THOMAS DEW1RE, first lieutenant, 
Infantry. (136) [Aff. from Alpha '(161)] 

AMORY, GEORGE SULLIVAN, first lieuten- 
ant, Infantry. (140) 

ANDEREGG, JOHN SWIFT second lieuten- 
ant, Infantry. (163) 

ARMS, NEWTON TAYLOR, sergeant, Engi- 
neers Corps. (102) [Aff. from Gamma Delta 
(46)] 

BBAKES, MAHLON HENRY, Navy. (182) 

BENTON, GEORGE ALDEN, cadet, Aviation 
Corps. (170) 

BETTCHER, GEORGE FRANCIS, sergeant, 
Quartermasters Corps. (141) 

BLAKSLEE CHARLES FAIRMAN. (114) 

BOWES, HENRY JOSEPH AUGUSTINE, cap- 
tain, Coast Defense Reserve. (43) 

BOWES, THOMAS DAVID. JR., Coast Artil- 
lery. (31) 

BUDD, IVAN HAROLD, pharmacist mate, 
Naval Hospital. (162) 

BURKE, ROBERT EMMETT, Becond lieuten- 
ant. Field Artillery. (129) 

CAMPBELL, LORN II. first lieutenant, Ord- 
nance Corps. (165) 
. CASE, MERV1N.* Marine Corps. (176) 

CHADWICK, STUART,* second lieutenant, 
Aviation Corps. (167) 

CLARK, FRANK PENDLETON, sergeant, En- 
gineers Corps. (175) [Aff. from Gamma Kappa 
(134)1 

CLARK, MERRELL EDWARD. (81) 



CLARY, LOUIS HANAWALT, Signal Corps. 

CRAWFORD, 



(146) 

CRAWFORD, JOHN 



_ cadet 

Naval Aviation.' (195) 

CRAWFORD, WILLIAM LEE. (163) [Aff. to 
Delta Gamma (115)] 

DAVIS. ARTHUR EDWIN, Navy. (171) 

ENGLEHARDT, HENRY,* top sergeant, Am- 
bulance Corps. (100) 

FISHER, ELBERT RUSSELL, Infantry. (180) 

GIST, SAMUEL COLVER, JR., lieutenant. In- 
fantry. (183) 

GRAY, JOSEPH HOWARD, Naval Aviation. 
(152) 

HOOVER, JAMES ARMITAGE, Aviation 
.Corps. (147) 

HOUGHTON, LOWELL CURTIS, Infantry. 
(174) [Aff. from Gamma Mu (164)] 

JAGGARD. ERNEST PLACK. sergeant. Quar- 
termasters Corps. (156) 

JANNOTTA, ALFRED VERNON, Army Y. M. 
C. A. (150) 



KNOX, ROBER WALES, lieutenant, Coast Ar- 
tillery. (164) 

LACKEY, WILLIAM TRUESDELL, Infantry. 
(HO) 

LUDINGTON, HOWARD JEROME, Naval Re- 
serves. (155) 

LUX, WOLENMAN.* (117) 

LYONS, HAROLD SHEPARDSON, Infantry. 
(139) 

LYON, PERCY SHEPARDSON, captain. Coast 
Artillery Reserve Corps. (107) 

McCLELLAN, JOHN MURRAY. Marines. (188) 



£ 



. McELROY, EDWARD BURNHAM. Navy. 

(172) 

MAYERS, ALTON RULON, sergeant (158) 
[Aff. from Pi (161)1 

MENGERS, CHARLES ALEXANDER, Navy. 
(145) 

MORTON, RALPH ENCELL, Aviation Corps. 
(143) 

MOSHER, RALPH EMERSON, Infantry. 
(202) 

NEILL, EDWARD ELLINGTON, Ordnance 
Corps. (189) 

OWEN. WILLIAM DOUGLAS, second lieuten- 
ant. (73) 

PATTERSON, WILLIAM KENNETH, Army 
Y. M. C. A. (184) 

PAULES, PARVIN ELWOOD, Aviation Corps. 
(122) [Aff. from Gamma Epsilon (95)] 

PULLIAM, HAROLD ARTHUR, Naval Cadet 
Flyer. (187) [Aff. from Gamma Iota (90^1 

RAYMER, PAUL.* Naval Reserves. (141) 

RE I LEY. JAMES McKENDREE, JR., captain, 
Infantry. (168) 

ROBERTS, ARCHIBALD BRADSHAW, first 
lieutenant (135) [Aff. from Beta Theta (143)] 

SUTTON, HENRY BRUNER, Medical Reserve 
Corps. (138) 

SUTTON, JOHN EDWARD, Medical Reserve 
Corps. (132) 

SWALM, JOHN MOFFATT, Infantry. (72) 

SWALM. ROBERT ALLEN, Infantry. (109) 

TAFT, HAROLD WOODWORTH. (149) [Aff. 
to Gamma Delta (122)] 

THOMPSON, JOHN GRAHAM, Ordnance De- 
partment. (131) 

TOOLE. ALLAN HARDENBROOK. first lieu- 
tenant. (93) [Aff. from Gamma Phi (12)] 

VESEY, WILLIAM JOSEPH. (75) 

VIEDT, HAROLD BERTRAM, Infantry. (134) 
[Aff. from Gamma Delta (83)] 

WALL, JAMES JOSEPH, JR., first lieutenant 
Engineers. (148) 

WALLACE. EARL STEWART, second lieuten- 
ant. Infantry. (120) [Aff. from Gamma Tau 
(60)1 

WELSH, THOMAS WHITNEY BENSON, lieu- 
tenant. Chemical Warfare. (57) 

WILLIAMS. EDWARD PAYNE, lieutenant. 
Infantry. (123) 

WILLIAMS, HENRY DARWIN, Marine Corps. 
(116) 

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY 

Gamma Iota 

AARON, GEORGE DOAN, second lieutenant, 
Aviation Corps. (75) 

AARON, NATHANIAL H.* (102) 

ATKINS, JAMES WILLIAM, first lieutenant, 
Engineers. (54) 

AUX1ER, JOHN FRIEND, captain, Infantry. 
(6) 

BAUGHM. WILLIAM LANUS, second class 
seaman, Navy. (71) 

CAMPBELL, DAVID PATTERSON. Naval 
Aviation Corps. (79) 

COMBEST. HOMER BURKE. (84) 
CRUTCHER. MORRIS JULTAN. (83) 
DRADDY. WILLIAM CABEL. (106) 
EISH. LELAND STANFORD. (107) 
GIBSON, JOHN MARSHALL, first lieutenant, 
Infantry. (91) 

GOODIN, ALBERT BROWNSFIELD, first 
lieutenant. Infantry. (76) 

HAYDEN. CHARLES J..* first lieutenant, In- 
fantry. (101) 

MATHERLY, C. HARTFORD,* sergeant- 
major, Infantry. (88) 

MONTGOMERY. MURRAY MATTHEWS, sec- 
ond lieutenant. Infantry. (96) 

MOORE. WILLIAM SHULTZ, Merchant Ma- 
rine. (100) 



Knights of the Republic 



187 



MORRISON. GEORGE BAIN, captain. Infan- 
try. <*«> 

NAGEL. HERBERT LINCOLN, first Unten- 
ant. Infantry. (62) 

0*SULL1VAN. SYLVESTER DARWIN JOHN- 
STON, cadet. Xaral Aviation. (100) 

PENDLETON. MORRIS EADES, Naval Avia- 
tion. (78) 

PCX LI AM. HAROLD ARTHUR. (90) [Aff. to 
Gamma Theta (187)1 

PULLIAM. KEELING GAINES, JR.. captain. 
Aviation Corps. (74) 

REED. JAMES ARTHUR, first lieutenant. In- 
fantry. (70) 

RINGO. JOSEPH COLLIS. second lieutenant. 
Infantry- (72) 

SCHRADER. CHARLES CHRISTOPHER, sec- 
ond-class seaman. Navy. (89) 

SKILLMAN. HENRY MARTYN. second lieu- 
tenant. Infantry. (51) 

SULLIVAN. JERRY, sergeant-major. (63) 

TAYLOR, CARROLL, second lieutenant, Avia- 
tion Corps. (34) 

VAUGHN, WOODSON WILLIAM. (81) 

WILSON. GEORGE HANCOCK, first lieuten- 
ant. Medical Corps. (6) 

WRIGHT. FLOYD HOLMES, cadet. Naval 
Aviation. (64) 

YOUNG. CLARENCE CALDWELL (111) 

YOUNG. WILLIAM THADDEUS. (59) [Aff. 
from Beta (119)] 

UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO 
Gamma Kappa Chapter 

BECKETT, REXFORD EVERT, corporal. En- 
gineers Corps. (138) 

BESSEE. CHARLES.* Signal Corps. (131) 

BISHOP. SIDNEY WILLARD. second lieuten- 
ant. Quartermasters Corps. (117) 

BOND, EUGENE ALVA, first lieutenant. In- 
fantry. (74) [Aff. from Xi (211)] 

BOUTON, CRAIG MILLER. (9) 

BROCK. JOHN LIDE, first lieutenant. Infan- 
try. (71) 

BUCKLEY. JOHN HAROLD, first lieutenant, 
Aviation Section, Signal Corps. (132) 

CADOT. JOHN JULIUS. Aviation Corps. (88) 

CARROLL, PHILIP HARRINGTON, Forestry 
Corps. (139) 

CHRISTENSEN, CLARENCE MELVIN, Ma- 
rine Corps. (157) 

CLARK. FRANK PENDLETON. (134) [Aff. 
to Gamma Theta (175)] 

COOPER, WILLIAM HAMILTON, sergeant, 
Eugineers Corps. (106) 

CURTIS, HARRY ALFRED, first lieutenant. 
Ordnance Corps. (53) 

DONAVAN, JOHN THEODORE, second lieu- 
tenant Field Artillery. (100) 

EKREM, THOMAS CLARENCE, Quartermas- 
ters Corps. (128) 

GREEDY, PAUL VICTOR, assistant surgeon, 
Navy. (95) 

GUTHRIE. PAUL ROY. lieutenant. (76) 

GUTHRIE, ROBERT LEE, Medical Reserve 
Corps. (114) 

HARRISON. HORACE LIPPINCOTT, Engi- 
neers Corps. (137) 

LUM8DEN. WILLIAM FRANK. (97) 

MORRISON. WILLIAM SCOTT. Ordnance 
Corps. (127) 

MURCH. HENRY BOYNTON, Coast Artillery 
Corps. (112) 

POTTER, EDWIN C., # Quartermasters Corps. 
(73) 

PRESTON, CALVIN BELMONT, Quartermas- 
ters Corps. (69) 

RINEHART, RAYMOND VICTOR, Quarter- 
ns sters Corps. (84) 

ROHDE, EARNEST CONRAD, Aviation Corps. 
(65) 

SAMUELSON, ARTHUR CLYDE. (119) 

SHIMEALL, HERBERT RAY, mess sergeant, 
Engineers Corps. (115) 

SHIMEALL, KARL WALLACE, first lieuten- 
ant, Engineers Corps. (109) 

SIMMONS. WILLIAM PETER, Navy. (145) 

SPIER. JAMES ELDRIDGE, corporal, Infan- 
try. (146) 

WESTERMAN, LESLIE CONRAD, sergeant- 
major. (94) . 

WOLF, CLAYTON SAMUEL, Aviation Section, 
Signal Corps. (118) 



UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN 



BACON. VAUGHN ROBERT, second lieuten- 
ant. Aviation Mechanics Training School. (88) 

BALLARD. ROSCOE FREDERICK. Field Ar- 
tillery. (123) 

BISSELL, WAYNE WILLIAM, captain. Medi- 
cal Corps. (58) 

BLAKNEY. GEORGE PETTI TT, first lieuten- 
ant. Ordnance Corps. (122) 

BLOODGOOD, DAVID WHEELER, Field Ar- 
tillery. (208) 

BOND, HARRY WILLIAM. Medical Reserve 
Corpa (146) 

BOOTH. ALFRED PERCY, first lieutenant 
Aviation Corpa (137) 

BOSWORTH. LESLIE JENNINGS, Quarter- 
masters Corps, Mechanical Repair Shop. (194) 

BRAGG, KENDAL BENJAMIN, lieutenant. 
Naval Aviation Corpa (107) 

BUNDY, HARRY EUGENE, first lieutenant, 
Medical Corps. (93) 

CARPENTER, MILTON JOSIAH, second lieu- 
tenant. Infantry. (126) 

CARTER. FRED GAY. Medical Reserve Corps, 
student University of Wisconsin. (161) 
.CARTIER, VINCENT GEORGE. dispatch 
rider, Aviation Corps. (139) 

CASEY. MATHEW JOSEPH. Navy. (169) 
a CHANDLER, GEORGE ANTHONY, serge 
Quartermasters Corps. (158) 

CLARKE, KENNETH DYER, Coast Patrol. 
(179) 

CRAMER, HERBERT LYLE. Infantry. (163) 
CUMMINGS, CHARLES MILTON. (174) [Aff. 



sergeant 



HOLBROOK, Aviation 
WILHAM, sergeant, 



to Beta Nu (238)] 

CUMMINGS, JOHN 
Corps. (177) 

DAWSON, CHARLES 
Medical Corpa (95) 

EASTMAN, WALKER PARRISH, Ordnance 
Corps. (159) 

ELLSWORTH, PAUL RAWSON, American 
Field Service. (81) 

EMIL, RALPH CARLYLE. (214) 

FOSKETT, HORACE WEBSTER, regimental 
statistician. Field Artillery. (180) 

FRASER. IRWIN MILES, lieutenant. Engi- 
neers Corps. (94) 

FREDERICKSON. FREDERICK ARTHUR, 
first-class petty officer, Naval Aviation. (182) 

GEARY. EDWARD ANDREW. Aviation Corps. 
(149) [Aff. from Gamma Zeta (82)] 

GRAHAM, WALLIS WOODRUFF, Marine 
Corps. (126) 

GREGORY, MAKLEM WALLIS, corporal. 
Field Artillery. (176) 

GREGORY, OMAR BURTT, Aviation Corps. 
(153) 

HARTMAN, RUSSELL EDWIN, first lieuten- 
ant. Infantry. (188) 

H'DOUBLER, FRANCTS TODD, first lieuten- 
ant Medical Corps. (78) 

HARRIS, JAMES WILLIAM. JR. (185) 

HESTON, CHARLES ELISHA, captain, Sig- 
nal Corps. (34) 

HIBBARD, CLARENCE ADDISON, Psychatric 
Unit, Naval Reserve Corps. (56) 

JONES. HOWARD PALFREY. (202) 

KEDNEY. HENRY S.,* second lieutenant. 
Field Artillery. (127) 

KITCHINGHAM, RAYMOND FRANK, Avia- 
tion Corps. (192) 

KOCH. HARRY JEFFERSON, Navy Depart- 
ment (128) 

KOCH, VINCENT WILLIAMS, first lieutenant, 
Medical Corps. (132) 

KOCH, WILLIAM WALTER. Aviation Corps. 
(165) 

LINDSEY. RUSSELL GILBERT, Aviation 
Corps. (184) 

LUPTON, ADELMA, sergeant-major. (172) 

McCANDLESS, DONALD SISSON, sergeant, 
Hospital Corps. (181) 

McCANDLESS, STANLEY RUSSELL, Infan- 
try. (190) 

McMASTER, PAUL HERBERT. (144) 

MERRILL, JOHN FRANKLIN, lieutenant. 
Signal Corps, Aviation Service. (162) [Aff. from 
G.amma Delta (78)1 

MILLER, GEORGE ELLSWORTH. (156) 

MOORE, WARREN GILLESPIE, second-class 
quartermaster, Naval Reserve Corps. (198) 



138 



The Delta 



MUELLER, WALTER EDWARD, captain. 

(171) 

N1SS, HERMAN VOIGHT, corporal, Field Ar- 
tillery. (138) 

NYE, JAMBS GORDON, captain, Infantry. 
(92) 

OWEN, RAY, captain, Intelligence Section. 
(26) 

PASSMORB ERIC WILLIAM, chief boat- 
swain's mate, Naval Reserve Corps. (121) 

PAYTON, JAMES MARTIN ANTHONY, Avia- 
tion Corps. (168) 

PHILLIPS, HARRY ALEXANDER. (203) 

PR1ESTER, HENRY CARL, Field Artillery. 
(105) 

RAY, HAROLD LIPPERT. (151) 

ROSE, AUSTIN THOMAS, Naval Aviation 
Corps. (195) 

ROTHWBLL, PAUL TAYLOR, lieutenant 
(183) 

SANDERS, EDWARD W1LLARD, Navy. (200) 

SCHANTZ, NICHOLAS MILTON lieutenant, 
Motor Section, Ammunition Train. (9) 

SHERIDAN, JOHN, ensign. (100) 

SIMPSON, GEORGE LANE, first lieutenant. 
(133) 

SMITH, ROBERT GEORGE, Motor Transport 
Service. (170) 

STORRS, ALBERT MILLER, Aviation Corps. 
(145) 

VOSS, EDWARD FRITZ, Field Artillery. 

WAGNER, NEWTON VAN DERVEER, lands- 
man, radio electrician Navy. (170) 

WEEKS, HAROLD PARKER. (166) 

WELLER, DAN BROWN, first lieutenant, 
Ordnance Corps. (Ill) 

WETHERBY, BARRON ROBERTS, sergeant, 
Ambulance Company. (118) [Aff. from Gamma 
Gamma (101)] , ,, 

WHITE. WEBB BOGART, second lieutenant. 
Field Artillery. (141) 

WHITNEY, FRANCIS EDWARD. (164) 

WILLIAMS, JOHN WESLEY Ordnance Corps. 

(178) 

WILLTSON, CHARLES DONALD, first lieu- 
tenant, Engineers Reserve Corps. (8) 

WILSON, HARLEY FROST. (160) 

WILSON, HERBERT DURAND, Ice Plant 
Company. (199) 

WOLCOTT, OLIVER SEYMOUR, first lieuten- 
ant. Aviation Corps. (148) 

YOUNG, WILLIAM MONROE, ensign, Navy. 

YOUNGREN, RALPH LOUIS Field Artillery. 
(209) 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
Gamma Ma Chapter 

ALLHANDS, CASH LYLE. (136) 

BAKER, EARL BOGGERS, Radio Service. 
(204) 

BARNUM. EDWIN CROSKEY, lieutenant, 
Aviation Corps. (191) [Aff. from Delta Theta 
(155)] 

BASH, HENRY EDWIN, first lieutenant, Field 
Artillery. (98) [Aff. from Gamma Sigma (57)] 

BERNARD, CLIFFORD SHAFFER, Aviation 
Section. Signal Corps. (174) • 

BOOZE, RALPH WALKER, second lieutenant. 
Field Artillery. (90) 

CALHOUN, PRESTON BROWN, Aviation 
Corps. (155) 

CARLTON. GEORGE ALEXANDER, cadet, 
Aviation Section, Signal Corps. (179) 

CARTER, RALPH MERLE, second lieutenant. 
Medical Corps. (11) 

COWELL. ROLAND ADEMAR, army field 
clerk, Infantry. (171) 

CROSE, JOHN OLIS, second lieutenant, In- 
fantry. (121) 

DAVIS, PHILIP FRANK, cadet, Aviation 
Corps. (193) 

DRESCHER, JOHN MORRIS PAYNE, Balloon 
Service. Signal Corps. (116) 

FARR. NOEL CLIFTON, student, Aviation 
School. (206) 

GIBSON. JAMES RAYMOND, cadet. Aviation 
Corps. (173) 

GIBSON, THOMAS ROBERT, second lieuten- 
ant (172) 

GREENE, JOSEPH NATHANIEL, first lieu- 
tenant, Infantry. (128) 



Corps. 
Corps. 



Aviation 



GUM, PERCY, ELI, Aviation Corps. (70) 

HACKMAN, LOGAN FRED, Infantry. (160) 

HARBICHT, HARLAN CARL, Engineers 
Corps. (205) 

HARLAN, AVERY STARK. Aviation Corps. 
(207) 

HEINEKE, HILTON EDWARD, cadet (190) 

HOFF, EINAR BENJAMIN, Field Artillery. 
(198) 

HOUGHTON, LOWELL CURTIS, Navy. (164) 
[Aff. to Gamma Theta (174)] 

HUDSON, GLEN EVANS, Infantry. (166) 

HUMPHREYS, ROBERT HATCJH. Aviation 
Section, Signal Corps. (153) 

IRISH, JOSEPH ELDER, first lieutenant In- 
fantry. (158) 

JANNATTA, FRANCIS SKIFF, Marines. 
(162) 

KASPER, EUGENE, sergeant (110) 

KNOWLTON, HENRY IRVING. (196) 

KRULL, DONALD CARL, Medical 
(185) 

LIST, RAYMOND FORD, Hospital 
(169) 

McKAY, JAMES ROBERTSON, cadet aviator, 
Aviation Section, Signal Corps. . (115) 

MALLERS, JOHN BERNARD, III, 
Corps. (188) 

MARX. GEORGE BERNARD, sergeant Quar- 
termasters Corps. (157) 

MELCHER, WOODBURY RANLET, Hospital 
Corps. (133) 

MILLER, ROY AUSTIN, cadet, Aviation 
Corps. (20) 

MILLER, JOHN AUSTIN, Aviation Section, 
Signal Corps. (101) 

MINER. HARRY EUGENE, lieutenant, Infan- 
try, Specialists School. (142) 

NELSON. BENJAMIN, Aviation Section, Sig- 
nal Corps. (45) 

OTIS, SPENCER, first lieutenant Infantry. 
(75) 

PAVEY, CHARLES ALLEN, cadet, Aviation 
Corps. (165) 

PEARCE. WALTER HAROLD, Aviation 
Corps. (192) 

PEMBERTON, CARLYSLE, Ordnance Corps. 
(55) 

PETESCH, GERMER, cadet. Aviation Corps. 
(183) 

PHIPPS, THOMAS ELMER, captain, Engi- 
neers Reserve Corps. (32) 

PIHLGARD, ERIC FREDERICH, first lieu- 
tenant. Infantry. (146) 

REGAN, MAURICE EDWIN, instructor, Avia- 
tion School. (140) 

RIDING. RALPH SPEARS. (167) 

RIESMEYER, FREDERICK HAASE, Navy. 
(148) 

SETFRIED, ARTHUR GEORGE. (147) 

SIEGMUND, HUMPHREYS OLIVER, instruc- 
tor, Aviation School. (154) 

SPANGLER, CHARLES, ensign, Naval Re- 
serves. (168) 

STAUDER, EDWARD P.,* first lieutenant 
Field Artillery. (163) 

STOVER. EARL BERTRAM, Radio Section, 
Navy. (197) 

THORNE. FRANK HILTON. (137) 

TOMPKINS. ROY WOODRUFF, corporal, 
Aviation Corps. (176) 

TOWER, ALEXANDER McJUNKEN, second 
lieutenant. Ordnance Corps. (170) 

WELSH, ST. CLAIR DUVAL, Aviation Corps. 
(202) 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 
Gamma Nu Chapter 



ALDEN. SPENCE THORNDYKE. (160) 
[Aff. to Gamma Theta (198)] 



ALTON. ROBERT MINT1E. captain. (148) 
[Aff. from Gamma Zeta (66)] 

ARNDT, THOMAS CHESTER, Naval Reserves. 
(186) 

BASH, PHILIP PURVIANCE, sergeant, Avia- 
tion Corps. (187) 

BURGESS. CHARLES HALL. (3) [Aff. from 
Beta Zeta (79)] 

COOMBS. PALMER BENNETT, Naval Re- 
serves. (194) 



Knights of the Republic 



139 



DANIELS, GEORGE BALL, Naval Reserves. 
(180) 

DONALDSON. BRYANT WESLEY, Naval Re- 
serves. (179) 

DUNN. JOHN FRANCIS, Medical Corps. (183) 

BSTABROOK, DW1GHT GODDARD, lieuten- 
ant. Ordnance Corps. (168) [Aff. from Beta Nu 
(165)] 

FIN LEY, MARK F., JR.,* Gas Investigation 
Service Section. (108) 

FOUNTAIN, JOHN RUSSELL, first lieutenant, 
Infantry, (ill) 

HACKNEY, EARL NEWELL, major. (124) 
[Aff. from Rbo (182)1 

HANNA. JAY EATON, Naval Reserves. (155) 

JOHNSON, SHERRARD McCARTY, Field Ar- 
tillery. (86) 

KEI8CH, LOUIS JOSEPH. (166) 

LANE, EBEN ELWOOD, Quartermasters 
Corps. (120) 

MAURBR, GEORGE NICHOLAS. Aviation 
Corps. (141) 

MILES, BRUCE JEROME, inspector, Signal 
Service. (133) 

MILLER, VILROY COLE. (152) 

OTTER. CLARENCE E.,* first sergeant, Hos- 
pital Corps. (170) 

PAYNE, WALTER ROSS, second lieutenant. 
Ordnance Corps. (193) 

RANDALL, FRANKLIN PELEG, Marines. 
(164) 

SCANLAN. LEROY JOSEPH, lieutenant, Field 
Artillery. (156) 

SHIMMEL, BLAINE BROWN. (128) 

ZEWADSKI. GUY BARCO, second lieutenant, 
Infantry. (144) 

ZEWADSKI, OLAF BANCO, second lieutenant. 
Aerial Observer. (161) 

MISSOURI SCHOOL OF MINES 

Gamma XI Chapter 

AMBLER. HARRY ATWOOD. first lieutenant, 
Infantry. (103) 

BLAND, CLARK C* captain, Infantry. (62) 

BROWN, JAMES WILLIAM, first lieutenant. 
Dental Reserve Corps. (81) 

CHANEY, ADRIAN BYRON, second lieuten- 
ant. Engineers Corps. (101) 

CHASE, JAMES HOWARD, corporal, Marine 
Corps. (47) 

CLARKE. WILLIAM DANIELS, second lieu- 
tenant. Ordnance Corps. (41) 

COWEN, WARDEN HENRY, second lieuten- 
ant. Infantry. (104) 

CRAWFORD, THOMAS RALPH, Infantry. 
(118) 

DICKSON, FRANK PAUL, JR. (60) [Aff. to 
Rho (221)] 

GOLICK, TONY FRANK, Infantry. (112) 

HARBICHT, HARLAN CARL, Engineers 
Corps. (108) 

HAYDEN, ROY WILBUR, Engineers Corps. 
(78) 

HEAD, JAMES LAWRENCE, second lieuten- 
ant. Engineers Corps. (80) 

HOGOBOOM. WILLIAM CORRYELLE, Engi- 
neers Corps. (83) 

IMLAY, JOHN LOGAN. (Ill) 

JONES, FORREST MASTON. (69) 

JONES, HOWARD HILTZ, cadet. Aviation 
Corps. (54) 

KAMP, WILLIAM HENRY, second lieutenant. 
Signal Corps. (92) 

KEENAN, JOHN THOMAS, major, Engineers 
Corps. (11) 

LEAVITT. JAMES BLAINE, second lieuten- 
ant. Engineers Corps. (56) 

LEAVITT, JOSEPH EDMUND, Field Artillery. 
(84) 

LEONARD, SPEED STEPHENS. (117) 

McFADDIN, EDWIN COOK, second lieutenant, 
Quartermasters Corps. (57) 

MITCHELL, LESLIE RAB. (105) 

MILLER, WINLOCK W., JR. (58) [Aff. from 
Gamma Omicron (50), and to Rho (22011 

MOORE. FRED VAIL. Infantry. (115) 

MOUNTJOY, RICHARD, LEROY, Field Artil- 
lery. (87) 

NOWLAN, HENRY HACKETT. first lieuten- 
ant. Balloon School. (65) 

OVBRSTREBT, CHESTER ZEARL, lieutenant. 
Engineers Corps. (26) 

REMY. CLAYTON LeROY. (82) [Aff. to Beta 
Nu (185)] 



RICE, JOHN TURNER, captain, Engineers 
Corps. (2) 

RICHMOND, WENDELL WILLIAM, corporal. 
Infantry. (123) 

T1DD. LUZERNE MAURICE, second lieuten- 
ant. Field Artillery. (126) 

WORNALL, RICHARD BRISTON, Aviation 
Corps. (89) 

WYMAN, WILLIAM CHARLES, first lieuten- 
ant, Engineers Corps. (8) 

YOUNG, CARL DEUEL. (66) 

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 

Gamma Omicron Chapter 

FRIER, CHAUNCEY PILCHER, Ambulance 
Corps. (93) 

GRAHAM, CHARLES L.,* Infantry. (74) 
GREEN, JOSEPH MARTIN, Aviation Corps. 

HALL, HENRY WILLIAM, corporal. (40) 
HAMLIN, CHARLES EVELEN, Ambulance 
Corps. (98) 

JOLLEY, RUSSELL LaG RANGE, second lieu- 
tenant, Infantry. (79) 

t JONES, HUGH CAMPBELL HODGE, first 
lieutenant. Infantry. (86) 

KEOUGH, OTIS EDMUND, second lieutenant, 
Infantry. (102) 

KOENIG, IRA ROBERT. Aviation Corps. (54) 
LOGAN. JOSHUA SUTHERL1N, second lieu- 
tenant. (75) 

MACKEY. WILLIAM WAYNE. (30) 

MILLAR, DAVID LUMAN, JR., Hospital 
Corps. (96) 

MILLER, WINLOCK W., JR..* (50) [Aff. to 
Gamma Xi (58), and to Rho (220)] 

MONTEITH, CHARLES NORTON, second 
lieutenant. Signal Reserve Corps. (71) 

MOORE. J. MORTON.* (88) 

MURDOCK. REGINALD SCOTT, first lieuten- 
ant. Engineers Corps. (76) 

PATTON, JOSEPH LAWRENCE, first lieuten- 
ant. (64) 

POTE, HORACE WILEY, corporal, Engineers. 

SCHISLER, EDWIN CARL, Field Artillery. 
(69) 

SHEPARD. JAMES CECIL. (90) 

WATK1NS, CHARLES RIVES, Ambulance 
Corps. (91) 

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 
Gamma PI Chapter 

ADAMS. ISAAC MAXWELL, JR., second lieu- 
tenant. Quartermasters Corps. (86) 

ASH. HOY FILLMORE, first lieutenant. Infan- 
try. (124) 

BALLARD. SHERMAN HART, second lieuten- 
ant. Infantry. (118) 

BURLEY, OVA MILTON, sergeant. Field Ar- 
tillery. (104) 

BUTLER, STANLEY CORNELIUS, second 
lieutenant. Infantry. (119) 

CURRY, HARRY.* second lieutenant, Infan- 
try. (106) 

DRAKE, LESLIE GILES, first lieutenant, In- 
fantry. (90) 

DUNBAR, JESSE TUCKWEILER, first lieu- 
tenant. (14) 

DUSENBERRY. BURMAH CALE, second lieu- 
tenant. Infantry. (123) 

DUTHIE. ROBERT WILLIAM, second lieuten- 
ant. Infantry. (107) 

EASLEY, JACK WHITE, second lieutenant. 
Infantry. (102) 

ENEIX. LLOYD CECIL, second lieutenant. In- 
fantry. (116) 

FOX, FRANCKE FULCHER, second lieuten- 
ant. Infantry. (128) 

GILL, CHARLES CLIFTON. (101) 

GUI HER, JAMES NORFORD, first lieutenant, 
Infantry. (Ill) 

HAGUE, CLYDE WATSON, lieutenant, Infan- 
try. (117) 

HIMES. WILLIAM DANIEL, second lieuten- 
ant, Infantry. (114) 

HUTCHINSON, HICKORY CLAY, lieutenant 
(143) 

HUTCHINSON, RALPH BRENTON, sergeant 
(110) 

JONES. JOHN PAUL. (79) 

LAW. RUSSELL LOWELL, lieutenant (112) 



140 



The Delta 



MORGAN, MONT FRANCIS, lieutenant (133) 
NEBLBY, FOREST HUNTER, cadet, Aviation 



CO §EYNOLl£s, LANDIN TAYLOR. (77) 

RHODES. LEWIS BOLING. (76) [Ait. from 



Eta (208) and to Beta Zeta (193)3 „ ia 

SANDERS. HERBERT WATTS, second lieu- 
tenant. Field Artillery. (30) m mm m aji , 
SAYRE, FLOYD tfcKINLBY, Field Artillery. 

(137) 

SCOTT, HALLECK McGINNIS. (28) 
WARDEN, PAUL PELLY, Hospital Corps. 

(9 WATERS, JOHN ROBERT. JR., Quartermas- 

^wIbISJ&R^JOHN BURNS, Hospital Corps. 
(129) [Aff. from Epsilon (99)] 
WEISS. HOWARD EDWARD, second lieuten- 

^mriSSS; (Carles samuel. (9 ?) 

WILSON, HAROLD FRANKLIN, landsman. 
(138) [Aff. from Gamma Alpha (203)] 
WILSON, HERMAN EVANS, sergeant, Infan- 

^ATEs! FRANK LLOYD, lieutenant, Infantry. 
(115) 

UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 
Gamma Rho Chapter 

BALL, DOUGLAS PHELPS, first lieutenant. 
(80) 

BEARDSLEY, HARRY MARKLE, sergeant, 
Infantry. (93) 

BOWDEN, LLOYD MELVIN. Aviation Corps. 

BRACE, ORVAL LESTER, Aviation Corps. 

(72) 
CONOVER, HUBERT SMITH, Navy. (81) 
DARRENOUGE, EVAN JOHN. (90) 
FISHER, DANIEL JEROME. Hospital Corps. 

(95) 

FISHER, LEWIS LATHOP. Hospital Corps. 

GILES, LEO CONNELL, Heavy Artillery. 
(108) 

HEDGES, WILLIAM SAXBY, Aviation Corps. 

HUNTER, DUNDAS, post commissary. (68) 

INGWERSON, HENRY NEWTON. (97) 

LAWRENCE, MILLARD CHOATE, Aviation 
Corps. (91) 

LITTLE, WILLIAM JAMES. (131) 

MATLOCK, ROBERT CUTTER, Signal Corps. 
(119) 

OLIVER. FRANK JOHN, Aviation Corps. 
(125) 

PALMER, EDGAR HENRY, Field Artillery, 
(127) 

PRATHER, ORA HENRY, Aviation Corps. 
(122) 

RAINEY, WARREN ROBERT, captain, Hos- 
pital Corps. (34) 

RETNHARDT, WILLIAM ROBERT LEWIS, 
first lieutenant, Medical Corps. (69) 

RING, HOMER WILLARD, Ordnance Depart- 
ment. (101) 

ROSS, ARTHUR JAMES, JR. (71) [Aff. to 
Delta Eta (47)] 

SCHLAMER, HOMER JESSIE, Canadian 
Army. (130) 

SCHUYLER, GEORGE LYNN, Naval Reserves. 
(128) 

SICKLE. EDWARD BERNARD, sergeant, 
Quartermasters Department. (87) 

SICKLE. MAX S.,* sergeant-major. (84) 

SPENCER, WALTER JAMES, Navy. (88) 

STEVERS, MARTIN DELAWAY, second lieu- 
tenant. Field Artillery. (70) 

STICKEL. CARL ALBERT EARL. (113) 

SWANSON, JOSEPH NATHANIEL, lieutenant. 
(57) 

VACIN, EMIL FRANCIS, Radio Signal Corps. 
(118) 

WENK, FREDERIC JAMES, Aviation Corps. 
(116) 

WHEELER, HERBERT EDWARD, captain, 
Medical Corps. (10) 

WILLIAMS, JOHN PHILLIPS, Ordnance 
Corps. (121) 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Gamma Sigma Chapter 

ALSTADT. CLYDE D.* (103) 

BASH. HENRY EDWIN. (55) [Aff. to Gamma 



Mu (98)1 
lCH, 



JULIUS EUGENE, Hospital Corps. 



BEA( 
(89) 

BREWER, LAWRENCE C* (91) 
BUDD, MYRON ALLEN, Navy. (116) 
CASSADY. EDWARD MIKE. (52) [Aff. from 
Beta Mu (111)] 

GIBBS. RUSSELL C* Infantry. (85) • 
HARLEY, WILLIAM P.,* Engineers Corps. 
(76) 

HENDERSON. TASKER. (119) 
LOTT, WALTER CLARENCE. (99) 
McFARLAND, DONALD HENRY, Field Artil- 
lery. (18) 

MAYERS. LELAND ALBERT. Navy. (127) 
PALMER, ROY CLARK. (109) [Aff. from 
Gamma Upsilon (89)] 

REEP, RICHARD WESLEY, gunner, Navy. 
(80) 

REINKE, PAUL AUGUSTUS, Infantry. (93) 
RELLER. WALTER HAMILTON, sergeant- 
major, Aviation Corps. (84) 

SAWYERS, RAY LYMAN, Field Signal Corps. 

( 105 > . . ~ 

SHEARER. BERYL CECIL, Hospital Corps. 

(104) 

SMITHSON. FRANK EMERSON, Cavalry. 
(98) [Aff. from Beta Chi (170)] 

SWINEY, JOHN DANIEL, captain, Field Ar- 
tillery. (83) . „ , . 

VAN DYCK, EUGENE,* Officers' Training 
School. (Ill) , _ 

WARNER, PHILIP AUGUSTUS, Navy. (112) 

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA 
Gamma Tau Chapter 

BAKALYAR, STEVE,* lieutenant, Coast Artil- 
lery. (66) 

BENTON, LOREN WILLIAM, second lieuten- 
ant. Infantry. (101) 

BLUNT. JAMES KEENANN, Dental Reserve 
Corps. (127) 

CARLSON, ARCHIE HAROLD, Aviation 
Corps. (102) 

DRESSER, HARRY SAMUEL, corporal, En- 
gineer Corps. (90) 

DUNNAVAN, PAUL HENRY, Aviation Corps. 
(92) 

DYKEMAN, HOWARD OLIVER, Ordnance 
Corps. (78) 

FEENEY, HOWARD SYLVESTER, Ordnance 
Corps. (98) 

FOSSEN, GEORGE OLIVER, Naval Air Sta- 
tion. (112) 

FOX, ROY WILLIAM. Naval Air Station. (89) 

FREEMAN, JAMES WENTWORTH. (94) 

HARRINGTON, HALSEY ORMAND, M. M. A. 
first-class Navy. (99) 

HELM.' RAYMOND MORRIS, lieutenant, In- 
fantry. (41) 

HILL, ALFRED ERNEST, Quartermasters 
Corps. (84) 

HOBBS, FOWLER KENNEDY. (33) 

IRWIN, FRANK HOWARD, first lieutenant. 
Engineers Corps. (86) 

JAAX. RAYMOND FREDERICK, corporal. 
Field Artillery. (Ill) 

JULIEN, ANTONE WAYNE, orderly, Cavalry. 
(106) 

KLEINSCHMIDT, ARTHUR ALFRED, Ord- 
nance Corps. (95) 

LEE, CLYDE WILLIAMS, Dental Reserve 
Corps. (109) 

McBEATH. EWING CLEVELAND, Medical 
Reserve Corns (44) 

MARSH, FAYETTE ELAM. lieutenant (17) 

MOFFAT, ALBERT GIBSON, lieutenant, Sig- 
nal Corps. (118) 

MURPHY, CLARE HARKER. (67) 

NELSON, HOWARD EDWARD, Aviation 
Corps. (115) 

NORTH, EARL JULIUS. Field Artillery, Re- 
serve Corps. (87) 

OLSON. ADOLPH BERNARD, Navy. (79) 

RYDLUN, EDWYN GUSTAVE. Balloon Divi- 
sion. (108) 

SHIELY. ALBERT RAYMOND, Ordnance 
Corps. (62) 



Knights of the Republic 



141 



SMITH, PERCY GRAVES. Marine Corps. 



(1 & 

II 

Navy 
VOSS, ROBERT EARL, Naval Aviation Corps. 



DD, RALPH WYVIL. Marine Corps. (91) 
TRIPP, LESLIE ROBERT, M. M. A. second 
class. Navy. (88) 



(107) 

WALLACE. EARL STEWART, lieutenant 
(50) [Aft*, to Gamma Theta (120)1 

WILLIAMS. VERNON MAURICE, Naval Avia- 
tion Corps. (83) 

UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS 

Gamma UpsUon Chapter 

AUTREY, JOHN LEE, first lieutenant, Infan- 
try. (75) 

CHRISTOPHER, FREELTN H. (107) 
COCHRAN, MAURICE WILLIAM, first lieu- 
tenant (90) 

CRAIG, ALFRED HENRY, captain. (97) 
DAVIS, JEFF,* first lieutenant. (104) 
EVANS. WILLIAM VIRGIL. (59) 
FLETCHER. READ.* (92) 
FLORA, BEN COX. (101) 
GERIC. THOMAS AUSTIN. (64) 
GOZA. HENSLEE DUPREY, first lieutenant 
(86) 

HAMBY. LEONARD CHRISTOPHER. (77)' 
HENRY, LEE ROY. (83) 
HICKS, HOMER WILTON. (91) 
HOLT, BASIL PAGE. (73) 
HOLT. HARRY CECIL. (72) 
LIGHTON, LOUIS DURYEA. (99) 
McINTYRE. LESLIE TURNER. (95) 
MATTHEWS. BEN BUFORD. (93) 
MAY. RUSSELL VARNELLE. (65) 
MURREY, JOSEPH HOFFMASTER. (87) 
MURREY. JAMES THOMAS, first lieutenant. 
Infantry. (113) 

OSWALD. FRED.* (52) 

PALMER. ROY CLARK. (89) [Aff. to Gamma 
Sigma (109)] 

RAWLINGS. AUBREY J. (108) 
RICE, DONALD McCONNELL, first lieutenant. 
(119) 
SCROGGIN. JESS KNOX. (Ill) 
8MEAT\ HAMILTON P.* (80) 
TAYLOR. AUSTIN BLACKWOOD. (129) 
TILLMAN, FRED ALLEN, second lieutenant 
(143) 
WOOD. JAMES ROSCOE. (76) 
WOOLRIDGE.* HARRY TUCKER. (33) 
ZOLL. ALLEN ALDERSON, second lieuten- 
ant (105) 

UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA 
Gamma Phi Chapter 

ADAMSON. JAMES MONTAGUE. (75) 

ADE. HARRY GEORGE. (61) 

ARMITAGE, GEORGE THOMAS, second lieu- 
tenant (48) 

BISHOFF, PAUL AUGUST. (63) 

BONNER, FRANK EDWARD (23). 

BONNER, JAMES HENRY, captain, Engineers 
Corps. (6) 

BRIDGBMAN, MORRIS LEWIS, JR., Navy. 
(86) 

BROWN, ROBERT KEITH, Quartermasters 
Corps. (99) 

BUTZBRIN, ARTHUR JOSEPH, Infantry. 
(104) 

CHRISTENSEN, EARL ARTHUR, Marines. 
(125) 



COOK, MARCUS BARRETT, on board 
the submarined Tuscania; drowned Feb- 
ruary, 1918. (117) 



DAWES, JOHN ARTHUR, Marines. (123) 
ECTOR, JOHN JAY. (103) 
FLAHERTY. HAROLD FRANKLIN. (107) 
GILCHRIST, RALEIGH,* chemist (56) 
HAUBENSACK, JAMBS HAROLD. (97) 
HAUCK, HERMAN LAWRENCE. (120) 
HOPPER. BRUCE CAMPBELL, first lieuten- 
ant Aviation Corps. (77) 

HUGHES, EARL FRANKLIN, sergeant, In- 
fantry. (39) 

JANECK, VICTOR WALTER, 8ignal Corps. 
(64) 



JENNINGS, JOHN JOSEPH, Infantry. (115) 

JOHNSON, HOWARD ARCHIE, Aviation 
Corps. (96) 

JONES, LESTER TAYLOR. Infantry. (108) 

JUDSON, HORACE WHITNEY, Naval Avia- 
tion Corps. (79) 

KANE. WILLIAM GEORGE. Marine Corps. 
(100) 

KENT, ROBERT WALTER, Ordnance Corps. 
(90) 

LAFEYRB, BENJAMIN EMIL, sergeant Med- 
icsl Corps. (88) 

LEB KICKER, SAMUEL LeROY. (80) 

LONGEWAY, FORREST HARRY, .first lieu- 
tenant Aviation Corps. (110) 

MARSH, RUSSEL L.* (124) 

McCarthy, owbns Bernard, infantry. 

(95) 

McCULLOUGH, MASSEY SANDERSON, Avia- 
tion Section, Signal Corps. (18) 

MOONEY, GUY HASTINGS. (121) 

NICHOLSON, STEWART HENRY, Infantry. 
(52) 

NOBLE, WARHAM M.* (98) [Aff. to Beta 
Chi (212)] 

PARKER. OTIS BERKELEY. (Ill) 

PEPPARD, OBBRT ALFRED, Engineers Corps 
(Bridge). (60) 

RICHTER, FREDERICK ARTHUR, Infantry. 
(58) 

ROBERTS, LLOYD SOUTHWICK, Aviation 
Corps. (69) 

ROBINSON, VERNE EUGENE. (78) 

SANDERSON, LAWSON HARRY. Marine 
Corps. (85) 

SEYBERT, JOSEPH DeWITT. (76) 

SIMPK1NS, CLAUDE JAMES, Aviation Corps. 
(65) 

SIMPKINS, EDWARD, Machine Gun Company. 
(53) 

SLOAN. ROYAL DANIEL, ensign, Navy. (42) 

SMITH. RALPH WALLACE, Engineers Corps 
(Electrical). (32) 

SPEER. EARL LeROY. Ordnance School. (47) 

TOOLE, ALLAN HARDENBROOK. (112) [Aft* 
to Gamma Theta (93)] 

TOOLE. WILLIAM BRUCE (98) [Aff. to Delta 
Iota (111)] 

WHALEY, ALBERT GRIFFITH, Ordnance 
Corps. (92) 

WHITAKER. JOCELYN ALFRED, Canadian 
Medical Corps. (35) 

WILSON, FRED BARLOW, Aviation Corps. 
(116) 

WINGETT, CHARLES VIRTUE. Forestry 
Corps. (89) 

WINNINGHOF. WILFORD JOSEPH, chemist, 
Gas Defense Service. (30) 

WOLFE. KENNETH:.* sergeant. Forestry 
Corps. (55) 

WOODWARD. WARD NORRIS, Engineers 
Corps (Forestry). (112) 

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON 
Gamma Chi Chapter 

BAKER. HAROLD JAMES MANNING, cap- 
tain, Engineers Corps. (20) 

BRADY, EMMET EDWARD, Cavalry. (176) 

BROWN, KIRK CHARLES, assistant surgeon. 
Navy. (126) 

BUCKLEY, RAYMOND JAMES, cadet Ambu- 
lance Corps. (177) [Aff. from Beta Chi (178)] 

CALHOUN, ARTHUR LINNEY. captain, Med- 
ical Corps. (4) 

COATES. CECIL LYNN, yeoman second-class. 
Navy. (168) 

COFFMAN, JOHN BRITTON, machinist's mate 
second-class, Aviation Corps. (162) 

CORSON, WILLIAM HIRAM, captain, Avia- 
tion Corps. (14) 

DOTY, WALTER,* second lieutenant. (149) 

DOUGLAS. GEORGE STUART, corporal, En- 
gineers Corps (Railway). (167) 

DRAHAM, WALTER HENRY, first-class pri- 



vate, Medical Corps. (186) 
DYMONT, DONALD ST. 



CLAIR. Infantry. 



(198) [Aff. from Gamma Zeta (131)] 

DYSART. LLOYD BUTLER, first lieutenant 
Marine Corps. (142) 

FAUBERT. EDWARD HENRY, second lieu- 
tenant Infantry. (166) 

FITZGERALD. CHARLES REYNOLDS, sec- 
ond lieutenant Artillery. (134) 



142 



The Delta 



PORAN. EDWIN VINCENT, first-class pri- 
vate. Engineers Corps (Railway). (175) 

FORAN. HARROLD GEORGE, Engineers 
Corps. (146) 

GRIMM. WARREN DORT, first lieutenant. In- 
fantry. (121) 

GRIMM, WILLIAM HENRY, sergeant, Infan- 
try. (181) 

GRUBER. EDWIN ALBERT. (109) [Aff. to 
and from Beta Psi (175)] 

GUERRIER, CHARLES WINPIELD, Signal 
Corps. (164) 

HANSEN, HOWARD HANS. (172) 

HEMPHILL, WALDO.* (190) 

HOLCOMB, MAURICE STASER, apprentice 
seaman. Navy. (194) 

HOLCOMB. SILAS RAYMOND, first-class pri- 
vate, Aviation Corps. (200) 

KANTZLER, GEORGE RANDOLPH ALEX- 
ANDER, ensign, Geodetic Service. (171) 

KNETTLE, LEMYRT DIX, cadet. Signal 
Corps. (210) 

LARSEN, JOHN JOSEPH, sergeant first- 
class. Medical Corps. (169) 

LIVINGSTONE, GILBERT TWEEDE, second 
lieutenant. (29) 

McLEOD, NORMAN ZENOS, cadet. Signal 
Corps. (197) 

MAGILL, WILLIAM FULTON, JR.. second 
lieutenant, Infantry. (173) 

MARKHAM, JOHN HOWARD, captain, Signal 
Corps. (160) 

MEAD. HAROLD WHITNEY. Ambulance 
Corps. (191) 

MORROW, JACKSON LEE. sergeant, Coast 
Artillery. (188) 

NOBLE. ELMER JOHN, first lieutenant, bay- 
onet instructor. (159) 

OLMSTEAD, FRANK LEWIS, machinists^ 
mate second-class. Aviation Corps. (161) 

OSTROM, HERBERT CAMERON, captain, 
Hospital Corps. (6) 

RICHARDSON. FREDERICK HOSEA. cap- 
tain. (47) 

ROBERTS. GEORGE WILMOT, second lieu- 
tenant. Infantry. (147) 

ROBERTSON, EDWARD WHITE, second lieu- 
tenant. Infantry. (139) 

RUBICOM, LESLIE HUBERT. Engineers 
Corps. (153) 

SALE, GEORGE AMBROSE. Ambulance Corps. 
(196) 

SEARS, GEORGE LESTER, lieutenant, Ma- 
chine Gun Companv. (183) 

SHANNON, EDWARD, Hospital Corps. (205) 

SUTHERLAND. D'LOSS. Signal Corps. (140) 

URNER. JOHN ARNOLD, sergeant, Medical 
Corns. (180) 

WHEELER. HENRY OLMSTEAD. machinist's 
mate second-class. Aviation Corps. (165) 

WILLTAMS, JOHN GRANVILLE. Ambulance 
Corns. (192) 

WILLTAMS, LEWIS DANIEL. JR.. second 
lieutenant. Artillery. (94) 

WILLIAMS, REES BRONGWYN, Infantry. 
(150) 

WILTON. GEORGE LAWRENCE, machinists 
mate second-class, Aviation Corps. (148) 

Gamma Psi Chapter 

ADAMS, EDGAR LUSH. Naval Reserves. 

(123) 

BANKS. JOHN HALSTEAD. Tnfantry. (81) 
BRAINERD. ROBERT BIDWELL. (136) 
COMAN, FRANCIS DANA, Ambulance Service. 

(118) 

COUNCILMAN. HOWARD EZRA. Navy. 
DTLLENBECK, ARTHUR OWEN. (8) 
DONALDSON, STANLEY JUSTUS, Ambulance 

Service. (107) 

DURYEA. GEORGE ROBBINS. (108) 
HENN, ADAM GEORGE, corporal, Infantry. 

(92) 
HOGUE, OLIVER WENDALL. Aviation Corps. 

(117) 

HUGHES. JAMES ALBERT. (80) 
JAMES, JAY WARD. (116) 
KENT. BION HOLLY. Medical Corps. (150) 
LEHMER. NORMAN,* first lieutenant, Medi- 
cal Corps. (126) 

LYDECKER. IRVING BROWN, Aviation 

Corps. (143) 

Mcdonald, george tennell. (125) 
montague. amos fairfax. (97) 
nostrant. howard frank. (129) 



PALMER, RALPH CLAYTON. (127) 
PHILLIPS, FREDERIC WILLIAM, JR. (165) 
QUIMBY. IRA, JR., first lieutenant, Engineers 
Corps. (63) 

RICKETTS, KIRK FLETCHER. Coast Artil- 
lery. (106) 

SIFFERLIN, CHARLES EDWIN, Engineers 
Corps. (100) 

TREVENEN, HAROLD VICTOR, lieutenant, 
Aviation Corps. (101) 

WEBSTER, JOHN BURNS, Hospital Corps. 
(129) 

SHAFF. HOWARD LYBOLT. (135) 
WILSON, GORDON TOTTEN, Navy. (138) 
WOODRUFF, LeROY THOMAS. (94) 

CASE SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCE 
Delta Alpha Chapter 

BALES, GLEN HARRISON, Engineers Corps. 
(19) 

BERRIDGE, ROY EDWARD, second lieuten- 
ant, Quartermasters Corps. (3) 

BLOOM, PAUL ALLEN. (55) [Aff. to Delta 
Beta (142)] 

BROOKS. FORREST EDMUND, captain, Tele- 
graph Corps. (34) 

BYERS, HAROLD LeROY, Infantry. (71) 

CARTER, HARRY WILLIAM. lieutenant. 
Aviation Corps. (65) [Aff. from Beta Iota (217)] 

CLEVELAND. JAMES WILSON, sergeant. 
Signal Corps. (10) 

ERBEN, FRANK, JR.,* warrant officer, Navy. 
(75) 

FRANCY, CLARK WILSON, first lieutenant. 
Engineers Corps. (1) 

HENION, KARL EUGENE, lieutenant. Infan- 
try. (76) 

HIBBEN, SAMUEL GALLOWAY, lieutenant, 
Engineers ReBerve Corps. (12) 

HINDMAN, DARWIN ALEXANDER, lieuten- 
ant. Infantry. (46) 

HOPKINS. LAWRENCE LEONARD, Engi- 
neers Corps. (22) 

HOPPER. EUGENE DUBOIS, second lieuten- 
ant. Coast Artillery. (59) 

KIDDER, HOWARD LORIN, Naval Reserves. 
(49) 

KNEALE, RALPH MARTIN, Radio School. 
(60) 

KNEALE. WILLIAM EDWARD, lieutenant 
junior grade. (37) 

KNOWLTON, ROBERT FORTUNE, Hospital 
Corps. (70) 

LePONTOTS. LEON ALLISON. (81) 

MARKT. GEORGE HOWARD, quartermaster. 
Naval Reserves. (52) 

MEDSKER. CHARLES ALLEN, sergeant, Hos- 
pital Corps. (68) 

PACKARD, BRYAN WILLIAM, Hospital 
Corps. (82) 

SCHOW, ALBERT HANS. Navy. (74) 

SCHNELL. FREDERICK EARL, first lieuten- 
ant, Quartermasters Corps (camp construction). 
(18) 

STEWART, DONALD GARDNER, Engineers 
Corps. (29) 

WENR1CK. JOHN COURTNEY, second lieu- 
tenant. Coast Artillery. (41) 

WILLIAMS, WILLIAM ROY, corporal. Infan- 
try. (38) 

WILSON, HERBERT WILLIAM, second lieu- 
tenant, Coast Artillery. (61) 

DARTMOUTH COLLEGE 
Delta Beta Chapter 

ALDEN. LEON VERDELL. (130) 

ALGER, FRED BRADFORD, sergeant. Ord- 
nance Corps. (118) 

BELL. LOUIS HEMENWAY. captain. (109) 

BLOOM. PAUL ALLEN, Gas Defense Service. 
(142) [Aff. from Delta Alpha (55)] 

CHASE, ERNEST HOWARD, Ordnance Corps. 
(80) 

COWLES, EUGENE ROBERT, first lieutenant, 
Aviation Corps. (121) 

CRATHERN, CHARLES FRANK HILL. (158) 

DEROSIER, JOSEPH EDWARD, Naval Re- 
serves (150) 

DUFFIELD. HERBERT EATON, Navy. (132) 

FITTS, ROBERT LYON, sergeant, Machine 
Gun Company. (82) 



Knights op the Republic 



143 



FOX, JOHN LESLIE, lieutenant, Quartermas- 
ters Corps. (50) 

FREDERICKS, HUGO AUGUST. (123) 

GRAY. ELMER JAMISON. (116) 

GREEN, DONALD WALLIS. (112) 

GREENWOOD, CLINTON WHITTIER, Ord- 
nance Reserve Corps. (99) 

HANLEY, JOHN LAWRENCE. Coast Guard. 
(128) 

HITCHCOCK, HORACE GAYLORD. Naval Re- 
serves. (140) 

KIPP, WALTER DOUGLAS, ensign, Naval 
Reserves. (119) 

KNIGHT. MORRIS EDWARD, lieutenant. 
Ordnance Corps. (44) 

KURTZ, WILBUR FISHER, Signal Corps. 
(145) 

LEWIS. ALLEN DODGE, Naval Reserves. 
(110) 

LINDMAN. EDWIN LEWIS. (106) 

McKINNEY. ROBERT ARMSTRONG, quar- 
termaster, Naval Reserves. (136) 

MARR, RUSSELL WALDEN. Navy. (114) 

MASON, HAROLD WHITNEY, Ordnance 
Corps. (117) 

MENDALL, RALPH BERTRANT. (100) 

MONTGOMERY, JAMES, JR..* Naval Re- 
serves. (115) 

MURPHEY, GEORGE CHARLES, seaman. 
Navy. (129) 

NOURSE. JAMES PERCIVAL. (63) 

O'CONNELL. THOMAS JOSEPH. (125) 

OHNEMUS. RUSSELL ARMSTRONG. (124) 

PALMER. ELMER JOSEPH, Radio Service. 
Navy. (137) 

PARSONS. HAROLD COBILLE. (141) 

PEARCE, FREDERICK LEON. (92) 

PETERS. CHARLES FREDERICK. Naval Re- 
serves. (Ill) 

PFEIFFER, ARTHUR EDISON, Aviation 
Corps. (156) 

RICE. ROGER COURTLAND, Ordnance Re- 
serves (98) 

SAWYER. EDMUND READ. (53) 

SHERMAN, LAWRENCE GATES. Aviation 
Corps. (122) 

SLEEPER. GORDON CROTHERS. lieutenant. 
Cavalry. (103) 

SOUTHWICK. MELVIN LEONARD, Engi- 
neers Corps. (126) 

SPERRY. IRVING LISTON, Aviation Corps. 
(113) 

SWENSON. CARL LESLIE. (90) 

THOMPSON. CLIFTON BADLAM. French 
Aviation Corps. (120) 

THOMPSON. DEAN ALAN, sergeant, Ordnance 
Reserve Corps. (65) 



TOWNSEND. WILLIAM HENRY. Ca- 
nadian Royal Flying Corps. Killed in ac- 
tion near Hazebrouck, France, about April 
22. 1918. (102) 



VAN RAALTE. JULIUS RAPHAEL, Aviation 
Corps. (134) 

VLIET, JOHN WELSH, JR., Naval Reserves. 
(138) 

WARREN. HOWARD PORTER. (78) 

WASHBURN. KENDRICK HARLOW. Naval 
Aviation Corps. (85) 

WATKINS. GEORGE FRANCIS, Reserve Offi- 
cers Training Camp. (69) 

WILKINSON, WINSOR DORNIN, sergeant. 
Field Artillery. (26) 

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Delta Gamma Chapter 

ANGELL, NORMAN HOAG. Army Y. M. C. A. 
(30) 

BARRY. RUTLEDGE BIRMINGHAM, lieuten- 
ant Aviation Corps. (106) 

BLANCHARD, DONALD DOUGLAS, first-class 
electrician. Navy. (67) 

BLANCHARD. HAROLD FREDERICK. (26) 

BRADY. JOHN CASPER, sergeant. Aviation 
Corps. (53) 

BRENNECKE. HENRY CARL. (58) 

BROWN, ORVILLE JAMES, sergeant, Quar- 
termasters Corps. (107) [Aff. from Epsllon 
(102)] 

CHAPMAN. ROBERT FLETCHER, chief yeo- 
man. Navy. (31) 



COATES, ARCHIBALD AUSTIN, Naval Re- 
serves, Navy. (32) 

CONDIT, KENNETH HAMILTON, first lieu- 
tenant, Engineers Corps. (55) [Aff. from Gamma 
Delta (53)1 

CORNWALL. CLIFT.* first lieutenant, Engi- 
neers Corps. (73) 

CRAWFORD. WILLIAM LEE, cadet. Aviation 
Corps. (115) [Aff. from Gamma Theta (153)] 

DAHMAN, WALLACE WERNETH, Aviation 
Corps. (25) 

DeGRAFF, BARTHOLOMEW ROBINS, second 
lieutenant. (93) 

DRESSER, JAMES SHERWOOD, Coast Patrol. 
(114) 

FIKE. TRACY RICHARD. (39) 

FORREST, WILLIAM LUCAS, corporal. Coast 
Artillery. (79) 

FRASER, HARRY CARLETON, chaplain, 
Field Artillery. (19) 

FREW, GEORGE HENRY. JR. (33) 

GARMAN. ALLEN DON. (80) 

GRIFFEN, JOHN DANIEL METTITT. (91) 
[Aff. to Gamma Eta (117)] 

GRUNOW, WILLIAM RANALD, captain, En- 
gineers Corps. (27) 

HAIGHT. JAMES POLLOCK, JR., Balloon 
Corps. (85) 

HEALY, EDWARD McGlNNIGLE, JR. (108) 



HEALY. JEFFERSON ALOYSIUS. lieu- 
tenant, Infantry. (95) Died from wounds 
received In action, August, 1918. 



