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Full text of "Dentos"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/dentos1936unse 



THE DENTOS 



Charles L. Lang 



Henry Kahn 



Co-Editor 



Raymond Wiegel 
Business Manager 



THE 





TOS 



OF NINETEEN HUNDRED AND THIRTY-SIX 



CHICAGO COLLEGE of DENTAL SURGERY 
DENTAL SCHOOL of LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 




High-lights and shadows displaying the beauty of the new dental units and 
emphasizing as well the ease and comfort which such an arrangement affords 
both patient and operator. 



36 




On the scroll of martyrdom are inscribed the names of men who 
have given their lives to advance research to the position it now 
holds. Here at our school there has been established a dental 
research laboratory, complete in every detail and under the guidance 
of capable men, which provides a means of carrying on the work 
of these heroes that their efforts might not have been in vain. 

Inactive now and seemingly at rest in anticipation of another 
busy day, which has become a part of their new life at the dental 
clinic. 

These pictures of the clinic and research department were secured 
through the courtesy of Dr. Warren Willman. 




36 



rjmmmm 

rsmmmmmm 




To Edgar D. Coolidge, M.S., D.D.S. — Teacher, Scientist, 
Scholar, Friend — who, as Professor of Therapeutics, has given 
us a valuable part of our professional knowledge — who, as a 
scientist, has sought, investigated and reported many things 
of permanent worth to Dentistry — who, as a scholar has person- 
ally demonstrated the virtues of devotion to learning — who, 
as a friend has proved that the exactions of all of these activities 
are not incompatible to a genuine spirit of understanding and 
fellowship — this — the nineteen hundred and thirty-six edition 
nf the DKNTOS is sincerely dedicated. 

DEDICATION 



36 



FOREWORD 



THE PRESENT — To record these days as they happen — 
To set them down with all of their exasperating anxiety and pleasur- 
able rewards — To indicate some of the many experiences and friend- 
ships that are an integral part of college life — To chronicle, in short, 
a single year in the history of the Chicago College of Dental Surgery — 
These have been the ambitions of the editors. 

THE FUTURE — If, in years that come, some of you will 
find in this record passages that are productive of the pleasure 
of reminiscence, the savor of old friendships, the editors will consider 
their ambitions completely realized. 



CONTENTS 



Faculty 

Senior 

Junior 

Sophomore 

Freshman 

Predental 

Athletics 

Publications 

Organizations 

Advertisements 

Autographs 



36 






























FACULTY 




Imparting knowledge in 
the arts and sciences, the 
manipulation of waxes, 
burs, and discs, that den- 
tistry might pass to pos- 
terity. 





The administrative body of Loyola University is 
composed of two groups, the Administrative Council, 
and the Academic Council. The former, composed 
of leading Chicago business men, have as their duty 
to consult and advise the President of the University 
on all matters of business. The problems, which here- 
tofore were the responsibilities of the President, are now 
divided amongst the various 'committees. The Academic 
Council, whose duty it is to decide matters of policy 
concerning the various departments, is composed of 
the Regents and Deans of the various colleges. 

The commendable work of both groups has won the 
appreciation of the entire University. 



Samuel Knox Wilson, S. J. 
President 



ADMIN 





William H. G. Loga?* 
Dean of Faculty 



Charles X. Johnson 
Dean ot Students 



36 





Robert W. McNulty 
Registrar 



Pliny G. Puterbaugh 

Secretary of Faculty 



f R ATI O N 



The Chicago College of Dental Surgery, Dental 
School of Loyola University, has, in Samuel Knox Wilson, 
S. J. President of the University; William H. G. Logan, 
Dean of the Faculty; Charles N. Johnson, Dean of 
Students; Robert W. McNulty, Registrar; and Pliny 
G. Puterbaugh, Secretary of the Faculty, an adminis- 
trative board which has proved its ability by the ever- 
increasing popularity and distinction which this school 
is receiving. 

The new equipment, of which we are so justly proud, 
is the result of the efforts put forth by these men and 
members of the facultv. 



36 






Thomas L. Grisamore 



William I). Z< 



EDGAR D. COOLIDGE 

Professor of Therapeutics, Preventive Dentistry 
and Oral Hygiene; D. D. S., Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery; M. S., Xi Psi Phi." 



THOMAS L. GRISAMORE 

Professor of Orthodontia; Division of Dental 
Diagnosis, Orthodontia section; Ph. G., Valpar- 
aiso University; D. D. S., Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 



WILLIAM D. ZOETHOLT 

Professor of Physiology and Pharmacology; 
A.B., Hope College; Ph.D., University of Chicago; 
Sigma Xi. 



JOHN L. KENDALL 
Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy; Divi- 
sion of Laboratory Diagnosis; B.S., Valparaiso 
University; Ph.G., Valparaiso University; M.D., 
University of Kentucky; Psi Omega. 



EMANUEL B. FINK 
Professor of Pathology, Histology, and Bacteri- 
ology; Division of Laboratory and Physical 
Diagnosis; Ph.D., University of Chicago; M.D., 
Rush Medical College; Alpha Omega. 




Eman-uel B. F 



36 



.„-, 




Robert E. MacBoyle 




ROBERT E. MacBOYLE 

Professor of Crown and Bridge Work; Division 
of Dental Diagnosis, Crown and Fixed Bridge 
Work Section D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery. 

WILLIAM H. G. LOGAN 

Dean of the Faculty, Professor of Oral Surgery 
and Oral Pathology; Chairman of Division of 
Diagnosis; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; M.D., Chicago College of Medicine and 
Surgery; F.A.C.S.; M.S.; LL.D.; Delta Sigma 
Delta.' 

RUPERT E. HALL 

Professor of Artificial Denture Construction; 

Division of Dental Diagnosis; Full Denture 

Section; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 

Surgery; Psi Omega. 

PLINY G. PUTERBAUGH 

Secretary of the Faculty; Professor of Principles 
of Medicine, Associate Professor of Oral Surgery; 
Division of Oral Diagnosis, Exodontia, and 
Minor Oral Surgery Section; Superintendent of 
the Infirmary; M.D., Chicago College of Medicine 
and Surgery; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 

RUDOLF KRONFELD 

Professor of Dental Histo-Pathology; Director 
of the Department of Research; M.D., University 
of Vienna; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; B.S., Loyola University; Delta Sigma 
Delta. 





Rupert E. Hall 



Pliny G. Puterbaugh 



Rudolf Kronfeld 



36 



EARL P. BOULGER 

Assistant Professor of Radiology; Division of 
Oral Diagnosis, Radiographic and Therapeutic 
Section; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; L.D.S.; Delta Sigma Delta. 



ROBERT W. McNULTY 

Registrar; Assistant Professor of Ethics, Econo- 
mics, and Dental Anatomy; A.B., Hanover 
College; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; M.A., Lovola University; Delta Sigma 
Delta. 



ELBERT C. PENDLETON 

Assistant Professor of Artificial Denture Con- 
struction, Division of Dental Diagnosis, Full 
Denture Section; D.D.S., Chicago College of 
Dental Surgerv; M.D.S., Lovola University; 
Xi Psi Phi. 



THESLE T. JOB 

Professor of Anatomy; A.B., Simpson College; 
M.S., Iowa State University; Ph.D., Iowa State 
University. 



WILLIAM I. McNEIL 

Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry; Division of 
Dental Diagnosis, Removable Bridge Work 
Section; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 





Robert W. McNulty 





William I. McNeil 



36 




Elbert C. Pendei ton 




Charles N. Johnson 




George C. Pike 





Henry Glupker 



John F. Svoboda 



JOHN F. SVOBODA 
Instructor of Exodontia; D.D.S., Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery; Delta S'gma Dalta. 



HENRY GLUPKER 
Assistant Professor in Prosthetic Dentistry, 
D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; 
B.S., Loyola University; Delta Sigma Delta. 



CHARLES N. JOHNSON 
Dean of Students; Professor of Operative Den- 
tistry; Division of Diagnosis, Operative Dentistry 
Section; L.D.S., Royal College of Dental Surgery; 
D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; 
M.A., Lake Forest University; M.D.S., LL.D.; 
Delta Sigma Delta. 



WARREN WILLMAN 

Assistant Professor in Operative Dentistry; 
D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; 
M.S., Loyola University; Delta Sigma Delta. 



GEORGE C. PIKE 

Assistant Professor of Exodontia; D.D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Delta Sigma 
Delta. 



36 






Karl A. Meyer 



Frank P. Lindner 



John R. Watt 



KARL A. MEYER 

Associate Professor of Surgery; M.D., Illinois 
College of Medicine; Psi Omega. 



FRANK P. LINDNER 

Instructor in Crown and Bridge Work; D.D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Delta Sigma 
Delta. 



JOHN R. WATT 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Prosthetic 
Dentistry; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 



HAROLD W. OPPICE 

Assistant Professor of Crown and Fixed Bridge 
Work; Division of Dental Diagnosis, Crown and 
Fixed Bridge Work Section; D.D.S., Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery; Xi Psi Phi. 



LON W. MORREY 

Lecturer on Oral Hygiene and Preventive 
Dentistry; D.D.S., Chicago College of^Dental 
Surgery; Psi Omega. 




Harold W. Oppice 




I. on \Y. Morrey 



36 




Wallace N. Kire 




WALLACE N. KIRBY 

Instructor of Seminar; B.S., University of 
Illinois; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 



AUGUSTUS H. MUELLER 

Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry; 
D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; 
M.S., Loyola University; Delta Sigma Delta. 



JOHN P. BUCKLEY 

Professor Emeritus of Materia Medica and 
Therapeutics; Ph.G., Valparaiso University; D. 
D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Delta 
Sigma Delta. 



HOWARD MICHENER 

Associate in Orthodontia; D.D.S., Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery; Trowel Fraternity; 
Delta Sigma Delta. 



CORVIN STINE 

Instructor in Children's Dentistry; D.D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Xi Psi Phi. 






John P. Buckley 



Howard Michener 



Corvin F. Stine 



36 



GERALD J. HOOPER 

Instructor in Operative Dentistry; D.D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Delta Sigma 
Delta. 



R. HAROLD JOHXSOX 

Assistant Professor of Crown and Bridge Work 
and Prosthetic Dentistry; D.D.S., Chicago Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 



PIATT M. ORLOPP 



Research Technician. 



MAX C. FRAZIER 



Instructor in Operative Dentistry; D.D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Psi Omega. 



PAUL T. DAWSOX 

Instructor in Operative Dentistry; D.D.S.. 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Delta Sigma 
Delta. 




R. Harold Johxsox 




Piatt M. Orlopi 




Max C. Frazier 



36 







Harry B. Pinney 



Frank J. Lodeski 



swanson 




-;r D. Warner 




William N. Holme 



PAUL W. SWANSON 

Instructor in Operative Dentistry; D.D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Delta Sigma 
Delta. 



FRANK J. LODESKI 

Instructor in Chemistry and English; B.S., 
Loyola University; ALA., Loyola University; 
Phi AIu Xi, Loyola University. 



HARRY B. PINNEY 

Assistant Professor of Exodontia and Minor 
Oral Surgery; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; Xi Psi Phi. 



LOZIER D. WARNER 

Assistant Professor of Bacteriology; Assistant 
in the Department of Research; B.A., Manchester 
College. 



WILLIAM N. HOLMES 

Instructor in Anatomy, and Prosthetic Dentis- 
try; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; 
Delta Sigma Delta. 



36 



M 





Harold Hillenbrand 



Frank W. Hyde 



\\ ILLIAM P. ScHOEX 



HAROLD HILLENBRAND 

Instructor in Physiology; B.S.D., Loyola 
University; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 



FRANK W. HYDE 

Instructor in Operative Dentistry and Dental 
Anatomy; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 



WILLIAM P. SCHOEN 

Instructor in Graphic and Plastic Arts; D.D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery; B.S., Loyola 
L niversity; Delta Sigma Delta. 



GAIL M. HAMBLETON 

Assistant Professor of Artificial Denture Con- 
struction; Division of Dental Diagnosis, Full 
Denture Section; B.S., D.D.S., Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 



LEWIS A. PLATTS 

Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry; 
D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; 
M.S.; Delta Sigma Delta. 




Lewis A. Platts 



36 



DWIGHT C. ATKINSON 

Instructor in Radiology; D.D.S., Marquette 
School of Dentistry, Delta Sigma Delta. 
(No Portrait) 



HENRY L. BORIS 

Instructor in Physcis; B.S., University of 
Illinois; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 



MAURINE WILLMAN 

Department of Research; B.A., University of 
Wisconsin. 



GRACE HOWELL GRANDSTAFF 
Clerk of Infirmary. 






Henry L. Boris 



Maurine Willman 



Grace Howell Grandstaff 



36 






Drue B. Prestly 



Florence MacDonald 



Lois D. Conger 



DRUE B. PRESTLY 
Clerk of Infirmary. 

FLORENCE MACDONALD 

Clerk of Infirmary. 

LOIS D. COXGER 

Department of Exodontia; R.X. 




ELEANOR M. FOWLER 
Switch Board Operator. 



Eleanor M. Fowlef 



No Portraits 

LAURA S. DICKINSON 

Secretary to Registrar 

JULIA WITTMAN 
Fiscal Clerk 



36 



Have a drink Warren? Thanks! 
Warren, don't mind if I do. — 
Too bad the Cubs lost, Doctor. — 
The faculty fashion plate. — 
Better get in the shade, Rudy. — 
Get in the game, Dr. Puterbaugh. 
— A couple of handshakers. — 
Two-gun Dawson. — Hey Ferrers, 
what are you dong there, this is 
the faculty section. — Easy meat 
these clay pigeons, huh! George? — 
Dawson and Kronfeld chewing 
the fat. — 




36 



SENIOR 




Achieving an end, reach- 
ing a goal, only to start 
on a more difficult and 
responsible climb; that of 
service to man. 



THE SENIOR CLASS 



The rumbling and grumbling of the ele- 
ments over Mount Olympia showed that the 
gods were in a state of agitation. Jupiter and 
all the other spirits of good omen found 
enough difficulty in maintaining peace at 
home to favor us mortals with their watchful 
attention and guidance. As a result, students 
from the various sections of the city, from the 
different states of the Union, Ah! even from 
one of the possessions, took refuge in the stately 
ageworn building at the corner of Wood and 
Harrison streets, the Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery. The unkindness and rude- 
ness of the world was quickly forgotten as 
mutual sympathies soothed new-found difficul- 
ties. Such were the circumstances under 
which the member of the class of 1936 started 
up the long, long trail of professional life. 



Each student, however, harbored the hope 
that with the completion of the struggles he 
would be rewarded with a fertile field, a calm, 
complacent, and prosperous world. 

Time passed. Rumors and threats of 
war, teetering on the verge of financial collapse. 
civil disorders in government, wreckage of 
dazed humanity, all these events occurring 
while from the sidelines, students gazed out 
in wonderment, gambling as to the state of the 
world when they would have to step out into 
its dangerous and swift moving current. 
About the fourth year, the storm began to 
break, the wind ceased its pitiful wailing, the 
hush of silence replaced the thunderous cannon- 
like roar, dark threatening clouds scurried 
across the skv. 




Thomas J. Campbell Mortimer B. Bauer Robert C. Murstig Edward F. Ste 



36 




Clark J. Mc Cooey 



Edward J. Kiwala Robert L. Stravb 



All took a breath and awaited the dubious 
outcome. Was it a break or a lull? The class 
of '36, snug in its feeling of good fellowship, 
peeped out on a dripping, bedraggled scene 
and with joyful optimism viewed nothing but 
bright prospects. 

Right they were! The tumult had ceased, 
conditions were better. One celestial guard- 
ian at a time withdrew from his family 
entanglements to lend a needed hand to the 
wants of mortals: gifts that were the object of 
the prayers of myriads of previous classes, 
now jealous but boastful alumni. Great 
blessings, new units, chairs, laboratories, were 



showered upon the favorite class of the gods. 
Patients were plentiful, the period of want and 
worry had disappeared. 

