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Full text of "Dentos"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/dentos1939unse 



Co-Editors 

LAWRENCE SCHEFF 
FRANK JERBI 



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Business Managers 

ARTHUR ADAMS 
MAX SHAPIRO 



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.u.,.^!AL LIBRARY 
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Published by the 
Senior Class of the 

CHICAGO COLLEGE 
OF DENTAL SURGERY 

Dental Department of 
Loyola University 



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Four years of our lives- years that have 
permitted us to snatch a fragment of knowl- 
edge and given us the opportunity to 
acquire the open eyes and clear head 
that are so essential if we are to go for- 
ward on our path surrounded by a world 
of turmoil have come to a happy comple- 
tion. It is our purpose to perpetuate the 
spirit and events of these vital years. 





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FACULTY 
SENIORS 
UNDERCLASSMEN 
PUBLICATIONS 
FRATERNITIES 
ATHLETICS 



DR. HENRY GLUPKER 





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To Dr. Henry Glupker — an incompar- 
able teacher, a sympathetic adviser, and 
a true friend — this volume is 
respectfully dedicated. 




Cfjarles; i^elson Jotjngon 



1860-1938 



3 n iUcmoriam 

In him we had a great and distinguished 
man, one who rendered o signal service 
to dentistry and whose achievements were 
surpassed only by hisdevotion to hisstudents. 




It matters much whether we make good 

dentists in our college course, but it 

matters more that we make of them 

good men and good citizens of the 

world 

W. H. G. Logan 



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iiiinniiii 



An institution of learning is no greater than the 
body of men who direct it. Under the guidance of 
capable men our college and university hove 
attained a standing second to none. For fifty- 
two years they have taught and inspired students 
of dentistry— -for fifty-two years dental education 
has progressed by their untiring efforts to improve 
technique and their constant search for scientific 
truth. Men of knowledge and understanding 
alike they have endeared themselves forever in 
the hearts of their students. The administration 
has built through the years a school and faculty with 
these purposes ever foremost — to teach a pro- 
fession and to moke men. 




SAMUEL KNOX WILSON, S.J. 
President 



WILLIAM H. G. LOGAN 

Dean of the Faculty,- Professor of 
Oral Surgery and Oral Patfiology,- 
D, D. S., Cfiicogo College of 
Dental Surgery; M. D., Chicago 
College of Medicine and Sur- 
gery,- F. A. C. S.,- LL.D.,- Delta 
Sigma Delta. 



ROBERT W. McNULTY 

Assistant Dean; Assistant Professor 
of Ethics, Economics, and Dento! 
Anatomy; A. B., hIanoverCollege; 
D. D. S., Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery; M. A. Loyola 
University; Delta Sigma Delta. 




PLINY G. PUTERBAUGH 

Secretary of the Faculty; Professor 
of Principles of Medicine; Associ- 
ate Professor of Oral Surgery; 
M. D., Chicago College of Med- 
icine and Surgery; D. D. S., Chica- 
go College of Dental Surgery; 
Delta Sigma Delta. 





WILLIAM D. ZOETHOUT 

Professor of Physiology and Pfiarmacologv; A. B. 
Hope College,- Ph.D., University of Chicago,- Sigmo Xi 



JOHN L. KENDALL 

Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy,- B. S., Val- 
paraiso University; Ph. G., Valparaiso University,- M.D., 
University of Kentucky,- Psi Omega. 



RUDOLF KRONFELD 

Professor of Dental Histology and Dental Pathology,- 
Director of the Department of Research,- M. D., Uni- 
versity of Vienna,- D. D. S-, Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery,- B. S., Loyola University,- Delta Sigma 
Delta, 

OSCAR KANNER 

Professor of Bacteriology and Pathology, M. D., Uni- 
versity of Vienna,- B. S., Sorbonne University, Pans. 





LOZIER D. WARNER 

Assistant Professor of Bacteriology and Pathology,- 
Assistant in the Department of Research,- B.A., 
Manchester College. 



RALPH H. FOUSER 

Associate Professor of Anatomy, F. A. C. S.; D. D, S., 
Northwestern University,- B. S., Lewis; M. D., Rush 
Medical College of the University of Chicago; 
B. S. M., Loyola University; Phi Beta Pi; Alpha 
Omega Alpha; Xi Psi Phi. 





EDGAR D. COOLIDGE 

Professor of Therapeutics, Preventive Dentistry and 
Oral Hygiene,- D. D. S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; M.S^,XiPsi Phi. 



JOHN P. BUCKLEY 

Professor Emeritus of Materia Medico and Thera- 
peutics; Ph.G., Valparaiso University; D. D. S., 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Delta Sigma 
Delta. 





THOMAS L. GRISAMORE 

Professor of Orthodontia; Ph.G., Valparaiso Uni- 
versity; D. D. S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; 
Delta Sigma Delta. 



RALPH G. LARSEN 

Instructor in Therapeutics; D. D. S., Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 



JEROME J. VIK 

Instructor in Orthodontia; Junior Lecturer in Ortho- 
dontia; D. D. S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; 
M. D. S., Loyola University; Xi Psi Phi. 

HOWARD MICHENER 

Assistant Professor of Orthodonitio; D. D. S., Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 







WILLIAM I. McNElL 

Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry; D. D. S., Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery,- Delta Sigma Delta, 

HENRY GLUPKER 

Associate Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry,- D. D. S.,- 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery, B. S., Loyola 
University; Delta Sigma Delta. 



ELBERT C. PENDLETON 

Associate Professor of Diagnosis and Full Denture 
Research; D. D. S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; M. D. S., Loyola University; Xi Psi Phi. 



EARL L. RICHEY 

Assistant Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry; D. D. S., 
University of lowo; M. D. S., Northv^estern Uni- 
versity; Xi Psi Phi. 





WILLIAM N. HOLMES 

Instructor in Dental Anatomy and Prosthetic Dentistry; 
D. D. S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Delta 
Sigma Delta. 



WALTER A, WYKHIUS 

Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry; D. D. S., Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery; A. B., Calvin College; 
Delta Sigma Delta. 



AUGUSTUS H. MUELLER 

Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry,- D. D. S., 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery,- M. S., Loyola 
University,- Delta Sigma Delta. 



WARREN WILLMAN 

Associate Professor of Operative Dentistry,- D. D. S., 
Cfiicago College of Dental Surgery,- M. S., Loyola 
University; Delta Sigma Delta. 





EARL P. BOULGER 

Assistant Professor of Radiology,- Instructor in Opera- 
tive Dentistry,- D. D. S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; L. D. S.; Delta Sigma Delta. 



JOSEPH S. RZESZOTARSKI 

Instructor in Children's Dentistry; Lecturer in Orel 
hHygiene and Preventive Dentistry; D. D. S., Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery; Forsyth Infirmory; Uni- 
versity of Iowa; Delta Sigma Delta. 



PAUL W. DAWSON 

Instructor in Operative Dentistry; D. D. S., Chicagc 
College of Dental Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 



FRANK W. HYDE 

Instructor in Operative Dentistry and Crown and 
Bridge Technology; D. D. S., Chicogo College cf 
Dental Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 






ROBERT E. MAC BOYLE 

Professor of Crown end Bridge Work; D. D. S., Chica- 
go College of Dental Surgery. 

HAROLD W. OPPICE 

Assistant Professor of Crown and Bridge Work; 
D. D. S., Cfiicago College of Dental Surgery; Xi Psi Phi. 



FRANK P. LINDNER 

Assistant Professor of Crown and Bridge Work; 
D. D. S,, Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Delta 
Sigma Delta. 

GEORGE C PIKE 

Assistant Professor of Crown and Bridge Work; 
D. D. S,, Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Delta 
Sigma Delta, 





M JOHN R. WATT 



Associate Professor Emeritus of Crown and Bridge 
Work; D. D. S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; 
Delta Sigma Delta. 

R. HAROLD JOHNSON 

Assistant Professor of Crown and Bridge Work and 
Prosthetic Technology; D. D. S., Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 





KARL A. MEYER 

Associate Professor of Surgery,- /VV D., Illinois College 
of Medicine,- Psi Omega. 



JOHN F. SVOBODA 

Instructor of Exodontia,- D. D. S., Cfiicago College of 
Dental Surgery,- B. S., Lovola University,- Delta Sigma 
Delta. 





ARNO LESHIN 

Instructor in Anatomv; M. D., University of Wisconsin,- 
B. A., University of Wisconsin,- Alpha Omega, 



v;allace n. kirby 

Instructor in Technical Composition,- B. S., University 
of Illinois,- D, D. S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery,- Delta Sigma Delta. 



HENRY L. BORIS 

Instructor in Physics, B. S., University of Illinois,- D. D. S., 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery,- Delta Sigma 
Delta. 

DWIGHT C ATKINSON 

Instructor in Radiography,- D. D. S., Marquette 
University School of Dentistry, Delta Sigma Delta. 






HAROLD HILLENBRAND 

Instructor in Economics,- B. S. D., Loyola University,- 
D. D. S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery,- Delta 
Sigma Delta. 



LOIS E. CONGER 



Instructor in Exodontia,- R. N. 



CAROLYN HAMMOND 

Research Technician; M. A. 

Research Technician,- B. A. 



MAURINE WILLMAN 





RUTH WALSH 

Librarian 



Department of Therapeutics,- R. N. 



THELMA CLINE 



FLORENCE MACDONALD 

Cashier. 

MARGARET KNIGHT 

Clerk of Infirmary. 





HAZEL L. JOHNSON 

Information Clerk. 



Clerk of Infii 



HAZEL TONKINS 



GLADYS M. KNOERNSCHJLD 

Fiscal Secretary. 

LAURA S. DICKISON 

Secretary to tfie Assistant Dean. 






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Pgae 21 




Page 23 




Four years of devotion to o single 
cause has demonstrated their steadfast- 
ness of purpose and abihty to achieve 
success. May theircourage never falter. 

P. G. PUTERBAUGH 



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KELLY 


JENKINS 


DeWITT 


SMEBY 


BASSAK 


DAVIDSON 







!t ^ould be quite impossible to set down all 
laughs, heartaches, triumphs, and despairs, that 
hove occured during our five years of existence 
here, but we \a/iII try to chronicle the more 
important of these events. 

Those who received their pre-dentol educa- 
tion here ^'ill remember the days when we 
rushed back and forth from the Downtown Co!-_ 
lege to the Dental building to attend our 
classes, and the efforts of Mr. Lodeski to cram 
some knowledge into our thick crania. Jerbi, 
McKee, and Paone were elected to the class 
officers that year. 

The memories of Dr. McNulty's machine-gun 
lectures. Dr. Kendall s philosophies, and Dr. 
Fouser's ensembles bring bock our freshman 
days. Most of us will never forget the rope 
jumping contest in anatomv with the small 
intestine as the rope, and the time we planted 
a finger in one of our classmates pockets. 

Our annual political maneuvering resulted 
in the election of McKee, Moses, Jerbi, and 
Paone as our officers. The skill shown in arrang- 
ing the election beforehand put the Tammonv 
and Kelly-Nash machines to shame. The big 
social event of the year, a dinner dance, was 




held at the Silver Room of the Knickerbocker 
Hotel, and those who remained sober through- 
out the evening, reported the affair to be a 
huge success. 

We returned to schooj as Sophomores with 
a feeling of assurance that we hod succeeded 
in mastering such subjects as Anatomy, Chemistry, 
Prosthetics, and hHistology. Operative Dentis- 
try was the course we all eagerly awaited 
h^ere was a chance to practice real Dentistry, 
and on a patient who felt no pain, and ^'ho'^e 
oral cavity received a brilliant illumination from 
the region of the throat. 

The pre-election caucuses ended with Adams, 
Paone, Epstein, and Kelly being chosen as class 
officers. The annual class c'ance was held a 
the Graemere hlotel and the affair was marred 
only by the factor that we ran into debt. 

The first days we spent m the clinic will long 
be a fond rememberance. Rnynes' electrc- 
magnetic broach remover and Politis' feat of 
setting a bridge with a mixture of petrolatum 
and cement powder were examples of our 
ingenuity at devising new methods for perform- 
ing our clinical duties. The master strategists 
met that yecr and elected Singler, Shapiro, 



Rosso, and Kurtz to the class offices. 

An event that will long be inscribed upon 
our memories was our Junior-Senior Prom — an 
affair that has since been pronounced the most 
successful and most "celebrated" prom in the 
history of the college. The scene of this 
momentous occasion was the beautiful grand 
ballroom of the Lake Shore Athletic Club. The 
success of this dance was due to the work of 
the committee composed of Limocher, chairman,- 
Moses, McKee, Jerbi, Jenkins, DeWitt and 
Bassak. 

Then came the realization of our ambitions — 
we were Seniors. The mad chase for points 
hod worn us down somewhat, but at last we 
were approaching the end of our trail. After 
the usual subterfuge, the following men were 
elected as class officers: Kelly, President,- Jen- 
kins, Vice-President; Smeby, Secretory,- DeWitt, 
Treasurer; Bassak, Sargent-ot-Arms; Jerbi and 
Scheff, Co-editors of the Dentos; Adams and 
Shapiro, Business managers of the DentoS; 
Paone, Class Artist. 

The memories of the struggles and joys of this 
year will forever be with us. We hope that 
the following pages will help enhance then. 



Page. 




ARTHUR G. ADAMS 

Villa Park, lllinoir; Loyola University. 
Class president '37,- Loyola News,- Bur Staff '35; 
Dentos, Co-Business Manager '39; Xi Psi Phi; 
Blue Key; Intramural Athletics. 

THEODORE C. AHNGER 

Chicago, Illinois; Loyola University. 
Class sergeant-at-arms '37; Delta Sigma Delta; 
Varsity Swimming '38. 



WILLIAM E. ALLEN 

Oak Pork, Illinois; Loyola University. 

SEYMOURE H. APPELL, B.S. 

Chicago, Illinois; City College of New York. 
Loyola News; Alpha Omega; Intramural Athletics. 



MARION D, APPLE 

Hutsonville, Illinois; Loyola University. 

JOEL D. ARNOLD 

Chicago, Illinois; North Park College. 
Loyola News; Intramural Athletics. 