HEATH, JAMES NEWTON. (88) 

HEGARTY. THOMAS ALEXANDER, corporal. 
Signal Corps. (118) [Aff. from Beta Iota (236)] 

HENRY. ALEXANDER STEWART, Aviation 
Corps. (72) 

HENRY, WILLIAM MICHAEL. (83) 

HOLMES. WILLIAM HARR1E, second-class 
seaman. Navy. (41) 

HOPKINS. FRED MERCER, JR. (120) 

JOHNSON. PAUL BARRUS, lieutenant. Medi- 
cal Corps. (56) 

JONES, ERNEST WALLACE. (128) 

LANE. LESTER BARKER, corporal. (68) 

LEONARD, HOWARD GEORGE, captain, In- 
fantry. (14) 

LOCHER. CHARLES HUNTER, sergeant, 
Motor Supply Train. (117) 

LUTHER. JACK,* corporal, Coast Defense 
Corns. (119) 

McCOHMlCK. JOnN KERNAN, Infantry. (37) 

McCORMICK, PAUL JOSEPH, Coast Defense 
Corps. (98) 

MICHAELIAN, FRANK MICHAEL, sergeant. 
(101) 

MILLER, HOWARD MILTON, Naval Reserve. 
Navy. (84) 

NELSON. CLINTON LINDREN, coxswain, 
Navy. (96) 

PAWLEY. CHARLES THOMAS, Coast De- 
fense Corps. (86) 

PERKINSON, ARTHUR ANGUS. (90) [Aff. 
to Pi '167)] 

POHLMAN, HARRY FRANCIS, Medical Corps. 
(82) 

PRIMM, WALTER ROGERS, Ordnance Corps. 
(134) 

PRINGLE. JOSEPH GRAHAM, first lieuten- 
ant. Coast Artillery Corps. (92) 

RADE. HENRY SIGMUND, first lieutenant. 
Machine Gun Company. (16) 

ROMAGNA. ANTHONY. JESSE. Veteran Corps 
of Artillery, (l) 

SCHM1T. ROSWELL LAURENCE. Medical 
Corps. (87) 

SCHWEIZER, JAMES ARMSTRONG, Infan- 
try. (34) 

SHORTER, HARRY,* Quartermasters Corps. 
(122) 

SMITH, RAYMOND CHARLES, Coast Defense 
Artillery. (121) 

SNYDER, ALFRED CARLISLE, sergeant. 
(90) 

STILLMAN, WALTER MARTIN. (70) [Aff. 
to Beta Mu (198)] 

SWAYZER. CHARLES BENTON. Navy. (103) 

THAYER, EDGAR RANDOLPH, Naval Re- 
serves. (65) 

WALLER. LAWRENCE WAITE. Aviation 
Corps. (116) [Aff. from Beta Chi (183)] 



144 



The Delta 



WATT, ROBERT,* lieutenant, Aviation Corps. 
(76) 

WHITAKBR. KARL BRROLL. (50) 

WINCHBLL, CLARENCE EDWARD, Army Y. 
M. C. A. (4) 

WINSLOW, JOHN CHASE, corporal, Coast 
Defense Commission. (112) 

WRIGHT, CLINTON IRVING. (124) 

PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 
Delta Delta Chapter 

ALLEN, JOHN EDWARD, Aviation Corps. 
(119) 

ARMSBY, EDWARD McCLELLAN. Ordnance 
Corps. (39) 

ARMSBY. SIDNEY PRENTISS, Quartermas- 
ters Corps. (2) 

BAILEY, ROLLAND GEORGE, Navy. (17) 

BARKER, GEORGE SATTERLEE, lieutenant, 
Infantry. (93) 

BARRON, HAROLD EARL, sergeant, Ord- 
nance Corps. (101) 

BOLE. RALPH DePUY. lieutenant. (61) 

BREIME1ER, FRED WILLIAM, Naval Avia- 
tion Corps. (56) 

BROWN, DONALD McKENZIE, ensign, Naval 
Reserves (89) 

COPE," RICHARD POLLARD, Machine Gun 
Company. (91) 

COTTOM, HARRY VANCE, sergeant, Ordnance 
Corps. (83) 

COTTOM, THOMAS IRVING, Medical Corps. 
(45) 

DEVEREAUX, ROBERT, JR.,* lieutenant, In- 
fantry. (10) 

EARL, DOUGLAS.* Infantry. (105) 

ETTERS, DAVID BENJAMIN, Engineers 
Corps. (68) 

EVANS, LeROY.* Army Y. M. C. A. (53) 

GAGE, GEORGE RAYMOND. Aviation Section. 
Signal Reserve Corps. (47) 

GRIMES. VANCE THOMAS. (84) [Aff. from 
Epsilon (107)] 

HADESTY, GEORGE BOYD, JR., lieutenant 
(70) 

HADESTY, JOHN WILLIAM, lieutenant. (78) 

HUTCHINSON. GILES VIRGIL. (103) 

MARKHAM, CARL WILLIAM, captain, Engi- 
neers Corps. (21) 



MICHELL, HENRY FREDERICK, sec- 
ond lieutenant. Engineers Corps. Drowned 
while engaged in bridge building, France. 
(76) 



Ml NICK, DON CAMBRIDGE, lieutenant, En- 
srineers Corns (22) 

NEAL, EDWARD DIXON, Aviation Corps. 
(121) 

NEELY, HOWARD ARTHUR, Signal Corps. 
(58) 

O'DONNELL, JAMES ARTHUR, O. R. T. C. 
(113) 

RAUCH, RICHARD HARVIE, Ordnance 
Corps. (126) 

RUNYAN, RALPH,* Ordnance Corps. (Ill) 

SHAVER, HERBERT HENRY, lieutenant, En- 
gineers Corps. (88) 

SULLIVAN, GEORGE WILLARD. (107) 

THOMAS, WILLIAM CLAUDE, Aviation 
Corps. (81) 

THOMPSON, SAMUEL MORRIS, Aviation 
Corps. (116) 

WEINMAN, WILBUR RAMSEY, corporal. 
(94) 

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA 
Delta Epsilon Chapter 

ARMSTRONG, CLAY WOOD, second lieuten- 
ant,. Infantry. (104) 

BELL. CHARLES CURRY, Medical Reserve 
Corps. (50) 

BERRY, CHARLES NELSON, Medical Re- 
serve Corps. (35) 

BONHAM, DAVTD EARL. (93) 

BRASTED, NATHAN RUSSELL. Navy. (73) 

BREEDLOVE, CHARLES W.,* Marine Corps. 
(113) 

BRISCOE, HENRY ALBERT. (102) 

BROWN, CARLOS CHESTER. (31) 



CHASTAINB, COLWELL CLARENCE, Field' 
Artillery. (96) 

CLARK, WILLIAM LYNN, second lieutenant. 
Machine Gun Company. (68) 

CLOUSB, OLES IVAN, cadet, Aviation Corps. 
(78) 

COLBURN, JAMES ORLTN. (24) 

COBB, SYLVESTER ATT. (36) 

CRABTREB, WYLBY ERNEST, Infantry. 
(117) 

CRBAGOR. JOB CLYDE, second lieutenant 
Infantry. (95) 

CURTISS. JOE WHEELER. (125) 

DARROUGH. PAUL GLADSTONE, Naval Re- 
serve Corps. (56) 

DODGE, KAY VANSE, Navy. (75) 

DODGE, WILLIAM NEIL. JR.. Ambulance 
Corps. (100) 

DUNN, ROBERT NORTH, Aviation Corps. 



(59) 

V) 



I ELDS, JESSE, sergeant. Ammunition Train. 



(52) 

GOODRICH, RAYMOND, Supply Depot (98) 

GRAY, ELMER REUBEN, second lieutenant 
(92) 

HARRILL, THOMAS CICERO. (76) 

HARRIS. SAMUEL LOWE. (122) 

HARTFORD, LELAND. Signal Corps. (112) 

HICKMAN, CECIL ROGERS, cadet Aviation 
Corps. (101) 

HIGH, CHARLES LESLIE, Quartermaster 
Department. (85) 

HILL, JAMES JULIAN, observer, Aviation 
Corps. (45) 

HILL, WILLIAM PENDLETON THOMPSON, 
lieutenant, Aviation Section Marine Corps. (77) 

H1NES, LELAND STANFORD, Marine Corps. 
(62) 

JACKSON, ROBERT EDWARD. JR., Quarter- 
masters Corps. (27) 

JONES, CLIFFORD ELLSWORTH. (121) 

JUDY, WILLIAM BLAINE, Medical Reserve 
Corps. (55) 

KELLER. REUBEN, cadet, Aviation Ground 
School. (109) 

KIMBERLIN, SAMUEL OWEN, lieutenant, In- 
fantry. (74) 

K1MBLEY, RUSSELL BRYCE. Signal Corps. 
(87) 

LIVELY, WILLIAM PRENTICE, lieutenant 
Infantry. (61) 

LOOKABAUGH, LEONARD LYTTON, second 
lieutenant, Infantry. (83) 

LOWE, ZEARAL EATON, Navy. (84) 

McBRIDE, EARL DUWA1N, first lieutenant 
Hospital Corps. (32) 

McBRIDE, HAROLD, sergeant, Hospital Corps. 
(105) 

McLANE, CHARLEY L., Navy. (99) 

MAGEE, CARLTON COLE. JR.. Ambulance 
Corps. (86) 

MEYER. CLIFFORD CLINTON, second lieu- 
tenant, Infantry. (70) 

MULLINS, WILLIAM KENION, motor me- • 
chanic, Signal Corps. (67) [Aff. from Iota (212)] 

NEAL. CASWELL.* Ambulance Corps. (114) 

NEIL, DAN, JR.,* Infantry. (43) 

NORTON, SAM, JR.* (124) 

PEARD, ROGER WOOD, captain, Marine 
Corps. (25) 

PONDER, CHARLES ELMER, lieutenant, Avi- 
ation Corps. (57) 

REASOR, CHRISTOPHER DRAKE, Engi- 
neers Corps. (79) 

RIDDLE, VERGIL, second lieutenant, Machine 
Gun Company. (115) 

ROPER, JOHN ELMER, sergeant, Infantry. 
(88) 

RUSSELL. CYRIL.* lieutenant, Bombing 
School. (110) 

SEVEY. WILLIAM BARNEY, cadet Aviation 
Corps. (90) 

SHAPARD, CHARLES BELL, lieutenant. (42) 

SMTTH, SAM JONES. (34) 

THOMPSON, JEAN CLEVELAND, captain, 
Infantry. (12) 

WEST, WILLIS KELLY, lieutenant Medical 
Corps. (41) 

WIRICK, HARRY LELAND, Infantry. (65) 

WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY 

Delta Zeta Chapter 

BARDEN, ELDRED STEWART, sergeant, In- 
fantry. (49) 



Knights of the Republic 



BHCHBBRGER, CARL STEAD. (M) 
BOWMAN, GEORGE ARVENE. Navy. («9) 
BRECK. THEODORE. JR.. drat lieutenant. In- 
fantry. (51) 

BROWN, HOLLA OSCAR. Medical Reserve 
Corpa, 154) 

COOPER, CHARLES MORGAN BAILEY, cor- 
poral. Gas Service. (69) 

COODRICH, MURRAY NEWTON. (60) 
GREENLESE, CLELL BISHOP. Engineers 
Corpa. (19) 
HARTMAN. DALE ALLEN. Field Artillery. 



Signal < 

SPOONUH, i;i;hik;f astoN, lieutenant. Bat- 
umi Division, .Signal Corps. (40) 
TEMI'I.TN. JullN FINCH. US) 
TKTKI1. .WHIN |.'K.\NKI.IN (1011 
VEKNON. ltni;i-;UT iis.'ail second lieutenant, 



WE1SE. OTTO.* ( 
IVOODSIDE, RAL] 



1FTON. secood-c 



WITNDEH. HENRY l-'UKIHIRICK. Ilea tenant. 



ne. N. C, January Z8. 1918. 



PEASE, RUSSELL BENJAMIN, corporal, En- 
gineers Corps. (58) 

PETHTEL. ZADOCK HOWARD, Field Artil- 
lery. (17) 

POME ROY, ORANGE BARKER, Hospital 
Corps. (63) 

RADCLIFFE. FREDERICK KING. (411 
SHREFFLER, HUBERT LL'VANTS. (21) 
STARKES, CARLTON CULLEY. captain. Med- 

_ STONE R. CHESTER KRUMROY, Hospital 



___ Field Artillery. (34) 

TERRELL. HARRISON MALONE, Field Ar- 
tlllary. (86) 

UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA 



ALDRICH, CARL MILTON, Aviation Corpa 
(10) 

ALDRICH, RALF JOHNSTON, Hospital 
Corps. (31) 

AMES. BDRNHAM,* Dental Reserve Corpa. 
(10) 

ARMSTRONG. GEORGE JACK. (38) 

BHdWNBLI.. ROY ALMOND. (7) 

BVBBSTBTTA, FRED ELMER, Naval Re- 
serves. (87) 

BUERSTETTA. ORVILLE ANDREW. (8S) 

CARSE. EARLE RUSSELL. Naval Reserves, 
III) 

cm; 

Naval .._, 

CHASE, CECIL ABTHUR. Aviation Corps. 

(JO) 
CONE. WILLIAM ALEXANDER. ((0) 
COOPER. HOLLAND MITCHELL. (71) 
DINSMOBE. EUGENE CLAY, lieutenant. 

tillery Corps. (88) 

DINSMOBE, FRANCIS ELMER. (IE) 
DRAKE. HUGH HENDERSON, lieutenant, 

run try. (I) 
EICHBERO, FRANK HARVEY. (««) 
GALBREITH. CLAUDE EUGENE, lieutenant 

(751 
FALKEN. GARRETT, JR.,* Medical Corp 

Navy. (51) 
HAWI.EY. MONES JOHNSON. (IB) 
LARSON, FOUHEST THURSTON. (80) 
LYNCH, BERNARD HENRY, Ambulan. 

Corps. (93) 
IfcHIRRON. BYRON CHARLES. (57) 



■'• < 81 i 
N. (88] 



PARKINSON, ROBERT McKEB. (42) 
PETERSON, VICTOR EMERSON. (88) 
PETREB. LEO WEBB, lieutenant, Aviation 



(79) 

POLLOCK, FAY HALL, 
Corpa (77) 

RANDALL. WILLIAM LESLIE, Balloon Di- 
vision. Signal Corpa. (23) 

RHODES, ROSCOB BRYAN. (87) 

RODWBLL, GLEN WBEDON, Aviation Corpa. 
(100) 

ROSS. ARTHUR JAMES, Medical Corpa. (47) 
[Aft. from Gamma Rho (71)] 

SCHUMACHER. EDWARD HENRY. (94) 






LOMBARD COLLEGE 
Delta Thetn Chapter 

ADAMS. CLIFTON ERNEST. Infantry. (181) 

BARNUM, EDWIN CROSKEY. USB) [AH. to 
Gamma Mu (191)1 

BARTLETT, JOHT 
Ambulance Corps. 148 

GEOFF, JOSEPH i 
gineera. (146) 

HALLO RAN, MICHAEL EDMUND, second 
lieutenant. Field Artillery. (157) 

HELLER, EDGAR STUART, captain. (145) 

HENDEL. ROBERT WALTER, JR., Artillery. 
(118) 

JUDY, JOHN ABRAM. captain. (128) 

ME1HSNER. KARL ARTHUR, French Mortar 
Battery, (121) 

OLSON. CARL NATHAN, captain. Aviation 



ROSEQUIST, CARL OSCAR. Drat lieu- 
tenant. Infantry. Died from wounda re- 
ceived In action, France, Hay 10, 1918. 
(119) 



BUSH, JOSEPH STEPHEN. (138) 

SANDERS, HUGH,* sergeant, Ambulance 
Corps. (160) 

SMITH, ROBERT MALCOLM. Heavy Field 
Artillery. (1661 

WILSON, CLAUD FREDERICK, Hospital 
Corps. (16B) 

WILSON, MARK EARL. Hospital Corpa. 
(139) 

WRIGHT, THEODORE PAUL, second lieuten- 
ant. (128) 

STATR COLLEGE OF WASHINGTON 

Delta. Iota Chapter 

ANDERSON, CHESTER S10FRIED. (18) 



BOONE, RALPH REECE. Aviation Corps. 

(108) " 

BROUGHT ON, CHARLES J., JR.,* sergeant. 

Infantry. (83) 

CHENEY. MOSES EDWARD. (62) 
COB, GUY ROMAINE, Infantry. (63) 
COPBLAMD, EDWIN WALLACE. (96) 
CRANE, FRANK ALF. (90) 
CURTI, EUGENE GODFREY. (121) 
DEEOAN, HARRY WILLIAM. (89) 
DUNLAP, EARL ALEXANDER, sergeant, In 

*I)URHAM, CLARENCE ROY. Navy Hospital. 

DURHAM. THOMAS ARTHUR, junior lieuten- 
ant. Navy. (81) 

EDWARDS. LLOYD GRAHAM. (118) 
FULLERTON. LYNNE ARANNAH A_ 
FULLERTON, ROSCOE r 



. . . __. (E0) 

FULTON. JEFFERSON HENRY, captain. 
GOODYEAR. TREVOR SHURCLIFF. " 



(57) 



(71) 



HANLBY, RICHARD EDGAR, Marine Corpa. 
,100) 

HILL, ROBERT MORGAN, Hospital Corpa. 

HOFFERDITZ. BENJAMIN ANDREW, Ord- 
nance Corps. (32) 

JINNETT, EMIL DALE. (104) 

JOHNSON. CARL GDSTAVU8, NaTy. (118) 



146 



The Delta 



McLEAN, JOSEPH SCOTT, sergeant. Infan- 
try. (116) 

McCROSKEY, EARLE McCRAY. (88) 
McDOUGALL, ALFRED FRANK. (101) 
McGREGOR. DONALD EUGENE, Marines. 
(113) 
McGREGOR, JOHN MAURICE, Marines. (65) 
MALONEY, WALTER LeROY. (54) 
MILLER, ALFRED DONALD, Ambulance 
Service (105) 

MILLER, WILLIAM MAXWELL. (131) 
MOESER. WILLIAM FREDERICK, Aviation 
Corps. (117) 

MOSER, MILTON PHILLIP, sergeant, Medi 
cal Corps. (60) 

MOSS, NORMAN WILLIAM, Hospital Corps. 
(73) 

MOSS, ROBERT WALLACE. Navy. (97) 



MUTTY. LOUIS PETER. Aviation 
CorpB. killed in action by aeroplane acci- 
dent, Miami, Fla., July 10, 1918. (78) 



RITTER, HERBERT LeROY, second lieuten- 
ant. Artillery. (35) 

ROGERS, ELVES FREMONT. (16) 

RUDBERG, RAYMOND HOWARD. (120) 

SABOE. JOSEPH G.* (122) 

SCANTLIN, THOMAS EDGAR. JR. (69) [ACT. 
to Beta Psi (187)] 

SKADAN, FRANK RUSSELL, sergeant. In- 
fantry. (123) 

STEWART. ARTHUR DAYTON. (48) 

TOLLBFSON, LEANDER PAUL, sergeant. 
Hospital Corps. (106) 

TOOLE. WILLIAM BRICE. Ambulance Corps. 
(Ill) [Aff. from Gamma Phi (87)] 

WALSH, ARTHUR OSCAR, first lieutenant. 
Field Artillery. (77) 

WHITHAM, STRAYER EARLE, Naval Re- 
serves (124) 

WILLIAMS, HENRY HAROLD. (76) 

WOODLAND, EARLE CLEMENT. (110) 

WOODLAND. LEONARD FREEMAN. (127) 

DELAWARE COLLEGE 

Delta Kappa Chapter 

BRATT1N, HOWARD, JR..* Aviation Corps. 
(97) 

BROCKSON, WASHINGTON IRVING. (58) 

CAMPBELL, FRANKLIN TRACY, first lieu- 
tenant. Infantry. (76) 

CHAMBERS, JAMES BRADY, corporal. (102) 

CORKRAN, WILLIAM SHERMAN, lieutenant. 
Engineers Corps. (4) 

CROTHERS, JAMES ALEXANDER, second 
lieutenant. (68) 

DEAKYNE, HORACE LISTON. (47) 

DEAN, FRANK H.,* Navy. (52) 

DOUGHERTY. GERALD PAUL. JR. (79) 

DOWNES. HALL.* (90) 

ENNIS, HOWARD TAYLOR, lieutenant. (32) 

FITZPATR1CK, WILLIAM STEPHEN, sec- 
ond lieutenant, Aviation Section. Signal Corps. 
(100) 

FOSTER, BYRON RAMON, second lieutenant. 
(20) 

GRIER. HAROLD CAULK. Naval Reserves. 
(103) 

HORSEY. DONALD PANCOAST. (81) 



HAMEL. ALFRED RICKERT, captain. 
Infantry. Killed in action. Chateau Thierry, 
France. (30) 



JONES, JOHN WESLEY, military instructor. 
(63) 

LAURITSEN, ALLEN LOUIS, Engineers 
Corps. (84) 

McNEAL, DANIEL RAYMOND. (31) 

MARSTON, HENRY WHITE. (91) 

MORRIS, ARTHUR HUDSON, chief pharma- 
cist's mate (87) 

O'DANIEL, JOHN WILSON, second lieuten- 
ant (74) 

PRICE, DONALD ADAMS. (66) 

ROSSELL, PAUL FRANCIS, captain, Engi- 
neers Corps. (35) 

SAWDON, WALLACE ATTERBURY, Engi- 
neers Corps. (25) 



SEWARD, WILLIAM BUCHANAN, second 
lieutenant. Infantry. (71) 

SMART, LAWRENCE LANDON, Aviation 
Corps. (98) 

SMITH, JULIAN CONSTABLE, captain, Ma- 
rine Corps. (45) 

SUMWALT, ROBERT LLEWELLYN, Engi- 
neers Corps. (95) 

W1LLTAMS, THOMAS EDWARD. (106) 

WILSON, ERNEST STATON, Engineers Corps. 
(82) 

BROWN UNIVERSITY 
Delta Lambda Chapter 

BROWN, PHILIP MALCOLM, Coast Artillery. 
(82) 

ENTWISTLE, CLIFTON ROY, Radio Service. 
(55) 

FORT, CHARLES MORTIMER, Coast Artil- 
lery. (71) 

FOSS. SILAS WILLIAM, Field Artillery. (17) 

GANNON, WALLACE ALLYN, Coast Artillery. 
(21) 

GIBSON, CARL BANTA. (52) 

GILBERT, HENRY GEORGE, Coast Artillery. 
(72) 

HILL. PLOYER PETER. Aviation Corps. (45) 

HALEY, JOHN WILLIAMS. (68) 

HAYLAN, MALCOLM CLEVELAND, O. R. 

T C* ( **7 ) 

JOYCE, WILLIAM THOMAS, flying cadet. 
Aviation Corps. (51) 

MACLEOD, MORTON PERRY, corporal, Engi- 
neer Corps. (54) 

MURPHY, WALTER VINCENT, Naval Train- 
ing Station. (53) 

NICHOLS, RALPH HALL, Coast Artillery. 
(70) 

PEACE, HENRY THORNTON, Coast Artil- 
lery. (23) 

PERKINS, EVERETT GRANVILLE, Aviation 
Corps. (44) 

PERRY, LESLIE LOVELL. (49) 

PORTER, HAROLD LEIGHTON. (50) 

PRESTON, LESTER WARE. Naval Reserves. 
(65) 

WEDDELL. THOMAS SEWARD, Coast Artil- 
lery. (80) 

YEAKEL. STUART EDSALL. Ambulance 
Corps. (33) 

YOUNG, WILLIAM HOWARD, corporal. (40) 

STETSON UNIVERSITY 
Delta Mu Chapter 

BARCO. SAMUEL JOSEPH, second lieuten- 
ant. (25) 

BASKIN, HAMDEN IIOLLOWAY, Naval Re- 
serves (47) 

BOONE. JAMES LUMFORD, first lieutenant 
(14) 

CAMERON. RALPH HENRY. JR., Quarter- 
masters Corps. (77) 

CARSON. WILLIAM ZEPHAR. (48) 

COLEMAN, GEORGE WILSON, first lieuten- 
ant. Field Artillery. (19) 

CURRAN, RUSSELL DAVID, first lieutenant, 
Field Artillery. (52) 

FENNO, LLOYD HORACE, Medical Corps. 
(65) 

FIELD. WAYNE LEWIS. (38) 

FISHER, HOWARD VOELKLER, Ambulance 
Corps. (39) 

FULLER, ORVILLE EUGENE. (60) 

GAUTIER, LAWRENCE PARRISH, ensign. 
Naval Reserves. (41) 

GEE, CLOUGH FARRAR, captain, Signal 
Corps. (66) 

GUMM. EDWIN JACOB. Infantry. (58) 

HARRIS. SAMUEL HENRY, ensign, Naval Re- 
serves (74) 

JACKSON, TOM LAWRIE, Balloon Division. 
(34) 

JACKSON, NEIL SPURGEON. (6) 

JONES, CLAUDE CURTIS, captain, Coast Ar- 
tillery. (5) 

JONES, SEABORN PHILLIPS. (56) 

JORDAN. RAYMOND HORACE, second lieu- 
tenant. (57) 

JUNKIN, JAMES WILLIS, lieutenant, Avia- 
tion Corps. (10) 

MERRITT. JACOB RADER. Quartermasters 
Corps. (40) 



Knights of the Republic 



147 



MILAM, DANIEL FRANKLIN. (15) [Aff. to 
Sigma (224)1 

MILAM. ROBERT RICHARDSON, first lieu 
tenant. (7) 

PEEK, OOUVENEUR MEDW1N, Naval Re- 
ferred. (68) 

PHILLIPS, ALFRED RAYMOND. (22) 

PHILLIPS, CHARLES PRATT, first lieuten 
ant. (53) 

ROSENBURG. JOHN ALMON. (26) 

SHALLENE. WILBERT ENGDAHL. (79) 

SHERMAN, GARDINER, ensign, Naval Re- 
serves. (50) 

SMITH. EDWARD JOSEPH. JR. (12) 

STRUM, LOUIS Wl ELAND, lieutenant-coin 
mander, Navy. (31) 

VINSON, ERNEST ABEL. JR. (11) 

WHITE. RUSSELL CONWELL, Naval Re 
serves. (64) 

W1DEMAN. FRANK,* first lieutenant, Cavalry. 
(2) 

WIDEMAN. JEROME EDWARDS, lieutenant, 
Infantry. (3) 

WITHERS, HAROLD STUART, sergeant. Hos- 
pita! Corps. (69) 

YOUNG. FRANK MONTAGUE. (59) 

UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 

Delta Na Chapter 

ALTON. FRANCIS OSGOOD. " (75) 
ASH, JOHN EMMONS. Signal Corps. (1) 
ATWOOD, LEWIS GERALD, Naval Reserves. 
(118) 

BALDWIN, FREDERICK EARL, Naval Re- 
serves. (112) 

BLAISDELL, LAWRENCE ALLEN. (13) 
BRAUN. EARL ROBERTSON, second lieuten- 
ant, Coast Artillery. (60) 

BRUNHAM, PHILIP MERKE. Reserve Officers 
Training Camp. (101) 

COBB, ROLAND HACKER, first lieutenant. 
(66) 

COPP. LINCOLN BRACKETT, second lieuten- 
ant. Infantry. (98) 

CRAWSHAW, THOMAS HILL, Quartermas- 
ters Corps. (Ill) 

DAVIS, PHILIP FRANK, Aviation Corps. (73) 

DRISCOLL, MICHAEL COLUMBUS, Engi- 
neers Corps. (41) 

EMERY. CHARLES IRVING, first lieutenant. 
Marine Corps. (47) 

EMERY, EARLE LESLIE. (55) 

EMERY.. NEWELL WYMAN, chief quarter- 
master. Naval Reserves. (104) 

ERSKINE. FRED STODDARD, Neville Marine 
Corps. (95) 

FOGG, HARRY WILLARD, Engineers Corps. 
(16) 

GILES, CORNELIUS FRANCIS, first-class 
quartermaster. Naval Reserves. (105) 

HARRIMAN, PHILIP AINSLEE, chief quar- 
termaster, Naval Reserves. (121) 

HIGGINS. ROYAL GRANT, second lieutenant, 
Infantry. (52) 

HODGKINS, HAROLD WINSLOW, Naval Re- 
serves. (113) 

JACOBS, LESTER WARNER, first lieutenant. 
Engineers. (68) 

JONES. HAROLD NORTON, Electricians 
Training School. (84) 

JONES, WALTER CONVERSE, Coast Guard. 
(58) 

KETCHEN, RALPH CLEON. Infantry. (69) 

KIRK. EDWARD BENEDICT, first-class 
quartermaster. Naval Reserve Corps. (103) 

KIRK, GEORGE EDWIN, second lieutenant. 
Machine Gun Company. (43) 

LEGAL, CHAPIN, second lieutenant. Quarter- 
masters Corps. (45) 

LIBBY, PHILIP ALLAN, Naval Aviation. 
(116) 

L1TTLEFIELD, ROBERT MOSES, Engineers 
Corps. (80) 

MACDOUGALL, HAROLD GEORGE, corporal, 
Infantry. (34) 

MALONE, GORDON JOHN. Naval Reserves. 
(132) 

MANK. NELSON FOUNTAIN, first lieutenant. 
Engineers Corps. (64) 

MERRITT, JOHN RADER. (40) 

PETERSON. HENRY ANDREW, second lieu- 
tenant, Infantrv. (81) 

PREBLE. LESLIE EDWARD. (22) 



PITTS, SAMUEL LEE. Naval Reserves. (107) 
RANDALL, HARRY ALGERNON, second lieu- 
tenant, Coast Artillery. (37) 

RANGER, RALPH AUGUSTINE, Reserve Offi- 
cers Training Camp. (108) 

RILEY. EDWIN ALDEN, O. R. T. C. (123) 
SHERIDAN, PHILIP BRINSLEY. second lieu- 
tenant. Machine Gun Company. (15) 

SILVA, RICHARD.* Coast Guard. (48) 
SIMPSON. WILLIAM ANDREW. (53) 
SMITH. FRANK AUGUSTUS, Field Artillery. 
(8) 

TINKER. HERBERT DUNBAR, Naval Re- 
serves. (120) 

TREWORGY, HAROLD EUGENE, sergeant. 
Aviation Corps. (128) 

WAUGH, HARVEY CYRUS, second lieutenant. 
Aviation Corps. (57) 

WHITAKER. CARL GROVER. (54) 
WHITEHOUSE. THURLE STEVENS. (106) 

UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA 

Delta XI Chapter 

BLOCK. nAROLD CHRISTIAN, Aviation 
Corps. (42) 

BROWN. RALPH WILLIS. Marines. (36) 
BUNNEL. WOODBURY LEE. (33) 
CASEY. FRANK ANTHONY. (32) 
CROWLEY. BASIL WEBB, corporal. (8) 
DESSAR. DELWYN,* captain. Field Artillery. 
(4) 

JACKSON. ALBERT MILLAR, first lieuten- 
ant. Coast Artillery. (7) 

JONES. WENDELL THEODORE. Infantry. 
(12) 

McCUBBIN. EUGENE LLOYD, Aviation Corps. 
(6) 

McKINLEY. PETER. Navy. (10) 
MUELLER, JOHN VICTOR, flrtt lieutenant. 
(19) 

MUftRAY, EDWIN DOUGLAS, first lieutenant. 
Submarine Corps. (18) 

NEASHAM, JAMES EDWARD, corporal. (16) 
PRESTON. ALBERT WILLIAM. Navy. (17) 
ROUNTREE. ELLIS CONNER. Marines. (22) 
WILLIAMS, CHARLES FRANCIS, second lieu- 
tenant. (43) 

UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO 
Delta Omicron Chapter 

ALBERT. DAVID WORTH, head cook, Quar- 
termaster's Corps. (12) 

BARTON. JOHN HORNER. Naval Aviation 
Corps. (19) 

BERRY. HUGH WALLACE. (64) 

BESSEE. CLINTON FISKE. lieutenant, Field 

Artillery, d) 

BOWMAN, LOGAN MANCER, Aviation Corps. 

CARLSON, OSCAR FREDERICK, captain. In- 
fantry. (9 

CLARK. WALTON BABCOCK, battalion-adju- 
tant, Coast Artillery. (61) 

DAVISON, MAURICE VERB. (71) 

DOWNING, CHARLES LEE. lieutenant (49) 

DOWNING. GEORGE JACKSON, captain. 
Field Artillery. (6) 

EMMETT. MILTON WELLES, second lieuten- 
ant. (26) 

EVANS. GROVER CLEVELAND, sergeant 

<22) 

FICKE. CHARLES.* Naval Aviation Corps. 

(55) 

FIELDS, CHARLES CARLOS, second lieuten- 
ant (51) 

GARBER. CLAUDE YANT. (25) 

GL1NDEMAN, HERBERT LEO, Field Artil- 
lery. (66) 

GRAF, FRED EDWARD. (45) 

GRAY. CHARLES CHESTER, Naval Aviation 
Corps. (36) 

HANNAH, DANIEL.* Navy. (52) 

HANSON. FRED HENRY, Naval Aviation 
Corps. (39) 

HELM, McKINLEY.* Hospital Corps. (47) 

HUNT, EVERETT EARL, second lieutenant. 
(69) 

KITCH, LORAN WOODWORTH. Naval Avia- 
tion Corps. (42) 

LYON. ALFRED JEFFERSON, lieutenant, in- 
structor, Aviation Ground School. (35) 



148 



The Delta 



McMULLIN. GEORGE LEIBY. second lieuten- 
ant (43) 

MULLEN, JOHN BERNARD. JR. (24) 

MUNSON, CHARLES OSCAR, first lieutenant, 
Engineers Corps. (46) 

ROBINSON, PAYETTE CHILDERS, Aviation 
Corps. (31) 

SWAN, DELLNER AXEL. (27) 

SWAN, HUGH HARRIS. Naval Aviation Corps. 
(18) 

SYLVESTER, CLARENCE ALBERT. (16) 

8YLVESTBR, GEORGE LEE, second lieuten- 
ant (7) 

WEST, WILLIAM 1NGERSOLL. (23) 

WYLIE, OAKLEY McDONALD. Navy. (58) 



GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 
Delta PI Chapter 

BATES. CLAUDE ERMAN. lieutenant. Avia- 
tion Corps. (72) 

BIRMINGHAM. CHARLES HENRY, civilian 
field clerk. Signal Corps. (58) 

BOYD, JOSEPH REGINALD, Ordnance Corps. 
(75) 

BROCKMAN, WILLIAM EVERETT. (25) 

CATHCART. PAUL HAMILTON, first lieuten- 
ant, Hospital Corps. (22) 

DOYLE. ROSCOE CLIFFORD, sergeant, Engi- 
neers Corps. (11) 

FISHER, LEWIS CICILLE. (32) 

FLEMING, JOHN PATTON. Machine Gun 
Company. (38) 

GESSFORD, RODGER DUNN, sergeant, Avia- 
tion Corps. (80) 

GOETZMAN. GEORGE FRANCIS, ensign, Na- 
val Medical Corps. (47) 

HEIST, LUTHER HENRY, Signal Corps. (52) 



HILLIS. ROGER WHITMAN, Canadian 
Engineers Corps; killed in action in 
France. (66) 



KEBLER, VICTOR LYMAN, second seaman. 
Navy. (68) 

KELLEY, RAYMOND DOUGLAS, second sea- 
man, Navy. (64) 

KINGSBURY, JOSEPH BUSH, Hospital Corps. 

(17) 

LANGLEY. JESSE RAYMOND, major, Infan- 
try. (50) 

McKOY, HENRY BACON, Engineers. (26) 

MEHL. CHARLES HERMAN, corporal, chief 
clerk to camp quartermaster. (35) 

MILLER, ODVER HARRISON, Naval Avia- 
tion Corps. (3) 

NEWMAN, HARRY ANDERSON. Ordnance 
Corps. (48) 



BROTHERS, HAROLD VERN, corporal, Field 
Artillery. (38) 

BUNTE. CHESTER BENJAMIN. Field Artil- 



(71) 



EDERHAUSER, DONALD O.,* Infantry. 



ROMBERGER, EARL ELLSWORTH. Infan- 
try. (61) 

ROMMEL, ROYAL ROBERT. Ordnance Corps. 
(86) 

SCHLADT, GEORGE JOSEPH, second lieuten- 
ant, Engineers Corps. (19) 

SCHMBHL, ROBERT PAUL. Infantry. (76) 

SMITH, CHESTER HARVEY. Signal School. 
(36) 

SMITHSON, GEORGE FORREST, lieutenant. 
Marine Corps. (23) 

STERLING. .RALPH JOHN, sergeant, Ord- 
nance Corp 8. (18) 

SUTLIFF, M1LO JOSEPH, Naval Reserves. 

ERRY, LEO CLAUDE, Signal Corps. (10) 



TERRY, LEO CLAUDE, Slg 
VANDERGRIFT, JOHN LESLIE. (40) 



VAN EZDORF. ROBERT.* Aviation Corps. 

WHITE, FRANK HIGGINS, cadet. Aviation 
Corps. (73) 

WOLTER, LOUIS CHRISTIAN, Ordnance 
Corps. (88) 

YATES, ROBERT RALEIGH, lieutenant En- 
gineers Corps. (53) 

COLORADO AGRICULTURAL. COLLEGE 

Delta Rho Chapter 

ADAMS, NYA1,.* lieutenant. (15) 
BAIN, CHARLES BRYAN, corporal, Field Ar- 
tillery. (43) 



lery. (59) 
CO 



OZZENS, JAMES PHILIP/ corporal. Field 
Artillery. (48) 

COVER. CHARLES JERRE, first sergeant 
(61) 

DOKE. HAROLD FRANK. Marine Corps. (28) 
DOKE, HORACE GREELEY, Navy. (12) 
DOTSON, HARRY L.» (51) 
ELDRIDGE. HARVEY PIPER. (53) 
FINGER, THEODORE JACK, lieutenant In- 
fantry. (47) 

HACKETT. WAYNE HOUSTON, lieutenant, 
Infantry. (8) 
,L 



HELLBECK, OSCAR K.,* first sergeant Field 
— 'y (3~ 
HOPPER, EVERETT RUSSELL. (24] 



Artillery. (30) 
HOPPER, E 
KELLY, RAY KILBURN. lieutenant Infantry. 



(65) 

KOLACH. HARRY.* (18) 

McKlNSTRY, JOHN ALEXANDER, lieuten- 
ant, Infantry. (63) 

PIERCE. MORRIS ESSELSTINE. (35) 

PREVOST. VICTOR CARNOT, corporal, Field 
Artillery. (54) 

RUNDAHL, EARL MILTON, lieutenant. (19) 

STROCK. GLENN TETER. lieutenant (1) 

TW1TCHELL. JOHN MAC. (52) 

VAUGHN. HOWARD EDWIN, Engineers 
Corps. (62) 

WALKER, GRANT EMMETT. Naval Aviation 
Station. (39) 

WHITE, CLAUDE ALFRED, lieutenant. Infan- 
try. (17) 

WOOLLEY. GEORGE ALLEN. JR. (9) 



CARNEGIE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 
Delta Sigma Chapter 

ANDREWS, WILLIAM SWARTZ, Wireless 
Service. (54) 

BENSON, KENNETH RAMSAY, Aviation Sec- 
tion. Signal Corps. (50) 

BOYER. MARTIN EVANS, JR., Naval Train- 
ing Station. (9) 

BROCKMANN, HENRY CHARLES, Engineers 
Corps. (11) 

BUTTON, LAMONT HARTUMG, sergeant, 
Hospital Corps. (6) 

CLAYTON, HAROLD OLIVER, Infantry. (70) 

COLWELL, CURTIS COLFAX, lieutenant En- 
gineers Corp 8. (58) 

CROSBY, RALPH MITCHELL, ensign, Naval 
Overseas Transportation Service. (17) 

DAKE, ROBERT EDWARD, Aviation Corps. 
(15) 

DIEHL. WILLIAM FRANCIS, sergeant, Ord- 
nance Corps. (5) 

DILLENBACK, LEMUEL CROSS, lieutenant. 
Aviation Corps. (27) 

FLEMING, RICHARD KNOWLSON, JR., En- 
gineers Corps. (61) 

GREEN. RUSSELL ERNEST, corporal. Engi- 
neers. (51) [Aff. from Beta Iota (244)] 

HAYNES, GLEN HUFFMAN, Hospital Corps. 
(10) 

HAYS. JAMES BYERS, Engineers Corps. (59) 

HIGHBERGER, FRANK McMASTER, Hos- 
pital Corps. (55) 

KESNER, JAMES ELIPHAZ. corporal. Engl- 
neers Corns (44) 

KINGSBURY, CARL OLIVER, Hospital Corps. 
(36) 

KIRK, RALPH LEVERING, lieutenant, Naval 
Reserves. (35) 

McCANDLESS, HOWARD FRANCIS, lieuten- 
ant, Infantry. (12) [Aff. from Beta Psl (220)] 

McKEE, EDWARD RUSSELL, Engineers 
Corps. (33) 

MARSHALL, PHILLIP PENCE. (45) 

MYERS, GEORGE FRAZIER. (20) 

RE1SINGER, JAMES COLLINS, Naval Acad- 
emy. (46) 

8IMPS6N, HUGH EVAN, Aviation Corps. (62) 

SCOBELL. HENRY JOHN, lieutenant. Infan- 
try. (13) 

SIMPSON, PAUL FULLER. Aviation Corps. 
(48) 

SIMPSON, RUSSELL SUDLOW, Engineers 
Corps. (47) 

STEWART. STANLEY POTTER, Engineers 
Corps. (2) 



Knights of the Republic 



149 



STOCKDALB, HENRY STANLEY, captain, 
foreman. Signal Corps. (38) 

SWEENEY, JOHN FRANCIS, JR.. Naval Avia- 
tion Corps. (21) 

TRAVER, LEWIS BENZON, librarian, Library 
War Service. (41) 

WARRICK, WILMER ALTDOBRFFER. (53) 
WE1GLER, WILLIAM REED. (3) 
WILLOUGHBY, RUSSELL RAY. (14) 

OREGON AGRICULTURAL. COLLEGE 
Delta Tan Chapter 

BENNER. ROBERT LENOX. (51) 

BRANDES, ALLAN CARL. Engineers Corps. 
(Railway) (13) 

COFFEY, WILSON BRYAN, Coast Artillery. 
(22) 

FERTIG, CHARLES ARTHUR, Field Artil- 
lery. (2) 

FLEGAL, CHARLES PLUMMER. (34) 

FULLERTON, CHARLES ELWYN, second 
lieutenant (21) 

GAMMON, EARLB T..* sergeant. (8) 

GARRETT, GEARY EVERETT. (40) 

HALLOCK, JOSEPH HOMER, radio electric- 
ian. Navy. (43) 

HART. SCOTT PARK. (42) 

HAYSLIP, EARL E.,* Forestry Regiment. 
(16) 

HAZELTINE. CARLYL RAWSON. (11) 

HUBBARD. EARL FORTUNATUS. sergeant. 
Coast Artillery. (19) 

JOHNSON, DARREL DELOS. second lieuten- 
ant. Infantry. (5) 

McEWEN, DANIEL FRANKLIN. Hospital 
Corps. (12) 

MONTELL. EDGAR WHITING. Officers Train- 
ing Camp. (6) 

PETERSON, CHESTER WILLIAM, Marines. 
(45) 

SMILTB. ROBERT STANLEY. (7) 

SUPPLE, JOSEPH, sergeant. Medical Corps. 
(4) 

VILAS, EDWARD PLATT, Balloon Corps. 
(38) 

VILAS. GEORGE WARREN, sergeant. Coast 
Artillery. (1) 

>. S 



(44) 



WARD. SIDNEU VALENTINE, Engineers 
►s. (17) 
ATSON, CLIFTON HOWE, radio electrician. 



Corps. (17) 
W. 



WERNER. RICHARD JOHN. Hospital Corps. 



(, W 

(20) 



OLLOMES, JAMES PAUL. Medical Corps. 

COLGATE UNIVERSITY 
Delta Upsllon Chapter 

ALLART, JACOB IRVING. Motor Mechanics 
Corps. (1) 

BOUGHTON, JOHN SCOTT, lieutenant, Ma- 
chine Gun Training School. (36) 

BUDGELL, ALLSTON TURNER. (7) 

DeFRIEST. ALBERTUS HOMER, Army Y. M. 
C. A. (15) 

FAY, HAMILTON LUCIUS. Ambulance Corps. 
(31) 

FORD, HARRISON FRANKLIN, Naval Avia- 
tion. (38) 

NOBLE. HOWARD EDGAR. Signal Corps. (9) 

PARKS, MURRAY BUSHNELL, Naval Avia- 
tion Corps. (11) 

PBCK. WALTER ARTHUR, lieutenant. Ord- 
nance Corps. (34) 

QUINCY, HAROLD MARLOW, Aviation Corps. 
(12) 

STEVENSON, HORACE LORRAINB. Aviation 
Corps. (28) 

TURNER, RICHARD THORPE. Signal Corps. 
(20) 

MARYLAND 8TATE COLLEGE 

Delta Phi Chapter 

ARTHUR, REGINALD WRIGHT, Naval Avia- 
tion Corps. (1) 

CH 'CHESTER. PETER WOOD. (4) 
DUVALL. WILLIAM HENRY. (5) 
HAMILL, FRANCIS JOSEPH, Ordnance 
Corps. (9) 

TALIAFERRO. JOHN EARL, sergeant, Infan 
try. (12) 



TRINITY COLLEGE 

Delta Chi Chapter 

BARBER, WILLIAM POND, JR., second lieu- 
tenant, Ordnance Engineers School. (27) 

BRAND, SMART.* cadet. Aviation Corps. (8) 
BRUCE. ROBERT GREENLEAF. (17) 
CHURCHILL, ALVORD BARNES, second lieu- 
tenant. Field Artillery. (29) 

FRANCIS, GEORGE SEYMOUR, Infantry. (1) 
JOHNSTON, RUSSELL ZIEBELL. (31) 
McCOID, CHESTER BAILEY, first lieutenant, 
Coast Defense Quartermasters Corps. (34) 

MARKHAM, JUDSON WILLIAM, Quartermas- 
ters Corps. (11) 

REITEMEYER. JOHN REINHART, corporal, 
Tank Service. (24) 

SAUNDERS, GEORGE LOUIS. (19) 
SEGUR, GERALD HUBBARD, second lieuten- 
ant, Infantry. (32) 

SCHORTMANN. EDWARD CHARLES. (16) 
SPORBR, MAXIMILIAN,* second lieutenant, 
Infantry. (5) 

VALENTINE, HENRY WOODHOUSE. (14) 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 
Delta. Psl Chapter 

BLAKE, GEORGE HORACE, Officers Training 
School. (5) 

DeMOTT, GEORGE STUART, Officers Train- 
ing School. (24) 

GORHAM, LEE SUMNER, corporal, Coast Ar- 
tillery Corps. (36) 

MAGUIRE, CHESTER CORBIN. (3) 

PALMER, KARL VERNON, second lieutenant. 

(1) 

RICHARDSON, RAYMOND MILLER, first 

lieutenant. Coast Artillery Corps. (37) 

ROUNDS, ROBERT CRESSEY, Coast Artillery 

Corps. (14) __ 

STEVENS. CLYDE ELLERTON, Officers 

Training School. (11) 

TUTTLE. RUFUS CLARKE. (13) 

UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA 

Epsllon Alpha Chapter 

GARDINER. JOHN HAINES, Hospital Corps. 
(2) 

JACOBUS. LAWRENCE RUSSELL. Navy. (7) 
MAYHEW, HENRY HART, Hospital Corps. 

WERFURTH. RALPH RYAN, Navy. (12) 
WRIGHT, GEORGE WILLIAM, sergeant, In- 
fantry. (6) 



Pledges 

BETHANY COLLEGE 

Epsilon Chapter 

CHAPMAN, BYRON, Navy. 
KINNEY, J. R.. Aviation Corps. 

Mccracken, byron, Navy. 

VANDEBBILT UNIVERSITY 

Sigma Chapter 

GILBERT. J. P L. 

HOUSTON, W. D., Naval Training Station. 

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS 
Upsllon Chapter 

WICKLINE, EARL, Infantry. 

DEPAIW UNIVERSITY 

Beta Beta Chapter 

BARLOW, GEORGE W., second lieutenant, In 
fantrv 

THORNBURG. CHARLES, Hospital Corpa. 
WEATHERS. FRANK. 



150 



The Delta 



Pledges 



MOUNT UNION COLLEGE 
Beta Iota Chapter 

CONWAY, ALBERT, Naval Reserve. 

OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY 
Beta Nu Chapter 

ATEX, CARL F. 

DARBY. CHESTER, Small Anns Ammunition 
Company. 

KAUFMAN, MURL. 

MANKEY, GUY. Small Arms Ammunition 
Company. 

ROBERTSON. ALLAN, first lieutenant. 

OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY 
Beta Nu Chapter 
LUDWIG. . 

ALBION COLLEGE 
Gamma Gamma Chapter 
EDDY, CHARLES. 

UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO 

Gamma Kappa Chapter 

CLENDENNING. .1. E.. Marine Corps. 
McGENNETY, LOGAN L., Naval Training 
Station. 

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN 

Gamma Lambda Chapter 
BULLEN, W. GRAHAM. 

UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS 

Gumma Upsllon Chapter 

BRACY. A. M. 

SHULTS, JOHN BROOKS, lieutenant, Infan- 
try. 

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON 

Gamma Chi Chapter 
JEBSON. CLIFFORD. 

PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 
Delta Delta Chapter 
HOLMAN, J. R., Artillery. 

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA 

Delta Epsilon Chapter 

FLYNT, ELMO. Infantry. 
MILES, A. D.. Aviation Corps. 

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA 
Delta EpNilon Chapter 
MILAM, WALKER K.. Ambulance Corps. 

UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA 

Delta Eta Chapter 

BECKARD, LEO. 
GRAU, WALTER. 

STATE COLLEGE OF WASHINGTON 
Delta Iota Chapter 
SWARTZ. LEO. 



BBOWN UNIVERSITY 
Delta Lambda Chapter 

LOSCALZO, PAUL, Naval Militia. 

COLORADO AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 
Delta Rho Chapter 4 

MONIGER, FRANK, lieutenant. 

CARNEGIE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 
Delta Sigma Chapter 

CHESTERMAN. AUBREY R., Engineer* Corps. 

CURTIS, GEORGE W. t Naval Training Sta 
tion. 

LOUR. WILLIAM H., Band. 

TRINITY COLLEGE 

Delta Chi Chapter 

BURNAP, A. E., second lieutenant, Infantry. 
CAH1LL, J. H.. Field Artillery. 
('ROSS, R. E.. Engineers Corps. 
ENGLISH, J. F., Hospital Corps. 

TRINITY COLLEGE 

Delta Chi Chapter 

FRANCIS. W. L.. second lieutenant, Infantry. 
IIUBER. II. C, Medical Corps. 
McGEE. M. T., Engineers Corps. 
MILLS, H. C, second lieutenant, Medical 
Corps. 

NELSON, W. L., sergeant. 

PARKER. J. M., second lieutenant, Infantry. 

PIERPONT, N. M.. corporal. Infantry. 

RANDALL, L., sergeant, Engineers Corps. 

RIPLEY. L. B., Tank Service. 

SEYMOUR. C. R.. corporal. Engineers Corps. 

TOLL, E. O., Field Artillery. 

UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA 
EpsUon Alpha Chapter 

BURNS. JOSEPH F.. sergeant. Infantry. 

BURRELL, ALDEN F., lieutenant, Field Ar- 
tillery. 

EBERLE. GEORGE L.. lieutenant, Infantry. 

HETLD, HORACE H.. lieutenant, O. R. C. 

HELM. LLOYD S.. Engineers Corps. 

LEWIS. GAIL I.. Hospital Corps. 

LOVEJOY, GERARD HERBERT, Engineers 
CorpB. 

LOVETT, ARCHIE E„ lieutenant, Infantry. 

McGlNNIS. RUSSELL C, lieutenant, Motor 
Supply Train. 

MASIIBIR. SIDNEY F. 

RHOADES, RICHARD CARROLL, corporal, 
Hospital Corps. 

RIDER. PERCY S., Signal Corps. 

ROGERS, EDGAR A. 

UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA 
Epsilon Alpha Chapter 

RUBEL, ALBERT C, lieutenant, Engineers 
Corps. 

RYAN, PATRICK D., lieutenant. Infantry. 

SHAPPELL, MAPLE DELOS, lieutenant. Avia- 
tion School. 

UPSHAW, ERNEST M., sergeant. Medical 
Corps. 

VOLLER. JOHN W., JR. 

WHIPP. HOMER D.. Hospital Corps. 

WIKOFF, C. E.. lieutenant. Engineers. 

WOODELL. ALLEN S. 



Knights Afield and at Home 

We want the name of each chivalric son that it may be enrolled in the immor- 
tal scroll of our history. We honor and love all of them. We shall pray for them 
through the bivouac and the battle. We shall watch for their return, and living 
or dead we shall hold them in cherished memory, immortal. — Walter J. Sears, 
Nu-Beta Nu. 



Knights of the Republic 



151 



Summary 



This honor roll, as shown by the following tabulation, includes every live Chapter and most of 
our dead Chapters. This table is correct as far as data has been furnished our office. The total 
number is, of course, much larger. 



Chapter 



Afflli- Net 
Total ates Total Dead 



Gamma Lambda 80 

Beta Psl 75 

Beta Iota 66 

Gamma Theta 65 

Delta Gamma 63 

Gamma Zeta 61 

Delta Epsilon 61 

Beta Nu 59 

Gamma Mu 59 

Rho 56 

Beta Sigma 56 

Gamma Phi 56 

Nu 53 

Delta Beta 52 

Gamma Chi 51 

Beta Chi 50 

Delta Iota 50 

Delta Nu 49 

Gamma Alpha 48 

Epsilon 46 

Theta 46 

Beta Theta 46 

Delta Eta 44 

Beta Beta 42 

Gamma Beta 42 

Beta Rho 41 

Gamma Delta 38 



Delta Mu 

Mu 

Gamma Gaminn 
Gamma Xi 



38 

37 

37 

36 

Gamma Pi 36 

Gamma Tau 35 

Delta Pi 35 

Delta Sigma 35 

Kappa 34 

Gamma Rho 34 

Delta Delta 34 

Delta Omicron 34 

Beta Zeta 33 

Gamma Iota 33 

Gamma Kappn 33 

Beta Eta 32 

Gamma Upsilon 32 

Pi 31 



1 

3 

4 

2 

3 

7 



1 

1 

1 



2 
o 

M 



7 
1 




( 





7 
1 
1 
2 
3 
1 
1 


4 
1 


2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 



79 
72 
62 
63 
60 
54 
61 
58 
58 
55 
56 
54 
51 
52 
51 
43 
49 
49 
43 
40 
41 
39 
44 
42 
42 
41 
31 
37 
36 
35 
33 
35 
34 
35 
35 
30 
33 
34 
34 
31 
32 
32 
30 
31 
29 







Afflli 


- Net 


Chapter 


Total 


ates 


Total Dead 


Delta Kappa 


31 





31 1 


Lambda 


29 


3 


26 


Beta Kappa 


29 





29 


Iota 


28 


5 


23 


Gamma Psl 


28 





28 


Delta Alpha 


28 


1 


27 


Beta 


27 


4 


5 


23 


Psl 


27 


27 


Beta XI 


27 


22 


Gamma Nu 


27 


.1 


26 1 


Delta Rho 


26 





26 


Sigma 


25 





25 


Delta Tau 


25 





25 


Alpha 


24 


3 


21 


(in in ma Eta 


24 


2 


22 


Beta Mu 


23 


1 


22 


Gamma Sigma 


22 


1 


21 


Delta Lambda 


22 





22 


Gamma Omicron 


21 


1 


20 


Xi 


20 


2 


18 


Gamma Epsilon 


20 


2 




18 


Delta Zeta 


19 


19 1 


Upsilon 


18 


2 


16 


Delta Theta 


18 


1 


17 .1 


Phi 


17 


2 


15 


Beta Upsilon 


17 


1 


16 


Delta Xi 


16 





16 


Eta 


15 


1 
2 
2 


14 


Beta Tau 


14 


12 


Beta Phi 


14 


12 


Delta Chi 


14 





14 


Delta Upsilon 


12 





12 


Delta Psl 


9 





9 


Delta Phi 


5 

5 






5 


Epsilon Alpha 


5 


Chi 


3 


1 


2 


Delta 


1 







1 


Zeta 


1 


1 


Beta Alpha 


1 


1 



2806 129 2677 15 
Affiliate 1 

14 



A Prayer Before Battle 

I wear my Five Armed Star close to my 
heart under my uniform and consider it as 
a protection. The Creed is my guide and 
should I join the "Unknown Band," I hope 
the honor roll of Sigma Nu shall be not 
one whit less white on account of me. 

VICTOR L. KEBLER, Delta Pi. 



By Past Regent A. H. Wilson. 



Alpha Chi Rho has entered Lehigh Uni- 
versity and thus establishes her sixth 
Chapter within the state of Pennsylvania. 
Alpha Chi Rho makes the twenty-sixth 
Fraternity to place a Chapter at this uni- 
versity. 

Sigpna Chi has placed her second Chapter 
within the state of Montana by entering, 
as the pioneer, the Montana State College. 
Sigma Chi at the University of Montana 
and the Montana State; Sigma Nu at the 
State University and Sigma Phi Epsilon at 
the State University comprise the extent 
of the Greek Letter life within the bounds 
of Montana. 

Delta Tau Delta has chartered the Kappa 
Theta local Fraternity at Amherst College, 
Amherst, Mass. Amherst is one of the real 
Fraternity centers in New England and 
Delta Tau Delta will meet Psi Upsilon, 
DKE, Alpha Delta Phi, Chi Phi, Phi Delta 
Theta, Phi Kappa Psi. Delta Upsilon, Phi 
Gamma Delta, Beta Theta Pi, Theta Delta 
Chi, and the local Sigma Delta Rho. 

Sigma Pi has withdrawn her Chapter 
from Temple University, Philadelphia, 
Penn., and placed her Mu Chapter at Cor- 
nell University. 

Richmond College, Virginia, has been 
taken over by the Federal Government as 
a base hospital for our soldiers returning 
from France. The college has met the issue 
enthusiastically and gladly surrendered 
their beautiful site at Westhampton for the 
duration of the war and on June 1st will 
remove back to their old buildings in the 
city of Richmond. Fortunately the old 
buildings are still intact and the college 
will suffer no great loss in the continuance 
of their work next year. All the profes- 
sors will be retained and to assist in the 
housing of the student body the Frater- 
nities will be permitted to occupy Chapter 
houses, a thing that was not yet permitted 
at the country place. All the Fraternities 
are responding and will rent homes near 
the college campus. The government will 
add new and permanent buildings in keep- 
ing with the present beautiful structures 
now on the Westhampton campus and at 
the end of the war these will be given out- 
right to the college plant. So in the long 
run the college will be the material as well 
as the sentimental winner. This is the 
second time in the history college that 
Richmond has been taken for hospital pur- 
poses for during the war between the 



States Jefferson Davis made use of Rich- 
mond College to take care of the Confed- 
erate wounded. It has been shown that 
after ships from abroad have landed at 
Newport News, Va., the wounded soldiers, 
via the Chesapeake Railway, can be 
brought to the Richmond campus. The en- 
tire college world, as well as all true patri- 
ots, will honor Richmond College in her 
splendid response to our President's call. 
Such willing sacrifice will not go unre- 
warded. 

A few years ago the so-called Rocky 
Mountain States were practically unknown 
to the fraternities with the exception of 
Colorado, where Delta Tau Delta had es- 
tablished her Chapter in the early eighties. 
Today every one of these States have be- 
come a part and parcel of the Greek letter 
life as follows: 

Idaho State University — Kappa Sigma, 
Phi Delta Theta, Beta Theta Pi and Sigma 
Nu. 

Montana State University — Sigma Nu, 
Sigma Chi and Sigma Phi Epsilon. 

Montana State College — Sigma Chi. 

Nevada State University — Sigma Nu, 
Phi Sigma Kappa and Sigma Alpha Epsi- 
lon.- 

Utah State University — Sigma Chi, Pi 
Kappa Alpha, Phi Delta Theta and Beta 
Theta Pi. 

New Mexico State University — Sigma 
Chi and Pi Kappa Alpha. 

Arizona State University — Kappa Sigma, 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon and Sigma Nu. 

Wyoming State University — Alpha Tau 
Omega, Sigma Alpha Epsilon and the 
Gamma Theta Chi (local) petitioning Sig- 
ma Nu. 

Within the State of Colorado, the fore- 
runner of the Rocky Mountain Chapters in 
Greekdom, there are five colleges where 
these Chapters have been established: 

University of Colorado — Delta Tau Del- 
ta, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Beta Theta Pi, 
Sigma Nu, Alpha Tau Omega, Phi Delta 
Theta, Sigma Chi, Kappa Sigma, Sigma 
Phi Epsilon, Alpha Sigma Phi, Phi Kappa 
Psi and Phi Gamma Delta. 

Colorado Mines— Sigma Nu, Kappa Sig- 
ma, Sigma Alpha Epsilon and Beta Theta 
Pi. 



Greek News 



168 



Colorado College — Sigma Chi, Kappa 
Sigma, Phi Delta Theta, Beta Theta Pi and 
Phi Gamma Delta. 

Denver University— tSigma Alpha Epsi- 
lon, Kappa Sigma, Bfta Theta Pi, Sigma 
Phi Epsilon and Lambda Chi Alpha. 

Colorado Agricultural College — Sigma 
Nu, Sigma Phi Epsilon and Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. 

Theta Delta Chi Ubs withdrawn her Har- 
vard University Chipter after an unbroken 
existence there of more than one-half cen- 
tury. With the pissing of Theta Delta 
Chi there still remain at Harvard Chapters 
of Delta Upsilon, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 
Kappa Sigma, and Alpha Sigma Phi. Dor- 
mant Chapters at Harvard are: Alpha 
Delta Phi, Beta Theta Pi, Delta Phi, Psi 
Upsilon, Zeta Psi, Delta Kappa Epsilon, 
Phi Kappa Sigma and Chi Phi. 

Delta Tau Delta refutes the statement 
she has lost her Chapter at Columbia Uni- 
versity. On the other hand arrangements 
have been made for Delta Tau Delta to 
either occupy an apartment or a suite in 
one of the dormitories when the university 
opens in September. The report of the 
Chapter loss became current through the 
newspaper telling of the sale of the Delta 
Tau Delta house owing to enlistment of the 
Columbia "Delta" in the army and navy. 
Sigma Chi at Columbia has given up her 
house also, and has already been estab- 
lished in Livingston Hall. If the war con- 
tinues for any great length of time no 
doubt other Columbia fraternities will fol- 
low these two fraternities into dormitory 
housing. Sigma Nu is happy to know that 
Delta Tau Delta will remain at Columbia 
for her place there would be difficult to 
fill as Delta Tau Delta has played a most 
important part among the Greeks at the 
big university. 

Theta Xi has purchased a very chapter 
house at the Stevens Institute of Tech- 
nology, Hoboken, N. J. The house is on 
the fashionable Hudson Street and at the 
edge of the campus. 

Maryland State College fraternities have 
been requested by the authorities there to 
give up their chapter houses for the dura- 
tion of the war and to reside at the college 
dormitories. The request has been met 
by the fraternities and Kappa Alpha, Sig- 
ma Phi Sigma and Sigma Nu are now lo- 
cated in Calvert Hall. 

Alpha Chi Rho is said to be looking with 
favor upon petitions from Dartmouth Col- 
lege ana the University of Michigan. Also, 
the efforts of the Western Alumni of this 
Fraternity to revive the only dormant 
Chapter of Alpha Chi Rho and at the Iowa 
State University. For some time the chap- 
ters of Alpha Chi Rho were confined to the 
thirteen original or colonial states, but 
such restriction whether actual or seeming 



has been put aside and Alpha Chi Rho has 
become national in chapters as well as in 
name. 

Theta Chi has placed her fifth chapter 
below the Mason-Dixon line at the Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute. Other Southern 
chapters of Theta Chi are at the Univer- 
sity of Virginia, Hampden-Sidney, Rich- 
mond College and the University of Flor- 
ida. At Alabama Polytechnic the Theta 
Chi will meet Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Kappa 
Alpha, Phi Delta Theta, Alpha Tau Ome- 
ga, Kappa Sigma, Pi Kappa Alpha, Sigma 
Phi Epsilon and Lambda Chi Alpha. 

Alpha Xi Delta Sorority has placed her 
twenty-fifth chapter at the University of 
Pittsburgh. The entrance was made with- 
in the month of June and was accomplished 
mainly through the work of the Pittsburgh 
alumnae, assisted by the Alpha Xi Delta 
chapters at Mount Union College, Bethany 
College and West Virginia University. 
This is the first chapter of this sorority to 
be established within the State of Penn- 
sylvania. 

Sigma Nu has established her Epsilon 
Alpha Chapter at the State University of 
Arizona and in doing so has added her 
fortieth State and the District of Columbia 
to her fraternal possession. At Arizona 
Sigma Nu will meet Kappa Sigma and Sig- 
ma Alpha Epsilon. Two locals are said to 
be petitioning nationals for charters. 

Within the past few months the colleges 
of New England have been given more than 
usual attention by the Greek letter fra- 
ternities. The known establishments are: 

New Hampshire State — Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. 

Trinity College — Delta Phi and Sigma 
Nu. 

Bowdoin College — Sigma Nu and Chi Psi. 

Amherst College — Delta Tau Delta. 

Pi Kappa Phi has revived her Alpha 
Chapter at the City of Charleston College, 
South Carolina, and enters in friendly 
rivalry with chapters of Kappa Alpha and 
Alpha Tau Omega. 

Chi Psi has re-established her Alpha Eta 
Chapter at Bowdoin College, Maine. Chi 
Psi first entered Bowdoin in 1844, but be- 
came dormant in 1866, after one hundred 
and fifty-six men had been initiated. In 
entering Bowdoin Chi Psi absorbed the 
Phi Theta Upsilon (local) Society. In 
chronicling the event "The Purple and 
Gold" of Chi Psi remarks: "Today Chi Psi 
needs, and in fact, can always use the 
right material, and this new crowd has 
certainly furnished unmistakable evidence 
of their fitness to become Brothers." 

Utah State University — Sigma Chi, Pi 
Kappa Alpha, Phi Delta Theta arvd Beta. 
Theta Pi. 



^MMIIMHIMIIUIMtMIMI>ll>IIMIIOIIIMIMMMIt»IMtlHtltlHIIIHIimimiMlim»IIIIHII»HIHIHII 



ll4MMItHI*MlMIM«IMMMMIMIHIIM«Mtl»*M 



Clippings and Comment 



PIRATES IMPALED 

Our genial and brazen contemporaneous 
pickpocket, the Delta Chi Quarterly, which 
lately "lifted" bodily two of our original 
contributions has been transfixed by the 
friends of journalistic ethics, our Brother 
Editors of Alpha Sigma Phi and Delta 
Upsilon, while Brother Banta's Greek Ex- 
change silently pillories the pilferers with 
his "comment is unnecessary." 

