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Full text of "Dentos"



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\l A R \' I X E . C H A P I X 

Editor-I n-Chief 

RALPH C, . L A R S E N 

Business Manager 




Digitized by tine Internet ^''chive 
in 2011 witii funding from 
CARLI: Consortium of Academic and l^esearcXl-ibraries'in 




littp://www.arcliive.org/details/dentos1937unse 



IHfDtfllOS 

OF NINETEEN HUNDRED 
AND THIRTY SEVEN 



CHICAGO COLLEGE 
OF DENTAL SURGERY 
DENTAL DEPARTMENT 
OF LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 



f^iosi^ OHi^ ^' i»«««^;;^«¥^^t^ 



"•' ' ^^S-Wte^ 





EARL P. BOULGER, D.D.S., L.D.S. 

To ONE WHO DEMONSTRATES DAILY THAT A VARIETY OF TALENTS 
IS NOT INCOMPATIBLE WITH THE DUTIES OF THE TEACHER, 

THE SCHOLAR, THE WORKER IN RESEARCH 

To ONE, IN WHOM THE CATALYST OF WIT AND UNDERSTANDING 
HAS REMAINED UNTOUCHED BY HIS WORK OR HIS SUCCESS 

TO ONE, Classicist, Friend, Confidant, — who has been 

MANY things to MANY STUDENTS 

This 

The 1937 Volume of 

The Dentos 

IS 

Respectfully, But withal 

Affectionately-, 

Dedicated 




fOfifUIORD 



To portray by word and picture 
those happy hours of 1937 — Gone 
but not forgotten— with the hope that 
somewhere, sometime in the coming 
years — "Seeing shall take heart again". 




t 



coniffiis 



PROGNOSTICATORS 

• FACULTY 

EXAMINATION 

• FRESHMEN 

EXPOSURE 

• SOPHOMORES 

DEVELOPMENT 

• JUNIORS 

DIAGNOSTICIANS 

• SENIORS 



CATALYSTS 

• ACTIVITIES 

TRANSFORMERS 

• ADVERTISERS 



I 




Erected in 1S93, the Chicago College 
of Dental Surger>- in 1937 contains 
the finest laboratory and clinical 
equipment in the countr}'. 




""Banish Lady Luck from thought — 
Dont shozv the least bereavement — 
Put faith and pep into your u-ork, 
Ayid soon will come achievevient.'' 




FACULTY 



^''Banish Lady Luck from . 

Doiit show the least bereavement — 
Put faith and pep into your work. 
And soon will come achievement." 




I 



ADMINISTRATION 



For fift>-four years, The Cliicaj,'" C< liege 
of Dental Surgery, now the Dental School of 
Loyola University, has been producing men 
of distinction in Dentistr\'. 

The men who are now guiding the course 
being pursued by the personnel of this institu- 
tion are: — Samuel Knox Wilson, S. J., 
President; Dr. W'il- 





W'lLLIAM 11. G. I.Oo 

Dean ot Faculty 



Ham H. G. l.ogan. 
Dean of the Fac- 
ulty; Dr. Charles 
\. 'Johnson, Dean 
of Students; Dr. 
Pliiu' (j. Puter- 
baugh, Secretar}' of 
the Faculty, and 
Dr. Robert W. Mc- 
Xult}', I^egistrar. 

With the advan- 
cement of research, 
the improvements 

in technique, the new equipment, and changes in 
curriculum, the administration has been constantly ele- 
vating the standards of the school and the profession. 



Samuel Kv 



.X Wii. 

iideul 



,S.J. 




Charles N. Johnson 
Dean ot Students 



Pliny G. Puterbaugh 

Secretary of faculty 



Robert \\ . McNulty 
Reiiisl. ar 




\MLLIAM H. G. LOGAX 

Dean of the Faculty, Professor of Oral Surgery 
and Oral Pathology; D.D.S., Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery; ^vLD., Chicago College of Medi- 
cine and Surgery; F.A.C.S.; M.S.; LL.D.; Delta 
Sigma Delta. 



CHARLES N. JOHNSON 

Dean of Students; Professor of Operative 
Dentistry; L.D.S., Royal College of Dental 
Surgery; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; M.A., Lake Forest Lniversity; M.D.S., 
LL.D.; Delta Sigma Delta. 



William H. G. Logan 




Charles N. Johnson 



Pliny G. Puterbaugh 



loHN P. Buckley 



PLINY G. PUTERBAUGH 

Secretary' of the Faculty; Professor of Principles 
of Medicine, Associate Professor of Oral Surgery; 
^I.D., Chicago College of Medicine and Surgery; 
D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; 
Delta Sigma Delta. 

JOHN P. BUCKLEY 

Professor Emeritus of Alateria Medica and 
Therapeutics; Ph.G., Valparaiso Lniversity; D. 
D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Delta 
Sigma Delta. 

ROBERT E. MacBOYLE 

Professor of Crown and Bridge \\ork; D.D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery. 




Robert E. MacBoyle 



OSCAR KAXNKR 

Professor of Bacteriology and Pathology; 
M.D., University of Vienna; B.S., Sorbonne 
University, Paris. 



RUPERT E. HALL 

Professor of Artificial Denture Construction; 
D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Psi 
Omega. 




OsCAK KaNNKI 




Rii'KKT K, Mali 



Joiix L. Kexdall 



\\ II.IIAM D. ZOETIIOIT 




Thomas L. Grisamore 



JOHN L. KEXDALL 

Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy; B.S., 
\ alparaiso L ni\'ersit}'; Ph.Cj., \ alparaiso L ni- 
versiiy; AI.D., L'ni\"ersity of Kentucky: Psi 
Omega. 



WILLIAM D. ZOETHOUT 

Professor' of Physiology and Pharmacology; 
A.B., Hope College; Ph.D., L'ni\'ersity of Chicago: 
Sigma Xi. 



THOMAS L. GRISAMORE 

Professor of Orthodontia; Ph.G., \ alparaiso 
l'ni\'ersity; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 




THESLE T. JOB 

Professor of Anatcm}-; A.B.. Simpson College; 
M.S., Iowa State Uni\"er£ity; Ph.D., Iowa State 
University. 



WILLIAM I. McXEIL 

Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry; D.D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Surger\'; Delta Sigma 
Delta. 



'I'liKSLi. T. Job 





William I. .McNeil 



Kdgar D. Coolidge 



Ri dole Kronfeld 



EDGAR D. COOLIDGE 

Professor of Therapeutics, Pre^■enti^•e Dentis- 
try and Oral Hygiene; D.D.S., Chicago College 
of' Dental Surgery; M.S., Xi Psi Phi. 



RUDOLF KROXFELD 

Professor of Dental Histology and Dental 
Pathclogy; Director of the Department of 
Research; M.D., LTniyersity of Vienna; D.D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery; B.S., Loyola 
LTniyersity; Delta Sigma Delta. 



KARL A. MEYER 

Associate Professor of Surgery; M.D., II 
College of Medicine; Psi Omega. 




Karl .\, Meyer 



HENRY (SLUPKER 

Assistant Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry; 
D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; 
B.S., Loyola University; Delta Sigma Delta. 



AUGUSTUS H. MUEl.Ll.R 

Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry; 
D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; 
M.S., Loyola University; Delta Sigma Delta. 




1 IhXKV CJl.L PKtK 




Augustus H. Mueller 



I'.LBERT C. Pendleton 




John R, Watt 



EARL P. BOULGER 

Assistant Professor of Radiology, Instructor 
in Operative Dentistry; D.D.S., Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery; L.D.S.; Delta Sigma Delta. 



ELBERT C. PENDLETOX 

Assistant Professor of Artificial Denture Con- 
struction, D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; ALD.S., Lo)'ola University; Xi Psi 
Phi. 



JOHN R. WATT 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Crown and 
Bridge Work; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 




EARL L. RICHEV 

Assistant Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry; 
D.D.S., University of Iowa; M.S.D., Xorth- 
western Universit\'; Xi Psi Phi. 



LOZIER D. W'ARXER 

Assistant Professor of Bacteriology and Path- 
ology; Assistant in the Department of Research: 
B.A., Manchester College. 



Kaki. ],. Ricufi 




LoziER D. Warner 



Harold W. Oppice 



Harry B. Pixney 



HAROLD W. OPPICE 

Assistant Professor of Crown and Bridge Work; 
D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Xi 
Psi Phi. 



HARRY B. PIXXEY 

Assistant Professor of Exodontia and Minor 
Oral Surgery; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; Xi Psi Phi. 



GEORGE C. PIKE 

Assistant Professor of Exodontia, and Diag- 
nosis; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; 
Delta Sigma Delta. 




George C. Pike 



R. IIAROI.I) jOliXSON 

Assistant Professor of Crown and Bridge Work 
and Prosthetic Technology; D.D.S., Chicago 
College of {Rental Surgcr}-; Delta Sigma Delta. 



HOWARD MICHEM;R 

Assistant Professor of Orthodontia; 1J).D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Surgerv; I3elta Sigma 
Delta. 




R. 1 lARoi.r) Johnson 




IIOWAKI) MiCHKXER 



\\ ARKKN WiLLMAN 



I,0\ \V. MORKLV 




RoBhRT W. McXuLTY 



WARRK.X WILLMAN 

Assistant Professor and Junior Lecturer in 
Operati\'e Dentistr\'; D.D.S., Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery; ALS., Loyola University; 
Delta Sigma Delta. 

LON W. MORREY 

Assistant Professor of Oral Hygiene and Pre- 
ventive Dentistry; D.D.S., Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery; Psi Omega. 

ROBERT W. McNULTY 

Assistant Professor of Ethics, Economics, and 
Dental Anatomy; A.B., Hanover College; D.D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Surger}'; M.A., 
Loyola Lniversity; Delta Sigma Delta. 




FRANK P. LLXDXER 

Assistant Professor of Crown and Bridge Work: 
D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery: 
Delta Sigma Delta. 



RALPH H. FOUSER 

Assistant Professor of Anatomy; F.A.C.S.; 
D.D.S., Northwestern University; B.S., Lewis; 
M.D., Rush Medical College of the L'^niversity 
of Chicago; B.S.M., Lovola University; Phi 
Beta Pi; Alpha Omega Alpha; Xi Psi Phi'. 



Fran'k p. Lin-dn 




Ralph H. Fouser 



CoKviN" Stine 



Paul T. Dawson 



CORMX STINE 

Instructor in Children's Dentistr}-; D.D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Xi Psi Phi. 



PAUL T. DAWSON 

Instructor in Operative Dentistry; D.D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Delta Sigma 
Delta. 



GERALD J. HOOPER 

Instructor in Operati\e Dentistry: D.D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Surgerv; Delta Sigma 
Delta. 




Gerald J. Hooper 



WALLACE N. KIRBY 

Instructor in Technical Composition; B.S., 
L'niversity of Illinois; D.D.S., Chicago C'tjllege 
of Dental Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 



JOHN F. SVOBODA 

Instructor of E.xodontia; D.D.S., Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 




W'ai.laci; X. KiRBV 




John F. S\ohoda 



William X. Hol.me 



I'KANK W . IIVDE 




Harold Hillenbrand 



WILLIAM X. HOLMES 

Instructor in Dental Anatomy, and Prosthetic 
Dentistr}-; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 



FRANK ^^■. HYDE 

Instructor in Operative Dentistry, Crown and 
Bridge Technology; D.D.S., Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 

HAROLD HILLENBRAND 

Instructor in Physiology; B.S.D., Toyola 
Cniversit}-; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surger}-; Delta Sigma Delta. 




DWIGHT C. ATKINSON 

Instructor in Radiography; D.D.S., Marquette 
University School of Dentistry; Delta Sigma 
Delta. 



HENRY L. BORIS 

Instructor in Physics; B.S., University of 
Illinois; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 



DwiGHT C. Atkinson 





Henry L. Bori 



Theodore R. Ferguson 



Lois D. Conger 



THEODORE R. FERGUSON 

Instructor in Physics; B.S., Loyola University; 
D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; 
Delta Sigma Delta. 



LOIS D. CONGER 

Instructor in Exodontia; R.N. 



DRUE B. PRESTLY 

Clerk of Infirmary. 