CURTIS J. BABCOCK 

Bensenville, Illinois; Loyola University. 
Intramural Athletics. 

CASIMIR A. BASSAK 

Chicago, Illinois; Loyola University. 
Class sergeant-at-arms '39; Junior-Senior Prom 
Committee; Psi Omega; Intramural Athletics. 



Pag,e 2S 



LEONARD H. BECKER 

Chicago, Illinois,- University of Chicago. 
Alpha Omega. 

EVO J. BINOTTI 

Chicago, Illinois; Loyola University. 
Psi Omega; Intromurol Athletics. 



EUGENE C. BLATTER 

Chicago, Illinois; University of Chicago. 
Central Y. M. C. A, College. 

WILLIAM B. BURKE 

Chicago, Illinois; University of Chicago; Loyola 
University; Delta Sigma Delta; Intramural Athletics 



M. A. BUTLER 

Washburn, Illinois; Eureka College. 
Delta Sigma Delta. 

JOSEPH J. CIBULKA 

Cicero, Illinois; Loyola University. 
Delta Sigma Delta. 



ALBERT DAVIDSON 

Chicago, Illinois; Loyola University. 
Chairman of Executive Committee '39. 

TRUMAN G. DE WITT 

Green City, Missouri; University of Illinois. 

Class treasurer '39; Dentos Staff '37; Junior- 
Senior Prom Committee; Student Instructor of 
Ceramics; Delta Sigma Delta; Alpha Sigma Nu. 




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Page 39 



RUDOLPH F. DOBRY, B.S. 

Algoma, Wisconsin,- Marquette University. 
Xi Psi Phi; Intramural Athletics. 

HAROLD EPSTEIN 

Chicago, Illinois,- Peoples Junior College. 
Class secretary 37; Alpha Omega; Intramural 
Athletics. 



MAURICE FEIN 

Chicago, Illinois; Crone Junior College, Lewis 
Institute; Central Y. M. C A. College. 
Alpha Omega; Intramural Athletics. 

HOWARD M. FISHER 

Berwyn, Illinois; J. S. Morton Junior College. 
Delta Sigma Delta. 



HOWARD H. GAULT 

Chicago, Illinois; University of Illinois. 
Loyola News '38, '39; Dentos Staff '39; Intramural 
Athletic Director '39; Intramural Athletics. 

AUGUST A. GIRALDI 

Chicago, Illinois; Wright Junior College, Crone 
College. 
Delta Sigma Delta; Intramural Athletics. 



HENRY O. GOLD 

Chicago, Illinois; Loyola University. 
Alpha Omego; Intramural Athletics. 

LAWRENCE L. GOLDEN 

Chicago, Illinois; North Park Junior College; 
University of Illinois. 
Intramural Athletics. 




Page 30 




ROBERT M. GORDON 

Avon, Illinois; Western Illinois State Teacher's 
College. 

SIDNEY GOREN 

Chicago, Illinois,- University of Illinois; Loyola 
University, 
Intramural Athletics. 



BEN H. GORSKY 

Chicago, Illinois; Central Y. M. C, A. College; 
Crane College. 
Intramural Athletics. 

THOMAS J. GRISAMORE, JR., B.A., M.D. 

Wilmette, Illinois; Colgate University; Rush 
Medical College. 

Bur Staff '37, '38; Student Instructor in Anatomy, 
hHistology, Chemistry, and Physiology; Delta 
Sigma Delta. 



STEPHEN A. HAJDUK 

Chicago, Illinois; Loyola University. 
Xi Psi Pi.i; Intramural Athletics. 

LUTHER H. HALE 

Tyler, Texas; Sam Houston College. 
Delta Sigma Delta. 



Chicago, Illinois; 
Class vice-president 
Committee; Xi Psi Phi 



DALE S. JENKINS 

lackburn University. 

'39; Junior-Senior P om 



FRANK C. JERBI 

South Wilmington, Illinois; Loyola University. 
■Class treasurer '36; Bur Staff '36, '37, '38, "39; 
Dentos, Co-Editor '39; Junior-Senior Prom Com- 
mittee; Student Instructor of Ceramics; Alpha Sigma 
Nu; Intramural Athletics. 



Page 31 




KENNETH G. JOHNSON 

Rock Island, Illinois,- Augustano College. 
Dentos Staff '32. 

JOHN J. JUREWICZ, B. S. 

Paterson, New Jersey; Catholic University. 
Xi Psi Phi; Intramural Athletics. 



WILLIAM J. KAISER 

Chicago, Illinois, Loyola University. 

GEORGE K. KELLY 

Chicago, Illinois; Crane Junior College. 
Class president '39; Class treasurer '37; Class 
secretary '30; Loyola News '38; Delta Sigma 
Delta; Intramural Athletics. 



ALBERT M. KIRCH 

St. Paul, Minnesota; St. Thomas Military Acad- 
emy, University of Minnesota. 

DAVID J. KLAPMAN' 

Chicago, Illinois; Peoples Junior College. 
Alpha Omega; Intramural Athletics. 



EDWARD F, KOSIOR, B.S. 

Whitmg, Indiana; University of Illinois. 

EDWARD J. KOZAK 

Chicago, Illinois; Morton Junior College, Lewis 
Institute. 
Delta Sigma Delta. 



STANLEY B. KRISS 

Chicago, Illinois,- Crone Junior College. 
Delta Sigma Delta. 

WILLIAM H. KURTZ 

Chicago, Illinois,- Loyola University. 
Class treasurer '38; Alpha Omega,- Intramura 
Athletics. 



M. M. LAND 

Utrecht, FHollond,- State University, Utrecht, 
Holland. 
Delta Sigma Delta. 

WILLIAM C. LIMACHER 

Joliet, Illinois; Joliet Junior College. 
Dentos Staff '36,'38; Junior-Senior Prom Committee, 
chairman; Delta Sigma Delta; Varsity Golf '37, '38, 
'39; Blue Key; Intramural Athletics. 



HAROLD J. LINK 

Chicago, Illinois; Loyola University. 
Intramural Athletics. 

RAYMOND E. LIPSEY 

Chicago, Illinois; Crane College. 



JOSEPH M. MAGGIO 

Chicago, Illinois; Lewis Institute. 
Class sergeant-at-arms '36; Intramural Athletics. 

JOHN F. McCarthy 

Chicago, Illinois; Loyola University. 




_-E09J.i 



Page 3:- 



E M. CUDAHV MhiViUKlAL 
LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 



VICTOR J. McKEE 

Salina, Kansas,- Wesleyan University; Loyola 
University. 

Class president — '36,- Loyola News; Junior-Senior 
Prom Committee; Delta Sigma Delta; Blue Key. 

EDWARD W. MIKULA, JR. 

Chicago, Illinois; Loyola University. 
Dentos, Cartoonist '39; Delta Sigma Delta; Intra- 
mural Athletics. 



NORMAN L. MOSES 

Chicago, Illinois; Loyola University. 
Class vice-president '36; Junior-Senior Prom 
Committee; Alpha Omega; Intramural Athletics. 

PAUL MULLER, D.M.D. 

Davos, Sv^/itzerland; University of Zurich, Basel 
and Fribourg. 
Delta Sigma Delta. 



FRANK A. MURIN 

Chicago, Illinois; Loyola University; Central 
Y. M. C A. College; St.' Mary's University. 
Loyola Union. 



ALFONSO W. 

Montgomery, West Virginia; New 
College; West Virginia University. 
Delta Sigma Delta. 



NICASTRO 

River State 



FELICE J. PAONE 

Chicago, Illinois, Loyola University. 
Class secretary '36, Class vice-president '37; 
Dentos Art Staff '36, '37, '39; Delta Sigma Delta; 
Student Roentgenologist. 

LUCAS C. POLITIS 

Chicago, Illinois; Loyola University. 
Delta Sigma Delta. 



Page 34 





DAVID J. RAYNES 

Chicago, Illinois,- Crone College; Lewis Institute. 

Loyola News; Alpha Omego; Intramural Athletics. 

HARVEY C. ROBB 

Regmo, Saskatchewan Canada; University of 
Saskatchewan. 



ROBERT J. ROCK 

Chicago, Illinois; Loyola University; De Paul 
University. 
Delta Sigma Delta; Intramural Athletics. 

JEROME B. ROSENBLUM 

Chicago, Illinois; North Pork Junior College. 
Intramural Athletics. 



JOSEPH J. ROSSA 

Chicago, Illinois; Loyola University. 
Class secretary '38; Pi Delta Sigma; Intramural 
Athletics. 

FREDERICK W. SALISBURY, B.A. 

Elgin, Illinois, University of Illinois. 
Class president, '36; Class sergeont-at-Arms, 38; 
Delta Sigma Delta; Intramural Athletics. 



CLARON C. SCHAFER 

Vermillion, Kansas; Loyola University. 

LAWRENCE SCHEFF 

Fort Wayne, Indiana; Loyola University. 
Dentos, Co-Editor '39; Loyola News; Inter-Fra- 
ternity Council '37, '38; Alpha Omega; Intramural 
Athletics. 



Page SS 




EDWARD M. SCOTT 

Los Angeles, California; University oF California 
at Los Angeles. 
Delta Sigma Delta. 

EDWIN H. SCHULTZ 

Lomira, Wisconsin; Ripon College, Valparaiso 
University; Lewis Institute. 
Delta Sigma Delta. 



MAX SHAPIRO 

Chiicago, Illinois, Loyola University. 
Class vice-president '38; Dentos, Co-Business 
Manager '39; Loyola Nevv'S; Alpha Omega; 
Intramural Atfiletic Director '38, '39; Varsity 
Swimming '36, '37, '38, '39; Monogram Club. 

LEONARD T. SHIMANDLE 

Riverside, Illinois; Loyola University. 



JOHN M. SINGLER 

Soutfi Bend, Indiana; University of Notre Dome; 
University of Michigan. 

Class president '38, Burr Staff '34, '35; Delta Sigma 
Delta. 

GLENN V. SMEBY 

Oberon, North Dakota; University of North 
Dakota. 
Class secretary '39; Delta Sigma Delta. 



BRUCE A. SPOONER 

Chicago, Illinois; Chicago Christian College. 
Dentos Staff '36, '39; Delta Sigma Delta; Intramural 
Athletics. 

CARMAN H. SUTLEY, B.A. 

Fort Pierre, South Dakota; Yankton College. 
Class vice-president '37; Xi Psi Phi. 



MARVIN TOPPER 

Chicago, Illinois,- Loyola University. 
Intramural Athletics. 

IZAAK VERHOEVEN 

Rotterdam, hlolland,- State University, Utrecht, 
Holland. 
Delta Sigma Delta. 



ADALBERT L. VLAZNY 

Chicago, Illinois,- Loyola University. 
Intramural Athletics. 

WILLIAM R. WALTERS 

Chicago, Illinois,- Loyola University. 
Intramural Athletics. 



DAVID H. WEINSTEIN 

Hartford, Connecticut,- American International 
College; Connecticut State College; Loyola 
University. 
Alpha Omega. 

DORUS L. WINQUIST 

Vermillion, Kansas; Loyola University; North- 
western University. 
Psi Omega. 



TAKEO K. YOSHINA 

Laupahoehoe, Hawaii; Loyola University. 
Dentos Photography Editor '39; Delta Sigma Delta. 

LOUIS R. ZANILLO 

Chicago, Illinois; Loyola University. 
Intramural Athletics. 




Page 37 



SENIOR SKETCHES 

"One-Beer" Adams — the politician. Golfing 
and other things went to his head at the Junior 
Outing. Most attentive during operative 
lectures, 

"Bubbles" Ahnger-^graceful as a ballet 
dancer. hHis presence on the swimming team 
was good for a foot more of water in any tank. 

"Bill" Allen--the only man known to find 
canes on the palate. Was late joining the 
Ranch Boys, but caught up. 

"Si" Appell - " graduate of the Riding 
Academy. He claimed the cavemen had the 
right idea- and proved it, 

"Two-ton" Apple ^one of the boys from the 
old school. Believed in making auxiliary 

dentures — seven for one oatient. 

"Joe" Arnold — one of our married men. 
Constructs bridges for interproximal spaces. 

"Happy" Babcock smiled once and dislocated 
his jaw. Was a good boy until he started to 
keep company with Jenkins. 

"Cass" Bassak frictionizes with Lipsey. Even 
a blizzard couldn't keep him away from exams. 
Believes in getting things done. 




Len Becker says its dangerous to live at the 
Crest. Anything might happen to you there. 

Buck" Binotti — his biggest mistake was 
selecting a seat in front of Robb, Jerbi, and 
Yoshina. One of our notorious hand-shakers. 

Gene Blatter could serve as a good double 
for one of our great churchmen. Con certainly 
wheel that big Buick around. 

Billie Burke —no relation to Ziegfield's 
wife, but rivals Ziggy at picking them. Played 
a lot of basketball for the Delts, 



Buttles" Butler — an ardent student of the 

axilla. Not enough variety at Eureka for his 

Jge department. 



social asDirations. Like 



"Mitts" Cibulka spends a lot of time drinking 
coffee. Thinks the fauces are a couple of 
beer taps. Prefers denture work. 

John Davidson — rather a reserved chap. 
Always spent his lunch hour arguing with 
Gorsky, 

"T. G." DeWitt — Gunner supreme! Juniors 
always thought he was ploying tog with the 
instructors. Has a good sense of humor. 

Ruby Dobry- -the big boy from Wisconsin. 
Something in Kenosha made him buy a pass on 
the North Shore. Likes to bowl. 

"Eppy" "Esguire" Epstein-^ -Dr. Fouser's chief 
rival. Hasn't worn the same suit twice in four 
years. 

"Luke " Fein — the Rosco Ates of the dental 
school. Took him two hours and forty minutes 
to say polymorphonuclear leucocyte. 



"H^wie " Fisher, the 
Berwin whose Ford was 
Received a big score during chemistry 



d faced boy from 
parking lot feature. 



"Joe E." Gault expects to conduct spring and 
fall soles of dentures. Will have the largest 
and most elaborate neon in Chicago. 

"Gus" Giraldi. Mussolini is still looking 
for this fugitive from the barbers. Hosn t 
proved that he doesn't come from Sicily. 

