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Full text of "Department circular"

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CIRCULAR INSTRUCTIONS 



Treasury Department 



RELATIVE TO THE 



TARIFF, NAVIGATION, AND OTHER LAWS, 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31,1896. 



JOHN G. CARLISLE, Secretary of Tag^pfi^J^p^ 



WASHINGTON : 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 
1897. 




INDEX 



A. 

Dept. No. 

Account for fees, mileage, or other allowances , 127 

for oaths, verification ol 167 

Alaska, customs district of. 46 

killing of fur-bearing animals in 7 

restrictions removed on sale of rifles, etc 164 

Allotments of pay of officers of Revenue Cutter Service 97 

Anchorage and movements of vessels in harbors of Chicago 114 

Application for relief of fines, etc 52 

remission of additional duties, report on 25 

review of appraisements 44 

Appointments in customs service 106 

Appraisement and classification of raw sugars 119 

Appraisers, local, reports to Board of General Appraisers 17 

Articles entitled to drawback on exportation, schedule of. 121) 

Austrian florin, value of. 16 

B. 

Banks, information concerning 136 

Blank forms, requisitions for and custody of. 54 

Bonds, coin, currency, etc., information relating to 123 

proposals for purchase of, invited *j 170 

U. S. six per cent, payment of 160 

subscriptions to, instructions for making 6, 12 

Books and blanks, changes in catalogue of. 130 

engravings, etc., free entry of. 158 

V. 

Cadet in Revenue Cutter Service, admission to grade of. 38 

Canada, inspection of foreign immigrants landed at ports of. 67 

Catalogue of customs books and blanks, changes in 130 

Cattle, importation, inspection, etc., of. 28 

Certificate of Chinese departing and returning 82 

deposit, proper disposition of. 89 

inspection of vessels 159 

registry for special-tax year 73 

Charges for transportation of national bank notes 91 

Cheese, filled, importation of 98 

Chicago, anchorage and movement of vessels in harbor of. 114 

bounds of collection district defined 5 

Chinese laborers, departure and return of. 147 

Civil Service Commission, communications to 104 

Classification of employees for civil service purposes 92 

returns, changes in schedule of. 69 

(3) 



Dept. No. 

Clearance of vessel proceeding to foreign port 84 

Coin, paper currency, bonds, etc, information relating to 123 

Coins, foreign, values of 1, 51 1()5, 142 

Collisions at sea, rules for prevention of. 171 

Communications, official, form of address 4 

Conneaut. Ohio, constituted subport of entry. 78 

Continuation in service after expiration of probational term 151 

Contracts for care of seamen 85 

Customs service, appointments in 106 

Currants, reliqnidation of entries not required 77 

Customs eases, decisions in 2,9,10, 11, 14, 15, 18, 19,21,26,30,33,40,43,47,50,55,57,59,62,64,71,74,79,83,88,93, 103, 11::, 

115,121, 1:25, 128, 12!), 134, 135, 137, 138, 139, 110,111, 144, 145, MS), 150, 152, 153", 155, 156, 161, 168,169, 172, 171 

I). 

Departure and return of Chinese laborers 147 

Deposit, proper disposition of certificates of -!i 

Deposit of public moneys DO 

Details of employees 109 

Directions for stating and receiving vouchers 48 

Domestic products exported and returned, free entry of 37 

Drawback, manufactured articles exported for 90 

schedule of articles entitled to 120 

on domestic manufactures made from imported materials 108 

on sugar and sirup 20, 102 

Duraugo, Colo., made port of delivery • 80 

Duties of employees 126, 132 

E. 

Employees, details of 109 

duties of 126, 132 

of exhibitors at Tennessee Centennial Exposition 175 

Entry and delivery of packages imported in vessels of the United States... 107 

of goods for immediate transportation, instructions for 70 

free, of books, engravings, etc 158 

domestic products, exported and returned 37 

merchandise for consumption , 131 

theatrical scenery, apparel, etc 42 

Entries, preliminary for drawback, reports on 23 

of currants, liquidated free 77 

imported goods, numbering of. 99 

Erie, Pa., made port of immediate transportation 95 

Examination of tobacco 34 

for promotion, per cent necessary 60 

Extention of limits of port of New Orleans 49 

time for imloading vessels 72 

Exposition, Teunessee Centennial 100 

F. 

Fastenings for packages, bonded cars, etc , 148 

Fees for oaths in verification of accounts 167 

Fines, penalties, etc., application for relief from 52 

Flag of United States to be displayed over public buildings 58 

Florida, suhports of entry and delivery in 94 



5 

Dept. No. 

Florin, Austrian, value of. 16 

Foreigu coins, values of. I, 5l ; 105, 142 

Freight charges, etc., liens for 143 

G„ 

General appraisers, proceedings nuder decisions of. 44 

Goods, entry of, in absence of certified invoice 76 

H. 

Home ports of vessels 173 

I. 

Immediate transportation, Erie, Pa., made port of 95 

Immigrants arrived on vessels on which contagious disease has appeared 65 

landed at ports in Canada, inspection of 67 

Importation, inspection, etc., of cattle 28 

of filled cheese 98 

Information concerning hanks 136 

Inspection of meats exported 32, 101 

Invoices, consular, reports of appraising officer 35 

Internal revenue, certificates of registry for special-tax year 73 

proposals for paper upon which to print stamps 45 

special-tax stamps for special-tax year 70 

L. 

Landing abroad of goods exported 117 

Leadville, Colo., made port of delivery 80 

Lead in imported Mexican ores, valuation of 53 

Licenses, steamboat officers', change of law regarding issue of 166 

Liens for freight, charges, etc 143 

Lifeboats and raits, inspection and acceptance of 112, 118 

Life-Saving Service, crews prohibited from hunting and fishing for market 63 

Light-House Establishment, officers on duty under 24, 116 

M. 

Meats exported, inspection of. 32, 101 

Messages, telegraph, transmission over bond-aided lines 27 

Marine-Hospital Service, admission of officers of Revenue Cutter Service to treatment by 157 

amendment to quarantine regulations.. 68 

certificate of inspection of vessels 159 

contracts for care of seamen 85 

ST. 

National bank notes, charges for transportation 91 

New Orleans, extension of limits of port of 49 

New York, anchorage of vessels in port of. 110 

Notification of departure of immigrants arriving upon infected vessels 65 

Notice of readmeasurement 41 

Numbering of entries of imported goods > 99 

o. 

Official communications, form for addressing ..' 4 

Officers of Revenue Cutter Service, transportation of 29 

on duty under the Light-House Establishment 24, 116 



Dept. No. 

Ores, imported Mexican, valuation of lead in 53 

Otter, sea, regulations governing hunting of 61 

P. 

Packages, bonded cars, vessels, etc., fastenings for 148 

imported in United States vessels, entry and delivery of. 107 

Palm Beach, Pla., made subport 13 

Passenger movements, reports of 87,111,176 

Payment of vouchers, evidenceof. 75 

Ports of delivery established at Durango, Pueblo, and Leadville, Colo 80 

Prevention of collisions at sea, rules for 171 

Printing and binding, requisitions for 151 

Probational term, continuance in service after 154 

Promotion, per cent necessary for .. 60 

Proofs of landing exported goods abroad waived 117 

Proposals for bonds invited 3, 170 

paper upon which to print internal-revenue stamps 45 

Public moneys, deposit of. 90 

Pueblo, Colo., made port of delivery 80 

Pecuniary obligations between officers and clerks 162 

Q. 

Quarantine regulations, amendment to 68 

K. 

Rafts, lifeboats, etc., inspection and acceptance of 112, 118 

Rates for telegraphing 124 

Readmeasurement, notice of 41 

Reappraisements. (See Customs.) 

Reappraisement proceedings 36 

Relief from fines, penalties, etc., application for 52 

Reports of appraising officer, values stated in consular invoice 35 

inspectors on entries for drawback 23 

local appraisers to Board of General Appraisers 17 

passenger movements 87, 111, 176 

on application for remission of additional duty 25 

Requisition for printing and binding 151 

Return, free, of articles exported for exhibition purposes 86 

Revenue Cutter Service, admission of candidates to grades of cadet and engineer 38,39 

to treatment in marine hospital 157 

allotment of officers' pay 97 

Rifles, restrictions on sale of, in Alaska removed 164 

Rondout, N. Y., made port for the discharge of bulky cargoes 133 

Rule for examination and appraisement of raw sugar 119, 146 

S. 

Salaries of inspectors of steam vessels 122 

Samples of imported goods must be filed 66 

Schedule of articles entitled to drawback 120 

classification of returns 69 

Seamen, contracts for care of 85 



Bept. No. 

Seizure of imported goods for undervaluation 8 

Stamford, Conn., made subport of entry 56 

Stamps, special-tax, for special-tax year 70 

Steamboat Inspection Service, inspection and acceptance of lifeboats and rafts 112, 118 

change in law relating to issue of licenses 166 

rules and regulations amended 31 

salaries of inspectors 122 

Subports of entry and delivery in Florida 94 

Stamford, Conn., and Conneaut, Ohio, made 56,78 

Subscriptions for bonds, instructions for making 6,12 

Sugar and sirup, drawback on 20, 102 

Sugars, raw, appraisement and classification of. 119, 146 

Syracuse, N. Y., made port of delivery 81 

T. 

Telegraphing, rates for 124 

Tennessee Centennial Exposition and employees of exhibitors at 100, 175 

Theatrical scenery, properties, etc., free entry of 42 

Tobacco, examination of. 34 

Tonnage tax on vessels from German ports 165 

Trade-marks, recording, etc 22 

Transmission of messages over bond-aided lines 27 

Transportation of officers of Revenue Cutter Service 29 

TJ. 

Undervaluation, seizure of imported goods for 8 

V. 

Value of Austrian florin 16 

Values of foreign coins 1> 51, 105,142 

Valuation of lead in imported Mexican ores 53 

Vouchers, directions for stating and receiving 48 

evidence of proper payment of. 75 

Vessels, certificate of inspection of. 159 

employed in sea-otter hunting 61 

extension of time for unloading 72 

proceeding coastwise with cargo 163 

to foreign port, clearance of. 84 

home ports of 173 

from German ports, tonnage tax on 165 

in port of New York, anchorage of. HO 

(Ed. 1 15 97 250.) 



VALUES OF FOREIGN COINS. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 1* 



^rjeasixrtj ^zpnximmi. 



BUREAU OF THE MINT, 

Washington, D. C. 9 January 1, 1896. 
Hon. John G. Carlisle, 

Secretary of the Treasury. 
Sir : In pursuance of the provisions of section 25 of the act of August 28, 1894, I present in the 
following table an estimate of the values of the standard coins of the nations of the world : 



VALUES OF FOREIGN COINS. 



Argentine Republic 



Austria-Hungary. 



Belgium 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

British Possessions N, 
A. (except Newfound- 
land). 
Central Amer. States — 

Costa Rica 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Salvador 

Chile 



Colombia . 

Cuba 

Denmark.. 
Ecuador .., 



Egypt .. 



Finland 

France 

German Empire. 

Great Britain 

Greece ■ 

Haiti . 



Gold and silver. 



Gold and silver. 

Silver 

Gold 

Gold 



Gold and silver . 



Silver 

Gold and silver . 

Gold 

Silver 



Gold . 



India I Silver 

Italy... 
Japan 
Liberia 



Mexico . 



Netherlands 

Newfoundland.. 

Norway 

Persia 

Peru 

Portugal 

Russia 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Tripoli 

Turkey 

Venezuela 



Gold 

Gold and silver . 

Gold 

Gold 

Gold and silver . 
Gold and silver . 



Gold and silver . 
Gold and silver* 
Gold 



Monetary unit. 



Franc 

Boliviano . 

Milreis 

Dollar 



Peso 

Peso 

Crown . 
Sucre ... 



Shanghai ... 
Haikwan 
(Customs). 

Tientsin 

Chefoo 



Pound (100 piasters)., 



Blark 

Franc 

Mark 

Pound sterling.... 

Drachma 

Gourde 

Rupee 

Lira 

/Gold.... 

{Silver.. 

Dollar 

Dollar 



Yen., 



Silv 



Gold and silver Florin 

Gold Dollar 

Gold Crown 

Kran 

Silver B Sol 

Gold J Milreis 

«»*«* Eub,e i«Sfc"» 

Gold and silver | Peseta 

Gold I Crown 

Gold and silver g Franc 

Silver I Mahbub of 20 piasters. 

Gold I Piaster 

Gold and silver 9 Bolivar 



.19,3 
.49,1 
.51,6 
1.00,0 



Gold: argentine ($4.82,4) and % argentine. Silver: peso and 

divisions. 
fGold: former system— I florins ($1.92,9), 8 florins ($3.85,8), 
I J ducat ($2.28,7) and 4 ducats ($9. 15,8). Silver : 1 and2florins. 
[ Gold : present system— 20 crowns ($4.05,2) ; 10 crowns($2.02,6) 
Gold : 10 and 20 francs. Silver : 5 francs. 
Silver: boliviano and divisions. 
Gold : 5, 10, and 20 milreis. Silver : %> 1, & n d 2 milreis. 



.49,1 I Silver: peso and divisions. 

.91,2 \ Gold : escudo ($1.82,4), doubloon ($4.56,1), and condor ($9.12,3). 
Silver: peso and divisions. 

.72,5 ' 



.92,6 
.26,8 
.49,1 



Gold: condor ($9.61,7) and double-condor. Silver: peso. 

Gold: doubloon ($5.01,7). Silver: peso. 

Gold: 10 and 20 crowns. 

Gold: condor ($9.64,7) and double-condor. Silver: Sucre and 

Gold: pound (100 piasters!, 5, 10, 20, and 50 piasters. Silver: 

1, 2, 5, 10. and 2(1 piasters. 
Gold: 20 marks ($3.85,9), 10 marks ($1.93). 
Gold : 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 francs. Silver : 5 francs. 
Gold : 5, 10, and 20 marks. 

Gold : sovereign (pound sterling) and >£ sovereign. 
Gold : 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 drachmas. Sliver : 5 drachmas. 
Silver: gourde. 

Gold: mohur ($7.10,5). Silver: rupee and divisions. 
Gold: 5, 111, 20, 50, and 100 lire. Silver: 5 lire. 
Gold : 1, 2, 5, 10, and 20 yen. 
Silver: yen. 

Gold : dollar ($0.98,3), 2%, 5, 10, and 20 dollars. Silver : dollar 

(or peso) and divisions. 
Gold: 10 florins. Silver: Y„, 1, and 2% florins. 
Gold : 2 dollars ($2.02,7). 
Gold : 10 and 20 crowns. 

Gold: K,l,and2tomans($3.40,9). Silver: %,%, 1,2, andSkrans. 
Silver: sol and divisions. 
Gold : 1, 2, 5, and 10 milreis. 
Gold: imperial ($7.71,8), and % imperial t(S3.86). 
Silver : %, %> an( l 1 ruble. 
Gold: 25 pes'etas. Silver: 5 pesetas. 
Gold : 10 and 20 crowns. 
Gold : 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 francs. Silver: 5 francs. 

Gold : 25, 50, 100, 250, and 500 piasters. 

Gold : 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 bolivars. Silver: 5 bolivars. 



*Gold the nominal standard. Silver practically the standard. 

t Coined since January 1, 1886. Old half-imperial —83.98,6. 

X Silver the nominal standard. Paper the actual currency, the depreciation of which is measured by the gold standard. 



Kespectfully, yours, 



R. E. PRESTON, 

Director of the Mint. 




OnrccEOF THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, January 1, 1896. 

The foregoing estimate by the Director of the Mint, of the values of foreign coins, I hereby proclaim 
to be the values of such coins in terms of the money of account of the United States, to be followed in 
estimating the value of all foreign merchandise exported to the United States on or after January 1, 
1896, expressed in any of such metallic currencies. 

J. G. CARLISLE, 
Secretary of the Treasury. 



REAPPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 2. 



3*r,easixr# g^partmjettt, 



of Customs. 

Oebiceof THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, January 8, 1896. 

To Collectors and Other Officers of the Customs: 

The following reappraisemeuts of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending November 30, 1895. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



REPORT OF REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1895. 

N. ~B.—In corresponding with the Board of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference sliould always be made to the number of Heappraisement. 

No. of rcojppraisc- 
ment. 

9925 Decorated china and earthenware, from , Paris, September 23, 1895 : 

1 sugar bowl, cut glass, entered at 10 francs per total. No advance. 
12 stained glass, entered at 60, advanced to 80 francs per total. 

102 Chinese porcelain bottles, entered at 155, advanced to 255 francs per total. 

54 plates, assorted, entered at 220, advanced to 275 francs per total. 

30 cups and saucers, entered at 150, advanced to 180 francs per total. 

6 spare pieces of porcelain, entered at 35, advanced to 55 francs per total. 

2 pair vases, porcelain, entered at 300 francs per total. No advance. 
Add boxing and packing. 

10023 Manufactures of metal, furniture, and. decorated china, from A. S. Hamburger, Amsterdam, 

October 11, 1895 : 

Secretary, book cabinet, cheffonier, frames, plate racks, saltcellars, milk pitchers, etc., 
advanced 10 per cent. 
10050 Printed glassware, etc., from Witzmann & Schwesinger, Stutzerbach, October 26, 1895: 

Thermometers, Yena Vounal glass, entered at 22, advanced to 25 marks per gross. 

Prismatic clinical thermometers, entered at 5.50, advanced to 9 marks per gross. 
9933 Cotton lace curtains, from Alder & Eappolt, St. Gall, October 16, 1895 : 

No. 947, 12/4, 3b yards, ecru, entered at 8.50, advanced to 9.50 francs per pair. 

No. 947, 14/4, 4 yards, ecru, entered at 11.47$, advanced to 12 francs per pair. 



2 

9933 Cotton lace curtains, etc. — Continued. 

No. 962, 12/4, 33 yards, feoru, entered at 14.45, advanced to 18 francs per pair. 

No. 942, 12/4, 3J yards, ecru, entered at 5.32, advanced to 6.50 francs per pair. 

No. 954, 12/4, 31 yards, white and ecru, entered at 10.62,!, advanced to 11.50 francs per 

pair. 
Add packing and cases. 

10011 Manufactures of silk and cotton, from L. Permeze] & Co., Lyons, October 24, 1895: 

92, cirka noir, entered at .082, advanced to 1 franc per meter. Discounts, 20 per cent 
and 3 per cent. Add cases and packing. 

10017 Covered flat Steele wire, from Rosenwald Bros., London, October 26, 1895: 

Eagle skirt steel, entered at 5, less 2\ per cent discount, advanced to 6s., sterling, per 
gross. Add case. 

10032 Gelatine, from Deutsche Gelatine-Fabriken, Kochlt a Main, October 15, 1895: 

White, 3 B., silver C, entered at 180 marks per 100 kilos. No advance. Packing 
included. 

10019 Beaded trimmings, from E. Steger Scunn, Chinaberg, October 26, 1895: 

Entered at a discount of 25 per cent, advanced to a discount of 5 per cent and 2 per cent. 

9000 Colored cotton, from Tootal Broadhurst Co. , Ltd. , Manchester, October 18, 1895 : 

Colored shirting, 10, 12 J, entered at 5d., advanced to 5]d., sterling, per yard. Discount, 
3 per cent. Add cases, etc. 
2544 OP ) 
Nashville!!! } Earthenware (printed seconds), from Thos. P. Bennett & Co., Liverpool, September 18, 1895: 

Entered at discounts of 671 per cent, 5 per cent, and 5 per cent, advanced to discounts of 
65 per cent, 5 per cent, and 5 per cent. Add crates. 

2452 O. P...") 

2453 O. P... [ Beans, from J. B. Stringer & Co., Chatham, September 21, 1895 : 
Buffalo ) 

Unpicked beans, entered at 80, advanced to 88 cents per bushel. 
9577 OP) 
Chicago...! j Toys and decorated cU na, from Bichard Horstmann, Berlin, September 10, 1895 : 

Entered at various prices. No advance. 

2579 O. P..) 

2580 O. P.. 

2581 O. P.. [Decorated earthenware and glassware, from Geo. Borgfeldt & Co., various places and dates- 

etc r 

Chicago.... J 

Entered at various prices. No advance. 

REAPPBAISEMENTS BY BOARDS. 

2550, 91iG..Decorated earthenware, from Vincenzo Errico, Naples, July 25, 1895 : 

Cornice Grande, entered at 200 lire per total, less 10 per cent. No advance. Add packing. 
2549, <mo..Decoraled earthenware, etc., from Anthony Shaw & Co., Burslem, August 31, 1895 : 

Entered at discounts of 45 per cent, 5 per cent, and 5 per cent. Advanced to discounts of 
40 per cent, 5 per cent, and 5 per cent. 
2530, 9617. .Blank books, from Ullmann & Engelmaun, Berlin, September 7, 1895 : 

Wallets, 2222/11, entered at 10, advanced to 18 lire per gross, less 2 per cent discount, 
2480, 9G68..Manvfacturesofsilk and cotton, from G. Varenne and J. Pointet & Co., Lyons, September 19, 1895 : 

18-inch fancy weave, 9091, dyed, entered at .85, advanced to .90 franc per meter. 

221-inch changeable rib, 9433, dyed, entered at .60, advanced to .66 franc per meter. 

18-inch ethiopia, 100, entered at .60, advanced to .66 franc per meter. 

Discount, 20 per cent. Add packing. 



3 

2587-9764, ") 

?539-9766 I Manu f aetures °f w00 h from Jos - Wilcock & Co., September 3, 10, 17, and 27, 1895 : 

2541-9763!. J 

54-inch and 56-inch fancy, 512, 498, 334, 359, 496, 323, 493, 516, 501, 498, 494, 264, entered 
at 3s. 9d., advanced to 4s. 6d., sterling, per yard. 

54-inch and 56-inch, 460/464, entered at 4s., advanced to 4s. 8d., sterling, per yard. 

56-inch, 540, fancy, entered at 3s. lid., advanced to 4s. 8d., sterling, per yard. 

Less -fa, 4T0. Add making up and packing. Discount, 2} per cent. 
2560-9971.. Vegetables, n. o. p. /., from P. Vitelli & Co., Castellamare, October 5, 1895: 

Garlic, entered at 11, advanced to 12 lire per 100 kilos. Add packing. 
541-2191..") 

O. P i Worsted yarn, from Ira Ickringill & Co., Ltd., Keighley, June 26, 1895 : 

Boston ) 

2/33 I. S., entered at Is. 7|d., advanced to Is. 7|d., sterling, per pound. Discount, 2\ 
per cent. 
579 0. P..) 

2351 [• Worsted yarn, from Pirth & Eenton, Bradford, August 16, 1895 : 

Boston . . . ) 

2/40 M. S., botany yarn, entered at 2s. Id., advanced to 2s. 3d., sterling, per pound. 
Discount, 2\ per cent. Add cases. 

576 0. P..) 

2413 [ English luster wool tops, from David Smith & Co., Halifax, August 27, 1895: 

Boston... ) 

Entered at 19d., advanced to 21d., sterling, per pound. Add bales. 

2394 > ' ]E> " l Wool tops, from Win. Tucksmith, Bradford, September 10, 1895 : 

Botany tops, entered at 19d. , advanced to 21d. , sterling, per pound. Discount, 11 per cent. 
2443-9466.. Matches, from A. Furth, Vienna, August 7, 1895: 

The Key safety match, entered at 23.10, advanced to 30 florins per case of 50 gross. 

The Key safety match, entered at 2.45, advanced to 3.40 florins per case of 5 gross. 

Packing included. 

O 






INVITING PROPOSALS FOB FOUR PER GENT BONDS. 



greasurtj Jteparttttsttt, 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 3. 

Division of Loans and Currency. 

OmoEoj THE SECRETARY, 



Washington, D. C, January 6, 1896. 

Notice is hereby given that sealed proposals will be received at the office of the Secretary of the 
Treasury, at Washington, D. C, until 12 o'clock m., on Wednesday, the 5th day of February, 1896, for 
the purchase of one hundred million dollars ($100,000,000) of United States four per cent coupon or 
registered bonds, in denominations of fifty dollars ($50) and multiples of that sum, as may be desired by 
bidders. 

The right to reject any or all bids is reserved. 

The bonds will be dated on the first day of February, 1895, and be payable in coin thirty years after 
that date, and will bear interest at four per centum per annum, payable quarterly, in coin, but all coupons 
maturing on and before the first day of February, 1896, will be detached, and purchasers will be required 
to pay in United States gold coin, or gold certificates, for the bonds awarded to them, and all interest 
accrued thereon after the first day of February, 1896, up to the time of payment for the bonds. 

Payments for the bonds must be made at the Treasury of the United States at Washington, D. C, 
or at the United States subtreasuries at New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Cincinnati, Chicago, 
St. Louis, and New Orleans, and they may be made at San Francisco with exchange on New York, and 
all bids must state what denominations of bonds are desired, and whether coupon or registered, and at 
what place they will be paid for. 

Payments may be made by installments, as follows: Twenty per cent (20 per cent) and accrued 
interest upon receipt of notice of acceptance of bids, and twenty per cent (20 per cent) and accrued interest 
at the end of each ten days thereafter ; but all accepted bidders may pay the whole amount at the date 
of the first installment, and those who have paid all installments previously maturing may pay the whole 
amount of their bids at any time, not later than the maturity of the last installment. 

The bonds will be ready for delivery on or before the fifteenth day of February, 1896. 

Notice is further hereby given that if the issue and sale of an additional or different form of bond 
for the maintenance of the gold reserve shall be authorized by law before the fifth day of February, 1896, 
sealed proposals for the purchase of such bonds will also be received at the same time and place, and up 
to the same date, and upon the same terms and conditions herein set forth, and such bids will be considered 
as well as the bids for the four per cent bonds herein mentioned. 

J. Q. CARLISLE, 
Secretary of the Treasury. 



ADDRESSING OFFICIAL COMMUNICATIONS. 



Chief Clerk. 

office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D, C, January 4, 1896. 

To the Heads of Bureaus and Chiefs of Divisions, 

Secretary's Office, Treasury Department: 

Hereafter in addressing official communications you will be guided by the following examples : 



To the President 

of the United States. 

To the Honorable 

The Secretary of the Treasury. 

To the Auditor for the 

Treasury Department. 

To the Comptroller 

of the Treasury. 

To the Comptroller 

of the Currency. 

To the Solicitor 

of the Treasury. 

To the Treasurer 

of the United States. 
To the Eegister 

of the Treasury. 
To the Commissioner 

of Internal Eevenue. 
To the Chairman 

of the Light- House Board. 
To the General Superintendent 

of Life- Saving Service. 
To the Commissioner of Navigation, 

Treasury Department. 
To the Supervising Surgeon-General 

Marine-Hospital Service. 



To the Supervising Inspector-General 

Steamboat-Inspection Service. 
To the Supervising Architect, 

Treasury Department. 
To the Speaker 

of the House of Eepresentatives. 
To the President 

of the Senate. 
To the Chairman, 

Committee on Appropriations 

House of Eepresentatives. 
To the Chairman, 

Committee on Appropriations 

United States Senate. 
To the Commissioner 

of the General Land Office. 
To the 

Commissioner of Pensions. 
Custodian, 

Court-House and Post-Office, 

Philadelphia, Penu. 

Collector of Customs, 

Baltimore, Md. 
Assistant Treasurer, U. S., 

New York City. 

To the Postmaster, 

Washington, D. C. 

S. WIKE, 

Acting Secretary. 



-" 



COLLECTION DISTRICT OF CHICAGO. 



Department C^lar No. 5. ^VtHSUVT^ ^ptlVhUtU^ 

Division of Customs. 

office of THE SECRETARY, 
Washington, D. C, January 4, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The following Act of Congress approved December 27, 1895, creating the collection district of Chicago, 
is published for the information and guidance of all concerned. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



[AN ACT to amend Section twenty-six hundred and one of the Revised Statutes relative to Ports of Entry.] 

Be it enacted by the Senate and Home of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress 
assembled, That section twenty-six hundred and one, Eevised Statutes, be, and the same is hereby, amended 
so as to read as follows : 

Section 2601. There shall be in the States of Indiana and Illinois one Collection District as follows : 

The District of Chicago ; to comprise the State of Illinois, and the waters and shores of Lake Michigan, 
within the State of Indiana ; in which Chicago shall be the port of entry, and Waukegan and Michigan 
City ports of delivery: Provided, That all present ports of delivery in the State of Illinois now a part of 
the New Orleans District, shall be ports of delivery in the new District of Illinois and shall have all 
privileges which they have under existing law : Provided further, That nothing in this Act shall be con- 
strued to repeal the provisions of the Act approved August seventh, eighteen hundred and eighty-two, 
which embraces East Saint Louis, Illinois, within the limits of the port of Saint Louis, Missouri. 

Approved, December 27, 1895. 



SUBSCRIPTIONS TO FOUR PER GENT BONDS. 



Division of Loans and Currency. 

office of THE SECRETARY, 
Washington, D. C. January 9, 1896. 

In subscribing for the new four per cent bonds under the circular of January 6, 1896, the annexed 
form should be followed. The blank may be detached, filled up, and addressed to the Secretary of the 
Treasury. The subscriber should state plainly the amount of bonds desired, the price which he proposes 
to pay, and the place where the bonds should be delivered, which may be the subscriber's home or any 
other more convenient place. He should at the same time state whether he desires to deposit the amount 
of his subscription at the Treasury Department in the city of Washington, or at one of the following 
subtreasuries, viz: New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Cincinnati, Chicago, St. Louis, New 
Orleans, or San Francisco. Deposits at San Francisco must be with exchange on New York. 

The bonds will be issued in the following denominations, viz : Coupon bonds, $50, $100, $500, and 
$1,000; registered bonds, $50, $100, $500, $1,000, $5,000, and $10,000. 

Subscribers should, if practicable, state in their proposals the denominations of the bonds desired and 
whether they should be coupon or registered ; but if at the time of offering the subscription the kind and 
denomination of the bonds desired can not be "stated, the subscriber may defer giving that information 
until he is notified that his proposal is accepted. 

Gold certificates will be received the same as gold coin in payment of subscriptions, but no payment 
should be made by any subscriber until he has been notified by the Secretary that his subscription has 
been accepted. 

•Additional copies of the annexed form of proposal may be had upon application to the Secretary of 
the Treasury. 

J. G. CARLISLE, 
Secretary of the Treasury. 

Envelopes should be plainly marked : " Proposals for four per cent bonds." 



/ hereby propose, under the terms of your Circular of January 6, 1896, to 
purchase U. S. four per cent thirty-year bonds described in said Circular, of 

the face value of dollars, 

and I agree to pay therefor at the rate of _. and accrued interest 

per $100. I further agree upon due notice of the acceptance of this subscrip- 
tion, to deposit the amount thereof in gold coin or gold certificates with the 

U. S. Assistant Treasurer at in accordance 

with the terms of said Circular. 

I desire (registered or coupon) bonds, in denominations as stated below, 
and I wish them to be delivered to me at 



(Signature :) _ 
To the Secretary of the Treasury. 



COUPON. 



50 $. 

100 $.. 

500 $.. 

1,000 $.. 



50 $.. 

100- $.. 

500 $.. 

1,000 $.. 

5,000 $.. 

10,000 $... 



REGISTERED. 



iV 



KILLING OF FUR-BEARING ANIMALS IN ALASKA. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 7. 

Division of Special Agents. 



%xzR&uxi% gzpuxtmzntf 



office of THE SECRETARY, 



Washington, B. C, January 9, 1896. 

Department Circular No. 56, dated April 14, 1893, wherein white men married to natives, and 
residing within the Territory of Alaska, are denied the privilege of killing fur-bearing animals, is hereby 
modified in such manner as to confer the privileges specified in said Circular upon white men who 
married natives, and engaged in otter hunting in said Territory, prior to March 2, 1893, in faith of 
previous rulings of the Department. 

J. G. CARLISLE, 

Secretary. 



splC PROPER 

> ~*-" u. s. *_ ' 
^S*V DEPART*^ 






SEIZURE OF IMPORTED GOODS FOR UNDERVALUATION UNDER SECTION 7 OF THE ACT 

OF JUNE 10, 1890. 



1S9G. 
Department Circular No. 8 



grjeastmj gjepartnuetti, 

Office op THE SECRETARY, 
Washington, D. C, January 8, 1896. 

To Collectors and other officers of the Customs: 

Section 7 of the act of June 10, 1890, provides that "if the appraised value of any article of imported 
merchandise shall exceed by more than ten per centum the value declared in the entry, there shall be 
levied, collected, and paid, in addition to the duties imposed by law on such merchandise, a further sum 
equal to two per centum of the total appraised value for each one per centum that such appraised value 
exceeds the value declared in the entry ; and the additional duties shall only apply to the particular 
article or articles in each invoice which are undervalued; and if such appraised value shall exceed the value 
declared in the entry more than forty per centum, such entry may be held to be presumptively fraudulent, and the 
collector of customs may seize such merchandise and proceed as in cases of forfeiture for violations of the customs 
laws; and in any legal proceedings which may result from such seizure the fact of such undervaluation 
shall be presumptive evidence of fraud, and the burden of proof shall be on the claimant to rebut the 
same, and forfeiture shall be adjudged unless he shall rebut said presumption of fraudulent intent by 
sufficient evidence." 

Although the language of the above provision has been construed as permissive, rather than mandatory, 
the Department desires it to be understood that, in any case where an undervaluation of 40 per cent or 
more has been found of imported merchandise, seizure should be made at once under a presumption of 
fraud, unless the circumstances are such as to positively relieve the importer from any suspicion of fraudu- 
lent intention. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



1 ?' 



REAPPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



*Qxzmux% gjeparimetxt, 



X896. 
Department Circular No. 9. 

Division of Customs. 

office op THE SECRETARY, 
Washington, D. C, January 10, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 

The following reappraisements of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending December 7, 1895 : 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING DECEMBER 7, 1895. 

y. B.—In corresponding with the Board of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference should alivays be made to the number of Meappraisement. 

2fo. of Keappraise- 
ment. 

9758 Manufactures of metal furniture, of wood, etc., from "William John McCoy & Sons, Belfast, 

September 7, 1895 : 
Plates, trays, coasters, tea sets, chafiDg dishes, oak chairs, fenders, etc., entered value 
sustained on some and others advanced up to 20 per cent. 

10071 Manufactures of metal and glass, from Storck & Sinsheimer, Hanau, October 30, 1895 : 

Bottles, baskets, buckles, etc., silver on the articles entered at 16 pfennigs per ounce. Kb 
advance. Add cases and packing. 

10130 Steel tubes, from Perfecta Seamless Steel Tube Co., Birmingham, October 31, 1895 : 

144 0/3 7/8 x 22g niults, 16 5/8, entered at Is. 3d. ; 100 0/2 3/4 x 24g mnlts, 22 1/8, entered 
at Is. 6d. ; 29 0/2, 1 1/4 x 24g mults, 21 1/8, entered at Is. lOd. Add cases. Discount, 
3J per cent. Packing, freight, and shipping charges deducted on entry. 
Advanced by disallowance of packing, freight, and shipping charges. 

10121.. Clock, from G. B. Maggs, Bristol, October 2, 1895: 

One eight-day, brass-face, grandfather's clock, entered at £5. No advance. Add packing 
and case. 
9783 Enamel ironware, from Etnaillirwery Silesia, Bybrick, July 10, 1895 : 

Entered at various prices, less cash discount of 2 per cent and 1 per cent. Freight and 



9783 Enamel ironware, etc. — Continued. 

charges included in price and deducted. Advanced by disallowance of deduction of 
cases and packing. 

10147 Decorated glassware, from , Venice, June 3, 1895: 

1,000 small scent bottles of glass, entered at 500 lire, advanced to 600 lire. Add packing 
and charges. 

9894 Beads (jet trimmings), from E. Syeger, Sr., Annaberg, October 11, 1895 : 

Various numbers and prices, less discount of 25 per cent. Advanced by reduction of 
discount to 5 per cent and 2 per cent. 

9908 Chemical salt, from Die Deutsche Gold & Silber ScheideAnstalt, Frankfort on-the- Main, 

September 9, 1895 : 
Zinc vitrol, entered at 4.535 marks per 100 kilos, advanced to 7.50 marks per 100 kilos. 
Add packing. 

10025 Wool dress goods, from E. Waddiugton, Bradford, October 18, 1895 : 

Z 2865, 42 fancy black, entered at 71d., advanced to 84 d., sterling, per yard. 
Z 2393, 42 fancy black, entered at 13!d., advanced to 15d., sterling, per yard. 
Discount, 24 per cent. Prices include making up and packing. 

10083 Worsted yarn, from Chas. Semon & Co., Bradford, November 6, 1895 : 

3 fo 8 gen. cord malishly 2228, entered at Is. 9id., advanced to Is. Hid., sterling, per 
pound. Discount, 2 J per cent. Add packing. 

10029 Silk embroidery, manufactures of silk, from Sarhan Shehfy, Damascus, October 1, 1895: 

Drab agbabain, hakra, drap de table, charbe, coufie, etc. Advanced 10 per ceut. 

10084 Cotton nettings and cotton lace, from B. "Walker & Co., Nottingham, November 8, 1895: 

3781 E. T. curtains, 34 yards, 48 inches, entered at 2s. 3d., advanced to 2s. 4d., sterling. 
3781 W. T. curtains, 3 J yards, 48 inches, entered at 2s. 3d., advanced to 2s. 4d., sterling. 
3940 <§cru curtains, 34 yards, 43 inches, entered at Is., advanced to Is. Id., sterling. 
3759 W. T. curtains, 34 yards, 48 inches, entered at 2s. 7£d., advanced to 2s. 103d., sterling. 
Discount, 24 per cent. Inland carriage deducted from entered price not allowed. Add 
cases to advanced value. 

10217 Colored cotton corduroys, from G. Boskill & Co., Manchester, November 12, 1895: 

27-inch, plain colored corduroy, quality K, entered at 124d., advanced to Is. Id., sterling, 
less ^f. Discount, 24 per cent. Making up included in price. 

10131 Manufactures of wool, cotton, and metal, from , Damascus, August 8, 1895: 

Advauced 10 per cent. 

10039 Mirrors, from Wehrle & Co., Puerth, October 10, 1895: 

31 by 2jL double schock crescent, 27 P, entered at 1.30, advanced to 1.40 marks per doz. 
3^ by 3i, double schock heart, No. 33, entered at 1.34, advanced to 1.40 marks. 
44 by 44, double schock clover leaf, No. 119, entered at 2.58, advanced to 2.80 marks. 
34 by 2}, t white, rd. corn., entered at 1.05, advanced to 1.15 marks. 

10129 Sweetmeata (preserved ginger), from Chee Long, Canton, August 29, 1895: 

Cargo ginger, entered at 8.75, advanced to 9.25 Mexican silver per picul. Discount, 2 
per cent. 
10016-10051 ..Sugar not above 16 B. S., from P. G. Guerra, Havana, October 13, 1895, and November 7, 1895 : 
Entered at .025 cents per pound, less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to .0226, United 

States gold, per pound, packed. 
Entered at .02^, less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to .0223, United States gold, 
per pound, packed. 



10235 Sugar not above 16 B. 8., from 1ST. Castano, Cienfuegos, November 6, 1895 : 

Centrifugal, entered at .021, less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to .02195, United 
States gold, per pound, packed. 
9998 Sugar not above 16 J). S., from A. G. Mendoza, Havana, October 23, 1895: 

Testing 97.30°, entered at 4.42, advanced to 5.238 reals per arroba. 

Testing 96.25°, entered at 4.39, advanced to 5.166 reals per arroba. 

Testing 93.15°, entered at 4.30, advanced to 4.766 reals per arroba. 

Testing 95°, entered at 4.30, advanced to 5.016 reals per arroba. 

Testing 93,30°, entered at 4.24, advanced to 4.786 reals per arroba. 

Testing 93.06°, entered at 4.18, advanced to 4.726 reals per arroba. 

Testing 88.10°, entered at 4.18, advanced to 4.084 reals per arroba. 

Testing 93.30°, entered at 3.91, advanced to 4.786 reals per arroba. 

Cost of bags, insurance, and storage added to entered value. Advanced prices in packed 
condition. 

2140 O. P..1 

2141 O. P.. I Cotton embroidery, handkerchiefs, etc., from Mir Balur ali, et al., Calcutta, March 1, 19, and 

2142 O. P. f 25, 1S95 : 
Galveston.. J 

Entered prices advanced from 80 to 115 per cent. Add cases and packing. 
2507 OP) ' 

Boston' ( ^^ Jmn ^ fcercflie f s ana " embroidery, from Sun Kwong Hop, Hongkong, July 29, 1895 : 

Silk handkerchiefs, etc., advanced 10 per cent. 

2433 0. P ] 

2432 O. P [• Manufactures of metal, from Schnepper & Schrader, Ludenscheid, July 5 and 18, 1895: 

Philadelphia.. J 

Buckles, No. 415, 10 and 12, blue and oxidized; No. 515 J, 10 and 12, blue, entered at .66, 
advanced to .68 mark per cts. 

Buckles, No. 680, 12, 10, blank ; No. 352/3, 10, 12, blank ; No. 354, 12, black ; No. 355, 
10, black ; No. 44, 10 and 12, black ; and No. 20, 10 and 12, blank, entered at .35 
mark per cts. No advance. 

Buckles, No. 400, 12, black, and 191, 10 and 12, black, entered at .30, advanced to .32 
mark per pack of 100. 

Buttons, No. 161, 14 and 17m, black, oxidized, and blue; No. 162, 14 and 17, oxidized, 
black, and blue ; No. 11, 14 and 17, blue, bronze, and white ; No. 15, 14 and 17, 
blue, bronze, and oxidized ; No. 150, 14 and 17, oxidized ; No. 2900, 14 and 17, blue 
and bronze, oxidized and white; and No. 2400, 14 and 17, blue, bronze, black, 
oxidized, and white, entered at 4.50, advanced to 4.80 marks per mass. 

Prices are for goods in packed condition. Discount, 2 per cent. 
Chicago. ( Manufactures of metal, from Lane & Timaeus, Loebtau-Dresden, September 21, 1895 : 

1 Victoria V. H. M. needle, 7, 37 cm., entered at 146, advanced to 188.50 marks. 

1 Victoria, V. S. M. needle, 7, 21 cm., entered at 70, advanced to 97.50 marks. 

2641 O. P.. ) 

2642 O. P.. > Maple sugar, from , Quebec, October 22 and 24, 1895 : 

Chicago.... ) 

Maple sugar, entered at 7i cents, United States currency, per pound. No advance. 
Maple sugar, entered at 7, advanced to 1\ cents, United States currency, per pound. 
Chicago [ ^ rws ^ es i fr° m Ch. Loonen, Paris, September 30, 1895 : 

Advanced by disallowance of deduction of 5 per cent commission added to invoice, but 
deducted on entry. 



Chi °o P i Wo ° l yar ' h from Adol P b Maas & Co -' Berlin, October, 17, 1895 : 

Mohair, 318 M, 50, called ice wool, white, entered at 5, advanced to 6.43 marks per kilo. 

Mohair, 490, ice wool, black, entered at 4.30, advanced to 5.50 marks per kilo. 

Mohair, 318 M, called ice wool, common colors, entered at 5.30 ; advanced to 6.81 marks 

per kilo. 
Mohair. 318 M, 50, called ice wool, imperial, entered at 5.60, advauced to 7 marks per kilo. 
Add putting up and boxes and cases. 

REAPPRAISEMENTS BY BOARDS. 

2303, 9056.. Macaroni, from Flli. Garofalo, Gragnauo, July 16, 1895 : 

Extra, entered at 3.50, advanced to 4 lire per box. 

Prima, entered at 3, advanced to 4 lire per box. 
2511-9 197. .Sugar not above 16 D. 8., from P. V. Drake & Co., Magdeburg, June 25, 1895 : 

Testing 88.812, entered at 9s., less 1} per cent, advanced to 9s. 8d., sterling, per cwt., 
packed. Add cost of bags to entered value. 
2509-9708..S?«^ar not above 16 D. 8., from Onckschwerd & Beichel, Magdeburg, May 12, 1S95 : 

Testing 77.10, entered at 7.209925 marks per cwt., advanced to 8s. 3£d., sterling, per cwt., 
packed. Add bags to entered value. 
2501, 9SS7, ) Manufactures of flax, from York Street Flax Spinning Co., Ltd., Belfast, October 9 and 16. 
2562, 9940.. j 1S95 : 

9 P. L. 351/6 white lineu, entered at 7d., advanced to lid., sterling, per yard. 

10 P. L. P., 4/4 white linen, entered at 8d., advanced to 81d., sterling, per yard. 

11 P. L., 4/4 white linen, entered at 9d., advanced to 9}d., sterling, per yard. 

11 P., 4/4 white linen, entered at 93d., advanced to 10d., sterling, per yard. 

12 P., 4/4 white linen, entered at 10d., advanced to lid., sterling, per yard. 

13 P., 4/4 white linen, entered at lid., advanced to 12d., sterling, per yard. 

14 P., 4/4 white linen, entered at 121-d., advanced to 12|d., sterling, per yard. 
Discount, 2 J per cent. Add cases, etc. 

r >514 1 banned vegetables, from Julius Eoever, Braunschweig, September 18, 1895 : 

1/1 asparagus, la extra, entered at 1. 75 less 10 per cent and 2 per cent discount, advanced ' 

to 1.80 marks per dozen, less 2 per cent. 
1/1 asparagus, la extra, entered at 1.30 less 10 per cent and 2 per cent, advanced to 1.40 

marks per dozen, less 2 per cent. 
1/2 asparagus, la extra, entered at .85 less 10 per cent and 2 per cent, advauced to .90 

mark per dozen, less 2 per cent. 

604 O. P..) n 7 e 

9 , ok \ Dyed moss, from ■ : 

Dyed moss, entered at 95, advanced to 135 francs per 1,000 bundles. Discount, 2 per cent. 

Add packing charges. 

226(j [ Sat pins, from Schindler & Co., Gablontz, June 28, 1895 : 

279/4, pins, 5-inch, entered at 2 florins per great gross. Add packing, less 7a per cen 

and 2 per cent ; add cases. Advanced to 3 florins per great gross, including packing, 

less 2 per cent. Add cases. 
9287/4, pins, 5-inch, entered at 3 florins per great gross. Add packing, less 1\ per cent 

and 2 per cent ; add cases. Advanced to 4 florins per great gross, including packing, 

less 2 per cent. Add cases. 






RE APPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



treasury Jtepa vtttmtt, 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 10. 

Division of Customs. 

Oeficeop THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, January 11, 1896. 
To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The following reappraisements of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending December 21, 1895. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING DECEMBER 21, 1895. 

N. B. — In corresponding with the Board of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference should always be made to the number of Reappraisement. 

No. of Reappraise - 
ment. 

9797 Soap, , Birmingham, September 28, 1895: 

Soft soap, entered at 9s. Gd. per dozen. No advance. 
Soft soap, entered at 6s. per dozen pints. No advance. 
Add cases. 

10047 Cotton and flax tape, , J. North Hardy & Son, Manchester, November 2, 1895 : 

Grey linen tape, 1,000 yards per reel, No. 1605, entered at 4«. Sd. per reel, advanced to 4s. 

lid. per reel. 
Pink cotton tape, 1,000 yards per reel, No. 60, entered at 4s. 6d., advanced to 4s. lOd. per 

reel. 
Discount 3 per cent. 

10272 Precious stones (uncut), from L. Strasburger & Co., Paris, November 21, 1895: 

9267, 31 a rough, 61 carats, entered at 29.66, advanced to 40 fraucs per carat. Discount 
5 per cent. Add packing. 

9996 Cotton lace curtains, tamboured cotton shams, and tidies, from M. Ph. Emden, St. Gall, October 

22, 1895 : 
2869, 14/4, 4 yards, Spachtel weiss, entered at 36.60, advanced to 40 francs per pair. 
2612, 12/4, 3i yards, Spachtel weiss, entered at 15.65 francs per pair. No advance. 
Bed sets, Spachtel weiss, entered at 36, advanced to 38 francs per pair. 



9996 Cotton lace curtains, tamboured cotton shams, and tidies, etc. — Continued. 

Bed sets, Spachtel weiss and 6cru, 2057 and 2894, entered at 14.70, and 21.55 francs per 
pair. No advance. 

Add cases and boxes to invoice value. 
101)15 Cotton luce curtains, from Goodall & White, Glasgow, October 31, 1895: 

61 yards, B. T., No. 674, entered at 4s. 3id., advanced to 4s. 6Jd. per pair. 

71 yards, W. T. and E. T., entered at 4s. 9d., advanced to 5s. per pair. 

Discount, 33 per cent. Add case and packing. 
lid it; Cotton lace curtains and cotton nettings, etc., from E. Kirke, Nottingham, November. 2, 1895: 

2528/9, E. T., 3 i yards, entered at 5s. lid., advanced to 6s. per pair. 

2529, W. T., 4 yards, E. T., 3] yards, entered at 6s. lid., advanced to 7s. per pair. 

2514, E. T., 4 yards, entered at 3s. 9ld., advanced to 3s. 10 1 d. per pair. 

2514, E. T., SI yards, entered at 3s. 2d., advanced to 3s. 3d. per pair. 

2516, E. T., 3i yards, entered at 3s. Id., advanced to 3s. 3d. per pair. 

Discount on entered values, 31 per cent. On advanced values, 2J per cent. 

1512, E. 51Hnch, fancy net, entered at 4|d., advanced to 5}d. per yard. Discount, 3| 
per cent. 

Add cases, less inland carriage. 
10054, etc.. Chestnuts, from Peri & Co., Nicola Cuneo, Valentino Savarese, and Salvatore Gison, Genoa, 
October 30; Sorrento, November 2, and Naples, October 28, 1895 : 

Entered at from 10 to 18 lire and advanced from 11.69 to 19.80 lire per 100 kilos. Add 
packages. 
10073 Sponges, from , Havana, November 9, 1895: 

Velvet, large and med. forms, 54 I, 25 J, entered at 80 cents per pound. No advance. 

Sheep's wool, large and med. cut, white and red, entered at $1.05. No advance. 
10275 Sponges, from E. N. Musgrove, Nassau, November 26, 1895: 

Med. wool, entered at $1.40. No advance. Add packing and charges. 
10139,10140, \Sicgar, from Willenstein, Krauss & Co., Pekalengan, August 31, Tegal, September 3, and 
10142 } Sourabaya, August 22, 1895 : 

Testing 96.81, entered at 7 florins per picul. No advance. 
10153, etc.Grapes, from S. C. Houghton & Co., etc., Almeria, October 7,18,13, November 2,6,13, 1895: 

Barrels of grapes containing 23 and 25 kilos per barrel, entered at from 12 pesetas, packed, 
to 13.30, advanced to 14.50 and 13.50 pesetas, packed, per barrel. 
10171 Anchovies, from — ; , Messina, September 24, 1895: 

Entered at 50 lire per 100 kilos, advanced to 100 lire per 100 kilos. 
10159 Anchovies, from , Bingen, October 24, 1895: 

Entered at 8 crowns. No advance. 
10334, etc... Fish n. o.p. /., from Eonneberg's Preserving Co., Stavanger, November 1, 1895: 

Smoked sprats in oil, entered at .20* crowns per case of 100 i tins. No advance. 

Smoked sprats in oil, entered at .32 crowns per case of 100 J tins. No advance. 
10264 Manufactures of goat hair and cotton, from Jos. Brooke & Co., Huddersfield, November 11, 1895: 

54-inch black knit fabrics, quality 444, entered at 2s. 5d. per yard. No advance. 

54-inch fancy suitings, 09668, quality 11943, entered at Is. 9d. per yard. No advance. 

54-inch fancy suitings, 09630, entered at Is. lid. per yard. No advance. 

54-inch fancy suitings, 09637, entered at 2s. per yard. No advance. 

Less measure]! yard per piece. Less 5 per cent discount. Add making up, cases, etc. 



10310 Cotton hose, from Winzer & Wecker, Chemnitz, October 26, 1895 : 

Men's Hermsdorf black cotton half hose, 108, 9 J/11, entered at 2.80, advanced to 2.90 

marks per dozen. 
Men's Hermsdorf black cotton half hose, 105, 9-5/11, entered at 3.80, advanced to 4 marks 

per dozen. 
Men's Hermsdorf black cotton half hose, 114, §1/11, entered at 4, advanced to 4.20 marks 

per dozen. 
Lad's Hermsdorf black cotton hose, 900, 8/10, entered at 5.25, advanced to 5.60 marks per 

dozen. 
Lad's Hermsdorf black cotton hose, 830, 8/10, entered at 4.55, advanced to 4.80 marks per 

dozen. 
Discount, 5 per cent. Packing included. 
10201, etc... Sugar, from Praser, Eaton & Co., Sourabaya, September 7, 1895: 

Testing 96.43°, entered at lis., less freight and noudutiable charges, advanced to 9s. 6d., 

packed. 

10311 Manufactures goat hair and cotton, from Joseph Brooks & Co., Huddersfield, November 14, 1895 : 

54-inch black serges, 09688, and blue, entered at 95d. per yard. No advance. 

53/4-inch black twill, 09738, blue twill, 09729, black, 09726, blue and mixture, black twill 

09738, entered at lOd. per yard. No advance. 
54-inch black meltons, 09732, entered at 101 d. per yard. No advance. 
54-inch black knit fabrics, quality 444, entered at 2s. 5d. No advance^ 
Less measurement 1 yard per piece. Less 5 per cent discount. 

10363 Pickles, from A. Vanden Bok &Son, Botterdam, October 23, 1895: 

Best cauliflower, entered at 6.50 florins per hogshead. Add cost of hogsheads at 3 florins 

per hogshead. No advance. 

10364 Pickles, from Mich. Bosnak, Amsterdam, November 7, 1895: 

Best 1895 cauliflower, entered at 8 florins per hogshead. Add hogsheads at 3 florins per 

hogshead. No advance. 
10350, etc.. Linen collars and cuffs, from Bichard Horstmann, Berlin, November 14, 1895 : 
Homer collars, entered at 3.70, advanced to 4 marks per dozen. 
Hiawasse and Hindoo, entered at 3.35i, advanced to 3.75 marks per dozen. 
Huron, entered at 3.585, advanced to 3.90 marks per dozen. 
Hudson, entered at 3.43^, advanced to 3.85 marks per dozen. 
Hampton, entered at 3.731, advanced to 4 marks per dozen. 
Hindooman and Himyara, entered at 3.50!, advanced to 3.85 marks per dozen. 
Hamorgate, entered at 4.85 T 1 - -, advanced to 5 marks per dozen. 
Holworthy cuffs, entered at 5.90, advanced to 6.40 marks per pair. 
Hawthorne cuffs, entered at 5. 23 i, advanced to 5.75 marks per pair. 
Hanover cuffs, entered at 6. 70^-, advanced to 7 marks per dozen. 
Henlopin cuffs, entered at 5.235, advanced to 5.80 marks per dozen. 
Huguenot collars, entered at 3.30, advanced to 3.75 marks per dozeD. 
Holbein collars, entered 3.58J, advanced to 4 marks per dozen. 
Halcyon, entered at 3.40, advanced to 3.85 marks per dozen. 
Hospodar, entered at 3. 65, advanced to 3. 90 marks per dozen. 
Honsdel, entered at 3.70, advanced to 3.95 marks per dozen. 
Add cases and packing. Collar boxes at .10 and cuff boxes at .20 mark each. 



'>•■■ v,l, 4 

^22 O. P.. ) (hfl E from E Rudolph, Chemnitz, May 27 and October 18, 1895. 

'Chicago j 

1/1 ladies' Albert staml. black cotton hose, 8/10, 9930, entered at 4.60 marks per dozen. No 

advance. 
1/2 ladies' Albeit staml. black cotton hose, 9940, 8/10, entered at 4.70 marks per dozen. 

No advance. 

Ladies' St. black cotton hose, 9840, 1/1, entered at 4.15 marks per dozen. No advance. 

Ladies' St. black cotton hose, 417, 1/2, entered at 4.80 marks per dozen. No advance. 

Ladies' St. black cotton hose, 177, 1/1, entered at 4.60 marks per dozen. No advance. 

Less I per cent discount. Boxes and packing included. 

2210 O. P., etc.. \ cu h f Carson, Perie, Scott & Co., Chemnitz, June 11, 1895 : 
Chicago J ' ' ' ' 

Ladies' H. black fleeced cotton hose, 7902, entered at 5 marks per dozen. No advance. 

Men's balbriggan cotton half hose, 5522, entered at 3.35 marks per dozen. No advance. 

Men's balbriggan half cotton hose, 9J/I1, 6S49, entered at 2.60 marks per dozen. No 
advance. 

Men's H. black cotton half hose, 9J/11, entered at 3.60 marks per dozen. No advance. 

7220, ladies' H. black cotton hose, 8/10, entered at 5.80 marks per dozen. No advance. 

7206, ladies' H. black cotton hose, 8/10, entered at 4.90 marks per dozen. No advance. 

Boxes and packing included. Discount, 4 per cent. 
2483 O. P...') 

Etc., (■ Worsted yam, from Samuel Jackson, Cleckheaton, September 17, etc., 1895: 

Boston ) ' 

Yarn, 2/40, super, entered at 2s. id., advanced to 2s. 2fd. per pound. 

Yarn, 2/4S.S, super, entered at 2s. Id., advanced to 2s. 3Jd. per pound. 

Yarn, 2/48, super, entered at 2s. 2d., advanced to 2s. 4ad. per pound. 

Packing included. 
2485 0. P...) 

Etc V Worsted yarn, from Hollingrake & Clegg, Halifax, September 12, 1895: 

Boston ) 

2/4S D. tubes, 429, 227, 9880, and 225,-entered at 2s. 10 J d., advanced to 3s. lid. per pound. 

2/48 D. 1368 marl, entered at 3s. lid., advanced to 3s. 5id. per pound. 

2/28 D. tubes, 4095, and 4093, entered at 2s. 9d., advanced to 3s. id. per pound. 

2/36 D. tubes, 4093, entered at 2s. 9 ad., advanced to 3s. Id. per pound. 

2/40 D. 227 tubes, entered at 2s. 9<>d., advanced to 3s. Id. per pound. 

2/48 D. 0722 C. T. tubes, entered at 3s. id., advanced to 3s. 4d. per pound. 

2/38 H. white, tubes, entered at Is. lid., advanced to 2s. lid. per pound. 

Add cases. 

95^5 OP ■) 

Boston "" ( Worsted V ar% i fl0m Hollingrake & Clegg, Halifax, October 10, 1895: 

2/40 C. white, entered at 2s. Id., advanced to 2s. 4id. per pound. 
2/48 D. 1739 marl and 1374, entered at 3s. lid., advanced to 3s. 5d. per pound. 
2/48 D. 225 and 4095, entered at 2s. HUd., advanced to 3s. 2d: per pound. 
2/28 D. 4113, entered at 2s. 9d., advanced to 3s. \d. per pound. 
2/36 D. 9838, entered at 2s. 9Jd., advanced to 3s. Id. per pound. 
2s/48 D. 0715, C.T., entered at 3s. Id., advanced to 3s. 4d. per pound. 
Add cases. 
2557 O. P.. Sugar not above 16 D. S., from McA.dam, Hogarth & Co., Greenock, October 17, 1S95: 
Entered at £9 5s., advanced to £9 16s. per ton. 



vm/F 



2557 O. V.. Sugar not above 16 D. 8., etc.— Continued. V/o &! ty/$^ 

Entered at £10, advanced to £10 lis. per ton. X&t- ' ^ ty" 

Entered at £10 10s., advanced to £11 is. per ton. ^X^'i* *^ 

Add cost of filling to entered price. Advanced value, packed condition. ^^<^TMcm-\ 

KEAPPKAISEMENTS BY BOARDS. 

2580, 9882.. Wool dress goods, from Alfred Munch, Gera, October 11, 1895: 

92/94 cm., all wool henrietta, quality 60, entered at .92, advanced to 1.07 marks per meter 
112/114, all wool lieurietta, quality 56, entered at 1.06, advanced to 1.12 marks per meter. 
Discount, 8 per cent. Add making up and cases. 
2582, 9906.. Wool dress goods, from Gebr. Pfeifer, Weida, October 12, 1895: 

114/115 cm., genre, 2750, black, entered at 1.45, advanced to 1.65 marks per meter. Add 
packing and case. 

2611, 10115.. Wool dress goods, from , Gera, November 1, 1895: 

95 cm., henrietta, 5011, entered at .84, advanced to .96 mark per meter. 
114 cm., henrietta, 5016, entered at 1.36, advanced to 1.51 marks per meter. 
114 cm., henrietta, 5013, entered at 1.12, advanced to 1.31 marks per meter. 
114 cm., henrietta, 5011, entered at 1, advanced to 1.14 marks per meter. 
US cm., henrietta, 5014, entered at 1.26, advanced to 1.40 marks per meter. 
Add packing and cases. 
2563,9637, ) Manufactures of wool and cotton, mohair velvet, etc., from Lester & Co., Ltd., Bradford, August 
2577 9830 \ 29 > September 10 and 19, 1895 : 

Mohair velvet, 01991, entered at 2s. 6d., advanced to 3s. 3d., sterling, per yard. 
Mohair velvet, 01199, entered at 2s. Id., advanced to 3s. Id., sterling, per yard. 
Mohair velvet, 01991, entered at 2s. 3d., advanced to 3s. 2d., sterling, per yard. 
Crimson mohair velvet, 0425, entered at 3s. 4Jd., advanced to 4s. 4Jd., sterling, per yard. 
Discounts, 21 per cent and J per cent. Add frames. 

2553, 9839, j Ename i ea - ironware, from Eisenhnttenwerk Thale, Thale, September 12, 1895 : 
2554, 9840.. j 

Eeflectors, entered at .57, advanced to .63 mark each. 

Lighting articles, entered at .19, advanced to .25 mark each. 

Discount, 2 per cent. 

2603, 10020.. Linen collars, from Richard Horstmann, Berlin, October 25, 1895: 

"Halton," entered at 3.66 T V, advanced to 4 marks per dozen. 

"Holbein," entered at 3.58J-, advanced to 3.90 marks per dozen. 

Add case and packing. 

2604=, 10000.. Manufactures of goat hair and cotton, from Godfrey Sykes & Sons, Huddersfield, October 23, 

1895: 

Black astrakan, 76, entered at 3s., advanced to 3s. 8d., sterling, per yard. Less 1 yard 

over measurement. Less &. Discount, 4 per cent. Add cases. 

2613, 10200.. Vegetables, n. o. p. f, etc., from F. Vitelli & Co., Castellamare, October 27, 1S95 : 

Macaroni, boxes of 101 kilos each, entered at 4.047, advanced to 4. 10 lire per box, packed. 

Garlic, entered at 11, advanced to 12 lire per box. 

Add packing. 

2556, 9857.. Cotton hose, etc., from Uhel & V. Wagner, Chemnitz, September 20, 1895 : . 

Ladies' black cotton hose, 8 J/10, 5451, entered at 3.40, advanced to 4.50 marks per dozen, 

packed. 



6 

2556, 9857. .(Mom hose, etc.— Continued. 

Ladies' black cotton hose, 8/10, 5453, entered at 3.40, advanced to 4.40 marks per dozen, 

packed. 

To entered prices add cost of bags and packing. 

506 O. P..1 

2226 [■ Worsted yarn, from Orentznaeh & Scheller, Dresden, July 21, 1895: 

Bos! oi i.... \ 

Woolen yarn, 2/40s, A. A. warp, entered at 3.95, plus packing, advanced to4.30 marks 

per kilo, packed. Discount, 2 per cent. 

592 O.P-0 
2348 I 

593 (). P.. ] Worsted yarn, from Samuel Jackson, Cleckheaton, August 21, 1S95, and August 29, 1895 : 
2350 | 

Boston ... I 

Yarn, 2/40s, super, entered at 2s. id., advanced to 2s. 23d., sterling, per pound, packed. 

Yarn, 2/48, super, entered at 2s. Id., advanced to 2s. 4]d., sterling, per pound. 

Packing included. 

590 O. P.") 

2354 Worded yarn, etc., from Columbian, etc., Halifax, August, 1895: 

Boston ... ) 

2/48 D. shade, 721 and 431, entered at 2s. 10ad., advanced to 3s. 13d., sterling, per pound. 

2/40 D. shade, 226, 225, entered at 2s. 9:!d., advanced to 3s. fd, sterling, per pound. 
2/48 D. shade, 1372, entered at 3s. ljd., advanced to 3s. 5ld., sterling, per pound. 
Bundle yarn, 2/40 C. white, entered at 2s. Id., advanced to 2s. 3Sd., sterling, per pound. 
Add bags. 

651 O. P..") 

25S5 [■ Wool shawls, from M. H. Menstadtt & Co., Prague, October 9, 1895: 

Chicago .. ) 

Shawls, No. 797, white and black, entered at 6.35, advanced to 7.60 florins per dozen. 

Shawls, No. 783, white and black, entered at 10.90, advanced to 13.10 florins per dozen. 

Shawls, No. 778, white and black, entered at 9.50, advanced to 11.40 florins per dozen. 

Add packing to advanced prices, entered prices include packing. 
650 O. P..) 

2584 - Wool shawls, from Chu Zimmermann & Son, Apolda, October 11, 1895 : 

Chicago.. ) 

Squares, No. 1119, 70 cm., entered at 10.40, advanced to 12.55 marks per dozen. 

Squares, No. 1378, 90 cm., entered at 14.50, advanced to 17.50 marks per dozen. 
Squares, Izalas, 90 cm., entered at 18.60, advanced to 22.40 marks per dozen. 
Orinico, 120 cm., entered at 29.20, advanced to 32.12 marks per dozen. 
Add case and packing. Discount, 2 per cent. Less freight and nondutiable charges. 

645 O. P ") 

2460 y Sugar, from E. Crooks & Co., Liverpool, September 11, 1895: 

Philadelphia..) 

Fourths, entered at £10 17s. 5d., advanced to £10 18s. 4d., sterling, per ton, less 21 per 
cent discount. 

O 



REAPPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



^rcasuvy Qtyttvtmmt, 



1S96. 
Department Circular No. 11. 

Division of customs. 

Officeof THE SECRETARY, 



Washington, D. C, January 14, 1896. 
To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 

The following reappraisenients of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending December 28, 1895. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING DECEMBER 28, 1895. 

X. B.— In corresponding tvith the Board of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference should altvays be made to the number of Reappraisement. 

Ifo. of reappraise- 
ment. 

10166, 1031 2.. Matches, from Henrik Lowenadler, Gothenburg, October 17, 1895: 

Lancer parlor match, size 65, entered at 40.12, advanced to 44 crowns per case of 50 gross. 

10066' ' [ Cotton yam, from McConnell & Co., Manchester, October 11, 25, November 1, 1895, etc.: 

No. 80/2, entered at Is. 6!d., advanced to Is. 7Jd., sterling, per pound. 

100 A, entered at Is. 11 d., sterling, per pound. No advance. 

140 A, entered at 2s. 4d. , sterling, per pound. No advance. 

80/2 P. N., entered at Is. 7d., advanced to Is. 9Jd., sterling, per pound. 

100/2, entered at 2s. 3d., advanced to 2s. 10d,, sterling, per pound. 

Add case and packing. Discount, 2' per cent. 
10354 Cotton wearing apparel, etc., from Herrmann & Cronheim, Plauen, November 9, 1895 : 

Entered discounts, 33^ per cent and 2 per cent ; advanced discount, 2 per cent. 
10362 Wool knit wearing apparel, from Mills & Gibb, Nottingham, November 23, 1895: 

Infants' black cashmere hose, sizes Nos. 41, 5, 51, 6, 6}, style No. 602 B, entered at 4s. 
10d., sterling, per dozen. No advance. Discount, 3 J per cent. Add cases and 
cartons. 

9952 Cotton laces and colored embroidery, from Pratt, Hurst & Co., Nottingham, October 12 and 19, 

1895: 

Entered at a discount of 20 per cent, advanced to a discount of 15 per cent. 

Ecru and ivory fish net, entered at 3id., advanced to 3id., sterling, per yard. 

Curtains entered at 8s. 6d., sterling, per yard. No advance. 

Entered discounts, 2i per cent and 2J per cent, advanced discount, 2i per cent. 

Add cases and lining. 



10263 Cotton lace, from Hunt, Moody & Co., Nottingham, November 7, 1895: 

White bretonne, entered at 2s. Gd., advanced to 2s. 9d., sterling, per gross. 

Drab bretonne, entered at 2s. 9d., advanced to 3s., sterling, per gross. 

White and natural embroidery, 8096, entered at 3s. 116.., advanced to 3s. 10Jd., sterling, 

per gross. 
Drab embroidery, No. 8096, entered at 3s. 416., advanced to 4s. 2d., sterling, per gross. 
Drab crochet, 8334, entered at 2s. 4 Id., advanced to 2s. 5d., sterling, per gross. 
Drab crochet, 8254, entered at 2s. 7ld., advanced to 3s. 3d., sterling, per gross. 
White crochet, 8255, entered at 2s. 4 L 5d., advanced to 3s. 10d., sterling, per gross. 
Drab crochet, 8255, entered at 2s. 7»d., advanced to 4s. Id., sterling, per gross. 
White crochet, 8260, entered at 2s. 4|d., advanced to 3s. 9d., sterling, per gross. 
Drab crochet, 8260, entered at 2s. 7 Id., advanced to 4s., sterling, per gross. 
Discounts, 20 per cent and 21 per cent and 1} per cent. 
Add case and packing. 

10376 Manufactures of wool and cotton, from Chas. Semon & Co., Bradford, November 20,1895: 

54" black beaver, 103/19, No. 1325, etc., entered at Is. 6|d, advanced to Is. 6.96d., sterling, 

per yard. 
54" blue and brown beaver, 103/2 and 103/3, No. 1305 and 1301, entered at Is. 7}d., 

advanced to Is. 7.99d., sterling, per yard. 
Less -gj. Add case and packing. Discount, 5 per cent. 
10405, 10415.. Wool linings and wool dress goods, from J. Cawthra & Co., Ltd., Bradford, November 12 and 
22, 1895 : 
32" black Italians, style No. 617, entered at 7M., advanced to 8Jd., sterling, per yard. 
32" black Italians, style No. 650, entered at 10|d., advanced to Hid., sterling, per yard. 
32" black cashmere, style No. 793, entered at 6id., advanced to 6M., sterling, per yard. 
32" black cashmere, style No. 791, entered at 5d., advanced to 5|d., sterling, per yard. 
54" perm fin Italians, style No. 4391, entered at Is. 5fd., advanced to Is. 7ld., sterling, 

per yard. 
54" Perm fin Italians, style No. 4392, entered at Is. 6fd., advanced to Is. 8 Id, sterling, per 

yard. 
54" Perm fin Italians, style No. 824, entered at Is. 7fd., advanced to Is. 9fd, sterling, per 

yard. 
Balance similar goods, similar advances. Less 1 yard per piece. Discount, 3b per cent. 

10366 Wool dress goods, from Julius Dittrich, Wuram, November 22, 1895 : 

Poplin a soie, entered at 1.06, advanced to 1.16 marks per meter. Discount, 5 per cent. 

10329 Wool dress goods, from Fred' k. Arnold, Griez, November 8, 1895: 

No. 446, 111/113 cm., all-wool henrietta, 190, entered at 1.27, advanced to 1.34 marks per 

meter. 
Nos. 335 and 340, 111/113 cm., all-wool henrietta, Z, mk. 650, entered at 1.11, advanced 

to 1.21 marks per meter. 
Nos. 275, 276, 325. and 329, 93/94 cm., all-wool henrietta, M, mk. 640, entered at .81, 

advanced to . 86 mark per meter. 
No. 278, 111/113 cm., all-wool henrietta, Z, mk. 0, entered at 1.11, advanced to 1.21 marks 

per meter. 
No. 388, 93/94 cm., all-wool henrietta, L, mk. 20, entered at .70, advanced to .77 mark 

per meter. 
Discount, 8 per cent. Add packing charges. 