Editor H. E. Chapin, of Alpha Sigma 
Phi, republishes our essay "On Honor 
Among Thieves" and follows it up with the 
following editorial on "Editorial Piracy," 
which speaks for itself: 

Editorial Piracy 

In the last number of the Tomahawk we 
reproduced an excellent article entitled: 
"What I Missed Without a Fraternity," 
giving credit to the Delta Chi Quarterly, 
which had published it as an original con- 
tribution. But we were astonished to learn, 
soon after, from the editor of the Delta of 
Sigma Nu that this article had been delib- 
erately appropriated from an old number 
of that ably conducted and highly es- 
teemed magazine. Not only had no credit 
been given to the Delta of Sigma Nu, but 
the article has been so skillfully juggled 
that it was made to appear as written by 
one of the contributors of the Delta Chi 
Quarterly. Were it not for such concrete 
evidence, it would have been impossible to 
believe that the editor of any Greek letter 
periodical could, in his eagerness to appro- 
priate an article from an exchange, be so 
brazen as to substitute the name of his 
own Fraternity for that of the one to which 
the article was originally contributed. The 
March number of the Delta of Sigma Nu 
very properly scores this species of edi- 
torial trickery, and, to prevent it in future, 
has deemed it necessary to have all its ar- 
ticles copyrighted. — The Tomahawk of 
Alpha Sigma Phi. 

Then along comes the "Gossip of the 
Greeks," who politely is the exchange edi- 
tor of the Delta Upsilon Quarterly, and, 
though no sufferer in the present case, he 
thus expresses his pleasure in the expos- 
ure and punishment of preditory editing. 

"The following set of facts startled your 
law-abiding Gossip in his studious search 
for fodder in the Greek pastures. He won- 
dered whether the days of pirates and buc- 
caneers had returned along with those of 
ruthless warfare. He is pleased to note 
that such actions cannot go unpunished and 
that justice is still our foundation. Under 



the title of 'On Honor Among Thieves' the 
current issue of 'The Delta* of Sigma Nu 
metes out judgment upon the culprit." 

To all of which let us add Editor Banta's 
"brief", who also was "taken in" by the 
bare-faced methods of "appropriation." 

"We reprinted with due credit to the 
Delta Chi Quarterly a little article en- 
titled 'What I Missed Without a Frater- 
nity.' The spirit and point were so admir- 
able that it seemed well worth the repeti- 
tion. 

"But the editor of the Delta points out 
that the article was originally published in 
that magazine, the only difference lying in 
the name of the Fraternity. Of course we 
were entirely innocent in our reprinting it 
in its changed form. 

"Comment as to the ethics involved would 
seem to be unnecessary." 

We have as yet heard nothing from the 
Delta Chi Quarterly. 



STUDENT SELF GOVERNMENT 

President Benjamin I. Wheeler of the 
University of California, in his commence- 
ment address of 1918, drew an interesting 
comparison between world democracy and 
educational democracy as expressed in 
Student Self Government. 

The following interesting tribute to Stu- 
dent Self Government appearing in that ad- 
dress is recorded in the California Alumni 
Fortnightly. 

Part of his address follows: "Student 
self-government is typical of the sort of 
education which serves the purposes of de- 
mocracy. It encourages men to be frank, 
full exercise of popular government which 
is a government springing from within a 
man or within a community, not imposed 
from without. The education suited to an 
autocracy deals with formal discipline ap- 
plied by the weight of an authority dictated 
from above; the education familiar to de- 
mocracy deals with inspiration and interest 
unfolding from within. The one teaches by 
assertion that it is, the other by encourag- 
ing to open the eyes and see; the one by 
rote and dictation, by rehearsing and recit- 
ing, the other by working together and com- 
ing together into the knowledge of truth. 
The one compels the children of industrial 
classes through early vocational choice to 
be sidetracked at twelve and become slaves 
of routine, the other leaves the way open 
to the last for every child to fulfill what is 
in him. The one is the German way, the 
other is the way of free peoples. 



Clippings and Comment 



155 



PITTSBURGH SIGMA NUS STARTLE 
OTHER GREEKS 

The Scroll of Phi Delta Theta read our 
Pittsburgh Alumni Chapter's announce- 
ment of "Daily Dinners," and remarks 
about this latest unique feature of our lead- 
ing Alumni group: 

"Dinner second Saturday of each month, 
8 P. M., Fort Pitt Hotel. Dinner omitted 
during June, July and August. Informal 
dinner every day at noon at Kaufman and 
Baer*s Dining Room. Notice that we are 
having dinners every day at noon. We have 
more than ten fellows every time and the 
number is increasing every week. Consid- 
ering that this is war-time how does this 
stack up? — -Sigma Nu Delta. 

"The foregoing announcement is made in 
the Delta by the Sigma Nu Alumni Club of 
Pittsburgh. Some alumni clubs of different 
Fraternities meet for luncheon monthly, 
fortnightly or weekly, but we have not be- 
fore heard of any enterprising enough to 
meet at luncheons daily. This is more feas- 
ible in Pittsburgh, however, than in any 
other city of its size, as the business sec- 
tion covers a comparatively small area." 

Remember Pittsburgh has twice and plus 
as many paid up-to-date members as any 
other Sigma Nu Alumni Chapter. 



subscription list. Still, the record of con- 
tinuous publication since 1877 has been 
maintained. 



FELLOW SUFFERERS 

The following clipping from The Rain- 
bow is expressive of a dilemma which is not 
confined to the Editor of that excellent Fra- 
ternity magazine. We have a kindred feel- 
ing Brother Rogers, not only for you, but 
with you. 

This number completes a volume of The 
Rainbow that has been produced under diffi- 
culties and handicaps too numerous to men- 
tion. The Editor has been ground between 
the millstones of almost doubled costs and 
a decrease of nearly eight hundred in the 



NEVER GROWS OLD 

The following paragraphs taken from the 
Phi Gamma Delta of April, 1918, betrays 
the deeper appreciation which the alumnus 
of today is showing in his college frater- 
nity, it reminds us of Brother Underbill's 
article last year on "The Best Days in Fra- 
ternity Life." 

"Many of our own boys through their 
undergraduate days with the idea in their 
minds that the 'Frat' is essentially an un- 
dergraduate organization. You have heard 
men say, 'Well, when I'm a grad it will be 
a nice thing to be able to come up to the 
Chapter House when I come back/ not say- 
ing, of course, but implying that this is 
perhaps all the Fraternity will mean to 
them — a place to hang their hats when they 
come back to their old college. 

"Perhaps that is true in some cases. But 
that is the man's fault, not the Fraternity's. 
On the contrary, for most Brothers, the 
Fraternity means more, and has added in- 
terest as they grow older, because they see 
it from a national not a local viewpoint." 



Pittsburgh Sigma Nus Meet Daily 

Eat Lunch Together Every Noon 

"Dinner second Saturday of each month, 
8 p. m., Fort Pitt Hotel. Dinner omitted 
during June, July and August. Informal 
dinner every day at noon at Kaufman & 
Baer's Dining Room." 

Notice that we are having dinners every 
day at noon. We have more than ten fel- 
lows every time and the number is increas- 
ing every week. Considering that this is 
war-time how does this stack up? 

Fraternally, 

R. C. HARDING, Secretary. 



Message Wanted From Every Sigma Nu in the Service 

Tear off on dotted line and mail to 714 Lemcke Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Name Chapter. 

Branch Address 

Please use space below for your message: 



Year. 




NO LONGER DO WE DANCE THE 
"GERMAN"! 

From widely separated sources comes the 
following suggestion. We suspect our 
Brothers are acting unofficially on it al- 
ready, but it will soon be a matter of otncial 
change. 

At the dinner of the New York Alumni 
Chapter, given to the High Council last 
June, Brother Maurice V. Samuels, Beta 
Psi, entered a strenuous protest in the 
name of the New York Alumni against the 
German word in the Sigma Nu yell. 

" 'Ausgezeichnet' has ugly associations in 
our minds just at present. Two suggestive 
is it of 'spurlos versenkt.' The idea we 
want lies in the Latin 'ex conspectu' — out of 
sight, literally translated." 

And in July comes a letter from Brother 
Herold T. Ross, Beta Beta, which details 
the action taken by our soldier Knights at 
Camp Hancock, Ga. 

"And after the boys had all had all that 
even an army appetite calls for, we had a 
few talks and it developed that there were 
thirty present, representing 19 different 
states and some 23 different Chapters. And 
while we had trouble harmonizing on a song 
(the need of an official song was apparent), 
we hit on all six when it came time for the 
Hi Rickety! Some of the boys were in- 
clined to think that the 'As tz' part 

of it should be changed in view of the fact 
that it is German, and some felt that it 
would be a shame to change a yell, so 
closely connected with our history, and as 
a result, we finally gave it right and ex- 
pressed our opinion of the Germans in more 
elaborate manner afterwards." 

Proposals for the right substitute to use 
for the condemned word are in order. 



Tribune and New York Herald, and Brother 
John F. Merrill, Gamma Delta and Gamma 
Lambda, the "Plane News," which claims 
the distinction of being "the only A. E. F. 
newspaper edited and printed by soldiers." 



CAMP PUBLICATIONS 

The Editor's thanks are due for the 
many camp papers and souvenirs sent to 
him by Brothers-in-Arms. 

Much valuable news and information has 
been gleaned from these for the papers of 
this Delta. To Brother W. K. Mulhns for 
the "Propeller"; to Brother Don Krull, 
Gamma Nu, for the "Fort Des Moines 
Post"; several Brothers for "Trench and 
Camp" (Camp Hancock), and to Brother 
William S. Hedges, Gamma Rho, editor of 
"The Pilot" of the Ohio State University 
School of Military Aeronautics. 

Half a dozen Brothers have sent us cop- 
ies of the Paris editions of the Chicago 



VISITORS' REGISTER 

Here we present the roll of visitors to the 
General umce, since the May Delta was 
published. 

It is not necessary to repeat our invita- 
tion again. Sigma Nus are heartily wel- 
come always and often. Come, Brothers, 
who pass through Indianapolis — make the 
General Office your headquarters while 
here. And Brothers in urbe, stop in when- 
ever you can. 

April 15, Arthur R. Kelly, Beta Zeta, 
1102 Nevada Bank Building, San Francisco, 
Calif. 

April 19, Paul W. Johnson, Beta Beta, 
210 W. Jefferson St., Fort Wayne, Ind. 
"May 3, Walter J. Sears, Nu-Beta Nu, 
Chillicothe, Ohio. 

May 11, W. A. Rooker, Delta Omicron, 
care Idaho Tech., Pocatello, Idaho. 

May 15, John E. Rosser, Xi-Sigma, 313 
S. Preston St., Dallas, Texas. 

May 23, Harrell V. Baily, Beta Beta, 35 
W. Ohio St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

May 31, F. B. Leist, Beta Eta, 322 Kirk- 
wood, Bloomington, Ind. 

June 7, J. E. Moffat, Beta Eta, 322 E. 
Kirkwood, Bloomington, Ind. 

June 18, John C. Scott, Beta Zeta, 6569 
De Longpre Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

June 23, Chas. M. Wells, Beta Eta, 2126 
College Ave., Indianapolis, Ind. 

June 24, Herschel A. Auxier, Gamma 
Iota, Edinburg, Ind. 

July 1, Tracy M. O'Brien, Beta Bete, 
Clayton, Ind. 

July 15, G. E. Sears, Beta Eta, Danville, 
Ind. 

July 18, Harrell V. Baily, Beta Bete, 35 
E. Ohio St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

July 1 G. E. Sears, Beta Eta, Danville, 
Ind. 

August 19, E. B. Hall, Gamma Mu, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. 

August 26, G. R. Eppesie, Beta Upsilon, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

September 3, Herschel A. Auxier, Gamma 
Iota, Edinburg, Ind. 

September 3, Royal Davis, Beta Beta, 
Greencastle, Ind. 

September 5, Frank C. McConnell, Beta 
Zeta, Sheridan, Ind. 

September 5, Kenneth Massengill, Beta 
Zeta, Henderson, Tenn. 



Editor Miscellany 



157 



ARMY RECOGNITION GUARD 

Sigma Nu Fraternity: 

All the boys agreed that it would be fitt- 
ing and proper that some form of insignia 
be added to the pins of those who were in 
the army during the war. This would 
sort of be the Fraternity recognition of the 
willing and eager sacrifice which the men 
of the Fraternity have made, and would 
prove, I am sure, a valued thing to the men, 
and as many will not return to their col- 
leges again, it will always explain to Sigma 
Nus their situation. I am merely express- 
ing the sentiment of some twenty boys 
here in the camp. We thought of some- 
thing that could be worn as the Chapter 
letters were worn, but that part of the 
plan was not marked out in detail, but 
merely submitted for your consideration. 

HEROLD T. ROSS, Beta Beta. 

Camp Hancock, Augusta, Ga. 

A THANKY JOB 
Fraternity Service a Reward In Itself 

[An Alumnus aptly hits the mark in a 
letter to us in which reads between every 
line the spirit of Sigma Nu. Our faithful 
working cohort of volunteer correspondents 
are always at hand though they themselves 
little know the service they render through 
the Delta and the General Office to the cause 
of our Fraternity. They may never receive 
outward recognition, but they are always 
happy in their service of love and in their 
harness of honor. 

It need be stated here that this latter 
was confidential and not for publication, 
though we cannot help sharing it with our 
Brothers in the hope that it may inspire 
some hitherto silent Knight to break into 
print even anonymously. — The Editor.] 
Sigma Nu Fraternity: 

When I read the May Delta, I found so 
much space allotted to myself it embar- 
rassed me. I must, say that I appreciate 
any recognition given "the old man" by 
the "boys." I have know nothing but serv- 
ing most of my life. If there were a 
thanky job in church or State, I got it. 
Never had a pay one in my life. Guess 
that is why I am so happy. 

It is with lust pride I note that so many 
offeror men have offered their services for 
Liberty and Democracy. My dear boy left 
this week for Camp Sevier, Greenville, S. 
C. We expect nothing less of loyal Sigma 
Nus. The responsibility is upon us. Will 
we meet it? 

Who knows but we for such a time, 

And for a duty so sublime, 

Have come upon the scene just here, 

To show the world whom we revere. 

America, the land of the free, and the 
home of the brave! Aren't you proud you 
are an American citizen? 

Fraternally, 

NO. 1. IN AN OLD CHAPTER. 

May 30, 1918. 



SIGMA NU WHISTLE 

How many Brothers know our whistle ? 

This whistle was written by Past Vice 
Regent Clarence W. Murphy, Psi, and was 
made official by Grand Chapter vote. 

Although it has been reprinted several 
times, every new generation of college 
classes needs a copy, and the many inquiries 
from active men during the past year lead 
us to repeat it again. Our soldier knights 
may find it useful, too, in locating unknown 
Sigs in trench and cantonment. 







G>*6 



t 



&tftr 



t 



zS #U.^jtoiXc 



DELTA UPSILON CHAPTER 

Doesn't Need This Information, But Your 

Chapter Does 

[It takes one of the youngest Chapters to 
set the pace for the rest of you. Past Com- 
mander Lyndon H. Strough comes through 
with a request on his own initiative which 
proves how alert a Chapter should be to 
keep in touch with its Alumni. The only 
medium provided to keep the Alumni to- 
gether and informed of the doings of all 
our Chapters and their comrades in Sigma 
Nu is the Delta. 

How many of your Alumni, Brother 
Commanders, are subscribers? — The Edi- 
tor.] 

Sigma Nu Fraternity: 

Will you kindly tell me if the subscrip- 
tions to the Delta of any of the brothers 
on the roll of Delta Upsilon Chapter have 
expired or will expire before the close of 
the next college year. If so, may I have 
their names? 

We are making a point of seeing that 
every Alumnus of the Chapter gets the 
Delta; we do not want any of them, and 
particularly the men in service, to get "out 
of touch." Consequently, I would appre- 
ciate this information. 

LYNDON H. STROUGH, 
Commander 1917-1918, 
Delta Upsilon Chapter. 
Oneida, N. Y., July 29, 1918. 



TO SOLDIER SUBSCRIBERS 

The editor wishes every soldier to receive 
the Delta regularly. Please send your new 
address to us every time you tttt tmh«£l 




'J«ttltllltl1MIMI«llttM«MMMMM«ll>lll«M«l«MM«tl»MMtM1MMMMIMM!l|(MMIMMMI* 



IH«MIM>l«IIIMMMIIIHHtMltMIMIMHII 



l«MlMMMMIIIII«IIIIMIMIIIMI|IIMHtllMIMMIItM>ll>*iMttl( 



THE UNDERGRADUATE AND HIS COL- 
LEGE. Frederick P. Keppell, Dean 
of the College, Columbia University. 
Houghton, Mifflin Co., Cambridge, 
Mass. (375 pages, $1.60 net.) 

This new volume by a man thoroughly 
conversant with the educational history of 
America is one of the most valuable books 
for the Chapter Book Shelf which it has 
been our privilege to read. It should take 
its place with Baird's American Frater- 
nities as a hand book by each of our active 
Chapters. It will have an added value to 
those Brothers who expect to have any 
connection with teaching or with college 
administration. 

There are three points of view which are 
each exceptionally well dealt with by one 
or more Chapters. 

There is first a discussion of the type of 
the present day college with some valuable 
historical material and a critical study as 
well. The author states "This book will 
attempt neither to arraign nor to white- 
wash the present day American college for 
men, but to bring together some informa- 
tion about it which may be useful to pros- 
pective investors of their own time or that 
of their children." The author then pro- 
ceeds to ask the following questions and 
answer them. "What is the American Col- 
lege? Where did it come from? And 
whither is it bound?" 

The second point of view is that of the 
undergraduate student and the third deals 
entirely with college problems from the 
standpoint of Educational Administration, 
dealing with the problems of organization, 
administration, teaching and teachers. 

By far the greater and most interesting 
part of this book is given to the point of 
view of the undergraduate and his prob- 
lems, the author stating "So far as possi- 
ble I have tried to write from their point 
of view rather than that of the professional 
educator." The chapter on "The Raw Ma- 
terial" is the best classification we have 
seen of the various types of the American 
college student. The chapter on "The 
Point of View" embraces the athletic activi- 
ties of the colleges in various parts of the 
country. 

The most interesting chapter of all, how- 
ever, and also one of the longest is that of 
"Student Organizations" dealing with 
"The Student as a Political Animal." This 



chapter is largely given Up to a brief de- 
scription of the Fraternity movement. "Of 
college organizations whose purpose is 
primarily social the most conspicuous and, 
on the whole, the most typical, is the Greek 
letter Fraternity. In the college secret so- 
cieties for men there are, in round figures, 
a total enrollment of three hundred thou- 
sand, and an investment in lands, build- 
ings, and endowment of more than twelve 
million dollars. The fifteen hundred living 
Chapters are scattered through the colleges 
over the length and breadth of the United 
States and Canada." 

Dr. Keppel finds that while the college 
Fraternity has its faults, that it is making 
a wonderful progress which is based upon 
a real service to the American college. "If 
any one thinks the value of this training in 
a Fraternity is negligible, let him pick out 
at random ten Fraternity and ten non-Fra- 
ternity men from any graduating class, 
and he will see a difference in social effi- 
ciency much greater than can be explained 
by the obvious retort that it is the grega- 
rious type of boy that naturally goes into 
the Fraternity. 

* * * Any boy may be harmed by 
membership in any society, but if he has 
chosen a good college in the first place and 
taken the trouble to learn something about 
Fraternities represented there, and which 
of them is likely to be best for him, he will 
be benefitted in numberless ways." Again 
our author says "In my judgment, the Fra- 
ternities are on the whole moving in the 
right direction. There are examples enough 
of snobbery, inconsiderateness, and selfish 
stupidity, but the beginning of a new spirit 
of individual responsibility for social jus- 
tice and tolerance may be recognized. The 
question as to whether a man is his 
brother's keeper is being honestly faced by 
a growing number of serious-minded bojra 
who do not believe that whatever is, is 
wrong and who are willing to do their share 
in improving the social and political insti- 
tutions that they find to their hand. In 
the best Fraternities such men are doing 
much to break down the silly convention- 
alism and injustices that furnish the basis 
for criticism of Fraternity life today, and 
every November about a hundred alumni, 
many of them distinguished in various 
walks of life, meet in an Inter-Fraternity 
Conference, in New York, and give serious 
consideration to plans for checking the evils 
and emphasizing the good qualities of the 
American fraternities, a significant tribute 
to the weight of opinion m favor of the 
Fraternity as a college institution." 



Chapter Bookshelf 



159 



THE KIT-KAT. Vol. 7, No. 3. Osman C. 
Hooper, Editor. (75-page magazine, 
25 cents the copy, $1.00 per year.) 
Published by "The Foundation" 
Chamber of Commerce Building, Co- 
lumbus, Ohio. 

We are in receipt of the July, 1918, num- 
ber of "The Kit-Kat, published four times 
a year at the Sign of the Torch," Colum- 
bus, Ohio, and "being some personal 
glimpses of Literature and Life." 

We note on the list "The Foundation" re- 
sponsible for this interesting little publi- 
cation the names of two Sigma Nu Broth- 
ers of Beta Nu Chapter, Walter J. Sears 
and C. E. Sherman. Brother Sherman 
whom the editor describes as "a professor 
of civil engineering at Ohio State Univer- 
sity whose diversion is literature," con- 
tributes a poem of some length and of 
equal merit. The subject is "I heard the 
Forest Bells." Evidently Brother Sher- 
man's only diversion is not literature as 
this poem discloses a deep love and appre- 
ciation of God's out-of-doors. 

The following lines disclose the sympa- 
thetic understanding of the true out-of- 
doors lover: 



« 



Awakening, I saw eastern skies 
Rose-tinted with approaching rise 
Of glorious morning sun; it sent 
Light breezes in the tree-tops spent; 
— Twas early morning, — and, astir, 
A pheasant passed me with a whir; 
Then distant through the friendly trees 
Came calls of wild ones on the breeze; 
Then tinkle of the forest stream, 
That must have soothed my fevered dream. 
Chimed out 'Awake'! through woodland 
dells." 

We sincerely hope that Brother Sher- 
man will not forget the Delta when indulg- 
ing in literary "diversions." 



BLOWN IN BY THE DRAFT. Frazier 
Hunt. Doubleday, Page & Co. (372 
pages, $1.60 net.) 

These stories are exactly described by 
the title. They betray the nne hand of the 
skilled newspaper man, a correspondent of 
the New York Times at Camp Upton who 
has keenly reflected the life of forty thou- 
sand selected men, Irish, Jews, Negroes, 
Chinese, Japanese and Italian. Here is a 
close view and a new one of "The Melting 
Pot" where the final refining process of the 
spirit of Democracy may be seen doing its 
mighty task. 

These stories are unconventional yarns of 
the camp which while keenly humorous also 
reflect the actual process by which the 
great mass of unpromising drafted men are 
quickly fused into units of first-class fight- 
ing men who are the pride of their country. 

The foreword of this volume, fit for any 
Chapter Book Shelf, is written by Theodore 
Roosevelt, who in speaking to the drafted 
men at Camp Upton said: "You represent 



the men who beyond ail others at this time 
have put their fellow countrymen under a 
lasting debt of high obligation." 

As you read these stories you will enjoy 
many a hearty laugh and while you are 
laughing you will at the same time find 
yourself a better American. 



MARCH ON TO VICTORY. Patriotic 
song by Clarence Wainwright Mur- 
phy, Lambda No. 6. Published by 
E. F. Droop & Sons, 1300 G. Street, 
N. W., Washington, D. C. 

The above is the title of an inspiring new 
song, the music of which is written by our 
esteemed Brother, Clarence Wainwright 
Murphy, Lambda, and published by E. F. 
Droop & Sons, 1300 G. Street, N. W., 
Washington, D. C. 

This music should be found in the music 
of all our Chapter Houses. The words are 
martial and majestic and the music is ex- 
pressive of the same spirit — not the feet 
shuffling, shoulder-shrugging variety that 
now seems to prevail in such abortions that 
are all too often inflicted upon the public 
under the guise of patriotism. 

The music and words are combined in a 
dignity appropriate to the church as well 
as the march and the community sins. 
Brother Murphy writes that "If it succeeds 
in inspiring any one, my 'mission' will have 
been accomplished. 

This stirring song is very appropriately 
dedicated "To the President, with great 
Respect and much Admiration." 

Special words of a Sigma Nu song have 
been written into one copy of this music 
by Brother Murphy. We commend it to the 
serious consideration of our Song Commit- 
tee in seeking for THE Sigma Nu Song. 



THE PILOT. School of Military Aero- 
nautics, Ohio State University, Co- 
lumbus, Ohio. August, 1918. Will- 
iam S. Hedges, Editor. 

This is a souvenir booklet of the type of 
the college "annual," detailing the experi- 
ences of the men enrolled in the aviation 
school at Columbus. No doubt to the stu- 
dent aviators, in after days, it will bring to 
mind those delightful memories that always 
cling round our college days, and bringing 
back to them, through the intervening tur- 
moil of battle and bloodshed, friendships of 
comrades sacrificed in "the pursuit of 
kultur." 

The book is printed on heavy glazed 
paper, illustrated with photographs and 
drawings, and filled with clever and inter- 
esting write-ups and sketches, some humor- 
ous and some serious. It is ably edited by a 
Gamma Rho Brother, who was on the staff 
of the Chicago Daily News — William S. 
Hedges. 

"The only booklet of its kind in the coun- 
try," he calls it. And while other camps 
have their publications, we feel sure they 
can't beat "The Pilot" for "style," 




'J«ttltllltl1MIMI«llttM«MMMMM«ll>lll«M«l«MM«tl»MMtM1MMMMIMM!l|(MMIMMMI* 



IH«MIM>l«IIIMMMIIIHHtMltMIMIMHII 



l«MlMMMMIIIII«IIIIMIMIIIMI|IIMHtllMIMMIItM>ll>*iMttl( 



By Mr. Samuel Pickwick, Esq., G. C, M. P. C. 



THE POSTHUMOROUS PAPERS OF 
THE PICKWICK CLUB 

Containing a Faithful Record of the Per- 
ambulations, Perils, Travels, Adven- 
tures and Sporting Transactions of 
the Corresponding Members. 

Mr. Samuel Pickwick, G. C, M. P. C, is 
glad to report unceasing activity on the 
part of our corresponding members, despite 
the effects of the hot weather of the sum- 
mer and its temptations to an idle vaca- 
tion. Particularly is Mr. Pickwick de- 
lighted at the interest of our soldier boys 
in furnishing to the Archives Pickwick 
sundry and varilorum episodes of camp life. 
He is only waiting now for actual ad- 
ventures from the trenches in France, and 
perhaps in Italy and Siberia. And heigh-ho, 
for the Navy, too! Weigh anchor, lads, 
and tear a leaf out of your log-books. 



A PICKWICK COLYUMNIATOR 

Mr. Samuel Pickwick, G. C, M. P. C, 
begs Mr. Augustus Snodgrass, Mr. P. C. 
Scribe and Guardian of the Archives to read 
the roll of our new Corresponding Mem- 
bers. 

"Mr. Donald Krull, Gamma Mu, of Indi- 
ana, California, Oregon, Washington and 
Ioway, and (to be) of Champagne and Bur- 
gundy, whose later address he hopes to be 
am Rhine, Frankfurter and Potsdam — " 

Hold! Hold! Enough! 

Behold, ye Corresponding Members of 
the Learned Society of United Pick- 
wickians, what renown has blossomed forth 
from such a tender shoot (and bold shot!) — 
a colyum writer with a real colyum in a 
real newspaper. 

"Krullers," by Don Krull, the legend 
reads in our military exchange, the Fort 
Des Moines Post, whose associate editor is 
Mr. Donald Krull, M. P. C, who pessimis- 
tically emits: "At the present time, I hold 
the job of associate editor, but between you 
and me and the gate post, I hope to have 
ye honorable's job one of the days." 

But to return to the colyum. It is full 
of Krullers, fried brown, crisp and fresh, 
and served hot. They sure take the cake! 
(to use the slang of the War with Spain). 
We are sorry we can't reprint them, but 
they're not about Sigma Nus. The only 
other Knight at Krull's post is Brother 
Ray Finger and he's not written up — be- 



sides he's the Y. M. C. A. secretary there 
and, of course, above reproach and 
notoriety. 

Ah, yes, here's one Mr. Pickwick sus- 
pects to have a touch of local color (Black, 
White and Gold) about it: 

"Wanted— One GOOD man to dispose of 
Puts, Bywater, McKamy and Garvey for 
choosing the man they did as Barracks 2 
Associate Editor." 

Mr. Pickwick seconds the motion and 
hereby offers a financial reward of one 
penny and his best wishes to the success- 
ful "disposer." All present, please rise. 
Carried. 

Note. — Proof must be furnished of dis- 
position of the aforesaid and consequent 
health of disposer. 



A DELTA GAMMA ALUMNUS GOES 

LOCO! 

One of our Brothers took a flinjr. at the 
Editor the other day, but, as he is impervi- 
ous in his perspicuity, no damage resulted. 
Still, as the Editor hesitated to publish such 

a bold exposition of the truth, Mr. Pick- 
wick offered to undertake the dangerous 
mission. In self-defense, therefore, Mr. 
Pickwick begs to state that he does not sun- 
press the number of Brother Fraser's regi- 
ment intentionally, but only on orders from 
the Committee of Public Information — 
otherwise, the letter is printed exactly and 
fully as written. One great good has 
already been produced — the carbon copy 
sent to the Chapter reporter brought forth 
a Chapter letter for the current Delta with- 
out the usual notification from the Editor. 

The Editor Escapes This Time 

Dear Brother Dunlavy: 

I am plumb disgusted and likewise peeved 
and the reason sounds like this. I was en- 
joying a most delightful Gas Mask session 
under one of those Army inquisitors sent us 
from the Gas Section as instructors, when 
word came that my Delta awaited me at 
my tent. It took all the joy out of not 
being able to use your nose for one of its 
proper purposes, all the pleasure out of 
suffocation — a parched throat — the-er-in- 
ability to expectorate, etc., to know that I 
would have to wait the remaining fifteen 
minutes of the "hour" before clasping my 



Pickwick Club 



161 



beloved Delta to my buzzum and to my 
already aching eyes. (A mixed metaphor.) 

A Vile Calumny 

What is now to come deserves a new 
paragraph. A careful perusal of the pages 
of aforementioned periodical failed to dis- 
close a single mention of the leading Chap- 
ter of the Fraternity. I need hardly men- 
tion the fact that I refer to Delta Gamma, 
except in the columns headed Knights of 
the Republic, where a vile calumny was 
perpetrated on the writer of this epistle. 
Several New York papers of repute recent- 
ly printed my name m a casualty list, but 
none ever dared to go so far as to accuse 
me of being the Chaplain of a "Doughboy" 
outfit. I actually read that I was connected 
with a certain Infantry Regiment. It is 
absolutely false. 

A Nefarious ' Plot 

To return to the plot to keep Delta Gam- 
ma out of the pages of the Delta, for I am 
convinced there is such a plot afoot, how 
dared you to mark "Delinquent" under the 
name of Columbia? No reporter of that 
Chapter has ever failed to submit a volumi- 
nous and newsy letter unless it was back 
in the days of that notorious deviator from 
the path of rectitude, Jack Story. And 
even did a Columbia reporter so forget him- 
self as to neglect his only real duty, you 
cannot make me believe that Ed Grant, 
Bill Brown or some of the Old Guard did 
not send in a story for the Alumni pages. 
Even Al Wilson's mention of poor Old Co- 
lumbia (I could swear he mentioned us 
once in some article sent in) was suppressed. 
And as to the Marriages and Birth columns, 
you even cut us out of them. 

A Horrible Threat 

The more I write the madder I get. This 
is my last word, if you don't print some- 
thing about Delta Gamma in your next issue 
I will ask you to take my name off the 
mailing list. I can't have Major Joe King 
of the Missouri Chapter, Lieutenant John 
Hadesty of the Penn State Chapter, Lieu- 
tenant Karl Koch of the Mount Union 
Chapter, laughing at their Sky-Pilot every 
time one of those expurgated editions of 
the Delta comes out, and I won't! 

Fraternally, 

HARRY CARLETON FRASER, 
Chaplain — Field Artillery, U. S. A. 

P. S. — I know you won't have the nerve 
to publish this scathing arraignment of you 
and your sheet, so I am sending a carbon 
copy to the Reporter in question that he 
may know just what I think of you. 

H. C. F. 
Camp Logan, Houston, Texas, 

May 27, 1918. 

Now, Brother Fraser, please pay your 
Delta subscription! Thank you! 



A TEXAN STEER IN CAMP 

Mr. Pickwick is overjoyed to welcome 
Brother Cofer, of Texas, into our enthusi- 
astic band of tale-bearing adventurers. 
Just as much happens to all of us as hap- 
pens to Brother Cofer, but we can't express 
it the same way. You will remember his 
Chapter letters last year and how we all 
wanted, after reading them, to pack our 
"grip and take a trip" to Texas u. Now 
he's a regular soldier, and is going to train 
the plebs at college next fall. 

Two Classes of People 

Mr. Samuel Pickwick, Esq., G. C, M. P. C. 

Dear Sir: 

I have been at this camp for five weeks. 
We are here from all parts of the United 
States to a two months training camp. We 
return to school next year to tram the 
R. 0. T. C. cadets. It is rather strenuous 
training and taste of real army life. For 
we are enlisted and have the rank of pri- 
vate. I hadn't been in camp very lone 
before I served kitchen police. I learned 
one thing. There are just two classes of 
people in the world — those who hold their 
cups over the serving pan and those who 
hold it over the floor. The majority are 
in the latter class. 

Officers Lack Sense of Humor 

Last night I served on guard. The cadet 
officer of the guard and the commander of 
the guard came by my post. They had a 
prisoner with them. I advanced the officers 
with their prisoner and recognized the offi- 
cers. I didn't pay any attention to the 
prisoner. I thought that with the officer 
of the guard and the officer of the day it 
did not behoove a B. A. private to get in- 
quisitive as to whom they had with them. 

When I told them to pass on, the com- 
mander of the guard yelled, "Well, what 
the hell are you going to do about this 
man?" pointing to the prisoner. 

"Sir," I said, "if you can't take him in 
alone I will call the corporal of the guard." 

He must not have appreciated my humor. 
Today I am serving fatigue duty at head- 
quarters. 

The Army No Distinguisher of Persons 

But sometimes I think that we really will 
get some good out of this army life. The 
first day I was here I went down toward 
the kitchen. There I saw Jack Beall, Jr., 
of Dallas, a Beta from the University of 
Texas. His father is an ex-congressman, 
and Jack never did a lick of work in his 
life. The first wages he ever drew was 
when he got his first pay. But Jack is a 
good sport and he was peeling potatoes 
with the best of them. He has been on 
kitchen police practically every week. So 



162 



The Delta 



with all of us. We are beginning to see 
what the army life means and that we can 
work when we have to. 

The Spirit of the Gridiron 

We were put in quarantine the first day 
that we got nere, for measles. We were in 
two weeks and had just gotten orders to 
the effect that the quarantine was lifted 
when another case developed. We went 
in for another two weeks. It was pretty 
hard on us all, who had not been out of 
camp for two weeks. But just after the 
second two weeks' quarantine was an- 
nounced, some one down in the end of the 
barracks started, "Pack up your troubles 
in your old kit bag, and smile, smile, smile." 
And everybody sang. It was the same 
spirit that used to make the fellows sing 
just the same when their college was losing 
a football game as when they were winning. 
And it is the spirit that is going to win 
this war. Our lieutenant, who is just back 
from France, said the other day that that 
accounted for the success of our forces over 
there. It is the spirit of the men and the 
officers who go over the top in the ranks. 

Sigma Nus at Camp 

Sigma Nu is forward here, as in all of 
the camps. There are some sixty odd in 
the whole camp. There are three in our 
company, two from Texas and Brother 
Maxwell C. Payne from Vanderbilt. He 
has just been transferred to Camp Perry, 
Ohio. We have meetings every Sunday 
morning and are planning a banquet just 
before the camp is over. If any of you 
should by chance be in Chicago say two or 
three weeks from now, we would certainly 
be pleased to have you attend it. Unfor- 
tunately, I have been unable to attend any 
of the meetings. The quarantine kept me 
from it. But I have heard from the other 
fellows what was going on. Brother John 
P. Phillips, of Minnesota (Gamma Tau), is 
in the adjoining company to me, and I have 
him keep me posted. I will miss the meet- 
ing next Sunday, as we go on a hike. 

Fraternally, 

JOHN D. COFER, Upsilon. 

S. A. T. C. Camp, 
Fort Sheridan, 111. 



TOGO STUDIES COLLAR JEWELRY 
AND MEETS THE AGENT 

The Rt. Esq. G. C. Picknic, so-called 
Sammy: 

After living % doz. months in calorie 
sunbeam climate of Amalgamated Counties 
of Texas — which are to South of U. S., and 
natives can read English — accomplices in 
conelike canvas domicile, called bookishly 
"pyramidal," for resemblance to Egypt, ex- 



coriate "North are still intact; why not re- 
turn soon in clothes of school youth?" 
"Blooey" rebut another, "This are not done 
today by front families. (Here I speak in 
on paper: But in Appaducian war this are 
popular propensity, according to Hon. Col. 
Bogey White, of Iowa Hussars.) Witness 
from Head ^4 s these words of G. O. — "Un- 
less rehearsal of taking the French leaves 
is deceased, stringent measurements will be 
introduced." From me, by mouth, "Who 
are going to make such introductions and 
who can be this Hon. Ments — a Germ?" My 
colleges then snickle, no doubtfully think- 
ing at my night in stockyard for W. Va. 
hike reported last time. 

So to my dear Hon. Cap. for advising. 
First I ripple "Cappy dear, I could be de- 
siring of honorable retreat from this 0. D. 
Club, but before, please to inform how col- 
lar jewelry, etc., are purchasable; appear- 
ances are so enhancing thereby." "Titter," 
he smole, camouflaging grin, "First to get 
commission, like I." "Treacher to this na- 
tionality," I brake out, "So you also get 
raking-offs on special orders." This burst- 
ing deprive me of ex-Hon. Captain's self- 
respect, so he shimmer to secretary, "Give 
this here hash person transporting nearly 
to North; he are daft of sun-heat." 
"Haha" silences thru my brain, "This agent 
are also bloated R. R. maggot, beside 
grafter in Army elections, to offer free 
rides." 

So back to U. S. A. I hie, deciding to take 
militia abode at former camping home of 
Gen. Grant, handy to home and U. W., 
which are my Alma's mother. No sooner 
am I arrive and step into soft booze store 
of 343rd Doughish Boys, than before me 
is framed on counter nice photo-painting of 
— who? author of Bevo? Rt. Rev. Geo. 
Wash.? Adm. Bunker Hill? Neither of 
these, but beaming cheeks of Judge Homer 
Vanderblue, once Swedish quarantine in- 
spector for Sigmund Knew Fraternity and 
composer of economical syllables at N. W. 
Univ. How like complexion adv. he gleam 
thru transparency of glass, but how cheru- 
bic in that Boyish Scouting clothes, in whose 
army he are important collar jewelry agent. 
On account of Van being so honorably fra- 
ternal scholar at Harvard, etc., editor of 
Chi. photo shop adv. in glass frame "Take 
a picture with me, like ancient Hon. Homer 
and others herewith." 

If readers like this bold obloquy, written 
below great stretches of champagne con- 
ditions on fields of Illinois, why not send 
H 2 2 for face bleaching, so I could member 
myself to this noble Sigmund Club, and 
shake the hands to old Bro. Generally Sears, 
which, in spite of his military jewelry on 
collar, I could do as frat pal. 

Respectively, 

"MUCH-HASH TOGO." 

(SERGEANT GEORGE A. CHANDLER, 

Gamma Lambda.) 



Pickwick Club 



163 



THE SPIRIT IS WILLING BUT THE 
"GAS" IS WEAK 

Mr. Samuel Pickwick, G. C., M. P. C., is 
delighted to present to you, the Cor- 
responding Members of the . Society of 
United Pickwickians, hereto assembled, an 
epistle from our honorable and learned col- 
league and officious officer and charter 
member — Mr. Samuel Weller, Jr., P. V. P., 
M. P. C. (Perpetual Vice-President, Mem- 
ber Pickwick club.) Mr. Weller is the sec- 
ond member of this August Assemblage 
of Seekers after the Spinacious and a one- 
time lengthy contributor of concomitant 
collections of cryptic and cressy compound- 
accounts of cretins.* He is deserving of 
all the honors of love and war and disports 
himself well among the perils and vicissi- 
tudes of tennis court and battledore. "Love 
all!" is his unanimous score, and gas his 
second nature. 

As a valiant and tried member of the Gas 
Service squad, Mr. Weller has made an 
enviable and uninmitable record as a brave 
and perse verant corporeal corporal. What 
stunts he has not hitherto tried out upon 
his college mates and fraternity pals, Mr. 
Weller will turn vindictively upon the flee- 
ing dashed-hund who will instinctively 
drag his tail between his legs and crawl 
saponaciously within his tank of near-beer 
to die an easy death amid the dregs, rather 
than face the fumes of Russian tobacco or 
draughts of Barden's cistern. The experi- 
ence of Mr. Weller as an apprentice in the 
well-known cooperage firm with which he 
has so long been connected, will serve in 
good stead in these days that test the met- 
tle of steeled souls. 

Alas! Mr. Weller has been trained to 
use his gas mask of late and is quite unlike 
his old self, consequently. Let us all hope 
and pray that Samivel will recover his 
sanguinity and revert to the ancient and 
accepted style of active ruction and nerv- 
ous narrative, denominated by the illiter- 
ate and artless as erotic rot, but known to 
all too true lovers of art as camouflage. 
(This word, by the way, originated in an 
original way from Mr. Weller's conversa- 
tion, to which a common introduction was 
"Gimme a camel." No reflection in this, 
by the way, to the 'alf-pints of liquid de- 
light at the Old Tavern on Random Road, 
which he was wont to take to swab the 
frog in his throat.) 

For such of those whose sloping and 
densely thatched understandings cannot un- 
dermine the undercurrent that underlies 
these delicious bits of undertakings in the 
field of ruminative reminiscence, Mr. Wel- 
ler is willin', for a consideration (a consid- 
eration of any metal not termed base by 
the olden alchemists) to supply a diagram 
and a key thereto. Everyone else step for- 
ward, si vous plait, and shout. 

•Mr. Pickwick would call upon the ignor- 
ant and forsooth impulsive reader, not a 
Corresponding Member naturally, to look up 



this word in the dictionary. It is not the 
modern English word signifying idiots, not 
at all, but the old French for Christians, 
hence human beings. 



Mr. Samuel Pickwick, Esq., G. C, M. P. C. 

Dear Sir: 

I am willing to bet that you are cursing 
me for a poor boob who has not enough de- 
cency to write to a pal. I am not going 
to put up a lot of bum excuses, but I will 
say that I have intended to write you for 
a hell of a long time, but each time I lacked 
the necessary ambition to do it. I have 
been detailed to the Gas Defense Service 
for the past four months, and I need not 
tell you that gas and I are old friends. You 
know me, Al. 

I have also thought of attempting to 
write a small article for the Pig Vig Pa- 
pers, but I find on looking myself over, 
that I have lost all my old journalistic 
punch. Those articles which I read have 
made me see how horribly inferior I am 
to the chaps who are at present contribu- 
tors to the famous paper, and, as I realize 
that I am getting old, I find myself 
strangely satisfied to let the young bloods 
do it. 

How are- they treating you ? The best 
is none too good for an original member 
of the Pickwick Club, and if at any time 
you need some muscular assistance, don't 
hesitate to call on Samivel Veller, the same 
being spelled with a "we". At the same 
time I say to you, do not call upon the same 
fellow for financial aid, because he is with- 
out funds. 

Do you remember the times we have 
drunken of the flowing bowl, and the tre- 
mendous way we each used to insist on 
being allowed to pay for it? Do you re- 
member the hope and fear with which the 
prospective members of our club used to 
come to us to try the exams for member- 
ship to our club, only to fall down on the 
test of wrassling with you? 

Hearts also was a good game, and it al- 
most makes me cry when I think of how 
that scum of a Murray Goodrich used to 
try to coax me to enter into some infamous 
conspiracy with him so that he might win 
one game from you. Thank God I always 
loved you enough to turn away from his 
nefarious offer with scorn, and I have yet 
to see anyone win a single game from you. 
How is Clem Sorrow (I mean Grief) ? He 
also sought in vain to take your scalp in 
Hearts, but he soon saw the futility of his 
deeds. 

Moore Emmett was a fine fellow and a 
very good friend of mine, and I am almost 
moved to lachrymation when I think of the 
noble way in which he stood by me when I 
fainted in the bath room. However, I feel 
that I sort of paid the debt when I so mag- 
nificiently helped him out of that scrape 



164 



The Delta 



with an infamous woman, and also when I 
dragged the chief of police from his pros- 
trate body. 

I like to reminisce, so to speak, but I am 
not the Veller of old, for all my fighting 

Froclivities are gone. Well, I must stop, 
shall appreciate the Delta at any time, 
and when I get back, I shall look you up. 

Lovingly, 

SAMUEL WELLER, JR. 

(CORPORAL CHARLES M. B. COOPER), 

Gas Defense Service, Engineers Corps. 

April 7, 1918. 

[Received June 20, 1918.] 

P. S. — Note the date of this letter. I 
had no money to buy a stamp. S. V. 



THE PRIVILEGES OF RANK OR A 
FRESHMAN'S REVENGE 

Mr. Samuel Pickwick, Esq., G. C, M. P. C. 

Dear Sir: 

War brings forth strange adventures and 
coincidences. When the Sigma Nu vet- 
erans gather around the old frat fireplace 
again, yarns will be spun that will rival 
The Tales of Arabian Knights. 

Beta Eta at Indiana University believes 
she has one that beats 'em all. The prin- 
cipal participants are Corporal F. S. 
Matthews and Private J. W. French, of the 
U. S. Marine Corps. A year ago Matthewp 
and French were roommates in college. 
Matthews was then a freshman, while 
French was a junior. Life for "Mat" wasn't 
the pleasantest in the world, for freshmen 
in a fraternity are bell-hops and baggage- 
smashers till they serve a "hitch" of one 
year. Matthews heard the call to the colors 
last August and joined the Marine Corps, 
being sent to Paris Island, S. C, for his 
training. 

French left Indiana University immedi- 
ately after Easter vacation, having com- 
pleted his four-year course. He, too, hit 
the Dixie trail and came South to the 
Marine Training Camp at Paris Island. 

Sunday, April 7, found French marching 
in line with several hundred applicants to 
shed his civilian clothes for a uniform. 
After being outfitted with uniform and 
blankets, he came to the hat counter. A 
tail, husky corporal slapped a campaign 
hat on his head. Looking up, French 
recognized his old roommate "Mat." The 
line held while "Mat" and French ex- 
changed excited and jubilant greetings as 
only real Sigma Nu brothers can. 

Corporal Matthews, who is a drill in- 
structor, had come over to outfit his new 
company at the quarantine station. To the 
surprise and joy of both Sigma Nus, French 
had been assigned in Matthews' company. 
The tables had turned — no longer was 
French the stern upperciassman and "Mat" 



the meek freshman. Instead, Corporal 
Matthews was in charge of a "boat com- 
pany," while French was a lowly private 
subject to Corporal Matthews' thundering 
commands. 

Revenge is sweet but fraternal bonds are 
stronger. Corporal Matthews spent the 
day marching his old upper-classman across 
the burning sands of the island, teaching 
him how to Squads Right! and About Face! 
In the evenings he would inspect French's 
washing and send him back as high as four 
times to rewash his duds before they were 
0. K.'d in his critical inspection. At night 
the two old "bunkies" would assemble in 
the corporal's tent. Then would they forget 
their rank as they talked over their old col- 
lege days and especially their past life 
together in the Fraternity. 

Tomorrow Corporal Matthews is leaving 
the company to take charge of a new com- 
pany being formed at the quarantine sta- 
tion. Acting Corporal J. A. Chase, of the 
N. C. B. School, will take Corporal 
Matthews' place. Strange, but true, Cor- 
poral Chase is also a Sigma Nu Brother, 
Gamma Xi, from Logansport, Indiana. So 
Private French will continue to receive 
training under a Sigma Nu officer. 

Neither of the three wearers of the five 
armed stars and the marine insignia can 
understand the strange coincidence. But 
any of them will vouch for the authenticity 
of this yarn. Thus the ties of Sigma Nu 
follow the Brothers from the fraternal 
threshold into the war camps and indeed 
to "the four quarters of the globe." 

Fraternally and sincerely, 

PRIVATE JOHN W. FRENCH, 

Beta Eta. 
Paris Island, S. C. 



« 



ALL MEN ARE LIARS," BUT NOT ALL 
LIARS ARE FISHERMEN 

General Secretary Dunlavy is going to 
take a Western inspection trip this fall. 
Already Inspector Sampson has asked him 
to plan for a fishing trip up in Montana, 
where— oh, well, Inspector Williams butts 
in to say, as it were, so to speak, you 
know — 

My Dear Dunlavy: 

Our fishing is the best in the world so far 
as sport goes. There are men who have 
caught fish seven and eight feet long in a 
brook not more than ten inches deep. I 
never saw the fish, but I have heard a great 
deal about them. 

Our fish are blooded fish; they do not be- 
come contaminated with the muddy waters 
of the Missouri river, as one finds in Mon- 
tana. I have been told that they have noth- 
ing but catfish in Montana. Still I have 
been there, and I never even saw a catfish 
walking around on the shore. 

Our fish are not tame. You have to work 
to catch them, but after you have caught a 



Pickwick Club 



165 



Colorado fish it becomes very much domesti- 
cated — at least those I catch do; in fact, 
the fish becomes a part of me, as it were. 

Notwithstanding all this, October is a 
bad month to attempt to fish in the moun- 
tains, on account of the storms. There is 
good fishing in the Laramie river, however. 
Of course, that is in Wyoming, but Samp- 
son does not have anything to do about 
Wyoming, and I therefore admit its virtue*. 

But remember, Colorado is the best State 
in the Union. It has the best fish. 
Fraternally, 

ERNEST L. WILLIAMS. 

After reading the letter aloud, Brother 
Dunlavy began to tell about Indiana fish. 
Inasmuch as such things should be saved 
for our Western Brothers, Mr. Pickwick 
hastily withdrew. Never let a preacher tell 
fish stories — it is contributing to delin- 
quency and a peril to immortal salvation. 



BENCHED! 

Our esteemed contemporary, Krullers, of 
the Fort Des Moines Post, operated under 
the supervision of Brother Don Krull, 
Gamma Mu, bears across the top of the 
column this sad legend, "Pinch Hitting for 
Krull by Private James W. Colton," and ex- 
plains it further down: "Krull is bothered 
with a falling of the sock this week, conse- 
quently I came in to be his supporter." 

Mr. Pickwick wishes to express his sym- 
pathy and the sympathy of the entire Order 
of United Pickwickers, with Brother Krull 
in his affliction. 



PRATHER A LA CREME 

Mr. Samuel Pickwick, Esq., G. C, M. P. C. 
Dear Sir: 

A shining example of patriotism and 
loyalty, worthy of our Knighthood in Sig- 
ma Nu and of American citizenship has 
come to my attention. I would be singu- 
larly forgetful of Pickwickian customs and 
characteristics did I not hasten to add it to 
our archives of sporting transactions. 

Brother Ora H. Prather was last year the 
commander of the Gamma Rho Chapter. He 
was an able executive and a zealous worker 
for his Chapter and Fraternity. But that 
is not the story — every Chapter has its 
commander and its faithful workers. 

Brother Prather is no longer commander 
of Gamma Rho — that's the point! He might 
have had a second term (who knows?) but 
for the cream — There, I'm getting along 
a little too fast, so let's go back to the be- 
ginning. 

The military examiner turned Brother 
Prather down on account of his weight or 
rather lack of it. Mournfully, he asked his 



Chapter mates how he could add a few 
pounds to his frame. "Drink milk," they 
said, "rich milk and plenty of it." Accord- 
ingly, Brother Prather went forth and 
bought cream, pure cream — $11.57 worth of 
it — so testify the Chapter gossips — $11.57 
worth of cream — and he consumed it as 
hastily as he was able. The next day he 
was accepted in the Aviation Corps. 

A high flyer now drinks milk, twould 
seem! 

JACK STRAW. 



SIGMA NU CALENDAR FOR RUSHEES 

It was the strict rushing rules of the 
Inter-Fraternity Council at Western Re- 
serve University that made possible this 
outburst of Sigma Nu spirit. "Circum- 
stances, I make circumstances," Napoleon 
said and did. Rushing rules may be made 
and met. This is the way. 

Mr. Samuel Pickwick, G. C., M. P. C. 
Dear Sir: 

We introduced a rushing innovation in 
the way of dating. Here is -what we were 
up against. There was to be only campus 
rushing until the third day of school. No 
dates were to be made until that third 
morning when all the fraternities would 
gather in at the end of the walk and nail 
the freshmen as they ambled in. The old 
way of dating was to find a blank sheet in 
the frosh's diary and scribble your insignia 
and the dates on it. Then every one of 
the other ten fraternities would do likewise, 
with the result that the poor frosh's diary 
looked like a drunkard's dream at the finish. 
And then usually the poor kids couldn't 
read what you had written. One came up 
to me one morning with his diary open and 
the following question: 

"Say, Shea, I got a date this afternoon 
with a frat and I can't read their name. 
It looks like a pretzel and a fishhook and 
I'll be if I know where to go." 

We had cards printed. I am sending you 
a copy. Our name was spelled out in good, 
plain English. Our address was there in 
husky, tangible arable numerals, and even 
the telephone number. And then, when we 
went after a date, all we had to do was 
insert on the card a couple of checks, tear 
off the upper half and give it to the fresh- 
man, and keep the rest ourselves. It 
knocked the other fraternities cold. Fresh- 
men were tickled to death. A lot of them 
put all their dates on that card. Imagine 
the situation. A Beta goes up to a fresh- 
man for a date and finds that he has to 
mark them on a Sigma Nu card. Next 
year it will be a case of "Everybody's 
Doing It." 

Yours fraternally, 

MORT SHEA, Delta Zeta. 



'illtllllllllllltlltlltlMttltttlMltflllllltlllltailtltlltltltllllllflMIIIIIIIIIttaillMltllltllllllltllttltllttltiailfllltllltKllttlllttlfXtMMIIMIIfllllllltltfMIt***!!*!! 



• •IMMMMIIIItillMtlltMMIMIIIIttltt 



Beta Zeta. — Lieutenant Merritt S. Beach 
and Miss Ruby Ness Scully of Utica, New 
York, on April 16, 1918, at Dallas, Texas. 
Brother Beach adds "and we are now 'at 
home' at Ellington Field" (Houston, Texas). 

Beta Iota. — Brother William P. Johns and 
Miss Mabel Sherwood, at Massillon, Ohio, 
last spring. Brother Johns left Camp Sher- 
man for an eastern camp and is probably 
"over there." 

Beta Iota. — Lieutenant Roland Jones and 
Miss Grace Elizabeth Wentz, on March 30, 
1918. 

Beta Iota. — Brother Floyd Trump and 
Miss Annette Fox, last spring. While home 
on a furlough from Camp Sheridan, Brother 
Trump made the most of his limited oppor- 
tunity and was married, meeting his bride- 
to-be in Pittsburgh, en route from her home 
in New York City. After a quiet wedding 
and a brief honeymoon, Brother Floyd re- 
turned to his outfit. 

Beta XL — Brother Russell Howard Senior 
and Miss Finis Robinson, December 28, 
1917, at Saint Joseph, Missouri. 

Beta Rho.— Brother Claude W. Dudley 
and Miss Dorothy Batcheler, July 17, 1918, 
at Raleigh, N. C. They will be at home to 
their friends in Washington, where Brother 
Dudley is engaged in Government work. 

Beta Phi.— Brother John F. Taddiken 
was married recently. Details unknown. 

Beta Phi-Gamma Lambda. — Brother Carl 
Bertie Bougere and Miss Norma Weaver, 
February 28, 1918, Covington, La. 

Gamma Delta. — Brother Leroy Vogel Ed- 
wards and Miss Eleanor Layman, on June 
1, 1918, at Brooklyn, N. Y. The wedding 
was a strictly Sigma Nu occasion, Brothers 
Taft and Stevenson as ushers, Brother 
Moeller as best man, and Past Regent A. H. 
Wilson officiating. Brother Edwards and 
his attendants are from Gamma Delta 
Chapter. 

Gamma Epsilon. — Brother Lieutenant 
Henry Jacob Smith and Miss Ida Rebecca 
Roye, on January 2, 1918, at Galveston, Tex. 

Gamma Epsilon. — Brother Henry A. 
Theis, inspector of the Seventh Division, 
and Miss Hope Leighter, June 14, 1918, at 
New York City, Brother Otto F. Theis, 
Gamma Epsilon, acting as best man and 
Past Regent A. H. Wilson officiating. 
Brother Theis is now inspector of the 
Seventh Division. The wedding took place 
in Brother Wilson's church, the Church of 
the Saviour. 

Gamma Lambda. — Brother Clarence Addi- 
son Hibbard and Miss Ruth Mildred Barr 



of Racine, Wisconsin, June 20, 1918, at 
Racine, Wisconsin. 

Gamma Sigma. — Lieutenant Thomas E. 
McCullough and Miss Margaret Babbitt, of 
Flagstaff, Ariz., on March 9, 1918, at Holly- 
wood, Calif. Brother McCullough is in the 
Engineers, U. S. R. 

Gamma Tau. — Brother Astor Alexius An- 
derson and Miss Ella Irene Smith, on July 
16, 1918, at Grantsburg, Wisconsin. Brother 
Anderson is assistant cashier of the 
Webster State Bank at Webster, Wisconsin. 

Delta Gamma. — Brother William Hori 
Brown, Jr., and Miss Emma Aline Gauthey, 
on July 6, 1918, at New York City. Brother 
Russell Brown was his brother's best man 
and Past Regent A. H. Wilson officiated. 
Among the guests were Brother Herbert S. 
Nulsen, Brother and Mrs. Albert H. Wilson, 
Brother and Mrs. Henry A. Theis, Brothei 
and Mrs. Edward J. Grant, and Brother and 
Mrs. Anthony Romagna, who made the wed- 
ding a real Sigma Nu affair. Brother 
Brown is a charter member of Delta 
Gamma. 

Delta Zeta. — Brother F. Moore Emmett 
and Miss Gladys Marie Wilkins, in June, 
1918, at Fairmont, Mont. They will reside 
in East Akron, Ohio. 

Delta Eta. — Brother Garrett Falcoln and 
Miss Rita Payne, at Schuyler, Nebraska. 
Brother Falcoln is in the Naval Medical 
Corps and is stationed at Great Lakes, 111. 

Delta Kappa. — Brother Archie H. Dean 
and Miss Maude Schumann, on June 15, 
1918, at New York City, Past Regent Albert 
H. Wilson officiating. 

Delta Kappa. — Brother Robert T. Weimer 
and Miss Elsie Davis, on June 22, 1918, at 
Newark, Delaware. Brother Rev. A. H. 
Wilson officiated and Brother Harold W. 
Horsey, Delta Kappa was the best man. 
Brother and Mrs. Weimer will make their 
home at Mansfield, Ohio. 

Delta O micron. — Lieutenant Alfred J. 
Lyon and Miss Majorie Adair, of Moscow, 
Idaho, on July 9, 1918, at Lake Charles, 
Louisiana, where Brother Lyon is instructor 
in the night flying school of the Aviation 
Corps. 

Delta Sigma. — Brother Thomas Carlisle 
and Miss Caroline Bowman. Brother Car- 
lisle is stationed at Camp Lee. 

Delta Chi. — Lieutenant Alvord B. Church- 
ill and Miss Jean Adelle Thompson, May 
30, 1918, at Hartford, Conn. 



BERTRAM T. CLAYTON 
Theta 

Lieutenant Colonel Bertram T. Clayton 
was killed by an air raid bomb in France, 
June 4, 1918. See extended notice under 
"With Military Honors." 



CHARLES PHILIP FRY 
Theta 

Brother Charles Philip Fry died May 27, 
1918, at New York City. 



DONALD H. CHARLTON 
Beta Nu 

Lieutenant Donald H. Charlton, Aviation 
Corps, was killed in an accident on Talia- 
ferro Field, Texas, while engaged in his 
duties as an airplane instructor. See ex- 
tended notice under "With Military Honors." 



MYRON WOLF 
Beta Psi 

Myron Wolf, attorney and clubman, for- 
mer State Insurance Commissioner, was 
stricken with apoplexy yesterday afternoon 
while eating lunch in the California Market. 

Attorney Wolf is well known in many 
circles of San Francisco and throughout 
northern California. He was president of 
his class at the University of California; 
shortly after he was on the staff of "The 
Examiner," gained fame as an orator for 
the Republican party and was made insur- 
ance commissioner by former Governor Gil- 
lette. 

Wolf has his offices in the Monadnock 
Building. He is a bachelor and resides at 
2816 Pierce street. He is a member of The 
Family and Bohemian Clubs. — San Fran- 
cisco Examiner. 



Sigma Nu has never had a man of whom 
she could be more justly proud than E. 
Myron Wolf, on whom the hand of death 
has suddenly fallen. From the days when 
he first lent his great natural talents to 
the upbuilding of Beta Psi Chapter, of 
which ne was one of the founders, until his 
closing hours he has been one of the truly 
big men of our Fraternity. 

Character has always been deemed the 
very cornerstone of our Fraternity's suc- 
cess, and it was because of his superb moral 
fiber, the bigness and kindness of his vision, 



the complete unselfishness and generosity 
of his nature that Myron was always one 
of the best-loved of the California Sigs. 

In 1906 he happened to be insurance com- 
missioner of the State when the greatest 
fire of the century destroyed San Francisco. 
Had he been anything but the absolutely 
conscientious, courageous and wrong-hating 
citizen that he was he could have easily 
kept silent, holding himself strictly to the 
formal duties of his office, instead of taking 
the initiative and conducting a vigorous 
fight in the creation of public opinion, when, 
bewildered by their terrible losses and anx- 
ious to get their much-needed money in a 
hurry, the stricken losers were being urged 
by the fire insurance companies to yield to 
their demand that 75 per cent, of the amount 
of the policy be made the basis at which 
losses should begin to be computed (25 per 
cent, discount being claimed for "earth- 
quake" loss whether there actually was any 
or not in a given case). Had this been ac- 
cepted San Francisco would have lost 
seventy-five million dollars. To Wolf, more 
than to any other cause, could their defeat 
be justly assigned. It is not hard to guess 
what pressure was sought to be put on him 
to be "reasonable." Many told him it was 
no duty of his office to take any part in 
the argument. It would have been very 
easy to have made no enemies. But San 
Francisco, sore stricken, would have suf- 
fered, and it would have been unfair. That 
was quite enough for Myron Wolf. 

Then, half contemptuous of politics as he 
saw the game played at the time, he re- 
solved to devote himself to the practice of 
the law. He resumed practice as poor a 
man as he had entered politics and I ques- 
tion whether he left much of an estate, for 
he was ever one to place a value on friend- 
ships and opportunities for kindness and to 
hold in disdain the acquisition of money 
beyond what is needed for modest living. 
Of one thing I am certain. The benefit he 
had done San Francisco could easily 'have 
been capitalized. He might have used it to 
build up his practice, for indirectly he had 
benefited many men. Never a word in print. 
Never a boast. Never a claim. He was 
well content merely to have done his duty 
as he saw it. In these days of unscrupulous 
privateering it is worth while for my Broth- 
ers in the Fraternity to ponder a moment 
over what such a life as Wolf's means in 
the preservation of our faith and our ideals. 

Simple, modest, unpretentious, big in 
body as in mind and heart, Myron was a 
well-known and a well-loved man in San 



168 



The Delta 



Francisco. At more than one club of dis- 
tinction his presence will be sadly missed. 
He leaves but one relative, an aged mother, 
whose magnificent character and splendid 
mind were ever his inspiration. 

As for myself, the world will never be 
quite the same to me again. Although my 
work keeps me East and I have been able 
of late years to spend but a few weeks occa- 
sionally in my old home, I have always 
thought of Myron as one of my own family 
and there is pain in the very though of 

foing to San Francisco again and not seeing 
im there. He was my truest friend, and of 
all the men I have ever met, of him I think 
it can lje most truly said he was the pal of 
my best self. 

