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Full text of "Dentos"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2011 with funding from 
CARL!: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in 



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http://www.archive.org/details/dentos1940unse 



Chicago (Jolloge of Denial Surgerj 





N the ageless march of the cenluries through time and 
history, there have been great men and great events. But 
not all of these have had the noble qualities that would 
enable them to resist the slow corrosion of the passing 
years. Some have shone briefly only to become lusterless 
under the accumulation of the centuries. Others have 
come down to us with their glory undimmed, the princely 
gift of the past to the present. 

The men and events which are now visible to us in the long per- 
spective of history have all had an influence that retains its significance 
in this day. This influence may have been enlarged by future achieve- 
ment, as the circle in water widens. But these concentric markings 
that roll endlessly against the shores of time have all had their origin 
in a central source. Perhaps it is for this reason that in a present 
day we commemorate these men and their achievements , evaluating the 
gifts they bestowed upon us. 

1940 marks three of these anniversaries of achievement . The first commemo- 
rates the Spanish prince, Ignatius of Loyola, who was the founder and first 
leader of the Society of Jesus. The second anniversary, separated from the 
first by three centuries, marks the first centennial of dentistry in this country. 
The third, later still by half a century, is the catalyst that unites the name 
Loyola with the practice of dentistry through the celebration of the founding 
of the Chicago College of Dental Surgery, Dental School of Loyola University . 



THE 400th ANNIVERSARY OF THE SOCIETY OF JESUS 

A few months before Christopher Columbus saw the green shores of the New 
World, Ignatius of Loyola was born in the S7nall province of Guipuzcoa 
in Spain. Descendant of a noble family, he beca^ne a page at the court of 
Ferdinand and Isabella who were shortly to make possible the discovery 
of the New World. Later Ignatius became a soldier and was severely wounded 
at the French attack on Pamplona. After a long convalescence during which 
he had given many hours to the thought of spiritual life, this Spanish knight 
renounced his career as a soldier, gave away his possessions and adopted a 
life of the utmost severity in the service of the sick and the poor. He gathered 
about hit7i a few followers and, on September 27, 1540, this small band was 
recognized by Pope Paul III as the Society of Jesus whose members are 
more popularly known as Jesuits. 




As a religious order the Society of Jesus belongs to that larger form oj religious 
life which has characterized the activity of the Catholic Church from its early 
days. Specifically, the Jesuits form an order of priests organized for apostolic 
work, following a fixed spiritual rule and depending for their material support 
on alms and free will offerings. 

It may be said that the spirit of the Jesuit Order is a inilitary spirit because 
its founder was a Spanish knight with the training appropriate in the Middle 
Ages to that station. As a knight he had been bred in the ideals of chivalry 
which denoted two main virtues: an intense loyalty to the person of the leader 
and an unflinching bravety against the foe. At first Ignatius of Loyola 
wished to call his organization the ^'Company of Jesus", perhaps because 
that term refnained with him from his military career but more likely because 
the members of this company were to give unfailing loyalty to their Leader 
and to be His companions in the battles they would wage against His enemies. 
Through the vows which Jesuits take as members of a religious order, they 
pledge themselves to copy the character of their Leader, to adopt His principles 
and to judge by His standards. 

At first it had been the plan of Ignatius of Loyola to go with his nine com- 
panions to the Holy Land, there to labor for the spiritual welfare of the people. 
Thwarted in this plai2, he and his followers put 
themselves at the disposal of the Pope to do his 
bidding in any critical situation thus becoming 
soldiers for the defense and propagation of the Faith. 
Under the spell of these lofty ideals Ignatius drew 
up with the authorization of the Pope a body of 
rules and a constitution that were to give form and 
direction to the new religious order. This was four 
centuries ago. 

The form of government in the Society is a consti- 
tutional monarchy. The chief commander is elected 

for life in his office of General of the Order. The supreme legislative assem- 
bly in the Society is the General Congregation which is summoned by the 
General when ?ieeded or by the Vicar-General in the case of the death 
of the General when a new one is to be elected. Membership in this 
General Congregation is drawn from the diffei-ent provinces of the Society 
through local elections of delegates. 

To this day the constitutions of the early Society remain substantially un- 
changed. The membership of the new order grew rapidly and inaugurated 





the tradition of sound scholarship in theology and the arts, and the careful 
mental training in philosophy and the sciences, which has been the heritage 
of the Jesuits these last Jour centuries. 

In the early days oj the Society when Renaissance and Huinanistic 
studies were the inspiration oJ scholars, the Jesuits came to formulate their 
cultural work on the Joundations of Humanistic studies. The Jesuit system 
oJ education is embodied in the Ratio Studiorum — A Method of Study, 
the first printed copy of which was circulated as early as 1586. Its whole 
spirit — and the whole spirit of Jesuit education — may be reduced to two old 
proverbs: Mens sana in corpore sano — a sound mind in a healthy body 
and Non multa sed multum — not many things but a few well known. The 
matter comprising the studies in Jesuit schools is therefore humanistic and 
includes the ancient classics — Latin and Greek, the Sciences, Mathematics 
and History. Less effort is made to read widely; rather the idea is to analyze, 
intei-pret and appreciate. 

In the field of intellectual endeavor the Jesuits have been outstanding 
during the past four centuries. Twenty thousand members of the Society 
have been writers who have enriched worthily the cultural content of the race. 
The topics covered by these productions are as various as the possible field of 
learning from theology, through the arts and sciences, to the lighter forms of 
belles-lettres. One of the early Jesuits, Father Athanasius Kircher, did 
such lasting work in the sciences that geophysics, physics and medicine are 
still under obligations of respect and veneration. Bellarmine, Suarez, the 
Bollandisis and countless others have enriched the treasury of the World's 
ze to a degree rarely, if ever approached by any similar organization. 



In addition to their educational activities, the Jesuits devote themselves 
to missionary and retreat work. For four centuries these soldiers of Ignatius 
have gone out not to conquer a wilderness of the material kind but the hearts 
and minds of men who had strayed far from moral paths. This the Jesuits 
have done through the Spiritual Exercises formulated by Ignatius of Loyola. 
These are an organic training in the laws of spiritual life and, since the time 
of Ignatius, have been the staple form of intense religious reawakening in 
missions and retreats. 

Not to the temples of learning or religion did this Company of Jesus 
confine its activities. It was founded at the zenith of an era of discovery. 
A new route to the Indies and to the Orient had shortly before been opened. 
Two huge continents , North and South America, had just been discovered. 
And to this New World, as well as to the far corners of the old one, the soldiers 




of Ignatius took their flag. To India, Ceylon, Japan, China and Malacca 
went the heroic band of Jesuits under Francis Xavier, bringing uncounted 
thousands to the banner of the Leader. 

Into the wilderness of the New World went the soldiers of Ignatius to build 
a vast spiritual empire. Into the desolate reaches of northern Canada, into 
the fertile plains and valleys of the Mississippi marched the Black Robes. 
Through the almost unendurable agony of harsh winters, through the dis- 
integrating heat of the summers, through the perils of wilderness and through 
the savagery of many Indian tribes these priest heroes fought their way to 
write a glorious chapter in American history. They explored the 7iew lands, 
painstakingly made maps of the routes which their hardships had opened 
for them and left the invaluable source book of early American history that 
we know as the Jesuit Relations. 

The history of our own Midwest could not be written except in terms of 
the achievements of these early Jesuits. Marquette — who made his perilous 
journey down the Wisconsin and Mississippi rivers, through the Illinois, 
touching very close to what is now metropolitan Chicago. Brebeuf — who 
closed his days of exploration in the New World under the tomahawks of the 
red men. Jogues — whose sainted hands bore the cruel marks of Indian 
torture even before the tomahawks brought him to 
his death in the country to which he had dedicated 
his life in the service of his Leader. And there are 
many others in whose debt the New IForld will 
always remain. 




In the far lands the same story was being written. 
The gentle Xavier died alone in Sancian after 
bringing the faith to more than one million souls 
and to fifty-two kingdoms. In Mexico schools 
and colleges were established long before the English 
colonists had even begun to settle along the Atlantic 

border. In South America the Jesuits established what was probably the 
finest type of communal life in modern centuries — the Reductions of 
Paraguay. Wherever the Black Robe marched, there arose hospitals 
and charitable centers, schools and colleges, until his contribution to this 
development of civilization becomes inestimable. 

Even in this modern day, the heroic traditions of the members of the 
Company of Jesus remain unchanged. There are twenty-five thousand 
soldiers of Ignatius scattered over the world, with more than five thousand 




in the United States. In this country alone there are thirty-four high schools 
and twenty-three colleges and universities taught by the Order. American 
Jesuits operate the foreign mission fields of Pata, India, of the Philippines, 
British Honduras, Jamaica, Alaska, Iraq, China, Ceylon and among the 
Indians on our own Western Reservatio7ts. 

More than one hundred of the members of this order have been raised to 
the heroic dignity of saints and many hundred more are still awaiting the 
pronoun cetnents of the Congregation of Rites before they too join that saintly 
company. Many of these were men of heroic virtue in the ordinary execution 
of their routine life. Many more are men who have made the final sacri- 
-fice of martyrdom. 

At one time the Society of Jesus operated in many parts of the world 
669 colleges, 176 seminaries, 273 missions and 325 residences. In 1870 
the Jesuits founded St. Ignatius College on the West Side of Chicago. Later 
that institution became Loyola University of which the Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery is one of eight schools. 

On the shores of Lake Michigan, whose waters had once borne the canoes 
of the early Jesuit explorers, the present Campus of Loyola University stands. 
Its cluster of buildings, dominated by the slender loveliness of the Chapel of 
Maria Delia Strada — Our Lady of the Wayside — gives living testimony of 
the work of Jogues, Brebeuf, Damen and Marquette. Its name is that of 
Ignatius of Loyola, first leader of the Society who sent these men to all corners 
of the earth. 

When the shadows deepen along the western curve of the lake waters, 
when the noise of the city comes but faintly to the ear, the figure of a black- 
robed father may be seen pacing the peaceful campus as he tells his beads. 
Through four hundred years the tasks and dreams and ideals of Ignatius 
of Loyola have come down to him. He is a follower in the steps of the Spanish 
knight who first sent the Company of Jesus to do unceasing battle in the 
service of the Eternal Leader. 




THE FIRST CENTENNIAL OF ORGANIZED DENTAL 
EDUCATION, LITERATURE, AND SOCIETIES 

1840—1940 




The story of deiuistry in this country is the 
story of a single century. It is a story of humble 
beginnings. It is the story of the efforts of many 
and of the genius of the few. It is the story of a 
triumph over hostility and indifference. It is 
the story of a crude, -primitive craft that was 
brought to the dignity of a profession that now 
serves faithfully the health security of this country. 

This story begins in Baltimore in 1840 with 
the names of Horace H. Hayden and Chapin A. 
Harris. In that year dentistry was given its first 

formal educational discipline with the establishment of the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery on February 1 . In that year also, the first attempt at 
a systematic professional literature was made with the appearance of the 
first number of The American Journal of Dental Science. Dental organ- 
ization also had its beginnings in that year for, on August 18, 1840, the 
American Society of Dental Surgeons was founded. 

Harris, with Dr. Hayden" s advice and assistance, but otherwise ''almost 
entirely unaided, secured the signatures of representative citizens to a petition 
in the legislature of Maryland for the incorporation of a College of Dental 
Surgery at Baltimore. After numerous difficulties and considerable op- 
position by jealous medical rivals, which he finally overcame, the charter 
was granted." Thus was founded the first unit of an educational system 
which was to contribute so monumentally to the progress of Amer-ican dentistry. 

Horace H. Hayden was born on October 13, 1769, at Windsor, Connecticut. 
At an early age he began to follow the sea but recurring attacks of tropical 
fever compelled him to return home to take up work as an architect. In the 
winter of 1792 he sought the services of Mr. John Greenwood, who had served 
George Washington as a dentist. Intrigued with Greenwood" s skill and 
ingenuity he undertook the study of dentistry, procuring from Greenwood 
the few available books on the subject, among them John Hunter s famous 
work. He left New York for Baltimore and set himself up in practice. He 
began to teach a class in dentistry and, in 1825, he accepted an invitation 




to deliver a course of lectures in dental surgery to the ??iedical class of the 
University of Maryland. In 1817 he was iftstrumental in organizing the 
first union of dental practitioners into an association for mutual benefit! 
In 1841 , through the agency of the newly organized society^ he aided in the 
publication of The American Journal of Dental Science, the first dental 
journal ever to be published. 

With Chapin A. Harris and other collaborators. Dr. Hayden founded 
the first institution dedicated to special dental educatioit and became, at the 
age of seventy, its first president and professor of Principles of Dental Science. 
Four years later Dr. Hayden died and was buried in Greenwood Cemetery, 
Baltimore, where his remains still lie in the family vault. 

Chapin Aaron Harris, whose name is always inti?nately associated 
with that of Horace H. Hayden, was born at Pompey, New York, on May 6, 
1806, and thus was many years Hayden's junior. He began the study of 
medicine in 1824 in Madison, Ohio, and was later duly licensed to practice. 
In 1828 he began the practice of dentistry and soon became an itineratit 
dentist, eventually to settle, in 1835, in Baltimore where he came into as- 
sociation with Hayden. In 1839 he published his first dental text, "The 
Dental Art — a Practical Treatise on Dental Surgery." This was to be 
merely the first of his many published writings for he C07Jt7-ibuted prolific- 
ally to the literature on a wide variety of subjects in later years. He joined 
with Hayden iji founding the first dental journal and the first dental society. 
In the winter of 1839-1840, under great difficulties, 
he managed to secure a charter for the incorpor- 
ation of the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery 
and became its first dean. He continued to be a 
vital force in all of these projects until his death 
on September 29, 1860. 