In one gigantic stroke of generosity, the 
god of donors smote the time-old stability of 
the point requirement and with knightly 
grace placed it on a silver platter within the 
reach of the humblest. Now as the world is 
once more surveyed, the sun is gleaming 
brightly from the rim of a friendly cloud. 
Everything is clear, fresh and abundant. 
The gods offer the class of '36 the best of 
prospects; reach out, classmates, and accept 
their bounty. 



36 




ADLER, LEO 

Calumet High School; Crane Junior College; University 
of Chicago; Lewis Institute; Loyola University; C. N. 
Johnson Seminar; Intramural Basketball, '32. 
Location, Chicago. 



CAMPBELL, THOMAS JOSEPH 

St. Ignatius High School; Crane Junior College; C. X. 
Johnson Seminar; Treasurer Sophomore Class; President 
Junior Class; President Senior Class; President Loyola 
Union; Dentos Staff '35; Intramural Basketball, Baseball. 
Location, Chicago. 



BAUER, MORTIMER B. 

Morgan Park Military Academy; Loyola University; 
C. X. Johnson Seminar; Vice-President Junior Class; 
Vice-President Senior Class; Intramural Baseball; Alpha 
Omega Fraternity, Chancellor. 
Location, Chicago. 



BERLIX, JOSEPH 

Crane Technical High School; Loyola University; C. X. 
Johnson Seminar. 
Location, Chicago. 



BULMASH, LOUIS 

John Marshall High School; Loyola University; C.X.John- 
son Seminar; Intramural Sports. 
Location, Chicago. 



COXIGLIO, MARTIX JOHX 

Austin High School; Loyola University; C. X. Johnson 
Seminar. 

Location, Chicaeo. 



COPALMAX. FRED 

Harrison High School; Crane Junior College; C. X. John- 
son Seminar; Intramural Sports; Alpha Omega Fraternity, 
Scribe. 

Location, Chicago. 



CRANE, RILEY 

York Community High School; Elmhurst, Illinois; 
Elmhurst College; C. X. Johnson Seminar; Loyola Xews 
'33; Class Editor Dentos '34; Class Editor Bur. Junior 
Class; Intramural Baseball '33; Delta Sigma Delta. 
Location, St. Charles, Illinois. 




CZUB, EDMUND J. 

Weber High School; Loyola University; C. N. Johnson 
Seminar; Pi Delta Sigma Fraternity; Xi Psi Phi Fraternity. 
Location, Chicago. 



EBERLY, GLENN 

Bloom High School, Chicago Heights; Loyola University 
C. N. Johnson Seminar; Bowling League. 
Location, Chicago. 



DULLAGHAN, OWEN T. 

DePaul Academy; Loyola University; Baseball, Bowling 
League. 

Location, Chicago. 



EWALD, E. L. 

DePaul Academy; Loyola University; C. N. Johnson 
Seminar; Intramural Sports. 
Location, Chicago. 






^^^ S it! Ik 

Km L H m 




FAFINSKI, JOHN S. JR. 

Weber High School; Loyola Univer 
Seminar. 

Location, Chicago. 



FERGUSON, THEODORE R. 

C. N. Johnson Joliet Township High School; Y. AI. C. A. College; Loyola 

University; Delta Sigma Delta Fraternity. 
Location, Chicago. 



FAIRMAN, JOHN H, 

St. Alel High School; Knox College; Lewis Institute; 
C. N. Johnson Seminar; Junior-Senior Prom Committee; 
Dentos Staff; Picnic Committee; Intramural Baseball. 
Location, Chicago. 



Melmore High School, Melmore, Ohii 
lege, Tiffin, Ohio. 

Location, Mansfield, Ohio. 



Heidelberg Col- 



36 



GOMBERG, JACK B. 

Carl Schurz High School; Loyola University; C. N. John- 
son Seminar; Intramural Baseball '33, '34, '35. 
Location, Chicago, 



GORCHOW, .MORTON 

Crane Technical High School; Lewis Institute; C. N. John- 
son Seminar; Alpha Omega Fraternity. 
Location, Chicago. 



GORNSTEIN, H. C. 

Bloom Township High School; Loyola University; C. X. 
Johnson Seminar; Freshman Class Editor; Freshman 
Loyola News Reporter; Basketball. 
Location, Chicago. 

IIKNSON, KENNETH J. 

Clinton Community High School, Clinton, Illinois; 
Loyola University; C. N. Johnson Seminar; Sports 
Editor Dentos '35; Student Instructor Ceramics '36; 
Dental School Basketball Team; Delta Sigma Delta 
Fraternity. 

Location, Chicago. 




HEYDANEK, EDWIN J. 

1; Loyola University 



Central Y. M. C. A. High Scl 
C. N. Johnson Seminar. 
Location, Chicago. 



JOHNSON. W. L. 

Port Huron High School, Port Huron, Michigan; Loyola 
University; C. N. Johnson Seminar; Delta Sigma Delta. 
Location, Chicago. 



HOLMES, HAROLD II. 

Stewardson District High School, Stewardson, Illinois 
James Millikin University; Eastern Illinois State Teacher 
College; C. N. Johnson Seminar; Basketball. 
Location, Chicago. 



KANEKO, VOS1IIO H. 

McKinley High School, Honolulu. Hawaii; Loyola Uni 
versity; C. N. Johnson Seminar; Senior Class Executivi 
Committee. 

Location, Honolulu, Hawaii. 



36 





KAPLAN, WILLIAM L. 

Harrison High School; Crane Junior College; C. X. John- 
son Seminar. 

Location, Chicago. 



KIMBLE, ROBERT W. 

Stryker High School, Stryker, Ohio; Loyola University; 
C. N. Johnson Seminar. 
Location, Defiance, Ohio. 



KITCHEN, JAMES A. 

Carl Schurz High School; Lewis Institute; C. N. Johnson 
Seminar. 

Location, Chicago. 



KIWALA, EDWARD 

DePaul Academy; Loyola University; C. N. Johnson 
Seminar; Class Artist; Baseball, Basketball; Pi Delta 
Sigma. 

Location, Chicago. 



KRUPA, MICHAEL SIMON 

Holy Trinity High School; Loyola University; C. N. 
Johnson Seminar; Intramural Baseball Champs '34; 
Bowling League; Pi Delta Sigma Fraternity; Psi Omega 
Fraternity. 

Location, Chicago. 

LARKIN, CLARENCE 

De LaSalle High School, Joliet, Illinois; St. Viator College; 
C. N. Johnson Seminar; Psi Omega Fraternity. 
Location, Joliet, Illinois. 

LEHMAN, KESTER G. 

Paris Illinois High School; Illinois Wesleyan University; 
Illinois State Normal University; James Millikin Uni- 
versity; Eastern State Teachers College; C. N. Johnson 
Seminar; Class Treasurer '35; Class Editor Bur; Delta 
Sigma Delta Fraternity; Kappa Phi Kappa Fraternity. 
Location, Illinois. 

LESTINA, JOSEPH M 

Austin High School; Loyola University; C. N. Johnson 
Seminar, Sergeant at Arms '36; Intramural Baseball and 
Basketball; Assistant Business Manager Dentos '35; 
Delta Sigma Delta Fraternity. 
Location, Oak Park, Illinois. 




36 



' 




LIEDMAN, SIDNEY CHARLES 
Lindblom High School; DePaul University; Armour 
Institute; C. N. Johnson Seminar; Sophomore Class 
Dance Committee; Assistant Editor Dentos '35; Senior 
Class Executive Committee. 
Location, Chicago. 

LOXGO, THOMAS J. 
Steubenville High School, Steubenville, Ohio; Catholic 
University; C. N. Johnson Seminar; Junior-Senior Prom 
Committee; Intramural Boxing; Basketball; Psi Omega 
Fraternity, Treasurer '33, '34, '35. 
Location, Steubenville, Ohio. 

LORITZ, RALPH F. 
Loyola Academy; Loyola University; C. N. Johnson 
Seminar, Secretary '35, President '36; Co-Chairman 
Junior-Senior Prom Loyola News; Assistant Editor Dentos 
'35; Intramural Sports; Psi Omega Fraternity-Junior 
Grand Master '35, Grand Master '36; Blue Key Fraternity. 
Location, Chicago. 

MAMMEN, DONALD H. 
LeMars High School, LaMars, Iowa; Loyola University; 
C. X. Johnson Seminar; Vice-President Pre-dental Class; 
President Freshman Class; President Sophomore Class; 
Chi Psi Fraternity; Delta Sigma Delta Fraternity. 
Location, Chicago. 



MAUROYICH, VINCENT 
Lindblom High School; Loyola University; C. N. Johnson 
Seminar; Intramural Basketball; Baseball. 
Location, Chicago. 

McCOOEV, CLARK J. 
St. Ignatius High School; Loyola University; C. N. John- 
son Seminar; Sophomore & Junior Class Secretary; 
Junior-Senior Prom Committee; Picnic Committee; 
Junior Class Editor Bur; Loyola News Campus Editor 
34- '35- '36. West Side Editor '36; Dentos Staff '34, '36- 
Business Manager '35; Loyolan Staff, Dental Representa- 
tive '36; Chairman Senior Executive Committee; Student 
Instructor of Ceramics '36; Curtain Guild '36; Intramural 
Sports; Blue Key Fraternity; Beta Pi Fraternity; Gamma 
Zeta Delta Fraternity. 

Location, Oak Park, Illinois. 

MOSES, MARCUS J. 
Harrison High School; Crane Junior College; Lewis 
Institute; C. N. Johnson Seminar; Senior Executive 
Committee; Intramural Baseball. 
Location, Chicago. 

MROCZVXSKI, HENRY C. 
North Tonawanda High School, New York; St. John 
Kanty Prep., Erie, Penna.; Canisius College, Buffalo. New 
York; C. N. Johnson Seminar; Xi Psi Phi Fraternity. 
. Location, Erie, Pennsylvania. 




36 



MURSTIG, ROBERT C. 

Austin High School; Loyola University; C. N. Johnson 
Seminar, Sergeant-at-Arms. 
Location, Chicago. 



PEFFERS, JOHN M. 

East Aurora High School, Aurora, Illinois; North Central 
College; C. N. Johnson Seminar; Delta Sigma Delta 
Fraternity, Treasurer '35, Senior Page '36. 
Location, Aurora, Illinois. 



OGLE, FRANCIS 

Lincoln High School, Lincoln Illinois; Lincoln College; 
Sergeant-at-Arms Sophomore Class; Delta Sigma Delta 
Fraternity; Tyler '35. 

Location, Lincoln, Illinois. 



PERKO, ADOLPH J. 

Central Institute High School; John Carroll University: 
C. N. Johnson Seminar; Xi Psi Phi Fraternity. 
Location, Cleveland, Ohio. 




PITCH, OLIVER H. 

Carl Schurz High School; Loyola University; C. N. John- 
son Seminar; Delta Sigma Delta Fraternity. 
Location, Chicago. 



RACZYNSKI, WALTER VINCENT 

Lindblom High School; Central V. M. C. A. College; 
C. N. Johnson Seminar; Intramural Basketball; Baseball; 
Pi Delta Sigma Fraternity. 
Location, Chicago. 



Morgan Park Milita 
Intramural Sports. 
Location, Chicago. 



PRIESS, DAVID 

Academy; Loyola University; 



RAFFLE, AARON JAY 

Hyde Park High School; Loyola University; C. N. Johnson 
Seminar; Intramural Basketball, Baseball. 
Location, Chicago. 



36 




RUST, AUSTIN J. 

Senn High School; Northwestern University; C. N. John- 
son Seminar; Chairman Junior-Senior Prom; Senior Editor 
Bur; Intramural Sports; Delta Sigma Delta Fraternity, 
Grand Master '36; Blue Key Fraternity. 
Location, Chicago. 

SASSO. LOUIS H. 

Pullman Free School of Manual Training; Christian Fenger 
High School; Loyola University; C. N. Johnson Seminar; 
Delta Sigma Delta Fraternity. 
Location, Chicago. 



SCANLAX, EDMUND JAMES 

Mt. Carmel High School; Loyola University; C. X. John- 
son Seminar; Loyola Union; Senior Class Treasurer; Bur 
Editor President, Freshman, Sophomore Classes; Intra- 
mural Basketball Champs '32; Intramural Baseball; 
C. C. D. S. Basketball Team. 
Location, Chicago. 

SCHROEDER, RUSSELL F. 

Oilman Community High School; Loyola L niversity; C. N. 
Johnson Seminar; Delta Sigma Delta Fraternity. 
Location, Illinois. 




SMITH, JOHN W. 

Carl Schurz High School; Loyola University; C. N. John- 
son Seminar; Senior Executive Committee; Intramural 
Sports. 

Location, Chicago. 



STECKER. EDWARD FREDERICK 

Crane Technical High School; Loyola University; 
Johnson Seminar; Senior Class Secretary; Intr 
Sports. 

Location, Chicago. 



C. X. 



STASINSKI, HENRY A. 

St. Bonoventure Prep. School, Olean, New York; St 
Bonoventurc College; C. N. Johnson Semina.; Xi Psi 
Phi Fraternity. 

Location, Detroit, Michigan. 



STECKER, HENRY WILLIAM 

Crane Technical High School; Loyola University; C. X. 
Johnson Seminar; Intramural Sports. 
Location, Chicaeo. 



36 




STRAUB, ROBERT L. 

Tilden Technical High School; Loyola University; C. N. 
Johnson Seminar; Dentos Staff '36; Intramural Baseball 
'34, '35; Champs '34; Delta Sigma Delta Fraternity. 
Location, Chicago. 



STROHACKER, ROBERT D. 

FreeportHigh School, Freeport, Illinois; Loyola L^niversity; 
C. N. Johnson Seminar; Intramural Sports; Delta Sigma 
Delta Fraternity; Worthy Master '36, Scribe '35. 
Location, Freeport, Illinois. 



STULGA, ANTHONY P. 

Englewood High School; Pio Nono High School, St. 
Francis Wisconsin; Loyola University; C. N. Johnson 
Seminar. 

Location, Chicago. 



SYLINSKI, CHESTER 

Lane Technical High School; Crane Junior College. 
Location, Chicago. 



THOMAS, EDWARD 
ola University. 



Tilden High School; I. 
Location, Chicago. 



VISION, CHARLES S. 

Crane Technical High School; Crane Junior College; C. X. 
Johnson Seminar; Intramural Sports. 
Location, Chicago. 



YITEK, MICHAEL 

Lindblom High School; Loyola University; C. N. Johnson 
Seminar; Vice-President Sophomore Class; Baseball. 
Location, Chicago. 



WOODLOCK, JOHN L. 

Freeland-Park High School-Indiana; Lewis Institute; 
Loyola University; University of Chicago; C. N. Johnson 
Seminar; Dentos Staff; Junior Class Treasurer; Intramural 
Sports; Xi Psi Phi- Secretary, Treasurer, President. 
Location, Chicago. 




36 




WORKMAN, HARVEY R. 

Onarga Township High School; Lewis Institute; Freshman 
Class Dance Committee; Intramural Basketball, Baseball, 
Wrestling; Delta Sigma Delta Fraternity. 
Location, Chicago. 



BLOOM. MAX K. 

Lewis Institute; Loyola University; C.X. Johnson Seminar 
Alpha Mu Sigma. 
Location, Lnknown. 



BRENNAN, JOHN" D. 

Hyde Park High School; Loyola Lniversii 
Location, Chicago. 



COEBF.RGH, MAXIMILIAN 

Stedelyk Gymnasium Te Utrecht; University of Utrecht 
Medical S; Dental School; Delta Sigma Delta Fraternity. 
Location, Rotterdam, Holland. 



VVYKHIUS, WALTER A. 

Oostburg High School, Oostburg, Wisconsin; Calvin 
College, Grand Rapids, Michigan; Loyola University; 
C. X. [ohnson Seminar; Class Vice-President '35; Intra- 
mural Basketball; Delta Sigma Delta Fraternity. 
Location, Lnknown. 