MAURICE V. SAMUELS, Beta Chi. 

New York, August 24, 1918. 



JOHN DAWKINS MATHIS 
Gamma Alpha 

Lieutenant John Dawkins Mathis was 
killed in action in France June 6, 1918. 
See extended notice under "With Military 
Honors." 



from wounds received in action. See ex- 
tended notice under "With Military Honors." 



ROSCIUS HARLOW BACK 
Delta Iota 

Captain Roscius Harlow Back, machine 
gun detachment, infantry, was killed in ac- 
tion in France. See extended notice under 
"With Military Honors." 



LOUIS PETER MUTTY 
Delta Iota 

Brother Louis Peter Mutty, Delta Iota, 
was killed in an airplane accident at Miami, 
Florida. See extended notice under "With 
Military Honors." 



ALFRED RICKERT HA MEL 
Delta Kappa 

Brother Alfred Rickert Hamel was killed 
in action in the drive at Chateau Thierry, 



France. See extended notice 
Military Honors." 



in 



u 



With 



ROBERT N. SMITH 
Gamma Kappa 

Brother Robert N. Smith died in Cleve- 
land, Ohio, last spring, after a brief attack 
of pneumonia. He left a widow and a baby 
son, born last December. His is a loss that 
is felt keenly by the Cleveland Alumni 
Chapter, for Brother Smith was a plugger 
for Sigma Nu. He was for several years 
secretary of the Salt Lake City Alumni 
Chapter. 



SPENCER THORNDYKE ALDEN 
Gamma Nu-Gamma Theta 

Brother Ensign Spencer Thorndyke Al- 
den was killed by a fall while flying at 
Great South Bay, Long Island, New York, 
May 4, 1918. See extended notice under 
"With Military Honors." 



JEFFERSON ALOYSIUS HEALY 
Delta Gamma 

Brother Jefferson Aloysius Healy died 
from wounds received in France. See ex- 
tended notice in *'With Military Honors." 



CARL O. ROSEQUIST 

Delta Theta 

Brother Lieutenant Carl 0. Rosequist, 
Delta Theta, died in France May 10, 1918, 



ROGER WHITMAN HILLIS 
Delta Pi 

Brother Roger Whitman Hillis was killed 
in action in France. Date unknown. See ex- 
tended notice under "With Military Honors." 



GERALD JAMES KEENAN 
Delta Pi 

Brother Gerald James Keenan was one of 
our charter members, being the ninth mem- 
ber to be initiated from Alpha Beta Phi on 
the 23d of October, 1915. He was born in 
Portville, N. Y., in 1894, and died after six 
months' illness. 

MILO J. SUTLIFF, Recorder. 



EARL JOHN GETTMAN 
Delta Sigma 

. Brother Earl John Gettman died on 
March 1, 1917. No other information re- 
ceived. 



HAROLD COLTHURST MILLS 
Delta Chi 

Lieutenant Harold C. Mills, Marine Corps, 
a pledge of Delta Chi Chapter, was wound- 
ed in action at Chateau Thierry, France, 
and died on July 17, 1918. See extended 
notice under "With Military Honors." 



Fraternity Directory 



169 



Sigma Nu Fraternity 

Founded at Virginia Military Institute, January 1. 1869. 



FOUNDERS 

JAMES F. HOPKINS. Alpha No. 1, '70; born De- 
cember SO. 1845; died December 15, 1913. 

ORSENF1ELD QUARLES. Alpha No. 2, '70; 
Helena. Ark. 

JAMES M. RILEY. Alpha No. 3. '70; born May 
16. 1849; died June 8. 1911. 

GENERAL OFFICER8 

EDWIN W. DUNLAVY. Beta Beta. Qeneral Sec- 
retary and Editor of The Delta. 
HARRY A. RIDER. Delta Zeta. Assistant Qeneral 
Secretary. 

General Offices. 714 Lemcke Building, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



GRAND OFFICERS 

The first four named compose the High Council. 

BORDEN H. BURR. Lambda, Regent, Brown- 
Marx Building. Birmingham, Ala. 

GEORGE A. SMITH, Beta Zeta, Vice Regent, 217 
Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

SAMUEL F. PEGUES. Theta. Grand Treasurer, 
508 Federal Building. Chicago, 111. 

WALTER E. MYERS, Beta Iota, Grand Coun- 
selor. 418 Guardian Building. Cleveland, Ohio. 

BURTON P. SEARS, Nu, Grand Historian, Room 
440. 29 S. LaSalle St., Chicago. 111. 

PAUL M. SPENCER. D. D.. Beta Beta, Grand 
Chaplain, 309 West 57th St.. New York, N. Y. 



STANDING COMMITTEES 



Finance 



THE VICE REGENT. 

HIRAM C. SAMPSON. Beta Eta. Lincoln Trust 

Company. Spokane. Wash. 
ROBERT J. BANNISTER. Beta Mu. Equitable 

Building, Des Moines, lowa. 
GEORGE A. CASKEY. Beta Nu. 68 East Broad 

Street. Columbus, Ohio. 
HENRY A. THEIS. Gamma Epsllon. 38 Park 

Row. New York, N. Y. 
HILL FERGUSON. Theta, 211 North 20th Street. 

Birmingham. Ala. 
CHARLES C. BURR. Beta Rho, 38 Irving Place. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
WILLIAM D. SHILTS. Beta Iota, 74 Casterton 

Avenue. Akron. Ohio. 
WILLIAM W. KEYSER. Lambda, 3320 Pine 

Street, St. Louis, Mo. 

Jurisprudence 

THE REGENT, ex-offlcio. 

THE GRAND COUNSELOR, ex-officlo. 

HARRY L. HOPWOOD, Beta Nu, New First Na- 
tional Bank Building. Columbus. Ohio. 

CLINTON H. GIVAN, Beta Eta, 911 Lemcke 
Building, Indianapolis, ind. 

GEORGE E. SHELLEY. Upsilon. 201 West 6th 
Street, Austin, Texas. 

J. HOWARD REBER. PI. Mutual Life Building. 
Philadelphia. Pa. 

PHILIP ALSTON, Theta, Equitable Building, 
Atlanta. Ga. 

ERNEST L. WILLIAMS, Gamma Kappa. 416 Gas 
and Electric Building, Denver, Colorado. 

Scholarship 

ALBERT H. YODER, Beta Eta. Wisconsin State 
Normal School, Whitewater. Wisconsin. 

FRED W. BRBIMEIER, Delta Delta, University 
Club. Washington, D. C. 

ERNEST W. CLEMENS. Upsilon. 2506 Rio 
Grande Street, Austin, Texas. 



FRANK W. FOX. Delta Zeta, Goodyear Tire & 

Rubber Co., Akron, Ohio. 
HARLEY F. WILSON. Gamma Lambda. Sigma 

Nu House, Madison, Wis. 
ERRBTT R. NEWBY. Delta Epsllon. University 

of Oklahoma, Norman, Okla. 

Chapter House 

LEROY E. KIMBALL. Gamma Gamma, 32 Wit- 
erly Place. New York, N. Y. 

WALTER S. MGILVRAY, Beta Chi, 920 Santa 
Fe Avenue, Los Angeles, Calif. 

WILLIAM L. RANDALL. Delta Eta, First Na- 
tional Bank Building, Omaha. Neb. 

ROY L. BOVARD. Delta Delta. 5599 Baum Boule- 
vard, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

J. POPE WATSON, Mu, Hawkinsvllle, Ga. 

Ritual 

RAWSON BENNETT. Mu, 6108 Stelner Avenue, 

Chicago, 111. 
THOMAS M. OWEN. SR., Theta. State Capitol. 

Montgomery. Ala. 
GRANT HARRINGTON, Nu, 914 Orville Avenue. 

Kansas City, Kans. 
CLARENCE E. WOODS, Zeta, Eustis, Fla. 
JOHN C. SCOTT, Beta Zeta, 6569 De Longpre 

Avenue, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Fraternity Songs 

WARREN PIPER. Gamma Beta. 31 North State 

Street. Chicago. 111. 
ARCHIE COATBS, Delta Gamma, 209 West 

107th Street, New York, N. Y. 
EDGAR F. BURNS, Gamma Chi, 612 State 

Street, Madison, Wis. 

Uniform Accounting* System 

THE VICE- REGENT. 

MILO C. NEWTON, Delta Zeta. 771 East 95th 

Street, Cleveland, Ohio. 
CLIFFORD B. LEPAGE, Gamma Delta, Mount 

Vernon, N. Y. 



Collegiate Chapters 

With a List of Their Chapter Reporter*. 



FIRST DIVISION 

Delaware* Maryland, District of Columbia* Vir- 
ginia* North Carolina 

INSPECTOR, William R. Edgar, 1415 Harrison 
Street, Wilmington, Del. 

BETA— (1870), University of Virginia, Char- 
lottesville, Va. 

Reporter. C. A. Nichol, Sigma Nu House. 

Adviser. A. H. Wilson, 155 Pelham Road. New 
Rochelle, N. Y. 

LAMBDA — (1882), Washington and Lee Univer- 
sity. Lexington, Va. 



Reporter, Greene B. Fenley, Sigma Nu House. 
Adviser, J. T. McCrum, Peoples National Bank. 

PSI — (1888). University of North Carolina. 
Chapel Hill. N. C. 
Reporter, J. S. Ficklln. 
Adviser, Walter Murphy, Salisbury, N. C. 

BETA TAU — (1895), North Carolina College of 
Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, Weat Ral- 
eigh, N. C. 

Reporter, W. M. Ruaa. 

Adviser, C. J. Hayden, Springfield, Ky. 



170 



The Delta 



DELTA KAPPA — (1910), Delaware College, 
Newark, Del. 
Reporter, Leonard D. Daly, Sigma Nu House. 
Adviser, Prof. Clarence A. Short. 

DELTA PI — (1915), George Washington Univer- 
sity, Washington, D. C. 
Reporter, Lee A. Swem, 1739 P St., N. W. 
Adviser, N. M. Shaw, 1519 O Street. 

DELTA PHI — (1917). Maryland State College, 
College Park, Md. 
Reporter — 
Adviser — 

SECOND DIVISION 

South Carolina* Georgia, Florida 

INSPECTOR, Oscar Palmour, Kappa, 425 Grant 
Bldg., Atlanta, Ga. 

KAPPA — (1881). North Georgia Agricultural 
College, Dahlonega, Ga. 
Reporter, <\ S. Long. 
Adviser, Prof. E. N. Nicholson. 

ETA — (1884). Mercer University. Macon, Ga. 
Reporter. H. L. Coachman. 
Adviser, John R. L. Smith. 

MU — (1884), University of Georgia. Athens. Ga. 
Reporter. W. W. McManus. 
Adviser, Thomas .7. Shackleford. 

XI — (1884), Emory College, Oxford. Ga. 
Reporter. S. L. White. 
Adviser, S. H. Adams. Covington, Ga. 

GAMMA ALPHA — (1896). Georgia School of 
Technology, Atlanta. Ga. 
Reporter. F. S. Bryan, 58 W. North St. 
Adviser, W. L. Kemp, Gould Building. 

DELTA MU — (1913). Stetson University. DeLand. 
Fla. 
Reporter, G. M. Peek. 
Adviser. Robert P. Walters. 



THIRD DIVISION 
Alabama, MIhhIhhIppI, Tennessee 

INSPECTOR — Manly R. Joiner. Iota, Gamma 
Kappa, Talladega, Ala. 

THETA — (1874), University of Alabama, Uni- 
versity. Ala. 
Reporter. It. II. Hartsfield. 
Adviser — 

IOTA — (1879), Howard College. East Lake. Ala. 
Reporter. Robert F. Carlisle. 
Adviser — 

SIGMA — (1886), Vanderbilt University, Nashville, 
Tenn. 
Reporter, J. D. McMillion. 319 Twenty-second 

Avenue, N. 
Adviser, C. Madison Sarratt. 

BETA THETA — (1890), Alabama Polytechnic 
Institute, Auburn. Ala. 
Reporter, H. T. Klllingsworth. Box 42. 
Adviser — 

FOURTH DIVISION 
Indiana, Kentucky 

INSPECTOR, Alfred C. Evens, Beta Beta-Gam- 
ma Rho, City National Bank Bldg.. Lafay- 
ette, Ind. 

BETA BETA — (1890). DePauw University, 

Greencastle. ind. 
Reporter, Cloyde O. Cook. Sigma Nu House. 
Adviser. Roy Davidson. 3038 N. New Jersey 

St., Indianapolis. Ind. 

BETA ZETA — (1891), Purdue University. La- 
fayette, Ind. 
Reporter, E. M. Wolf. 268 Littleton Ave. 
Adviser — 

BETA ETA — (1892), Indiana University, Bloom - 
ington, Ind. 
Reporter, Ralph Winslow. 322 E. Klrkwood. 
Adviser, Henry T. Stephenson. 408 S. College 
Avenue. 



BETA UP8ILON — ((1895), Rose Polytechnic In- 
stitute, Terre Haute, Ind. 
Reporter, Paul J. Grafe, 1502 N. 7th St 
Adviser, Frank Baxter, Room 2. Union Station. 

GAMMA IOTA— (1902), University of Kentucky. 

Lexington. Ky. 
Reporter, W. C. Drady. 319 E. Maxwell Street 
Adviser, Dr. George II. Wilson, 139 N. Mill 

Street. 

FIFTH DIVISION 

Ohio, West Virginia, That Part of Pennsylvania 
West of the 78th Meridian 

INSPECTOR — Perry D. Caldwell, Beta Iota-Delta 
Zeta. 433 Williamson Building, Cleveland. 
Ohio. 

EPSILON — (1883). Bethany College, Bethany, W. 

Va. 
Reporter. D. N. Walker. Sigma Nu House. 
Adviser, W. Edwin Wells, Jr., East Liverpool. 

Ohio. 

BETA IOTA— (1892). Mount Union College, Al- 
liance, Ohio. 

Reporter. H. E. Ritchie. 1690 S. Union Avenue. 
Adviser, D. M. Armstrong, 422 E. Main Street. 

BETA NU — (1891), Ohio State University, Co- 
lumbus, Ohio. 

Reporter. .7. C. McNamara. 80 E. 13th' St. 

Adviser, H. L. Hopwood, New First National 
Bank Bldg. 

GAMMA PI — (1904). West Virginia University, 
Morgantown, W. Va. 
Reporter, A. It. Winter, 466 High Street 
Adviser. Herbert McMillen. 118 Willey Street 

DELTA ALPHA — (1907), Case School of Applied 
Science, Cleveland. Ohio. 
Reporter. C. R. Anderson, 11448 Euclid Avenue. 
Adviser. James A. Moffett, 1397 E. 109th Street 

DELTA ZETA — (1909), Western Reserve Uni- 
versity. Cleveland, Ohio. 

Reporter, Keith Henney, 11448 Euclid Avenue. 

Adviser. Howard K. Hunter, 11448 Euclid 
Avenue. 

DELTA SIGMA — (1916). Carnegie Institute of 
Technology. Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Reporter. R. E. Drake, 5540 Forbes Street 
Adviser, Frank II. Haaren. 629 Bridge Street 
Parnassus, Pa. 

SIXTH DIVISION 

That Part of Pennsylvania East of the 78th 

Meridian 

INSPECTOR, II. E. Sibson. Gamma Theta, Cyn- 
wyd. Pa. 

PI — (1885). Lehigh University, South Bethle- 
hem. Pa. 
Reporter, J. Sherman, Sigma Nu House. 
Adviser. Stanley S. Zweible, Bethlehem Steel Co. 

BETA RHO — (1894). University of Pennsyl- 
vania, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Reporter, Gilbert E. Strickland, 3312 Walnut 
Street. 

Adviser — 

GAMMA EPSILON— (1900), Lafayette College. 
Easton, Pa. 
Reporter. Clifton J. Hopf. 32 Cnttell St. 
Adviser. II. T. Spengler, 337 Shawnee Drive. 

DELTA DELTA — (1909). Pennsylvania State 
College, State College. Pa. 
Reporter. John F. Kell, Sigma Nu House. 
Adviser. D. B. Etters. 

SEVENTH DIVISION 
New York* New Jersey 

INSPECTOR, Henry A. Theis, Gamma Epsllon, 
38 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

GAMMA DELTA — (1900), Stevens Institute of 
Technology, Hoboken, N. J. 
Reporter, Harold DeL. Gregory. 
Adviser, Clifford B. LePage, Mount Vernon, 
N. Y. 



Fraternity Directory 



171 



GAMMA THETA — (1901), Cornell University, 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
Reporter, Douglas L. Root, 230 Willard Way. 
Adviser, David R. Mixsell, Little Falls, N. Y. 

GAMMA PSI — (1906), Syracuse University, Syra- 
cuse, N. Y. 
Reporter, Charles Kulze, 212 Euclid Ave. 
Adviser, George M. Parsons, 524 Ostrom Ave. 

DELTA GAMMA — (1908), Columbia University. 

New York, N. Y. 
Reporter^ — 
Adviser. Anthony J. Romagna. 31 Liberty 

Street. 

DELTA UP8ILON— (1917). Colgate University, 
Hamilton. N. Y. 
Reporter, Eugene G. Bewkes. Sigma Nu House. 
Adviser, George G. Saunders. Box 912. 

EIGHTH DIVISION 

Connecticut* Massachusetts* Maine* New Hamp- 
shire, Rhode Island* Vermont 

INSPECTOR* Edson K. Smith, Beta lota-Delta 
Lambda, 1102 Union Trust Bldg., Providence. 
R. I. 

BETA SIGMA — (1898), University of Vermont. 
Burlington, Vt. 
Reporter, John W. Meaehem. 
Adviser, W. E. Aiken, care University of Ver- 
mont 

DELTA BETA — (1907). Dartmouth College, Han 
over, N. H. 

Reporter, A. I. Palmer. 

Adviser. Dean L. Thompson, care Minute Tapi- 
oca Co.. Orange. Mass. 

DELTA LAMBDA — (1912), Brown University. 

Providence. R. 1. 
Reporter, Ralph H. Watkins, 110 Waterman 

Street. 
Adviser. Arthur E. Konyon. Box 136. Woon- 

socket, R. I. 

DELTA NU — (1913), University of Maine. Orono, 

Maine. 
Reporter, Roger B. Hill, Sigma Nu House. 
Adviser, Thomas E. Houghton. Fort Fairfield, 

Maine. 

DELTA CHI— (1918), Trinity College, Hartford. 

Conn. 
Reporter, Harmon T. Barber. Sigma Nu House. 
Adviser. Raymond H. Segur. 67 Farmington 

Avenue. 

DELTA PHI — (1918), Bowdoin College, Bruns- 
wick, Maine. 
Reporter^ — 
Adviser — 

NINTH DIVISION 

Michigan* Illlnol** WUconnln 

INSPECTOR* John M. Roberts. Beta PI. 460 E. 
Ohio Street, Chicago, 111. 

GAMMA BETA — (1898), Northwestern Univer- 
sity, Evan8ton, 111. 

Reporter, Edward R. Halperin. North Univer- 
sity Campus. 

Adviser, C. J. Luther, 1317 Elm wood Ave. 

GAMMA GAMMA — 1895. Albion College. Albion, 
Mich. 
Reporter. Glen Wilkinson, 306 E. Erie Street. 
Adviser, Robert Baldwin. 

GAMMA LAMBDA— (1902). University of Wis- 
consin. Madison. Wis. 

Reporter, D. D. Shaw. 625 N. Henry Street. 

Adviser, Prof. H. F. Wilson. Entomology Build- 
ing, University of Wisconsin. 

GAMMA Mi:- (1902), University of Illinois. 

Champaign, 111. 
Reporter, Scott J. Wilkinson, 624 E. Green 

Street 
Adviser, J. E. Miller, University of Illinois. 

GAMMA NU— (1902), University of Michigan. 

Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Reporter, Roland F. Merner. 915 Oakland 

Avenue. 
Adviser. Bruce J. Miles, 843 Jefferson Avenue 

E.. Detroit. Mich. 



GAMMA RHO — (1904). University of Chicago. 
Chicago, 111. 
Reporter, Louis L. Faber. 5824 Woodlawn 

Avenue. 
Adviser, George M. Cook, 1420 Corn Exchange. 

DELTA THETA — (1891), Lombard College, 
Galesburg, 111. 
Reporter. Alva F. Spring. Sigma Nu House. 
Adviser, Webb A. Herlocker, Carr Bldg. 

TENTH DIVISION 

Minnesota* North Dakota* Sooth Dakota* 
Nebraska* Iowa 

INSPECTOR. J. H. Kraft. Gamma Sigma. 4237 
Ingersoll Avenue, Des Moines. Iowa. 

BETA MU— (1893), University of Iowa, Iowa 
City, Iowa. 
Reporter, Harold H. Newcomb, 706 E. College 

Street 
Adviser, Prof. John Dunlap, University of Iowa. 

GAMMA SIGMA — (1904), Iowa State College, 
Ames, Iowa. 
Reporter, P. A. Warner, 2166 Lincoln Way. 
Adviser, H. L. Eichling. 

GAMMA TAU — (1904), University of Minnesota. 
Minneapolis. Minn. 
Reporter, Harold A. Jules. 915 University 

Avenue. 
Adviser, W. M. Babeock. 610 Temple Court. 

DELTA ETA— (1909). University of Nebraska. 
Lincoln, Neb. 
Reporter, Leon Hamilton, 2530 Q Street. 
Adviser. William Leslie Randall, 820 Park 
Avenue, Omaha, Neb. 

ELEVENTH DIVISION 
Missouri* Arkansas 

INSPECTOR, Hal H. H. Lynch, Gamma Omlcron, 
625 Locust Street, St. Louis, Mo. 

RHO — (1886), University of Missouri, Columbia, 
Mo. 
Reporter, E. F. Way, 620 College Ave. 
Adviser. Orville M. Barnett, University of 
Missouri. 

BETA XI— (1894). William Jewell College, Lib- 
erty, Mo. 
Reporter, W. H. Shaw. 
Adviser. E. H. Norton, Citizens State Bank. 

GAMMA XI — (1903), Missouri School of Mines. 
Rolla, Mo. 
Reporter, R. N. Stubbs. 

Adviser, Dr. .7. W. Barley, Missouri School of 
Mines. 

GAMMA OMICRON — (1903), Washington Uni- 
versity, St. Louis. Mo. 
Reporter, Fritz Grolock. 
Advisor, Dr. John Vaughn, 560 Skinner Road. 

GAMMA UPSILON — (1904). University of Arkan- 
sas, Fayetteville, Ark. 
Reporter, Austin B. Taylor. Sigma Nu House. 
Adviser, L. D. Lighton. 

TWELFTH DIVISION 
Kansas* Oklahoma 

INSPECTOR, E. R. Newby, Delta Epsilon, Uni- 
versity of Oklahoma, Norman. Okla. 

NU — (1884), University of Kansas, Lawrence, 

Kan. 
Reporter, Fred Sehnitzler. 1246 Oread Avenue. 
Adviser, Prof. E. F. Engle, University of 

Kansas. 

BETA KAPPA— (1913). Kansas State Agricul- 
tural College. Manhattan, Kans. 
Reporter, C. W. Hestwood, 1031 Leavenworth 

Street. 
Adviser, Malcolm Sewell. 

DELTA EPSILON— (1909), University of Okla- 
homa, Norman. Okla. 

Reporter, John Burton, Sigma Nu House. 

Adviser, Crawford D. Bennett, Colcord Build- 
ing, Oklahoma City, Okla. 



172 



The Delta 



THIRTEENTH DIVISION 
Louisiana, Texas 

INSPECTOR, John E. Rosser, Xi- Sigma, 313 S. 
Preston Street, Dallas. Texas. 

UPSILON — (1886), University of Texas, Austin, 

Texas. 
Reporter, E. H. K el trier, 2505 Nueces Street. 
Adviser, George Shelley, 201 W. 6th Street. 

PHI— (1887), Louisiana State University, Baton 
Rouge, La. 
Reporter, John H. Tucker, Jr. 
Adviser, Frank B. Jones, Fuqua Hardware Co. 

BETA PHI— (1888), Tulane University, New Or- 
leans, La. 
Reporter, D. M. Martinez. 1415 Calhoun Street. 
Adviser, Charles E. Dunbar, care Fenner, How- 
ard, Spencer & Walker. 

FOURTEENTH DIVISION 
Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico 

INSPECTOR, Ernest L. Williams, Gamma Kappa, 
Gas and Electric Building, Denver, Colo. 

GAMMA ETA — (1901), Colorado School of Mines. 

Golden, Colo. 
Reporter, Carl Linderholm, Sigma Nu House. 
Adviser, Clement Crawley, office of Attorney 

General, Denver, Colo. 

GAMMA KAPPA — (1902), University of Colorado. 
Boulder, Colo. 
Reporter, Roger B. Mead, 1165 13th Street. 
Adviser, David Thomas, Chamber of Commerce 
Building, Denver. Colo. 

DELTA RHO — (1915), Colorado Agricultural Col- 
lege, Fort Collins, Colo. 
Reporter, Miles F. House. 
Adviser, H. N. Wheeler, U. S. Forest Service. 

FIFTEENTH DIVISION 

Idaho, Montana, and That Part of Washington 
and Oregon East of the 120th Meridian 

INSPECTOR, H. C. Sampson, Beta Eta, Lincoln 
Trust Co., Spokane, Wash. 

GAMMA PHI — (1905), University of Montana. 
Missoula, Mont. 
Reporter, Keith Brown. 500 University Ave. 
Adviser, John J. Lucy, 347 South Third Street. 

DELTA IOTA — (1910). State College of Wash- 
ington, Pullman, Wash. 
Reporter, E. Egge, Sigma Nu House. 
Adviser, F. E. Sanger. 



DELTA OMICRON — (1915), University of Idaho, 
Moscow, Idaho. 
Reporter, Ralph Gochnow, 1030 Blake Avenue. 
Adviser, F. E. Sanger, Pullman, Wash. 



SIXTEENTH DIVISION 

That Part of Washington and Oregon- West of 

the 120th Meridian 

INSPECTOR, Claude J. Hunt. Beta Beta, Uni- 
versity of Washington, Seattle, Wash. 

GAMMA ZETA — (1900), University of Oregon, 

Eugene, Ore. 
Reporter, Arthur J. Goreczky, 217 B. 11th 

Street. 
Adviser, Luke Goodrich, First National Bank. 

GAMMA CHI — (1896), University of Washington, 
Seattle Wash. 
Reporter,' Felix 'dine. 1616 W. 47th Street N. 
Adviser, S. H. Hedges, 702 14th Avenue. 

DELTA TAU — (1917), Oregon Agricultural Col- 
lecre Corvallis Ore 
Reporter, J. Paul Woollomes. 119 N. 9th Street. 
Adviser, Sigurd H. Peterson. 



SEVENTEENTH DIVISION 
California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona 

INSPECTOR, Otto K. Grau. Beta Chi. 1205 
Chronicle Building, San Francisco, Calif. 

BETA CHI — (1891), Leland Stanford University, 
Stanford, Calif. 
Reporter — 

Adviser, Donald Seymour, 828 Cooper Street, 
Palo Alto, Calif. 

BETA P8I— (1892), University of California, 
Berkeley, Calif. 
Reporter, R. L. Harter, 2610 Durant Ave. 
Adviser, Dr. Henry S. Whisman, University 
Infirmary. 

DELTA XI — (1914), University of Nevada, Reno, 
Nev. 
Reporter, Sam Hardin, 118 Elm Street 
Adviser, C. S. Knight. Dean of Agriculture, 125 
E. 7th Street. 

EPSILON ALPHA — (1918), University of Ari- 
zona, Tucson, Ariz. 
Reporter — 
Adviser, J. F. McKale, University of Arizona. 



Alumni Chapters and Secretaries 



ALABAMA — 

Brew ton — Secreta ry — 

Birmingham — Secretary, Perry Turner, 405 
Title Guarantee Building. 

Montgomery — Secretary, John Paul Jones 16 Mi 
Cryt Square. 

ARIZONA — 

Tucson — Secretary, J. F. McKale, University of 
Arizona. 

CALIFORNIA — 

Los Angeles — Secretary, Vernon M. Brydolf, 
Jr., 508 Security Building. 

Luncheon, every Thursday noon, Fifth Street 
Chocolate Shop. 

San Francisco — Secretary, George W. Weeks. 
Monadnock Building. 

Luncheon, every Friday, 12:15 p. m., Uni- 
versity Room, Palace Hotel. 

COLORADO — 

Denver — Secretary, O. S. More, 966 Gas-Elec- 
tric Building. 

Meeting, first Friday evening each month, 
Denver Athletic Club. 

CONNECTICUT— 

Hartford — Secretary, Raymond II. Segur, 67 
Farmlngton Avenue. 



DELAWARE — 

Wilmington — Secretary, W. R. * Edgar, 1415 
Harrison Street. 
Meeting, second Thursday each month, 7:30 
p. m., Hotel DuPont. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA — 

Washington — Secretary, A. L. Harris, 1505 
Lamont St., N. W. 
Weekly luncheon, Thursdays, 12:45 p. m., 
National Club, 14th St . 

FLORIDA — 

Tampa — Secretary, John W. Bull, care Hilburn 
& Bull. 
Meeting, first Tuesday in each month. 

GEORGIA— 

Savannah — Secretary, Charles D. Ellis, Con- 
solidated Naval Stores Company. 

Atlanta — Secretary, R. L. Reynolds. 908-10 
Empire Building. 
Luncheon, Saturdays. 12:30, Hotel Ansiey 
Rathskeller, corner North Forsyth and 
James St. 

Augusta — Secretary, H. G. Hatch, care City 
Engineer. 

ILLINOIS— 

Chicago — Secretary, R. A. Brown. 7419 N. 
Paulina St. 



Fraternity Directory 



173 



Luncheon, every Wednesday, 12 to 2 p. m., 
sixth floor Marshall Field Building for 
men, Washington St and Wabash Ave. 

Galesburg; — Secretary, Webb Herlocker, 15 

Carr Building. 
Meetings, first Tuesday each month, 7 :30 p. m., 
Carr Building. 



INDIANA— 
Indlanapolli 



•Secreta ry* — 



IOWA— 

Dos Moines — Secretary, J. H. Kraft, 4237 ln- 
gersoll Ave. 
Luncheon, every Wednesday noon, Younker's 
Tea Room. 

KANSAS— 

Topeka — Secretary, H. H. Haynes, 510 W. 10th 
Street. 

LOUISIANA — 

New Orleans^ — Secretary, Charles E. Dunbar, 

Jr.. Union St. 
Shroveport — Secretary, N. W. Sen tell, 315 First 
National Bank Building. 

MARYLAND— 

Baltimore— Secretary, John F. Bledsoe, Super- 
intendent Maryland State School for the 
Blind, Overlea, Md. 

MASSACHUSETTS— 

Boston — Secretary, Gordon C. Sleeper, 44 Kilby 
Street. 

MICHIGAN— 

Detroit — Secretary, Fred C. Day, 192 Burlln- 
game. 
Luncheon, Saturday, 1 p. m., Board of Com- 
merce. 

MINNESOTA — 

Minneapolis — Secretary, Arthur L. Kreitter, 
4816 Garfield Ave., S. 
Luncheon, Thursday, 12:30 to 2 p. m., Prls- 
cllla Tea Rooms. 

MISSOURI- 

St. Louis — Secretary L. C. Hummel, 4034 Flad 
Avenue. 
Luncheon, Saturday, 12:30 to 2 p. m.. City 
dub. 

NEBRASKA— 

Omaha — Secretary, W. L. Randall, 820 Park 
Avenue. 
Meeting, every Saturday noon, Loyal Hotel. 

NEW YORK — 

New York — Secretary, R. B. Sawyer, 55 Han- 
son Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Luncheon, every Thursday, 12 to 2 p. m., 
private dining room Machinery Club, top 



8 



floor Hudson Terminal Building, 5 
Church St 

Buffalo — Secretary, Allison F. Eberle, 727 Ma- 
rine National Bank Building. 

NORTH CAROLINA — 
Wilmington — Secretary, Clayton Smith. 

OHIO — 
Akron — Secretary, W. W. Schaller, 1009 West 
Exchange St 
Meeting, first Monday evening of each month, 
at Akron City Club. 



Cincinnati — Secretary, S. Clark Riker, 1916 
Bigelow St 
Dinner, last Thursday each month, Palace 
Hotel. 

Cleveland — Secretary, Miles E. Evans, 708 
American Trust Building. 
Dinner, first Friday each month, 6:16 p. m., 
Schuster's Restaurant. 1833 E. 12th St., 
opposite Hotel Stetler. 

Columbus — Secretary, G. L. Mooney, 743 Deni- 
so n Ave. 
Meeting, every two weeks, Saturday noon, 
Athletic Club. 

OREGON— 

Portland — Secretary-Treasurer, Glenn B. Mil- 
ler, 1011 Northwestern Bank Building. 
Luncheon, Friday noon, Portland Hotel. 

OKLAHOMA — 

Muskojree— Secretary, H. L. Armstrong, Flinn- 
Ames Building. 

Oklahoma City — Secretary, Orthell B. Jones, 
1005 Colcord Building. 
Luncheon, first Saturday noon each month, 
Savoy Cafe. 

Panama, R. de P. — Secretary, Steven Ganson, 
Ancon, C. Z. Meetings, announced by card. 

PENNSYLVANIA — 

Philadelphia — Secretary, John Solenberger, 425 

S. 15th St. . 
Luncheon, every Saturday, 1 p. m., English 
Room, Adelphi Hotel. 
Dinner and meeting, first Tuesday each 

month, 6:00 p. m., 3312 Walnut St 

Pittsburgh — Secretary. Elwood H. McClelland, 
5599 Baum Blvd. 

Dinner, second Saturday, each month, 8:00 
p. m., Fort Pitt Hotel. 

(Monthly meetings and dinners omitted dur- 
ing June, July and August.) 

Informal dinner every day. 12 to 12:30 noon, 
at Kaufman & Baer's Dining Room. 

RHODE ISLAND— 

Providence — Secretary, Walter H. Robinson, 
110 Waterman St. 

Meeting, last Monday each month, 8 p. m., 
110 Waterman St 

IT HAH — 

Salt Lake City — Secretary, Fred A. Clark, 
Apartment 3, Ivanhoe Apartments. 
Dinner, third Friday every month, 7 p. m.. 
University Club. 

VIRGINIA— 
Richmond— 

WASHINGTON — 
Lewis County — Secretary, Edwin Gruber, Che- 
halis, Wash. 

Spokane — Secretary, Orrin S. Good, Jones Bldg. 
Luncheon, every Friday noon, German 
Room at Davenport's. 

Seattle— Secretary, Edwin J. Brown, 450 New 
York Building. 



Alumni ! Enter Our Professional and Business Directory 

$1.00 a Year Prints Your Name There 



Professional and Business Directory 

The card of any member of the Fraternity will be entered herein for $1.00 

per annum. 



LAW DIRECTORY 



ROBERT J. BANNISTER, Beta Ma, SO 

STIPP, PERRY, BANNISTER & STARZINGEK 

1013-1020 Equitable Building 

Des Moines, Iowa 

GEORGE J. BREAKER 

Beta XI— Gamma Omlcron 

1748-52 Pierce Building 

St. Louis, Mo. 

BORDEN H. BURR, Theta- Lambda 

PERCY, BENNERS & BURR 

Brown-Marx Building 

Birmingham, Ala. 

EDWARD G. HOFFMAN, Gamma Nil, 23 
BARRETT, MORRIS & HOFFMAN 
Shoaff Building. Fort Wayne, Ind. 

H. L. HOP WOOD, Beta Nu 

INDUSTRIAL LAWYER 

Associated With 

DOUD, CRAWF1S, BRADFORD & DONES. 

Attorneys 
Columbus, Ohio 

WILLIAM M. MATTHEWS, Beta Nu, '08 

MATTHEWS & MATTHEWS 
Callahan Bank Building, Dayton, Ohio 

WALTER E. MYERS, Beta Iota 

418 Guardian Building 
Cleveland, Ohio 

JAMK8 W. NOEL, Beta Zeta 

919 Lemcke Building 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

PERRY 8. PATTERSON, Gamma Rho, 29 

SHEPARD, M'CORMICK, THOMASON, 

KIRKLAND & PATTERSON 

Tribune Building. Chicago 

JOHN S. PARKER, Theta 

FRANKLIN A. WAGNER, Gamma Nn 

PARKER, DAVIS & WAGNER 

646-649 Mutual Life Building 

34 Nassau Street, New York City 

WILLIAM L. RANDALL, Delta Eta '13 

PALMER & RANDALL 

206 Bee Building 

Omaha, Neb. 

J. HOWARD BEBER, PI 

Mutual Life Building, 1001 Chestnut St. 

Philadelphia. Pa. 

ANTHONY J. ROMAGNA, Delta Gamma 

31 Liberty Street, New York City 
Tel. Nos. John 2266; John 2267; John 1774 

GEORGE E. SHELLEY, Upsilon 

FISET, M'CLENDON & SHELLEY 

726-730 Littlefleld Building 

Austin, Texas 



LAW DIRECTORY 



EDSON K. SMITH, Beta Iota-Delta Lambda 
EDWARDS & ANGELL 

170 Westminister St. 
Providence, Rhode Island 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



HILL FERGUSON, Theta 

Vice President 

JEMISON REAL ESTATE & INSURANCE CO. 

Real Estate, Sales, Loans, Appraisals 

Birmingham, Alabama 

W. P. GETTMAN 

CENTER AVENUE GARAGE CO., INC. 
5424-28 Center Avenue, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania 

H. H. H. LYNCH, Gamma Omlcron 

J. HAL LYNCH & SON 

Architects 

635 Locust Street, St. Louis, Mo. 

JOHN E. ROSSER, Xl-Si*ma 

Southwestern Manager WORLD BOOK COM- 
PANY 
313 S. Preston St., Dallas, Texas 

GEORGE A. SMITH, Beta Zeta 

Life Insurance 
Astor House Building, 217 Broadway 
New York. N. Y. 

HARRY T. WATSON, Gamma Chi 

Assistant District Manager GEO. H. MORRILL 

CO., of California 
432 Wall Street. Los Angeles. Cal. 



FRATERNITY JEWELRY 



DURBIN DOWNEY, Gamma Ma 

Representing 

J. F. NEWMAN, Fraternity Jeweler 

Altman Building, Kansas City, Missouri 

WARREN PIPER, Gamma Beta 

Chicago Manager 

J. F. NEWMAN. Fraternity Jeweler 

31 North State Street, Chicago 

MARCEL WHEAT, Gamma Mn 

Representing 

J. F. NEWMAN, Fraternity Jeweler 

31 North State Street 

Chicago 

WILLIAM P. YATES, Beta Rho 

Representing 

L. G. BALFOUR CO. 

Attleboro, Mass. 

J. POPE WATSON, Mn 

Representing 

L. G. BALFOUR CO. 

Attleboro, Mass. 



Sigma Nus! Put your name here 





Change of Address Notice 

Kindly clip this notice and mail it in when You 
Change Your Address. It will save us much time and 
will help prevent the loss of your copies of THE DELTA. 






Change of Address for the Delta 

Date 

Nam* 




NFW AiUm. 


OLD AAArrmn 


Cr»«pte' Yea' of Graduation 











for the boys"Overthere" 



* 



THE DELTA 

One Year - One Dollar 



There are Two Reasons Why 

Stafford Engravings are used in this Publication and 
why they should be used in Yours — 

The First, of course, is quality. Through years of specialization, our organisation has become 
unusually expert in half-tones, color plates, sine etchings, and designs for college and school pub- 
lications. We have the very best snop equipment and every faculty for prompt production of 
quality work. 

The famous Levy Acid Blast process gives our half-tones a cleaner, deeper, sharper etching 
than the tub method most commonly used, and makes it easier for your printer to give you a first 
class job. 

The Second is Stafford Co-operation. For the benefit of our customers in their dealing with 
us, we have prepared a valuable handbook entitled, "Engraving for College and School Publica- 
tions," containing 164 pages and oyer 300 illustrations, and giving complete Information in regard 
to planning your publication, the preparation of copy, and ordering of engravings. This book 
simplifies ordering, prevents costly mistakes, and means high quality engravings at lowest cost. 
We do not sell It — but we lend a copy to the staff of each publication for which we make the 
engravings. 

Let Stafford make your commencement invitations, fraternity stationery, 
visiting cards, and any other copper plate engraving or steel- die emboss- 
ing, we have a large department devoted exclusively to this class of work, 
and can give you both quality and service. Samples with prices on request. 

Stafford Engraving Company 



ARTISTS 



DESIGNERS 



CENTURY BUILDING 



ENGRAVERS 

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 



(tyjxcm* 




THI WOOLD* CSXATIST NEWSPAPER 



PARIS THURSDAY, JANUARY M, Itll 



SIGMA NU FRATERNITY 

All members of the Sigma Nu Fra- 
ternity in France are requested to 
send their names to Flying Cadet 
Howard A. Johnson. A. E. F., U. S. A., 
P. 0. 725. The desire is to effect 
some sort of informal organization 
if possible. 



The above notice appeared in th§ Paris edition 
of the Chicago Tribune of January 24. We are 
glad to repeat Brother Johnson's call here. We 
urge every Brother who arrives in France to re- 
port to Brother Johnson and to the General Office. 
Even a post card will be gratefully received. 



VOLUME XXXVI 



DECEMBER 1918 



Number Two 




Published By 

Sigma Nu Fraternity 

A National Society of College Men' 

oc jht General Office* ae .of 

Lemcke Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 




Devoted to Fraternity and College lntere«t». Published 
on the first dayi of October, December, March and May 



EDWIN W. DUNLAVY. Edit™ 



CopTTiakl. 1918, by Edwin W. DunUvy 



e/poMan pmidad for in Section 1103. Act otOet.V WVJ , |atenV&|3l1A.W"> 



"Let's Go" 



As we go to press the Great War comes to a close. 

Sigma Nu has made a wonderful record in the number of Brothers who 
have given themselves to their country. 

The General Office promptly offered the use of all our Chapter Houses 
to the Government without any stipulation as to financial return. 

The Chapter activities have been confined to the perpetuation of the 
organization, local and national. 

The vast majority of the college administrations have been intelligently 
sympathetic toward the fraternities under war conditions, as is witnessed by 
a large file of recent letters from college presidents in the General Jffice. Some 
of these went so far as to offer financial assistance to the local Chapter. Houses 
if needed. 

m 

We have been disappointed at the obtuse unfriendliness of a very few 
college administrations which were quick to avail themselves of the special 
war provisions made by the Government on their own behalf and at the same 
time denied or thwarted the general policy outlined by Brigadier General Rees 
for the fraternities. 

As a result of this a very few of our Chapters have not been functioning. 
This cannot be continued unless charters are relinquished. 

We must all pull our part of the war burden of the General Fraternity. 
No Chapter can ride while its sister Chapters pull the load. 

However, before these words are read in print, changes will have come. 

The Government announces imminent changes in the S. A. T. C. 

Fraternity life will quickly become more normal. 

Many promising men are in college. 

Many Brothers will be quickly returning to college. 

There is still time for us to realize a year of greatest prosperity. 

Now— "Let's Go." 



Loyalty to Sigma Nu 



We have been greatly pleased by the rising tide of Sigma Nu spirit which 
has marked these war days. 

The active Brothers who so unanimously dropped their books for the 
sword when their country needed them, have kept us very busy answering 
their inquiries about "the boys/' sending them Deltas and caring for their 
contributions to The Delta. 

Again we have been happily surprised by the older Brothers, many of 
whom had been given up as lost to the fine fraternal idealism of their college 
days. These Brothers have in the hour of need risen with offers of assistance 
to their Chapters, to the General Office, and to The Delta, which has surpassed 
all expectations. We have been too busy in these war days to even think of 
a Delta subscription campaign. Yet the individual Alumni subscriptions have 
increased about 500 in the past few months. The older Brothers have been 
baptized with a new spirit of devotion to Sigma Nu. Finally it has enthused 
our fraternal soul to see the fine loyalty of the new and younger Brothers who 
have been left untrained in Sigma Nu, and without knowledge of our organiza- 
tion, to carry the whole responsibility of the local chapters. 

We could count the Chapters which have ceased to function on the fingers 
of one hand. 

The fine spirit of loyalty to Sigma Nu, as well as loyalty to our country, 
bespeaks still greater days for our Fraternity. 




The Finish of Hunism 



By Past Regent Walter James Sears 



TRULY, this is a good time to 
look forward. Indeed for more 
than four years, the unconquer- 
able sons of God and the lovers of 
humanity, have been fighting for- 
ward through the smoke-clouds of 
battle to win again their inalienable 
right to look forward hopefully and 
fearlessly — fighting forward with 
changeless purpose to drive from the 
earth, the Hunish hosts of wrong and 
oppression, and to destroy utterly the 
last remaining citadel of tyranny. 
The task has been so titanic and so 
compelling that none might rest for 
a single moment to measure the full 
meaning of the conflict, or contem- 
plate the heroic greatness of the re- 
sults. 

And now victory — more complete 
than we had dared to hope. Victory 
of justice over cruelty, of liberty over 
slavery, of happiness over misery, of 
democracy over autocracy. The free 
peoples of the world have once more 
paid the supreme and ultimate price 
of blood and tears for the rights of a 
nobler and freer existence, and now 
as always the rights which have been 
won, have been worth the price. 

The real and vital significance of 
the victory shall be known only to our 
children and our children's children; 



but this much we know: The hun 
philosophy which glorified the biolog- 
ical law of hatred and brutality, born 
of the jungle, is dead; the hun re- 
ligion which denied Christ and en- 
throned the pagan god of war, is 
dead; the hun cult of science which 
wallowed in gross materialism, is 
dead ; the hun system of politics 
which exalted might above right, is 
dead ; and if the individual huns who 
have been responsible for the shame- 
less crimes against humanity receive 
their just deserts, they too shall die 
the death of bloody outlaws. And 
further, let it be said, that history 
again records the failure of another 
tyrant who started something which 
he could not finish, and which in fact 
has put upon his life, a finish as com- 
plete as it is ignoble. 

The war has again revealed, what 
has always been basically true, that 
the world is directed by ideas. The 
direction may take a noble course or 
an ignoble one. Civilization goes for- 
ward or stands still, just as society 
is either fossilized by a stagnation of 
ideas, or is energized by a fermenta- 
tion of ideas. Normal and healthy 
growth and progress are marked by 
a gradual development of a new order 
as it replaces an older one. This is 
evolution which may perform its 



182 



The Delta 



functions as benevolently among so- 
cial institutions as it performs them 
in the lower ranges of world-life. 

When the strata of social life be- 
come fixed, when they cease to re- 
spond to change and growth, there 
follows a reaction upon the human 
mind causing it to seek relief from its 
chains of repression. Ideas begin to 
take shape, new thoughts break 
against the old order. So moved men 
cease to be complacent and submis- 
sive. They destroy the tyranny 
which holds and confines them. They 
rush into the light and life of new 
ideas. This is revolution. 

More than half of the civilized 
world is now rushing through the 
storm and chaos of revolution. Rus- 
sia, Austria, Hungary, Bohemia, Po- 
land, the Slav States, Germany — all 
are now ablaze with the moving and 
fertilizing ideas of liberty, frater- 
nity, equality — the symbols of eman- 
cipation which the free nations of the 
earth carried into battle against the 
Germanic hosts, held aloft as the 
flaming ideas of hope and happiness 
for all peoples who should take them 
as their very own. 

They have indeed accepted these 
ideas with a vengeance. Having ac- 
cepted them amid an anarchy of 
blood and tears, the question is, not 
what these ideas will do for the peo- 
ple, but what will the people do with 
these ideas? Since no ideas which 
concern the social well-being of a na- 
tion are of any value, unless they find 
an orderly application and expression 
in the political and economic life of 
the nation. 

Therefore, the world war is not 
over — it is not half over. It will not 
be over until all the civilized nations 
reach that stability of ideas which 
shall promise and produce the bless- 
ings of justice and happiness. It 
will not be over until democracy is 
safe from the vagaries of the Indus- 
trial Workers of the World, from 
Bolshevikism, from Marxian Social- 
ism which seeks to set up the class 
rule of the proletariats — that is, the 
working classes. 



We didn't start the war. We may 
thajik God that our souls are free of 
that monstrous crime. But the free 
democracies of the world must finish 
it. And not until we have done a 
good job, in constructive finishing, 
may we thank God again. 

• 

The processes of re-construction 
will not be confined to the old mon- 
archial nations, which have just come 
into a new life of freedom. The old 
democracies like Great Britain, 
France, Italy and the United States 
must harmonize their free institu- 
tions to the new ideas which are now 
setting up nobler ideals of human 
existence. This work will fall upon 
the thoughtful and enlightened men 
and women of these free nations. It 
is their first duty to analyze the forces 
now at work, to discard the ideas 
which are harmful and unite upon 
these which will bring the world to a 
condition of peace, security and hap- 
piness. 

I make bold to suggest in an hum- 
ble spirit some of the tendencies 
which will likely direct and modify 
our basis institutions : 

(1) Religion will become more 
democratic, progressive, tolerant, 
self-sacrificing and unified. The old 
theologies are as dead as Bancho's 
ghost, to be succeeded by the supreme 
conceptions of the Fatherhood of 
God, and the brotherhood of men. 
Men will no longer seek by conform- 
ing to rites and ceremonies, to save 
their souls. They will save them by 
acts of love, and service to their fel- 
low men. Heaven will be no longer 
a place of ineffable glory beyond the 
stars. It will be the world itself, 
shot through and through with the 
light of good cheer, and hope and 
happiness. Theologies having passed 
away, religious denominations will 
cease to exist as such, and all men 
will group themselves under the di- 
vine leadership of one God of love and 
truth. The pathway leading to Him 
will be no longer narrow, but as wide 
as the conceptions of love and truth 
themselves, so that men shall find 



The Finish of Hunism 



Him and serve Him, by all the pre- 
monitions and inspirations of life, be 
they the verities of science, the real- 
ities of social growth, or the sacrific- 
ing' labors of love. 

(2) Political institutions will ex- 

Kess the broad ideals of human well- 
ing. Politics as this country has 
developed them, will become sane, 
honest and enlightened. . Agencies of 
the Government will become more 
and more responsive to the people's 
will. All arbitrary power will cease 
and tyrants will be shot to death, as ■ 
fast as they appear. 

(3) Educational institutions will' 
be released from the plague of mate- 
rialism, to be refreshed by the human 
qualities of noble and self-denying 
service. Teutonic cults of philosophy 
and science will be sent to hell, never 
to return. It will be no longer 
thought necessary, to teach the Ger- 
man language, to secure the funda- 
mentals of an education, or to secure 
a doctor's degree, at a German uni- 
versity to obtain the highest standing 
in the teaching force of an American 
college. 

Not that we are to fall into a nar- 
row Philistinism which will deny all 
that may be sound in German 
achievement, but no longer will we 
fawn before the German assumption 
of super-intellectuality. 

The uplifting ministries of learn- 
ing will reach every child who will be 
given a fair chance for a successful 
and honorable life. Ignorance, the 
hand maidens of false and mislead- 
ing ideas, will be banished and our 
democracy will be inspired and di- 



rected into sane, noble and disinter- 
ested actions. 

(4> Industrial and commercial 
institutions must expect to pass 
through serious if not radical trans- 
formations. Against the plan of rad- 
ical Socialism, which proposes to re- 
duce all economic life, to a common 
level of collective effort, we must set 
up the plan of co-operative indus- 
trialism. This will involve a fairer 
division of the productive income, as 
well as bring the laboring man into 
a closer relation with all enterprises. 
England has already taken this step 
by organizing industrial councils 
composed of employers and employes. 

Whatever the great future holds in 
store for us, whatever the trend of 
great social and economic events, we 
shall make no permanent achieve- 
ment unless we keep our minds open 
to the world-wide yearnings and 
strivings of all the human races. The 
law of progress which the world war 
has established, and which cuts 
throught all human effort is this : All 
nations are one — all must rise or fall 
together — all must work together for 
social and economic well-being. 

In a struggle which must uplift 
and glorify humanity, it is most grat- 
ifying that our Brotherhood has re- 
sponded so nobly. It has sent forth ' 
a real host of fearless and forward- 
looking men who have thought it a 
joyous privilege to serve and die for 
their Faith and their Flag — the one 
standing for chivalry, the other for 
justice. Those who have served and 
those who have died, have already 
won an abiding place of glory in the 
Walhalla of Memory. 





1 



DECEMBER. 1918 



THE DELTA 



The Regent in France 

Four Months With the American Army 
By Regent Borden H. Burr 



SB ever-increasing names on our 
Jberty Roll, the Knights of the 
Republic, disclose, in a general 
the part our Fraternity is play- 
n the present great struggle for 
ty and humanity. 

uing the past summer, as a spe- 
representative of 'the National 
Work Council of the Young 
I Christian Association, it was 
oivilege to observe first-hand at 
range the wonderful work of the 
rlean soldier, including some of 
Hfema Nu Brothers. 



1 be impossible to put a 
r upon the opportunity which I 
n*d of thus observing the Amer- 
aoidier, marching with him on 
dhea, billeting with him in the 
• and barnyards of the French 
mtry, seeing him heroically 
rtand assaults in the trenches, 
tgeously while in reserve imder- 
a terrors of bombardment, fear- 
r' charge the enemy through 
( woods and across open fields, 
unselfishly and uncomplainingly 
r wounds and surrender life as a 
sacrifice for our sakes and for 
mmtry*s honor. Any one hav- 
hia experience of necessity must 
a clearer conception of our coun- 
Ideals and a greater pride in its 
fish purposes. Such a one must 
If he has recognized the sacrifice 
underlies it all, have his great 
i In his country and her soldiers 
sailors tempered with humility 
i he knows that the most he can 



render over here is but the least when 
compared with one of those over 
there. 

The Gallant Death or Brother McGrew 

My experiences have not only made 
me feel, if possible, a greater pride in 




my Fraternity, but that pride — more 
democratic than it used to be— -em- 
braces American manhood which our 
Fraternity typifies. 

It was my good fortune to be as- 
signed to the 167th Infantry Regi- 
ment of the Rainbow Division. This 
regiment, while originally composed 
of Alabamians, through severe losses 




in battle and replacements has be-' 
come, in a measure, all American. 
Captain Herman Thompson, Iota ; 
Lieutenant Richard B. Kelly, Theta; 
Lieutenant George Glenn, Sigma 
Theta ; Lieutenant Robert M. Brooks. 
Epsilon ; Lieutenant Judson McGrew, 
Beta Beta, and myself represented 
the Sigma Nus in this regiment. 
When I tell you that Brother McGrew 
paid the supreme sacrifice, that 
Brother Thompson was most severely 
and probably fatally wounded, and 
that all of the others received wounds, 
it can be readily seen how the work 
of the Sigma Nus and their sacrifice 
■ in this regiment has been almost a 
hundred per cent. This regiment, 
after having assisted, on July 14 to 
17, inclusive, in breaking the spear- 
head of the German offensive on the 
Champagne front, took part for eight 
days in our offensive which drove the 
Germans to Fismes. The division 
went into this offensive under most 
unfavorable circumstances. The majn 
body of the huns had retreated, leav- 
ing as a rear guard a very large num- 
ber of machine guns, and also pro- 



tecting the retreat by heavy artillery. 
It had been raining for several days 
and the roads were impassable, and 
on this account our artillery had not 
been able to keep up with the infan- 
try. The regiment on the afternoon 
of the 26th of July was ordered to 
drive through a very thick forest, bo 
dense that it was almost impossible 
to maintain liason and so muddy that 
even foot progress was difficult. With 
nothing except their rifles and bay- 
onets and high-handed courage, these 
boys had to charge through the forest 
under shell Are and against machine 





Group from the 167th D. S. Infantry 
Including Lieutenant Kelly 



guns placed in the trees and emplace- 
ments in the field beyond, so hidden 
that the only possible way to locate 
them was to charge against them. It 
was in the thickest of this battle that 
Lieutenant McGrew lost his life. As 
his men were advancing against an 
unusually thick nest of machine gun- 
ners, they were thrown in momen- 
tary confusion by some of the French 
who were on our left (the boys 
always thought German spies in 
French uniform) running back 
through them, yelling "Allez! Allez!" 
McGrew rushed from a place of com- 
parative safety, rallied his men, re- 



The Regent in France 



187 



ceived a wound in the aim, continued 
to go iorward, and after going about 
twenty paces was struck again, this 
time dying instantly. The next morn- 
ing twenty-one German machine guns 
were found in this part of the forest, 
a great many American dead, includ- 
ing the body of Lieutenant McGrew, 
but at least three German dead for 
every American, and most of the Ger- 
mans showed on their persons bay- 
onet wounds and the marks of per- 
sonal combat. 

History will never record a braver 
fight than was made by these boys, 
nor braver leadership than was given 
by Lieutenant McGrew and the other 
officers of this regiment. They gained 
their objective, but when gained only 
585 effectives of a regiment of nearly 




3,000 remained in line. During this 
same battle Lieutenant It. B. Kelly 
was seriously gassed and is yet con- 
fined in the hospital. Captain Her- 
man Thompson received a most seri- 
ous wound in his head from shrapnel 
and is being returned to the States, 
with slight hope of his ultimate re- 
covery. The degrees of the wounds 
our other Brothers received I have 
not been able to ascertain, though I 
understand they were not severe. 

The sacrifice and service which is 
being rendered by our Brothers, their 
unselfish and Uncomplaining suffer- 
ing of wounds and surrender of life 
should- cause us to arrive at a re- 



newed and consecrated determination 
to subordinate everything else to the 
passionate support of our country 
and of our boys until we have at- 
tained a peace with complete victory 
and a surrender without conditions. 

The Regent's Dinner 
Receiving a cablegram ordering 
me to return to the States in time to 
assist in the Liberty Loan drive, I in- 
serted in the Paris edition of the New 
York Herald a notice requesting any 
Sigma Nus who could conveniently 
do so to meet me for dinner on Mon- 
day evening, August 26.* In response 
to this invitation, with as little possi- 
bility as it had and as short as the 
time was, I was delighted on reaching 
Paris to find letters from Sigma Nus, 
some of them as far away as Italy. 
Fifteen of us, representing all sec- 
tions of the country and a great many 
of our Chapters and all branches and 
grades of the. service, gathered 
around the board. Among those pres- 
ent whom I recall were First Lieuten- 
ant C. J. Underhill, Beta Xi, Chap- 
lain, 2d Regiment, M. M. S. C.; Ser- 
geant G. C. Schrieber, 27th U. S. 
Aero Squadron, Gamma Eta; Lieu- 
tenant Earle J. Dickinson, Gamma 
Eta, Air Service; First Lieutenant 
Alfred A. Grant, Beta Kappa, 27th 
Aero Squadron, First Pursuit Group, 
Kansas State University ; First Lieu- 
tenant Roy A. Miller, Gamma Mu, 
Aviation Service; Lieutenant J. B. 
Lovelace, Beta Theta, Anti-Aircraft 
Artillery School; Second Lieutenant 
George C. Hawley, Beta Nu-Upsilon, 
Battery C, 2d Anti-Aircraft; First 
Lieutenant John F. Merrill, Gamma 
Delta-Gamma Lambda, 28th Aero 
Squadron. From these Brothers and 
from a great many other Sigma Nus 
whom I ran across from time to time 
(and everywhere I went Sigma Nus 
were found), we heard of the other 
Brothers, and from what we could 
learn, all over there in their appoint- 
ed positions are living their lives and 
performing the deeds which will go to 



188 



The Delta 



make our record in this world strug- 
gle a record of sorrow for those who 
have been called upon to pay the su- 
preme sacrifice, but of great pride 
and joy that we have been able 
through these Brothers and through 
the services of those who remain to 
contribute so much to the cause of 
liberty, democracy and Christianity. 

Overlooking No Man's Land 

During the night of July 4, with 
the exception of the supply company, 
which remained housed in a large 
abandoned manufacturing plant, the 
167th Infantry Regiment moved to- 
wards the front. After several move- 
ments, Companies E and F were lo- 
cated with French troops in the front 
line trenches, just outside of the 
ruined town of Souain, and Compa- 
nies G and H in the front line 
trenches to the right. The first and 
third battalions were located in sup- 
port and reserve, the first battalion 
being placed in stretches of woods, 
while the third occupied a long open 
ditch in the field. Regimental head- 
quarters were located in a French 
camp between the first and third bat- 
talions. From the 5th of July until 
the German offensive commenced at 
midnight of July 14 there was com- 
paratively little shelling from the 
enemy. It is their custom, so the 
French officers say, to spend a period 
before beginning an offensive in in- 
tensive preparation, during which 
time they make but little reply to the 
bombardment of the Allies. We 
therefore had the opportunity with 
comparative safety of going through 
the surrounding country, becoming 
familiar with the locations of our 
boys, and watching with interest the 
great preparations being made to 
withstand the threatened assault. 
One afternoon we went into an obser- 
vation post cleverly built and hidden 
in the top of a magnificent oak tree. 
From here we obtained a most won- 
derful view. This Champagne sec- 
tion of France is beautiful. Behind 
us from the post we could see as far 
as the eye could reach the golden 
grain waving in the sunshine, bril- 



liantly colored with the red of the 
poppies, while the gireen background 
of the government-kept forests added 
to the beauty of the scene. Above us 
were twenty or twenty-five aero- 
planes like huge birds darting here 
and there. In front the contrast be- 
tween the pleasures of peace and the 
terrors of war became manifest. 
Here we looked out on the trenches, 
and No-Man's Land, devastated and 
desolate, not a trace of vegetation re- 
maining, the earth plowed and re- 
plowed with shot and shell ; trenches 
laced and interlaced. It had the ap- 
pearance — except many times gloom- 
ier and more desolate — of a mill pond 
after the water had been drained off 
for days and the sun had dried and 
cracked the earth into innumerable 
cracks and all vegetation had with- 
ered and become dead. Looking on 
this portion of the trenches as a sec- 
tion, it was not difficult to imagine 
miles of similar territory and the mil- 
lions of men lined ready to spring at 
each other's throats. The country 
here is rolling, but so long has it been 
cultivated (and even now the brave 
and thrifty French have planted their 
grain within the wrte entanglements) 
that it seems free from the irregu- 
larities of our hills. The valleys 
gently melt into the hills. Evidently 
the French under General Gourard 
had determined to make a final stand. 
Guns of all sizes were camouflaged in 
almost every conceivable place. From 
a distance of ten miles behind the line 
could be found' hidden within the 
trees and camouflaged with branches 
and with bagging painted to conform 
with the landscape large naval guns 
with a range of from twenty to thirty 
miles. From here towards the front 
guns of lesser caliber were placed at 
a distance of within two or three 
miles of the front; hundreds of 
French 75's formed a network of de- 
fenses. Still closer could be found 
innumerable machine guns. Through 
this part of the country runs one of 
the military roads constructed by 
Caesar. Though not longer used as 
a road, its grade is clearly discern- 
ible, and the outline, with firmness of 



The Regent in France 



189 



contour, is preserved. At places it 
has the appearance of an old railroad 
grade, and along this grade one could 
find hundreds and hundreds of ma- 
chine guns. The successful, camou- 
flaging of these guns is amazing. You 
can pass sometimes within a few feet 
of a large gun without discovering its 
presence. I recall one afternoon as I 
was going from visiting one of the 
battalions back to headquarters, 
walking along with my thoughts far 
across the sea, a big gun within ten 
feet of me belched forth, deafening 
the ears, numbing the faculties and 
causing me to wonder where the 
earthquake came from. 

