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Full text of "Dentos"

mm 







Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/dentos1943unse 



THE DENTOS 

OF 
NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY-THREE 



* 



Presented by the Senior Class of the 

CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

Dental School of Loyola University 

WILLIAM ARTHUR GEORGE 

ROMEO R. ARRA 

Co-Editors 

LON VERNON PORTER 

ARTHUR PAUL GRUNT 

Co-Business Managers 




Dr. John Svoboda discussing 
a pathologicaloralcondition 
with two popular members 
of the faculty, Drs. Walter 
Wykhuis and Ralph Larsen. 



l/Ue salute tlti 



i 



atm taxceJ- c 



m 






In these days when the future is dark- 
ened by the rage of war throughout 
the world, let us fight for the star of 
hich is inherent to we Ameri- 




tailor 




Br. ISHtUtam Hoffman (garbncr ILogan 




This volume is respectfully dedicated to the memory of our late 
dean whose worthy attributes have placed him in high esteem among 
his professional colleagues and friends throughout the entire world. 




WILLIAM HOFFMAN GARDINER LOGAN 
1872-1943 

The Chicago College of Dental Surgery, in 
particular, and the entire profession of dentistry 
have suffered the loss of a great leader with 
the death of Dr. Logan on April 6, 1943. 

Although his very presence among us testi- 
fied to the reality of his being, his achievements 
have acquired an almost legendary quality as 
they have passed down from class to class. 
His labors with us represent the efforts of a 
generation. He was the motivator and directing 
force of that generation which developed the 
eminence and prestige that dentistry enjoys 
tcday. Unstinting ly and dauntlessly he was 
identified with innumerable activities which 
were constantly advancing the dental profes- 
sion. 

The Chicago College of Dental Surgery has 
reaped the greatest benefits from Dr. Logan s 
untiring and unceasing efforts to further dental 
progress. He has been dean and professor of 
plastic and oral surgery of this school since 1920. 
Having received his degree in dentistry from this 
institution in 1896, Dr. Logan stayed on as an 
assistant in oral surgery to the equally immortal 
Dr. Truman W. Brophy besides practicing gen- 
eral dentistry. In 1905 he received his M.D. 
degree and scon was teaching oral surgery, in 
which he finally specialized. He is responsible 
for many innovations and improvements in the 
field of oral surgery. His passion for knowledge 
and research led him to organize the Foundation 
for Dental Research of the Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery, which is one of the most famous 
dental research laboratories in this or any other 
country. 



During World War I, Dr. Logan, then a major 
in the Medical Reserve Corps, was chiefly in- 
strumental in the formation of the Dental Corps 
as we know it today. He became chief of the 
dental division in August, 1917, and in May, 
1918 he achieved the rank of colonel, the 
highest possible rank at that time in the Dental 
Corps. 

In addition to his abilities in the educational 
field, Dr. Logan possessed extraordinary admin- 
istrative, executive and diplomatic talents which 
was readily recognized and extensively employ- 
ed by the dental profession. He was president 
of the Chicago Dental Society in 1909. In 1914 
he held the same office in the Illinois State 
Dental Society. He held the presidency of the 
National Dental Association (now called the 
American Dental Association) in 191 8. He was 
vice-president of the Incernational Dental Fed- 
eration from 1926 until he became president 
of that great organization in 1936, an office 
he held until his death. He was a Fellow of 
the American College of Surgeons, serving on 
its board of governors since 1928. 

As an acknowledgment of his accomplishments 
Dr. Logan received many honors. He received 
the Doctor of Laws degree from Loyola Univer- 
sity, a Master of Science degree from the Uni 
versity of Michigan and Doctor of Laws from 
the National University of Ireland in Dublin. 
He was a member of the dental honor society, 
Omicron Kappa Upsilon,- Pi Gamma Mu, the 
honorary science society; and Delta Sigma Delta. 

Dr. Logan's inspiring figure will no longer be 
seen within the portals of the Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery but the memory of all he has 
accomplished and advocated will not soon fade 
from the remembrance of those who follow. 



o 






r~> 








— \ f-\ - 







The facully of this famous institution is composed of 
men whose virtues place them on the highest plane of 
great teachers. For history reveals this college to be 
the heme of many immortal contributors and leaders in 
the field of dental science. 

Constantly in research are famous men working ener- 
getically on health problems confronting the general 
practitioner. The men of this faculty whose mental 
qualities are emulated by their respective students are 
partly responsible for the elaborate progress evolving 
in dentistry. 



COLLEGE 




REV. JOSEPH M. EGAN, S.J. 
President of Loyola University 



Teach us good Lord, to serve Thee as 

Thou deservest, 
To give and not to count the cost; 
To fight and not to heed the wounds,- 
To toil and not to seek for rest; 
To labour and not ask for any reward 
Save that of knowing that we do Thy will." 
(St. Ignatius of Loyola) 



IISIIIIIIII 



DR. WILLIAM H. G. LOGAN 

Dean 





DR. R. W. McNULTY 

Assistant Dean 



'Whether it be to friends or 
foe, talk not of other men s 

lives." 

(Ecclesiasticus XIII) 



DR. PLINY G. PUTERBAUGH 

Secretary of the Faculty 




■ - 



IlllDC 





HARRY SICHER 
Associate Professor of Anatomy, His- 
tology, and Research; M.D., Uni- 
versity of Vienna, Austria. 



THOMAS L. GRISAMORE 

Assistant Professor of Histology and 
Pathology, B.A., Colgate University, 
D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery, M.D., Rush Medical College 
of the University of Chicago , Phi Kappa 
Tau, Nu Sigma Nu, Delta Sigma Delta. 




DEDICATE. 



A cadaver which will not harbor every known and unknown disease of humanity. 




WILLIAM P. SCHOEN 
Instructor in Dental Materials; B.S 
Loyola University, D.D.S., Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery, Delta Sigma 
Delta. 



PHILIP S. FAILLO 
Instructor in Physiology, Pharmacology, 
Metallurgy and Materia Medica,- M. 
D.S. and D.D.S., Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery, Delta Sigma Delta. 




PHVSIOLOGV - PHnRMHCQLDGV 




DEDICATE: 

A group of trained frogs that will move the 
kymograph needles without making too 
much commotion for the students at rest. 



WILLIAM D. ZOETHOUT 
Professor of Physiology and Pharma- 
cology, A.B., Hope College; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago, Sigma Xi. 



JOHN L. KENDALL 
Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy,- 
B.S., Valparaiso University, Ph.G., 
Valparaiso University, M.D., Uni- 
versity of Kentucky, Psi Omega. 




"Wisdom is the principal thing, there- 
fore get wisdom,- and with all thy 
getting get understanding." (Proverbs 
1,10). 



GEORGE D. WESSINGER 
Associate Professor of Chemistry, Physi- 
ology, and Research in Biochemistry, 
B.S., Florida Southern College; M.S., 
Northwestern University, Ph.D., North- 
western University; Phi Lambda Up- 
silon,- Sigma Xi. 




mil DID fiimfifNIIR! 






ROBERT E. MACBOYLE 
Professor of Crown and Bridge Work; 
D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery. 



RALPH G. LARSEN 

Instructor in Crown and Bridge Work; 
D.D.S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; M.D.S., Loyola University, 
Delta Sigma Delta. 



R HAROLD JOHNSON 
Assistant Professor of Crown and Bridge 
Work, D.D.S., Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery. 



DEDICATE: 



A brand new shelf remover along with all the excess shoulders 
ground off the porcelain jacket preparations. 



FRANK P. LINDNER HAROLD W. OPPICE MICHAEL A. GAUDIO 

Assistant Professor of Crown and Bridge Assistant Professor of Crown and Bridge Instructor in Dental Technics,- D.D.S., 

Work; D.D.S., Chicago College of Work; D.D.S., Chicago College of Chicago College of Dental Surgery. 

Dental Surgery, Delta Sigma Delta. Dental Surgery, Xi Psi Phi. 






J**- 



*M 



[monies 



u 




DEDICATE: 

An insurance policy for every good 
tion found after the war has ended. 



ROBERT W. McNULTY 

Assistant Dean, Associate Profes- 
sor of Ethics, Economics, History, 
and Dental Anatomy, A B. Han- 
over College, M. A., Loyola Uni- 
versity, D.D.S., Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery, Delta Sigma 
Delta. 



HAROLD HILLENBRAND 
Instructor in Economics, B.S.D., 
Loyola University, D.D.S., Chi- 
cago College of Dental Surgery,- 
De ta Sigma De!ta. 





WALLACE N. KIRBY 

Instructor in Technical Composi- 
tion; B.A., University of Illinois, 
D.D.S., Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery, Delta Sigma 
Delta. 



"Envy is a pain of mind that suc- 
cessful men cause their neigh- 
bors." (Onasander). 



IPffifllltf DENTISTRY 




WARREN WILLMAN 
Professor of Operative Dentistry, 
M.S., Loyola University,- D.D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery; Delta Sigma Delta. 



PAUL DAWSON 
Assistant Professor of Operative 
Dentistry, B.S. Loyola University 
D.D.S., Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery, Delta Sigma Del- 




DEDICATE: 



All the essential inlay margins ground off and laid in a straight 
line to guide the incoming neophytes to the gloom room. 



ANTHONY F. ROUCEK 
Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry 
and Operative Dentistry; D.D.S. 
Chicago College of Dental Sur- 
gery, Delta Sigma Delta. 



VICTOR SEITZ 
Instructor in Dental Materials and 
Operative Dentistry, B.A., North 
Central College, D.D.S., Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery. 



AUGUSTUS H. MUELLER 

Assistant Professor of Operative 
Dentistry, M.S., Loyola Uni- 
versity, D.D.S., Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery, Delta Sigma 
Delta. 






fililfl III 




HOWARD MICHENER 
Assistant Professor of Orthodon- 
tia,- D.D.S., Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery, Delta Sigma 
Delta. 



JEROME J. VLK 
Associate Professor of Ortho- 
dontia, M.D.S., Loyola Uni- 
versity, D.D.S., Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery,- Xi Psi Phi. 




DEDICATE: 



A ruler to measure the 1-60 inch the orthodontic band should 
extend below the gingival margin, also all the steel scrap remain- 
ing from band construction to be cast in a plaque stating Angle s 
classification of malocclusion. 



EARL P. BOULGER 

Assistant Professor of Radiology 
and Operative Dentistry,- B.A., 
Loyola University,- L.D.S. and 
D.D.S., Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery,- Delta Sigma 
Delta. 



RUTH MORRIS 

Technician in Radiography. 



DWIGHT C. ATKINSON 

Instructor in Radiology,- D.D.S., 
Marquette University School of 
Dentistry,- Delta Sigma Delta. 






puis 




WILLIAM I. McNEIL 

Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry 
D.D.S., Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery, Delta Sigma 
Delta 



HENRY GLUPKER 
Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry, 
B.S., Loyola University, D.D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Sur- 
gery, Delta Sigma Delta. 




DEDICATION. 



A magic abrasive roll which will trim the denture border while 
the operator runs down for a "coke." 



WALTER A. WYKHIUS 
Assistant Professor of Prosthetic 
Dentistry,- A.B., Calvin Colleg? 
D.D.S., Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery, Delta Sigma 
Delta 



WILLIAM N. HOLMES 
Assistant Professor of Prosthetic 
Dentistry; B.S., Loyola Univers- 
ity, D.D.S., Chicago College of 
Dental Surgery, Delta Sigma Del- 



ARTHUR G. ADAMS 

Instructor in Prosthetic Dentistry 
and Dental Anatomy, D.D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Sur- 
gery, Xi Psi Phi. 






HEnnPEima 




TRUMAN G. DeWITT 

Instructor in Therapeutics and 
Dentistry for Children,- D.D.S., 
Chicago College ol Dental Sur- 
gery. 



EDGAR D. COOLIDGE 

Professor of Therapeutics, Preven- 
tive Dentistry and Oral Hygiene, 
M.S., Northwestern University,- 
D.D.S., Chicago College of Den- 
tal Surgery,- Xi Psi Phi. 




DEDICATE: 



All the collected calculus removed in prophylactic treatments 
and thus be used as a base in the construction of a new cafeteria. 



THELMA CLINE 
Department of Therapeutics, R.N. 
B.S., Loyola University. 





Ilfill SURGERY 




WILLIAM H. G. LOGAN 
Dean of Faculty, Professor of 
Oral Surgery, Oral Pathology, 
and Plastic Surgery,- M.S. 
and D.D.S., Chicago Col- 
lege of Dental Surgery, M.D., 
Chicago College of Medicine 
and Surgery,- F.A.C.S , LL.D., 
Delta Sigma Delta. 



PLINY G. PUTERBAUGH 
Secretary of the Faculty, Profes- 
sor of Principles of Medicine, 
Associate Professor of Oral Sur- 
gery, D.D.S., Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery,- M.D., Chi- 
cago College of Medicine and 
Surgery,- Delta Sigma Delta. 




DEDICATE: 



Our surgery notes since no one can replace our late professor 
in Oral Surgery. 




WAYNE G. SLAUGHTER 

Assistant Professor of Plastic 
and Maxillo-Facial Surgery,- B.S. 
University of Nebraska,- M.A. 
in Anatomy, University of Ne- 
braska, D.D.S., University of 
Pennsylvania,- M.D., University 
of Nebraska. 



KARL A. MEYER 
Associate Professor of Surgery, 
M.D., Illinois College of Med- 
icine, Psi Omega. 




MINOR SllfiGfl? 