Dri E B. Presti.y 




Julia Wittmann 
Fiscal Clerk 



Laura S. Dickison' 
Secretary to the Regtstrar 



Maukini. \\ illman' 
Research Tech n icia u 




Carolyn Hammond 
Research Technician 



I'LUKhXCE AJaCUOXALD 

Clerk oj Infirmary 



Ruth \\ alsh 
Librarian 



Margaret B. Knight 

Clerk of Infirmary 

(No Portrait) " 




Irene D. Bossu 

Clerk of Infirmary 

(No Portrait) " 



Eleanor M. Fowler 
Information Clerk 



3n ilemoriam 




Cmauual JB. Jfink 



1890=1936 



Cmanuel p. Jf ink 

A man of science, genial and human, whose exterior 
seemed so cold and forbidding — 

A teacher both sympathetic and understanding, albeit 
a stern taskmaster — 

A friend to cherish and rely upon, to all who came 
to know him intimately. 



THE FOUNDATION 
FOR DENTAL RESEARCH 




W. II. G. Logan 
Chairnwil 



r !)(.AR D CoOLIDG 

/ i,e-Cliatnnan 



Tlie Foundation For Dental Research of the Chicago College of Dental Surgery 
was established in the summer of IQ35, on a budget drawn against the sum of 
twenty-five thousand dollars or more a year. This amount was donated by a 
prominent Chicago philanthropist who wishes to remain anonymous. 

The Foundation is administered by a committee of eight, all of whom are mem- 
bers of our faculty. Dr. Logan is chairman of this committee. Dr. Coolidge 
vice-chairman, and Dr. McXulty secretar\'. The other members are Dr. Puter- 
baugh. Dr. Job, Dr. Kronfeld, Dr. Kanner, and Dr. Zoethout. This committee 
has full power to administer all funds and to decide en all research activities. 
The duty of the Foundation is to approve suitable research problems, select re- 
search workers, and pass on all work carried out under its auspices. 

In addition to the administration committee, the Foundation has a committee 
of three ad\-isers, men of outstanding reputatirn in their own fields, who will 
be able to look upon oral and dental problems from the vantage point of unbiased 




RuDoi.r Kronfi 



( )scAR Kanner 




obser\'ers. These advisers are Dr. Ludvig Hectoen, a scientist of world-wide 
reputation, editor of the "Archives of Pathology" and the "Journal of Infectious 
Diseases", and director of the John McCormick Institute For Infectious Diseases; 
Dr. Richard H. Jaffe, director of the Department of Pathology of the Cook County 
Hospital and Professor of Pathology at the University of Illinois; and Dr. R. A. 
Kuever, Professor of Pharmacology at the University of Iowa. 

The Foundation has been most fortunate in being able to secure the services 
of Dr. Ruth Tunnicliff, one of the country's most illustrious bacteriologists. She 
is at present applying her wide knowledge of bacteriology to the problems of 
the oral cavity. 

The technical part of the work is in the hands of two young women. Miss 
Maurine Willman, who has been the research technician for several years and 
who has prepared all the tissue specimens which were studied and reported during 
that time, is now doing that work for the Foundation. Miss Carolyn Hammond 
who, until her initiation into the Foundation, worked in the bacteriology depart- 
ment of the Michael Reese Hospital of Chicago, is now bacteriologic technician 
for the Foundation. 



Much has been accomplished up to the present time, and we can look forward 
into the future with a great deal of expectancy. 



^Achievement means a lot of zvork. 
For nothing -well zvorth gaining. 

Can be secured except b\' those 

If'ith skill that comes bv training." 



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Achievement meat^. 

For nothing well worth gaini,.^ 
Can he secured except by those 

With skill that comes by training.'''' 




^ 



FRESHMEN 




For man}' months the individual members of the class had been reading over the C. C. 
D. S. catalogue, and with this publicatitn to guide them, had formed many opinions of 
what the new school U( uld be like. At last en Tuesday evening, October 6, one of the 
largest classes to enter the school in many years tork its place in the large amphitheatre, 
along with friends and upper classmen. The introductions of the professors and their 
speeches were very impressive. The class left the college that evening with a feeling of 
satisfaction, in that they had chosen dentistry as their life work, and above all that the}' 
had chosen C. C. D. S. as the school for their foundation in this work. 

Wednesday morning, October 7, found the school full of embryo dentists who could 
not find their wa}' to that large room where they had been the night before. As the clock 
struck nine, the class of '40 was seated, one hundred and nine strong, waiting with much 
anticipation for classes to begin. By the middle of the month, the classes were in full 
swing, and ever}'one was doing his best to car\'e an upper central incisor without losing 
more than half a finger. 

. Frida}' the thirteenth, a red letter da}' for freshment at C. C. D. S. passed with little 
notice until lunch hrur, when srme of the freshmen thought the}' would make a few posters 
to show the sophc mores that at least there were a few he-men in the freshman class. The\' 



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Top /eon— C.\sci.\TO. Belofsky, DeM.\rco. B.\r.\nowski. .\ppell. 
Miit'lte i?oi('^BuTLER. Bro. Buda. Dedekind. Chmiel. Czeslawsk 
BiMom Run — Beckeii, Bobalek. Brzdenkiewicz. Bi'rke, .Axelson 




T"/. /!■""■ l•'lsH^ 
Bottom Row — Hi 



IRALDI, FeRIN-GTON. CiOHDON. HoL.MES, K. Gl 

ISAMORE, J. Gibson, .Iaracz, JuRE-nirz, Gol: 
;iFFO. Francis. Golsdtein, Josh, Goodman, 



soon found out that there had been a number of men in last year's class that also were he- 
men. The outcome of the fight was a few smashed-in lockers and quite a few tired, blood}', 
and ragged freshmen, that turned up late for the anatomy class that afternoon. 

In the third week of November the class held its first meeting, with Dr. T. L. Grisamore, 
Jr., presiding. After much discussion and voting, the class elected as its officers the following 
students: 



F. W. Salisbury 

C. SUTLEY 

J.J. Haas 
Af. Riley 
M. Gast 



President 

J'ue-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Serzeant-at-arms 



These men have done much to bring the class together and help the co-operation and 
order. The class feels grateful to these fellow students for the time they have spent and 
the work they have accomplished. 

The Freshman Frolic was held January 29, 1937, at the So\ereign Hotel, and the music 
was supplied by the Colonial Club Orchestra. As this was the first social adventure of 




T,>,, A'.Mi— Pearlman, Ma 

MiMlv yfoiC— MclNTYRE, 
Hiilliim Rou NiKIFORUK, 



, Perlman. Kryda. O'Gradi Pvssv 
NsKi, Moore. ^IELZE, Link Kt_l\ 
LSKi, Newman. Krzvzowski Ivosioi 



f t r f rt 



m 



Tu,, R„,i--\i,v,< 
Mvhil,- li„u — 1^1 
Bottom Ruu — \l 



the class, it was doubtful at first hr.w it would turn out, but the spirit of the class was 
behind it and the dance was a big success — if success can be measured by the number of 
vacant seats in the chemistry and physics classes the following morning. 

The annual mid-winter meeting of the Chicago Dental Society, especially the free sample 
part, drew the interest of a large majority of the class, and it was not proper (if one was 
a freshman) to leave the Stevens Hotel until both arms were full. Aside from the samples 
there were many things cf interest and most of the students returned to school with the 
feeling that they had profited by the time they had spent at the convention. 

As this is being written, we are looking forward to our first attendance at the Annual 
Homecoming Clinic. The class of '40 has taken a great interest in this e\'ent and has 
supplied a number of exhibits that it hopes will be oi interest to the returning alumni. 
These exhibits are as follows: 



Jack McCarthy 
Seymour Appell 
R. G. Herthneck 



Embryology 

Histology 

Gross Anatomv 



In addition to this, many are taking part in the minstrel show that is to be given at 
the banquet in the Congress Hotel. 

As the school year reaches an end the freshmen are still glad that they chose C. C. 
D. S. as their school, and in the ne.xt three }'ears they will do all in their power to keep it 
on top. 

But to glance back do you remember the da}- that Joe Haas was caught making 

eyes at Dr. Holmes.'' 

The two Burke brothers arrived at school on time.^ 

Kenneth Gibson carved a right central for a left.^ 

Joe Gibson didn't go to sleep in lecture.' . 

Charley DeAIarco waved at the nurses in Cook County and got caught.' 

George JMadden attached his bunsen burner to the water attachment.' 

Eddie Farrington tried to teach a certain professor something about how to study.' 

J. V. Foley put two stools together and still the)' were not wide enough for him to 
sit on .' 

Seymour Appell wasn't trying to teach some of his pals enough to get them through 
the next exam .' 

Lester Hoffman went all day without sa\'ing anything.' (Impossible). 

C. Axelson came to school with two black eyes.' 

"Home}-" Rile}- wasn't eating.' 



^'Though the tempo may seem fast, 
Dont get cold jeet or jitters — 

Don't let the tension get your goat- 
Don t be among the quitters." 



R 



M 








''^Though the tempo may seen^ ^ 
Dont get cold feet or jitters — 

Dont let the tension get your goat - 
Don't be among the quitters." 






19 



SOPHOMORES 




In the fall of 1956 the members of the sophomore class were back from their summer 
vacations and to work with a bang; impressing the incoming freshmen with the thought 
that they really were somebody. It is an interesting fact that about the most egotistical 
personages in an institute of higher learning are those beginning the second lap, and our 
class was not an exception. 

In a very short time the crack of the master's whip was heard, and things began to 
happen. The gang soon stopped singing "Time On My Hands", and "Get Along Little 
Doggie" became the theme song as we tried to get the hang of the new laboratory courses. 
In Physiology, we tried to "get the idea" about the definition of life. Our "temper" was 
tested in Metallurgy, Materia Medica "drugged" us into a stupor, and our "paths" were 
microbe laden in Pathology. 

A bystander might easily have surmised that no little amount of group-religion was 
soon "Gone with the Wind", and b\' the time the quarter grades were received and thor- 
oughly digested, our bastile of ego was completely disrupted. However, we set about in 
a self-imposed restriction to regain cur lest prestige and soon earned the title of "Gunners", 
with the result, that well, judgment day was just around the corner. 

After a goodly number of secret meetings in the way of political gestures, the final cut- 
come of the class elections showed Adams as president, and Pacne as vice-president. The 
offices of secretary and treasurer were filled by Epstein and Kelly respectively. Sergeant- 
at-arm,s was alloted to "Bubbles" Ahnger. 

The next great task before the class was securing subscriptions for the Dentos, and 
then trying to collect the buck and a half. y\s master salesman, DeW itt soon became 
known as public enemy number one, and his confederates soon took a pro-rating in the 
collecting field. 




Top Roil— 

MiMIr Rv 
Hotluw R„ 




Top Sou.— GOHEN, GOMBERG, I.IPSEY. Je 

Middle Row — Kriss. Kaiser, Jenkins, L. 
Bottom Roic — KippENHAN, Gordon, Kla: 



ri 'f'ff 



Top Row SPOONER. ROSSA. WiNQUlST. TOPPEH. WaLTEBS. MOSES. YO8HINA. 

Middle How — Raynes, Nicastro. Rosenei.um. Shafer, Prusis. Scheff. Robb, 
Bottom Row — Vlazny, Singler, Shimandle, McKee. Maggio. Shapiro. 



The class dance, held at the Graemere Hotel, was in keeping with the other "all-or- 
none" policies of the crew, thanks to the fine work of the committee and "Georgie" Lim- 
achei's wizardry at making it rain "Pennies from Hea\'en", or at least from somewhere. 

All in all, we've had a somewhat hectic }ear, although none the less pleasurable, aug- 
mented by a new, modern laboratory which approaches the ideal for practical instruction. 
Next October should find us in the Clinic, armed with the vigor of a few months vacation, 
and no doubt, some new ideas about dentistry. 

Adams: "Ethylene is a colorless gas with an ethical odor." 

Paone: "Twilight Sleep is when you set the clock an hour ahead." 

Epstein: "Yom Kippur is a general in the Chinese army." 

Kellv: "Iron was discovered because someone smelt it." 



Ahnger: "Abraham Lincoln wrote the Gettysburg Address while tra\-eling from Washington 
to Gettysburg on the back of an envelope." 



\ 



''\4chievement -zve must gam, or else 
We'll need a dole or pension, 
So let's zvake up and give our zvork 
Our ver\' best attention." 



^V, 



"Achiev/'me7U zve mu^. 

Wf^ll need a d?le or pension, 
So let's wake up and git!' our work 
Our very best attention." 





JUNIORS 




Freshmen Out! Sophomores Out! How many times we had had tlifjse wf)rds hurled 
at us as we blundered into a room of upper-classmen who were settling into their chairs 
for a lecture. There they were, clad in their wliite gowns — those superior beings who were 
no longer mere mechanics, but soon to be practicing dentists. 