Dugouts de Luxe 

In this portion of France there had 
been constructed large dugouts. Un- 
derneath regimental headquarters 
were three of these dugouts, capable 
of housing some fifteen hundred or 
two thousand men. One of the dug- 
outs had been specially constructed 
for use as a hospital. About ninety 
feet underground, with three en- 
trances, and an entry below with 
rooms turned off, it provided wards 
for two hundred and fifty patients. 
It was floored, with side walls and 
ceilings of corrugated iron, and while 
it lacked having many of the conven- 
iences of our hospitals, it was really 
a hospital underground. Other dug- 
outs were scattered here and there 
through the woods for the purpose of 
affording shelter during the bombard- 
ment. The love of the French for the 
artistic was never better illustrated 
than oy little things one would notice 
around these dugouts and temporary 
camps. Although the camps were 
known to be within shell range and 
thus expected at any time to be shot 
up, we would find flower gardens, 
carved figures in the chalk-like rock 
of the trenches, which lends itself to 
sculpture, and vegetable gardens ar- 
tistically planted — one I recall in the 
shape of an enormous horseshoe— 
the camouflage around and over the 
places where the dugouts stood hav- 
ing the appearance as you approached 
it, especially at night by moonlight, 



of a beautiful summer arbor. Al- 
most every day we would carry cig- 
arettes, tobacco, chocolate and cakes 
to the front line trenches. Here our 
boys lived like surface rats. To make 
conditions more pleasant and safer, 
many of them undercut and make 
shelves no larger than their bodies. 
Irving Cobb used to refer to an upper 
in a sleeper as "the upper shelf of 
Mr. Pullman's perambulating pan- 
try." He should see one of these Ala- 
bama shelves. They used pieces of 
shelter tent to cover them with, and • 
during their idle moments write vari- 
ous inscriptions with the chalk rock. 
One had written across it, "Stage en- 
trance. No admittance^ This is not 
the Jefferson (Birmingham Theater), 
so keep out, YOU/' The Germans, 
when they attacked, a few days later, 
obeyed instructions and kept out. 

Creature Comforts 

We found the boys hungry and al- 
most crazy for cigarettes, tobacco and 
chocolates. Transportation is a big 
problem in France. It is difficult to 
get "Y" supplies from the warehouses 
to the supply eschelons of the regi- 
ments, which are in the front, and 
from there the "Y" secretary carries 
it out on his back. It was a great 
experience to go through the trenches 
and hand out chocolate and cigarettes 
and tobacco to these boys. On ac- 
count of the scarcity of supplies we 
had to limit each boy to a choice of 
one article. The cigarette smoker and 
the chocolate fiend loved their cigar- 
ettes and chocolate, but oh, boy, how 
the chewer loves his chew! One 
chewer bought the piece of plug lim- 
ited to the individual, and I saw him 
stealthily slip a piece of money to one 
of his comrades who was broke,' with 
the expectation that this comrade 
would purchase for him another plug. 
The comrade, who loved cigarettes, 
winked at me, and with the other fel- 
low's money, to his intense disgust, 
bought cigarettes instead of chewing 
tobacco. The life of a Y. M. C. A. 
secretary is a happy, but busy one. 
My diary of Friday, July 12, which 
was a normal day, shows that the sec- 



190 



The Delta 



retary served the boys in the follow- 
ing ways: Carried in his pack, 
strapped to his back, writing paper, 
tobacco, cakes, raisins and chocolates 
to the companies in the front line 
trenches, the walk to and fro being 
at least twelve miles ; sold goods over 
the counter in a canteen amounting 
to over two thousand francs' worth ; 
gave out thousands of sheets of free 
paper and envelopes; cashed checks 
for a number of officers ; sent money 
home for a number of enlisted boys ; 
• wrote several letters for soldiers who 
were not able to write, and conducted 
prayer service at the end of the day. 

The rolling- kitchens were located 
about three miles behind the front 
trenches, and the food was carried up 
by details in canteens and large cans 
provided by the French. Here the 
bread was principally French hard- 
tack, which when wet swells like a 
sponge. Meeting a detail carrying 
dinner to the front in a heavy down- 
pour of rain, we asked, "Everybody 
happy ?" and the response came, 
"Sure. This rain will make much 
bread of the hardtack." 



M 



Marking Time 



M 



Interlude 



On July 8 it was reported to the 
commanders of the different compa- 
nies that the German offensive would 
begin at 4 o'clock, and about 3 o'clock 
the boys stationed in the woods in 
support and reserve commenced to 
get ready their equipment in antici- 
pation of the attack. Their spirits 
reminded one of a football team on 
edge — a little nervous, but ready to 
go. Listening to them talk, we heard 
such remarks as these : "Parade be- 
gins at 4 o'clock" ; "The next time we 
show in Germany" ; "If one gets me 
I'm shaved and had a hair cut" ; "It's 
hard to die without a chew." A few 
minutes before 4 o'clock the French 
commenced to lay down a very heavy 
barrage, and the noise was terrific. 
Could see over in their lines a very 
large German ammunition dump in 
flames. For some reason the report 
of the attack proved incorrect and it 
did not develop at this time. 



At night large details were taken 
from each company and carried for- 
ward for the purpose of digging 
trenches as cover for the supports. 
They went forward in the communi- 
cating trenches which had already 
been partially built, and as they 
wound in and out of the trenches with 
only their steel helmets visible in the 
twilight it had the appearance at a 
distance of a large snake moving for- 
ward. These details were handled in 
the democratic way of marking off 
so much space for each man, and 
when this space was completed his 
job was done. During the night the 
terrific din of the big guns, which 
seemed as if shot just over your bed 
roll, together with the activities of 
the rats, made sleep a question of 
almost impossibility. 

On July 11 there was distributed 
to the boys cigarettes and tobacco 
from the Alabama tobacco fund. 
Could those in charge of this fund 
and the donors see the delight of the 
boys on receiving their allotment of 
the cigarettes and tobacco they would 
be more than repaid for their gener- 
osity &nd would have an added zeal 
for carrying on this good work in the 
future. 

"Awake and on Our Guard' 9 

On this . same day the following 
general order of the famous French 
General Gourard was published, 
translated and read to each of the 
companies : 

"To the French and American Sol- 
diers of the Fourth Army : 

"We may be attacked at any mo- 
ment. You all know that a defensive 
battle was never engaged under more 
favorable conditions. We are awake 
and on our guard. We are powerfully 
reinforced with infantry and artil- 
lery. 

"You will fight on a terrain that 
you have transformed by your work 
and oy your perseverance into a re- 
doubtable fortress. This fortress will 
be invincible and all its entrances are 
well guarded. 



The Regent in France 



191 



"The bombardment will be terrible. 
You will support it without weakness. 
The assault will be fierce, in a cloud 
of smoke, dust and gas, but your po- 
sition and your armament are for- 
midable. In your breasts beat the 
brave and strong hearts of free men. 
None shall glance to the rear. None 
shall yield a step.. Each shall have 
but one thought— to kill many until 
they have had their fill. 

"That is why your general says to 
you, You will break this assault and 
it will ce a happy day. 

"Signed : Gourard." 

With determined faces the orders 
were received and the attack awaited 
with confidence. 

• 

On the morning of July 12 we 
found that a regiment of French Blue 
Devils had moved into our camp dur- 
ing the night. They remained under 
cover, and about daylight the follow- 
ing morning made a successful raid 
on the German trenches, capturing 
thirty or forty prisoners. From these 
prisoners valuable information as to 
the plans of the enemy and the time 
of their contemplated attack were se- 
cured. Having with their usual brav- 
ery and recklessness performed this 
difficult undertaking, they marched 
out of camp, singing as they went the 
French marching song, "The Madel- 
on." This had more of the glamor 
and pomp of warfare than anything 
we had seen. These Blue Devils, with 
their dark blue uniforms and jaunty 
caps, having about them an air of 
recklessness and bravado, in appear- 
ance look the part, and their deeds, 
as we all know, have not belied their 
names. 

The Cross Preferred 

On Sunday, July 14, it was ascer- 
tained that the Germans would begin 
their offensive at midnight, and that 
the attack on this immediate front 
would be made by twenty divisions on 
a twenty-kilometer front, and oppos- 
ing the twenty divisions the allies had 
seventeen. In the afternoon the 
French general presented crosses of 
honor to twenty-eight men. I noticed 



that for some of them it was the third 
decoration. The presentation is very 
formal and inspiring. The general 
would address the soldier, pin the 
medal on his breast and kiss him on 
both cheeks. Following this the band 
would play a part of the Marsellaise, 
the music being closed each time by 
the buglers, who used their bugles not 
only musically, but with the graceful- 
ness and mannerism of a band lead- 
er's baton. The same ceremony was 
continued for each of the soldiers to 
whom the croix de guerre was pre- 
sented. One of our boys standing 
nearby remarked, "Gee, I'm willing 
to pass up the croix de guerre if 
they'd just give me a croix (cross) 
de Atlantic." 

Bringing in "les Blesses 99 

From my diary the following is 
copied : 

"Monday, July 15. Well, it hap- 
pened and is continuing to happen. 
After 8:30 service last evening we 
took our roll-ups to headquarters 
company dugout, but found it too full 
for comfort, there being standing 
room only. So returned to hut, and 
just as we were going to bed received 
a message from headquarters for us 
to go into the hospital dugout. We 
went down into this dugout, forty- 
nine steps, about ninety feet under- 
ground, the dugout being floored, 
walled and ceiled. About ten min- 
utes before midnight the bombard- 
ment of the allies begins, and at mid- 
night that of the Boche. In a few 
minutes French artillerymen begin 
pouring into the dugout yelling "Gas" 
as they came in. We get into our gas 
masks with as much rapidity as pos- 
sible and with feelings hard to de- 
scribe, as we sit below, listening to 
the explosion of the shells, the shriek- 
ing of the shrapnel and the answer- 
ing drum of our artillery. The noise 
is terrific. The wounded begin to 
come in. We hear to our left rifle 
fire, and this lends credence to the 
report which has already come (aft- 
erwards this was found to be incor- 
rect ; the firing we heard was an am- 
munition dump set on fire) that the 



192 



The Delta 



Boches have broken through on our 
left and that all communications have 
been cut. There is nothing for us to 
do except to wait, like rats in a hole, 
for developments. For over twelve 
hours constant shelling, both from 
the enemy and the allies, continues 
without abating. It is impossible to 
find out what is happening around 
us. About 8 a. m. Captain Mortimer 
Jordan runs in from regimental head- 
quarters, reports thirty-six casualties 
in the third battalion and a great 
many in the first, no direct news from 
the second battalion in the front line, 
that wires, flashes, carrier pigeons 
have all gone, and, as in Caesar's day, 
runners have to be depended upon. 
He reports the bombardment of shells 
to extend from the front almost in a 
steady stream as far back as Suippes. 
At 9 a. m. a Frenchman with shrap- 
nel-wounded head is brought in, re- 
fuses opiate and shows the most won- 
derful nerve while Major Watt 
dresses his wound. U. S. soldier hit 
150 yards from dugout, dies as they 
were bringing him in. One of our 
sergeants who had reported this man 
being struck, returns about 9 :30 with 
a badly wounded Frenchman. Later 
on this same sergeant comes into the 
dugout and asks that his shrapnel 
wound, which he had received when 
his comrade had been killed, be treat- 
ed. In a few minutes he grows weak, 
and while we hold his hand, dies. Re- 
quests us to write his mother. His 
individual service, thinking not of 
himself, but altogether of others, is 
typical of our nation's unselfish serv- 
ice in this world conflict. Following 
the death of this sergeant the wound- 
ed commence to come in in large num- 
bers. One Doy dies from phosgene 
gas — tasteless, odorless and invisible. 
Neither he nor any one else suspected 
that he had it until within a few min- 
utes of his death. Foaming at the 
mouth and appearance of his features 
terrible. Several other gas patients 
brought in. 10 a. m. — Shell exploded 
in the midst of a burial detail en- 
gaged in burying two of the men of 
the headquarters company. Two of 
the burial detail were killed and two 
— Lowe and Emmons — brought into 



the dugout. Lowe's left arm and 
shoulder practically torn off by the 
shrapnel, Emmons with a jagged hole 
almost as large as a water bucket in 
his back, and with shrapnel in his 
face, side and back. Lowe talks a 
good deal and remarks to his lieuten- 
ant, "Well, lieutenant, I have sol- 
diered with you to the last." They 
both ask for cigarettes, realize their 
condition, and request us to write 
their relatives. Ambulance service 
not good. These two boys and others, 
with only first-aid attention, are not 
evacuated with ambulances until late 
in the afternoon. Edwards gassed, 
gasping and choking. All of them 
nerve clean through. Calls have been 
coming in for ambulances to go to 
Companies G and H in the front line 
trenches and it is reported that they 
have there fifty casualties awaiting 
attention, and that the men have been 
engaged in hand-to-hand fighting 
with the Germans. About noon, the 
shelling having lessened, we venture 
out of the dugout. The camp, which 
the day before had been a beautiful 
place with twenty or thirty barracks, 
large trees, artistically kept by the 
French, had overnight become a 
shambles, trees two and three feet in 
diameter snapped off like match- 
heads, the barracks shot down and 
burned, thirtyrsix mules and horses 
killed, the ground pocked with shell 
holes, some very large. Germ&n air- 
planes are over. They seem to have 
the superiority in the air. California 
engineers who had been located with 
our third battalion come into our dug- 
out. During the bombardment a 
shell made a direct hit in the midst 
of these engineers, killing eight and 
wounding several. Those remaining, 
with tears in their eyes, plead for an 
opportunity to get into the fight. See 
more suffering and blood during the 
day than in my entire life. Stories 
that we have all heard of the persist- 
ent bombing by Germans of hospitals 
are confirmed. Ambulance drivers 
report that evacuation hospital at 
Bussey le Chateau bombed during the 
night and several patients injured; 
other wounded at once evacuated to 
Chalons. Bombed there and evacu- 



The Regent in France 



193 



ated again some distance behind 
Chalons, the last evacuation hospital 
being about twenty miles from the 
first-aid stations. At 8 o'clock we 
take the first ambulance to Compa- 
nies G and H, four of us in the party. 
Went the route that we recognized 
irom trips we had made to these boys 
in the previous days, but so entirely 
changed as to make us doubt whether 
or not we were on the correct road. 
Roads full of shell holes around which 
we had to detour. Trees cut down, 
dead horses and mules alongside the 
road. Recognizing landmarks, we 
keep going until we reach an Amer- 
ican outpost, who states that we are 
on the correct road, but that the last 
quarter of a mile is under German 
observation and shelling." 

We reached our destination and an- 
other scrap from my diary reads : 

"Found heavy casualties at G and 
H — about forty-five. One-half of 
platoon missing. Men are holding po- 
sitions and fighting the Germans face 
to face. Rockets all colors going up. 
Shells bursting. I get in a tremen- 
dous hurry to leave, but find that 
these ambulance boys after getting 
here would not be hurried until all 
patients properly attended. Leave 
with these litter patients all shot to 
pieces. Some trip coming back. Sky 
towards Germany full of all kinds of 
lights — flashes — guns big and little. 
The road with shell holes in it and 
pieces of trees cut with shrapnel all 
along it. No lights to the ambulance. 
Two of the boys lying out on the fen- 
ders acting as headlights. Dead 
mules and horses alongside the road. 
Shells bursting, and barrage in rear 
and to our side. Ambulance had to 
take the wounded to Chalons, so on 
final trip they put Pete, one of the 
orderlies, and myself out to find our 
way back to the hospital dugout. 
Passed French ammunition trains, 
but my limited French did not get 
much information. Met another 
wagon and asked, "Ou est Camp Do- 
lores?" American voice responding, 
"By God, man, I like to have shot 
you," sounded sweet. They directed 
us, and we reached dugout at 1 a. m." 



A "Heavenly" Street Car 

On the morning of July 16 we vis- 
ited the third battalion, taking cigar- 
ettes, tobacco and chocolate. We 
found that those boys had been 
through probably the worst experi- 
ence of any. They were located in a 
large open ditch without dugouts or 
cover. Shells had bursted thickly 
among them and their casualties had 
been heavy. One of the lieutenants 
told me of the conduct of a young 
Hebrew, Benjamin Rutstein. With 
both legs mangled by shrapnel, he 
called for paper and pencil and wrote 
a letter to his mother. It was a won- 
derful letter ; he told her that he was 
dying, but that it was all right, he 
was dying like a brave man and for 
his country. Again we found the 
Germans had superiority in the air. 
Boys here reported that German 
planes had been over them almost 
without opposition and had fired ma- 
chine guns into the ditch where they 
were staying for partial cover. While 
we were there ten German planes 
made us a visit, and we heard for the 
first time the spiteful "spat, spat, 
spat" of the machine gun. Shelling 
had now become desultory and only 
occasionally the shriek of the shells 
was heard. The boys learn by their 
sound how to estimate fairly accu- 
rately the size, kind and probable 
place of striking. The Austrian 
"whiz-bam" — so nicknamed by the 
soldiers— has the sound almost of a 
street car running through the heav- 
ens, followed by the quick "whiz" and 
then the "bam" of the explosion. 
They pay no attention to the sound 
of the shells which do not indicate 
danger, but when one is heard coming 
which they recognize as being a close 
visitor no pancake can get flatter 
than they can to the ground or to 
their cover. The most expressive car- 
toon that has ever been executed is 
that one of Briggs' which represents 
the soldier's grand and glorious feel- 
ing when the shell proves to be a dud. 

Returning to the dugout from the 
third battalion, we had the oppor- 
tunity of observing the wonderful ac- 



196 



The Delta 



for their losses and sufferings. The 
vacant places closed up and they went 
forward to face the hun on another 
sector with renewed determination, 
an unconquerable spirit and a mag- 
nificent morale. 

The Fraternity of Arms" 

In the issue of "L'lllustration" of 
July 27 a wonderful description of 
this battle appeared. A free trans- 
lation of a portion of it is as follows : 

"While the attacking troops had 
arrived before the line of redoubts, 
all the machinery behind them was 
continuing to function according to 
the schedule based on a hypothesis of 
a victorious progress. The barrage 
rolled rythmatically far in advance of 
the furious waves breaking against 
the dyke which was resisting them. 
And the divisions of the second line, 
fully convinced that the first were 
pursuing their regular advance, like 
the .hands of a clock, had advanced 
behind them at the appointed hour; 
then motor convoys, supply wagons, 
horse-drawn batteries, in columns on 
the roads — into all that our artillery- 
men fired with open sights, pounding, 
grinding unceasingly, the men, the 
heavy trucks and the horses. Never 
has any one seen such fine hecatombs. 
At the source of the Aisne, on that 
little hillock which General Marchand 
used to love and which he called 
Tlace de l'Opera/ seventy corpses 
were lying in one heap. But it was 
perhaps in the region of the 'Monts,' 
which we had just abandoned during 
the night in conformance with the 
plans of the command, that the car- 
nage was the finest. They were seen 
to appear on the crests, at present 



denuded, where no cover masked 
them from view, and then to plunge 
down the slopes. Magnificent tar- 
gets ! 'We were firing into the mass/ 
the gunners say. 

"One fact will suffice to give an idea 
of the valor and determination of our 
soldiers, as well as the will of the 
enemy and of the violence of his as- 
sault. In the army corps which was 
fighting on our left wing three divi- 
sions had to face six enemy divisions, 
the first six of the enumeration given 
above. Now these admirable troops 
fought until the 18th. There was one 
battalion there which, completely sur- 
rounded, resisted three long hours on 
the Roman road and succeeded in dis- 
engaging itself. On the fourth day 
of the combat the regiment to which 
it belongs was charged with pinning 
down the enemy, holding him back, 
and keeping him from sending his 
reserves to another point. Not only 
did it 'pin him down,' but it prog- 
ressed at certain points and brought 
back as trophies thirty-three machine 
guns and machine gun rifles. 

"They had in their midst, in the 
most perfect fraternity of arms, an 
American division. It esteemed it an 
honor to rival them in courage and 
nerve. Its men went under fire as 
into a football game, in shirt sleeves, 
with their sleeves rolled up over ner- 
vous biceps. In a trench they were 
operating in concert with our Chaus- 
seurs sixty corpses were counted on 
a field of 250 meters. Ah! the Ger- 
mans who saw them at work can no 
longer doubt that they were there, 
and, indeed, as our troopers say, 
'certainly there.' " 



A Man's Game 

We are called upon as Americans and as Sigma Nils to play a 
man's part in a man's game. — Regent Borden Burr. 



A Word to the Active Chapters 

By Lieutenant George A. Chandler, Gamma Lambda 



ONE day last fall, shortly after 
Western college, a young army 
the opening of a large Middle 
officer called upon an old friend in the 
Faculty. The officer was the founder 
of the local chapter of a national fra- 
ternity at that school, and the pro- 
fessor was the chapter adviser. They 
were discussing the organization's 
prospects of rebuilding its member- 
ship that year. Only four of the old 
members had returned, and they were 
all members of the S. A. T. C. So far 
they hadn't "found the time" to 
pledge any new men, giving as an 
excuse that they were too busy with 
their military work. 

One of the Brothers, of an expan- 
sive personality, who might have 
been expected to put some life into a 
whirlwind rushing campaign, even 
under the very adverse conditions 
then existing for fraternities, was 
called upon the carpet and asked to 
explain why nothing had been done. 
He selfishly said that he was devoting 
absolutely every ounce of effort to 
purely military work, in order that 
he might be sure of winning a com- 
mission. He didn't have any time to 
fool with talking to men and trying 
to interest them in joining a frater- 
nity, least of all one that had such 
poor prospects and (to his way of 
thinking) no inducements. What 
good would it do to pledge and initiate 
a bunch of men? They would all go 
off to war anyway, and the fraternity 
would be of no use to them and they 
would do nothing for the fraternity. 
Why not just let the chapter die out, 
and then everybody come back after 
the war and revive it in a hurry ? Or 
if the adviser and the founder were 
so anxious for new men, why didn't 
they and some of the other older men, 
whose business it really was, since 
they started it (but who, by the way, 
were all in service), get out them- 
selves and try to interest some fresh- 
men? 



That man was a traitor to his fra- 
ternity, and further conversation de- 
veloped the proof and the cause. It 
seems this man felt that because 
there was no house, no group of con- 
genial brothers, and none of the gar- 
ish display of fraternity life, the fra- 
ternity was failing to contribute any- 
thing to his well-being. He was will- 
ing to have anything done for his 
good, but extremely unwilling, espe- 
cially in an emergency, to do even so 
much as lift his hand for the organi- 
zation which had honored him with 
membership. To make a long story 
short, it was found that this man had 
been initiated during the year 1917- 
'18 and had been a young member of 
the chapter during the most critical 
time in its history — when the mem- 
bership was very unstable, living con- 
ditions were abnormal, and the very 
essence of fraternity life was one of 
intense sacrifice. He had been unable 
to look beyond the darkling clouds to 
the time when his college and his 
Chapter would again be in prosperous 
condition, and his spirit passed on. 
Then and there he ceased to be a fra- 
ternity man, for he repudiated the 
principles laid down by the Founders 
of his Order. 

This is only an isolated instance of 
what may be taking place in the lives 
of countless so-called fraternity mem- 
bers — men who were initiated and 
grew into their chapters during a 
time of stress such as last year 
proved to be for so many organiza- 
tions. But does the fault lie entirely 
with such an individual as we have 
pictured? Cannot the chapter be 
blamed for not properly educating its 
members and establishing in them 
the principles of their order? This 
problem is one which will have to be 
faced squarely during the year by 
each one of the seventy-nine Chapters 
of Sigma Nu, lest our Brotherhood 
have traitors such as this to deal with 
— and, more important, lest some of 



198 



The Delta 



our Chapters expire through the neg- 
ligence and cupidity of just such an 
individual, capable of misdirecting 
the efforts of otherwise loyal com- 
rades. 

So let each Chapter of Sigma Nu 
take especial care this year to incul- 
cate, more thoroughly than ever be- 
fore, the true Principles of our Order. 
Let each novice be carefully drilled in 
a. genuine understanding of the im- 
perishable words of Past Regent 
Sears, author of the Creed of Sigma 
Nu. If the novice grasps the tre- 
mendous import of this message, no 
fear need be expressed that he will 
ever lose sight of that wonderful 
vision which gave birth in the heart 
of a great emporor to the enduring 
Principle upon which our Fraternity 
was later to be founded. Master of 
this inspiring Creed, a Knight can be 
trusted to obey the Ancient Customs, 



the Law, and the proper commands of 
his fraternal superiors ; he can be re- 
lied upon to "carry on" for the free- 
dom of all mankind — to be a better 
man, a better soldier, a better Amer- 
ican, as well as a better Sigma Nu. 

Keep up the system of careful ex- 
amination of candidates and thereby 
protect our Fraternity from encum- 
bering itself with men who, in a test- 
ing time, would prove disloyal and 
threaten the foundations of the Chap- 
ter. Choose your men with greater 
judgment than ever before. Now, if 
ever, we need quality instead of quan- 
tity. Pursue the sane policy of mak- 
ing your initiation ceremonies true 
courses of instruction— revelations of 
the deeper significance of our Order 
— not occasions of levity. Teach each 
man the meaning of the Fifth Point ; 
make him realize that the aim of 
Sigma Nu is to serve all mankind. 



Thanks 

By Archie Austin Coates, Delta Gamma 

[The following poem by Brother Coates was published with favorable com- 
ment in article on current poems on life published m recent issue of The Literary 
Digest. This poem is selected from a new volume of Brother Coates's "City. Tides/ 9 
(Doran & Co.)— The Editor.] 

For all the murmured words you did not say, 

And all the hours beneath the star-shot blue 

Unspent by us ; and for the gold and gay 

Midsummer noons we never shared . . . my thanks to you. 

Ay, and for all the messages of cheer 

And tenderness unsent, and for the true 

Deep gaze of understanding, that the drear 

And gray beclouded days found not . . . my thanks to you. 

For all that might have made our few days rare, 
But which you did not give, my thanks are due ; 
For you have made an ending I could bear, 
Which otherwise had rent me, so . . . my thanks to you. 



In War-Time Italy 

A Sigma Nu Red Cross Man's Experiences 
By V. Hugo Friedman, Tfaeta 

[Brother Friedman, formerly Chapter Advisor to Theta, joined the American 
Red Cross some time ago and was sent to Italy, and here are a few experiences 
whidx the censor permitted to pass. He has not run across Sigma Nus as our 
Brothers in France have frequently, but his tale is full of interest — The Editor.] 



IT may be of interest to you to know 
that neither submarines, Big Ber- 
thas nor bombing planes can stop 
a real dyed-in-the-wool Sigma Nu. 

When I left the old U. S. about two 
months ago for front-line work with 
the Red Cross canteen service, it was 
with one of the largest convoys that 
had ever sailed up to that time. When 
we hit out onto the deep blue you 
could look out over the bounding main 
at sunset and the turrets and stacks 
of the fleet resembled the sky line of 
New York city. Interesting events 
(to a layman) came thick and fast. 
Submarine alarms, life-boat drills — 
both day and night, the sad spectacle 
of seeing the body of one of our boys 
lowered over the side of his ship- 
all these were interesting. 

This burial took place just at sun- 
set. Every soldier on every vessel 
stood at attention, the officers at sa- 
lute, and faced the burial ship. 
Across the waters floated the trum- 
peter's 'taps" and as the casket was 
lowered the Stars and Stripes were 
pulled from off the body and it slid 
below the waves. And then, one 
morning when we were thinking of 
land again, a bunch of little dots came 
racing over the horizon. It took them 
only a few minutes to reach our flag- 
ship, and lo and behold, they were 
ten little "wasps of the sea" with the 
Stars and Stripes floating from their 
mast heads. Oh, boy ! but the troops 
aboard did give them a reception. 
And then came the crowning event of 
the trip. It was about 3 o'clock in 
the afternoon, that hour when every 
one is sunning himself on deck, a big 
gun boomed on the flagship and we 
could see the water spurt where the 



shell struck. In just one minute every 
little wasp was circling around the 
fleet like mad, some of them shooting 
off at tangents obedient to the signals 
of the flagship, and about every 500 
yards the little fellows would drop a 
depth bomb. At every explosion, al- 
though some of the bombs were 
dropped at a distance of a mile or 
more from us, the big ships would 
tremble, so it took no very vivid imag- 
ination to know just how far from 
life's pleasant journey riding on a 
hunted submarine must be. The dis- 
appearing stern of one sub as she 
started her disastrous journey to 
Davy Jones' locker was all that was 
visible to the spectators, but the next 
morning, when the troops lined up 
for inspection, the Adjutant read a 
wireless received from the British 
Admiralty to the effect that "From 
evidence obtainable we advise that 

your convoy has accounted for 

submarines." 

When land was sighted the convoy 
separated and our ship docked at a 
certain English port whose people 
had never beheld a contingent of 
American troops before. The au- 
thorities had been notified of our ap- 
proach and the city was in holiday 
attire. As the troops came down the 
gang plank and swung into line for 
a march to the City Hall, where a 
banquet awaited them, the school 
children threw flowers in their path, 
and I saw many a sad-eyed woman 
rush out into the ranks and, grasping 
a soldier's hand, exclaim, "Good luck, 
sir, and God bless you." Think of it. 
Over 16 per cent, of the inhabitants 
of this city were or had been in the 
war. 



200 



The Delta 



Then from England to France, 
where the most interesting event was 
the baptism of Big Berthas' fire for 
three days, and then on to Rome. 

From Rome to a little city of 
northeastern Italy and then out into 
the war zone by means of a military 
automobile. Now no one rides in 
Italy except the militare. The Amer- 
ican Army rides in Fords and the 
Italians in Fiats. Either one is ca- 
pable of from fifty to sixty miles per 
hour on these magnificent Italian 
roads, and believe me the military 
chauffeurs coax them for the limit. 
I am now stationed at a big villa used 
as a clearing station for the wounded 
and sick of an entire Italian army 
corps. Hundreds of men are brought 
here each twenty-four hours by the 
Red Cross, Italian and U. S. Army 
ambulances before being distributed 
to various hospitals nearby. We are 
in the very center of the war zone, 
just a few miles from the Piave and 
Grappa hills. You can hear the big 
guns easily, and I assure you that a 
civilian, unless he be aged or one- 
legged, is a matter of curiosity. 

. As I suppose you know, one cannot 
write of the things that would inter- 
est you most — of military incidents, 
of particular units, of dates or places, 
nor of anything that might interest 
our enemy the hun. Nor can you 
criticize in any way. The last named 
restriction does not handicap me, 
however, as it is my opinion that any 
man who would criticize in this war- 
stricken, devastated country ought to 
be taken out and shot rather than 
censored. But I can relate two inci- 
dents which happened to me ' last 
night and which may interest youl 

Last evening about 8 o'clock the di- 
rector of this station sent an orderly 
to my room and invited me to go with 
him to meet a colonel who had just 
arrived. We motored down to a large 
villa about one mile distant and there 
we were ushered into a large dining 
hall. Seated around several tables 
were the colonel, a captain and fifty- 
two young lieutenants. They had just 
started dinner. 



Now the director seems to have the 
idea that I am not only representing 
the American Red Cross, but the 
Army, Navy, President Wilson and 
the "whole damn family," and as this 
director is such a fine fellow and in- 
cidentally treats me so nicely I hesi- 
tate to wake him from "love's young 
dream." Courtesy, accompanied by 
some urging, compelled me to sit next 
the colonel. The only English words 
contained in. the colonel's repertoire 
were "New York" and "Washing- 
ton." Now these are good old burgs, 
I must admit, but their names are not 
conducive to a very prolonged conver- 
sation; but just to show the colonel 
how finished his knowledge of Eng- 
lish was I promptly told him, by 
means of signs, and punches princi- 
pally, that I lived in both places, took 
my meals in one and slept in the oth- 
er. This pleased his vanity very much. 
You can imagine how my mastery 
(?) of the Italian language was then 
put to the test. I find that this lan- 
guage is one-fourth poetry and three- 
fourths gesticulation. A good 
"Southpaw" who has the use of either 
arm could master it overnight. 

When the colonel could not "get 
me," which was ofttimes, I pulled my 
little English-Italian dictionary and 
we worked it out, much to the amuse- 
ment of his lieutenants. There was 
a piano in the hall, and after cheese 
was served one of the lieutenants 
played a few Italian operas most ex- 
cellently, then he tried for the Star 
Spangled Banner, on a whispered tip 
from the. colonel. Well, if I had not 
overheard the whisper, believe me I 
would have thought it another Italian 
opera. We immediately stood at at- 
tention and the lieutenants shouted 
"Viva Americana," then another lieu- 
tenant played all of the allied national 
airs and there was a following cheer 
for each. Three of the lieutenants 
sang solos in excellent voice, after 
which the pianist played "Over 
There." Everybody looked at me as 
if I was expected to go the sojo route, 
but I kept calm and also their respect. 



In WAfc-TiME Italy 



201 



Then came the crowning feature 
of the bill. The colonel called upon 
a young lieutenant for a recitation, 
and while I could not grasp over one 
word in every fifty, it was the best 
exhibition of acting that I have ever 
seen. You could grasp the story just 
as if he had been talking English. 
Later the director told me that he is 
considered the coming actor of Italy. 
He is a wonder. The captain arose at 
this point — he has just come out of 
the hospital, his left arm having been 
shot away — and presented the assem- 
bly with a bunch of chocolate that I 
had brought, telling them that I of- 
fered it as a token of my great es- 
teem. Then they cheered again, but 
remember that cheering came easily 
about this time of the evening, as the 
old wine bottle always remains on the 
table long after the crumbs are 
brushed away. I find that there is a 
difference in liquid refreshments over 
here. I have seen one full bath tub 
in three weeks, but I see three kinds 
of wine at every meal. Seeing that 
the colonel was about to adjourn the 
meeting, it being then 11 p. m., I 
soberly arose and in six well-chosen 
Italian words, which I had been re- 
hearsing for ten minutes, I told them 
that I wanted to drink one more toast 
to the "greata biga friendship be- 
tween America and Italy," which as- 
sertion brought forth renewed Vivas 
Atttericanas. 

Now, fellows, this is a true account, 
just as I saw it, and the moral of the 
incident is that American help, a 
whole lot of wine and six well-chosen 
Italian words can stampede any ban- 
quet in the war zone any old night. 

I left the station about 11 :30 last 
night and walked down to my room, 
which is in a villa now occupied by 
the officers of an aero squadron, the 
unit which protects this sector from 
air raids. 'Just about the time that 
I had gotten the "pale blues" on and 
was preparing to unfurl the mosquito 
bar I heard a sound very much like 
the fluttering of mighty wings. Being 
a newcomer here and not very welf 
up on affairs militare, I wandered 
over to the'^tflidoW, thinking perhaps 



the Italian army possessed an angel 
squadron, when something began to 
give a long, whining whistle which 
lasted for about five seconds, then a 
thud, and then — as Tecumsy Sher- 
man would have said — hell broke 
loose. A terrific explosion occurred 
just about 500 yards from my villa 
and the echo of that bomb hadn't got- 
ten a good start toward Rome before 
you would have thought the battle of 
Gettysburg was being fought over. 

Four batteries of three-inch guns 
(of whose presence I had no previous 
knowledge) began to boom out shrap- 
nel, little rapid fire guns, that you 
see on all the higher buildings in the 
war zone, began to patter-patter like 
big bunches of firecrackers, and five 
searchlights began to comb the sky 
for the Austrian. Well, fellows, you 
could imagine that hun climbing, for 
shrapnel was bursting all over and 
the sky looked like it was inhabited 
by an army of fireflies. It was the 
first real raid they have had at this 
point in a month's time, but they 
were up and ready for the gentleman. 
But he did have some nerve, for with 
all this discouraging reception, and 
though Italian planes began to hum 
in pursuit, he continued on down the 
valley and dropped three more bombs 
on and near a town below here before 
wending his way back across the 
Piave. 

Not one of these bombs caused a 
casualty or hurt an important build- 
ing. I may say that he might as well 
have hit me. I have watched these 
raids in the distance for three nights 
now, but this is the first time I have 
been "at home" to one. There are 
two things you never forget — the 
hum of a rattlesnake and the whine 
of a falling bomb. Now my hair did 
rise upon this occasion, in fact it does 
not comb just right as yet, but I did 
manage to keep my head out of the 
window and see and hear all there 
was to see and hear. And, fellows, 
there's a full moon again tonight. 
May she sober up soon! 

I am expecting and hoping to go 
up on the Piave next week for work 



202 



The Delta 



along the front, and while interesting 
things are barred from the mails I 
hope to bring a bunch of them back 



with me for expression after Victory 
and Peace. 

(To be Continued.) 



A Scholar In La Belle France 



By Kenyon Stevenson, Beta Eta 



Ever since I came to France I have 
intended writing you, but leisure 
moments have not been especially 
plentiful. Now I have been over here 
a little more than four months, and 
so have a service chevron two-thirds 
won. 



In Artillery School in France 

Almost five hundred of us, gradu- 
ates of the Third Officers 9 Camps, 
came from Camp Jackson in May to 

the Artillery School. Our 

trip was a very adventuresome one 
and included passage via steerage 
and walking guard on a stockade (we 
were all sergeants at that time) . 

We had three months more artil- 
lery training at and at the 

close of the camp were assigned to 
outfits to put into practice some of 
the many theories we've been having 
drilled into our heads for the past 
eight months. 



Sigs in Transit 

There were several Sigma Nus in 
our party which came across to- 
gether. I didn't learn all the fellows 9 
names, but some of them are: Lieu- 
tenant Floyd M. Sayre, of West Vir- 
ginia ; Lieutenant "Mickey 99 O'Quinn, 
of Louisiana; Lieutenant Robert W. 
Hendel, of Lombard; Lieutenant H. 
Harper Moulton, of Missouri; Lieu- 
tenant James W. Boring, of Kansas ; 
Lieutenant Philip P. Marshall, of 
Carnegie Tech.; Lieutenant Harold 
Lyon, of Cornell ; Lieutenant William 
A. Shearer, of Rose Poly, and Lieu- 
tenants George D. Wiley, Fred E. 
Fair, and myself, of Indiana. 



A French Billet 

We are all scattered now, but 
somewhere in the A. E. F. My bat- 
tery is now billeted in a little French 
village in the foothills of the Jura 
mountains. We just made a move 
from another village to this one to- 
day. I have a very nice room in the 
house of the village cure, with the 
great high French bed and a lot of 
curious little symbols and pieces of 
bric-a-brac everywhere. The place 
is wonderfully clean, and, to use an 
expression of one of my fellow offi- 
cers, "There's not a cow in the 
house. 99 

It's the French custom, you know, 
to have all property sheltered under 
one roof. The peasant has his own 
home, his granaries, his tool sheds, 
his hay mows and stables all in one 
large building. That, of course, is 
very convenient, if not sanitary, and 
especially handy in the winter time, 
when, I am told, the snow lies four 
and five feet deep on the ground for 
three months at a stretch. 

The French Countryside 

We are pretty well outside the civ- 
ilized world, it seems, for we don't 
get newspapers but once or twice a 
week, have no place to spend money, 
have to see by candle light in the 
evening, and are six miles from a 
railroad. We are pretty well com- 
pensated, however, for we have an 
excellent mess and get mail pretty 
regularly. 

The scenery is wonderful, for we 
are up among the peaks, which are 
covered with spruce forests and roll- 
ing meadow lands. I really don't see 



Crossing On A Transport 



203 



r keep such thinly soiled hills 
Every few yards the lime- 
ows up on the surface and 
ly there are jagged cliffs, 
isants all have cows, huge 
rger than any back home, 
ley often use as oxen besides 



their regular capacity as milk pro- 
ducers. 

In all, it's a very interesting coun- 
try, but can't compare with the home 
land, the U. S. A., and we're all ready 
for "Recall." 



Crossing on a Transport 

A Sigma Nu in the Royal Canadian Dragoons 
By Homer J. Schlamer, Gamma Rho 

Brother Schlamer, reading the interesting experiences of other men in The 
f set down a few of his own for us. We wish our readers to remember con- 
nons from every one are invited. Many a fascinating tale is told nowadays 
would, if written, make the Delta the best reading of the year. — The Editor.] 



HE just received the May 
slta from Brother Johnson in 
•ance and I certainly was 
> receive some news about the 
I their doings. The military 
tees, somehow, pleased me 
or at present I'm serving 
ing George when I really be- 
ll the Americans, but I was 
in the States because of de- 
rision, and as I couldn't bear 
y Brothers taking all the bur- 
nlisted with the Royal Ca- 
Dragoons, one of the crack 
units of Canada. 

I read of the various experi- 
' my Brothers in Sigma Nu 
npted to tell you of a some- 
citing time I had on the trip 

England. 

nit was stationed in Toronto, 
near the Exhibition Park, in 

[id barracks. Our draft left 

ine 27 and went to a certain 
the St. Lawrence river for 

ition. We left immediately 

1 quite a nice trip down the 
sing treated to a sight of the 
ebec bridge. But our good 
isn't to last long, for a sub- 
was reported as having been 
once we were in the Atlantic, 

captain took precautionary 
is and went out of the course. 

fog came down on the night 
1, causing the ship to anchor. 



We started slowly the next morning 
through heavy fog and rain. About 
7 o'clock on July 2, as we were con- 
suming what was given to us as 
breakfast, a terrible crash occurred 
and the utensils, dishes and food were 
sent flying across the room. Nat- 
urally we all thought of a submarine 
attack, so every one hastened to the 
life-boat stations. The R. C. D.'s were 
stationed at the port side of the poop 
deck and on arriving there were 
greeted by the sight of a monstrous 
rock protruding about sixty feet out 
of the water. We were somewhat re- 
lieved, but guards were put on. the 
hatchways to prohibit us from re- 
turning to our bunks. It wasn't long 
before the ship's gunners got busy 
and sent up one-pound rockets at min- 
ute intervals. Several shots were 
also fired from the four-inch gun on 
deck. The men began to get restless 
until the crew came around and took 
soundings. They assured us that the 
water was less in depth than what 
the ship drew, so all would be O. K. 
if the ship did go down. After an 
hour of anxiety several rowboats and 
small fishing smacks came in sight, 
but that was all. The whistle was 
signalling continually when suddenly 
a motor dory appeared with an Amer- 
ican officer in charge. After waiting 
for about five hours we were taken 
off "The City of Vienna" by the crew 
of the U. S. S. Aztec. All on board 



204 



The Delta 



were eventually saved and taken to 
Halifax. 

There sure were some peculiar hap- 
penings during those anxious five 
hours in the fog and rain. The can- 
teen stores were opened and the con- 
tents thrown out to us. Every dra- 
goon had a package of 500 cigarettes 
and a box of gum. It was all given 
to the Yanks on the Aztec. We had 
some colored troops on board and 
they caused a great deal of trouble by 



jumping into the life-boats and try- 
ing to lower them. One of the crew 
knocked one "nigger" cool when he 
refused to come out of the boats. But 
the most curious of all was the action 
of the "Drags." Some were shooting 
craps (a customary affair in this 
army) , others were singing to the ac- 
companiment of a banjo, while others 
were trying to dance. 

Still it was quite a happy bunch 
that landed in Halifax at midnight. 



Going Across via Hydroplane 

A Sigma Nu Marine Aviator 
By C. Frank Schilt, Beta Upsilon 



I WAS with the First Marine Aero- 
nautic Co. We left Philadelphia 
on January 9th, last. It was 
necessary for two tug boats to break 
the ice for our transport in order to 
get down the Delaware. We steamed 
south and very moderate weather ap- 
peared in about two days out to sea, 
but it certainly was a rough ocean, 
for five days we could see our de- 
stroyers only about half of the time, 
the waves hiding them the other half. 

On our twelfth day out we sighted 
land and "believe me" it was a wel- 
come sight, for it is not very funny 
to be seasick for nearly two weeks, 
and the sight of land took all of that 
away. We stayed all night in port, 
and the next day. The port was a 
very beautiful place, the harbor itself 
shaped like a horseshoe and the 
mountains under cultivation with 
hedge trees in perfect alignment for 
fences, and beautiful winding roads 
all seemed to lead to the center of the 
harbor. The houses were painted 
white and yellow on the sides, the 
roofs painted green and red, all made 
out of tile. 

On the second night we "put out" 
to sea again. This time everyone 
was alert, for a very few days be- 
fore, a Spanish ship had been sunk 
outside of the harbor and submarines 



were reported to be all around our 
course. Our destroyers circled 
around us and afforded good protec- 
tion. On January 23 we put into 
port that was to be our home for 
seven months. It was a beautiful 
place to look on, nearly the same as 
the first port. The greatest thing 
that I remember going into port is 
that the captain of our transport had 
all the marines pulling on a nine-inch 
rope from 5 o'clock until 11 p. m. 
without "chow." I hope to meet that 
captain in civilian life. I have 
learned to do most anything, but I do 
love my "chow" first of all. The 
next morning a landing party was 
sent ashore and unloading the ship 
commenced soon afterwards. We 
were well equipped and prepared, 
having everything that could make 
us comfortable. Our commanding 
officer, Major Evans, looked after 
that part of it. 

The natives were very curious, 
having seen but few Americans be- 
fore, they could hardly realize the 
amount of goods that we unloaded, 
and one could not make them believe 
that the hydroplanes in the big boxes 
would really fly. 

On the day of our first flight about 
ten thousand people had gathered to 
witness it, and when the ship left the 



Help the World Sweet Peace Secure 



205 



water, they nearly went wild with 
excitement. 

The natives are mostly very poor 
and go barefooted all the year. The 
children are very apt and when you 
go through the towns, they all cry 
money! money! money! They seem 
to think that all Americans are mil- 
lionaires, and it does go about five 
times as far there as it does here. 
One can get a very good meal there 
for fifty cents. 

Onr duty consisted of patrolling 
the seas with hydroplanes, which is 
usually very uninteresting work. 
Only one time did it become excit- 
ing to me, and that was when Lieu- 
tenant Pougue (not a Sigma Nu) and 
myself were lost out at sea. A heavy 
fog had appeared and we could not 
find the island we were looking for. 
We took turns at the wheel, each 
steering his own course where he 
thought the island was. We finally 
sighted land just as our gas was 
nearly gone. 

I was sent back to the U. S. to fin- 
ish my training and we had a long 
trip coming back. It took 29 days to 



get here. The trip included the 
Azore Islands, Bermudas, Cuba, Port 
Arthur, Texas, then up the Missis- 
sippi to New Orleans, then we went 
overland to Miami, Florida. On the 
trip back we were without drinking 
water for five days. 

I was stationed in Miami for two 
months as chief mechanic of a plane. 
Have been sent to Boston Technical 
to finish my training. While train- 
ing, I rank as a gunmen sergeant. 
Will be at Boston Technical from 
eight to ten weeks, then be sent to 
Miami and if I get through all the 
training course 0. K., will be com- 
missioned a second lieutenant. 

Brother William P. Hill, a Sigma 
Nu from ' Oklahoma University, 
served in the same company across 
as myself. Brother Hill is a first 
lieutenant and now adjutant of the 
post at Miami, Florida, and a very 
popular adjutant he is. 

Brother Henry F. Sheets, of Le- 
high University, is in the same class 
of cadets as myself, and is very pop- 
ular here. 

Marine Aviation Cadets. 



Help The World Sweet Peace Secure 

By R. E. Pettus, Theta 

[Who handed them to the committee yesterday with a thousand-dollar subscription 

for Liberty Bonds.— -The Editor.] 



The plea our President has made, 

Must not unheeded go, 
At once, we for our country's aid, 

Should needed help bestow. 

This call is to the rich and poor, 

It comes to all alike, 
To help the world sweet peace secure, 

The Kaiser's death knell strike. 

A land so blessed in field and store, 

And factories everywhere. 
Chould run our Nation's coffers o'er, 

Our loyalty declare. 

Six billion dollars, what is that, 
For such domain as ours? 



We'll show old Bill the diplomat, 
We lead all money powers. 

For Liberty, this is fourth loan, 

If it were five or six f 
We'd take the bonds without a groan 

And there would be no kicks. 

Heed not the overtures for peace 

Of Germany just now; 
From drafts and bonds we will not cease, 

Our hands are to the plow. 

Let us have proof she is sincere, 
THEN lasting peace will come, 

Well see that nothing interfere 
To bring opprobrium. 

— Huntsville, Ala., Times. 



The Regent's Dinner 

And Other "Good Reading" 
By Brothers Over There 

« 

[Inspector Ernest L. Williams, Fourteenth Division, has sent us some "good 
reading" in the shape of a letter from Lieutenant Earl J. Dickenson, Gamma Eta, 
who attended the Regent's Dinner at Hotel Wagram, in Paris. This gathering 
of Sigma Nus in the American Expeditionary Forces is significant even in the 
history of our Fraternity, and the descriptions which follow are more than of 

gassing interest. These letters are delightful tales of the dinner given by the 
Regent, Brother Borden Burr, at the Hotel Wagram, Paris, while he was abroad 
in Y. M. C. A. work. They are full of the Spirit of Fraternity — as many soldier 
correspondents of the Delta say, "never knew what Sigma Nu meant to me till 
I joined the Army." They are further the first accounts of Sigma Nu reunions 
abroad. Rumors of get-together meetings "over there" persist in coming in but 
no one has before written beyond the bare mention of them. — The Editor.] 



Reunion In Paris 

* 

By Earl J. Dickenson, Gamma Eta 

Ernest L. Williams, 

Denver, Colorado. 

Dear "Dad" : 

Well, Dad, I guess you think I am 
a fine guy for not writing you before, 
but things have been happening so 
rapidly in my life the last few months 
that it has kept me busy being on the 
move all the time so that I have not 
had much time for corresponding, 
but I have thought about you all more 
than once, and I imagine by this time 
that my wife has been in to see you 
and given you the dope. 

On Arriving in France 

Well, first of all I arrived in this 
here land August 5, 1918, and I have 
been going ever since. I think I have 
seen most every town of any size or 
consequence in France and they all 
are very nice when it comes to fine 
buildings and wonderful architecture, 
but I have failed as yet to find a "Cur- 
tis Street" in any of them. I may say 
that most all the cities show the ef- 
fects of a four years' war, as lots of 
things are pretty well run down, and, 
as for the sanitary condition of 
things, I don't think the French know 
what sanitation means. The prices 
of nearly everything an American 
wants over here have gone or are 
going up, but, as far as food is con- 



cerned, they seem to have plenty, and 
I have found the food here in France 
much better and more plentiful than 
in England, but they say tyey are 
bleeding England to save France, and 
I guess it is about right, but our 
camps are well fed, and all the boys 
are healthy, cheerful and anxious to 
get it over with. 

The Regent's Dinner 

It was quite strange when I landed 
in Paris on the 20th of August. I 
stopped at the American University 
Union. It is a hotel run for nothing 
but American men from the universi- 
ties, and the first notice that came to 
my eye was a notice that on August 
26th all Sigma Nus would meet with 
Brother Burr at the Hotel Wagram 
for dinner. Well, can you imagine 
how I felt? Here I was alone in 
Paris, and could speak damn little 
French. If there ever was a time in 
my life when I was glad I was a 
Sigma Nu it was then. Well, when 
the night came I was Johnnie on the 
spot, and all together there were nine 
of us including Brother Burr, and a 
more enjoyable evening I never spent. 
(Now, dad, don't let that Gamma Eta 
go to sleep, because some day they 
will realize as I have what Sigma Nu 
means to them.) Brother Burr was 
on his way back to the States to take 
part in a Y. M. C. A. drive of which 
he has charge of some particular 
branch. He had been to the front for 



The Regent's Dinner 



207 



three months, and believe me, he had 
some interesting stories and a great 
many things of interest to take back. 

I have been in Paris during two 
air raids, the last one just two nights 
ago, and I tell you it is some sight. 
You don't know whether to run for 
shelter, or take a chance, and you 
know me. Take a chance is my motto, 
but it certainly was wonderful. The 
guns of Paris accounted for two, and 
the rest got back all O. K. as far as 
I know. 

• A Word to the Colorado Chapters 

I have met very few men from Col- 
orado, and I understand there are 
very few over. Tell my Gamma Eta 
Brothers hello for me, and give them 
my best, and one by one I hope to get 
a letter to each one, but the mails are 
pretty scarce, and the news has to be 
so carefully watched that what you 
want to say means nothing after you. 
cut out the facts that might be of in- 
terest to the Germans. So, Dad, even 
though this letter may be very short, 
read between the lines, and you can 
gather a little more information. I 
wrote Gamma Eta a long letter. I 
hope some one gets pep enough to 
answer it, and give me the dope, as I 
am sure anxious to see that bunch 
up and doing. By the time you re- 
ceive this, schools in Colorado will be 
well starte dand I sincerely hope 
Delta Rho and Gamma Kappa the 
best of luck. Well, Dad, that must be 
all for this time. Give my best to 
all. 

Second Lieutenant, 
Air Service, A. E. F. 
September 8, 1918. 

A Welcome Reminder 
By JohN F. Merrill, Gamma Delta 

Dear Brother Dunlavy: 

Yours of the 23rd ult. received a 
few days ago. I am glad you enjoyed 
the "Plane News." 

As for Sigma Nu items, I have but 
two. There is a Brother in this 
squadron with me, a flyer, named 
John H. Buckley, Gamma Kappa. 



The other item is the weekly din- 
ner given by our Most Eminent Re- 
gent, Brother Burr, every Monday 
evening at the Hotel Wagram in 
Paris. Had the honor and pleasure 
of being present at the one given this 
week; there were eight of us besides 
Brother Burr, and if the others en- 
joyed it as much as I, it was a very 
successful little gathering. One is 
prone to forget many things which 
would be ever present in our daily 
lives back in the States, and such a 
pleasant reminder of Sigma Nu was 
very welcome. 

August 29, 1918. 

Aero Squadron, 

Pursuit Group, First Army. 

Present In Spirit 

By Evan J. Darrenouge, 

Gamma Rho 

Regent, Sigma Nu Fraternity, 

Hotel Wagram, Paris. 

Dear Brother: 

As I am not stationed in the vicin- 
ity of Paris, I will not be able to at- 
tend your dinner there the 28th. 
However, I will be there in spirit. 

France, 
August 15, 1918. 

Regrets From Italy 
By Hugo V. Friedman, Theta 

Dear Brother Dunlavy : 

When in Rome couple of weeks 
ago, I noticed in Paris edition of the 
Herald, a note asking all Sigs in 
Paris to meet with Regent Burr for 
dinner at Hotel Wagram. 

I would have given a great deal to 
have been with Borden and the boys 
that night. Have met several Sigs in 
Italy. There are two here now in 
the U. S. Ambulance Unit. 

From what we can learn, matters 
are unusually well with the Allies and 
next summer should see the finish. 

Rome. 

American Red Cross. 




Founder Jamei F. Hopkini. Alpha No. 1. Born December 30. 1845. Died December IE, 1911. 



Synopsis of the History of Sigma Nu 

By Grand Historian Burton P. Sears 



SIGMA NU was founded on or 
about January 1, 1869, at the 
Virginia Military Institute, Lex- 
ington, Va., — the West Point of the 
South. Following the war between 
the States, large numbers of students 
had enrolled from the West and 
South, some of whom had borne arms 
under the Confederacy. The dark 
days of reconstruction had set in, 
times were troubled, and a general 
feeling of restlessness pervaded the 
Institute. Numerous organizations 
were formed, and out of one of these 
— the Honduras-Emigrant Aid So- 
ciety — grew the Sigma Nu Frater- 
nity. 

Alpha Tau Omega had been 
founded there in 1865, and being 
without a rival for several years, 
soon dominated the Institution, se- 
curing most of the honor men and a 
strong following among the sub-pro- 
fessors, and its members, known as 
"Blackfeet," assumed an attitude of 
superiority. This dominance was re- 
sented by a number of Western boys, 
who proceeded to organize a rival or- 
ganization, known as the "White- 
feet", and later as the Sigma Nu Fra- 
ternity. 

The prime mover in the scheme 
was Cadet John Frank Hopkins, who 
had served in the war and was twen- 
ty-one years of age when he came to 
the Institute, in 1866. He there be- 
came a Mason and a member of the 
Knights of the White Carnelia, a 
Southern order designed to preserve 
the old traditions and ideals of the 
South. Finding a severe system of 
hazing in vogue, he espoused the 
cause of the freshmen, or "rats", as 
they were called, and in their defense 
successfully fought numerous battles 
with prominent upper classmen, thus 
gaining the enmity of the "Black- 
feet", but at the same time securing 
the warm friendship of many of the 
under-classmen. Some time there- 
after, aided by Cadets J. M. Riley, 



Greenfield Quarles, J. W. Hobson, 
and R. E. Semple, all of whom were 
dubbed "Hopkins' rats", he set to 
work among the members of his 
class, many of whom had been mem- 
bers of the Honduras-Emigrant Aid 
Society, which had recently collapsed, 
and he soon had an organization 
under way. 

The first regular meeting of which 
we have any account was held Jan- 
uary 1, 1869. The organization was 
intended simply as a local society, 
none of its founders ever dreaming 
that it would ever extend beyond the 
Institute. Its success was phenom- 
enal, forty men being initiated be- 
fore the commencement in 1869. Its 
members were known as "White- 
feet", and the rivalry between the 
new organization and the older so- 
ciety of "Blackfeet" was tense and 
bitter. By the following commence- 
ment, Sigma Nu had secured prac- 
tically all of the principal offices in 
the Cadet Corps. Emboldened by its 
success, the idea of extending the 
order was proposed and discussed, 
and a constitution, badge and sym- 
bols were adopted. The badge was 
designed and its symbols suggested 
by Founder Hopkins, while the orig- 
inal constitution was chiefly the work 
of Edward R. Arthur, later third 
Regent of the Fraternity. The badge 
has always remained the same, vary- 
ing only in size and the use of the 
raised center, while the constitution 
has undergone many changes and 
modifications necessary to meet the 
wants of a rapidly growing order. 

The form of government adopted 
in 1870 and that in use until the 
Nashville Convention of 1884, was as 
follows: The only general officers 
were a Regent and a Vice-Regent 
elected for the term of five years. 
The first Regent was Founder Riley, 
and the first Vice-Regent was 
Founder Hopkins, both being elected 
by the V. M. I. Chapter (Alpha) on 




%W^/. 




Founder Greenfield Quarlei, Alplia No. 2. Still living at Helena, Ark. 



Synopsis of the History of Sigma Nu 



211 



May 7, 1870. Each State was to have 
a president and vice-president, 
elected for three years, by the Chap- 
ters in each State, each commander 
having one . vote for every twelve 
members of his Chapter. The State 
presidents were thereafter to elect 
the Regent and Vice-Regent from 
candidates selected by the Chapters, 
each president having one vote for 
every twenty-five members in his jur- 
isdiction. The Regent was to desig- 
nate some one Chapter as the Grand 
Chapter, which was to have special 
privileges in regard to granting char- 
ters in any section of the world. Each 
State president in turn was to desig- 
nate some one Chapter in his State 
as the Grand Chapter of that State, 
which had power to establish Chap- 
ters in the State. Chapters were 
designated with Roman numerals, in 
the order of their establishment, not 
receiving their present Greek-letter 
names until 1888. 

It became the practice to give to 
certain members leaving the parent 
Chapter blank charters to establish 
Chapters in such places as they might 
choose. Several charters were issued 
in this way, and it is probable that a 
number of shotf-lived Chapters were 
formed, but all have been lost sight 
of except four. These were located 
at the University of Virginia, Bailey 
Law School of Asheville, N. C., Uni- 
versity of Georgia, and at Tarboro, 
N. C. No records of any of them 
have ever been found. The first 
charter was granted to Henry T. 
Drane, in December, 1870, authoriz- 
ing him to found a Chapter at the 
University of Virginia (Beta). He 
enlisted only four men, none of whom 
returned to college the next year and 
accordingly the Chapter died, until 
revived in 1882. 

In the fall of 1871 John P. Arthur, 
of Alpha Chapter, tried unsuccess- 
fully to establish a Chapter at the 
Bailey Law School of Asheville, N. 
C. (Gamma), and in 1874 a few bus- 
iness men at Tarboro, N. C, were 
initiated in an irregular way (Delta) . 
In 1873 James Bonham, of Alpha, 



founded a Chapter at the University 
of Virginia (Mu) , and had made four 
initiations, when the authorities 
abolished all fraternities. 

In 1874 Alpha authorized O. E. 
Smith to establish a Chapter at. the 
University of Alabama (Theta), 
which he did through the efforts of 
Thomas W. Clark. This was the first 
real Chapter to be established, but it, 
too, soon encountered anti-fraternity 
laws and in 1877 was driven into a 
sub rosa state. It continued, how- 
ever, to initiate members from time 
to time until it came out from under 
the rose in 1885. 

In 1879 Alpha alone survived, ex- 
cept for the fact that Theta was run- 
ning sub rosa. In June, 1879, 
through the efforts of R. E. L. Hud- 
son, of Theta, a Chapter was in- 
stalled at Howard College (Iota), but 
in 1881 it was disbanded, because of 
anti-fraternity legislation, and not 
revived until 1890. 

Then followed the most critical 
period in the history of the Frater- 
nity, for anti-fraternity legislation 
had destroyed all except the parent 
Chapter at Virginia Military Insti- 
tute (Alpha). In 1881, through the 
efforts of Commander Eugene H. 
Crowdus, of Alpha, a Chapter was 
established at North Georgia Agri- 
cultural College (Kappa). John 
Alexander Howard was one of the 
charter members of the Chapter. 
Alpha realized that more Chapters 
must be founded and in the spring of 
1882 initiated Isaac P. Robinson, who 
in the fall of that year established a 
Chapter at Washington and Lee Uni- 
versity (Lambda), likewise in Lex- 
ington, Va. Robinson was a man of 
great energy and soon developed a 
flourishing Chapter. At the sugges- 
tion of Lambda and Alpha, he created 
for himself the office of General Sec- 
retary and began a correspondence 
with all known members of the Fra- 
ternity, discussing such steps as a 
general convention, extension, a cat- 
alog and a Fraternity journal. He 
put himself in touch with Kappa 
Chapter and with its leader, John A. 




Founder Jimei M. Uiley, Alpho No. t. Bora May IS. 1.8*9. Died Juno S, 1911. 



Synopsis of the History of Sigma Nu 



213 



Howard. In April, 1883, with but 
three living Chapters, (Alpha, Kappa 
and Lambda), Howard began the 
publication of the Sigma Nu Delta, 
deriving the name from the trio of 
living Chapters mentioned. 

With the advent of Robinson and 
Howard, the Fraternity's struggle 
for existence became more successful 
and it is at this point that the real 
constructive revival of the Fraternity 
begins. Alpha granted to Lambda 
the privilege of establishing new 
Chapters and Robinson, as com- 
mander, made the most of it. Beta, 
Theta and Mu were revived, and four 
new Chapters founded, Epilson, Zeta 
and Nu organized through the efforts 
of Lambda, and Eta by members of 
Kappa. 

Through the efforts of Robinson 
and Howard, the first Convention 
was held at Nashville on July 9, 1884, 
and was comprised of eight delegates, 
representing five Chapters. The en- 
tire form of government was changed 
and the supreme power vested in a 
General Convention of Chapters, 
while the OgBcers, including the three 
division chiefs, were designated as 
the Grand Chapter. The method of 
granting charters was changed so as 
to require the consent of all of the 
officers, all Chapters in the division, 
and a majority of the remaining 
Chapters. A ritual was also adopted. 
Robinson was made General Secre- 
tary and Howard, Vice-Regent. 

The second Convention was held 
at Lexington, Ky., in 1886, and was 
comprised of twenty-six delegates, 
representing ten chapters. In the in- 
terval, Alpha, Beta and Epsilon had 
died, the first from anti-fraternity 
regulations and the other two from 
indifference. Six new Chapters were 
founded, Delta, Xi, Omicron, Pi, Rho 
and Sigma. Robinson resigned in 
December, 1885, and Rawson Ben- 
nett, of Nu (University of Kansas), 
became General Secretary, and for 
the succeeding ten years the Frater- 
nity was largely in the keeping of 
members of Nu Chapter. This Lex- 
ington Convention, dominated by the 



progressive views of Bennett, revised 
the ritual and constitution, investing 
the supreme power in a Grand Chap- 
ter composed of the grand officers 
and three delegates from each Chap- 
ter, and in a High Council, composed 
of the four officers of the Fraternity. 
This is substantially the form of gov- 
ernment which has ever since pre- 
vailed. The laws as to extension were 
greatly modified and practically gave 
to the officers the power to grant 
charters. 

The third Grand Chapter was held 
at Birmingham in 1887, under the 
auspices of the Fraternity's first 
Alumni Chapter. It was distinctly 
reactionary in sentiment, but no con- 
structive policy of legislation was 
adopted. It placed itself definitely 
on record as being opposed to con- 
solidation in any form, and refused to 
receive a report favoring a proposed 
consolidation with the Kappa Sigma 
Fraternity. 

The fourth Grand Chapter was 
held at Asheville, N. C, in 1888. The 
contest between the expansionists 
and conservatives was sharp, but not 
• entirely decisive. A conservative was 
selected as Regent, and the law was 
amended so that any one Chapter or 
Grand Officer could prevent the is- 
suance of a charter. 

