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Full text of "Dentos"

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D E N T O S 
19 3 3 



PRESENTING THE GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY DENTOS 









LEONARD CLIFFORD BORLAND 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 



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U S I N E S S MANAGER 



JOSEPH AMBROSE NORTON 



THE D E N T O S 



O F 



1-9-3-3 



Published 



THE JUNIOR CLASS OF THE CHICAGO COLLEGE 



OF DENTAL SURGERY - DENTAL DEPARTMENT OF 



LOYOLA UNIVERSITY - CHICAGO, iLLINOIS 



T. W. BROPHY 



M D., D D. S., L. L. D 




V% .:' 



W. H. C. LOGAN 

M D., D. D. S ., M S 
L . L D, F. A . C S 



D E D I C A 



O N 




Brophy- The man whose name lends eternal renown 
to this college. 

Johnson- The student of human nature by whose 
companionship we perceive humanity. 

Logan- The man of action, poise, steadfastness, the 
integrating force of this college. 



CONTENTS 




FACULTY 



CLASSES 



ATHLETICS 



FRATERNITIES 



ACTIVITIES 



FEATURES 



FOREWORD 




Rich, noble, supreme as the gold, radiating, poig- 
nant, marrow-warming as the red; stern, tranquil en- 
during as the black; do these colors interpret the 
spirit impelling the lives of these men; Brophy, John- 
son, and Logan, true standards for the student of this 
college to have, to behold as students, as men, till 



fate shall decide our destiny. 



COLLEGE TODAY 





SOPHOMORES 



FRESHMEN 



PREDENT 



JUNIORS 




EXODONTIA ROOM 



EXAMINATION ROOM 



CERAMICS ROOM 



ORATORY 



I ROBERT M. KELLY, S. 

President of Loyola University 




WILLIAM H. C^ LOGAN, 
Dean of Faculty 



FACULTY 

Father Kelly, the President of Loyola University 
since 1927, represents the faculty and the student 
body of this university, of which this college is an 
integral part. Prior to his association with Loyola 
University he was Assistant to the Provincial, of the 
Society of Jesus, in the State of Missouri. 



Dr. Logan, the Dean of the Faculty of this col- 
lege, has since his graduation been associated with 
this college. During the time that he has been the 
Dean of Faculty, many of the monumental str ides that 
have been made in the expansion of the curriculum 
and the enlargement of class enrollment were exe- 
cuted. 



Dr. Johnson, the Dean of Men, was graduated 
from this college in 1885. Since that time he 
has never ceased to add renown to the name of this 
institution, nor to act in the capacity of a benevolent 
instructor and counselor. His name has to each of the 
graduates a particular meaning and the memory of 
this man never alters with the expiration of time. 








FACULTY 



ROBERT M KELLY, S 
President. 



CHARLES N. JOHNSON 

Dean of Students; Professor of Operative Dentistry; D'- 
vision of Dental Diagnosis, Operative Dentistry Sect. on; 
LDS, Royal College of Dental Surgeons; D D.S , Chiraro 
College of Dental Surgery; MA, Lake Forest University; 
M.DS ; LL D ; Delta Sigma Delta 



WILLIAM H. C LOGAN 

Dean of the Faculty, Professor of Oral Surgery and Oral 
Pathology; Chairman of Division of Diagnosis, DDS, Chi- 
cago College of Dental Surgery; M.D , Chicago College of 
Medicine and Surgery, FACS; MS, LLD; Trowe 1 
Fraternity; Delta Sigma Delta 



PLINY C PUTERBAUCH 

Secretary of the Faculty, Professor of Principles of Medi- 
cine, Associate Professor of Oral Surgery; Division of Oral 
Diagnosis, Exodontia, and Minor Oral Surgery Section; 
Surgery, Superintendent of the Infirmary; M.D., Chicago 
College of Medicine and Surgery; DDS, Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery; Trowel Fraternity; Delta Sigma Delta. 



ROBERT W. McNULTY 

Registrar; Assistant Professor of Ethics, Economics, and 
Dental Anatomy; DDS, MA, Chicago Co'legs of Dental 
Surgery; AB, MS Trowel Fraternity; De!ta Sigma Delta. 




---$ Hi 0- 



^^^£^5 



FACULTY 



)HN P. BUCKLEY 

Professor Emeritus of Materia Medica and 
Therapeutics; Ph.C, Valparaiso University, 
DDS, Chicago College of Dental Surgery; 
Trcwel Fraternity; Delta Sigma Delta 
3BERT E. MacBOYLE 

Professor of Crown and Bridge Work; Division of 
Dental Diagnosis, Crcwn and Fixed Bridge Work 
Section, D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery. 

HOMAS L, CRISAMORE 

Professor of Orthodont : a — Division of Dental Di- 
agnosis. Orthodontia Section, Ph.C, Valparaiso 
University; D.DS, Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; Trowel Fraternity, Delta Sigma Delta. 

JPERT E HALL 

Professor of Artificial Denture Construction — 
Division of Dental Diagnosis, Full Denture Sec- 
tion; DDS., Chicago College of Dental Sur- 
gery; Trowel Fraternity; Psi. Omega. 
)HN L KENDALL 

Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy — Division 
of Laboratory Diagnosis; BS. Valparaiso Uni- 
versity; Ph.C., Valparaiso Universi'y; MD, Uni- 
versity of Kentucky; Trowel Fraternity; Psi 
Omega 

'ILL I AM D ZOETHOUT 

Professor of Physiology and Pharmacology; AB ; 
Hope College; PhD, Un.versity of Chicago; 
Sigma Xi. 

MNUEL-B. FINK 

Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology — Divi- 
sion of Laboratory and Physical Diagnosis; PhD, 
University of Ch.cago; MD, Rush Medical Col- 
lege; Trowel Fraternity; Alpha Omega 
HESLE T. JOB 

Professor of Anatomy; AB, S mpson College; 
M.S., Iowa State University; PhD, Iowa Sta'e 
University 

ILIUS V. KUHIKKA 

Professor of English — Division of Seminar; Ph B , 
A.M., University of Chicago; Delia Sigma Phi 

ILLIAM I. Mch'EIL 

Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry — Division of 

Dental Diagnosis, Removable Bridgework Section; 

D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Delta 

Sigma Delta. 

>GAR D. COOLIDCE 

Professor of Therapeutics, Preventive Dentistry, 

and Oral Hygiene, DDS., Chicago College of 

Pertal Surgery; MS; Trowel Fraternity, Xi Psi 

Ph' 

JDOLPH KRONFELD 

Professor of Special Hisfo-Paihology and Director 

of the Department of Research; MD, University 

of Vienna; Delta Sigma Delta; Blue Key, Loyola 

University. 




s{17}* 





FACULTY 



KARL A MEYER 
Associate Professor of Surgery; MD, Illinois 
College of Medicine; Trowel Fraternity; Psi 
Omega. 

JOHN R WATT 
Associate Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry; 
D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; 
Trowel Fraternity; Delta Sigma Delta. 

AUGUSTUS H MUELLER 

Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry, In- 
structor in Dental Therapeutics and Oral' Hy- 
giene; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Sur- 
gery; B.S. ; M.S.; Trowel Fraternity; Delta Sigma 
Delta. 

LEWIS A. PLATTS 
Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry; 
D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; B.S ; 
M S ; Delta Sigma Delta. 

EARL P. BOULCER 
Assistant Professor of Radiology; Instructor in 
Clinical Therapeutics — Division of Oral Diagno- 
sis, Radiographic and Therapeutic Section; 
DDS, L.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Sur- 
gery; Delta Sigma Delta. 

RALPH H. FOUSER 

. Assistant Professor of Anatomy, Histology, and 
Pathology; DDS., Northwestern University; B S., 
Lewis; MD, Rush Medical College of the Uni- 
versity of Chicago; B.S.M., Loyola University; 
Phi Beta Pi; Alpha Omega Alpha; Xi Psi Phi. 
e-+-i> 

ELBERT C. PENDLETON 
Assistant Professor of Artificial Denture Con- 
struction — Division of Dental Diagnosis, Full 
Denture Section; D.D.S., Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery; Trowel Fraternity; Xi Psi Phi. 

LOZIER D. WARNER 
Assistant Professor of Bacteriology and Path- 
ology; Assistant in the Department of Research; 
BA, Manchester College. 

HAROLD W. OPPICE 
Assistant Professor of Crown and Bridge Work — 
Division of Dental Diagnosis, Crown and Fixed 
Bridge Work Section; D.D.S., Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery; Trowel Fraternity; Xi Psi Phi 

HARRY B PINNEY 
Assistant Professor of Exodontia and Minor Oral 
Surgery; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Sur- 
gery; Xi Psi Phi. 

GAIL M HAMBLETON 

Assistant Professor of Artificial Denture Con- 
struction — Division of Dental Diagnosis, Full 
Denture Section; B.S. DDS, Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery; Trowel Fraternity; Delta Sig- 
ma Delta 

GEORGE C. PIKE 

Assistant Professor of Exodontia; DDS., Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery; Trowel Fraternity; 
Delta Sigma Delta. 




-4 18 ]»- 




ON W. MORREY 
Lecturer on Oral Hygiene and Preventive Den- 
tistry; DD.S, Chicago College of Dental Sur- 
gery; Psi Omega. 

IOWARD MICHENER 
Associate in Orthodontia; D.D.S., Chicago Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery; Trowel Fraternity; Delta 
Sigma Delta. 

IENRY CLUPKER 
Associate in Prosthetic Dentistry; D.D.S., Chi- 
cago College of Dental Surgery; Trowel Fra- 
ternity; Delta Sigma Delta. 



vARREN WILLMAN 
Associate in Operative Dentistry; D.D.S., Chi- 
cago College of Dental Surgery; B.S.M.;' Delta 
Sigma Delta. 

S HAROLD JOHNSON 
Instructor in Crown and Bridge Work; DD.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Trowel Fra- 
ternity; Delta Sigma Delta. 

1AX C. FRAZIER 
Instructor in Operative Dentistry; D.D.S., Chi- 
cago College of Dental Surgery; Trowei Fra- 
ternity; Psi Omega. 



AUL W. SWANSON 
nstructor in Exodontia, DDS, Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery; Trowel Fraternity; Delta Sig- 
ma Delta. 

RANK P. LINDNER 
Instructor in Crown and Bridge Work; D.D.S. 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Delta Sig 
ma Delta. 

ORVIN F. STINE 
nstructor in Children's Dentistry; DD.S., Chi 
cago College of Dental Surgery; Xi Psi Phi. 



AUL T. DAWSON 
Instructor in Operative Dentistry; DDS, Chi- 
cago College of Dental Surgery; Trowel Frater- 
nity; Delta Sigma Delta. 

;erald J. HOOPER 
Instructor in Operative Dentistry; DD.S, Chi- 
cago College of Dental Surgery; Delta Sigma 
Delta. 

LMER SCHEUSSLER 
Instructor in Exodontia; D.D.S. , Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery; Psi Omega. 




-4 19 }§ 




FACULTY 



HAROLD HILLENBRAND 

Instructor in Operative Dentistry and Physiology; 
BSD. DDS, Chicago College of Dental Sur- 
gery; Delta Sigma Delta. 

DONALD F. COLE 

Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry; BSD, DDS, 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery. 

WILLIAM N. HOLMES 

Instructor of Anatomy, Operative Dentistry, and 
Prosthetics; D.D.S., Chicago College of Denta, 
Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 



OHN F. SVOBODA 
Instructor of Exodontia and Operative Dentistry, 
D D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery. 

WILLIAM P. SCHOEN 

Instructor in Graphic and Plastic Arts, DDS, 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery; B.S., Loyola 
University; Delta Sigma Delta. 

FRANK J. LODESKI 

Instructor in Chemistry and English; B.S., Loyola 
University; MA., Loyola University; Blue Key, 
Loyola University, Phi Mu Xi, Loyola University. 



VIRGIL M BRADSHAW 

Instructor of Pre-Dental Biology; B.S., University 
of Florida; M.S., St. Louis University; Phi Chi 

MARION KAMINSKI 

Instructor of Physics; BS., Loyola University 

PIATT M ORLOPP 
Research Technician. 



WALLACE N. KIRBY 

Instructor in Chemistry, B. S, University of llli-j 
no.s; D. D. S., Chicago College of Dental Surg?ry;l 
B'ue Ksy, Omicion Kappa Upsilon, Delia S.^maj 
Delta 

)ERRY J. MAHONEY 

Professor in the Department of Physics; Sigma. 
Xi; and Gamma Alpha. (No portran ) 

FRANK W. HYDE 

Instruction in Dental Anatomy and Prosthetics 
DDS. Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Blue 
Key, Omicron Kappa Uprjlon, Delta Si^m; Jo. fa 
and Sigma Nu 






20 ft 



FACULTY 

ROSE C THEILER 

Department of Exodontia; R N. 

LOIS D CONGER 

Department of Therapeutics; R N 

DRUE B. PRESTLY 
Clerk of Infirmary. 



FANNIE ROBSON 
Clerk of Infirmary. 

GRACE HOWELL 
Clerk of Infirmary. 

ETHEL TAKKUNEN 
Assistant Librarian, R.N. 



MAURINE WILLMAN 
Department of Research; B.A. 
Research Technician. 

LOUISE NEWELL 
Librarian. 

JUDITH FORBERG 
C'erk of Infirmary 



FLORENCE MacDONALD 
Clerk of Infirmary. 

LAURA KIRBY 

Clerk of Infirmary; B S. 
No Portrait 

LAURA S. DICKISON 
Secretary to Registrar. 
No Portrait 

JULIA WITTMAN 

Librarian and Fiscal Clerk. 
No Portrail 



21* 




THE t 

LARGE AMPHITHEATER 




THE 
SMALL AMPHITHEATER 



CLASSES 

The three amphitheaters; the large, the small, 
and the surgical, are invariably associated with the 
experiences of the classroom for every student who 
has ever attended the Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery. Practices and theories are modelled and 
remodelled, but the memory of these three class- 
rooms endure without change, to enjoy the same rank 
and degree of esteem from every student. 

In the accompanying picture Dr. Brophy and 
Dr. Logan were photographed while operating in the 
pit of the large amphitheater before a class of be- 
whiskered semi-somnolent students. 

In the surgical amphitheater Dr. Puterbaugh was 
photographed while conducting one of his clinics, and 
upon closer scrutiny Dr. Pike with the other members 
of his class may be seen intently watching the pro- 
cedure. 

The last picture of the small amphitheater shows 
what the amphitheater must have looked like before 
the whittling craft of the students had almost com- 
pletely denuded the seats. 










■. 


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Sgi 


^-'■ii^ ^ 






QUAE NOCENT 
D O C E N T 



BERNARD THIEL 
President. 

DAVID J. AHNER 

1st Vice-President. 



BERNARD CHARLES LAPP 
2nd Vice-President 

NOEL WORKMAN 

Secretary. 



PIKE, ROBERT K. 

Treasurer. 

JOHN P. BRAHM 
Editor. 



ANTHONY F. VICHICK 

Class Artist. 

JERRY QUINLAN 

Chairman of Executive Commit tw 



^/^/^//^//^//^f/^//^j/^ 



4 24 fr- 



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JOHN D. DONELAN 

Executive ComrrMtee. 



ARTHUR ). KONRAD 
Executive Committee 



MARSHALL W MILNAR1K 
Executive Committee. 



MERTCN B. SKiNNER 
Executive Committee. 



& 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE SENIOR CLASS 



The executive committee is a representative 
body of the senior class whose duty is to transact 
all business affairs of the class. At a meeting, 
held early in the school year, Jerry Quinlan was 
elected to the chairmanship with John Donelan, 
Arthur Konrad, Marshall Milnank and Merton 
Skinner as other members of the committee 

The ma|or business transaction of the com- 
mittee concerned the issuance of contracts 

After much consideration and deliberation 
the photography contract was arranged with the 
Gibson Studios. The "depression" price obtained 
together with the excellence of service and quality 
of work was favorably accepted by the class. 

The class ring of former design with its addi- 
tion of the Dental Caducius, as suggested by the 



committee, likewise gained favor. This contract 
was issued to Pollack & Co. This same firm was 
deemed worthy of printing the graduation an- 
nouncements. Here again reduced prices were 
secured — and enjoyed. 

The cap and gown contract was arranged 
through the office of the Dental Department of 
the university. 

Other affairs managed by the committee per- 
tained to the bouquet presented to Dr. C. N. John- 
son on his 74th birthday and the sending of con- 
dolence cards to bereaved classmates. 

The senior class wishes to take this oppor- 
tunity to extend its gratitude to chairman Quin- 
lan and his corps of committeemen for the earnest 
effort and productiveness exemplified in all tran- 
sactions. 




m 25 1*. 




QUAE 

NOCENT, 

D O C E N T 



AHNER DAVID JOHN 

AKAN, JOHN JEROME 

ALLAN, ARTHUR N. 



ANDREWS, ANDREW S. 

BAIM, HARRY M. 



BAKER, HENRY F. 

BALL, JOHN CORDON 



BATLER, LOUIS 

BERNERO, LOUIS 



-4L 2(3 }<>•■ 



QUAE 

^OCENT, 
D O C E N T 



IIALECKE, EDWARD P. 
BIESTEK, JOHN P. 

BLUME, MARSHALL E 



BRAHM, JOHN P. 

CANNINC, ARTHUR 



CHU, SE HONN 

COCLIANESE, EMIL 



COMROE, JOSEPH D. 

COUCHLIN, JOSEPH P 



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QUAE 

N O C E N T , 

D O C E N T 

^2 



CUNNINGHAM, WILLIAM j. 

DANREITER, CHARLES P 
DEACH, NORVAL M 



DEBSKI, HENRY T. 

DEN INC, ELTON 



DOLCE, ANTHONY C. 

DONELAN, JOHN 



DORMAN, LA PORTE V. 

ETU. LAWRENCE A 



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QUAE 

NOCENT, 

D O C E N T 



FIRNSIN, CHARLES 

FORTELKA, GEORGE C. 

FOSTER, VICTOR CHAS 



GAROFALO, JOSEPH 

GRACZYK, THEOPHILUS 



GRANDSTAFF, CHARLES H 
HAFERT, JOE A. 



I-IALMOS, GEORGE A. 

HARRIS, HAROLD 



M 29 j§e» 






QUAE 

N O C E N T . 

D O C E N T 





HAWKINS, JAMES F. 




HEIDORN, LESTER H. 


1 *** 


JONES, LESLIE F 



HEINZ, JOHN L 

HIRSCHENBEIN, IRWIN M. 



HOFSTEEN, LESLIE N. 

HOLZ, WILFRED 



JOSEPH, FRANCIS SAMUEL 

KAMINSKI, MIECIESLAUS 



QUAE 
NOCENT, 

DOCENT 



KUBiK, JOSEPH E. 

KARL, ROBERT j. 

KEENAN, JAMES F 



KELLER, LEONARD 

KELLEY, LEONARD 



KLEIN, LEONARD S. 

KONRAD, ARTHUR 



KOUKOL, GEORGE E. 

KRONFELD, RUDOLF 





QUAE NOCENT, 
D O C E N T 



KRYSINSKI, THEO T. 

KUTTLER, FRED C. 



LACHMANN, ELMER 0. 

LAPP. BERNARD CHARLES 



LEM, IRVING C. 

LERMAN, IRVING 



LOCKWOOD, AL1 AN T 
LUBAR, PHILIP 



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QUAE NOCENT 
D O C E N T 



£ 



LUBER, ELI 

LUKINS. FRED B 



MACHEK, FRANK A 

MILNARIK. MARSHALL W. 



MITSUNAGA, DAVID M. 
MITZ, RUBEN 



NAUSEDA, BRL'NO F. 

NICHOLS, RAY M. 



§4 33^ 








QUAE NOCENT, 
D O C E N T 



OLECH, RAY A. 

PIKE, ROBERT K. 



PISCITELLI, VINCENT J. 

POTASH NIK, MAX 



POWERS, HOLLIS S. 

PUTNIS, JOHN 



QUINLAN, JERRY 

RINCA, EDWIN C. 



QUAE NOCENT, 
D O C E N T 



RONSPIEZ, ELMER E. 

RUBIN, JEROME 



RYLL, DENNIS J. 

SAFARIK, BOHUMIL 



SEGAL, BURT 

SIMKUS, JOHN 



SIMON, PAUL A. 

SKINNER, MERTON B. 



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QUAE NOCENT, 
D O C E N T 



SMITH, HUCO C. 

STERN, LEO 



FERES I, CARL j. 

THAYER, ERNEST A. 



THIEL, BERNARD 

VARCO, ANTHONY 



VERNE, HARRY M. 

VICHICK, ANTHONY F 




-••3§f 36 }>• 



QUAE NOCENT 
D O C E N T 



WACHOWSKI, CHESTER S. 
WAGNER, OTTO F. 



WATSON, KARL J. 

WEISS, JOSEPH H. 



WOJCZYNSKI, SEVERN T. 
WORKMAN, NOEL 



WREN, JOSEPH A. 

WURSCH, CHARLES S. 




4 37 }i> 








SENIORS 



AHNER, DAVID JOHN Chicago, Illinois 

Lindblom High School 

Loyola University 

Vice President class, '33; President of C N, Johnson 
Seminar, '33; Blue Key. 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
AKAN, JOHN JEROME Chicago, Illinois 

DePaul Academy 

Loyola University 

Class Artist, '29, '30, '31, '32; Art Editor of Dentos, 

'32; Vice President class, '30. 

Location, Johanesburg, South Africa. 
ALLAN, ARTHUR NOEL Decatur, Illinois 

Decatur High School 

University of Illinois 

Dance Committeeman, '30, '31 ; Circulation Manager of 

Dentos, '32; Delta Sigma Delta; Blue Key. 

Location, Decatur, Illinois. 
ANDREWS, ANDREW Chicago, Illinois 

Englewood High School 

Loyola University 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
BAIM, HARRY MAURICE Chicago, Illinois 

Tilden Technical High School 

Crane Junior College 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
BAKER, HENRY FRANCIS Chicago, Illinois 

Austin High School 

Loyola University 

Treasurer class, '30; Delta Sigma Delta 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
BALL, JOHN CORDON Elizebeth, New Jersey 

Royal Centre High School 

Wheaton College 

Indiana University 

Location, New Brunswick, New Jersey. 
BATLER, LOUIS Chicago, Illinois 

Medill High School 

Crane Junior College 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
BECHERER, CLIFFORD K Elgin. Illinois 

Elgin High School 

University of Chicago 

Trowel Fraternity. 

Location, Elgin, Illinois. 
BERNERO LOUIS JOHN Chicago, Illinois 

Lane Technical High School 

Loyola University 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
BIALECKE, EDWARD P. Chicago, Illinois 

Lindblom High School 

Crane Junior College 

Lewis Institute 

Bowling Team, '33. 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
BIESTEK, JOHN P. Cicero, Illinois 

Morton High School 

Loyola University 

Wrestling Team, '33. 

Location, Cicero, Illinois. 
BLUME, MARSHALL E. Highland Park, Illinois 

Deerfield Shields High School 

Loyola University 

Treasurer class, '31; Senior Page, '32, '33; Fraternity 

Editor, '32; Loyola News, '32; Delta Sigma Delta. 

Location, Highland Park, Illinois. 
BR~AHM. JOHN PETER Chicago, Illinois 

DePaul Academy 

Loyola University 

Editor of Dentos, '32; Class Editor, '33; Circulation Man- 
ager of Class, '29, '30; Intramural Manager, '32; Loyola 

News, '32, '33; Senior Bur Editor, '33; C. N. Johnson 

Seminar, '32, '33; Psi Omega; Blue Key. 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 



CANNING, ARTHUR J. Chicago, Illinois 

Quigley Seminary High School 

Loyola University 

Handball Team, '33; Loyola Glee Club, '33. 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
CHU, SE HONN Honolulu, Hawaii 

Honolulu High School 

St. Louis College 

University of Michigan 

University of Chicago 

Location, Honolulu. Hawaii. 
COCLIANESE, EMIL J Chicago. Illinois 

Lindblom High School 

Crane Junior College 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
COMROE, JOSEPH DANIEL Chicago, Illinois 

Hyde Park High School 

Crane Junior College 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
COUCHLIN. JOSEPH P. Chicago, Illinois 

DePaul Academy 

Loyola University 

Class Editor, '32; Psi Omega Senator, '31, '32; Psi Omega 

Chief Interrogator, '32, '33. 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
CUNNINGHAM, WILLIAM J. Chicago, Illinois 

Austin High School 

Loyola University 

Secretary class, '31 ; Psi Omega Junior Grand Master, '32; 

Psi Omega Grand Master, '33 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
DANREITER, CHARLES P. Sterling, Illinois 

Sterling High School 

Central Y, M. C A High School 

Loyola University 

Delta Sigma Delta; Blue Key. 

