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Full text of "The Democratic Party of the state of New York : a history of the origin, growth, and achievements of the Democratic Party of the state of New York, including a history of Tammany Hall in its relation to state politics"

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THE 

DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

OF THE 

STATE OF NEW YORK 

A HISTORY OF THE ORIGIN, GROWTH AND ACHIEVEMENTS 

OF THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY OF THE STATE OF 

NEW YORK, INCLUDING A HISTORY OF 

TAMMANY HALL IN ITS RELATION 

TO STATE POLITICS 

Edited by JAMES K. McGUIRE 



AN HISTORICAL CHAPTER ON KINGS COUNTY DEMOCRACY 
By MARTIN W. LITTLETON 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE 
LEADING DEMOCRATIC POLITICIANS 
IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK 



VOLUME III 



UNITED STATES HISTORY COMPANY 
1905 



M. 






THP^ NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ASTOR, LENOX AND 
TILOEN FCU^DATIONS. 
1 1910 L 



COPYRIGHT, igo5, BY 

UNITED STATES HISTORY COMPANY 



J. r. TAPUFV CO. 

BOOK MANUFACTURERS 

h t W YORK 



THE 

DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



O F T H E 



STATE OF NEW YORK 



BIOGRAPHICAL DEPARTMENT (CONTINUED) 

JopiN J. Turner is a leader among the Democrats of Montgomery 
County and is well known and highly esteemed, not only throughout the 
Mohawk Valley but over the entire State. He was born in the town of 
Day, Saratoga County, N. Y., November 19, 1853, and after receiving 
a liberal public school education embarked in the business of contractor 
and builder at Amsterdam, N. Y., which business he has since followed 
and in which he has been remarkably successful. He established him- 
self in Amsterdam in 1882 and in 1890 formed a partnership with 
James Shanahan. Mr. Turner has carried through some enormous 
contracts. He built the Clinton prison at Dannemora, N. Y., which 
was a two hundred and fifty thousand dollar contract. From 1892 to 
1894 he put up several large buildings at Ogdensburg, N. Y., among 
them the State Hospital for Insane, which cost nearly four million 
dollars and which is one of the finest hospitals of its kind in the United 
States. He has also erected several large buildings for the General 
Electric Company at Schenectady, N. Y. These are only a few of the 
large contracts which have been entrusted to Mr. Turner and which he 
has carried through successfully, displaying an executive ability and a 



4 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

capacity for large undertakings which stamp him as a man of unusual 
powers. 

In politics Mr. Turner has always l)een a consistent and earnest 
Democrat, ever ready to exert himself to the utmost for the benefit or 
success of the party, and every campaign finds him the most active 
among the active. Nor has it been through work alone that he has 
aided the party, for he has contributed largely to campaign funds, and 
to his honor it can be truthfully said that he gives his money as freely 
as his energ}' to secure the success and advancement of his party. He 
has been delegate to county and State conventions and was put in nomi- 
nation for Sheriff of Montgomer\' County by the Democratic Party 
in 1888. On May i, 1903, he was appointed a member of the Water 
Commission by the Common Council and was elected Treasurer of the 
board. 

Mr. Turner is a member of the Knights of Columbus, of the Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of Elks and of the E. D. Brunson Steamer 
Compan}'. As might be inferred from, his extensive undertakings and 
pronounced success, yir. Turner is a man of broad and liberal mind, of 
large sympathies, congenial and courteous to all, and highly popular 
wherever he is known. He lives in a beautiful residence in Amsterdam 
and has an interesting family consisting of his wife, three sons and 
two daughters. 



Fr.\nk Beebe, M.D., a scion of a family which has been Demo- 
cratic for over a century, was born in Fonda, Montgomery County, 
N. Y., August 4. 1854. After a thorough public school education he 
entered the Albany Medical College and was graduated therefrom in 
the class of 1881 with Hie degree of M.D. Immediately after receiving 
his degree Dr. Beebe Ijegan the active practice of his profession in 
Johnstown. X. Y., and has continued the same up to the present time. 
Professional success and his standing as a citizen, together with his 
loyal adherence to the principles of the Democratic Party, made him a 
desirable candirlate in a countv which runs from 1,200 to 1,600 Re- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 5 

publican majority. In 1889 he was the nominee of the Democratic 
Party for Member of Assembly and only fell short of election by 580 
votes, cutting- off nearly one thousand Republican majority. The next 
year he was again the candidate of his party, but the result was about 
the same. In 1902 his party nominated him for Congress, but he was 
unable to succeed against an overwhelming Republican vote, although 
reducing it about 50 per cent. 

Notwithstanding these reverses, Dr. Beebe's conspicuous services 
to his party under circumstances of extreme uncertainty and adversity 
have won for him the confidence and esteem of the Democrats every- 
where, while his professional distinction and character as a citizen have 
placed him in a foremost position in the Fulton-Hamilton district. 

Dr. Beebe's society memberships include the New York State Medi- 
cal Association, the Fulton County Medical Society, the Masonic fra- 
ternity and the Lotus Club. 



Hon. John J. Kennedy, for seven years the City Judge of Troy, 
was born in that city, June 13. 1866. He was educated in the public 
schools of Troy, and after completing the course he began the studv of 
law. He attended the Albany Law School, graduating with the class 
of 1889. Fie immediately began the practice of his profession in his 
native city. 

Being a firm believer in the principles of the Democratic Party, he 
at once identified himself with the Democratic organization and proved 
so efficient and popular that in the year 1890 his services were recog- 
nized by a nomination to the office of City Judge. He was elected by a 
handsome majority and served the city so acceptably that he was re- 
elected in 1893 ^or another term of three years. When his second term 
expired he held over for another year under the special legislation for 
the second-class cities of the State popularly known as the "White 
Charter," from the name of the Senator who introduced the bill. 

Judge Kennedy has served on Congressional and Senatorial district 
committees and has many 'times been a delegate to Democratic district 
conventions. 



6 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

\\'iLLiAM J. McCoRMiCK. Oiic of the efficient Democratic work- 
ers in Albany County is William J. McCormick, Esq., a well-known 
member of the Bar. Mr. McCormick has always preferred to serve in 
the ranks, but in 1886 the Democrats of the Ninth Ward insisted upon 
his accepting their nomination for the office of Supervisor. He was 
triumphantly elected and so acceptable to his constituents was his ser- 
vice that he was six times re-elected without a break. This long ser- 
vice in the County Board gave him a clear insight into county affairs 
and added largely to his efficiency in the work in subsequent campaigns. 

From 1894 to 1900 Mr. ^McCormick served as a member of the 
Board of Health, and here, too, he proved himself a vigilant and capa- 
ble official, gaining credit for his party, as well as honor for himself. 



George E. Van Kenxen^ one of the most active leaders of the 
Democratic Party in St. Lawrence County, is a prominent attorney of 
Northern New York, with offices at Ogdensburg. 

Essentially a leader of men by reason of a forceful personality and 
a keen knowledge of human nature, Mr. Van Kennen has worked 
ardently to perfect the Democratic organization in St. Lawrence 
County. And this, despite the fact that the county is the most strongly 
Republican in the State. That the efforts of the Democratic leaders 
are not altogether fruitless has been frequently demonstrated by vic- 
tories in municipal elections at Ogdensburg, and 1904 by the election 
of twelve Supervisors in various parts of the county. 

In his allegiance to the organization Mr. Van Kennen has been a 
consistent memljer of the Democratic City Committee of Ogdensburg 
for many years, and at times has served as chairman. He has held 
membership in the County Committee for a long period and became 
its secretary on several occasions. In all classes of conventions he has 
acted as delegate, including the State conventions of 1892, 1902 and 
1904 and the National Convention of 1904. 

In 1887 he was nominated for Recorder of Ogdensburg, and hi? 
election followed. He was elected to the same office in 1893. 

Under the second Cleveland administration he was appointed Col- 
lector of the Port of Oswegatchie and served from 1893 to 1897. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 7 

Mr, Van Kennen was born in the town of Norfolk, St. Lawrence 
County, September 1 1, 1861. His education was obtained in the pubhc 
schools of his native place, the Potsdam Normal School, and com- 
pleted at Hamilton College, Clinton, N. Y., from whence he was grad- 
uated in the class of 1886. In the same year he began the study of law 
in the offices of Magone & Spratt, Ogdensburg, and was admitted to 
practice in 1888. 

He is a member of the St. Lawrence County Bar Association, the 
Bar Association of the State of New York, the Century Club, the Free 
and Accepted Masons and the Royal Arcanum. 



George L Cusiiman^ one of the best known Democrats of Che- 
nango County, was born in the town of Plymouth, in that county, De- 
cember 16, 1862. He was educated in the public schools of Norwich 
and took a course in the State Normal School at Brockport. He taught 
school in his native county for two years, and afterward engaged in the 
butter &nd cheese trade, but for many years he has followed the occupa- 
tion of farmer. 

Mr. Cushman comes from a strong Democratic family, but no other 
member of them all is stronger than he in the party faith, nor more 
ardent and energetic in laboring to place its nominees in power. When 
only twenty-four years old, he was elected Supervisor of Pharsalia, 
and performed his duties so acceptably that he was honored with a re- 
election. Before the close of his second term he moved back to Ply- 
mouth. From this town and Pharsalia he has served as member of the 
Democratic County Committee for seventeen years, and he is among 
the most influential party workers of Chenango County. Though not 
in sympathy with all the views of William J. Bryan, he worked ear- 
nestly for that gentleman's election. He has many times been a dele- 
gate to party conventions, though the pressure of business has forbid- 
den his attendance at Democratic State conventions. 

Mr, Cushman was married, November 16, 1885, to Miss Rathbun, 
daughter of G. S, Rathbun, of Pharsalia, 



8 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

William F. Heuser, a staunch and steadfast Sullivan County 
Democrat, was born in the city of New York, June 17, 1866. He came 
to Cochecton, however, at an early age, and was educated in the public 
schools, afterwards taking also a course in the academy at Damas- 
cus, Pa. 

After his educational training had been completed Mr. Heuser re- 
turned to Cochecton and engaged in the hotel business, becoming the 
proprietor of the Erie Hotel, where he is still located, in 1904. He 
proved one of those rare men that "know how to keep a hotel," and he 
has done a very prosperous business, with a reputation that has made 
him well known in that corner of New York. 

Mr. Heuser belongs to the Masonic fraternity, being a member of 
Delaware Lodge, at Callicoon Depot. 



Flo^T) H. Cowles, a leading business man and a prominent Demo- 
crat of Greene, Chenango County, was born in that county, at Smith- 
ville Mats. January 6, i860. He was educated in the public schools 
and the High School of his native village. After leaving school he 
spent three years learning the drug business with J. S. Wood, a pros- 
perous druggist at Greene. After this he removed to Pennsylvania, 
but returned to Greene in 1884, and bought the drug business of his 
former employer. He has built uj) a large and flourishing trade in this 
establishment, which he still owns. 

Mr. Cov/les has always taken great interest in politics, and has been 
the Democratic leader in the town of Greene for many years. He was 
elected Supervisor of this town in 1888, and was tendered a renomina- 
tion. his service having proved very acceptable, but he declined it. He 
was also elected Town Clerk in 1891 and 1892. 

Mr. Cowlcs was apixiintcd I'ostmaslcr at Greene by President 
Cleveland during his seconcl administration, and held the office five and 
a half years. He is a veteran and enthusiastic campaign worker and 
has served eighteen years as meml)er of the Democratic County Com- 
mittee. He is always a Delegate to the County conventions, and in 1892 
he was a delegate to the so-called "Dandelion"' State Convention at 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 9 

Syracuse, which had so much influence in securing the renomination of 
Mr. Cleveland for the Presidency in that year. He was also a delegate 
to the Democratic State Convention in 1900. 

He is a man of ability and a valued counselor in party affairs. 

Mr. Cowles was married in 1885 to a daughter of M. M. Wood, 
and after her death he was married a second time, in 1895. 



Charles W. Clare, a staunch meml^er of the Jefferson County 
Democratic organization, is proprietor and editor of the Watertown 
Rc-Union, a semi-weekly publication, whose editorial columns have 
always been devoted to the best interests of Democracy, whether local, 
State or national. 

In the organization work of the local party Mr. Clare is especially 
active. A consistent member of the Watertown Democratic City 
Committee and the JefTerson County Democratic Committee, he has 
always endeavored to bring adherence to the true principles of De- 
mocracy, and by his energetic efforts has aided in the creation of the 
existing organization in Jefferson County to-day. He has been sent 
to various conventions as delegate, including that famous State con- 
vention in 1 89 1, that nominated the late Roswell P. Flower for 
Governor. 

In 1893 ^^is services to the party were recognized by the appoint- 
ment of Postmaster, at Watertown, tendered by the then President. 
Grover Cleveland. He served until 1897. 

He has also been a member of the Board of Public Works, Water- 
town, for five years. 

Mr. Clare was born in Utica, September 4, 1854, where he obtained 
his early education in the public schools and the old Utica Academy. 
During this time he was a newspaper carrier for the Utica Daily 
Observer, and when but* fifteen years old was doing reportorial work 
on the old Utica Bee. When only seventeen years old his father died, 
and he became bookkeeper for Thorn & Pomeroy, a position made 
vacant by his father's death. Several years later he found employment 
in the business department of the Utica Daily Republican, where he 



lo THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

remained until iSSi. In that year he came to Watertown with D. T. 
Kelly and purchased tlie Watertown Morning Dispatch and Weekly 
Re-Union. Quickly discovering that there was no field for a morn- 
ing newspaper, the Dispatcli was dropped, and ?^Ir. Clare bought out 
his partner's interest in the Re-Union. He has since conducted it 
alone as a semi-weekly. Under his management it has prospered, and 
has earned a fine brick building of its own. 

Besides these interests, Mr. Clare is a trustee of the Jefferson 
County Savings Bank. 

He is a member of the Jeffersonian Club, the Watertown Lodge, 
No. 49, F. and A. !M., and the Royal Arcanum. 



JoTTX HuDSOx Peck, LL.D., a lineal descendant in the ninth gene- 
ration of William Peck, an original settler of New Haven, Conn., was 
born in the city of Hudson, New York, February 7, 1838. Hon. 
Darius Peck, his father, was for many years County Judge of Co- 
lumbia County, a leader of the Democratic Party and long its county 
chairman. John Hudson Peck was graduated from Hamilton College 
with the class of 1859. He became a member of Phi Beta Kappa 
on graduation, and thirty years later his college conferred on him the 
degree of LL.D. He settled in Troy, N. Y., and entered upon the 
study of the law with Hon. Cornelius L. Tracy and Hon. Jeremiah 
Romeyn and was admitted to the Bar at Albany in December, 1861. 
He l)egan practice in partnership with ]\Ir. Romeyn, the firm continuing 
until 1867. In the latter year he formed with IMr. Tracy, his other 
instructor, the firm of Tracy & Peck, which was dissolved by the final 
illness of the senior partner in 1879. From that time for upwards of 
twenty years he practiced his profession without a partner, until in 
1901 he associated with him in his present firm Joseph C. Behan, Esq., 
of Troy, N. ^'. In the earlier years of his practice Mr. Peck was en- 
gaged in a great deal of very heavy litigation. He was counsel for the 
Troy and Boston Railroad Company until its merger with the Fitch- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK ii 

burgh Railroad and during a long term of years for the Troy Union 
Railroad Company, He has been many years counsel for the Troy Sav- 
ings Bank. More recently his attention has been occupied in the affairs 
of private trusts and estates involving large interests. 

He was early identified with the educational interests of Troy. In 
1883 he became a trustee of the Troy Female Seminary, the pioneer 
school founded by Emma Willard. In 1888 he was elected president 
of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the best known and oldest 
school of engineering, from which he resigned in 1901 to devote him- 
self exclusively to the practice of his profession. 

He was a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1894 and 
served on the important committees of legislative organization and 
apportionment and education. He w'as named by the Legislature of 
this State one of the original incorporators and trustees of The Ameri- 
can Scenic and Historic Preservation Society, of which he continues a 
trustee. He was chairman of the commission which erected the new 
Rensselaer County Court House and one of four trustees for the build- 
ing of the Hart Memorial Library. He has also been associated with 
the building committees of several other important public buildings. 

Mr. Peck is a member of the Episcopal Church and is one of the 
trustees of the diocese of Albany and treasurer of that body. Mr. 
Peck is well known as a forceful public speaker, and he has written 
voluminously for the public press. His wa'itings are characterized by 
dignity and culture and are direct and strong. His oration before the 
Society of Alumni of Hamilton College in 1889 was said by the Utica 
Herald to be "one of the ablest and most carefully prepared delivered 
before the association." 

Mr. Peck is by heredity, conviction and association a staunch Dem- 
ocrat. Although at times tendered nominations by his party to public 
office except in the case of delegate to the Constitutional Convention, 
he has invariably declined. He has, however, acted as delegate to 
county and State conventions and served his party well in the press, 
with committees and on the stump. For many years he answered every 
call with tireless service. 

Mr. Peck married, August 7, 1883. Mercy Plum Mann, second 
daughter of Nathaniel Mann, Esq., of Milton, Saratoga County, N. Y. 



12 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hon-. Joiix ^\^ INIcKxigiit, of Castleton, N. Y., was lx)rn In Al- 
bany. December 19, 1847, the son of William and Catharine (Higgins) 
McKnight. of Scotch-Irish origin. Educated in the common schools 
of Albany and Scliodack and the Albany Business College and German- 
town Academy, he left school life at the age of seventeen years for the 
service of his country, and on September 20, 1864, enlisted in the 
Ninety-first Regiment, New York Volunteers, and served until the 
close of the war. He is to-day Second Vice-President of the Ninety- 
first Regiment Association. In 1866, returning from the front, he 
began his work as a teacher in the public schools of the State and taught 
with great success for many years in Columbia County and later at 
Castleton. 

yiv. McKnight has ever been an effective worker in the Democratic 
ranks and for twenty-five }'ears or more has been a close follower of 
Senator Murphy's leadership. The party has recognized the value of 
his services in many ^^■ays, and he has served successively as Assessor, 
Collector and Supervisor of the town of Schodack, bookkeeper of the 
county jail for three years. Chief Clerk of the United States Postal Card 
Agency under President Cleveland, and, while so serving, was elected 
Member of Assembly in 1890 and re-elected in 1891. In 1892 he was 
ai)pointed Chief Clerk of Auburn Prison and held the position for two 
years and six months, relinquishing it again to take up the duties of 
Chief Clerk of the United States Postal Agency. Nominated for Sheriff 
in 1903 against his personal desire, he made a spirited fight, but was 
defeated, although he carried his own strongly Republican township by 
175 majority. Mr. McKnight's personal popularity is plainly attested 
by the fact that his majority for Member o-f Assembly was 1,806, at 
least 800 more than any other member from his district had ever 
received. 

He has been a frec|uent delegate to State and county conventions 
and for fifteen years a member of the County Committee, on wliich he 
was an active and al)le member of tjie Executive Committee. 

Plis principal assignments while a Memlier of Assembly were the 
Committees on Commerce and Navigation. Indian Affairs and Rail- 
roads. He was for twelve years a meni1)er of the Board of Education, 
and for nine years sen-ed as a member of the Board of Village Trustees. 



OF THE STATE 01< NEW YORK 13 

He is Chief Engineer of the Castleton Fire Department. In his 
fraternal relations he is a Royal Arch Mason. 

On March 10, 1875, John W. McKnight was united in marriage 
with Fannie Schermerhorn, daughter of Nicholas A. and Lucy J. 
Schermerhorn, of Castleton, and of this union there are four children 
living, two sons and two daughters. Two other children, of a deceased 
sister, w^ere adopted at an early age and have shared all the advantages 
of a pleasant home. 



Clark M. Smith, of Elmira, is not only a staunch Democrat, but 
he is a man who ''knows how to keep a hotel." He was born in Dun- 
dee, Yates County, September 20, 1863, the son of George and Charity 
Shannon Smith. He obtained his education in the public schools of 
Dundee and at the Starkey Seminary, from which he was graduated in 
1884. With the exception of one year, in which he conducted a grocery 
business, Mr. Smith has been a hotel man ever since he was old enough 
to«go into business. He has been the proprietor and manager of hotels 
in Dundee, Flammondsport, Savona, Watkins and Montour Falls be- 
fore coming to Elmira in 1894, where he is in the same business, his 
hotel having an extended reputation all through the "Southern Tier." 

In politics Mr. Smith has always been one of those Democrats that 
are ever ready to serve their party's interests. He was elected a mem- 
ber of the Board of Trustees at Watkins. In 1893 he accepted the 
Democratic nomination for Sheriff of Schuyler County, and cut the 
normal Republican majority of sixteen hundred down to two hundred 
and seventy, a conclusive piece of evidence as to the confidence and 
personal regard in which he is held by his neighbors. For several years 
he has been a member of the Board of Aldermen of Elmira, and he is 
also* a member of the Democratic County Committee. 

He belongs to the Red Men and the Odd Fellows. In 1883 Mr. 
Smith married Miss Alice Wickham, of Montour Falls, and they have 
one son. Mr. Smith has great influence in the party organization, and 
his counsel is always eagerly sought. Personally he is a genial, large- 
hearted gentleman, and his friends are many. 



•14 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Daniel A. McCarthy, M.D.. was born in the city of Montreal, 
Canada, May i8, 1877. at the summer residence of his father, John 
McCarthy, wlio was an American citizen. He received his preHminary 
education in the pubHc schools of Troy, New York, and then took a 
course in McGill University, Montreal, graduating in the class of 1895. 
Finally he took a course in the Albany Medical College, from which he 
was graduated in the class of 1899 with the degree of M.D. 

He began the active practice of his profession in Troy, N. Y, after 
a year's experience in hospital service in New York City, and has built 
up a large practice and a high reputation in his profession. 

Dr. McCarthy is an earnest and active Democrat and is particularly 
strong in organization work in the Thirteenth Ward of the city and 
was a member of the Democratic Committee. He was appointed Dis- 
trict Physician January, 1900. and promoted to Assistant Health Offi- 
cer in January, 1903. 

He is a member of Troy Council, Knights of Columbus; Ilium 
Court, I. O. F. ; of the K. O. T. M. and is National Treasurer of the 
Knights of the Red Brancli. The Doctor is active in the County Medi- 
cal Society, of which he is a member, as w-ell as of the State Medical 
Societv. 



James Roddy, one of the leaders of the younger Democracy of 
Troy, was born in that city on the i8th day of May. 1870. After com- 
pleting his educatifMi in the public schools of Troy he learned the trade 
of blacksmith and wagon-maker in his father's establishment at 1518 
Sixth avenue. After his father's death, in company with his brother, 
George Koddy, he succeeded to his father's business under the firm 
name of Roddy Brothers. 

Mr. RofUly has 1)een active in politics ever since he became of age 
and is a power in the organization of the Second Ward. He is a pros- 
perous and successful man in his extensive private business, and his 
interest in politics is simply that of a disinterested Democratic worker. 
He has neither the time nor the ambition to seek political office, but he 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 15 

is a strenuous Democrat and has often served his party with great 
acceptance as a meml^er of ward, city and county committees and as a 
delegate to important conventions. 



Royal Rose Soper, the secretary and treasurer of the Elmira 
Gazette Company and the active manager of that influential Democratic 
organ, was born in Tioga County, Pa., in 1840, the son of Harris and 
Susanna (Powers) Soper. He was educated in the Public schools and 
at Willsboro Academy. 

In 1 86 1 he removed to Elmira, where he studied law for one year, 
when he enlisted in the One Hundred and Sixty-first Regiment, New 
York Volunteers, in which he served with credit until the close of the 
Civil War. He took part in the famous Louisiana campaign of Gen- 
eral Banks, and by his good service he reached the rank of first lieu- 
tenant, and was mustered out as such November 13, 1865. 

He served as clerk of the Board of Supervisors and Treasurer of 
the city of Elmira. He became Secretary and Treasurer of the Elmira 
Gazette Company and also business manager in 1876. 

This newspaper, established in 1820, has for nearly a century been 
a power in the advocacy of Democratic principles and policies and the 
support of Democratic candidates, amoiig the latter being General An- 
drew Jackson, whom it supported in all his campaigns' for the Presi- 
dency. Since Mr. Soper took charge it has advanced steadily in circu- 
lation and influence until it stands in the first rank of the newspapers 
of the State. 

Mr. Soper has served as a member of important party committees, 
and many times as delegate to Democratic State conventions. 

He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, of the Century 
Club and a charter member of the City Club. In 1867 he married Miss 
Emma Wheeler, of Hammondsport. They have two children. 

Mr. Soper is a prominent figure, not only in the political but also 
in the newspaper world. For several years he has been Secretary and 
Treasurer, and also a member, of the Executive Committee of the New 
York State Associated Press. 



i6 THE DEMOCRATIC TARTY 

Alderman William F. Doxohue was born in Bridgewater, 
Oneida County, in 1869, but in 1878 removed to Utica with his pa- 
rents, where he was educated in the public schools. 

He was a meml3er of the firm, Phelan & Donohue, proprietors of the 
Mechanics' Hotel. John and Catherine streets. Utica. for five years and 
is at present proprietor of the Oneida Hotel, at John and Joy streets. 

Mr. Donohue is a natural political leader. Since his residence in 
the Fifth Ward, Utica, he has been instrumental in increasing the 
Democratic vote there, and by virtue of natural ability rose to the posi- 
tion of leader. In recognition of his services his constituents elected 
liim to the Democratic City and County committees, where he has 
served for more than seven years. In 1900 he was nominated for 
Alderman from the Fifth Ward and his popularity was attested by the 
comfortable majority accorded him at the polls. In 1903 he was re- 
elected. During his terms on the board he has served on many of the 
important committees and has been a staunch supporter of Mayor Tal- 
cott in giving the city a clean and judicious administration. 

Mr. Donohue is a member of Division No. 2, A. O. H., and Aerie 
97, F. O. E. 



James W. Gleknox was lx)rn in Kingston, November 2, 1845, 
and was educated in the public schools of that place. He began work 
as a canal boy on the Delaware and Hudson and Champlain canals. 
In 1877 he was elected Constable, and continued to hold this office 
until 1887, when he was appointed Deputy Sheriff, serving as such for 
four years until 1891. In that year he engaged in the grocery business 
in partnership with his son, John B. Glennon. Their success has been 
highly satisfactory, and they have built up a large and profitable trade. 

Mr. Glennon is a member of the C. M. B. A. 

He has always been a strong and active Democratic worker, and 
is one of the recognized party leaders in the Seventh Ward of the 
city of Kingston. He is especially efficient when a political campaign 
is in progress, and the value of his services has been recognized by 
placing him upon the General City Committee for many years. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 17 

John B. Glennon, a prosperous mercliant and one of the influen- 
tial Democrats of Ulster County, was born in King^ston, Septemlx^r 
15, 1 87 1. He received his educational training in the pubhc schools 
and the Kingston Academy. After leaving school he became a partner 
of his father, James W. Glennon, in the grocery business, and has con- 
tinued there ever since. 

He is a member of the Rescue Hook and Ladder Company and 
of the Knights of Columbus. He has been an active Democratic worker 
from the time he became of age, and has co-operated with his father in 
the leadership of the Seventh Ward. 

He has accepted two nominations for Supervisor, and was elected 
both times and counted out both times. He was appointed, January i, 
1905, Secretary of the Municipal Civil Service Commission. He is a 
power with the younger Democracy, and has rendered his party valu- 
able service as delegate to conventions and as memljer oi political com- 
mittees. Mr. Glennon was appointed a member of the Municipal Civil 
Service Commission in 1901, and is still serving in that position. 



Fletcher Barber, a prominent grain broker in the city of Albany, 
is a splendid type of the successful American man of business who is 
also interested in public affairs. He is a staunch Democrat, and he is 
always not only ready but anxious to do all in his power to further the 
cause. 

A sound and successful business man, his counsel is eagerly sought 
and freely given in all party matters, and he is a faithful and zealous 
worker whenever an important campaign is on. He was active and 
influential in the organization of the Democratic Citizens' Union in 
1903 and rendered highly important service in that heroic attempt to 
break the shackles of the misgovernment of the Republican ring which 
has for several years held full sway in the Capital City. 

Mr. Barber, always ready for party service for its own sake, but 
never a seeker after office, has rendered great service to his party in 
political conventions and in furthering the work of campaign com- 
mittees. 



i8 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY . 

Mitchell Chadwick. One of the active and earnest Democrats 
of Wayne County is Mitchell Chachvick, of Newark. He was born 
at Arcadia, March lo, i860. He was educated in the public schools, 
graduating from the Newark High School in the class of 79. 

After working for a time as lalx)rer and then as foreman on the 
Erie Canal, he was elected Town Collector in 1882. He served for 
several years as messenger in the Capitol at Albany. Under President 
Cleveland's second administration Mr. Chadwick was appointed Post- 
master at Newark. In 1903 he was appointed Commissioner of Streets, 
serving two years, and was reappointed in the spring of 1905. 

He served as delegate to the Democratic State Convention held in 
Buffalo. 

He is a member of the Order of Maccabees and also of the Odd 
Fellows. ]\Ir. Chadwick, in 1885, married J\Iiss Jennie Hooper, of 
Newark. 



John L. O'Shea was born in Hillsdale, Columbia County, N. Y., 
October 21, 1861. He received his educational training in the public 
schools of Hudson. He then learned the trade of cigarmaker and 
worked at it twenty-three years, having only two employers in all that 
time. He came to Kingston in 189 1, and eight years afterward he 
opened a liquor store, which he still owns. 

Mr. O'Shea is the Past Exalted Ruler of Kingston Lodge of Elks, 
No. 550. has belonged to the Knights of Pythias and is a member of 
the Red Men. the Haymakers' Association, the A. O. H., the C. M. B. 
A., the German Mannerchor, the State Firemen's Association, the 
Hudson Valley Fire Association, the Kingston Exempt Firemen and 
the foreman of the W'iltwyck Hose and Truck Comj^any. He has been 
First Assistant Ciiief of the Kingston Fire Department for four years, 
and the president of the Kingston branch of the Ulster County Wine 
and Liquor Dealers' Association for two years and seven months. 
He is also a member of the F. O. Eagles, of Kingston, N. Y. 

He lias always been an active Democratic worker, Ijeginning l^efore 



OF raE STATE OF NEW YORK 19 

he was of age, and he has done very eflicient service in important cam- 
paigns. He has been a delegate to many party conventions, both at 
Hudson and Kingston, fre(|uently being chosen chairman. He has 
also performed much valuable party work on committees. Fie has both 
zeal and capacity, and is one of the leaders of the Democratic organiza- 
tion in his district. 



Hon. Edward Murphy, Jr. Since the expiration of the term of 
Hon. Daniel S. Dickinson in the United States Senate, in 1851, the 
Democratic Party of the State of New York has had but three repre- 
sentatives in that august body. These have been Francis Kernan, 
David B. Hill and Edward Murphy, Jr. The party has received a ma- 
jority of the popular vote in many elections during this period, but un- 
just apportionments have prevented it from securing a majority in the 
Legislature. 

The Hon. Edward Murphy, Jr., the latest elected of these three 
United States Senators, was born in the city of Troy, which has al- 
ways remained his home, December 15, 1836. His father, Edward 
Murphy, Sr., was born in Ireland, but in 1833 he came to Canada and 
not long after removed to Troy, where the future Senator was born. 
The father was a successful brewer, and accumulated a large estate. 

Edward, Jr., attended the public schools of his native city, after- 
ward entering Montreal College, in the Canadian metropolis, and from 
that institution he went to St. John's College, Fordham, near New 
York City, where his literary education was completed. 

Returning to his home in Troy, Mr. Murphy engaged in the brew- 
ing business with his father, assisting to develop it into^ large propor- 
tions. The father afterward retired, relinquishing the business to the 
son, who conducted it alone for some years with great success. In 
1867, however, he entered into partnership with William Kennedy, also 
a practical and experienced brewer, and the firm of Kennedy & Murphy 
extended the business to its present large dimensions, the firm being 
known throughout the United States. 

In politics Mr. Murphy always took a great interest, and while yet 
a very young man he was appointed a delegate to the Democratic State 



20 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

convention which nominated William Kelly for Governor. From this 
time forward he lias been a delegate to practically every Democratic 
State convention, and has been one of the leaders who have named the 
candidates and formulated the policy of the party. A man himself of 
unquestioned integrity, he has always been a firm supporter of every 
effort to make politics clean. When Samuel J. Tilden began his great 
fight against corruption, he found no more sympathetic and ardent sup- 
porter than Edward Murphy, Jr., who had become one of the leaders of 
the Democracy in Rensselaer County. 

Mr. Murphy is a man of remarkable ability and unusual force of 
character. He is a natural leader of men, having brains, courage, 
sound judgment, perfect poise and mastery of himself, clear insight, 
quick vision and alertness of action. For a number of years he served 
as a member of the Democratic State Committee, and was its Treasurer 
through many campaigns. In 1887 he became its Chairman, holding 
that place of power and influence for a long period. During Mr. Mur- 
phy's chairmanship the Democratic State tickets were elected year after 
year, and even the Legislature became Democratic. 

.Such a record of a long and unbroken succession of Democratic vic- 
tories in the State of Xcw York has not been seen since the days of Van 
Buren and Marcy and Silas Wright. 

In the Tilden campaisiis Mr. Murphy had already become a power 
in the party and in the State. He was also a loyal and powerful sup- 
porter of Governnr Lucius Robinson. At the Democratic National 
Convention of 1880 he was convinced that the nroper course was to re- 
nominate Mr. Tilden for President. In the lig-ht of events the sound- 
ness of his judgment has been clearlv vindicated. That Mr. Tilden 
should have "declined" another nomination, thus releasing the party 
from any obligation to right the monumental wrong of 1876 as far as 
he himself was personallv concerned, was entirelv in keeping with the 
character of that great man. Put the reparation was due. not to Mr. 
Tilden personally, but to the Democratic Party, and to the people of the 
United States. They had not only l^een defrauded of their choice 
for Chief Magistrate of the nation, but our system of free popular gov- 
ernment, itself, had been outraged and a precedent establi.shed that was 
sure to bring bitter fruit at some time. The very least that the party 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 21 

could have done without failing in its duty, was to again nominate Mr. 
Tilden and thus allow the people an opportunity to redress, to the ex- 
tent of their power, the outrage perpetrated upon them through him. 
Mr. Murphy saw this fact very clearly, but there were a number of 
anxious aspirants, each one of whom seemed to think his own election 
would be a sufficient vindication of Mr. Tilden, and an ample atone- 
ment for the unspeakable crime of the theft of the Presidency four 
years before. 

So advantage was taken of Mr. Tilden's declination. It was ac- 
cepted, and the Democratic Party again failed to grasp a great oppor- 
tunity, an opportunity all the greater as it was a matter of patriotic 
duty, and not simply one for mere partisan advantage, that was neg- 
lected. The greatest of Democrats then living had been defrauded of 
the Presidency by a series of stupendous crimes, utterly unparalleled in 
American political history, and the whole American people, regardless 
of party divisions, clearly and thoroughly understood that fact. Mr. 
Murphy fully comprehended the situation and would have had the party 
meet it squarely, rising to the height of its obligation to the people, but 
other counsels prevailed. 

When the historic Democratic State convention of 1882 assembled 
at Syracuse, Mr. Murphy favored the Hon. Erastus Corning, of Al- 
bany, for the nomination for Governor. However, when the balloting 
developed the fact that the votes of the delegates were nearly all divided 
between Mayor Grover Cleveland, of Buffalo, Congressman Roswell 
P. Flower, of New York, and General Henry W. Slocum, of Brooklyn, 
Mr. Murphy cast the vote of the Rensselaer County delegation for 
Cleveland, and this action proved a decisive factor in the contest, secur- 
ing Cleveland's nomination. All through the campaign Mr. Murphy 
worked diligently and efficiently for Mr, Cleveland's election, contribut- 
ing materially toward his phenomenal majority at the polls. In 1884 
Mr. Murphy was an advocate of the nomination of the Hon. Roswell P. 
Flower for President, by the Democratic national convention, to which 
he had been appointed one of the delegates. He, however, cordially 
acquiesced in Mr. Cleveland's nomination, giving him a genuine and 
hearty support and one which doubtless gave the Democratic candi- 
date the electoral votes of New York and thus secured his election. He 



22 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

cordially supported the renominatioii of President Cleveland at the St. 
Louis convention, in 1888, and conducted a vigorous campaign in the 
State of Xew York in favor of his election. In 1892 Mr. Murphy 
favored the nomination of Senator David B. Hill for President, and 
was appointed one of the four delegates from the State-at-large, to the 
Democratic national convention at Chicago. The sentiment of the 
convention proved to be overwhelmingly in favor of the nomination of 
ex-President Cleveland for the third time, and Mr. Murphy loyally fell 
into line, conducting one of the most vigorous and strenuous campaigns 
in the history of the Democratic Party in the State of New York. It 
was crowned with a magnificent triumph. Not only did J\Ir. Cleveland 
secure the electoral votes by a majority approximating 50.000, but the 
Democrats again secured a majority in the State Legislature. 

\\'hen the Legislature met, in January, 1893, the sentiment of the 
Democracy throughout the State was so unanimous and so unmistak- 
ably in favor of the election of Mr. ]\Iurphy as L^nited States Senator, 
to succeed the Hon. Frank Hiscock, that practically no other name was 
mentioned, and he was chosen for the full term of six years, from 
March 4. 1893, to March 4. 1899. 

Though now chosen to what is generally regarded as the highest 
and most influential office within the gift of the people of his native 
State. Senator Murphy had never been an officeseeker. He had served 
two years as a member of the Troy Common Council, to which he was 
elected in 1864. and ten years later he accepted the position of Fire 
Commissioner, which he held for a similar period. 

In 1875 he had been elected Mayor of Troy, where his unswerving 
integrity, his lofty public spirit and his unsurpassed executive ability 
had enabled him to give the city a memorable administration, and one 
which made his splendid capacity recognized throughout the State, and 
even beyond its borders. Four terms in succession was he called upon 
to serve. Indeed, he was again renominated for a fifth term, but his 
private interests had grown to be so extensive that i\e felt compelled to 
decline a further continuance of public employment. 

It was under Mayor Murphy's administration of the Chief Execu- 
tive office of the city that Troy's new City Hall was completed, and its 
erection had beeir carried on with such vigilance, fidelity and economy, 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 23 

that not only was its cost brought within the appropriation originally 
made, a fact deserving of lasting remembrance, but no less than 
$18,000 of the sum appropriated still remained in the city treasury. 
Great street extensions and paving improvenients were made, an im- 
portant enlargement of the water supply was undertaken and com- 
pleted, and many other extensive outlays necessitated by the rapid 
grow^th of a live, progressive American city were provided for. So 
judiciously had all this work been accomplished, so masterly had been 
the businesslike management of the city's finances, that the bonds of 
the city, which had been selling below par at the time of his election, 
had advanced until they were eagerly sought at a premium. And, 
with all the large and costly public improvements inaugurated and 
perfected, when Mayor Murphy turned over the administration of the 
municipal government to his successor, the city debt was smaller than 
that of any other place of its size in the whole United States. 

During his entire eight years of service as Mayor, Senator Murphy 
never once drew his salary for personal use, but every Christmas he 
distributed it among the city's charitable institutions, without regard to 
need. A striking instance of his generous public spirit was given wdien 
in a year of grave financial peril he came to the rescue of the Manu- 
facturers' National Bank of Troy and saved it from threatened 
disaster. 

Indeed, Senator Murphy has at all times shown his public spirit 
and his desire to be helpful to others, and his public and private bene- 
factions would make a long list. This largeness of heart and gen- 
erosity of spirit have been an important factor in his unequaled success 
as a political manager and leader. That he is a vigorous and formid- 
able fighter when the situation calls for battle is well known. But the 
great Senator's large heart and sound sense enables him to settle con- 
troversies, or, still better, to avoid them, by the exercise of wise diplo- 
macy. He would make a successful Ambassador or Minister of For- 
eign Affairs. While his sense of justice is rigid and he is inflexible 
where any matter of right and wrong is involved, he has the clearness 
and largeness of view which enables him to see any question on every 
side and in all its bearings. When President Cleveland and Senator 
Hill held somewhat strained relations with each other during Cleve- 



24 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

land's second administration. Senator iVrnrphy was on friendly terms 
with each of them, and they both held him in the highest regard and 
confidence as a political leader, and at the same time with warm per- 
sonal esteem. 

Every reader of this history of the Democratic Party of the State 
of New York cannot help but be struck with the almost constant and 
scarcelv interrupted factional quarrels and personal differences which 
have so often prevented success. This has been the result of the 
strong individuality and intense independence of spirit which have 
always characterized the Democracy of this State. Not only is boss 
rule in all its forms utterly unendurable to the free Democratic spirit, 
but even the restraints of needful party discipline are irksome. 

It is to be noticed, however, and it is worthy of lasting remem- 
brance, that in all the years during which Senator Murphy was at the 
head of the State party organization it was united. This is the highest 
possible evidence of his wisdom and skill as a party leader. 

The same characteristics made Senator Murphy a power in the 
United States Senate His course was entirely free from anything 
savoring of the sensational or the spectacular. He was always cour- 
teous, never indulging in flights of ambitious oratory, but few Senators 
have ever accomplished more work of the highest value to their con- 
stituents, in a single term, than Edward ]\Iurphy. Jr. 

Senator Murphy is always a gentleman. His personality is mag- 
netic and winning. He is loyal and true in every relation of life, 
staunch in his friendships, kindly in his judgments, liberal and tolerant, 
and a man who always keeps his promises. No man has a wider or 
warmer circle of personal friends, and there is no man in public life 
whose friendship is more highly valued, nor one whose friendship is of 
greater value. 

Senator Murphy's home life is ideal. He married Miss Julia Dele- 
hanty. daughter of Michael Delehanty, of Albany, a lady of rare per- 
sonal charms and of great beauty and strengt'li of character. Nine 
children have been lx)rn to them, of whom eight, five sons and three 
daughters, are living. One of their daughters is the wife of ex-Mayor 
Hugh J. Grant, of New York. The Murphy homestead, at 1819 Eifth 
avenue, in the city of Troy, is a spacious and elegant mansion, a gen- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 25 

nine home and the seat of a gracious and generous hospitahty worthy 
of its owners, who are splendid iUustrations of the best type of Ameri- 
can manhood and American vvomarfhood. 



Jonas Jacobs, M.D., is one of the al)le physicians and one of the 
active Democrats of the busy and handsome city of Ehnira. He was 
born in New York City, November 15, 1862, his parents being Marks 
and Leah Jacobs. He acc[uired his hterary education at New Haven, 
Conn., where his father, who died January 18, 1903, was for some time 
a rabbi. He received his professional education at the Medical School 
of Yale University, University Medical College, New York, and the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons of Baltimore. He received his 
diploma from the last-named institution in 1886. He accepted an ap- 
pointment as interne at Ward's Island for one season, after which he 
began the practice of his profession in the fall of 1886, and met with 
immediate and gratifying success, building up a large practice. 

In politics Dr. Jacobs has always been an active and enthusiastic 
Democrat. He served as Coroner of Chemung County for one term 
and for one and one-half years he was a member of the Elmira Board 
of Health. For six years he has been the City Physician and also 
Police and Fire Surgeon. He is a member of the Democratic County 
Committee and has been appointed a delegate to every Democratic 
county convention. 

Dr. Jacobs belongs to the Order of Elks and is a Past Exalted 
Ruler of Lodge No. 62 ; he is a member of the Improved Order of Red 
Men, the Masonic fraternity, the Order of the Veiled Prophet. He is 
Past President of the Order of B'rith Abraham and also of the Indepen- 
dent Order of B'rith Abraham. He is president and secretary of the 
Elmira Academy of Medicine and has held the position of president in 
the Chemung County Medical Society. He is also a member of the 
Lake Keuka Medical and Surgical Association and of the American 
Medical Association. Not only in his profession, but also as a man 
and a citizen Dr. Jacobs enjoys the highest standing and the confidence 
and respect of the entire community. 



26 THE DE.MOCRATIC PARTY 



HOX. GEORGE W. DRISCOLL 

Hon. George \\'. Driscoll. Always zealous in its interest and 
ever faithful to the trusts that the party has reposed in him, Hon. 
George W. Driscoll, of Syracuse, is recognized by the Democrats of 
Central New York as one of the faithful and loyal party men who have 
done much to spread the doctrine of Jeffersonian Democracy in an elo- 
quent and convincing manner. 

I\Ir. Driscoll was born in Syracuse. He spent his youth in Camil- 
lus, on a farm in an agricultural community, where he is still held in 
the highest honor and respect. He was educated in the Elbridge In- 
stitute and was prepared for \\''illiams College, from which institution 
he was graduated with the highest honors in the class of 1881. 

After leaving Williams College ]\Ir. Driscoll took up the study of 
law. and after a two years' course was admitted to the Bar. He and 
his brother, Hon. Michael E. Driscoll, the present Representative in 
Congress from the Onondaga-Madison District, formed a partnership 
in 1883, ^"d they are to-day recognized as one of the most prominent 
law firms in the State. Their business is a very extensive one and 
particular success has been made by them in the trial of negligence cases 
against railroads and other large corporations. 

The subject of this sketch has always been identified with the Demo- 
cratic Party .=irce his first vote was cast. His eloquent tongue has been 
heard in national, State, city and county campaigns, and he is re- 
garded as one of the most convincing and attractive orators in the 
State. Mr. Driscoll is an effective pleader in any cause, whether it be 
before the highest court in the State or at a meeting in the interest of 
good government or pleading the cause of his party's candidates. 

In Syracuse Mr. Driscoll is known to nearly all of the residents, 
cither personally or by reputation. His name has many times been con- 
nected with important public offices. His large and lucrative law busi- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 27 

ness has prevented him from accepting the nomination for Mayor on 
several occasions. 

Mr. Driscoll is a member of the New York State Bar Association, 
the Onondaga County Bar Association, Citizens Ckib of Syracuse, the 
Century Club of Syracuse, and he has for some years past been Presi- 
dent of the Central New York Alumni Association of Williams College. 



Lafayette H, Beach. One of the influential Democrats of Or- 
leans County, is Lafa3'ette H. Beach, the proprietor and editor of the 
Orleans Republican, a Democratic organ of the county, and one of the 
oldest and most influential newspapers in Western New York. 

Mr. Beach was born at Albion, where he has always resided, April 
2, 1856. He acquired his educatioil in the public schools of his native 
town and at the Albion Academy, iEOiji which he was graduated in 
1871. After his school days were ovibf' Mr. .Beach learned the trade of 
printer in his father's publishing offke. In 1878 he became associate 
editor, and in 1882 he succeeded to the editorship. 

In 1878 Mr. Beach married Miss Jennie S. Roberts, of Albion. 
Five children have been born to them. Mr. Beach is an official member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and for twenty-one consecutive 
years was the Superintendent of the Sunday-school. He has, for 
twenty-seven years, been the Secretary of the Orleans County Agri- 
cultural Society. He served one term as President of the Genesee Con- 
ference Epworth League. 

The Orleans Republican was established in 1828, its first number 
being issued June ist of that year by Cephas S. McConnell. In 1850 
the plant and business was purchased by Calvin G. Beach, who con- 
ducted it until his death, in 1868. His widow then assumed charge 
until her death in 1900, when her son, the subject of this sketch, suc- 
ceeded to the property, which he still owns and manages. The news- 
paper has a circulation of over 2,200 copies, and it wields great power 
in its important field. 



28 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

'SI. H. CoxxoRS, an active Democratic hustler of Cuba, Allegany 
County, was born in that village, September 15, 1869. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools and the Cuba High School. 

When seventeen years old he began to study and practice teleg- 
raphy, and received an appointment as railroad station agent at Cuba. 
Since 1901 he has also been train dispatcher. He is a member of the 
C. M. B. A. 

Mr. Connors has always been an earnest Democratic worker. He 
served as secretary of the County Committee for several years, and for 
the last seven years he has been chairman of the Town Committee. 
He has also been honored with appointment as delegate to Democratic 
State and county conventions. 

He is a young man who is highly respected and personally very 
popular. 



M.-\jOR Willis E. Craig, a gallant soldier of the great Civil War 
and a sterling Democrat, as well as a prominent business man of Alle- 
gany County, was torn at Jasper, Steuben County, August 6, 1837. 
He was educated at Elmira, and also took a course in a commercial 
college at Baltimore. He served with great credit in the army. He 
was Captain for one year, when he was promoted to ]\Iajor, serving two 
years in that rank. 

After the close of the war he at once engaged in business as a mer- 
chant in several places in New York and Pennsylvania, among them 
being Lockport, where he conducted a grocery store. Returning to 
Jasper, he was a prosperous merchant and lumberman for several years, 
also doing business as a contractor and builder. In 1888 he removed 
to Belmont. Allegany Comity, where he has since resided. 

He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of the G. A. R. 
and of tlie Masonic order, in which he has taken thirteen degrees. 
Major Craig has always been a staunch Democrat, active and promi- 
nent in the organization. 

He was elected Sheriff of Steuben County, the first Democrat that 
had l)cen elected to office in that county for twenty-two years. He was 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 29 

also Supervisor of Jasper for five years and Justice of the Peace for 
several years. He has served on the Democratic County Committee, 
and has been honored with the appointment as delegate to many county, 
district and State Democratic conventions. 

Major Craig has been prosperous in business and he has a beautiful 
home. 



Newton D. Bartle, one of the loyal and influential Democrats of 
Chenango County, is a retired business man, but he retains his interest 
and activity in politics just the same. He was born at Oxford, in that 
county, where he has always lived, May 10, 1842. He was educated in 
the public schools and at the Oxford Academy. He began his active 
life as a farmer, but in 1871 he removed to Guilford and opened a gen- 
eral store. He proved a very popular and successful merchant, and 
continued in that business for twenty-eight years, retiring with a com- 
petency in 1899. 

Mr. Bartle comes from Democratic stock. His father was an active 
worker in that party, as are all the members of his family. Mr. Bartle 
was elected Justice of the Peace in 1882, and he served in that position, 
under repeated re-elections, for eighteen years, when he declined an- 
other nomination. He has the remarkable record of never having had 
a decision reversed during all his years of service. 

His duties in this judicial position necessitated his becoming famil- 
iar with the law, and for several years he has been the trusted counselor 
and legal adviser of the people of his town. 

Mr. Bartle has often been a delegate to Democratic conventions and 
has frequently served on the party committees, but he has uniformly 
refused the many nominations for office tendered him. His only official 
service, in addition to his many terms as Justice of the Peace, has been 
as School Trustee, a position in which he has performed much valuable 
work for many years. 

Mr. Bartle married in 1862 a daughter of James Jacobs, of Oxford. 
His wife died in 1899. 



30 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Michael P. Dunxe, a loyal soldier of the Old Democratic Guard 
in Chenango County, is a native of Ireland, where he was born August 
4, 1843. 

He came to this country with his parents in 1847, ^^""^ after spend- 
ing a year in Xew York City they came to Oxford. Here Mr. Dunne 
was educated in the public schools. He learned the trade of black- 
smith from his father, and worked in his father's shop until the latter 
retired. Then he worked at farming until he was nineteen years old, 
when he opened a blacksmith shop of his own, and has worked at his 
forge with great success ever since. 

Mr. Dunne has been a Democrat all his life and has voted the 
party's ticket ever since he became of age. He has represented his 
town in county conventions, but has persistently refused to accept any 
nomination to office, having neither inclination nor ambition for public 
place. He is simply a staunch and loyal Democrat, trusted and held in 
respect and honor by the entire community W'here he has so long made 
his home, always ready to serve his party and anxious for its success. 



John G. Bush. A model citizen and a stalwart Democrat is John 
G. Bush, of Moscow, Livingston County. Not only is J\Ir. Bush him- 
self a staunch believer in the principles of Jefferson and Jackson, but he 
has five sons, all voters and all Democrats, with a sixth not yet of age, 
who will make the seventh Democratic voter in this family. 

Mr. Bush was born in Moscow, July 14, 1836. He began life as a 
farmer, and still resides upon the same valuable and highly cultivated 
farm where he l)egan life for himself as a young man, nearly half a 
century ago. It is about three miles from Moscow village and Mr.- 
Bush and his sons have brought it to a very high state of productive- 
ness. 

Mr. Bush is a member of the Ancient Order of United \\''orkmcn 
and is quite active in the order. 

As a party worker and leader he is one of the most influential in 
Livingston County. He has frequently been called to serve his fellow- 
citizens in public office. He has been Supervisor of his town for two 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 31 

terms. He was a Justice of the Peace for six terms. He was a model 
Highway Commissioner, and he made a memorable run for Member 
of Assembly in the campaign of 1900, so active and so successful a 
canvass that he greatly reduced the overwhelming Republican ma- 
jority. He has frequently been a delegate to Democratic State and 
county conventions, and he has the confidence and esteem of all who 
know him. 



John B. Abbott, Esq. A man of sterling Democratic Hneage and 
of unswerving fidelity to his party, is John B. Abtett, Esc|., of Geneseo, 
one of the prominent attorneys of Western New York 

He was born at Dansville, Livingston County, December 31, 1857. 
After a thorough preliminary training in the public schools he was 
graduated at the GeneseO' Normal School and at the University of 
Rochester. 

Having chosen the profession of the law, he completed his studies 
and was admitted to the Bar in 1880. He began practice in Geneseo, 
also opening an office in Rochester. He still retains his two offices, but 
makes his home at Geneseo. He has been a prominent figure in the 
public and social life of this thriving village for many years. 

Mr. Abbott's father was one of the most prominent Democrats of 
Livingston County and served as chairman of the Democratic County 
Committee for many years. He was, in fact, a power in the Demo- 
cracy of Western New York. 

His son has followed in his footsteps. He is a familiar figure at 
local and State Democratic conventions, and has himself been chair- 
man of the Democratic County Committee. He is a member of the 
Geneseo Club, has been for many years active in educational work and 
president of the Board of Education. 

He has never been a candidate for office, but an earnest party 
worker. He has long been connected* with the Geneseo Democrat, an 
influential party organ, and he served for two years as Postmaster at 
Geneseo under President Cleveland. A very live man and a sterling 
Democrat is John B. Abbott. 



32 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Alderman \\'illiam Roach is one of the prominent Democrats 
of the city of Kingston and of Ulster County. He was born in King- 
ston, August 15, 1849, '^"<^1 '^•'^■'^s educated in the pubhc schools of his 
native village. He spent many years as a boatman on the Hudson 
River and the Erie Canal. He left this for the hide and leather busi- 
ness in 1880. Six years later he took his brother into partnership, 
and has built up a thriving trade. 

Mr. Roach has been an efficient Democratic worker ever since he 
became of age. He was appointed Alderman in July, 1899, and in 
the following year he was elected to the same office by a good, round 
majority, and in 1901 he was re-elected and served as president of the 
board, of which he still continues a member. He has been a member 
of the City Committee and of its Executive Committee, and has many 
times been a delegate to Democratic conventions. Mr. Roach is an 
enthusiastic Democrat, and has long been the recognized leader of his 
party in the Fourth Ward of the city of Kingston. 



John W. Searing, a well-known editor and lawyer of Ulster 
County, was born in that county, at Saugerties, March 22, 1855. 
After taking a course of study at the Saugerties Institute he entered 
Rutgers College, from which he was graduated in the class of '74. 
He then studied law in the office of that noted lawyer, the Hon. Augus- 
tus Schoonmaker, afterwards the Attorney-General of the State of 
Xew York, and was admitted to the Bar in June, 1877. 

He opened an office in Saugerties, but removed to Kingston in 
1886. Here he went into partnership with John E. Kraft, becoming 
one of the editors, publisliers and proprietors of the daily and weekly 
Kingston header, at the same time continuing his law practice. The 
firm dissolved partnership in 1898, and the fc^llnwing Xew Year's Day 
Mr. Searing formed, with ]\Iayor William D. Brinnier, the legal firm 
of Brinnier & Searing. 

He belongs to the Masonic order, the Kingston Clul) and the Uni- 
versity Club of New York Citv. 

Mr. Searing has always been active and influential in supporting 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 33 

the Democratic cause. In 1899 he was appointed Corporation Counsel 
of the city of Kingston. He has frequently served as a delegate to 
Democratic State, district and local conventions, and he has also been 
efficient in committee work, having for many years been a member of 
the County Executive Committee, and the chairman of that body in 
1895. 



Morgan H. Hoyt^ one of the live and active younger Democrats 
of Dutchess County, and one of the most efficient workers in the party 
organization, was born at Brewsters, in the adjoining county of Put- 
nam, October 14, 1865. 

He acquired his educational training in the public schools and en- 
gaged in the insurance business, which he pursued until 1889. In that 
year he removed to Matteawan and accepted a position on the Evening 
Journal. He has continued his connection with that newspaper, and in 
1900 he bought an interest in it. 

Mr. Hoyt is a member of the Masonic fraternity, of the Order of 
the Maccabees, of the Study Social Club and of the Main Street Social 
Club, both of Matteawan. 

In politics he has always been a strong Democrat. He was ap- 
pointed Postmaster at Brewsters under President Cleveland's first ad- 
ministration, and served acceptably four years. In 1900 he was ap- 
pointed Village Clerk of Fishkill Landing, and in 1902 he was elected 
Police Justice by 100 majority in a strong Republican village. 

His great political achievement, however, was in resuscitating and 
rehabilitating the Democratic Party in the town of Fishkill. It was in 
a moribund condition, and no longer even made nominations. Mr. 
Hoyt and his associates, however, brought it into vigorous life and it 
is steadily growing in strength, all this being effected without any out- 
side help. 

Mr. Hoyt has frequently been sent as a delegate to party conven- 
tions, including the famous State Convention of 1902. He is also 
Secretary of the Democratic Town Committee. 



34 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Abram M. Roos was born in Ulster County, February i, 1851. 
He received his education in the pubHc schools and at Newport Acad- 
emy. His first business undertaking was as a cattle buyer. Later he 
went into the hotel business in Wallkill, and later in Kingston. He also 
spent three years as proprietor of a restaurant in Detroit. Returning 
to Kingston in 1894, he secured the Hotel Ulster, where he remained 
five years. He left this to open the Hotel Elk, where he is still lo- 
cated. He is one of the best known and most popular hotel men in 
Ulster County. 

He belongs to the ]\Iasons and Elks, and is secretary of the Ulster 
County Liquor Dealers' Association. 

He has been appointed a delegate to several Democratic State con- 
ventions, and to innumerable local conventions, and he has been a mem- 
ber of the Democratic County Committee five years. He declined a 
nomination for member of Assembly when the Democratic nomina- 
tion was equivalent to an election, in 1882. He was the candidate 
from the First Assembly District of Ulster County in the fall of 1903. 
Mr. Roos is always loyal to his party, supports all its candidates, and 
is a hustler in a political campaign every time. 



Patrick Fitzgerald was born in Kingston, Ulster County, July 
10, 1854. After finishing a course in the public schools, he learned 
the trade of stonecutter, and followed it until 1897. He opened a 
marble shop in 1885, and continued it until 1890. He opened a cafe 
in 1887 and. after he sold out his marble shop three years later, he 
devoted his time entirely to the cafe business. 

Mr. Fitzgerald is an active and energetic Democratic Party worker 
and exercises much influence. In 1891 he was elected Assessor of the 
city of Kingston by four hundred and ninety majority, while the Demo- 
cratic nominee for Mayor on the same ticket was defeated by over five 
hundred votes. Mr. Fitzgerald failed of re-election by a small ma- 
jority. In order to give his whole attention to his extensive business, 
he has not desired political preferment, but reluctantly accepted the 
nomination for Coroner of Ulster County in the fall of 1904, when he 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 35 

was defeated by about i,ooo in a strong- Republican county. He ren- 
dered efficient service on party committees for many years. He be- 
longs to the C. M. B. A. and the A. O. H., and is a respected and 
public-spirited citizen. 



Alexander DeWitt Wales was born at Liberty, Sullivan Coun- 
ty, N. Y., on the i6th day of December, 1848. He was educated in 
New York City public schools and for a year and a half attended the 
New York Free Academy, now known as the College of the City of 
New York. 

His parents going to Delaware in 1865, Mr. Wales did not com- 
plete the college course, but in 1869, after returning to New York, he 
began the study of law at the law school of the New York University. 
In January, 1871, he came to the city of Binghamton and was ad- 
mitted to the Bar in June of that year. The family was of old Revolu- 
tionary stock, Mr. Wales' paternal great-grandfather having served as 
a Captain throughout the Revolutionary War in a regiment from 
Windham, Conn. ; his maternal grandfather served in Hardinburg's 
Regiment from Central and Northern New York. 

Mr. Wales' father was a strong Republican and an original aboli- 
tionist, but in 1872 he became an ardent supporter of Horace Greeley, 
and he was on the stump for three months in that campaign. In 1876 
Mr. Wales was clerk of the Board of Supervisors of the county of 
Broome and for many years thereafter Corporation Counsel for the 
city of Binghamton. At one time during the early seventies he was 
the candidate of the Democratic Party for District Attorney, and in 
1896 he was the Democratic nominee for Congress from his district, 
stumping throughout the campaign in every county in the district. 

From the beginning of his professional life Mr. Wales has been a 
trial lawyer and has been connected with most of the important con- 
tested litigations in Broome County for the past fifteen or twenty 
years. He has taken a deep interest in the trust question and has made 
some very important and successful moves against trusts. These 
strategic moves have been largely secret and surprisingly successful. 



36 THE DE:\I0CRATIC PARTY 

Dr. Charles ]\I. IMarxes. one of the active and influential Demo- 
crats of Clinton Countv. was torn at Chazy, in that county, July 7, 

1855- 

He has always been a staunch Democrat, and he had the pleasure, 

which he also considers an honor, of casting his first ballot for that 
illustrious Democratic leader, the Hon. Samuel J. Tilden, for Presi- 
dent, in 1876. 

Dr. ]\Iarnes entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons at 
Chicago, after completing his preliminary medical studies, in 1883. 
He was graduated in 1886, and in 1889 he began the practice of his 
profession at Rouse's Point, in his native county. He had previously 
spent three years after his graduation at the Cook County Hospital, 
Chicago, perfecting his preparation for general practice. 

Dr. jMarnes is the chairman of the Democratic Town Committee 
of Champlain. 

He is a very successful physician and a very energetic Democratic 
worker. His medical practice absorbs his time so completely that he 
has never been able to accept any public ofifice. 



Hox. Michael O'Connor, City Judge and prominent Democrat 
of Elmira, Chemung County, N. Y., was born in that city on March 
14, 1 87 1, the son of Patrick and Bridget (Burke) O'Connor. He 
attended the public schools until 1888, when he entered the law ofifices 
of Taylor & Bacon and studied law during the years 1 889-1 891. He 
then took a course in Cook Academy and prepared for Cornell Uni- 
versity, from which institution he was graduated in 1893 ^^'^^^ ^^'^^ 
admitted to the Bar in June. 1894. 

On January i, 1897, the firm of Taylor, Heller & O'Connor was 
formed and is still doing business under that title. This firm repre- 
sents the Board of Supervisors and is one of the most notable and suc- 
cessful law concerns in the county and in that part of the State. 

Mr. O'Connor has always been an active, earnest worker for the 
cause of Democracy and takes the keenest interest in its success and 
advancement. His ability was early noticed and quickly recognized, 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 37 

and he has held many positions of trust and importance in tlie gift of 
the party. He was Clerk of the Surrogate's Court during the years 
1 893- 1 897. In 1899 he was made City Attorney and filled that posi- 
tion for one year with great acceptability to his constituents. In March, 
1903, he was appointed Judge of the City Court and is the present 
incumbent of that office. Judge O'Connor has the rare distinction of 
having been the youngest City Attorney and City Judge who ever held 
those respective offices. He is a member of the Democratic City and 
County Committees, being a member of the Executive Committee of 
the latter, and has often represented his party as a delegate to con- 
ventions. 

Every indication points to a bright political career for this young 
attorney, whose education, experience and natural ability would seem 
to fit him to fill any office with credit to himself and to the party. 

In 1895 Hon. Michael O'Connor married Catharine O'Brien, of 
Elmira ; they have two children. Mr. O'Connor is a member of the 
Knig-hts of Columbus and of the F. M. T. A. B. 



Arthur G. Yate.s. One of the leading Democrats of Western 
New York, and one of the most prominent in the State, is the Hon. 
Arthur G. Yates, of Rochester, the President of the Buffalo, Rochester 
and Pittsburgh Railway Company. 

He is a native of "The Southern Tier," his father being Judge Ar- 
thur Yates, of Tioga County. 

Reared in the Democratic faith, Mr. Yates has always been a 
strong supporter of the party of Jefferson and Jackson, of Tjlden and 
Cleveland. His first vote was cast for General George B. IMcClellan 
for President, and he has followed with a vote for every subsequent 
Democratic candidate for that office, with the exception of the Hon. 
William Jennings Bryan. 

Mr. Yates is a business man of high rank and vast and varied re- 
sponsibilities, which have prevented him from taking a very active part 
in politics, yet he has rendered his party valuable and effective service 
in many important campaigns. 



38 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

John J. Britt. Among the public-spirited citizens of Albany 
County who have done much to advance its prosperity is John J. Britt, 
formerly an efficient member of the city and county committees from 
the Twelfth \\'ard and now the Democratic leader of the Tenth. 

He is strong in the Democratic faith and ardent and effective in 
party service. ]\Ir. Britt's prominence does not come from the holding 
of public office, for he has neither held nor aspired to hold any. He is 
a successful business man, and his work for the Democracy is inspired 
by his love for the cause the Democracy represents. He is faithful in 
his attendance at the primaries, and has often been a delegate to party 
conventions. 

Mr. Britt is prominent in several religious and fraternal societies 
and holds a number of prominent official positions in connection with 
them. Among these are the Catholic Union, the C. M. B. A., the 
C. B. L., the C. R. B. A. and the Knights of Columbus. He is also 
Treasurer of the Columbia Association of the Tenth Ward and has 
served as Vice-President of the Master Plumbers' Association, At the 
present time he is President of the Master Plumbers' Association and 
is also a member of the Royal Arcanum, Mohawk Council. 



William Hamilton. Both the superior capacity and the versa- 
tility of the American business man are shown in the successful career 
of William Hamilton, of Caledonia, one of Livingston County's notable 
men of affairs. Many, perhaps most, of those who forge to the front 
and become leaders are noted for their concentration of effort. They 
confine themselves to one line and do not "spread out," as the phrase 
has it. But it has not been so with Mr. Hamilton. As a farmer, as a 
real estate dealer, as a merchant, as a great mill owner, as a bank offi- 
cial, as a manufacturer, as an agriculturist and in many other fields of 
endeavor he has divided his strength, but he has been successful in all. 

He was born in LeRoy, N. Y., on Christmas Day, 1832. His 
education was such as the public schools of his boyhood afforded, their 
range and facilities for instruction being exceedingly limited when 
compared with the schools of to-day. Mr. Hamilton was, however, 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 39 

studious and ambitious and made the most of his opportunities. His 
experience is another ilhistration of the fact that in securing an educa- 
tion more depends upon the scholar than upon the schools. With his 
acquirements, a stout heart and a clear, strong brain, he began his life 
battle and met with success from the first. It would be a difficult mat- 
ter to determine which field he has shown the greatest capacity in. 
Perhaps, however, he is fonder of his farm than of any of his other 
occupations. He prosecutes this business on an extensive scale, and 
his mastery of many features is shown by the fact that he has held the 
position of president of the Western New York Agricultural Society 
for five years. He has also' been Trustee of the Iroquois Portland Ce- 
ment Company, of Caledonia, and for five years he was one of the 
Commissioners of the Niagara Falls Reservation. 

The many-sided activities of this bright and forceful man have not 
kept him from giving much time and attention to politics. Always an 
ardent Democrat, he has been many times a delegate to the State con- 
ventions of his party, and during the administration of Governor 
Flower he served two years as a member of the Democratic State Com- 
mittee. He has been a Highway Commissioner for many terms and 
served for seven years as Supervisor of his town. 

He is a director of the Monroe County Savings Bank of Rochester. 
His son, W. V. Hamilton, who is associated with him in business, is 
also a prominent and influential Democrat, and each of them is a power 
in the party, not only in Western' New York, but also in the State. 



Alderman Charles Carroll, one of the influential Democrats of 
the city of Oswego, was born in that thriving place, July 29, 1854. He 
was educated in the public schools of his native city, where he has 
always resided, after which he learned the trade of boiler-maker, which 
he has followed to the present time. 

Mr. Carroll is a strong and active Democrat, and he has frequently 
served as delegate to party conventions and has performed much valua- 
ble service as a member of party committees. In 1901 Mr. Carroll was 
elected Alderman from the Second Ward and was re-elected in 1903. 



40 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

\\'. Scott Gillespie was born in Marbletown, Ulster County, 
AugT-ist 7. 1846. He received his educational training in the public 
schools of Ulster County, after which he accepted a position in a gro- 
cery store in Kingston, holding it for seven years. At the end of this 
time he went into the same business on his own account, in partnership 
with yir. James Oliver. In 1872 the firm became DeAA'itt & Gillespie, 
which continued until 1894, when JNIr. Gillespie succeeded to the entire 
business, and has since prosecuted it with great success by himself. 

He belongs to the Masonic Order, the Kingston Club, and was 
formerly a member of the Knights of Pythias. 

Mr. Gillespie has been an active and earnest Democrat ever since 
he became of age, taking great interest in his party's success. In 1878 
he was elected from the Ninth \\'ard to the Board of Aldermen, and 
succeeded himself for two terms. He served in the Board of Educa- 
tion of Kingston from 1885 till the present time, and is still a member 
of that body. 

He was appointed Postmaster of Kingston by President Cleveland, 
and served during his first administration. 

INIr. Gillespie has been appointed delegate to many party conven- 
tions, and has done much efficient work as a member of party com- 
mittees. 



A. L. Chapman. In the work of Democracy in Jefferson County 
Mr. A. 1.. Chapman, an attorney of Watertown, has taken an active 
part. Through the various dissensions of the party he has always re- 
mained loyal to Democratic principles and given his aid whenever 
necessary. 

While his extensive practice never permitted association with the 
organization committees, he has nevertheless forced the time to partici- 
pate in campaigns and to serve as delegate to various conventions. 

In the "eighties" he was nominated for Surrogate of Jefferson 
County, and was only beaten by four hundred majority. The head 
of the ticket was overcome by a majority of two thousand. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 41 

Mr. Chapman was born in Henderson, Jefferson County, August 
8, 1856. After a course in the pubhc scliools and the Union Academy, 
at Belleville, he attended the Hungerford Collegiate Institute, and 
finished at the St. Lawrence University, Canton, N. Y., in the class 
of 1878. Following graduation, he read law in various offices in 
Watertown, completing his studies in the office of Lansing & Rogers, 
from whence he was admitted to the Bar in 1886. He began prac- 
tice in Theresa in the same year, but in 1894 re-established his office 
in Watertown, wdiere he is at present located. 

Li 1884 he married Etta, daughter of Elman Tyler, of Henderson 
Harbor, and they have two children, Barrett S. and Dorothy. 

Mr. Chapman is a member of the Jeffersonian Club, of Water- 
town. 



Thomas F. Nolan, commonly knowai as "Alderman" Nolan from 
his service in that board, is a Democratic leader of great popularity. 
Party allegiance is no light matter w-ith him. He believes that the 
welfare of the Republic demands the success of the principles and poli- 
cies of his party, so that it is a duty to further them by all honorable 
means. 

The caucus and the primary are, therefore, matters of importance 
in Mr. Nolan's estimation — which is undoubtedly the true one — as it 
is there that the springs of party action are set in motion and where 
they are controlled. He makes it a point of duty to attend them, and 
has many times been called upon to represent his fellow Democrats in 
the higher delegate assemblies of his party. 

In iQOi Mr. Nolan w^as elected Alderman from the Fourth Ward 
of the city of Albany and served with courage and credit, rendering the 
citizens of his ward efficient and valuable service. Party divisions un- 
fortunately limited his service to one term, but he made a splendid 
record and one of which he may well be proud. 

Mr. Nolan is active in the work of fraternal organizations. He is 
a member of the Knights of Columbus, also Elks, No. 49, and is the 
County Treasurer of the A. O. H. and also Vice-President of his divis- 
ion in the latter organization. 



42 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hiram R. Wood, of Rochester, is one of the sound Democrats of 
Monroe County. 

His first vote was cast for Grover Cleveland for President of the 
United States, and he has always remained an active member of the 
Democratic Party. 

He considered the nomination of the Hon. William Jennings Bryan 
for President, on the platforms of the two National Conventions which 
placed him in nomination, as a departure from the traditional princi- 
ples of the party, and withheld his support. He was, however, en- 
thusiastically in favor of the nomination and election of Judge Alton 
B. Parker for President in 1904, and he fervently hopes to have the 
privilege of assisting toward the election of many Democratic Presi- 
dents in the years to come. 



John B. Jud.son, one of the most prominent and faithful of Demo- 
crats of Central New York, was born m the city of Gloversville, August 
20, 1861. After receiving a liberal public school education in his native 
place he enjoyed the advantages of a course of study at the English 
and Classical Williston Seminary of East Hampton, Mass. 

After leaving school ]\Ir. Judson learned the art of printing and 
subsequently embarked in the printing and bookmaking trade, in which 
he established himself as a took and job printer in Gloversville in the 
vear 1877. This business he has conducted with uniform success down 
to the present time. He is also one of the largest real estate owners in 
Gloversville. 

Although well known as an honorable and successful business man, 
it is on account of his public services to the Democratic Party that he is 
most widely known. He was a delegate to the State Democratic Con- 
vention in 1888 and again in 1892. From 1890 to 1894 he was secre- 
tary to the Democratic County Committee, and from 1894 to 1903 was 
chairman of that committee. In the years 1893 and 1894 he was again 
a State Convention delegate and for the years 1894 and 1897 he was 
Secretary of the State Committee. 

These services rendered with ability, drew to 'Mv. Judson the confi- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 43 

dence and esteem of his party, and in 1895 he was chosen as the Demo- 
cratic candidate for State Comptroller. In 1900 the party again se- 
lected him as one of its standard-bearers, this time for the office of 
State Treasurer. As is well knowai, the whole Democratic ticket failed 
in those years, and of course Mr. Judson suffered defeat along with 
his party. Still it is worthy of note that in his candidacy for Comp- 
troller he polled 508,832 votes and when running for Treasurer he re- 
ceived the suffrages of 687,313 citizens of the Empire State. 

The prominence in party activity and service of Mr. Judson during 
a period of more than fifteen years was due not less to his high charac- 
ter, intelligence and prosperity than to the enthusiasm and loyalty of 
his support of Democratic principles and his energy and success in the 
direction of organization work. 



Blinn H. Buell, one of the influential Democrats of Chenango 
County, w-as born at North Norwich, June 21, 1861. He has always 
lived in his native county, and received his education in the public 
schools and at the Norwich Academy. 

He was engaged in farming, but in 1885, under President Cleve- 
land's first administration, he accepted an appointment as railway mail 
clerk and held that position until 1890. Since leaving the govern- 
ment's service he has been a prosperous farmer, residing at King's 
Settlement, in the town in which he w'as born. 

Mr. Buell has ahvays been a Democrat, staunch and stalwart, firm 
in the party faith and alert and active in its support. No^ split nor bolt 
has ever disturbed his strict party allegiance. 

]\Ir. Buell was elected Supervisor of North Norwich in 1898, and 
the following year he w^as re-elected, holding the position for two years, 
the term having been lengthened by the Legislature. He declined the 
offer of another nomination. He has served many years on the Demo- 
cratic County Committee and is a recognized power in the Chenango 
County Democracy. 

Mr. Buell married a daughter of Captain Piatt Titus, of North 
Norwich. 



44 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



HON. THOMAS E. KINNEY. 

Hon. Thomas E. Kixxey. Xo son of Oneida County retains a 
higher place in the hearts of his friends than the late Hon. Thomas E. 
Kinney, who held many public trusts, always fulfilling the duties de- 
volving upon him with honesty and fidelity. He was Mayor of Utica 
for four terms, the only Utican to be so signally honored. 

]\Ir. Kinney was the son of Thomas and Eliza Kinney, who settled 
in Utica in 1840. He was born August 3, 1841, and received his early 
education in the public schools and the Assumption Academy. Gradu- 
ated from the University of Virginia in 1863, he began the study of 
law in the office of Edmunds & Miller, He was admitted to the Bar 
in Syracuse in 1866 and for more than two years was managing clerk 
in the office of Hon. Francis Kernan. In 1867 he was chosen City 
Attorney of Utica and was twice re-elected. He did all of the legal 
business of the city without any assistance; he possessed a great legal 
mind, and the rapidity with which he transacted business was the cause 
of much admiring comment from his friends in the legal profession. 

In 1885 iMr. Kinney received tlie nomination for ]\Iayor by the 
Independent Citizens' Party. He ran against John- L. Earll, Repub- 
lican, and Patrick F. Ouinlan, Democrat, and was elected by a plurality 
of 160. In 1886 the Democrats nominated Mayor Kinney, and he 
defeated James Miller, Republican, by a majority of 1.196. In 1887 
the unusual political proceeding was gone through of all parties endors- 
ing Mayor Kinney for a third term, and he received all the votes cast 
for Mayor. 

In the fall of 1897, Mr. Kinney was nominated by petition of 530 
of Utica's leading citizens, representatives of all parties, as the candi- 
date of the Independent Citizens' Party for Mayor. He was endorsed 
by the Republicans and, after a spirited campaign, was elected by a 
majoritv of alx)ut 100, defeating John G. Gibson, who had held the 



NEW YU 




^. H«<«<um. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 45 

office during the four preceding years. In his letter of acceptance of 
the nomination he defined a poHcy tn which his achninistration closely 
adhered: "I am in favor of divorcing politics from municipal affairs 
and running the business of the city in the interests of all its citizens, 
v^ithout regard to party, nationality or creed, with the same care and 
economy which any careful citizen would exercise in managing his 
own private affairs. I am in favor of clean men and clean methods 
of doing business in the City Hall, and for clean streets for the city of 
Utica." Entering upon his duties January i, 1898, it was not long 
before the Republican leaders discovered in the Mayor's sturdy and 
honest independence a stumbling block to their partisan purposes. His 
refusal to make certain appointments at their dictation resulted not 
only in the withdrawal of the promised Republican support, but also 
in an organized hostile effort to defeat all of Mr. Kinney's most 
cherished measures for the public good. 

Mr. Kinney died on Saturday, November 4, 1899, and was buried 
upon the following Tuesday, the election day upon which his successor 
as Mayor was chosen. The entire city mourned his demise. Public 
buildings were draped in mourning and throughout the city flags were 
at half-mast. Around his bier in St. John's Church gathered a multi- 
tude of all creeds to do honor to his memory. 

In the history of Utica there is no Mayor who established a greater 
reputation for progressiveness, independence of spirit, fearlessness of 
action, candor, honesty and industry than Thomas E. Kinney did 
during his four terms of office. He cleansed the city of the black 
shadows of vice and gambling; he lighted the streets with electricity; 
he laid the foundation for a splendidly paved city ; constructed a new 
system of sewers, and while he was continually making public improve- 
ments he kept a watchful eye on the tax budget so that the burden of 
the improvements was rightly placed. He was the Mayor — there was 
no "Boss" nor "Warwick." He was outspoken, sometimes severely 
frank, but his public utterances on any question of great magnitude 
were always made after great deliberation and thought, and he gen- 
erally was found on the right side. He was public-spirited. In a busi- 
ness way he was a leader in the cause of commercial prosperity. It 
was he who aided to a large extent in the development of many sue- 



46 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

cessfnl enterprises that still thrive in Utica. He \Yas generous, free- 
hearted and kind, and althoug-h he gave freely to charity the public did 
not know about his benefactions. Attention was attracted to him from 
all parts of Xew York State, and he was regarded as a force in Demo- 
cratic politics. 

Mr. Kinney ran for Special County Judge on the Democratic ticket, 
and, although the county was strongly Republican, he cut down the 
vote of the opposing party, as he did also when he ran for County 
Judge. He ran three times for State Senator against Hon. Henry J. 
Coggeshall, each time cutting down the Republican vote so much that 
he barely missed the election. 

In the celebrated Cleveland movement in New York State in 1892, 
]\Ir. Kinney organized the Cleveland men in the counties of Oneida, 
Herkimer and Lewis, and was chosen their State Committeeman. He 
was also elected a delegate to the Chicago National Convention. As a 
political organizer he had no superior and his efforts were crowned 
with success. He would never sacrifice his political principles, no 
matter how great the importunities of his friends. He was the friend 
of the laboring man and when Mayor he showed where his sympathies 
were. He always stood for the principle of Home Rule in city affairs 
and ever opposed restrictive and illiberal laws. He was an earnest, 
faithful and painstaking public serv^ant, whom the people loved to 
honor. They believed in him and trusted him. 

In August, 1877, i\Ir. Kinney married Fannie Golden, daughter of 
D. V. W. Golden, the leading dry goods merchant of Utica, who sur- 
vives her distinguished husband. Four children, David G. Kinney, 
Edward D. Kinney, Miss Rose Kinney and Thomas E. Kinney, Jr., 
also survive him. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 47 

E. H. BoHL, of the Fourth Ward, Watertown, Jefferson County, 
conducts one of the busiest grocery stores in the city. With but a httle 
time to spare from his business interests, he is nevertheless one of the 
most ardent workers in the cause of Democracy. Nominations for 
pubHc office have been tendered to him by the Democratic organization 
in recognition of his services, but in each instance he refused. 

In 1897, however, he was appointed to the Board of PubHc Safety, 
Watertown, and he accepted. In 1898 he was reappointed for a five- 
year term. He discharged the duties of his office in such an eminently 
satisfactory manner that upon the expiration of his term, in 1903, he 
was reappointed for another five-year term by a Republican Mayor. 

Mr. Bohl was born in Watertown, January 21, 1854. After an 
education in the public schools he became clerk in a grocery store. His 
thrift and industry was rewarded in 1886, when he had accumulated 
enough capital to begin business for himself as a member of the firm, 
Bohl & Gamble. In 1897 he purchased his partner's interest and has 
since continued the business alone. 

He is a member of the JefTersonian Club, A. O. H. and K. of C. 



John P. Burch. One of-the earnest and efficient members of the 
Democratic organization in Dutchess County is John. P. Burch, who 
was born at Amenia, in that county, June 27, i860. He acquired a 
sound education in the public schools of his native county. 

After his school days were over he continued in his occupation of 
farmer, and in 1892 he removed to Millerton, where he has a fine farm. 

For several years Mr. Burch, who is an intelligent and enterprising 
agriculturist, has been a member of the New York State Grange. 

In politics Mr. Burch has always been a staunch, straight and 
strenuous Democrat, devoted to his party because he believes in its 
principles. His pri^'ate interests have been so extensive and important 
that they have demanded his attention so fully that he has never ac- 
cepted any public office, nor even a political nomination. He has, how- 
ever, attended party conventions as a delegate, and has rendered the 
Democracy valuable service in all im.portant political campaigns. 



48 THE DE^IOCRATIC PARTY 

Hox. Ji^i Stevexs. Back in the days of Seymour, Kernan and 
Fenton there was a sturdy Democratic leader in Oneida County, who 
was of a high type of citizenship, and his democracy and skill as head 
of the party in his county were exemplified in a remarkable manner. 
Mr. Stevens has not taken an active interest in politics in many years, 
but his past deeds for the party entitle him to a front place among those 
who have helped to make the Democratic Party the great organization 
it is in the Empire State. 

Jim Stevens was born in Rome, Oneida County, in 1836. He was 
educated in the common schools and the Rome Academy. His first 
entrance into politics was in 1866, when he was elected President of 
the village of Rome. His record in that office commanded attention 
and the demand for his renomination was urgent and it was accom- 
plished, and he was re-elected by a handsome majority. In 1867 he 
was nominated for ]\Iember of Assembly by the Democrats of the 
Third District of Oneida County and was elected, taking his seat on 
January 5, 1868. He was re-elected in 1868. His terms of office were 
marked by faithful and conscientious performance of his duties. In 
1879 l"*^ received the unanimous nomination for State Senator from the 
Twenty-second Senatorial District and was triumphantly elected. He 
served one term in the State Senate, declining a unanimous renomina- 
tion which had been tendered him. 'Mr. Stevens' record in the Senate 
was an upright and capable one, and he retired with the good will of 
those who elected him. Only seven Democrats were elected to the 
Senate in that year, the famous Senate that passed on the effort of 
Conkling and Piatt to be re-elected to the United States Senate after 
their sensational resignations. 

Mr. Stevens represented Oneida County on the Democratic State 
Committee in 1873 ^^^ 1874. and his counsel and advice were fre- 
quently sought by the State leaders. In 1876 he was elected a national 
delegate to St. Louis and worked and voted for the nomination of 
Samuel J. Tilden for President. In that memorable campaign i\Ir. 
Stevens took an active part, and every legitimate exercise of his powers 
was exerted in bringing about Democratic success. 

In 1884 the Congressional District Democratic Convention elected 
Mr. Stevens delegate to the Democratic National Convention at Chi- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 49 

cago, which nominated Grover Cleveland for President. In that cam- 
paign Mr. Stevens was active and influential, and it is a matter of his- 
tory that Oneida County went Democratic and made Mr. Cleveland 
President of the United States. Mr. Stevens was an important factor 
in that campaign. In the campaign of 1892 he was one of four com- 
mitteemen-at-large appointed to assist the Democratic State Committee 
in prosecuting the national campaign in New York. 

For fifteen years and upwards Mr. Stevens was elected a delegate 
to State conventions. He gained a State reputation in Democratic poli- 
tics and was on intimate terms with all of the famous men who helped 
shape Democratic history in past years and is also on close terms of 
intimacy with the Democratic State leaders of to-day. 

In 1 87 1 he was nominated for Supervisor of the Fourth Ward and 
was elected. He was inducted into office and had the distinction of 
being one of the first Supervisors under the new charter, incorporating 
Rome as a city. 

In 1884 he was nominated for Mayor and was elected. He was re- 
elected in 1886. 

In the business world Mr, Stevens has led an active and busy life. 
He is the ruling force in the Rome Merchant Iron Mill, which fur- 
nishes employment to between 200 and 300 men. It is one of the 
largest industries in Rome. He is also at the head of the Jackson & Co. 
dry goods store, the largest establishment of its kind in Rome. He was 
president of the Central National Bank of Rome for many years, and 
when the affairs of the bank had to be wound up, owing to the defalca- 
tion of an emplove, Mr. Stevens was appointed receiver by order of 
President Cleveland. 

In 1 87 1 Mr. Stevens and Miss Agnes Sharp, daughter of the late 
Jacob Sharp, of New York, were married. They are the parents of one 
son and one daughter. 

Mr. Stevens is an active member of the Rome Club and also of the 
Sons of Oneida. He is a man who is noted for strict honesty, integ- 
rity, uprightness of character, liberality and for his loyalty to his 
friends. All of his business and political acts have been conspicuously 
creditable. 



50 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

James G. McMahon. An enterprising citizen and a busy business 
man is James G. McMahon, of Ellicottville, one of the strong Demo- 
crats of Cattaraugus County. He was born in Allegany June ii, 
1868, and received his education in the public schools and at the Roch- 
ester University. After leaving school he plunged into business, and 
has met with the large measure of success that is due to a man of so 
much energy and enterprise. He deals in dry goods and general mer- 
chandise, is the owner of a large flouring mill and has a pecuniary 
interest in a last factory at Ellicottville. He is a member of the Knights 
of Columbus. 

In politics, as in business, ]\Ir. ^VIcMahon is very much alive, eager 
for success and a tireless worker. He has held nearly all the village 
offices — he has no time for any others — and has served on party com- 
mittees and as delegate to Democratic conventions, including several 
State conventions, and his work has always been attended with great 
advantage to his party. He was a delegate to the last Democratic 
National Convention, held at St. Louis. 



Samuel Dill, one of the most prominent Democrats and one of 
the most popular men in Ulster County, was born in that county at 
Wallkill. town of Shawangunk, December 25, 1844. He received his 
education in the public schools and the Wallkill Academy. After leav- 
ing school he went into business as a harnessmaker. 

He is a member of the ]\Iasons and of the Knights of Pythias. 

He has been an earnest Democrat and active in politics ever since 
he has been entitled to vote. His first office was that of Town Clerk 
of the town of Shawangimk, and he succeeded himself for a number 
of terms. In 1874 he was elected Supervisor, and was re-elected the 
following year. He was appointed Town Clerk to fill a vacancy, and 
held the office until 1888, when he was elected Sheriff of Ulster County 
by a large majority. 

It was during Mr. Dill's term as Sheriff that a very threatening 
popular outbreak, which had almost become a riot, was averted by his 
coolness, courage and ruick judgment in handling the excited crowd. 
The trnuVile arose in connection with the Ulster County Savings Bank. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 51 

Mr. Dill has refused any further pohtical nominations on account 
of the demands of his private business. Mr. Dill's personal popularity 
may be understood from the fact that at the time he was elected Sheriff 
there were four hundred and forty votes cast in Shawangimk, of which 
he received three hundred and ninety-seven. He removed to Kingston 
January i, 1889, when he assumed his duties as Sheriff. 



John H. Wemple, one of the most progressive and prosperous 
farmers in Livingston County, and a sterling Democrat of the "old 
school," is a native of the famous Mohawk Valley. 

He was born at Johnstown, Fulton County, N. Y., March 11, 1833. 
He has nevertheless been almost a life-long resident of Livingston 
County, having accompanied his parents when they removed, during 
his boyhood, to the town of Leicester. His father settled in this, at that 
time, practically new country, upon the farm which has ever since been 
Mr. Wemple's home. It is located on the Genesee Flats, about three 
and a half miles from the village of Geneseo, famed as the seat of one 
of the best normal schools in this State or the country. 

Mr. Wemple's family has long been prominent in financial and 
public affairs in the Mohawk Valley. His father was a member of 
General Washington's body guard. It is, and always has been, a 
Democratic family, and the branch transplanted to the Genesee has just 
as loyally maintained its attachment to and its support of the principles 
of Jefferson. 

He has one son, Alton J. Wemple, who lives at home with his 
father, and is also a Democrat of that loyal devotion which makes any 
party strong. 

Mr. Wemple has always been an earnest party worker and has 
frequently served as delegate to Democratic conventions, but he has 
never aspired to public office. He has been chosen Inspector of Elec- 
tions, but has never held any other official station. 

He has long been a member of the Odd Fellows' organization, and 
is prominent in its councils. 



52 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Edward J. Tuttle^ of jMiddleport, one of the active and influ- 
ential Democrats of Niagara County, was born in the adjoining county 
of Orleans September i8. 1825. He was educated in the public schools, 
and afterward learned the trade of carpenter, his original occupation 
being that of farmer. He worked at his trade for many years, meeting 
with much success. 'Mv. Tuttle is a member of the IMasonic fraternity. 

In politics he has always been a staunch and unwavering Democrat. 
For many years he served as School Inspector, and in 1895-6 he was 
elected President of the Village of Middleport, making a fine record in 
that important position. 

He resided in the State of jNIichigan from 1838 until 1849 ^^^ was 
School Inspector in that State for some time. He was also the sole 
trustee in the school district of Middleport, Niagara County, in the 
years 1871-1873. The district had three teachers at that time. 



Hexry Shaw, one of the live Democratic workers of Dutchess 
County, was born in the town of Washington, in that county, October 
18, 1845. He received his education in the public schools, and at the 
well-known Nine Partners' Academy, a Quaker institution located in 
his native town. After leaving school he learned the trade of black- 
smith, and has followed this occupation to the present time. In 1898 
he established himself at Millbrook, where he has built up an extensive 
business in his line. 

Mr. Shaw is a member of the ^Masonic fraternitv, having taken all 
the degrees up to and including those of the Commanden,^ of Knights 
Templars, also of the Council and Shrine (Cypress Temple, Albany, 
N. Y.), and is a member of the B. P. O. E. He is the Master of Hal- 
cyon Lodge. He also belongs to the IMillbrook Club. 

In politics Mr. Shaw has always been a stalwart Democrat and has 
rendered valuable service to the party organization as a member of the 
regular committees and as a delegate to all classes of local conventions. 

He was appointed Postmaster at South Millbrook in 1884 and 
served with great acceptance for four years, but with this exception he 
has steadily refused all ofifers of public office or of political nominations. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 53 

Samuel Cotton, sqii of George H. and Jane (Broadhurst) Cot- 
ton, was born in Elmira,, February 22, 1863. He attended the public 
schools until 1879, when he began his business career. This was with 
his brother in the cartage and trucking business under the firm name of 
George H. Cotton & Brother. From 1899 to 1904 he has held the 
position of Fire Commissioner and was elected Treasurer of the fire 
pension fund. 

Mr. Cotton is an unswerving Democrat, loyal in the support of his 
party, eager for the advancement of its interests and ever ready to give 
any aid in its cause. For the past ten years he has been a member of 
the County Committee and has also served as delegate to many county 
conventions. 

He is a prominent Mason, being a member of Union Lodge, No. 95, 
F. and A. M., and also of the Grotto of the Veiled Prophet, and. is also 
a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. 

Mr. Cotton was married in 1885 to Ida Spaulding, of Elmira. 



Ervin a. Burnett is one of the earnest and efficient Democratic 
workers of Dutchess County. 

He was born in that county, in the village of Hughsonville, in 1873. 
After having completed his educational training in the public schools, 
he learned the trade of carpenter under his father's instruction, and in 
1897 he was admitted into partnership with his father, and the firm 
has continued in business until the present time. 

He is a member of the Royal Arcanum and also- of the Junior A. 
O. U. W. 

In politics he has always been active in the Democratic cause. He 
was chairman of the Town Committee for several years, and is still a 
member of that body. He has also served as Delegate, to many impor- 
tant Democratic conventions. He has served several years as Inspec- 
tor of Elections, and in 1898 he was elected Justice of the Peace, serv- 
ing until 1903. 

Mr. Burnett is personally very popular and he is highly esteemed 
by a wide circle of friends. 



54 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Samuel IMason^ one of the active and efficient Democratic work- 
ers of Dutchess Count}', was born across the Hudson, at Wawarsing, 
Ulster County. December ii, 1850. 

He acquired his education in the pubhc schools of Ulster County, 
and learned the trades of wagonmaker and undertaker. In 1881 he 
removed to PaAvling, Dutchess County, and bought out an* undertaking- 
establishment, which he still conducts. 

]\Ir. Mason belongs to the Masonic fraternity and also to the Order 
of Odd Fellows. 

He has always been a loyal and steadfast Democrat. He was 
elected Inspector of Election, and accepted nominations for Overseer 
of the Poor and Justice of the Peace, but could not overcome the over- 
whelming Republican majority for the two offices last named. He 
has rendered the Democracy important service as a member of party 
committees, and has frequently been sent as a delegate to important 
party conventions. 



JoHX Oilman. One of the life-long and influential Democrats of 
Livingston County is John Oilman, of the town of Sparta. He was 
born in the town of Groveland, September i, 1859, but his active busi- 
ness life has been spent on the farm where he now resides. His land 
holdings are extensive, and his residence, located two miles from 
Groveland station, is one of the pleasantest homes in the county. It 
has a splendid site, commanding a wide view of the beautiful Genesee 
Valley. 

Mr. Oilman' has succeeded in life because he possesses the qualities 
that command, and even compel, success. That he is a good neighbor 
and a good citizen is abundantly attested, not only by the high esteem 
of all who know him, but also by the public trusts that have been com- 
mitted in his charge. His ncighhnrs, who know him best, have twice 
chosen him to the office of Supervisor, to look especially after the 
affairs of his town, and also to represent it in the board whose province 
it is to promote and safeguard the interests of the entire county. In 
this office he has shown himself to be both a capable administrative 



OF THE STATE OF xNEW YORK 55 

officer and a competent legislative official. He has also been chosen 
Inspector of Election, and in 1892 he was elected a Justice of the 
Peace, an office which, by repeated re-elections, he filled to everybody's 
satisfaction for many years. 

He was also appointed Deputy Sheriff in 1900, and held the posi- 
tion for three years. 

He has always been an active Democratic Party worker, and as a 
delegate to County and Congressional district conventions he has al- 
ways exercised a large influence in the councils of his party. 



William B. Murphy, a prominent attorney of Gloversville, was 
born at Schoharie Court House, September 26, 1835. After being 
graduated from the Charlotteville Seminary, at Charlotteville, N. Y., 
he began the study of law and attended the Poughkeepsie Law School. 
He began the practice of his profession in Kentucky, in 1857. The 
firm name was Huston & Murphy, and they were located at Morgan- 
field, Union County. 

He returned to New York State in 1861. and formed a partner- 
ship with N. P. Hinman, at Schoharie Court House. He also engaged 
in farming from 1881 to 1893. In the latter year he removed to Glov- 
ersville. where he has continued in the practice of his profession. Mr. 
Murphy is a member of the Masonic fraternity. 

He has always been an active Democrat and a worker in the or- 
ganization. He was elected Justice of the Peace in Schoharie County, 
serving sixteen years, and was also an Excise Commissioner. In 1877 
he was elected Supervisor. 

He was a teacher in the Fergusonville Seminary from 185 1 to 
1855 and was connected also with the Morganfield Seminary while he 
resided in Kentucky. 

In 1899 he accepted his party's nomination for Recorder of Glov- 
ersville, and was counted out. In 1901 he ran again, and came within 
twenty-two votes of an election. He has performed valuable service on 
party committees, and is highly esteemed as a citizen. Mr. Murphy 
comes from an old Democratic family and of good Revolutionary stock. 



56 THE DE.MOCRATIC PARTY 

John T. Bradley, a well-known business man and manufacturer 
of Herkimer County, was Ijorn at Little Falls, August 19, 1861. He 
was educated in the public schools and afterward he engaged in the 
shoe and leather business. Later he invented a device for telling the 
size of a shoe a person should wear to fit his foot, upon which he re- 
ceived a patent. This device has come into great demand, and Mr. 
Bradley is engaged in manufacture to supply it. 

He is a staunch Democrat in politics and has frequently served as 
delegate to Democratic conventions. He has also been honored by his 
party by the nomination for ]\Iember of Assembly. 

He is an energetic and prosperous citizen and is highly respected in 
the community. 



"\\'iLLiAM H. .Sullivan. One of the brightest lawyers and one of 
the most active and influential Democrats of Chenango County is 
William H. Sullivan. He was born in Norwich, May 25, 1869, and 
was educated in the public schools of his native town, graduating from 
the High School in the classical course in 1889. 

Mr. Sullivan began the study of law in the office of Congressman 
George W. Ray. now judge of the United States District Court for the 
Northern District of New York, and was admitted to the Bar in 1891, 
and in the following- year began practice at Norwich. 

Ever since reaching his majority Mr. Sullivan has been a very vig- 
orous worker in the Democratic Party, and when but twenty-two years 
old he was electerl a Justice of the Peace and was re-elected at the close 
of his term. He took the stump in the campaign of 1891 and did great 
service toward assuring the glorious triumph of Governor Roswell P, 
Flower. 

Tie was a delegate to the Democratic State Convention of 1894 and 
to both conventions of 1896. In 1898 Chenango County was anxious 
for the nomination of that splendid Democrat. ex-State Treasurer El- 
liot Danforth, one of her own .sons, for Governor. That nomination 
having Ix^en awnrded to the Hon. Augustus Van Wyck. of Kings, it 
was decided to present Mr. Danforth's name for Lieutenant-Governor, 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 57 

and this honor was given Mr. Suhivan, who made a strong and bril- 
liant speech and the gallant Democratic leader of Chenango was 
nominated. 

Mr, Sullivan again stumped the State for the ticket. In the mem- 
orable State con\-ention of 1902 he made the first speech seconding 
the nomination of the Hon. Bird S. Coler for Governor. Mr. Sullivan 
has enjoyed the distinction of being placed upon one or the other of the 
important committees on credentials or on resolutions in each of the 
State conventions he has attended. 

From 1896 to 1902 he was chairman of the Democratic County 
Committee, and he has been a power for the party in every campaign. 

Mr. Sullivan is a member of the Knights of Columbus, of the Alert 
Hose Company, No. i, of the Norwich Club, of the Red Men, of the 
Ancient Order of Hibernians, in which he has been president of Divis- 
ion No. I, and is vice-president of St. Paul's Cemetery Association. On 
June 26, 1895, Mr. Sullivan married Miss Annie E. Conway, daughter 
of the late Michael Conway, and two children have been born to them. 



Abram Hanson^ one of the efficient Democratic workers of Fulton 
County, was born at Albany Bush, Montgomery County, July 24, 1842. 
He received his education in the public schools and then learned the 
trade of blacksmith. 

Early in the Civil War, although still a minor, he enlisted in the 
One Hundred and Fifteenth Regiment of New York Volunteers, and 
performed gallant and faithful service until the close of the war in 1865. 

For twenty years he worked at his trade. In 1889 he removed to 
Gloversville and engaged in the mercantile business as a member of the 
firm of Hanson & Van Dewater. Soon after he bought out his part- 
ner's interest and has continued the business alone. 

Mr. Hanson belongs to the Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, 
the Royal Arcanum and the Grand Army of the Republic. 

Mr. Hanson comes from a Democratic familv. and has alwavs been 
loyal and energetic in the cause, but has always declined public office. 



58 THE DE^IOCRATIC PARTY 

Hon. ]\lARCirs B. Jewell is one of the prominent attorneys of 
Cattaraugus County and a leading Democrat and citizen of that section 
of the State. He was born in Machias, in the county which has always 
been his home, November 7, 1858. He received a thorough education 
in the public schools, supplemented by a course at the Franklinville 
Academy. 

After completing his educational training Mr. Jewell began the 
study of law and was admitted to the Bar April 3, 1883. He opened 
an office in Olean, where he has continued in practice to the present 
time, taking a high rank in his profession, and becoming one of the 
leaders of the CattaraugT.is County Bar. He is a member of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity. 

In politics ]Mr. Jewell has always been an earnest and influential 
Democrat and a very capable party leader. He has served as Town 
Clerk and City Attorney, and for seven consecutive years he has been 
a member of the Board of Supervisors, making an excellent record in 
each position. He has frequently been honored by appointment as 
delegate to important conventions, including Democratic State conven- 
tions, and he is universally esteemed as a man and citizen of the highest 
class. 



Bexjamix F. Willis, one of the most popular and prominent 
young men in Cattarau§T.is County, was born at ]\Ianilla, Erie County. 
After graduating from the union public schools at IManilla he at- 
tended the Sugar Grove Seminary, from which he was graduated at the 
early age of seventeen years. He took a still further course at the Buf- 
falo College of Commerce and began his business life at Limestone, in 
the town of Carrollton, Cattaraug^is County. He accepted a promi- 
nent position in connection with the Limestone Tannery Company and 
has continued with that extensive and prosperous business ever since. 

He is a member of the Masonic order and has taken all the degrees 
up to and including that of Knight Templar, and he also belongs to the 
Mystic Shrine, the Odd Fellows and the Maccabees. Mr. Willis has 
been promoted to superintendent and manager of the Limestone Taa- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 59 

nery Company, and he is recog^ni^cd as one of tlie most capable of the 
younger business men of Cattaraugus Coimty. 

In poHtics he has always been a staunch Democrat and a man of 
great influence and popularity. In 1896 he was elected vSupervisor of 
Limestone, defeating the Republican incumbent, who had been elected 
for several years in succession. He was re-elected Supervisor at every 
election since 1896 ; has served nine years and still holds that office. He 
has made a splendid record, and in 1897 he w^as nominated for Member 
of Assembly and made a brilliant race. Despite the strong Republican 
majority in his county and district, Mr. Willis is sure to be heard from 
and to reap further political honors if he shall care to accept them. 



George J. Ball, of Olean, one of the prominent and leading Demo- 
crats of Western New York, was born in Wyoming County, April 16, 
i860. His home has been at Olean, Cattaraugus County, since his 
childhood, and he was educated in the public schools of that thriving 
city. 

At the age of seventeen years he began to earn money for himself 
as a painter and paper hanger, and his thrift and enterprise have 
brought him success and prosperity from the first. He afterwards be- 
came a contractor, and pursuing this business with his characteristic 
energy he has become an important figure in the affairs of the com- 
munity. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias ana of the Order 
of Elks. 

In political matters Mr. Ball has always been an earnest and active 
Democrat, one of much w^eight in party councils. He served three 
terms in the Board of Aldermen and has been president of the Common 
Council. He has also been a Water Commissioner and was a member 
of the committee of citizens that drafted the city charter of Olean. 
He has been a delegate to county and State conventions many times, 
was chairman of the Democratic County Committee for a long period 
and chairman of the Democratic City Committee for ten years. 

In 1900 he accepted his party's nomination for Congress and made 
a splendid run in that Republican Gibraltar. 



6o THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

George E. Christie was born in Mayfield, Fnlton County, N. Y., 
September 8, 1862. After leaving the district school, he took courses 
in both the Fort Edward Institute and the Cazenovia Seminary before 
entering- upon the active duties of life. Subsequently he embarked in 
the glove manufacturing industry in his native place and was so en- 
gaged on his own account until 1894, when the partnership of Christie 
& Wilkins was formed, whicli still exists and carries on a thriving 
busmess. 

^Ir. Christie is one of the men who have become Democrats through 
the attractive principles of Democracy, and since becoming a member of 
the Democratic Party he has been a loyal supporter of regular party 
action. He is an active and zealous political worker. He held a seat 
on the Board of Supervisors for Fulton County during the years 1900 
and 1901. I\Ir. Christie is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 



W. \V. Hexry^ born at Gowanda, Erie County, in April, 1837, has 
long been one of the most active and most prominent citizens of Cat- 
taraugus County, which has been his home since 1853. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools and learned the printer's trade. After work- 
ing five years at the case he started a Democratic newspaper at Go- 
wanda. 

\\'hen the Civil War broke out he enlisted in Company A, Sixty- 
fourth New York Regiment, and by faithful service received repeated 
promotions and attained the rank of first lieutenant. After returning 
home he spent eight years in business in the oil regions near Oil City, 
Pa. Returning to Gowanda. he was elected Supervisor in 1869 and 
1870, then appointed Under Sheriff, and in 1873 ^""^ ^^'^^ elected Sheriff 
of Cattaraugus County, in spite of its overwhelming Republican ma- 
jority, by a majority of seven hundred votes. 

In November, 1879. in company with E. F. Persons, he joined in 
the establishment of a Democratic paper at Olean, N. Y. His residence 
has been at Little \''alley, N. Y., since 1871. From 1883 to 1892 he 
was employed in the State Department of Public W^orks. In 1893 he 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 6i 

was appointed Postmaster of Little Valley and served five years. At 
the end of this term of public service he retired. 

He has always been connected with the Democratic organization. 
He was member and chairman of the County Committee for many 
years, and has been many times a delegate to Democratic State and 
county conventions, never missing one for fifteen years. He has also 
served as delegate to the Democratic National Convention. 

Mr. Henry belongs to the Masonic fraternity, in which he has taken 
all the degrees up to and including that of Knight Templar, He has 
led a busy and a fruitful life and is held in high esteem by all who have 
ever known him. 



William H. Lovell is an active Democrat of Chemung County. 
He was born in that county, at Big Flats, in October, 1845. He is the 
son of Reuben and Retecca (Gillespie) Lovell. He received his educa- 
tion in the public and private schools of Elmira and the M. S. Converse 
Private Seminary. He also took a course in a commercial college. 

Mr. Lovell began his business life as a farmer and also as a dealer 
in lumber. Afterwards he engaged in the tobacco trade in partnership 
with his father, succeeding to the business at his father's death, in 
1886. He has a large warehouse and as a packer of leaf tobacco he 
does the most extensive business in that part of the State. 

Mr. Lovell served three years as Supervisor during his residence at 
Big Flats, and in 1884 his party honored him with the nomination for 
County Clerk. He has often been appointed a delegate to Democratic 
city, county and State conventions, and has also rendered efficient ser- 
vice on the Democratic County Committee, serving the past two years 
as chairman of the County Committee. 

In February, 1873, Mr. Lovell married Miss Mary Hosley. He is 
a member of the Masonic fraternity up to and including the Royal 
Arch Chapter, of the Knights of Pythias, of the A. A. O. N. M. S., of 
the Century Club, of the Pine Cliff Club, of the Masonic Club and of 
the Sons of the American Revolution. Mr. Lovell is a prosperous and 
highly respected citizen. 



62 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Dr. ^^'ILLTA^r J. Bulger, one of the leading Democrats of Oswego 
County, was born in that county. May 28. 1857. He had a thorough 
educational training, which he completed at the University of Michigan. 

After his preliminary medical studies he attended the Long Island 
College Hospital in Brooklyn. He received his diploma as M.D. in 
1882. and began the practice of his profession in Oswego, where he 
has continued and is recognized as one of the most skillful and success- 
ful physicians and surgeons in that part of the State. Dr. Bulger is a 
member of the Oswego County ]\Iedical Society. 

He has always been active and prominent in the Democratic or- 
ganization and has been honored with appointments as delegate to 
State and National conventions. He sen-ed as Collector of Customs at 
Oswego during the second administration of President Cleveland, and 
in 1902 he was elected Mayor of Oswego. Dr. Bulger is a man of 
superior ability and he is a tower of strength to the Democracy of 
Oswego County. 



Lewis Edminster Mosher, son of Herman and Angeline (Ed- 
minster) Mosher, was iDorn in Horseheads, Chemung County, January 
18, 1869. He received his educational training in the public schools and 
Cornell University. He studied law and was admitted to the Bar in 
1890. when he had just attained his majority. Until 1899 he prac- 
ticed his profession with gratifying success in his native village, when, 
desiring a wider field, he removed to Elmira. 