A century ago dentistry was a craft concerned 
with materials and the prices to be made from 
ada-pting these to the occasional needs of the people. 
It was a craft that had many things in common 
with the silversmith and the vendor of potions. It relieved gross suffering and 
infrequently atte7npted to restore those organs lost through such ministra- 
tions. It required nothing more than a mild ambition to undertake these 
primitive dental operations because there was no system of education or 
licensure. 

Dentistry in those days was not associated in friendly relationship with 






the practice of medicine and often operated in open 
hostility to it. Its literature did not exist and its 
recruits came from those restless souls who were 
willing to try their hand at anything. Commer- 
cialism and exploitation were part and parcel of 
dental practice and the social standing of the 
practitioner was not even that of the accomplished 
artisan. Dentistry in short, had little of the 
noble blood of the arts and less of the heritage of 
science. 

Then came Hayden and Harris in 1840. 

The education of dentists was put on a rational and scientific basis. 
Rudimentary medical science was taught to future practitioners and the 
foundations of a rationale for dental practice were laid. Through the dec- 
ades cotn7nercialism was driven from dental education; the basic sciences 
became fundamentals of the dental course; the dental technics in clinic and 
laboratory were refined. Increased too were the preliminary educational 
requirements necessary to the practice of dentistry until, today, the minimum 
requirements for dental practice are two years of liberal arts college education 
and four years of dental education. 

As dentistry began to expand its services to the public, there was increasing 
need of measures to control the charlatan. State by state, legislatioti was 
adopted to regulate the requirements and admission of dental practice until 
the system was evolved which today protects the public from the untrained 
and the unqualified. 

For many years after the foundation of the first dental college, the emphasis 
of dental practice was laid upon materials and physical procedures. The 
mechanical obstacles to be overcome in the difficult technical procedure of 
filling and restoring the teeth were many. But the pioneers applied a re- 
markable ingenuity to solve them and their success is attested by the many 
methods of theirs which are still in use to this day. This technical advance, 
perhaps more than any other, has characterized American dentistry until 
today finds it leading all of the other countries of the world. 

The interchange of ideas that comes with organizatiotj was soon to give 
its benefits to dentistry. Dental societies were organized and grew in in- 
fluence until they became the nucleus of the American Dental Association 
which represents the profession in this country at the present time with a 




membership of 45,000. In the years of its existence it has ably advanced 
the two ideals to which it is dedicated: the advancement of the public health 
and the progress of the profession. 

Dental literature, too, grew in quality and quantity. Its advancing 
standards did much to foster the exchange of ideas and to abolish the prim- 
itive practices that had no foundation in science. It was of great influence 
in disseminating information on technical advances and in grounding more 
solidly the dental practice of the day in the elementary sciences. 

One of the great contributions of dentistry to mankind and one that did 
much to enhance the prestige of the developing profession was the role dentists 
played in the discovery and promotion of general anesthesia. No matter 
how much acrimony surrounds the actual facts and circumstances of dis- 
covery, it remains that the names of Horace Wells and William T. G. Morton, 
both dentists, will live in connection with this inestimable contribution to 
the relief of human suffering. 

Now that dentistry was beginning to attain its stature as a profession, 
even more significant changes were not far in the future. In 1891 Willoughby 
D. Miller had written a paper on The Human Mouth as a Focus of In- 
fection and later came his Microorganisms of the Human Mouth. Hunter, 
working in England at about the same time, introduced the term "oral sepsis" 
and, in 1910, called attention to the hazards of health that might arise in 
the human mouth. Only a few years previous 
Billings and Rosenow, of Chicago, had enunci- 
ated their historic theory of the relationship between 
dental and systemic disease. 

All of this work had a tremendous impact upon 
the practice and development of dentistry in this 
country. The emphasis, which previously had been 
placed on the mechanical aspects of dentistry, was 
now shifted to the biologic phases of dental practice. 
A knowledge of the basic sciences became essential 
and the associated sciences were enlisted to aid the 
practice of dentistry. 




This developmejit is, perhaps, the most significant in the modern 
history of dentistry. It established dentistry as a profession that has a 
distinct province in ministering to the health of the public. It demonstrated 
undeniably the important relationship between dental and general health 




and forged the inseparable link that now exists between medical and dental 
science. 

Dentistry had now substantially increased the basis of its practice. Den- 
tistry now included not only the relief of pain., but the scientific restoration 
of lost teeth., the correction of the deformities of the palate and lips, the treat- 
ment of fractures involving the maxillo-facial bones, the exploration and 
diagnosis of the relationship between oral and systematic disease, and the 
removal of foci of infection through therapeutics, extraction and surgery. 

Almost all of these advances were made possible through the techiical 
work of the early pioneers, the development of 
anesthesia for dental operations, the early use of 
the x-ray in the service of dentistry, the pioneer 
work of dentists in the early repair of cleft palates 
and harelips and in the tnore complete u?jder- 
standing of the relationship between dental and 
systematic diseases. 

In order to fix these gains, dentistry began to 
inquire into the scientific basis of the conditions 
which came into its notice. This early dental re- 
search was to be increased to the tremendous extent at which dental research 
is now being carried on in this country. In its advancing standards, in its 
scientific discipline lies the future hope of advancement for American den- 
tistry. The causes of an ahnost universal disease — dental caries — are within 
the power of dental research to reveal. The continued, patient and organized 
search for these causes will ultimately provide dentistry's opportunity to offer 
this knowledge to the happiness and health of the American people. 

This story of dentistry's first century can not be told adequately in terms 
of scientific progress. It must recognize the human qualities that contributed 
so immeasurably to it. The story of dentistry in the United States is the 
story of great men, not all of whom can be enumei'ated here. It is the story 
of Hay den and Harris, of Wells and Morton, of Allport and Black, of Brophy, 
Johnson and Logan, of Gilmer, of Taggart, and Bonwill and the host of 
others whose names are immortalized in the history of dentistry' s fi}'st century. 







the ghosts of the great men who have stood in that pit to lecture or sat in that 
room to learn must surely pass before him. The portraits of Brophy and 
fohnson look down upon him — the dental student of the future — to whose 
success and progress they, and many with thetn, dedicated their work and 
their lives. 

In the year 1940, three things will he bright before us. The soldiers of 
the Company of Jesus whose tradition and history enrich the name of Loyola 
University . The progress of dentistry in this country and the benefits that 
it has given to an advancing national happiness and health. The role that 
the Chicago College of Dental Surgery has played in association with the 
other two, to add to the glory of the narne of Loyola and to make its own definite 
contribution to the progress of mankind. 




NOTE 

The present writer wishes to acknowledge his indebtedness to Father 
Roubik, S. J., who prepared material on the history of the Society 
of Jesus. Many paragraphs of this article are quoted verbatim from 
that material. 

The present writer also wishes to acknowledge, as one of his main 
sources, HISTORY OF DENTAL SURGERY, 2 vols., by Koch and 
Thorpe. 

Harold Hillenbrand, B.S.D., D.D.S. 



We of the 1940 DENTOS wish to thank Dr. Harold Hillenbrand 
for this manuscript and Mr. Roman Ziolkowski for the art work. 

Robert G. Herthneck, Editor 

Daniel E. LaMothe, Business Manager 




H D 4i © 



Editor 

ROBERT G. HKRTHNECK 

Business Manager 
DANIEL E. LaMOTHE 



,-{sst. Business Manager 
PETER GRIFFO 



Vke J)eMicpi ^ f9W 



AS PRESENTED BY 



rag %W[\m tm. 



CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 
DEPARTMENT OF LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 





DR. ROBERT W. McNULTY 





©g©OC^Ta@K) 



To DR. ROB E R T W . M c N U L T Y 

A man of honest conviction 

A man of high ideals 

A teacher, adviser, and a leader 
in dentistry 

. . . this volume of the 1940 Dentos 
is respectfully dedicated. 









DR. RUDOLF KRONFELD 
(1 901 —1 940) 



We feel the loss of this man as 
our friend, teaeher, and adviser. 
His brilliant wcjrk in dental re- 
search will always be a pride 
to the school and valued by 
the profession the world over. 
His work was the epitome ot 
thoroughness. His lo\"e and tol- 
erance of his fellow men made 
him the ideal of all who knew 
him. 



DR. THOMAS L. GRISAMORE 
(1875 1939) 




Men were fortunate who knew 
him as he was a successful 
teacher, antl a great triend. A 
quiet, unassuming man with a 
great love for his home and 
famih'. A man \\idel>' known 
for his work in ilentistry. We 
miss his philosophy of good li\'- 
ing which was as much a part 
of his lectures as was dentistry. 




N 
N 
I 

V 
E 
R 
S 
A 
R 
Y 



100th year of 

DENTAL ORGANIZATION 

LITERATURE and EDUCATION 



400th year of 
THE SOCIETY OF JESUS 



57th year of 

CHICAGO COLLEGE of DENTAL 

SURGERY 

DENTAL SCHOOL of LOYOLA 
UNIVERSITY 



Lit 
ntittt 




History gi\'es us the names of many men who 
have devoted their hves to advance research to 
the position it now holds. The Foundation for 
Dental Research ot The Chicago College of Den- 
tal Surgery has made possible a modern research 
laboratory from which ha\e come man^• findings 
that enables dentistry to continue a progressive 
science. 



m^ - /m 



2)^. V^iuiMOM W. BnxMmu 



In 1881, Dr. Brophy took the initiative in or- 
ganizing the Chicago Dental Infirmary, which 
later became the Chicago College o\ Dental Sur- 
gery. He was the first dean ot this institution 
and held this position until 1920, an uninterrupted 
service ot nearly forty years in this responsible 
capacity. In 1886 he pertormed his first opera- 
tion tor immediate closure of congenital clett 
palate in a young infant, and from that day, 
his name stands out as the premier operator in 
this department of surgery throughout the world. 





f ^ C ty t I ¥ 








SAMUEL KNOX WILSON, S.J 

President 



D R . \V 1 L L I A M H . C; . L O Cy A N 
Dean ot the Faculty 






D R . R O B K R T W . M c N L' L T ^ 

Assistant Dean 



DR. P I, I N Y G . P U T E R B A U (; H 

Secretary of the Faculty 






WILLIAM D. ZOETHOLT 

Professor of Physiology and Pharmacology; 
A.B., Hope College; Ph.D., LIniversity of 
Chicago; Sigma Xi. 




g^CTJglfia@t@^Y 






^i¥CK]®i.®@Y 





RALPH H. FOl'SER 

Professor of Anatomy; F. A. C. S.; 
D.D.S., Northwestern L'niversity; B.S., 
Lewis; M.D._, Rush Medical College of the 
University of Chicago; B.S.lM., Loyola Uni- 
versity; Phi Beta Pi; .'\lpha Omega Alpha; 
Xi Psi Phi. ^ . 

THOMAS L. GRISAMORE, Jr. 

Assistant Professor of Bacteriology and 
Histology; B.A., Colgate University; M.D., 
Rush Medical College of the LIniversity of 
Chicago; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Svn-^erv; Delta Siyma Delta. 



ARNO LESHIN 

Instructor in Anatomy; M.D., L'niversity 
of Wisconsin; B.A., L'niversity of Wisconsin; 




Alpha Omega. 



LOZIER D. WARNER 

.Assistant Professor of Bacteriology and 
Pathology; Assistant in the Department of 
Research; B.A., Manchester College. 









JOHN L. K END ALL 

Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy; B.S., Valparaiso Uni- 
versity; Ph.G., ^'alparaiso L'niversit)'; i\LD., University o( 
Kentucky; Psi Omega. 





H K N R Y L . BORIS 

Instructor in Physics; B.S., University of Illinois; D.D.S., Chicago 

College of Dental Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 



GEORGE D. WESSINGER 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Physiology; B.S., Florida 
Southern College; M.S., Northwestern LIniversity; Ph.D., North- 
western University; Phi Lambda L'psilon; Sigma Xi. 






iM 



ROBKRT E. MacBOYLE 

Professor ot Crown and,Bridge Work;D.D.S. 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery. 



CiEORGE C. PIKE 

Assistant Professor ot Crown and Bridge 
Work; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Sin-gery; Delta Sigma Delta. 




mmim mm mm^m w^m 




R. H.AROLD JOHNSON 

Assistant Professor of Crown and Bridge 
Work and Prosthetic Technology; D.D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Delta 
Sigma Delta. 



FRANK P. LINDNER 

Assistant Professor ot Crown and Bridge 
Work; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Suro;er\-; Delta Sia;ma Delta. 





HAROLD W. OPPICE 

Assistant Professor of Crown and Bridge 
Work; D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgeri,-; Xi Psi Phi. 



ANTHONY F. ROITEK 

Instructor in Crown and Bridge Work; and 
Operative Dentistry; D.D.S., Chicago Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 









mmmimm 




ROBKRT \V. McNlLTY 

Assistant Dean; Assistant Professor ot'Kthics, 
F.conomics, and Dental Anatom\-; A.B., 
Hanover College; D.D.S., Chicago College 
ot Dental Surgery; M.A. Loyola University; 
Delta Sigma Delta. 