HAYES, MICHAEL 

St. Leo High School; Loyola University; C. X. Johnson 
Seminar. 

Location, Chicago. 

PRICE, SIMOX 

Lewis institute; Y. M. C. A. College; Crane College; 
Loyola Universitv. 



RAGO, MICHAEL F. 

McKinley High School; Loyola University; C. X. Johnson 
Seminar. 

Location, Chicago. 

SVEXCISKAS, CHARLES J. 

Lindblom High School; Loyola University. 
Location, Chicago. 



ZIPPRICH, WALTER F. 



St. Ignatius High School; 
Johnson Seminar; Senior I 
mural Baseball, Basketball. 
Location, Chicago. 



Loyola Unive 
xecutive Comr 



WESSELY, FREDRICK 

Real-Gymnasium-Bruno Czechoslovakia; Masaryk Uni- 
C. X. versily Medical School. Brno, Czechoslovakia; State 

Intra- Institute of Dental Surgery, Prague; University of \ ienna. 

Austria; Delta Sigma Delta Fraternity. 
Location, Brno, Czechoslovakia. 



36 



SENIOR SKETCHES 



"LOOKIX AT YA" 

Here's a look-in on the different gangs in 
the senior class. About the switchboard at 
noon one would surely see Straub waxing in a 
denture while he passed the time of day with 
his pals, Sasso and Woodlock. Bob Straub, 
shrewd left hander, always has an eye for busi- 
ness, as was evidenced by the way he manipu- 
lated the checkroom at Homecoming. Bob 
was a darn good switchboard operator too. 

Sasso will be remembered as the world 
fair guide with the glamorous uniform. Louis 
also is a business man. 

John Woodlock is known for his ability as 
an apothecary. He was among the first with 
Hartman's solution. John, like his pals, is 
good with the figures. 

The corporation of Moses, Vision, and 
Bulmash has gone to such an extent that it is 
almost communism. Marcus Moses is a 
sweet short-stop and was always in the money 
in the point race. Vision is a conscientious 
worker and is also a man of uniform-a mailman. 
Louis Bulmash is a quiet, unassuming lad who 
seems to accomplish much with little effort. 
All these boys are as good as married. 

The largest of the crowds that furnish 
amusement for the class consists of the Stecker 
brothers, Coniglio, Murstig, Sylinski, and 
Fafinski. 

The Steckers are as good as Siamese; they 
are inseparable in action, thought, and points. 
"Charley" Coniglio and "Sarg" Murstig are 
Trolley car companions from the same neigh- 
borhood who get along by battling in a refined 
manner. Marty likes and is good in, inlay 
work while "Sarg" prefers prosthetics. 

Sylinski is meticulous in all his work and 
was a member of the class bowling squad. 

"Feets" Fafinski is a worker who likes to 
take time out to see the movies now and then. 
John is the Romeo of the class with all the 
attractive girl friends. 

These lads, although never really bosom 
pals, were always close together. Gomberg 
will be remembered for his forceful personality 
and his operation. We knew Jack would get 
it in the end. 

Gornstein was captious and slightly arro- 
gant by nature. Herman kept the profs, on 
the jump: he also conducted review classes. 



Raffle, was the Napoleon of the peanut 
industry, who likewise alleviated the transpor- 
tation difficulties to the south side. 

Kaplan and Copalman were seen together 
often while riding the tram in to the sunset. 
"Kap" is as silent and frozen faced as the 
great stone physiognomy. One of the depend- 
able pluggers. As Priess would say, foiled 
again. 

Fred, the old two-stepper, will be remem- 
bered by his famous bridge. 

Berlin, a hard and dependable worker, 
will always be called to mind as vendors call 
out for old gold and iron. 

Prep school cadets found themselves tossed 
together once again. Bauer, a blusterous 
Jewish politician and a great prosthetist; 
Mort leans towards the egotistical and as the 
sign says, "Can't take it". 

Priess, a person with a droll and clamorous 
humor who just about has the class worn out 
with his spontaneous wit. 

These following men stood out alone as 
individuals to face the fight. 

Gillig, a frugal individual who has all the 
foil scraps and solder bits that have gotten 
off the beaten path. John is one of the mem- 
bers of the "Papa Club". 

Haydanek, commonly known as "Sphinx", 
is the tops for quietness and reserve. A good 
student with many possibilities. 

Fberly, "Baby Glenn", our youngest 
member, is a lad of unquestionable ability, 
his favorite actress is Shirley Temple. 

Hays, apprehensive by nature, gets the 
jitters when pressed. Mike is presidential 
candidate for the "Borrower's Club". 

The out-of-town trio from Lincoln, Aurora, 
and Freeport always furnish amusement in 
any crowd. "Ogly" Ogle is personality kid 
himself, always smiling even when he is about 
to go to blows with his pa! Peffers. John 
is a musician of note and, above all, a gentle- 
man. Bob Strohacker is an Abraham Lincoln 
type, honest, quiet, reserved, and cultured. 
Bob is a dandy worker. 

A quiet pair are James Kitchen and John 
Smith. Kitch is clever with his hands and 
head. He ran both a small supply house 
and a bus to the W 7 est side. Smith is an 
ideal student who is bound to make a successful 
practitioner. 



36 



Another quiet but active pair are Campbell 
and McCooey. Tom is an all-university man 
who not only earns his daily bread by working 
nightly but was busy in every activity. An 
athlete of distinction and a competent poli- 
tician. "Mac", well! it's too long a story! 

Maurovich, Vitek, and Thomas are a trio 
of contradictions. "Vince" is a slugger in 
baseball, credulous in nature, a true friend, 
and a demon for asking questions. Mike is 
a swift and competent operator. He is 
among the highest. Thomas is a capable 
worker with a devil-may-care spirit. 

The "L" on the roll seem to have gotten 
together and have been close friends and fra- 
ternity brothers. This group is composed of 
Loritz, Longo, Larkin, Kimble, and Waska. 
Ralph is a hard worker with much talent 
and personality. He is partial to a good game 
of golf. Tom is a diligent worker but is 
slightly pugnacious by nature. He likes the 
boxing and wrestling matches sponsored bv 
the U. 

Pat is a genial Irishman with a hearty 
chuckle. He is a good listener and dislikes 
being called upon for recitation. 

Romaine, is a cautious, diligent and tedious 
worker. He has a refined and aloof manner 
and is a gunner in the true sense of the word. 

Schroeder, Mammen, and Pitch have 
come through the years together. 

"Russ" is a conscientious operator but 
with a slightly arrogant nature. He is like- 
wise known for his apothecary. "Don" is a 
competent operator with an amiable, jocular 
disposition, a friend of all. "Oli" is mild and 
serious in manner, a conscientious operator, 
courteous and gentlemanly. 

Fairman and Zipprich may be seen steaming 
in a bit late for the eight o'clocks. "Butch" 
is critical by nature, although generous and 
ambitious. He is fond of Foley's and points 
west. "Zip", a frank and likable character, 
likes nothing better than to exchange jokes 
with Casey. 

The St. Nick has brought many friends 
together. Among them are "Trainer" John- 
son and "Jockie" Stasinski. Bill is a suave, 
aloof in nature, and a demon with the women. 
Henry is a silent lad who acts with precision 
and competency. 

Former classmates Henson and Lestina 
met after several years to resume studies 
again and have gone the route. "Ken" is a 
fellow of exceptional ability and a genial and 



agreeable nature. Joe is a lad of sonamm- 
bulistic tendencies who slays the boys with 
the extensive verbosity of his dental articles. 

To this little clique we owe many 
amusing hours throughout our courses. 
Whether in the classroom, in the clinic, or 
while gathering supply-house points, Krupa, 
Kiwala, and Ewald lead the way to merriment. 
Alike was a deity among the bowlers, a true 
sport and one who could be counted on. 
Eddie, a boisterous and comical individual who 
will be remembered for his penmanship of 
class room caricatures. Ervin, an audacious 
lad who was wont to make vociferous com- 
ments on . . . oh, things in general. 

Another roll-call companionship was that 
of Crane and Dullaghan. Riley is a polished 
young man whose affability with patients is 
admirable. Owen was one of the heavy 
sluggers in baseball but is slightly arrogant in 
nature. 

Fortune tossed our two foreign students 
together in mid-sea. Fritz is a vivacious 
though slightly fastidious individual who 
engendered much pep in any discussion. 
Max, a reserved and likeable chap who proved 
himself to be a real fellow, is an excellent 
worker also. 

Then we have the eight three-year men who 
caught up with this class in order to raise the 
standard. These men, because of their heavy 
burden, were forced to plod their weary way 
in solitude. 

Lehman, a rotund and urbane individual, 
possesses a jocular shrewdness which has 
gained him many friends. 

Ferguson, a calm, cultured and busy fellow, 
always appeared to be a bit too serious. 

Raczynski is egotistical by nature but not 
to the extent of boredom. An excellent 
worker and a good fellow, he strongly dislikes 
his nickname. 

Adler, a courageous though unkempt lad. 
was always the first in his class. It's all in 
the name. 

Holmes, skeptical and inquisitive by nature, 
was never able to solve any of the major crimes 
about the building, despite his famous name 
and interrogative ability. 

Wykhuis, an earnest and opinionated lad. 
was known for his thoroughness on both the 
basketball and clinic floors. 

Scanlan, a naive and orderly fellow, was 
one of those rarities, a true student and 
great athlete. Abhors his abattoir moniker. 



36 



Stulga, a courteous gentleman, is a tireless 
and conscientious operator. Anthony has a 
pet cigarette holder and pet, well, look in the 
snapshot section. We're flabbergasted. 

Perko, silent and taciturn in nature. 
Adolph performs his tasks methodically and 
efficiently. 

Czub, persuasive and gentle in nature, 
handles patients admirably. 

And, saving the best for the last, we have 
Liedman, a skilled and practical technician 
whose manners are best described as "free 
and easy". Sid is extremely likable. 

PRIZE DUMB DOINGS 

The exodontia patient who waited outside 
the room for two hours. (He had been told 
to wait two hours before using salt water.) 

The prof who asked, "How many thirds 
is the face divided into?" 

The dentist's girl friend who was thrilled 
as she read. "Into the jaws of death rode 
the six hundred." She thought they were 
professional men. 

Ewald, relating a "Lights Out" story: 
"And his girl friend turned into a vampire." 

Krupa : "Gosh ! he was lucky. Mine always 
turns into a restaurant. 



Jag, Jag, Jag. 

Oh, whatever the trouble can be, 
I would that my tongue could utter 
The thoughts that arise in me. 

Oh, well for the guys who are tops, 

Who boast all the live-long day! 

hell! for the Ail-American lads. 

Who sit in the basement and bay. 

And the time goes steadily on 

To graduation at the end of the year 

But oh, for the touch of a helping hand, 

Or an encouraging voice to hear. 

Jag, Jag, Jag,_ 

And still behind in points, I see! 

But the tender grace of a day that is dead 

Will never come back to me. 

Apologies to Alfred Tennyson. 

Ogle: "When is a "Zip" not a Zip. 
Stansiski, indignantly: "I'm sure I don't 
know." 

Ogle: "W T hen he's a "Delt"; haw, haw." 



Dr. Johnson: "How many pounds can you 
condense gold foil." 

Priess, awakening: "Sure I kin dence." 
We have learned that even diseases are 
becoming educated to the point where a 
good foursome of bridge is appreciated. It 
was said that the right handed mump followed 
suit to the left handed mump. 
The exam was finished in a hurry 
We thought it was kinda phony 
And sure enough, there's a look of worry 
For the chump turned in the pony. 

To counteract this never ending eyesore 
I humbly submit this anitdote . . . 



SALT 

When it rains it pours 
Through bedlam and snores 
Attention is called — halt — 
To the remedy: salt. 

When the patient is dying 

Or frantically crying 

And the cause is not your fault, 

Be wise, prescribe — salt. 

When Hartman's solution fails 

And the moans become wails 

For which you're about to get hell, 

Then, with dignity supreme, say, NaCl. 

Prizefighters often are saved by the bell 
And next round look unusually well, 
For the cobwebs are swept from the brain vault 
By the good old odoriferous salt. 

If these be not idle words 
Then I do fly with chirping birds 
Or while embracing a strong malt 
Do fondly reminisce the tale of salt. 

Said young John Peffers, 
(A gay dog is he) 
"A peach in the lap 
Is worth two on a tree." 

Then said he to the old duffer, 
"L'nless you shut up 
And keep in that upper, 
I'll have to get tuffer." 

Murstig: "Whats worse than a purple blue 
suit?" 

Coniglio: "Two of them." 



36 




JUNIOR -SENIOR PROM 



"Class meeting after this period." "Say 
Al", somebody remarked, "is this a mara- 
thon?" "Haven't you settled the Prom?" 
Eagerly the Prom Committe tried to placate 
everybody at one time. Which would it be, 
formal or informal? The debate raged hot 
and heavy; finally a vote was cast and an 
informal dance won by a narrow margin. 



side. Now, but to await the evening — Friday. 
February 21st. 

A north side rendezvous, a gay crowd, 
smooth, suave, melodies, a famous cuisine. 
The high spot of the social year at the Dental 
School. A very enjoyable evening was spent 
by Seniors as guests of the Juniors at the Edge- 
Beach Hotel w r here they danced to the smart. 




A Committee was formed which began to seek 
a location for a prom. 

After many tumultuous days of arranging 
multitudinous details in which nothing was 
overlooked. Tie menu was approved, the 
seating arrangements were found satisfactory, 
the location ideal and the orchestra superb. 
The bids were distributed, the financial situa- 
tion was finally on the credit side after many 
a thrill and swerving dip over to the debit 



sophisticated rhythms of Herbie Kav's Orches- 
tra and partook of the hospitality of the Marine 
Dining Room. 

The students were not to be outdone by the 
faculty, even when it came to dancing. The 
doctors showed that same agility of dogging 
other couples on the dance floor that they have 
in dodging between the units on the clinic 
floor. The chaperons for the dance were 
Doctors Pike. William, Dawson, and Svoboda. 



36 




Others of the faculty who were enjoying 
themselves were Doctors Linder, Atkinson, 
and Holmes. 

The students who were responsible 
for the success of the Prom were, Wilfred 
Mase, chairman, George Meinig and Lawrence 
Furlong, vice-chairmen. The committee ap- 



pointed consisted of Joseph Smentek, John 
Dzuibski, Henry Kahn, Gerard Casey, and 
Morton Esterman. To these men and to 
those committees mentioned elsewhere goes 
the students' heartfelt thanks for presenting 
such an enjoyable and memorable 1936 Junior- 
Senior Prom. 




36 




OlomberikiCj Semor — 



Double s ? 




-The aci4 "test — 







A couple of pals. — Where is 
my articulator? — The beach com- 
ber. — Anthony and Cleopatra. — 
"Sitting Bull" and "All Bull".— 
The dance hall kids. — Hunting 
for specials. — More disappoint- 
ments. — It was okayed but the 
shock was ton great. 




36 



JUNIOR 




A milestone on the road 
to a dental career, a new 
air of responsibility, a 
new sense of superiority, 
combined with a deter- 
mination to get ahead. 



THE JUNIOR CLASS 



Having climaxed a strenuous sophomore 
year with the all important State and National 
Board Exams, we returned to school, possessing 
an exaggerated air of responsibility and im- 
portance, to procure our clinical experience. 

Although feeling confident that we were 
prepared to meet an 1 overcome any and all 
obstacles which might arise, it was with 
trembling limbs and beating hearts we appro- 
ached the desk of that mighty overseer. Dr. 
GeDrge Pike. 

After serving our apprenticeship in the 
examination room and as caddies. we were duly 
assigned to our first unsuspecting victims. 
To many of the patients it appeared that we 
were veterans. To others it was apparent 
we were novices. Some of us were even foclish 
enough to tell them they were the first. How- 
ever, such minor problems were overcome 
as time progressed and we became accustomed 
t"> the clinic routine. 