Mr. Mosher is a member of the Masonic fraternity, having taken 
the Blue Lodge and Chapter degrees. He also belongs to the Modem 
Woodmen and a number of social clubs. 

He has always taken a great interest in politics and has been active 
and influential in the Democratic organization. He has been chosen 
delegate to city, county, Senatorial and Judicial District and State 
Democratic conventions. He has tried many important civil and crimi- 
nal cases. 

In 1897 Mr. Mosher married Miss Katharine Wanamaker, of 
Horseheads, and thev have one son. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 63 

Charles B. Swartwood, one of tlie leaders among- tlie yonng-er 
members of the Chemung County Bar, was l)orn, in Schuyler County, 
May 20, 1872. He was educated in the public schools and at Cornell 
University, from which he was graduated with the class of 1897. 

After leaving college he began the study of law in the office of 
Reynolds, Stanchfield & Collin, and continued with that distinguished 
firm until he was admitted to the Bar. He began the i>ractice of his 
profession in November, 1898, and quickly took a high rank. 

He served as Civil Service Commissioner for one year, and in 
March, 1902, he was elected City Attorney, giving such satisfaction 
that he was re-elected. 

He is a member of several of the Masonic todies, of the Delta Chi 
Fraternity, the Holland Society of New York and the Sons of the 
American Revolution. 

Mr. Swartwood is a young man of superior ability and he has every 
promise of a distinguished career. 



John F. Murtaugh, a prominent attorney of Chemung* County, 
was born in Elmira in February, 1874. He was graduated from Cor- 
nell University in 1899, receiving the degree of LL.B. He had pre- 
viously been graduated, in 1896, from Allegany College, w^hich had 
conferred upon him the degree of A.B. In 1899 he was admitted to 
the Bar at Albany, and in May, 1902, he formed a partnership with 
James J. O'Connor. 

Mr. Murtaugh has always been a strong and influential Democratic 
worker, both in the Democratic organization and in political cam- 
paigns. He is a forcible and eloquent public speaker and has been ap- 
pointed a delegate to all classes of party conventions. He has served 
four years as a member of the Board oi Supervisors and as Chairman 
of the Board of City Auditors. He was nominated for District Attor- 
ney in 1904, ran about 1,300 ahead of his ticket, but was defeated by 
the Roosevelt landslide. 

He belongs to the City Club. Mr. Murtaugh is one of the leading 
men among the younger members of the Chemung County Bar. 



64 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

JoHX W. Stoll, one of the notable hotel proprietors of Ulster 
County, was born in that county, in the village of Lefever Falls, town 
of Rosendale, June ii. 1867. After a course in the public schools he 
learned the trade of barber, and then traveled extensively throughout 
the country. 

He returned to Binnewater in 1883 and opened a small hotel. By 
strict attentiC)n to business he steadily enlarged his patronage and ex- 
tended his hotel building, until he has the largest and most profitable 
hotel in the town, with an opera house attachment that will seat five 
hundred people. He is also engaged in the bottling business and is pro- 
prietor of a bottling establishment. 

Mr. Stoll belongs to the Foresters and the Democratic Club of 
Binnewater, of which he was the founder and is treasurer of both. 

He is, and always has been, an earnest and vigorous supporter of 
Democratic principles and policies, and active in the work of the party. 
He has served the party in conventions and on committees, but the 
pressure of business has compelled him to decline all nominations for 
political office. 



Dr. C. J. Bacon, one of the prominent physicians, and one of the 
most popular Democrats of Oswego County, was born in Fulton, in 
that county, March 24, 1844. He was educated at Falley Seminary 
and Hobart College, afterward studying medicine and attending the 
Albany Medical College, from which he was graduated in 1865. 

He was an examining surgeon during the War of the Rebellion, 
and has practiced his profession two years in Fulton, ten years in 
Hoosick Falls, twenty-one years in Camden, Oneida County, when he 
returned to Fulton, where he is still located. Dr. Bacon enjoys a high 
rank in his profession, and is a mem1:ier of the American Medical Asso- 
ciation, of the Xew York State IMedical Society, of medical societies 
of Oswego and Oneida counties, the Syracuse Academy of Medicine, 
president of the Fulton Hospital Association, consulting physician of 
the Oswego Hospital and president of the Fulton Association of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 65 

Dr. Bacon has always been a sterling and loyal Democrat and has 
served as delegate to State and County Democratic conventions. He 
has also been honored with elections as Supervisor, Justice of the Peace 
and Excise Commissioner. He also accepted the Democratic nomina- 
tion for Sheriff one year and ran two thousand votes ahead of his 
ticket, though the Republican majority was too great in Oswego 
County for even his phenomenal popularity to entirely overcome. 



James F. Brown^ an ardent and influential Democrat, of Ulster 
County, was born in Rosendale, August 5, 1859. He was educated in 
the public schools of his native town, and after leaving school he went 
to work in the cement mills to learn, the cooper's trade. He remained 
in the mills until 1889, when there was a strike and he went to New- 
burgh for a time. 

He returned to Rosendale in 1891 and opened a barber shop, which 
he still runs. In 1891 he was appointed Town Clerk to succeed his 
brother, who had resigned, and held the office during the unexpired 
term. He was elected to this office in 1892 by a handsome majority, 
and succeeded himself for five terms. In 1895 he was appointed Police 
Justice at the instance of his fellow-townsmen. They desired to put 
an end to corruption in elections, and petitioned that a Justice to deter- 
mine criminal cases be allowed in the town of Rosendale. By succes- 
sive re-elections Mr. Brown has continued to hold this office to the 
present time. He has also held the office of School Trustee through 
the same term of years. He served as Village Trustee for three years, 
and was the first President of the Active Hose Company and has been 
member and foreman of that company continuously. He belongs to 
the Foresters of America and the Knights of Labor. 

Mr. Brown is a straight and stalwart Democrat and a recognized 
leader in his section, his influence being especially strong with the labor 
vote. He has rendered the Democracy great service as committeeman 
and has been a delegate to all kinds of local conventions. He was hon- 
ored with the nomination of his party for Member of Assembly, and is 
a man of much influence in the organization and in the community. 



66 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Joiix C. Donnelly. One of the most prominent leaders of the 
young- Democracy in the city of Troy is John C. Donnelly, of the Sev- 
enth ^^^ard. INIr. Donnelly was born in Troy, November 7, 1873, ^"^ 
was educated in the public schools of that city, subsequently attending 
and finishing his educational course at Fordham College. After leav- 
ing Fordham he- completed a course at the Albany Law School, gradu- 
ating in the class of 1896. 

After his graduation he returned to Troy and engaged in the real 
estate business, becoming the junior member of the firm of Cofifey, Mc- 
Domiell & Donnelly, at 279 River street. 

]\Ir. Donnelly has always been closely identified with the Demo- 
cratic organization ever since he became of age. In the year 1900 he 
was nominated for Alderman by the Democrats of the Seventh Ward 
and was elected by the largest majority ever received in that ward. He 
served as the only Democratic member of the important Committee on 
Public \\'orks in the Board of Aldermen and soon became one of the 
most influential men in the board. 

Mr. Donnelly is a member of the Laureate Boat Club, the Order of 
Elks, Knights of Columbus and other fraternal organizations, in all 
of which he is active and prominent. 



Hon. John G. Gibson. Few citizens of Oneida County are better 
known than John G. Gibson, of Utica, whose two terms as Mayor of 
that city made for him a reputation that public officials strive for. Mr. 
Gibson stands for all that is best in politics and the high esteem in 
which he is held testifies to his excellent public record. He was elected 
Mayor of L^tica in 1893 '^"cl again in 1895. his re-etection being an 
emphatic vindication of his record in the Mayor's office, the majority 
for him being 1,169. 

Mr. Gibson is a native of Geneva, N. Y., where he was born in 
1854. He was brought to Utica by his parents in 1859 and has made 
that city his home since. He went through the public schools and 
.Academy of Utica and then through Hobart College. He was ad- 
mitted to the Bar in 1877, and has practiced his profession with marked 
success. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 67 

Since he became a voter Mr. Gibson has always been conspicuous in 
Democratic poHtics. He is an eloquent pubHc speaker, and in national, 
State, city and county campaigns has been prominent in expounding 
the principles liis party candidates stood for. He has never played the 
part of laggard at the polls. 

Many times public offices have sought Mr. Gibson, but time and 
again he has refused them. In the fall of 1893 he was persuaded to 
accept the nomination for Mayor on the Democratic ticket. He was 
the unanimous choice of his party and he made a vigorous and snappy 
campaign. The Republicans were in power, the Mayor being Hon. 
Thomas Wheeler, who two years before defeated Hon. Nicholas Ker- 
nan, son of the late United States Senator, Francis Kernan. Mr. 
Gibson entered into the spirit of the campaign with the enthusiasm 
characteristic of him, and when the polls closed he was elected. 

Mr. Gibson's first term as Mayor was marked by diligent and ear- 
nest efforts in behalf of the taxpayers. He was economical, but pro- 
gressive. His policy was broad and liberal. He accomplished results 
and the people found in him a public servant whom they could trust. 
In 1895 he was renominated and re-elected. His second administra- 
tion was a record to be proud of. He maintained the public credit, im- 
proved the police and fire departments ; new streets and sewers were 
built and advancement was made along other lines. For a third time 
he was nominated for Mayor, in 1897, ^ signal honor paid him ; but the 
Republicans invaded the ranks of the Democrats and selected ex- 
Mayor Thomas E. Kinney, a Democrat, a man of marked strength at 
the polls, and Mr. Gibson lost the Mayoralty by a slender majority, 165. 

When he retired from office, Mayor Gibson left behind him a long 
record of good deeds accomplished for his constituents. 

In January, 1902, Mayor Talcott tendered the appointment of Cor- 
poration Counsel to Mr. Gibson, who accepted. Mr. Gibson is re- 
garded as one of the best authorities on the city charter and his legal 
services are of great value. Mr. Gibson is a son of the late Rev. Dr. 
William T. Gibson, one of the most honored and distinguished Episco- 
pal clergymen who ever occupied a pulpit in the diocese of Central 
New York. 



68 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Harvey W. Steele, an active Democrat, despite his extensive 
legal duties, is at present Supervisor from the Third Ward, Water- 
town, an office he has been elected to continuously since 1895. It is 
a great tribute to his popularity with the electorate that he should 
represent a strongly Republican ward for ten years. In 1892 the 
same ward elected him to the Board of Aldermen, and again in 1894. 

The activity of ]\Ir. Steele in the Democratic Party has not been 
centered in his candidacy for office. He has been a member of the 
executive committee of the Jefferson County Democratic Committee, 
and for many years was secretary of the county committee. He has 
also served as delegate to various conventions, including the celebrated 
"Anti-Snap" convention. He has given his services on the stump in 
many campaigns. 

Mr. Steele is a native of Jefferson County. He w^as educated in 
the district schools and at the Hungerford Collegiate Institute. In the 
spring of 1883 he entered the law office of Judge A. H. Sawyer, and 
was admitted to practice in 1886. 

He is a member of the Jeffersonian Club of Watertown, and was 
the first Commodore of the Crescent Yacht Club, succeeding himself 
for two terms. 



Hexry Beck, the Democratic leader of the Sixth Ward of the 
city of Kingston, was born in that city, June i, 1854, and acquired his 
education in the public schools. After leaving school he served an ap- 
prenticeship at the trade of stonecutter with his father, in Albany, and 
worked at the trade ten years. Returning at the end of this period to 
Kingston, he established himself in the liquor business, which he has 
successfully conducted ever since, except for two years, during whicli 
he was engaged in contracting. In 1883 he was elected School Com- 
missioner, serving in this position continuously through repeated re- 
elections until 1902. In 1884 Mr. Beck was elected Alderman, and in 
this office, also, he had a long term, resigning in 1903 to accept an ap- 
pointment as Postmaster at Rondout. In this position he served only 
one year, when, against his protest, the office was discontinued. In 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 69 

1896 he was elected a member of the Common Council of the city of 
Kingston, and has filled the place continuously to the present time. 

Always a straight, staunch Democrat, he has frequently been sent 
as a delegate to important party conventions, including the Demo- 
cratic State Conventions of 1894 and 1896. Ever since 1893 he has 
been an active and efificient member of the Democratic County Com- 
mittee. He is a sincere and loyal Democrat and an upright and valua- 
ble citizen. Mr. Beck served as Postmaster during President Cleve- 
land's second administration. He stands high in the esteem of his 
fellow-citizens. 



Charles P. Bragle, Sr. One of the most influential leaders 
among the German Democrats in the city of Troy is Charles P. Bragle, 
Sr. He was born in Germany, March 29, 1847, but the city of Troy 
has always been his home since he came to America. He was educated 
in the public schools and afterward learned the trade of iron molder. 
He worked at his trade only six years, however, when he abandoned it 
to embark in the undertaking business in Green Island. This was in 
1870, and five years later he removed to Troy, where he has ever since 
been engaged in the business of funeral director and embalmer. 

Mr. Bragle is prominent in many fraternal and benevolent societies, 
including the C. B. L., K. of C, St. Joseph's Benevolent Association, 
the C. M. B. A. and the Germania Benevolent Association. He is also 
a trustee of St. Lawrence Roman Catholic Church, the Captain of the 
Jolly Bowling Club, a member of the Troy Sangerbund, a member of 
the Canstata Volkfest and has held the office of Vice-President of the 
First German Democratic Club of Troy ever since its organization. 

In politics Mr. Bragle has been an active Democrat from the time 
he became of age, and he has been a power in the organization. He 
was a delegate to the Democratic State Convention in 1894 and has fre- 
quently served as delegate to city, county and district conventions. He 
has had neither the time nor the inclination to hold public office, though 
he has accepted the position of Commissioner of Deeds. A stalwart 
Democrat and a valuable party worker is Charles P. Bragle. 



70 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



JOHN FINEHOUT 

John Finehout. Among the Democrats of the past generation it 
may safely be said that none was more highly respected and trusted in 
^Montgomery County than the late John Finehout. But it was not in 
his own county alone, but throughout the whole Mohawk Valley, that 
he was known as an able and ardent Democrat and one of the most 
successful business men of that fertile region. 

John Finehout was born in Minden, Montgomery County, N. Y., 
in the year 1829. The first seventeen years of his life were spent on 
the farm and in attendance at the public school, after which he became 
a clerk for Solomon Keller & Company, of Fort Plain. From his 
earliest years he was painstaking, honest and faithful and he learned 
correct business methods in the school of actual experience; and the 
business training and knowledge he acquired during the six years 
which he spent in a clerkship were retained by him throughout his life, 
although manifestly enlarged and improved upon as his mind ripened. 

At the age of twenty-three he embarked in the crockery business 
with Rufus Lipe, and the partnership lasted for three years, at the end 
of which time Mr. Finehout sold out to Mr. Lipe and entered into part- 
nership with his brother-in-law, D. Q. Norton. This firm continued 
for atout four years, when Mr. Finehout withdrew from the business, 
and a year later, or i860, he removed to Canajoharie, where he settled 
permanently. 

As soon as he settled in Canajoharie he at once entered into trade 
and established the extensive grocery business in which he made not 
only a fortune but built up an honorable and abiding reputation. When 
his son, Elmer J. Finehout, was old enough to engage in business he 
was associated with his father in this enterprise, which finally passed 
into his hands and which he still conducts. The business has grown 
to immense proportions, both because of the sound business principles 



£b. 






<^ 



THE 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 71 

of John Finehout and of the energy and intelHgence which both he and 
his son have always displayed in its management. 

Mr. Finehout was always an honest, ardent and consistent Demo- 
crat, who was indefatigable in his exertions for the advancement of 
his party's interests. These interests were always safe in his hands, 
and of this his fellow Democrats were not only aware, but were anxious 
to show their confidence in him, and he was on several occasions the 
standard-bearer for the Democratic Party in his town and county. He 
represented his town on the Board of Supervisors for four terms, in 
addition to "holding various other local offices. During part of the 
period in which he was Supervisor, he was Chairman of the Board. He 
also held the position of President of the village, and in every office 
he held, no matter whether the interests were large or small, he always 
exhibited the same scrupulous care of the public interests and an execu- 
tive ability of a high order. He served for several years as trustee of 
the Clinton. Liberal Institute and was elected Treasurer of Montgomery 
County on the Democratic ticket in the fall of 1886, serving as Treas- 
urer from 1887 to 1890. 

In both his public and business life he made many friends, and 
people came to have so much confidence in him that for many years 
previous to his death he acted as administrator of large estates. He 
died December 3, 1897, 

John Finehout, in addition to being a good financier, a suc-cessful 
business man, and a trusted public official, possessed many qualities 
which made him highly popular with people at large. He was gen- 
erous, manly, and courteous and was an ornament to public and private 
life and to society. 



7^ 



THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



Fred. \\'. FAR^^'ELL. One of the strong and stalwart Democrats of 
Allegany County is Fred. \\\ Farwell. He was born in the town of 
\\'ard, February 5. 1865, and was educated in the public schools. He 
went into business as a merchant, at Phillips Creek, and continued with 
much success for ten years. He left the store for the farm at the end 
of that time, and is one of the live, up-to-date agriculturists of Alle- 
gany County. 

He is a jnember of the Masonic fraternity. 

Mr. Far^^■ell is held in such esteem by his fellow-townsmen that 
they have frequently called him into the public service. He has served 
two years as Town Clerk and eleven years as Justice of the Peace. He 
also serA'ed as Postmaster under President Cleveland's second admin- 
istration. He has frequently been honored by election as delegate to 
County and District Democratic conventions. 



Samuel F. Bagg^ a conservative business man and an. unswerving 
adherent to the true principles of Democracy, is Secretary of the Water- 
town Steam Engine Company. Prohibited by his manifold duties 
from accepting public office, or becoming a member of the various 
organization committees, ]\Ir. Bagg has rendered aid in many cam- 
paigns. 

His deep interest in educational matters, however, has led to his 
appointment to the Board of Education, ^^'atertown, and he has served 
in this capacity many years. 

He was delegate to the State Convention in 1892 and to the famous 
"Dandelion" convention at Cliicago. 

]Mr. Bagg was lx)rn- in Utica, September 13, 1848. 

His early education was obtained in the public schools of his native 
city, and finished at Hamilton College, Clinton, N. Y., graduating in 
Ihe class of 1869, witli tlie degree of A.M. He also attended the 
Hamilton Law School, graduating with the degree of LL.B., and later 
was admitted to the Bar in Oneida County. For several years he en- 
gaged in teaching and then purchased a small newspaper, which he 
edited for some time. Finding this unprofitable, he accepted a position 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 73 

in the Oneida County National Bank, at Utica, which he retained until 
ofifered the secretaryship of the Utica Steam Eng-ine Company. In 
1876 he became secretary of the Watertown- Steam Engine Works and 
removed to Watertown, where he is at present located. 

Since establishing his residence in Watertown. Mr. Bagg has taken 
an active interest in civic affairs and has done much to promote the 
welfare of the municipality. He is a director in the Watertown Na- 
tional Bank, the Ontario Paper Company and the Northern New York 
Marble Company. 

Mr. Bagg is a member of the American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers, the Jeffersonian Club, of Watertown ; the Alpha Delta Phi, 
Hamilton College ; the Transportation Club, New York, and an ex- 
member of the Reform Club, of New York. 



William Ransford Loomis. One of the eloquent and popular 
men and a firm believer in Democratic principles in Chenango County 
is William Ransford Loomis, who was born in Norwich, February 14, 
1870. He completed a course in the public schools and a'fterw^ard en- 
tered Hamilton College, from which famous institution of higher learn- 
ing he was graduated in 1890. Having chosen the profession of the 
law, he completed his preparation in the Columbia University Law 
School, being a graduate of the class of 1893. He was admitted to 
the Bar and began to practice in New York, but returned to his native 
Norwich and opened an office there in 1895. He has as a lawyer been 
quite successful. He enjoys a high reputation as a brilliant speaker, as 
a safe counselor and as an energetic worker. 

Mr. Loomis has often been called upon to address mass meetings. 
In both of the Bryan campaigns, in 1896 and 1900, he stumped the 
county wMth great success. In the famous gubernatorial campaign of 
1898 he was sent out by the Democratic State Committee, and his 
speeches in favor of Van Wyck and Danforth were among the most 
eft'ective of the campaign. High honors are in store for this gallant 
young champion of Democracy. In March. 1905, Mr. Loomis was 
appointed Corporation Counsel of Norwich, N. Y. 



74 THE DE^vIOCRATIC PARTY 

Alderman George Creagh, of Little Falls, was born in Montreal, 
P. O., but came to Little Falls -when quite young and attended the 
public schools. 

j\Ir. Creagh learned the trade of barber, and he has followed that 
occupation up to the present time. 

He has served as delegate to the Democratic county conventions 
several times, and he has also been elected a member of the Board of 
Alderman several terms, been chosen Chairman of the Board during 
two of them. He is the present Chairman of the Democratic City 
Committee. 



William J. Ludden. One of Troy's leading lawyers and most 
prominent Democrats, \\'illiam J. Ludden, was born in Ireland in 1849. 
He came to the United States with his parents in 1861. He had all the 
advantages of a thorough education and was graduated from St. John's 
College in 1870, receiving the degree of Bachelor of Arts. In the 
autumn of the same year he entered the Albany Law School. After 
graduation and admission to the Bar he was admitted to a partnership 
with Hon. IMilton D. Barnett, of Rome. Oneida. County, at that time 
District Attorney of the county. He remained at Rome but a 
short time, removing to Binghamton, where he became associated with 
the late Senator Edmund O'Connor, of that city. While at Bingham- 
ton Mr. Ludden served two terms as Corporation Counsel of that city. 

In 1 88 1 Mr. Ludden opened a law office in Troy. In 1889 he was 
elected Justice of the City Court of Troy, and continued to hold that 
important position until January i, 1896. 

Mr. Ludden was married ifi 1877 to a daughter of James Prender- 
gast. of Binghamton. Five sons and two daughters have been born to 
them. His two oldest sons are now lawyers associated with him in 
business. 

Among the many important cases Mr. Ludden has had in his long 
practice are the celebrated "Dennin Mill Case" and the defense of 
James H. Jones, accused of murder. He has always taken an active 
interest in Irish national affairs and was president of the Irish Land 
League at Binghamton when he removed to Troy. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 75 

In politics Mr. Liicklcii has been active in all Democratic campaigns 
and has been one of the most popular speakers in Eastern New York. 
He was appointed Assistant Corporation Counsel of the city of Troy- 
January I, 1900, and two years later, upon the expiration of his term, 
he was reappointed. He has often been a delegate to Democratic con- 
ventions, and as a staunch, true and loyal Democrat he is held in high 
regard by his party, as he is for his ability and worth by the entire 
community. 



Thomas A. Matthews, one of the active and influential Demo- 
crats of the city of Troy, is a native of Newark, N. J., where he was 
horn on January 23, i860. He came to Troy, however, with his 
parents in his boyhood, and was educated in the public schools of that 
city. After completing his school course he engaged in the market 
business, and in 1902 he established his prosperous market in its present 
location at 555 Fourth street. 

Mr. Matthews has always been prominent in fraternal organiza- 
tions. He was for several years the President of the local branch of the 
C. M. B. A., and for a long time he was the president of Branch 200 
of the C. B. L. He is alsa actively identified with the Foresters of 
America and the Fraternal Order of Eagles. 

Mr. Matthews has always been a sound and solid Democrat and one 
who was active in organization work. In the year 1900 he accepted 
his party's nomination for Member of Assembly from the Second As- 
sembly District of Rensselaer County, and ran far ahead of his ticket, 
but a split in the local Democratic ranks prevented his election. He is 
one of the leaders of the Twelfth Ward, and has large influence and 
popularity with all classes of voters. 

This sketch is history and not prophecy, but it is safe to say that 
many official honors await his acceptance. Mr. Matthews has fre- 
quently represented his constituents as a delegate to Democratic con- 
ventions, and he has perfomied valuable party service on City, County 
and District committees. 



76 THE DE^IOCRATIC PARTY 

Hox. Jerome DeWitt, twice elected Mayor of the city of Bing- 
hamton, was born at Nicholson, Pennsylvania, February 15, 1845. 
When he was still very young the family removed to New Milford, 
Pa., which continued to be his home until after he attained his ma- 
jority. He received his education at the academy at New Milford and 
at the University of Michigan. 

Having studied law and been admitted to the Bar in this State, he 
entered into a professional partnership at Binghamton with the late 
William H. Scoville and since the latter's death has continued the 
practice by himself. 

He belongs to the Holland Society, of New^ York. He was chief 
of the Volunteer Fire Department of Binghamton for two terms and 
has also served two terms as a member of the Board of Fire Commis- 
sioners. For twelve years ]\Ir. DeWitt was treasurer of the Asylum 
for the Insane at Binghamton; and, as already stated, he serv^ed as 
Mayor of that thriving city for two terms, receiving many Republican 
votes at each election. 

Mr. DeWitt is an able lawyer and one of the prominent Democrats 
of the southern tier. 



M. Bradford Nortiirup was 1:)orn in the town of Galway, Sara- 
toga County, N. Y., in the year 1838 and received his education in the 
public schools. After his school days he took up the occupation of 
farming, but later became interested in the manufacture of gloves. Be- 
ginning with the year 1867 he was on the road as an agent in this busi- 
ness for eight years, after which he established the Northrup Glove 
Manufacturing Company at Johnstown, N. Y., which he has conducted 
up to the present time. 

The business energ)^ and capacity of Mr. Nortiirup found notable 
expression in the Electric Light and Power Company, of which he was 
one of the founders, and in the operations of the People's Bank, of 
which he is one of the directors. He is also one of the owners of the 
Johnstown Opera House. In political activity Mr. Northrup has al- 
ways been an" earnest and consistent Democrat and has been a delegate 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK y7 

to numerous city and county conventions and to the State Convention 
of 1894. 

As a representative of large manufacturing- and banking interests, 
as a progressive man in his ideas, as a citizen of high intelHgence, in- 
tegrity and pubhc spirit, Mr. Northrup commands the universal respect 
and confidence of the public at large, as well as of the political party 
of which he is a valued member. 



Michael J. Larkin. One of the leaders of the younger Democ- 
racy in Oneida County is Michael J. Larkin, of Rome. Born in Rome, 
May 19, 1874, he received a public school education in his native city 
and was graduated from the Rome Free Academy in 1891. Immediate- 
ly afterward he was engaged as clerk in the freight department of the 
N. Y. C. & H. R. R. at Rome. With his appointment as Clerk to 
Recorder Charles Carmichael, of Rome, in April, 1898, came his op- 
portunity to study law, and he made the most of his advantages. In 
March, 1899, he entered the law ofiices of ex- Judge John D. McMa'hon 
and Deputy Attorney-General John E. Mason, of Rome, where he 
finished his legal education. He was admitted to the Bar in 1901, and 
in July of the same year was taken into partnership under the firm 
name of McMahon, Mason & Larkin, and January i, 1904, upon the 
withdrawal of Mr. Mason, the firm name was changed to McMahon & 
Larkin. 

In the organization work of the party, Mr. Larkin has been espe- 
cially active. He has been a member of the Democratic City Commit- 
tee of Rome for a number of years, and from 1898 to 1904 was its 
Chairman. He is also a member of the Utica City and Oneida County 
Democratic associations and has represented his district at many con- 
ventions. He is a prominent figure in the local branches of the Royal 
Arcanum, the Knights of Columbus and the Rome Club. 

In 1904 Mr. Larkin was appointed City Attorney of Rome, and 
served a one-year term with splendid ability. In the fall of the same 
year he was nominated for the office of City Judge, but the presidential 
landslide carried him down to defeat. 



78 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hervey Ross, for many years a prominent and influential Demo- 
cratic journalist in Central New York, was born in Jordan, Ontario, 
May 19. 185 1. He was educated in the public schools at Lyons, Iowa. 
From 1875 to 1S94 j\Ir. Ross was the proprietor and editor of the 
Gloversville Standard, a newspaper which he conducted with ability, 
and which did effective service for the party. In 1890 he began a daily 
edition of the Standard. He also, for some years, published the Hamil- 
ton County Press. 

i\Ir. Ross was appointed Postmaster of Gloversville by President 
Cleveland during his second administration, serving until after the 
Republican Party again came into power. In 1899 he became pro- 
prietor and* editor of the Gloversville Morning Herald, which he con- 
ducted with much ability for some three years. 

Mr. Ross has been for fourteen years a member of the Board of 
Directors of the Littauer Hospital at Gloversville and for eleven years 
its secretary. Mr. Ross, being a cultivated aiid courteous gentleman, 
was popular from the first with his own party and the community gen- 
erally. He attended the Democratic Senatorial and Congressional Dis- 
trict conventions for many years, and he has always been one of the 
most valued and trusted party counselors in his part of the State. 



James J. Sweeney, one of the prominent business men and leading 
Democrats of Ulster County, was born in Kingston, January, 1854. 
He received his education in the public schools and at St. Vincent's 
College, Eatrobe, Pa. After leaving college he engaged in the North 
River blue stone business and has continued with great success to the 
present time. 

Mr. Sweeney has always been a straight and earnest Democrat, and 
he is held in high esteem by his party associates both as a counselor and 
a worker. He is especially influential among the workers in the stone 
quarries and the labor vote throughout the State. 

In 1875 he was elected Alderman from the Eighth Ward, and lield 
the office without any break for nine years. He has also served many 
years on the Health Board and the Alms Board. In 1895 there was 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 79 

much factional difference in the Democratic ranks in Kingston, and 
Mr. Sweeney was urged to take the nomination for Mayor, as his 
strength and popularity would do much to bring the party together. 
He finally consented, but was defrauded out of the nomination by 
treacherous delegates who sold out. 

He was a delegate to the State Convention in 1892, and has been 
conspicuously efficient in party service at all times. For many years 
he was Treasurer of the Democratic County Committee. Mr. Sweeney 
is now Police Commissioner, an office he has filled with great accep- 
tance for several years. 



William N. Wilkins was born in the town of Johnstown, Fulton 
County, N. Y., June 12, 1856. After receiving a liberal public school 
education he began teaching at the age of eighteen. After following 
this avocation for several years he took up the industry of manufactur- 
ing gloves and mittens and settled himself permanently at Mayfield, 
N. Y. Shortly after he began this business, in 1879, the firm of Wil- 
kins & Close was formed, which existed until 1894. In that year the 
firm became Christie & Wilkins, which firm still exists. 

Mr. Wilkins has always taken an active part in public, affairs and 
is a staunch and ardent Democrat. He was elected a member of the 
Board of Supervisors for Fulton County in 1890 and he served as a 
Justice of the Peace four years and as a Justice of Sessions two years. 
Under President Cleveland's first administration he was appointed 
Postmaster at Mayfield and filled that position efficiently for the four 
years from 1885 to 1889. Under Cleveland's second administration 
he was reappointed to the same position, which he filled from 1893 
to 1897. 

From 1878 to 1902 Mr. Wilkins was a member of the County 
Democratic Committee, a term of service which indicates very clearly 
the esteem in which he is held by his party and the confidence which 
that party has in his ability as an executive officer and leader. He has 
been a delegate to County, Senatorial and State conventions and is a 
scion of a family rich in Democratic tradition and service. 



8o THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hon. Robert C. Titus was born In Ecleii, Erie County, October 
24, 1839. His boyhood was spent on a farm and his education was ac- 
quired in the district school. A later opportunity, which he im- 
proved for laying the foundation of his future distinction at the Bar 
and on the Bench, was that of a course of academic study at Oberlin 
College, Oberlin, Ohio, where he turned his attention to preparation 
for the law as a profession. The study necessary to this he so success- 
fully accomplished, after his return to Buffalo; as to obtain admission 
to the Bar, with high honors, in icS65, and during the thirteen years at 
Buffalo which followed, professional success brought extensive practice 
and large public recognition. 

In 1877 the successful lawyer was elected to the office of District 
Attorney and discharged the duties of the office for the term of three 
years. On returning to private practice he was again called to public 
service by election, in 1881, and served four years as State Senator 
from the Thirty-first District, which then included the whole of Erie 
County. The higher judicial service which was to cover so large a 
part of his career Mr. Titus entered upon when he was elected, in 1885, 
a Judge of the Superior Court of Buffalo. 

His position on this Bench became that of Chief Judge and continued 
until a change in the basis of judicial organization in the State brought 
about the alDolition of this court and the transfer of its judges to the 
bench of the Supreme Court, January i, 1896. 

In early life the future lawyer and judge became a thoroughly con- 
vinced and ardent Democrat and won wide distinction as an effective 
campaign orator. In his maturity and later years he was not less loyal 
to Democratic principles and active in support of Democratic candi- 
dates, while his distinction at the Bar and his eminence on the Bench re- 
flected honor^on American citizenship not less than upon the Demo- 
cratic Party. 

Judge Titus has for many years been a prominent member of the 
Masonic fraternity. 

Judge Titus stood loyally by the Democratic flag in the trying cam- 
paigns of 1896 and 1900. He never wavered, standing up and pro- 
claiming his unswerving devotion to the national standard-bearer and 
the platform of party principles. I\Ir. Bryan had no more devoted 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK • 8i 

political supporter and friend in the United States than Judg-e Titus. 
He is a brilliant public speaker, and added to his natural ability as an 
orator is a commanding presence. In the Presidential and State cam- 
paigns of 1904 Judge Titus delivered some telling speeches for Judge 
Parker and Judge Herrick, and in his home city of Buffalo he did great 
work in the campaign. 

Judge Titus is one of the most highly honored and esteemed citi- 
zens of Buffalo, and at the Bar of Erie County he ranks among the 
foremost members. 



Hon. Robert Tifft Turner was born in Veteran, Chemung 
County, N. Y., January 28, 1835. He went from the district school to 
Alfred Academy, New York, where he prepared for college and later 
entered Union College, from which he was graduated in 1861. In 
1864 he opened an office in Elmira and began the practice of the law. 
He rose in this profession to the highest ranks and soon became one of 
the leading lawyers of the city, taking an active interest in making 
Elmira a railroad center. 

In the building of the Elmira and State Line Railroad he was an 
attorney and director, as also in the Elmira, Cortland and Northern 
Railroad, in which he was attorney and director until 1880, when the 
New York, Lackawanna and Western Railroad was organized ; then 
he resigned from the Elmira, Cortland and Northern Railroad to be- 
come attorney and counsel for- the Lackawanna, which position he has 
held for more than twenty years. 

Originally Mr. Turner was a Republican and voted for Abraham 
Lincoln twice for President. He disapproved the reconstruction policy 
and platform of the Republican Party, and in 1865 he voted the Demo- 
cratic ticket and has since remained a staunch adherent of that party, 
and, though not an active politician but an active business man, he has 
served therein as Alderman, Mayor and School Commissioner of El- 
mira with credit to himself and his party. 

Opposed to the silver plank in the Democratic platform of 1896, he 
allowed his name to be used as candidate for Justice of the Supreme 



82 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Court on the Palmer and Biickner Gold Democratic ticket to complete 
the organization and best aid in the defeat of the Bryan Democracy. 



Michael Cavanaugii, one of the well known Democrats of Troy, 
was born in the County Tipperary, Ireland, February i6, 1842. In 
1853 he was brought to this country by his parents, who settled in Troy, 
X. Y., where he received a public school education, finishing at Bryant 
and Stratton's Business College. After his course in the business col- 
lege he learned the trade of mason and worked thereat for a number of 
years, later branching out as a contractor, and he has carried through 
many important contracts in municipal work. 

In 18S3 ]\Ir. Cavanaugh embarked in the brewery business under 
the firm name of C. B. Ruscher & Company, and to this business he has 
since given his personal attention. 

Mr. Cavanaugh has always been a true Democrat and takes a warm 
interest in the success of the party. In 1S76 he was appointed City 
Commissioner. After serving one year this office, through legislation, 
was changed to City Superintendent, and he was appointed to the 
latter office, in -^Ahich he served for four years. In 1882 he was ap- 
pointed Police Commissioner and held that office also for four years. 

He is the recognized leader of the Fourth Ward and has great 
influence among his constituents, being able to sway his district to 
whichever course he favors. He has served as chairman of the 
Democratic City Committee for more than eight years, and for over 
twenty years has been elected a member of that Ijody. He has also 
served as delegate to city, county. Congressional and Senatorial con- 
ventions and was delegate to the State Convention that nominated Ros- 
well P. Flower for Governor in 1891. He has also been delegate to 
several other State conventions. 

A\'hile ]\Ir. Cavanaugh modestly disclaims to possess great merit as 
a party worker, his friends agree that he is one of the most influential 
Democrats in county affairs, and though he has seldom sought official 
honors, his determined campaigns to benefit, others have been instru- 
mental in bringing alx)ut many local Democratic victories. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 83 

Martin W. Collins^ of Rhinebeck, is a "bred-in-the-lx)ne" Demo- 
crat of notable Revolutionary descent. In 1875 he was elected School 
Commissioner for his Assembly District, and was re-elected in 1878, 
being the only Democrat elected in Dutchess County that year. He 
was a delegate to the Democratic State Convention in 1884, 1887 and 
1890, and he has served on the County and Assembly District Demo- 
cratic Committees for a number of years. 

Mr. Collins was born in the town of Washington, Dutchess County, 
October 14, 1847, ^^'^^^ "^^''^s educated in the public schools of his native 
county, the Amenia Seminary and at the Dutchess County Academy, 
where he studied engineering and surveying. In 1880 he removed to 
Poughkeepsie and purchased an interest in a marble and stone work 
business, the firm name becoming Van Wyck & Collins. 

Owing to the urgent demands of his flourishing business Mr. 
Collins has not been able to find time to hold, nor even to seek, public 
ofiice, but -to all campaign calls for assistance he has given generously 
to the extent of his means. 

His grandfather served in the War of 1812, and his earlier ances- 
tors were of Revolutionary fame. 



Frank Cleary. Among the active and influential Democrats of 
Dutchess County is Frank Cleary, of Hyde Park, where he was born, 
March 17, 1870. 

His education was acquired in the public schools of his native vil- 
lage. For five years after leaving school he served as manager of the 
Dutchess County Hunt Club, resigning to assume the management of 
the E. N. Wales estate, on the Hudson, a position he still retains. 

Mr. Cleary is a straight and sound Democrat, and a pow'er in the 
party organization'. He has been, for many years Chairman and mem- 
ber of the Democratic Town Committee, and also a member of the 
Democratic County Committee. He has frequently been appointed a 
delegate to important party conventions. He was elected Town Clerk 
in 1896 an'd made a splendid record. 

Mr. Cleary is personally very popular and he has a host of friends. 



84 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

James B. Austin, an earnest Democrat of Fulton County, was born 
in Oppenheim, in that county, June 3, 1858, and received his educa- 
tional training- in the public schools. He has been both a farmer and a 
merchant and quite successful in both occupations. He kept a general 
store for several years. 

In politics ]\Ir. Austin has always been a loyal and enthusiastic 
Democrat, eager to serve his party. He has held many offices, having 
served as Justice of the Peace, as Postmaster for six years and as Super- 
visor of the town of Oppenheim for eight years. He has also been an 
important factor in the party organization and for five years he served 
as a member of the Democratic County Committee. 



Hon. Michael F. Collins was born in the city of Troy, N. Y., 
September 2^, 1854, and received his early education in the public 
schools of his native city. After leaving school he learaed the trade of 
printer, working at a case on the Troy Weekly Press. 

In 1877 a printers' strike occurred in the city of Troy, whidi culmi- 
nated in a co-operative newspaper — the Troy Standard — and Mr. Col- 
lins was elected city editor. That position he retained until 1879, when 
he purchased the Troy Observer, which he still conducts and which 
under his able management has taken a distinct place as one of the best 
newspapers in this part of the State. 

Mr. Collins has aJways been, an unwavering Democrat, untiring in 
his efforts both as a citizen, and through his newspaper, TJie Observer, 
to further the Ijest interests of the party. He has been secretary of the 
County Democratic Committee for the past ten years and is always 
ready to contribute his abilities and caimsels, as well as his work, in the 
interests of the party. 

In 1883 Mr. Collins was appointed Civil Service Commissioner and 
filled that office for four years. In 1885 ^'"i^ 1886 he was elected to the 
Assembly from the First District, and so faithfully and well did he 
represent his constituents that in 1887 he was placed in nomination for 
State Senator by the Democratic Party of Rensselaer and Washington 
counties, the latter a stronghold of Republicanism. Such was his pop- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 85 

ularity, however, that he was not only elected but re-elected in 1889. 
In 1890 he was put forward for Member of Congress in the same dis- 
trict, but suffered defeat through a local split in the party. In 1891 he 
failed of a second re-election to the Senate for the same reason. In 
1893, however, the central districts having been reconstructed, Mr. 
Collins was nominated by the Democratic Party of the Rensselaer and 
Columbia District for Senator and was elected by the largest majority 
ever given to a candidate in that district. 

Mr. Collins has served on both Senatorial and Congressional com- 
mittees for many years and has always been identified with city com- 
mittees. He was a delegate to the State Convention in 1884, when Mr. 
Cleveland was first nominated for President. 

While in the Senate Mr. Collins served on various important com.- 
mittees, including Corporations, Prisons, Canals, Taxation, Printing 
and Villages. 

Mr. Collins is a member of Troy Lodge, No. 143, Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks ; the Troy Mannerchor, and was President of 
the Pilsener Democratic Club, which was later merged into the Troy 
Democratic Club, of which he is at present secretary. 



Stewart M. Brice, son of the late United States Senator Calvin 
S. Brice, and who succeeded to the? charge of his father's enormous 
railroad interests, was born at Lima, Ohio, in 1870. He came to New 
York in 188 1. Pie was educated at Phillips Academy, Exeter, N. H., 
and at Harvard LTniversity. He made a tour around the world and 
afterward entered upon an active business career. For a time he was 
the general manager of the Dayton Natural Gas Company, of Dayton, 
Ohio, but after the death of his father he at once took charge of the 
interests of his vast estate. 

Mr. Brice is a member of Tammany Hall, and in 1897 he was 
elected a member of the Council. 

He is a member of the Order of Elks and belongs to the New York 
Athletic, the Racquet, the Knickerbocker and the Lambs' clubs, and is 
very prominent both in business and in politics. 



86 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Thomas H. Kennelly, one of the active and forceful Democrats 
of Dutchess County, was born at Hartford, Conn., April 27, 1870. 
Coming to Dutchess County in his youth, he received his education in 
llie puljlic schools of Fishkill-orr-Hudson, completed by courses at St. 
Laurent College, near Montreal, and St. John's College, at Fordham, 
N. Y. He also took a course ajt a business college. 

He is a- member of the Foresters of America, the Independent Order 
of Red ]\Ien, the Order o-f Elks, the Carthage Ice Yacht Club, the 
Riverview Boat Club and the Study Social Club of Fishkill-on-Hudson. 

In politics Mr. Kennelly has always been a staunch, sturdy and 
straight Denxocrat. He established the Daily N'czi.'s at Fishkill-on- 
Hudson, but sold the plant and engaged in the contracting business 
with New York Cit}^ firms. In 1896 he returned to Fishkill-on-Hudson 
and engaged in the liquor business, in which he has remained until the 
present time. 

Mr. Kennelly has never been an office seeker, but has occasionally 
allowed his name to be used to strengthen the party ticket, running 
ahead of the party strength. He was chairman of the Democratic 
Town Committee for five years, and has served as delegate to all classes 
of local and district party conventions. 



Jacob S. Hinsdai.l, long prominent in the Democratic politics of 
Dutchess County, was born at Gallatin, in the adjoining county of 
Columbia, Januarv- 8. 1858. 

He was educated in the public schools and at the Hudson Academy, 
and began his business life as a farmer and dealer in horses and cattle. 
In 1880 he removed to Dutchess County and settled at Pine Plains, 
where he has since resided. Mr. Hinsdall is a meml^er of the Masonic 
fraternity. 

In politics he has always been an earnest and influential Democrat, 
serving many years as nicmlicr and cliairman of the Town Committee, 
and since 1893 ^ member of the County Committee. He has also fre- 
quently been appointed a delegate to all classes of Democratic conven- 
tions, including the State Convention. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 87 

In 1885 he was elected Commissioner of Highways, holding the 
office by successive re-elections for five terms. He was elected Super- 
visor in 1893, and again in 1897 and 1898. It was while he was a 
member of the County Board that new county buildings, court liouse. 
jail and poor house, were ordered. 

Mr. Hinsdall is an excellent and highly respected citizen. 



Alderman Daniel B. Brady, of the Second Ward of the city of 
New Rochelle, is one of the best known and most popular Democrats 
in that growing city. He has always been a loyal and effective party 
worker, and has rendered the Democracy valuable service, both as a 
member of political committees and as a delegate to political con- 
ventions. 

In 1898 he made a successful canvass for Trustee, served one year 
as Trustee of the village and one year as one of the first Aldermen of 
the city. 

Mr. Brady belongs to the Order of Elks, the Foresters of America, 
the Ancient Order of Hibernians, the Robert Emmet Club, the Irish 
Benevolent League and the Holy Name Society. 



W. R. Tucker. An enterprising and successful farmer and a stal- 
wart and sterling Democrat of Allegany County is W. R. Tucker, who 
was born in the town of Ward, November 27, 1853. He was educated 
in the public schools and at Alfred University. 

Mr. Tucker has always been a farmer, and since he became of age 
he has worked the fine and valuable farm on which he still resides, six 
miles from Scio village. He is a member of the Order of Maccabees. 

Always greatly interested in politics, Mr. Tucker has rendered 
valuable services to his party. He has held several important town 
offices, having been Supervisor, Inspector of Elections, Commissioner 
of Highways and Assessor. He held the last named office for sixteen 
years. 



88 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

R. A. Scott, of Friendship, in which town he was born, September 
4, 1847, ^s one of the prominent business men and an active, influential 
Democrat of Allegany County. He was educated in the public schools, 
supplemented by a course in the Friendship Academy. 

As soon as he became of age he went into business with his father, 
who was a leading merchant in that section, and he has continued it 
since his father's death, doing a successful and profitable business. He 
belongs to the ^Masonic fraternity and is the Secretary of his lodge. 

i\Ir. Scott has always been greatly interested in politics, and he has 
wielded much influence in behalf of the Democracy. He has served as 
Supervisor, has been Trustee of the village since its incorporation and 
was Postmaster under President Cleveland during his first term. He 
has been pro^ninent in the party organization, serving many years as a 
member of the Democratic County Committee, of which he is now a 
member of the Executive Committee, and he has been appointed Dele- 
gate to Democratic County, State and even National conventions. 

Personally Mr. Scott is a genial and cordial gentleman and he has 
troops of friends. 



Joiix H. Gleason, of Troy, N. Y., contractor and produce mer- 
chant, was born in Schenectady, N. Y., September 22, 1841, the son 
of Edward and Mary (]\IcCaffrey) Gleason. Although born in Eng- 
land, Mr. Gleason's father and mother were of Irish parentage. He 
was educated at the Lancaster School in Schenectady, and after leaving 
school was apprenticed to Calkins & Donohue, of Troy, where he 
learned his trade as a carriage blacksmith. A little later he established 
a general blacksmithing and carriage building business for himself at 
the foot of Fulton street, Troy, on what was known as the Troy Ship- 
yard, and continued successfully in that line until 189 1. In 189 1 Mr. 
Gleason entered into partnership with L. A. Flint in the fruit and vege- 
table business in New York. \\'iii]e the active management of the 
business is left to Mr. Gleason's partner it is well known that the firm 
carries on an extensive and highly remunerative business. For many 
years he has been active in the Northern New York Asphalt Paving 
Company and is its present Secretary and Treasurer. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 89 

Mr. Gleason has always l^een an uncompromising and active Demo- 
crat, and for many years has been known as one of the party's most 
effective workers among the Troy Democrats. He was for three years 
Deputy Sheriff under Sheriff McKean and for a similar term under 
Sheriff Hotchkins. He was then appointed Boiler Inspector for the 
Rensselaer Congressional District, under Governor Hoffman, and held 
the office for one year. For nine years, three terms in all, he was an 
influential member of the Board of Education, where his knowledge of 
practical affairs was fully appreciated. As assistant superintendent of 
the w^ater works and keeper of the reservoir he rendered the city twelve 
years of important and faithful service. After quitting the Water 
Department Mr. Gleason was for some time the agent of the Holley 
Company, and during that time put in the present pumping station. 
He has been many times a delegate to local conventions and twice a 
delegate to State conventions and for a time was a member of the 
County Committee, giving ample evidence of his political resourceful- 
ness. 

Mr. Gleason is an honorary member of the J. C. Osgood and Arba 
Read Steamer Companies and was one of the first active members of 
the Niagara Steamer Company along with Edward Murphy, Jr., John 
Morrissey and James McKean. This company subsequently became 
the Osgood Company. He is a member of the Exempt Firemen's As- 
sociation and of Troy Lodge, B. P. O. E. 

Mr. Gleason is married and has three children. 



Captain Edw^ard Porter Howe. One of the veteran and influ- 
ential Democrats of Saratoga Coimty is Captain Edward Porter 
Howe, of Saratoga Springs, the publisher and editor for nearly a quar- 
ter of a century of one of the leading Democratic newspapers of the 
State of New York. Captain Howe was born at Westfield, Mass., the 
son of Elbridge H. and Laura Porter Howe, February 15, 1842. The 
same year his parents removed to Dayton, Ohio, and afterwards to 



90 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Wayne County, Indiana, on the eastern border of the State. The father 
was a merchant, and after accumulating- a handsome capital he sought 
a wider field and bought an interest in a large wholesale house in Cin- 
cinnati. Ohio. This was in 1853. Cincinnati was then the Queen City 
of the West, with St. Louis a close second, Chicago being nothing 
more than a lusty infant, making a great deal of noise and growing 
like Jack's famoiis beanstalk. 

Young Howe had attended the country schools before removing to 
Cincinnati, but here he had educational advantages of the very best, 
and impro.ved them to the utmost. He was graduated from the famous 
Hughes High School in the class of i860, with the record of the highest 
standing in his class, and was awarded a silver medal for his pro- 
ficiency in mathematics. He taught a country school in his old home 
district in Indiana the winter before the outbreak of the great Civil 
War, and then began the study of law at Centerville, the then county 
seat of \\'ayne County. He accepted a position also as Deputy County 
Clerk. In September, 1861, he enlisted as a private in the Fifty- 
seventh Indiana Regiment, and was promoted, on his merits, for good 
service, to Quartermaster Sergeant, Second Lieutenant, First Lieu- 
tenant and Captain, his commission to the last named rank being dated 
April 14, 1863. 

Although barely of age, and one of the youngest captains in the 
army. Captain Howe made a record for fidelity and efficiency, and also 
for gallantry in battle not surpassed by any of his comrades. He was 
detailed as Brigade Quartermaster soon after his last promotion, after 
having achieved much credit by instructing the officers of his brigade 
in the then novel bayonet drill. He served in this staff position until 
after the capture of Chattanooga. His brigade was the first to enter 
Chattanooga and was given charge of the post. The commander, 
Brigadier-General George D. \\^agner. was made Commandant of the 
post, and Captain Howe, Post Quartermaster. When the whole Army 
of the Cumberland assembled at Chattanooga and was reinforced by 
Hooker's Corps from the Army of the Potomac and General Sherman's 
Army of the Tennessee. Captain Howe had charge of supplying fuel 
for the post, and his details of wood choppers and teamsters had the 
unique experience of felling trees and loading wagons while big shells 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 91 

from siege guns were dropping around them from the summit of Look- 
out Mountain, 

Captain Howe asked to be retired from staff duty and took com- 
mand of his company before the Atlanta campaign began, and partici- 
pated in the battles of that terrible four months' struggle. At the end 
of the war Captain Howe was appointed Assistant Adjutant-General 
of the State of Indiana, and supervised the preparation and publication 
of the records of Indiana's part in the war, filling many large volumes. 

Captain Howe is a member of the Presbyterian church, of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity and of the Grand Army of the Republic. 

In 1872 Captain Howe accepted the Democratic and Liberal Re- 
publican nomination for State Senator from the Indianapolis District, 
at the request of Thomas A. Hendricks, then the Democratic candidate 
for Governor, and other -leaders, and he ran ahead of his ticket, but 
failed of election. After serving some years as secretary of a life in- 
surance company and dealing extensively in real estate specu- 
lations, his health broke down and he came to Saratoga Springs for 
treatment. It was successful, and Captain Howe has ever since been a 
resident of that place. He published the Saratoga Sun from 1882 to 
1900 and the Saratoga Herald from 1900 to 1904, both strong and 
vigorous Democratic organs. In 1894 he was appointed Postmaster 
at Saratoga Springs by President Cleveland, serving until 1899. He 
has attended and presided over a great many Democratic conventions, 
and has rendered valuable service to his party. 

In 1867 Captain Howe married Eliza B., daughter of the Hon. 
James M. Ray, President of the Bank of the State of Indiana. They 
have one child, Louis McHenry Howe, also a journalist of prominence. 
Both he and his father have long been connected as correspondents with 
the New York Herald, the Boston Herald and other leading news- 
papers in the large cities of the country. They have both traveled ex- 
tensively, having visited the West Indies, South America, England, 
France and all the countries around the Mediterranean, and their de- 
scriptive letters, many of them illustrated from photographs taken by 
the Junior, have been extensively published in the newspapers they 
represent. They have also contributed to magazines and have per- 
formed much other literary work. 



92 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Martin Bohan, well knov/n in the Democratic ranks of the city of 
Troy as an earnest and efficient worker, was born in County Tipperary, 
Ireland, October lo, i860. He was educated in the schools of Tip- 
perary, and in the year 1880 he came to the United States. He stopped 
at first in Xew York City, but in the year 1892 he removed to Troy 
and established his present grocery and liquor business at 386 First 
street. 

]\Ir. Bohan is an active and vigorous Democrat. While he resided 
in Xew York he became known as one of the most efficient workers in 
Tammany Hall. Since he removed to Troy he has not been able to take 
the time from his own business to do much political work; still he has 
aided his party in every possible way except to accepting its nomina- 
tions to office. As a campaign hustler he ranks wuth the best. 

Mr. Bohan is a member of the Knights of Fidelity and is a much 
respected citizen. 



Edward A. O'Connor was born February 14, i860, in the Ninth 
\\'ard of Troy, where he has always had his home. He was educated 
in the public schools of his native city and afterwards learned the 
bakers' trade. He worked at this trade for fifteen years, his skill and 
industry securing him the position of foreman. 

Desiring to go into business for himself, he resigned this position 
and established himself in the liquor trade at 329 Second street. 

Always a Democrat, Mr. O'Connor has been a recognized force in 
the organization of the Ninth Ward. He has frequently been elected a 
delegate to party conventions and has rendered great service on cam- 
paign committees. He has never aspired to political place, being closely 
occupied with his private business, but he has exerted an influence in 
campaigns, especially with the labor vote, that few men have equaled. 
He is a power in the Ninth Ward. 

Mr. O'Connor has served as President of the local branch of the 
Bakers' Union, and has been honored by the Union itself as a delegate 
to the .State Federation of Labor. He is an active member, also, of St. 
Joseph's Sodality. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 93 

John Wiesner, one of the solid citizens and staunch Democrats of 
Dutchess County, was born in Austria, March 23, 1847. 

He was educated in the schools of his native land. He came to the 
United States in 1867, and settled in the village of Hughsonville, where 
he has since resided. Here he worked for a time at his trade of wagon- 
maker, but in 1870 he set up in business for himself. 

He belongs to the Order of Red Men, and also to^ the Mamierchor 
Society of Wappinger Falls. 

Ever since he became entitled to vote Mr. Wiesner has been an 
ardent and influential Democrat, and has consented to serve his party 
on Town and County committee, and also as delegate to important 
conventions, although he resolutely refused all nominations to political 
office. 



Harry C. Feroe. Prominent among the active Democrats of 
Dutchess County is Harry C. Feroe, of Tivoli, in which village he was 
born, October 18. 1872. 

After completing the educational course in the public schools of his 
native village, from which he was graduated in 1885, Mr. Feroe en- 
gaged in business with his father, J. H. Feroe, in the coal and lumber 
trade and general freighting. 

Mr. Feroe, senior, was the Democratic leader in the town of Red 
Hook up to the time of his death, in 1901, so the subject of this sketch 
inherited his sound Democracy and his interest in his party's success. 
Since his father's death Mr. Feroe has continued the prosperous busi- 
ness in which the firm was engaged, still further enlarging and expand- 
ing it. 

He has always been greatly interested in the local Fire Department, 
a volunteer organization, of which he was unanimously elected the 
Chief. He is also the President of the F. S. Ormsby Engine Company. 

Though greatly interested in politics and a very efficient Demo- 
cratic worker, he has steadily refused to accept any nomination for 
public office. He has, however, frequently served as delegate to im- 
portant party conventions. 



94 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

John ]\Iuli,ally, one of the vigorous Democratic workers of 
Dutchess County, has always Hvecl within its borders since his birth, 
July 4. 1 86 1. He received his education in the pubhc schools. He was 
engag-ed in farming for a time, but left this occupation for the trans- 
portation business, becoming captain of a barge on the Hudson River 
in 1 89 1, and he settled at Chelsea, where he established the popular 
River A'iew Hotel, which he still manages. 

He is Treasurer of the Carthage Landing Ice Yacht Club. 

In politics I\Ir. Mullally has always been a devoted adherent of the 
Democratic Party organization, and he has performed services of much 
value to the Democracy. 

He has never had any aspirations for political office, but he is 
always zealous in the work when a campaign is in progress. He has 
served efficiently on the Democratic Town Committee and has many 
times been a delegate to town and county conventions. 



Frederick .V. Sweet. A vigorous and valuable Democratic 
worker is Frederick A. Sweet, of Smyrna, Chenango County. He was 
born in the village where he resides September 29, 1862, and received 
his education in the public schools of Smyrna. He also took a course in 
a commercial college at Utica, graduating with great credit. For a 
considerable time ]\Ir. Sweet worked as a butter-maker in different 
creameries in Massachusetts, but he returned to Symrna in 1890 and 
became a farmer, in which occupation he engaged for three years and 
met with marked success. He also deals extensively in cattle and farm 
produce. 

Mr. Sweet is, and has always l:)een, a sterling and influential Demo- 
crat, always faithful and always active in party work. For many 
years he has never missed being a delegate to the Democratic county 
conventions, and he has rendered efficient service as a member of the 
Democratic County Committee for twelve years. 

President Cleveland, during his second administration, appointed 
Mr. Sweet Postmaster of Smyrna, a position which he filled with great 
credit for five years. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 95 

Alderman Charles V. Havvver, of the city of Hudson, and 
chairman of the Fire Committee, was torn in Hudson, December 24, 
1870. He is the son of WilHam H. Hawver, a veteran of the great 
Civil War, and who is at present the armorer at the Hudson Armory. 

The subject of this sketch has also seen active military service in 
the field, having been a volunteer in the Two Hundred and Third New 
York Regiment during the war with Spain. 

Mr. Hawver is a staunch and active Democrat, and has always 
been a faithful party worker ever since he was entitled to a vote. He 
has twice been chosen Inspector of Elections, and in the year 1900 he 
was elected Alderman from his ward. His record was so acceptable 
that he was re-elected in 1902, and has served as Chairman of the Fire 
Committee since that time. 

Mr. Hawver is a tinsmith by trade, an excellent workman and a 
popular and influential citizen. 



Charles W. Wright was born at Bangall, Dutchess County, 
March i, 1866, and acquired his education in the public schools. He 
then began in the mercantile business at Bangall, and continued there 
until 1886. In that year he removed to New York City and estab- 
lished a dairy business. 

In 1893, however, he returned to Dutchess County, and settled at 
Clinton Corners. Here he bought out a general mercantile establish- 
ment, and in 1900 he added to his business by purchasing flour and feed 
mills. 

Ever since he became of age Mr. Wright has been a straight and 
stalwart Democrat, eagerly assisting his party in every way within 
his power. His private business interests have been so extensive and 
exacting that he has never had time to give to any public oflice, and he 
has resolutely declined all offers in that direction. He has, neverthe- 
less, been active in the work of the party organization, and has attended 
all classes of party conventions. 

Mr. Wright is a prosperous business man and stands high in the 
community, both as a man and a citizen. 



96 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



GEORGE STANDISH WEED 

George Standish ^^^EED, lawyer, was born in Plattsburgh, N. Y., 
February 13, 1862, the son of Hon. Smith M. Weed and Carrie L. 
(Standish) W^eed. Upon the father's side he is descended from soldiers 
of the Revokitionary War and the War of 1812. Through his mother 
he is of the eighth generation in Hneal descent from Captain Miles 
Standish, of the Mayflower's pilgrim band. His elementary education 
was acquired in the public schools of Plattsburgh. From the high school 
there he went first to St. Paul's School in Concord, N. H., anrl later to 
the famous school at Exeter, N. H., to complete his college preparatory 
course. Entering Harvard University, he was graduated with the 
degree of A. B. in the class of 1886. Resuming the study of law, 
which he had begun while yet an undergraduate, after his return to 
Plattsburgh. he was admitted to practice in 1888. A unique feature 
in Mr. Weed's career as a lawyer is the fact that he became an active 
member of the well-known firm of Palmer, Weed & Kellogg two years 
before his admission to the Bar. At present the firm style in Platts- 
burgh is Weed, Conway & Cotton, and in New York, Smith. Conway 
& ^^'eed. Their practice is said to be the most extensive in Northern 
New York. 

Political affairs have always attracted ^Ir. Weed's active interest, 
and in him the Democratic Party has had one of its most ardent and 
effective supporters. Only a few months after his graduation at Har- 
vard, in 1886, he was nominated for Member of Assembly, and, re- 
versing a normal Republican majority of 2.000, was elected by a ma- 
jority of 1,800. He was returned to the Assembly in the following 
year without opposition, the Republicans making no nomination. Dur- 
ing his first term he served on the Committee on Appropriations, the 
Committee on Villages and the Committee on State Prisons. His 
assignments during his second term embraced, among others, the Com- 
mittee on Ways and Means and the Committee on Rules. In 1889 he 
was elected President of the village of Plattsburgh. When County 




^~~if 6(f £". ^. i4^//f^tms i^^ra /'^'- 





OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 97 

Judge S. A. Kellog-g resigned his office in 1890 because of his election 
as Justice of the Supreme Court, Mr. Weed was appointed by Governor 
Hill to fill the vacancy. Almost continuously since 1886 he has 
efficiently served the Democracy of Clinton County as a member of its 
County Committee. He was an active member of the Democratic State 
Committee in 1887 and again during the Presidential campaign of 
1888, when he was treasurer of the committee. In the interest of the 
party at large in 1892 he accepted the nomination for Representative in 
Congress and made a strong canvass in a district hopelessly Republican. 
He was defeated, but with the satisfaction of reducing the Republican 
majority in his own county to eighty-seven. In recognition of this 
and other party service, President Cleveland appointed Mr. Weed, in 
1893, the Senate confirming in March, 1894, Collector of the Cham- 
plain District, and this office he retained until July, 1899, a period em- 
bracing more than half of President McKinley's first term. Mr. Weed 
has long been a director of the Plattsburgh State Normal School, chair- 
man of its Teachers' Committee, aud for ten years treasurer of the 
institution. For many years he was secretary bf the old Chateaugay 
Railroad Company. He is a director pf 'the ■Wiiliams Manufacturing 
Company of Canada and a trustee of the Epigcopal Church. 

Mr. Weed's successful career has been largely self-wrought, and 
not even the fame of a distinguished father can eclipse the brilliant 
qualities, the inherent ability and initiative of this distinguished son. 

In May, 1891, Mr. Weed married Frances Ross, daughter of John 
Ross, a prominent citizen of Plattsburgh. 



Lewis Nixon, a distinguished Democrat of New York City, is one 
of the ablest and one of the largest shipbuilders in the world. His ship 
yards at Elizabeth, N. J., have turned out many of the largest and 
finest vessels that sail the seas. Mr. Nixon has always been a strong 
and active Democrat, an indefatigable and successful party worker and 
one who stands very high in the Tammany Hall organization. When 
Richard Croker retired from the leadership of Tammany Hall Mr. 
Nixon succeeded him and maintained the organization at a position of 



98 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

the highest efficiency. The immense complications of metropolitan 
politics required him to take too much time and attention from his 
enormous private interests, however, and he felt compelled to resign the 
leadership. 

j\Ir. Xixon is a man of a very high order of ability, a splendid 
organizer and one who has proved himself a very capable and success- 
ful manager of large affairs. He still retains his interest in Demo- 
cratic success, however, and is a very valuable and influential factor, 
not only in city, but also in State and national politics. 



William K. Roy. One of the leading Democrats and one of the 
most enterprising and public-spirited citizens of Dutchess County is 
William K. Roy, of the village of Wappinger's Falls, where he was 
born, December 31, 1853. He passed through the full course of the 
public schools of his native village, and in 1872 entered Cornell Uni- 
versity. Here he took courses in chemistry and civil engineering and 
was graduated with high honors in the class of 1876. During the Cen- 
tennial Exposition at Philadelphia, in the same year, he was placed in 
charge of some of the chemical exhibits. In recent years he has been 
connected with his brothers in the drug business. 

In politics Mr. Roy has always been an important factor in the 
Democratic organization, and a very influential leader in county 
affairs. After having been elected and re-elected Town Clerk of 
Poughkeepsie, in 1887. he was chosen as Supervisor. On retiring from 
this office he was unanimously chosen Clerk of the Board of Village 
Trustees. In May. 1887, he was appointed Postmaster at Wappinger's 
Falls, retiring in 1892 to become Index Clerk of the State xA.ssembly at 
Albany. He held this office for two years, when he was again ap- 
pointed Postmaster, serving until 1900. 

Mr. Roy was one of those who were instrumental in the building 
of the bridge at Wappinger's Falls, and also in securing the building of 
the electric railroad between that thriving village and Poughkeepsie. 
He is one of the directors of the railroad company. He was also a 
potent factor in securing a public park for the village, and is the Secre- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 99 

tary of the Board of Park Commissioners. In politics Mr. Roy has 
always been a power in the Democratic Party, and also in promoting 
the success of its principles and policies and the election of its candi- 
dates. For a score of years he has been a member of the Democratic 
County Committee, and for half that period he has served upon its 
Executive Committee. He is at present the Chairman of the com- 
mittee. He is Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Directors 
of the Wappinger's Falls Savings Bank, and is a Trustee of the Grinnell 
Library and Secretary of the board. He has been appointed a delegate 
to almost every Democratic State convention for nearly twenty years, 
and he has served in the same capacity to all classes of local and district 
party conventions. He is the present chairman of the Democratic Vil- 
lage and Town committees, and he has been a meml^er of each of these 
bodies for many years. 

Few men have had a life of such wide and varied activities, and in 
every position in which he has been placed he has rendered efficient and 
valuable service. 



John S. Cronin, one of the prominent Democrats of the city of 
Troy, was born there in the year 1857, and it has always been his home. 
He was educated in the public schools, including the Troy High School. 

After completing his educational course he accepted a position as 
reporter on the Troy Press, and afterward became its city editor. He 
was connected with the Press some fifteen years and became widely 
and favorably known in the journalistic profession. 

In 1890 he established a large storage warehouse, and later he be- 
came an extensive manufacturer of knit underwear. He became a 
prominent member of the Young Men's Association of Troy and was 
its President for a number of years. 

Mr. Cronin, though an earnest and active Democrat, has never 
aspired to official honors. He has been a delegate to many Democratic 
conventions and has served as Chairman, and he is ahvays an energetic 
campaign worker. He was appointed a member of the Board of Edu- 
cation in the year 1900 and he still holds that position. 



48261;^ 



lOO THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Alderman Peter E. McCune, of Hudson, Columbia County, was 
born in that city, in the year 1863. He has always been an active Dem- 
ocrat, as was his father before him, Peter McCune, who at the time of 
his death had been a section boss on the New York Central and Hud- 
son River Railroad for a score of years. 

The subject of this sketch received his education in the public 
schools of his native city, after which he accepted a position as foreman 
in a livery stable. After ten years of faithful and industrious service 
in that capacit}^ he leased the property and began business for himself. 
During the twelve years since that time he has carried on. the business 
with marked success at the same place. 

Air. McCune has always been prominent in the local Democratic 
organization of his city, and a valuable and influential worker for the 
party. In 1900 he was elected Alderman from his ward, and so efficient 
was his service that he was honored with a re-election. 

He was one of the charter members of the C. B. L. of Hudson. He 
is one of the successful business men of Hudson, and is highly es- 
teemed by the community, in which he is recognized as an enterprising 
and valuable citizen. 



]MoRTON Haynes, one of the most popular Democrats in Dutchess 
County, and a power in the party organization. He was born in Paw- 
ling, which has always been his home, February 23, 1849. He acquired 
his education in the public schools of Dutchess and Saratoga counties, 
and then followed the occupation of farmer for several years. 

He left the farm to establish a railroad restaurant at Pawling, on 
the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad. 

Mr. Haynes is a member of the Masonic fraternity. Blue Lodge 
and Chapter, and has served as Master of his lodge. 

In politics he has always been an active and efficient Democratic 
worker, and the value of his party services is shown in the practical 
disappearance of the Republican majority in his own town. His own 
personal popularity among his townsmen may be seen in his repeated 
elections to important local offices, such as Collector, Commissioner of 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK loi 

Highways, and Supervisor. Indeed he was re-elected Supervisor, so 
satisfactory had been his work in the office. Mr. Haynes has rendered 
his party efficient and vakiable service as member of the Town and 
County Democratic committees. He has also repeatedly been honored 
with appointment as delegate to party conventions, among them the 
Democratic State Convention of 1888. 

Mr. Haynes is a man of high standing as a citizen and is greatly 
respected. 



Frank J. Lynch. One of the leaders of the young Democracy of 
Syracuse is Mr. Frank J. Lynch, present Clerk of the Municipal Court. 

As an earnest disciple of the trae principles of Jefferson, he began 
political work in the Democratic ranks in the Fifteenth Ward, where 
his ability in organization work brought early recognition. He served 
his apprenticeship as poll worker and inspector of election and as dele- 
gate to the various minor conventions. The knowledge thus gained 
proved invaluable to him in later years, when he became a member of 
the Onondaga Democratic County Committee and the Democratic City 
Committee of Syracuse. A year after his election to the County Com- 
mittee — in 1902 — he was made its secretary, a position he has filled 
faithfully until the present writing. He is also secretary of the City 
Committee. 

In 1900 he was appointed Clerk of the Municipal Court, Syracuse, 
and he has been reappointed continuously in every succeeding adminis- 
tration. 

In 1904 he was elected delegate to the State Convention at Sara- 
toga, which nominated Hon. D-Cady Herrick for Governor. 

Mr. Lynch was born in Syracuse, June 25, 1878. He received a 
public school education in his native city, and upon graduation en- 
tered the College of Law, Syracuse. When his term was completed he 
studied law in the offices of Hancock, Hogan & Devine, and was ad- 
mitted to practice in 1903. 

He is a member of the C. M. B. A., K. of C, A. O. H. and 
A. O. U. W. 



I02 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Frank Tully, one of the earnest and influential Democratic lead- 
ers of Dutchess County, was born in County Cavan, Ireland, April lo, 
1S47. He received his educational training in the schools of the Emer- 
ald Isle, and, in 1866, at the age of nineteen, he came to this country 
and settled at Fishkill Landing, Dutchess County. 

He learned the trade of gardener, and became very skillful and pro- 
ficient in that occupation. In 1876, however, he concluded to engage 
in business for himself and entered the liquor trade, in which he has 
continued with much success to the present time. 

]\Ir. Tully has always been an active Democratic worker, earnest at 
all times, and a hustler when an important campaign is in progress. 
He has never found time to either hold or seek public of!ice, but he has 
rendered his party valuable service on the Town and Village Com- 
mittees, and he has often served as Delegate to party conventions. 



John E. Hynes, a strong and active supporter of the Democratic 
Party, was born in Norwich, Chenango County, June 29, 1870. He 
was educated at the excellent public schools of his native village and at 
the Norwich Academy. Mr. Hynes is a very active and enterprising 
man, and he has had a wide business experience. He worked for a time 
in the Norwich Silk Mills, and afterward learned the trade of wood 
turner. Then he put in five years in the boiler shops, at the end of 
which time he went into business with his father for two years, when 
he opened the New York Hotel. Plere he met with much success, and 
he is still the proprietor of that popular hostelry. 

Mr. Hynes has been an ardent Democrat all his life, anxious for 
the triumph of Democratic principles, and zealous in working for the 
success of Democratic candidates. He supports the action of the regu- 
lar party organization loyally, and is opposed earnestly to all party 
splits and factional fights. 

He came within a very few votes of being elected Collector of the 
town of Norwich in 1892, although it is a strong Republican town. 

Mr. Hynes, in 1890, married a daughter of David Moore, of Nor- 
wich, and they have been blessed with a family of seven children. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 103 

Alderman John E. Martin was born in the city of Hudson, 
April 7, 1867. His father, John Martin, came to this country in 1852, 
served through the great Civil War, was connected with the New York 
Stock Exchange, and later removed to Hudson, where he died in 1882. 

John E. Martin acquired his education in St. Mary's Academy. He 
then began work in a brickyard, and when twenty-one years old he be- 
came foreman, having in his charge a force of eighty-five men. He 
afterwards accepted a position as assistant engineer in the brewery of 
C. H. Evans & Son, which he still retains. 

In 1 89 1 he was married to Miss Mary E. Shay, and is the father of 
seven children. 

Mr. Martin has always been a staunch Democrat in politics and 
has held various positions of trust and responsibility. He was elected 
Alderman from the Second Ward in 1899, and was re-elected in 1901. 

He belongs to the Royal Arcanum and is Secretary of the Hudson 
Post of the International Union of United Brewery Workers. 



P. H. Potts. One of the live Democratic workers of Dutchess 
County is P. H. Potts, of Tivoli. He was born in Columbia County, 
June 14, 1835. He received his education in the public schools of his 
native county, and after completing his course he engaged in teaching 
for three years. 

He married Miss Emma Lasher, of Germantown. 

He was a merchant for several years in Columbia County, and 
later he engaged in the hotel business, being at the present time the 
proprietor of Potts' Hotel, at Tivoli, Dutchess County. He belongs to 
the Masonic fraternity. 

In 1884 Mr. Potts was appointed Postmaster at Madalin, serving 
four years. 

He has always been a strenuous Democrat and has held a great 
many local ofifices, among them Village Trustee, in which he served for 
three years. He has done much effective work on party committees 
and has been honored by appointment as delegate to all classes of party 
conventions. 



I04 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Erickson Perkins^ one of the prominent brokers and financiers 
of Rochester, has always been an active and influential supporter of 
Democratic principles and candidates. 

In 1896 he was one of the delegates from New York to the Demo- 
cratic National Convention at Chicago, and he opposed the nomination 
of the Hon. \\'illiam Jennings Bryan for President, being earnestly in 
favor of the Hon. David B. Hill. 

He has long been an important factor in the Democratic organiza- 
tion, and has been honored by appointment as delegate to many impor- 
tant Democratic State conventions. 



JoHK Crell, the owner and proprietor of the well-known Crell's 
Hotel, on River street, Troy, has been an active worker and an impor- 
tant factor in the Democratic Party of Rensselaer County ever since he 
became of age. 

i\Ir. Crell was born in the county in which he has always resided, 
October 17, 1857. He was educated in the district schools of Rensse- 
laer County. He worked for a time on a farm, but left this for a situa- 
tion in the knit goods trade, in which he was engaged for seventeen 
vears. In 1887 he removed to Troy and went into business for himself 
in the Second \Vard. He was so successful that in 1896 he concluded 
to retire. His retirement was, however, of brief duration, for he found 
idleness the hardest work he had ever undertaken, so he purchased the 
fixtures where he has since done a highly successful business, Crell's 
Hotel being both popular and profitable. 

Mr. Crell is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
of the Fraternal Order of the Eagles, of the Knights of Fidelity and of 
Rankin Steamer Company in the Fire Department of Troy. 

He has lx?en, as already stated, an active Democratic worker from 
llie time he was old enough to become interested in politics. In 1892 
he was elected Supervisor from the Second Ward, in spite of the fact 
that it was a Republican stronghold, serving with great acceptance 
until 1894. Mr. Crell has been a delegate to many Democratic con- 
ventions, and he is efficient in both city and county politics. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 105 

Henry M. Van Wyck. A strong and sturdy and stalwart Demo- 
crat is Henry M. Van Wyck, of New Hamburgh, Dutchess County. 
He was born in that town, May 1 1, 1849, ^.nd acquired his education in 
the public schools and at the Easton Academy. 

After leaving school, he spent six years in the mercantile business 
in New York City. In 1873 '^^ returned to New Hamburgh, and en- 
gaged in farming and fruit raising. He retired from business in 1890. 
Mr. Van Wyck is a member of the Holland Society, of New York City. 

In politics he is a straight, strong and strenuous Democrat of the 
Jeffersonian school, and he has performed much effective work for his 
party, though he could never be prevailed upon to accept party nomina- 
tions. He has frequently been sent as delegate to important party 
conventions. 



James B. Donovan^ one of the most active and best known Demo- 
crats of the city of Little Falls, was born in that city, September 25, 

1855- 

He received a liberal public school education and afterwards em- 
barked in the clothing business, which he pursued for several years, 
after which he took up insurance, and is now district manager of the 
John Hancock Eife Insurance Company. 

Mr. Donovan is not only one of the most widely known business 
men of Little Falls, but is recognized as an ardent, able and willing 
Democrat, who is always anxious to advance the interests of his party 
and of his community. He has always been an active worker and has 
frequently served as Delegate not only to County conventions, but has 
been honored by being sent as a delegate to Senatorial, Judicial, Con- 
gressional and State conventions. His ability and his value to the 
Democratic Party have been recognized in various ways, but particu- 
larly in his election to the office of Recorder of the City of Little Falls 
in the fall of 1901 for a term of four years. This position he now oc- 
cupies and discharges his duties with that fidelity and ability which 
have characterized him in all his undertakings. He also held a seat on 
the Board of Aldermen in the city of Little Falls from 1893 to 1895, 



io6 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

D. D. ^Morgan, one of the stalwart and steadfast Democrats of 
Herkimer County., was born at ]\Iohawk June 27, 1847. 

His educational training was received in the public schools, supple- 
mented b}' a course at the Holbrook Military School, at Ossining, 
N. Y. Mr. jMorgan is a veteran and leading master of transportation, 
being the owner of a fleet of boats on the Erie Canal. 

In spite of his extensive private business demands, he has given 
much time and service to the cause of Democracy. He has served 
acceptably as Village Trustee, and as Postmaster under both of Presi- 
dent Cleveland's administrations. He has been prominent in the party 
organization, having served several terms on the County Committee, 
and also as a delegate to all classes of local and district Democratic 
conventions. 



Hon. James Young is one of the "Old Guard" among the staunch 
and loyal Democrats of Otsego County. He was born in the county in 
which he has always resided, in the town of Springfield, March 6, 1823. 
He was educated in the public schools, supplemented by a course in the 
Fairfield Academy, in the neighboring county of Herkimer. 

Mr. Young has devoted his manhood's years to the practice of the 
legal profession, his office being at Cherry Valley. He is one of the 
Xestors of the Otsego County Bar, and has attained a noteworthy suc- 
cess as a lawyer. 

He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, having taken all the degrees 
up to and including those of the Commandery. 

With the exception of one or two years, he has been a member of 
the Democratic County Committee of Otsego since i860, a term of 
forty-five years. He has served fifteen years as Supervisor of his town, 
was several years Chairman of the lx)ard, and in 1864 and again in 
1870 he was elected Member of Assembly, where he made a very credit- 
able record. 

Mr. Yoimg had the privilege of voting for Silas Wright for Gov- 
ernor and James K. Polk for President in 1844. He has always been a 
loyal Democrat and a citizen greatly honored and respected. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 107 

Charles A. Fox was born in St. Johnsvillc, Herkimer County, 
N. Y., September 3, 1859. He attended tbe public schools in his native 
place until fourteen years of age, when he came to Little Falls, where 
he has since resided and where he has been principally engaged in a 
general mercantile business. 

Mr. Fox has always been closely and clearly identified with the 
Democratic Party, in which he has been an earnest and able worker, 
and in which his services and abilities are highly appreciated. 

Fie was Corporation Collector in 1877 and was elected City Treas- 
urer in the fall of 1898, taking possession of his office on January i, 
1899. The convention of 1898 came to a deadlock over the nomina- 
tion of City Treasurer. He was put up as a dark horse and won out. 
He was re-elected to succeed himself in 1900 for a second term. 

Mr. Fox is a man of recognized ability and sterling honesty, and 
to these two qualities is largely due the popularity which placed him in 
the very responsible position of City Treasurer. 



J. A. Burnett, a prominent and influential Democrat of Dutchess 
County, was born in that county in 1840. He was educated in the 
public schools and learned the trade of carpenter with his father. 

When the Civil War broke out he was one of the first to enlist, in 
April, 1 86 1. He belonged to Company I, Fourth Regiment of New 
York Volunteers, and took part in many famous battles. He was 
severely wounded at Gettysburg, July, 1863, and in the autumn he was 
mustered out. Returning home, he resumed work at the carpenter's 
trade. 

He is a member of the G. A. R. and is the quartermaster of Ket- 
cham Post, No. 88. 

In politics Mr. Burnett has always been a loyal and influential 
Democrat, and he has raised a family of ten sons, all oi whom hold the 
same political faith. He has been a delegate to many party conven- 
tions and has long been a prominent factor in the County organization. 
He served one term as Constable and ten years as Commissioner of 
Excise. In 1884 he was appointed Postmaster at Hughsonville, serv- 



io8 JHE DE^IOCRATIC PARTY 

ing with great acceptance until 1892. He has dechned many nomina- 
tions, but he has been a tower of strength to his party at election time. 



Hox. Sylvester B. Sage was born in Greene County, N. Y,, Sep- 
tember 8, 1836. He was educated in the district school and at Catskill 
Academy, and began the active duties of life by conducting a general 
store at Prattsville, in which business he was engaged for a period of 
ten years. 

Leaving Prattsville, he moved to Catskill and formed a partnership 
with Colonel Jacob H. Meech, under the firm name of Meech & Sage, 
dealers in groceries. This firm continued until 1880, when Mr. Sage 
sold out and held the office of Under Sheriff for a term of three years. 
He then opened a carriage repository, which he conducted until 1898, 
when he turned the business over to his son, Clarence B. Sage, by whom 
it is still conducted. 

]\Ir. Sage has been a life-long Democrat and has always been an 
active worker for the success of his party and the maintenance of the 
principles of its founders. He was three times elected to the Assembly, 
including the years from 1897 to 1900, and while a member of the 
Legislature was noted for his fidelity to his duties and his support of 
all good bills, while he was ever an opponent of all obnoxious meas- 
ures. He is well known not only in his own county, but throughout 
the State. 

He has also held various other offices. He has been Assessor and 
Collector, and also Police Justice for the long period of nine years. He 
takes a warm interest in the public schools and has sensed on the Board 
of Education. He is a member of Catskill Lodge, No. 458, F. and 
A. M., and of the Presbyterian Church. 

Mr. Sage is one of the best known breeders and raisers of Shetland 
ponies in the State. In 1891 he purchased a large farm for this express 
purpose and takes a warm interest in the enterprise, which he conducts 
as much for the pleasure it affords as for the money it produces. 

In December, 1861, Hon. Sylvester B. Sage married Alice Smith. 
They have two children, namely, F. Virginia and Clarence B. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 109 

Elliott T. Lester, of Ilion, one of the active, earnest and influ- 
ential Democrats of Herkimer County, is a native of Oneida County. 

His education was obtained in the pubhc schools, supplemented by 
a course at Cazenovia Seminary. He became a resident of Ilion in 
1875, and has been a leading factor in the Democratic politics of Her- 
kimer County ever since. 

He has been appointed delegate to all classes of local and district 
conventions. 

Mr. Lester served as Justice of the Peace, through successive re- 
elections, for twelve years, and as City Judge for five years, being still 
the incumbent of that office. For more than ten years he has been 
President of the Democratic Club of Ilion. He is a member of the 
Democratic Town Committee. He served as Justice of Sessions two 
terms before that office was abolished by the new Constitution of the 
State. 

He is a sound Democrat and an estimable citizen. 



Ward P. Munson, one of the leading Democrats of Herkimer and 
a prominent citizen of the village and county, was born at the county 
seat in August, 1844. He was educated in the public schools and has 
been connected with the express business ever since his school days 
were over. For more than forty years he has served the American and 
National Express companies, having for over thirty-five years been the 
agent of those companies at Herkimer. 

He has been President of the Board of Education for several years, 
and he has also been a member of the Police, Fire, Electric Light, 
Water, Sewer and Municipal Commissions. Few citizens have been 
so closely identified with the municipal affairs of the village, and his 
intelligence, enterprise and public spirit have rendered his services of 
great value to the community. 

Mr. Munson has been closely identified wnth the Democratic Party 
organization and has always been a loyal worker for the cause. He 
has served as delegate to the Democratic State Convention and to local 
and district conventions on many occasions. 



no THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hon. Charles S. Harvey^ Mayor of the city of Hudson, Co- 
lumbia County, was born in that thriving place, Octeber 28, 1856. He 
was so fortunate as to secure a sound and thorough education in the 
public schools and the Hudson Academy. 

After completing his educational course he engaged in the manu- 
facture of cigars. He left this occupation ' to accept an appointment 
as Office Deputy, tendered him by the Sheriff of Columbia County, in 
which position he served with marked efficiency for six years. In 1887 
he was appointed Postmaster at Hudson by President Cleveland, again 
making an excellent record as a public official. 

In 1899 he was nominated for Mayor by his party and was trium- 
phantly elected. His administration w^as so satisfactory that he was 
honored by a re-election in 1901. Mr. Harvey has always been an 
earnest and influential Democrat, and his services have been of great 
value to the party. 

He is a member of the Order of Elks, the Hudson Fire Department 
and the Evans Hook and Ladder Company. 



Charles C. Hubeel^ one of the most expert and most extensive 
real estate dealers of Columbia County, was born at Hudson, in the 
year 1836, and has always lived there with the exception of a few^ years 
spent in Brooklyn. 

His father, George C. Hubbel, built up a large trade as an importer 
and rectifier of liquors. He began in 1838, and continued until his 
death, in 1872, his son, Charles C, being associated with him for sev- 
eral years. The firm manufactured "The Golden Bitters," which was 
sold extensively both in this country and in Europe. 

\\'hen this business was closed up, the subject of this sketch served 
for a time as President of the Columbia Knitting Company. He then 
went to Brooklyn, where he was identified with the manufacture and 
sale of Duryea's starch. Ill health, however, drove him back to Hud- 
son, in 1881, where he has become well known as an operator in real 
property. He is an authority on real estate values. For many years 
he was a trusted official of the Hudson City Savings Institution. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK in 

In politics Mr. Hiibbel has always been an ardent and influential 
Democrat. He received the nomination for City Treasurer and was 
elected to that office without any opposition from the Republican Party. 
He has held many other responsible trusts and many more of them 
await him whenever he may desire them. 



H. W. Eysman, an influential Democrat of Herkimer County, was 
born at Little Falls, in 1859. 

He has always been an energetic and enterprising business man. 
He received his educational training in the public schools and has been 
actively engaged from the time his school days were over. At present 
he is an extensive contractor. 

Mr. Eysman has frequently been appointed a delegate to Demo- 
cratic conventions. In 1898 he was elected a member of the Board of 
Supervisors, and his service was so efficient and satisfactory that he 
was re-elected in 1900. 



Richard Kennedy, long prominent in the ranks of the Democracy 
of Dutchess County, was born in Tipperary, Ireland, August 17, 1848. 
He received his educational training in Ireland, and emigrated to this 
country in 1865. 

He first settled at Northampton, Mass., but in 1869 he removed to 
Fishkill Landing, where he has since resided. In 1873 he engaged in 
the liquor business, which he has continued to the present time. 

Mr. Kennedy is a member and Treasurer of the local branch of the 
A. O. H., a member of the Celtic Social Club, and also of the Fishkill 
Landing Liquor Dealers' Association. 

He has always been active in the Democratic organization, and has 
rendered his party much valuable service. He has steadily refused all 
political offices and all nominations to office, but as a live campaign 
worker he stands among the first. He has also served as delegate to 
all classes of local and district party conventions. 



112 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hon. William W. Rider, a prominent Democrat of Greene 
County and a former Member of x\ssembly, was born at Cairo, in that 
county. January 14, 1859. He removed to Catskill in 1870. 

His education was obtained in the pubHc schools and at the Catskill 
Academy. In 1877 he engaged in the manufacture of brick at Athens, 
a business which he has conducted with large success to the present 
time. 

Mr. Rider has always been an earnest and influential Democrat and 
a man of much weight in party councils. After removing to Athens he 
served for several years as a member of the Board of Village Trustees. 

In the year 1900 he was elected Member of Assembly from Greene 
County, and the succeeding year he was accorded the honor of a re- 
election and served on several important committees. 

I\Ir. Rider is a prosperous and greatly respected citizen. 



^Michael Prendergast, Jr. One of the live, vigorous and en- 
thusiastic Democratic workers of Greene County is Michael Prender- 
gast, Jr., of Coxsackie. He was born in that thriving village, which 
has always been his home, September 16, 1866. 

After his school days were over he accepted a position as clerk in a 
grocery for five years, and then spent twelve years assisting his father 
in his hotel, afterwards being employed three years in the Lexington 
Hotel, at Lexington, Greene County. Influential friends secured him 
a position in the State Capitol building, at Albany, which he retained 
two and a half years. His tastes were, however, in the line of hotel 
management, and in 1894 he bought the West End Hotel at Coxsackie, 
which he has since conducted with gratifying success. 

September 12, 1893, Mr. Prendergast married Miss Catharine 
Maloney. He is a member of Coxsackie Hose Company, No. 3, and 
of St. Mary's Church. 

He has always been an active Democratic hustler and has rendered 
great service to his party. He served as a member of the Democratic 
County Committee in 1901, but has never had any aspirations for 
public office. He is a prominent and greatly respected citizen. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 113 

Hon. Robert P. Anibal, one of the best known Democrats in 
Central New York and a lawyer of prominence, was born at Benson, 
Hamilton County, N. Y., in the year 1847. He received his literary 
education at the common schools, the Fort Edward Institute and the 
Cooperstown Seminary, and after leaving the latter institution took up 
the study of law. 

After completing his legal studies and being admitted to the Bar, 
he began the active practice of his profession in Northville, Fulton 
County, in the year 1872. He continued in practice alone until Janu- 
ary, 1880, when the firm of Anibal & Patterson was formed. In 1886 
he moved to Johnstown and the law firm of Anibal & Murray was 
established, which continued until 1896. In September, 1900, the firm 
was again changed to its present name, Anibal & Smith. 

Judge Anibal has been a life-long Democratic worker, and the fact 
that Fulton County is strongly Republican indicates the ardent faith 
which he has in the principles of Democracy, which have sustained 
him in his unremitting endeavors to advance the interests of his party 
through a period of over thirty years. Even as a youth he was a 
worker for the Democratic cause, and in 1872 he was nominated by his 
party for the office of County Judge in Hamilton County and w^as 
elected for a term of six years. When he took office, in January, 1872, 
he was but twenty-five years of age, yet he filled that responsible posi- 
tion with credit to himself and dignity to the Bench, displaying not 
only a wide knowledge of the law but a fine judicial mind. 

Since that time the Democratic Party has endeavored to confer 
many honors upon him, which he has not received for the sole reason 
that the Democracy of Fulton County possesses less numerical strength 
than the Republican Party. He is to-day, and has been for years, the 
real leader of the Democratic Party of Fulton County. He has been a 
member of the Democratic County Committee for twenty-five years 
and has been a delegate to numerous conventions, including County, 
Congressional, Judicial and State assemblages. 

Judge Anibal is a prominent Mason and is a member of Fish House 
Lodge, F. and A. M. ; Sacandaga Chapter, R. A. M. ; the Holy Cross 
Commandery, No. 51, K. T., and the A. A. O. N. M. S., Albany, N. Y. 
He is a member of the B. P. O. E. 



114 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

John Freeman, one of the solid Democrats of the city O'f Troy, 
was born in County Roscommon, Ireland, in i860. He received a good 
education in the schools of his native county, and in 1881 he came to 
the United States, making his home in Troy. 

In 1890 he engaged in the grocery and liquor business at 74 Hoo- 
sick street, where he is still located. He is a strong Democrat from 
principle. He is a vigorous advocate of the political doctrines of his 
party and is an efficient party worker. Mr. Freeman has repeatedly 
declined proffered nominations to office, being essentially a business 
man, with no desire for political honors. He has, how^ever, been a 
delegate to many Democratic conventions, and his voice and vote 
always have much weight in determining who shall be the nominee. 



Dr. W. a. Day, an active and prominent Democrat of Cattaraugus 
County, was born within its boundaries in 1839. He was educated in 
the public schools, and then began the study of dentistry. Having fin- 
ished his preparation, he started in the practice of his profession at 
Warsaw, W^yoming County, in 1858. 

When the great Civil War broke out he enlisted in the Sixty- fourth 
Xew York Regiment, and served two years. Upon the expiration of 
h.is term of enlistment he resumed the practice of dentistry, locating at 
Franklinville, where he has since remained. 

In politics Dr. Day has always been an earnest Democrat. He 
showed the vigor of his Democracy very clearly while in the army, 
being the only man in his company who sent home a ballot for the 
Democratic candidates. 

He has served as Supervisor two years and as President of the vil- 
lage nine years. He has served on the County Committee for many 
years and has been a delegate to County and State Democratic conven- 
tions. 

He is president of the Union National Bank of Franklinville and 
also of the local Cemetery Association, whose grounds, under his artis- 
tic care, are among the handsomest belonging to any village in the 
country. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 115 

Hon. E. H. Kingsbury was born in Little Falls, Herkimer County, 
N. Y., December 16, 1862, and received a liberal public school educa- 
tion. 

His business life has been to a great extent connected with the 
paper mill business in his native city, where he is connected with E. B. 
Waite. 

Mr. Kingsbury has been a life-long Democrat, always zealous in 
the support of the party and its principles and is recognized as a leader 
in his city. He has been Town Clerk for two terms, Assessor for two 
terms and Mayor of the city of Little Falls for two terms. He has 
served a great deal on local committees at various times, always lend- 
ing the party his active efforts, as well as his valuable advice. During 
the year 1892 he was a member of the Congressional Committee and 
took an active part in the work of that body. 



John F. Hester, an active and earnest Democratic worker of Co- 
lumbia County, was born in Hudson, in 1876, and he has always been a 
resident of that place. He received a good education in the public 
schools, and then learned the trade of mason. 

His father, Dennis Hester, who came to this country from Ireland, 
in his youth, had learned the same trade, and as mason and contractor 
and builder made his way with great success. 

The subject of this sketch has been equally persistent and equally 
fortunate. In addition to his principal occupation, he has also carried 
en a prosperous grocery store. 

In 1899 Mr. Hester was married to Miss Maud M. Malley. 

Mr. Hester began his service for his party as soon as he became of 
age, and he has kept it up ever since. He was cliosen Inspector of 
Elections about as soon as he was old enough to vote, or hold office, and 
Jias held the position by repeated re-elections pretty nearly ever since. 
In 1902 he was also elected Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

He is a member of the Knights of Columbus and of the Catholic 
Benevolent League, and is an excellent and highly respected citizen in 
every respect. 



ii6 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

James E. Rafter^ one of the leading Democrats of Herkimer 
County, was born at Mohawk, in that county, September 24, 1872. He 
received a thorough education, having attended the pubhc schools, the 
Fairfield Seminary and the University of the City of New York. 

]\Ir. Rafter is an energetic and effective Democratic worker. He 
has served as a delegate to Democratic State. Senatorial, Judicial and 
County conventions. He has also rendered valuable service as member 
and chairman of the Democratic County Committee. He was elected 
Village President in 1891 and Village Clerk in 1894. 

Mr. Rafter was appointed Deputy Attorney-General in January, 
1903, by Attorney-General Cunneen, and held that office until Decem- 
ber 31, 1904. 



Jacob S. Bowman, a popular Democrat, who has for many years 
been prominent in public affairs in Dutchess County, was born at 
Milan, in that county, November 24, 1842. He attended the public 
schools until he was thirteen years old, when the death of his father 
threw the support of the family largely upon him. He took up farm- 
ing for a time, but later learned the trade of mason. 

In 1862 he enlisted in Company C, One Hundred and Twenty- 
eighth Regiment. New York Volunteers, and served to the close of the 
Civil War. He made a fine record, serving under General Banks in 
the famous Red River expedition, and being sent North with the 
Nineteenth Army Corps he took part in the great battles of Winchester 
and Cedar Creek under Sheridan. 

In 1872 he removed to Pine Plains, and 1876 he purchased a drug 
store, which he has successfully conducted to the present time. He is a 
member of the Masonic fraternity. 

He has always been an active Democratic worker. He served one 
year as Overseer of the Poor, and in 1889 he was elected Supervisor of 
Pine Plains. He also served as Postmaster at Pine Plains for four 
years. He accepted one nomination for Member of Assembly, and ran 
ahead of his ticket, but lack of harmony in the party prevented his elec- 
tion. He has served as dclciratc to all classes of Democratic conven- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 117 

tions, mcliiding the State conventions of 1884 and 1900, and rendered 
his party much effective service on the regular organization committees. 



Frank W. Klock was born in Little Falls, N. Y., December 7, 
1868. After receiving a liberal public school education he embarked 
in the clothing business, with which he has been principally identified 
during his business life. 

Mr. Klock has always been a faithful worker in the Democratic 
Party, and his value therein has been appreciated by his fellow Demo- 
crats. He has several times served as a Delegate to both City and 
County conventions. He was elected City Clerk in the year 1899 and 
was re-elected to succeed himself in February, 1901, for another term. 



James M. Ryan, born in Troy, January 23, 1874, has long been 
prominent among the Democratic workers of that city. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools and the La Salle Institute, graduating from 
the latter in the class of 1893. He entered the Albany Law School and 
in 1894 received his diploma, but he continued his preparation for the 
practice of the legal profession by taking a further course in the law 
department of Cornell University. Graduating here in 1895, he re- 
ceived the degree of LL.B. In the following year he was admitted to 
the Bar, being one of the first to pass under the new State Board of 
Law Examiners. 

He began practice in March, 1896, in Troy in partnership with 
Abbott H. Jones. The firm continued until the election oi Mr. Jones 
as Police Magistrate in 1899. 

In 1903 Mr. Ryan was appointed Commissioner of Charities and 
Correction, to succeed his father, James E. Ryan, deceased. 

He is a member of the Foresters of America, the Laureate Boat 
Club and the Knights of Columbus and is President of the Alumni 
Association of La Salle Institute. 

Mr, Ryan has always been an active Democratic worker. 



ii8 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

John A. Ives, born in the town of West Almond, Allegany County, 
in which he has always resided, December 20, 1828, is one of the Old 
Guard of Democratic Veterans in that Republican stronghold. 

He was born just after General Jackson had been first elected Presi- 
dent, and before his inauguration, and in all his long life has never 
voted any other than the Democratic ticket. He was educated in the 
public schools and has always followed the occupation of farmer. He 
has a fine farm, which he still cultivates with diligence and success. 
Always a straight Democrat, Mr. Ives has rendered his party valuable 
service as delegate to party conventions and as member and Chairman 
of the County Committee. He has also been honored with many offices, 
ha\'ing served with efficiency and success as Town Collector, Town 
Assessor, Road Commissioner and Supervisor. Some of these posi- 
tions he held, by repeated re-elections, for many years, and in all he 
gave great satisfaction. 

A grand old Democrat is John A, Ives, of Allegany. 



Percy W. Decker, a well-known attorney and a leading Democrat 
of Greene County, was lx)rn in the adjoining county of Ulster, July 
14, 1873, the son of Frank S. and Sarah F. (Bailey) Decker. 

When he was quite young his parents removed to Catskill, and here 
he obtained his education in the public schools and the Academy. 
Choosing the legal profession, he studied law in the office of Frank H. 
Osborne, and in July, 1897, he was admitted to the Bar. He at once 
commenced the practice of his profession- at Catskill, which has ever 
since been his home. 

Always a strong Democrat and active in party service, Mr. Decker 
was elected Justice of the Peace in 1899, and in 1902 he was chosen a 
member of the Board of Education. 

He is a meml^er of the Royal Arcanum and is an officer in Company 
E, Tenth Regiment, N. G. S. N. Y. (Sixteenth Separate Company). 
He is the attorney for the Merchants' Association. 

Mr. Decker is a public-spirited citizen and stands high in the com- 
munity. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 119 

Dr. W. E. McDuffie, a sound and solid Democrat and an earnest 
party worker in Cattaraugus County, was born at New Albion, in that 
county, July 2^, 1859. He was educated in the public schools and at 
the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor. 

After completing his literary education he studied medicine and was 
graduated at Buffalo University in 1888. After practicing his profes- 
sion at Farmersville for two years, he removed to Olean, and has con- 
tinued there to the present time. 

He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, in which he is a Knight Tem- 
plar, and to the order of Maccabees. Dr. McDuffie has been City Phy- 
sician, Pension Examiner under Cleveland, Chemist for the Western 
New York State Milk Department under Hill and Flower. 

Dr. McDuffie is a genial and popular gentleman and is highly re- 
spected by the entire community. For several years he has served as 
secretary of the Democratic County Committee, and he is a very strong 
man with his party. 



Fred. J. Harter, M.D., was born in Herkimer County, N. Y., 
October 6, 1855. He took literary courses at Fairfield Acad- 
emy and Eastman's Business College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. He 
then took up his medical studies and graduated from the medical 
department of Columbia. College, known as the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, in the class of 1880. He first located at Moravia, N. Y., 
where he remained until January i, 1893, when he settled permanently 
in Herkimer, where he has built up a large practice. 

Dr. Harter has always been closely identified with the Democratic 
Party and has been peculiarly valuable as a party worker because of his 
abilities and education. While in Moravia he was chairman of the 
County Committee and also of the Executive Committee and was con- 
nected with the Cayuga Democrat. 

During his life in Herkimer he has also been very active in further- 
ing the interests of the party and his services have been recognized in 
various ways, particularly by his election as President of the Village in 
1897 and again in 1902. 



I20 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Thomas F. IMc^Mahon. Among the bright and active Democrats 
of Cattaraugus County is Thomas F. Mc^Mahon, a young man of abihty 
and a successful farmer and himberman, who resides two miles from 
Allegany village. He has a large farm and he cultivates it with both 
diligence and skill, making it one of the most productive and profitable 
tracts of land in the county, 

j\Ir. ]\Ic^Iahon was born in the town of Allegany, March 5, 1866, 
and received his education in the public schools. 

He has always been a strong and influential Democrat, and so great 
is his personal popularity and so high the esteem in which he is held, 
that in the strong Republican town in which he has always lived he has 
been elected Commissioner of Highways, and for several terms he has 
carried it for Supervisor. 

Mr. McMahon comes from a Democratic family and he has ren- 
dered the party valuable service in many campaigns. 



H'. A. TozER was born in Naples, Ontario County, N. Y., July 3, 
1 850. He attended the public schools in his native place until thirteen 
years of age, when he left home to go to Glens Falls with the purpose 
of learning the trade of printer. He remained in Glens Falls until 
1867, when he went to Springfield, 111., where he was connected with 
the State Journal until 1871. In that year he went to Canandaigua, 
X. Y., and then to Little Falls, N.'Y., where he settled permanently. 

In Little Falls Mr. Tozer bought out the interests of Mr. Chapman 
in the firm of Chapman & Chappel, and conducted the business until 
he was compelled to retire on account of ill health. In 1877 he went 
into the undertaking business, in which he has since been engaged. 

Mr. Tozer is a staunch and consistent Democrat, and, while he 
takes a lively interest in tiie success of his party, he has an earnest con- 
cern for the welfare and progress of his city. He is particularly de- 
voted to the cause of education and has been a member of the School 
Board for nine years. He has on several occasions iDcen a delegate to 
county conventions, and was at one time a strong candidate for County 
Treasurer. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 121 

John H. Curley. One of the Democratic wheel-horses of the 
Seventh Ward of Troy and a strong leader in the city organization is 
John H. Curley. 

He was born in Troy, June 18, 1852, and he has always lived in 
that city. He was educated in the Troy public schools and afterward 
completed a course in the Troy Business College. 

He was appointed clerk in the Troy Police Department in 1870 and 
filled the position with great acceptance for six years. In 1876 he went 
into the business of undertaker at 2185 Fifth avenue and has continued 
without change ever since. In the year 1900 he was appointed Clerk of 
the Health Department, a position he still holds. 

Mr. Curley has been a hustler in the work of the party organization 
from the time he became of age, and he is a power in his ward. He 
has been a delegate to Democratic conventions on many occasions, and 
for ten years he held the position of chairman of the Board of Election 
Inspectors. 



John Begley^ a prominent business man and an influential Demo- 
crat of Fulton County, was born at Springfield, Otsego County, Au- 
gust 29, 1859. He received a sound education in the public schools 
and at once engaged in business. 

For five years he was manager of the Cooperstown Telephone Com- 
pany. From 1889 to 1901 he served as Superintendent of the Glovers- 
ville Electric Light Company. He has also been engaged as a con- 
tractor and constructor of electric light plants, being an electrical ex- 
pert. He is the Superintendent and Manager of the Gloversville Cold 
Storage Company. 

Mr. Begley is a member of the K. O. C, the K. O. T. M. and the 
Order of Elks. 

He is a loyal and earnest Democrat, and an efficient worker in the 
ranks. He has never had the time for official positions either in the 
party organization or the public service, but he is highly esteemed by 
his party associates and by the entire community of the thriving and 
prosperous city of his residence. 



122 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

John F. Brownell,, long- an active Democratic worker in the 
politics of Fulton County, was born at Hope, Hamilton County, Feb- 
ruary 25, 1862. 

He received a good education in the public schools and engaged in 
business as a bottler of carbonated drinks at Northville, Fulton County. 
The firm was L. & J. F. Brownell until 1898, since which time J. F. 
Brownell has conducted the business alone. 

]\Ir. Brownell has always been interested in the success of his party 
and was elected Town Clerk in 1898, serving two years, and in 1900 
he was elected Highway Commissioner, being re-elected and serving 
four years. He served as a member of the Democratic Town Com- 
mittee for several years and has frequently been a delegate to County 
and District conventions. • 

Mr. Brownell belongs to the I. O. O. F., including the Encamp- 
ment, and to the Order of Red Men. 



Hon. Eugene F. Patten was born in Marlboro, Ulster County, 
Decemljer 9, 1845. He was educated in the public schools, and after- 
wards embarked in the meat business. The market in Milton, which 
he has managed with such marked success, he established in 1870. 

He belongs to the Masonic order and the Knights of Pythias. 

Mr. Patten has always been a loyal and influential Democrat and 
active in the organization. 

He was elected Town Collector in 1874 and 1875 and Supervisor 
in 1877 and again in 1879. I" 1SS2 he was elected Member of Assem- 
bly from the Second Ulster District. In 1892 he was again chosen 
Supervisor, and he succeeded himself for two terms more. He was 
Cliairman of the Democratic County Committee in 1886, 1887 and 
1888, and he has been a member of the committee for the past twenty 
years. 

He was a delegate to the Democratic State Convention of 1879, ^^ 
well as that of 1900. and he has represented his district in several other 
famous conventions. 

He was elected Supervisor in 1903 and unanimously chosen chair- 
man of the Ulster County Board of Supervisors in 1904. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 123 

Louis W. Stowell, one of the leading Democrats of Cattaraugus 
County, was born at Olean, July 9, 1877. 

His father was a strong and prominent Democrat before hira, 
Sheriff of Cattaraugus County, and Postmaster at Olean under Cleve- 
land. 

The subject of this sketch was educated in the public schools, and 
was graduated from the High School of that thriving city. He studied 
law with J. H. Waring, Esq., of Olean, and after his admission to the 
Bar he began the practice of his profession in his native city. 

In 1 90 1 he was elected Justice of the Peace, and in 1903 he was 
honored with the Democratic nomination for Police Justice. He failed 
of election, although he ran two hundred votes ahead of his ticket. 
There are doubtless many political honors in reserve for this talented 
young Democrat. 



Patrick Peters. One of the class of Democrats to whom tKe 
Party of the People has always owed much of its strength and vitality 
is Patrick Peters, of the Ninth Ward, in the city of Troy. 

Mr. Peters was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, in i860, and 
was still little more than a child when he emigrated to the United 
States. His parents made their home in Troy, and here the subject of 
this sketch obtained a good, sound public school education. After 
leaving school he began work in a grocery store, and in 1876 he estab- 
lished the flourishing business in that branch of trade which he has 
since conducted with so much success at 381 Second street. He is at 
present a director of the Retail Grocers' Association of the city of Troy. 

Mr. Peters has always been a vigorous and efficient worker in the 
Democratic organization in the Ninth Ward and a man of power and 
influence in the party councils. He is interested in the success of his 
party, however, only as he is interested in good government, the prime 
essential of prosperity, and he has never had any aspiration to political 
station. He has often served, however, as a delegate to party conven- 
tions, and has had much influence in shaping their action and naming 
their candidates. 