' Hank " Gold -God's gift to the nurses says, 
"My main trouble is that they always fall in 
love with me.' 



Page JS 



"Larry (jolden believes in extracting the 
right tooth and only that tooth. Tried to get 
in every picture for the Dentos. 

"Bob" Gordon the Avon Kid. Packs a lot 
oF dentures for his daddy. Sold us our crown 
and bridge text book. 

"Sid" Goren — formed the third member of 
the Gorsky-Davldson lunchtime Forensic League. 

"Bennie" Gorsky — a very generous fellov/. 
Ardent believer in the axiom, "It is better to 
give than to receive." 

Tom Grisamore gave a year's course in 
diagnosis in an hour's lecture. At least his 
prescription's didn't do us serious harm. 

"Steve" hHojduk. hHis use of words, over two 
syllables, was something. Just didn't feel like 
coming to school after the sophomore dance. 

"Texas " Hale still holds it against the boys 
for never fixing him up. To him Texas is the 
heart of the Union. 

"Moocher" Jenkins • likes O. P. Cigarettes. 
Took a blind date to the Prom and went home 
the some way. Prefers foil. 

"Jerbo" Jerbi — the song bird from the 

Garden Spot of America. Famed for his 

rendition of Pennies from hHeaven " at the 
sophomore dance. 

"Ken" Johnson is from out Moline way. Just 
a son of or Man River. Trades a bottle of 
Color-Bak for h^air-bak. 

"Errol" Flynn" Jurewicz, the Casanova of 
the Crest, is overjoyed when his motion picture 
double appears on the screen. Spends hours 
in front of a mirror afterwards. 

Kay Kaiser-— the speed merchant. Gets 
around like a snail on crutches. Procrastinotor 
supreme. Takes pride in his upper lip. 

Red Kelly looked too much like our assistant 
dean for comfort. Raced Ewart up the stairs 
before every eight o'clock class. 




CHILDREN'5 CUNIC 

OR 
BEFIUry FtND THE QEf\STS 



Gono Klapmon, alias Sleeping Beauty, 
alias Sir Galahad, says water is poison. Is 
cursed with Roman FHonds. 



Ed Kosior — the man of the upsweep hat- 
brim. Thinks the styloid is a fashion magazine. 
Prefers blondes. 

Clark " Kozak is the pride of Wolf Rood, h^is 
anatomical drawings are in demand. Petty 
looks to him as a successor. 

Stan Kriss was the noisiest fellow in class. 
Duggan led him astray. Worrying about little 
things ended in loss of weight. 

Bill Kurtz is saving 200 "harps " for a 
v^edding license. FHe is a "dead pidgeon." 

Johnny Land, an all around good fellow 
from the land of wooden shoes. Spends his 
evenings playing bridge at the Y. M. C. A. 

George Limacher puta water filled balloon 
in Dr. VIk's pocket (so Dr. VIk said) but still 
denies it. Goes around school like a floor- 
walker. 



"Al" Kirch is president of the Poppy Club. 
Thinks a lot of army life. Going bock to the 
Gopher State. 



FHep " Link — impersonator of instructors. 
With white hair and a long laboratory coat the 
effect v^ould have been fool proof. 



Page 39 



"Colonel" Lipsey believes in mai<ing the 
patient Fit the restoration. Assumed role of 
first assistant to seniors on Thursdays. Goes for 
foils. 

"Joe" Maggio- -the only C. C. D. S. under- 
graduate ever to become a member of the 
Shirley Temple Club. Noted for his dramatic 
apologies. 

"Charlie" McCarthy will be the up-to-date 
practitioner if pneumatic mallets and rubber 
operating aprons are indications. Most non- 
chalant. 

"Curley" McKee hangs around anything nice. 
Has given everything a try except toupe and 
hair transplantations. Likes jackets. 

"Scratch" Mikula -the class cartoonist. hHis 
masterpiece, depicting the direct and indirect 
methods of investing, should be in every den- 
tist's office. 

Norm" Moses — quite a coincidence, but 
every night he worked we froze the following 

day. 

"Putzi" Muller — an amiable Swiss lad. Has 
made a name for himself in international hockey. 
Warns Hitler to keep out of the Alps. 

Frankie ' Murin could smile in the face of 
a soft foil. Liked to sit on the bench. Bets on 
anything. 

Ferdinand" Nicastro- -the worst rider in the 
class. Can t stay' on a car, motorcycle, horse, or 
even a hayrack. 

Pup Paone--radiologist, artist, and pencil 
pointer. Invaluable source of information for 
any lecturer. 

Luke Politis- -one fellow that does hove 
trouble with hair getting in his eyes. First on 
the floor to make gastric inlays. 




Cowboy ' Rock developed on apparatus 
known as a "Duplicator" which simplifies 
denture rebosing. Likes Dr. Vik's horses. 



'Jerry" Rosenblum hod a hard time keeping 
the boys away from his locker album of glamour 
girls. Played center for the Burs. 



"Henry' Rosso spent half the night getting 
home from school and the other half trying to 
make on eight o'clock class. 



Sarg " Salisbury liked walking back so much 
he joined the cavalry. We'd like a picture of 

him in riding boots and spurs. 



"Turkey " Schafer — the Kansas Casanova put 
the Ranch on a paying basis. Kept a good line 
of fillies going for the boys. 



Rhino Raynes---the "onse". Staunch ad- 
vocater of the broach retriever. Believes the 
scope of its application is boundless. Has the 
most dignified sneeze. 

Bronco" Robb. Canadian life may be 
different from that on the Boulevard, but he 
showed the boys a few tricks. Likes the Dean's 
lectures. 



Larry ' Scheff— another alumnus of the 
Riding Academy or the hotel that is a home 
(for whom?) is the only man in school who 
puts in temporary stopping with on anguloted 
plugger. 



"Gas " Schultz intends to enlist in the army 
:hemical corps. With his natural ability he 
:ould be a whole unit. Likes orthodontia. 



Page 40 



"Ed" Scott — most reserved fellow in class, but 
with plenty on the boll. Forsook the mountains 
of California for the canyons of Chicago. 

"Max" Shapiro, the man with the unprintable 
nicknames, is racing Kurtz to the altar. Was a 
varsity swimmer for 4 years. 

"Lenny" Shimandle went in for making 
expensive portials. hHis league of nations 
"feed" left the members beltless. Likes long 
pipes. 

"Pappy" Singler— home address is corner of 
Van Buren and Wood. Likes Notre Dame, oral 
surgery, and a good dish of spaghetti'. 

"Whitey" Smeby — a three year man with a 
four year man's points. Going to keep the 
Minnesota cows in good cud chewers. 

"Short-pants" Spooner. "Caries on the distal, 
Mr. Spooner." Hod an uncanny knack of getting 
Jenkins up in the air — especially during class. 

"Jughead" Sutley- -best juggler of a partial 
denture that we have known. The girls from 
"Pres" came through with his foil points. 

"Marv" Topper always uses a 24 pound test 
line when he goes fishing. Pity the poor fish. 




OR.Rfl/NES' 

PUCP HEtllTft LlZBH 
So POTENT, THOT 
WHEN THf PflTlfNT ''( III 

DIES, IT IS Nscessfiay r~-' — ^ 
TO Remove the tta!=»-=i= 

PULPS flU/O 6E«T 

THEM To OEflTH 

WITH CLUBS 



"Big Stoop ' Verhoeven certainly shov/ed the 
lads that foreign boys have plenty of speed 
when it comes to dentistry and social contacts. 

Emily' Vlazny has made his mark in the 
literary world. Any man that con get us to 
wear ties must be good. 

"Bill " Walters could always be found on 
the children's clinic side of the infirmary. Drove 
a Ford. Likes operative. 

Dave Weinstein uses Lavoris, Listerine, 
soap and Lysol as mouth washes — kissing is 
dangerous. 

Windy " Winquist had the best line in school. 
Should write a book on salesmanship. Perfected 
the Vossburg root canal technique. 

"Murphy" Yoshina — sometimes called "Flash- 
light' . Was accused of photographing the 
basement munitions plant. One M.O.D. inlay, 
SIX recasts, eight points. 

"Lou " Zanillo- the quietest fellovv' in school: 
so much so that Ewart never knew he was in 
class. 



CLASS WILL 

We, the graduating class of 1939, of the 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery, being still 
of sound mind and body after four years in this 
institution, do hereby declare and promulgate 
this, our last will and testament. We do hereby 
bequeath: 



To Dean Logan: A patent on hi 
Rogers " head lamp. 



'Buck 



To Dr. Puterbaugh: A rocking chair and a box 
of cigars, to be installed in the small amphi- 
theatre. 

To Dr. McNulty: An automatic mallet, node 
over into a machine gun, to shoot down dumb 
freshmen. 

To Dr. Glupker: All our flasks, nuts, and bolts 
for a picture of himself in a bathing suit. 

To Dr. MacBoyle: A gold-plated pair of 
Goslee pliers and a Little Giant post-puller. 

To Dr. Willman: A phonograph record which 
keeps repeating Um-hum, um-hmmm — 

To Dr. Pike: A class that can solder Richmond 
Crowns — the first time. 



Piise 41 



To Dr. Zoethout: Two trained frogs to pith the 
brains of sophomores who don't quite get the 
right idea. 

To Dr. Pendleton: One bottle of Vitolis and 
o phonograph record of the song "My Buddy". 

To Dr. Coolidge: A corkscrew for torturous 
root canals. 

To Dr. Kanner; An electric razor. 

To Dr. Fouser: A subscription to Vogue. 

To Mr. Warner: A big red pencil. 

To Dr. hdyde: A bottle of stain remover for 
upper third molars. 

To Dr. Kendall: A 400 foot Eucalyptus tree 
for his front lawn. 

To Dr. Dawson: One diamond pointed 
Crenshaw scaler for testing foils. 

To Dr. Kronfeld: hHolf interest in the bottle 
of Vitolis we are leaving Dr. Pendleton. 

To Dr. R. H. Johnson: One volume of "1001 
New Jokes." 




To Dr. Boulger: A rubber tipped explorer for 
testing prophylaxes. 

To Dr. Lindner: A job as deputy bridge 
inspector of Chicago. 

To Dr. Mueller — A handbook of foreign 
languages. 

To Dr. Grisomore: An orthodontia patient 
with ten lower anterior teeth and four deciduous 
bicuspids. 

To Dr. VIk: A cowboy suit, a season pass to 
the Merry-Go-Round at Riverview and a shovel. 

To Dr. Meyer: A ticket to the motion picture 
"Four Girls in White". 

To Dr. Kirby: The unused set of "Black's 
Index to Dental Periodical Literature, " in the 
library. 

To Dr. FHolmes: A flower pot of glodiolas. 

To Dr. Rzeszotarski: One nursing bottle and 
a pacifier. 

To Dr. Michener: A Bottle of plaster glue 
to be used for the sophomore technic course. 

To Dr. Svoboda: A fishing hook for retrieving 
roots which students push into the maxillary 
sinus. 

To Dr. Larsen: An automatic bite-opener. 

To Dr. Richey: A normal bite denture cose. 

To Dr. Boris: One copy of "FHow to Win 
Friends and Influence People 

To Dr. Atkinson: A simplified index systerrt 
for radiographs. 

To Ewart: A watch that always remains 
fifteen minutes slow. 

To Dudley: (The human microtome): A 
magnif>ing gloss to be served with each sand- 
wich. 

Lipsey: "I haven't come to any ham in this 
sandwich yet. 

Mr. Dudley: "Try another bite.' 
Lipsey: (taking huge mouthful)' — "Nope, none 
yet." 

Mr. Dudley: "Dog-gone it! You must have 
gone right post it. 




Page -fS 




THE 



From the First bar of music on the evening of 
Friday, February seventeenth, to the lost bar 
on Rush Street during the following morning it 
was a big occasion. The "stiff-fronts" started 
out as such and ended much more so,- and the 
corsages, every one of them, remained pleas- 
ingly fresh. 

It all happened when the Juniors played 
hosts to the Seniors at the annual Junior-Senior 
Prom in the Crystal Ball Room of the Edgewater 
Beach hHotel. The setting was a fitting one 
for the affair when this dignified and famous 
hotel so willingly masqueraded as the home of 
merriment. 

One hundred twenty couples and Ernie 
Draper passed beneath the impressive entrance, 
wormed their way through a shining and colorful 
display of new gas-buggies, and found them- 
selves on a perfect floor for dancing. On the 
stage Roman George's orchestra did itself 
proud in providing the music throughout the 
evening. The musicians were conducted by 
none other than Roman Ziolkowski of our own 
junior class. 

The grand march was the highlight of the 
evening for those vv'ho were physically able to 
take part in it. Led by the officers of the junior 
and senior classes the cancers presented a 
display of near perfect formation that rivaled 



the efforts of any of the good drill teams. This 
lasted but a few minutes until the photographers 
began their work and pandemonium broke 
loose as everyone jockeyed for a good position 
before the camera. 

At first glance one would think that the 
Juniors were presenting a style show for men. 
Gault waltzed in v/ith white tie, toils, and 
"stove-pipe" hot. Gibson said that Bolbat 
was to carry a gold-headed walking stick which 
would have been a big help to some fellows. 
Fein had a hat that popped out from a pancake 
position. Scarcely recognizable ^as Wilber 
Gordon without clashing colors or plaids. 
Everyone thought that McKee would come 
attired in his familiar blue shirt, red tie, brown 
jacket, and grey trousers, but he v^ore a neat 
looking outfit with a neat looking number on 
his arm. 

Some side-line glances of the dance may 
bring back memories. George Madden was 
there, then he was gone, and then he appeared 
again but his spirit was dampened . . . Lim- 
acher was the most disappointed person at the 
Prom when with all his hair pulling he could 
not find a single toupee — not even on Raynes, 
Gast, or hHaas Gold presented an interest- 

ing subject and we do mean interesting - . . 
Pretty Boy did some mean back scratching 



Page 4:f 




PROM 



, . Jenkins tried hard to find a corsage ^ . . 
Adorns didn't know he wos hke that when a 
Photograph was token of the grand march . . 
In the wee hours an absent instructor just 
missed answering a phone coll thot hHep 
Link was anxious to put through . . . Sothras 
could be found at the bar . ■ one Junior 
became so self-centered his eyes were kept 
busy looking at each other Shapiro 

trimmed his mustache especially for the occasion 
. Dedekmd was all puffed up about the 
whole thing ^ . ^ The Seniors attending the 
Prom with expectations of receiving a souvenir 
to present to their companions of the evening 
did not leave empty handed. 