Location, Sterling, Illinois. 
DEACH, NORVAL M Downers Grove, Illinois 

Downers Grove High School 

Loyola University 

Location, Downers Grove, Illinois. 
DEBSKI HENRY T. Chicago,, Illinois 

Cenrtal Y M C A. High School 

Crane Junior College 

Loyola University 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
DENING, ELTON JOHN Lowville, New York 

Lowville Academy 

Union Free School 

Loyola University " 

Assistant Editor of Dentos, '32; Delta Sigma Delta Grand 

Master, '32. '33. 

Location, New York, New York. 
DOLCE. ANTHONY C Buffalo. New York 

Buffalo Central High School 

Canisus College 

Location, Hutchinson, New York 
DONELAN, JOHN J. Springfield, Illinois 

Springfield High School 

Loyola University 

Executive Committeeman, '33; Blue Key. 

Location, Springfield, Illinois 
DORMAN, LaPORTE V. Peoria. Illinois 

Peoria Central High School 

Bradley Polytechnic Institute 

.Loyola University 

Location, Oak Park, Illinois. 
ETU. LAWRENCE A. Calumet, Michigan 

Calumet High School 

Loyola University 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 



SENIORS 



FIRNSIN. CHARLES Berwyn, Illinois 

Morton High School 
Loyola University 
Bowling Team, '33. 
Location, Berwyn, Illinois. 
FORTELKA, GEORGE CHARLES Chicago, Illinois 

Harrison Technical High School 
Loyola University 

Photograph Editor of Dentos, '32; Basket Ball Team, '32; 
Bowling Team, '33; Vice President Class, '29; Sergeant 
at Arms Class, '31 ; C. N. Johnson Seminar, '33; Psi 
Omega 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
FOSTER, VICTOR CHARLES Chicago, Illinois 

DePaul Academy 
Northwestern University 
Loyola University 

Dance Committeeman. '32, '33; Bowling Team, '33; Bas- 
ketball Team, '33; Delta Sigma Delta. 
Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
FREEDMAN, GEORGE Chicago, Illinois 

Roosevelt High School 
Crane Junior College 
Loyola University 
Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
GAROFALO. JOSEPH Chicago, Illinois 

Englewood High School 
Loyola University 
Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
GRACZYK, THEOPHILUS Chicago, Illinois 

St. Stanislaus Academy 
Loyola University 
Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
CRANDSTAFF. CHARLES H. Mounds, Illinois 

Mounds High School 
Loyola University 

Phi Delta Theta; Delta Sigma Delta 
Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
HAFERT, JOSEPH A Fort Wayne, Indiana 

Fort Wayne South Side High School 
Indiana University 
Loyola University 
Location, Fort Wayne, Indiana. 
HALMOS. GEORGE A. Chicago, Illinois 

Eggery High School 
Y.M.C.A. College 
Loyola University 

A.T.K. Dance Committeeman, '30; Loyola News, '32; 
Social Committeeman, '32, '33; Psi Omega Editor, '31. 
'32; G N. Johnson Seminar; Psi Omega 
Location. Chicago, Illinois. 
HARELIK, NORMAN Chicago, Illinois 

Medill High School 
Crane Junior College 
Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
HARRIS. HAROLD Chicago, Illinois 

John Marshall High School 
Crane Junior College 

Baseball Team, '33; Basketball Team, '33. 
Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
HAWKINS, JAMES FRANCIS Chicago, Illinois 

St. Rita Academy 
Crane Junior College 
Loyola University 
Bowling Team '33. 
Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
HEIDORN, LESTER HAROLD Chicago, Illinois 

Lindblom High School 
Northwestern University 
University of Utah 
Lombard College 

Bowling Team, '33; Sigma Nu; Blue Key. 
Location, Chicago, Illinois. 



HEINZ, JOHN L. Chicago, Illinois 

Parker High School 

Loyola University 

Delta Sigma Delta 

Location, Chicago, Illinois'. 
HIRSCHENBEIN, IRWIN M Chicago, Illinois 

John Marshall High School 

Crane Junior College 

Loyola University 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
HOFSTEEN, LESLIE Holland Michigan 

Holland High School 

Loyola University 

Basketball Team, '33; Sergeant at Arms Class, '32; Del- 
ta Sigma Delta. 

Location, Aurora, Illinois. 
HOLZ, WILFRED J Racine, Wisconsin 

Racine High School 

Milwaukee State Teachers College 

Loyola University 

Class Editor for Bur, '30, '31, '32; Loyola Union, Delta 

Sigma Kappa. 

Location, Jamaica, Wisconsin 
JACOBSON, SAMUEL H Chicago, Illinois 

Crane Technical High School 

Crane Junior College 

Northwestern University 

Loyola University 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
JONES, LESLIE FRANCIS Chicago, Illinois 

Central High School 

James Millikin University 

Loyola University 

Delta Alpha Epsilon 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
JOSEPH, FRANCIS SAMUEL Chicago, Illinois 

Lake View High School 
Crane Junior College 
Loyola University 
Assistant Editor of Dentos, '32. 
Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
KAMINSKI. MIECIESLAUS V Chicago, Illinois 

Holy Trinity High School 
Loyola University 

Basketball Team, '30; Intramural Basketball Team, '32, 
33,; G N. Johnson Seminar. 
Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
KARL, ROBERT J. Saginaw, Michigan 

St. Andrews Academy 
University of Detroit 
Loyola University 
Omega Beta Pi. 
Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
KEENAN, JAMES F. Brainerd, Illinois 

Calumet High School 
Loyola University 

Assistant Editor of Dentos, '32; Class Editor, '31 ; Loyola 
News, '30. '31, '32, '33; Dental Campus Editor, '32, '33; 
C. N. Johnson Seminar; Psi Omega Secretary, '32; Psi 
Omega. 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
KELLER, LEONARD Chicago, Illinois 

Crane Technical High School 
Crane Junior College 
Loyola University 
Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
KELLY, LEONARD Kankakee, Illinois 

Kankakee High School 
St. Viator College 
Loyola University 

Athletic Associate, '32; Loyola News, '33; Delta Sigma 
Delta. 
Location, Chicago, Illinois. 



SENIORS 



KLEIN, LEONARD SAMUEL Chicago. Illinois 

Lane Technical High School 

Crane Junior College 

Loyola University 

Treasurer Class, 32; Alpha Omega Quaestor, '33. 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
KONRAD. ARTHUR JOHN Aurora, Illinois 

East Aurora High School 

Lewis Institute 

Loyola University 

Executive Committeeman, '33. 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
KOUKOL, GEORGE EDWARD Chicago, Illinois 

Harrison Technical High School 

Crane Junior College 

Loyola University 

Secretary Class, '32; Bowling Team, '33; Basketball 

Team, '33. 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
KRONFELD, RUDOLF Vienna, Austria 

Franz Josefs Gymnasium, Vienna 

University of Vienna, School of Medicine 

Delta Sigma Delta; Blue Key. 

Location. Chicago, Illinois. 
KRYSINSKI, THEODORE T Chicago, Illinois 

Carl Schurz High School 

Crane Junior College 

Loyola University 

Basketball Team, '29, '30; Intramural Basketball Team, 

'32, '33; C. N. Johnson Seminar. 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
KUBIK, JOSEPH E. Cicero. Illinois 

Morton High School 

Loyola University 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
KUTTLEB, FRED CHARLES Moline, Illinois 

Molme High School 

Augjstana College 

Loyola University 

Vice President Class, '31 ; Delta Sigma Delta Junior Page, 

'31, 32; Delta Sigma Delta Worthy Master, '32, '33; 

Delta Sigma Delta. 

Location, Moline, Illinois. 
LACH, FRANCIS J. Chicago, Illinois 

St. Stanislaus Academy 

Loyola University 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
LACHMANN, ELMER Chicago, Illinois 

Lane Technical High School 

Loyola University 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
LAPP, BERNARD CHARLES Chicago, Illinois 

Harrison Technical High School 

Loyola University 

Bowling Team, '33; Vice President Class, '33. 

Location. Chicago, Illinois. 
LEM, IRVING C. Hammond, Indiana 

Hammond High School 

Loyola University 

Location, Hammond, Indiana. 
lERMAN, IRVING Chicago, Illinois 

Tuley High School 

Illinois Pharmacy School 

Loyola University 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
LOCKWOOD. ALLAN THOMAS Chicago, Illinois 

Sandwich High School 

Illinois Wesleyan University 

Loyola University 

Location, Sugar Grove, Illinois. 
LUBAR, PHILLIP Chicago, Illinois 

Harrison Technical High School 

Loyola University 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 



Chicago, Illinois 



Williston, North Dakota 



Chicago. Illinois 



Berwyn, Illinois 



LUBER. ELI 

Crane Technical High School 

Crane Junior College 

Loyola University 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
LUKINS, FRED B 

Williston High School 

University of North Dakota 

Loyola University 

Location, Texas. 
MACHEK, FRANK ANTON 

Harrison Technical High School 

Crane Junior College 

Loyola University 

Location. Chicago, Illinois. 
MILNARIK, MARSHALL W. 

Harrison Technical High School 

Loyola University 

Executive Committeeman, '33; Treasurer Class, 31; Sec- 
retary Class, '32; Trowel Fraternity; Blue Key. 

Location, Berwyn, Illinois 
MITSUNACA, DAVID M. Honolulu. Hawaii 

Honolulu High School 

St. Louis College 

Loyola University 

Loyola News, '32; Dentos Staff, '27, '28. 

Location, Honolulu, Hawaii. 
MITZ, RUBEN Chicago, Illinois 

Englewood High School 

Crane Junior College 

Loyola University 

Alpha Omega. 

Location, Chicago, Illinois 
NAUSEDA, BRUNO F. Chicago, Illinois 

St. Phillips High School 

DePaul University 

Loyola University 

Basketball Team, '29. 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
NICHOLS. RAY M. Indianola, Iowa 

Indianola High School 

Simpson College 

Loyola University 

Kappa Theta Psi; Tri Beta. 

Location, Des Moines, Iowa 
OLECH, RAY A. Chicago, Illinois 

Bowen High School 

Loyola University 

President Class, '29; Social Chairman Class, '30; Social 

Chairman Class, 31 ; Campus Editor, Loyola News, 30. 

31 ; Chairman of Prom Committee, 32; Co-Chairman of 

the All University Prom Committee, 32- -Delta Sigma 

Delta; Blue Key. 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
PIKE, ROBERT KEITH White Pigeon, Michigan 

Lane Technical High School 

Loyola University 

Treasurer Class, 32, 33; Loyola Union, 31, 32. 33; 

Vice President of Loyola Union, 33; Delta Sigma Delta; 

Blue Key. 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
PISCITELLI, VINCENT J. Schenectady, New York 

Schenectady High School 

St. Bonaventures College 

Location, LaSalle, Illinois 
POTASHNIK, MAX Chicago, Illinois 

Harrison Technical High School 

Crane Junior College 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
POWERS, HOLLIS SHELDON Petersburg, Illinois 

Petersburg Harris High School 

Loyola University 

Basketball Team, '29, 31; Predent Editor of Dentos, '29; 

President Class, 32; Blue Key. 

Location, Decatur, Illinois. 



SENIORS 



PUTNIS, JOHN Chicago, Illinois 

Austin High School 
Loyola University 
Location, Chicago, Illinois. 

QUINLAN, JERRY Oak Park Illinois 

Oak Park High School 
Loyola University 

Chairman of Executive Committee, 33; Bowling Team, 
33; Phi Mu Chi; Delta Sigma Delta 
Location, Oak Park, Illinois 

RADLOFF, CHESTER J. Chicago. Illinois 

Lindblom High School 
Crane Junior College 
Location, Chicago, Illinois. 

RINCA, EDWIN C Chicago, Illinois 

Loyola Academy 

Loyola University 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
RONSPIEZ. ELMER EDWARD Juda, Wisconsin 

Union Free High School 

North Central College 

Delta Sigma Delta. 

Location, Wisconsin. 
RUBIN, JEROME Chicago, Illinois 

John Marshall High School 

Lewis Institute 

Alpha Omega. 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
RYLL, DENNIS JOHN Chicago, Illinois 

Carl Schurz High School 

Loyola University 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
SAFARIK. BOHUMIL Cicero, Illinois 

Morton High School 

Loyola University 

Bowling Team, 33, 

Location, Cicero, Illinois. 
SEGAL, BURT Chicago, Illinois 

Crane High School 

Crane Junior College 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
alMKUS. JOHN JOSEPH Chicago, Illinois 

St. Bede Academy 

St. Bede College 

Treasurer Class, 32; Bowling Team. 33. 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
SIMON, PAUL A. Chicago, Illinois 

Carl Schurz High School 

Loyola University 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
SKINNER, MERTON B. Joliet, Illinois 

i Joliet High School 

Illinois University 

Northwestern University 

Loyola University 

Business Manager of Dentos, 32; Executive Committee- 
man, 33; Blue Key. 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
SMITH, HUGO C. Madison, Wisconsin 

Wisconsin High School 

University of Wisconsin 
R Delta Sigma Delta. 

Location, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 
SMITH, LEROY FRED Chicago, Illinois. 

Lane Technical High School 

Loyola University 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
STERN, LEO Chicago, Illinois 

Marshall High School 

Crane Junior College 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 



TERESI. CARL J. Batavia, New York 

Batavia High School 

Caniaius College 

Xi Psi Phi. 

Location, Batavia, New York 
THAYER, ERNEST A. Chicago, Illinois 

Pontiac High School 

Illinois University 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
THIEL, BERNARD Elgin, Illinois 

Elgin High School 

Loyola University 

President Class, 33; Blue Key. 

Location, Elgin, Illinois. 
VARCO, ANTHONY J. Buffalo. New York 

Central High School 

Canisius College 

Bowling Team, 33; Xi Psi Phi Treasurer, 32; Sigma Al- 
pha Chi; Xi Psi Phi. 

Location, Buffalo, New York 
VERNE. HARRY M. Chicago, Illinois 

Nicholas Senn High School 

Loyola University 

Vice President Class, 32; Alpha Omega Vice Chancellor, 

31, 32; Alpha Omega Chancellor, 32, 33, C N, John- 
son Seminar; Alpha Omega. 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
VICHICK, ANTHONY F. Cleveland, Ohio 

Central Institute 

Notre Dame University 

Assistant Artist of Dentos, 32; Artist Class, 33; Delta 

Sigma Delta. 

Location, Cleveland, Ohio 
WACHOWSKI, CHESTER S. Chicago. Illinois 

Holy Trinity High School 

Loyola University 

C. N. Johnson Seminar; Bowling Team, 33. 

Location, Chicago. Illinois 
WAGNER, OTTO FRED Chicago, Illinois 

Lindblom High School 

Crane Junior College 

Loyola University 

Bowling Team, 33. 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
WATSON. KARL JAMES Calumet, Michigan 

Calumet High School 

Albion College 

Sigma Chi. 

Location, Calumet, Michigan. 
WEISS, JOSEPH Chicago, Illinois 

Jewish People's Institute 

Central Y.M.C A College 

Crane Junior College 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
WOJCZYNSKI, SEVERN T Chicago. Illinois 

Carl Schurz High School 

Crane Junior College 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
WORKMAN, NOEL Onarga, Illinois 

Onarga High School 

Loyola University 

Bowling Team, 33; Wrestling Team, 33; Delta Sigma 

Delta. 

Location, Chicago, Illinois. 
WREN, JOSEPH A. Terre Haute, Indiana 

Coneannon High School 

Indiana State Normal 

DePaul University 

Location, Terre Haute, Indiana. ' 

WURSCH, CHARLES STANTON Chicago. Illinois 

Lindblom High School 
Crane Junior College 
Location, Chicago, Illinois. 



SENIOR CLASS 



GRADUATION looms before us — warm, glow- 
ing and inviting, encompassing within itself 
all our ambitions and plans for the future. That 
goal toward which we have been striving no long- 
er challenges us by its dim outlines but at last has 
assumed recognizable lines by which we can ap- 
praise and cherish it as something which we have 
earned with considerable difficulty. We recognize 
that this point in our life is not the ultimate or 
finished purpose but rather a firm footing from 
which we are about to make our leap into life. 

In looking back over this road we find dif- 
ficulties and hardships that have been overcome 
and, too, many staunch friendships that have been 
cemented as the result of mutual difficulties con- 
quered. The good times we had together aided 
in balancing our college life into a pleasant span. 
Now that we must part and wave a farewell to 
these friends and good times we hear sighs of re- 
gret mingled with those of relief. 

It would be quite impossible to set down all 
the laughs, heartaches, triumphs, and hectic times 
occurring during our life spent under C.C.D.S.'s 
roof. Hence, it is my purpose to mention merely 
a few names and certain events and places in the 
hope of awakening trains of thoughts which will 
recover for the individual those fond memories of 
the things which made our college life more pleas- 
ant. 

Those of us who received our Pre-dental in- 
struction at C.C.D.S. will remember that Ray 
Olech, George Fortelka, and Joe Kearney assumed 
the positions of class officers. The social pro- 
clivities of the class immediately became evident 
when the social committee, consisting of Allen, 
Brahm, Canning, and Akan, were appointed and 
arrangements for the class dance at the Illinois 
Women's Athletic Club were made. Class co- 
operation made the dance an unqualified success. 
Notables of the evening were "Chick" Hurwitz 
and "Crooner" Wasserman. It also became evi- 
dent from the start that this class would excel 
all others scholastically and produce in later years 
for the dental profession another Brophy, Logan, 
or Johnson. This fact was attested to by Doctors 
McNulty and Michener in Dental Anatomy class. 



These men were no doubt a bit awed into these 
opinions by the futuristic carvings presented to 
them for approval by members of the class. 

With new additions as freshmen we began to 
show everyone who was or was not interested of 
what we were made. Bill Kirby was elected presi- 
dent, Red Kelly, secretary and "Hank" Baker, 
treasurer. Allen, Brahm, Olech, and Pike were 
appointed to the social committee and things began 
to happen at once. Remember the dance at the 
Pompeiian room of the Congress Hotel where 
Elmer Lachman staged a Weismueller in the hotel 
fountain? Certain members of the class might 
also recall D48 as something associated with the 
committee and Cafe Anne Jean's associated with?? 
Enough money was "salted away" on this dance 
to run another at the St. Clair Hotel. Keenan and 
Cunningham "et dates" enjoyed the roof garden 
so well, we were told, they left at the request of 
the checking force. 

Who will forget the Anatomy lab, with its 
foul odors carried home at night with a finger or 
muscle in our brief case for good measure, and 
the fights when Dr. Cluley and asistants were ab- 
sent? 

The salient points of Dr. Kendalls lectures 
will no doubt be remembered and practiced bv us 
until we no longer are able to use them. The 
hardy fighters of the class will recall Friday the 
thirteenth on which day we were initiated into 
some of the traditions of the school and also es-i 
tablished our supremacy over the sophomores. 

Sophomores! And one step nearer our goal. 
We were able to use the dental engine and cuss 
at each brittle tooth which resisted our savage 
onslaughts. Dr. Watt inculcated in us principles 
of bndgework and Life itself with his poems and 
brief lectures. After a long electioneering pro-I 
gram which would shame our national organiza- 
tions, Clem Frey was elected to the presidency; 
F. C. Kuttler, vice-president; W. J. Cunningham, 
secretary; and M. E. Blume, treasurer. The sopho- 
more period passed quickly in anticipation of the 
more practical clinical work which we were to] 
perform during the coming year. 

As Juniors the mysteries of the clinic were 



-4 42 )*•■- 



SENIOR CLASS 



jnfolded to us by the lordly seniors for whom we 
"caddied." During the first few weeks we sweat 
slood over our first prophylaxis, first inlay, and 
above all, our first foil. The denture department 
will be remembered by all of us as forming the 
subject of nightmares that lasted through to the 
;nd of our senior year. 

Class officers were elected after considerable 
nigh powered campaigning on the part of the op- 
Dosing factions. Genial Hollis Powers presided 
aver the class as president. Verne, Koukol, and 
Simkus acted in the respective offices of vice- 
aresident, secretary, and treasurer. 

The traditional Junior-Senior dance was held 
at the Knickerbocker hotel and those of us who 
:an remember the festivities agree that "King 
Hilarity" reigned supreme. The fraternity rushes 
and initiations were another form of diversion en- 
tered into by active members of the class. By 
:he time the middle of the year rolled around most 
af the class had made double their requirement in 
supply house points and incidentally increased 
'heir standing in the league of Ananias. Cold- 
aerg's emporium rated a close second for the noon 
aour session of bulling with some members of bet- 
er financial and sporting blood engaging in costly 
james of chance. 

Overnight it seemed we became proud seniors 
with all the suave dignity invested in men about 
;o become doctors of a stately profession. We im- 
mediately took on the worried expressions of men 
: aced with weighty problems which in truth were 
aurs in the form of points. The supply houses 
were shunned as we got down to the more serious 
aroblem of amassing the number of points neces- 
sary for graduation. Nervous tension now reigned 
supreme while here and there "griper" clubs were 
•ormed with an ever increasing membership. Time 
was taken out from "point hounding" and "grip- 
ng" to engage in two noble enterprises. The 
election of class officers and the Junior-Senior 
Jance. 

Bernard Thiel was elected to the presidency 
With Dave Ahner, to assist in the conduction of 
:lass affairs. "Jerry" Quinlan was selected as 
rhairman of the executive committee with Done- 



Ian, Konrad, Milnarik, and Skinner to assist in the 
conduction of the business of the class. No more 
capable men could have been selected in the ad- 
ministration of class affairs, as they have shown 
us by a most successful year. 

The dance given by the Juniors for us at the 
Knickerbocker hotel will live in the memory of 
every one of us as a social affair that will be un- 
paralleled as the years roll by 



SENIOR CLASS PROPHECY 
The sun was setting slowly — a gorgeous spec- 
tacle unappreciated by two middle-aged men who 
were temporarily interested in other things while 
walking up the lane to the clubhouse of the ex- 
clusive Richmond Country Club, situated near 
Chicago. 

— "and the only club I know anything aboui 
is the mashie and all I know about that is thai 
I can't use it." 

"Right. But don't forget it takes years and 
years to learn to play golf. You've only been play- 
ing a quarter of a century." 

"That's long enough to learn." 
"Wish I could drive a ball like the Pro can." 
"I do too. Still after my drive on the 5th 
sliced into the rough I took the old spade, pitched 
dead to the pin and sank the putt as you know. 
On the next hole I took a number two iron, — 
nuts! I'm even boring myself." 

By this time they reached the locker room 
and upon entering were greeted by none other 
than John Brahm, a retired dentist of comfortable 
means, who is president of the club 

"Hello fellows, how'd you hit em?" 
"Not very far, not very straight, and not very 
often, and the score card is torn, burned and 
buried." 

"Sure was a fine day to play though." 
"Let's get heading for the showers. See you 
later John." 

"Best part of the game, these showers." 
"Best part of your game you mean." 
Next we find the boys finished with the 
showers and grouped about their lockers. 

"Sambo — bring two set-ups and gingerale." 



■4 43 Jsi... 



SENIOR CLASS 



"Yes Suh " 

"Nice to have the mixins back, eh ? Remem- 
ber back in the old days of '33 when we graduated 
how 3.2% beer was brought back? Those weren't 
the days. Then they modified that and permitted 
8% beer before July of '34, and late in 19-10 
Arthur Allan of our own class, after just a year in 
the Senate formulated the Allan Act. It went 
over big and ever since we've had our mixin's as 
they used to was!" 

"Yes, that and the World's Fair of '33 were 
howling successes which rushed prosperity back 
into view. I remember the day Dr. Johnson told 
us in operative lecture that our class was indeed 
fortunate to enter the profession at that time be- 
cause the public had neglected their teeth and 
with prosperity near, action would come. That 
was hard to believe then but he was right. It 
did prove so. Prosperity came back, as suddenly 
as it went out but stayed longer than it had been 
gone," 

"Fortunately, but I'll cross my fingers after 
that remark." 

"Some of the boys cleaned up on the Fair 
with good jobs at the start. Johnny Simkus was 
demonstrating a model children's operating room 
for the Soakem Dental Company — has a swell job 
now — state salesmanager with the same firm, 
Noel Workman made big money red capping at 
the Union Station — he knows America and no 
foolin'; has travelled all over it; free transporta- 
tion you know! Thayer is in the dental supply 
business too. His dad retired and Ernie took over 
his practice just after graduation; has made a go 
of it between the two." 