124 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



PATRICK J. TIERNEY 

Patrick James Tierney, lawyer, was torn in Plattsburgh, N. Y., 
February 19, 1876, the son of James and Margaret (Harney) Tierney. 
James Tierney was a successful lawyer and staunch Democrat and was 
elected to many important" public offices, notwithstanding the strong 
Republican preponderance in Clinton County. He was born at Clin- 
tonville, Essex County, N. Y., in May, 1845, the son of Patrick Tier- 
ney, who came from Ireland early in the last century and settled in 
Northern New York, where he prospered as a blacksmith and farmer. 
James Tierney was educated at the Fort Edward Collegiate Institute 
and was a highly esteemed teacher and farmer before he began the 
practice of law in Plattsburgh in 1877. Patrick J, Tierney, the subject 
of this sketch, received his education in the Plattsburgh public schools, 
and after graduation from the High School entered his father's office 
as a student of law. In 1897 he was graduated from the Albany Law 
School, in the same year was admitted to the Bar and has since built 
up a flourishing practice. 

Young Tierney inherited his father's taste for politics, and while yet 
a boy was a good worker in getting out the Democratic vote in his 
ward. He was the nominee of his party for District Attorney in 1901, 
Ijut was defeated. In June, 1902, Plattsburgh's first ]\Iayor, Albert 
Sharron, appointed him City Judge for a term of two years. Under 
the special charter of the city this official is vested with a somewhat 
extensive jurisdiction, both civil and criminal. He was for two years 
chairman of the Democratic City Committee, has been secretary of the 
County Committee and is now (1904) a member of that body. In the 
fall of 1902 Mr. Tierney sprang at a lx>und into State-wide prominence 
through the struggle for Clinton County's delegates to the State Con- 
vention at Saratoga. On the one side were the veterans of the Weed 





r/ie lyhih^ Statt^s /^ist^rt^ <C^ 




TM€ 

NEW VO^!" 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 125 

forces, on the other the Hill or Tierney Democrats, sometimes called 
the Young Democracy. In the interest of impartial history the claims 
of the Young Democracy should be related here. In the County Con- 
vention six town delegations of the Hill wing were denied admission, 
whereupon these delegations, being joined by four of the seated dele- 
gations, thus making ten delegations out of a total of fifteen, withdrew, 
held another convention, of which Mr. Tierney was chairman, selected 
as their delegates to Saratoga Mayor Albert Sharron, Patrick J. Tier- 
ney and John H. Pettinger. The fight was thus transferred to the 
State Convention, where, before the Committee on Contested Seats, 
Mr. Tierney ably presented their claims to regularity and Thomas F. 
Conway championed the Weed cause. The result, the seating of the 
Hill delegation, was generally regarded as a brilliant victory for the 
young lawyer. The remoter result of that factional disappointment, 
carried to the polls, is an unhappy feature in the Democratic annals of 
1902. Mr. Tierney takes pride in the loyal support given by the Young 
Democracy of Clinton County to the entire ticket in 1903. 

Mr. Tierney was married November 28, 1900, to Louise Hogan, 
of Albany, N. Y. .:;■' ■^• 



John M. O'Malley^ one of the enterprising and successful mer- 
chants of Ontario County, was born at Geneva, October 10, 1867. That 
pleasant little city has always been his home. He acquired his educa- 
tion at the St. Francis de Sales School, and after his school days were 
over he embarked in the mercantile business, in which he has continued 
with much success to the present time. 

Mr. O'Malley is a member of the Knights of Columbus and of the 
Volunteer Fire Department of his native village. 

He has always been an active Democratic worker, and has served as 
delegate to many important conventions. In 1901 he received the ap- 
pointment as City Clerk and his record of efficient service was such that 
he was reappointed in the fall of 1903 and is still the incumbent of the 
office. 



126 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Stephen R. Ryax, one of the adopted sons of Watertown, Jeffer- 
son County, has proved a valiialjle acquisition to the local Democratic 
organizations. He has taken an active part in the caucuses and pri- 
maries of the party, and has given ample demonstration of his ability 
as a leader in the management of several campaigns. 

While controlling extensive business interests in the city, he has, 
nevertheless, found time to devote to the work of the organization as 
a member of the City Democratic Committee and of the Jefferson 
County Democratic Committee, having served on both these bodies for 
many years. He has likewise given time to represent the local or- 
ganizations as delegate to many conventions, and twice, in 1884 and 
1892, he went as delegate to State conventions. In 1904 he was candi- 
date for delegate to the National Convention at St. Louis and was 
defeated by only one vote. 

In his early youth, before Watertown \vas incorporated as a city, 
Mr. Ryan was elected Constable and so faithfully and well did he dis- 
charge his duties that he was .elected to three succeeding terms in the 
strongly Republican Second Ward. 

In business life ]Mr. Ryan has achieved great success. He was 
born in Osceola, Lewis County. December 26, 1849. -^'^ the age of 
eleven his parents removed to Maple Hill, Williamstown, N. Y., where 
his father had a contract to get out wood for the New York Central 
Railroad. In 1865 he obtained employment in a general store at Maple 
Hill, where. Ijy virtue of four years of faithful work, he gained and 
held the esteem of his employers. Later he went to Croghan, where, 
with a brother, he learned the trade of millwright and carpenter and 
joiner. In 1873 ^""^ removed to Watertown and worked at his trade 
until 1876, when he was elected Constable. 

He established a small liquor store on Court street in 1880, and 
two years later formed a ]mrtnership with John Winslow, and engaged 
in the wholesale business. In 1884 the firm name was changed to 
Ryan & Williams, which continued until 1886, when Mr. Ryan be- 
came .sole proprietor. In his business he occupies a handsome building, 
wliich he owns, and two large outside storehouses. 

He is a member of the Jeffersonian Club, A. O. LI., C. M. B. A., 
and is Past Exalted Ruler of Watertown Lodge, No. 496, B. P. O. E. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 127 

Mr. Ryan married, September 2, 1873, Caroline, eldest dang-hter 
of Moritz Clodwick, of Belfort, Lewis County, N. Y. They have two 
sons, George W., of Pittsburgh, Pa., and A. H., a lawyer of New York 
City. 



Hon. Gideon Howard Strong, formerly the Mayor of the city of 
Olean, was born at Black Lake, Sullivan County, in i860. 

He comes from good Democratic stock, his father, the late Jairus 
B. Strong, having been one of the most prominent and powerful Demo- 
crats in Western New York in his day. He was a masterly kisiness 
man and accumulated a large fortune by his energy and sagacity. He, 
too, was a native of Sullivan County, and came to Cattaraugus Coimty 
in 1864. His personal popularity, and the esteem in which he was held, 
was shown by his election as County Treasurer in this overwhelming 
Republican county in 1875. He died in 1878. 

His son, the subject of this sketch, was educated in the public 
schools and at the famous Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., from 
which he was graduated in 1881. He was associated in business with 
his father, and from 1892 to 1898 he was Secretary and Treasurer of 
the Electric Street Railway Company of Olean. He has been also a 
large oil producer and an extensive and successful operator in real 
estate. 

He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, being a thirty-second 
degree Mason of the Scotch Rite, and he belongs to the Elks and the 
City Club. In 1887 he was married to Miss Annie Macintosh, of Brad- 
ford, Pa. 

Mr. Strong has been one of the leading business men of Olean, and 
he has done much to develop its possibilities and increase its pros- 
perity. He has always had the faculty, like his father before him, of 
"striking oil" in every enterprise he engaged in. 

In 1898 he accepted the Democratic nomination for Mayor of Olean, 
and in spite of the very large normal Republican majority, so great 
was his personal strength that he was triumphantly elected. He gave 
the city a splendid, businesslike administration, fulfilling all the high 
anticipations of the community. 



128 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

ZoPHER I. DeLong was one of the more prominent of our modern 
patriarchs, one recalhng those biographies and chronicles of events of 
limes gone by. 

Mr. DeLong was an American through blood, by birth, in tradition, 
of choice. Back at the fountain head of the family were French 
Huguenots individually, aye families who suffered torture and death 
for conscience's sake. 

Zopher I. DeLong was the son of James L. and Elizabeth (Dem- 
ing). DeLong, and was born in the town of Edinburgh, Saratoga 
County. X. Y., July 9, 181 5. 

In the earlier years of his life he received that education which is 
imparted in our American common schools, attending those of the 
towns of Day and Edinburgh, Saratoga County. 

He was married to Aliss Catherine Scott, of West Day, in 1838. 
The preliminaiy business training of Mr. DeLong was inculcated at the 
counters of a general store. Stepping from out this particular line, the 
gentleman became interested for a time in lumbering and yet again in 
farming. 

In December, i860, Mr. DeLong came to Glens Falls and founded 
the hardware house of DeLong & Sons. The firm is a type of the best 
of similar character, solid, conservative, cautious. 

Since Mr. DeLong's death two of his sons, Theodore S. and John 
B., have continued the business under the firm name of DeLong's 
Sons. 

Politically Mr. DeLong was a Democrat, one to be relied upon in 
disaster as well as in victory, a type of character which in its outcrop- 
ping recalls in no small measure that Huguenot element yet radiating 
through the family lines. 

He took an active interest in party affairs and for eight or ten years 
represented the town of Day on the Board of Supervisors and later was 
also Clerk of that body for one term. He was also Chairman of the 
board for one term. Coming to Glens Falls, his interest in political 
affairs did not lessen. He served as Village Trustee in 1862 and 1863 
and again in 1873. In 1874 and 1875 he was elected Supervisor of the 
town of Oueensbury. the issue involved in his first election being the 
repudiation of the bonds for $100,000 issued to assist in the building 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 129 

of the Glens Falls Railroad. Mr. DeLong represented those who fav- 
ored the payment of the town's debts. 

C. W. Gilchrist was the opposing candidate in 1874, and Charles 
H. Green was his opponent in 1875. 

Mr. DeLong represented the best type of citizenship. A man of 
the strictest integrity, an exemplar for those who would achieve suc- 
cess in material things and command the respect of all who admire 
moral rectitude, he occupied an inviolable position in the estimation of 
the people of his community. He was the embodiment of affability, 
Tn his capacity as a public official, in the conduct of his private business 
and in the social realm, under any and all circumstances, he was the 
same courtly, considerate gentleman. 

Mr. DeLong survived his wife ten years, dying in Glens Falls Janu- 
ary 14, 1 90 1. He is survived by five sons and two daughters. 



Frank H. Grant,, a prominent and potent Democratic worker of 
■Chenango County, was born at Norwich, March 28, 1867. He was 
educated in the public schools and Norwich Academy. He also re- 
ceived a thorough business education at Eastman's Business College, 
at Poughkeepsie. 

He served as Clerk in the Norwich Postoffice during President 
Cleveland's first term, but resigned to engage in the clothing business, 
and he continued some two years in that branch of trade, when he 
left it for the grocery business. This he also abandoned after a time 
for hotel work. In 1900 he took charge of the National Hotel, at Nor- 
wich, and he still continues in that position, being one of the most 
popular landlords in Central New York. 

Mr. Grant is a natural torn politician, having both the taste and 
the capacity for doing effective political work. He is one of the strong 
men of the party organization in Chenango County. In 1890 he was 
elected Town Clerk, only one other candidate on the Democratic ticket 
being successful. He has been urged to accept various other nomina- 
tions, but his business affairs have prevented his acceptance. Both as a 
member of party committees and as a Delegate to Democratic conven- 
tions Mr. Grant has rendered distinguished party service. 



I30 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Arthur D. Bedell. An enterprising and prosperous business man 
is Arthur D. Bedell, of Salamanca, the most extensive cigar manufac- 
turer and dealer in Cattaraugus County. 

He was born at Binghamton, September i, 1861, and received his 
educational training in the public schools at Great Bend, Pa. After 
leaving school he came to Salamanca and engaged in the business 
which he has pursued with remarkable energy and success. 

]\Ir. Bedell is a Free and Accepted Mason, and a Noble of the Mys- 
tic Shrine. 

He is a loyal and earnest Democrat in politics, and he has been 
honored by his party with nominations and by his fellow-citizens with 
election to the three principal local offices. Town Clerk, President of 
the Village, and Supervisor. To the last named office he has been called 
four times, showing the esteem in which he is held by his party and his 
fellow-citizens. 



Erastus Darling was born in the town of Day, Saratoga County, 
X. Y., Januar}^ 24, 1844. He received a liberal public school educa- 
tion and has all his life been engaged in the lumber business, real estate 
and mercantile pursuits. While in Saratoga County he was a member 
of the firm of Darling Bros., and in Hamilton County was a member of 
the firm of Darling & Deming. 

His business interests are large and varied. He was the founder of 
the Mechanics' and Merchants' Bank and was one of its directors; he 
is a director and was one of the founders of the Northville Bank; he 
was prominent in prnjecling llic Fonda, Jolmstown and Gloversville 
Railroad, and is one of its directors and a heavy stockholder; he is a 
director of the Caynadetta Railroad ; is a stockholder in the Amster- 
dam Street Railroad ; is President of the Cold Storage Company of 
Gloversville and President of the Northville Granite Company. 

.A.11 these business interests indicate an active and successful life, 
yet, notwithstanding the demands upon his attention which these vari- 
ous enterprises have made, he has found time to render valuable assis- 
tance to the Democratic cause. He was Supervisor of the town of Day, 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 131 

Saratoga County, from 1875 to 1880, and since his residence in Glov- 
ersville he has loyally, although quietly, done a great deal to forward 
the interests of Democracy. 

Mr. Darling is a prominent Mason and is a member of Gloversville 
Lodge, No. 429, F. and A. M. ; Johnstown Chapter, No. 78, R. A. M. ; 
Gloversville Commandery, No. 51, K. T., and the Cyprus Shrine at 
Albany, N. Y. He is also a member of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks and of the Eccentric Club. 



William J. Roser. One of the potent leaders of the Montgomery 
County Democracy is William J. Roser, of Canajoharie. He was born 
in that village October 6, 1866, and was educated in the public schools. 
In 1889 he engaged in the jewelry business, continuing in that branch 
of trade for eight years, leaving it to accept the position of President of 
the Canajoharie Creamery Company. In 1898 he organized the Roser 
Furniture Company, and in the following year he became the President 
of the Montgomery Electric Light and Power Company, but also con- 
tinues his furniture business. 

In spite of the fact that Mr. Roser has always been a man of such 
great and varied activities, he has found time to be of essential service 
to the Democratic Party, to which he is devotedly attached. He is 
especially efficient in important campaigns, though he is always active 
and eager for party work. After three years' service as Town Clerk, 
in 1895 he was elected Supervisor and repeatedly re-elected, his tenure 
of the office continuing unbroken until 1902. He was Chairman of the 
Board of Supervisors in 1890. For twelve years he has been a member 
of the Democratic County Committee. Mr. Roser has a host of per- 
sonal friends. 

He is prominent in fraternal societies, being a member of the 
Masons up to and including the Commandery, the Oriental Temple and 
the Mystic Shrine; of the Royal Arcanum; of the Odd Fellows and of 
the Red Men. He is president of the Board of Trade and of the Board 
of Health. He is one of the foremost citizens of Montgomery County, 
and he is highly respected by all who know him. 



132 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Robert Lansing, lawyer, of Watertown, N. Y., was born in that 
city October 17, 1864. the son of John and Maria L. (Dodge) Lansing. 
Of Dntcli origin, the name Lansing has been a notable one in the 
colonial and State history of New York through many generations. 
No name is better known in Albany or more closely identified with that 
city's early struggles and mature growth. Robert Lansing, the grand- 
father of the subject of this sketch, was a native of Albany, but early 
removed to Jefferson County, where he distinguished himself in the 
practice of the law and upon the bench. He was twice elected a mem- 
ber of the State Senate. There was a singular parallel in the career of 
the maternal grandfather, Judge Edwin Dodge, of St. Lawrence 
County. He, too, graced the bench and likewise represented his dis- 
trict in the State Senate. Both were staunch Democrats. 

Robert Lansing, the subject of this sketch, was educated in the 
public schools of A\'atertown and at Amherst College, from which he 
was graduated in 1886. He then began the study of law in the office 
of his father and was admitted to the Bar in 1889. Immediately after 
his admission he was taken into partnership by his father, under the 
firm name of Lansing & Lansing, with offices in Watertown. 

In the practice of his profession. Mr. Lansing has devoted a large 
portion of his time to international law. He was appointed Associate 
Counsel for the United States in the Behring Sea Arbitration, at Paris, 
in 1892. He was, likewise, one of the United States Counsel before 
the Behring Sea Claims Commission, in Halifax, in 1897. 

In the discharge of these duties, fraught with such important re- 
sults to this country, Mr. Lansing acquitted himself so favorably that 
the government at AN^ashington employed him again in 1903 as Solici- 
tor in the -Alaskan boundary question. Besides the many other impor- 
tant commissions he has held, Mr. Lansing for some time was counsel 
for the Chinese and Mexican Legations at W^ashington. 

A Democrat from principle as well as by inheritance, Mr. Lansing 
has found time to devote to local matters affecting Democracy. He 
has served on the Jefferson Coimty Democratic Committee, and from 
1888 until 1 89 1 he was Chainnan of the committee. At various times 
he has served as delegate to the different minor conventions, and in 
1888 and on several other occasions has l^een a delegate to the State 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 133 

conventions. Fie has been a member of the Board of PubHc Safety, 
Watertown, for eleven years. 

Mr. Lansing is a member of the Psi Upsilon fraternity and of the 
Black River Valley Club. 

Robert Lansing married, January 15, 1890, Eleanor, daughter of 
John W. Foster, former Secretary of State at Washington, D. C. 



William F. O'Brien was born at Geneva, February 16, 1864. He 
was educated in the public schools, and after the completion of his 
educational training he engaged in the granite business at Lidianapolis, 
the capital city of Lidiana, in 1884. He continued at Lidianapolis for 
eight years, when he returned to his native place, where he has ever 
since been conducting an extensive business in the same line. Mr. 
O'Brien is a member of the Knights of Columbus. 

He is a loyal and active Democrat and one of the most active and 
efficient party workers in the county during political campaigns. 

In 1 90 1 he was appointed President of the Board of Health. Mr. 
O'Brien is a prominent business man and a highly esteemed citizen. 



William Keleher has for many years been one of the staunch 
and sterling Democrats of Rockland County, always interested in his 
party's success and anxious to secure it. He has on many occasions 
served as delegate to ipiportant Democratic conventions, and his valua- 
ble assistance can always be relied upon when a political campaign is in 
progress. His private business, however, is so exacting in its de- 
mands upon his time and attention that he has never consented to ac- 
cept any appointment or nomination to public office, though repeatedly 
urged to do so. He believes in his party, however, just the same, and 
he has never been known to fail to take part in the primaries since he 
became entitled to a vote. 

Mr. Keleher is a member of the Red Men, of the Foresters and of 
the Columbia Engine Company of Spring Valley. 



134 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

James A. Connelly^ a prominent worker in the Democratic or- 
ganization of Chemung County, was born at PhilHpsburg, N. J., in 
May, 1872. 

When but one year old his parents removed to Ehnira, and that 
flourishing city has ever since been his home. He was educated in the 
pubhc schools, including the Elmira High School. 

In April, 1899, he was appointed Clerk to the Elmira Cit}- Court, a 
position which he has filled with fidelity and skill to the present time. 
He has served three terms as Constable, and was for three years In- 
spector of Public Works. He has often been appointed delegate to 
local Democratic conventions, and for nine years he has served as a 
member of the Democratic County Committee. 

Mr. Connelly is a member of the Knights of Columbus, of the Order 
of Red Men and of the Ancient Order of Hibernians. 

As a man and as a citizen Mr. Connelly stands high, and he has 
much weight, both in the party and the community. 



William W. Thomas. One of the earnest and influential Demo- 
crats of Allegany County is William W. Thomas, an enterprising and 
prosperous merchant and prominent business man, who has always 
resided within the boundaries of that county. 

He was born at Centerville about fifty years ago, but since 1S80 he 
has conducted an extensive business at Rushford, dealing in clothing 
and general merchandise. He received his education in the public 
schools, supplemented by a course at the Oberlin, Ohio, College. 

He belongs to the Odd Fellows and the Order of Maccabees. In 
addition to his private business, Mr. Thomas is the superintendent and 
manager of the Rushford Telephone Company and Secretary of the 
Rushford Agricultural Association. 

His son, Dr. C. H. Thomas, has graduated in dentistry and already 
enjoys a large practice in his profession, although he did not open his 
office until 1903. 

Both father and son are loyal and active in the Democratic cause. 
The father has served for many years on the Democratic County Com- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 135 

mittee, of which he Is still a member. He has on several occasions con- 
sented to accept nominations for public office, but the Republican ma- 
jority has prov^ed too heavy for even his popularity to overcome. He 
has, however, given his opponents a very close race at times, and they 
have always known that there was a popular man running against 
them. 



Hubert C. Stratton, 'Esq., one of the most prominent lawyers, 
one of the finest public speakers, and one of the most influential Demo- 
crats of Chenango County, was born within its borders, December 5, 
1863. He received a sound and excellent education in the public 
schools and the Oxford Academy. Selecting the legal profession, he 
began his studies in the office of the Hon. Solomon Bundy, of Oxford, 
and completed them by a two years' course at the Law School of Co- 
lumbia University, New York City. 

After his graduation and his admission to the Bar, he at once began 
the practice of his profession, opening his office at Oxford, March i, 
1889. He soon took high rank at the Chenango County Bar, and he 
has an extensive practice in Central New York. 

Mr. Stratton's first essay in politics was when teaching school, and 
only eighteen years old. He became intensely interested in the election 
of Willis R. Hall as School Commissioner. He worked with great 
zeal, and his candidate was triumphantly elected. From that time for- 
ward he has been one of the most valuable workers for Democratic 
success in the State. In 1886 he was elected Justice of the Peace, and 
in 1889 and 1890 he was chosen Supervisor of the strong Republican 
town of Oxford. He has been honored by his party with nominations 
for District Attorney, Special County Judge, Member of Assembly, 
County Judge and State Senator, and he has always run ahead of his 
ticket, but the Republican majority was too great for even his immense 
popularity to overcome. 

Mr. Stratton has often served his party as delegate to Democratic 
State conventions, and for many years he has served as member and 
Chairman of the Democratic County Committee. Chenango County is 



136 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

not a very hopeful field for a Democratic worker, but Democratic votes 
count just as strongly in a State contest as if they were in the majority 
in the county, and Mr. Stratton, realizing that fact, has given great 
attention to strengthening the organization and bringing out the full 
Democratic vote at every election. It is such faithful, undiscouraged 
and active workers in counties where the Democracy is in a hopeless 
minority that have given the party its many brilliant State, and even 
National victories. 

Mr. Stratton was married, December 17, 1890, to Miss Lewis, 
daughter of Samuel E. Lewis, a prominent citizen of Chenango 
County. 



Walter Elmer Colgrove^ M.D., leading physician and a promi- 
nent Democrat of Horseheads, Chemung County, N. Y., was born in 
Erin, that county, January 22, 1862, and is the son of Benjamin F. and 
Sarah A. (Whitman) Colgrove. He received his literary education 
at the public schools and free academy of his native village, finishing 
in 1S77. 

He afterward attended the AA^estern Reserve University in Cleve- 
land, Ohio, until 1879, when he returned to Elmira and began the study 
of medicine, being engaged as a clerk in the drug store of Ingram Bros. 
In 1882 he was graduated from the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons of Baltimore, Md., with the degree of M.D., and immediately 
began the active practice of his profession in Chemung. In 1885 Dr. 
Colgrove located at Horseheads, which he has since made his home. 
and where he has built up a large and lucrative practice and established 
a high reputation as a skillful and successful physician and surgeon. 

Dr. Colgrove is an earnest and loyal Democrat and takes the keenest 
interest in his party's success. The party was quick to recognize his 
ability, and in 1898 he was the Democratic nominee for Coroner and 
was the only Democrat elected. In 1901 he was again nominated for 
Coroner, and in 1902 received the nomination for Member of Assem- 
bly, but on both occasions the whole Democratic ticket was defeated. 
He has represented his party as a delegate to county conventions since 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 137 

entering the political arena and has great influence with his fellow 
Democrats throughout the county. His advice is always sought on 
every occasion of importance and is freely and disinterestedly given. 
He is a personal friend and strong admirer of D. B. Hill, of wdiose 
political principles he is a staunch adherent. 

In his fraternal relations Dr. Colgrove is a member of the Royal 
Arcanum, the New York State Medical Society, the Masonic Chapter 
at Horseheads and the Firemen's Association of the State of New 
York, of which he was president in 1902. 

In 1884 W. E. Colgrove, M.D., married Cordelia Ruggles, of Che- 
mung, Chemung County, and they have one son. 



Henry A. Maloy. One of the active and prominent Democrats of 
the city of Albany is Henry A. Maloy, always diligent and efficient in 
his party's cause. Mr. Maloy is a prosperous brewer, but even the 
exactions of his extensive private business cannot prevent him from 
doing yeoman service for the Democracy. He has shown splendid effi- 
ciency on party committees and his counsel has been much sought in 
Democratic conventions. 

Mr. Maloy w^as elected Inspector of Elections in 1874, and in 1878 
he accepted an appointment as Keeper of the Albany Penitentiary. He 
was Acting Deputy Superintendent during the great fever scare in the 
penitentiary. After nine years of faithful service in this responsible 
position Mr. Maloy resigned, in 1887, and his fellow officials presented 
him with a handsome and valuable gold watch as a token of their re- 
spect, friendship and admiration for him as an official and as a man. 
In the same year Mr. Maloy was chosen clerk of the Board of Super- 
visors, a position he held until 1895. a period of eight years. In 1896 
he was elected City Clerk and in 1898 he was re-elected, serving until 
1900. 

Mr. Maloy was a member of the famous political marching organi- 
zation known as the Democratic Phalanx. He is the Great Sannop of 
the Great Council of I. O. R. M. of the State of New York and is a 
prominent member of the B. P. O. E. 



13.8 THE DE^IOCRATIC PARTY 

Frank E. Munson^ a prominent Democrat and one of the leading 
business men of Herkimer, was born in that village, October 25, 1864. 
He received his education in the public schools, and after his school 
days were over he engaged in the furniture manufacturing business. 
Later he became the proprietor of an extensive bottling plant, in which 
he has built up a very large business, and which he still owns. 

He served one term as Justice of the Peace and was the assistant of 
Sheriff Baker during his term of three. years, 1898, 1899 and 1900. In 
the latter year Mr. IMunson received the Democratic nomination for 
the same office, and made a strong and strenuous canvass. His per- 
sonal popularity and the esteem in which he is held were clearly shown. 
by his running 2,000 votes ahead of his ticket. 

]\Ir. ]\Iunson was a delegate to the famous Democratic State Con- 
vention held at Saratoga in 1902, and he has many times been a mem- 
ber of county and district conventions, as well as an efficient member of 
the Democratic County Committee. 



Herbert H. Carpenter, a popular hotel proprietor of Northville, 
Fulton County, is not only a live and influential Democrat, but he has 
also practically demonstrated the fact that he "knows how to keep a 
hotel," his hostelry being well known in that part of the State. 

Mr. Carpenter was born at Hope, Hamilton County, October 14, 
1858. He acquired his education in the public schools and the Acad- 
emy at Amsterdam. After leaving school he engaged as a lumberman, 
with the Morgan Lumber Company, for several years. In 1890 he 
went into the hotel business at Piseco Lake, and in 1893 ^'^^ ^ook charge 
of the hotel at Northville, where he has remained until the present time. 

He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, and also to the Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine. He holds membership in the Fish House Lodge, the 
Sacandaga Chapter, the Holy Cross Commandery and the Cypress 
Temple of Albany. 

In politics Mr. Carpenter is an active Democratic worker, who has 
rendered much valuable service to his party, and as a citizen he is highly 
respected in the community. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 139 

Cyrenius B. Signer was born in Ulster County, March 28, 1869. 
He received his educational training in the pul)lic schools and engaged 
in contracting for quarries, a business in which he was so successful 
that he pursued it for sixteen years. In 1893 he went into the hotel 
business, establishing Signer's Hotel, in Binnewater. Here he has 
built up a fine business and his hotel has a wide reputation. 

He is a member of the Knights of Pythias and of the Independent 
Order of Red Men. 

Mr. Signer has always been one of those loyal and active Democrats 
who constitute the life and strength of the party. He has often repre- 
sented his party in conventions and is a tireless and efficient worker for 
his party's success, though his extensive business interests have com- 
pelled him to decline all nominations for public offxe. 

Mr. Signer comes of sturdy Democratic stock. His father, Jacob 
I. Signer, was one of the Democratic leaders in Ulster County for many 
years and served as vSheriff in 1849. 



Hon. George H. Smith, County Judge of Sullivan County and 
one of the prominent Democrats in that part of the State, was born at 
Woodbourne, Sullivan County, October 18, 1864. 

After acquiring such education as the public schools afforded, he 
took a course at the Liberty Normal Institute. After thus completing 
his educational training Mr. Smith entered upon the study of law and 
pursued it with diligence and success, graduating from the Albany Law 
School and being admitted to the Bar in 1887. He began the practice 
of his profession at Monticello without entering into any partnership, 
and at once took a high rank as a sound lawyer. So marked was his 
ability and so pronounced his success that in 1893, when only twenty- 
nine years of age, he was elected County Judge, the youngest man, it is 
believed, ever chosen to this high office in the history of the State. So 
able and satisfactory was his work upon the Bench that he was re- 
elected for another term of six years in 1899. 

Judge Smith belongs to the Masonic and Odd Fellows' fraternities, 
and he has every promise of a distinguished public career before him. 



I40 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hon. Daniel E. Conway, brewer of Troy, was born in that city, 
Angiist 14, 1856, the son of John and Mary (Ctishing) Conway. His 
early education, acquired in the pubhc schools of Troy, was supple- 
mented by a full course in the Troy Commercial College, from which 
lie was graduated with credit. Mr. Conway is one of a family of ten 
children, eight sons and two daughters, practically all of whom have 
manifested the qualities wliich make for success along their chosen 
lines. 

Daniel Conway's first emplo3'ment kept him in the foundries of 
Basse, McLeod & Co., of Troy, and James Wager, of West Troy, for 
four years. He then entered the coal business and continued therein 
for a period of six years, until in January, 1883, i^ association with 
his brother and N. T. Kane, he purchased the brewery of W. H. Potter 
& Co. Under the firm name of Conway Bros. & Kane a large and suc- 
cessful business was rapidly built up. Mr. Kane died in 1887. The 
business has continued to expand during succeeding years until now, 
under the firm style of Conway Bros. Brewing and Malting Company, 
it is one of the best known in the State. Mr. Conway is President of 
the company. IMr. Conway founded the Troy Sunday Nczi'S, an active 
Democratic paper, September 9, 1894, and continued as its sole owner 
and proprietor until May i, 1901, when he disposed of his interest. 

In the political history of the city of Troy and in its recent rapid 
development Mr. Conway has played a most important part. His first 
public office was that of Supervisor from the Seventh \\'ard, to which 
he was elected in 1881 and 1882. Then came his election as County 
Clerk in 18S6, followed by re-election to the same office in 1889. In 
1 89 1, during the so-called Maynard campaign, Governor Hill removed 
Mr. Conway from his position as County Clerk at alx)ut the same time 
and for the same cause that he removed the County Clerks of Dutchess 
and Onondaga counties. The removal of Mr. Conway was destined to 
have a profound effect upon the fortunes of the Democracy in Troy and 
in the State for several years, as it was not until the fall of 1903 that 
the party was able to heal its differences and present a united front to 
the common enemy. 

Mr. Conway was nominated for Mayor by the Progressive Democ- 
racy and endorsed Iw the RqDublicans in 1899, and after a spirited 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 141 

campaign was elected by- a plurality of 686. He was re-elected in 1902 
by the Progressive Democracy and the Republicans jjy a plurality of 
2,363. This was the result of an unusually aggressive campaign in 
wdiich, for weeks, public meetings and parades were as numerous as in 
a presidential year. Mayor Conway's administration made good the 
promises of the platform upon which he was elected and secured for the 
city many of the great public improvements for which the citizens had 
long clamored. Under his administration street cleaning machines 
were introduced, a fine free public bath was established and Prospect 
Park, the city's first park of considerable size, was acquired. Beauti- 
fully located on the hill and com.manding an extensive view of the Hud- 
son Valley to the south and north, this park in time is destined to be- 
come one of the finest in the State. A new gravity water system, which 
when completed will supply a population ten times the size of the pres- 
ent city with pure spring water, thus ridding the city of the contami- 
nated river water, was begun. Police protection was improved and the 
force was increased by twenty-five per cent., while in the fire depart- 
ment two steamer companies and one hose company were added. 
Greater Troy became an accomplished fact through the action of Mayor 
Conway by the joining of Lansingburg and portions of the towns of 
Brunswick and North Greenbush, thus making a city of about 80,000 
instead of 60,000 at the beginning of the Mayor's administration. 
Large extensions of paving and sewers were constructed and these im- 
provements were especially welcomed in Second avenue, where resi- 
dents had petitioned for them for years in vain. In June, 1901, the 
Mayor was gratified in securing an ordinance compelling ultimate 
burial of all wires beneath the surface of the street. 

Mr. Conway has been many times a delegate to local and State con- 
ventions and was a delegate to the National Convention in 1904. He 
was a member of the Democratic City Committee for fourteen years, 
efficiently representing his ward, the Seventh. He has many times dis- 
played his capacity as political organizer, and even adversaries gen- 
erally concede that during the period when factional differences were 
in their most acute stage his successful attacks upon the old and thor- 
oughly established organization were conducted with great ability and 
in the face of odds that seemed overwhelming. It is worthy of recog- 



142 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

nition that Mr. Conway's administration rose superior to local condi- 
tions and that he led the way to reconciliation and union in the fall of 
1903 and in the presidential campaign of 1904. He is a member of the 
Troy Lodge of Elks. 

Daniel E. Conway married, January 20, 1893, Mary Calvin, and 
has two sons. 



Edwix \\'. FiSKE, the present Mayor of the city of Mount Vernon 
(1904). was born at Shamokin, Pa., July, 1861, and received a com- 
mon school education in the public schools of Harrisburg, Pa. At the 
age of eighteen he was apprenticed to learn the Bessemer steel manu- 
facturing business and served his time at this trade with the Pennsyl- 
vania Steel Company, Steelton, Pa. From there he came to New York 
City, and for the past fourteen years has been engaged in the steam and 
hot water heating business. 

Mr. Fiske mo^'ed to Mount Vernon about eleven years ago, and 
immediately interested himself in public affairs. 

From 1889 to 1890 he served the old Second Ward in the Board of 
Village Trustees. 

In 1893 ^""^ ^^''^s elected Alderman from the present Second Ward 
against a strong competitor. In 1894 he was the unanimous choice of 
the Democratic Party for Mayor of the city, and the election was so 
close that it required several months for the courts to decide that his 
opponent was elected by one vote. 

In 1896 he was again the unanimous choice of the Democratic 
Party for Mayor and was elected by a majority of 505. 

Shortly after Mr. Fiske's arrival in Mount Vernon he interested 
himself in Steamer Company No. 3 of the City Fire Department, and 
after a short period became its foreman. This office he filled for three 
vears with credit to himself and satisfaction to all, when he was elected 
as Chief Engineer of the Fire Department. He was serving his fourth 
term as Chief of the Fire Department when elected to his present office. 
.•\s Ciiief of the Fire Department he did much towards giving tlie citi- 
zens l:)etter equipment, better discipline and a better department in 
every sense. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 143 

Mr. Fiske is largely interested in social as well as political matters. 

He has been Vice-President and a member of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the International Association of Fire Engineers of the World. 
He has been President and Treasurer of the Firemen's Benevolent As- 
sociation of his city ; is a member of Hiawatha Lodge, F. and A. M. ; 
Mount Vernon Chapter, R. A. M. ; Bethlehem Commandary, O. D. O.'s 
and of Mecca Shrine of New York City ; a member of the order of B. 
P. O. Elks, Lodge No. i, of New York City; a member of Golden Rod 
Council, Royal Arcanum, and of the Sons of the American Revolution, 
New York State; a member of Aque-a-Nonck Tribe, 369, L O. Red 
Men, and of the Old Guard Colonial Wars, Chicago. He is also a 
member of the Mount Vernon Cycle Club and Westchester County 
Wheelmen ; a member of the Firemen's Exempt Association and a sus- 
taining member of the Y. M. C. A. He is a member of the City Club 
of Yonkers and the City Club of Mount Vernon; a member of the 
Democratic Club and Tammany Society of New York City ; a member 
of the Mount Vernon Turn Verein, and Sons of Veterans, Charles J. 
Nordquist, Camp 64 of Mount Vernon. He is also a member of Ver- 
non Conclave, 510, L O. H., American Spaniel Club, and the American 
Kennel Club of New York City. 

Mr. Fiske has been president of the Board of Aldermen, the chair- 
man of the Committee of the Board of Aldermen on Streets and Side- 
walks, and in this position did much toward making many improve- 
ments to the streets and avenues. As a politician he is classified as a 
"hustler" and comes from old Revolutionary fighting stock. 

As the Chief Executive of his city, the past two> years Air. Fiske 
has guarded the many interests of the citizens faithfully and has done 
much to make Mount Vernon an ideal place of residence. 

So well pleased was his party with the record made by him, both 
for the credit of the city and the Democratic Party, that again he was 
made the candidate for Mayor at the charter election of May 17, 
1898, by the unanimous vote of the nominating con\^ention, and his 
unsullied record in all former positions of trust, particularly that of 
Mayor, resulted in* his carrying every ward in the city and increasing 
his majority to the grand total of 671. 

One has only to drive through the streets of the city to^ see the vast 



144 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

permanent improvements made therein, and to scan the financial reports 
to see the uniform increase in the city's credit, it being an incontroverti- 
ble fact that the price offered for the bonds of the city by the most 
proininent bankers and financiers of New York and other cities steadily 
increased during his administration and the prices, offered during the 
past few months were higher than ever before in the history of the city, 
and has not been surpassed by anv city of the size in the country, thus 
most emphatically emphasizing the confidence felt by investors in his 
administration of the affairs of the city. 



Hox. \\'iLLiAM Crawford Ramsdale^ one of the leading attor- 
neys and among the most prominent Democrats of Orleans County, 
was born March 5. 1856, in the town of Malta, Saratoga County, the 
son of \\'illiam and Parthemia Crawford Ramsdale. 

His family has long been active in the cause of Democracy. 

He obtained his education in the public schools and at Rochester 
University, from which he was graduated in 1879. He studied law 
with John H. WHiite and was admitted to the Bar in 1881. He en- 
tered into partnership with Assistant Attorney-General Church, the 
firm of Ramsdale & Church being one of the most prominent and suc- 
cessful in Orleans County. 

Mr. Ramsdale has always been an active and influential Democrat. 
He has been elected Village Clerk and Justice of the Peace. He was 
appointed County Treasurer to fill a vacancy, and in 1890 he was his 
party's candidate for that office and came within 180 votes of election 
against a normal Republican majority of 1,700. 

In 1895 he was elected County Judge and Surrogate, a remarkable 
triumph to be won against such odds. Judge Ramsdale has frequently 
served as delegate to important party conventions. He is an active 
Mason, of high degree, and is District Deputy. Grand Master of the 
Forty-seventh District. In 1884 Mr. Ramsdale married Miss Ellen J. 
Wall", of Albion. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 145 

W. H. Hitchcock. An active and influential Democrat of On- 
tario County is W. H. Hitchcock, a well known and popular commer- 
cial traveler. He was born at Ossining, Westchester County, Alarch 
28, i860, but removed tO' Port Chester in his childhood and received 
his education in the public schools of that place. At Port Chester, also, 
he learned the trade of moulder. This was in 1875 3-"^ he remained at 
Port Chester until 1902, when he accepted a position as commercial 
traveler and made his home at Geneva, where he has since resided. 

He belongs to the Order of Elks, the Eagles, the C. M. B. A. and 
the Protective Legion. 

In politics he is an elert and vigorous Democrat. For several 
years he has been Ward Committeeman from the Sixth Ward and he 
has frequently been honored with appointment as delegate to important 
Democratic conventions. 



Daniel J. Haley^ who has for a generation conducted one of the 
popular markets of Troy and is an active Democratic worker, was born 
in Boston, Mass., October 31, 1853. His parents removed to Troy in 
1856, however, and he grew up and was educated in that city. After 
passing through the lower grades of the public schools he also went 
through the regular course of the Troy Fligh School. 

He engaged in the market business, and in 1873 he established a 
market of his own, which he still owns and which is one of the most 
popular and prosperous in the city. Mr. Haley is Secretary of the 
National Retail Butchers' and Meat Dealers' Association. He is also 
Secretary of the State branch and has charge of all matters of legisla- 
tion affecting the association. He is the author of the law for closing 
all markets on Sunday. 

Mr. Haley is a strong and very influential Democrat and has long 
been recognized as one of the leaders of the Eleventh Ward. In 1900 
he was appointed Chief Clerk in the Department of Charities and Cor- 
rections and also became the Deputy Commissioner. He has many 
times been a delegate to local party conventions and an important factor 
in political campaigns. 



146 THE DE^IOCRATIC PARTY 

D. W. Lyxcii. One of the staunch Democrats of Ontario County 
is D. W. Lynch, of Geneva. He was born at Potsdam, St. Lawrence 
County. June 3. 1866. and acquired liis education in the pubhc schools 
and at the Xew York State Normal School in his native village. 

In 1892 he removed to Geneva, where he embarked in the grocery 
business. He has been quite successful, and in 1905 he organized the 
Lynch Furniture Company, which also has a branch devoted to under- 
taking. Mr. Lynch belongs to the Knights of Columbus. 

He has always been an active and influential Democrat, and has 
served his party as delegate to important conventions and also in cam- 
paign work. In 1902 he was appointed one of the Park Commissioners 
by the Mayor and reappointed in 1904 on account of his record for 
efficient service. For eight years he has served as treasurer of the 
Democratic Club. 



]\IiCHAEL Edward AIcTygue, one of the prominent and popular 
young Democrats of Saratoga Springs, was born at Northville, Fulton 
Ccunty, July 15, 1876. He acquired his education in the public schools 
of Saratoga Springs, which has been his home since his early youth, 
and after leaving school he studied law in the office of William D. Mc- 
Nulty. In the class of 1901 he was graduated from the Albany Law 
School and was admitted to the Bar. He at once began the practice of 
his profession, in which his ability and diligence won him success from 
the start. 

He is a member of the Order of Elks, of the Knights of Columbus 
and of the Delta Chi Society. He is also the President of the Demo- 
cratic IMarching Club and of the Saratoga County Democracy, which 
was organized by him. 

In politics Mr. ]\IcTygue has always been an active Democratic 
worker, and he has frequently served as delegate to party conventions. 
In 1903 he was elected Justice of the Peace and was honored with his 
party's nomination for District Attorney in 1904. 

Mr. McTygue was married July 14, 1903, his bride being Miss 
Anna F. Ayen, daughter of Charles F. Ayen, of Saratoga Springs. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 147 

William Burns. A native of Tompkins County, having been torn 
in the town of Lansing, Deceml^er 3, 1855. 

Wilham Burns has all his life been a strong and sterling Demo- 
crat, always active, earnest and effective in the service of his party. 
After acquiring a sound education in the public schools he learned the 
trade of blacksmith. He has worked at his trade over thirty years, 
eighteen of the years in Ithaca, where he works to-day in the same shop 
and at the same forge as when he first removed there so many years ago. 

For a quarter of a century Mr. Burns has been a member of the 
Masonic fraternity. In politics he has been an energetic and effective 
Democratic worker, frequently a delegate tO' party conventions and for 
six years, through repeated re-elections, a member of the Board of 
Aldermen. He has two sons, Raymond L. and Robert C, both bright 
and loyal Democrats, to serve the party through another generation. 
Mr. Burns is a man of more than usual ability and is highly respected 
as a citizen. 



James H. McGrath. But few men have succeeded themselves as 
Supervisor in Rensselaer County for six consecutive terms, the record 
made by J. H. McGrath, of the Twelfth Ward of the city of Troy. Mr. 
McGrath, who has long been a live factor in Troy politics, was born in 
that city, December 29, 1856. He was educated in the public and paro- 
chial schools of his native city. 

After leaving school he learned the trade of iron worker and worked 
in that vocation until 1891. 

In the year 1885 he was elected Supervisor from the Twelfth Ward 
as a Democrat, and, as- stated, succeeded himself for six terms. In 
1 89 1 he was elected Coroner, serving the full term of three years. In 
March, 1900, he accepted an appointment en the Troy police force, 
being made Captain of the First Precinct. 

Mr. McGrath is a public-spirited citizen and is a member of several 
fraternal organizations. He has also done much service to his party 
as representative in many Democratic conventions and campaign com- 
mittees. 



148 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hox. John Henry Burke, lawyer of Ballstoo, New York, was 
born at Mechanicville, August 21, 1856, the son- of Patrick aiid Ellen 
(Purcell) Burke. His earliest education was acquired in the district 
schools of Stillwater, N. Y., but he subsequently took courses at the 
Fort Edward Institute and the Mechanicville Academy, from which he 
was graduated in the college preparatory course. He then entered 
Williams College, where he acquitted himself with honor and received 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts with his class in 1884. After leaving 
college he took up the study of the law with the well-known Ballston 
firm of L'Amoreaux, Dake & Whalen. Upon his admission to the 
Bar in 1886 he returned to Mechanicville, where he entered upon the 
active and successful practice of his profession and so continued until 
1890. He then removed to Ballston Spa and entered into partnership 
with the Hon. John Person under the firm name of Burke & Person. 
This partnership conducted a highly successful business until 1895, 
when it was dissolved, since which time Mr. Burke has practiced alone, 
doing an extensive general practice, as well as a lucrative practice in 
Surrogate's Court. He is attorney for and director of the Ballston Spa 
National Bank. 

In his social and fraternal relations Mr. Burke is a member of the 
Utopian Club of Ballston, of the Williams Chapter of Delta Upsilon, 
the Knights of Columbus and President of the Williams Alumni Asso- 
ciation of Northern New York. 

Mr. Burke has always been an earnest and an aggressive believer 
in the doctrines of the Democratic Party, and in many capacities has 
exemplified both his zeal and ability in the service of the party of his 
choice. His first office was that of Assemblyman from the First As- 
sembly District of Saratoga County. He was elected to this ofiice 
shortly after his admission to the Bar, and before he could enter upon 
the practice of his profession. The district from which Mr. Burke was 
elected was considered safely Rci)u])lican ; hence the choice of the voters 
was a highly complimentary expression of their confidence in the integ- 
rity and capacity of the young lawyer. Among the committees upon 
which Mr. Burke served was the Committee on Villages, which is of 
unusual importance to Saratoga County, owing to the fact that the 
largest village in the State and several other villages of considerable 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 149 

size are located in that county. The Legislature was Republican during 
the period of Mr. Burke's service; nevertheless he left the Assembly at 
the end of one year with the respect of his associates and with an 
enviable record for fidelity and effectiveness. Mr. Burke was re-nomi- 
nated at the end of his first term, and after a spirited struggle was de- 
feated by a small majority by the Hon. Harvey Donaldson. In 1901 
the party nominated Mr. Burke for Surrogate of Saratoga County. 
His earnest work and personal popularity were shown by the fact that 
he was defeated in that strongly Republican county by less than six 
hundred votes. Mr. Burke has been Village Attorney at Ballston Spa 
for several years and was for some time attorney for the Board of 
Supervisors. He was first made Chairman of the Democratic County 
Committee in 1889, and out of the sixteen ensuing years, with occa- 
sional intervals, held that office for twelve years. In the presidential 
campaign of 1904 Saratoga County was one of the few counties in 
which the Democrats succeeded in reducing the McKinley majority of 
1900, and Mr. Burke, as chairman of the County Committee, by his 
unremitting labor and complete organization, was a principal factor in 
the results obtained. In State, County and other conventions Mr. Burke 
has always been an influential representative of his party. 

February 10, 1891, John Henry Burke married Minnie A. Chris- 
topher, of Ballston Spa. 



Chester A. Wooley. One of the farmers of Western New York 
is Chester A. Wooley, of the town of Java, Wyoming County. He was 
born and has always resided in the same town, his birth having taken 
place Augitst 13, i860. He received his education in the public schools 
of his native town. His occupation has always been that of the farmer, 
and by his energy, his industry and his enterprise he has reaped success. 

Mr. Wooley has always been a staunch and sterling Democrat and 
greatly interested in his party's success. 

In 1903 his fellow-townsmen elected him Highway Commissioner, 
a position he has filled with signal efficiency. Mr. Wooley is an excel- 
lent citizen and he stands very high as a citizen and as a man. 



i:;o THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



JOHN B. PORTER 

JoHX B. Porter^ of Buffalo, is a man who has become an impor- 
tant factor in the business world of Western New York. From a hum- 
ble beginning he has risen to the foremost rank in the patent business, 
and since he began the buying and selling of patents he has made more 
than $500,000. It is to his credit that every parent right placed in his 
hands has been disposed of. He is the only man in- the western sec- 
tion of New York State who makes the buying and selling of patents a 
business. 

]\Ir. Porter was born in Jersey City on September 28, 1867. When 
four years of age he went to Buffalo-, and there he has lived ever since. 
He was educated in the Buffalo public schools. When not attending 
school he sold newspapers. His first employment was driving a milk 
wagon, the salary being v$6 a month and his board. This job he held 
for seven years, when he was given $30 a month and his board. Later 
he was employed by the Erie Railroad as brakesman. Next he learned 
the trade of machinist. Then for eight years he worked as a fireman 
on the Lake Shore Railroad. He was promoted to be engineer and 
had charge of one of the important trains for four years. At the end 
of that time he went into the milk business himself. Mr. Porter 
recalls with considerable interest the fact that one of his customers, 
when he was earning $6 a month, was Grover Cleveland, for whom he 
left one quart of milk every day at his apartments in the Weed Block 
at Swan and Main streets. Mr. Porter's first vote was cast for Mr. 
Cleveland when he ran for President in 1888. 

Since 1895 ^^^- Porter has been engaged in the business of buying 
and selling patent rights. His offices are in the Dun building in Buf- 
falo. This business has brought him into great prominence in the busi- 



THi 
WfeW YORK \ 



''«'«''<tii' 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 151 

ness world, and he has become one of the best known men in Buffalo. 
Besides his patent business Mr. Porter is also engaged in the buying and 
selling of real estate. 

Lately there was placed in Mr. Porter's hands the world-famous 
Henry C. Jewett stock farm at East Aurora, N. Y., which contains 
four hundred acres of land. This famous farm was built at a cost of 
$500,000. It contains a covered and an uncovered track. The farm is 
considered the best training farm in this country for young horses. 
The vast sum of money that is interested in this farm shows the big 
responsibilities that are being placed in Mr. Porter's hands. 

As amusements Mr. Porter has two hobbies — fast horses and poli- 
tics. He is the owner of the well-known horses "Ember Day," which 
has a record of 2:14, driven by an amateur; "Sabrina," "The Muti- 
neer," "The Jeweler," "The Barbarian," "The Russian," "King Hal" 
and several other trotting horses. Mr. Porter is a true sportsman and 
he is highly esteemed in that circlp.ln which men of wealth move. 

Ever since he cast his first vote Mr. Porter has been actively inter- 
ested in Democratic politics in the T>y.enty-first Ward of Buffalo. He 
has been true to the principles of the party which he has been identified 
with, and there is no worker in the ranks wdio has more willingly 
placed his time and his bank account at the disposition of the party and 
the candidates for office. Mr. Porter has attended many State conven- 
tions o-f the Democracy and is well-known at such gatherings. 

Mr. Porter is a man who has carved his own way in the world. He 
has known what it is to be without the necessities of life and now that 
he has attained affluence and wealth he sympathizes in the true way 
with the afflicted. He has a generous heart. An instance of this is 
recalled by his friends. He fell ill with fever in the Sisters' Hospital 
in Buffalo. After being nursed back to life he presented the hospital 
with two ambulances and the good Sisters of Mercy have never for- 
gotten this noble deed. There are many other instances of his gene- 
rosity and large-heartedness. 

John B. Porter is a man who makes friends easily and retains them. 
He is the soul of honor and those who know him well know that his 
word is as good as his bond. He has worked hard all of his life and 
easily acquired success. His brain is always active and busy, and the 



152 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

result is that he has attained a commanding position in the commercial 
world and the fruits that trail the paths of wealth. 
]\Ir. Porter lives at 92 Tenth street, Buffalo. 



Hex. Lewis W. Day^ one of the leaders in Sacketts Harbor and 
the town of Hounsfield, and a member of the 1903 Legislature, is a 
partner in the firm of Day, Cornwall & Dunsfield, wholesale grocers of 
Watertown. but still continues to reside in Sacketts Harbor. 

Since first attaining his majority Mr. Day has been an ardent 
Democrat, remaining true to the party principles throughout the many 
factional changes that have occurred. His unswerving allegiance has 
won him a place in the regard of the Democratic organization in Jef- 
ferson County, that has been time and again attested to by victories 
at the polls. 

During his business career in Sacketts Harbor he was elected Vil- 
lage Trustee on many different occasions and several times to the Presi- 
dency of the Village. In 1884 he was elected Supervisor from the town 
of Hounsfield and re-elected in 1885, overcoming a normal Republi- 
can majority of 250. 

But a history-making epoch in political annals came in 1902, when 
Mr. Day was elected to the Assembly from the First District, Jefferson 
County, in a district of about 2.400 Republican majority. The last 
Democrat previously elected from this i^ssembly District was one fifty 
years ago, and it is a fitting tribute to Mr. Day's popularity with the 
electorate. 

During his service in the Assembly the Democrats were in such 
minority that no important bills emanating from them were able to 
pass the opposition, but J\lr. Day was appointed to these prominent 
committees : Taxation and Retrenchment and Agriculture. 

He was also a delegate to the State Convention in 1884. 

I\Ir. Day was born in Sacketts Harlx)r, N. Y., Decemter 25, 1849. 
He finished his education at the Hungerford Collegiate Institute, 
Adams, N. Y., and was in the drug business in Sacketts Harbor for 
twenty years, retiring in 1893. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 153 

He is a director in tlic National Bank and Loan Company, Water- 
town, and a member of Sacketts Harljor Lodge, No. 135, F. and A. M. ; 
Sacketts Harbor Chapter, No. 68, R. A. M. ; Watertown Lodge- of Per- 
fection; Watertown Commandery, No. 11, Knights Templar, and 
Media Temple, A. A. N. M. S. He was a delegate of Media Temple to 
the Imperial Council in 1897 at Detroit, Mich. He is also a member 
of the Black River Valley Club. 

In 1879 Mr. Day married Anna McGuin Walling, and they have 
one son, Edward L. 



Thaddeus J. Herrick, an active business man and prominent 
Democrat of Dutchess County, was born at Lafayette, in that county, 
July I, 1869. He acquired his education in the public schools of his 
native town, at Seymour Smith Academy, Pine Plains, and at Union 
College. After leaving school Mr. Herrick was appointed School Com- 
missioner of the Second District of Dutchess County to fill a vacancy. 
In the following year he was regularly elected to this office. 

In 1894 he removed to Hyde Park, where he purchased a- coal yard, 
and afterward added a lumber yard, both of which he still conducts 
with much success. 

He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, the Order of Odd Fellows, 
the Beta Theta Pi Society of Union College, and is also a member of 
Eagle Engine Company, of the Hyde Park Fire Department, of the 
Hyde Park Social Club and of the Dutchess Club, Poughkeepsie. He 
is a member of the Dutchess Horticulture Society, is President of Eagle 
Company for second term and has just been elected District Deputy for 
the Dutchess District of the Odd Fellows. 

In politics Mr. Herrick has always been an earnest Democrat. In 
1895 he was elected a member of the Board of Education, a position 
which he still holds by repeated re-elections. For three terms he has 
been President of the board. He has been an efficient member of all 
local party committees for many years and has been chairman of the 
Democratic Town Committee. He has also served as delegate to all 
classes of party conventions. 



154 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

John \\ Jones. One of the prosperous and vigorous Democrats 
of Ontario County, is John Y. Jones, Commissioner of Pubhc Works 
of the city of Geneva. He was born at Niagara Falls, May lo, 1866, 
and received his educational training in the parochial school at that 
place, being graduated in the class of 1880. 

After his school days were over he learned the trade of moulder 
and worked at Hamilton, Ontario, for ten years. He then removed to 
Geneva, where he has resided up to the present time. He belongs to 
the ^loulders' Union and to the Knights of Columbus. He was ap- 
pointed delegate to the National Aloulders' Union convention of 1895 
at Chicago, and to that at Indianapolis in 1899. 

In politics ]Mr. Jones has always been a staunch Democrat. In 1901 
he was elected Alderman from the Fifth Ward and served two years 
with great acceptance. In 1903 he was appointed Commissioner of 
Public A\'orks by the ]\Iayor. 

Mr. Jones is an efficient party worker and a public-spirited and 
highly respected citizen. 



Augustus ^Morris, a prominent and influential Democrat of Lock- 
port, and one of the ablest members of the Niagara County Bar, was 
born at Youngstown, N. Y., October 12, 1864. He came to Lockport in 
his boyhood and completed his educational training at the Lockport 
High School. 

Having selected the legal profession, he made thorough and dili- 
gent preparation and was admitted to the Bar in March, 1893. He 
began practice in Lockport. without delay, and has built up an exten- 
sive and profitable business. 

Mr. Morris belongs to the Odd Fellows' fraternity, the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen and the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks. 

In politics Mr. Morris has always been a loyal and earnest Demo- 
crat. He has never aspired to public office, but he has served his party 
in all possible ways. He has frequently been appointed delegate to 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 



'DJ 



important party conventions, and he has used liis superior oratorical 
gifts in the Democratic cause in many pohtical campaigns. 



Michael J. Mulqiteen^ one of the bright and active young Demo- 
crats of Saratoga County, was born in that county, at Bacon Hill, April 
II, 1869. The first twenty years of his life were spent on a farm, but 
he acquired a sound education in the public schools of his native county, 
including the High Schools of Schuylerville and Saratoga Springs. The 
thoroughness of his training and the excellent use he made of his op- 
portunities are shown by the fact that he was awarded an academic 
diploma, after a complete examination, by the Regents of the University 
of the State of New York. After his school days were over Mr, Mul- 
queen studied law, and in 1893 ^"^^ accepted the position of managing 
clerk for the firm of C. S. & C. C. Lester, of Saratoga Springs, one of 
the leading law firms in Northern New York. He still fills this posi- 
tion with credit and success. His diligence, his courtesy and his in- 
telligence have made him widely and favorably known, both in the 
legal profession and in the community. 

Mr. Mulqueen is a member of Division No. 4, Ancient Order of 
Hibernians, in which he is president. He is also secretary of the Sara- 
toga County Division of the order. He is the recorder and financial 
secretary of Saratoga Council, No. 246, Knights of Columbus; the 
President of the Father Mathew Total Abstinence Society of Saratoga 
Springs ; a member of the Jeffersonian Democratic Club of Saratoga 
Springs, and second lieutenant of Company M, First Regiment Hiber- 
nian Rifles. 

Mr. Mulqueen has always been an earnest and influential Demo- 
cratic worker and has rendered the organization services of great value. 
He has never had the time nor the inclination to seek public office, 
though he accepted the position of Census Enumerator for the town of 
Northumberland in the taking of the State Census of 1892, tendered 
him by Governor David B. Hill. He is a young man of superior ability 
and remarkable fidelity, and many political honors will doubtless come 
to him if assured of his accq^tance. He stands high as a citizen and is 
universally respected in the community. 



156 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hon. J. S. Chapman, one of the prominent and influential Demo- 
crats of Wyoming County, was born in Castile, and that town has 
always been his home. He was educated in the public schools and en- 
gaged in business with his father as a contractor and builder in 1876. 
In 1893 ^^^ '^Iso became interested in a company for the manufacture of 
wood novelties. 

I\Ir. Chapman is a Democrat in politics, although he comes of a 
strong RepulDlican family. He has frequently been honored with the 
appointment as delegate to County and State conventions of his party. 
For many years he has served as a member of the Board of Trustees of 
Castile and has also filled the office of President of the village with 
great efficiency and general satisfaction for several terms. Castile is 
one of the strongest Republican towns in the State. He was one of the 
nine men who organized the Castile Fire Department and has been one 
of the main supporters of that organization, holding the office of Chief 
for several years. 

I\Ir. Chapman is a member of the Masonic fraternity and also of the 
Ancient Order of United W^orkmen. Personally he is a genial and 
companionable man and has a large circle of friends. 



William H. Murray, M.D., of Albany, prominent and successful 
in his medical profession, has been no less prominent and successful in 
politics. He is one of those sterling Democrats that are the strength of 
the party, and no party service is too hard for him. As for political 
offices, he has at some time been District Physician, Coroner's Phy- 
sician, Police Surgeon, Penitentiary Surgeon, County Physician and 
for nine years City Physician of Albany. These have all been in the 
line of his profession, but he has also served as Supervisor, Alderman 
and for a considerable period Acting Mayor of Albany. This somewhat 
formidable list of pul)lic stations, filled with efficiency by Dr. Murray, 
were all won by merit. 

He was the first Democratic candidate that ever carried the Six- 
teenth Ward, which has a normal Republican majority of five hundred. 
In the legal contest between Dr. John Swinburne, Republican, and Hon. 



OF THE STiVTE OF NEW YORK 157 

Michael N. Nolan, Democrat, as to which one had heen legally elected 
Mayor, Dr. Murray, as Acting President of the Common Council, be- 
came Acting Mayor. 

In Democratic organization work Dr. Murray has been very indus- 
trious and very successful. In 1877 '-*^ was elected Supervisor from the 
Sixteenth Ward, and in 1S83 this same Republican stronghold elected 
him Alderman. He has done work of great value on Democratic cam- 
paign committees and as delegate to Democratic conventions. 

At various times Dr. ]\Iurray has been chosen President, Vice-Presi- 
dent and Treasurer of the Albany County Medical Society, and he is a 
prominent member of the New York State Medical Association. He is 
a prominent Mason, having taken all of the many degrees in that fra- 
ternity. He is also a member of the Albany Democratic Club and of 
the Royal Arcanum. 



Charles H. Perry, M.D., physician, surgeon and lawyer of 
Oneida, Madison County, was born in Woodstock, Vt., June 25, 1844. 
He w'as educated, after a preparatory school course, at Dartmouth Col- 
lege, graduating from the medical department. He began the practice 
of medicine in 1867 at Perkinsville, Vt., and in 1873 removed to Oneida. 
By this time he had added the study O'f law to his knowledge of medi- 
cine, and had secured admission to the Bar. He thus went to Oneida 
with a double professional standing, and, as the event showed, amply 
equipped for both medical and legal practice. 

That Dr. Perry commanded respect and confidence both as a medi- 
cal practitioner and as a lawyer is shown by the fact that for twenty 
years he was Health' Officer of Oneida, and for eight years, under 
Cleveland, was President of the Madison County Pension Board. It 
specially attested his legal distinction that he was designated as acting 
City Judge. 

His memberships include the Masons, the Madison County Medical 
Society and the Madison County Bar Association. 

Mr. Perry's father was Thomas Jefferson Perry, born in 1802, and 
who was all his life a staunch Democrat. 



158 THE DE^IOCRATIC PARTY 

Chief Judge Sanford E. Church. One of the great names in 
the pubhc Hfe of the State of New York is that of Sanford E. Church, 
one of the most eminent jurists and publicists in the history of the 
State, a man of such abiHty and such fame that the delegation from the 
Empire State presented his name before the Democratic National Con- 
vention for the nomination for President of the United States. 

Judge Church was a native of the State, having been born in Mil- 
ford, Otsego County, April i8, 1815. He was of English descent, his 
ancestors having settled in Connecticut, in which State his parents were 
born. In 1834 they moved to Orleans County. Here their famous son 
came with them. He finished his literary education at the Monroe 
Academy, and in 1835 he located in Albion, which ever afterward re- 
mained his home. 

In 1838 he began the study of law in the office of B. S. Bessac, with 
whom he entered into partnership in 1840. In the following^ year he 
was elected ]\Iember of Assembly from Orleans County, being only 
twenty-six years old and the youngest member of that body, which 
numbered such giants as John A. Dix, Michael Hoffman, Horatio Sey- 
mour, Levi S. Chatfield and George R. Davis. It was largely through 
his influence that George R. Barker, of Buffalo, was elected Attorney- 
General. 

In 1844 ]\Ir. Church entered into partnership with Noah Davis, Jr., 
and this continued until 1857, when Mr. Davis was appointed by Gov- 
ernor John A. King a Justice of the Supreme Court. In the vear 1844 
Mr. Church was elected a delegate to the Democratic National Con- 
vention at Baltimore, where he warmly advocated the nomination of 
Martin Van Buren for President. After that great New York states- 
man was beaten in the convention, however, Mr. Church zealously sup- 
ported the nominee, James K. Polk, and exerted a great influence to- 
ward securing for him the electoral votes of New York, which gave 
him the election. 

In 1845 Mr. Churcli was appointed District Attorney of Orleans 
County by Governor Silas Wright under the provisions of the old Con- 
stitution, and in 1847, ^vhen the Constitution had been amended as 
now in force, he became a candidate before the people for the same 
office and was elected. He was also his party's nominee for Congress 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 159 

in 1846 and for Senate in 1849. ^^i 1850, the first time Horatio Sey- 
mour was nominated for Governor, Sanford E. Church was also named 
on the Democratic ticket for Lieutenant-Governor. Mr. Seymour was 
defeated by Washington Hunt by some three hundred majority, but Mr. 
Church was elected by about eight thousand. These same great Demo- 
crats headed the ticket again in 1852, and both were elected by many 
thousands majority. Mr. Church declined a third nomination for Lieu- 
tenant-Governor in 1854, and resumed the practice of law which, in- 
deed, he had never entirely relinquished during his four years' service 
as Lieutenant-Governor. Li 1856 he was nominated for Congress, and 
in 1857 for State Comptroller, but in the vicissitudes of New York poli- 
tics he failed of election each time. 

In 1857 he was nominated and elected Comptroller of the State, but 
in 1859, having received a renomination, he was defeated at the polls 
by a union of Republicans and Know-Nothings. 

In 1867 Mr. Church was a member of the State Constitutional Con- 
vention and was appointed by its president, Hon. William A. Wheeler, 
chairman of the Finance Committee, the most important committee of 
that body, although the Republicans had a majority of the convention. 
The committee was made up of the leading men of the State, among 
whom on the Democratic side were Erastus Corning, Augustus Schell, 
Samuel J. Tilden and others. In 1868 New York State presented Mr. 
Church as its candidate for the Presidency. 

At the judicial election in 1870 Mr. Church was elected Chief Judge 
of the Court of Appeals over Henry R. Selden, the very able and popu- 
lar candidate of the Republicans, by about 90,000 majority, which 
position he held until his death in 1880. 

In October, 1840, Judge Church married Miss Ann Wild, of New 
Hampshire, a descendant of one of the oldest families in New York. 
Two children were born to them, the Hon. George B. Church and 
Helen A. Church, who married the late S. R. Cochrane, of Albion. 

Judge Church was a man of impressive appearance, a profound 
lawyer, always earnest and sincere, a sound reasoner and an eloquent 
orator. Indeed he stood in the front rank of the strong men of his 
generation. 



i6o THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Elmer Winner, an active and influential Democrat of Liberty, 
Sullivan County, was born in that town, October i6, 1856. 

He received a good educational training in the public schools and 
this was supplemented by a course in the Monticello Academy. 

]\Ir. Winner is a born trader and he easily drifted into the stock 
business, buying and selling cattle and horses. He began at Liberty in 
1877, and by native shrewdness and fair dealing he has achieved a note- 
worthy success, continuing in the same occupation to the present time. 
Mr. \\'inner belongs to the Odd Fellows, including the Encampment, 
and the Order of Red Men. 

He has always been a loyal Democrat, ready for service, and an 
efficient campaign worker. In 1896 he was appointed by President 
Cleveland Postmaster at Liberty and held the position, rendering great 
satisfaction to the patrons of the ofifice, the full term of four years, his 
successor being appointed in 1900. 



James Tracey, Esq., of Albany, a distinguished member of the 
legal profession, has long held a high rank among the leaders of the 
Democratic Party in Albany County. He has enjoyed many party 
honors, having been many times chosen as a delegate to important local 
and State conventions, and is well known as President of the Young 
]\ren's Democratic Ckib of Albany. In the last named capacity he made 
the congratulatory speech at the public reception tendered to Grover 
Cleveland when he came to Albany to assume the duties of the Gover- 
norship in 1883. 

Mr. Tracey is a brilliant and effective stump speaker, and as such 
was a prominent factor in many campaigns. In 1877 l"*^ ^^'^^s appointed 
Examiner of Corporations in the office of Secretaiy of State, and he 
also served as Park Commissioner under the Mayoralty administration 
of Hon. James H. Manning. In 1902 President Roosevelt stepped 
across party lines and recognized the ability and legal attainments of 
Mr. Tracey by tendering him the appointment of Justice of the Su- 
preme Court in the Philippine Islands, but his personal and professional 
interests at home were so great that he declined the favor. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK i6t 

Dr. John Freeman Humtiirey, one of the leading- medical i)rac- 
titioners of Saratoga Springs, was born at Mechanicville, March 24, 
1865, the son of Henry Lafayette and Frances Caroline (Freeman) 
Humphrey. He comes of English ancestry and himself belongs to the 
sixth generation of the American branch of his family. The Hum- 
phreys have been Democrats ever since the foundation of the govern- 
ment, with but one exception, and that one lost his father at an early 
age and was brought up in a Republican family. Dr. Humphrey's 
great-grandfather was at one time attorney for Martin Van Buren. 
His father was a native of Columbia County, but at an early age re- 
moved to Stillwater, Saratoga County, where he was a schoolmate of 
Bishop John P. Newman, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and of 
Colonel John R. Fellows, the silver-tongued Democratic orajtor of New 
York City. In 1867 Dr. Humphrey's parents removed to Saratoga 
Springs. Here the future physician was educated in the public schools 
and was graduated from the High School in the class of 1883. 

Having chosen the medical profession for his life work, he entered 
the office of Dr. W. H. Hodgman, an eminent practitioner of the vil- 
lage, and, after completing his preliminary studies, he entered the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York 
City, from which he was graduated in 1891. He began the practice of 
his profession with his preceptor, with whom he remained until 1896. 
In that year he opened aii office of his own and has built up a large 
practice. 

Dr. Humphrey has always been a public-spirited citizen and a 
staunch Democrat, though the demands of his profession have pre- 
vented him from actively engaging in political work. He has, how- 
ever, served for three terms of three years each as member of the Board 
of Education and for nearly two years he was the Health Officer of 
Saratoga Springs, making an enviable record for efficiency in each posi- 
tion. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. Blue Lodge, Chapter 
and Council, of the Order of Elks and of the Royal Arcanum. 

On January 4, 1899, Dr. Humphrey married Miss Maude Funden- 
berg, of Pittsburgh. Two sons have been liorn to them. 

Dr. Humphrey stands very high in his profession, and he is greatly 
esteemed as a citizen by the entire community. 



i62 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Frank Tiffany. One of the active Democrats of Chenango 
County is Frank Tiffany, an enterprising and prosperous farmer, whose 
place is situated near North Norwich. 

]\Ir. Tiffany was born in that village, March 22, 1861, and received 
his education in the public schools and the North Norwich Academy. 
\Mien his school days were over he engaged in farming, but left this 
employment and became a merchant in his native village. He returned 
to the farm, however, after a time, and has devoted himself to agricul- 
tural pursuits ever since. 

Air. Tiffany is a straight and strict Democrat in politics, always a 
loyal supporter of his party's action and an enthusiastic worker for 
Democratic tickets. He was elected Supervisor in 1899 and was re- 
elected for a term of two years in 1900, although his town has a heavy 
Republican majority. 

He has frequently represented his town as a delegate in party con- 
ventions, but the demands of his business have prevented his acceptance 
of nominations for county or district offices. 



Dr. George W. Lane, one of the leading physicians of Steuben 
County and a Democrat who was twice elected Mayor of the strong 
Republican city of Corning, was born at Beaver Dam, in the neighbor- 
ing county of Schuyler, May 28, 1858. He received his literary educa- 
tion in the public schools. He began the study of medicine after his 
school days were over and attended lectures at the Medical Department 
of the University of Buffalo, from which he was graduated and re- 
ceived his diploma in 1886. He began the practice of his profession at 
once, locating at Big Flats. Chemung County, but two years later he 
removed to Coming, where he has remained up to this time, building 
up an extensive business and a fine professional reputation. He is 
prominent in medical circles and is a member of the New York State, 
the Steuljen County and the Corning Medical Societies. Dr. Lane is a 
member of the Odd Fellows, both lod^e and encampment, and also of 
the Order of Red Men. 

Dr. Lane is a strong Democrat and a power in the party organiza- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 163 

tion. He has been a member of the City, Town and County Democratic 
committees for years, and for four years, 1898 to 1902, he served as 
Chairman of the County Committee. He was elected Aldennan from 
the Fifth Ward in 1894, and in 1886 he was elected Mayor by 160 
majority in a city with a normal Republican majority of 600. His 
administration proved so efficient and satisfactory that he was re- 
elected in 1900 by the much larger majority of 316. 

He is a model official and deserves, as he enjoys, the respect and 
confidence of all his fellow citizens, regardless of party lines. 



Kenneth D. L. Niven, a prominent business man and one of the 
leading and influential Democrats of Sullivan. County, was born at 
Monticello, the county seat, March 31, 1862. He had the advantages 
of a sound education, for, after passing through the public schools, he 
enjoyed the privilege of supplementing this training by courses at the 
Weston and Milton Academies, both advanced schools of high reputa- 
tion. 

His school days over, Mr. Niven accepted a position as clerk at 
Newburgh in 1878. From there he went to Brooklyn, in 1880, and 
began business on his own account as a druggist, continuing in Brook- 
lyn until 1885. In tl^^t y^^^ l"*^ returned to Monticello, his native town, 
and engaged in the business of florist, which he has since pursued with 
great success. 

In political matters Mr. Niven has always been an active and vig- 
orous Democratic worker, with such a capacity for leadership that it 
was promptly recognized, and he has been an important figure in the 
party organization. In 1888 he w^as appointed Deputy Postmaster at 
Monticello, and in 1891 he was elected Assistant Doorkeeper of the 
Assembly at Albany, holding that position as long as the Democracy 
had control of that tody. 

In 1898 he received the appointment as Postmaster at Monticello. 
In all these public positions, as well as in private life, Mr. Niven has 
enjoyed the respect and confidence of the community and is recognized 
as a valuable and public-spirited citizen. 



i64 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hon. August Seitz, one of the prominent and influential Demo- 
crats of Cattaraugus County, was born in Germany, May i, 1858, and 
was educated in the schools of his native land before coming to Amer- 
ica. He settled in Salamanca, after coming to this country, and en- 
gaged in business there in 1884, and has been successful from the first. 
He deals in clothing and boots and shoes, having quite an extensive 
establishment. 

He has taken an active part in politics ever since he came to Catta- 
raugus County, and has been very influential in the Democratic or- 
ganization. He has served as Village Treasurer and has twice been 
elected' President of the Village. 

He has frequently been appointed delegate to Democratic conven- 
tions and is always greatly interested in the success of his party. 



Edward H. Hoyt^ one of the best known- and most popular Demo- 
cratic leaders in Saratoga County for many years, was born in that 
county, in the town of Greenfield, November 22, i860. He received his 
educational training in the public schools of his native county, supple- 
mented by a course at the Pulaski Academy. 

]\Ir. Hoyt became an earnest and active Democrat from conviction, 
and in' 1891 he was prevailed upon to accept his party's nomination for 
Supervisor in a strong Republican town. His political opponents were 
not disposed to consider his candidacy very seriously, but he conducted 
a vigorous canvass, and, to everybody's surprise, he came within a very 
few' votes of election. This campaign brought him into- such prominent 
notice that, in- the same year, he received the Democratic nomination 
for State Senator by unanimous acclamation. His opponent ^liad been 
elected to the same office at the last previous election without serious 
opposition, and was confident of a re-election by a- large majority. Mr. 
Hoyt. however, made such a thorough and splendid canvass of the 
district that he received a majority, but was counted out. In 1893 he 
was nominated by the Democratic State Convention for one of the 
Delegates-at-larg-e to the New York State Constitutional Convention, 
but failed of election on account of the Republican tidal wave which 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 165 

swept the State in that year. In 1894 Mr. Hoyt was prevailed upon 
to accept the Democratic nomination for Sheriff of Saratoga County, 
but it was not a Democratic year, and he was unable to overcome the 
large normal Republican majority, though he made a great run and 
again demonstrated his popularity among the people. From this time 
Mr. Hoyt has firmly declined any further political nominations, but he 
has remained an active and influential factor in Democratic politics. 
He has also frequently served as delegate to important Democratic 
conventions, including three State conventions. He has devoted him- 
self to business, having established an extensive and profitable packing 
box manufactory at Saratoga Springs, which has for several years been 
his home. Personally Mr. Hoyt is a genial companion and his circle of 
friends is very large. 



Benjamin F. Empie. The staunchest Democratic county in the 
interior of the State of New York is Schoharie, and one of the most 
active Democrats within its borders is Benjamin F. Empie, of Rich- 
mond ville. He was born in the towaof Seward, June 8, 1872. He was 
educated in the public schools, and was afterwards graduated from the 
Albany Business College, receiving his diploma in April, 1894. He 
w^orked on a farm until 1898, when he engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness at Richmondville, where he is still engaged at the present time. 

Mr. Empie is a member of the Richmondville Lodge, No. 525, 
I. O. O. F., of Hyndsville Tent, No. 753, K. O. A. M., and of the 
Hyndsville Protective Legion. 

In politics he has always been a straight and active Democrat, 
greatly interested in his party's success. He was elected Town Clerk 
in 1899, and held that office one term. His service gave such satisfac- 
tion that in 1901 he was elected Supervisor, and has been twice re- 
elected to the same office. He has rendered much service to the Demo- 
cratic county organization, and is an expert in making the usual politi- 
cal canvass preceding an election. 

Mr. Empie stands high as a citizen and is greatly respected in the 
community. 



i66 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

John S. Anderson^ a prosperous n^erchant of Narrowsburg, was 
born at Monticello, the county seat, July lo, 1868. He was educated in 
the pubHc and private schools of his native town, and in 1891 he em- 
barked in the hardware business at Narrowsburg, where he has lived 
and prospered ever since. 

I\Ir. Anderson is a member of the F. and A. M. and of the K. 
O. T. M. 

In politics he is an earnest and enthusiastic Democrat, and in 1897 
he was honored by his party with a nomination for Justice of the Peace, 
serving for three years. In 1900 he was elected Assessor, and in both 
positions he made an excellent record. He has done yeoman work in 
the party organization, rendering efficient service on both the Town and 
County Democratic committees. 



Jesse Peterso^t. Among the staunch and influential Democrats of 
Niagara County, Jesse Peterson stands in' the front rank. He was born 
at Belfast, x\llegany County, October i, 1850, and was educated in the 
public schools, including the High School, after which he took a course 
at the Buffalo Commercial College. 

When but eighteen years old Mr. Peterson- engaged in the contract- 
ing business, which he followed with much success for seven years. He 
then embarked in manufacturing at Lockport, his specialty l^eing wood 
pulp. From this he became interested in the production of v\'ood fiber 
and he is now the President of the United Industrial Fiber Company, 
which operates an extensive plant at Lockport. 

In politics he has always been a staunch and stalwart Democrat and 
a man- of much political power. Pie has served with great credit as 
Police Commissioner and has been honored by his party with the nomi- 
nation for Mayor of Lockport. He also had the pleasure, as a Presi- 
dential Elector, of voting directly for Grover Cleveland for President of 
the United States. He is an efficient party worker and always ready to 
help the cause of Democracy. 

The complete list of the business enterprises in which this capable 
and energetic master of affairs is interested would make a formidable 



OF THE STATE OF NEV/ YORK 167 

catalogue. In addition to those already mentioned Mr. Peterson is the 
President of the Buffalo Warehouse and Distributing Company and the 
proprietor of the Cascade Pulp Mills. He is a member of the Society 
of Sons of the American Revolution, of the Buffalo, Falcon, Ellicott 
and Wood Clubs, of Buffalo, and of the City and Country Clubs, of 
Lockport. 

Mr, Peterson's ancestors came from Holland and belonged to the 
sturdy stock which resisted and overthrew the tyranny of Spain w'hen 
the power of that kingdom overshadowed the New as well as the Old 
World. His parents were Gilbert and Elizabeth (Parker) Peterson. 
On January 29, 1873, he married Miss Arabella A. Brown. Two chil- 
dren have been born to them, a daughter, Clara B., and a son, J. Dudley. 

Mr. Peterson is one of those strong, able, self-reliant Americans 
who keep our country at the front, a splendid illustration of the highest 
type of American manliood. 



Cassius G. Andrew,, proprietor of the St. James Hotel, Corning, 
and one of the earnest and efficient Democratic workers of Steuben 
County, was born at Monterey, Schuyler County, March 6, 1868, and 
educated in the public schools of his native town. 

He removed to Corning in 1888 and in 1896, as a member of the 
firm of Clark & Andrew, he became one oi the proprietors of the popu- 
lar hotel with which he has since been connected. Mr. Clark retired in 
1899, and Mr. Andrew has conducted the hotel alone. He has met 
with great success and the St. James has a wide reputation. 

He belongs to the Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias, the 
K. O. T. M. and for fifteen years he has been a member of the Pritchard 
Hose Company. 

Mr. Andrew is a sterling and strenuous Democrat, the party leader 
in his district and a power in the county organization. He has for 
many years been a member of the County and Town Democratic com- 
mittees. He has the distinction of being the only Democratic Alderman 
ever elected from the Third Ward. Mr. Andrew is a very popular hotel 
man and is well known to the traveling public along the Southern Tier. 



i68 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

George A. Blauvelt, a well-known attorney of Rockland County, 
is one of the live and efficient Democratic workers that have been 
brought to the front in that county. Mr. Blauvelt has been a power in 
the party organization for many years. For two years he served as 
Chairman of the Democratic County Committee. He has frequently 
been appointed delegate to local and district conventions, and in 1893 
he was sent as a delegate to the Democratic State Convention. 

In 1894 ]\Ir. Blauvelt was elected School Commissioner and served. 
three years, until 1897. In 1892 he received the party nomination for 
Supervisor of Ramapo. but the Republican majority proved too- great 
for him to overcome, although he made a gallant contest. 

In 1903 he was appointed Corporation Counsel of Spring V^alley, a 
position he still holds. He is a member of the Rockland County Bar 
Association, 



Dr. Charles L. Styles, a prominent Democrat and an able phy- 
sician of Tioga County, was born in New Jersey. After completing his 
literary education in the public schools of his native county he studied 
medicine at Windsor. N. Y.. and was graduated from the Geneva Med- 
ical College and received his diploma and degree in 1865. 

Dr. Styles has always had great pride in his profession, in which he 
has been a successful practitioner, and he is a member of the New York 
.State Medical Society and of the County Medical Societies of Tioga, 
Chemung and Tompkins counties. New York, and of Susquehanna 
County, Pennsylvania, and also of the Binghamton and Elmira Acad- 
emies of Medicine. He is, likewise, the President of the Erie Railroad 
Surgeons' Association. 

Dr. Styles is a strong Democrat and served as School Commis- 
sioner, an office to which he was elected in this Republican stronghold. 
His personal popularity was still further demonstrated by his election 
to the office of Coroner. This office, however, he refused to accept on 
account of what he considered some crooked work in the election, so 
high was his sense of honor. 

He is the son of L. N. and Cynthia (Green) Styles. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 169 

. Martin S. Lynch was born in Otsego County, April 25, 1857. 
He received his educational training- in the public schools and at the 
Niagara University, from which he was graduated in 1881. 

He at once began the study of law in the office of D. O. Hancock, 
and in 1884 he was admitted to the Bar, and at once commenced the 
practice of his profession. For ten years he was a partner of Hon. 
John G. Sears. Later he had for his partner C. L Nixon, and still later 
he had F. J. Davis, who is his partner at the present time. 

Mr. Lynch has had no aspirations for political office, but he has 
always been a strong and influential Democrat. He has served as Chair- 
man of the Democratic County Committee for many years, and he has 
frequently been honored with appointment as delegate to Democratic 
State and county conventions. 

Mr. Lynch is the son of Michael aiid Mary (Holland) Lynch, and 
on November 25, 1885, he was married to Miss Kate Campion. 



Austin A. Moran. One of the stalwart Democrats of Sullivan 
County and one of the efficient party workers is Austin A. Moran. He 
was born in County Roscommon, Ireland, August 9, 1872. He came to 
this country when he was sixteen years old and became a resident of 
Liberty. 

In 1897 he embarked in business as a funeral director, becoming the 
junior member of the firm of McGibbon & Moran. In the fall of 1899 
he opened a branch establishment for the firm at Monticello, the county 
seat. The following year he bought out his partner's interest in the 
Monticello branch. In 1902 he disposed of his interest at Liberty and 
has since continued in business by himself at Monticello. 

Mr. Moran is a member of the A. O. H., the K. of C, and he was 
the organizer and the first President of the Holy Name Society at 
Monticello. 

In politics he has always been a loyal and earnest Democrat, and he 
has served as Secretary of the Democratic County Committee. He is 
one of the influential leaders of the party in Sullivan County, as well 
as a citizen who is universally respected. 



170 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Joiix D. Oakley, Jr. Any political party is fortunate in having 
such adherents and supporters as John D. Oakley, Jr., one of the faith- 
ful and efficient Democratic party workers in Rockland County. 

]\Ir. Oakley has been active in his party's service ever since he be- 
came old enough toi vote. He has been a power in the organization, 
serving as delegate to town, county and district conventions and as 
a member of the Democratic Town and County committees. He is at 
this time Chairman of the Town Committee and Secretary of the 
County Committee. 

Mr. Oakley is a member of the Foresters of America, of the Broth- 
erhood of Locomotive Firemen and of Columbia Engine Company of 
Spring \^alley. He has belonged to the engine company for fourteen 
years, and has held the offices of Foreman and Secretary. 



William B. Milliman, one of the active and popular Democrats 
of Saratoga Springs, was born at Fort Edward, January 24, i860, the 
son of Nathaniel B. and Celina (Barney) Milliman. He acquired his 
education in the public schools of his native village, at the Granville 
Military Academy and the Fort Edward Institute. In 1880 he en- 
gaged in the lumber business with his father, at Fort Edward. In 1882 
he accepted an offer from the A. W. Wright Lumber Company, of 
IMichigan, one of the most extensive in the country, remaining there 
some four years. In 1887 he removed to Saratoga Springs, where he 
has since been engaged in the same business. Mr. Milliman is a promi- 
nent member of the Masonic fraternity, in which he has taken all the 
degrees up to and including those of the Commander}^ He belongs 
also to the Order of Elks, the Mystic Shrine, the Foresters, the Royal 
Arcanum, the Knights of Maccabees, the \\^oodmen, the Saratoga Golf 
Club and the Jeffersonian Club of Saratoga Springs. In politics Mr. 
IMilliman has always been an earnest and active Democrat and promi- 
nent in the party organization. He has rendered efficient service on 
party committees and has frequently been a delegate to party o^nxcn- 
tions, including the State Convention of 1904, and he was also an 
alternate delegate to the National Convention in the same year. He 



OF THE STyVTE OF NEW YORK 171 

was elected Village Trustee and also Receiver of Taxes and Assess- 
ments. In 1900 he ran for County Treasurer, the majority against him 
being only 696, while McKinley carried the county by about 4.500. De- 
cember 12, 1882, Mr. Milliman married Miss Maud D. Woodward, of 
Saratoga Springs. They have one child living. Personally Mr. Milli- 
man is genial and popular, having a large circle of devoted friends. 



James E. Sherwood. One of the active Democratic leaders in 
Rockland County and one of the most popular men of any party in that 
county is James E. Sherwood, of the town of Ramapo. He has long 
been prominent in the party organization and has been a very important 
factor in wiping out the Republican majority in Rockland County in 
recent years. 

He is one of the Democrats who always attend the primary cau- 
cuses, thus shaping political action and nominations in the most effec- 
tive way. Mr. Sherwood has performed faithful and valuable service 
on party committees for many years, and has been favored with ap- 
pointment as delegate to many important Democratic conventions. 

In 1898 he accepted his party's nomination, for Superintendent of 
the Poor, and in spite of the normal Republican majority in the county 
at this time he was one of two Democrats that carried the county. His 
election was an important factor in the political redemption of the 
county by the Democracy. In 1903 Mr. Sherwood accepted the nomi- 
nation for Sheriff and carried his own town, Ramapo, by thirty-six 
majority, though its normal Republican majority was five hundred. 
He failed of election by only thirty-eight votes, and he would unques- 
tionably have been elected by a large majority except for a factional 
quarrel and consequent Democratic defection in one of the towns of the 
county. By his great run he overcame all the precedents for thirty 
years, making a large gain even in the Hillburn District, the banner 
Republican district in the State of New York. This fact was widely 
commented upon by the press of New York at the time. 

Mr, Sherwood is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the 
Suffern Volunteer Fire Department. 



172 THE DE.MOCRATIC PARTY 

Lons J. Ledtger. For many years Louis J. Lediger has been a 
prominent figure in the Democratic Party in Rockland County. Though 
resohitely refusing pubhc office, and even party nominations, he has 
been an energetic and efficient worker in the cause of Democracy, and 
has been influential in the party organization. 

He has frequently been honored with an appointment as delegate 
to important party conventions, and he has rendered efficient and valua- 
ble service as member of the Democratic Town and County committees. 

]\Ir. Lediger is a prosperous and progressive business man, and he 
is highly esteemed by citizens of all parties. He is a member of the 
C. B. L. 



JoHx J. Coffey, of Attica, has for several years been one of the 
active and influential Democrats of Western New York. He was born 
in Binghamton in 1869 and acquired his education in the public schools 
of that city. After his school days were over he learned the trade of 
cigarmaker, and became a power in that organization, being elected to 
many important offices. Li 1895 he engaged as commercial traveler 
for a firm of dealers in leaf tobacco. Later he formed a connection with 
the Culjan Tobacco Company, which "he represented in twenty-six States 
of the Union. 

In 1898 he married J\Iiss A. Sweeney, of Attica, and settled himself 
in business in that flourishing village, manufacturing cigars of a high 
grade. His ability, energy and large acquaintance with the trade 
enabled him to rapidly build up a large trade all through that section. 

j\Ir. Coft'ey is very prominent in the .\. O. H. and also in the C. M. 
B. A. He is likewise the President of the Wyoming County Liquor 
Dealers' Association and is a member of the Knights of Columbus, 
Elks, K. of E., Cigarmakers' Union and U. P. L. 

In politics Mr. Coffey has always been a straight and strenuous 
Democrat, and has been an important factor in the party organization 
in his county. He is now the chairman of the Wyoming County Dem- 
ocratic Committee. Personally Mr. Coffey is a very genial and popular 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 173 

man, and he is especially interested in any movement that has for its 
motive the well-being and advancement of the Irish race. 



Thomas J. Torpy, of Peekskill, one of the Democratic leaders of 
the Third Assembly District of Westchester County, has been a loyal 
and earnest worker in the cause of Democracy for more than a score of 
years. He has rendered his party efficient service as member and Secre- 
tary of the Town Committee. He was also a member of the County 
Committee and Secretary and Treasurer of the Village Committee. 

Mr. Torpy has never aspired to political office, his time and atten- 
tion being fully occupied with his private business. He is nevertheless 
a very valuable factor in every important campaign. 

He is a member of the Democratic Club, the Friendly Sons of St. 
Patrick, the Catholic Club, the Road Drivers' Association, the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, the F. O. E. of New York City, the 
K. of C, the C. B. L. and the Montgomery Club of Yonkers. 



Charles R. Atkins^ one of the Democratic hustlers of Ulster 
County, was born and has always resided in Esopus, the home of that 
great Democrat, Alton B. Parker. The date of his birth was October 
I, 1843. He was educated in the public schools, and learned the trade 
of wagon-maker in his father's establishment, and upon the death of 
his father, in 1873, he succeeded to the business. His manufactory is a 
well established and extensive plant, and it enjoys a fine trade. Mr. 
Atkins is a prominent member of the Masonic order. 

In politics he has always been a stalwart Democrat, always earnest 
and ready for duty whenever there is any party work to be done. His 
influence has been especially strong with the farmer vote. In 1887 he 
was chosen Inspector of Elections, and he has held the position of No- 
tary Public continuously for twenty-five years. 

He has been honored with nominations for Justice of the Peace and 
Highway Commissioner and has frequently been a delegate to party 
conventions. He has also done good service on party committees. 



174 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



HON. SAMUEL H. JONES- 

Hon, Samuel H. Jones. A politician's popularity is never given 
such a thorough test as when he is before the people of his district 
seeking their suffrages. Hon. Samuel H. Jones, Sheriff of Oneida 
County, was before the voters of that county in November, 1903, and 
in one of the strongest Republican centers in New York State he was 
elected to the office by more than fifteen hundred majority. He car- 
ried every ward and election district in the city of Utica by a total 
majority of 3,162, a display of political strength that astonished the 
voters of all political creeds. 

Sheriff Jones was born in Rome, N. Y,, July 16, 1862, and was 
educated in the common schools of that city. At the age of fifteen he 
went to Utica and secured employment in the stained glass works of 
C. P. Davis' Sons. Later he became assistant foreman for the whole- 
sale tobacco house of Kirkland Bros., of Utica. Since relinquishing 
that business he has represented the Mohawk Valley Brewing Com- 
pany, of Ilion ; the People's Brewing Company, of Utica ; Quinn & 
Oster and John M. Murphy, being employed by Quinn & Oster for five 
years, and by Mr. IMurphy six years. During his business career on 
the road he made thousands of friends in all parts of the country and 
established an extensive business for his employers. 

IMr. Jones was a candidate for Sheriff in 1900, but gave way to 
another aspirant and loyally supported the Democratic candidate. In 
1903 he showed unmistakable strength in the County Convention and 
was awarded the prize. Sheriff Jones is one of the best campaigners 
Oneida County has ever seen. He was the first Democratic Sheriff 
elected in a score of years and has efficiently discharged the duties of 
his ofifice. 

Sheriff Jones is a man of pleasing address. He is frank, open, 
genial and companionable, a man of strong mental capacity, who makes 




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OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK lyS 

a deep and lasting impression upon those who meet him. In politics he 
has always been a Democrat. He has never failed to give freely of his 
means to candidates for office and has, in many campaigns, worked 
harder for the success of others than for his own political welfare. In 
the election of 1903 he toured the county from end to end and proved 
that as a vote-getter Oneida County has rarely seen his equal. 

Sheriff Jones belongs to many social and fraternal organizations. 
He is on the roll of membership of the Elks, Eagles, Knights of Honor, 
the Commercial Travelers' Association of America and the Utica Jack- 
sonian Club. He is also a valued member of the Utica Democratic 
Association. 

As Sheriff Mr. Jones has made a record that will stand the Demo- 
cratic Party in good stead. Those committed to his safe-keeping have 
found him kind hearted and sympathetic while having to perform un- 
pleasant duties. Samuel H. Jones is one of the big men of the Demo- 
cratic Party in Oneida County and future honors are sure to come to 
him. 

In 1879 he married Miss Sarah Jones, of Utica, and two children, 
Cora M. and Isabel Lena, have blessed their union. 



George A. Larkin, a bright young lawyer of Olean, is one of the 
coming men in the Democratic Party of the Southern Tier. 

He was born at Olean, December 10, 1879, and received his educa- 
tional training in the public schools of his native city and at Cornell 
University. 

He studied law after completing his literary education, and was 
admitted to the Bar in 1903, beginning the practice of his profession at 
Olean. 

He is a member of the Knights of Columbus. 

He accepted the Democratic nomination for Surrogate in 1904 and 
made a very strong run in that overwhelmingly Republican county. 
He has a bright future in politics and business alike. 



1/6 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hon. Ezra D. Beckwitii. of Utica, has won wide recognition in 
the field of pohtics and in the business world of Central New York. He 
^\•as one of the mainstays in the celebrated "Dandelion Movement" in 
New York State in 1892, and he did a great deal to crystallize senti- 
ment in his section in favor of the nomination of Grover Cleveland for 
President that year. ]\Ir. Beckwith made himself a power in politics in 
his home county of Herkimer. 

]\Ir. Beckwith is a descendant of a noble family. His grandfather 
was Hon. Abijah Beckwith, who served in the New York State Senate. 
His father, Hon. J. W. Beckwith, was a member of Assembly in this 
State for several years. On his mother's side Mr. Beckwith is related 
to the Dorr family, of Rhode Island, one of whom was elected Governor 
of that State. 

Ezra D. Beckwith is a native of Columbia, Herkimer County, where 
he was born in 1837. He was educated in the Winfield Academy and 
received his further training in the Little Falls Academy. After his 
school days he worked on a farm. A\^hen he was twenty-seven years of 
age he engaged in the cheese business in Columbia. He made the high- 
est grade of cheese in his section of the State, doing all of the buying 
for the firm of Webb, Turner & Co., of New York, who shipped to all 
parts of the world. Mr. Beckwith continued in this business for ten 
years, establishing a high reputation for business probity and sagacity. 
He then engaged in the tanning business in Cedarville. Afterwards 
the firm of Beckwith & Hiteman Bros, was formed, Mr. Beckwith being 
the senior member of the firm. They make the highest grade of calf 
goods, which find a ready market in all parts of the United States. 
This business has been continued for more than thirty years on an 
extensive scale. 

Mr. Beckwith, while he was building up a splendid reputation in 
the business world, was active in Republican politics in Herkimer 
County, and at the age of twenty-six was sent from Herkimer County 
to the Assembly, being one of the youngest men ever sent to that legis- 
lative Ixxly. His record there was first-class, and he served on impor- 
tant committees. He was conceded a unanimous renomination, but 
had to decline, owing to his pressing business engagements. Two years 
later he was elected School Commissioner of Herkimer County and 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 177 

served with distinction for three years. His constituents insisted on 
his accepting a second term, but he respectfully declined. Mr. Beck- 
with made an active and progressive School Commissioner and his 
retirement from the board was regretted by all. 

When Carl Schurz and other notable Republicans bolted the n(;mi- 
nation of Hon. James G. Blaine for President by the Republican Party 
in 1884 Mr. Beckwith announced his retirement from the party and he 
threw all of his indomitable energy into the Cleveland campaign, and 
by his pen and in public speeches he proved to be a force in bringing 
about the result of the election in this State. Mr. Beckwith was an 
Independent voter in the memorable gubernatorial campaign in 1882 
and cast his vote for Mr. Cleveland and aided in his election. Since 
the first Cleveland campaign for the Presidency Mr. Beckwith has been 
a loyal and consistent Democrat and has frequently taken part in the 
councils of his party. 

In 1892 Mr. Beckwith organized the Cleveland men in Herkimer 
County at the request of Hon. Charles S. Fairchild and Hon. William 
C. Whitney. That county had one of the best Cleveland organizations 
in the State of New York, all due to Mr. Beckwith, who also did 
valuable work in the counties of Otsego, Oneida and Lewis. He at- 
tended the Syracuse Cleveland Convention as a delegate and was elected 
a national delegate to the Chicago Convention from Herkimer County. 
At Chicago he took a leading part in all of the conferences of the Cleve- 
land delegates. After the nomination of Mr. Cleveland Mr. Beckwith 
returned home, and during the campaign he toured Herkimer County 
and made speeches nightly. Being an expert on the subject of the tariff, 
his addresses on tariff reform were widely quoted and read and the 
cutting in two of the natural Republican majority of 1,500 in Herkimer 
County was the result of his efforts to elect Mr. Cleveland President. 

During the second term of President Cleveland Mr. Beckwith was 
the recognized leader in Herkimer County, having captured the or- 
ganization. He was allowed to name all of the postmasters in that 
county by the appointing power. 

In 1896 Mr. Beckwith supported and voted for Palmer and Buck- 
ner, but in 1900 he voted for Mr. Bryan. He has always been a free 
trader. He is regarded as one of the best posted men in the State on 



178 THE DE^IOCRATIC PARTY 

the tariff. At the age of twenty-one ]\Ir. Beckwith was married to Miss 
E. Robinson. Three cliildren were born to them, John D. Beckwith 
(now deceased), wlio was one of the ablest lawyers in Herkimer 
County, and two daughters, who were educated at Syracuse University. 
Besides his tannery in West \\'infield, i\Ir. Beckwith has a large 
cnameline factory in Utica and a tannery at Chadwick's Mills, in, 
Oneida County. 'Mr. Beckwith is of engaging personality and has a 
wide acquaintance in all parts of the State. Everywhere he is regarded 
as a man of the highest standing. 



Hox. George Bessac Church, son of the late Chief Judge San- 
ford E. and Ann Wild Church, was born in Albion, July 23, 1842, He 
received his educational training in the public schools, including the 
high school of Albion, and at the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary at 
Lima, from which he was graduated in 1861. He also took a course in 
a business college in 1863, after which he accepted a position in the 
municipal government of New York City, holding it for two years. 
In 1870 he was appointed Deputy Superintendent of the New York 
State Insurance Department under Superintendent George W. Miller. 
He resigned from this position in 1872, but in the following year he 
served as Acting Superintendent of Insurance for seven moiiths. He 
then retired from public life until 1890, when he accepted the position 
of Deputy State Treasurer, which he held for four years. Returning 
to Albion in 1894 he engaged in the insurance business, which he has 
continued to the present time. 

Mr. Church has served two terms as Village Trustee and has repre- 
sented his county in Democra.tic State conventions. 

He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, in which he has taken all 
the degrees up to and including those of the Council of Royal and 
Select Masters. 

In 1866 Mr. Church married ]\Iiss Florence Tousley, of Albion. 
They have one son, Sanford T. Church, Esq., who accepted the position 
of Deputy Attorney-General under Attorney-General John Cunneen, 
in 1903. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 179 

PiTiLip Van Alstine, one of the active and earnest Democratic 
workers of Rockland County, has always Ijeen efficient and influential 
in his party's service. Before he came to Rockland County he was a 
power in the Democratic organization in Columbia County and also in 
Jersey City, N. J., where he resided for several years. 

He has served on party committees and has l^eeii a delegate to many 
Democratic conventions, including State and National. He has often 
served as chairman. While a resident of Jersey City he twice accepted 
his party's nomination for Member of Assembly, and so great was his 
personal popularity, and so effective the canvass he made, that each time 
he was a candidate he reduced the normal Republican majority of 2,500 
in the district down to 500. 

Mr. Van Alstine is an excellent citizen and a man of weight in the 
community. 



Dr. George B. Lewis^ a leading physician of Owego and one of the 
prominent Democrats of Tioga County, was born at Owego, December 
9, 1865. He is the son of Isaac W. and Ellen (Sutton) Lewis. He 
acquired his literary education in the public schools of his native village 
and at the Owego Academy. After leaving school he began the study 
of medicine, and in 1884 h^ entered the Medical Department of the 
University of the City of New York. He was graduated in 1886, re- 
ceiving his diploma as Doctor of Medicine. He at once began the prac- 
tice of his profession at Owego, and his skill and learning have given 
him a wide reputation and brought him a large practice. 

Dr. Lewis is a member of the Tioga County Medical Society and of 
the Masonic fraternity up to and including the Commandery of Knights 
Templars. 

Li politics Air. Lewis is an earnest and ardent Democrat and has 
always been a hustler when an important political campaign was in 
progress. He has not had the time to hold nor to seek public office, but 
he is active in the organization and stands very high, both as a citizen 
and a physician. In 1887 he married Miss Anna M. Young, of Ow^ego, 
They have one daughter, Dorothy. 



i8o THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Joseph A. Kellogg. One of the prominent of the younger Demo- 
cratic leaders of Warren County and a leading attorney of Glens Falls 
is Joseph A. Kellogg. Indeed Mr. Kellogg is well known, both as a 
lawyer and public speaker throughout that section of the State. 

Mr. Kellogg was born in Wilmington, Del., ]\Iay 13, 1865. He 
comes of distinguished Democratic ancestry, his maternal grandfather, 
Hon. Joseph Baucus. having been Slieriff of Saratoga County, Member 
of Assembly and for many years the Supervisor of the town of Sara- 
toga Springs, a man of superior ability and a highly successful man of 
business, who accumulated a large estate. His maternal uncle, Hon. 
Alexander B. Baucus. was also Sheriff of Saratoga County, State Sen- 
ator and the Democratic nominee for Congress in 1890. 

Mr. Kellogg received his education in the public schools, the Pas- 
saic High School and the Passaic Classical School of Passaic, N. J., 
and the Island Grove School at Fort Edward, N. Y. 

He pursued his law studies with the well-known firm of Hughes & 
Xorthup at Sandy Hill, and was graduated from the Columbia College 
Law School. New York City. He began the practice of his profession 
at Sandy Hill in 1886 in the firm of Young & Kellogg. In '1892 he 
was appointed Assistant Attorney-General of the State by Attorney- 
General S. W. Rosendale, serving two years. In 1894 he removed to 
Glens Falls, becoming a member of the firm of Potter & Kellogg. 

In 1897 i\Ir. Kellogg accepted the Democratic nomination for 
Member of Assembly, and carried nearly all the leading towns in the 
county, cutting the normal Republican majority of twenty-four hun- 
dred down to four hundred. He was appointed delegate to the Demo- 
cratic State Conventions of 1896 and 1900, and in 1898 he was 
accorded the privilege of naming all the delegates from ^\'^arren 
County. 

In 1904 he was unanimously nominated as the Democratic candi- 
date for Congress, and made a brilliant canvass, running over 3,600 
ahead of his ticket in a district overwhelmingly Republican. 

Mr. Kellogg is prominent in the Masonic fraternity, having been 
the Worshipful Master of the lodge at Glens Falls and ha\ing taken 
all the thirty degrees of the order. He is also a member of the Oriental 
Shrine of Troy, of the Order of Red Men, of the Order of Elks, of the 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK i8i 

Glens Falls Club, and he is a non-resident member of the Tilden Club 
and Craftsmen's Club of New York City. 

His firm was counsel to the State Comptroller from 1895 to 1903. 
Mr. Kellogg is a director and attorney of the Glens Falls Trust Com- 
pany, secretary and director of the Hudson Valley Railroad Company, 
director of the Glens Falls and Lake George Plank Road Company, 
director of the Empire Real Estate and Theatre Company of Glens 
Falls, director and treasurer of the Glens Falls Hospital Association, 
president of the Glens Falls branch of the Co-operative Building Bank 
of New York and chairman of the Committee on Constitution of the 
Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of the State of New York. 
Amid all these varied and important activities Mr. Kellogg finds time 
to render efficient and valuable service to the Democratic Party, to 
which he has always been loyally attached, and which has hig'h political 
honors in store for him. 

In February, 1905, the firm of Potter & Kellogg was dissolved, and 
Mr. Kellogg, in association with John H. Barker, formed the firm of 
Kellogg & Barker. 



John J. O'Neiix. One of the recognized Democratic leaders in the 
Sixth Ward of the city of Troy is John J. O'Neill, a native of that city, 
where he was torn August 31, 1875. He was educated at the La Salle 
Institute, where he completed the full academic course. After finishing 
his school education he engaged in business as a funeral director at his 
present location, 43 Stowe avenue. 

He is active in the work of the Democratic organization and is also 
prominent in fraternal societies. He is a member of the Knights of 
Columbus, of the Foresters of America, the C. M. B. A. and the K. 
of M. He has held many official positions in these organizations. He 
has served on election boards as inspector and poll clerk, and was ten- 
dered his party's nomination for Alderman in the Sixth Ward, but he 
was compelled to refuse it on account of his important private business 
interests. 

Mr. O'Neill has frequently served as delegate to Democratic con- 
ventions, and he is a man of force and weight in his party. 



1 82 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

\\'iLLTAM ]\IcDoxALD, 0116 of the livc Democratic hustlers of Steu- 
ben County, was born in the neighboring county of Livingston in 1848. 
He received his educational training in the public schools. He has been 
in active business since 1865, when he was but seventeen years old. He 
has been engaged in the liquor trade and also as a horse dealer. Later 
he opened the well known and popular McDonald Cafe, where he has 
met with great success and which he still conducts. 

Mr. ]\IcDonald is a member of the B. P. O. E. and of the K. 
O. T. M. 

He is an earnest and enthusiastic party worker and always active in 
the organization. He has never held nor aspired to public office, but he 
has had the honor of being appointed a delegate to many important 
Democratic conventions, including the State and the National. 



William H. Godson. One of the leaders of the rock-ribbed Demo- 
cracy of the Eleventh Ward in the city of Troy is William H. Godson, 
among the best known and most efficient Democratic workers in Troy. 
He was born in Troy, March 12, 1865, and his home has always been 
in that thriving city. He was educated in the parochial school of the 
Christian Brothers. 

After leaving school he served as bookkeeper for ]\layor Dennis J. 
Whalen, retaining this important position for twelve years. In the 
year 1900 he engaged in the wholesale and retail liquor business at 346 
Fourth street, where he is still located. 

Mr. Godson is a member of the Foresters of America and of the 
Ancient Order of Hibernians. He has served as County President of 
the last-named powerful organization. 

He has always been a loyal and vigorous supporter of the local 
Democratic organization in the Eleventh Ward. His popular strength 
was clearly shown in 1901, when, as the Democratic candidate, he ran 
five hundred votes ahead of his ticket. Mr. Godson's services on party 
committees and as delegate to Democratic conventions has been of 
great value and he is held in high esteem by the Democrats of Rens- 
selaer County. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 183 

Hon. Esler Sherwood has for many years been an important 
figure and factor in the Democratic pohtics of Rockland, County. In 
fact, his interest dates back to the time he became of age. He is an 
influential leader in the town of Ramapo. He has been chosen as a dele- 
gate to all classes of local and district conventions, and he has per- 
formed valuable service on the Democratic Town and County com- 
mittees. 