Would we e\-er reach such heights.^ Man\- times we asked oursehes that question 
as we stro\-e to master the subjects presented in our first two years, and man}' times we 
had our doubts, but at last we weie Juniors — privileged to wear one of those coveted white 
gowns. 

Soon after classes ended in Ma}- the majority of us started on our work in the clinic, 
and after tagging around with a senior student for a week or so we had a brief and sometimes 
puzzling period in the examination room. Then came that long awaited and nrjt little 
feared moment — we were assigned our first patient — God help him! With knocking 
knees and qui\'ering fingers we finalh' managed to get him to a chair. After meekly dra\\'- 
ing from him the assorted information required and ver^' uncon\"incingl}' informing liim 
that this was our third }'ear in the school, wc put on a brave fiont and picked up mirror 
and explorer. What a terrible small opening liis mouth seemed to be! W li}' did we e\er 
take up dentistr}'.' After what, to our patient, seemed like endless poking and probing 
we managed to fill out a chart and begin the blood}', brutal struggle through our first 
prophylaxis. 

All cf this seems ^'er}' humorous to us now since we have fairh' well de\'eloped the 
manner of practicing dentistr}', but we, as well as thousands who preceeded us, shall never 
forget it. 

Toward the end of summer those of us who were unable to stav at the school returned 



to find our classmates far ahead of us, and such "gunners" as Larsen, Chapin, and Charm 
talking about senior points. Soon we were all into the swing of things and classes were 
resumed. 

Before long the political question arose. The various groups in the class respected each 
other so much that the usual battles and hard feelings were avoided. Certain men were 
singled out to execute the duties of the Junior class officers and were installed immediately 
following a mock election. 

The officers selected were: Everet Archer, president; Xorman Cohen, vice-president; 
James Govostis, secretary; Irving Fishman, sergeant-at-arms, and Joseph Schneider, editor. 




Tuji Raw -HoHN, Bkoz, S\voi3ki.n, Gelberd. Lee. Ladwii;, IIckwich, Tkook, ST.\siEn-icz. Estermax. G 
Middle Row — Fisher. Gal.\i8. D. Cohen, Schneider, Larsen, Bruz.as, Litman, Galaskiewicz. Arnega 
Bottom Row — HiCKLiN, Hofrichter. Lawrence, Cassidy, Letvison, Arra, Goldberg, Lang. 



In spite of the fact that the usual fireworks of a class election were missing, a representive 
group was selected and all c(3ncerned seemed well pleased with the results. 

As usual the outstanding social event of the year was the Junior-Senior Prom held in 
the Oriental Room of the Hotel Knickerbocker, The success of this event may be attributed 
to the efforts of Archer, Larsen, Meinig, Murphy, and Richards who made up the committee 
in charge of the affair. 

Following the custcm set by previous classes our class advocated the production of a 
Dentos for 1937. To carr\' out this tedious and complicated job two very capable men 
were chosen as Editor and Business Manager — Mar\-in E, Chapin and Ralph G, Larsen, 
A staff was also selected to support these men in their work — the most annoying and 
persevering member of the latter group being none other than "Gimmie" (Money Bags) 
Goldberg, 



As the months have passed, and our ability, knowledge, and points sltAvly increased, 
we still have hopes of being able to locate "caries on the distal" without the aid of an eagle- 
e\'ed demonstrator. At an\' rate, every member of the class has done his utmost to fulfill 
the requirements of a Junior student and we hope that in the near future the instructors 
will no longer remark in a rather sarcastic vein — ""i'ou can always tell a Junicjr, but ycu 
can't tell him much." 

Aicher: "Strategy is when you don't let the enemy knrw that you're rut r,f ammunition 
and you keep on firing." 




Tup Hou — R.\SQUi. Zanillo. \.\n CuR.t, MiKULA, Ohtman. Zajdinski, yoHON. .Makks. .S- 
Middle Row — Woldman. Ness. Mittleman, Tihengle. Wubsch, Sartox. Sass. Stvburs 
Bottom Row — Richards. McEwen, Meinig. Roucek, Blevins, Chapix, XIcVicar. 



Cohen, N.: "A state of misery in which many Christians belie\e is Purgative."' 

Go\-ostis: "The United States is mostly populated by people, and half of the married 
people are women." 

Murphy: "They gave \\ illiam l\ a lovely funeral. It tock six men to carry tlie beer." 

Fishman: "A Mugwump is a bird that sits on the fence with its mug en cne side, and 
its wump on the other." 



Ladwig: "Adolescence is the stage between puberty and adultery." 



^Competition ive all need. 

To make us keep on striving 
As otherwise zve'd likely shirk 
And be too late arrivinz-" 



^v 



/ V ^\ 



•"iM 



•>*F' 



i>,.«f 



i: 



To make us keep u 
As otherwise we' d likely shirk 
And be too late arriving." 





SENIORS 

"MLCIi ADO ABOUT \0T1IL\C;" 
(with apologies to Shaicespeare.J 

Previeiu: The melodrama of men who wanted to be, came and saw, were seen and 
conquered; how they took it and what became of them. Incidental music, such as pathos, 
tragedy to be supplied by a group known as the faculty. The actors (marionettes, puppets) 
are some sixty odd men searching in vain for the answer to the question "To be or not to 
be." There will be four acts, each having two scenes known as semesters. 

As a matter of fact, the only act and scene to be dramatized will be y\ct 4, Scene 2. 

Presenting — 

Bolewicz: If one good deed in all m\- life I did, 

I do repent it from m}' very soul. 
Olson: Let the world slide. 

Mase:' No profit grows, where is no pleasure ta'en; 
In brief, sin; study what you most affect. 
- Hletko: There's small choice in, rotten apples. 

Sherman: Ville. Intolerable, not to be endured! 

Dumanowski: Nothing becomes him ill, that he would well. 

Myers: Your wit's too hot, its speed too fast, 'twill tire. 

Furlong: He has been at a great feast of languages and stolen the scraps. 

Tomaszewski: Do you bite your thumb at us. Sir.' 

Is the law of our side if I say by.'' 
Oliver: Not half so big as a round little worm 
Pricked from the lazy finger of a maid. 
Ser\'er: Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast! 

Would I were sleep and peace, so sweet to rest. 
Ditkowski: A gentleman that loves to hear himself talk; and will speak more in a 
minute than he will stand to in a month. 

Spooner: Oh, I thought it all for the best. 
Mitchell: Meagre were his looks. 

Sharp misery had worn him to the bones. 
Smentek: God made him, and therefore let him pass for a man. 
Meinig: I never did repent for doing good, 

Nor shall not now. 
Starsiak: The pound of flesh which I demand of him. 

Is dearly bought, 'tis mine, and I will have it. 
Gierman: I am never merry when I hear music. 
Sterk: 0, what men dar do! what men may do! 

What men daily do, not knowing what they do! 
DeWolf: Sweep on, you fat and greasv citizen! 
Peterson: For in my youth I never did apply. 

Hot and rebellious liquor in my blood. 
Wozniak: But, sure, he's proud; and yet his pride becomes him. 
Jakubs: Good is a good doctor but dead is sometimes better. 
Rabin: Your bait of falsehood takes this carp of truth. 
Wroblcwski: He raised a sigh so piteous and profound. 

That it did seem to shatter all his bulk. 
Kulhanek: y\ dull and muddy-mettled rascal. 
Sukala: The devil hath power 

To assume a pleasing shape. 
Schoen: Get thee to a nunnery. 

Montgomery: For, 0, for O, the hcbb\'-horse is forgot. 
Graham: He does it with a better grace, but I do it more natural. 
Mikell: Here comes the trout that must be caught by tickling. 
Fornango: But be not afraid of greatness; 

Some men are born great, some achieve greatness, and some ha\'e great- 
ness thrust upon them. 
Bara: I hate ingratitude more in man 

Than lying, vainness, babbling, drunkenness. 




Mase. Dziubski. 



Curshan: There is no darkness but ignorance. 

Casey: Is not birth, beauty, good shape, discourse, manhood, learning, gentleness, 
virtue, youth, liberality and such like the spice and salt that season a man? 
Crook: Modes and doubt are called the beacon of the wise. 
Murphy: He that is proud eats up himself. 
Firnsin: Brother, you have a voice of mercy in you 

\\ hich better fits a lion than a man. 
Morgan: Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none. 
Miller: A young man married is a man that's marred. 

Ernst: To say nothing, to do nothing, to know nothing, and to have nothing. 
Wiegel: For the love of laughter, hinder not the humors of his design. 
Dziubski: What's mine is mine, and what is }-ours is mine (changed). 
Lang; Have more than thou showest. 
Speak less than thou knowest; 
Lend less than thou owest. 
LaPorta: Music, moody food 

Of us that trade in love (and paintings). 
Swainson: Mechanic slaves. 

With greasy aprons, rules and liammers. 
Llip: Thou art a fellow of a good respect; 

Thy life hath had some smatch of honor in it. 
Bolte: It is to hope, though hope were lost. 

Martyka: Knowledge is, indeed, that which, next to virtue, truly and essentially 
raises one man above another. 

Camino: Knowledge bloweth up, but charit\' buildeth up. 
Lennox: A little nonsense now and then 

Is relished by the wisest man. 
Dullaghan: There is nothing new except what is forgotten. 
Zelko: They who are pleased them,=elves must always please. 

Rosinski: The whole world is strewn with snares, traps, and pitfalls, for the capture 
of men by wcmen. 

Waska: For art is nature made b}' man 
To man the interpreter of God. 

And so the cast is presented — characters that are interesting, yet not of the best. They 
play their parts, some good, seme bad, some indifferent, yet four acts are played. 

The story will not be continued for time and space will not permit. Also were this 
played on the stage it would be condemned as impractical, improbable fiction. 

And so for the sake of humor let no man's feelings be hurt, foi as Charles Dickens once 
said: '"Umble we are, "umble we have been, "umble we shall ever be." 

And in closing may I thank the old English masters of the pen and wish }.ou all good 
luck and good health. 




BARA, JAAIKS R. 
Chicaeo. Illinois 



Lindblom High School; 
versity; Loyola Uni\'ersity: 
ball; C. N. Johnson Seniin; 



Marquette Uni- 
Intramural Base- 



- BOLEWICZ, CASIMIR G. 

Chicago, Illinois 

Lane Tech High School; L'ni\'ersity of Chicago 
Loyola Universit}-; Pi Delta Sigma Fraternity 
C. X. Johnson Seminar. 



BOLTE. ROBERT L. 

Treytown, Ohio 

Oak Harbor High School; Loyola L"ni versity; 
Loyola Track Team; Delta Sigma Delta 
Fraternity; C. N. Johnson Seminar. 



CASEY GERARD J. 

Chicago, Illinois 

Quigle}- Preparatory Seminar}-; St. Mary's 
University; Loyola University; Loyola Union; 
Curtain Guild; Junior-Senior Prom Committee 
'36; Loyola News, Reporter '36, Campus 
Editor '37; Secretary Senior Class; Photog- 
raphy Editor Dentos "36; Blue Key Fraternity; 
C. N. Johnson Seminar. 

CROOK, DONALD C. 

Chicago, Illinois i 

Crane High School; Class President '32; L, 

Alanager All-L'niversity Basketball Champions ', 

"34; Delta Sigma Delta Fraternit}'; C. N. f; 

Johnson Seminar. L 

CURSHAN. MARTIN S. | 

Chicago, Illinois | 

Crane Tech High School; Crane Junior College; I 
Alpha Omega Fraternity-\ ice Chancellor '37; 
Circulation Manager Dentos '36; Editor Junior 
Class; C. N. Johnson Seminar. 



CAMINO, RUDOLPH J. 
Chicago, Illinois 

Bowen High School; Sergeant-at-Arms, Junior 
Class; Editor Freshman Class; Loyola News 
'32; C. N. Johnson Seminar. 



DE \\OLF, ROBERT J. 

Woodstock, Illinois 

Woodstock Ccmmunit}' High School: Loyola 
University; Psi Omega Fraternity-Chaplain 
"36, Editor "37; Senior E.\ecuti\'e Committee; 
C. N. Johnson Seminar. 



DITKOWSKY, MAURICE A. 



Chicago, Illinois 

Senior Executive Committee; 
Sports; C. N. Johnson Seminar. 



Intr 



lural 



ERNST, ROY . 

Quincy, Illinois 
St. Mary's High School, Kansas; Springfield 
University, Mobile Alabama; Prom Committee 
'36; Delta Sigma Delta Fraternity; Bowling 
'36, '37; C. N. Johnson Seminar. 