"No! No 1 I never take a big drink. Promised 
my wife I wouldn't . . . but mix me four little 
ones." 

"Here's looking at you. ■ May you never die 
till a dead horse kicks you." 

"Suppose you know Leroy Smith has a high 
class haberdashery in the .loop. Saw him yester- 
day; I was in there buying some shirts and ties. 
Still the same boy — clever enough. with the poems 
to reduce Shakespeare's royalties. He. told me a 
lot of news. He says; 'Max Potashnik has gone into 



the brewing business and amassed a fortune at it. 
Chester Wachowski entered the United States 
Army Dental Corps and is now a major. Fred 
Lukins and Allan Lockwood have successful joint 
practices in Wiliston, N. D. and have presented 
many valuable papers to the society; and Philip 
Lubar is in Colorado. It seems that he worked 
too- hard and too long hours and was advised by his 
physician to abandon practice and rest. On the 
other hand Bohumil Safarik is the personification 
of health, and the Barnum and Bailey Circus has 
engaged him as a strong man. William Cunning] 
ham and Joseph Coughlin remained in the groove 
though and have offices across the hall from eacH 
other in the Marshall Field Annex. 

"Oh, I almost forgot about Hirshenbein. Smith 
said Hirshenbein recently struck his stride and 
now takes care of thirty patients a day on the 
West Side." 

"That is news. I heard Ray Olech singing 
over NBC last week. He sings operatic numbers—^ 
swell music; fell asleep listening though. He's up 
with the big radio entertainers now. The Chicagd 
Symphony Orchestra has George Fortelka leading 
it, and John Donelan sings in the church choir in 
Springfield. That silver voice of his is the oug 
standing feature of the choir. He has his Dad's 
practice under excellent control — "a line and a 
song for each patient" is his motto. On the othel 
hand .Severn Wojczynski tried singing to his pa-j 
tients and found he lost them all. He couldn't 
stop singing so he gave up practice and sings an| 
plays the latest hits at Woolworth's Five and TenJ 

"I knew about Olech. Did you hear what 
happened to Dave Mitsunaga? He went back tc 
Honolulu and took up research work — discovered 
the absolute cause- of dental caries. Yes, sin 
The article was in the Journal last year. It made 
a big sensation, didn't it? Especially since he he 
a treatment with it — special mouth wash to ward 
off caries. The motto is "A gargle a day keel 
the caries away." Hugo Smith, as you know 
broadcasts it for the Ripsodent Company whs 
have taken up Dave's idea. Robert Kar 
bought out the entire Ripsodent plant. It seem 
that little gal he married in his senior year inspire! 



SENIOR CLASS 



-lim to bigger and better things and with invest- 
ments clicking, Kari stacked up the dollars, 
-rancis Baker, Joseph Kubik, Harold Harris, and 
_eonard Keller made up a party with their families 
and took an eastern trip and stopped in to visit 
Dave. They saw the town right and during the 
rourse of the trip discovered that the information 
»en in Dave's seminar lecture was invaluable." 

"Chu returned to live with his folks in Hono- 
ulu too and is now married and does a flourishing 
susiness — gets a cut on every shirt laundered in 
Honolulu." 

"Sambo, where's my shoe?" 

"Ah don't know boss, Ah ain't seen it." 

"Oh, here it is in the corner of the locker 
Tiding on me. That reminds me Lerman and Luber 
ire in the shoe business, their establishment bears 
he name of "L and L." The first day I wore their 
;hoes that's what I said, 'ell!' 'ell!' Made a sack 
I money at it though. They have Louis Batler 
ind Henry Debski working for them. Eli told me 
rhat Joseph Comroe is now in charge of a large 
hanufacturing concern that makes their shoes 
or them." 

"Isn't it curious the way some of the other 
joys have branched off, using dentistry as a step- 
>ing stcne ? Take Joseph Carofalo for example' 
le continued his postal associations and became 
)ostmaster at Chicago. James Keenan is editor 
if the Dental Cosmos and devotes his entire atten- 
ion to that. Holz, Crandstaff, and Hafert are 
egular contributors. Francis Joseph is another. 
He entered the wholesale grocery business with his 
)ad and put things in proper working order with 
lis inimitable efficiency and business ability." 

"Kaminski and Lapp went in for different 
hings too. "Punk" coached basketball and recent- 
y led Harvard to the national title. And Lapp is 
ikewise nationally known; he had h:s picture in 
ill the papers when he led the competition in the 
Vofessional Bowlers League." 

"What about Anthony Vichick and John 
Ian?" 

"That's right. They're both drawing cartoons, 
/ichick works for the Cleveland News and Akan 
or the New York Times. You've seen a lot of 



their cartoons reprinted in the Digest, I guess." 

"Sure I have 1 And there's another successful 
fellow, Joseph Weiss, he's chief of the Moving 
Picture Operator's Union. He operated the proj- 
ector at the Chicago Theater for quite a while — 
until the public complained about the discomfort 
they experienced when the pictures were shown 
upside down. The management then saw fit to 
have Weiss elsewhere." 

"Yes, and had you heard of George Halmos? 
'Count' gave up dentistry and after a successful 
test rose to fame in the talkies. George Koukal is 
a producer in Hollywood and has La Porte Dorman 
acting in his comic "Sensations." They're the 
best since Charlie Chaplin's time. Ted Krysinski 
does stunt flying in air scenes in the movies. I 
heard he broke his leg but is now convalescing. 
It seems he rolls in his sleep and fell out of bed 
one night. Hollywood claims Vic Foster, too. He 
moved there with his family and does all the por- 
celain jacket work for the stars." 

"That reminds me of the new C.C.D.S build- 
ing." 

"Some dental building now, isn't it?" 

"Sure is. Five storied structure with all 
modern equipment. In addition to the splendid 
equipment they furnish an excellent service to 
the students by having laboratory men to cast in- 
lays, pack and polish plates. No more point system 
either 1 Nothing like our days there, eh!" 

"Sambo 1 More gingerale." 

"Yes suh, boss, Yes suh 1 " 

"Then there is Rudolf Kronfeld. He's dean 
now. Still teaches special pathology and goes in 
for research. He has Keith Pike in charge of 
ceramics, Otto Wagner demonstrating operative, 
and Charles Wursch with Chester Radloff assist- 
ing in the extraction room. Vincent Piscitelli is 
professor of therapeutics and conducts his own 
practice in addition — does only root filling work." 

"What happened to Mert Skinner?" 

"Let me see. Oh, yes 1 He continued school 
work and studied medicine — always had more in- 
terest in that. He became punctual and successful. 
He's chief of staff at a hospital out in Joliet. Never 
will forget the time Mert was called upon to give 



M 45 }§6~ 



$v> 



W^^^i^S^^^^^ 



SENIOR CLASS 



his punctuality speech for seminar and was ab- 
sent." 

"I won't either." 

"He lived that down though." 

"I read about Joseph Wren in the papers. You 
know how he always helped others so much? Well, 
he was exceptionally kind to some old man — did 
some dental work free when the man was down 
and out, but this man invented a tricky electric 
clock and made a fortune out of it, upon his death, 
willed $50,000 to Joe. Joe gave half of it to an 
orphan home. Interesting, eh!" 

"Who were some of the other boys?" 

"Well, I saw Dave Ahner recently. He has 
an office with his Dad. He has charge of an or- 
phan clinic; is married and has three children, 
two girls and a boy. The boy is studying dentistry 
at CC.D.S. Dave said, 'Cordon Ball makes the 
biggest and best inlays in New Brunswick, N. J 
Raymond Krempel is a dancing instructor for a 
classic ballet. Frank Machek is a prominent citi- 
zen of Cicero and is active in civic affairs and 
never misses a dental meeting. Samuel jacobson 
is still single and has grown fat and prosperous. 
Teresi and Segal have offices together and live in 
the same apartment on the South Side. Jerome 
Rubin, Rubin Mitz, and Leonard Klein have stepped 
into society and have gone in for ten course din- 
ners at the Drake Hotel. He also told me that 
Clifford Becherer has specialized in extraction at 
the Illinois Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital." 

"And Andrew Andrews is a member of the 
firm of Andrew, Andrew, and Andrew, attorneys. 
He was the defense attorney for the Liability In- 
surance Company in a malpractice case against 
Emil Coglianese. The case went over slick. They 
couldn't pin a thing on him; George Freedman was 
the judge and the boys worked together. Anthony 
Varco is Chicago representative for the company 
and has all the fellows insured " 

"Politics have claimed many of the boys all 
right. Oak Park has Jerry Quinlan as leader of the 
Democratic faction. He took a golf lesson one 
day and when asked by the Pro to address the 
ball, Jerry said, 'Mr. Ball, Mr. Chairman, Ladies 
and Gentlemen." 



"Was he embarrassed?" 

"I should say not. Nothing could embarrass 
Jerry." 

"You know Hawkins and Heidorn have offices 
directly across the street from the Democratic 
headquarters. They specialize in children's den- 
tistry. Leonard Kelley, besides being the PastorJ 
in his home church in Kankakee, is assessor of 
taxes for the county. The mayor of Cicero is 
none other than John Biestek. After two weeka 
in office John quieted the town by demanding, 
that all shooting cease after nine p. rri." 

"Craczyk, Jones, and Lach are breaking into 
politics, too. They lost their |obs with the Bostorj 
Dentists after the state abolished advertising den-j 
tistry. Harry Verne; President of the Chicago 
Dental Society and his corps of officers which' 
included Paul Simon, Edward Bialecke, and Elme| 
Lachmann, worked feverishly and were instru- 
mental in accomplishing this noble and advan-l 
tageous deed for the profession and the public." j 

"It was a surprise that Charles Danreiter 
didn't go back to Sterling, Illinois. I thought ha 
would. Instead he started up a laboratory and 
has built up a neat little business. His closest 
competitor is the firm operated by Leo Stern and. 
John Putnis. The way they've cut prices on full 
dentures down to $1.98 would be hard on even 
the obsolete Boston System, but they still haven't 
any red figures on their balance sheets. Nauseda 
works for Danreiter's lab — he's the highest paid 
man in the lab business; does all the gold work.! 

At this point a tall dark haired gentleman ap- 
proached our gossiping golfers. It was the pro of 
the club who had returned from the Keeler Coun- 
try Club at Saint Paul where he had participated 
in the Professional Golfers Association Championj 
ship. 

"As I live and breathe — Chuck Firnsin! How'd 
you get back so soon?" 

"Hello fellows. Took a train shortly after 
the match. Glad to be back and away from that 
terrible strain." 

"Read the story of the match in the morri 
ing paper. My, its tough to win only second placej 
after being champion for two years in succession. 



•4 46 m 



SENIOR CLASS 



"Nevertheless, you're to be congratulated, 
fellow. Here's a toast to our conquering Pro 1 " 

"Thanks. Who do ycu suppose I met up 
with in St. Paul?" 

"Haven't the slightest idea." 

"Ray Nichols 1 All dressed up in a sporty 
golf outfit. Had dinner with his family. Ray 
went over big in Indianola, Iowa. He said he had 
been working very hard and needed a rest, so he 
decided to attend the contest at the last minute. 

"What did Ray have to say?" 

"Well the championship was the main con- 
versation but we managed to come around to old 
times topics. Talked about the fellows out of 
town mostly. I found out that Elmer Ronspiez 
has achieved success in general practice at Juda, 
Wisconsin, and Norman Harelik made things go at 
Grand Rapids, Michigan." 

"Let me see who else had his ears burning? 
Oh, yes, E. j. Dening travelled all the way back 
home to Louville, N. Y., with his little bag of in- 
struments, to become a valuable addition to the 
register of professional services there. He's teach- 
ing crown and bridge at the N. Y. State Dental 
College too — been there for years now. Talked 
about Leslie Hofsteen also. He specialized in 
Orthodontia for Dutchmen only at Holland, Mich- 
igan. His home is the show place of the town, 
with its beautiful garden of tulips. 

Then we hopped over to Calumet, Michigan, 
in our discussion. Ray Nichols thought Larry Etu 
and Carl Watson would be located there but I in- 
formed him they were conducting ethical practices 
on the North Side in Chicago. You boys knew 
that, I guess." 

"Sure. Etu was the speaker at the North 
Side Dental Society meeting a couple of months 
ago. He spoke on 'The Relation of Roofless Den- 
tures to the Palate.' " 

" 'Member Carl Watson? I always remem- 
ber that cute little mustache and happy smile. 
Say, how many times has he been married, any- 
how?" 

"Only once — that wife of his knew how to 
hold him and keep the others away." 



"Hollis Powers was a flash with the women, 
too. He conducts a practice down at Petersburg, 
Illinois, consisting largely of the opposite sex— 
can't keep them away." 

"It certainly looks that way. Fred Kuttler 
came into our discussion too. Moline, Illinois, 
keeps him busy taking impressions for dentures 
and keeping up social contacts— has a four chair 
office and devotes his entire time to denture con- 
struction." 

"Hew about the feHows who lived close to 
Chicago — the commuters?" 

"Art Konrad was one of them. He's Aurora's 
leading extraction specialist. Have you inspected 
those new type adjustable forceps he designed?" 

"Yes and they're fine; the one forceps fits 
any tooth in the mouth." 

"Marshall Blume was another commuter. 
Highland Park has been fortunate to have such a 
mayor. He's been in office for two consecutive 
terms and has retired from practice." 

"Deach and Lem fit in here too. Deach has 
a state job lecturing on Oral Hygiene. He travels 
a lot from one town to another and lectures to 
societies on Preventive Dentistry." 

"That class of '33 turned out to be a corker, 
with all of the boys taking care of themselves so 
well." 

"Sure did. You know if we had a list and 
checked against it we'd find that every fellow has 
been spoken of today." 

"I think so too . . . hold on, how about Bunny 
Thiel?" 

"Well, we see him so much we overlooked 
him." 

"He should complain! He's happily married 
and has three healthy children — all boys — calls 
them Bernard I, II, III; owns a Cadillac, a home 
and an earned reputation. He's ex-president of 
the Elgin Dental Society and at present just 
operating for friends 1 " 

"And you?" 

"I'm not complaining either." 



Note: Written by an optimist. 



-4 47 fr 




JUNIOR CLASS 



MELVIN F. LOSSMAN 
President 



ROBERT ROCKE 
1st Vice-President 



JOHN A PILUT 
2nd -Vice-President 



JOSEPH A NORTON 
Secretary . 




FIRST SECTION OF THE JUNIORS 



TOP ROW: Borland, Kelly, rrost, Cault, Ashworth, Breger, 
Friedrich, Klaper, Coldfield, Damuth, Kurpiewski, Dvorak, 
Kite, Kirz, Chubin. 

2nd ROW: Dickter. Bukowski, Brennan, Fi'ek, Faul, Alderson, 
Braun, Nemec, Deutsch, Marotta, Guzik, Boris, Ne'son, 
Thomas, Cerber. 



3rd ROW: Cable, Gosicki, Cuttman, Kielbasa, Cam;no, Ell 
man, Lippo!d, Benedetto, Ciocca. 

4th ROW Bekier, Cesal, Dunn, Heineman, Crauer, Craig 
Rambaldi, Alishahon 




- 4 4S fee 



JUNIOR CLASS 




JOHN MALANOWSKI 
Treasurer 



LME ) FILEk 
Artist 







WALTER KELLV 






Sergeant-at-Arms 


HENRY ] 


BEKIER 




Editor 








SECOND SECTION OF THE JUNIORS 



'OP ROW: Rea, Odorozzi, Offenlock, T ic hy, Neer, Winder, 
Stewart, Malancwski, Norton, Ohlenroth 

nd ROW: Pilut, Patti, Metcalf, O'Reilly, Wexler, Zlotnick, 
j.Tischler, Stiernberg, Meyer, Davis, Schwartz, Sylvan. 



3rd ROW: Mertes. Rocke, Lipmski, Reynolds, Schmidt, Nud- 
ved, Perlowski, Parowski, Szymanski. 

4th ROW: Phillips, Pacocha. Marcinkowski, Ziherle, Ziolkow- 
ski, Lyznicki, Sielaff, Sklamberg. 



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If 49 )■>•- 



JUNIOR CLASS 



THE Junior class of C.C.D.S. started immediate- 
ly and a class election was held, with 
the fraternity and non-fraternity men fight- 
ing hard to place their candidates. After a spirited 
and organized class election the following Juniors 
were elected to office: Melvin F. Lossman, presi- 
dent; Robert Rocke and John A Pilut, vice-presi- 
dents; Joseph A. Norton, secretary; John Mala- 
nowski, Treasurer; and Walter Kelly, Sergeant-at- 
Arms. 

The Junior-Senior Dance was one of the out- 
standing events of the year. This dance given an- 
nually by the Junior Class in honor of the Seniors, 
was held in the beautiful Oriental Ballroom of the 
Knickerbocker Hotel. Most of the faculty attend- 
ed the dance. The success of this dance was due 
to the splendid cooperation and work of Chairman 
Faul and his committee composed of Lipinski, 
O'Reilly, and Parowski. 

Points, patients, appointments, and examina- 
tions are some of the things that have kept the 
Juniors busy and rushing during the past year. 

The Juniors are firmly upholding one of the 
traditions of old C.C.D.S. by publishing the year 
book, "Dentos." Leonard C. Borland was selected 
as Editor-in-Chief ; J. A. Norton as Business Man- 
ager. The Junior class is proud to be able to put 
out the 1933 "Golden jubilee" Dentos, celebrating 
the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery. 

Intra-mural sports; such as basketball, bowl- 
ing, wrestling, and tennis have been ably repre- 
sented by Junior class members. Literary and art 
talent has also had a strong Junior class repre- 
sentation on the Dentos, Bur, and Loyola News 
staffs The Juniors have many of its members in 
the fraternities at C.C.D.S. and the Blue key hon- 
orary scholastic fratern y has also honored some 
cf its scholars. 

May unity and friendship ever distinguish the 
class of 1934! -HENRY J BEKIER 



SIDE GLANCES 

FRASZ-- Our embryo writer and historian. 

TISCHLER— Taxi? Right here sir. 

NORTON — Boys 1 I got another page ad to- 
da^ 

PILUT — Originator of the "ketchup bottle" 
liquid measurement, 

O'REILLY — The best column writer, second 
only to "Winch" Norton. 

WEXLER — A future political campaign man- 
ager. 

SCHMIDT— The big chief of the Zips. 

BUKOWSKI— Beau BrummeH's only rival. 

GUZIK— Did you ever see Ted without his 
smile- 5 

CAMINCi — Points don't mean anything to 
Romeo. 

FRIEDRICH— Where Larry is, Friedrich is 
there too 1 

ZIOLKOWSKI— Bowling and girls are his 
favorite interests. 

ALDERSON— The pride and joy of Devils 
Lake, N. D. 

TICHY — Our good friend from New Mexico. 

DICKTER — Dick was born with a camera in 
his hand. 

BORLAND— Our genial Editor-in-Chief. 

GAULT — They blame Irv for everything. 

BORIS— A gentleman and a scholar 1 

PATTI- -Angelo always brightens up things 

BREWER— A quiet fellow, but what a hu- 
morist? 

LIPINSKI— You should taste some of r 
homemade beer 1 

KITE — The "Russian Lullaby" crooner. 

JACOBSON— The "full denture specialist. 

PHILLIPS—A wiz with the fair sex. 



-HSf50J 



JUNIOR CLASS 



JUNIOR FLASHES 

Allen and Cable the "extraction specialists" 
have a new proverb: — The whole tooth and noth- 
ing but the tooth. 



Cuzik says: — Modern marriage is just like a 
cafeteria. A man grabs what locks nice to him 
and pays for it later. 



Ciocca: "How is your companionate mar- 
riage working out Craig ? " 

Craig: "Terrible. I've lost my wife's ad- 
dress." 



"Life is like a deck of cards." says Neer, 
"When you are in love it's hearts, when you be- 
come engaged, it's diamonds; when you are in bad 
with the wife, it's clubs; and when you die, it's 
spades." 



Breger is getting to be like the Scotchman 
who went into his room in a hotel. Seeing a clock 
on the wall he stopped his watch. 



Barber: "Wet or dry, mister?" 
Davis: "Never mind my politics. Just comb 
iy hair." 



The other day a patient told Camino this: "I 
believe I'm a little better, doctor, but I'm still 
short of breath." Camino replied, (without 
thinking) "I can stop that completely after a few 
more treatments." 



Don Reynolds sent this one in to us: "I wo 
chance acquaintances from Ireland were talking 
together. 

"An so yer name is Riley: 3 " said one. "Are 
yez any relation to Tim Riley?" 

"Very dishtantly," said the other. "Oi wus 
me mother's first child and Tim was the twelfth." 



Lee Damuth wrote the following letter home 
last week: 
"Dear Dad, 

Please send me one hundred and twenty dol- 
lars. I am taking three language courses at 
school. They cost as follows: Latin, ten dollars, 
ten dollars for Creek and one hundred dollars for 
Scotch. 

Your son, 

Lee" 



Faul: "What makes you think Bob Ohlen- 
rcth won't be out of the hospital for a long timer 1 
Did you see his doctor:- 1 " 

Freidnch: "No, I saw his nurse." 



O'Reilly could make money on the side by 
having classified ads in his "Dent Spurts." Re- 
member the results the "mirror ad" gotr^ 



"Say Ed., that guy Perlowski was so lubricated 
after the Junior-Senior dance that he sold the 
post office." 

Smreczak: "Well, why are you so down in 
the mouth about it ? " 

Parcwski: "Oh because I bought it." 



MEDITATION 

In his book, "Living the Creative Life," j, H. 
Appel gives nine elements of creative living. 1 hey 
are worth our thinking about, as dental students. 
They are as follows: 

(I) Health; (2) Energy of body, mind and 
soul; (3) Understanding, including knowledge, 
ludgment, skill and good sense; (4) Action, in- 
cluding willingness and diligence; (5) Endurance, 
including lasting quality, perseverance; (6> Hos- 
p't'kty, including courtesy and tact; (/) Care- 
fuiness, including accuracy and punctuality; 
(8) Thoroughness, including rystem and planning; 
and (9) Concentration, or the ability to focus 
one's mind and effort on the thing to be done. 



if5i>~ 



JUNIOR CLASS 



SCRAMBLED HASH 

Sylvan and Rea are getting into action re- 
cently. They are collaborating on a scientific 
treatise called "Advice to the Lovelorn ." Illustra- 
tions have been taken from scenes in the small 
amp 

Ashworth "Why is Chemistry like love, 
Donald?" 

Stewart: "Because the higher the pressure, 
the greater the temperature" 



Mertes, Patti, and Cault are in hard training 
these last few weeks. They are going to compete 
for the championship in the "West I owe I and 
Chalk Eraser Throwing Tournament." 



"Cabby" Cobler thinks a dormitory is a school 
where you sleep. Also that the highest form of 
animal life is the giraffe. 



During an exam in the large amphitheatre: 
Dr. Svoboda; "This is the third time you have 
looked at Lippold's paper." 

Ziherle: "Yes sir, he doesn't write very 
plainly." 



In the extraction room. 
Offenlock: "My girls teeth are like the stars 
in heaven." 

Szymanski: "Why?" 

Offenlock: "They come out every night" 



Remember the time Dr. Zoethout was lectur- 
ing on the scalp while Metcalf was sleeping in 
class. 

"What is dandruff?" he asked Metcalf. 

Chips off the old block," replied Metcalf, 
awakening. 



This is what one of the Juniors overheard in 
the c'inic last week: 

Demonstrator: "I want you students to make 
these charts out so clearly that they can be under- 
stood by the most stupid person. Then I can tell 
exactly what you mean." 



Norton was asked by Giles if a dentist ever 
beats his wife, and here is what "Dode" said: "A 
dentist never beats his wife, he crowns her." 
"Angel" should hear about this! 



Nedved claims that getting the baby to sleep 
is hardest when she is about eighteen. 



Indignant Parent (6 A. M): "Young man, 
what do you mean by bringing my daughter in at 
this hour?" 

Shapiro: "Well, I gotta be at school by 8." 



Sielaff has a Swedish patient on whom he has 
been working for the last six months. Fred asked 
her: "What kind of a tooth brush do you use 
madam?" And she replied: "A strong vun — dar 
bane seven in my familee." 

ALL IN A DAY'S WORK! 