In 1 88 1 Mr. Sherwood was elected Town Clerk and his service was 
so satisfactory that he was twice re-elected. In 1903 he was also 
elected Supervisor of his town, the second Democrat elected in thirty 
years, overcoming a Republican majority of 500. 

He belongs to the Masons and the Odd Fellows and has long been 
a member of the Volunteer Fire Department. Mr. Sherwood is a man 
of ability and high character, and he is greatly respected as a citizen. 



Andrew Spencer^ a prominent citizen and one of the leading at- 
torneys of Otsego County, was born at Milford, N. Y., December 10, 
1863. He acquired a thorough education in the public schools, at the 
Cooperstown High School, the Hartwick Seminary and Cornell Uni- 
versity. After leaving the university he devoted several years to teach- 
ing. In 1893 he accepted the position of superintendent of the United 
States Indian School at Eastern Cherokee, N. C, serving two years. 
after which he was for three years the Superintendent of the United 
States Indian School at Mount Pleasant, Mich. He studied law in the 
meantime, and in 1899 he began the practice of his profession at Mil- 
ford, Otsego County, where he has remained until the present time, 
building up a fine business. 

Mr. Spencer is a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows' fra- 
ternities. 

Always a Democrat, he was elected Clerk of the Otsego County 
Board of Supervisors in 1900, and the same year he served as president 
of the Bryan Club. In 1904 he was selected as a delegate to the Demo- 
cratic State Convention. He is highly respected as a citizen and is 
active and influential in the Democratic organization. 



i84 THE DE^IOCRATIC PARTY 

John B. Rilev, of Plattsburgh, Clinton County, has long held a 
position of influence in the councils of the Democratic Party of the 
State. Born at Schuyler Falls, September 9, 1852, his early education 
was acquired in the district schools of his native town, in the Pitts- 
burgh Academy, and later at the Keeseville High School, where he was 
prepared for college. He then turned his attention to teaching and 
followed that profession for some years in the village of Au Sable 
Forks, N. Y. One of the founders of the Clinton County Teachers' 
Association, he was its President or Secretary for several years. In 
1879 he finished his legal studies, which had been carried on in the 
ofiice of Smith M. ^^^eed, coincidently with his educational work, and 
was admitted to the Bar. He at once established an office in Platts- 
burgh. Under the firm names, Riley & Norton, Riley & Conway and 
Riley & Healey, he has at different periods been associated with Benja- 
min Norton, T. F. Conway and R. E. Healey in the building up of a 
very successful practice. He was admitted to practice in the United 
States Courts in 1892. !Mr. Riley married Genevieve Desmond, of 
Plattsburgh, September 25, 1882. 

Mr. Riley's interesting career of widely diversified public service 
began with his election in 1875 ^^ the office of School Commissioner of 
Clinton County, despite a normally heavy Republican majority. Not 
only did he greatly raise the standard of the schools under his jurisdic- 
tion, but in the annual conventions of commissioners and superinten- 
dents, in conferences with the State Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion and before educational and legislative committees, he earnestly 
advocated the reforms in the State's educational system, which, with 
possibly one exception, he has since seen adopted. The young Com- 
missioner quickly gained wide recognition as a positive force for good 
in the school world. Re-elected School Commissioner at the expiration 
of his first term, he held the office until 1881. In 1885 Pi'esident Cleve- 
land appointed Mr. Riley Superintendent of the Indian Schools of the 
country. His condvict of the educational interests of the nation's wards 
was one of the notable successes of his first administration, to which 
President Cleveland frequently referred witli jjridc. Resigning this 
position in January. 1888. Mr. Riley was made Chief Examiner of the 
New York State Civil Service Commission, and in this office he con- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 185 

tinued the tactful performance of his trying- ckities until Mr. Cleve- 
land's re-election in 1892, Thereafter, until August, 1897, Mr. Riley 
represented this country as Consul-General at Ottawa, bringing to the 
responsible semi-diplomatic duties of his post courtesy, accuracy of 
information and well-trained judgment creditable alike to himself and 
to American public service. Up to the time of Mr. Riley's appointment 
it had been the custom for each of the three Consul-Generals in Canada, 
one at Ottawa, one at Montreal and one at Halifax, to represent the 
United States Government in its dealings with the Dominion Govern- 
ment at Ottawa in matters arising in his jurisdiction, but by order of 
President Cleveland it was directed that thereafter all such affairs 
should be handled solely by the Consul-General at Ottawa. The order 
caused some friction at the time, but experience proved its wisdom, and 
the practice has been continued under succeeding administrations, thus 
augmenting greatly the dignity and importance of the Ottawa appoint- 
ment. Some of the questions adjudicated through the agency of Mr. 
Riley w^re: the discrimination against United States shipping in the 
tolls on Canadian canals, the discrimination against citizens of the 
United States in some of the provinces in the matter of lumlDcring 
privileges, and, in several of its phases, the vexed fisheries dispute. An 
incident indicative of Canadian appreciation of the retiring officer oc- 
curred shortly before his return home, when a deputation of Ottawa's 
leading citizens, headed by Hon. R. W. Scott, Secretary of State, pre- 
sented to him a massive chest of silver tableware, together with a splen- 
didly engrossed address. To Mrs. Riley, at the same time, was given a 
jewelled souvenir of worth. Mr. Riley has been sent often to State 
Democratic conventions as a delegate from Clinton County, while as 
member or chairman of his County Committee the party has profited 
largely by his wise management. In his own community the confidence 
of his neighlxirs has resulted in repeated demands upon him. He has 
been at different times a Trustee of the village,- twice President of the 
village of Plattsburgh, and is now (1904) and has been since Platts- 
burgh became a city its Corporation Counsel. The Plattsburgh State 
Normal School has numbered him as one of its Board of Managers 
from its inception, and for the past five or six years he has been the 
president of the board. He is a trustee and chairman of the Executive 



1 86 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Committee of the Catholic Summer School near Plattsburgh and has 
rendered invaluable service in its development to its present grand 
dimensions. 



Gen. Charles Tracey^ of Albany, was a Democrat who enjoyed 
not only a State but also a National reputation. A gentleman of a high 
order of ability, of wide culture and familiar with public affairs, he 
played for many years a leading part in the shaping of the policies of 
his party. 

Gen. Tracey was born in Albany, May 27, 1847, ^"^ his early years 
were all spent in that city. He was graduated from the famous Boys' 
Academy, where he won high honors for superior scholarship and dis- 
played many of the qualities which brought him fame in. later life. 
Soon after graduation he set out on an extended tour in foreign lands. 
Having an adventurous disposition, he greatly enjoyed the sights and 
scenes of the historic places of the Old World. While he was in Rome, 
in 1867, he enlisted in the Papal Zouaves, the celebrated military corps 
organized by Pope Pius IX. and his fidelity, intelligence and soldierly 
qualities gained him the rank of Corporal. He resigned in 1870 and 
returned to his native city. Before leaving Rome he was decorated by 
Pope Pius with the Cross of the Order of St. Gregory the Great. He 
is probably the only American who ever received this honor. 

Upon his return to Albany he devoted himself to business affairs for 
four years, but in 1875, "^vhen Governor Samuel J. Tilden organized 
his military staff, the former Zouave was surprised by an appointment 
tendered him as Aide. He accepted the honor and displayed his cus- 
tomary zeal and ability so that Governor Lucius Robinson promoted 
him to the responsible position of Commissary General of Subsistence, 
with the rank of Brigadier-General. Here, again, he displayed so much 
efficiency that he won the approval of the Governor and the good-will 
of the entire N?ticnal Guard of the State. 

He retired at the close of Governor Robinson's administration, but 
in 1884 he was brought back into the public service by an appointment 
as a member of the Board of ^Managers of the Plouse of Refuge at Hud- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 187 

son, N. Y., a position which he filled until his resignation was accepted, 
in 1894. 

In 1897 Gen. Tracey was nominated to fill the vacancy caused by 
the death of Hon. Nicholas Kane, the representative in Congress of the 
Albany District. It was a hotly contested election, but Gen. Tracey 
was elected by six hundred majority. He was re-elected for the full 
term in 1898 by a majority of twenty-three hundred and again in 1900 
by a majority of five thousand. He was again chosen to this honorable 
post in 1902. Gen. Tracey made his mark in Congress, serving on 
some of the most important committees and winning a reputation as a 
wise legislator that has not been ecjualed by any other representative of 
his district for a generation. 

He was long recognized as a potent force in party affairs, serving 
on the City and County committees and as delegate to important con- 
ventions. In 1896 he was selected by his district as one of the dele- 
gates to the National Convention at Chicago, where William J. Bryan 
w^as nominated for President. Gen. Tracey foresaw that this nomina- 
tion would mean an overwhelming defeat, if not party disruption, and 
he opposed it with all his power. In the campaign that followed he 
became what was known as a Gold Democrat and was elected chairman 
of the National Committee of that organization. 

Gen. Tracey was the cordial and trusted friend of Samuel J. Tilden, 
Daniel Manning, Lucius Robinson, David B. Hill and other Democrats 
of national fame. In business life he was the president of the Columbia 
Distilling Company, of Albany. Gen. Tracey was a gentleman of large 
wealth, great ability, a lofty public spirit, with the courage of his con- 
victions, and few Democrats in the United States were more trusted 
for sound counsel or more admired by their associates for the posses- 
sion of winning personal qualities. He died in the winter of 1905. 



Louis F. Haffen, long a prominent figure in the municipal poli- 
tics of New York City, was born at Melrose, Westchester County, in 
1854. He received a sound and thorough education, and in 1879 he 
was graduated as a Civil Engineer from the Columbia School of 



i88 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Mines. His preparatory educational training was acquired in the 
public schools, in a German private school, at St. John's College, Ford- 
ham. N. Y., and at Niagara College. He entered upon the practice of 
civil engineering, afterwards making a practical study of mines in 
California, Colorado and .\rizona, resuming his profession as civil 
engineer at ]\Ielrose, upon his return to the East. He afterward be- 
came Superintendent of Parks in the Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth 
Wards of New York City. 

In 1893 j\Iayor Gilroy appointed him Commissioner of Street Im- 
provements in the same wards, known as "The Annexed District," and 
at the fall election of the same year he was elected to this position. He 
held this last named position until the office was atolished. 

In 1897 Air. Haffen was elected President of the Borough of The 
Bronx, after the creation of the Greater New York. 

Mr. Haffen has won a high reputation as a civil engineer, and as 
Borough President he has been a successful administrator. 



Charles D. Horton, A.B., LL.B., one of the prominent and in- 
fluential Democrats of Westchester County, is a leading attorney and 
a power among the younger element of the party. He has been active 
in the organization for many years, and is a vigorous and valued mem- 
ber of the town and village committees of White Plains, where he re- 
sides. He has also served his party as a delegate to many important 
conventions. 

Mr. Horton, in addition to the large demands of his extensive legal 
practice, is the editor of The Eastern State Journal, the oldest paper in 
Westchester County, but his interest in the triumph of the political 
principles of his party is so great that he has given liberally of his time 
and talents to further the cause of Democracy. He has, however, 
steadily declined all political positions and party nominations because 
the demands of his private business are so great as to absorb his time 
and attention, and he could not give the public business such careful 
and exclusive service as he conscientiously considers it requires. 

Mr, Horton is a graduate of Columbia College, class of 1887, and 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 189 

of the Columbia Law School, class of 1889. In 1893 '^^ formed a part- 
nership with ex-County Clerk John M. Digney, the style of the firm 
being Digney & Horton, and it is one of the leading legal firms in West- 
chester County. 

Mr. Horton is a member of the Manhattan and Democratic Clubs 
of New York City, is a member of the Masonic fraternity up to and 
including the Knights Templars and thirty-second degree, a member 
of the Mystic Shrine, of the Odd Fellows, of the Elks, of the Foresters, 
of the Eagles, of the Woodmen, of the Royal Arcanum and of the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen. 



WiLLETT W. Read, civil engineer and chairman of the City Demo- 
cratic Committee, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Willett W. Read was born in the city of Watertown, N. Y., Febru- 
ary 12, 1865. After a course of study to fit himself for the university 
he entered Cornell, and, after a highly creditable course, was graduated 
from that institution with the degree of C.E. in the class of 1888. 

After following his profession in the city of Syracuse. N. Y., until 
1894, he located pennanently in Niagara Falls and has become closely 
identified not only with the Democratic Party of that city but with the 
progress and development of the city itself. He has taken an active 
part in political work for the past ten years, has been delegate to manv 
conventions and is at present chairman of the City Democratic Com- 
mittee, which position he has held for the last three years. His voice is 
heard with respect in Democratic councils and he is in close touch with 
the leaders of the party throughout Niagara County. 

Mr. Read has been City Engineer of Niagara Falls for several 
years, is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and 
of D. K. E., his college fraternity. 

Mr. Read is a congenial gentleman of broad education and liberal 
views, who is ever ready to further the interests of the Democratic 
Party by every means in his power. His personality is a strong addi- 
tion to the Democratic strength of Niagara Falls, where his abilities 
and W'Orth are highly appreciated. 



190 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Thomas Hunt, an earnest and popular Democrat of Orleans 
County, was born at Sligo, Ireland, January 2, 1857, the son of Thomas 
and Bridget (Bartley) Hunt. He came to this country while young, 
and in 1882 he settled in .\lbion. For ten rears he served as Superin- 
tendent of the Gas AVorks at Tonawanda, but several years ago he 
accepted a similar position at Albion, which he has filled with great 
acceptance to the present time. 

^Ir. Hunt is ardently attached to the Democratic Party and always 
ready to render the cause of Democracy any serv^ice in his power. In 
the presidential campaign of 1888 he was the Captain of the Young 
Men's Democratic Club of Tonawanda, and he is always a hustler for 
his party whenever a political campaign is in progress. 

In 1887 Mr. Hunt married ]\Iiss Annie iMcDonough, and two 
daughters and four sons have been born to them. Personally Mr. Hunt 
is a genial man and very popular. 



James Ardel Haxlox, long prominent in both the politics and 
business affairs of Orleans County, was born at Lockport, November 
16, 1 84 1, the son of John and Mary (McQueeland) Hanlon. He was 
graduated from the Academic Department of the public schools in 1859. 
After leaving school he worked on a farm for eight years, doing chores 
for his board. He then engaged as clerk in the hardware store of 
\\'hedon & Allen, at Medina, Orleans County. After six years of capa- 
ble and faithful service he secured a one-third interest in the business. 
In 1869 the firm dissolved aiid was succeeded by that of O. Whedon & 
Co., in which Mr. Hanlon was an equal partner. In 1876 he withdrew, 
and, in connection with his brothei", established the existing firm of 
Hanlon Brothers in the same line of business. 

Mr. Hanlon has always been an earnest and influential Democrat 
and an efficient party worker. He was Collector of Tolls on the Erie 
Canal for two years and meml^er of the Board of Village Trustees for 
one term. He was appointed State Collector of Taxes by Governor 
Tilden, and in 18S6 President Cleveland gave him the appointment of 
Collector of Internal Revenue for the Twenty-eighth District of New 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 191 

York, comprising fourteen counties in Western New York. He served 
as delegate to the Democratic National Conventions of 1884, 1892 and 
1896, and has represented his county in. every Democratic State Con- 
vention since 1872. 

He is a member of the Catholic Mutual Benevolent Association and 
also of the Knights of Columbus. In 1874 Mr. Hanlon married Miss 
Sarah Elizabeth Dawson, of Toledo, Ohio. They have had nine chil- 
dren, of whom four sons are still living. 



Dr. Charles E. Parish, a skillful and popular physician of Mary- 
land, Otsego County, was born at Davenport, Delaware County, Octo- 
ber 14, 1854. He was educated in the Albany district and high schools, 
after which he began the study of medicine. He was graduated at the 
Albany Medical College, and in 1879, immediately after receiving his 
degree, he located at Maryland, where he has ever since continued in 
the successful practice of his profession. 

He is a member of the Otsego County Medical Society, of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity. Blue Lodge and Chapter, and of the K. of M., Ny- 
skuna: Tent. 

In politics Dr. Parish has been a lifelong Democrat and prominent 
in the organization in Otsego County. In 1883 ^^^ ^^'^^ elected Coro- 
ner, and his service was so satisfactory that he was re-elected in 1886. 
He was elected member of the Board of Supervisors in 1899, and in 
the following year he was chosen Chairman of the board. He was 
again elected to this position in 1900, 1901, 1902, 1903 and 1904. He 
is a member-elect of the board of 1905. 

Dr. Parish is a very efficient political organizer and party worker. 
The town of Maryland has long had one of the best party organizations 
of any town in the State, and gives a regular Democratic majority of 
about twenty. It was carried by Mr. Bryan in both 1896 and 1900, 
and in 1904 this majority was increased for Judge Parker by a larger 
per cent, than that of any other town. Dr. Parish has never had less 
than one hundred majority, and in one year it reached three hundred 
and twenty, showing his remarkable popularity. 



192 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hon. ]\I. Z. Haven, of Syracuse, is one of the best known Demo- 
crats in the State of New York. A man of great abihty, he will rank 
as an organizer of the highest skill. For three years he represented the 
Onondaga District on the State Committee, and for four years was at 
the head of the Literary Bureau of the New York State Democratic 
Committee. Previous to the presidential campaign of 1904 Mr. Haven 
was prominently mentioned for the chairmanship of the State Com- 
mittee, but at the last moment one of those curious happenings in poli- 
tics occurred and J\Ir. Haven was forced to give way to Hon. Cord 
]\Ieyer, much to the regret of hundreds of prominent party men who 
had urged him as the best man for the place. Mr. Haven is tactful, 
courteous, fair and is very sociable without being convivial. 

Descended from Richard Haven, who came to Boston in 1634 and 
became the progenitor of a line distinguished in the colonial wars, Mr. 
Haven was born in the village of New Hartford, Oneida County, New 
York, in 1854. He was educated in the public schools of Utica and in 
W'hitestown Seminary. After leaving school he took up the study of 
law in Utica, and in 1876 was graduated from the law department of 
Hamilton College. In that year he cast his first presidential vote for 
Samuel J. Tilden. Since his admission to the Bar he has practiced law 
in Syracuse, and has held various public positions, among them that of 
Corporation Counsel. He is regarded as one of the able lawyers at 
the Bar of Onondaga County. 

During the two years in which the Parker-Roosevelt campaign was 
included Mr. Haven was in charge of the Democratic State headquar- 
ters at Albany. During that time he did very effective work for his 
party by sending broadcast literature bearing on the political situation 
in this State and giving many cogent reasons why the Odell regime 
should be brought to an end by the voters. Mr. Haven is an able 
writer and his campaign documents have received much merited praise. 
In the field of politics Mr. Haven is at home. Those who have watched 
him of late years look upon him as one of the sharpest and shrewdest 
politicians in the State. He does not carry around with him in cam- 
paigns a brass band and a trumpeter, but works silently and effectively. 
He never lets the public in on his plans, and when he wins he leaves it 
to his opponents to tell how they were l^eaten. He is modest, quiet and 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 193 

unassuming. He enjoys the confidence of pu1)Hc men in all parts of the 
State and is classed among the men who are capable of doing things 
on a large scale. 

In the spring primaries in Onondaga County in 1904 Mr. Haven 
fought against tremendous odds for an instructed Parker delegation, 
and after a long and arduous battle carried his point, despite the fact 
that many of the most prominent Democrats in the county were against 
him. In the Parker and Davis campaign Mr. Haven was found at his 
post of duty daily at the Democratic State headquarters and did valua- 
ble service. 



Charles S. Starr, elected Treasurer of Sullivan County for four 
consecutive terms, or twelve years in all, was born at Fallsburgh, and 
his native county has always been his home. He received a sound and 
thorough education in the public schools, the Liberty Normal Institute 
and the New York Conference Seminary at Charlottesville, N. Y. 

After the completion of his educational course he began teaching in 
1855. He taught two years at Bunker Hill. Illinois, and then became 
a merchant. In i860 he returned to Monticello and engaged in tan- 
ning leather. 

In 1866 he engaged in business as real estate broker, a business in 
which he is still engaged and in which he has met with great success. 

In 1875 he w^as elected Treasurer of Sullivan County, and by suc- 
cessive re-elections he served four consecutive terms, declining a nomi- 
nation for a fifth term. 

Mr. Starr retired from politics at the close of his service as County 
Treasurer, but he has always maintained his activity and interest in 
Democratic success. 

In 1893 he was appointed Examiner of Court Funds by the State 
Comptroller, Hon. Frank Campbell, but has not since accepted any 
public employment. Mr. Starr is a Past Master of the Masonic fra- 
ternity, and it was largely through his efforts that the fine Masonic 
temple w^as erected at Monticello. He is a popular and influential citi- 
zen in his part of the State. 



194 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Henry A. Conway, a prominent Democrat of Rensselaer County 
and one of the best-known business men in the city of Troy, was born 
in that city, August 8, 1858. He received his early education in the 
public schools and at St. Peter's Parochial School. 

j\Ir. Conway has always taken a warm interest in the success of the 
Democratic Party and has given it liberal and Jiearty support in every 
way. He has served as delegate to District, County, Assembly, Con- 
gressional and Senatorial conventions, in all of which he has done 
valuable service. In 1891 he was put in nomination by the Democratic 
Party for Senator of his district and came within one hundred and 
twenty-eight votes of being elected. 

Mr. Conway is a member of the widely known firm of Conway 
Brothers, of Troy, N. Y., and is a member of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. 



John H. ]\IcKeever, of Watervdiet, furnishes an illustration of 
the value of the business man in politics. For many years he has 
been in the grocery trade, and by his energ}^, courtesy and liberal deal- 
ing he has become one of the leading grocers in his city. In spite of 
the demands of his prosperous and growing private business, Mr. Mc- 
Keever has always manifested great interest in politics, and is one of 
the most active and influential Democratic workers in Albany County. 
Indeed he comes of good Democratic stock, his father, of the same 
name, having always been prominent in party affairs. 

Mr. McKeever, senior, was one of the first School Commissioners 
elected under the city charter, having already served for twenty years 
as one of the School Trustees of the village of West Troy. He died in 
office, and his son, the subject of this sketch, was appointed to succeed 
him. 

In 1899 he was appointed to serve a full term and he has proved 
himself a faithful and valuable official. 

Mr. McKeever is also a member of Watervlict Council, Knights of 
Columbus, and is a man of much influence in that vigorous and grow- 
ing order. 



I 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 195 

Dr. Charles S. Smitii^ prominent as a physician in Steul)en 
County, and a valuable member of the Democratic organization, was 
born in that county, in the town of Cameron, December 29, 1863. He 
received his literary education in the public schools and at the Haver- 
ling Academy. After leaving school he began the study of medicine 
and was graduated from the Medical Department of Buffalo University. 

He at once began the practice of his profession, in which he has 
taken a high rank. He was at one time Assistant Surgeon of the State 
Soldiers' Home at Bath. Dr. Smith is a member of the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks. 

He is a staunch and sterling Democrat, and has rendered his party 
valuable and efficient service as a member of the Democratic town and 
county committees. 



Hon. Frank J. Nelson, one of the able and prominent Democrats 
of Steuben County, was born in Titusville, Pa., December 28, 1867. 
He received a thorough literary education in the public schools, at the 
Edinborough Normal School, Pennsylvania, and at Alfred University, 
Alfred, N. Y. 

After completing his university course he studied law and was ad- 
mitted to the Bar in 1895. He at once began the practice of his pro- 
fession at Hornellsville, where he has continued to the present time. 
He has never had a partner. He stands high among the members of 
the Bar, and has built up an extensive practice. 

Judge Nelson belongs to the Masons, the Odd Fellows, the Elks, 
the United Workmen and the K. O. T. M. 

He has always been an earnest and influential Democrat and an 
active and efficient worker in the service of his party. He was elected 
Justice of the Peace in 1895 '^^^ served three years, until 1898, whai 
he was elected City Judge. He held this office until 1900, when he was 
elected Mayor. He gave such an eminently satisfactory administra- 
tion that he was re-elected. 

Judge Nelson is one of the foremost men in his city, able, public- 
spirited and progressive. 



196 THE DE^ylOCRATIC PARTY 

Arthur T. ^^'ARXER, a prominent attorney and leading Democrat 
of the staunch Democratic County of Schoharie, was born in that 
county, at Richmondville, January 22, 1873. He acquired his educa- 
tion in the pubhc schools, at Hartwick Seminary and at Hamilton 
College. 

He studied law and completed his preparation* at the New York 
Law School. He was admitted to the Bar, and in 1898 he begarr the 
practice of his profession at Cobleskill, where he has remained until 
the present time. Mr. \\^arner is a member of two college fraternities, 
Delta Kappa Epsilon and Phi Beta Kappa. 

In politics Mr. Warner is a straight Democrat, and he has rendered 
his party valuable service as a stump speaker. In 1902 Mr. Warner 
purchased the Cobleskill Index, a leading Democratic journal of Scho- 
harie County, of which he also became the editor, giving it increased 
strength and prominence as an advocate of the cause of Democracy. 



R. Simon Bulger. One of the well-known and popular Demo- 
crats of Montgomery County is R. Simon Bulger, of the town of M'm- 
den. His ancestors on his father's side came from Ireland, and on his 
mother's side they were among the earliest settlers of the Mohawk 
\^alley. 

Mr. Bulger was born in the town of Stark, Herkimer County, 
March 13. 1853, '^"'^ acquired his education in the public schools. After 
leaving school he became a teacher, and followed this vocation in Her- 
kimer and Montgomery counties from 1872 to 1893, when he began to 
devote his entire time to farming, continuing this until the present time. 

He belongs to the ^Masonic fraternity, to the Knights of Pythias, to 
the O. U. A. IM. and to the K. O. T. M. 

Always a staunch Democrat, Mr. Bulger has been active in party 
work and influential in party councils. In 1886 he was elected Justice 
of the Peace and re-elected in 1890. He has served as Supervisor for 
eleven years, holding the record for length of service in his town. 

Mr. Bulger is married and has five children. He is a man of strong 
character and a leader in the community. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 197 

J. Velmore Guernsey. One of the active and prominent of the 
young Democrats of Schoharie County, that renowned Gibraltar of the 
"up-State" Democracy, is Attorney J. Vehnore Guernsey, of Coble- 
skill. He is a native of Schoharie County, having been lx>rn at Howe's 
Cave, January 3, 1877. He received his educational training in the 
public schools and at the Cobleskill High School. 

Having chosen the legal profession for his lifework, he made dili- 
gent preparation and was duly admitted to the Bar. 

Mr. Guernsey is a member of the Masons, the Odd Fellows, the 
Knights of Pythias and the K. O. T. M. 

In politics Mr. Guernsey has always been a very live and influential 
Democrat. In the campaign of 1900 he was elected President of the 
Democratic Club of Cobleskill and made a number of able and eloquent 
political speeches during the presidential campaign of 1904. 

Mr. Guernsey is sure to be heard from in the Democratic politics of 
New York. 



HoKT. Hiram D. McNeil, of Lockport, an enterprising and pros- 
perous business man, and an active and influential Democrat, was born 
in the town of Cambria, Niagara County, January 22, 1845. He was 
educated in the public and select schools of his native county and en- 
gaged in business at Lockport. For many years he has done a thriving 
and profitable trade in tea, coffee and spices in that live city. 

Mr. McNeil belongs to the Masonic fraternity, in which he has 
taken all the thirty-two degrees. Being a man of great public spirit, he 
has always been much interested in municipal affairs. 

In 1877 he was elected Mayor of the city of Lockport and served 
for one term with great acceptance. In 1879 ^""^ was elected Chief Engi- 
neer of the City Fire Department, and in 1893 he was appointed City 
Clerk, a position which he still holds. He has frequently served as 
delegate to important party conventions. 

Mr. McNeil has two sons, Hiram D., Jr., and William D., both of 
whom are strong Democrats, and, like their father, they have rendered 
important service to their party. 



198 THE DEAIOCRATIC PARTY. 



HON. FREDERICK EISENMENGER 

Hox. Frederick Eisenmenger, Mayor of Schenectady, was born 
in that city, ]\Iarch 21, 1849, ^^""^ only son of Ferdinand and Wilhelmina 
(Layman) Eisenmenger, who came to this conntry from Germany 
about 1845. He attended the pubhc schools of Schenectady until the 
14th day of August, 1862, when, at the age of thirteen and one-half 
years, he enlisted as a private in Company B, 134th Regiment, N. Y. 
A'olunteers. His father was a member of Company K in the same 
regiment, and did noble service in the defence of his adopted country 
until May 16, 1864, when he was killed, while charging on a Rebel 
battery, in the battle of Resaca, Ga. Frederick Eisenmenger served 
throughout the war and from the time of his enlistment until he re- 
ceived his honorable discharge on the loth day of June, 1865, was 
never absent from his command in the field. He participated in all 
of the engagements that befell his regiment and shared in the hard- 
ships and the triumphs of Sherman's March from Atlanta to the Sea. 
It is believed that Mr. Eisenmenger was the youngest soldier regularly 
enlisted in the War of the Rebellion. But the military service of the 
Eisenmengers does not end here. When the Spanish-American War 
came on, Mr. Eisenmenger's patriotic spirit naturally led him to tender 
liis services to his country, and it was a source of grave disappoint- 
ment to him that he was not permitted to aid in the cause. The family 
was not to iDe without representation, however. His only son, Fred- 
erick L. Eisenmenger, served throughout the war as a member of Com- 
pany E, Second Regiment, N. Y. V. The record is unusual. In little 
more than the half century after the departure from Germany, three 
generations of Eisenmengers had borne arms under the Stars and 
Stripes. 

When peace was restored, he returned to Schenectady and 1:>egan his 
apprenticeship as a machinist in the Schenectady Locomotive Works. 





3^-'U-i>^^.^^^^!^'f^^^>ty^ 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 199 

The next seventeen years of the young man's life were fruitful in 
character-building and in broadening the education necessarily cut 
short by his early enlistment. Naturally studious and aspiring, his 
days of arduous toil in the shops of the locomotive company were 
followed by nights of instructive reading and research. Such ability 
and patient determination could not escape recognition, and on May 2, 
1882, he was appointed Police Justice of the city. From that time 
until the first day of January, 1904, he held the position continuously, 
his efficiency and popularity having gained for him election in 1883, 
and re-elections in '^y, '91, '95 and '99. In November, 1903, after a 
spirited campaign, he was elected Mayor of Schenectady, wresting the 
city from Republican control, and entered upon the duties of that office 
in January of the following year. 

Mayor Eisenmenger is a life-long Democrat, and has always been 
an ardent and faithful worker for the success of his party. His admir- 
able administration of the duties of the Police Justiceship and the per- 
sonal traits which have led to his wide popularity have made him a 
source of great strength to the party in Schenectady County. As a 
wise counsellor, his judgment and advice have ever been held in high 
esteem by the lea.ders of the party. An earnest and convincing speaker, 
his appeals to the voters of Schenectady County have never failed to 
make votes for the Democracy. 

As a public-spirited citizen he has been active in all movements 
looking to the betterment of his native city. He is a member of Sche- 
nectady Democratic Club ; St, George's Lodge, No. 6, F. and A. M. ; 
and past-commander of Horsfall Post, No. 90, G. A. R. 

Mayor Eisenmenger married Louise, daughter of Lewis and Louise 
Pepper, September 4, 1874. They have two children, Frederick L. 
and Clara L. Eisenmenger. 



200 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

A. G. Haskix is one of those tried and true Democrats who have 
kept their poHtical faith in a town which is hopelessly Republican and 
a county and district of the same political complexion. But this makes 
no difference to Mr. Haskin ; he would still be a Democrat even if he 
were the only one in the county. 

He was born in Bedford County, Pennsylvania, December 28, 1856, 
and received his education in the public schools. He learned the trade 
of carpenter and pursued it for some" years, becoming also a contractor 
for the erection of buildings. 

In 1 90 1 he removed to Freeville, Tompkins County, where he 
erected a large building, mill, etc., and also became a dealer in coal and 
wood. Mr. Haskin belongs to the IMasonic Order, 

He has always been an earnest and energetic party worker and has 
served as member of the County Committee, delegate to Democratic 
conventions, etc. He is a man of means and is the architect of his own 
fortune. He has never aspired to office, but in loyal party service he has 
been abundant and efficient. 



Grove Webster was 1x>rn in Delaware County, N. Y., May 12, 
1844. His parents removed to New York City during his infancy, and 
he was educated in tlie public schools of that city. At the age of seven- 
teen he came to Rondout and was appointed a clerk in the postoffice;, 
under Postmaster Rensselaer Acly. 

Upon the organization of the First National Bank of Rondout. in 
1863, he accepted a sutordinate position, but by his capacity and fidelity 
lie was steadily promoted until he liecame teller. In 1880 he became a 
member of the hardware firm of Sabler, Reynolds & Webster, having 
also an interest in the livery business. Mr. Sabler died in 1890 and 
Mr. Webster retired, accepting a position as accountant with the Hud- 
son River Blue .Stone Company, meanwhile continuing the livery busi- 
ness. 

Mr. Webster is a member of tlie Rondout Club. r)f wliich he is the 
secretary, and he is also a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity, 
in which he has been the recorder of Rondout Commandery, No. 52, 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 201 

K. T., from the time of its organization. He also belongs to the Mys- 
tic Shrine and the Order of Elks. 

He has been an active Democratic worker ever since he attained his 
majority. He held the office of City Treasurer uninterruptedly for 
seventeen years, his marked efficiency securing his retention in spite of 
changes in political control. In 1902 he was elected Alderman from 
the Sixth Ward, without opposition. He was elected Sheriff on the 
Democratic ticket in the fall of 1903, and still holds that position. He 
has been a delegate to many conventions, and has rendered his party 
great service as a member of campaign committees. 



Hon. Frederick W. Thomson. Presiding in the Police Justice's 
Court in Syracuse is a young man whom the voters of Syracuse have 
twice elected to that office by tremendous majorities — Frederick W. 
Thomson. Judge Thomson is a splendid type of the self-made man, 
and to-day there is no man in Syracuse who stands higher in the com- 
munity than he. 

Judge Thomson is a native of Alexandria Bay, where he was born 
in 1867. He sold newspapers in his school days in order to pay his 
tuition fee. When he received his preliminary education he entered 
Cornell and took up the study of law. He was graduated from college 
in 1899 and admitted to the Bar. He is now a member of the well- 
known law firm of Thomson, Woods & Smith. 

Judge Thomson has made a model police magistrate and his opin- 
ions have rarely been overruled. In 1903 he was made the candidate 
of the Democratic Party for Mayor, and despite adverse conditions he 
cut down the natural Republican majority from 3,500 to 2,300, He 
made a grand carqpaign and made a good impression on the voters, who 
received him with great enthusiasm. Judge Thomson has a large fol- 
lowing in Syracuse and is respected by all for his sterling manhood. 

He is a member of the Cititzens, University, Century and Country 
Clubs of Syracuse. He is also a prominent member of the Masonic 
fraternity, having taken all the degrees in that order up to and includ- 
ing the thirty-second. 



202 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Henry D. Sutherland has long been one of the efficient and 
vahiable members of the Democratic organization in Rockland County. 
He has been an active worker from the time he became old enough to 
vote. He is always at the primaries and he has performed effective 
work on party committees and as delegate to important Democratic 
conventions. 

Mr. Sutherland is not an office seeker, and he supports his party 
faithfully and earnestly because he believes in it and is anxious to see 
its principles control our government. He was prevailed upon to accept 
a nomination for Assessor and at another time a nomination for High- 
way Commissioner in the town of Ramapo, with its overwhelm.ing Re- 
publican majority, and he made a gallant contest and a great run in 
each instance. 

Mr. Sutherland is a member of the Odd Fellows' fraternity, and he 
organized and sers^ed as the first President of the Carpenters' and Join- 
ers' Union of the town of Ramapo. He is an estimable citizen and is 
highly regarded in the community in which he lives. 



William Butts Dye, one of the leading Democrats and one of the 
prominent business men of Orleans County, was born in that county at 
Carlton, July 13, 1840, the son of Walter E. and Charlotte (Butts) 
Dye. He was educated in the public schools of his native county and 
was graduated from the Albion Academy in 1859. 

Mr. Dye's father was a prosperous general merchant at Carlton, 
and the son entered his store after leaving school, continuing there 
until 1872. In that year he formed a partnership with Mr. Fox, of 
Albion, under the firm name of Dye & Fox, and engaged in the cloth- 
ing business. The new firm prospered from the first, and it has become 
one of tlie Ijest known in Orleans County. Mr. Dye is a member of the 
Masonic order, and has taken the full thirty-two degrees. On August 
I, 1903, he was chosen President of the Orleans County National Bank 
and now holds that position. 

In politics Mr. Dye has always been a straight Democrat and is the 
recognized leader of his party in Orleans County. He has been for 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 203 

more than ten years the chairman of the Democratic County Com- 
mittee, and has served as delegate to all classes of conventions, includ- 
ing the Democratic State Convention, Mr. Dye has been elected Super- 
visor, and has for nine years been President of the Village. He was 
also president of the Board of Managers of the Western House of 
Refuge for Women from 1893 to 1898. He was appointed by Gover- 
nor Flower in 1893. In 1898 he was his party's candidate for State 
Senator. 

In 1867 Mr. Dye married Miss Charlotte E. De Diemer. They 
have two daughters. Mr. Dye is a solid business man and an excellent 
citizen who stands very high in the community. 



John A. Jerson^ a leading Democrat of Ulster County, was born 
at Kingston, February 22, 1870, and was educated in the public schools 
of that city. After leaving school he was engaged for a time as solici- 
tor for a life insurance company, after which he became infected with 
the mining fever and went to Idaho. Here he located a claim on Sal- 
mon River, where he discovered the well-known X-Ray Placer Gold 
Mine. Two years' mining experience satisfied him, so he sold out his 
interests in Idaho and returned to Kingston. He enlisted in Company 
M, First New York Regiment, and served through the Spanish-Ameri- 
can War. His service was so creditable that he was promoted to the 
rank of sergeant. After his return he engaged in the dairy business, 
in the Rondout section. He is now a general contractor and makes the 
construction of sewers a specialty. 

Mr. Jerson has been an active Democratic worker ever since he 
became of age, and he has rendered very efficient service both in con- 
ventions and as a member of party committees. In 1900 he was elected 
Alderman from the Seventh Ward and made a fine record in the board. 
But two other Democrats were elected to the board in that disastrous 
political year. He refused a renomination. 

Mr. Jerson is a member of the Knights of Columbus, of the Grand 
Order of the Orient, of the Knights of Pythias and of the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks. 



204 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Job B. Giles. One of the valuable and influential members of 
the Democratic Party in Orange County is Job B. Giles, of Middletown. 

He Avas torn in Wiltshire, England, March 21, 1865. He ac- 
quired his education in the English schools, and also learned the trade 
of carpenter before he came to this country in 1883. He settled at 
Middletown, where he engaged in building and a general contracting 
business, becoming a member of the corporation known as the Crane- 
Giles Company, with which he is still connected. 

In politics, Air. Giles has always been an active and steadfast Demo- 
crat, always eager and anxious to serve his party. He has performed 
much valuable service on party committees and has frequently been 
honored with appointment as delegate to Democratic conventions. He 
has had no ambition for public office, and has accepted but one political 
nomination. This was for Alderman in 1896, wdien he ran far ahead 
of his ticket, showing the regard and confidence of his neighbors. 



IMiCHAEL Donahue, one of the loyal and earnest Democrats of 
Orange County, vvas born in County Tipperary, Ireland, September 29, 
1841. At an early age he was brought to this country by his parents, 
who made their home at Newburgh. Here the subject of this sketch 
received his education in private and parochial schools. 

After his school training had been completed, he established a pros- 
perous trucking business, but in 1862 he enlisted as a soldier in the 
great Civil War, serving in Company F, Nineteenth Regiment, New 
York Volunteers. Having been honorably discharged in the following 
year, he returned to Newburgh and established an undertaking busi- 
ness, which he has continued to the present time. 

He married IMiss Mary A. Gleason and has three sons, all Demo- 
crats, and two daughters. He belongs to the Catholic Benevolent Le- 
gion, and has been the President of the local council ever since it was 
organized, more than fifteen years ago. He is the President of the St. 
Vincent de Paul Society of St. Patrick's Parish, and is a member of 
the Order of Red Men, and of Chapman Steamer Company, No. i, 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 205 

organized nearly half a century ago. He is also a member of the For- 
esters of America and of the Grand Army of the Republic. 

Mr. Donahue has always been a straight and strenuous Democrat, 
active and efficient as a party worker, but resolutely refusing all nomi- 
nations to political office, though he did accept an appointment as Com- 
missioner of Excise in 1894 and served with great acceptance for three 
years. He has performed efficient service on party committees, and as 
delegate to important Democratic conventions. He is one of the fore- 
most party leaders in Orange County, and has great influence with all 
classes of voters. 



William F. Rafferty. Among the younger members of the 
Onondaga Democracy there is none who commands higher respect or 
who is in better standing than Attorney William F. Rafferty, who did 
such magnificent work in the Thomson campaign in 1903, when he 
was at the head of the Executive Committee that made such a terrific 
onslaught on the Republican breastworks. 

Mr. Rafferty has been a Democrat ever since he cast his first vote. 
He was one of the "Old Guard" that helped elect Hon. James K. Mc- 
Guire Mayor of Syracuse in three successive campaigns. 

Mr. Rafferty is a law^yer by occupation and is a member of the firm 
of Edgecomb & Rafferty, who enjoy a very lucrative practice. He is 
attorney for some of the largest corporations in Syracuse, President of 
the University Heights Land Company and a director in the George 
Zett Brewery, of Syracuse. He also founded the Improved Order of 
Tycoons, which has a membership of many thousands in all parts of 
the Empire State. 

The subject of this sketch is not a "fair weather Democrat" — he 
w^orks the hardest when the clouds are the darkest, and that is why he 
has the confidence and the good-will of all who have the pleasure of his 
acquaintance. High honors at the hands of the Onondaga Democracy 
are in store for him. 

Mr. Rafferty is well known socially and has membership in the 
Citizens' Club, the Cedar Vale Fishing Club, the Syracuse Driving 
Club and the Ancient Order of Hibernians. 



2o6 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Thomas Joseph Ford. An active and influential Democrat of 
Elmira, and a valuable party worker, is Thomas Joseph Ford, an able 
civil engineer. 

Mr. Ford was born November 4, 1873, ^^ Canandaigiia, his parents 
being Martin and Mary Cullen Ford. His parents removed to Elmira 
when Thomas was but six years old. and here he acquired his educa- 
tion in the public schools, being graduated from the academy in 1889. 

He turned his attention to civil engineering after completing his 
school course, and spent ten years in the office of the City Surveyor, 
and became expert and efficient in his calling. In 1902 he accepted an 
appointment as Assistant City Engineer. 

In politics ]\Ir. Ford has been an earnest Democratic worker ever 
since he became of age, and for five years he has been a member of the 
Democratic County Committee. He is also the president of the J. B. 
Stanchfield Club. 

Mr. Ford belongs to the A. O. H. and the I. O. R. M. He comes 
from a staunch Democratic family. His father has served as Alder- 
man of the Second Ward. 



Robert Cleland, a prominent and influential Democrat of Orange 
County, is a native of Ireland, having been born there, in County Down, 
February 4, 1839. He was deprived of educational advantages in his 
boyhood but he has given himself a good education, just the same, by 
ambition and application, utilizing his leisure time in study. 

He came to this country with his parents in 1848, settling in New 
York City. Here he learned the trade of horseshoer and blacksmith 
jobbing, which he followed with much skill and worked successfully in 
various parts of the State. He returned to Brooklyn, where he re- 
mained for twenty- four years. In 1874 he went to Cornwall-on- 
Hudson to conduct his father's blacksmith shop during his parent's ill- 
ness. Upon his father's death he succeeded to the business, which he 
has conducted to the present time. In Brooklyn Mr. Cleland served 
as a Trustee of the Journeyman Horse Shoers' Association. He is a 
member of the Knights of Honor, and has belonged to many secret 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 207 

fraternal societies, which the pressure of business compelled him to 
resign. 

He has always been an earnest Democrat. He has been Chairman 
of the Town Committee, has been Inspector of Elections for a quarter 
of a century, was Commissioner of Excise six years and has served 
several years on the Board of Education. He has always declined 
political office, but has been a vigorous and efficient party worker, and 
has frequently served as delegate to important party conventions. In 
1900 he was one of the principal organizers of the Democratic Social 
Club, and was elected as its President. Mr. Cleland stands high in the 
• community as a citizen and as a man. 



Charles Cornelius Flaesch^ of Unadilla, one of the prominent 
young attorneys of Otsego County, was born in the city of Washing- 
ton, D. C, October 17, 1876. After completing his course in the 
Schenevus High School, he attended the Albany Business College and 
the Union University. Aftei" the completion of his literary education 
Mr. Flaesch studied law, and, being admitted to the Bar, he became a 
partner of ex-Senator David P. Loomis, of Otsego County, at Una- 
dilla. Since the death of Senator Loomis he has continued the business 
successfully by himself. 

He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, including Freedom 
Lodge, Unadilla Chapter and Norwich Commandery. He also belongs 
to Kalurah Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., of Binghamton. 

Mr. Flaesch has always been a staunch and loyal Democrat, ren- 
dering his party valuable service. For many years he has been a mem- 
ber of the Town and County Democratic committees, and he served as 
a delegate to the famous Democratic State Convention of 1902. 

He has made an excellent record in public office as President of the 
Unadilla Board of Education, Corporation Counsel of the Village and 
as counsel to the Town Board of Unadilla. 

In 1899 he was honored with the Democratic nomination for Dis- 
trict Attorney of Otsego County and made a popular run. He is one 
of the prominent Democrats of his section and is greatly esteemed. 



2o8 THE DEAIOCRATIC PARTY. 

Ja:mes Anselm Kennedy, a leading and earnest worker in the 
Democratic Party in Orleans County, was born at Albion, the son of 
James and Eliza (Ryan) Kennedy, May 31, i860. He has always lived 
in his native village, and here he received his education in the public 
schools, from which he was graduated in 1878. For two years after 
finishing his school course he worked on a farm and in a stone quarry, 
but in 1880 he accepted a position with the New York Central and Hud- 
son River Railroad Company and has continued in that employment to 
the present time. 

]\Ir. Kennedy is a prominent member of the Catholic Mutual Benev- 
olent Association, and is one of the officers of the State organization. 
He has always been active in the cause of Democracy, and has rendered 
much valuable service to his party. He was elected Town Collector in 
1897, serving one year, and in 1900 he was elected a Trustee of the 
village, and was re-elected, so efficient and satisfactory was his service 
in that position. 

In 1900 iMr. Kennedy married Miss Agnes Hunt, of Albion. One 
son has been born to them. 

Mr. Kennedy is a man of high character and an estimable citizen. 
He has often been selected as delegate to party conventions. 



James AIcGuigan, prominent alike in the business and political 
affairs of Chemung County, was born in Bath, Steuben County, Sep- 
tember 5, 1856. He received his educational training in the public 
schools of his native village, and for a time he was variously employed, 
at the same time learning the trade of enameling. He later accepted 
the position of baggage master, and served the Delaware and Lacka- 
wanna and the Lehigh Valley railroads in that capacity for five years. 

In the year 1883 he removed to Elmira and made that eiiterprising 
and prosperous city his permanent home. For twelve years he was the 
agent of Bartel's Brewing Company. November i, 1901. Mr. McGui- 
gan was elected Vice-President and General Manager of the Chemung 
Consumers' Brewing Company, of Elmira. He is also a member of 
the L^nited Commercial Travelers of Elmira. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 209 

Mr. McGuigan is a member of the Ancient Order of Hibernians, 
the Cathohc Mutual Benefit Association and the Benevolent Mutual 
Benefit Association and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

He has always been a strong and earnest Democrat and has been 
eight years a member of the Board of Aldermen, having been repeatedly 
re-elected, and he has made a fine record in that body. He has served 
with efficiency as a member of the Democratic County Committee and 
has often been appointed a delegate to important party conventions. In 
1903 Mr. McGuigan was again elected Alderman, representing the 
Sixth Ward of Elmira. 

In 1900 he was one of the delegates from Chemung County to the 
Democratic State Convention which nominated his eloquent and popu- 
lar fellow-townsmen, the Hon. John B. Stanchfield, for Governor. 



George C. Stewart^ one of the prominent lawyers and citizens of 
Amsterdam, was bom in the town of Perth, in the adjoining county of 
Fulton, February 12, 1867. His education was begun in the public 
schools, but it was completed at Union College, Schenectady, from 
which famous institution of higher learning he was graduated with 
many honors in the class of 1890. During his college course he won 
two valuable prizes in the writing of literary essays. 

After his graduation Mr. Stewart at once began his studies for the 
legal profession in the office of Hon. C. S. Nisbet, County Judge. He 
was admitted to the Bar in 1892, and since that time he has been 
actively engaged in the practice of his profession. 

Mr. Stewart's high professional standing, his legal learning and his 
ability led his party to nominate him for District Attorney in 1898, 
and he made a great run, but the Republican majority proved too large 
in Montgomery County for even his popularity to overcome. This ex- 
perience was repeated in 1901. 

Although not successful in his candidacies, Mr. Stewart became a 
notable Democratic leader in Montgomery County, and there can be no 
question but that high political honors await his acceptance in the 
future. 

1 \ 



2IO THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Charles Moon, one of the active and efficient Democratic workers 
of Clinton County, was born at Wells, Hamilton County, February 14, 
i860. His father, James Moon, was for many years a leading Demo- 
crat in Hamilton County, of which he was elected Sheriff. The County 
of Hamilton covers a large territory, and its population is the smallest 
of any county in the State, being widely scattered. This makes it very- 
difficult to maintain an effective organization, but the feat has been 
accomplished, and the IMoon family have done their share of the work 
which has brought it about. So thoroughly has this been accomplished 
that Hamilton County habitually gives a Democratic majority, the only 
county in Northern New York which enjoys this distinction. When 
still a 3'oung man, Charles Moon was appointed to a responsible posi- 
tion in connection with Clinton Prison, at Dannemora, which he still 
retains, after a service of more than twenty years. He is a member of 
Saranac Chapter, No. 778, I. O. O. F. He is a loyal Democrat and 
has a large circle of personal friends. 



Hon. Andrew X, Fallon, County Judge of Rockland County, 
has long been a figure in the politics of the county. He has been a 
delegate to judicial district conventions for many years, and has often 
been sent as a representative to minor conventions. In 1888 he was 
selected as one of the delegates to the Democratic State Convention. 
During presidential campaigns he has rendered his party service as a 
member of -the Special Advisory Committee, to act in conjunction with 
the Democratic County Committee. 

In 1884 he was elected a member of the Board of Trustees of the 
village of Piermont, and served by repeated re-elections until 1889. 
In 1888 he was elected Supervisor and was re-elected in 1889, 1890 and 
1 89 1, and in 1893 he was appointed to fill a vacancy in- the Ijoard and 
again was repeatedly re-elected until 1900. In 1899 ^''^ '^'^'^s elected 
County Judge of Rockland County, an office which he still holds. 

He is a member of the Knights of Columbus and of the Rockland 
County Bar Association. As a citizen he occupies a position in the 
front rank. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 211 

Anthony Steber^ a prominent citizen of Herkimer County and 
an influential Democrat, was born in France, Febniary 11, 1846. 

He was brought to this country in his cliildhood, and was educated 
in the pubhc schools of Utica. He was graduated from the Utica 
Academy in 1863. He remained in Utica until 1870, when he went to 
Oswego, and afterward to Ilion. where he has resided since 1884. He 
is employed in the great works of the Remington Arms Company. 

He has always been an active and public-spirited citizen, and he 
has filled various important positions under the village government. 
He has been a member of the Board of Trustees, President of the Vil- 
lage and President and Secretary of the Board of Sewer Commis- 
sioners. 

So popular and highly esteemed is Mr. Steber, and so generally is 
the value of his public services recognized, that no Republican could be 
found to run against him for Village President. 



Almon H. Gardiner^ a loyal and earnest Democrat and one of the 
best known insurance men of Steuben County, was born in Cameron, 
in that county, October 15, 1869. He received his literary training in 
the public schools and the Haverling High School. He also took a 
course of instruction at the Elmira Shorthand College. 

His first business employment was with the Uniteil States Express 
Company at Bucyrus, Ohio, in 1889-90. He was for several years 
identified with the management of the Steuben County Agricultural 
Society. He taught school and gave instruction in stenography. In 
1899 he founded the insurance business carried on by Longwell & 
Gardiner, and since that date he has been a special agent of the New 
York Life Insurance Company. Mr. Gardiner is a member of the 
$100,000 club of the New York Life and of the Improved Order of 
Red Men. 

He has always been an active and valuable Democratic worker and 
an influential member of the party organization. He -has been a mem- 
ber of the County and Assembly District committees for years and 
also chairman of the Democratic Town Committee. He is an ener- 
getic and successful business man and an excellent citizen. 



212 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Ira L. Case. One of the active Democrats of Orange County is 
Ira L. Case. He was born near Alonticello, Sullivan County, July 15, 
1844. He acquired his education in the public schools, supplemented 
by a course at the Unionville Academy. He then engaged in teaching 
in his native county, and followed this profession for twenty-four 
years, the last ten as principal of the intermediate department of Wall- 
kill Academy, IMiddletown, N. Y. His ability was recognized by an 
election and re-election as School Commissioner, serving six years, 
after which he engaged in his present business, real estate and insur- 
ance, at IMiddletown, Orange County, which has been his home since 
1874. He served two terms in the local Board of Education, when he 
declined another nomination. 

He accepted his party's nomination for Mayor in 1896 and came 
within twenty votes of an election, running far ahead of his ticket. He 
ran again for the same office in 1900 and w^as beaten by only seven 
votes. 

I\Ir. Case has always been a loyal Democrat and active in party 
work from the time he was entitled to vote, and has rendered valuable 
ser^•ice on party committees and in party conventions. 

He is a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity, including the 
Commandery. and he also belongs to the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine 
and the Knights of Pythias. He is a member of Excelsior Hook and 
Ladder Company, in which he has served as President. He has also 
been president of the Hillside Cemetery Association since 1898. He is 
one of the most prominent INIasons in the State, and ha^ been honored 
by many positions in the State organizations. 



William Svllabocii, a strong and influential Dempcrat of Herki- 
mer County, was torn at Herkimer, November 3, 1866. 

He received his education in the public schools. He engaged in 
the hotel business after his school days were over, and has continued in 
that line, meeting with satisfactory success, up to the present time. 

Mr. Syllaljoch is a well-known, popular and highly esteemed citizen 
and a faithful and tireless worker in the cause of Democracy. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 213 

Dr. Andrew T. Pearsai.l, one of tlie successful and eminent phy- 
sicians of the Southern Tier, was born in Lauderdale County, Alabama, 
April 22, 1839, the son of Thomas and Martha (Thustin) Pearsall. 

His parents removed to Owego in 1844, and here Andrew was 
educated in the public schools and at Hobart College. He studied 
medicine and was graduated from the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, Columbia, 1861. During the Civil War Dr. Pearsall served as 
a surgeon in the Confederate Army from 1862 to^ 1865, and became 
the medical director of the brigade commanded by Colonel W. C. P. 
Breckenridge. At the close of the war he practiced his profession at 
Montgomery, Ala., until 1878, when he returned to his northern home 
at Owego, where he has since lived, building up a large and lucrative 
business. 

He is a member of the Masonic fraternijty and of the Tioga County 
Aledical Society. 

Dr. Pearsall has always been an ardent Democrat. He was elected 
Coroner of Tioga County in 1882, and served three years. He has 
frequently been appointed a delegate to Democratic conventions. 

He is a widower and has one daughter, Mrs. Eleanor McNamara, 
of Pueblo, Col. Dr. Pearsall is a very able physician and a highly 
respected citizen. 



D.\NiEL Slattery, an earnest and popular young Democrat of 
Niagara County, was born in that county, at Hartford, September 17, 
1871. 

He was educated in the public schools. He began his business life 
as a farmer, but in the year 1900 he removed to Gasport, also in Nia- 
gara County, and embarked in trade as a wholesale and retail liquor 
dealer. 

Mr. Slattery belongs to the Order of Elks. 

He is a hustling Democrat whenever a campaign is in progress. He 
has been elected School Trustee in the town of Hartford, and has been 
honored with appointment as delegate to Democratic County and State 
conventions. 



214 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

A. C. Douglas, a contractor whose operations are so large that 
they justly entitle him to be ranked among the leading contractors of 
the State, was born in the Dominion of Canada in the year 1857. His 
parents were citizens of the United States, and, although he was edu- 
cated in Canada, his business life has been spent in this country and his 
operations largely confined to the United States. He resides at Niagara 
Falls, N. Y., and that is the headquarters'of his extensive business. He 
has been very successful in his business operations and the accumulated 
resources of capital and plant, which this success through many years 
has given him, entitle him fairly to be ranked not only among the fore- 
most contractors of the State but of the country. 

Although a staunch and liberal Democrat, Mr, Douglas has so 
manv business demands upon his time and attention that he is naturally 
restricted in political activity. He has, however, sen^d as Commis- 
sioner of Public Works in Niagara Falls during the years 1889 and 
1890, and during 1891 ancf 1892 he was a member of the City Council 
when Niagara Falls was incorporated as a city, in 1892. He is a 
thirty-second degree ]\Iason, Scottish Rite, and is also a member of the 
Chapter, the Commander}^ and of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. 



Hon. AA\ Cook Oille, ex-Mayor of North Tona\vanda and whole- 
sale lumber dealer, was born in the Dominion of Canada, January 28, 
1855, and was educated in the public schools of his native country. 

When he was twenty-one years of age he embarked in the lumber 
business, in w'hich he has been engaged all his life. In 1892 he settled 
in North Tonawanda, Niagara County, N, Y., where he has since con- 
ducted an extensive wholesale lumber business. 

Always imbued with the principles of Democracy, when Mr. Oille 
came to the United States he naturally cast his ix)htical fortunes with 
the Democratic Party, and during his residence in North Tonawanda 
he has taken an active part in public affairs and has filled several im- 
portant offices, including that of Mayor of the city. He has been a dele- 
gate to many conventions, and for five years was City Committeeman. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 215 

In 1899 he was elected Mayor of the city and was twice re-elected, 
namely, in 1900 and 1901, holding the chief office in the corporation for 
three successive terms. He was the first Democratic Mayor of the city, 
and is the only man who has held the Mayoralty office for more than 
one term. He is energetic, broad-minded and lil^eral, and his effective- 
ness as a political worker, together with his ability as a public official, 
have made him highly popular. 

Mr. Oille is a member of several social organizations, including the 
Masons, Maccabees and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 
He was the first Exalted Ruler of the lodge of Elks in North Tona- 
wanda. He is also president of the North Tonawanda Lumber Asso- 
ciation. 



Abram Cramer. Born from a long line of Democratic ancestors 
in the town of Root, Montgomery County, March 5, 1844, Abram 
Cramer was, from his boyhood, well-grounded in the Democratic poli- 
tical faith. 

He acquired his educational training in the public schools of his 
native county, and he has always lived within its borders. 

Mr. Cramer, before he attained his majority, enlisted in the Union 
Army and rendered faithful service during the Civil War. His record 
as a veteran soldier secured him an appointment as letter carrier in- the 
city of Amsterdam, which has been his home for many years. The fact 
of his being a veteran did not, however, prevent his removal from office 
after the Republicans returned to power. 

Mr. Cramer, in 1882, started in business in Amsterdam as the 
owner of a large grocery store, and this flourishing and profitable es- 
tablishment he has successfully conducted to the present time. Though 
a staunch Democrat, his customers came from the Republican ranks as 
well. This extensive business has made it impracticable for Mr. Cramer 
to accept political office, but he has rendered his party essential service 
in every important campaign, and his counsel is always highly valued. 

Mr. Cramer is a prominent member of the Independent Order of 
Od'd Fellows and also of the Mystic Circle. 



2i6 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

James Halligan, one of the prominent Democrats of Montgomery 
County, was born in Ireland, May ii, 1835. He came to this country 
in 1853 3.nd settled in Troy, but in 1859 he removed to Canajoharie, 
which has ever since been his home. He had all his educational train- 
ing in public schools. 

]\Ir. Halligan conducts an extended wholesale produce, hide and 
leather business. He is a very superior business man, and, although at 
times he has suffered severe financial losses, he has prospered just the 
same, and he is one of the solid and wealthy business men of his town. 

Mr. Halligan is an earnest Democrat and has ever been an ener- 
getic and liberal supporter of the Democratic cause. His earnestness 
and zeal have always been of essential assistance to his party, and his 
service has been recognized by his fellow Democrats, who have named 
him for many responsible official positions, to which the people have 
elected him. 

He has served with credit and honor as Overseer of the Poor, Town 
Clerk. Village Treasurer and Supervisor. President Cleveland ap- 
pointed him Postmaster at Canajoharie, and he filled this important 
position with great satisfaction to the community for eight years. 

Mr. Halligan is a large-hearted, genial and courteous gentleman, 
and his circle of friends includes all who know him. 



Hon. Peter C. Foley, one of the leading business men and a for- 
mer Mayor of the city of Olean, was born at Boonville, Oneida County, 
October 8, 1862. He received his education in the public schools of 
his native town, and then learned the trade of marble cutter. He spent 
three years in learning his trade, when he accepted a position as granite 
carver on the new Capitol at Albany. He has since been extensively 
engaged in this line of work in all parts of the country. He helped to 
construct, among many other important edifices, the State Capitol at 
Austin, Texas. 

In 1886 I\Ir. Foley located permanently at Olean. Cattaraugus 
County, where he has built up a very extensive business in marble and 
granite monument work. His firm, Foley Bros., has erected many of 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 217 

the finest monuments within a radius of two hundred miles, and it em- 
ploys from thirty to fifty hands. Mr. Foley belongs to the City Club, 
to the Maccabees, the K. O. T. M., to the Knights of Honor and Ben 
Hur, to the Order of Elks and to the Knights of Columbus. 

In politics Mr. Foley has always been- an active and earnest Demo- 
crat, and the estimation in which he is held by his fellow-citizens is 
shown by his election as Mayor of the strong Republican city of Olean 
by 300 plurality. He made a splendid administration, giving universal 
satisfaction. He has traveled much in Europe and this country. 

He is fond of music and has belonged to several bands, being one of 
the finest clarionet players in the State. 



James A. Parsons^ a prominent attorney of Steuben County, was 
born in Woodhull, in that county, July 24, 1868. He acquired his 
literary education in the public schools, including the Hornellsville High 
School, and at Cornell University, from which he was graduated in 
the class of 1890. After leaving the university Mr. Parsons studied 
law and practiced in Nebraska for a time, but in 1894 he returned to 
Hornellsville, where he has continued ever since. He has built up a 
large practice and stands high in his profession. He is a member of 
the B. P. O. E., the K. O. T. M. and the A. O. U. W. 

Mr. Parsons has always been a stalwart and steadfast Democrat, 
and is a power in the party organization. He has been chairman of 
the City and County Democratic committees, having been a meml^er of 
each body for many years. He has also been appointed a delegate to 
many party conventions, including the State conventions of 1900 and 
1902, in each of which he served as a member oi the Committee on 
Credentials, and since 1904 has been a member of the Democratic State 
Committee. 

In 1896 Mr. Parsons was appointed Corporation Counsel and 
served three years. In 1899 ^""^ "^^'^s elected City Judge, or Recorder, 
and filled that difficult position with eminent success for five years. Mr. 
Parsons is a man of brains and energy, and he is a recognized force in 
the political and business life of the city. 



2i8 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Wallace Beach Eckert, an active Democrat of Orleans County, 
was born at Allentown, Pa., June 2'], 1861, the son of Andrew and 
Mary (Beach) Eckert. He acquired his education in the public schools 
of his native city, completing his course in 1876. The following year 
he was appointed candidate from his Congressional district for admis- 
sion to the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md. He after- 
ward removed to Philadelpliia and followed the cigarmakers' trade — 
which he had learned in his father's factory when a school boy — after 
which he went on the road, traveling in that line of business until 1883. 
In that year he located at IMedina, Orleans County, continuing in the 
cigar manufacturing trade. Since 1899 he has been the resident man- 
ager of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company of New York for 
the Niagara Falls District. 

In politics ]\Ir. Eckert has always been an earnest and loyal Demo- 
crat, greatly interested in his party's success. He is active in the party 
organization, and since 1900 he has been the secretary of the Demo- 
cratic County Committee. 

]\Ir. Eckert, in 1887, married Miss Catherine Lynch, of Medina. 
They have four children. ]\Ir. Eckert is highly respected as a man and 
as a citizen. 



John J. Riley, Chairman of the Board of Supervisors of Mont- 
gomery County and an influential and highly respected citizen, is one 
of the leaders of the young Democracy of Montgomery County. 

He was born at Albany, March 31, 1873. He received a sound and 
liberal education in the public schools and at St. Mary's High School 
at Amsterdam. He worked for a time, after leaving school, in the 
knitting mills, but he did not like the confinement, and, besides, he was 
ambitious to engage in some calling with more favorable opportunities 
for advancement. Pie accordingly went into business for himself when 
only seventeen years old, opening a barber shop in Amsterdam, which 
from the first has been a noteworthy success. 

Mr. Riley has always been an earnest and enthusiastic worker in 
the cause of Democrac}', with a natural gift for leadership, which 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 319 

necessarily forced him into prominence. He has never been an office 
seeker, but his abiHty and popularity brought him the Democratic 
nomination for Supervisor in 1899, and he was triumphantly elected. 
His splendid service brought him a renomination and re-election in 
1901, and he was made Chairman of the board. 

So great is Mr. Riley's popularity that a strong Democratic or- 
ganization, "The John J. Riley Association," of Amsterdam, largely 
composed of young men, was named in his honor. It was organized 
in September, 1901, and is in a highly flourishing condition, having 
some 150 active members. 

Mr. Riley has represented his county as a delegate tO' the Demo- 
cratic State Convention, and many future honors surely await him. 



John A. Davidson, one of the prominent Democrats of the city of 
Amsterdam, Montgomery County, New York, has always lived in that 
thriving manufacturing center. There he was born, April 13, 1865, 
and in the public schools of that city he received the education that has 
fitted him for an active and successful business life. 

He conducted a successful cigar business for fifteen years, and 
afterward opened a meat market. In this he has met with great suc- 
cess, his establishment having become one of the most prosperous in- 
its line in Amsterdam. 

Mr. Davidson is one of those staunch and sterling Democrats that 
constitute the main strength of the party. He believes in the soundness 
of Democratic principles, and he is always anxious, and ever eager, to 
do everything within his power to have them established and enforced 
in the conduct of the government. 

He has never accepted nor sought any public office, his extensive 
private business demanding his entire time and attention. But as a 
party worker he has few equals, and he is always ready to respond to 
any call for his services. 

Mr. Davidson is a member of the Knights of Pythias, of the Benev- 
olent Order of Elks, and he also belongs to the E. D. Brumsen Fire 
Company. 



220 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Richard H. Murray^ one of the earnest and effective Democratic 
workers of Niagara County, was born at Lockport, November 15, 1851. 
He received his education in the pubhc schools of his native city and at 
St. Basil's Seminary, Toronto, Canada. 

Mr. Murray learned the trade of machinist, in which he is one of 
the most skillful and efficient in that busy city. For many years he has 
been the foreman machinist of the Trevor Manufacturing Company. 

]Mr. ]\Iurray is a prominent member of the Catholic Mutual Benevo- 
lent Association and has filled all the important offices in the local 
organization. 

He has never been a seeker after political offices, but in 1892 he 
was chosen ^^'ater Commissioner, in which office he served with great 
acceptance for four years. 



^^'ILLIAM j\I. Battin^ an earnest and active Democratic worker of 
Wyoming County, was born in Ossian, in the adjoining county of Alle- 
gany. I\Iay 6, 1858. He received his educational training in the public 
schools of Tioga and Broome counties and at a select school at Weth- 
ersfield Springs. After his school days were over Mr. Battin began 
work on the same farm where he now resides. 

His father is the Rev. J. E. Battin, a Protestant Episcopal clergy- 
man, now a resident of Rock Glen, Wyoming County. 

He has a son, Linn Francis, just now in his early "teens," who is a 
youth of much promise, bright and active, and an ardent Democrat like 
his father. Mr. Battin belongs to the Order of Modern Woodmen. 

In politics he has always been a strong and sturdy Democrat. He 
is a very influential party worker, and has for several years been a mem- 
ber of the Democratic Town Committee. He has never consented to 
accept any nomination for public office, his many and important party 
services having l^een rendered because of his deep devotion to Demo- 
cratic principles and his anxiety to see them enforced in the conduct of 
the government. 

Mr. Rattin is a descendant of the family of Battins (spelled Batyns 
or DcBatyns), who have resided for six centuries in Somerset, Eng- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 221 

land, where they are ranked among the British landed gentry. They 
are of Flemish origin, coming originally from Battenberg, and some of 
them were eminent merchants in the wool trade during the time of 
Edward the First. John Battin (great-grandfather) died in New York 
City, June 29, 1852. He was born in Bristol, England, February, 
1752, and was a lineal descendant of the Somerset family. At four- 
teen years of age he lost his father, and at eighteen he enlisted in the 
British cavalry. About a year later he was commissioned cornet and 
was attached to the corps which came to North America under General 
Howe in 1776. He was present at the battle of Long Island and en- 
tered New York along with the British Army. When the English 
evacuated, after the close of the war, he resigned his commission to 
remain in the new country. He taught school for a time and subse- 
quently went into business near where Chambers street now is, and 
resided in New York until the time of his death. An account of him 
is to be found in an issue of the Commercial Advertiser in February, 
1852, when he was one hundred years old. 



R. Simon Blood. One of the active and leading Democrats of 
Amsterdam, and one of the prominent business men of that flourishing 
city, is R. Simon Blood. He was born in Amsterdam, September 9, 
1832, and was educated in the public schools of his native city and at 
the Amsterdam Academy, of which he is a graduate. 

Mr. Blood is the Secretary of the American Box and Machine Com- 
pany and is a very successful business man. 

He is an energetic worker in the cause of Democracy, and his ser- 
vices to his party have been of very great value. He has often been 
honored by his party by nominations to important official positions, in 
recognition of the aid he has given the organization. In 1892 he was 
elected County Clerk, although his associates on the county ticket were 
all defeated. He was also elected to represent the First Ward of 
Amsterdam in the Common Council. 

Mr. Blood is a deservedly popular man and is held in the highest 
esteem by the citizens of all political parties. 



222 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Caleb McNair, One of the prominent and popular Democrats of 
Niagara County is Caleb McNair, of Gasport. 

He was born at South Bristol, Ontario County, July 8, 1853. He 
received his educational training in the public schools, and until 1875 
he was engaged in farming in the town of Hartwell, Niagara County. 
In that year he removed to Gasport and opened a general store, where 
he has built up a flourishing and profitable business, and which he still 
conducts. 

He is a member of the Masons, the Odd Fellows, the Maccabees 
and the Order of the Eastern Star. 

I\Ir. IMcNair is an earnest and active Democrat and has often served 
as a delegate to party conventions. He was elected Supervisor of the 
town of Royalton, Niagara County, in 1896, and served two years, 
making a fine record. He is personally very popular and is highly 
respected in the community. 



Hox. Thomas O'Reilly, a prominent Democrat of Niagara 
County, was born at Niagara Falls, October 11, 1853. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools of his native county. 

After leaving school he engaged in business as a merchant until 
1890. Afterward he purchased and opened a valuable sandpit, located 
at Stamford, Canada, and he has built up a large trade as a wholesale 
dealer in sand. 

Mr. O'Reilly is a member of the Knights of Columbus and of the 
Catholic Mutual Benefit Association. 

In politics he has always been an earnest and active supporter of 
the Democratic organization, and for four years he served as a member 
of the Democratic County Committee. In 1894 he was elected Alder- 
man from the Second Ward of Niagara Falls, and with the exception 
of one term he has sers-ed in this position until the present time. In the 
spring of 1900 he was appointed Commissioner of Public Works and 
made an excellent record. 

As a man and as a citizen Mr. O'Reilly is highly respected and very 
popular in the community. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 223 

Frank Maroney^ one of the most popular Democrats of Lockport, 
was born in that city, March 20, 1862, and was educated in the local 
public schools. 

After leaving school he engaged in business and for many years he 
has been one of the most enterprising and prosperous grocery mer- 
chants in the city. 

He belongs to the C. B. L., the A. O. H. and the B. P. O. E. 

Mr. Maroney has always been active and influential in the cause of 
Democracy, and in 1895 ^^^ was elected Supervisor of the First Ward, 
in which office he made such an excellent record that he was repeatedly 
re-elected, serving for five consecutive years. 

Personally Mr. Maroney is a genial companion and has a large 
circle of friends. 



Charles W. Wheeler. One of the prominent Democrats of 
Montgomery County is Charles W. Wheeler, Esq., of Canajoharie. He 
was born in that handsome village, April 25, 1834, and received his 
education in the public schools and in the Canajoharie Academy, from 
which he was graduated. 

He studied law with D. S. Morrell, Esq., and was admitted to the 
Bar September 13, 1887. He immediately began the practice of his pro- 
fession in his native village, which has always been his home. 

Mr. Wheeler has always been a sincere and sturdy Democrat in 
politics, and a zealous and effective supporter of his party's principles 
and candidates. 

His sound judgment and judicial fairness, shown in the discharge 
of the duties of the office of Jutsice of the Peace, to which he was elected 
in 1865, gave him an unbroken tenure of that important position by 
successive re-elections until 1902, a period of thirty-seven years. This 
record has seldom been equaled, and it bears the highest testimony as to 
Mr. Wheeler's integrity and to the high esteem in which he is held by 
his fellow-townsmen. 

He is a prominent and active member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church and also of the Masonic fraternity. 



224 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



JOHN J. CUMMINS 

John J. Cumt^iins. No history of the Democratic Party of the 
State of New York would be complete unless it made extended refer- 
ence to John J. Cummins, chairman of the General Committee of 
Onondag-a County. Ever since he reached the age of twenty-one Mr. 
Cummins has been a hard and persistent worker in the ranks of Democ- 
racy and his work has had telling effect. 

Mr. Cummins is now the president of the Syracuse Lighting Com- 
pany, one of the most important positions held by any young man in 
the United States. He occupies a high position in business and social 
circles and his acquaintance throughout the State is an extensive one. 
Mr. Cummins rose from the position of bundle boy in the store of 
Charles Chad wick & Co. to that of financial manager of Neal & Hyde, 
and from that place he was drafted by the Syracuse Lighting Company. 

Mr. Cummins has many times been asked to run for public office 
by the Democratic Party, but he has always thrust political honors 
aside. A\'lien the Black Primaiy Law was adopted he reluctantly ac- 
cepted the position of chairman of the Democratic General Committee 
and has held that office ever since, devoting all of his spare time during 
campaigns to the management of the committee. 

Mr. Cummins is also President of the Board of Trustees of the 
Syracuse Public Library, President of the Syracuse Reduction and 
Manufacturing Company, a director of the State Bank, a trustee of the 
Trust and Deposit Company and a director in nine other companies 
and corporations. His rise in the business world has been rapid, but 
merit and ability have been recognized in his case. He is a splendid 
type of the progressive young Democrat and higher honors are in store 
for him. 




JT-ra 611 S G »-7//a^y^ 2,£rir ATi^ 




'/'fi-i4^^lHy(^Pt ^ 



OF THE STy\TE OF NEW YORK 225 

Philip Heary, of Lockport, one of the earnest and influential 
Democrats of Niagara County, was born at Lockport, January 29, 
t86o. He received his educational training in the public schools of his 
native city and began work as messenger boy for the firm of B. 81 J. 
Carpenter when he was only nine years old, and remained in their em- 
ploy for twenty years. His capacity and fidelity secured him repeated 
promotions. He then accepted the position of lock tender on the Erie 
Canal, holding it for five years, when he engaged in business as a gro- 
cer. He was successful from the start, and has built up a flourishing 
trade. 

He belongs to the C. M. B. A. and to the Washington Hose Com- 
pany, of Lockport. 

In politics Mr. Heary has always been a strong and active Demo- 
crat and he has great weight in party affairs. 



Hon. James Brennan, of A4bany, N. Y., is a staunch Democrat 
upon whom his party has called for assistanc-e on many occasions, and 
as a counselor his services have been inva-luable in the cause of the 
Democracy of the State. Having served as delegate to city, county 
and Assembly conventions, his experience in this line of work was 
gradually obtained and he more and more recognized the need of a 
truer Democracy in the controlling of the State's affairs. 

In 1 888 he accepted the nomination as a member of the Common 
Council, which had been tendered him by his party in recognition of the 
services rendered by him in minor offices. Mr. Brennan represented 
the Sixth Ward of the city, and so well was this representation carried 
out in accordance with the dictates of the people that he succeeded him- 
self continuously for four years. 

In 1894 Hon. James Brennan fi.gured largely in the campaign as 
nominee for Assemblyman from the Third Assembly District and won 
the election. In this office he remained one term. 

Mr. Brennan has established a large clientele in the profession of 
law, in which he has practiced with great success since first admitted 
to the Bar. 



226 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Charles Augustus Lux, one of the leading Democrats of Wayne 
County, was born at Clyde, October 30, 1858, and that thriving village 
has always been his home. He was educated in the public schools and 
was graduated from Cornell University in the class of 188 1. 

After the completion of his educational course he embarked in the 
coal and cooperage business, which he has successfully conducted to the 
present time. 

Mr. Lux has always been active in politics, and is one of the influ- 
ential Democratic leaders of Western New York. He is the member of 
the Democratic State Committee from the Forty-second Senatorial Dis- 
trict. 

]\Ir. Lux is prominent as a business man, being a Director and the 
Secretar}' of the Rochester, Syracuse and Eastern Electric Railway 
Company, \^ice-President of the Wayne County Electric Company, 
President of the Wayne County Telephone Company and also the Pres- 
ident of the White Crystal Marble Company, of Gouverneur, N. Y. He 
is a member of the Masons, up to and including the Commandery of 
Knights Templars. 



Hon. George ]\L Voorhees. Among the Democrats of Mont- 
gomery County who have conferred honor upon their party, the Hon. 
George M. Voorhees, of Amsterdam, stands conspicuous. 

He was lx)rn on T^Iarch 16, 1826, in the same house in which he 
still lives. Another fact worthy of note is that no other child has been 
born in that house since. Mr. Voorhees was so fortunate as to receive 
a thorough education, an advantage that is common enough now, but 
was rare indeed in the days of his boyhood,- sixty years ago. He com- 
pleted his educational training at the Amsterdam Academy, a famous 
institution in those days. 

Mr. \"oorhees is one of those party men thoroughly imbued with 
the political principles of Jefferson and Jackson, that we call "Demo- 
crats of the old school." Politics with these veterans is purely a matter 
of principle, without any selfish thought. 

Mr. \'"oorhees has been a prominent and successful man of affairs. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 227 

public spirited and enterprising, all his days. He held the office of 
Excise Commissioner for twenty-five years, rendering most efficient 
public service, and in 1876 he was triumphantly elected Member of 
Assembly. He has also served for many years as an Alderman in his 
native city. 

Mr. Voorhees was formerly a farmer, but retired many years ago 
on a competency. He is a veteran of the great Civil War and a memlx^r 
of E. S. Young Post, G. A. R., of Amsterdam. He is known to all his 
old friends as Major Voorhees. 

He is a gentleman of solid worth and is universally popular and 
respected. 



Edward W. Hyatt, of Homer, a leading lawyer of Cortland 
County, was born in that county in the town of Fenner, March 5, 1867. 
He received a thorough education in the public schools of his native 
county, at the Cazenovia Seminary and at Hamilton College, from 
which he was graduated in 1889. 

After completing his college course he began the study of law, and 
in 1892 he was admitted to the Bar. He began the practice of his 
profession at Homer, where he has continued up to the present time. 
He has built up a large practice and enjoys a high standing in his pro- 
fession. He is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. 

In politics Mr. Hyatt is an alert and active Democratic worker and 
is a prominent figure in the party organization, having served for many 
years as a member of the County Committee and for some time as sec- 
retary of that organization. He is at present Chairman of the Execu- 
tive Committee of the Democratic County Committee. He served as 
village clerk for seven years ; one term of four years as Justice of the 
Peace, and is at present Police Justice of the village of Homer. He has 
been honored by appointment as delegate to many important party con- 
ventions, including no less than four Democratic State conventions, and 
also to the last National Convention at St. Louis. He is an excellent 
and highly respected citizen in the community where he has long had 
his home. 



228 THE DEIMOCRATIC PARTY 

Joseph Scully, one of the live and loyal Democrats of Ulster 
County, was born in Kingston, November 9, 185 1, and received his 
education in the public schools. He worked on the Delaware and Hud- 
son Canal fifteen years, after which he opened Scully's Hotel in the 
town of A\'ilbur, where he is at present located. 

He is a member of the Wilbur Democratic Club and the C. M. B. A 
He has always been active in the Democratic organization since he 
became of age. and a staunch supporter of all party nominations. In 
1898 he v.-as elected Alderman from the Eighth \\^ard. He has fre- 
quently been appointed a delegate to Democratic city and county con- 
ventions, and he has never failed to hustle things when a campaign has 
been in progress. 



J. OvETTE Smith. One of the solid and prosperous business men, 
and one of the active and influential Democrats of Clinton County, is 
J. Ovette Smith. He was bom at Clarenceville, Province of Quebec, 
Dominion of Canada. Januar}^ 5, 1850. Pie lost both his parents in his 
childhood, his mother having died when he was only four years old, 
and his father when he was but seven. The young lad was, however, a 
sturdy and brainy boy, filled with ambition and a determination to make 
his mark in the world. He early perceived the advantages of a thor- 
ough education, and determined to secure it. In 1861 he entered school 
at Fort Edward, where he made the most of very superior advantages. 
In 1873 '""^ engaged in business at Schenectady, in the manufacture of 
brooms, an enterprise in which he was very successful. In 1880 he 
entered into partnership with B. S. W. Clark, a man wdio had become 
prominent in l)0th business and politics, and began the manufacture of 
wood pulp at Cadyville. This w^as a comparatively new^ industry at 
that time, but the enterprise was prosecuted with sucli vigor and suc- 
cess that the firm enlarged its operations by erecting another pulp mill 
at Chateaugay. Mr. Smith has been the president of the company from 
the beginning. It is known as the High Falls Pulp Company, and it 
has become a very extensive and prosperous industry. 

Upon leaving Schenectady Mr. Smith made his home at Platts- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 229 

burgh, where he has since resided. He has taken much interest in 
public affairs, and has been an active and influential factor in the poli- 
tics of Clinton County. He was nominated by his party for Supervisor 
and was elected, making; an excellent record in the board. He has also 
served with great credit in the Board of Aldermen. Both at Schenec- 
tady and at Plattsburgh he was elected a member of the Board of Ex- 
cise Commissioners, He has added to his reputation as an efficient 
administrator by his service as President of the village of Plattsburgh. 
Mr. Smith stands high in the community, and his service and coun- 
sels are highly prized in the Democratic organization. 



Frank W. Glidden, the owner and proprietor of the Downs Hotel 
at Holley, Orleans County, was born in that county, the son of Smith 
and Cordelia (Wheeler) Glidden, July 31, 1851. He received his edu- 
cational training in the public schools of his native county and at the 
State Normal School at Brockport, from which he was graduated 
in 1870. 

After completing his training in the Normal School Mr. Glidden 
taught school in Iowa and also in Orleans and Genesee counties, in this 
State. He was brought up on a farm, but abandoned that occupation 
for other pursuits. He was in the carriage business for a time, but was 
attracted by the hotel business, for which he had a peculiar gift, so he 
bought the Downs Hotel, which he has conducted with great success 
for many years. 

Mr. Glidden belongs to the Masonic order, and has been the Wor- 
shipful Master of the local lodge. He is also a member of the United 
Workmen. 

In politics he has always been a staunch Democrat, the leader of 
his party in Holley, but he has resolutely and repeatedly declined public 
office. 

In 1877 Mr. Glidden married Miss Franc R. Holt, of Byron, N. Y. 
They have one son, Earle Glidden, who is a partner of his father in the 
hotel business, the title of the firm being Glidden & Son. 



230 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hon. \\'illiam Richmond, ex-Mayor of Lockport, N. Y., Collec- 
tor of the Port of Niagara Falls under President Cleveland and manu- 
facturer of flouring mill machinery at Lockport, Niagara County, N. Y. 

\Mlliam Richmond is a native of England and was born in that 
country, October 6. 1847. He was educated in the old country and 
came to America in 1863. From 1863 until 1868 he was mostly en- 
gaged in the study, both theoretical and practical, of machinery and 
mechanics. In the latter year he came to Lockport, settled permanently 
and shortly afterwards entered into business for himself. 

In 1 88 1 Mr. Richmond organized the Richmond Manufacturing 
Company, of which he has been President ever since, and of whose 
operations he is the guiding genius. This company manufactures ma- 
chinery for flour mills and its trade extends over a great area of 
country. 

In politics Mr. Richmond has always been an ardent Democrat, a 
believer in and a staunch upholder of the principles of the Democratic 
Party as enunciated by Thomas Jefferson. During his residence in 
Lockport he has taken an active part in public affairs and has held sev- 
eral important ofiices. He served two terms as Alderman of the city, 
first representing the First Ward and afterwards the Third Ward. 
His ability and fidelity as a member of the Board of Aldermen were 
evidently highly appreciated by the citizens at large, for in 1883 he 
was elected Mayor of Lockport. Subsequently he received the ap- 
pointment of Collector of the Port of Niagara Falls from President 
Cleveland and was Collector of that port for four years. He has also 
served on the Board of Water Commissioners and on the Board of 
Education. He was the Democratic candidate for County Treasurer in 
1892, but failed of an election. 

Mr. Richmond is a member of the Masonic fraternity and is not only 
a successful business man but has proved himself to be a reliable and 
conscientious public official, whose deportment in office has shown that 
he in truth considers that "public office is a public trust." In the dis- 
charge of his duties he has added dignity to the office and has strength- 
ened the Democratic Party by honorable methods and the healthful 
tone of his administration. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 231 

M. McGowAN. One of the live Democrats of the city of Oswego 
is M. McGowan, a native of that city, where he was born, December 
II, 1858. 

He was educated in the pubhc schools, afterwards going into busi- 
ness. He manages an extensive insurance agency and also deals large- 
ly in coal. 

Mr. McGowan is a member of the Knights of Columbus, and in 
politics he has always been a staunch Democrat. 'He has served his 
party as delegate to city, county and district conventions. He was 
elected Alderman from his ward, and his service was so acceptable 
that he was accorded a renomination and a re-election. 

He has also served as a member of the Board of Education. 



Adelbert M. Scriber^ an accomplished newspaper man and a 
leading and loyal member of the Democracy of Sullivan County, was 
born in that county, which has always been his home, at Livingston 
Manor, January 5, 1865. He was educated in the public schools and 
began his journalistic career on the Livingston Manor Times in 1880 
and two years afterwards, at the age of seventeen, he became editor and 
proprietor of that journal. He went to Monticello in 1885 and became 
associated with The Republican Watchman, and in 1894 bought a half 
interest in the paper, Mr. Charles Barnum being associated with him. 

Mr. Scriber is a graceful and vigorous writer, and, as editor of an 
influential Democratic organ, he has rendered his party very valuable 
service. He is also a skillful politician and a strong and eloquent public 
speaker. He has never held nor sought any political office, but was 
nominated for Member of Assembly and State Senator, much against 
his will, and although running in strongly Republican districts, he re- 
duced the majority, and in the Assembly contest was defeated by about 
a hundred and sixty majority. As a party worker he clearly belongs 
to the first rank. 

Mr. Scriber is a prominent Odd Fellow, both in the lodge and the 
encampment. He is identified with school matters and is now serving 
the ninth year as trustee of the Monticello High School. 



232 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Elisha Curtiss, ^vho has the remarkable record of having served 
as principal of an academy for forty years, was born at Ellsburgh, 
Jefferson County, June 7. 1840. 

He received his education in the public schools, at the Cazenovia 
Academy, the Belleville Academy, the Pulaski Academy and at Union 
College, from which he was graduated in the class of 1864. He be- 
came the principal of the Sodus Academy, and has filled that position 
with credit and success to the present time. 

Mr. Curtiss received a State appointment as Inspector of Training 
Classes in 1890 and served acceptably for three years. He belongs to 
the ]\Iasons, having taken all the Master Mason and Royal Arch de- 
grees also and to the Phi Beta Kappa Society. 

In politics ^Ir. Curtiss has always been an earnest and loyal Demo- 
crat, but his profession has precluded him from holding any political 
office. As a teacher and school executive he holds a place in the very 
first rank. 

He married Miss Josephine E. Allen. They have a daughter, who 
was graduated from Columbia College, and a son, who was graduated 
from the Syracuse Classical School. 



Hon. Saxford T. Church comes of a distinguished Democratic 
family. His grandfather was the great jurist. Chief Justice Sanford 
E. Church, and his father is the Hon. George B. Church, of Albion, 
where the subject of this sketch was born. 

After completing his literary education he began the study of law. 
He attended the Columbia College Law School and in 1890 was ad- 
mitted to the Bar. 

In 1892 he accepted the Democratic nomination for District Attor- 
ncv of Orleans County, but the Republican majority in that stronghold 
proved too great to l:)e overcome. In 1896 he was appointed Clerk of 
the Surrogate's Court, under the only Democratic Surrogate ever 
elected in Orleans County. Hon. W. Crawford Ramsdale. and upon his 
retirement in 1902 formed a law partnership with Judge Ramsdale, 
which still continues under the firm name of Ramsdale & Church. On 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 233 

January i, 1903, Mr. Church was appointed Deputy Attorney-General 
of the State of New York, and served for two years in that position 
under Attorney General John Cunneen. 

Mr. Church is a member of the New York State Bar Association, 
the Lawyers' Chib of Buffalo, and the Fort Orange Club of Albany. 
He has always been active and prominent in the Democratic organiza- 
tion. For six years he served as Chairman of the Albion Village Demo- 
cratic Committee, and as a member of the Senatorial and Judicial Com- 
mittees. He is at present a member of the Board of Education of the 
village of Albion, having been placed on both Democratic and Republi- 
can tickets at the last village election. In 1891 he married Florence 
H. Beach, daughter of the proprietor of the leading Democratic news- 
paper in Orleans County, and they have one son, Sanford Beach 
Church. 



Eugene J. Gallager, M.D., one of the prominent physicians of 
the city of Kingston and an earnest and active Democrat, was born in 
Mongamp Valley, in the adjoining county of Sullivan, August 22, 
1869. He was educated in the public schools and in the high school at 
Monticello, the county seat of Sullivan County. 

Having selected the medical profession for his life work, he at- 
tended the Albany Medical College, graduating with the class of 1892. 
After perfecting his preparations for practicing his profession, he had 
a year's service in St. Peter's Hospital at Albany, and then located in 
Kingston in May, 1893. 

He is Vice-President of the County Medical Society, a member of 
the Foresters, the K. of C, the C. M. B. A. and the B. P. O. E. Sep- 
tember 21, 1902, Dr. Gallager married a daughter of Patrick Kiernan, 
of Chelsea, Mass. 

He is an active worker in the Democratic organization and has 
always been, ever since he attained his majority. He is also an active 
party worker and is now located in Yonkers, N. Y. Dr. Gallager's 
large practice has compelled him to decline all nominations to public 
office. 



234 THE DEAIOCRATIC PARTY 

Dennis W. Daly. One of the prosperous merchants and one of 
the prominent young Democrats of Niagara County is Dennis W. Daly, 
of Lockport. He was born in that city, June 17, 1872, and received his 
educational training in its public schools. 

He has always been engaged in the mercantile business, for several 
years as a clerk, and since 1898 as a member of the firm of Lerch & 
Daly, dealers in clothing and men's furnishing goods. 

Mr. Daly is a member of the Knights of Columbus, the Ancient 
Order of Hibernians, the Order of Elks and of the Clerks' Union. 

In politics Mr. Daly has always been an earnest and energetic 
worker in the Democratic organization and has frequently been ap- 
pointed a delegate to Democratic county conventions. 

He is not only a strong party man, but also a strong man in his 
party, and many political honors doubtless await him whenever he may 
care to accept them. 



The Hon. John Foley, for many years one of the prominent 
Democratic leaders in Northeastern New York, was born in County 
A\'aterford. Ireland, in 1848, the son of Thomas and Margaret 
( A'Hearn) Foley. When he was but five years old his family emigratecl 
to this country and settled in Saratoga Springs, which has ever since 
been his home. He received his literary education in the public schools 
and at Professor A. J. Robb's Collegiate Institute. During his boy- 
hood ]\Ir. Foley turned his hand to all kinds of work, including selling 
newspapers, and afterv.-ard worked at the carpenter's trade. Determ- 
ining to study law, he entered the" ofYice of Hon. Lemuel B. Pike in 
1867, and was admitted to the Bar in 1869, the year he attained his 
majority. Fle was associated with Mr. Pike up to the time the latter 
retired from general practice. Mr. Foley was employed in many im- 
portant litigations, including the defence of Alderman Arthur Mc- 
Quade, of New York City, when his trial was sent to Saratoga County 
on a change of venue. Mr. McQuade was charged with bribery in con- 
nection with the granting of the Street Railroad Franchise in Broad- 
way, New York. ]McQuade had been convicted in New York and 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 235 

served a part of his sentence, when he was granted a new trial, and in) 
this trial, with Mr. Foley managing his defence, he was acquitted. This 
was the last of the so-called "Boodle Aldermen trials." He was also 
active in the management of the prosecution in the famous Billings 
murder trials. 

Although by no means a professional politician, Mr. Foley has al- 
ways taken an active part in the work of the Democratic Party. He has 
been honored with the appointment as delegate to Democratic National, 
State and all classes of local and district conventions, and he also served 
for two years as member of the Democratic State Committee. He has 
held many local offices, including Village Attorney and President of 
the Village. He was elected Collector of Taxes when he had just at- 
tained his majority. He also served as Justice of the Peace a full term 
of four years, and for nine years he was a member of the Board of Edu- 
cation, serving as President of the Board for three years. Four times 
was he prevailed upon to accept the Democratic nomination for District 
Attorney, in the hopelessly Republican county of Saratoga, and it did 
not, in his case, prove "three times and out," for at the fourth attempt 
he was elected by more than five hundred majority, the first and only 
time that any Democrat has been elected to that ofifice since the organi- 
zation of the Republican Party in 1856. He declined a renomination, 
and also the Democratic nomination for Congress in 1886. In 1887 
Mr. Foley was elected State Senator by about 4,000 majority, the nor- 
mal Republican majority in the district being about the same figure. 
In this, as in all his previous offices, Mr. Foley made an excellent rec- 
ord, and he was also a member of such important committees as the 
Judiciary, Villages and Taxation. He was active in securing the loca- 
tion of a State Armory at Saratoga Springs, and would also have se- 
cured a State Normal School there but for the determination of Gov- 
ernor Hill not to approve any further bills for that purpose. 

In July, 1893, the death of the Hon. Donald McNaughton, of Roch- 
ester, left a vacancy in the position of Chief Executive of New York 
State at the Columbian Exposition at Chicago, and Mr. Foley was ap- 
pointed to fill that office by Governor Roswell P. Flower. There was 
much labor involved in this position, and a multiplicity of details, as the 
exhibit from this State was a very important feature in that historic 



236 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

display, in which the wliole civilized world participated. He was em- 
ployed in this important work for about one year. 

In 1889 ]\Ir. Foley was elected a director and President of the Citi- 
zens' National Bank of Saratoga Springs, upon the reorganization of 
that financial institution, and he built it up to a great success and a 
prominent position in the world of finance. After his resignation he 
also rendered valuable aid in rehabilitating the bank after the difficulties 
which involved the local national banks in serious difficulties in 1904. 

In 1900 ]\Ir. Foley married Miss Sara E. Dillon, of Saratoga 
Springs. Two children, one son and one daughter, have been born to 
them. 

Mr. Foley has been prominent in Democratic State politics, and he 
was strongly supported for the nomination for Attorney-General in 
1889. He stands high as a man and a citizen, having the esteem and 
the confidence of the entire community in which his life has been spent. 



Hon. Michael N. Kane^ one of the popular and earnest Demo- 
crats of Orange County, was born at McLean, Tompkins County, April 
I, 1 85 1. After completing a course in the public schools of his native 
county, he was educated at the Cortlandville Academy. Here he was a 
schoolmate of Chief Judge Alton B. Parker, of the New York Court of 
Appeals. This illustrious jurist was also a fellow-pupil of Mr. Kane 
at the Cortland Normal School, from which Mr. Kane was graduated 
in 1873. 

After leaving the Normal School Mr. Kane took a special course at 
Cornell University, studied law, and was graduated from the Albany 
Law School in 1878. He was admitted to the Bar the same year, and 
Ijegan the practice of his profession at Warwick, Orange County, where 
he has remained ever since. He has built up an extensive practice and 
stands high in his profession. 

He belongs to the Exempt Firemen of Warwick, having been for 
several years a member of Excelsior Hose Company. 

Judge Kane has always been a staunch and prominent Democrat. 
In 1882 he was elected Police Justice and served seven years. In the 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 237 

same year he was elected Special Surrogate of Orange, and was re- 
elected, serving- with great acceptance for six years. He was elected 
President of the village of Warwick, and in 1890 was elected Meml:)er 
of Assembly. 

He has the rare distinction of having never been beaten as a candi- 
date for public office. 

He has served as Corporation Counsel of the villages of Warwick, 
Chester, Monroe and Washingtonville. He has rendered the Democ- 
racy great service on party committees. He has been honored by ap- 
pointment as delegate to four Democratic State conventions and two 
Democratic national conventions. He was selected as a member of the 
Notification Committee by the National Convention of 1900. He won 
a high reputation as an organizer by his splendid work in the Twen- 
tieth Congressional District. 



Henry C. Preston, of Hornellsville, one of the strongest and most 
influential Democrats of the Southern Tier, or of Western New York, 
was born at Fremont, October 25, 1847. He was educated in the public 
schools and at the Union Seminary, at South Dansville. 

Mr. Preston has been a resident of Hornellsville since 1872, where 
he has been engaged in various kinds of business, all of which have been 
prosecuted with the diligence, energy and sound management that com- 
pel success. Whether as merchant, as liveryman, as wire cable manu- 
facturer, as hollow cable manufacturer, as brick manufacturer or in- 
terested in any other line of activity, he has achieved satisfactory re- 
sults, with corresponding profits. 

Mr. Preston is a member of the Masonic order, of the Order of 
Elks and of the Hornellsville Board of Trade. 

He is a Democrat of the sterling variety, always anxious and ear- 
nest in his endeavors to promote his party's success. He has never 
aspired to public office, but he consented to accept an appointment as 
Police Commissioner, and served six years, from 1898 to 1904. Mr. 
Preston is one of the most prominent and most valuable citizens of 
Steuben County, and no man stands higher in the public regard. 



238 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Peter Flannagan, a prominent business man of Port Jervis, and 
an active and influential Democrat, was born in that village June 13, 
1871. Pie acquired his education in the public schools and at the Port 
Jervis Academy. He served four years as letter carrier, resigning to 
accept a position in the local office of the Erie Railroad Company. In 
tSqo he formed a partnership with Thomas Gunning in the clothing 
and furnishing business at Port Jervis. The firm has built up a pros- 
perous trade, and still continues in business. 

He belongs to the Knights of Columbus, in which he has taken all 
the degrees. He is a member of the Port Jervis Board of Trade, and 
also a member and Chairman of the Board *of Manufactures, and he 
holds the public office of member of the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners. 

In politics he has always been actively identified with Democratic 
organization work from boyhood. He was a worker, and held a posi- 
tion in the post office before he attained his majority. He has rendered 
valuable service on the Democratic County Committee, and has been 
sent as a delegate to all classes of party conventions, including the State 
convention which nominated the Hon. John B. Stanchfield for 
Governor. 



Eugene D Scribner was born in Delafield, Waukesha County, 
Wis., December 21, 1869. He received a liberal preparatory education 
in the public schools of Johnstown, N. Y., and studied law in the office 
of Hon. Robert P. Anibal at Northville, N. Y. He was regularly ad- 
mitted to the Bar in 1899 and has been actively engaged in his profes- 
sional work since that date, w ith practice in both the Supreme Court 
and the United States Courts. 

Since attaining his majority Mr. Scribner has taken an active part 
in political affairs and has been an ardent and effective worker in the 
Democratic cause. His loyalty to principles has gained him the confi- 
dence of all who know him, and his ability and enthusiasm have made 
him a leader in political work. He was a Justice of the Peace at North- 
ampton, Fulton County, from 1892 to 1896 and was honored with the 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 239 

Democratic nomination for Member of Assembly for Fulton County in 
1894. He has been a member of the Democratic County Committee 
since 1895 and was made chairman of that committee in 1902. 

Mr. Scribner is an active factor in about every department of pubhc 
life in Northville, He is a member of the Board of Education, is Presi- 
dent of the Citizens' Hose Company, President of the Northville Social 
Club, a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of the Sul> 
ordinate Lodge at Northville and of Gloversville Encampment, No. 49, 
of the Independent Order of Red Men and of the K. O. T. M. He is 
also a member of the New York State Bar Association. 

In both his professional position as an able and honorable lawyer 
and in his political activity as a foremost Democrat Mr. Scribner com- 
mands hig-h respect and esteem, not only within but beyond the boun- 
daries of his own district. 



John J. Taylor, who was one of the great Democrats of the last 
century in Southern New York, was born in Leominster, Worcester 
County, Mass., April 27, 1808. In 1837 he married Miss Emily G. 
Laning. Two children were born to them, John L. and Sarah, wife of 
L. Burr Pearsall. 

He took a college preparatory course at New Ipswich, and entered 
Harvard University in 1825 and was graduated in the class of 1829. 
He studied law, and came to Owego in 1834, where he formed a part- 
nership with Stephen Strong, which continued until 1838. 

Mr. Taylor held many important offices. In 1835 he was appointed 
District A.ttorney, in 1846 he was a member of the New York State 
Constitutional Convention, in 1852 he was elected a Member of Con- 
gress. In 1858 he was the Democratic nominee for Lieutenant-Gov- 
ernor on the ticket headed by Judge Amasa J. Parker, of Albany, for 
Governor. 

For many years he was the President of the Bank of Tioga. He 
was also President of the Southern Central Railroad Company. He 
belonged to the Unitarian Church. Mr. Taylor was a strong man in 
his day, recognized as one of the ablest in the State. 



240 THE DE^IOCRATIC PARTY 

J. AA\ li. Kelly, one of the strong and influential Democrats of 
Niagara County, was born at Delavan, Warworth County, Wis., April 
2^, 1865. He removed to Lewiston with his parents in his boyhood. 
Here he received his education in the public schools and then engaged in 
business. He deals in flour, feed and grain, and is the owner of a large 
mill, where his stock is prepared for his trade. Mr. Kelly also con- 
ducts a prosperous and profitable business in coal and produce. 

He is a member of the Order of Elks and of the Knights of Co- 
lumbus. 

In politics he has for many years been prominent in the Democratic 
organization of his county. He has been honored by appointment to 
many important county and State conventions, and in 1899 he was 
tendered the party nomination for Supervisor of his town. He ac- 
cepted the nomination and was triumphantly elected. So efficient and 
satisfactory was his service that he was continued in office, and he is 
still the incumbent, which is a very creditable record and bears the 
highest possible evidence as to his capacity and fidelity in administering 
this important public trust. 



F. H. Mover, M.D. One of the leading citizens and most active 
Democrats of Livingston County is Dr. F. H. Moyer, of Moscow. Dr. 
Moyer was born at Mount Morris, N. Y., on the 14th day of August, 

1847. 

Having a natural bent towards the practice of medicine and sur- 
gery, he early began the work of mastering his chosen profession. After 
completing his preliminary studies, he entered the Buffalo University 
Medical College, from which he was graduated in 1872. He immedi- 
ately began the practice of his profession at ]Mount ^Morris, but in 1876 
he removed to ]\Ioscow. where lie ha-^ resided ever since. Dr. Moyer at 
once established a large and lucrative business, being a physician of 
unusual ability and thorough preparation, and also a gentleman of 
pleasing manners, earnest, enthusiastic and energetic, devoting his time 
and strengtli without stint to the relief of the sick and the suffering. 
He soon 1)ecame recognized as one of the most skillful and successful 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 241 

medical practitioners in his section, and his professional reputation has 
steadily grown. 

In addition to the exacting duties of his profession Dr. Moyer has 
been prominent in the Masonic fraternity, having taken all the degrees, 
including those of Commandery. He is also a Noble of the Mystic 
Shrine. 

In politics, too, he has always taken great interest and is one of the 
most efficient Democratic w'orkers in all Western New York. He is 
content to strive for the success of the political principles and policies he 
deems to be best for the country, but has steadily declined office, and 
even all nominations to office, giving himself wholly to the ever-increas- 
ing work of his profession. As a citizen and a Democrat, Dr. Moyer 
belongs to the highest type. 



John B. Arnold,, one of the prominent citizens and one of the 
leading Democrats of Niagara County, w^as born at Lima, Livingston 
County, May 1 1, 1848. He received his education in the public schools 
and at the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary. 

After his school days were dver Mr. Arnold engaged in the milling 
business, owning and running extensive flouring mills at Lockport. He 
conducted this business with marked success for a. quarter of a cen- 
tury, retiring in 1891, w'ith a comfortable competency, though he keeps 
in touch with business by speculating, wdiich has added materially to 
his fortune. 

Mr. Arnold belongs td the Masonic fraternity, to the Order of Elks, 
to the City Club, to the Wheelmen's Club and to the Ellicott Club, oi 
Buffalo. He has always been a loyal and earnest Democrat, and in 
1884 he was elected County Treasurer of Niagara County. He has 
also served as Police Commissioner and as member of the Board of 
Education of the city of Lockport. He has frequently served as dele- 
gate to important State and other Democratic conventions. 

Mr, Arnold lives in a beautiful home on Genesee street, Lockport, 
and he is very highly and very widely respected as an able business man 
and an excellent citizen. 



242 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hon. Aaron Barber, president of the State Bank of Avon, has 
long been one of the most influential citizens of Western New York. 
Although a banker and a power in the financial world, Mr, Barber is 
no less prominent as a farmer. Probably no other man in the State has 
done more to enlarge the range and increase the value of farm products 
in his section than j\Ir. Barber, 

He was born in the town of Rush, ]\Ionroe County, July 6, 1836. 
His home is on the famous "Barber Farm," three miles from the village 
of Avon. In the original inheritance there was only a quarter section, 
or one hundred and sixty acres of land, but it was as fine a farm as the 
sun shines upon, and JMr. Barber brought it to the highest state of culti- 
vation and productiveness, so that the "Old Homestead" became a 
regular gold mine, and its energetic owner was able to keep on buying 
all the land adjoining until the estate now covers over seven hundred 
acres, all in one plot. Here this enterprising banker-farmer has 
achieved great success as a breeder of fine stock, his specialties being the 
renowned "short-horn" cattle and Merino sheep. In this branch of his 
industry and activity, as well as in everything else, Mr. Barber has 
worked upon large lines. His herd of high-bred cattle contains more 
than one hundred head, and his flocks of Merino sheep number over six 
hundred animals. Both cattle and sheep are great prize winners. They 
ha^•e been exhibited in competition with the stock of the most celebrated 
farms, not only of New York, but also of the Central, Western and 
Southern States. In fact, l\Ir. Barber's exhibits of full-blooded stock 
have been important features of State fairs in most parts of the country 
for many years, and as a winner of blue ribbons he is probably not ex- 
celled by any other stock-breeder in the United States. That he is a 
sagacious and successful business man is attested by the fact that he 
has accumulated an estate which is valued at fully a quarter of a million 
dollars. His home is one of the show places of his section, the resi- 
dence being spacious and of handsome architecture, while the grounds 
are noted for their charming landscape effects. 

Such a man could not fail to be interested in pu1)]ic affairs. He 
acquired a sound, practical education in the district schools and the 
Lima Seminary. He has served four terms as Supervisor of his town, 
has been Town Assessor for several terms and as a candidate for Mem- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 243 

ber of Assembly he cut an adverse party majority of alxDiit two thousand 
down to fifty votes. He has often served his party as a delegate to its 
State conventions, and in all respects he is one of the most forceful and 
valuable citizens of Western New York, 

Mr. Barber is a Democrat of the old school. Living in a county 
and district which are overwhelmingly Republican, and, for that reason 
alone, he has been practically excluded from the conspicuous and lucra- 
tive public offices, but there is no Democrat in the State whose counsel 
is more often or more eagerly sought, nor one whose word is more 
potent in shaping the policy and action of his party. 



Hon. Hurlburt E. Brown. One of the most prominent, active 
and successful business men in Livingston County, is the Hon. Hurl- 
burt E. Brown, the veteran cashier of the Genesee River National 
Bank, of Mount Morris. Mr. Brown has held this position, without 
any break or intermission, since 1861, a length of uninterrupted service 
that has seldom been parallelled. 

Mr. Brown was born in the neighboring county of Wyoming, July 
2, 1 83 1. He was educated in the public schools and at the Nunda Lit- 
erary Listitute. He was only seventeen years old when he began busi- 
ness for himself as a civil engineer. His unusual capacity and re- 
markable efficiency in this profession are shown by the fact that he was 
soon employed by the State of New York and by the Erie Railroad 
Company, and continued to serve one or the other of them for twelve 
years, until 1861, when, as stated above, he became cashier of the bank 
with which he is still connected. 

In 1855 Mr. Brown wa.s appointed by Governor Clark to a position 
on the staff of the brigade commanded by Brigadier-General Calvin T. 
Chamberlain, and held the place for five years. 