HAKOIJ) HILLENBRAND 

Instructor in Economics; B.S.D., Loyola 
Lniversit}'; D.D.S., Chicago College ot Den- 
tal Surgery; Delta Si^ma Delta. 



WALLACE N. KIRB^' 

Instructor in Technical Composition; B.S., 
L^niversity of Illinois; D.D.S., Chicago Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 







WARREN WILLMAN 

Associate Professor of Operative Dentistr\-; 
D.D.S., Chicago College ot Dental Surgery; 
M.S., Loyola University; Delta Sigma Delta. 



©f-ii^Ma^i E)i5^TrasT^¥ 




AUGUSTl'S H. MLELLER 

Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistr\-; 
D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; 
M.S., Loyola University; Delta Sigma Delta. 



PAUL W. DAWSON 

Instructor in Operative Dentistry; D.D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Delta 
Sigma Delta. 



FR.A.NK W. HYDE 

Instructor in Operative Dentistry; D.D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Delta 
-Sitjma Delta. 







@STKI@©®MIQ^|^ 



HOWARD MICHF.NER 

Assistant Professor ot Orthodonitia; D.D.S., 
Chicago College ot Dental Surgery; Delta 
Sigma Delta. 





JEROME J. VLK 

Assistant Professor ot Orthodontia; Lec- 
turer in Orthodontia; D.D.S., Chicago Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery; M.D.S., Loyola 
L'ni\-ersit\'; Xi Psi Phi. 



J 




WILLI AiM I. McNeil 

Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry; D.D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery; Delta 
Sigma Delta. 




^K®STi^®E)@Mira^ 







HENRY GLUPKER 

Associate Professor of Prosthetic Dentistr\-; 
D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; 
B.S., Loyola L^niversity; Delta Sigma Delta. 



EARL L. RICHEY 

Assistant Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry; 
D.D.S., University of Iowa; M.D.S., North- 
western l^niversitv; Xi Psi Phi. 





WALTER A. WYKHIl'S 

Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry; D.D.S. 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery; A.B. 
Calvin College; Delta Sio:m;i Delta. 



WILLIAM N. HOLMES 

instructor in Dental Anatomy and Pros- 
thetic Dentistrx-; D.D.S., Chicago College 
of Dental Surt!;erv; Delta Sigma Delta. 









KDCiAR D. COOLIDGE 

Professor of Therapeutics, Preventive Den- 
tistry and Oral Hygiene; D.D.S., Chicago 
College of Dental Surgerv; M.S., North- 
western I'niversit}'; Xi Psi Phi. 





R.ALPH G. LARSEN 

Instructor in Therapeutics; D.D.S., Chicago 
College of Dental Surgerv; Delta Sigma 
Delta^. 



JOSEPH S. RES'IARSKI 

Instructor in Children's Dentistry; Lecturer 
in Oral Hygiene and Preventive Dentistr}'; 
D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surgery; 
Forsyth Infirmar>'; University of Iowa; 
Delta Sigma Delta. 





m/Ai %m<^mi 





WILLIAM H. G. LOGAN 

Dean of the Faculty; Professor ot Oral 
Surgery and Oral Pathology; D.D.S., Chi- 
cago College of Dental Surgery; M.D., Chi- 
cago College ot Medicine and Surgerv; 
F.A.C.S.; LL.D., Delta Sigma Delta;\^ni- 
versity of Michigan; M.S.; Pi Gamma Mu. 



PLINY G. Pl'TKRBAUGH 

Secretary of the Faculty; Professor ot Prin- 
ciples ot Medicine; Associate Professor of 
Oral Surgery; M.D., Chicago College of 
Medicine and Surgerv; D.D.S., Chicago 
College of Dental Surgerv; Delta Sigma 
Delta^. 





KARL A. MEYER 

Associate Professor of Surgery; M.D., Ill- 
inois College of Medicine; Psi Omega. 








JOHN F. S\OBOUA 

Instructor in Exodontia; D.D.S., Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery; B.S., Loyola 
University; Delta Sigma Delta. 








CEDRIC K. DITTMER 

Instructor in Exdontia; D.D.S., Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery; M.D.S., Loy- 
ola L^niversity; Delta Sigma Delta. 




K^©a@L®(§¥ 






KARL P. BOULGER 

Assistant Professor of Radiology; Instructor 
in Operative Dentistry; D.D.S., Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery; L.D.S.; Delta 
Sigma Delta. 



DWIGHT C. ATKINSON 

Instructor in Radiography; D.D.S., Mar- 
quette University School of Dentistry; Delta 
Sigma Delta. 






1 




SgSg^SCB^ 




RL'DOLPH KRONFFLD 

I-'rofessor cf Dental Histology and Dental 
I'atholog}'; Director of the Department ot 
Research; M.D., University of Vienna: 
D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental Surger\ ; 
B.S., Lovola University; Delta Sigma Delta. 



FUBERT C. PENDLETON 

Associate Professor of Diagnosis and Full 
Denture Research; D.D.S., Chicago College 
of Dental Surger}-; M.D.S., Lo>'ola Uni- 
versity; Xi Psi Phi. 





CAROLYN HAMMOND 

Research Technician; ALA. 



GERALD REED 

.Associate of the Department of Research; 
Ph.D., Charles University of Prague; Re- 
search .Associate at High Technical College, 
Prague. 




4/ 




LOIS K. CONGER 
Instructor in Exodontia, R.N. 

Rn^H WALSH 

Librarian 




DOROTHY BROWNE 

Fiscal Secretary 



FLORENCE ALACDON.ALD 

Cashier 




HAZEL GIFVERT 

Information Clerk 



THELMA CLINE 

Department of Therapeutics; R.N 




HAZEL TONKINS 

Clerk of Infirmary 

MARGARET KNIGHT 

Clerk ot lnfirmar\- 

L.AIRA S. DICKISON 

Secretary to the .Assistant Dean 
No Portrait 





CHARLES NELSON JOHNSON 
(1860—1938) 



Write your name in kindness, love, and mercy on 
the hearts of the thousands you come in contact 
with, year by year, and you will never be forgotten. 

— Chalmers 



f^40 . . . 



liauimane "ibental Goileae 



A singular distinction comes this year to the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery with the 
celebration of its One Hundredth year ot service 
to dental education. Intimately associated with 
the founding ot the school and its earlv history 
were two pioneers ot dental education, Dr. Horace 
H. Hayden and Dr. Chapin A. Harris, who were 
elected president and dean, respectively, at the 
first faculty meeting held February 3rd, 1840. 
Thus was created, as the foundation of the present 
dental profession, the Baltimore College of Den- 
tal Surger\-, the first and oldest dental school in 
the world. 





K] I @ ^ 





^ke GlaM 



4 mo 



[n June this class leaves the lah- 
oratories, lecture halls, and clinic to 
enter the professional world. 

In one hundred years the profes- 
sion of Dentistry has undergone a 
process of advancement which seems 
almost miraculous if we but stop to 
wonder what we would do without 
anesthesia, the cast inlay, balanced 



amalgam, and restorations of por- 
celain. 

Surely, we students of today owe 
our preceptors an immeasurable 
debt. There is one way, though, 
by which we can materially show a 
small degree of gratitucie and appre- 
ciation for the great progress macie. 
If we are unable to advance our 




profession, at least let us not ilo 
anything which will he a discredit 
to these men and their erforts. To 
our faculty, let us he grateful for 
the effort and patience which the\' 
have expended so that we might 
profit and ad\'ance. If we possess 
teaching ahilitx', we may aid those 
who follow us by publicizing the 
service rendered by modern den- 
tistry. 

To you men of the faculty, the 
Class of 1940 expresses its sincere 
appreciation and, in a way, picks up 
the torch of progress. To the stu- 
dents that follow, we can only hope 
that vou realize the great amount 
which there is to learn, as does the 
class of 1940, and that we new and 
coming men ma\- make some worthy 
contribution to the profession, be it 
ever so sniall. 






<::-> 



<x> 




Kenneth Dedekind 
Charles DeMarco 
Henrv Mathews 



Lester Hofmas 
Joseph Cjibson 
Elmer Kouba 




Burke 
Chmiel 



BARANOWSKI, ADOLPH 
LaPorte, Indiana 
LaPorte High School 
Crane Technical High School 
Loyola University 
Psi Omega 



BRO, RAYMOND M. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Von Steuben High School 
Loyola LIniversity 
Delta Sigma Delta 



BECKER, LEONARD H. 

Chicago, Illinois 
Hyde Park High School 
University of Chicago 
Alpha Omega 



BRZDENKIEWICZ, THADDEUS EDWARD 
Chicago, Illinois 
Weber High School 
Loyola L'niversity 
Intramural Athletics 
Student Radiologist 



BELOFSKY, EDWIN M. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Lane Technical High School 

Ass't. Director of Intramural Athletics, '38-'39 
Dentos Staff '40 
Alpha Omega 



BURKE, RICHARD I. 

Chicago, Illinois 
Mt. Carmel HighSchool 
Loyola Llniversity 
Intramural Athletics 
Delta Sigma Delta 



BENDERSKY 

Chicago, 111 
Roosevelt High School 
University of Illinois 
Alpha Omega 



CHMIEL, EDWARD J. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Austin High School 
Lovola University 
XiPsi Phi 




COBB, PAUL A. 
Sun Prairie, Wisconsin 
Sun Prairie High School 
Platteville College, Wisconsin 
Intramural Athletics 



DA\IDSON, ALBERT 
Chicago, Illinois 
Austin High School 
Loyola L'niversity 
Chairman Executive Committee '3S-'39 



CONNOR, LAMES W. 
Morris, Illinois 
Morris High School 
Notre Dame University 
Loyola University 
Intramural Athletics 



CURTIN, RICHARD E. 

Freeport, Illinois 
Amboy High School, Amboy, Illinois 
Central YMCA College 



DEDEKIND, KENNETH L. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Roosevelt High School 
Central YMCA 
Lewis Institute 
Northwestern Universitv 
Class President '39-'40 ' 
Class Secretary '38-'39 
Class Treasurer '37-'38 
Loyola News Staff 
Alpha Sigma Nu 
Intramural Athletics 
Civil Aeronautics Authority 
Psi Omesia 



DE MARCO, CHARLES J., B.S. 
Jamestown, New York 
Jamestown High School 
Fordham University 
Class Treasurer '39-'40 
Intramural Athletics 
Xi Psi Phi 



CZESLAWSKI, THAD A. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Campion High School 
Prairie Du Chien, Wisconsin 
Loyola University 
Intramural Athletics 
Xi Psi Phi 



EDWARDS, ARE CHARLES GOODWIN, D.F. 
M.P., D.E.D.P. 
Bordeaux, France 
Academy Bordeaux, France 
University of Paris 
Delta Sigma Delta 




FERIN'GTOX, A. EDMUND 

Lockjiort, New York 
Lockport High School 
North Central College 
Chairman Dance Committee '37-'38 
Class President '37-'38 
Intramural Athletics 
Xi Psi Phi 



FOLEY, L. \. 
Chicago, Illinois 
St. George High School 
Marquette University 
Loyola University 
Intramural Athletics 
Delta Sigma Delta 



FIREMAN, MORTON J. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Parker High School 
Wilson Junior College 
Alpha Omega 



FRANCIS, JOHN GEORGE 
Chicago, Illinois 
St. Rita High School 
YMCA 

Loyola University 
Loyola Union ■3q-'4n 
Intramural .Athletics 



FISHER, WILLIAM THOMPSON 
Chicago, Illinois 
Fenger High School 
Central YMCA 
Intramural Athletics 

Chairman Interfraternity Dance Committee '36-'37 
Psi Omega 



FISHMAN, THEODORE A. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Harper High School 
Loyola L'niversity 
Alpha Omega 



CAST, L. LEO 
Valparaiso, Indiana 
St. Paul High School, Indiana 
Valparaiso University 
Class Sergeant-at-.Arms '36-'37 
Delta Sigma Delta 



GAUDIO, MICH.AEL A. 

Chicago, Illinois 
Marshall High School 
YMCA High School 
Crane Technical High School 
Austin Evening High School 
Loyola University 
Student Ceramist 




GIBSON, JOSEPH R. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Tildcn Technical High School 
Lewis Institute 
Class Secretary '39-'40 
Delta Sigma Delta 



GOMBERG, JOSEPH M. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Roosevelt High School 
North Park College 
Intramural Athletics 



GIBSON, KENNFIH F. 
Molinc, Illmois 
Moline High School 

St. Andrews College, Davenport, Iowa 
Intramural Athletics 
Delta Sigma Delta 



GOODMAN, SIDNEY 

Chicago, Illinois 
Roosevelt High School 
Loyola LIniversity 
Alpha Omega 



GOLDBERG, SAMUEL L. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Crane Technical High School 
Crane College 
Lewis Institute 
Intramural Athletics 
Alpha Omega 



GOLDSTEIN, BYRON M. 

Chicago, Illinois 
Senn High School 
Lovala University 
Alpha Omega 



GORDON, WILBERT G 

Chicago, Illinois 
John Marshall High School 
Lewis Institute 
University of Illinois 
Alpha Omega 



CiRIFFO, PETER P. 