Worrying again about points — another disap- 
pointment today — Ellman looking at a pretty pa- 
tient — to class, late again — Gresens has a weak- 
ness for blondes — Marcinkowski around again, to 
collect for the "Dentos" — another exam tomorrow 
— Nedved doing some research work for Dr. Pike 
— Frasz drinking coffee, at Dudleys — gotta get a 
clean gown today — nonchalant Schwartz — Zlot- 
nick, quietest fellow in class — Patti throwing wet 
towel at Gault — Ohlenroth, the basketball player 
— Sklamberg and Cerber, always together — an- 
other inlay recast — patient calling on the phone — 
wonder, if that was my name called? — Metcalf, 
handsomest man in class is in love — Davis doesn't 
sleep in class anymore — Smreczak has the blues— 
Parowski and Perlowski, planning another party — j 
Cesal and Gosicki — Dunn, running to 8 o'clock 
class — Dvorak talking to Dr. Svoboda — Goldfield, 
asleep — "Arkansaw" Heineman — Gutmann look- 
ing for his patient — "Sarg" Kelly borrows a plug- 
ger — Kirz and Klaper arguing — Meyer, calling t<| 
Lyznicki for help — Odorizzi, reading "The Loyola 
News" — Pacocha whistling — Solomon poundingj 
foil — Stiernberg looking for Tichy — Dickter taking 
snap-shots — points posted — and so on and on. 



-■•§{ 52 }3«"- 



JUNIOR CLASS 



THOUGHTS 

Here are some thoughts from the writings ot 
our own Dr. C. N Johnson: 



RECOMPENSE 

Surely the time will come when we shall know 
The passing of the dream that men call youth, 



"A man should be estimated not so much by 
the size of his hat as by the size of his heart. 

I would rather have charity in my heart for 
the faults of others than be the most righteous 
person in the world. 

Say the truth even it it hurts, but try to say 
it so that it will not hurt 



When blooms we nurtured in the long ago 

Shall yield at length the sombre fruits of 
truth. 

When that day comes our hearts will leap no more 
At the bright call of youth as breakers run 

To greet the challenge of the shining shore, — 
Our days with light and laughter will be done 



I hate persecution whether it be attributed to 
a man, a devil, or a god. 

Do good at every opportunity — you never 
know how few chances may be left. 

Never condemn a man totally till you know 



One who has never suffered has never fully 
developed. 

If a man falls, pick him up — do not tread on 



I would be contented if I could make others 
contented. 

The greatest luxury I know is to have ample 
time in which to do your work well. 

If a day passes without making some one hap- 
pier, it is a day wasted." 



But ours shall be the wisdom of old trees 

Dreaming of countless summers come and 
gone, 

Glory of westward ships on westward seas, 
Beauty of shadow lace upon a lawn, 

The sum of love beside a friendly fire, 

And peace, that is the end of all desire." 

Dr. Scruggs 

MOTHER 

One name is dearer 
than the rest — 
Mother, 
It stands for all 

things loveliest — 
Mother, 
Not earth nor sky 
nor boundless sea 

can measure what 
it means to me 
And so I speak it 
tenderly — 
Mother! 



Kef 53 }§*.._ 




SOPHOMORE CLASS 



JOHN J MrBRIDE 
President 



LORETTO J. MADONIA . 
Secretary 



WILLARD T. VONDRAN 
Vire-President 



LAYTON M DOCHTERMAN 

Tieasurer 




FIRST SECTION OF THE SOPHOMORE CLASS 



TOP FOW: Druck. Bogacki, Kmdschi, Buckley, Korngoot. 
2nd ROW: Hunter, Kelder, Creadon, Holm, Kosner, Brundags, 
Ciza, Eisenstem, 

3rd ROW: Bromboz, Hauff.Ciebien, Altheim. Brown, Frisch, 
Landeck, Dziolczyk, Bor.worth 



-1th ROW: Kunka, Berens, Fyfe, Flaxman, Klees, Cioscio,,] 
Cosgrove. 

3th ROW: Costello, Dochterman, Abrahamson, Chott, Dubrowj 
Bloom, Kane. 




SOPHOMORE CLASS 




HERMAN P KELDE^ 
Ssrgeant-at-Arms 



CHARLES P. COSCROVE 
Editor 



RAYMOND NEUBARTH 
Circulation Manager 



HENRY L BORIS 
Artist 




SECOND SECTION OF THE SOPHOMORES 



TCP ROW: Migala, Workman, Vonesh, Stryker, Rywniak, 
Mosetich, Rybacek, Riley Kolczak, Zopel, Laskey, Roga!ski 

2nd ROW: White, Rzeszotarski, Vondran, Lukas, Kowalski, 
Korngoot, Prawdzik, Mroczynski, Weller. 



3rd ROW: Rea, Wadas, Madonia, Rago, Lerner, Kosner, Rosen- 
berg, Marsan, Libman, Svenciskas. 

-I In ROW Langer, Uyeda, Uditsky, Lyznicki, McBride, Las- 
kowski, Neubatth, Mueller, Meier 




— ■€{ 55 }i* - 



$■■»'.. •'"'•■...'■■:>. ,''U ; <;U? 4 




SOPHOMORE CLASS 



A NCHORS aweigh! Cast off 1 And the good 
-**• ship "Sophomore" pointed her bow down 
the river that opened into the vast expanse of the 
'Sea of Destiny.' The vessel on this voyage was 
manned by a new crew of approximately ninety 
capable and confident men who were striving to 
win the right to become members of the crew of 
the enviable liner christened the 'junior.' 

When everything was made shipshape and 
the vessel was cloaked in an atmosphere of 
friendliness the captain declared that an election 
be held so that beneficial working cooperation 
among members of the crew might be attained. 

After a number of political gestures had been 
made with serious intent, the final outcome ot 
this election showed John McBride as president, 
and Wm. Vondran as vice-president. I he office 
of secretary and the office of treasurer were filled 
by F. Madonia and Layton Dochtermann respec- 
tively. Keeper of the hatchway, or sergeant-of- 
arms, was allotted to Herman Kelder. 

The men of the crew are to be complimented 
on the fact that all pre-election sentiment was im- 
mediately dispersed when the final outcome was 
announced. All showed willingness to aid in what- 
ever way they could in maintaining perfect har- 
mony among themselves. 

The next piece of business before the mast 
was the securing of subscriptions for the Dentos. 
Chosen to handle this phase of work was Raymond 
Neubarth who was successful in securing a goodly 
number of pledges. Ray, it may be said, did ex- 
ceedingly well considering the financial status ot 
the crew. Charles Cosgrove was commissioned 
with the business of portraying the happenings ot 
the year, while Henry (King) Boris was granted 
permission to express his talent by acting as class 
artist. Both cooperated in their work so as to 
correlate the sketches with the scribblmgs of the 
class editor. 

The first real storm was encountered when 

the ship had reached the half-way mark in its 

voyage. At this point are the 'Mid-year Straits,' 

through which our ship had to pass before it could 

unfurl its sails on the last lap of the journey. By 



this time the crew had become so adept in their 
labors that surprisingly little difficulty was had in 
navigating the vessel through these treacherous 
waters. 

With the 'Straits' behind them the crew 
deemed it necessary to celebrate. A dance com- 
mittee was selected and arrangements were made 
for an informal party. An orchestra was signed 
on at 'Port Hotel Allerton' and the after-deck was 
converted into a luminous dance pavilion. I he 
crew enioyed themselves immensely and expressed 
their desires to hold another festival before they 
reached port. In charge of this affair were Har- 
vey Workman, chairman, Albert Fyfe, Chester 
Bromboz and George Chott. 

Calm, with occasional bad weather, was en- 
countered throughout the rest of the voyage and 
the port of destination is now in sight. All the 
members of the 'Sophomore's' crew hope that they 
will be granted their papers which will automa- 
tically number them among the 'Junior's' crew. 



I hold no dream of fortune vast, 
Nor seek undying fame. 

I do not ask when life is past 
That many know my name. 

I may not own the skill to rise 
To glory's topmost height, 

Nor win a place among the wise, 
But I can keep the right. 

And I can live my life on earth 

Contented to the end. 
If but a few shall know my worth 

And proudly call me a friend. 



Song Hit 

Laskowski: Say, Bill, have you heard the new- 
est dental song ? 

Vondran: "I'll bite. Spring it. 
Laskowski: "The Yanks Are Coming." 



-4 56 Ji* - 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



The battle is over 1 The roar of savage shouts 
has dimmed to silence. Lofty seniors, who were 
humbly creeping from their haunts of refuge undei 
the lockers, are again looking forward to gradu- 
ation (?). Dignified juniors who, a short time ago 
are stealthily peeking around in search of points. 
The bewildered pre-dents, who wanly shook their 
heads amazed that the building still remained upon 
its quaking foundation, are hopefully awaiting the' 
semester's close. Why? Why — because "hell day' 
is over 1 Peace, — calm, — "hell day" is over and the 
battle scarred sophomores and freshmen have 
painfully resumed their duties as dental students 
once again. But alas, fellow ruinmates, that is 
not all; think ye of the poor unfortunates who 
could not return to school due to the fact that 
they lacked the - er - proper attirement. 

Who would have thought that at 1 I :45 Friday, 
January the 13th, the serenity of the day was to 
be severed by ruinous conspiracies running not in 
the minds of the lower classmen (otherwise known 
as "Satans Playboys?") But a few notes scribed 
by your scribbler as the memorable conflict pro- 
gressed may serve to picture the gory spectacle to 
those craven souls who were trembling on the 
roof as the fray wore on. 

1 1 :45 A. M. — A few anxious freshmen have 
arrived and are quickly securing points of vantage 
:along the line of battle. Who's that man in over- 
alls with the big glistening ring knife on his right 
hand. Why it's Serrilella — the dirty — 1 I :50 A.M. 
— More freshmen appear — twenty — thirty. 
Gathering together in small excited groups, hastily 
glancing in all directions, hoping that the enemy 
will not appear before their forces are organized. 
12:00 — Frosh forces are vicious for battle — 
all entrances are guarded. The atmosphere is 
electrified with a sustained excitement. Where 
are the sophs? 

12:05 P. M— Here come the sophs 1 1 hey 
rush up 1 They are here 1 And hark! like the 
roar of billows, the cry of battle rises along their 
charging line 1 Frosh lines are broken! The bat- 
tle is on 1 Crys rend the air — shouts of victory — 
shrieks of anguish 1 Back to back, arm to arm, 



the fight to the last. Death with honor but never 
surrender. Shirts, ties, collars fill the air. Tear- 
ing of teeth, gnashing of hair. They grip — slip — 
tear — trip — and wrestle here in the gutter of no- 
man's-land. Someone's nails in another's wind- 
pipe nestle. He tries to gouge but the other 
bites his hand. On they fight, on — on — on, 

12:30 P. M. — Friends, Istudents, and other 
sleepers, — to arms 1 Call out the militia, — ring 
the curfew, — do anything, but stop this war 1 

12:45 P. M — The awful end 1 The ravaged 
vests, cravats, belts, hats, shirts, etc., all in shreds 
--all in tatters Dangling from the pipes, — hang- 
ing from lockers, littering the floor — everywhere. 

Yes, folks, hell day is over. — Their arms were 
strong, and well they learnt the foe, 1 he echo of 
their cries is ringing yet — will ring for aye. All 
else — let us forget. 



E A U IDEAL 



Hair by Alishahon 

Eyes by "Burp" Brundage 

Nose by "Schnozzle" Frisch 

Ears by "Martha" Berens 

Mouth by "Joe" Brown 

Mandible by "Toughy" Kelder 

Neck by "Chicken" Workman 

Moustache by "Private" Bosworth 

Milwaukee Bay by "Tony" Bromboz 

Hips by "Tool" Kitt 

Clutii by "Brodder" Flaxman 

Legs by "Slim" Vonesh 

Feet by "Windy" Braun 

It by "Simon" Price 

Clothes by "Charlie" Abrahamson 

Collars by "Bill" Vondran 

Personality by "Ches" Rywniak 

Sex Appeal by "Pat" Rosenberg 

COMIC VALENTINE 
You ought to be a politician, 
You have an awful "pull." 
You empty your patients' pockets 
To keep yours always full. 



•■>Sf 57 }*■— 



■ 




SOPHOMORE CLASS 



ADVICE TO THE LOVELORN 

There was a certain middle-aged lady who 
had never entered into that great and sacred 
institution called marriage. True she had suffered 
much during her early life. She became the wear- 
er of artificial dentures when she was still a 
flourishing lass. She had, at one time, been slight- 
ly anemic. She had recovered from indigestion and 
no longer needed to wear heavy concave lenses to 
keep her eyes from staring at e.ch other. Halito- 
sis and stomatitis had been contracted and gotten 
rid of. 

Naturally, all these systemic disturbances had 
ruined her chances of matrimony. But new she 
had fully recovered and was pointing her actions 
toward securing a husband for herself. Presently 
she succeeded in becoming engaged to a hand- 
some and well-to-do gentleman and was about to 
take the last leap when lady luck shined ill upon 
her once again. She hesitated in telling her lover 
that she had false teeth, fearing, of course, that 
he might spurn her for some other woman not so 
afflicted. In despair she consulted the "Advice 
to the Lovelorn" column of a local newspaper. Her 
letter, and an answer to it, appeared in the column 
a few days later. It read: 
Dear Advice to the Lovelorn : 

A short time ago I became engaged to a hand- 
some wealthy gentleman. I am quite sure that I 
love him but I am in a quandary I have false teeth 
and if I tell him this before we are married I am 
afraid that his love for me may grow cold. If 
I should wait and tell him after we are married I 
am afraid that he will lose interest in me and start 
keeping company with other women. As I say, I 
am in a quandary and I appeal to you for advice 
i_pon this matter which means so much to my fu- 
ture happiness. Sincerely, 

Ponderous Portia 

The answer that appeared in the column ap- 
peared was as follows: 
Dear "Ponderous Portia" 

Since you consult me en th.s matter of seri- 
ous consequence to you my best advice would be 
to get married and keep your mouth shut 



SIDE WISE 

Kelder 
, Question: What is meant by pulse pressure 
and what is it an indication of? Kelder — not here? 
Oh 1 There you are 

Answer: (What a question 1 What's the 
answer Cosgrove, quick?) That is - er - pulse 
pressure is what you feel on your wrist. (What, 
wrong? Why didn't you give a guy a hand Cos?) 
McBnde 
Question Will you kindly explain the tech- 
nique of casting a three-quarter crown? 

Answer None. Mac's absent Maybe he 
knew though. 



Question 
there? 

Answer: 
seen have only 



Mueller 
How many decidious bicuspids are 



Question: 



"Well, all the cases that I have 
- six, but they should have eight. 

White 
Why do we give a high polish to 
orthodontia appliances? 

Answer: Well, a doctor in Alabama told me 

we polished them to make sure that the teeth will 

slide ever them when we chew. Is that right? 

Laskowski 

Question: What do we mean by the laking 

of ihe red blood cells? 

Answer: Oh, we haven't had that yet, doctor. 

Hauff 
Question: Can you name one of the most im- 
portant causes of hyperemia? 

Answer: Yes I can. My shoes! 

Oebien 
Question: Gebien, in medicine, we have a 
corr.po:.nd called "Brown's Mixture." Can you giva 
n e the Latin for this? 

Answer: (Pause) Could "Mistura Browni" 
bo correct? 



BAD HABIT 
If for pleasure you would look 
See the girl- -forget the book. 



^58^ 



SOPHMORE CLASS 



SECRETS 

Has any one seen the famous and much talked 
of donkey that the eminent Harvey ("Cookie" 1 
Workman is supposed to be sporting? Rumor has 
it that when he is not obliging his fair one he 
takes one of the local debs for a ride. Harvey 
says that he takes a lot of pride in the animal but 
at the same time refuses to tell where he keeps it 
Possibly if enough pressure was placed upon the 
issue Harvey might afford us a glimpse in the 
near future. Concurrently comes the news that 
our popular friend Irwin ("Ani") Altheim has a 
new girl. The following is a message that he re- 
ceived from her on March 14th. 

Though you may frown at my advances, 

Fond hopes are won by taking chances. 

So I will chance this little line; 

Will you be my Valentine? 

Then too, we find some interest in Ihe almost 
dastard deed of our dear colleague "Cyppe r " 
George. Had it not been for the restraining power 
of Doctor Johnson, George would have sold "Ya" 
Korngoot a couple of dimes and pennies for 
twenty-four carat gold. Had the deal been suc- 
cessful George's one and only would, in all prob- 
abilities, have gotten herself a manicure. And 
while on the subject of manicures let it be known 
to all that our erstwhile orchestra leader polishes 
his nails on the lathe in the crown and bridge lab. 
Maybe the depression has something to do with 
this. 

Incidentally, Druck no longer believes that 
castile soap is used to shampoo the dental cilia 
His latest is that it is used to wash the plaster out 
of the proximal spaces after a plaster wash. 

"Bo" Mosetich blossomed forth at the Soph 
party and revealed some hidden talent He at- 
tempted to depict an Egyptian dancing g.rl by 
wiggling his lumbar region and tying his arms in 
Knots. Maybe he will try it again provided Sve:i- 
ciscas and Frisch furnish the melody. 

"Kringelein," alias Costello, attributes his gray 
hair to the fact that he drinks plenty of milk. He 
fails to state, however, that this milk is shipped to 
him intermittently from a tiger farm in India, Ac- 



cording to "Knngy" the beverage is quite strong 
and best taken when diluted with an ample amount 
of gingerale or lemon soda. Is it possible that 
"Grampa" Creadon is bald because he uses this 
tonic on his scalp. 



BABY'S GOT A TOOTH 
The telephone rang in my office today, as it often 

has tinkled before 
I turned in my chair in a half-grouchy way, for a 

telephone call is a bore; 
And all I thought, "It is somebody wanting to 

know the distance from here to Pekm " 
In a tone that was gruff I shouted, "Hello," a sign 

for the talk to begin. 
"What is it?" I asked in a terrible way. I was 

huffy, to tell the truth, 
Then over the wire I heard my wife say "Ihe 

baby, my dear, has a tooth!" 

I have seen a man jump when the horse that he 

backed finished first in a well driven race 
I have heard the man cheer, as a matter of fact, 

and I've seen the blood rush to his face; 
I've been on the spot when good news has come in 

and I've witnessed expressions of glee 
That range from a yell to a tilt of the chin, and 

some things have happened to me 
That have thrilled me with joy from my toes to my 

head, but never from earliest youth 
Have I lumped with delight as I did when she said, 

"The baby, my dear, has a tooth." 

I have answered the telephone thousands of times 

for messages good and bad; 
I've received the reports of most horrible crimes, 

and news that was cheerful or sad; 
I've been telephoned this and telephoned that, a 

joke, or an errand to run; 
I've been called to the phone for the idlest of 

chat, when there was much work to be done; 
But never before have I realized quite the thrill 

of a messcge, forsooth, 
Till over the wire came these words that I write, 

"The baby, my dear, has a tooth." 



-4 59 &•- 




FRESHMAN CLASS 



DONALD H MAMMEN 
President 



CLARK J. McCOOEY 
Secretary 



MICHAEL VITEK 
Vice-President 



JAMES E STOTT 
Treasurer 




FIRST SECTION OF THE FRESHMAN CLASS 



TOP ROW: Longo, Browning, Hayes, Priess. 

2nd ROW: Murstig, Crane, Strohacksr, Maurovich, Kimble, 

Loritz, Kiwala, Larkin. 
3rd ROW: Heydandk, Johnson, Fairman, Ness, Neymark, Han- 

nett, Schroeder, Mammen, Adler 



4th ROW: Bauer, Ewald, Cholewinski, Waska, Perko, Hooper, 
Zipprich, Dullaghan. 

5th ROW: Peffers, Shallman, Berlin, Bulmash. Raffle, Sta- 
sinski, Ogle, 




■•«§{ 00 )§H 



FRESHMAN CLASS 




STANLEY JAKUB5 
Artist 



HILDRETH A. HANNETT 
Sergeant-at-Arms 



ROBERT D. STROHACKEK 
Circulation Manager 



HERMAN C CORNSTEIN 
Editor 




SECOND SECTION OF THE FRESHMAN CLASS 



TOP ROW: Gomberg, Cillig, Kaplan. Rust, Pitch, Van Landeg- 
hen, Cornstein, Eggers, Thomas, Vision, Eberly, Coniglio, 

2nd ROW Kitchen, Campbell, Sutker, Jakubs, Liedmjn, Miz- 
gata, Kaneko, Kropidlowski. 



3rd ROW: Janowsky, Vitek, Krupa, Smith, Stott, Wellman, 
McCooey, Serritella. 

4th ROW: Weiss, Fafmski, E Stecker, H. Stecker, Moses 
Friedman, Copalman 




y 6i }> 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



ANEW field, a field of adventure lay before 
them. Seventy-six ambitious men assembled 
at the Chicago College of Dental Surgery on the 
sixth day of October, nineteen hundred thirty-two, 
to set cff to a new start in search of knowledge 
which some day would enable them to be better 
fit to serve humanity. To some the surroundings 
were new and inspiring, while to others who had 
clinic and amphitheater held no special fascina- 
tion. 

After the first few days, all aloofness and 
reserve had disappeared, and the feilows greeted 
each other by their first names or nicknames as 
they passed in the corridors or met in the base- 
ment. Soon arose before them the task of choos- 
ing from the class those men whom they thought 
were best fitted to pilot them through their initial 
year. A class meeting was held and various men's 
names were put up for consideration. I he elec- 
tion was held, and Donald Mammen was elected 
president, Michael Vitek, v.ce-president; Clark 
McCooey, secretary; James Stott, treasurer, and 
Stanley Jakubs, sergeant-at-arms. 

Then came that eventful day, Friday the 
thirteenth, when the freshmen met the sopho- 
mores on the field of honor and emerged victor- 
ious. It is said to have been the fiercest fight 
since the days of way back when. In spite of the 
fierce exertion, panting, grunting, and tear- 
ing, there was no display of animosity, tveryone 
fought fairly and cleanly, or should we say bare'y 
and cleanly. The only casualty reported was re- 
ceived by a freshman whose pants were filled with 
clinkers as he battled his way through the sophs. 
All that remained of the spoils were torn shirts 
and uppers which were strewn knee deep about 
the floor. 

Everybody returned from his Christmas vaca- 
tion in the best of spirits, and resumed his work 
with a hearty vigor. Rumors of a fresman party 
were going about, so the class met to take a poll 
of those men who were in favor of supporting such 
a function. A majority was in favor of it, and 
after permission was received from the office, a 
committee cf six men headed by H. A. Hannett 
was appointed by the class president, Don Mam- 



men The necessary arrangements were made, 
and the party was held on February tenth at the 
Old Arts Colony Club. In spite of the heavy snow 
which had fallen, the faculty and students 
turned out in full force. The music was supplied 
by Jimmy Creegan and his orchestra. Austin J. 
Rust supplied vocal entertainment which was well 
received and appreciated. 

After the second semester was well on its 
way, a bowling team was organized to compete in 
the intramural tournament. The outstanding man 
on the team was Krupa, who not only led the 
team, but was one of the highest scorers of the 
league. The class was also well represented in 
basketball and tennis. 

Under the tutelage of Dr. Kendall, several 
papers dealing with various phases of organic and 
physiologic chemistry were presented to the class. 
The students who participated in the presentation 
received invaluable experience which will stand 
them in good stead when they have to deliver 
papers in seminar. This work was further en- 
couraged by Dr. Fouser who had the students give 
oral talks to enlighten others on the mysteries of 
histology and organology. 

A fine spirit of leadership was shown by the 
men who were elected to lead us through the year 
and the courageous type of cooperation which was 
manifested by the student body enabled the class 
to go through the year without serious mishaps or 
misfortune. The class wishes to express words 
of thanks to the faculty who have made this pos-.j 
sible. Every member of the class hopes to keep 
up this fine record that has been made for the 
remainder of the time in school. 
ODD FACTS ABOUT OUR PROFS 

Dr. Kendell had a cigar in his pocket ons day 

Dr. Job was once a basketball coach. 

Dr. Fouser has a daughter who is a junior at 
Minnesota. Beware fellows. 

Dr. Clupker is down in the restaurant every 
morning at 8:15. 

Dr. Holmes has on a clean gown every I hurs 
day in anatomy. 

Dr. Kirby teaches classes at the downtown 
school. 



-•«§( 62 M • 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



FROSH COINCIDENCES 
We wonder what would happen if: 

"Speedy" Kiwala were in his seat when Dr. 
Job takes roll. 

"Eagleye" Neymark were to stay awake for 
an entire lecture. 

"Flash" Schroeder actually went to s!eep on 
the rail under the anatomy table 

"Connig" came to school with cigarettes of 
his own. 

"Jimmy" Serntella would offer to pay Corn- 
stein's carfare, and Cornstein would refuse if he 
were in his right mind. 