He early became interested in political matters and was elected to 
many local offices, but his great political triumph was his election as 
County Clerk of Livingston -County. He held the office for the full 
term of three years, being the first and only Democrat who was ever 
chosen to that position. Mr. Brown has, however, held many impor- 



244 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

tant public positions by appointment. He was made Loan Commis- 
sioner for Livingston County in 1876, and when the State of New 
York estabhshed the Craig Colony for Epileptics, in 1894, he was 
made one of the managers, a position he has held ever since, and of 
which he is very proud. 

Few men have served as trustee or executive of as many valuable 
estates as Mr. Brown, and his fidelit}^ to these private, as well as to his 
many public trusts, has proved of signal advantage to all those whom 
he served. He has been a delegate to national, State and county Demo- 
cratic conventions, and he has been a valued counselor of many great 
Democratic leaders, among them being Samuel J. Tilden, Horatio Sey- 
mour, John T. Hoffman and Roswell P. Flower. 



Thomas C. Flannagan, a well-known and popular Democrat of 
Orange County, was born at Port Jervis, November 24, 1873. He re- 
ceived his education in the public schools of his native county, leaving 
school in 1892 to accept an appointment as clerk of one of the commit- 
tees of the State Assembly. In the following year he was appointed 
examiner of cloth and clothing at the State Prison at Sing Sing, hold- 
ing this position until 1896, when he was legislated out of office. 

Mr. Flannagan is a prominent member of the Knights of Columbus, 
and is District Deputy of the Twentieth District. He is also a member 
of the Board of Trade. 

In politics Mr. Flannagan has always been a faithful and energetic 
party worker, rendering the Democracy valuable and essential service. 
He was the leader of the Fifth District until 1901, making it the banner 
Democratic district of the town. In that year he removed into the 
Eiglith District. He has performed long service in party committees, 
especially the reorganized \^illage Committee, known as the Executive 
Committee. In 1901 he was elected Tax Collector. 

Since 1897 he has been connected with the firm of Gunning & 
Flannagan, doing a large trade in the clothing business at Port Jervis. 
Mr. Flannagan is an excellent citizen of high standing in the com- 
munitv. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 245 

Bird S. Coler was born at Champaign, 111., October 9, 1867. He 
was educated at the Andover Academy and also took a polytechnic 
course. He was a clerk in his father's banking- house and subsequently 
became a partner. He first attracted attention in political affairs when 
he was Comptroller for New York City, where he established a high 
reputation for honesty in office and also incurred the displea.sure of 
Richard Croker. He was strongly supported for the Democratic nomi- 
nation for Governor in 1900. He was Senator Hill's choice and re- 
ceived the full benefit of the up-State leader's support, but the antago- 
nism of Richard Croker prevented his nomination. In. 1902 he was the 
standard-bearer of his party and came nearer to carrying the State 
than has any other Democratic gubernatorial candidate since 1891. He 
has been chairman of the Finance Committee of the Democratic or- 
ganization and is a member of several prominent clubs. 



James W. Burnham, one of the solid and prosperous business men, 
and one of the prominent representative Democrats of Steuben County, 
was born at Avoca, in that county, in August, 1838. He received a 
thorough education in the public schools and at Alfred University. 

After his school days were over he at once engaged in the mercan- 
tile business in his native town. He remained there, however, but a few 
years, when, feeling the need of a larger field, he removed to Hornells- 
ville, where he has for a generation been one of the most capable and 
prosperous general merchants in his section. 

Although immersed in his own extensive affairs, Mr. Burnham has 
not neglected any of the duties of citizenship. Public-spirited and alert 
to see the needs of the community, he has always been ready to respond 
to any opportunity to promote the general welfare. He served as Vil- 
lage Trustee for many years, and for four years he also filled the office 
of Assessor. 

Mr. Burnham has always been an active and influential Democrat, 
and has been a leading figure in the party organization continuously for 
many years. Personally Mr. Burnham is highly esteemed and very 
popular in the community. 



246 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

\'\^illia:m H. ^Iurphy was born at Woodbourne, Sullivan County, 
j\Iarcli 29, 1872. He received a sound education in the public schools, 
and in 1892 he became the proprietor of the Mansion House at Liberty, 
in his native county, where he has continued his very successful busi- 
ness to the present time. 

Mr. Murphy is a member of the Order of Red Men and of the Elks. 

He has always been a strong Democrat, active, loyal and influential, 
a power in every important campaign. He has been a member of the 
County Committee for five years and has represented his party as a 
delegate in many important conventions. Mr. Murphy has never ac- 
cepted any nomination for office, as his private business demands his 
time and attention, but he is a power in the organization and he stands 
very high as a citizen. 



Hon. Dow Vroman^ of North Tonawanda, a leading attorney 
and a prominent Democratic leader of Niagara County, was born at 
IMiddleburg, Schoharie County, November 28, 1867. Mr. Vroman 
enjoyed the advantages of a thorough education, being graduated from 
Union College in the class of 1887. He at once began the study O'f law, 
and after completing a course at the Albany Law School he was ad- 
mitted to the Bar in 1890. He promptly began the practice of his pro- 
fession at North Tonawanda, where he has attained a high standing 
and has built up an extensive practice. 

Mr. Vroman is a member of the Masonic fraternity and was the 
first Master of his lodge. He also served two years as District Deputy 
Grand Master. 

In politics Mr. Vroman has always been an ardent Democrat and 
acti\e in the work of the party organization. He was elected Village 
Attorney in 1894, and in 1897 he was chosen Member of Assembly 
fn)in the First District of Niagara County. He is at tliis time the City 
Attorney of North Tonawanda, where he is the recognized Democratic 
leader. ]\Ir. Vroman has served as delegate to Democratic State con- 
ventions and was nominated for County Judge in 1899. He has also 
rendered valuable service on Democratic party committees. 



OF THE STATE OF NEVv^ YORK 247 

Dr. James E. Mansfield, a prominent and popnlar physician of 
Oswego, was born in New Brunswick, New Jersey, April 22, 1866. 
He was educated at the Sacred Heart College, New Jersey, and after- 
wards studied medicine and was graduated from the Medical Depart- 
ment of Dartmouth College. 

After receiving his diploma Dr. Mansfield began the practice of his 
profession at Oswego, in the fall of 1897, and soon established a fine 
practice and a high reputation as a medical practitioner. He is a mem- 
ber of the Oswego County Medical Association, the Knights of Colum- 
bus and the Order of Elks. 

In politics Dr. Mansfield is an earnest and influential Democrat. 
He has served as a delegate to local conventions and also to the Demo- 
cratic State convention. In 1898 he was appointed a member of the 
Board of Health of Oswego. 



James P. Gillen, for many years prominent in the business and 
political affairs of Port Jervis, was born in that thriving village, July 
31, 1855. He was educated in the public schools of his native village, 
and when his school days were over he entered the employ of the Erie 
Railroad Company. He remained with the company in various capaci- 
ties, including that of conductor, for twenty-three years. In 1890 he 
resigned, in order to undertake the management of extensive coal yards, 
a work which devolved upon him at the death of his father, and he has 
continued in this business until the present time. 

He belongs to the Knights of Columbus and has taken all the de- 
grees of that order. He is also a member and Treasurer of the local 
branch of the C. M. B. A. and of the A. O. H. Ever since he left 
the employ of the Erie Railroad Mr. Gillen has been an active worker in 
the Democratic organization. He has been a member of the Town 
Committee for several years, and has served as delegate to all classes of 
party conventions. He has held many important municipal offices, in- 
cluding- Villasfe Trustee, Sewer Commissioner, member of the Board 
of Health, and is Vice-Chairman of the Executive Committee which 
controls the village government. 



248 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY. 



HON. LEVI F. LONGLEY 

Hox. Levi F. Longley was born in the city of Hudson, Columbia 
County, N. Y., May 5, 1846, and was educated in the pubHc schools of 
his native city and at Bradbury's Classical Institute, a well-known pre- 
paratory school, where he fitted himself for college with the intention 
of matriculating at Brown University, Rhode Island. 

He subsequently took up the study of law and was admitted to the 
Bar of the State of New York in 1867, when he was but twenty-one 
years of age. He pursued the practice of his profession throughout his 
life and attained high distinction therein. 

In 188 1 he and his brother, John B. Longley (now deceased) 
opened a law office in New York City, where he remained three years, 
and then returned to Hudson, N. Y., where, in 1888, he formed a law 
partnership with his father-in-law, Robert E. Andrews. The firm of 
Andrews & Longley succeeded Andrews & Edwards as local counsel for 
the New York Central and Boston & Albany Railway Companies. 
Subsequently he was also counsel for the Hudson Electric Company, 
which office he held from the organization of that company until he 
was elected Mayor of Hudson in 1890. 

Judge Longley held several offices of importance and trust in Co- 
luml)ia County, and these came to him not only because of his clean 
politics and exemplary life, but because of his superior abilities. He 
served tliree years as County Clerk, was twice elected Mayor of the 
city of Hudson and served two terms in that office. He was also 
County Judge of Columbia County for a period of six years, to which 
office he was elected in 1895. In 1902 he was nominated for Judge of 
the Supreme Court, Third Judicial District, against Judge Cochrane, 
but everything going Republican that year he was defeated. 

In politics Judge Longley was a Democrat, one who was not only a 
credit to his party, but one whose voice and counsel were ever sought 




LEVI F. LONGLEY 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 249 

and highly respected by the best men in the party, in whicli he was for 
many years one of the leaders. Indeed, his influence extended outside 
of his own party, and he was well known and highly respected through- 
out the entire Hudson River Valley. He was an excellent public 
speaker and possessed great power and charm as an orator. As a plat- 
form speaker he was persuasive and eloquent and his serv'ces were 
sought by his ])arty and party associates in every campaign. But he 
did not confine himself entirely to political and legal subjects. He 
made many addresses of a literary character all over the State and was 
chosen Orator of the Day upon the occasion of the laying of the corner- 
stone of the new Columbia County Court House, on August 14, 1900. 

The social side of Judge Longley's nature was well developed. He 
had none of the characteristics of the recluse, but, while dignified in his 
deportment, he was one of the pleasantest of men to meet, was courte- 
ous, kind, patient and considerate, and, on account of these qualities, 
he made an ideal judge. 

His professional career was itseful, honorable and distinguished 
and was identified with a large portion of the important litigation that 
arose in the State during his active career; His professional career 
was characterized by a strict observance of a high standard of profes- 
sional ethics, without which talents and learning avail but little. He 
was peculiarly sensitive to the obligations which, as a lawyer, he owed 
to society, to the Bench and to the Bar. He felt that while the law 
frequently bestows high rewards upon its practitioners, it expects from 
them in return a severe obedience to duty and morality. 

Judge Longley was a member of Aquilla Lodge, No. 700, F. and 
A. M., an honorary member of the Masonic Club, served his time as a 
Fireman in the C. H. Evans Hook and Ladder Company, and was a 
consistent and faithful member of the Baptist Church. 

Judge Longley died July 8, 1902, in the prime of life and in the 
midst of his activities and usefulness. His death was sincerely lament- 
ed by all who knew him. The Democratic Party lost in him one of its 
ablest men and brightest ornaments in his section of the State. Even 
his political opponents honored and respected him for his high quali- 
ties of mind and character, and people who knew him only by repute 
held him in high esteem. 



250 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

S. A. O'Brien, a former Alderman from the Fifth Ward of the 
city of Oswego, was born in that city, November i8, 1861. He re- 
ceived his education in the pubHc schools of his native city, and was 
graduated from the High School. With the exception of three years, 
during which he served on the Buffalo police force, INIr. O'Brien has 
always resided in Oswego, where he does an extensive business as a 
broker. 

He is a member of the C. M. B. A., of the Order of Maccabees, and 
of the O. R. S. 

He has always been a consistent Democrat and a valuable party 
worker. He has served as a delegate to many Democratic conventions, 
and under President Cleveland's first administration he was appointed 
letter carrier. 

In 1 90 1 he was elected Alderman, and made an excellent record. 



James H. Cullen. Although born in County Cavan, Ireland, Jan- 
uary 6, 1S47, ^^^- Cullen has lived in Ulster County ever since 1852, 
when he came to this country with his parents. He was educated in the 
public schools of Ulster County, and after leaving school he worked on 
a farm until he was twenty-one years old. He then removed to Ron- 
dout, where he engaged in the grocery and liquor business. He was suc- 
cessful from the first, and he soon enlarged his enterprise. He afterward 
began boating and transportation in New York harbor. Mr. Cullen 
is a prominent member of the Order of Elks, and of the Ancient Order 
of Hibernians. He is also an exempt fireman of the Hook and Ladder 
Company. 

Mr. Cullen has always been an active Democratic hustler, a power 
lx)th within his party and for his party. In 1S75 he was elected Super- 
visor, and as the recognized leader of the Sixth Ward of the city of 
Kingston he is a prominent figure in the councils of his party, though 
tlie demands of his private business have compelled him to refuse the 
many political honors offered to him. 

A man of force and successful in business, Mr. Cullen is a citizen 
of mark in the prosperous city where he resides. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 251 

Edward Mathews, a proniinciit liveryman of Oswego, was born 
in that city, which has always been his place of residence. He received 
his educational training in the public schools, and afterward engaged 
in the livery business, which he has conducted ever since with great 
success. 

Mr. Mathews is a stalwart and vigorous Democrat, an efificient and 
enthusiastic party worker, and always ready to utilize any opportunity 
to serve his party. He is prominent in the Democratic organization of 
his native city, and has been honored with the appointment as delegate 
to many important party conventions, including two State conventions. 

He has also performed important and valuable service on party 
committees. 



Nicholas F. Fitzpatrick, an earnest and influential Democrat of 
Orange County, was born at Newburgh, November 21, 1857. 

He was educated in the public and parochial schools, and, after his 
school training had been completed he opened a family market, which 
he has continued to the present time, and where he has built up an ex- 
tensive business. 

He is a member of the Knights of Columbus, of the Catholic Benev- 
olent Legion, of Chapman Engine Company, and of the Newburgh 
Volunteer Fire Department, of which he was elected Chief Engineer. 

In politics Mr. Fitzpatrick has always been a straight and stalwart 
Democrat and a faithful and vigorous worker in the party organization. 
In 1888 he v;as appointed by President Cleveland Collector of the Port 
at Newburgh, and held that office until 1893, when the ofifice was abol- 
ished by the Secretary of the Treasury. He has served as a member of 
the Democratic City Committee for the past ten years, and he has also 
performed valuable service on the Democratic County Committee, of 
which he is still a member. He has also been a member of Assembly, 
Senatorial and Congressional District committees, and has been hon- 
ored by appointment to all classes of Democratic conventions, including 
the State convention. He is an excellent citizen and stands high in 
the community. 



252 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

AViLLiAM H. Fredenburgh, a prominent Democrat of Ulster 
County, was born in Kingston, June i6, 1828. He was educated in 
the public schools of Kingston and in 1845 ^^^ went to Brooklyn, where 
he learned the sash, blinds and door trade in Williamsburgh. He re- 
mained there until 1849, when he returned to Kingston and started in 
the same business for himself. Mr. Fredenburgh was the pioneer in 
this branch of manufacture in Ulster County. He continued it with 
success until 1856, when he retired in order to accept an appointment 
as Customs Inspector of the Port of New York, under Hon. Augustus 
Schell. He rendered good service in this responsible position until the 
Republican Party came into power, in 1861. He then returned to 
Kingston again, and engaged in the grocery business for six years. 
He retired from this tq. open a real estate and insurance office, con- 
tinuing in this line until his final retirement from active business in 
1884. 

Mr. Fredenburgh became interested in politics in 1852 by his vig- 
orous and effective support of the Hon. Theodoric R. Westbrook for 
Congress. Judge Westbrook was elected and Mr. Fredenburgh ob- 
tained recognition as a highly important factor in Ulster County poli- 
tics. In 1853 he yielded to urgent entreaties to accept the Democratic 
nomination for Member of Assembly, but party dissensions prevented 
liis election. In 1861 he was elected Overseer of the Poor by a large 
majority, holding the office three years. He was Treasurer of the 
Democratic County Committee from 1863 to 1867, when he was chosen 
Chairman, serving until 1884. 

Mr. Fredenburgh was the first Alderman elected from the Ninth 
Ward of the city of Kingston, after the villages of Kingston, Rondout 
and some smaller ones liad been consolidated and incorporated under a 
city government. He served as Alderman six years. He also served 
as member of the Board of Health through all these years. As a party 
leader Mr. Fredenburgh lias won a great reputation. From 1852 to 
1884, under his leadership, Ulster County always gave a substantial 
Demrxrratic majority. His ability as a part}^ organizer and as a cam- 
])aign manager have never been surpassed in the political history of 
Ulster County. He has servefl many times as delegate to important 
conventions, and his time and counsel have always been freely rendered 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 253 

since he gave up his leadership. He is famiharly known as 'The Old 
War Horse" of the Democracy of Ulster. 



John Braniff, an active Democratic worker in the city of Osweg-o, 
was torn in Pittsburgh, Province of Ontario, Canada, February 4, 
1863. 

His parents removed to Oswego in his youth, and that thriving 
city has remained his home. He was educated in the public schools of 
Pittsburgh and Ontario. Mr. Braniff has long been a prominent long- 
shoreman, and member of the Longshoremen's Union. 

Politically he has always been a sturdy and influential Democrat. 
He has frequently been a delegate to city and county conventions, and 
was for three years a member of his Ward Committee, for two years 
serving as Chairman. 

In 1 90 1 Mr. Braniff was elected Alderman from the First Ward 
and made a fine record. 



James E. Quigley was born in Kingston, October 18, 1866. He 
was educated in the public schools of his native place. After leaving 
school he engaged in the ice business, which he has continued to prose- 
cute with energy and success. 

He is a member of the Knights of Columbus and of the Order of 
Elks. 

He has been a staunch and loyal Democrat ever since he has been 
entitled to vote. He is an active and enthusiastic worker and has fre- 
quently been appointed a delegate to important conventions, but he has 
always refused both nominations and appointments to public office, as 
his extensive business interests have demanded all his time and 
attention. 

Mr. Quigley is an excellent citizen and is very highly respected in 
the community, as well as remarkably popular in the Democratic 
organization. 



254 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Rev. ^Michael F. Mooney, of Amsterdam, was born at Troy, Au- 
gust 15. 1866. He received a thorough education at the La Salle Insti- 
tute and St. Joseph's Seminary, of Troy, and Manhattan College, New 
York. 

In May, 1891, he was ordained to the Roman Catholic priesthood, 
and had important charges in Albany and Saratoga Springs before he 
was appointed to the large parish now under his care in Amsterdam. 

Father ]\Iooney is too strictly devoted to his clerical duties to take 
any acti\-e part in political matters, but he is a firm believer in the 
principles of the Democratic Party, and supports them loyally at the 
polls. He cast his first vote for Grover Cleveland for President, in 
1888. 

Father ^Mooney is a prominent member of the Knights of Colum- 
bus, of the Catholic Benevolent League and of the Catholic Mutual 
Benefit Association. 



John H. T^^IcArdle, one of the prominent citizens and one of the 
leading Democrats of Westchester County, was born at White Plains 
in 1863. He has been an alert and loyal Democratic worker ever since 
he became of age. He has been a power in the organization, serving 
on the Town Committee of ^^'hite Plains and that of Mamaroneck, to 
which place he removed in 1884, and having also performed effective 
work on the Westchester County Democratic Committee. He has 
served as delegate to all classes of conventions, including local, district, 
State and National. 

He represented his Assembly District in the Democratic State Con- 
vention of 1896 and the Democratic National Convention of 1904. 

In the year 1884 he was elected Trustee of the village of White 
Plains, the youngest Trustee ever elected in that town. He also served 
the village as School Trustee. 

After ]Mr. McArdle removed to ]\Iamaroneck he at once identified 
liimself witii the local Democratic organization, an4 was elected Chair- 
man of the Democratic Town Committee, Chairman of the Board of 
Education and Supervisor. He served twelve years continuously as 



OF TJIE STATE OF NEW YORK 255 

member of the Board of Education. Although accepting these local 
offices, Mr. McArdle's large business interests have compelled him to 
decline all proffered nominations to more extended official responsi- 
bilities. 

He is a member of the Knights of Columbus, the Foresters, the 
Catholic Benevolent Legion and the Union Hook and Ladder Com- 
pany, of Mamaroneck. He is also a director of the First National 
Bank of that place. 



C. D. Martin^ one of the active business men of the city of Roches- 
ter, has always been a consistent and earnest Democrat. He never 
misses a Democratic caucus, and never fails to deposit a Democratic 
ballot at election time. 

His vote for a presidential candidate was given to William J. 
Bryan, but in 1904 he favored the nomination of Judge Alton B. 
Parker. 

He is in the plumbing business and is a highly respected and in- 
fluential citizen. 



John A. McManus was born in Kingston, October 5, 185 1. He 
received his educational training in the public schools of his native 
place. After leaving school he worked for a considerable time along 
the Hudson River. Li the year 1883 he established a liquor store in 
the Wilbur section of Kingston, and he has continued the extensive 
business he has built up until the present time. He is a member of the 
C. M. B. A. 

In politics he has always been a Democrat of the kind that is of 
great value to the organization. He is always loyal, staunch and true. 
Mr. McManus has done much party service in conventions and on cam- 
paign committees, but he has always refused recognition of his work 
in the way of nominations, preferring the post of a zealous worker in 
the ranks. 



256 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

E. Leo Fay, one of the prominent young attorneys of Genesee 
County, was born at LeRoy, iiT that county, June 13, 1879. He was 
educated in the pubHc schools of his native village, and afterward took 
a course at the Columbia University Law School, in the city of New 
York. 

In June, 1900, he was admitted to the Bar, and in the following 
October he began the practice of his profession in LeRoy. He is a 
member of the Knights of Columbus. 

In politics ■Nlr. Fay has always been a staunch and loyal Democrat. 
He has served as member of the Democratic County Committee and 
has had the honor of being selected as delegate to the Democratic State 
Convention. 

Personally Mr. Fay is a genial and companionable man, and has a 
wide circle of friends. He is a party leader who will be heard from. 



Edward \Vells_, Jr. One of the active and influential Democratic 
workers of Westchester County is Edward Wells, Jr., chairman of the 
Democratic Committee of the village of Peekskill, of the committee of 
the town of Cortland and also a member of the County Committee. 

j\Ir. Wells is one of the prominent attorneys of his section and 
among the leading citizens of the county. He was graduated from 
Yale University in the class of 1884 and from the Columbia College 
Law School in the class of 1887 and was admitted to the Bar in the 
same year. He served his clerkship in the law office of Roscoe Conk- 
ling, in New York City. 

i\Ir. Wells has such an extensive legal practice that he has not 
found time to accept any public office, nor any nomination for office; 
but he has been so earnest in his anxiety for Democratic success that 
he has rendered his party great .service as a public speaker in New York 
City, New York State and national political campaigns. He is always 
ready and willing to render the Democracy any service in his power, 
and he is one of the most effective stump speakers in the State. 

Mr. W^ells is a member of the Reform Club and also of the Bar 
Association of the City of New York. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 257 

Andrew F. Flummerfelt, one of the active Democrats of Herki- 
mer County, was born in Warren County, New Jersey, and was edu- 
cated there in the pubhc schools. He learned the printer's trade and 
worked four years at Portland, Penn. ; then he established the Otsego 
Times, remaining at Otsego five years; then three years at Atlantic 
Highlands as manager, and five years more as proprietor of a Demo- 
cratic newspaper; then three years at New Haven, Conn., as manager 
of a job printing establishment ; then he came to Herkimer as manager 
of the Herkimer County Democrat, which he subsequently brought out. 

Mr. Flummerfelt has always been an energetic Democratic worker. 
He was a delegate to a Democratic State convention in New Jersey, and 
since he came to Herkimer he has taken an active part in the organiza- 
tion, as well as in political campaigns. 

He comes of good Democratic stock, his grandfather having been a 
State Senator in New Jersey, and two of his brothers are now promi- 
nent in politics and incumbents of legislative offices in different States. 



Michael Gogarty^ one of the strong and active Democrats of 
Orange County, is a native of that county, and has always resided with- 
in its borders. 

He was born at Middletown, April 12, i860. He acquired his edu- 
cation in the public schools and learned the trade of cheesemaker. After 
continuing four years in this occupation he learned the trade of black- 
smith, and has been engaged in that calling ever since. He established 
a shop at Newburgh, where he remained for sixteen years, when he 
removed to Cornwall-on-Hudson, where he has continued to the present 
time. 

He belongs to the Foresters of America, to the American Mechanics 
and to the Storm King Engine Company, of Cornwall. He has also 
been the President of the Democratic Social Club of Cornwall. 

Mr. Gogarty has always been a staunch Democrat and an active 
and efficient party worker. He has never sought public office, but in 
1902 he consented to accept a nomination for Village Trustee, and 
was elected, winning a notable triumph against large odds. 

i \ 



258 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hon. William Popham Platt, of White Plains, has been a 
prominent factor in the Democratic pohtics of Westchester County for 
a quarter of a century. He has always been active in the organization, 
being one of the leaders of the conservative element of the party, and 
has frequently been a delegate to party conventions. 

In 1889 "he was elected District Attorney and re-elected in 1892, 
serving six years in all. In 1901 he accepted a nomination for County 
Judge and was elected by a handsome majority, being the only Demo- 
crat on the ticket elected. 

Judge Piatt is a member of the Democratic Club of New York, of 
the Westchester County Bar Association, of the Medico-Legal Society, 
of the Knollwood Country Club, of the American Yacht Club, of the 
City Club of Yonkers, of the Masonic fraternity and of the Order 
of Elks. 



Hon. Williaai H. Baker, Mayor of the city of Lockport, N. Y., 
and a prominent and popular Democrat of Niagara County, was born in 
the city of Rochester, N. Y., May 31, 1854. He received his early edu- 
cation in the public schools of his native city and then took up the study 
of law and was legally admitted to the Bar on June 8, 1875. 

Immediately after his admission to the Bar Mr. Baker began the 
practice of his profession in Rochester and was identified with the 
courts of that city until 1880. In that year he began business as a con- 
tractor in Buffalo and New York City and followed the contracting 
business until 1893, when he came to Lockport and took charge of the 
plant of the United Indurated Fibre Company. 

Since taking up his residence in Lockport Mr. Baker has been 
active in public affairs, and the best indication" of his ability aiid suc- 
cess is th^ fact that, after a residence of only nine years in Lockport, he 
became Mayor of the city. He is a Democrat out of a Republican fam- 
ily, and therefore his political stand is not one acquired either from 
birth or prejudice, but is the result of education and the dictates of his 
own judgment. 

Mr. Baker's first political office was that of Alderman-at-Large for 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 259 

the city of Lockport, to which he was elected in 1898, serving two 
terms. In 1899 ^^^ ^^'^s nominated by the Democratic Party for Mayor, 
but failed of election by a small majority. In 1902 the Democratic 
Party still considered him its strongest candidate, and he was again 
nominated for Mayor and was elected by a majority of four hundred 
and fifty-eight. He has been delegate to county and city conventions 
many times, always takes an active part in political campaigns, has a 
warm regard for Democratic principles and institutions and is always 
ready to forward the interests of his party in every way he can. A man 
of fine education, high integrity and sterling worth, he is one of the 
pillars of the Democratic Party in Niagara County. 

Mr. Baker takes a warm personal interest in the commercial life of 
the city of Lockport and is a prominent member of the Board of Trade 
and Business Men's Association. He is also a member of the Masonic 
fraternity, of the Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and of a number 
of local clubs. 



A. B. Ryder, of Cornwall-on-Hudson, has long been a prominent 
citizen and a leading Democrat of Orange County. He was born in the 
village where he still resides, February 15, 1832. 

He received his educational training in the public schools of his 
native town. After his school days were over he worked in his father's 
piano establishment for fifteen years. He left this to engage in busi- 
ness on his own account in the furniture trade, with a branch devoted 
to undertaking, which he has continued until the present time. 

Mr. Ryder belongs to the Masonic fraternity, to the Knights of 
Honor and to the Democratic Social Club of -Cornwall. 

In politics Mr. Ryder has been a strong and sturdy Democrat all 
his life, and has frequently been appointed delegate to important party 
conventions. He has also been a valuable worker in the party organi- 
zation. He has never aspired to political office and has always refused 
all tendered nominations, his private business demanding all his atten- 
tion. He stands high as a citizen and is greatly respected in the 
community. 



26o THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

\A'iLLTAM F. Herrtck was born in Kingston, September 16, 1861. 
He was educated in the public schools and at the Kingston Acadetny. 

After his school days were over, he learned the trade of brickmaker. 
By industry and economy he saved enough out of his wages to start 
in the same line for himself in 1895. Three years later he sold this 
plant and engaged in the hotel business, opening the Herrick House, at 
East Kingston, where he is still located. 

He is a member of the East Kingston Social and Benevolent Club. 

]\Ir. Herrick has always been a sincere and earnest Democrat, and 
an active party worker. In 1901 he was elected Justice of the Peace 
for the town of Ulster, a position he still holds. He is also Chairman 
of the Board of School Trustees in- District No. 7, and a member of the 
Board of Health. He has performed valuable service on party com- 
mittees, and has often been sent as delegate to Democratic conventions. 



Hon. iMiCHAEL J. Tierney, of New Rochelle, has for many years 
been prominent in the Democratic politics of Westchester County. 
His political activity began at an early age, and when only twenty-one 
years old he was elected Police Justice of New Rochelle, being probably 
the youngest justice ever elected in his county. 

In 1895 he was appointed Corporation Counsel of New Rochelle, 
and with the exception of one interval of two years, he has held this 
office continuously until the present time. Mr. Tierney was also the 
counsel for the village of New Rochelle for a number of years previous 
to its incorporation as a city. He has rendered the Democracy valuable 
service by his work on village, town, city and county committees. He 
was also the counsel for the Democratic organization in the famous 
Bantel litigation, which so greatly interested political circles in all 
parts of the country. 

Mr. Tierney has many times served his party as delegate to con- 
ventions, many times presiding over their deliberations. He is a mem- 
ber of the New York Democratic Club, the New Rochelle Democratic 
Club, the New Rochelle Yacht Clulj, the New Rochelle Rowing Club, 
and the Order of Elks. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 261 

Joseph Henry. One of the earnest Democrats of Westchester 
County is Joseph Henry, the leader of the young Democracy of the 
village of White Plains. Always loyal, always active and a campaign 
hustler, Mr. Henry has for several years been a force in the politics of 
the county. 

Immersed in his private business affairs, he has had neither the 
time nor the inclination to seek public office, but whenever there is party 
work to be done, he can always be depended upon implicitly. 

Mr. Henry is the Foreman of Hope Engine Company, No. i, of 
White Plains, member of the Foresters of America, of the Eagles, of 
the Central Social Club of White Plains, of the Arioii Singing Society, 
of the Concordia Singing Society, and of the Central Liquor Dealers' 
Society of White Plains. 



Theodore Smith^ one of the enterprising and prosperous business 
men of Orange County, and a prominent and influential Democrat, was 
born in that county, which has always been his home, October 6, 1857. 
He attended school until he was fourteen years old, when he accepted a 
situation in a grocery store. His natural aptitude for business, together 
with industry and economy, enabled him to accumulate sufficient capi- 
tal to engage in the same line of business on his own account. This he 
did at Goshen in 1882. He built up a large and successful trade, which 
he is still enlarging. Always a Democrat, he has been active in the 
organization ever since he became of age. In 1896, under President 
Cleveland's second administration, he was appointed Postmaster at 
Goshen. He held this office four years, but resigned in 1900 to accept 
the Democratic nomination for Sheriff of Orange County. His per- 
sonal popularity was so great that he ran 1,100 votes ahead of his ticket, 
but it was a Republican landslide year and he was unable tO' overcome 
the overwhelming normal Republican majority. He has held several 
local offices, making an excellent record. He has rendered his party 
valuable service on important committees and has frequently been ap- 
pointed delegate to Democratic conventions. As a man and a citizen he 
stands high in the community. 



262 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Henry Fulle is one of the live and earnest Democrats of West- 
chester County. He is a valuable party worker, and has been such 
ever since he became of age, having never missed a caucus or a primary. 

He began his political experience in New York City, but later re- 
moved to Westchester County, making his home at White Plains. His 
interest in politics was in no wise diminished. He never had any as- 
pirations toward political office, but as a party worker he has always 
been among the most active, and he has often served as member of 
party committees and as delegate to Democratic conventions. 

Mr. Fulle is a member of the Elks, the Foresters, the Eagles, 
Knights of Sherwood Forest, Chief of the White Plains Volunteer Fire 
Department, President of the Arion Singing Society, member of the 
Concordia Singing Society, of the Kickers' Club, Secretary of the 
AMiite Plains Liquor Dealers' Association, which vests him with the 
position of delegate to the Central Liquor Dealers' Association of 
Westchester County. 



Alderaian AA'illiam J. Callahan, one of the best known Demo- 
cratic politicians in Western New York, was born in the city of Niagara 
Falls, June 20, 1867. He was educated in the public schools of his 
native city and has pursued railroading as a vocation. 

For many years Alderman Callahan has been an active and success- 
ful worker in the Democratic Party. He has always been an admirer 
and disciple of Hon. D. B. Hill, and has ever been indefatigable in his 
support of the party under the leadership of that statesman. He is, 
therefore, an organization man, and has never been found, even by 
implication, outside the lines of political regularity. 

He was elected to the Board of Aldermen from the First Ward of 
the city of Niagara Falls in 1898 and is now serving his third term on 
the Ixjard, having been twice re-elected. During his regime a rear- 
rangement was made in the city representation and he now represents 
the Fifth Ward upon the Board of Aldermen. He has been a commit- 
teeman for years and has Ijeen delegate to many Democratic conven- 
tions. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 263 

Alderman Callahan is a member of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks and of the Order of Eagles. He is a genial and affable 
gentleman, who is ever ready to help forward any undertaking looking 
toward the advancement and success of the Democratic Party. He has 
the reputation of being a wise politiciaai who always has his eyes open 
for the signal lights ahead, thereby keeping to the straight track of 
Democratic principles and endeavoring to obtain the best results for the 
good of the party, which means for the good of the country, and is the 
true science of statesmanship. 



Dr. wS. a. Russell, a prominent physician and leading Democrat of 
Oswego County, was born at Fredonia, Chautauqua County, February 
13, 1850. He was educated in the public schools of his native village, 
the Toronto Grammar School and the University of Buffalo, from 
which he was graduated in the class of 1871. 

After receiving his diploma, Dr. Russell began the practice of his 
profession in Buffalo. He practiced there two years, then six years in 
Toronto, then five years in Rome, and, since then, twenty-one years in 
Fulton, Oswego County. Dr. Russell stands high, both as a physician 
and a citizen. He is a member of the Oswego County Medical Society, 
the Oneida Medical Society and the Syracuse Academy of Medicine. 

In politics Dr. Russell is an ardent and influential Democrat. He 
was elected a delegate to the Democratic State convention of 1902, held 
at Saratoga. He has served as Health Officer for five years, and was 
elected Alderman from the Fifth Ward in the spring of 1902. 



Thomas J. Dunn, for many years one of the district leaders of 
Tammany Hall and one of the most popular Democrats in the city of 
New York, was born on a farm, but his life has been mainly spent in 
the metropolis. 

Mr. Dunn is a very bright man, successful in business as well as in 
politics. After leaving school he learned the trade of stonecutter, and 



264. THE DE^IOCRATIC PARTY 

as he had brains and thrift, as well as skill and industry, it was not long 
before he set up in business for himself and became a large employer 
of labor, instead of working for wages himself. He was but thirty 
years of age when he went into business on his own account, but he was 
remarkably successful from the start. 

His skill and energ}' soon brought him the leadership of his district, 
and he became one of the most popular and best known men in the 
whole Tammany Hall organization. 

In 1897 he received the nomination for Sheriff, and was elected by 
nearl}^ one hundred thousand majority, the largest given any Democrat 
on the ticket in that year. He made a splendid record in this highly 
important office, and he has great influence in the organization. 



Thomas Watts, a successful lawyer and a stalwart Democrat of 
Orange County, was born in Monticello, the shire town of the adjoining 
county of Sullivan, in the year 1857. He completed the course of in- 
struction of the public schools of his native county, after which he spent 
some ten years in mechanical pursuits. 

He improved, his leisure time in the study of law. He also studied 
stenography, and became the official Court Stenographer for the courts 
of Sullivan County, and, later, he served the State Court of Claims in 
the same capacity for twelve years. Having been admitted to the Bar 
in 1885, he resigned his position as Stenographer and began the prac- 
tice of his profession in New York City. After ten years he opened an 
office in Middletown. where he is still located. 

>\rr. Watts has always been a strenuous Democrat and, though he 
has been free from desire for public office, he has been an active worker 
in every important campaign. In 1893 he accepted the chairmanship of 
the Democratic City Committee, and for the first time in many years 
the city gave a Democratic majority, and he repeated this victory. 
Mr. Watts has been a delegate to every Democratic State convention 
for seventeen years, and he has also attended numerous city, county 
and district conventions. Many political nominations have been ten- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 265 

dered him, but he has always refused to accept them, preferring to con- 
tinue his effective service in the ranks. 



John McDermott, mason and builder, of Schenectady, was born 
in County Roscommon, Ireland, in 1839, the son of Patrick and Mary 
(Conry) McDermott. With his parents he came to this country in 
January, 1848, and located soon thereafter in Schenectady. He was 
educated in the Schenectady public schools. After learning his trade 
as mason and following it for some years, in 1867, he began work as a 
contractor and builder. As a result of his enterprise many of Schenec- 
tady's handsomest buildings to-day stand as monuments to the capac- 
ity and industry of John McDermott. Among the buildings he has 
erected are the new St. John's Roman Catholic Church, the Van Curler 
Opera House, Ellis Hospital, Y. M. C. A. building at Union College, 
Central Fire Station and the Veeder building. During a period of sev- 
enteen years he practically built the locomotive plant twice over for the 
Ellis and the American Locomotive Companies. He is a trustee of the 
Schenectady Savings Bank, a manager of the Ellis Hospital and was 
for several years one of the directors of the Van Curler Opera House. 

Mr. McDermott has the gift of his race for politics and before he 
was yet a voter he was to be found about the polls doing energetic 
service for the Democratic Party. His party loyalty has been many 
times recognized by his elevation to positions of public trust. He was 
twelve years a member of the Common Council, in two periods of six 
years each, always representing the Third Ward of the city. For two 
years he was a practical and valuable member of the Board of Educa- 
tion, and during three and one-half years of the time that he was a mem- 
ber of the W^ater Commission he served as the president of the board. 
He was for several years a member of the Schenectady County Demo- 
cratic Committee. In January, 1904, he was called to the responsible 
position of Commissioner of Public Safety and upon him devolved the 
duty of organizing the department under the new charter. 

Mr. McDermott is a member of the Knights of Columbus and 
president of the Master Builders' Association of Schenectady. 



266 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

In 1865 Mr. McDermott married Ann McEncroe, of Schenectady, 
who died in January, 1886. Five children survive this union. One 
son. Patrick H. IMcDermott, has been three times elected Alderman 
from the Third Ward. 



Alderman Patrick W. Sheehy, of the city of Oswego, was born 
there, December 25. 1857. He was educated in the public schools of 
his native city, including the High School. 

After the completion of his educational training he learned the 
trade of boilermaker, having a natural bent and gift for mechanics. 

He is a member of the C. M. B. A. 

Alderman Sheehy has always been an earnest and efficient Demo- 
cratic worker, and has on many occasions been appointed a delegate to 
city. Assembly, county and Congressional district conventions. He 
was elected Alderman from the Fifth Ward, and rendered very accept- 
able service. 

He also held a responsible ofifice under the United States Govern- 
ment during President Cleveland's second administration. 



George S. Ewart. A fine specimen of the American farmer who 
tills his broad acres with success, and at the same time conducts an 
extensive business in buying and shipping produce and managing a 
large mill plant, is George S. Ewart, of Groveland, Livingston County. 

]\Ir. Ewart was born in the town of Groveland, November 12, 1835. 
He had the advantages of a thorough education in»the public schools, 
tlie Geneseo Academy and the Lima Seminary. He began life as a 
farmer, and he still owns and cultivates a valuable estate of over 400 
acres of fertile land. He has, however, added the other branches of 
business already mentioned. As a shipper of produce to New York, 
Philadelphia and other large seaports, he is one of the heaviest in his 
section. 

Mr. Ewart is a member of the Masonic order, and has all his life 
been an active Democratic Party worker, and was for many years 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 267 

Chairman of the Democratic County Committee. He has been a dele- 
gate to many State conventions and a trusted friend and counselor of 
Senator Murphy, Governors Hill and Flower, Lieutenant-Governor 
Sheehan and many other great party leaders. 

For nine years he served as Supervisor, for ten years as Loan Com- 
missioner and for twelve years as Justice of the Peace. No Democrat 
has ever done his party more faithful service, and in efficiency he ranks 
among the first. 



Thaddeus K. Green. Among the Democratic leaders and live 
political workers of Westchester County Thaddeus K. Green, of the 
town of Bedford, stands prominent. For more than a quarter of a cen- 
tury he has served as member of the Democratic Town Committee and 
the Democratic County Committee and has been elected Chairman of 
each body. He has also served as Chairman of the County Executive 
Committee, and has for some years been the Democratic leader of the 
Third Assembly District. He has been honored with the appointment 
as delegate to numberless party conventions, and he holds the very re- 
markable record of having been a delegate to every Democratic State 
Convention for more than twenty years. 

Under Mr. Green's efficient leadership the Democracy of his assem- 
bly district have largely reduced the overwhelming normal Republican 
majority, and his own personal strength was clearly shown in 1895, 
when, for the first and only time, he was prevailed upon to accept a 
nomination for political office. He ran for Member of Assembly and 
received 1,000 more votes than the remainder of his ticket, while his 
own towai, Bedford, actually gave a Democratic majority for the first 
time in fifty-two years. 

Mr. Green is a member of the Democratic Club of New York City 
and is a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity, including the 
Commandery and the Mystic Shrine. His district contains seven out 
of the eleven towais in Westchester County, and in these Mr. Green's 
leadership has continued for fifteen years, and for twelve years he has 
been the Chairman of all Democratic Assembly District conventions. 



268 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hon. John T. Gorman was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., October 20, 
1856,. and received an academic education. While yet a boy he re- 
moved to Cohoes and has since made that city his home. 

j\Ir. Gorman is one of the most prominent Democrats in Albany 
County and has a brilliant record as a public man. In 1886 he was 
nominated by his party for ]\Iember of Assembly and was triumphantly 
elected over a Labor and Republican candidate by a majority of 529. 
In 1887 he was re-elected, this time by a majority of 746, the largest 
ever given a candidate for Member of x\ssembly by this district. This 
majority was all the more noteworthy as his opponent was a very 
strong and popular Republican. 

In 1890 ]\Ir. Gorman was again put in nomination by his party for 
Member of Assembly and was elected by 846 majority over William B. 
Leroy, a wealthy manufacturer of Cohoes. In the next year he was re- 
elected by 1,057 majority over his opponent, George Rivinberg. 

A\'hile in the Assembly in 1886 and 1887 Mr. Gorman showed his 
ability as a legislator by having twenty-seven very important bills 
passed by both Houses, and he has the unusual record of never having 
had a bill defeated. 

He was the only member who succeeded in passing a State labor 
liill through a Republican Legislature and having it signed by the Gov- 
ernor, namely, "The Coercion Act.'' Among other bills which he had 
passed were an appropriation for $20,000 for a hospital, $14,000 to 
build a bridge and $15,000 for a viaduct. 

While an Assemblyman Mr. Gorman served on many important 
committees, among them being the Canal, Excise, Trade and Manufac- 
tures committees, and in 1891 was chairman of the Committee on 
Banks. 

Mr. Gorman is an untiring worker in his district, and that the 
people fully appreciate his labors is shown by an increased majority 
every time he is elected. 

In 1892 Mr. Gorman was nominated on the regular Democratic 
ticket for Mayor of Cohoes, but through a split in the party was de- 
feated. He has been active in politics ever since, but has been a candi- 
date for no office. 

Hon. John T. Gorman has served on the City and County com- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 269 

mittees of his party and as delegate to all classes of conventions, in- 
cluding State, and as alternate to the National Convention of 1892. 

Mr. Gorman served five years in the N. G. S. N. Y. and in 1891 
\vas elected first lieutenant of the Seventh Separate Company Militia, 
Cohoes, N. Y. He is also an exempt member of the Cohoes Fire De- 
partment and was Vice-President of the State Merchants' Association 
in 1888-89 and one of its directors. 



Edward Elsworth^ President of the Poughkeepsie Savings Bank 
and Treasurer of Vassar College, one of the most prominent Democrats 
in Dutchess County, was born in New York City in 1840, the son of 
John and Martha (Van Varick) Elsworth. When he was eight years 
old, his parents removed to Poughkeepsie. He acquired his education 
at the Rutgers Grammar School and the old Dutchess County Acad- 
emy. He prepared himself for the legal profession in the law office of 
Thompson & Weeks, and later he took a course in the State and Na- 
tional Law School, from which he was duly graduated. 

He was clerk in the office of Judge Homer A. Nelson and managing 
clerk in the office of Barnard Roeler, of New York City. He prac- 
ticed his profession in Dutchess and Rockland counties for many years 
with great success. He was also interested in the hardware and iron 
business with Guilford Dudley. 

In 1876 he was elected a Trustee of the Poughkeepsie Savings Bank- 
and became its President in 1903. In 1891 he was elected President of 
the Fallkill National Bank, filling that position with great ability for 
twelve years. He was elected a Trustee of Vassar College in 1892 and 
Treasurer in 1899, which office he still holds. Rutgers College con- 
ferred upon him the degree of A.M. in 1892. Mr. Elsworth belongs 
to the Sons of the Revolution, to the Holland Society and to the Reform 
Club of New York City. 

He has served with great credit as School Commissioner, as Super- 
visor, and for two terms as Mayor of Poughkeepsie. He is also Trustee 
and Treasurer of Vassar Brothers' Institute and Judge Advocate of the 
Eighth Brigade of the National Guard of the State of New York. 



270 THE DEJ^IOCRATIC PARTY 

Halsey H. Rogers, of Plattsburg-h, is well known throng-hont Clin- 
ton Count}- as a strong and reliable Democrat and is one who belonged 
to the Hill wing of the party before that eminent leader retired from 
politics. 

i\Ir. Rogers is a native of Plattsburgh, where he was born September 
13, 1868, and where he has always resided. His business is that of a 
contractor and his operations are so large that they extend to various 
parts of the country and even into other States of the Union. His 
brother, George Rogers, is also an active Democrat and is associated 
with him and aids him. both in his public and private affairs. 

]\Ir. Rogers holds the office of Superintendent of Public Works in 
the city of Plattsburgh, and is recognized as a highly capable and effi- 
cient public officer. 



Joseph Hynes. Many and great have been the political servdces of 
Joseph Hynes, of Green Island, in the cause of Democracy. He is not 
only a worker, but also a leader, and his district always gives a good 
account of itself at the polls. 

]\Ir. Hynes has many times been sent as a delegate tO' Democratic 
conventions, including two State conventions. 

Mr. Hynes was one of the organizers of the village corporation of 
Green Island, and he has held almost every office within the gift of the 
people of that thriving municipality, including five terms as President 
of the V'illage. 

Green Island is located in the Fourth Assembly District of Albany 
County, and in 1880 Mr. Hynes was elected to represent this district in 
the Assembly by a majority of one hundred and sixty-eight, the only 
instance in which any Democrat had ever received a majority in the 
district. His Republican opponent. Thomas Liddle, made a contest 
and the strong Republican majority in the Assembly finallv awarded 
him the seat. It is, however, worthy of note that this decision was 
reached only after Mr. Hynes had served through the term, and that is 
good evidence that the Republican majority believed he was really 
entitled to take part in the legislation of the session. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 271 

Thomas M. Parker, of Portchester, has for more than twenty 
years been a potent force in the poHtics of Westchester County. He 
has been especially alert and efficient as a Democratic hustler when any 
important campaign has been in progress. 

On Village, Town and County committees he has performed much 
faithful and valuable service, and as delegate to all classes of Demo- 
cratic conventions, including the famous State conventions. In the year 

1892 he was elected Treasurer of the village of Portchester, and in 

1893 ^1^ was elected Justice of the Peace. In 1901 he was appointed 
Village Assessor. In all of these offices Mr. Parker served with great 
credit to himself and to the entire acceptance of the people. 

Mr. Parker is a member of the Knights of Columbus. As a citizen 
he stands high and is greatly respected. 



Thomas Ford, who was for many years one of the leading busi- 
ness men of Elmira and a prominent Democrat, was born in Canan- 
daigua, March 17, 1853, ^^^<^ was educated in the public and parochial 
schools of that village. After his school days were over he engaged in 
business at Canandaigua, continuing there with much success until 
1880, when he removed to Elmira, which city continued to be his home 
during the remainder of his life. Here he accepted a position as 
brewers' agent, his brother later becoming associated with him. In 
1888 he embarked in the liquor business for himself, and conducted the 
same until his death, prosecuting it with energ)^ and success. 

In politics Mr. Ford was always a sterling and stalwart Democrat. 
He was an earnest campaign worker and a hustler on election day. 
Many times was he honored by being appointed a delegate to Demo- 
cratic conventions, both county and State. In igoo he was an alternate- 
delegate to the Democratic National Convention. For fourteen years 
he was an efficient meml^er of the Democratic County Committee. Al- 
though always active in political work, Mr. Ford was never an office- 
seeker. While a resident of Canandaigua he served as a member of the 
Board of Health, the only public position he could ever be prevailed 
upon to accept. 



2y2 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Peter J. Carpenter. A sterling Democrat, for many years active 
and influential in the politics of Westchester County, is Peter J. Car- 
penter, who had before his removal to Westchester been a member of 
Tammany Hall, in the metropolis, surely one of the most effective 
training schools in practical politics to be found the wide world over. 

Remo\-ing to Dobbs Ferry, he has done good service on the Village, 
Town and County Democratic committees, being at this time a member 
of the two last named. Mr. Carpenter has also been a delegate to all 
local, county and district conventions. In 1892 he was elected School 
Trustee for the town of Greensburgh, and he has continued to hold that 
office to the present time, so satisfactory has been his service. While 
Chief Engineer of the Dobbs Ferr}^ Fire Department he inaugurated 
the "Gamewell System," so well known in New York City, in the Vil- 
lage Fire Department, and it has proved a decided success. Mr. Car- 
penter is the Democratic leader in the Sixth Election District, and his 
energ}^ and skill have been of the highest value to his party. 

]\Ir. Carpenter is a member of the Elks, of the K. of C, of the Mas- 
ter Plumbers' Association of New York City and of New York State, 
of the \^eteran Firemen's Association of the town of Greenburgh, and 
he is also an honorary member of the New York City Volunteer Fire- 
men's Association. 



Hon. Michael J. Dillon,, of New Rochelle, is one of the most 
popular Democrats in that city and one of the m.ost valuable and promi- 
nent party workers in Westchester County. He was born in New 
Rochelle and has been active in politics ever since he attained his ma- 
jority. 

His first public office was Town Clerk, which he filled with great 
acceptance for two years. He also served as Village Assessor one year 
and as Village Clerk eleven years. For eight years he was Receiver of 
Taxes of the Town and in 1898 and 1899 he was Supervisor. To this 
important office he was elected by 653 majority, the largest ever given 
any candidate in New Rochelle. 

\\'hen New Rochelle became a city Mr. Dillon was elected as its 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 273 

first Mayor. This was in 1899. He has always been active in the party 
organization and has been appointed a delegate to almost every Demo- 
cratic State convention beginning with 1879. He has served many 
years on the Democratic County Committee, and has probably presided 
over a greater number of Congressional, Senatorial, County, City and 
Assembly conventions than any other man in Westchester County. He 
is a fine public speaker, and his addresses before these conventions have 
been an inspiration in many campaigns. In 1888 and 1889 he was 
Chairman of the Board of County Canvassers. 

Mr. Dillon is a member of many clubs and societies, both in New 
Rochelle and in New York City. 



Caspar Wells^ one of the efficient Democratic workers of Mont- 
gomery County, was born in the city of Schenectady, March 29, 1865. 
His early years were spent in that city, where he received a sound edu- 
cation in the public schools. 

For many years he has been a resident of Amsterdam, where he has 
been a staunch and consistent Democrat and an active force in the party 
organization. He has not been an office seeker, but he accepted the 
Democratic nomination for Alderman from the Seventh Ward and was 
elected by a handsome majority. His public service was marked by the 
diligence and fidelity characteristic of the man. 

Mr. Wells has worked his own way from the days of his boyhood. 
He began as an unskilled laborer; then he learned the moulders' trade; 
then, having a remarkably fine and delicate sense of color, he studied the' 
art of dyeing. His knowledge and skill in the mixing of colors so as 
to produce exactness in shade and bring out the most delicate tints, are 
remarkable and probably unsurpassed. So greatly is ability prized 
that he has become the foreman in the dyeing department of the great 
mills of Stephen Sanford & Son, one of the most important manufac- 
turing plants in the Mohawk Valley. 

As a citizen Mr. Wells is energetic and enterprising. He has done 
much public service and is at present the Chief of the Fire Department 
of the city of Amsterdam. 



274 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



COLONEL R. J. HAIRE. 

CoLaNEL R. J. Haire was born in Michig-an fifty-five years ago. 
His father was an eminent lawyer and jurist and a direct descendant 
on his mother's side of Robert Living-ston, one of the drafters of the 
Declaration of Independence. The mother of Colonel Haire was a 
descendant of the famous Hayne family of South Carolina, from which 
came Robert Hayne, the opponent of Daniel Webster. Colonel Haire's 
father was a Douglas Democrat and a personal friend and supporter of 
Abraham Lincoln during the war. Colonel Haire was toO' young to 
enter the army at the time of the Civil AVar, but nevertheless he was 
on the firing lines at the battle of Gettysburg and was there wounded. 
Afterwards he served in the Indian wars, rendering conspicuous ser- 
vice in the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. 

As a lawyer Colonel Haire has devoted much time to the practice 
of criminal law, having tried over one hundred cases of murder in the 
first degree. He succeeded in securing the right of the negro tO' sit 
upon the grand and petit juries in the State of Missouri, the first South- 
ern State to accord that right after the reconstruction period. He held 
the office of State Senator and District Attorney for several years in 
his native State, ]Michigan. Then, his health failing, he moved to Mis- 
souri, and later to New York, where he is now practicing. In Missouri 
Colonel Haire handled many celebrated criminal cases. He was attor- 
ney for the James ]x)ys. Subsequently he was attorney in the \A''oods- 
Hamilton case in New York, which he appealed to the United States 
Supreme Court and won. 

Ever since 1868 the Colonel has taken an active part in politics, in 
almost every national campaign working under the direction of the 
Democratic National Committee. During Cleveland's first presidential 
campaign Colonel Haire delivered 285 speeches for the national ticket. 
He is one of the foremost orators of the country, and his services are 




0/'//'/ru:> 



vM/r/^: 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 275 

widely sought. Since leaving Michigan in 1881 he has refused several 
appointive offices and has dechned to become a candidate for office, pre- 
ferring to be independent and able to assist his friends and party in such 
manner as seems best to him. 

Colonel Haire is a great reader of history and has traveled exten- 
sively in this country, Europe and Asia. He spent one year in Europe 
studying political conditions, especially the tariff and economic cjues- 
tions of government. He is a graduate of the University of Michigan. 



Hon. Thomas H. Dowd^ one of the prominent attorneys of Catta- 
raugus County, and one of the leading Democrats of Western New 
York, was born at Humphry. N. Y., Augtrst 20, 1859. He acquired 
his education in the public schools and at Ten Broeck Academy, at 
Franklinville, N. Y. After his school training was completed he pre- 
pared himself for the legal profession and began to practice at .Sala- 
manca, May 6, 1884. He at once met with success and has built up a 
large business, remaining at Salamanca until the present time. At 
present he is the senior member of the firm of Dowd & Ouigley. 

Mr. Dowd belongs to the Ancient Order of Hibernians, to the Cath- 
olic Mutual Benefit Association, to the Catholic Benevolent Legion and 
to the Knights of Columbus. 

Mr. Dowd has always been a loyal, active and earnest Democrat and 
an efficient party worker. He was elected Justice of the Peace of the 
town of Humphry in 1881 and Supervisor of the same town in 1884. 
After his removal to Salamanca he was again elected Justice of the 
Peace and served eight years, from 1887 to 1895. Mr. Dowd was a 
member of the Democratic State Committee from 1895 to 1904, and in 
the years 1898, 1899 and 1900 he served as a member of the Executive 
Committee. 

February 12, 1890, Mr. Dowd married Miss Agnes McCrum, by 
whom he has three children. He is a man of ability, and is not only an 
efficient worker but also a power in the Democratic organization. 



276 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Samuel H. Graham. For more than a quarter of a century Sam- 
uel H. Graham, of Rye, has been an active factor in the Democratic 
13ohtics of \\'estchester County. He has performed highly valuable 
service on Village, Town and County Democratic committees and has 
been a delegate to all local and district Democratic conventions. 

He was elected Constable in 1885 and served until 1892, when he 
resigned. He was elected Highway Commissioner in 1895 ^^^*^ was 
re-elected. 

]\Ir. Graham reorganized the Rye Volunteer Fire Department, 
changing from hand engine to steamer, and since 1901 he has been its 
chief. Under his efficient administration the membership has increased 
from 30 to 125, and the department has been thoroughly equipped in 
e\ery respect. Mr. Graham is a member of the Royal Arcanum. 



Hon. John Gibney. One of the most prominent and influential 
Democrats of \\^estchester County is the Hon. John Gibney, of Ossi- 
ning. He is a veteran worker for Democratic success, his service hav- 
ing extended through the average lifetime of a generation. Mr. Gibney 
has performed much valuable service as a member of Town and County 
committees, and there are but few men in Westchester County who 
have attended as many Democratic conventions as he. 

He was elected Justice of the Peace in 1885, and served, through 
successive re-elections, for twelve consecutive years. In 1882 he was 
appointed Corporation Counsel for the village of Ossining, serving with 
great credit and marked success for twenty years without a break. In 
1894 he was honored ])y an election as member of the New York State 
Constitutional Convention, which formulated the existing Constitution 
of the State. In 1897 Mr. Gibney was elected Member of Assembly 
from the Third Assembly District of Westchester County, making an 
excellent record. In his business life Mr. Gibney is an attorney-at-law, 
having been admitted to the Bar in 1871. and he has practiced his pro- 
fession in Ossining ever since, taking a high rank as a lawyer. He is 
a meml)cr of the Grand Army of the Republic and also of the West- 
chester County Bar Association. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 277 

James H. Morrissey has, ever since lie became of age, been a vig- 
orous and effective worker in the Democracy of Rockland County. He 
has been a power in the organization from the first, having been elected 
? member of the Democratic County Committee the very year he at- 
tained his majority. He has also served as member and as Chairman of 
the Democratic Town Committee, and he has been appointed a delegate 
to many County, Senatorial and Congressional conventions. 

In T901 he accepted the Democratic nomination for Superintendent 
of the Poor and was elected. He is still the incumbent of this impor- 
tant office. 

Mr. Morrissey is a member of the Order of Elks. 

He comes from a staunch Democratic family. His brother, Patrick 
Morrissey, was elected Tax Collector for the town of Haverstraw in 
1897, and made the remarkable record of receiving every vote in his 
own election district. 



James Lynch, one of the solid business men and of the staunch, 
stalwart and strenuous Democratic leaders of Tompkins County, has 
always resided within its boundaries. He was born in Ulysses, No- 
vember 7, 1866, and was educated in the public schools, including the 
Ithaca High School. 

When he left school he began his active life as a clerk in a hard- 
ware store for three years. Then for five years he was a railroad man, 
but, concluding to go into business for himself, he opened a coal and 
wood yard. Mr. Lynch is one of those enterprising, far-seeing men 
who seem to have luck on their side. His business prospered right 
along, and he added an insurance agency. Still expanding, he built 
a large elevator, making a success of every undertaking. He has 
served as sewer commissioner for several years, and has long been a 
member of the Democratic County Committee. In 1901 he was elected 
chairman of that body, and showed himself very clearly to be the right 
man in the right place. He also was Secretary for several years, and 
he has frequently been honored with the appointment as delegate to 
County and State conventions. 



278 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

John F. Hunter, M.D. More than a full score of years has Dr. 
John F. Hunter been noted as one of the most earnest and efficient 
Democratic workers and leaders of Westchester County. He has served 
on the Village and Town committees of Mamaroneck and the West- 
chester County Committee, each for a long term. His place on the 
Town Committee he has held more than seventeen years, and he has 
several times been its Chairman. In 1895 he w^as appointed Village 
Health Officer and served continuously for eight years. 

Dr. Hunter is a member of the C. B. L., of the U. O. of Golden 
Cross, of the I. O. O. F., of the R. A., of the Westchester County Medi- 
cal Society, of the New^ York State Medical Society, of the New York 
City Academy of ]\Iedicine, of the Mamaroneck Yacht Club and of the 
I\Iamaro Engine Hose Company. 



Hon. John Larkin, Sr. One of the oldest, as well as one of the 
most faithful and efficient of the "wheel-horses" of the Democracy of 
Albany County, is the Hon. John Larkin, Sr., of Cohoes, For more 
than half a century Mr. Larkin has been in the Democratic harness, 
always pulling straight and true. In the city of Cohoes he has long 
been recognized as one of the most energetic and efficient party leaders, 
and for a number of years he served as chairman of the Democratic 
City Committee. He is also, and has been for a generation, a member 
of the Democratic County Committee. 

In organization work he ranks among the most effective in the 
State. Early in the years of his young manhood Mr, Larkin was 
elected to the office of Constable and also served for ten years as a 
Deputy Sheriff. He was his party's nominee for Sheriff in 1873, but 
that was a Republican year, and he failed of election. In 1877, how- 
ever, he was elected County Clerk and received the coveted honor of a 
re-election in 1880, serving six years. He has been a delegate to party 
conventions fully fifty times, twice Ijeing sent to Democratic National 
conventions, and many times to State conventions. 

Mr. Larkin is one of Albany County's Grand Old Men and a Demo- 
crat of the "Old School." 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 279 

J. W. Sherwood has for many years been a prominent factor in 
the pohtics of Rockland County. He received a thorough educational 
training, and was graduated from the Albany Normal School and from 
the Law School at Cornell University. 

Mr. Sherwood is an ardent and zealous Democrat and a faithful 
attendant at the primaries, as well as the larger conventions. 

In 1899 he was elected School Commissioner of Rockland County, 
and so satisfactory was his service that he was re-elected in 1902, and 
he is still the incumbent of this important and highly responsible office. 
He is a member of the Phi Delta Phi Society, of Cornell University, 
and he has also belonged to the Masonic fraternity and to^ the Rock- 
land County Bar Association. 



F. J. Stupp, an active and stalwart Democrat, and one of the most 
popular men in the city of Auburn, was born in New York City, March 
26, 1844. He was educated in the public schools of New York and 
Auburn, having been brought to the latter city by his parents during 
his youth. After completing his educational course, Mr. Stupp en- 
gaged in the coal business and has continued in the same line to- the 
present time, building up a large trade and meeting with great success. 

He is a veteran of the great Civil War and is a comrade of the 
G. A. R., and he is also a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the 
Order of Maccabees. 

Mr. Stupp has always been a sterling, staunch and stalwart Demo- 
crat. In 1896 he was elected Mayor of Auburn by about two hundred 
majority, but was thrown out by defective ballots. He was elected 
Recorder in 1892 by 1,045 pli-^rality and was thrown out by a change 
of charter in 1896. Later another election for Recorder was held on 
account of that of 1892 having been invalidated, as stated, and this 
time the people spoke with such emphasis that there was no effort to 
thwart their will, Mr. Stupp's election for four years being made by a 
■ majority so large that no attempt was made to nullify it. 

Mr. Stupp is an excellent citizen and is highly respected by the 
people of all parties. 



28o THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Dr. E. F. Sheehan, for many years a potent figure In the Demo- 
cratic Part}- in Westchester County, was born in Saratoga County, 
where his father, P. Sheehan, was for many years known as one of the 
most effective party workers in that section of the State. Dr. E. F. 
Sheehan removed to \\'estchester County in 1890, promptly identified 
himself with the Democratic organization, and soon became a power in 
its service and in its councils, especially in the town of Ossining. 

He has done excellent work on the County Committee and also on 
its Executive Committee. He is chairman of the Town Committee and 
the leader of the Third Assembly District. He has frequently served 
as delegate to all classes of local conventions and has several times been 
appointed delegate to the Democratic State Convention. 

He is a member of the K. of C, B. P. O. E., of the Westchester 
County i\Iedical Association and of the A. O. H. 



Hon. Richard C. S. Drummond, City Judge of Auburn, was born 
in that city, Januar}^ 2, 1879. He received a thorough education. After 
passing through the public schools of Auburn, including the High 
School, he entered Hamilton College, from which he was graduated in 
1901. He studied law and was graduated from the Albany Law School 
in June, 1903, being the president of his class. He is a member of the 
Delta Kappa Epsilon and Phi Beta Kappa societies. 

Mr. Drummond is a strong and enthusiastic Democrat. He did 
valuable work on the stump for Bryan in 1896. when only seventeen 
years old. and he has taken a similar part in all succeeding campaigns. 

In 1902 he accepted the Democratic nomination for City Judge of 
Auburn, and. in spite of the large Republican majority in that city, he 
was elected by twenty-seven majority. It was claimed that the election 
was void, owing to a mistake in the charter, and the Supreme Court 
held that view wlicn the question came before it. At the election in 
1903 Mr. Drummond was again elected and this time by a majority of 
620, showing that even if the Legislature did make an error in the ' 
charter there was no mistake in the desire of the voters of Auburn that 
Mr. Drummond should serve them in this important office. 



OF THE STATE OE NEW YORK 281 

James J. Shaw. A veteran and effective Democratic worker in 
Westchester County is James J. Shaw, of White Plains. For three 
years he held the position of Chairman of the Democratic Town Com- 
mittee. He has also been Chairman of the Village Committee and has 
performed valuable service as a member of the County Committee. 

He has been a delegate to all classes of local party conventions and 
has no less than four times been honored by an appointment as delegate 
to Democratic State conventions. In 1889 Mr. Shaw was made Sheriff's 
Clerk, having been already, in 1887, appointed Special Deputy to the 
County Clerk. He has been connected with title insurance companies in 
New York City for many years. In 1900 he was elected Town Clerk 
and received a re-election. 

Mr. Shaw is a member of the Order of Elks and is District Deputy 
of the Knights of Columbus. 



Hon. D-Cady Herrick was born in Schoharie County, N. Y., 
April 12, 1846, and was educated at the Albany Classical Institute. He 
took up the study of law and became District Attorney for Albany 
County and also Corporation Counsel for the City of Albany. He sub- 
sequently became Supreme Court Justice and Associate Justice of the 
Appellate Division of the Supreme Court of New York. During the 
time he sat on the bench he took no part in politics, but in the Fall of 
1904 the Democratic Party of the State turned to him as its strongest 
selection for Governor. He was nominated at the convention in Sara- 
toga and thereupon resigned his Judgeship. He was defeated by Gov- 
ernor Higgins, who was carried through by the presidential vote and 
the reluctance of voters to split their tickets. After the election Judge 
Herrick resumed the practice of law, in which he is still engaged. He 
is a member of the Fort Orange (Albany) Club, of the Press Club, the 
Reform Club and the Democratic Club. 

Since the election contest of 1904 Judge Herrick is looked to by 
up-State Democrats, at least, as the logical State leader of the party. 



282 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Obed Edson is the son of Judge John M. Edson, a well known 
pioneer of Chautauqua County, prominent among its early Democrats, 
who voted for Jackson in 1832, and afterwards took a leading part 
in the politics of the county. 

Obed Edson was born in Sinclairville, Chautauqua County, N. Y., 
February 18, 1832, and received his education at the Fredonia Academy 
and Albany Law School. In early life, and at intervals later, he fol- 
lowed the business of railroad and land surveying, and was engaged 
in the survey of several railroads in New York and Pennsylvania. 
He read law with Hon. E. H. Sears, and was admitted to the Bar 
April 8, 1853. at Albany, and has since practiced his profession at 
Sinclairville. He has been for many years a member of the National 
Geographic Society, the State Bar Association, the Buffalo and other 
historical societies. He is a writer upon historical and kindred sub- 
jects, and has been a contributor to the Magazine of American History, 
the Continent, the Chant aiiquan and other periodicals. He is the 
author, among other books, of a history of Chautauqua County, includ- 
ing its political history. He has lectured before the Chautauqua As- 
sembly, and delivered the historical address at Westfield in 1902, on 
the occasion of the centennial celebration of the settlement of Chau- 
tauqua County. 

Mr. Edson has always been an active Democrat. His first vote 
for President was cast for James Buchanan. He was always afterward 
a leading member of that party in his town and county. In early life 
he was elected several times Supervisor of his native town, and to other 
town and county offices. He afterwards was often made a candidate 
of his party to fill higher public positions, but owing to the overwhelm- 
ing Republican majority it was seldom that a Democrat was elected 
in his county. 

In 1873 he was the Democratic candidate for Member of Assembly 
in the Second Assembly District of Chautauqua County, which then 
usually gave more than 1,000 Republican majority. He failed of an 
election by only 72 votes. The next year he was elected to the Assembly 
by 225 majority. He is the only Democrat that has been elected to 
that office in that Assembly District. While in the Assembly he sup- 
ported Governor Tilden in his attack on the canal ring, in debate and 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 283 

with his vote. Among other Legislative enactments, he (h-ew, intro- 
duced and effected the passage of a general act for the incorporation of 
library societies, the law that first made the organization of circulating 
libraries practicable in country localities. A little later he was the Demo- 
cratic candidate for County Judge, and was defeated by a majority of 
but 1,200, the usual Republican majority being over 3,000. In 1893 
he was the Democratic candidate for delegate to the Constitutional 
Convention of the State of New York for the Counties of Chautauqua, 
Cattaraugus and Allegany. As the Republican majority was very 
large in the district he failed of election. 

Mr. Edson has always upheld the banner of the Democracy in a 
part of the State in which the Republican majority has been over- 
whelming, attending its County and State conventions and actively par- 
ticipating in all its campaigns. He, with Lorenzo Morris, C. D. Mur- 
ray and H. C. Kingsberry, were often its standard-bearers in the po- 
Htical campaigns that followed the Civil War and during the famous 
feud between the Fenton and Sessions wings of the Republican Party. 
He is now the only one living of these well known Democrats, and is 
still an active and influential member of that party. In th^ presiden- 
tial campaign of 1904 he took an active part as a speaker and other- 
wise. He was chosen by his party as the candidate for the Assembly 
in the Second District of Chautauqua County against the Hon. A. C. 
Wade, of Jamestown. The Democrats being in the minority by many 
thousands, he failed of election, but polled a far greater vote than either 
the Democratic National or State ticket in the district. 



Walter H. Edson, the son of Obed Edson, was born in Sinclair- 
ville, Chautauqua County, January 8, 1874. He graduated at the 
Sinclairville High School in June, 1891, and afterwards at Cornell 
University, receiving the degree of Bachelor of Letters in 1896. He 
delivered the memorial address of his class. He commenced the study 
of law in the office of his father in Sinclairville in July, 1895, com- 
pleted his studies and graduated from the College of Law of Cornell 
University, receiving the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1897. He 
took part in many public speaking contests among the students, appear- 



284 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

ing upon the prize stage in declamation, oratory and debate. In 
1896-7 he was an assistant in the oratorical department of the uni- 
versity. He was admitted to practice in the courts of the State of New 
York at Rochester, in February, 1898. In July, 1897, he commenced 
the practice of law' in Sinclairville with Harley N. Crosby as his law 
partner. I\Ir. Crosby had been in the same university and law school, 
received the same degrees and was the best debater in Cornell Uni- 
versity. He is now a prominent lawyer and a member of the Republi- 
can Party in Chautauqua County. In March, 1898, Mr. Edson and 
Mr. Crosby commenced the practice of law at Falconer, Chautauqua 
County, under the firm name of Edson and Crosby, where they still 
continue their practice. They are regarded as one of the strong law 
firms of the county. 

]\Ir. Edson cast his first vote at a presidential election for Bryan In 
1896. He took an active part as a Democrat in the presidential cam- 
paign of 1900, speaking in Chautauqua and Cattaraugus counties. 
He w'as a speaker at the great Democratic meeting in Celoron in 
August of that year, when Bryan and Stanchfield w^ere the principal 
speakers of the day. He was the Democratic candidate for Member 
of Assembly in the First Assembly District in 1901, and for County 
Judge in 1902 against the present judge, Hon. Jerome B. Fisher, the 
Republican candidate. 

In 1 90 1 he was chosen chairman of the Democratic County Com- 
mittee of Chautauqua County, was unanimously re-elected and is now 
serving in that position. During the presidential campaign in 1904, 
besides presiding over and speaking at many Democratic meetings, 
he caused to be made, as the result proved, a nearly perfect canvass 
of the voters in every town in tlie county, and effected through his 
personal efforts a most thorough organization of Democrats in each 
election district. In no part of the State did the Democrats achieve 
better success, notwithstanding its overwhelming Repul)lican majority, 
accomplished through his strenuous insistence without resort in any 
degree to illegitimate measures, proving that more substantial and 
permanent results can be effected by raising the moral standard of 
political action and in legitimate and energetic effort than by ques- 
tionable methods. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 285 

He is a strong and able speaker, has much executive abihty, and 
has rendered during the time he has been County Chairman, and is still 
rendering, efficient service in his county for the Democratic cause. 

Although the Republican Party has always been largely in the 
majority in Chautauqua County, at no time have its leaders or its mem- 
bers ranked higher for intelligence and character than those of the 
Democratic Party. It has not among its young men at this time, not- 
withstanding its great superiority in numbers, the equals, for sincerity 
and energy of purpose, for ability and talent as speakers, of the young 
men of the Democratic Party. Prominent among these young Demo- 
crats of the county is Mr. W. H. Edson. 



Hon. John W. Hart. A veteran Democrat and one of the most 
distinguished in Albany County, is the Hon. John W. Hart, of the city 
of Watervliet. Beginning in 1866, he has given the Democracy nearly 
forty years of faithful and efficient service. Probably no other Demo- 
crat in the county has attended a greater number of party conventions 
than Mr. Hart. Over these he was many times called to preside. 

He is especially proud of the fact that he was a delegate to the 
Democratic State Convention of 1874, and had the pleasure and the 
honor of voting for the nomination of that great Democrat, Samuel J, 
Tilden, for Governor. 

In the year 1867 Mr. Hart was elected one of the Trustees of the 
village of West Troy, and his service was so satisfactory that he was 
again elected, for a second term. In the year 1878 he was chosen Tax 
Collector of the village. In the following year the Legislature estab- 
lished the office of Chamberlain, and Mr. Hart, who had received the 
Democratic nomination, was elected to be the first incumbent of this 
responsible position by the unprecedented majority of 1,331 votes. He 
held this important trust until 1885, when he resigned in order to ac- 
cept the Democratic nomination for Sherifif of Albany County. He was 
elected by more than 2,500 majority, and made one of the most popular 
Sheriffs in the whole history of the county. 



2cS6 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Alphonso Dix Bissell was lx)rn in the town of LeRoy, Genesee 
County, N. Y., on the 30th day of May, 1872, and is the son of David 
Jackson Bissell, Esq. He received his early education in the district 
schools and the Academy at LeRoy, N. Y. After leaving the academy 
he entered Union College, and after a highly creditable course was 
graduated from that historic institution in the class of '95 with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science. He then entered the law ckpartment of 
Cornell University at Ithaca, and was graduated therefrom in 1898 
with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

After completing his collegiate and legal studies, Mr. Bissell took 
up the active practice of law in the city of Rochester. He was admitted 
to the Bar at Rochester, N. Y., in June, 1898, and continued in that 
city, engaged in the practice of his chosen profession, until the fall 
of 1900. 

After the death of his grandfather, the late General C. Fitch Bissell, 
he removed to his old home at LeRoy, N. Y., to take up with his father, 
David J. Bissell, Esq., the practice of law in the same offices wdiich 
had been occupied by his grandfather in the practice of his profession 
for nearly sixty years, and by his father for upwards of thirty years. 

Mr. Bissell is one of the rising lawyers of Genesee County, where 
he is already a highly respected member of the Bar, and is noted for 
the careful and conscientious study which he gives all his cases, as well 
as for his ability in handling them in court. With a determination to 
succeed, and not only liking but having a capacity for hard work, he 
is rapidly coming to the front rank in his profession. 

Politically, Mr. Bissell is a Democrat, as were his father and grand- 
father before him. He is ever staunch and loyal to his party, and is 
a firm 'believer in the tenets of Democracy as taught by Jefferson, 
Jackson and the Constitution. He has not only the prestige of his 
own ability to recommend him as a public man. but also the fortuitous 
strength of the records of his father and grandfather, both of whom 
were strong Democrats and lawyers of repute. This family has been 
a bulwark of the Democratic Party in Genesee County for more thaii 
half a century. He is too broad and liberal to countenance factionalism, 
and the warfare of partisans within the party has ever been repugnant 
to him. This attitude is a natural consequence of his liberal and highly. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 287 

educated mind. He not only knows what disasters have been wrought 
by internal dissensions during- the past, but also realizes their baneful 
influence upon the future of the party's prospects. 

Mr. Bissell is a member of the Delta Upsilon and Delta Chi college 
fraternities. He is also a member of Olive Branch Lodge, No. 39, F. 
and A. M., of LeRoy, N. Y. 



General C. Fitch Bissell. The subject of this sketch, General C. 
Fitch Bissell, was born in Greenfield, Franklin County, Mass., on the 
9th day of March, A. D. 18 18. He was educated in the common schools 
of Greenfield, and at the age of 19 years came to LeRoy, N. Y.,* to 
reside. His first study of law was in the office of the late Judge Put- 
man, of Attica, N. Y., and he was admitted to the Bar of New York 
State in 1845. He then commenced practice in the office of Samuel 
Skinner, with whom he formed a co-partnership, later forming a part- 
nership with the late Randolph Ballard, and in 1853 opened an office 
on Main street in LeRoy, where he continued in business until his 
death, in December, 1898, having been in partnership with his son, 
David J. Bissell, for many years of this time. As a business man, Gen- 
eral Bissell was a surprise even to himself. He came to LeRoy empty- 
handed, with a strong inclination for hard work and a determination to 
succeed, and with only a common school education he studied night and 
day and worked his way up the ladder of success until in his chosen pro- 
fession he was the compeer of any lawyer in the land, and in business 
the competitor of the best financiers of his day. Dignified in his bear- 
ing always, he commanded and received the respect due to men of his 
sterling worth the world over. General Bissell was a Democrat of 
Democrats, but he numbered among his most intimate personal friends 
many of his strongest and staunchest political opponents. He was a 
firm believer in State rights under the Constitution, of home rule for 
municipalities, and any denial of personal rights and privileges was sure 
to arouse in him unbounded enthusiasm for the prospective victim. He 
was opposed to sumptuary laws in State affairs and believed that a 
people governed by a modicum of just and generous laws were better 



288 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

governed than by a multiplicity of emanations from the host of cranks 
who so often manage to creep into legislative seats. Mr. Bissell was 
one of the largest real estate owners in Genesee County, and for many 
years was President of the LeRoy Gas Light Company. He was one 
of the leading Democrats in Western New York, and was elected Dis- 
trict Attorney of Genesee County on the Democratic ticket in 1865 and 
again in 1874. He received his military title from different appoint- 
ments under Governors William Bouck, William H. Seward and John 
Hoffman, of the State of Xew York. Mr. Bissell has represented his 
district on many occasions as delegate to several State and National 
conventions. He was also one of the electors on the Bryan ticket in 
1896. Mr. Bissell was a member of Olive Branch Lodge, No. 39, 
F. and A. ]\I., of LeRoy Chapter and of Batavia Commandery. 



David Jackson Bissell. a leading member of the Bar of Genesee 
County, was bom in the town of LeRoy, Genesee County, N. Y.-, 
August 21, 1845, ^"*J is the son of the late Gen. C. Fitch Bissell. He 
attended the district schools in his native place and then took a course 
in the ^Nliddlebur}' Academy at W^'oming, N. Y., from which he was 
graduated in the class of 1861. He afterwards took a course in the 
Riverview Military Institution, Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, N. Y., 
and graduated therefrom in 1864. 

Having decided on the law as a life profession, he took a course 
in the law department of the University of Michigan, and graduated 
therefrom with the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1867. In March of 
that year he was admitted to the Bar of Michigan and, within the 
same year, passed his examination and was admitted to the practice 
of law in the State of New York. In that year he began the practice 
of law at LeRoy. N. Y., wliere he has since resided, engaged in the 
active duties of his profession and attaining an honorable reputation 
throughout Genesee County and that part of the State. 

In politics Mr. Bissell is a Democrat, as was his father before him, 
and he has represented his party in both State and National conven- 
tions. He was twice elected Justice of the Peace and served both terms ; 



OF THE STATE OE NEW YORK 289 

he was appointed one of the Board of Trustees of the New York State 
Institution for the BHnd at Batavia, N. Y., by Roswell P. Flower, and 
was elected President of that board by the trustees of that institution 
for two years. He has been prominent in the councils of his party in 
his county and State, and is as well and favorably known as any man 
in his party from the Gulf of Mexico to Penobscot Bay, He was also 
elected and served his party as Chairman of the Democratic County 
Committee. 

Mr. Bissell is a member of Olive Branch Lodge No. 39, F. and 
A. M. ; LeRoy Chapter, Batavia Commandery ; Rochester Consistory, 
and the Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, Dawsen's 
Temple, Rochester, N. Y. 



Abram a. Demarest has been one of the earnest and influential 
Democrats of Rockland County for half a century. He is truly a vet- 
eran in the cause he has served so long, so faithfully and with so much 
distinction. He has served on all local and district party committees, 
and he has been honored with the appointment as delegate to all classes 
of Democratic conventions, including State conventions. 

Mr. Demarest received a thorough education and was graduated 
from the State Normal College in 1849. He taught school for several 
years, and in 1856 he was elected County Clerk of Rockland County 
and re-elected for the three succeeding terms. In 1885 he was elected 
District Attorney, serving the full term of three years. 

In 1893 ^^^ accepted his party's nomination for County Judge, but 
there was disaffection in the party that year and a "stump" ticket was 
placed in the field, which drew off enough votes to make Mr. Demarest 
fail of election by a small margin. 

He is a man of great influence in his party, and in the county gen- 
erally, especially with the conservative class. He is a Democrat of the 
"Old School," a firm believer in Democratic principles, and always loyal 
to his party. Mr. Demarest belongs to the Masonic order and is the 
President of the Rockland County Bar Association. 



290 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

A\^iLLiAM J. Randolph. One of the active, earnest and influential 
members of the Democratic organization of Rockland County is Will- 
iam J. Randolph. He has for many years served on the Democratic 
Town and County committees, and has been sent as a delegate to a great 
many Democratic conventions. 

In 1895 he was elected Collector of Taxes, and so efficient and satis- 
factory was his service that he was honored with three successive re- 
elections. In 1899 he was accorded the further honor of a nomination 
and election to the important and responsible office of County Treasurer. 
Here again his acceptable performance of his duties gained him a re- 
election, and he is still the incumbent of the office. 

Mr. Randolph is a member of the Masonic fraternity, of the Odd 
Fellows, of the Red Men, of the Royal Arcanum and of the Y. M. C. A. 
No man stands higher as a citizen, and he is greatly esteemed through- 
out Rockland County by men of all political parties. 



John D. Blauvelt, a prominent Democrat of Rockland County, 
comes from good Democratic stock, the Blauvelt family having long 
taken an active part in the politics of the county. John D. has kept up 
the reputation of the family in that line. 

For many years he has been the Democratic leader in the town of 
Ramapo. 'He has served as delegate to many party conventions, in- 
cluding the famous State Convention of 1882, which nominated Grover 
Cleveland for Governor. Mr. Blauvelt has never been an office-seeker, 
but he yielded to the solicitation of his party friends so far as to accept 
a nomination for Congress. 

The old Seventeenth District, in which he was the candidate, was 
hopelessly Republican, but Mr. Blauvelt made a vigorous fight and 
greatly reduced the Republican majority, running ahead of his ticket. 
In 1884 he was appointed Postmaster at Spring Valley and served ac- 
ceptably for many years. Fie is a member of the G. A. R., of the Sons 
of the Revolution and of the Masonic fraternity. Flis father, Nicholas 
C, served as School Commissioner, and for many terms as Member of 
Assembly. He was prominent in both County and State politics. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 291 

A brother, Abram D., has also been prominent in the pubHc Hfe of 
Rockland County. For several years he has been Supervisor of Ram- 
apo, and he has served with great acceptance as Treasurer of the 
County. 



Charles Eberling has long been an active and influential Demo- 
cratic Party worker in Rockland County. He has rendered valuable 
party service as a member of Town, County and District Democratic 
Committees, and he has served as delegate to the same classes of party 
conventions. 

His first public office was that of Town Auditor. For many years 
he has been a mem.ber of the Board of Education, and it was largely 
through his influence that a handsome and modern new school house 
was erected. In 1903 Mr. Eberling was elected Coroner of Rockland 
County, an office he still holds. 

He belongs to the Order of Red Men, to the Foresters of America, 
to the International Benevolent Association, to the Rockland County 
Industrial Association and to Engine Company, No. i, of New City. 



DeWitt H. Lyon. DeWitt H. Lyon, a prominent attorney-at-law 
of the village of Portchester, town of Rye, Westchester County, has 
been an active force in the Democratic organization of that county for 
many years. He has rendered efficient service on Village, Town and 
County committees, and has been sent as delegate to all classes of local 
conventions. Mr. Lyon has never aspired to political office, but he has 
served as Corporation Counsel to the village municipal government for 
many years. He is a man of force and highly respected by the entire 
community. 

He is a member of the Alasonic fraternity, up to and including the 
Knights Templars, the Mystic Shrine, the Order of Elks, the West- 
chester County Bar Association, the Apawamis Club, of Rye, and the 
Transportation Club of New York City. 



292 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Howard Garner is one of the popular and influential Democrats of 
Rockland County, a power in the organization and an effective cam- 
paign worker. 

In 1 90 1 he was elected Trustee of the village of Nyack, and so ac- 
ceptable and satisfactory was his service that he was re-elected in 1903. 
In 1903 he was also elected Tax Collector of the town of Orangetown. 

He is an honorary member of the Nyack Volunteer Fire Depart- 
ment. Mr. Garner stands high as a citizen, and many political honors 
are doubtless in store for him should he care to accept them. 



William H. Wood^ for many years one of the active leaders of 
the Democratic Party in Dutchess County, is a native of that county, 
having been born at Stanford, December 31, 1855. He received his 
educational training in the public schools, and after its completion he 
taught school himself for a time. His ambition, however, lay in another 
direction, and he left school work to study law. He was admitted to 
the Bar in 1879 and at once began practice in Poughkeepsie, where he 
has since remained and where he has built up a large and valuable 
business. 

]\Ir. Wood has always been a sterling and stalwart Democrat, and in 
1876, before he became of age, he stumped Dutchess County for Tilden 
and Hendricks. In 1884 he was appointed clerk of the Board of Super- 
visors, and in 1886 and 1887 he served as Deputy Collector of Internal 
Revenue under Cleveland's first administration. In 1888 he was elected 
Supervisor of the town of Fishkill, and in June, 1892, Governor Flower 
appointed him one of the State Assessors, in which position he served 
until 1896. In the same year he was elected a member of the Board of 
Education, in which office he served four and one-half years, the last 
year and a half being under appointment, after a change in the charter. 
January i, 1903, he was appointed Deputy Attorney-General, serving 
two years. 

Mr. Wood was chairman of the Democratic County Committee of 
Dutchess County from 1884 to 1889 and was chairman of the Pough- 
keepsie City Committee from 1896 to 1901. He served as a delegate 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 293 

to the Democratic State Convention of 1881, and lias been sent to many 
others since. Air. Wood stands high in the party and in the community. 



Jeremiah Hanglon. One of the staunch, sterling, steadfast and 
stalwart advocates and supporters of Democratic principles and candi- 
dates in Rockland County is Jeremiah Hanglon. He has served with 
fidelity and efficiency on Town, Assembly, County, Senatorial and Con- 
gressional committees, and he has been honored with appointments as 
delegate to all clases of Town, County and District conventions. 

Mr. Hanglon has never been an aspirant for public office, but in 
1888 he yielded to the urgency of the party leaders to accept the nomi- 
nation for County Superintendent of the Poor. He made a splendid 
run, and would have been elected had his Republican opponent not been 
helped out by the Prohibitionist vote. 

He belongs to the Order of Foresters of America. 



John J. Haley, of White Plains, ex-Chief Ranger for the State of 
New York of the Foresters of America, has for many years been one of 
the strenuous Democratic workers in Westchester County. He has 
been a member of the Village, Town and County Democratic commit- 
tees, and has been a delegate to all the local party conventions. In 1895 
he was elected School Trustee. There were three candidates in the 
field, but Mr. Haley received more than twice as many votes as both of 
his opponents put together. He has continued to hold this office 
through successive re-elections to the present time. 

In 1902 he was appointed Police Commissioner, but resigned. His 
resignation was not accepted and he was reappointed. In 1899 he was 
elected Town Auditor and held that office until 1904 through repeated 
re-elections. 

He is a member of the Foresters, of the Knights of Sherwood For- 
est, of the Knights of Columbus, of the C. B. L., of the Royal Arcanum 
and of the Order of Elks. 



294 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

John A\\ Goodwin. A very active and prominent figure in the 
political life of the village and town of Mamaroneck, Westchester 
County, is John W. Goodwin, who for a score of years has been an 
influential Democratic worker. He is and has been for- a long term a 
member of the Democratic Count}^ Committee. 

In 1903 he was nominated for Town Auditor and was triumphantly 
elected, nmning ahead of his ticket. He also made an excellent record 
as a member of the Board of Excise Commissioners, serving two terms 
with great acceptance. In fact, his service continued until the board 
was legislated out of existence by the Raines law. He has also served 
two years as Sewer Commissioner of the village of Mamaroneck. 

i\Ir. Goodwin is a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows' fra- 
ternities, of the Foresters, the Royal Arcanum and of Hook and Ladder 
Company, No. i, of Mamaroneck, of which he is the only charter mem- 
ber left, and in which he has efficiently filled every office from Foreman 
to Chief. 



Louis j\I. KiNG^ a popular and prominent young Democrat and 
attorney of Schenectady, the son of Emanuel and Theresa (Cohen) 
King, was born at Canajoharie, November 21, 1865. He was gradu- 
ated from Union College in the class of 1888. While in college he was 
a member and President of the Adelphic Literary Society. 

He studied law in the office of Judge Austin A, Yates and was 
admitted to the Bar in 1890. He was also, in 1892, admitted to prac- 
tice in the United States Courts. He has built up an extensive and 
valuable practice in both the State and the United States Courts. 

In Scptemljer, 1891, Mr. King married Miss Davidson, of Schenec- 
tady, by whom he has two children. He belongs to the Masonic fra- 
ternity and is a Past Master of New Hope Lodge, No. 730. He is also 
Past Chancellor of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias and is a 
member of the German Club. He is a member of the Democratic Club, 
the Schenectady Club and the University Club. He is Past Commander 
of the Kniglits of St. John and j\Ialta and of the Free Sons of Israel, 
being United States Deputy Grand Master of the order. He also be- 
longs to the Order of Elks and to the Red I\Icn. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 295 

In politics Mr. King is an earnest and enthusiastic Democrat and 
active and prominent ni the party organization, frequently serving as 
delegate to important conventions. In 1900 he was elected City Clerk, 
holding the position for two years. He acted as Judge of the Police 
Court during the summers of 1898-1901, inclusive, and was his party's 
candidate for City Judge in 1897. Mr. King has done much news- 
paper work and is a vigorous and graceful writer. 



William H. Whyard. Ever since he became old enough to vote 
William H. Whyard has been an important factor in the politics of 
Rockland County. He has a natural aptitude for organization work, 
and for many years he has rendered efficient service on all local and 
district Democratic committees. He has also been sent as a delegate to 
all classes of conventions and has frequently been called upon to preside. 

In 1894 he was a delegate to the famous State convention, held at 
Saratoga Springs, which nominated David B. Hill for Governor the 
last time he was a candidate for that office. He was also a delegate to 
the State Convention of 1898, which nominated Judge Augustus Van 
Wyck for Governor, and he was one of the first to put Coler in nomina- 
tion in the convention of 1902. 

In 1880 Mr. Whyard was elected Excise Commissioner of the town 
of Orangetown and served one term. In 1881 he was appointed Justice 
of the Peace, and through successive elections he has been continued in 
that office ever since, without a break, each election being by an in- 
creased majority. 

Mr. Whyard founded and became the first editor of the Orange- 
town Nczvs in 1 90 1. Two years later he secured control of the Rock- 
land County Review, publishing both papers for about a year, when a 
stock company was formed to consolidate them under the name of the 
Rockland Democrat. Through the influence of his papers Mr. Whyard 
has rendered services of the highest value to his party. He belongs to 
the Odd Fellows, the Red Men, the Foresters and the Royal Arcanum. 
He is also a member of the Volunteer Fire Department of Nyack. 



296 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

\\'iLLiAM IMcCauley, 3. prominent attorney and a leading Demo- 
crat of Rockland County, has the unique distinction of having been 
elected as a Democratic nominee for District Attorney without opposi- 
tion in a county which had at the time, 1890, a decided Republican 
majority. 

Mr. McCauley is a thoroughly educated man, as well as an able 
lawyer. He enjoyed, in addition to the universal public school advan- 
tages, the training of one of the Pennsylvania normal schools and that 
of the Wesleyan University at Middletown, Conn. 

He studied law in the office of the Hon. George W. Weiant, of 
Haverstraw, and in 1882 he was admitted to the Bar. Mr. McCauley 
has always been a staunch and active Democrat, though the exactions 
of his large professional business have prevented him from participat- 
ing in organization work, either in conventions or on committees. 

His election as District Attorney in 1890 has been already men- 
tioned, but it may be added that he received his party's nomination 
without any seeking or desire on his part, and it took strong urging to 
induce him to accept. He made a splendid record in his three years' 
term. ]\lr. McCauley is a member of the Haverstraw Club and of the 
Rockland County Bar Association. 



Hon. S. S. Knox, who enjoys the distinction of having been 
elected County Judge of Cortland County, the highest position within 
the gift of the people of that county, and the further distinction of being 
one of the few Democrats ever elected to any county office in Cortland 
County, was born in the town of Colesville, Broome County, on the 5th 
day of February, 1845. 

He was educated in tlie public schools of his native county, the 
Windsor Academy, in the town of Windsor, Broome County, and at 
the Wesleyan University at Middletown, Conn., from which lie was 
graduated with honors in the class of 1871. After the completion of 
his university course Judge Knox began the study of law, and in the 
year 1875 he was admitted to the Bar. He at once began the practice 
of his profession at Cortland, and has continued there to the present 



OF THE STi\TE OF NEW YORK 297 

time. His unusual al)ility, his courtesy, his inchistry and his integrity 
soon gave him a very high standing in his profession, and he was given 
charge of many important Htigations, being retained on one side or the 
other of ahnost every cause in which considerable interests were in- 
volved. 

Always a staunch and earnest Democrat, Judge Knox has fre- 
quently been appointed a delegate to important Democratic County, 
District and State conventions. 

He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and is not only an influ- 
ential Democrat and a leader of the Bar, but also one of the first citizens 
of Cortland County. 



Hon. Michael McCabe. One of the prominent figures in the 
politics of Rockland County is Hon. Michael McCabe, of Haverstraw, 
for many years a leader in the Democratic organization. 

He was born at Brooklyn, February 2j, 1864. When four years 
old his parents removed to Haverstraw, where he received his education 
in the public schools. His father, Felix McCabe, was a staunch and 
active Democrat, and for several years held public office, being Under- 
Sheriff and Tax Collector. His brother is also an earnest Democrat and 
holds the office of Justice of the Peace. 

The subject of this sketch, as was inevitable with his heredity and 
environment, has always been a stalwart and vigorous Democratic 
worker. He is the founder, owner and editor of the Haverstraw Times. 

He is very prominent in the party organization. He has been the 
chairman of every village convention of his party and a delegate to 
every Democratic County and State convention during the past twelve 
years. In 1888 he was elected Town Clerk and was re-elected for three 
years in succession. In 1892 he accepted the Democratic nomination 
for Supervisor and was beaten by only seventeen votes, running four 
hundred votes ahead of his ticket. 

In 1902 he was tendered the nomination for Member of Assembly. 
The same year he was elected a member of the Democratic State Com- 
mittee, a position he still holds. 



29S THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Timothy Callahan^ of JMamaroneck, is one of the staunch, loyal 
and efficient Democrats of Westchester County. He is a veteran in party 
service, having been an earnest worker in the cause of Democracy for 
more than a quarter of a century. He has performed valuable service 
on Village, Town and County committees, and he has represented his 
district in a great many Town and County Democratic conventions. 

In 1 89 1 he was elected Constable of the town of Mamaroneck, and 
in 1894 he was elected Road Commissioner and was re-elected in 1896. 
It was during his term of office that the famous "Arch Bridge" over 
the Mamaroneck River, on the Boston Post Road, was constructed. 
This is one of the greatest public works ever built by any township in 
the United States. 

yir. Callahan is a valuable and highly respected citizen in every 
walk of life. 



Patrick Henry Russell, an influential Democrat of Schenectady 
County, was born in Limerick County, Ireland, March 29, 1870. He 
attended school in Ireland, and, coming to the United States in 1879, 
he received further instruction in the Brooklyn public schools. 

After serving for a time with a hatter in Brooklyn and as a delivery 
clerk for White's Express Company, he learned the trade of boiler- 
maker at the American Locomotive Works, Schenectady. In 1889 he 
accepted employment in the West Shore Railroad shops at Buffalo, and 
in 1 89 1 went to Cleveland, Ohio, where he acquired a thorough knowl- 
edge of marine boiler making with the Globe Shipbuilding Company. 
In 1893 he returned to Schenectady, where he became a meml>er of the 
Mohawk Brewer^' Company. In 1900 he renewed his connection with 
the American Locomotive Works in his former capacity, and he has 
remained there until the present time. 

Mr. Russell is a member of the Democratic County Club, of the 
Catholic Mutual Benevolent Association, of the American Eedcration 
of Labor, of the Brotherhood of Boilermakers, of the Iron Shipbuilders 
of America, and is also Grand Worthy Conductor of the Schenectady 
Aerie of Eagles. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 299 

In politics Mr. Russell has always been an ardent and active Demo- 
crat and an influential party worker. He served for thirteen years as a 
member of the Democratic County Committee and accepted in 1902 the 
Democratic nomination for Sheriff, making a splendid canvass and a 
strong run. Mr. Russell is also a prominent leader in labor circles. 

On December 22, 1899, Mr. Russell married Miss Isabella Clute, of 
Albany. He stands high as a citizen and is greatly respected by all 
who know him. 



James H. Shine, one of the active and energetic business men of 
Cohoes, is the kind of Democrat that helps to win Democratic victories. 

He began his political work in Waterford, Saratoga County, wdiere 
he formerly resided. He early displayed a talent for leadership, and in 
the year 1879 ^^^ was elected to the Board of Trustees for the village of 
Waterford. In 1881 he was elected Supervisor of the town of Water- 
ford and re-elected in 1882 and 1883, three successive elections, to this 
important office, being an honor accorded no other Democrat by this 
strong Republican town for a generation. 

He accepted the Democratic nomination for Member of Assembly in 
1884 and made a great run, failing of election by only a hundred votes 
in a strong Republican district. 

While a resident of Saratoga County Mr. Shine served as his town's 
representative on the Democratic County Committee for ten years. He 
removed to Cohoes in the year 1900 and is still one of the active and 
progressive business men of that thriving city. Naturally he soon 
began to take an interest in politics in his new home. He was 
appointed a member of the Board of Public Improvements and in 1901 
he was elected its Chairman, a position he has filled with conspicuous 
ability and which he still holds. 

Mr. Shine has always been an active party man and has been a dele- 
gate to County, District and State conventions a great many times. He 
was a member of the State conventions which nominated Seymour and 
Cleveland for Governor. Personally Mr. Shine is always affable and 
approachable and is a delightful companion. 



300 THE DEiAIOCRATIC PARTY 

Joseph T. Kelly is one of the loyal and energetic Democrats of 
Rockland County. He has long been active in the party organization. 
He has been a member of the Town and County Democratic commit- 
tees, and has always been an earnest and influential worker for his 
party's success. He has often been honored by appointment as delegate 
to party conventions, and as a campaign hustler he ranks among the 
most effective in the county. 

In 1882 Mr. Kelly was elected Justice of the Peace, and was re- 
elected in 1886. In 1888 he resigned his office, as he removed to Nyack. 

Here he began the publication of the Rockland County Democrat. 
In 1898 he was appointed Clerk of the village of South Nyack, an office 
which he still holds. He also remains the incumbent of the office of 
Deputy County Treasurer, an important and responsible position to 
which he was appointed in 1900. Mr. Kelly stands high in the com- 
munity, as a man and as a citizen. 



James H. Glavin, who has been a prominent figure in the Demo- 
cratic politics of Saratoga County and also of the State, was born at 
Waterford, in that county, December 16, 1862. He acquired his edu- 
cation in the public schools of his native village and engaged in the 
mercantile business, which he has prosecuted with diligence and success. 

He is a member of the Waterford Club, the Royal Arcanum, the 
Property Owners' League, the Knights of Columbus and the Young 
Men's Catholic Literary Association. 

In politics ]\Ir. Glavin has alwa}'s been a straight Democrat and an 
active and influential factor in the ])arty organization. He has l3een 
honored with the appointment as delegate to all classes of party con- 
ventions, including the State conventions. In 1902 he was elected a 
meml^er of the Democratic State Committee and was re-elected in 1904, 
rendering valuable and important service in the campaigns of iDoth 
years. 

After serving as Town Clerk for three terms he was elected Super- 
visor of the strong Republican town of Waterford. and his sen^ice was 
so satisfactory that he was triumphantly re-elected. For one term he 
was chosen Chairman of the board. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 301 

Mr. Glavin is a genial and companionable man, and he is highly 
respected in the community in which he has always resided, while few 
men have a larger circle of devoted personal friends. 



Edward F, Campion is one of the vigorous and popular Demo- 
cratic hustlers of Westchester County. For a score or more of years 
he has been one of the party's "war horses." He has served on Town 
and County committees and as delegate to numberless party conven- 
tions. 

Mr. Campion has exerted a specially powerful influence with the 
labor vote and among the younger Democracy in his section of the 
State. Mr. Campion has never consented to accept either office or nomi- 
nation, but he has been a potent influence in securing both for his per- 
sonal friends and his party associates. 

He belongs to the F. O. E., F. of A., IMontauk Association, New 
York State Licjuor Dealers' Association and the Westchester County 
Liquor Dealers' Association. 



Michael F. Biddulph. One of the live and earnest Democratic 
workers of the County of Westchester is Matthew F. Biddulph, of the 
town and village of Rye. He is one of those loyal and active party 
hustlers who render such valuable service in every campaign. He is a 
member of the Democratic Committee of both town and village, and 
has frequently served as delegate to Town, County, Assembly and 
Senatorial conventions. 

Mr. Biddulph has never been a seeker after public office, but in the 
year 1893 he accepted an appointment as Deputy Sheriff and served 
four years, making an excellent record. 

He is the First Assistant Engineer of the Rye Volunteer Fire De- 
partment, and he is one of the charter members of the local lodge of the 
Order of Elks. 



302 THE DE^IOCRATIC PARTY 

Frederick F. Bittig. One of the live Democrats of Rockland 
County and one of the most influential among the younger element is 
Frederick F. Bittig. He has rendered his party highly effective service 
as a member of the Democratic Town and County committees, and he 
has frequently been honored by the appointment as delegate to impor- 
tant party conventions. 

In 1893 ^^r- Bittig was appointed Deputy Sheriff and served under 
three Sheriffs, being three terms of three years each, or nine years in 
all. In 1903 he accepted his party's nomination for Coroner and was 
elected by the largest majority received by any candidate on either 
ticket in Rockland County that year. 

He is a member of the Foresters of America, of the Independent 
Order of Red ]\Ien and of the Orangetown Fire Engine Company, No. 
I, of which he was Foreman three years. 

I\Ir. Bittig stands high as a citizen, and as a party hustler he ranks 
among the first. 



James F. Martin. For more than thirty years James F. Martin 
has been an alert and effective worker in the Democratic Party in the 
county of \\'estchester. He is a resident of Peekskill and has perfomied 
great service on both Village and Town committees. He was chairman 
of the Third Assembly District Committee for some twelve years. He 
has served as delegate to all classes of Democratic Conventions, includ- 
ing four State conventions, and as alternate to the Democratic National 
Convention. 

Mr. Martin has been a Trustee of the village of Peekskill a number 
of times and also acceptably filled the position of Excise Commissioner 
of the town of Cortlandt for seven consecutive years. The high regard 
in which Mr. Martin is held by his neighbors is shown in the^fact that, 
akhough a strong and unswerving Democrat, he has been nominated 
for \^illage Trustee by Republicans as well as Democrats, something 
that very seldom occurs. 

Mr. Martin is a member of the Order of Elks and of the Knights of 
Columbus. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 303 

Joseph R. Stewart, a prosperous farmer and a prominent Demo- 
crat of Wyoming County, was born at Herkimer, N. Y., March 6, 
1862. He received his education in the pubHc schools of Little Falls 
and at Pike Seminary in Wyoming County, his parents having re- 
moved to that place while he was still a child. After leaving school he 
went to work with his father on the valuable farm where he has lived 
ever since, about three miles from Pike village. 

Mr. Stewart is one of the enterprising and progressive agriculturists 
that have made a garden of Western New York. He has a beautiful 
home and is one of the leading citizens of the county. He belongs to 
the Masonic order, the Odd Fellows and the Order of Maccabees. 

In politics he is a live and influential Democrat. He has given 
many years of service on the Democratic Town Committee and has 
frequently been sent as delegate to County conventions. 



Dr. Albert C. .Way, one of the ablest physicians and surgeons of 
Western New York, and one who stands in the very front rank of his 
profession, was born at Binghamton, August 28, 1870. After passing 
through the public schools of his native city he took a course at the 
University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, and at its conclusion began the 
study of medicine. Fie was graduated from the Medical Department 
of Buffalo University in 1895, and for five years he practiced his pro- 
fession in the city of Buffalo. In 1900 he removed to Perry Center, 
Wyoming County, where he has built up a large practice. 

Dr. Way is a member of the American Medical Association, of the 
New York State Medical Society and of the Wyoming County Medical 
Society. He also belongs to the Odd Fellows and the Order of Elks. 

In politics Dr. Way is a strong and enthusiastic Democrat and an 
active and generous supporter of the party cause. He has never held 
any public office and has never aspired to any, his time and attention 
being absorbed in his extensive and growing professional work. Per- 
sonally Dr. Way is a splendid type of the brainy and genial American 
citizen, and that he has a large army of devoted friends goes without 
saying. 



304 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



JOSEPH P. BRENNAN. 

Joseph Patrick Brenkan^ a veteran of the Spanish-American 
War, for several years the Village Attorney of Saratoga Springs and 
one of the brightest and most capable young Democrats of Saratoga 
County, was born in Saratoga Springs, January 29, 1870, the son of 
Patrick and Catherine (Halpin) Brennan. He received his literary 
education in the public schools of his native village, including the High 
School, from which he was graduated with honor. Having determined 
to study law, he pursued his studies with characteristic diligence. Hav- 
ing completed his preliminary preparation, Mr. Brennan entered the 
Law School of Yale University, from which he was graduated in 1891, 
and was admitted to the Bar in November of the same year. In 1895 
he accepted the position of managing clerk in the office of Hon. Edgar 
T. Brackett. Upon the outbreak of the Spanish-American War, in the 
spring of 1898, he enlisted in Company L, Second Regiment of New 
York Volunteers, and served with credit to the close of the war, being 
mustered out with his regiment, October 26, 1898, as Corporal. 

In 1892 Mr. Brennan was elected Justice of the Peace, serving the 
full term of four years with much credit. In the fall of 1898 he ac- 
cepted the Democratic nomination for Member of Assembly and ran far 
ahead of his ticket. In the town of Saratoga Springs, while the ma- 
jority for Brackett, Republican, for State Senator, was 413, Mr. Bren- 
nan was honored with a majority of 453. In the spring of 1899 Mr. 
Brennan was appointed Village Attorney, and so efficiently were his 
duties performed that he was reappointed in 1901 and again in 1903. 
During his incumbency a large number of suits for damages against 
the village were brought to trial, and Mr. Brennan defended them with 
much success, gaining a wide reputation. These results not only cleared 
the docket of old litigations, but acted as a deterrent against others 
being brought. He was also successful in maintaining the constitution- 




jET'y. itfS.^ »«&ra- S- Br, 




'^tW YORK 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 305 

ality of new laws enacted to regulate tlie use of the streets by vehicles. 
These cases presented many new points and Mr. Brennan again added 
to his reputation as a shrewd and capable lawyer. 