DULLAGHAN, OWEN T. 
Chicago, Illinois 

DePaul Academy; Loyola University; Intra- 
mural Baseball; Bowling League. 



DUMANOWSKL CASIMIR C. 
Chicago, Illinois 

Quigley Preparatory Seminary; St. Mary's 
University; Loyola University; Loyola News 
Reporter; Interfraternity Council, Representa- 
tive '36, '37; Xi Psi Phi Fraternity, Secretary 
'37; Intramural Sports; C. N. Johnson Seminar. 



DZIUBSKI, JOHN W. 
Chicago, Illinois 

Lindblom High School: Loyola University; 
Pi Delta Sigma Fraternity, Master Cere- 
monies '36; Vice-President Senior Class; Bowl- 
ing '36; C. N. Johnson Seminar. 



FIRNSIX, EDWARD 

Berwyn, Illinois 

Morton High School; Morton Junior College; 

Basketball '34, '35; C. N. Johnson Seminar. 

FORXAXGO, VINCENT N. 

Joliet, Illinois 
Joliet Township High School; Joliet Junior 
College; Dentos Staff '36; Bur '36; Student 
Instructor Chemistry '35; AU-University Bas- 
ketball Champions '34; Intramural Sports; 
Delta Sigma Delta Fraternity; Tyler '36; 
C. X'. Johnson Seminar. 

FURLONG, LAWRENCE D. 
Joliet, Illinois 
De LaSalle High School; Joliet Junior College; 
Loyola Varsity Basketball, C. C. D. S. Basket- 
ball Team; Intramural Sports; Secretary 
Freshman Class; President Sophomore Class; 
Sports Editor Dentos '36; Delta Sigma Delta 
Fraternity; Blue Key Fraternity; Prosector 
Anatomy '^7; C. X. Johnson Seminar. 





-^ "m 




ffsi >^i 




GRAHAM, STANLEY E. 
Morris, Illinois 

Morris High School; Loyola University; Uni- 
versity of Illinois; Baseball '34; Delta Sigma 
Delta Fraternity, Grand Master "37; C. X. 
Johnson Seminar. 



KULHANEK, LADDIE J. 
Chicago. Illinois 

Central Y. M. C. A. High School; Morton 
Junior College; Central \ . M. C. A. College 
Loyola Lniversity; Intramural Sports; C. X. 
Johnson Seminar. 



HLETKO, STEPHEX J. 
Chicago, Illinois 

St. Procopius Academy; St. Procopius Junior 
College; Lewis Institute; Loyola Varsity 
Basketball; Intramural Sports; All-LIniversit\- 
Basketball, Champions '34; C. X. Johnson 
Seminar. 

JAKUBS, STAXLEY 

Chicago, Illinois 



Lindblom High School; 
Fraternity'; Class Artist 
Seminar. 



Lambda Mu Delta 
2, '-ifi: C. X. Johnson 



KAHX, HEXRY 

Chicago, Illinois 

Marshall High School; Lcycla L'niversity; 
Artist Sophomore Class; Editor Senior Class; 
Co-Editor Dentos '36; Bur '37; Loyola Xews 
'37; Student Instructor Ceramics '37; Radiol- 
ogy Assistant; Intra-mural Sports; C. X. 
Johnson Seminar. 



LAXG. CHARLES L. 

Joliet, Illinois 

Intramural Sports; All-University Basketball 
Champions '34; Dentos Staff '35; Co-Editor 
Dentos '36; President Senior Class; Delta 
Sigma Delta Fraternity, Treasurer '36; Blue 
Kev Fraternit\'; C. X. Johnson Seminar. 



LAPORTA, MICHAEL 
Chicago, Illinois 

Carl Schurz High School; Loyola Lniversity; 
C. X. Johnson Seminar. 



LE CHAXJOUR, LOUIS 
Paris, France 

Lorient High School; \"annes College; Dental 
School of Paris. 



LENNOX, BENEDICT J. 
Chicago, Illinois 

St. Alel High School; Loyola LTniversity; 
Intramural Sports; C. N. Johnson Seminar. 

AlARTYKA, CHESTER Y. 
Chicago, Illinois 

Austin High School; Central Y. M. C. A. 
College; Pi Delta Sigma Fraternity; Secretary 
Junior Class; C. N. Johnson Seminar. 

MASE, WILFRED E. 
Chicago, Illinois 

Washington High Schr)ol, Milwaukee, W is- 
consin; Northwestern LIniversity; Loyola L'ni- 
versity; Chairman Junior-Senior Prom Com- 
mittee '36; Senior Executive Committee "36; 
Interfraternity Council '37; Psi Omega Fra- 
ternity Treasurer '37; C. N. Johnson Seminar. 



MEINIG, CiKORGE E. 
Glencoe, Illinois 

Roosevelt High School; Vice-President Junior 
Class; Assistant Editor Dentos '36; Junior- 
Senior Prom '36; Secretary C. N. Johnson 
Seminar; Psi Omega Fraternity — Junior Grand 
Master '36, Grand Master '37; Senior Exec- 
utive Committee; Intramural Sports. 



MIKELL, BEN H. 
Chicago, Illinois 

Crane High School; Crane Junior College; 
Lewis Institute; Y. M. C. A. College; Alpha 
Omega Fraternity, Chancellor '37; C. N. 
Johnson Seminar. 



MILLER, OTTO L. 
Newark, Illinois 



East Aurora High School 
Pi Gamma Delta Fraternit} 
Seminar. 



Knox College; 
C. N. lohnson 



MITCHELL. EDWARD C. 

Chicago, Illinois 

Centralia Township High School; Central 
Y. M. C. A. College; C. N. Johnson Seminar. 



MONTGOMERY, LEE E. 

Glasgow, Montana 

Glasgow High School; Poly Technic Institute. 
Billings, Montana; Lo^■ola L niversit}'; Delta 
Sigma Delta Fraternit}'; C. N. Johnson 
Seminar. 





WJ . 





MORGAN', BERNARD B. 

Crystal Lake, Illinois 

Cr}-stal Lake High School; Loyola University; 
C X. Jnhiison Seminar. 



OLSOX, XORMAX 

Chicago, Illinois 

Senn High Schorl; Lo\-ola L'ni\"eisit}-; Delta 
Sigma Delta Fraternity; Sergeant-at-Arms 
'34, '35; Intramural Sports; C. X. Johnson 
Seminar. 



MURPHY, LAWRENCE B. 

Chicago, Illinois 

St. Mel High School; Loyola University; Presi- 
dent P'reshman Class; Prom Committee; 
Delta Sigma Delta Fraternity, Scribe '36; 
Blue Key Fraternity; Assistant Business 
Manager, Dentos '36; Basketball '34, '3:;; 
C. X. lohnson Seminar. 



MYERS, LA VERNE 
La Harpe, Illinois 

La Harpe High School; Monmouth College; 
Delta Sigma Delta Fraternity; Loyola L'nion; 
C. N. Johnson Seminar. 



OLIVER, NORMAN R. 

Chicago, Illinois 

Englewood High School; Delta Sigma Delta 
Fraternity; C. N. Johnson Seminar. 



PETERSOX, CHARLES J. 

Chicago, Illinois 

St. Mel High School; Loyola University; 
C. C. D. S. Basketball Team '35, '36; Intra- 
mural Sports; Bowling '37; C. X. Johnson 
Seminar. k 

ROSIXSKI, ALFOXS J. I 

Xorth Tonavvanda, New York *- 

North Tonawanda High School; Canesisus 
College, Buffalo, Xew ^'ork; Xi Psi Phi 
Fraternity, Treasurer '35, President "36; Presi- 
dent Junior Class; Prom Committee '36; 
Bowling '36, '37; C. X. Johnson Seminar. 



SER\ER, ARTHUR B. 

Newark, Xew Jersey 

South Side High School; Xew York L niversity 
Treasurer Senior Class; Alpha Omega Fratern- 
ity Scribe '35; Intramural Sports; C. X. John- 
son Seminar. 



SHERMAN, MARTIN R. 
Chicago, Illinois 



Marshall High School; 
C. N. Johnson Seminar. 



Loj'ola University; 



SMENTEK, JOSEPH J. 
Chicago, Illinois 

Lane High School; Loyola L'ni\-ersit}-; Pi 
Delta Sigma Fraternity; Prcm Committee "36; 
Senior Executive Committee; Sergeant-at- 
Arms Senir)! Class; Intramural Sports; C. X. 
Johnson Seminar. 



STERK, GEORGE W. 

Lake Linden, Michigan 

Lake Linden High School: St. Mary's College; 
Executive Committee; All-L niversity Basket- 
ball champion Team "34; Intramural Sports: 
ball Champion Team "34; Intramural Sports; 
C. X. Jchnscn Seminar. 



SUKLALA, HENRY J. 
Chicago. Illinois 

Carl Schurz High School ; Crane Junior College; 
Pi Delta Sigma Fraternity; Basketball '34, '35; 
C. N. Johnson Seminar. 



SPOOXER, GRANT 

Chicago, Illinois 

Calumet High School; Dentos Staff '36; 
Intramural Sports; Delta Sigma Delta Fratern- 
ity; C. N. Johnson Seminar. 



STARSIAK, WILLIAM J. 

Chicago, Illinois 

Holy Trinity High School; Loyola L'niversity 
Freshman Class Artist; Dentos Staff '36; 
Xi Psi Phi Fraternity, President '37; Intra- 
mural Sports; Bowling '36, '37; C. N. Johnson 
Seminar. 



SWAINSON, W YNYARD S. 

Elmhurst, Illinois 

\\ yn}-ard High Schocil. \\ vnvard, Canada; 
^drk High School, Elmhurst; River Falls 
State Teachers College, Elmhurst College; 
Junior Class Editor; Delta Sigma Delta 
Fraternity; C. N. Johnson Seminar. 



TOMASZEWSKI. CASIMIR F. 

Chicago, Illinois 

Holy Trinity High School; Loyola L niversity 
C. N. Johnson Seminar. 





ULIP, EDWARD j. 
Berwyn, Illinois 

Morton Higli School; Armour Institute of 
Technology; Vice-President Freshman Class; 
Senior Executive Committee; Basketball "34; 
C. N. Johnson Seminar. 



■ WASKA, ROMAINE J. 
Chicago, Illinois 

Calumet HighSchool;Feature Editor Dentos'35; 
Psi Omega Fraternity; C. X. J(jhnson Seminar. 



WEISS, BERNARD 

Chicago, Illinois 

Maishall High School; Crane Junior College; 
Intramural Sports; C. X. Johnson Seminar. 



WOZXIAK, FRAXK S. 
Chicago, Illinois 

Morgan Park Military Academy; Lo\-ola 
University; Treasurer Freshman Class; Sec- 
retary Sophomore Class; Senior Executive 
Committee; Dentos Staff '36; Delta Sigma 
Delta Fraternity, Junior Page "36, Worthy 
Master 'iJ; Intramural Sports; C. N. Johnson 
Seminar. 



WROBLEWSKI. HEXRV S. 
Chicago. Illinois 

Weber High Schocl; Loyola University; Pi 
Delta Sigma Fraternity; Interfraternity Coun- 
cil; Dentos Staff "36; C. N. Johnson Seminar. 



WIEGEL, RAYMOND E. 
Chicago, Illinois 

Morgan Park Military Acadeni)-; North- 
western University; Business Manager Dentos 
'36; Class Editor '34; Delta Sigma Delta 
Fraternity, Senior Page "36; Blue Key Fra- 
ternity; Intramural Sports; C. N. Johnson 
Seminar. 



ZELKO, JOSEPH W". 

Jc'liet, Illinois 

Jcliet Township Fligh Schocl; Central Y. M. 
C. A. College; Loyola L'ni\'ersity ; Treasurer 
Junior Class; Dentos Staff "36; Delta Sigma 
Delta Fraternity; Intramural Sports; Pro- 
sector Anatomy '],j; C. N. Johnson Seminar. 



ALOISIO. MICHAEL P. 

Brooklyn, New York 

Bushwick High School; St. Johns College; 
C. N. Johnson Seminar. 



GEIRMANX, CHARLES A. 

Chicago, Illinois 

Calumet High School; Crane College; Central 
y. M. C. A. College; Loyola News '^ij; C. X. 
Johnson Seminar. 



PRIESS, DAMD 

Chicago, Illinois 

Morgan Park Military Academy; Loyola 
L'niversity; Intramural Sports; C. X. Johnson 
Seminar. 



RABIN, BEN A. 

Berwyn, Illinois 

Morton High School; Junior-Senior Prom 
Committee; Morton Junior College; Intra- 
mural Sports; C. N. Johnson Seminar. 