"Piffle" Raffle would live up to his reputa- 
tion as a "zizzler." 

Hannett's name were not Hildreth. 

"Handshaker" Rust were able to keep the 
girls away. 

Don Mammen didn't show up for school in 
his "closed job." 

"01 lie" Pitch were able to follow out Dr 
Kendell's principles. 

Hayes were not color-blind. 

Benny Friedman gave a negative test to Lugol's 
solution. 

Tony Kaneko could answer roll without say- 
ing "heah." 

Anyone could tell Ed from Henry Stecker the 
first day in class. 

"Van" lost his little book. 

Adler would bring his girl to school. 

Cornstein lost that picture of Rosie. 

Bauer drank as many quarts of beer as he said 
he could. 

Loritz had some sleep before he came to 
school. 

Perko would stop making eyes at the nurses. 

"Jake" would stop cleaning his nails in class. 

Hooper could run all the way up the stairs. 

Crane could grow as big a mustache as Dr. 
Kendell's was. 



click 



hat. 



Pness would stop talking about "Might> 
1." 

Shallman could forget Sussie for a while. 

Eggers ever came to school without his iron 



Kropidlcwski ever admitted that his first 
name was Alphonso. 

Peffers were really sixteen. 

Ogle were not standing in front of Skinner 
that day in the lab. 

Bob Strohacker would lose part of his nasal 
protruberance. 

Bill Johnson got together with Benny Fried- 
man 

Cill.g were to have his mustache removed. 

Fairman would smile once in a while. 

Charlie Ness got up five minutes earlier as 
Dr Job suggested. 

Sutker got less than a 99 in physiological 
chem. 

Rietz showed us the secret of his match trick 

Krupa ever found who always swipes his 
chair in prosthetics. 

Waska lost his rubber gloves. 

It is reported to us that Dr. Clupker showed 
one of our students how they find lost teeth in the 
clinic with the a:d of two vulcanite trimmers. 

MYSTERY 

In "P" chcm one Saturday after a paper on 
endocrine glands wcs read by one of the students, 
someone asked a question concerning the relation 
of the pituitary to the hypophisis. I he unfortu- 
nate who read the paper was apparently taken 
aback by this important word, and was at a loss as 
to what to answer. 



-■■€{ 63 }§* 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



DENTAL DRIVELS 

Rust in metallurgy: "Cosh, if Dr. Kendall 
gives us any problems about corks and sinkers, 
I'm sunk/' 

Vitek, explaining a problem concerning speci- 
fic gravity: "Well, after you have the weight and 
volume, you divide or do something and then get 
the answer." 

Friedman, the leading light of the chem class 
discovers a new short cut in finding specific grav- 
ity problems. 

Dr. Fouser, reading a definition of the mtima 
from a students paper, learns that the intima is 
the coloring matter of red blood cells. 

At this time we would like to pay tribute to 
Nienmark for his valiant effort to stay awake dur- 
ing first hour lectures. 

Hooper is still trying to figure out new many 
buccal cusps there are on a lower first molar. 

Schroeder, explaining to Dr. Holmes how he 
would get plaster out of the foramen magnum 

"Well, I would hit the patient over the head 
and shake him until it fell out." 

Ogle, at a fraternity meeting: "My name is 
Frances Ogle." 

Sineni, when asked to locate the external 
meatus, replied: "Oh, it's somewhere in the 
skull." 

Eggers, the poet, hands in this contribution: 

"We wonder which student, whose initials 
are A. J. 

Tipped his hat to the prof one day." 

Priess is still hungering for one of his anatomy 
sandwiches. 

Peffers, in anatomy: "Now fellows, it the 
calcified mass on the fingers is a finger nail, what 
would a similar mass be on the toe?" 

Bauer wants to know when the root of a low- 
er lateral incisor begins to erupt. 

Jukubs: "Holy smokes, will you get off my 
foot"' 

Johnson: "That's all right Jake, just call me 
Mister." 



The contrib from a poor mind. 
A wonderful bird is a Pelican, 
For he stores in his beak 
Enough food for a week, and 
I wonder how in the hellhecan. 

THE LUCKY MAN 

Luck had a favor to bestow 
And wondered where to let it go. 

"No lazy man on earth," said she, 
"Shall get this happy gift from me. 

"I will not pass it to the man 
Who will net do the best he can. 

"I will not make this splendid gift 
To one who has not practiced thrift. 

"It shall not benefit deceit, 

Nor help the man who's played the cheat 

"He that has failed to fight with pluck 
Shall never know the Coddess Luck. 

"I'll look around a bit to see 

What man has earned some help from me.' 

She found a man who's hands were soiled 
Because from day to day he toiled. 

He'd dreamed by night and worked by day 
To make life's contest go his way. 

He'd kept his pest and daily slaved, 
And something of his wage he saved. 

He'd clutched at every circumstance 
Which might have been his golden chance. 

The goddess smiled and then, kerslap I 
She dropped her favor in his lap. 



4 64 j» 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



THROUGH THE WEEK WITH A FRESHMAN 

Monday After going through the unpleasant 
ceremonies of dragging himself out of bed, the 
weary student performs his ablutions and sets oft 
for school. Upon reaching his destination, he im- 
mediately heads for Dudleys to get his morn- 
ing cup of coffee. While partaking of this nectar, 
he discusses the happenings of the week-end with 
his fellow cronies. In the midst of the conversa- 
tion, someone suddenly remembers that there is 
to be a quiz in Histology. Immediately there is a 
barrage of questions fired. "Say, Don, what is 
lymphatic leukemia?" "How would you differen- 
tiate between frog and human blood." This in- 
tense study is interrupted by the migration of 
Dfhers to the amphitheater, so they too arise and 
join the multitude struggling en the stairs. 

The amphitheater gained at last, the ex- 
hausted student takes a seat from which he can 
cast coveted glances at the papers of others. I he 
quiz over the student leaves the room in deep 
meditation trying to figure out whether or not 
Dr. Fouser will give him at least five points for 
trying on that last question. 

On to the histology lab where the next two 
lours are spent fiddling around with a pen 
trying to produce a reasonable fascimile of what 
ie sees in the microscope. After what seems to 
3e an endless hundred and twenty minutes, Mr. 
Earner finally says "Alright fellows," the student 
: s aroused from his lethargy, grabs h:s "mike" and 
rushes to the window so that he may turn it in 
and finish the morning of toil 

Down to the basement he rushes to grab 
something to eat. With one eye on the clock, 
ie gobbles down his food, hurriedly smokes a 
:igarette, and clambers the stairs to be in time 
for roll call in prosthetics. 

Safely entrenched behind his desk, the stu- 
dent relaxes. Here he may spend the next three 
and a half hours working leisurely setting up teeth, 
fhus endeth the first of six nerve-wracking days 

Tuesday. A similar procedure of getting up 
and going to school. This time instead of a quiz 



the student may sit back in his seat and lend an 
attentive ear to the ministrations of Dr. Job I he 
lecture over, our friend makes his mournful way 
to the chem lab hoping that he will go to the 
small amphitheater to hear some student read a 
paper on some s.bject or other. The gods are 
favorable, for upon reaching the lab, Dr. Kirby in- 
forms him that he will proceed to the small amphi- 
theater where Dr Kendell will lecture to him. 
Here the student is safe, for these lectures are 
of personal interest, and he is not in fear of going 
to sleep, and in doing this embarrass himself. 
He passes through the rest of the morning with- 
out due uncomfort. The noon hour and after- 
noon pass as on the day preceding. 

Wednesday Wednesday goes by and the stu- 
dent is cheered by the knowledge that half the 
week has passed. 

Thursday. Today there is a little variation in 
the program although the morning is the same, for 
on this day the class goes to the medical building 
for anatomy. Although the student does not wel- 
come the change because of anatomy, he is cheer- 
ed by the thought that the week is drawing to a 
close. This reminds him of a pleasant duty: here 
it is nearly Saturday, and no date yet. Just who 
should he take out, Ruth ? No. They didn't get 
on so well the last time Oh well, he'd take Susie 
out this time, she was a good kid. Such thoughts 
occupy the mind of a student who is supposed to 
be deeply engrossed in an intensive study of ana- 
tomy. So passed an interesting afternoon of mus- 
ing 

Friday. Again the same procedure as had 
taken place the days previous. The morning over 
with and back to the anatomy lab again "f his 
time with the satisfaction of knowing that the ob- 
ject of his choice had consented to go with him 
Now to spend the afternoon p'enning what he is 
going to do on Saturday night. The musings were 
interrupted by the untimely approach of Dr 
Holmes. Cosh, the table was in for a practical 
quiz, and here he didn't know a thing. Oh well, 
if he assumed an expression of beaming intelli- 



-<% 65 jV 



^^^^^^^5^^^^^ 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



gence perhaps Dr. Holmes wouldn't ask so many 
questions. The plan worked, and now to finish the 
schemes for tomorrow night. With this occupa- 
tion to fill the time, the rest of the lab hour 
passed quite rapidly. 

Saturday. Ahead of him the only day of the 
week that he actually enioyed, the student comes 
to schooi with happiness in his heart. The morn- 
ing fairly flies by, and at twelve o'clock the trans- 
formed person is released to a luxurious vacation 
of a day and a half. Oh for the life of a student 1 



MODERN PROBLEMS 
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 

Dear Aunt Myrtle: Please suggest some 
method for removing cosmetics that will appeal 
to my young daughters who don't care for cleans- 
ing tissues and are ruining my linen supply. 

Mrs. Exasperated, 

Red City, Idaho. 

Dear Ma From Idaho: Burlap bags are in- 
expensive yet quite durable and unexcelled in 
ability to penetrate into the deepest pores. What- 
ever you do don't have your daughters wash their 
faces. 



Dear Auntie: For business reasons I have 
found it necessary to dye my gray hair, but unfor- 
tunately it grows so fast that my Saturday after- 
noons and most of my luxury allowance has to go 
to keep the new growth retouched. What can I 
do 5 

Margy. 

Dear Margy: Business? What kind of busi- 
ness 5 Any way my advice is — act your age granny, 
act your age. 



Auntie Dear: Please >ell me how I can im- 
prove my eyebrows and lashes which are thin and 
scanty. 

Miss Baren, 
Sandy, Utah 



Dear Miss Baren: Brush them daily to remove 
dust and grit. Do not apply soap and water. Or 
you might ask Joan or Loretta to lend you theirs. 



Dear Aunt Myrtle: Although it is winter 
time, I still have freckles. I have tried most every- 
thing to remove them but have met with no suc- 
cess. Will you suggest something? 

Miss B. Speckled. 

Dear Miss B. Speckled Are the freckles con- 
fined to your nose or are they widespread 5 How- 
ever that may be the best thing you can do is to 
paint them to match your hair, your dress, your 
rouge and lipstick, or, your toenails. 



Aunt Myrtle: I am going to visit some 
friends who dine in restaurants a great deal, and 
I frankly don't know how artichokes should be] 
eaten. I know I'll be hungry, so don't tell me to 
let that dish alone. 

Vida, 

California. 

Dear Vida: Ve-da had a nice time but for 
your question. Ve'er in the same boat. 



Dear Aunt Myrtle: I have always wanted to 
know the meaning of the initials R.S.V.P. appear- 
ing on certain formal invitations. 

Dimples. 

Dear Dimples: Did you look in Webster's? 
We believe that has something to do with butcher 
shops. Then again it may be the abbreviation of 
the victuals your going to get. 



Hooray, here's one from a male. His reads] 



^66 






FRESHMAN CLASS 



Dear Myrtle: My wife has become careless 
of her appearance. She has allowed herself to be- 
come fat and unattractive. She doesn't care how 
she looks. If I say anything to her about it, she 
gets mad. You know how it is. 

Slim. 

Dear Slim: No I don't know how it is. Not 
as yet anyway. Slim, what do you do with your 
car when its tires become bulgy, its paint blist- 
ered, its fenders loose and droopy, and the whole 
blamed thing sluggish? It's the same all the way 
through. Even to the first installment. 



N 



RUNNING A FACTORS 



Dear Aunt Myrtle: In many of the letters 
you receive there is something about the girl who 
is in love with a married man. I am not for it, 
but how can you help it? 

Brown-eyed Susan. 

Dear Susan: just let his wife know, 

A PRAYER 

"My thoughts now steal 

Away from things of minor worth 
To fashion here a new ideal 

Above the lesser things of earth. 
The close of day 

Draws nigh too soon, when ev'ry man 
Must hasten on his lonely way 

Across the twilight's narrow span. 



Long ere mine eyes 

Are dimmed and I shall feel death's sting, 
Lord Cod, help me to realize 

The high ideals to which I cling. 



Yet, Lord from day 

To day, let my ideals advance. 
Keep them within my reach, I pray, 

But just beyond the day's expanse." 

Dr. Reilly 



If I were running a factory 

I'd stick up a sign for all to see, 

I'd print it large and I'd nail it high 

On every wall that the men walked by, 

And I'd have it carry this sentence clear: 

"The 'better job' that you want is here 1 " 



It's the common trait of the human race 
To pack up and roam from place to place; 
Men have done it for ages and do it now, 
Seeking to better themselves somehow 
They quit their posts and their tools they drop 
For a better job in another shop 



It may be I'm wrong, but I hold to this — 
That something surely must be amiss 
When a man worth while must move away 
For the better job and the better pay; 
And something is false in our own renoun 
When men can think of a better town. 



So if I were running a factory 

I'd stick up this sign for all to s:?, 

Which never an eye in the place could mis; 

"There isn't a better town than this! 

You need not go wandering, far or near— 

The 'better job' that you want is here." 



mm 67 jV- 




PREDENT CLASS 



DONALD C. CROOK 
President 



LAWRENCE B, MURPHY 
Vice-President 



FRANK S WOZNIAK 
Secretary 



EDMUND J. SCANLAN 
Treasurer 




FIRST SECTION OF THE PREDENT CLASS 

TOP ROW: Peterson, Wiegel, Pellettier, Pollack, Smentek, 2nd ROW: Dumanowski, Kahn, Zelko, Wasielewski, Graham, 

Tomaszewski, Tolpa Kramer, Heilemann. 

3rd ROW: Stulga, Starsiak, Crook, Lennox, Schuessler, Brown. 




■•*§{ 68 fr~ 



PREDENT CLASS 




NORMAN OLSON 
Sergeant-at-Arms 



RUDOLF CAM I NO 
Editor 



WILLIAM J. STARSIAK 
Artist 



A/ALTER A. WYKHUIS 
Circulation Manager 




SECOND SECTION OF THE PREDENT CLASS 



TOP ROW: Block, Kunik, Ditkowsky, Camino, Bolewicz 

2nd ROW: Scanlan, Olson, Murphy, DeWolf, Mase, Meini] 



3rd ROW: Ulip, Wykhuis, Esterman, Dziubski, Abrams, 
Wozniak, 




m 69 $■■■ 






PREDENT CLASS 



WITH the inception of this, the first year at 
college, for the students of the pre-dent 
class, the opening pages of a new chapter in our 
destiny unfolds. A quiet evident expression of 
timidity permeated this tiny student body, as they 
ming'ed observingiy in the basement prior to the 
first assembly. Then with the approach of the 
hour with a none too definite idea as to where we 
would find the amphitheater, we began with some 
reluctance to ascend the staircases. I hen fil- 
tering slowly into the arena with a unanimous 
effort on the part of every one to assume an at- 
titude of ease in his seat, we secretly wondered 
how we would ever endure five years of servitude 
in these back-breaking straight |ackets. 

However, with the passing of the first month, 
after some of the names had been committed to 
memory, and adequate substitutions made for the 
other tongue twisters, the latent social proclivities 
began to assume proportions in each of the mem- 
bers of the pre-dent family which laid the foun- 
dation for happy associations. 

Everyone seemed to feel that our first course 
in plaster throwing, under the tolerant direction 
of Dr. Schoen, brought to our attention the pseudo- 
art talent of Wozniak and Wiegal, the Amos 
and Andy of the class. The course of our study 
seemed to culminate in the little extra-curricular 
dissertation on cleanliness, most especially dedi- 
cated to Messrs. Lennox and Peterson, by Dr. 
Schcen. 

In the chemistry laboratory the experimental 
inclinations of Camino and Scanlan and a few 
others afforded us all the sensations of men in the 
trenches, with one successive bombardment fol- 
lowed by another, and subsequent blasts of poison 
gas. The lives of every man in the company re- 
ceived a threat when Smentek showed a wanton 
disrespect for hydrogen. 

After several avenues for our social develop- 
ment had been opened up, our attention and in- 
terest turned toward the establisment of a basket- 
ball team. After due deliberation and a short sea- 
son for tryouts Murphy, Scanlin, Tolpa, Lennox, 
Peterson, and Mase, through their proved ability- 



were qualified for the team. Considering the fact 

that this was the initial debut for our basketball 

team, we all feel reasonably justified in the pride 

we take in our team, and with the showing that 

it made. 

In Biology Dr. Bradshaw told the class that 

they were to catch some bugs for the study of the 

insects in the laboratory. Imagine some of the 

funny sights one could see: 

Dumanowski with a net in his hand catching 

butterflies. 

DeWolf sneaking along the weeds like an 

old Indian trying to catch a grasshopper on the 

trees. 

Tomaszewski putting honey on his mustache 

to attract the bees. 

Tolpa with his pipe smoking the old barns 
to get some beetles. 

Besides catching insects the class had to 

overhaul worms, crayfish and frogs, and were they 
"woppers." 

After the mid term exams the class decided 
to organize and through the wonderful choice of 
the class the officers of the class were elected: 

President Donald Crook 

Vice-President Lawrence Murphy 

Secretary Frank Wozniak 

Treasurer. . Edmund bcanlin 

Editor Rudolph Camino 

Artist William Starsiak 

Sergeant-at-Arms Norman Olson 

Intramural Manager Walter Wykhius 

After the election the class did not have 
many affairs because of the lack of funds. 1 he 
class was so small that it could not pay for a 
dance or any get-togethers, but at the latter part 
of the first semester the class had hopes for the 
future from the new February students. With 
such men as Graham, Pellettien, and others the 
class was made more successful and larger. As the 
second semester entered the class finally got Phy- 
sics. The Newton and Galileo of the class, Bole- 
wicz and Dzuibski, showed their skill in the 
lab by pulling their hair off in some of the ex- 



4 70 p 



PREDENT CLASS 



periments. One can still picture in one's mind the 
time Ulip spent a week trying to find the center 
of gravity of a meter stick. He started on a Tues- 
day and on Friday he was further behind than 
when he began. We all laughed at him but finally 
we all got stuck with the same one. 

Time finally passed and it wasn't long before 
we were studying for the final exams. After the 
exams we finally completed the first step in our 
climb to the top. We realized that it would be 
only a few months that we would enter the fresh- 
man class. On the last day of that first semester 
everyone was telling every one else what he was 
going to do in the summer and finally bidding each 
other goodbye 'til the next semester, we departed. 
Some took street cars east; some west; some took 
trains; some autos; and within a few minutes we 
were out of sight of the school and we could see 
each other smiling as we travelled on. 1 he mem- 
ories of our first year in school were pleasant even 
though the course had been hard. 



IMAGINE 

Ted Tolpa — without his pipe. 

Edward Ulip — without his hair combed 

Charles Kunik — six feet tall. 

Donald Crook — sweet sixteen. 

Lawrence Murphy — without his homework. 

Robert Abrams — early to lecture. 

Walter Wykhius — without his suit pressed. 

Joseph Smentek — with his revised dictionary. 

Casimer Tomaszewski — without a mustache. 

Leo Wasielewski — quiet. 

Frank Wozniak — without a wisecrack. 



table. 



busy. 



Robert Wiegel — as a girl. 

Casimer Bolewicz — wearing a cap. 

John Dziubski — without Bolewicz. 

Anthony Stulga — without his glasses. 

Norman Olson — four feet tall. 

William Starsiak — not present at plastic arts. 

Elmer Block — present at school every day. 

Robert Dewolf — not singing. 

William Mase — same. 

Maurice Ditkowsky — understanding the force 

Casimer Dumanowski — not in the library at 
i. 

Morton Esterman — cheating in a test. 
Benedict Lennox — not with Peterson. 
Charles Peterson — with blonde hair. 
George Meinig — taking the Biology practical. 
Edmund Scanlin — with all his time free — 

James Bara — being bashful. 
Maurice Brown — saying something in class. 
Henry Kahn — without a drag. 
Wilbur Schuessler — being noisy. 
Morton Gorchow — arguing in Ethics 
Dante Pellettieri — a poet. 
Gord Pollack — not arguing with someone. 
Wilbur Rose — as a singer. 
Louis Kramer — not sitting in the rear at an 
n. 

Joseph Zelko — an actor. 
Glen Heilemann — as an artist with wavy hair. 
Rudolph Camino — without his briefcase. 



N 71 )> 



P R E D E N T 

HEARD ON NEW YORK TRIP BY A PRE-DENT 

Bride: "Won't oos 'ittle umpsie dumpsie kiss 
oos 'ttle ootsie wootsie?" 

Mase (in next berth); "Won't those foreign- 
ers ever shut up and go to sleep." 



He bent over her and gazed at her wealth of 
golden hair; then at her eyes; which reminded him 
of twin pools beneath a southern sky, then at her 
ruby lips, which broadened into a smile disclosing 
two gleaming rows of perfect teeth, he bent still 
closer — why not? He was a dentist! 



Tomaszewski : "I'm growing a mustache on 
the installment plan." 

Tolpa: "How's that?" 

Tomaszewski: "A little down each week." 



H- 



"Co to father," she said 
When I asked her to wed 
And she knew that I knew 
That her father was dead. 
What a life he had led 1 
And she knew that I knew 
What she meant when she said 
"Co to father." 

V. K. 



CLASS 

DEFINITIONS OF SCHOOL TERMS 

'According to Pre- Dents) 

Ponies: Small bits of paper, inscribed with 
various interesting pieces of information which are 
capable of enraging the teacher to a degree far 
disproportionate to their size. Flunk preven- 
tives, the use of which is very liable to abuse. So 
called because of their close relation to ? (Note' 
This term is used exclusively all over the world 
in every college and university that exists. 

Stalls: Illustrations of the proverb "Hope 
springs eternal in the human breast." Experiments 
in a very difficult form of composition. Non- 
spoken voice of an answer to a question. (Note) 
Students who devote themselves earnestly to the 
development of this practice are permitted, as a 
special distinction, to have all their marks written 
in red. 

Lips: The most overworked part of the hu- 
man body. Their original and most important pur- 
pose was to convey ideas, but their main use for 
dental students is. for eating, whistling and sing- 
ing "Hey-nonny-nonny and a hot-cha-cha." 

Pre-Dent: An abysmally ignorant creature 
who enters college with the strange belief that a : 
college is to furnish a good time. This idea is 
usually lost by the time he becomes a senior. 



-4 72 M 






PREDENT CLASS 



Senior: An exalted being, the climax ot tive 
years of toil by the student, his parents, and his 
teachers. He endeavors to direct the activities of 
the school but is hampered considerably in this 
by his professors 

"A's": The rifts in clouds; high marks; al- 
ways given solely in reward for excellent scholar- 
ship, perfect attendance, and similar praise of 
worthy qualities. An element that is very rare. 

Flunks: The flies in the ointment; the thorns 
in the orange blossom, low marks which when 
given to other students are the just punishment 
for poor scholarship and negligence of work; when 
given to oneself however, they are based on unfair 
and un|ust discrimination. 



BANANA OIL 

Crook: "Yes, I walk to and from school every 
Jay. It's such good exercise ." 

Wozniak: "I wouldn't have been late if our 
:lock hadn't been slow." 

Wiegel: "Same here." 

Tolpa: "Yes, Mr. Lodeski, I'll have that 
heme for you on Monday." 

Pellettien: "Oh, I got an 'A' on that last 
heme." 

Ulip: "I know my chemistry exam cold, and 
'II get every question." 



Wykhius: "We won every game we played in 
the intramural tournament." 

Bolewicz: "Dzuibski and I got more Physics 
experiments than anyone else." 

Dziubski: "And howl" 

Graham: "It's too personal, boys." 

Lennox: "I don't think we will get an exam 
in Biology today." 

Peterson. "I know my Physics I do" 

Murphy: "I can make a hit with any nurse 
at the county." 

Kahn: "I got a drag with every one of my 
teachers." 

Ditkowsky: "I can go to the county and see 
an operation anytime I want." 

Esterman: "I got a suit for every day in the 
month." 



Professor Mahoney (after a lengthy explana- 
tion on the molecular theory of matter) : "And now 
are there any questions?" 