Early in the school year thoughts turned 
to politics, which this year were decidedly 
definite. Nominations were not in order. 
The two parties were merely voted on, and 
with the previous year's elections in mind, 
the issue was at no time in doubt. The victori- 



ous candidates were: Alphonse Rosinski. 
president; George Meinig, Vice-President: 
Chester Martyka, Secretary: Joseph Zelko. 
treasurer; Stanley Jakubs, artist; and Rudclph 
Camino, Sargeant-at-Arms. 

The dictatorship, as it was jokingly referred 
to by Dr. Boulger, commenced immediately- 
A Ways and Means committee was appointed 
to determine in what manner funds could be 
raised to assist in allaving the expense of a 
Junior-Senior Prom. Following the example 
of the juniors of the previous year, a "turkey 
raffle" was decided upon, and successfully 
carried out. 

After the interim of Christmas holidays, 
plans were begun for the Junior-Senior Prcm. 
the high-light of the year's social functions. 
Under the capable guidance of Wilfred Mase. 
as chairman, a committee was appointed to 
execute these plans. Those chosen to assist 
in the work were George Meinig and Lawrence 
Furlong, Vice-Chairmen. To assist Gerard 
Casey with bids and programs were Henry 
Kahn, Lynn Miller, Roy Ernst, and Edward 
Flip. 

The Edgewater Beach Hotel as the site of 
the dance, with music by Herbie Kav, was 



Chester T. Ma 




36 




:r, Wiegel, Pellettieri. ( Iliver, Starsiak, Montgomery, Tomaszewski, Sherman, Swainson 
M. R. Ulip, Sukala, Casey, Smentek, Wroblewski, Olson. Miller. Sterk, Gierman, M 
B. R. Schoen. Mase. Server, Martyka. Rosinski, Zelko. Meinig. Roche. Morgan. Mt'f 



decided upon by Joseph Smentek, aided by 
Casmir Bolewicz, Laddie Kulhanek, Lawrence 
Murphy, and Robert De Wolf. Those on the 
reception committee were Alfonse Rosinski, 
Lawrence Furlong, Joseph Zelko, Wilfred 
Mase and John Dziubski. The floor com- 
mittee was composed of Morton Estermen, 
Gerard Casey, John Roche, Grant Spocner, 
William Starsiak, and Benjamin Rabin. 

The junior class led by such pace-makers 
as Zelko, Camino, Kahn, LaPorta, Olson, 
W roblewski and others has acquired the 
reputation of being a class of "gunners", and 
as such the majority reports their junior 
requirements fulfilled and their senior points 
well under way. 



Dr. Dawson: (Testing a simple occlusal foil): 
"Caries on the mesial." 

Dr. Willman: (Inspecting a dove tail inlay): 
"It rocks." 

Dr. MacBoyle: "Now then, fellas, remember." 

Dr. McNulty: (Taking the roll call): "I assure 
you that the others won't be late again." 

Dr. Morey: "What do you know about the 
Illinois plan?" 



Dr. Pendleton: "Would you like to see these 

slides, boys?" 



The lecture was boring 

So Morgan was snoring 

Rosinski was sleeping his life away 

Graham was snoozing 

Because he'd been boozing 

And hadn't got in till the break of day 

Camino the gunner 

Was now deep in slumber 

Olsons' eyes had slowly gone shut 

The teacher was drowsy 

He said he felt lousy 

For he too had gotten tanked up 

Wroblewski the mimic 

Was giving a clinic 

While in the arms of Morpheus he did rest 

He dreamt Major Bowes 

Who puts en the shows 

Was about to give him a test 

He barked like a dog 

He "oinked" like a hog 

And finished with a comical song 

The class was awakened 

And visibly shakened 

W 7 hen the "Warbler" got the gong. 



36 




T. R. LaPos 



A TRIFLING EXPERIENCE 

Well, I got through the first two years, and 
say! was my father surprised! I don't know, 
though. I remember my father being quite 
skeptical about my ability ever to be a good 
dentist. He wanted me to become a lawyer 
and get into politics. Not I, though. I 
heard that an ordinary politician couldn't even 
pass the entrance exam to a dental school on 
a bet. 

I was eighteen when I started dental college, 
a lanky guy they used to call me "longlegs". 
Most of the time I used to lope in and out of 
some doctor's office asking, "Any teeth?" 
only to be on the run to another place as though 
I were a salesman, or something, till I wore 
my shoes through. 

But I was more than a horse's neck when I 
started my first day in the clinic. A glance 
at the tough superintendant we had in the 
examination room almost convinced me that 
I'd have been better off planning to be a dumb 
politician. As I approached him to make my 
quest, I began to feel as though my mind had 
a fever. 



"Well, sir," said he to me: "so you want to 
start en the floor." 

"\ es, sir." 

"Well, seeing that you're all set to ruin 
your life, you might as well start in by caddy- 
ing for a while. Kiwala, take care of this 
man." 

Well, we made the rounds that afternoon 
into the Crown and Bridge and Denture 
Departments, and the Senior Lab., where I 
had a number of practical jokes played on me. 

The climax to my first experience eventu- 
ally landed me on the waiting bench, where 
I stayed for nearly a week to see everyone 
walk off with a patient, while both hope and 
patience escaped me. 

It seemed to me at times as though I have 
been completely sloughed off as if I were so 
much dandruff. Finally, I actually heard 
mv name over the announciator directing 
me to the examination room to sneak up on 
the innocent and unaware public: and from 
then on I showed about as much of direction 
as an egg beater. 



36 



"Hello! you jags, may I come in? This 
is Frank Wozniak speaking to you over the 
amplifying system at the Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery. Now fellas, have your pat- 
ients empty their mouths into the cuspidor, 
cough up that rubber dam you have down 
their throats and relax, for I am about 
to bring to you through the courtesy of 
Corega one of the most soothing tales that 
will absolutly guarantee to make all future 
dental operations painless for the student." 

"Immediately after the next number which 
will be sung by the senior lab glee club, I will 
spring the big surprise." 

The music goes round and round 
OH— O-O— 0—0— 0—0— 

And it comes out here. 
"Thank you boys!" 

"And now, we have the big news. At a 
recent faculty meeting, besides discussing how 
the juniors beat the faculty at two lines of 
bowling and the health of the babes at the 
Glupker home, a decision was reached whereby 
all point requirements were to be cut, slashed 
and diminished by one-half. 

"There you have it gentlemen! Don't 
fail to take advantage!" 

"Our program will be completed by "Bing" 
Pendelton singing "My Buddy" and "Lind- 
ners Bridges Falling Down." 

"Goodbye, all, and don't fail to tune in 
next year at the same time." 



Olson: What did you put on the chart 
today? 

Pelletieri: Attempted rubber dam two 
hours. 

Fritz: I don't see vy I don't get this set-up 
okayed . 

Students in unison: Pay the War Debt, 
Fritz. 

Lawyer (Helping Esterman up) "Ccme 
with me, my man. You can get damages." 

Esterman: "Heavens, man, I've got all the 
damages I want. Get me some repairs. 

Wife: "I cook and bake for you and what 
do I get? Nothing!" 

Rosinski : "You're lucky, I get Indigestion." 

Dean Logan: "Aren't you ashamed to be 
seen in this office so often?" 

Ernst: "Why, no sir, I thought it was quite 
respectable here. 

Wiegel: "There is something preying on 
my mind". 

Wozniak: "Never mind, it will soon starve." 

"Father don't you think it would be foolish 
for me to marry a girl who was intellectually 
my inferior?" 

"Worse than foolish, Curshan, my boy," 
was the reply, "worse than foolish-impossible!" 

Dr. Hyde addressing the class: "Do you 
see anyone who isn't here?" 



Rudolph J. Camino 



Martin S. Curshan 



Stanley Jakubs 










36 



4h\ItRN Pf\LE I 



& 






<v 



^v 



^y 



L 



4 



s -this ll^e cokuse of Hon 



Mo ^ lisle n r*e laeis 
— G y-r-y-r ! ! 




/lr> Qccentoa4§(i view 
of Warble 




eh9\^c«red" We(g U4 
Made of tke boys !?*< 




Hflppy dck^ s om-« here l> 
s.j.JAfcUBS 

R <2>"Z. (Ollvowsk i 



Apple Annie. — One for all, all 
for Purity Hall. — Fish for posing, 
fifty cents. — Wide awake, interest- 
ing subject now. — Coffee, Murph? 
— Help me find that inlay, 
Peanuts. — The amalgam king. — 
Love in bloom. — Zelko, still gunn- 
ing. — The bondholders friend. 




36 



SOPHOMORE 




Introduced into a new 
world of instruments, 
medicines, and teeth, en- 
thused over the prospects 
of actual practice, yet 
with a growing fear of 
a moving mandible. 



THE SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Having forgotten the hardships of our 
freshman year we unwittingly returned to the 
fray. On October I, 1935 we came as sop- 
homores to attend the Opening Exercises. 
On this occasion we were graciously encouraged 
in our endeavors by Dean Logan, Dr. C. N. 
Johnson and Dr. Gallie. The next day our 
troubles started. 

After procuring our books and much desired 
case and engine we bravely started in to work. 
Who among us will ever forget the first time 
we held the hand piece and quickly cut into 
that plaster tooth. Our one regret was that 
our crown and bridgework course ended so 
soon. Dr. R. H. Johnson, our amiable and 
capable teacher, assisted by Dr. Hyde, initiated 
us into the mysteries of producing those 
glittering pieces of dentistry, namely the 
gold crown and bridge. From our work in 
this c mrse we'll have to admit — 

He who never made a mistake never made 
a discovery. 

When we were successful we thanked our- 
selves. 

When we made a mistake we blamed 
something else. 

The mixing and preparing of medicines 
proved to be a bit more difficult than we had 
anticipated. Dr. Kendall, of course, easily 



conveyed us over this treacherous ground, 
preparing us for steeper climbs. 

In physiology we were introduced to the 
intricacies of the human body by Dr. Zoethout. 
To be sure this proved to be one of our hardest 
courses and yet one of our best and most 
interesting. 

Bacteriology with Dr. Fink carried us into 
the realms of minute life. Remember these 
drawings, and how we worked to find a 
capsule? 

Dr. Michner and Dr. Johnson taught us 
the art of making an orthodontia appliance. 
What a surprise it proved to be. After all 
was said and done the attachments really 
fitted. 

In February Dr. Glupker returned to us 
to see how much we had forgotten in prosthet- 
ics. His was the task of rehashing those 
choice bits of information concerning dentures 
and impressions. 

Dr. Fink should know by now that it 
never rains but it pours, and so once again 
he had to endure the indians through his 
course in pathology. After many weeks 
of bewilderment we finally became acclimated 
and pathology wasn't such a bad course 
after all. 




Stanley J. Ma 



IIahold .1. Gc 



Anthony F. RorcEK 



36 




T. R. Gel: 
M. R. Horsi 
B. R. X. Cohex 



Umhum, fully equipped we whole heartedly 
faced the music with Dr. \\ illman. His 
undertaking was large for he had to make the 
best of available material. After much hard 
work he finally succeeded in teaching us some 
of the tricks of the profession. So we leave 
our laboratory courses to try our luck on the 
floor — the first step of our dreams come true. 

During all these joys and sorrows we were 
confronted with the task of choosing our 
class leaders. \\ ith much ado about nothing 
we proved that the public could be right. 
Stanley Marks was chosen as president. 
Abraham Moser as vice-president, Anthony 
Roucek as treasurer, David Cohen as secretary, 
Ralph Larsen as class editor and Harold 
Goldberg as sargent-at-arms. Later William 
McEwen was appointed as the class artist and 
Stanleigh Richards as the circulating manager 
of the Dentos. Under the leadership of these 
men we worked in common bond toward the 
attainment of our ambiticns. 

Adept at riding ponies 

Is our friend whom everyone knows 
The distinguished horseman from Berwyn 

Master Ignatius Willie Broz. 



SIMILES 

As timid as Rasqui. 

As noisy as Schmidt and Venzara. 

As large as Mittelman's shoes. 

As funny as McYicar. 

As large as Sobon's vocabulary. 

As quick as Swainson. 

As smart as Server thinks he is. 

As quiet as Galias. 

As futile as Sherman. 

As silly as these similes. 



Chapin believes the \\ ar of Roses was between 
two florists. 



36 



rr h 



irt r*N 



tt tit i 



T. R. Rasqui 
M. R. \'enzara 
B. R. Stvburski 



IN THE LIGHT OF OUR EYES 

Dr. Kendall — The Pharmacopoeia. 

Dr. Zoethout — The World Book-man. 

Dr. Fink — This patient didn't die. 

Dr. Hyde — Little man what now? 

Dr. AIcNulty — The bond salesman. 

Dr. Kronfeld — Reunion in Vienna. 

Dr. Hillenbrand — Horrible Harold. 

Dr. Holmes — Holmes! Sweet Holmes! 

Dr. Glupker — Elongated Hank. 

Dr. Michiner — This case can be straightened. 

Mr. Warner — The stooge. 

Miss Wittman — The sponge. 

Ewart — The census taker. 

Casey — Hot air from the basement. 

Frances — Ptomaine Mary. 

Chapin 

£ ou . cek I The brain trust. 
Archer 

Schneider J 



D. Cohen — The new heel. 

Gelberd — The broken record. 

Larsen and Lang — Mutt and Jeff. 

Blevins — Old high pockets. 

Govostis — It's all Greek to him. 

Krzak — Zeke. 

\ an Cura — It's a snatch. 

Charm — The scavenger. 

Lee — Charlie Chan. 

Litman — Maple Leaf. 

Meinig — The political class whip. 

Mikula — He knows his stuff. 

Lawrence — The perpetual hangover. 

Ladwig — Someone give him a ccmb. 

Server — Heap big noise. 

Moser — The Quaker. 

Swartz — He came to the big city and made 
good. 



Ak 



-Muscl 



36 




Dr. Zoethout was heard to cry: "Eureka! 
I've found it, perpetual motion". Of course 
he had reference to our star pupil Meinig 
with his everlasting gum. 



Dr. Johnson: "Gelberd, what is a pontic?' 
Gelberd: "The head of the church." 



Everybody works but Litman. He must 
be the drone in our midst. 



The class wishes to thank Dr. Johnson 
for congratulating Lee on behalf of the class 
on New Year's Day, January twelfth, twenty- 
one thirty-two. 



Dr. Fink: "What do you receive from 
Physiology?" 

Server: "A headache." 



We wonder who wrote the Christmas 
greetings from Dean Logan on McVicar's 
tuition bill. 



Dr. Zoethout: "Mc Vicar, is the "I" in 
your name long or short?" 
McVicar: "I don't know." 



Dr. Fink: "If you boys don't behave I'll 
give you an exam." 

\ enzara: "You can't do that to us". 

Dr. Fink: "Question number one is . . . ." 



Dr. Johnson: "Ladwig, why don't you 
comb your hair?" 

Ladwig: "I love my comb so much that 
I hate to part with it." 



Goldberg will get the medal. He shook 
plaster for one minute before he found that 
he had forgotten to add the water. 



On being introduced to the fair voung 
twins Chapin was heard to ask: "Who's the 
youngest?' 

Question: What difference should that 
make, Chapin? 



HUMANITY 

You may grow to great riches and glory, 
You may toil for yourself through the day, 

You may write in your record and story 
The struggles you've met on the way. 



But in vain is the fame that you boast of 
And wasted the years that you scan, 

Your strength you have not made the most of 
If you've rendered no service to man. 

— Selected. 