Freeport, Illinois 
Freeport High School 
Loyola University 
Intramural Athletics 
Class Treasurer '35-'36-'37 
Lovola Union '35-'3() 
Dentos Ass't. Bus. Mgr. 1940 
Blue Kev 




HAAS, I. lOSKPH 
ChicLigo, 'Illinois 
Austin High School 
Central Y. M. C. A. College 
Class President '38-'39 
Class Secretary '36-'37 
Intramural Athletics 
Delta Sigma Delta 



HOFMAN, LESTER 
Memphis, Tennessee 

Marshall High School 

Lovola University 

Class Vice-President •38-'39-'40 

Intramural Athletics 

Dentos StafF 

Alpha Omega 



HARVEY, DOUGLAS W., L.D.S., R 
London, England 
Cranleigh School, Surrey, England 
Guy's Hospital, London, England 
Delta Sigma Delta 

HENKIN, MAURICE L. 

Chicago, Illinois 
R. r. Crane Technical High School 
Crane Junior College 
Central Y. M. C. A. College 
Alpha Omega 

HERTHNECK, ROBERT G. 

Seattle, Washington 
Ballard High School, Seattle, Washington 
Northwestern Universitv 
Central Y. M. C. A. College 
Alpha Sigma Nu, President '39-'40 
Chairman Dance Committee '35-'36 
Class Editor '35-'3() 
Interfraternity Council '3(i-'37-'38 
Intramural Athletics 
Editor— Dentos ■39-'40 
Delta Slema Delta 



HOLMES, HAROLD H., 
Dayton, Ohio 
Chadwick Community High School 
Carthage College 
Intramural Athletics 
Delta Sigma Delta 



HULL, FRED P. 
Lockesburgh, Arkansas 
Lockesburgh High School 
Y. M. C. A. High School 
Lewis Institute 
Loyola University 



JARACZ, LEONARD J. 
East Chicago, Indiana 
Roosevelt High School 
Lovola L'niversitv 
XiPsi Phi 




KOIBA 
KOWAI.SKI 



JOSH, JOSEPH A. 

Chicago, Illinois 
St. Mel High School 
Lewis Institute 
Intramural Athletics 
Xi Psi Phi 



KRISS, STANLEY B. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Tuley High School 
Crane Junior College 
Delta Sigma Delta 



KNICKF.LS, ASHTON E. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Y. M. C. A. High School 
Loyola University 
Psi Omega 



KRYDA, JOHN FRANCIS 
Detroit, Michigan 
Crane Technical High School 
Northwestern Universitv 
Xi Psi Phi 



KOUBA, ELMER J. 

Chicago, Illinois 
Crane Technical High School 
Central Y. M. C. A^ College 
Chairman Executive Committee '3V-'40 
Xi Psi Phi 



KRZYZOWSKI, RAYMOND JOSEPH 
Chicago, Illinois 
Harrison High School 
Loyola L^ni versify 
Intramural Athletics 



KOWALSKI, JOHN S. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Tulev High School 
Central Y. M. C. A. College 



KULA, EDWARD J. 

Chicago, Illinois 
Weber High School 
Loyola L'niversity 
Intramural Athletics 




' -^^^1 l^fl 




LA MOTHE, DANIF.L E. 

Manchester, New Hampshire 
Manchester Central High School 
St. Anselm's College, Manchester, N.H. 
Loyola Llniversity 
Intramural Athletics 
Loyola News Staff 
Civil Aeronautics Authority 
Dentos Staff, Business Manager •39-'40 
Xi Psi Phi 

LANDSTROM, GLENN E. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Roosevelt High School^ 
Lewis Institute 
Delta Sigma Delta 



McINTYRE, HAROLD WILLLAM 

Holland, Michigan 
Holland High School 
Hope College 
Intramural Athletics 
Delta Sigma Delta 



MELZE, HOWARD G. 

Chicago, Illinois 
Schurz High School 
Lovola University 



LINK, JULIAN A. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Mt. Carmel 

Chicago I'niversity High School 
Loyola Llniversitv 
Psi' Omega 



NEWMAN, RUSSEL E. 
Crystal Lake, Illinois 
Crystal Lake Community High School 
Wheaton College 



MATHEWS, HENRY JAMES 
Chicago, Illinois 
Concordia College, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
Loyola University 
Class Sergeant-at-Arms '39-'40 
Intramural Athletics 
Dentos Staff 



NIKIFORUK, MICHAEL D. 
Red Berry Park, Saskatchewan, Canada 
Nutana Collegiate High School 
University of Saskatchewan 
University of Alberta 




O'Gradv 

Passarei.i.i 
J. Pear I.MAN 
B. Peri, MAN 



O'GRADY, FRANCIS J. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Quigley High School 
St. Mary of the Lake Seminary 
Loyola University 
Delta Sigma Delta 



POGIRSKI, H. H. 
Chicago, Ilhnois 
Central V. M. C. A. Hi'uh School 
Central Y. M. C. A. College 
Lewis Institute 



PASSARELLI, JOHN A. 

Chicago, Illinois 
Lane Technical High School 
Lewis Institute 
Intramural Athletics 
Psi Omega 



POMERNACKI, CHARLF.S 
Chicago, Illinois 
.Austin High School 
Crane Junior College 



PEARLMAX, JOSEPH 

Chicago, Ilhnois 
Marshall High School 
Lewis Institute 
.Alpha Omega 



PRUSIS, ALGERD \V. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Von Steuben High School 
Loyola University 
Intramural .Athletics 
Delta Sigma Delta 



PERLMAN, BERNARD C. 

Chicago, Illinois 
Roosevelt High School 
Loyola University 
Intramural .Athletics 
Alpha Omega 



R.AJCA, HENRY J. 

Chicago, Illinois 
Lane Technical High School 
Lovola University 
Central Y. M. C.' A. 
Pi Delta Sigma 




Riley 
rozaksri 

SCHOEN 

Shallmax 



SCHECHTMAN 



SiTAR 

Smith 



"fflTffl 





RILEY, MEDFRED S. 
Newton, Illinois 
Newton Community High School 
Lewis Institute 
University of Kansas City 
Class Treasurer '35-'36 
Intramural Athletics 
Bur Representative 
Blue Key 
Dentos Staff 



ROZANSKI, STANLEY A. 

Chicago, Illinois 
Tilden Technical High School 
Lewis Institute 
Central Y. M. C. A. College 
Pi Delta Sigma 



SCHOEN, PHILIP FRANCIS 

Chicago, Illinois 
Loyola Academy 
Loyola University 
Loyola News '35-'3h 
Delta Sigma Delta 



SHALLMAN, MORTON 
Chicago, Illinois 
Roosevelt High School 
Loyola University 



SCHECHTMAN, CHARLES J. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Marshall High School ' 
Lewis Institute 
Loyola University 
Intramural Athletics 
Alpha Omega 



SIMON, NICHOLAS M 
Chicago, Illinois 
Lane Technical High School 
Central Y. M. C. A. College 
Xi Psi Phi 



SITAR, KARL J. 
Joliet, Illinois 
Joliet Township High School 
Joliet Junior College 
Dentos Staff 
Intramural Athletics 
Delta Siima Delta 



SMITH, FRANK JOSEPH 
Chicago, Illinois 
Mt. Carmel High School 
Loyola University 
Intramural Athletics 
Delta Siuma Delta 




SOTHRAS, NICHOLAS S. 



Oak P 
Oak Park High Schoo 
Lewis Institute 
University of Illinois 
Chairman Dance Con 
Intramural Athletics 
Delta Sigma Delta 



rk, mil 



THOMAS, BERNARD \V. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Lane Technical High School 
Loyola University 



STROM, MAURICE 
Chicago, Illinois 
John Marshall High School 
Lewis Institute 
Alpha Omega 



\AN KLEY, LA \ERN A. 

Zeeland, Michigan 
Zecland High School 
Hope College 
Delta Sigma Delta 



SUSSMAN, HANS G., D.M.D. 

Kretcld, (jermany 
(iymnasium Bautzen High School, German) 
Bonn Dental College, Germany 
Zurich Dental College, Switzerland 



VERKAIK, JOHN \V. 
Lansing, Illmois 
Thornton High School 
Thornton Junior College 



THIEL. CHARLES W. 
Elgin, Illinois 
Elgin High School 
Loyola University 



VINIKOUR, BENJAMIN 

Chicago, Illinois 
Roosevelt High School ' 
Loyola University 
Alpha Omega 








VOCAT, JOSEPH AMBROSE 
Chicago, Illinois 
Englewood High School 
Harrison High School 
Lewis Institute 
De Paul University 
Class Serseant-at-Arms '37-'38 



WEINSTEIX, DAVID H., B.S. 
Hartford, Connecticut 
Hartford Public High School 
University ot Connecticut 
Loyola LIniversity 
Intramural Athletics 
Alpha Omega 



WADAS, ALFRED J. 

East Chicago, Indiana 
Catholic Central High School, Indiana 
St. Marv College, Winona, Minnesota 
Xi Psi Phi 



ZIOLKOWSKI, ROMAN GEORGE 
Chicago, Illinois 
Lane Technical High School 
Loyola University 
Intramural Athletics 
Class Secretary '37-'38 
Chairman Junior-Senior Prom '38-'39 
Student Ceramist 
Dentos Staff Artist 
Xi Psi Phi 



SS 



Vke GLm Will 




We, the graduating class of 1940, of the Chicago College of Dental Surgery, Dental 
Department of Loyola University, hereafter to be called, referred to, and known as the 
part}- of the First Part, having been duly examined b)- reputed and competent psychia- 
trists and pronounced to be of sanjs mind, body, and character, do hereby declare, decree, 
and promulgate this our last will and testament, to the faculty of said college, hereafter 
to be called, referred to, and known as the party of the Second Part, unbiased, without 
preiudice, and with malice toward none we hereby transmit, offer, and bequeath to: 

Dean Logan — a surgical syringe and a set of silver needles to be employed for aspi- 
ration before operating. 

Dr. Puterbaugh — an elastic vest tor reducing the waistline. 

Dr. McNulty — a set of leather bound office records with gilded edges. 

Dr. Pike — a class that can make porcelain jackets which the patient can wear in day- 
light- 

Dr. MacBoyle — a portrait of himself demonstrating the use of enamel cleavers. 

Dr. Larsen — students that can make bridges which will go to place without being cut. 

Dr. Svoboda — five hundred yards of suture material which he can use tor suturing the 
gingival tissue after some students complete prophylaxis. 

Dr. Pendleton — a patient, wearing an upper denture to a full complement of lower 
natural teeth, for which he and Dr. Glupker have been searching tor the past twelve years. 

Dr. Vlk — a patient with all the deciduous teeth impacted on which he can reveal the 
"secrets" of orthodontia. 

Dr. Glupker — a hole in which to stand so he will not overlook the patient which he 
and Dr. Pendleton are looking for, when he, she, or it comes into the clinic. 

Dr. Richey — more abnormal bite denture cases. 

Dr. Wykhuis — success in casting lingual bars for the students. 

Dr. Willman — Taggart's original casting machine, after it is gold-plated, including 
the whistle. 

Dr. Dawson — a class that can insert proximal toil fillings so he won't break his back 
on Thursdays helping them. 

Dr. Mueller — more foreign students. 

Dr. Coolidge — a technic whereby teeth can be extracted, the root canals filled and the 
teeth placed back in the mouth. 

Dr. Hyde — a white smoking jacket which can be worn in the clinic, and an assort- 
ment of pipes with large bowls, and one hundred pounds of pipe tobacco. 

Dr. Kirby — a class which will be original when writing their papers. 

Dr. Hillenbrand — another trip to Washington D. C. at his own expense. 

Dr. McNeil — a list of the possible partial denture combinations which can be utilized 
as a criterion when contemplating adequate partial denture service. 

Dr. Restarski — one dozen "brats" (we mean children) at one time in the clinic so he 
can demonstrate the rubber bowl method. 

Dr. Meyer — a brown derby and a large cigar. 

Dr. Zoethout — all our quiz papers, pithed trogs, turtles, k\mograph tracings, and 
written experiments. 

Dr. Kendall — a bust of Dr. Zoethout. 

Dr. Michener — a class of sophomores who will solder their orthodontia appliances 
in the technic course. 

Dr. Holmes — a five pound box of Fannie May candy. 

Dr. Oppice — the shoulders from all our porcelain jacket preparations. 

Dr. Fouser — a gold tube which can be used in either a high or low tracheotomy. 

Dr. Johnson — 100 gilt edged engraved invitations for his Christmas parties. 

Dr. Boris — a free pass to all of Boris KarlofF's pictures. 

Mr. Warner — ten boxes of loaded five cent cigars and an eas\' chair. 

59 



/<p/5 - fm 



A 



0A^ax2e 



WelU 




American dentist, and discoverer ot surgical 
anesthesia through the inhalation ot nitrous oxide 
gas, at Hartford, Connecticut, December 11, 1844. 
Wells submitted to the renioval of one ot his 
own teeth while under the influence of this gas, 
the first instance ot painless surgery by means 
ot an anesthetic. 




tl h 







urr- 



B^r-.^ a 




^M\im 



The Junior year of the class of 1941 started immediately with the all important and 
awe-inspiring State and National Board examinations. Many ot our classmates labored 
diligently in preparation thereof, whereas, others returned home and to vacationland. 