The fifth Grand Chapter, held at 
Chattanooga in 1890, was the most 
constructive Convention ever held, 
with the possible exception of the 
Nashville Convention in 1884 and the 
Denver Grand Chapter in 1915. The 
progressives and conservatives there 
met squarely on the issues of exten- 
sion and the progressives were vic- 
torious. The Fraternity definitely 
committed itself to a policy of rapid 
northern and western extension, 
under the leadership of Harrington 
and Bennett. The constitution and 
laws were codified, and a much 
needed financial statute enacted, 
which is substantially the same as 
that which prevails today. The right 
to grant charters was placed in the 
hands of the Grand Recorder, subject 
only to the control of the High Coun- 




Lexington Hotel, Lexington, Va. r where Alphi 

beld many of Its earl; meetings, and where 

the Installation of Alpha took place 

when It was revived In 1909. 




The Original Alpha Cheat Found by Grand Hli 
torlsn Walter J. Sears, In the McCrum 
Home. Lexington. Vu. 



iter J. Sear*, on the Steps of 
Carnegie Library Building, Wash- 
ington & Lee University, 1910. 



SCENES AT £ 



l SC-S BIRTHPLACE. 



Synopsis of the History of Sigma Nu 



215 



dL The Chapters themselves were 
given no vote upon petitions. Then 
followed a period of rapid extension, 
and before the next Grand Chapter, 
Harrington had founded twelve new 
Chapters. 

The sixth Grand Chapter, held at 
St Louis in 1892, approved the exist- 
ing policy of extension, and re-elected 
Bennett as Regent and Harrington as 
Grand Recorder. 

The seventh Indianapolis Grand 
Chapter of 1894 marked the retire- 
ment of Harrington and Bennett, 
and the return of the conservatives 
to control. The laws relative to ex- 
tension were modified so that division 
Chapters could reject a petition for 
a charter. Robinson, a conservative, 
was made Regent, and Clarence E. 
Woods was made Grand Recorder. 

The early history of the Frater- 
nity, from 1869 to 1894, may be di- 
vided into three periods of Chapter 
domination. First, the Founders' 
Period—from the foundation of the 
Fraternity to the establishment of 
the Delta— 1869 to 1883— may be 
said to be that of the domination of 
Alpha Chapter. Second, the period 
from the founding of Lambda in 
1882 and the establishment of the 
Delta in 1883, up to the advent of 
Harrington and Bennett, in 1885 and 
1886, may be said to be that of the 
domination of Lambda Chapter, rep- 
resented by Robinson, supplemented 
by the aid of the Delta, edited by 
John Alexander Howard, of Kappa. 
The third period, from the advent of 
Harrington and Bennett, 1885 and 
1886, up to the Indianapolis Grand 
Chapter, of 1894, may be said to be 
that of the domination of Nu Chap- 
ter. 

The activities of Robinson an J 
Howard gave to the Fraternity such 
leaders as Bennett and Harrington, 
who successfully made the Fraternity 
a national organization, by rapidly 
extending it north and west. 

Following this period of rapid and 
progressive extension, the Fraternity 
entered into a short period of conser- 



vative expansion and financial de- 
pression. 

The eighth St. Louis Grand Chap- 
ter of 1896, after a strenuous con- 
test, adopted even more conservative 
laws in reference to extension, and 
the liberals were routed for the time 
being. 

Woods, as Grand Recorder, was re- 
tained in office until 1913, and being 
at heart an ardent expansionist, his 
views soon became those of his asso- 
ciates and those of the Fraternity, 
which within a few years was again 
in control of the progressive element, 
and numerous Chapters were estab- 
lished throughout the United States. 

The ninth Atlanta Grand Chapter 
of 1898 marked the defeat of Hey- 
wood as Grand Treasurer, who took 
the Fraternity's finances in hand and 
placed the Fraternity upon a firm 
business basis. 

The seven succeeding Grand Chap- 
ters took no radical action upon the 
questions of general Fraternity pol- 
icy, but were devoted primarly to- 
wards perfecting the internal devel- 
opment of the Fraternity, and at the 
same time extending the roll of its 
Chapters particularly in the State 
Universities of the country. 

The seventeenth Denver Grand 
Chapter marked a new era in the de- 
velopment of the Fraternity, for it 
enacted more constructive legislation, 
of general importance, than had been 
enacted since the days of the Chatta- 
nooga Grand Chapter. The admin- 
istrative system was entirely reor- 
ganized and provision made for a 
General Office to be conducted by a 
General Secretary, chosen by and re- 
sponsible to the High Council. The 
system adopted has proven a # success, 
and the real internal development of 
the Fraternity may be said to have 
definitely begun. 

The color originally chosen for the 
Fraternity was sky blue, but it was 
superseded by the Black, White and 
Gold. The white rose was chosen in 
1892 as the distinctive emblem, and 



216 The i 

in 1913 the first Sunday in November 
was adopted as Memorial Day. The 
Fraternity permits no honorary 
members. The Creed of Sigma Nu 
was written by Walter J. Sears, as 
was also the Declaration of Princi- 
ples, adopted in 19X5. 

Established in the West Point of 
the South, following the war between 
the States, Sigma Nu was essentially 
a military Fraternity, and its mem- 



bers in the present great world war 
are fully living up to the Faith of 
their Founders, the teachings of the 
Ritual, and to that precept of the 
Creed which admonishes each Knight 
"To guard with jealous care the an- 
cient rights of human freedom, in 
whose name we shall destroy all 
wrong and oppression • * * and 
so to be faithful to the Knighthood 
of Truth." 

Chicago, 111., April 17, 1918. 




[These old historic pictures, accompanying this article, are reprinted from 
Deltas dating from 1907 to 1913, chiefly for the thousands of initiates since those 
years, who have never seen them, and also for the few to whom the history of 
Sigma Nu in word and picture, oft repeated, never grows wearying o 
—The Editor.] 




Building a National Fraternity 

I. Extension Period from 1886 to 1894 
By Past Grand Recorder Grant W. Harrington 

[The following article is the first of a series of historic narratives prepared for 
The Delta by Brother Grant Harrington, Nu No. 4. Brother Harrington's long 
experience as Editor of The Delta and Grand Recorder gives these articles an 
uncommon value to the younger Brothers. If Sigma Nus will carefully read these 
articles as they appear, together with recent and current articles of Brother 
Rawson Bennett and historic synopsis of the Grand Historian, Burton Sears, they 
will then have a comprehensive knowledge of other days. — The Editor.] 



^^ T TRITING for The Delta in 191 1 
yy (XXXII, p. 5), Past Regent 
Bennett said: "Historically, 
~^are who framed the law intended that 
Sigma Nu should have a general man- 
ager and that he should be the Grand 
Recorder." As I was the acting or 
actual Grand Recorder from the Lex- 
ington Convention in 1886 to the In- 
dianapolis Grand Chapter in 1894, it 
is not egotistical for me to say that 
for the eight-year period between 
these two gatherings I had more to do 
with directing the policy of the Fra- 
ternity than any other member. 

The first issue of The Delta under 
the management of Nu Chapter in 
1886 contained the following official 
notice : 

"Notice is hereby given that I have 
this day appointed Grant W. Har- 
rington, Chief of the Fourth Division, 
to the post of Assistant Grand Re- 
corder. All official communications 
intended for the action of the Grand 
Recorder, or High Council, will be ad- 
dressed to him until further notice. 
The office of the Grand Recorder is 
hereby established at Lawrence, Kan- 



sas. 



Peblee Rawson Bennett, 

G. R., S. N. F. 



In his report to the Birmingham 
Grand Chapter in 1887, Grand Re- 
corder Bennett said : 

"I can find no more fitting place 
than this to pay a richly deserved 
tribute to a Brother whose energy 
and ability have stood the Fraternity 
in good stead during the past year. 
I refer to Brother Grant Woodbury 
Harrington, Chief of the Fourth Di- 
vision and publisher of The Delta. I 
say no more than truth when I say 
that the work of the Grand Record- 
er's office could not have proceeded at 
all this year without Brother Har- 
rington. Early in the year I foresaw 
that I would be unable to attend to 
the routine work of the office, and ap- 
pointed him my Assistant Grand Re- 
corder. Right well has he fulfilled 
the task. During the past year 
Brother Harrington has written hun- 
dreds of letters. He has published 
The Delta with the brilliant success 
that we all know; he has carried on 
the routine work of the Grand Re- 
corder's office ; he has collected about 
one-half of the material needed for a 
complete catalogue of the Fraternity ; 
he has gathered from many sources a 
large amount of most valuable histor- 
ical material. In addition to all this 
he has kept up his college work in fine 
style, graduating second in a class of 



218 



The Delta 



thirty. With all respect to this Grand 
Chapter, I here urge that Brother 
Harrington be rewarded in propor- 
tion to his deserts." 

Bennett was re-elected Grand. Re- 
corder at Birmingham, and in his re- 
port to the Grand Chapter at Ashe- 
ville one year later said : 

"For reasons elsewhere more fully 
explained I have been constrained to 
turn over to Brother Harrington 
nearly all the duties of the high office 
with which you have repeatedly hon- 
ored me." 

I succeeded Bennett as Grand Re- 
corder at this Grand Chapter and 
was re-elected at Chattanooga in 1890 
and at St. Louis in 189?. After being 
out of office two years Bennett was 
elected Regent at Chattanooga in 1890 
and re-elected at St. Louis in 1892. 
In his report to the Grand Chapter at 
St. Louis Regent Bennett said : 

"Owing to the isolated situation of 
my residence as regards the bulk of 
the membership of the Fraternity, I 
have been able to concern myself but 
little with external administration, 
nor have I been able to make any visi- 
tations to Chapters. But the inter- 
ests of the Fraternity have not suf- 
fered by this enforced inactivity ' on 
my part, the organization of the High 
Council leaving the executive direc- 
tion of the order in the hands of the 
Grand Recorder when the Regent is 
unable by reason of circumstances to 
exercise his powers to their full ex- 
tent. Fortunately for Sigma Nu, we 
have in our Grand Recorder, Brother 
Grant W. Harrington, an official who 
is fully equal to the task imposed upon 
him and whose discretion, fidelity and 
zeal are so well proven to the Fra- 
ternity at large that they need no 
commendation from me. ,r 

At the Indianapolis Grand Chapter 
in 1894 Regent Bennett said : 

"Brother Harrington has been the 
working head of our Fraternity, with 
free hands, for the past two years. 
He has been such because I as Regent 
desired that he should be; and while 



I have never hesitated to check him 
in any enterprise which I did not ap- 
prove, he has done nothing which I 
did not then and do not now fully and 
emphatically endorse. More than 
this, Brother Harrington has been 
virtually Grand Recorder not only 
since 1888, but since 1886. I never 
more than nominally filled the office, 
my lack of settled residence during 
those two years preventing my at- 
tending the multitudinous details. 
The work was done in my name, but 
Brother Harrington did it in fact. 
With such aid as my own household 
could furnish he compiled our first 
catalogue and published it at his own 
risk, the Fraternity then having no 
sound system of finance. He pub- 
lished The Delta year after year and 
often had to pay the printer out of 
his own pocket. He has worked early 
and late, in sickness and in health, 
neglecting his own business for 
Sigma Nu, and has performed for her 
services that no money compensation 
we can give him will adequately re- 
pay." 

Getting Out of the Sectional Rut 

What was done during this period 
with The Delta, the Catalogue and 
the Song Book have already been told. 
But these were only incidental to the 
main work of getting the Fraternity 
out of the sectional rut in which it was 
stuck and putting it on the highway 
to national greatness. Two ideas ex- 
isted then, as now, regarding the pur- 
pose of a college fraternity — one that 
it is a very select organization to 
which only the bon ton, who can run 
the gauntlet of wealth and social po- 
sition, should be admitted; and the 
other that it is a democratic institu- 
tion responsive to the demands, of 
student needs wherever found. It is 
the world old story over again of the 
conservative — the disciple of the 
things that are — and the radical — the 
one who believes in growth and prog- 
ress. It was inevitable that these two 
ideas should clash in the management 
of Sigma Nu. The first real test of 
strength between the conservatives 
and the progressives took place at the 



Building A National Fraternity 



219 



Asheville Grand Chapter in 1888. A 
petition from the Chi Beta Delta local 
at Westminster College at Fulton, 
Missouri, had been rejected by the 
High Council and the case had been 
appealed to the Grand Chapter. 
After a pretty full discussion of the 
policy of extension the matter of the 
Westminster petitioners was re- 
ferred to the incoming High Council 
by a vote of 27 to 16. 

The chief of the conservatives at 
this time was Regent Daniel W. Lang- 
don, Jr. He had prevented the grant- 
ing of the petition from Westminister 
when it was before the High Council 
and his re-election, of course, meant 
the defeat of the petitioners once 
more. It meant more than this. It 
meant a continued check to the policy 
of expansion, which some of us were 
convinced was necessary to secure 
the permanency and prosperity of the 
Fraternity. 

Accordingly Brother Eugene H. 
Crowdus of Alpha, who had achieved 
prominence in the Fraternity by his 
work in breathing new life into Up- 
silon Chapter at the University of 
Texas, was nominated for Regent 
against Brother Langdon, who was a 
candidate for re-election. The min- 
utes of the Grand Chapter show that 
the fight was made in the open. They 
read (see Delta VI, p. 150) : 

"Brother Howard nominated for 
Regent Brother Daniel Webster 
Langdon, Jr., of Theta. 

"Brother Murpbey nominated 
Brother Eugene Crowdus of Alpha. 

"Brother Bennett seconded the 
nomination of Brother Crowdus. 

"Brother Dean seconded the nomi- 
nation of Brother Langdon. 

"Brother Harrington seconded the 
nomination of Brother Crowdus, tak- 
ing occasion to say that he opposed 
Brother Langdon merely on account 
of the tatter's overconservatism in 
extension. 

"This brought out a speech of reply 
and defense from Brother Langdon. 



"The Grand Chapter applauded 
both Brethren and took occasion to 
praise their truly fraternal frank- 
ness. The roll was called and re- 
sulted as follows : 

"Brother Daniel Webster Langdon, 
Jr., of Theta, 23 y 2 votes. Brother 
Eugene Crowdus of Alpha, 18 Vfc 
votes. Total, 42 votes. 

"On motion of Brother Harring- 
ton, Brother Daniel Webster Lang- 
don, Jr., was then declared elected 
Regent by acclamation." 

The Grand Chapter was not as con- 
servative as this vote would indicate, 
but the progressives labored under 
the handicap of not having their can- 
didate present. Brother Langdon 
was of charming personality and no 
one questioned the zeal and fidelity 
with which he served the Order. He 
was "Our Dan," and the result was a 
personal victory for him. 

The June, 1889 Delta, containing 
the proceedings of the Asheville 
Grand Chapter, was mailed to every 
member of the Fraternity so far as 
addresses were known. This seemed 
a suitable time to discuss the subject 
of extension and so my General Cir- 
cular No. 16 was inserted : 

GENERAL CIRCULAR NO. 16 
Office Grand Recorder Sigma Nu. 

To the Members of the Fraternity : 
As this issue of The Delta will reach 
nearly every member of the Frater- 
nity, it seems to be a good time to call 
attention to the subject of extension. 
So far we have drifted along without 
any definite notion as to where we 
were going, and many of our now 
most flourishing Chapters were or- 
ganized more through accident than 
design. The unparalleled activity of 
rival fraternities now makes it im- 
perative that we adopt some policy 
and steadily pursue it or drop behind 
in the race. Such a policy, of course, 
cannot be adopted before the next 
Convention, which will meet some 
time during the summer of 1890, but 
in the meantime we can determine 



220 



The Delta 



what fields are still open for us pnd 
gain new footholds. The Catalogue 
just issued ought to give an impetus 
to the work that will succeed in re- 
viving some of our dead Chapters and 
organizing a half-dozen new ones be- 
fore the next Convention. 

In the First District, which in- 
cludes the states of Delaware, Mary- 
land, Virginia, West Virginia, North 
Carolina and South Carolina, there 
are probably no more schools we 
would care to enter. Our Beta 
Chapter at the University of Vir- 
ginia ought to be reorganized by 
all means. Experience has shown 
that a Chapter cannot be successfully 
maintained here in the professional 
schools, and we have never yet se- 
cured a foothold in the academic de- 
partment. Of our 850 members 
about forty are now residents of the 
Old Dominion. It ought to be a mat- 
ter of pride to them to see a flourish- 
ing Chapter here, and I believe it 
could be done if they would undertake 
the work. 

In the Second District, comprising 
the States of Georgia, Alabama, Flor- 
ida, Mississippi and Louisiana, we 
are strongly intrenched, nearly one- 
half of our members being found in 
these States. There are many and 
strong rivals in this territory and 
many of them are much better or- 
ganized than we, and through the 
means of their State associations and 
Alumni Chapters much valuable aid 
is given to the active Chapters. A 
more thorough organization is needed 
in this division. 

The Third Division, comprising the 
States of Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, Il- 
linois and Michigan, covers a bound- 
less field into which we have scarcely 
penetrated. Our two Chapters in 
Kentucky are doing work of which 
we can feel proud, but aside from this 
we have done nothing. Our Vander- 
bilt Chapter was allowed to die 
through indifference. This is the 
most desirable place in the State and 
an especial effort should be made this 
coming year to revive it. The trouble 
here, like that at the University of 



Virginia, is to gain a foothold in the 
academic department. This is over- 
shadowed by the professional schools, 
but we cannot hope to gain any- 
thing permanent in these schools, 
as the men as a rule do not attend 
long enough to give stability to a 
Chapter. On account of the strong 
rivalry we would meet in an attempt 
to reorganize, the most feasible plan 
seems to be to pledge enough men 
before they enter in the fall to give 
the Chapter a start. This can be done 
by the Alumni throughout the State. 
The feasibility of this plan is shown 
by the success in Texas last fall. It 
needs some one to take personal su- 
pervision, and fortunately the chief 
of this division, Brother S. E. Brad- 
shaw, of Forest City, Arkansas, is 
both able and energetic and will make 
the most possible out of the aid fur- 
nished him by the Alumni. 

In the remaining four States across 
the Ohio river we have done nothing. 
The directory shows our membership 
in these States to be as follows : Illi- 
nois, 7; Ohio, 5; Indiana, 1; Michi- 
gan, 0. And this, too, in the face of 
the fact that these four States are 
among the foremost States in the 
Union in wealth, intelligence and pop- 
ulation. Nothing shows the onesided- 
ness and sectional aspect of our Fra- 
ternity stronger than this. In these 
four States there are upwards of 
twenty-five colleges and universities 
where some of our rivals have chap- 
ters. A half, at least, of these schools 
are desirable places for us to enter. 
In many of them there are societies 
that might be absorbed if the matter 
was properly looked after. Alpha 
Tau Omega and Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
have been working this field success- 
fully for the past two years and there 
is no valid reason why we should not 
do likewise. 

The Fourth Division, comprising 
all the territory west of the Missis- 
sippi and the state of Wisconsin, like 
the Third also opens a boundless field, 
but, unlike the Third, it is compara- 
tively new and so there is a greater 
opportunity to extend. It is only a 



Some Notes and Queries 



221 



tion of time when the center of 
dation will be west of the Missis- 
L With it will come great schools 
it is far better for us to gain a 
bold now than to wait until we 
» to fight hard for everything we 
The four institutions where we 
» Chapters now have no superiors 
tie Fraternity, Yale alone except- 
The State universities of Wiscon- 
Minnesota and Iowa are equal to 
a in every respect, while those of 
raska and Colorado are not far 
nd. * * * Phi Delta Theta has 
en chapters in this division, Beta 
ta Pi nine, Phi Kappa Psi seven, 
oa Chi 6, while a number of oth- 
are represented by one or two 
iters. 

tie Fifth Division, comprising the 
die and New England States, has 

been regarded as a territory in 
sh the Western and Southern 
ik fraternities could not flourish. 
K)ls ift this division, outside the 
> or five great schools, are small 

rule, and a little comparison will 
7 that they do not compare f avor- 

with the Western and Southern 
lenities. They have reached 
r full development and do not pre- 

the possibilities of the newer 
ols. The University of Boston 



presents a possible exception to this. 
An effort ought to be made to gain 
Chapters in the larger institutions, as 
it is very probable that as we grow 
in numbers many of our members 
will go here for a professional edu- 
cation. These should be provided for. 

By our Constitution the Vice Re- 
gent, Grand Recorder and the five 
Division Chiefs are constituted a 
board of extension, but their hands 
are practically tied without the ear- 
nest co-operation of the members of 
the Fraternity. All information as 
to schools or men should be sent to 
some member of this board at once. 
It often happens that some member 
will know of a bright, energetic man ' 
about to enter college who can be in- 
terested in the work and who will 
work up a petition after he has ma- 
triculated. Quite a number of our 
Chapters have been founded in this 
way. This is one of the most success- 
ful means of founding new Chapters 
and the one on which we must rely 
if we hope to accomplish much. 

Fraternally yours, 

Grant W. Harrington, 
Grand Recorder. 

[To be Continued.] 



Some Notes and Queries 

By Past Regent Rawson Bennett 



UST needs retract my inferen- 
ial deprecation, in my note in the 
February Delta, of the printing 
he Founders' Constitution. The 
int has called attention to an 
r in the Howard transcript which 
ild be corrected. I refer to the 
sentences in Sections 1 and 2 of 
cle IV, where it is said to be the 
' of the Regent and the State 
lident to designate some "Point" 
he "Grand Lodge" for the Order 
the State. For "Point" we should 
duly read "Chapter." 

i the summary of the Founders' 
ititution made by Brother Grant 



W. Harrington, with the original be- 
fore him, for in the Historical Sketch 
prefixed to the catalogue of 1889 it 
is stated: "The Regent was to des- 
ignate some Chapter, which during 
his term of office, was to be desig- 
nated as the Grand Lodge, and which 
was to have special privileges in re- 
gard to granting charters. The 
President of each State was also to 
designate some Chapter which would 
be known as the Grand Lodge of that 
State." 

The only construction that can give 
any meaning to "Point" is that of 
"office" or "headquarters" which 



222 



The Delta 



might pass in view of the fact that 
the founders were at a military 
school, were not that meaning wholly 
inconsistent with the powers as- 
signed to the "Grand Lodge" and to 
the "Head Chapters of States" in 
Article VIII, which provides for issue 
of charters. That article evidently 
contemplates some body of men who 
were to grant or refuse petitions for 
charters. The Regent and Vice-Re- 
gent and State President and Vice- 
President seem to have had a veto 
rather than an initiative, since with- 
out their signatures no charter would 
be valid. 

Who Granted the First Charters? 

The vagueness of that Article VIII 
as to the charter granting process is 
in striking contrast with the present 
particularly on that subject. It also 
suggests inquiry as to what was the 
actual method pursued up to the 
change in the frame of government 
effected by the Nashville Convention 
of 1884, or first Grand Chapter. 

It is evident from the "Form of 
Charter" set out in Article VIII that 
the plan of extension was to issue to 
some Brother a warrant to establish 
in a given State and place — not neces- 
sarily a college — an organization 
which became a Chapter, with power 
to frame its local by-laws, when 
twelve men were enlisted. 

We know, in fact, that Chapter II 
(Beta) was to established at the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, Chapter III 
(Gamma) at the Bailey Law School, 
Chapter IV (Delta prime) at Tar- 
boro, North Carolina, and not in a 
college; Chapter VIII (Theta) at the 
University of Alabama, Chapter IX 
(Iota) in Howard College, Chapter 
X (Kappa) at North Georgia, Chap- 
ter XI (Lambda) at Washington and 
Lee, and Chapter XIII (Nu) at the 
University of Kansas. 

Brother Harrington also ascer- 
tained in the course of his researches 
in 1888 that a charter was issued to 
Brother James Bonham for Chapter 
XII (Mu) at the University of 



Georgia and obtained the statement 
that four men were initiated before 
the college president interposed his 
veto. Brother Harrington also ob- 
tained the names of two "Hills" as 
two of these initiates. Brother Wal- 
ter J. Sears later discovered, I be- 
lieve, that these gentlemen were mem- 
bers of another Fraternity. 

But what authority issued these 
charters ? And to whom and for what 
States and places were issued the 
warrants for Chapters V, VI and 
VII? Epsilon, Zeta and Eta, which 
later bore the Greek letters corres- 
ponding to these numbers, were not 
established until 1883-84 as part of 
the revival which began when 
Brother I. P. Robinson obtained the 
warrant for Lambda. The numbers 
given Lambda, Mu and Nu show that 
these warrants had been issued and 
the number given Theta in 1874 
shows that they were issued before 
that. 

What Were the "Grand Lodges?" 

So far as I know the fragmentary 
records that remain owing to the loss 
in that Kansas fire so many years ago 
reveal no designation of "Grand 
Lodges" for the Fraternity at large 
or for any State. In fact, it seems 
doubtful if the "State President" plan 
ever extended beyond the first at- 
tempt to establish in Virginia in 
1870. 

The reasonable supposition is that 
Alpha Chapter, either by designation 
of Regent Riley, or by assumption of 
the power because there was no other 
body, at times, to exercise it, sanc- 
tioned all the charters issued down to 
that sent out to Nu shortly before the 
Nashville Convention met. If any 
formal action was taken by any other 
Chapter the old records of Theta, 
Kappa and Lambda ought to show 
something of it. 

Nu's charter was signed "Wm. H. 
Wade, Regent; J. P. Imboden, Vice- 
Regent," and by a third name which 
I do not now recall, to which was 
annexed the Greek letters "Gamma 



Some Notes and Queries 



223 



Sigma/ 9 meaning "Grand Scribe/' as 
the Corresponding Secretary, now the 
Reporter, of the Chapter was then 
called. He was however, merely an 
officer of the Chapter, and not of the 
Fraternity. 

The fact last mentioned is pre- 
sumptive evidence that Alpha Chap- 
ter had been given or had assumed 
the charter granting power. The 
fact that "Grand Scribe" is specified 
in the "Form of Charter" as attesting 
the document is further evidence that 
a Chapter, and not a "Point" was to 
be designated as "Grand Lodge." 

Who Elected the Second Regent? 

A surviving record shows the elec- 
tion of J. M. Riley and J. F. Hopkins 
as the first Regent and Vice-Regent. 
But who re-elected them in 1875 and 
1880, if they were re-elected when 
their terms would by law expire, and 
who elected W. H. Wade Regent and 
J. P. Imboden Vice-Regent in 1882? 

Our founders who were the first 
Regent and Vice-Regent have gone 
beyond, leaving these questions un- 
answered, if they could answer them. 
But Brother Wade is, I believe, still 
living, and an effort should be made 
to obtain his records or recollections 
of how he obtained the office. 

In this connection I must point out 
an error in the lists of Grand Officers 
given in the Proceedings Delta. It is 
there stated that I. P. Robinson was 
Grand Recorder, 1882-1884. He 
could not have been for the simple 
reason that as no such office existed 
until the Nashville Convention 
created a "General Secretary" in 
July, 1884, and elected Brother Rob- 
inson. The roll for that office should 
stand thus: 

General Secretaries (Grand Recorders). 

1884-1885— Isaac P. Robinson, Lambda. 
1885-1888— Rawson Bennett, Nu. 
1888-1894— Grant W. Harrington, Nu. 
1894-1912— Clarence E. Woods, Zeta. 
1913-1915— Walter J. Sears, Nu Beta Nu. 
1915-1917— Bixby Willis, Lambda. 
1917- ...— Edwin W. Dunlavy, Beta Beta. 

The original title was "General 
Secretary." I was elected "General 



Secretary" toward the end of 1885 to 
fill the vacancy caused by Brother 
Robinson's resignation. Notice 
reached me, I think, along in October 
or November of that year. 

Interest in "Dead" Chapters. 

These notes have dealt largely with 
"dead" Chapters, including some that 
probably never lived. There is a feel- 
ing in some quarters that we should 
not talk about our "dead" Chapters. 
Their history is, however, of impor- 
tance, because of the men they have 
contributed during their more or less 
brief career to Sigma Nu's upbuild- 
ing. For instance: 

C. W. Lohse, founder of Pi, the 
beginning of our whole eastern se- 
ries, was initiated at Epsilon, which 
speedily "died" and which a number 
of Brethren fought hard to keep 
"dead." 

Carl L. Clemans, founder of our 
Pacific coast wing, was initiated at 
Chi, since "dead." J. M. Roberts, 
Inspector of the Division in which I 
write, was admitted at another Chap- 
ter long since "dead." 

And Clarence E. Woods became a 
Sigma Nu at a Chapter which its 
members let die instead of moving it 
with the college in which it had lived, 
in which course, with all respect to 
them, I think they made a mistake. 

To turn to where I started, the re- 
print of the Founders' and the Nash- 
ville Constitutions was a good idea, 
but before "the law" of 1890 is re- 
printed I will see that the General 
Office is supplied with a correction of 
a typographical error which, queerly 
enough, has persisted through all re- 
visions down to the latest. 



To You Contributors 

Says Inspector Errett R. Newby, 
Delta Epsilon, "Congratulations on 
the October Delta. It is inspiring to 
get the good thoughts of the leaders 
of Sigma Nu." 



Sigma Nus Bear Acquaintance 

How Travel Broadens One's Views on Extension 

By Lorens F. Logan, Beta Psi 

[Brother Logan's interesting letter on Eastern Chapters he has visited and 
Brothers in service from Chapters all over the country, is a frank commentary 
on Sigma Nu's nationalism. His Alumni news has been distributed to "Alumni 
Notes." Acquaintances with Brothers from many colleges gets us away from any 
sectional pride that would look down on other parts of the country. Of course, 
"my" Chapter is the best, but "yours" is the next. Brother J. Pope Watson also 
briefly voices the same idea in a note on his sojournings. Moral — let's get ac- 
quainted with each other. 

These comments are sidelights from men of this college generation that 
prove the fruits of the policies of our Builders as outlined by Past Grand Recorder 
Grant Harrington in his series of historical reminiscences. — The Editor.] 



1HOPE that The Delta arrives 
promptly, for I am extremely 
anxious to read the latest news 
about the Fraternity. 

I shall try to " become a regular 
contributor, but must say that news 
of interest is extremely scarce around 
this post. I have been a victim of 
hard luck since my arrival here. You 
see, there were some ninety of us who 
had completed the Master Gunner 
Preparatory Course at the Enlisted 
Specialists School at Fort Winfield 
Scott, California, and they hurried 
us back to Monroe, claiming that we 
were needed immediately to enter the 
finishing course at the Enlisted Spe- 
cialists School here. We arrived here 
Friday, September 13th, and after 
waiting around about a week, they 
announced to us that they would only 
handle thirty men every three weeks, 
so they lined us all up and we drew 
numbers to determine order of en- 
trance into the school. Well, I drew 
No. 89, which meant that I had to 
wait six weeks before entering the 
school here — six long weeks in this 
dreary place with nothing to do but 
grow homesick. The first thirty 
started Monday, September 22, the 
second thirty started Monday, Octo- 
ber 14, and the bunch I am in is due 
to start Monday, November 4— and 
believe me, that date is being awaited 
by all of us with the greatest anxiety. 



Delta Pi 

Fortunately the six long weeks 
have been broken by two very pleas- 
ant trips, one to Washington, and the 
other to New Yprk. The major very 
kindly gave me a seven-day pass, and 
I made a trip to Washington during 
the week, September 28-October 5, 
and enjoyed it immensely. It was 
my first trip to the Capitol City, and 
I had the good fortune to hear Presi- 
dent Wilson speak before the Senate 
on the Suffrage Amendment. While 
there, I visited Delta Pi Chapter at 
George Washington University. 
There was only one man there who is 
a member of that Chapter, but the 
House was filled with Sigma Nus 
from all over the country who are in 
the service and are stationed in 
Washington on special duty. Nat- 
urally, the Chapter is in a flourishing 
condition financially, due to the large 
number of men living in the House. 

Delta Gamma 

This last week I enjoyed a very 
pleasant trip to Schenectady, N. Y., 
with all expenses paid, as I was on a 
Government mission. I had a very 
nice stopover in New York City on 
my return ; saw the Passing Show of 
1918 at the Winter Garden, and went 
out to visit the boys at Columbia Uni- 
versity. There I found Brother 
"Willie" Spalthoff and Brothers 



Sigma Nus Bear Acquaintance 



225 



Blanchard and Warren, Atwell and 
Peek, and others. Believe me, the 
Fraternity at large certainly has to 
"hand it" to Brother Spalthoff. The 
New York Alumni were going to let 
the House go because of inability to 
pay interest on the mortgage, when 
he stepped forward, gave his per- 
sonal check to cover the deficiency, 
and saved the House for the Chapter, 
and for one of our best Chapters. He 
has now undertaken the personal 
management of the House, and as 
you probably already know, has 
leased it under sealed contract to the 
Government for one year, which will 
enable the Chapter to have the House 
in its own name by that time. All 
hats off to "Willie" Spalthoff. To 
say that I enjoyed my visit with these 
boys is only putting it mildly — I felt 
just like one of them, and they re- 
minded me more of my own Chapter 
than any I have ever visited. Or 
rather, I should say, they reminded 
me more of our western boys than 
any others I have met. 

I plan soon to make a trip up to 
William and Mary College, as 
Brother Spalthoff tells me there is a 
local Fraternity petitioning there, 
and I should like to give the boys the 
"once over." I shall let you know, 
should I make this trip. 

Idea* on Expansion Change 

The October Delta arrived this 
afternoon all 0. K. Believe me, I 
surely was glad to get it, and already 
have devoured half of its contents. 
I read with interest the articles on 
the Installations at Bowdoin and 
Arizona. I certainly was glad to 
hear that Brother Red Adams was on 
hand for the installation at Arizona, 
as he greatly admired that bunch, 
and it was he, more than any one 
else, who secured Beta Psi's favor- 
able action on the informal petition 
— we relied on his recommendation 
absolutely. You perhaps know how 
hard it is to get any favorable action 
from the boys out that way — they 
are a very conservative lot — but with 
Brother Adams' hearty endorsement 
and also the fact that they have a 
growing State behind them, we 



finally "came around," and I know 
we will never live to regret it. My 
ideas on expansion have changed a 
little since coming East, and I rather 
believe that some of the rest of the 
Brothers from Beta Psi Chapter will 
have their ideas changed before this 
war is over also. 

We are planning on having a rous- 
ing Sigma Nu Thanksgiving dinner 
at the Hotel Chamberlain, if not 
some informal gatherings before that 
time. Of course, time is limited in 
the school, for one is kept busy night 
and day, but some week-end shall try 
and get all the hoys together and get 
a picture of the bunch for The Delta. 
You know Fortress Monroe is a train- 
ing center for the Heavy (Coast) Ar- 
tillery, and it is just like a big college 
— in fact there are no regular com- 
panies at this post any longer. Leave 
it to me to get all the boys together ! 

I have a good mind to write to 
Brother Westmoreland Davis, Gover- 
nor of Virginia, to run down from 
Richmond and join us at our banquet, 
but I suppose the press of official 
duties will detain him. 

Sigma Nu In Dixie 

By J. Pope Watson, Mu 

If you could but be here and see 
our fellows and compare them with 
the average ones, you would under- 
stand more fully why our Southern 
Brothers are so proud of Sigma Nu. 
Of course, the majority of the other 
fraternities have good men, but we 
have got just the same old kind* that 
it takes to keep up the good standard 
of Sigma Nu. Nor lowered one par- 
ticle on account of the war. 

A man doesn't know how to appre- 
ciate being a Sigma Nu until he goes 
about and meets his Brothers else- 
where. And when he sees the same 
good bunch, the same good spirit all 
working for the same cause, he just 
gets so proud of that five-pointed 
badge, that he has the right to wear, 
that he wants to let everybody know 
he's "one" too. 



A Look-in On Arizona 

Our Baby Chapter — Epsilon Alpha 
By Herschel A. £uxier, Gamma Iota 



FOR fear you might think my 
health has completely failed me, 
I thought I'd better let you hear 
a bit about life out here in Arizona. 

Farewell to Gamma Iota 

I was down to visit the boys at 
Gamma Iota, Lexington, Kentucky, 
and stayed with them- for a week dur- 
ing "rushing season" in their new 
home on 416 East Maxwell Street. 
The House they have this year is an 
excellent Chapter House and situated 
much closer to school than the one we 
lived in last year. It was hard part- 
ing for me when I had to board the 
train Sunday morning and start for 
such an arid place as the State of Ari- 
zona. All along the way I discovered 
enough interesting objects to keep me 
from getting so tired of my trip. It 
was quite a change from Kentucky. I 
got here at 3 :45 a. m. Thursday and 
soon found a hotel near the station. 
Naturally, the first thing I did on 
waking was to hunt up the Sigma Nu 
House. I started from the hotel with 
coat and vest on, but had both on my 
arm in a short while. I found the 
"Sigs" to be the regular "Sig" type. 
All good fellows and ready to do any- 
thing for a Brother Sig. 

The Five G Club 

Since then everything has changed. 
All the boys but three entered the S. 



A. T. C. and another entered the Ar- 
tillery Training Camp at Camp Tay- 
lor, Ky. The remaining Sig and my- 
self tried to hold the House by gath- 
ering up a bunch of "physical 
wrecks" and getting them to live in 
the "Frat House." We were just do- 
ing fine under the name of "Five G 
Club" when school was shut down 
because of influenza and now we've 
had to discontinue eating in the 
House and have just enough to hold 
the House as a rooming place for us. 
We hope to be able to gather in more 
"Five G's" when school reopens and 
to again start the table as usual. 

Epsilon Alpha Boys 

I never found a bunch of more 
highly pleased fellows to have gotten 
Sigma Nu than are these boys. I 
helped them give the pledging cere- 
mony to twelve new pledges just be- 
fore they were all inducted into the 
S. A. T. C. We have been unable to 
hold meetings as all the S. A. T. C. 
boys have been under quarantine 
since they were inducted into service. 
We are planning to resume our reg- 
ular routine after quarantine is over. 
I hope the trouble will end and bring 
all the boys back safely from Europe 
and then we can cheerfully defy any- 
one when we all start to work once 
more. 



Instructor in History Wanted 

Brothers who have specialized in 
history and who would desire a chair 
in a relatively small but strictly high 
grade college, are asked to communi- 
cate with the General Secretary. This 
place is open for the year beginning 
September, 1919. 



The Romance of Business 

I. Selling Goods 
By A Sigma Nu Sales Manager 



IF success in life can be computed 
in dollars and cents, there is no 
field that offers greater oppor- 
tunity to youth and brains than the 
gentle art of selling goods. It is 
pleasant, happy work, requires no 
special technical training, and is a 
broadening education in itself. The 
demand for men who can consis- 
tently deliver is constantly growing 
and in cold cash it leads the field. 
There is none of the years of waiting 
for recognition that faces the young 
lawyer or doctor in their crowded 
fields, none of the uncertainty that 
faces the engineer, nor does the sales- 
man content with the respectable 
starvation of the newspaper man and 
journalist in their notoriously under- 
paid work. All for the following rea- 
son: As long as a factory wheel 
turns in this country the man who 
can sell that product for the most 
money will be in demand, at his own 
price. No matter how efficient are 
manufacturing methods or how mod- 
ern the factory equipment, it's not 
worth a whoop without the sales or- 
ganization to put it over. 

Volumes of doubtful worth have 
been written on "How to Sell Goods," 
and I do not purpose to duplicate 
•them. I wish only to show the oppor- 
tunities for salesmen and the neces- 
sary qualifications in the hope of an- 
swering some lad's query, "What 
shall I do when I leave college ?" 

The popular notion of a salesman, 
which is as incorrect as most popular 
notions, is one who has the ability to 
make you buy something you don't 
want. A real salesman does nothing 
of the sort. Instead, he makes you 
want to buy something he has for 
sale. Divorce yourself right now 
from the idea that the salesman of 
today even remotely resembles the 
slangy, noisy, "hail fellow" we find 
on the stage and in the magazines. 



Your modern salesman is a high-class 
man, well bred and well informed, 
and decidedly well paid. 

Generally speaking, a salesman's 
work consists of selling the product 
of a factory or the stock of a whole- 
sale house either to the retailer or 
direct to the consumer. Real estate 
and insurance salesmen are in a spe- 
cial class with other lines requiring 
special training. City salesmen stay 
in one location important enough to 
warrant it; traveling salesmen cover 
a territory. Salesmen are paid either 
a "straight" or regular salary or a 
commission — sometimes both. Trav- 
eling and other business expenses are 
usually paid by the house, or ad- 
vanced by them. Beginners in most 
lines make from $75.00 to $125.00 
per month and expenses. The future 
is up to the man. In two or three 
years he should double his starting 
salary. If he is a mere order taker 
his advance may stop there, but if 
he can produce his earnings will rise 
on a par with his ability. One friend 
of mine sells the entire output of a 
clothing specialty factory each year 
in two trips of one month each, and 
his annual commissions are never less 
than $15,000. He spends the other 
ten months collecting the rents from 
his apartment buildings. Thousands 
of salesmen make $5,000 per year or 
more. 

Every Chapter House is an uncon- 
scious school of salesmanship, and 
. the man who leads the "rushing" is 
usually a "natural-born" salesman, 
for he probably has the gift of per- 
sonality. This much-abused word 
covers a multitude of sins, but the 
man who leads in "rushing" has the 
gift of meeting people, liking them 
and making them like him. It's the 
art of being human. He knows the 
value of cordiality, he says the right 
thing at the right time, but he also 



228 



The Delta 



knows when to be a good listener. He 
learns to appreciate the other fellow's 
viewpoint. He avoids arguments, and 
learns to put things on a personal 
basis ; he anticipates the other man's 
objections and answers them before 
they are consciously formed. He 
knows the right time to suggest put- 
ting on the button, which is equiva- 
lent to the right time for closing a 
sale. Such a man is alive mentally 
and physically. He has the gift of 
personality. With some it is a nat- 
ural gift; most of us can learn to 
acquire it. 

Two other qualifications are equally 
important— energy and balance. Per- 
sonality counts for little without en- 
ergy to carry it out, and energy 
means work. It means more than 
merely doing allotted tasks ; it means 
steam, enthusiasm, driving power. It 
means doing more than is expected of 
us, then looking for still more, hitting 
the line for all we're worth, strug- 
gling ahead and hitting it again. It's 
the last plunge that puts the ball over. 
The hardest thing for a college man 
to learn is to work for the sheer love 
of working, for he is handicapped by 
four years' training in which most of 
them do only what is expected of 
them, seldom more and usually less. 
I have visited practically every Chap- 
ter House of every Fraternity in 
America and I dare you to name one 
Chapter in which more than one- 
third of the members are consistently 
hitting the grade with every ounce of 
steam they possess. The grades from 
the dean's office mean nothing. Full 
steam ahead is beyond and above any 
mere scholarship mark that a college 
faculty awards. There is no royal 
road to salesmanship or anything 
else, much-fiaunted short-cut corre- 
spondence courses to the contrary 
notwithstanding. Success means en- 
ergy, cooked on the hot coals of am- 
bition, flavored with enthusiasm and 
topped off with the sweetest satisfac- 
tion the world holds — the knowledge 
that you are doing your damndest 
and doing it better all the time. 

The third qualification is the most 
important. I called it balance. It's a 



sense of responsibility, a regard for 
the fitness of things; for successful 
salesmanship depends upon charac- 
ter, not conversation. Personality 
can be developed and energy can be 
stimulated, but balance is a gift of 
the gods. It's the art of playing fair 
with yourself and the world. It 
means taking care of your health, im- 
proving your mind, paying your bills, 
saving your money. It means mod- 
eration and decency, the happy me- 
dium between extremes. It helps us 
to win without crowing, to lose with- 
out excuses, to laugh at ourselves be- 
fore we laugh at the other fellow. 
It's a sense of sportsmanship that 
forces us to obey orders, to do dis- 
agreeable tasks, to be kind, consider- 
ate and appreciative. It urges us to 
be loyal to our house and its interests, 
to fit in with the general scheme of 
things. It's the spirit of teamwork 
which prevents us from cheapening 
ourselves or the house we represent, 
for it dignifies our efforts. Balance 
is the sense of individual responsibil- 
ity, the daughter of common sense. 
If you have those qualifications — per- 
sonality, energy, balance — you can 
sell goods, and a real salesman can 
command his own price. Selling 
goods is selling human nature. If 
you can sell one line of goods you can 
sell another. The branch manager's 
job is just ahead of the salesman, be- 
yond that the sales manager's desk— 
and the rest is up to you. 

To the young man entering the 
selling game I say study yourself and 
the people you meet. Cultivate the 
qualities that please; avoid saying 
things that irritate. 

I believe in starting with a smaller 
-firm rather than the huge corpora- 
tion; you will learn more of general 
business and general methods. Spe- 
cialize later when you can better 
judge what you are fitted for. 

I believe in selling the highest price 
line ; it's probably the best in its field, 
and the American public is being edu- 
cated to appreciate that the best is 
the cheapest in the long run. 



The Romance of Business 



229 



Too many salesmen are floaters, 
drifting from one position to another. 
Don't be a quitter. Stick with the 
ship until you know beyond doubt 
that you can learn no more and climb 
no higher. But don't be afraid to 
change when you know you have 
reached the limit. Some men throw 
their lives away vainly trying to put 
across an impossible proposition, and 
hang on through sheer obstinacy. 

Road work is hard work, but a 
broadening education. Get your 
share of it, for it will pay in dividends 
of experience. 

Don't abuse your expense account. 
Travel for your house as you would 
travel for yourself. You are entitled 
to all of the comforts and some of 
the luxuries, but none of the extrava- 
gances. Besides, an experienced 
sales manager can pick a doctored ex- 
pense account every time. If you 
doubt it you're kidding yourself, 
which is the next worst sin to taking 
yourself seriously. 



Your house is judged by its repre- 
sentative, and you are judged by your 
appearance and manners. The well- 
bred, well-groomed, dignified sales- 
man will be producing business long 
after the noisy order-taker has talked 
himself into the hell which God has 
prepared for bores and boors. 

Business drinking has gone out of 
fashion, and the salesman. who gets 
business on the strength of a shot of 
Scotch is betting on the wrong cards. 

Somewhere in your life build a 
shrine to a good woman and play fair 
for her, whether it is your mother or 
a girl back home. It ought to be 
both. More salesmen are tripped by 
the "wild, wild women" than were 
ever entertained by Al Jolson's cheer- 
ful ditty. A daily letter from the 
man on the road to a real woman is 
more than a good habit — it's insur- 
ance. 

Last of all, smile, doggone you, 
smile. It wins every time. 

[To be Continued.] 



Special Instructions on How to Write the Winning Song in that 

Sigma Na Song Contest 

Contributed by Big Noises in the Sigma Nu World 

[Some of these gents were too busy to be interviewed, so the com- 
mittee jotted down what they would have said if they could have found 
the time. — Warren Piper, Chairman, Committee on Songs.] 

"Make it ripple like the splash of a mountain stream, tender and 
true, deep and low — and fill it with plenty of the 'dear brethren' stuff. 
That gets away in a cloud of dust." — Walter J. Sears. 

"Make it soft as the voice of the Southland, borne on the fairy 
wings of a breeze, fragrant with the breath of magnolias, bathed in 
Southern sunshine and caressed by a Southern wind." — Clarence 
Woods. 

"I said 'jazz' and I mean 'jazz.' Make it step, d'yuh understand, 
make it step. Give it a swing of the right tempo, slip a kick into the 
words, and you'll knock 'em all dead. I said 'jazz.' " — Pete Burns. 

"Very simple (ahem) very simple. Merely a matter of combin- 
ing meter and sentiment and melody. Very simple." — Inspector Van- 
derblue. 

"Call it 'Hip-Hic-Hooray."— The Alabama Delegate to the Grand 
Chapter. 

The Second Lap of the Song Contest has begun — Pile in! 




Brother Chandler's Admonition 

We cannot* too strongly commend 
to every active Brother the article in 
this issue by Brother George Chand- 
ler, Gamma Lambda. It is called "A 
Word to the Active Chapters," and 
so particularly calls attention to 
present conditions that we call at- 
tention to the article in preference to 
elaborating on these conditions in this 
department. 

Chapter House Clubs 

Despite the flight of our men to 
the Government barracks, several 
Chapters are still keeping their 
Houses as club houses for Brothers 
to meet in off hours. Nu Chapter is 
still in its House. Beta Nu and Delta 
Zeta found congenial landlords who 
reduced the rent by a half and are 
continuing on the same premises. 
Beta Beta Alumni who own their 
House have offered to hold it open 
for the active men. And so the list 
goes. 

Club Rooms 

Chapters that found it impossible 
to hold their Houses, have given them 
up and opened club rooms near the 
college. Here they hold their infre- 
quent business meetings and gather 
informally for many a smoke or war- 
talk. Thus the spirit of the Frater- 
nity is kept alight and the organiza- 
tion intact for the postbellum resur- 
rection. But the men of this college 
generation gain much in real frater- 
nal experience in their club rooms 
and barracks that in easier times was 
missed in the palatial Chapter House. 

Preserve the Records. 

We wish it were possible to suf- 
ficiently impress the active Chapters 
with the importance of preserving 
their records. Much of the details of 



our fifty years of history will never 
be recorded because of failure in this 
respect. Many Chapters, compelled 
to move in these war days, are almost 
certain to destroy records of fact 
which cannot be replaced when want- 
ed for future history. 

Remit At Once If Not Sooner. 

Some few of the Chapters have 
written this office, assuming that the 
regular fees would not be remitted 
under war conditions. If such an 
idea were to prevail it would ruin the 
Fraternity. 

The large budget voted by the last 
Grand Chapter and contracted for 
could not be met. 

The records at the General Office 
would not show the return of the men 
in college this year, nor would the 
per capita tax Delta subscription be 
provided for. 

No new initiate is recognized as a 
Sigma Nu until his initiation fee is 
received at the General Office. 

In these days no Chapter can ride 
while its sister Chapters do all the 
pulling. 

Any Chapter, therefore, which vio- 
lates our law by failure to remit will 
be at once cited to the High Council 
for prompt suspension of charter. 

Whether such charter is returned 
at the close of the war will be left to 
the tender mercy of the Brothers who 
cheerfully are- making sacrifice to 
carry the load now. 

Jewelry and Jewelers. 

We trust that every Chapter will 
remember that we now have two offi- 
cial jewelers and only two. All Fra- 
ternity jewelry should be purchased 
from the L. G. Balfour Company or 



Secretary's Table 



231 



from J. F. Newman. The Fraternity 
is protected in price and quality, as 
price lists are filed with the General 
Office. The general Fraternity is 
also helped financially by the terms of 
these contracts, which is very impor- 
tant in these war times. 

Do not submit to any sort of spe- 
cial plea by the nonofficial jeweler. 
Chapter officers are expected to see 
that the law is obeyed with reference 
to the display of jewelry in the Chap- 
ter Houses. 

Fiftieth Anniversary. 

Wherever it is possible there 
should be little gatherings of our 
Brothers on or as near Wednesday, 
January 1, 1919, as possible, in honor 
of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the 
Founding of Sigma Nu. 

The specific date — coming in the 
midst of holidays — may make a cele- 
bration of the exact day a difficult 
matter. The active Chapters ought 
to hold a special meeting or informal 
dinner as near that date as possible 
and invite some of the older Brothers 
to tell the interesting story of both 
national and local growth of Sigma 
Nu. 

It ought to be an occasion where 



local Chapter histories are begun and 
when facts which have never been 
gathered are put in permanent form. 

Volume 35 Bound. 

We have had Volume 35 of The 
Delta promptly bound. We are ready 
to furnish these volumes free to each 
active Chapter according to our law. 
We are not, however, mailing these 
volumes according to our usual cus- 
tom on account of the many changes 
of addresses of the active Chapters 
caused by the S. A. T. C. 

Where Chapters are in temporary 
quarters, with the Fraternity furni- 
ture and library stored, it would 
probably be best not to ask for these 
volumes until the Chapter is in its 
permanent quarters again. The vol- 
umes are in our office, however, and 
may be had at the discretion of the 
active Chapters. 

Individual Brothers wishing bound 
volumes can obtain the same through . 
the General Office. 

Volume 35 will be found to have 
the most complete index of any of 
our bound volumes. It will be fur- 
nished free of cost to Brothers who 
wish to have their Deltas bound. 



Do You Know Sigma Nu s History? 

Enter the Inter- Fraternity Contest and Test Your Knowledge 



Dear Greek: 

Last college year the College Fraternity 
Reference Bureau offered a prize of $25.00 
for the best short history of any college 
fraternity or sorority. It required that 
these histories should be confined to two 
hundred words. 

When the committee met this summer, it 
was found not a single entry had been made. 
Enquiry developed that many had been will- 
ing to enter the contest, but they felt that 
the limit of two hundred words was too con- 
fining. It was therefore decided to remove 
this limit and to simply ask that each con- 
testant write a short history of his or her 
fraternity and that the prize be awarded to 



the one which covers the main facts most 
carefully in a brief sketch. 

The purpose of this contest is to enable 
the bureau to have on file an authentic rec- 
ord of each organization. Aside from the 
value of this to the Greek letter societies, 
one would think that the national officers 
of all fraternities and sororities would en- 
courage their members to enter the contest, 
from the good which would come to the 
members themselves as well as to the 
society. 

This is a move to do something for the 
whole Greek world. Will you help? 

Very fraternally, 

WILLIAM C. LEVERE. 
For the College Fraternity Reference 
Bureau, Box 254, Evanston, 111. 



View and Review 



The past few weeks have been 
filled with uncertainties and confu- 
sion on the part of 
T HJ? r *£ the all the fraternities. 

Fraternities 

The situation, how- 
ever, is rapidly clearing. The Exec- 
utive Committee of the Inter-Fra- 
ternity Conference went to Washing- 
ton and after a conference at the War 
Department secured an order permit- 
ting fraternities to keep up their 
business organizations, though omit- 
ting all social and "ceremonial" 
functions. 

We have since secured a ruling 
from Brigadier General Rees, of the 
General Staff, that "the War Depart- 
ment considers that election of mem- 
bers is an activity of a business na- 
ture and so unobjectionable." 

By far the larger number of our 
own Chapters are already function- 
ing. We regret to say that a very 
few of our Chapters have neglected 
to take advantage of the action of 
the War Department and have "ad- 
journed" until a more favorable time. 
Still others, however, are making the 
best records of their history. 

We also regret to say that a very 
few of our colleges have, while ac- 
cepting the special provision of the 
War Department to assist the col- 
leges themselves, have at the same 
time refused the fraternities the 
privilege of the special provisions of 
the War Department made that the 
fraternities might live. 



A few of the plans of our sister 
fraternities are noted in "Clippings 
and Comment" of this issue. 



The New York Times did a very 
great injury to the college frater- 
nities of the entire 
Ne ,7i? r k ^J! 1 ** country in an edi- 

and Fraternities . , z. , _ A 

tonal Sunday, Octo- 
ber 6th. 



The first sentence in this editorial 
was: "By request of the War De- 
partment — a request which will nat- 
urally be heeded — the activities of 
college fraternities are to be sus- 
pended during the war at institutions 
where the Student Army Training 
Corps is at work." 

The "Times" usually so careful in 
its editorial statements, evidently 
was confused by a statement of 
Brigadier General Rees commanding 
the S. A. T. C. i 

This statement sought only to sus- 
pend the social activities of the Fra- 
ternities and so far from "suspen- 
sion" of Fraternities that it con- 
tained specific provision for the busi- 
ness meetings of the Fraternities. 
This was later followed by specific 
permission to receive new members. 

While a very few of .our Chapters 
have given up under their own dis- 
couragements or the discourage- 
ments of a hostile school administra- 
tion, Sigma Nu instead of being sug- 



View and Review 



233 



pended, has thus far initiated more 
men proportionately than she had at 

this time last year. 

* * * 

As this issue of The Delta comes off 
the press, the Tenth Session of the 

Inter- Fraternity 

hlt S«flrOTw tJ Conference is being 

held. It meets at 
the University Club, New York, on 
Saturday, November 30. This or- 
ganization has exerted a large influ- 
ence in the cutivation of a fine spirit 
of co-operation among the college 
fraternities. It has also been very 
useful in dealing with anti-fraternity 
agitations. 

This conference has been sup- 
ported by a number of leading edu- 
cators and college presidents. 

The delegates from Sigma Nu this 
year are Regent Burr, Grand Counsel- 
lor Myers, and General Secretary 
Dunlavy. Vice Regent Smith and 
Brother Charles C. Burr, both of 
New York City, are the alternates. 

The session this year will be mem- 
orable for its review of war activities 
and plans for reconstruction. A full 
report will be given in the March 
Delta. 

* * * 

Our Fiftieth Anniversary, which oc- 
curs on Wednesday, January 1, 1919, 

will be celebrated 
™*J very differently 

from the way to- 
ward which we have been looking 
forward through the years. Our 
Chapters are only maintaining their 
business organization. All our men 
are in uniform and nearly four thou- 
sand are in the active service of their 
country. 

There is, however, a most beautiful 
side to the fiftieth commemoration of 



the Anniversary of Sigma Nu at this 
time. 

Not only have the fifty years of 
wonderful growth of Sigma Nu been 
typical of wonderful development of 
our country, but Sigma Nu is also 
typical of the spirit of national unity 
by means of which our country today 
sits at the head of the council board 
of the nations of all the earth. 

At the first Grand Chapter in 
Nashville in 1884 Regent Wade, in 
speaking of the sad days immediately 
after the Civil War, when Sigma Nu 
was founded, said : 

"At a time when the 'men and 
women of the South longed for an 
early death as the only happy future 
of their children, when the rope of 
resistance was broken and the bell 
of despair was tolling the dirge of 
death, then Sigma Nu faced the 
emergency, determined to succeed.'' 

How well Sigma Nu has succeeded 
is not only recorded in the new Cata- 
logue, with its more than thirteen 
thousand names, but in the wonder- 
ful new national spirit which Sigma 
Nu, born of the old South, grown into 
the new nation, with no North and no 
South, typifies. 

And even as our Founders had 
much to do with the reconstruction 
of our own great land, so it falls to 
our Knights of the Republic of today 
to have to do with the reconstruction 
of the entire world. 

So; whether our Fiftieth Anniver- 
sary shall be kept by our widely scat- 
tered Brothers on foreign soil, which 
henceforth in most sacred sense shall 
be forever America because of the 
number of our Brothers sleeping 
there, or whether we shall gather in 
little uniformed groups without the 



234 



The Delta 



jest and jollity we would normally 
have celebrated with, still the Fiftieth 
Anniversary of Sigma Nu comes at 
a time and is a part, of the greatest 
hour in two thousand years of his- 
tory. 

* * * 

We are glad to be able to announce 
in this our anniversary number ar- 
ticles of great his- 

£&%&£* toric value b * 

• Brothers Rawson 
Bennett and Grant Harrington. What 
these Brothers are doing for us is 
typical of what at least a dozen other 
Brothers who were more or less inti- 
mately connected with the earlier 
days ought to be doing. 

Brother Harrington's articles have 
been gathered together and will be 
published serially under the above 
subject. These articles began with 
an intended sketch, but have expand- 
ed into more formidable proportions, 
as we knew they would when once 
Brother Harrington became reminis- 
cent. 

Brother Harrington's articles have 
been grouped together under the fol- 
lowing heads: "The Extension Pe- 
riod From 1886 to 1894," "A Proph- 
ecy and Its Fulfillment," "Extension 
Policy Approved," "Eight Years of 
Delta History," and "The First and 
Second Catalogues." 



These war days are developing a 
new relationship between the active 

Chapter and its 

The Chapter and Alumni. 
Its Alumni 

The responsibil- 
ity for this is mutual. The Alumnus 
is feeling a new responsibility for his 
Chapter. This is shown by letters 
and by a rapid increase of individual 
Delta subscriptions among the older 



men. The active Chapter has found 
a new interest and a new bond in 
keeping up with pardonable pride its 
list of Knights of the Republic. This 
has necessitated keeping in touch 
with the Alumni. Then the active 
boys have been greatly interested in 
the Brothers across the seas. 

We somehow feel that in the midst 
of a time which is filled with uncer- 
tainties in our Fraternity life foun- 
dations are being laid which mean, 
in the years immediately to come, the 
deepest realization of Brotherhood, 
expressed in service, which we have 

ever known. 

* » * 

A combination of circumstances 
has caused a number of changes in 

this issue from the 
This accustomed form. 

Issue __ . 

The pressure of 
the Fiftieth Anniversary has made it 
necessary to curtail or entirely omit 
some of our regular departments. 
These will again appear in their reg- 
ular places in the next issue. 

We have also been compelled to use 
a slightly lighter weight paper than 
hitherto. The Government now spec- 
ifies the weight of the paper stock 
used, and limited the maximum ton- 
nage to our subscription list. 

We are happy to accommodate our- 
selves, as such slight inconveniences 
are, after all, very small parts of the 
larger sacrifice being cheerfully given 
by so many of our Brothers. 

* * * 

The Editor remained at home 

throughout the past summer without 

his usual vacation 
Little in ojtfer thsL t he 

Journeys . . 

might have leave of 
absence for five weeks this fall to 
give our Western Chapters tide' per- 



Death op Mrs. John C. Scott 



235 



sonal visitation long promised by the 
High Council. 

The war situation, however, de- 
layed our program after the schedule 
was prepared and this was followed 
by national quarantine. The whole 
program is now problematical. The 
Editor has visited some of the nearby 
Chapters, but these recently have 
found a place in "Little Journeys," 
so that this department will give way 
in this issue to need of space for more 
important articles. 



Many of our Chapters give us a 
thrill of pride by the way they seem 

determined to make 
Historic unusual records in 

Sequence 

war time. Nu Chap- 
ter seems to have this year under- 
taken the task of supplying the Ed- 
itor with material for the department 
of "Kindred Brothers" for all time to 



come. They have just initiated five 
men who, by virtue of their initia- 
tion, become "double Brothers." To 
this imposing list they have also 
added Grant Harrington, son of the 
founder of their Chapter, who is also 
Past Grand Recorder and Past Ed- 
itor of The Delta. This list of initi- 
ates tells the story of a Chapter 
which has kept in touch with its 
Alumni. 

Another unusual record of Nu 
Chapter is shown in the cut of last 
year's Chapter in this issue. In that 
photograph there are thirty Broth- 
ers. Of these, three are dead and the 
twenty-seven remaining are all in the 
service of our country. Nu Chapter 
has a total of 110 Brothers in service. 

Beta Eta Chapter has a feature all 
its own in a "Second Generation 
Club," composed of four sons of Sig- 
ma Nus in the Chapter this fall. 



SDeatl) of £0rs. goljn c. $>cott 



There will be sadness in the hearts of many Brothers in 
Sigma Nu by the announcement of the death of Mrs. Hazel 
Reeves Scott, wife of Brother and Past Editor John C. Scott, 
on October 26, 1918. She was buried at Columbus, Ind., on 
October 28th, the fifteenth wedding anniversary of this de- 
voted Sigma Nu home. The funeral services took place from 
the old family home. The General Secretary was privileged to 
be present and assist in the services. 

Mrs. Scott was a graduate of Butler College and a mem- 
ber of Kappa Kappa Gamma. Although only thirty-five years 
of age, she was possibly more widely known among Sigma Nus 
than any other of our Sigma Nu wives. For years a guest 
room was maintained in the Scott home known as the Sigma 
Nu room. Her home life was filled with a beautiful idealism. 
She was a most devoted wife and mother. 

The heartfelt sympathy of our whole Brotherhood will 
go out to Brother Scott and the four little sons. 



uimiiiuuumiii ii im iiii iiii ii iTnm^^ »''"i i mm i niiini i i ^^B8555a immmuuiHiu HfflHB 



Chapter Letters 




iHrni i iimii iii nTflfffffrnf^ii i i ii mm mmmmif 



Prize Award 

The prize book for the best Chapter letter this time is "Blown in by the Draft/ 9 by 
Frazier Hunt, which was reviewed in the October, 1918, Delta. 

The award is given for December to B rother David W. Smith, Gamma Lambda, who 
describes himself as "Acting Reporter, also Treasurer, Acting Recorder, Acting Emi- 
nent Commander, and Janitor." Despite his numerous offices and these necessary duties, 
he found time not only to write a rattling good Chapter letter, but to observe the re- 
quest for Alumni notes and military notes. And he did not forget to follow Delta styl* 
even to the heading which saves the Editor a deal of hard work. 

For merit we will cite Mu, Beta Iota, Beta Kappa and Delta Chi. We mention^., 
too, Gamma Mu, whose letter is equal to the prize winner, but Brother LaBier for — 
got the Alumni news. Beta Iota and Beta Kappa have been at the head before. Brother** 
O'Brien always writes a good letter and Brother Marlowe is following in Brother^ 
Ritchie's footsteps. We welcome Mu and Delta Chi! It is tine to see one of our babj^ 
Chapters standing in the front rank. 