Wiegel (from rear): "What time is itr 1 " 



1 73 }£•■■ 



THE FOOTBALL TEAM 




THE BASEBALL TEAM 






THE BASKETBALL TEAM 






ATHLETICS 

A good many years ago, when rhe students of this 
college were not so sorely laden with academic and 
clinical requirements for graduation,; the athletic teams 
were well supported, and there were plenty of men 
out for the teams. Now, with classes from morning till 
night, and the clinic open the year around, the time 
to spend on some athietic field, or in a gymnasium, 
is practically unheard of. 

Baseball was never very popular,- however, football 
and basketball enjoyed great popularity. The condition 
at present seems quite the reverse for now we have 
no football team, and baseball and basketball enjoy 
the favor of the student body. 

The former teams played other medical and dental 
colleges here in the city, about forty schools in all, 
which provided unlimited opportunities for the teams 
to practice their physical prowess. 




i«£Ss3g5$Q^ 



INTRA-MURAL 
ASSOCIATION 

Since the abolishment of football as an inter- 
collegiate sport at Loyola a few years ago, much 
stress was placed on the Intra-Mural Athletics 
for the entire student body. Because of lack of 
convenient gymnasium facilities the West Cam- 
pus in past years had only a small representation 
in the various divisions of these sports. However, 
this year under the faculty moderation of Dr. Job 
and Dr. McNulty the gymnasium at the Profes- 
sional Y.M.C.A. was secured as the headquarters 
of the Medical and Dental athletes. 



DR. R. I. McNULTY 




\ 



NORTON 
West Side 
IMA. Mgr. 




HALMOS 
Sen. Mgr. 




-4 76 M 



INTRA- AA URAL 
ASSOCIATION 

The success of these inter-class athletics are 
lue entirely to the earnest endeavors of Joseph 
'Dode" Norton, who as general manager of the 
Vest Campus division was instrumental in the 
enting of the Y.M.C.A. as a place of recreation. 

At the Dental School Mr. Norton had as- 
istants in the various classes: Mr. George Holmes, 
>enior; Mr, Edward J. O'Reilly, Junior; Mr. Ed- 
vard Vonesh, Sophomore; Mr. Jacob Weiss, 
■reshman, and Lawrence Murphy, Pre-dental. 




DR. T. JOB 






CAM I NO 
Pre Dent. Mgr. 



WEISS 
Fresh. Mgr 



VONESCH 
Soph. Mgr. 



^77 




VARSITY 
BASKETBALL 

Using as a nucleus three members of last 
year's squad, Coach Len Sachs built a powerful 
quintet, which under the cool leadership of Cap- 
tain Don Cavanaugh won fifteen games out of 
twenty-one starts. Most of these losses occurred 
while the team was playing on foreign floors and 
under the usual adverse condition of a team on 
the road. Then too, they were going through a 
hard schedule against stiff opposition, which 
called for as many as four games in the same 
number of days. 



CAPTAIN CAVANAUGH 



VARSITY BASKETBALL TEAM 




■'■»]{ 78 }i«- - 



VARSITY 
BASKETBALL 

As leader of the '33 quintet, Captain "Don" 
Cavanaugh played his last season for Loyola. 
Cavanaugh has proved himself by his impreg- 
lab.'e defense tactics and his cool and calculat- 
ing leadership, a basketeer of the highest type 

Handicapped throughout the season by a 
lack of reserve strength the Ramblers laid down 
in impressive record and as a grand climax to the 
season whipped the University of Wisconsin team, 
39 to 23. 



BOB OHLENROTH 

Robert Ohlenroth was the only Dental School 
basketball player on the University Varsity this 
'ear. "Bob" was a forward on Le Sachs quintet 
vas his uncanny eye for the hoop swelled the total 
.core many a game this season. 

Against Michigan Ohlenroth was at his best 
;nd had his come-back in this fracas. Previous to 
his game Bib was on the sidelines for three games 
>wmg to a sprained ankle received in the final 
waiter of the Millikin game Ohlenroth is a Junior 
nd has one year of varsity competition left. He 
s regarded as one of the most promising candi- 
lafes for next year's teams. 




*/A. 



"4 79 &■• 




• 



LOYOLA UNIVERSITY (Chicago) BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 

1932-1933 

WON 14 — LOST 7 

1931-32 1932-33 

L.U. OPP. LU. OPP. 

__ Dec 14 — Davis and Elkms College at home 30 35 

__ Dec. 17 — University of Western Ontario at home 38 18 

30 14 Dec 19— Millikin at Decatur 31 24 

Dec 21 — St. Ambrose College at home 16 15 

27 22 Jan 2 — Centenary College at home 38 29 

36 30 Jan. 6— College of the City of Detroit at Detroit 30 19 

.. Jan 7 — St. John's University at Toledo, 35 15 

17 25 Jan 9 — Michigan State Normal at Ypsilanti 28 48 

32 23 Jan 14— Western State Teachers at home 38 27 

18 29 Jan, 21— Western State Teachers at Kalamazoo 22 34 

— Jan 27 — FAL of Mexico Oty at home 39 22 

__ Jan. 28 — Franklin College at home 33 28 

__ Feb 3 — University of Wisconsin at Madison 26 28 

29 26 Feb 6— Millikin at home 32 22 

_- Feb 10 — Illinois Wesleyan at Bloomington 21 28 

__ Feb. 9 — St. Ambrose College at Davenport 30 28 

— Feb. 16— Michigan State Normal at home 20 30 

33 19 Feb 18— College of the City of Detroit at home__ 30 16 
Feb. 25 — Monmouth College at home 35 17 

Mar. 4 — Illinois Wesleyan at home 22 33 

_. Mar 7 — Wisconsin at home 39 24 




REYNOLDS 



WESTSIDE 

BASKETBALL 

CHAMPS 



VULTURES 
FLASHES 



ALL NATIONS 
SENIOR BASKETBALL 











WESTSIDE 

BASKETBALL 

CHAMPS 




INTRA-MURAL BASKETBALL 

Because of the convenience of a playing 
floor, the Dental School was well represented in 
the intra-mural basketball league. 

Meeting every Monday and Friday evening 
in a schedule of games many of which were 
played against the teams of the medical school, 
the various class quintets provided genuine 
thrills to spectators. 

Nine teams were entered from the Dental 
School, the most outstanding being the Bush- 
whackers which was made up of Junior Dents. 
Playing a fast and smooth style the Bushwhack- 
ers won the West Division and continued into the 
Round Robin without a defeat. The first, last and 
only loss being suffered at the hands of the So- 
dality whom they met in the All-University Cham- 
pionship game at the Intra-mural Carnival. 



FRESHMAN TEAM 
PANTHERS 



PREDENT TEAM 
ROSENBERCS 




VARSITY BASKETBALL 

In one of the forward positions, the Dental 
School was well represented by Bob (Gunner) 
Ohlenroth. Although playing his first year with 
the varsity, the tall red-head clamped a regular 
berth, by virtue of his sterling floor work and un- 
erring accuracy in shooting baskets. However, 
the "Gunner" emulated the famous Charley Mur- 
phy by sacrificing the glamour of the box score 
to "feed" the ball to his teammates. 

Coupled as running mate with Ohlenroth 
was Eddie Connelly of last year's team whose 
"shots" under the basket recalled the days of 
"Jimmie Bremner." 

Jim Hagan played at guard in an invincible 
manner and contributed much to the team's scor- 
ing power. 

Made to order for Coach's Sachs system of 
play, Bill Motz, tall center, held a mortgage on 
the tip-off and ran away with the individual scor- 
ing honors. 




DICKTER TISCHLER 



BOWLERS 



FACULTY NO. 
SENIORS NO. 



FACULTY NO. 2 
SENIORS NO. 2 





TRICK 



RAMBALDI 



VARSITY SWIMMING TEAM 

Led by Captain Trick of the Dental School, 
the University swimming team passed through a 
very successful season winning most of its 
meets by good scores. 

Captain Trick's work in the 100-yard and 
200-yard free style events was noteworthy. He 
demonstrated equal prowess as anchor man in the 
medley relays. 



BOWLERS 



Rambaldi, also of the Dental School, placeu 
consistently in all of the meets as a versatile 
swmmer. 

His performances as lead-off man in the relays 
and backstroke events are showdowned only by 
his stellar performance as a point-winner in thf 
fancy diving events. 



SENIORS NO. 3 
JUNIORS NO 1 



JUNIORS NO 2 
FRESHMEN 




INDOOR BASEBALL 

Last year the All-University Indoor Base- 
ball Championship was won by the Dental School. 
The sophomore class of C.C.D.S. produced under 
the management of Edward Marcinkowski a well 
organized nine which struggled through a hard 
schedule of games on the west Campus to meet 
the much praised team on the West Campus 

Despite the advanced rating of the North 
Shore team they proved of little value as oppo- 
sition to the Sophomore Dents who handed the 
north siders a sound licking, winning the game 
by a margin of more than ten runs. This victory 
gave the Dental School the undisputed indoor 
baseball championship of Loyola University. 

Members of the victorious team receiving 
medal awards for their stellar work were Law- 
rence Faul, Bill Schwartz, David Klaper, Joseph 
Norton, Walter Lippold, Edward Smreczak, Robert 
Ohlenroth and Edward Marcincowski. 




SCHWARTZ SZYMANSKI 

OHLENROTH KLAPER 



INTRA-MURAL 
ATHLETICS 



PREDENT BASEBALL 
FRESHMAN BASEBALL 



SENIOR BOWLERS 
"PANHANDLERS 






WRESTLING 
AND BOXING 



WRESTLING AND BOXING 

The Dental School didn't fare so well in 
wrestling and boxing as it did a year ago when 
Melton Dickter won both the wrestling and box- 
ing championships in the light-heavy weight divi- 
sion. 

However, the teams representing the Den- 
tal School in these sports made a very good show- 
ing despite that lack of condition and training 
which was so evident in our men. Nevertheless, 
the two brothers. Noel and Harvey Workman, 
won their weight divisions championships by pin- 
ning their men with considerable ease. 

Because of schedule difficulties the hand- 
ball championships have not yet been awarded. 
The dental division in this pastime is very well 
represented by a good number of fine handball 
enthusiasts. 

Preparations are being made to retain the 
Tennis Doubles Championship at the Dental 
School, this honor was won last year by Milton 
Dickter and Joseph Tishler who breezed through 
the best competition the various departments of 
the University could produce. 



WRESTLERS 
VULTURES 



BOXERS 

HANDBALL 




PSI OMEGA HOUSE 




DELTA SIGMA 
DELTA HOUSE 



t 



FRATERNITIES 

After the first Chicago World's Fair this college 
assumed a position of prominence in dentistry, as the 
first dental college in the Mississippi Valley. In con- 
sequence of this fact a large majority of the student 
body were not residents of this city. It was then that 
fraternities and fraternity houses were much in vogue. 
These fraternity houses were on Ashland Boulevard, 
near Van Buren Street, in close proximity to the college. 
Time has executed great changes, for Chicago has 
become a mammoth city, and other dental schools 
in the middle west have been established. These two 
factors have done much to disturb the gregarious 
tendencies of student life connected with the Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery, Dental Department of 
Loyola University. 




Earl P. Boulger, D. D S , L, D. S. ; John P. Buckley, Ph. C, D. D, S.; 
Paul W Dawson, D D. S ; Henry Clupker, D. D. S. ; Thomas L. Grisa- 
,-nore. Ph. C , D D S . F A CD,; Gail M. Hambleton, B S ., D. D. S. ; 
Harold Hillenbrand, B S. D., D. D. S. ; William N. Holmes, D, D, S ; 
Gerald ) Hooper, D D . S. ; Frank W. Hyde, B A., D. D. S. ; Charles 
N. Johnson, M A, L D S., D. D.S.LLD,; Reginald H. Johnson, 
D. D. S. ; Wallace N Kirby. B. S, D D S. 



DELTA SIGMA DELTA 

BETA CHAPTER 

Founded at University of Michigan, 1883 

Established at 

Chicago College of Dental Surgery, 1885 

31 Active Chapters 

Thomas F. Alderson, Arthur N. Allan, Henry F. Baker, Marsha; 
Blume, -Senior Page; Henry L. Boris, Harry F. Ciocca, Law- 
rence Creadon (No portrait); Charles P. Danreiter, Elton J. 
Dening, Grand Master; Lawrence P. Faul (No poitarai); John 
1 Dcnelan.V ctor C Foster, Edward R. Frasz (No portrait), 
M Coggins, Gustav Gosicki, Junior Page; Charles 





DELTA SIGMA DELTA 

BETA CHAPTER 

Founded at University of Michigan, 1883 
Established at 

Chicago College of Dental Surgery, 1885 
31 Active Chapters 

Leslie Hofsteen, Alvm Jacobson, Leonard M. Kelly, Historian; Frank 
W. Klees (No portrait); Fred C. Kuttler, Worthy Master, Walter M. 
Lippold, Tyler; Sylvester S. Metcalf (No portrait); Ray A. Olech, Jerry 
Quinlan, John Phillips (No portrait); Robert K. Rike, Robert Rocke, 
Scribe; Ernest A. Rambaldi, Elmer E. Ronspiez, Merton B. Skinner, 
Hugo C. Smith (No portrait); Donald F, Stewart, Treasurer, John A. 
Stryker (No portrait); Anthony F. Vichick, Harvey R. Workman (No 
portrait); Noel Workman, Adolf Ziherle (No portrait). 



Rudolf Kronfeld, M. D, D. D. S ; Frank P. Lindner, D. D. S ; William 
H. C. Logan, M. S , M D , D. D S., F. A C. S L L D ■ William I. 
McNeil, D, D. S ; Robert W. McNulty, M. A, D. D. S; Harold 
Michener, D. D. S.; Agustus H. Mueller, M. S , D. D S ; George C. 
Pike, D. D. S-; Lewis A, Platts, M, S. D. D S ; Pliny C. Puterbaugh, 
M. D., D D. S. ; William P. Schoen, D. D. S. ; Paul W. Swanson, 
D. D S.; Warren Willman, B. S. M , D. D. S ; John R Watt, D. D. S 




|& 89 }§e.. 



lohn L, Kendall, BS. Ph.C, M D 
Rupert E Hall, D.DS 
Karl A Meyer, M D 




PSI OMEGA 

KAPPA CHAPTER 



Robert Allen, Chief Inquisitor. 

Leonard C Borland, Chief Interrogator 

John P, Brahm. 

Joseph Buckley, Chaplin. 

Chester Bukowski, Senator, 

William J. Cunningham. 

Joseph P. Coughlm 

Phillip Dunn, Treasurer. 



Founded at New York College of Dentistry, 1892 

Established at 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery, 1898 j 

39 Active Chapters 




-..^ 90 M 




Lon W Morrey, D.D.S. 
Elmer W. Schuessler, D.DS 
Max C Fra;ier, D D S. 



PS! OMEGA 

KAPPA CHAPTER 

ounded at New York College of Dentistry, 1892 

Established at 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery, 1898 

39 Active Chapters 



Wilder Bosworth (No portrait). 

Edgar F. Giles, (No portrait). 

George C. Fortelka. 

Clem Frey 

George A. Halmos. 

lames F. Keenan. 

Edward E Landeck, Inside Guardian. 

John McBride, Junior Grand Master. 

Edward S. Meyer, Secretary. 

Herman Nedved, Outside Guardian (No portrait). 

Raymond Neubarth, Editor. 

Edward J. O'Reilly, Grand Master 





[91}* 



Edgar David Coolidge. M.S. DDS 
Ralph H. Fouser, BS. DDS, M.D. 
Harold W Oppice. DDS 




XI PSI PHI 

LAAABDA CHAPTER 

Founded at University of Michigan, 1889 
Established at Chicago College of Dental Surgery, 
36 Active Chapters 



Henry J. Bekier, Editor. 

Chester E. Bromboz, Vice-President (No portrait). 

Albert H. Fyfe, Treasurer (No portrait). 

Wenceslaus Lipinski, Master of Ceremonies. 

Chester A. Lyznicki 

John Malanowski, Director. 

Stanley J. Parowski, Alternate. 





- *j{ 92 M 




Harr> B. Pinney, D.D.S. 
Corvin F. Stine, D.D.S. 
Elbert C. Pendletofi, DDS. 



XI PSI PHI 

LAMBDA CHAPTER 

Founded at University of Michigan, 1889 
stablished at Chicago College of Dental Surgery, 
36 Active Chapters 



John A. Pilut, Secretary. 
Zigismund A. Perlowski, Censor. 
Walter F. Schmidt, President. 
Carl J. Teresi. 
Anthony J. Varco. 





i 93 )§*- 



Twenty-two years ago, there was founded 
at CC.D.S. a fraternity for Jewish dental students. 
Four years later Alpha Chapter, Alpha Zeta Gam- 
ma secured a charter from the state of Illinois, 
and a national office was created. With this 
humble beginning, Alpha Zeta Gamma spread na- 
tionwide. Last year, however, it was decided to 




EMANUEL B FINK, PhD, M D 

ALPHA OMEGA 

ALPHA LAMBDA 
CHAPTER 



Allan J. Gerber, Chancellor, 

Leonard S. Klein. 

Sidney J. Kosner, Adjudant, Quaestor. 

Rubin Mitz. 

Irvin C. Neer, Editor. 





-4 94H 




ALPHA OMEGA 

ALPHA LAMBDA 
CHAPTER 



merge with Alpha Omega, whose ideals paralleled 
those of Alpha Zeta Gamma. The formal installa- 
tion of Alpha Lambda chapter took place October 
7, 1932, with all the present f raters as charter 
members. With the completion of all the details 
the chapter looks forward to the bright prospects 
now in view. 




Jerome Rubin. 

Charles Sklamberg, Quaestor. 

Emanuel Uditsky, Vice-Chancellc 

Harry Verne. 

Benjamin Wexler, Scribe. 





95 }§*••- 




David J. Ahner 
Arthur N. Allan 
Leonard C. Borland 
John P. Brahm 
Charles P. Cosgrove 
Charles P. Danreiter 
John J. Donelan 
Lester H. Heidorn 
Melvin F. Lossman 



BLUE KEY 

National Honorary Society 

Founded at University of Florida. 1924 

Established at 

Loyola University, 1926 



The Blue Key Honorary Society is a non-secret 
fraternal organization, established at this and other 
colleges throughout the nation to commemorate 
the accomplishments, social and academic, of the 
members of the faculty and the student body who 
have excelled in these attributes. 

The men who have most recently been ap- 
pointed to membership are; David J. Ahner, Arthur 
N Allan, Charles P Drnreiter, John J. Donelan, 
Lester H Heidcrn, Rudolf Kronfeld, Marshall W. 




-•*{ !)6 {> - 




BLUE KEY 

National Honorary Society 

Founded at University of Florida, 1924 

Established at 

Loyola University, 1926 

Milnarik, and Bernard Thiel, all of the senior class. 
Leonard C. Borland, Melvin F. Lossman, Edward J. 
O'Reilly, Robert Rocke, Donald F. Stewart, and 
Joseph A. Norton, of the junior class. Charles 
Cosgrove of the sophomore class. 

The old initiates are; John P. Brahm, Ray A. 
Olech, Robert K. Pike, and Hollis S. Powers. 



Mai shall T. Milnank 
)oseph A Norton 
Ray A. Olech 
Edward J. O'Reilly 
Robert K. Pike 
Merton B. Skinner 
Robert Rocke 
Donald F Stewart 
Bernard Thiel 



The members of the faculty who are members 
of Blue Key are; Earl P. Boulger, D.D.S., L.D.S.; 
Harold A. Hillenbrand, B.S.D., D.D.S.; Wallace N. 
Kirby, B.A., D.D.S.; Frank W. Hyde, B.A., D.D.S.; 
Frank J. Lodeski, B.S., MA.; and William P. 
Schoen, BSD.. D.D.S. 




•4. 97 )fr 



Albert A. Dahlberg. 
Phillip Faillo. 
Frank W Hyde. 
Bernard Jacobson. 




OMICRON KAPPA 
UPSILON 

PI CHAPTER 

Founded at Northwestern University, 1914 
Established at Chicago College of Dental Surgery, 1925 




HONORARY SOCIETY 

Upon the culmination of each school year, 
and on the eve of graduation, a small group of the 
graduating class is honored with membership in 
Omicron Kappa Upsilon, the Graduate Honorary- 
Society of the profession. This honor is considered 
a final tribute paid by the college in recognition of 
the conclusion of the school careers of these men 
worthy of special commendation. 




Robert J. Kotula. 
Wallace N. Kirby 
George E. Lemire. 
Otto B Schaller. 
Wallace W. Summeifield 



OMICRON KAPPA 
UPSILON 

PI CHAPTER 

Founded at Northwestern University, 1914 
Established at Chicago College of Dental Surgery, 1925 

HONORARY SOCIETY 

Pi Chapter at this college was founded in 
1925, and in the interim of time two hundred and 
forty-nine men have received this cardinal honor. 

The officers of the society are; Dr. W. H. C. 
Logan, Dr. W. I. McNiel, and Dr. P. C Puterbaugh. 

The new members are; Albert A. Dahlberg, 
Phillip S. Faillo, Frank W. Hyde, Bernard Jacob- 
son, Wallace M Kirby, Robert J Kotula, George L. 
Lemire, Otto B. Schaller, and Wallace W. Sum- 
merfield. 



fHE TALLY-HO 




CHICAGO LOOP 



FEATURE 

These street scenes convey to mind a general 
idea of how Chicago's traffic moved some fifty years 

ago. In fact, these pictures represent the manner and 
mode of transportation available to the student of 
that time, which he might use in going to and from 
the college. 

The tally - ho picture, taken on Ashland Boulevard, 
of a party of students about to leave the city for some 
far distant beer garden, perhaps all of two or three 
miles from the environs of the city. In reality this picture 
does not offer such a strange contrast to the manner 
in which the student of this day and age disposes of 

his leisure time. 



The photograph of the bicyclists, members of one 
of Chicago's many cycle clubs, is representative of a 
kind of vehicular diversion which en|oyed the favor 
of the student in those days. [Courtesy of Mr.J.E.Mead]. 

The last picture taken of the downtown loop char- 
acterizes the general appearance of that sector of the 
loop wherein the original college was located. 



Dents, Meds Asked To £ gj?? 1 '* 
Show Stiff Upper Lin fZ^cXft 



Nd^ , i W^&i^l^ DENT ! 



Outward, 

Shaw, 

All 






Defbv 



School Grc\ . V U * ~ rX 



A Hair Here: * 

TV- " 



WW* 







„ Dt ZoctViout - 



/« Ti 



Wo 



u ^p'r:± h ™y 3 



LOYOLA NEWS 




The Loyola News is the All-University publi- 
cation. It is issued weekly and is published by the 
students of the six departments of Loyola. 

Dental items of interest, the activities of the 
professors and Dent Spurts, comprise the weekly 
contribution to the Loyola News. 

Dent Spurts the official column of the Dental 
Department is edited by Mr. E, J. O'Rielly. This 
column serves as a voice of the students and also 
gives the latest information on what is new or 
who is news at this department. 



Dr McNULTY 
Moderator 




..<g{ 102 }3*~ 




TOP ROW: H. A. Hanneth, C R. Crane, H. ), Cornstein, L Kelly. 

2nd ROW: H. J. Bekeir, M, T. Hayes, L C Borland, J P Brahm, J. A Norton, H L Boris 

1st ROW: E. J O'Reilly, R Neubarth, E, Frasz, R Camino, J. J. Keenan, C, A Halmos. 



LOYOLA NEWS 



The feature writer on the paper from the 
Dental Department are: Edw. Frasz, James Keenan, 
and Henry Bekier, Lyle Filek handles the art 
assignments and sports. Two men from each class, 
cover their groups for any news that breaks. Faculty 
supervision of the news from the Dental Depart- 
ment is handled by Dr. R. W. McNulty. His sug- 
gestions and help has been of great value and ap- 
preciated by the members of this year's staff. 

Dental News has proven to be headline copy 
during the past year, and the front page story by 
Dental scribes attest to the value of Dental ac- 
tivities. 




J. A. NORTON 
Feature 
Editor 




-4 103 }»■• 




November, 1930 




Robert W. McNulty, MA, DDS., Editor-in-chief. 
John P. Brahm, Senior Editor. 

Robert Rocke, Junior Editor. 



THE BUR 



^cB\IR 



The Bur, our tri-annual periodical, edited by 
Dr. McNulty, fulfills one of the positive require- 
ments of the academic development of the stu- 
dents and alumni of this college. It does so by 
bringing to the notice those men associated with 
school' or profession the multifarious extracurricu- 
lar activities enacted within the domain of this 
college, which would otherwise pass unheeded. 