9902 Manufactures of metal {clocks, etc.), from Durand-Ruel & Co., Paris, October 9, 1895: 

B. 56, bronze, Thesee et le centaire, entered at 200, advanced to 220 francs per total. 

B. 57, pendule marbre, entered at 200, advanced to 220 francs per total. 

B. 59, masque, entered at 20, advanced to 22 francs per total. 

B. 63, cache pat, entered at 100, advanced to 110 francs per total. 

B. 64, vase, entered at 75, advanced to 82.50 francs per total. 

B. 65, platem, entered at 70, advanced to 77 francs per total. 

B. 66, vase, entered at 40, advanced to 4.4 francs per total. 

Add packing. 
103S4 Prepared meat, etc., from Sun Kwong Hop, Hongkong, October 15, 1895 : 

Dried duck feet, entered at 6 Mexicau dollars per case. No advance. 
10265 Pocl<etknives, from Alfred Williams, Sheffield, November 11, 1895: 

Knives, No. 601, entered at 24s., advauced to 27s., sterling, per gross. Add packing. 
9868,9869, 1 Polished cylinder glass, beveled, etc., from Schrenk & Co., Fuerth, September 30, October 3, 
10125, etc.. j 10, 14, and 21, 1895 : 

No. 6697, 36x18, beveled, unsilvered, entered at 5.19, advanced to 5.25 marks per piece. 

No. 6695, No. 6696, 40x18, entered at 6.03, advanced to 6.15 marks per piece. 

No. 6699, No. 6700, No. 6701, No. 6702. 28x22, entered at 4.98, advanced to 5.10 marks 
per piece. 

No. 6698, 30x24, entered at 6.11, advanced to 6.24 marks per piece. 

No. 6733, No. 6734, 24x20, entered at 3.67, advanced to 3.80 marks per piece. 

No. 6718, 34x28, entered at 9.81, advanced to 10.03 marks per piece. 

30x17, entered at 3.81, advanced to 3.92 marks per piece. 
10337 Manufactures of leather, from Walter Hunt, Liverpool, November 18, 1895: 

36" imitation calf laces, entered at 7s. Discount, 10 per cent. No advance. Add cases. 
10347 Grapes, from , Almeria. November 5, 1895 : 

Grapes, entered at 12.30 pesetas, advanced to 13.50 pesetas per barrel. 
10445 Sugar not above 16 D. S., from , Cardenas, December 2, 1895 : 

Testing 94.15°, centrifugal, entered at 2f, United States gold, per pound, less freight. No 
advance. 
10451 Sugar not above 16 D. S., from , Matanzas, November 30, 1895: 

Testing 92.50°, centrifugal, entered at 2\, less freight, advanced to .0210, United States 
gold, per pound, packed. 
10452 Sugar not above 16 D. S., from , Havana, December 5, 1895 : 

Testing 93.48°, entered at 2*, less freight, advanced to .0216, United States gold, per pound, 
packed. 
10398 Prepared chalk, from Franz Kuhnel, Nurnberg, November 7, 1895: 

G reen and blue billiard chalk, entered at 2. 82, advanced to 3 marks per gross. Add packing. 
10413 Lava tips, from J. Von Schwarz, Nuremberg, November 14, 1895: 

E. H. lava tips, E. H. lava tips Boston, 1° sign tips, etc., entered at 1.10, advanced to 1.20 
marks per gross. Discount, 5 per cent from entered value. Deduct inland freight to 
Hamburg. 
9910 Yellow prussiate potash, from W. Candery, London, October 4, 1895: 

Entered at 6^d., plus casks, advanced to 7Jd., sterling, per pound, packed. 
10342 Zinc dust, from Beer, Sondheimer & Co., Frankfort, October 21, 1895: 

Entered at 21.75, plus casks, advanced to 24.20 marks per 100 kilos, packed. 



4 

9827 Cod liver oil, from , Aalesund, September 10, 1895: 

Entered at 116.50, advanced to 121.40 crowns per barrel. Add casks and coopering. 
10357 Prepared mushrooms, from J. Dumagnou, Paris, November 15, 1895: 

Champignons, 1st choice extra, entered at 74.40, advanced to 81.25 francs per case. Add 
cases. 
10365 Vegetables, n. o. p.f., from Luciano Grosso, Gragnano, November 9, 1895: 

Garlic, entered 12 lire per 100 kilos. No advance. Add baskets. 
10447 Anchovies, n. o. p.f., from Chr. Bjelland & Co., Stavanger, November 16, 1895 : 

Entered at 7.50, advanced to 8 crowns per half barrel. 
10416 Paint, etc., from Suter, Hartmann & Kahtjens Co., London, November 21, 1895: 

No. 1, N. N., entered at 22s. 9d., advanced to 24s. 6.84d., sterling, per cwt. 

Ill, N. N., entered at 68s. 6d., advanced to 73s. 11.76d., sterling, per cwt. 
10417 Essential oil, from B. Sielfried, Zofingue, October 30, 1895: 

Oil nunguet, entered at 16.50 francs per kilo. No advance. Add packing. 
10120 Prepared peas, from George Caffe, Paris, August 18, 1895: 

Entered at .32, .36, .43, and .55 franc per i tin, less 5 per cent discount. Add shipping. 
No advance. 

2591 O.P ) 

2592 O.P YSoap, from Lever Bros., Ltd., Liverpool, October 22, 1895: 

Philadelphia., j 

Sunlight laundry soap, in tin foil, entered at 13s., advanced to 15s., sterling, per case. 

2672 O.P ") 

2673 O. P [• Chemical compound, from Oesterreichischer Verein, Aussig, October 22, 1895 : 

Philadelphia..) 

Hyposulphate of soda, entered at 4.40, plus packing, advanced to 6.18 florins per 100 
kilos, packed. 

or7K n r> l Chemical compound, from Verein Chemischer Fabriken, Mannheim, October 24, and Nov- 

£i -i a i i. v " ' V ember 5, 1895 : 
Philadelphia.. J ' 

Hypo of sodium, entered at 8.60 and 9.10, add packing, advanced to 10.60 marks per 100 
kilos. 
PI "1 fl 1 hi I ® u tyh ate of ammonia, from "West & Penrose, London, November 5, 1895: 

Entered at £8 5s. 6d., add bags, advanced to £9 Is. 9d., sterling, per ton, packed, 
t? , I Chemical compound, from Thos. Vickers & Sons, Manchester, October 20, 1895: 

Dunging salt, entered at 12s., sterling, per cwt. No advance. Add casks and packing. 

2693 OP ) 

San Francisco'." j Jute rUffS ' from H " Ka g asata > Hi og a , October 5, 1895: 

Jute rugs, 3x6, entered at .90, advanced to 1.20 silver yen per piece. 

Jute rugs. 2x4, entered at .40, advanced to .54 silver yen per piece. 

Add cases and packing. 
10383 Manufactures of metal, etc., from Sun Kwong Chong, Hongkong, August 31, 1895: 

Brassware, entered at 21, advanced to 28 Mexican dollars per box. 

Cotton shoes, entered at 23, advanced to 25.20 Mexican dollars per box of 72 pair. 
10403 Prepared vegetables, from Sun Kwong Hop, Hongkong, August 31, 1895 : 

Salted bamboo shoots, entered at 2.50, advanced to 2.58 Mexican dollars per box. 
10457 Cotton lace curtains, from John Keller, Walzenhausen, November 23, 1895: 

Job lot, entered at a discount of 15 per cent. No advance. 



M fttf i ^eam thrasher and separator, from Samuel Eagle, Ontario, Canada. 

Separator, not new, entered at 150 dollars, United States currency. No advance. 

KEAPPRAISEMENTS BY BOARDS. 

2320, 8931.. Decorated china, from Japan Import and Export Commission Company, Kobe, March 11, 1895 : 

Umbrella stands, No. 6033, entered at .65, advanced to .80 silver yen. 

Bishin butter plates, No. 11526, entered at 3.80, advanced to 4 silver yen per 1,000. 

Bishin tea pots, No. 11527, entered at 2.30 and 2.35, advanced to 2.50 silver yen per 100. 

Bishin seji vases, 5" 11582, entered at 3.60 silver yen, per 100. No advance. 

Add cases and packing. 
2605, 10004. .Macaroni, from Giov. Aeauford, Castellamare, October 14, 1895 : 

Macaroni, entered at 28 plus packing and cases. Advanced to 37.40 lire per 100 kilos 
packed. 
2516, 9809.. Wool dress goods, from E. Zschoch & Co., Meuselwitz, October 2, 1895 : 

113 cm. henrietta, quality 5011, entered at .98, advanced to 1.06 marks per meter. Add 
case, packing, etc. 
2585, 9812..Manufactures of silk and cotton, from Edm. Corty, Crefeld, October 4, 1895 : 

Black and seal-brown satin, 36 in., entered at from 1.50 to 2.35 marks per meter, discounts, 
20 per cent and 2 per cent, advanced by disallowance of 20 per cent and 2 per cent 
discounts. 
2601, 9956.. Wool dress goods, from Hopf & Merkel, Milan, October 16, 1895. 

96 cm., henrietta, No. 19s, entered at 1.09, advanced to 1.16 marks per meter. 

96 cm., henrietta, No. 22, entered at 1.24, advanced to 1.34 marks per meter. 

96 cm., henrietta, No. 20, entered at 1.14, advanced to 1.22 marks per meter. 

96 cm. henrietta, No. 21, entered at 1.19, advanced to 1.28 marks per meter. 

96 cm. henrietta, No. 23, entered at 1.29, advanced to 1.40 marks per meter. 

Add cases to advanced value. Discount, 8 per cent. 
2602, 9994.. Wool dress goods, from , Zurich, October 21, 1895 : 

96 cm. cashmere H., 110, black, entered at .89 franc per meter. No advance. 

96 cm. cashmere H., 120, black, entered at .98 franc per meter. No. advance. 

96 cm. cashmere H., 160, black, entered at 1.21 francs per meter. No advance. 

96 cm. cashmere H., 170, black, entered at 1.29 francs per meter. No advance. 

96 cm. cashmere H., 130, entered at 1.03, advanced to 1.06 francs per meter. 

96 cm. cashmere H., 140, entered at 1.07, advanced to 1.10 francs per meter. 

96 cm. cashmere H., 150, black, entered at 1.13, advanced to 1.16 francs per meter. 

Entered discount, 8 per cent ; advanced discount, 5 per cent. 
2599, 9917. .Mohair and wool dress goods, etc., from A. & S. Hardy & Co., Ltd., Bradford, October 18, 1895 : 

27" all-wool mohair, black A., entered at 20s., advanced to 22s., sterling, per piece. 
Discount, Ik per cent. 

21" all-wool mohair, black B., entered at 18s., advanced to 19s. 8d., sterling, per piece. 
Discount, li per cent. 

56" black twill worsted, entered at Is. lid., advanced to 2s. trod-, sterling, per yard. 

56" black fch. blk. twill, entered at 2s. 9Jd., advanced to 2s. ll^d., sterling, per yard. 

56" black fch. blk. twill, entered at 2s. 6 2d., advanced to 2s. 8d., sterling, per yard. 

Discount, 5 per cent. Less ^j. 



599 O. P 1 

2185 I 

600 O. P [■ Olives, from Lacave & Co., Seville, May 11 and 14, 1895 : 

2186 I 

Philadelphia . J 

Padron lsts., 80/90, entered at 67.50, advanced to 80 pesetas per fanega. 
Padron 2nds., 100/110, entered at 47.50, advanced to 55 pesetas per fanega. 
Eeina lsts., 110/120, entered at 30, advanced to 42.50 pesetas per fanega. 
Keina lsts., 120/130, entered at 30, advanced to 32.50 pesetas per fanega. 
Eeina 2nds., 130/140, entered at 17.50, advanced to 27.50 pesetas per fanega. 
Keina 2nds., 140/150, entered at 17.50, advanced to 24 pesetas per fanega. 
Eeina 2nds., 150/160, entered at 17.50, advanced to 22 pesetas per fanega. 
Eeina 2nds., 160/170, entered at 17.50, advanced to 18 pesetas per fanega. 
Eeina 3rds., 170/180, entered at 12, advanced to 17 pesetas per fanega. 
Manzanillas, entered at 14, advanced to 19 pesetas per fanega. 

654 O. P ) 

2520 > Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from Larrondo & Co., Sagua la Grande, September 30, 1895 : 

Philadelphia. ) 

Testing S4.30 molasses, entered at .0175, less freight, advanced to .01603, United States 
currency, per Spanish pound, packed. 

648 O. P ") 

2553 {Apples, from Lyman Gilford, Oshawa, Canada: 

Port Huron..) 

Apples, entered at 1, advanced to 1.60 dollars per barrel. 



ADDITIONAL CIRCULAR. 

SUBSCRIPTION TO FOUB PUB GENT BONDS. 



*QxKumvi$ Jtepartttumi, 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 13. 

Division of Loans and Currency. * 

Office of THE SECRETARY, 



Washington, D. C, January 15, 1896. 

Treasury Circular (So. 3, 1896), dated January 6, 3 896, inviting proposals for the purchase of one 
hundred million dollars ($100,000,000) of United States Four Per Cent Bonds, is hereby so modified that, 
after the payment of the first installment of twenty per cent with accrued interest, as required in said 
circular, the remainder of the amounts bid may be paid in installments of ten per cent (10 per cent) each 
and accrued interest, at the end of each fifteen days thereafter ; but all accepted bidders may pay the whole 
amount of their bids at the time of the first installment, and all accepted bidders who have paid all 
installments previously maturing may pay the whole amount of their bids at any time not later than the 
maturity of the last installment. 

Accepted bidders who pay the whole amount at the time of the first installment, or at any date 
thereafter, as above provided, will be entitled to receive, at the date of the payment, the whole amount 
of bonds awarded to them, aud accepted bidders who pay by installments will be entitled to receive at 
the dates of such payments the amount of bonds paid for. 

J. G. CARLISLE, 
Secretary of the Treasury. 






PALM BEACH, FLORIDA, A SUBPORT OF ENTRY AND DELIVERY. 



1S96. 
Department Circular No. 3 3. 

Division of Customs. 

office of THE SECRETARY, 



grimsiirtj jpipartrnjent, 



Washington, D. C. January 15, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 

The following act of Congress approved January 6, 1896, making Palm Beach, Fla., a subport of 
entry and delivery is published for the information of all concerned. 

S. WIKE, 

Acting Secretary. 



AN ACT to make Palm Beach, Plorida, a subport of entry and delivery, 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress 
assembled, That Palm Beach, in the State of ^Florida, shall be and is hereby made a subport of entry and 
delivery, and a customs officer, or such officers, shall be stationed at said subport with authority to enter 
and clear vessels, receive duties, fees and other moneys, and perform such other services and receive such 
compensation as in the judgment of the Secretary of the Treasury the exigencies of commerce may 
require. 

Approved, January 6, 1896. 



REAPPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED 8TATE8 GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



%xzksuxi% J^jmrimeut, 



1S96. 
Department Circular No. 14. 

Division of Customs. 

office of THE SECRETARY. 

Washington, D. C, January 16, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The following reappraisernents of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending January 14, 1S96. 

S. WIRE, 

Acting Secretary. 



REPORT OF REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING JANUARY 4, 1896. 

N. B. — In corresponding with the Board of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference should always be made to the number of Iteappraisement. 

No. of reappraise- 
inenl. 

9S75 Sugar not above 16 D. S., from Boxwell, "Williams & Co., Maceio, June 1, 1S95 : 

Tons, 999, 19, 2, 5, entered at £6152 3s, 7d., total, advanced to 6s. 63d., sterling, per 
hundredweight, packed. 

9S23 Sngar, from Robert Crooks & Co., Liverpool, October 4, 1895: 

Fifths, entered at £9 2s. 5d., sterling, per ton, advanced to 9s. 8d., sterling, per hundred- 
weight. Discount, 21 per cent. 
Fourths, entered at £11 12s. 5d., sterling, per ton, advanced to 12s. 2d., sterling, per hun- 
dredweight. Discount, 2 i per cent. 

10053 Sugar not above 16 D. S., from G. R. Corey, St. Vincent, September 14, 1S95: 

Entered at f 1. 66 per 100 pounds, less N. D. charges, advanced to $0. 0165 per pound, packed. 
10393' etcf 4 ' \ 8v 0ar, from Maclain, Watson & Co., Batavia, September 24, 1895: 

Testing 96.94°, entered at lis., less freight, advanced to 9s. 6d., sterling, per hundred- 
weight, packed. 

10034 Sugar, from Matthew Bomeister, Amsterdam, October 24, 1895: 

Dutch granulated sugar, entered at 14s. 3d., less N. D. charges. Add bags. Advanced 
to 13s. lid., sterling, per hundredweight of 112 pounds, packed. 

10385 Cotton hose, from , Chemnitz, November 8, 1895: 

Men's brown cotton half hose, No. 678, entered at 2.30 marks per dozen. No advance. 
Men's tan cotton half hose, No. 1161, entered at 2.75 marks per dozen. No advance. 



10385 Cotton hose, etc.- — Continued. 

Lads' H. blk. cotton hose, No. 1269, entered at 4.75 marks per dozen. No advance. 
Lads' balbr. cotton hose, No. 160, entered at 4, advanced to 4.10 marks per dozen. 
Men's tan cotton half hose, No. 605, entered at 2.40, advanced to 2.50 marks per dozen. 
Lads' black cotton hose, No. 4763, entered at 4.90 marks per dozen. No advance. " 
Lads' black cotton hose, No. 110, entered at 3.50 marks per dozen. No advance. 
Lads' black cotton hose, No. 340, entered at 4.90, advanced to 5 marks per dozen. 
Men's H. blk. cotton half hose, No. 101, entered at 3.90, advanced to 4.05 marks per 

dozen. 
Men's tan cotton half hose, No. 101, entered at 3.80, advanced to 3.95 marks per dozen. 
Discount, 5 per cent. Charges for boxes, etc., included in price. 

103S9 Cotton hose, from Theo. Dietzel, Chemnitz, November 13, 1895: 

Lads' black cotton hose, 215 and 227, entered at 5.90 and 4.80 marks per dozen. No 

advance. Add making up at .50 pfennig per dozen. 
Lads' brown cotton hose, 124, entered at 2.40 mai-ks per dozen. No advance. Add making 

up at .55 pfennig per dozen. 
Discount, 5 per cent. 
S272, 10408.. Cotton hose, from E. Rudolph Chemnitz, May 4 and October 20, 1895: 

Men's Hdf. black cotton half hose 91/11, entered at 3.60, plus boxes and packing, 

advanced to 4. 70 marks per dozen, packed. 
Men's Hdf. black cotton half hose, 878 and 894, entered at 2.75 and 3.35 marks per dozen. 

No advance. 
Men's Hdf. tan cotton half hose, 878 and S94, entered at 2.65 and 3.25, advanced to 2.75 

and 3.35 marks per dozen. 
Add cases and packing at .40 pfennig per dozen. 



Misses 

Misses 1 
Misses 
Misses 1 
Misses 1 
Misses 1 
Misses 
Misses : 
Misses 
Misses 
Misses : 
Misses 1 
Misses 1 
Misses 
Misses 1 
Misses 
Misses 1 



St. black ribbed hose, No. 5, entered at 1.10, advanced to 1.25 marks per dozen. 
St. black ribbed hose, No. 51, entered at 1.35, advanced to 1.48 marks per dozen. 
St. black ribbed hose, No. 6, entered at 1.60, advanced to 1.75 mai-ks per dozen. 
St. black ribbed hose, No. Gi, entered at 1.85, advanced to 2.05 marks per dozen. 
St. black ribbed hose, No. 7, entered at 2.10, advanced to 2.30 marks per dozen. 
St. black ribbed hose, No. 7}, entered at 2.35, advanced to 2.60 marks per dozen. 
St. black ribbed hose, No. 8, entered at 2.60 advanced to 3 marks per dozen. 
St. black ribbed hose, No. 8}, entered at 2.85, advanced to 3.15 marks per dozen. 
St. black cotton hose, No. 5, entered at 1.25, advanced to 1.38 marks per dozen. 
St.' black cotton hose, No. 5J, entered at 1.50, advanced to 1.65 marks per dozen. 
St. black cotton hose, No. 6, entered at 1.75, advanced to 1.90 marks per dozen. 
St. black cotton hose, No. 6 i, entered at 2, advanced to 2.20 marks per dozen. 
St. black cotton hose, No. 7, entered at 2.25, advanced to 2.45 marks per dozen. 
St. black cotton hose, 7 i, entered at 2.50, advanced to 2.70 marks per dozen. 
St. black cotton hose, No. 8, entered at 2.75, advanced to 3 marks per dozen. 
St. black cotton hose, No. 8 i, entered at 3, advanced to 3.30 marks per dozen. 
St. black cotton hose, No. 9, entered at 3.25 marks, advanced to 3.60 marks per 



dozen. 
Add cases and packing at .30 pfennig per dozen. Discount, 4 per cent. 

10029 Silk embroidery, manufactures of silk, from Sarhan Shehfy, Damascus, October 1, 1895: 

Drab aghabani, hakra aghabani, charbe, coufie, etc. Advanced 10 per cent. 



3 

10493 Manufactures ofsilJc, from Kecordon, Keeve & Co., London, November 5, 1895: 

27" twill, entered at Is. 6d., sterling, per yard, printing and finishing at 6d. per yard. 
Add case and packing. Discount, 22 per cent. 

10420 Silk articles embroidered, etc., from Fraser, Farly & Co., Kanagawa, September 27, 1895 : 

Advanced by addition of cost of tickets, boxes, paper, etc., deducted on entry, and also by 
addition for cases. 

104S0 Cotton and wool Jcnit wearing apparel, from Carl Scherf, Limboch, November 11 1895 : 

No. 2509, No. 119, men's white Berlin gloves, 1 B. L., 1/2 J. W., lisle pt., entered at 1.75, 

advanced to 1.90 marks per dozen. 
No. 250 and No. 255, men's black Berlin gloves, 2 B. L., 1 J. W., lisle pt., entered at 

2. 75, advanced to 3 marks per dozen. 
No. 229, men's black Berlin gloves, 1 B. L., 1/2 J. W., lisle pt., entered at 1.80, advanced 

to 1.95 marks per dozen. 
No. 81, men's black cashmere gloves, 2 B. L., 1 J. W., silk pt., entered at 5.10, advanced 

to 5.60 marks per dozen. 
No. 181, lads' black cashmere gloves, 12 J., 1 J. W., kid pt., entered at 4.75, advanced to 

5.20 marks per dozen. 
No. 113, lads' black cashmere gloves, 13 J., 3/4 J. W., lisle pt., entered at 2.55, advanced 

to 2. 80 marks per dozen. 
No. 181, lads' black cashmere gloves, 12 J., 1 J. W., silk pt., entered at 4.65, advanced to 

5.10 marks per dozen. 
No. 34, lads' black cashmere gloves, 13 J., 1 J. W., silk pt., entered at 4, advanced to 4.35 

marks per dozen. 
No. 110, lads' black cashmere gloves, 12 J., 1 J. W., silk pt., entered at 3.25, advanced to 

3.55 marks per dozen. 
No. 100, lads' black cashmere gloves, 12 J., 1 J. W., silk pt., entered at 3.85, advanced to 

4.20 marks per dozen. 
No. 220, men's white Berlin gloves, 2 B. L., 1 J. W., silk pt., entered at 2.20, advanced to 

2.40 marks per dozen. 
No. 27, black imitation taffetas 2B.L..1J.W., silk pt., entered at 4.90, advanced to 5.35 

marks per dozen. 
Discount, 6 per cent. 

1° 45 5 Manufactures of wool and cotton, from Ferdinand Heilborn & Co., Bradford, December 2, 1895: 

Black and blue serge and brown beaver, 709, 54" and 55", entered at Is. 2id, advanced to 

Is. 2.72d., sterling, per yard. 
Black and blue serge, 54", 714, entered at Is., advanced to Is. O.lSd., sterling, per yard. 
Brown serge, 54", 714, entered at Is. 0£d., advanced to Is. 0.69d., sterling, per yard. 
Black and blue beaver, 54", 703, entered at Is. 9d., advanced to Is. 9.32d., sterling, per yard. 
Brown beaver, 54", 703, entered at Is, 10d., advanced to Is. 10.33d., sterling, per yard. 
Less measurement, ■£,-. Add making up and packing. Discount, 5 per cent. 

iO* 90 Bleached cotton, from Tootal Broadhurst Lee & Co., Ltd., Manchester, November 19, 1895: 

32/3", No. 36 white pique, entered at 5Jd., advanced to 61d., sterling, per yard. 
32", No. 39 white pique, entered at 71 d., advanced to 9d., sterling, per yard. 
32/3", No. 574 white pique, entered at 9|d., advanced to 101d., sterling, per yard. 
27", No. 112 white pique, entered at lid., advanced to 12d., sterling, per yard. 
28", No. 122 white pique, entered at 13d., sterling, per yard. No advance. 



10496 Bleached cotton, etc. — Continued. 

27/8", No. 133 white pique, entered at 16d., sterling, per yard. No advance. 

33", No. 532 white pique, entered at 9td., advanced to lid., sterling, per yard. Noadance. 

34", No. 543 white pique, entered at 13d., sterling, per yard. No advance. 

Add cases. Discount, 3 per cent. 
10473 Cotton shoe laces, from Fr. Pet. Ostermann, Barmen, November 12, 1895 s 

I-yard, glace shoe laces, entered at 1.07, advanced to 1.30 marks per gross. 
10379 Bronze powder, from Becker & Co., Nuremberg, November 11, 1895: 

Brocade, No. 2 B, entered at .78, advanced to .84 mark per pound. 

Brocade, No. 2 C, entered at .68, advanced to .74 mark per pound. 

Add boxes. 
10422 Manufactures of straw hats, from T. Ward, London, November 21, 1895: 

No. 9, entered at 7s. 6d., advanced to 8e., sterling, per dozen. 

No. 10, entered at Ss., advanced to Ss. 6d., sterling, per dozen. 

No. 11, entered at 8s. 6d., advanced to 9s., sterling, per dozen. 

No. 12, entered at 9s., advanced to 9s. 6d., sterling, per dozen. 

No. 13, entered at 9s. 6d., advanced to 10s., sterling, per dozen. 

No. 14, entered at 10s., advanced to 10s. 6d., sterling, per dozen. 

No. 15, entered at 10s. 6d., advanced to lis., sterling, per dozen. 

Entered discount, 6 per cent ; advanced discount, 2J per cent. 

loin' ' i Manufactures of flax, from Wm. Chalmers, Dundee, October 31, November 8 and 15, 1895 : 

24", No. 2 flax canvas, entered at 10|d., advanced to lljd., sterling, per yard. 

24", No. 3 flax canvas, entered at 10id., advanced to 10|d., sterling, per yard. 

24", No. 4 flax canvas, entered at 9|d., advanced to 10d., sterling, per yard. 

24", No. 6 flax canvas, entered at 8fd., sterling, per yard. No advance. 

24", No. 2 flax canvas, entered at 10fd., advanced to lid., sterling, per yard. 

24", No. 5 flax canvas, entered at 9id., sterling, per yard. No advance. 

24", No. 4 D. D. flax canvas, entered at 9|d., advanced to 101d., sterling, per yard. 

Discount, 2} per cent. Add ropes and packing. 
10483 Macaroni, from Giovanni Acaufora de Nicola, Castellamare, November 18, 1895: 

Entered at 30 lire per 100 kilos, plus cost of manufacture and cases, advanced to 37.40 
lire per 100 kilos, packed. 
10484 Macaroni, from Sarata Cambardella, Napoli, November 16, 1895 : 

Entered at 4, advanced to 4.20 lire per case. 
10458 Cotton yarn, from McConnel & Co., Ltd., Manchester, November 29, 1895: 

80/2, entered at Is. 7d., advanced to Is. 7Jd., sterling, per pound. 

100a, entered at Is. 7 id., advanced to Is. 7£d., sterling, per pound. 

Discount, 2J per cent. 
10503 Orange boxes, from , Liverpool, December 7, 1895: 

Entered at Is., advanced to Is. 8d., sterling, per box. 
10497 Beaded trimmings, from , Paris, December 6, 1895: 

Entered at a discount of 25 per cent, advanced to discount of 5 per ceut and 2 per cent. 
10498, 10460.. Gelatine, from Deutsche Gelatine Fabriken, Hochlt a Main, November 12, 1895 : 

Gelatine, white, fine, no labels, entered at 325 marks per 100 kilos. No advance. Cases 
and packing included. 



10414 Grapes, from , London, November 21, 1895: 

Entered at 10s., sterling, per barrel. No advance. Cases and packing included. 

10476 Iron plates, enameled with vitreous glass, from Birmingham Vinegar Brewing Company, Ltd., 

Birmingham, November 13, 1895 : 

Enameled show plates, entered at 8s., sterling, per plate. No advance. 

Enameled show plates, entered at 4s., advanced to 4s. 3d., sterling, per plate. 
10377 Prepared peas and mushrooms, from Amedee Nadal, Bordeaux, November 4, 1895 : 

Extra fine peas, entered at 56.60, advanced to 61 francs per case of 100 £ tius. 

Extra mushrooms, entered at 70.85, advanced to 75 francs per case of 100 I tins. 

First choice, entered at 61.35, advanced to 66 francs per case of 100 ] tins. 

Galipetta, entered at 46.15, advanced to 50 francs per case of 100 } tins. 

Packing included. 
10487 Sauce, from Sun Kwong Hop, Hongkong, July 25, 1895: 

Sauce, thick, entered at 2, advanced to 2.40, Mexican dollars, per cask of 100 catties. 
10490 Pickles, cauliflower, from M. Bomak, Amsterdam, November 26, 1895: 

Cauliflower, entered at 10.50, advanced to 11 florins per hhd., packed. 
10169 Prepared fish, from Bonneberg's Preserving Co., Stavanger, October 25, 1895: 

Pish balls, entered at .55 crown per 4 ration tins. No advance. 

Pish balls, entered at .33 crown per 2 ration tins. No advance. 
9583 Beans, from Anton Strauss, Budapest, January 26, 1895: 

White Haricot beans, entered at 10s. 3d. , less inland freight, freight to New York, com- 
mission, etc. Advanced by addition of inland freight to port of shipment. 

10469' 10468 ' } Su 9 ar i not above 16 D - S -> from Hidal g° & Co., November 23 and December 7, 1895 : 

Testing 88.20° molasses, entered at .01J, less freight, advanced to .01839, United States 
gold, per pound, packed. 
" Testing 92.225°, centrifugal, entered at .02J, less freight, advanced to .02171, United States 
gold, per pound, packed. 
Testing 93.194°, centrifugal, entered at .02^, less freight, advanced to. 0214, United States 
gold, per pound, packed. 

2355 O. P ") 

2420 O. P y Cocoanuts, from A. Gomez, Carthagena, July 16 and September 5, 1895 : 

New Orleans. ) 

Cocoanuts, entered at 16, advanced to 25 sols, per 1000. 

Cocoanuts, entered at 17, advanced to 25 sols, per 1000. 

Add packages. 

2718 OP 1 

San Francisco i ^ ut ^ ass » ^ rom ^*- Lou i s Crystal Glass Co., Kehl, September 12, 1895: 

Glassware, entered at 5 per cent, 5 per cent, 5 per cent, 5 per cent, and 2$ per cent dis- 
counts. No advance. 

2696 O. P ) 

2624 O. P [■ Sugar not above 16 D. S., from Thorn & Cameron, October 8 and November 21, 1S95 : 

Philadelphia.. ) 

Entered at 2.73, United States dollars, per hundredweight, less freight and N. D. charges. 

No advance. 
Entered at 2.82, less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to 2.744, United States dollars, 
per hundredweight, packed. 



2449 O. P.. 
Chicago. . . . 

2626 O. P.. 
2625 O. P.. 
2529 O. P.. 
2662 O. P.. 

Etc 

Chicago .... 



8545 O. P..."| 

2608 O. P... I 

2609 O. P. . . | Sugar above 16 J). S., from Gebr. Michalles, Hamburg, September 22, 29, 30, October 5, 1895 : 
Etc | 

Baltimore... I 

Granulated sugar, entered at .027126, less cartage, United States dollars, per pound, 

advanced to 13s. 8d., sterling, per hundredweight, packed. Discount, 5/6 per cent 
Refined sugar, entered at .027027, less cartage, United States dollars, per pound, advanced 

to 13s., sterling, per hundredweight, packed. Discount, 5/6 per cent. 
Refined sugar, entered at .027522, less cartage, United States dollars, per pound, advanced 

to 13s., sterling, per hund red weight, packed. Discount, 5/6 per cent. 
Refined sugar, entered at .027225, advanced to .0282, United States dollars, per pound, 

packed. Discount, 5 per cent. 

Manufactures of jute, from T. R. Bower, Liverpool, August 9, 1895 : 
Brown sacks, entered at 3d., advanced to 31 d., sterling, per sack. 

Sugar not above 16 D. 8., from Robt. Crooks & Co., Liverpool, July 21 aud 24, October 8, 12, 
16, 20, 1895 : 

Fifths, entered at 9s. 3d., advanced to 9s. 8d., sterling, per hundredweight. Discount, 

2 J per cent. Packing included. 
Fourths, entered at lis. 9d., advanced to 12s. 3sd., sterling, per hundredweight. 
Fifths, entered at 9s. 3d., advanced to 10s., sterling, per hundredweight. 
G., entered at 10s., advanced to 10s. 6d., sterling, per hundredweight. 
M., entered at 10s. 3d., sterling, per hundredweight. No advance. 
Discount, 2 i per cent. Packing included. 
Fourths, entered at £11 2s. 5d.. sterling, per ton. 
Fourths, entered at £10 17s. 5d., sterling, per ton. 
Fourths, entered at £11 12s. 5d., sterling, per ton. 
Thirds, entered at £11 9s. lid., sterling, per ton. 
Thirds, entered at £11 4s. lid., sterling, per ton. 
No advance. Discount, 2 J per cent. 
Fifths, entered at 9s. 3d., advanced to 9s. 10d., sterling, per hundredweight. Discount, 

2 J per cent. 

EEAPPRAISEMENTS BY BOARDS. 

2438, 95lO..Refmed sugar above Wo. 16 D. 8., from Robt. Crooks & Co., Liverpool, September 11, 1895 : 

Entered at £10 17s. 5d., advanced to £11, sterling, per ton. Less 2i per cent. 
2590, 9850. .Sugar, from , Liverpool, October 1, 1895 : 

English refined sugar, firsts, crystals, entered at £14 17s. 5d., advanced to £15 13s. 2Jd., 
sterling, per ton. 

Fourths, entered at £11 12s. 5d., advanced to £11 13s. 6d., sterling, per ton. 

Fifths, entered at £9 2s. 5d., advanced to £9 10s. 3d., sterling, per ton. 

Fifths, eutered at £8 17s. 5d., advanced to £9 5s. 3d., sterling, per ton. 

Discount, 2 J per cent. Add cartage. 



2591, 9955..8ugar, from Eobt. Crooks & Co., Liverpool, October 11, 1895 : 

English refined sugar, M., entered at 10s. 3d., advanced to 10s. 5d., sterling, per hundred- 
weight. 

English refined sugar, fourths, entered at lis. 9d., advanced to 12s., sterling, per hundred- 
weight. 

Fifths, entered at 9s. 3d., advanced to 10s. 2d., sterling, per hundredweight. 

Fifths, entered at 9s., advanced to 9s. 10fd., sterling, per hundredweight. 

Discount, 2 J per cent. 
25S6, 9S96. .8ugar, from Eobt. Crooks & Co., Liverpool, October 18, 1895 : 

Fifths, entered at 9s. 3d., advanced to 9s. 10d., sterling, per hundredweight. Discount, 2] 
per cent. 
2713, 10119, ") 

2714,10306, [ Musical instruments, from Jules Cuendet, Auberson, November 2, 9, and 16, 1895 : 
Etc ) 

Advanced by disallowance of deduction of 10 per cent commission. 

2622, 9997.. I'M, n. o. p./., from Joh's Conradsen, Stavanger, October 4, 1895 : 

Anchovies, entered at .38, advanced to .40 crown per I keg. 
2548, 9856.. Manufactures of gelatine, from Joh Green, London, October 15, 1895: 

Sheets gelatine, scarlet, magenta, dark blue, etc., entered at 65s., advauced to 80s., sterling, 
per 1,000. Add case. Discount, 10 per cent. 
2575, 9813. .Manufactures of mineral substance not decorated (carbons), from Schiff, Jordan & Co., Vienna, 
September 9, 1895 : 
Cored alternate, 13 x 305 mm., 13 x 229, and 13 x 153, entered at 23.97, advanced to 26.36 
United States dollars per 1,000 feet. Discounts 65 per cent and 5 per cent. 
2717, 10l2i..8ulphide of sodium, from Georg Egestorff, London, October 24, 1895: 

Entered at 8, advanced to 8.50 marks per 100 kilo=t, less freight and K. D. charges. 

2637, 96S9..Sille wearing apparel, from , Bradford, September 17, 1895: 

Seal capes partly made up, 01321, entered at 4s. lid., advanced to 5s. lid., sterling, each. 
Add cutting and tacking at 3d. each. Add case. Eutered discounts, 50 per cent, 2J 
per cent, and i per cent. Advanced discounts, 2J per cent and •> per cent. 
2643, 10002.. Manufactures of silk and cotton, from Georges-Dufetre, Lyons, October 9, 1895 : 

118 cm. taffettas, eutered at 2.50, advanced to 3 francs per aune. Don. 2* per cent, tare, 
i per cent. Discounts, 16 per cent and 2 per cent. Add case and packing. 

595 O. P...") 

2464 [■ English refined sugar, from Eobt. Crooks & Co., Liverpool, September 21, 1895: 

Baltimore.. ) 

Entered at £11 2s. 5d., less 2i percent, sterling, per ton, packed. Eb advance. 

596 O. P....) 

2498 V English refined sugar, from Eobt. Crooks & Co., Liverpool, September 28, 1895 : 

Baltimore., j 

Entered at £11 2s. 5d., sterling per ton, advanced to lis. 2d., sterling, per hundred- 
weight. Discount, 2i per cent. 

542 O. P ") 

2249 V Sugar not above 16 D. 8., from Juan F. De Castro, Macoris, May 28, 1895 : 

Philadelphia.. ) 

Testing 95.85° I, centrifugal, entered at 1.87, advanced to 2.047 dollars per 100 pounds, 

packed. 
Testing 88.90° IT, centrifugal, entered at 1.52, advanced to 1.556 dollars per 100 pounds, 
packed. 



542 0. P ) 

224!) > Sugar not above 16 D. 8., etc.— Continued. 

Philadelphia.. ) 

Testing 95.45° I, centrifugal, entered at 1.87, advanced to 2.019 dollars per 100 pounds, 

packed. 
Testing, 95.90° I, centrifugal, entered at 1.S7, advanced to 2.044 dollars per 100 pounds, 
packed. 

550 O. P ") 

2325 V Sugar above 16 D. S., from Eobt. Crooks & Co., Liverpool, August 14, 1895 : 

Philadelphia.. ) 

Fourths, entered at £11 2s. 5d., sterling, per ton, discount 2} per cent, advanced to lis. 

Id., sterling, per hundredweight, packed. 
Fifths, not above 16 D. S., entered at £8 17s. 5d., sterling, per ton, discount 2} per cent, 
advauced to 8s. lid., sterling, per hundredweight, packed. Discount, 2J per cent. 

o!^r°' r " ] Sugar, from , Bahai, August 1, 1895 : 

2615 ) 

Entered at 7s. 6d., less freight and H". D. charges, advauced to 6s. 7 id., sterling, per 
hundredweight, packed. 
2009,0919, | Refined sugar above No. 16, D. S., from Van Bghen & Co., Amsterdam, September 30, and 
260S,9918.. \ ' October 5, 1895 : 

Entered at lis. 7 id., add bags, advanced to 13s. 10d., sterling, per hundredweight, packed. 

Entered at lis. 3d., add bags, advauced to 13s. 3d., sterling, per hundredweight, packed. 
2709, 10244...S«.r/«r. from , Havana, October 21, 1895 : 

Testing 91.92°, entered at 2f and 2\, less freight aud ~N. D. charges, advanced to .02212, 
United States currency, per pound, packed. 
25Sl,9898..TF<>od pulp, from Gysinge Aktiebolag, Stockholm, September 16, 1895 : 

Chemical, wood pulp, entered at 123.13 crowns per ton, gross weight. No advance. 



REAPPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



%xz&mx\} gjeparttttjent, 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 15. 

Division of Customs. 

office op THE SECRETARY, 
Washington, D. C, January 20, 1896. 
To Collectors and Other Officers of the Customs: 

The following reappraiseinents of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending December 14, 1895. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING DECEMBER 14, 1895. 

N. B. — In corresponding xvith the Board of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference should altvays be made to the number of Reappraisemetvt. 

No. of reappraise- 
Tnent. 

10302 Sugar, from Booker Bros., Demarara, November 19, 1895: 

Entered at $0.0225 United States currency per lb. No advance. 

9360 Linoleum, from The H. B. Claflin Co., Manchester : 

Pattern, 2/107, 4/104, 6/101, etc., entered at Is. OJd., sterling, per square yard. No 

advance. Discount, 5 per cent. Add cases. 

10161 Wool Unit wearing apparel, from Goldie & Osborne, Mansfield, November 1, 1895 : 

Ladies' black cashmere hose, 84, 8 2 /10, entered at 8s. 6d., advanced to 9s., sterling, per 

dozen. 
Infants' black cashmere hose, 17, 4/6, entered at 5s. 6d., sterling, per dozen. No advance. 
Ladies' black cashmere hose, 50, Si/10, entered at 10s. 5d., advanced to lis., sterling, per 

dozen. 
Discount, 31 per cent. Add cases. Boxes included in price. 

10146 Wool dress goods, from Alfred Munch, Gera, November 1, 1895: 

92/94 cm., all-wool henriettas, 60, quality 4018, entered at .92, advanced to 1.02 marks 

per meter. 
112/114 cm., all-wool henriettas, 44, quality 1500, entered at .88, advanced .9S mark per 

meter. 
112/114 cm., all-wool henriettas, 52, quality 1700, entered at 1, advanced to 1.10 marks per 

meter. 
Discount, 8 per cent. Add making up and cases. 



1021 1 Manufactures of sill: and cotton, from Bruder Baum, Wien, October 30, 1895 : 

Entered at .65, advanced to 1.02 florins per meter. Add cases and packing. 
9950 Cotton lace curtains, from W. E. Mach & Co., Nottingham, October 17, 1895: 

31 yards, entered at 4s. lid., less inland charges, advanced to 5s. 6d., sterling, per pair. 
Discount, 21 per cent. Add cases. 
10200 Colored cotton corduroy, from Hardt & Co., Manchester, November 8, 1895: 

538 H., 27/28" brown cords, entered at llf^d., advanced to 12^-d., sterling, per yard. 
Discount, 2:1 per cent. Less ¥ V- -A-dd packing charges. 
10270 Dressed upper leather, from Mayer, Michel & Deninger, Mayeuce, October 31, 1895: 

Patent leather media, Ex. Ex., entered at 98 marks per dozen. No advance. 

Patent leather Ex., entered at 88 marks per dozen. No advance. 

Patent leather media, E., entered at 50 marks per dozen. No advance. 

Patent leather media, P., entered at 47 marks per dozen. No advance. 

Discount, 4 per cent. Add cases. 
10269 Dressed upper leather, from Cornelius Hey t, Worms, August 26, 1895: 

Patent leather No. 3 I, entered at 53.50 marks per dozen. 

Patent leather No. 4 I, entered at 48 marks per dozen. 

Patent leather No. 2, locherig, entered at 52.50 marks per dozen. 

Patent leather No. 3, locherig, entered at 47 marks per dozen. 

Patent leather No. 4, locherig, entered at 43 marks per dozen. 

Patent leather No. 1, locherig, * entered at 61 marks per dozen. 

No advance. Discount, 2 per cent. Add cases and packing. 
10261 Dressed upper leather, from Eeinhart & Co., Worms, October 14, 1895: 

Patent calf, a special first choice, entered at 82, advauced to 83.64 marks per dozen. 

Patent calf, 3, middle, entered at 51, advanced to 52.02 marks per dozen. 

Patent calf, 2, light, entered at 57, advanced to 58.14 marks per dozen. 

Add case and packing. 

10036 Bleached and colored cotton, from Tootal Broadhurst, Lee & Co., Ltd., Manchester, October 29, 

1895: 

32" white pique, 6x, entered at 5*d., advanced to 61d., sterling, per yard. 

32" white pique. 790, entered at 9:>d., advanced to 10id., sterling, per yard. 

32" fancy pique, C. B. W., entered at 7id., advanced to 8Jd., sterling, per yard. 

Discount, 3 per cent. Add cases and tickets. 
10237 Alkaloid caffeine, from Howard & Sons, London, November 6, 1895: 

Entered at 18s., less 5 per cent, advanced to 18s., sterling, per pound, net. 
10177 Chemical salt, from Chemischer Fabriken Falk, Koln, October 18, 1895: 

Chloride of barium, entered at 8.05 marks per 100 kilos. No advance. Add cases. 
10149, 10218.. Chemical Salt, fiom Deutsche Gold & Silber Scheide Anstalt, Frankfort, October 7 and No- 
vember 13, 1895 : 

Entered at 22.35, plus packing, advanced to 23.63 marks per 100 kilos, packed. 

Entered at 20.62, plus packing, advanced to 21.88 marks per 100 kilos, packed. 
10122 Mirrors, from Jacques Plachfeld, Paris, October 24, 1895: 

Glace 3 face chrome, 35930/310, entered at 13 francs per dozen. No advance. 

Glace 3 face chrome, 35931/311, entered at 20 francs per dozen. No advance. 

Glace 3 face chrome, 35932/312, entered at 25 francs per dozen. No advance. 

Glace 3 face chrome, 36066/313, entered at 30 francs per dozen. No advance. 

Discount, 2 per cent. Add cases and packing. 



10001 Slate pencils, from Kichard Horstmann, Berlin, October 21, 1895: 

Plain pointed grey, 14 cm. long, 41-41 mm., 100 pencils in box, entered at 1.46, advanced 

to 1.54 marks per 1,000. 
Plain pointed grey, 18 cm. long, stick, 44-4f mm., 100 pencils in box, entered at 2.25 

marks per 1,000. No advance. 
Union S., 14 cm. long, stick, 4i-42 mm., 100 pencils in box, entered at 1.70, advanced to 

1.77 marks per 1,000. 
Union S., 18 cm. long, stick, 4,}-4J mm., 100 pencils in box, entered at 2.55 marks per 

1,000. No advance. 
Gold, 14 cm. long, stick, 4i-4f mm., 100 pencils in box, entered at 1.80, advanced to 1.87 

marks per 1,000. 
Gold, 18 cm. long, stick, 41-41 mm., 100 pencils in box, entered at 2.67 marks per 1,000. 

No advance. 
14 em. long, stick, 5 mm., gross boxes of 144 small boxes of 12 pencils each, } gold, '> Union 

S., entered at 4.18 marks per gross box. No advance. 
Packing charges included. 

10220 Vegetables, n. o. p. /., from Kwong Yuen Kwing, Hongkong, October 1, 1895 : 

White nuts, entered at 1.50, advanced to 2.25, Mexican dollars, per basket. 

10262 Prepared meat (sausage), from Sun Kwong Hop, Hongkong, October 7, 1895: 

Dried meat, 2nd quality, entered at 6, advanced to 7, Mexicau dollars, per box of 50 catties. 

10241 Stereotype plates, from Edmund Downey, London, October 11, 1895: 

Entered at Is., 6d., advanced to 2s., sterling, per plate. Add case. 

9737 Water color paints, from Eobert Hartwig, Sonneberg, September 10, 1895: 

Entered discounts, 5 per cent and 5 per cent. No advance. Add cases. 

10277 Toilet soap, alcoholic perfumery, etc., from J. G. Monson & Co., Frankfort, October 28, 1895 : 

Entered discount, 25 per cent ; advanced discount, 20 per cent. Add cases. 

10128 Table Mives andforlcs, from Thomas Bell & Son, Sheffield, October 26, 1895 : 

Stag carvers, entered at 12s., advanced to 14s., sterling, per dozen pair. 
Stag carvers, entered at lis., advanced to 13s., sterling, per dozen pair. 
Phnade^hia I €h ' a P es > from "Ulibani & Peydro, Almeria, October 24, 1895 : 

Entered at 13, advanced to 13.50 pesetas per barrel of 23 kilos, packed. 
Entered at 14, advanced to 14.50 pesetas per barrel of 25 kilos, packed. 

a -p ' '. I Desiccated cocoanuts, from A. Goupil, Papeete, June 11, 1895: 

Entered at .14, Peruvian coin, per kilo. No advance. Add packing charges at .02 per 
kilo. 

2636 O. P..) 

2637 O. P.. [• Decorated earthenware, from , Bodenbach, Prague and Haida, October 15, 10, and 16, 1895 : 

Chicago ) 

Entered at various prices. No advance. 

REAPPKAISEMENTS BY BOARDS. 

2611, 10115.. Wool dress goods, from , Gera, November 1, 1895 : 

95 cm. henrietta, 5011, entered at .84, advanced to .96 mark per meter. 
114 cm. henrietta, 5016, entered at 1.36, advanced to 1.51 marks per meter. 
114 cm. henrietta, 5013, entered at 1.12, advanced to 1.31 marks per meter. 
114 cm. henrietta ; 5011, entered at 1, advanced to 1.14 marks per meter. 
118 cm. henrietta, 5014, entered at 1.26, advanced to 1.40 marks per meter. 
Add cases and packing. 



2560, 9971, [Macaroni and vegetables, n. o. p. /., from P. Vitelli & Co., Castellainare, October 5 and 27, 
2613,10200..) 1895: 

Macaroni, boxes of 103 kilos each, entered at 30 lire per 100 kilos, add packing, advanced 

to 4.10 lire per box, packed. 
Garlic, entered at 11, advanced to 12 lire per 100 kilos. Add packing. 
2435, i»r>S4.. Manufactures of cotton (velvet skirt binding), from Hithersay & Eamm, Manchester, September 3, 
1895: 
15" black princess bias, entered at 6s. lid., less 5 per cent, advanced to 6s. 10d., sterling, 

per gross, net. 
1 1" colored princess bias, entered at 7s. 6d., less 5 per cent, sterling, per gross, advanced to 

7s. 6d, sterling, per gross, net. 
li" colored princess bias, entered at 4s. 6d., less 5 per cent, advanced to 4s. 7d., sterling, 

per gross, net. 
Add cases and packing. Add to advanced prices, 2} per cent commission. 
2530, 9G17.. Blank books, from Ullinann and Engelman, Berlin, September 7, 1895 : 

Wallets, 2222-11, entered at 10, net, advanced to 18 marks per gross, less 2 per cent. 

PMtedd^hfa' i Sugar above 16 B ' 8 ' J from Van E §' hen & Co -> Amsterdam, August 21, 1895 : 

Penned sugar, entered at 12s. Add bags. Advanced to 13s., sterling, per cwt., packed. 

PMH<M 2 hfa' 1 Sugar above 16 D- S "> from Van E S hen & Co -> Amsterdam, September 3, 1895 : 

Pefined sugar, entered at 12s. Add bags. Advanced to 12s. 10zd., sterling, per cwt., 
packed. 

PWla<M 2 hfa' j 8ugar above 16 D ' 8, > from ' Amsterdam, August 6, 1895 : 

Refined sugar, entered at 12s. Add bags. Advanced to 12s. lid., sterling, per cwt., 
packed. 



VALUE OF AUSTRIAN FLORIN. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 16. 

Division of Customs. 



Ohpioeof THE SECRETARY, 



Washington, I). C, January 20, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 

The Department is informed by the Honorable Secretary of State, that owing to the decline in value 
of the Austrian florin, the consuls in Austria- Hungary have all been instructed to furnish currency 
certificates to iuvoiceh, commencing. December 11, 1895. 

These certificates will be accepted by Collectors of Customs in liquidating invoices made out in the 
above specified currency. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary.. 






REPORTS OF LOCAL APPRAISERS TO TEE BOARD OF GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



%xmmx% Jkpartmjettt, 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 17. 

Division of Customs. , 

Office of THE SECRETARY, 

. Washington, D. C, January 22, 1896. 

To Appraisers and Acting Appraisers of Merchandise : 

Officers charged with the preparation of reports of the business of their respective districts, which 
are required by Article 1128 of the Customs Eegulations of 1892 to be made monthly to the Board of 
General Appraisers at New York, are hereby instructed that in case invoices, entries, etc., are transmitted 
by them daily to the Auditor for the Treasury Department, the data required for said monthly reports 
should be properly taken in advance of such transmission to avoid delay. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



^ ? % 



mvi*i^ v 






REAPPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



1S96. 
Department Circular No. 18. 



*Qvmsuv% ^zpwcttwmt, 



Division of Customs. 

office op THE SECRETARY, 
Washington, D. C, January 22, 1896. 
To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The following reappraisements of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending January 11, 1896. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 

REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING JANUARY 11, 1896. 

If. B. — In corresponding with the Board of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference should always be made to the number of Heappraisement. 

No. of Reappraise- 
ment. 

10570 Manufactures of metal, from M. Boas, jr., Berlin, November 30, 1895: 

No. 3, II., 50/100, entered at 69.30 marks per 100 kilos. 

No. 5, I., 50/75, entered at 65.30 marks per 100 kilos. 

No. 7, I., 50/75, entered at 57.30 marks per 100 kilos. 

No. 8, I., 50/75, entered at 55.30 marks per 100 kilos. 

No. 2, 50/50, entered at 118.30 marks per 100 kilos. 

No advance. Discount, 1$ per cent. Add packing. 
10463, 10464.. Manufactures of metal and cotton and manufactures of cotton and metal, from Maurice Beigne, 
Marsalle, November 3 and 8, 1895 : 

Tapis en coton, 170x170, entered at 7, advanced to 8.16 francs per piece. 

Tapis en coton, 150x150, entered at 4.75. advanced to 6 francs per piece. 

Tapis en coton, 150 x 150, entered at 1.50, advanced to 1.83 francs per piece. 

Carres coton, 50x50, entered at 5, advanced to 6.90 francs per dozen. 

Tapis en coton, 130x130, entered at 3.50, advanced to 4.50 francs per piece. 
10521 Cotton lace curtains, from E. W. Bodenmann, St. Gall, November 30, 1895: 

Bordered curtains, white, 12/4, 3i yards, 1408/12, 2/6, 2/5, entered at 10.90, advanced to 
11.90 francs per pair. 

Bordered curtains, white, 12/4, 3* yards, 1411/31, 1/5, 1/4, entered at 12.30, advanced to 
13.50 francs per pair. 



10521 Cotton lace curtains, etc. — Continued. 

Bordered curtains, white, 14/4, 4 yards, 1411/4, 1/7, entered at 15.40, advanced to 16.90 

francs per pair. 
Bordered curtains, white, 14/4, 4 yards, 1411/4, 1/4, entered at 16.20, advanced to 17.70 

francs per pair. 
Bordered curtains, white, 12/4, 4 yards, 1418/4, 1/6, entered at 16.40, advanced to 18 

francs per pair. 
Bordered curtains, white, 14/4, 3 i yards, 1420, 3/6, 2/4, entered at 15.90, advanced to 

17.45 francs per pair. 
Bordered curtains, white, 14/4, 4 yards, 1422, 3/6, 1/5, entered at 17.35, advanced to 19.05 

francs per pair. 
Add cases. 

10410 10411, | Embroidered flax and cotton handkerchiefs, from Hoffmann, Huber & Co., St. Gall, November 

10579'. J 12 and 19, 1895 : 

Advances from 1 per cent to 4 per cent. 

10509 Wool dress goods, from Th. Michau & Co., Boubaix, December 5, 1895: 

Colored serge, No. 300 and 1202, 35", entered at .60, advanced to .65 franc per meter. 

Colored serge, Kb. 1220, 37", entered at .72, advanced to .79 franc per meter. 

Discount, 5 per cent. Add cases and packing. 
10328 Wool shawls, from Testart Preres, Paris, November 19, 1895: 

No. 2060, 18/19, Chales carres ecossais, 160 creme, 2 fringes, entered at 4.55, advanced to 
5.10 francs each. Discount, 10 per cent. Add cases and packing. 
10407 Sugar not above 16 D. 8., from J. L. Bamerez & Co., Manzanilla, October 14, 1895 : 

Testing 95.60°, entered at .0235, advanced to .02638, Spanish gold, per pound, packed. 
10554 Vegetables, n. 0. p. /., from S. Vitelli & Co., Castellamare, November 25, 1895 : 

Garlic, entered at 10 lire per 100 kilos. No advance. Add packing charges. 

9742, 10560, ) Sugar not above 16 D. S. and refined sugar above 16 D. S., from B. Crooks & Co., Liverpool, 
10558 ) October 2, November 28, and December 6, 1S95: 

Entered at £8 17s. 5d., advanced to £9 8s. 3d., sterling, per ton. Discount, 2£ per cent. 

M., entered at £9 12s. 5d., advanced to £9 13s. 4d., sterling, per ton, packed. 

Fifths, entered at £8 4s. lid., advanced to £8 15s. 10d., sterling, per ton, packed. Dis- 
count, 2 a per cent. 

Dark brown, entered at £9 7s. 5d., sterling, per ton. No advance. 

Fifths, entered at £8 17s. 5d., advanced to £9 0s. 10d., sterling, per ton. 

Fifths, entered at £9 2s. 5d., advanced to £9 5s. 10d., sterling, per ton. 

Fourths, above 16 D. S., entered at £10 12s. 5d., advanced to £10 13s. 5d., sterling, per ton. 

Discount, 2 J per cent. 
10526 Beaded trimmings, from Bacher & Leon, Berlin, December 6, 1895: 

Entered discounts, 10 per cent, 2 per cent, and 25 per cent. Advanced discounts 10 per cent 
and 2 per cent. 
10636 Sweetmeats, from Thomas J. Lipton, London, December 20,1895: 

Black currant jam, entered at 3s. 3d., advanced to 3s. 9d., sterling, per dozen. Add cases. 
lQi89.,,.....Flax lace tidies and sets, from , Paris, November 28, 1895 : 

Advances up to 50 per cent. 



10260, 10335, } Cotton lace curtains, from B. Walker & Co.. Ltd., et al., Nottingham, November 15 and 16? 
10471, etc j and December 6, 1895 : 

No. 3907/8, W. T. and E. T., 48", 3* yards, entered at 2s. 73d., advanced to 2s. 10id., 
sterling, per pair. 

No. 3750, W. T., 54", 3 J yards, entered at 2s. 3d., advanced to 2s. 5d., sterling, per pair. 

No. 3757 and 3759, W. T., 50", 3} yards, entered at 2s. 7Jd., advanced to 2s. 10Jd., 
sterling, per pair. 

Discount, 21 per cent. Less inland freight. Advanced also by addition for cases. 
10553 Sugar not above 16 D. 8., from , Demerara, November 21, 1895 : 

Testing 95.95°, entered at .0225, United States currency, per 100 pounds. No advance. 
10525 Wool Jcnit wearing apparel, from Mills & Gibb, Nottingham, December 7, 1895 : 

Infants' black cashmere t hose, 100 B., entered at 3s. lid., sterling, per dozen. No advance. 

Infants' white cashmere I hose, entered at 4s. , advanced to 4s. 2d. , sterling, per dozen. 

Discount, 31 per cent. 
10307 Tamboured cotton sets, from M. Ph. Emden, St. Gall, November 12, 1895: 

No. 2068, 7/4 Vitr. sp. weiss, entered at 2.40, advanced to 2.50 francs per aune. 

No. 2069, 7/4 Vitr. sp. weiss, entered at 2.50, advanced to 2.60 francs per aune. 

No. 2771, 7/4 Vitr. sp. weiss, entered at 1.35, advanced to 1.45 francs per aune. 

No. 2773, 7/4 Vitr. sp. weiss, entered at 1.40, advanced to 1.50 francs per aune. 

No. 2777, 7/4 Vitr. sp. weiss, entered at 1.95, advanced to 2 francs per aune. 

No. 2662, 7/4 spachtel ecru bed set, entered at 17.65, advanced to 18 francs per set. 

Add cases and boxes. 

10569 Nonenumerated manufactured articles, from Fr. Carl Dilchert, Bayreuth, November 16, 1895 

Prepared chalk, No. 4, entered at 6 marks per 100 pounds. 
Prepared chalk, No. 5, entered at 5.20 marks per 100 pounds. 
No advance. Discount, 11 per cent. Add packing. 

10581 Colored cotton corduroy, from -, Manchester, December 17, 1895: 

27l/28i" dark drab, entered at llfd., advanced to 12d. 

271/271 blk. drab, entered at 9sd., advanced to lOd. 

271/271 brown drab, entered at 9 ad., advanced to 9|d., sterling, per yard. 

Less -^j. Discount, 2* per cent. Add cases and packing. 

10571 Chemical salt, from G. Borehers, Goslar, November 16, 1895: 

Permanganate of potash, entered at 103.80, advanced to 110 marks per 100 kilos. Ad<? 
cases and packing. 

10491, 10557.. Musical instruments, etc., from Jules Cuendet, Auberson, November 30, and December 7, 1895: 
Entered at a deduction of 10 per cent for commission, advanced by disallowance of deduc- 
tion. 

10517 Sauce, chop sticks, etc., from , Hongkong, October 12, 1895 : 

Shrimp sauce, eutered at 1.10, advanced to 1.50, Mexican dollars per package. 
Chop sticks, entered at 4 Mexican dollars per package. No advance. 

2678 OP ") 

Philadelphia i ^ 00 ^ to P s i from ^ on ^ an Fihrmann, Antwerp, November 5, 1895. 

Eutered at 17.812d., sterling, per pound. No advance. 



4 

2547 O. P "J 

2574 O P f 6fra i ,e *« flom ,Tose Garcia > et al -i A-lmeria, October 4, 7, 8, 19, 1S95: 

Philadelphia, etc.. I 

Entered at (i, advanced to 7 pesetas per i barrel. 

Entered at 12, advanced to 14.50 pesetas per barrel. 

Entered at 12.50, advanced to 13.50 pesetas per barrel. 
PhiHdeLjiiia } chcmical compound, from V. Frauz Fakhel, Prag, October 21, 1895 : 

Hyposulphite of soda, entered at 4.40, add cases and packages, advanced to 6.18 florins per 

100 kilos, packed. 

n, 0( ? 9'i P ^'-"" \ Mustard, from J. & J. Colman, London, November 1, 1895 : 
Philadelphia.. } ' ' 

i tins, entered at 16d., i tins, entered at 14d., and kegs, entered at 5d., discount, 5 per cent. 

Add cases at 3s. 8d., less inland freight, advanced by disallowance of deduction of inland 

freight. 

2679 O. P... ) Su „ ar f,. om Eobt Crooks & Co., Greenock, November 19, 1895: 
Baltimore...] ■' ' ' ' ' 

Entered at 9s. 3d., advanced to 9s. 5d., sterling, per cwt. Discount, 21 per cent. 

Chica°o P ' } 8uaar ' from ' Liver P° ol > October 18, 1895 : 

Entered at 10s. per cwt. , discount, 2 per cent. No advance. 
10561 Orange boxes, from , Glasgow, November 29, 1895 : 

Entered at Is. 6d., advanced to Is. 8d., and Is. 10d., sterling, per case. 
2621 O. P., 1 

9A99 O P 

2C2S OP I ® u 9 ar not above 16 D. S., from Kobt. Crooks & Co., Liverpool, October 6, 4, and 9, 1895 : 

Philadelphia.. J 

Fifths, entered at 9s. 3d., advanced to 9s. 9d., sterling, per cwt., packed. Discount, 2i 

per cent. 

Fifths, entered at 9s. 3d., advanced to 10s., sterling, per cwt., packed. Discount, 2£ per 

cent. 

Fifths, entered at 9s. 7Jd., advanced to 10s., sterling, per cwt., packed. Discount, 2 i per 

cent. 

9590 OP ) 

Philadelphia \® u 9 ar above 16 D. S., from Van Eghen, Heel & Co., Amsterdam, October 15, 1895: 

Entered at 13s., plus bags, advanced to 14s., sterling, per cwt., packed. 
2620 O. P. .Sugar not above 16 B. 8., from O. G. Hempstead & Co. , Liverpool, October 23, 1895 : 

Fifths, entered at 9s. 3d., advanced to 9s. 5d., sterling, per cwt., packed. Discount, 2\ 
per cent. 
°665 OP ( ® u 9 ar not aoove 16 D- &> fro™ L. Sutro & Co., London, November 5, 1895 : 

Entered at 10s. 4Jd., less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to 9s. 9d., sterling, per cwt., 
packed. 
2630 OP ) 
Philadelphia ( ® u 9 ar not aoove 16 D- #•> fr° m > London, October 29, 1895 : 

Entered at 10s. 9d., less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to 10s. lid., sterling, per 
cwt., packed. 

Philadelphia [ Wo ° l tops ' from Ben y s Fl- y s ' Tourcoing, October 28, 1895 : 

Weft and warp, entered at 38! and 39J cents, plus 5 per cent. Deduct freight and com- 
mission. No advance. 



2595 O. P. ) 

2596 O. B. >■ Decorated earthenware, from Alfred Meekin, Tunstall, August 28 and October 5, 1895 : 
New Orleans.. ) 

Printed thirds, entered at discounts of 62 J, 5 per cent, and 5 per cent. No advance. 

B°t°' ^ } Earthenware , from W.H.Grindley & Co., Tunstall, November 19, 1895: 

Baltimore teas, entered at 3s. 4d., sterling, per dozen. Discounts, 60 per cent, 5 per cent, 
and 5 per cent. No advance. 

REAPPRAISEMENTS BY BOARDS. 

2639, 10276. .Silk embroidery, etc., from Benjuiat Bros., London, November 14, 1895 : 

Bragas, entered at 3s., sterling, per pair. No advance. 

Selonica linen squares, entered at Is. 6d., sterling, each. 

Suzini linen one yard squares, entered at 5s., sterling, each. 

Anavato linen one yard squares, entered at 8s., sterling, each. 

Dival satin cushions, entered at 4s. 6d., sterling, each. 

No Advance. Add case and packing. 
2624, 10239.. Chocolate, from D. & M. Grootes Bros., Westzaan, November 4. 1895 : 

Sweetened chocolate, entered at 35, advanced to 38 cents, United States currency, per 
pound, packed. 
2612, 10198.. Macaroni, from Garafalo, Gragnano, October 24, 1895 : 

Prime spuso, entered at 34, advanced to 37 lire per 100 kilos. 
2633, 10320. .Skins dressed and finished, from Albert Eeinhard, Luxemberg, November 13, 1895 : 

Black shoeskins, entered at 225, advanced to 250 francs per 100 skins. Add case, etc. 
2711,9605....DoZZs, from William Dressel, Sonneberg, August 31, 1895: 

Deduction of 5 per cent commission on kid dolls, disallowed. 
2630, 10168..Surface-coated paper, from Barmen, October 24, 1895: 

Streaked gold paper, 24, 24 x 20, entered at 10.30, advanced to 10.56 marks per reis. Dis- 
count 2 per cent, less inland freight. 
2450, 9105..Gotlon yarn, from McOonnel & Co., Ltd., Manchester, August 2, 1895 : 

No. 110/2, entered at Is. 9d., advanced to Is. lid., sterling, per pound. 

No. 100 A., entered at Is. 71 d., sterling, per pound. No advance. 

No. 115 I., entered at 2s. 2d., advanced to 2s. 3d., sterling, per pound. 

No. 125 I., entered at 2s. 5d., advanced to 2s. 7 id., sterling, per pound. 

No. 130 A., entered at 2s. 2 Id., advanced to 2s. 4d., sterling, per pound. 

No. 90, entered at Is. 5£d., advanced to Is. 6ad., sterling, per pound. 

Discount, 21 per cent. 
2712, 10037. .Manufactures of articles nonenumerated, from Weil Bros., Paris, October 15, 1895: 

Quill toothpicks, entered at 1.85, advanced to 2.15 francs per pack. 

Quill toothpicks, entered at 2, advanced to 2.20 francs per pack. 

Discounts, 5 per cent and 2 per cent. Add case and packing. 
2626, 1017 4.. Manufactures of wool and cotton, from Halbot & Lens, Bradford, November 6, 1895 : 

Black beaver, quality 1, entered at Is. 5d., advanced to Is. 5.85d., sterling, per yard. 
Less -^f. Discount, 5 per cent. Add making up and packing. 

Ohic 2 i 6 o °" P ' } Votton lace > efe- ' from Michael N - Saati > Tripoli, August 9, 1895: 

Pine cotton trimmings, entered at 63, advanced to 83 piasters per oke. 
Coarse cotton trimmings, entered at 54, advanced to 81 piasters per oke. 
Add cost of box, canvas, and packing. 



2552, 9847.. Cotton yarn, from McConnel & Co., Ltd., Manchester, September 27, 1895: 

No. 120/2, entered at 2s. 10d., advanced to 3s. 4d., sterling, per pound. Add cases. 
Discount, 2{ per cent. 
2fU4, 10209.. Manufactures of goat hair and cotton, from Henry Walker & Sons, Mirfield, November 8, 1895 : 
Black astrachan, entered at 3s. 6d. advanced to 3s. 10d., sterling, per yard. Less ^y, \ in 
10 yards. Discount, 2» per cent. Add case. 






REAPPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



grjeasury gepartmewt, 



1S96. 
.Department Circular No. 19. 

Division of Customs. 

Ofstceof THE SECRETARY, 
Washington, D. C, January 31, 1896. 
To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 

The following reappraisements of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending January 18, 1896. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING JANUARY 18, 1896. 

N. 15. — In corresponding with the Board of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference should always be made to the number of Reappraisement. 

No. of reappraise- 
ment. 

10486 Silk and cotton elastic, and cotton india rubber webbing, from M. Loughton, Leicester, December 7, 

1895: 
7/16 black schappe silk elastic, 4/36, entered at 13s. 8d., advanced to -18s. 9d., sterling, per 

gross. 
7/16 white and black cotton elastic, 4/36, entered at 6s. lid., advanced to 7s. 10d., sterling, 

per gross. 
3/8 black schappe silk elastic, 4/36, entered at lis. 2£d., advanced to 15s. 9d., sterling, per 

gross. 
Discount, 21 per cent. Add cases and lining. 

10593 Nuts, n. s. p.f., from Amatruda & Co., Naples, December 6, 1895 : 

Pine cones, entered at 6 lire per 100 kilos. No advance. 

10595 Sweetmeats, from Geo. Damson, Liverpool, November 27, 1895: 

Assorted jams, entered at 4s. 6d., 10s., 9s., and 13s., sterling, per dozen. No advance on 
jams. Add 4s. per dozen on decorated earthenware (unusual coverings). 

9924 Fruit in own juice, from Nicolas Quintana, Havana, October 19, 1895 : 

Estorilized pineapple, entered at $2, advanced to $2.18 per case. 

10625 Cotton yarn, from , Goggingeu, November 20, 1895: 

Crochet cotton, 25 gr., No. 20, white, entered at 3.29, advanced to 3.71 marks per kilo. 
Crochet cotton, 25 gr., No. 60, entered at 6.29, advanced to 6.71 marks per kilo. 
Crochet cotton, 25 gr., No. 70, entered at 6.93, advanced to 7.38 marks per kilo. 
Embroidery cotton, N. 14/18, colored, entered at 18.57, advanced to 19.70 marks per kilo. 



10625 Cotton yarn, etc.— Continued. 

Embroidery cotton, 12 boxes, 1 gr., ST. 8, turkey red, entered at 11.12, advanced to 11.64 

marks per ldlo. 
•Embroidery cotton, 12 boxes, 1 gr., No. 10, turkey red, entered at 11.21, advanced to 11.72 

marks per kilo. 
Embroidery cotton, 12 boxes, 1 gr., No. 16, turkey red, entered at 11.64, advanced to 

12.07 marks per kilo. 
Embroidery cotton, 12 boxes, 1 gr., No. 18, turkey red, entered at 11.85, advanced to 12.28 

marks per kilo. 
10648, 1044!).. \ Manufactures of wool, from Schunk & Co., Leeds, November 4, 27, 30, and December 7, 11, 

10647, etc I and 21, 1895: 

No. 2146, black clay twill, 60" and 61", entered at 2s. 2}d., advanced to 2s. 4d., sterling, 

per yard. 
No. 2174, black clay twill, 61" and 62", entered at 2s. 5|d., advanced to 2s. 7fd., sterling, 

per yard. 
Less -fa. Discount, 23 per cent. Add cases and packing. 