CEDRlC K. DITTMER 

Instructor in Exodontia, M.D.S., 
Loyola University, D.D.S., Chica- 
go College of Dental Surgery, 
Psi Omega. 



JOHN F. SVOBODA 

Assistant Professor of Exodontia,- 
B.S., Loyola University, D.D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Sur- 
gery,- Delta Sigma Delta. 




DEDICATE: 



A new instrument which will straighten the roots of teeth before 
extraction, thus eliminating the use of numerous complicating 
instruments. 




ALICE ANDERSON 
Department of Exodontia, R.N. 



B. J. SEIGRIST 
Instructor in Exodontia, D.D.S., 
Chicago College of Dental Sur- 
gery,- M.D.S., Loyola University. 




i[j(«Ki;« 




BALINT ORBAN 
Professor of Dental Pathology 
and Research in Histopathology, 
D.D.S., Northwestern University, 
M.D., Vienna and Budapest, 
Delta Sigma Delta, Sigma Xi. 



JOSEPH P. WEINMANN 
Assistant Professor of Dental 
Pathology and Research in His- 
topathology, M.D., University 
of Vienna, Austria, Sigma Xi. 




DEDICATE: 



Our moral support for the wonderful work that they have done 
in the eyes of dentistry. 




ELBERT C. PENDELTON 
Professor of Diagnosis and Re- 
search in Full Denture Prosthesis, 
M.D.S., Loyola University, D.D 
S., Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery, Xi Psi Phi. 



JOAN LAUNSPACH 
Research Technician 




20 



"When bad men combine, the good 
must associate, else they will fall cne 
by cne, an unpitied sacrifice in a con- 
temptible struggle." 

(Edmund Burke) 




43 




FAMOUS QUOTATIONS BY THE FACULTY 



Dr. MacBoyle — "I've been doing it for over 
forty years, fellahs,- and I still remember what 
Dr. Goslee used to tell us . . 

Dr. McNeil— "Should I hit him? No, he's got 
glasses on; now what I'm trying to say is . . . 
now that's important; put it in your notebook. 

Dr. Glupker — "Now just listen with your minds' 
ear for a moment." 

Dr. Vlk — . . . and I assure you gentlemen, 
that it won t be very long before . . . etc., 
etc., etc." 

Dr. Larsen — "That's a mighty fine piece of work, 
son,- what is it?" 

Dr. Pendleton — "Don't you boys ever sharpen 



?" 



you ooys 
your explorers or use separators 

Dr. DeWitt — "Get me a towel." 

Dr. Gaudio — "We don't use lead strips any- 
more." 

Dr. Willman — "Mmm-Hmm, that's right." 

Dr. Dawson — "Well I'll tell you, son, you've 
got caries on the other side." 

Dr. Karl Meyer — "Now, get this ..." 

Dr. Boulger — "Eh? What say?" 

Dr. Wykhius— "Yu, Okay" 

Dr. Mueller — "I still can collect them." 

Dr. Svoboda — "Where's your x-ray?" 



QUESTIONS TO OUR FACULTY 

Some questions to our faculty 
We'll hiss them one by one 
We'd all be very grateful 
If they would answer some. 

First consider Dr. Vlk 

The Orthodontia kid 

Do you believe that stuff you throw? 

Are your secrets really hid? 

We can't forget Dr. DeWitt 

And his teachings day by day 

Will you solve the problem of the child? 

Can you keep the germs away? 

Then in the bridge department 
We have a doctor on the beam 
Let's have the dope now doctor 
Does your coffee contain some cream? 

Next is our boy, Kendall 
Your lectures were never cold 
But we often wonder, Doctor 
How many cows you really sold. 

Dr. Glupker should answer this one 

It helps us all in awe 

Before we write down finish 

How many teeth in an edentulous jaw? 

In a diagnosis, Penny 
Would you stop or even reckon 
With thirty-one teeth absent 
Would you pull the thirty-second? 

For Dr. Willman we have a question 
We know that he will help 
To make a Proximal really stick 
How about retention in the pulp? 

Here's one for Dr. Wykhius 
From him we'd like to hear 
About the fish you lost in rivers 
For the truth we'll buy a beer. 

And for the entire faculty 

And a final prayer to Him 

Will you sign your name on the dotted line 

Cause we sure need that old sheepskin. 



22 




&ICYCUE Kid" DrWiTT 
DURING EKAMS 



AUe.s' 



MIGHTY FINE, SON 
Ml&HTY FINE 
WHAT IS IT ? 



ROTATE THOSE CUSPIDS 
DEPRESS THOSE NECKS 
GRIND THE R.1D&E LAP- 
WHERE WERE YOU 

DURING LECTURES 



o 



n 



r~\ 



n 



n 



n 



u 



b 



L 



L U 



The past year has seen a great change in the 
class routine of the school. In accordance with 
the demands of war a new plan of accelerated 
dental education has been inaugurated. For 
the first time in the history of the school students 
will attend organized summer classes. The im- 
portance of dental health service to the war 
effort has been recognized by both the Army 
and Navy, and opportunities have been provided 
for students to obtain and maintain reserve 
commissions until they have completed their ed- 
ucation. 

Classes are being adapted to conform to the 
special requirements of a war time practice 
rather than to a private one. The program 
calls for graduation at the end of three calendar 
years with no reduction in clinical and didactic 
requirements. 





ClflSS 



L 



1940 Heave ho! 

We are embarked on our voyage into the almost fathomless sea of knowl- 
edge comprising dental science and dental art. A crew of seasoned 
men begins the task of strengthening the sea legs of this new cargo of 
landlubbers. The first quadrant of our itinerary into the deeps of dentistry 
uncovers our latent powers of digital dexterity and the basic sciences 
give us a tourists eyeview of what may be expected later on this cruise. 
The good ship C. C. D. S. has gathered the unseasoned sailors into its 
bosom and promises them a rigorous but richly rewarded voyage. 

1941 Avast ye swabs! 

Our vessel is under full sail now! The journey becomes a little more 
arduous as the ship's lanes run across such ports of call as Crown and 
Bridge, Orthodontia, Full Denture Prosthesis, and Operative Dentistry. 
Towering waves in the guise of examinations lash out angrily to test our 
mettle and our ability to continue this excursion into oceans of dentistry. 
Few, however, are found wanting as we successfully navigate one half 
of our strenuous voyage. 

1942 ALL hand on deck! 

At last we become deck-hands and are allowed to put to practice the 
basic training we have so carefully been taught. As apprentice seamen 
we are given the run of the ship and under the firm, but reasonably toler- 
ant command of our superior officers we gradually acquire a certain amount 
of skill and efficiency in our duties. We are taught the correlation and 
application of the various experiences we gathered in the first half of 
our trip and as the vessel plows forward through the depths of dentistry 
the waters begin to lose their strangeness. Our thoughts and actions 
are concerned with perfecting our abilities to steer a straight course to 
our port of chosen endeavor. 

1943 Land ho! 

The richly-laden argosy speeds toward its sighted port. We are still 
preoccupied with the perfection of our skill in executing the duties of 
our vaunted profession. The seas of dental knowledge have been laid 
bare to us on our voyage and each of us has been permitted to gather 
as much cargo as his discretion and ability allowed him. One compar- 
atively short journey is being completed, but a greater and longer one is 
in the offing, on which each of us will be his own helmsman on his own 
vessel, and the success of this voyage will be determined by the fruits 
of his previous one. 



26 




Secretary 

VICTOR E. HERSHMAN 



Treasurer 

JOHN F. PURCELL 



President 

MICHAEL A. DEPALMA 



Vice-President 

JOHN A. DOMEIKIS 



Sergeant-at-Arms 

HENRY R. LETERNO 



The day on which postings 
were set up. The students 
madly inspect their points to 
see the record of their ener- 
getic dental achievements, 
accomplished in the previous 
month in the infirmary. 




^\l ^1 



GEORGE P. ALLES 



JOSE Z. ALMAGUER 



ROMEO R. ARRA 



NORMAN BALIN 




MYRON T. ATAMAN 



HOWARD S. BERG 



& ..^fr 



GILBERT J. BLAHNIK 



THOMAS K. BOYD 



SENIORS 





j^S; 




LDEN C. BUECHE, B.A. 

GORDON L. BURNS 



ALAN R. CASS 



PETER S. COOPER 



JULIUS J. DZIUBAK, B.S. 



EARL T. ENRIGHT 



WALLACE G. FINCH 

SYDNEY N. FISHMAN 



U L 



If '43 




MATTHEW J 


FRANEY 








JOHN S. 


FRASCO ^ 




THADDEUS E 


1. GASIOR, 


B.S. 






WILLIAM 

Va 


A. GEORGE, 

ledictorian 


B.S. 


THOMAS C. 


GILLIS, B.A. 






EDWARD G. GRIFFIN 


ARTHUR H. 


GRUNT 







JOSEPH F. HAJDYS 



SENIORS 




30 






f RALPH A. 


HALL 








TRAVERS R. HAMILTON 


CARLIN 

Pre 


K. HAYES 

phet 


LESTER 


L. 


JANES 


JOHN E 


JANKUS 












DAVID 


A 


KAYE 



AUGUST C. KING 



MATTHEW P. KLORIS 



CUSS IF '43 



ROBERT J. LAGORIO^ 


LEONARD M. KRASKE 




THADDEUS A. MALACHOWSKI 


MARVIN B. LEWISON 




BRUNO J. 


MARRESSA 


RAYMOND MARCUS 




THEODORE A. 


MELCAREK 


HAROLD J. McGRANE 





[DIMS 





ARTHUR F. MONTUORI, B.S. 
RICHARD A. METZGAR 



FRANK V. OLIVER 



RALPH J. PAGANO 



AURELIUS J. PAGANO 



ALBERT M. PETRIZZI, B.S. 
ROMEO A. PALLOTTO 



CLASS If '43 



LON V. PORTER, B.A. 
EDWARD F. PIECH 



JOSEPH A. PROPATI 
ANDREW J. POTEMPA 



EUGENE S. PUSKIEWICZ 



MICHAEL A. RITZA 




WALTER J. REAM 



WALTER H. SIR 



lions 



4^ ^pH 



\ 



34 




WILLIAM H. SOWLE 

ARTHUR W. STURM 



JACK A. TATELMAN 

JOSEPH T. TRAMPOTA 



GEORGE W. WALKER 

ROMAN J. WALLEY 



**M !"3 1 




LLOYD R. WALTY 

GERALD ASTE SALAZAR, CD. 



U L 



FISS If '43 



sunns 



GEORGE P. ALLES 

Maywood, Illinois 
Proviso Township High School 
Lewis Institute 
Dentos Staff '42-'43 
Army Dental Reserve 

JOSE Z. ALMAGUER 

Chicago, Illinois 
Bowen High School 
Monmouth College 
Class Secretary '39-'40 
Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 
Delta Sigma Delta 
Army Dental Reserve 

ROMEO R. ARRA 

Chicago, Illinois 

Lane Technical High School 
Lewis Institute 
Wright College 
Co-editor of Dentos '42-'43 
Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 
Naval Medical Reserve 

MYRON T. ATAMAN 

Chicago, Illinois 
Lane Technical High School 
St. Procopius College 
Naval Medical Reserve 

NORMAN BALIN 

Chicago, Illinois 
Manly High School 
Herzyl Junior College 
Army Dental Reserve 

HOWARD S. BERG 

Chicago, Illinois 
Austin High School 
University of Illinois 
Army Dental Reserve 

GILBERT J. BLAHNIK 

Algoma, Wisconsin 

Algoma High School 

University of Wisconsin 

Carroll College 

Xi Psi Ph, 

Naval Medical Reserve 

THOMAS K. BOYD 

Grand Rapids, Michigan 

Creston High School 

Grand Rapids Junior College 

Army Dental Reserve 



ELDEN C. BUECHE, B.A. 

Toledo, Ohio 
DeVilbiss High School 
Wittenberg College 
Delta Sigma Delta 
Army Dental Reserve 

GORDON L. BURNS 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Oak Park High School 
Loyola University 
Delta Sigma Delta 
Army Dental Reserve 

ALAN R. CASS 

Viroqua, Wisconsin 

Viroqua High School 
University of Wisconsin 
Class Secretary '40-'41 
Dentos Staff '41 -'42 
Dance Committee '41 -'42 
Delta Sigma Delta 
Naval Medical Reserve 

PETER S. COOPER 

Whitinsville, Massachusetts 

Northbridge High School 
Calvin College 
Army Dental Reserve 

MICHAEL A. DEPALMA 

Auburn, New York 
Jordan High School 
Canisius College 
Class President '42-'43 
X, Psi Phi 
Army Dental Reserve 

JOHN A. DOMEIKIS 

Chicago, Illinois 

Harper High School 
Wilson Junior College 
Class Vice-President '42-'43 
Army Dental Reserve 

JULIUS J. DZIUBAK, B.S. 

Chicago, Illinois 

Lindbloom High School 

Northwestern University 

Central Y. M. C. A. College 

Dentos Staff '42-'43 

Xi Psi Phi 

Army Dental Reserve 

EARL T. ENRIGHT 
Bay City, Michigan 

St. James High School 
Marquette University 
Dentos Staff '39-'40 
Xi Psi Ph, 
Army Dental Reserve 



WALLACE G. FINCH 
Hancock, Michigan 

Hancock Central High School 
Michigan College of Mining and Tech- 
nology 
Army Dental Reserve 

SYDNEY N. FISHMAN 
Chicago, Illinois 

Marshall High School 

Peoples Junior College 

Lewis Institute 

Herzl Junior College 

Alpha Omega 

Army Dental Reserve 

MATTHEW J. FRANEY 

Green Lake, Wisconsin 
Carroll College 
Army Dental Reserve 

JOHN S. FRASCO 

Chicago, Illinois 
Crane High School 
Central Y. M. C A. College 
Delta Sigma Delta 
Army Dental Reserve 

THADDEUS B. GASIOR, B.S. 