The evening entertainment did not end when 
the site of the Prom was left behind. Both the 
junior and senior classes were well represented 
in number of the favorite bright spots until 
the early part of the morning. Many a mother s 
daughter, attired in a glittering formal and 
with metallic shaded dancing shoes in her 
hands, carried the morning papers and coffee 
cream in to daddy. 

After such a prolonged and strenuous period 
of activity it was surprising how many appoint- 
ments were kept at the clinic on the following 
day. The majority of the Juniors were even 
able to attend the early morning lecture. Yet, 
let it be known that Jerbi was late for on 



eleven-thirty appointment and Dudley thought 
he was having his lunch when in reality it was 
his breakfast. 

The faculty was represented by Drs. Pike, 
Svoboda, Rzeszotorski, and Lorsen. They acted 
as chaperones and their presence was more 
or less instrumental in maintaining the milder 
form of disorder that prevailed throughout the 
night. The sincere interest these men took in 
the prom was deeply appreciated. 

The committee in charge of the Prom deserved 
hearty congratulations for having presented 
such a memorable farewell for the seniors. 
The members of the group were; 

Co-Chcirmen 
Roman Ziolkowski 
Nicholas Sothras 

Ballroom and Orchestra 

Kenneth Dedekmd 
Richard Burke 

Finances 
Elmer Kouba 

Joseph Peorlmon 

These men promoted an affair that was a 
financial success as well as a criterion for future 



P^g, A^- 




The zealous student will be re- 
warded. Continuous growth, devo- 
tion to your work and rehability 
measure your progress and bespeak 
your future success much more than 
high grades on examination day. 
J. L. Kendall 



n 



n 



n 



L lUL/ luu 




IL 



U 





\^ 




\ 






^ 


- 


-< 




a^^ 



HAAS 


HOFMAN 


DEDEKIND 


ZULLO 


ZIOLKOWSKI 


GRIFFO 




"The Baron" says, "Romance went out of 
my life when Wanda left '. Oh, well, we can't 
have everything. 

Ed Belofsky thinks curly hair gets the women. 
Deep down in his heart though, he wishes it 
would keep from getting caught in the engine 
belt. 

"Bender" knows Standard Laboratory can't 
be beaten. Doctor VIk will back him up but 
isn't quite so enthusiastic. 

Steve Bobaiek dominates the girls he brings 
to our "shindigs". Try and talk to any one of 
em and see where it ge'ts you. 

A true patriot is Wally Bolbat. Paid for his 
Prom bid but didn't use it. Where d it go to, 
Wally"? 

"Love IS a very wonderful thing". "Don 
Juan" Bro ought to know— he's got that dying 
calf look. 

We just hod to put in the full name of 
Thaddeus E. Brzdenkiewicz. (You should a 
heard the printer cuss). 

'Jockey Joe thinks nothing can beat a 
certain blonde filly. 

Dick Burke is about ready to have a certain 
Greek deported, unless the aforesaid Greek 
changes his Greekish ways. 

Heah Ah is " won't give us any more free 
ones. "Take your trade elsev^/here , say we. 

Ask the "Mudcat " how he got that new scar 
on his visage. hHe'll tell o different story 
every time. 

"Milk makes teeth sparkle ". After all, 
Chmiel sells the stuff so what can you expect. 

"God s gift to Wisconsin" has Doctor Oppice 



Page 4S 




thinking his last name is Paul. Just an old 
smoothie from the farm. 

They grow 'em pretty out in Oak Park. Curtm 
is biased about the whole thing, so don't 
believe a word he says. 

The proudest man at the Prom was Dedekind 
even his cheek puffed out especially for the 
occasion. 

Tight-wad Duggan still won't bring in any 
samples from the place he works. Nuts to you, 
Ed, we'll make our own. 

It s the real thing this time," says the Weasel. 
The only trouble is, he's got a new one every 
other week. 

Fireman and Fishman were both kicked by the 
same horse twenty years ago and haven't 
come out of it yet. 

L. V. F., Jr., argues that Northwestern 
Sorority houses are nice places to spend the 
long winter evenings. 

Francis and the other two Musketeers were 
quite the thing at the Prom. Only the brave 
deserve the fair — or do they? 

My, deah, you really should move up on the 
drive. It's so swanky, don'tcha know ", overs 
Gast, the Porter County Flash. 

"Mike de Pike" says he'll give $10.00 to 
anyone proving he hasn't worn shoes at least 
twenty-five-years. 

Ever since Dr. Kronfeld noticed Gewartow- 
ski's missing laterals, this student thinks he's a 
celebrity — or something. 

Joe and Ken both threaten mayhem to the 
next person who pulls off that "Are you 
brothers? " business. 



"Kelly" just won't stand for insults on the 
honor of the South, suh. 

'By" Goldstein doesn't know about drawing 
upper molars, but when it comes to "doodling " 
during lectures, he'll beat Dr. MacBoyle 
any day. 

Joe Gomberg won't admit it, but he's got 
a past just the same. 

Goodman's only reason for living is to get 
even with Strom and Vmikour. 

Flash" says he's trying to reduce, hence 
the overcoat-suit he's been wearing all winter. 

"FHotfoot" Griffo better watch his step from 
now on — inlay magnets just oint. 

Pretty Boy and Gwen sure made a nice 
couple at the Prom. Bock scratching is the latest 
thing, or didn't you know. 

"The Claw " lays claim to being Orthodontist- 
in-Chief of the Class of '40. (Throw the big 
bum out). 

FHerthneck's wife hollers, "No more ties for 
Christmas — Bob gets Vitalis from now on. 

Did you see Les in "tails"? Just an old 
Society F^ound from way back. 

Holmes says, "If massage dont bring it back, 
nothing will" . Keep on trying, FHarry. 

Wonder what "Pop" FHull does with all his 
money? Spill it, Fred. 

Lenny helps ""Jockey Joe" "improve the 
breed ". We haven't seen any bonk rolls 
flashed around yet, though. 

Joe Josh IS generally acknowledged as the 
champ ^hen it comes to St. Apollonia and 
stuff. Doctor McNulty thinks he's "aces", too, 
dont you, Doctor? 



Pcise 49 



"It's got me beat", says King. "They never 
fit at the gingival . 

Knickels wonders who invented eight o'clock 
classes. Go easy, Ash, they still hang for 
murder here in Illinois. 

"There's no place like home", drowsily 
mumbles Elmer, "Especially the morning after. 

Kowalski thinks foil should be used for 
optional points. Why not thro^ some our way 
John? 

"Little Caesar" Kryda will tell you muscles 
come from doing hard work. After working 
everybody in the basement for a smoke, he 
ought to know. 

"hlit 'em with a wood, he can't flew," is 
Krzyzowski's slogan. 

Treat Ed Kulo nice, boys. \~\\s Uncle was 
elected Judge lost November. (Being a 
Democrat helps). 

LaMothe says. Give em some time, France 
always pays her debts ". When will it be 
through, Pierre? 

Wonder who Glenn Londstrom would heckle 
if Bro walked out on him? 

Link has the championship for being on time 
at eight o clock classes. Oh, yeah? Ask 
Ewart. 

For a change, the large ice-box was v\/arm 
for eight o'clock class. Reason? Madden 
wasn't on duty the night before. 

"Heinie " still thinks it's easier to extract 'em 
than It is to fix em up. 

Mac would rather be a jitter-bug than a 
dentist any day. He claims you just con t 
get rhythm v/ith a foil plugger. 

See Meize if you want a piece of plaster 
shined up. FHe s got a ' secrut " formula, or 
something. 

The Quiet Man from Crystal Lake " doesn't 
talk much, but have you seen those points 
roll out? 

Nick attributes his success to the white 
enameled trimmings on his operative case. 

Passarelli thinks nothing can beat his job at 
the mortuary. You don't get a leg talked off, 
anyhow. 

Joe Pearlman has on artist s temperament all 
right, hie won't work unless inspiration comes 
at the right time. (See Joe if you want to 
know what's "inspiring "). 

White hats are in style on election day, 
anyhow," says Alderman Perlmon. 

Pogirski has all his patients believing that 
gold foil IS the only filling they'll let you put in 
at C.C.D.S. Watch out for the instructors, FHenry, 

Charley Pomernacki tells his wife he's a 
Judge cause he's been on the bench now for 
almost half a year. 

Quinn thinks nine o'clock's early enough for 
any class. Better slip Ewart some of the green 
stuff, Ernie. 



Rojca wants to trade bridges for dentures. 
Better hold on to em, hdenry, the diplomas 
won't be out 'til 1940. 

Riley, the Scourge the Second Floor, has a 
couple of trick centrals through which water 
flows vv'ith the greatest of ease. A word to the 
wise ---. 

Rosey went Democratic for the primaries, but 
for another $5.00 will be a Republican in 
April, hiow do you expect to be President 
thotawoy? 

"The FHead " v/ants to make sure Vitalis 
does something for hderthneck and hHolmes 
before he puts out any shekels. 

"Butts " quit smoking cigars ever since Dr. 
Johnson's course made him tooth conscious. 
Remember that smile, bovs? 

Simon says, "Sleep sure soothes students' 
souls ", hfow do you keep from falling out of 
your seat though, Nick? 

If worse comes to worse, Sitar can always 
get into the pen at Joliet. Can you get out 
just as easily, Karl? 

The eldest of the Smith Brothers knows the 
younger one hasn't got a chance. After all, 
Frank's our No 1 apple-polisher. 

For over fifty years they've been throwing it 
around down in the basement. From the looks 
of things though, our Greek is the undefeated 
chomp. 

Joe Stewart gets the prize for having the 
biggest collection of borrowed pens, pencils, 
and brass checks. 

Moe StrofTi IS an.artist of no mean ability. He 
and Vinikour go to the Riolto to develop 
their aesthetic sense. 

fHans Sussman knows more about English 
than we do. Just try and stump him on grammar. 

For lessons in chalk-talking see Charley 
Thiel, our ace screwball. 

The champion of the chain stores is our boy, 
Bernie. Fde's for the drug racket 100%. Says 
v^hich? 

Von thinks the College ought to have some 
coeds. This way, it'd be official and on the 
up-ond-up. 

For any more "info " on Ben, see Strom and 
Goodman. 

Little Joe has his hunting grounds down ot 
Billings. The only trouble is, they see him 
first, so he's still hunting. 

Al Wadas bids fair to out-Gosley our doctor 
Goslev if he keeps turning out bridges by the 
bucketful. 

Prom Promoter Extraordinorv is "Rome' . 
If Dentistry doesn't treat him nice, he claims 
there's always hHollywood 

"Slug" Zullo has an idea he s a "copper" 
ever since being appointed on the Anti- 
Thieving Committee. Did you see "Cam 
make him behave at the Prom, though? 



Page 50 








W •"«**• h'A L^f, C 





Baranowski 


Belofsky 


Bendersky 


Bobolek 


Bolbct 


Bro 


Bridenkiewicz 


Buda 


Butke 


Casciato 


Cathcart 


Chmiel 


Cobb 


Curtin 


Dedekind 


Duggan 


Ferington 


Fireman 


Fishman 


Foley 


Francis 


Gast 


Gaudio 


Gewartowski 


J. Gibson 


K. Gibson 


Goldberg 


Goldstein 


Gomberg 


Goodman 


Gordon 


Griffo 


Haas 


Henkin 


Herthneck 


Hofman 


Holmes 


Hull 


Jaracz 


Josh 


King 





Pag,- 51 




Knickels 


Kouba 


Kowalski 


Kryda 


Krzyzowski 


Kula 


LaMothe 


Landstrom 


Link 


Madden 


Mothefs 


Mclntyre 


Meize 


Newman 


Nikiforuk 


Pasarelli 


Pearlman 


Perlman 


Pogirski 


Pomernacki 


Quinn 


Rajca 


Riley 


Rozanski 


Shallman 


Shechtman 


Simon 


Sitar 


Smith 


Sothras 


Stewart 


Strom 


Sussman 


Thiel 


Thomas 


VanKley 


Vinikour 


Vocot 


Wadas 


Ziolkowski 


Zullo 





Page 52 



IJUNIORS-" 



;^//:;''^^;-:i|| 




r^ 




r>i 



v_/ 




aj^^ 



HOCKING 

HATTENDORF 

GARGIULO 



BROWN 

BARTKOWIAK 

NEWELL 




Our class entered the Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery in October 1937 under the 
brilliant guidance of the NA/eli loved and 
distinguished scholar, Dr. C. N. Johnson. With 
a few well chosen words of wisdom and 
understanding, Dr. Johnson oriented the 
thoughts of the bewildered neophytes. Our 
class now bears the proud heritage and 
distinction of having been the last class to be 
so honored upon entering the Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery. With pride and reverence, 
we recall our Dr. Johnson as a true gentleman 
and o great scholar. 

Our freshman year unfurled the wide field 
of dentistry before us and under the splendid 
leadership of Drs. Kendall, McNulty, Fouser, 
Glupker, Konner, and hJolmes, we were skill- 
fully guided to a clear and basic understanding 
of our future careers. 

We can never forget those long hours in the 
anatomy laboratory with all the other 
students" strolling along the walks, with the 
gentle touch of spring in the air, v/ith long 
golden beams of sunshine streaming through 
the windows and you with the head and 
neck dissection to be learned for tomorrow s 
practical examination. 

hdow many hours we spent carefully carving 
those precious wax models, with Roach or 
Swainson carver, or better with your faithful 
penknife, always, to be disconcerted by that 
devastating Boley guage checking and re- 
checking those few spore millimeters. 



Pa^f .■'V 




Try to rotate the cuspid to the mesial, draw 
to the distal; elevate the buccal cusps on that 
lower molar; line and reline the posteriors 
along the arch of ridge; wax and rewax; 
polish and festoon; these were but a few of 
our tribulations in full denture construction. 