Mr. Brennan was elected president of the Jeffersonian Club, the 
Democratic local organization, serving with marked success. He also 
proved himself an effective campaign orator, and his services on the 
stump have been in great demand. He is a member of the Order of 
Elks, of the Knig-hts of Columbus, of the Yale Club and of the Catholic 
Club of New York City, of the Saratoga Club and an ex-president of 
the Alumni Association of the Saratoga High School. He also belongs 
to the Woolsey Association of the Yale Law School. While still hold- 
ing the position of Village Attorney of Saratoga Springs, in the spring 
of 1905, Mr. Brennan felt impelled to resign this important office in 
order to avail himself of inducements held out to him to remove to New 
York City. His offices are located at 37-39 Liberty street. 

Personally Mr. Brennan is a genial, affable and brilliant gentleman 
and he has a host of friends. 



Frank J. Robinson is one of the loyal and earnest Democrats of 
Wyoming County who, in spite of the overwhelming Republican ma- 
jority, always stand by their colors and make a strong fight in every 
political campaign. 

Mr. Robinson was born in the town of Pike, Wyoming County, 
August 26, 1849. t^^ was educated in the public schools of his native 
town, which has always been his home. In fact, he has always lived on 
the same farm upon which he was born. He is a member of the Ma- 
sonic order. 

Mr. Robinson has always been a Democrat, and, although his town 
is hopelessly Republican, his fellow townsmen elected him Assessor in 
1899, and he served the full term of three years with great acceptance. 
He has rendered effective service to his party by his work on com- 
mittees and as delegate to conventions. Mr. Robinson is an excellent 
citizen and he has hosts of personal friends. 



3o6 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Thomas S. Holland, of Mamaroneck, is an active and well known 
figure in the political life of Westchester County. For many years he 
has been in the thick of every strenuous battle of politics, always loyal 
and always efficient in support of the Democratic cause. He has per- 
formed valuable service on Village and Town committees, and he has 
been a delegate to numbers of local party conventions. 

i\Ir. Holland has never sought nor accepted any nomination for 
political office, his service being given freely for the good of the cause 
whose success he has so much at heart. 

He is a member of the Executive Committee of the State Com- 
mittee of the State Liquor Dealers' Association, of the F, O. E., of the 
Larchmont Engine Company and Foreman since its organization. He 
is also Vice-President of the Central Association of Westchester 
County, N. S. L. D. Association and of the New Rochelle Branch. 



JoHX Underhill, a well-known and able journalist of Western 
Xew York, was born at Bath, Steuben County, January 20, 1868. He 
had the advajitages of a complete and thorough education, for after 
passing through the public schools he took a course at Bath Academy 
and entered Yale University, being graduated with the class of 1889. 
He began business in company with his father and his brother, in Bath, 
but in ]\Iarch, 1896, he came to Warsaw, Wyoming County, where he 
has since published the JVyoniiiig County Times, of which he is the 
owner and editor. The Times has exerted a powerful influence in be- 
half of Democratic principles and candidates. 

In the spring of 1898 Mr. Underbill was elected Chairman of the 
Democratic County Committee. The party organization had not been 
in a shape to do effective work for some years, but the new chairman 
soon put new life into it, and by his sound and sagacious control he soon 
brought order out of chaos, harmony out of discord, and the party im- 
mediately began to gain in every direction. Mr. Underbill still holds 
the chairmanship of the committee and the Democracy of Wyoming is 
united and growing in strength. Mr. Underbill has served as delegate 
to Democratic County, District and State conventions. He is also a 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 307 

valuable member of the Board of Education. In February, 1905, the 
Democrats gained control of the Board of Supervisors, the first time 
in the history of the county. 

He belongs to the Masonic order, to the Odd Fellows and to the 
Knights of Pythias. He is also the secretary of the Democratic Edi- 
torial Association. 



Louis J. Zeci-ies^ one of the active and influential Democrats of 
Wyoming County, was born in the town of Wethersfield, in that 
county, September 10, 1864. He received his education in the public 
schools of his native town. Mr. Zeches is a farmer by occupation, and 
has one of the finest farms in a county where fine farms are the rule. 

He is a member of the Maccabees and of the Modern Woodmen of 
America. 

Mr. Zeches has never had any aspirations for public office, but he 
consented to accept his party's nomination for Supervisor in 1903, and 
he was triumphantly elected, and has made a very acceptable official. 
Mr. Zeches is personally very popular and stands high in the com- 
munity. 



Daniel Murray. Among the earnest and influential workers in 
the cause of Democracy in Westchester County must be numbered 
Daniel Murray, the prosperous and wealthy contractor of Portchester. 
He is a veteran in the party service, and for more than thirty years he 
has always been ready to serve on party committees, tO' attend party 
conventions or to do any other helpful service within his power. 

Mr. Murray is a genuine "Captain of Industry," the employer of 
more than four hundred men, and one of the most public-spirited citi- 
zens in the county. Mr. Murray has never had either the time or the 
inclination to assume the duties and responsibilities of public office, but 
is always eager to help the party cause in every legitimate way. 

He is a member of the Knights of Columbus, the Royal Arcanum 
and the Loyal Edition of the Royal Arcanum. As an influential citizen 
Mr. Murray stands in the front rank and is held in the highest regard. 



o 



08 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



Benjamin IMills. An earnest and influential Democratic worker 
of \\'estchester County is Benjamin Mills, a resident and prominent 
citizen of the village of Portchester and the town of Rye. Mr. Mills 
has rendered his party valuable service as member of the Village and 
the Town committees and also as delegate to every class of Democratic 
conventions except the State and the National. 

Mr. Mills is an energetic and active business man and has never 
had aspirations for political office. His vigorous and effective party 
work is performed for the good of the cause he has so much at heart, 
and he is a host in himself when any important political campaign is in 
progress. 

He is prominent in the IMasonic order and belongs to the Royal 
Arcanum, the Harry Howard Hook and Ladder Company, the State 
Line Fox Htmting Club, the Transportation Club of New York City, 
the Order of Elks and the Azure Grotto, No. 7, of New York. He is 
at the present time the Treasurer of the Democratic Town Committee. 



Dr. Edward Meany^ one of the leading and influential Democrats 
of Tompkins County, has lived within its lx)rders all his life. He was 
born at Enfield, November 17, 1865. He received his educational train- 
ing in the public schools. Having determined to enter the medical pro- 
fession, he attended lectures at the Buffalo Medical College and was 
duly graduated after having completed his course, receiving his diploma 
in 1S87. He began the practice of his profession at Ithaca in 1887, ^"<i 
soon took rank among the leading physicians of the city. He has long 
been promiricnt in medical circles and is an active member of the New 
York Medical Society. Pie is Vice-President of the Tompkins County 
Medical Society, and is the proprietor of Meany's Pharmacy, one of 
the leading drug stores of Ithaca. He is also the President of the 
Ithaca Realty Company. 

Devoted to his work. Dr. ]\leany lias never been known to take a 
vacp.lion mrire than a day off to attend a Democratic convention. He 
has liad to do this on many occasions, for he is a very earnest Democrat 
and has often been asked by his party to accept the position of delegate. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 309 

He has served as Chairma.n of the Democratic County Committee, but 
lias always declined nominations to public office. He, however, always 
works diligently in behalf of those who do accept, and he is always a 
liberal contributor in addition. 

Personally Dr. Meany is genial and popular and his circle of warm 
personal friends is a large one. 



Charles E. Horn. Among the Democrats of Rockland County 
who have been active and earnest in the work of the party organization, 
is Charles E. Horn. He has rendered valuable service in both Clarks- 
town and Ramapo townships. As a member of party committees and 
as a delegate to party conventions he has been an influential factor in 
shaping party action. 

In 1894 Mr. Horn was elected Assessor of the town of Clarkstown, 
which he resigned, as he was about to remove to Suffern. 

He is a member of the Independent Order of Red Men and of the 
Foresters of America. Mr. Horn stands high as a citizen and is greatly 
respected in the community where he lives. 



Charles F. Rattigan, a prominent journalist and a leading and 
influential Democrat of Auburn, was born in that city, November 13, 
1865. He was educated in the public schools. In 1885 he accepted a 
position on the Auburn Bulletin and was afterward promoted to Man- 
aging Editor. 

He is a strong and graceful writer, and his trenchant and timely 
editorials have been of great service to the Democratic Party, of which 
he has always been a staunch and active supporter. He has served as 
delegate to countless conventions of his party, including two State con- 
ventions, and in 1902 he was elected a member of the Democratic State 
Committee, upon which he rendered efficient service. 

Mr. Rattigan is a power in the Democratic organization, and he is 
highly regarded by all its prominent leaders in the State. 



310 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Patrick O'Reilly, an active and alert Ulster County Democrat, 
was born in County Cavan, Ireland, March 17, 1843. 

His parents came to this country when he was but two years old, 
settling in Rondout, where he has lived ever since. He attended the 
public schools for a time, but when seven years old he went to work in 
the cement mills, and continued there seven years. He went to school 
at intervals and educated himself during spare hours. When fourteen 
years old he learned the blacksmith trade, and has continued to follow 
that occupation. He owns a shop in Rondout section. 

]\Ir. O'Reilly is one of the Democratic leaders of the Fifth Ward, 
a hustling worker and a warm personal friend of ex-Chief Judge Alton 
B. Parker. 

He has often been a Delegate to County and State conventions, and 
has frequently been tendered nominations to office. He has, however, 
invariably declined them, preferring his influential place in the ranks, 
where he has long rendered important aid to his party's nominees. 



Joel !M. Potter, a veteran soldier, a prosperous farmer, an active 
and prosperous business man and a loyal and popular Democrat of 
\\''yoming County, was born in the town of Wethersfield, on the farm 
which has always been his home, one mile from the village of Her- 
mitage, January 31, 1840. He received his educational training in the 
public schools of his native town and went to work with his father on 
the homestead farm. 

In 1862 Mr. Potter enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and 
Thirty-seventh Regiment, New York Volunteers, in the great Civil 
War, and he is a member of the G. A. R. For twenty years Mr. Potter 
lias been salesman for a large cheese factory and has been very suc- 
cessful. 

Mr. Potter is one of the prominent Democrats of Wyoming County 
and has frequently l^een honored with the appointment as delegate to 
important party conventions. He has been elected Excise Commis- 
sioner of his town, and for more than twelve years he has filled the 
office of Justice of the Peace with great acceptance. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 311 

William F. Rafferty was born in Kingston, December 12, 1857, 
and was educated in the public schools. He learned the trade of 
cooper, but afterwards became traveling salesman for his uncle, John 
Maxwell, representing a leading brewery. His uncle died in 1895 ^^^"^ 
Mr. Rafferty succeeded to the business. 

He has always been an active Democratic worker, and so high is 
the regard in which he is held that he has never been defeated when a 
candidate before the people for office. He has been five times elected a 
member of the Board of Aldermen over very strong opposition, and he 
is still an incumbent of that important office. He was a delegate to the 
Democratic State Convention in 1900, and again in 1902, and has ren- 
dered valuable service on both the Democratic General and Executive 
County Committees. 

Mr. Rafferty is a member of the Knights of Columbus, and also of 
the Order of Elks. 



Vinson D. Morgan, one of the progressive and prosperous farm- 
ers of Wyoming County, is also a staunch and loyal Democrat, even in 
that Republican stronghold. He was born in Wyoming County, in the 
town of Wethersfield, January 12, 1868. 

After completing a course in the public schools he attended the 
State Normal School at Geneseo, from which he was graduated with 
honor. After leaving school Mr. Morgan engaged in work as a far- 
mer upon his father's farm. This is one of the finest farms in the State, 
or the United States for that matter. It contains 365 acres and has 
been brought to the highest state of cultivation. Here Mr. Morgan has 
a beautiful home and is universally held in the highest esteem by all 
who know him. 

He belongs to the Masons, the United Workmen, the Modern 
Woodmen and the Red Men. 

He is an active and influential Democrat and has held the offices of 
Constable, Collector and Highway Commissioner. He is a member of 
the Democratic Town Committee and a man of great weight in the 
party organization. 



312 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Frank ^I. Davis. One of the prominent business men and of the 
leading influential Democrats of Tompkins County is Frank M. Davis, 
of Ithaca. He was born in that city, December 5, 1856, and attended 
the public schools, graduating from the Ithaca High School. After 
leaving school he taught for seven years, being only sixteen years old 
\vhen he began, and then engaged in business. For more than twenty 
years he has been the proprietor of an extensive flour, feed, grain, hay 
and produce establishment, and he is also the owner of a cold storage 
plant. 

He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

In politics ]\Ir. Davis has always been an earnest and active Demo- 
cratic worker. He has been honored by appointment as delegate to 
many State and County Democratic conventions, and his party has sev- 
eral times named him for important public offices, and he has always 
made a strong run, but the Republican majority has proved too great 
for him to overcome. In 1903 he was appointed Superintendent of the 
Poor, an ofiflce in which he has made an excellent record. 



William Holl, a prominent business man, and one of the leading 
Democrats of Wyoming County, was born at Buffalo, April 3, 1858. 
He received his educational training in the public schools, and almost 
immediately engaged in business. He removed to Attica, where he 
was a successful shoe merchant for twelve years. He then embarked 
in the grocery business and continued in that for nine years. Since 
leaving this he has Ixen associated in an extensive furniture business. 

Mr. Holl is a member of the Masonic order, also of the Odd Fel- 
lows. He has served for some years with the local Hook and Ladder 
company. 

In poHtics he has always been a sterling and steadfast Democrat, 
voting the party ticket and taking much interest in its success. Mr. 
Holl has l^een too much immersed in his large private business inter- 
ests to be able to devote much attention to politics, and he has never 
sought political honors. He has, however, been elected Supervisor of 
his town and accepted the office, making an efficient officer and an ex- 
cellent record. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 313 

General Richard UroYKE Sherman was torn in Vernon, 
Oneida County, N. Y., June 26, 1819, the son of Willett H. and Cath- 
erine (Schoolcraft) Sherman. Wihett H. Sherman, the father, a native 
of Rhode Island, removed to Oneida County early in the nineteenth 
century, where for more than fifty years he was a positive force in the 
commercial, manufacturing and agricultural life of the county. Henry 
R. Schoolcraft, whose researches and notable contributions to the "His- 
tory of the Indians of North America" excited the admiration of the 
whole scientific world, was a brother of Mrs. Sherman, mother of the 
subject of this sketch. 

In the public schools of Vernon, in the Utica Academy, from which 
he was graduated in his fourteenth year, young Richard U. Sherman 
acquired an excellent English education. On reaching his majority he 
turned his attention to newspaper work, having a distaste for the mer- 
cantile life for which his father had trained him. The Harrison and 
Van Buren campaign, in 1840, found him conducting a campaign paper 
at Utica with ability and success, so much so that the Gazette, the first 
enduring daily of the city of Utica, engaged his services as leading 
editor in the following year. For ten years thereafter he was actively 
engaged in editorial work. The Herkimer Journal was under his direc- 
tion in the campaign of 1844. In 1846 he was editor of the Oswego 
Daily Times. In 1847, i^'^ association with Erastus Clark, he brought 
out at Rochester the Daily Evening Gazette, the only daily paper in the 
State which advocated the support of General Zachary Taylor for the 
Presidency by the Whig Party. Later in the same year he returned to 
Utica, and, with R. W. Roberts, established the Utica Morning Herald, 
which for many years was one of the strongest papers published in the 
interior. 

Mr. Sherman was elected Clerk of the Assembly in 1851, and held 
the office continuously, with the exception of one year, until 1857. The 
position is a trying one and calls for rare cjualities, but in the history of 
the State no man has filled the position with greater ability. Many 
reforms in the business of the desk were instituted imder his adminis- 
tration and the Clerk's Manual, which he wrote during this period, has 
been of greater practical use than any of the more pretentious treatises 
on parliamentary law. A peculiarly interesting situation arose in 1856. 



314 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Three parties, the Democrats, Republicans and Americans, were about 
equally divided in their representation, and a triang^ilar fight for the 
Speakership arose. As Clerk j\Ir. Sherman had to preside and his skill 
and fairness during" the weeks that the struggle continued established 
his reputation as a gifted parliamentarian. No> better proof of his tact 
is required than the simple statement that under these conditions he was 
elected Clerk by a decisive majority, although less than one-third of the 
members belonged to his party. Democrats, as well as Americans, 
joined the Republicans to secure this result. In 1857 Mr. Sherman was 
elected a member of the Assemljly by the Republican Party. 

In i860 the twenty-nine members of Congress who then consti- 
tuted New York's representation united in the request that Mr. Sher- 
man be appointed Assistant Clerk of the House of Representatives. 
That office he held for ten years, adding yearly to the reputation which 
he had established in Albany. No member of the Constitutional Con- 
vention of 1867, to which ]\Ir. Sherman had been elected, made more 
valuable contribution to the measures finally adopted than Mr. Sher- 
man. He devoted himself especially to the limitation of special legisla- 
tion, and, while all his suggestions were not adopted at the time, practi- 
cally all have been embodied in the laws of the State to-day. When 
Mr. Sherman resigned his position as Assistant Clerk of the House of 
Representatives in 1870 there was none of his official associates who 
did not regret the loss of his eminent executive qualities and the sever- 
ance of uniformly agreeable relations. After leaving Washington Mr. 
Sherman's chief business was the care of many large estates, which his 
integrity and ability had caused to be entrusted to him as executor, 
administrator or trustee. 

An earnest Whig in his youth, a Republican by conviction from the 
inception of the party, Mr. Sherman's devotion to principle was so 
strong that he found himself unable to endorse the attitude of President 
Grant toward the civil service, and after careful consideration, in 1872, 
he gave his support to the Liljeral movement of that year. The Demo- 
crats and the Liberal Republicans of the Oneida district unanimously 
selected him as the nominee for Congress. He was defeated, but ran 
ahead of his ticket by many hundred votes. The first Oneida y\sscmbly 
District had been for years strongly Republican, but when Mr. Sher- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 315 

man was nominated by the Democrats in 1874 his personal popularity 
enabled him to triumph over a candidate who had never been beaten 
before. No Democrat ever gave a finer illustration of self-sacrifice than 
did Mr. Sherman in that session of 1874-5. Without a doubt he could 
have been elected Speaker, but, fearing that his candidacy for that posi- 
tion might interfere with the election of Francis Kernan as United 
States Senator, he refused to permit the use of his name in connection 
with the Speakership. He was made chairman of the Committee on 
Rules and a member of the Committee on General Laws, and in the 
framing of the many new general laws required by the amended Con- 
stitution Mr. Sherman was of conspicuous service. He drafted a law 
which largely increased the legislative power of Boards of Supervisors, 
and secured the establishment of the law library in the city of Utica 
during the session. As a member of the joint select committee to in- 
vestigate canal frauds he assisted in framing the report, which is still 
regarded as a document of great legislative importance. 

Re-elected to the Assembly in 1876, he was the only member of the 
minority who was given a committee chairmanship. He was the choice 
of his party for the Speakership and was a member of the important 
committees, Ways and Means, Apportionment, Rules and Public 
Printing, and chairman of the committee to revise the game laws. The 
joint committee to revise the civil list of the two Houses w^as another 
of his committees. General Sherman has left an indelible impress upon 
one department of the State's activities. Appointed in 1879 to succeed 
Governor Seymour as a member of the Fish and Game Commission, he 
continued in that office till 1890, when he resigned. Four new hatch- 
eries were added to the single one which existed when he took office. 
While in this commission the membership was increased from three to 
five. His intimate knowledge of the Adirondack region and his love 
for forest sports singularly fitted him for the work. He was a founder 
of the North W^oods \Valton Club, and in 1878 organized the Bisby 
Club. Both clubs were made up of the true lovers of hunting and fish- 
ing. The Bisby Club established a hatchery of its own on the first 
Bisby Lake, and it was under General Sherman's care that the land- 
locked salmon were introduced in that lake, the first in this country out- 
side of Maine. The protection of fish and game early attracted General 



3i6 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Sherman's attention, and the system, as it exists to-day, was practically 
established by him. The codification of the game laws in 1892 was 
accomplished by a committee of which he was Chairman. When Canada 
and New York State sought some method of protecting the fish in the 
Great Lakes, a joint committee was appointed and of this committee 
Mr. Sherman was one of the most influential members. 

General Sherman spent the later years of his life in the village of 
New Hartford, and no citizen possessed the public confidence in so large 
measure as did he. He was the referee in matters of dispute and much 
litigation was prevented by his good judgment and tact. In fact, as 
Justice of the Peace it was his habit to say to litigants before the case 
came to trial, "If you will settle this case now there will be no costs tO' 
pay me." In the business life of the village he bulked large. He or- 
ganized the New Hartford Canning Company in 1880 and was its Pres- 
ident until his death. The New Hartford Cotton Company, of which 
he had been trustee from 1879, benefited by his advice. Thrice was he 
President of the village, and when the Butler Memorial Hall was 
opened, in 1890, he was made President and trustee. The Oneida His- 
torical Society, one of the best of the State, found him one of its earliest 
members and one of its counsellors. He was a member of Oriental 
Lodge, F. A. M., and of Shenandoah Lodge of Odd Fellows. In 185 1 
he had passed a law authorizing the incorporation of building and loan 
associations, and he was President of the Utica Building Society in 
1849, the first association in the city. While a resident of Utica, General 
Sherman was Alderman from the Fourth Ward and was Chairman of 
the Fire Department Committee in that year. The following year he 
was Chief of the Fire Department. This was at a period when incen- 
diarism was rampant in the city, and the office was one of great re- 
sponsibility. In 1854-55-56 General Sherman represented the Fourth 
Ward in the Board of Supervisors and was Chairman of the board in 
1854. The Seventh Ward sent him to the board in 1857. He then 
removed to New Hartford, where he spent ten years U[)on a farm, but 
in 1867 moved into the village. 

The L'tica Press has well said: "Mr. Sherman was actively en- 
gaged in politics and public affairs for over thirty years and had the 
reputation of being a sagacious and skillful organizer. He was a 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 317 

favorite with the people of this county, and though he was before them 
a score of times as a nominee for elective offices he was but once beaten. 
In the course of his life he filled nearly the whole range of local trusts, 
and thereby and by his connection with National and State legislation 
acquired a knowledge of public affairs possessed by but few. Though 
not a lawyer by profession, his opinion on constitutional and general 
legal questions had great weight with the House." 

Mr. Sherman married Mary F. Sherman* grand-daughter of Stal- 
ham Williams and daughter of R, W. Sherman, a well-known steami- 
boat Captain on Lake Champlain, January 14, 1848. Their children are 
Richard W., a civil engineer and contractor and an ex-Mayor of the 
city of Utica; Mary Louise, wife of the Hon. H. J. Cookingham, of 
Utica; Congressman James Schoolcraft Sherman, now serving his 
ninth term as a member of Congress, and Sanford F. Sherman, of 
Utica. Two sons, Willett H. and Stalham W., have died. 

General Sherman's career was unique. In three great political par- 
ties he won distinction, as a Whig, as a Republican and as a Democrat. 
In no instance did any charge of self-seeking lie at his door. His abso- 
lute integrity put him beyond the reach of any suspicion of ulterior 
motive. Whatever his political affiliations, he never failed to command 
the respect of his party associates and the admiration of his political 
opponents. 



Martin E. Brogan, one of the active and influential Democrats 
and one of the most energetic and effective party workers in Wyoming 
County, was born in the town of Portage, in that county, September 
12, 1873. He received his educational training in the public schools of 
Genesee Falls. He has for some years been engaged in the liquor trade 
and does an extensive business. 

Mr. Brogan is the recognized Democratic leader in Genesee Falls. 
He is a bright politician and personally very popular, and he has a large 
following. He has frequently been sent as a delegate to Democratic 
County conventions, and for several years he has rendered efficient ser- 
vice as a member of the Town and County committees. 



3i8 THE DE^IOCRATIC PARTY 

Patrick C. Dugax, a lawyer and sterling' Democrat of Albany, 
X. Y.. was born in the town of Wright, in the county of Scholiarie, 
N. Y., ]\Iarch lo, 1866. After completing his early studies he decided 
upon the law as his profession and was admitted to the Bar November 
30, 1889. when twenty-three years of age. He began the practice of 
his profession in his native county and remained there until February, 
1892, when he removed to Albany, where a wider field opened up to 
him. In Albany he speedily built up a gratifying practice and rapidly 
advanced to a promising place in the legal profession of the Capital 
City. Since 1901 he has been the attorney for the United Traction 
Company, whose principal office is in the city of Albany. 

Mr. Dugan is well known not only as an able lawyer but as an active 
and earnest Democrat. He is always willing and ready to further the 
interests of the party by his best endeavors, but has never been a candi- 
date for any office. 



Hon. W^illiam J. Delaney^ who for several years has presided 
over the Police Court of Saratoga Springs, is the son of James and 
Margaret (Fitzpatrick) Delaney, and was born in the town of Green- 
field, Saratoga County, August 31, 1864. His father was a native of 
Queens County, Ireland, and came to this country in 185 1. He first 
settled in Saratoga Springs, where he worked at his trade of carpenter 
for a number of years, afterward removing to the adjoining town of 
Greenfield, where he engaged in farming. He died December 1 1, 1898, 
in his seventy-seventh year, greatly honored and respected by a wide 
circle of friends and acquaintances. 

William J. Delaney was educated in the public schools, including 
the High School at Saratoga Springs, and at Cornell University, from 
which he was graduated with the class of 1890, receiving the degree of 
LL.B. While still attending the Saratoga Springs High School, and 
during the whole time of his college course he taught in the public 
schools of his native county. Having chosen the law as his profession, 
he made diligent and thorough preparation, and in 1890 he was ad- 
mitted to the Bar, He Ijegan practice in partnership with the Hon. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 319 

Charles M. Davison at Saratoga Springs, but since November i, 1898, 
he has practiced by himself. 

In March, 1898, Mr. Delaney was elected Police Justice of the town 
of Saratoga Springs, an office which he has filled with eminent success, 
and which, through repeated re-elections, he has continued to hold until 
the present time. The duties of this position in such an important 
summer resort as Saratoga Springs are exceedingly varied and exact- 
ing, but Judge Delaney has discharged them with remarkable success. 
His aim has always been to "temper justice with mercy," but to mete 
out justice every time. 

Judge Delaney has always been a staunch and stalwart Democrat, 
and he has been a power in toth the local and the county organizations. 
In 1895 he accepted his party's nomination for Member of Assembly, 
but the normal Republican majority proved too large for even his popu- 
larity to overcome. 

He belongs to the Knights of Pythias, to the Knights of Columbus, 
to the Independent Order of Red Men, to the Jeffersonian Club of Sara- 
toga Springs and to the Elks, of which he is a Past Exalted Ruler. He 
has been prominent in all these fraternal organizations. Personally 
Judge Delaney is genial and companionable, and he stands high in the 
esteem and confidence of the entire community, without regard to party 
lines. 



William V. Cleary has been an earnest and effective worker in 
the Democratic cause in Rockland County ever since he became of age. 
He has been an influential member of the party organization, serving as 
a member of Town, County and Congressional District Democratic 
committees, and being appointed a delegate to all classes of local con- 
ventions. 

In 1901 he was elected Town Clerk of Haverstraw, and so efficient 
and acceptable was his service that he was triumphantly re-elected. 

Mr. Cleary is an enterprising and valuable citizen and is highly 
esteemed by citizens of all political parties. He is a member of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 



320 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Joseph F. Drilling, one of the leading Democrats of Wyoming 
County, is an enterprising, progressive and prosperous farmer and a 
prominent citizen of the town of Bennington. He resides on the same 
farm where he was born, January 6, 1861. His educational training 
was received in the public schools of his native town. 

Mr. Drilling has rendered important service to his party, having 
always been an energetic campaign worker. He has frequently been 
honored with appointments as delegate to important Democratic con- 
ventions, and has been for some years a member of the Democratic 
County Committee. Mr. Drilling served as Postmaster under Presi- 
dent Cleveland, and he has also been elected Town Clerk, and in each 
office he proved a very competent and popular official. 



James Forrestal, carpenter and building contractor in Mattea- 
wan, Dutchess County ; captain five years of the Sarsfield Guard, Com- 
pany E, Twenty-first Regiment, N. Y. N. G., and Major Twenty-first 
Regiment from 1880; Postmaster of Matteawan tmder Cleveland's 
second administration. 

Mr. Forrestal was born in County Cork, Ireland, May 20, 1848, 
and came to this country in i860 and settled in Matteawan, where he 
obtained a public school education. He learned the carpenter's and 
builder's trade and had great success as a building contractor. Many 
of the finest residences in ]\Iatteawan during a quarter of a century 
were erected under contracts taken and executed by him. A large 
planing mill for his business was put up by him and is now operated as 
part of his business. 

His organization of the military company named above, of which 
he was elected Captain, and his position later in tlic Twenty-first Regi- 
ment, N. Y. N. G., attested his general popularity. In 1894 he was 
nominated for Coroner, much against his wishes, but failed of election, 
although running considerably ahead of his ticket. 

Mr. Forrestal is not a seeker for office, but is Iw preference a busi- 
ness man with very large and important interests demanding In's atten- 
tion, but for all organization work he is one of the most devoted and 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 321 

energetic workers and a stauncli advocate of regular party doctrines. 
He has been on many occasions a delegate to County, Assenil)ly and 
Congressional conventions, has served many years on the Town Com- 
mittee, and is on the County Committee, having been elected to that 
position in 1902. 

During the Spanish-American War Mr, Forrestal showed the 
quality of his patriotism by tendering his services to the Adjutant- 
General of the National Guard of the State of New York. 



James E. Newell^ who has been for several years a factor in 
Democratic politics in Syracuse, was born in Davenport, N. Y., on 
October 2.2, 1859. He attended Fergusonville and Colgate academies 
and then entered Colgate University, graduating in 1886. That year 
he took up his residence in Syracuse and entered the law office of 
Waters & McLennan. After taking the necessary law course he was 
admitted to the Bar in 1889. 

Mr. Newell has always been devoted to politics, but not to the ex- 
tent of neglecting his extensive law practice. He and Hon. S. Chap- 
man are law partners. When he took the office of Mayor, in 1896, Hon. 
James K. McGuire appointed his old friend, Mr. Newell, Corporation 
Counsel and reappointed him in 1898. Mr. Newell handled the city's 
legal affairs with skill and his department came in for much public 
praise. Mr. Newell is a man of distinguished presence and is a splen- 
did platform orator. 

He is a member of Century, University, Citizens and Masonic 
Temple Clubs, New York State Bar Association, Onondaga County 
Bar Association, Knights of Pythias and a prominent Mason, having 
attained to the thirty-second degree and belonging to all of the various 
Masonic organizations. He is also a member of the Delta Kappa Epsi- 
lon fraternity of Colgate University. 

Mr. Newell has been a member of the Executive Committee, of the 
County Committee and delegate to various conventions, including a 
number of State conventions. As a campaign orator he has assisted 
materially in many campaigns. 



322 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Ered. D. Vax Order, of Ithaca, is one of the active and popiilar 
Democratic workers of Tompkins County. He was born at Ithaca, 
IMarch 31. 1866, and obtained his education in the public schools. 

In the year 189.:! he engaged in the bottling business, which he has 
since conducted with such energ}- and ability as to reap a great success. 
He is a member of the Independent Order of Red Men. 

jMr. Van Order is a man of popular manners, and he is a general 
personal favorite. He was elected Alderman of the First Ward in 
1903 and has made a fine record. He has frequently served as delegate 
to Democratic conventions, and has been Chairman of the Democratic 
City Committee. He is now a member of the Democratic County Com- 
mittee. He is an earnest Democrat and has much influence, both in the 
organization and among the people. 



L. F. XoxoN. One of the strong, strenuous and stalwart Demo- 
crats of the "Southern Tier" is L. E. Noxon, of Ithaca, long a leading 
factor in the Democratic politics of Tompkins County. Mr, Noxon was 
born in Dutchess County in 1841, but his parents removed to Tompkins 
County when he was but one year old, and he has lived there ever since. 

He was educated in the public schools, and when his school days 
were over he accepted a position as clerk in a grocery establishment. 
By his fidelity and intelligence he was able to go into business for him- 
self and engaged in the feed business, which he has conducted with 
great success for nearly thirty years. 

!Mr. Xoxon has always been a very busy man, but he has always 
found time to do effective work in behalf of the principles and candi- 
dates of the Democratic Party, to which he has iDelonged and been a 
loyal supporter ever since he became entitled to vote. For the full life- 
time of a generation he has served the cause of Democracy, and he has 
been honored by the appointment as delegate to State and even National 
conventions of his party. lie was elected Supervisor tlu'ee times con- 
secutively, and rendered both his party and his town services of great 
value in the 1x)ard. He was complimented by being elected as Chair- 
man of the Canvassing Board. He was urged to accept another nomi- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 323 

nation, but his private business demanded his entire time and he felt 
compelled to decline further public honors and responsibilities. Mr. 
Noxon is a genial and companionable man. He says his name is just 
the same whether spelled forward or backward, and his Democracy is 
just as unchangeable. He is an earnest worker and a power in the 
organization. 



James S. Ludington. Former Assistant Corporation Counsel 
James S. Ludington, of Syracuse, has been one of the hardest workers 
the Democratic Party has in Syracuse. He has spent his time and 
money freely in promoting the cause of the candidates on his ticket and 
has given unselfishly. 

Mr. Ludington was born in Parish on January 25, 1858, and re- 
ceived a splendid education in the Mexico and Pulaski academies, grad- 
uating from the Pulaski Academy in 1877. He studied law for three 
years and received his diploma in 1880. He began the practice of his 
profession in Vinton, Iowa, but soon returned to practice in Phoenix 
and Parish, where he attained much success. In 1893 he mo'ved to 
Syracuse, since which time he has been prominent in the law and in 
politics. 

He was elected Alderman of the old Fifth Ward in 1897. For 
three years he served as School Commissioner of Oswego County, after 
a hard fight in which he overcame a normal RqDublican majority of 
1,200 and only fourteen votes were cast against him in his home town- 
ship of Parish. 

In every campaign Mr. Ludington takes the platform to speak for 
his party's nominees. He is an orator of pleasing ability. 

In 1899 he was appointed Assistant Corporation Counsel by Mayor 
McGuire and continuerl for two years, aiding to a large extent in the 
handling of the city's cases. Mr. Ludington is now the senior member 
of the well-known law firm of Ludington & Keneally. 

He is a member of Republican Lodge, 325, Parish; F. and A. M., 
Oswego River Chapter, Phoenix; R. A. M., B. P. O. E., Modem 
Woodmen of America, and the Onondaga County Bar Association. 



324 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

James E. Murphy, one of the staunch and stalwart Democrats of 
\\''yoming County, was born in the town of Pavilion, in the adjoining 
county of Genesee, January 12, 1873. His parents removed tO' Wyo- 
ming County when ]\Ir. Murphy was quite young, and he acquired his 
education in the public school at Pearl Creek. After leaving school he 
engaged in business at Pearl Creek, and he has built up a fine trade, 
dealing in coal and produce. 

In politics Mr. IMurphy has always been a loyal and earnest Demo- 
crat. He has frequently been a delegate to Democratic County con- 
ventions, and for the past fi\-e years he has served as Secretary of the 
Democratic County Committee. 

Personally he is very popular and has a host of friends. 



J.\soN B. AIerrill. a veteran Democrat and one who has ren- 
dered great service to his party for many years is Jason B. Merrill, of 
Ithaca. He was born in the town of Caroline, Tompkins County, May 
29, 1846, and received his education in the public schools and academy. 
When only eighteen years old he became the telegraph operator at 
Ithaca for the D., L. and \Y. Railroad Company. He went from there 
to New York City during the closing period of the great Civil War, 
returning in 1868 to Ithaca. He was connected with the Railway 
Mail Service during Cleveland's first administration. Later he en- 
gaged in the insurance business and also became an architect. He is a 
member of the ]\Iasonic fraternity. 

]Mr. ^Merrill has also displayed unusual gifts as an artist and for 
many years he has done the cartoon work for the Elmira Telegram. 
Some of his hits have been widely copied and have given him an ex- 
tended reputation. 

Mr. Merrill has always been an earnest and efficient Democratic 
worker. He was a Civil Justice and Acting Recorder for eight years. 
He has served as delegate to Democratic State and National conven- 
tions and was nominated for Presidential Elector in 1896. He has 
been an important factor in the party organization for a generation. 
He was City Assessor for eight years and for a long time he performed 
efficient service as Chairman of the Democratic City Committee. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 325 

Mr. Merrill stands high as a citizen and is greatly respected by the 
entire community in which he has lived so long. 



Charles F. Makon. One of the active and enthusiastic Demo- 
cratic hustlers of Saratoga County is Charles F. Mahon, of Saratoga 
Springs. He was born in that village, the son of James and Mary 
(Kiernan) Mahon, January 6, 1866. His parents werelx)th natives of 
Ireland, and came to this country in i860. The father died in 1891, 
but the mother is still living. Charles F. Mahon has always resided in 
Saratoga Springs. He received his educational training in the public 
schools. While quite young he became one of the dipper boys at the 
Washington Spring, where his brightness and politeness made him 
quite a favorite among the patrons of the spring. After leaving school 
he entered the employ of Caleb W. Mitchell, with whom he remained 
nine years. In 1889 he engaged in business on his own account, open- 
ing a hotel and cafe in one of the most prominent locations in the vil- 
lage, where he still continues, and where he has built up a large and 
lucrative business. 

Mr. Mahon belongs to the Improved Order of Red Men, to the 
Ancient Order of Hibernians, the Foresters of America and the Jeffer- 
sonian Democratic Club, which for a quarter of a century has been a 
prominent factor in the politics of this part of the State. 

In 1887 Mr. Mahon married Miss Kate E. Haas, O'f Saratoga 
Springs. 

He has been a prominent figure in the party organization, having 
served as chairman of the Democratic County Committee and also for 
many years as chairman of the Democratic Town Committee. He has 
never had either the time or the inclination to accept any public office, 
his valuable and long-continued party service having been cheerfully 
rendered in behalf of the great party in whose principles he strongly 
believes, and in whose success he has always had a warm, loyal and 
patriotic interest. 

Personally Mr. Mahon has a large circle of devoted friends, won 
and retained by his genial and manly ways. 



326 THE DE:M0CRATIC PARTY, 



MAJOR ]\IATTHEW R. MARKS. 

IMajor ]\Iatthew R. Marks. Few men have seen more of the 
ups and downs of the world and come through seventy years of aher- 
nate victories and defeats into an active old age with a heartier consti- 
tution and a brighter disposition than Matthew R. Marks. 

^lajor j\Iarks was born on October 29, 1834, of an old Southern 
family at Columbus, Ga. His father, a clergy-man, Rev. Richard T. 
!Marks, owned several estates in the South, among them the watering 
place of White Sulphur Springs, Ga. Here the boy J\Iatthew spent his 
early life, receiving a common school education, and later managing the 
estates which he had inherited upon the death of his father. 

At the outbreak of the Civil War Mr. Marks organized and was 
elected captain of the Blalock Guards of Alerriwether County, Ga. He 
soon retired as captain of the guards and in 1862 was chosen Major of 
the Second Alabama Cavalry. Throughout the war he served in the 
Confederate army, for the most part engaging in skirmishes in the Ala- 
bama hills. In the spring of 1865 ]\Iajor INIarks was in command of 
the Confederate forces at Meridian, ]\Iiss. The war was fast coming to 
an end, and on May 4 he surrendered the town to General Bertram, of 
the Federal army. 

Major jMarks then retired to his plantation in IVIontgomery County, 
Ala., but difficulties with the carpet baggers soon induced him to sell 
out and return to his birthplace in Georgia. After a few years' resi- 
dence there he moved to Orange County, Fla., and engaged in the real 
estate and land business. In one transaction alone Mr. Marks nego- 
tiated the sale cf 4,000,000 acres of land. During the next few years 
he settled more than 6,000 people on Florida lands. He soon became 
interested in the orange growing industry and was eminently successful 
until the disastrous freeze in the winter of 1893-1894. More than 
$200,000 worth of the Major's trees were destroyed. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 327 

Following this disaster, undismayed and with a marvellous courage, 
Major Marks interested himself in the mining business and organized 
the International Kaoline Company, of Lake County, Fla. Like most 
Southerners, the Major has always been a strong Democrat. He served 
as Mayor of Orlando, Fla., for two successive terms, and was then 
elected State Senator for two terms. While in the Senate he was a vig- 
orous opponent of the railroad commission. Of the thirteen bills which 
he introduced into the Legislature eleven became laws, and the Major 
says, with a twinkle in his eye, that of the two which failed to pass one 
was for a dog tax and the other for a whipping post. 

Since 1898 Major Marks has made his headquarters in New York 
City, where he is interested in several mining concerns. He has taken 
an active interest in city politics and stumped the Ninth Ward for Mc- 
Clellan in the campaign of 1903. The Major has two sons, one of 
whom, Richard T. Marks, is assistant United States District Attorney; 
at Jacksonville, Fla. 



WiLLETT Terry^ an estimable citizen and a strong and influential 
Democrat, of Trumansburg, Tompkins County, was lx>rn in Seneca 
County, New York, July 23, 1854. He was educated in the public 
schools, and after his school days were over he embarked in the produce 
business, which he prosecuted with the diligence and energy that com- 
pel success for many years. During the last few years he has been in 
the coal business at Trumansburg, in this also meeting with gratifying 
success. 

Mr. Terry is an earnest Democrat and a faithful and effective party 
worker. He has never been an officeseeker, but as a member of party 
committees and as a delegate to party conventions he has performed 
much valuable service. 

Mr. Terry is a genial gentleman, well liked and highly respected, 
and always ready to help the Democracy by all the honorable means 
within his power. 



328 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Thomas Hamilton Lee. Among the forceful and popular Demo- 
crats of Rockland County is Thomas Hamilton Lee, who is also one of 
the foremost citizens of the count3^ He was born at Bovina, Delaware 
County, i\Iay 13, 1862. He had the advantages of a thorough educa- 
tion. After passing through the various grades of the public schools, 
he further pursued his studies in the Andes Academy and at Hamilton 
College, from which he was graduated with the class of 1883. He at 
once began the study of law in the office of Chapman & Lyon, of Bing- 
hamton, where he remained two years. 

AMiile engaged in his law studies he became greatly interested in 
politics, and in the memorable national campaign of 1884 he took the 
stump for Cleveland and Hendricks, delivering effective speeches before 
large audiences throughout his section of the State. The same year he 
was elected Clerk of the Board of Supervisors of Broome County. In 
1885 he was appointed temporary clerk in the office of the New York 
State Railroad Commission at Albany. He passed the civil service 
examination for a position in the New York Custom House, and Feb- 
ruary I, 1886, he received an appointment. Before the end of the year 
he was promoted to the position of Law Clerk under United States 
General Appraiser George V. Brower. Here he remained until July, 
1889, when General Appraiser Bower having been succeeded by Hon. 
Donald ]McLean under appointment of President Harrison, he resigned 
to enter upon the practice of his profession in New York City, having 
completed his studies and been admitted to the Bar in that year. 

Pie identified himself with the Tammany Hall organization and was 
elected a member of the General Committee from the old Twenty-third 
Assembly District. Pie was one of the organizers and one of the char- 
ter members of the Sagamore Club, and he was also connected with the 
Harlem Democratic Club. 

In 1899 ]Mr. Lee married Miss Hannah McMahon. of Stony Point, 
and he has since made his residence in that historic village. Two chil- 
dren have been torn to Mr. and ]Mrs. Lee, Thomas Hamilton, Jr., and 
Eugenia, 

In 1895 Mr. Lee gave up his New York City office and opened one 
in Haverstraw. Pie promptly identified himself with the Democratic 
organization of Rockland County, and has been honored with appoint- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 329 

ments as delegate to all classes of party conventions. In 1899 Mr. Lee 
was elected District Attorney of Rockland County, and his service was 
so efficient that he was re-elected at the close of his term by a majority 
three times as large as that he received at his first election. He is still 
the incumljent of the office, in which he has given a model of a con- 
scientious, clear and effective public service. 

Mr. Lee is a member of the Haverstraw Club, the Masonic frater- 
nity, the Order of Elks, the Theta Delta Chi Society of Hamilton Col- 
lege, the Rockland County Bar Association and the New York State 
Bar Association. Mr. Lee is also a member of the Stony Point Com- 
mittee of the American Scenic and Historic Preservation Society, and 
he was an important factor in the movement to have the old Stony 
Point battlefield made a State reservation. He has been from the first 
one of the committee in charge of this historic spot, where "Mad An- 
thony" Wayne's victory thrilled the hearts of our Revolutionary fathers 
on that July day in 1779. 

Mr. Lee is a citizen of great public spirit and one who is held in high 
honor by all who know him. 



Ffarrington M. Thompson, of White Plains, is one of the promi- 
nent and influential Democrats of Westchester County. He has done 
good work on Village and Town committees, and has been a delegate 
to all classes of Democratic conventions except State and national. 

In 1893 he was elected School Commissioner, and in 1896 he ac- 
cepted his party's nomination for Surrogate, but the big Democratic 
slump in that year gave the Republicans a landslide. In 1902 he was 
nominated for Supervisor, and the result was a tie vote between Mr. 
Thompson and his Republican opponent, although the town has a nor- 
mal Republican majority of 600. His opponent was also the incumbent, 
and there being no election he held over. The following year Mr. 
Thompson was renominated and this time he was elected by a hand- 
some majority. 

He is a member of the Masons, the Elks, the United Workmen and 
the Westchester County Bar Association. 



00 



:!o THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



Hon. Aeram Bellixger Weaver, a prominent lawyer of Utica, 
Oneida County, with interest as a farmer; Member of the Assembly, 
1863-1865, and in 1865 Democratic candidate for Speaker; an eminent 
educator; School Commissioner, 1856- 1860; trustee of Cornell Uni- 
versity, 1865-1874; State Superintendent of Public Instruction, April, 
1868, to April, 1874; Democratic candidate, nominated by acclamation, 
for ]\Iember of Congress, in 1870; again nominated as Democratic 
candidate for State Senator in 1885 ; for Presidential Elector in 1900, 
and for Congress in 1902. 

Mr. Weaver was born, December 18, 1830, in Deerfield, N. Y., the 
home town of Horatio Seymour, Governor, 1853 and 1854, and 1863 
and 1864. He was educated in the public schools of Utica and the 
Utica Academy and at Hamilton College, from which he was gradu- 
ated A.P>. in the class of 185 1. Admitted to the Bar in 1853, he en- 
gaged in practice in New York, 1865 -1868. 

The intellectual bent which strongly characterized Mr. Weaver 
from his early years brought him to the front in educational matters 
and made him especially an educator for almost half a century. As 
early as 1856 he had been appointed School Commissioner for the First 
District of Oneida County, and in 1857 he was elected to the same office 
for a term of three years. 

But marked legal ability and special interest in public affairs, to- 
gether with intelligent appreciation of, and loyal adherence to, Demo- 
cratic principles marked him as a candidate for political distinction 
under Democratic auspices. He was put in nomination in 1861 for 
jMember of the Assembly from the First District of Oneida County and 
came within a few votes of success at the polls. Success with the people 
it was in fact, and upon a second nomination in the fall of 1862 he was 
elected and served for the years 1863, 1864 and 1865. It was a re- 
markable tribute to his qualifications as a leader and his executive gifts 
that in his second year as an Assemblyman he was tilie candidate of his 
party for Speaker of the Assembly. 

In the direction of the educational interests of the State Mr. Weaver 
was elected, in 1865, a trustee of Cornell University and served in that 
position until 1874, through a very important period in the development 
of that institution. The appointment under which he served from 1868 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 331 

as an examiner of candidates for admission to the Bar was a recogni- 
tion both of his distinction as a lawyer and as an educator. The educa- 
tional leadership for which he was so eminently qualified pointed him 
out to the Legislature for election, on April 7, 1868, as Superintendent 
of Public Instruction, and this office he held, by re-election, until April, 
1874. This office carried with it the position of membership in the 
Board of Regents and the Board of Trustees of Cornell University (to 
which he had already been elected) of Syracuse University and of the 
State Normal School at Albany. 

After his retirement in 1874 from the office of Superintendent of 
Public Instruction, Mr. Weaver stood in the front rank of candidates 
for the highest office within the gift of his party. In 1870, during his 
first term as Superintendent of Public Instruction, he had been nomi- 
nated by acclamation for Representative in Congress from Oneida 
County, but shared the defeat of his party at the polls. In 1885 he was 
nominated against his protest for State Senator from Oneida County, 
but not elected. He was again nominated in 1900 as Presidential 
Elector, and in 1902 was nominated for Congress, but declined to run. 

Mr, Weaver has long been a conspicuous representative of Utica 
and Oneida County Democrats in party conventions from the lowest to 
the highest. He has been in the first rank as a Democratic leader for 
nearly half a century. 



Daniel D. Clearwater, one of the wheel-horses of tlie Ulster 
County Democracy, was born at Gardiner, in that county. May 6. 1842. 
He was educated in the public schools of his native county. He learned 
the trade of carriage-maker, and in 1872 he established a carriage 
manufactory in Gardiner, which he has conducted successfully tO' the 
present time. 

Mr. Clearwater has always been an ardent and enthusiastic Demo- 
cratic worker, faithful and loyal in every campaign. He was elected 
Constable in 1887 and has been regularly re-elected, without a break. 
He has done much party service in conventions and on committees and 
is a political power in his section of the county. 



2,^2 • THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Henry McNamee. One of the rare records of longf-continued 
official service and repeated re-elections is that of Henry McNamee, 
one of the leading Democrats of Ulster County. Mr. McNamee was 
born in ^^^lrtsboro, Sullivan County, August 2Tf, 1854. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Sullivan County and finished his school 
training at St. Francis Xavier's College, in New York City. He then 
accepted a position as clerk in a general country store at Eddyville, 
Ulster County, and by industry and thrift accumulated enough capital 
to buy out his employer. This was in 1887, when he was only thirty- 
three years old, and it is a very rare record for a clerk to save enough 
to purchase the business where he is employed at so early an age. 
He still continues his original business, but also has branched out 
into other lines. He has become a contractor, owning two quarries, 
two stone crushers and machinery, also an ice business. He holds a 
contract to build stone roads through the State. Mr. McNamee is a 
member of the K. of C, the A. O. H. and the A. O. F. 

His first political office was Police Justice of the town of Ulster, 
when the office was created, and he still fills that position. In 1887 he 
was elected Supervisor, and he has also held that office ever since, a 
record of continuous service that has rarely been equaled in the State. 
He has been Chairman of the board three times and has always served 
on the most important committees. As an enterprising and public- 
spirited citizen Mr. ]\IcNamee has been heartily in favor of the good 
roads movement, and has served as a delegate to the Good Roads con- 
ventions held in Albany for the last four years. He is a member of the 
Executive Committee of that body. So prominent and efficient has he 
been in this movement that in 1901 he was appointed by Governor 
Odell one of the delegates from this State to the meeting of the Inter- 
national Good Roads Association at the Pan-American Exposition at 
Buffalo. In 1894 Mr. McNamee was elected Member of Assembly 
from the First Assembly District of Ulster County, being the last 
Democrat elected up to this time from that strong Republican District. 
He was a delegate to the Democratic State Convention which nomi- 
nated Roswell P. Flower for Governor. Mr. McNamee has also ren- 
dered his party valuable service as member of the County Committee, 
where he has been one of the Executive Committee for six years. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 333 

Andrew L. F. Deyo was born in Gardiner, Ulster County, March 
3. 1845. He was educated in the pubhc schools of his native town and 
then went to work on his father's farm, one mile from the village, and 
has lived there all his life. He has also given much attention to fruit 
growing. He belongs to the Knights of Pythias. 

Always an active Democrat, he was elected Supervisor of Gardiner 
in 1873, and he held this office, with some intervals, for nine years. In 
189 1 Mr. Deyo was elected County Treasurer and held the office the 
full term of three years. He was renominated and ran 500 votes ahead 
of his ticket, but the tide against the party that year was too strong for 
even his popularity to overcome it. Mr. Deyo has performed long and 
valuable service on party committees and has been a delegate to many 
conventions. He is always at the caucus and is a campaign hustler. 

He is not only prominent in his party, but he is one of the men to 
whom it owes so much of its strength with the people. 



Frank J. Wilkins was born in the town of Shawangunk, Ulster 
County, January 24, 1869. He received his educational training in the 
public schools of his native town, and afterwards attended a business 
college at Newburgh. His first employment was with the Borden Con- 
densed Milk Company, at Shawangimk, where he remained four years, 
leaving this position to accept an offer of a clerkship from Park & Til- 
ford, of New York City. He left this employment after one year, and 
in 1890, when he became of age, he established a large general store in 
the village of Wallkill, Ulster County, where he has continued, doing a 
prosperous business until the present time. He is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias, 

Mr. Wilkins has always been a straight and stalwart Democrat and 
active in party work. He has served as Inspector and Clerk of Elec- 
tions for eight years. In 1897 he was elected Town Clerk and has been 
re-elected at each succeeding election, being still the incumbent of that 
office. As delegate to party conventions and as member and Chairman 
of Democratic committees he has rendered his party very effective ser- 
vice for many years. 



334 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

^^'ILLIS E. \"uNK, of Dryden, is among the most faithful and influ- 
ential Democratic workers in Tompkins County. He was born in 
Onondaga County, July 23, 1874, and received his education in the 
public schools and at the Dryden High School. He has been a merchant 
since he became old enough to go into business, and has been continu- 
ously located at Dryden. 

He belongs to the Odd Fellows, Alaccabees and Golden Seal. 

He is a Democrat from conviction and always staunch and true, in 
spite of his hopelessly Republican environment. He has served as dele- 
gate to Democratic conventions, and in 1903 he was appointed a mem- 
ber of the Democratic County Committee. 



Vv'iLLiAM !M. CameroNj a prominent attorney and leading Demo- 
crat of \\^arren County, is a native of that county, having been born at 
Thurman, July 2y, i860. He obtained his literary education in the 
public schools and at the Glens Falls Academy. When his school days 
were over he began the study of law with Judge A. D. Waite, of Fort 
Edward, continuing his studies there from 1880 to 1883, when he 
spent an additional year under the instruction of Hon. C. R. Paris, of 
Sandy Hill. 

He began the practice of his profession in 1884 at Glens Falls. The 
following year he became a member of the firm of Cameron & ]\Ic- 
Arthur, continuing this connection until 1889, since which time he has 
been without a partner. 

Mr. Cameron is a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity, 
having taken the whole of the thirty-two degrees. He also belongs to 
the Odd Fellows, the \\''oodmen of America, the New York Bar Asso- 
ciation and to the Glens Falls Club, of which he is a director. 

In politics Mr. Cameron has always been an earnest and influential 
Democrat and a power in the party organization. He was elected Vil- 
lage Clerk in 1889 and Supervisor in the following year. In the same 
year he was elected Memter of Assembly from that overwhelmingly 
Republican county, and in the session of 1891 he served with both credit 
and distinction, being a member of the Judiciary and the Public Lands 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 335 

and Forestry committees. In 1898 he was again elected Village Clerk, 
serving two years, and in 1900 he was appointed Corporation Counsel, 
in which position he also served two years. He was appointed a dele- 
gate to the Democratic State Convention in 1892, and has rendered his 
party great service on various committees, especially the Democratic 
County Committee, of which he was the Chairman for several years. 



Michael S. Cummings, for a quarter of a century Town Clerk of 
Saratoga Springs, and one of the best known and most popular Demo- 
crats in his section of the State, was born at Troy, N. Y., February 18, 
1855, the son of Sylvester and Jane E. (Allen) Cummings. In i860, 
when but five years old, he removed with his parents to Saratoga 
Springs, where he has since resided. He received his education in the 
public schools. His first employment was as a dipper boy at some of 
the famous mineral springs of Saratoga, and next engaged as clerk and 
later manager of a news store. In 1878 he entered the law office of Carr 
& Peters and became clerk for Mr. Peters, who had just been elected 
Surrogate of Saratoga County. In March, 1880, Mr. Cummings ac- 
cepted the Democratic nomination for Town Clerk and was triumphant- 
ly elected. With only one break, of a single year, he has held this office 
continuously, to the present time. Many years he has had no opponent, 
and in most of the others his opposition has been, purely nominal. Re- 
publicans as well as Democrats giving him a cordial support. This is 
a high tribute to the remarkable efficiency of Mr. Cummings as a public 
official. One of his innovations was to keep regular office hours. An- 
other was to have all the official books and papers in the custody of his 
office in complete shape at all times for ready reference. Both in the 
special duties of his office and as a member, cx-officio, of various official 
boards, Mr. Cummings is a model public officer. He has been the secre- 
tary of the Jeffersonian Club ever since its organization in 1881. He 
once accepted the Democratic nomination for County Clerk and made a 
great run. Mr. Cummings married, November 23, 1881, Miss Kittie 
M. Brown, of Albany. They have two daughters, Millie and Marie, 
and one son, Gerald. 



336 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Frank ^^'ESSELLS has for nearly a score of years been an active and 
prominent Democratic worker in the village of Peekskill and the 
county of Westchester. He has rendered valuable service as member 
of the Town and Village committees, and has served as delegate to all 
classes of local Democratic conventions. 

He was defeated one year for Village Trustee, but pluckily tried it 
again the next year and was elected. So satisfactory had his work 
proved that he was accorded two re-elections. He had the same ex- 
perience in connection with the office of Receiver of Taxes, being de- 
feated the first time he ran and elected the second. 

j\Ir. Wessells is a member of the Masonic fraternity, of the Order 
of Elks, of the Odd Fellows, of the Red Men and many others, includ- 
ing the Royal Arcanum. Mr. Wessells has also been a member of the 
Cortlandt Hook and Ladder Company for twenty-one years and has 
served in every executive office of the company. 



Daniel Gray. During the last two years there has arisen to the 
surface in Democratic circles in Syracuse a man of great force of char- 
acter — a man who has done something and in his doing he has accom- 
plished much for the party organization. This man is Daniel Gray, 
President and founder of the Democratic Club which bears his name. 
The club has a membership of five hundred prominent party workers 
in Syracuse, and it did much in the last Presidential and State cam- 
paign. 

Mr. Gray is a native of Utica, Oneida County. He was educated 
in the public and private schools of that city, and soon after he com- 
pleted his education he took up a commercial life. He has stuck to it 
ever since and is one of the best known commercial men who make a 
tour of the Eastern States. 

Mr. Gray is an enthusiastic Democrat and has worked in season 
and out of season for the Democracy without any hope of emolument 
of reward other than the satisfaction of having worked faithfully for 
his party. This Mr. Gray has done well. He formed a Democratic 
Club in Syracuse in the summer of 1904 and so enthusiastically did he 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 337 

go about the work of organization that he was unanimously elected its 
President, every member insisting upon his accepting the honor. 

He is a member of the United Commercial Travelers' Association, 
K. of C, C. M. B. A. and C. B. L. 

Mr. Gray first became active in Democratic politics in his home 
county in 1884. In that important campaign he acquired a training 
that has assisted in his later success. At that time he was proprietor of 
the Park House in Whitesboro and raised a liberty-pole in front of the 
hotel to Cleveland and Hendricks, the first Democratic liberty-pole ever 
raised in the town. 

In the same year he was appointed Deputy-Sheriff of Oneida 
County as a compensation for having carried the town of Whitestown 
for the Sheriff, overcoming a Republican majority of 250 . 

In 1886 he was elected Collector for the town of Whitestown and 
served one term. 

He has been delegate to all classes of minor conventions, and in 
1900 was a delegate to the State Convention. He has been also a mem- 
ber of the Democratic Town Committee of Whitestown. 

Mr. Gray has ever given loyal service to the organization, holding 
faithful to the principles of Democracy through all its vicissitudes. 



RoLLiN L. Weaver, of the town of Dryden, is a native of that 
town, in which he was born, August 24, 1843. He was educated in the 
public schools of Dryden and afterward supplemented this at Syracuse. 

He chose the profession of dentist and began to practice in Ithaca 
in 1867. He remained there five years, when he returned to Dryden, 
where he has continued until the present time, more than thirty years. 
He belongs to the Odd Fellows' organization. 

In politics Mr. Weaver has always been a strong Democrat, and his 
party has frequently honored him by appointment as delegate to Demo- 
cratic conventions and by election to public office. He served nine 
years as Water Commissioner and was elected Secretary and Treasurer 
of the board. He has also performed long and valuable service on 
party committees. 



338 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Edmuxd AIoran, long one of the most popular hotel men along the 
Hudson River, was born at \\^oodstock, Ulster County, October 22, 
1 87 1. He received his educational training in the public schools, after 
which he engaged in the hotel business in his native village. He con- 
tinued there five 3Tars, after which he conducted the Eagle Hotel at 
Kingston two years, and then opened a liquor and cafe business at 
Saugerties and remained there two years. In 1897 he took charge of 
the Eagle Hotel in the same village, where he still remains, doing a 
flourishing and profitable business. 

!Mr. I\Ioran is a member of the Masonic fraternity and also of the 
Order of Elks. 

He has always been a strong Democrat and a loyal worker in the 
organization. He has never held nor sought public office of any kind, 
his private business keeping him fully engaged, but he has served as a 
delegate to party conventions and is always zealous in the cause of 
Democracy. 



Hon. James J. Barrett. It has been largely due to the efforts and 
influence of Hon. James J. Barrett, of Syracuse, that tremendous 
Democratic majorities have been rolled up in the western end of the 
city. Mr. Barrett is one of the youngest Democrats in Syracuse, but 
he possesses a large degree of influence with the voters and he has done 
great work in accomplishing victories for the party, both by his per- 
sonal efforts in poll work and also by his public speeches. jMr. Barrett 
is one of the most eloquent orators the party has in Syracuse. 

Mr. Barrett was born in Syracuse on April 18, 1877. He was edu- 
cated in the common schools, Syracuse High School and the College of 
Law of Syracuse University, from which he graduated with honors in 
1897. He was admitted to the Bar in 1898 and in the following year 
formed a law partnership with T. Aaron Levy. He is now a member 
of the firm of LcA'y, Barrett & Schlaeter. 

At an early age Mr. Barrett took a deep personal interest in Demo- 
cratic politics and assisted in whatever way he could in the election of 
Democratic candidates for office. His services to the party were recog- 
nized during the term of Hon. James K. McGuire as Mayor, and Mr. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 339 

Barrett was appointed Assistant Corporation Counsel by Hon. M. Z. 
Haven, head of the legal department of the city, Mr. Barrett held that 
office during the years 1900 and 1901 and was of great assistance to 
the city in the trial and preparation of cases. 

In 1903 Mr. Barrett was accorded higher honors at the hands of 
his party, receiving the appointment of Assistant Deputy Attorney- 
General under Hon. John Cunneen. Mr. Barrett has done efficient 
work in the higher department and is extremely popular among State 
officials. 

Mr. Barrett is a m.ember of the Knights of Columbus, A. O. H., 
C. B. L., C. M. B. A., Foresters, and Knights of St. John, and in those 
organizations he has held many important offices, 

Mr. Barrett is a Democrat of the sturdy and loyal type. He has a 
host of friends and he enjoys their respect and confidence to a remarka- 
ble degree. 



Bertrand a. Stebeins, farmer and fruit grower of Oneida, Madi- 
son County; Alderman from the First Ward of Oneida, 1901, 1902 and 
1903. 

Mr. Stebbins was born in Oneida, December 21, 1868. He was 
educated in the public schools and the Oneida High School and gradu- 
ated from the Utica Business College in 1889. His start in business 
was that of a commercial traveler in the West, but after some experi- 
ence in this direction he returned to the East and established himself 
on a farm with special attention to fruit growing. 

Mr. Stebbins has served as delegate to City, County and Congres- 
sional conventions, and has been Inspector, Poll and Ballot Clerk for a 
number of years. In the spring of 1901 he was elected Alderman for a 
short term, and in the fall of the same year he was re-elected for a full 
term of two years. 

He is a member of the Odd Fellows. In his position as a leading 
citizen and as a prominent Democrat Mr. Stebbins has enjoyed uni- 
versal esteem, as well as party confidence. 



340 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hon. John M. Digney, for many years the County Clerk of West- 
chester County, has long been one of the most influential Democrats in 
the county. He has performed long and valuable service on party com- 
mittees and has been honored with appointments as delegate to all 
classes of Democratic conventions, including both State and National. 

Tn the 5'ear 1885 Mr. Digney was appointed County Clerk of West- 
chester County to fill a vacancy, and at the November election in the 
same year he was elected for a full term. So efficient was his service in 
that highly important position that he was re-elected continuously for 
three more terms. 

]\Ir. Digney is a member of the Order of Elks, of the Foresters of 
America, of the Turn Verein, of the Knights of Columbus, of the 
Exempt Firemen's Association, of the Westchester County Bar Asso- 
ciation and of the New York City Bar Association. 



George E. Johnston was born In Gardiner, Ulster County, Sep- 
tember 19, 1852. He was educated in the public schools and began his 
business career as clerk in the store of Hasbrouck & Bro., in New Paltz. 
Here he remained eleven years, when he went into business for him- 
self, opening a general store at Liberty ville. In 1880 he returned to 
New Paltz, having boug^ht out a drug store, which he has successfully 
conducted up to the present time. 

IMr. Johnston belongs to the Masons and the Odd Fellows, to the 
Excelsior Hook and Ladder Company, and he has served as the Secre- 
tary and Treasurer of the Bradhead Driving Park Association from the 
time of its organization, in 189T. 

Mr. Johnston has always been an active and loyal Democrat and an 
influential worker for his party's success. When the village of New 
Paltz was incorporated, in 1886, he became the Corporation Treasurer 
anrl held that office with great acceptability for ten years. He was 
elected Town Clerk in 1898, and has been continuously re-elected until 
the present time. In 1901 he was also appointed Superintendent of 
Streets. He has ser\-ed on political committees for many years and has 
frequently been appointed a delegate to Democratic conventions. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 341 

George T. Roddy, well known in the politics of Rensselaer County, 
was born in Troy, January 6, 1877. He received his education in the 
public schools. Fie began the study of law, but abandoned this and 
engaged in blacksmithing and carriage making with his father, who 
retired from business in 1900 and was succeeded by his sons. 

Mr. Roddy is a veteran of the Spanish War, in which he served as 
a sergeant in Company C, Second Regiment, New York Volunteers. 
He continues his connection with his old company, and has been pro- 
moted to the rank of Second Lieutenant. He is also a member of the 
Foresters of America. 

He has always taken an active part in the Democratic organization 
and is a strict party man, always ready for service and doing effective 
work. He has been a delegate to many Democratic conventions, has 
been Chairman of the Second Ward Committee and an efficient member 
of the Democratic County Committee. 



( 

Otto Pfaff, M.D., physician of Oneida, Madison County; Health 

Officer of Oneida for three years, and Mayor 1902 and 1903. 

Dr. Pfaff was born in the town of Crogan, Lewis County, January 
9, 1862. He was educated in the Carthage Union Free School and the 
University Medical College of New York, and began, practice in Turon, 
Lewis County. After three years he removed, in the spring of 1890, to 
Oneida and became permanently settled. 

Dr. Pfaff added to professional success in Oneida a position as a 
leading citizen, which caused him to be selected as Trustee of the village 
for two years and Health Officer for three years. And that these evi- 
dences of public respect and confidence were justified by the event of 
his services was proved by the fact that in 1902 he was elected Mayor 
of the city of Oneida for a term of two years. 

The distinctly party record of Dr. Pfaff shows that he has served 
as delegate to County conventions and to the State convention at Sara- 
toga in 1902. 

His memberships include the Odd Fellows, Masons, Elks, Macca- 
bees and Knights of Pythias. 



342 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hon. S. a. Beardsley. The Democratic political leader in Oneida 
County is the Hon. Samuel A. Beardsley, son of the distinguished 
lawver, the Hon. Arthur M. Beardsley, and grandson of the Hon. 
Samuel Beardsley, one of the most eminent jurists of his time. Samuel 
A. Beardsley, since his advent into public life, has been a potent factor 
in Democratic politics in New York State, and since he took the reins 
in Oneida County that once rock-ribbed Republican stronghold has 
been converted into a Democratic stamping ground and to-day the 
majority of the county officials are Democrats, while the government 
of Utica is entirely in the hands of the Democrats, which result reflects 
the marvelous political sagacity of leader Beardsley, who has exercised 
scrupulous care in managing the campaigns in Oneida County, 

Judge Beardsley was born in Utica, December i, 1856. He was 
educated in the public schools and in Williston Seminary, East Hamp- 
ton, ]\lass. After leaving college he studied law in the office of his 
father when the firm was Beardsley, Cook & Burdick. He was ad- 
mitted to the practice of law in 1879, and thereupon was admitted to 
the firm. In 1884 the firm name was changed to Beardsley & Beardsley. 

Always a Democrat of the strictest kind. Judge Beardsley was 
early found battling in the ranks of the party workers. His natural 
aptitude for politics made him sought after by the party leaders, who 
regarded the young man as one of the brilliant young lights in the 
party. In 1S86 he was nominated by the Democratic City Convention 
for Special City Judge and was elected by 1,021 majority over Louis 
Goodier. He made a splendid record on the Bench, and in 1888 was 
nominated for City Judge. He defeated Henry F. Coupe, the Indepen- 
dent candidate, by 1,144. 

By this time Judge Beardsley had gained a State reputation and in 
1892 Governor Flower appointed him Railroad Commissioner. Judge 
Beardsley resigned his position on the Bench. He was a very useful 
member of the Railroad Commission, and many of the practical results 
that accrued during his membership on the board were the work of his 
sound legal mind. 

Judge Beardsley served as Secretary of the Democratic State Com- 
mittee from 1889 to 1893 ^"<^' ^^'"^^ ^ member of the committee, being 
the .State Committeeman from the Oneida County District. He was 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 343 

chairman of the Oneida County Democratic Committee in 1886, 1887 
and 1888. 

For several years Judge Beardsley has devoted much of his time to 
his extensive law husiness in New York. He is the senior member of 
the well-known Wall Street firm of Beardsley & Hemmens, with offices 
at No. 54 Wall street. He is counsel for the corporation that controls 
the gas and electricity contract in the city of New York. 

Judge Beardsley stands high among the Democratic leaders in New 
York State. He is a always consulted in matters of importance and is 
never absent from any of the big gatherings. 

Judge Beardsley married a daughter of the late Hon. Thomas Hop- 
per, one of the most prominent men in Utica. 



Charles A. Richardson. Few young men in Syracuse have come 
to the front in Democratic politics as rapidly as has Charles A. Rich- 
ardson, the leader of the Fourteenth Ward. Mr. Richardson, who is 
the manager of the Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company in Syracuse, is 
widely known as a fighter for principle, and he is generally found on 
the winning side. He has an engaging personality and makes friends 
easily and keeps them. 

Mr. Richardson accepted the nomination for State Senator in 1901, 
despite the wishes of his friends, and, although he was leading a hope- 
less cause, he did it for the sake of his party and hundreds of compli- 
mentary votes were cast for him. 

Mr. Richardson is a man who believes in party organization and 
party leaders, but he steadfastly maintains that the people are the court 
of last resort — to them should be entrusted the work of selecting candi- 
dates for ofiice. He is independent in thought and action and is a 
worthy exponent of the idea that the young man in politics must be 
heard and taken care of when the offices are distributed. 

Mr. Richardson is a pleasing public speaker and is always heard 
with delight in campaigns. He is a member of LeMoyne Council, 
Knights of Columbus, and is one of the most prominent members of 
that order. 



344 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hon. IMartin F. Dillon. One of the noblest types of Democrats 
in Xew York State, one who is known for his Democratic patriotism, 
is Hon. J\lartin F. Dihon, of Skaneateles, who, at present, is connected 
with the Attorney-General's office in Albany. Judge Dillon is a splen- 
did type of citizenship and his Democracy is as pure as his citizenship. 

Judge Dillon is a native of the town of Elbridge, Onondaga County, 
where he was born on January ii, 1867. He was educated in the 
JMonroe Collegiate Institute and in the State Normal School at Albany. 
He began the study of law in the office of C. R. Mulford, Skaneateles, 
in 1888, and was admitted to the Bar in 1891. He immediately began 
the practice of law in Skaneateles. He has always had a large and 
lucrative practice and stands high at the Bar of Onondaga. He has 
had many important cases in the highest courts of the State, including 
the celebrated one of the Water Works Company against the Village of 
Skaneateles, which involved the fine legal question whether a village 
which had granted a franchise for a water system to a private corpora- 
tion could afterward establish a competing plant of its owm, without 
first acquiring the franchise it had given. The decision favored the 
village of Skaneateles, for which Judge Kellar w^as counsel. 

Judge Dillon has served as Attorney for the village of Skaneateles 
for four years and as Justice of the Peace for twelve consecutive years, 
in both positions receiving warm commendation for the able way in 
which he discharged the duties imposed upon him. In 1898 he was 
placed in nomination for the office of District Attorney of the county 
of Onondaga, and, despite the tremendous majority rolled up for the 
Republican candidates, he ran ahead of his ticket, hundreds of compli- 
mentary votes having been cast for him. In 1902 he was nominated 
for Member of Congress by the Democrats of the Onondaga-Madison 
District and received a very flattering vote. 

AMien Hon. John Cunneen assumed the duties of the Attorney- 
General's office he selected Judge Dillon as a member of his stafif and 
he discharged acceptably a large number of important duties assigned 
to him. 

Judge Dillon, in 1892. married Miss xA.nna McCarthy, of Skane- 
ateles Falls. He enjoys the esteem and respect of his fellow-citizens, 
irrespective of their political creed. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 345 

Judge Dillon is one of the most eloquent and effective campaign 
orators in Central New York and is in great demand in campaigns and 
at various public functions. 

He is a member O'f the County and State Bar associations and a 
practitioner in the United States Supreme Court. Fie also holds mem- 
bership in the K. of C. and is Chairman of the Law Committee of New 
York Grand Council, C. M. B. A. 



Edward C. Buchenan has for a quarter of a century been one 
of the active and influential Democratic Party workers in Rockland 
County. In 1890 he was elected Town Clerk of the town of Clarks- 
town, and through successive re-elections he has continued to hold this 
oflice until the present time. This unusual record is the more remarka- 
ble from the fact that each of his many re-elections has been by an in- 
creased majority. 

Mr. Buchenan is a member of the Masonic fraternity, of the Odd 
Fellows, of the Red Men, of the Elks and of Engine Company No. i, 
of which he served as Foreman for many years. He is a prosperous 
and highly respected citizen and stands high in the community. 



Theodore DeNoyelles has for many years been an active and 
influential factor in the politics of Rockland County. 

Always a Democrat since he became of age, he has been a valuable 
worker in the party organization. He has been a delegate to all classes 
of local and district party conventions, and was prominently mentioned 
for delegate to the Democratic State Convention of 1902. In 1900 Mr. 
DeNoyelles was elected Justice of the Peace, and his efficient and satis- 
factory service in that oflice secured him a re-election. 

He is a prominent member and is treasurer of the Foresters of 
America, a member of the Independent Order of Red Men, Chief of the 
New City Fire Department and a member of the Elks of the Haver- 
straw Lodge. He is an excellent citizen and is highly respected. 



346 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

George Zett. One of the men who has distinguished himself in 
business circles in Syracuse is George Zett, whose brewing business is 
one of the largest in the central part of the State. Mr. Zett was born 
in Bavaria in 1843. His father was one of the famous brewers in Ger- 
many and the son naturally took to the business, in w^hich he was thor- 
oughly educated in all its branches. 

]\Ir. Zett has been connected with tlie brewing industry in Syracuse 
for twenty years and has made a splendid reputation. He is noted for 
his business honesty and integrity. In politics he has always been a 
consistent and loyal Democrat. He has been a heavy contributor to all- 
of the campaigns of his party in Onondaga County. Mr. Zett has 
never been a seeker for office, preferring to be an adviser to his party. 
In 1866 ]\Ir. Zett was married to Miss Anna Droessler. The Zett fam- 
ily is one of the most prominent in Syracuse. 



Hon. Michael J. Walsh, who has the distinction of breaking the 
long line of Republican IMayors of Yonkers, has long been an active 
force in Westchester County politics. He has performed great service 
in organization work, having been a member of party committees, in- 
cluding two terms on the Democratic State Committee, for many years. 
He has also been a delegate to numberless party conventions, frequently 
presiding over their deliberations. 

In 1897 he was elected Alderman of the Fourth Ward and he was 
re-elected in 1899. Three of the four years of his service he was elected 
chairman of the board. 

In 1 90 1 he achieved his great triumph of election as Mayor of Yon- 
kers, and in that strong Republican city he was beaten by but one hun- 
dred and fifteen votes for re-election two years later, running far ahead 
of his ticket. 

Mr. W^alsh belongs to the C. B. L., K. of C, A. O. H., I. O. R. M., 
Royal Arcajium, ]\IcKlern Woodmen, Order of Elks, Order of Eagles, 
Clan-na-Gael, Foresters, Hudson Hose Company, City Club of Yon- 
kers, Yonkers Choral ^Society, Exempt Firemen's Benevolent Associa- 
tion and the Catholic Club of the City of New York. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 347 

P. J. Flannery, one of the active and earnest Democratic workers 
of Westchester County, began his political life as a member of Tam- 
many Hall, in New York City, where he resided at the time, but he 
resigned his membership when he removed to Yonkers, about the year 
1892, 

He at once identified himself with the Democracy of Westchester 
County. Mr. Flannery is a business man and his interest in politics 
grows out of his public spirit and his desire for the best government, 
which, in his opinion, will be promoted by the success of his party. In 
1896 he was appointed a member of the Board of Water Commission- 
ers and through successive reappointments he served in this position 
five years, when the demands of his private business compelled him 
to resign. 

Mr. Flannery is a member of the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic 
Benevolent Legion, the Order of Elks and the Yonkers City Club. 



Willis C. Hine, a prominent contractor and one of the leading 
Democrats of Tompkins County, was born at Enfield, May 9. 1867. 
He was educated in the public schools of his native town, and after his 
school days were over he came from the home farm to Ithaca, and after 
learning the trade he began business as a contractor and builder. He 
was successful from the first, being very popular personally and a mas- 
ter of his trade. He soon had a large shop and a lar^ge force of work- 
men and did an extensive and profitable business. 

He belongs to the Masonic order, the Elks, the Knights of Pythias, 
the Red Men and the Royal Arcanum. 

Mr. Hine is an energetic and congenial man and has troops of 
friends. In politics he is an aggressive fighter, and has but few equals 
as an effective party worker. He was elected Supervisor of the Second 
V;''ard in 1892 and was re-elected in 1893, failing of another election by 
only two votes, and that in one of the strongest Republican wards in 
the city. 

There are doubtless many political honors awaiting him if he shall 
care to accept them. 



348 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Peter F. Ryan-. For a score of years an active and efficient Demo- 
cratic worker in W^estchester County, Peter F. Ryan is a veteran in his 
party's service. For many years he has served on the City and County 
committees and is a power in the pohtics of both city and county. 

]\Ir. Ryan is a business man, with extensive private interests, and 
he has not only never aspired to pohtical office, but he has persistently 
declined all offers made in that direction. As a leader and a worker, 
intensely interested in his party's success, he is, however, a power in 
every campaign. 

He is a member of the Order oi Elks and of the Ancient Order of 
Hibernians. 



Edward J. Heffernan. One of the Democratic leaders in Sara- 
toga Springs for many years is Edward J. Heffernan, prominent alike 
in business, official and political life. He was born in the village which 
has always been his home, August 29, 1856, the son of Peter and Sarah 
(Gunning) Heffernan. His maternal uncle, John Gunning, Esq., was 
a prominent attorney of his day. 

Edward J. Heffernan learned the printer's trade in his boyhood, 
and in the days of hand composition, before the advent of the type- 
setting machines, he was one of the most rapid compositors in this part 
of the country. He began in 1869 and continued until 1889, working 
the greater part of the time on the Daily Saratogian. In 1889 h^ ^^^^ 
"the case" to engage in the bottling business. Here his energy and 
enterprise met with swift recognition and prompt success, and he has 
built up one of the largest and most lucrative trades in his line in that 
part of the State. 

He is a member of the Order of Elks, the Ancient Order of Hiber- 
nians, the C. M. B. A. and the Typographical Union. 

Mr. Heffernan has always been a straight, sterling and strenuous 
Democrat, and he is a power in the organization. He served on the 
Board of Excise Commissioners for many years, and has also been for 
several terms a member of the village Board of Trustees. He is a strong 
man, with brains and courage, and his gift for leadership brings him 
alwavs to the front in every enterprise in which he is engaged. He has 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 349 

been a delegate to the Democratic State Convention and also to many 
other conventions, and he has been recognized as one of the most influ- 
ential Democrats in Saratoga County. 

Mr. Heffernan married Miss Catherine Farrell, April 24, 1878. 
He is very popular, both socially and in business, and has a large army 
of devoted friends. 



Louis Hahn is one of the best-known Democrats in Rockland 
County. He has always been conspicuously efficient in organization 
work, having given much valuable time, and having rendered much 
valuable service as member of the Town and County committees and as 
delegate to Democratic Town and County conventions. 

Mr. Hahn has always had so much business of his own to attend to 
that he has refused all solicitations to accept nominations to public 
office, but as a party worker he has been for many years one of the most 
popular and effective Democrats in the county. Personally he is very 
highly respected, popular and prosperous. 



Edward M. Ringo, one of the earnest and influential Democrats 
of Wyoming County, was born in that county, in the town of Pike, and 
has always lived in that town. He received his educational training in 
the public schools. Mr. Ringo is a farmer by occupation and owns one 
of the finest farms in Wyoming County. He is also the owner of a 
large flour and feed mill. He is an enterprising and public-spirited 
citizen of large means and high standing in the community. 

In politics Mr. Ringo is a staunch Democrat, a firm believer in the 
principles of his party and a loyal and active supporter of its nomina- 
tions. He has frequently been honored by appointment as delegate to 
Democratic County conventions. He was appointed Postmaster under 
President Cleveland and served with credit to himself and satisfaction 
to the people for six years. 



350 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



JOHN H. CUSACK. 

John H. Cusack, for many years a prominent member of the Tam- 
many organization of New York City, was born in the old Sixth Ward 
of Brooklyn in 1847. Soon afterwards his parents moved tO' New York 
City, and there ^Ir. Ciisack was educated in the public schools. At the 
outbreak of the war, when he was fourteen years old, he left school and 
enlisted in the nayy, but his father refused to allow so young a boy to 
serve. During the draft riots Mr. Cusack was detailed in Orison 
Blunt's office in City Hall Park, where the draft drawings were in 
progress. 

After the war had closed Mr. Cusack engaged in the drug business 
with Demas Barnes, a Congressman from the Twelfth District of 
Brooklyn. It is an interesting coincidence that the drug house was 
located at 21 Park Row, on the same site in which Mr. Cusack now has 
his office in the big Park Row building. In those days the Demas 
Barnes baseball team was the crack amateur team of the city. Under 
Mr. Cusack's guidance as Captain they defeated teams from the Stock 
and Produce exchanges, as well as many other noteworthy organiza- 
tions, and never once suffered a defeat. 

Mr. Cusack's genial disposition led him to engage in the hotel busi- 
ness. He secured the old Washington Irving homestead, at the corner 
of State and Bridge streets, where the new Custom Plouse now stands, 
and there established a hostelry which became famous with sporting 
men and politicians. Mr. Cusack himself took a hand in politics and 
became leader oi his district, working under Senator John Fox, now 
the President of the Democratic Club. 

The old Irving homestead had to be torn down to make way for 
modern buildings, and in 1882 Mr. Cusack removed his business to 15 
Broadway. There he continued until 1894, wlicn lie accepted a position 



TMi 

NtW YOBK 






OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 351 

untler the Spanish Government following Cuban filibustering' expedi- 
tions. The outbreak of the Spanish-American War in 1898 put an end 
toi filibusters, and Mr. Cusack became identified with the claim depart- 
ment of the Metropolitan Street Railway System. In 1900 he resigned 
this position to become an Inspector in the Bureau of Incumbrances, 
which position he still fills. 

Mr. Cusack has been closely identified wuth many great athletic 
contests. He was one of the men who brought out John L. Sullivan, 
and his hotel was Sullivan's headquarters. He was at one time one of 
the best known wrestlers in the State. In politics Mr. Cusack has long 
been an influential factor, though he has never accepted any nomina- 
tions for office. 



R. A. HiLL^ merchant in Oneida and later banker. Treasurer of 
the village of Oneida for several terms. City Chamberlain from April, 
1 90 1, to 1902, and re-elected in 1902 ftDr term of two years. 

Mr. Hill was torn in Oneida, March 1^9, 1870. He was educated 
in the public schools, and after graduation from the Oneida High 
School became engaged in mercantile business, and on the basis of his 
success in this he later established "himself in the banking business, with 
a reputation in financial matters which especially commanded public 
confidence. 

For a series of terms Mr. Hill served as treasurer of the village of 
Oneida, and when Oneida became a city, public respect and confidence 
called him, by election, to the position of City Chamberlain from April, 
1 90 1, to 1902, and again, by re-election, from 1902 to 1904. 

For four years Mr. Hill was Chairman of the Town Committee and 
Chairman for one term of the Democratic City Committee. He has 
also served as County Committeeman and as delegate to County, City, 
Assembly and Congressional conventions. Under all circumstances of 
his career, as a much-respected and successful business man, without 
aspiration for office, the quality of Mr. Hill's Democracy, like that of 
his reputation as a banker, has been of the highest. He is a member of 
the Elks. 



352 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Joseph O. Connor, one of the active and influential Democrats of 
Wyoming County, was born in that county, in the town of Java, De- 
cember 31, 1846. He was educated in the pubhc schools of his native 
town. 

]\Ir. Connor is an enterprising and successful farmer, and he has 
always resided on the farm upon which he was born. He is a member 
of the Catholic IMutual Benefit Association. 

I\Ir. Connor has always been a strong, straight and stalwart Demo- 
crat, and has rendered his party service of great value. He has fre- 
quently been appointed a delegate to Democratic County conventions. 
The high regard in which he is held by his neighbors is clearly shown 
by the fact that he holds the office of Town Clerk, to which he has been 
repeatedly elected for many years. 



Joseph A. Baumert^ one of the well-known and popular Demo- 
cratic leaders of Jefferson County, was born in New York City, June 
2, 1876. His education was received in the public schools of New 
York and at Canisius College at Buffalo. He showed himself an apt 
scholar and made the most of his opportunities. After the completion 
of a thorough literary education Mr. Baumert engaged in business with 
his father, the late Francis Xavier Baumert, as a cheese manufacturer. 
The firm of F. X. Baumert & Co., whicli has its principal office and 
sales warehouse on Centre street, New York City, is well known to 
the trade, to the proprietors of high-class hotels and restaurants and to 
epicures generally. Mr. Baumert is a member of the Order of Knights 
of Columbus. 

In politics he has always been a straight and strenuous Democrat, 
anxious for the success of his party and for the enforcement of its 
principles in the conduct of the government. He has for many years 
served as an efficient member of Democratic committees, and in 
1 90 1 he was elected a member of the Board of Village Trustees, in 
which he served with fidelity and great acceptance for two years. As a 
progressive citizen and enterprising business man Mr. Baumert stands 
high. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 353 

Richard Gleeson, a progressive and prosperous farmer of Jeffer- 
son County, was born in Antwerp, in that county, Noveml^er 21, 1869. 
His educational training was obtained in the pubHc schools and at Ives 
Seminary. In addition to the care of his farm property, Mr. Gleeson 
is an engineer and has taught school. He has been the President of the 
Antwerp Fire Department ever since it was organized in 1895. 

Mr. Gleeson has always been an earnest and influential Democrat, 
and for several years he has been one of the most active and efficient 
local party leaders in Jefferson County. He has long been a member of 
the Democratic County Committee, and has been very prominent in 
organization and campaign work. 

In 1895 he was appointed Postmaster of Antwerp, under President 
Cleveland's second administration, and served with conspicuous ability 
and satisfaction to the patrons of the office until 1901, his efficiency 
keeping him in office through President McKinley's first administra- 
tion. 



Joseph DeNoyelles. As an active worker in the Democratic 
organization of Rockland County Joseph DeNoyelles has long been 
prominent. He has for many years served as a member of local and dis- 
trict party committees, rendering his party valuable service, and as a 
delegate to all classes of Democratic conventions, town, county and dis- 
trict, he has been an important factor in party affairs. He served with 
great credit to himself and satisfaction to the people as Town Clerk of 
Clarkstown for fourteen consecutive years. In 1880 he accepted an ap- 
pointment as Deputy County Clerk and served eight years, until 1888. 

In 1890 he was elected Supervisor, and through successive re-elec- 
tions he held that important position five years. He was appointed 
clerk of the Board of Supervisors in 1897 and is still the incumbent of 
that office. In 1901 Mr. DeNoyelles accepted the position of Deputy 
Clerk of the Surrogate's Court of Rockland, which he has continued to 
fill with satisfaction to the people to the present time. 

He belongs to the Masons, the Red Men, the Elks and to Engine 
Company, No. i, of New City. 



354 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Michael J. Hays, of the city of Yonkers, has for twenty years 
been a sturdy and stalwart supporter of Democratic principles and 
Democratic candidates in \\'estchester County. He has done valuable 
work as a member of various party committees and as delegate to a 
great many Democratic conventions. 

He was appointed a Fire Commissioner in 1898 and proved an 
efficient and acceptable official, holding his position until 1904. 

Mr. Hays is one of the Democratic leaders in the Fourth Ward and 
he is especially a political power in business circles. 

He belongs to the Knights of Columbus, to the Exempt Firemen's 
Association, to the Elks and to the City Club of Yonkers. 



Frank G. vSchirmer^ of "White Plains, has for thirty years been a 
prominent citizen and an important political factor in the life of West- 
chester County. He has rendered valuable service on all local and dis- 
trict committees, and has frequently served as chairman. He has been 
honored with the appointment of delegate to every Democratic State 
convention during more than twenty-five years, and he has also attended 
national conventions, but not as a delegate. When only twenty-two 
years old, Mr. Schirmer was elected Tax Collector for the town of 
White Plains and was twice re-elected, so satisfactory was his service. 

In 1876 he was elected Coroner of Westchester County and was re- 
elected in 1879. Tn 1888 he was elected Sheriff, serving the full term 
of three years. In 1892 he was elected Supervisor without opposition 
and was twice re-elected to this important office. While Supen^isor he 
was also appointed A\^ater Commissioner and served four years. Dur- 
ing his term of service the water works of White Plains were con- 
structed, and during his service as Supervisor he was appointed on a 
committee to reconstruct the county jail. 

Mr. Schirmer is a member of the Order of Elks, of the Knights of 
Columbus and of the Exempt Firemen's Association, he having served 
as Chief of the Fire Department of White Plains. In former years he 
held membership in nearly all fraternal and secret societies, but in re- 
cent years he has withdrawn from all except those named above. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 355 

Thomas F. Curran, a prominent member of the Westchester 
County Bar, has for many years been an earnest and influential Demo 
cratic leader. His service on party committees has been extensive and 
of great value to the party. He has also been appointed delegate to all 
classes of party conventions, including the Democratic State Conven- 
tion of 1896. 

In 1900 he accepted his party's nomination for City Judge of Yon- 
kers. He was just of age and the youngest man ever nominated for 
that office. He made a splendid canvass and ran ahead of his ticket, 
though the Republican majority proved too great for him to overcome. 

Mr. Curran belongs to the Knights of Columbus, the Montgomery 
Club, the Order of Elks, the Order of Red Men, the City Club of Yon- 
kers and the Westchester County Bar Association. He was formerly 
counsel for the Yonkers Railway Company, and the firm of Brennan & 
Curran represented the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad 
Company in the famous "Tunnel" cases. 



Alderman Arthur W. Nugent, of the Second Ward of Yonkers, 
is one of the active and influential Democrats of Westchester County. 
Indeed he is a veteran in the service of Democracy, his activity having 
extended through a full score of years. He has been a faithful soldier 
in the ranks and has been an efficient officer on party committees. 
He has been a delegate to City, County, Assembly, Senatorial and Con- 
gressional District conventions, always loyal to the Democracy, and 
always efficient in its service. 

He won a great triumph in 1896, being elected Alderman in a Re- 
publican stronghold and defeating a candidate who had not been beaten 
before for twelve years. He was defeated himself in 1898, but in 1903 
he had another test of strength with the same opponent and was tri- 
umphantly victorious, running ahead of his ticket. 

Mr. Nugent is First Lieutenant, Company A, First Regiment, 
N. G. S. N. Y., and is a veteran of the Spanish-American War. He is 
a member of the F. and A. M., the I. O. O. F., the City Club of Yon- 
kers, the Yonkers Turn Verein and other organizations. 



356 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Daniel C. j\IcElv\'ain. An active and efficient worker in the 
Democratic cause is Daniel C. McEhvain, of Cohoes. Always interested 
in Democratic success, he has served his party with zeal and efficiency 
ever since he became a voter. As Chairman of the Campaign and Ex- 
ecutive Committees of the citv of Cohoes from 1901 to 1903 his work 
for the party was especially valuable and it was highly appreciated. 

He has frequentl}' been a delegate to the Democratic local conven- 
tions and was chosen an alternate-delegate to the State convention. In 
1898 he was appointed Recorder of the city of Cohoes, serving with 
great acceptance until 1902. In 1904 he was the Democratic candidate 
for Congress in the Twenty-third District, running ahead of the presi- 
dential candidate. 

Mr. AIcElwain is a graduate of Union College Law School, class of 
1886. He was admitted to the Bar in the latter year, and at once be- 
came prominent in his profession. He has served as Exalted Ruler of 
the Order of Elks and is a member of the City Club of Cohoes. 



George Potter^ farmer. Justice of the Peace and Highway Com- 
missioner. 

Mr. Potter was born in Kent, England, September 19, 1823, and 
came to this country in 1845. ^^ "^^'^s educated in English day schools, 
and upon coming to America started as a farmer in the town of Eaton, 
Madison County. He later removed to the Southwest, locating him- 
self as a farmer in Missouri, but after some experience of Missouri 
conditions he returned to New York and became permanently settled 
as a fanner in Madison Count3^ 

He has served eight years as a Justice of the Peace and two years 
as Highway Commissioner in the town of Stockbridge.' He has been a 
delegate to County, Assembly, Senatorial and Congressional conven- 
tions and to the State convention at Saratoga, which nominated Mr. 
Flower for Governor. He has also served as County Committeeman 
and has proved himself, through a long experience of American poli- 
tics, a most intelligent and efficient supporter of genuine ^Vmerican 
Democracy. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 357 

Charles Cook^ the Democratic leader in Clarkstown, one of the 
five t(jwns of Rockland County, has been a staunch Democrat ever since 
he has had the right to vote. He has never manifested any sort of 
desire for public office, but he has rendered great service to his party by 
his work upon the Democratic Party committees of both town and 
county. He has also been a delegate to every class of Democratic con- 
ventions, including State conventions. 

He was a delegate to the great Democratic State Convention of 
1902. Mr. Cook has never aspired to public office, but he has been a 
vigorous worker in every campaign since he has been entitled to vote. 
He has an especially large influence with the labor vote. 

Mr. Cook is a member of the I. O. O. F. and of the I. O. R. M. He 
is a business man of unusual success, and one who is esteemed highly 
by all who know him. 



Charles Henry Ford, one of the leading Democrats of Wayne 
County, was born at Utica, October 19, 1861. He had the advan- 
tages of a good education, received in the public schools and at Whites- 
town Seminary, from which he was graduated in 1878. 

After his school days were over Mr. Ford accepted a position as 
clerk in a tobacco store at Auburn, and after a few years he deter- 
mined to go into the same business on his own account at Clyde. He 
opened his present establishment, wholesale tobacco and liquors, in 
1883, ^^^ his capacity and energy have made it a great success. 

Mr. Ford has always been an active and loyal Democrat, and in 
1888 he was elected Village Trustee, and served as Supervisor five 
terms. In 1890 he was appointed a Division Superintendent on the 
Erie Canal under Governor Flill's administration and served also under 
Governor Flower. In 1894 he was appointed Sheriff of Wayne County 
by Governor Flower — a county which is a Republican stronghold. He 
served as Supervisor again in 1896- 1898, and as Village Trustee ini 
1902. He has been a delegate to all Democratic State conventions 
since 1890. He is a member of the Patriarchs, I. O. O. F. and is 
highly respected as a citizen and as a man. 



358 THE DE^IOCRATIC PARTY 

Hon. George W. ]\Iiller, one of the leading and influential Demo- 
crats of Tompkins County, ^vas born at Ithaca, September 25, 1858. 
His parents were immigrants from Scotland, and Mr. Miller has much 
of the shrewdness, thrift, industry and perseverance characteristic of 
the cann}' Scots. He received his educational training in the public 
schools, but it ^^■as not very extensive, as he began to work in the 
Ithaca Calendar Clock Company's establishment when he was only 
twelve years old. He has continued his connection with this important 
and successful enterprise to the present time, being steadily promoted 
until he became the President, and in 1899 the sole owner and manager. 

He has truly been "the architect of his own fortune," and is a man 
of weight and power, greatly honored and respected in this intelligent 
and thriving community. 

Always a sturdy Democrat, Mr. Miller has taken much interest in 
his party's success. In 1902 he was elected Mayor of the city, an office 
in which he made a splendid record for efficient service. 



Edward J. Pardee was torn in Oneida, Madison County, June 12, 
1869, where he received an early education in the public schools of his 
native city and completed his studies at the Oneida Higli School. 

After graduation he became engaged in mercantile pursuits and is 
at present one of Oneida's best known and respected business men. 

With a natural leaning towards politics, Mr. Pardee became iden- 
tified with the Democratic organization of Oneida and later of the 
county, where his qualifications soon brought him recognition. He 
was cntnisted with the duties of delegate at several conventions, and in 
the spring of 190T went before the electorate of the Fifth Ward, 
Oneida, as a candidate for Alderman to fill an unexpired term. His 
jx)pu]arity was attested by the comfortable majority accorded him at 
the polls. His splendid record in the office made him the logical candi- 
date for the office in the fall of the same year, and he was re-elected 
for a full term. 

^Ir. Pardee is a member of the Knights of Columbus and the Cath- 
olic Mutual Benevolent Association. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 359 

David E. Allen has been one of the loyal and efficient workers for 
Democratic success in Westchester County for many years. He is the 
leader of his district, the Second of the First Ward of the city of Yon- 
kers, and has served on the Ward and City committees, being the treas- 
urer of the last named. He is also a member of the Democratic County 
Committee. 

He has been honored with the appointment of delegate to all local 
party conventions and was elected an alternate delegate to the Demo- 
cratic State Convention of 1904. He accepted the nomination for 
Alderman in his ward, after urgent solicitation, in 1898, and again in 
1902, each time making a splendid run, although the normal Republi- 
can majority proved too strong to be overcome. 

Mr. Allen is a member of the Masonic fraternity, the Order of Elks 
and the Royal Arcanum. He is a staunch Democrat and stands high 
as a citizen. 



James E. Brewer^ attorney-at-law of Oneida, Madison County; 
City Judge, elected January i, 1902, for term of four years. 

Mr. Brewer was born in the town of Verona, Oneida County, 
October 7, 1874. He was educated in the Vernon Union School and 
at the Cazenovia Seminary, and after studying law was admitted to 
the Bar and commenced practice in Oneida in 1889. Public respect 
and confidence, in view of his character and his professional success, 
brought to him as early as 1894 the office of Village Clerk, which he 
filled for two years, and from this beginning he advanced to the posi- 
tion of Village Trustee in 1897- 1898. His next advance made him 
Police Justice for the years 1 899-1 901, and from January i, 1902, he 
has held the office of City Judge by election for a four years' term. 

Mr. Brewer's adherence to Democratic principles and activity in 
support of the proceedings of the party found expression in his service 
as delegate to County, Congressional, Judiciary and Senatorial conven- 
tions, and for four years he was Secretary of the County Committee. 
His memberships include the Elks, Odd Fellows, Maccabees and An- 
cient Order of United Workmen. 



36o THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Frederick S. ^^^EIANT. An active and earnest Democrat of Rock- 
land County is Frederick S. Weiant, one of the strongest and most pop- 
ular men in the county. In 1900 his party honored him by nominating 
him for Sheriff, and so great was his personal popularity and the good- 
will and confidence of the people that he ran four hundred votes ahead 
of his ticket and was elected, although every other Democratic county 
candidate was defeated. 

]\Ir. Weiant is the leader of the conservative element of the party, 
and he wields a wide and powerful influence, especially in the lower 
part of the county. He was the youngest Sheriff ever elected in Rock- 
land County, and at the time of his election he was the youngest Sheriff 
in the State of New York, being only twenty-two years old. He made 
a splendid record in this important office. 

]\Ir. Weiant is a member of the Haverstraw Club, of the Masonic 
order, through the Royal Arch Chapter, of the Knights of Pythias and 
of the United Workmen. 



A. P. Dodge, IVI.D., physician and surgeon of Oneida, Madison 
County, was born in Winfield, Herkimer County, December 16, 1854, 
the son of Sanders Dodge and Elizabeth (Prescott) Dodge. He was 
educated at the Clinton Liberal Institute and University of IMichigan 
IMedical College. He began the practice of medicine in Oneida Castle. 
In 1896 he became established as a physician and surgeon in Oneida, 
with a professional reputation which gave him, during both terms of 
President Cleveland, the position of Pension Surgeon at Oneida and 
that of Oneida Health Officer, with that also of Division Surgeon for 
tlic \\'est Shore and New York Central Railroads. 

His memberships include the American Medical Association, New 
York State Medical Association, State Society of Railroad Surgeons, 
Madison County Medical Society and State Medical Society, also the 
Elks. Knights of Pythias and the Masonic fraternity. 

In professional distinction, due to exceptional intellectual gifts, 
Dr. Dodge has held a rank which made his Democratic loyalty es- 
pecially valuable and effective. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 361 

Joseph L. McMaiion, of Nyack, is one of the active and earnest 
Democratic leaders of Rockland County, He has always been a faithful 
and efficient worker in the party organization. 

He has frequently served as delegate to Town, County, Assembly 
District, Senatorial District and Congressional District conventions. 

He is a member of the Nyack Volunteer Fire Department. 

Mr. McMahon is an excellent citizen and stands high in the com- 
munity. He is a hustler during political campaigns and he is a man of 
much influence among his party associates. 



John Eylers. One of the veteran Democratic workers and lead- 
ers oi Westchester County is John Eylers, whose service to his party 
has extended over forty years. On party committees and in party con- 
ventions he has been an active and influential factor. 

Mr. Eylers is^ prominent business man, but his extensive interests 
have not prevented him from being always an ardent party man and a 
great power in every political campaign. He was appointed Water 
Commissioner in 1891 by the Common Council of the city of Yonkers 
and served efficiently and successfully for five years. 

Mr. Eylers has always been an influential leader of the conservative 
element of the party, and he has been a controlling factor in that wing 
for many years. Mr. Eylers has never sought political office, but he has 
consented, at times when it seemed especially important to strengthen 
the ticket, to accept nominations for Alderman and for Mayor, the Re- 
publican majority proving each time too strong to be overcome. Where- 
ever and whenever opportunity tO' serve the Democracy presented itself 
he has never held back. 

He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, to the Order of Elks, is a 
trustee of the Yonkers Savings Bank, is a member of the Yonkers Turn 
Verein and the Mount Vernon Turn Verein, has been president of the 
Yonkers Bowling Association since its organization, was the first 
treasurer of the Retail Grocers' Association in New York City, now 
known as "The Central Organization," and is a member of the New 
York State Retail Grocers' Association and of the City Club of Yonkers. 



362 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Peter J. I\Iitchell, a leading Democrat of Westchester County, is 
a native of the city of Yonkers, where he has ahvays resided and has 
been an active and vigorous advocate of his party's principles and 
worker for his party's success ever since he became of age. He has 
served on the Yonkers City Committee and has been leader of the 
Fourth Ward. 

I\Ir. ^Mitchell works for the Democracy because he believes its suc- 
cess is a matter of supreme importance and not from any personal or 
ambitious motive. He is a business man, with large interests to look 
after, and he has never sought office nor even consented to accept a 
political nomination. 

He is a member of the Legislative Committee of the New York 
State Volunteer Firemen's Association, of the Order of Elks, of the 
Democratic City Club of Yonkers, a director of the Yonkers Brewery, 
director of the First National Bank of Yonkers, Vice-President of the 
Yonkers Bowling Association and member of the Corinthian Yacht 
Club. 



Theodore R. Hetnrichs. One of the Democrats of Westchester 
County whose earnest and faithful work has been of great service to 
his party is Theodore R. Heinrichs, of Yonkers. For many years Mr. 
Heinrichs has been a power in the organization and in the various cam- 
paigns. For more than six years he has been Secretary of the Yonkers 
City General Committee and a member of the Democratic County Com- 
mittee for a long period of time. He has sensed on the Executive Com- 
mittee of the County organization with great advantage to the party. 
He has also taken part as delegate in all classes of local conventions. 

He is one of the leaders in the Fifth Ward and Vice-chairman of the 
\\'ard Committee, and he has frequently sen-ed as Chairman or Secre- 
tary of party conventions. Mr. Heinrichs was appointed one of the 
City Assessors in 1901 and was chosen Chairman of the board. 

He is a member of the Ancient Order United Workmen, the Royal 
Arcanum, the Yonkers Turn Verein, of which he has been tmstee and 
President ; the Yonkers Teutonia, the Deutscher Order of Haru-Gari 
and the Order of Eagles. 



if 
OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 363 

Hon. Charles N. Bulger, the Democratic leader in Oswego 
County and Democratic nominee for Lieutenant-Governor in 1902, was 
born on a farm in the town of Ohiey, near Fulton, Oswego County, 
N. Y., August 19, 1857. He received his educational training in the 
public schools and Falley Seminary, at Fulton, supplemented by a 
course at Fordham University. 

After his literary education had been completed Mr. Bulger studied 
law in the office of the Hon. Albertus Perry, of Oswego, now of New 
York City, and he was admitted to the Bar in 1879. He at once began 
the practice of his profession at Oswego, where he has continued to the 
present time, and is one of the recognized leaders of the Bar in North- 
ern New^ York. 

Mr. Bulger is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Knights of Columbus and the 
Oswego County and the New York State Bar Associations. 

In politics Mr. Bulger has always been a loyal, vigorous and stren- 
uous Democrat. He has been a delegate to every Democratic State 
convention for twenty years, and also to several Democratic National 
conventions. He has also served as member of the Democratic State 
Committee for ten years, and has been one of the most active and effi- 
cient campaign leaders and party workers in the State. 

In the Democratic State Convention of 1900 Mr. Bulger had a 
memorable passage at arms with Senator Thomas F. Grady, which 
attracted attention throughout the country and stamped Mr. Bulger as 
a master of controversial debate. 

In 1902 Mr. Bulger received his party's nomination for Lieutenant- 
Governor and took a very active part in the campaign, coming within 
some 9,000 votes of election. 

Mr. Bulger was elected Recorder of the city of Oswego six times in 
succession, from 1883 to 1893, inclusive. He also served with great 
credit as Corporation Counsel of the city. January i, 1903, he was 
appointed First Deputy Attorney-General of the State by Attorney- 
General John Cunneen, and sensed with marked ability for two years. 

Mr. Bulger is a man of both brains and courage, and it is certain 
that he is destined to play an important part in State politics in the 
coming years. 



364 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

JNIalcolm Graeme Annis^ one of the leading business men, one of 
the prominent officials and one of the most active and efficient Demo- 
cratic workers in Saratoga County, was born at Mclndoes Falls, Vt., 
November 19, 1856. He received a thorough educational training in 
the public schools of Keene, N. H., and Saratoga Springs, N. Y., hav- 
ing removed to the last-named place in his boyhood. He also took a 
course at the Troy Business College. 

In 1877 Mr. Annis entered the employment of the Delaware and 
Hudson Railroad Company, serving as Check Clerk in the baggage 
department. Conductor and Ticket Agent for seven years. He left the 
road to engage in the dr}^ goods and boot and shoe business as a mem- 
ber of the firm of J. H. ]\Iabbett & Co., in 1883. It is a staunch firm 
and has built up a large and flourishing trade. In 1902 Mr. Annis 
also became one of the organizers of the Farmers' Hardware Com- 
pany, an important and successful corporation, of which he has been 
the Secretary and Treasurer from its organization to the present time. 

He is prominent in the Masonic fraternity, being a member of Ris- 
ing Sun Lodge, of the Chapter, the Council and of the Washington 
Commandery. He is also a member of Oriental Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine, of the Order of Elks, of the Foresters and of the Modern 
Woodmen. Mr. Annis has also been an active member of the Saratoga 
Business Men's Association, of which he is now President. 

In politics Mr. Annis has always been an active and earnest Demo- 
crat and a man of great influence in the organization. He is serving 
his fifth term of two years in the Board of Trustees of Saratoga 
Springs, is the President of the Board of Avenue Commissioners and 
has ])een a member of the Board of Street, Sewer and Water Com- 
missioners ever since its organization, several years ago. 

October 30. 1883, Mr. Annis married Miss Olive Griswold, of 
Saratoga Springs. They have one son and one daughter. 

Persctnally I^Tr. Annis is an able, large-hearted and popular man 
and an excellent and enterprising citizen, a man of force and one who 
stands very high in the community. Many of his elections to public 
office have been without opposition, and he has received a solid support 
from all parties, a noteworthy tribute to his capacity and integrity in 
the public service. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 365 

Arthur W. Beardsley was born at Danby, Tompkins County, 
January 8, 1871. He was educated in the public schools and the Ithaca 
High School, from which he was graduated in 1898. He went into 
business with his father, H. S. Beardsley, the firm name being H. S. 
Beardsley & Son, as general merchants and undertakers. 

His father is also a strong Democrat and has held the offices of 
Postmaster, Town Clerk and Supervisor. 