Next Chapter Letter 

While all of these letters are interesting and most of them well- written, the re- 
porters, with the exceptions above, failed to observe the conditions. Follow them, 
Brother Reporters, and you will win your opportunity. 

STANDARDS FOR GRADING 



«i 



'Promptness" — be on time! 
"Facts," not "Great Expectations" or "Pipe Dreams." 
"Journalistic Sense" — direct and intimate narrative. 

Separate pages of Alumni notes, military news, lists of marriages and deaths. 
Mechanical but important details; typewriting, punctuality, spelling, punctuation, 
heading. The use of nicknames and abbreviations is poor form, too. 

Many a reporter this time lost his opportunity by the omission of one or more of 
these points. "Watch Your Step!" 

The Chapter letter for March is due January 15, 1919. 

To the Alumni 

If your Chapter is delinquent, send word to the Reporter. A word from an Alumnus 
is more effective than the Editor's familiar dun. If you Alumni ask the reason why, 
you will get the news you wish to see. — The Editor. 



UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA 
Beta Chapter 

Beta Chapter opened on September 23d 
with eleven old men back and one affiliate. 
At that time it was not known for certain 
whether fraternities would be allowed by 
the military authorities to run, so that it 
was with a great deal of anxious interest 
that we awaited the conference between the 
military end, academic end, and the repre- 
sentative of the Inter-Fraternity Council. 
Finally, four days after college opened, dur- 
ing which there was a gentleman's agree- 
ment between the different Chapters that 
there would be no bidding or pledging, the 
decision was rendered, namely that we 



would be allowed to run so long as our or- 
ganization did not interfere with military 
affairs and matters. 

Now that our rushing season is over it 
can be termed a success in every sense of 
the word. The simple fact that Sijrma Nu 
has not lost a single bid this year is a rec- 
ord in itself. There were exactly nine bids 
extended and nine men pledged to Beta 
Chapter. We brushed up against six of the 
strongest chapters here in rushing, so that 
it cannot be said that we had our men sewed 
up beforehand. It gives our Chapter great 
pleasure to introduce at this time our new 
Brothers in Sigma Nu: J. H. Cessar and 
G. T. Paterson, Leland, Miss., C. R. Fen- 
wick and A. S. Knowles, Falls Church, Va., 



Chapter Letters 



287 



Herat and G. K. Shands, Washing- 
». G, J. B. Jackson, Hopkinsville, Ky., 
[. E. Ralph, Washington D. C. Ran- 
Odell, our ninth pledge, could not be 
in at this fall initiation, having re- 
1 home for an operation, however, he 
iturn after Christmas and become one 
t crowd. 

te of the Chapters are to be allowed to 
heir Houses this year for ten of them, 
tea owned by the fraternities, have al- 
been taken over by the Government 
used as barracks in quartering the 
unlisted in our. Student Army Train- 
orps Unit. There are a thousand or 
men in college which brings our en- 
;nt up to the normal peace time at- 
lce, ao that it has been necessary for 
overnment to take over all available 
b to house us in. Our House is a 
I one which is not to be taken over, 
it we have been able to occupy it up 
this time. We expect to give it up 
w, some time this next week, for the 
ire required to live in their assigned 
as soon as they are inducted into 
ervice. At this time we will rent 
rooms as most of the other Chanters 
done to be used as meeting rooms, 
system of running fraternities with- 
[ouses will be continued during the 
. of the war. This will reduce finances 
minimum, for the running expenses 
mount to very little. 

ing this period we are going to lay 

r the future in increasing our new 

fund. It will be possible to put all of 

itiation fees into this fund which will 

it to quite a little and in addition the 

is dues. In two years we ought to be 

j reach the first thousand dollar mark 

has been our goal for so long and 

our dear Brother A. H. Wilson has 

s kept vividly before us. With this 

ed the rest will be much easier and 

will realize the dreams which have 

Ireamt by every Beta Sig for the last 



crowd of old men who are here to 
Beta during this second year of the 
ealize what her existence means and 
mtered into every move as one man. 
is the type of fraternal harmony 
always works for the best and has 
us concerted action in making the 
a we have out of the rushing season. 
are: Brothers Harold Sparr, Powell 
i, Bill Bramham, Warren Birge, 
e Dean, George Chiles, Shorty Moore, 
ick Jackson, Ottp Jennings, Dan 
, and A. R. Shands, together with 
nr Mewborne from Eta Chapter, who 
ready proven his worth as a Brother 
ma Nu. With the eight new initiates, 
unber is brought up to normal. These 
r of Beta Chapter have started her 
i one of the leading crowds of the 



University of Virginia, and will keep that 
place during this school year of 1918-19. 

A. R. SHANDS, JR., E. C. 

BETHANY COLLEGE 
Epsilon Chapter 
Delinquent. 

MERCER UNIVERSITY 
Eta Chapter 

Out of the most threatening circum- 
stances, Eta has come out victorious and 
with more than mediocre success. It seemed 
for some time that Eta would not return 
more than three men. But just as the 
clouds seemed darkest, a bright gleam was 
brought into our fraternity life by Mercer's 
securing one of the S. A. T. C. Under the 
supervision of the United States Govern- 
ment, Mercer became at once a nucleus to 
which the patriotic young men concen- 
trated, bringing to our threshold the best 
of metal. 

As a result of Brothers Mewbourne, 
Rainey, Fudge, Pulliam, Jackson and 
Coachman's concerted alertness, we wish to 
introduce to Sigma Nus Pledges Charles 
and Joe Smith, Ed Morgan, Poole, Physioc, 
Sieg, Tripp, Read, Geer, Dortch, Hawkes, 
Heard, Meadows, Hopkins and Taylor, 
some of whom will be in the ranks as 
Brothers ere this reach you. 

Such a coterie of Brothers has never 
graced the "old halls' 9 in many a day. We 
are indeed proud of them. We are deeply 
grateful to all Sigma Nus for the assist- 
ance which they rendered us in obtaining 
these men. 

We have two new Brothers who have 
come to us: Brother Kelly, from George 
Washington University, and Brother Long, 
from Dahlonega. It is good to have them 
with us. 

It is with a deep feeling of loss, that we 
give up Brother Charles Crawford Morgan, 
our past Eminent Commander, who has 
now joined hands with Uncle Sam in this 
great struggle, which we all hope to assist 
in winning. 

Each member desires to join arms with 
his Sigma Nu Brothers on the battlefields 
of France, in the extermination of autoc- 
racy from the face of the globe. And may 
our cause meet the approbation of our God 
who will give us success! 

H. L. COACHMAN, E. C. 

UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA 
Theta Chapter 

Delinquent. 



238 



The Delta 



HOWARD COLLEGE 
Iota Chapter 

The opening of school found Brother Rob- 
ert F. Carlisle back to keep old Iota going. 
He is due much credit for his diligent work 
at the beginning of school. He was not by 
himself long, for in a few days Brothers J. 
A. Price, R. J. Bell, M. F. Langston, W. F. 
Yarborough, and H. M. Barrentine came to 
his aid. We all got busy and have had one 
of the most successful rushing seasons in 
our history. 

We have twelve new men, who are the 
best on the hill. They are S. R. Crew and 
Dean Fleming of Goodwater, Ala., J. M. 
Yarborough, George Savage and Fred R. 
Smith of Montgomery, Ala., B. A. Culpep- 
per of Headland, Ala., Joel Davie of Clay- 
ton, Ala., Fred Colley and Frank Carlisle 
of Birmingham, Ala., Sam Ingram, Avrea 
Ingram, and Stanton Ingram of Anniston, 
Ala. 

We are expecting great things of these 
Brothers in the future, and are sure that 
they will not disappoint us. The members 
of this Chapter believe in quality not quan- 
tity, which accounts for our small num- 
bers. We are holding up our standard this 
year. 

Out of our fourteen members last year, 
all but four are in the service, five in the 
S. A. T. C, and the others are in different 
branches of the service, some in France. 
Brothers Rupert Lindsey and S. L. Price 
are second lieutenants. Brothers Clyde 
Walker and John L. Ray are attending 
school at Vanderbilt University, and 
Brother T. B. Gibson is in the Chaplain's 
Training School at Louisville, Ky. 

• 

This summer six men were chosen from 
Howard to go to Fort Sheridan, 111., to take 
a course in military instruction to assist in 
the instruction at the college this year. Oat 
of the six, three were Sigma Nus, namely: 
Brothers W. F. Yarborough, M. F. Lang- 
ston and S. L. Price. Brothers Price and 
Langston were offered commissions. 
Brother Langston turned his down in order 
to return to college; Brother Price accepted 
and was sent to Lombard College. Four 
of our men here have been appointed as 
non-commissioned officers, sergeants; they 
are Brothers Langston, Yarborough, Avrea 
Ingram and Savage. 

All the boys are full of enthusiasm now 
and things are running fine, so we are ex- 
pecting a good year. 

The college is in fine shape this year. 
The Government has taken it over, and over 
two hundred students have been registered. 
However, things looked gloomy for a while 
at the opening of school as our House was 
taken over and we were left without any 
place to go, but we managed to get some 
nice rooms close by and have furnished 



them well, and are able to have our meet- 
ings just the same. 

ROBT. J. BELL, 
Reporter. 

NORTH GEORGIA AGRICULTURAL 

COLLEGE 

Kappa Chapter 

During the past year Kappa recorded a 
successful and prosperous year. Our com- 
mencement was cut short to allow the mem- 
bers of the R. 0. T. C. to attend the train- 
ing camp at PlattsbUrg, at which Kappa 
was well represented. It is needless to talk 
further on rlattsburg, as there was a great 
bunch of Sigs there as we saw it, and where 
there are Sigs there is a great life. 

After a pleasant vacation, Kappa has 
opened her doors and the year promises to 
be as bright as has ever been before us. 
We have returned five faithful Brothers 
and we have initiated six men. They are 
Brothers Anderson, De Loach and Emmit, 
Statesboro, Ga.; Hogan, Hogansville, Ga., 
and Newman, Gainesville, Ga. 

N. G. A. College is expecting to install 
a unit of the S. A. T. C. in the next week. 
And as we already have an abundance of 
students and a very crowded condition, are 
expected just what influence this will have 
on our fraternity life cannot be plainly 
for seen. We have offered our house as a 
barracks and four df the men are now liv- 
ing in it. One thing is certain, there will 
be an exceedingly large crowd to choose 
fraternity material from, although we do 
not claim to choose fraternity material but 
rather to make fraternity material. 

Just a bit of dope on our private life; 
believe me, we have a great bunch this year. 
Brothers Anderson, DeLoach, Nunnally, 
Brown and Emmitt are oh the football team. 
Brother Vickery is the cadet major and 
Porter is captain; Nunnally and Brown are 
first sergeants; Emmitt and Ripley are ser- 
geants, while Brother Tatum boasts of a 
corporal's rank. As ever, Sigma Nu holds 
positions of esteem in college life. 

We are sorry to have lost Brothers Hig- 
gins, Faucett, Long and Christopher from 
last year's roll. Higgins is now serving 
his country as a second lieutenant, while 
Faucett and Long are with the civil engi- 
neers, both having graduated this spring. 
Brother Christopher also is in his Uncle's 
Army. 

Social activities 'have practically discon- 
tinued in Dahlonega, partly as a patriotic 
conservation measure and partly on account 
of female sex, as Dahlonega is located in 
the mining section of Georgia and there- 
fore the latter could not be expected — and 
what is life without them? The absence 
of the social side of life does not diminish 



Chapter Letters 



289 



our "pep." We are forever working and 
the prospects are when The Delta goes to 
press again we will give announcement of 
the initiation of several others. 

One of the most interesting events that 
ever occurred in this college was the box- 
ing bout which was held last Saturday 
night. We were well represented by 
Brother Nunnally. He fought an opponent 
of equal weight ten rounds to a knockout. 

Wrestling has become very popular in 
our college, and on the next Saturday night 
Brother Anderson is slated to meet Mr. 
Fowler to a finish bout. It is easily seen 
that our Chapter is taking an active part 
in all branches of athletics. 

The prospects for a gala year of football 
and other forms of athletics seem very dis- 
appointing, as the military authority has 
ruled that no man can be absent from the 
post for that long a period. We are in 
hopes that this order will be repealed, how- 
ever chances are very slim. 

GEO. H. PORTER, JR., 

Reporter. 



WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY 

Lambda Chapter 

When Lambda's roll was called Septem- 
ber 25, 1918. Brothers M. W. Simmons, L. 
S. Musgrove, W. F/ Barron, J. P. Hill, J. 
D. Owens, F. A. Henry and F D. Comp- 
ton answered present. 

The session 1918-19 was formally opened 
by a university assembly at the chapel, in 
which President Smith made an impres- 
sive address. The enrollment this year is 
one of the largest in our history, and it 
continues to increase. 

When the Government took over the uni- 
versity, October 1st, and established the 
S. A. T. C, the rushing season closed, and 
Sigma Nu claimed the following pledges: 
Rowell Stanton, J. J. CNeil, and J. L. 
Glover, all of Rome, Ga.; Joe Dinges, of 
Huntington, W. Va., and Woodruff Wil- 
liams, of Tulsa, Okla. 

The Inter-Fraternity rules having been 
disregarded during the period of the war, 
we initiated on the evenmg of October 12, 
1918. 

As the Chapter House is adjoining the 
campus and we are allowed to spend our 
leisure hours there, we have decided to 
keep the House open this year, although 
none of the other fraternities are keeping 
their Houses. 

In the military line Lambda leads, as 
usual. The highest cadet officers in the 
S. A. T. C. are first sergeants and of these 
four officers we have Brothers Williams 
and 0*Neil. Brother Hill is line sergeant 



and Brothers Dinges, Musgrove, Owens and 
Glover are corporals. 

Lieutenant Diggs, formerly of Delta Phi, 
is now stationed at Washington and Lee, 
and is the commanding officer of Company 
"C." 

At the recent elections of the Ribbon So- 
cieties, Brothers Simmons and Compton 
were elected to membership to the white 
Friars and Brothers Hill and Henry to the 
Pi Alpha Nu. This makes all the old men 
members of one or the other of the two 
societies. 

Brothers Simmons, Musgrove and Hill 
have been elected to the Cotillion Club, 
giving Lambda four Cotillion Club men this 
year. 

Of the six "13" Club men returned to 
the university this year Lambda has 
Brothers Barron and Musgrove. 

Although conditions are somewhat upset 
at this time by the military training, yet 
Sigma Nu has the opportunity of making 
this her banner year at Washington and 
Lee 

FLOYD D. COMPTON, 

Reporter. 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 
Mu Chapter 

The University of Georgia is an entirely 
different college this year from what it has 
ever been before. Instead of the usual 
crowd of class-goers ambling leisurely to 
classes, we see uniformed men at drill or 
on working parties. Tis, indeed, a changed 
place. An S. A. T. C. department was es- 
tablished here, and also a Naval Section.' 
There are some seven hundred in these two 
departments and about three hundred 
others, making a round total of one thou- 
sand, some two hundred and fifty larger 
than it has ever been before. 

Of the six men we thought would return 
to begin this Chapter's activities this year 
two returned, and four that thought they 
would not be back are with us. The re- 
turned Brothers are: Wilhoit, F. E.; Mc- 
Manus, W. W.; Woodall, J. D.; Rice, W. 
B. Jr.; Morris, B. I., and Malone, G. K. 
We have three affiliates: Brother Edwin 
H. Jesup, from Beta Theta, and from East- 
man, Ga.; and Brothers Lester D. and 
Harvey L. Henderson, from Eta and Monti- 
cello, Fla. 

Chapter activities have been badly broken 
into by a quarantine for Spanish influenza. 
The campus and barracks have been strict- 
ly quarantined for a week, and most of the 
men in the Chapter are on the campus. 
We took in ten men before the quarantine 
was declared. They are: Ramsey, B. Y., 
Bainbridge, Ga.; Wieker, D. L., Jr., War- 



240 



The Delta 



renton, Ga.; Woodall, A. M., Columbus, Ga.; 
Freeman, I* 0., College Park, Ga.; Walker, 
S. E., Waycross, Ga.; Carlton, W. M., 
Union Point, Ga.; Stanley, J. B., Quitman, 
Ga.: Hart, J. B., Jr., Macon, Ga.; Palmer, 
V. D., Tennille, Ga.; Starr, F. F., Jr., Dub- 
lin, Ga. Besides these we nave four 
pledges, who will come in as soon as the 
quarantine is lifted. They are: Smith, F. 
L., Jr., Quitman, Ga.; Hand, Frank, Pel- 
ham, Ga.; Durden, Graymont. Ga.; White, 
Chris, Dublin, Ga. Besides these we have 
a few others "on the string," but all action 
is off of course until that infernal quar- 
antine is lifted. We expect to see, in the 
near future, a Chapter of some thirty or 
so good Sigma Nus adorning our meeting- 
room. 

By an order of the university, we have 
{riven up our House and have our "lodge' 9 
in two rooms of one of Athens' sky- 
scrapers, the Southern Mutual Building. If 
any Brothers should drop over to see us 
they will find "Sigma Nu'* on the directory. 
and opposite it 708-9. We are not there all 
the time but will be there, when they give 
us liberty. 

There are not nearly so many college 
activities as usual this year, but we have 
our share of student non-coms, which is 
the highest a student can attain. 

All in all, we are going to have a good 
Chapter. Our only regret is that we can- 
not live together at the House, and so a 
good measure of Brotherhood be lost with 
a consequent measure of estrangement re- 
sulting. But we shall take advantage of 
every opportunity to get together in . the 
rooms and at smokers and banquets, and 
so make up, somewhat, for what we lose 
in being separated. 

FRANK E. WILHOIT, E. C. 



UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS 
Nu Chapter 

One hundred per cent. This is Nu's pic- 
ture in 1917. Brother Hazen Kendrick and 
Pledge James Barrett died in the year 1917 
of throat trouble. Every other man was 
in active service before school began this 
year. Nu Chapter has one hundred and 
one Brothers in service that are not in 
school. New stars will be added to the 
service flag as the men leave school this 
year for further training and service. 

Nu Chapter now has the pleasure of see- 
ing the coiled serpent on a man that we 
have long been waiting for. Harris Har- 
rington, the son of Grant Woodbury Har- 
rington, one of the only living charter mem- 
bers of Nu Chapter. See "Kindred 
Brothers" Department. Brother Harring- 
ton was for several years editor of the 
Delta. He has been with us much of rush 
week and we have received great inspira- 



tion and help from him. It is largely due 
to the combined efforts of Brother Harring- 
ton and Brother Engle that we were able 
to refinish our house this year and have 
it in A-l condition for this year. 

Another interesting event in the history 
of Nu Chapter is the fact Pledges Blair, 
Harms, Jackson, Clawson and Crawford 
are Brothers of old Sigs, and we are Justly 
proud that these men follow so closely m 
the path of their older Brothers. Not only 
is this a record in the history of this 
Chapter, but also the number of pledges 
which has amounted to just twenty is 
greater than ever before. 

Out of fifty-three men that were sent 
from Kansas University to the R. O. T. C. 
at Fort Sheridan, nine were made commis- 
sioned officers. The two Brothers from Nu. 
Bert E. Cochran and Merl M. Clift, received 
commissions as second lieutenants, making 
another one hundred per cent, record for Nu 
Chapter. Brother Cochran is stationed at 
Fort Worth, Texas, and Brother Clift is 
at Manhattan. 

It is to be expected that the standard 
of a Chapter should rise and every year, 
of course, the new men are better than of 
the year previous, but never before has 
there been the need of new men so great, 
due to the scarcity of old men, and never 
has there been such a field of material to 
choose from. It takes a remarkably good 
man to make a fraternity at K. U. now, 
so you can judge what class of men are 
qualified to wear the Sigma Nu pledge but- 
ton this year. With our twenty pledges 
and ten old men returned, we just fill our 
House nicely. One of the problems that is 
before us this year is to instill the right 
kind of fraternity spirit into men that will 
only be in the House for about two weeks. 
It means that we must be more intensive 
in our training in both discipline and in 
fraternity instruction. 

As Wichita, Kansas, is now represented 
with nine men in the Chapter at present, 
the new Alumni Association of Wichita 
plays an important part in the well-being 
of this Chapter. The organization is new 
but it has helped us greatly in rushing this 
year. The banquet that was given the 
tenth of August was a great success and 
it enabled many Sigma Nus from other 
Chapters to get together in a way that only 
Sigma Nus know how. 

The Chapter House is to remain open this 
year at least. Our location makes this pos- 
sible and our Alumni has provided that our 
home shall be maintained here and that 
Mother Young, who has been so faithful to 
us for the past nine years, shall stay with 
us regardless of how things turn for the 
active Chapter. This munificence is greatly 
appreciated by every man, but if everything 
goes as planned we will not have to call 
upon them for help in any form. Our finan- 



Chapter Letters 



241 



condition is the best that it has been 
in years. At the present time we have all 
bills paid and a surplus is to our credit. 

The list of pledges are as follows: Wil- 
mer Harms, Edward Thompson, George 
Wellwood, Daymon George and Jack Hartle, 
from Wichita; Julian Brown and Fred 
SalathieL Independence; Charles Blair and 
Ralph Holliday, Carthage, Mo.; Everett 
Clawson, Finley Daugherity. Victor Muse 
and Harold Evert, of Concordia; Paul Jack- 
son, Kansas City: Harris Harrington, Kan- 
sas City. Mo.; Harold Henry. Bellville; 
Robert Winkler, Bartlesville, Okla.; Verling 
Welker, Hutchinson; Dana Hale, Delphos, 
and Raymond Crawford, Paola. 

We all mourn the loss of Brother Ward 
Ellis, who was killed in action. This is the 
second Brother that Nu Chapter has given 
to the cause of liberty. 

DWIGHT M. SMITH, 

Reporter. 

EMORY COLLEGE 
Xi Chapter 

[This is the Chapter that in the fall of 
1917 had only one man back, Brother A. C. 
Darling. Now they are going strong. — The 
Editor.] 

We certainly appreciate the interest 
shown in Xi by the General Office and will 
do our level best to make our Chapter a 
credit to Sigma Nu. 

We are doing nicely now with eighteen 

Brothers. Our new Brother Collins is from 

Louisiana State College, affiliating from 
Phi. 

We have been waiting for further de- 
velopments to see what the Government is 
going to do with our boys. 

The college enrollment for 1918-19 is 
larger than ever — nearly four hundred stu- 
dents. Only three of last year's Chapter 
returned, Brothers Jeffcoat, Dixon and Tay- 
lor. Two affiliate Brothers are Wynne, 
from Kappa, and Collins, from Phi. 

Following Inspector Pelmour's quotation 
in the October Delta that some scheme 
would be devised for holding Xi together 
until we move to Atlanta next year, our 
Alumni went over the top and paid off Xi's 
outstanding debt. With the aid of several 
of our Alumni, Brothers Jeffcoat, one of 
the first members in Xi Chapter; Adams, 
our advisor; Battle, of Warrenton, Ga. 
(who has not missed a spiking season in 
twenty-eight years) : G. L. and L. G. Alex- 
ander, of Forsyth, Ga., and C. W. Daniels, 
one -of last year's Chapter, who is now at- 
tending Medical College in Atlanta, the old 
active members Jumped in the front line 
trenches and initiated fourteen of the elite 
of the Freshman Class. They are: 



Brothers G. H. Alexander and J. T. Hill, 
Forsyth; J. W. Harned, Jr., and B. K. 
Harned, Hopkinsville, Ky.; W. P. Petrie, 
Fairview, Ky.: Gibbs Lyons, Jackson; R. L. 
Smith, Jr., Moultrie: G. F. D. P. Croy, 
Douglas; R. L. Marchman, Jr., Perry; T. 
I. Lewis, Concord; J. N. Willis, Midland^ 
P. H. Mitchell, Crawfordville; G. C. Alder- 
man, Lake Butler, Fla., and W. L. Hudson, 
Macon. Six pledges— R. C. Tuggle, W. H. 
Wynne, Jr., J. E. Pritchett, E. C. Griffin, 
and Walter Brady, all of Atlanta, and Sims, 
of Macon. 

Having given up one House, we have 
rented a hall in the center of town for our 
meetings. 

On account of our Brothers in the S. A. 
T. C. being quarantined, we have been able 
to hold only a few business meetings, but 
several of the Brothers who are not quite 
old enough to enter the S. A. T. C. are 
holding down the fort until the quarantine 
is lifted. 

The Chapter officers for 1918-19 are: M. 
T. Wynne, commander; J. G. Jeffcoat, Jr., 
lieutenant-commander; S. H. Dixon, treas- 
urer; G. H. Alexander, recorder; B. K. 
Harned, reporter; Gibbs Lyons, chaplain; 
J. N. Willis, marshal, and W. L. Hudson, 
sentinel. 

There is certainly a moral in what Xi 
has accomplished this year in that Sigma 
Nu "will out." There has never been 
greater Sigma Nu spirit shown than by Xi 
and her Alumni this year. They have stood 
the test and shown that they are Sigma Nu 
to the bone. 

Xi sends this message to her Brothers in 
service: She will be with you in the un- 
broken chain of Brotherhood in either body 
or spirit at a near future meeting in France. 
We will all march through Berlin together! 

M. T. WYNNE, E. C. 



LEHIGH UNIVERSITY 
Pi Chapter 

College opened September 12th with a 
larger Freshman Class than usual. The 
majority of the upperclassmen returned, 
but Sigma Nu was with only three old men, 
of whom Brother Cyril Melville has since 
been called into service. These three, how- 
ever, made things look alive and there are 
now fourteen active members in the Chap- 
ter. The new members are: Brothers Tice, 
Jacobs, Glen, OTCeefe, Keenan, Sears, Lit- 
tle. Dowd, Kline and R. Knerr. .Brother 
Schuler has returned after a year's absence 
from college. Brother Butz returned from 
Camp Greenleaf . Brother Carter, L. U. '17, 
returned, not as an active member, but as 
an instructor in the chemistry department. 
Because of the few old men in the House, 
elections were held. 



242 



The Delta 



As a war measure we have taken in the 
Nu Chapter of the Phi Sigma Kappa Fra- 
ternity, having ten active members. Our 
House will be a barracks for the perioJ of 
the war, and a quota of forty men has been 
assigned to it. Everything is unsettled as 
yet-—possibly some of our men will be com- 
pelled to move, and there is a probability 
that all of us will be assigned to other 
quarters. The housing question is entirely 
at the discretion of the commandant. At 
a recent meeting between the fraternities 
and the commandant in which all fraterni- 
ties were represented, the Houses were put 
at the disposal of the commandant for use 
as barracks, in lieu of commandeering them 
for the same use. 

We have no intentions whatever of clos- 
ing the Chapter, and Pi looks forward to 
a successful year. 

G. RUSSELL KNERR, 

Reporter. 



UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI 
Rho Chapter 

Rho Chapter was ready, with the uni- 
versity, to start a new year two weeks 
earlier than usual. Not only has Rho an- 
swered the call of Sigma Nu, by pledging 
fifteen standard men, but since the first of 
the month she has responded to Uncle Sam. 
Upon establishment of the S. A. T. C, we 
were one of the first fraternities to offer 
our House for barracks. With only one 
month together, we have accomplished a 
great deal. Pan-Hellenic gave permission 
to initiate, in accordance with which we 
took all our novices in as Brothers. Eight- 
een old men are back and with a Chapter 
of this size there is little doubt but what 
Rho Chapter will survive through the 
period of the war. We have rented club- 
rooms and are to have our weekly meetings 
and as much fraternity life as possible. 

In the cadet roster of officers we are well 
represented with Brother Brickey as cap- 
tain; Brothers Foster, Shore and Bradford, 
as lieutenants; Brothers Gravely, Way, 
Rathbun, Mackey and Jacobs as sergeants, 
and the rest all high-class privates. Four 
of these have received special training at 
Fort Sheridan. 

In school our, scholastic reputation is 
rewarded by the appointment of five of our 
Brothers as assistants — Brother Black in 
mathematics; Brother Love in physiology; 
Brother Mackey in farm crops; Brother 
Schneitter in metal work; and Brother 
Bradford in bacteriology. We also are rep- 
resented in the political part of the school 
with several student officers. 

With our new officers-elect, and under 
the leadership of Commander Foster, Rho 
Chapter, can assure that Sigma Nu at 



Missouri will survive the war as victorious- 
ly as Uncle Sam. 

WM. L. BRADFORD, Reporter. 

VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY 
Sigma Chapter 

Your letters reached me on my arrival 
home Tuesday and my short furlough did 
not afford time for answering. I will tell 
you of the active Chapter in this letter as 
best I can and write in detail of the Alumni 
in a few days. 

In accordance with a Faculty ruling there 
are temporarily no fraternities at Vander- 
bilt. Sigma, like the rest ; gave up her 
House. I am told that rushing will be per- 
mitted as soon as the S. A. T. C. has got- 
ten a proper start (about Christmas). The 
S. A. T. C, of course, keeps the men in 
barracks. They are at present quarantined 
with influenza. When fraternities start 
again, Sigma Nu will start strong, for 
there are an able crowd of men back and 
at least four younger Brothers besides a 
very large Freshman Class. Since the 
Medical Department is on a separate cam- 
pus, the fellows are a little bit isolated. 

Brother John McMillon is an interne in 
Vanderbilt Medical Hospital. 

I was riding in a very filthy part of town 
when I met Brother Dan Thomas carrying 
in his arms a very sick influenza patient to 
be put in an ambulance. Brother Thomas 
is an interne at the City Hospital. 

Brother Ernest Milam returned to 
school with an eight and a half pound son 
for future Sigma, besides a much heavier 
younger Brother. 

Brother George Owen is back in medi- 
cine, so there are no medics missing. 

On the other campus Brother Charles M. 
Sarratt, Iota, is a member of the Faculty. 
A Sigma Nu lieutenant of the Sheridan 
camp from the University of Alabama has 
for his top sergeant at Vanderbilt Brother 
Coker (also at Sheridan). A Brother from 
the University of Oklahoma also adds to 
Sigma's number. The academics back, as 
best I could learn, are Knight, Coker, De- 
Lay, Marley, Stevens, Bushart, Davis, 
Leathers and J. J. Thomas. With this 
bunch back I feel certain that Sigma Nu 
can hold her lead when activities are re- 
sumed. 

Am not surprised that our Inspector has 
not heard from Sigma in as much as the 
S. A. T. C. and influenza have muddled 
things. 

■ 

Brother Sarratt of the Vanderbilt Faculty 
and Brother George Owen, Vanderbilt Med- 
ical School, can best keep you informed. I 
will from time to time endeavor to write 
you what I may gather. 



Chapter Letters 



243 



I am on my way to Delaware State Col- 
lege as an instructor in S. A. T. C. and ex- 
pect to find a great bunch of Sigs there. 

MAXWELL CARR PAYNE, 

E. C. 1917-18. 

I beg to advise that Sigma has been some 
what disconcerted, owing to the inaugura- 
tion of the S. A. T. C. in Vanderbilt, and 
while it has been a very difficult matter to 
get the "gang" together, we have not for- 
gotten that we have a good Chapter, and 
are not overlooking preparations for a suc- 
cessful year, even though we have been 
rather tardy in complying with requests 
from the General Office and in answering 
letters. 

We have been working under most diffi- 
cult conditions in Vanderbilt this year, ow- 
ing to the inauguration of the S. A. T. C. 
University ruling delayed the date of pledg- 
ing until November 7th and has allowed 
no time for rushing. We have two affili- 
ates this year. Owing to the difficulty in 
getting away from the reservation, we have 
been unable to hold any meetings up to 
this date. 

To day nine of us got together and made 
preparations for rushing day, November 
7th. We have been fortunate in having 
quite a large number of letters of recom- 
mendation from our Alumni, and from a 
list of some thirty-four men. I feel sure 
we shall be able to perpetuate the ideals of 
Sigma Nu and Sigma Chapter. The meet- 
ing today was very informal, and tempo- 
rary officers were selected, to fill the places 
of those men who have gone to the army 
since last year. We anticipate a regular 
meeting of the Chapter within the next 
few days. 

The university authorities at Vanderbilt 
have not declared an armistice nor ceased 
the operation of fraternities, but on the 
other hand have really been doing every- 
thing in their power, feasible, to maintain 
their operation. I think the delay in the 
rushing season a very wise one under the 
present conditions. 

I regret that we were unable to main- 
tain our Chapter House this year, but every 
Fraternity in Vanderbilt has given up its 
House. Owing to the medical and academic 
departments of Vanderbilt being in differ- 
ent sections of the city, and to the quaran- 
tine which has just been raised, it has been 
extremely difficult to get together. I feel 
sure that from now on this difficulty can be 
overcome at least partially. I can assure 
you that Sigma is still on the job and shall 
do all within our power to uphold the ideals 
of our Fraternity and hold the Chapter to- 
gether. 

By the time for the next issue of The 
Delta, we will have as much information as 
possible with regard to the boys in the 
service and .Chapter letter. 



I am very glad indeed to know of the 
attitude of the War Department toward 
Fraternity matters. 

GEORGE W. OWEN. 

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS 
Upsilon Chapter 

[In lieu of the Chapter letter we are pub- 
lishing a letter from last year's commander, 
Lieutenant John D. Cofer, who is now at 
Camp Grant, Illinois, which furnishes a clue 
to the Chapter's condition. Brother Cofer 
always hits the mark and gives the kernel 
of a situation. — The Editor.] 

Sometime ago a letter was forwarded to 
me by my mother from your office, in which 
you asked for a report on Upsilon Chapter. 
At the time at which I received the letter 
I had just arrived at Camp Grant and was 
so busy that I was unable to answer it. 
So as usual I suppose I am late for the 
next issue of the Delta. My affairs have 
been so upset for the last month that I can 
hardly find time to drop a line now and 
then to a young lady at home that wears 
a Kappa key over the "Cross of the Legion 
of Honor." 

The new S. A. T. C. has practically done 
away with fraternities at the University of 
Texas. I hear from the fellows that the 
fact that they live in barracks has seriously 
interfered with the opening of the Chapter. 
Yet they have a few pledges. The House 
has been let out as a girls' boarding house. 
The fellows have rented club rooms. I 
think if it has not already been done that 
it would be a good idea for the General Of- 
fice to issue some sort of circular giving 
advice to the different Chapters over the 
country. The boys at home are almost at 
a loss as to how to maintain the Chapter. 
We do not want the Chapters to fall 
through, and I have no doubt that you all 
have formulated a plan. 

I have met two splendid Sigs up here — 
Brother Evans C. Crow of Penn State and 
Brother Willard Wight of Maine. We 
would appreciate copies of the first Delta 
when it comes out. No matter how far we 

§o away we will always carry the spirit of 
le Fraternity which meant so much to us 
at college. You just begin to realize its 
advantages when you get out into the world. 

JOHN D. COFER. 

LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY 
Phi Chapter 

Delinquent. 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Psi Chapter 

All the members of the Chapter are in 
the S. A. T. C. and hence we hay* not YmmL 



244 



The Delta 



the time to get in any of our reports. How- 
ever, in the future, we will try to be more 
prompt and we will get in all reports at an 
early date. 

JAMES S. FICKLEN, 

Recorder. 



DEPAUW UNIVERSITY 
Beta Beta Chapter 

Delinquent. 

PURDUE UNIVERSITY 
Beta Zeta Chapter 

Delinquent. 

INDIANA UNIVERSITY 
Beta Eta Chapter 

When Indiana University announced that 
it was to have a unit of the Student Army 
Training Corps, the greatest number of 
students in the history of the institution 
arrived in Bloomington for the registration 
day. Among these were thirteen members 
of Sigma Nu and a number of pledges. 

The Brothers who returned to school are: 
Victor Mays, Pendleton; Leo Reed, Parker; 
Hiram Stonecipher, Zionsville; Cecil Craig, 
Otwell; Frank Faust, Goshen; Alan R. Mc- 
Ginnis, Evansville; Robert Rogers, Bloom- 
ington; Robert Sinclair, Fort Wayne; Ralph 
Winslow, Greenfield; James E. Moffat, 
Bloomington, and Edward M. Pitkin, Green- 
castle. 

Brothers Robert Brewster, Fortville; 
Floyd NefF, Logansport; Andrew Sallade, 
Goshen, were in Bloomington during rush 
week, but are not now in school. Brother 
Robert F. Brewster has entered a training 
camp at Warsaw, Indiana. Brother Andrew 
Sallade was forced to withdraw from col- 
lege on account of illness, but will no doubt 
return to school later. 

Other visitors present during rush were 
Past Regent George M. Cook, of Chicago; 
Brother William R. Stuart, of Greenfield; 
Brother Bernet Leist, of New Albany: 
Brother John Leonard, of Chicago, ana 
Brother "Pat" McCorkle, of Greensburg. 
Brother Stuart is now in training at the 
Great Lakes Naval Training Station and 
Brother Leist has also entered the service. 
Other men of last year's Chapter who are 
now in the service are Brothers Earl 
Stickel, Camp Forest, Ga.; J. Wymond 
French, who enlisted in the Marine Corps 
and is now on his way to Siberia; Earl Bet- 
tinger, Fort Sill, Okla.; Donald Richardson, 
Great Lakes; William McCaw and Law- 
rence Anderson, Municipal Pier at Chicago; 
and Ralph Winslow, who was assigned to 
Indiana University from the Great Lakes 
Naval Station. 



During rush week twenty-five men were 
pledged. They are all men of high char- 
acter and moat of them come here with 
enviable athletic and scholastic reputations. 
The men wearing the pledge pin are: 
Myron Brozier, Pendleton; Orville Castor, 
Lapel; Ralph Closson, Logansport: Hallis 
Deakyne, Fortville; Kenneth Ellington, 
Pendleton; Monroe Frazure, Gary ; Kenneth 
Fugit, Greensburg; John Fair, Blooming- 
ton; Shoppie Gnmsley, Fortville; Philip 
Hardin, Fortville; Paul Honk, Columbus; 
Vernon Hyer, Parker: Dee and John Jones, 
Williams; Harold Kercheval, Sheridan; 
Kenneth Kilpatrick, Gary; John Kyle, 
Gary; Frank Marauardt, Gary; Ralph 
Lamb, Indianapolis; Noble Riggle, Goshen; 
Clifford Smoke, Goshen; Robert Stahr, Elk- 
hart; Eugene Thomas, Fortville: Harold 
Wells, Columbus; Lee Crawley, Princeton. 
Clarence Feldman, of Evansville, who was 
pledged in 1913, came to Indiana this year 
and was initiated October 6th. 

The freshmen give promise of adding to 
the athletic glory of the university and of 
the Fraternity. Several of the pledges 
starred in high school basketball and will 
no doubt be strong contenders for the Crim- 
son quintet this year. Kyle, former Emer- 
son High whirlwind, is playing fullback on 
the varsity eleven. Stahr, who "starred" 
in high school athletics, is making good as 
alternate quarterback. Kilpatrick, another 
fast little player from Gary, is rapidly de- 
veloping into a speedy half-back who never 
fails to make a dent in the line of the op- 
ponents of the Crimson eleven. 

Brother Frank Faust, who is playing his 
second year on the varsity as quarterback, 
is going better than ever before and has 
proved himself to be one of the best gen- 
erals the Big Red Team has had for sev- 
eral years. In the first game of the season 
Faust made a sensational run of ninety 
yards and has been a consistent ground 
gainer. 

Indiana University was one of the few 
universities in which the fraternity men 
were allowed to live in their Houses. The 
Houses here were all taken over by the 
Government, furniture, curtains, pictures, 
etc., were removed, and they were convert- 
ed into barracks. Additional plumbing and 
heating arrangements were installed m or- 
der to bring the house up to Government 
specifications. All the members of Sigma 
Nu who were in the S. A. T. C. were al- 
lowed to stay in the House and enough 
other men were taken into our House to 
fill our quota of sixty-five. 

In order to provide a club room for the 
men and to provide a place where they 
might spend their time between drill hours, 
another house, located two blocks from the 
original one, was rented and all our furni- 
ture was put in there. Five Brothers and 
pledges who are not members of the S. A. 
T. C, live in the House, which, is called the 



Chapter Letters 



245 



M 



Sigma Nu Annex." There Fraternity meet- 
ings and initiations are held. Two rooms 
have been fitted up as club rooms and the 
gang can always be found there during 
leisure hours. 

Brother Victor Mays has been appointed 
top sergeant of the Sigma Nu House, now 
known as "Barracks No. 10/' and he has 
taken charge of the work in a most credita- 
ble manner. 

The Chapter last year was able to pay off 
many of the old debts and we were able to 
start the year with practically a clean 
slate. 

The financial arrangement made with the 
Government will take care of practically, all 
the financial problems that arise through- 
out the year. 

Beta Eta will not slacken this year in 
her effort to keep represented in all 
branches of student activities. As usual, 
she is holding her own in athletics. Brother 
Ralph Winslow is editor of the 1919 
Arbutus and president of Sigma Delta Chi, 
the honorable journalistic fraternity of 
which Brother Robert Rogers is also a 
member. Brother Victor Mays is business 
manager of the Indiana Daily Student, the 
college newspaper. Brother James E. Mof- 
fat is a member of the Faculty, teaching 
in the Economics Department. Brother 
Edward M. Pitkin is an instructor in the 
Anatomy Department in the Medical School. 
Brother Pitkin's wife and young son ac- 
companied him to Bloomington this year 
and they are now residing here. 

There are four men in school this year 
whose fathers are Sigma Nus and they 
have formed a "Second Generation Club. 
They are Brothers Victor Mays, Hiram 
Stonecipher, Pledges Dee and Paul Jones. 

The officers of the Fraternity this year 
are: Ralph Winslow, commander; Robert 
Rogers, lieutenant commander; Hiram 
Stonecipher, recorder, and Cecil Craig, 
treasurer. These men are looking after the 
material interests of Sigma Nu. 

Initiation of the pledges has been planned 
for next Sunday. The university has closed 
for ten days. 

• Beta Eta has managed to weather the 
storm in this crisis for fraternities. She 
has given a host of Brothers who have gone 
put to fight for the principles of Sigma Nu 
and to make the world a safe place to live in. 

• 

This year it shall be the goal of Beta 
Eta to instill into all her pledges the Sigma 
Nu spirit and the principles which should 
guide their lives, although she is handi- 
capped by war-time conditions. Her am- 
bition shall be to give to her Government 
the very best, and the greatest possible 
number of officers. 

RALPH WINSLOW, E. C. 



ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 
Beta Theta Chapter 

I suppose you think that Beta Theta is 
taking a good while to let you hear from 
us this year, but we have been in such a 
position this year that we did not know 
what to do and we are just now getting on 
our feet good. 

When we .returned to college we found 
that our treasurer and assistant treasurer 
would not return as they were in a train- 
ing camp and were commissioned at the 
end. Things were also in a turmoil in col- 
lege and there was a lot of talk about tak- 
ing over all the fraternity houses here and 
using them as barracks for the boys, and 
fraternities here were in a bad fix. How- 
ever, we went to see the president of the 
college and he told us that we could stay 
in our House until the first of October and 
maybe longer, so we went right to work 
as we have always done and started work. 
We elected new officers and have pledged 
fourteen fine freshmen. We are all right 
now as we have the books posted up and 
have things going full sway. 

The Government has taken over our 
House as barracks, and we are to get out on 
the first of October. We are trying to keep 
the Fraternity going and have rented halls 
out in town to hold meetings in, but I am 
not sure that we can do this. I hope, how- 
ever, that we can get along some way, and 
we are going to do all in our power to keep 
Beta Theta of Sigma Nu running. 

They have moved fifty-two cots in our 
House already, and the rest of the Fra- 
ternity Houses have as many as they can 
get in. I think that they are planning to 
put as many of the college boys as they 
can in these Houses so they can be kept up, 
as we have no regular barracks here. 

Anything that we can do to help our 
Government in this time of war we are go- 
ing to do as cheerfully as possible, although 
it means that we are to give up all that we 
hold dear in our college life and the sacri- 
ficing of our college home. We have talked 
this over in the Chapter and have decided 
that this is the best and only thing to do 
and have told the president of the college 
that we were willing to let him use the 
House. I am sure that we were the first 
of the Fraternities here to make this sacri- 
fice, and he praised the spirit that we 
showed very highly. 

We got a letter some time ago from you 
telling us that we had better take the steps 
we have, if necessary, and we were very 
glad to get this advice, for we have only 
three men in the Chapter now who have 
been here three years, and no four-year 
men, so you see that the three of us have 
to work a little harder than usual to keep 
things straight. 

JOHN F. FRAZER, Tveasuxex. 



246 



The Delta 



MOUNT UNION COLLEGE 
Beta Iota Chapter 

At the time of this writing we are un- 
able to say much in regards to Beta Iota's 
future. Our House has been taken over by 
the Government for barracks, owing to a 
strict quarantine, as yet we have been un- 
able to effect an organization. However, 
the college authorities and the commandant 
will arrange to provide a meeting place for 
all fraternities here. We will pledge men 
as usual and will endeavor to keep up the 
fraternity life as much as possible. 

Brothers Eynon, Burkle, Cocklin, Jones, 
Marlowe, Dager, Helwick, Knoll, Nelson, 
Rymer, Shively and Sprankle have returned 
to school and are enlisted in the S. A. T. C. 
All are scattered through the different bar- 
racks and have little opportunity of meet- 
ing as in normal times. We have our share 
of honors. Brother Eynon, back from Fort 
Sheridan, is ranking student officer of the 
S. A. T. C. unit here, and is also varsity 
football manager. Brothers Burkle, Dager, 
Nelson and Sprankle are varsity football 
men. Brother Marlowe is editor-in-chief of 
the college weekly, the Dynamo. In the 
S. A. T. C. we have our share of officers, but 
as no permanent appointments have been 
made, it is impossible to say how many at 
this time. We miss Brothers Brown, 
Hughes and Ritchie, who have been com- 
missioned and are now stationed elsewhere. 
As long as a few of us remain in school, 
Beta Iota will hold up to the last. 

LEROY E. MARLOWE, Reporter. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGE 
Beta Kappa Chapter 

Kansas State College opened this year 
September 9th. Contrary to' expectations and 
contrary to the rule of the two years previ- 
ous, we returned fifteen old men — a fine 
nucleus to carry out a successful rush sea- 
son. The two main problems which imme- 
diately confronted us were: First, that our 
Chapter House would be taken over by the 
Government to be used as barracks for the 
Students' Army Training Corps, which 
would be organized on about October 1st; 
second, that practically all of the old men 
and those who we would pledge would, on 
that date, leave the Chapter and go into 
training. 

However, the S. A. T. C. was our draw- 
ing card and never in our experience in 
fraternity life has fraternity material for 
pledging been so plentiful nor of such 
splendid quality. High school graduates 
came by the hundred to enter the Student 
Training Course and as the regular college 
rulings regarding pledging were the same 
as usual, we got busy and pledged a larger 
number of freshmen than we generally do 
the first week of school Two pledges, W. 



E. Gault, Wichita, and J. L. Pike, Chanute, 
Kansas, were carried over from last spring. 
To these, we added twelve new pledges, all 
of whom we are very proud to have wear 
the serpent button. They are as follows: 

C. E. Bleckley, Wichita; J. P. Fallis, St 
Joe, Mo.; Fred Miller, Wamego; Leland 
Lovejoy, Clay Center; E. J. Howe, Mor- 
gan ville; G. 0. Faulkner, Bell ville; D. G. 
Lynch, Manhattan; K. B. Key. Wichita; 
Arthur Stark, Bell ville; F. B. Russell, 
Paola; Tate Fry, Lockney, Texas; Milton 
Spencer, Concordia. 

Since the induction of the men into the 
S. A. T. C, we have rented another house. 
furnishing it with our own furniture, ana 
it is being manned by the five left-oven, 
three old men and two pledges. Our ma- 
tron, Mrs. Bassler, is still with us, although 
a part of each day she spends in the new 
S. A. T. C. Community House. The S. A. 
T. C. is just now temporarily quarantined 
with Spanish influenza, but it is our pro- 
gram to have the men in uniform with us 
at our Chapter Annex a few minutes each 
day, and on week-ends. 

As yet we have not initiated our new 
men. We did everything possible to instill 
into them real Sigma Nu spirit and Beta 
Kappa's way of doing things before they 
were taken over by the Government, and 
we expect to give them all the training pos- 
sible in the time we have. Thus we have 
made possible a common meeting place for 
the men in college and visiting Brothers 
from the nearby camps; a place for regu- 
lar Chapter meetings; a place where initia- 
tion can be held soon; and so long as pos- 
sible, Sigma Nu, as an organization will be 
maintained and recognized in Kansas State 
College. We are determined to "Carry on!" 

H. A. O'BRIEN, Reporter. 



UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 
Beta Mu Chapter 

Delinquent. 

OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY 
Beta Nu Chapter 

Beta Nu opened her Chapter halls this 
fall with six old men, one Senior, Lester C 
Neer. four Juniors, Robert Sherman, com- 
mander elect, Walter Hamilton, Ray Swoish 
and Carter Motz, and one Sophomore, D. S. 
Dean. Later in the year Dwight Deffen- 
baugh, a Senior and the Chapter Treasurer, 
entered school. Looking back over last 
year, we have two things to feel proud of: 
the large number of men who have entered 
the service and the fact that, in spite of the 
unsettled condition and the small number 
of active men, we were able to pay more 
than $200 on an old debt. 



Chapter Letters 



247 



State University had the largest 
lan Class in the history of the insti- 
this fall, mostly on account of the 
\ C. The boys got together and with 
ip of a couple of Alumni, pledged 
' excellent freshmen, probably the 
inch of freshmen ever pledged at any 
it at Ohio State. The last week in 
iber we initiated two sophomores, 
b of last year, George Kibler, Cir- 
t, O., and Lawrence Bonner, Colum- 
, By the time this is printed the ma- 
of this year's pledges will be wear- 
5 five pointed badge. 

lie evening of September 26 the act- 
lapter entertained the new pledges 
regular college dance. Socially, the 
got by" for the year. One of our 
pledges from Lima, 0., fell so hard 
tttle sorority pledge that the boys are 
he will give his pin away as soon as 
s it. Mrs. Lewis B. Makepeace, the 
f one of our men in France, chap- 
. Twenty-four couples were present. 

litions around the university are very 
ed, some of the men are in barracks, 
oi the waiting lists, and others in va- 
lassifications; we can be sure of noth- 
tt we feel a certainty that we will be 
»w to keep the house open through- 
5 college year. At first this seemea 
ible. The majority of the larger fra- 
*a here have either closed or about to 



Chapter has had some very fine visi- 
Ireaay this fall. Brother Hop wood, 
apter adviser, has been up a number 

* and helps out wonderfully. Brother 
aant Aviator Charles Milton Cum- 

formerly of Fort Worth, Texas, 
i one evening on his way across via 
ork. Brother Cummings was Chap- 
nmander part of last year and was 
led by all. Brother Clyde D. Alstadt, 
& Sigma, of Camp Mt. Clemens, 
was nere for a few days. He is a 

• Signal Electrician. This Chapter 
id the pleasure of entertaining and 
entertained by the inevitable "Chic" 
f Messrs. Shubert, New York, who 
aying in the Winter Garden produc- 
*Doing Our Bit" at the Hartman 
e. This happened during rushing 

and I'm sure had quite a bearing on 
b results that we can show. Lieuten- 
>ley, chief of the military police in 
ma, spent the very pleasant evening 
pledge dance with us. He is a Yale 
nd though not a Sigma Nu, one of 
est men we have seen in an officer's 
n since the war began. We must not 
Brother C. H. Julian, one of our 
interested and active alumni, who 
n on us now and then. We could not 
nogh a rushing season without him. 

tier Stebelton, Eta, has entered the 
ity here and seems to be a typical 



southern Sigma Nu. Brother Frank Beach, 
Gamma Zeta, who has been connected with 
the State Department of Agriculture for a 
couple of years, left a few weeks ago for 
service in the coast artillery. 

The Sigma Nus at Ohio State along with 
many other things are working patiently 
and faithfully on their New House Fund, 
and as soon as the war is ended, the Chapter 
expects and intends to build the finest and 
most modern fraternity home on the cam- 
pus. 

The names of the new pledges are: Rob- 
ert B. Manley, Howard Sherman, Bryan 
Downs, Columbus; Jefferson Hoshor, James 
Chambers, of Canal Winchester; Frank H. 
Wickline, Akron; James D. Ward, Belmar, 
N. J.; Wm. Brinkmeier, . George Orphal, 
Howard Doute, St. Mary's; Wade W. Mc- 
Gee, Chillicothe; Harry LeFeure, Jack 
Reese, Gloucester; Howard Dinkel, Lima; 
Ralph Gibson, Elyria; Francis Gallagher, 
Mt. Sterling, and Robert Gehring, Findlay. 

LESTER C. NEER, Reporter. 

WILLIAM JEWELL COLLEGE 
Beta Xi Chapter 

The following boys have entered the serv- 
ice since our last year's report: 

Brothers Hamilton Baksade, Donald 
Church, Ray Cooper, Herbert Eby, Paul 
Cook, Basil Joyce, 0. P. Moody, Mason 
King. Frank White, Paul Hunt, Paul Rich- 
mond, Perry Stoits, Harold Stewart and 
Austin Hall. 

Pledges Wilfred Beasley, Ridy Stockdale, 
George Scovun, Amos Dickson, Earl Smort, 
Jack Bachlor, Elmer Cobb, Fitener, Finley 
Mason, Robert Funkhouser, E. R. Samuel, 
R. L. Word, O'Fallen Nutter, Frank Coff- 
mon and Russel Bollow. 

Brother Sanford Miller Brown was killed 
in action. 

We opened school this year with nine 
active men and five pledges. Since then 
we have pledged fifteen others. Our pros- 
pects this year are the best they have been 
for years. 

Although we were unable to keep our 
House, we manage to meet there every Sun- 
day for dinner. We are holding regular 
Chapter meetings and expect to initiate 
soon. 

We own our House, so we are not both- 
ered financially in that way. 

Address all mail to Sigma Nu House, 
Liberty, Mo.; D. M. Church, Commander; 
H. Stewart, Treasurer. 

P. P. RICHMOND, Reporter. 



248 



The Delta 



UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 
Beta Rho Chapter . 

All of the Fraternity Houses have been 
taken over this year for Government pur- 
poses, we had to either store our furniture 
and give up all ideas of having a common 
meeting place, or rent a suite of rooms 
which could be occupied by several of our 
Alumni, and pay a small rent. We decided 
upon the latter and forthwith had the treas- 
urer of the Beta Rho property company 
lease rooms at the above address. 

Of course, we can not be together as 
much as we wish, but we manage to make 
week-end liberties very enjoyable, as well 
as the few hours we may get off during the 
week. 

At the beginning of the term we had 
eighteen members, more than any other fra- 
ternity on the campus — and even now that 
four nave gone to officers' camps, we still 
hold our own. We are all in the service, 
however, and have had little time for rush- 
ing, but we managed to very quietly pledge 
and initiate two splendid fellows, Howard 
Hovde and Gerald Jewett, both of Des 
Moines, la. 

Most of us are twenty or over, and as 
we are not certain of staying after Decem- 
ber, we have made arrangements with our 
younger Brothers and our Alumni to have 
them keep things in as good form as pos- 
sible under the circumstances. 

JACK L. SEBALD, Recorder. 

I do not know whether any of the active 
men at Beta Rho have written you recently 
regarding the situation at Pennsylvania, 
and I am therefore taking this opportunity 
of informing you. 

The university gave us to understand 
that our House would be acceptable for 
barrack purposes and we therefore removed 
all the furniture, rugs, etc., excepting beds, 
mattresses, pillows, and straight chairs. 
The fifteen Sigs who have returned to col- 
lege rented three rooms and a bath about 
three squares away and everything was 
ready for the signing of the lease, when an 
inspector from the surgeon general's office 
of the War Department condemned the use 
of the House as barracks. 

If we had known of this sooner it may 
have been possible to have partially filled 
the House with Alumni, but I fear it is a 
little late this year to do this now. We 
will simply have to make the best of it and 
pull out somehow. Three of the men in 
college have been transferred to officers' 
traimng camps, and those that have re- 
mained have already taken in two initiates. 

W. L. GRUHLER, Treasurer, 
Beta Rho Property Company. 



UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT 
Beta Sigma Chapter. 

Delinquent. 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 
Beta Tau Chapter 

The commander of our S. A. T. C. unit 
has issued an order that no fraternity or 
secret order mail shall be delivered in bar- 
racks, so I have received no fraternity mail 
since coming back to school. 

If you will please send all mail to Beta 
Tau Chapter to our Chapter adviser, Dr. 
Rayford K. Adams, State Insane Hospital, 
Dix Hill, Raleigh, N. C. I can get it from 
him, as he is a loyal Sigma Nu, and the 
best Advisor this Chapter ever had. 

This Chapter has only two men back, F. 
S. Childs and B. F. Mitchell, but we have 
several pledged men from last year back 
that we can take in in a short while if 
fraternities are allowed to remain active. 
The Freshman Class this year is unusually 
large and has lots of fraternity material 
in it. 

BURTON F. MITCHELL, Reporter. 

ROSE POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 
Beta Upsilon Chapter 

Delinquent. 

TULANE UNIVERSITY 
Beta Phi Chapter 

Delinquent. 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
Beta Psi Chapter 

Delinquent. 

GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY 
Gamma Alpha Chapter 

Delinquent. 

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 
Gamma Beta 

Going under the supposition that Chap 
ters all over the country are laboring 
under the same difficulties, we will not at> 
tempt to enumerate Gamma Beta's. Suffice 
it to say, however, that they are plentiful. 

Notwithstanding the times, several old 
men and two pledges returned to school at 
its start to join the S. A. T. C. Brothers 
Eugene McMakin, Vincent Ely, Wayne 
Walker, and Phelps joined the S. A. T. C. 
while Brothers George Young and Edward 



Chapter Letters 



249 



Halperin were returned from the navy 
school to continue their course of study; 
Brother Donald Richardson of Indiana also 
was returned to Northwestern and Brother 
William Hicks joined the Naval Unit of the 
S. A. T. C. Brothers Twist Thorson and 
Togi Moore are down at the Dental School 
and Brother Earle Pronger is attending 
the Medical School. 

Since it no longer had a House to sup- 
port and because it feels that most of the 
old men will return immediately after 
peace is declared, the Chapter conserva- 
tively pledged but six new men. They were 
carefully chosen and the rushing period ex- 
tended over three weeks in order to do so- 

The pledges are: Willard Helmuth, 
Leeds, Ala.; John Taft, Evanston; Arthur 
J. Stevens, Joliet; Miles R. Scott, Concor- 
dia, Kans.; William Moeller, LaSalle; 
George Kerr, Chicago; William Ballanger, 
Richmond, Ind., and Joseph Bryant, Fair- 
field. 

The House, along with all the other Fra- 
ternity Houses and dormitories on the 
campus, has been taken over for Govern- 
ment use. Since this act is for the public 
weal, Gamma Beta is satisfied to do its 
duty in every possible manner. Brother 
Captain Homer Vanderblue talked to the 
men occupying the House and he urged 
them not to damage it. 

Vic Ely, Norman Phelps and Eugene 
McMakine left for training camps a week 
after school started. Vic and Mac are at 
Camp Grant and Norm is at Hancock. 
Brother Cliff Porter is flying at Carrothers 
Field, Fort Worth, Texas. Eddie Sutphen 
and Charlie Kiefner have recently been 
ordered overseas from that place. Kief 
visited us on his way across. We received 
a card from "Skin" Miller the other day 
from Dublin. Joeb Luther says that Bob 
Ennis is expected home for Thanksgiving 
dinner. Tom Harwood and Bob have been 
trying to locate each other in France — they 
have met by now. 

.-• Billy Pore, training for naval aviation, 
happened through and pepped up the 
Brethren considerably. Brother Jack Nel- 
son is at Great Lakes taking the officers' 
material school course. Brother Paul 
Beckett is at Princeton in the paymaster's 
school. Brother Dan Hagin is doing some 
boxing at the Lakes and he held the heavy- 
weight belt for some time. Brother Cy 
Young is now playing varsity center on the 
Northwestern football team and he is one 
of the stars of the school. 

With Sigma Nus fighting everywhere for 
the safety of the world, distinguishing 
themselves in every field, Gamma Beta is 
certainly proud to be a unit in such a won- 
derful organization — an organization that 
will come out of the war as strong and pow- 
erful mm ever. 



The Chapter has been saddened by the 
loss of two Brothers. Wilbur Thomas 
Rawleigh, Gamma Beta, of Freeport, 111., 
succumbed to pneumonia at Great Lakes. 
He was a musician in the Second Regiment 
Band. Brother Leo G. Maury, Gamma Beta, 
an interne at the Michael Reese Hospital, 
Chicago, met death fighting to suppress the 
epidemic. Gamma Beta extends its sym- 
pathy to the bereaved parents of both these 
brave men. 

EDWARD R. HALPERIN, 
Address all mail care of 

C. J. LUTHER, 
State Bank of Evanston, 

Evanston, 111. 

ALBION COLLEGE 
Gamma Gamma Chapter 

[In lieu of the Chapter letter we are 
forced to include a brief note, accompanying 
a formal report, which gives a bare outline 
of the Chapter's condition. — The Editor.] 

We are of course in a sad state of uncer- 
tainty as to fraternity life this year, but 
are trying to hold together with eleven 
actives and as many pledges. We have 
given up the House but are planning to rent 
some rooms wherein to meet. 

DON M. ALEXANDER. Recorder. 
S. A. T. C, Albion College, Albion, Mich. 

Gamma Gamma was very fortunate in 
having so many of the actives returning 
this year there being at the present time 
eleven in all. They are: Brothers Donald 
Alexander, Milo Bostwick, Shorey Peter- 
son, Roy Tuxworth. Ford Otis, Charl Green, 
Harlan Hatch, Glen Wilkinson, Douglas 
Sargent, Hilton Tullar, and Arthur Hud- 
nutt. Brothers Jay Wade and Donald 
French although not connected with the 
active Chapter, are in Albion this year. 
Brother "Bob" Baldwin, Chapter Adviser, 
is still with us and we are proud to say 
that we are plad for his help and could not 
get along without him. 

The following pledges complete the 
Chapter: Roland Davies, Detroit; Cleve 
Jordan, Lake Odessa; Edwin Pearce, De- 
troit: Roumaine McCall, Ithaca; Hubert 
Suick, Muskegon; Roy McGeachy, Gay lord; 
arry Laity, Grand Ledge; Stewart Kings- 
north, Albion; Frank Church, Detroit. 

Brothers Sargent, Peterson and Hudnutt 
have been recommended for the Officers' 
Army Training School at Camp Grant, 111. 
Two others were chosen to complete the 
number, thus giving Gamma Gamma three 
out of the five. This goes to show that 
Sigma Nu is still at the front. Brother 
Tuxworth is manager of the Co-operative 
Book Store; Brother Otis has charge of the 
college S. A. T. C. hospital, and Brother 
Wilkinson is acting as assistant chemist in- 
structor in the college. 



250 



The Delta 



Owing to all the Chapter but three being 
in the S. A. T. C, we were forced to give 
up our House, and Fraternity Mother, Mrs. 
Barnes, but we are in hopes that soon we 
can have both back again. Meetings of the 
Chapter will be held at Brother French's 
home. Our first initiation conies November 
9th. 

Our fall party was a success and we were 
very lucky to be able to hold it, as the 
Government had not yet prohibited such 
functions- in connection with the war activ- 
ities. 

MILO BOSTWICK, Reporter. 

STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 
Gamma Delta Chapter 

Gamma Delta has been very fortunate 
this fall in having most of the Chapter re- 
turn. Only three men have left to enter 
the service. This has largely been due to 
the fact that the Government has estab- 
lished the S. A. T. C. at "The Stute," and 
the place is now practically the preliminary 
to an officers' training school. 

The entire student body will soon be uni- 
formed and put into barracks. This will 
mean that there will only be about half a 
dozen men in the house, and it is still a 

Question as to what will be done. Recent 
evelopments seem to indicate that the 
Chapter will continue as under normal con- 
ditions till at least the first of the year. 

Five men have been pledged and there 
are good prospects for more. 

Gamma Delta to date has fortunately no 
gold star in its flag and the Chapter wants 
to take this opportunity to extend sym- 
pathy to those chapters whose members 
have made the supreme sacrifice. 