Our initiation to clinical experience is always to be remembered. With a feeling of 
confidence and an exaggerated air of responsibility we registered for clinical work. How 
quickly our air of savoir-faire vanished and with trepidition and tumbling fingers we 
charted our first patient and began that ordeal which is technically called prophylaxis. 
Soon points, patients, appointments, disappointments, mockboards, and special exam- 
inations occupied all of our time and kept all the Juniors busy. 

The Chicago Dental Society's Annual Mid-^^'inter meeting found many Juniors taking 
active participation in the clinics and supplementary programs. Many never saw the 
lower level exhibits and with just pride we point to the complete metamorphosis from the 
"sample interest" to a more profound curiosity in dental subjects. 

The school, and Dental world, has suffered a great loss in the death ot our Doctor 
Kronfeld. Our class joins the Faculty' and the entire dental profession in pa\ing tribute 
to a great teacher, a great gentleman, and a brilliant scholar 

We now invite \ ou to pla\' the well known and popular game called "What's My 
Name". All the following clues should be grouped together, and a word picture ot a 
well known figure will appear. 

I am a man well adxanced in years. My step and attitude however, are comparable 
to that ot a much \ounger man. I am a faculty member of the Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery and it is my privilege to meet all new patients. I have destroyed enough prox- 
imal explorers to supply all the dentists attending the Mid- Winter meeting. I am "ap- 
prehensive" of the distal carries of that cuspid, and woe to the unfortunate student who 
fails to describe the amount ot calculus and mereh' fills in the space on the chart with 
the word, "present". I am greatK interested in research — \Miat's m\' name? 

62 



JUNIOR OFFICERS 

Edward Bartrowiak 
Walter Schell 



Monty Gregoi.ixe 
Alfred Harris 
Henry Kopczynski 




I am also an instructor of The Chicago College ot Dental Surgery but my choice is 
mostly with those patients who desire teeth. I am tall and thin and my long supple fingers 
have caressed many a maxillar)- tuberosity. I have an extraordinarily fine memory and 
I have caused more teeth to be rotated, tipped or shifted than all the orthondontists in 
America. My signature is valuable and tor the lack ot the same one forfeits two points. 
"Denture want to Graduate?" — What's m\' name? 

Now I am neither instructor nor student, and my daily attendance at school is ciesired 
by all. I have many moods, some of which seem odd to my fellow passengers. I go up 
and down more times per day than the average student does in one week. I am an ex- 
change tor news items and messages. I can "floor" vou at will or pass you by. ^ ou can 
call me with a buzzer, but don't necessarih' get a reply. — What's my name? 

I am in my late thirties and have a wonderful tactile sense developed through years 
of practice with an explorer and mirror. In my tew idle moments I stand with my hands 
behind my back and with measured steps I follow students to their individual chairs. 
My little office on Thursday afternoons is crowded and my abbreviated signature is a 
letter of the alphabet raised to the second power. My "I'm hum" before picking up your 
slip is well known. — What's my name? 

I am a woman and 1 am connected with the school. I am very prompt and m\- "cage" 
is always opened at the proper time. 1 am not otf" the gold standard and with me each 
grain means money. I give you all your filling materials, and all you have to do is put 
them in their proper cavity preparations. My hair is the color seen at the end ot the 
luminous spectrum farthest from violet. Now, what's my name? 



63 




iiyKia©^ 



^% ^^ ^^ 

^i^ ^ A Bin 

o o ^ 



Richard Ackland 

Frank Amaturo 

Edward Bartkowiak 



Forrest Branch 

Paul Brown 

Irwin Cowen 



Henry Filip 

Edward Gargiulo 

Peter Gekas 



Monty Gregoune 

Joseph Grysbeck 

Fi.orian Gl'towski 



Alfred Harris 

Derwood Hattendork 

Clare Hocking 



John Humphreys 



64 



CIL^ 




Salvatore Impei-literi 

Henry Kopczynsri 

Paul Kubai.a 



Leslie Luallen 

John Mistretta 

Joseph Malina 



George Newell 

Roman Podraza 

John Poronsky 



Harold Readel 

Edward Reihsen 

Alexander Roin 



George Robb 

Walter Schell 

Richard Shrago 




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A 



ViGGO SORENSEN 



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B^®^@S 



One October evening in 1938, sixty-two rather bewildered young men gathered in the 
large amphitheater for opening exercises. These young men were to be the class ot 1942. 
They sat quieth' as mixed cheers and jeers greeted the incoming upper classmen. The 
faculty filed in and we got our first glimpse of the men into whose hands we had intrusted 
our futures, .-\fter the opening exercises were concluded we left the building feeling that 
we were a part of The Chicago College of Dental Surgery. 

The group of young men, who assembled as Sophomores for the opening exercises in 
October, 1939, were a more confident group than the\' were the previous year, the>' cheer- 
tulh' greeted one another and talked o\'er the work of the commg \'ear. 



Some new instructors were on hand to guide us along the second lap of 
our journe)'. ^^'e immediately became interested in the course of Crown and Bridge. 
It was a real test of om- skill and brought us just a little closer to working actually for 
patients. The much talked of course in Physiology was upon us. This course brought 



SOPHOMORE 
OFFICERS 

(.EORGE Ma'I-OUSEK 

Cari, I<'ogt 



Donald Anderson 
Jerome Piekos 

Ross Neglio 




\^^\ W*^F 





us in contact with an interesting instructor, Dr. Zoethout. He brought with him a \'ast 
knowledge of his subject, a new phi!osoph\' of Hte, and a different method of teaching. 

A desire for a Sophomore dance was t]uickl\' expressed and plans were readiU' made. 
Mr. A. Sauer was again appointed chairman of the dance committee. The dance was 
heki at the Columbia '^'acht Ckdi and the music was furnished by .Ste\e \\'a\'ne and his 
orchestra. It was a gala affair, as student and facult\' members mingled together. .As 
we walked down the gang plank that night, each felt sad that such a delightful occasion 
must come to an end, but at the same time, happ>' because of the pleasant memory that 
will long linger in our minds. 



We look fondly back on the past and look anxiously toward the future for a contin- 
uation of what has eone before. 




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®^Ji]@R;a@S 



Peter Abramski 

Donald Anderson 

Raymond Bartz 

David Bennett 



Alfred Berlev 

Richard Brehm 

David Bloom 

Alfred Brandt 



John Chedester 

Howard Conrad 
Earl Faber 

Carl P'ogt 



Leonard Gigante 
Carl Gordon 

Herman Gresik 

^'INCENT GrEBLINAS 



MrrcHEL Greenbaum 
Fred Grohowiar 

Michael Gurrieri 

Charles Hotkins 



Yoshiaki Harunaga 
Paul Jason 

NIarshall Jastromb 

Martin Killoren 



F.DWIN KOSEL 

?»-<«« V Anthony Kotecki 

Rov Lambert 

John Lehman 



tllA 




Wai.demar Lukaszewski 
Warren Lutton 

George Matollsek 

\\] i.niR Ma\() 



John Moskal 

John Moss 

William Mueller 

Ross Neglio 



William Onak 

Edmond Perroxe 

Jerome Pieros 

William Rennie 



Irving Resnik. 

Andrew Sauer 

Victor Seitz 

Harry Smeikal 



Eugene Stegmaier 

Joseph Swantek. 

Erwin Schwartz 

William Tener 



Michael Tilka 

Lester Trace 

Donald Webber 

Robert Williams 



Steve Wovnovitch 

Wilfred Valkenaar 
Vance Vlk 

JOSEI'H ZlOLKOWSK.1 



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Freshmen 1 Timid, tender, and green we have now found our niche in an institution 
and a profession ot which we are proud. Through the famous portals ot Chicago College 
of Dental Surgerx- have passed countless numbers ot men who have contributed much 
to the glorious histor)- of our institution and to the advancement of the dental profession. 
And, all of these men have had their humble beginning as Freshmen. It is our hope and 
endeavor to follow along the paths which have been blazed bv the classes which have 
preceded us, and to achieve, as they have achieved before us. 

The year 1940 represents the centennial of Dentistry as an organized profession, and 
as a group we realize the significance of the new epoch which we as professional stucients 
in the field of Dentistry have entered upon. 



Out of the n-regular practitioners of Dentistry, such as the barber surgeons, and travel- 
ing charlatans, grew this specialty of the healing art. Today, Dentistry is practised by 
men who ha\'e been educated imder the formal academic organizations of which the Chi- 
cago College of Dental Surgery, Dental Department of Loyola University, is one of the 
foremost. The history of the Chicago College of Dental Surger>' is tilled with the out- 



FRESHMAN 
OFFICERS 

Edward Cjri i kin 

William George 



Jose Almaguer 

Romeo Pal lotto 

Michael Ritza 





^^mm 




standing contributions that ha\-e enabled Dentistry to arrive at its present state oi de- 
velopment. Doctors I'riinian W. Brophy and C. N. Johnson, the stalwarts ot dentistry, 
have done much to make it a recognized profession. Imbued with the spirit ot our insti- 
tution which was the result ot the men who have developed it, we hope to carry on the 
traditions ot our institution anci our profession. 

The tirst Dental school of formal education was founded by Chapin .A. Harris in Balti- 
more, in 1840. The men who entered that school at that time were taced with what 
seemed insurmountable obstacles. .A handful ot men opened a new era in the art of heal- 
ing. Competing with c|uacks and charlatans they succeedeci b>" their efforts to create a 
great profession from such humble beginnings. One hundred years later, we find dentistry 
attracting thousands of men fully qualified to enter this profession. We, "Freshmen ot 
1940" are happy to enter a profession which today is prouci ot its great achievements 
and we ha\e made our pledge for the continueci progress of our profession. 




Pl^glKlff^lK) 






George Alles 

Jose Almaguer 
Romeo Arr.^ 



Norman Bali> 






Howard Berg 

Gilbert Blahxir 

Eldex Bueche 

Alax Cass 



Peter Cooper 

JoHx Jaxkus 

johx domeikis 

Earl Exright 



Wallace Fixch 

Sydney Fishman 

Matt Franey 



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John Frasco 



ThADDEUS (iASIOR 

William George 

Thomas Gillis 

Edward Griffin 



Arthur Gruxt 

Ralph Hall 

Travers Hamiltox 

John Hazlet 



Joseph Hajdys 

Carlin Hayes 

Victor Hershman 
Marvin Lewisox 

Richard Kelly 



Matthew Ki.oris 
Da\td Kosofsky 

Leonard Krasre 

Robert Lagorio 

Isaac Landes 



€i^i> 



Robert Lee 

Raymond Marcus 

T. Malachowski 

Vernon MacKa\ 



Harold McGrane 

Bruno Maressa 

Arthur Montouri 

Charles Novich 



Frank Oliver 

Aurelius Pagano 
Ralph Pagano 

Albert Petrizzi 



MvRON Ataman 

WooDROw Platt 

Eugene Puszriewicz 

Romeo Pallotto 



LoN Porter 

Andrew Potempa 

Joseph Propati 

Walter Ream 



John Purcell 

Michael Ritza 
Walter Sir 

William Sowle 



Arthur Sturm 

George Walker 
Lloyd Walty 

Roman Wolniakowski 



Edmund Wolf 
John Vice 

John Domeikis 

Joseph Trampota 

Jack Tatelman 









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Professor ot dental pathology at the Chicago 
College ot Dental Surgery 1883-1889. A disting- 
uished Chicago dentist and a toremost investigator 
in dental science ot modern times. His researches 
in physical characteristics of dental tissues, dental 
anatom}-, dental amalgams, and his tormation ot 
a system ot operative dentistry, were extensive 
and original and have become basic in mociern 
teaching. 





aCTQ^injQgl 







Robert Herihneck 

Editor- 



Daniel LaMothe 
Business Manager 




Dr. W. VVillman 
Editorial Adviser 



One Hundred years of Organized Dentistry; fitty-seven years of The 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery; and tour hundred years of Jesuit 
Teaching is the theme ot the 1940 Dentos. 

The staiT has tried to combine the happenings of our every day lives 
with this theme — selecting a few of the great men ot the past tor honorary 
position ot the division pages throughout the book. An attempt has 
been made in this issue to formulate a brief history in honor ot these 
anniversaries for the benefit ot those readers so vitally interested. This 
history is printed on antique paper with old style engravings to en- 
hance this age old story. This expressive supplement could not have 
been possible without the cooperation ot Dr. Harold Hillenbrand, author, 
and Roman Ziolkowski, art director. 

The staff has worked hard to prepare this edition with the hope that 
the 1940 Dentos will be one which the students and the school may well 
be proud of. 

The splendid work of Mr. Daniel La Mothe as business manager and 
his assistants, Mr. Peter GritTo and Mr. Karl Sitar has made the 1940 
Dentos a financial success. Much credit is due Mr. Roman Ziolkowski, 



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J. Roche 
k. montiegle 
1). I.aMoihe 
R. Herthneck 
O. Rogers 







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art director, for all of the pen and ink drawings and the symbolic medallions. 
Mr. Medfred Riley, staff photographer and his assistant, Mr. Edwin 
Belotsky, are responsible for most of the candid shots which portray 
our student life. 

.As an extensive advertising campaign was carried out this year it 
was necessary to have stenographers to handle the correspondence. This 
large amount of work was handled exceptionally well by two underclass- 
men, Mr. Earl Faber and Mr. Earl Enright. The circulation of the 
Dentos and the sixteen page historical supplement was handled b\' Mr. 
Lester Hotman. The Class Will and the personal history of each senior 
was written by Mr. H. Mathews. 