10602 Surface-coated paper, from Schoultrall & Co., Fuerth, November 14, 1895: 

Copper, No. 2, 20 x 24" sheets, regular shades, entered at 10 marks per ream. No advance. 

Discount, 2} per cent. Add cases. 
10475 Paintings and manufactures of wood (frames), from Takoh Schuller Vergohen, Munchen, Novem- 
ber 20, 1895 : 
Gold frames, entered at 56, advanced to 60 marks per frame. 
Gold frames, entered at 58, advanced to 63 marks per frame. 
Add cases and packing. 
9989, 10024.. Cotton lace curtains, from T. I. Birkin & Co., Nottingham, October 26, 1895: 

White lace curtains, No. 2755, 4 yards, entered at 3s. 83d., advanced to 3s. 113d., sterling, 

per pair. 
White lace curtains, No. 2813, 33 yards, entered at 6s. 9d., advanced to 8s., sterling, per 

pair. 
Ecru lace curtains, No. 2802, 33 yards, entered at 5s. 3d., advanced to 5s. 6d., sterling, per 

pair. 
Ecru lace curtains, No. 2983, 33 yards, entered at 3s. 9d., advanced to 4s. 3d., sterling, 

per pair. 
White lace curtains, No. 2986, 3 J yards, entered at 5s. 6d., advanced to 6s., sterling, per 

pair. 
Ecru lace curtains, No. 2818, 3 § yards, entered at 8s. Id., advanced to 9s., sterling, per 

pair. 
Ecru lace curtains, No. 3009, 33 yards, entered at 4s. 9d., advanced to 5s. 9d., sterling, 

per pair. 
Ecru lace curtains, No. 2738, 3£ yards, entered at 2s. 13d., advanced to 2s. 33d., sterling, 

per pair. 
White lace curtains, No. 2738, 33 yards, entered at 2s. 33d., advanced to 2s. 53d., sterling, 

per pair. 
White lace curtains, No. 2948, 3* yards, entered at 4s. 8d., advanced to 5s. 2d., sterling, 

per pair. 
Other similar goods, similar advances. 
Discount, 23 per cent. Add cases. Less inland freight. 



966"' 9 t n ' 1 Lead P encUs > etc -> from Geo - Bor g feldfc & Co -> Fuerth, August 14 and 27, July 26, 1895 : 

Colored crayons, 6303/1/12, entered at 14, advanced to 15.30 marks per gross. 

Colored crayons, 6303/1/6, entered at 7.40, advanced to 8.29 marks per gross. 

Add cases and packing. 

Looking-glass plates 16918/3/4}", entered at 3.97 marks per gross. No advance. Discount, 
2 per cent. 
10630 Unbleached cotton velvet, from Chamberlain, Downer & Co., Manchester, December 18, 1895 : 

175" black velvet, 1, entered at 4Jd., sterling, per yard. 

18" black velvet, 2, entered at 4|d., sterling, per yard. 

21 i" black velvet, O. X., entered at 61 d., sterling, per yard. 
» 20J" grey velvet, A., entered at 6id., sterling, per yard. 

Less -jV and 5 per cent. Advanced to discounts of -J Y and 2J per cent. Add cases, etc. 
10629 Colored cotton corduroy, from Edward Willi & Co., Manchester, December 18, 1895: 

27/8 extract prts. corduroy, 7412, entered at Is. 23 d., sterling, per yard. No advance. 
Less -fa. Discounts, 21 per cent. Add cases and packing. 
10624, 106 16.. Colored cotton corduroy, from Ehrenbacb & Brumm & Co., et aL, Manchester, December 10 
and 4, 1895 : 

27" extract corduroy, entered at Is. 2d, advanced to Is. 3d., sterling, per yard. Dis- 
count, 2J per cent. Add packing. 
10604, 10G11.. Prepared vegetables, from Vincenzo Lauritano, Gragnano, November 27, 1895 : 

Peppers, entered at .40 lira per tin. No Advance. 

Peppers, entered at .37, advanced to .40 lira per tin. 

Add cases and packing. 
10314 Cigarette paper, from , Paris, November 15, 1895 : 

Bobins, 1560, 32-leaf, entered at 129.20, advanced to 156.75 francs per 100 bobins. 

Bobins, 1560, 29-leaf, entered at 115.90, advauced to 142.50 fraucs per 100 bobins. 

Bobins, 1560, 30-leaf, entered at 123.50, advanced to 147.75 francs per 100 bobins. 
10642 Bleached and colored cotton, from George Mathers & Co., Nottingham, December 16, 1895 : 

32" gossamer mull, No. 320, entered at 4}d., sterling, per yard. 

32" gossamer mull, No. 324, entered at 7|d., sterling, per yard. 

32" gossamer mull, No. 327, entered at 101d., sterling, per yard. 

32" black, No. 322, entered at 5 Id., sterling, per yard. 

32" black, No. 323, entered at 6d., sterling, per yard. 

32" black, No. 326, entered at 9 ad., sterling," per yard. 

Discount, 5 per cent. Advanced to discount of 2 J per cent. Add cases and packing, 
deduct inland freight. 
10477, 10511, \ Sugar not above 16 D. 8,, from Wellensteiu Krause & Co., Batavia, Sourabaya, October 15, 
etc j 1895, and September 24, 1895 : 

Entered at total values, advanced to 6.96 florins per picul. 
10580 Decorated china and metal, furniture of wood, from , Loudon, November 26, 1895 : 

Pair sevres and ormalu candelabra, entered at £6 15s., advanced to £7 10s., sterling. 

1 bohemian glass vase, entered at 12s., advauced to £1. 

1 ruhl table, eutered at £6 10s. No advance. 

1 small tortoise-shell box, entered at 5s., advauced to 15s. 

1 carved rosewood sofa, entered at £6 10s. No advance. 

1 small ruhl table, entered at £1 17s. 6d. No advance. 

Add cases and packiug. 



4 

10444 Manufactures of wool, from , Leeds, November 30, 1895: 

Entered at 2s, 10d., advanced to 2s. Hid., sterling, per yard. Less, -fo. Discount, 2\ 
per cent. Add case and packing. 

10576 Silk galloons, from Carl Hinnenberg & Sou, Schwelm, December 4, 1895 : 

Art. 771, corset edging, black and gold, entered at 6.05, discount, 3 per cent, less 
freight, advanced to 6.35 marks per gross, discount, 3 per cent. 

2703 O. P | Manufactures of silk, from Mendleson Bros., Yokohama, November 5, 1895 : 

27 x 50 yards, 7/7 i" white habutai, 2nd quality, entered at 6.70, advanced to 7 silver yen 

per 100 momme. 
36x50 yards, 7/7J" white habutai, 2nd quality, entered at 6.75, advanced to 7 silver yen 

per 100 momme. 
19 x 50 yards, 7 J" str. koshu kaiki, entered at 6, advanced to 6.10 silver yen per 100 
momme. 

2707 O. P \ Manufactures of metal, from Emaillirwerk Silesia Caro Hegeuscheidt Co., Paruschowitz, 

San Francisco.. J June 15, 1895 : 

Entered at discounts of 55 per cent, 10 per cent, 5 per cent, and 2 per cent, less cases and 
packing and freight, advanced by disallowance of deduction of cases, packing, and 
freight. 
pk? ill'. \ Sulphate of ammonia, from West & Penrose, London, November 29, 1895: 

Entered at £8 9s. 8d., add bags, advanced to £8 18s. 9d., sterling, per ton, packed. 

2732 O. P | Chemical compound, from Nor ddeutsche Chemische-Fabrik, Harburg, November 23, 

Philadelphia...} 1S95 : 

Hyposulphite of sodium, entered at 10.10., add casks, advanced to 10.60 marks per 100 
kilos. 

2727 O. P | Worsted yarn ^ from Firth & Benton, Bradford, July 26, 1895 : 

2/40, M., 5 botany yarn, entered at 2s. Add packing. Charges, less discount, 2\ per 
cent. No advance. 
2b70 U. r I -flr orste d y arn> from Samuel Jackson & Sons, Ltd., Cleckheaton, November 7, 1895: 

2/4S super, entered at 2s. Id., advanced to 2s. 3£d., sterling, per pound. 

| 72 i °- P \ Bricks, from . Glasgow, October 1, 1895: 

Boston ) ' b ' ' 

Fire bricks, 9x4Jx2i, entered at 30s., sterling, per 1,000. 
Fire clay, 24 x 12 s 2, entered at 7d., sterling, per 1,000. 
No advance. 
2723 O? P ^ 

9°}i°n p [ Sugar above and not above 16 D. S., from R. Crooks & Co., Liverpool, September 13 and 

9795 q p ( 20, October 4 and 8, 1895 : 

2726 O. P. ...... J 

Fourths, entered at lis. 9d., advanced to 12s. 4id., sterling, per cwt., packed. Discount, 

21 per cent. 
Fourths, entered at £11, 12s. 5d., advanced to £12, sterling, per ton. Discount, 2£ per 

cent. 
Fourths, entered at £8 18s. 4d., discount 2 per cent, advanced to £9 8s., sterling, per ton, 

net. 
Fourths, entered at £10 17s. 5d., sterling, per ton. Discount, 21 per cent. No advance. 
Fourths, entered at £11 2s. 5d., advanced to £11 3s. 7d., sterling, per ton. Discount, 25 

per cent. 



REAPPRAISEMENTS BY BOARDS. 

2722, 10353.. Chemical salt, from Actien Gesellschaft Georg Egestorffs Salzwerke, Linden, November 9, 1895 : 
Chloride of barium, entered at 8.40, advanced to 9.50 luarks per 100 kilos. Add casks 
at 3.50 each. 

2765, 1026S, ") 

2743, 10179, [ Manufactures of cotton, dress facings, from A. McAllister, Manchester, November 15, 1895: 

2748, 10319.. ) 

Majestic A., 11", 4-yard bolts, black, entered at 4s. 2d., advanced to 4s. 5d., sterling, per 

gross. 
Majestic A. A., It", 4-yard bolts, black, entered at 6s. 6d., advanced to Gs. 10d., sterling, 

per gross. 
Majestic A., 11", 4-yard bolts, colors, entered at 4s. 6d., advanced to 4s. 9d., sterling, per 

gX'OSS. 

Majestic A., 11", 36-yard reels, colors, entered at 4s. 8d., advanced to 5s., sterling, per 

gross. 
Majestic A A., II", 36-yard reels, colors, entered at 7s. 3d., advanced to 7s. 8d., sterling, 

per gross. 
Majestic A. A., H", 4-yard bolts, colors, entered at 7s. Id., advanced to 7s. 3d., sterling, 

per gross. 
Add cases at 12s. each. 
2614, 10209.. Manufactures of goat hairand cotton, from Henry "Walker & Sons, Mirfield, November 8, 1895 : 
Black astrakhan, entered at 3s. 6d., advanced to 3s. 10d., sterling, per yard. Less ^-, } 
yard in 10. Discount, 2J per cent. Add cases. 
2623, 10246.. Matches, from Ste. Anne Caussenille Jne. & Cie et Eoche & Cie, Gand, August 27, 1895 : 

No. 36, Etig Weiller son, etc., entered at 2.60, advanced to 2.83 francs per gross, less 
freight, at 510 francs per 25 gross. 
2627, 10207.. Wool dress goods, from P. Zschoch & Co., Menselwitz, November 6, 1895 : 

Henrietta, 5011, entered at .84, advanced to .96 mark per meter. Add cases, and packing, 
and making up. 
2634, 10274..Go«ow hose, from Sturm & Dietrich, Chemnitz, November 6, 1895 : 

Ladies' black cotton hose, S. 39, 8/10, 1/2 dozeu boxes, entered at 4.80, advanced to 5.50 
marks per dozen packed. Discount, 5 per cent. Add charges for boxes and pack- 
ing to entered value, at .60 pfennig per dozen less 5 per cent. 
2734, 10450. .Looking-glass plates, etc., from Schunk & Co., Fuerth, November 18, 1895 : 

Beveled, unsilvered, 36 x 18, entered at 5.19, advanced to 5.25 marks per plate. 
Beveled, unsilvered, 40x18, entered at 6.03, advanced to 6.15 marks per plate. 
Beveled, unsilvered, 48 x20, entered at 10.25, advanced to 10.37 marks per plate. 
Beveled, unsilvered, 24 x 20, entered at 3.67, advanced to 3.80 marks per plate. 
Beveled, unsilvered, 28x22, entered at 4.98, advanced to 5.10 marks per plate. 
Beveled, unsilvered, 30 x 24, entered at 6.11, advanced to 6.24 marks per plate. 
Less freight. 
2629, 10170.. Wool knit wearing apparel, from Mills & Gibb, Nottingham, November 9, 1895 : 

100 B, infants' black cashmere, 3/4 hose, sizes, 4, 4 1 and 5, entered at 3s. lid., sterling, 
per dozen. No advance. 

101 B, Infants' white cashmere, 3/4, 32 half hose, size, 4], entered at 3s. lid., advanced 
to 4s. 2d., sterling, per dozen. 

Discount, 31 per cent. Add cases. 



6 

«If«' 1«™?' 1 Stoffar, from Robt. Crooks & Co., Liverpool, November 15 and November 22, 1895: 
2746, lOJO,').. J 

Fifths, not above 16 D. S., entered at 8s. 9d., advanced to 8s. lid., sterling, per cwt., 
packed. 

Fifths, not above 16 D. S., entered at 9s., advanced to 9s. 2d., sterling, per cwt., packed. 

Seconds, above 16 D. S., entered at 14s. 3d., advanced to 14s. 5d., sterling, per cwt., packed. 

Discount, 2} per cent. 
2756, 9S22..Sugar, from , Amsterdam, September 21, 1895 : 

Eefined sugar, entered at lis. 42 d., add bags, advanced to 13s. 2d., sterling, per cwt. oi 
112 pounds, packed. 
2716, 10313.. Pickles, from Ferdinand Wolf, Berlin, November 7, 1895 : 

Entered at .20 mark per pound. Add packing. Discount 2 per cent. No advance. 
2762, 1017 L. Anchovies, n. o. p. /., from , Messina, September 24, 1895 : 

Entered at 50, advanced to 100 lire per 100 kilos, net. 
2710, 10199.. Refined camphor, from H. Lucas & Co., Hiogo, July 19, 1895: 

Japan camphor, entered at .59}, advanced to .74J silver yen per pound. Add refining at 
3.85 sen per pound. Add packing, etc. 

o7o?'i°j?p5' X Wool dress goods, from Tasch's Nachfolger, Glauchau, November 26 and 29, 1895: 

118 cm., quality 1037, entered at 1.13, advanced to 1.24 marks per meter. 

125 cm., quality 1018, entered at 1.23, advanced to 1.35 marks per meter. 

125 cm., quality 1044, entered at 1.50, advanced to 1.65 marks per meter. 

108 cm., quality 1016, entered at 1.02, advanced to 1.12 marks per meter. 

95 cm., quality 103, entered at .94, advanced to 1.02 marks per meter. 

108 cm., quality 7921, entered at .98, advanced to 1.06 marks per meter. 

104 cm., quality 7507, entered at 1.15, advanced to 1.25 marks per meter. 

95 cm., quality 7913, entered at 1.02, advanced to 1.10 marks per meter. 

98 cm., quality 173, entered at 1.09, advanced to 1.18 marks per meter. 

95 cm., quality 101, entered at .89, advanced to .96 mark per meter. 

115 cm., quality H. H. H., entered at 1.28, advanced to 1.40 marks per meter. 

108 cm., quality H. H., entered at 1.19, advanced to 1.30 marks per meter. 

118 cm., quality 2155, entered at 1.75, advanced to 1.90 marks per meter. 

108 cm., quality 915, entered at 1.19, advanced to 1.30 marks per meter. 

95 cm., quality 805, entered at 1.02, advanced to 1.08 marks per meter. 

95 cm., quality 803, entered at .94, advanced to 1 mark per meter. 

95 cm., quality 3701a, entered at 1.07, advanced to 1.16 marks per meter. 

98 cm., quality 410, entered at 1.04, advanced to 1.12 marks per meter. 

118 cm., quality 5941, entered at 1.25, advanced to 1.36 marks per meter. 

Add cases and packing. 
2771, 10391. .Cotton hose, from , Chemnitz, November 6, 1S95 : 

Ladies' black cotton hose, S/10, No. 207, entered at 3.15, advanced to 3.45 marks per dozen. 

Ladies' black cotton hose, 8/10, No. 209, entered at 4.50 marks per dozen. No advance. 

Ladies' black cotton hose, S/10, No. 211, entered at 4.70 marks per dozen. No advance. 

Ladies' black cotton hose, 8/10, No. 216, entered at 3.45, advanced to 3.55 marks per dozen. 

Ladies' colored cotton hose, No. 1365, entered at 3.50, advanced to 3.70 marks per dozen. 

Ladies' colored cotton hose, No. 1355a, entered at 3.40 marks per dozen. No advance. 

Ladies' black cotton hose, No. 1135, entered at 4. 70, advanced to 5 marks per dozen. 



7 

2771, 10391.. Cotton hose, etc. — Continued. 

Ladies' black cotton hose, No. 213, entered at 5.10 marks per dozen. No advance. 

Ladies' black cotton nose, No. 8783, entered at 2.60, advanced to 2.75 marks per dozen. 

Men's colored cotton half hose, No. 118, entered at 2.80, advanced to 2.90 marks per dozen. 

Add to ladies' for boxes, packing, and cases at .50 pfennig per dozen. 
• Add to men's for boxes, packing, and cases at .40 pfennig per dozen. 

Discount, 5 per cent. 
675 O.P....1 

2489 \ Mineral red, from John Kenyon & Sons, London, August 27, 1894 : 

Boston J 

Entered at 63d., advanced to 7 ad., sterling, per pound. Discount, 5 per cent. Add barrels. 

661 o.r...^ 

2549 > Macaroni, from J. Cairet & ses Pils, St. Marcel, September 7, 1895: 

Boston J 

Spaghetti, etc., advanced by disallowance of deduction of 5 per cent commission and 2 per 

cent cartage. 

663 O. P ) 

2628 [■ Chinese merchandise, from Kwong Wan June, Hongkong, September 25, 1895: 

San Francisco.. ) 

Beansticks, entered at 2.40, advanced to 2.70 Mexican dollars per box. 

617 O. P..0 
2333 I 

618 O. P.... \ Decorated and plain white earthenware, from Geo. Borgfeldt & Co., Sonneberg, July 3, 1895 : 
2334, etc... | 

Chicago.... J 

Entered at various prices and discounts, and deduction of 5 per cent commission added 
to invoice, but deducted on entry. Entered value sustained on reappraisement. 

619 O. P | 

2424 V Jet ornaments and manufactures of metal, from , Bodenbach, September 5, 1895: 

Chicago J 

Entered at various prices and discounts, and deduction of 5 per cent commission added to 
invoice, but deducted on entry. Entered value sustained on reappraisement. 

O 



DRAWBACK ON SUGAR AND SIRUP. 



1S9G. 
Department Circular No. 20. 

Division of Customs. 



treasury gjeparirojewt, 

office op THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, I). C, February 1, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 

On the exportation of refined sugars made wholly from imported raw sugars, and on the exportation 
of sirups made wholly from imported raw cane sugars, drawback will be allowed equal in amount to ihe 
duties paid on the imported sugars so used, less the legal deduction of 1 per cent. 

When the exported sugars are "hard refined," of standard test, commercially known as loaf, cut 
loaf, cube, granulated, crushed, or powdered, and are made wholly from imported raw cane sugars, the 
amount of drawback shall be determined by allowing for each 100 pounds of the exported article, the 
duties paid on the respective grades and quantities of material used, as indicated in the following 
schedule : 



Test of raw 
sugar used. 


Allowance for 100 
pounds, hard refined. 


Test of raw 
sugar used. 


Allowance for 100 
pounds, hard refined. 


Degrees. 
100 


Pounds. 
100. 00 


Degrees. 

87 


Pounds. 
124. 27 


99 


101. 87 


86 


126. 14 


98 


103. 73 


85 


128. 01 


97 


105.60 


84 


129. 88 


96 


107. 47 


83 


131.74 


95 


; 109. 34 


82 


133. 61 


94 


111.20 


81 


135. 48 


93 


113.07 


80 


137. 35 


92 


114.94 


79 


139.21 


91 


116.81 


78 . 


141. 08 


90 


118..67 


77 


142. 95 


89 


120. 54 


76 


144. 82 


88 


122. 41 


75 


146. 68 



When "soft refined'.' sugars made from. imported raw' cane sugars are exported, the quantity: of 
"crystallizable sugar" contained therein shall be determined by reference to weight arid polariscope 
test of ' the exported article, and drawback allowance shall be based on the quantity of "crystallizable 
sugar" so found, as hereinbefore provided for a like quantity of "hard refined" sugar. 

When the "hard refined" sugars hereinbefore described are made wholly from imported raw beet 
sugars, the dutiable value of the material used for each pouud of the exported article shall be determined 



by dividing the dutiable value of 1 pound of the material used by the decimal denoting the "net 
analysis" of such material. 

The amount of drawback which may be allowed on the exported sirup product of raw cane sugars 
shall be determined by allowing for each gallon of the exported article, valued at 5 cents in condition as 
"thrown" from the "centrifugal," the duties paid on the respective grades and quantities of material 
used as indicated in the following schedule : 



Test of raw 
sugar used. 


Allowance for one 
gallon sirup. 


Test of raw 
sugar used. 


Allowance for one 
gallon sirup. 


Degrees. 
99 


Pounds. 
1.36 


Degrees. 
86 


Pounds. 
1.56 


98 


1.37 


85 


1.58 


97 


1.39 


84 


1.60 


96 


1.40 


83 


1.62 


95 


1.41 


82 


1.64 


94 


1.43 


81 


1.66 


93 


1.44 


80 


1.68 


92 


1.46 


79 


1.70 


91 


1.48 


78 


1.72 


90 


1.49 


77 


1.74 


89 


1.51 


76 


1.77 


88 


1.53 


75 


1.79 


87 


1.55 







The value of the sirup in condition as thrown from the centrifugal shall be declared by the manu- 
facturer on the drawback entry, which declaration shall be verified by the collector, and if the declaration 
so verified shows a value per gallon above or below 5 cents, the allowance shall be determined by 
increasing or reducing the schedule allowance in proportion to the increase or reduction above or below 
the 5 cents per gallon, but in no case shall the allowance be based on a value of sirup exceeding 8 cents 
per gallon without special authority from the Department. 

For fractional tests of the raw cane sugar used in the manufacture of either refined sugar or sirup, 
the allowances of quantity of material shall be computed in proportion to the schedule allowances for the 
degrees next above or below such fractional test. 

The quantities of sugar and sirup exported shall be ascertained by United States weighers and 
gaugers, respectively, and samples shall be taken as ordered by the collector, to be submitted to the 
appraiser for report of polariscope test and such other expert inspection as may be requisite. 

On requisition of collectors, appraising officers shall furnish polariscope tests, "net analyses," and 
other conditions of valuation of raw sugars not found on the import invoice for use in liquidation of 
drawback entries. 

J. G. CARLISLE, 

Secretary. 



RE APPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



%xtas\xx\} gcpartwstxt, 



1S96. 
Department Circular No. 21. 

Division of Customs. 

OfficeofTHE SECRETARY, 



Washington, D. C, February 4, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 

The following reappraisements of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending January 25, 1896. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING JANUARY 25, 1896. 

N. B. — In corresponding with the Board of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference should always be made to the number of Reappraisement. 

No. of reaj>praise- 
ment. 

10676, 10677. .. Bronze powder, etc., from Adam Riessner, Nuremberg, November 27 and December 9, 1895: 

Brocade, No. 2 L., 2 B., No. U B., entered at .82, advanced to .84 mark per pound. 

Brocade, 2 A. and 3 A., entered at .85, advanced to .89 mark per pound. 

Brocade, 2 brilliant, entered at .95 mark per pound. No advance. 

Plate gold, brilliant/W., entered at 1.13 marks per pound. No advance. 

Flitters, No. 3 A. B., entered at .82, advanced to .84 mark per pound. 

Lemon B. and Orange B., entered at .88, advanced to .89 mark per pound. 

Add boxes. 
10527 Anchovies, n. o. p.f., from Deigo Guardiuo, Naples, November 1, 1895: 

Sardines in boxes, 41 x 3J x 1£, entered at 43, advanced to 45 lire per 100 kilos. 
10691 Macaroni, from Enrico Birloglio, Nervi, December 18, 1895: 

Cases of lOa kilos each, entered at .36 lira per kilo. Add packing at .60 lira per case. 
No advance. 
10092 Vegetables, sauces, etc., from San Kwong Hop, Hongkong, October 17, 1895: 

Soy, entered at 2, advanced to 2.40 Mexican dollars per cask. 

Shrimp sauce, entered at 1.50 Mexican dollars per cask. No advance. 
10622 Wool dress goods, from Julius Dittrich, Meerane, December 6, 1895: 

94/95 cm., silk popeliue, No. 1255, entered at 1.05, advanced to 1.15 marks per meter. 
Discount, 5 per cent. Less inland freight and consul fee. 



10587 Wool dress goods, from , Glauchan, November 26, 1895: 

92/93 cm., all wool, entered at 1.05, advanced to 1.15 marks per meter. 
106/107 cm., all wool, entered at 1.32, advanced to 1.45 marks per meter. 
Discount, 7 per cent. Add case and packing. 

10508, 105SS Wool dress goods, from Schumann &Heidner, Glauchau, November 25 and December 2, 1895 : 

112/118 cm., Art. 2950, bunt., all wool, entered at 1.20, advanced to 1.30 marks per 

meter. 
112/113 cm., Art. 2950, black and white, all wool, entered at 1.15, advanced to 1.24 

marks per meter. 
92/93 cm., Art. 3046, wool and mohair, entered at 1.20, advanced to 1.30 marks per 

meter. 
93/94 cm., Art. 3000, wool and silk, entered at 1.20, advanced to 1.30 marks per meter. 
124/126 cm., Art. 1027, black and white, all wool, entered at 1.31, advanced to 1.44 

marks per meter. 
124/126 cm., Art. 1027, bunt., all wool, entered at 1.37, advanced to 1.50 marks per 

meter. 
106/108 cm., A.rt. 1043, wool and mohair, entered at 1.70, advanced to 1.80 marks per 

meter. 
92/93 cm., Art. 746, all wool, entered at 1.05, advanced to 1.15 marks per meter. 
106/S cm., Art. 7864, all wool, entered at 1.15, advanced to 1.24 marks per meter. 
106/8 cm., Art. 762, all wool, entered at 1.32, advanced to 1.45 marks per meter. 
106/8 cm., Art. 7865, all wool, entered at 1.12, advanced to 1.20 marks per meter. 
92/3 cm., Art. 745, all wool, entered at .98, advanced to 1.05 marks per meter. 
106/8 cm., B. P. 350, wool and silk, entered at 1.48, advanced to 1.60 marks per 

meter. 
93/94 cm., B. P. 320, wool and silk, entered at 1.51, advanced to 1.63 marks per 

meter. 
108/9 cm., Art. 761, all wool, black and white, . entered at 1.11, advanced to 1.20 

marks per meter. 
108/9 cm., Art. 764, all wool, colored, entered at 1.165, advanced to 1.26 marks per 

meter. 
93/4 cm., Art. 255, wool and silk, entered at 1.20, advanced to 1.30 marks per meter. 
112/3 cm., Art. B. P. 370, all wool, black and white, entered at 1.15, advanced to 1.24 

marks per meter. 
112/3 cm., Art. B. P. 370, all wool, colored, entered at 1.20, advanced to 1.30 marks 

per meter. 
93/4 cm., Art. B. P. 360, all wool, entered at 1.22, advanced to 1.32 marks per meter. 
106/8 cm., Art. B. P. 340, wool and silk, entered at 1.38, advauced to 1.50 marks per 

meter. 
93/4 cm., Art. B. P. 330, wool and silk, entered at 1.51, advauced to 1.65 marks per 

meter. 
106/8 cm., Art. 761, all wool, black and white, entered at 1.10, advanced to 1.18 marks 

per meter. 
93/4 cm., Art. 3063 1, wool and cotton, entered at 1.03, advanced to 1.10 marks per 

meter. 
92/3 cm,, Art, T 125, wool and silk, entered at 1.06, advanced to 1.15 marks per meter. 



3 

10508, 10588 Wool dress goods, etc. — Continued. 

93/4 cm., Art. 3167, all wool, entered at 1.24, advanced to 1.32 marks per meter. 

93/4 cm., Art. 3155, wool and silk, entered at 1.11, advanced to 1.20 marks per meter. 

93/4 cm., silk jaquard jardiniere, wool and silk, entered at 1.10, advanced to 1.18 
marks per meter. 

92/3 cm., Art. 745, all wool, entered at .98, advanced to 1.05 marks per meter. 

Discount, 7 per cent. Add cases. 
10704 Cotton hose, from E. Loewenthal, Berlin, November 13, 1895: 

Black dr. women's hose, No. 7358, entered at 3.10, advanced to 5 marks per dozen. 

Black women's hose, No. 3191, entered at 2.60, advanced to 3.80 marks per dozen. 

Black fir. women's hose, No. 350, entered at 4, advanced to 5.60 marks per dozen. 

Cashmere hose, No. 500, entered at 4.50, advanced to 7 marks per dozen. 

Men's hose, No. 75, entered at 1.40, advanced to 2.20 marks per dozen. 

10614 Cotlonhose, from Georg Seidler, Seigmar, December 3, 1895: 

Ladies' black cotton hose, maco foot, 2958, entered at 4.65, advanced to 5.25 marks per 

dozen. 
Ladies' mode cotton hose, 2177, entered at 4.30, advanced to 5 marks per dozen. 
Men's black cotton half hose, 236, entered at 3.50, advanced to 4.10 marks per dozen. 
Ladies' cotton hose, 2121, entered at 3.55, advanced to 4.20 marks per dozen. 
Ladies' black cotton hose, 2181, entered at 4.65, advanced to 5.30 marks per dozen. 
Ladies' black cotton hose, maco foot, 2953, entered at 4.10, advanced to 4.80 marks 

per dozen. 
Ladies' black cotton hose, 2126, entered at 3.90, advanced to 4.40 marks per dozen. 
Ladies' mode cotton hose, 2127, entered at 3.70, advanced to 4.25 marks per dozen. 
Ladies' brown cotton hose, 2153, entered at 3.75, advanced to 4.25 marks per dozen. 
Ladies' black cotton hose, 2156, entered at 4.20, advanced to 5 marks per dozen. 
Ladies' black cottou hose, 2096, entered at 2.90, advanced to 3.50 marks per dozen. 
Men's brown cottou half hose, 185, entered at 2.05, advanced to 2.40 marks per dozen. 
Men's brown cottou half hose, 170, entered at 3.20, advanced to 3.85 marks per dozen. 
Ladies' black cotton hose, 4160, entered at 3.10, advanced to 3.65 marks per dozen. 
Ladies' black cotton hose, 2111, entered at 3.45, advauced to 3.95 marks per dozen. 
Men's black cotton half hose, maco foot, 306, entered at 3.35, advanced to 4 marks per 

dozen. 
Infants' black cotton hose, 1112, eutered at 2.50, advanced to 2.95 marks per dozen. 
Ladies' black cotton hose, 2126, entered at 3.95, advanced to 4.45 marks per dozen. 
Men's mode cotton half hose, 187, entered at 2.30, advanced to 2.60 marks per dozen. 
Men's black cotton hose, 176 entered at 3.55, advanced to 4.30 marks per dozen. 
Men's mode cotton hose, 361 T, entered at 3.40, advanced to 4.10 marks per dozen. 
Men's black cotton hose, 191, entered at 2.20, advauced to 2.60 marks per dozen. 
Children's black cottou hose, size 5, 1126, entered at 2.50, advauced to 2.95 marks per 

dozen. 
Cbildreu's black cotton hose, size 5J, 1126, entered at 2.70, advanced to 3.20 marks 

per dozen. 
Children's black cottou hose, size 6, 1126, entered at 2.90, advanced to 3.45 marks per 

dozen. 



10614 Cotton hose, etc. — Continued 

Children's black cotton hose, size 61, 1126, entered at 3.10, advanced to 3.60 marks 

per dozen. 
Children's black cotton hose, size 7, 1126, entered at 3.20 advanced to 3.85 marks per 

dozen. 
Children's black cotton hose, size 7i, 1126, entered at 3.50, advanced to 4.10 marks 

per dozen. 
Children's black cotton hose, size 8, 1126, entered at 3.70, advanced to 4.35 marks per 

dozen. 
Children's black cotton hose, size 81, 1126, entered at 3.90, advanced to 4.60 marks 

per dozen. 
Men's black cotton half hose, 3529. entered at 3.40, advanced to 3.90 marks per dozen. 
Men's black cotton half hose, 4309, entered at 3.50, advanced to 4.15 marks per dozen. 
Men's brown cotton half hose, 4278, entered at 3.20, advanced to 3.90 marks per dozen. 
Children's white cotton hose, size 7, 2416, entered at 2.55, advanced to 3 marks per 

dozen. 
Children's white cotton hose, size 7 J, 2416, entered at 2.85, advanced to 3.30 marks 

per dozen. 
Children's white cotton hose, size 8, 2416, entered at 3.15, advanced to 3.60 marks per 

dozen. 
Children's white cotton hose, size 81, 2416, entered at 3.45, advanced to 3.90 marks 

per dozen. 
Children's black cotton hose, size 7, 2416, entered at 3.75, advanced to 4.20 marks per 

dozen. 
Children's black cotton hose, size 71, 2416, entered at 4.05, advanced to 4.50 marks 

per dozen. 
Children's black cotton hose, size 8, 2416, entered at 4.35, advanced to 4.80 marks per 

dozen. 
Children's black cotton hose, size 81, 2416, entered at 4.65, advanced to 5.10 marks 

per dozen. 
Children's black cotton nose, size 5, 215, entered at 2.35, advanced to 2.80 marks per 

dozen. 
Children's black cotton hose, size 51, 215, entered at 2.70, advanced to 3.15 marks per 

dozen. 
Children's black cotton hose, size 6, 215, entered at 3.05, advanced to 3.50 marks per 

dozen. 
Children's black cotton hose, size 61, 215, eotered at 3.40, advanced to 3.85 marks per 

dozen. 
Children's black cotton hose, size 71, 215, entered at 4.10, advanced to 4.55 marks per 

dozen. 
Children's black cotton hose, size 8, 215, entered at 4.45, advanced to 4.90 marks per 

dozen. 
Children's black cotton hose, size 81, 215, entered at 4.80, advanced to 5.25 marks per 

dozen. 
Men's mode cotton half hose, 331, entered at 3.45, advanced to 4 marks per dozen. 
Men's brown cotton half hose, 346, entered at 3.20, advanced to 3. 80 marks per dozen. 



5 

10614 Cotton hose, etc. — Continued. 

Men's black cotton half hose, maco foot, 301, entered at 3.60 advanced to 4.30 marks 

per dozen. 
Ladies' black cotton hose, 2176, entered at 4.35, advanced to 4.90 marks per dozen. 
Ladies' black cotton hose, 2186, entered at 5.35, advanced to 6 marks per dozen. 
Ladies' black cotton hose, maco foot, 2950, entered at 3.10, advanced to 3.55 marks per 

dozen. 
Ladies' black cotton hose, 2261, entered at 3.90, advanced to 4.45 marks per dozen. 
Ladies' black cotton hose, 4908, entered at 4.50, advanced to 5.20 marks per dozen. 
Men's black cotton half hose, 104, eutered at 2.90, advanced to 3.30 marks per dozen. 
Men's black embroidered cotton half hose, 114, entered at 3.35, advanced to 3.95 marks 

per dozen. 
Men's brown cotton hose, 1502, entered at 1.95, advanced to 2.30 marks per dozeu. 
Men's black cotton hose, maco foot, 4306, entered at 3.40, advanced to 4.05, marks per 

dozen. 
Discount, 5 per cent. To entered prices add boxes, packing, and cases. Advanced 
prices include boxes, packing, etc. 

10721 Manufactures of cotton and metal, from Pastori & Casanova, Morga, November, 15, 1S95: 

Tappeti fignrati, assorted, entered at a discount of 20 per cent, advanced discount, 10 
per cent. 

10659 Manufactures of metal, etc., from Benner Witte & Co., Paris, October 12, 1895 : 

Tenailles grande morbele, entered at 2, advanced to 3 francs per dozen. 

10689 Manufactures of metal, from Salmon & Lumley, Paris, December 12, 1895: 

Metal hooks, 5021, entered at .30, advanced to .36 franc per gross. 
Discount, 2 per cent. Add cases. 

10626 Manufactures of metal (umbrella tubes), from Henry Holland &Co., Birmingham, December 

14, 1895 : 
25 x 6 mm., 27 x 6 mm., 25 x 7 mm, 27 x 7 mm., brown enameled tubes, entered at 
33s., advanced to 36s., sterling, per gross. Discount, 5 per cent. Case, packing, 
inland carriage, 6s. per gross deducted from entered price, deduction disallowed. 

10668 Hatters' furs not on the shin, from Louis Kanarek, Tarnow, November 24, 1895: 

Babbit hair, entered at 1.70 florins per kilo, add packing. No advance. 

10618 Hatters' furs not on the skin, from I. Lustgarten, Vienna, October 30, 1895: 

Babbit hair, entered at 1.65, advanced to 1.70 florins per kilo. Add cases. 

10757 Cotton lace, etc., from Seligmann & Marx, Calais, January 3, 1S96: 

Drawback deducted on entry, advanced by disallowance of deduction of drawback. 

10738 Silk and cotton galloons, from Benoit Booker, Nottingham, November 11, 1895: 

0/969 B., tape, entered at Is. 3d., advanced to Is. 4d., sterling, per gross. 
Entered discounts, 10 per cent, 5 per cent, and 11 per cent. Advanced discounts, 2$ 
per cent, 11 per cent. 

10577 Manufactures of cotton N. K, from Alexander McAllister, Manchester, December 5, 1895: 

Cotton velveteen dress facings, majestic colors, 11" 4-yard bolts, entered at 4s. 6d., 

advanced to 4s. 9d., sterling, per gross. 
Cotton velveteen dress facings, majestic colors, 1!" 4-yard bolts, entered at 7s. Id., 
advanced to 7s. 3d., sterling, per gross. 



10577 Manufactures of cotton N. K, etc. — Continued. 

Cotton velveteen dress facings, majestic colors, U" 36-yard reels, entered at 4s. 8d., 

advanced to 5s., sterling, per gross. 
Cotton velveteen dress facings, majestic colors, II" 36-yard reels, entered at 7s. 3d., 

advanced to 7s. 8d., sterling, per gross. 
Add cases to advanced prices. 

10646 Matches, from , Hiogo, August 24, 1895: 

Safety matches, entered at 15.25, advanced to 16.50 silver yen per case. 
Safety matches, entered at 14.25, advanced to 15.50 silver yen per case. 
Safety matches, entered at 13.25, advanced to 14.50 silver yen per case. 
Less N. D. charges. 

10745 Sugar not above 16 D. 8., from L. W. Miller, Macoris, December 24, 1S95 : 

Testing 94.65°, first centrifugal, entered at $1.97 per cwt., add bags, advanced to 
$0.02059, United States currency, per pound, packed. 

10684 Sugar not above 16 D. 8., from Booker Bros. & Co., Demerara, December 23, 1895: 

Testing 96.24°, entered at $2.25 per 100 kilos, add bags, advanced to $0.023875, 
United States currency, per pound, packed. 
10537, 10536.... j ^ m , ngt ahove m D ^ frQm _ Sourabaya, September 14 and 17, 1895: 

Testing 96.58°, entered at 10s. 6d., less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to 9s. 

4fd., sterling, per cwt. of 112 pounds, packed. 
07Q1 OP ) 

Ph 1 d 'l l"" I Books, l' rom Lever Bros., Ltd., Liverpool, November 20, 1895: 

Almanacs, 1896, entered at £10, sterling, per 1,000. Add packing. No advance. 

IhitadelThia 1 8u 9<*r, from > Sourabaya, October 17, 1895: 

Testing 97.06°, entered at lis., less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to 9s. 5£d., 
sterling, per cwt., packed. 

p, ., . ', .". I Hugar, from.Erdmaun & Sielcker, Sourabaya, July 27, 1895: 

Testing 97.27°, entered at lis. 3d., less freight arid N. D. charges, advanced to 9s. 

5-j^d., sterling, per cwt., packed. 

2701 O P ) 

PI "I 11 l"i'a" 1 8u 9 ar not aoove 16 D- &> from , Batavia, September 23, 1895: 

Testing 96.85°, entered at lis. HA., less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to 9s. 

5 Id., sterling, per cwt., packed. 

2734 O. P \ Sugar not above 16 D. S., from Fraser, Eaton & Co., Sourabaya, September 28, Octo- 

Philadelphia... j ber 5, 7, 2, and 9, 1S95: 

Testing 96.94°, entered at lis., less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to 9s. 5|d., 

sterling, per cwt., packed. 
Testing 96.94°, entered at lis., less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to tOs. 2d., 

sterling, per cwt., packed. 
Testing 96.94°, entered at lis., less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to 9s. 9id., 

sterling, pei cwt., packed. 
Testing 96.94°, entered at lis., less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to 10s. 2d., 

sterling, per cwt., packed. 



2743 O. P 

San Francisco. 



Glassware, from The St. Louis Crystal Glass Company, Muuzthal, October 22, 1895 : 
Entered at discounts of 5 per cent, 5 per cent, 5 per cent, and 2 per cent. No advance. 



2748 O. I I Macaroni, from Pates Alimentaires, Marseilles, Nov. 6, 1S95: 

Boston J ' 

Macaroni, cases of 25 one-pound packages, entered at 53 francs per 100 kilos, less 5 

per cent commission and 2 per cent cartage, advanced by disallowance of 5 per 
cent commission and 2 per cent cartage. 
Macaroni, alphabets, cases of 24 boxes of 1 pound each, entered at 61.50 francs per 
100 kilos, less 5 per cent commission and 2 per cent cartage, advauced by disal- 
lowance of 5 per cent commission and 2 per cent cartage. 

K.EAPPBAISEMENTS BY BOARDS. 

2774,10466 Prepared meat, from Chop Song, Hongkong, October 1, 1895: 

Dried meat (pork strips), entered at 6 Mexican dollars per .basket. No advance. 
Dried meat (sausage), entered at 6, advanced to 8 Mexicau dollars per basket. 
Add cases, etc. 

2744,10210 Chinese merchandise, from , Hongkong, September 14, 1895: 

Pickled melon, water, entered at .50, advanced to 1 Mexicau dollar per tub of 100 
catties. 

2638, 10048 Manufactures of metal, etc., Salmon & Lumley, Paris, October 24, 1895: 

Metal hooks, Nos. 5004 and 5013, entered at 20, discounts 15 per cent and 2 per cent, 
advanced to 25 francs per 100 gross. Discount, 2 per cent. Add case and packing. 

2617,9872 Iron plates enameled with vitreous glasses, etc., from Lever Bros., Ltd., Liverpool, October 

10, 1895 : 
Enameled iron plates, blue and black, entered at 3s. 9d., advauced to 4s. 6d., sterling, 
per plate. Discount, 5 per cent. Add cases. 

2747,40243 Chestnuts, from Salvatore Gison, Naples, October 28, 1895: 

Entered at 10, advanced to IS lire per 100 kilos. Add packing charges. 

2720,10298 Manufactures of silk, from Perrot Freres & Co., Lyons, November 20, 1895: 

Pongee, 78 cm., Orient 1 6cru, entered at .78, advanced to .95 franc per meter. Dis- 
count, 20 per cent. Add packing. 

2628-9987 Manufactures of silk (pongee), from Gindre & Co., Lyons, October 20, 1895: 

Pongee, 76 em., £cru, entered at .68, advanced to .95 franc per meter. 
Pongee, 76 cm., ecru, entered at .73, advanced to 1 franc per meter. 
Cachemirienue, 92 cm., entered at 1.60, advanced to 1.75 francs per meter. 
Discounts, 20 per cent and 1 per cent. Add packing. 

2769-10388 Silk wearing apparel, from Eeichenbach & Co., Paris, November 20, 1895: 

Samples of collars, black and colored, entered at from 20.40 to 132 francs per dozen. 

Discount, 25 per cent. Advanced by disallowance of 25 per cent discount. 
70 cm. beaded nets, entered at 2.45 francs per meter. No advance. 
Black beaded collars, entered at 2.85, advanced to 4 francs per collar. 
Black beaded collars, entered at 2.10, advanced to 3 francs per collar. 
Black beaded collars, entered at 2. 25, advanced to 3 francs per collar. 

2583-9953 Wool dress goods, from W. H. Arnold, Jr., Greiz, October 10, 1895: 

112 cm., all-wool heurietta, Nos. 760 and 860, entered at 1.24, advanced to 1.36 marks 

per meter. 
112 cm., all-wool henrietta, No. 870, entered at 1.30, advanced to 1.43 marks per 
meter. 



2583-9953 Wool dress goods, etc.— Continued. 

112 cm., all-wool henrietta, No. 8S0, entered at 1.36, advanced to 1.49 marks per 

meter. 
112 cm., all-wool henrietta, No. 890, entered at 1.42. advanced to 1.56 marks per 

meter. 
112 cm., all wool henrietta, No. 900, entered at 1.48, advanced to 1.62 marks per 

meter. 
112 cm., all-wool henrietta, No. 1060, entered at 1.62, advanced to 1.78 marks per 

meter. 
112 em., all-wool henrietta, No. 660, entered at 1.15, advanced to 1.24 marks per 
meter. 
~^CJr Discount, S per cent. Add packing and making up. 

2751-ldicSA.... Wool dress goods, from H. Bruhm's Son, Gera, November 16, 1895: 

' r . 112 cm. henrietta, D., 8 blk., entered at 1.14, discount, 2 per cent and 6 per cent, 

. I advanced to 1.24 marks per meter, discount, S per cent. Add cases, packing, and 

'• •""/ making up. 

2764-1 0019/.... | Spun sill; cotton yarn, etc., from Bale Stewart & Co., Manchester, October 18, 25, and 29, 

2742-101-67/ j November S, 1895 : 

Gray cotton yarn, 60/2 xx soft Amer., entered at 125d., advanced to Is. Id., sterling, 
per pound. Discount, 2J per cent. Add bales. 

2584-9993 Alcoholic perfumery, etc.. from J. O. Monson, Frankfort, October 15, 1895: 

Entered at a discount of 25 per cent ; advanced discount, 20 per cent. Add cases. 

2796-10495 Swords, from May Fils Aine, Paris, November 26, 1895: 

Swords, entered at 24, less 5 per cent, advanced from 25 to 75 francs per dozen, net. 

2387-9265 Wool dress goods, from Ernst Boessneek, Glauchau, August 15, 1895: 

107 cm., qual. 243, entered at 1.73, advanced to 1.80 marks per meter. 

107 cm., qual. 14, entered at 1.35, advanced to 1.40 marks per meter. 

107 cm., qual. 130, entered at 1.87, advanced to 2 marks per meter. 

107 cm., qual. 244, entered at 1.82, advanced to 1.90 marks per meter. 

107 cm., qual. 188, entered at 2.15, advanced to 2.35 marks per meter. 

107 cm., qual. 239, entered at 1.76, advanced to 1.85 marks per meter. 

107 cm., qual. 119, entered at 1.70, advanced to 1.80 marks per meter. 

107 cm., qual. 281, entered at 1.94, advanced to 2.10 marks per meter. 

107 cm., qual. 49, entered at 1.55, advanced to 1.65 marks per meter. 

107 cm., qual. 68, entered at 2.78, advanced to 3.05 marks per meter. 

97 cm., qual. 207, entered at 1.45, advanced to 1.65 marks per meter. 

97 cm., qual. 120, entered at 1.99, advanced to 2.10 marks per meter. 

97 cm., qual. 76, entered at 2.26, advanced to 2.35 marks per meter. 

97 cm., qual. 93, entered at 1.65 marks per meter, advanced to 1.65 marks per meter, net. 

97 cm., qual. 1SS, entered at 1.69, advanced to 1.65 marks per meter, net. 

107 cm., qual. 109, eutered at 1.50, advanced to 1.60 marks per meter. 

107 cm., qual. 153, eutered at 2.04. advanced to 2.40 marks per meter. 

107 cm., qual. 258, entered at 2.09, advauced to 2.25 marks per meter. 

107 cm., qual. 121, entered at 1.52, advanced to 1.60 marks per meter. 

97 cm., qual. 120, entered at 1.99, advanced to 2.15 marks per meter. 

97 cm., qual. 89, entered at 1.60, advanced to 1.70 marks per meter. 



9 




23S7-9265 Wool dress goods, etc. — Continued. 

107 cm., qual. 1567, entered at 1.45 marks per meter, advanced to 1.45 marks per 

meter, net. 
107 cm., qual. 7511, entered at 2.04, advanced to 2.20 marks per meter. 
107 cm., qual. 188, entered at 2.15, advanced to 2.25 marks per meter. 
97 cm., qual. 160, entered at 2.20, advanced to 2.30 marks per meter. 
113 cm., qual. 125. entered at 1.38, advanced to 1.50 marks per meter. 
107 cm., qual. 320, entered at 1.75, advanced to 1.80 marks per meter. 
93 cm., qual. 303, entered at .69, advanced to .75 mark per meter. 
97 cm., qual. 304, entered at 1.05, advanced to 1.10 marks per meter. 
93 cm., qual. 301, entered at .64, advanced to .70 mark per meter. 
93 cm., qual. 214, entered at .90, advanced to .95 mark per meter. 
93 cm., qual. 218, entered at .95, advanced to 1 mark per meter. 
97 cm., qual. 217, entered at 1.15, advanced to 1.25 marks per meter. 
93 cm., qual. 861a, entered at .70, advanced to .80 mark per meter. 
93 cm., qual. 899a, entered at 1, advanced to 1.05 marks per meter. 
93 cm., qual. 880, entered at .65, advanced to .70 mark per meter. 
102 cm., qual. 870a, entered at 1.35, advanced to 1.50 marks per meter. 
93 cm., qual. 906a, entered at 1.10, advanced to 1.20 marks per meter j 
112 cm., qual. 714, entered at 1.20, advanced to 1.25 marks per meter. 
93 cm., qual. 740, entered at .85, advanced to .90 mark per meter. 
93 cm., qual. 1223, entered at .64, advanced to .70 mark per meter. 
97 cm., qual. 1200, entered at 1.16, advanced to 1.25 marks per meter. 
107 cm., qual. S 3206, entered at 1.08, advanced to 1.20 marks per meter. 
107 cm., qual. 320, entered at 1.75, advanced to 1.85 marks per meter. 
93 cm., qual. 557, entered at 1.15, advanced to 1.20 marks per meter. 
93 cm., qual. S 3248, entered at .95, advanced to 1.05 marks per meter. 
93 cm., qual. 4034, entered at .85, advanced to .88 mark per meter. 
112 cm., qual. S 3400, entered at 1.20, advanced to 1.30 marks per meter. 
107 cm., qual. 4082, entered at 1.90 marks per meter, advanced to 1.90 marks per 

meter, net. 
93 cm., qual. S 3223, entered at .52 advanced to .57 mark per meter. 
93 cm., qual. S 3205 entered at .82 advanced to .88 mark per meter. 
93 cm., qual. 416, entered at .58, advanced to .60 mark per meter. 
93 cm., S 3257, entered at 1, advanced to 1.10 marks per meter. 
93 cm., qual. S 1936, entered at .72, advanced to .78 mark per meter. 
93 cm., qual. S 3450, entered at 1.30, advanced to 1.40 marks per natter. 
93 cm., qual. 447, entered at 1.15, advanced to 1.35 marks per meter. 
93 cm., qual. 476, entered at 1.40 marks per meter, advanced to 1.40 marks per meter, 

net. 
93 cm., qual. 408., entered at 1.01, advanced to 1.10 marks per meter. 
93 cm., qual. 488, entered at 1.30 marks per meter, advanced to 1.30 marks per meter, 

net. 
93 cm., qual. 497, entered at 1.35, advanced to 1.50 marks per meter. 
93 cm., qual. 410, entered at 1.30, advanced to 1.35 marks per meter. 
93 cm., qual. 433, entered at .85, advanced to .95 mark per meter. 
2 21 



10 

2387-9265 Wool dress goods, etc. — Continued. 

97 cm., qual. 561, entered at 1.03, advanced to 1.25 marks per meter. 

93 cm., qual. S 3209, entered at .95, advanced to 1.10 marks per meter. 

93 cm., qual. S 3220, entered at .73, advauced to .80 mark per meter. 

93 cm., qual. 228, entered at .95, advauced to 1 mark per meter. 

97 cm., qual. 304, entered at 1.05, advanced to 1.10 marks per meter. 

113 cm., qual. 190, entered at 1.02, advanced to 1.08 marks per meter. 

107 cm., qual. 1554, entered at 1.30, advanced to 1.45 marks per meter. 

107 cm., qual. 537, entered at 1.38, advanced to 1.50 marks per meter. 

113 cm., qual. back ly 1, entered at 1.45, advanced to 1.55 marks per meter. 

93 cm., qual. S 3352, entered at 1.10, advanced to 1.15 marks per meter. 

87 cm., qual. S 3223, entered at .49, advanced to .54 mark per meter. 

107 cm., qual. 925 C, entered at 1.35, advanced to 1.60 marks per meter. 

107 cm., qual. 925 D, entered at 1.50, advanced to 1.70 marks per meter. 

102 cm., qual. 950 K, call 950 M, entered at 1.50, advanced to 1.55 marks per meter. 

93 cm., qual. 861a, entered at .70, advanced to .85 mark per meter. 

Entered discount, 8 per cent. Advanced prices, net. Add cases and packing. 
2735 10 -:> 99 ) 

27%' 10300 i Decorated china, from K. Kamocki, Hiogo, May 6, 1895 : 

Vases, jars, milk pitchers, bowls, cups, and saucers, etc. Advances up to 125 per cent. 

Boston 84 ° P 1 Gold rolled steel > from Jones & Colver > Sheffield, March 28, 1895 : 

4 x 21 G., and 4 J x 21 &., entered at £10 7s. 6d., advanced to £11 8s. 6d., sterling, per 
ton. Discount, 3 per cent. 

O 



TRADE-MARKS. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 

DiviBion of Customs. 



%xzn$uv% gjcpartmjewt, 



office of THE SECRETARY, 



Washington, D. C, February 5, 1896. 

To Officers of the Customs and others : 

The attention of officers of the customs and others is invited to the following provision of Section t> 
of the Act of August 28, 1894, viz : 

"Section 6. That no article of imported merchandise which shall copy or simulate the name or trade- 
mark of any domestic manufacture or manufacturer, shall be admitted to entry at any custom-house of 
the United States. And in order to aid the officers of the customs in enforcing this prohibition any 
domestic manufacturer who has adopted trade-marks may require his name and residence and a description 
of his trade-marks to be recorded in books which shall be kept for that purpose in the Department of the 
Treasury, under such regulations as the Secretary of the Treasury shall prescribe, and may furnish to the 
Department fac-similes of such trade-marks ; and thereupon the Secretary of the Treasury shall cause one 
or more copies of the same to be transmitted to each collector or other proper officer of the customs." 

Applications for the recording of names or trade-marks in this Department will state the name and 
residence of the domestic manufacturer, and furnish a description of the mark and the names of the ports 
to which the facsimiles should be sent. No such name or trade-mark will be received unless accompanied 
by the proper proof of ownership and proof that the owner is a domestic manufacturer, which must con- 
sist of the affidavit of the owner or one of the owners, certified by a notary public, or other officer entitled 
to administer oaths and having a seal. 

On the receipt by a customs officer of any such facsimiles, with information from the Department 
that they have been recorded therein, he will properly record and file them, and will exercise care to 
prevent the entry at the custom-house of any article of foreign manufacture copying or simulating such 
mark. 

No fees are charged for recording trade-marks in the Department and custom-houses. 

A sufficient number of facsimiles should be forwarded to enable the Department to send one copy to 
each port named in the application, with an additional copy for the files of the Department. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



REPORTS OF INSPECTORS OF CUSTOMS ON PRELIMINARY ENTRIES FOR DRAWBACK. 



J/reasurtj ^Bzpuvtmznt, 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 23. 

Division of Customs. 

Office of THE SECRETARY, 



Washington, D. C, February 6, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

In view of the frequency of cases where the Inspectors of Customs report on preliminary entries for 
drawback, apparently filed at least six hours before the lading of the goods, "goods not found," it is 
hereby ordered that the inspecting and lading officers shall be required to state in such reports, the date 
and hour when they reached the place of deposit of the goods specified in the entry. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



OFFICERS ON DUTY UNDER TEE LIGHT-HOUSE ESTABLISHMENT. 



UhJS. N o. *, Swasnrg g^artroenf , 

office of THE LIGHT-HOUSE BOARD, 

Washington, D. C, February 11, 1896. 

The following list of officers on duty under the Light- House Establishment on this date, with the 
residence or post-office address of each, is published for the information of all concerned : 

MEMBERS OF THE LIGHT-HOUSE BOAED. 

Hon. John G. Carlisle, Secretary of the Treasury and ex officio President of the Board, Treasury 
Department, Washington, D. 0. 

Bear- Admiral John G. Walker, U. S. N., CLairman, 1202 Eighteenth Street NW., Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Walter S. Franklin, 24 East Mount Vernon Place, Baltimore, Md. 

Col. John M. Wilson, U. S. A. , War Department, Washington, D. C. 

Mr. W. W. Duefield, Superintendent U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, Washington, D. C. 

Capt. John B. Bartlett, U. S. 1ST., 1836 Jefferson Place NW., Washington, D. C. 

Lieut. Col. Alexander Mackenzie, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A., War Department, Washington, D. C. 

Commander George F. F. Wilde, U. S. N., Naval Secretary, 1101 K Street NW., Washington, D. C. 

Capt. John Millis, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A., Engineer Secretary, 1815 Biggs Place NW., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

INSPECTOES. 

1st Dist.— Commander George E. Wing ate, U. S. N., Custom-House, Portland, Me. 
2d Dist. — Commander Francis M. Geeen, U. S. N., Post-Office Building, Boston, Mass. 
3d Dist. — Commander Albert S. Snow, U. S. N., Tompkinsville, N. Y. 
4th Dist. — Commander George C. Reitee, U. S. N., Post-Office Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 
5th Dist— Commander Benjamin P. Lamberton, U. S. N., Post-Office Building, Baltimore, Md. 
6th Dist. — Commander Morris B. S. Mackenzie, U. S. N., Brown's Wharf, Charleston, S. C. 
7th Dint— Commander William B. Newman, U. S. N., Navy- Yard, Pensacola, Fla. 
8th Dist— Commander Joseph B. Coghlan, U. S. N., Custom-House, New Orleans, La. 
9th Dist. — Commander James H. Dayton, U. S. N., Boom 1308, Chamber of Commerce Building, 
corner Washington and La Salle Streets, Chicago, 111. * 



10th Dint. — Commander Charles V. Gridley, U. S. N., Post-Office Building, Buffalo, N. Y. 

11th Dist. — Commander William W. Mead, U. S. N., 80 Griswold Street, Detroit, Mich. 

12th Dist. — Commander Feank Couetis, U. S. N., Safe Deposit Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

18th Dist. — Commander Oscar W. Faeenholt, U. S. N., 623-25 Marquam Building, Portland, Oreg. 

14th Dist. — Lieut. Commander William W. Gillpatbiok, U. S. N., Post-Office Building, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

15th Dist. — Commander Abeaham B. H. Lillie, U. S. N., New Custom-House, St. Louis, Mo. 

16th Dist. — Commander Andrew J. Iveeson, U. S. N., Custom-House, Memphis, Tenn. 

ENGINEERS. 

1st Dist. — Maj. William R. Liveemore, U. S. A., Rooms 141 and 142, Post-Office Building, Boston, Mass. 

2d Dist. — Maj. WilliamR. Livebmobe, TJ. S. A., Rooms 141 and 142, Post- Office Building, Boston, Mass. 

8d Dist— Maj. Heney M. Adams, U. S. A., Tompkiusville, Staten Island, N. Y. 

4th Dist— Maj. William H. Bixby, U. S. A., Post-Office Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

5th Dist— Maj. Ernest H. Ruffneb, U. S. A., Post-Office Building, Baltimore, Md. 

6th Dist— Capt. Feedeetc V. Abbot, U. S. A., 12 Southern Wharf, Charleston, S. C. 

7th Dist. — Maj. James B. Quinn, U. S. A., 349 Carondelet Street, New Orleans, La. 

8th Dist— Maj. James B. Quinn, U. S. A., 349 Carondelet Street, New Orleans, La. 

9th Dist— Maj. Milton B. Adams, U. S. A., 18 Bagley Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 
10th Dist— Lieut. Col. Jabed A. Smith, TJ. S. A., Hickok Building, 185 Euclid Avenue, corner of Erie 

Street, Cleveland, Ohio. 
11th Dist— Maj. Milton B. Adams, TJ. S. A., 18 Bagley Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 
12th Dist— Maj. Chaeles E. L. B Davis, U. S. A., Room 89, Flood Building, San Francisco, Cal. 
18th DM— Capt. Waltee L. Fisk, U. S. A , 73 Fourth Street, Portland, Oreg. 
Uth Dist— Maj. William H. Heuer, U. S. A., Custom-House, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
15th Dist— Lieut. Col. Amos Stickney, TJ. S. A., 1515 Locust Street, St. Louis, Mo. 
16th Dist— Lieut. Col. Amos Stickney, TJ. S. A., 1515 Locust Street, St. Louis, Mo. 

JOHN G. WALKER, 

Bear-Admiral, TJ. S. N., Chairman. 

Geoege F. F. Wilde, 

Commander, TJ. 8. K, Naval Secretary. 

John Millis, 

Captain, Corps of Engineers, TJ. 8. A., Engineer Secretary. 

Approved : 

JOHN G. CARLISLE, 

Secretary. 



INFORMATION TO BE INCLUDED IN REPORTS ON APPLICATIONS FOR REMISSION OF 
ADDITIONAL (PENAL) DUTIES UNDER SECTION 7 OF THE ACT OF JUNE 10, 1890, ETC. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 25. 

Division of Customs. 



2Jreasurtj ^zynximznt, 



Office of THE SECRETARY, 



Washington D. C, February 13, 1896. 



To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

Hereafter in transmitting to the Department your reports on applications for the remission of 
additional (penal) duties levied, under Section 7 of the Act of June 10, 1890, you will be careful to state 
the kinds of merchandise, whether purchased or consigned, the total entered and appraised values 
thereof; the amount of penal duties, and, if consigned, whether exported by foreign purchaser or 
manufacturer. 

In cases in which application is made for the release of merchandise seized for undervaluation under 
the section above mentioned, you will include in your reports the kinds of merchandise, the total foreign 
and appraised values, the regular duties, the amount of the penal duties that would have accrued had the 
merchandise not been seized, and, if consigned, whether exported by foreign purchaser or manufacturer. 

The above information is required for the records of these cases kept in this Department, of which the 
following are the forms : 

Applications for the remission of additional (penal) duties. 



Name of 
Applicant. 



Date of 
Application. 



Kind of 
Merchandise. 



Purchased 

or 
Consigned. 



Entered 
Value. 



Appraised 
Value. 



Penal 
Duty. 



Applications for release of seizures where duty is over $25. 



Name of 
Applicant. 



Date of 
Application. 



Kind of 
Merchandise. 



Foreign 
Value. 



Duty. 



Penal 
Duty. 



CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 



REAPPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



1S96. 
Department Circular No. 26. 



3*r£a$mnj ^zpKvtmmt, 



Division of Customs. 

office of THE SECRETARY, 
Washington, D. C, February 15, 1896. 
To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The following reappraisements of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending February 1, 1896. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING: FEBRUARY 1, 1896. 

N. B. — In corresponding with the Board of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference should always be made to the number of Meappraisement. 

No. of Beappraise- 
menl. 

10787 Furniture of icood, from Josef Hoffmann, Bielitz, December 1, 1895 : 

Chairs, entered at 1.20, advanced to 1.50 florins each. Add packing charges. 

10814 Cocoanuts, from Caribbean Cocoanut Company, Colon, December 26, 1895 : 

Cocoanuts, entered at 20 condors, Columbian gold, per 1,000. Add sacks and packing, 
advance. 

10749 Sauce, from Quong Mee Yuen, Hongkong, July 22, 1895: 

5 cases of soy, thin, entered at 9.97 Mexican dollars per total. Add packing charges. 
No advance. 

10723 Nonenumerated manufactured article, from A. Costa, Genoa, December 18, 1895: 

Chestnut flour, entered at 20, add barrels, advanced to 25 lire per 100 kilos, packed. 

10S18 Nonenumerated manufactured article, from Gourana Fratelli, Isotona, January 3, 1896 : 

Chestnut flour, entered at 17, advanced to 20 lire per 100 kilos. Add to advanced 
prices boxes at .50 lira each. 

10695 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from Francke Higoszla, Havana, December 26, 1895 : 

Testing 94.50°, entered at $0.02^, less freight, advanced to $0.02383, United States gold, 
per pound, packed. 

10741 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from Eobt. Crooks & Co., Liverpool, December 31, 1895 : 

Fifths, entered at £8 17s. 5d., sterling, per ton, discount, 2 J per cent; advanced to 
£8 18s. 4d., discount, 2 i per cent, packed. 



10774 Manufactures of wool, manufactures goat hair and cotton, etc., from Sir Titus Salt, Bart., Sons 

& Co., Ltd., Saltaire, December 28, 1895 : 

No. 8284/95, 56" all black impl., quality 695, entered at Is. 8|d., advanced to Is. 9|d., 
sterling, per yard. Discount, 5 per cent. Add cases and making up. 
10753-10755 Wool linings, from J. Cawthra & Co., Ltd., Bradford, December 25, 1895 : 

32" black italians, No. 868, entered at 8|d., advanced to 9|d., sterling, per yard. 

32" black italians, No. 870, entered at 9id., advanced to 10id., sterling, per yard. 

32" black italians, No. 873, entered at 9|d., advanced to 10|d., sterling, per yard. 

32" black italians, No. 793, entered at 8|d., advanced to 9id., sterling, per yard. 

32" black italians, No. 625, entered at 8id., advanced to 8 id., sterling, per yard. 

32" black italians, No. 617, entered at 7|d., advanced to 8Jd., sterling, per yard. 

32" black italians, No. 630, entered at 8|d., advanced to 9|d., sterling, per yard. 

32" black italians, No. 640, entered at 9Jd., advanced to 10£d., sterling, per yard. 

32" black italians, No. 650, entered at 10fd., advanced to Hid., sterling, per yard. 

32" black italians, No. 655, entered at Hid., advanced to 12 id., sterling, per yard. 

32" black italians, No. 645, entered at 10Jd., advanced to Hid., sterling, per yard. 

32" black italians, No. 662, entered at 12d., advanced to 13|d., sterling, per yard. 

32" black and blue cashmeres, No. 799, entered at 10fd., advanced to llfd., sterling, 
per yard. 

54" black italians, No. 757, entered at 18fd., advanced to 20£d., sterling, per yard. 

57" black twills, No. 748, entered at 10£d., advanced to Hid., sterling, per yard. 

57" black twills, No. 750, entered at 12£d., advanced to 13fd., sterling, per yard. 

Allowance, 1 yard per piece. Discount, 3i per cent. 
10752 Wool dress goods, from B. Waddington, Bradford, December 13, 1895: 

42" fancy blacks, No. 1888, entered at 13|d., advanced to 15id., sterling, per yard. 

40" fancy blacks, No. 1600, entered at old., advanced to 6Jd., sterling, per yard. 

42" fancy blacks, No. 2865, entered at 7id., advanced to 8Jd., sterling, per yard. 

Discount, 2i per cent. Less freight and N. D. charges. 
10786 Chemical salt, etc., from Kunheim & Co., Berlin, November 29, L895: 

Bhodan ammonia, entered at 181. 75, plus bags, advanced to 191. 75 marks per 100 kilos, 
packed. 

10722 Chemical salt, from Actien-Gesellschaft Georg Egestorffs Salzwerke, Linden, December 21, 

1895: 

Chloride barium, entered at 8.77, advanced to Q.18 marks per 100 kilos. Add casks 
at 3.50 each. 
10737 Chemical salt, from Norddeutsche Chemische-Pabrik, Harburg, December 21, 1895: 

Hyposulphite of sodium, entered at 9.30, add casks at 2.75, advanced to 11 marks per 
100 kilos, packed. 
10790-1 Chemical salt, from Hofmann & Schoetensack, Gernsheim, December 4, 1895: 

Phosphate soda, entered at 17.50 marks per 100 kilos. Add casks at 5 marks each. 
No advance. 
10760 Blank books, from Von John Hess, Hamburg, December 12, 1895: 

Notes No. 2222/3, entered at 10, advanced to 18 marks per gross. 
10591 Manufactures of metal, from P. Goldberg, Berlin, November 28, 1895: 

Burners, entered at . 70, advanced to . 75 mark each. Add packing, 






10514 Spectacles, from Leobaldti Fibres, Paris, November 21, 1895: 

Lunettes, 612^-, entered at 12.25 francs per gross. 

Lunettes, 222, 618s, entered at 9.50 francs per gross. 

No advance. 
10817 Bleached cotton, from George Myeroft, Nottingham, January 2, 1896: 

108, 36" striped muslin net, under 100 threads to square inch, entered at 3|d., sterling, 
per yard. No advance. Discounts, 2b per cent and lb per cent. Add cases. 
10488 Manufactures of silk and cotton, from Meckel & Co., Elberfeld, December 3, 1895: 

24" tie silk, style 10825, entered at 1.25, advanced to 1.50 marks per meter. 

24" tie silk, style 10845, entered at 1.13, advanced to 1.23 marks per meter. 

24" tie silk, style 10970, etc., entered at 1.54, advanced to 1.65 marks per meter. 

24" tie silk, style 10954, etc., entered at 1.50, advanced to 1.63 marks per meter. 

24" tie silk, style 10S38, etc., entered at 1.59, advanced to 1.74 marks per meter. 

24" tie silk, style 10951, entered at 1.55, advanced to 1.70 marks per meter. 
9945 Manufactures of shells, from Thos. Gasson, Sheffield, September 27, 1895: 

4" mother-of-pearl slabs, entered at 30s., advanced to 47s., sterling, per dozen. 

31" mother-of-pearl slabs, entered at 25s., advanced to 37s., sterling, per dozen. 

31" mother-of-pearl slabs, entered at 20s., advanced to 30s., sterling, per dozen. 

31" mother-of-pearl slabs, entered at 16s., advanced to 24s., sterling, per dozen. 

3J" mother-of-pearl slabs, entered at 14s., advanced to 21s., sterling, per dozen. 

3" mother-of-pearl slabs, entered at 12s., advanced to 18s., sterling, per dozen. 

2V mother-of-pearl slabs, entered at 10s., advanced to 15s., sterling, per dozen. 

21" mother-of-pearl slabs, entered at 8s. . advanced to 12s., sterling, per dozen. 

21" mother-of-pearl slabs, entered at 7s., advanced to 8s. 6d., sterling, per dozen. 

2\" mother-of-pearl slabs, entered at 6s., advanced to 7s. 6d., sterling, per dozen. 

2f" mother-of-pearl slabs, entered at 4s., advanced to 5s., sterling, per dozen. 

21" mother-of-pearl slabs, entered at 3s., advanced to 3s. 9d., sterling, per dozen. 

2i" mother-of-pearl slabs, entered at 2s., advanced to 2s. 9d., sterling, per dozen. 
10799, 10800 Manufactured articles nonenumerated, from A. Barnard, London, October 3, 1895 : 

Stearine pitch, entered at £4 10s. 0d., sterling, per ton. No advance. 
10567 Wood ware and earthenware, from G. Salviati, Venezia, November 11, 1895 : 

Entered discount, 40 per cent ; advanced discount, 25 per cent. 

Entered discount, 50 per cent ; advanced discount, 35 per cent. 
10771 ...Prepared mushrooms, from A. Mathieu, Paris, December 19, 1895 : 

Champignons, extra, entered at 51.65 francs per case of 100 £ tins. No advance. 