Organic chemistry, histology, dental histology, 
physiological chemistry, and physics were some 
of the strange lands we traveled but with our 
knowledge of them always increasing, and 
ever more filled with interest, we turned toward 
the second lop of our goal 

A great deal of water has since swiftly 
traveled beneath the bridge and those difficult 
fundamentals no longer frighten us. No longer 
are we all thumbs and already many of our 
class have secretly chosen a special field for 
their future careers. 

In our sophomore year with Dr. Kendall, 
whose popularity and great teaching ability is 
ever increasing, we separated those fine threads 
of knowledge from that mixed bedlam of 
substances in Materia Medico. Those intricate 
concoctions were carefully interpreted and 
various drugs and their uses became our common 
knowledge. Thus prepared we approach our 
future course in therapeutics. 

Bacteriology and pathology were very 
strange and difficult subjects to master. Slowly 
the underlying classifications became visible; 
with careful teaching we began to understand 
that varied mass of tissues which our slides 
presented. All this seemingly hopeless situa- 



tion was dissolved by Dr. Kanner and Dr. 
Kronfeld with the priceless assistance of our 
good friend and confidant, Mr. Warner. 

"Dr. Zoethouts' Physiology "^ -three little 
words, but what a difference they mode to all 
of us. Here we met our Waterloo or Verdun 
depending upon which side we took part in. 
Here also we had to be ever alert to escape 
unscathed the withering and piquant sarcasm of 
that gentle little man. Those little quizzes 
would invariably catch us napping and play 
havoc with those overages. Now we more 
fully appreciate the careful reading and deeper 
insight of physiology, but ah that kymograph 
and frog which refused to produce that needed 
graph and response. 

Our grand finale for the sophomore year was 
operative dentistry. Under the skillful guidance 
of Dr. Willman, we mastered the art of cavity 
preparation and filling; we more fully appreciat- 
ed our crown and bridge course; and we had 
instilled into us a burning desire to do work 
and to do it well. We proudly recall those 
"W2's" which stamped our slips as clearly as 
if the words, "good work, well done were 
printed on them. 

That bitter political feud which had its origin 
in our first freshman class election has been 
softened, not by the promise of future candidates 
to office, but by the added maturity of our two 
years m school. We now possess a closely 
mtregroted group which shows great promise 
in scholarship and extracurricular activities. 



Page Si 



^^^i^^ ^(ffii^^%ik ^HUEfe i^^'il^fli^ ^^iKKt^ifi^ ^tffKli^ 




Amaturo 

Filip 

Hattendorl 

Mistretta 

Robb 



Bartkowiak 

Gargiulo 

Hocking 

Newell 

Roina 



Block 

Gekas 

Humphreys 

Podraza 

Schell 



Branch 

Gregoline 

Impellitteri 

Poronsky 

Shrago 



Brown Cowen 

Gutowski Harris 

Kopczynski Luallen 

Readel Reihsen 
Sorensen 



Page S6 




Page 57 




n 





ai^^ 



MOSS 


ANDERSON 


SAUER 


WEBBER 


SHOR 


MATOUSEK 



KALIN 




THE LIFE OF A FRESHMAN 
THROUGH THE EYES OF HIS CADAVER 

John Q. Corpse (otherwise known as No, 
2116, County Morgue) lay, still as death itself, 
on his slob' in the dissecting laboratories of 
Loyola Medical school,- -breathlessly awaiting 
the onslaught of the freshmen dental students. 

John had been dead now for two months and 
he was getting just a wee bit restless. He 
really didn't look as handsome as was necessary 
for this auspicious occasion: i.e., the meeting 
of fifty-four prospective A-1 dentists. He was 
in dire need of: 1 . a shave; 2. a pair of pants,- 
3. a dash of "Christmas Night ". In all other 
respects, however, he was a veritable Tyrone 
Power. 

The freshmen were late in arriving. Thev 
just couldn't get used to this "half hour for 
lunch " business. 'Ah! Here they ore, " 
John said, half aloud, as he heard the approach- 
ing sounds of teeth chattering and knees knock- 
ing together. ' They re scared stiff ', he thought. 




Page 5S 




Finally, those dictators of dissectors, those 
masters of things macroscopic. Doctors Fouser 
and Leschin arrived upon the scene. The 
covers of the bins v^ere promptly rolled up and 
at last John could see his future violators. 

There they were, spic and span (or should it 
be "sick and wan") in their clean white, 
ill-fitting surgical gown's. "Oh, those gowns ', 
thought John with a sardonic smile playing 
about his oral opening, ("mouth", for the benefit 
of upper classmen who forgot their anatomy), 
"Oh, those virgin cassocks - soon to acquire 
such tints and odors as to rival the very stables 
of Augeas". 

The freshmen were soon assigned to tables 
and cadavers and it wasn't long before John Q. 
was formally introduced to the four men who 
were to figure so largely in his "life" for the 
next eight months. The students first listened 
to an introductory lecture by Dr. Leschin in 
which the honorable doctor made a nasty crock 
(making our John blush clear through to the 
hypodermis) concerning the powerful odor 
which would begin to emanate from the bodies 
along about May. 

Then John's four greenhorns began cutting up. 
Over the clink of the scalpels John could hear 
the voiced reflections of the freshmen of the 
important happenings of the past few days: 
how fearful and timid they had been when 
listening, wide-eyed, to the summary opening 
addresses of Dean Logan and Dr. Mueller 
rendered in the large "amp" Tuesday eve,- 
how, at the first meeting of the Dental Anatomy 
class, they amazedly witnessed Dr. McNulty 
carve on upper central incisor in six minutes flat,- 
how narrow they had been at first when they 
had snickered at Dr. Kanner's pronunciation 



of "teese in the mouse ", before realizing that 
it isn't how one savs a thing, but what one says 
that really makes the man. These were the 
reactions that our alert John observed this 
first day of dissection. 

Much later, (to be specific: thirteen bones 
and twenty-seven muscles later), John began 
to notice many changes occurring in this Fresh- 
man class, which by now had progressed from 
the embryonal to the fetal stage. One fact 
that was really puzzling was that practically 
everyone in the class had the same first name. 
In reality, twenty-six of the students suddenly 
adopted the monicker of Max. "FHey, Max!" 
seemed to be the "Open Sesame" for the 
entire class. This surprising development vvas 
undoubtedly the work of a clique including: 
Fred (Max) Grohowiak,- Andy (Max) Sauer; 
Vic (Mac) Seitz; Gene (Max) Stegmoier,- Ross 
(Max) Neglio; and others, (Maxes). 

After much discouragement, three intramural 
volleyball teams were organized, with the 
inestimable help of managers Jason, Shor, and 
Trace. Of the three teams, one, (Captain Marty 
Killoren and Co.), is now sporting a gold watch 
charm as a result of its fine efforts expended in 
winning the school-wide tournament. 

Approximately one week before the Christ- 
mas let-up, John O. overheard the boys discuss- 
ing the recent class election. It seems that 
John Moss hod been the logical candidate for 
presidency and he did achieve this office 
practically uncontested. The position of vice- 
president was won by Don Anderson. The 
other offices filled included: treasurer — Andy 
Sauer,- secretary—'Don (Armond) Webber; and 
lost, but certainly not least, sergeont-at-arms 
rollicking Roy Lambert. 



Page 59 



The Christmas vccaticn began at last — 
giving John a much-neec'ed rest and a chance 
to take stock ol himself. 

In January when the boys were back at it 
again, John learned of the little celebration 
held over at Lefty's after the last exam. It 
seems they nearly burned that noble establish- 
ment to the ground, by making a little bonfire of 
the calcification crib-sheets. "Well, boys will 
be boys ", sighed our John. 

The first business of the month discussed 
around the dissecting tables after the vacation, 
was the proposal of a class dance. This met 
with instantaneous approval and Andy Sauer 
was appointed dance chairman. hdowever, 
things did not proceed as smoothly as planned. 
Many problems arose — such as: the date of the 
dance; the name of the affair (should it be 
"Cuspid Capers ' or "Dent Debut Swingaroo ),■ 
and whether the girls should wear long dresses 
or short dresses (all in favor, signify!). The 
ultimate outcome was that the Freshman Class 
held their annual "Winter Informal at the 
Medinah Club, the evening of February tenth. 

Music was supplied by a swell band featuring 
classmate Steve Woynovitch as pianist; the girls 
wore short dresses; and everyone, including 
Andy Sauer, was happy. 

The beginning of the next semester found the 
class engulfed in ^/ork much more pertinent to 
the specialized study of Dentistry and also 
brought the freshmen into contact with two men, 
one of whom Dr. Rudolf Kronfeld, a recognized 
authority in his field, left the boys with a 
lasting, memorable impression; the other, a 
man destined to act as a guiding influence for 
the students throughout the rest of their college 
and post-college days. Dr. hdenry Glupker. 

Dr. Kronfeld, in his course in Oral hHistology, 
methodically, and with great patience, con- 
veyed to the minds of the freshmen the intimate 
microscopic structure of the teeth and their 
surrounding tissues. 

Dr. Glupker, in turn gave the students their 
first taste of the problems encountered in the 
construction of an artificial denture. 

Throughout all this mutation Anatomy worries 
were omnipresent. In fact, John Q. himself was 
getting o little worried as he was experiencing 
difficulty in thinking to himself since the students 
had removed his brain for neurological study, 
h^e was really in a bad way. hfis head was in 
bits: bisected, trisected, etc. They hod already 
begun hacking at his abdomen, the ghouls! 
But Friday, June second, put an end to all that. 
It also put an end to John Q. Corpse, for God 
Bless FHis Soul- on that day his story ends, (as 
does ours) as he is slowly lowered into the 
boiling cauldron of caustic soda — to be reduced 
to nothing but bones-- for the benefit of the 
Freshman class of 1943. Goodbye, John! Re- 
quiescat in Pace! 




,'S* 



0^ /^ ^^ 




Abramski 


Anderson 


Bartz 


Bennett 


Berley 


Bloom 


Bonaventura 


Brandt 


Brehm 


Chedester 


Conrad 


Fober 


Fogt 


Gigante 


Gordon 


Grebliunas 


Greenbaum 


Gresik 



Page- 00 




^^^J, ^ .^J f-^^ '^a% ^^y U^lf 

Ck ^ (fl>, ,/f^. ,ffl!i, (f!1i. ^ 

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Am 




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Grigal 




Grohowic 


ik 


Guerrieri 




Harunag 


a 




Hopkins 




Ireland 


Jason 




Jastromb 




Kalin 




Killoren 




Kosel 






Kotecki 




Lambert 


Lehman 




Lukaszewski 


Lutton 




Matousek 




Mayo 






Metzgar 




Moskal 


Moss 




Mueller 




Neglio 




Onak 




Perrone 






Piekos 




Rennie 


Resnik 




Sauer 




Seitz 




Shor 




Smeikal 






Stegmaier 




Swantek 


Tener 




Tilka 




Trace 




Valkenaar 


VIk 




Webb 


er Willi 


iams 


Woyr 


lovitch Ziolko« 


,ski 



Jresh-man iv fer pre faf ions of 

STUDYING ORIElVTAriON 

ttccordinq io*-) 




ioday , Doct 



C^.o J /n»l«usck,Jr 



Page 62 




Page 6S 








THt PfiriEjVT Couir) TO THt 
E.(>TR,ftOTiorl i?5)on 



Pa^t' 65 




The publications of any organization, 
like the pulse-beat of an organism, 
indicate to those without what manner 
of health prevails within. 

Warren Willman. 



K^ 



n 



u 



n 



u 





^ 



^M^,k 



FRANK JERBI LAWRENCE SCHEFF 

Co-Editors 



III 



Q 



The year 1939 marks the return of the Dentos 
as an all-college book. The privilege of 
publishing this volume was missed by us as 
Juniors v^hen the class of 1938 published a 
Senior Dentos. This year the Senior class took 
matters into their ov^n hands and elected a 
Dentos staff. 

Immediately after the elected men had been 
approved by Dr. Logan and Dr. McNulty, the 
remainder of the staff was selected and work 
was begun. The seniors chosen were Felice 
Paone, class artist,- Edward Mikula, cartoonist,- 
and Takeo Yoshina and Bruce Spooner, photo- 
graphers. An editor, artist, and circulation 
manager were appointed to represent each 



class. The under class men were: Juniors — 
Dedekind, Ziolkowski, Belofsky, and Stewart; 
Sophomores^rGarguilo, Newell, and Readel,- 
and Freshmen — Shor, Kalin, Matousek, and 
Fogt. 

The staff has worked hard to prepare an 
annual such as the graduating senior deserves, 
and one of which the school may be proud. 
Each member has given untiringly of his service, 
and each student his support. Without this 
fine cooperation on every hand the book would 
have been an impossibility. 

In the 1939 Dentos the staff has tried to 
assemble the happenings of the year. Between 
its two covers they have sought to cramp a 




Shac 



Page 6S 



|[|IOS 




DR.ROBT. E.McNULTY DR. WARREN WILLMAN 
Financial Advisor Faculty Advisor 



space of time that it may ever recall these months 
spent at work and play with friends. 

In spite of a limited budget they have tried 
to produce a book of quality rather than size — 
a book distinctive in its very simplicity. Sym- 
metry and balance have gt all times been the 
key-words. To make a unified whole of the 
mass of conglomerated material has been their 
aim. 

It IS hoped that the novel division pages in 
two colors lend a bit of pleasing informality 
as well as humor to the book. The handpiece 
theme and arrangement of photographs are 
examples of the originality of design. 



The snapshots, most of vi'hich were token by 
Takeo Yoshina ore as varied and humorous 
as life — they are in truth snaps of life — snaps 
of life's irony, wit and flattery. For that very 
reason these sections are always exceedingly 
popular and interesting. 

Unlimited credit is due Dr. Robert McNulty 
and Dr. Warren Willman, financial and faculty 
advisers, for their wise counsel and unstinted 
assistance in making this Dentos possible. 

Acknowledgement is expressed to Mr. James 
Oldham of the John and Oilier Engraving 
Company and Mr. Oliver Rogers of the Rogers 
Printing Company for their technical assistance. 