Chicago, Illinois 

Harrison Technical High School 
Northwestern University 
Dentos Staff '39-'40 
Class President '40-'41 
Delta Sigma Delta 
Army Dental Reserve 

WILLIAM A. GEORGE, B.S. 

Brockton, Massachusetts 

Brockton High School 

Boston College 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Loyola University 

Class Vice-President '39-'40 

Co-editor of Dentos '42-'43 

Dentos Staff '39-'40, '41 -'42, '42-'43 

Student Instructor in Bio-Chemistry '41- 

'42 
Student Instructor in Human Anatomy 

'42-'43 
Co-Chairman of Junior Senior Prom 

'41-'42 
University Senior Ball Committee '42- 

'43 
Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 
Alpha Sigma Nu Honorary Fraternity 
Loyola Union Honorary Key 
Delta Sigma Delta 
Naval Medical Reserve 



THOMAS C. GILLIS, B.A. 

Bradalbame, P.E. Island 
Mount Allison Academy 
Mount Allison University 
Student Instructor in Histology, '42-'43 
Xi Psi Phi 
Army Dental Reserve 

EDWARD G. GRIFFIN 

Chicago, Illinois 
Loyola Academy 
Loyola University 
Class President '39-'40 
Delta Sigma Delta 
Naval Medical Reserve 

ARTHUR H. GRUNT 

Melrose Park, Illinois 
Proviso Township High School 
Loyola University 

Co-Business Manager of Dentos '42-'43 
Army Dental Reserve 

JOSEPH F. HAJDYS 

Chicago, Illinois 
Holy Trinity High School 
Wilson Junior College 
Loyola University 
Army Dental Reserve 

RALPH A. HALL 
Oak Park, Illinois 

Arsenal Technical High School 
Loyola University 
Dentos Staff '42-'43 
Delta Sigma Delta 
Army Dental Reserve 

CARLIN K. HAYES 

Sagola, Michigan 

Channing High School 
Northwestern University 
Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 
Student Instructor in Human Anatomy 

'42-'43 
Dentos Staff '42-'43 
Army Dental Reserve 

TRAVERS R. HAMILTON 

Highland Park, Illinois 

Deerfield-Shields High School 
Northwestern University 
Class Treasurer '41-42 
Delta Sigma Delta 
Naval Medical Reserve 

VICTOR E. HERSHMAN 
Chicago, Illinois 

Austin High School 

University of Chicago 

Junior Senior Prom Committee '41-42 

Class Secretary '42-'43 

Army Dental Reserve 



LESTER L. JANES 
Chicago, Illinois 

Tilden Technical High School 
Wilson Junior College 
Northwestern University 
Army Dental Reserve 

DAVID A. KAYE 

Brooklyn, New York 

S. J. Tilden High School 
New York University 
Dance Committee '41-'42 
Alpha Omega 
Army Dental Reserve 

AUGUST C. KING 

Chicago, Illinois 

Elgin Academy 
Loycla University 
Phi Omega 
Army Dental Reserve 

MATTHEW P. KLORIS 

Chicago, Illinois 
Tilden Technical High School 
University of Illinois 
Central Y. M. C A. College 
Sergeant-of-Arms '41-'42 
Army Dental Reserve 

LEONARD M. KRASKE 

Chicago, Illinois 
St. Mel High School 
Wright Junior College 
Dentos Staff '42-'43 
Delta Sigma Delta 
Naval Medical Reserve 

ROBERT J. LAGORIO 

Chicago, Illinois 

Austin High School 
Class Secretary '41 -'42 
Dentos Staff '42-'43 
Delta Sigma Delta 
Naval Medical Reserve 

HENRY R. LETERNO 

Blue Island, Illinois 

Loyola University 
Sergeant of Arms '42-'43 
Army Dental Reserve 

MARVIN B. LEWISON 

Chicago, Illinois 

Austin High School 

Herzl Junior College 

Student Assistant in Radiology 

'42-'43 
Army Dental Reserve 



THADDEUS A. 

MALACHOWSKI 

Chicago, Illinois 
Carl Schurz High School 
Loyola University 
Dentos Staff '42-'43 
Army Dental Reserve 

RAYMOND MARCUS 

Chicago, Illinois 

Hirsch High School 
Wilson Junior College 
Lewis Institute 
Student Instructor in Ceramics 

'42-'43 
Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 
Naval Medical Reserve 

BRUNO J. MARRESSA 

Newark, New York 

Newark High School 
St. Michael's College 
University of Toronot 
Xi Psi Phi 
Army Dental Reserve 

HAROLD J. McGRANE 

Chicago, Illinois 
Lane Technical High School 
Loyola University 
Psi Omega 
Naval Medical Reserve 

THEODORE A. MELCAREK 

Chicago, Illinois 

Lindbloom High School 
Wilson Junior College 
X, Psi Phi 
Army Dental Reserve 

RICHARD A. METZGAR 

Chicago, Illinois 
St. Bede Academy 
Holy Cross College 
Class President '41-'42 
Xi Psi Phi 
Army Dental Reserve 

ARTHUR F. MONTOURI,B.S. 

Brooklyn, New York 
Boy's High School 
St. John's University 
Xi Psi Phi 
Army Dental Reserve 

CHARLES NOVICH 

Yonkers, New York 

Yonkers High School 
Kansas State College 
Army Dental Reserve 



FRANK V. OLIVER 

Chicago, Illinois 

Waller High School 
Loyola University 
Delta Sigma Delta 
Naval Medical Reserve 

RALPH J. PAGANO 

River Forest, Illinois 
Oak Park and River Forest High School 
Loyola University 
Co-Chairman of Dance Committee '42- 

"43 
Chairman of Dance Committee 41 -'42 
Delta Sigma Delta 
Army Dental Reserve 

AURELIUS J. PAGANO 

River Forest, Illinois 
Oak Park and River Forest High School 
Loyola University 
Co-Chairman of Dance Committee '42- 

'43 
Delta Sigma Delta 
Army Dental Reserve 

ROMEO A. PALLOTTO 

Chicago, Illinois 
Morgan Park Military Academy 
Loyola University 
Class Treasurer '39-40 
Army Dental Reserve 

ALBERT M. PETRIZZI 

New York, New York 
Naval Medical Reserve 

EDWARD F. PIECH 

Chicago, Illinois 

St. Rita High School 
University of Chicago 
Dentos Staff '42-'43 
Army Dental Reserve 

LON V. PORTER, B.A. 

Chicago, Illinois 
Englewood High School 
University of Illinois 
Bur Class Editor 

Student Instructor in Ceramics '42-43 
Co-Business Manager of Dentos '42-43 
Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 
Alpha Sigma Nu Honorary Fraternity 
Delta Sigma Delta 
Army Dental Reserve 

ANDREW J. POTEMPA 
Chicago, Illinois 

Harrison High School 
Loyola University 
Delta Sigma Delta 
Army Dental Reserve 



JOSEPH A. PROPATI 

Chicago, Illinois 
Fenger High School 
Wilson Junior College 
Lewis Institute 

Student Instructor in Anatomy '42-'43 
Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 
Delta Sigma Delta 
Army Dental Reserve 

JOHN F. PURCELL 

Chicago, Illinois 
De Paul Academy 
Loyola University 
Class Treasurer 42-'43 
Army Dental Reserve 

EUGENE S. PUSKIEWICZ 

Chicago, Illinois 
Mt. Carmel High School 
St. Mary's College, Minn. 
Loyola University 
Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 
Naval Medical Reserve 



WALTER J. REAM 

Peru, Illinois 

LaSalle Peru Township High School 

University of Illinois 

Xi Psi Phi 

Naval Medical Reserve 



MICHAEL A. RITZA 

Chicago, Illinois 
De LaSalle High School 
St. Mary's College, Minn. 
Class Sergeant of Arms 39-'40 
Co-Chairman of Dance Committee 

'41- '42 
Dentos Staff '42-'43 
Blue Key Honorary Fraternity 
Naval Medical Reserve 

WALTER H. SIR 

Chicago, Illinois 
Carl Schurz High School 
University of Illinois 
Lewis Institute 
Dentos Staff '42-'43 
Delta Sigma Delta 
Army Dental Reserve 

ARTHUR W. STURM 

Beaver Dam, Wisconsin 

Pio Nono Academy 

St. Mary's College, Minn. 

Dentos Staff '42-'43 

Xi Psi Phi 

Army Dental Reserve 



JACK A. TATELMAN 

Chicago, Illinois 
Harrison Technical High School 
Crane Junior College 
Army Dental Reserve 

JOSEPH T. TRAMPOTA 

Chicago, Illinois 
Sg. Pracopius High School 
St. Pracopius College 
Army Dental Reserve 

GEORGE W. WALKER 

Monroe, Wisconsin 

Monroe High School 
University of Wisconsin 
Xi Psi Ph, 
Naval Medical Reserve 

ROMAN J. WALLEY 

Grand Haven, Michigan 
Grand Haven High School 
Muskegan Junior College 
X, Psi Phi 
Army Dental Reserve 

LLOYD R. WALTY 

Springfield, Illinois 

Springfield High School 
Springfield Junior College 
Delta Sigma Delta 
Army Dental Reserve 

GERALD ASTE SALAZAR, 
CD. 

Lima, Peru, So. America 

St. Joseph School 
National University of St. 

Mareus Den- tal-Medical 
Associate Member of the 

Academoy Stomatology of 

Lima 



WILLIAM H. SOWLE 

Rockford, Illinois 
Rockford Senior High School 
University of Illinois 
Lewis Institute 
Dentos Staff, '42-'43 
Delta Sigma Delta 
Army Dental Reserve 

JOHN E. JANKUS 
Chicago, Illinois 

Tilden Tech. High School 
Wilson Junior College 
Northwestern University 
Army Medical Reserve 






SKETCHES 



GEORGE ALLES: 

Is one man the Greeks didn't have a word for. 
He is so unique he defies all classification. 

JOSE ALMAGUER: 

Has finally decided to bury the axe with Pusky — 
in Gene's head. 

ROMEO ARRA: 

Has decided, under pressure, to sell Kloris his 
secret on what makes gold foil stick in proximal 

fillings. 

MYRON ATAMAN: 

That shy demure lad, has proven to be the 
downfall of Griffin. 

NORMAN BALIN: 

Has been requested by his block captain to 
remain indoors during blackouts because only 
the warden is allowed to carry a lit flashlight 
then. 

HOWARD BERG: 

We wonder how much this lad could really eat 
if given full sway in Dudley's. 

GILBERT BLAHNIK: 

Says milking those Wisconsin cows has made his 
wrists so strong that he doesn't need an auto- 
matic plugger to condense his foil — always 
with the hands. 

THOMAS BOYD: 

Our bearded wonder tells us that after grad- 
uation he is due for a valve grind and a release 
from that pallid look. 



/ let's rotate the* — i 

^CUSPID, SHALL W£r»| 




KloRIS' SECRET AMBITION / 



for th 



e so many 



ELDEN BUECHE: 

Is advocating higher arm rests in the small am- 
phitheater chairs. Reason: just to prevent his 
head from dropping between his knees while 
sleeping in lectures. 

GORDON BURNS: 

Certainly has a trusting wife, he does her dental 
work you know. 

ALAN CASS: 

His nocturnal extra-curricular activities have 
earned him quite the nickname — what is it 
they call you Al? 

PETER COOPER: 

Hates to think of the rubber shortage. Here s 
one boy who really loves to give those proximals 
a vicious go. 

MICHAEL DePALMA: 

Has decided to incorporate with En right on a 
fig factory. Their doing it will keep them oc- 
cupied if there should ever be a let-down in 
dentistry. 

JOHN DOMEIKIS: 

Our friend Chauncey has auite a job keeping 
Matthew P. from taking on the whole school. 

JULIUS DZIUBAK: 

Makes such good contrast 
rowdy lads in the class. 

EARL ENRIGHT: 

Pride and joy of the Crown and Bridge, will 
greet you anytime with a ' heeba haba . 

WALLACE FINCH: 

Wonder if this kid ever eats meat. His mild 
manner leads us to believe that he s a vege- 
tarian, but the Michigan boys tells us otherwise. 

SIDNEY FISHMAN: 

Has two reasons for getting to school so 
late — his wife and Junior. 

MATT FRANEY: 

Just rejected an offer from the Army for his 
"heap". Seems as though they wanted to junk 
it and bolster civilian morale. 

JOHN FRASCO: 

That double dynamo, keeps his patients guess- 
ing by day and the trucks rolling at night. 

TED GASIOR: 

Always ready to pat you on the back and find 
a soft spot to touch you for some favor. His 
political abilities far overshadow his attempts 
to assume another role. Definitely the fatherly 
type. 

BILL GEORGE: 

Knows all about anatomy and claims he just 
can't figure out what makes Jankus go. 



40 



TOM GILLIS: 

His perplexed look leaves you in an even 
more perplexed state when you ask for an 
explanation of it — he just doesn t know. 

ED GRIFFIN: 

Our lad from the north side is quite the enter- 
tainer when he once enters the spirit of the 
occasion. 

ART GRUNT: 

Is so happy now that his sister has joined the 
WAACS. Now he can use her snood and hair 
set for that crop he nurses. 

JOE HAJDYS: 

That delicate creature keeps us all so gay when 
he just floats past us on the clinic floor with the 
cheeriest, "Hi ya, kid? 