Champignons, 1st choice, entered at 42.60 francs per case of 100 i tins. No advance. 

Champignons, choice, entered at 31.80 francs per case of 100 i tins. No advance. 

Champignons, 2d choice, entered at 23.10 francs per case of 100 * tins. No advance. 

Add for bags, packing, cases, etc., at 22.90 francs per case. Discount, 5 per cent. 
10845 Prepared mushrooms, from Ch. Guillanmin, Paris, January 3, 1896: 

Cases of 100 i tins each, extra C, entered at 59.20 francs per case. No advance. 

Cases of 100 i tins each, extra B, entered at 57.20 francs per case. No advance. 

Cases of 100 i tins each, 1st choice, entered at 51.20 francs per case. No advance. 

Cases of 100 * tins each, choice masson, entered at 41.20 francs per case. No advance. 

Cases of 100 i tins each, 2d choice, entered at 32.20 francs per case. No advance. 

Add for boxes, packing, and cases at 21 francs per case. Discount, 5 per cent. 



2617 O. P \ Medicinal preparations, from Wing Shong~Loong & Co., Hongkong, September 16, 1895: 

Boston j * 

Medicinal oil, entered at 4 Mexican dollars per box of 500 bottles, advanced to 16 

Mexican dollars per total. 

2760 O. P.. | M anu f ac t ure s of Silk, from Mendelson Bros., Yokohama, December 6, 1895 : 

24 x 50 yards, 8890, momme grade, 9 J fancy silk, entered at 7.30. advauced to 7.60 

silver yen per 100 momme. 
24 x 50 yards, 8890, momme grade, 9i fancy silk, entered at 7.50, advanced to 7.60 

silver yen per 100 momme. 
21 x 60 yards, 641, 646/7, momme grade, 14 fancy silk, entered at 8.50, advanced to 

8.70 silver yen per 100 momme. 
24 x 50 yards, 8314, momme grade, 9/10 fancy silk, entered at 7.50, advanced to 7.60 

silver yen per 100 momme. 

REAPPRAISEMENTS BY BOARDS. 

2619, 9981 Ironplates enameled iciih vitreous glasses, from Lever Bros., Ltd., Liverpool, October 17, 1895 : 

Enameled iron plates, 36x18", entered at Is. 3d., advanced to Is. 4d., sterling, per 

plate. Discount, 5 per cent. Add cases at 6s. 6d. each. 
2834, 10555 Flint and cut glassware, from The Church Bridge Cut Glass Works, Birmingham, September 

24, 1895 : 
8" bowls, De Sota, smoothed only, entered at 6s., advanced to 9s., sterling, each. 
7" nappies, De Sota, smoothed only, entered at 5s., advanced to 7s., sterling, each. 
9" nappies, Ss & fau, smoothed only, entered at 6s. 6d., advanced to 9s. 9d., sterling, 

each. 
9" ovals, Ss & fau, smoothed only, entered at 6s., advanced to 8s. 6d., sterling, each. 
7" ovals, Trenton, smoothed only, entered at 4s., advanced to 5s. 3d., sterling, each. 
Clarets, De Sota, smoothed only, entered at 15s., advanced to 17s., sterling, per dozen. 
10" bowls, Salvador, smoothed only, entered at 12s., advanced to 18s., sterling, each. 
8" nappies, Treuton, smoothed only, entered at 7s., advanced to 10s., sterling, each. 
6" ovals, Trenton, smoothed only, entered at 2s., advanced to 2s. 9d., sterling, each. 
6" shell nappies, smoothed only, entered at 3s., advanced to 4s., sterling, each. 
6" nappies, Fulton, smoothed only, entered at 3s. 6d., advanced to 5s. 6d., sterling, 

each. 
Olives, Ss & fau, smoothed only, entered at 2s. 6d., advauced to 3s. 6d., sterling, each. 
12" vases, smoothed only, entered at 4s. 6d., advanced to 5s. 6d., sterling, each. 
Colognes, smoothed only, entered at 5s. 6d., advanced to 7s., sterling, each.. 
8" bowls, Salvador, entered at 12s., advanced to 14s., sterling, each. 
6" vases, entered at 2s., advanced to 2s. 6d., sterling, each. 
Add cases and packing. 

2S23, 10489 Flax lace tidies and sets, from , Paris, November 28, 1895: 

Linen renaissance tidies, 16/18, 101, entered at 11.20, advauced to 14.50 francs per 

piece. 
Garnitures de lil Guip d'art, 150/50138, entered at 13.25, advanced to 14.75 francs per 

piece. 
Add cases. 



5 

2856, 10324.. ... ) Manu f actu res of flax, from J. D. Glass, Moscow, September 5, 1895 : 
2857— 10o25j6tc. J 

Crashes, advances up to 33£ per cent. 
[' 2851, 10643 Cigarette paper, from Soeiete Anonyme des papiers, Paris, December 18, 1895 : 

Eolls of 30 mm., entered at 1.40 francs per roll, discounts 5 per cent and 2 per cent, 
advanced to 155 francs per 100 rolls, discount 5 per cent. Less inland freight. 
2835,10589 Sauce, etc., from Kwong Yuen Hing, Hongkong, July 15, 1895: 

Soy, entered at .95, advanced to 2.40 Mexican dollars per case. 

Fruit jams, entered at 1.95, advanced to 2.45 Mexican dollars per case. 
2568, 9897 Manufactures of cotton, from Gustav Leclercq, Courtrai, October 12, 1895 : 

Tapis, 130/130 cm., entered at 4.50, advanced to 4.85 francs each. 

Tapis, 170/220 cm., entered at 10.50, advanced to 11.30 francs each. 

Eideaux, 130/300 cm., entered at 20.25, advanced to 21.85 francs each. 

Tapis, 170/170 cm., entered at 8, advanced to 8.60 francs each. 

Tapis, 170/260 cm., entered at 12.25, advanced to 13.20 francs each. 

Discounts, 10 per cent and 3 per cent. 
2640,9942 Embroidered cotton handher chiefs, from Jacob Eohues, Eebstein, October 17, 1895: 

Advances up to 14 per cent. 

660 O. P ") Wool shawls, and wool lenit wearing apparel, from Chu. Zimmermann & Sohn, Apolda, October 

2644 > i ft ioqk. 



16, 1895 
Chicago 4 



Squares, 103/7, entered at 8.80, advanced to 10.65 marks per dozen. 

Leggings, drawers, 104/1, entered at 13.80, advanced to 16.65 marks per dozen. 

Leggings, drawers, 104/2, entered at 16.70, advanced to 20.10 marks per dozen. 

Leggings, drawers, 104/3, entered at 18.90 advanced to 22.75 marks per dozen. 

Bootees, 105, entered at 2.60, advanced to 3.15 marks per dozen. 

Bootees, 106, entered at 3.30, advanced to 4 marks per dozen. 

Bootees, 107, entered at 4.40, advanced to 5.30 marks per dozen. 

Bootees, 108, entered at 6.80, advanced to 8.20 marks per dozen. 

Mittens, 112/2, entered at 1.70, advanced to 2.05 marks per dozen. 

Mittens, 112/3, entered at 2.10, advanced to 2.55 marks per dozen. 

Add packing on shawls and leggings at .40 pfennig per dozen; on bootees 105 at .10 

pfennig, and on balance at .20 pfennig ; and on mittens at .10 pfennig per dozen. 

Discounts, 2 per cent and 1 per cent. 



O 
2—26 






TRANSMISSION OF GOVERNMENT MESSAGES OVER BOND-AIDED OR SUBSIDIZED 

TELEGRAPH LINES. 



office of COMPTROLLER OF THE TREASURY, 

Washington, D. C, February 17, 1896. 

To Disbursing Officers mid other Officers and Agents of the Government : 

The observance and enforcement of the following regulations will hereafter be required of the 
disbursing officers and other officers and agents of the Government. A strict compliance therewith will 
obviate the necessity of disallowances and suspensions in the settlement of their accounts : 

1. The statutes of the United States require that the compensation for messages sent at Government 
expense over telegraph lines constructed in connection with Pacific railroads, to which bonds have been 
issued by the United States in aid of their construction, shall be withheld by the Secretary of the Treasury 
and applied in payment of the subsidy bonds and interest. In order that these provisions of law may be 
complied with, the accounts of the respective telegraph companies for Government messages sent over 
bond-aided or subsidized lines must be transmitted to the Treasury Department for settlement, and not be 
paid by disbursing officers or by any other officers or agents of the Government. 

2. Officers or agents of the Government, in sending messages on Government business, are instructed 
to use the bond-aided or subsidized telegraph lines, whenever practicable to do so, in preference to other 
lines which are not subject to the same conditions. 

3. Messages originating on a bond-aided line and directed to a point on a bond-aided line must be 
sent over the aided line or lines. 

4. Messages originating on a bond-aided line and directed to a point near an aided line should be sent 
over the aided line in cases where the larger part of the service would be over aided lines. 

5. Messages originally filed with a nonaided company which has a through line to the point of 
destination may be transmitted to destination without transfer to any other line. If the company has no 
through line and transfer is necessary, the transfer must be to a bond-aided line whenever practicable, 
and at the nearest point of contact with the aided line. In such cases the officer sending the message 
must indorse thereon the request that it be sent over the bond-aided line ; but a failure to make such 
indorsement shall not be construed as giving the company the right of selection and discrimination 
against bond-aided Hues. 

6. When a message is filed with a bond-aided company, whose operator is also serving a nonaided 
company, the message must be written on a blank furnished by the former company. 

7. Where the entire service is over bond-aided or subsidized telegraph lines no payment to the tele- 
graph companies must be made by the officer or agent of the Government who sends the message or by 
any disbursing officer. In such case the officer or agent sending the message is not charged with any 
duty respecting the payment thereof, except to inform the agent or operator of the telegraph company 
who receives the message that it is the duty of the company under the law to transmit the same, and to 



present its account therefor to the proper Department of the Government, to be approved by the head of 
such Department, under the proper appropriation, and forwarded to the accounting officers of the Treasury 
for settlement in accordance with the requirements of the law. Such accounts should be forwarded by 
the respective telegraph companies, through their usual channels, to that Department of the Government 
with which the officers or agents sending the respective messages are connected. For example : An 
account for messages sent by officers of the Interior Department should be transmitted to that Department, 
to be approved and forwarded to the accounting officers of the Treasury for settlement; an account for 
messages sent by officers of the Department of Justice should be forwarded in like manner to that Depart- 
ment, or an account for messages sent by officers of the Treasury Department should be transmitted to 
the Secretary of the Treasury. 

8. Where the service is continuous and entire over lines partly subsidized and partly not, or over con- 
necting lines one of which is subsidized and the other not, but one account for the entire service should 
be rendered by the telegraph company which receives and transmits the message, showing the respective 
amounts claimed for aided and nonaided service. Such account is not to be paid by any disbursing officer 
or by the officer or agent sending the message, but must be forwarded by the telegraph company to the 
proper Department of the Government in the manner already indicated, and in the settlement thereof by 
the accounting officers, the amount found due and payable in money for nonaided service will be certified 
for payment to the telegraph company, and the amount found due for service over the bond-aided lines 
will be applied as required by law. 

9. Whenever practicable prepayment should not be made on messages sent to and from Washington, 
D. C, but accounts for the same should be sent through the proper channels to the Treasury Department 
for payment ; provided that this shall not apply to officers required to pay the expense of telegraphing 
from the emoluments of their offices. 

For the information and guidance of all concerned is subjoined a list descriptive of the bonded Pacific 

railroads in connection with which bond-aided or subsidized telegraph lines have been constructed, and 

a reference to the several acts of Congress relating thereto. 

R. B. BOWLER, 

Comptroller. 
Approved : 

J. G. CARLISLE, 

Secretary of the Treasury. 

List of bonded Pacific railroads in connection with which subsidized telegraph lines have been constructed. 

Union Pacific Railway.— From Bridge Junction, Omaha, Nebr., to Utah Central Crossing, 

Ogden, Utah 1,029.49 

Union Pacific Railway (Kansas Division).— From Kansas City, Mo., to a point on the rail- 
road between Monument and Gopher Stations 393.9.4 

Centeal Pacific Railboad (operated by Southern Pacific Company).— 

From Ogden Station, Ogden, Utah, to Sacramento, Cal 742.61 

From Brighton, Cal., to Niles, Cal 103.83 

From Niles, Cal., to San Jose, Cal 17.54 

Sioux City and Pacific Raileoad.— From Sioux City, Iowa, via California Junction, to 

Fremont, Nebr 101.77 

Missotjbi Pacific Railway Company (Central Branch Union Pacific Railroad).— From 

Atchison, Kans., to Waterville, Kans 100. 00 



ACTS OF CONGEESS BELATING TO BOND-AIDED PACIFIC EAILEOADS. 



Act July 1, 1862, 12 Stats., 489. 

Act July 2, 1864, 13 Stats., 356. 

Act March 3, 1S65, 13 Stats., 504. 

Joint resolution May 7, 1866, 14 Stats., 355. 

JoiDt resolution May 21, 1866, 14 Stats., 356. 

Act July 3, 1866, 14 Stats., 79. 

Joint resolution July 26, 1866, 14 Stats., 367. 

Act March 6, 1868, 15 Stats., 39. 

Act March 3, 1869, 15 Stats., 324. 



Joint resolution March 3, 1869, 15 Stats., 348. 
Joint resolution April 10, 1869, 16 Stats., 56. 
Act May 6, 1870, 16 Stats., 121. 
Act March 3, 1873, 17 Stats., 508. 
Act June 20, 1874, 18 Stats., 111. 
Act May 7, 1878, 20 Stats., 56. 
Act March 3, 1879, 20 Stats., 420. 
Act August 7, 1888, 25 Stats., 382. 



fir Fjflfc 






!: 



v u - a *— ) 

^S^f DEPART* 



IMPORTATION, INSPECTION, AND TRANSPORTATION OF CATTLE. 



i89e. 

Department Circular No. 28, 

Division of Customs. 



Office of THE SECRETARY, 
Washington, D. C, February 18, 1896. 
To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 

The annexed regulations issued by the Secretary of Agriculture under date of the 1st instant, concern- 
ing the transportation of cattle, are published for the information and guidance of Collectors and other 
Officers of the Customs. 

It will be observed that the Secretary notifies the managers and agents of railroads and transporta- 
tion companies of the United States, etc., that "a contagious and infectious disease, known as splenetic 
or southern fever," exists among cattle in the following described area: 

"All that country lying south or below a line beginning at the northwest 'corner of the State of Cali- 
fornia ; thence east, south, and southeasterly along the boundary line of said State of California to the 
southeastern corner of said State ; thence southerly along the western boundary line of Arizona to the south- 
west corner of Arizona ; thence along the southern boundary lines of Arizona and Now Mexico to the 
southeastern corner of New Mexico ; thence northerly along the eastern boundary of New Mexico to the 
southern line of the State of Colorado ; thence along the southern boundary lines of Colorado and Kansas 
to the southeastern corner of Kansas ; thence southerly along the western boundary line of Missouri to the 
southwestern corner of Missouri; thence easterly along the southern boundary line of Missouri to the 
Mississippi Eiver; thence southerly along the Mississippi River to the southern boundary line of Tennes- 
see ; thence easterly along said boundary line to the southeastern corner of Polk County, Tenn. ; thence 
northerly along the eastern boundary line of Tennessee to the southern boundary line of Virginia; thence 
west along said boundary line to the boundary line of Kentucky at the western point of Virginia; thence 
northerly along said boundary line to the northernmost point of Virginia ; thence southerly along said 
boundary line to the northeast corner of Virginia, where it joins the southeastern corner of Maryland 
at the Atlantic Ocean." 

Attention is invited to Paragraph 4 of said regulations which prescribes as follows : 
"Cattle from the Republic of Mexico may be admitted into the United States to remain below said 
Federal quarantine line after inspection according to law, but said cattle shall not be permitted to cross 
said quarantine line otherwise than by rail for immediate slaughter, except by special permit from the 
inspectors of the Bureau of Animal Industry issued according to the regulations of the said Bureau, and 
no permit shall be issued except for cattle free from splenetic or Texas fever, or from contact therewith 
during the three months preceding the issuance of said permit, and which have been grazed in a locality 
free from infection of such fever." 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 

REGULATIONS CONCERNING CATTLE TRANSPORTATION. 



U. S. Department of Agriculture, 

Office of the Secretary, 

Washington, D. C, February 1, 1896. 
To the Managers and Agents of Railroads and Transportation Companies of the United States, Stockmen 

and Others: 

In accordance with Section 7 of the act of Congress approved May 29, 1884, entitled " An act for 
the establishment of a Bureau of Animal Industry, to prevent the exportation of diseased cattle, and to 



provide means for the suppression and extirpation of pleuro-pneumonia and other contagious diseases 
among domestic animals," and of the act of Congress approved March 2, 1895, making appropriation 
for the Department of Agriculture for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1896, you are hereby notified 
that a contagious and infectious disease known as splenetic or Southern fever exists among cattle in the 
following- described area : 

All that country lying south, or below, a line beginning at the northwest corner of the State of 
California; thence east, south, and southeasterly along the boundary line of said State of California to the 
southeastern corner of said State ; thence southerly along the western boundary line of Arizona to the 
southwest corner of Arizona; thence along the southern bouudary lines of Arizona and New Mexico to 
the southeastern corner of New Mexico ; thence northerly along the eastern boundary of New Mexico to 
the southern line of the State of Colorado; thence along the southern boundary lines of Colorado and 
Kansas to the southeastern corner of Kansas ; thence southerly along the western boundary line of Missouri 
to the southwestern corner of Missouri; thence easterly along the southern boundary line of Missouri to 
the Mississippi River ; thence southerly along the Mississippi Eiver to the southern boundary line of 
Tennessee; thence easterly along said boundary line to the southeastern corner of Polk County, Tenn. ; 
thence northerly along the eastern boundary line of Tennessee to the southern boundary line of Virginia ; 
thence west along said boundary line to the boundary line of Kentucky at the western point of Virginia ; 
thence northerly along said boundary line to the northernmost point of Virginia; thence southerly along 
said boundary line to the northeast corner of Virginia where it joins the southeastern corner of Maryland, 
at the Atlantic Ocean. 

Whenever any State or Territory located above or below said quarantine line as above designated shall 
duly establish a different quarantine line, and obtain the necessary legislation to enforce said last- 
mentioned line strictly and completely within the boundaries of said State or Territory, and said last 
above-mentioned line and the measures taken to enforce it are satisfactory to the Secretary of Agriculture, 
he may by a special order temporarily adopt said State or Territorial line. 

Said adoption will apply only to that portion of said line specified, and may cease at any time the 
Secretary may deem it best for the interest involved, and in no instance shall said modification exist 
longer than the period specified in said special order ; and at the expiration of such time said quarantine 
line shall revert without further order to the line first above described. 

Whenever any State or Territory shall establish a quarantine line, for above purposes, differently 
located from the above-described line, and shall obtain by legislation the necessary laws to enforce same 
completely and strictly, and shall desire a modification of the Federal quarantine line to agree with such 
State or Territorial line, the proper authorities of such State or Territory shall forward to the Secretary of 
Agriculture a true map or description of such line and a copy of the laws for enforcement of same, duly 
authenticated and certified. 

Such States or Territories as now have a line established as last above mentioned can immediately 
forward certified copies of said line and laws for the enforcement thereof, and if satisfactory to the 
Secretary of Agriculture, the same may be adopted at once and the Federal line so modified. 

From the 15th day of February to the 15th day of November during each year no cattle are to be 
transported from said area south or below said Federal quarantine line above described to any portion of 
the United States above, north or west of the above-described line, except by rail for immediate slaughter, 
and when so transported the following regulations must be observed : 

1. When any cattle in course of transportation from said area are unloaded above, north or west of 
this line to be fed or watered, the places where said cattle are to be fed or watered shall be set apart and 
no other cattle shall be admitted thereto. 

2. On unloading said cattle at their points of destination, pens shall be set apart to receive them, and 
no other cattle shall be admitted to said pens ; and the regulations relating to the movement of cattle from 
said area, prescribed by the cattle sanitary officers of the State where unloaded, shall be carefully observed. 
The cars that have carried said stock shall be cleansed and disinfected before they are again used to trans- 
port, store, or shelter animals or merchandise. 

3. All cars carrying cattle from said area shall bear placards stating that said cars contain Southern 
cattle, and each of the waybills of said shipments shall have a note upon its face with a similar statement. 
Whenever any cattle have come from said area and shall be reshipped from any point at which they have 
been unloaded to other points of destination, the cars carrying said animals shall bear similar placards 
with like statements, and the waybills be so stamped. At whatever point these cattle are unloaded they 
must be placed in separate pens, to which no other cattle shall be admitted. 

4. The cars and boats used to transport such animals, and the pens in which they are fed and watered, 
and the pens set apart for their reception at points of destination, shall be disinfected in the following 
manner : 

(a) Eemove all litter and manure. This litter and manure may be disinfected by mixing it with lime 
or saturating it with a 5 per cent solution of carbolic acid, or, if not disinfected, it may be stored where 
no cattle can come into contact with it until after November 15. 



(6) Wash the cars and the feeding and watering troughs with water until clean 

(c) Saturate the walls and floors of the cars, and fencing, troughs, and chutes of the pens with a 
solution made by dissolving 4 ounces of chloride of lime to each gallon of water. Or disinfect the cars 
with a jet of steam under a pressure of not less than 50 pounds to the square inch 

Cattle from the Eepublic of Mexico may be admitted into the United States to remain below said 
Federal quarantine line after inspection according to law, but said cattle shall not be permitted to cross 
said quarantine line otherwise than by rail for immediate slaughter, except by special permit from the 
inspectors of the Bureau of Animal Industry issued according to the regulations of the said Bureau and no 
permit shall be issued except for cattle free from splenetic or Texas fever, or from contact therewith durino- 
the three months preceding the issuance of said permit, and which have been grazed in a localitvfree from 
infection of such fever. J 

The losses which formerly occurred to the owners of susceptible cattle, both in the interstate and 
export trade, by the contraction of this disease from exposure in unclean and infected cars and pens and 
by means of the manure carried in unclean cars from place to place, became a matter of srave and serious 
concern to the cattle industry of the United States until this danger was removed by the inspection of this 
Department. It is absolutely essential, therefore, that this cattle industry should continue to be protected 
as far as possible by separating the dangerous cattle and by the adoption of efficient methods of disinfection 
Inspectors will be instructed to see that disinfection is properly done, and it is expected that trans- 
portation companies will promptly put into operation the above methods. 
All prior orders conflicting herewith are hereby revoked. 

J. Sterling Morton, 

Secretary. 



TRANSPORTATION OF OFFICERS. 



Department Circular No. 39. 

Division of RevenuTc^terServioe.lNo. 63. OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, February 20, 1896. 
The following Circular is published for the information of officers of the Eevenue Cutter Service : 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



CIECULAE. 

War Department, 

Quartermaster-General's Office, 

Washington, D. C, February 8, 1896. 

In compliance with the request of the Secretary of the Treasury of 4th instant, it is hereby ordered 
that when officers of the Eevenue Cutter Service are ordered from the Atlantic to the Pacific coast, 
or vice versa, officers of the Quartermaster's Department will furnish the necessary transportation, upon 
presentation of their orders, accompanied with request from the Treasury Department for the transpor- 
tation involved. 

The transportation will be paid by the Treasury Department. 

Eespectfully, 

E. H". BATCHELDEE, 
Quartermaster- General, TJ. S. Army. 



RE APPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



treasury Jbpartmimt, 



1896. 
Department. Circular No. 30. 

Division of Customs. 

Office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, February 24, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The following reappraisements of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending February 8, 1896. 

W. E. CURTIS, 

Assistant Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING FEBRUARY 8, 1896. 

ST. B.— In corresponding with the Board of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference should always be made to the number of Reappraisement. 

No. of Reappraise- 
ment. 

10813' 10838 ( ® u 9 ar not above No. 16 D. S., from Francke Hijos & Co., Havana, January 4, 1896: 

Testing 93.15°, entered at $0,025, less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to $0.02384. 

United States gold, per pound, packed. 
Testing 93.23°, entered at $0,025, less freight and 1ST. D. charges, advanced to $0.02373, 

United States gold, per pound, packed. 
Testing 94.51°, entered at $0,025, less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to $0.0246, 

United States gold, per pound, packed. 
Testing 94. 172°, entered at $0,025, less freight and K D. charges, advanced to $0.02433, 

United States gold, per pound, packed. 

10837, 10876 Sugar not above 16 D. S., from Hidalgo & Co., Havana, December 24, 1895: 

Testing 93.50°, entered at $0.02^, less freight, advanced to $0.02321, United States 

gold, per pound, packed. 
Testing 94.35°, entered at $0,025, less freight, advanced to $0.02374, United States gold, 

per pound, packed. 
Testing 93.425°, entered at $0,025, less freight, advanced to $0.02385, United States 

gold, per pound, packed. 

10621 Orange boxes, from Yeoward Bros., Liverpool, December 21, 1895: 

Empty boxes, entered at 6d., advanced to Is. 2d. sterling per box, less than 4 cubic 

feet. 

10612 Orange boxes, from Leeman & Moss, Liverpool, December 11, 1895 : 

Empty boxes, entered at Is. , advanced to Is. 4d. sterling per box, over 4 cubic feet 

and less than 6 cubic feet. 



(Orange boxes, from Arthur Baker, L. H. Williams & Co., and Eussell, Fairbeard & 
!^"5'!^.V„ J, Fletcher, Liverpool, December 7, 10, 14, and 21, 1895, and Glasgow, December 13, 

lUuOo, 1UO40 I ~\RQK. 

Empty boxes, entered at Is. 6d. sterling per box. No advance. 

10847 Orange boxes, from Eichardson & Carmichael, Liverpool, January 10, 1896: 

Large cases, entered at 2s. 4d. sterling each. No advance. 

10671, 10586 1 Orange boxes, from McGeorge & Jardine, J. McKittrick & Co., Smith & Crouch, Liver - 

10820, 10822 ) pool, December 19, 21, and 31, 1895, and Jauuary 3, 1896: 

Entered at Is. 8d. sterling per box. No advauce. 

10841) Manufactures of Wool, from Sir Titus Salt, Bart., Sons & Co., Ltd., Saltaire, January 10, 

1896 : 
62 and 63, black, all imperial, No. 8461, entered at Is. Sid., advanced to Is. 9|d. ster- 
ling per yard. Discount, 5 per cent. Add making up aud case. 

10743 Manufactures of wool and cotton, from E. Possett & Co., Bradford, December 23, 1895: 

56-in. cott. wp. twill, G., entered at Is. 5ad., advanced to Is. 6Jd. sterling per yard. 
Less measure ^. Discount, 2 i per cent. Add packing and making up. 

10660 : Manufactures of wool and cotton, from Ferdinand Heilborn & Co., Bradford, December 11, 

1895: 
57/6, blk. French B. B. twill, entered at 2s. 5d., advanced to 2s. 5.73d. sterling per 

yard. 
56" black C/W twill, entered at Is. 33d., advanced to Is. 5.89d. sterling per yard. 
Less measure ¥ V- Discount, 5 per cent. Add making up, cases, and lining. 

10678 Manufactures of silk and cotton, from B. D. Warburg & Co., Lyons, December 26, 1895 : 

Polonaise, 92 cm., entered at 1.36, advanced to 1.56 francs per meter. 
Mirveilleux, 92 cm., entered at 1.57, advanced to 1.70 francs per meter. 
Polonaise, 92 cm., entered at 1.05, advanced to 1.20 francs per meter. 
Polonaise, 92 cm., entered at 2, advanced to 2.30 francs per meter. 
Austria, 92 cm., entered at .76, advanced to 1.05 francs per meter. 
Polonaise, 92 cm., entered at .74, advanced. to 1.05 francs per meter. 
Diagonal, 92 cm., entered at .80, advanced to 1.15 francs per meter. 
Discount, 20 per cent. Add cases and packing. 

10679 Manufactures of silk and cotton {Austria, etc.), from Noyer, Durand & Co., Lyons, November 

23, 1895: 
Eay6, 46 cm., 467, entered at .75, advanced to .85 franc per meter. 
Austria, 92 cm., 466, cotton grege dyed in piece, entered at .92, advanced to 1.05 

francs per meter. 
Polonaise, 92 cm., 468/91, cotton grege, entered at .60, advanced to .76 franc per meter. 
Discount, 20 per cent. 
10702 Manufactures of silk and cotton (Austria, etc.), from Messrs. Schelliug & Co., Lyons, Decem- 
ber 7, 1895 : 
Austria, 92 cm., black and card black, entered at .82, discounts, 20 per cent and 1 
per cent, advanced to 1.05 francs per meter, discount, 20 per cent. Add eases 
and packing charges. 

10462, 10(370 Prepared mushrooms, from Talbot Freres, Bordeaux, November 19 and December 14, 1S95 : 

Cases of 100 I tins, first choice, entered at 58, advanced to 68 francs per case. 
Cases of 100 I tins, choice, entered at 48, advanced to 56 francs per case. 
Cases of 100 i tins, hotel, entered at 40, advanced to 47 francs per case. 
Cases of 100 \ tins, extra, entered at 68, advanced to 74 francs per case. 



3 

10725 Sauce, from TheBirmiDgham Vinegar Brewery Co., Ltd., Birmingham, December 24, 1895 : 

Eep. i pts. Holbrook's Worcest. sauce, entered at 2s., advanced to 2s. 6d. sterling 

per dozen. 
Bep. pints Holbrook's Worcest. sauce, entered at 3s., advanced to 4s. 3d. sterling per 

dozen. 
Eep. quarts Holbrook's Worcest. sauce, entered at 5s. 3d., advanced to 9s. sterling 

per dozen. 
Add cases. 

10810 Sauce, etc., from Choy Chong Lung, Hongkong, November 15, 1895: 

Oyster oil, entered at 1.80, advanced to 6.15 Mexican dollars per case of 6 dozen each. 

10877 Pineapples, from D. W. Hainer, Havana, January 16, 1896: 

Pineapples, entered at $0.80, advanced to $1, United States currency, per barrel. Add 
barrels at 20 cents each. 

10840 Alcoholic perfumery, from Lecaron & Pils, Paris, December 4, 1895: 

Entered discounts, 15 per cent and 10 per cent, advanced discount, 20 per cent. 

10855 Sweetmeats, etc., from Ze Zu, Hongkong, November 28, 1895: 

Entered at 2.25, advanced to 3.60 Mexican dollars per box of 72 catties. 

10783 Manufactures of shell and metal, from Dabdub Bros., Jerusalem, October 23, 1895: 

Bosaries, mother-of-pearl, 2d quality, metal-mounted, small, entered at 42, advanced 

to 60 francs per gross. 
Bosaries, mother-of-pearl. No. 1, entered at 48, advanced to 72 francs per gross. 
Bosaries, mother-of-pearl, 1st quality, 3/2, entered at 60, advanced to 72 francs per 

gross. 
Bosaries, mother-of-pearl, 1st quality, 3, entered at 75, advanced to 108 francs per gross. 
Bosaries, mother-of-pearl, 1st quality, 4, entered at 84, advanced to 120 francs per gross. 
Bosaries, mother-of-pearl, 2d quality, 2, entered at 54, advanced to 84 francs per gross. 
Bosaries, mother-of-pearl, oral, 1st quality, 1, entered at 45, advanced to 72 francs per 



Bosaries, mother-of-pearl, oral, 2d quality, 2, entered at 48, advanced to 80 francs per 

gross. 
Bosaries, mother-of-pearl, oral, 1st quality, 1, entered at 90, advanced to 120 francs 

per gross. 
Bosaries, mother of-pearl, oral, 1st quality, 2, entered at 102, advanced to 144 francs 

per gross. 

Crosses, metal figures, entered at 12, advanced to 18 francs per gross. 

10758 rochetknives, etc., from T. H. Clowes, Stoke-on-Trent, December 13, 1895: 

Entered at Is. lljd., advanced to 2s. 2*d. sterling per dozen. 

™ 6 '? °,- F : ;: '- Sugar not above 16 D. S., from Johnston, Pater & Co., Pernambuco, December 6, 1895: 

Philadelphia... ) " ' 

Entered at a total value, advanced to 8s. 5.46d. sterling per cwt., packed. 

& 79 O. P.. \ Cut j from zimmer & Schmidt, Gablonz, November 8, 1895 : 

San Francisco., j a ' 

Entered discount, 10 per cent, advanced discount, 5 per cent. 

REAPPKAISEMENTS BY BOARDS. 

2822, 10516 ) 

2S61, 10009 [ Manufactures of wool, from Joseph Wilcox & Co. , Bradford, December 4 and 11, 1895: 

Etc ) 

56-in., fancy, entered at 2s. 53d., advanced to 2s. Sid. sterling per yard. Less ^ and 

? V Add making up and packing. Discount, 2i per cent. 



2863, 10631 Wool dress goods, from Schulze & Son, Greiz, December 13, 1895: 

115 cm., berle 645, wool, entered at .77, advanced to .95 mark per meter. 

95 cm., rapine 669, wool and silk, entered at 1.06, advanced to 1.20 marks per meter. 

95 cm., Othello 667, wool and silk, entered at .80, advanced to .90 mark per meter. 

Hansa, 657, 654, 653, J. 800, and 652, entered at .82, advanced to. 92 mark per meter. 

Discount, 8 per cent. Add cases and packing. 

2615, 9767 ) Manufactures of S'ilk and cotton, from Mecanische Seidenweberei, Crefeld, August 29, and 

2616,9768 j September 8, 1895: 

37 j, serge roh 6 L. E. B., entered at .35, advanced to .60 mark per meter. 

37 j, diagonal roh D. G. L. 3, entered at .44, advanced to .65 mark per meter. 

34 j, satin roh G. B. C. C. P., entered at .69, advanced to .84 mark per meter. 

37j, serge roh 6 G. E. C. C. F., entered at .69, advanced to .84 mark per meter. 

37j, satin roh P. 602 F., entered at .77, advanced to .96 mark per meter. 

43i j, gloriosa noir L. O. S., entered at .83, advanced to .95 mark per meter. 

43ij, gloriosa noir A. P. P. N., entered at .83, advanced to .99 mark per meter. 

36 j, gloriosa noir P., entered at .73, advanced to .85 mark per meter. 

36j, Ehadame chang B. G. T., entered at 1.44, advanced to 1.53 marks per meter. 

36j, Ehadame noir B. G. T., entered at 1.40, advanced to 1.48 marks per meter. 

37 j, satin roh P. E. N. M., entered at .51, advanced to .73 mark per meter. 

37 j, serge roh 8.382 S. B., entered at .61, advanced to .80 mark per meter. 

37 j, gloriossa roh, 50 A. A., entered at .49, advanced to .70 mark per meter. 

37 j, chevron roh, C. L., entered at .68, advanced to .83 mark per meter. 

Add packing. 
2864, 10412 Manufactures of silk, from Gindre & Co., Lyons, November 13, 1895: 

Pongee, 31-in. ecru, entered at .68, advanced to .95 franc per meter. 

Pongee, 31-in. ecru, entered at .73, advanced to 1 franc per meter. Discounts, 20 per 
cent and 1 per cent. 

Add cases and packing. 
2869, 10478 Manufactures of silk and cotton, from H. B. Schniewind, Elberfeld, November 29, 1895 : 

24j, fig. satin, N. F., entered at 2.381, advanced to 2.60 marks per meter. 

24j, fancy E., entered at 1.24J, advanced to 1.60 marks per meter. 

24 j, all silk swivel, E. E. E., 107, entered at 1.89*, advanced to 2 marks per meter. 

24 j, crav. art., 284, entered at .96, advanced to 1 mark per meter. 

24 j, all silk swivel, H. H., 192, entered at 2.50] marks per meter. No advance. 

24 j, arm. E. E. P., Ill, entered at .92, advanced to 1 mark per meter. 
2870, 10700 Chemical salt, from E. de Haen, Hanover, December 14, 1895 : 

Peroxide barium, entered at 74, advanced to 78.80 marks per 100 kilos, net, packed. 

568 O. P ") 

2326 > Sugar, from Morales & Co., Fajardo: 

Boston ) 

Testing 88.50°, entered at .0275, advanoed to .0328, Porto Eico currency, per pound, 
packed. 

O 






AMENDED STEAMBOAT RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



1S96. 
Department Circular No. 31. 



Jgrmsxtrij gjepartmmi, 



STEAMBOAT-INSPECTION SERVICE, 

Office of the Supervising Inspector General, 

Washington, D. C, February 19, 1896. 

At the regular meeting of the Board of Supervising Inspectors of Steam Vessels, held at 
Washington, D. C, January, 189G, in pursuance of section 4405, Revised Statutes of the United 
States, amendments were made to Rules I, II, III, V, and IX, of the General Rules and Regula- 
tions. 

Form 2177, Certificate of Inspection for Foreign Passenger Steamers, was amended; and 
inspectors in districts where foreign passenger steamers are inspected should make immediate 
requisition therefor, and, as soon as supplied, use the new form exclusively, interlining the 
changes in book of certificates. 

These amendments to the rules, having received the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, 
have now the force of law, as provided in section 4405, Revised Statutes, and must he observed 
accordingly. 

The following devices were approved by the Board, and have also received the approval of 
the Secretary of the Treasury, as required by section 4491, Revised Statutes : 

The Reliance Metallic Life Raft, presented by L. H. Raymond. 

The Lunkenheimer Improved Pop Safety Valve. 

The Board, under the authority conferred upon it by section 4429, Revised Statutes, approved 
coil and pipe boilers presented by the following-named persons and firms, when such boilers are 
constructed in all their parts of wrought iron, steel, or cast steel, in the manner as provided in 
the general rules of the Board : 

C. R. Benton, Vergennes, Vt. 

Baylies C. Clark, New York, N. Y. 

J. F. Craig, Toledo, Ohio (Craig Water Tube Boilers, Nos. 1 and 2). 

E. N. Drouillard, Wyandotte, Mich. (Drouillard Water Tube Boiler No. 1). 

A. W. Fiulayson, Detroit, Mich. 

T. W. Godwin & Co., Norfolk, Va. 

Samuel M. Gray, Providence, R. I. 

Wm. H. Herbertson, Cadwalader, Pa. 

L. W. Loomis, Carrollton, 111. 

Wm. H. C. Lyons, Philadelphia, Pa. 

John Mohr & Sons, Chicago, 111. 

Wm. Oldman, Jr., Buffalo, N. Y. (horizontal and vertical 

Geo. E. & Chas. A. Painter, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Wm. E. Plummer, Jr., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Joseph Provencher, East Providence, R. I. 

J. B. Rives, St. Paul, Minn, (waterous boiler). 




Rochester Machine Tool Works, Rochester, N. Y. (Buckley Patent Water Tube Pipe Boiler). 

Isaac E. Shepardson, Providence, R. I. 

R. Weston & A. M. Lemke, Saginaw, Mich. 

Geo. L. Whittington, Sea Isle City, N. J. 

Chas. P. Willard, Chicago, 111. 

Following is the text of the rules amended in part only, the parts stricken out inclosed in 
brackets [thus], while the additions to such paragraphs are printed in italics. Entirely new sec- 
tions and paragraphs of sections are in plain type preceded by the word (new) in parentheses. 

JAS. A. DUMONT, 

Supervising Inspector General, 
President of the Board of Supervising Inspectors of Steam Vessels. 

Approved February 19, 1896. 

S. Wike, 

Acting Secretary of the Treasury. 






RULES. 



RULE I. 



Section 3. (Third paragraph new.) 

To ascertain the tensile strength and other qualities of steel plate, there shall be taken from 
each sheet to be used in shell or other parts of boiler which are subject to tensile strain, a test 
piece prepared in form according to the following diagram : 




The straight part in center shall be 9 inches in length and 1 inch in width, marked with light 
prick punch marks at distances 1 inch apart, as shown, spaced so as to give 8 inches in length. 

The sample must show, when tested, an elongation of at least 25 per cent in a length of 2 inches, 
for thickness up to i inch, inclusive ; and in a length of 4 inches, for over £ to T \, inclusive ; in a 
length of 8 inches, for over ^ to 1 inch, inclusive; and in a length of 6 inches, for all thickness 
over 1 inch. 

The reduction of area shall be the same as called for by the rules of the Board. No plate 
shall contain more than .06 per cent of phosphorus, and .04 per cent of sulphur, to be determined 
by analysis by the manufacturers, verified by them, and copy furnished the inspector for each 
order tested ; which analysis shall, if deemed expedient by the Supervising Inspector General, be 
verified by an outside test at the expense of the manufacturer of the plate. 

It being further provided that said manufacturer shall also furnish a certificate with each 
order of steel to be tested, stating the technical process by which said steel was manufactured. 
It being further provided that steel manufactured by what is known as the Bessemer process shall 
not be allowed to be used in the construction of marine boilers. Plates over 1 inch in thickness 
may be reduced to 1 inch in the straight part for testing, in cases where the testing apparatus is 
not of sufficient capacity to test the full thickness of plate. The reduction of area and elongation 
must be equal to the requirement of full thickness of metal. 

Provided, however, That where contracts for boilers for ocean-going steamers require a test 
of material in compliance with the British Board of Trade, British Lloyds, or Bureau Veritas 
rules for testing, the inspectors shall make the tests in compliance with the above rules. The 
samples shall also be capable of being bent to a curve of which the inner radius is not greater 
than one and a half times the thickness of the plates after having been heated uniformly to a low 
cherry red, and quenched in water of 82 degrees Fahrenheit. Such tests are to be made at the 
place of manufacture of the material, by a local or assistant inspector of the district in which such 
material is to be used, whenever possible. If, however, from distance or other sufficient reason, 

(3) 



the inspectors of the district are unable to make such tests, the Supervising Inspector General 
may direct a local or assistant inspector from another district to make them. In every case, 
however, the inspector making the tests shall stamp the initials of his name above the manufac- 
turer's stamp on the plates, and also the letters "U. S. I.", with the initials or abbreviated signs 
of the name of the port to which the inspector making the tests belongs. 

Provided always, That the plate possesses homogeneousness, toughness, and ability to with- 
stand the effect of repeated heating and cooling ; but should these tests prove any plate to be over- 
stamped, such plate must be rejected as failing to have the strength stamped thereon. But 
nothing herein shall be so construed as to prevent the manufacturer from restamping such plate 
and all other plates in the lot at the lowest tensile strength indicated by the deficient sample, pro- 
vided such restamping is done previous to the use of the plates in the manufacture of marine 
boilers. When more than one sample shall be tested from one sheet, the sample showing the 
lowest tensile strength shall be allowed as the tensile strength of the plate. 

These amendments shall take effect on and after July 1, 1896. 

Section 4. (First paragraph.) 

4. The manufacturer of any boiler to be used for marine purposes shall furnish the inspectors 
of the district where such boiler or boilers are to be constructed a blue print or tracing descriptive 
of same for their approval, which shall be kept on file in their office. Where more than one boiler 
is made from a similar design, a drawing of which is on file in the local inspector's office, if 
made at a different date, a reference to such drawing on file is cdl that shall be required. The 
manufacturer shall also furnish the inspectors a written statement of the kind of material and 
size of rivets to be used, in the construction of such boiler, and the size and pitch of the rivet 
holes in same, as well as an affidavit in the following form, subscribed to, either by himself or 
authorized agent having superintendence of the construction of such boilers. 



Section 9. (New paragraph at end of section.) 

Tubes, water pipes, and steam pipes, made of steel manufactured by the Bessemer process, 
shall not be allowed to be used in any marine boiler built from and [on or] after July 1, 1896 ; 
nor shall any tube increased in thickness by welding one tube inside of another be allowed for 
use after the above-named date. 

Section 14. (Third paragraph amended.) 

RIBBED FURNACE FLUES. 

The strength of ribbed flues, when used for furnaces or steam chimneys (rib projections not 
less than If inches deep), and not more than 9 inches from center to center of ribs, and provided 
that the plain parts at ends do not exceed 9 inches, and constructed of plates not less than ^ inch 
thick, with practically true circle ; and 

The strength of corrugated flue when used for furnace or steam chimney, corrugated by sec- 
tions with flanged ends overlapping each other and riveted with \-inch rivets, 2-inch pitch, corru- 
gated projection not less than 2% inches from inside of flue to outside of lap, and not more than 
18 inches between centers of corrugation, provided plain parts at ends do not exceed 12 inches in 
length, constructed of plates not less than -^ inch thick, with practically true circles; and 

The strength of ribbed flues when used for furnaces or steam chimneys, when made in sections 
of not less than 12 inches in length, measuring from center to center of said projections, and 
flanged to a depth not exceeding 2\ inches, and substantially riveted together with wrought-iron 
rings between such flanges, and such rings have a thickness of not less than double the thickness 



of the material in the flue and a depth of not less than 2£ inches, when stra ight ends do not exceed 
12 indies in length, shall, in each of the above cases, be calculated from the following formula: 

C =14,000, a constant. 

T =thickness of flue in decimals of an inch. 

D = diameter of flue in inches. 

P= pressure of steam allowable. 

Formula: P= ,-. . 

Section 19. (Amended.) 

All steamers [navigating rivers] having boilers externally heated shall have a clear space of 
not less than 6 inches between the boilers and woodwork on either side, and 4 inches on the top 
of said boilers. 

Section 21. (New.) 

21. All boilers hereafter placed in steamers shall have a clear space of at least 8 inches 
between the under side of the cylindrical shell and the floor or keelson. 

All manholes for the shell of boilers over 40 inches in diameter shall have an opening not less 
than 11 by 15 inches in the clear, except that boilers 40 inches diameter of shell and under shall 
have an opening of not less than 9 by 15 inches in the clear in manholes. 

Section 23. (Part in brackets transferred to section 38, Rule II.) 

23. All boilers shaft have a clear space at the back and ends thereof of 2 feet opposite the 
pack connection door. [Slip joints in steam pipes shall, in their working parts, when the steamer 
is to be employed in navigating salt water, be made of copper or composition.] Provided, That 
on vessels constructed of iron or steel with metal bulkheads, the distance between back connection 
doors and such metal bulkheads shall not be less than 16 inches. 

Section 38. (Third paragraph.) 

On all boilers built after July 1, [1891,] 1896, a [flanged bronzed] bronze, or brass-seated 
stopcock or valve shall be attached to the boiler between all check valves and all steam and feed 
pipes and boilers, in order to facilitate access to connections. 

Where such cocks or valves exceed H inches in diameter they must be flanged to b&iler. The 
stop valves attached to main steam pipes may, however, be made of cast iron or other suitable 
material. The date referred to above applies to this paragraph only._ 

Section 38. (Transferred from section 23 to end section 38.) 

Slip joints in steam pipes shall, in their working parts, when the steamer is to be employed 
in navigating salt water, be made of copper or composition. 

RULE III. 
Section 12. (First paragraph amended.) 

12. Passenger steamers navigating oceans, northwestern lakes, bays, and sounds of the United 
States, excepting steamers tinder 100 gross tons hereinafter provided for, must be equipped with 
lifeboats in proportion to their tonnage as follows : 

Steamers between 100 and 200 tons 2 boats. 

Steamers between 200 and 300 tons 3 boats. 

Steamers between 300 and 400 tons 4 boats. 

Steamers between 400 and 500 tons 5 boats. 

Steamers between 500 and 1,000 tons 6 boats. 

Steamers between 1,000 and 1,500 tons 7 boats. 

Steamers between 1,500 and 2,000 tons 8 boats. 

Steamers between 2,000 and 2,500 tons 9 boats. 

Steamers between 2,500 and 3,000 tons 10 boats. 

Steamers between 3,000 and 3,500 tons 11 boats. 

Steamers between 3,500 and 4,000 tons 12 boats. 

Steamers between 4,000 and 5,000 tons 13 boats. 

[Steamers of 5,000 tons and above 14 boats.] 



6 

Steamers above 5,000 tons burden shall be furnished with an additional boat of mil less than 
495 cubic feet capacity for each additional BOO tons harden or fraction thereof; or, if the owners 

or agents prefer, two boats may be used, provided the aggregate capacity shall be the same as the 
one boat described. 

RULE V. 

Section 2. (Amended as follows:) 

The following-named grades < >f engineers are abolished, and struck out of the rules : " 

Chief engineer of condensing steamers under 100 tons. 

Chief engineer of non condensing steamers under 100 tons. 

Chief engineer of canal steamers. 

First assistant engineer of condensing steamers under 100 tons. 

First assistant engineer of noncondensing steamers under 100 tons. 

First assistant engineer of canal steamers. 

Second assistant engineer of noncondensing river steamers. 

Second assistant engineer of noncondensing freight, towing, and fishing steamers. 

Second assistant engineer of condensing steamers under 100 tons. 

Second assistant engineer of noncondensing steamers under 100 tons. 

Third assistant engineer of noncondensing lake, hay, and sound steamers. 

Third assistant engineer of condensing river steamers. 

Third assistant engineer of noncondensing river steamers. 

Third assistant engineer of noncondensing freight, towing, and fishing steamers. 

The word "bay" is struck out of the grade. 

Third assistant engineer of condensing lake, [bay,] and sound steamers. 

Section 5. (Proviso amended.) 

Provided, That any person who has served [as] a regular apprenticeship to the machinist 
trade in a marine-engine works for a period of not less than three years, and any person who has 
served for a period of not less than three years as a locomotive engineer, stationary engineer 
[regular machinist], or as an apprentice to the machinist trade in a locomotive or stationary- 
engine works, and any person who has graduated as a mechanical engineer from a duly recognized 
school of technology, may be licensed to serve as an engineer on steam vessels after having had 
not less than one year's experience in the engine department of [a] steam [vessel] vessels, which 
experience must have been obtained [within two years preceding the application] either with in- 
ane year before or one year subsequent to the acquisition of the skilled knowledge above mentioned, 
(which fact must be verified by the certifiate in writing of the licensed engineer or master under 
whom the applicant has served, said certificate to be filed with the application of the candidate) ; 
and no person shall receive license as above, except for special license, who is not able to deter- 
mine the weight necessary to be placed on the lever of a safety valve (the diameter of valve, 
length of lever, distance from center of valve to [and] fulcrum, weight of lever, and weight of 
calve and stern being known) to withstand any given pressure of steam in a boiler, or who is not 
able to figure and determine the strain brought on the braces of a boiler with a given pressure of 
steam, the position and distance apart of braces being known, such knowledge to be determined 
by an examination in writing and the report of examination filed with the application in the 
office of the local inspectors, and no engineer or assistant engineer now holding a license shall 
have the grade of the same raised without possessing the above qualifications. 

Section 10. (Third paragraph.) 

In case of original or renewal of any license of any 'master or pilot who has not been examined 
for color blindness, and who is living at [an inconvenient] a distance of one hundred miles or 






more from a surgeon of the Marine-Hospital Service, he may he examined for color blindness by 
any respectable physician residing in the same town or locality with said applicant ; [who (the 
physician)] and the physician, shall furnish a duplicate report of the examination made upon the 
regulation blanks [which shall be in duplicate] , one copy of which shall be furnished the applicant 
and the other sent [by mail] to the local inspectors of steam vessels [, to which application shall 
be made for a] to whom the applicant shall apply for such original or renewal of license. 

Section 14. (Proviso in third paragraph.) 

Provided, however, that applicants for original license to act as master or mate of steam pilot 
boats, or of steamers engaged in the Atlantic, Pacific, or Gulf coast [menhaden] fisheries, shall 
only be subjected to such examination as shall satisfy the inspectors that the applicant is a 
competent coast pilot, capable of navigating such [fishing] steamers. 

RULE IX. 

Section %. 

2. It shall be the duty of the inspectors jointly, before granting a certificate of inspection, to 
thoroughly test the fire apparatus of steamers, and to examine carefully all pumps, hose, lifeboats, 
and other equipments required by law, and to see that the glass of colored signal lights [are] is in 
no case less than 6 inches [diameter] in width and [6] 5 inches high in the clear. 

Section 5. 

5. It shall be the duty of the supervising inspectors to inform their respective local boards, 
in writing, of their decisions in cases of appeal. Supervising inspectors granting license to a 
vessel engaged in towing, to carry persons in addition to its crew [under the act], approved July 
9, 1886, shall notify the local inspectors in whose jurisdiction the steamer receiving the permit is 
engaged. The local inspectors shall keep a record of the same. 

(No change in remainder of section.) 



INSPECTION OF MEATS EXPORTED. 



1S96. 
Department Circular No. 32. . 

Bureau of Navigation. 

office of THE SECRETARY, 



Office of THE SECRET, 
Washington, D. C, February 28, 1896. 



To Collectors of Customs and others: 

Attention is invited to the order of the Department of Agriculture, appended hereto, dated the 25th 
instant, relative to certificates of inspection of meats exported from the United States, and especially to 
that portion which directs that the order shall not be enforced until July 1, 1896. 

S. WIKE, 

Acting Secretary. 



Order Postponing the Certification of Export Beef to July 1, 1896. 

TJ. S. Department of Agriculture, 

Office of the Secretary, 
Washington, D. G. , February 25, 1896. 

Whereas, Section 2 of the Act of Congress approved March 3, 1891, as amended in the Act approved 
March 2, 1895, provides as follows : 

"Section 2. That the Secretary of Agriculture shall also cause to be made a careful inspection of all 
live cattle, the meat of which, fresh, salted, canned, corned, packed, cured, or otherwise prepared, is 
intended for exportation to any foreign country, at such times and places, and in such manner as he may 
think proper, with a view to ascertain whether said cattle are free from disease, and their meat sound and 
wholesome, and may appoint inspectors who shall be authorized to give an official certificate clearly stating 
the condition in which such cattle and meat are found, and no clearance shall be given to any vessel having 
on board any fresh, salted, canned, corned, or packed beef being the meat of cattle killed after the passage 
of this act for exportation to and sale in a foreign country from any port in the United States until the 
owner or shipper shall obtain from an inspector appointed under the provision of this act a certificate 
that said cattle were free from disease, and that their meat is sound and wholesome;" 

It is ordered, That all beef offered for exportation, whether fresh, salted, canned, corned, or packed, 
shall be accompanied by a certificate of an inspector of this Department showing that the cattle from 
which it was produced were free from disease, and that the meat was sound and* wholesome. And in 
order that it may be determined whether all beef exported has been so inspected and found free from 
disease and wholesome, it is further ordered that the meat of all other species of animals which is packed 
in barrels, cases, or other packages, shall be legibly marked in such manner as to clearly indicate the 
species of animals from which the meat was produced. Meat which is not so marked, and which is not 
accompanied by a certificate of inspection, will be subject to unpacking and examination in order to 
ascertain if it is uninspected beef. 

Notice is hereby given to exporters of beef, whether said beef is fresh, salted, canned, corned, 
packed, or otherwise prepared, and to owners and agents of vessels upon which said beef is exported, 
that no clearance can be given to any vessel having on board said beef until the provisions of this order 
are complied with. 

As it has been found impossible to establish inspection prior to March 1, 1896, at all points where 
beef is prepared and packed for the export trade, and as legislation is now pending modifying the require- 
ment for certificates with all exported beef, it is directed that this order shall not be enforced until July 
1, 1896. 

All orders and regulations of this Department inconsistent with this order are hereby revoked. 

J. Sterling Morton, 

Secretary. 



f > 



REAPPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



Department Circular No. 33. ^IXCiiSXlvtj < 2tl£prt VIIIXCIIT7 

Division of Customs. 

OfficeofTHE SECRETARY, 
Washington, D. C, February 27, 1896. 
To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The following reappraisements of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending February 15, 1896. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING FEBRUARY 15, 1896. 

N. B. — In corresponding with the Board of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference should always be made to the number of Reapp raise ment. 

No. of Reappraise- 
ment. 

10S74 Colored cotton corduroy, from Thomas Barnes & Co., Ltd., Manchester, January 6, 1896: 

27" tan, cream and white cotton whipcord, entered at lid. sterling per yard, less 
measurement -J T , discount 5 per cent, advanced by addition of 21 per cent, com- 
mission added on invoice, but deducted on entry. Add tickets, boxes, and 
packing. 

10657 Cotton netting and cotton lace curtains, from B. Walker & Co., Ltd., Nottingham, November 

29, 1895 : 

68/356, ivory, cotton Hamburg net, 50", entered at 3i'd., advanced to 4d. sterling per 
yard. 

3629,3927, white and^cru curtains. 48", 3i yards, entered at 2s. 3d., advanced to 2s. 
4d. sterling per pair. 

2929, white curtains, 50", 3z yards, entered at Is. lid., advanced to 2s. Id. sterling 
per pair. 

3781, ecru and white curtains, 48", 31 yards, entered at 2s. 3d., advanced to 2s. 4d. 
sterling per pair. 

Discount, 25 per cent. 
10901 Colored cotton, decorated china, etc., from Kwong Lung Shiug, Hongkong, November 25, 1895: 

Japan cloth entered at .30, advanced to .60 Mexican dollar per piece. 

Tea pot with basket, entered at 4.25, advanced to 6 Mexican dollars per box of 30 
pieces. 

Add packing charges. 



2 

L0341 Cotton wearing apparel, from Bhenish Corset Manufacturing Company, Ltd., Cologne, 

October 26, 1895 : 

Style 102/33, boned with horn, entered at 25, advanced to 45 marks per dozen. 

401/33, boned with whalebone, entered at 58.50, advanced to 60 marks per dozen. 

301/33, boned with whalebone, entered at 36, advanced to 50 marks per dozen. 
10886. Colored cotion, from Weiss-Fries & Co., Mulhouse, January 9, 1896 : 

Caile a Vaile 80 cm., serie 1, entered at .73, advanced to .80 mark per meter. 

Caile a Vaile 80 cm., serie 2, entered at .77, advanced to .92 mark per meter. 

Cretonne, entered at .69, advanced to .71 ma;k per meter. 

Add cases. 
10911 Cotton laces, etc., from Said Tourbah, Beirut, October 8, 1895: 

Trimmings entered at 69, advanced to 75 piastres per oke. Add cases, packing, etc. 

10035 Bleached and colored cotton, from Tootal Broadhurst Lee Company, Ltd., Manchester, 

October 15, 1895 : 

308, 31" fancy pique, entered at 7id., advanced to 8ad. sterling per yard. 

1875, 27" fancy pique, entered at did.., advanced to 7d. sterling per yard. 

145 F. 33" stripe piqu6, entered at 9Jd., advanced to lid. sterling per yard. 

145 G. 32/3" check piqu£, entered at 9Jd., advanced to lid. sterling per yard. 

Discount on entered prices 3 per cent. Advanced prices net. Add cases, etc. 

1US25, 10857 } Manufactures of wool and cotton, from Simon Israel & Co., Bradford, December 12 and 19, 

10848, etc. j 1895, "and January 2, 6, and 9, 1896 : 

56" black worsted coatings, entered at Is. 3d., advanced to Is. 5d. sterling per yard. 
Discounts, 21 and 1} per cent. Add cases, shooks, and linings. 

56" black union cloakings, entered at Is. 2]d., advanced to Is. 5d. sterling per yard. 
Discounts, 2* per cent and ] i per cent. Add cases, etc. 
10623 Mirrors, from Wehrle & Co., November 29, 1895: 

4]" diameter, :; white, round, entered at 2.84, advanced to 3 marks per dozen. 

4r, x 41 double schack clover leaf, No. 109, entered at 2.58, advanced to 2.60 marks per 
dozen. 

31 x 2^ double schack crescent, 27 P., entered at 1.30 marks per dozen. No advance. 

3j^ x 3^ double schack heart, No. 33, entered at 1.34, advanced to 1.40 marks per dozen. 

5>v x 3* white, oval, entered at 1.70, advanced to 2 marks per dozen. 

4|f x 3i white, round corner, entered at 1.83, advanced to 2 marks per dozen. 

44 x If double shack round corner, entered at .71, advanced to .78 mark per dozen. 

34 x 14 f white, round corner, entered at .80, advanced to .90 mark per dozen. 

4|i x 21 white, round corner, entered at 1.62, advanced to 1.70 marks per dozen. 

44 x 21 double shack, round corner, entered at .95, advanced to 1 mark per meter. 

31 x 24 I white, round corner, entered at 1.05, advanced to 1.15 marks per dozen. 

10867, 10925 Alcoholic perfumery, etc., from Lecaron Fils, Paris, January 8, 1896 : 

Entered discounts, 15 per cent and 10 per cent, advanced discount, 20 per cent. 

10897 Metallic pins, from Job. Casp. & With Eumpe, Burtscheid, December 30, 1895: 

Mourning pins, entered at a discount of 6 per cent, discount disallowed. 

10766 Manufactures of silk and cotton (ribbon), from Th. Schelling & Co., St. Etienne, December 

24, 1895 : 
9 m No. 12736 faconne 36'", entered at 11, advanced to 14.07 francs per piece of 15 
meters. 



3 

10766 Manufactures of silk aud cotton (ribbon), etc. — Continued. 

9 in No. 12737 faconne 62'", entered at 8.30, advanced to 11.96 francs per piece of 15 

meters. 
9 m No. 12737 faconne" 46'", entered at 7, advanced to 11.45 francs per piece of 15 

meters. 
Bonification, 40 per cent. Discounts, 20 per cent and 2 per cent. t 

10904 Manufactures of wool and cotton (black beaver'), from Ferdinand Heilbom & Co., Bradford, 

January 15, 1896 : 
No. 337, 54" black beaver, entered at Is. 5£d., advanced to Is. 5.76d. sterling per yard. 
Less measure, ^ T . Discount, 5 per cent. Add making up and packing. 

10746, 10803 Manufactures of ivool, from Lummer, Bach & Bamminger, Gcra, December 9, 1895: 

130 cm., mantle dress goods, colored, 2178 aud 1999, entered at 2.90, advanced to 3.15 

marks per meter. 
130 cm., mantle dress goods, colored, 3109, entered at 2.5J9, advanned to 2.75 marks 

per meter. 
Add cases, packing, and cost of making up. 

10862 Wool dress goods, from Carl Gunther & Co. , Plauen, December 30, 1895 : 

100 cm., piece dyed, 283, black, entered at .82, advanced to .95 mark per meter. Add 
case and packing. 

10688 Wool dress goods, from Schulze & Son, Greiz, December 5, 1895 : 

104 cm., perle, 645, entered at .70, advanced to .92 mark per meter. 

115 cm., mosaic, 688-692, entered at 1.29, advanced to 1.58 marks per meter. 

Discount, 8 per cent. Add packing. 

10883 Manufactures of cotton, N. M, from B. Isaacs & Bro., Hiogo, August 24, 1895: 

Gold stamped cotton crape Tukusas, 27"x27", style 57701^, entered at .11 silver yen 
per piece. No advance. Add packing, boxes, etc. 

10850 Sal ammoniac, from Dr. Schaeffer, Charlottenberg, December 23, 1895: 

Entered at 42.85J, add casks, advanced to 50 marks per 100 kilos, packed. 

10906 Leather shoes, sugar, and prepared vegetables, from Say Zing Chong, Kongkong, December 

5, 1895 : 
Straw shoes, entered at .08 Mexican dollar per pair. No advance. 
Brown sugar, entered at .03, advanced to .0426 Mexican dollar. 
Salted cabbage, entered at 1 Mexican dollar per jar. No advance. 

10839 Sugar not above 16 D. 8., from Dubois & Co., Matanzas, December 20, 1895: 

Testing 93.46°, entered at $0.02 2 l , advanced to $0.0232, United States gold, per pound, 

packed. 
Testing 92,88°, entered at $0.02^, advanced to $0.02283, United States gold, per pound, 

packed. 
Testing 94.05°, entered at $0,021, advanced to $0.02356, United States gold, per pound, 

packed. 
Testing 92.95°, entered at $0.02^, advanced to $0.02287, United States gold, per pound, 

packed. 
Prom entered prices deduct freight and N. D. charges. 

10713 Manufactures of wood and metal, from D. Bahaim, Paris, December 18, 1895 : 

Chapelets en bois 5, entered at 16, advanced to 17 francs per gross. 
Chapelets lustres, 493, entered at 14, advanced to 15 francs per gross. 



L0713 Manufactures of wood mid metal, etc. — -Continued. 

RomLs de serviettes en bois, entered at 32.45, advanced to :U.40 francs per gross. 
Medailles en cuivre, 4, entered at 1.15, advanced to 1.25 francs per gross. 
Statuettes St. Jos. zinc, entered at 5, advanced 5.50 francs per gross. 
Add cases. 

JJ875 Looking //lass platen and poUshed cylinder glass, beveled, etc., from Schren & Co., Fuerth, July 

11,1 Sitf): 
Is x 20, beveled, uusilvered, entered at T.!t4, advanced to 0.94 marks per piece, less 
inland freight. 

[0889, 10890 Manufactures of flax, from Carl Siegl Sen, Schouberg, December 17, 1895 : 

No. 250, prima sheeting linen, entered at 38, advanced to 57 florins per piece of 44 

yards. 
No. 260, prima sheeting linen, entered at 42, advanced to 63 florins per piece of 44 

yards. 
22J/36, No. 40, hemstitched pillow cases, entered at 5, advanced to 7.50 florins per 

dozen. 
224/36, No. 50, hemstitched pillow cases, entered at 5.50, advanced to 8.25 florins per 

dozen. 
25/36, No. 40, hemstitched pillow cases, entered at 5.40, advanced to 8.10 florius per 

dozen. 
27/36, No. 40, hemstitched pillow cases, entered at 5.80, advanced to 8.70 florins per 

dozen. 
Entered discount, 6 per cent. Advanced discount, 2 per cent. 

10880 Manufactures of flax, from Wm. Meyer & Co., St. Gall, December 30, LS95 : 

Dotted Swisses, woven, 30" union linen, entered at 18.40, advanced to 19.20 francs per 

piece of 201 yards. 
Dotted Swisses, woven, 30" union linen, entered at 18, advanced to 18.80 francs per 

piece of 20! yards. 
Add boxes. 
L0568, 10861, ) Cotton hose, from Eobert Herfurth, Chemnitz, November 21, 29, 30; December 14 and 31, 

etc j 1895: 

Advances up to 9 per cent. 
Princess alpaca, from E. G. Williams & Co., Bradford, January 6, 1890: 
32", patt. 5, princess alpaca, 470-119 P. P. 8, black, entered at 13d., advanced to 13}d. 

sterling per yard. 
32", patt. 5, princess alpaca, 466-107 P. P. 10, black, entered at 14d., advanced tol4Jd. 

sterling per yard. 
32", patt. 5, princess alpaca, 231-55 P. P. 12, black, entered at 15id., advanced to 15|d. 

sterling per yard. 
32", patt. 5, princess alpaca, 232-58 P. F. 14, black, entered at 16 id., advanced to 17Jd. 

sterling per yard. 
32", patt. 5, princess alpaca, 228-55 P. F. 16, black, entered at 17fd., advanced to 185d. 

sterling per yard. 
32", patt. 5, princess alpaca, 228-57 P. F. 18, black, entered at 19]d., advanced to 20}d. 

sterling per yard. 
54", albert alpaca, 386-90, entered at 2s. 3d., advanced to 2s. 3ld. sterling per yard. 
Less 1] per cent discount. 



2798 O. P.... . 
Philadelphia. 



5 



2786 0. P | 

Philadelphia... j 



2738 O. P 

New Orleans. 



2742 O. P 

New Orleans. 



2737 0. P 

New Orleans . 



2729 O. P 

New Orleans . 



2832 O. P.. 
Baltimore.. 



2G48, 10076. 
2649,10079. 



2533, 9833. 



2875,10737. 
2879, 10659. 

2883, 10750. 
2868, 10423. 



Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from L. Evans, Sourabaya and Samarang, Augvust 26, Sep- 
tember 4 and 20, 1895 : 
Testing 96.50°, entered at 9s. 6d., advanced to 9s. 6?d. sterling per cwt. 

Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from Hidalgo & Co., Havana, December 14, 1895 : 

Testing 92.71°, entered at $0,021, advanced to #0.0227, United States gold, per pound, 
packed. Prom entered price deduct N- D. charges. 

Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from Hidalgo & Co., Havana, December 21, 1895: 

Testing 94°, entered at $0. 021, advanced to $0.02352, United States gold, per pound, 
packed. Prom entered price deduct N. D. charges. 

Sugar not above No. 16 I). S., from Francke Hijos & Co., Havana, December 20, 1895: 

Testing 94.06°, entered at $0.023575, less N. D. charges, advanced to $0.02356, United 
States currency, per pound, packed. 

Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from Dubois & Co., Matanzas, December 14, 1895: 

Testing 92.87°, centrifugal, entered at $0,024, less N. D. charges, advanced to $0.0228, 
United States gold, per pound, packed. 

Gocoanuls, from John McLeod, Cayman, January 18, 1896 : 

Large cocoanuts, entered at 40., advanced to 44s. sterling per 1,000. 

REAPPRAISEMENTS BY BOARDS. 

Grapes, from Manuel Orozco and others, Almeria, October 12, 1895 : 

Grapes, entered at various prices, barrels of 23 kilos each, advanced to 13.50, and 
barrels of 25 kilos each, advanced to 14.50 pesetas per barrel, packed. 
Mohair shawls, from Max Schlottmann & Co , Berlin, October 5, 1895 : 

Mohair shawls, 6211, entered at 17.40, advanced to 18.17 marks per dozen. 

Mohair shawls, 6212, entered at 21.85 marks per dozen. No advance. 

Mohair shawls, 1733, 100 cm., entered at 14.60, advanced to 15.69 marks per dozen. 

Mohair shawls, 1733, 80 cm., entered at 11.80, advanced to 12.77 marks per dozen. 

Mohair shawls, 7996, entered at 19.60, advanced to 20.35 marks per dozen. 

Mohair shawls, 1734, entered at 13.10 marks per dozen. No advance. 

Mohair shawls, 1620, entered at 10.60, advanced to 10.98 marks per dozen. 

Add packing charges. 
.Manufactures of silk and silk embroidery, from S. Shehpy, Damascus, November 30, 1895 : 

Advances up to 60 per cent. 
.Manufactures of metal, etc., from Benner, White & Co., Paris, October 12, 1895: 

Tenailles grand morbele, entered at 2, advanced to 2.50 francs per dozen. 
. Manufactures of metal, from Max Guttmann, Breslau, December 7, 1895 : 

Coat hangers, No. 200, avg. 17 link, entered at 3.80, advanced to 4 marks per M. 

Coat hangers, No. 100, avg. 17 link, entered at 4.30, advanced to 4.40 marks per M. 

Discount, 7 per cent. 

.Macaroni, from Enrico Bertoglio, Nervi, November 26, 1895 : 
Macaroni, entered at $4.75 per case, packed. No advance. 



6 

OQQQ -J AQQr ~\ 

2888' 10834 | S"9 ar > not " hove No - 16 &• &i from Booker Bros. & Co., Demerara, January 7, 189<>: 

Testing, 96.05°, entered at $0.0235, advanced to 10.0252, United States currency, perl 

pound, packed. 

2787, L0480 Cotton wearing apparel, from Carl Scherf, Limboch, November 11, 1895 : 

No. 2509, men's white Berlin gloves, size 11/13, 1 B. L., ■} J. W., lisle pt., entered 

at 1.75 marks per dozen. No advance. 
Nos. 250 and 255, men's black Berlin gloves, size 12/13, 2 B. L., 1 J. W., lisle pt,, 

entered at 2. 75 marks per dozen. No advauce. 
No. 119, men's white Berlin gloves, size 10/12, 1 B. L., 12 J. W., lisle pt., entered atj 

1.75 marks per dozen. No advance. 
No. 229, men's black Berlin gloves, size 10/12, 1 B. L., i J. W., lisle pt., entered at 

1.80 marks per dozen. No advance. 
No. 220, men's white Berlin gloves, size 11/13, 2 B. L., 1 J. W., silk pt., entered at 

2.20 marks per dozen. No advance. 
Discount, 6 per cent. 

O 



EXAMINATION OF TOBACCO. 



Division Of CuBtoma. 

Office of THE SECRETARY.. 
Washington, D. C, February 28, 1896. 

To Collectors and Other Officers of the Customs : 

In order to secure a more conclusive examination and appraisement of imported tobacco, Officers of 
Customs are hereby instructed that whenever the examination of any portion of any lot of tobacco covered 
by an invoice, discloses the existence in one bale of both "filler" and "wrapper" tobacco, all the 
packages in such lot should be subjected to examination in order to determine the exact nature of the 
merchandise. If the examination of the usual number ordered for examination indicates that the contents 
are of one kind, i. e. either filler or wrapper, as set forth in the invoice, the goods may be passed as correct. 