Paone 



Mikula 



Spc 




J-. 




Page 09 



Th 



Bu 



Hi Hi 



The BUR, the official pubhcation of the olumni 
association, is in its forty-third year, having 
been first edited by the late Dr. C. N. Johnson 
in 1896. In recent years it has been very 
successfully supervised by Dr. Robert W. Mc- 
Nulty, who was maintained consistently the 
high standards set by its first editor. It is publish- 
ed three times each year, and its circula- 
tion includes all students and alumni of the 
school. 

The purpose of the BUR is not to instruct 
along highly scientific lines, but rather to 
entertain with news and notes concerning 
college and alumni affairs. There ore, however 
contained in each copy of the magazine, articles 
of value and interest, by graduates of the 
college, on dentistry. Results of research, 
news of conventions and meetings, and notes 
on the happenings in the undergraduate 
classes fill the pages. The success of the 

Page 70 



Chicago College of Dental Surgery Alumni 
Association owes much to this publication. 

The December 1938 issue of the BUR was 
devoted entirely to the life of our late beloved 
Dr. C. N. Johnson. In it were many of his 
writings and also many tributes paid to him by 
other authors. 

The sections devoted to each of the classes 
have made the BUR very popular during the past 
few years. It has made students feel as though 
they were a part of the alumni Association. 
Editors representing each class are appointed at 
the beginning of the school year. Frank Jerbi, 
representing the senior class, has done a good 
job of reporting the activities of his classmates. 
Medford Riley reported the doings of the 
junior class. Forrest Branch took care of the 
sophomore pages and did it well. John Moss 
was the editor that reported the outstanding 
events of the freshmen class, and his articles 
were enjoyed by the members of all classes. 



Thk Leivi'LA News 
Dental Alumni To Meet 



a 



\n iifiii i[is 



Ever since the founding of The Loyola News 
more than thirteen years ago by a small group 
of liberal arts students among whom were our 
own Doctors Harold hiillenbrand and William 
Schoen, it has grown to be one of the most 
important publications of the University. Through 
its pages, the dental student has the opportunity 
for broadening his outlook beyond his pro- 
fessional boundaries. Through its columns he 
may become infiltrated with some of the school 
spirit which dominates a large university. 
Through the News we are brought face to 
face with personalities and events of the other 
campuses. The spirit of the founders is strictly 
adhered to, so that today the news is yet the 
torch-bearer of Loyola traditions. 

The tabloid form of the paper which was 
inaugurated in 1934 was maintained this year 
with increasing popularity. The Collegiate 
Digest proved to be one of the most popular 
sections. Its recording, by striking and unique 
pictures of the activities of other universities 
gives us a medium of exchange of ideas that 
is eagerly sought. Among the most popular of 



the columns during the past year were "Marty 
at the Mike", and ' Ho-hHum." 

This year almost every issue had at least one 
or two articles of dental interest. Most of 
these articles gave lost-minute reports of the 
sports and fraternity events of the dental school. 
In this manner, the News staff has endeavored 
to relate interesting events happening at our 
campus and to give a cross-section of our 
fraternity and sport li.fe. 

The staff for the past year, under the direction 
of Max Shapiro, Campus Representative, was 
Howard Gault, Joe Arnold, D. J. Roynes, and 
Seymoure Appell. These men were all assigned 
certain activities to cover and write up. Feature 
articles were written by the campus representa- 
tive. All material before being published 
was approved by Dr. R. W. McNulty, dental 
news faculty moderator. 

For next year the News staff will be Kenneth 
Dedekind '40, Campus Representative, Daniel 
La Mothe '40, Salvatore Impelliteri '41, and 
John Kalin '42. These men were picked 
because of their willingness to cooperate and 
their ability. 

Page 71 




"I shall pass this v/ay but once; any 
good thing, therefore, that I can do 
or any kindness that I can show to any 
human being, let me do it now. Let 
me not defer it or neglect it, for I shall 
not pass this way again.' Earl of 
Devonshire. This should be the motto 
of every fraternity man. 

Fori P. Boulger 



n 



LL 




|[[n SIGMH Hill 



At the University of Michigan College of 
Dental Surgery, in 1882, the first dental fratern- 
ity was organized by nine men, who desired 
to increase professional fraternal association 
and to impress upon the members that a spirit 
of fraternal cooperation toward scientific, 
ethical, and professional progress was of 
paramount importance for dentistry. A few 
years later, on March 24, 1885, Beta Chapter 
was founded at the Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery. 

The fraternity consists of a Supreme Chapter,- 
a Supreme Council to conduct the business of 
the fraternity between the annual meeting of 
the Supreme Chapter; a Council of Deputies 
to govern the activities of the thirty-two sub- 
ordinate chapters in the dental schools over the 



country; many Continental Chapters; and fifty 
Auxiliary Chapters in the United States and 
Canada. 

The Desmos, issued quarterly, is the official 
publication of the fraternity. Each issue usually 
contains an item submitted by each of the 
subordinate chapters, and articles by graduate 
members prominent in some specialized work. 

Beta Chapter held dinner meetings during 
the post year usually at the Professional Schools 
Y M. C. A., every second week. All of the 
meetings were organized by the members, 
under the supervision of Deputy Supreme Grand 
Master, Earl P. Boulger. During the year 
twenty-five new members v/ere initiated, bring- 
ing the total active membership to sixty-seven. 




Boulger Buckley Dawson Glupker Grisamore hdillenbrand hHolmes hlooper 

Hyde C. Johnson R. Johnson Kirby Lindner Logan McNeil McNulty 

Michener Mueller Pike Puterbough Schoen Swanson Watt Willman 

Page 74 




FRATRES IN 
COLLEGIO 

Kelly 

DeWitt 

Singler 

Spooner 

Ahnaer 



Scott 

Yoshina 

Hale 

Fischer 

McKee 



Nicastro 

Paone 

Limacher 

Kosak 

Mikula 



Kriss 
Pohtis 
W. Burke 
Smeby 
Rock 



Gnsomore 

Giraldi 

Butler 

Land 

Verhoeven 



Herthneck 
Gost 
Haas 
VanKley 
R. Burke 



Holmes 
J. Gibson 
Landstrom 
Smith 
Sitar 



Amoturo 
Hocking 
Mclntyre 



Alpha Omega, organized in 1907, has 
entered upon its fourth decade of service to the 
dental profession. Founded at the Pennsylvania 
College of Dental Surgery by a small group of 
unorganized men, it has shown a growth and 
development far beyond the most sanguine 
expectation of its founders. 

Today, Alpha Omega's domain e,»;tends 
throughout the United States and Canada, 
consisting of thirty-two chapters and approxi- 
mately thirty-five hundred men. 

The fraternity spirit is expressed in the three 
Latin words, ' Harmonia, Amor et Veritas , 
meaning 'Harmony, love, and truth , in life, 
good scholarship, clean sportsmanship, and the 
honor of a gentleman. 

Alpha Lambda chapter, founded in 1932 at 
this school, has completed the most successful 
year of its brief history. Our meetings, held 
semi-monthly at the Congress h^otel, have been 
mode extremely interesting by the presentation 
of clinics and lectures by men prominent in the 
profession. 

The social life of our chapter was very bright, 
centering about smokers, parties, dances, and 
buffet suppers. The first of these, a smoker in 
honor of the freshmen, was held in the Florentine 



Room of the Congress FHotel. A few interesting 
films V'/ere shown and several alumni and guests 
gave short speeches. 

After the Christmas holidays the newly- 
elected officers of the chapter were installed 
at ceremonies held at the Morrison Hotel. A 
buffet supper and dancing follov/ed. 

In the spring, the Congress Hotel was the 
site of another buffet social. Music for the 
occasion was supplied by Benny Goodman, Hal 
Kemp, Tommy Dorsey and other famous recording 
orchestras, and the affair was one of the most 
popular of the year. 

On May fifth, the highlight of the social year, 
the Senior Dinner Dance, was held at the Gold 
Coast Room of the Drake Hotel. There, to 
the soothing strains of Ted Weems and his ever- 
popular orchestra, the members and alumni 
feted the ten departing seniors upon the 
completion of their scholastic careers. The 
Chancellor's key was presented to Harold 
Epstein and the Junior Scholarship award to 
Max Shapiro. 

Several days later, on May tenth, the Illinois 
alumni chapter of Alpha Omega presented a 
Tri-Chopter initiation at the Skyline Athletic 
Club. In an impressive ceremony, the neophytes 




Dr. Leshin 



Dr. Siegel 



of the Illinois, Northwestern, and Chicago 
undergraduate chapters were inducted as 
members. 

Prospects for the future are bright, due to 
the enthusiasm of the fraters and the efficiency 
of the officers. The officers for the following 
year are: 

Maurice hienken- Chancellor 
Joseph Perlman- Vice-Chancellor 
Paul Brown Quaestor 



Wilbert Gordon—Scribe 
Charles Shectman-— Macer 
Morton Fireman — Editor 

Active fraters of the past year were: Appell, 
Becker, Epstein, Fein, Gold, Klapman, Kurtz, 
Moses, Roynes, Scheff, Shapiro, Weinstein, 
Belofsky, Bendersky, Fireman, Fishman, Gold- 
stein, Goodman, Gordon, FHenken, Hoffman, 
Pearlman, Perlman, Shectman, Vinickour, Brown, 
Cowan, hHarris and Shrago. 




FRATRES IN 
COLLEGIO 

Epstein 
Moses 
Scheff 
Shapiro 



Gold 

Fein 

Raynes 

Klapman 



Kurtz 
Appell 
Belofsky 
Becker 



Vinickour 
FHenkin 
Fireman 
Goodman 



Bendersky 
Perlman 
Gordon 
Hofman 



Page 77 



Xi Psi Phi was founded at the University of 
Michigan Feb. 8, 1889. 

It was the second dental fraternity organized. 

It was the first dental fraternity to become 
international in its scope, with the establishment 
of Omicron chapter at the University of Toronto 
in 1899. 

During its existence it has established forty-six 
active college chapters, but approximately 
one-half of these have gone out of existence, 
many because of the discontinuance of the 
dental schools of which they were part. We 
hove today twenty-five active chapters. 

It has initiated 16,000 members. It was 
first dental fraternity to adopt a Life Insurance 
Plan, 

It IS the only dental fraternity having a Life 
Membership Plan, whereby every initiate 



becomes a Life Member upon graduation. 

The objectives of Xi Psi Phi fraternity are to 
promote social unity among dental students 
generally and to render mutual assistance 
among them; to inspire intellectual advance- 
ment, and to broaden tfieir appreciation of 
friendships while they are pursuing their course 
of study,- to establish a fraternal feeling and 
brotherhood among them while they are in 
their respective schools and colleges,- and to 
promote fellowship, sociability, moral rectitude, 
intellectual advantage and opportunity to its 
members after they have entered the profession 
of dentistry. 

Lambda chdpter has endeavored to maintain 
the brilliant standards of Xi Psi Phi. Its gradi'ates 
have achieved fame and distinction in ell fields 
of dentistry. 




Dr. Coolidge 



Dr. Oppice 



Dr. Pendleton 



Dr. Pinney 



Dr. Stine 




Dr. Richey 



Page 78 







L 






j'-^^ 








FRATRES IN 
COLLEGIO 



Adams 
Jenkins 



Hadjuk 
Jurewicz 



Dobry 
Sutley 



Kouba 
LaMothe 



itewart 
Ziolkowski 



Ferington 
Chmiel 



Zullo 



The finest aid to a local under- 
graduate chapter is the alumni 
of the chapter, and the Lambda 
chapter has an alumni that is 
active, an alumni that is enthusi- 
astic and guiding. We are oroud 
of our brothers and the individ- 
uals who govern the affairs of the 
Xi Psi Phi. 

Lambda meets twice monthly. 
FHere students make valuable con- 
tacts and clinical observations. 
Social events have had their place 
on lambda's calendar to round 
out the activities. Earlv last fall 
a ' FHard Times " Dance was held 
at the West End Women's Qub. 
The affair vv/as attended by 
members of the other fraternities 
and non-fraternity men as well as 
well as the "Zips ". Those who 
came well dressed, soon found 
their clothes reduced to a state 
quite becoming to a Depression 
Ball. Music for the occasion was 
furnished by Roman George's 
Orchestra. The leader, is none 
other than our own Roman Ziol- 
kowski. Faculty members attend- 
ing the affair were Drs. VIk and 
Rzeszotarski. 

This year has been especially 
great and important to Xi Psi Phi — 
February 8, 1939 marked the 
founding and we celebrated the 
Golden Anniversary at the birth- 
place of our fraternity, Ann 
Arbor, .Michigan. 

The official magazine of the 
Xi Psi Phi fraternity is the Xi 
Psi Phi Quarterly ", a publication 
intended to keep the members 
informed of fraternity matters. 

The incoming officers are: 

Elmer Kouba, president 
Daniel LaMothe, vice-president 
Joseph Stewart, secretary 
FHarold Readel, treasurer. 

Graduate officers ore: 

Dr. E. A. Prugh, Deputy Sup- 
reme President. 

Dr. E. D. Coolidge, Assistant 
Deputy Supreme President. 

Dr. J. J. VIk, Assistant Deputy 
Supreme President. 



Page 79 




Winquist 



Bassak 



Link 



Dedekind 



Baranowski 



Forty men banded together and called 
themselves PsI Omegons. This was the formation 
of Alpha Chapter of Psi Omega Fraternity at 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery in 
1892. From this small group of staunch men 
arose a great fraternity, boasting of approxi- 
mately nineteen thousand in membership and 
embracing fifty-five active Chartered Chapters. 
A group of men, desiring the benefits of such a 
great fraternal organization, grouped together 
and formed the Kappa Chapter in 1898 at the 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery. 

Successful Psi Omegans may be found over 
the entire world and in every branch of Den- 
tistry. The alumni and active members have 
done much to earn the respect of their fellow 
men. They hove followed the teachings of 
Psi Omega and have been prominent in advanc- 
ing and improving the standards of Dentistry. 

Active members keep in touch with the 
alumni members through a quarterly publication 



known as The Frater, the official bulletin of the 
Psi Omega Fraternity. 