RALPH HALL: 

Definitely the silent type, nobody knows a thing 
about — he just won t talk. 

TRAVER HAMILTON: 

All predict a great career for him — this kid s 
got experience. 

CAL HAYES: 

Wonder if Dr. DeWitt will accept root fillings 
done on cadavers. 

VIC HERSHMAN: 

Is always tired; nearly threatened to quit school 
when the spring term started because not hav- 
ing these morning classes made him miss too 
much sleep. 

LES JANES: 

Is firmly convinced that the dentist's future is only 
one of darkness. Of course, he is being in- 
fluenced by Jankus who has the whole setup 
of the world figured out. 

DAVE KAYE: 

Forsook the trombone for the drill and is now 
casting a longing glance back towards the horn. 

CHARLIE KING: 

Holds the life of his friends in his hands just 
as scon as they step into his car. 

MATT KLORIS: 

The srrcoth, cultivated gentleman who makes 
known his intentions to specialize in Children s 
dentistry. He likes them so much — to eat. Has 
been voted the best dressed man in his class — 
but then, he's in a class by himself. 

LEONARD KRASKE: 

Is consistently on the go in keeping Bob Lagorio 
out of those many eternal triangles he gets him- 
self mixed up in. 

BOB LAGORIO: 

Jankus claims Bob has the pick of the examina- 
tion room, judging by his clientele. 



TMCV CAN T DO THIS jl 
TO OS DWIGHT, PoU/\ 



\Cofree, 

MOST H/ 




we 

have 



bcs4 



Dudley's: 2PM curfew > 



HENRY LETURNO: 

Is a little worried about whether or not people 
will forget his barbering abilities when they 
someday enter his office. He plans on giving 
an amalgam and shave at ethical rates if they 
refuse to adjust themselves to the change. 

MARV LEWISON: 

A gunner in the flesh, is worried about where 
he will get the facings if he ever loses those 
anteriors of his — big, aren't they? 

TED MALACHOWSKI: 

Claimed he was going blind the other day 
until Piech reached over and pulled Mai's hair 
away from his eyes. 

RAY MARCUS: 

Drives Ralph Pagano mad with his hot licks From 
the latest jive joints. 

BRUNO MARESSA: 

Hear he has installed a signal alarm system in 
his lab locker to help trap the culprits who took 
his wax apatula he borrowed from Pallotto 
last year. 

HAROLD McGRANE: 

Was insulted last week when he went down to 
become a blood donor. It seems as though they 
strapped him down to a table before he could 
say a word, gave him two pints of blood and 
then whisked him away to the County Hospital. 

TED MELCAREK: 

Claims Les Janes didn't know how to live until 
he took him in hand and showed him the ropes. 
Unfortunately their attack on life was abruptly 
ended when they were both given a glance 
of the rope. 



RICHARD METZGAR: 

Is -working himself up into a Fever at the pros- 
pects of what June will bring: Graduation? 
Wrong! The prospect of becoming a father. 

ART MONTOURI: 

Has finally learned to speak the English lan- 
guage without the Brooklyn accent. He speaks 
it so well that even Dr. Orban can understand 

him. 

CHARLIE NOVICH: 

Has just refused a Hollywood offer which his 
unique profile earned him. He claims his heart 
is wrapped up in dentistry and he just couldn't 
leave. 

FRANK OLIVER: 

The boy whose character is as dark as his com- 
plexion has been given up as a lost cause by 
the Pagano boys, who relinquished all claims 
to him. 

AURELIUS PAGANO: 

Just sits and giggles at Kloris. He drives poor 
Gert, Dudley's assistant, to tears with his sharp 
remarks. 

RALPH PAGANO: 

That might mite of dentistry is the only man in 
the school who can take a flying leap from the 
second elevation of the large amphitheater, 
practically tear Dr. Vlk's arm out to break his 
speed and get away with it. 

ROMEO PALLOTTO: 



Is the bane of 
Irondale. 

AL PETRIZZI: 



Pusky's life and the rage of 



Is still bending every effort to convince Ed 
Piech his own philosophy is the only one. 



GOWN SIZES: 36 




R. PAGANO 



NOVICH 



LON PORTER: 

Just ask him what he got for his birthday and 
then defy him to deny it. 

ANDY POTEMPA: 

Has finally completed his thesis on the ' Tird 
Molar" which he will read in the basement 
just after Julius closes his speech on advertising. 

JOE PROPATI: 

Is wondering what Way Marcus's secret with 
the women is, but as yet, is still wondering. 

JOHN PURCELL: 

Has hired a host of bodyguards to protect him 
from the irate members of the South side, upon 
which he cast so many aspersions. 

GENE PUSZKIEWICZ: 

The Polish Petunia is still trying to flat that 
lateral to where it should be. 

WALTER REAM: 

Is bemoaning the fact that his wings were 
clipped when the government placed restric- 
tions on civilian junior birdmen. 

MICHAEL RITZA: 

Gasps in amazement when he tries to figure out 
where Dr. Glupker gets all that confidential 
information. 

WALTER SIR: 

The only man living who is equipped with cross 
bite anteriors by Mother Nature. 

BILL SOWLE: 

Has finally consented to will that sharp herring- 
bone sport jacket to Ritza when they graduate. 
Wonder what his brother will say'? 

ART STURM: 

Just keeps rolling along. 

JACK TATLEMAN: 

Has acquired the nickname Murphy over the 
loud protests of Griffin, Enright, and Franey. 
Now who could have called him that? 

JOE TRAMPOTA: 

Plans on locating close to Kloris in practice — 
claims he'll make a million on Matt's ex-patients. 

GEORGE WALKER: 

Our fair-haired boy from Wisconsin; snores too 
loud during lectures. 

LLOYD WALTY: 

Our dream boy claims that the trouble with 
the world today is that everyone is always in 
such a rush. 

ROMAN WALLEY: 

Wonders how long Enright and DePalma will 
last when they ration the fig. 

JERRY ASTE-SALAZAR: 

His English vocabulary is limited but by all 
means very effective. 

ED PIECH: 

Just wonders if Petrizzi is right. 



42 



Best borrower — George Alles. 

Best non-returner — Ditto. 

Best snoozer — Julius Dziubak. 

Proudest papa — Sid Fishman. 

Best instigator — Earl Enright. 

Best exponent of boogie woogie — Ralph Pagano. 

Best lab man — John Domeikis. 

MOSTS 

Most proboscis — John Frasco. 

Most elusive — Tom Boyd. 

Most worried (with least to worry about) — Joe 

Hajdys. 
Most garrulous — Ted Gasior. 
Most "experience" — Traver Hamilton. 
Most comfortable in the lecture room — Bruno 

Maressa. 
Most unconcerned in the lecture room — Gil Blah- 

nik. 




THE 61G THREE- MCLCftREK , KHMO 
ANO METZG/VR 



CAUGHT WITH MY BRIDGES DOWN 



IMMORTAL UTTERANCES BY SENIORS 

Whole class — Hamilton s got experience." 
Whole class — "Ssssssss-sssssss-ssssss." (Ask Ewart). 
Sid Fishman — "Hallelujah." 
Mike Ritza— "Kloris." 
John Jankus — I m a genius." 
Mike DePalma — "Always." 
Matt Franey — What's your name?" 
Jack Tatleman — I'm being jagged." 
Tom Gillis — "Well, er, ah, we— II." 
Matt Kloris — 'Do you want to be ionized?" 
Joe Porpati — Do you want to see a good inlay < 
Lon Porter- 
verbatim. 



Do you want to see a good ml 
If I remember correctly, I know it 



Hm-M-N>-i"»-«i-~ .1 

KSgKwtce YCS/j 




I constructed a bridge a few weeks back 

And polished it so fine 
It sparkled like a precious jewel 

This wondrous work of mine. 

The abutments were the finest 

The pontics were sublime. 
The anatomy was perfect 

Like a newly minted dime. 

Here's a bridge thats destined to be 

The best of all creation. 
"The fit is perfect," I exclaimed 

In tones of great elation. 

"The bridge is fine," the prof replied 

With a twinkle in his eye, 
"But check the occlusion and you II find 

The bridge is much too high. 

The color drained from off my face, 

My legs beneath me sagged 
I uttered the famous epitaph 

Ye gcds, I m being jagged. 

I ground that bridge, that helpless bridge, 

I really went to town. 
And ended the procedure 

With a hole right thru the crown. 

I repaired that bridge, that doggoned bridge 

Like a poor demented man, 
Now I ne'er polish a bridge 

As highly as I can. 



V*eSTHETtC SOLtTt 
vAiHAT'S THAT 



J WH COS'S THftT 



.touch , 




ens oi wisdom 



Not to be outdone by either the Literary Digest magazine or Gallop polls, the Dentos this year sent out 
reporters to find out if the student body had really learned anything of value thus far in their various courses. 
For the benefit of future classes here are a few of the suggestions offered: 



You can save wear and tear on your under- 
shirt if you remove it before donning your clinical 
gown. 

(WallySir) 

You can keep your disappearing plaster from 
disappearing if you have someone watch it for 
you when you leave the laboratory. 

(Lloyd Walty) 

"A good stiff mix of plaster can be made by 
mixing a little alcohol with the water before in- 
corporating. Your case will then be well plas- 
tered." 

(Elden Bueche) 

"If tor any reason you find that you cannot get 
into your locker, have Ewart remove the top shelf." 

(Mike Ritza) 

"If one of your gangrenous root fillings threatens 
to blow up it is probably caused by some foreign 
agent germanating there. Call the F. B. I." 

(Mike DePalma) 

"After inserting your silicates always have the 
patient pass the tongue over the restorations. If 
they remain in place you have done your work 
well." 

(Tom Gillis) 

"If you spill phenol over your patient's lower 
lip always excuse yourself by saying, Pardon me, 
but I think I spilled phenol on you lip." 

(Gil Blahnik) 

If you carry a small fire extinguisher in your 
pocket you will find it valuable in case your gown 
catches fire." 

(Royal Stern) 

"If you are doing laboratory work while seated 
and desire to stand for a few moments, always 
look behind you before reseating yourself. Your 
chair may have migrated to the other end of the 
laboratory." 

(Joe Propati) 



If you are running up an impression always 
wear tennis shoes. This prevents laceration from 
sharp cusps etc. 

(Ted Melcarek) 

If you are adapting an inlay and your patient 
throws a fit, always ascertain if it is a good fit. 
Good fits are difficult in this department." 

(Tony Williams) 

"If you can secure a good model ask her for her 
telephone number. If she gives it to you you have 
made a good impression." 

(Alan Cass) 

If you are not able to diagnose a possible 
case of Vincent's have the patient say AH . . 
Place this in a sterile test tube and give it to Dr. 
Weinmann for examination. 

(Frank Oliver) 

"If you feel that you are not getting enough 
points for your inlays, don t fret or blame your 
technique. It probably has something to do with 
point rationing." 

(Matt Franey) 

"There are two methods of impression taking 
for full denture — the open and the closed mouth 
technique. The first is the more democratic,- the 
second is almost exclusively in Nazi Germany. 

(Dr. G ) 

"If you are over at the County Hospital watch- 
ing one of the trained nurses do some tricks, ask 
her if she has been nursing any good grudges 
lately. She will probably think you are pulling 
her leg, but it's possibly only a tight garter." 

(Balm) 



All women are untrustworthy. 



(Earl Enright) 



"A little whiting rubbed into the spots on a 
clinical gown will make it last another day." 

(Kloris) 



45 





^3 

McGrane.- record holder for inserting 

AMftLCAW AT to FEET - WtTH AN OUTWARP CURVE 



k 



At?tf, GERALO WE'LL 
/GET INTO THE CM MR 
/ WON'T WE P HEH, HEM / 




TASIORI- US INC A LITTLE 
CHILD PSYCHOLOGY 

fr 





Editors note: by their torsos ye 
shall know them-propati one 
circle , leturno two / 



Maressa runs his own 
interference to the la© 



HMD ED IN lit CHHRI I 



A PLAY IN THREE ACTS 
SCENE: The Chart Room 

ACT I 

A Slight Case of Murder 

Time is just before noon one Monday during 
the middle of last week as one of the students, 
whom we shall call Mr. "X", saunters up to 
the Chart Room window and clears his throat. 

Mr. X. "May I have Mr. Wagbottom please'? 
He's in my files." 

Mrs. Fisher:" I'm sorry but that patient is not 
in your files. 

Mr. X. "Well try in today's files. Maybe I did 
make that appointment after all." 

Mrs. Fisher: "I wish you boys would remember 
where you put your patients! 

Mr. X. "Well then try looking in the patient's 
files." (After a lapse of about one minute a 
blood curdling scream is heard.) 

Mr. X. "Did that scream come from you 
Mrs. Fisher'? Don't tell me ... no it's too 
gruesome!" 

Dr. Pen. "What's all the yelling about?" 

Mrs. Fisher: "I just found Mr. "X's" patient 
crammed between the wigs and the wags." 

Dr. Pen. "Call the police immediately! The 
patient probably suffocated there. There's very 
little ventilation in those drawers." 

ACT II 

THE NAKED TRUTH 

ENTER TWO DETECTIVES FROM THE 

CHICAGO POLICE FARCE. 

1st detective: "What's that clutched in the 
patient's hand?" 

2nd. Detective: Looks like a copy of last 
year's Dentos!" 

1st. Detective: "Who discovered the bodv?" 

Mr. X. "What.body?" 

1st. Detective: "Why the dead body of course!" 

Mr. X. "Oh! that body!" 