Unlimited credit is due Dr. Robert McNultv and Dr. Warren Will- 
man, financial and facult\' advisors, for their wise counsel and assistance 
m making the Dentos possible. 

.Acknowledgement is expressed to Mr. O. Rogers of the Rog!:-s Printing 
Company, Mr. J. Roche of the Root Studio, and Mr. F. Moitieg'e of 
the Pontiac Engraving Company for their technical assistance. 




Dr. R. W. McXultv 
Financial Adviser 



Enright 




77 




Tb 



Bu 



UNDERGRADUATE 
STAFF 

Kenneth Dedektnd 
Walter Schell 
Andrew Sauer 
Lox Porter 



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The BL'R is the official pubhcation of the Alumni 
Association of the Dental College. It is published 
three times a year under the efficient editorship ot 
Dr. R. \V. AIcNulty, the assistant dean of the school. 

The purpose ot this publication is not to enlighten 
the graduates and students on scientific subjects, al- 
though it does contain articles of dental interest written 
h\' the faculty and graduates, but to form a more 
binding union between the alumni, the students, and 
the school. The March issue invariably contains the 
program of the coming alumni meeting. 

Each issue contains undergraduate class notes which 
capture the interest of the students. The columns are 
written b>- students and contain, among other things, 
comments on some ot the humorous ev^ents ot the 
classrooms and labs. Kenneth Dedekind represented 
the Senior Class and wrote several interesting articles. 
Walter Schell reported the activities ot the Juniors in 
a very commendable manner. The Sophomore notes 
were well handled bv Andrew Sauer. The Freshman 
Class editorials were written b\- Lon Porter. Each 
of these men did fine work in reporting their class 
e\ents and the articles were enjoyed by all. 



Ttag t®¥@a.i\ Miw 




_Thi^Lc)U)la N'I;\vs_ 
Dental Alumni To Meet 



It is this important piihlicatinn that has been in- 
strumental in keeping the excellent relationship that 
now exists between the different departments of 
Loyola University. A student reading this publication 
secures information that aids and benefits him in his 
knowledge of the university at large. It has been said 
that it is the News that is the torch bearer of Loyola 
L'niversity. 

The News was founded about fifteen years ago by 
our own Dr. Harold Hillenbrand and Dr. William 
Schoen. The first edition was a single page which 
has grown into a tabloid form, inaugurated in 1934, 
and has been maintained with increasing popularit\'. 
The Collegiate Digest, a rotogravure section, has been 
added to this and offers a pictorial review ot what is 
happening on different campuses throughout the 
country. 

The paper this >'ear has contained man>- articles ot 
interest. Fraternal and social events along with 
different academic happenings have been the bases of 
the articles and editorials written this \ear. 

It is through these columns that the student ma\' 
become inculcated with the school spirit which pre- 
dominates in our university. All material from the 
dental school is approved by Dr. R. W. Mc\ult\', 
dental news facultv moderator. 



S 



DENTAL SCHOOL 
STAFF 

Kenneth Dedekixd 
Daniel LaMothe 
Sal\'atore Impelliteri 
John Kalin 




©^17^ lacj^^ ©ii?^ 



OFFICERS 



R. G. Herthneck 
Grand Aiaster 

L. L. Gast 
Ji^orthy Master 

C. W. Hocking 
Scribe 

V. B. SORENSEN 

Treasurer 

H. H. Holmes 
Senior Page 

M. R. Gregoi.ine 

Junior Page 

H. W. McIntvre 
Historian 

A. W. Sauer 
Tyler 



Delta Sigma Delta was founded in 1882 at the University of Michigan. 
Beta Chapter was founded in 1885, the same year the Supreme Council 
was organized for graduates in dentistry. The fraternity consists of a 
Supreme Council, a Council of Deputies, Continental Chapters in prac- 
tically every foreign country, fifty auxiliary chapters in the United States 
and Canada and thirty-three Subordinate Chapters at dental schools 
across the continent. 

The Official Publication is the "Desmos". Each issue usually con- 
tains an item submitted by each of the subordinate chapters and articles 
by the graduate members prominent in some specialized work. 

Beta Chapter held dinner meetings at the Professional Y. M. C. A. 
twice each month. All ot the meetings were organized by the members, 
under the supervision ot the Deputy Supreme Grand Master, Earl P. 
Boulger. 

Outstanding social events of the past year have been a pledge dinner 
held at the Edgewater Beach Hotel; the Pledge Dance held at the Tower- 
Town Club in honor ot the new pledges; an informal initiation held at 
the West End Womens' Club; the Formal initiation held at the Knicker- 
bocker Hotel; and the never to be forgotten highlight ot college fraternity 
lite, the Senior Spring Formal. 




Boitl.GER 


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(in 1-KER 


tjRISAMO 


Hvde 


C. 


Johnso 


R. Johnson 


KiRBV 


Lindner 


Michener 


M' 


heller 


Pike 


Puterbaugh 


SCHOEN 



Hillenbrand Holmes 
Logan McNeil 

SwANSON Watt 



Hooper 

McNuLTV 

Willman 




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Amatiro Anderson Bartz Bro 


BiRRE Conrad E^dwards Foley ^ 


Gast J. CiiBsoN K. Gibson Greblii 


NAs (Jrohowiak Haas Harinaga Herthxeck 


Hocking Holmes Jason Kriss 


LaNDSTROM McIntVRE NeGLIO O'CiRADV 


Prusis Sauer Schoen 


SiTAR Smejkal Smith Sothras 


Almacver Burns Gasior (iriffin 


George Hall Hamilton Piszkiewicz McKay 


Oliver A. Pagano R. Pagano Potempa 


Porter Propati Sir Sowle Waltv 




81 




OFFICERS 

Elmer Kotba 
President 

Daniel LaMothe 
Vice-President 

Joseph Steavart 

Secretary 

Harold Readel 
Treasurer 

George Newell 
Editor 




Xi Psi Phi was founded at the University of Michigan, February 8 
1889. It was the second dental fraternity organized. It was the first 
dental fraternity to become international in its scope, with the estab- 
lishment ot Omicron chapter at the University of Toronto in 1899. 

The objectives ot Xi Psi Phi fraternity are to promote social unity 
among dental students generally and to render mutual assistance among 
them; to inspire intellectual advancement, and to broaden their apprecia- 
tion of friendships while they are pursuing their course of study; to estab- 
lish a fraternal feeling and brotherhood among them while they are in 
their respective schools and colleges; and to promote fellowship, sociability, 
moral rectitude, intellectual advantage and opportunity to its members 
after they have entered the profession of dentistry. 

The finest aid to a local undergraduate chapter is the alumni of the 
chapter, and the Lambda chapter has alumni that are active, that are en- 
thusiastic, and that are guiding and inspiring. Weare proud of our brothers 
and we Lambda appreciate all they have done and are doing for us 
to make our chapter the outstanding chapter of our fraternity. Doctors 
Oppice and Prugh have given us much of their time and have given us 
the realization of the importance of being real fraternit\" men. We are 
justly proud of Doctors Richey and Pendleton who have heiped us in 
making this year a great one for our chapter. 

Lambda meets twice monthly. Here students make valuable contacts 
and clinical observations. Social events have had their place on Lambda's 
calendar to round out the activities. Early last fall a Hard Times Dance 
was held at the West End Womens Club. The affair was attended by 
all members, other fraternity members and non-fraternity men as well. 

The official magazine of the Xi Psi Phi fraternity is the Xi Psi Phi 
Quarterl)-, a publication intended to keep the members informed of 
fraternity matters. 

GRADUATE OFFICERS 
Dr. E. a. Prugh, Deputy Supreme President 
Dr. E. D. Coolidge, Assistant Deputy Supreme President 
Dr. J. J. Vlk, Assistant Deputy Supreme President 
Dr. C. Stixe, Assistant Deputy Supreme President 




Dr. Coolidge 



Dr. Pendleton 



Chmiel 
czeslawsk.1 
DeMarco 
Ferington 

FOGT 



Gargiulo 

GiGANTE 

Jaracz 
Josh 

Koi BA 



Kryda 

LaMoihe 

Mistretta 

Newell 

Readel 



SCHELL 

Simon 

SWANTEK 

Tener 
Wadas 



Blahnik 

Enright 

Grunt 

Guerrieri 

Maressa 



MONTOURI 

PfRCELL 

PlEKOS 

Platt 
Ream 



Walker 

Wolf 

Wolniakowski 



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G 
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S 




^l^n^ t^5^i©J\ CKl^^Tl^S 



OFFICERS 



Paih, Brown 
Chancellor 

Alfred Harris 
Vice-Chancellor 

Carl Gordon 
Scribe 

Marshall Jastromb 
^liaestor 

Richard Shrago 
Macer 

Joseph Shor 

Editor 



"Harmonia et \'eritas," "Harmony, Love and 
Truth." This, in a tew simple words, expresses the 
ideal which inspired a small group ot pioneers to con- 
ceive the plan for the first national Jewish dental 
fraternity. Thus, in 1907 at the Pennsylvania College 
ot Dental Surgery, Alpha Omega was born. 

That Alpha Omega was a welcome addition to or- 
ganized dentistry is evidenced by the rapidity ot growth 
trom an infinitesimal body of tour members to an 
organization now boasting over thirty chapters and 
nearly tour thousand members scattered throughout 
all of North America. 

This, the Alpha Lambda chapter, was organized 
and chartered in 1932 and quickly assumed propor- 
tions far and above the fondest dreams of its founders. 

Alpha Lambda sports twenty-six active members, 
fitteen ot which are members ot the senior class and 
soon to be departed trom these ranks. F.lections, held 
earlv in the year, tound the office ot Chancellor be- 




Dk. Leshix 
Dr. Siegel 




cs c^ e% Ci. 






Benderskv 


Brown- 


Fireman 


KiMIMAN 


Goodman 


Gordon 


Harris 


Henkin 


HOFMAN 


Perlman 




SCHECHTMAN 


Strom 


VlNIKOIR 





queathed to Paul Brown. Other officers include: Alfred Harris, Vice-Chaiicellor; Carl 
Gordon, Scribe; Marshall jastromh. Quaestor; Richard Shrago, Macer; Joseph H. Shor, 
Editor. 

Meetings, held semi-monthly at the Congress Hotel, were enlivened, to no small degree, 
through the efforts of the newly formed lecture committee, headed by Benjamin \'inikour. 

Social affairs, in the competent hands of Wilbert Gordon, again proved, although it 
slightly unorthodox in manner, the many and varied benefits accrued ot this organization. 

A well-enjoyed phonograph dance, held November fourth, started the ball rolling. 
A combination formal initiation and first annual smoker was held November nineteenth, 
in the Pine Room of the Congress Hotel. In the afternoon Neophytes Greenbaum, Resnik, 
and Trace were formally initiated into the inner mysteries that are an integral part ot 
Alpha Omega. In the evening several guest speakers spoke to a congenial group ot traters, 
alumni and specially invited guests. 

In the offing is the Annual Senior Farewell Dinner Dance. This affair is a tradition 
ot Alpha Lambda and is presented by the Junior fraters in honor of the graduating senior 
members. It will take place sometime in the latter part of May at a downtown hotel. 

The thinning ot the ranks suffered by the chapter, due to the graduation ot such a 
large group ot active members, will be offset, to a large measure, by the many new recruits 
from the present Freshman class. These men are now passing through that important 
phase ot fraternal life consisting of test by trial and tribulation that is so \-ital to the 
lite and survival of Alpha Omega. 

It is with tond remembrances ot the past, and a confident eye to the future, that Alpha 
Lambda ot Alpha Omega wishes the graduating traters a bounty of luck and happiness 
in their chosen profession. 




.CD. O:. 







Forty men banded together and called them- 
selves Psi Omegans. This was the formation 
of Alpha Chapter of Psi Omega Fraternity at 
the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery in 
1892. From this small group of staunch men 
arose a great fraternity, boasting of approxi- 
mately nineteen thousand in membership and 
embracing fifty-five active Chartered Chapters. 
A group of men, desiring the benefits o\ such a 
great fraternal organization, grouped together 
and formed the Kappa Chapter in 1898 at the 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery. 

Successful Psi Omegans may be found over 
the entire world and in every branch of Den- 
tistry. The alumni and active members have 
done much to earn the respect of their fellow 
men. They have followed the teachings of 
Psi Omega and have been prominent in advanc- 
ing and improving the standards of Dentistry. 

Active members keep in touch with the 
alumni members through a quarterly publi- 
cation known as The Frater, the official 
bulletin of the Psi Omega Fraternity. 

Kappa Chapter convenes twice a month at 
the Psi Omega House. Here the able assist- 
ance of Dr. Frank Biedka, Deputy Councilor, 
IS utilized, and much work is accomplished 
towards the continuation of a grand group of 
students and alumni. 

Well attended freshmen smokers and success- 
ful parties were held in the Psi Omega House, 
where most of the social functions of this 
Chapter are held. 