Ralph G. Lahsen 



36 




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SSf 

fo*MxM\\ 






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SophoTDOTGS 




-™?mmwm r .'mm* ¥V%^£ 



^mmm, w 




Don't crowd girls. — What did 
we lose now? — A dogs life, no 
beer. — The sun God. — What the 
well dress'ed nudist will wear. — 
Walking in his sleep again. — 
The woman hater. — Snorkey. 



m 



■10K ' 




36 



FRESHMAN 






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.-., 


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• 


| 




j 


if *\ 


. 










ffj 




,: ;l 



1 



Neophytes to the fra- 
ternity of dental students, 
newly initiated into the 
mysteries of dental opera- 
tions and placed on a 
proving ground to deter- 
mine their mettle. 



THE FRESHMAN CLASS 



THE FRESHMAN MARCH OF TIME 

Tuesday Evening, October I, 1936. 

This evening the newly registered students 
1 if C.C.D.S. who are known as "Green Fresh- 
man", were introduced to the faculty and 
their future Alma Mater. They heard an 
address of welcome given by Dr. Donald M. 
Gallie, whose words of encouragement were 
welcomed with smiles and sincere applause. 
They listened attentively and expectantly 
to addresses given by Drs. McNulty, C. 
X. Johnson, and the dean of the dental 
school, Dr. \\ . H. Logan. After being con- 
gratulated upon their choice of a vocation the 
meeting was adjourned. Following the adjour- 
raent most of the students "did" the town in 
a last night celebration before classes were 
formally opened the following day. 



Wednesday Afternoon, November 6, 19^6. 

This afternoon, midst the historic surround- 
ings of the dental anatomy laboratory the 
annual class election was held. After much 
campaigning and many political manipulations 



the actual vote was taken. The victorious 
candidates, McKee, Moses, Paone, and Jerbi 
were elected to the offices of president, vice- 
president, secretary, and treasurer respectively. 
Friday Morning, December 13, 1936. 

Friday the thirteenth, always a day of 
sophomore-freshman rivalry at C.C.D.S. today 
proved to be an unusually bloody affair. 
Contrary to old tradition the battle was held 
outside, instead of in the school basement. 
And, also contrary to tradition and history, 
the freshman class was defeated! The sopho- 
mores successfully defended their class flag 
(or rag) which had previously been nailed 
to the top of a greased pole. Several serious 
threats were made by the "Frosh", but none 
materialized. 

Saturday Evening, January 11, 1936. 

This evening a dinner dance, the first social 
affair to be sponsored by the Freshman class, 
was held in the Silver Room of the Knicker- 
bocker Hotel. With fine food, and the swing 
rhythym of Gay Clarridge's band the event 
proved to be a huge success. Y\ as everybody 
happy?????????? 



Victor J. MrKt: 



Norm \n L. Moses 



Felice J. Paon 




36 



ft? f t t "J 

t f * 



T 


R. Kurtz 


Link Shimandle Murin Nic 


astro WlNQUIST Walter; 


s Riddle Politis 


R. Kushn 


er Yos 


hina Raynes Kirch Ross a 


Topper Trook Swoisi 


tIN MlSKA VLAZNY 


R. SOTHRAS 


SCHEFF 


Rosenblum Scott Shafei 


a Prusis Landis Rc 




:. Klapman 


Spooner 


Paone Moses McKee 


LlMACHER MAGGIO 


Stasiewicz Shapiro 



January 29, 30, and 31. 

These few days, midst moans and sighs, 
the members of the freshman class took the 
semester final exams. Tests in anatomy, 
physological chemistry, histology, dental 
physics, and dental anatomy kept the young 
dentists well occupied, and for many days the 
thoughts of our "social lions" were far from 
any affairs social. 

Tuesday Afternoon, March 10, 1936. 

This afternoon many of the freshmen were 
pledged into the various fraternities having 
chapters in our school. Delta Sigma Delta 
pledged twenty-seven freshmen, and according 
to all indications will be the dominating 
fraternity in the future history of the class. 

TIME MARCHES ON! 



SO WHAT? 

Leaving home HALE and hardy, I was in 
the mood for adventure and roaming about; 
going nowhere in particular but just roaming. 
I started GOREN south, and when I got to the 



car line, I TROOK the first street car that came 
along. I sat in a seat near the back of the 
car not taking particular notice of the big 
GOLD man I was sitting beside. Looking 
at me he suddenly cried; "Great SCOTT, Bill, 
TOPPER the morning to you! This sure is 
FEIN seeing you after all these years." Not 
knowing him I felt like ALLEN' didn't know 
what to do. Holy MOSES! I seemed to 
recognize his voice but couldn't LINK it with 
his appearance. It sure was a RIDDLE. 
I would have guessed but I didn't on a CON- 
NER I was afraid I'd MISKA. (I'd probably 
get it BASSAKwards!) SWOESKIN you do 
in a case like that, especially when you want 
to be as POLITIS you can? I began reading 
my newspaper, and after a while he began to 
HORN in. "HURWICH your paper, Bill; 
I want to read it for a while." I thought to 
myself, VLAZNY a lot of nerve! This was 
A DAM Sight too much GAULT, and I knew 
it would make me AHNGERY, SPOONER 
or later. AL YEY have to do on the street 
cars is read and I figure I ARNOLD enough 
to let anybody push me around yet. 



36 




R. Epstein Bassak Fe 

R. Adams Akland C 

R. Gewartowski DkU'i 



I began to watch him carefully, because I 
was afraid he'd ROBB me. I told him to 
KIPPENHANs where they belonged. He 
looked like a big German; in fact he'd pass for 
the KAISKR himself. A flower, which looked 
like a MAGGIOLa was sticking out of his 
button hole. Suddenly he reached into his 
pocket and pulled out a paper and what looked 
like a GOLDEN pen. I think it was a SHA- 
FER. Asking me if I wanted to become 
rich and hearing me answer, "Of GORSKY, 
SHIMAXDLE," he began drawing a map on 
the paper. It was to be a boat trip to his 
treasure island. 

As we started on our trip it began to shower. 
"This RAYNES terrible," he remarked. (Most 
of the crew would have made better FIS- 
CHERs than sailors.) He seemed to become 
very impatient with me, and took my pistol 
away from me saying, "You ARNEGARD 
around here you know; you're just one of the 
crew. To be specific you're the SCHEFF. 
"Can you imagine a guy by the name of 
LIMACHER cooking when there is a "gent" 
by the name of SOTHRAS on the crew who 



could have started a whole restaurant! I 
missed the self-appointed captain for a while, 
but when I looked around, SPIZZIRI was 
right beside me. I told him to STASIEWICZ 
from me because he gave me the "creeps". 
However, he was DE WITT of the party. 
Y\ e sailed for weeks, and one morning 
when we had only BIXOTTI bed for about 
an hour, land was sighted. The captain was 
heard shouting "KLAP MAX, clap! We've 
found it." I heard one of the crew shouting, 
"What the AK LAXD is this?" "This 
LAND IS my treasure island," the captain 
answered. "See the HAJDUK I built over 
there near the shore." The shore was simply 
covered with flowers, most of which were 
ROSSAs. One of the crew caught a pigeon 
and wanted to build a coop for it. Hearing 
him calling my name I called back, "WAL- 
TERS you want?" He replied. "Come help 
me build this KOPE MAX." YOSHIXA 
my shoes and 1 will," I answered. The 
argument was interrupted by the captain. He 
was making each man PA OXE hundred 
dollars for the privilege of going ashore. 



36 




Reaching the shore with our picks and shovels 
the captain showed us where to start excavat- 
ing. We DUGG AN dug, but CIBULKA 
the dirt seemed to be falling back into the hole. 
In fact there was MUR IN the hole than out. 
While we were laboring, the captain enter- 
tained us by singing "When You and I Were 
Young McK.ee," and "Rosenblum". (Or was 
it "Love in Blcom.") Suddenly a lot of com- 
motion was noticed and the captain thought 
he ought to investigate. He found the whole 
crew reading an old Chicago Tribune they had 
found. There was a Notre Dame football 
lineup on the front page, and the boys were 
having a terrible argument about whether or 
not all the players of the "Fighting Irish" 
team were really Irish. The lineup was as 
follows: 



. Gomberg and Prusis 

Shipiro and Winquist 

Epstein and Babcock 

Gewartowski 

Krzeczkowski 

Kurtz and Kirch 

Nicastro 

Jerbi, Gorden, Jenkins, 



Ends . 

Tackles 

Guards 

Center 

Quarterback 

Halfbacks 

Fullback 

Substitutes 
Kushner, Davidson. 

The poor captain decided that the whole 
thing was so damn ridiculous that he'd give 
up. So he took the crew home and forgot all 
about the treasure, because there probably 
wasn't one there anyway. 

(My apologies to the substitutes!) 



A FEW UNSOLVED CLASS MYSTERIES 



What "Mussolini" did with all the dance 
money — and where his new suits have been 
coming from (since the dance). 

How Kushner charms Drs. McNulty and 
Glupker. 

How Trook's anatomy theories compare 
with Cunningham's and Gray's. 

Why Alvey expects us to believe all that 
stuff. 

Why Robb objects to the nickname 
"Cornwallis", and why he's always trying 
to "kid us" about the size of Regina. 

Why Dr. Job compliments (?) our anatomy 
class so often. 

How Adams got to be such a pal of Dr. 
Boris. 

Why Kippenhan tried to take on those 
four bandits that night. 

Why somebody wasn't appointed to watch 
the Sergeant-at-Arms. 

Why Davidson's always so cheerful and 
agreeable. 

How the boys got along in the retake 
anatomy exam. 

How our histology instructor got that little 
curl on the ends of his mustache. 





36 




ST> 



/he Juff//nf ncT- 



J)c.ci<J(/o tts S/'ci/sp'/a 



M< 



O^A^mam.jf&ntcrc^s $? 



36 



Public enemy No. "O". — A 
bunch of chiselers. — Fight! fight! 
It's friday the 13th. — Two 
pioneers. — Stokers. — Bubbles with 
his lunch. — To the rescue. — Bauer 
strikes out. — Still in love. — Sleep- 
ing beauty. — Go ahead Bill we're 
not lookin'. — Watching the fresh- 
man-sophomore clash. — Our Itali- 
an emmissarv. — 




PRE-DENTAL 




At the foot of the ladder 
gazing toward their goal, 
heedless of the dangers 
that lurk on every rung. 



THE PRE-DENTAL CLASS 




Floyd R. Skelton 



Raymond M. Br 



Henry .1. Ma 



One, two, three, four; only four more years 
lie ahead, with the dental school as our most 
important background. Having completed 
our course of studies for the pre-dental year 
we are in a position to look back. We find that 
we are no longer pre-dents but members of 
the class of 1940. 

This last year has passed so rapidlv that 



it seems as though it were only a few weeks 
ago that we met in the large amphitheatre 
on the first of October. The new faces, the 
new surroundings, the presence of new instruc- 
tors, all made the pre-dents feel very "green". 
It was not long however, before the surround- 
ings were familiar and the new faces became 
the faces of friends. 




Thomas E. Bol 



36 



In spite of the fact that everyone knew 
each other after a few weeks of class, there 
was no action taken for class elections until 
after the first semester was completed. \\ e 
held the elections one Friday afternoon during 
Public Speaking class. Now, for some reason, 
or other there was considerable confusion due 
to the fact that while there were only eighteen 



P — for power, some extractions require very 

much. 
R — for reason, most examinations diminish 

our supply. 
E — for energy, five long years call for such. 

D — for degree, D.D.S., we pre-dents wonder 

why. 

E — for evenings, which we seldom spend with 
our books. 

N — for nothing, some say it fits with the rest. 



T. R. Bolbat Fishman Baraonowski Hancock Belofski Gaudio Hofman Pef 
R. Kochonski, Vice, Kauch, Krvzowski, Griffo, Vinikocr. Thiel. FisheI, Madden, Franci 
R. Schiller Perlstein Foley Muda Schechtman Ziolkowski Melze King Chmiel Line 
R. Casciato Goldstein Boland Halloran Smith Mathefs Bro Skelton Kubiszak 




members of the class present, there were over 
twenty-some votes cast. The first conclusion 
was that there was a miscount of the ballots. 
But after three or four counts, we decided that 
somebody must have stuffed the ballot box. 
In the second election, which was necessary, 
Floyd Skelton was elected president; Raymond 
Bro, vice-president; Frank Smith, treasurer; 
Henry Mathefs, secretary; and John Halloran, 
sergeant-at-arms. 



T — for time, in this respect our lectures are 

crooks. 
S — for success, we pre pre-dents hope for the 

very best. 
Oh for the sound of the dentists drill. 
Oh to have Dean Logan's skill. 
Oh for the use of the plaster bowl. 
Oh to work with a plastine roll. 
Oh for the clinic as a senior bold. 
Oh to work in the lab with gold. 
Oh to tell the freshman how. 
Oh to say to him "stop that now". 
Oh nertz. 



36 



How about some dough, fellas? 
— Kiwala's shadow. — Two of a 
kind. — Get thee behind me Satan. 
— Puzzle, find Lang. — The Water 
boy. — A Klu Kluxer. — Goldstein's 
fish market. — Day dreaming. — 
You can't live on love, Kopeman. 




36 




lttTv»ve* Oclock 



SUv»er/ ^ 

(^ Pve^ev^tS 7 ' Words' QH e Oft? 

36 



— — — 



—— 



ATHLETICS 




. With a thought to the 
body as well as the mind. 
Relieving the hum-drum 
monotony of daily exis- 
tance with healthful recre- 
ation. 



BASKETBALL 



The school team, which was organized 
last year by Dr. Michener, Dr. Svoboda, and 
Mr. Warner of the faculty, met with difficulty 
during the year in obtaining a long count in 
any of its games. However, much of the 
cause can be laid to graduation of many of 
the stars of last year and injuries to such 
able basketeers asScanlan,Henson, and Hletkc. 
The lack of facilities for practice also aided in 
an unsuccessful season. 

The season opened against Lisle College 
on the opponents' floor. Despite the difference 
in the final score, the game was close until 
the final minutes of play when the organized 
Lisle outfit pulled away to a comfortable 
lead and wound up with a 38 to 26 victory. 
Hletko, Hensen, Petersen, Sukula, Wykhuis, 
and Furlong gave a creditable account of them- 
selves in face of the fact that it was the initial 
game and was played without practice prior 
to the fray. 

On December 4th, the school team jour- 
neyed to Joliet to engage the fast Rendel 
Radiator Team. It was this same aggregation 
which last year copped the State Amateur 
Title. The C.C.D.S. team took the lead and 
held it until the opening of the second half. 



At the breathing period the score stood 14 to 
12 in favor of the dental school. In the second 
period, height coupled with organized team 
play, enabled the State Champions to pull 
away with ease from the team and at thel 
sound of the final gun the score stood 42 to 
26 in favor of the Jcliet team. 

The final game of the season was with the 
Loyola Freshman. The game was arranged 
in such a hurry that it was impossible to have 
the dental school's first team in action. The 
game was played, and it was nothing more 
than a breeze for the Freshman team. The 
75 to 5 score indicated the lack of competition 
afforded the north side team. In fact it was 
necessary to borrow a player from the Fresh- 
man team. This may have been a factor in 
the small donation of points of the dental 
school team — who knows? 

Despite the lack of success in the basketball 
season, the dental school is thankful and 
proud of the men who donated their time and 
effort throughout the season: Henson. Sterk, 
Hletko, Sukula, Wykhuis, McYicar, Jerbi. 
Lennox, Peterson, Lang, Furlong, and \ ince 
Fornango. Many thanks for representing us, 
and to those remaining for next vear — Lots of 
luck. 




36 





INTRAMURAL BOWLING 



The Bowling League held the limelight in the recreational 
activities of the school this year, and it proved to be the 
most interesting and successful year since the League was 
inaugurated. 

The Bowling League, composed of teams representing 
the Faculty, Alumni, Senior, Junior, and Sophomore classes, 
along with a team calling themselves the Lucky Strikes, 
met every Wednesday evening at the bowling alleys on 
Ashland avenue throughout the winter months. 