Arthur W. Beardsley has been a member of the Democratic County 
Committee ever since he was twenty-one years old, and he is a tireless 
and efficient worker in the Democratic cause. 



Goodwin Brown^ of Yonkers, has long been one of the prominent 
Democrats of Westchester County, and his valuable service as State 
Commissioner in Lunacy gave him a wide reputation that reached be- 
yond State lines. 

When Governor Cleveland assumed the duties of his office, Janu- 
ary I, 1883, he appointed Mr. Brown Pardon Clerk and he was re- 
appointed by Governor Hill. In 1889 he was appointed State Com- 
missioner in Lunacy, and in 1893 ^^ ^^"'^^ reappointed by Governor 
Flower and served until 1899. During his term of service was in- 
augurated the great reform of having the State care for all the insane. 
The Lunacy Commission was instrumental in securing the enactment 
of this law, which proved one of the most beneficial in the history of 
the State. In 1893, during Governor Flower's administration, when 
the Democrats also had control of the Legislature, the Lunacy Com- 
mission was given financial control of the hospitals for the insane, con- 
ceded to be a reform of the highest value and importance. 

In 1904 Mr. Brown was appointed a member of the Yonkers Board 
of Health, under a Republican administration, and was elected Presi- 
dent of the board, despite the fact that the Democratic members were 
in the minority. 

He is a member of the Sons of the Revolution, of the Society of 
Colonial Wars, of the Masonic fraternity, of the Psi Upsilon and the 
Phi Kappa Psi fraternities. ; 



366 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Frederick W. Schaper. An active business man and a sincere 
Democrat of Rockland County is Frederick W. Schaper, of Haver- 
straw. Although he has always refused public office, and even nomina- 
tions for political positions, on account of his extensive private business 
interests, Mr. Schaper has long been one of the most valuable men in 
the party organization, as well as a party hustler during important 
political campaigns. Although he has not been able to spare the time to- 
attend party conventions, nor to serve on party committees, his zeal and 
activity have made him an important factor in the politics of Rockland 
County. 

Mr. Schaper is a member of the Masonic fraternity, of the Order of 
Elks and of the Rescue Hook and Ladder Company. He is a public- 
spirited and highly respected citizen. 



Wellington R. Vedder^ civil engineer, graduate of Cornell Uni- 
versity School of Engineering, City Engineer of Oneida from April, 
1902^ and in the fall of 1902 a prominent contestant, with Richard W. 
Sherman, for the Democratic nomination to the office of State Engi- 
neer and Surveyor. 

Mr. Vedder was born in Leeds, Greene County, April 29, 1864. He 
was educated in the public schools, the Catskill High School and the 
Cornell University School of Engineering. He began practice as a 
civil engineer in Syracuse in December, 1891, in the office of the City 
Engineer. During the winter of 1892 he had a valuable experience 
with the United States Engineer Corps, and in 1893 he was in Newark 
and Elizabeth, N. J. 

After these years of varied activity and of notable advance in his 
profession. Mr. Vedder returned to Syracuse and remained there in 
the practice of his profession until January i, 1902. Li April, 1902, he 
came to Oneida as City Engineer, and in the Democratic State Con- 
vention of the same year he was a candidate for nomination to the 
office of State Engineer and Surveyor, an office for which he was 
qualified in an eminent degree, even by the side of the veteran of State 
and national distinction, Richard W. Sherman, to whom the nomina- 
tion was accorded as the crowning honor of a lifetime. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 367 

Mr. Vedder's career to this time amply warrants the expectation 
that he will repeat in the twentieth century the services and successes 
of Sherman in the earlier century. 



Michael Lynch. An active and successful business man, who 
has no desire for public office nor for any other of the rewards of poli- 
tics, is Michael Lynch, of Troy, Yet the Democratic Party has nO' 
more faithful worker in Rensselaer County. 

Mr. Lynch is a native of Troy, where he was born in 1865. He 
was educated in the parochial school of that city, receiving- a sound, 
practical education. For a time he dealt in horses, but in 1898 he con- 
cluded there was more profit in running a cafe, and he accordingly 
established himself in partnership with his brother, Peter Lynch, in the 
Hall Building. Their place of business, known as "The Board of 
Trade," has been a very profitable venture from the beginning. 

Mr. Lynch, as already stated, is active in the Democratic organiza- 
tion and a veiy valuable man to the party, though he prefers to work in 
the ranks, and is very popular among all his acquaintances. 



Hugh McVeigh. An earnest and influential member of the Demo- 
cratic Party in Rockland County is Hugh McVeigh, for many years 
one of the most efticient party workers in the county. 

He has always had too many demands from his extensive private 
business to be able to devote much attention to regular organization 
work, but he makes it a point to always attend the primaries, the true 
fountain-head of political power under our system of government. 
And when a campaign of importance is in progress Mr. McVeigh some- 
how finds opportunities to do a great deal of valuable service for his 
party, to which he is devotedly attached. 

Mr. McVeigh belongs to the Foresters of America, and he is a 
highly respected citizen. 



368 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Thomas McCarthy, City Superintendent of Ithaca, and one of 
the prominent Democrats of Tompkins County, was born in Bradford 
County, Pennsylvania, I\Iay lo, 1847. 

He was educated in the public schools and afterward engaged in 
business as a contractor in connection with public works, in which he 
met with great success and in which he has continued to the present 
time, ^^*hen a young man he built a portion of the Lehigh Valley 
Railroad. 

]Mr. McCarthy has always been a \Qry busy man, but he has found 
time to render great service to the Democratic Party, to which he has 
always been ardently attached. He is an influential party leader and 
has been honored by appointment as delegate to many State and County 
conventions. Personally he is companionable and has troops of friends. 



J. Arthur Polhemus. A very vigorous young Democratic worker 
in Rockland County is J. Arthur Polhemus, who for nearly a score of 
years, dating back to the time before he became of age, has been earnest 
and influential in the party organization. For many years he has been 
a member of the Democratic Town Committee and for five years its 
Chairman. He is also a veteran on the Coimty Committee, of which he 
has been the Secretary for three years and the Chairman for two years. 
It was during his chairmanship, in 1892, that Rockland County gave 
one of the largest Democratic majorities in its history. 

i\Ir. Polhemus has served as delegate to a great numlxr of County 
and District conventions, and four times he has represented his coimty 
in the Democratic State convention. 

He accepted his party's nomination for Member of Assembly in 
1894, but it proved a disastrous year for Democrats and he failed of 
election. 

Mr. Polhemus is now a resident of New York City, where he is 
engaged in the insurance business. While in Nyack he belonged to the 
Odd Fellows, the Masons, the Foresters, the Nyack Country Club and 
the Nyack Rowing Association. He is an aggressive political leader, 
and he has a special faculty for political organization, which he under- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 3^9 

stands thoroughly so far as Rockland County is concerned, down to 
the minutest details. 



John F. McFarlane. One of the staunch and stalwart Democrats 
of Rockland County is John F. McFarlane. He has always been active 
in the work of the party organization, serving on Town and County 
committees, with conspicuous efficiency, and frequently being commis- 
sioned as delegate to take part in shaping the action of party conven- 
tions. 

In 1902 Mr. McFarlane was elected Justice of the Peace, which 
office he still holds and fills to the general acceptance and satisfaction of 
the people. He is a graduate of the New York Law School and was 
admitted to the Bar in June, 1897. 

He is a member of the Rockland County Bar Association and of the 
Volunteer Fire Department. Mr. McFarlane is a leader among the 
younger element and a young man of much promise, both in law and in 
politics. 



George W. Mitsch. One of the earnest and influential Democrats 
of Rockland County is George W. Mitsch, of West Haverstraw, He 
has always been one of those sturdy, faithful workers upon whom party 
success so greatly depends. He is a power in the party organization 
and a remarkably efficient campaign worker. 

In 1887, under President Cleveland's first administration, he was 
appointed Postmaster of West Haverstraw and made an excellent 
record. In the following year he was elected Tax Collector of the town 
of Haverstraw, and by successive re-elections continued to hold this 
office until 1904. 

Mr. Mitsch is a member of the Odd Fellows' fraternity and also of 
the Rescue Hook and Ladder Company of Haverstraw. Mr. Mitsch 
stands high as a citizen and is very popular among the members of all 
political parties. 

( \ 



370 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY, 



ROBERT EARE. 

Hon. Robert Earl, Chief Judge of the Court of Appeals of the 
State of New York, one of the ablest and most distinguished jurists in 
the history of this State or nation, was a traly great man and one of 
nature's noblemen. 

He possessed a mighty mind, and a great good heart. He shed 
lustre, not alone upon the bench, of which he was for a generation such 
a noble and conspicuous member, but also upon his party, standing for 
all that is great and good in Democracy. As a citizen his life was the 
working out and practical application of high ideals! Fortunate, in- 
deed, is the land that is able to produce sucli a man ! 

Judge Earl was born in Herkimer, N. Y., which place was his 
home throughout the whole of his illustrious career. The date of his 
birth was September lo, 1824. The revolutionary period of our his- 
tor}' had just passed. The old soldiers and leaders of the revolution 
had largely passed away and the State and nation were entering their 
new and glorious history. Indeed in 1824, the date of Judge Earl's 
birth, for the first time in the history of our country there was a con- 
test for the Presidency between candidates who had not taken part in 
the Revolutionary War. 

And what new and wonderful developments was this boy born in 
1824 destined to see. As a boy he found the Mohawk River used for 
purposes of commerce, with the old flat-lx)ttomed bateau; then the 
Erie Canal ; then the building of the first railroad in the Mohawk Val- 
ley, with all the improvements in railroading from the old "DeWitt 
Clinton" to the "Empire State Express." The telegraph, the tele- 
phone and wireless telegraphy all came in his lifetime. The Judge 
lived in the golden age of American histoiy, and well and worthily did 
he do his part. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 371 

During the years of his boyhood there was much activity in \)o]\- 
tics. General Jackson was eng-ag-ed in his great struggle in which he 
succeeded in overthrowing the United States Banl<, crushing nullifica- 
tion, and also in relieving the people from the oppressive exaction of 
the "tariff of abominations." Young Earl naturally became a great- 
admirer of the hero President and was interested in politics from his 
boyhood. His neighl3ors were all intensely interested in public mat- 
ters, so much so that it was considered almost a treason not to vote. 

He was reared on the home fann by his mother and uncle, where he 
and his elder brother, Samuel Earl, worked in their lx>yhood. His 
academical education was had at the Herkimer Academy, where he pre- 
pared himself for college and entered the Junior Class of Union Col- 
lege in 1843. Graduating in 1845, with high honors, he began reading 
law with his cousin, Hon. Charles Gray, both student and preceptor 
afterwards sitting In the Court of Appeals. 

While pursuing his law studies he assumed charge of the Herkimer 
Academy, in 1846-47. The fi^st year after he became a voter he was 
elected Town Superintendent .Sf SdiDofe,:and in 1849 ^'"^^^ again in 1850 
served as Supervisor of the town* of ' ttefkiiTber, and he also filled the 
offices of Trustee and President of -his-native village. 

After admission to practice law in'i'848 he at once formed a partner- 
ship with his brother Samuel, under the firm name of S. & R. Earl. 
This firm obtained a large practice in the courts of the State and was 
retained either upon one side or the other in nearly all of the important 
litigations of the Mohawk Valley. 

In 1855 he was elected County Judge of Herkimer County, serving 
a full term of four years. He was held in such high esteem by the 
people of his county that he was elected to the office of County Judge 
by voters whose party affiliations were naturally against him. While 
filling the office of County Judge his ideals of the office were so high 
that he took no part In party politics. 

In the discharge of his duties as County Judge he was very pains- 
taking. He always wrote an opinion In every case decided by him, no 
matter how trivial, and as a County Judge he gained a wide reputation 
as being learned, painstaking and impartial. The reputation which he 
secured throughout the State by the unusually able manner In which he 



Z72 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

had discharg-cd the duties of County Judge was the foundation for his 
nomination in later years to the office of Judge of the Court of Appeals. 

Upon the completion of his term as County Judge he resumed the 
practice of his profession, in which his remarkable ability, sound judg- 
ment and great learning gained for him not only a large and lucrative 
practice but a wide reputation as a counselor and advocate throughout 
the State. 

In 1869 he was nominated and elected Judge of the Court of Ap- 
peals. He was then only 45 years of age. Truly a wonderful career 1 
The result, not of chance, but the recognition by the people of a great, 
grand, good character, improved by constant, thorough and diligent 
stud}'. 

Judge Earl took his seat January i, 1870, as Chief Judge of the old 
Court. In July, 1870, by virtue of the Constitutional amendment, he 
was transferred to the Commission of Appeals, created for a term, of 
three years, a term extended by a further amendment of 1875, which 
commission disposed of cases pending in the former Court of Appeals, 
and subsequently transferred to it by the new court. He was appointed 
by Governor Tilden in 1875 Judge of the Court of Appeals to succeed 
Judge ^Martin Grover, deceased. 

He was re-elected in 1876 for a full term of fourteen years, and in 
1890 was nominated by both the Democratic and Republican parties, 
an extraordinary compliment paid him, in spite of the fact that the age 
limit would retire him at the end of four years' service on the bench. 

Upon the death of Chief Judge Ruger, in 1892, he was appointed 
by Governor Roswell P. Flower to fill the vacancy of Chief Judge until 
Judge Andrews was elected as Chief Judge in 1893. 

Pie served in the Court of Appeals until compelled to retire by reason 
of the Constitutional limit of age, December 31, 1894, having served 
longer than any judge who ever sat in that court. 

Some 1,800 opinions were written by Judge Earl while in the Court 
of Appeals, many of them discussing the most important questions 
arising in statutory, constitutional and common law. In disposing of 
cases before the Court of Appeals Judge Earl's quick perception and 
ready mastery of the law and facts were greatly relied on, and he was 
there an authority. His industry and capacity for work was phcnome- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 373 

nal, and after writing in tlie cases allotted him he often helped out his 
brethren when in arrears. 

The way in which the judges of the Court of Appeals looked up to 
him, and the esteem in which he was held by his judicial brethren, is 
best expressed by the rqDorted proceedings of that court, reported in 
143 New York reports and read by Judge Andrews, as follows: 

"We cannot get by the inevitable separation which makes your 
place vacant in our judicial family without putting the regret we feel 
in words which you may take with you as you leave us. 

"How much we shall miss the unflagging industry, the swift dis- 
crimination, the watchful oversight upon which we have long de- 
pended, you will scarcely realize, while we shall feel it day by day as 
our work goes on. More and more you have steadily risen toward the 
high and difficult level which all of us strive to attain, and, none of us 
quite reach, with a toil that has been untiring, a patience that was 
never exhausted and a wealth of resources at which we often wondered. 

"Especially we shall miss you at the consultation table, where the 
capacity to see swiftly and grasp accurately and hold firmly the rapid 
succession of facts and doctrines involved in the cases as they pass in 
review^ finds its most useful field of effort. You held your place there, 
a sentinel never asleep, a patrol always on the alert, a guard not to be 
eluded ; and yet none of us, even when stopped or challenged, ever had 
reason to regret the manner of the vigilance. For, however earnest the 
warning, or relentless the criticism, there was always kindness and 
courtesy behind it and a zeal which fully subordinated pride of opinion 
to the sound and stable reputation of the court. 

"After twenty years of almost unbroken service, you leave us in 
the full maturity of your powers, laden with an invaluable experience, 
by force of an arbitrary rule which we may regret, but must neverthe- 
less obey. 

"Be assured that you will take into your retirement our gratitude 
for the arduous and excellent work you have done, our appreciation of 
the ability which has characterized it, and, beyond that, our personal 
respect, affection and esteem." 

Herkimer County was for many years so prominent in the councils 
of the Democratic Party of the State, and the county seat was so cen- 



0/ 



4 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



tral and accessible, that Democratic State conventions were frequently 
held there. It was at Herkimer that Martin Van Buren was nominated 
for Governor in 1828; Enos T. Throop was also nominated there in 
1830 and William L. Marcy in 1832, 1834 and 1836. 

From 1828 to 1840 Michael Hoffman, who resided at Herkimer, 
was the most prominent and influential Democrat in the county and 
one of the strongest in the State. 

From 1848 to i860 Judge Earl was the owner and publisher of the 
Herkimer Democrat, and in 1852 he conducted a campaign paper at 
]\Iohawk in the interest of Franklin Pierce for the Presidency. 

Judge Earl presided over the Democratic State Convention in 1868 
that nominated John T. Hoffman for Governor, one of his college 
mates at Union. 

\Mien he became a Judge of the Court of Appeals he retired from 
any participation in partisan politics, although he was frequently urged 
for the Democratic nomination for Governor, and there is little doubt 
but that he could have received the nomination if he desired it. In 
fact, in 1898 the sentiment in favor of his nomination was sO' strong 
that the movement for his selection, which was looked upon with favor 
by many of the most powerful party leaders, including ex-Governor 
Hill, was stopped by his peremptory refusal of the use of his name. 
Had the wishes of his friends been seconded by him it is quite probable 
that he would have been nominated and elected and added the highest 
executive honors of the State to the highest distinctions of the judi- 
ciary. 

\\nien some leaders of both parties proposed him to fill a vacancy 
in the Supreme Court of the United States and pointed to the unani- 
mous choice by both parties for Judge of the Court of Appeals as a 
precedent, the appointing power, admitting his fitness, was constrained 
by political considerations to raise the sole objection, "He is a Demo- 
crat." 

He was also frequently mentioned as the Democratic nominee for 
President, so eminent was his character and ability, and so distin- 
guished his public services in high places. 

However much his attention was taken by tlie duties of his exalted 
position, or occupied by exacting la1x)rs, Judge Earl never ceased to 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 375 

take a deep interest in the prosperity and advancement of his native 
town, and to the success of his townspeople, as his Hberal gifts in vari- 
ous ways sufficiently testify. Herkimer was his home and he was al- 
ways proud of it. This fact was shown by the royal gift which signal- 
ized his last days in the presentation by Mrs. Earl and himself of his 
handsome residence to the people of Herkimer for a free public library, 
together with his personal library of some two thousand well-selected 
volumes. 

Judge Earl founded the Herkimer County Historical Society and 
was its president from its organization down to the time of his death. 

He was largely interested in business affairs, being one of the foun- 
ders and vice-president of the Herkimer National Bank and one of the 
founders and directors of the Utica Trust Company. 

He had always taken great interest in farming and devoted much 
research in the history and science of agriculture. Probably no one 
living at the time in the Mohawk Valley had a wider knowledge of the 
local history. It was a pastime for him to write local history, which 
he frequently read before the Herkimer County Historical Society. 

He was a churchman by conviction, based and built upon a thorough 
study and knowledge of the church. He was a member of the vestry 
of Christ Episcopal Church for nearly fifty years, and frequently repre- 
sented his diocese in the General Convention. 

Judge Earl received the degree of L.L. D. from his Alma Mater in 
1874 and from Columbia University in 1887. 

He was married to Juliette Wilkerson, of Richfield Springs, Octo- 
ber 12, 1852. Mrs. Earl died at Clifton Springs March 25, 1900. No 
children were ever born to Judge or Mrs. Earl, the nearest relatives 
being nephews of his deceased brother. 

Judge Earl was an honorary member of the Medico-Legal Society, 
trustee of Union College and St. John's School, Manlius. He belonged 
to the Masonic fraternity and the Sons of the American Revolution. 

Judge Earl was stricken with paralysis November 22, 1902, and 
died December 2, 1902. The funeral was a day of general mourning, 
being largely attended by some of the most prominent men in the State. 

The public honors that came to Judge Earl were paid as a tribute 
to personal merit, ability and character. Whenever he was called upon 



2,^^ THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

to act as arbitrator in great questions the confidence in his fairness and . 
sound judgment was both remarkable and universal. This was shown 
in the celebrated franchise tax cases, lately decided by the United 
States Supreme Court, and which were first referred and passed upon 
by Judge Earl as referee. 

In 1900 the new franchise tax, so-called, was passed and subse- 
quently stubbornly contested as unconstitutional by some forty-seven 
large corporations. Millions of dollars were involved and some of the 
ablest lawyers of the state argued before Judge Earl as referee in these 
cases. The amount involved and the gravity of the issues to be de- 
cided made this litigation one of the most important ever considered 
by the courts of this country. 

After a careful and exhaustive examination. Judge Earl wrote a 
strong opinion holding the law to be constitutional in all respects. This 
opinion has recently been unanimously affirmed by both the Court of 
Appeals of this State and the Supreme Court of the United States. 
Unfortunately Judge Earl did not live to see the ultimate af^rmance by 
the highest tribunal of his opinion in these cases. His decisions and 
opinions in these cases were crowning examples of the mature mind of 
a learned jurist. Speaking of these great cases, the Court of Appeals 
said: 

"In reviewing these cases we have received great aid from the 
strong and exhaustive opinion of the late Judge Earl, for many years a 
distinguished member of this court, who, acting as referee, decided 
them in the first instance, after full and careful consideration of all the 
questions involved. It was the last judicial work of that ripe lawyer 
and eminent jurist, and w^e regard his decision as one of the most able 
and profound judgments ever pronounced by him during his long and 
useful career." 

Judge Earl has very strong claims upon the grateful remembrance! 
of his countrj^nen, not alone for his long and valuable public service, 
though these are many and powerful, for he was one of the great Amer- 
ican jurists, of which can be said that no motive ever sought to stain 
the whiteness of his integrity in public or private life. 

A just judge, firm, unbiased, with an open mind and true judicial 
temper, fearless, inflexible and a true lover of justice. Conscious as he 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 377 

must have been of abilities equal to the demands of the highest station, 
his modesty was such that there was a grand equipoise of character. 

Of him it was said by Chief Judge Parker, speaking for the Court 
of Appeals : 

'The man with the longest service to his credit in this court — sur- 
passing by a few months that of his distinguished associate, ex-Chief 
Judge Andrews — has gone to rest, leaving behind him a record of use- 
ful public service equalled by comparatively few of his generation. He 
was thoroughly equipped for a judicial career. His opinions evidence 
splendid training, painstaking research, careful thought, a thorough 
grasp of the subject, common sense and a love for exact justice. His 
mind was to him a virile, ready and competent servant, which per- 
formed for him many arduous tasks. Admirable as he was in all 
these respects, he had that which endeared him even more tO' his asso- 
ciates, the Bar and the public — a cordial, genial manner which be- 
tokens the true nobility of character, a love of fellowmen, which makes 
the heart gentle and expresses itself in cordial words and kind deeds. 
And he had a patriotic spirit which stimulated him to become a broad- 
minded student of governmental affairs, evidenced in many public 
utterances, but nowhere more effectively than in his opinion involving 
the consideration of constitutional questions. Stevenson's words aptly 
describe him : 

"I knew thee, strong and quiet as the hills ; 
I knew thee, apt to pity, brave to endure ; 
In peace or war a Roman full equipt. 
And just I knew thee, like the fabled kings 
Who by the loud seashore gave judgment forth, 
From dawn to eve, bearded and few of words." 



378 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hon. Denis O'Brien^ Associate Judge of the New York State 
Court of Appeals, and one of the distinguished jurists of the Empire 
State, was born in the city of Ogdensburg, March 13, 1837. Nature 
bestowed upon him that priceless combination, "a sound mind and a 
sound body," and this equipment directed by a high purpose in life and 
an ambition to attain the utmost excellence, was sure to result in an 
eminent career. 

Having acquired a thorough literary education, young O'Brien 
began the study of law. with the determination to master the profes- 
sion. In ]\Iay, 1861, at the age of twenty- four, he was admitted to the 
Bar at Ogdensburg, but in November of the same year he removed to 
W'atertown, where he has ever since made his home. His ability and 
his diligence soon brought both recognition and reward, and he became 
one of the leaders of a Bar which numbered among its members many 
able men who stood high in their chosen profession throughout the 
State. This strong competition did not daunt Mr. O'Brien, however, 
in the least. It acted, rather, as a stimulus to the development of his 
powers. 

Although eager for professional, instead of political distinction, 
Mr. O'Brien was a strong Democrat, from conviction, and it was in- 
evitable that he should become well known and prominent in the field 
of politics. In 1869 he accepted a nomination for Alderman. He was 
elected and served four years, making an enviable record. Then he was 
nominated and elected Mayor, a position in which he greatly extended 
his reputation. His name became known be5'ond the limits of his own 
city, and in 1880 he was chosen to succeed the late James F. Starbuck 
as a member of the Democratic State Committee. Here also his ser- 
vice was one of marked efficiency, and at the Democratic State Con- 
vention of 1883 he received his party's nomination for Attorney-Gen- 
eral of the State. He was elected and made such an excellent record 
that in 1885 he was renominated and re-elected by a handsome ma- 
jority. 

After the close of his second term as Attorney-General, Mr. O'Brien 
resumed the practice of his profession, meeting with great success. In 
1889 ^ic received a unanimous nomination from the Democratic State 
Convention for Associate Judge of the Court of Appeals, to succeed 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 379 

Judge George F. Danforth, and again his nomination was ratified at the 
polls. Judge O'Brien took his seat upon the Bench of the highest court 
in the State, January i, 1890. In 1903 he was re-nominated and re- 
elected without opposition, an unusual honor, and one which hears the 
highest possible evidence of his character and capacity as a jurist. His 
term will expire by the constitutional age limitation, December 31, 1907. 



Daniel M. Lounsbury. One of the earnest and loyal Democrats 
of the village of Portchester and town of Rye, Westchester County, is 
Daniel M. Lounsbury. For many years he has rendered valuable ser- 
vice to his party as a member of the Village and Town committees. He 
has been appointed a delegate to all classes of local and district conven- 
tions, and, being a fine presiding ofiticer, he has frequently acted as 
chairman. 

Mr. Lounsbury is so highly regarded by the Democrats of his town 
that they have twice nominated him for their most important office, 
that of Supervisor, but the Republican majority has proved too strong 
to be overcome. Mr. Lounsbury is a member of the Royal Arcanum, 



Paul Schultze, civil engineer serving under appointment as Utica 
City Engineer. 

Mr. Schultze was born in Hoboken, N. J., August 17, 1866. He 
was educated at the Hoboken Academy and the Rennselaer Polytechnic 
Listitute at Troy, where he graduated with the degree of Civil Engi- 
neer. He has had engineering engagements in all parts of the United 
States. 

In 1899 he was appointed Utica City Engineer, and this appoint- 
ment was renewed for 1900, 1901, 1902, 1903, 1904 and 1905. Be- 
sides various other memberships, Mr. Schultze is a member of the 
Democratic City and County Associations, and he has served as a dele- 
gate to a Congressional convention. With the demands of an exacting 
profession, and not an aspirant for ofBce, Mr. Schultze has preferred 
private service in his party to public position. 



38o THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

John J. Blackhall. One of the wheel-horses of the Rensselaer 
County Democracy is John J. Blackhall, the veteran and efficient leader 
of the Tenth Ward. He was born in Northfield, Vt., February 12, 
1842. That g-reat Democrat, Stephen A. Douglas, who was also a 
native of the Green ^Mountain State, once remarked that \^ermont was 
"an excellent State to emigrate from," meaning, of course, that it was 
such in a political sense. ]\Ir. Blackhall's father seems to have been of 
the same opinion, and in 1849, "^vhen the subject of this sketch was but 
seven years old, he removed to Schaghticoke, Rensselaer County, N. Y. 
Here he grew to manhood and received his educational training. In 
April, 1863, as soon as he became of age. he made his home in Troy, 
where he has ever since resided. He engaged, at first, in the liveiy 
business, and later opened a grocery store. He soon dropped the latter, 
however, and devoted h'is entire attention to livery and dealing in. fine 
carriages and wagons. His industry, energy and superior business 
capacity brought him noteworthy prosperity, and his establishment be- 
came one the largest and most complete in the city of Troy. In the year 
1897 he admitted into partnership his sons, Frederick L. and John 
J., Jr., the firm name becoming John J. Blackhall & Sons, and the loca- 
tion of the business being at 3100 Sixth avenue. Another son, George 
C. is employed as bookkeeper in the Standard Oil Company's office in 
Albany, and the youngest son, AA''alter, is a student in the Rensselaer 
Pol}-technic Institute. ]Mr. Blackhall was married in 1866 to i\Iiss 
Martin, daughter of Cornelius Martin, a prominent contractor of Troy. 

He has done good service in the Fire Department of his city and is 
a member of the Exempt Firemen's Association. He has also served 
on the Board of Trustees of the department. In the Civil War he 
served in the Twenty-fourth Xew York Regiment and in the Veteran 
Zouaves, becoming an Orderly Sergeant in the last-named organiza- 
tion. 

In politics Mr. Blackhall is a staunch and active Democrat and one 
of the most influential ward leaders in the city. He was elected Super- 
visor from tlie Tenth A\''ard. succeeding himself for three terms. In 
1875 ^^ ^^''^^ elected one of the Coroners of Rensselaer County, an 
office which he filled for the full term of three years. He afterward 
sensed three years as Deputy Sherifl:. He was a delegate to the State 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 381 

convention that nominated Horatio Seymour for Governor in 1876 and 
which afterward reassemhied and nominated Lucius Robinson, after 
Governor Seymour felt compelled to decline the nomination. Mr. 
Blackhall has also served as delegate to a great many City, County and 
District conventions. 



J. B. Weaver, hotel keeper at Canastota, Madison County, was 
born in Fayetteville, Onondaga County, September 10, 1856, and was 
educated in the public schools of his native place. He became engaged 
in the hotel business in the town of Skaneateles. After four years he 
established himself in the same business in Syracuse and continued 
there for sixteen years, until 1893, when he undertook the business for 
the third time, in Canastota, and has remained there until the present 
time. 

His memberships include the Knights of Pythias, the C. M. B. A. 
and Elks Lodge, B. P. O. E., Oneida, No. 676. 

He has served as delegate to both Town and County conventions 
and has always maintained an active and loyal relation to party move- 
ments and interests. 



Isaac Gale Perry was born at Bennington, Vt., March 24, 1822. 
He was one of that class of men who, lacking school opportunities in 
early days, succeed in acquiring an education for themselves. He 
learned the trade of carpenter and subsequently became an architect. 
He began his professional career in New York City in 1849 ^"^ P*-^^" 
sued it for many years. In 1884 he was appointed State Architect and 
eight years later was placed upon the Capitol Commission. He retired 
from his active career in 1900 and died March 17, 1904. He was sur- 
vived by his widow, Lucretia G. Perry, who died March 17, 1905. and 
one daughter, Mrs. W. C. Sexsmith, of Binghamton, N. Y. During 
his long career as an architect Mr. Perry did a great deal of notable 
work in various parts of the State. He was not demonstrative as a 
politician, although a sound Democrat. 



382 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Joiix J. Devitt is a staunch and stalwart Democratic veteran of 
Westchester County, and for more than thirty years he has ahvays been 
a loyal and energetic supporter of the party's platforms and candidates. 

]Mr. Devitt has never aspired to official -honors, nor has he had the 
time to serve on party committees. He has, however, been a delegate to 
manv Democratic conventions, and he has always been a highly effec- 
ti\"e campaign worker. 

He is a member of the City Club of Yonkers and of the Knights of 
Columbus. 



John Joseph Crowley, a promising and already prominent young 
attorney of Chemung County, was born at Elmira, April 8, 1874, the 
son of Thomas and Margaret Butler Crowley. He obtained his educa- 
tion in the public schools of his native city and was graduated from the 
academy in 1894. He afterward took a complete course in a business 
college also, being graduated in the following year. He then began his 
preparation for the legal profession in the office of Bacon & Aldridge, 
and in the year 1900 he was admitted to the Bar, and later became asso- 
ciated in the practice of his profession with the firm of Taylor, Heller 
& O'Connor. 

In politics Mr. Crowley has always been an active and influential 
Democratic worker and a power in both the city and county party 
organizations, having for some 3^ears been the Chairman of the former 
and the Secretary of the latter. His strength before the people has been 
shown in his repeated elections to important public offices. He served 
six consecutive years as Su]ier\-isor, and he enjoys the distinction of 
being one of the only two representatives of the city in the board that 
has honored him by election as Chairman. When first elected, for he 
has presided two terms, he was the youngest member of the board. In 
1900 he was triumphantly elected City Clerk and has made a model 
official. 

He l)elongs to the Pine Cliff Club and the Father Mathew Society. 

Mr. Crowley is a young man of superior ability and he has every 
promise of a highly successful career. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 383 

Charles Platt Williams, a leading attorney and prominent 
Democrat of Wayne County, was born at Lyons, the county seat, Feb- 
ruary 19, 1870, the son of the Rev. and Mrs. W. H. Wihiams. He 
received a thorough educational training in the public schools and the 
High School of Rochester. He engaged for a time as a salesman for 
the Westinghouse Electric Company, of Pittsburgh, until 1890. He 
afterwards began the study of law in the office of Judge Collins, at 
Lyons, and in 1895 he was admitted to the Bar and began the practice 
of his profession. In 1896 and in 1902 he was elected Police Justice 
for the town of Lyons. 

Mr. Williams is a staunch and influential Democratic leader and is 
the Chairman of the Wayne County Democratic Committee. He has 
served as delegate to Democratic State and district conventions and is 
a power in the Democratic politics of Western New York. 

He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Blue Lodge and Chapter. 
In 1 90 1 Mr. Williams married Miss Frances A. Sissons, of Lyons. 



John Dingnan_, restaurant keeper and farmer of Canastota and 
prominent in Madison County Democratic politics, was born in 
Canastota, Madison County, December 3, 1855. He was educated in 
the public schools of his native place, and learned a trade which enabled 
him to become a manufacturer. After attention for some time tO' manu- 
facturing interests he undertook the restaurant business in Canastota 
and has continued in it to the present time. To the interests already 
named Mr. Dingnan added that of a farm, with special attention to 
agriculture and fruit growing. 

In his relations as an active and zealous Democrat Mr. Dingnan 
was for seven years County Commissioner for the town of Lenox and 
at the same time Inspector of Public Works. That he was conspicuous 
as a citizen and a party supporter is shown by the fact that he served 
as a delegate to Town, County and Assembly conventions and to the 
State convention held at Saratoga, September 11, 1900. 

Mr. Dingnan's memberships include the Knights of Pythias and 
the C. M. B. A. 



384 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Frederick W. \\^oodcock, a well-known Democrat of Oswego 
County, was born at Fulton, that county, May 29, 1857. He was edu- 
cated in his native ])lace and when he grew to manhood took up the 
business of contractor, which he still pursues at Fulton. 

Mr. Woodcock has always been an active and earnest Democrat, 
and his services to the party have been so highly appreciated that he 
has held several village and city offices. He is always in line with his 
party and always diligent in furthering its best interests. 

He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, of the Odd Fellows, Red 
Aten and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 



Duncan W. Peck. Few men in Syracuse have been so cordially 
received by the public when running for office as has Hon. Duncan 
W. Peck, who has been before the voters as a candidate for Member of 
Assembly, Mayor and State Senator. Mr. Peck numbers his friends 
by the thousand — they embrace all conditions in life and every acquaint- 
ance of his values him highly. 

-\Ir. Peck, who is a son of the late Major-General Peck, whom 
President Lincoln appointed to command of the army of the East, with 
headquarters in New York, has been a Syracusan all of his life. Few 
are its citizens who do not know him personally or by reputation. 

Mr. Peck has been one of the great leaders of the Democratic Party 
in Syracuse and his counsel and advice have been sought upon numer- 
ous occasions. In 1899, after the election of ]\Iayor McGuire, Mr, 
Peck was selected for Commissioner of Public Safety and his manage- 
ment of the two departments, police and fire, added greatly to his repu- 
tation as an organizer and executive officer. When he retired from 
that office he did so with the good will of all those with whom he came 
in contact officially. 

In politics and in business j\Ir. Peck has won public respect and ap- 
proval. His Democracy is of the Jeffersonian brand and is not diluted 
with any of the weak spirits of modern times. His services to the party 
have iDcen the means of its achieving victory -on many occasions in 
Onondaga County. ... 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 385 

Francis Larkin. One of the veteran Democratic hustlers of West- 
chester County is Francis Larkin, of Ossining. He has been active in 
the party org-anization for a quarter of a century, chairman of Village, 
Town and County Democratic committees and a delegate to many State 
and national Democratic conventions. 

In 1892 he was appointed Assistant Paymaster-General on Gov- 
ernor Flower's staff, with the rank of Colonel. 

Mr. Larkin is a member of the University Club of New York, of 
the Princeton Club of New York, of the Democratic Club of New York, 
of the Shattamuck Yacht Club of Ossining and of the Mount Pleasant 
Field Club. 



Max Cohen, well known as an active and influential Democratic 
worker and as an eloquent and convincing popular political orator in 
Westchester County, began his party service as a member of Tammany 
Hall in the city of New York, serving for a time as a member of the 
General Committee of the Thirty-first Assembly District. For several 
years, however, he has been identified with the Democratic organization 
of Westchester County. He has rendered valuable service on the Yon- 
kers City Committee and has been a delegate tO' all classes of local con- 
ventions. 

In 1901 Mr. Cohen accepted his party's nomination for Supervisor 
in the Third Ward, and, although he did not quite succeed in carrying 
that Republican stronghold, he gave his political opponents a big scare 
and their large majority pretty nearly melted away. 

In 1902 he was appointed a member of the Municipal Civil Service 
Commission, and was elected its Secretary. Mr. Cohen has a rare 
faculty for organization. Lie organized the Jewish element in Yonkers, 
politically, and is its recognized leader. He is also leader of his election 
district, and he is the author of a plan of district organization that was 
first tried with great success in the Third District of the Fourth Ward 
and then in the entire First Ward and must prove effective throughout 
Westchester County. As a stump speaker Mr. Cohen has won many- 
laurels and rendered his party valuable service. 



386 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Thomas F. Larkix. One of the prominent and loyal Democratic 
hustlers of Westchester County is Thomas F. Larkin, of Yonkers. He 
has long been an active and efficient party worker and is especially in- 
fluential among the younger element in the Fourth Ward of the city of 
his residence. 

He is a member of the Knights of Columbus and of the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks. 

j\lr. Larkin is extensively engaged in contracting and building and 
has had but little time to serve on party committees or to attend party 
conventions, but he has shown his interest in his party's success by 
earnest work during important political campaigns, and also by regular 
attendance at local caucuses, which are the springs of party action. 

As a business man ]\Ir. Larkin has been very successful, and as a 
man and a citizen he stands high in the city of his residence. 



Jeremiah F. Connor^ City Clerk, Oneida, N. Y. 

]\Ir. Connor, although a young man, has already attained honorable 
distinction in the Democratic Party of Madison County and has been 
accorded substantial recognition by the people of the city of Oneida. 

He was born in the town of Verona, Oneida County, N. Y., April 
3, 1878, and was educated in the public schools and at the Oneida High 
School. After graduating from the High School he took up the study 
of law and was admitted to the Bar in June, 1902. 

Immediately after his admission he established himself in the active 
practice of his profession in Oneida, but previous to this he had already 
entered upon public office. While yet a law student he had evinced an 
intelligence and an ability for public affairs which led to his appoint- 
ment to the office of City Clerk for a term of two years by the Mayor 
and Council of Oneida. This appointment was made January i, 1902. 
In this position he is adding to his popularity, as well as to his reputa- 
tion as a man of ability, honesty and reliability. 

Mr. Connor has early in life entered upon a career of Democratic 
public service which promises to be honorable and fruitful. He is a 
member of Oneida Council, No. 4"/,^,, Knights of Columbus. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 387 

Franklin P. Denison, of Syracuse, is one of the best known citi- 
zens of that section. He is a son of the late Henry D. Den i son, who 
was prominently identified with the commercial interests of the city for 
twenty years. F. P. Denison was torn in Syracuse on Octol)er 29, 
1854. He is of English descent. He received a fine education in the 
public schools, St. John's Military Academy and Georgetown Univer- 
sity. He was appointed a lieutenant on General Daniel Hawley's staff 
in the State militia. In 1878 Mr. Denison and Miss Ada Schug were 
married. They have one daughter, Mrs. William D. Dunning, Jr. 
Mr. Denison is a capitalist. He has always supported Democratic 
candidates and was especially active and enthusiastic in the Flower 
campaign in 1901. He has for many years been connected with the 
Citizens' and Century Clubs and also with the Country Club. In the 
social side of life in Syracuse Mr. Denison has always been a prominent 
figure. 



John H. McDowell^ of Syracuse, was born in Oswego, October 
15, 1849. H^ ^"^^ educated in the public schools of that city. At the 
age of 15 he enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Eighty- fourth 
Regiment, New York State Volunteers, and served with distinction 
during the Civil War. After the war he became a sailor and served as 
such for four years. He went to Syracuse in 1873 and began work in 
the lumber yard of H. H. Crane & Co-. Later the firm became known 
as Crane, Belden & Co., and subsequently Mr. McDowell acquired an 
interest in the business and it was changed to the firm name of Belden 
& McDowell. In 1888 Mr. McDowell purchased Mr. Belden's interest 
in the firm and he has conducted the business in Wilkinson street ever 
since. He is the largest lumber dealer between Albany and Buffalo, 
his yearly average being an output of 30,000,000 feet of lumber. 

In politics Mr. McDowell is a rock-ribbed Democrat and he has 
always been very active in party management and affairs. During the 
term of Flon. James K. McGuire as Mayor Mr. McDowell was one of 
his closest advisers. Mr. McDowell is a man of the highest business 
standing and he is esteemed by all who know him. He has been a 
forceful factor in Democratic politics in Syracuse for many years. 



388 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Edward J. Renaiian, of the city of Yonkers, is a member of the 
Democratic Committee of the First Ward, and for nearly twenty years 
he has been one of the party's most successful workers in the city or- 
ganization. He is a veteran committeeman and he has been a delegate 
tjD all the classes of local conventions, always ready to use his time and 
his best efforts for the benefit of the party. 

In 1890 ]\Ir. Renahan was appointed Clerk of the Water Depart- 
ment, resigning this position in 1893 i^^ order to accept the office of 
Chief Clerk of the Board of Public Works of the city of Yonkers. 

i\Ir. Renahan is a member of the Order of Elks, of the Democratic 
Club, of the Knights of Columbus and of the City Club. 



A\^iLLiAii N. HoYT, the Democratic leader In the Second Ward of 
IMount A''ernon, Westchester County, is one of those staunch and stal- 
wart upholders of Democratic principles whose loyalty and whose ser- 
vices have given him much influence in the organization. He has ren- 
dered valuable service in past years as a member of the Democratic 
County Committee, of which he is still a member and also as a member 
of the Democratic City Committee. 

In 1897 he was appointed City Clerk under Mayor Edwin W. 
Fiske and held office continuously until December, 1903. He has also 
rendered efficient service as Clerk of the Board of Health and Clerk of 
the Board of Plumbing Examiners. 

He was one of the founders of the lodge of the Order of Elks or- 
ganized in Mount Vernon and he also belongs to the United Workmen, 
to the Foresters, to the Royal Arcanum, to the Red Men and to the Odd 
Fellows. 

In politics Mr. Hoyt has served as delegate to all local conventions, 
County, City, Assembly, Congressional and Senatorial, and in 1902 he 
was sent from his district to the Democratic State Convention at Sara- 
toga. In the campaign of 1900 Mr. Hoyt organized the Bryan and 
Stevenson Club of Mount Vemon, and he has always been a vigorous 
hustler in all important political campaigns. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 389 

James O'Day, of the village of Irvington, town of Dobbs Ferry, 
Westchester County, has been an active factor in the political life of 
that county for nearly a score of years. He is the Democratic leader 
of his election district and has performed valuable party service on the 
Village, Town and County committees. Of the latter he is a member at 
the present time, representing the Fourth Election District. Mr. O'Day 
has also had his loyal and efficient party service recognized by appoint- 
ments as delegate to Town, County, Assembly, Senatorial and Con- 
gressional conventions. He was elected Tax Collector of the village of 
Irvington in 1902 and was re-elected the following year, so satisfactory 
was his service. 

He is a member of the F. of A. and the W. B. A. and is also an 
Exempt Fireman of the Irvington Firemen's x\ssociation. 



Hon. J. E, Gavin. Among the many thousands of Democrats who 
have done earnest, effective and hard labor for the cause of the party in 
Erie County none of them have come in for greater praise than has 
Hon. J. E. Gavin, who occupies a high place in the business world of 
the Queen City. Mr. Gavin is a native of Buffalo, where he was born 
in 1855. He was educated in the public schools, St. Joseph's College 
and St. Michael's College, Toronto. Upon the death of his father, who 
was a well known coal merchant, Mr. Gavin succeeded to the business 
and has conducted it ever since. 

Mr. Gavin's first political office was that of Customs Inspector 
under Mayor Cleveland. He gave all of his time to the duties of the 
position and served the country faithfully and well. In 1891 he was 
nominated for City Comptroller and was elected by a majority of more 
than 4,000. He proved to be one of the most popular men who ever ran 
for office in Buffalo. 

Mr. Gavin upon several occasions has been sent by his party to 
National and State conventions. He is a member of the C. M. B. A. 
and ever since that organization was started has been a prominent 
factor in its development. He has also taken a very active part in 
charity work. 



390 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

"\\'iLLiAM R. Hill. One of the best known Democrats in Syracuse 
is William R. Hill, who has held the responsible positions of Chief 
Engineer and Superintendent of the Syracuse Water Department and 
of Chief Engineer to the Xew York Aqueduct Commission, resigning 
the office in Syracuse to accept the higher one tendered him by the New 
York City Board. 

]\Ir. Hill superintended the construction of the Syracuse water 
works system, and the work was done thoroughly and well. During 
his many years of service at the head of the Syracuse Water Bureau 
he was of invaluable service to the city and his work in that department 
will never be forgotten. In his larger field of work in New York City 
he showed that he was capable of handling big undertakings, and his 
resigiiation as Consulting Engineer to the Aqueduct Commission was 
accepted with deep regret. 

Mr. Hill has always been a loyal Democrat. Many times he has 
been mentioned in connection with the high office of State Engineer 
and Surveyor, but he has preferred to remain in private life. He is a 
public-spirited citizen and wields considerable influence in party affairs. 
He is a member of the Society of Civil Engineers, of the New England 
Water Works Commission, Central States Water Works Association 
and of the American Water Works Association, of which body he has 
been President. 



Colonel Edward J. Mitchell. An active and strenuous life has 
been that of Colonel Edward J. Mitchell, one of the prominent Demo- 
crats of \A'estchester County for forty years. His record of party ser- 
vice is a long one, and he has served on every class of local party com- 
mittees and has been a delegate to party conventions numberless times, 
including no less than five times to the Democratic State Convention. 
He has frequently sensed as convention Chairman and has alv/ays been 
influential in the proceedings. 

In 1882 he was elected Alderman of the city of Yonkers and was 
twice re-elected, serving as President of the board in 1883. He pre- 
sented the resolutions which secured a grant of the land upon which 



; OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 391 

the public (lock is located and was Chairman of the committee that 
built it. He also presented the resolutions which secured an appro- 
priation of $10,000 for new houses for the Fire Department. He has 
served as Coroner, with great acceptance. 

Colonel Mitchell is a veteran of the great Civil War, making a fine 
record. He was also one of the volunteers in the Fenian Raid on the 
Canadian border in 1S66. 

He has served twenty years as a member of the Protection Fire 
Engine Company, serving as Foreman and Secretary. He was also for 
fourteen years Secretary of the Board of Representatives and for two 
years Assistant Engineer of the Fire Department and is still a member 
of the Exempt Firemen's Association, of which he is First Vice-Presi- 
dent. He has been Commander and Adjutant of Retching Post, No. 60, 
of the G. A. R., to which he belongs, and has several times been sent to 
represent his post in the State Encampment. In 1894 he was appointed 
Assistant Quartermaster-General of the Department of New York, and 
in 1900 he was elected Senior Vice-Commander. Since 1894 he has 
been the Secretary and Treasurer of the New York State Women's Re- 
lief Corps Home at Oxford, Chenango County. He was the chairman 
of the Memorial Committee of the city of Yonkers for 1904. 

Mr. Mitchell is Treasurer of the Yonkers Bowling Association, 
President of the Montgomery Club, Treasurer of the City Club of Yon- 
kers, Secretary and Treasurer of the Westchester County Association, 
G. A. R., and member of the Irish Industrial League. 



Nicholas Osterman was born in Germany, April 15, 1843, ^^^ 
attended school in his native land and later completed his education in 
the public schools of the United States. He was for thirty-five years a 
cigarmaker, and later, for twelve years, conducted a cafe in Utica. He 
is a member of the Cigarmakers' Union and also of the Utica Liquor 
Dealers' Association. 

Mr. Osterman has served as delegate to City, County and Assem- 
bly conventions. In the years 1879 and 1880 he filled the position of 
Superintendent in charge of the City Hall. 



392 THE DE:^I0CRATIC PARTY. 



DUNCAN C. LEE. 

Hon. Duncan Campbell Lee. One of the most brilliant young 
Democrats in the State of New York is Hon. Duncan Camptell Lee, of 
Ithaca, for many years a Professor in Cornell University and who has 
been Editor-in-chief of the Ithaca Daily Nezvs since 1899. Professor 
Lee has a State reputation as an orator of brilliant attainments, and 
his speech as chairman of the State Convention which nominated Hon. 
D-Cady Herrick for Governor in 1904 will long be remembered by all 
who heard it as one of the most masterful and powerful political 
speeches ever heard at a State Convention or any other public gather- 
ing. His address, which he prepared at short notice, attracted great 
public attention and evoked widespread comment, not only in this State 
but throughout the Nation. 

Professor Lee is a native of Bovina Center, Delaware. County. He 
was born of Scotch-Irish ancestry in 1869. He is a son of Rev. Dr. 
James B. Lee, a well-known and eloquent member of the Presbyterian 
ministry, a grandson of Judge Thomas Lee, of Ohio, a celebrated jurist 
and orator. Young Lee started in to earn his own living at the age of 15 
by securing employment as a telegraph operator in New York City. 
After working at this profession for a time he attended Delaware 
Academy at Delhi, N. Y. From that institution he entered Hamilton 
College. He graduated with the class of 1891 and was tlie saluta- 
torian of the class. During his college course he was President of his 
class for four years, Captain of the football squad and won several 
scholastic and athletic prizes. After leaving college young Lee was 
secured by the Cascadilla School of Ithaca as teacher of Greek and 
English. He filled that position for two years. In 1894 he was called 
to the Chair of Oratory in Cornell University. He was 24 years of age 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 393 

at the time and enjoyed the distinction of being the youngest professor 
ever secured by the trustees of Cornell University. His occupancy of 
the Chair of Oratory brought tO' him warm praise from the trustees, 
faculty and students, and he became recognized as one of the most 
brilliant men connected with Cornell. Wheii the Spanish-American 
War broke out Professor Lee resigned his position at Cornell and 
enlisted as a private with the Two Hundred and Third Regiment, New 
York State Volunteers, and served with the regiment at Camps Black 
and Mead. He served in turn as Sergeant, Sergeant-Major and Lieu- 
tenant. At the close of the war he was tendered an appointment in the 
Philippine service, but declined it because of his opposition to the Philip- 
pine war, and returned to his home in Ithaca and resumed his place at 
Cornell University. 

Ever since he became of age- Professor Lee has been actively inter- 
ested in Democratic politics, fie is the best known Democrat in Tomp- 
kins County. Li 1899 the County 'Convention placed him in nomina- 
tion for Member of Assembly. He-w-a§:a member of the Civil vService 
Commission of the city of Ithaca at the time and was compelled by law 
to decline the Assembly nomination for that reason, having failed tO' 
resign the local office ninety days previous to his nomination. 

In the first Bryan campaign Professor Lee stood loyally by the 
standard-bearer, and he did much to hold together the wavering ones 
who hesitated between the duty they owed to their party and the candi- 
date for President. In 1900 he was again found supporting the nomi- 
nee of the National Convention, and he was one of those whO' took the 
platform to defend the party from the onslaughts of the Republicans. 
He was organizer and President of all the Bryan clubs of Tompkins 
County during this campaign. 

At Democratic State conventions Professor Lee has been a con- 
spicuous figure for many years. He sprung into great prominence in 
Saratoga in 1900, when he offered a resolution on the floor of the con- 
vention calling for a declaration in the platform against the ice trust in 
the city of New York. In 1902 he was strongly urged for the nomina- 
tion for Secretary of State. Political friends in different sections of 
the State asked for his nomination. That year he attained additional 
prominence and added to his reputation as a platform orator by the 



394 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

many able speeches he cleHvered in different sections of the State in 
favor of the election of Coler and Bulger. In 1903 he was the party 
nominee for Regent of the University of the State of New York and 
received more than the party vote in the Legislature. In 1904 he was 
unanimously selected to preside over the Saratoga State Convention, at 
which he was strongly urged for the nomination for the Lieutenant- 
Governorship. As the permanent chairman of that convention he at- 
tracted unusual attention by reason of the splendid address he deliv- 
ered and the attractiveness of its wording. It was pronounced one of 
the best campaign arguments ever prepared by a party orator in New 
York State. In the presidential campaign that followed Professor Lee 
did gallant service for Judge Parker and was equally diligent in his 
efforts to elect Judge Herrick. 

Not only as a college professor, a campaign orator and public lec- 
turer has Professor Lee distinguished himself, but he has also shone in 
the Fourth Estate. Since 1899 he has been the editor-in-chief of the 
Ithaca Daily News, one of the best known dailies in the State. He Is a 
writer of great power and force and has made the News one of the big 
factors in Western New York journalism. In order to devote all of 
his time to the Nezvs Professor Lee resigned the Chair of Oratory in 
Cornell in 1904. His leaving the faculty of Cornell occasioned deep 
regret among all those interested in the university. 

In the business, social and college life of Ithaca Professor Lee has 
been one of the forceful leaders. One of the most commendable acts 
of his was the organization and conduct of the Boys' Brigade of 
Ithaca, a philanthropical and charitable movement for the bo)^s of the 
city. All of his time is occupied, but he manages to devote himself to 
his home city by entering actively into the work of the Business Men's 
Association, church work and any movement that tends to better the 
town. 

Professor Lee is an officer of the New York State Democratic Edi- 
torial Association and has frequently addressed that lx>dy. His ad- 
dress on "Thomas Jefferson and the University of Virginia" at the 
annual banquet held in Albany in 1903 was a very able and scholarly 
effort. Professor Lee is a student of Jefferson and has on several 
occasions addressed literary societies on the life of the Sage of Monti- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 395 

cello. He is the author of several popular addresses which have at- 
tracted widespread comment and favorable attention, notably "Shake- 
speare," "University Life at Oxford," "Citizenship" and "Thomas 
Jefferson as a Scholar and Educator." 

Professor Lee is a member of the Theta Delta Chi, Delta Chi and 
Phi Beta Kappa college fraternities and is a prominent and enthusiastic 
member of the Masonic order and of the Elks. 

In 1899 Professor Lee and Miss Elizabeth Williams, daughter of 
George R. Williams, president of the First National Bank oif Ithaca, 
were married. They have one son, Douglas Boardman Lee, and a 
daughter, Nancy Lee. 

Professor Lee stands to-day as one of the brilliant and able men of 
New York. His standing is firmly established beyond cavil as a man 
of great ability, attainments, a profound scholar and student, an ac- 
complished editor, a man who is loyal to every right thought and prin- 
ciple and who has done much to bring politics up to a high plane and 
to keep it out of commercial hands. He is popular with all classes of 
people. He is a loyal friend, a model family man and in Ithaca there 
is no more popular and better liked citizen. The Democracy loves him 
for what he has done to keep waving the banner of the party of the 
common people. 



M. L. McCarthy, of Syracuse, ever since he took up his residence 
in that city, has been more or less identified with the active work con- 
nected with the Democratic organization in that city. Mr. IMcCarthy 
is a lawyer by profession and enjoys a large and lucrative practice. He 
was Assistant Corporation Counsel for two years, from 1900 to 1902, 
and he attained just prominence by the masterful way in which he 
handled many important cases that came up for trial. Mr. McCarthy 
has been engaged in several important cases outside of his official duties 
that attracted public attention. He is a native of Truxton, Cortland 
County, and after attaining his early education studied law in the office 
of Judge Duell, afterwards taking up the study in the office of Hon. 
William A. Poucher, of Oswego. 



396 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY i 

Philip E. Gooley, of Syracuse, is a man known to nearly all of 
the Democrats of Onondaga by reason of his business connections and 
his long association with political affairs. He was born in Syracuse in 
i860 and received his education in the public schools and the Christian 
Brothers Academy. For ten years he was in the employ of E. F. 
Holden, the coal magnate. In 1884 he established a large grocery store 
in ^^'est Genesee street and in 1892 he opened another store at Ulster 
street and ]\Iilton avenue. In 1886 he was elected President of the 
village of Geddes. Previous to his being elected President he held the 
office of Village Trustee for two years. In 1894 he was the Demo- 
cratic nominee for County Clerk and received a very handsome vote. 
^Ir. Gooley has frequently been sent as a delegate to City and State con- 
ventions. He is a prominent member of the A. O. H. and C. M. B. A. 
In 1 89 1 ]\Ir. Gooley and Miss Johanna C. Ryan ^vere married. They] 
have one daughter. 



Elbert F. Allen. A firm Democrat, an enterprising and honora- 
ble citizen, Elbert F. Allen, has won the good will of all who know him. 
He was born in Delphi, January 11, 1850. He received his education 
in the public schools and began the labor of life as bookkeeper for Keu- 
yon. Potter & Co., of Syracuse. He remained with that firm until 1876, 
when he was engaged as bookkeeper and cashier by the Syracuse, Iron 
Works Company, remaining there nine years. He served as Deputy 
City Treasurer under Treasurers Roscoe and Ouinlan, and in February, 
1895, "^^'^s appointed City Treasurer to fill a vacancy. In the fall of 
that year Mr. Allen was nominated by the Democrats for Treasurer 
and he was elected. He was re-elected in 1897 ^^'^^ ^0^ ^ third term in 
1899. His administration of the office was marked by strict honesty, 
faithful performance of every duty and obligation and courteous treat- 
ment of all. He received a nomination for a fourth term in 1901, but 
went down to defeat with the rest of the ticket. In 1882 ]\Ir. Allen and 
Miss Lillian T. Corbin were married. They have three children. Mr. 
Allen is at present devoting his time to the management of his farm in 
the village of Fayetteville. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK - 397 

John Heartt, one of the live and earnest Democratic leaders in the 
northern part of Tompkins County, was born in Connecticut, May 
10, 1852. 

He received his education in the pubHc schools of that State. He 
learned the trade of blacksmith and. came to Lake Ridge, Tompkins 
County, over thirty years ago, and that has ever since been his home. 
Mr. Heartt is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

In politics he has always been a staunch and loyal Democrat, active- 
ly interested in the success of his party. He has served several terms as 
Town Assessor. He has served on important county comm.ittees, he 
has frequently been a delegate to party conventions, and he is a man of 
much weight in Democratic councils. 



Hugh Whalen, one of the live and active young Democrats of 
Saratoga County, and noted as an efficient and influential party worker, 
was born at Newark, N. J., November 14, 1874. He received his edu- 
cational training in the public schools of Albany and Ballston Spa and 
at St. Paul's Military Academy at Salem, N. Y. After his school days 
were over Mr. Whalen began the study of law in the office of Hon. 
John H. Burke, at Ballston Spa, and after completing his preparatory 
work and taking a course at the Albany Law School, from which he 
was graduated in 1899, he was admitted to the Bar. He promptly com- 
menced the practice of his profession at Ballston Spa, where he has 
continued, with success, to the present time. 

Mr. Whalen is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks. 

In politics he has always been a live and vigorous Democrat and 
has rendered his party valuable service. He has frequently served as 
delegate to Democratic county conventions, and, November 9, 1900, 
he was appointed Justice of the Peace, to fill a vacancy. January i, 
1 90 1, he began a regular term in this same office, to which he had been 
elected in the previous March. 

Mr. Whalen is a young man of ability and stands high in the com- 
munity. 



398 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Michael J. Francis^ of Dobbs Ferry, is one of the veteran and 
efificient Democratic leaders of Westchester County. For almost a 
score of years he has always been at the front when a fight was on. He 
has served on A^illage, Town and County committees and has been sent 
as a delegate to all classes of local, county and district Democratic con- 
ventions. 

]\Ir. Francis is a member of the Elks, of the Red Men, of the For- 
esters, of the Knights of Columbus and of the Livingstone Hose Com- 
pany of Dobbs Ferry. 

He is the Democratic leader of the Seventh Election District. He 
has never had any aspirations for political office, but he has been a 
powerful supporter of all Democrats nominated by the regular part;^ 
organization. 



James E. Dolan, In every campaign, National, State and local, 
James E. Dolan, of Syracuse, is found on the platform preaching the 
gospel of Democracy. Mr. Dolan is one of the best orators in the 
United States and he has been heard in nearly all of the Northern 
States. 

Mr. Dolan takes no ordinary interest in Democratic politics. He 
is one of the active w^orkers and has been since 1895. In 1899 he had 
full charge of the campaign in Syracuse, and he put up one of the hard- 
est contests ever waged in that city. He has a mind splendidly trained 
for executive work and is often pressed to devote most of his time dur- 
ing elections to the heavy and intricate work that has to be done. 

Two years ago, in Denver, Mr. Dolan was elected National Presi- 
dent of the Ancient Order of Hibernians. He is one of the pioneer 
members of that order and his standing in it can be judged by the way 
his name was received at the Denver Convention. 

Democrats in Syracuse regard James E. Dolan as one of the bright 
particular stars in the membership of the party and one of its. most 
devoted exponents. For fifteen years he has been connected with the 
clothing firm of W. S. Peck & Co., and has traveled all over the United 
States in its interest. Mr. Dolan is widely and favorably known. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 399 

George Dalson was born in Lloyd, Ulster County, October 9, 
1856. He was educated in the public schools and in a private academy 
at Highlands. After leaving- school he learned the blacksmith trade, 
and he has followed that calling ever since. In 1885 ^^*^ removed to 
Libertyville, where he is still located. 

Mr. Dalson became interested in politics before he became of age, 
and he has been an ardent and effective Democratic worker in every 
campaign since. He served five years as Town Auditor, but has re- 
fused all other offices, as he did not wish to spare the time from his own 
business. He has served several years on the Democratic Town and 
County committees, rendering valuable service tO' his party. He has 
been a delegate to many conventions, and is in every way a first-class 
citizen and a stalwart Democrat, loyal and true. 



James H. Meagher, former Commissioner of Public Works of the 
city of Syracuse, has been a leading figure in Democratic politics for 
fifteen years. He was born in Syracuse, December 14, 1865. He re- 
ceived his education in the public schools. In 1884 he engaged in the 
grocery business with his father. For four years he acted as book- 
keeper for John Bachtold. Later the firm of Meagher & Kieley was 
formed, Mr. Meagher and James H. Kieley, in the gentlemen's fur- 
nishing goods business in Syracuse. Mr. Meagher served on the 
School Board in 1888 and in 1889. He was nominated for Member of 
Assembly by the Democrats of his district in 1893 and was only beaten 
by a few votes in a largely Republican district. In 1894 he was elected 
Overseer of the Poor. In 1896 Mayor McGuire appointed Mr. Meagher 
Superintendent of Public Works, to succeed Daniel O'Brien, resigned. 
Mr. Meagher was the Assistant Superintendent at the time. He held 
the office for six years, inaugurating many needed reforms in the Public 
Works Department. Mr. Meagher is a man of wide popularity. He 
belongs to several social and fraternal organizations, including the 
Elks, A. O. H. and C. M. B. A. In Democratic circles Mr. Meagher is 
regarded as an important factor. He is now engaged in the under- 
taking business with P. J. Cody. 



400 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Peter L. Ryan^ of Syracuse, has been an active worker in the 
ranks of the Democracy for many years. Being well known and enjoy- 
ing a large acquaintance, he has been of good service to the party. Mr. 
Ryan is a native of Syracuse and was born in 1856. He was educated 
in the public schools. Nearly all of his life he has been in the drug 
business, but at the present time he represents the Mutual Life Insur- 
ance Company, having charge of the territority in which he lives. Mr. 
Ryan has traveled extensively abroad. He was married in 1888 to 
Miss Ada C. Tyler. They have four children. 



James T. Lennon, of Yonkers, has for many years been an active 
and efficient Democratic Party worker, and he is the present Chairman 
of the Cit}' Committee. He has served as delegate to all classes of con- 
ventions, including the Democratic State conventions of 1900 and 1902. 
He was appointed Receiver of Taxes for the city of Yonkers, in 1901, 
and served acceptably until 1903. 

]\Ir. Lennon is the Democratic leader of the Sixth Ward and his 
efficiency is attested by the fact that it is one of the strongholds of the 
party. He is a meml:)er of the Democratic County Committee, of which 
he has served as Vice-chairman. 

]\Ir. Lennon belongs to many fraternal and benevolent societies, 
including the Foresters, the Knights of Columbus, the Elks, the Red 
]Men, the Ancient Order of Hibernians, the Montgomery Club, the 
Volunteer Fire Department and the Catholic Benevolent League. He 
is also a member of the Westchester County and of the New York State 
Druggists' associations. 

A very high testimony to the efficiency and executive capacity of 
Mr. Lennon as a campaign manager is the fact that it was during his 
term as chairman of the Executive Committee of the Democratic City 
Committee that the first Democratic Mayor Yonkers had l;nown for 
twelve years was elected, and that, too, by the largest majority ever 
given a Democfatic candidate for Mayor in that city. That this result 
was not merely temporary is seen from the fact that Yonkers also gave 
a Democratic majority fur Go\ernor in the following year. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 401 

C V. A. Blauvelt, one of the leading and influential Democrats 
of Rockland County, comes from good Democratic stock, his family- 
having long been prominent in the party organization. 

He has served as delegate to all classes of local and district Demo- 
cratic conventions. His first office was that of Town Collector, in 
which he made a fine record during several years of service. In 1892 
he was elected Supervisor and served two terms. In 1894 he was 
nominated for County Treasurer and resigned his office of Supervisor 
to accept. He was elected and served the full term of three years. 

In 1897 he was elected Sheriff of Rockland County, serving in this 
office also the full term of three years. Mr. Blauvelt is one of the lead- 
ing citizens of Rockland County, and few men have as much weight in 
its public affairs. He is a member of the Masonic order, of the Fores- 
ters and of the Red Men. 



John Moore. Few men in Syracuse are better known than John 
Moore, capitalist and "Captain of Industry." Always a Democrat, he 
has ever supported the nominees of his party, and although he has many 
times spurned tempting offers to run for public office, nevertheless he 
iias never shown loss of interest in the Democratic Party. 

Mr. Moore is a native of Ireland, where he was born on July 9, 
1840. He came with his mother to the United States when a youth 
and learned the business of mason and builder. When he reached the 
age of 21 he engaged in building for himself and has continued in that 
business since. He has built a large number of government and State 
buildings, among them being the Denver and Baltimore postoffices. He 
also did considerable government work at Sacketts Harbor and at 
West Point. He has erected many other buildings in Syracuse and 
other leading American cities. The Moore apartment house in Syra- 
cuse was built by Mr. Moore and is his property. 

Mr. Moore is progressive and up to date. His opinions have weight 
and his judgment is sound and valuable. A sterling Democrat, he has 
been a commanding figure among the many sterling Democrats of 
Onondaga. 



402 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Joseph F. O'Brien is among- the live and zealous Democrats of 
Westchester County that keep things moving. For more than fifteen 
years he has served his party with a loyal devotion that has won him 
the confidence and esteem of all the members of the party. 

He has served on the Yonkers City General Democratic Committee, 
and has been sent as a delegate to all classes of Democratic conventions, 
including- the State Convention. In 1890 Mr. O'Brien was appointed a 
page in the Common Council of his city, and in 1894 he was made 
Assistant City Clerk. He has been, either City Clerk or Assistant City 
Clerk ever since, and has made a fine record in that difficult and re- 
sponsible position. 

He is a member and Exalted Ruler of the Order of Elks, of the 
City Club of Yonkers, of the Yonkers Yacht Club and of Protection 
Engine Company of the Yonkers Fire Department. Mr. O'Brien is 
yet a young man and there are surely many official honors yet in store 
for him. 



A. J. Walkowiak. In the large Polish section of Buffalo there is 
no man who has done more than Anthony J. Walkowiak to spread 
Democratic doctrine. ■ He stands accredited with being a leader among 
the Polish-Americans. In the councils of his party in Erie County he 
has always been given a seat, as his advice is valuable. Mr. Walko- 
wiak was born in 1869 in Posen, Germany. He came with his parents 
to America in 1880. In Buffalo he attended the public schools for four 
years. For a number of years he did farm work. From 1888 to 1892 
he represented a wholesale grocery house. In 1893 he established a 
grocery and liquor business at 387 Peckham street, Buffalo, which he 
now conducts. In 1892 Mr. Walkowiak was his party's candidate for 
Coroner. In 1893 he was a doorkeeper in Albany during the session 
of the Assembly. He was District Committeeman for four years and 
for two years was Chairman of the City Committee. He has been a 
memlDer of the Democratic General Committee for twelve years. He is 
prominently connected with tlie Polish Union. In 1890 Mr. Walko- 
wiak married Miss Rose Pitass, of Buffalo. They have five children. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 403 

Isidore J. Beaudrias. Among the active and efficient Democrats 
of Westchester County is Isidore J. Beaudrias. For nearly jtwenty 
years he has been a vigorous worker in the cause of Democracy. In 
1 89 1 he was elected a member of the Yonkers City General Committee, 
and in 1896 he was elected Chairman. In 1899 he was chosen Vice- 
chairman of the Democratic County Committee, and in 1900 he became 
a member of the Democratic State Committee. He has been appointed 
a delegate to all classes of local conventions and many times tO' State 
conventions. 

In 1 89 1 he was elected Justice of the Peace, and in 1893 he was 
appointed Acting City Judge of Yonkers. In 1901 he was appointed 
Corporation Counsel for the city of Yonkers and in 1903 he was ap- 
pointed Special Counsel to the Corporation Counsel of New York City 
for Westchester County. In 1897 he originated the famous "Cart- 
Tail Campaign" in Yonkers, which added largely to the Democratic 
strength. 

While a member of the State Committee in 1900 he originated the 
plan of appointing members of county committees by election districts, 
which was adopted by Westchester County in 1902, and in 1903 was 
adopted by the State Committee for the entire State. 

Mr. Beaudrias is a member of the City Club of Yonkers, Bar asso- 
ciations of New York City and of Westchester County, Knights of 
Columbus, Knights of Pythias and Alpha Omega Society. He is a 
graduate of the College of the City of New York, class of 1888, and of 
Columbia College Law School, class of 1891. 



John L. Standart^ an attorney of Syracuse, is one of the best 
known citizens of the Saline City. He is a native of Attica, Indiana, 
where he was born on January 21, 1859. He was educated in the public 
and private schools. He studied law in the offices of Kennedy. Sedg- 
wick & Tracey, of Syracuse. For many years he acted as the confi- 
dential secretary of the late Supreme Court Justice George N. Ken- 
nedy, of Syracuse. Mr. Standart is a man of considerable literary abil- 
ity and his poems have appeared in magazines and newspapers. 



404 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Sydney A. Syme, of IMount Vernon, is an active and earnest Demo- 
crat who holds a prominent place in the politics of Westchester County. 
He has been a loyal party worker ever since he became of age. He has 
for five 3'ears been the Clerk of the City Committee of Mount Vernon, 
and lie has been honored by the appointment as delegate to all classes of 
local and party conventions. 

In Januar}'-, 1902, he was elected Acting City Judge and still serves 
in that capacity. In the same year he was elected Justice of the Peace, 
being the only Democrat elected on the city ticket at that election. 

]\Ir. Syme is a member of the Jefferson Democratic Club of Mount 
^>rnon, of the City Club of ]\Iount Vernon, of the Order of Elks, of 
the Masonic fraternity, of the Royal Arcanum, of the Mount Vernon 
Turn A^erein, of the Westchester County Bar Association and of the 
Bar Association of the City of New York. 



\\^ILLIAM P. Gannon^ president of the Syracuse Rapid Transit 
Railway Company, has for years been one of the leading lights in the 
Democratic Party in Onondaga County. Noted for his sound legal 
judgment and his political acumen and shrewdness, Mr. Gannon has 
been of great service in hard political contests. 

During the term of ]\Iayor William B. Kirk Mr. Gannon served as 
Corporation Counsel and made a reputation for himself in that office, 
serving with fidelity to the interests of the taxpayers. 

When the present extensive Rapid Transit Railway system was 
reorganized J\lr. Gannon was elected President and he has since held 
that place. He is a member of the law firm of Stone, Gannon & Pettit, 
one of the best known legal combinations in the State. 

- Of late years Mr. Gannon has devoted most of his time to the vast 
business enterprise, of which he is at the head, but he has loyally stood 
by his party and his time and his money have been at the disposal of 
the party leaders. 

]\Ir. Gannon is a native of Syracuse and has lived there all of his 
life. He is one of the best known and one of the most popular residents 
in the Typewriter City. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 405 

James S. Tiiorn^ of Syracuse, is a native of that city. He was 
born January 7, 1854. He attended the pubHc schools, and after 
graduating from the High School took up the study of law in the offices 
of Hiscock, Gifford & Doheny. He was admitted to the Bar on Janu- 
ary 7, 1876. He opened an office and took up the practice of law, meet- 
ing with splendid success. For many years Mr. Thorn and Hon. M. Z. 
Haven have been connected in the legal business, with offices in the 
Wieting Block. During the term of Mr. Haven as Corporation Coun- 
sel Mr, Thorn was Assistant. He is a man of sound legal knowledge. 
He is an uncompromising Democrat and faithful and loyal to the 
cause. Mr. Thorn has been an active party man for many years, both 
on the platform and at the polls on election day. 



David Verplanck, of White Plains, a prominent attorney of 
White Plains, has been an important figure in the Democratic politics 
of Westchester County for many years. Indeed he began three or four 
years before he became of age. He has twice been honored with an 
appointment as delegate to Democratic State conventions and has often 
been a member of local and' district conventions. He has also per- 
formed much valuable service to the organization as a member of party 
committees. 

He was elected Town Clerk when only twenty-one years of age, the 
youngest on record in that thriving town. In 1867 he was appointed 
Clerk of the Surrogate's Court of Westchester County, serving four 
years. • 

In 1 87 1 he entered into partnership with Stephen S. Marshall for 
the practice of law. Three years later this firm was dissolved and Mr. 
Verplanck entered the firm of Mills & Cochran. In 1877 Judge Coch- 
ran was elected District Attorney and he appointed Mr. Verplanck his 
Assistant, a position which he continued to fill with great ability for 
twenty-one years. He was Trustee of the village of White Plains 
through successive re-elections for more than twenty years. 

Mr. Verplanck is a member of the Masonic fraternity and also of 
the Westchester County Bar Association. 



4o6 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Michael J. CANT^^■ELL. One of the stalwart Democratic veterans 
of \\>stchester County is ]\IichaeI J. Cantwell, of the city of Yonkers. 
For more than forty years he has been an active and influential worker 
for his party's success in every campaign. 

He has served on the City Democratic Executive Committee for 
many years, and both as a counselor and as a hustler he is greatly re- 
spected by all his fellow Democrats. 

He is so busy attending to the demands of his own extensive affairs 
that he has always refused to accept nominations for office, but his sup- 
port of the party candidates is always loyal and earnest in every impor- 
tant campaign. 



James P. Dunn. For nearly a score of years James P. Dunn has 
been one of the earnest and influential Democratic workers of West- 
chester County. As a member of party committees, City, County and 
State, he has rendered great service. 

From 1896 to 1898 he was a member of the Democratic State Com- 
mittee. He has also been elected a delegate to numberless conventions, 
among them the famous State Convention at Saratoga Springs which 
nominated Roswell P. Flower for Governor in 1891. 

He was elected Aldemian from the Fifth Ward of the city of Yon- 
kers in 1893, serving two years with great acceptance. In 1900 Mr, 
Dunn accepted the Democratic nomination for Sheriff of Westchester 
County, and his great personal popularity was made clear by his run- 
ning seventeen hundred and eighty-four votes ahead of his ticket, but 
the Democratic "slump" that year prevented his election. 

In 1897, while Mr. Dunn was Chairman of the County Committee, 
the tliree Assembly districts of Westchester County each elected a 
Democrat as Member of Assem1:)ly, the first time this political feat was 
ever accompH.shed. He was appointed Fire Commissioner in 1903 and 
served until the Rqiublicans regained |X)wer in the city. He was Chair- 
man of the Democratic City Committee for four years. Mr. Dunn is a 
member of the City Club, of the Order of Elks and of the Exempt Fire- 
men's Association of Yonkers. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 407 

William J. Hillery has long been one of 'the pillars of the Democ- 
racy in Buffalo and has done a great deal to stimulate activity in the 
rank and file of the party. Mr. Hillery, in sunshine and storm, has 
always been a Democrat and is staunch in his belief in the principles of 
the party. 

, Mr. Hillery is a native of Dunkirk, where he was born in 1859. He 
was educated in the public schools of that city, and in 1872 took up his 
residence in Buffalo. For several years he was connected with the 
Pennsylvania and the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western railroads. 

Sooii after Grover Cleveland became President in 1885 Mr. Hillery 
was appointed Deputy Collector of Internal Revenue and discharged 
the duties of the office with marked fidelity and efficiency. In 1889 
he was elected Alderman from the old Thirteenth Ward by a handsome 
majority. In 1892 he was appointed Sealer of Weights and Measures, 
Mr. Hillei7 is in the contracting business. He has a wide acquaintance 
in Buffalo and is highly regarded by all who know him. 



Captain Michael F. Carmody, of Mount Vernon, Has long been 
recognized as one of the strong Democrats of Westchester County. 
For many years he has rendered valuable service on the Mount Vernon 
City Committee, and he has been a delegate to City, County, Assembly, 
Senatorial and Congressional District conventions. Captain Carmody 
has never been anxious for public office, but his personal popularity and 
the esteem in which he is held by the community in which he lives may 
be seen in the fact that when, in 1903, he was nominated for Supervisor, 
the majority against him was only seventy-nine votes, although the 
head of the ticket was beaten by twelve hundred. 

In 1894 he was appointed a member of the Board of Examiners 
and was chosen President, holding the office until he resigned. 

Captain Carmody received his title from his holding that offfce in 
Company B, First Regiment, N. G. S. N. Y. He is also a member of 
the Royal Arcanum, the Turn Verein, the Order of Elks, the Catholic 
Benevolent League, the Firemen's Benevolent Association and the Cen- 
tral Hose Company, No. 3, of Mount Vernon. 



4o8 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hon. Cornelius A. Pugsley, wlio has been active in the pohtical 
hfe of Westchester County for many years, is a native of that county, 
liaving- been born on the Pugsley Farm near Peekskill, in the year 1850. 
His early education was obtained in the district schools, and after 
graduation he enjoyed the advantages of a private tutor for some time. 

His entrance into business life was made as clerk in the Peekskill 
postoffice, but shortly after he was appointed Assistant Postmaster. 
Later he resigned this position to enter the Westchester County National 
Bank. Beginning at the bottom of the ladder, he was promoted through 
the various departments until in the fall of 1897 his business career was 
crowned with his election as President of the AVestchester County Na- 
tional Bank. 

I\Ir, Pugsley has always taken an active interest in Democratic poli- 
tics, lx)th State and National, but his extensive business interests pre- 
vented aspiration to office. In 1898 he was urged by friends and the 
Democratic organization to take the nomination for the United States 
Congress from the old Sixteenth Congressional District, but he de- 
clined. In 1900 the solicitations of his party became so urgent that he 
accepted the nomination, and in November of that year was elected by 
711 majority, a remarkably large one in that year of Republican ma- 
jorities, and he was the only Democratic Congressman elected between 
New York City and Buffalo. In 1902 he was again nominated for Con- 
gress, but under the new apportionment of Congressional districts in 
the State, the Sixteenth District was divided and the Nineteenth Dis- 
trict included only Westchester County, which has a normal Republican 
majority of 3,700. Under the new conditions Mr. Pugsley made an 
excellent showing in the election, losing the contest by only 500 votes. 

During his term in Congress he was a member of the Banking and 
Currency Committee and was largely instrumental in causing the de- 
feat of the Fowler bill, which would have created a monopoly of banks 
throughout the country. 

Mr. Pugsley is a prominent figure In the financial circles of the 
State and nation, and he lias twice been elected a member of the Execu- 
tive Counci] of the American Bankers' Association of the United States 
and is a member of the New York Chamber of Commerce of the State 
of New York. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 409 

Socially he has been Vice-president and Treasurer-general of the 
National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution and is a mem- 
ber and Vice-president of the Empire State Sons of the American Revo- 
lution, of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, of the New 
England Society, of the Harlem Club and the Patria Club of New York 
City. He is President of the Board of Trustees of the Field Library of 
Peekskill, is Trustee and Treasurer of the Field Home at Yorktown, is 
Trustee and President of the Peekskill Military Academy and is an 
Elder in the First Presbyterian Church of Peekskill. 

Mr. Pugsley is an eloquent speaker and his services have been eager- 
ly sought not only in political circles but on commemoratidn occasions, 
in social gatherings and religious convocations. 

In financial circles his voice is a power, and during his. term in Con- 
gress he was of invaluable assistance in all legislation relating to finan- 
cial matters. He introduced a bill advocating the designation of na- 
tional banks as government depositories for public moneys and meas- 
ures for reform in the currency which created much favorable comment. 

He has ever been careful of the interests of his constituency and has 
uniformly shown such broad-mindedness in public affairs that during 
the year of 1904 many of the State leaders of the Democratic Party 
turned to ]\Ir. Pugsley as an ideal candidate for Governor, a candidate 
who could unite all factions and lead to victory, and his name was heard 
along with those of other prominent candidates up to the last hour of 
the Saratoga Convention. 

He is an able and progressive member of the Democratic Party and 
has won the confidence of all members of that party. 

His \'iews on financial matters has Seen much sought for by the 
press of the nation. His careful management of the Westchester 
County National Bank has raised a country institution to the position 
of on0 pf the strongest banks in the State. 

[Hon'. David B. Henderson, in an article published in the January 
number of Everybody's Magacinc of 1904, wrote: 

'The latter (Mr. Pugsley), a banker, is perhaps the ablest Democrat 
in the House in financial matters and he has made a special study of our 
monetary laws and needs." 

Personally Mr. Pugsley is an affable, enteftainihg and progressive 



4IO THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

gentleman, and to these attributes his great popularity is primarily due, 
but his integrity and public spirit are quite as marked and hold the 
esteem of all men. 



]M. J. GoLDBAS^ wholesale junk dealer, connected with th'e Utica; 
Gas and Electric Company. 

Air. Goldbas was born in Utica, Oneida County, June 2, 1864. He 
was educated in the pul:)lic schools of his native city, and became en- 
gaged in the wholesale junk business. He is at present connected with 
the Utica Gas and Electric Company. He has served as delegate to 
County and Senatorial conventions, has been for eight years a member 
of the Board of Health and is a member of both the City and County 
committees. 



\\'iLLiAAi Addison Duncan^ of Newark, Wayne County, was 
born at Penfield, Monroe County, January 25, 1849. He was educated 
in the public schools of Newark and at Brownsville, Ontario. After 
leaA'ing school he was engaged with his father in a woolen factory 
until 1882. The following year he went into the bottling business, 
which he has ever since pursued with great success. 

jNIr. Duncan is a loyal and energetic Democratic worker. He has 
served as Village Trustee and as Chief of Police with great acceptance. 
For twenty years he has been a frequent delegate to party conventions, 
State and County. 

Mr. Duncan is a memher of the Masons and has taken all the de- 
grees, up to and including those of the Commandery of Knights Tem- 
plars. Tie married, in 1865, Miss Hannah L. Rawley, of Long Island. 
They ha\e two sons. IMr. Duncan's ancestor came over on the May- 
flower, and his family has been represented in every war from the 
Revolution to the great Civil W^ar, in which three of his brother's en- 
listed. Two of them became commissioned officers and all proved 
themselves gallant soldiers. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 411 

Hon. Thomas Ryan. A veteran leader of Democracy in Onon- 
daga County, three times Mayor of the populous city of Syra- 
cuse, twice an Alderman from the Fourth Ward, are the main 
events crowded into the strenuous political career of Mayor Thomas 
Ryan. 

There is no royal road to success in politics. Generously gifted as 
he was, Mr. Ryan began as other young men, at the bottom rung of the 
ladder, and it was by arduous toil and intense application to his duties 
only that he has attained to his present prominence. 

At the inception of his career he served the usual apprenticeship at 
the polls and on the various minor committees. It was in the faithful 
discharge of these lesser duties that his superior ability was recognized 
and he was accorded a place on the Executive Committee of the Onon- 
daga County Committee. Then came elections as delegate tO' the vari- 
ous minor conventions and later to the more important State conven- 
tions. 

In 1875 he went before the electorate of the Fourth Ward, Syra- 
cuse, as a candidate for Alderman. His popularity overcame the Re- 
publican opposition and he was elected by a comfortable margin. So 
well did he fulfill his trust as Alderman that he was re-elected the fol- 
lowing year. 

Gaining in strength and popularity with every succeeding cam- 
paign, he became a fit candidate for the Assembly, and in 1881 he was 
nominated in the First District, Onondaga. This district was regarded 
as an invincible Republican stronghold, as it had returned big majori- 
ties against Democratic candidates for the preceding twenty-one years. 
Undismayed by these adverse conditions, Mr. Ryan plunged into the 
campaign with hearty vigor. It is an unquestioned fact to this day 
that he succeeded in downing his opponent by eighty-six votes, but the 
count defeated him. He made no contest, though urged by all his 
friends to do so. 

The crowning event in his political life came in 1883, when the 
Democratic City Convention of Syracuse named him as its choice for 
Mayor. There was a strong Republican opposition at the time, but 
after a hard campaign the voters decided in his favor and he was in- 
ducted into office. The clean-cut, business administration that followed 



412 THE DEiVlOCRATIC PARTY 

vindicated the judgment of the electorate, and they attested their ap- 
proval by re-electing him in 1884 and 1885. 

i\Ir. Ryan was born in Tipperary County, Ireland, May 12, 1844. 
He came to the United States with his parents in 1849, ^^^ i^ the pub- 
lic schools of Syracuse obtained an education. He began commercial 
life by learning the cooper's trade and later opened a restaurant. In 
1883 he had accumulated sufficient capital to establish a brewery, and 
through his skillful management it has assumed its present prosperous 
proportions. 

\Mien the great Civil War was declared Mr. Ryan was Lieutenant 
in the ^^'oodruff Zouaves — afterward changed to the Westcott Zouaves, 
an independent company. But he threw rank aside and enlisted as a 
private in Company A, Eighty-sixth New York Volunteers. When 
mustered out he became a member of Company F, N. G. S. N. Y., and 
was later elected its Captain. He also holds the rank of Major, Fifty- 
first Regiment of the National Guard. 

During his busy career he started a newspaper, the Syracuse News, 
which he edited five years in the interests of Democracy. 

He has had little time to devote to club life and holds membership 
only in the Century Club, of Syracuse. 



Levi H. Brown, of Watertown, one of the leaders of the Bar in 
Northern New York, and long the senior of its active members, was 
lx)rn at Lorraine, Jefferson County, March 2y, 1818. His early years 
were spent upon his father's farm, or in his mills, when not attending 
the public school. At the age of 18 he attended the Academy at Flor- 
ence, Oneida County, for three months. From thence he entered the 
Union Academy, at Belleville, where he remained through several 
terms. Afterward he pursued his studies still further at the Hamilton, 
!Madison County, Academy and the old Oxford, Chenango County, 
Academy. In 1841 he entered the junior class at Union College, from 
which he was graduated in 1843. 

In October of the same year Mr. Brown, who had begim the study 
of law entered the office of Calvin Skinner at Adams. His prelimi- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 413 

nary reading, while at college and spare times before he began his for- 
mal preparation for his profession, had been pursued under the instruc- 
tion of Counselor Jones, a prominent attorney of Schenectady. In 1845 
he was admitted to the Bar at Watertown, in the Court of Common 
Pleas. In July, 1846, he was admitted to practice in the Supreme 
Court and Court of Chancery ; in June, 1855, to the United States Dis- 
trict Court; in May, 1865. to the United States Circuit Court, and in 
March, 1879, to the United States Supreme Court. 

Mr. Brown began the practice of his profession at Adams, Jefferson 
County, in 1846, but in 1852 he removed to Watertown, where he con- 
tinued until his death, in the fall of 1904. Upon his removal toi Water- 
town he formed a partnership with Joshua Moore, Jr., which continued 
until Mr. Moore's death, in 1S54. In the following month he became a 
partner of Allen C. Beach. Mr. Beach retired in 1869, after his election 
as Lieutenant-Governor, but the firm was not formally dissolved until 
1 87 1. Mr. Brown's next partnership was with Henry Gypson, a for- 
mer student in his office. This continued until 1878, after which time 
he continued to practice alone. 

Mr. Brown applied himself diligently to the duties of his profes- 
sion, in which he attained not only success, but also eminence, building 
up a very large business. He was especially noted at the Bar for his 
shrewdness as a cross-examiner of witnesses, in which branch of his 
profession he was known as one of the most skillful attorneys in the 
State. Like all great lawyers, Mr. Brown discouraged, instead of pro- 
moted, litigation, but, once engaged in a cause, he proved himself a 
tnily formidable antagonist. Perhaps the most noted case in which he 
was engaged was that, in 1869, in which he was associated with Charles 
Rhodes, of Oswego, and Samuel Earl, of Herkimer, in defending the 
State of New York in suits for damages aggregating $639,000, brought 
by two hundred and sixty property owners along the Black River. The 
claims were based upon losses caused by the escape of the waters of 
North Lake Reservoir, in April, 1869. The claimants were represented 
by thirty of the ablest lawyers in the State, but Mr. Brown and his 
associates succeeded in saving the State some $400,000. 

Mr. Brown was always so assiduously devoted to the work of his 
profession that he had comparatively little time left for the activities of 



414 THE DEAIOCRATIC PARTY 

political life. Still he was so earnestly interested in the success of the 
Democratic Party, of which he w^as an active supporter through all his 
long life, that he stood high in its councils and wielded great influence 
both in the organization and with the people. In 1844 he attended the 
Democratic State Convention which nominated Silas Wright for Gov- 
ernor, and from that time he became an active figure in State politics. 
He was given his party's nominations for District Attorney in 1853, 
for State Senator in 1868, and afterward for Representative in Con- 
gress. In 1876 he was elected Mayor of Watertown. 

Mr. Brown was a director of the Jefferson County Bank for more 
than thirty-five years and the president of the AVatertown Spring 
\\'agon Company from 1876 until his death. He had also extensive 
business interests in other localities. In 1861 he married Miss Delia M. 
Cole, of Palmyra, Wayne County. He was for many years a Vestry- 
man of St. Paul's Episcopal Church. He was a strong man, a devoted 
Democrat and an eminent citizen, and he occupied a very high place in 
the confidence and regard of the community. 



Hon. Curtis N. Douglas was born at Watertown, N. Y., May 28, 
1856. He was named for his father's business partner, Curtis Noble, 
who was one of the founders of the Hanover National Bank and of the 
Home Insurance Company, of New York City. His father, John Pettit 
Douglas, moved to Brooklyn, N. Y., in 1859, and Curtis N. received 
most of his early education in the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute. He 
was prepared for college at the private school of John C. Overheiser, a 
famous clc'issical scholar, and then entered the University of Rochester, 
from which he was graduated with the degree of A.B. in the class of 

1877. 

In 1886 Mr. Douglas settled in Albany, N. Y., and in 1887 he was 
elected a memljer of the Board of Alanagers of the Young Men's Asso- 
ciation. In 1889 he was elected President of that Association, after a 
very warm contest. 

In 1893 ^""^ '^^'^^ elected to the Assembly from the Fourth District of 
Alljnny County, defeating Amos J. Ablett by a plurality of 272. Dur- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 415 

ing the year 1894 he was a member of the Committee on Railroads and 
of the Committee on Federal Relations. In 1898 Mr. Douglas was the 
Democratic candidate for Senator in the Twenty-ninth Senatorial Dis- 
trict and was elected by a plurality of 1,422, his opponent being' Senator 
Myer Nussbaum. During his term in the Senate he was a member of 
the Committees on Finance, Railroads and Pensions. 

Mr. Douglas is the managing partner in the well-known lumber 
firm of L. Thomson & Co. He has been for several years President of 
the Albany Board of Lumber Dealers and has been a member of com- 
mittees of the National Wholesale Lumber Dealers' Association. 

Senator Douglas is an enterprising business man, and his public 
career, both in Assembly and Senate, engenders the wish in all good 
Democrats that there were more public men of his character and 
calibre. 



Maurice C. Spratt^ one of the prominent attorneys of Buffalo, 
was born at Rossie, St. Lawrence County, April 4, 1866. He acquired 
his literary education in the public schools of his native town, at the 
Ogdensburg Academy and at the Georgetown University, from which 
he was graduated with honor. He began the study of law in the office 
of his father at Rossie, and after completing his preliminary reading "he 
entered the Law School of Georgetown University, from which he was 
also graduated, and in 1891 he was admitted to the Bar. 

He promptly began the practice of his profession at Buffalo, where 
his ability and industry brought him swift recognition, and he has built 
up a large and lucrative practice. 

Mr. Spratt is a member of the Buffalo Club, of the University Club, 
of the Liberal Club, of the Orpheus Society and of the Knights of Co- 
lumbus. He is the president of the Jefferson Club of Erie County, the 
leading Democratic Club of the city and the county. He is a member 
of the Democratic General Committee of the Twenty-first Ward of 
Buffalo and also of the Democratic County Executive Committee. 

Mr. Spratt is one of the leaders of the younger Democracy, and 
both professionally and socially he stands very high in the Western 
New York metropolis. 



4i6 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



HON. JOHN D. McMAHON. 

John D. jMcMahon was born in the city of Toronto, the capital 
of the Province of Ontario, Canada, January 28, 1859. He is the 
son of Daniel ]\Ic^Ialion, a native of County Clare, Ireland, who came 
to this country about the year 1843 at the age of sixteen. He later 
married Alice Cavanagh, a native of Florence, Oneida County, New 
York. They resided in Toronto for some time. In 1861 they moved 
to Oswego, New York, where Daniel McMahon enlisted in the 146th 
New York regiment, in which he made a record as a brave and efficient 
soldier. 

When John D. McJMahon vras but nine years old his father died, 
and he removed with his mother to Florence, New York, where he 
rec^ved his early education in the district school. At the age of six- 
teen he entered the Academy at Rome, and was graduated therefrom 
in 1879. He then took private instruction from Rev. Father Smith, 
an accomplished tutor, of Rome, from \\'hom he gained an intimate 
knowledge of Latin and Greek. While he desired to take a college 
course, circumstances dictated other plans and, as he had already se- 
lected the law as his profession, he entered the offices of Johnson & 
Prescott, prominent attorneys of Rome. He remained with the firm 
tliree years, and was admitted to the Bar October 6, 1882. 

Almost as soon as he commenced the active practice of his pro- 
fession he began to attract public attention as an able and even brilliant 
lawyer, and he soon gained high distinction and a wide popularity. 
His popularity did not depend entirely upon his success as an advocate, 
but was greatly increased by his attractive personal qualities. 

Early in life he began to interest himself in politics, and his fellow 
citizens soon recognized that he was well qualified for public service. 
He affiliated with the Democratic Party while yet a youth and, after 
attaining his majority, he Ijecame an active ^\orker in its ranks. In 
fact, he began public speaking at the age of eighteen. 





/<c t^"^ ^y^ 




OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 417 

On March 7, 1883, fo^-^^ months after his admission to the Bar, 
when he was but twenty- four years of age, Mr. McMahon was appointed 
Corporation Counsel of the city of Rome by tlie City Council, and on 
the 1 2th of March, 1884, he was reappointed to the same office. The 
ability which he displayed as Corporation Counsel greatly increased 
his popularity among all classes of citizens, and on March 6, 1886, he 
was elected Recorder, or City Judge, of Rome, by the flattering ma- 
jority of 1,000. He carried every ward in the city, many Republicans 
casting their votes for him. His administration of the office of Re- 
corder was characterized by such judicial wisdom that his reputation 
was greatly increased and, at the expiration of his first term of office, 
he was re-elected for a second term of four years, March 4, 1890. 

John D. McMahon's rise at the Bar has been as rapid and notice- 
able as his advance in public life. In the autumn of 1884 he formed 
a law partnership with T. Curtin, Jr., of Rome, under the firm name 
of McMahon & Curtin. This partnership continued until December, 
1896, when the firm became McMahc«i & Mason. Since July, 1901, 
the firm has been McMahon, Mason & Larkin. Mr. McMahon has 
long been regarded as one of the ablest lawyers in the State of New 
York, and has figured in many notable legal trials, always adding to 
his already high reputation as an advocate and lawyer. 

In the fall of 1888 Mr. McMahon was nominated for Member of 
Congress from the Twenty-third Congressional District of New York, 
and although defeated in that Republican stronghold he made an 
excellent record in the race, running 2,500 votes ahead of his ticket. 

On April 15, 1890, Mr. McMahon was nominated by Governor 
Hill and confirmed by the Senate to succeed Hon. Daniel Magone, of 
Ogdensburg, as one of the managers of the State Insane Asylum at 
Utica, New York. 

In 1 89 1 a deadlock occurred in the Legislature, caused by the re- 
fusal of the Republicans in the Senate to enact legislation unless a 
resolution empowering a committee of that party to investigate the 
management of the canals and public works of the State should be 
allowed by the Democrats to pass. It was a period of great excite- 
ment in Albany and among politicians of both parties throughout the 
State. The Democrats would not yield, and the Senate adjourned 



4i8 . THE DE:\I0CRATIC PARTY 

without the passage of the resolution. To avoid the charge of even 
seeming to cover irregularity or fraud, the Democratic Assembly then 
appointed a committee to investigate the truth of the charges which 
had been made by Republican Senators. The Democratic managers 
selected John D. ]\IcMahon, the young Democratic leader of Rome, 
as the proper person to conduct the investigation as the counsel of the 
committee. That delicate and difficult task was assumed by him, and 
four weeks were spent in examining witnesses. It was a critical 
case, as every step was closely watched and reported and commented 
upon by the entire press of the State, but through the skillful manage- 
ment of Mr. I\Ic]\Iahon the investigation resulted in the complete 
vindication of the Democratic administration of canal affairs. The 
effect throughout the State of the investigation can hardly be over- 
estimated, and it is conceded that it contributed more than any other 
one cause to the magnificent triumph gained by the Democratic Party 
in the State at the November election of that year. The press, gen- 
erally, paid high tributes to the ability of ]\Ir. McMahon in the conduct 
of the investigation, and the Xew York Herald, in particular, was 
profuse in its praises of the manner in which he had conducted the 
whole matter. His efficient work brought him prominently before 
the whole State, throughout which his name has since remained 
familiar. 

When the State Democratic Convention met at Saratoga. Septem- 
ber 1 6. 1 89 1, John D. McAIahon was a delegate from his district, and 
when the name of Roswell P. Flower was presented to the convention 
as a candidate for the nomination for Governor he seconded the nomi- 
nation. During that memorable campaign he worked with great en- 
thusiasm for the success of the Democratic State ticket, speaking 
wherever directed by the committee, a practice which he followed for 
many succeeding campaigns. For seventeen years, except on one or 
two occasions when he was absent on business engagements, he has 
represented his district as its delegate in Democratic State conventions, 
always taking a prominent part in the proceedings, and in 1896 he was 
a delegate from New York in the Democratic National Convention at 
Kansas City. 

Early in the year 1892 Judge Mc^Mahon was appointed Deputy 



OF THE' STATE OF NEW YORK 419 

Attorney-General of the State, and resigned the judgeship at Rome in 
order to enter upon the duties of this office. 

He conceived the idea of estabhshing a State institution at the 
city of Rome — the first one in its history. While Deputy Attorney- 
General he sold to the State one-half the County Home property of 
the County of Oneida, which had previously been used for the care of 
the insane, and drew and had passed an act of the Legislature estab- 
lishing the Rome State Custodial Asylum. In the following year he 
took proceedings to condemn the balance of the county property and 
fix its value, and obtained an appropriation from the succeeding Legis- 
lature for the purpose of purchasing it. From this beginning has re- 
sulted the present Rome State Custodial Asylum, one of the largest of 
our State institutions. 

His interest in the welfare and material prosperity of the city of 
of his home is further evidenced by the fact that he is a Director 
of the First National Bank of Rome, of the Rome Gas, Electric 
Light & Power Company, of the Williams Brothers Knitting Com- 
pany, of the James A. Spargo Wire Company, and a Trustee of 
the Rome Savings Bank. He is also counsel for many of these and 
other institutions and business associations that g'ive life and material 
prosperity to the growing city of Rome. He is also a Director of the 
National Gas, Electric Light & Power Company, and the Central New 
York Abstract and Title Company, and a member of the New York 
State Bar Association, the Rome Club, and the Manhattan Club of 
New York City. 

John D. McMahon has been a worker all his life, and whether man- 
aging a legal case or attending to some public duty he has always 
given his whole mind and energy to the matter before him. He is 
broad-minded and public-spirited, and has been instrumental in secur- 
ing many legislative appropriations for carrying on and completing 
various public works and improvements for the benefit of his city, thus 
contributing largely to its advancement and prosperity. 

Of slight build, Mr. McMahon is physically robust. He is a man 
of strong determination and great tenacity of purpose, yet always just, 
while his consideration for his fellow men makes him remarkably at- 
tractive and popular, both in private and public life. 



420 THE DE^IOCRATIC PARTY 

He was married on April 26, 1886, to Aliss Julia F. Johnson, 
daughter of Hon. D. j\I. K. Johnson, with whom he read law. They 
have one child, a son. Johnson D. ]\IcMahon, born March 8, 1887, who 
is now a student at Phillips Exeter Academy, at Exeter, N. H. 



Daniel F. Toomey^ a prominent business man and capitalist of 
Chautauqua County, was torn at Dunkirk, February 6, 1855, and that 
thriving cit}^ has always been his home. He was educated in the public 
schools, and after his schooldays were over he engaged in the flour 
and feed business. In 1892 he left this and became a real estate dealer. 
He is the owner of a daily and weekly newspaper. He organized the 
company and built the railroad from the Union Station, Dunkirk, to 
Point Gratiot, and was President and General Manager until 1903, 
when the property was sold to a Cleveland syndicate. 

He was one of the founders of the Young Men's Association of 
Dunkirk, and also of St. Mary's Lyceum. He was one of the founders 
of the ]\[crchants' National Bank, and he organized and is one of the 
largest stockholders in the company which erected the Hotel Gratiot, 
the largest in the city. Nor does this long catalogue complete the list 
of Mr. Toomey's public acti\'ities. Fie was the first man to take advan- 
tage of the half-million-dollar improvement of Dunkirk harbor by estab- 
lishing the Dunkirk and Buffalo Steamboat Company, of which he is 
the President and sole owner, having the distinction of owning the 
first large Dunkirk steamboat, that city being its home port. 

Mr. Toomey has always been an ardent and active Democrat. He 
is an eloquent public speaker, and he has rendered the part}'- great ser- 
vice on the stump. He has l^een a member of political committees and 
a delegate to State and National conventions. He has also been hon- 
ored with many public ofiices. Tax Collector, Member of Common 
Council, Alderman, Member of Board of Education, etc. A very live 
man. and an upright, excellent, valuable citizen of great public spirit 
is Daniel F. Toomey. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 421 

Augustus Blood, born in Sweden, N. Y., February, 3, 1843, was 
educated in Ihe public schools of Brockton and Westfield. He left 
school to enlist in the 112th New York Regiment, during tlie Civil 
War, and served three years in the field. At the close of the war he 
returned to Brockton and taught school for ten years ; then he engaged 
in farming, grape-raising, and speculation. He is the owner of a 
very valuable vineyard. 

Mr. Blood is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and has taken 
all the degrees up to and including the Commandery and the Mystic 
Shrine. He also belongs to the G. A. R., the Knights of Pythias, the 
Order of the Eastern Star, and the United Workmen. 

Mr. Blood has always been an earnest and influential Democratic 
worker. He served as Postmaster for nine years, and has also held 
the offices of Town Collector and Justice of the Peace. He has been 
a delegate to many County and State conventions. 



George W. Fuller. One of the enterprising and valuable citi- 
zens of Chautauqua County is George W. Fuller, of Portland. He 
was born in that town, November 26, i860, and was educated in the 
public schools and at the Westfield Academy, 

Mr. Fuller's father, R. D. Fuller, was a large grape grower and 
wine manufacturer, and the son became associated with him and suc- 
ceeded him in the extensive business they both built up. Mr. Fuller 
is a member of the Masonic fraternity. 

He has always been a loyal and earnest Democrat and ready to 
help the cause to which he is so loyally devoted, both by his efforts 
and his means. He has served as delegate to many party conventions 
but has never been able to spare the time from his extensive private 
business to accept any public office nor even a party nomination. 

Personally, Mr. Fuller is a courteous and cultivated gentleman, 
bright and companionable, and he has a beautiful home and a large 
army of friends. His vineyard contains one hundred acres of grape- 
vines, and his extensive wine manufacturing establishment is not only 
spacious and complete, but up-to-date in every respect. 



422 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Clixtox Beckwith, one of the most active and efficient Demo- 
cratic leaders in Central New York, was born in the city of Troy, 
November 30, 1846, the son of William and Hannah (Salisbury) Beck- 
with. His parents removed to Utica during his boyhood, and his edu- 
cational training was received in the public schools of that city. At the 
outbreak of the great Civil War, although a boy in his fifteenth year, 
he became fired with patriotic enthusiasm and enlisted in Compadiy K, 
Ninety-first Regiment, New York Volunteers. The exposure and 
hardships of camp life, in the field, were too great, however, for a youth 
of his years, and in May, 1862, he was discharged for physical dis- 
ability. In August of the same year, his health having become re- 
stored, he again enlisted in Company B, One Hundred and Twenty- 
fourth New York Regiment, in which he served with efficiency and 
gallantry until the close of the war. 

Returning to Utica, he completed a course in a business college. In 
the following year he engaged as axman with an engineering party 
which built a part of what is now the Delaware, Lackawanna and 
V\>stern Railway, and worked his way up to the position of assistant 
engineer. From 1867 to 1870 he was in the marble monument busi- 
ness at Herkimer and Utica. He sold out in 1870 and from that time 
forward he has been engaged as a civil engineer and has been promi- 
nent in the railroad, canal and sewer construction. 

Among the important engineering works with which he has been 
connected have been four-tracking the New York Central Railroad, 
buikling river conduits, dams, storage basins, sewers, tunnels and aque- 
ducts at various points in New York and New England. He made 
extensive cuts and built the retaining walls for the West Shore Rail- 
road through the gorge at Herkimer ; built the Erie Railroad terminals 
at Bufl^alo; built a portion of the Erie Railroad in Onondaga and 
Cayuga counties ; completed the line of the West Shore Railroad from 
Black Creek to Esopus on the Hudson River; built the large lock at 
Sprakers, on the Erie Canal ; constructed the Aqueduct tunnel, four 
miles, under the west side of Washington City; constructed the tunnel 
under the Harlem River, near High Bridge; constmcted a portion of 
the New York Aqueduct tunnel, l:)etween Croton and Tarrytown; built 
thirty miles of the Norfolk and Western Railroad, in West Virginia; 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 423 

enlarged the Erie Canal from Utica to Little Falls ; built three sections 
of the Metropolitan system of sewerage at Boston; constructed the 
trolley line from Flerkimer to Little Falls, and executed some large 
contracts for dams, filter basins and pipe lines at New York City and 
on Long and Staten Islands. 

Amid all these important engineering undertakings Mr, Beckwith' 
has found time to render great and valuable services to the Democratic 
Party. His home has been at Herkimer for many years, and here he 
was elected Supervisor in 1875 and President of the village in 1878, 
besides declining many other important public positions. He has been 
the Democratic nominee for the Assembly and for the State Senate. 
Since 1883 he has been a member of the Democratic State Committee 
and has been a delegate to a great many Democratic State and National 
conventions. 

Mr. Beckwith is a member of the Masonic fraternity, of the Elks 
and of the Grand Army of the Republic. He served as Colonel on the 
staff of Governor Flower, and is a member of the Gettysburg and Chat- 
tanooga Monument Associations. For many years he has been a direc- 
tor of the Mohawk Valley Bank. 

Li 1869 Mr. Beckwith married Frances'E. Nelson, of Herkimer. 

Few men have lived a life of more varied activity than ]\Ir. Beck- 
with, and none stand higher in the esteem of all who know him. 



Richard Finegan. Always a loyal Democrat, and active and ear- 
nest in his party's service, Richard Finegan is, naturally, one of the 
popular Democrats of Rockland County. He is a strong advocate of 
Democratic principles and a very effective supporter of Democratic 
candidates. He has often served as delegate to Democratic County 
conventions. 

Mr. Finegan has never had either the time or the desire to strive 
for any public office, but he was elected Constable, notwithstanding, 
and served one year, and again in the spring of 1904 he was elected' 
Assessor. 

He is a member of the Ancient Order of Hibernians. 



424 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Stephen A. Failey, a staunch adherent to Democratic principles, 
was born in Utica, Oneida County, September 7, 1843. He received a 
public school education and was graduated at the Utica Free Academy. 
Upon the completion of his studies he learned the business of brewing, 
which he followed for many years under the firm name of Brown, 
Failey & Co., and later as Failey, Joyce & Co. 

In 1900 Mr. Failey retired from the brewing business and engaged 
in mason contracting, in which he is at present engaged. He is also 
connected with the Utica Gas and Electric Company. 