1st Detective: "Just where were you Mr. X. 
when the bcdy was discovered?" 

Mr. X. "I was asking for Mr. Wagbottom in 
my files." 

1st Detective: "What time was this?" 

Mr. X. "It was just twelve noon." 

1st Detective: "How did you know the exact 
time?" 

Mr. X. "I heard the clock on the second 
floor strike twelve." 

Ast Detective: "A likely story!" 

2nd Detective: (turning suddenly and firing 
his question point blank.) "Suppose you tell us 
Mr. X. . . . what is centric relation?" 



Mr. X. "Centric relation is that relation of the 
mandible to the maxilla in which the condyles 
of the mandible are in their most retruded 
position in the glenoid fossae from which all 
masticatory movements emanate." 

1st Detective: He forgot' at a given degree 
of jaw separation 

2nd Detective: "Just so! You're obviously 
trying to hide something, Mr. X. What's that 
you are trying to conceal behind the lobe of 
your right ear?" 

Mr. X. "Just the patient's chart, sir." 

1st Detective. "Suppose we just relieve you 
of that and retire to the examination room for 
further examination of that chart." (The corpse 
suddenly rises on one knee, adjusts his tie and 
again pages through last year's Dentos. After 
reading several pages Rigor Mortis comesin 
with a bottle of bourbon. The corpse becomes 
quite stiff.) 



ENTER DETECTIVES WITH MR. X. 

1st Detective: "You say you examined thebcbv. 

Mr. X., How about this pernicious anemia 
you've recorded here?" 

Mr. X. "The patient was taken to County 
Hospital. The case proved so pernicious that 
even the bravest doctor feared to take a blood 
sample. One of the internes was attacked by 
several red corpuscles. They said it was the 
most pernicious case they had ever seen!" 

1st Detective. "You say they were red 
corpuscles? You informed the F.B.I, of course?" 

Mr. X. "Yes but when they arrived the 
patient began to belittle himself. He had to 
be placed on a stretcher! They said the man 
was a British subject." 

1st Detective: "How did they airive at that 
conclusion? 

Mr. X. "His blood agglutinated instead of 
just clotting! He also was collecting money 
to buy portfolios for those Cabinet ministers 
without portfolios.' 

2nd Detective: (picking up last year's Dentos) 
I think I've found a clue. 

1st Detective: Ods bodkins man, you're 
right. I believe we've solved the case." 

2nd Detective: "Egads! You aren't suggesting 
that ..." 

1st Detective: (After reading the annual) 
Yes I think we've solved the case. Strangest 
case I ve ever seen . . . !! the man was ob- 
viously bored to death!!" 



47 



JUNIORS 



This class plundered into its junior year immediately upon the 
completion of its second. The traditional routine of each junior 
student assisting a senior for a week in the infirmary was duly 
accomplished. Then into the examination room went each student 
and there made his timid request for new patients. 

The frightful shock to these men will long be remembered after 
rhey had completed their first prophylaxis successfully. From this 
day on a keen state of competition existed between the members 
of this class in a vain attempt to secure first, the required clinical 
credits for the year. Many became disillusioned because of the 
scarcity of patients and the unexpected disappointments by their 
respective clientele. 

The adjustment to the eight o clock classes by these juniors 
became very difficult and discouraged many. Ceramics and all other 
courses left the students in a state of mental progression. Many 
problems confronted in the clinic were gradually answered by the 
lectures dictated in these various courses. 

As the year progressed, class election of officers was held and 
from this, a colorful dance evolved. 



OFFICERS 

Hugo P. Chott President 

Zenon J. Krol Vice-President 

Edward B. Graves Secretary 

Alphonse F. Cholko Treasurer 




Left to right, Back row: Edward B. Graves, Alphonse F. Cholko. 
Front row: Zenon J. Krol, Hugo P. Chott. 



4X 



U L 



in ir 'u 




Dr. Vlk, "Gentilly, what would you do if a 
patient stepped into your office and his x-rays 
showed undeveloped wrist bones?" 

Gentilly, "I would send the patient to you 
and let you do the worrying. 



Krol, "Wh 



ere are you going 



?" 



Hurning, "Downstairs to the prosthetic de- 
partment and spend the next hour outthinking 
Dr. Glupker." 

Krol, "No fooling, do you really do that?" 
Hurning, "Sure, everyday between twelve 
and one o'clock." 



Teeling, "Using denture powder doesn't 
prevent my patient's lower denture from 
floating." 

Dr. Wykhius, "See Dr. Glupker and have him 
explain the washer and rubber band technique." 

Stern, "Will you check my wax pattern?" 
Dr. Willman (after examining mouth) "Well, 

ah — just where is the pattern. I see wax all 

over the teeth but nothing resembling a wax 

pattern." 

Stern, "But Doctor, I called Avery over a 

minute ago and he thought it was a fine one. 



49 



Allegretti, Leonard N. 
Avery, Robert D. 
Black, Harold A. 
Brandt, Clarence A. 



Chott, Hugo P. 
Conglis, Peter C. 

Connors, William J. 
Corrigan, John C. 



Dunn, David 

Dziubski, Raymond E. 
Fey, Richard W. 

Friedman, William W. 



Gillotte, Aldo E. 
Guidice, George J. 
Graves, Edward B. 
Greco, Eugene C. 



Hurning, James H. 
Jurewicz, Felix J. 
Justen, Bernard P. 
Kawka, Thomas 



Kowalski, Leonard F. 
Kraay, Wesley 
Krol, Zenon J. 



mm rr*r!- £»*4 w*l 




i. 



5*, ■■*?,»■■■ .£* 




":;**?' *■*••'•*§ •-*««? '"*-"** 

f\ A ^ A 

, m* ^' a ** e | «*rf«f< Itl^T 

tt ^ o tt 

ff* 'H4 J^ 





_, 



T 



e conscious 



t hat 



you are, igno 




O ,D. D Q 

o. in o. 

f?5 ^ fi o 




«* I*- I 








McNeil, Warren W. 
Meisel, Raymond R. 
Liebowitz, Hyman 
Limke, Louis H. 



Piotrowski, Leon 

Radochonski, Stephen P. 
Rimkus, Edward R. 
Risk in , Abraham 



Schroeder, Edward W. 
Sentiere, Evo J. 

Shaewitz, Irving J. 
Shaheen, Edward J. 



Smith, William 
Sousa, Louis, J . 

Stacknik, Stanley J. 
Stephen, William J 



Sullivan, John E. 
Teeling, Sherman J. 
Tesone, Ezio N. 
Tikusis, Stanley R. 



Viglione, Ralph 

Waldman, Albert G. 
Williams, Anthony J. 



int is a great step to knowledge 



(DISRAELI) 









Bielinski, Chester 






Bierma, Warren G. 
Binderman, Bennie 


ia 


> j&*£ 




Brezezinski, 1. Frank 




© ^ 




Carelli, Edward J. 

Cholko, Alphonse F. 


ilk 






DeLap, Kenneth C. 


Oi 






Diamond, Henry R. 
Doyle, Edward L. 




tffciHi 




Gelfond, Sam Z. 


ff?Wk 


ft © 




Gentilly, James M 
Gierz, Alfred A. 


AM 


AiM* 




Gresik, Bernard A. 


X^J 






Hazlet, John W. 
Hulett, Robert L. 


L* 


iii.fi* 




King, Elbert W. 




£\ o 




Kinney 

Klow, Milton 


AiJl 


liAfiil 




Krolik,PaulP. 


ffl 


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Landes, Isaac J. 


ii* 


ra 




A good 


nam 


e is rat 


i e r t 




Larson, Jack L. 
Leavitt, Jujius M. 
Levy, Virgil L. 



Lipinski , Roman J. 
Matera, Charles R. 
Matousek, Edward J. 



Missak, Walter G. 
Murphy, William J. 
Nyboer, Andrew G. 



Schaffner, Sanford 
Schluchter, Roy T. 
Schlueter, Reinhold 



Sherrard, Ben G. 
Shotton, John R. 
Sisson, William J. 



Stern, Royal L. 
Straka, Francis J. 
Suffka, Edward T. 



Treiber, Marven 
Uczen, Bruno F. 



e chosen than 



r e a t riches. 

(PROV. XX 12) 



SBPHOHIHES 



OFFICERS 

Robert H. Black President 

John E. Boles Vice-President 

Errington E. Pitzer Secretary 

George B. Petty Treasurer 

John F. O'Malley . Sergeant-at- 
Arms 



This class slightly fatigued by an unsegmented twelve month class 
schedule continued onward from their freshmen year with much 
determination. The term Bridge no longer meant an under pass, 
nor did a Shell Crown mean a crown made of sea shells. The 
Crown and Bridge course was completed in a shorter period of 
time but the contents teing the same as previous years. With the 
completion of this course came that of Prosthesis by Dr. Glupker, 
a teacher all students know. It was a disheartening act to break 
the freshmen constructed dentures for the sake of science but the 
knowledge accumulated in repairing these justified the motive. 
Then into the realm of Orthodontia the class passed only to learn 
that soldering was an easy procedure. 

Finally the eventful day arrived, the course in Operative Dentis- 
try. This meant each student would have his new case of instru- 
ments and on it his name inscribed. This was an indication of 
progress toward the clinic. The Operative course was full of 
amazements and Mr. Rubbercheek Dentec was pitifully abused. 
All looked forward to the final day when the tan gowns would 
be supplanted by the white ones, an indication that they would 
be juniors. 




Left to right, Back row: George B. Petty, Errington E. Pitzer. 
Front row: Robert H. Black, John E. Boles. 



54 



GLASS IF '45 




Montouri, (from Brooklyn) "Look at the boid!" 
Kaye (from Brooklyn) "That's not a boid, 
it's a bird." 

Montouri, "Gee, it's got wings like a boid." 

Dr. Qrgan, (in review class) "What is 
mottled enamel?" 

Gasior answers in a lengthy discussion as 
it were for state board exams. 

Dr. Orban, "Very good — same stupid defini- 



tion you gave in your junior year. 

Dr. Kendall, "What is osculation?" 
Propati, "Smooching. 

Dr. Puterbaugh, "What are the contrain- 
dications for anesthesia?" 

Finch, "A certain stage in pregnancy. 

Dr. Puterbaugh, "That's funny I thought they 
were all certain." 



SS 



Boles, John E. 

Bosqck, S. Richard 

Bielinski, Raymond R. 
Black, Robert H. 



Bourque, Charles V. 
Brandner, Philip 
D'Andrea, Charles J. 
Fash, Andrew H. 
Feldstein, Louis 



Fuchs, Milton 
Gazarek, Paul F. 
Griffiths, Robert H. 
Handschu, Richard G. 
Hannell, John M. 



Heinz, John A. 
Herman, Samuel S. 
Jankowski, Thaddeus J. 
Jedlowski, Sylvester W. 
Kaufman, Frederic 



Kazubowski, Edward J. 
Kelleher, Andrew J. 
Kiechler, Robert J. 
Knitter, Orville W. 
Konen, Lloyd W. 



Kowalik, Bruno M. 
Laenertz, Ernest J. 
Lancaster, William H. 
Lucas, Lawrence E. 
McAuliffe, Thomas J. 



■f is* «?' \j^ «*. * '.5, «s |f * ^ -*■■ ,; 





.a a. a n o> 





o m$ Oi 




Bett 



e r 



now 



o t h 



n 9 



t h a 



56 





OOQfifl 






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McDonald, Alonzo B. 
Misera 
Mistretta, Dominic 
Negrevski, John A. 



Newman, Roy L. 
Niblick, Charles W. 
Niedzwiadek, Walter C. 
Northouse, Louis M. 
O Connell, John J. 



O'Malley, John F. 
Oppice, Robert B. 
Panico, Frank A. 
Pawlikowski, Leonard 
Petty, George B. 



Pitzer, Errington E. 
Remijas, Richard J. 
Ridenour, E. Charles 
Rux, Raymond R. 
Sedlacek, James W. 



Siemion, Thaddeus J. 
Smith, Boyce V. 
Sochowski, Richard T. 
Stackler, Harold M 
Suriano, Ralph 



Vegter, J. Robert 
Wawrowski, Henry 
Wright, Warren F. 
Zakula, Michael 
Ziolkowski, Edwin T. 



a I f k n o 



w 



many 



thin 



9 s 



57 



nun 



I he first day of school was a day of commemoration, a day on 
which the members of this class marched down the road toward 
their destiny, dentistry. But this group of men was different than 
others, since the effect of war had changed the usual procedjre 
by which classes were admitted- The first section of the freshman 
class donned their tan gowns on June 29, 1942, and from this 
day on worked unceasingly and without vacations. The summer 
weather and all the temptations of early Fall made the dental 
curriculum less popular. 

On the first part of October of the same year, a new section of 
freshmen was added to the summer group. From this day onward 
an undying rivalry grew between the two groups. The curriculum 
of the latter section was slightly modified so that they could combine 
with the other section in certain courses. 

The year progressed, and friendly acquaintances between class 
members soon grew. Class election of officers took place with 
section A winning by a close margin. With the close of this event 
many problems evolved concerning the annual class dance. It was 
not decided until the latter months of the school year just where 
this social would take place. 

In spite of the amazements, disappointments achievements and 
excitements, the freshmen class continued to trod onward and 
onward to their destiny, dentistry. 



OFFICERS 

Robert H.Levi President 

Lester J. Miller . Vice-President 
Paul E. Van Eenenaam Secretcry 
Andrew P. Tomaras Treasurer 

Joseph T. Tisoncik Sergeant at- 
Arms 




Left to right, Back row: Andrew P. Tomaras, Paul R. Van Eenenaam. 
Front row: Lester J. Miller, Robert H. Levi, Joseph T. Tisoncik. 