-4 104 M 




Henry L Boris, Sophomore Editor. 

C Riley Crane, Freshman Editor. 

Edward J. Scanlan, Predint Editor. 



THE BUR 



Problems of research, scientific treatises, and 
a chronicle of events for each of the classes are 
bound within the covers of this booklet. 



The editors for the senior, junior, sophomore, 
freshman, and predent classes are; John P. Brahm, 
Robert Rocke, Henry L. Boris, C. Riley Crane, and 
Edmund I Scanlan. 





m 105 ]£• 




C. N. JOHNSON 
SEMINAR 



DAVID J AHNER 



HARRY M VERNE HENRY J. BEKIER 



The C N Johnson Seminar is an extra cur- 
ricula activity. This organization was founded in 
1932 under the initiative of such men as Wallace 
Kirby and Albert Dalberg. The name of the organi- 
zation is derived from our much respected dean 
of students, Dr. C. N. Johnson, 

Membership in Seminar is limited to Junior 
and Senior students who are interested and de- 
sirous of attending and taking active part in the 
meeting of the group. Meetings are carried on as- 
nearly as possible like those of any well organized 
dental society. Parliamentary proceedings are ad- 
hered to in their strictest sense. All papers to be 
read must be submitted to the officer before being 
read. These articles must then be ratified by the 
officers as containing practical knowledge, cor- 
rectness in every detail, and of sufficient interest 
to warrant its reading. The speaker is open to 
questioning by his audience after he has delivered 
his address or read his paper. 




-4 106 }3- 



C. N. JOHNSON 
SEMINAR 

The officers for the 1932-1933 Seminar are: 
)avid Ahner, Harry Verne and Henry J. Bekier; 
he latter being the Junior Officer. 

Subjects of some of the years papers were: 

The group also conducted a series of review 
luizzes for the senior mid-term examinations. 
APICOECTOMY 
DRY SOCKET 
ELECTRO-STERILIZATION OF ROOT 

CANALS 
IMMEDIATE DENTURE 
MEDICAL DIATHERMY IN DENTISTRY 




C. N Johnson 



C. N. JOHNSON SEMINAR CROUP 





m 107 ^ - 




ROBERT W. McNULTY, M.A , D.D.S. 
Financial Advisor 



WARREN WILLMAN, B.S.M., D.D.S. 
Faculty Advisor 



LEONARD C. BORLAND, B.A. 
Editor-in-Chief 



THE DENTOS 

The editor, Len. Sorland, and the business 
manager, Joe Norton, devote the contents of these 
two pages to a recitation of thanks to those men, 
who through their prestige, counsel, or endeavor 
have assisted in the publishing of this book. 

To Dr. McNulty and Dr Willman, as faculty 
advisors. 

To Mr. Baechle, Manager of the college an- 
nual department, of the McCrath Engraving Cor- 
poration, and Mr Laudis. 





-««§( 108 }§•■■- 




STAFF: Robert W. Allen, Assistant Editor; Henry J. Bekier, Art Editor; Allan A Brewer, Makeup 
Editor (no portrait); Willis H. Cable, Alumni Editor (no portrait); Milton R Dickter, Photograph 
Editor; Lyle J. Filek, Junior Art Editor (no portrait); Louis A. Fredrich, Assistant; Edward R. Frasz, 
Assistant Business Manager; Edward R Marcincowski, Assistant Circulation Manager; Irvin C. Neer, 
Assistant Editor; Herman Nedved, Assistant Business Manager; Edward J. O'Reilly, Circulation Manager; 
Donald F. Stewart, Feature Editor. 



JOSEPH A. NORTON 
Business Manager 




THE DENTOS 

To Mr. Kallish of the Gibson Studio, the 
photographer. 

To the staff whose abilities and hearty co- 
operation have greatly facilitated production of 
this book. 

To the senior, junior, sophomore, freshman, 
and predent classes whose support unequivocally 
determined the success of this book. 

To these men, and to the classes, Len Bor- 
land and Joe Norton, extend their most cordial 
thanks. 




-4 109 }§*•- 



THE DENTICLE 

Volume 00 



Amalgam 

.Anniversary 

Number 




PUBLISHED BY THE CLASS OF 43 
THE MOUTH MECHANICS MECCA 

CITY OF PEORIA, STATE OF COMA 




DEDICATION 



To Castroc Nemus , M.D., MM.M., (Mule Driver and Muscle 
Man) whose great accomplishment in the harnessing of gas from 
gangrenous fourth molars has revolutionized our technique — if 
any — of gas anethesia for the painless extraction of fees. We gas 
you will all agree with us in thinking that such work shall not go 
unrewarded. Hence this dedication. 



Nemus has always been a goer in so far as professional activ- 
ities are concerned. He was one of the first to realize that gold 
inlays were more easily cemented in than were gold foils. But his 
father was perhaps a shining example for him. He wielded a plug- 
ger in the anterior cavities during the amalgam war. 

1 

1 

1 

'■ 
^ . _ j 



Ik in 




Ǥ{ 112 M 




4 113 fc - 




Training for the Big Derby 



n the Dental 
Derby, Mertes 

and Bekier Won 
By A Note 
[A Pocket Full] 



tfi}*^. 




Dream Daddy of 

Radio Fame. The 

Luke Is Against 

H im Though 



The "Daddy" of C. C. D. S. 



-»€f 114 ji 




tfUsJfc 



Chasing Elusive Telephone Numbers 



Buko" Lost His Pance. His 
ace Was Red But His Cravat 
Knot Hid His Shame 



The Gals All Love 
Him. It Is Said the 
Only Gal Who 
Didn't Faul Was 
Victoria Rea. 
Oh Sylvan 




Bukowski, After a 
Pantsectomy at Frames 



i 115 ►- 



WHO'S HOOEY 



U. Du Borus--A student living in the twentieth 
century. Won fame for his worthy contributions to 
the handshaking profession. 

Cussick— Stylist at the Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery. Member of handshaker fraternity. 

Bghouski — Perfected the art of borrowing at the 
age of one (pre-natal). It is said he has one great 
ambition, to live on borrowed time. 

Hell man (Hellmouse) — First student in history of 
school to believe and attempt to apply all that is 
told him by professors. It is said he has even been 
seen taking books home 

Fatimo — This man has given Notre Dame a close 
race for the point a minute championship. He can 
maul the patients and get by with it. (Editor's note) 
How, oh how do you do it. 

Malt — Famous paperweight champion of the school 
He has contributed greatly to the study of abrasions 
of the head. Better keep your nose out of range. 

Batty — This man was the inspiration for 'Peck's 
Bad Boy'. His most noteworthy achievement was the 
complete moving of White's furniture. (Editor's 
note) Wot a man 

Kike — Famous Russian bomb-maker, communist, an- 
archist, bolshevik and garlic eater. His. intellectual 
discussions of absolutely nothing have won him a 
place in this column. 

Maltese — Famous strong man of the school. An- 
chor man on the Vassar daisy chain for three years. 
Body by Casey. 

Sternboig — Won his mark thru his outstanding con- 
tributions in men's hats He has been contemplating 
constructing a handle for his own hat — guess what 
it will resemble. 

Solven— This man has perfected the a r > '■' loving 
in the small 'cmp'. His hair has been c. .v.ed for 
years by tho breeders of sheep. 

Beam — The recipient of the love given vent to in 
rhe small 'amp'. It has not been disclosed which end 
of the affair Ray is holding up, but we can't be ar- 
rested for thinking. 



Teeschler — First man in our institution of learn- 
ing who has needed a club to keep the women away. 
(Editor's note) Do you owe them money or are they 
nuts' 

Freedrick — Famous tamer of wild animals. He ac- 
tually brought a live buffalo to the junior-Senior 
dance. 

Beaker — Well known artist. Perfected the art cf 
drawing flies and inlay patterns. His most famous 
contribution to art is his criticism of 'After the Mar- 
riage.' 

Halterson — Product of Devil's Lake, North Dakota. 
'He was an artist was he, by cracky. Just tell him 
which section you are going to plow and he'll sharpen 
the plow accordingly.' 

Doowarack — This man has added his vast command 
of English to our limited vocabularies. 'Toot' is his 
most famous addition. He is now trying to leave the 
'b' out of bass, but he has not mastered it as yet. 
It seems his work bounces right back at him 

Keelvasser — Conducted an experiment last winter 
in using his ears as sails. He was propelled along so 
rapidly that he had difficulty in breathing. Spring 
is here and the experiment is halted until the cold 
wind doth again blow. 

Cootman — The original fan-tail dental student. His! 
feathers were the inspiration for the first feather i 
duster. 

Bendeneto — Better known as the 'Boy Broker.' He 
deals in anything from cement slabs to second hand 
cough drops We are told that his banana stand oc-1 
cupies most of his spare time. 

Dictter — Muscle man deluxe. Coached 'rasslin' at 
the Norwegian Old Folks Home to pay his contribu- 
tions to the home for point crazy seniors. 

Kelly — Defies any professor to come later than he. 
His average is eight mornings late out of six. Sell 
that damn car Wally. 

Olenrot — Famous basketeer of our acquaintance^ 
Easter baskets a specialty. He claims Motz wouldn't 
feed him the ball. Ever try cod fish balls Bobbie? 



-4 H6 






ACTIVITIES 



We are informed that Wesler and Schmidt are or- 
ganizing a club of bug hunters. These boys and their 
proteges plan to take long hikes in search of the 
elusive creatures this spring and summer. May we 
recommend searching Sylan's hair and Cresson's mus- 
tache. When Cerber shaved his off, six dead flies and 
a banana spider were found not to mention a pair 
of scissors that had disappeared from Klapper's sterile 
tray two years ago. 

Ciocca and Craig are sponsoring a shower for 
Sylvan and Rea in the boiler room of the Adams Hotel 
next week. All those attending are requested to 
wear masquerade costumes. The recipients of the 
shower are not included in this because no one can 
tell what they are anyway. 

We are requested to announce that the daily meet- 
ing of the punch board club has been postponed This 
club is composed of a group of fellows from all classes 
who punch boards for Weller's candy. Lasky sustained 
a sprained wrist reaching for candy out of the box 
Cosgrove won. Faul was fined ten days in the den- 
ture room for punching Agnes. 

A secret group of fellows known as 'The Alley 
Rats' has been organized in the school to apprehend 
those culprits who have been picking flowers on the 



campus A group was being formed some time ago 
to look into the cat business in the basement, but 
the maintenance took care of this by disposing of the 
cat. 

Last week a meeting of the handshaking fraternity 
was held in the 'Rat Room'. Grand Master Dvorack 
presented for trial a new type of hand oil which 
hardens the skin and enables quicker and more fre- 
quent action 

Dr. Pike has devised a new system for taking care 
of non-English speaking patients in the examination 
room He has added to his force Brahm for colored 
patients, Ashworth for Polish speaking, Jacobson for 
Italian, Neer for Swedish and Casey for deaf and 
dumb. 

A movement is now underway by Drs. MacBoyle 
and Linder to have the floor of the Crown and Bridge 
department covered with carpet or to make the fac- 
ings out of rubber. Easier yet, do away with the 
bridges. 

Professors Norton and Dunn are giving a lecture 
on 'how to grow hair, please tell us'. We'll be with 
you soon boys if we scratch our heads for points much 
longer Incidentally, shaving makes the hair grow 
thicker. 




■-* 117 fi~ 



THE DENTICLE 



It is the purpose of the DENTICLE staff to pres- 
ent in this brief discussion deplorable conditions in 
the clinic and remedies which we consider wholly in- 
adequate. 

The first condition which we wish to remedy is 
the untidy appearance of the lineup following in the 
wake of a popular demonstrator. We advocate the 
setting aside of a room in the building for drill duty 
so that students may be taught the proper formations. 
In place of guns each student will be presented with 
a mop to mop up leaky cuspidors along the march. 
In keeping with this militaristic procedure, we recom- 
mend that each student spend two hours sentmal duty 
every day at the sterilizer to prevent certain members 
from stealing the nickel plate from its surface 

Also, very deplorable is the lack of saliva ejectors. 
It is sometimes necessary for the student to wear 
rubber boots and a raincoat to protect himself from 
the flow of juice A case has been reported to us of 
a student who left his patient to make a payment 
and receive some foil After standing in line six 
months he was taken care of and promptly returned 
to his chair He was fortunate in arriving in the 
nick of time, for his patient was just going under 
for the third time It so happened that when the 
patient saw the bill she died anyway, so it would 
have made little difference. Our only salvation has 
been a third towel stuffed down the patient's throat, 
but a 52 '/; point fine in S S. White points has now 
taken even this mode of recourse from us 

There is one mirror in the X-ray room for 210 
students This would not be so bad if Sylvan and 
Bekier would take their turns, but they also take 
everybody else's We are told that around four 
o'clock the dandruff is so thick on the floor that 
passage is practically impossible. Our solution for 
this problem is to give each of these boys a bottle of 
Herpicide or shave their hair. 



Furthermore, we recommend the synchronization of 
cuspidor, lamp, and bracket table. If the lamp is 
placed so that the operator can see into the patients 
mouth, the cuspidor is between his legs, and the 
bracket table — Cod knows where. The cuspidor is 
then pulled into its proper position and the lamp 
modestly retires to the other side of the room while 
the bracket table swings around and knocks out your 
newly inserted silicates If the bracket table is tug- 
ged into place, the lamp will promptly dip into the 
cuspidor and be extinguished. 

The next great difficulty which we wish to dwell 
upon is the difficulty in getting a demonstrator to 
look at your work We recommend that Dickter be 
retained by the school at a nominal salary to teach 
the students wrestling holds with which a demonstrat- 
or may be held after he has finally been found We 
would publish a list of places where demonstrators 
might be found, but the detectives which we have 
retained can't find them either. We also wish the 
demonstrators would return as promptly at one 
o'clock as they check out at twelve 

One more thing before we sign off We recom- 
mend that the switchboard operator be sent to Eur- 
ope for a course in electrocution It's that or ou 
ears are folded over. We also advise the settin 
aside of a permanent fund for the purchase of coug 
drops for the same lady Whatever course is pur- 
sued, please keep Ewart away from the sending sta 
tion. The last time his melodious voice was heard 
seven dead rats were found in Kite's lunch pail. 

In conclusion we wish to state that we know these 
.ideas are all wet; but if you have any that are be 
ter, keep them to yourselves if you want to gradu 
ate. We can get away with this because we are 
supposed to be funny — but you just try it. 

P. S. — As this goes to press we have not been 
definitely notified as to whether Ewart or the garlic 
in Kite's lunch killed the rats 



-^llS}iV 



ADVERT 
BEAUTY SHOPPEA 

Eyebrows tcezcd 

She had never been kissed and then 
she used Blondex 

Ask for Sylvan 
Fone — Pansy oh oh 


ISEMENTS 

STIERNBERG & SKINNER j 

Men's Hats 

All the latest 1893 modes in our attic j 

We have our Spring hats in all 
shades of black 


: HANDCLASP 
1 EVENING SCHOOL 

Special courses in handshaking 

All the latest handclasps 

Be not left in the mire, join now and 
\ let your hands work for you 

Address all correspondence to 
Dean Boris 


DRS. NORTON & NEER 

Excretion Specialists 

Offices in all wet states 
Local branch — 12 So. Water St. 


j 

PATTI GOWN CO. 

(Encapsulated) 

Night gowns a specialty 

Guaranteed to fit like hell 
( Editor's note ) They do 


GUZICK CLOTHIERS 

Double chested suits 
(buttons extra) 
Smooth broach with every burlap 
' suit 

If you desire a suit like mine I will 
i pay you five dollars to wear it 

No other store sells clothes like 

mine 

(thank goodness) 


GOLDBIOG'S i 
FOOD DISPENSARY ; 

Everything to eat — also hamburgers 

Sandpaper to tickle the palate 
Standing room only 


SOS WHITE DENTAL 
DEPOT 

/ can of rentention to every student 

Automatic Bunglers Repaired 

We specialize in anatomy for any 

teeth 

Closing out our supply of barbed 

wire napkin holders 


BUSTUM DENTISTS 

Brainless Dentistry 

■ 

Fool's gold crowns 

Toothless plates 

1 



■<i 119 ]^- 



MISCELLANEOUS 
SNAPS 




5 Dr. Svoboda. Heidorn. and 9 Dr. Willman and twin Brother 
friends again. 



4 120 }*•- 



SHHURranfm 



SENIOR 

SNAPS 




JUNIOR 
SNAPS 







Nedved's lady friend 

Ziolkowski 

Hank and Wen. 

Gresens and wife 

Cerber making contact. 

The "Spurts" editor. 

Krysinski and Krysinski 

Gresens and the Mrs. 

Gresens and the twins. 

Miss X. 

Camino out for lunch. 

Lipinsk-i and sister. 

The Meyer Brothers. 

Nedved and friends a 

beach. 

When the seniors and juniors 

go camping for the summer. 



Vichick at the beach. 

Another one of Nedved's 

friends. 

Biestek. 

Dickter cleaning out his can 

Ziherle. 

Schmidt and his family. 

Looking for a passenger. 

Braun and Ciocca. 




■4 122 )§►•■- 



SOPHOMORE 
SNAPS 




1 Dubrow and his car. 

2 Korngoot, on a Sunday after- 
noon. 

3. The triad, Dubrow, Mr X., 
and Druck. 

4 Druck with his car. 



5. Mr. and Mrs. Bosworth. 

6. Rzeszotarski and his equine 
pal 

7. Kane, Altheim, Berenbaum, 
and Fox trying to make their 
escape. 

8. Dubrow at the derby. 




-«< 123 )§*•- 



FRESHMAN 
SNAPSHOTS 




Kruppa waiting for the bsl I- 

Mr. and Mrs. (?) 

Stott doing a little teaching. 

Schroeder of duty. 

Mr. Cornstein, well attended 

The dog is on the left. 

Cornstein, while a boy scout. 

Ogle, Longo, and Brownin, 

doing some second 

work. 

Vanlangdahan, in the 

without a spectator. 

10. Crane and Crane. 

1 1 . Ogle, Peffers, Johnson, Stro- 
hacker, Browning, and Longo 

12. Schroeder and squaw 



Mammen, Cornstein, Schroe- 
der, and Pitch. 

Sutker, Schroeder, Mammen, 
Rust, and Eggers. 
Schroeder's getting his nose 
wet again. 

Strohacker, Johnson, and Pef- 
fers 

Just a couple of mariners. 
Camino at the meet. 




-4 124 }> 



PREDENT 
SNAPS 



I20 HGHW 

UNION-GROVE 
STURDEVANT I 




1. Wasielewski. 

2 Dziubski. 

3. Dziubski. 

4. Dumanowski. 



ust two Pals. 
6 Fishing on the rocks. 
7. Mammen, Pitch and Schroeder 
of the freshman class. 




■■4 125 fc- 



m 




I 

D 
R 



...,,»:,- "JIM CLAIMS HElS COMING BACK TO TEACH? 
•..-;.••■ >.±i:-.'; "HE ALWAYS SAID HE'D TAKE A VACATION 
' '<^-' AFTER GRADUATION" 

v^V.l'-y,:.; 








"THAT'S THE MOST ^ 
LOYAL CAT ON THE § 
CAMPUS." ^ 

"YES. IT HAS PLED m 
GEO TO GIVE ITS 
NWE LIVE* TO THE 
COLLEGE." xvj 



•••*§{ 126 )§6-r 



■;&M%*^f*- f ''—''■■ " :, '- : - : ' >: ' '•#-• 



nirzvNAdfii tells • 

THE DEMONSTRATOR 
WHERE TO GET OFF. 




OLECH, C.C.D.S's CONTRIBUTION 

TO RADIO SAYS, "AN OPTIMIST A DA,L \ SCENE AT THE "■*«■ ENTRANCE. 

/5 A PERSON WHO THINKS '.j£§ ;,_ '^ 

77MT .ST-AT/C /5TH£ WOffST "* > ' t ! " V ; fffQttJ** 

TH/m THAT COMES OVER THE * ,'. f .t _■ ' • "- HlC i-^ 

RADIO. ' ■ ,, ,-, . 

-■■■■■ ...■,■■■- ■-.-■■ .->■ -.■■■■ ■■■■>♦■■■ r ■!--. m, .->■<■ 



1 127 ^ 




••••ef 128 






CO.& 








■ -*----.•■- , - -■■ -■■„•■■,.-. , ^' ^ -■■-- ^ — -" 



$ 129 ]3*- 





goes to 



^'fev Zen C. Bite. 
■■M\ ''£&jj; Modesty on 




this gentle- 



st to ob 

_tam this 

, gentleman's 

■photo- Rogue's 

^allcKy, howevei, 

lent us this one. 



.because our class possesses 
, more championship teams 
than any other class, we have 
decided to enter thir prize win- 
ning beauty team.. Fo'^ive us^- 

3^Prize 



Dreamy ayes- 
won this man, 
MMMebnan, 
iifih on this 
Champi«\*ip team 





7,U 

First Prize 



Gamuel 5. Soldfteid ^He 
says that the photograph 
doesn't do him justice.. 
Howevef, its mercy he neei*. 




Elly Eli Shim, 
has a Tli pmV^ 
Complexion & a 
continual Smile 
curled about his 
lips. 

HoNOMBLE 
MENTION 

. Bam Segal'. 
(*\ When -the 
"judge saw 
ixiS iowzltps; 
he ^usi couldn't 
Help giving 
2>a*v\ aplaee 
on,oui^'teao(. 



•••$ 130 £♦- 




-4 131 ji*-- 



Ats ) AfT^PT AT 



AllisHahon 




WtT?T THE. fitS i bftuSSc]) 
SopH- WILL WtAf^ 



-4f 132 )i- 



AT 







4 133 h 




CO&oor 




PLASric-ARTS 

oece££/ 



g^wiH ■- XT^ 





OG.PfcT£ DATING A M)&9£ 



WKtewrs concept 
oeuisevruae 



TW€OAlLYGX€Gase 

TOTWepWYSlCSLAfc. 




AftAftESPGCIMGNOf 

xlass iwsec?A 




T9£nfiST0AVfNC.C,D.S. 



p^weiNGFoaTHeexftns. 



■■•*{ 134 $§ 




Mem- TIME AFTER^II^ST 

r - — - _^ ,1>AY (W Art ATOMY- — ■• -^, ,, 

iiflNNE-rr Refuses tq sujscribeI a-^ o 

JoRjJeWTOS. TEU-S SAD S/1D STSR/q^ ^- ^ ^ V 

8>out- Wl^E AND KlP5: F^" c ' Frc^ s -^~rh ^° V ^ cS^ <^ 




■<i 135 ]§►- 



ADVERTISING 

Twenty one years ago when the cry was first heard, 
about the college, for an annual answering the des- 
cription of The Dentos, the dental supply houses 
through their patronage made possible the pub- 
lication of the first Dentos. 

Since that time other denial manufacturers, and 

proprietors of businesses supplying student necess- 
ties, have added their support, guaranteeing the 

success of each succeeding Dentos. 

It is to these concerns who have subscribed to 
this year's advertising section that we extend our most 
sincere appreciation. 



PROSPECTIVE 
DENTAL STUDENTS 



Loyola University College of Arts and Sciences offers a pre- 
dental year of especial interest to prospective dental students. 
The work is given part in the downtown college, 28 North 
Franklin Street, and part in the dental building, the Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery. 

In addition to the required subjects the course offers work 
of a dental nature which will enable the student to enter the 
four-year dental course with thirty-two semester hours of 
college credit. 



The Next Session Will Open 
October 4, 1933 



<^vp^> 



FOR PARTICULARS ADDRESS 

THE REGISTRAR 

CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

DENTAL DEPARTMENT OF 

LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 

1747 WEST HARRISON STREET 
CHICACO, ILL. 



■4 138 ]j- 



THEKE IS NO kttej_ 
ADVICE THAN THIS 
FOK«^/GRADUAT€S 



IT is generally agreed that only a 
small minority of the population 
avails itself of the services of the 
dental profession. 

However, it is a well known fact 
that people are becoming more and 
more dental-minded now that they 
are beginning to appreciate the great 
value of modern dental service to 
their health and happiness. 

Consider, then, what a wonderful 
opportunity is offered to you dental 
graduates who are beginning practice 
just as this demand for dental service 
is gaining momentum! 

By establishing yourselves in the 
right locations and equipping your 
offices with new Ritter equipment 
which will enable you to take full 
advantage of your skill and profes- 
sional knowledge, you will be pre- 
pared to meet this growing demand 
for high grade dental service. 