SCHOEN, PAUL E. 

Chicago, Illinois 

Loyola .\cademy; Loyola L'niversity; Delta 
Sigma Delta Fraternity; C. X. Johnson 
Seminar. 



AN AVERAGE DAY 



In- 



Arthur B. Server 



Listen closely, my good friends. 
To the sad, sad tale I tell, 
Of the days we know at C. C. D. S. 
liach day — a lifetime spent in hell. 



So carefully you put a new one in 

7\nd call over Dr. Dawson 

He looks at the filling and examines the bite, 

And the fun has just begun. 



You get up .early in the morn. 

And hurry off to school, 

Where they put you on a merry-go-round 

Till vou feel like a fool. 



Then he takes a look at the tooth again. 
And the matter he does carefully weigh; 
Then he turns to vou and sa}-s with a grin, 
"Take it out — there's distal deca\'I" 



First you go to lecture class 

In a hot and stuffy room. 

Where all the seats are hard as rocks, 

And the place feels like a tomb. 



In despair you send your patient home 
And go down to the senior lab 
Where you try to do some denture 
Midst a bedlam of blab and gab 



Then the teacher starts to lecture 
About seme subject awfully deep, 
And before you hardly know it. 
You've fallen fast asleep. 



You spend a few hours setting teeth 
.And you think you got them right 
^'ou bring them out to Pendleton 
\\ ho awaits ^'ou with delight. 



And just when you've got to sleeping good 
And you dream of some fond embrace, 
A friend of yours across the room 
Shoots a spit-ball at }-our face. 



"My bey" he says, "you sure are dumb" 

"You haven't the brains of a flea; 

"You d< n't even know who plays third for 

the Cubs, 
".•\nd sa\% don't argue with me I" 



But soon the lecture's over 

And you hurr\- to the floor. 

You wish that you could stay awake. 

Your eves feel so darn sore. 



Then he leads you to a Bunsen flame. 
And holds your work therein. 
And as your teeth fall slowly out. 
He veils: "Thev're not sealed in!" 



Your patient ccmes in an hour late. 

And }'ou throw him in the chair; 

Then you look for the amalgam that you put in. 

But cripes — it isn't there! 



So you spend a few more hours in the lab; 
To get the teeth to fit. 
And when you bring them out again — 
You find tliat Pen just quit. 



Then your patient finally confesses 
That he tried to crack a shell 
To see how strong the filling was 
And he broke it all to hell! 



So slowly you lay }"our work to rest 

And start to walk awa\-; 

And if you're so disgusted },'ou c; 

move. 
Little man, 'twas an average da\'. 



hardlv 



''Friendships make the hours fly fast 
As evening shadows lengthen. 
So it should be our constant aim 
Our friendship chain to strengthen. 




J 



''Friendships make the A&>..^_^^ 

As evening shadows lengthen. 
So it should be our constatii aim 
Our friendship chain to strengthen. 




THE LOYOLA UNMON 

To sponsor All-l'niversity events which would meet with the approval of every 
branch of the Uni\'ersit}- is the purpose for which the Lcycla Union was founded. 
However, due to the wide-spread distances that separate the schools, the plan of 
unification set forth b}' the Union has net as yet been realized in fidl. Yet, little 
by little, obstacles are over-come and ever)' }'ear sees a better harmony of ideas 
of the students of the different branches of the Uni\-ersity. 

The main plan of unification by the Union is the bringing together of students 
through social events. These All-University events are, as it were, a symposium 
for the interchange of ideas between students of diff'erent departments. Changes 
in the constitution of the Union was the big work of the year. The scope of the 
constitution is now wider than it has e\'er been, and more power has been gi\"en to 
the Union. 

The members of the Union of the present group are to be congratulated on the 
work of revising the constitution and on the whole-hearted co-operation given to 
all problems with which the\" dealt. 



THE JUNIOR 



The "White Tie and Tails" of the sophisticated members of the upper classes was quite 
a contrast to the very attractive white and gold ballroom of the Knickerbocker Hotel 
Friday, February fifth when the 1937 Junior-Senior Prom held the spotlight as the main 
event of the past years social season. 

The committee responsible f(;r the dance - and the deficit - was composed of: \\illiam 
Alurphy and S. B. Richards, co-chairmen; D. Meinig and William AlcEwen, orchestra 
and ballrocm; M. Chapin and R. Larsen, bids and program. The members of the faculty 
present were Dr. Lindner, Dr. McNulty, Dr. Holmes, Dr. Svoboda, and Mr. Lodeski. 



As to the music, "Red" Hodgson, who is better known as the composer of "The Music 
Goes 'Round and "Round," did an excellent job and was enthusiastically appreciated. 
His dramatic presentation of h.is famous fox-trot which went 'round and 'round at twelve 
midnite, was almost too — spectacular. 




SENIOR PROM 




Favors, in the form cf compacts, were red with gold lettering, for future reference to 
the /act that they were acquired at the Junior-Senior Prom. 

To make it easier for the Juniors to pay for the Seniors' bids the annual turkey raffle 
was held. Each man was gi\'en a book of tickets to sell — the luck\' ticket holder to rccei\'e 
one turkey or ten dollars in cash. "Hill Billy" Blevins' patient w<:;n the rafffe. There is 
still some dispute as to whether or not his patient ga\'e him his "cut" or whether she took 
the cash amount cut in gold foil fillings — \\ e wcnder.^ 

To one of the members of the Junior class it seemed as though the dance was dragging — 
so to li\-en things up a little he proceeded to bash in his skull by missing the top step on his 
way downstairs. Of course we have our own ideas, but we "ain't sa-\-in". 



Much credit is due the committee as well as the faculty for arranging and sponsoring 
a splendid prom. 



THE DENTOS 




It has been the efforts of the staff of the 1937 Dentos to place before you a publication 
noteworthy of its school, faculty, and graduates. 

The theme behind this year's book is the X-ray. The facult}' section has been headed 
Progncsticators, referring to those men who, by our signs and actions, are able to foretell, 
prophes}-, and predict our varied degrees of success. 

The E.\aminati( n, being the first step in any operation, has been the heading applied 
to the Freshmen. In the freshman year the student is carefully examined by the faculty 
and his ability to think is carefully scrutinized. 

In the sophomore year the first real light of dentistry is flashed upon the student, con- 
sequently the Sophomores have come under the head of Exposure. 

B\- the time the student has reached the junior class his theoretical knowledge of den- 
tistri,- is more or less complete. His remaining task is to put this knowledge into actual 
practice — hence Development has been the heading for the Juniors. 




OF 193 7 




Top Roil GOLDBE 

BoWuH flou'— Rich 



The seniors after completing four such periods have received all the required steps, 
and, through their records, have established their diagnoses. Accordingly the Seniors 
have been regarded as Diagnosticians. 

The activities this year, following through our general theme, have been termed 
Catalysts. ("Catalysis — acceleration of a reaction produced by the presence of a substance 
which itself appears to remain unchanged.") 

The Advertisers have been classed as Transformers, or those who change the graduate's 
life from one of a student to that of a practitioner. 

Heretofore the Dentos has been just another college annual, but by incorporating a 
subject closely related to dentistry, we, the staff, feel that the 1937 Dentos has been in- 
dividualized and made more concrete. 



^^ ithout the able assistaijce of Drs. Willman, McXulty, and Pike, to whom too much 
credit cannot possibly be given, the Dentos could not have been de\'eloped. Likewise 
acknowledgement is due to Air. Fred Alonteigel of the Pontiac Engraving Company 
and Mr. Oliver Rogers of the Rogers Printing Company. 

Upon the hearty co-operation and hard work of: Ralph Larsen, business manager; 
Douglas Aleinig, assistant editor; William Alurphy, assistant business manager; Harold 
Goldberg, circulating manager; Henter Blevins, photography editor; Donald AIc\'icar, 
artist; Everet Archer, Stanleigh Richards, and Joseph Schneider, make-up men, and the 
various class editors, the success, if any, of this volume depends. 

Thus the 1937 Dentos closes another year of work at C. C. D. S. — for many the last. 
For such it is much, but perhaps not too much, to hope that when they open these pages 
again and again as years pass they will be able to recall with appropriate humor and sen- 
timentality the joys and grief of college years. 



THE BUR 



iSlni B\JR 




The Bur, published three times each year through the combined efforts of the alumni 
and undergraduates of the Chicago College of Dental Surgery, is the official publication 
of tlie Alumni Association of the College. 

Although the greater part of the publication is devoted to articles by instructors and 
graduates of the school, the students, too, have a share in contributing toward a magazine 
of interest and edification to its readers. Each class is allotted space for its contributions; 
consequently, there are sections containing articles from the Senior, Junior, Sophomore, 
and Freshman classes, each of which is submitted b}' a duly appointed representative of 
his class. 

Henry Kahn is writing the Senior notes this \'ear, Alar\'in Cliapin is writing the Junior 
notes, Frank Jerbi is writing the Sophomore notes, and Frank Salisbury is the editor for 
the Freshman class. 

The three editions of the Bur are published in March, Juh" and November. Due to the 
unstinting efFcirts of its editor. Dr. R. \\ . McXulty. the Bur has reached its present high 
standing. 



Tlie March issue of this year's Bur contains — the program for the Annual Homecoming 
Clinic, and an article on "Dental Therapeutics in the Daih- Routine of Infirmary Prac- 
tice" by Dr. Ivlgar D. Coolidge, (a second article written b\' Dr. Coolidge will appear in 
the July issue of the Bur.) Dr. Rudolf Kronfeld also continued his information to the 
alumni as well as the student body regarding "The Foundation for Dental Research of 
the Chicago College of Dental Surgery", and "Laboratory A", our latest addition of modern 
dental equipment, was described to the "nth" degree by Dr. \\allace X. Kirby, as was the 
new Physics Laboratory. The March issue was concluded b\' "E.x Libris", an article on 
books, submitted by Mrs. Ruth Walsh, our librarian. 

\\ itli a great deal of expectancy and anticipation we look forward to the forthcoming 
issues of The Bur. 



THE LOYOLA NEWS 



The Lo yola N ews 

Hold Dental Homecoming April 8-9 



The Loyola News, the University weekly, carries en as the medium of association 
between the dental school and the other departments of the University. The weekl}- 
items of local interest make the News popular with the dental student and in glancing 
through its columns they become more or less University conscious. 

The paper is published entirely by students of the \-arious departments of the I_ ni\-ersit}-. 
The desire to participate in the numerous collegiate enterprises is stimulated by an accurate 
account of their activities. 

Such columns as "On The Aisle", '"Ho Hum," and "Lcyolans After Dark" add humor 
as well as items of interest to certain individuals. 

The dental news staff has endea\'ored to relate interesting events taking place at our 
campus and to herald tlie accomplishments of our students, fraternities, organizations and 
professors. The dental campus editor is Gerard Casey, and he is assisted by Joseph \"an 
Cura. The \"arious acti\"ity reporters are Charles Geirman, Arthur Adams, and Casimir 
Dumanowski. All dental news is approved before publication by the facult}' moderator. 
Dr. R. W. McXulty. 

The Dentos staff of 1937 offers sincere congratulations to the Loyola News and wishes 
them continued success. 



INTRAMURAL 



One of the greatest successes of this year's sport activities was the bowling tournament. 
The fight of the teams for positions was close throughout the season with the Seniors finally 
proving their superiority. The Juniors No. 2 and the Lucky Strikes ended the season 
with a very close fight for second place with the Juniors No. 2 led by Chuck Zajdzinski 
winning by a slight margin. 

The high individual game was won by Dr. J. Svoboda (242) of the Faculty. The high 
series was wen by Owen DuUaghan (602) of the Seniors. The high team game (930) and 
the high team series (264S) was taken by the Seniors. 

The humor was mainly provided by Chapin, Peterson, and Mc\ icar who by their 
peculiar antics provided laughter throughout the season. The last night of bowling "Sweep- 
stakes Night", found every one in a particularly good humor due to the fact that the cash 
prizes were awarded that night. The contest was taken by ever3'body in a spirit of good 
fun and was won by Zajdzinski and Dr. Stasinski, the second prize was won by Binotti 
and Breier, the booby prize was captured after a terrific struggle by \ enzara and Larsen. 
The struggle for individual standing was keen, with only a few points separating the first 
six men. 



Owen Dull.\ghax 


165 


S. MiZGATA 


163 


S. Morrow 


15S 


E. Breier 


157 


R. Ernst 


156 


C. Zajdzinski 


155 




F.XIORS 
Peterson 
dullaghan 

MlZCATA 
ROSIXSKI 

Ernst, Capt. 