OFFICERS 



Julian Link 


. Gr 


tind Master 


.'\SHTON KnICKELS 




Treasurer 


.^DOLF BaRANOWSKI 




Seeretary 


Kenneth Dedekind 




Editor 


August King 




. Chaplain 




Dr. Kenda 




@IM]CB®M U/A^^/A ^P$]l©¥\ 




Upon the culmination of each school year, and on the eve of graduation, a small group 
of the graduating class is honored with membership in Omicron Kappa L'psilon. This 
honor is considered a final tribute paid by the college in recognition of the conclusion 
of the school careers of those men worth\' of special commendation. 

Requ'irements for nomination to this society are a splendid character and citizenship 
as well as the possession of such grades earned during the entire course that places the 
student in the upper twelve per cent oi his class. To be presented with the distinguished 
gold key, emblematic of membership, is the highest honorary award offered at the Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery. 

In addition to selection of its members from the graduating classes practitioners mav 
become eligible. Those who "through excellence of professional attainments and citizen- 
ship, have distinguished themselves in their profession, and in respective communities" 
may have membership conferred upon them. 

This, the Graduate Honor Society of the Profession, was organized in 1914 at the 
Northwestern University Dental School. The founders were Drs. Thomas L. Gilmer, 
Arthur D. Black, and C. R. E. Koch, who felt that a fraternit\- was needed "to encourage 
and develop a spirit of emulation among students in Dentistry and to recognize in an 
appropriate manner those who have distinguished themselves b>' a high grade of scholar- 
ship." 

In 1925 the Chicago College of Dental Surgery was granted a charter to establish a 
chapter designated as Pi, which has since honored approximately three hundred men, 
practitioners and graduates. Pi chapter is guided by such men as Dr. \V. H. G. Logan, 
president; Dr. R. W. McNulty, vice-president; and Dr. P. G. Puterbaugh, secretar>-- 
treasurer. These men and practically all of the facultx- of this school ha\'e been honored 
with membership for their distinctive accomplishments. 





Founded at University ot Florida 1924 
Established at Lovola Universitv 1926 



Blue Key National Honor Fraternity is a fraternity which has as its objectives high 
scholastic rating, participation in school activities, and popularity among one's fellow 
students. 

The organization is not secretive in nature, but has as its ideals the creation of a feeling 
of good fellowship among non-members. This one point alone could not be possible if 
it were governed as most fraternities are. It has no national installation terms, fees, or 
dues, but the local conditions at the Universities in which the chapters exist govern the 
formation of its c:)nstitution and by-laws. 

Blue Key not only restricts its membership to undergraduate students, but offers 
opportunity of entrance to the active graduate. To receive such honorary entrance to 
Blue Ke^' the graduate must be active both in mind and body. Requisites being mainten- 
ance of good moral character, conscious aim toward bettering the chosen profession, and 
progressiveness in r.ccord with scientific advancement. 

The Blue Kev members on one campus act, from time to time, as host to Blue Key 
members and their friends on the other campuses of the University. In 1937 the dental 
campus was host and the othercampuses were invited to look behind thescenesot scientific 
research in the dental profession by inspecting the newly created Foundation For Dental 
Research laboratory of the Chicago College of Dental Surgery. 

Facult)' meir.bers in the dental school are Drs. W. H. G. Logan, Dean; FLarl P. Boulger, 
Harold A. Hillenbrand, Frank W. Hyde, Wallace N. Kirby, Paul T. Dawson, Henry 
L. Boris, John F. Svoboda, William P. Schoen, Ralph G. Larsen, and Joseph S. Restarski. 

Special homage is paid to Dr. Roudolf Kronfeld by his brother members in the Blue 
Key Fraternity. His passing was felt keenly b)' all members. 

Honorary membership to Blue Ke>- Fraternity was awarded to Dr. George C. Pike, 
assistant professor of Crown and Bridge. 

Undergraduate ir.embers in the dental school are: 

.V('w/'or,f--Medfred S. Rile\-, Peter P. Griffo, Roman G. Ziolkowski, John G. Francis. 

Juniors — Viggo B. Sorenson, lohn Mistretta. 



Mm^ i>mmh mw 





Alpha Sigma Nu celebrates its Silver Jubilee this year at Marquette L'niversity ot 
Milwaukee, \\'isconsin, home ot the Mother Chapter. 

Since the toundation of Alpha Sigma Nu twenty-five years ago, this honorary Jesuit 
Society has been a leading undergraduate organization in every university in which it 
has been established. It promises to be the future official honorary Society in all Catholic 
Universities throughout America. 

The Society is designed to honor students who have distinguished themselves in scholar- 
ship, service, and loyalty to the L^niversity; to promote all the various activities of the 
University, of the students, and of the student organizations which will elevate the cultural 
and intellectual level of the student body; and to strengthen the bonds of friendship and 
understanding between faculty and students. 

The Loyola Chapter of Alpha Sigma Nu was established in ]938. Under the counsel 
of the Rev. Thomas A. Egan, S.J., the Society has assumed an important place m the 
role of a quiet, moderating influence on undergraduate affairs. 

Two men from the Junior Class of each College of the University are selected for mem- 
bership by their respective Deans. These prospective members are formally initiated 
at a banquet and ceremony held in the Spring at an outstanding hotel. The Dental School 
was honored this past year by having the Presidency conferred upon one of its members, 
Robert G. Herthneck. 

Undergraduate members of Alpha Sigma Nu in the Dental College are: 
Seniors — Robert G. Herthneck, Kenneth L. Dedekind. 
Juniois — Clare Hocking, Edward Gargiulo. 









The student flight program ot the Civil Aeronautics Authority was instituted at Loyola 
University in the fall of 1939. 

Enrollment in the course is limited to those students under the age ot twenty-five 
years, who are able to pass successfully the Authority's physical examination. 

The Dental Department of Loyola Laiiversity has two senior students enrolled in 
the program; Kenneth Dedekind, the senior class president, and Daniel LaMothe the 
business manager of the 1940 Dentos. 

Theoretical instruction is given in Meteorology, Navigation, Map-reading, Instruments 
and Engines, History of Aviation and the study of the Civil Air Regulations. The actual 
flight instructions are given the students under the guidance ot competent certified in- 
structors who use Government approved ships for this work. 

When a student has successtullv completed a minimum ot eight hours of dual mstruc- 
tion, he is eligible to "Solo" upon the recommendation of his instructor. 

A private pilot's certificate is awarded those enroUees who satisfactorily complete 
the theoretical and flight course and then pass the examination ot the Department of 
Commerce. 

Loyola LIniversity has thirty students enrolled in the Elight program. The program is 
conducted in part on the Arts Campus and at the Lewis Lockport Airport, Lockport, 
Illinois. 




^niendd. ami Pain<m6^ 



'W^^A 




Taken trom A Flagship ot the American Airlines, Inc 



In using this picture of' the National Capitol in Washington, the staff 
of the 1940 Dentos wishes to remind our readers that this publication 
is in part made possible by the CAPITAL support ot our advertisers. 



One Hundred Years 
Of Progress 




VI T A L LIU M 

This yi'ar Dentistry celebrates its 100th anniversaiy. Each year has seen 
new advances and new achievements. As the Science of Dentistry has ad- 
vanced, so has the Metallurgist succeeded in attaining the ideal of phj^sical 
])r()|)('rties in \'itallium. 



Just as the jihysical ]iroporties of ^'itaIlium can- 
not Ije copied, so the perfoi'mance of a ^ italHuni 
restoration due to these physical proiierties can 
only be imitated. 





T/je only true Cobalt Chromuiin alloy bchig used in T)cntistr\ and Surgerv 

AUSTEN AL LABORATORIES, Inc. 



New Yohk 



(.'hkaco 



Austenal Porcelain 
Has Kept Pace 




Fi-(im the hcginninjj of Dentistry, the prdlcssioii has \-ainly s(juglit an 
artificial tooth that Wduid faithfully rcijroducc natural anatomy and look 
like a natural tooth in the mouth. 



Now, for the first time in dental history, this idea of the 
profession has been fully realized in Austenal Teeth made 
hy the Micromold I'ruccss from natural tooth mohls and 
not from manually carxeil originals as heretofcjre. 



rradcmark Re 
IS. Pat. Offic 



=Ij 



Anstoial Teeth have the natural character aiui appearance of the patioit' s oim teeth. 



AUSTENAL LABORATORIES, Inc. 



New York 



C'HItWOO 



Headquarters for All 

Dental and Medical Books 

used in 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery 

We have the largest and most complete Stock to be 
found anywhere. 

Wide assortments of Notebooks, Blankbooks, Loose- 
leaf Covez's, and Fillers, Drawing Supplies, Fountain 
Pens, and Inks, Brief Cases, Dissecting Sets, 
Laboratory Supplies 
Prices Right 

SPEARMAN'S BOOK STORE 

1820 WEST CONGRESS ST., COR. OF NORTH HONORE STREET 

(Next to Y. M. C. A.) 




JUST ANOTHER OFFICE? 



YOUR FIRST OFFICE . . . how wiU it look 
to your patients? Will it be in keeping with 
the modern, progressive dental techniques 
you have just successfully mastered ... or 
will it be "just another office"? For an 
office that is different, new, and up-to-date, 
equip with AMERICAN. The new models, 
marvels of sanitation and efficiency, are 
available in any color you prefer . . . any 
one of them will be the "heart" of a fine, 
modern, different office. 

THE AMERICAN CABINET CO. 



TWO RIVERS 



WISCONSIN 



. Here is the new No. 147 
^ American Dental Cabinet 



Ctmwuucam 

DENTAL CABINETS 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

DUDLEY'S 
CAFETERIA 



BASEMENT 

CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL 

SURGERY 




• You'll profit from this sound advice-. Get 
the full CDX story; it's backed with facts and 
figures based on its 16-year record in thou- 
sands of practices. Designed and built to pro- 
duce the finest results, the CDX rs a depend- 
able, economical, practice-building aid to the 
successful practice of dentistry, especially 
to the young dentist establishing his practice. 

GENERAL ELECTRIC 
X-RAY CORPORATION 



IDENTIFY YOURSELF WITH A 
YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN AS- 
SOCIATICN. IT IS A WORLD- 
WIDE MOVEMENT DEDI- 
CATED TO THE CHRISTIAN 
WAY OF LIVING. 



PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS 



Y. M. C. A 

1804 Congress Street 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

Seeley 7060 



THE CONGRESS 

BARBER and BEAUTY 

PARLOR 



Successfully Catcrinp; to the Doctors 

and Students of this \icinity for the 

past right years. 

In the Professional "Y" Building 
"Just Inside the Door" 

Charles E. Richakdsox, Prop. 



No 



+ 



Barbers Chairs Waiting 



The \A^EBER 
Dental Manufacturing Co, 

For 41 years, makers of dental equipment and X-Rays, making the 
most complete line of an}^ one dental manufacturer, comprising: 

The Weber "Zenith" Motor Chair 

The Weber Model "F" Chair with Compensating Arms 

The Weber Model "G" Chair with Lateral Motion Arms 

Three Models of Units — 
The Empire 

The Majestic Model "F" for the left side of chair 
The Majestic Model "G" for the right side of chair 

Weber No. 5 Raydex Shockproof X-Ray with kilo volt range 
control and stabilizer, Stationary or Mobile 

Weber No. 6 X-Ray, Shockproof, with milliammeter and volt- 
meter. Stationary or Mobile 

Operating Lights 

Stools 

Cuspidors 

Six Models of Cabinets 

Engines — Unit, Wall, Laboratory and Mobile Models 

Don't fail to see these products and have them demonstrated to 
you before entering practice as they represent individuality in 
design, high utility value and great economic value. 

All products fully guaranteed and sold by first line dealers every- 
where. Our X-Rays, including the tube, are guaranteed for one year. 
An X-Ray Counselling Brochure given with each X-Ray, gratis. 

Architectural, Survey, Office Planning services performed without 
cost or obligation. 

We wish you every success and all services we have to offer are 
at your command to help make your professional life triumphant. 

The Weber Dental Manufacturing Co. 

("HY.ST,\L PaUK CaNTOX, OhIO 



Our Best Means of Obtaining Business 

WILL CONTINUE TO BE 
THE RECOMMENDATION OF SATISFIED CUSTOMERS 

galla(;her service ixcledes 

COOPERATION IN SECURING A GOOD LOCATION 

PLANNING MODERN ARRANGEMENT OF OFFICE 

Distributor 

XEW WEl^ER DEXTAL EC^UIFMEXT 

A CONVENIENT PLAN OF PAYMENT 

HARRY U. GALLAGHER 

Doital E(jitipj)ie}it 

37 So. Wabash Avenue 

Phones: Central 3562-3563 

CHICAGO 

29 Years of Satisfactory Equipment Service 




97 



WESTERN 



W 



Heat Merchants 
for 49 years 



"ONE TON OR A CARLOAD" 



HAVE YOU TRIED 




Made (n CAicog'" 

IN YOUR HOME 



VAN BUREN/^ 
AUSTIN 

EUCLID 



■^234 




/O 




Individuality the Mark of the 
Successful Dentist 

Your Patients Will Appreciate the 
Individual Touch and Sanitation 

Lily-Tulip Cup & Specialty Co. 

317 No. Wells St. Sup. 3476 



£Sv^ 



^t 



Offers a Complete 

Dental Laboratory 

Service 

Telephone 
Central 1680 

M. W. SCHNEIDER 

Complete Dental Laboratory 
30 N. Michigan Ave. Chicago, 111. 



Great Lakes 
Linen Supply Co. 