As the season got under way, the faculty team, composed 
of Drs. McNulty, G. Pike, Craig, Michener, Svoboda, took 
the lead and was the team to beat, all season. They failed 
to weaken at any stage in the schedule and when the season 
closed, led the league with forty-three games won and 
seventeen lost. The total number of pins collected by 
the faculty amounted to forty-nine thousand nine hundred 
and came through with an 831.40 average. Craig led his 
team-mates with a season's average of 186. Close behind 
him were, Drs. McNulty and George Pike, with averages 
of 167.52 and 170.22 respectively. 

Trailing the faculty came the Senior team with thirty- 
four wins and twenty-six losses. Ever trying to unseat 
their superiors, the Seniors pressed hard throughout the 
season, but fell short by seven games. They knocked down 
a lot of pins throughout the year and wound up with a 
total of 46,449 at the close of the league. Krupa, Mizgata, 
and Dullaghan paced the way for the team's fine showing. 

The alumni team composed of Drs. Kurland, Firnsin, 
Lapp, Kelder, and K. Pike, shared the third place position 
with the Sophomores. Kurland, Lapp, and Firnsin, led 
their team in the pin tumbling, while Chapin and Zajdzinski 
were the best of the Sophomore lot. Both teams closed 
the season with twenty-eight wins and thirty-two losses. 
However, the Alumni team total pin count was 45,727 
to 41,143 of the Sophomores. 



Michener 


McNulty 


Craig 


Svoboda 




Pike 


Kelder 


Kurland 


Firnsin 


Lapp 




Pike 



36 



FACULTY II 
SENIORS 



Finishing in fourth place was the Lucky Strike team with 
twenty-two games to the good and thirty-five donations to 
the loss column. Red Brier was the only consistent pin 
gatherer, although other members of the team tallied some 
fine games in the season's counting. Brier rolled 161.38 
for a season's average. 

The cellar position was occupied by the Junior team, 
and the only consolation they could get was the fact that 
the last place lads took two out of three games from the 
winning faculty team. Dziubski and Ernst gave good 
accounts of themselves leading their team-mates in all 
departments of the league. 

Handicaps were given according to the standings of 
the teams, thereby making the contest eventful and exciting. 
Disputes were settled through conferences of the captains 
of the respective teams. Many questions arose concerning 
the legality of certain points in the games and scores through- 
out the season, but all were ironed out in a smooth and 
satisfying manner to all concerned. 

Final Standing: 



TEAMS 


Won 


Lost 


Totals 


Averages 


High 


Faculty 


43 


17 


49,900 


83 1 .40 


936 


Seniors 


34 


26 


4 6 >449 


774-9 


914 


Alumni 


28 


3 2 


45727 


762.7 


898 


Sophomores 


28 


3 2 


4M43 


68S43 


784 


Lucky Strikes 


2 5 


35 


42,81.5 


7I4-23 


842 


Juniors 


22 


38 


41,707 


695-7 


841 



The final night of bowling was given over to the running 
of the first Annual Doubles Sweepstakes. This was the 
first year the Sweepstakes were run off, and proved to be 
a huge success. The highest averaged bowler was teamed 
with the lowest and so on down the list until fifteen teams 
were organized. Prizes were awarded to the three highest 
teams, individual high games, least number of open frames, 
and the booby. No man received more than one prize, 
which gave even the mediocre bowlers a chance. 




POXTOX WORKMA 



MlSGATA Kh 



36 



JUNIORS 
SOPHOMORES 




Following are the winners of the Sweepstakes Prizes: 



1st high Team 

2nd high team 

3rd high team 

Booby prize 

High individual game 



Dr. Firnsin and Sylinski 

Drs. George Pike and Heupel 

Venzara and Brier 

MlZGATA AND LARSEN 

Dr. McNulty 



Least number of open frames 



Krupa 



The bowlers extend their appreciation and thanks to 
Edmund ("Red") Brier who acted in the capacity of Execu- 
tive Secretary and handled all totaling routine and schedules 
throughout the season; also for the inauguration of the 
Sweepstakes event. 

All in all, it was a lot of fun, and everybody enjoyed 
the exercise derived from the indoor sport, especially those 
who started the season with quite a bulge around the waist- 
line, and we are looking forward to the next season when 
the head pin is the King of winter sport — So until then — 
lots of strikes and no splits! 



36 



PUBLICATIONS 




The Dentos, The News, 
and The Bur uniting 
through the agency of 
the press the various 
departments, the facul- 
ties, and the students into 
one organization, the 
University. 



THE DENTOS 

of 
1936 




June, 1935, marked the beginn- 
ing of a series of improvements 
at our college, both in the clinic 
and laboratories. New equip- 
ment was installed throughout 
the first and second floors. With 
it came ease for the operator and 
comfort for the patient. An air 
of professionalism seemed to 
pervade the atmosphere. Clean- 
liness, par-excellance, both as 
to person and to equipment was 
now injected into the picture. 
And so we have endeavored to 
bring to the readers of this 



Dentos the full significance of 
the meaning of this new equip- 
ment, of which we are all justly 
proud. 

On the covers of this DENTOS 
we have strived to represent 
the meaning of cleanliness; with- 
in them the fullness of our college 
life. 

In endeavoring to make this 
edition of Dentos worthy of the 
standard of progress of our 
college we have used several new 
arrangements. For the division 
pages we have used photographs. 






36 




■George Meinig 
Frank Wozniak 
Gerard Casey 



Hi 



of groups of figures made of waxes, burs, discs, 
etc., which have now become so much a part 
of us. We have set aside the usual white 
paper with black ink and have used instead 
the more pleasant combination of a rich 
brown on an old ivory paper. 

The feature sections of this Dentos have 
been arranged differently, being found behind 
each division. 

The design of the book was planned with 
the hope of pleasing the greater majority of 
its readers and keeping within our budget. 

We wish to express our indebtedness to 
the entire editorial staff for their whole hearted 
cooperation and assistance in preparing this 
volume of the Dentos: the business manager, 
Ray Wiegel, and assistant business manager, 
Frank Wozniak; assistant editor, George 
Meinig; feature editor, Henry Wroblewski; 
photography editor, Gerard Casey; sports 



editor, Lawrence Furlong; two circulating 
managers, Lawrence Murphy and Martin 
Curshan; Artists, Stanley Jakubs and William 
Starsiak; and makeup-man, Joseph Zelko. 

The work was further subdivided by 
individual class editors, artists, and circulating 
managers. Their ability and interest also 
greatly facilitated and directed the success of 
this volume to a degree of excellence. 

We are deeply grateful to Dr. R. W. Mc- 
Nulty and to Dr. Warren Willman, financial 
and faculty advisors, for their wise counsel 
and unstinted assistance in making this 
Dentos possible. 

Acknowledgement is expressed to Mr. 
Monteigel of the Pontiac Engraving Company 
and Mr. O. D. Rogers of the Rogers Printing 
Company for their technical assistance. 

The Editors. 



36 




Through the columns of The Loyola News comes the oppor- 
tunity for professional students to broaden their outlook beyond 
the professional and become infiltrated with that spirit which 
dominates a university. By its printed page we, of the dental 
school, are brought vis-a-vis with other personalities and their 
doings on other campuses. They are made known to us, and 
we to them; and though we may never meet, we cannot say that 
we are not influenced by them and they by us. The Loyola 
News is the ever present bond that unites the scattered campuses 
of Loyola University. The spirit of the founders, among whom 
were Doctors Hillenbrand and Schoen, is strictly adhered to. 
so that today the News is the torch-bearer of Loyola traditions. 

The ever popular tabloid form of the paper has been kept. 
The rotogravure section which was added last year, is as extremely 
popular this year as ever. Its recording, by striking and unique 
pictures, the activities of other universities gives us a medium of 
exchange of ideas that is eagerly sought. The composition of 
the Xews remains the same. "Students' Comment" column 
has again come to the fore, which bespeaks well of student attitude 
toward university activities. Of high literary commendation 
are the columns "On The Aisle" and "Current Books" which. 
by their analysis of matter and clarity of presentation, have 
added new literary achievements to The Loycla News. 

The sport pages and the fraternity page give up-to-the minute 
reports on sport events and fraternity happenings. 

Items of interest to dental students set forth in pithy style 
were this year revived in the column "Dent Spurts." 

At the Dental School the News Staff endeavors to present to 
the university a cross-section of events which cover the fraternities, 
organizations, professors, and intramural teams. 

The reporting staff is under the direction of Clark McCooey, 
Dental Campus representative and West Side editor. One 
reporter comes from each class and these cover the events in their 
classes. The staff consists of the following members: Charles 
Lang, Gerard Casey, Joseph Van Cura, and Victor McKee. 
Special events, feature articles are assigned to these men to cover 
and write up. All material for publication is first approved by 
Dr. R. McXulty, dental news faculty moderator. 



The Loyola News 

Hold Dental Homecoming Aprii 8-9 



THE 

LOYOLA 

NEWS 



36 



THE BUR 



^(•BtTK 




November. 1930 



The Bur is the official publication of the Alumni Association 
of the College. It is published thrice annually in March, July, 
and November, under the efficient editorship of Dr. R. W. Mc 
Xulty, the Registrar of the school. 

The purpose of this publication is not to enlighten the graduates 
and students en dental subjects, although it dees contain articles 
of dental interest written by the faculty and graduates, but to 
form a more binding union between the alumni, the students, and 
the school. The November issue invariably contains an illustrated 
account of the Annual Alumni Outing which occurs during the 
summer months, and this article is a great factor in st+m-u fating 
alumni to attend the outing. 

The articles which capture the interests of the students are 
the class notes. These columns are written by students and 
contain, among other things, comments on some of the humorous 
events of the classrooms and labs. The Senior notes were written 
this year by Austin Rust, who did a commendable job. Vincent 
Fornango compiled the Junior notes, Bill Charm the Sophomore 
notes, Frank Jerbi the Freshman notes, and Charles Thiel the 
Pre-dental notes. These men have written columns for each of 
the three editions of the Bur and have contributed greatly to the 
success of these editions. 

Various faculty members have contributed articles which are 
indeed of value to the student and alumnus. Dr. Atkinson's 
article depicting "A Practical Technique for the Localization 
of Unerupted Teeth", Dr. Fink's article on "The Oral Mani- 
festations of the Blood Discrasias", and Dr. Kronfeld's article 
en "The Foundation for Dental Research of the Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery" are writings which are educational as well as 
entertaining and interesting reading material for the graduate. 

The Bur is the agent which lends unity to the Alumni Associa- 
tion of the Chicago College of Dental Surgery. 




Austin Rust Vincent Fornango Frank Je 



36 



ORGANIZATIONS 




Fraternalism, unity, and 
the furtherance of the pro- 
fession of which all are 
representatives — building 
better men and better 
dentists. 



DELTA SIGMA DELTA 



BETA CHAPTER 



Delta Sigma Delta, professional dental 
fraternity, was founded in 1882 in the college 
of Dental Surgery of the University of Michi- 
gan at Ann Arbor, by nine men who realized 
the importance of professional fraternal asso- 
ciation. These men organized and adopted 
a constitution for the first Greek letter frater- 
nity founded for the purpose of uplifting 
dentistry by inculcating in the minds of 
students and of the graduates a spirit of 



to guide the activities of the subordinate 
chapters; Continental chapters in practically 
every foreign country; fifty auxiliary chapters 
in the United States and Canada; and subordi- 
nate chapters at thirty-two dental schools 
across the continent. 

The official publication of the fraternity 
is the quarterly 'Desmos'. It maintains close 
contact between all the members and chapters 
in our country as well as those chapters scat- 




DOCTORS ROULGER, BlTCKL 

Hyde. C. N. Johnson. H. 
Michener, Mueller, Pik 



•son. Glupker. Grisamore Hillenbrand, Holmes. Ho 
m. Kirby, Lindner, Logan, McNeil, McNulty. 

PUTERBAUGH, SCHOEN, S\YANSON, W.\TT, WlLLMAN, AtKINSO: 



fraternal cooperation toward scientific, ethical, 
and professional progress. Alpha chapter 
was founded November fifteenth, 1882. On 
March twenty-fourth, 1885, Beta chapter 
was established at the Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery. In the same year the 
Supreme chapter was organized for graduates 
in dentistry. 

Delta Sigma Delta fraternity consists of a 
Supreme Council to conduct the business of 
the fraternity between the annual meetings 
of the supreme chapter; a council of deputies 



tered to the four corners of the earth. Each 
issue presents articles of interest and scientific 
importance by members outstanding in their 
field. Several pages are devoted to notes and 
news and alumni chapters; and an accurate 
directory service is maintained. 

Due to the lack of a house, for which an 
adequate committee is now combing the 
city, the meetings have been held at the 
College, having an evening dinner at Dudley's 
and then adjourning to the library or amphi- 
theater for the formal meeting. 



36 




Outstanding social events of the past year 
have been: The Halloween Hardtimes Hoot, 
held last Fall; a celebration of the fiftieth 
anniversary of the founding of Beta chapter 
(attended by all the living charter members, 
who assembled with the active members at 
Knickerbocker Hotel); an initiation at the 
Auditorium Hotel; a dance at the Belmont 
Hotel; a smoker at the Knickerbocker; a 
Tri-Chapter dance combining Beta with the 
Eta and Rho chapters from Northwestern 
and Illinois dental schools, held at the Medina 
Club; a Spring dance; and the never-to-be- 
forgotten highlight of college fraternity life, 
the Senior Formal. 



At present the membership of Beta chapter 
has reached a total of fifty-seven active Seniors, 
Juniors, and Sophomores. At pledging time, 
twenty-four more men took Delta Sigma 
Delta pledge pins and a large number of these 
men were initiated before the semester was 
completed. 

The presiding officers of this chapter for 
the past year were: Austin Rust — Grand 
Master, Robert Strohacker — Worthy Master, 
John Peffers — Senior Page, Kenneth Henson — 
Historian, Lawrence Murphy — Scribe, Charles 
Lang — Treasurer, Frank Wozniak — Junior 
Page, and Vincent Fornango — Tyler. 




Ci ^ n c?l o ci rs t*i 




Graha 


m. Fornango. Lang. Murp 


HY, SCHO 


EN SWA 


INS 


ON, WEIGE] 


:., Wos 


Zelko 


Archer, Chapin, Hofrice 


iter. Lai 


.WIG, L 


ARS 


ON, RlCHAR 


DS, SCI 



36 



PS I OMEGA 



KAPPA CHAPTKR 



In 1892 a small number of students at the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery felt the 
need of an organization which would bind 
them together in a fellowship that would 
inspire them to give their best to their profes- 
sion and to one another in any difficulties. 
This need prompted them to form an organiza- 
tion which they called Psi Omega. 

From the very start, the men who were 
selected for membership were required to 
measure up to certain high standards. Thus 
Psi Omega has maintained a membership of 
men whose thoughts are not of themselves but 
of their profession and their fellow men. The 
class of men in Psi Omega are leaders in the 
dental profession and are doing much to 
advance dentistry wherever it is practiced. 

Kappa chapter is one of the leading national 
chapters of the fraternity, and the past year 
has been a very successful one from every 
standpoint. 

The first affair of the season was the annual 
Freshman dance at the Diana Court of the 



\ assar House. The spirit of friendship, gaiety. 
and mirth, reigned supreme. The committee 
headed by George Meinig and composed of 
Stanley Marks, Michael Krupa, Robert De- 
Wolf, and Thomas Longo deserved all the 
credit that they received. 

Throughout the year numerous clinics by 
foremost authorities on their respective sub- 
jects have been held. These clinics, held 
exclusively for members of Kappa chapter, 
have proved to be an unsurpassable aid to 
the members' clinical and laboratory work. 

Xew Features in Kappa's social life are 
the frequent informal parties and gatherings 
held at Beta Chapter (Illinois) fraternity house. 
The house, which was opened at the start of 
the 1935-36 school term, is located only a few 
blocks from school at 1832 Adams street, and 
the boys from Kappa have been invited to 
come and go as they please. The many 
gatherings have been popular with members of 
both schools and has afforded a chance for the 
men to acquire new friends. 