58 



U L 



SS II 'II 




Medical Examiner, (during physical exam for 
Army) "Read that chart on the wall!" 

Trapper Cal Hayes, "I'm from Michigan and 
I can't read a word, but get me a 22 gun and 
I'll pick everyone of them fer ye/' 

1st Patient, (leaving the clinic) "I certainly 

outsmarted that doctor." 

2nd Patient, "How do you figure?" 

1st Patient, "The doctor asked me what tooth 

was aching and i told him, 'you've got the 



education I've got the toothache, you find it. 
He pulled every tooth in my mouth but one 
and that son-of-a-gun is still aching." 

Dr. Johnson, "When are bridges contrain- 
dictated?" 

Murphy, "In patients who have not reached 
the age of adultery." 

Dr. Johnson, "First time I realized that sex 
entered into this question." 



59 



Abood, William N. 
Alderman, William A. 
Apter, Stanley 
Block, Louis H. 
Bona, Richard A. 
Bonk, John T, 



Borello, Dominic A. 
Bozovsky, James J. 
Brown, Robert C. 
Cannova, Anthony J. 
Chott, George M. 
Chrobak, Theodore M. 



Davido, Richard 

Demos, Theodore J. 

DeOrio, Clement J. 

DePinto, Joseph L. 

Dolnick, Earl C. 

Ensing, Ernest 



Esser, Joseph W. 
Fahey, Joseph F. 
Fehlman, Richard A. 
Fend, Robert D 
Gewartowski, Henry T. 
Gilbert, George W. 



Gold, Jerome J. 
Gotlib, Samuel 
Greenberg, Raymond 
Greshiw, George S. 
Guziec, Raymond E. 
Haskins, James J. 



Hiatt, William H. 

Kailer, Charles E 

Kaplan, William V. 

Keehn, William H. 

Kranov, Donald S, 

Krause, Arthur M. 



Kusmer, Andrew T. 
London, Charles W. 
Leahigh, Leland J. 
Lebetski, Raymond R. 
Levenson, Lawrence F. 
Levi, Robert H. 






47. ^7 r^i ^3 ^3 ^ - 

Off! CJ *. n 








Ci £> q f 3 ^ 

ftftftfl 





Difficult! 



e s 



a r e 



th 



" 9 





QQo 




i 7> 1 U 

^S ^ f* 1 ! ^S O 








h i c h s h o 



w w 



h a t 



Luckhardt, Leo A. 
Malmberg, Bert T. 
Martin, William B. 
McCormick, Robert E. 
Miller, Lester J. 
Miller, William I. 



Natvig, Paul 
Okmin, Seymour 
Opper, Hylbert N. 
Orth, Michael M. 
Pacocha, Theodore J. 
Paliulis, Peter M. 



Pape, Thomas J. 
Partyka, Stanley L. 
Pelka, Francis X. 
Portman, Seymour 
Rachlin, Frederick P. 
Rak, Michael J. 



Rauen, John H. 
Sabin, George 
Sarley, Erwin 
Scavuzzo, Santo F. 
Schick, Robert E. 
Scofield, Henry H. 



Severnio, Alexander H. 
Sherow, Asher 
Skupien, Norbert R. 
Smith, Edward J. 
Smith, Joseph B. 
Tacticos, Julian G. 



Tendrich, Max I. 
Thodos, Harry R. 
Tisoncik, Joseph T. 
Tomaras, Andrew P. 
Torch, David 
Udkoff, Claude 



Van Eenenaam, Paul R. 
Weinfield, Edwin E. 
Wittke, Harvey A. 

Members of the Freshman 
class not photographed. 

Cerniglia, Ralph R. 

Michels, Frank E. 

Katz, Bernard D. 

Kaufman, Joseph S. 

King, Robert A. 

Krol, Stanley L. 

Rose, Angelo J. 

Schwartz, Arthur 



men are 



61 



. 







s~\ 



n 



u 



n 



to 



It is recognized that in the efforts to secure an education in 
dentistry one often forgets that a social aspect to the development 
of a student is just as essential as the technical procedure taught 
in the classes. To supplant in some measure the lack of campus 
activities are made available each year to the student body. 
Fraternities take the lead in establishing a mutual bond of good 
fellowship among the members by providing each with the oppor- 
tunity to become better acquainted with his fellow student. Each 
class as a unit is a part of this cooperative program. The various 
class dances held each year afford a welcome mental relaxation 
from our clinical and didactic training. 





WILLIAM A. GEORGE 

Co-Editor 



ROMEO R. ARRA 
Co-Editor 



LON V. PORTER 

Co-Business Mgr. 



ARTHUR H. GRUNT 

Co-Business Mgr. 



m 




The Dentos is the dental school's annual and is published by the 
senior class. Its editor and business manager are selected by the 
administrative officers of the institution. 

In this year's volume, the staff has striven with great earnestness 
to place within its covers the memories that will always be cherished. 
The task was immense, the working time very brief, but with the 
collaboration of talented staff members, the goal was accomplished. 
Liberalism and conservatism of many incidents have blended to- 
gether so that in years to come memorable recollections may be 
pleasantly reviewed. 

With a limited budget, the Dentos staff has produced a book 
most modern in conception, in construction and design. To Drs. 
Warren Willman, Robert W. McNulty and all those who have 
contributed their assistance to the success of the book, members 
of the staff express their profound gratitude. 



"Life, misfortunes, isolation, abandoment, poverty, are battlefields 

which have their heros; obscure heroes, sometimes greater than the 

illustrious heros.'' 

Victor Hugo 




ff 



CO-EDITORS 

William A. George 
Romeo R. Arra 



CO-BUSINESS MANAGERS 

Lon V. Porter 
Arthur H. Grant 



FEATURE WRITERS 

William H. Sowle Edward F. Piech 

Carlin K. Hayes Arthur W. Sturm 

Michael A. Ritza Leonard M. Kraske 

CARTOONERS 

Thaddeus A. Malachowski 
Gecrge P. Alles 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 

Robert J. Lagorio 
Julius J. Dziubak 
Joseph A. Propati 




DR. WARREN WILLMAN 
Editorial Advisor 



* 



k 



DR. ROBERT W. McNULTY 
Financial Advisor 







E 101 



The Bur is the official organ of the Alumni Association of the 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery. It is a Irimonthly publication 
whose high standards have been successfully kept by the present 
editor, Dr. Robert W. McNulty. 

It serves as a means of unification of the Alumni Association, the 
faculty, and the student body. Each edition contains valuable 
contributed articles on timely subjects of interest to student and 
alumnus. From the modern research laboratory of The Foundation 
for Dental Research of The Chicago College of Dental Surgery 
have come many findings that enabled dentistry to continue as a 
progressive science. Many of these findings are published in 
the Bur. 

Each issue contains class notes which are, among other things, 
comments on some of the events of classrooms, labs, and students. 
Several interesting articles concerning the Senior Class were very 
well handled by Lon Porter. The Junior Class activities were 
presented in a fine manner by Elbert King. The Sophomores con- 
tributed through Louis Northouse. The Freshman Class editorials 
were written by Leland Leahigh. All of these men are to be 
congratulated for a job well done. 




"Remember this — very little is needed to make a 
happy life." (Marcus Aurelius Antoninus) 



66 



[ IB! 



NF 



The Loyola News is a weekly publication of the University. 
December 15, 1924 marked the birth of this publication. It was 
not until 1928, however, that the News became a university paper. 
The first edition of the News was a single page which has grown 
into tabloid form, inaugurated in 1934, and has been maintained 
with increasing popularity. 

It serves as a medium of association between the various depart- 
ments of the university. Its pages inform the student body of the 
organization, fraternities, athletic teams, professors, and individual 
students. The opportunity to participate in collegiate spirit in 
contrast with the ever present professional attitude is offered 
through its columns. 

Ever since the founding of the Loyola News by a small group of 
liberal arts students among whom was our own Doctor Hillenbrand, 
it has grown to be the most important publication of the university. 
The spirit of the founders is strictly adhered to, so that today the 
News is yet the torch-bearer of Loyola traditions. 

Dr. R. W. McNulty, dental news moderator, approves all material 
from the dental school, which is submitted by Eymard Doyle. 



"Those who wish to appear wise among fools, 
among wise seem foolish." (Quintilian) 







«Sg£1? 



■'e et 



67 



DICES 




During the past year, the number of dances 
sponsored by each class was curtailed due to 
war conditions. However, the few which 
did occur were by all means financially success- 
ful and highly colorful. The senior class held 
its affair at the Shoreland Hotel, with Aurelius 
and Ralph Pagano serving as co-chairmen. The 



Junior class danced at the Lakeshore Athletic 
Club, while the Sophomores at the Skyline 
Club. At the Furniture Club, the freshmen class 
in the latter days of May rallied behind its 
president Robert Levi to conduct successfully 
a memorable affair. 



HE HH 




69 




Sowle, Wish you would look at this prepara- 
tion Doctor, it's just like the book." 

Dr. Willman, 'Mm-mmm-mmm, must be reading 
Colliers again." 

Burns, "Everytime a patient faints in the ex- 
traction room we give him a drink.,' 

Patient, 'I II have a rum and seven up." 



Ritza, "Just finished my Radiology course. I 
can take an x-ray machine apart and put it 
together again. I know every type of film on 
the market today. I know the formula of all 
solutions used in developing etc. etc. 

Marcus, Good, I have a picture here. Is that 
a cyst of the maxillary sinus?" 

Ritz, "Gee whiz, I don't know." 



70 



Bill CHAPTER If 

[ 





Fifty-nine years ago Bet Chapter of Delta Sigma 
Delta was organized, just two years after Delta Sigma 
Delta was founded at the University of Michigan. These 
years have been successful for Beta Chapter. It is still 
a great fraternity at College and has among its alumni 
many of the leaders in the dental profession. The fra- 
ternity has the right to be proud of the type of men taken 
into Beta Chapter, and this past school term has been no 
exception to the rule. It has a treasured past, a proud 
present, and the expectation of a great future. 

The war has naturally cut some of the social functions 
this past year,- therefore, the fraternity has striven for 
quality rather than quantity. Those events which have 
been held have more than made up for the lack in 
number. 

First in the line of events was the formal dinner dance 
given to the "Delt" seniors last June. Beating the Army 
by a nose, they zig-zagged their way into the New 
Horizon Room of the Congress Hotel (now used as a 
classroom for the Army Air Corps) and had a gala time 



OFFICERS 

W. George Grand Master 



L. 


Porter . 


Worthy Master 


R. 


Hulett 


Scribe 


E. 


King 


Treasurer 


E. 


Griffin 


Historian 


R. 


Lagorio 


Senior Page 


B. 


Sherrard 


Junior Page 


J- 


Hines 


Tyler 



^^ f~*\ f*\ 




Atkinson 


Boulger 


Dawson 


DeWitt 


Faillo 


Glupker 


Grisamore 


Hillenbrand 


Holmes 


Johnson 


Kirby 


Larson 


Lindner 


Logan 


McNeil 


McNulty 


Michener 


Mueller 


Puterbaugh 


Roucek 


Schoen 


Svoboda 


Willman 


Wykhius 



MEMBERS 



*** H * 



«. f .* £fc *•' 



O O ft 

r^ r^ o f**. /*\ 










<:■ 7 -~ — 



PC*) f*s C*\ ^ Ph F*- 

D ft O O ft a D ifi 



George 


Porter 


Lagorio 


Griffin 


King 


Hulett 


Sherrard 


Heinz 


Almaguer 


Avery 


Black 


Boles 


Bourque 


Brandt 


Bueche 


Burns 


Cass 


Doyle 


Fey 


Frasco 


Gasior 


Gentilly 


Graves 


Gresick 


Hall 


Hamilton 


Handschu 


Hannel 


Kiechler 


Kowalik 


Kraske 


Laenertz 


McNeil 


Meisel 


Niblick 


Oliver 


A. Pagano 


R. Pagano 


Pawlikowski 


Petty 


Pitzer 


Potempa 


Propati 


Radochonski 


Remijas 


Sedlacek 


Sentiere 


Smith 


Sochowski 


Sowle 


Stacknik 


Suffka 


Sullivan 


Feeling 


Walty 


Williams 



PLEDGES 




bood 


Borello Brown 


Can nova 


Davido 


DeOrio 


Fehlman 


Fend 


Gilbert 


Greshiw 


Guziec 


Hayes Hiatt 


Kailer 


Keehn 


Kranov 


Kusmer 


Leahigh 


Luckhardt 


Malmberg 


Martin 


McCormick Pape 


Pelka 
Shaheen 


Rauen 
E. Smith 


Ritza 
Van- 


Scavuzzo 
Wittke 


Schick 


Scofield 


Severino 



Next on the docket was a dinner and smoker 
at the American Furniture Club. The Freshmen 
were the guests at this smoker, and forty-three of 
the forty-five invited came to enjoy the entertain- 
ment that was to be had. It was there! 
Speeches were numerous, garnished with 
songs by The Three Romeos from the National 
Broadcasting Company, magic a la Binderman, 
and the crooning of Charley Bourque. The 
jive of a three-piece orchestra carried the 
program into the morning hours. 

The informal initiation went off with a 
bang" the Freshmen taking it in the rear. This 
usual frivolous event was followed by the 
formal initiation held at the Merchant Club 
on April 27, where 35 pledges were inducted 
into Delta Sigma Delta. 