I intended to write a week ago, but I 
was taken with Spanish influenza and that 
stopped me quick. As it is, I am writing 
this in bed, and I think I could put myself 
in almost any mood except that of letter 
writing. This letter will probably be a 
day late, but if it is possible will you please 
do your best to have it published because 1 
know the gang would be disappointed if it 
were not. 

H. D. GREGORY, Reporter. 

LAFAYETTE COLLEGE 
Gamma Epsilon 

Gamma Epsilon has eleven active men 
left out of seventeen who should have re- 
turned in normal times. The Chapter met 
four days prior to the opening of the col- 
legiate year in order to prepare for rush- 
ing season. Never before did prospects 
look brighter because the entering class is 
•the largest in the history of the college. 



Twelve men have been pledged. We aim 
to bring our Chapter roll up to thirty, but 
whether or not we reach our goal depends 
upon the finding of men of Sigma Nu 
caliber. 

Our future Chapter life depends largely 
upon the decisions of the military authori- 
ties. It has been learned from good author- 
ity but not officially that the S. A. T. C. 
will mess as a whole unit with the conse- 
quence that our commissary will be closed. 
Students may also be quartered according 
to age or course pursued, which act should 
not allow us to be together in our House. 
However, in that event we will no doubt be 
allowed a place for meeting during recrea- 
tion hours. The officers in command do not 
approve of using our House for barracks 
because it is not on the campus. Our 
executive committee is negotiating with 
the college to bear our financial burden if 
the Chapter House is not accepted for S. 
A. T. C. or Regional Headquarters. 

Regardless of these probable conditions 
we are going to hang together and keep 
things going as usual so long as it is pos- 
sible. We are looking forward and pre- 
paring for the time when peace is declared. 

We take pleasure in introducing as 
pledges, Preston Schimer, Pottsville, Pa.; 
Philip N. Trowbridge, Chatham, N. J.; 
Raymond Jewell, Utica, N. Y.; H. Walton, 
Tyrone, Pa.; John Penn, Waynnesburg, Pa.; 
J. Bieber and H. Dissinger, Kutztown, Pa.; 
Howard Heffernan, Hoboken, N. J.; Ray- 
mond Lerch, Reading, Pa.; Alvin Morgan, 
Minersville, Pa., and H. Brotzman, PhiBps- 
burg, N. J. We shall hold a smoker this 
week for the purpose of teaching these men 
the college traditions and inciting the 
proper college spirit. Thus they will be 
fitted to take the part of leaders during the 
period of reorganization. 

Brother Smith is assistant manager of 
the football team and has no opposition for 
the coming year. Brother Alexis is trying 
for an end position on the bootball squad, 
and is making good. Pledges Trowbridge 
and Morgan are tackles who show great 
promise. 

Our undergraduates who are in the serv- 
ice are Brother Kuhn, '19, enrolled in the 
Medical Reserve Corps at the University of 
Pennsylvania; Brother Hopf, '19, who ifl at 
the Central Officers' Training School at 
Camp Lee, Va.; Brother Gunter, '19, who is 
in France with an engineering unit; and 
Brothers Magee, '19; Fackenthal, *20, and 
Shirer, '20, who have enlisted in the Navy. 
Brothers Forrest, Hagey and Sarrat, who 
graduated last year, are also in the Army. 

Our motto is "After the United States 
Gamma Epsilon needs you," and we will 
not let it perish. We are all confident and 
cheerful. F. L. KELLER, 

Acting Reporter. 



Chapter Letters 



261 



UNIVERSITY OF OREGON 
Gamma Zeta Chapter 

Delinquent. 

COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES 
Gamma Eta Chapter 

Delinquent. 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
Gamma Theta Chapter 

Delinquent. 

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY 
Gamma Iota Chapter 

The University of Kentucky opened this 
year with the largest enrollment in the 
Freshman Class in its history. There were 
approximately five hundred men enrolled 
in this class alone and probably three hun- 
dred in the others. This increased enroll- 
ment in the Freshman Class was due in part 
of course to the great number of men that 
came to join the S. A. T. C, but it was 
mainly due to the marked improvement 
that has been shown in the university in 
the past year under the able management 
of President Frank L. McVey. Several new 
departments have been added to the uni- 
versity, and there has been a very large 
increase in the staff of instructors to meet 
the growing number of students that are 
coming every year. Every college has a 
very able and well known man at its head. 
In addition to the regular S. A. T. C. here, 
we have a branch of the Naval Reserve as 
well, and many of the students are choos- 
ing this branch of the service. 

One month of our college year has al- 
ready passed, and it finds Gamma Iota well 
on its way to what we believe will be one 
of its most prosperous and successful years. 
However, we might, say that uncertainty 
broods over all of us, yet we are not differ- 
ent from other Chapters in that respect. 
Uncertainty has altered our plans but little, 
and we have gone ahead with them as in 
former years. With all our old men and 
pledges, with one exception, in the S. A. T. 
C. or the Naval Reserve, it is hard to say 
just what the result of this year will be, but 
many of the pledges are taking engineer- 
ing, so it is safe to say that practically all 
of those men will be here all year. 

The following old men returned at the 
opening of the university: J. G. Heber, 
Neal W. Knight, C. C. Young, T. L. Gor- 
man, Winston Coleman, E. V. Murphree, 
W. D. Morgan, G. H. Creech, Earl Wallace 
and Pledge Ed. Gregg. Brother W. C. 
Draddy, who has been out of the university 
for a year, working with a large brokerage 
concern in Cincinnati, also returned this 



year. We are fortunate enough to have two 
Brothers from other Chapters. Brother 
Salsburg comes to us from Sigma, and 
Brother John Clay from Beta Zeta. We 
are indeed glad to welcome such good 
Brothers. 

Rush season is over and it finds Sigma 
Nu as usual with the best freshmen in the 
University. No other fraternity in the uni- 
versity can say that we didn't get the best 
here this year; in fact there were only two 
men in the university that we wanted that 
we didn't get. We therefore tdke great 

Jdeasure and pride in introducing the fol- 
owing pledges, whom we believe will make 
good and enthusiastic Sigs: Barron Faul- 
coner, Lexington, Ky., quarterback on Pica- 
dome High; William Faulconer, Lexington, 
Ky., football with Cornwall Prep., Wash- 
ington, D. C; Mark A. Watkins, London, 
Ky., star pitcher on the strong K. M. I. 
Team of 1918; T. Jerry Beam, Bardstown, 
Ky., fullback on football and first base on 
base ball team with Peddie Military Insti- 
tute; G. R. Hubbard, Bardstown, Ky., made 
1917 Virginia Freshman Team; G. L. Hay- 
don, Springfield, Ky., star on Springfield 
High Football Team; F. B. Noe, Spring- 
field, Ky.. football and baseball with Spring- 
field High Teams; Harry Rainev, Lancaster, 
Ky., star end on Millersburg Military Acad- 
emy Team; Fred C. Lewis, Harlan, Ky., 
pitcher and manager baseball, Maryville 
College, Maryville, Tenn.; R. J. Riorden, 
Newport, Ky., football with Newport High; 
Harry Jennings, Ashland, Ky., solo cor- 
netist, University of Kentucky Band; J. S. 
Yanky, Springfield, Ky., and J. F. Pannell, 
Nelson, Ky. 

All initiations will take place at the 
earliest possible moment, because it is very 
likely that some of the men will have to 
leave most any time, besides it is the de- 
sire of the university officials that we initi- 
ate at once. The War Department order 
calling for the discontinuance of fraterni- 
ties during the period of the war will of 
course have a great effect upon this Chap- 
ter. We will have of course our regular 
business meetings and an occasional get- 
together in the form of banquets and 
dinners. 

We are living at present in our own 
House, as the barracks at the university 
have not been completed as yet. We are 
trying to get the commandant to use our 
House as a barracks, as they are doing at 
the other schools, but we fear that our 
House is too small. Everyone who possibly 
can is living in the House so that we may 
get all the good out of it that we can before 
we are required to go into barracks. We 
are going to maintain the House as a meet- 
ing place, and then some of the men can 
live there, as those men in the Naval Train- 
ing Unit do not have to live in barracks 
with the Army Unit. Sigma Nu is the only 
Fraternity maintaining a House this year. 



252 



The Delta 



In college activities Sigma Nu is well 
represented as usual. Brother Heber is cap- 
tain of this year's varsity, as well as being 
one of the fastest and most aggressive ends 
that the team has ever had. Brother 
Murphree is back at his old position at 
right tackle, and rumor has it that he is to 
be the captain of next year's team since 
he is the oldest man left and sure of being 
back. Pledges Faulconer, Beam, Watkins, 
Hubbard and Rainey are all out for the 
team, and although nothing has been prom- 
ised any of them, it is certain that two or 
three of 'them will make good this year. 
Brother Andy Gill, of Beta Eta, is this 
year's coach and unless military activities 
interfere he is going to turn out one of the 
best teams that the University of Kentucky 
has ever had. Several old men and pledges 
have non-com. ranks in the training units. 
Pledge Jennings is playing solo cornet in 
the University Band; Brother Draddy is 
sport editor on the Kernel; Brother Cole- 
man is an instructor in the Radio School, 
and Brother Creech is president of the 
Strollers. There have been no class elec- 
tions as yet. but when they do come off we 
feel assured that Sigma Nu will be well 
represented in class offices. 

Six Brothers from Gamma Iota have re- 
cently won commissions. They are: En- 
sign Floyd H. Wright, Aviation; Ensign 
Harold A. Pulliam, Aviation; Ensign David 
P. Campbell, Aviation, Balloon Service; En- 
sign William S. Moore, Transport Service; 
Lieutenant Tilford L. Wilson, Infantry; 
Lieutenant Jeff D. Rowlette, Signal Corps. 
Five Brothers and one pledge are now in 
training for commissions. They are: 
Steve Watkins, Nat. Aaron, Leland Eish, 
and Pledge Ed. Gregg, These four are 
candidates for commissions in Field Artil- 
lery at Camp Taylor, Louisville, Ky. 
Brothers C. E. McCormick and J. W. Marr 
are in Naval Aviation and are now attend- 
ing the Ground School at Boston and Minne- 
apolis respectively. More than fifty per 
cent, of the total initiates of this Chapter 
are in the service, and over ninety per cent, 
of those have commissions, or are candi- 
dates for them. 

Brother Guy Huguelet, '15, was the only 
Alumni representative during rush season, 
but he made up for several as he gave us 
valuable assistance. Brother Huguelet has 
been made Chapter adviser. Brother Igle- 
hart, Beta Xi, '17, also paid us a visit dur- 
ing rush season. Brother Herschel Auxier 
was unable to return to the university this 
year on account of ill health, but he came 
down and helped us out during the rush- 
ing season. Since the opening of school 
we have also lost Brother W. D. Morgan, 
who was compelled to go West for his 
health. 

On the whole the prospects for a good 
year are very bright. Most of the old men 
are in the Engineering or Chemistry De- 



partment, and these will not be compelled 
to leave until they have completed their 
courses, and none of them are seniors. Most 
all of the pledges are also taking engineer- 
ing, so we are very sure that we will come 
through the year with a goodly proportion 
of the men we have at present. We have 
been careful in picking men who we. know 
are here for the full four year's work, war 
or no war. We have made no especial 
effort to get those men who are taking 
strictly war courses, with the express pur- 
pose of leaving the university at once. All 
our pledges are good enthusiastic men, and 
they say that should they have to go be- 
fore the year is over, that they fully Intend 
returning and finishing up their courses 
when the war is over, and to eventually help 
build that House for Gamma Iota, which we 
know is a certainty after this war is over. 

This Chapter wishes to extend congratu- 
lations to all those pledges who have been 
wise enough to choose Sigma Nu and for 
their good fortune. The best wishes of this 
Chapter goes with every Brother who enters 
the service of his Country this year. 

GROVER H. CREECH, E. C. 

UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO 
Gamma Kappa Chapter 

Delinquent. 

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN 
Gamma Lambda Chapter 

Things for a time during the middle of 
the school year of 1917-1918 looked very 
dubious for Gamma Lambda, but thanks to 
the consistent efforts of Rushing Chairman 
McCandless and the other members, we 
succeeded in keeping a fair sized bunch. 
At the end of the school year we had what 
promised to be a good Chapter for the 
opening of school this fall. Then the new 
draft law came into effect and all of us ex- 
pected to be in service in a short time. 
Then the S. A. T. C. was organized and we 
expected to have a larger Chapter this fall 
than ever. About the time we were ready 
to make our fall plans for the House the 
news came saying that all S. A. T. C. men 
would live in barracks and be under mili- 
tary discipline. Of course we know that we 
would have to give up the House, but to 
whom we did not know. As our new place 
is somewhat off the campus, the university 
asked that we lease it to them for use as 
a girls' dormitory. Thus it happens that 
the cries of feminine voices ring through 
the halls and dining room where once the 
freshmen sang ads to the tune of "On Wis- 
consin. 



$t 



At the present time we are temporarily 
located at 433 State Street. Our bunch this 
fall is the largest and the best on the cam- 
pus. The following active men are in 



Chapter Letters 



263 



school: R. H. Ede, W. M. Fanning, Ernst 
Wallau, W. Brothers, G. Spies, R. Lam- 
inert. H. Lenz.D. Smith, M. Mecartney. D. 
L. Shaw, H. Duecker, R. Touton; Pledges 
Conley, G. Martin, A. Martens, Stevens, 
Stolley, Bennett, Norris, Ede K., Below, 
Terkel, McDonald, Osmondson, Miller, Rit- 
tenberg, Gates, Blowney and Brother Mark 
Nelson from Lombard. 

Our rushine this fall has been completely 
impromptu, but very successful. Every 
man pledged this year is of the best and 
most promising sort. When the war is over 
Gamma Lambda of Sigma Nu will be the 
biggest and best by far of any fraternity 
on the University of Wisconsin campus. 

At the end of the summer session of this 
year the fellows in school pulled off a very 
successful house party at Lake Waubesa. 
Those present were: Fred Carter, Dick Ede, 
Dave Smith, Ken Ede, Rush Touton, Tom 
Rose and Hub Lenz. And who can guess 
what happened to Fred Carter ? 

When it comes to music the coming 
Chapters are going to be as well supplied 
as the past and our pledges include some 
of the best banjo and piano, mandolin and 
saxaphone players in school. Last year the 
Sigma Nu Band and Jazz gained quite a 
rep and we have hopes for the future. Be- 
sides the vocal quartette is not lacking. 

Past E. C. Walter Timm spent several 
days with the Chapter this summer. For- 
rest Staley 'spent several weeks of the 
summer here in company with some young 
men and enjoyed the proximity of Lake 
Mendota. 

Brother Joe Hopkins, from South Caro- 
lina, is an affiliate of Gamma Lambda. 

The S. A. T. C. has brought with it the 
"influ" and the following men are in the 
hospital with it at the present time: Ray 
Lammert, Richard Ede, Cornelius Below, 
R. Osmondson, Geo. Martin, Armin Mar- 
tens, Russell Blowney, Hub Lenz and Glen 
Rittenberg. 

Eminent Commander Ernst C. Wallau, 
Brother W. M. Fanning and Brother Rush 
D. Touton left Saturday, October 12, for 
the O. T. S. at Camp Grant. For the pres- 
ent Brother D. W. Smith is assuming the 
duties and worries of Commander. 

DAVID W. SMITH, 
Acting Reporter. 

[Also Treasurer, Acting Recorder, Act- 
ing Commander, and Janitor.] 

A Later Word 

Things are going in fine shape here. We 
have a dinner together each Saturday even- 
ing. Last evening twenty-five of us were 
present. 



A couple of men from other Chapters 
are here and an Alumnus, Ensign Harry 
Koch, '15. 

Financially we are O. K., or will be as 
soon as all bills are paid (not including old 
bills). 

A fine bunch of women are living in our 
House and yesterday at open house about 
twenty of us visited it and were right roy- 
ally entertained. They promise us a regu- 
lar party as soon as the "flu" ban is com- 
pletely raised. 

Better than all, the Sigma Nus in school 
this year are more active than ever in all 
branches and we* are getting to be known 
even among the town people, and not noto- 
riously either. 

DAVID W. -SMITH, Treasurer. 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
Gamma Mu Chapter 

A week before school was scheduled to. 
begin notice was sent out that the opening 
of school was to be postponed until Sep- 
tember 80th. The reason for this was evi- 
dent considering the great program for the 
formation of the Student Army Training 
Corps. Work began and preparations were 
under way to take care of 5,000 students. 
Courses were changed to conform to the 
new regime, a new second floor was put in 
the Armory, where 1,200 men are to be 
quartered, and the lower floor was made 
into a mess hall for the entire S. A. T. C. 

^ It was almost entirely due to the forma- 
tion of this new branch of the service that 
the Chapter started off this school year with 
twelve men back. The greater part of the 
men had expected to be voluntarily or in- 
voluntarily inducted into the service so that 
until the creation of this new branch of the 
service very few of the men considered it 
worth while starting back to school. The 
Chapter started off strong with Brothers 
R. E. Spangler, W. F. Gast, G. E. Misener, 
S. J. Wilkinson, R. C. Williams, D. W. 
Stockham, C. R. LaBier, T. H. Utley, R. 
M. Eaton, W. B. Russell, M. H. Watson and 
C. W. Campbell back this year. Unfortu- 
nately Brothers F. S. Hager and C. C. Rus- 
sell, who came back to enter again, had 
registered prior to September 12th and 
were not allowed to join the S. A. T. C. 
This loss was compensated by the addition 
of Brothers L. V. Ingraham and D. C. 
Peden, both of Delta Theta, who will affili- 
ate soon. 

For a time it was thought that if we 
would be able to fill our Chapter House 
with "old men" and pledges we would be 
able to keep our House intact as a Fra- 
ternity House, except that it would be at 
the disposal of the Government and all the 
men in the service. For the first few 



254 



The Delta 



weeks we were able to do this, as our quota 
was thirty-three, and having pledged six- 
teen men who, with the "old men," prac- 
tically filled it. Now it is a certainty that 
we will be obliged to take up temporary 
quarters in which our meetings may be car- 
ried on and in which we can gather at our 
very few leisure hours. In a short time 
provision will be made for quartering some 
of the men in the Armory. 

All S. A. T. C. men will eat there. It 
happens that the greater part pf the Chap- 
ter will be quartered in the Armory. The 
prospects of carrying out a normal fra- 
ternity year are entirely gone. The House 
as we now occupy it is under military super- 
vision, with reveille at six-thirty and taps 
at ten o'clock. 

Having decided to 'make an attempt to 
pledge men to fill our quota of thirty-three 
men, we started off with the old time "pep" 
and pledged sixteen men without lowering 
the standard of former years in the least. 
This year it was a question of hours instead 
of days or weeks, and we were lucky to 
pledge several talented men. The following 
men have been pledged: A. B. Whitcombe, 
Dixon; E. A. Rynearson, Dixon; G. A. Ed- 
munds, Joliet; A. M. Montzheimer, Joliet; 
A. J. Wiener, Dixon; P. H. Wilkinson, 
Bethany; B. R. Lathe, Sterling; R. J. Hager, 
St. Louis, Mo.; E. B. Mailers, Chicago; L. 
K. Bartholomew, Dixon; F. J. Quinn, La- 
fayette; E. B. Wingert, Dixon; W. E. Hazel- 
rigg, Terre Haute, Ind.; D. E. Murray, 
Springfield, Mass.; C. H. Orlup, Aurora; H. 
H Graham, Canton. 

In all probability many of the men will 
be sent to officers training schools by the 
first of the year and this will leave the 
younger men to keep the Chapter together. 
This prospect is good and it is the best that 
could possibly be done under the present 
conditions. 

At the first of June this Chapter had a 
strong sixty men accounted for in the serv- 
ice. Brother H. 0. Siegmund has accepted 
an instructorship at Drexell Institute in 
Philadelphia. 

A baby boy arrived last May to Brother 
Maurice Edwin Reagan, who is teaching 
machine guns in the local ground school. 

Instead of merely holding our own along 
with the other fraternities in scholarship, 
we came out on top by a good margin the 
first semester last year, and came back the 
second semester for third place in scholar- 
ship without half trying. 

The prospect of varsity football this fall 
is very encouraging, even though we did 
fall before Great Lakes last Saturday. The 
showing made quite exceeded our expecta- 
tions and in the future great confidence is 
going to be laid in the team. Navy football 



has attracted Brothers Russell and Camp-., 
bell as well as Pledge Lathe. 

RUSSELL LABIER, Reporter. 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 
Gamma Nu Chapter 

Delinquent. 

MISSOURI SCHOOL OF MINES 
Gamma Xi Chapter 

Despite the comparative shortage of col- 
lege men this year, Gamma Xi was able 
to return eleven old men, including J. M. 
Morris, F. V. Moore, T. C. Morris, C. A. 
Gettler, A. L. Cairns, R. N. Stubbs, E. A. 
Williams, H. F. Patterson, H. A. Hollings- 
head, James M. Wilson and Joseph M. Wil- 
son. The prospects for a good foundation 
in men were encouraging and our financial 
condition was very good, for our bank book 
has been well looked after. 

So far we have pledged five men: J. A. 
Spalding, Roy Gettler and D. A. Bash, Han- 
nibal, and H. H. Price and E. G. Ohnsorg, 
of Alton, Illinois. These men all took an 
active interest in their duties as pledges, as 
well as in their classes. Due to the ab- 
normal conditions which exist because of 
the S. A. T. C, we found it necessary to 
initiate these men early and they are prov- 
ing to be good Sigma Nus. 

'■?.• 

At present rather indefinite conditions 
are confronting us owing to the S. A. T. C, 
in which practically . all of our men have 
enlisted. We will not be able to maintain 
our House as a fraternity house, but there 
is a possibility of our being barracked in 
our House, as it is adjacent to the campus. 
Of course, we are hoping for this. In case 
we are not, we will probably rent a suite of 
rooms for use when off duty. In any event, 
however, some means will be provided by 
which we can continue our fraternal rela- 
tionship insofar as conditions permit. 

We will keep in touch with each other as 
best we can during the war, so that Gamma 
Xi can come out with a new vigor after- 
ward. JOSEPH M. WILSON, 

Reporter. 

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 
Gamma Omicron Chapter 

With the return of two active men, 
Brothers Deal and Danglade, Gamma Omi- 
cron opened the fall rushing season of 1918 
with a party at the home of Brother H. H. 
Lynch, as a result of our being deprived 
of our former Fraternity rooms, which we 
have held since the year 1903. Our rooms 
were given to the cause upon the inaugura- 
tion of the W. U. S. A. T. C. 



t 



Chapter Letters 



255 



With the aid of Brothers Campbell, Roth, 
Hollinshead, Hassrnger, Liggett and Brink- 
man, we succeeded in pledging eight select 
men. They are: J..H. Danglade, Harold 
Johnson, W. M. Logan, Francis Quigley, M. 
L. Wingfield, Sydnor Hall, Fred B. Hulse 
and G. J. Eberle. 

Inasmuch as the Pan-Hellenic Union has 
suspended activities and laws, we initiated 
these men on September 30th, after a 
thorough consideration of the possibilities 
of our being able to run the Chapter as 
heretofore. 

At a request of Major W. M. Craigie of 
the local unit of S. A. T. C, the fraterni- 
ties of Washington University agreed to 
consider suspending activities during the 
present crisis. Thus far no definite action 
has been taken, but we are in hopes that 
we will be able to meet at intervals. 

With the sincere assurance that we will 
put forth a maximum effort in the behalf 
of Sigma Nu, we remain 

F. J. DANGLADE, E. C. 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 
Gamma Pi Chapter 

Out of a Chapter of twenty-three men 
last year only six returned to school this 
year. Practically all of the others entered 
some branch of the service during the 
course of the summer. We also had five 

Sledges at the close of the last school year, 
ut since that time all have entered the 
service and three of them have won com- 
missions. In keeping with the military 
notoriety of our Chapter, many of the 
Brothers in the service previously com- 
missioned lieutenants have been promoted 
to the rank of captain and some even higher. 

We are still at the moving game, having 
moved three times since April. Being com- 
pelled to move from the House we had oc- 
cupied for the last several years, we moved 
into a small house temporarily until we 
could find a place well suited for a fra- 
ternity. Just before the opening of school 
this fall we found a place that was ideal for 
a Fraternity House in every respect. Not 
long after we moved into our new home 
we were asked to give it up for a dormi- 
tory for girls, for barracks, for a hospital, 
and for a hostess house. In keeping with 
the spirit of patriotism so manifestly shown 
by Sigma Nu everywhere, we willingly 
placed the House in the hands of the Gov- 
ernment to do what they saw fit with it. 
The House has been taken over for barracks 
and seventy men will be placed in it October 
14th. This necessitated our third move. We 
have stored our furniture and expect to 
hold meetings at the home of one of our 
Alumni until suitable club rooms can be 
procured. 



A wealth of good fraternity material en- 
tered the university this fall and out of the 
nearly one thousand men enrolled we have 
pledged twenty men who came to us with 
splendid recommendations. Out of this 
number six are upperclassmen who are 
eligible for initiation at once. We plan to 
hold an early initiation in order to materi- 
ally strengthen our Chapter. 

As practically all of our members and 
pledges are enlisted in the Students Army 
Training Corps, we will be separated most 
of the time. We will, however, have a 
chance to get together once and a while 
in our club rooms, which we hope to have 
before long. 

We opened our Fraternity House early 
this fall and soon had it full with twenty 
eating at the table. We began to hold 
meetings for our preps earlier than usual, 
and out of the unusually large number a 
splendid six-piece orchestra was procured. 
Continuance of these meetings and special 
watchfulness for each pledge will be pre- 
vented by the interference of military 
duties. 

Practically all Inter-Fraternity life and 
social activities will be eliminated here this 
year. 

In conclusion I am glad to say that when 
everything is taken into consideration our 
Fraternity has as bright if not brighter 
prospects for a successful year than any 
of tne other nine fraternities established 
at West Virginia University. 

Our reporter, Brother Mark Valentine, 
is out of town owing to the fact that the 
university has been closed down for a time 
because of the Spanish influenza epidemic. 
I do not know that he did or did not send 
in a Chapter letter and for fear that he 
did not I am sending one. 

For the present and more than likely for 
the whole year, send all the mail intended 
for any of the members or Chapter officers 
to Box 874, Morgantown, W. Va. 

A. R. WINTER, E. C. 

UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 
Gamma Rho Chapter 

Uncle Sam is still drawing on our young 
men to "lick" the huns (not a proper noun). 
Our service flag now contains fifty blue 
stars and one gold one. We are extremely 
grateful to Mrs. Beardsley, the mother of 
one of our members now serving Uncle 
Sam, who so generously presented to us 
this flag, an emblem which will be cher- 
ished long after the present war becomes 
history. With the growing of the service 
flag always comes a diminishing of our 
numbers so that although we closed last 
year with fifteen men, only six returned to 
university this fall. 



256 



The Delta 



We, however, had an advantage over the 
other fraternities by having "Dad" Cook to 
back us. Before the opening of school he 
called us together to organize. Through 
his advice and assistance we obtained a 
suite of rooms in the Hotel del Frado, a 
hotel which is only three blocks from the 
school, and were ready before the opening 
of the fall term. We started rushing of 
this quarter and are still at it. 

We have already gone over the top, but 
have not slackened our pace. Our pledges 
up to date are: Robert Alexander, Evans- 
ville, Ind.; Hamilton Bruce Maher, Chicago; 
Joseph Earl Wooding, Fort Wayne, Ind.; 
Donald Ghering Rose, Chicago; Merrick 
Roblee Breck, El Paso, Texas; Howard Lob- 
dell Van Arnum, Fort Wayne, Ind.; Carl 
William Rothert, Fort Wayne, Ind.; 
Francis Herbert Himelick, Fort Wayne, 
Ind.; John David Adams, Chicago; Jasper 
Meade Stull, St. John, Kan.; Edward Jo- 
seph Chalifoux, Chicago; Edward White 
Wilson, Chicago; Benjamin Kenneth Widdi- 
field, Charlevoix, Mich.; Russell Avery 
Schweitzer, Charlevoix, Mich.; Elmer Don- 
ald Miller, Fort Wayne, Ind.; Charles Will- 
iam Palmer, Chicago; Ernest Van Duser, 
Chicago; Carl Dewey Hullinger, Hunting- 
ton, Ind.; Karl Joseph Kastner, Joliet, 111.; 
Charles Miller Rudy, Chicago; Paul Elias 
Atkinson, Chicago. The fellows if anything 
are above the average and in normal times 
would be prominent in all campus activities. 
Their ability ranks from football, basket- 
ball and track to debating and journalistic 
work. 

We intend to organize the Sigma Nu Jazz 
Band, as we have a great deal of musical 
talent, at least we call it that. Although 
hindered greatly by the military training 
and the studies, we intend to get together 
at least once a week. 

Our 'scholastic standing for last quarter 
was third of twelve national fraternities. 
On account of the Students' Army Training 
Corps, there will be no record of the grades 
kept this year. 

We expect by next time to be able to tell 
you more about the status of fraternities 
for the coming year and also more news. 
But in spite of the war and the loss of men 
that came with it, Gamma Rho is more 
firmly entrenched than in pre-war times 
and is looking forward to an especially suc- 
cessful year. 

JOS. B. HALL, Reporter. 

IOWA STATE COLLEGE 
Gamma Sigma Chapter 

Delinquent. 



UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA 
Gamma Tan Chapter 

How things have changed since last year. 
We have scattered from one end of our 
country way across the ocean. Men from 
our Chapter are in the S. A. T. C, in train- 
ing camps, and in Europe. So far we have 
only lost one man, so we count ourselves 
on the list of fortunates. This does not 
signify by any means that very few of 
our men are "over there." We have a good 
representation in France, and our men are 
doing justice to Gamma Tau, according to 
reports. Our percentage of officers is very 
high. Most of our men are commissioned. 
Those who are not will soon be. At the 
last training camp at Fort Sheridan four 
out of six of our men received commissions. 
At the time this letter is being written, we 
have five men on the way to Camp Pike to 
a central officers' training camp. 

Our Chapter this year is far ahead of 
other chapters on the campus, financially 
and otherwise. Many of the other fraterni- 
ties have had to give up their houses; 
others have turned them into boarding and 
rooming houses. We, however, are among 
the fortunate few. Our House with four 
others has been taken over by the univer- 
sity as a dormitory for girls, and is used 
in connection with the large dormitory. We 
receive a good rent for the House and it 
is kept in good condition. Fifteen of our 
old men came back this fall and with very 
few exceptions are in the S. A. T. C. Our 
men must all live in barracks furnished by 
the university, so no houses are open at 
all on the campus. 

We are pledging men this fall and so far 
we have certainly gotten the best men on 
the campus — men who will do their best 
for Sijrma Nu and do her honor. Our social 
activities will be continued as much as pos- 
sible. The Alumni have consented to open 
their homes during the week-end holidays 
for social activities. By having some kind 
of a "get-together/* we expect to keep the 
men interested and eager to do their beat. 

We hope that other Chapters are in good 
condition and will be able to weather the 
storm in great shape. 

To the Editor — Please excuse this writ- 
ing, as it is being written on a train. I 
am on my way to Camp Pike. 

WILLARD BALLENBACH, 

Reporter. 

UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS 
Gamma Upeilon Chapter 

The opening of this school year was a 
hard one for all the fraternities, at Arkan- 
sas, and especially it seemed for Sigma Nu. 
The Students Army Training Camp captured 
the attention of the new men, who were 



Chapter Letters 



257 



anxious to enlist as early as possible, and 
in consequence no rushing rules were es- 
tablished, and it lay with the fraterinties 
who worked the fastest and the hardest to 
get the best men. There were only a few 
old men back ahead of schedule time, but 
others came in soon after, and we suc- 
ceeded in pledging seventeen men. We lost 
but few, due to the rush and excitement, 
and we feel that we were very successful 
since all of our pledges are exceptionally 
good men. 

After the first five days, the "flu" grabbed 
us all, and the Chapter House took on the 
appearance of a hospital in all its details. 
There was but one case to develop into 
pneumonia, and luckily we sustained no 
casualties. 

We will be handicapped this year on ac- 
count of almost all our men being in the 
S. A. T. C. However, we have five who are 
too young to enter and they are to keep 
the House for us. We shall be one of a 
very few of the fraternities who will be 
lucky enough to have a Chapter House. 

We are not able in this letter to give the 
names of all our old Brothers who are in 
the service and their addresses, but hope 
to have this ready for our next letter. We 
have a large service flag containing forty- 
eight stars, and expect to add many more 
soon. A large number of these forty-eight 
are commissioned officers, several are al- 
ready in France, and some are in officers 
training camps. 

We are very proud to have in our Chap- 
ter, Brother Roy Benoit, from Louisiana 
State University. 

We were well represented on the varsity 
football team last year, and we have re- 
turned three of those men who made their 
A's. These, together with some of the new 
men who expect to be out for the team, 
will represent us well in that line of stu- 
dent activities this year. 

GIBSON WITT, Reporter. 

UNIVERSITY OF MONTANA 
Gamma Phi Chapter 

Delinquent. 

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON 
Gamma Chi Chapter 

Delinquent. 

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY 
Gamma Psi Chapter 

After spending six months at camp, and 
winding up with an operation, it was real 
pleasure to be returned to college, if only 
for a short time. When I returned things 



were changed materially, our House being 
used for officers' quarters, and most of the 
other Fraternity Houses being used as bar- 
racks; but the Sigma Nu spirit still pre- 
vailed. 

We have twelve men scattered about the 
"hill" in different companies and we get 
together as much as we are able, but it is 
never so the entire Chapter may meet at 
one time, as there is always one company 
on guard and another on detail; while that 
notorious institution "K. P." extends its 
autocratic influence into the sanctum of our 
Fraternity — there is no place so secluded 
that is entirely free from this influence. 

Some time ago. there was a meeting of 
the Inter-Fraternity Conference at the 
University Club, at which was discussed the 
advisability of renewing Fraternity activ- 
ities. There was much to be said for and 
against the movement, but the negative 
element finally prevailed. This, I think, to 
be a good thing, as it is impossible to edu- 
cate a man in his "fraternal profession" in 
three months at the most, as that is the 
longest the best men will remain here. For 
that reason, it is my opinion, that the con- 
ference representing this institution, acted 
wisely. 

LESLIE M. THOMPSON. 



CASE SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCE 
Delta Alpha Chapter 

I was over at mess this A. M. when some 
fellow handed me your letter unopened, 
saying that he had found it. I have been 
unable to find out who had been carrying it 
around for a week. 

From this letter you will perceive that I 
as well as all the rest of Delta Alpha Chap- 
ter are in quarters — and under quarantine 
at that — we received notice suddenly three 
weeks ago that we were to go into quar- 
antine at once, so you can imagine what 
the Chapter's status as regards business or 
other activity has been. 

The Delta Zeta Chapter has arranged to 
keep the House at 11448 Euclid Ave., until 
spring at least. Mort Shea can give you 
more definite information as regards the 
plans of finance for they made the arrange- 
ment while we were in here. [See Delta 
Zeta Chapter letter.— -The Editor.] 

We have about seven men pledged so far 
but have several good prospects and hope 
to have about ten good men. 

As regards the soldier roll, as far as I 
can check the October list, there are no 
"addenda." All of my data is at the House. 
I have not heard from any of the boys in 
quite some time, so I cannot give you any 
news of them. It has been exceedingly dif- 
ficult to carry on at all here in the barracks 



258 



The Delta 



because of the strictness of the quarantine. 
I hope it will soon be over. 

Crane, I understand, has dropped out of 
school and I heard Anderson was going to 
Purdue. I cannot verify either statement. 
As soon as the "Q" is lifted I will write 
you more definitely regarding the situation. 

Parks is waiting a call for Naval Avia- 
tion, as is also Don Brooker. They have 
both passed the examination. 

Vandy is in the Naval barracks and back 
into the game. They need him, too. 

J. J. CRYAN, E. C. 

DARTMOUTH COLLEGE 
Delta Beta Chapter 

Delinquent. 

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 
Delta Gamma Chapter 

It was Delta Gamma's misfortune not to 
be represented in the May issue of The 
Delta. The reason for such delinquency was 
the fact that the Chapter's very efficient 
Reporter, W. Rogers Primm, was called to 
the colors, and no one was named to fill 
the vacancy until too late for the letter to 
appear. 

Despite war clouds, Delta Gamma Chap- 
ter ended a good year. With a service flag 
of more than sixty stars, no further com- 
ment need be made as to the loyalty of 
Delta Gamma, or as to the great demand 
that has been made upon this Chapter. In 
resume it might be stated that Delta Gam- 
ma started the past college year with six 
active men and ended the year with eight- 
een. One of the finest set of men ever en- 
tering at this Chapter were initiated during 
the past year and from all appearances 
Delta Gamma will return fourteen men in 
September. The one big problem is the 
Chapter House and at the present time this 
matter is being most carefully attended by 
a committee from the Alumni in the city. 
Whatever happens as to the House, one 
thing is certain, that Sigma Nu at Columbia 
University will be right on the job as one 
of the big factors in the life of this big 
university. 

Honors were numerous throughout the 
year and Sigma Nus at Columbia did them- 
selves proud. In football Brothers Shaw 
and Healy and Pledge Houlihan were stars 
and won their letter. In basket ball Brother 
Frank Kiendl made a name for himself and 
also won his "C." In baseball Brothers 
Buonaguro and Carroll and Pledge Houli- 
han were brilliant performers, while Buona- 
furo captained the team. As for track, 
igma Nu contributed Brothers Shaw ana 
Sibley and both performed with credit. 



Brother Shaw was one of the most con- 
spicuous winners at the Pennsylvania meet 
this season. In all Sigma Nus at Columbia 
brought to the Sigma Nu House three "C's" 
in football, three in baseball, one in basket 
ball and two in track. In scholarship Sig- 
ma Nu stood near the top, although the 
exact ratings have not as yet been pub- 
lished. 

Other important honors coming to Sigma 
Nu were the presidency of the Junior Class 
given to Brother Healy; Senior Society 
election of Buonaguro, Naccoms, while the 
spirit among the brothers was fraternal 
and at all times of great concern to keep 
the Chapter strong and forceful. 

Since the last report the following men 
have been added to Sigma Nu at this Chap- 
ter: Brothers Hanson, Bysinger and 
Hoover. 

During the summer months the Chapter 
has been turned over to the Delta Gamma 
Alumni Chapter, as it was last season, 
with Brothers Grant, Romagna and Wilson 
in charge of the same as the officers with 
power to act for the good of Sigma Nu at 
Columbia. 

Brother Romagna, as Chapter Advisor, 
has been of great assistance to Sigma Nu 
this past year, while Brothers Grant and 
Dickey, registrars at the university, have 
been of the greatest and constant inspira- 
tion to the Chapter. 

Brother Jack Dennis graduated from the 
university in June, but expects to return for 
post graduate work in September. So we 
will not lose him from the Chapter. 

At present the Brothers are scattered 
from training camps to munition factories 
doing their part as opportunity is afforded, 
but when September rolls around the fol- 
lowing are expected to return and start 
once more to keep the old Chapter going 
and to fit themselves for service when they 
are called upon to take a more open part 
in winning this great war for democracy: 
Brothers Shaw, Salmond, Healy, McCor- 
mick, Hanson, Bysinger, Buonaguro, Car- 
roll, Dennis, Sibley, Doubleday, Kiendl and 
Relyea; also, Pledges James Houlihan and 
Wilson LeFevre. 

J. A. L. SALMOND, Reporter. 

The Alumni report, in brief, as follows: 
"We are about to make arrangements to 
give up our Chapter House at Columbia U. 
until after the war. It is not a matter of 
quitting, but of keeping Sigma Nu forceful 
at the university. We will lease from the 
university a suite of rooms in the campus 
dorms. The rooms overlook south field and 
are arranged with one big living room and 
off from the room, the west side, are two 
smaller rooms. These smaller rooms will 
be occupied by two of the Brothers, who 



Chapter Letters 



259 



will pay rent for them. We will have eight 
or ten men to return and then we can 
initiate a good class and still watch very 
closely the essentials of the men. I have 
discussed the matter with some of the pro- 
fessors, not Sigma Nu men, at Columbia, 
and they are unanimously of the opinion 
that considering the unusual scarcity of 
coal, the high rate of rentals, and the taxes 
that must De paid that all the fraterni- 
ties would be wise to follow this plan of 
living. Brother J. E. Grant, registrar's of- 
fice, will attend to the matter of the 
finances. Sigma Nu will be right there 
until the war is over and then back to the 
House when the boys are home. Brother 
Grant will send you a full account when 
the matter has been actually settled. Delta 
Gamma will give a good account of herself. 

PAST REGENT A. H. WILSON. 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 
Delta Delta Chapter 

At the beginning of college on Septem- 
ber 25th, Delta Delta could not have wished 
for brighter prospects than those which 
confronted her. With eighteen of last 
year's Brothers returning to college, and 
the Chapter House open as usual, Sigma Nu 
still holds her place among the leaders 
at Penn State. 

Since that time we have passed through 
a strenuous rushing season and nine 
pledges have been secured. They are: 
Emile P. Roy, Chicago, 111.; Herbert N. 
Hallett, Buffalo, N. Y.; Harry W. Good, 
Harrisburg; Paul H. Boeder, Harrisburg; 
J. Howard Worley, Pittsburgh; Louis C. 
Bruckman, Pittsburgh; Fred F. Kramer, 
Irwin; E. Gail Cooley, Irwin; W. Elmer 
Perry, Jr., Pittsburgh. Further rushing has 
been absolutely impossible because of the 
military duties which confront us as mem- 
bers of the Student Army Training Corps. 

At present we are entrenched as firmly 
as any fraternity here, and although we 
are existing under some hardships, we will 
be able to continue as a Chapter, at least 
for a while. Twenty-five men are living 
in the House, which is being run as a bar- 
racks. The Government is going to make 
an allotment for each man in the S. A. T. 
C, as it is doing in the other colleges, so we 
will be able to remain right here in our 
Chapter House. We are allowed to run our 
own mess under supervision of the mess 
officer. 

Although we have made a good beginning, 
our prospects for the coming year are un- 
certain. Four of the Brothers are already 
making preparations to leave and enter 
other tranches of the service. Just how 
their places in the House will be filled is 
not known. It may be that some outsiders 
will be brought here in their stead. In that 



case, we would have to find a new place for 
our meetings. So it can be seen that at 
present we are moving along as usual, but 
just what our situation will be a few 
months from now, we do not know. At 
least, we hope for the best. 

JOHN F. KELL, Reporter. 

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA 
- Delta Epsilon Chapter 

Delta Epsilon opened the school year of 
1918-19 with the return of fourteen active 
members of last year's Chapter. The war 
took a number of our best men, including 
Brothers David D. Morris and Joe Wheeler 
Curtis, who were commissioned during the 
summer at Fort Sheridan. Brothers Sam- 
uel Lowe, Harris and Sam Norton, Jr., have 
entered active service since school opened; 
Brother Harris going to Central Officers' 
Training School at Camp Taylor, Ky., and 
Brother Norton enlisting in the Marine 
Corps. 

However, we did well during the fall 
rush, getting fourteen good men: Arthur 
Miles, Perkins; Paul Fahrney, Vinita; 
George Townsend, Shawnee; J. U. Biggers, 
Dallas, Tex.; Leland Booth, Robert Bos- 
worth, Creed Taylor and Ed. Waite, Okla- 
homa City; Dudley Wood, Laile Neal and 
McClelland, Blockwell; Pat. McAllis- 
ter, Seling; Whitman Fentum, Ada; and 
Nat. .Irish, Muskogee. 

In addition to the old men and the 
pledges, Brother Francis, of Gamma Omi- 
cron, Washington University, entered Okla- 
homa University and has affiliated. 

Our Chapter House has been converted 
into barracks for the Students' Army 
Training Corps, but we have rented a cot- 
tage within the military reservation to be 
used as a Chapter House and loafing place 
for the S. A. T. C. men while off duty. 
We have four men in the Engineers' Re- 
serve and one seventeen-year-old pledge 
who live in the cottage and form a sort of 
nucleus around which the S. A. T. C. men 
and others in the service may gather. 

We have just received the good news 
that the Inter-Fraternity Conference 
Scholarship Cup was awarded to us for the 
last semester of the school year 1917-18, 

?iving Sigma Nu first place in scholarship 
or both semesters of last year. 

Social activities here have been curtailed 
by the quarantine against the Spanish in- 
fluenza, but we "pulled off" two good 
dances before the S. A. T. C. men were in- 
ducted into the service, and are planning 
other social activities as soon as the quar- 
antine is lifted. 

Although college politics have been forced 
into the background this year, we hold a 



260 



The Delta 



lion's share of the spoils. Brother Reasor 
was re-elected treasurer of the Student 
Council, and is also president of the Inter- 
Fraternity Conference; Brother Young is 
president of the Sophomore Class, and 
Brother Darrough is sophomore representa- 
tive on the Student Council. We are also 
well represented in the various honorary 
and professional organizations on the 
campus. 

While the establishment of the Students' 
Army Train Corps at Oklahoma University 
will seriously affect fraternities, we are de- 
termined to carry on the good work, and so 
enthuse our pledges with the spirit of Sig- 
ma Nuism that Delta Epsilon Chapter will 
be able to start out with a full stride after 
the war is over. 

SYLVAN ANDREWS, Reporter. 

WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY 
Delta Zeta Chapter 

This date finds Delta Zeta well started 
in its year's work. 

Nine of last year's men are back this 
year. They are Brothers Glauner, Shea, 
Searl, Warnes, Burton, Wagner, Rolli, 
Krock and Shissler. 

We have twelve pledges, and more to 
come, we are certain. Burri and Hartman, 
New Philadelphia; Boyd, Hartman and 
Harrisson, Marion, 0.; Gunk, Trenton, 0.; 
Shaw, Wilmington, 0.; Wolf, Bellevue, 0.; 
Stevenson, Macedonia, 0.; Tompkins and 
Kramer, Cleveland, 0.; Warnes, Ashland, 
0. No other Reserve fraternity has over 
seven at present. 

Appreciating school conditions, the owner 
of our home has reduced the rent one-half, 
making it possible to keep it in spite of our 
having to live in barracks. We nave pros- 

Sjcts of some ten Alumni to move into the 
ouse and help us to keep it. 

Our most excellent matron, Miss Bauer, 
is still with us. 

« 

S. A. T. C. started with a bang, and is 

foing fine. Two of our men, back from 
ort Sheridan, are instructors. 

Brother Searl is captain of the biggest 
football turnout Reserve has ever seen. 
Pledge Burri, 280 pounds strong, is varsity 
guard. 

Scholastic report is not yet out. 

Influenza is rampant, but has hit none 
of our boys. 

All in all, we cannot but be exceedingly 
hopeful and optimistic. We are sure that 
with Delta Alpha's co-operation, we are 
best able of any of Reserve's fraternities 
to weather these war times. 

MORTIMER, J. SHEA, E. C. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA 
Delta Eta Chapter 

Delta Eta broke into the front lines at 
Nebraska University at the beginning of 
the year with seventeen old men back and 
a cleanup of ten of the best freshman 
pledges in school as the result of a very 
successful rush week. We have but four 
upperclassmen back, but our second year 
men are pushers and are bound to make 
things hum. 

The chances are that we will be able to 
keep our House open as six men have re- 
turned from the Great Lakes to school and 
three more have enlisted in the S. A. T. C. 
From all indications these men will be al- 
lowed to live at the House. 

Brother Herman B. Thompson was re* 
cently made an ensign in the Navy, and 
Brother Cecil A. Chase, a lieutenant in the 
aviation section of the Army. They visited 
us during rush week. They were both in 
school last year and have made rapid prog- 
ress since entering the service. 

Along about the first of October the 
Chapter was in fine shape with twenty- 
seven men at the tables. We had planned 
our first social event of the year, a House 

Sarty for Saturday, October 5, when the 
eadly Spanish influenza struck town. 
Pledge Starret was very sick at the House, 
but had just recovered when Brother Paul 
Schminke Younf was taken ill. The Fri- 
day night previous to the party Brother 
Young took a turn for the worse and Sat- 
urday night he passed away. The Brothers 
gave up the party and were all at the House 
at the time of the death. [See "Deaths" 
for further chronicle.] 

Pledges Hays and Lake and Brother 
Goodfellow were sick at the time. They 
and Pledge Fletcher, who was taken sick 
later, are now doing very well. Delta Eta 
extends heartfelt sympathy to any other 
Chapter which may have suffered the effects 
of the dread disease. 

After the mist had cleared away and the 
House was no longer a hospital, all the 
"gang" congregated again and started in 
where things had been left off. Plans were 
immediately begun for the initiating of the 
pledges according to a provision made by 
the university for their initiation. 

The boys again resumed their places in 
activities. Pledge Mont Munn has cinched 
his place at the pivot position on the var- 
sity. Brother Wade Munn is taking part 
in all the games at guard. These two 
brothers, who seem to come of a race of 
ancient giants, are proving themselves even 
better athletes than the Brother, Wayne 
Munn, who is at present in an Officers 9 
Training School at Camp Pike. 



i 



Chapter Letters 



261 



Brother Parsons is again dipping his 
finger in politics and has introduced two 
pledges, Maurice, Bramman and Frank Par- 
sons, into the realms of the tactful art. We 
felt it best not to run any men for offices, 
although the political leaders had saved a 
very important place as sophomore mem- 
ber of the publication board for Brother 
Parsons. It is probable that he will be ap- 
pointed to this place, although no names 
appear on the ballot for this office on elec- 
tion day. Brother Landale is sporting 
editor on the Daily Nebraskan. 

Our fussers, much delayed because of 
our recent bereavement, are due to get un- 
der way any time now. The Kappas and 
the Delta Gammas seem to be popular with 
most of the boys except those that are tied 
up at some other House. It's a cold week- 
end night when at least three-fourths of 
the Chapter are not found dating at some 
"classy" party. For instance Brother Par- 
sons is so popular that for every dance 
date he makes he gets about three or four 
in return. 

Just as a little finis, Delta Eta would 
like to let her sister Chapters know that 
she is not dead and that they can expect 
big things from the Cornhusker Sigma Nus. 
We are not all lined up in activities as yet, 
but will be well represented in all lines of 
activities soon. 

•Our Chapter has certainly been fortunate 
in their late trouble. We never knew that 
we had so many friends until that time 
when everybody from professors and neigh- 
bors to sorority girls and Brother Greeks, 
turned in and helped us. 

JACK LANDALE, Reporter. 

LOMBARD COLLEGE 
Delta Theta Chapter 

College opened on September 12th with 
prospects extremely promising for Delta 
Theta. Brothers H. M. Mottram, Harold 
Graham, Russel Anderson and Henry 
Hughes were those of last year's Chapter 
to return. In a few days we were encour- 
aged by the return of Brother Geo. Stephen- 
son, who had entered West Point Military 
School last June, but owing to an accident 
had been given a dismissal until next 
Spring, and so was able to return to con- 
tinue his college work. Neophyte Harold 
Behringer also came back. With such a 
nucleus we were able to get things in shape 
and commence rushing. Before many days 
we had pledged fourteen men and can say 
that we are mighty proud of the men that 
are now wearing the button. They are as 
follows: Frank E. Culp, Kewanee; Earl 
Culp, Leroy Carlson, Chas. F. Bates, Don- 
ald C. Nance, Leo Graham, Kewanee, 111.; 
Fred E. Wetterholm, Red Oak, Iowa; Scott 
Nowers, Atkinson; Fred W. Wikoff, Oneida; 
Robert D. Robinson, William Hines, Edwin 



L. Harris, Galesburg; Hobart G. Gore, Can- 
ton; Carman R. Vance, Yates City. 

The House was opened and *after a week 
we had things in nne running order. All 
of the fellows stayed in the House with the 
exception of those that lived in town. We 
surely were thankful of the outlook, which 
had looked so dubious in the summer, but 
which had been greatly strengthened by 
the S. A. T. C. Umt which has been organ- 
ized at Lombard. Immediately we started 
in to give the neophytes as much instruc- 
tion along fraternity lines as we could be- 
fore moving into the Army barracks. As 
was suggested by the National Fraternity, 
we have co-operated in every way with the 
college and offered our House to them to 
be used as barracks, if necessary. It was 
finally accepted as a temporary place until 
the college barracks were ready, and the 
boys remained in the House until about 
October 7th. 

Of course, Brother Stephenson was un- 
able to ioin the unit and Brothers Mottram 
and Graham and Neophytes Hines and Gore 
were unable to join on account of special 
Government ruling. All the other members 
of the Chapter were inducted into the S. A. 
T. C. At this writing Brother Mottram has 
been allowed to join and Neophyte Hines 
is waiting for papers to return from Wash 
ington. 

At present nothing has been done with 
the House but we are making plans to rent 
it. The Phi Delta Theta House has been 
taken over for the Y. M. C. A. Hut, but as 
our House is not directly on the college cam- 
pus, it is not desirable for any Government 
use. We are making plans to hold informal 
meetings as often as possible so as to keep 
up the interest and already one of these 
meetings has been held in which a general 
discussion was had to which the pledges 
were present. 

A few days ago our numbers were again 
swelled by the return of Brother Harold S. 
Bates, who has been transferred from the 
Great Lakes Naval Training Station, to the 
Student Army Training Corps. 

Just as school opened we were disap- 
pointed to lose Neophyte Vance, who was 
suddenly called to Camp Grant. Due to 
this special Government ruling Brother 
Graham and Neophyte Gore will have to 
wait their call. Neophyte Behringer was 
recently initiated. This took a problem off 
of our minds which would have been more 
difficult to solve after the Chapter moved 
into the barracks. 

We have had many letters from Brothers 
who have answered the call to service and 
we sure are deeply indebted to them for 
the interest that they have shown and the 
words of encouragement that they have 
given us. In the last few days we have had 
letters from Brothers Fronk, Negley, 



262 



The Delta 



Adams, Hendel, Johnson and Hodson, who 
have just recently landed "over there." We 
were pleased with the interest that they 
have in what we are doing. 

We feel that this is a year of trial for 
Sigma Nu, inasmuch as there are certain 
problems that we will have to work out as 
individual Chapters, that are absolutely 
foreign and that we have never confronted 
before. Delta Theta is going to meet these 
problems to the best of her ability and we 
are hoping that this will be a most success- 
ful year, as the prospects now look. 

The following members of the Chapter 
have been elected to the various college offi- 
ces: 

President, Junior Class, Brother Stephen- 
son: President, Sophomore Class, Brother 
Anderson; Treasurer, Freshman Class, Neo- 

Shvte Graham; Assistant Manager, Foot- 
all, Brother Hughes. Neophytes Wickoff 
and Harris are acting sergeants with Harris 
also as company bugler. 

HAROLD M. MOTTRAM, Reporter. 

WASHINGTON STATE COLLEGE 

Delta Iota Chapter 

Washington State College, the same as 
all like institutions, is now a unit of the S. 
A. T. C, and as a result, fraternity life is 
practically at a standstill. All men are now 
in barracks, therefore we are using the 
House as a club room only. 

Delta Iota owns her property and we are 
therefore sure of not losing our House. 
There are no outstanding bills against the 
Chapter, so we plan on starting, after the 
war, with a clean slate. 

The entire Chapter of last year, as well 
as this year, is now in the service. This is 
a record of which we are proud. 

The Chapter has lost one member in the 
war, Lieutenant Lewis Peter Mutty, U. 
S. Navy Air Service, who was killed in an 
aeroplane accident at Miami, Florida, about 
July 15. We feel the loss greatly, but are 
proud of Brother Mutty. 

Among the Brothers in France, there are 
Gene Curti, Ray Rudberg, Edwin Copeland, 
Earl Whitman, Mason Leigh, Herbert Rit- 
ter, Roscius Back, Maurice McGregor, 
Frank McDougall, "Cad" Durham, "Bull" 
Durham, Earl Woodland, Leonard Wood- 
land, Harold Williams, Joe Halm, Harry 
Deegan, Al Crane. 

Brothers Captain A. 0. Walsh and Brice 
Toole have both returned from the front. 
Brother Walsh is of the Field Artillery, and 
Brother Toole of the American Ambulance 
Corps. 

All other members are now in this 
country, waiting to go across. 



Brother Roscius H. Back, Captain of In- 
fantry, was reported killed in action, but 
this report was later corrected, to severely 
wounded in action. 

Following is a list of the members and 
pledges now in college: 

Members: Richard A. Cisna, E. Leroy 
Knight and G. Frederick W. Salt 

Pledges: Merrill B. Davis, Spokane; 
George W. Bohanon, Spokane; Philip A. 
Yenney, Walla Walla; Gerald Hover, Walla 
Walla; Gervan Wilcox, Walla Walla; Camp- 
bell Wilson, Pullman, and Jack White, Wal- 
lace, Idaho. 

G. FREDERICK W. SALT, 

Reporter. 

DELAWARE COLLEGE 
Delta Kappa Chapter 

The college authorities will decide 
whether a fraternity house is to be used as 
a barracks for the S. A. T. C. or not. The 
Chapter at Delaware College is to keep its 
own House, live in it and go on living as 
they did before, provided they have always 
twenty-five Sigs living in the House who 
are members of the S. A. T. C. The House 
will be known as a barracks instead of a 
Fraternity House. In addition the Chapter 
will receive ten cents per day per man for 
housing the twenty-five which nets a reve- 
nue of $75.00 per month. The Delta Kappa 
House paid its last B. and L. payment on 
the first of this month, therefore we own 
the house. Now with the above amount 
coming and the assessment for members, 
Delta Kappa will have some funds to salt 
away in Liberty Bonds for some future 
time when she will want to build. It seems 
to me that if every Chapter is as fortunate 
as Delta Kappa in retaining its House and 
getting revenue besides and the students of 
the S. A. T. C. who live in the House get 
$30.00 per month for going to college, that 
this is the golden opportunity for each 
Chapter to put away some money. Not let 
assessments stop by any means. 

Yesterday Delaware College opened and 
Delta Kappa returned thirteen men and two 
pledges. Before the sun hid itself for the 
night, twelve men were pledged and they 
were the pick of the largest class that ever 
entered Delaware College. Last night I 
drove down to a smoker they had and the 
first punch, cake, apple and smokes I have 
seen together since we went to war were 
heaped on a large table. It brought back 
memories of the feeds we used to have 
years ago. 

There were about fifty men at the House 
when I arrived, all making merry and hav- 
ing a good time. The commander-elect, 
Brother Craig, was busy with several other 
Brothers making the men feel at home at 
the same time putting the pledge button on 



Chapter Letters 



263 



al more for good luck. The party 
i up at 10 p. m., due to the rule for 
rving coal that requires all lights out 
it hour. 

5 Faculty at Delaware College will 
this coming week to consider the rule 
no freshman can be initiated until he 
s the first term work. The prospects 
hat the rule will not be enforced this 

WM. L. EDGAR, 
Inspector, First Division. 

fch the opening of Delaware College, 
were but sixteen Sigma Nu boys out 

trty-eight of last year that showed up. 

▼er, the sixteen Brothers that did 
up started in the rushing season with 

if pep with the result that eighteen 

men were pledged. 

was the case in nearly all the Chap- 
the war has taken many of our best 
The best athletes in the college, and 
were, the majority were Sigma Nu 
have gone to officers' training camps 
is a result, the Delta Kappa Chapter 
>nly three or four old athletes as a 
us to win honors in the athletics of the 

ltrary to expectations the army au- 
ties have consented to allow the fra- 
mes to remain intact and active at Del- 
5 College on condition twenty-five men 
loused at every fraternity. For hous- 
he men the Chapter is to be paid sev- 
ftve dollars a month and ten cents a 
or every man over the twenty-five men 
d. If these conditions continue so sat- 
*>rv the Delta Kappa Chapter has 
«cts of enjoying a very happy and 
saful year. 

sre has been an epidemic of Spanish 
nsa in our college and as a result col- 
has been closed down since October 1. 

result of the unsettled conditions at 
louse and college, a report for the 

Kappa Chapter has been neglected, 
rver, I hope you will accept my apol- 

for my negligence and do your very 
to get this short report in the Decem- 
tolta. 

M. ALBERT HEMPHILL, 

Reporter. 

BROWN UNIVERSITY 
Delta Lambda Chapter 

tmquent. 

STETSON UNIVERSITY 
Delta Mu Chapter 

Ita Mu opened up with five old men 

as follows: Rutherford, Sanderson, 

m, Harris and Landis. They held two 

•formal meetings, September 25 and 



October 2, pledging five and two men re- 
spectively, making a total of seven pledges, 
then the influenza struck us and every man 
down with it except Sandy. Personally, I 
have been pretty busy and not profession- 
ally. Therefore, I trust you will overlook 
my not writing something at least. I did 
not even think to ask any of the sick fellows 
if any report of the opening had been made. 

I am glad now to be able to report that 
all of the boys are up and about though 
somewhat weak. We had one meeting last 
Sunday, and initiated John C. Ainsworth. 
At that meeting, the proper officers of the 
Chapter were instructed to make immedi- 
ate reports to you, and I am glad to say 
that such reports were forwarded to you the 
first of the week. 

Conditions look pretty bright for us this 
year. The president of the university very 
graciously gave us a room in which to hold 
our meetings, free of rent, and even al- 
lowed us to give a smoker, although smok- 
ing in this building is positively prohibited. 
I don't know how soon S. A. T. C. will in- 
terfere with our fraternity plans, by sending 
away some or all of our members, but we 
are going right ahead, and hope we will be 
able to manage to keep a quorum. 

R. P. WALTERS, Chapter Adviser. 

UNIVERSITY OF MAINE 
Delta Nu Chapter 

I am glad to say that since writing you. 
the ruling at Orono has been modified and 
Delta Nu Chapter has succeeded in pledging 
eleven very promising men. The Chapter 
is, of course, greatly hampered by the men 
being quartered all over the campus, but I 
suppose that this is the same condition that 
other Chapters are working under. 

Delta Nu is in as good condition as could 
be expected, considering the restrictions 
that are imposed. The university has pro- 
vided a room for each Fraternity to meet 
in, and this of course will help considerably 
in keeping up the Fraternity activities. 

Brother B. C. Kent, the new treasurer of 
the Delta Nu Property Association, is an 
instructor at Orono and is, of course, in 
daily contact with the active Chapter. You 
may be sure that everything will be done 
that can be done to maintain our Frater- 
nity existence the coming year. 

I have received my call for Y. M. C. A. 
service overseas and expect to leave as soon 
as I can straighten out my business af- 
fairs. 

W. O. HARVEY, Ex-Treasurer, 
Delta Nu Property Association. 

4 

UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA 
Delta Xi Chapter 

Delinquent. 



264 



The Delta 



UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO 
Delta Omicron Chapter 

We are getting along quite well with our 
work so far. There are several of our mem- 
bers that are awaiting the day when they 
may be inducted into the S. A. T. C. At 

8 resent we boast of eleven good pledges. 
if these there are five that are too young 
to enter the S. A. T. C. 

Owing to the difficulties that have con- 
fronted us in our effort to reorganize for 
the coming college year, our letters to the 
Delta have been sadly neglected. . For this 
failure, I express the apology of this Chap- 
ter. 

Brother Sampson, our Inspector, called 
for a short while yesterday afternoon and 
gave us a talk. We certainly appreciate 
having such a man as he to aid us in our 
work. 

BOYDE W. CORNELISON, E. C. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 
Delta Pi Chapter 

The boys of Delta Pi are prepared, after 
a short vacation, to start the most stren- 
uous season since we have been a Chapter 
of Sigma Nu. We are sure that Delta Pi 
will have its usual high standard Chapter 
with such men as Brother Delany, com- 
mander; Brother Sullivan, treasurer, and 
Brother Nicholson, House manager. 

The Call to the Colors has reached the 
hearts of every active man, most all of 
whom have left for army training units, 
leaving only those who cannot be spared 
from their Government positions and a 
naval reservist. 

The Chapter has worked together re- 
markably well during the summer, holding 
meetings of twenty active men every two 
weeks. 

Delta Pi possesses a number of musical 
men, who entertained the Chapter, and 
their fiancees at several picnics held at 
Brother Delany's camp on the Potomac 
River, every time we thought we had 
enough dancing for one week. 

It has been our pleasure during the sum- 
mer to meet many Sigma Nus for whom 
Washington has been the mecca. There 
have been throughout the summer, twenty 
"Sigs" staying with us, sleeping on any ac- 
commodations we could offer. 

Our Alumni has been very active, work- 
ing in harmony with us on every occasion. 
We arranged a sched