Complete Rental 
Service on 

TOWFLS, COATS AND GOWNS 

for the 
Dental Projession 



Plant: 36th and Pamell Avenue 
Telephone: Houlevard (5oOO 



Phone State 2706 

MASTER 

DENTAL COMPANY 

• We specialize in the construction oj 
practical restorations. 

• Thermotrol Castings Electrically Con- 
trolled. 

• Full information, literature and price 
list upon request. 

162 North State Street 
Chicago, Illinois 



^0»pucir|. 



v< 



.5' 




Ask your dealer about the S. S. Wliite Easy 
Payment Plan and Free Office Planning 
Service, or write direct. 

THE S. S. WHITE DENTAL JIFG. CO. 
211 S. 12lh Slr«t, Philadelphia. Pa. 





OUR SERVICE TO THE PROFESSION 

has extended over a period of about Ninety-Five Years and we are proud 
of our record. 

We employ a staff of Equipment Specialists who are anxious to be of 
service to you in planning your future office, suggesting a suitable location, 
assisting in the selection of curtains, drapes, floor coverings and color 
schemes. 

They will also supply accurate blueprints of your office which can be 
turned over to contractors for construction work. 

These blueprints show plumbing details, electrical outlets, also parti- 
tions, etc. 

We invite you to confer with one of our qualified representatives 
before completing details for your office. Many times they will offer 
suggestions that will minimize expense and make your office more 
efficient. 

Our interest in your welfare does not cease when you have purchased 
your Equipment requirements as we ore anxious to continue to serve you 
with doily needs of Merchandise, Gold &• Teeth. 

Come in and get acquainted and inspect our modern depot and 
methods of serving you. 

THE S. S. WHITE DENTAL MFG. CO. 

PITTSFIELD BUILDING 

55 East Washington Street 

CHICAGO 



FOSTER DENTAL FILMS 

and 

DENTAL FILM MOUNTS 

used exclusively by 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery 



N. W. FOSTER CS, SON 

Morton Gro\'e, Illinois 



START OFF PROPERLY 

WITH A BOSWORTH 

VISUAL BOOKKEEPING 

SYSTEM 



Originated by a dentist and used by 
dentists for the last twenty years. 
E\'ery piuchaser secures our Practice 
Management Service without charge. 

Specify a Bosworth System wlicn you 
purchase your equipment. 



HARRY J. BOSWORTH CO. 

1315 S. Michigan Ave. Chicago, 111. 



Compliments 

of 

DEMOS GRILL 



FRINK DENTAL SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

4753 Broadway 
CHICAGO 

Phones: Longbeach 3350-3351 



102 



iTTRIUm 



<ptonounced ZIT-RI-UMJ 



The Biological Approach 

to the Treatment 

of Pyorrhea 




ENAMEL 

CREVICE EPITHELIUM 

WITH KERATINIZED 

LAYER 

ENAMEL ATTACHMENT 
EPITHELIUM 

NOTE PAPILLAE 

NOTE ABSENCE OF 
PAPILLAE 

CEMENTO-ENAMEL 
JUNCTION 

FREE GINGIVAL 
PERIODONTAL FIBERS 

ALVEOLAR CREST 

PERIODONTAL MEMBRANE 

CEMENTUM 



SALIVARY 
CALCULUS 



POCKET 
FORMATION 

SERUMAL 
CALCULUS 

NOTE DOWN 
GROWTH OF 
CREVICE EPITH- 
ELIUM WITH 
KERATINIZE 
LAYER AND 
PAPILLAE 

ROUND CELL 
INFILTRATION 



RESORBED 
ALVEOLAR CREST 



The ultimate aim in 
tlic ti'catmciit of the 
pyiirilicM ])()ci\ct is t(i 
eliminate the jiockct. 



Tlio 40-page, interest- 
ing and informative 
Xttrium book de- 
sci-ihcs the scientifie 
background for the 
Xttrium treatment 
and gives complete in- 
formation regarding 
technique. Return 
the coupon for yoiu' 
free co]3y. 



Schematic representation of downgrowth of 
crevice epithelium and pocket formation. 



AN INFORMATIVE BOOK IS FREE RETURN YOUR CARD TODAY 



THE XTTRIUM CO., 343 So. Dearborn St., Chicago, II 



Be Proud of Your Laboratory 

Selecting a dental laboratory is one of the most important matters in building a dental 
practice. Remember, it is your name that appears on your office door, and you are re- 
sponsible for all work going out of that office. 

You should visit your laboratory and satisfy yourself that it is the kind of an organi- 
zation you can have confidence in — that the work and service is of a type that will help 
you in your practice. 

Be sure it is a jilace you are proud to be seen visiting. 

We have many customers tell us they enjoy visiting our labora- 
tories, and are proud to have it known that they deal here. 

If you have not already done so, we urge you to come in at your 
first opportunity. 



AMERICAN DENTAL COMPANY 



5 South Wabash Avenue 



ESTABLISHED 1900 

LABORATORIES 

Phone STATE 1642 



Chicago, Illinois 




^(M. K&placeifietdi a^ BeoMitf, MUetufik, Gomj^ and M&uuce; call 

• SCHROEDER DENTAL LABORATORIES 

2414 Lawrence Avenue, Chicago • LONgbeach 3534-5 



.Arthir J. ScHROEDER, President 
\V. E. ScHROEDER, V lee-Pres'ident 



E. C. ScHROEDER, Treasure 
M. Wermich, Secretary 



Dealer £> 



Pamphlets 
sent on 
request 



AT A FAIR PRICE 



INLAY GOLD - PARTIAL DENTURE GOLD - WIRE - SOLDER 
DELASTIC IMPRESSION MATERIAL — DEE HEATREAT UNIT 





105 







)Ja4fjm^mt, 



After you graduate... what? 

You arc faced with the problem of establish- 
ing a successful practice . . . you must select 
the right location for yourself. . .you must 
plan \our ofTice so that it will be attractive in 
>yinning and holding your first patients ... you 
must know the thousand and one little steps 
that go to make up the business side of your 
practice; steps that arc learned in most cases 
by the trial and error method 

unless you have the guidance of men 

who have taken all these steps the "hard 
way". 

Your way to a successful practice can be 
paved more easily if you take advantage of 
the manv services which Ritter and your 
Ritter dealer can make available to you. 



Through Rittcr"s statistical service and office 
planning division you arc enabled to start 
right 

But . . . after you open your own office with 
new Ritter equipment Ritter will see you 
through . . . bv enabling xou to start right, 
through its Practice Building Service in which 
nearly 10,000 dentists already have been en- 
rolled ... a service that presents the funda- 
mental principles of building to a successful 
practice. 

Your Ritter dealer. . . or the Ritter represent- 
ative . . . will be glad to discuss all these 
factors . . . and also explain Ritters liberal 
deferred payment plan. 

Ritrer 

Denial iVIaniifaclurinp Company, Inc. 
Ritler Park Rochester. N. Y. 



106 



Counselors to more than Thirty 
Graduating Classes 



A dental dealer should be more than o merchant. It is not enough that he hondle 
only the best of materials, maintain adequate stocks and render courteous end 
efficient service. Something more than that is required if he is to be worthy of 
the name. 

Every dentist needs someone of experience that he can advise and counsel 
with about business matters. This is particularly true of a recent graduate, h^e 
IS confronted with the vital problem of finding a location; the leasing of on office,- 
the selection and financing of his equipment and appliances and often times with 
the purchase and installation of a proper accounting system. 

It has been our pleasant privilege to act as counselor to many graduates of 
your Alma Mater for more than three decades. Many of the most successful den- 
tists in this area have been kind enough to credit us with an important part in their 
success. 

Naturally, we don't profess to "know all the answers " but the benefit of what 
experience we have gleaned from over thirty years of daily contact with dentists 
and their problems is yours for the asking. We cannot always find on ideal solution 
to every problem but we can and do steadfastly adhere to a policy of honest deal- 
ing and sincerity of purpose. Because the future of any business rests on the success 
of its patrons your welfare, naturally, becomes our first consideration. 

We would consider it a privilege to discuss your problems with you. We believe 
that it will prove to your advantage to do so. 



C. L. FRAME DENTAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

MAIN STORE SOUTHSIDE BRANCH 

Marshall Field Annex BIdg. 733 West 64th Street 

25 E. Washington Street 

We handle such outstanding lines as L. D. Caulk Plastics, Clev-Dent Steel goods, 
Columbus Dental Steele's Facings, Cook-Waite Anesthetics, Dee & Ney Golds, 
Dental Products, Anesthetics and Investments; Dentists' Supply Co., New FHue and 
Trubyte Teeth; Ransom & Randolph Cutwell burs; Ritter equipment and S. S. White 
general merchandise. Also, the products of practically all the other leading dental 
manufacturers. 




Famous for Our Steaks 
Gkorge Motto, Mgr. 




Restaurant 

"The Talk of the Town" 

BARBECUE HOME-MADE 
ITALIAN SAUSAGE 

Roast Turkey Served 365 Days Each Year 



1S25 West Madison Street 

Across from the Stadium 

Sbeley 9737 Chicago 



AUGUST S. CARON 

ca, SON 
BUILDERS 



212 S. Marion St. 
OAK PARK 

Euclid 26 Mans. 1383 



Compliments 

of 

LOGIN BROTHERS 



DENTAL AND MEDICAL 

BOCKS 

NEW AND USED 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS 



1814 W. Harrison St. 

Opposite Cook County Hospital 

CHICAGO 



V>i ri 1 V_>i iV vJ V^ O most modern 

and finely equlpped laboratorij 




standard oerVlCe is synonyinous wltli (niality. ^Ye are 
Mtalliuni Licensees and cast cases in our own laboratories. We 
are fully eciuipped to make Austenal Teeth by the Micromold 
Process and feature tlu>in in Acrylic and other denture materials. 
Dental Restorations of Every Type and Technique 

STANDARD DENTAL LABORATORIES 



185 N. Wabash Ave. 



Chicago, Illinois 



CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 
DENTAL SCHOOL OF LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 



1757 West Harrison Street 
CHICAGO 



The Fifty-Eighth Annual Session Opens October 2, 1Q40 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATIOX 

To meet the advanced requirements of dental education 
students entering the dental school must present entrance 
credits amounting to fifteen accei)table units, representing 
four years of high school work, and in addition thereto, 
two years, sixty semester hours of approved college credit 
which must include: 

Chemistry 8 semester hours 

Biology 6 semester hours 

English 6 semester hours 

The remainder of the requirement should include elective 
subjects intended to broaden the intellectual background 
of the student, an imi)ortant essential in professional life. 
Recommended elective subjects are advanced courses in 
English, history, foreign language, economics, philosophy' 
and social and political sciences. 

Graduate Courses Offered in Selected Subjects 



Address Registrar 

CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 
DENTAL SCHOOL OF LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 




ROOT STUDIOS 


Est. 1889 


185 No. Wabash Avenue 

• 


OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS 


1936 DENTOS 


1937 DENTOS 


1938 DENTOS 


1939 DENTOS 


1940 DENTOS 


Special Rates to C. C. D. S. Students at All Times 


TELEPHONE STATE 0113 



Frank Milford 

DENTAL TECHNICIAN 



Room 1106 
25 E. Washington 

Telephone RAN. 9675 




"THE HOUSE OF A 
THOUSAND MODELS" 

Invites You to Visit Its Showroom 

When in New York 

for 

The World's Fair 

See the Great Variety of 

COLUMBIA 
DENTOFORMS 

in 

IVORINE - ALUMINAL - RUBBER - 

STONE - PLASTER 

ir it's a mcidi'l, C'oluinliia iias iter 
cull make it I'lir you! 

COLUMBIA DENTOFORM CORP. 

131 East 23rd Street New York, N. Y. 





Boyda Dairy 
Company 



J. C'hmiel, ^Igr. 



C m p I i 1)1 e n t s 



of 



FERN D A ^M D S O N 



C m p I i 111 e n t s 



of 



CHARLES KAVAXAUGH 



II 



ILLINOIS - 



DENTAL LABORATORY, INC. 
4010 W. MADISON ST., CHICAGO 




Mdir and mure professional men are 
'■|)i>iiitiTi(; with pride" to Illinois-made 
full uiul partial dentures. Numbered 
amoii); these leading dentists are many 
whc] were graduated from Loyola. .\s a 
httiiiK ciiniploment to your I>oyola train- 
ing and y(i\ii- skill may we suKgest that 
you take advantage of Illinois craftsman- 
ship and service? 



ON MAINTAINING 

LEADERSHIP • • • 

• To win and consistently hold a place as the recognized 
leader of school annual printing, has been the record of 
Rogers Printing Company since its beginning in 1908. 

• That we have, during a period of 32 years successfully 
produced hundreds of annuals for schools throughout the 
country; attests our ability to satisfy completely the most 
discriminating Year Book Staff. 

• New ideas, coupled with the knowledge and experience 
gained through a quarter of a century's service, insure the 
school which chooses a Rogers printed book, of ideal pages 
"From Start to Finish." 

• We are proud that the staff of THE DENTOS 
entrusted its printing to our organization and we herewith 
present it as an example of our work. 

ROGERS PRINTING COMPANY 



307-309 First Street 

DIXON, ILLINOIS 



228 N. LaSalle Street 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



Autographs 



Autographs 



Autographs 



Autographs 



Autographs 



-^l4;