Semi-monthly meetings have been exception- 
ally good this last year, and we hope they will 
be an inspiration to those who will follow. 
Charley O'Rourke, quarterback of the Chicago 
Bears and friend of Grand Master George, as 
a speaker, the Tribune movie "From Trees to 
Tribunes, Dr. Svoboda s movies and talk on 
the "Great Woods of the North," and Dr. 
Sicher (professor of Anatomy at the College), 
who talked on his experiences in Vienna, 
Austria, under German domination, were some 
of the most excellent programs. 



Eenenaam 

As guests of the Auxiliary Chapter, Beta 
Chapter of Northwestern had dinner at the 
Bismarck Hotel. Guest speaker of the evening 
was Dr. Thorn, Grand Master of Delta Sigma 
Delta. The affair was a fine one, and the 
three subordinate chapters enjoyed each other's 
company and the interesting time given to them 
by the Auxiliary Chapter. This was the first 
of this type of get-together, and there are plans 
for more of them. 

The three subordinate chapters jointly held 
a golf outing, after finding how compatible 
they were with one another, and this outing 
was one of the bright spots of the year. 

The spring formal was, as always, the high- 
light of the year, indicating to the Seniors that 
their four years in the fraternity had been 
appreciated. There was a tasty dinner, dance- 
able music, and no complaints about lack of 
gaiety and laughter. 

This year has been a successful one for 
Beta, both socially and scholastically. Twenty- 
one Beta "Delts" expect to receive their sheep- 
skins this spring, and most of them will go at 
once into active service in either the Army or 
the Navy. Good luck to all of you, carry on 
the traditions of Delta Sigma Delta, and come 
home safe and victorious. 



73 



[fl 

XI PSI PI 





Dr. Elbert Pendleton Dr.Jerome Vlk 



The Xi Psi Phi Fraternity was founded at the University 
of Michigan in 1889. It has grown from a few charter 
members to the great organization it is today, with 
chapters in all the major dental schools of the United 
States and Canada. 

In 1898 a branch chapter was organized at the 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery. Since its inaugura- 
tion, this chapter has shown an increasing growth. 
Lambda Chapter is discriminating in its choice of mem- 
bers and demands a calibre of man who can fulfill its 
ideals. Good fellowship is the standard which dom- 
inates. This pledge of good fellowship has not only 
made its brothers popular with the student body, but 
the spirit of mutual assistance has been carried to the 
professional world, aiding in the advancement of 
organized dentistry. 



Earl T. Enright 
Roman J. Wally 
Walter J. Ream 
Arthur F. Montuori 
Robert B. Oppice 
Lester L. Janes 



President 

Vice President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Herald 

Guard 




Dr. Ralph Fouser Dr. Harold Oppice 




Dr. Edgar Coolidge 





an a n ci 




Lebetski 
74 



Levi 



Bona Bozovsky Bonk 

McDonald Orth Partyka 



Chott 
Skupien 



Chrobak 
Tacticos 



Krol 

Thodos 



Torr 






Ill 7 

<?% <•> ^s n "*k o 

(**% f^ f*| f^') f - ^ O 

Jf«»*-' !**<«*▼ -v-*Hl *-■-**. qf^ ~ gm-^l 




Bielinski 

Fash 

Levy 


Enright 
Bosack 
Gillis 
Matousek 


Wally 
Choiko 
Greco 
Niedzwiadek 


Ream 
Chott 
Hurning 
Mistretta 


Montouri 
D'Andrea 
Jurewicz 
Metzgar 


Janes 
DeLap 
Justen 
Negrevski 


Sisson 
DePalma 
Krol 
O'Connell 


Dziubak 

Larson 

Oppice 






Riskin 


Schlueter 


Uczen 


Ziolkowski 







Just a few weeks ago a new staff of officers 
was elected to carry on the traditions of the 
fraternity. The past has been great and enjoy- 
able, and all look forward to an even greater 
future. The past officers extend their con- 
gratulations to the newly elected president, 
Zenon Krol, and new vice president, William 
Sisson. 

During future long winter events, when you 
open this book and read some of the articles 
written, surely the events most happily recalled 
to your memory will be those events incident to 
your fraternal contacts with fellow "Zips." To 
mention only a few: Remember that barbeque 



picnic and other outings out at the "farm?" 
Or those get together" dances and smokers? 
Remember the party and dinner at Dziubaks? 
Or the informal initiation and the annual 
banquet? For the senior "Zips", these gvents 
are cherished memories,- to the succeeding 
classes, they offer a challenge to carry on to 
greater heights. 

There is a destiny that makes us brothers. 
None goes his way alone. 
What ever we send into the lives of others, 
Comes back into our own." 



75 



diih 



NPliF! If 



fltPWfl HHEBH 



Alpha Omega, international dental fratern- 
ity, was founded in 1907 at the Pennsylvania 
College of Dental Surgery. In 1933 the 
Alpha Lambda Chapter was organized and 
chartered at Chicago College of Dental 
Surgery. Its creed is: "Alpha Omega fra- 
ternity shall be a dental fraternity, the student 
members of which shall be elected from the 
undergraduate students on the basis of scholar- 
ship, character, leadership, and personality. 

Last October the death of Dr. S. Albert 
Siegel was greatly felt by Alpha Lambda and 
the entire dental profession. We would not 
be justified in this limited space to list the 
merits of a frater who was a friend, teacher and 
adviser. Through his efforts, Alpha Lambda 
has risen above the fondest dreams of its 
organizers. 

Captain Arno Leschin, our former praetor, is 
on the medical staff of the Loyola Hospital 




DR. ARNO LESCHIN 



(II HIS 



|(^ s T I* «- Mat ff 

%E- I \j?- 





Miller Okmin 

Stachler 



Pcrtman Rachlin 
Tendrich Weind^eld 



MEMBER 



afto p p 








Kaye 


Fishmcn 


Riskin 


Landis 


Leavett 


Freidman 


Krolick 


Paule 


Schaffner 


Treiber 


Waldman 


Diamond 



Unit. Caplain Leschin is at present at the 
Army Medical Center, Walter Reed Hospital, 
in Washington, D. C. 

Under the guidance and supervision of the 
newly chosen adviser, Dr. A. Albert Moser, 
the chapter holds semi-monthly meetings at the 
Midwest Athletic Club. The meetings are 
followed by clinics and popular speakers on 
scientific subjects. 

During the past year the chapter has taken 
part in a series of successful social events, 
namely, pledge smoker at the Skyline Athletic 
Club; informal initiation at the Midwest Athletic 
Club; annual pledge dance at Glickman's 
Studio; and the bi-chapter dinner dance at the 
University of Illinois Union Building. All are 
looking forward to the Senior Formal Ball, soon 
to be held. 



1942 OFFICERS 
David Kaye .... President 
Sidney Fishman . . Vice President 

Isaac Landes .... Treasurer 
Abraham Riskin .... Secretary 



Socrates said, "Bad men live that they 
may eat and drink whereas good men eat 
that they may live." 



77 



man khpph mum 




Eighteen years have passed since the Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery awarded the first gold key of Omicron 
Kappa Upsilon, and since that time several hundred 
students of graduating classes have received this honor, 
the highest paid to the embryo dentist. Under the guid- 
ing hand of our Dean, Dr. W. H. G. Logan, ably assisted 
by Dr. R. W. McNulty, Vice President, and Dr. P. G. 
Puterbaugh, Secretary-Treasurer, Pi Chapter here at 
Chicago College will honor this year another group of 
graduates. 

To be eligible for Omicron Kappa Upsilon, the grad- 
uating student must have achieved a high scholastic 
standing, one which places him in the upper one twelfth 
of his class. His character and citizenship must be of 
indisputable quality, and he must possess leadership 
ability. 

All is not lost to the man who graduates and does not 
receive this award, since the practitioner who "through 
excellence of professional attainment and citizenship 
and who has distinguished himself in his profession in his 
respective community," may have this honor conferred 
upon him. 

Omicron Kappa Upsilon was founded at North- 
western University Dental School in 1914 by Drs. 
Thomas L. Gilmer, Arthur D. Black and C. R. E. Koch. 
These men felt that a fraternal organization such as this 
was needed to encourage and develop a spirit of 
emulation among students of dentistry and to recog- 
nize, in an appropriate manner, those who have dis- 
tinguished themselves by high grades of scholarship." 



'Knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers." 

(Tennyson) 



N. JOHNSON OlOO 



Ma MEMORIAL AWARD 



•:';,//. -',•-: /^, :, mOM 



FflJUfiAflAOTfR ;4M SCHOLARSHIP 

AND 

PROFiClENCY IN OPERATIVE dENTISTRY 

CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 



On the twenty-eighth day of March, nine- 
teen-hundred and forty a ceremony took place 
which marked the dedication and inauguration 
of the C. N. Johnson Memorial Award. It is 
the annual award given in the department of 
Operative Dentistry. The purpose of the 
award is to perpetuate the memory of Charles 
Nelson Johnson, whose work will always be 
an integral part of the history of the Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery, and to stimulate 
greater interest in Operative Dentistry, to which 
he has devoted ro large a measure of his life. 
He was the most beloved character in all 



dentistry, was a man of much genius in science, 
education, literature, oratory and philosophy. 
Character, scholarship and proficiency in 
operative dentistry are the basis of awarding 
this plaque. The recipient is chosen by a com- 
mittee consisting of the dean, assistant dean and 
the head of the department. Although the 
award is available every year, this does not 
mean it will be given each year. It is only 
given in the event that the graduating class 
produces a man who is worthy and fulfills the 
requirements necessary for its reception. 



Bin in 



mm 









Fropati 
Gentilly 






George Porter Arra 

Hayes Marcus Ritza Almaguer Puszkiewicz 

Shaheen King Graves Delap Sherrard 



The Blue Key was founded at the University 
of Florida in 1924 and established at Loyola 
University in 1926. 

The organization has for its object the creation 
of the feeling of good fellowship among non 
members. There are no dues or installation 
fees. The constitution and by-laws are 

governed by the conditions that exist in the 
chapters at the Universities. 

The Blue Key Honor Fraternity is not restricted 
to undergraduate students, but is open to the 
active graduate. In order to receive such 
honorary entrance to Blue Key the graduate 
must be active in mind and body. The requisites 
being the maintenance of good moral character 
and some contribution to the scientific advance- 
ment of the dental profession. In order for an 
undergraduate to become a member he must 
possess the following qualities: high scholastic 
rating, participation in school activities and 



popularity among one's fellow students. 

Special homage is paid to Dr. W. H. G. 
Logan by his brother members in the Blue Key 
Honorary Fraternity. 

Honorary membership this year was awarded 
to Dr. Cedric K. Dittmer, instructor in exodontia. 

FACULTY MEMBERS: Drs. Earl P. Boulger, 
Harold A. Hillenbrand, Wallace N. Kirby, 
Paul T. Dawson, John F. Svoboda, WiJIiam 
P. Schoen, Ralph G. Larsen, Philip S. Faillo, 
Victor W. Seitz, DwightC. Atkinson, and War- 
ren P. Willman. 

SENIORS: Romeo R. Arra, William A. 
George, Lon V. Porter, Eugene S. Puszkiewicz, 
Joseph A. Propati, Michael A. Ritza, Raymond 
Marcus, Carlm K. Hayes, and Jose Z. Al- 
maguer. 

JUNIORS: James M. Gentilly, Edward B. 
Graves, Elbert W. King, Ben G. Sherrard, 
Edward J. Shaheen, and Kenneth C. DeLap. 





George Porter Shaheen Chott 



This distinguished Jesuit honorary society was 
founded twenty-eight years ago, and in 1938 a 
chapter was established at Loyola University. 
Alpha Sigma Nu is now represented in the 
leading Catholic universities throughout the 
entire nation. In the junior year of each class, 
the honor is conferred upon two students, 
from each of the University departments, who 
are selected by their respective deans. Excel- 
lence in scholastic ability, characteristics which 
are elevating to the intellectual and cultural 



attributes of his fellow students are determining 
factors for society members. He must be a 
person ready to contribute service and loyalty 
to his institution and promulgate harmony and 
understanding between faculty and students. 
In the present senior class Lon Porter and 
William George are the dental school members. 
The latter served as treasurer of the University 
chapter. In the Junior class, Edward Shaheen 
and Hugo Chott were recently indoctorinated 
into the society. 








MABEL FISHER 
Clerk of Infirmary 



ELSIE E RICHARDSON 

Information Clerk 





FLORENCE MacDONALD 

Cashier and Clerk of Infirmary 



BETTY LOU RIORDAN, B.S. 

Mundelein College 

Librarian 



LAURA S. DICKISON 

Secretary Administrative Office 

HARRIETT H. FLINT 

Clerk, Administrative Office 



82 




CUSS Of 




CIVe welcome this opportunity to congratulate you 
upon the completion of your college work, and 
extend sincere wishes for your success. Serving 
you has been a pleasure, a pleasure which 
we hope will continue throughout your career. 

To those of you who plan to enter military service, 
may we remind you that S. S. White Equipment 
and other products will continue to be a part of 
your daily life. Brushing-up on their operation and 
techniques now will prove of value later. Always 
remember S. S. White field representatives, 
branches and dealers stand ready to assist you. 

You who will serve at home in private practice will 
be confronted with the greatest demand ever placed 
upon dentistry for the conservation of public 
health. Here again we can assist, for nothing will 
do more toward promoting efficiency, extending 
service, and conserving your health, than a prop- 
erly designed, well-equipped office. 





THE S.S.WHITE DENTAL MFG. CO. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

S3 



• • • — \/ • • • — 
HELP TO PUT 

Teeth 

IN OUR 

Bite 

AT THE AXIS 

• . • — 

Buy 
War 

Bonds 

• • • — 

COLUMBIA 
DENTOFORM CORP. 