Let the Ritter Architectural De- 
partment help plan your office. Begin 
right .. .buy Ritter! Ritter Dental 
Manufacturing Company, Incor- 
porated, Rochester, New York. 




BUY KITTER 



-<{ 139 j*- 





nvestment- 



Tidati Expense 



A, 



lpproaching the purchase of equipment with the 
thought that it is merely a compulsory expense, to be 
minimized by buying as cheaply as possible, would be 
equivalent to bargaining for a low-priced college course 
with the sole idea of saving money. 

Both the college course and the equipment are invest- 
ments, both should have capital value, both will return 
dividends in proportion to their quality and complete- 
ness. 

S. S. White Equipment is made and sold on this 
basis — on the premise that nothing can be too good as a 
dentist's investment. If he buy real estate, it should be 
good, if he buy bonds they should be sound, in any in- 
vestment he should look for permanency of value and 
adequate return — his equipment certainly should be a 
high-grade investment. 

Furthermore, the office and the operatory are the 
dentist's daytime home — they should be conveniently 
and adequately equipped for his comfort and efficiency 
and as an inspiration for his best effort. From the 
patient's point of view the dental office should be in- 
viting and reassuring; it should proclaim up-to-date, 
competent, and reliable service. 

S. S. White Equipment lends itself to the perfection 
of these ideals. Office planning service furnished by the 
S. S. White Company and by the dealers who sell S. S. 
White Equipment, and the liberal terms of purchase 
enable the dentist to make his investment in equipment 
highly satisfactory in every consideration. 



CO-OPERATING WITH THE DENTAL PROFESSION SIN 




-4 140 }y- 



A Dental Depot of Distinction 




THE PITTSFIELD BUILDING 

55 East Washington Street 

THE WORLD'S FINEST DENTAL DEPOT 

Twenty-first Floor 

Take Tower Elevators 



In artistic excellent and practical planning this 
depot we beiieve is unexcelled by any other com- 
mercial space of similar character in the world- 
Store Customer Service 

A customer's section in the store proper, with 
merchandise stock and salesmen exclusively de- 
voted to their service, insures prompt and courte- 
ous attention to all who visit the depot in person 

An Order Department 

Entirely removed from the customer's section, gives 
prompt and undivided attention to mail, phone and 
salesmen's orders, thus insuring their careful hand-' 
ling and facilitating delivery 

Complete Stocks of All Makes 

of dental merchandise in current demand includ- 
ing the largest retail stock of standard S. S White 
Products in America. 

Service to Graduates 

Graduates will be interested to know that a large 
force of salesmen in intimate contact with condi- 
tions in this section permits us to offer valuable 
information and advice regarding locations, the 
choosing of which is an important factor in assur- 
ing the success of a new practice. 

A very efficient and reliable office-planning serv- 
ice is also available without cost or obligation to 
buy. 



Phone Central 0981 for appointment or ca! 
in person at your convenience 

ASK FOR EQUIPMENT DEPARTMENT 



The S. S. White Dental Mfg Co. 

55 East Washington St., Cor. Wabash Ave. 
CHICACO 



*4 141 ]§*••• 



START RIGHT WITH RITTER 




<J and patient confidence that Ritter 
Equipment brings. 

No need to handicap yourself with 
equipment with which you will never be 
satisfied. Now you can buy the finest equip- 
ment Ritter has ever made at the lowest 
prices in ten years — and take thirty-six 
months to pay. 

In modern design (in any one of the six 



smart finishes) Ritter Equipment conveys 
the impression of advanced methods, of 
complete competence. 

Its ultra-efficient, time-saving features 
and built-in quality make Ritter the great- 
est dollar for dollar value in dental equip- 
ment. Remember that the equipment you 
buy must provide years of satisfactory serv- 
ice and be modern and up to date for years 
to come. Start off right with Ritter. 



C. L Frame Dental Supply Company 



5 South Wabash Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 



■4. 142 ^ 



The Best Equipment is the Cheapest 

in the End 



After a quarter of a century of equipping dental 
offices there is one fact that stands out in our 
experience. The Best Equipment is the most 
economical in the long run Ask the dentist who 
bought New Ritter Equipment five, ten or even 
twenty years ago, and he will tell you that it func- 
tions just about as well today as when he bought 
it and with practically no upkeep cost in the 
meantime. 

Ritter equipment is built to last a dental life- 
time — and does. The man who buys it insures 
himself against embarrassing break-downs and 
costly delays at critical moments. No matter how 
cheaply an outfit has been bought it is false econ- 
omy if the buyer finds it necessary to replace it 
a short time after its purchase. 

Spread over the period of its use, the cost of 
Ritter equipment is a minor factor when compared 
to rent or laboratory bills. As a matter of fact, 
the expense is little more than that for telephone 
or laundry service, and yet there is nothing, ex- 
cept a dentist's personality or skill which is apt 
to contribute more to his success. Ritter equip- 
ment enhances the operators skill. It beautifies 
his environment and makes his "daytime home'' 



^P 



a happier and more pleasant place to work. Ritter 
users take just pride in their offices and right- 
fully so as no finer or more efficient equipment 
can be bought at any price. 

The cost of new Ritter equipment is no higher 
than any other make of comparable quality, but 
for those who feel that their location or financial 
resources do not warrant the purchase of new 
goods, we can usually supply second hand or re- 
built Ritter Equipment at attractive prices. 
Whether your budget calls for an investment of 
three hundred or three thousand dollars, it will 
be to your advantage to consult with us 

We will be happy to help you find a location 
or assist you with any of the details connected 
with establishing an office, no matter where you 
purchase your equipment. 

Our future is largely dependent upon the ability 
of our customers to buy teeth, gold, alloy and other 
consumable supplies. Naturally, we are much more 
interested in your success than a concern whose 
sole object is to sell you equipment. Any estab- 
lished dentist will fell you that other things being- 
equal, it will pay you to purchase from the company 
that you will look to for your daily requirements. 



^ 



C. L. Frame Dental Supply Company 



Sole Distributors of Ritter Equipment 
in the Chicago Area. 



17th Floor Mailers Bldg. 



5 S. Wabash, Chicago 



•<i 143 fr 



New Improved 
STANDARD EQUIPMENT' 
made by HARVARD 

"Designed to meet all Dental requirements" 



Some of the exclusive 
"HARVARD" features are:— 



CHILD'S SEAT 
ROTATION AT FLOOR 



SELF-ADJUSTING 

BACK CUSHIONS 




Peerless Harvard Chair 



Harvard Dental Cabinets have always kept pace with 
the progress of the profession. Sanitation is rightly 
receiving much attention, and this point has had 
special consideration in both the design and manufac- 
ture of Harvard Cabinets. To that end all Harvard 
Cabinets are made dustproof in construction without 
any extra charge. Instrument drawers being equipped 
with glass trays Made in many different styles. 

HARVARD CABINET MODEL NO. 500 

Price Mahogany Finish 

Eastern Zone Western Zone 

$150.00 $170.00 

For any color duco finish add $25.00. 



The New Improved "Standard'' 

Peerless Harvard Chair 



During the forty years of building 
"Standard" Dental Chairs, Harvard 
has always been foremost in meeting 
the needs of the profession and 
Harvard leadership has again been 
demonstrated in the further devel- 
opment of various new features de- 
signed to make the new Peerless of 
still greater value. 

Price Mahogany or Black Chromium 
Plated 

Eastern Zone Western Zone 

$275.00 $305.00 

For any color duco finish add $40.00 



Chicago Representative 




Model No 500 



H. U. Gallagher, 37 So. Wabash Ave., Chicago 






■<{ 1-14 M 



The Harvard 'Standard Efficiency" Unit 

is unsurpassed 

The Greatest "Standard" Equipment Value Ever Offered to the Profession. 

Beauty — Efficiency — Durability. 

No other equipment offers so much with such econ- 

It is in every sense a complete operating equipment 
offering you those essentials which permit you to carry on 
your daily operative work easily, efficiently and profitably 
and with less resulting fatigue 

Designed and built by an organization that devotes its 
entire efforts to producing 
quality dental equipment, the 
Harvard Unit is a 'thoroughly 
practical outfit that will reflect 
itself directly in your operative 
technique and your remunera- 
tion 

The beauty of design and 
complete harmony of the Unit, with the distinctive hand- 
rubbed satin-like finish, gives an impression of character and 
dignity that is sure to attract the instant appreciation of 
your patients. 

HARVARD "STANDARD EFFICIENCY" UNIT 
Model A-3 Includes: 
Electric engine complete with controller and all cord arm 
Fountain cuspidor with saliva ejector and sanitary drink- 
ing glass stand. 
v _ ,_ Combination spray and tumbler heater "four-heat con- 

Mignest |B rM fro |" w ; tn two a t mizers an d auxiliary table, 

standard |i i 

| n H ' ■ Bunsen burner, 

FFFICIFNirY * *8 Valves for all air instruments 

DURABILITY 
BEAUTY 



Model A-3 Unit 
Harvard "Standard'' Efficiency Unit Unsurpassed 

The beauty of design and complete harmony of the 
Unit, with the distinctive hand-rubbed satin-like finish, gives 
an impression of character and dignity that is sure to at- 
tract the appreciation of your patients 

EASTERN WESTERN 
ZONE ZONE 

Mahogany or black chromium plate $350 00 $380 00 

For any color duco, chromium 40.00 40.00 

Adapter arm for cluster light add 10.00 10.00 

Mouth Examination and Trans-illuminating 

lamp with transformer add 25 00 25.00 

Harvard Air Cut-Off add 8.50 8 50 

Hot Air Syringe add 22.00 22.00 

Harvard Cabinet Model No. 600A 
Price Mahogany Finish 
EASTERN ZONE WESTERN ZONE 

$235.00 $260.00 Harvard Cabinet Model No. 600A 

For any color duco finish add $25.00. 

THE HARVARD CO., CANTON, OHIO 
Manufacturers of Chairs, Cabinets, Units, Engines and other dental equipment 

For Sale by Harry U. Gallagher, 3 7 So. Wabash Av e., Chicago, III 





■>4 145 ►- 



REPUTATION 



EXPERIENCED DENTISTS 

Know that the best is 
cheapest in the long 
run. That is why they 
specify Dee Gold. 



THOMAS J. 

DEE & CQ 

Precious Metals" 

55 EAST WASHINGTON ST., CHICAGO 




SELECTED AND GUARANTEED 



COAL 



COKE 



ONE TON OR A CARLOAD 
for • 
HOMES, APARTMENTS, HOTELS AND INDUSTRIES 



Western Fuel Company 

MAIN YARD: 2623 W. ADAMS STREET 
TELEPHONE VAN BUREN 4411 



•4 146 )§►.- 



^Wifflff 1 ^ 



,|IGttT€QUIPmcnT 



iSm^jr^ 



It is good sound professional and business 
sense to start your dental career knowing 
that you have not wasted any of your 
time or money on equipment of doubtful 
practice-building value. The dental cabi- 
net too, should have your most careful con- 
sideration, and for many good professional 
reasons, should be the best you can afford. 

Of course — it should be an 
American Dental Cabinet, as 80% 
of all dental cabinets in use are 
American Dental Cabinets. 

Can 48,000 dentists be wrong? 

Ttt€flm€RicflnaBin€rd 

"mo Rivers, UJ is, 




GREAT LAKES 

Linen Supply Company 

llllllllllllllllllllllllllll!l!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli:illlllllllllll!ll!!l!lllllll!l!lllllllll!!lllill^ 



We Specialize in 
COMPLETE RENTAL SERVICE 

on 
TOWELS, COATS AND GOWNS 

for the 
DENTAL PROFESSION 



Telephone 
BOULEVARD 6300 



Plant 
36th AND PARNELL AVENUE 



<i 147 }£*•- 



Courtesy of 


Next To Home This Is The Best 


Mike Bauer Dental 


Place to Eat 


Laboratory 


+ 


* 

Accuracy 


Restaurant 


and 




Personal Service 
+ 


Mrs. Degen 


Room 1504 


+ 


159 N. STATE STREET 




Chicago 






500 S. LINCOLN ST 


Phone Dearborn 3455 
Phone Dearborn 8403 


Phone Seeley 9721 




Phone Kedzie 3186 


DUDLEY'S 


Phone Kedzie 3)87 


• 

Cafeteria 


George Erhardt & Sons 

Incorporated 


1 


Contractors for 


■** 


PAINTING. DECORATING, WOOD 


< ; 


FINISHING and LACQUERING 


The food is as good as can 
! be bought — 


'«>=«: 


■i 

I The service as clean and 

quick as human hands can 

make it — 


SPRAY PAINTING OF ALL KINDS 
Industrial, Commercial and Residential 
Furniture Finishing of all Description 


The prices are as lew as are 
consistent with highest qual- 


^«>« 


ity. 


3123 W. LAKE STREET 









-•■•§( 148 p- 



Outstanding Facilities 

for 

LARGE OR SMALL 
SOCIAL GATHERINGS 

Menu suggestions gladly submitted for 

dinners, dances, banquets, 

luncheons, etc. 



Knickerbocker 
Hotel 

Walton Place East of Michigan 

Fhone Superior 4254 



Phone Seeley 9329 



A Clean, Nutritious Meal 



German-American 
Restaurant 



Mrs. Anna Ognar, Prop. 



FAST, COURTEOUS SERVICE 



30c — Special Dinner Daily — 25c 



We Specialize in Serving 
Dental Students 



1834 W. VAN BUREN STREET 



A CDX DENTAL X-RAY 
UNIT — you will need one in 
your new office 

Leaders in the dental 
profession have their own 
X-ray units. They find 
that making; their own 
radiographs enables them 
to spend their time more 
profitably and speei 
their work with greater 
efficiency and accuracy. 
The fact that many of 
these leaders have chosen 
the CDX Dental X-Ray 
Unit evidences its superitv. 

The CDX Dental X-Ray Unit 
hangs suspended from the wall. 
It is 100 per cent electrically safe. 
You and your patient can touch 
the CDX while in operation with- 
out any danger of shock. 

And owni 'g a CDX is not an expense. A 
liberal monthly payment plan will enable you 
to pay each monthly insallment from the re- 
venues derived and still have a profit. In 
starting out you cannot afford to be without 
this important tool of your profession. Write 
for full information. 

GENEEAL 9 ELECTMC 
X-EAY CORPORATION 




2012 Jackson Boulevard 

FORMERLY VtCI • > it 



Chicago, IU..U.S. A. 

X-RAY COKPOHATION 



A SOCIAL AND RECREATIONAL 
CENTER FOR STUDENTS 

•§•+ 

WEST SIDE PROFESSIONAL 
SCHOOLS 



<^TF V ' 



Y. M. C. A. 



West Congress Street 






^(149J*- 



Compliments 

of 

A Friend 



Miss J. Wittmann 



NOTARY PUBLIC 



LIBRARIAN 

CHICAGO COLLEGE OF 

DENTAL SURGERY 



1747 W. Harrison St. 



Leo A. Schueneman's 
BILLARDS -BOWLING I 



5 Prominent Locations 



•:-♦ 



WEST TOWN 

324 So. Ashland Blvd. 

Phone Seeley 951 1 

LAKE VIEW 
3239 N. Clark St. 



LOGAN SQUARE 
2552 Milwaukee Ave 



UPTOWN 
103 Bryn Mawr Ave. 



PORTAGE PARK 
4421 Milwaukee Ave. 



•4150)3-- 






For Dental Models Come to Headquarters 



J In grateful acknowledgement of the 
s 

J generous patronage of the Chicago 

I College of Dental Surgery. 



J. O. Pollack & Co 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 
7 West Madison Street 




Ivorine - Aluminal - Rubber - Stone - Plaster 

Over 500 Dcntoforms assure a model 

for almost every purpose 
Columbia Dental & X-Ray Corp. 

131 East 23rd Street New York, N Y. 



OUR POLICY AND PRICES 

Winning an Ever Crowing Circle 
of Patrons 

We Serve The Best Beer 

• 

PABST — ATLAS 
PRIMA 

Van - Ogden 

_ CUT- RATE CICAR STORE 

1804 OCDEN AVENUE 
Phone Seeley 1316 



The CONGRESS 

BARBER SHOP 



Successfully Catering to the 
Doctors and Students of this 
vicinity for the past four years 

» » 
In the Professional "Y" Building 
"Just Inside the Door" 

Charles E. Richardson, Prop. 



Barbers 



Chairs 



No 
Waiting 



-*f 151 ^- 



r~ ^— - , 



THE NOVOL FAMILY 
OF LOCAL ANESTHETICS 

Each member of this unusual family — the 
most complete family of local anesthetics 
and anesthetic specialties — has its place 
in the affections of the dental profession. 
There are bottle solution, Procame-Epine- 
phrin Tablets and Ampules for the non- 
cartridge user, Novampuls and Anestubes for 
the cartridge user; syringes . . . needles 
. . . etc. for all. 

Novampuls and Anestubes are the heads of 
the family, because they provide mechanically 
perfect cartridges, permitting an unbroken 
chain of sterile precautions Bottles, Am- 
pules, Novampuls and Anestubes contain the 
New Improved Novol 75 Anesthetic Solution 

Novocol Chemical 
Mfg., Co., Inc. 

2921-2923 Atlantic Ave. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Makers of Novol Products 

OAKLAND, Cal. TORONTO, Can. 

European Distributor 
Davis, Schottlander & Davis 



Headquarters for All 
DENTAL AND MEDICAL BOOKS 

used m the 

Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery 

We have the largest and most complete 

Stock to be Found Anywhere 

in This Country 

Wide Assortment of Notebooks, Blank- 
books, Loose-Leaf Covers and Fillers, 
Drawing Supplies, Fountain Pens and Inks, 
Brief Cases, Dissecting Sets, Laboratory 
Supplies. 

Speakman's 
Book Store 

Congress and Honore Streets 
(Next to YMCA Hotel) 



Individuality the mark of 
the successful dentist. - - - 

Your patients appreciate the 
individual touch. 



Lily Tulip Cup 
cV Specialty Co. 



317 No. Wells St. 



Sup. 3476 



Restaurant Par Excellance 

Student Luncheon our Specialty. 

We cater to Fraternity Dinners. 



Pure 


Swift 


Wholesome 


Courteous 


Delicious 


Satisfying 


Food 


Service 



The Koffee Den 



1739 Polk St. 



Seeley 9087 









■•«§{ 152 )S- 



Graduate Work 

! l!ll«lllllllllllll!!llllll!ll!!ll!lll!lll!!llllllllllllllllllllllllllll!!IIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!l!!:>i!:i!; 

Continue Your Dental Education 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM 

i . . at . . 

Loyola University 

| 

I The degree of Master of Dental Surgery is con- 

| ferred in the Chicago College of Dental Surgery through 

J the Graduate School of Loyola University. 

I 

J Graduate work in dental sciences are offered in the 

i Graduate School, 28 N. Franklin Street and in the Chi- 

cago College of Dental Surgery, 




Loyola University 
Chicago 



-4 153 }§<••- 



The student body and faculty of 
C. C. D. S. are cordially invited to 
visit our studios at any time. Here, 
at your disposal is one of the finest 
equipped studios in the country. 
Guaranteed workmanship at the 
current low prices. 



THE GIBSON STUDIOS 

Modern Portraiture 

58 EAST WASHINGTON STREET 
OPEN SUNDAYS 10 TO 4 CENTRAL 3982 

«*TJ?VJ 

EXCLUSIVE PHOTOGRAPHERS FOR THE 1933 DENTOS 






-4 154 )§►•- 



CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

DENTAL DEPARTMENT OF LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 
1747 West Harrison Street 

CHICAGO 

The Fiftieth Session Opens October 4th, 1933 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION IN THE 4-YEAR COURSE 

The educational requirements for matriculation are graduation from 
a high or other secondary school offering a four-year, fifteen-unit course 
of instruction approved or accredited by its State Department of Public 
Instruction, or like standardizing agency of equal rank and in addition 
thereto, thirty semester hours of college credit as follows: 

Chemistry 6 semester hours 

Biology or Zoology 6 semester hours 

English 6 semester hours 

Physics 6 semester hours or 1 unit of High School Physics 

The remaining semester hours to total the thirty are elective which 
should be selected with a view to their cultural influence or for their 
training in the field of manual dexterity. This work must be completed in 
a college offering courses approved by the North Central Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools or by a standardizing agency of equal rank. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION IN THE 3-YEAR COURSE 

Applicants presenting at least sixty semester hours of college work 
towards the B A or B. S. degree, including at least six semester hours of 
English, of biology, of zoology, of physics, of inorganic chemistry and three 
semester hours of organic chemistry may register in the first year of the 
dental course and complete requirements for the D.D.S. degree in three 
years. The second and third years of this course are of ten months each 
instead of eight months, as in the four-year course. 

Graduate Courses Offered in Selected Subjects 

ADDRESS REGISTRAR 

CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

DENTAL DEPARTMENT Of LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 



e{ 1 55 }t«" 



CRESCENT PRODUCTS 
A COMPLETE LINE OF DENTAL 
INSTRUMENTS AND SUPPLIES. 

ROOT CANAL OUTFITS OUR 
SPECIALTY. 



Crescent Dental 
Manufacturing Co. 

1839 So. Crawford Ave. 
Phone Lawndale 2923 



DRUGS 



SUNDRIES 



•5-5- 

We specialize in Student Lunches 

- Speedy — Courteous — Service - 

Where Cleanliness is Supreme. 



Fischer Pharmacy Co. j 

1820 Ogden Ave. 
Phone Seeley 5000 



Blue Island 
Specialty Co., Inc. 



Manufacturers of Bisco Burs, Instruments, 

Copper Bands, Impression Trays, Mounted 

Points and Orthodontic Materials 



BLUE ISLAND, ILL. 



COMPLIMENTS OF GOLDBERG'S 
RESTAURANTS 

WE STILL CATER TO OUR 
FRIENDS AT CCDS 

OUR NEW LOCATION 

Goldberg's 
Restaurant 

2019 W. Madison St. 






h|(156>- 




For the best results the individual require- 
ments of your cases may demand the appli- 
cation of the best features of two or more 
techniques. Study the illustration shown — 
notice that we have used an Akers' clasp, 
a Roach clasp and a bent wire clasp on the 



TWO 

Techniques 

or ONE? 



same case. Perhaps the shape and inclina- 
tion of the teeth in your next partial denture 
problem may require a similar solution. 

Send your work to a laboratory trained in 
all the modern techniques, and equipped to 
serve your needs whatever they may be. 



The Standard Laboratories of Chicago, Snc. 

185 N.Wabash Avenue Telephone Dearborn 6721 



To save money Shop at 



Login Brothers 

1814 West Harrison Street 
(Opposite Cook County Hospital I 



•5-J- 



Largest Selection of New and Slightly Used 
Dental Text Books 



Biggest Dental and Medical Bargain 
Book House 



When Patronizing 

OUR ADVERTISERS 

Please Mention 
The Dentos 






-4 157 Hh- 



ORGANIZATION 



ORGANIZATION IS AN ARRANGEMENT OF INTERDbPbNDENT 
PARTS, EACH HAVING A SPECIAL FUNCTION IN RELATION 
TO THE WHOLE ORGANIZATION REACHES ITS HIGHEST 
FORM WHEN IT ENCOURAGES THE GREATEST DEGREE OF 
INDIVIDUAL EXPRESSION TO ATTAIN THE ULTIMATE OF 
COLLECTIVE ACCOMPLISHMENT. THE PERFECT ORGANIZA- 
TION WORKS SMOOTHLY AND WITHOUT NOISE, BECAUSE 
FRICTION IS ABSENT. 



SERVICE 

McCRATH ENGRAVING CORPORATION EXTENDS ITS THANKS 
TO THE FACULTY AND THE STAFF OF NINETEEN THIRTY- 
THREE. WITHOUT THEIR CONFIDENGE IN US AND THEIR 
LOYAL CO-OPERATION AT ALL TIMES, THIS GOLDEN ANNI- 
VERSARY DENTOS WOULD HAVE BEEN LESS APPROPRIATE 
FOR THE OCCASION IT COMMEMORATES. 
CONCEIVED AND PRODUCED COMPLETE IN THE DEPART- 
MENTS OF McCRATH ENGRAVING CORPORATION CHICAGO, 
ILLINOIS. 






'Look Before You Leap" . . . 

See Earl Regarding New and Rebuilt Equipment 

Complete Outfits as Low as $200 

Underclassmen, It Would Be to Your Advantage 
to See Earl Before You Buy 




BEST OF LUCK TO YOU ALL 
Full display of all equipment at 

ALEXANDER CASSRIEL CO. 
207 So. Wabash 






■4 160 )*- 









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