Mr. Failey has served as delegate to City, County and Assembly 
conventions and as member of the Democratic City and County asso- 
ciations. 

From 1874 to 1884 he served on the Utica police force. 

He is a member of the Knights of Honor, the Cornhill Benefit Asso- 
ciation and the Holy Name Society. 



Harry Hale was born in Coventry, England, February 3, 1870. 
He was educated in the public schools of his native country, and when 
finished was employed in the famous mills of England. Being dis- 
satisfied with conditions there, his ambitions led him to New York 
Mills, Oneida County, where his proficiency soon earned him recogni- 
tion, and he was rapidly advanced to his present position of Assistant 
Superintendent. Unlike many of the adopted citizens of this country, 
Mr. Hale took an immediate interest in its government and identified 
himself with the Democratic organization of Oneida County, where his 
talents brought him a hearty welcome. He served the customary ap- 
prenticeship of work in the ranks and gradually forged ahead step by 
step, holding the position of Inspector of Elections eleven years. He 
discharged the duties of delegate to County, Assembly and Congres- 
sional conventions so well that in 1897 he was appointed School Com- 
missioner. He was nominated for his first elective office. Fire Commis- 
sioner, in 1899 and was promptly voted into the position. He was re- 
elected at the expiration of his term. Further recognition was accorded 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 425 

him by appointment as Milk Inspector, an office he retained for two 
years. 

Mr. Hale is a member of the Yorkville Fire and Hose Company 
and of the Sons of St. George. 



Hon. George Hall. There are few residents in St. Lawrence 
County who have succeeded in attaining the distinction of Mr. Hall in 
Democratic history. Living in a county renowned as the Republican 
stronghold of New York State, he has attained wide popularity. Five 
times has he been elected Mayor of Ogdensburg — an unprecedented 
feat for a Democrat — three times Alderman, and eventually reaching 
the eminence of a place on the State ticket. 

It is his personal influence and activity, however, that have done 
much towards building up the healthy Democratic organization now 
existent in St. Lawrence County. He became identified with the or- 
ganization in his early manhood and has ever since given it his devoted 
allegiance. His activity led him into membership on the City and 
County committees, and his popularity induced his frequent election to 
the chairmanship of both committees. He resigned from these only 
when the broader duties of membership in the Democratic State Com- 
mittee made it imperative. Withal, he still retains an active interest in 
the local committees and his counsel is sought in every emergency. 

He is public-spirited and has done much to advance the welfare of 
Ogdensburg. In every movement towards the betterment of the city 
he has been a liberal contributor and earnest advocate. There are num- 
berless individual cases that have shared in his benevolence, but which 
will never go on record. His public philanthropies are necessarily 
traceable. It was largely through his munificent donation of $35,000 
that the present Ogdensburg City Hospital and Home was founded. It 
stands to-day a monument to his beneficence, dispensing its grateful aid 
to the poor and needy. Then, too, he has brought realization to the 
dreams of Civil War veterans residing in the county by subscribing 
$6,500 to their fund for a monument to the dead heroes of Oswegatchie. 

Any industries that promised to furnish employment to his neigh- 
bors have met with his hearty co-operation and support. But for this 



426 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

the new silk mills and shoe factory, which are large employers of Help, 
would have been located elsewhere. 

His popularity was first put to the test in 1879, when ne was nomi- 
nated to represent the First Ward, Ogdensburg, as Alderman. He was 
promptly elected, running ahead of his ticket. In 1889, 1891 and 1892 
he was again elected to the City Council, but during his last term re- 
signed a few months after election. 

The real test came iji 1887, however, when he came before the peo- 
ple as a candidate for Mayor. He scored a decided triumph at the polls 
and was re-elected in 1888. x\fter a short period of retirement he was 
again induced to take the nomination for Mayor in 1899, and his elec- 
tion followed. He has succeeded himself continuously since then. 

With the memorable presidential campaign of 1904 came recogni- 
tion from the State. He was nominated for Controller of New York 
State at the Democratic State Convention. But the whole ticket went 
down to defeat in the Republican avalanche. It is noteworthy, how- 
ever, that the only county in the State to show a reduced Republican 
majority was St. Lawrence. 

George Hall was born in Sackett's Harbor, March 11, 1847, where 
he obtained a public school education. He became a proficient tele- 
graph operator under his father's tuition and worked at his trade in 
various parts of the State until 1865, when he settled in New York 
City. In 1 87 1 he went to Ogdensburg and entered the employ of Hall 
& Gardner, coal dealers and forwarders, of which firm his brother, 
Henry Hall, was a member. In 1872 his brother died and Mr. Hall 
succeeded him in the firm. The partnership was dissolved in 1880. 

The business was purchased by Mr. Hall, J. S. Bean and W. L\ 
Proctor, who reorganized it under the firm name of George Hall & Co. 
Under Mr. Hall's management the business reached great proportions, 
introducing the use of soft coal along the river St. Lawrence. In 1893 
the company was re-established under the firm name of the George Hall 
Coal Company, with a capital of $650,000. A large number of men 
are employed and the annual business runs into the millions. 

Mr. Llall is President of the Century Club, President of the St. 
Lawrence marine railway and is actively interested in other organiza- 
tions. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 427 

Matthew Clune, of Pcckskill, lias been a wide-awake and inllu- 
ential Democratic hustler in Westchester County for a score or more 
years. His activity has not been confined tO' Westchester County either, 
for he is a member of the Democratic Club of New York City, also of 
the Twentieth and Twenty-second Assembly District clubs and of the 
General Committee of Tammany Flail. 

In 1887 Mr. Clune was elected Supervisor of the town of Cort- 
landt, in wliich Peekskill is situated, and in 1884 he was elected a 
Trustee of the village of Peekskill and was re-elected, serving two 
terms with great acceptance. He has also performed efficient and val- 
uable service on both the Town and Village Democratic committees. 

Mr. Clune is a member of tlie Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. 



Charles Barnum^ for many years one ot the prominent figures in 
the Democratic politics of Sullivan County, is a native of that county, 
having been born at Bridgeville. He acquired his education in the 
public schools, completing his literary training by a course at the Monti- 
cello Academy. 

Mr. Barnum has always been active in public affairs. For a con- 
siderable period he was a civil engineer and surveyor, and for thirty- 
five years he filled the position of Court Stenographer of Sullivan 
County with great acceptance. 

In politics Mr. Barnum has always been a faithful and influential 
Democrat, and his ability has made him a power in the party organiza- 
tion. For fifteen years he served with conspicuous success as Chairman 
of the Democratic County Committee, and he had a term of equal 
length, from 1889 to 1904, as member of the Democratic State Com- 
mittee. For fifteen years also he was School Commissioner of Sullivan 
County with great success, efficiently promoting the educational inter- 
ests of the county. 

At the present time Mr. Barnum is the editor of the Monticello 
Watchman. He is a man of high character and is greatly esteemed 
wherever he is known. 



428 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

\\'ard D. \\^hite. One of the solid, substantial and stalwart Demo- 
crats of Tompkins County is Ward D. White, of the town of Groton, 
in which he was born. February 23, 1859, and in which he has always 
lived. He received his education in the public schools, continuing all the 
while to work with his father on the home farm, one mile from Groton 
village. This is a valuable farm and highly cultivated. Mr. White 
inherited it from his father, and here he has always lived. He is a suc- 
cessful agriculturist, one of the kind that ''mixes brains with his farni 
work." He belongs to the Grangers and is enterprising and progres- 
sive. 

Mr. White is the father of two bright sons, Charles D. and Walter 
\\\, who are being inculculated with sound Democratic doctrines, and 
will doubtless be likewise a credit and source of strength to their party. 

Mr. White is an active and influential party worker and has served 
as Commissioner of Highways for three years, an office to which he 
was elected by the unusual majority in that town of 173. He has fre- 
quently served as delegate to Democratic County conventions and is a 
man of force and influence in the community in which he has always 
had his home. 



Hon. Thomas Mott Osborne. A splendid type of the business 
man in politics is represented in Hon. Thomas M. Osborne, president 
of D. M. Osborne & Co., manufacturers of harvesting machines, and 
the present ]\Iayor of Auburn, Cayuga County, 

In 1902 Mr. Osborne, as a candidate for Mayor, carried every elec- 
tion district in the city but one. The following year every Democrat 
on the municipal ticket was elected to office, and in the memorable cam- 
paign of 1904, when the whole country was producing overwhelming 
Rq:)ub]ican majorities, Mr. Ostorne again won a decisive victory. 

A contributory cause to these continued successes is found in the 
exemplary administrations accorded to Auburn by the Democratic 
Party. The clean-cut, incisive management of the city's affairs have 
won the unqualified approval of business men and taxpayers, irrespec- 
tive of party. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 429 

During Mayor Osborne's term the city cliartcr has been thorouglily 
reorganized and revised to abohsh all unprogressive and other detri- 
mental laws and giving the city home rule. One of the best financial 
systems in the United States for municipalities has been devised and 
instituted under Democratic rule; several miles of streets have been 
paved and improved, and the promise of a handsome railroad station 
has been obtained from officials of the New York Central. 

These many reforms accomplished in the inconceivably short space 
of a two-year term amply demonstrate the efficiency and vigorous char- 
acter of the man. 

It is the general testimony that he possesses unique methods of lead- 
ership. The sledge-hammer variety is eschewed. Instead, his good- 
tempered and tactful ways, his unfailing self-coutrol and his quick 
judgment of other men surround him with allegiance. But with all 
this velvet gentleness of method he has never lacked fighting power or 
the ability to assert himself when occasion required it. In addition he 
is an eloquent orator and has seen service on the "stump" in many im- 
portant campaigns. 

In the course of his public career Mr. Osborne has been thrice elected 
School Commissioner in a strongly Republican district and was a can- 
didate for Lieutenant-Governor on the Independent-Democrat ticket 
of 1898. In 1896 he was a delegate to the National Convention at Chi- 
cago, and was again elected to the convention at Indianapolis. In 1904 
he served as delegate to the State Convention at Saratoga. 

Mr. Osborne was born in Auburn, Cayuga County, September 23, 
1859. He graduated from Harvard University in 1884, and afterward 
became a member of the firm of D. M. Osborne & Co., of which he is 
now president. He is interested in many local concerns, being trustee 
and president of the George Junior Republic Association, trustee of 
Wells College, trustee of the Auburn Savings Bank, a director in the 
Auburn Hame Company, the Eagle Wagon Works, the Buffalo Bi-Sul- 
phite of Lime Company and the Columbian Rope Company, of Auburn. 

He is also a well-known clubman, holding membership in the Uni- 
versity, the City and the Harvard clubs, of New York; the Tavern 
Club, of Boston ; the University Club, of Chicago ; the City and Country 
clubs, of Auburn, and is a member of the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity. 



430 THE DE^rOCRATIC PARTY 

Joseph Hover. One of the staunch and stalwart Democrats of the: 
metropohtan district is Joseph Hover. He has served on the Yonkers 
General Committee for many years, and he has been a delegate to vari- 
ous conventions of the party, including the "Anti-Snap" convention of 
1902. 

Mr. Hover was nominated for Justice of the Peace in 1897, and 
after a contest was declared duly elected by the Board of Aldermen. 
He refused, however, to accept the office. By the contest that resulted 
in this decision and his refusal he, incidentally, killed the use of voting 
machines in Yonkers. 

I\Ir. Hover is an attorney and is a member of the A\^estchester 
County Bar Association. His home is now in New York City. 



Stephen J. Stilwell. A veteran and valuable member of the 
Democratic Party of New York City, formerly of Westchester County, 
is Stephen J. Stilwell, a prominent attorney of Tremont, City of New 
York. For a score of years he has been an active party worker, serving 
as meml)er and Chairman of the City Committee from Mount Vernon 
and member of the County, Congressional, Senatorial arid Judicial 
committees. He has been honored by being elected a delegate to all 
classes of party conventions, including every Democratic State conven- 
tion during the past ten years. He was also recorded the distinguished 
honor of being selected as a delegate to the Democratic National con- 
ventions of 1896 and 1900. 

In 1896 he was nominated for Member of Assembly, but the nor- 
mal Republican majority proved too great to be overcome. Mr. Stil- 
well accepted the nomination at the urgent request of the party, as he 
has never had any desire for official position. The demands of his pro- 
fessional business absorb his time and attention, indeed, so that he has 
always refused offers of political nominations with this one exception. 

He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Royal Arcanum, For- 
estei's of America, the New York State Bar Association and the West- 
chester County Bar Association. 

Not long after Mr. Stilwell was admitted to the Bar his legal ability 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 431 

received signal recognition by his employment as counsel for the towns 
of E^st Chester, Mamaroneck and Pelham. 

Mr. Stilwell's interest in his jDarty's success begins at the beginning, 
and he always attends the primaries. He belongs to the Tammany Hall 
organization and the Tammany Hall General Committee. He is Trustee 
of the Olin M. E. Church of Williamsbridge, President of the Good 
Fellows' Club of Williamsbridge and is a member of the Chippewa 
Democratic Club of the Annexed District. He has a fine suite of law 
offices in the Bronx building, at Tremont avenue and Third avenue, 
borough of The Bronx, City of New York, and his future is a promis- 
ing one. He is mentioned for Judge of the Municipal Court of The 
Bronx. 



C. H. Smyth^ of Clinton, Oneida County, for many years a promi- 
nent factor in the Democratic politics of the State of New York, was 
born in the city of Oswego, August 24, 1839. He received his educa- 
tional training in the public schools of his native city. After leaving 
school, in 1859, he engaged in the shipbuilding business, in which he 
continued until 1864. He then became connected with the Franklin 
Iron Works as Secretary, remaining until 1873. In that year he re- 
moved to Clinton, where he served as Manager until the company shut 
down, in 1892. He became Secretary and Treasurer of the Niagara 
Falls and Clifton Suspension Bridge, and was promoted to President of 
the company in 1883, filling this position with marked acceptance until 
1898, when the property was sold to the International Traction Com- 
pany. 

He is a member of the Fort Schuyler Club, of Utica. He also be- 
longs to the Masonic fraternity. 

Mr. Smyth has always been a sturdy and stalwart Democrat and 
influential in the party organization. He accepted a position on the 
staff of Governor Samuel J. Tilden. He served for ten years as a mem- 
ber of the Board of Village Trustees. In 1896 he was a member of the 
Sound Money Democrajtic State Convention. He is an earnest Demo- 
crat and stands very high as a citizen. 



432 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hon. ^^'ILE^R F. Porter, five times elected Mayor of Watertown, 
and the Democratic nominee for Governor of New York in 1896, was 
bom in Herkimer County, N. Y., June 22, 1832. At the age of six 
years his parents removed to the adjoining county of Jefferson. Here 
Mr. Porter acquired his education in the pubhc schools, completing his 
course of instruction at the Wesleyan Academy, Gouverneur, N. Y., 
and at the Fulton Academy. 

After leaving school he taught district schools for two winters and 
began the study of law. Mr. Porter was exceedingly ambitious to 
obtain a classical education, but was unable to secure a course at college 
because of lack of financial resources, but he made diligent use of his 
opportunities, thus largely making up for his disappointment. His 
parents desired him to enter the ministry, but he preferred the law, and 
while still teaching he began study for this profession with Laban H. 
Ainsworth, Esq., of Cape Vincent. Shortly afterward he removed to 
AVatertown, where he continued his studies in the office of Bagley & 
\Vright. In 1857 he was admitted to the Bar, and in the same year he 
opened an office and began the practice of his profession at St. Vincent. 
Three years later, in i860, he removed to Watertown, where he entered 
the office of Bagley & A\^right, where he remained for ten years. In 
1870 he established a business of his own, but soon after formed a 
partnership with Edmund B. Wynn, which continued until 1877. In 
that year he formed a partnership with ex-Judge Watts, and in 1883 
Mr. Porter's son, Charles G. Porter, entered the firm, the style becom- 
ing Porter, Watts & Porter. In January, 1897, Mr. Watts withdrew, 
the firm name being changed to Porter & Porter, as it has continued to 
the present time. 

]\Ir. Porter has always been an active and influential Democrat and 
a power in the party organization. His first political office was that of 
trustee of the Second Ward of Watertown, being elected in a strong 
Republican ward. So efficient was his service that when he was after- 
wards nominated as the Democratic candidate for Mayor he was tri- 
umphantly elected and re-elected until he had served five terms. At one 
of his re-elections he had no opposition and his name appeared on the 
ballot as the nominee of lx)th the Democratic and Republican parties. 
In 1896 Mayor Porter received the Democratic nomination for Gov- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 433 

emor and he proved a strong candidate, thoiigli the free silver issue 
made it an overwhelming RepubHcan year. Mayor Porter made es- 
pecially large gains in Republican strongholds. He was appointed one 
of the Judges of the State Court of Claims by Governor Flower and 
held that position for six years, making a splendid record on the Bench. 
Mayor Porter is a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity and 
is one of the leading citizens of Northern New York. 



John Ellis was born in Clayville, Oneida County, October 2.}^, 
1870. His education was obtained in the district schools of New Hart- 
ford and Washington Mills. He later learned the barber trade and 
established himself in New Hartford. 

Mr. Ellis has always been in active service in the local Democratic 
organization and has been on the firing line in many campaigns. His 
efforts have forced recognition and he has been delegate to District, 
School, County and Assembly conventions on many occasions. He has 
also served on the Town Committee for three years. 

Mr. Ellis is a member of the New Hartford branch of the A. O. H. 



John W. Hahn w-as born in Utica, Oneida County, March 24, 
1872, where he was educated in the public schools. He became a ship- 
ping clerk and later traveling salesman, a position he occupies at the 
present time. 

As an active member of the Democratic organization in Utica, Mr. 
Hahn has given valuable assistance in many campaigns. He has served 
as delegate to City, County and Assembly conventions and is a member 
of the City and County Democratic associations, and has been a mem- 
ber of the Sixth Ward Committee for a number of years. 

In 190 1 Mr. Hahn was nominated to represent the Sixth Ward as 
Supervisor, and after a gallant fight against the normal Republican 
majority he was elected by a comfortable plurality. 

Mr. Hahn is a member of the Allemania Lodge, I. O. O. F. 



434 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Edward J. Fi-etcher, vSupervisor of the Seventh Ward of Utica, 
was born in the ward he so weH represents, on April 27, 1873. He 
acquired his early education in the public schools of the city and at 
Assumption Academy, after which he received a careful training in the 
Utica Business College. Immediately thereafter he entered into busi- 
ness and holds a responsible position with the poultry and provision 
house of John Boyce, with whom he has been associated for several 
years. 

Politically Mr. Fletcher is a strong Democrat devoted to the interest 
of his party, and yet so faithful in the public service that it has been his 
honor continuously to represent a strongly Republican ward in the 
Board of Supervisors since 1897. So long a term of service speaks 
volumes for his fidelity, capacity and personal popularity. 

Among his fraternal and social relations he is a member of the 
jMaccabees, the Lafayette Outing Club and the Jacksonians. 



Joseph H. Beall^ of the city of Yonkers, is a lawyer by profes- 
sion and for many years has been actively connected with the organiza- 
tion of the Democratic Party in his city and in Westchester County. 
As a member of party committees, and as a delegate to party conven- 
tions, as well as an earnest and effective campaign worker, Mr. Beall 
has rendered the Democracy valuable and conspicuous service. 

In 1893 ^^^- Beall was elected Alderman from the Fourth Ward, 
and sen-ed until 1895. I" t^"*^ latter year he accepted the party nomina- 
tion for Member of Assembly and cut down the Republican majority to 
about one hundred votes. He was appointed a member of the Board 
of Water Commissioners in 1902 and was elected President of the 
board, .serving until February, 1904. During his administration of the 
Water Board large and important adrlitions to the water system were 
made, including the devising and construction of the Saw I\Iill River 
filter beds and the raising of the Grassy Sprain Reservoir dam, by which 
the city water supply was more than doubled. 

A\'"hen the question of sewerage for the Bronx River valley became 
urgent, in 1903, the Mayor of Yonkers appointed Mr. Beall chairman 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 435 

of a committee of fifteen leading- citizens to devise and rq:)ort n[x;n a 
plan for the city to adopt, and the work of this cominittee resulted in 
the Bronx River sewer project. In 1905 the Ma3'or and Council of 
Yonkers appointed him a member of a committee of nine citizens to 
secure the extension into Yonkers of the New York City Rapid Transit 
system. 

Mr. Beall is a member of the Lawyers' Club of New York City, of 
the New York So'Uthern Society, of the City Club of Yonkers, of the 
Democratic Club of the City of Yonkers, of the Royal Arcanum, of the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen and of the Order of Elks. 



Hon. Thomas Spratt, long one of the most prominent and influ- 
ential Democrats of Northern New York, and one of the leaders of the 
Bar, was born at Rossie, St. Lawrence County, December 12, 1848. 

He received a sound and thorough education in the public schools 
and at the academies of his native county. He then began the study of 
law in the office of Foote & James, at Ogdensburg, and continued with 
the Hon. Daniel Magone, one of the prominent Democratic leaders of 
the State of New York. From this office he was admitted to the Bar, 
in 1870, and shortly afterward admitted to practice in the United States 
District and Circuit Courts. In 1888 he was admitted to practice in the 
United States Supreme Court. Mr. Spratt has always been actively en- 
gaged in the practice of his profession, in which he stands in the fore- 
most rank. 

In spite of his absorption in his engrossing professional engage- 
ments, Mr. Spratt has found the time to render great service to the 
Democratic Party, of which he has always been a loyal and efficient 
worker. He was for a time an active and valuable member of the 
Democratic State Committee, and he has represented the Democracy of 
the State in the Democratic National convention. 

Mr. Spratt married Miss Emma J. Lytle, daughter of Nathan J. 
Lytle. 

He is a strong man, and as lawyer, as politician and as citizen he 
stands very high. 



436 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

iMiciiAEL DoRAX was born in Upper Canada, now Ontario, No- 
vember II, 1830. He was educated in the common schools and upon 
coming to New York State from Canada located at Durhamville, in 
the boat building and dry dock business, and so continued during his 
life. He served three years as a Road Commissioner, and for the year 
1901 as Supervisor. He was a delegate to County, Assembly and Con- 
gressional conventions, a stfaightout regular Democrat, and particu- 
larly prominent, not only as a Democratic Party leader, but as a citizen 
greatly esteemed, in the section where his life was spent. He died 
in 1904. 



James IMoran, Sr., one of the staunch and influential Democratic 
leaders of Rensselaer County, has cjuite an interesting history. He is 
a native of County Clare, Ireland, having been born there in 1838, and 
came to this countiT in 1850. His parents settled in Troy, wdiere Mr. 
Moran was educated in the public schools. Being of an adventur- 
ous disposition, he enlisted in the United States Regular Army in 1857 
and was detailed for duty in the Ordnance Department. He served 
throughout the great Civil "\\^ar and was in the Nineteenth Army Corps 
from the time of its organization under General Ben Butler and Gen- 
eral Banks. He was engaged in many of the famous battles of that 
historic corps and was mustered out as the war was coming to a close, 
in 1864. He did not immediately leave the military service, however, 
being appointed Foreman in the United States Government ordnance 
shop, at New Orleans, where his long experience enabled him to render 
valuable service. 

He returned to Troy in 1866 and engaged in the grocery and liquor 
business on Liberty square, where he has been located ever since. 

Mr. Moran has never had any aspirations to political office, though 
he has frequently been honored with the appointment as delegate to 
Democratic State, District, County and City conventions. Pie is the 
treasurer of the local branch of the National Retail Liquor Dealers' 
Association and is an active member of the Ancient Order of Hiber- 
nians. 



X3F THE STATE OF NEW YORK 437 

Daniel M. Edwards, of Syracuse, was born in Johnstown, March 
25, 1861. He is a son of E. W. Edwards, whose name is famiHar in 
business circles in New York State. D. M. Edwards was educated in 
the pubhc and private schools of his native city and engaged in business 
with his fatlier in 1881. He had charge of their Gloversville store for 
four years. In 1889 the firm purchased the Milton S. Price store in 
Syracuse, and since then D. M. Edwards has managed it most success- 
fully. Mr. Edwards is a splendid type of the progressive and up-to- 
date business man. He acts independently in politics. 



Captain John H. Morris, one of the active and prosperous attor- 
neys and one of the loyal Democrats of Saratoga Springs, was born in 
that famous village. May 31, 1865. He received his educational train- 
ing in the public schools, after which he engaged in newspaper work, 
becoming a well-known reporter. In September, 1884, he accepted a 
position as Assistant Secretary of the Board of Education, in which he 
rendered satisfactory service for five years. In 1889, having chosen 
the law as his profession, he entered the office of the Hon. Theodore F. 
Hamilton, at that time District Attorney of Saratoga County, and May 
8, 1 89 1, he was admitted to the Bar. He continued with his preceptor 
until January i, 1895, when he established an ofiice by himself and suc- 
cessfully engaged in the practice of his profession, which he has con- 
tinued with gratifying results to the present time. 

Captain Morris has always been a sturdy and stalwart Democrat 
and an efficient party worker. In 1897 he was elected Justice of the 
Peace, an office which he has filled with credit to himself and accept- 
ance to the public. Captain Morris was the leading spirit in the or- 
ganization of the Hibernian Guards, a fine military organization of 
Saratoga Springs. He was chosen Captain of the company and has con- 
tinued to hold that office to the present time. He belongs to the Knights 
of Columbus and to the Ancient Order of Hibernians. 

October 28, 1896, Captain Morris married Miss Sarah Zita Ken- 
nath, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Kennath, of Albany. They have 
one daughter, Margaret. 



438 THE DE^^IOCRATIC PARTY 



JAMES OLIVER. 

James Oliver, a lifelong worker in the Democratic Party, was 
lx)rn in the Second Assembly District of New York City in 1845, 3-nd 
has since resided there continuously. He is a man of strong person- 
ality of keen foresight and of abundant good nature. His aggressive 
work in party interests has made his district one of the strongholds 
of Democracy for a quarter of a century. 

Mr. Oliver received his early education in the public schools of 
the Fourth ^A'ard, later attending St. John's College, Fordham. After 
his collegiate training he took up the study of la.w, was admitted to 
the Bar, and from 1869 to 1872 ser^^ed in the Corporation Counsel's 
office under Richard O'Gorman. His interest in politics and his abil- 
ity as an organizer brought him into prominence in the Democratic 
Party, and his services in every campaign were productive of splendid 
results. ]\Iayor Edward Cooper, in 1880, appointed him School In- 
spector for the First District. Mr. Oliver's splendid education had 
well fitted him for this position and he was retained in it for seven 
consecutive years, taking a personal interest in the work and success 
of the city schools and doing much to enhance their reputation for 
efficiency and thoroughness. In the meantime his great popularity 
in the district of which he had been a resident from birth brouglit him 
the nomination for Member of the Assembly. Fie served in the Legis- 
latures of 1884 and 1885, always with the welfare of his constituents 
at lieart. His efforts to promote legislation favorable to labor were 
effective and fully appreciated by workingmcn. ITigli commendations 
were bestowed upon him for his work in the Assemblv by tlie State 
Federation of Labor at its State conventions in 1884 and 1885. The 
Liquor Dealers' Association also, at their annual convention, gave him 
a vote of thanks for his opposition to high-license legislation. An ex- 




~*afrs J-fisft^r-i; C~ 







THf 
Nt-W YORK 








OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 439 

acting legal practice compelled Mr. Oliver t<) forego further office- 
holding until 1897, when he was again sent to the Assembly. He re- 
ceived the support of both Tammany Hall and the Nation.al Demo- 
crats, and his popularity in his district is attested by the returns of 
this election, which gave him 4,878 votes as against 1,304 votes for 
his nearest competitor, Isaac E. Bermant, the Republican nominee. In 
the Assembly of 1898 Mr. Oliver served on the Committees or» Ways 
and Means and Religious and Charitable Societies. 

The Democratic National Committee sought Mr. Oliver's services 
as sergeant-at-arms in 1892, and this position he continued to hold for 
a number of years following. 

Mr. Oliver is a lawyer, with offices at 220 Broadway, New York. 
From Civil War times until the present day he has been identified 
with the Democratic Party, and always his work has been of the kind 
that brings success. He has a splendid record of service and has made 
a host of friends throughout the State. 



J. C. McFadden, railroad contractor, was born in Ireland, March 
15, 1848. He received his education in the public schools of his native 
country and in the United States. 

His business throughout life has been that of a contractor for rail- 
road work, xA'ith engagements in all parts of the country. 

Since first entitled to vote, Mr. McFadden has been identified with 
the Democratic Party and has been especially active in the Oneida 
County organization and in the city of Utica, where he resides. His 
activity has frequently led him to act as delegate to City, County, As- 
sembly, Senatorial and Congressional conventions and as a member of 
the Democratic City and County associations. 

In 1900 he was appointed Street Commissioner of the city of Utica 
and served two years. He has also served as Inspector for the State 
under the administrations of Governors Hill and Flower. 

Mr. McFadden is a member of the Knights of Honor. 



440 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

James J. Lyxch, of Yonkers, is a strong Democrat and an earnest 
advocate of his party's political principles. Mr. Lynch is so immersed 
in his extensive private business that he has always declined proffered 
nominations for political office. He is nevertheless an active and potent 
influence in the work of the party organization, and one whose strength 
and value are always highly appreciated when there is an important 
political campaign in progress. 

]\Ir. Lynch is a member of the Order of Elks, of the Knights of 
Columbus, of the Yonkers Corinthian Yacht Club and of the Yonkers 
Yacht Club. 

He is one of the party leaders in his district and is always loyal and 
efficient. 



Hon. Godfrey R. Martine, M.D., of Glens Falls, Warren County, 
N. Y., is a son of the late James J. Martine, formerly of Troy, N. Y., 
but latterly of Caldwell, Warren County, where he was well known as a 
man of scholarly attainments in his day, and where he passed away in 
1888, at the ripe old age of eighty-nine years. 

Dr. ]\[artine, the only survivor of six brothers who entered the War 
of the Rebellion, was born in the city of Troy, N. Y., April 27, 1837. 
His school days commenced in his native city, next at Cambridge, 
N. Y. ; later and for several years he attended the Warrensburgh Acad- 
emy under different instructors, among whom was General O. E. Bab- 
cock, afterward a prominent officer on General Grant's military staff. 
He next entered the State College at Albany, and after re- 
ceiving a teacher's State-certificate he pursued a classic course 
under the direction of Rev. R. C. Clapp, of Chestertown, 
who was then the most noted classical teacher of Northern New 
York. Li recognition of high, moral and scholarly attainments, 
Dr. ]\Iartine was appointed principal of Warrensburgh Academy. After 
serving several terms he decided to abandon teaching as a profession, 
and having a natural taste for the study of medicine he entered the 
Medical Department of the University of Vermont, graduating from 
that institution in 1862. He has also since done post-graduate work 
in diseases of the heart and lungs in New York City. He served for a 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 441 

short time as volunteer siirg-eon during the War of the Rcl^elhon, and 
has ever since practiced mechcine in the county where he is still located. 

In 1869 Dr. Martine was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. 
Woodward Macdonald, a lady of marked intellectuality and refinement, 
the only surviving daughter of the late Charles Macdonald, of War- 
rensburgh, and a niece of Sir John A. Macdonald, the late Prime Min- 
ister of Canada. They have one son, Byron A. Martine, born in Glens 
Fails, N. Y., in 1883. 

In politics Dr. Martine has always been a pronounced Democrat, 
believing that this party most nearly represents the true interests of the 
great mass of the people. He represented the town of Johnsburgh in 
the Board of Supervisors from 1866 to 1870, inclusive; has also repre- 
sented Warren County as State delegate, and has held the offices of 
Health Officer and Coroner. In the fall of 1869 he was elected a ]\Iem- 
ber of the New York State Legislature from a strong Republican 
county. In the halls of legislation he was, as elsewhere, a gentleman 
of pronounced ability, honesty of purpose, a logical and convincing 
speaker and enthusiastic in his support of whatever he considered best 
for his constituents. Among other beneficial bills he secured the pas- 
sage of the bridge bill appropriating $5,000 from the State for the 
building of the iron bridge which now spans the Hudson River at the 
village of North Creek, on the basis that the State, in giving the right- 
of-way for running logs down the river, had interfered with the high- 
way fording place. Proof of the energy and influence required tO' pass 
this bill is furnished in the fact that it is the first instance on the State 
records where State money has been appropriated under such circum- 
stances, and Governor Hoffman hesitated in giving his signature, on 
the ground that there was no precedent for such appropriations, and 
summoned the Doctor to the Executive Chamber, where, in a speech of 
which the following quotation was one of the unanswerable arguments, 
"Governor, while I allow to the State the power thus to usurp our high- 
ways, I at the same time deny the right so to do' without just compensa- 
tion therefor," convinced Governor Hoffman of the justness and legal- 
ity of the bill, for he subsecjuently signed it, and the bridge now stands 
a monument to the resourceful and brainy perseverance of Dr. Martine. 

The Doctor has done much to develop the business interests of 



442 THE DE^IOCRATIC PARTY 

Xorthern New York. He was the first man in, Warren County wHo 
saw there was money in wood pulp, and he built, with his partner, Ran- 
dolph IMcNutt, now of Buffalo, N. Y., the first pulp mill, manufactur- 
ing the first wood pulp placed upon the market from Warren County. 
He has also done much to develop the beautiful resorts of the Adiron- 
dack region by opening one of the most popular gateways into that 
wilderness. In 1S74, when that section was unknown, Dr. Martine 
purchased the site and erected the Blue Mountain Lake House, located 
on the shores of the romantic lake of that name. The popularity of the 
Blue ]\Iountain Lake region is solely due to the energetic efforts of Dr. 
■Nlartine. It is an acknowledged fact that his perseverance and faith in 
this enterprise were the means of saving the Adirondack Railroad from 
an early decline, the lasting benefits thus conferred upon the people of 
that section, and the public generally cannot be fully estimated. 

In 1878 he established the "Martine Drug Store" at North Creek, 
which was managed by his brother, Byron A. Martine, up to the time of 
his death in 1881. This store is nov,' owned and managed by the doc- 
tor's only son, Byron A. Martine. 

Dr. IMartine is a member of the American Medical Association and 
was one of its delegates to the World's Medical Congress, a Fellow of 
the New York State Medical /\ssociation and one of its original mem- 
bers ; ex-member of the Executive Committee of the Eastern Branch of 
the State IMedical Association ; has been several times President of the 
Warren County Medical Society; was the first President of the Warren 
County Medical Association and President of the late Union or Tri- 
County iMedical Association ; was Secretary of the Board of United 
States Examining Surgeons at Glens Falls, N. Y., from 1884 to 1889. 
In 1885. with Dr. Lemon Thomson, Jr., he established the Glens Falls 
Hospital, of which he is still a consulting physician. 

His principal writings on medical subjects include papers on "Diph- 
theria," "Sleep," "How to Keep AWll." "The Germ Theory," and 
"Pneumonia," the latter published in the transactions of the New York 
State Medical Association in 188S, and in the Journal of the 'American 
Medical Association in 1889. 

In various other ways he has been an incessant worker in every 
measure tending toward the improvement and elevation of society in 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 443 

general. He is President and one of the founders of the Glens Falls 
Lyceum, an institution for the promotion of the best in literature, art 
and science, and before which, for more than twenty years, all intricate 
matters relative to the welfare of the village and its community have 
been discussed. When the First Wesleyan Methodist Church of Glens 
Falls, N. Y., was to be sold under a mortgage Dr. Martine rallied the 
church-loving people in the community, and, with the valuable aid of 
its pastor, the Rev. Charles E. Fox, raised by subscription the requisite 
amount, thus saving the church to bless the present and coming genera- 
tions. When the first Methodist Church was built at North Creek, the 
Doctor was one of the moving spirits, one of the Building Committee 
and one of the church trustees. When the Presbyterian Church of War- 
rensburgh was being rebuilt, Dr. Martine placed therein a memorial 
window commemorative O'f his friend, the Rev. Courtney Smith, a 
former pastor of this church, one of the foremost thinkers of his time, 
and the acknowledged orator of W^arren County. The Doctor is a life 
member of the American Peace Society, also a member of the New 
York State Historical Association, was for some years Secretary of 
the local State Board of Charities for Warren County, is one of the 
trustees of the Crandall Free Liljrary and of the Glens Falls 
Academy; was one of the originators and a director of the 
Glens Falls Board of Trade, was also one of the promoters 
and contributors for the Training School for Teachers, and 
of the Young Men's Christian Association, and for fifty-five 
years a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Dr. Martine 
is a constant reader and close student of general literature. He has an 
extensive library, embracing the choicest of the w-orld's literary pro- 
ductions, especially enriched by works of deep eruditional interest and 
freshened by the very latest collections in scientific research. He has 
been a frequent lecturer on different topics, and when a public library 
for Glens Falls was first agitated, he gave an Interesting lecture in the 
old Opera House, donating his fee therefore of $50 as a library 
nucleus. The Doctor is still, day and night. In the active pursuit of his 
profession, and being a man of great energy he throws into every 
undertaking with wdilch he Is connected all his fruitful resources. 
Though unmindful of himself, he was never known to forget others. 



444 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

He is one of the most liberal and public-spirited citizens of Warren 
Coimty, and it is stated that he has earned and given away to the 
worthy poor a large fortune. His lifelong motto has been, 
"There is more in life than what money we can hoard." 
Possessing kindly, genial manners, and never more happy than when 
aiding others, he stands a unique figure among the noblest of Warren 
County's citizens. His career is an illustrious example of a busy life 
well li^■e(l, and his reputation as an active, useful man and skilled physi- 
cian will long continue in the affectionate and grateful memory of all 
who know him. 



PIoN. Frank H. ]\Iott. The political career of Hon. Frank H. 
]\Iott, of Jamestown, who is one of the Democratic leaders in Western 
Xew York, shows the great possibilities that are held out to the young 
men. in this age, who have brains and who can apply them in the right 
direction. At the age of twenty-nine he was nominated for the high 
ofifice of Secretary of State by the Democratic State Convention held 
in Saratoga in 1902. There is no record in the history of the party 
in this State that equals this. Mr. Mott made a remarkable canvass, 
and the splendid popular vote he received in the Republican Gibraltar, 
Chautauqua County, is the best evidence of the high regard in which 
he is held by the people of his home city, which, though normally 
Republican by 2.S00, he carried by atout 300. In Chautauqua County 
he ran more than 300 ahead of his ticket. 

Frank H. ]\Iott was born in the town of Russell, Warren County, 
Penn., February 9, 1873. He came with his parents to Jamestown 
in 1888. He was educated in the local schools, and when he finished 
his course he took up the study of law in the offices of Cook, Fisher 
& Wade, one of the leading law firms of Chautauqua County. Later 
he took a special course in the Buffalo Law College, and was admitted 
to the Bar in 1899, and immediately began the practice of law in 
Jamestown. He suspended his law practice to become the political 
editor of the Buffalo Evening Times, the newspaper owned by Hon. 
Norman E. Mack. Mr. Mott, in the stirring presidential canijiaign of 
1900, made a splendid record in the field of journalism by his political 
writings in the Times. He was always a close student of politics, and 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 



445 



his writing's in that memorable contest were widely distributed and 
quoted by the literary bureaus connected with the campaign. After 
the campaign, Mr. Mott returned to Jamestown to resume the active 
practice of the law, 

Mr. Mott has never been a laggard in Democratic politics. Since 
he cast his first vote, in 1894, for the Democratic candidates named 
that year, he has been strenuously and persistently preaching- Demo- 
cratic doctrine and principles of faith. Although a man, of compara- 
tive youth, he has forged to the front among- the leaders, and to-day 
he is recognized as one of the powerful factors in his party in the 
western section of the State. In 1900 he was chosen one of the 
delegates from the Congressional District comprising Chautauqua, 
Cattaraugus, and Allegany counties, to the National Convention held 
in Kansas City, and was there selected as New York's representative 
to notify Mr. Bryan of his nomination. 

Two years later the highest honor bestowed upon him came to 
Mr. Mott. In the memorable 1902 campaign he was unanimously 
chosen by the Democratic State Convention to run for Secretary of 
State. The beardless young man from Chautauqua County made a 
splendid campaign, speaking nightly in the principal cities and towns in 
the State. Gifted with a remarkable degree of eloquence, of most 
pleasing address, Mr. Mott attracted thousands of young voters to 
him that year. His speeches had a splendid ring to them, and he was 
regarded as one of the ablest and most eloquent young men who had 
ever been named to run for an important office in this State. 

In 1902 the Democrats lost the State by a narrow margin. In his 
home county Mr. Mott made a remarkable showing, running 1,200 
votes ahead of Mr. Coler in the city of Jamestown, and 1,700 votes 
ahead of him in Chautauqua County. Regardless of political faith, 
men of all classes went to the polls and voted for the sterling young 
candidate who is esteemed by every citizen in the city and county. 
The vote was a magnificent tribute to his personal worth and popu- 
larity. It also showed his standing in the community. There was 
no disgrace attached to the defeat of Mr. Mott. In many other sec- 
tions of New York State his vote was highly complimentary to- him. 

At the bar of Chautauqua County Mr. IMott ranks among the 



446 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

leaders. Ele is brilliant and able, and is sound in the law. He has 
appeared in many important cases, and professionally represents some 
of the largest interests in Chautauqua County. 

In the social and fraternal ikvorld he has been conspicuous. He is 
Secretary and Treasurer of Jamestown Chapter of the Society of the 
Sons of the Revolution, and Exalted Ruler of the Order of Elks. 

Aside from Secretary of State, Mr. Mott has never been a candi- 
date for any public office, and has declined nominations for the Assem- 
bly, for Congress, and for Mayor of his city. In his absence from the 
city and without solicitation on his part, he was unanimously elected 
a member of the Board of Education of Jamestown, at the annual 
school meeting of 1903, his term expiring in 1906. 



Edwin J. Brown, a prominent attorney of Oneida, Madison 
County, and a political orator of ability, was born in the town of Ve- 
rona, Oneida County, N. Y., November 30, 1842. His boyhood was 
passed at Oneida Castle, Oneida County, and Morrisville and Oneida, 
jMadison County, where he attended public and private schools. In his 
youth he was a student and teacher at Onondaga Academy, Onondaga 
Valley, N. Y., and Oneida Seminary, Oneida, N. Y., and was gradu- 
ated from Hamilton College, Clinton, N. Y., in the class of 1867. The 
same year he entered the office of Shoecraft & Snow as law student and 
clerk, and was admitted to practice from their office by the General 
Term of the Supreme Court at Binghamton, I\Iay 8, 1868. After sev- 
eral months spent in AA^estern Pennsylvania and Northern Illinois, he 
returned to Oneida and entered into partnership with M. J. Shoecraft, 
Esq., in 1869. It was in the office of those veteran Democrats, Shoe- 
craft & Snow, that Mr. Brown was initiated into the organization 
methods of a great party, and his active grasp of detail made him a 
ready pupil. He became identified with the local organization of his 
party, and his ability as an orator and his knowledge of the rules of 
deliberative bodies made him a desirable delegate at all classes of con- 
ventions, including State conventions at Syracuse, New York and 
Saratoga and the National convention at Kansas City in 1900. He has 
also served on the Town and Village committees. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 447 

As a strong advocate of the principle that tlie fundamental strength 
of party organization lies in the primaries and caucuses, Mr. Brown 
has been a faithful attendant of them throughout the many years of his 
activity, and through his persuasive eloquence has impressed these 
views on the party leaders in his section. By his own example, coming 
to attend the primaries even w'hen his practice necessitated his presence 
in distance places, Mr. Brow^n has added weight to his argument. 

The presidential campaign of 1868 found him stumping the country 
in New York and Pennsylvania in the interests of Horatio Seymour, 
and his maiden efforts were so successful that his services have been 
required in many succeeding campaigns of importance. 

In 1870 he was nominated for School Commissioner in the strongly 
Republican Second Assembly District of Madison and suffered defeat 
by the narrow^ margin of 133. In 1871 he was the candidate of his 
party for Justice of the Peace of the town of Lenox for a vacancy and 
full term and was elected by 200 majority, overcoming a normal Re- 
publican majority of nearly 300. He was candidate on the Democratic 
ticket for Member of Assembly in the Second Madison District in 
1873, but was unable to overcome normal conditions, although he ran 
greatly ahead of his ticket. 

At the close of his term of office as Justice of the Peace Mr. Brown 
refused a renomination, preferring to confine himself strictly to the 
practice of his profession. In 1869 he was appointed i\ttorney for the 
village of Oneida and drafted the charter of the village, which was 
passed that year. Since then he has many times held that position, 
nearly every time when the village has had a Democratic administra- 
tion. 

One of the greatest services Mr. Brown has rendered his county, 
and at the same time the Democratic Party, was his able exposition of 
the irregularities and illegal charges of the Sheriff's office as conducted 
by Republican officials for many years. Acting on the evidence and 
the report of the commissioner, the Governor, on motion of Mr, Brown, 
removed the Sheriff of the county in 1890, and that fall, for the first 
time in thirty years, the Democratic candidate for Sheriff was elected. 
On account of his successful prosecution of the investigation other 
counties commenced similar proceedings, and as a result the Sheriff of 



448 THE DEAIOCRATIC PARTY 

Madison and the Sheriffs of several other counties are now paid sal- 
aries instead of fees. A saving of about $12,000 a year has thus been 
effected in ^Madison County alone. 

'Mr. Brown was also instrumental in breaking up the "boy slavery" 
system at the old House of Refuge in Rochester, now known as the 
Industrial School. 

He aided in organizing the Old Ladies' Home of Madison County, 
N. Y., (a charitable institution) located at Oneida and procured its 
charter in 1885, and has acted as its attorney every since, gratuitously. 

Mr. Brown is a member of Hamilton College Chapter of Alpha 
Delta Phi ; High Priest of Doric Chapter, No. 193, Royal Arch Ma- 
sons; a member of Oneida Lodge, No. 270, F. and A. M., and is and 
has l>een since its organization, which he helped to effect, Correspond- 
ing Secretary of the ]\Iadison County Historical Society. He is also 
first Vice-president of the Madison County Bar Association. 

jMr. Brown has never sought public office, but has been a faithful 
worker and a valued counselor in the ranks of his party. He is a con- 
scientious, painstaking attorney and advocate, a friend of his clients 
and devoted to their interests. 



Hon. David C. Robinson^ son of Governor Lucius Robinson and 
Emma (Osborn) Robinson, was born in New York City, January 3, 
1846. He is the lineal descendant of the Rev. John Robinson, the 
famous pastor of the Pilgrims who came over in the IMayflower. 

In 1855, when he was but nine years old, young Robinson's father 
removed to Elmira. and his home has ever since been in that pleasant 
and thriving city. Here he completed the course in the public schools, 
and then, after due preparation, he entered Union College, from which 
he was graduated in the class of 1865. Having decided to adopt the 
profession of law, he took a course in the Law School of Columbia 
College. 

After leaving the law school he worked for a time in his father's 
office. In 1867 he was admitted to the Bar and became his father's 
partner, the partnership continuing until the death of the father, since 
which time he has continued in practice by himself. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 449 

Following closely in the steps of his distinguished father, Colonel 
Robinson has been a prominent factor in the political affairs of his 
county, and has served as delegate to many State and County Demo- 
cratic conventions. In 1891 he was nominated for Alderman from his 
ward, and was triumphantly elected. In the following year he was 
elected Mayor of Elmira by a very large majority. He also served 
as Colonel on his father's military staff during the latter's administra- 
tion as Governor, from January i, 1877, to December 31, 1879. Colonel 
Robinson is an ardent Democrat, anxious for the success of his party, 
and he has been prominent as a political speaker in many important 
campaigns. Since the close of his term as Mayor Colonel Robinson 
has steadily declined further political honors, but his interest in Demo- 
cratic success has in no wise abated. 

Colonel Robinson is very prominent in the Masonic fraternity, hav- 
ing taken all the degrees up to and including those of the Commandery 
of Knights Templars. He also belongs to the Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine and to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He like- 
wise holds membership in two college fraternities, the Alpha Delta 
Phi and the Phi Beta Kappa. 

In 1875 Colonel Robinson married Miss Emma A. De Voe, daugh- 
ter of Frederick A. De Voe, one of the prominent citizens of Elmira. 
They have two children, Lucius and Emma D. 



T. Frank Dolan^ one of the largest real estate dealers in Central 
New York and a Democrat who has rendered efficient service for the 
Democratic Party in several campaigns, is a native of Marcellus, where 
he was born December 1 1, i860. He was educated in Monroe Collegi- 
ate Institute, Elbridge. In 1890 he opened a real estate office in the 
Wieting Block in Syracuse. He is interested in many real estate enter- 
prises, including the Yonkers Heights Land Company. In 1894 he 
w'as appointed a member of the Civil Service Board and served accepta- 
bly. He has long been prominent in the A. O. H., C. M. B. A. and the 
Knights of Columbus. On December 19, 1891, Mr. Dolan and Miss 
Mary T. Ready were married. They have two children. 



450 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

\\'iLLiAM Hengerer. Fcw mcii in Buffalo have attained higher 
prominence in the commercial world of that city than has William 
Hengerer, head of the Hengerer Company, which conducts one of the 
largest department stores in the United States. Mr. Hengerer is a 
Democrat, and although he has been prominently mentioned on several 
occasions for high offices within the gift of his party he has refused to 
allow himself to be led away from business activity. Despite his mark- 
ed reluctance to holding public office, Mr. Hengerer has always taken a 
very deep interest in political affairs and his counsel and advice have 
frequently been sought. He is the highest type of Democrat and is 
regarded as one of his party's leaders and one of the most influential 
men in Buffalo. 

]\Ir. Hengerer is a native of Germany, where he was born in 1839. 
He came to America with his parents in 1849 ^^""^^ settled in Pittsburg. 
At the age of 22 he took up his residence in Buffalo and began clerking 
in a dry goods store at a salary of $6 a week. A month after young 
Hengerer settled in Buffalo President Lincoln called for volunteers to 
go to war and the Hengerer boy was among the first to enlist. He 
joined Company B, Twenty-first Regiment, New York Volunteers. 
He served with honor and distinction for two years, and after being 
mustered out returned to Buffalo. He secured a position with the dry 
goods firm of Sherman, Barnes & Co. Faithful and diligent work, 
coupled with strict honesty and integrity, led to his promotion, and in 
1874 he was admitted to the firm, the name being changed to 
Barnes, Hengerer & Co. About twelve years ago Mr. Hengerer 
assumed the entire responsibility of the vast establishment, and it 
now bears his name. Mr. Hengerer is the directing genius of the 
concern. 

During the term of office of Mayor Scoville he appointed Mr. Hen- 
gerer a meml)cr of the Buffalo Park Commission, and he brought to 
that office those business fiualifications tliat have won for him success 
in tlie commercial world, and his term of service on the 1x>ard was char- 
acterized by official acts that aided to a great extent in the improve- 
ment of the park system. So well and faithfully did he serv^e the city on 
this iDoard that when a Republican Mayor, Hon. E. C. Knight, entered 
office he appointed Mr. PIcngerer a mcml)cr of the Park Commission 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 451 

and he was unanimously chosen Chairman of the board, which position 
he has held for the past three years, 

Mr. Hengerer has also filled with distinction and honor for many 
years the office of trustee of the Buffalo State Normal School and is 
Secretary and Treasurer of the board. 

At the present time Mr. Hengerer is the choice of thousands of 
Democrats in Buffalo for the nomination for Mayor, they believing that 
he is the kind of a Democrat who will give Buffalo what it badly needs, 
a business administration. His name will be persistently urged for that 
honor. 

Mr. Hengerer is a prominent member of the Grand Army of the 
Republic. He is a member of the Buffalo^ Club, Ellicott Club and Acacia 
Club. He is a thirty-second degree Mason. He is a faithful attendant 
at the Church of the Redeemer (Lutheran) and one of its most valuable 
members. He is the President of the Board of Trustees of that church. 
He is also President of the Board of Trustees of the Lutheran Church 
Home for the Aged and Infirm. 

In 1863 Miss Louisa Duerr, of Buffalo, and Mr. Hengerer were 
married. They have nine children, eight boys and one girl. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hengerer live at No. 800 West Ferry street, Buffalo. 



John O'Toole, one of the active and popular Democratic leaders 
of Westchester County, has made a fine record as a party worker. He 
resides in Mount Vernon, where he has served on the City Committee 
and has been honored by appointment as delegate to all classes of local 
party conventions. 

In 1897 he was appointed to fill a vacancy in the office of Comp- 
troller of the City of Mount Vernon, and was reappointed for a full 
term, rendering highly satisfactory service and serving until 1900. In 
that year he received an appointment as Commissioner of Public Works 
of the City of Mount Vernon, filling this nnportant office likewise 
with great acceptance, until 1904. 

Mr. O'Toole is a member of the Royal Arcanum, the Knights of 
Columbus, the Firemen's Benevolent Association, and the Exempt 
Firemen's Association of the city of Mount Vernon. 



452 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY, 



NORMAN E. MACK. 

Norman Edward I\Iack^ one of the most forceful and influential 
Democratic leaders in both State and national politics, and the founder 
and editor of the Buffalo Tunes, was born July 24, 1854. 

He received his educational training in the public schools, after 
which he went West and engaged for a time in business pursuits. 
Returning to Buffalo, he established the Sunday Times in 1879, and the 
Daily Times in 1883. Both as a journalist and as a political leader, 
Mr. Mack has long held a prominent position in Western New York 
and, indeed, throughout the Empire State. 

He ^^■as appointed a delegate to the Democratic National conven- 
tions of 1892, 1896 and 1900, and has rendered valuable service as a 
member of the New York State Democratic Committee for many 
years. In 1900 he was selected as the New York representative on 
the Democratic National Committee, and served as a member of the 
executive committee. 

Mr. Mack married, December 22, 1891, Miss Harriet B. Taggart, 
of Buffalo. 

Mr. ^lack is a Democrat of national reputation, and has long been 
a recognized power in the party organization. 



The Hon. Thomas Ewing, Jr., has been an" active and prominent 
factor in the Democratic organization of Westchester County for more 
than ten years. For a considerable time he has been a member of the 
Democratic General Committee of the City of Yonkers, and has fre- 
quently been appointed a delegate to Democratic conventions. He 




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THE 
NEW YORK 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 453 

twice accepted the Democratic nomination for Mayor of Yonkers, and 
greatly reduced the Republican majority. In 1899, the last time he 
ran, he came within seventy-five votes of an election. He served as 
a member of the Board of Education from 1897 to 1903, and during 
some years of his term he was the Vice-President of the Board. 

Mr. Ewing is a member of the City Club of Yonkers, the Univer- 
sity Club of New York City, and is the Vice-President of the Ohio 
Society. He is also a member of the Westchester County Bar Asso- 
ciation and of the New York City Bar Association. 



Hon. John J. Scannell. One of the ablest, shrewdest, most tire- 
less and most efficient Democratic leaders in New York City is the 
Hon. John J. Scannell, the Tammany Hall leader for many years, in 
w'hat is now the Twenty-fifth District. 

Mr. Scannell is a native of the metropolis, w^here he was born in 
1840. He has always been an active and earnest Democrat and very 
influential in the Tammany Hall organization. January i, 1893, Mr. 
Scannell w-as appointed by Mayor Thomas F. Gilroy to fill a vacancy 
in the Board of Fire Commissioners. He was afterwards elected 
President of the board, in which he served for many years with marked 
efficiency. 

One of the highest tests of a man's political ability in New York 
City is the capacity he displays as District Leader. To fill this posi- 
tion successfully, to keep the party forces intact and make them strong 
and enthusiastic, bringing out a big vote for the Democratic ticket on 
election day, requires a combination of qualities rarely found. That 
Mr. Scannell has been kept in charge of his district for twelve years is, 
therefore, the highest possible testimonial as to his capacity. 

Mr. Scannell served as one of the commissioners of the Mulberry 
Bend Park, appointed by the Supreme Court, and was unanimously 
elected President of the Commission by his fellow-members, although 
they were politically opposed to him. The resulting transformation of 
the old "Five Points" into a handsome park was, certainly, a creditable 
and indeed remarkable achievement. 



454 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Albert A^\n Houtex has been an active and popular Democratic 
worker in \\'estchester County for many years, serving on the Yonkers 
City General Committee and frequently as a delegate to party conven- 
tions. He is one of the leaders of his election district and has great 
influence, especially among the conservative voters. 

In 1 90 1 he was appointed a member of the Board of Education of 
the city of Yonkers, holding the office until he resigned in 1903, having 
been elected Coroner in 1902. He had accepted the nomination for 
Coroner in 1901, and showed his popular strength by running thirteen 
hundred votes ahead of his ticket. Being again nominated in 1902, he 
was elected by sixty-one majority, although Odell had two thousand 
majority for Governor. 

Mr. Van Houten is a member of the Royal Arcanum, of the West- 
chester County Pharmaceutical Association, of which he has served as 
the President two terms, and of the New York State Pharmaceutical 
Association. 



Frank J. Phillips, a prominent farmer and stock dealer, and a 
leading Democratic worker of Chautauqua Count}^, was born in that 
county in the town of Villanova, March 5, 1863. He was educated 
in the public schools, and then learned the trade of cheese-maker, which 
he followed for some years. He then engaged in the business which 
he still pursues, and in which he has achieved both success and profit. 

In politics, Mr. Phillips has always been an earnest and energetic 
Democratic worker, and has frequently been appointed a delegate to 
party conventions. Democrats are not often elected to office in Chau- 
tauqua County, and anyone who achieves that feat is a "good one!" 
Mr. Phillips is one of those who have done the act, and for eight 
years lie has served with credit as Justice of the Peace, having not 
only been elected, but also re-elected. 

He has two sons, Manly and Stanley, both being brought up, 
politically, in sound Democracy, and, as they are capable and promising 
youths, they will he a valuable reinforcement to Chautauqua County's 
Democratic workers. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 455 

James V. Lawrence is one of the old guard of Democratic work- 
ers in Westchester County, having been an earnest supporter of the 
party since 1872. He has performed valuable service on party com- 
mittees, especially the General City Democratic Committee of Yonkers 
and the County Democratic Committee, and he has been a delegate to 
all classes of party conventions. 

Mr. Lawrence has been too closely occupied with his private busi- 
ness to accept public office, but he served two terms in the Board of 
Supervisors with great acceptance, and for many years he was a School 
Trustee and member of the Board of Education. 

Li 1896 he accepted a nomination for Congress on the ''Gold Demo- 
cratic" ticket and made a run which showed great personal popularity. 

Mr. Lawrence is a member of the City Club of Yonkers, of which 
he has served as President; of the Masonic fraternity, of the Loyal 
Legion, of the Blue and Gray, charter member of Fremont Post, G. 
A. R., of the Order of Elks and of the Corinthian Yacht Club. 



Frank L. Bapst. Among the recognized leaders of the Demo- 
cratic Party in Buffalo is Frank L. Bapst, whose services to the Democ- 
racy in several campaigns have been fruitful. Mr. Bapst enjoys a large 
measure of popularity and of public confidence and he has done no 
small amount of missionary work in Erie County. Mr. Bapst was born 
in Buffalo and received his early education in the public and private 
schools. He took a course in engineering in the Rensselaer Polytechnic 
Institute, graduating in 1879. He was appointed Assistant City Engi- 
neer of Buffalo in 1882 and held that office for two years. In 1884 he 
was nominated by the Democrats for City Engineer and was defeated 
by only 1,100 votes, running 4,500 votes ahead of his ticket. In 1885 
Mr. Bapst and P. B. McNaughton formed a partnership for contract- 
ing work. The firm is one of the largest in the western section of the 
State. Mr. Bapst is Vice-president of the Buffalo Dredging Company 
and General Manager of the German Rock Asphalt and Cement Com- 
pany. Mr. Bapst has on several occasions been sent as delegate to 
Democratic State conventions. 



456 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hon, Lorenzo Morris, the only Democrat ever elected to the 
State Senate from the district in the southwestern corner of the State 
of New York, was born at Smithfield, Madison County, August 14, 
18 1 7. His parents removed to near Mayville, in Chautauqua County, 
in 1829. when he was only twelve years old. He received his education 
in the public schools, beginning in the log schoolhouse and finishing 
in the Academy at Mayville, from which he was graduated in 1836. 
He taught school while studying law, and practiced in the inferior 
courts for three years before his admission to the Bar, in 1844, by 
the Supreme Court. During this period he resided in Jamestown, but 
after his admission he returned to Mayville, where he practised his 
profession until 1852. He then removed to Fredonia, which was his 
home during the remainder of his life. 

His remarkable ability soon brought him to the front in his pro- 
fession. He was a thorough lawyer, a master of his profession, a 
powerful advocate before judge or jury, and a gentleman of the most 
stainless honor and unquestioned integrity. He was a member of 
the ]\Iasonic fraternity. 

He was always a Jeffersonian Democrat, and one of the ablest in 
the State. He served as Justice of the Peace and Justice of Sessions. 
In 1S67 he accepted the Democratic nomination for State Senator, 
and was elected, being, as stated above, the only Democrat who ever 
represented Chautauqua County in that body. He made a splendid 
record in the Senate, and was one of the recognized leaders, being a 
veritable giant in debate. In 1856 he was appointed Postmaster at 
Fredonia by President Pierce, and served through President Buchan- 
an's administration also. He was removed after the Republicans 
came into power, having held the office for six years. He was a mem- 
iDer of the Board of Local Managers of the State Normal School 
from its establishment until his death, and was for several years its pres- 
ident. He was also for two years a trustee of the State Insane Hospital 
at Buffalo. He was a Democrat of State reputation, and served as 
delegate to Democratic State and National conventions, and was for 
many years Chairman of the Democratic County Committee. 

He was fond of telling his experiences, and abounded with inter- 
esting reminiscences of early days. On the 14th of August, 1903, 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 457 

vSenator Morris celebrated the eighty-sixth anniversary of his birth, 
over forty of his relatives being present. On the 2d of October follow- 
ing he passed away through death into life everlasting. 

Judge Lambert, of the Supreme Court, said of him just after his 
death : "He was a big man. You cannot make your estimate of him 
too high. Not only in ability and honesty and integrity, but in every 
attribute which goes to make up real greatness. If Senator Morris 
had drifted to a city he would have shone equally as a leader there 
as he did here, for he had all the elements to make him a leader. He 
was a big man; you cannot make that statement too strong." 



Thomas A. Browne. For many years Thomas A. Browne has 
]^en an important factor in the Democratic politics of Westchester 
County. He is an earnest and active party worker, and has on many oc- 
casions served the Democracy by attendance at county, district and local 
conventions, and by his efficient work as* a member of the city and 
county committees. In 1897 he was elected Supervisor, and was twice 
re-elected, so satisfactory was his record to his constituents. Mr. 
Browne is a member of the order of Elks and of the International 
Bricklayers' and Plasterers' Union. 



George William Reimer has always been one of those sterling 
Democrats whose vigor and vigilance make them a tower of strength 
to the party, as he has been in Rockland County for many years. 

His efficient work has been recognized by his party, not only by 
election as a delegate to important conventions, but by repeated elec- 
tions to public office. In 1888 he was chosen Justice of the Peace, and 
he has served in that important office through repeated re-elections, 
through all the intervening years until the present time. 

In 1890 he was elected Assessor of his town and served nine con- 
secutive years, until 1899. Mr. Reimer is a member of the Indepen- 
dent Order of Red Men and is an influential and highly respected citi- 
zen of Rockland County. 



458 THE DE.MOCRATIC PARTY 



Thomas J. Cummings. One of the bright young lawyers and 
Democrats of Chautauqua County is Thomas J. Cummings, who was 
born at Dunkirk, July 14, 1871. He received his early educational 
training in the public schools, and this was rounded out and completed 
by courses at St. Mary's Academy, the Fredonia Normal School, and 
Cornell University, from which he was graduated in 1898. In the 
same year he was admitted to the Bar and began the practice of his 
profession in Dunkirk. 

He belongs to the Dunkirk Young Men's Association, the A. O. H., 
the New York State Bar Association, the K. of C, the B. P. O. E., 
the Dunkirk Club and the Chamber of Commerce. Mr. Cummings 
is a bright young man, and he has already acceptably filled the offices 
of Supervisor and City Attorney, his first term in each office having 
l^een so satisfactory that he was accorded a re-election. 

Mr. Cummings is a captivating public speaker, and has taken an 
active part on the stump in every important campaign since he became 
of age. He is personally very popular, and he certainly has a bright 
political future before him. • 



George F. Darrow, one of the leading journalists of Northern 
New York, was born in AVest Eaton, Madison County, June 18, 1854. 
He was educated in the public schools, and at Syracuse University, 
from which he was graduated in the class of 1876. In the following 
year Mr. Darrow purchased the Ogdensburg Advance, of which he has 
continued the publisher and editor to the present time, making it a 
power in the cause of Democracy. 

^Ir. Darrow is a member of the Ogdensburg Club and of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity. Always an ardent Democrat, Mr. Darrow has re- 
ceived many public honors as a representative rif his party. In 1892 
he was appointed by Governor Flower a member of the Board of Man- 
agement of the Ogdensburg State Hospital, the largest in the world, 
holding the position until 1895, when he resigned. In 1894 he was 
elected Supervisor of the First Ward and was re-elected in 1895. In 
1899 he was elected Alderman from the same ward, and through re- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 459. 

peated re-elections he was continued in office to the present time. lie 
is also one of the trustees of the Ogdensburg Public Library. 

Mr. Darrow, in addition to his newspaper advocacy of Democratic 
principles, has rendered long and valuable service as a member of the 
Democratic City and County committees, serving many years as Chair- 
man of the former. He has also been a delegate to all classes of local 
and district party conventions and has many times served as Chairman. 
He has also on numerous occasions been honored with appointment as 
delegate to Democratic State conventions. 

Mr. Darrow is a man of ability and stands high in the community. 



Eugene H. Sherman, son of the Hon. Richard W. Sherman, a 
former Mayor of Utica, was born in that city, June i, 1874. Mr. Sher- 
man enjoyed the best educational advantages and improved them to the 
utmost. After completing a course in the schools of his native city, he 
entered Yale University in the class of 1896 and was duly graduated 
from that famous institution of learning. Having made choice of the 
law for his profession, he completed a course in the New York Law 
School, from which he was graduated in 1898. 

In 1901 Mr. Sherman became actively engaged in the contracting 
business on an extensive scale with the Troy Public Works Company, 
and afterward with Hurd, Sherman & Co., of which he became Vice- 
president, and which position he held until January i, 1905, when the 
company was dissolved. He was in the contracting business four years, 
displaying great energy and marked ability and meeting wnth gratify- 
ing success. 

Mr. Sherman is a member of the college fraternity Chi Phi, of the 
Yale Club of New York City and of the Democratic Club of Utica. 

He has made his mark as a lawyer, demonstrating unusual capacity 
in the work of his profession. 

In politics Mr. Sherman has always been an earnest and influential 
Democrat, active in the organization and a power in political cam- 
paigns. He is one of the rising young men of Central New York, and 
high political honors are surely in store for him whenever he shall 
choose to accept them. 



46o THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Thomas F. Houlihan, of Mount Vernon, is one of the faithful 
and earnest Democratic workers of Westchester County. He has 
ahvays been active and efficient in party work, and has rendered valu- 
able service as a member of the Democratic City and County commit- 
tees. He has also served as delegate to all classes of minor conventions. 

In 1896 ]\Ir. Houlihan was appointed Plumbing Inspector of the 
City of j\Iount Vernon, and so satisfactory has been his performance 
of this important official duty that he has been continued in office up to 
the present time. 

He is a member of the Royal Arcanum, of the Catholic Benevolent 
Legion, of the Firemen's Benevolent Association, and of the Independ- 
ent Hose Company. 



The Hon. Charles H. Corbett, of the firm of Hart & Corbett, 
of Sherman, N. Y., among the largest general merchants of Chau- 
tauqua County, was born in the town of Mina, in the county where 
he has always resided, November 5, 1845. He was educated in the 
public schools and at the Westfield Academy. He also took a course 
in Eastman's Business College. In 1871 he engaged in business with 
the firm with which he is still connected, dealing in dry goods, carpets, 
]x)ots and shoes, etc., and doing a very extensive and prosperous 
business. 

Mr. Corbett is a member of the Masonic fraternity, having taken 
all the degrees up to and including those of the Commandery. He is 
also a Nol)le of the Mystic Shrine. 

In politics, Mr. Corbett has always been an ardent and vigorous 
Democrat, one rendering service of great value to his party. He has 
held many town offices, including those of Town Clerk and Super- 
visor, and in 1882 he was elected Member of Assembly, being one of 
the few Democrats that have held anything higher than a town office 
in Chautauqua County for half a century. He came near achieving a 
second election and repeating this feat, in 1902. 

He has often served as delegate to Democratic County, District, and 
State conventions, and was an alternate delegate to one of the Demo- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 461 

cratic National conventions that nominated Grover Cleveland for Pres- 
ident. He has also been a member of the Democratic State Committee, 
and was once its chairman. A strong man in every way and a splendid 
Democratic leader is the Hon. Charles H. Corbett. 



John T. Sweeny, for many years one of the active and influential 
Democratic leaders of Saratoga Comity, was born in the village of 
Saratoga Springs — which has always been his home — October 30, 1854. 

He received his education in the public schools of his native village, 
after which he engaged in the hotel business, which he has continued 
Avith great success to the present time. Sweeny's Hotel, at Nos. 18, 
20 and 2.2 Railroad Place, is one of the well-known and popular 
hostelries of the famous spa. 

Mr. Sweeny has always been an earnest and vigorous Democratic 
worker, and has been prominent in the local and county organization. 
He has served for many years on the Village, Town, and County 
Democratic committees, and has been the Chairman of the Town Com- 
mittee, making a splendid record for efficiency in this important and 
responsible position. He has frequently been appointed a delegate 
to Village, Town and County conventions. 

He was a member of the Village Board of Trustees for one term, 
and for several years he rendered valuable service as a member of the 
Board of Water Commissioners until this Board was superseded by 
the present Board of Street, Sewer and Water Commissioners. He 
was a member of the new board for four years, his term expiring 
in 1904. In all these official positions Mr. Sweeny rendered valuable 
service to the community, and his work was highly appreciated. 

Mr. Sweeny was married, November 12, 1876, to Miss Bridget 
M. Casey, daughter of Martin and Mary Casey, of Saratoga Springs. 
They have eight children — four sons and four daughters. The eldest 
son, Martin C. Sweeny, also a stalwart Democrat, holds the position 
of Assistant Superintendent of Streets of Saratoga Springs. 

John T. Sweeny is a man of ability and a prosperous and popular 
citizen, as well as a highly successful landlord. 



462 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Leonard F. TalljNian. Among the veteran and valuable Demo- 
cratic workers of Rockland County, Leonard F. Tallman has been 
conspicuous for a whole generation. He is always active and efficient 
in the party organization, and a man of much weight in its councils. 
Mr. Tallman was elected Excise Commissioner in the town of Clarks- 
town. and through repeated re-elections he continued in that respon- 
sible position for nine years. He was also one of the leading members 
of the former Tilden Club, at Rockland Lake, for many years one of 
the important political societies of Rockland County. 

Mr. Tallman is also a charter member of the Industrial Benevolent 
Association, of New York City. 



Hon. John Herriman White^ for many years the President of 
the Milage of Saratoga Springs, and a prominent factor in the Demo- 
cratic organization of that section of the State, was born in New York 
City, the son of Charles and Eliza (Bryav) White, February 23, 1823. 
His father was a prominent lawyer and a well-known Irish patriot, 
having been one of the companions of Robert Emmet, and afterward 
partner in the practice of law in New York City with that famous 
patriot's brother's Thomas Addis Emmet. The style of the firm was 
Emmet & White. 

The suljject of this sketch lost his father in his early childhood, 
and his mother married the late Dr. John Clark, one of the principal 
founders of Saratoga Springs. Dr. Clark owned a large tract of 
land on the east side of the village, including the famous Congress 
Spring and its beautiful park, and reaching out to the Saratoga Racing 
Park. Dr. Clark was, indeed, largely instrumental in developing the 
Saratoga mineral springs and extending their fame. 

Young White was brought up amid a Whig environment, and was 
an especially strong admirer of Henry Clay. After the defeat of that 
magnetic statesman for the Presidency, in 1S44, he became a Democrat, 
and ever afterward remained a loyal adlierent of the Democracy. 

In 1859, I\lr. Wliite accepted liis ]xirly's nomination for Member 
of Assembly. It was a three-cornered light, the two other candidates 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 463 

being Austin L. Reynolds and Joseph Baucus, 1>)tli men of the higliest 
personal character and great popularity. The result was exceedingly 
close, there being a margin of only sixteen votes between the three 
candidates. It took the official canvass to determine which one had 
been elected, the decision being in favor of Mr. Baucus, with Mr. White 
second, and Mr. Reynolds third. In 1861 Mr. White was nominated 
by the Democracy for Sheriff, his opponent being Henry H. Hathorn, 
afterward twice elected a Representative in Congress. The result was 
again close, but Mr. Hathorn was elected. Mr. White had, however, 
again demonstrated his phenomenal popularity by running far ahead 
of his party's strength. 

In the meantime, Mr. White had held about all the important local 
offices in the town and village of Saratoga Springs. In 1866, after 
Saratoga had procured a special charter, he w^as chosen President of the 
Village, the election being by popular vote. He filled this difficult 
and responsible position with such general satisfaction that he was re- 
elected, in 1868, holding the office four years, when, on account of 
failing health, he resigned. In 1868, he accepted the Democratic nom- 
niation for Representative in Congress, against the Hon. Stephen San- 
ford, of Amsterdam, but he failed of election. He was, however, many 
times elected President of the Village of Saratoga Springs, holding the 
office under both charters for a period of eighteen years. It is said 
of his administration that not a single dollar went astray while he was 
the incumbent of this office. He instituted many reforms during his 
long service, among them being the creation of a Board of Village 
Auditors, and the institution of the office of Receiver of Taxes and 
Assessments, which greatly simplified the management of the fiscal 
affairs of the town and village government. 

Mr. White was looked upon as a very safe and able counselor 
and a successful lawyer, while his wide sympathy and great generosity 
made him a man of large helpfulness to the poor and the unfortunate. 
He died July i, 1876, soon after his return from an extended tour 
abroad, in the hope of restoring his broken health. 

He was survived by a widow and one son, John H. White, a live, 
energetic, and public-spirited man, who has taken a great interest in 
the affairs and fortunes of the village which has always been his home. 



464 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Charles A. Illingworth, the leader of the Democratic organiza- 
tion in the Third Ward of the city of Yonkers for several years, has 
been an important factor in the political life of Westchester County 
for a long while. He has been a member of the city committee and the 
county committee for a long period, and he has also served as delegate 
to city, county, Assembly, District and Congressional District conven- 
tions. In every party relation he has proved loyal and efficient. Mr 
Illingworth has never been willing to accept either public office or nomi- 
nations for office, but his earnest efforts for party success have been 
none the less conspicuous in every important political campaign. 

He is a member of the Democratic Club of the City of Yonkers, the 
Independent Order of Red Men, the Irving Hose Company, the Y. V. 
F. P., and has represented these organizations in many conventions. 



H. C. Kingsbury. One of the prominent and promising young 
attorneys of Chautauqua County is Henry C. Kingsbury, Jr., of West- 
field. The subject of this sketch was born in Westfield, March 2, 1872. 
He acquired a sound education in the public schools and the Westfield 
High School. 

Mr. Kingsbury's father, now dead, was one of the ablest Democrats 
of Western New York. The son, naturally, was attracted by his 
father's example and his fame, and he began the study of law immedi- 
ately after leaving school, and after completing his course at the 
Albany Law^ School he was admitted to the Bar, in 1893, the year he 
became of age. He went into partnership with his father and soon 
justified his title to a membership in even such an eminent firm as 
this, taking high rank in his profession. 

Mr. Kingsbury has always been an earnest and influential Demo- 
crat, and his party has honored him by appointment as delegate to 
many party conventions. Pie has also been elected Justice of the 
Peace, and has served with distinction as President of the Village for 
two terms. 

Mr. Kingsbury is one of the bright young men in his profession, 
and high political honors assuredly await his acceptance. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 465 

Dr. John J. Maiioney, a prominent physician and surgeon of 
Jamestown, was born in that city, June 28, 1869. He was educated 
in the public schools of his native city, and was graduated from the 
high school in 1887. After serving for seven years as clerk in a 
drug store he began the study of medicine, and entered the medical 
department of Buffalo University, from which he was graduated and 
received his diploma in 1896. After one year's hospital work he re- 
turned to Jamestown, where he has ever since continued in the practice 
of his profession, in which he has taken a high rank. Dr. Mahoney 
is a member of the Order of Elks, of the Woodmen, of the Maccabees, 
of the Knights of Columbus, and of the Chautauqua County, of the 
New York State, and of the American Medical associations. 

Dr. Mahoney has always been an earnest Democrat and an active 
party worker. He has performed valuable service on the Democratic 
County Committee. He is a man of genial manners, and is very popular 
and highly respected in the community. 



Robert Terry, one of the enterprising and prosperous farmers 
of Chautauqua County, was born in the town of Floyd, Oneida County, 
January 10, 1835. He acquired his education in the public schools 
and the Ellington Academy, he having become a resident of Ellington 
in his boyhood and having had his home there ever since. 

Mr. Terry has always been a farmer — one of the enterprising and 
progressive order, industrious and thrifty — -and his two large farms 
are among the finest in Chautauqua County, which has a great many 
fine ones. 

In politics Mr. Terry has always been a straight and sterling Demo- 
crat and an earnest worker in his party's cause. He has often been 
honored by appointment as delegate to party conventions, and has 
served as Inspector of Elections, but he has never accepted a nomina- 
tion for any other office. 

His son, Allen D. Terry, is as strong a Democrat as his father, 
and that he will also render the party great service in his time is one 
of those predictions that it is perfectly safe to make. 



466 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

John E. Crick, for many years an enterprising and prosperous 
fanner of Chautauqua County, was born in that county, in the town 
of Gerry, May 15, 1836. He received his educational training in the 
pubhc schools of his native town, continuing his work on his father's 
farm. He remained there until after the great Civil W'^ar, when he 
removed to a farm in the town of Ellery. He continued farming 
there until 1902, when he removed to Jamestown. 

^Ir. Crick has always been a staunch Democrat and an efficient 
supporter of the party cause. He has, however, never held nor sought 
either nomination or election to public office. 

He served in the Union army three years, and was mustered out 
at the close of the war. Personally, Mr. Crick is a man of intelligence 
and engaging manners, and enjoys a sort of busy leisure in looking 
after his farms. 



Jerome La Due. One of the prominent members of the Chau- 
tauqua County Bar is Jerome La Due, of Westfield. He was born in 
the town of Chautauqua, December 12, 1839, and completed his literary 
education at the ^\^estfield Academy. 

He studied law with H. C. Kingsley, Sr., and was admitted to 
the Bar in 1867. He spent six years in Milwaukee, and then removed 
to Westfield, where he has since resided. Li addition to his law prac- 
tice 'Mr. La Due conducts an extensive real estate, insurance and loan 
Ijusiness. Being asked what societies he belonged to, ]\Ir. La Due 
replied : "I belong to no society in God's world but the Democratic 
Society and my wife." 

He is an ardent Democrat, and has many times made speaking 
tours through Chautauqua and adjoining counties. He is a very popular 
orator and is widely known. lie was a close friend of Samuel J. 
Tilden. 

Pie has been a delegate to County, State and National conventions. 
He served as Postmaster under President Cleveland, and has held 
many local offices, including Member of the Board of Education, and 
village trustee. He is a prominent citizen and very highly respected. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 467 

Alfred V. H. Clark, a prosperous farmer of Clarkstown, is one 
of the earnest and influential Democrats of Rockland County. As a 
valuable member of party committees and as a delegate to important 
party conventions, Mr. Clark has rendered great service to the Democ- 
racy of his town and county. 

In 1877 he was elected Commissioner of Highways, and through 
successive re-elections he acceptably filled that office for nine years. In 
1887 he was chosen Collector of Taxes of his town, in which office 
he served continuously until 1897. In 1899 he was elected Supervisor 
of Clarkstown, and has been continued in that most important of all 
town offices to the present time. It is greatly to the credit of Mr. 
Clark, and a high testimony to his efficiency and fidelity to his public 
trusts, that the people are always anxious to continue him in their 
service. 

Mr. Clark is a member of the Independent Order of Red Men. 



Charles B. Richardson, a strong and strenuous, a sterling and 
stalwart Democrat of Chautauqua County, was torn in the town of 
Panama, May 7, 1858. He has always lived in his native county, 
in his native town, and even in the old homestead in which he was 
born, nearly half a century ago. He received his education in the 
public schools and went to work on his father's farm. Mr. Richardson 
is a progressive and successful agriculturist and is a man of decided 
influence in the community. 

He has always been much interested in politics, and especially in 
the success of the Democratic Party, to which he has been warmly 
attached. He has been content to work for the cause, and has never 
sought public office, though he has served as Inspector of Elections. 
He has frequently been honored with an appointment as delegate to 
County and District party conventions, and has been alternate delegate 
to the Democratic State Convention. 

■ He has two bright sons, Lavern and Fred H., who are already 
instilled with love for the great party their father has served so loyally, 
and are anxious to follow his example. 



468 THE DE.AIOCRATIC PARTY 



TIMOTHY J. CAMPBELL. 

The political history of New York City contains few names more 
deserving of high tribute than that of Timothy J. Campbell. For 
over forty years Mr. Campbell made politics his business, but he con- 
ducted this business not so much for himself as for the thousands of 
his constituents who made him their leader. Mr. Campbell's bailiwick 
was the Eighth Congressional District, on the great East Side of New 
York City. Here he was the undisputed leader. He was more than 
a leader — he was the personal friend and adviser of his constituents. 
Throughout his long career as Assemblyman, Judge, State Senator 
and Congressman he commanded and retained the confidence of his 
electors. His influence was bounded only by the limits of the party in 
which he served. 

Timothy J. Campbell was born of Scotch-Irish ancestry in the 
County of Cavan, Ireland, in January, 1840. His parents, who be- 
longed to the small gentry of Ireland, but were in straitened circum- 
stances, brought the lx)y to New York when he was five years old. tie 
attended the public schools of the city for a few years, and then, am- 
bitious to earn his own living, he became a "fly boy" in the pressroom 
of the New York Herald. From "fly 1x)y" he steadily advanced to 
general oflice manager, holding, at different times, positions on the 
Herald, Express, Times and Tribune. In the meantime young Camp- 
bell, not content with the slight education that he had received, attended 
night schools and took an active interest in debating. His interest in 
political questions and his innate ability to lead men naturally turned 
him into active participation in party politics. From the first he was 
a stalwart Deinocrat. His usefulness to the party brought him, in 
1865, a position as Deputy in the County Clerk's oflice. 




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OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 469 

No man was more popular on tlic East Side of New York than 
'Tinr' Campbell. Physically powerful, he was more than a match 
for any one in his district in a wrestling bout, and it is said that during 
the Tweed-Sweeney regime he once had an encounter with a famous 
heavy-weight prize-fighter, much to the chagrin of the professional 
boxer. In 1867 he was chosen for his first elective office, State Assem- 
blyman. He served continuously in the Assembly until 1873, and then, 
after missing one term, was re-elected in 1875. While in the Assem- 
bly he was a member of many important committees, and attained to 
an influence in legislative matters equaled by few of his colleagues. 
He devoted himself to the study of law, was admitted to the Bar, and 
upon retiring from the Assembly was elected Justice of the Fifth 
Judicial Civil Court in New York City. Here he served with distinc- 
tion. 

After his term on the bench had expired Mr, Campbell was again 
returned to the Legislature at Albany. He was an ardent supporter 
of Governor Cleveland. It is related that Mr. Campbell was once dis- 
cussing a bill of his with Mr. Cleveland, when the Governor gave it 
as his opinion that the bill was unconstitutional. "Yes, I know, Gov- 
ernor," answered the Assemblyman, "but what is a little matter like 
the Constitution between friends ?'' Twent}^ years later, long after Mr. 
Cleveland had served his two terms as President and Mr. Campbell 
had been in Congress, the two met at a banquet in New York. The 
ex-President greeted his former Assemblyman cordially, and then, in 
an undertone, asked : "Tim, how is the Constitution between friends?" 

Mr. Campbell's loyal support of Governor Cleveland gained for 
him the nomination to the State Senate in opposition to the regular 
Tammany candidate. He was elected by over five thousand votes. In 
the Senate he continued the success with which he had met in the As- 
sembly, working always in the mterests of his district and of the people 
who had elected him. Organized labor had no stronger friend any- 
where than was Mr. Campbell. Before the expiration of his term in 
the Senate a vacancy from the Eighth Congressional District in the 
House of Representatives had occurred through the appointment of 
Congressman S. S. Cox as Minister to Turkey. Mr. Campbell was 
chosen to fill the vacancy, and, taking his seat in the Forty-ninth Con- 



470 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

gress. he served as Representative for several years following. Retir- 
ing from active political office in 1893, ^""^ none the less continued his 
interest in legislative matters until the day of his death. 

Congressman Campbell \vas married on December 20, 1891, to 
]Miss ]\largaretta ]Miller, of Huntingdon, Pa. Mrs. Campbell comes 
from one of the best families of Pennsylvania, and for over thirty 
years her father was County Clerk of Pluntingdon County. She is a 
direct descendant of Oliver Cromwell. 

On April 7. 1904, Timothy Campbell died. He was one of the 
foremost leaders of the Democratic Party in New York City. The 
secret of his success lay in his absolute honesty, his respect for his 
word, and his great foresight. Pie worked for the people who elected 
him to office. He gave them freely the benefit of his talents, whether 
in his profession as a lawyer or in his duties as a legislator. He was 
largely instrumental in opening two of the parks in New York City, 
Corlear's Hook and Oriental Park, and in the latter it is proposed to 
erect a monument to his memory. 

No better tribute can be paid to his memory than that contained 
in a memorial adopted by the International Printing Pressmen's Union : 

''The man who, by his generalship, his master mind, or his influ- 
ence among men, brings about the elevation of his fellow-man, is more 
of a hero than the soldier-general who leads his army into battle and 
wins the fight with great sacrifice of life, where some reap the glory 
and others make the sacrifice. Such was the life of Timothy J. Camp- 
bell. By his sacrifices, untiring efforts, his persistent application, his 
indomitable courage, thousands got the glory therefrom. The wage 
earner should look upon such a man as a hero, a champion worthy of 
a monument, a substantial offering to the memory of one who, while 
in the glamour and limelight of legislative life, never lost sight of the 
workingman, and in every honorable way sought by legal en.actment 
to better his condition, increase his income and multiply his comforts. 

"There is no better way to honor a benefactor than to- erect an 
indestructible monument of gratitude to his memory. The pressmen 
were his beneficiaries, and they should be among the first to contribute 
towards the fund for the erectirm of this lasting memorial to one whose 
charity was unbounded and whose life was devoted to making others 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 471 

happy and conif(jrtablc. It is not a matter (jf charity, but a mark of 
justice; not a complimentary token, but a well-earned reward; not a 
fanciful sentiment, but a duty we owe to God and our neighbor, to 
honor the dead who have earned their crown, and to tliaiik God that 
such men once lived." 



Henry W. Race, of Hudson, a man of large and varied business 
experience and a staunch Democrat, was born in Claverack, N. Y., 
seventy-two years ago. He comes from one of the most prominent 
Democratic families in Columbia County and one of those long identi- 
fied with the county's history. Mr. Race lost his father in his in- 
fancy and lived on the farm until he was fourteen years old, when he 
came to Hudson and accepted a clerkship in a dry goods store. He also 
pursued the same calling in New York City, but at the age of twenty- 
one he returned to Hudson and went into the same line of business for 
himself. He sold out later and became a reporter for a commercial 
agency. 

When the Civil War began he enlisted in the Union army and 
served until the close of the war. During the latter part of the time 
he was on the staff of General Thomas. At the close of the war he 
resumed his work in New York, but two years later he returned to 
Hudson and served as Deputy in the County Clerk's Office for ten or 
tw^elve years. As an insurance agent, as a broker and as a canvasser 
for large publishing firms, he had much experience and his services 
were in great demand. 

For a time he was engaged in the insurance business in Albany and 
became quite active in the Democratic organization. He has always 
been a strong Democrat and ready to render any service in his power 
to his party. He has frequently served as delegate to party conven- 
tions, but has had too much business of his o\vn to look after to permit 
him to accept any political office. 



472 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Frank Xavier, editor of the Yonkers Herald, has been one of 
the leaders of the Westchester County Democratic organization for 
some ten years, having a wide field of influence, which has included the 
whole of this populous and wealthy county. The duties of a news- 
paper organ are so exacting that IMr. Xavier has not had the time to 
devote much attention to convention or committee work, much less to 
accept nominations to office, but when a political campaign is in pro- 
gress his abilities and his opportunities have enabled him to render his 
party services that have been not only efficient, but of the highest 
value. 

^Ir. Xavier is a member of the R. A. Yonkers Yacht Club, of the 
Yonkers Corinthian Yacht Club, and of the Irish Industrial League. 



Hon. Henry Van Bergen was born in the town of Athena, 
Greene County, N'ew York, December 30, 1853, and is the son of Peter 
P. and ]\Iary (DeGraff) Van Bergen. He was educated in the district 
schools and at Coxsackie. 

After leaving school he was engaged in the pursuits of farming 
and milling until the year 1877, when he was elected County Clerk, 
which office he held for six years. From the time of his majority, 
and even before, he had taken a lively interest in political affairs, and 
had early adhered to the Democratic Party. His election to the office 
of County Clerk was an indication of his popularity at that early day, 
when he was but twenty-four years of age, and an indication also of 
the high estimate which his party had formed of his abilities and 
services. 

In the fall of 1899 ^Ir. Van Bergen was elected Sheriff of Greene 
County for a term of three years. He took the office on January i, 
1900, and served until the end of the year 1902. He has also been 
Supervisor of his town, and, being a man of liberal education and 
advanced views, has always taken a deep interest in educational mat- 
ters, and has been a member of the School Board. He was also a 
Presidential Elector in 1896, and is a member of Eureka Lodge No. 
131, Knights of Pythias. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 473 

Not only has Mr. Van Bergen been prominent in public affairs in 
Greene County for a quarter of a century, but he has been an active 
and highly successful business man. He is a large landowner in his 
native county, where he has several fine farms. In addition to his 
faithfulness as a public officer and his business abilities, IMr. Van 
Bergen unquestionably owes a measure of his success and popularity 
to the fine courtesy and uniform consideration w'hich he unconsciously 
extends to others. 

On Decemter 22, 1887, Henry Van Bergen married Phoebe J. 
Delemater, who died December 22, 1902. He has two children, namely, 
Lawrence Van Bergen and Miss Minnie Van Bergen. 



JosiAH J. Hasbrouck, one of the prominent Democrats of Ulster 
County, was born at New Paltz, January 13, 1843. He received a 
thorough education, finishing in the New Paltz Academy. In 1857, 
when only fourteen years old, he engaged as a clerk in a general store, 
and by thrift and industry he managed to gather enough capital to 
buy an interest in the business from his brother, J. M. Hasbrouck, in 
1865. In 1876 he purchased the remaining interest, and has since 
conducted the business himself, building it up until it has become the 
most extensive in the village. 

Mr. Hasbrouck's activity in politics began before he was of age, 
and so efficient a worker was he that at the age of twenty-one years 
-he was elected Town Clerk, and succeeded himself for two terms. 
Shortly after this he was elected Supervisor of New^ Paltz, and held 
this office, off and on, for eleven years, serving as Chairman at different 
times. 

In 1896 he was nominated for County Treasurer, and ran 1,400 
votes ahead of his ticket. He ran again in 1901, but the Republican 
majority once more proved too great for even his popularity to over- 
come. He has twice been a delegate to Democratic State conventions, 
and is the Treasurer of the State Normal School at New Paltz. He 
has been a member of the Democratic County Committee for twenty- 
five years, and is one of the influential politicians in Ulster County. 



474 THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

John C. jMuxro. Few men in the county of Onondaga are better 
known than John C. ]\Iunro, of Camillas. He is from a branch of 
the ]\Innro family which has been identified with the history of the 
county for the past century. He is a son of John C. and Emily (Ben- 
nett) ^lunro. and was born in the town of Camillus in 1849. He has 
always been a Democrat and has taken much interest in politics. In 
1879 he was elected Supervisor from Camillus and served six years, 
making a splendid record. For five years he served as Justice of the 
Peace. In the campaign of 1904 Mr. Munro was very active and at- 
tained much prominence. Of late years he has devoted much of his 
time to the management of his 300-acre farm. 



jMajor Hiram Smith, a gallant soldier of the great Civil War, 
a prominent citizen and a leading Democrat of Chautauqua County, 
was born at Hanover, New York, October 25, 1819. He received his 
education in the public schools and the Fredonia Academy. His 
grandfather settled in Chautauqua County in 18 10. His father helped 
to clear away the forests of what is now one of the most highly cul- 
tivated counties in the United States. When twenty years old he 
besran his business career as a clerk in his father's store at Smith's 
Mills. Soon after this his father started a branch store at Great 
\''alley, Cattaraugus County, and sent Hiram there to take charge. 
The supply of currency being limited, trade w^as mostly a matter of 
barter, and the young merchant soon had a large number of logs 
accumulated. He had these sawed and the lumber rafted down the 
Alleghany and Ohio rivers to Cincinnati. His business ability was so 
evident that his father made him his partner in 1843, '^^'^^ the firm 
of Rodney B. Smith & Co. became widely and favorably known. For 
eighteen years, until the outbreak of the war, it conducted an extensive 
and flourishing general merchandise business. 

In 1 86 1 the great war began, and Mr. Smith promptly abandoned 
his large business interests and enlisted in the Union army. He served 
through the whole war, and by his gallantry and efficiency he secured 
repeated promotions, and held the rank of Major when he was mus- 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 475 

tercd out of the service in 1S65. After the close of the war Major 
Smith engaged in mercantile business in St. Louis, but the climate 
did not agree with his health, and he returned to Chautauqua County 
in 1867, making his home in Jamestown, where he has since resided. 
He entered the insurance business, and has prosecuted it with his usual 
diligence and success. 

In politics Major Smith is an earnest and influential Democrat of 
the old school. He was elected member of the Assembly in 1859, and 
was re-elected in i860. He was Town Clerk for several years, and 
served six 3^ears as Supervisor. In 1884 ^^^^ again in 1890 Major 
Smith accepted the Democratic nomination for Congress, and each 
time he made a splendid showing at the polls in that Republican Gib- 
raltar. 

Major Smith is one of the first citizens of Chautauqua County, a 
man of unsullied life and splendid record and highly honored and 
esteemed by the entire community. He has been twice married, Sep- 
tember 10, 1844, to Miss Melissa P. Love, of Forestville, New York, 
and September 10, 1894, to Miss Anna L. Gray, of Jamestown. 



Frank E. Shearman, one of the leading manufacturers of James- 
towai, and one of the prominent Democrats of Chautauqua County, 
was born at Jamestown, December 12, 1857, and that city has ahvays 
been his home. He acquired his educational training in the public 
schools, including the high school. In 1880 he became a member of 
the firm of Shearman Bros., manufacturers of couches. The firm is 
known all over the United States, and sells couches from ]\Iaine to 
California. Mr. Shearman is a member of the Order of Maccabees. 

He has long been one of the most active and efficient Democratic 
workers in the county. He has frequently been appointed a delegate 
to Democratic County and State conventions, and was an alternate 
delegate to the National convention in 1900. He was for several years 
chairman of the Democratic County Committee. Personally, Mr. 
Shearman is a bright and companionable gentleman, and very popular 
in the community. 



476 ' THE DEiMOCRATIC PARTY 

Luj^iAN W. Pierce. One of the staunch and sterling Democrats 
of Chautauqua County is Luman W. Pierce, who was born in the 
town of Stockton, May i6, 1855, and has always lived within its 
borders. He was educated in the public schools of his native town. 
]\Ir. Pierce worked as a creamery man for ten years, when he left 
that employment to become a farmer, an occupation which he has 
since followed with signal success. 

jNIr. Pierce has always been an active party worker, and has fre- 
quently been honored by appointment as delegate to party conventions. 
He has been elected Inspector of Elections and Town Clerk, and is a 
highly respected, popular and influential citizen. 

He has two sons, P. Clifford Pierce, who is secretary of the 
Y. M. C. A. of Washington City, and E. May Pierce, who is still 
a youth. They are both bright and capable and are full of promise. 



Darius G. Pickett. One of the leading physicians, and one of 
the most prominent Democrats of Chautauqua County is Dr. Darius 
G. Pickett, of Fredonia. He was born at Stockton, in the same county, 
December 9, 1841, and acquired his education in the public and select 
.schools of the county. He studied medicine when his schooldays were 
over, and was graduated at the Buffalo University in February, 1874. 
He began the practice of his profession in his native village at once, 
but in 1S85 he removed to Fredonia, where he has since remained. 
He stands in the very front rank of the medical fraternity, and has a 
very large practice. 

\''ery few Democrats have ever been Supervisor of two towns in 
Chautauqua County, or even of one town, for that matter, but Dr. 
Pickett has the distinction of having Idccu elected Supervisor of Stock- 
ton in 1884, and of Fredonia in 1891-2 and 1893. His service in 
Fredonia is not likely to be forgotten soon, as he saved the town 
$12,000 on a reservoir. Fie was nominated by his party for State 
Senator in 1902. and ran ahead of even the popular Democratic candi- 
date for Governor. He has served as delegate to County, State and 
National Democratic conventions. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 477 

Dudley F. Valentine. For many years Dudley F. Valentine has 
been a loyal and effective worker for the Democratic cause in the city 
of Yonkers. He has rendered efficient service on the City and County 
committees, and as a delegate he has assisted in the deliberations and 
helped tO' shape the action of numberless party conventions. 

In the year 1898 he was elected an Alderman from the Seventh 
Ward, and so satisfactory and in every way creditable was his service 
that he was re-elected in 1900 and 1902, running ahead of his ticket 
each time. He was the first Democrat elected Alderman from his ward 
in many years. His triumph in 1900 was especially noteworthy, as 
that w^as the year of the great Democratic slump everywhere. In 
1902 his run was also phenomenal, as his plurality of 120 was the 
largest any candidate for Alderman ever received in the Severith Ward. 

Mr. Valentine is a member of the Order of Elks, of the Seventh 
Ward Democratic Club, of the Howard Hose Company and of the 
Yonkers Volunteer Fire Department. 



Monroe Mattison. One of the venerable Democratic patriarchs 
of Chautauqua County is Monroe Mattison, of the town of Busti. 
He was born m that town, October 27, 1824, while James Monroe, 
the great Democratic President for whom he was named, occupied 
the Presidential chair. He was educated in the public schools. His 
long life has been an active and successful one. He has been a shoe- 
maker and merchant, and for many years he was an extensive dealer 
in cattle. 

Mr. Mattison has always been a strong and earnest Democrat, and 
in his younger days he was one of the party's most active hustlers. 
As to the strength and strenuousness of his Democracy, it is needless 
to say more than to call attention to the fact that he has lived all of 
his more than fourscore years in such a county as Chautauqua, which 
gives 8,000 Republican majority, about the largest given by any rural 
county in the United States, and that during all his life he has never 
voted any but a Democratic ticket! That is surely a very marked 
distinction. 



478 THE DEAIOCRATIC PARTY 

Hox. George Raines. The most noted criminal lawyer in the 
State outside of New York City, and one of the most eminent Demo- 
crats in the entire State is Hon. George Raines of Rochester, who is 
known from coast to coast as an orator without a peer, a man whose 
eloquence has thrilled crowded courtrooms, the Senate halls of his 
State, and national conventions of his party. To-day Mr. Raines 
stands in the foremost rank of men who have achieved greatness at 
the Bar and whose Democratic principles have made him a man who 
can be pointed to with pride, for he has always been a loyal and 
steadfast Democrat. He has been very prominent in New York State 
politics since he cast his first vote, and he has rendered splendid ser- 
^'ice for his party, both on the rostrum and in the halls of legislation. 
He is one of the counsellors and advisers of the party, and as Chair- 
man of State conventions, Chairman of the committee on platfonn, and 
in other positions of honor and trust, he has made for himself a name 
that has attracted to him widespread attention. 

Mr. Raines is a native of Pultneyville, Wayne County, where he 
was born on November lo, 1846. He is a descendant of a noted 
English family that is well known in Yorkshire. His father was a 
well known Methodist minister and was located in the principal cities 
of Western New York. The subject of this sketch was educated in 
the public schools of Rochester, Elmira Free Academy, and in Ro- 
chester E'niversity, graduating with the class of 1866. He was con- 
sidered the first orator in his class. He also won a number of prizes 
in Latin and Greek. JNIr. Raines was married to Florence Dana 
in 1868. 

After finishing his college education young Raines entered the law 
offices of J. & O. Van Voorhis as a student, and in 1867, at the age 
of twenty-one, he was admitted to the Bar. In the political campaign 
of 1866 ISlr. Raines made his debut as a campaign orator, winning 
many laurels for his brilliancy. 

After his admission to the Bar Mr. Raines entered the law office 
of H. C. Ives as a clerk, receiving five dollars a week. Later on the 
clerk liecame a partner of Mr. Ives, and the partnership continued 
ior a numl)er of years. In 1871 Mr. Raines was elected District- 
Attorney of Monroe County by a very substantial majority. He made 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 479 

a splendid record in that office, and was re-elected in the fall of 1874. 
Murder trials by the score have been handled by him with marvelous 
skill and legal acumen, and he has become noted as one of the best 
prosecuting officers in the State. 

When he completed his second term as District-Attorney Mr. 
Raines was nominated for State Senator by the Democrats of Monroe 
and elected. During his term in the Senate he was one of the cham- 
pion supporters of Governor Robinson's reform policy, and his elo- 
quent voice was often heard in espousing the cause of measures that 
were drafted for the public good. In the fall of 1881 Mr. Raines 
was again named for Senator, but this time there was framed against 
him a district that was almost hopelessly Republican, and he lost by 
a narrow margin, although he ran 3,ocxd votes ahead of his party 
associates in Monroe County. 

Since he retired from the Senate Mr, Raines has devoted all of 
his time to the practice of his profession. He has been called many 
times to other counties in the State to assist in, murder cases, and 
has nearly always come out with flying colors. He was selected by 
Governor Flower in 1894 to assist in the famous Bat Shea murder 
case in Troy. He w^as selected to deliver the oration before the Legis- 
lature of 1887 on the life and services of S. J. Tilden. 

As a public speaker and orator at conventions, commencement day 
exercises at colleges and universities, Mr. Raines has come to be classed 
as one of remarkable brilliancy. He is a master of language. In the 
National Convention held in St. Louis in 1888 he was chosen by the 
New York State delegation to second the nomination of Allen G. 
Thurman for Vice-President, and those who heard the "Demosthenes 
of Rochester" pronounced his speech one of the best ever heard at a 
national convention. 

At the Albany State Convention In 1904 Mr. Raines was the Chair- 
man, and he again achieved a notable triumph by his masterly address. 
At the Saratoga convention of that year he was Chairman of the com- 
mittee on platform. He has acted in this capacity at several State 
conventions. Mr. Raines has been Chairman of eight Democratic State 
conventions. 

He has served since 1890 as a manager of the Rochester State 



48o THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Hospital, and as a Commissioner of the Niagara Falls Reservation 
under different State administrations. 

j\lr. Raines has ahva3-s been a Democrat, never deserting his party 
at critical times when the opposition appeared to be in the ascendancy. 
He has always been ready and willing to take part in campaigns, and 
in every National, State and City campaign since he cast his first vote 
he has assisted in the election of his party associates. He has been an 
active participant in all of the important campaigns in this State for 
more than thirty years. 

As a lawyer, orator, citizen, man and husband George Raines is 
a model, and thousands of people who know him in this State testify 
to his worth and integrity. 



Hox. Sylvester S. Taylor, the leader of the Democratic forces 
in the city of Elmira and Chemung County, began his political career 
as an active worker in the Democratic ranks as soon as he became of 
age. His ability and his faculty for leadership w^ere soon recognized, 
and at a very early age he became a potent factor in party management. 

He has performed valiant and valuable service as a member of 
City, Senatorial, Congressional and State committees, and has often 
been a delegate to State and national conventions. 

Judge Taylor was elected District-Attorney of Chemung County 
in November, 1875, and served with eminent distinction through the 
full term of three years. He was renominated in 1878, but the Green- 
back issue defeated him. 

In September, 1888, Governor David B. Hill appointed him County 
Judge of Chemung County in place of Hon. Seymour Dexter, resigned, 
and he served one and one-half years. In 1890 he received the Demo- 
cratic nomination for County Judge and Surrogate, and was trium- 
phantly elected, serving the full term of six years. He was renomi- 
nated in 1896, and ran 1,300 votes ahead of his ticket, though the 
Republican tidal wave of that year defeated him. In 1902 he again 
accepted a nomination for this office, and again ran nearly 600 votes 
ahead of his ticket, but again failed of election, this time by only 230 
votes. 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 481 

He was appointed by Hon. John Cunneen, Attorney-General of 
the State of New York, to be Deputy Attorney-General, a position 
which he has filled with eminent success. 



Charles W. Fowler, of Sherman, Chautauqua County, was 1x)rn 
in the town which has always been his home, September 2, 1836. He 
acquired his education in the public schools, and began his business 
life as a harnessmaker. After a time he opened a restaurant and 
billiard hall, which he has conducted with great success for more than 
forty years. He is a member of the United Workmen and of the 
Select Knights. 

Mr. Fowler is a Democratic hustler whenever a campaign is in 
progress. He has served on the County Committee. He has never 
held any public office, the Republican majority being too large for 
even his popularity to overcome. He is one of the old Democratic 
war horses, and he is very highly and universally respected by all 
who know him. 



Calvin McCarthy, Justice of the Peace of Jamesville, town of 
Dewitt, is recognized as an able and worthy citizen, and the evidences 
of esteem that have been displayed towards him when he is running for 
office are many and flattering. Mr. McCarthy has been Justice since 
1893 by the unanimous vote of the town, Republicans, Prohibitionists 
and men of all parties endorsing his nomination. The Justice was born 
in Ireland in 1850 and received his early education there. He taught 
school from 1868 to 1872. He was principal of the Hard Lott School 
from 1873 to 1879. In turn he has served as School Trustee. Justice 
of the Peace and as Clerk of the School District Committee for seven 
years. He has been a member of the Good Templars since 1870. Jus- 
tice McCarthy is interested to a large extent in lime, plaster and flour 
industries in Jamesville. 



482 THE DEAIOCRATIC PARTY 

Dennis B. Keeler, of Syracuse, is one of the ablest attorneys in 
Central New York. He is a native of Cork, Ireland, where he was 
born on February 26, 1843. He came to America with his parents at 
the ag-e of 10. He was educated in Fairfield Academy, Herkimer 
County: Los Villa University, Quebec, and at the Michigan Uni- 
versity. He studied law with the late Judge Earl, of Herkimer, N. Y. 
He has practiced his profession successfully in Syracuse for more than 
twenty years, appearing at times in notable criminal cases. Mr. Keeler 
when a young man was married to Miss Sarah Brayton, of Newport, 
Herkimer County. They had one son, Robert Earl Keeler, who died 
in 1891. 



William J. Marshall has always been an earnest and vigorous 
worker for the success of Democratic principles and candidates, and 
has been recognized as a leader in Westchester County for many years. 

He resides in the city of Mount Vernon, of which he was appointed 
the Corporation Counsel in 1896. He served until 1903, holding over 
for two years under a Republican city administration. For five years 
he has rendered effective service as a member of the city committee, and 
he has been selected as a delegate to all classes of local Democratic 
conventions, and an alternate to the State convention. 

Mr. Marshall is a member of the Benevolent Order of Eagles, is 
Past Commander of the Knights of St. John of Malta and an honorary 
member of the Jefferson Democratic Club of Mt. Vernon. 



Charles A. Burrows, an active and earnest Democratic worker 
of Chautauqua County, was born in that county, in the town of Ripley, 
June 7, 1866, and acquired his education in the public schools of his 
native town. Here he remained, being an industrious farmer until 
1896, when, in company with In's elder brother, John L., he removed 
to Ripley village and opened a general store, the style of the firm 
being Burrows Bros. The business was skilfully and energetically 



OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 483 

conducted, and it was successful from the first, later attaining large 
proportions, and in this the firm is still engaged. 

Mr. Burrows belongs to the Masons, the Odd Fellows, the Royal 
Arcanum and the United Workmen. 

Mr. Burrows has always been an enthusiastic Democrat and a live 
party worker. He has been honored by his party and his fellow towns- 
men by election as Town Clerk. lie is an excellent citizen and stands 
very high in the community. 



Grant Cowden, a prominent and active Democrat of Chautauqua 
County, comes from a Republican family. He was born in the town 
of Ellery, November 14, 1864, and received his education at the public 
schools and at St. Clairsville Academy. He is a prosperous merchant 
of Ellery Center, dealing in general merchandise and groceries. He 
belongs to the Odd Fellows. 

He has accepted nominations to office, and has served as delegate 
to many conventions. Mr. Cowden is an intelligent and popular man 
personally, and a highly respected citizen. He owns one of the most 
attractive stores in Chautauqua County. •» 



Paul Weiss. One of the vigorous and influential Democrats of 
Chautauqua County is Paul Weiss, one of the leading business men of 
Dunkirk. He was born in that city, June 29, 1865, and it has always 
been his home. He wa.s educated in the public schools, after which 
he spent eight years as a traveling salesman. In 1887 he w^ent into 
business in Dunkirk as a wholesale and retail liquor merchant, in 
which he has met with great success, and has continued until