BOWLING 



JUNIORS NO. 2 
Zajdzinski, Capt. 

MiKULA 

Vexzara 
Schmidt 
Toi.pa 




TEAM 


STANDING 






Won 


Los 


Seniors 


46 


17 


Juniors No. 2 


42 


21 


Lucky Strikes 


31 


32 


Juniors No. i 


28 


35 


Sophomores 


24 


39 


Faculty 


22 


41 




JUNIORS NO. I 
Richards 
Chapix 
Larsex. Capt. 
Archer 
McV'icAR 



FACULTY 
Dr. Stixe 
Dr. Svoboda 
Dr. .Michexer 
Dr. I,ASKOASKi,Capt. 
Dr. Stasixski 



SOPHOMORES 
Ba.ssak 

Connors, Capt. 
Adams 
Babcock 

BlXOTTI 




spi 



OMICRON KAPPA UPSILON 

PI CHAPTER 

Founded at Northwestern University 
1914 

Established at Chicago College of Dental Surgery 
1925 

Each year several men are elected from the graduating class to Omicron Kappa Upsilon, 
the Graduate Honor Society of the Profession. The high standard of this honor group 
is safeguarded b}' the limitation of membership, only twelve per cent from each class 
being eligible. 

The fraternity was organized in 1914 to fill a long-felt necessity for some such group. 
Drs. Thomas L. Gilmer, Arthur D. Black, and C. R. E. Koch were the men who met in 
that year at Northwestern University Dental School and gave to the Profession Omicron 
Kappa Upsilon. 

In the words of the founders, "the fraternity was organized to encourage and develop 
rit of emulation among students in Dentistry and to recognize in an appropiate manner 
e who shall distinguish themselves by a high grade of scholarship." 

In addition to selection of its members from the graduating classes, practitioners may 
become eligible. Those, who, "thniugh excellences of professional attainments and citizen- 
ship, have distinguished themselves in their profession, and in communities" ma}- have 
membership conferred upon them. 

A chapter, designated as Pi, was founded at the Chicago College ot Dental Surger}' 
in 1925. Since the charter was granted, approximateh' three hundred men. practitioners 
and graduates, have been honored by election to Pi Chapter. 

Almost all <if the members of the faculty of this school have, by reason of their distinctive 
accomplishments, received the key which is emblematic of membership in this honorary 
dental scholastic fraternity. This fraternity has for its officers such men as Dr. ^^'. H. G. 
Logan, president, Dr. R. W. McNulty, vice-president, and Dr. P. G. Puterbaugh, secretary- 
treasurer. Of last year's graduates men of recognized scholastic ability were given the 
signal honor of wearing the key of this worthy fraternal organization. As this book goes 
to press the new members from the present graduating class are not as vet selected; but 
by glancing over the brilliant scholars in this group, one can find many eligible men whose 
names, no doubt, will grace the honor roll of this fraternity. 

Those who received this distinction in 1936 were: 

DoN.'\LD H. Mammen 
Clark J. McCooey 
Oliver H. Pitch 
Austin J. Rust 
Edmund J. Scanlan 
\\ alter a. W ykhuis 



BLUE KEY 




National Honorary Fraternity 

Founded at Uni\-ersitv of Florida 
1924 

Established at Loycla Uni\"ersit}" 
1926 



The Blue Key National Honorary Fraternity was founded at the University of Florida 
in 1924, and membership is attained through participation in extra-curricular acti\'ities. 
"The test shall be that students shall be recognized as all-around men in scholarship, 
college activities, high moral standing, and personality". Membership is not onh' an 
objective to be striven for, but a definite responsibility; not only an award, but a dut)- 
and an obligation. This ideal is set forth in the motto of the Blue Ke}' Fraternity, "Serving, 
I Live". 

Progress is ever present in Blue Key. The Blue Key men on one campus of the Uni- 
versity act as host to the Blue Key men and their friends on other campuses. This year 
the dental campus was host to the University. At this meeting the University was invited 
to look behind the scenes of scientific research in the dental profession by inspecting the 
newly created Research Foundation of the Chicago College of Dental Surgery. 

Faculty members in the dental school are: Dr. \\. H. G. Logan, Dean; Dr. Earl P. 
Boulger, Dr. Harold A. Hillenbrand, Dr. Frank W. Hyde, Dr. Wallace N. Kirby. Dr. 
Rudolph Kronfeld, Dr. Paul T. Dawson and Dr. Henr)- L. Boris. 

L'ndergraduate members in the dental school are: Gerard Case}', Raymond W eigel 
Lawrence Furlong, Lawrence Murphy, and Charles Lang. 



DELTA SIGMA DELTA 




Top Roil — Doctors Boulger, Buckley, Dawson. Glupker, Grisamore. Hillenbrand, Holmes 
Middle Rou — Hyde, C. N. Johnson, R. ,Iohnson, Kirby, Lindner, Logan, McNeil, McNulty. 
Bottom Row — MiCHENER, Mueller, Pike, Puterbaugh, Schoen, Swanson, Watt, Willman. 



Back in 1882 nine men in the College of Dental Surgery of the University of Michigan 
at Ann Arbor, realizing the importance of professional fraternal association, organized 
and adopted a constitution for the first Greek letter fraternity founded for the purpose 
cf uplifting dentistry by inculcating in the minds of the students and of the graduates 
a spirit of fraternal co-operation toward scientific, ethical, and professional progress. 
Alpha Chapter was founded on November 15, 1882. Not long afterward, on March 24, 
1885, Beta Chapter was established at the Chicago College of Dental Surger}'. In the 
same year the Supreme Chapter was organized for graduates in dentistry. 

Delta Sigma Delta fraternity consists of a Supreme Council to conduct the business 
of the fraternity between the annual meetings of the Supreme Chapter; a Council of Depu- 
ties to guide the activities of the Subordinate Chapters; Continental Chapters in practically 
every foreign country; fifty Auxiliary Chapters in United States and Canada; and Subordin- 
ate Chapters at thirty-two dental schools across the continent. 

The official publication of the fraternity is the quarterly, Desmos. It maintains close 
contact between all members and chapters in our country as well as those scattered to the 
four corners of the earth. Each issue presents articles of interest and scientific importance 
by members conspicuous in their fields; several pages are devoted to news and notes of 
the student and alumni chapters; and an accurate directory service is maintained. 

Beta Chapter meets twice each month at the Professional \ . M. C. A. building. In 
the past year meetings have been of instructive as well as of social importance. The 
chapter is now under the guiding hand of Deput\' Supreme Grand Master, Dr. E. P. Boulger. 

Several of the highlights of the social events of the year were those sponsored by Delta 
Sigma Delta. The pledges were honorably feted at the annual dance. Plans and efforts 
were not in vain by the social season being culminated with the presentation of the Spring 
Formal for the graduating seniors. 

The membership of Beta Chapter has reached gratif\-ing proportions; thirt\--fi\"e men 
accepted pledge pins and out of this number twenty-fi\'e were initiated before the semester 
was out. 

The past year's successes are products of Past Grand Master Graham's labors while 
those of the coming year shall be accumulated by Grand Master Larsen. 

















AIA ' 'cM^.^^rM 







^1 ^1 w^"^ i^i^ci f^ 

^ f^ Q 





7of) fliiii — Ghaham. Wozniak, Miirphy, Wiegel, P'ohnango. Lang. Spooner. FniLoxa. 
■•second Roir — Crook, Zelko, Bolte, Olson, Sterk, Swainson, Montgomery Schoen 
r/im/Boii— Myers, Ernst, Lakses, Chipin floKuicHTER .'Jingier 
Faurlh /?o;,— Archer, Kki.i.i I.m.mi,,, S« m,,/ S, hmm.kk M, V„ w. Hlevivs Ortm^n 

F,/(ft /?„„— Lee, CHAR.M, S DiWiii \hn \I,K,, 11m, \,,-,nN-.i ■'-"™-"^- 

-■■.r/;, «„«— Fisher, .-^pooviK \i, ,mum \;,.uu„.~ Um:, ,, 1 1 1 i, , hnepk. Holmes, Gir\ 

.KHvdvs,, It. uKF,.^M,Tii, (;,n-»M,. HE, Gibson. 



B<.tlum Hoir^W^N Kley, Hi 



PS I OMEGA 




In the spring of 1892 Alpha Chapter of Psi Omega was organized at the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery. Forty members formally adopted and signed the original ritual on 
June tlie Sth, and the real activity of the Chapter commenced the following October. 

From a little band of three hundred members and three active Chapters in 1S95, Psi 
Omega has grr)wn to something over eighteen thousand in membership and has Chartered 
fifty-five active Chapters since its organization in 1892. 

Kappa Chapter of Psi Omega was founded in 1.S98 at the Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery by a body of men who realized the advantages which could be derived from fraternal 
friendship. 

As soon as its Alumni entered into practice they carried out the teachings of the fra- 
ternit\- and connected themselves with dental organizations, and have been prominent 
in every movement to advance and to improve the standards of dentistry as they were 
encouraged to do by the lessons of the ritual and the teachings of the fraternity. Psi 
Omega has been a strong influence in the development of dentistry as a profession and in 
the battle to attain fr)r dentistry the esteem and respect to which it is entitled as a highly 
important field ni health ser\ice. 

The official bulletin of Psi Omega is the "Frater", a quarterly publication intended to 
keep the members informed of fraternity matters. 

Kappa Chapter convenes on the first and last Tuesday of each month at the Professional 
Schools ^ . M. C. A. Much interest has been manifested in the meetings since the intrc-iduc- 
tion of table clinics given perii>dicall\- b)' various commercial concerns. 

Last fall Kappa Chapter was largely responsible for the instigation of the Inter-Fratern- 
ity Jamboree, which was held as a Welcome Dance for the freshman class at the Medinah 
Athletic Club. 










r'*> 1^ rs "^ '^ 





Top «uii— G. Meinig, Mase, .Muui'hv, D. Meinig, UeWoli-. 
MitUilt: Row — GovoSTis. Marks. Bruzas. Styburski. Fisher, Uasqui. 
Bottom Row — Bassak. Winquist, Binotti. Link, Knickels, Dedekind. 



Psi Omega sponsored a smoker for incoming pledges at the Midwest Athletic Club. 
It was an outstanding success drawing man\' alumni as well as freshmen. 

On April jrd., Psi Omega alumni observed their forty-fifth anniversar}- with a banquet 
at the Medinah Athletic Club, which was noteworthy for the large turn-out of acti\-e 
Chapter members. 

Kappa Chapter unanimously chose as its officers for the new \-eai a group of men who 
will serve with a membership that will support them, Stanley Alarks was chosen to suc- 
ceed George Meinig as Cirand Master, Casimir Bassak to succeed Stanley Marks as Junior 
Grand Master, George Rasqui will take o\'er \\ ilfred Mase's position as Treasurer, \\ illiam 
Murphy succeeds James Govostis as Secretary, and \\ illiam Fisher will replace Robert 
DeWolf as Editor. An E.\ecuti\e Committee was formed to act in an advisor}' capacity 
to the Grand Master. This committee consists of Douglas Meinig, \\ illiam Murphy, 
and George Rasqui. 

Of the ten men pledged to Kappa Chapter this year, si.x have been formally initiated 
into membership. 



XI P S I PHI 



The objectives of Xi Psi Phi fraternity are to promote social unity among dental students 
generally and to render mutual assistance among them; to inspire intellectual advancement 
and to broaden their appreciation of friendship while they are pursuing their course of 
study; to establish a fraternal feeling and brotherhood among them while they are in their 
respective schools and colleges; and to promote fellowship, sociability, moral rectitude, 
intellectual advantage and opportunity to its members after they have entered the pro- 
fession of dentistry. 

Lambda Chapter has endeavored to maintain the brilliant standards of Xi Psi Phi. 
Its graduates have achieved fame and distinction in all fields of dentistry. 

The finest aid to a local undergraduate chapter is the alumni of that chapter, and the 
Lambda Chapter has an alumni that is active, an alumni that is enthusiastic and guiding. 
We are proud of r)ur brothers and the individuals who govern the affairs of the Xi Psi Phi. 

The members of the active and alumni chapters, both here and in foreign countries, 
are bound closer together by the Xi Psi Phi Quarterly published by the fraternity. In 
connection with dental and scientific articles b}- prominent brothers, a large portion is 
devoted to chapter activities. 