36 




L> 4g> ™ 



s~^S 



»' >««5^fc 



A\fm Jfit Ar* *«fc 





Several interesting clinics were held at the 
house on subjects pertaining to clinical work 
during school life. The house gives the out-of- 
town members of Kappa chapter a chance to 
live with their fraternity brothers and also 
gives the members whose homes are in Chicago 
a chance to become better acquainted with 
life in fraternity houses. 

At the annual election of officers the follow- 
ing men were selected: George Meinig was 
elected to succeed Ralph Loritz as Grand 
Master; Stanley Marks will fill the office of 
Junior Grand Master; James Govostis will 
act as Secretary; Wilfred Mase as Treasurer; 
Douglas Meinig as Chaplain and Historian; 
George Styburski as Chief-Inquisitor; Robert 
DeWolf will take the office of Editor. These 
men have all proved themselves capable of 
any task and will co-operate to the utmost to 
make their term in office the most successful 
year in Kappa's History. 

On Sunday, March first, a smoker was 
held at the Iota chapter house in the Medina 
Athletic Club for the members of the Freshman 
class. There were over twenty-five freshmen 



present as well as numerous alumni and 
active members of Kappa Chapter. Many 
of the men went swimming while the others 
talked over some of the experiences they had 
encountered at school. Supper was served 
and Brother Neubarth from the class of '35 
gave a few of his famous recitations. The 
affair was a huge success and made many new 
friends for the visiting freshmen as well as 
the members of Kappa chapter. 

On Tuesday, March tenth, Kappa pledged 
an impressive group of men both from the 
freshman class and the upper classes as well. 
Those pledges were men who will live up to 
the high standards that Psi Omega requires. 

Thus the members of Kappa Chapter 
continue to live up to the principles and ideals 
of Psi Omega. The fraternity continues to 
be a source of inspiration to its members, 
bringing them together under one union of 
brotherhood, a union that carves their lives 
and characters so that they will be among the 
prominent and leading members of their 
chosen profession. 



36 



XI P S I PHI 




Dr. Pendleton 



Since the birth of our fraternity, we cannot 
help but reflect the material progress it has 
made. Starting with a very small group of 
ambitious men striving for a definite purpose, 
we have shown advances beyond our own 
expectations. 

The Xi Psi Phi dental fraternity was 
founded at Ann Arbor, Michigan, in 1887. 
Nine years after its origin, a few men, possess- 
ing the faculty of foresight, recognizing its 
commendable purpose of uplifting dentistry 
in the minds and practice of students and grad- 
uates, set about to establish a chapter at the 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery, known 
as Lambda. 

Lambda chapter has endeavored to main- 
tain the brilliant standards of the Xi Psi Phi. 
Its graduates have achieved fame and distinc- 
tion in all fields of dentistry. 



The finest aid to a local undergraduate 
chapter is the alumni of that chapter, and the 
Xi Psi Phi has an alumni that is active, an 
alumni that is enthusiastic and guiding. 
We are proud of our brothers and the individu- 
als who govern the affairs of the Xi Psi Phi. 

The members of the active and alumni 
chapters, both here and in foreign countries, 
are bound closer together by the Xi Psi Phi 
published by the fraternity. In connection 
with dental and scientific articles by outstand- 
ing Brothers, a goodly portion is devoted to 
chapter activities. 

Lambda meets twice monthly at the 
Alumni quarters in the Hamilton club. Here 
students have made valuable contacts and 
clinical observations. Social events have had 
their place on the Lambda's calendar to 
round out the activities. 



36 



The Zip stag party was the initial event 
of the year, followed by the closed alumni- 
student dance just before the holidays. Vari- 
ous pledge parties and entertainments were 
held to acquaint the Freshman with Xi Psi Phi. 

The Annual Zip banquet was outstanding 
in the social events of the year. To close the 
year's activities, the annual June Farewell 
Formal will close the pages of the students' 
lives of six departing members. 

The presiding officers of the Xi Psi Phi for 
the past year were: 



John Woodlock 



William Starsiak 



Edmund Czub 



Alfons Rosinski 



Henry Stasinski 



President 



V ice-President 



Secretary 



Treasurer 



Editor 



Deputy Supreme President 

Dr. W. Adams Pregh 




36 



ALPHA OMEGA 




Led by the retiring Chancellor, Mortimer 
Bauer, and the other outgoing officers, Alpha 
Lambda chapter of Alpha Omega, National 
Jewish Dental fraternity, completed one of 
its most successful years. The membership 
has greatly increased during the past year, a 
fact which will undoubtedly go toward making 
this chapter better suited to cultivate the 
spirit of fraternalism and sociality among 
its members. 

Alpha Lambda is one of thirty active chap- 
ters scattered throughout the world in all the 
larger Dental schools. It is an outgrowth of 
a meeting held by a small group of men of 
the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery 
in 1907. These young men of ideals decided 
to band together for mutual aid, for self- 
improvement, for self-culture in the hope 
that their united efforts would mean the 
strengthening within to counteract any press- 
ing influence without. Slowly but steadily 
more and more chapters were added and with 
the affiliation of Alpha Zeta Gamma on October 



7, 1932, its goal was achieved, for it reached the 
enviable position of being the leading Jewish 
dental Fraternity en the North American 
Continent. 

The sole purpose of this fraternitv is 
experessed in their motto "Fraternalism and 
Equality" and to this purpose they hold both 
within their organization and their daily 
contact with the faculty, their classmates, and 
patients. The high regard in which the 
members are held by students and faculty 
alike as well as their scholastic achievements 
has proved their purpose not in vain. 

As a chapter. Alpha Lambda has been 
most active in the past vear in social activities. 
Foremost among these was a dance given 
to inaugarate the new term. This dance, 
held at the \\ est End Y\ omen's Club, was 
acclaimed bv all present as being highly 
successful. Many students of the school 
besides the members and alumni of the 
chapter attended. 



36 



After only a short period of quiesence, the 
social committee broke into action, and this 
time a large group, consisting of members, 
pledges, and their dates, were highly enter- 
tained at a splash party and dance held at 
the George Williams college. Although the 
weather at that time was far below zero there 
was "a hot time in the old town that night". 

Without giving the group much of a breath- 
ing spell, Alpha Lambda chapter in conjunction 
with Alpha Alpha chapter of the University 
of Illinois, and Alpha Kappa chapter of North- 
western University, held a smoker at Steuben 
club. After the athletic part of the program, 
consisting of basketball games and swimming 
meets, was dispensed with, the prospective 
freshman neophytes were provided with an 
opportunity to become acquainted with mem- 
bers of all chapters during the smoker proper. 
Refreshments culminated the affair. 

To complete the year, a formal Senior 
dinner dance is planned for May ninth, to be 
held in the Continental Room of the Stevens 



Hotel. There, to the exquisite Rhumba 
music of Xavier Cugat, the members and 
alumni expect to bring to an appropriate 
close the scholastic careers of their two depart- 
ing seniors, Mortimer Bauer and Fred Copal- 
man. There also will be provided an oppor- 
tunity to present adequately the Chancellor's 
key to Frater Bauer and also the Junior 
scholarship and senior diploma. It will be 
a fitting climax to a most successful year in 
the annals of Alpha Lambda. 

The future holds many bright prospects. 
With thirteen pledges on the active list, most 
of whom will be inducted before the end of 
the year, and several more prospective pledges 
the man power of the chapter will be the 
highest in its history. This, together with 
the efficiency of the present officers augers 
well for Alpha Lambda. The officers for the 
following year are Benjamin Mikell — Chancel- 
lor; Albert A. Moser — Vice-Chancellor; Henry 
Mittelman, Quaestor; Paul Lang, Scribe; Nor- 
man Cohen, Editor; and Irving Fischman- 
Macer. 







C* *ZS fa 





36 



OMICRON KAPPA UPSILON 



Charles P. Cosgrove 
Layton M. Dochterman 
Warren W. Eggers 
Theodore R. Mosetich 
Raymond Xeubarth 
William R. Ondrosek 
John A. Rea 
Joseph S. Rzezotarski 

In the year past, 1934, from a class of 87 
students, these men have won for themselves, 
by reason of their scholastic ability, their 
splendid character, and citizenship, the highest 
honorary award offered at the Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery. 

To become a member and receive an honor- 
ary fraternity key, a student is required to 
be within the upper twelve percent of the 
graduating class and to have passed in everv 
course during his years at the school without 
condition or failure. 

Membership is not confined solely to gradu- 
ating students but is extended to practitioners 
as well. To those dentists who have become 



eligible by distinguishing themselves in the 
profession and in their communities, this honor 
is often awarded. 

Omicron Kappa Upsilon. the dental schol- 
astic honorary fraternity, was organized in 
1914 at Northwestern University by Dr. 
Thomas Gilmore, Dr. Arthur Black, and 
Dr. C. E. Koch. Here at the Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery in 1925, the chapter known 
as Pi was founded. Dr. W. H. G. Logan is 
president of our local chapter. Dr. Robert 
McNulty is vice-president, and Dr. P. G. 
Puterbaugh holds the offices of Secretary and 
treasurer. 

These men, practically all of the faculty. 
and more than 250 others have been given 
this award since the establishment of Pi 
chapter over ten years ago. 

Those who so recently received a member- 
ship are to be congratulated and the success 
that has favored them in their scholastic 
achievements is to be wished upon them in 
their practice of the dental profession. 



36 




Austin Rust Ralph Loritz 



THE BLUE KEY 



The Blue Key National Honorary Frater- 
nity was founded at the University of Florida 
in 1924. its purpose being to award men 
recognition for outstanding scholastic and 
activity attainments. The ideals set down 
by its founders soon attracted other prominent 
universities to establish chapters, and Loyola 
was among those to join in 1926. 

The organization is not secretive in nature, 
but rather tries to create a feeling of good 
fellowship among non-members which could 
not be done if it were governed as most frater- 
nal organizations are. 

This year has seen new progress in Blue 
Key in the establishment of a merit table 
which governs the eligibility of students for 



membership. In order to be presented as a 
candidate for membership, an individual 
must acquire a fixed number of credits for 
extra-curricular activities, in addition to a 
rigorous scholastic standard, and must likewise 
score in popularity with his fellow students. 
Thus a man can be elected only when he 
meets with the highest standards in his class. 

Faculty members in the dental department 
are: Doctors Earl Boulger, Harold Hillenbrand, 
Frank Hyde, Wallace Kirby, Rudolph Kron- 
feld, Frank Lodeski, \\ illiam Schoen, Henry 
Boris, and Paul Dawson. 

Undergraduate members in the dental 
school are: Clark McCooey, Ralph Loritz 
and Austin Rust. 



36 



The Loyola Union, a student organization 
representative of all departments of the Uni- 
versity, was founded in 1928 by Father T. J. 
Schulte on the Lake Shore campus. Each 
school of the University has three members 
who serve until their graduation if they main- 
tain the required scholastic standing. This 
year the Union has been happy to welcome 
the school of Nursing to its fold. For the 
past few years the women students of the 
University have not been eligible to the board 
of governors of the Loyola Union. It is 
hoped that their addition will have a beneficial 
and stimulating influence. 

The ideals for which the Loyola Union 
was founded are expressed in its name, that is, 
unification. To sponsor All-University events 
which would meet with the approval of every 
branch of the University may seem an easy 
task; Nevertheless the contrary is true in 
many instances. To arrange affairs which 
will appeal to both the professional and non- 
professional men and women is indeed difficult. 
If the students of Loyola had a common 
campus upon which they could intermingle 
frequently, their ideas would be in better 



harmony. As this is not so, it is the aim of 
the Loyola Union to reconcile the attitude 
and desires of the different schools. 

Up to the present time the Loyola Union 
has worked hard to overcome many obstacles 
and to produce results. It has not achieved 
the purpose for which it was intended, as yet. 
but in the near future it hopes to rearrange 
its structure and build a bigger and better 
organization. 

The members of the Union of the present 
year are to be congratulated for the zeal 
and unselfishness with which they tackled 
every problem given to their care. The assist- 
ance and advice given by Father Warth, our 
faculty advisor, grew in value, as the L'nicn 
learned to use his bits of wisdom. The support 
of the student body was gratifying to the mem- 
bers of the Union. 

The Loyola L'nion is happy to be a part of 
the "Dentos"' this year. It knows that the 
members of the staff have worked hard to 
produce this book and congratulates them 
on the results of their labors. 



THE LOYOLA UNION 




Thomas Campbell Gerard C 



36 




C. N . JOHNSON SEMINAR 





*i^ifcAjfc 



R. Loritz G. Meinig 



Since its organizaton four years ago this 
extra-curricular study club, named after the 
Dean of students, has become one of the 
outstanding activities at the college. 

Organized "for the purpose of instilling 
within its members a more profound interest 
in problems of dental research", it is recognized 
as the first organization of its kind and has 
been widely imitated throughout the country. 
It affords experience in the writing, presenta- 
tion, and intelligent criticism of papers on 
dental subjects as well as being an additional 
source of knowledge for the student outside 
his regular scholastic activities. 

Officers for the year were: Ralph Loritz. 
president; George Meinig, secretary; and 
Joseph Lestina seargent-at-arms. 



Under this regime, the meetings were 
devoted to lectures and pictures on a variety 
of subjects bv authorities in their respective 
fields. 

Dr. Dwight C. Atkinson of the faculty 
presented a lecture on "Radiographic Inter- 
pretation" accompanied with lantern slides. 
Dr. Simonds of Northwestern University 
presented the famous Canti films on cancer. 
He is at present chairman of the Illinois 
branch of the American Society for the Control 
of Cancer. 

Many other meetings of interest were 
held throughout the year and it can be said 
that every meeting presented something of 
interest to the dental student. 




Smith Perko 

McCooey Who 
Meinig 



36 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 




S-SWHITE EQUIPMENT UNIT 




V 

A OL) can com- 
mence praclic? with 
a new, impressive, 
efficient, trouble- 
free unit and chair 
suited l<> your par- 
ticular practice and 
purse. 

Our engineers ex- 
pressed a wise forethought for tin- 
demist when they so designed the 
S. S. White Equipment I nil that 
any of the junior models can be 
readily built into a more complete 
or senior unit by the dentist. Con- 
sider for a moment, what this feat- 
ure means to you; il permits you 
to commence your practice with a 



sparkling new. in- 
viting, efficient, 
fullv guaranteed, 
trouble-free unit 
and chair without 
over-taxing your 
linancial resources, 
and without creat- 
ing a burdensome 
overhead expense at the period in 
practice when thrift in purchasing 
is most important. 

New equipment makes a more 
fitting impression upon the patient, 
too, and as the practice warrants, a 
junior unit can be built up to the 
summit of efficiency expressed in the 
S. S. Vi Lite Equpmenl I nil 61 D. 



Our OFFICIAL PLANNING SERVICE is jree 



If you plan to equip a new < 
cordially invited to take ad' 
Department. The service is 
part. Dental dealers who dij 
details of this service and th< 
Ask your dealer for the S. 
Build for Today." It is fret 



trice or renovate an established office, vou are 
anfcage of the services of our Office Planning 
ree and does not entail any obligation on your 
rilmtc S. S. White Equipment will explain the 
se i<\ the S. S White deferred pavment plan. 
3. White booklet. "'Plan fo ~ 
for the asking. 



KDSDIIlillES 



FOR the DENTAL PRACTICE of TODAY and TOMORROW 



36 



A DENTAL DEPOT 
OF DISTINCTION 




THE PITTSFIELD BUILDING 

55 East Washington Street 

The World's Finest Dental Depot 

Twenty First Floor 

Take Tower Elevator 



In artistic, excellent, and practical planning, 
this depot we believe is unexcelled by any 
other commercial space of similar character 
in the world. 



Store Customer Service 

A customer's section in the store proper, 
with merchandise stock and salesmen exclu- 
sively devoted to their service, insures prompt 
and courteous attention to all who visit the 
depot in person. 