"The House of A Thousand Models" 
131 E. 23rd ST. NEW YORK CITY 



r~\ 




"Personal Service Lily Cups" 
are trie mark of individuality 

Your Patients Will Appreciate 
The Individual Touch and Protection 

LILY-TULIP CUP & 
SPECIALTY CO. 



317 NO. WELLS St. 



SUPERIOR 3476 






/ 



THERE IS A REASON 

for every DEE inlay gold 

popular because of color, uniformity, 
casting qualities, and physical properties. 



oo 




Ask the Successful Dentist Why He Says Dee Gold 



/Jtec/au* ynefcuL 



GENERAL DFFICE5 

AND PLANT 
I9DD W. KINZIE ST. 



CHICAGO 



DOWNTOWN OLD GOLD 
AND SALES OFFICE 
55 E.WASHIN0T0N5T. 



84 



In Both Branches of the Nations Armed Forces 




BRANCHES AT 

BATTLE CREEK MICH. 
COLUMBUS GEORGIA 
MIAMI BEACH FLA. 

GRINNELL IOWA 






3RD FLOOR 

19 W. JACKSON BLVD. 



CHICAGO 



ILLINOIS 



85 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

CHARLES AND 
JOSEPH KAVANAUGH 

316 South Wood 



August S. Caron 
&Son 

BUILDERS 
#> 

212 S. Marion Street 

Oak Park, Illinois 

Mansfield 1383 Euclid 26 



WESTERN 
^ FUEL 




MAIN OFFICE 

2627 W. Adams St. 

Chicago, III. 






HEAT MERCHANTS FOR 51 YEARS 

SUPPLYING 

APARTMENTS 

HOMES 

INDUSTRIES 



"A Ton or A Carload" 



VAN BUREN 
AUSTIN 

EUCLID 



7J1234 



9. 



ortunate is the dextist who 

HAS A HITTER UNIT TODAY 



V 




IT'S TIME-SAVING FEATURES CLIP 
MINUTES FROM EVERY OPERATING HOUR 



Today, dentists remaining in civilian 
practice face large practices, longer 
hours, harder work. Thousands of 
dentists, working under war conditions 
have thanked their lucky stars they 
have a Ritter Model "E" Unit. The 
efficiency and speed brought to den- 
tistry by finger-tip control of every 
operating essential on these Ritter 



Units have proved their fatigue-reduc- 
ing ability as never before. 
If you do not have a Ritter Unit and 
face delayed delivery in obtaining one, 
please be patient. Our Armed Services 
appreciate the convenience of these 
Units, too — and they have first call ! 
Ritter Company, Inc., Ritter Park, 
Rochester, N. Y. 



fZu'dd a U/at Sond ]Qieietve fiot 



Ritter 

£. <r ui ja m e nt 



87 



CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 
DENTAL SCHOOL OF LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 

1757 West Harrison Street 
Chicago, Illinois 

Accelerated Dental Educational 
Program Effective June 28, 1943 



TO MEET the demands being created by the war, the Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery, Dental School of Loyola Univer- 
sity, announces the continuation of its program of accelerated 
dental education. 

Freshman students will be admitted to begin class on June 28, 
1943, and again on October 4, 1943. 

The same requirements for entrance will be enforced; namely, 
a minimum of sixty semester hours of approved college credit, 
including one year in each of the following subjects: English, 
chemistry, biology, and physics, and one-half year of organic 
chemistry. 

Education will be on a quarter system, each year to consist of 
four quarters, of eleven weeks each. Thus each student will be 
in attendance for forty-four weeks of each year for a three-year 
period . 

There will be no dimunition in the quality and quantity of 
instruction heretofore given in four academic years. 

There will be no increase in tuition and fees. 

It is felt that accelerated education in the fields of health 
service will avert a shortage of dentists and physicians to care 
for the needs of the armed forces and the public, and the stand- 
ardizing agencies of dental and medical education have approved 
this procedure. 



Amazing New Invention in Retention 







^>i> tV 



GLOBAL WAR AND YOUR PRACTICE 

This is a momentous year. 

Your country is at war and you will probably enter practice with the 
armed forces. 

When the day of victory comes, you will be vitally interested in 
those things which will help you to build your private practice rapidly 
and substantially. 

Undoubtedly the use of Austenal Teeth by the Micromold Process 
will be a genuine factor in pleasing your patients. 

Because cf a new and advanced process of manufacture, Austenal 
Teeth look and feel like natural teeth. Labial ly, they have natural 
appearance and lingual ly, they are more comfortable because they 
provide more room for natural tongue movement, due to the absence 
of metal parts. 



AUSTENAL LABORATORIES, INC. 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO 

YOU CAN OBTAIN AUSTENAL MICROMOLD TEETH FROM 
THE VITALLIUM LABORATORY NEAR YOU 



Trade Mark Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 



89 



Foster Dental Films 

and 

Dental Film Mounts 



ft 



Used Exclusively by 

CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 



* 



N. W. FOSTER & SON 

MORTON GROVE, ILLINOIS 



90 




IF IT'S A YELLOW TOOTH 

o*t& o£ iUeie 3 

yeUauti. pA-okcUdif. 

matcUei. it fbesi^eetltf. 


IF IT'S A GRAY TOOTH 

o*t& a£ tlieA.& 3 

(fiatjA, ■psiaLa&Lf. 

matched. U petofacHif 




COLOR MATCHING 




YELLOW 
BLENDS 



GRAY 
BLENDS 



The first quick glance in the patient's mouth tells 
whether yellow or gray predominates in the tooth 
to be restored. 

Always, it's either yellow or gray, regardless 
of the race, color or habitat of the patient. 

No mystery there — just distinguish between 
yellow and gray! 

Now look at the Caulk Shade Guide. The 3 
most prevalent yellows and the 3 most prevalent 
grays, found in natural teeth, are instantly avail- 
able right at the top of the Guide. And each one 
represents a basic Synthetic Porcelain powder. 



With these 3 direct matching yellow powders 
and 3 direct matching gray powders more 
than 7 out of every 10 patients' teeth can be 
matched perfectly using only one basic powder 
for each case. 

What a grand relief this is for users of Synthetic 
Porcelain — freedom from the drudgery and annoy- 
ance of forever blending powders — the satisfac- 
tion of having available 6 basic powders with a 
shade range that's completely adequate for the 
vast majority of natural teeth — and the con- 
venience of a practically automatic Shade Guide. 



Caulk SYNTHETIC PORCELAIN 



ROOT STUDIOS 

Est. 1889 
185 No. Wabash Ave. 

OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS 

1936 DENTOS 

1937 DENTOS 

1938 DENTOS 
1940 DENTOS 

1942 DENTOS 

1943 DENTOS 

Special Rates to C. C. D. S. Students at All Times. 
Tel STATE 0113 



/ 



IN UNCLE SAM'S SERVICE, TOO 



In the big and proud responsibility await- 
ing you as Uncle Sam's dentist you'll find, 
ready to help, the best equipment your 
country can provide — including the 
General Electric Model CDX dental 
x-ray unit. 

Those of you already acquainted with the 
CDX will be greeting an old friend. And 
on that happy day when you return to 
private practice the faithful CDX will be 
waiting to help you maintain the nation's 
health in peacetime. 

GENERAL © ELECTRIC 
X-RAY CORPORATION 

2012 JACKSON BLVD. CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 




%€&#* KeSf %«* -#.£ Ufa %o*uto 



"A MOTLOID PRODUCT" 



The Truly Superior 

ACRYLIC 

Denture Base 




5 ueanA, ol i&uuce 

Since its introduction to the Profession, at the Chicago Midwinter 
Meeting back in 1938, Moldent has won the approval of thousands 
of dentists in the United States, Canada and South America. 

Technicians like Moldent because its working qualities are fool- 
proof. They find it easy to process, trouble free. Without "stress or 
strain" it eliminates checked teeth. Moldent's wide variation of colors 
(Numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 and clear) meet the most critical taste. 

Hundreds of laboratories are using Moldent today with complete 
success. Available in 3 size units: Bulk unit for 150 dentures; 
16 oz. unit for 25 dentures; 2 oz. unit for 2 dentures. 

SAVE TIME SAVE LABOR SAVE MONEY USE MOLDENT 
All orders filled promptly, thru your dealer or direct 



THE MOTLOID COMPANY ...» CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

Offices: Marshall Field Annex • Laboratories: 325 West Huron St. 



93 



1913 



1943 



\y 



Dudley Cafeteria 

IN THE BASEMENT 



Wholesome 
Home Cooked Foods 



THE CONGRESS 

BARBER and BEAUTY 

PARLOR 

Successfully Catering to the Doctors 

and Students of this vicinity for the 

past eight years. 

In the Professional "Y" Building 
"Just Inside the Door" 

CHARLES E. RICHARDSON, Prop. 
5 5 No 



Barbers 



+ 



Chairs Waiting 



Headquarters for All 

Dental and Medical Books 

used in 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery 

We have the largest and most complete Stock to be 
found anywhere. 

Wide assortments of Notebooks, Blankbooks, Loose- 
leaf Covers, and Fillers, Drawing Supplies, Fountain 
Pens, and Inks, Brief Cases, Dissecting Sets, 
Laboratory Supplies 
Prices Right 

SPEARMAN'S BOOK STORE 

1820 WEST CONGRESS ST., COR. OF NORTH HONORE STREET 

(Next to Y. M. C. A.) 



Select a 

GOOD LABORATORY 



jt 



In selecting a dental laboratory always bear in mind 
you are the one responsible for the replacements that 
go into your patient's mouth. 

You should visit your laboratory and satisfy yourself 
that it is the kind of an organization you will have 
confidence in,- that the workmanship and service is of 
a type that will help you in your practice. 

You should be proud to be seen 
visiting your laboratory. 



*£ 



AMERICAN DENTAL COMPANY 

Established 1900 

LABORATORIES 

Phone STATE 1642 

WM. H. SCHROLL, President HARRY L. DAVIS, Treasurer 

JOHN A. SARENA, Vice-President JOHN H. ERLENBORN, Secretar 

5 SOUTH WABASH AVENUE CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



PS 



Great Lakes 
Linen Supply Co. 

• 

Complete Rental 
Service on 

TOWELS, COATS 
AND GOWNS 

for the 
Dental Profession 

• 

Plant: 36th and Parnell Avenue 

Telephone: Boulevard 6300 


y 

COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

LOGIN BROTHERS 

DENTAL AND MEDICAL 
BOOKS 

Surgical Instruments 

1814 West Harrison Street 
Opposite Cook County Hospital 


Phone State 2706 

MASTER 

DENTAL COMPANY 

• We specialize in the construction of 
practical restorations. 

9 Thermotrol Castings Electrically Con- 
trolled. 

• Full information^ literature and price 
list upon request. 

162 North State Street 
Chicago, Illinois 


Best Wishes 

FROM 

FERN DAVIDSON 


Success To The 
Class of '43 

FROM 

V. A. H. 




View of General Laboratory 

Consider Standard as Your Individual Creative Laboratory 
on All Types of Cases. Gold Removables, Porcelain and 
Acrylic Jackets and Bridges. Dentures by Dr. Ewell Neil 
and Dr. H. F. McGrane Techniques. We Process Vitallium 
and Austenal Micromold Teeth in Our Own Laboratory. 

Guaranteed Satisfaction 
on All Work 

Visit Our Laboratory 



^r 



STANDARD DENTAL LABORATORY 

185 NORTH WABASH AVENUE DEARBORN 6721 







SCHNEIDER 



SPEND A DAY AT 



c ^ m ^ a e>[i ^ 



You are cordially invited to spend a day in our laboratory, watching 
us carve and bake porcelain jackets. In fact you can watch us con- 
struct anything in which you are interested — Be it a THIMBLE BRIDGE, 

a REINFORCED JACKET, a PORCELAIN or ACRYLIC JACKET, 
a CAST REMOVABLE or a DENTURE. 



Telephone CENtral 1680 

771.W ScAwufoi 



A COMPLETE DENTAL LABORATORY 

30 7l.7YUcJuacut <*4*te. * Cfocaaa, 7J£. 



98 



Printing 

TH E 
1943 DENTOS 



ROGERS PRINTING 
COMPANY 

CHICAGO DIXON 

ILLINOIS ILLINOIS 




Lei a new American Denial 
Cabinet help you build your 
practice. It will give your of- 
fice an inviting, clean, and 
sanitary appearance. It will 
help patients build confidence 
in your practice. The Ameri- 
can Cabinet, illustrated at the 
left, is portable . . . for greater 
efficiency ... it can be moved 
to the most convenient oper- 
ating position for each patient. 
Every thing you need will be 
at your finger tips . . . within 
your sphere of activity. See 
your American Cabinet dealer 
before you start your practice 
... he will be glad to help 
you plan your office. 

THE AMERICAN CABINET 
COMPANY 

Division of 
Hamilton Manufacturing Co. 

Two Rivers, Wisconsin 



99 







MASTER ENGRAVERS TO AMERICA'S SCHOOLS 

Constantly alert for new Ideas, better ways of doing 
things . . . Pontlac has sponsored outstanding Improve- 
ments In yearbook design and engraving procedure. The 
name Pontiac" Is and will continue to be your guarantee 
of unquestionable quality and complete satisfaction. 

PONTIAC ENGRAVING 6- ELECTROTYPE CO. 

812-822 WEST VAN BUREN ST. (Chieftain Bldg.) CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 




100 



mess. - ■— "• 





^'sS 



■&&&$