Tobacco in the transient condition of "sweat" should be subjected to a brief exposure to the air 
before examination. 

As a general rale the Department holds that at least twenty-five per cent of every invoice should be 
ordered for examination. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 






REPORTS OF APPRAISING OFFICERS REGARDING VALUES STATED IN CONSULAR 

INVOICES. 



Division of Customs. 

office of THE SECRETARY, 
Washing/ on, T>. C, March 2, 1890. 

To Appraisers and Acting Appraisers of Merchandise : 

In order that Consular officers may be apprised of the advantages to the revenue which shall have 
resulted, in any case, from information conveyed by their notations upon certified invoices, appraising 
officer's of customs are hereby instructed to report to the Department the conclusions reached regarding 
the appraisement of any merchandise which is covered by a certified invoice on which the Consul has 
made annotations calling attention to apparent discrepancies between the value named in such invoice 
and that prevailing in the country of exportation. 

These reports will be duly transmitted by this Department to the Honorable Secretary of State 
for the information of the Consuls. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



J 



REAPPRAISEMENT PROCEEDINGS. 



" greasttrij IP-epartrnjettt, 



Department Circular No. 3G. 

Division of Customs. 

Office op THE SECRETARY, 
Washington, D. C, February 29, 1896. 

To Collectors of Customs : 

Section 13 of the act of June 10, 1890 provides that whenever the importer, owner, agent, or consignee 
of imported merchandise shall be dissatisfied with the appraisement thereof as made by the local 
appraiser, and shall have complied witli the requirements of law with respect to the entry and appraise- 
ment of merchandise, "he may, within two days thereafter give notice to the Collector, in writing, of 
such dissatisfaction, on the receipt of which the Collector shall at once direct a reappraisement of such 
merchandise by one of the general appraisers." 

The last clause of article 847 is hereby amended, so as to read as follows : 

"Collectors and acting collectors of customs shall, upon request of the General Appraisers, notify 
importers of the time and place appointed for the hearing of any reappraisement case, in which they 
respectively shall be interested, and such collectors, as well as the local appraisers and special agents of 
the Department, shall cooperate to aid the Board of General Appraisers in the preparation of cases by 
securing witnesses and furnishing all attainable evidence in support of the Government's contention. 

"Whenever a valuation has been determined, the General Appraiser shall report the same to the chief 
officer of customs." 

It is intended by this amended regulation to avoid delays such as have occurred in many cases on 
account of the failure of importers and witnesses to appear at hearings before the Board. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



I 



FREE ENTRY OF DOMESTIC PRODUCTS EXPORTED AND RETURNED. 



Departmen^fularNo.37. ^XtftZVLXX} ^t^XXXtitViXy 

Division of Customs. 

Office of THE SECRETARY, 
Washington, D. C, February 28, 1896. 
To Collectors and Other Officers of the Customs : 

Paragraph 387 of the act of August 28, 1894, provides as follows : 

'Articles the growth, produce, and manufacture of the United States, when returned after having been 
exported, without having been advanced in value or improved in condition by any process of manufac- 
ture or other means ; casks, barrels, carboys, bags, .and other vessels of American manufacture exported 
filled with American products, or exported empty and returned filled with foreign products, including 
shooks when returned as barrels or boxes ; also quicksilver flasks or bottles, of either domestic or foreign 
manufacture, which shall have been actually exported from the United States ; but proof of the identity 
of such articles shall be made, under general regulations to be prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury, 
but the exemption of bags from duty shall apply only to such domestic bags as may be imported by the 
exporter thereof, and if any such articles are subject to internal tax at the time of exportation such tax 
shall be proved to have been paid before exportation and not refunded : Provided, That this paragraph 
shall not apply to any article upon which an allowance of drawback has been made, the reimportation of 
which is hereby prohibited except upon payment of duties equal to the drawbacks allowed ; or to any 
article manufactured in bonded warehouse and exported under said provision of law : And provided 
further, That when manufactured tobacco which has been exported without payment of internal-revenue 
tax shall be reimported it shall be retained in the custody of the collector of customs until internal- 
revenue stamps in payment of the legal duties shall be placed thereon." 

This provision is a reproduction of paragraph 482 of the act of October 1, 1890, with the addition of 
the words "but the exemption of bags from duty shall only apply to such domestic bags as may be 
imported by the exporter thereof." 

Exportations under this provision of law must be bona fide and not for the purpose of evading any 
revenue law. 

Merchandise, the growth, produce, or manufacture of the United States, ostensibly exported to ports 
in Canada in foreign vessels, but really shipped from one place in the United States to another by routes 
part water and part rail, and passing through foreign territory, are not bona fide exportations, and the 
merchandise is not entitled to free entry on importation. 

Entries of merchandise returned to the port of original exportation, must show the fact of regular 
clearance for a foreign destination by the records of the customs, and by the declaration of the person 
making the entry. But when the reimportation is made into a port other than that of original exporta- 
tion, there shall be required, in addition to the declaration, a certificate from the collector and the naval 
officer, if any, of the port where the exportation was made, showing the fact of exportation from that port. 
If the importation be made within one year after the date of exportation, the collector shall require the 
importer to make affidavit to the fact that such exportation was made by him in good faith. 






CAT. NO. 594. 

Oath for return of American products exported. 

I, — — , do solemnly, sincerely, and truly swear (or affirm) that the several articles of mer- 
chandise mentioned in the entry hereto annexed are, to the best of my knowledge and belief, truly and 
bona fide of the growth (or production or manufacture) of the United States ; that they were truly exported 
and imported as therein expressed; that they are returned without having been advanced iu value or 
improved in condition by any process of manufacture or other means, and that no drawback, bounty or 
allowance has been paid or admitted thereon, or on any part thereof. 



Port of 



Sworn to this day of , 18—. 

, Collector. 

Cat. No. 773. 
Certificate of exportation of domestic commodities. 

District of- , Port of , , 18 — . 

This is to certify that there were cleared from this port on the , in the , whereof - 



was master, for , the following articles of merchandise (here enumerate the number of packages, 

their denomination, marks, numbers, and contents) on which no drawback, allowance, or bounty has been 
paid or admitted. * 

[seal.] '— Collector. 

[seal.] Naval Officer. 

If such certificate can not at once be procured, and the proof otherwise required be produced, free 
entry will be permitted on bond (Cat. No. 596) being given for the production of the certificate in a sum 
equal to what the duties would be if it were foreign merchandise. 

To guard against fraud, and to insure identity, the collector shall require in addition to proof of 
clearance, the production of a declaration made by the foreign exporter of the goods before the United 
States Consul, of the fact that the merchandise was imported from the United States, and that it has not 
been advanced in value nor improved in condition by any process of manufacture or other means. But 
if it be impracticable to produce such declaration at the time of making entry, bond may be given for 
the production thereof. (Synopsis, 14653.) 

Collectors, with concurrence of naval officers, if any, may waive the record evidence of clearance and 
above declaration, and in lieu thereof accept other satisfactory evidence of exportation, in the case of 
domestic goods on which no drawback has been allowed, valued at not over $100, if satisfied that the 
failure to produce the record evidence did not result from wilful negligence on the part of the importers. 

In default of observance of the foregoing requirements, imported merchandise will be treated as 
foreign. 

Should it appear that any internal-revenue tax was remitted or refunded by way of drawback, on the 
original exportation of any articles of the growth, manufacture, or product of the United States, a duty 
must be exacted upon their return equal in amount to the tax imposed by the internal-revenue laws upon 
such articles at the time of their reimportation, but all articles manufactured in bonded warehouse are 
subject to duty, on reimportation, as foreign merchandise, and all articles on which drawback was made 
are liable to a duty equal to the drawback allowed. 

The following oath will be required in all cases of importations of bags claimed to be of domestic 
origin : 



3 

Oath for return of American bags exported. 

I, , importer of the bags described in the entry herewith, do solemnly, sincerely, and truly 

swear (or affirm) that said bags are of domestic production ; were shipped by me per the to 

on the day of , 18-, (') ; that the identical bags are now returned by me per the 

( 2 ) , bearing marks ; that the same have not been advanced in value or improved in 

condition while abroad ; that they are not baled with any bags of foreign origin, and that no drawback 
was paid to me on the exportation thereof as aforesaid. 



Sworn to before me this day of , 18- 



( ' ) State whether empty or filled with . 

( 2 ) State whether empty or filled with . 

It is desirable that as a means of easy identification ineffaceable marks should be placed upon all 
exported domestic bags, facsimiles of which should appear on the certificate of exportation (Synopsis 
14912). 

Duties voluntarily paid on returned American goods can not be refunded in the absence of a timely 
protest under section 14 of the act of June 10, 1890, as the only importations exempted from protest by 
section 1 of the act of March 3, 1875 (18th Statutes, p. 469), are personal and household effects and other 
articles not merchandise, and article 353 of the Eegulations of 1892 applying only to goods brought in as 
personal or household effects or passenger's baggage. 

S. WIKE, 

Acting Secretary. 



ADMISSION OF CANDIDATES TO THE GRADE OF CADET IN THE REVENUE CUTTER 
SERVICE OF THE UNITED STATES. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 38. 



*Qxz<xs\xx\$ ^zpnxtmmt, 



Division of Revenue Cutter Service, No. 65. 

Office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, March 4, 1896. 

Candidates for admission to the grade of Cadet in the Revenue Cutter Service will be subjected to 
the examination prescribed in Department Circular No. 194, dated December 13, 1894, the standard of 
proficiency under which is fixed at 75 out of a possible 100, except as follows : 

Candidates who have served at sea for a period of two years, or as deck officers of sea-going ships of 
the United States Merchant Marine and are still within the age limit, will not be required to make a 
general average in the examination of more than 60 out of a possible 100. 

Such candidates must produce evidence of sea service from the masters of merchant vessels with 
whom they have served, or certificates of competency from shipmaster's associations. 

In all cases testimonials of good moral character and deportment must be produced to the Department 
before a designation for examination will be made. 

Department Circular No. 194 is hereby amended to fix the age limit of the candidate at twenty-five 
years, to conform to the Act of Congress of July 31, 187(5, establishing such cadetships. 

S. WIRE, 

Acting Secretary. 



EXAMINATION OF APPLICANTS FOB THE POSITION OF SECOND ASSISTANT ENGINEER 
IN THE UNITED STATES REVENUE CUTTER SERVICE. 



Department Circular No. 39, 

Division Revenue Cutter Service, No. 64. OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, 

Washington. D. C, March 4, 1896. 

The following rules and regulations governing the admission of candidates to the grade of Second 
Assistant Engineer in the Revenue Cutter Service of the United States, are published for the information 
of all concerned : 

1. No person will be examined for, or appointed to, the grade of Second Assistant Engineer in said 
Service, who is not a citizen of the United States. 

2. Candidates must not be less than 21, nor more than 28 years of age, and must be of vigorous con- 
stitution, physically sound and well-formed, and not less than 5 feet 3 inches in height. 

The application for examination must be in the handwriting of the applicant and addressed to the 
Secretary of the Treasury. It must state the date and place of birth, and the State of which a resident. 
If the applicant be of foreign birth it must be shown that he is a citizen of the United States. 

3. The application must be accompanied with satisfactory evidence of the good moral character and 
correct habits of the applicant, and certificates showing his practical experience either in a machine shop, 
technical institution, or in the engine room of a steamer, as required by paragraph 4. 

4. To be eligible for examination, a candidate must have had not less than eighteen months' expe- 
rience in a machine shop, or responsible charge of a steam engine for that length of time ; or, if a graduate 
of a technical institution, he must present a certificate from the president of such institution showing that 
he has taken the full four years' course in mechanical engineering. 

5. A candidate who has fulfilled either one of the above requirements may, upon successfully passing 
the physical and professional examinations required, be appointed an Acting Second Assistant Engineer, 
for a probationary period of six months. Should he, at the expiration of that time, have shown progres- 
sive efficiency and ability to perform his duties at sea, he will be eligible for the position of Second Assist- 
ant Engineer, without further examination, A candidate who, in addition to fulfilling either of the above 
requirements, has had not less than six months' experience in charge of, or assisting in the care and 
management of the steam machinery of a sea-going vessel in actual service, may, upon successfully passing 
the physical and professional examinatious, be commissioned a Second Assistant Engineer. 

6. Candidates will be required to pass a satisfactory examination as to their physical qualifications 
before a board of medical officers, to be designated by the Secretary of the Treasury. The physical 
examination will precede the professional, and should the candidate be found physically disqualified he 
will be examined no further. 

7. Candidates having been found physically qualified, will be examined professionally by a board of 



engineer officers of the Eevenue Cutter Service, in the following subjects, the questions and answers all 
being written : 

(a) Grammar, spelling, punctuation, composition, penmanship ; 

(b) Statement of shop and engineering experiences ; 

(c) Elementary mathematics, including arithmetic, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and use of 
logarithms ; 

(d) Elementary mechanics and physics, including mechanical powers, friction, laws of falling bodies, 
force, work, etc.; 

(e) Practical problems connected with steam engineering, such as calculation of loss by blowing off, 
gain by use of heaters; amount of condensing water required, safety-valve problems, etc.; 

(/) Incrustation and corrosion in marine boilers, and problems connected with combustion ; 

(g) Mai'ine boilers, description of various types with their advantages and disadvantages, repairs to 
same, practical management of boilers, and discussion of accidents and difficulties such as foaming, back 
draft, etc.; 

(h) Heat, steam, theory of expansion, use of steam ; 

(i) The steam-engine indicator, interpretation of diagrams therefrom, calculation of horsepower 
and evaporation from diagrams ; 

(J) Marine engines, description of the various types, including those used with paddle wheels, with 
advantages and disadvantages, special attention being given to multiple expansion engines, practical 
questions relative to care and manipulation of engines, overhauling and repairs, alignments, etc. ; 

(fc) Valves and valve gears as applied to marine engines, including those used on side-wheel steamers, 
but with special attention to modern types used with propeller engines ; 

(I) Condenser, pumps, steam gauges ; 

(m) Strength of materials, including simple problems in proportions of marine engines and boilers. 
Inspection of materials. 

(n) Screw propellers. Description of common types. Definitions and simple problems connected 
therewith. 

8. The professional examination will be competitive, and all candidates who pass the minimum 
standard required will be placed upon the list eligible for appointment in the order of proficiency 
exhibited by them, respectively, in the examination. From this list appointments will be made in regu- 
lar order, as vacancies occur, until another examination is held. 

9. The standard of proficiency has been fixed at 75 per cent, and candidates failing to obtain that 
average will be rejected. They may, however, if otherwise qualified, take a second examination at the 
next convening of the board of examiners. Failing in two examinations will result in the final rejection 
of the candidate. 

10. No person will be originally appointed to a higher grade than second assistant engineer. 

11. Any person producing a false certificate of age, time of service, character, or making a false 
statement to the board of examiners, shall be disqualified for appointment. 

12. Any person who, subsequent to his examination, may become disqualified from moral considera- 
tions, will not be appointed. 

13. All correspondence with reference to the provisions of this circular should be addressed to the 
Secretary of the Treasury, Washington, D. C. 

S. WIKE, 
Acting Secretary. 



REAPPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISER. 



Department Circular No. 40. <J/ VCUSUVIJ 4J CJJ <l t'iUX CU-t^ 

Division of Customs. 

OfficeofTHE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, March 6, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 

The following reappraiseineuts of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending February 22, 1896. 

W. E. CURTIS, 

Assistant Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING FEBRUARY 22, 1896. 

N. B.— In, corresponding with the Board of Genera/ Appraisers relative to any of tin- items in this 
report, reference should always be made to the number of Reappraisement. 

No. of reappraise- 
ment. 

10997, 11014 Sulphate of ammonia, from Bradbury & Hirseh, Liverpool, January 17, 1896 : 

Entered at £8 2s. 6d. sterling per ton. Add bags at 7s. 6d. per ton. No advance. 
Entered at £8 Is. 3d. sterling per ton. Add bags at 7s. 6d. per ton. No advance. 

1 L013 Sulphate of ammonia, from Peter B. McTwie & Son, Liverpool, January 21, 1896 : 

Entered at £8 5s. 4}d. sterling per ton. Add bags at 2s. 9d. per ton, and bagging at 
7Jd. per ton. No advance. 

1.0863 Chemical salt, from E. W. Greeff & Co., London, December 21, 1895 : 

Nitrate of baryta powder, entered at £15 5s., advanced to £16 10s. sterling per ton. 
Discount, '21 per cent. *■ 

10993 Chemical salt, from E. Stobwasson, Loudon, January 23, 1896: 

Prussiate soda, entered at 51 d. sterling per pound. No advance. Add casks at 5s. (id. 
per cask. 

11005 Manufactures of wool, from Lummery, Bach & Eamminger, Gera, January 15, 1896 : 

130 cm., mantle dress goods, colored, 2181, entered at 2.90, advanced to 3.15 marks 

per meter. 
130 cm., mantle dress goods, colored, 3112 and 3110, eutered at 2.50, advanced to 
2.75 marks per meter. 

11006 Manufactures of wool and cotton, from Simon Israel & Co., Bradford, January 7. 1896: 

Black worsted coating, 56", entered at Is. 3d., advanced to Is. 5d. sterling per yard. 
Discounts, 2\ per cent and II per cent. Add making up and packing. 



10712 Wool dress goods, from , Greiz, December 13, L895: 

Crepon sup., black, entered at L.62, advanced to 1.80 marks per meter. Add packing 
charges. 

1098!) Manufactures of wool, from Franz Bar & Becker, Eonneburg, January 11, 1896: 

128/30 cm., woolens, 3408, black, entered at 2.35 marks per meter. Discount, 8 per 

cent. No advance. 
128/30 cm., woolens, 3402, blue, entered at 1.90 marks per meter. Discount, S per 
cent. No advance. 

10507, 10882 Colors in tubes, from A. Lacroix, Paris, December 4 and 8, 1895: 

No. 1 colors, verifiable, in tubes, and new colors, verifiable, entered at a discount of 

40 per cent, advanced discount 30 per cent. 
Gold colors, verifiable, entered at 331 per cent, advanced to a discount of 32 per cent. 
Add cases. 

1(1850, 10991 Cotton and chip braids for hats, from Paul Walser & Co., Woblen, November 20, 1895, and 

January 15, 1890 : 
Advanced by disallowance of part of amount deducted on entry as freight to New York. 

10000 Manufactured articles, N. E., from Glaenzer & Co., Paris, January 15, 1890: 

Quill toothpicks, 3, entered at .95, advanced to 1.13 francs per package. Discount, 2 
per cent. 

L0939 Decorated china, from Hertwig & Co., Katzhutte, December 17, 1895: 

Entered at discounts of 15, 10, and 3 per cent, advanced discounts, 15 and 3 per cent. 

10978 Manufactures of cotton, n. s. p. f, from V. Coyer Duraud & Callon, Paris, January 15, 1890 : 

No. Ill, niulle cotton, 2/3, entered at 1, advanced to 1.12 francs per meter. 

No. 112, mulle cotton, 2/3, entered at 1, advanced to 1.20 francs per meter. 

Discount, per cent. Add case and packing. 
10450 Manufactures of cotton, N. E., from Mendelson Bros., Yokohama, November 5, 1805: 

52" cotton table covers, entered at 8, advanced to 8.40 silver yen per dozen. 
10S04 Manufactured articles, from Typke & King, London, January 10, 1890 : 

Pactice, entered at 4d. sterling per pound. No advance. 

10088 Manufactures of wood and metal, from Salim & Monkarzel, Paris, January 22, 1896: 

Chapelets cnivre, entered at 15, advanced to 17 francs per gross. 

Chapelets lustres petit, entered at 11.80, advanced to 12 francs per gross. 

Add case. 
10854 Bronze powder, from Adam Eiessner, Nuremberg, December 23, 1895: 

Brocade, 2a and 3a, entered at .85, advanced to .89 mark per pound. 

Brocade, 2c, entered at .71, advanced to .74 mark per pound. 

Brocade, 36, entered at .82, advanced to .84 mark per pound. 

Aluminum, L 1^, entered at 2.93, advanced to 2.99 marks per English pound. 

Aluminum, L 1J, entered at 2.83, advanced to 2.89 marks per English pound. 

Add boxes. 
11042 Lemon and orange boxes, from F. Tagliavia, Palermo, December 9, 1895 : 

2s cubic feet, entered at .80, advanced to .90 lira per box. 
10844 Orange boxes, from Leeman & Maas, Liverpool, January 4, 1896 : 

31 cubic feet, entered Is., advanced to Is. 2d. sterling per box. 

5S cubic feet, entered at Is., advanced to Is. 4d. sterling per box. 

2 cubic feet, entered at Is. sterling per box. No advance. 



10705 Manufactures of silk, etc., from Cabourier & Co., Paris, December 11, 1895 : 

Linon plumefcis, 6479, entered at 2.25, advanced to 2.75 francs per meter. 

Liuon quadrille. 15763/1, entered at 2, advanced to 2.25 francs per meter. 

Linon damaste, 15770/2, entered at .90, advanced to 1.10 francs per meter. 

Linon raye, 6472, entered at 1.75, advanced to 2.21 francs per meter. 

Linon quadrille, 15729/2, entered at 1.40, advanced to 1.65 francs per meter. 

Discount, 5 per cent. Add cases and packing. 
10680 Manufactures of silk and cotton, from Besson Bertrand & Co., Lyons, November 29, 1895 : 

Austria, 46 cm., cotton grege, dyed in the piece, entered at .50, advanced to .55 franc 
per meter. 

Satin, 124 cm., entered at 1.12, advanced to 1.22 francs per meter. 

Satin, 95 cm., entered at .73, advanced to .80 franc per meter. 

Austria, 92 cm., cotton grege, entered at .90, advanced to 1.10 francs per meter. 

Polonaise, 92 cm., entered at .84, advanced to 1 franc per meter. 

Satin, 92 cm., entered at 1.03, advanced to 1.15 francs per meter. 

Satin, 92 cm., entered at 1.20, advauced to 1.40 francs per meter. 

Satin, 60 cm., cotton grege, dyed in the piece, entered at 1.15. advanced to 1.25 francs 
per meter. 

Satin, 92 cm., cotton grege, dyed in the piece, entered at 1.20, advanced to 1.30 (Vanes 
per meter. 

Discount, 20 per cent. 

10980 Sugar not above 16 D. S., from P. G. Guerra, Havana, January 23, 1896: 

Testing 94.47°, centrifugal, entered at $0.02-}4, advauced to $0.02544, United States 

gold, per pound, packed. 
Testing 84°, molasses, entered $0.02, less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to 

•SO. 018. United States gold, per pound, packed. 

10902 Sugar not above 16 D. S., from M. Cabeo, Havana, January 8, 1S96: 

Testing, 94.20°, entered at 4], advanced to 5.258 reals per arroba, packed. 
Testing, 96.80°, entered at 45, advanced to 5.554 reals per arroba, packed. 
To entered prices add bags at 50 cents. 

10974 Sugar not above 16 D. S., from Eblen Freidheim & Co., Macoris, January 15, 1896; 

Testing, 95.80°, centrifugal, entered at $0.0208, add bags, advanced to $0.0231 United 
States gold, per pound, packed. 

10984 Sugar not above 16 D. &, front E. Hufnngton, Macoris, January 4, 1896 : 

Testing 96.15°, centrifugal, entered at $0.0197. add bags, advanced to $0.02326, United 

States gold, per pound, packed. 
Testing 85.95°, centrifugal, entered at $0.0142, add bags, arivauced to $0.01685, United 
States gold, per pound, packed. 

10893 Su(/ar not above 16 D. S., from Booker Bros. & Co.. Demerara, December 30, 1895 : 

Testing 96.60°. entered at $0.0235, advanced to $0.02518, United States gold, per pound, 
packed. 

10976 Furniture of wood, from Harnisch & Co., Neusohl, December 24, 1895, aud December 31, 

1895: 
Chairs, No. 18, entered at 26.10, discount 40 per cent, advauced to 18. 50 florins per 
dozen, net. Add cases and packing. 



2786 0. P ") 

2785 O. P V Sulphate of ammonia, from Makin & Bancroft, Liverpool, December 4, 1895 : 

Philadelphia.... ) 

Entered at £9 12s. 6d., less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to £8 12s. sterling per 

ton, packed. 
Entered at £9 Os. 6d., discount 2J per cent, less freight and N. D. charges, advanced 

to £8 7s. 6d. sterling per ton, packed. 

"Sl r > () 1' ) 

San Francisco" Mamfacttures of silk, from Mendelson Bros., Yokohama, January 4, 1896: 

19 x 50 yards, grade 8, Koshu Kaiki, entered at 5.90, advanced to 6.10 silver yen per 

100 mommes. 
24x50 yards grade, 9/10 brocade habutai, entered at 7.50, advanced to 7.70 silver yen 

per 100 mommes. 
Add cases and packing. 

REAPPRAISEMENTS BY BOARDS. 

2880, 10672 \ Cotton hose, from Rudolph Drechsel & Co. and Emil Scherf, Chemnitz, October 23 and 

2881,10673 j 30,1895: 

Advances up to 4} per cent. 

2833, 10522 Wool dress goods, from , Rheims, December 6, 1895: 

42:} cm. colored cashmere, 155, entered at .80, advanced to .85 franc per meter. Dis- 
count, 5 per cent. Add cases. 

2885, 10470 Manufactures of silk and cotton, from Meckel & Co., Elberfeld, December 3, 1895: 

61 cm., style 10920, etc., broches, entered at 1.28, advanced to 1.50 marks per meter. 
61 cm., style 10932, etc., broches, entered at 1.25, advanced to 1.50 marks per meter. 
61 cm., style 10612, broches, entered at 1.32, advanced to 1.55 marks per meter. 

2872, 10456 Manufactures, silk and cotton tie silk, from Georges Cerf, Lyons, November 19, 1895: 

70794/834, serge, 60 cm. impe., entered at 1.30, advanced to 1.40 francs per meter. I 
53331/39, Japonaise raye, 60 cm., entered at 1.50, advanced to 1.60 francs per meter. 
Discount, 20 per cent. Add packing. 

2866, 10500 Manufactures of silk, taffetas, etc., from Megroz & Co., Lyons, December 5, 1895 : 

No. 632, taffetas raye, 19", entered at 1.50, advanced to 1.60 francs per meter. 

No. 650, faconne, 24", entered at 2.75, advanced to 3 francs per meter. 

No. 636, taffetas raye, 21", entered at 2.75 francs per meter. No advance. 

No. 577, faconne, 22", entered at 3.75 francs per meter. No advance. 

No. 635, faille imprime, 21", entered at 3.25, advanced to 3.40 francs per meter. 

No. 685, taffetas ecossais, 21", entered at 2.75, advanced to 3 francs per meter. 

Discount, 20 per cent. Add case and packing. 

2S86, 10585 Manufactures of silk and cotton (tie silk), from Kniffon-Siegfried, Crefeld, December 16, 1895 . 

60 cm. tie goods, half silk, entered at from 1.10 to 1.60, advanced from 1.20 to 1.65 

marks per meter. 
60 cm. printed embossed satins, entered at .67, advanced to .90 mark per meter. 
Add labels and packing charges. 

2570,9011 Flax thread, from Filature & Filteries Reunies, Alost, September 3, 1895: 

Balls of 55 meters, 48 balls per box, black, No. 30 and No. 40, entered at 48 cents per 
box. No advance. Discount, 10 per cent and 5 per cent. 






700 2739 O. P..") 

701 j 2740 O. p" [Sugar above 16 D. S., from Robert Crooks & Co., Liverpool, December (i, 1895: 

Fourths, entered at £10 17s. 5d., advanced to £11 2s. 5d. sterling per ton. Discount, 
21 per cent. 
§726 9250 .... "I 

2727^9251 [ Lead pencils, etc., from A. W. Faber, Stein. July 30, August 6, August 27, and October 

2728,' 9401 f 25, 1895, etc. : 

2729,' 9439, etc. I 

Eound gilt, Nos. 2, 3, 4, and 5, entered at 8.60, advanced to 9.50 marks per gross. 

Hexagon gilt, Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 5, entered at 10.30, advanced to 13 marks per gross. 
Low-priced pencil, natural polish, low-priced pencil A. W. F., natural-polish stamp 

G. F. K., student, entered at 1.80, advanced to 2.20 marks per gross. 
School pencil H., brown polish ; school pencil HB., brown polish ; school pencil, crown 

polish F. ; school pencil, crown polish, 2B.B., and school pencil, brown polish, 

gold, HB. and H., entered at 2.40, advanced to 3.15 marks per gross. 
Office blue pencil, cedar, blue polish silver, entered at 6, advanced to 8.30 marks per 

gross. 
Office red and blue pencil, cedar, red polish silver, entered at 6.60, advanced to 8.75 

marks per gross. 
Wax crayons, Nos. 1, 43, 45, etc., polish gold, and wax crayons, Nos. 12, 18, 42, and 

60, entered at 11.60, advanced to 15.75 marks per gross. 
English, 2H, 4H, B. F., and H. F., entered at 7.25, advanced to 9.45 marks per gross. 
Artists' pencils, No. 20, carmine-blue and blue, entered at 40.50, advanced to 58. SO 

marks per gross. 
Nickel gauges, A to S, entered at 1.45, advanced to 2 marks per piece. 
Nickel gauges. «W to 9M, entered at .85, advanced to 1 mark per piece. 
Boxes of lead points with two wire gauges, entered at 12, advanced to 14.40 marks per 

gross. 
Boxes of green and blue pencils of three pencils in each box. No. 20, entered at 3, 

advanced to 3.90 marks per dozen. 
Black chalk, square, No. 2, entered at 2.25, advanced to 2.35 marks per gross. 
Black chalk, round, Nos. 1, 2, and 3, entered at 2.80, advanced to 3.90 marks per gross. 
Black chalk, round, polish, entered at 3.50, advanced to 4.90 marks per gross. 
Siberian pencils, 2H, 3H, 4H, 5H, 6H, HB, FH, and F, entered at 15, advanced 

to 19.75 marks per gross. 
Artists' pencils, pro and repelling, black lead, blue. No. 3, entered at 37.20, advanced 

to 65 marks per gross. 
Artists' pencils, No. 10, carmine, entered at 19.40, advanced to 35.40 marks per gross. 
Middle tine hexagon, red silver polish, Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4, entered at 4.60, advanced 

to 5.35 marks per gross. 
Round middle, fine black, Nos. 1, 2, and 4. and silver 3, entered at 3.60, advanced to 

4.75 marks per gross. 
Carmine and blue extra fine, entered at 18.30, advanced to 21.75 marks per gross. 
Carmine pencil, white wood, red polish, green pencil, plain cedar, expressmen's 

pencil, plain white wood, blue pencil, 2nd quality, plain cedar, entered at 5, 
advanced to 6.90 marks per gross. 
Red chalk pencil, No. 0, plain cedar, entered at 3, advanced to 4.90 marks per gross. 
Red chalk pencil, No. 1, plain cedar, office red, plain white wood, office red and bine, 
plain white wood, entered at 4, advanced to 5.90 marks per gross. 



6 

2726,9250 ) 

2727 9251 f 

27qq '6404 > Lead pencils, etc. — Continued. 

2729^9439, etc.... J 

Bed chalk pencil, No. 2, plain cedar, entered at 5, advanced to 8.30 marks per gros 

Bed chalk pencil, No. 3, plain cedar, entered at 6.50, advanced to 9.8. r > marks per gr< 

Bed chalk pencil, No. 4, plain cedar, entered at 7.20, advanced to 11.80 marks per gross 

Green pencil, white wood polish, entered at 4.50, advanced to 5.80 marks per gross. 

Carpenters' red chalk pencil, white wood, and black chalk pencil, plain cedar, No. 1 

entered at 3.70 advanced to 6.90 marks per gross. 
Warehousemen's blue pencil, white wood polish, blue, white wood, blue polish, green 

white wood, green polish, entered at 4.20, advanced 6.90 marks per gross. 
Stenographic thin polish silver, entered at 6.40, advanced to 13.75 marks per gross. 
DrawiDg pencils, in boxes of 6 pencils in each box, pens and eraser, entered at s. 

advanced to 14 marks per gross pencils. 
Artists' pencils No. 22, carmine and blue, entered at 60.70, advanced to 88.75 marks 

per gross. 
Artists' black chalk Nos. 1 and 2 combined, warehousemen's pencils, black, red and 

blue, white wood, red polish, blue and black, plain cedar, blue plain silver polish, 

green, plain cedar, natural polish, silver, entered at 5.40, advanced to 7.90 marks 

per dozen. 
Artists' copying pencils, pro and repelling, 16 cm., entered at 3.30, advanced to 5.40 

marks per dozen. 
Boxes, No. 6 copying lead 200, 2", entered at 3, reappraised at 2.80 marks per dozen, j 
Finest and best drawing pencil, hexagon, H, HB, and 6H, entered at 11.50, advanced 

to 17. 75 marks per gross. 
Siberian artists' pencils, pro and repelling, HB, entered at 6.68, advanced to 6.90 

marks per dozen. 
Siberian artists' pencils, pro and repelling, 3B, 4B, 5B, entered at 6.88, advanced to ' 

6.90 marks per dozen. 
Triangle pro and repelling pencils, no scales, entered at 7.20, advanced to 7.55 marks 

per dozen. 
Lumbermen's green pencils, in boxes of 3 pencils each, entered at 16.20, advanced to 

70 marks per gross pencils. 
Black chalk, square, No. 2, entered at 2.25, advanced to 2.35 marks per gross. 
White chalk, No. 2, entered at 2.25, advanced to 3.90 marks per gross. 
Befills No. 00, entered at 3.60, advanced to 4.10 marks per gross. 
Befills No. 00, entered at 2.10, advanced to 2.40 marks per gross. 
Befills No. 00, entered at 1.80, advanced to 2.05 marks per gross. 
English, in wooden boxes of 5 pencils each, entered at 7.60, advanced to 14 marks 

per gross pencils. 
English, in wooden boxes of 5 pencils each, knife and rubber, entered at 15.05, 

advanced to 27.75 marks per gross pencils. 
Siberian, in wooden boxes of 5 pencils each, knife and rubber, entered at 23.50, 

advanced to 43.25 marks per gross pencils. 
Wax crayons, in boxes of 6 pencils each, polish gold, entered at 13.10, advanced to 

18 marks per gross crayons. 
Blue pencil, blue, silver hexagon, and green pencil, green, silver hexagon, entered at 

11.40, advanced to 15.75 marks per gross. 






2720,9250 1 

Eol'n?^ ■ Lead pencils, vie— Continued. 

„ ( J&Oj .141)4: | 

$729,9439, etc.. J 

Artists' pencils, carmine, entered at 21.10, advanced to 25 marks per gross. 

Siberian leads, 2H, H, and HH, entered at 6.20, advanced to 9.85 marks per dozen 

boxes. 
Carpenter's red pencil, entered at 9, advanced to 11 marks per gross. 
Carpenter's red pencil, entered at 11, advanced to 13.80 marks per gross. 
Carpenter's red and black pencil, entered at 8, advanced to 9 marks per gross. 
English, in boxes of 10 pencils each, entered at 6.70, advanced to 12.30 marks per 

gross pencils. 
Siberian, in boxes of 5 pencils each, entered at 17, advanced to 31.25 marks per gross 

pencils. 
Siberian, artists' pencils, H, HB, PH, 2H, 3H, 4H, and 6H, entered at 38.10, advanced 

to 47 marks per gross. 
Artists' copying pencils, pro and repelling, and ever-pointed copying pencil, pro and 

repelling, eutered at 3.30, advanced to 3.95 marks per dozen. 
Carmine and bine, 2d quality, hexagon, entered at 12.40, advanced to 13.80 marks 

per gross. 
Ink and pencil rubber, oval, red polish, entered at 20, advanced to 27.50 marks per 

gross. 
Boxes of lead points, A to G and J to S, 200 M, O, P, q, A, B, C, D, E, P, G, J, K, and 

L, entered at .55, advanced to .60 mark per dozen. 
Boxes of 6 leads, 1 and 5, entered at 2.80, advanced to 5 marks per dozen boxes. 
Warehousemen's black lead, green and blue, plain white wood, entered at 3.60, 

advanced to 5.90 marks per gross. 
Office red pencil, plain cedar; warehousemen's pencil, red, white wood, red polish; 

parcels-post pencils, hexagon, blue, plain white wood ; expressmen's red, green 

and red, and blue, plain white wood, hexagon, entered at 6, advanced to 8.25 

marks per gross. 
Warehousemen's pencils, black, white wood, red polish, and red and blue, plain 

white wood, entered at 4. SO, advanced to 6.90 marks per gross. 
Warehousemen's, plain red, plain cedar, entered at 7.20, advanced to 9.80 marks per 



Green, large, fine tipped, entered at 11.50, advanced to 15.75 marks per gross. 
Warehousemen's pencils, green, cedar, polish silver, entered at 6, advanced to 8.S0 

marks per gross. 
Warehousemen's pencils, red and blue, cedar, polish silver, entered at 7.70, advanced 

to 10.80 marks per gross. 
Warehousemen's pencils, red and blue, plain cedar, entered at 6.60, advanced to 

8.50 marks per gross. 
Lead poiuts, 6, 7, 30, 102, etc., eutered at 1.20, advanced to 1.30 marks per gross. 
Expressmen's pencils, plain white wood polish, and red and blue, round, entered at 

5.60, advanced to 7 marks per gross. 
Expressmen's pencils, plain white wood, hexagon, entered at 5, advanced to 8.25 marks 

per gross. 
Expressmen's pencils, red, blue, and green, white wood polish, entered at 6.80, advanced 

to 9.50 marks per gross. 



272(5, 9250 "1 

2727 'l' ,r >l 

'>79«' Q4.04." i bead peneih, etc. — Continued. 

2729)9434, etc.... 



Office, blue and green pencil, plain white wood, entered at 3.60, advanced to 5.50 marks 

per gross. 
Easel pencil, hexagon, red gold, extra thick, entered at 21, advanced to 35.50 marks 

per gross. 
Carmine pencil, red, silver, round, entered at 12, advanced to 14.75 marks per gross. 
Carmine pencil, red, silver, hexagon, entered at 12.60, advanced to 15.75 marks per 

gross. 
Blue pencil, blue, silver, round, green pencil, green, silver, 7-ouud, entered at I0..S0 

advanced to 14.75 marks per gross. 
Carmine pencil, red polish, round, entered at 9, advanced to 10.80 marks per gross. 
Carmine pencil, red polish, hexagon, entered at 9.60, advanced to 11.80 marks per gross. 
Bine peucil, blue polish, round, green pencil, green polish, round, entered at 8.40, 

advanced to 10. SO marks per gross. 
Blue pencil, blue polish, hexagon, green pencil, green polish, hexagon ; colored writing 

pens, plain cedar, red, blue, green, and yellow, entered at 9, advanced to 11.80 

marks per gross. 
Carmine pencil, 2d quality, red, silver, entered at 7, advanced to 7.90 marks per gross. 
Carmine pencil, 2d quality, plain cedar, entered at 6, advanced to 6.90 marks per gross. 
Pencils in wooden boxes of 3 each, English, 1 red, 1 blue, knife and rubber, entered at 

17.50, advanced to 32.20 marks per gross pencils. 
Blue, large, entra fine, tipped, entered at 13.20, advanced to 15.75 marks per gross. 
Green pencils, green polish, entered at 4.50, advenced to 5.80 marks per gross. 
Stenographic pencils, square tips, entered at 9.80, advanced to 17.75 marks per gross. 
Ever-pointed peucils, entered at 14.20, advauced to 17 marks per gross. 
Artists' pencils, No. 2, entered at 21, advanced to 25.20 marks per gross. 
Artists' peucils, pro and repelling, 1, 2, and 4, entered at 2.50, advanced to 7 marks per 

dozen. 
Warehousemen's red peucil, plain white wood, entered at 5.40, advanced to 7.30 marks 

per gross. 
Warehousemen's pencils, red and blue, plain white wood, and black lead peucils, white 

wood, red polish, entered at 4.80, advanced to 6.90 marks per gross. 
Pen point protector, without rubber, entered at 4.50, advanced to 5.40 marks per gross. 
New green pencil, hexagon, green polish, entered at 25.40, reappraised at 23. 70 marks 

per gross. 
Siberian artists' peucils, double ends, 2H, HB, F, aud 2H, entered at 61.10, advauced 

to 71 marks per gross. 
Siberian artists' pencils, pro and repelling, 6B, eutered at 7.10, reappraised at 7 

marks per dozen. 
Siberian artists' pencils, HB, F, H, 2H, 3H, entered at 6.68, advanced to 6.80 marks 

per dozen. 
English pencils in wooden boxes of 7 pencils each, entered at 6.50, advauced to 12. 

marks per gross. 
Discount on entered prices of lead pencils, 8 per- cent on some and 12'. per cent on 

others. Advanced prices net. 
Slate peucils, colored polish, eutered at .84, advanced to 1.05 marks per box, net. 



NOTICE OF READMEASTJREMENT UNDER TEE ACT OF MARCH 2, 1895. 



treasury ■Qcptixlmmt, 

BUREAU OF NAVK 
Washington, D. C, March 7, 1896. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 41. 

Bureau of Navigation. 

BUREAU OF NAVIGATION 



Collectors of Customs and Others : 

On the readrneasurenient of any vessel under the act of March 2, 1895, and the issue of an Appendix 
(Cat. No. 565), without surrender of marine documents, the proper customs officer will advise this office 
of the vessel's new net tonnage, and, if the appendix issue otherwise than at the vessel's home port, he 
will also notify the Collector at such port. 

EUGENE T. CHAMBERLAIN, 

Commissioner. 
Approved : 

S. WIKB, 

Acting Secretary. 



FREE ENTRY OF THEATRICAL SCENERY, PROPERTIES, AND APPAREL. 



Department 1 ^— No. 42. ^XZUZUXVl ^ZpUXtttXtUtf 

Division of Customs. 

office op THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, March 10, 1896. 
To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

Paragraph 596 of the act of August 28, 1894, provides as follows : 

"Professional books, implements, instruments, and tools of trade, occupation, or employment, in the 
actual possession at the time of persons arriving in the United States ; but this exemption shall not be 
construed to include machinery or other articles imported for use in any manufacturing establishment, or 
for any other person or persons, or for sale, nor shall it be construed to include theatrical scenery, 
properties, and apparel, but such articles brought by proprietors or managers of theatrical exhibitions 
arriving from abroad for temporary use by them iu such exhibitions and not for auy other person and not 
for sale and which have been used by them abroad shall be admitted free of duty under such regulations 
as the Secretary of the Treasury may prescribe ; but bonds shall be given for the payment to the United 
States of such duties as may be imposed by law upon any and all such articles as shall not be exported 
within six months after such importation : Provided, That the Secretary of the Treasury may in his dis- 
cretion extend such period for a further term of six months in case application shall be made therefor." 

The following regulations will hereafter govern the importation of theatrical scenery, properties, and 
apparel, under the foregoing paragraph. 

The invoice filed with the entry of the articles must describe them in such manner as to insure their 
identification at the time of export, and the values thereof must be duly set forth. Entries of such 
merchandise will be made under the general provisions of article 349 of the Customs Eegnlations of 1892, 
with the necessary modifications to meet the case. 

The exportation of the merchandise covered by said bond shall be made only at the port of importation 
and shall be on regular withdrawal and under customs supervision. 

The bond account of such transactions shall be kept separate and distinct from the ordinary ware- 
house account. 

At the expiration of the bond it shall be sent to the district attorney for collection, unless the required 
proofs of exportation shall have been furnished by the importer or consignee. 

S. WIKE, 

Acting Secretary. 



REAPPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED 8TATE8 GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



XS96. 
Department Circular No. 43. 



gtxasitrtj ^tymvtmmt, 



Division of Customs. 

office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washingtoiv, D. C, March 12, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The following reappraisenients of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending February 29, 1896. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING FEBRUARY 29, 1896. 

N. B. — Jn corresponding with the Hoard of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference should always be made to the number of Keappraisement. 

No. of Reapjwaise- 
meiit. 

11090 Chinese merchandise, from Sun Kwong Hop, Hongkong, December 26, 1895: 

Oyster sauce, entered at 1.95, advanced to 3 Mexican dollars per box. 
10701 Manufactures of silk and cotton, from F. Lafite & Co., Lyons, December 23, 1895: 

95 cm., ecru satin, 400, entered at 1.18, advanced to 1.35 francs per meter. 

95 cm., ecru satin, 398, entered at .98, advanced to 1.12 francs per meter. , 

95 cm., 6cru satin, 399, entered at 1.03, advanced to 1.21 francs' per meter. 

95 cm., ecru serge, 397, entered at .67, advanced to .85 franc per meter. 

95 cm., ecru serge, 396, entered at .62, advanced to .SO franc per meter. 

92 cm., black serge, 395, entered at .81, advanced to 1.16 francs per meter. 

Eutered discounts, 20 per cent and 1 per cent. Advanced discount, 20 per cent. Add 
cases. 
10729 Manufactures of silk and cotton, from A. "Villy, Lyons, December 12, 1895: 

Serge, 92 cm., silk and cotton, entered at .78, advanced to 1 franc per meter. Dis : 
count, 20 per cent. 
10714 Manufactures of silk and cotton, from Chr. Spazin, Herzog & Co., Lyons, November 27, 1895 : 

Serge tre., cot. noir, 36", entered at .95, advanced to 1.10 francs per meter. 

Serge tre., cot. noir, 36", entered at .85, advanced to 1 franc per meter. 

Discount, 20 percent. 



11025, 11049 Cigarette paper, from May Fils Aine, Paris, January 18, 1896: 

Bobines petite largeur, entered at 141.50, advanced to 147.75 francs per 100 bobines. 
Discount, 5 per cent. 

10999 Sugar candy, from Kwong Ling Shiug, Hongkong, December 23. 1895: 

Candy, entered at 3.70, advanced to 4.97 Mexican dollars per box of 95 pounds. Add 
case and packing. 

11034 Sugar not above 16 D. S., from B. Durau, Havana, February 1, 1896: 

Testing 82.80°, Muscovado, entered at .02, advanced to .0218, Spauish gold, per pound, 
packed. 
1095^' 109 1 Su ff ar not above 16 D - 8 -> from Hidalgo & Co., Havana, January 16 and 21, 1896 : 

Testing 95.114°, entered at $0,021, advanced to $0.0259, "United States gold, per pound, 

packed. 
Testing 87.89°, entered at $0.02^, advanced $0.02014, United States gold, per pound, 

packed. 
Testing 87.22°, entered at $0.02 T V, advanced to $0.01972, United States gold, per 

pound, packed. 
From entered prices deduct freight and N. D. charges. 

11021 Sugar not above 16 D. S., from Waaren-Commission Bank, Hamburg, January 3, 1896 : 

Analysis, 88.18°, entered at from 10.965625 to 11.04375 marks per cwt., advanced to 
10s. 8|d. sterling per cwt. , packed. From entered price deduct freight and N. D. 
charges. 

10985 Sugar not above 16 D. S., from Chas. Clark, Savana-la-mar, January 22, 1896 : 

Testing 91.90°, entered at £10 8s. sterling per ton. Add bags. No advance. 

11022 Sugar not above 16 D. S., from F. G. Guerro, Havana, February 1, 1896 : 

Testing 90.70°, entered at .021, advanced to. 02308 United States dollars per pound, 
packed. From entered price deduct freight and N. D. charges. 

11020 Sugar not above 16 D. S., from C. Czarnikow, Hamburg, January 3, 1896 : 

Analysis, 87.25°, entered at 10s. 4£d., advanced to 10s. 61d. sterling per cwt., packed. 
From entered price deduct freight and 1ST. D. charges. 

10917 Colored cotton, from Paul Lath & Frere, Boubaix, January 14, 1896: 

Ameublement, 1232, entered at 2.30, advanced to 2.40 francs per meter. Discount, 6 
per cent. 

10916 Cotton-lace curtains, from W.H.Fletcher & Co., Glasgow, January 10, 1896 : 

54", No. 745, ecru and white curtains, taped, entered at 3s. 9d., advanced to 4s. 6d. 
sterling per pair. Discount, 21 per cent. Add case. 

10355 Collon-lace curtains, from T. I. Birkin & Co., Nottingham, November 23, 1895 : 

Fjcru and white, 3039, ecru and white, 3040, and ecru, 3041, lace curtains, 3a yards, 

entered at 2s. 3d., advanced to 2s. 5d. sterling per pair. 
]Wu and white, 2743, ecru and white, 2736, 3J yards, entered at 2s. 6d., advanced to 

2s. 8d. sterling per pair. 
Discount, 2£ per cent. Add cases. Deduct inland carriage. 

11066 Sweetmeats, xoliite and decorated china, etc., from Zee Chong, Hongkong, November 22,1895 : 

Preserved betel nuts, II dozen in each box, entered at 1.30, advanced to 1.60, Mexicau 

currency per box. 
Cotton quilts, entered at 6, advanced to 9, Mexican currency, per box. 



11066 Sweetmeats, tohite and decorated china, etc. — Continued. 

Teapots with baskets, entered at 2.60, advanced to 3.28, Mexican currency, per box. 

Chinaware, consisting of six (6) boxes, entered at 37.10, advanced to 52.70, Mexican 
currency, per total. 
10014 Decorated china, etc., from Julius Eudert, Carlsbad, January 5, 1896 : 

Advances up to 8 per cent. 
10981, 109S2 Chemical compound {perfumery powder), from H. D. Boret, London, January 16, 1S96 : 

Perfumery powder (crude), entered at £18 3s. 7Jd., discount, 10 per ceut, advanced 
to £25 Is. lOd. sterling per pound, net. 
10504-10764 Pocketknives, from Edward Owen & Co., Birmingham, December 6 and 31, 1895 : 

Pocketknives, 1094, entered at 14s. 3d., add case and packing, advanced to ISs. 
sterling per gross, packed. 
10S99 Manufactures of wool and cotton, from Glover Bros., Leeds, January 6, 1896 : 

54", 145 ounces, woolen and cotton warps, entered at 8d., advanced to 9d. sterling per 
yard. Add cases and packing. 
10998 Etched glassivare, etc., from YeeYe, Hongkong, December 20, 1895: 

100 lamp shades, entered at 1, advanced to 5 Mexican dollars per total. 

Cotton sashes, 200 pieces, entered at 13, advanced to 14.50 Mexican dollars per total. 

10 silk shirts, entered at 17, advanced to 20 Mexican dollars per total. 

30 red silk shirts, entered at 36, advanced to 45 Mexican dollars per total. 

Add packing charges. 

11000,11012.. . \ Silk veiling, etc., from O. M. De Leon Levy, Paris, December 20,21, 1895. and January 
11036 S 16,1896. 

Chenillette, 45 cm., cream, 525/530, entered at .25, advanced to .30 franc per meter. 

Mousseline soie, 105 cm., assorted colors, 555, entered at 1.40, advanced to 1.50 francs 

meter. Discount, 20 per cent. 
Chenille, black and white, 35 cm., 164, entered at .28, advanced to .33 franc per meter. 
Chenillette, 35 cm., colored and black, 328, entered at .19, advanced to .24 franc per 

meter. 
Chenille, 45 cm., black and cream, 324, entered at .30, advanced to .37 franc per 

meter. 
Chenille, 35 cm., noir, 128, entered at .16, advanced to .23 franc per meter. 
Chenillette, 45 cm., noir, 297, entered at .25, advanced to .31 franc per meter. 
Chenillette, 70 cm., magpie, 298, entered at .38, advanced to .48 franc per meter. 
Chenille, 45 cm., 298, entered at .21, advanced to .30 franc per meter. 
Chenille, 35 cm., 332, entered at .23, advanced to .28 franc per meter. 
Chenille, 45 cm., assorted, 331, entered at .225, advanced to .28 franc per meter. 
Chenille, 45 cm., magpie, 555, entered at. 24, advanced to .32 franc per meter. 
Chenille, 14", black and cream, 114, entered at . 175, advanced to .21 franc per meter. 
Chenille, 16", colored and magpie, 114, entered at .21, advanced to .24 franc per 

meter. 
Chenillette, 45 cm., cream, 297, entered at .15, advanced to .19 franc per meter. 
Chenillette, 35 cm., assorted, 328, entered at .12, advanced to .15 franc per meter. 
Chenille, 45 cm., cream and black, 560, entered at .16, advanced to .20 franc per 

meter. 
Chenille, 35 cm., blauc and noir, 323, entered at .18, advanced to .22 franc per meter. 



11036' 11012 } Silk veilin 9> eic.— Continued. 

Chenille, 35 cm., black, 563, entered at .10, advanced to .15 franc per meter. 

Chenille, 40 cm., magpie, 324, entered at .30, advanced to .37 franc per meter. 

Chenille, 70 cm., black, 295, entered at .30, advauced to .42 franc per meter. 

Chenille, 70 cm., creme, 298, entered at .29, advanced to .40 franc per meter. 

Chenille, 70 cm., cream and magpie, 329, entered at .34, advanced to .44 franc per 
meter. 

Chenelle, 35 cm., magpie, 285, entered at .17, advanced to .22 franc per meter. 

Discount, 2 per cent. Add cases. 
10717,10718 Tamboured cotton shams, etc., from Hammel & Seelig, St. Gall, December 17 and 23, 1895 : 

Advances up to 11*. per cent. 

KEAPPRAISEMENTS BY BOAKDS. 

2797, 10028, \ Manufactures of flax and cotton, from J. D. Einsteiu and G. Hartenstein, St. Gall, October 
2798, 10041, etc. j 12, 29, and November 5, 1895 : 

Advances up to 13 per cent. 
2902, 10707 Siu/ar not above 16 D. 8., from Eazar & Co., Cardenas, December 21, 1895 : 

Testing 92.4544°, entered at $0.02*, advanced to $0.02255, United States gold, per 
pound. Prom entered price deduct freight and N. D. charges. 

otw>' r W)' t 1 I[em V y arn > fl ax y arn i and tJirea d, from Eobert Stewart & Sons, Lisburn, August 29, 1894 : 

12 A tow yarn W., brown, 2-cord, in hanks, invoiced at 73d., reappraised at Sd. ster- 
ling per pound, net. 

18 AA tow yarn "W., brown, 2-cord, in hanks, invoiced at 71d., reappraised at 8d. 
sterling per pound, net. 

16 1 AA T. H. B., 2-cord, in hanks, invoiced at 7 Id., reappraised at 8d. sterling per 
pound, net. 

18 flax line, grey, in hanks and bundles, invoiced at Sid., reappraised at Sid. sterling 
per pound, net. 

18 hemp line, grey, in hanks and bundles, invoiced at 8d., reappraised at Sd. sterling 
per pound, net. 

18 flax tow W., brown, 2-cord, in hanks, invoiced at 7 Id., reappraised at 8d. sterling 
per pound, net. 

10 H. B., Merrimack, 1 and 2 ounce balls, boxed, invoiced at 20s., reappraised at 22s. 
sterling per dozen. 

12 red star, grey, yellow, and tan, 5, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, and 9 cord, 1-pound balls, pap'd, 
invoiced at 20s., reappraised at 24s. sterling per dozen. 

20 P. gilling, grey, 3-cord, i-pound balls, pap'd, invoiced at 23s., reappraised at 29s. 
sterling per dozen. 

25 P. gilling, grey, 3-cord, i-pound balls, pap'd, invoiced at 26s., reappraised at 33s. 
sterling per dozen. 

22 special gilling W., brown, 3-cord, l-pound balls, pap'd, invoiced at 21s., reap- 
praised at 24s. sterling per dozen. 

40 special gilling W., brown, 2-cord balls, pap'd, invoiced at 28s., reappraised at 37s. 
sterling per dozen. 



2802' 6399' etc f Hemp yarn, flax yam, and thread, etc. — Continued. 

50 special gilling, grey W., brown, 2-cord balls, pap'd, invoiced at 33s., reappraised 

at 45s. sterling per dozen. 
35 red star W., brown, 3, 5, 6, and 9 cord, satin, •] -pound balls, boxed, invoiced at 33s., 

reappraised at 37s. sterling per dozen. 
25 red star W., brown, 3, 5, 6, and 9 cord satin, Hb. balls, boxed, invoiced at 26s., 

reappraised at 30s. sterling per dozen. 
50 red star W., brown, 2-cord satin {golden star quality), invoiced at 45s., reappraised 

at 49s. sterling per dozen. 
40 white star, grey, 3-cord satin, Hb. balls, boxed, invoiced at 46s., reappraised at 

58s. sterling per dozen. 
20 red star W., brown, 2- cord satin, 1-lb. bobbins, invoiced at 23s., reappraised at 

27s. sterling per dozen. 
12 red star, grey, 3/7-cord satin, 1-lb. balls, pap'd, invoiced at 22s., reappraised at 24s. 

sterling per dozen. 
12 red star D., blue, 3, 5, and 6 cord, lib. tubes, pap'd, invoiced at 20s., reappraised 

at 24s. sterling per dozen. 
30 red star W., brown satin, 3-cord, Hb. balls, boxed, invoiced at 29s., reappraised 

at 33s. sterling per dozen. 
35 red star W., brown, 3-cord, Mb. balls, boxed, invoiced at 33s., reappraised at 37s. 

sterling per dozen. 
35 F. gilling, grey and W., brown, 2-cord, Mb. balls, pap'd, invoiced at 33s., reap- 
praised at 41s. sterling per dozen. 
40 F. gilling, grey and W., brown, 3-cord, Mb. balls, pap'd, invoiced at 37s., reap- 
praised at 46s. sterling per dozen. 
25 special gilling, grey, 3-cord, Hb. balls, pap'd, invoiced at 22s., reappraised at 26s. 

sterling per dozen. 
60 red star W., brown, 6-cord satin, 3 -lb. balls, boxed, invoiced at 53s., reappraised 

at 57s. sterling per dozen. 
50 F. gilling. grey, 3 cord, Hb. balls, boxed, invoiced at 45s., reappraised at 55s. 

sterling per dozen. 
25 white star, dark blue, 3-cord, Hb. balls, boxed, invoiced at 33s., reappraised at 

37s. sterling per dozen. 
2 Blake, grey, 7 cord, invoiced at 12s., reappraised at 18s. sterling per dozen. 
25 white star, yellow, 3-cord, 2-oz. spools, invoiced at 36s., reappraised at 36s. sterling 

per dozen. 
50 white star, grey and orange, 3-cord, 2-oz. spools, invoiced at 59s., reappraised at 

59s. sterling per dozen. 
60 white star, grey and orange, 3 cord, 2-oz. spools, invoiced at 68s., reappraised at 

68s. sterling per dozen. 
2 Blake finished, 7-cord, invoiced at 16s., reappraised at 22s. sterling per dozen. 
18 special gilling, grey, 3-cord, Hb. balls, pap'd, invoiced at 18s., reappraised at 22s. 

sterling per dozen. 
40 salmon thread, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 12 cord, 2-lb. balls, invoiced at 28s., reappraised fft 

28s. sterling per dozen. 



2801 639S ") 

980')' ("vw f i -^ em P :'/"'"! ./'"'' yarn, and thread, etc. — Continued. 

12 H. B. Merrimack, 2-oz. balls, boxed, invoiced at 28s., reappraised at 36s. sterling 
per dozen. 

Sup. shoe thread, H. B., 2-oz. balls, boxed, invoiced at 16s., reappraised at 16s. 
sterling per dozen. 

25 red star W., brown, 5-cord satin, 1-lb. bobbins, invoiced at 26s., reappraised at 30s. 
sterling per dozen. 

20 white star, dark blue, 3 and 4 cord, J -lb. balls, invoiced at 29s., reappraised at 33s. 
sterling per dozen. 

80 white star, dark blue, 3-cord, 2-oz. spools, invoiced at 80s., reappraised at 80s. 
sterling per dozen. 

16 white star, gray, 4-cord, Hb. balls, boxed, invoiced at 27s., reappraised at 31s. ster- 
* ling per dozen. 

25 blue star W., brown, 2-cord, Hb. balls, pap'd, invoiced at 22s., reappraised at 26s. 
sterling per dozen. 

30 F. gilling, gray, 3-cord, Hb. balls, pap'd, invoiced at 29s., reappraised at 37s., ster- 
ling per dozen. 

60 F. gilling W., brown, 2-cord, Hb. balls, pap'd, invoiced at 53s., reappraised at 64s. 
sterling per dozen. 

40 white star W., brown and orange, l-cord, 2-oz. spools, invoiced at 49s., reappraised 
at 49s. sterling per dozen. 

Sup. sole sewing, gray, 12-cord, 1-lb. balls, pap'd, invoiced at 28s., reappraised at 28s. 
sterling per dozen. 

40 A. gilling, gray, 3-cord, Hb. balls, pap'd, invoiced at 46s., reappraised at 58s. ster- 
ling per dozen. 

25 special gilling, gray, 3-cord, Hb. balls, pap'd, invoiced at 22s., reappraised at 26s. 
sterling per dozen. 

35 special gilling, gray, 2-cord, Hb. balls, pap'd, invoiced at 26s., reappraised at 33s. 
sterling per dozen. 

3 H. B. Merrimack, 2-oz. balls, boxed, invoiced at 22s., reappraised at 26s. sterling 
per dozen. 

3 H. B. standard, 2-oz. balls, boxed, invoiced at 30s., reappraised at 38s. sterling per 
dozen. 

18 white star, gray and yellow, 3-cord, Hb. balls, boxed, invoiced at 28s., reappraised 
at 32s. sterling per dozen. 

30 white star, dark blue, 2-cord, 4-oz. spools, invoiced at 40s., reappraised at 40s. ster- 
ling per dozen. 

90 F. quality, full white, 3- cord, 200-yard spools, invoiced at 22s., reappraised at 28s. 
sterling per gross. 

35 F. quality, full white, 3 cord, 200-yard spools, invoiced at 22s., reappraised at 28s. 
sterling per gross. 

50 F. quality, dark blue, 3-cord. 200-yard spools, invoiced at 22s., reappraised at 28s. 
sterling per gross. 

50, 40, and 60 F. quality, W., brown, 3-cord, 200-yard spools, invoiced at 22s., reap- 
praised at 28s. sterling per gross. 



7 

nonn fiQqq' f P f Hemp yarn, flax yarn, and thread, etc. — Continued. 

30 F. quality, dark blue, 3-cord, 200-yard spools, invoiced at 22s., reappraised at 2Ss. 

sterling per gross. 
80 P. quality, full white, 3-cord, 200 yard spools, invoiced at 22s., reappraised at 28s. 

sterling per gross. 
25 F. quality, full white, 3- cord, 180-yard spools, invoiced at 21s., reappraised at 27s. 

sterling per gross. 
25, 30, 35, 40, 50, and 60 F. quality, dark blue, 3-cord, 180-yard spools, invoiced at 21s., 

reappraised at 27s. sterling per dozen. 
Twenty- five per cent discount on all except the first six items. 
16 sole-sewing, gray, 8-cord, 1-lb. balls, invoiced at 13|d., reappraised at 18d. sterling 

per dozen, net. 
To invoiced prices various additions were made on entry to some of the above prices. 

587 O.P ) 

2086 I 

597 O.P I 

20S7 \ Linen thread (No. 16), from Kobert Stewart & Sons, Lisburn, January 21 and 22, 1895: 

598 O.P I 

2088 | 

Boston J 

No. 2 Mackay, gray, 7-cord, 1-lb. balls, entered at 22s., advanced to 26s. sterling per 
dezen. Discount, 25 per cent. Add cases. 

702 O.P ) 

2704 y Macaroni, from Talbot Freres, Bordeaux, November 18, 1895: 

Boston ) 

Cases of 25 1-lb. packages, entered at 4.88, advanced to 5.S5 francs per case. 

O 



PROCEEDINGS UNDER DECISIONS OF THE BOARD OF GENERAL APPRAISERS AND 
APPLICATIONS FOR REVIEW UNDER SECTION 15 OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE ACT. 



X896. 
Department Circular No. 44. 



%xtnsnm gtepartwjettt, 



Division of Customs. 

office of THE SECRETARY. 
Washington, D. C, March 16, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 

As some perplexity appears to exist among appraising and classifying officers of customs as to the 
effect of decisions rendered by the United States General Appraisers, the Department now instructs such 
officers that appraisements of values made by the Board, under Section 13 of the Act of June 10, 1890, 
are final and conclusive, as to such values, and appraisers should always be governed thereby in similar 
cases. 

Whenever a decision has been made by the Board under Section 14 of the above act, in regard to the 
classification of any kind of merchandise and no appeal has been taken to the courts within the prescribed 
period, under Section 15 of the said act, such decision will govern the liquidation of the particular case 
which was the subject of the decision. In the absence of such appeal and of contrary instructions, all 
similar goods will be treated in liquidation in accordance with the classification established by the Board. 
Should appeal be taken by the Government against such decision, the classification will continue to be 
made by collectors in accordance with that which was the subject of protest by the importer. Due notice 
will be given of the result of every appeal and collectors will thereafter be guided by the judgment of 
the court. 

"Whenever protest has been filed against the collector's action and the final decision of the court 
shall be in favor of the claim made by the importer upon any contention regarding the revenue laws, 
reliquidation of the entries thereby affected will be made, and duties wrongfully exacted, if any, will be 
refunded as provided by existing regulations. 

While the decisions of the Board do not, under the law, control any case except that which was under 
review by the Board, a proper uniformity of procedure wjj.1 be best promoted by the rules above set 
forth. 

Section 15 of the Act of June 10, 1890, provides that, "if * * * the collector * * * shall be 
dissatisfied with the decision of the Board of General Appraisers * * * as to the construction of the 
law and the facts * * * "he "may within thirty days next after such decision and not afterwards, 
apply to the circuit court of the United States * * * for review of the question of law and fact 
involved in such decision." 

The Department instructs collectors that no such application for review shall be made by them, except 
with the expressed approval of the Department. This inhibition is considered proper in view of the 



desirability o^nnifotiiicoiistnycti^ns of law and is established under the following opinion rendered by 
the Honorable Attorney -General on Jnly 27, 1895 : 
" The Secretary of the TreQ$$jjv r .S 

Sir: I am in receipt of your letter of July 26, 1895, requesting an opinion whether or not in a case in 
which the General Appraisers have decided that an article is not dutiable, Section 15 of the Act of June 
10, 1890 (26 Statutes, 138), in so far as it confers upon the collector the power, in case he is dissatisfied 
with the decisions of the Board of General Appraisers, to apply for a review of their decisions, repeals 
the authority conferred by Section 2652 of the Revised Statutes, upon the Secretary of the Treasury, to 
control the officers of customs in the administration of the revenue laws. 

Section 2652, Eevised Statutes, is as follows : 

' It shall be the duty of all officers of the customs to execute and carry into effect all instructions of 
the Secretary of the Treasury relative to the execution of the revenue laws ; and in case any difficulty 
shall arise as to the true construction or meaning of any part of the revenue laws, the decision of the 
Secretary of the Treasury shall be conclusive and binding upon all officers of the customs.' 

"The decisions of the Secretary of the Treasury upon all questions as to the construction or meaning 
of any part of the revenue laws are, by this section, made conclusive upon all customs officers. 

"This law has been in force since 1842, and still remains part of the revenue system of the United 
States. 

"A later statute does not abrogate a prior one unless such intention is expressed, or the two are so 
entirely inconsistent that they can not stand together. 

"Section 15 of the Act of June 10, 1890, provides that 'the collector or the Secretary of the Treasury,' 
if dissatisfied, may apply for a review of the questions of law and fact involved in decisions of the Board 
of General Appraisers. This does not mean that the collector may appeal against the decision or wishes 
of the Secretary, but that, as either may be the officer who ultimately acts for the Government, the right 
of appeal is given to either, as the case may be. But if the Secretary has decided any matter, no collector 
can by appeal question such decision. 

•"A collector is merely a subordinate of the Secretary of the Treasury, and no intention to give him 
such right as against his superior is to be gathered from the act in question. 

" My opinion is that Section 2652 is in full force, notwithstanding anything that is in Section 15, and 
that it is the duty of the collector to follow the decision and instructions of the Secretary of the Treasury 
in all matters relating to the revenue laws. 

" Very respectfully, Judson Harmon, 

' ' Attorney- General. ' ' 

Chief officers of customs are further instructed to make prompt report to the Department whenever a 
decision is received from the Board of General Appraisers which in their opinion should be taken to the 
courts for review, and with each report of this kind they will submit a statement of the reasons which 
have governed such opinion. 

S. WIKE, 

Acting Secretary. 



0$ PROPER 



PROPOSALS FOB PAPER UPON WHICH TO PRINT UNITED STATES INTERNAL-REVENUE 

STAMPS. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 45. 



%xzksvlx\} gtepatrtmjettt, 



Internal Revenue No. 452. 

OFFICE OF 



COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE, 

Washington, D. C, March 20, 1896. 

Sealed proposals will be received until 1 o'clock p. m. of April 22, 1896, for furnishing this office 
with such paper, to be used in the printing of United States internal-revenue stamps during the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1897, as may be from time to time ordered. 

The paper must, in respect to composition, sizing, strength, and calendering, be equal to the samples 
of the paper now used in the printing of internal-revenue stamps which are to be found for examination 
at the office of the Commissioner of Internal Eevenue — the degree of sizing, calendering, and strength to 
be such as may be prescribed by the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, with the approval of the Secre- 
tary of the Treasury — and must be free from clay or other adulteration, thread-knots, grit, or other foreign 
substances. A proportion of chemically prepared wood fiber (not exceeding 40 per cent) will be permitted 
in the composition. Each sheet of paper shall be made distinctive by being closely watermarked with 
the letters "U. S. I. R." in such manner that each square inch of the sheet shall bear some portion thereof. 

The quantity required under the contract contemplated by this circular will be about 800,000 pounds, 
and will be white, plain green, or such other color, not more expensive, as may at any time be prescribed 
by the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, but the 
coloring material used must not be such as to be injurious to persons handling the paper. 

The paper is to be manufactured and delivered iu such quantities and in sheets of such sizes and 
weights as this office may from time to time order, and must be counted, examined, and separated into 
lots of 1,000 sheets, each hundred to be separated by a paper tag and each lot tied with strong twine. 

The paper is to be manufactured under the supervision of an agent of the Government, who shall 
have access to all departments of the mill where the special paper is being manufactured, and under the 
protection of guards to be stationed at the mill ; and the contractor will be required to provide, without 
charge, in the building in which the paper is made, rooms suitably furnished, to be used as an office by 
such agent and for the persons designated to guard the paper delivered, and also a room in which to 
store it until shipped ; and he will be further required to conform to such reasonable regulations as may 
be made by the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, 
to prevent the improper removal from the mill of the paper manufactured under the contract. All 
paper will be receipted for by the agent at the mill, subject to future examination, and the contractor 
will be required to furnish perfect paper with which to replace any returned to him as defective. 

The contractor will be required to sign a written contract and to commence the manufacture of the 
paper at such time after June 30, 1896, as the Commissioner of Internal Revenue shall designate, and 



will also be required to enter into a bond in the sum of $10,000, with approved sureties, for the faithful 
execution of the contract. The contract will bind the contractor to manufacture the special paper for 
the United States only. 

Bills accruing under the contract will be paid monthly. 

Bidders will state in their proposals the price or prices per pound for the paper, deliverable at the 
Treasury Department, in the city of "Washington, District of Columbia, securely packed in the presence 
and under the direction of the agent of the Department stationed at the mill, in wooden boxes strapped 
with iron, sealed and marked ready for shipment, all at the expense of the contractor ; and it is expressly 
stipulated that in case it shall be at any time necessary, in the opinion of the Commissioner of Internal 
Bevenue, to require shipment of paper by express, instead of by the ordinary freight delivery, the Govern- 
ment shall not be responsible for the cost of transportation except to the extent of the ascertained differ- 
ence between the express rate and the rate by freight. 

Al l paper returned from the Department to the contractor as defective, for which he is required, as 
hereinbefore stated, to furnish paper to replace the same, shall be returned at the expense of the contractor, 
aud the paper furnished in place thereof shall be delivered at his expense at the Treasury Department as 
aforesaid. 