Kappa Chapter convenes twice a month at 
the Psi Omega FHouse. Here the able assist- 
ance of Dr. Frank Biedko, Deputy Councilor, 
IS utilized, and much work is accomplished 
towards the continuation of a grand group of 
students and alumni. 

Well attended Freshmen smokers and success- 
ful parties were held in the Psi Omega FHouse, 
where most of the social functions of this 
Chapter are held. 

Every year finds a new installation of officers 
and this year was no exception. Julian A. 
Link followed Dorus L. Winquist as Grand 
Master, Ashton E. Knickels succeeded Julian 
A. Link in the position of Treasurer, Adolf 
Baranowski took over the position of Secretary 
from Evo Binotti, Kenneth L. Dedekind was 
elected Editor, and August C. King retained the 
position of Chaplain. 




Dr. Meye 



cm yppH upsiiii 




Upon the culmination of each school year, 
and on the eve of grocuotion, a small groLjp of 
the graduating class is honored with membership 
in Omicron Kappa Upsilon. This honor is 
considered a final tribute paid by the college 
in recognition of the conclusion of the school 
careers of those men worthy of special com- 
mendation. 

Requirements for nomination to this society 
are a splendid character and citizenship as well 
as the possession of such grades earned during 
the entire course that places the student in the 
upper twelve per cent of his class. To be 
presented with the distinguished gold key, 
emblematic of membership, is the highest 
honorary award offered at the Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery. 

In addition to selection of its members from 
the graduating classes practitioners may become 
eligible. Those who "through excellence of 
professional attainments and citizenship, hove 
distinguished themselves in their profession, 
and in respective communities" may have 
membership conferred upon them. 

This, the Graduate hHonor Society of the 
Profession, was organized in 1914 at the 



Northwestern University Dental School. The 
founders were Drs. Thomas L. Gilmer, Arthur 
D. Black, and C R. E. Koch, who felt that a 
fraternity was neeced "to encourage and de- 
velop a spirit of emulation among students in 
Dentistry and to recognize in an appropriate 
manner those who have distinguished themselves 
by a high grade of scholarship." 

In 1925 the Chicago College of Dental 
Surgerv was granted a charter to establish a 
chapter designated as Pi, which has since 
honored approximately three hundred men, 
practitioners and graduates. Pi chapter is 
guided by such men as Dr. W. H. G. Logan, 
president; Dr. R. W. McNulty, vice-president; 
and Dr. P. G. Puterbaugh, secretory-treasurer. 
These men and practically all of the faculty of 
this school have been honored with membership 
■ for their distinctive accomplishments. 

From the graduating class of 1938 five men, 
by reason of their brilliant records as students, 
were given the signal honor of wearing the 
key of this worthy fraternal organization. 
Those men were; Marvin E. Chapin, William J. 
Charm, Ralph G. Larsen, A, Albert -Moser, and 
Joseph Schneider. 

Page SJ 



i[|[ ni 



1^ 



MM 



Founded at University of Florida, 1924 
Established at Loyola University, 1926 

Blue Key National Honor Fraternity is a fra- 
ternity which has as its objects high scholastic 
rating, participation in school activities, and 
popularity among ones fellow students. Thus 
o man is elected to Blue Key only when he 
meets with the highest standards in his class. 

The organization is not secretive in nature, 
but has as its ideals the creation of a feeling of 
good fellowship among non-members. This 
one point alone could not be possible if it were 
governed as most fraternal organizations are. 
It has no national installation teams, fees, or 
dues, but the local conditions at the universities 
in which the chapters exist govern the formation 
of its constitution and by-laws. 

In October of 1924 Blue Key was founded at 
the University of Florida, and since then has 
spread over the entire country. In 1926 
Loyola Chapter was admitted as the nineteenth, 
there being today over fifty chapters which ore 
active in some of the largest universities in the 
country. 



The Blue Key men on one campus act as host 
to the Blue Key members and their friends 
on the other campuses of the University. In 
1937 the dental campus was host to the Uni- 
versitv, and the other campuses were invited to 
look behind the scenes of scientific research in 
the dental profession by inspecting the newly 
created Foundation for Dental Research of 
the Chicago College of Dental Surgery. 

Faculty members in the dental school are: 
Drs. W. H. G. Logan, Dean,- Earl P. Boulger, 
hiarold A. FHillenbrand, Frank W. h^yde, 
Wallace N. Kirby, Rudolf Kronfeld, Paul T. 
Dawson, h4enry L. Boris, John F. Svoboda, 
William P. Schoen, Ralph G. Larsen, and 
Joseph S. Rzesortarski. 

Undergraduate members in the dental school 
are: 

Seniors: 

Arthur G. Adams 
Victor J, McKee 
William C. Limacher 

Juniors: 

Medfred S. Riley 
Peter Griffo 



Page AV 




Since its foundation twenty-four years ago as 
an hionorary Jesuit society, Alpha Sigma Nu 
has been a leading undergraduate organization 
in every university in which it has been estab- 
lished. It has gamed such prominence that 
mention has been made of recognizing it as 
the official honorary society in all catholic 
colleges and universities throughout the coun- 
try. 

The purposes of Alpha Sigma Nu are to honor 
students who have distinguished themselves in 
service and loyalty to the University as well 
OS in scholarship; to lend support to and promote 
such activities of a character which will tend 
to elevate the intellectual and cultural level 
of the students in their respective universities,- 
and to help strengthen the bonds betvveen 
faculty and students. 

Established at Loyola in the spring months of 
1938 the chapter has, with the aid of the Rev. 
Thomas A. Egan S. J., carefully built a founda- 
tion upon which future members will be able to 
act with confidence and autfiority. The members, 
selected while in their junior year by the deans 
of their respective schools, meet every month 
at the Downtown College to discuss under- 



graduate problems. Contact is maintained with 
the other chapters through the "Newsletter", 
the official publication of the society. 

With the deans of the various schools present 
as honor guests the formal initiation of new 
members was conducted on April 23, 1939 in 
the Town Room of the Knickerbocker hHotel. 
A number of alumni \/vere present at the 
banquet that preceded the initiation ritual. 

The coming year will be an active one for 
Alpha Sigma Nu. The year 1940 marks the 
silver jubilee of the society and plans are in 
progress to conduct a memorable national 
convention at Marquette University of Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin, the home of the mother 
chapter. 

Undergraduate members in the dental school 
are: 

Seniors: 

Truman G. DeWitt 
Frank C. Jerbi 

Juniors 

Kenneth L. Dedekind 
Robert G. EHerthneck 



Page SJ 




Good enough" is not sufficient. Tfie 
gome is either won or lost. 

G. C. Pike 



n 



n 






u 








ITIHMilHI Un\l 



The Intramural Athletics of the Dental School 
are supervised and their schedules planned by 
Dr. Ralph Larsen, FHoward Gault, Max Shapiro, 
and a board of intramural managers selected 
from the various classes. Edv^/in Belofsky 
represents the Junior Class and also serves in 
the capacity of Assistant Intramural Director. 
He v^ill be Intramural Director for the coming 
year. Edward Garguilo and Salvatore Impel- 
literi represent the Sophomore Class, and Paul 
Jason, Lester Trace, and Joseph Shor, the 
Freshman Class. The board of class managers 
plays a very important part in dental school 
athletics. These men are present at each 
game of every tournament, and the success of 
a tournament depends upon the work and 
judgement of the class managers. At the end 
of the intramural year, various awards are given 
out. The Freshman Managers receive bronze 
awards, the Sophomore Managers, silver 
awards, the Junior Manager, a gold medallion, 
and the Director, a sweater and letter from the 
University. 

This year was one of the most successful, so 
far as athletics were concerned, in a great 
many years. There were more different 
tournaments than ever before in the history of 
the Chicago College of Dental Surgery. The 
first innovation was a volley-ball tournament, 
which proved to be very successful. Nine 
teams were entered and competition was 
very fast and very close. At the start of the 



tournament, the Delts 1 team vv'os picked as 
the probable winner. Led by the redoubtable 
Joe FHaas, they seemed to be prime favorites 
to emerge on top at the close of the tournament. 
FHowever, a dark horse, in the person of the 
Freshman 1 team entered the picture. Matching 
the Delts, win for win, the end of the season 
found these two teams undefeated, v/ith but 
one game left to play, and that game to be 
played against each other. Class partisanship 
ran high, for most of the Delts were Sophomores, 
Game time found the Delts stiil favorites to 
win, due mainly to the fact that the Freshmen 
were not very well known. The Delts were 
confident and piled up a good lead in the 
opening minutes of play, but Captain Marty 
Killoren rallied his green-clads and they came 
bock with renev^ed vigor in the last part of the 
game to win both the contest and the tourna- 
ment. 



Members of the 


VIC 


orious Freshman 1 Teorr 


are as follows: 








Grigal 
Conrad 
Jastramb 
Killoren (c) 






. Gordon 
Faber 
Abramski 
Tener 


The final standin 


g o 


f the 


teams is as follows 


Team 






Won Lost 


Freshman 1 






8 


Delts 1 

Freshman II 






7 1 
6 2 . 



Gault Belofsky impellitterl Stic 



Trace 



Jason 




Page So 




Zips 4 4 

Alpha Omega 3 5 

Burs 2 6 

Freshman III 2 , 6 

Juniors 8 

Delts 8 

The next tournament on hand was the annual 
basketball tournament. This, as in other years, 
turned out to be the most popular tournament 
of the season. Unlike volley-ball, the entries 
in this tourney were restricted to one team 
from each fraternity and one independent team 
from each class. A total of six teams was 
entered. The tournament was run ol^ in two 
rounds with the provision that the v^inner of 
the first round would ploy the winner of the 
second round for the championship. All games 
were played at the Professional Schools Y. M. 
C. A. with the various cipss intramural managers 
acting as officials. The Delts, who were last 
year's champions, came up with a host of new 
stars and were considered prime favorites to 
take this year's classic. Last year's luminaries. 
Charm, Blevins, and Ortman, who had been 
lost through graduation were more than easily 
replaced by Bortz, Mclntyre and Anderson. 
The only other team considered able to give 
the Delts a battle was the Zips, a strong, but 
erratic team. Bolstered considerably by the 
addition of brilliant "Red " Brzdenkiewicz, the 
Zips were picked either to finish next to the 
Delts, or possibly upset them for title. The 



most disappointing team of the tournament was 
the Burs, an independent team composed mainly 
of seniors. In the previous year's tournament, 
this team was outstanding and in the playoff for 
the championship, lost to the Delts in the last 
few seconds of play and then only by one 
basket. FHowever, this year told another story 
and for some unknown reason, the Burs slumped 
badly and finished in the cellar. 

The Delts won the first round and won it 
rather easily. hHowever the second round was 
a little different. Paced by fast-stepping "Red 
Brzdenkiewicz and "Pete" Zullo, the Zips 
matched the Delts' unblemished record and the 
result v^as that these two teams played each 
other for the championship of the second round. 
As the Delts had already won the first round, 
they needed only this one game to capture the 
championship. Both teams played excellent 
basketball, but the confident Delts turned back 
a fighting Zip team to win the game and 
3 margin of three baskets, 
the Champion Delt Team ore 



tournament by 
The members o 
as follows: 
Burke 
Haas (c) 
Mclntyre 
Bartz 



Anderson 
Fober 
Neglio 
Amaturo 

On the eleventh of April, the Delts met the 
Hoplites, Champions of the Loyola Medical 
School Tourney, for the championship of the 
west side departments of Loyola University. 




P-'S'- 




The game was played at the Professional 
Schools Y. M, C. A. The Delts lost a hard 
fought and hotly contested game by a score of 
27 to 25. Markiewicz and Meier starred for 
the visitors, while Joe hdaos and Pay Bartz 
were outstanding for the home team. Incident- 
ally, lost year, the same two teams met for the 
west-side championship, and the hloplites 
won ... by two points. 

The final placement of the teams is as follows: 
Delts Alpha Omega 

Zips Terrors 

Freshmen Burs 

All of the members of the winning Delt 

basketball team were awarded little gold 
basketballs. 

The Annual Intramural Bowling Tournament 
was run off at the Schuenemonn-Flynn Bowling 
Alleys. A total of fifty-five men entered the 
tournament. Rudolph Dobry of the Senior Class 
and Joseph Buda of the Junior Class were 
favored to v^/in. The close of the tournament 



found the following five men at the top of the 
heap. 

Name Score (average) 

Dobry 180 

Amaturo 158 

Buda 153 

Wadas 148 

Adams 146 

These five men were given small watch charms, 
m the form of gold bowling balls, for awards. 
As o word of caution, the winners of tnese 
av^ards are advised not to use them for casting 
gold inlays. 

This year found members of the Dental School 
rather active in University athletics. Bill Lim- 
ocher of the Senior Class was on the varsity 
golf team, and was awarded a minor letter and 
sweater. Max Shapiro, the stellar merman, 
completed four years of varsity competition with 
the University swimming team. Max was high 
point man of the team during the precedingyear, 
and this year finished in third place in point 
standing. hHe was awarded a major letter and 
sweater for his efforts. In addition to being a 
member of the swimming team. Max was also 
active in .Dental Intramural athletics, serving as 
Intramural Director in 1938 and as Intramural 
Co-Director in 1939. The beginning of the 
year found both Ted Ahnger and Eddie Fer- 
ington out for the swimming team, but both boys 
felt that they had to devote more time to studying 
and points, so dropped out before the season 
had gotten well under way. 

As yet, the annual Ping-Pong Tournament is 
not finished, while Baseball and FHorseshoes 
(singles and doubles) have no[ started . . . due 
to the inclemency of the weather. 

With a great future on the horizon for the 
Intramural Sports of the Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery, Co-Directors hfoward Goult 
and Max Shapiro turn over the helm to Edwin 
Belofsky and his staff of assistants and v/ish him 
the best of luck for the coming year . . . 1940. 



Max Shapiro 




Page SS 



VI 


i 


" p 
u 


— 


y 


fi 





n 



OUR SERVICE TO THE PROFESSION 

has extended over a period of about Ninety-five Years and we are proud 
of our record. 