An Order Department 

Entirely removed from the customer's sec- 
tion, gives prompt and undivided attention to 
mail, phone and salesmen's orders, thus in- 
suring their careful handling and facilitating 
delivery. 



Complete Stock of All Kinds 

of dental merchandise in current demand in- 
cluding the largest retail stock of Standard 
S. S. White Products in America. 

Service to Graduates 

Graduates will be interested to know that a 
large force of salesmen in intimate contact with 
conditions in this section permits us to offer 
valuable information and advice regarding 
locations, the choosing of which is an important 
factor in assuring the success of a new practice. 

A very efficient and reliable office planning 
service is also available without cost or obli- 
gation to buy. 



The S. S. White Dental Mfg. Co. 

55 East Washington St., Cor. Wabash Ave. 
CHICAGO 



36 




AFTER GRADUATION 



RITTER'S PRACTICE BUILDING SERVICE 
WILL GUIDE YOU TO SUCCESS 



Ritter's new "Practice Building Service" acts 
as a definite guide to the establishment of a 
successful, profitable practice. Available with- 
out charge to all graduates who invest in 
major items of new Ritter Equipment, this 
service places at your disposal the practice 
building methods used by many successful 
dentists in the country. 

The Ritter "Practice Building Service" liter- 
ally gives you a head start in practical ex- 
perience which could ordinarily be acquired 
only after several years of actual practice. 



For your own success and security decide now 
that you will take advantage of Ritter's 
"Practice Building Service" — and that you 
will start your career with modern, new Ritter 
Equipment which creates patient confidence 
in your ability. Visit your nearest Ritter 
Dealer. He will be glad to explain the details 
of the Ritter Deferred Payment Plan which 
permits you to extend payments for Ritter 
Equipment over a period of three years if 
desired —to give you complete information on 
the new "Ritter Practice Building Service.' - 



RITTER DENTAL MANUFACTURING COMPANY, INC. 
RITTER PARK, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



AFTER YOU GRADUATE Ritter WILL SEE YOU THROUGH 



TO THE CLASS OF 1936 

We Cordially Invite You 

AMERICA'S NEWEST DENTISTS 

To Visit 

AMERICA'S NEWEST AND MOST MODERN 

DENTAL DEPOT 



Just completed, you will find our new store an inspiration and a convenience. Designed 
to display every type of material and appliance to its best advantage, it will enable you to make 
accurate comparisons and select those items best suited to your requirements. 

Here you will see such outstanding lines as Caulk's Plastics, Cleveland Dental and S. S. White 
Steel Goods, "Cutwell" Burs, "Unitube" and "C'arpule" Anesthetics, Ney's and Dee's Gold, 
together with the products of other leading American Manufacturers. 

"Frame's for Teeth" has been a "By-word" among the Profession for two generations. Our 
stock of "Trubyte" Teeth and Steele's Facings is perhaps the largest on the North American 
Continent. This insures the selections you want when you want them. 

Experienced and competent dental men will be glad to advise in choosing the needs for your 
future office. Such assistance is available without obligation on your part. 

We solicit your future patronage on the basis of quality, service and friendly co-operation. 



C. L. Frame Dental Supply Co. 

10th Floor of the Marshall Field & Co. Annex Bldg. 
25 E. Washington St. Chicago, 111. 



We co-operate with the Ritter Dental Equipment Company 
in distributing Ritter products in the Chicago area. 



36 



THE WEBER AND HARVARD LINES OF DENTAL EQUIPMENT OFFER TO 

THE CONSERVATIVE, THOUGHTFUL BUYER THE BEST 

OPPORTUNITY FOR SOUND INVESTMENT. 




< fulfils range in price from $765.00 to 82.000 .00. and are supplied in all dental colors. 
Products of both lines are fully guaranteed. 

Direct representation, office planning and office location analysis service yours for the asking. 
As an important part of your dental education, seek out the truth about the equipment you must 
live and work with for many vears to come. 

Both Weber and Harvard equipment will stand the test of scientific investigation in their com- 
petitive field. 

Sold by selected, first line dental dealers everywhere on liberal and most suitable terms. 
SUCCESS TO YOU IN YOUR PROFESSIONAL UNDERTAKING! 

THE WEBER DENTAL MFG. CO. 

THE HARVARD COMPANY 

EXPORT DEPARTMENT, 149 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY 



CANTON, OHIO 



36 



Start With 
AMERICAN 

With the cap and gown laid aside, your career 
begins in earnest. The experience of veteran 
practitioners is valuable to you, and over 75% 
of practicing dentists today have American 
Dental Cabinets in their operating room. 
This can mean but one thing, that American 
Cabinets are superior in beauty and effi- 
ciency. They have answered every require- 
ment of dentistry for thirty years and every 
improvement has been introduced and orig- 
inated by The American Cabinet 
Company. 

It pays to start RIGHT. Your pa- 
tients will appreciate your facilities 
for serving them efficiently. Ask 
your dealer. 



CkmMAJcam 

DENTAL CABINETS 





Cabinet No. 14 
shown above sen 
every dental requii 
ment. 



THE AMERICAN CABINET CO. 

TWO RIVERS, WIS. 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

A FRIEND 



36 



I 



EXPERIENCE HAS TAUGHT MANY 

THAT THE BEST MATERIALS ARE CHEAPEST 

IN THE LONG RUN. THAT IS WHY THEY 

"SPECIFY" 




MORE PRECIOUS 



Scientific treatment 



I 






THOMAS J. 

DEE & CO. 

PRECIOUS METALS 

55 E. WASHINGTON ST. CHICAGO, 



ILL 



Root Studios 

Est. 1889 
185 No. Wabash Ave. 



OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS 
1936 DENTOS 

Special Rates to C. C. D. S. Students at All Times 



36 




5 
DENSCO USERS 

will tell vou that the Densco 
Contra Angle is more accurate 
and less painful — therefore less 
expensive. 

The onlv handpiece on the market 
that is built the onlv way mechan- 
ical engineers have ever found for 
building such a tool. 



THE DENTAL SPECIALTY 
COMPANY 

DENVER, COLORADO 



CDX 

Model "E" 

The Oil -Immersed 
Dental X-Ray Unit 
100% Electrically 
Safe 



cannot fai 
reciate more fully your r 
lethods of dental surgery when 
supplemented by routine ur- - 
the x-ray. 

This wall-mounted G-E unit is 
your means of obtaining for each 
patient the far-reaching benefits 
of x-r - ■=- " ■- 



NERAL (§) ELECTRIC 
RAT CORPORATION 



The GOOD recommendaton of well 
satisfied customers is the best advertis- 
ing we have. 

Through this medium we are each year 
increasing our sales and making more 
friends among the dental profession. 

We Sell 

STANDARD MAKES OF NEW 

EQUIPMENT 

also 

GOOD REBUILT EQUIPMENT 
REPAIRS AND REFINISHING 



HARRY U. GALLAGHER 

37 South Wabash Avenue 
CHICAGO 

Phones: Central 3562-3563 



THE HOUSE OF A THOUSAND MODELS 




jj ZXCodel for Almost Every Purpose 

COLUMBIA 
DENTOFORMS 



Ivorine — A luminal — Rubber 
Stone — Plaster 

COLUMBIA DENTAL & X-RAY CORP. 

131 East 23rd St. New York, N. Y. 



36 



———■—■— »y 



Phone State 2706 

MASTER 

DENTAL COMPANY 



■ (J e specialize in the construction of 
practical restorations. 

■ Full information, literature and price 
list upon request. 



162 North State Street 
Chicago. Illinois 



Mike Bauer 

DENTAL 
LABORATORIES 



159 North State Street 

Room 1504 Chicago. II 

Dearborn 8403—3455 



Headquarters for All 

Dental and Medical Books 

used in 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery 

We have the largest and most complete Stock to be 
found anywhere. 

Wide assortments on Notebooks, Blankbooks, Loose- 
leaf Covers, and Fillers, Drawing Supplies, Fountain 
Pens, and Inks, Brief Cases, Dissecting Sets, Labor- 
atory Supplies 

Prices Right 

Speakman's Book Store 

Congress and Honore Streets 
(Next to Y. M. C. A. Hotel) 



36 



COAL - COKE 

A TON OR A CARLOAD 

Apartments, Homes, Hotels and Industries 
"Our Vapor Spray Keeps DUST Away" 

WESTERN FUEL COMPANY 

2627 W. Adams Street 

Van Buren ) 
Austin J-1234 

Euclid \ 



AMERICAN SERVICE 




is Maintained on a Very High Plane, Serving Those 




Who Appreciate Quality 




We Want You to Visit Our Laboratories 




AMERICAN DENTAL COMPANY 




Laboratories 




William H. Schroll, Pres. Carl H. Lamp 


e, Secy. 


John A. Sarena, Vice-Pres. Harry L. Davis 


, Treas . 


5 So. Wabash Ave. Chicago, I 


linois 


TELEPHONE STATE 1642 





36 




V I T A L L I U M ? 



Vitallium is an alloy of chromium, 
cobalt and tungsten. It has been 
especially developed for denture pur- 
poses and it has proved so far superior 
to the best of golds that it must 
ultimately replace them where the 
best is desired in cast restorations. 
It is an unusually intricate metal to 
work. It casts at 2700 degrees F. and 
a special casting machine and burn-out 
oven are employed in its construction. 
A special sand-blasting machine and 
tiny little motors are employed in its 
finishing and polishing. 
See Vitallium cast in our laboratory. 
It is but one of the many interesting- 
procedures that await you on your 
visit to 

STANDARD 

Dental Laboratories, Inc. 
185 No. Wabash Avenue Chicago, Illinois 



*Trade mark registered 
U. S. Patent Office by 
Austenal Labs. Inc. 



FOSTER DENTAL FILMS 

and 

DENTAL FILM MOUNTS 

used exclusively by 
Chicago College of Dental Surgerv 

V W. FOSTHR & SON 

Morton Grove, Illinois 



BLUE ISLAND 
SPECIALTY CO. Inc. 



Manufacturers of Bisco Burs. Instru- 
ments. Copper Bands. Impression Travs. 
mounted Points and Orthodintic 
Materials 



BLIK ISLAM). ILL. 



36 



REMEMBER 

The most important instrument, as 
far as the home care of the pa- 
tient is concerned, is the Dr. Butler 
Tooth Brush. Both you and the 
patient will be delighted with the 
results that can be obtained from 
the use of this particular brush. 

JOHN O. BUTLER COMPANY 

7359 Cottage Grove Avenue 
CHICAGO 



SPIES BROS., Inc. 

"Reliable Since 1878" 

Manufacturers of 

CLASS PINS CLASS RINGS 

CLUB EMBLEMS 

MEDALS TROPHIES 

FRATERNITY AND SORORITY JEWELRY 

DIPLOMAS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS 

DANCE PROGRAMS, BIDS AND FAVORS 



Sales Office and Show Rooms, 27 E. Monroe St. 

Factory, 1140 Cornelia Ave. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 




Novol . . . 

THE *4 ADVANTAGE 
LOCAL ANESTHETIC 



*1. Novol Buffered Solution is sup- 
plied in Metal Cap Anestubes or 
Novampuls — both permit an unbroken 
chain of sterile precautions. 

*2. Novol Buffered Solution is buf- 
fered to compatibility with the tissues 
into which it is injected. 

*3. Metal Cap Anestubes and 
Novampuls bear the seal of acceptance 
of the Council on Dental Therapeutics 
of the American Dental Association. 

*4. Novol Buffered Solution in Metal 
Cap Anestubes or Novampuls reaches 
the user as fresh as the day it was 
made. The cartridge tubes are packed 
in vacuum tins. 



Only Novol provides these necessary 
safeguards. 

For the young practitioner, especially, 
Novol should be the anesthetic of 
choice. 

jnovocol Chemical MhUXUL 

©3931-3933 ATLANTIC AVE. BROOKDfN. N.Y. W 
jMak*r» of c4^3=C Product*! 



36 



The St. Nicholas Hotel 



404 So. Ashland Ave. 



Nearest to your School. 

Bright clean rooms at minimum 
prices. 

Our large Lounge and College 
Room, with Pool and Ping-Pong 

are entirely free to our guests. 
Due to demand we are adding 
more rooms. 



John Strauss 
Manager 



Great Lakes 
Linen Supply Co. 

Complete Rental 
Service on 

TOWELS, COATS AND GOWNS 

for the 
Dental Profession 

Plant: 36th and Parnell Avenue 
Telephone: Boulevard 6300 



COMPLIMENTS 



Dudley's Cafeteria 



BASEMENT 

CHICAGO COLLEGE DENTAL 

SURGERY 



36 



Phone Kedzie 3186 
Phone Kedzie 3187 



George Erhardt & Sons 



Incorporated 



Contractors for 



Painting, Decorating, Wood 
Finishing and Lacquering 



SPRAY PAINTING OF ALL KINDS 

Industrial, Commercial and Residential 
Furniture Finishing' of all Description 

3123 W. Lake Street 



MISS J. WITTMAN 



Notary Public 
Fiscal Agent 



CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL 
SURGERY 



Dental Dept., Loyola University 
1747 W. Harrison 



The Congress 
Barber Shop 

Successfully Catering to the Doctors 

and Students of this vicinity for the 

past six years. 

In the Professional "Y" Building 
"Just Inside the Door" 

Charles E. Richardson, Prop. 



5 5 No 

+ 
Barbers Chairs Waiting 



From a Friend 



36 



ON MAINTAINING 

LEADERSHIP 



To win and consistently hold a place as 
the recognized leader of school annual 
printing, has been the record of Rogers 
Printing Company since its beginning in 
1908. 

That we have, during a period of 28 years, 
successfully produced over 700 annuals for 
schools throughout the country, attests our 
ability to completely satisfy the most dis- 
criminating Year Book Staff. 

New ideas, coupled with the knowledge 
and experience gained through a quarter 
of a century's service, insure the school which 
chooses a Roger's printed book, of ideal 
pages "From Start to Finish' . 

We are proud that the staff of this book 
entrusted its printing to our organization 
and we herewith present it as an example 
of our work. 



ROGERS PRINTING COMPANY 

307-309 First Street # 228 N. LaSalle Street 

DIXON, ILLINOIS CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



36 



CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 
DENTAL SCHOOL OF LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 



1757 West Harrison Street 

CHICAGO 



The Fifty-fourth Session Opens October 6, 1936 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION IN THE 4-YEAR COURSE 
FOR THE YEAR 1936-37 

The educational requirements for matriculation are graduation from a high or other secondary 
school offering a four-year, fifteen-unit course of instruction approved or accredited by its State 
Department of Public Instruction or like standardizing agency of equal rank and in addition thereto, 
thirty semester hours of college credit as follows: 

Chemistry 6 semester hours 

Biology 6 semester hours 

English 6 semester hours 

The remaining semester hours to total the thirty are elective which should be selected with 
a view to their cultural influence, or for their training in the field of manual dexterity. This work 
must be completed in a college offering courses approved by the North Central Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools or by a standardizing agency of equal rank. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION IN THE 3-YEAR COURSE 
FOR THE YEAR 1936-37 

Applicants presenting at least sixty semester hours of college work towards the B.A. or B.S. 
degree, including at least six semester hours of English, of biology, of physics, of inorganic chemistry 
and three semester hours of organic chemistry, may register in the first year of the dental course 
and complete requirements for the D.D.S. degree in three years. The second and third years of 
this course are of ten months each instead of eight months, as in the four-year course. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION BEGINNING OCTOBER 1937 

Beginning in October, 1937, the minimum requirement for entrance to the dental school will 
be sixty semester hours of approved college credit, including the following: 

Chemistry 6 semester hours 

Biology 6 semester hours 

English 6 semester hours 

The three-year course will be discontinued, and the dental curriculum will be a four-year 
course. 

Graduate Courses Offered in Selected Subjects 

Address Registrar 

CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 
DENTAL SCHOOL OF LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 



36 



AUTOGRAPHS 



36 




AUTOGRAPHS 



36 






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V