The contractor will be required to furnish new dandy rolls for watermarking the paper, unless those 
now owned by the Government can be used, and will be required to pay all expenses connected with the 
repairing of such dandy rolls from time to time as necessity may require. Such rolls shall be manufac- 
tured (and repaired, if necessary) under the supervision of an agent of the Government, and will become 
and remain the property of the United States. 

Each proposal shall be accompanied by a written guaranty, signed by two responsible persons, that 
if the award is made to the proponent the contract and bond will be executed promptly on the making of 
the award. 

Bids will not be considered unless made by persons actually engaged in the manufacture of paper, 
and the right to reject any or all bids, and to waive informalities, in case it shall be deemed to the 
interest of the Government so to do, is hereby reserved. 

The bids will be opened on Wednesday, the 22d day of April, 1896, at 1 o'clock p. m., in the office 
of the Commissioner of Internal Eevenue, and bidders are invited to be present. 

Bids should be indorsed "Proposals for Internal-Eevenue Stamp Paper," and addressed to the "Com- 
missioner of Internal Revenue, Washington, D. C." No blanks for such proposals are furnished, nor are 
they required. Proposals may be made by letter. 

Bidders are required to deposit with their bids samples of the paper which they propose to furnish— 
made with special reference to the character and quality of paper required to be supplied by the terms of 
this circular — at the price' or prices bid; which samples will be subjected to the usual tests as to strength 
and quality. No samples of paper now in use will be sent out by this Bureau for examination. 

JOS. S. MILLER, 

Commissioner. 
Approved : 

J. G. CARLISLE, 

Secretary of the Treasury. 






CUSTOMS COLLECTION DISTRICT OF ALASKA. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 46. 

Division of Customs. 



%xmmx\} gjejmrittiettt, 

office op THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, March 20, 1896. 
To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 

The following Act of Congress, approved March 16, 1896, entitled "An Act to reorganize the Customs 
Collection District of Alaska," is published for the information and guidance of all concerned. 

W. E. CURTIS, 

Assistant Secretary. 



AN ACT To reorganize the Customs Collection District of Alaska. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and Rouse of Bepresentatives of the United States of America in Congress 
assembled, That the Customs Collection District of Alaska be, and the same is hereby, reorganized and 
established to comprise the Territory of Alaska, in which Sitka shall be the port of entry. 

Sec. 2. That such other places as may be designated by the Secretary of the Treasury, as the interests 
of commerce may require, shall be subports of entry or delivery or both ; and customs officers shall be 
stationed at such subports, with authority to enter and clear vessels, receive duties, fees, and other moneys, 
and perform such other services and receive such compensation as in the judgment of the Secretary of the 
Treasury the exigencies of commerce may require. 

Sec. 3. That all acts or parts of acts in conflict with the provisions of this Act are hereby repealed. 

Approved, March 16, 1896. 



REAPPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



%vtn&nx% Qt$%xtmmt t 



1S96- 

Departtuent Circular No. 47. 

Division of Customs. 

office of THE SECRETARY 



Washington, D. C, March 23, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 

The following reappraisements of merchandise have been made by the United States General 

Appraisers during the week ending March 7, 1896. 

W. E. CURTIS, 

Assistant Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING MARCH 7, 1896. 

N. B.— In corresponding with the Board of General Appraisers relative to ana of the items in this 
report, reference should always be made to the n umber of Benppraisement. 

No. of reappraise. 

ment. 

107S4 Metallic trimmings, from G. De Chaviere & Co., Lyons, December 21, 1895 : 

Advances up to 25 per cent. 
11061 Manufactures of metal, from Gr. Wandel, Reutlingen, January 16, 1896: 

2 wire cloths, No. 65, measuring 10.11 x 2.235, entered at 6, advanced to 6.30 marks 
per square meter. Add packing. 
11077 Musical instruments, etc., from Jules Cueudet, Aubersou, January 20, 1896 : 

Cartels, No. 40 B., entered at 13.80, advanced to 14.50 francs per cartel. 

Cartels, 58, systenie star, entered at 52 francs per cartel. No advance. 

Cartel, 180, 6 ai, entered at 65 francs per cartel. No advance. 

Add packing. Entered discount, 6 per cent. Advanced discount, 5 per cent. 
11088 Manufactured articles N. E., from Hongkong, January 3, 1S96 : 

Bean sticks, entered at 2.40, advanced to 2.70 Mexicau dollars per box. 
11041 Sugar, not above 16 D. S., from G. P. Decoar, Montego Bay, January 28, 1896: 

Testing, 91.95°, muscovado, entered at £8, 0s., 0d., advanced to £10 14s. Sd. sterling 
per ton, packed. To entered price add bags and inland transportation. 
11059 Coal tar color, from Farbwerk E. ter Meer & Co., Uerdingen, January 27, 1896: 

Cotton blue, entered at 3.30 marks per kilo. Add packing. No advance. 
11058 Chemical salt, from E. Stobwasson, London, January 29, 1896: 

Prussiate soda, entered at 5Jd. sterling per pound. Add casks. No advance. 



11068 Soap, n. o. p. /., from Chas. L. Cook, Liverpool, January 20, 1896: 

Double crowu soft soap, entered at 8s., 10d., advanced to 9s. Sd. sterling per dozen 
jars. Discount, 2'> per cent. Add cases and packing. 

11009, 11092 Refined camphor, from Stallman & Fulton, London, January 16 and 18, 1896 : 

Japan refined camphor, entered at Is., 10id., advanced to Is. 11 .id. sterling per pound. 

11139 Cotton shoe laces, from Fr. Pet. Ostermann, Barmen, January 28, 1896: 

25a" No. 53 black mohair laces, 6/8 boxed, entered at 1.17, advanced to 1.35 marks 

per gross. 
25i" No. 18 black mohair laces, 6/8 boxed, entered at 1.60, advanced to 1.84 marks 

per gross. 
25J" No. 20 black mohair laces, 6/8 boxed, entered at 1.90, advanced to 2.20 marks 
per gross. 

11112 Colored cotton, from Weiss, Fries & Co., Mulhouse, January 24, 1896 : 

80 cm. cretonne forte, entered at .69, advanced to .71 mark per meter. Add case. 

11108 Bleached cotton, from Brown, Graham & Co., Glasgow, January 25, 1896: 

No. 1855, 28" white fancy cloth, entered at .02||d., advanced to .03 T yi. sterling per 
yard. Add case and packing. 

10759 Orange boxes, fromM. Isaacs & Son, Ltd., Liverpool, January 4, 1896: 

Empty boxes, entered at Is. 8d. sterling per box. No advance. 

11062 Embroidered initials, flax handkerchief s and cotton handkerchief s, from Samuel W. McBride, 

Belfast, January 27, 1896 : 
Ladies' H. S. sheer linen initial handkerchiefs, unlaundried, 27 LI c. 1, entered at 2s. Id., 

advanced to 2s. 6d. sterling per dozen. 
Ladies' H. S. sheer linen initial handkerchiefs, unlaundried, in 1-dozen boxes, 271 

c. 3, entered at 2s. 2d., advanced to 2s. 7d. sterling per dozen. 
Sheer linen initial handkerchiefs, unlaundried, in 5-dozen boxes, 720 c. 2, entered at 

2s. Id., advanced to 2s. 3d. sterling per dozen. 
Gents' H. S. linen initial handkerchiefs, unlaundried, in papers, 135 c. 1, entered at 

2s. 5d., advanced to 2s. 8d. sterling per dozen. 
Gents' H. S. linen initial handkerchiefs, unlaundried, in 6-dozen boxes, 2010 c. 2, 

entered at 4s. 4d., advanced to 4s. lOd. sterling per dozen. 
Ladies' H. S. cotton lace edge and insertion handkerchiefs, in 5- dozen boxes, 789 c. 2, 

entered at 2s. Id., advanced to 2s. 6d. sterling per dozen. 
Discount, 2£ per cent. Add cases and making up. 

10789 Cotton lace, from Habeel Habis, Damascus, February 25, 1895: 

Garniture en laine, entered at 32.14, advanced to 75 piasters per oke. 

10378 Silk wearing apparel, from E. Prevet, Succr., Paris, November 21, 1895 : 

Corsage et supe, essayage de Mannequiss, entered at 50, advanced to 75 fraucs per 
total. Add case and packing. 

10918 Manufactures of silk and cotton, from G. Varenne and J. Pointet & Co., Lyons, January 2, 

1896 : 
78 cm. foulard, 9167, in grey, entered at .75, advanced to .88 franc per meter. 
Discount, 20 per cent. Add packing. 

10912 Manufactures of silk, from Kahn & Kahn, Lyons, January 16, 1896 : 

Surah impe, 65 cm., entered at 1.20, advanced to 1.30 francs per meter. 
Surah impe, 60 cm., entered at 1.15, advanced to 1.25 francs per meter. 
Discounts, 20 per cent and 1 per cent. Add cases and packing. 



3 

10903 : Manufactures of silk and cotton, from Stunzi Sohne, Horgen, January S, 1S96 : 

Satin, taffetas, etc., advances up to 19 per cent. 
11097 Decorated earthenware, from Geo. Borgfeldt & Co., Vienna, January 13, 1896 : 

Figures of Napoleon, Othello, vases, etc., advances up to 11 per cent. 

j, ( '.', Skin's tanned, but not finished, from the , Madras, September 26, 1895 : 

Entered at 1/8/8 rupees per pound, plus cases and packing, advanced by addition of 

cartage, shipping and harbor charges, telegrams ; commission, 2i per cent. 

0709 o P I 

t, " . ' " [ Chemical salt, from Thos. Vickers & Sons, Manchester, August 13, 1895 : 

Dunging salts, entered at £13 sterling per ton. Add cases and packing. No advance. 
Boston P [ Dl ' u M ets > from Barin g Bros - & Co., Ltd., Madras, November 11, 1895: 

Druggets, entered at 1/10/0 rupees per square yard, advanced by addition of packing 
charges, etc. 
9811 n p [Colored cotton velvets, from J. Hallworth & Son, Manchester, December 19, 1895, and 

ioiton. .::::::::: \ Jairaar y 7 ' 1896: 

22" black imperial cotton collar velvets, quality A. A., entered at 8|d. sterling per yard, 
22" black imperial cotton collar velvets, quality CO., entered at 15 id. sterling per yard 
Discount, 4 per cent. Add making up and boxing at Is. 4d. per piece. Advauced by 

addition of 2} per cent commission, which was added to invoice but deducted on 

entry. 

sl^Francisco".'. } 0Hves > from ' Sevi,le ' Au « ust 20 ' 1895 : 

Padron lsts., entered at 80 pesetas per fanega. 
Queens 2nds., entered at 24 pesetas per fanega. 
Manzariillas, entered at 19 pesetas per fanega. 

No advance. The above prices are in accordance with values found by the special 
Board. 

REAPPBAISEMENTS BY BOAEDS. 

2970, 10773 Manufactures of silk and cotton, from P. Lafute & Co., Lyons, December 4, 1895: 

Austria pekin, 95 cm., 6cru, entered at .80, advanced to 1 franc per meter. 
Austria pekin, 92 cm., colored, entered at 1.10, advanced to 1.30 francs per meter. 
Austria pekin, 92 cm., colored, entered at .90, advanced to 1.05 francs per meter. 
Diagonale, 92 cm., noir, entered at .80, advanced to 1.05 francs per meter. 
Serge, 92 cm., noir, entered at .74, advanced to .95 franc per meter. 
Cote russe, 92 cm., coul, entered at .88, advanced to 1.05 francs per meter. 
Discount, 20 per cent. 

2945,10696 Manufactures of silk and cotton, from A. L. Trapadoux Fre>es & Co., Lyons, December 4, 

1895: 
Alessandra 6cru, 92 cm., entered at .78, advanced to .90 franc per meter. Discounts, 
20 per cent and 1 per cent. Add case and packing. 

2750, 10387 Wool linings, from , Bradford, November 20, 1895 : 

32" italian lining, black, entered at 5 Jd. , advanced to 6Jd. sterling per yard. Discount, 
2? per cent. Add cases. 



2958, 10830 1 Sugar above and not above 16 1>. S-, from Robert Grooka & Co., Liverpool, January 2 and 

2959,10806 f 10, L896: 

Fifths, entered at £8 17s. 5d., advanced to £9 13s. Id. .sterling per ton, packed. 
Fifths, entered at CO 2s. 5d., advanced to £9 18s. id. sterling per ton, packed. 
Fourths, above 16 D. S., entered at £11 2s. 5d., advanced to Cll 5s. lOd. sterling per 

ton, packed. 
Fourths, above 1G D. S., entered at £11 7s. 5d., advanced to Cll 10s. lOd. sterling per 

ton, packed. 
Fifths, not above 1(1 D. S., entered at £S 17s. 5d., advanced to £9 10s. sterling per 

ton, packed. 
Fifths, not above lti D. S., entered at £9 2s. 5d., advanced to £9 15s. sterling per 

ton, packed. 
Discount, 2] per cent. 

2973, 1095S Sugar not above 16 D. S., from W. Mellor, Macoris, January 15, 1896 : 

Testing 94.90°, entered at .0220, add bags, advanced to .02253, United States dollars, 

per pound, packed. 
Molasses testing 87.70°, entered at .0152, add bags, advanced to .01794, United States 

dollars, per pound, packed. 

2606, 10012 Decorated china, from , Dresden, July 27, 1895: 

Advances up to 200 per cent on jugs, dishes, plates, candlesticks, etc. 

2968, 10955 Manufactures of silk, from Winckler & Co., Yokohama, December 27, 1895 : 

No. 3756, fancy brocaded wash silk, 20"x50 yards, entered at 5.90, advanced to 6.90 

silver yen per 100 mommee. 
No. 3746, satin striped wash silk 20" x 50 yards, entered at .42, advanced to .50 silver 

yen per yard. 
Add packing and boxes. 

3050, 10926 Cotton neckwear, from Kiefe Freres, Paris, January 16, 1896: 

Cotton ties, entered at 3.10, advanced to 3.25 francs per dozen. Discounts, 6 per cent 
and 2 per cent. Add case and packing. 

3055, 10597. \ Cotton netting and cotton lace curtains, from B. "Walker & Co., Ltd., LentoD, December 20, 
3056,10658..'.] 1895: 

Ecru and ivory cotton hamburg net, 103, 101, 108, 202, 204, 50", entered at 2]d., 

advanced to 3d. sterling per yard. 
Ecru and ivory cotton hamburg net, 501, 503, 504, 50", entered at 5d., advanced to 

5]d. sterling per yard. 
Ecru and ivory cotton hamburg net, 402, 403, 404, and 407, 50", entered at 4-kl., 

advanced to 5d. sterling per yard. 
Ecru and ivory cotton hamburg net, 50", 702 and 703, entered at 5 id., advanced to 

6d sterling per yard. 
White curtains, 3 yards, 1920, 43", entered at Is. per pair. No advance. 
Ecru curtains, 31 yards, 3971, 50", entered at 2s. 9d., advanced to 3s. sterling per 

pair. 
Discount, 21 per cent, less inland freight. 

2943,10634 Cotton-luce curtains, from W. E. Meats Co., Nottingham, December 20, 1895: 

No. 5923, E. T., 3a yards, entered at 3s. lid.., advanced to 3s. 9d. sterling per pair. 



2943,10634 Cotton-lace curtains, etc.- — Continued. 

Nos. 4415,4448, B.T., 3 J yards, entered at 6s. 3d., advanced to 6s. 9d. sterling per 

pair. 
No. 6479, E. T., 3J yards, entered at 4s. Id., advanced to 4s. 6<3. sterling per pair. 
No. 6495, E. T., No. 6495, E.H. E., 3 i yards, entered at 4s. 2d., advanced to 4s. 8d. 

si erling per pair. 
Discount, 2J per cent, less inland carriage. Add cases. 

2955,10824 Manufactures of cotton, n. e., from Edward Owens & Co., Birmingham, January 8, 1895: 

Velveteen dress binding, 4 yards, II", black, entered at 6s. 9d. sterling per gross. No 

advance. 
Velveteen dress binding, 4 yards, II", colors assorted, entered at 7s. 3d., advanced to 

7s. 6d. sterling per gross. 
Velveteen dress binding, 4 yards, II", entered at 4s. 3d. sterling per gross. No 

advance. 
Add case. 

2749, 10343 Chemical salt, of Deutschen Gold & Silver Scheide-Anstalt, Frankfort, Ostober 21, 1895 : 

Sulphide of iron, entered at 11.25, discount, li per cent and 1J per cent, advanced to 

12.25 marks per 100 kilos, net. Add packing charges at 1 mark per 100 kilos. 

2949,10594 Orange boxes, from F. W. Wood & Co., Liverpool, December, 1895: 

Empty boxes, 4} cubic feet, entered at 4d., advanced to Is. 4d. sterling per box. 



2—47 






VOUCHERS— HOW STATED AND RECEIPTED. 



office of COMPTROLLER OF THE TREASURY, 

Washington, I). C, March 23, 1896. 

To all Disbursing Officers of the United States. 

Disbursing officers are hereby notified that the following proof will be required on vouchers as 
evidence of proper payment. 

VOUCHEES — HOW STATED. 

All vouchers must be stated iu the name of the person, firm or company, or corporation rendering 
the service and entitled to payment. 

RECEIPTS TO VOUCHERS. 

If the payee be a firm or company (not incorporated), the receipt should be in the firm or company 
name, to be followed by the autograph signature of the person authorized to sign the firm or company 
name; if a corporation, the receipt should be in the legal corporate title of the company, to be followed 
by the autograph signature of the officer (giving his title) or agent duly authorized to receive the money 
and receipt therefor. 

Vouchers may be signed in the name of the principal by agents or attorneys duly authorized to receive 
checks for their principals, but in such cases the disbursing officer must first satisfy himself of the authority 
of said agent or attorney to sign the name of his principal and receive the CHECK issued in payment of 
the principal's claim. 

In all cases where a voucher is receipted by au agent or attorney payment, must be made by check drawn 
on some U. S. Depository and made payable to the ORDER of the rightful claimant and payee of the vouchers, 
and the disbursing officer must certify on the voucher over his signature that payment has been so made, 
giving number and date of check and the name of the depository on which drawn. 

These instructions are not intended to affect any additional regulations adopted by the various 
Departments, but are to be regarded as showing what is required by the accounting officers as necessary 
proof of payment made by disbursing officers. 

R. B. BOWLER, 

Comptroller. 
Approved : 

J. G. CARLISLE, 

Secretary. 






EXTENSION OF LIMITS OF PORT OF ENTRY OF NEW ORLEANS. 



%xzixmx\} ^zyuxtmmt, 



1896. 

Department Circular No. 4f). 

Div^on of customs. Office of THE SECRETARY. 



Washington, D. C, March 27, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The following Act of Congress, approved March 20, 1896, entitled "An act to extend the limits of the 
port of entry of New Orleans," is published for the information and guidance of all concerned. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



AN ACT To extend the limits of the port of entry of New Orleans. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assem- 
bled, That the limits of the port of entry of New Orleans shall be, and the same are hereby, extended so 
as to include that portion of the parish of Jefferson on the west bank of the Mississippi River lying 
between the upper line of the parish of Orleans, west bank, the west bank of the said river to a point 
opposite the upper boundary line of the parish of Orleans, east bank, a line drawn thence back four 
thousand feet, perpendicular to said river, and a line drawn thence parallel to the Mississippi River until 
it intersects said upper parish boundary line, west bank ; and so as further to include that portion of the 
parish of Saint Bernard lying between the lower boundary line of the parish of Orleans, east bank, the 
east bauk of the Mississippi River to a point three miles below said lower boundary, a line drawn thence 
back foui' thousand feet parallel to said lower boundary line, and a line drawn thence parallel to the 
Mississippi River, until it intersects said lower boundary line of the parish of Orleans. 

Approved, March 20, 189<i. 



REAPPRAISEMENTS.OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



^rjeastmj geparitimxt, 



1S96. 
Department Circular No. 50. 

Division of Customs. 

office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, March 27, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The following reappraisements of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending March 14, 1896 : 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 

REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING MARCH 14, 1896. 

N. S. — In corresponding with the Board of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in, this 
report, reference should always be made to the number of lieappraisement. 

No. of Reappraise- 
ment. 

11114.' 1 1007 ( Wool dress goads, from Schulze & Son, Greiz, December IS, 1895, January 2 and 27, 1896 : 

95 cm., art. 725, wool, entered at .67, advanced to .72 mark per meter, net. 

95 cm. perle, 645, wool, entered at .65, advanced to .85 mark per meter, net. 

115 cm. chinois, 646, wool, entered at .58, advanced to .88 mark per meter, less 8 per 

cent. 
95 cm. chinois, 646, wool, entered at .48, advanced to .75 mark per meter, less 8 per 

cent. 
114 cm. silk-warp heurietta, entered at 1.21, advanced to 1.48 marks per meter, less 8 

per cent. 
Discount on entered prices, S per cent. Add packing charges. 

1100S Wool dress goods, from C. Grabner, Neumark, Januarys, 1896: 

90 cm. mercur, entered at .85], advanced to 1.05 marks per meter. 
120 cm. arion, entered at 1.33}, advanced to 1.45 marks per meter. 
Discount, 7 per cent. Less inland freight and consul fee. 

10929 Manufactures of silk and cotton, from Seidenwaarenfabrik Vorm, Edwin Nacf, A. G. Zurich, 

January 13, 1896 : 
Black satin tr. cot., 36", entered at 1.80, advanced to 2.30 francs per aune. 



2 

L0929 Manufactures of sill.- and cotton, etc. — Continued. 

Black rhadames tr. cot., 36", entered at 1.80, advanced to 2. 10 francs per aune. 

Black rhadames tr. cot., 36", entered at 1.95, advanced to 2.30 francs per aune. 

Black satin tr. cot., 3(5", entered at 2.60, advanced to 3 francs per anne. 

Black satin tr. cot., 36", entered at 2.90, advanced to 3.45 francs per aune. 

Brown satin tr. cot, 3<i", entered at 3, advanced to 3.60 francs per aune. 

Black satin tr. cot., 20V', entered at 1.50, advanced to 1.70 francs per aune. 

Discount, 20 per cent. Add case and packing. 

11016 Manufactures of silk and cotton, from Mech Seidenstoffvveberei, Winterthur, January 21 

1896: 

Satin I soie, uoir, 36", entered at 1.90, advanced to 2.40 fraucs per aune. 

Ehadames, noir, 36", entered at 2.30, advanced to 2.75 francs per aune. 

Discount, 20 per cent. Add cases and packing. 
11096,11107 Colored cotton velvet, from Alfred Louis, Manchester, January 28, 1896: 

22" velveteen cord, M. S., entered at 20d. sterling per yard. 

22" black velvet cord, M. S., entered at 19d. sterling per yard. 

To entered prices add boxes at 9d. each. Amount added for boxes advanced to Is. 
each. 
11132 Bleached cotton, from B. W. Bodenmann, St. Gall, January 23, 1896: 

Woven swiss blumetefs, T. TJ. R., 1104, entered at 27 francs per piece. No advance. 

Woven swiss blumetefs, T. TJ. B., 1204, entered at 28.50 fraucs per piece. No advance. 

Woven swiss blumetefs, T. U. R., 1501, entered at 22.50 francs per piece. No advance. 

Woven swiss blumetefs, J. J. B., 804, entered at 20.60 francs per piece. No advance. 

Discount, 3 per cent. Add bleaching and finishing at 1.15 francs each. 
11001 Cotton netting, etc., from Johu Fellmann & Co., Ltd., Nottingham, January 16, 1896: 

108" white mosquito net, No. 205, entered at 51d., advanced to 53d. sterling per yard. 

120" white mosquito net, No. 205, entered at 6sd., advanced to 6ad. sterling per yard. 

90" white mosquito net, No. 211, entered at 6Jd., advanced to lid. sterling per yard. 

108" white mosquito net, No. 211, entered at 7|d., advanced to 8j!d. sterling per yard. 

120" white mosquito net, No. 211, entered at 83d., advanced to 9ld. sterling per yard. 

90" white mosquito net, No. 207, entered at 53d., advanced to 6Jd. sterling per yard. 

108" white mosquito net, No. 207, entered at 6id., advanced to 73d. sterling per yard. 

120" white mosquito net, No. 207, entered at 71d., advanced to 83d. sterling per yard. 

90" white mosquito net, No. 300, entered at 4d,, advanced to 41 d. sterling yer yard. 

108" white mosquito net, No. 305, entered at 4:]d., advanced to 5^d. sterling per yard. 

90" mosquito net, 310, entered at 4Jd., advanced to 51 d. sterling per yard. 

108" white mosquito net, 315, entered at 5d., advanced to 61d. sterling per yard. 

90" white mosquito net, 320, entered at 4ld., advanced to 5»d. sterling per yard. 

108" white mosquito net, 325, entered at 53d., advanced to Gi sterling per yard. 

90" white mosquito net, 330, entered at 53d., advanced to 6Jd. sterling per yard. 

108" white mosquito net, 335, entered at 63d., advanced to 7|d. sterling per yard. 

Discount, 20 per cent. Add cases. 
11111, 11129 Manufactures of wool and cotton, from Simon Israel & Co. , Bradford, February 3 and 6, 1896 : 

56" black union coatings, No. 06050, entered at Is. 3d., advanced to Is. 5d. sterling per 
yard. 

77 i" black cheviot, No. 3473, entered at lid. sterling per yard. No advance. 



11111, 11129 Manufactures of wool and cotton, etc. — Continued. 

54" black serge, No. 2472/3, entered at lid. sterling per yard. No advance. 

Discounts, 2] per cent and 1] per cent. Add making up and packing. 

11115 Bleached and colored cotton, from The Belfast Linen Handkerchief Company, Ltd., Belfast, 

January 29, 1896 : 

872, 32" persian lawns, -white, No. 5026, entered at 2 T %d., advanced to 3^d. sterling 
per yard. 

873, 32" persian lawns, white, No. 5028, entered at 3:!d., advanced to 45 d. sterling per 
yard. 

874, 32" persian lawns, white, No. 5031, entered at 5d., advanced to 5iid. sterling per 
yard. 

875, 32" persian lawns, white, No. 5032, entered at 5^d., advanced to S^d. sterling per 
yard. 

876, 32" persian lawns, white, No. 5033, entered at O^d., advanced to 7 T %d. sterling per 
yard. 

877, 878, and 879, 32" persian lawns, dyed, sky, No. 5039 ; pink, No. 5040, and straw, 
No. 5041, entered at 3 T %d., advanced to 4f\d. sterling per yard. 

880 and 881, 32" persian lawns, dyed, pink, No. 5043, and straw, No. 5044, entered at 

4 T 4 lf d., advanced to 5 T 2 „d. sterling per yard. 
8S2, 883, and 884, 32" persian lawns, dyed, sky, No. 5045 ; pink, No. 5046 ; straw, No. 

5047, entered at 4i ! d., advanced to 55d. sterling per yard. 
885, 8S6, and 887, 32" persian lawns, dyed, sky, No. 5048 ; pink, No. 5049, and straw, 

No. 5050, entered at 5Jd., advanced to 6*d. sterling per yard. 
Discount, 35 per cent. Add cases and packing. 

11075 Steel wire, from , Sheffield, January 4, 1896 : 

Steel wire, 59"x \, entered at 13s. sterling per cwt. No advance. Add cases. 

10706 Cotton lace curtains, from B. Walker & Co., Nottingham, December 13, 1895: 

35 yards, No. 3940, E. T., 43", entered at Is., advanced to Is. Id. sterling per pair. 
35 yards, No. 3907, E. T. and W. T., 48", entered at 2s. 75d., advanced to 2s. 10£d. 

sterling per pair. 
35 yards, No. 3940, W. T., 43", entered at Is., advanced to Is. Id. sterling per pair. 
35 yards, No. 3729, E. T., 56", entered at 5s. sd., advanced to 6s. sterling per pair. 
35 yards, 3689, E. T. and W. T., 54", entered at 5s. lOd. sterling per pair. No advance. 
Discount, 25 per cent. Less inland freight. 

10856 Cotton-lace cwtains, from M. C. Thompson, Glasgow, January 3, 1896: 

35 yards, curtains, W. T., 2510, 2511, and 2512, entered at 3s. 2d., advanced to 3s. 3d. 

sterling per pair. 
4 yards, curtains, W. T., 2511, entered at -">s. 9Jd., advanced to 3s. 105d. sterling per 

pair. 
4 yards, curtains, W. T. and E. T., 2526 and 2527, entered at 6s. 8d. sterling per pair. 

No advance. 
35 yards, curtains, W. T. and E. T., 2526 and 2527, entered at 5s. 8d. sterling per 

pair. No advance. 
35 yards, curtains, W. T. and E. T., 2517, entered at 3s. 5d., advanced to 3s. 6d. 

sterling per pair. 
4-yard curtains, W. T., 2518, entered at 4s. .'id. sterling per pair. No advance. 



10856 Cotton-lace curtains, etc. — Continued. 

3i-yard curtains, E. T., 2534, entered at 7s. Lid., advanced to 8s. 6d. sterling per pair. 

3i-yard curtains, W. T., 2533, entered at Gs. lid. sterling per pair. No advance. 

3} -yard curtains, W. T. and E. T., 2518, entered at 3s. 7d., advanced to 3s. 9d. 

sterling per pair. 
4-yard curtains, W. T., 2517, entered at 4s. Id. sterling per pair. No advance. 
4 yard curtains, W. T. and E. T., 2527, entered at Gs. 8d. sterling per pair. No 

advance. 
Entered discount, 3'j percent; advanced discount, 2-> percent. Add cases. Less inland 

freight. Add boiling, twisting, and finishing at 3d. per pound. Add packing. 

^oAQ^i'me'? 1 Flax thread, from Robert Stewart & Son, Lisburn, August 31, September 25, October 30, 
101)87, iyit>4 , ai]d Decem ber 18, 1S95, and January 15, 1896: 

Red star, gray, 5, 6, and 7 cord, in skeins, invoiced at 22s., reappraised at 23s. sterling 

per dozen. 
' 9/10, A. H. B., standard 2-oz. balls, boxed, invoiced at 25s., reappraised at 27s. ster- 
ling per dozen. 
Red star, gray, 5 and G cord, 1-pound balls, pap'd, invoiced at 22s., reappraised at 23s. 

sterling per dozen. 
Superior, gray, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 cord, 1-pound balls, pap'd, invoiced at 28s., reap- 
praised at 2Ss. sterling per dozen. 
30, F., gray, 3-cord, in skeins, pap'd, invoiced at 29s., reappraised at 36s. sterling per 

dozen. 
Red star, dark blue, 3-cord, skeins, boxed, invoiced at 33s., reappraised at 33s. sterling 

per dozen. 
35, P., gray, 2-cord, skeins, pap'd, invoiced at 33s., reappraised at 40s. sterling per 

dozen. 
40, P., gray, 3-cord, skeins, pap'd, invoiced at 37s., reappraised at 45s. sterling per 

dozen. 
Red star, gray, 4, 6, and 7 cord, 1 -pound balls, pap'd, invoiced at 22s., reappraised at 

24s. sterling per dozen. 
40, F. W., brown, 2 cord, skeins, pap'd, invoiced at 37s., reappraised at 45s. sterling 

per dozen. 
35, red star, dark blue, 3-cord. skeined, boxed, invoiced at 33s., reappraised at 33s. 

sterling per dozen. 
60, F., gray, 3-cord, skeins, pap'd, invoiced at 53s., reappraised at 63s. sterling per 

dozen. 
25, F., gray, 3-cord, skeins, pap'd, invoiced at 26s., reappraised at 32s. sterling per 

dozen. 
25, F., gray, 3-cord, skeins, pap'd, invoiced at 26s., reappraised at 32s. sterling per 

dozen. 
35, F., gray, 2-cord, skeins, pap'd, invoiced at 33s. reappraised at 40s. sterling per 

dozen. 
60, F., gray, 2-cord, skeins, pap'd, invoiced at 53s., reappraised at 63s. sterling per 

dozen. 
10, H. B., Merrimack, 2-oz. balls, boxed, invoiced at 20s., reappraised at 22s. sterling 

per dozen. 



99(>0,10056, 
10087,10162, 

Etc '. 



Flax thread, etc. — Continued. 



40, F., gray, 2 and 3 cord, skeins, pap'd, invoiced at 37s., reappraised at 45s. sterling 

per dozen. 
30, F., gray, 3-cord, skeins, pap'd, invoiced at 29s., reappraised at 36s. sterling per 

dozen. 
Red star, gray, 8- cord, in skeins, invoiced at 22s., reappraised at 22s. sterling per 

dozen. 
Red star, gray, 5 and 6 cord, in skeins, invoiced at 22s., reappraised at 22s. sterling 

per dozen. 
Superior, gray, 10-cord, in skeins, invoiced at 28s., reappraised at 28s. sterling per 

dozen. 
Superior, gray, 7-cord, 1-pound balls, pap'd, invoiced at 28s., reappraised at 30s. 

sterling per dozen. 
18 A. A., tow yarn, 2-cord, in hanks and bundles, invoiced at 8s. 6d., reappraised at 

7s. 6d. sterling per dozen. 
25 and 30, Porter's standard dark-blue 2-cord, 65-yard spools, invoiced at 7s., reap- 
praised at 7s. sterling per gross. 
30 and 35, household F. white, 2 cord, 100-yard spools, invoiced at 9s., reappraised at 

9s. sterling per gross. Discount, 25 per cent. 
Red star single yarn, gray, in hanks, invoiced at 13s. 6d., reappraised at 15s. sterling 

per dozen, net. 
15, single yarn, gray satiu, J-pound balls, pap'd, invoiced at 13s. 6d., reappraised at 

16s. 6d. sterling per dozen, net. 
12, single yarn, gray satin, J -pound balls, pap'd, invoiced at 12s. 6d., reappraised at 

15s. 6d. sterling per dozen, net. 

10808 ..Flax thread, from Win. Ewart & Son, Ltd., Belfast, December 6, 1895 : 

13 c, 6-ply, D. R. C. line (boiled and finished), entered at 10d., advanced to Is. sterling 

per pound. 

1003S Flax thread, from W. & L. Knox, Kilbirnie, September 24, 1895: 

Gray, 16x40, 12 c, 2-pound balls, best salmon twine, entered at 2s. 4d. sterling per 

pound. No advance. 
Gray, 18x50, 14 c, 2-pound balls, best salmon twine, entered at 2s. 5d. sterling per 

pound. No advance. 
Discount, 25 per cent. Add cases. Less inland freight. 

11047, 11078 Sugar not above 16 D. S., from Hidalgo & Co., Havana, January 16 and 22, 1896: 

Testing 81.326°, entered at $0.01}±-, less freightand N. D. charges, advanced to $0.0158, 

United States gold, per pound, packed. 
Testing 86.267°, entered at $0.02J, less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to $.01968, 

United States gold, per pound, packed. 
Testing 83.28°, entered at $0.01^1, less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to $0.01759, 

United States gold, per pound, packed. 
Testing 80.10°, entered at $0,011, less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to $0.01461, 

United States gold, per pound, packed. 

11076 Sugar not above 10 D. S., from Frederico, Hahtl, Santa Domingo, January 27, 1896: 

Testing 96°, centrifugal, entered at .0224, advanced to .0241 United States dollars 

per pound, packed. 



110G3 Sugar not above 16 I). S., from Wm. Kerr, Montego Bay, January 28, 1896: 

Testing 90.05°, entered at £8, advanced to £10 9s. 23d. sterling per ton, packed. 

Testiug 80.65°, entered at £8, reappraised at £7 8s. 6d., sterling per ton, packed. 

Add bags, hogsheads, and filling. 
1 1 149 Sugar and vegetables, from Sun Kwong Hop, Hongkong, December 5, 1895: 

Sugar above No. 16 D. S., entered at 3.50, advanced to 3.72 Mexican dollars per 
package of 93 pounds. 

Seaweed, entered at 3.80, advanced to 4 Mexican dollars per box of 50 pounds each. 
11151 Vegetables, n. o.p.f., from Juan Prieto, Havana, February 20, 1896: 

Peppers, entered at .25, advanced to .30, Spanish gold, per carrier. Add packages. 
11156 Brushes, etc., from Ullmanu & Eugelmann, Puerth, January 21, 1896 : 

Biushes, No. 814, entered at 2.55, advanced to 3.55 marks per gross. Add boxes and 
cases. 
1114S Manufactured articles, N. K, from Sun Kwong Hop, Hongkong, December 17, 1895: 

Bean curd sticks, entered at 2.40, advanced to 2.70 Mexican dollars per box. 
11118 Flax lace tidies, from Kiefe Freres, Paris, February 13, 1896: 

Voiles, 27", No. 3430, renaissance linens, entered at 4, advanced to 4.25 francs each. 

Voiles, 24", No. 3430, renaissance linens, entered at 3.40 francs each. No advance. 

Chemius, 18x54, No. 3449, renaissance linens, entered at 4.75, advanced to 5.10 francs 
each. 

Voiles, 30", No. 3430, renaissance linens, entered at 4.50 francs each. No advance. 

Chemins, 18 x 36, No. 3449, renaissance linens, entered at 3.50 francs each. No advance. 

Discount, 4 per cent. Add cases and packing. 
11120 Linoleum, from John Barry, Ostlere & Co., Ltd., Kirkcaldy, January 17, 1896: 

Entered at Is. 9d. sterling per square yard, less 20 per cent, advanced to Is. 9d. 

sterling per square yard, less 15 per cent. Add packing. Deduct inland carriage. 
11197' ' [ Ve 9 etaotes i n - °- P-f'i fr° m Antonio Calofat, Havana, February 15, 20, and 22, 1896: 

Tomatoes, entered at .30 Spanish gold per carrier. Add cost of carriers at .25 each. . 
10572 Manufactures of marble, from E. & CFratelli Lapini, Firenze, November 29, 1895: 

1 column of green of Prato, entered at 20, advanced to 40 lire per total. Add packi ng. 
11160,11161 Decorated earthenware, from E. Felici & Galli, Napoli, January 20, 1896: 

1 dish and plate, majolica ware, entered at 30, advanced to 60 francs per case. 

Majolica ware, entered at 15, advanced to 30 francs per case. 

11131 Manufactures of silk, paper, cotton, and silk- embroidered articles, from Morimura Bros., 

Hiogo, November 16, 1895 : 

Satin screens, No 264, entered at 6 silver yen each. 

Satin screens, No. 265, entered at 22 silver yen each. 

Satin screens, No. 267, entered at 3 silver yen each. 

Satin screens, No. 262, entered at 6.50 silver yen each. 

Satin screens, No. 263, entered at 5 silver yen each. 

Satin screens, Nos. 256, 257, and 261, entered at 25 silver yen each. 

Satin screens, No. 258, entered at 20 silver yen each. 

Satin screens, No. 259, entered at 24 silver yen each. 

Satin screens, No. 260, entered at 13 silver yen each. 

Satin screens. No. 266, entered at 10 silver yen each. 

No advance. Add packing, boxes, etc. 



7 

11125 Decorated earthenware, etc., from Geo. Borgfeldt & Co. , Vienna, January 22, 1896: 

Figures and busts, entered at from 5.X5 to 54 francs each, discounts 10 per cent and 
3 per cenf, advanced 11 i per cent. 

11147 Manufactures of metal, from Alfred Sautel, Paris, February (i, 1896: 

Ceinture, entered at 5.50, advanced to francs per dozen. 
Ceiuture, entered at 4, advanced to 4.50 francs per dozen. 

Entered discounts, 10 per cent, 2 per cent, and 5 per cent. Advanced discounts, 10 
per cent and 2 per cent. 

10853 Manufactures of metal and wood, etc., from Arnold & Schirmer, Berlin, December 21, 1895: 

1 filter., constructed according to Piefke model No. 3, contains 10 chambers and 1 set 
reserve gauze sieve, entered at 445, discount 20 per cent, advanced to 445 marks 
each, net. 
1 staff-fanger entered at 40 marks, discount 15 per cent, advanced to 40 marks, net. 
Add cases. 

2788 O. P | Worslea - y arn f rom i ra Ickringill & Co., Ltd., Keighley, July 2, 1895: 

Boston j 

Yarn, quality 2/36 I. S. B., entered at Is. Sd. sterling per pound. Discount, 21 per 

cent. No advance. 

2700 O. P j Wool tons, from Kammgarnspinnerei Stohr & Co., Plagwitz, October 3, 1895 : 

Boston ) 

Tops, x extra fast, vigour colored, entered at 3.95 marks per kilo. Add packing 

charges. No advance. 

Tops, xx extra fast, vigour colored, entered at 4.15 marks per kilo. Add packing 

charges. No advance. 

2789 O. P | j vn i es f rom c. L. Laurence, Yarmouth. December 30, 1895 : 

Boston I * e ' 

Entered at $1.50, advanced to $1.75, United States currency, per barrel, packed. 

2745 O. P ) p enc n s f rom The American Supplies Company, London, November 12, 1895 : 

Boston ) ' 

No. 731, black chalk pencils, entered at 6s. 6d. sterling per gross. No advance. 

No. 697, blue chalk pencils, entered at 6s. sterling per gross. No advance. 

Add cases. 

2837 O. P 1 

2839 O. P ( Sugar above and not above 16 D. S., from Robert Crooks & Co., Liverpool, December 31, 

2842 O. P., etc.. [ 1895, January 4 and 10, 1896 : 

Boston J 

Fourths, above 16 D. S., entered at £11 2s. 5d., advanced to £11 12s. 6d. sterling per 

ton. Discount, 21 per cent. 
Sugar, entered at 9s. 3d., advanced to 9s. 7 ad. sterling per cwt. Discount, 2\ per cent. 
Fifths, not above 16 D. S., entered at £9 2s. 5d., advanced to £9 15s. sterling per ton. 

Discount, 21 per cent. 
Fifths, not above 16 D. S., entered at £9 2s. 5d., advanced to £9 14s. Id. sterling per 

ton. Discount, 24 per cent. 

2797 O. P ] Sugar above and not above 16 I>. S., from Bobert Crooks & Co., Liverpool, December 31, 

Philadelphia...]: 1895: 

. Fourths, not above 16 D. S., entered at £11 2s. 5d. sterling per ton, advanced to lis. 
7KL sterling per cwt. 
Fifths, above 16 D. S., entered at £9 2s. 5d. sterling per tou, advanced to 9s. 6d. ster- 
ling per cwt. 
Discount, 21 per cent. 



2751 OP ) 

Philadelphia..! j ]V,)I " 1 P' a l>- from H. E. Aerenberg, Gothenburg, November 7, L895: 

Entered at E5 L8s. 6d. .sterling per ton. No advance. 

l,,:i ' s:! Cut and decorated glassware, from Speelman Bros., Rotterdam, December 7, LS95: 

Engraved wine glasses, entered at 18 florins per total. 

Painted milk glasses, entered at 13.65 Ilorins per total. 

Large and small green-painted bottles, entered at G.50 ilorins per total. 

Red-painted bottles, entered at 7 ilorins per total. 

No advance. 



VALUES OF FOREIGN COINS. 



Department cfrf^ar No. 51. ^XtUSUXl^ ^KpSXttmUt, 

BUREAU OF THE MINT, 

Washington, D. C, April 1, 1896. 
Hon. John G. Carlisle, 

Secretary of the Treasury. 

Sir : In pursuance of the provisions of section 25 of the act of August 28, 1894, I present in the 

following table an estimate of the values of the standard coins of the nations of the world : 



VALUES OF FOREIGN COINS. 



Monetary unit. 



*3 CO 



Argentine Republi< 



Gold and silver . 



Austria-Hungary. ■ 



Belgium 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

British Possessions N. 
A. (except Newfound- 
land). 
Central Amer. States — 

Costa Rica 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Salvador 

Chile 



Gold and silver . 

Silver 

Gold 

Gold 



Franc 

Boliviano . 

Milreis 

Dollar , 



.20,3 
.19,3 



Gold and silver . 



Colombia. 

Cuba 

Denmark.. 
Ecuador ... 

Egypt 



Silver 

Gold and silver . 

Gold 

Silver 



Peso 

Peso 

Crown , 
Sucre ... 



Shanghai .. 
Haikwan 
(Customs). 

Tientsin 

Chefoo 



Gold. 



Finland 

France , 

German Empire.. 

Great Britain 

Greece 

Haiti 

India , 

Italy 

Japan 

Liberia 

Mexico 



Gold 

Gold and silver ... 

Gold 

Gold 

Gold and silver ... 
Gold and silver ... 

Silver 

Gold and silver ... 
Gold and silver* . 



Pound (100 piasters).. 



Mark 

Franc 

Mark 

Pound sterling.. 

Drachma 

Gourde 

Rupee 

Lira 

Yen /Gold.. 



4.86,6>^ 



*1 Silver- 



Netherlands 

Newfoundland- 
Norway 

Persia 

Peru 

Portugal , 

Russia , 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Tripoli 

Turkey 

"Venezuela 



Gold and silver . 

Gold 

Gold 

Silver 

Silver 

Gold 



Florin . 
Dollar .. 
Crown 
Kran ... 
Sol.. 



SilverJ 

Gold and silver . 

Gold 

Gold and silver . 

Silver 

Gold 

Gold and silver . 



Milreis . 
Ruble.... 



/Gold 

(Silver 

Peseta 

Crown 

Franc 

Mahbub of 20 piasters. 

Piaster 

Bolivar 



Gold: argentine ($4.82,4) and % argentine. Silver: peso and 

divisions. 
fGold: former system— 4 florins ($1.92,9), 8 florins (83.85,8), 
ducat (82.28,7) and 4 ducats ($9.14,9). Silver : 1 and 2 florins. 
I Gold : present system— 20 crowns ($4.05,2) ; 10 crowns ($2.02, 6) 
Gold: 10 and 20 francs. Silver: 5 francs. 
Silver: boliviano and divisions. 
Gold : 5, 10, and 20 milreis. Silver : }£, 1, and 2 milreis. 



Silver : peso and divisions. 



Gold : escudo ($1.82,4), doubloon ($4.56,1), and condor ( 
Silver: peso and divisions. 



Gold: condor ($9.64,7) and double-condor. Silver: peso. 

Gold: doubloon ($5.01,7). Silver: peso. 

Gold : 10 and 20 crowns. 

Gold: condor ($9.64,7) and double-condor. Silver: sucre and 

divisions. 
Gold : pound (100 piasters), 5, 10, 20, and 50 piasters. Silver: 

1. 2, 5, 10, and 20 piasters. 
Gold : 20 marks ($3.85,9), 10 marks ($1.93). 
Gold : 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 francs. Silver : 5 francs. 
Gold : 5, 10, and 20 marks. 

Gold : sovereign (pound sterling) and % sovereign. 
Gold: 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 drachmas. Silver: 5 drachmas. 
Silver: gourde. 

Gold: mohur ($7.10,5). Silver: rupee and divisions. 
Gold : 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 lire. Silver : 5 lire. 
Gold : 1, 2, 5, 10, and 20 yen. 
Silver: yen. 

Gold : dollar ($0.98,3), 2%, 5, 10, and 20 dollars. Silver : dollar 

(or peso) and divisions. 
Gold : 10 florins. Silver: %, 1, and 2% florins. 
Gold: 2 dollars ($2.02,7). 
Gold : 10 and 20 crowns. 

Gold: ^,1, and 2 tomans ($3.40,9). Silver: %,% t l,2,and5krans. 
Silver: sol and divisions. 
Gold : 1, 2, 5, and 10 milreis. 

Gold: imperial ($7.71,8), and % imperial t($3.86). 
Silver : %, %, and 1 ruble. 
Gold: 25 pesetas. Silver: 5 pesetas. 
Gold: 10 and 20 crowns. 
Gold : 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 francs. Silver: 5 francs. 



* Gold the nominal standard. Silver practically the standard. 

f Coined since January 1, 1886. Old half-imperial =$3.98,6. 

j Silver the nominal standard. Paper the actual currency, the depreciation of which is measured by the gold standard. 



Bespectfully, yours, 



R. E. PRESTON, 

Director of the 



Opiiobof THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, April 1, 1896. 

The foregoing estimate by the Director of the Mint, of the values of foreign coins, I hereby proclaim 
to be the values of such coins in terms of the money of account of the United States, to be followed in 
estimating the value of all foreign merchandise exported to the United States on or after April 1, 1896, 
expressed in any of such metallic currencies. 

J. G. CARLISLE, 
Secretary of the Treasury. 



APPLICATIONS FOR RELIEF FROM FINES, PENALTIES, AND FORFEITURES. 



Pepart».e,,t 1 Cireul'ar No. 52. ^VCtVSXttlJ ^^'iltttU^ttt^ 

Bureau of Navigation. 

office op THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, April 2, 1896. 
To Collectors of Customs and others: 

To facilitate the consideration of applications for remission or mitigation of fines, penalties, and 
forfeitures, yon will advise applicants, ship owners, masters, aud agents, or other persons concerned, that 
the regulations governing the matter require in ordinary cases that such applications be addressed to the 
Secretary of the Treasury, and presented to your office for transmittal to the Department, with your 
report thereon. 

S. WIKE, 

Acting Secretary. 



VALUATION OF LEAD CONTAINED IN IMPORTED MEXICAN ORES, FOB PURPOSES OF 
CLASSIFICATION UNDER PARAGRAPH 165 OF THE ACT OF AUGUST 28, 1894. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 53. 

Division of Customs. OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY 



of THE SEGRETA 
Washington, D. C, April 1, 1896. 



To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 

The Special Regulations of July 17, 1889 (Synopsis 9492), as amended by Department's circular of 
July 17, 1891 (Synopsis 11481), which provides that "in determining the value of lead contained in 
Mexican ores, such value will be computed at the latest known pa-ice of bar lead in the New York market, 
less II cent per pound" are hereby supplemented as follows : 

Whenever the market value of lead at the port of importation is ascertainable, such value shall be 
taken as the basis of computation ; otherwise the above-stated rule must be applied. 

S. WIRE, 

Acting Secretary. 



XS96. 
Department Circular No. 54. 

Division of S., P., and B. 



CABE AND CUSTODY OF BLANK FORMS, ETC. 

Office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. 0., April 7, 1896. 

To Heads of Bureaus, Treasury Department, 

and Chiefs of Divisions, Secretary's Office : 

Special attention is hereby directed to the following requirements of Department Circular No. 95, 
of 1894 : 

(•&) At least a year's supply of regular or standard forms should be ordered at a time, 
(c) Blank books should be ordered at least four months, 

And— 

Blank forms, official paper and envelopes, two months before being needed for use. 

******* 

Much of the delay experienced in receiving supplies ordered from the Public Printer is occasioned 
by the numerous "specials" that are constantly being pushed ahead of the regular work. This evil 
has reached such embarrassing proportions as to require its discontinuance. 

It is therefore directed that in each bureau of the Department and division of the Secretary's Office 
the blank forms, blank books, letterheads, and envelopes be placed in the custody of a competent person, 
who should, where practicable, be supplied with proper shelf accommodations for storing the material in 
one place, such person to be held to a strict accountability for having at all times a sufficient stock on 
hand to meet the usual demands. The persons designated to prepare printer's copy and make requisitions 
on the Secretary, under the provisions of the above-mentioned Circular, might be selected for this duty. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



RE APPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 55. 



gtxasitrtj Qzpttxtmmt, 



Division of Customs. 

office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, April 4, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The following reappraisenients of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending March 21, 1896. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING MARCH 21, 1896. 

N. B. — In corresponding with the Board of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference shoidd always be made to the number of Heappraiisement. 

No. of Rcappraise- 
menl. 

11253 Stereotype plates, from Hutchinson & Co., London, February 13, 1S96 : 

1 set stereo plates, "Daireeu," entered at £18 14s. 7d., advanced to £35 14s. 7d. sterling 
per total. Add cases. 

11189 Electrotype, from L. W. Partridge & Co., Loudon, February 11, 1896: 

277 pages electros of letter press on pages 38 to 320 of "Greeu Mountain Boys," 
entered at £17 6s. 3d., advanced to £24 4s. lOd. sterling per total. Add cases. 

11287 Electrotype plates, from T. Fisher Murvin, London, February 11, 1896 : 

Steros white sand, 336 pages, entered at Is., advanced to 2s. lf|d. sterling per page. 
Steros "Game of Consequences," 192 pages, entered at 6d., advanced to Is. 7f£d. 

sterling per page. 
Add packing boxes. 

11134 Manufactures of silk and cotton, from Scheffer Hamers, Viersen, January 22, 1896 : 

36" twill, double black, 250, entered at 1.20, advanced to 1.35 marks per meter. 
36" twill, double black, 270, entered at 1.45, advanced to 1.55 marks per meter. 
36" mervilleux, black, 200, eutered at 1.20, advanced to 1.40 marks per meter. 
36" satiu, seal-brown, 410, entered at 1.30, advanced to 1.40 marks per meter. 
" 36" satin, black, 420, entered at 1.40, advanced to 1.55 marks per meter. 
27" satin, black, 510, entered at 1.45. advanced to 1.60 marks per meter. 
36" satin, black, 430, entered at 1.50, advanced to 1.65 marks per meter. 
36" satin, 440, black and seal-brown, entered at 1.60,, advanced to 1.75 marks per 

meter. 
Add cases, packing, charges, etc. 



11138, 11227.. Manufactures of silk and cotton, from Deuss & Oetker, Crefield, February 7 and 14, 1S96 : 

Satin noir, 80, 20}", entered at .75, advanced to .96 mark per meter. 

Satin noir, 80, 20}", entered at .70, advanced to .96 mark per meter. 

Satin noir, SO, 20}", entered at .85, advanced to .98 mark per meter. 

Satin de chine, 93, 20}", entered at .80, advanced to .95 mark per meter. 

Satin de chine, 93, 20}", entered at .75, advanced to .95 mark per meter. 

Satin de chine, 93, 20}", entered at .90, advanced to .95 mark per meter. 

Satin de chine, 95, 20}", entered at .90, advanced to 1.05 marks per meter. 

Satin de chine, 95, 20}", entered at .85, advanced to J. 05 marks per meter. 

Satin de chine, 95, 20}", entered at 1, advanced to 1.05 marks per meter. 

Satin de chine, 93}, 20}", entered at .90, advanced to .95 mark per meter. 

Satin de chine, 95}, 20}", entered at 1, advanced to 1.05 marks per meter. 

Satin de chine, 96}, 20}", entered at 1.10, advanced to 1.18 marks per meter. 

Satin noir, 80, 27", entered at 1.15, advanced to 1.25 marks per meter. 

Satin noir, 80, 27", entered at .95, advanced to 1.20 marks per meter. 

Satin noir, 509, 27", entered at 1.25, advanced to 1.35 marks per meter. 

Satin noir, 510, 27", entered at 1.35, advanced to 1.45 marks per meter. 

Satin de chine, 93, 20}", entered at .70, advanced to .96 mark per meter. 

Satin de chine, 93}, 20}", entered at .80, advanced to .95 mark per meter. 

Satin de chine, 95}, 20}", entered at .90, advanced to 1 mark per meter. 

Satin de chine, 96}, 20}", entered at 1.10, advanced to 1.18 marks per meter. 

Satin raye, 800, 20}", entered at .85, advanced to .98 mark per meter. 

Satin de chine ray 6, 930, 20}", entered at .90, advanced to 1 mark per meter. 

Serge noir, 512, 27", entered at 1.25, advanced to 1.35 marks per meter. 

Satin noir, 508, 36", entered at 1.35, advanced to 1.45 marks per meter. 

Satin noir, 508, 36", entered at 1.45, advanced to 1.55 marks per meter. 

Satin noir, 36", entered at 1.40, advanced to 1.50 marks per meter. 

Add packing, cases, etc. 
11067 Manufactures of wool and cotton, from Simon Israel & Co., Bradford, January 16, 1896: 

56" black union cloakings, No. 06050, entered at Is. 3d., advanced to Is. 5d. sterling 
per yard. 

54" black cotton cloakings, No. 06056/7, entered at 10 }d., advanced to 11} d. sterling 
per yard. 

54" black serges, M, 9050/1, entered at lid. sterling per yard. No advance. 

Discounts, 2} per cent and 11 per cent. Add cases and packing, 
ineno iaqio C Colored cotton corduroy, from Hardt & Co., Manchester, December 20, 27, 1895, January 



10995; etc".'.'. '.'.) 17 ' 24 ' Februar y 14 and 20 > 1896 : 

27", "B," 537, entered at Hid. sterling per yard. 

27" dark-drab, 1, 719, entered at 7Jd. sterling per yard. 

27" dark-drab, 11, 537-A, entered at 101 d. sterling per yard. 

27", "B," 719, entered at 8}d. sterling per yard. 

27/8" drab, 11, 8 shafts, 120 H., entered at Is. 2 T 9 ^d. sterling per yard. 

27/8" 11, 8 shafts, 2 H., entered at Is. 4^d. sterling per yard. 

27" light-drab, 8 shafts, 654 H., entered at 7}|d. sterling per yard. 

28" black, 8 shafts, 539 H., entered at llffd. sterling per yard. 

27/8" dark- drab, 11, 116 H., entered at Is. l}d. sterling per yard. 



10662,10748 ) 

10802,10919 [ Colored cotton corduroy, etc. — Continued. 

10995, etc ) 

27/8" light drab mole, 26 H., entered at lO^d. sterling per yard. 

28" dark-drab, 11, setts, 115 H., entered at llffd. sterling per yard. 

28" drab, 1, 8 shafts, 537 A. EL. entered at 9|fd. sterling per yard. 

27/8" light drab, Genoa cords, 567 S. H., entered at llfd. sterling per yard. 

27/8" light-drab, Genoa cords, 567 H., entered at 11 Id. sterling per yard. 

27/8" light-drab, 8 shafts, cords, 120 H., entered at 133d. sterling per yard. 

27" brown cotton cord, 541, entered at 13|d. sterling per yard. 

27" dark-drab, 1,558, entered at 6|fd. sterling per yard. 

27" dark-drab, 1,806, B., entered at 6£d. sterling per yard. 

28" light-drab, No. 539 H., entered at ll|id. sterling per yard. 

28", 120 H., light-drab cords, entered at 14^d. sterling per yard. 

28" drab, 1, cords, entered at 9^|d. sterling per yard. 

28" drab, 1, 539 H., entered at 10 T \d. sterling per yard. 

No advance on prices. Advanced by addition of 2 per cent commission added to 
invoice, but deducted on entry. Less ¥ X T . Discount, 2} per cent. 
11217 Cotton yarn, from McConnell & Co., Ltd., Manchester, February 14, 1896: 

No. 100/2, M., gassed, 20, entered at 2s. 4d. sterling per yard. Discount, 2 1 per cent. 
No advance. 
11065 Colored cotton, from Bartram Harvey & Co., London, January 30, 1896 : 

40" printed cotton, entered at 7d., advanced to 17d. sterling per yard. Discount, 21 
per cent. Add cases and packing. 
11211 Cotton netting, etc., from John Feilman & Co., Nottingham, February 6, 1896: 

90" white mosquito net, No. 204, entered at 5d., advanced to 5}d. sterling per yard. 

108" \\diite mosquito net, No. 204, entered at 6d., advanced to 6sd. sterling per yard. 

90" white mosquito net, No. 206, entered at 5 3d., advanced to 5 Id. sterling per yard. 

108" white mosquito net, No. 206, entered at 6sd., advanced to 7jd. sterling per yard. 

120" white mosquito net, No. 206, entered at 73d., advanced to 73d. sterling per yard. 

108" white mosquito net, No. 208, entered at 7d., advanced to 7 Id. sterling per yard. 

120" white mosquito net, No. 208, entered at 7ld., advanced to 83d. sterling per yard. 

108" white mosquito net, No. 211, entered at 8jd., advanced to 83d. sterling per yard. 

120" white mosquito net, No. 211, entered at 8ld., advanced to 9?d. sterling per yard. 

108" white mosquito net, No. 220, entered at 73d., advanced to 7|d. sterling per yard. 

120" white mosquito net, No. 220, entered at 7ld., advanced to S\A. sterling per yard. 

Discount, 20 per cent. Add cases. Less inland carriage. 

10620,10596 \ Olives, from Antonio de Olmedo, Antonio Alonso, and others, Seville, June 18, 20, 

10617, 1063!) j August 20, and October 17, 1895 : 

Manzanillas, entered at 14, advanced to 19 pesetas per fanega. 

11246 Unbleached and bleached cotton Swisses, from Otto G. Wolfers & Co., St. Gall, February 11, 

1896: 

Ecru dotted Swisses, No. 309, entered at .78, advanced to .87 franc per yard. 

Ecru dotted Swisses, No. 310, entered at .83, advanced to .92 franc per meter. 

White dotted Swisses, No. 87, entered at .90, advanced to .98 franc per yard. 

White dotted Swisses, No. 54, entered at .52J, advanced to .565 franc per yard. 



11246 Unbleached and bleached cotton sivisses, etc. — Continued. 

White dotted Swisses, No. 44, entered at .474, advanced to .524 franc per yard. 
White dotted Swisses, Nos. 77 and 86, entered at .80, advanced to .88 franc per meter. 
White dotted Swisses, No. 39, entered at .55, advanced to .60 J franc per meter. 
Discount, 3 per cent. Add cases and packing. 
11169, 1 UCS.... Sugar not above 16 D. S., from Samuel Abbott, St. Kitts, February 4, 1896 : 

Testing 89.30°, entered at 2.32, advanced to 2.339 United States dollars per 100 pounds, 

packed. 
Testing 84.25°, entered at 1.S4, advanced to 2.034 United States dollars per 100 pounds. 

packed. 
Testing 83.35°, entered at 1.84, advanced to 1.958 United States dollars per 100 pounds, 

packed. 
Testing 88.30°, entered at 2.09, advanced to 2.286 United States dollars per 100 pounds, 

packed. 
Testing 83.15°, entered at 2.09, reappraised at 1.9378 United States dollars per 100 

pounds, packed. 

11166 Sugar not above 16 D. S., from Emil S. Debel, St. Kitts, February 3, 1896: 

Testing 88.15°, muscovado, entered at 2.09!, advanced to 2.277 United States dollars 

per 100 pounds, packed. 

11176 Sugar not above 16 B. S., from J. Bueno & Co., Santiago, February 1, 1896: 

Testing 96.66°, entered at .024, advanced to .02872 Spanish gold, per pound, packed. 

Add bags. 

11231 Manufactures of flax, from C. A. Hottsch, Eingenhain, February 2, 1896: 

Damask towels, knot fringe, 22/50, Nos. 65 and 71, entered at 13.50, advanced to 

14.50 marks per dozen. 
Damask towels, knot fringe, 22/50, No. 50, entered at 10, advanced to 10. 75 marks per 

dozen. 
Damask towels, knot fringe, 22/48, No. 521, entered at 9. GO marks per dozen. No 

. advance. 
Discount, 2 per cent. 

7324 Flax thread, etc., from The H. B. Claflin Company, Manchester, February 1, 1895: 

White star, dark-blue, 3-cord, 2-oz. spools, entered at 59s. sterling per dozen. No 

advance. , 

25 F. quality and 40 F. quality, dark-blue, 3-cord, 200-yard spools, entered at 22s. 

sterling per dozen. No advance. 
Entered discounts, 25 per cent and 1} per cent. Advanced discount, 25 per cent. 

11050, 11194 Precious stones cut, from B. H. Davis, London, February 7, 1896 : 

Sapphires, entered at £1 15s., advanced to £1 18s. sterling per karat. 
Bubies, entered at £5 15s. sterling per karat. No advance. 
Pearls, entered at lis., advanced to 12s. per karat. 
Emeralds, entered at £4 15s. sterling per karat. No advance. 
Similar goods, similar advances. 
11039 Manufacturers of metal, leather, etc., from F. Brampton & Co., Birmingham, January 29, 

1896 : 
Bicycle saddles, Nos. 55 and 56, entered at 3s. 6d. sterling each. 
Bicycle saddles, No. 50, entered at 3s. Id. sterling each. 
Advanced by addition of cost for cases. 



11256 Steel bars, etc., from Eicken & Co., Hageu, February 17, 1896 : 

1 bar drawn-out steel, F., 50 mm., entered at 2.31, advanced to 23.10 marks, per total. 
Discount, 2 per cent. Add packing. 

11124 Cartridges, as manufactures of metal, from H. Utendoerffer, Nurnbui'g, January 27, 1896: 

Flobert cartridges (B. B. caps), entered at 2.41, discount, 5 per cent, add boxes, pack- 
ing, string, wood and zinc case, and freight, ad sauced to 2.50 marks per thousand, 
discount, 2 per cent in packed condition. 

11236 Decorated china, from C. Tielsch & Co., Altwasser, February 5, 1896: 

Tassen, 73 stab. IV. geo. rd. rosa lustre, entered at 20 marks per gross. No advance. 
Tassen, 226 IV. geo. rd. rosa lustre, entered at 20 marks per gross. No advance. 
Add casas and packing. Discount, 2 per cent. 

11247 Prepared vegetables, etc., from , Hongkong, January 21, 1896: 

Salt vegetables, entered at .90, advanced to 1 Mexican dollar per box of 8 jars. Add 
packing charges. 

11159 Vegetables, from M. Nebot, Havana, February 15, 1896: 

Tomatoes, entered at .25, advanced to .30 pesetas per crate. Add crates. 

B^to^ P 1 Sugar ahove 16 D ' S- ' fr0m Eobert Crooks & Co -> Liverpool, December 28, 1895 : 

Fourths, entered at £11 2s. 5d., advanced to £11 10s. 9d. sterling per ton, packed. 
Discount, 2 J per cent. 

2816 O. P ") 

2784 O. P >■ Chinese merchandise, from Van Kwong Hop, Hongkong, October 7 and December 2, 1895 : 

Boston ) 

Medical glue, entered at 1, advanced to 2.60 Mexican dollars per total. 

Brown sugar, not above 16 D. S., entered at 2.30, advanced to 4.80 Mexican dollars 
per box. 

Salt fish, entered at 3. 75 Mexican dollars per box. No advance. 

Medical pills, entered at 7 Mexican dollars per box. No advance. 

Medicine tea, entered at .85, advanced to 1.40 Mexican dollars per box. 

Medicine pills, entered at .07 Mexican dollar per pack. No advance. 

Dried lizards, 200 pairs, entered at 5.70, advanced to 6 Mexican dollars per box. 

2699 O. P ) 

2688 O. P > Oriental goods, from Gabriel Teorizian, Constantinople, November 12, 1S95: 

Boston ) 

Turkish embroideries, advances up to 100 per cent. 

2757 O. P \ Silk embroidery, paper and okra, vegetables, etc., from Gabriel Teorizian, Constantinople, 

Boston j December 2, 1895 : 

Okra, entered at 4 piasters per oke. No advance. 

Gauze handkerchiefs, entered at 5, advanced to 6 piasters each. 

Satin band, entered at 30, advanced to 45 piasters each. 

Table covers, entered at 30, advanced to 45 piasters each. 

Cushion covers, entered at 20, advanced to 25 piasters each. 

Doylies, entered at 15 and 20, advanced to 17 and 25 piasters per dozen. 

Add cases. 

2888 O. P Orange boxes, from Smith & Crouch, Liverpool, December 4, 1S95 : 

Boxes, entered at 9d. sterling per box. No advance. 
2S6S OP ^ 

Boston " i ^ >arc ^ meni paper, from Schleipen & Erkens, Zulick, December 28, 1895: 

Paper, entered at 76 and 81.50 marks per 100 kilos. Discount, 2 per cent. Less inland 

freight to Rotterdam. No advance. 



28SG. 
Balti 



6 

2853 0. P ) 

2901 O. P | Sugar above 16 D. 8., from Gebruder Michabelles, Hamburg, January 14 and 30, 1896 : 

Baltimore ) 

Eutered at 2.8512 United States dollars per 100 pounds, discount 5/6 per cent, less 

cartage, advanced to 13s. 2d. sterling per cwt., packed. 
Entered at 2.8512 United States dollars per 100 pounds, discount 5/6 per cent, less 
cartage, advanced to 12s. 9?d. sterling per cwt., packed. 

Baltimore I S " ffar above 16 D ' S "> from M- C- R Barbe > Amsterdam, Dec. 31, 1895: 

Entered at 15.67 J florins per 100 kilos, less lighterage, advanced to 13s. 6Jd. sterling 
per cwt., packed. 

Ra ij.: • ••■ •• I Sugar above 16 D. S., from L. E. Lowenstam, Amsterdam, January 16, 1896: 

Entered at 15.9225, advanced to 16.69 florins per 100 kilos, net. 

, 288J O. P. j Worsted doth from Wallace & Co., Bradford, December 6, 1895: 
imore j ' ' ' 

Black and blue worsted coating, No. 182, entered at 2s. 5d., advanced to 2s. lOd. ster- 
ling per yard. 

Black worsted coating, No. 443 and "D," entered at 2s. 2d., advanced to 2s. Sd. ster- 
ling per yard. 

Black worsted coating, No. 394, entered at Is. lid., advanced to 2s. 4d. sterling per 
yard. 

Black worsted coating, No. 204, entered at 2s. 4d., advanced to 2s. lOd. sterling per 
yard. 

Black worsted coating, No. 910, entered at 3s. 2d., advanced to 3s. 9d. sterling per 
yard. 

Fancy worsted coating, Nos. 385, 374, 388, 370, and 375, entered at 3s. 3d., advanced 
3s. lOJd. sterling per yard. 

Black worsted coating, No. 226, entered at 2s. Id., advanced to 2s. 3d. sterling per 
yard. 

Less measure, -fa. Discount, 5 per cent. Add cases. 

9QQ7 OP ) 

PI 'ladel \'-\ f Sugar not above 16 D. S., from Thorn & Cameron, Demerara, January 8, 1896 : 

Testing 96.70°, entered at $2.88, less N. D. charges, advanced to $2.7469, United States 
currency, per cwt., packed. 

2861 OP ) 

PI ilndel 1 i I ® u 9 ar not noove %> &• &> from Hamburg, December 23, 1895 : 

Testing 89.077°, entered at 10.4375, less N. D. charges, discount 11 per cent, advanced 
to 10.88 marks per 50 kilos, packed. 

PhiKdel P hi-i 1 Sagar not al)0ve 16J) ' S '' from T " V- Drake & Co -' Magdeburg, January 6, 1896: 

Testing 88.19°, entered at 10.875, less N. D. charges, discount W per cent, advanced 
to 10.80 marks per 50 kilos, packed. 

9S75 OP ) 

PhiKdelniii-i " I ^ u ff ar mt above 16 D. S., from Hidalgo & Co., Havana, Jauuary 20, 1896 : 

Testing 93.32°, entered at $0,021, less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to $0.023785, 
United States currency, per pound, packed. 



Phnade^iiia " [ Gin S er ale > from W - A - Eoss & Sons > Ltd -> Belfast ) February 14, 1896 : 

Barrels and half cases of ginger ale, entered at 2s. 3|d. Add barrels at 3s. each, and 

half cases at 2s. each. Goods in barrels advanced to 2s. 7£d., aud goods in cases 

advanced to 2s. 8£d. sterling per dozen, packed. 

2905 O. P.. ) ou f L j d Liana, Seville: 

San Francisco j ' ' 

Padrons. 2ds, entered at 55 pesetas per fanega. 

Keina, lsts, entered at 32.50 pesetas per fanega. 

Eeina, 2ds, entered at 22 pesetas per fanega. 

Eeina, 3ds, entered at 17 pesetas per fanega. 

Manzanillas, entered at 19 pesetas per fanega. 

No advance. 

REAPPRAISEMENTS BY BOARDS. 

30S5, 10924, ) Sugar above and not above 16 D. 8., from Eobert Crooks & Co., Liverpool, January 6 aud 
3086,11057 I 23,1896: 

English refined sugar, fifths, not above 16 D. S., entered at £9 2s. 5d., advanced to 
£9 15s. sterling per ton. 

Fourths, above 16 D. S., entered at £11 12s. 5d., advanced to £12 sterling per ton. 

Fifths, not above 16 D. S., entered at £9 7s. 5d., advanced to £10 sterling per ton. 

Discount, 2 a per cent. 
2976,10785 Wool dress goods, from E. Waddington, Bradford, December 30, 1895: 

42" black figures, No. 1888, entered at 13fd., advanced to lSd. sterling per yard. Dis- 
count, 2J per ceut. Less N. D. charges. 