We employ a staff of Equipment Specialists v^ho are anxious to be of 
service to you in planning your future office, suggesting a suitable location, 
assisting in the selection of curtains, drapes, floor coverings and color 
schemes. 

They w\\\ also supply accurate blueprints of your office v/hich con be 
turned over to contractors for construction work. 

These blueprints show plumbing details, electrical outlets, also parti- 
tions, etc. 

We invite you to confer with one of our qualified representatives 
before completing details for your office. Many times they will offer 
suggestions that will minimize expense and make your office more 
efficient. 

Our interest in your welfare does not cease when you have purchased 
your Equipment requirements as we are anxious to continue to serve you 
with daily needs of Merchandise, Gold & Teeth. 

Come in and get acquainted and inspect our modern depot and 
methods for serving you. 

TrlE S. S. WHITE DENTAL MFG. CO. 

PITTSFIELD BUILDING 

55 East Washington Street 

CHICAGO 



Page 92 



^^^tPMCfTi 




1919-1939 



ism. 



MADISON STREET 



...lUUtoU... 

DENTAL LABORATORY 

4010 WESl MADISON SlREEl 

NEVADA 0088 



Manufacturers of 

Surgical and Dental 

Specialties 



FARA MFG. CO. 

6773 Talcott Avenue 
CHICAGO 



PHONE NEWCASTLE 3820 



Great Lakes 
Linen Supply Co. 



Complete Rental 
Seriice on 

TOWELS. COATS AND GOWNS 

for the 
Dental Profession 



Plant: 36th and Pamell Avenue 
TeU'plKine: Boulevard (iHOO 



GOOD 




LUCK 




TO 




TEE 




CLASS 


OF 1939 


Alexander 


Cassriel Co. 


207 South 


Wabash Ave. 


Har. 5128 


Chicago, III. 



Page 94 



^ V ft N N f D 



PROFESSIONAL 
SUCCESS 




fe^^*^:. ..-..it^nrW^g^ 



A well planned successful professional future calls for a thorough 
knowledge of the appliances that one must work and live with in 
the practice of dentistry in the years to come. 

We can counsel you no more sincerely than to recommend that you 
investigate and thoroughly study the merits and values of the new 
WEBER line of dental o(]uipiuent. There has been no finer dental 
equipment ever built than is offered you in the Weber line of toda^^ 
It is sold by reputable dealers everywhere on very liberal terms and 
is fully guaranteed to meet every modern electrical and mechanical 
scientific development, and is prepared in design antl priced to suit 
the most discriminating buyer. 
All types of helpful services are yours for the asking. 

The Weber Dental Manufacturing Co. 

Crystal Park CANTON, OHIO 

Makers of Fine Dental Equipment and Cabinets 



Page 95 




JUST ANOTHER OFFICE? 



YOUR FIRST OFFICE . . . how will it look 
to your patients? Will it be in keeping with 
the modern, progressive dental techniques 
you have just successfully mastered ... or 
will it be "just another office"? For an 
office that is different, new, and up-to-date, 
equip with AMERICAN. The new models, 
marvels of sanitation and efficiency, are 
available in any color you prefer . . . any 
one of them wiU be the "heart" of a fine, 
modern, different office. 

THE AMERICAN CABINET CO. 



TWO RIVERS 



WISCONSIN 



■ Here is the new No. 147 
"^ American Dental Cabinet 



O/rneAXJcart 

DENTAL CABINETS 



Headquarters for All 

Dental and Medical Books 

used in 

Chicago College of Dental Surgery 

We have the largest and most complete Stock to be 
found anywhere. 

Wide assortments of Notebooks, Blankbooks, Loose- 
leaf Covers, and Fillers, Drawing Supi^lies, Fountain 
Pens, and Inks, Brief Cases, Dissecting Sets, 
Laboratory Supplies 
Prices Right 

SPEARMAN'S BOOK STORE 

CONGRESS AND HONORE STREETS 
(Next to Y. AI. ('. A. Hotel) 



Page < 



USEFUL! 




Columbia Rubber 
Model Formers 

TPHE caxji way to nuikc ikcI study niddcls. 

Just pour plaster into model former and 
mount anatomical cast. The soft, pliable 
rubber permits easy removal of model, 
which comes out perfectly smooth and 
finished, with indented panel for patient's 
name and otiier data. 

Upper and lower m<idels made in these 
formers occlude automatically. 

PRICE per set — 1 upper and 1 lower 
rubber model former $2.75. 

CGLUMBIA DENTOFORM CORP. 

"The House of a Thousand Models" 
i:il i:,\sT 2:!in) St. Xiow Vouk, X. V. 




Offers a Complete 

Dental Laboratory 

Service 

Telephone 
Central 1680 

M. W. SCHNEIDER 

Complete Dental Laboratory 
55 E. Washington St. Chicago, 111. 



THE CONGRESS 

BARBER and BEAUTY 

PARLOR 

Siiccessfull.y Caterin.o; to the Doctor.-^ 

and Students of this vicinity foi- the 

past seven yeai-s. 

In the Professional "Y" Building 
"Just Inside the Door" 

Chahli'Z.s E. Kichakdsox, Prop. 

5 5 No 

+ 
Barbers Chairs Waiting 




• You'll profit from this sound advice: Gel 
Ihe full CDX story; it's backed with facts and 
figures based on its 16-year record in thou- 
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successful practice of dentistry, especially 
to the young dentist establishing his practice. 

GENERAL ^ ELECTRIC 
X-RAY CORPORATION 



BUILDING A SUCCESSFUL PRACTICE 



Far seeing dental graduates appre- 
ciate that quality equipment means 
a satisfactory income. Ritter equip- 
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well chosen investment. Then too the 
Ritter Company is the only organ- 
ization with a well organized plan to 
help you to quickly build a successful 
practice. 




5. Hitter's Practice Building Service . . . Every two 

weeks, for a year and a half, this Service brings bim 
the sohitions of problems that are tried and proven 
methods of successful dentists. 




1. Graduate selects Hitter eipiipment ... is surprised 
at small monthly payments. 




6. Personal problems of 
Practice Building answer- 
ed by competent practi- 
tioners associated with 
the Ritter Practice 
Building Service. 



7. Ritter's Educational 
Division helps him build 
a profitable children's 
practice by advising him 
how to win them to his 
office. 



2. Ritter's Statistical De- 3. Ritter representative 
partment rectmimends }nTS()iially gives the 
best locality for greatest young dentist sound ad- 
opportunity, vice on specific problems. 





4. Ritter's Architectural Service lays out his attractive 
and erticient ollice. 



8. THE RESULT: A profitable prartiie in but a frac- 
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that Ritter helped him make. The Ritter Dental 
Manufacturing Company, Inc., Ritter Park, Roch- 
ester. Ps. V. 



^tart Right with Ritter 




THIRTY YEARS OF FRIENDLY SERVICE 

Thirty years ago our Company was founded by Dr. C. L. Frame, then a practicing dentist. 

Having been through the mill of practical experience he knew the economic and professional 
problems confronting the young graduate. 

It was his ambition to build an organization capable of serving you and your colleagues 
with a helpful and sympathetic understanding as well as to merchandise the finest materials 
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During the past three decades a great many graduates of your school have honored our 
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tell you that two things determined their choice. Quality merchandise of course but, more 
important still, they appi'ociated (Inins: Wu-hm-- with people who had ;i tlinrnugh understanding 
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We .solicit j'our futviic patronage mi the l)a.-<is of Quality merchandise and fiiendly cooperation. 



T 



25 East Washington Street 



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DISTRIBUTORS OF ALL WELL KNOWN MAKES OF DENTAL SUPPLIES 
INCLUDING 

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Equipment Plastics Golds Steele's Facings Burs 



Paie 99 




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Specify DEE Gold and 

when you have Old Gold 

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J. 

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Phones: Central 3562-3563 

CHICAGO 

28 Years of Satisfactory Equipment Service 



Page 100 



WESTERN 




Heat Merchants 

for 

48 Years 



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HAVE YOU TRIED 



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VAN BUREN 

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EUCLID 



?fl234 



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If ebster defines GootI if ill — The advantage in custom which 
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AMERICAN DENTAL COMPANY 

Established 1900 

LABORATORIES 

Phone STATE 1642 

5 South Wabash Avenue Chicago, Illinois 



Page 101 



AN IDEAL 
LABORATORY SERVICE 

The aim of the Standard Dental Laboratories has alwaj's been: 
To be first with the best prosthetic laboratory service. 

That is why we pioneered \'itallium. We felt that it was to the 
best interest of the members of the profession whom we serve. 
Our judgment has been vindicated by the performance of Mtallium 
in over one million mouths. 

That's why we have ec|uipped our laboratory to process Austenal 
All Porcelain Dentures and Austenal Teeth by the Micromold Pro- 
cess. We sincerely believe that these dentures and teeth have an 
unprecedented future in dentistrj-. 

That's why we offer to the dental profession one of the most com- 
plete laboratory services in Chicago including, Mtallium, Austenal 
Teeth, Austenal All Porcelain Dentures, plate work, gold dentures 
of all kinds, fixed bridges, porcelain jacket crowns, pontics, acrylic 
resin and condensate restorations of all types. 

You can have confidence that you will (jbtain the very best pros- 
thetic materials and the very finest craftsmanship at Standard. 



Standard Dental Laboratories, Inc. 



185 North Wabash Avenue 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



Dearbor 6721 



Page 102 



IDENTIFY YOURSELF WITH A 
YOUNGMEN'SCHRISTIAN AS- 
SOCIATION. IT IS A WORLD- 
WIDE MOVEMENT DEDI- 
CATED TO THE CHRISTIAN 
WAY OF LIVING. 



PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS 

Y. M. C. A. 

1804 Congress Street 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

Seeley 7060 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

DUDLEY'S 
CAFETERIA 



BASEMENT 

CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL 

SURGERY 



Compliirents 

of 

LOGIN BROTHERS 



DENTAL AND MEDICAL 
BOOKS 



SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS 



1814 W. Harrison St. 

Opposite Cook County Hospital 

CHICAGO 



FOSTER 


DENTAL FILMS 




and 


DENTAL 


FILM MOUNTS 


used exclusively by 


Chicago College of Dental Surgery 




♦ 


N. W. 


FOSTER & SON 


Morton Grove, Illinois 



CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 
DENTAL SCHOOL OF LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 



1757 West Harrison Street 
CHICAGO 



The Fifty-Seventh Annual Session Opens October 3, 1939 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

To meet the advanced reciuirements of dental education 
students entering the dental school must present entrance 
credits amounting to fifteen acceptable units, representing 
four years of high school work, and in addition thereto, 
two years, sixty semester hours of a^Dproved college credit 
which must include: 

Chemistry 6 semester hours 

Biology 6 semester hours 

English 6 semester hours 

The remainder of the reciuirement should include elective 
subjects intended to broaden the intellectual background 
of the student, an important essential in professional life. 
Recommended elective subjects are advanced courses in 
English, history, foreign language, economics, philosophy 
and social and political sciences. 

Graduate Courses Offered in Selected Subjects 
Address Registrar 

CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 
DENTAL SCHOOL OF LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 



Page 104 



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I 




Individuality the Mark of the 
Successful Dentist 

Your Patients Will Appreciate the 
Individual Touch and Sanitation 

Lily -Tulip Cup & Specialty Co. 

317 No. Wells St. Sup. 347g 



PiioM-; Srvri; 2706 



MASTER 

DENTAL COMPANY 



• It <• s/x'cidlizf in llir nmslnit tioii of 
prticlicdl rcslDiiilitins. 

• 1 licnnolrol Caslitigs Electrically Con- 
trolled. 

• I'ul! infonnntion. literotiire ontl f)rici' 
list upon re<iuest. 

162 North State Street 
Chicago, Illinois 



ROOT STUDIOS 


Est. 1889 


185 No. Wabash Avenue 


OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS 


1936 DENTOS 


1937 DENTOS 


1938 DENTOS 


1939 DENTOS 


Special Rates to C. C. D. S. Students at All Times 



Page JOS 



You will probably make 
36,000 local anesthetic 
injections during your 
practicing years . . . 



When you consider the vast amount of 
local anesthetic, injections you will make 
during your practicing years, it becomes 
obvious that even a slight variation in 
efficiency affects a large number of cases. 

That's why we urge you to use Novol — 
the local anesthetic generally accepted as 
closest to the ideal. 



Only Novol provides these advantage.* — 

1. Solutions with pH above the critical 
acid value of the blood. 

2. Cartridge container that permit a com- 
plete chain of sterile precautions from 
containers to the tissues. 

3. Cartridges that reach you in vacuum 
packed tins to insure freshness. 



NOVOCOL CHEMICAL MANUFACTURING CO., INC. 

2921-23 Atlantic Ave. BROOKLYN, N. Y 

TORONTO — LONDON - BUENOS AIRES — RIO DE JANEIRO 

.\oi()l is the norld's iiidsI extrnsiivly iiscil local nnestlietic! 



Compliments 



A FRIEND 




Compliments of 

MIKE BAUER 

DENTAL LABORATORY 



NEW ADDRESS 

30 W. Washington 

Telephones: Dearborn 8403 -8404 



Page 106 




JAHN & OLLIER ENGRAVING CO 

817 West Washington Blvd.. Chicago, III. - Telephone MONroe 7080 

Commercial Artists, Photographers and Makers of Fine Printing Plates for Black and Colo 



Page lOy 



ON MAINTAINING 

LEADERSHIP • • • 



To win and consistently hold a place as 
the recognized leader of school annual 
printing, has been the record of Rogers 
Printing Company since its beginning in 
1908. 

That we have, during a period of 31 years, 
successfully produced over 700 annuals for 
schools throughout the country, attests our 
ability to completely satisfy the most dis- 
criminating Year Book Staff. 

New ideas, coupled with the knowledge 
and experience gained through a quarter 
of a century's service, insure the school which 
chooses a Rogers' printed book, of ideal 
pages "From Start to Finish". 

We are proud that the staff of this book 
entrusted its printing to our organization 
and we herewith present it as on example 
of our work. 



ROGERS PRINTING COMPANY 

307-309 First Street . 228 N. LaSalle Street 

DIXON, ILLINOIS CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



MC 






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