Lambda meets twice monthly at the Alumni quarters in the Hamilton Club. Here 
students make valuable contacts and clinical observatifms. Social events have had their 
place on Lambda's calendar to round out the acti\ities. 




Dr. Office 





^ ^ 




■ft 




ryf> c^ 



Top Ron- — RosiNSKi. \'an Cura. Dumanowski. Tolpa, Kochanski, Sobon. Adams. Hajdc 

Middle. Rim — Jenkins. DeMarco, Zullo. Sutlev, Stewart. Ziolkowski. 

Bottom Ron — Czeslaivski. Kouba. ZrREwicz. Starziak. Chmiel, Lamothe, Fehinoton. 



The Zip Stag party was the initial event of the year, followed by the Lambda Chapter 
pledge party given in the Old King Cole and Red Lacquer Rooms of the Hamilton Club. 
Both of these initial events overflowed with the well known Zip enthusiasm. 

The fall quarter showed an abundance of Zip spirit in the way of parties and other 
fraternity functions. Here all the aifairs were given in conjunction with RHO chapter 
of Northwestern University. The Annual Zip banquet was outstanding in the social 
events of the year. Our formal initiation was held in conjunction with Rho Chapter after 
the pledges passed their regular Hell-Week. To close the 3'ear's activities, the Annual 
Farewell Formal closed the pages of students' lives for four departing members, and will 
welcome Dr. E. L. Richey into the activities of Lambda. 

The presiding officers of the Xi Psi Phi for the past year were:\\ illiam J.Starsiak — 
President; Casimir C. Dumanowski — Secretary-Treasurer; Alfons J. Rosinski — Master 
of Ceremonies and Editor. 



The incoming officers are: 

Joseph F. \ anCura-President; T. Tolpa — Vice-President; Steve Hajduk — Recording 
Secretary; Arthur G. Adams — Fin. Secretary-Treasurer; Dale S. Jenkins — Master of 
Ceremonies; E. Czeslawski — Editor. 



Deputy Supreme President 
Dr. E. Adams Prugh 

Assistant Deput}' Supreme President 
Dr. Corvin I*\ Stine 



ALPHA OMEGA 



This year marks the closing of the third decade in Alpha Omega's history. In 1907, 
a small group of men of the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery, realizing the need 
for professional fraternal association, founded Alpha Omega Fraternity. These young 
men of ideals decided to band together for the advancement of their fellow men in the 
hope that their united efforts would mean the strengthening within to counteract any 
pressing influence without. Slowly but steadily more and more chapters weie added 
and with the affiliation of Alpha Lambda Chapter, formerly known as Alpha Zeta Gamma 
fraternity, on October 7, 1932, its goal was reached for it had the enviable position of being 
the leading Jewish dental fraternity on the North American continent. 

Today Alpha Lambda is but one of thirty active chapters scattered throughout the 
North American continent in all of the larger dental schools. The sole purpose of this 
fraternity is expressed in their motto "Amor Harmon et \ eritus" and to this purpose 
they hold both within theii organization and their contact with the outside world. 

As a chapter. Alpha Lambda has had the most successful year of its brief history. The 
membership has been tripled during the past year, a fact which will undoubtedly go toward 
making this chapter better suited to culti\'ate the spirit of fraternalism and sociality among 
its members. We regret the loss of our three senior members, ex-chancellor Ben Mikell, 
Arthur Server, and ALirtin Curshan through graduation. 

Alpha Omega, the schod, and science as a whole suffered a severe loss through the 
passing away of Dr. K. B. Fink. Beloved and respected by all who knew him, both as 
a scholar and a man, his loss is keenh' felt. 

During the past year we have also rbtained a new and much larger meeting place, our 
meetings being held semi-monthly at the Congress Hotel. 

With the greatly increased membership to aid, a most successful year was had socially. 
The first event of the new term was in initiation banquet at the Aledinah Athletic Club. 









^^ 



Top ftoil- MiKELL. CURSHAN. SERVER, D. CoHEN, MOSER. Mr 

Seconil Row — FisHMAN. Gelberd, Epstein, Klapman. 

Th-iril Ki)i(— ScHEFF, Horn, Ravne.s Fein, Appel. Firemin. C 

Bottuiii Rou — Shapiho, Becker, Belofskv, Bender.sky. Mo9e.v 



Later, the same evening, the prospective freshmen neophytes came up and a smoker was 
held, at which several interesting motion pictures were shown. 

Following the holiday season, several fraternit)- parties were held, at the Rathskeller, 
private homes, and at the Congress Hotel. On April ii, the second initiation banquet 
of the school year was held in the Pine Room of the Congress Hotel. 

To complete the }'ear, the annual formal Senior Dinner Dance will be held on May 28, 
at the Congress Casino. There the members and alumni expect to bring to an appropriate 
close the scholastic careers of their three departing seniors. The Chancellor's key will 
be presented to Ben Alikell and the Junior Scholarship Award to Arthur Server. It will 
be a fitting clima.x to a most successful year. 

The future holds many bright prospects. The efficiency of the present officers indicates 
good times ahead for Alpha Lambda. The officers for the following year are: Albert Moser- 
Chancellor; David Cohen — Vice-Chancellor; Norman jMoses — Quaestor; Moses Gelberd — 
Scribe; Lawrence Scheff — Editor; and Henrv Gold — JMacer. 



C.N. JOHNSON SEMINAR 




Dr. C. NT. Johnson Dr. G. Pii 



The C. N. Johnson Seminar was organized in this school when the class of IQ37 entered 
as pre-dental students five years ago. Recognized at that time as the first organization 
of its kind it has since been imitated in other colleges. 

Named after our Dean of Students this extra-curricular study club has for its purpose 
"the instilling within its members a more profound interest in the problems of dental 
research". This is accomplished mainly b}' attendance at lectures, outside of the regular 
scholastic activities, on varied subjects by well-known authorities in each specific field. 
The way is also open for its members to write and present papers or criticisms of papers 
on dental subjects or allied topics of interest. 

In tlie past two years there ha\e been se\eral interesting lectures which the junior and 
senior members will no doubt remember well. Probably the most interesting was the 
"Canti" film on cancer presented by Dr. Simonds, chairman of the Illinois branch of the 
American Societ}' for the Control of Cancer. 

Earl\- this \"ear Dr. Robert E. Lee, head of the student health examinations at Loyola 
L niversit}-, gave a splendid talk on "\\ hat the Records Re\'eal in Student Examinations'", 
and just how the health program is carried out. Another highlight was Dr. Dwight C. 
Atkinson's lecture on "Radiographic Interpretation" accompanied by lantern slides. 

For future meetings the junior and senior students look to the class of 1038 to carry 01^ 
the good work of the C. N. Johnson Seminar. 



THOSK WHO IIA\ K RKAl) HISTORY' W ITH DISCRIMI- 
NATION KNOW THK FALLACY' OF THOSK PANE- 
GYRICS AND IN\KCTI\KS WHICH RFPRKSFNl" 
IN]:)1\ IDUALS AS AFFECTING CiRI'.A'I' MORAl, AND 
INTELLECTUAL REXOLUTIONS, SUBVERTING 
ESTABLISHED SYSTEMS, AND IMPRINTING A NEW 
CHARACTER ON THEIR AGE. THE DIFFERENCE 
BETWEEN ONE MAN AND ANOTHER IS BY NO 
MEANS SO GREAT AS THE SUPERSTITIOUS CROW D 
SUPPOSE. 

Macaulay 



'^ Achievement worthy of the name. 

Must be our great ambition, 
For things worth while are hard fought for 

There\f akvavs competition.'^ 




\* 






,^^^ 



ipf 



''''Achievement u'orthv oj . 

Must be o.'r great ambitior. 
For things worth while we h/.rd jought for 

There's aLu>a\s competition." 






r 



■■■■■a 



ANTICIPATE SUCCESS! 




Because they have pioneered every major 
improvement in dental cabinet design, 
, appearance, and efficiency for over 25 
years, American Dental Cabinets are used 
in over 75 per cent of all dental offices. 
Your choice of a Modern American 
Cabinet reflects your alert, professional 
attitude; your anticipation of a successful 
career! Ask your dental supply dealer. 

AMERICAN CABINET COMPANY 

TWO RIVERS WISCONSIN 



Ybu 



ill probably 

ismo 

esthetic in, 



make 



local ^f^^^^£J^^jfcfions 



»V HEN you consider the number 
of local anesthetic injections you are 
likely to make during your practicing 
years, even a slight variation in effi- 
ciency affects a large number of cases. 
Hence we suggest that you use Novol 
Local Anesthetic - the local anesthetic 
with the highest efficiency — right from 
the outset. 



That "highest efficiency" is based 
upon Novol's exclusive advantages — 

1. Solutions with a high pH, above the 
critical acid value of the blood. 

2. Cartridges that permit a complete chain 
of sterile precautions from container to oral 
cavity. 

3.' Cartridges that reach the user just as 
fresh as the day they were made cartridges 
packed in vacuum. 



NOVOCOL CHEMICAL MANUFACTURING COMPANY, Inc. 

2921-23 Atlantic Ave. Brooklyn, N. Y. 




SOON, THE PORTALS OF A NEW ERA 
WILL BE OPEN TO YOU . . . 

. . . An Era of Professional Service to Mankind ! 



i^uccEss or failure awaits j'ou . . . 
success which will be measured by 
your willingness to accept certain fun- 
damental principles of Professional 
procedure and management. 

The Weber Company wants to help 
J'OU understand what those principles 
are and how they may be applied suc- 
cessfully. Besides making for your 
use a fine line of dental equipment, 
fairly priced, we can help you with 
your office location analysis, office 
planning and decorating. We can 
help you to finance your initial pur- 
chase of equipment and we can help 



you with \our early mechanical office 
problems — plumbing, wiring, sign 
lettering, etc. 

When you purchase Weber equip- 
ment, you are provided with one of 
the most comprehensive courses on 
Dental Office Management ever com- 
piled, introducing a new service deal- 
ing with bookkeeping forms; office 
management; duties of the assistant 
and hygienist ; contracting and pre- 
senting all classes of dental service; 
radiograpliy and all phases of its use; 
suggested letter forms for all neces- 
sary professional correspondence, etc. 
Xo cliarge is made for this service. 



]Veh,'r 



iiuipmint is >.;,I,I hii srlrrt,;!. n-.-'pniixihlr ilriital (lenh-rs n'frti- 
,,'iini iJir tnilli (ihniit it },i-fi,n- nidkiii,/ iimir tiiml il,i-i.iiin, tn hiiii. 



THE 



WEBER 



DENTAL MFG. CO. 

CANTON -OHIO 



EXPORT DEPARTMENT, 149 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY 



Our Best Means oF Obtaining Business 

WILL CONTINUE TO BE 
THE RECOMMENDATION OF SATISFIED CUSTOMERS 

(JALLAGHER SERVK^E INCLUDES 

COOPERATION IN SECURING A GOOD LOCATION 
PLANNING MODERN ARRANGEMENT OF OFFICE 

X]':\V WEBER 1)1-:XTAL El^'IPMEXT 

COMPLETELY RECONDITIONED EQUIPMENT ALL MAKES 
A CONVENIENT PLAN OF PAYMENT 

HARRY U. GALLAGHER 

Dt'iital Equipvunit 

37 So. Wabash Avenue 

Phones: Central 3562-3563 

CHICAGO 

26 Years of Satisfactory Equipment Service 



Manufacturers of 

Surgical and Dental 

Specialties 



FARA MFG. CO. 

6773 Talcott Avenue 
CHICAGO 



PHONE NEWCASTLE 3830 



Phone State 2 TOO 



MASTER 

DENTAL COMPANY 



• We specialize in the construction of 
practical restorations. 

• /•(/// information, literal arc and pria' 
list upon nujuesl. 



162 North State Street 
Chicago. Illinois 



Beij.U.S.Pof.Off-. 

•Hic first time you use it 

• PERFECT IN FORM 

• UNIFORM IN QUALITY 

• WHITE AND LUSTROUS 

COWf^ORMS TO MEW FEDERAL ANO APA SKCIFICATIONS 



CRESCENT DENTAL MFG CO., 

1839 S. Crawford Ave., CHICAGO 








Great Lakes 


COMPLIMENTS 




Linen Supply Co. 


OF 




Complete Rental 
Service on 


A 




TOWELS. COATS AND GOWNS 


FRIEND 




for the 
Dental Profession 

Plant: 36th and Pamell Avenue 


J. P. F. Jr. 




Teleiihone; Boulevard 6301 ) 



/ 

c-rZ''^ir noble 

/lytOye4Aian. deserves 

o M 




That is Why they Always 
Specify DEE Gold to their 
Laboratory and Dealer. 