2972, 10909 Manufactures of metal, etc., from Salmon & Lumley, Paris, December 31, 1895 : 

Metal retainers, 5037, entered at 28. advanced to 34 francs per 100 gross. Discount, 
2 per cent. Add case and packing. 
3058, 11026 Cotton and silJc wearing apparel, from Troll & Uhlmann, Eibenstock, January 20, 1896: 

Cotton collars, Nos. 1493, 1562, 1587, and 1594, and silk collars, Nos. 1584, 1585, and 
1595. entered at 7.50 marks each. No advance. 

Cotton collar, No. 1554, entered at 15 marks each. No advance. 

Cotton collars, Nos. 1557 and 1588, entered at 5 marks each. No advance. 

Cotton collar, No. 1592, entered at 5.50 marks each. No advance. 

Silk collar, No. 1572, entered at 8 marks each. No advance. 

Silk collar, No. 1573, entered at 9^marks each. No advance. 

Cotton collar, No. 1586, entered at 10 marks each. No advance. 

Silk collar, No. 1596, entered at 20 marks each. No advance. 

Entered discount, 25 per cent. Advanced to a discount of 5 per cent. 

2876, 10763 Chinese merchandise, from King Yu Tye, Hongkong, November 4, 1895 : 

15 vest coats, entered at 22.50, advanced to 24.50 Mexican dollars per total. 

150 color, entered at 12, advanced to 13 Mexican dollars per total. 

2 shawls, entered at 13, advanced to 15 Mexican dollai'S per total. 

2 shawls, entered at 16, advanced to 18.50 Mexican dollars per total. 

4 dozen handkerchiefs, entered at 24 Mexican dollars per total. No advance. 



2S76, 10763 Chinese merclmndise, etc. — Continued. 

15 jackets, entered at 16.50, advanced to 18 Mexican dollars per total. 

13 jackets, entered ot 42.25, advanced to 45 Mexican dollars per total. 

4 jackets, entered at 13, advanced to 17.60 Mexican dollars per total 

1 box earthenware, entered at .96 Mexican dollar per total. No advance. 

3091, 10650 Manufactures of goat hair and cotton, (black astrakhan) from Henry Walker & Sons, Mirfield, 

December 6, 1895 : 

16, 5388, 79, entered at 3s. 8d., advanced to 4s. 2d. sterling per yard. 

13, 5389, 87, entered at 3s. 3d. , advanced to 3s. 9d. sterling per yard. 
15, 5390, 84, entered at 3s. 4d., advanced to 4s. Id. sterling per yard. 

14, 5391, 90, entered at 3s. 6d., advanced to 4s. sterling per yard. 
9, 5392, 84, entered at 3s., advanced to 3s. 6d. sterling per yard. 

20, 5393, 71, entered at 3s. Sd., advanced to 4s. 2d. sterling per yard. 
Less ^t-, I yard in 10. Discount, 2 J per cent. Add cases. 



STAMFORD, CONN., A STJBPORT OF ENTRY. 



Departs* cf^lar No. 66. ^XZ&SUXQ ^Zp^XtmZUtf 

Division of Customs. 

office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, April 11, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 

The following Act of Congress, approved April 6, 1S96, making Stamford, Conn., a subport of entry- 
is published for the information of all concerned. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



AN ACT constituting Stamford, Connecticut, a subport of entry, 

Be it enacted by the Senate and Home of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress 
assembled, That Stamford, Connecticut, be. and is hereby, constituted a subport of entry for the customs 
collection district of Fairfield, Connecticut. 

Approved, April 6, 1896. 



REAPPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



1SOG. 
Department Circular No. 57 



treasury gepavtiucut, 



Division of Customs. 

office op THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, April 11, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 

The following reappraisements of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending March 28, 1896 : 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 

REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING MARCH 28, 1896. 

N. B. — In corresponding with the Board of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in thin 
report, reference should always be made to the number of Meappraisement. 

No. of Seappraiae- 

menl. 

11177 Manufactures of Silk, fromPonchon, Bouvatot, Bessieres & Company, Lyons, Feb. II, 1890. 

Double chain frei 54, Col. 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, S, 3, 11, 22, 33 Cauabis, entered at 3.15, advanced 
to 3.30 francs per meter. 

Double chain frei 51, Col. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 Canon, entered at 3.15 francs per meter ; 
no advance. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

Add case and packing. 
11155 Manufactures of Silk & cotton, from A. Bessou & Lauze, Lyons, Feb. 12, 1896. 

Broderie, 46 c/m, 4291, entered at .75, advanced to .S2 francs per meter. 

Broderie, 60 c/m 4292, entered at .90, advanced to 1.00 franc per meter. 

Suedoise I, 60 c/m 2874, eutered at .90, advanced to 1.05 francs per meter. 

Suedoise II, 60 c/m 4290, entered at .75, advanced to .90 francs per meter. 

Africaine, 46 c/m 4283, entered at .65, advanced to .70 francs per meter. 



Broderies, 46 c/m 4291, entered at .65, advanced to .70 francs per meter. 
Broderies, 60 c/m 4292, entered at .75, advanced to .90 francs per meter. 
Suedoise I, 60 c/m 2874, entered at .75, advanced to .95 francs per meter. 
Suedoise II, 60 c/m 4290, entered at .60, advanced to .80 francs per meter. 
Printed pongee, 45 c/m 4327, entered at .60, advanced to .66 fraucs per meter. 



11155 Manufactures of silk and cotton, etc. — Continued. 

Printed pongee, 45 c/m 4327, entered at .55. advanced to .60 francs per meter. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

Packing included in price. 

11258 Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from Booker Bros. & Co., Demerara, Feb. 11, 1896. 

Sugar Test 96.49, entered at $2.65 per cwt., advanced to $0.02665 per pound packed. 
11064 Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from Noerdlinger & Fratello, Trieste, Jan. 17, 1896. 

Refined sugar, entered at 16!, advanced to 19 florins per 100 kilos pkd. 

To entered value add boxes and packing. 
11279 Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from J. Bueno & Co., Santiago de Cuba, Feb. 15, 189(1. 

Sugar 96.30 test., entered at $.025, advanced to $.0301 per lb. Spanish gold. 

Sugar test. 96.95 entered at $.021, advanced to $.03032 per lb. Spanish gold. 

To entered value add bags at $.50. 
11273 Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from Ehlers, Priedheim & Co., Macoris, Jau. 30, 1896. 

First Centrif. sugar 93.75°, entered at $.0218, advanced to $.02262 per lb. 

First centrif. sugar. 85.65°, entered at $.0218, reappraised at $.01756 pkd. 

To entered value add bags at $.36. 
11224 Sugar not above No. 16 I). 8., from Emil S. Delish, St. Kitts, Feb. 10, 1896. 

Muscovado sugar (test 88.45), entered at $2.0325 per 100 lbs., advanced to $.02296 
per lb. pkd. 

To entered value add bbls. at $.20. 
11170 Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8. from J. Bueno & Co., Santiago de Cuba, . 

Sugar, test 96.66, entered at .025, advanced to. 02872 Spanish gold per lb. 

Add bags. 
11245 Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from Emil S. Delish, St. Kitts, Feb. 11, 1896. 

Muscavado sugar, test 90.35, entered at $2,095 per 100 lbs., advauced to $.02372 per 
lb. pkd. Add to entered value, hhds. at $3.50. 

Muscavado sugar, test 87.65, entered at $2,095 per 100 lbs., advanced to $.022456 per 
lb. packed. 

Add bbls. to entered value, at 20c. 
11259 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from Booker Bros. & Co., Demerara, Feb. 11, 1896. 

Sugar, test 90.80, entered at $2,255 per cwt., advauced to $.02276 per lb. pkd. 

Sugar, test 91.40, entered at $2,255 per cwt., advanced to $.02295 per lb. pkd. 

Sugar, test 89.80, entered at $2,175 per cwt., advanced to $.02245 per lb. pkd. 

Sugar, test 89.05, entered at $2.10 per cwt., advanced to $.0222 per lb. pkd. 

Sugar, test 90, entered at $2,175, per cwt., advanced to $.0225 per lb. pkd. 

Sugar, test 90.45, entered at $2.15 per cwt., advanced to $.02265 per lb. pkd. 

Cost of packages included in price. 
11167 Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from Geo. A. Wattle, St. Kitts, Feb. 4, 1896. 

Sugar, test 91.30, entered at $2.35, advanced to $2,371 per 100 lbs. pkd. 

Sugar, test 87.95, entered at $2.1325, advanced to $2,264 per 100 lbs. pkd. 
11241 Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8. from E. du Boulag, St. Lucia, Jan. 23, 1896. 

Muscavado sugar, test 84.25, entered at $.0220, advauced to $.02033 per lb. pkd. 

Deduct cartage, etc., from entered price. 

Cost of bags, weighiLg and filling included in price. 



11038 Flax lace curtains, from Celine Mayer, Paris, Jan. 23, 1896. 

No. 1382 Bid., 3 i yds. entered at 20., advanced to 22. francs per pair. 

No. 1486 Bid., 3*! yds. entered at 28. francs per pair; no advance. 

No. 1488, Bid., 3 2 yds. entered at 45. francs per pair ; no advance. 

No. 1499, drab ecrn, 3i yds. entered at 20. advanced to 23. francs per pair. 

No. 1412, drab Wane, SI yds. entered at 24. francs per pair ; no advance. 

No. 1487 Bid., 4 yds. entered at 38., advanced to 40. francs per pair. 

No. 14S9, Bid. , 4 yds. entered at 60. francs per pair ; no advance. 

No. 1490, Bid., 4 yds. entered at 60. francs per pair; no advance. 

No. 200 drab solde, 4 yds. entered at 125., advanced to 135. francs per pair. 

Discount 5 per cent. 

Add cases. 
11265.. Flax lace tidies and sets, from Labey & Duncan, Paris, Feb. 19, 1896. 

Guipure d'art tidies 50204, entered at 2.15, advanced to 2.35 francs per pair. 

Guipure d'art tidies 50094, entered at .68 franc per pair ; no advance. 

Cluny tidies 2358, entered at 2.05, advanced to 2.20 francs per pair. 

Cluny tidies 2390, entered at 9.09, advanced to 9.90 francs per pair. 

Linen renaissance tidies, entered at from 4.75 to 91.00 reappraised at from 4.75 to 
100.00 francs per pair. 

Add cases. 
10719,10915 ) Tambd. Cot. Shams etc., from M. H. Pulaski & Co., St. Gall, Dec. 19, 1895, Jan. 9, 23, 
11035,11099 ) 30,1896. 

Bonnas pillow shams 718, entered at 12.00 francs per dozen ; no advance. 

Bonuas pillow shams 717, entered at 16.50 francs per dozen ; no advance. 

Bonnas pillow shams, 800, entered at 8.25, advanced to 9.00 francs per dozen. 

Bonnas bureau covers 825, entered at 8.25, advanced to 9.00 francs per dozen. 

Bonnas pillow shams 3214, entered at 17.25 francs per dozen ; no advance. 

Bonnas pillow shams SOS, entered at 18.00 advanced to 19.00 francs per dozen. 

Similar goods, similar advances. 

Add overboxes, case and packing. 
10887 Kmbd. Cotton handkerchiefs, from M. H. Pulaski & Co., St. Gall, Jan. 2, 1896. 

Design No. 576/1, entered at 2.10, advanced to 2.26 francs per dozen. 

Design No. 581/1, 577/1, entered at 2.07, advanced to 2.26 francs per dozen. 

Design No. 15044/1, entered at 1.94, advanced to 2.08 francs per dozen. 

Design No. 343/1, entered at 2.17, advanced to 2.34 francs per dozen. 

Design No. 15034/1, entered at 2.10, advanced to 2.29 francs per dozen. 

Design No. 15038/1, entered at 2.02, advanced to 2.20 francs per dozen. 

Design No. 350/1, entered at 2.15, advanced to 2.31 francs per dozen. 

Design No. 1/1714/15838/1, entered at 4.12, advanced to 4.37 francs per dozen. 

Add manufacturer's profit 8 per cent. 

Add expenses 5 per cent. 

Add boxes. 
10962 Embd. cotton handkerchiefs, from Dauras & Co., St. Gall, Jan. 16, 1896. 

Handkerchiefs entered at from 1.98 to 6.66, advanced to from 2.12 to 6.66 francs per 
dozen. 

Add cases. 

Add 8 per cent and 5 per cent. 



I j|gg' 11345 I Silk veiling from Olliver, Paris, Feb. 5, 13, 20, 1896. 

Chenillette noir, 35 c/in 253, entered at .22 francs per meter ; no advance. 

Chenillette creme 70 c/m 69, entered at .44 francs per meter ; no advance 

Discount 2 per cent. 

Chenillette 45 c/m 597, entered at .22 francs per meter ; no advance. 

Discount 3 per cent. 

Add packing. 

11117 Cotton hose, from Heinrich Christ, Waldenbvng, Jan. 30, 1896. 

Men's Hermsdorf black cot. 868, dozen boxes entered at 2.20, advanced to 2.60 marks 

per dozen. 
Men's Hermsdorf black cot. 3262, half dozen boxes entered at 2.90, advanced to 3.55 

marks per dozen. 
Men's fast tan cot. 3464, I doz. boxes entered at 2.80, advanced to 3.55 marks per 

dozen. 
Hermsdorf blk. cot. 5006, dozen boxes, entered at 2.10, advanced to 2.60 marks per 

dozen. 
Crown cot. 648, i doz. boxes, entered at 3.20, advanced to 3.70 marks per dozeu. 
Hermsdorf cot. 649B, i doz. boxes, entered at 3.50, advanced to 4.20 marks per dozen. 
Fast tan cot., 649T, J dozen boxes, entered at 3.40, advanced to 4.10 marks per dozen. 
Hermsdorf blk. cot. 552B, dozen boxes, entered at 2.00, advanced to 2.45 marks per 

dozen. 
Hermsdorf blk. cot. 120, dozen boxes, entered at 2.20, advanced to 2.50 marks per 

dozen. 
Plermsdorf blk. cot., •] doz. boxes, entered at 3.50, .advanced to 3.S5 marks per dozeu. 
Less 5 per cent discount. 
Cases, boxes, and putting up included in price. 

11299 Unbleached cotton velvet, from Batstone, Cooke & Co., Manchester, Feb. 29, 1896. 

19 in. Picker velvets No. 24651 N, entered at 63d. per yard ; no advance. 

191 in. Picker velvets No. 24651 W, entered at 6fd. per yard; no advance. 

Less measure 1/37. 

Less discount 2 J per cent. 

Add cases and packing. 
11301 Colored cotton, from Alvardo & Co., Paris, Feb. 25, 1896. 

Cotton printed shirtings 78/80 c/m, entered at .52 francs per meter; no advance. 

Discount 4 per cent. 

Add case and packing. 
11300 Colored cotton velvet, from C. Cowper & Co., Manchester, Feb. 28, 1896. 

24 in. blk. dyed cot. velvet No. 300, entered at 15kl. per yard ; 

24 in. blk. dyed cot. velvet No. 600, entered at 20d. per yard. 

24 in. blk. dyed cot. velvet, No. 400, entered at 16 1 d. per yard. 

Less 1/37. 

Discount 5 per cent. 

Add making up Is. 2d., add packing. 

Advanced by disallowance of commission of 2i per cent, added on invoice, but 
deducted on entry. 



11314 Colored cotton, from Samuel Turner & Co., BocMale, Feb. 10, 1896. 

29 iu. Honeycombe stripes 0.17, entered at. 43d., advanced to 5|d. per yard. 
Discount 2 J per cent. 
Add cases. 

11290 Ill 'eached cotton etc. (dotted Stoisses) from B. W. Bademann, St. Gall, Feb. 10, 1896. 

7/4 Woven Swiss dots Kb. 804 JJR, entered at 20.60 francs per piece ; no advance. 

7/4 Woven Swiss dots No. 1104 JUB, entered at 27.00 francs per piece; no advance. 

7/4 Woven Swiss dots 1204 JUB, entered at 28.50 francs per piece; no advance. 

7/4 Woven Swiss dots 1504JUB, entered at 22.50 francs per piece ; no advance. 

Less discount cash 3 per cent. 

Add bleaching and finishing expenses. 

Add cases. 

11171 Bleached cotton, from M. Ph. Emdeu, St. Gall, Feb. 4, 1896. 

7/4 blattest nollen No. 806, entered at 17. 10 francs per piece of 16 auues ; no advance. 
7/4 blattest nollen No. 904, entered at 30.35 francs per piece of 32 aunes ; no advance. 
7/4 blattest nollen No. 1004, entered at 32.30 francs per piece of 32 aunes ; no advance. 
7/4 blattest nollen No. 1104, entered at 17. 10 francs per piece of 16 aunes ; r.o ad vance. 
7/4 blattest nollen No. 604, entered at 22.60 francs per piece of 32 aunes ; no advance. 
7/4 blattest nollen No. 509, entered at 15.20 francs per piece of 16 aunes ; no advance. 
7/4 blattest nollen No. 906, entered at 18.10 francs per piece of 16 aunes ; no advance. 
Add cases. 

1128 L Colored cotton corduroy, from Jas. Johnson, Manchester, Feb. 27, 1896. 

Excelsior Pure cotton cord, qual. 245.1025, Tan, mode 2, Grey C, mode 1, cream, white, 

dk. drab 2, entered at 10Jd., advanced to Hid. per yard. 
Excelsior pure cotton cord, qual. 245.1025, navy blue, myrtle, entered at 13d., 

advanced to 13}d. per yard. 
Excelsior pure cotton cord, brown 3, brown 2, brown 1, entered at 113d., advanced 

to 12d. per yard. 
Excelsior pure cotton cord, qual. 245.1025, gray 1, silver, entered at 10id., advanced 

to lid. per yard. 
Excelsior pure cotton cord, qual. 245, 1025, black, entered at 12d., advanced to 12Jd. 

per yard. 
Add wood cases. 
Less ^7- measure. 
Less 2 A per cent discount. 

11193 Manufactures of silk and cotton, from Albert Lehman, Lyons, Feb. 8, 1896. 

Armure 45. c/m col'd & black, entered at .55, advanced to .60 francs per meter ; 

discount 20 per cent. 
Satin 46 c/m 100 col'd & black, entered at .53, advanced to .60 francs per meter, 

discounts 20 per cent and 2 per cent. 
Faconne" 46 c/m, col'd & black, entered at .75 francs per meter, discount 20 per cent; 

no advance. 
Cases, packing, boxes, tickets, etc., included in price. 
11195 Manufactures of mineral substance (not decorated) (Carbons) from Schiff, Jordan & Co., Wien, 

Jan. 22, 1896. 
95 cored alternating C 13m/m diam., entered at $23.97 per 1000 meters ; advanced to 

23.36 florins per 1,000 feet. 



11195 Manufactures of mineral substance (not decorated) (Carbons), etc. — Continued. 

8 solid J, 13 in/in, entered at $21.60 per 1000 meters; advanced to 23.75 florins per 
1000 feet. 

Less discounts 65 per cent and 5 per cent. 

Add packing. 
1 1 328 Pickles & nuts, n. o. p. f. , from Luigi Savastano, Vico Equense, Nov. 16, 1895. 

Peppers, entered at 20 lire per case of 750 peppers ; no advance. 
11310,11309 Vegetables, from Antonie Calafat, Havana, Feb. 29, Men. 5, 18196. 

Egg plant, string beans, tomatoes, entered at $.25, advanced to $.30 per box. 

Add empty boxes at $.20. 
I 1240 Fish, n. o. p.f, from Joseph Chancerelle, Douarnenez, Feb. 10, 1896. 

22 m/m sprats, entered at 20.00, advanced to 23.00 francs per case of 100/4 boxes. 

18 m/m sprats, entered at 15.00, advanced to 18.00 francs per case of 100/4 boxes. 
10823 Sublimed sulphur, from Alonzo & Consoli, Catania, Dec. 14, 1895. 

Flowers of sulphur, entered at 9.00 lire per 100 kos., no advance. 
10806 Sublimed sulphur, from Michele Finocchiaro, Catania, Dec. 2, 1895. 

Flowers of sulphur, entered at 107.20 lire per ton ; reappraised at 9.00 lire per 100 kos. 

Boston P } Tiles > from Maw & Co- ' Ltd- ' Jackfield > Nov - 13 ; 1895 - 

Paving tiles, red, entered at 3s. 2d., advanced to 3s. 6d. per sq. yd. 

Packing on same entered at 5d., advanced to 6d. per sq. yd. 

2889 O P | Manufactures of cotton n. o. p. f. (paper), from J. & P. Coats, Ltd., Paisley, Jan. 28, 

Boston j 1896. 

Patent packing paper, entered at l T \d., per yard ; advanced by disallowance of 2i 
per cent discount deducted from entered value. 

Add crates at 8s. each. 

EEAPPEAISEMENTS BY BOARDS. 

2914, 10783 Manufactures of shell and metal, from Dabdaub Bros., Jerusalem, Oct. 23, 1895. 

Rosaries, mother of pearl, 2nd quality, metal mounted, small, entered at 42. advanced 

to 50.40 Francs per gross. 
Rosaries, mother of pearl, No. 1, and oval 2nds. No. 2, entered at 48. advanced to 57. 60 

Francs per gross. 
Rosaries, mother of pearl, 1st. quality 1/2, entered at 60. advanced to 72. Francs per 

gross. 
Rosaries, mother of pearl, 1st. quality 3, entered at 75. advanced to 90. Francs per gross. 
Rosaries, mother of pearl, 1st. quality 4, entered at 84. advanced to 100. Francs per gross. 
Rosaries, mother of pearl, 2nd. quality 2, entered at 54. advanced to 64.80 Francs per 

gross. 
Rosaries, mother of pearl, oval 1st. quality 1, entered at 45. advanced to 54. Francs pe r 

gross. 
Rosaries, mother of pearl, oval 1st. quality 1, entered at 90, advauced to 108. Francs per 

gross. 
Rosaries, mother of pearl, oval 1st. quality 2, entered at 102. advanced to 122.40 Francs 

per gross. 
Crosses, metal figures, entered at 12. advanced to 14.40 Francs per gross. 



2632,10212 Chemical salts, from Julius Hulseu, Newcastle, on Tyne, Oct. 16, 1895. 

Nitrate of Baryta powder, entered at £15. 17a. 6d. less freight 8s. 100 kilos, advanced 
to 16. Is. 9d, Sterling per ton net. 
3138,113111 Macaroni, from Saverio Gentile, Gragnauo, Feb. 17, 1896. 

Macaroni, 2nd quality, entered at 30. advanced to 37.50 Lire per 100 kilos. 

Add cost of manufacture at 3. Lire per 100 kilos. 

Add cases and packing at .50 lira per case. 
2971, 10797 Wool Dress Goods, from Meinkardt & Bierling, Gera, December 27, 1895. 

113/114 c/m In biege, 2688, entered at . 77, advanced to .81 mark per meter. 

Add for charges .30 marks per piece. Add cases. 
2967, 10875 Wool dress goods from Meiuhardt & Bierling, Gera, Dec. 6, 1895. 

113/114 c/m., fancy, 2907, entered at 1.40, advanced to 1.70 marks per meter. 

Add case and packing. 
3070, 10987 Manufactures of wool & Cotton, from Ferd Heilborn & Co., Bradford, Jan. 15, 1895. 

LW20, 54 in. black beaver, entered at Is. 6'>d., advanced to Is. 7id. per yard. 

161 54 in. blue doeskin, entered at Is. 8£d., advanced to Is. 9.32d. per yard. 

L30, 54 in. brown melton, entered at lO'.d., advauced to 10.92d. per yard. 

171 54 in. blue boucle, entered at 2s, advanced to 2s. 1.20d. per yard. 

171 54 in. black boucle, entered at 2s. Id., advanced to 2s. 21d. per yard. 

172 54 in. blue boucle, entered at 2s. 6d., advanced to 2s. 7Jd. per yard. 

H 50-56 black c/u twill, entered at Is. 3Jd., advanced to Is. 5]d. per yard. 
H70, 56-58 black twill, entered at Is. 63d., advanced to Is. 7.40d. per yard. 
N.B90, 57-58, black twill, entered at 2s. 9Jd., advanced to 2s. 10.34d. per yard. 
Less measure -J T , discount 5 per cent. 
Add cases, packing and making up. 

3089,11105 Sugar above No. 16, D. S., from Eobert Crooks & Co., Liverpool, Feb. 6, 1S96. 

Fourths, entered at £11. 17s. 5d., advanced to £12.00 per ton. 

Fifths not above No. 16 D. S., entered at £9. 14s. lid., advanced to £10. 10s. per ton. 

Fifths, entered at £9. 9s. lid., advauced to £10. 5s. per ton. 

Less 2 1 per cent discount. 

Packing included. 

3092,11095 ■) 

3083, 11029 > Manufactures of Silk, from Megroz & Co., Lyons, Jan. 9, 1896. 

3072,10884 J 

569 Faconne" 21 in., entered at 2.90, advanced to 3.50 francs per meter. 

656 Taffetas impe. 21 in., entered at 3.00. advanced to 3.30 francs per meter. 
635 Taffetas impe. 21 in., entered at 3.25, advauced to 3.40 francs per meter. 
654 Taffetas impe. 21 in, entered at 4.00, advanced to 4.40 francs per meter. 
651 Ceinture 7 in., entered at 2.50, advauced to 3.50 francs per meter. 

657 Ceinture 7 in., entered at 5.00, advanced to 6.50 francs per meter. 
470 Grisaille 25^ in., entered at 1.10, advanced to 1.30 francs per meter. 
618 Faconn6 25* in., entered at 3.00 advanced to 3.30 francs per meter. 
661 Faconne 255 in., entered at 1.75, advanced to 2.00 francs per meter. 

630 Taffetas impe., 20 in., entered at 2.75, advauced to 3.00 francs per meter. 
Discount 20 per cent. 
Add cases aud packing. 



3095,10782 Manufactures of silk, from Kahn & Kahn, Lyons, .Tan. 2, 1896. 

Tissus shappe & soie, Pongee 31 in. ecru, entered at .675, advanced to .90 franc per 
meter. 

Discounts 20 per cent and 1 per cent. 

Add case and packing. 
3081, 10986 Manufactures of silk (ribbons), from C. Brossy & Co., St. Etienne, Jan. 13, 1896. 

No. 48 Broche Ombre, pattern No. 532, entered at 2L.60, advanced to 23.01 francs per 
piece. 

No. 48 fac. onnie, pattern No. 534, entered at 19.20, advanced to 24.00 fraucs per piece. 

No. 60 Moni ombre, pattern No. 535, entered at 22.80, advanced to 27.00 francs per 
piece. 

No. 13 Teintpiece, pattern No. 555, entered at 7.80, advanced to 9.10 francs per piece. 

No. 29, Teintpiece, pattern No. 555, entered at 17.40, advanced to 20.75 francs per piece. 

No. 48, Ombre, Pattern No. 531, entered at 21.60, advanced to 24.00 francs per piece. 
Bonification 40 per cent. 

Discounts, 20 per cent and 2 per cent. Cases and packing included. 
3077,10792 Manufactures of Silk, from Bretthal & Co., Crefeld, Dec. 18, 1895. 

Qual. I 60 c/in, piece dyed set, entered at 1.90, advanced to 2.10 marks per meter. 

Qual. Ill 60 c/ui, piece dyed set, entered at 1.57, advanced to 1.75 marks per meter. 

Qual. II, 60 c/m, piece dyed set, entered at 1.80, advanced to 2.10 marks per meter. 

Qual. XXII, 60 c/m, piece dyed set, entered at 1.80, advanced to 2.10 marks per meter. 

Qual. XXIII, 60 c/m, piece dyed set, entered at 1.90, advanced to 2.10 marks per 
meter. 

Qual. XV, 60 c/m piece dyed set, entered at 2.00, advanced to 2.15 marks per meter. 

Add packing charges, labels and wrappers. 
2954, 10815 Linen collars and cuffs, from Richard Horstmauu, Berlin, Dec. 28, 1895. 

Howdah, entered at 4.80 marks, advanced to 5.00 marks per dozen. 

Harebell, entered at 3.60, advanced to 3.95 marks per dozen. 

Huron, entered at 3.65, advanced to 3.90 marks per dozen. 

Add cases and packing. 
3105,11152 Cotton lace, from Holkke, Nahleh (Syria), Nov. 28, 1S95. 

Laces, entered at 1.00 piastre per yard, no advance. 

Add cases, emballage, etc. 
3078, 10913 Manufactures of silk and cotton, from Gaismau & Levy, Lyons, Tan. S, 1896. 

Diagonale 36" p. on D. H. D., entered at 1.15, advanced to 1.30 francs per meter. 

Austria, 36" p. on D. F. Y., entered at .88, advanced to 1.00 franc per meter. 

DiscountsllS per cent and 2 per cent. 

Add packing. 

677, 2582 O. P.. j Wool shaw i s from c zimmermann & Son, Apolda, Oct. 5, 1895. 

Chicago J 

906 squares, entered at 5.30, advanced to 6.40 marks per dozen. 

915 squares, entered at 13.85, advanced to 16.70 marks per dozen. 

909 squares, entered at 6.65, advanced to 8.05 marks per dozen. 

921 squares, entered at 20.80, advanced to 25.05 marks per dozen. 

924 squares, entered at 22.20, advanced to 26.75 marks per dozen. 

927 squares, entered at 29.20, advanced to 32.12 marks per dozen. 



677,2582 0. P..) WqoJ shawl eic . —Continued. 
Chicago ) 

930 squares, entered at 23.10, advanced to 36.40 marks per dozen. 

Discount 2 per cent. 

Add packing (boxes). 

Add cost of case to advanced price. 
704,2768 0. P..] 
* ;l " ^:\V,Y'p \ Refined sugar above 16 I>. S., from China Sugar Refining Co., Hong Koug, Sept. 6, 1895. 



etc 



Sugar entered at $6.50, advanced to $6.79 Mexican currency, per picul. 
Sugar, entered at $6.49}, advanced to $6.73, Mexican currency, per picul. 
Sugar entered at $6,555, advanced to $6.79, Mexican currency, per picul. 
Sugar, entered at $6,761, advanced to $6.97, 'Mexican currency, per picul. 
To entered price, add 20 cts. Mexican currency, for packing. 
Advanced price on packed condition. 



-57 



FLAG OF THE UNITED STATES TO BE DISPLAYED OVER ALL PUBLIC BUILDINGS 
UNDER THE CONTROL OF THE TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



gttfasxint fjjfepartmetit, 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 58. 

Chief Clerk. 

Office of THE SECRETARY; 

Washington, D. C, April 18, 1896. 

Custodians of United States Buildings 

Under the Control of the Treasury Department : 
The following instructions are promulgated as an amendment to Section XLII, "Instructions to 
Custodians of Public Buildings, 1895," dated March 1, 1895, viz: 

The flag of the United States shall be displayed over all public buildings under the control of the 
Treasury Department during the hours of business, and on February 22, May 30, and July 4, from sunrise 
to sunset, except when stormy weather prevents. Should any of the last three days fall on Sunday, the 
flag is to be displayed on the day that is observed locally. On May 30 the flag should be placed at half 
staff. 

The revenue flag will also be displayed over Custom Houses, as required by article No. 1208, General 
.Regulations, under the Customs and Navigation laws. 

S. WIKE. 

Acting Secretary. 






RE APPRAISEMENTS OF 3IERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



Departmental No. 59. ^tjCitSUrtJ g CJJ <tVtm Ctlt, 

Division of Customs. 

OfficeofTHE SECRETARY. 
Washington, D. C, April 22, 1896. 
To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The following reappraisenients of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending April 4, 1896. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING APRIL 4, 1896. 

N. B. — In corresponding with the Hoard of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference should always be made to the number of Keappraisement, 

11356 Mf. Mineral Substance carbons, not dec, from Setoff, Jordan & Co., Wein, Feb. 6, 1896. 

I x 12", I x 11", i x 10" cored alternating C W, entered at $23.97, advanced to $26.36 
per 1000 ft. 

Discount 65 per cent. 

Cash Discount 5 per cent. 

Add for packing charges. 
11350 Precious Stones Uncut, from Coetermaus-Henrichs, Auvers, Feb. 10, 1896. 

Rough diamonds, 1801 carats, entered at 78, advanced to 82 francs per carat. 

Rough diamonds, 108J carats, entered at 72. advanced to 76. francs per carat. 

Rough diamonds, 1001 carats, entered at 64., advanced to 68.50 francs per carat. 

Rough diamouds, 100 J carats, entered at 60., advanced to 64. francs per carat. 

Rough diamonds, 601 carats, entered at 66., advanced to 70. francs per carat. 

Rough diamonds, 211 carats, entered at 48., advanced to 55. francs per carat. 

Discount 4 per cent. 
11443 Chemical salt, from Verein Chemischer Fabriken, Mannheim, Feb. 22, 1896. 

Antichlor T, entered at 10.00, reappraised at 10.00 marks per 100 kilos, packed. 

11266 Chemical Salt, from A. Boake Roberts Co., London, Feb. 20, 1896. 

Potash tablets, 24 to the ounce entered at Is. 9d., advanced to Is. lOd. per lb. 



10761 Paint, from Suter, Hartmann & Eahtjens Composition Co., Ltd., London, Dec. 27, 1895. 

No. INN Paste, entered at 22s. 9d., advanced to 24s. O.yVp-d. per cwt. 
No. IIINN Paste, entered at 68s. 6d., advanced to 73d. 11. ^d. per cwt. 
Grey paste, entered at 31/-, advanced to 33s. 5.-^d. per cwt. 
Add bbls. at 2s. 6d. each. 

1120-1 Guava Jelly, from Bridat, Montros & Co., Havana, Feb. 8, 1S96. 

1/2 lb. boxes, entered at $.70, advanced to $.80 Spanish gold per dozen. 
1 lb. boxes, entered at $1.40, advanced to $1.60 Spanish gold per dozen. 
Discount 10 per cent. 
Add case and packing. 

11451 Decorated glass ware, from S. Mossel, Amsterdam, Feb. 29, 1896. 

Crystal milk jugs, entered at 6.00, advanced to 8.00 florins each. 

Crystal bottles, entered at 3.00, advanced to 4.00 florins each. 

Crystal butter boats, entered at 12.00, advanced to 15.00 florins for two. 

Small crystal scent bottles, entered at 15.00, advanced to 20.00 florins for ten. 

Double-handle bottles, entered at 1.00, advanced to 1.50 florius each. 

Square bottles, entered at 1.00, advanced to 1.50 florins each. 

Wine glasses, entered at .40, advanced to .60 florin each. 

Wine glasses, entered at 11.50, advanced to 15.00 florins for 23. 

Add to advanced value for cases and packing. 

11150 Manufactures of silk from J. Baumann & Co., Zurich, Feb. 3, 1896. 

Black peau de soie 53/56 c/m, entered at from 2.50 to 4.10, advanced to from 2.70 to 

4.50 francs per aune. 
Black satin, 54/56 c/m, entered at from 3.25 to 4.60, advanced to from 3.55 to 5.00 

francs per aune. 
Black taffetas, 51 c/m, entered at 1.92, advanced to 2.10 francs per aune. 
Black taffetas, 57 c/m, entered at 2.15, advanced to 2.35 francs per aune. 
Black taffetas, 69 c/m, entered at 2.60/2.65, advanced to 2.90 francs per aune. 
Black damas, 52 c/m, entered at 2.35, advanced to 2.75 francs per aune. 
White taffetas 53 c/m, entered at 2.60 & 2.65, advanced to 2.80 and 2.85 francs per 

aune. 
Col'd satin 56 c/m, entered at 4.85, 5.55 and 6.45, advanced to 5.50, 6.00 and 6.90 

francs per aune. 

Less i per cent measure. 

Less 19 per cent discount. 

Add case and packing. 

11084 ) 

110S5 I Manufactures of silk & cotton, from J. & P. Michel & Co., Lyons, Feb. 5, 1S96. 

11133! ) 

Diagonale, 94 c/m No. 1999, ecru, entered at .82, advanced to .86 franc per meter. 

China 78 c/m, No. 6259 col'd, entered at .67, advanced to .95 franc per meter. 

China 60 c/m No. 6260 ecru, entered at .59, advanced to .70 franc per meter. 

China 76 c/m No. 6263 col'd, entered at .87, advanced to 1.05 franc per meter. 

Bragance 60 c/m, No. 1992 col'd, entered at .70, advanced to 1.00 franc per meter. 

China 80 c/m No. 6259, ecru, entered at .60, advanced to .83 franc per meter. 

China 95 c/m No. 6259, yellow ecru, entered at .70, advanced to .98 franc per meter. 



11084 ) 

11085 \ Manufactures of silk & cotton, etc. — Continued. 

11133 ) 

China 140 c/m No. 6259, yellow ecrn, entered at 1.00, advanced to 1.37 francs per 

meter. 

Austria 92 c/m No. 1911 (30), entered at 1.00, advanced to 1.05 francs per meter. 

Diagonal 92 c/m No. 2003, entered at .81, advanced to 1.00 franc per meter. 

Tacoma 56 c/m, No. 2060, entered at 1.50, advanced to 1.65 francs per meter. 

Discounts 16 per cent and 2 per cent. 

Packing included in price. 

Bibr. 9 meter, 45c/m, entered at 2.90, advanced to 3.15 francs per piece of 15 meters. 

Less bonification 40 per cent, discounts 16 per cent & 2 per cent. 

Packing included in price. 
11010 Manufactures of silk & cotton, from E. Chevillard & Co., Lyons, Jan. 18, 1896. 

Austria 92 c/m, No. 706, entered at .83, advanced to 1.05 francs per meter. 

Austria 92c/m, No. 707, entered at .85, advanced to 1.05 francs per meter. 

Discounts 20 per cent and 1 per cent. 

Add cases and packing. 
11216 Manufactures of Silk & cotton, etc., from Chr. Spazin, Herzog & Co., Lyons, Feb. 13, 1896. 

Serge noir 36 inch, entered at 1.00, advanced to 1.05 francs per meter. 

Faconne etc. coul. 36 inch, entered at 1.60, advanced to 1.70 francs per meter. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

Packing included in price. 
11178 Looking-glass plates, from M. A. Bomeisler, Fuerth, Jan. 25,1896. 

10J x 82 plain, entered at .35, advanced to .37 mai-k per plate net. 

14 x 10 plain, entered at .69, advanced to .70 mark per plate net. 

Cases and packing included in price. 

From entered prices take freight to New York and consul fees. 
11367 Oriental rugs, from Jas. D. Langdon, Smyrna, Dec. 12, 1895. 

Nos. 1 to 6, entered at from 19.00 to 78.00 piastres per sq. pics ; advanced by addition 
of amount of inland transp. (31.00 piastres). 
11261 Col'd cot. velvet etc., Jacobs & Leendertz, Crefeld, Feb. 24, 1896. 

All cot. col'd velvet "Superb" 17i in., entered at .88, advanced to .95 mark per 
meter. 

Add cards, tickets, labels & packing charges. 
11110 Wool lining, from J. Cawthra & Co., Ltd., Bradford, Feb. 7, 1896. 

32 in. black Italians, Nos. 617, 625, 630, 650, 655, 662, entered at from 73d. to 12Jd., 
advanced to from 8i to 13|d. per yard. 

54 in. black twills Nos. 748 and 750, entered at lid. and 134d., advanced to 11 id. and 
133d. per yard. 

54 in. black fan. Italians No. 4390, entered at 163, advanced to 17Jd. per yard. 

54 in. black fan. Italians No. 4391, entered at 18!, advanced to 19 2 d. per yard. 

54 in. black fan. Italians, No. 4392, entered at 193d. advanced to 20 Id. per yard. 

32 in. twills, No. 748, entered at 61, advanced to 7id. per yard. 

32 in. twills, No. 4305, entered at 9}, advanced to 93d. per yard. 

32 in. twills, No. 4307, entered at 10J, advanced to lljd. per yard. 

Less allowance 1 yard per piece. 

Discount 31 per cent. 



11292 Manufactures of wool (black & Navy Imperial), from Sir Titus Salt Bart. Sons Co. Ltd., 

Saltaire, Feb. 13, 1896. 

56 in. black wool Imperial, entered at Is. Si! advanced to Is. 9id. per yard. 

56 in. Navy Wool Imperial, entered at Is. I0:id., advanced to Is. 113d. per yard. 

Less discount 2} per cent. 

Add making up at \ per piece. 

Add cases. 
11440 Lemon boxes, from Antonino Villari, Messina, Feb. 10, 1896. 

Lemon boxes, entered at .80 lira per box ; no advance. 
11419 Lemon boxes, from A. Orlando, Palermo, Feb. 13, 1896. 

Lemon boxes, entered at .75, advanced to .80 lira per box. 

10278 \ Toilet soap, alcoholic perfume, etc., from Hecht, Pfeiffer & Co., Berliu, July 29, Oct. 14, 

9915 j 1895. 

Soap, powder, perfumery, entered at from 9.60 to 30.00 marks per dozen. 

Soap, savon au bouquet de violette, entered at 720 marks per case. 

Toilet articles and soap entered at 1108.80 marks per 3 cases. 

Advanced by reducing discount from 25 per cent to 20 per cent. 

Add cases. 

Packing included in price. 
j,,qo \ Toilet soap, alcoholic perfume, etc., from Maurice Allain, Paris, Jan. 30,1896, Jan. 25, 1S96. 

Soap entered at from 3.00 to 15.00 francs per dozen ; advanced by reducing discount 
from 25 per cent to 20 per cent. 

Cost of cases included in price. 

9790 1 Toilet soap, alcoholic perfumery, etc., from Hecht, Pfeiffer & Co., T. G. Mouson &Co., Berlin, 

9753 j Sep. 25, 1895, Sep. 14, 1895. 

Soap, entered at from 1.40 to 4.80 marks per dozen. 

Eau de cpiinine, entered at 8.00 marks per dozen. 

Perfumery entered at from 9.00 to 20.00 marks per pint. 

Advanced by reducing discount from 25 per cent to 20 per cent. 

Add cases. 

Packing included. 

979."> Toilet soap, Essential oil, etc., from J. G. Mouson & Co., Frankfurt, Sep. 14, 1895. 

Soap entered at from 3.60 to 9.60 marks per dozen. 

Essential oil (bottles included) entered at 18.00 marks per lb. 

Advanced by reducing discount from 25 per cent to 20 per cent. 

Add case. 
11262 Decorated china, from Porzellan-Fabrik, Victoria |Schmidt & Co., Carlsbad, Jan. 24, 1896. 

Dinner sets 100 pes. 693 '/3732 '/3663 '/3731 ', entered at 9.73 florins per set; no 
advance. 
11425 Decorated china, from Fasott & Eichel, Blankenhain, Feb. 8, 1896. 

Dishes entered at from 2.25 to 10.00 marks each less 15 per cent, 2 per cent & 5 per 
cent discounts. Advanced by disallowance of 5 per cent discount. 

Add cases. 

T$ 91 ff ® m P | Barley, from J. Lindsay, Fort Erie (Canada), 

Barley entered at $.30, advanced to $.35 per bushel. 



2913 OP... 
2919 OP... 
2909 OP.. 

etc 

Baltimore. 
2935 OP J 



.Sugar above No. 16 D. 8., from Robert Crooks & Co., Liverpool, Feb. 17, 1896, Feb. 14, 
1896, Feb. 4, 10, 18, 1896. 



Sugar fourths, eutered at £11/17/5, advanced to £12.00 per ton pkd. 

Sugar fourths, entered at £12/2/5, advanced to £12/12/6 per ton pkd. 

Sugar fourths, entered at £11/17/5, advanced to £12/7/6 per ton pkd. 
Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8. — 

Sugar fifths, entered at £9/17/5, advanced to £10/8/4 per ton pkd. 

Less 2 J per discount. 

Packages included in price. 
11173 Sugar above No. 16 D. 8., from Matthes & Borineester, Amsterdam, Jan. 31, 1S96. 

Dutch crystal sugar No. 2, entered at 16.30, advanced to 17.63 florins per 100 kilos pkd. 

Add bags, sewing and packing to entered price. 
11222 Sugar not above 16 D. 8., from Jas. Lucas, Rotterdam, Jan. 21/96. 

Test 77.90, entered at 9s. 1.725d., per 100 kilos, advanced to 9s. 6.35d. per cwt. pkd. 

N. D. charges deducted from entered price. 

N 31 Orleans' 1 8u 9 ar not above 1Q D - Sm > from Hidal §'° & Co -> Havana, Jan. 24, 1896. 

Centrifugal sugar, test 94.10, entered at $.02545 Sp. gold, advanced to $.0249 U. S. 
gold per lb. pkd. 

Non- dutiable charges deducted in entered price. 
11308 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from T. V. Drake & Co., Magdeburg, Jan. 17, 1896. 

Beets firsts test 90.24, entered at 11.175, advanced to 11.148 marks per 50 kilos, pkd. 

From entered value deduct N. D. charges. 
11307 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from C. Czarnikow, Hamburg, Jan. 17, 1896. 

Sugar test 89.775, entered at 11/4, advanced to ll/0id. per 50 kilos, pkd. 

From entered value deduct N. D. charges. 
11219 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from T. Traki & Co., Hamburg, Jan. 11, 1896. 

Sugar, test 89.98, entered at 11.10, advanced to 11.065 marks per 50 kilos pkd. 

From entered value deduct N. D. charges. 
11040 Sugar above No. 16 D. S., from Matthes & Bormeester, Amsterdam, Jan. 20, 1896. 

Dutch Crystal Sugar No. 2, entered at 15.99, advanced to 17.28 florins per 100 kilos, 
pkd. net. 

To entered price deduct cost of bag, packing & sewing. 
11037 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S. from Zuckschroerds & Beushel, Magdeburg, Jan. 11, 1896. 

Sugar test 80.00, entered at 9s. 4.51875d., advanced to 9s. 3.5d. per cwt. pkd. 

From entered price deduct N. D. charges. 
11304 Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from Alyander Bass, Macoris, Feb. 13, 1S96. 

Sugar, test 96.80, entered at $.0218, advanced to $.02435 per lb. packed. 

Add bags 36c to entered value. 
11303 Sugar not above No. 16 B. 8., from F. C. Huffingher, Macoris, Feb. 3, 1896. 

Second centrifugal sugar, test 88.05, eutered at $1.56 per 100 lbs., advanced to $.019 
per lb. packed. 

Add bags at 36c. to eutered price. 



11302 Sugar not above No. 16 B. S., from Juan F. DeCastro, Macoris, Feb. 3, 1896. 

Second centrifugal sugar, test 86.05, entered at $1.56 per 100 lbs., advanced to $.01776 
per lb. pkd. 

Add bags at 36c. to entered price. 
11220 Sugar not above No. 16 B. S., from Tolm & Eunge, Hamburg, Jan. 11, 1896. 

Sugar test 88.1875, entered at 11.015, less N. D. charges & li per cent discount; 
advanced to 10.75 marks per 50 kilos pkd. 
11203 Sugar not above No. 16 B. S., from C. Tonnant Sons & Co., Agency, Trinidad, Jan. 30, 1896. 

Muscovado sugar, test 90.74257, etered at $.0222502, advanced to $.0235 per lb. pkd. 

Add bags at 14c. to entered price. 

Add labor & filling at 2c. to entered price. 
11305 Sugar not above No. 16 B. S., from Juan F. DeCastro, Macoris, Feb. 3, 1896. 

First centrifugal sugar, test 94.782, entered at $2.18 per 100 lbs., advanced to $.02335 
per lb. pkd. 

Add bags at 36c. to entered price. 
11306 Sugar not above No. 16 B. S., from T. V. Drake & Co., Magdeburg, Jan. 17, 1896. 

Sugar Beet seconds, test 77.375, entered at 9.38, advanced to 9.14 marks per 50 kilos 
pkd. 

Deduct non- dutiable charges from entered price. 
11369 Sugar above No. 16 B. S., from J. Eignez & Co., Manzanillo, Jan. 31, 1896. 

Centrifugal sugar, test 95.575, entered at $.0266, advanced to $.02821 per lb, Spanish 
gold. 

Molasses sugar, test 90.55, entered at $0255, reappraised at $.02427 per lb. Spanish gold. 

Add bags at 50c. to entered value. 
11434 Sugar not above No. 16 B. S., from Thormau Bucherman & Co., Macoris, Jan. 27, 1896. 

Sugar test 96.79, entered at $.0208, advanced to $.02435 per lb. packed. 

Add bags at 36c. to entered value. 

11143 Sugar not above No. 16 B. S., from Dubois & Co., Matanzas, Feb. 24, 1896. 

Sugar test 94.83, entered at $.034 per lb.; no advance. 

Less freight & N". D. charges. 

2944 OP -] 

Chicago. . . . 
2899 OP... 
Baltimore. 
2937 OP... 
Baltimore.. 

etc 

11331 



Sugar not above No. 16 B. S., from Eobt. Crooks & Co., Liverpool, Feb. 12, 1896, Feb. 7, 
1896, Feb. 26, 1896, Feb. 21, 1896, Feb. 14, 1896, Feb. 25, 1896. 



Sugar, fifths, entered at £9/14/11, advanced to £10/5 per ton pkd. 

Sugar, fifths, entered at £9/17/5, advanced to £10/8/4 per ton pkd. 

Sugar, fifths, entered at £10/2/5, advanced to £10/8/4 per ton pkd. 

Less 21 per cent discount. 

Cost of packages included in price. 

Sugar, entered at 10s/6d per cwt., advanced by disallowance of 2* per cent discount. 

2934 OP ~] 

28^9°OP \ Sludge Acid, from Nat. Oil Co., Petrolia, Mch. 6, 1S96. 

Detroit J 

Sludge acid, entered at $19.26 per tankcar ; no advance. 



Prussiate Potash, from W. Caudery & Co., Liverpool, Dec. 24, 1895; London, Oct. 26, 
1895. 
Prussiate potash, entered at 6kl., advanced to 6ld. per lb. pkd., shipped December 

24, 1895. 
Add casks at ls/lOd. 

Prussiate of potash, entered at 6d., advanced to 7d. per lb. pkd., shipped Oct. 26, 1895. 
Add packages. 



)- Cotton netting & cot. lace curtains, from B.Walker & Co., Lenton, Jan. 10, 24, 28, 1896. 

Ecru, ivory Cott. Hanibg. No. 490s 40 in., entered at 2]d. per yd.; no advance. 
Ecru, ivory Cott. Hambg. Nos. 563,565, 50 in., entered at 21 advanced to 3d. per yd. 
Ivory, white, ecru, No. 139 & No. 143, 50 in., entered at 5d., advanced to 5Jd. 

per yd. 
Ivory, ecru, No. 84, 50 in., entered at 5i, advanced to 6d. per yard. 
Ivory, Nos. 517}, 5221, etc., entered at 2d., advanced to 2}d. per yd. 
Et curtains, No. 1717, 60 in. 4 yds., entered at 4s/2d, advanced to 4s. 8d. per pair. 
Et curtains, No. 1940, 43 in. 3 J yds., entered at ls/1 per pair; no advance. 
Bed sets, No. 5885, entered at 3s/3, advanced to 3s/6 per set. 
Bed sets, No. 5862, entered at 4/-, advanced to 4s/6 per set. 

Wt. curtains, No. 1373, 62 in., 4 yds., entered at 6s/6, advanced to 7s/3 per pair. 
Similar goods, similar advances. 
Less cost of inland carriage. 
Less 2J per cent. 
Add cases. 

I Cot. netting & cot. lace curtains, from B. Walker & Co., Nottingham, Jan. 17, 1896, Dec. 
( 31, 1895. 

Ecru cot. Hmbg. net, No. 3, 50 in., entered at 5il., advanced to 6}d. per yard. 

Ecru cot. Hmbg., net No. 1, 50 in., entered at 5d., advanced to 6kl. per yd. 

Wht. cot Hmbg. net 60 in. No. S500, entered at 7d., advanced to 8:|d. per yd. 

Wt. curtains 54 in. 3} yds., No. 1647, entered at 4s/l per pair ; no advance. 

Et. & wt. curtains, 50, 48, 60 in., Nos. 1759, 1907, 1930, entered at 2s/3}, advanced 

to 2s/6J per pair. 
Wht. cot. Hmbg. net, 54 in. Nos. S100/S300, entered at 3, 31, 41, advanced to 3 J, 

4}, 5|d. per yd. 
Wht. 60 in. Nos. S400/S600, entered at 5d., 7d., advanced to 6}, 8J, 9d. per yd. 
Similar goods, similar advances. 
Discount 21 per cent. 
Add cases. 

Less cost of inland carriage. 
.Cot. Lace curtains, from E. Kirke, Nottingham, Feb. 21, 1896. 

Cot. lace curtains, 3] yd. E. T. No. 2537, entered at 5s/ll, per pair. 

Cot. lace curtains, 3^ yd. W. T. Nos. 2511, 2512, entered at 3s/2, advanced to 3s/3 per 

pair. 
Cot. lace curtains, E. T. No. 2527, 3i yd., entered at 5s/8, per pair. 
All advanced by reduction of discount from 31 per cent to 21 per cent. 
Add cases and packing. 
Less carriage to port. 



8 

TC ft- l I" C° tton lace owtabu, from W. B. Baggaley, Nottingham, Dec. 16, 1895. 

3 2 yds. ecru, white, No. 20/31, entered at from ls/11 to 2s/5, advanced to from 2s/9i 
to 3s/3| per pair. 

Corners entered at 4d, advanced to 5d. per pair. 

To entered price add dressing, etc., 8 2 d. per pair, less 5 per cent and 23 per cent. 

Add cases. 

Advanced prices lb per cent discount. 
11462 Furniture of wood, from Arnisch & Co., Neusohl, Feb. 13, 1896. 

Chairs Hno, 18 braces oak, entered at 27.30 florins, 10 per cent discount per doz.; 
advanced to 18.00 florins net. 

Chairs Hno. 18 braces mahog., entered at 26.10 florins, 40 per cent discount; advanced 
to 18.00 florins per doz. net. 

Armchairs, 18$ braces, mahog., entered at 4.25 florins, 40 per cent discount; advanced 
to 2.95 florins net each. 

Add cases and packing. 

Importer on entry adds about 131 per cent to invoiced value. 

11417 Manufactures of wood, manufactures of metal, etc., from Geo. Prints & Co., Aachen, Jan. 31, 

1896. 

Patent boxes, empty, entered as of no value, advanced to 2.00 marks each. 

1200 tins (unusual coverings for sewing needles), entered as of no value, advanced to 
87. 50 marks for total. 
11378 Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from Jas. Bougie, Greenock, Feb. 20, 1896. 

Sugar entered at 10/-, advanced to 9/10i. per cwt. pkd. 

Sugar entered at 10/1J, advanced to 9/9 per cwt. pkd. 

Sugar entered at 10/li, advanced to 10/li per cwt. pkd. 

Sugar entered at 10/6, advanced to 10/4 2 per cwt. pkd. 

Sugar entered at 10/6, advanced to 10/6 per cwt. pkd. 

Sugar entered at 10/9, advanced to 10/6 per cwt. pkd. 

Sugar entered at 10/10J advanced to 10/9 per cwt. pkd. 

From entered value deduct N. D. charges. 

REAPPRAISEMENT BY BOARDS. 

lj°99 | Decorated china, from Charles Ahrenfeldt, Carlsbad, Dec. 2, 1895. 

Dishes entered at from .20 to 9.75, advanced to from .21 to 10.70 florins per piece. 
Dishes entered at from .24 to 3.60, advanced to from .25 to 3.78 florins per dozen. 
Tassen entered at 39.00, advanced to 42.80 florins per case. 
Cases entered at 5.00, advanced to 7.50 florins each. 

i^I? 6 \ Flax yam, from Bobert Stewart & Sous, Lisburu, Nov. 28, 1895. 

3099 J 

Bed star single yarn, grey, in hanks, entered at 13s. 6d., advanced to 15s. per doz. net. 

Bed Star grey, 6 cord in skeins, entered at 23s. per dozen ; no advance. 

Bed Star grey 7 cord in skeins, entered at 23s. per dozen ; no advance. 

Less 25 per cent on last two items. 

Add packing bales at 2s. 



11122 
3119 
1122: 
3120 



311 9- [Manufactures of silk, from Megroz & Co., Lyons, Feb. 6, 1896. 



No. 651 Ceinture 7 in., entered at 2.50, advanced to 3.50 francs per meter. 
No. 657, Ceinture 7 in., entered at 5.00, advanced to 6.50 francs per meter. 
No. 661, printed serge 25}, entered at 1.75, advanced to 2.00 francs per meter. 
Discount 20 per cent. 
Add case and packing. 

11033 1 Manufactures of silk & cotton, from Schiffer & Hamers, Viersen, Jan. 15, 1896. 

36 in. Rhadame 34 black, entered at 1.15, advanced to 1.25 marks per meter. 

36 in. Rhadauie 26 black, entered at 1.02 i, advanced to 1.10 marks per meter. 

36 in. Rhadame 32 black, entered at 1.10, advanced to 1.20 marks per meter. 

36 in. Rhadame 34 black, entered at 1.15, advanced to 1.25 marks per meter. 

36 in. Rhadame 40 black, entered at 1.30, advanced to 1.40 marks per meter. 

36 in. Rhadame 48 black, entered at 1.45, advanced to 1.55 marks per meter. 

36 in. Merveilleux 36 black, eutered at 1.20 advanced to 1.30 marks per meter. 

Add packing, cases, labels and wrappers. 
10401 1 Manufactures of silk & cotton {serge), from Durand Freres, Lyons, Nov. 27, 1895. 

Raw serge 92c/m, entered at .60, advanced to .92 franc per meter. 

Raw serge, 60 junielle, entered at .91, advanced to 1.40 francs per meter. 

Raw serge, 60 jumelle, entered at 1.10, advanced to 1.68 francs per meter. 

Raw satin, 60 jumelle, eutered at .90, advanced to 1.40 francs per meter. 

Raw serge, 60 jumelle, entered at .74, advanced to 1.14 francs per meter. 

Raw satin, 60 jumelle, entered at 1.58, advanced to 2.41 francs per meter. 

Discounts 20 per cent and I per cent. 

Add case and packing. 
10776 1 Manufactures of silk Tissus, sliappe & sole from Kahn & Kahu, Lyons, Dec. 7, 1895. 

Pongee 31" ecru, entered at .73, advanced to 1.00 franc per meter. 

Discounts 20 per cent and 1 per cent. 

Add case and packing. 
10777 1 Manufactures of silk from Besson, Bertrand & Co., Lyons, December 14, 1895: 

Pongee 31" ecru, No. 83731/810, entered at .73, advanced to .95 franc per meter. 

Pongee 76 c/m teint en piece No. 51/89, entered at 1.10, advanced to 1.30 francs per 
meter. 

Discounts 20 per cent and 1 per cent. 

Add cases and packing. 



11128.. 
3127... 
11180.. 
3128... 
11181. 
3129... 
etc.... 



Manufactures of flax, flax and cotton, wool dress goods, etc., from Tabourier & Co., Paris, 
' Dec. 18; 1895, Dec. 24, 1895, Jan. 17, 1896, etc. 



Linon plumetis, No. 6478, 70 c/m, entered at 1.50, advanced to 1.94 francs per meter 
Quadrille, 15761/1, 70 c/m, entered at 1.60, advanced to 2.50 francs per meter. 
Quadrille, 15729/2, 70 c/m, entered at .95, advauced to 1.05 francs per meter. 



-59 



10 
11128 | 

3127 ; 

11180 I 

3128 )■ Manufactures of. flax, flax and cotton, wool dress goods, etc.— Continued. 

11181 | 

3129 .,. | 

etc I 

Raye 15735/1, 70 c/m, entered at .85, advanced to 1.00 franc per meter. 

Raye 6472, 70 c/m, entered at 1.15, advanced to 1.35 francs per meter. 

Raye 15732/1, 70 c/m, entered at .85, advanced to .95 franc per meter. 

DamassS, 15770/1, 70 c/m, entered at .90, advanced to 1.00 franc per meter. 

Quadrille 15762/2, 108 c/m, entered at 1.30, advanced to 1.46 francs per meter. 

Quadrille 15733/1, 70 c/m, entered at 1.05, advanced to 1.79 francs per meter. 

Raye, 16072. 70 c/m, entered at .85, advanced to 1.00 franc per meter. 

Eaye, 16072 108 c/m, entered at 1.25, advanced to 1.50 francs per meter. 

Quadrille, 15733/1, 108 c/m, entered at 1.65, advanced to 2.60 francs per meter. 

Raye 16117/1, 70 c/m, entered at 1.05, advauced to 2.00 francs per meter. 

Less 5 per cent. 

Add cases & packing. 

Similar goods, similar advances. 

Bande Mousseline, 4070, 15 c/m, entered at .40, advanced to .50 franc per meter. 

Discount 15 per cent. 

Add case and packing. 



Prepared vegetables, from Sun Kwoug Hop, Hong Kong, Aug. 28, 1895. 

Salted bamboo shoots, entered at $2.40, advanced to $2.83 Mexican currency per cask 

of 95 catties. 
Packing chgs. included in price. 

VI9I' 2 [ booking-glass plates, from M. S. Bomeisler, Furtb, Dec. 7, 1895. 

Plates I" 10^x8* plain, entered at .35. advauced to .37 marks per plate. 
Deduct N. D. charges from entered price. 

oj^l 4 ' i Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from , Santa Domingo, Jan. 16, 1896. 

1st centrifugal sugar 94.05, entered at $.0184, advanced to $.02199 per lb. packed. 
1st centrifugal sugar, 93.80, entered at $.0184, advanced to $.021835 per lb. packed. 
Add cost of bags to entered price. 

^Q 3 I Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from , Demerara, Jan. 14, 1896. 

Sugar 88.60, entered at .021, advanced to $.02075 per lb. pkd. 
Sugar 89.85, entered at $.0215, reappraised at $.02131 per lb. pkd. 
Sugar 92.20, entered at $.02175, advanced to $.022 per lb. pkd. 
Sugar 88.55, entered at $.0215, advauced to $.02072 per lb. pkd. 
Sugar 89.10, entered at $.0205, advanced to $.02103 per lb. pkd. 
Sugar 90.80, entered at $.0205, advanced to $.02156 per lb. pkd. 
Sugar 91.00, entered at $.0205, advanced to $.02131 per lb pkd. 
Sugar 91.35, entered at $.0210, advanced to $.02173 per lb. pkd. 
Similar tests, similar advances. 
Value of packages included in price. 



11 

11162 1 

3101 

11164 } Sugar not above No. 16 J). 8., from Booker Bros. & Co., Deniarara, Jan. 14, 1896. 

3123.."!.!!."...." 1 

Sugar 90.20, entered at $.02125, advanced to §.02137 per lb. pkd. 

Sugar 90.23, entered at .021, advanced to $.021224 per lb. pkd. 

Sugar 91.70, entered at $.0275, reappraised at $.02184 per lb. pkd. 

Sugar 89.10, entered at $0210, advanced to $.02103 per lb. pkd. 

Sugar Eose Hall 96 10, entered at $2,525 per cwt., advanced to $.02528 per lb. pkd., 

cost of pkges. included in price. 
Sugar Skeldon, 96.25, entered at $2,525 per cwt., advanced to $.02533 per lb. pkd. 

cost of pkges. included in price. 

2835 OP \ Sugar above and below No. 16 D. S., from Robt. Crooks & Co., Liverpool, Dec. 31, 1895, 

718 j Jan. 16, 25, 1896. 

2S a 55 1 0p e ' ' ^ u 8' ar aDOve ^°- I 6 D - S., entered at £11/2/5, advanced to £11/17/6 per cwt. pkd. 

719 I Sugar above No. 16 D. S., fourths, entered at £11/12/5, advanced to £12/0/0 per ton 

Baltimore ] pkd. 

2834 OP ) Sugar above No. 16 D. S., fourths, entered at £11/2/5, advanced to £11/12/6 per ton 

717 » pkd. 

Baltimore Sugar below No. 16 D. S., fifths, entered at £9/7/5, advanced to £10/0/0 per ton pkd. 

Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., fifths, entered at £9/2/5, advanced to £9/15/0 per ton pkd. 

Less 2i per cent discount. 

Packages included in price. 
3^ 8 1 Flax thread from Wm. Ewart & Sou, Ltd., Belfast, Dec. 6, 1895. 

Flax thread finished, entered at 16id. per lb. ; no advance. 

Add packing charges. 



FIXING THE MINIMUM PER GENT AT WEIGH PERSONS EXAMINED FOR ENTRANCE 
OR PROMOTION, IN SERVICES UNDER THE TREASURY DEPARTMENT MAT BE 
APPOINTED OR PROMOTED. 



treasury gjepartmewt, 



iS9e. 

Department Circular No. CO. 

Division of Appointments. 

office of THE SECRETARY. 



Washington, I). C, April 2JJ., 1896 

To Officers, Clerks, and Employees under the 

jurisdiction of the Treasury Department. 

It is hereby provided that no promotion or appointment shall be made, except as otherwise provided 
by law, until the examination papers of the persons designated have been approved by the Board of 
Examiners, consisting of the principal officer in charge of the service in which the person is to be 
employed, the Chief Clerk of the Department, and the Private Secretary of the Secretary of the Treasury, 
or their alternates, certifying that the person examined attained an average of eighty per cent or more. 

J. G. CARLISLE, 

Secretary. 



REGULATIONS GOVERNING VESSELS EMPLOYED IN SEA OTTER HUNTING DURING THE 
SEASON OF 1896, UNDER REVISED STATUTES, SECTION 1956, AND ACT OF CONGRESS 
APPROVED FEBRUARY 21, 1893. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. Gl. 

DiviBion of Speci.il Agents. 

Office of THE SECRETARY 



Stjeasurtj Jljepartrojewt, 

Office of THE SECRE 
Washington, D. C, April 29, 1896. 



Article I. 
Every vessel employed in sea otter hunting, or in transporting sea otter parties, shall have in addition 
to the papers now required by law, a special clearance and license. 

Article II. 
No vessels propelled by steam shall be employed in sea otter hunting within territorial waters, that 
is, within three miles of the shore, or for the purpose of transporting sea otter hunting parties within said 
territorial waters. Only sailing vessels and boats propelled by oars or paddles shall be so employed. 

Article III. 

The master of any vessel having on board skins of sea otter, mink, marten, sable, fur seal, or other 

fur-bearing animals, shall, before unlading the same, report to the collector of customs at the first port of 

arrival of his vessel in the United States, and shall file a manifest in detail of such skins with said 

collector. 

Article IV. 

Masters of vessels failing to comply with these regulations will be considered to have violated the 
provisions of Section 1956 of the Revised Statutes, hereinafter annexed, and will be liable to the penalty 
described therein. 

"Section 1956. No person shall kill any otter, mink, marten, sable, or fur seal, or other fur-bearing 
animal within the limits of Alaska Territory, or in the waters thereof; and every person guilty thereof 
shall, for each offense, be fined not less than two hundred nor more than one thousand dollars, or 
imprisoned not more than six months, or both ; and all vessels, their tackle, apparel, furniture and cargo, 
found engaged in violation of this section shall be forfeited ; but the Secretary of the Treasury shall have 
power to authorize the killing of any such mink, marten, sable, or other fur- bearing animal, except fur 
seals, under such regulation as he may prescribe ; and it shall be the duty of the Secretary to prevent 
the killing of any fur seal, and to provide for the execution of the provisions of this section until it is 
otherwise provided by law ; nor shall he grant any special privileges under this section." 

Article V. 

It will be the duty of the officers of the United States who may be in localities where sea otter are 
taken, or who may have knowledge of any such offense having been committed, to take all proper 
measures to enforce the penalties of the law. 

Article VI. 
Vessels which have cleared in good faith for sea otter hunting prior to the issuance of these regulations 
shall not be seized for a breach thereof made in good faith, without knowledge of said regulations. 
Masters of said vessels shall, however, be warned by the United States officers charged with the enforce- 
ment of these regulations, and shall be given a copy thereof. 

Article VII. 
The foregoing regulations are intended to apply only to the season of 1S96. 

J. G. CARLISLE, 

Secretaru. 



RE APPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 63. 



grjeasimj ^zpaxtmmt, 



Division of Customs. 

office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, JD. C, April 29, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The following reappraisements of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending April 11, 1896. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING APRIL 11, 1896. 

N. B. — In corresponding with the Hoard of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference should always be made to the number of Iieappraisement. 

No. of Reappraise- 
ment. 

11517 Decorated glassware, from Ashmore & Son, London, March 6, 1896. 

1 case glassware, containing claret and sherry glasses, entered at £5 Os. Od. advanced to 
:C8. Os. Od. Sterling per total. 
11393 Decorated china, from Franz Dorfl, Wieu, Feb. 20, 1896. 

Vases No. 8, entered at 10. 50 Advanced to 11. Florins per pair. 

Discount 5 per cent. Add case and packing. 
11359 Decorated china, from Prague, Feb. 15, 1896. 

No. 3033 dinner sets, entered at 11.06 advanced to 12.56 Florins per set. 

Discount 6 per cent. Add cask. 
11360 Decorated China, from Geo. Borgfeldt & Co., Bodenbach, Feb. 7, 1896. 

Dinner set 557/3354, 826, entered at 12.57 advanced to 14.07 Florins per set. 

Dinner set 651/3272, 822, entered at 14.38 advanced to 15.88 Florins per set. 

Dinner set, 653/4020, 825, entered at 11.61 advanced to 13.11 Florins per set. 

Dinner set, 557/3338, 829, entered at 10.45 advanced to 11.95 Florins per set. 

Discount 6 per cent. 

Add casks. 
11280 Cotton lace curtains, from Simon May & Co., Nottingham, Feb. 17, 1896. 

Ivory and white lace curtains, 6163/507N, •'!•] yards, entered at 5s/6d Sterling im- 
pair, No Advance. 

Ivory and white lace curtains, 2586/5076, entered at 5s/;>d Sterling per pair, No 
Advance. 

White and ecru lace curtains, 5826/5060, 4 yards, entered at (is/Od Sterling per pair, 
No Advance. 

Ecru and white lace curtains, 3i yards, 2541/5096, entered at 5s/2kl Sterling per pair, 
No Advance. 



H280 Cotton lace curtains, etc. — Continued. 

Ecru 3081/5075 and ecru 3080/5074, entered at 5s and 4s/9 2 d advanced to 5s/3d 

Sterling per pair. 
Discounts 21 per cent and i per cent. Add cases and packing. 

ni07? 1 CoUmi nettings, from George Mather's Exors. Nottingham, Feb. 14 and 21, 1896. 

2000, 49" and 2001 45" ecru, fancy curtain nets, entered at 23 d Sterling per yard, No 

Advance. 
2002, 48" ecru fancy curtain nets, entered at 2|d Sterling per yard, No Advance. 
2010 45" ecru fancy curtain nets, entered at 4Jd Sterling per yard, No Advance. 
2011, 2012, 45" ecru fancy curtain nets, entered at 4 2 d Sterling per yard, No Advance. 
106, 36" white point d'Esprit nets, entered at 4d Sterling per yard, No Advance. 
116, 36" white point d' esprit nets, entered at 5d Sterling per yard, No Advance. 
206, 54" white point d' esprit nets, entered at 6}d Sterling per yard, No Advance. 
216/54", white point d'esprit nets, entered at 71d Sterling per yard, No Advance. 
195, 48" ecru curtain nets, entered at 8?d Sterling per yard, No Advance. 
2003 46", 2004, 2005 47" and 2006 44" ecru curtain nets entered at 3d Sterling per yard, 

No Advance. 
2008 47" 2009 49" ecru curtain nets, entered at 31d Sterling per yard, No Advance. 
3698 50" ecru curtain nets, entered at 82 d Sterling per yard, No Advance. 
Discounts 20 per cent & 2J per cent. 
Add cases. 

{4°^° X Cotton lace curtains and cotton netting, from B. Walker & Co., Nottingham, Jan. 9, 1896. 

Ivory cotton Hamburg net, 50" 101, 108 and 207 and ecru cotton Hamburg net, 50" 

102 and 106 entered at 2|d advanced to 3d Sterling per yard. 
Ecru and ivory cotton Hamburg net 50" 301 and 302, entered at 3d advanced to 3Jd 

Sterling per yard. 
Ecru cotton Hamburg net 50" 407, and ivory cotton Hamburg net 50" 401 and 402, 

entered at 4^d advanced to 5d Sterling per yard. 
Ecru cotton Hamburg net 50" 1005, 1006 and 1007 entered at 6£d advanced to 6|d Ster- 
ling per yard. 
W. T. curtains 1757 50" 31 yards, entered at 2/3Jd advanced to 2s6£d Sterling per pair. 
E. T. curtains, 1759 50" 31 yards, entered at 2s3 2 d advanced to 2s/6 2 d Sterling per pair. 
W.T. curtains, 1908 48" 3J yards, entered at 2s/3Jd advanced to 2s/6 2 d Sterling per 

pair. 
W. T. curtain 1932 44" 3 yards, entered at Is Sterling per pair, No Advance. 
Discount 2i per cent. 