THOMAS J. 

DEE & CQ 

Precious Metals" 

55 EAST WASHINGTON ST., CHICAGO 




We Buy Old Gold, Filings, 
Bench Sweeps, Etc. 



% 



Where Do You Send 

YOUR LABORATORY WORK? 

• This is a inattcr of vital importance to every dentist antl should be carefully 
considered. 

• The American Dental Company is the recognized outstanding leader in this 
territory having conducted a high class, conservative dental laboratory service 
for over 36 years. 

• "American Service" is designed for the better trade — for those who are 
particular — those who really appreciate quality. 

• There is a real satisfaction in being able to saj' "The American I^ental Company 
is my laboratory". 

• We are not interested in the reducing of prices, but we are vitally interested 
in anything that will make "American Service" more valuable to our customers. 

• True, we are in business to make money, but we fully realize that "He profits 
most who serves best". 

• We solicit the jjatronage of the better elenu lit — th(is(> who are particular. 

AMERICAN DENTAL COMPANY 

LABORATORIES 



5 SO. WABASH AVE. 



CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 




/ ,s„ , .,„„.„•. /„„.s, i..,i,..r.„..n.. STAKDARD DENTAL LABORATOEIES of Chicago, Inc. 

Meim, >l »m> Dl^Tll, Abts Blu.din.; 185 N. WABASH AVE. Devkbokn 6721.2-i-t-5 



COAL -COKE 

FOR 

HOMES - APARTMENTS - INDUSTRIES 

Headquarters for 
BLUE RIDGE POCAHONTAS & STOKER COALS 




WESTERN FUEL CO. 

Genekm. Office: 2627 W . ADAMS ST. 
SiBiRBAN Office: 1900 \^ . LAKE ST. 

iE;::"iZ34 



Hair you tried 



>PPERS 



BLUE ISLAND 
SPECIALTY CO, Inc. 



Manujacliircrs (if liisco Burs, fnstni- 

ments. Copper lid tuls. lm[>r<'ssi(in Iraxs. 

Alounlcd Points and Orlliotlinlic 

Materials 



BLUE ISLAND, ILL. 




Individuality the Mark of 
The Succesful Dentist 

Your Patients Will Appreciate the 
Individual Touch and Sanitation 

Lily TuLip Cup 
& Specialty Co. 



317 No. Wells St. 



Sup. 3476 








find 



pleasure in referring friends to 
"their dentist," and it is sound 
business practice to view every 
desirable patient that enters your 
office as a potential source of contact 
with equally desirable accounts. 

Make these references easy for your patients 
and without apology for the first impressions of 
your office. It isn't necessary to create a burden- 
some overhead in making a new equipment in- 
stallation. For a very moderate cost, you can 
install an S. S. White C or E Type Unit and a 
Diamond Chair. The dignity and efficiency ex- 



pressed by these will make your office inviting, 
reassuring, and proclaim the up-to-date reliable 
service that you are certainly capable of rendering. 

iVloreover, they will permit you to com- 
mence practice with new, trouble-free equipment 
— let you experience the joy of first ownership and 
the inspiration that only new equipment can give. 

Make it a point to see a demonstration of the 
S. S. White C and E Type Units and remember that 
the most simplified S. S. White Unit can be easily 
built into a senior unit as the practice permits. 



OUR OfFIC€ PLANNING S€RVIC€ IS -FRt* 



Without incurring any obligation whatsoever on your part, 
you can have the services of our office planning depart- 
ment. Ask your dealer about this service, also about 
our liberal, deferred payment plans, or, write direct. 

THE S.S.WHITE DENTAL MFG. CO. 

211 SOUTH 12th STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



A Dental Depot 
of Distinction 




VUK PriTSKIl-iLn lU'lLDlXd 

55 Kasi Wasliiiifrfon Street 

The Woilil's I'liirsi Dental Depot 

Twc'iitv I'ir.-if Floor 

Take Tower Elevator 



In artistic, excellent, and practical planning, 
this depot we believe is unexcelled by any 
other commercial space of similar chai-acter 
in the world. 

Store Custcmer Service 

A cr.stomer's section in the store proper, 
with merchandise stock and salesmen exclu- 
sively devoted to their service, insures prompt 
and courteous attention to all who visit the 
depot in person. 

An Order Department 

Entirely removed from the customer's .sec- 
tion, gives prompt end undivided attention to 
mail, phone and salesmen's orders, thus in- 
suring their careful handling and facilitating 
delivery. 

Complete Stock of All Kinds 

rf dental merchandise in current demand in- 
cluding the largest retail stock of Standard 
S. S. \Miite Products in America. 



Service to Graduates 

Graduates will be interested to know that a 
large force of salesmen in intimate contact with 
ccnditions in this section permits us to offer 
vahiable information and advice regarding 
l(jcaticns, the choosing of which is an important 
factor in assuring the success of a new practice. 

A verj^ efficient and reliable office planning 
service is also available without cost or obli- 
gation to buv. 



The S. S. V^HITE 



55 East Washington St., Cor 
CHICAGO 



DENTAL MFG. CO. 

Wabash Ave. 



Mike Bauer 

DENTAL 
LABORATORIES 



159 North State Street 

Room 1504 Chicago, 111. 

Dearborn 8403—3455 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



A FRIEND 



COMPLIMENTS 



Dudley's Cafeteria 



BASEMENT 

CHICAGO COLLEGE DENTAL 

SURGERY 



PATRONIZE 

OUR 

ADVERTISERS 









AT 




-^^^ 


THE 




^m 


Y 


1804 Congress St. 


Athletic Equipment 


Living Accommodations 


Dining Facilities for Regular or 
Banquet Service 


Balanced Program of Activities 




COLUMBIA READY-MADE 
STONE MODEL BASES 

Made in 5 Standard Sizes 

A REAL incentivp to use .•^tiuly 
models, hccaiiso they make tlic 
making of presentable study models 
easy. 

Just pour in plaster and mount the 
anatomical casts. No foriuing, no 
grinding; the casts occlude automatic- 
ally. 

Study models let paticnte xee their 
mouths ae you see them. Ubc study 
models as regularly as you do X-rays 



COLUMBIA DENTAL & X-RAY CORP. 



ROOT STUDIOS 

Est. 1889 

185 No. Wabash Avenue 



# 



OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS 

1936 DENTOS 

1937 DENTOS 

Special Rates to C. C. D. S. Students at All Times 




INVEST WHERE YOUR DOLLAR BRINGS YOU MOST 

Be hard headed about your equipment investment. Where does your dollar bring you most? 
What manufacturer does most to make your professional life successful? Check the Five Point 
Ritter "Plus Value" offer — then compare — 



1. Ritter Equipment. Electrical and Mechanical per- 
fection plus beauty and long life, make 80% of the pro- 
fession choose Ritter when equipping their dental offices. 

2. Ritter Practice Building Service. Here is practical, 
valuable assistance in building an efficient, profitable prac- 
tice. Let the combined experiences of thousands of success- 
ful dentists answer your problems. 

3. Ritter Statistical Department. Here are facts and 
figures on population, purchasing power, opportunities 
for specialized practice, etc., of invaluable help to you. 
Predetermine your success by choosing the proper location. 



4. Ritter Architectural Planning Department. Here 
is the same practical advice that has designed over 30,000 
efficient dental offices. This department, finest of its kind, 
will take care of every detail of office planning. 

5. Ritter Deferred Payment Plan. Here is the utmost 
in cooperation for those about to start in practice. Small 
payments in monthly installments over a period as long as 
three years. For details, consult your Ritter dealer. 

TAKE THE FIRST STEP to planned profes- 
sional success by utilizing the Ritter "Plus 
Value" Services. 



RITTER DENTAL MANUFACTURING CO., INC., Ritter Park, ROCHESTER. N. Y. 
?IFTY YEARS OF PROGRESS 



TO THE CLASS OF 1937 

We Cordially Invite You 

AMERICA'S NEWEST DENTISTS 

To Visit 

AMERICA'S NEWEST AND MOST MODERN 
DENTAL DEPOT 

Completed less than a year aKO, you will fiml our new store an inspii'ation 
and a convenience. Desi^netl to display every type of material and applianc(> 
to its best advantage, it will enable you to make accurate comparisons and select 
those items best suited to your requirements. 

Here you will see such outstanding lines as C'aulk's Plastics, Cleveland Dental 
and S. S. White Steel Goods, "Cutwell" Burs, "Carpule" Anesthetics, Nej-'s 
and Dee's Gold, together with the prfxhicts of othei- leathng American Man- 
ufacturers. 

"Frame's for Teeth" has been a "By-word" among the Profession for two 
generations. Our stock of "Trubyte" Teeth and Steele's Facings is perhaps the 
largest on the North American Continent. This insures the selections you want 
when you want them. 

Experienced and competent dental men will i)e glad to advise in choosing 
the needs for your future office. Such assistance is available without f)l)ligation 
on your part. 

We solicit your future patronage on the basis of Quality, Service and Friendly 
Co-operation. 



C. L. FRAME DENTAL SUPPLY CO. 

lOth Floor Marshall Field Annex Bldg. 
25 K. Washington St. Chicago, 111. 

JT t' ro-opmilc Hi'lh llir Rillpr Dental E<iuipmiml C(>m[)aiiv 
in (listrihuling Rillrr products in the Chicago area. 



Seeley 9737 

G's RESTAURANT 

Across from Stadium 

"The Home of Sizzling Steaks" 



Geo. Motto, Ma;r. 
1825 W. Madison St. 



MISS J. WITTMAN 



Notary Public 
Fiscal Agent 



CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL 
SURGERY 



Dental Dept., Loyola University 
1747 \V. Harrison 



COMPLIMENTS 



F 



A FRIEND 



Headquarters for All 

Dental and Medical Books 

used in 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery 

We have tlic larj^cst and most complete Stock to be 
tovuul anywhere. 

Wide assortments of Xotebooks, Blankbooks, Loose- 
leaf Covers, and Fillers, Drawing SLii:)plies, Fountain 
Pens, and Inks, Brief Cases, Dissecting Sets, 
Laboratory Supplies 

Prices Right 

SPEAKMAN'S BOOK STORE 

CONGRESS AND HONORE STREETS 

(Next to Y. M. C. A. Hotel) 



The Congress Barber SKop 
and Beauty Parlor 

Successfully Catering to the Doctors 

and Students of this vicinity for the 

past six years. 

In the Professional "Y" Building 
"Just Inside the Door" 

Ch.\rles E. Kich.\kds()N, Pro|i. 



5 5 No 

+ 
Barbers Chairs Waiting 



FOSTER DENTAL FILMS 

and 
DENTAL FILM MOUNTS 

used exclusively by 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery 



N. W. FOSTER & SON 

Morton Grove, Illinois 



CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 
DENTAL SCHOOL OF LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 



1757 West Harrison Street 

CHICAGO 



The Fifty-fiFth Annual Session Opens October 5, 1937 



REQUIREMEXTS FOR MATRirULATTOX 

To meet the advanced requirements of dental education 
students entering the dental school must present entrance 
credits amounting to fifteen acceptable units, rei^resenting 
four years of high school work, and in addition thereto, 
two years, sixty semester hours of approved college credit 
which must include: 

Chemistry 6 semester hours 

Biology 6 semester hours 

English 6 semester hours 

The remainder of the reriuirement should include elective 
subjects intended to broaden the intellectual background 
of the student, an important essential in professional life. 
Recommended elective subjects are advanced courses in 
English, history, foreign language, economics, philosophy, 
and social and political sciences. 

Graduate Courses Offered in Selected Subjects 
Address Registrar 

CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 
DENTAL SCHOOL OF LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 



ON MAINTAINING 



LtflOffiSHI 



• To win and consistently hold a place as the recognized 
leader of school annual printing, has been the record 
of Rogers Printing Company since its beginning in 
1908. 

• That we have, during a period of 29 years, success- 
fully produced hundreds ofannuals for schools through- 
out the country, attests our ability to satisfy completely 
the most discriminating Year Book Staff. 

• New ideas, coupled with the knowledge and experi- 
ence gained through a quarter of a century's service, 
insure the school that chooses a Rogers' printed book 
of ideal pages "From Start to Finish. " 

• We are proud that the staff of THE DENTOS en- 
trusted its printing to our organization and we 
herewith present it as an example of our work. 



ROGERS PRINTING COMPANY 



307-309 First Street 

DIXON, ILLINOIS 



228 N. LaSalle Street 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



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