11267 Cotton lace curtains, from Goodall & White, Glasgow, Feb. 21, 1896. 

No. 674 61 yards E. T. curtains, entered at 4s/3*d advanced to 4s/6 2 d Sterling per pair. 
Nos. 843 and 893, 6i yards E. T. curtains, entered at 5s/8Jd Sterling per pair, No 

Advance. 
Discount 31 per cent. Advanced discount 2 2 per cent. Add cases and packing. 

11179 Cotton lace curtains, from E. W. Rice & Co., Nottingham, January 17, 1896. 

E. K. curtains 6495, 3? yards, entered at 4s /2d advanced to 4s /8d Sterling per pair. 
W. K. curtains, 7036, 7050, 31 yards, entered at 5s /6d advanced to 6s/- Sterling per 

pair. 
E. K. curtains, 6300, 31 yards, entered at 4s /Id advanced to 4s /6d Sterling per pair. 
W. curtains, 806, 3 2 yards, entered at 4s /lid advanced to 5s /9d Sterling per pair. 
Discount 2 i per cent. Add cases. Deduct inland freight. 



11467 Mfs. sillc and linon, from A. Tabourier & Co.. Paris, Mar. 3, 1896. 

Linon quadrille 15761 /l 70 c/m entered at 1.75 advanced to 2.50 Francs per meter. 

Linon rayi, 15732 /2 70 c /in, entered at 1.30 advanced to 1.45 Francs per meter. 

Linon rayi, 15730 /l 70 c /m, entered at .85 advanced to .95 Franc per meter. 

Discount 5 per cent. Add cases and packing. 
1X442 1 Silk veiUn 9> from Olliver, Paris, Feb. 28, 1896. 

Chenillette, 70 c /m, No. 69, entered at .44 Franc per meter No Advance, Discount 2 
per cent. 

Chenillette, 35 c /m, No. 253, entered at .22 Franc per meter No advance, Discount 2 
per cent. 

Chenillette, 45 c /m, No. 283, entered at .22 Franc per meter No advance. 

Discount 3 per cent. Add cases. 
11484 Mfs. of wool and cotton, from M. Zossenheim & Co., Leeds March 14, 1896. 

No. 4698, chinchilla cotton warp, entered at Is /8d advanced to Is /lid Sterling per yard. 

No. 4670 chinchilla cotton warp, entered at Is /10d advanced to 2s /Id Sterling per yard. 

Less measure 1 /37th, less 1 /40th, discount 3} per cent, add packing. 
11491 1 

^cjo VMfs. of metal, from Chr. Wandel, Eeutlingen, Feb. 29, & Mar. 7,1896. 

Wire cloths, No. 70, entered at 6. Marks per square meter, No advance. 

"Wire cloths, No. 90, entered at 7. Marks per square meter. No Advance. 

Add packing. 
10637 ) 

1072 4 i Lava MP 8 ' ^ rom J- Von Schwarz, Nurnberg, Nov. 30 and Dec. 21, 1895. 

E. H. lava tips, 3 & 4, entered at 1.10 advanced to 1.20 Marks per gross. 

Discount 5 per cent. Less inland freight. 

11476 ") Bleached & unbleached cotton, (dotted Swisses) from Otto G. Wolfers & Co., St. Gall. Mar 

11496 } 4,1896. 

7/4, No. 54, entered at .51 advanced .52 J Franc per yard. 

7/4, No. 86, entered at .80 Franc per yard, No Advance. 

7/4, No. 57, entered at .62 Franc per yard, No Advance. 

7/4 No. 87, entered at .90 Franc per yard, No Advance. 

7/4, No. 77, entered at .79 advanced to .80 Franc per yard. 

7/4 No. 44, entered at .46 advanced to 47 J Franc per yard. 

Ecru dotted Swisses, No. 3509, entered at . 75 Franc per yard No Advance. 

Ecru dotted Swisses, No. 3512, entered at .SO Franc per yard No Advance. 

Discount 3 per cent. Add case and packing. 
11495 Chemical salts, from Konigs Wartin & Ebell Chemische Fabrik. Linden, Feb. 25, 1896. 

Antichlor, entered at 8.45 advanced to 10. Marks per 100 kilos. 

To entered price add packing, advanced price packed. 
11421 Bead trimmings, from Kern, Loewi & Mendel, Annaberg, Mar. 6, 1896. 

Samples entered at discount 15 per cent. Advanced to a discount of 5 per cent & 1 
per cent. 
11486 Bead trimmings, from H. Hempel & Co., Sachsen, Mar. 5, 1896 

Samples, entered at discounts 20 per cent, 5 per cent, and 2 i per cent. Advanced to 
discounts of 5 per cent and 2 } per cent. 
11401 Stereotype plates, from Benziger Bros., London, Feb. 27, 1896. 

Stereotype plates of Hunter dogmatic theology volume 3, entered at £19. 18s. Id. 
advanced to £40. 0s. Od. Sterling per total. 

Add cases and packing. 



11549 Meel tubes, from The Mannismann Tube Co., Ltd., Landore, Mar. 14, 1896. 

Entered discounts 67' per cent and 2' i>er cent Advanced to a discount of 67* per 
cent. 
11430 Soap, N. 8. P. F. from C. C. Bartlcy, Birmingham, Feb. 8, 1896 

Soft soap, entered at 9s/6d advanced to 10S. Sterling per dozen quarts. 

Soft soap, entered at 6s/- advanced to 6s/6d Sterling per dozen pints. 

Add casks. 
11389 Wool hiit fabrics, from Felix Frank, Chemnitz, Feb. 13, 1896. 

5i navy stocking nette entered at a discount of 10 per cent and 9 per cent commission, 
advanced by disallowance of deduction of 9 per cent commission. 

mVl 1 Sugar not above 16 D. S., from Francke Hijos & Co.. Havana Feb. 26, 1896. 

11450 j " 

Testing 93.72, entered at .02* less freight, advanced to .02.74 U. S. Gold per lb., 

packed. 

Testing 93.589, entered at .021 less freight, advanced to .02.73 U. S. Gold per lb- 
packed. 
11420 Sugar notabove 16 D. S. from Hildalgo & Co., Havana, Feb. 13, 1896. 

Testing 94.4528, entered at .02|f less freight, advanced to .02.68 U.S. Gold per lb., 
packed. 
11405 ...Mohair shawls, from Eobert Winkler, Loebschutz, Feb. 15, 1896. 

Eosa, 0, 570, entered at 15.25 Marks per dozen, No Advance 

Toni, 3, 250, entered at 27. advanced to 29. Marks per dozen. 

Ida 0, 890 & 900, entered at 8.50 Marks per dozen, No advance. 

Flora, 1, 550 and 1, 600, entered at 14. advanced to 15. Marks per dozen. 

Flora, 1, 000, entered at 28. advanced to 30. Marks per dozen. 

Holland, 0, 420, entered at 24. advanced to 25.50 Marks per dozen. 

Juno, 1, 650, entered at 24. advanced to 25. 50 Marks per dozen. 
11431 Flax yarn, from Eobert Stewart & Sons, Lisborn, Feb. 13, 1896. 

Polished yarn, w. brown, 6 cord satin in hanks and bundles, entered at 26s/- advanceed 
to 29s/- Sterling per dozen. 

Polished yarn w. brown, 6 cord satin in hanks and bundles, entered at 41s/- advanced 
to 43s/- Sterling per dozen. 

Polished yarn, w. brown, 3 cord satin, in hanks and bundles, entered at 33s/- advanced 
to 36s/- Sterling per dozen. 

Discount 25 per cent. Add packing. Deduct inland carriage. 

11264 \Oelatine, from Deutsche Gelatine Fabriken, HOchst Feb. 20, and Frankfort, Feb. 12, 

11329 j 1896. 

Gelatine No. 4, entered at 300. advanced to 324. Marks per M. sheets. 
11444 Prepared vegetables and bean sticks, from Sun Quong Hop, Hongkong, Jan. 11, 1896. 

Green vegetables, entered at 1. Mexican dollar per box of 8 jars, No Advance. 

Bean sticks, entered at 2.50, advanced to 2.70 Mexican Dollars per box of 40 pounds. 
11445 . ... \ Sweetmeats, sauce, soy, isinglass, &c, from Kwong Yee Wing, Hongkong, Oct. 11 and 
11504 j 14th 1895. 

Candied betelnuts, entered at 1.30 advanced to 1.60 Mexican Dollars per box of 18 jars. 

Candied plums, entered at 1.50 advanced to, 1.80 Mexican Dollars per box of 18 jars. 

Candied wong pa, entered at 1.50 advanced to 1.80 Mexican Dollars per box of 18 jars. 

Soy, entered at 2. advanced to 2.40 Mexican dollars per tub of 100 catties. 

Plum sauce, entered at 2.37 advanced to 2.50 Mexican Dollars per tub of 100 catties. 
Isinglass, entered at 14. advanced to 14.85 Mexican Dollars per bale of 70 pounds. 



5 

Detroit P j Mica > from Powe11 & demons, Ottowa, Canada, Sept, 4, 1895. 

Cut amber mica, 1x3" and l|"x2J" entered at 10. discount 30 per cent, advanced to 
$16. per 100 pounds, net. 
New Oifeiiis > Mushrooms, from Charles Jougla, Bordeaux, Jan. 16, 1896. 

No. 2, entered at 64. Francs per case. No Advance. 

No. 4, entered at 79. Francs per case, No advance. 

Discount 5 per cent. Less cartage and putting on board. 
New Orleans i Mushrooms, fromCh. Chevalier, Puteaux, Dec. 17, 1895. 

Champignons gallipedan, entered at 51. Francs per case, of 100 » tins. No advance. 

Discount 5 per cent. 
New Or- I Mmlirooms i from Adolphe Eeynaud, Paris, Feb. 15, 1896. 

Champignons extra, entered at 54.60 Francs per case of 100 i tins, No Advance. 

Champignons, 1st choice, entered at 44.60 Francs per case of 100 I tins, No Advance. 

Champignons, 2nd. choice, entered at 35.10 Francs per case of 100 I tins, No Advance. 

Champignons, ordinares, entered at 23.60 Francs per case of 100 •} tins, No Advance. 

Add cost of boxes putting up etc., 22.40 Per case. 
SanViaiicisc'o" } M - fs - °ffl ax ' from dnnamond Park Co., Belfast, Jan. 14, 1896. 

52" damask 46, entered at 6id Sterling per yard, No advance. 

42" damask 47, entered at 6Jd Sterling per yard, No advance. 

72" cream demi wash damask 60, entered at 10*d Sterling per yard, No Advance. 

Discount 5 per cent. Add packing. 

2945 o.p ") 

2946 o. p [Mfs. of silk, from E. Mendelson, Yokohama, Feb. 10 and 17, 1896. 

San Francisco.. ) 

White habutai, 27x50 yards, 2nd. quality, entered at 6.80 advanced to 7.10 Silver Yen 

per 100 mommes. 
White habutai, 20x50 yards, 2nd. quality, entered at 6.80 advanced to 7.10 Silver Yen 

per 100 mommes. 
White oshu 36x50 yards, 2nd. quality, entered at 6.80 Silver Yen per 100 mommes, 

No Advance. 
White echyeu habutai 27x50 yards 2nd. quality, entered at 6.80 advanced to 7. Silver 

Yen per 100 mommes. 
Jap dyed colored canton pongee 20x40 yards, quality 17 J entered at 8.50 advanced to 

8.62 Silver Yen per 100 mommes 
dyed Oshu habutai, 27x50 yards, 2nd. quality, entered at 6.80 advanced to 7.25 Silver 

Yen per 100 mommee. 
Brocade habutai, 24x25 yards, 2nd. quality entered at 7.50 advanced to 7.80 Silver 

Yen per 100 mommee. 
Koshu kaki, 20x50 yards, 2nd. quality, entered at 6.60 Silver Yen per 100 mommee, 

No advance. 

2950 o.p ] 

2951 o. p > Sugar not above 16 D. S. from Macleod & Co., Cebu, Dec. 2, 1S95. & Iloilo, Nov. 20 1895 

Phila ) 

No. 1, reappraised at 3.50 Manila currency per picul. 
No. 2, reappraised at 3. Manila currency per picul. 
No. 1, reappraised at 4. Minila currency per picul. 
No. 2, reappraised at 3.37; Minila currency per picul. 



2920 °- P I Sugar not above 16 D. S. from Ransohoff & Wissler, Magdeburg, Jan. 13, 1896. 

Phila J 

Testing 89.11, entered at 10.85, advanced to 11. Marks per 50 kilos, packed. 

2941 °- P 1 Ginger ale from Cochrau & Co., Belfast, Mar. 2, 1896. 

Phila j 

Entered at 27s/6d Sterling per barrel, Discount 10 per cent, ~No advance. 

2894 o. p ") 

2895 o. ]> [■ Wool cloths, from Wallace & Co., Bradford, Dec. 31, 1895 and Jan. 24, 189G. 

Baltimore ) 

55/50" quality B. black worsted coatings, entered at 2s/2d advanced to 2s/8d Sterling 

per yard. 

55/56" quality 910, black worsted coating, entered at 3s/2d advanced to 3s/9d Sterling 
per yard. 

55/56" quality 362 blue worsted coating, entered at 2s/6d advanced to 2s/9d Sterling 
per yard. 

55/56" quality 394. black, worsted coatings, entered at 3s/3d advanced to 3s/10]d Ster- 
ling per yard. 

55/56" quality 394, blue worsted coatings, entered at ls/lld advanced to 2s/4d Ster- 
ling per yard. 

55/56" quality 226, black worsted coatings, entered at 2s/ld advanced to 2s/4d Ster- 
ling per yard. 

55/56" quality 285, black worsted coatings, entered at ls/8Jd advanced to ls/10Jd 
Sterling per yard. 

Less measure l/37tb Discount 5 per cent. Add cases. 
289 3 o. p » Earthenware, from J. & G. Meakin, Ltd., Hanley, Jan. 16, 1896. 

Entered discounts 45 per cent, 30 per cent, 5 per cent & 5 per cent, advanced discounts 
45 per cent, 5 per cent & 5 per cent. 

2985 o. p j Decorated earthenware, from TJnger&Schilde, Boschutz, Thurinza, 

Chicago j 

Discounts 5 per cent 5 per cent and 15 per cent sample discount, advanced by disallow- 
ance of deduction of 15 per cent sample discount. 

2817 0. p ~) . „ „. „ , 

2984 o. p V Macaroni, from Antonio Bondino, Naples, 

Chicago ) „ , ., 

Entered at 35. advanced to 42. Lire per 100 kilos. 

2 755 o. p j M jr s _ O fwool, f r om Elberfeld, Dec. 6, 1895. 

' * Entered discounts 24 and 24 per cent commission, advanced by disallowance of 

deduction of 24 per cent commission. 

2708 o. p } Wool dress g00 ds, from L. Hecht & Co., Berlin, Oct. 29, 1895. 

Chicago I 

Wool shawls. 6149/95, entered at 5.25 advanced to 7. Marks per dozen. 

Scarves, 400/1, entered at 2.75 advanced to 3.20 Marks per dozen. 

Scarves, 400/5, entered at 6.75 advanced to 7.80 Marks per dozen. 

Scarves, 400/4 entered at 5. advanced to 5.80 Marks per dozen. 

Scarves, 400/7, entered at 10.75 advanced to 12.50 Marks per dozen. 

Add cases &c. 

2714 o. p \ Cigars, from Havana, Nov. 22, 1895. 

r Eosa Santi perfectos, entered at 74.50 advanced to 75. Spanish gold per M. 

Discount 2 J per ceut. 



1T382 Mfs. of silk and cotton, from Keller & Maeder, Zurich March 3, 1896. 

Turquoise noir te coton a/c S 60/61 c/in, entered at 2.15 advanced to 2.35 Francs per 
aune. 

Satin noir, te coton. 1044, entered at 1.95 advanced to 2.10 Francs per aune. 

Satin noir te coton, 1119, entered at 2.65 advanced to 2.85 Francs per aune. 

Satin pointille, te coton, entered at 2.40 advanced to 2.60 Francs per aune. 

Discount 20 per cent Add cases and packing. 
11107 Mfs. of silk, from Boucharlat, Freres & Pettit, Lyons, Mar. 8, 1896. 

Peau de soie, noir, 54 c/m, No. B, entered at 2.75 advanced to 3.05 Francs per meter. 

Peau de soir noir, 54 c/m No. C, entered at 3. advanced to 3.30 Francs per meter. 

Peau de soie noir, 54 c/m, No. D, entered at 3.25 advanced to 3.45 Francs per meter. 

Peau de soie noir, 55 c/m No. E, entered at 3.50 advanced to 3.75 Francs per meter. 

Peau de soie noir, 56 c/m, No. F, entered at 3.70 advanced to 4. Francs per meter. 

Peau de soie noir, 58 c/m, No. I, entered at 4.60 advanced to 4.95 Francs per meter. 

Danias noir 52 c/m, , entered at 1.85 advanced to 2. Francs per meter. 

Discount 20 per cent. 
11185 Mfs. of silk and cotton, from F. Lafite & Co., Lyons, Feb. 12, 1896. 

61 c/m blanc, No. 788/799 serge, entered at .65 advanced to .71 Franc per meter. 

61 c/m blanc 800/31 serge, entered at .67 advanced to .73 Franc per meter. 

60 '61 c/m creme No. 832/59 serge, entered at 1.12 advanced to 1.22 Francs per meter. 

60/61 c/m blanc, No. 930/79 serge, entered at .65 advanced to .71 Franc per meter. 

60 c/m blanc, No. 980/9 serge, entered at .80 advanced to .90 Franc per meter. 

6(1/61 c/m, blanc, No. 990/1039 serge, entered at .75 advanced to .83 Franc per meter. 
Discount 20 per cent. 
11201 Linen collars and cuffs, from Bichard Horstinann, Berlin Feb. 6, 1896. 

Holbein, 14J/16, entered at 3.70 advanced to 3.90 Marks per dozen. 

Hiawasse and Hindoo, 144/18, entered at 3.45, advanced to 3.75 Marks per dozen. 

Hudson, 141/18, entered at 3.43^, advanced to 3.75 Marks per dozen. 

Hamilton, 14/171, entered at 3.73:1 advanced to 3.S5 marks per dozen. 

Halvemen, 15J/17, entered at 3.90 Marks per dozen, 

Halton, 143/165, entered at 3.66^ advanced to 3.80 Marks per dozen. 

Himyara, Prescott & Macaulay, 14/20, entered at 3.501 advanced to 3.65 Marks per 
dozen. 

Hugo, 14!/16i, entered at 3.772, advanced to 3.95 Marks per dozen. 

Honolulu, 13I/17J, entered at 3.43^, advanced to 3.65 Marks per dozen. 

Harrowgate, 131/17, entered at 4.85^ advanced to 4.90 Marks per dozen. 

Henrique, 9i/ll 5 entered at 6.01}, advanced to 6.12 Marks per dozen pairs. 

Hathaway 11/11] entered at 6.011 advanced to 6.05 Marks per dozen pairs. 

Hanover, 91/11, entered at 6.70 T 9 U advanced to 7 Marks per dozen pairs. 

Holworthy, 11, entered at 5.90 advanced to 6.40 Marks per dozen pairs. 

Eliot, and Halcyon 14/17, entered at 3 55 advanced to 3.70 Marks per dozen. 

Schiller, 14/17, entered at 3.45 advanced to 3.65 Marks per dozen. 

Swift, 13/16', entered at 3.60 advanced to 3.77 Marks per dozen. 

Goethe, 14/16'., entered at 3.25 advanced to 3.45 Marks per dozen. 

Defoe 14/17], entered at 3.60 advanced to 3.65 Marks per dozen. 

Emerson, 14/18 2 , entered at 3.45 advanced to 3.70 Marks per dozen. 

Lowell, 14/17, entered at 3.48^ advanced to 3.85 Marks per dozen. 



11201 IAnen collars and cuffs, etc. — Continued. 

Thackeray, 14/173, entered at 3.65 advanced to 3.85 Marks per dozen. 

Dickens, 14/17, entered at 3. 77 J advanced to 3.85 Marks per dozen. 

Bulwer, 13/163, entered at 3.585 advanced to 3.90 Marks per dozen. 

Oarlyle and Huguenot, 14 /17, entered at 3.50 advanced to 3.65 Marks per dozen. 

Whittier, 91 /lis, entered at 5.333 advanced to 5.50 Marks per dozen pairs. 

Longfellow and Browning 93 /Hi, entered at 5.333 advanced to 5.50 Marks per dozen 

pairs. 
Byron, Moore and Spencer and Dryden, 93 /Hi, entered at 6.111 advanced to 6.15 

Marks per dozen pairs. 
Burns, 9i /Hi, entered at 5.81^ advanced to 6.10 Marks per dozen pairs. 
Hollywood, 16 /17i, entered at 4.30 Marks per dozen, No Advance. 
Homesdel, 143 163, entered at 3.70 advanced to 3.75 Marks per dozen. 
Hoodah, 133 /153, entered at 5.30 Marks per dozen, No Advance. 
Add for making up on collars .10 Pfennige per dozen and cuffs .20 Pfennige per dozen. 
Add cases and packing. 

11282 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from J. Talbo Jr., Pernambuco, Feb. 1, 1896. 

Testing 85. Muscavado, entered at 16s /9Jd advanced to 19s/- Sterling per 100 kilos. 

11479 Sugar not above 16 D. 8. from Triden O. Bourke, Cienfueges, Feb. 27, 1896. 

Testing 96.80, entered at 0.2 i less freight, advanced to .02.919 U. S. Gold per lb., 

packed. 
Testing 86. molasses, entered at 0.2f, less freight, advanced to .02.221 U. S. Gold per 

lb., packed. 

11505 Dressed fur on sUns, fromN. Haendler & Son, London, Mar. 9, 1896. 

Alaska and copper, entered at 86s and 51s /- less discount 23 per cent ; add lot money, 

brokerage, add dressing, dyeing and finishing at 14s/- add cases and packing. 
Advanced by addition of 2 per cent commission. 

11499 Worsted yarn, from Alfred Mott Freres, Boubaix, Mar. 11, 1896. 

Parti 934, ecru, quality 114 trame 1 ,/60 anglais on tubes, entered at 5.35 Advanced to 

5.75 Francs per kilo. 
Parti 993, ecru, quality 114, trame, 1 /75 anglais on tubes, entered at 5.73 advanced 

to 6.13 Francs per kilo. 
Marine assurance deducted on entry, not allowed on reappraisement. 

Chi 2 °'o P I M f Sl °f metal ' from Southampton!, Nov. 11, 1895. 

Engine filling liquid fuel apparatus, entered at £20. Is. Od. advanced to 20. 19s. 7d. 
Sterling per total. Add case. Added to make market value (for royalty)) £16. 
j" 1 . 1 °J, I 1 1 Mfs. of silk from Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Shanghai, Aug. 9, 1895. 

Shauting pongees advanced by addition of amount of charge for inspecting. 
Ch^-°* P 1 Artificial flowers, from C. Barp, London, Dec. 19, 1895. 

Entered at from 7d to ls/7id Sterling per gross, less discount 73 per cent. No Ad- 
vance. 

2917 o. p ) 

Nogales > Live cattle from Mexico, 

Arizona ) 

Steers, three years old, entered at 14. advanced to 15. Mexican dollars per head. 



PEAPPRATSEMENTS P.Y P.OAKDS. 

<*HJ?. I Mfs. of silk, from Paris, Jan. 11, 1896. 

112,7 ) J J 

Linen raye, 16072, 70 c/m, entered at .85 advanced to 1. Franc per meter. 

Linen plumetis, 6478, 70 c/m, entered at 1.55 advanced to 1.94 Francs per meter. 

Linen ray6, 16117/1, 70 c/m, entered at 1.05 advanced to 2. Francs per meter. 

Linen nni, 15744/3 70 c/m, entered at .80 advanced to .90 Franc per meter. 

Li-nen raye, 15742/5 108 c/m, entered at 1.50 advanced to 1.72 Francs per meter. 

Linen uni, 15719/1, 108 c/m, entered at 1.40 advanced to 1.65 Francs per meter. 

Discount 5 per cent. Add cases and packing. 

2964 1 

10 6? 3 )-Mfs. of silk and cotton, from Chr. Spazin Herzog & Co., Lyous. Nov. 27 & Dec. 12, 1895. 

2965 j J 

10682 J 

Austria T. C. coul, 36", piece dyed, entered at 1. advanced to 1.14 Francs per meter. 

Austria T. C. coul 36" piece dyed, entered at .85 advanced to 1.05 Francs per meter. 

Discount 20 per cent. 
?H*;. | Cotton hose, from Georg Seidler, Siegmer, Jan. 13, 1896. 

Entered at from 1.75 to 5.50 advanced to from w2.60 to 6.95 Marks per dozen. Dis- 
count 5 per cent. 

605 o. p ) 

2276 I Mfs. of metal, from Spiegel, Spiegelglas Fabriken, Hart manitz, June 7, 1895. 

San Francisco..) 

Capsules, entered discounts 60 per cent & 5 per cent, advanced discounts 55 per cent & 
5 per cent. 

O 



RELATIVE TO BOATING, FISHING, HUNTING, ETC., BT LIFE-SAVING CREWS. 



Department Circular No. 63. £ > V&%L8\XKX$ JjCpitrillXUtlt, 

Life-Savins Service. 

OFFICE OF THE 

GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT. U. S. LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 

Washington, D. C, May 2, 1896. 

Information has come to this office that members of life saving crews in some localities engage in 
ferrying, boating, fishing, hunting, and other employments, during the active season, seriously competing 
with persons who depend upon such occupations for a livelihood. It further appears that in some 
instances crews have neglected their duties and otherwise infringed the regulations of the Service in such 
pursuits. 

It is, therefore, directed that hereafter no member of a life-saving crew shall, during the active 
season, engage in ferrying, boating, oystering, crabbing, fishing, shooting game, gathering moss, or in 
similar employment, for pay or market, in competition with other persons engaged in such business. 



(/^wVD 



General Superintendent. 
Approved : 

S. WIKE, 

Acting Secretary. 



REAPPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



Division of Customs. 

Office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, May 1, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The following reappraisemeuts of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers daring the week ending April 18, 1896. 

W. E. CURTIS, 

Assistant Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING APRIL 18, 1896. 

N. B.— In corresponding with the Board of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference should always be made to the number of Reappraisement. 

No. of Reappraise • 
menl. 

11515 Macaroni, from Agost Montella & figl, Castellamare, Feb. 25, 1896. 

Extra fine macaroni, entered at 37. Lire per 100 kilos. Add manufacturing at 3 Lire 
per 100 kilos, add packing at .60 Lira per case. 
11521 Mirrors, from Geo. Borgfeldt & Co., Fuerth, Feb. 4, 1896. 

Adv. mirrors, 16964/132/0, entered at 1.39 advanced to 1.50 Marks per gross. 

Add cases. 
11542... Chemical salt (oxide soda) from Rinau-Kessel & Co., Cologne, March 12, 1896. 

White oxide of tin levigated, entered at 119. advanced to 123. Marks per 100 kilos. 

Add casks, Discount 1 i per cent. 
11592 Bead ornaments, from Carl M. Becher, Annaberg, Mar. 21, 1896. 

Samples, entered at a discount of 20 per cent, advanced to a discount of 5 per cent & 
2 per cent. 
11460 Colored cotton velvet, from Mechanische Weberie Hanover, Feb. 29, 1896. 

Sammet, P. 236, 23 i", entered at 1.30 advanced to 1.40 Marks per meter. 

Add cases, packing and making up, discount 1J per cent. 
11605 Mfs. of wood, from J. Witkowski & Co., Hiogo, Oct. 14, 1895. 

Bamboo blinds, 8x8, 10x8, 7x8, 12x8, 9x8, entered at .65 advanced to .70 Silver Yen 
per 100 feet. 

Bamboo blinds, 8x8, and 12x8, entered at .42 advanced to .45 Silver Yen per 100 feet. 

Add packing, boxes etc. 
11485 Stereotype plates, from Fleming H. Eevell Co., London, Feb. 20, 1896. 

"Eden lost and won" 51x51, entered at £16. 10s. Od. advanced to £22. 0s. Od. 

Add cases. 
11554 Sauce, from Silicetis & Co., Hongkong, July 10, 1895. 

Soy, entered at 13.72 advanced to 13.97 Mexican dollars Per cask. 



1 1558 Sauce, from Canton, Aug. 3, 1895. 

Chy loong soy, entered at 14.50, advanced to 15. Mexican silver dollar per cask. 

Discount 2 per cent. 
11522 Colored cotton corduroy, from Jas. Hall & Son, Manchester, Mar. 19, 1896. 

26/7 E. dark drab 8 shaft cotton cords, 35980, shade 118 entered at lOJd Sterling per 
yard, 

26/7 E. black, 8 shaft cotton cords, 35980, shade 118, entered at 12Jd Sterling per yard, 

26/7 E. brown, 8 shaft cotton cords, 35980, shade B 2, entered at 12}d Sterling per yard, 

26/7 E. navy, 8 shaft cotton cords, 35980, shade B. 2, entered at 13d Sterling per yard, 

Entered discounts 2£ per cent & 2* per cent, advanced discount 2 i per cent Less l/37th, 
add cases and packing. 
]]qII ! Fire crackers, from Melchers, & Co., Canton, Sept. 9, 1895 

40/64 long stem, entered at .58 i advanced to .59 Mexican dollar per box. 

Discount 2 per cent. Less export duty and boat and coolie hire Deduction of lekin 
taxes deducted on entry, not allowed on reappraisement. 
11423 Mfs. flax & silk &c, from Tabourier & Co., Paris, Feb. 25, 1896. 

Linen rayi, 18763/3, 70 e/m, entered at 1.05 advanced to 1.40 Francs per meter. 

Linen rayi, 15741/1 70 c/m, entered at .97 advanced to 1.17 Francs per meter. 

Linen quadrille, 15733/1, 70 c/m, entered at 1.20 advanced to 1.79 Francs per meter. 

Linen plumetis, 6478, 108 c/m, entered at 2.50 advanced to 3. Francs per meter. 

Discount 5 per cent. Add cases and packing. 
11585 Sugar not above 16 B. 8. from J. Bueno & Co., Guantanamo, Feb. 20, 1896. 

Testing 86.91, molasses, entered at .02.99 advanced to .02.423 Spanish Gold per lb., 
packed. 

Add bags, at 50 cents each. 
| j koI [ Sugar not above 16 B. 8. , from J. Bueno & Co. , Guantanamo Feb. 20, 29 and Mar. 4, 1896. 

Testing 94.85, entered at .02.75 advanced to .03.05 Spanish gold per lb., packed. 

Testing 86.15, entered at .02.99, reappraised at .02.372 Spanish gold per lb., packed. 

Add bags. 
}V£l I Sugar not above 16 B. S. from Booker Bros. & Co., Demerara, Feb. 1 and 29, 1896. 

Testing 97.21, entered at .02.80 advanced to .02.888 U. S. Currency per lb. packed. 

Testing 97.05, entered at .02. 52 £ advanced to .02.68 U. S. Currency per lb., packed. 

JJJJqq [ Sugar not above 16 B. 8. from G. Amsinck & Co., Santiago, Mar. 14 and 17, 1896. 

Testing 91.10, entered at .021 advanced to .02.62 Spanish gold per lb., packed. 

Testing 96.91, entered at .021 advanced to .03.154 Spanish gold per lb., packed. 

Add bags. 
11572 Sugar not above 16 B. S. from W. De Costa & Co., Barbados Mar. 4, 1896. 

Testing 90.15, entered at .02.20 advanced to .02.555 TT. S. Dollars per lb., packed. 

Testing 86.70, entered at .02.30 advanced to .02.377 U. S. Dollars per lb., packed. 

Testing 96.55, entered at .02.80 advanced to .02.817 U. S. Dollars per lb., packed. 

Add packages, to entered prices. 
11537 Sugar not above 16 B. 8. from J. B. Vicini, Macoris, Feb. 1, 1896. 

Testing 95.71, entered at .01.98 advanced to .02.381 U. S. Dollars per lb., packed. 

Testing 86.80, entered at .01.44 advanced to .01.813 U. S. Dollars per lb., packed. 

Testing 95.71, entered at .01.98 advanced to .02.381 U. S. Dollars per lb., packed. 

Add bags to entered value. 



1IB30 Sugar not above No. 16 B. 8., from C. Tennant & Sons & Co., Trinidad, March , 2, 1896. 

Testing 93.10, entered at .02. 5822 advanced to .02.678 Sterling per lb., packed. 

To entered price add bags 
11455 Sugar not above 16 B. 8. from Dominica, Feb. 14, 1896. 

Testing 86.70 entered at .02.25 advanced to .02.27 U. S. Dollars per lb., packed. 

Testing 93.85, entered at .02.25 advanced to .02.546 U. S. dollars per lb., packed. 

Testing 97.70, entered at .02.25 advanced to .02.733 U. S. Dollars per lb., packed. 

To entered prices add bags. 

U'roo [ Sugar not above 16 B. S. from E. I. Sadler, Jamaica, Feb. 26, 1896. 

Testing 90.30, entered at £11. 5s. Od. advanced to £11. 14s. 5. Sterling per ton, 

packed. 
Testing 88.90, entered at £11. 5s. Od. advanced to £11. 6s. 5d. Sterling per ton, packed. 
Testing 91.60, entered at £11. 10s. lOd. advanced to £11. 18s. 3d. Sterling per ton, 

packed. 
Testing 86.35, entered at £11. 10s. 10d., advanced to £10. 15s. 6d. Sterling per ton, 

packed. 

11531 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from Henry Davis & Son, Jamaica, Feb. 17, 1896. 

Testing 91.70, entered at £9. 12s. Od. advanced to £10. 14s. Od. Sterling per ton, packed. 
To entered price add bags at 5d each. 

110K9 ~l 

11097 \ Sugar not above 16 B. S. from John Hudson, Savana-la mar Feb. 12 aud 18, 1896. 

Testing 90.88, entered at £11. 6s. 8d. advanced to £11. 8s. 2.4d Sterling per ton., 

packed. 
From entered price deduct N. D. charges. 

Testing 90.90, entered at £11. 0s. Od. Sterling per ton, packed, No advance. 
Testing 90.75, entered at £11. 0s. Od. less charges, advanced to £10. 19s. 6d. Sterling 
per ton packed. 

11596 Sugar not above 16 B. 8. from Dubois & Co., Matanzas, Jan. 28, 1896. 

Testing 94.53, entered at .02j| less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to .02.547 
U. S. Gold per lb., packed. 

11501 Sugar not above 16 B. 8., from Eansohoff & Missler, Stettin, Feb. 11, 1896. 

Testing 83.75, entered at 9s/10d advanced to 10s/11.125d Sterling per cwt., packed. 
From entered price deduct N. D. charges. 

11536 Sugar not above 16 B. 8. from P. Munoz, Santiago, Feb. 29, 1896. 

Testing 96.05, entered at 02.822 advanced to .03.127 Spanish gold per lb., packed. 
Add bags to entered price. 

11546 Sugar not above 16 B. 8. from Societe pour 1 'exportation des sucres, Antwerp, Feb. 11, 1896. 

Testing 89.45, entered at HS/10.4445d les3 N.D. charges and 1} per cent, advanced to 
12s/0.17d Sterling per cwt. packed. 

11545 Sugar not above 16 B. S. from Bremen, Feb. 7, 1896. 

Testing 88.71, entered at 12s/0Jd less N.D. charges and discount 11 per cent, advanced 
to lls/10.31d Sterling per cwt., packed. 

11353 Sugar not above 16 B. S., from J. Wray & Nefleni, Carlisle Bay, Feb. 20, 1896. 

Testing 91.70, entered at £11. 15s. Od. less N.D. charges, advanced to £11. 10s. 6d. 
Sterling per ton, packed. 



4 

11598 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from Frederick Hohtl, Santa Domiugo, Mar. 4, 1896. 

Testing 9(5.90, entered at .02.47, add bags, advanced to .02.618 U. S. Dollars per lb. 
packed. 

11562 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from C. Brauet & Co., Guantanamo, Mar. 3, 1896. 

Testing 96.25, entered at .02.88, add bags at 50 cents each advanced to .03.134 Spanish 
Gold per lb., packed. 

2761 o. p ") 

2762 o. p [Sulphate of ammonia, from Emil Groschke, London, Dec. 24 and 31, 1895. 

Phila ) 

Entered at £9. 10s. 0d., less carriage to London, freight, insurance and consul fee, 

advanced to £8. 15s. 3d. Sterling per ton, net, packed. 
Entered at £9. 7s. 6d. less carriage to London, freight, insurance and consul fee, 

advanced to £8. 15s. 3d Sterliug per ton, net, packed. 
Entered at £9. 5s. Od. less carriage to London, freight, insurance and consul fee, 

advanced to £8. 15s. 3d. Sterling per ton, net, packed. 

2922 o. p ) SugM , al}QVe 1Q B s from L E L 0wens tan, Amsterdam, February 6, 1896. 

Superior granulated, entered at 16.92125, less lighterage advanced to i7.62 Florins per 

100 kilos., packed. 
Superior granulated, entered at 16.6725, less lighterage advanced to 17.32 Florins per 

100 kilos. , packed. 

| 9 ^. - P | Sugar below No. 16 B. S., from Eobert Crooks & Co., Liverpool Feb. 25, 1896. 

Entered at 10s/71d less discount 2] per cent advanced to lOs/lOJd Sterling per cwt. 
packed. 

2962o. p ) 

2963 o. p y Hyposulphite of soda, from Joseph Brunner & Co., Liverpool Dec. 24, 1895. 

Boston ) 

Entered at £5. 8s. 4d. less loading charges 3s per ton, advanced to £5. 9s. 6d. Sterling 

per ton, packed. 
Entered at £5. 12s. 6d. less loading charges at 3s. per ton, advanced to £5. 9s. 6d. 
Sterling per ton, packed. 

Boston P ^ Mica > fr0m Webster & Co -> otfcowa > Jan - 3l > 1896 - 

Crude mica, entered at 8 cents advanced to 81 cents per lb. 
2898 o. p | Sugar not abme le jy & from L _ EvanS; Sourabaya, Nov. 4, 1895. 

Testing 96.534, entered at lis/ 7 id less freight and N". D. charges, advanced to 9s/ll^d 
Sterling per cwt., packed. 

KEAPPRAISEMENTS BY BOARDS. 

^330 1 Worsted yam, from Alfred Motte Freres, Eoubaix, Feb. 26, 1896. 

Trame 1/60 auglais partie 934 ecru, quality 114, entered at 5.35 advanced to 5.60 

Francs per kilo. 

3109 ) 

110 „X" [ Metal umbrella frames, from Kortenbach & Eauh, Weyer, Jan. 9, 1896. 

27" umbrella frames, entered at 6.75 advanced to 8.75 Marks per dozen. 

2589 ) 

qrjqq f Jewelry, precious stones, from Bombay, Aug. 15, 1895. 

Indian jewelry, entered at 630. Eupees advanced to £35. 6s. Od. Sterling per total. 



1 

-Mfs. of flax, from Carl Seigl Sen, Schouberg, Dec. 17, 1895. 

22 J/36, No. 40, hemstitched pillow case shams, entered at 5. advanced to 6.75 Florins 

per dozen, net. 
27/36, No. 40, hemstitched pillow case shams, entered at 5.80 advanced to 7.83 Florins 

per dozen, net. 
90, No. 250, prima sheeting linen, entered at 38. advanced to 51.30 Florins per piece 

of 44 yards. 
90, No. 260, prima sheeting linen, entered at 42. advanced to 56.70 Florins per piece 

of 44 yards. 
22J/36 No. 40, hemstitched pillow cases, entered at 5. advanced to 6.75 Florins per 

dozen. 
221/36 No. 50, hemstitched pillow cases, entered at 5.50 advanced to 7.40 Florins per 

dozen. 
25/36, No. 40 hemstitched pillow cases, entered at 5.40 advanced to 7.29 Florins per 

dozen. 
27/36 No. 40 hemstitched pillow cases entered at 5.80 advanced to 7.83 Florins per 

dozen. 
Entered discount on items uot marked net 6 per cent, advanced discount 4 per cent. 
Add cases and packing. 

3209 I Mfs. of flax, from W. M. Kirk & Co., Belfast, Feb. 10, 1896. 

35736" shirting linen S. 19, entered at 10d., advanced to 10Jd. Sterling per yard. 
35 2 /36" shirting linen, S. 20, entered at Hid. Sterling per yard, No advance. 
Add case and packing, Discount 2 J per cent. 
3158 1 

11250 \-Mfs. of wool, from Crous & Hoffmann, Aachen, Jan. 23, and 30, 1896. 

3151 I J J 

11249 J „ . , 

Eskimo, 1078/1, entered at 6. Marks per meter, No Advance. 

Kamgarn, 1406/3, entered at 4.20 advanced to 4.60 marks per meter. 

Kamgarn, 1528/2, entered at 4. advanced to 4.50 marks per meter. 

Kamgarn, 1535/7, entered at 3.50 advanced to 4. Marks per meter. 

Kamgarn, VIII schwarz 17", entered at 3.70 advanced to 4.10 Marks per meter. 

Add cases and packing. 
3053 " j Wool dress goods, from Alfred Munch, Gera, Jan. 10, 1896. 

92/94 c/m all wool henrietta quality 52, entered at . 86 advanced to . 90 Mark per meter. 

Entered discount 8 per cent, advanced price net. 

Add making up and cases. 
^^•- 1 Mfs. of silk and cotton, from Ernst Englander, Crefeld, Feb. 4, 1896. 

Satin de chine Austria, colored 12028 and 12069, entered at .41 advanced to .45 Mark 
per meter. 

Discount on entered price 6 per cent, advanced price net. 
31 ^ 5 -- | Mfs. of silk, from Chaleyer & Monnier, Lyons, Feb. 6, 1896. 

Pongee colored 28J" entered at .75 advanced to .98 Franc per meter. 

Discount 20 per cent. 



6 



10742...... [ M f s ' °f silk and cotton, {tie silk) from Georges Cerf, Lyons, Dec. 3, 1895. 

Satin gaufre, 60 c/m, blanc, pat. 872, 874 and 877, entered at 1.35 advanced to 1.45 

Francs per meter. 
Japonias 60 c/m imprime, pat. 852/6, entered at 1.20 advanced to 1.40 Francs per 

metei'. 
Beige, 60 c/m, pat. 848/9, entered at 1.30 advanced to 1.40 Francs per meter. 
Surah 65 c/m, metis, pat. 863, entered at 1.30 advanced to 1.40 Francs per meter. 
Discount 20 per cent. Add packing. 
11137 " | Mfs. of silk and cotton, from Medieck & Co., Lobberich, Feb. 3, 1896. 

Pointelle half silk 23*" entered at 1.10 advanced to 1.25 Marks per meter. 

Printed half silk 23 J", entered at .90 Mark per meter. 

No Advance. 

Add cases, packing etc. 
11357 ..... [ M f Sm °f silk and cotton, from F.Lafite & Co., Lyons, Feb. 19, 1896. 

Serge 92 c/m, col. No. 293/328, entered at .95 advanced to 1.10 Francs per meter. 

Serge 92 c/m, black, No. 329/352, entered at .92 advanced to 1.07 Francs per meter. 

Diagonale 92 c/m, No. 353/386, entered at .98 advanced to 1.05 Francs per meter. 

Diagonale 92 c/m, No. 387/410, entered at .95 advanced to 1.10 Francs per meter. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

3073 1 

10754 ' 

3079..'.'.'.'."!!!!!.'.'.' [ M f 8 ' °^ silk &c -> from N °y er ' Durand & Collon, Lyons, Dec. 5, 1895 and Jan. 8, 1896. 

10975.'.'.'...."!!"! J 

Pongee 45 c/m, entered at .52 \ advanced to .57 i Franc per meter. 

Pongee 53 c/m, entered at .62£ advanced to .68* Franc per meter. 

Fancy wear 45 c/m, entered at .70 advanced to .77 Franc per meter. 

Satin Jumelle, 97 c/m, entered ab 1.20 advanced to 1.42 Francs per meter. 

Satin jumelle 96 c/m, entered at 1.30 advanced to 1.60 Francs per meter. 

Satin juinelle 94 c/m, entered at 1. advanced to 1.15 Francs per meter. 

Brocade pongee 53 c/m, entered at .92i advanced to 1.01 J Francs per meter. 

Brocade pongee, 53 c/m, entered at .97} advanced to 1.06} Francs per meter. 

Surah 47 c/m, entered at 1.02 advanced to 1.12 Francs per meter. 

Surah 47 c/m, entered at .75 advanced to .82 Francs per meter. 

Satin jumelle 97 c/m, entered at 1.375 advanced to 1.60 Francs per meter. 

Satin jumelle 95 c/m entered at 1.05 advanced to 1.15 Francs per meter. 

Pongee 78 c/m, entered at .75 advanced to .90 Francs per meter. 

Discount 20 per cent. Add cases and packing. 

722o. p ~l 

2866 | 

723 o. p } Phenacetine, from Elliott & Co., Toronto, Canada, Feb. 10 & 12. 1896 

2867 I 

Port Huron J 

Phenacetine bayer powder, entered at 30 cts. U. S. currency per oz., No Advance 

721 o. p ^ 

2865 [• Phenacetine, from W. E. Saunders & Co., London, (Canada) Feb. 7, 1896. 

Port Huron ) 

Entered at 27 cts., advanced to 30 cts. U. S. Currency per oz. 



7 

730 o. p ") 

2927 \W S - °f woo h fr° m Ad. Parisis, Verviers, Oct. 28, 1895. 

Chicago ) 

Billiard cloth, 190 c/m, entered at 11.50 Francs per meter. 

Billiard cloth 140 c/m, entered at 9. Francs per meter. 

Discount 8 per cent, Cash discount 2 per cent, add wood and zinc cases. 

Advanced by disallowance of 8 per cent discount. 

725 o. p ^ 

2906 > Precious stones cut but not set, from H. J. Schleich, Oberstein, Jan. 15. 1896. 

Chicago ) 

Flat cats eyes, moonstones, marquise, black onyx, entaglio and tiger stones, advances 
up to 40 per cent. 

O 



NOTIFICATION TO STATE HEALTH AUTHORITIES OF THE DEPARTURE OF IMMIGRANTS 
ARRIVED ON VESSELS UPON WHICH CONTAGIOUS DISEASE HAS APPEARED. 



Marine-Hospital Service. 

office op THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, May 1, 1896. 

To Quarantine Officers of the United States, Commissioners of Immigration, 

State and local health authorities, and others concerned : 
After arrival at a quarantine station of a vessel upon which there appears, or has appeared, during the 
last voyage, a case of cholera, smallpox, typhus fever, or plague, and after quarantine measures provided 
by regulations of the Treasury Department have been enforced and the vessel given free pratique, it is 
hereby ordered that notification of the above-mentioned facts be transmitted by the quarantine officer to 
the Commissioner of Immigration at the port of arrival, whose duty it shall then be to transmit, by mail or 
telegraph, to the State health authorities of the several States to which immigrants from said vessel are 
destined, the date of departure, route, number of immigrants, and the point of destination in the respective 
States of the immigrants from said vessel, together with the statement that said immigrants are from a 
vessel which has been subject to quarantine by reason of infectious disease, namiug the disease. 

This information is furnished to State health officers for the purpose of enabling them to maintain 
such surveillance over the arriving immigrants as they may deem necessary. 

J. G. CARLISLE, 

Secretary. 



SAMPLES OF IMPORTED GOODS. 



18Q6. 
Department Circular No. 66* 



office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, May 4, 1896. 



To United States Customs Appraising Officers: 

It is hereby directed that all samples, except samples of perishable goods, taken by or furnished to 
Appraising Officers shall be regarded and filed as official documents, with proper notations so as to secure 
identification of the same when necessary. Also all sample cards received from United States Consular 
Officers. The samples and cards so taken to be retained on file for at least six months from date of 
receipt, and due record kept of the same. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



AMENDATORY TO DEPARTMENT CIRCULAR NO. 156 OF OCTOBER 7, 1893, RELATING TO 
THE INSPECTION OF FOREIGN IMMIGRANTS LANDED AT THE PORTS OF THE 
DOMINION OF CANADA. 



1S96. 
Department. Circular No. 67. 

Bureau of Immigration. 

office of THE SECRETARY. 



greasuvy Ilepavtmcut, 



May 5, 1896. 

This supplemental agreement made and entered into this twenty-fifth day of March, one thousand 
eight hundred and ninety-six by and between the Canadian Pacific Eailway Company, the Allan Steam- 
ship Line, the Hansa Steamship Line, the Grand Trunk Bail road Company, the Dominion Steamship 
Line and the Beaver Steamship Line, parties of the first part, and Herman Stump, Commissioner General 
of Immigration of the United States of America, on behalf of the United States of America, party of the 
second part, witnesseth : 

Whereas, The several parties hereto heretofore, to wit, on the seventh day of September, A. D. 1893, 
at Montreal, Canada, did make and enter into a certain agreement providing for the establishment of 
immigrant inspection stations at certain ports in the Dominion of Canada and for other purposes therein 
particularly set forth ; 

And whereas, In addition to the ports therein specified as landing ports in the said Dominion of 
Canada, the Beaver Steamship Line, one of the parties hereto, desires also to use the port of St. John, 
New Brunswick, as a lauding port for immigrants during the winter months; 

And whereas, The party of the second part claims that through wrong information supplied by 
immigrants to the steamship companies, immigrants destined for the United States are sometimes ticketed 
to a point in the Dominion of Canada from whence they afterwards proceed to a destination in the United 
States, and in consequence thereof the names of such immigrants do not appear upon the lists or mani- 
fests furnished to the United States inspectors under section 4 of the aforementioned agreement; 

And whereas, Also by an act of the Congress of the United States of America approved August 
eighteenth, A. D. 1894, the per capita tax upon aliens entering the United States was increased from fifty 
cents to one dollar : 

Now, therefore, In consideration of the continuance of the mutual benefits and advantages accruing 
to the several parties hereto by the agreement hereinbefore referred to, and also in consideration of such 
additional benefits and advantages as are hereinafter provided for, it is covenanted and agreed that the 
aforementioned agreement of September seventh, A. D. 1893, be amended and supplemented, as follows : 

I. By adding to the ports named as landing ports in the first clause of the aforementioned agreement 
of September seventh, A. D. 1893, the port of St. John, New Brunswick : 

II. That all immigrants destined to the United States provided for by the aforementioned agreement, 
who shall not have been listed on the manifest supplied to the United Statas inspectors at the port of 
entry, and who within thirty days from the date of their arrival at any one of the ports named in the said 
agreement and this supplemental agreement, shall apply for admission or enter the United States within 
the meaning and intent of the said agreement, and a per capita tax of one dollar on all such immigrants 
shall be paid as provided for by section 6 thereof; and access to ships, manifest of passengers shall be 
afforded, or extracts therefrom furnished to the United States inspectors whenever the same shall be 
requested, to verify the lauding of any immigrants. 

HI. That section 6 of said agreement of seventh September, A. D. 1893, be amended by striking out 
the words "Fifty cents" wherever they occur in said section and inserting in lieu thereof the words '"One 
dollar." 

IV. And it is further covenanted and agreed, that if any immigrant, who has landed at any one of 
the ports named in the aforementioned agreement of seventh September, A. D. 1893, as amended by this 
supplemental agreement, shall apply for admission into the United States within thirty days after arrival 
at said port without the certificate provided for by section 3 of the said agreement, and shall be debarred 
from entry into the United States under the laws of the United States regulating immigration, or if it be 



ascertained that the said immigrant has been previously refused admission into the United States by any 
immigration official, the said railway and steamship companies parties to this agreement hereby under- 
take and agree to return said immigrant to the port of landing or transport him to such place upon their j 
line of travel as said immigrant is willing to go most remote from the borders of the United States. 

V. It is further covenanted and agreed that the several provisions of this supplemental agreement 
shall hereafter have the same force and effect as if they had been originally incorporated in the afore- 
mentioned agreement of seventh September, A. D. 1893, and that the said agreement of seventh Septem- 
ber, A. I). iSito, shall be construed and continued in effect as if these provisions were originally therein. 

John G. Carlisle, 

Secretary. 



Treasury Department, 

Office of the Secretary, 

Washington, D. C, May 5, 1890. 

In view of the supplemental agreement, which appears above, between the various transportation 
• companies in the Dominion of Canada and Herman Stump, Commissioner General of Immigration, approved 
by the Secretary of the Treasury of the United States of America, governing the inspection and entry of 
immigrants into the United States through foreign contiguous territory, the following rules and regula- 
tions, in addition to those promulgated under date of October 7, 1893, are hereby prescribed for your 
information and guidance: 

I. That any European immigrant who, within thirty days after landing at any port in the Dominion 
of Canada, applies for entiy into the United States without the certificate provided by section 3 of the 
original agreement, shall be inspected, the port of entry, date of arrival, and the name of the steamer by 
which he came ascertained, and that information furnished the United States Commissioner of Immigration 
at the port of entry in order that the per capita tax, provided by section 6 of the original agreement as 
amended by section 3 of the supplemental agreement, may be collected. 

II. That any European immigrant who has been refused a certificate of admission into the United 
States by a Commissioner of Immigration, and within thirty days thereafter attempts to enter the United 
States, shall be returned to the port of landing or transported to such place as said immigrant is willing 
to go most remote from the border line. 

III. That it shall be the duty of collectors of customs and immigrant inspectors along the border to 
see that the provisions of said agreement are carried out, and that all immigrants from Canada and British 
Columbia be inspected under the provisions of the Immigration Laws of the United States. 

J. G. CARLISLE, 

Secretary. 



AMENDMENT TO QUARANTINE REGULATIONS. 



Depa.t,ne„™ula,Ko.68. ^XZ&BUXQ ^t^iiXX\Mt\\\ f 

Marine-Hospital Service. 

Office op THE SECRETARY.. 

Washington, D. C, May 2, 1896. 
To Officers of the Treasury Department, Consular Officers, and others concerned : 

Referring to Department Circular dated April 26, 1894, United States Quarantine Laws and Regula- 
tions, the following amendment is hereby made to the supplemental bill of health to be furnished vessels 
calling at intermediate ports : 

Article I, paragraph 4, amended to read, following the table of diseases: "Number and sanitary 
condition of passengers landed at this port.' 1 ' 1 

J. G. CARLISLE, 

Secretary. 



CHANGES IN STATISTICAL SCHEDULES A, B, AND E, CLASSIFICATION FOB RETURNS 
OF IMPORTED AND EXPORTED COMMODITIES. 



X896. 
Department Circular No. 69. 

Bureau of Statistics. 



grjeasitrtj gjqrartmtet, 



Washington, D. C, May 5, 1896. 
To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The following are changes made in the Statistical Schedules, A, B, and B of the Bureau of Statistics 
of this Department, and are published for the guidance of customs officers in rendering returns of imports 
and exports to that Bureau : 

Schedule A, of June 1, 1895. 



FEEE OF DUTY. 

Transfer (old) class 48 to follow class 13 (class 48 in the amended schedule being blank), and 
to read as follows : 
Breadstuffs : Farinaceous substances and preparations of (sago, tapioca, etc.), not elsewhere specified. 

Classes after No. 52 will be changed as follows : 
Fibers, vegetable, and textile grasses, and manufactures of, not elsewhere specified : 
Unmanufactured — 

Flax and tow of 

Hemp and tow of. 

Istle or Tampico fiber 

Jute and jute butts 

Manila 

Sisal grass 

All other . 

Manufactures of: 

Bags for grain, made of burlaps 

Bagging, gunny cloth, and similar material suitable for covering cotton 

Burlaps 

Coir yarn 

Twine, binding 

Fish, fresh : 

Salmon 

All other 

Fruits, including nuts, not elsewhere specified : 

Bananas 

Currants 

All other 

Furs and fur skins, undressed ; and dressed, suitable only for hatters' furs 

Grease and tallow 

Hair, unmanufactured 

Hats, bonnets, and hoods, materials for, composed of straw, chip, grass, palm leaf, willow, osier, 

sparterre, or rattan, and batters' plush. 
Hides and skins, other than fur skins : 

Goatskins 

All other 

Household and personal effects, and wearing apparel in use, and implements, instruments, and tools 

of trade of persons arriving from foreign countries, and of citizens of the United States dying 

abroad. 



Unit of quantity. 



Ton (of 2 
Ton (of 2 
Ton (of 2 
Ton (of 2 
Ton (of S 
Ton (of :: 
Ton (of 2 



Lb. 
Lb. 



,240 lbs.) 
,240 lbs.) 
,240 lbs.) 
,210 lbs.) 
,240 lbs.) 
,240 lbs.) 
,210 lbs.) 



A, of June 1, 1895 — Continued. 



fbee OF duty — Coutinued. 



India rubber and gutta-percha, crude : 

Gutta-percha 

India rubber 

Iron and steel, manufactures of, not elsewhere specified : 

Needles, band-sewing and darning 

Shotgun barrels, forged, rough-bored 

Ties for baling cotton 

Ivory : 

Animal 

Vegetable 



Matting for floors, manufactured from round or split straw, including Chinese matting.... 



Oils, not elsewhere specified : 

Fixed or expressed 

Mineral, a 

Volatile or essential, and distilled . 



Paints, pigments, aud colors, not elsewhere specified . 
Paper stock, crude : 

Rags, other than woolen 

All other 

Platinum 

Plumbago 



Salt, a 

Seeds, not elsewhere specified 

Silk, unmanufactured : 

Cocoons 

Raw, or as reeled from the cocoon 

Waste 

Spices, unground : 

Nutmegs 

Pepper, black or white 

All other 

Sugar and molasses, not elsewhere specified : 

Molasses, under 40° polariscopic test, and other from the Hawaiian Islands. 

Sugar, free under reciprocity treaty with Hawaiian Islands 

Tea 

Tiu in bars, blocks, pigs, or grain or granulated 



Wood, not elsewhere specified : 
Cabinet woods — 

Mahogany 

Allother 

Logs, and round timber, 6 

Timber, hewn and sawed, squared or sided, b 

Boards, deals, plank and other sawed lumber, b 

All other, b 

Wool, hair of the camel, goat, alpaca, and other like animals: 
Class 1, clothing — 

Iu the grease 

Scoured 

Class 2, combing — 

In the grease 

Scoured 

Class 3, carpet — 

In the grease 

Scoured 

Rags, noils, and wastes, not elsewhere specified 

All other free articles. 

ftFroui countries which do not impose duty oti similar imports from the United States. 
b From countries which do not impose an export duty, or discriminating- stumpayo dues. 



Unit of quantity. 



Lb. 

Lb. 



Roll (of 40 yds.) 



Lb. 

Ton (of 2,240 lbs.) 



Rice, free under reciprocity treaty with Hawaiian Islands Lb 



Lb. 



Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 

Lb. 
Lb. 

Lb. 

Gall. 
Lb. 

Lb. 
Lb. 



M. feet. 
M. feet. 
M. feet 



Lb. 
Lb. 

Lb. 
Lb. 

Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 



Schedule A, of June 1, 1895 — Continued. 



162 

163 

104 
165 
166 



167 
168 

169 
170 

171 

172 
173 

171 
175 



220 
221 

221 « 



DUTIABLE. 

Insert class — 

Art works 

Classes 162 to 175, inclusive, will be changed to read as follows : 
Fibers, vegetable, and textile grasses and manufacturers of, not elsewhere specified 
Unmanufactured — 

Flax hackled 

Hemp hackled.. 

Manufactures of — 

Cables, cordage, and twine except binding 

Yarns or threads 

All other 

Fish, not elsewhere specified : 

Fresh, frozen, or packed in ice — 

Salmon 

All other 

Cured or preserved — 

Anchovies and sardines, packed in oil or otherwise 

Cod, haddock, hake, and pollock, dried, smoked, salted, or pickled 

Herring — 

Dried or smoked 

Pickled or salted 

Mackerel, pickled or salted 

Salmon, pickled or salted 

All other 

Classes 220 and 221, "Jewelry, etc.," will be changed to read as follows : 
Jewelry, manufactures of gold aud silver, and precious stones — 

Diamonds, not elsewhere specified, cut or uncut, but not set 

Other precious stones, cut or uncut, but not set 

Jewelry and manufactures of gold and silver 



34 a 
56 a 



69 

70 

71 
72 
73 

71 
75 



Schedule B, of March 24, 1894. 
Insert class — 

Buckwheat , 

Change classes 32 and 33, " Carriages, etc.," as follows : 
Carriages, cars, and parts of — 

Carriages and street care 

Cars, passenger and freight, for steam railroads , 

Insert class — 

Cement 

Insert class — 

Cycles, and parts of 

Change classes 61 to 75, inclusive, as follows : 

Fibers, vegetable, and textile grasses, manufactures of — 

Bags 

Cordage 

Twine 

All other 

Fish : 

Fresh, other than salmon 

Dried, smoked, or cured — 

Cod, haddock, hake, and pollock 

Herring 

Other 

Pickled- 
Mackerel 

Other 

Salmon — 

Canned 

Other, fresh or cured 

Canned fish, other than salmon and shell fish 

Shell fish- 
Oysters 

Other 



Ton of (2,240 lbs.) 
Ton of (2,240 lbs.) 

Lb. 
Lb. 



Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 



Lb. 
Lb. 

Lb. 

Bbl. (of 200 lbs.) 
Bbl. (of 200 lbs.) 



Schedule B, of March 24, 1894. — Continued. 



Unit of quantity. 



no 

ni 

112 
113 

114 
115 
115.1 
116 

117 

118 

1111 
120 

121 
122 
123 
124 
125 
120 
127 



188 
189 



Class 96. Insert unit of quantity "Pairs." 
Insert class — 

Scrap, and old, fit only for remanufacture 

Change classes of iron and steel and manufactures of, after class 109, 8S follows : 
Machinery — 

Printing presses and parts of 

Sewing machines and parts of. 

Steam engines and parts of — 

Fire engines 

Locomotive engines 

Stations ry engines 

Boilers and parts of engines 

Typewriting machines, and parts of 

All other 

Nails and spikes — 



Cut.. 



Wire, wrought, horseshoe, and all other, including tacks. 
Plates and sheets — 

Iron 

Steel 

Railroad bars or rails — 

Iron 

Steel 

Saws and tools 

Scales and halances 

Stoves and ranges, and parts of. 

Wire 



All other manufactures of iron and steel 

Strike out of class 139 the words "and cement." 

Strike out class 170, "Ore gold and silver hearing." 

The numbers of all classes following No. 1(19 will become one less, making 2G4 classes in the schedule 

instead of 265. 
Change class 170 (new number) as follows: 

"Paints, pigments, and colors " 

Insert class — 

Lard compounds, and substitutes for (cottolene, lardine, etc.) 

Change classes 188 and 189 "oleomargarine" as follows: 

Oleo, the oil 

Oleomargarine, imitation butter 



COl.Il AND SILVER. 



Class 3, silver bullion, insert unit of quantity, "Oz. 
Insert classes — 

Gold and silver in ore : 

Gold 

Silver 



Lb. 
Lb. 



Lb. 
Lb. 



Ton (of 2,240 lbs.) 
Ton (of 2,240 lbs.) 



Lb. 
Lb. 



Schedule H, of August 28, 1894, as corrected and reprinted in Synopsis of Decisions, September, 1894, and 
modified by circular of November 3, 1894. 




30 
30 a 



84 o 

188 



299 

299 a 



507 a 
507 i 

1144 



578 a 
021a 
6216 



044 
644 a 



645 
045 a 



830 a 
1009a 



1138 
1138 a 



Change class 30 as follows : 

Articles of American manufacture exported filled with American products, 
or exported empty and returned filled with foreign products, not else- 
where specified — 

Bags 

Casks, barrels, carboys, and other vessels . 

Insert under "Acids," class — : 

Pyrogallic rj, 

Subdivide class 188, as follows: 

Bauxite j jn 

Terra alba aluminous jj, 

Insert class — : 

Currants j jn 

Subdivide class 299, "Hides, etc.," as follows : 

Horse and cattle, including calf, dry, salted, or pickled Lb 

All other, not elsewhere specified Lb. 

Class 322, "Matting, etc.," insert unit of quantity, "Roll" (of 10 yds). 



Insert under " Chemicals, etc.," class — : 

Cyanide of potash and soda 

Class 494, "Agate manufactures," change rate of duty to 30 per cent- 
Change classes 925, 1143, and 1144, as follows : 
Beads and bead ornaments — 

Heads, glass, loose, strung, or corded 

Bead, beaded, or jet trimmings or ormaments 

Jet, manufactures of, not otherwise provided for 

Class 500, "Cement, other," strike out unit of quantity. 
Insert under "Chemicals, etc.," classes — : 

Caffeine 

Hyposulphite of. 

Phosphate of 

Change classes 044 and 045 under "Clays, etc.," as follows: 
Fuller's earth — 

Uuwrought or unmanufactured 

Wrought or manufactured 

All other— 

Unwrought or unmanufactured 

Wrought or manufactured 

Insert class — : 

Cycles and parts of, not otherwise provided for 

Strike out of unit of quantity of class 725 "Thread on spools, etc.," the-word 

"hundred," and from rate of duty the words " hundred yards." 
Change rate of duty of class 821 "Emery wheels, etc.," to / a cent per pound. 
Insert under "Fibers, etc. , ' ' class — : 

All other partially manufactured 

Strike out under " Glass and glassware, classes" 912, 913, 918, and 919. 
Insert class — : 

Iron, chrome 

Subdivide class 1138, as follows : 
Tubes, flues, and stays — 

Tubes aud tubing for cycles 

All other tubes, flues, or stays of wrought iron or steel for boilers 
and other purposes, not elsewhere specified 




Lb. 


20 per cent 


Ton. 


20 per cent 


Lb. 


25 per cent 


Lb. 


25 per cent 



25 per cent. 



10 per cent. 
35 per cent. 
25 per cent. 

25 per cent. 
25 per cent. 
25 per cent. 



|1 per ton. 
$2 per ton. 

$1 per ton. 
$2 per ton. 

35 per cent. 



Schedule 1$, of August 28, 1894, etc. — Continued. 





Km 






°3 








.A 


-o o 

o 



1117 
1147o 

1148 
1148a 
114!) 
1150 



Unit of quantity. 



Dutiable — Continued. 

Change classes 1147 to 1150 inclusive, as follows: 
Precious stones. 
Diamonds — 

Uncut 

Cut, but not set 

Other- 
Uncut 

Cut, but not set 

Diamonds and other, set, not otherwise provided for i 

Imitations of, not set, not exceeding 1 inch in diameter 

Strike out of class 1152 the words, "contained in other." 

Change rate of duty of class 1222, " Mineral substances, etc.," to 20 per cent, 

and strike out class 1223 "Mineral substances in a crude state." 
Insert class — : 

Stearine I Lb. 

Change rate of duty of class 1460, " Sawed boards, etc.," to 20 per cent. 
Strike out of class 1403 the words "and oriental, Berlin, and other similar 

rugs," and return such rugs under class 1502. 
Strike out unit of quantity in class 1520, " Knit wearing apparel." 



10 per cent. 
25 per cent. 

10 per cent. 
25 per cent. 
30 per cent. 

10 per cent.. 



20 per cent.. 



The changes made by this circular in Schedule A will necessitate the correction of "numbers of 
classes of Schedule A" in the left-haud column of Schedule E, but this can be done by the statistical 
clerk at each custom house. 

S. WIKE, 

A cling Secretary. 



SPECIAL TAX STAMPS FOE THE SPECIAL TAX YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1897. 



189G. 
Department Circular No. "0. 

Internal Revenue, No. 457. 



OFFICE OF 

COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE, 

Washington, D. C, May 9, 1896. 

1. Immediately on receipt of this circular, collectors will make out and transmit to this office requi- 
sitions on Form 100 (revised December, 1890) for special tax stamps for the special tax year commencing 
July 1, 1896, and ending June 30, 1897. 

2. Collectors who have already forwarded their requisitions for the special tax year commencing July 
1, 189(3, will, upon receipt of this circular, each make and forward an order based upon the instructions as 
given herein. In no case will stumps he issued to a collector in excess of an estimated three months' supply. 

3. These stamps will be denominated "Series 1S96," and requisitions therefor should have this 
denomination distinctly indorsed thereon. 

4. Collectors, in ordering special tax stamps, should base their estimates of the quantity they will 
need upon the number of each kind issued by them during the first three months of the current year, but in no 
case should less than one book of any denomination be ordered. 

5. Collectors will insert, in red ink, in the left-hand column of Form 100 (revised), on which requi- 
sition is made, directly opposite the number of stamps of each kind ordered, the number of whole books of 
such stumps, "Series 1895," in their hands on the day requisition is forwarded to this office. 

6. It is expected that all stamps for the coming year will be transmitted from this office on or before 
June 10, 1896. 

7. Collectors will not issue special tax stamps for the special tax year ending June 30, 1897, until 
Form 11, properly filled out, and the money for the stamps have been received ; and the stamps must be issued, in 
consecutive order, the dates upon the stubs so indicating. 

8. On June 80, 1896, collectors will return to this office all special tax stamps of the Series of 1895 (E), and 
all coupons and stubs of such stamps remaining in their hands, reporting them on line 10 of Form 68 for June as 
"in transitu" June 30, 1896. Collectors are informed that this instruction is mandatory ; that no excuse 
for not complying with the same will be accepted, but that in every case where a collector, for any reason, 
sliall fail to comply herewith, he will be required to forward amended Forms 68, on which such stamps 
and coupons returned must be reported as " in transitu June 80, 1896." 

9. When special taxes are collected for other than the current year the collector will issue stamps of Series F, 

writing across the face thereof, and also across the stubs, in red ink, "Issued , 189-, for the last 

months of the special tax year ended June 80, 18 — ," signing the same in his official capacity. 

JOS. S. MILLER, 

Commissioner. 
Approved : 

J. G. CAELISLE, 

Secretary of the Treasury. 



REAPPRA1SEHENT8 OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



Depart.^ cSLar No, 71. %TZKS\\X\} ^tpUXXmttltf 

Division of Customs. 

OfficeofTHE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, May 8, 1896. 
To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The following reappraisements of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending April 25, 1896. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING APRIL 25, 1896. 

N. B.— In corresponding with the Board of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference should always be made to the number of Heappraisement. 

No. of reappraise- 
ment. 

11683 SMns dressed and finished, from J. L. Kanniger, Altenburg, March 21, 1896. 

Glove leathers, entered at 209 advanced to 249. Marks per 100 skins. 

11695 Glass beads, from Michael Trassl, Oberwarmensteinach, Mar. 16, 1896. 

Round solid beads, sizes 8 and 11, quality E. F. G. L. D. T. W. C. &c, entered at 
from .291 to .88 Mark per mille, Discount, 2 per cent advauced by addition of 
amount for cases. 

L1637 Wool knit wearing apparel, from Wm. Janssen, Chemnitz, Mar. 6, 1896. 

Men's national wool shirts No. 1420, size 34/46, entered at IS. 90 Marks per dozen, No 

advance. 
Men's national wool shirts \ sleeves No. 1420, sizes 34/36 and 36/46, entered at 17.90 

Marks per dozen, No advance. 
Men's national wool drawers No. 1420 sizes 32/36 and 28/46 entered at 18.90 Marks 

per dozen, No Advance. 
Discount 21 per cent. 

11416 Colored cotton corduroy, from Hardt & Co., Manchester, March 6, 1896. 

810, 27/8" Lt. drab, 567 H, entered at 12^ advanced to ls/l^d Sterling per yard. 
Less ^Vth) discount 21 per cent add making up and cases, and 2 per cent commission, 
advanced by disallowance of deduction of 2 per cent commission added to invoice 
but deducted on entry. 

11633 Chemical salt, from Gebr. Borchers, Goslar-a-Harz, Mar. 7, 1896. 

Permanganate potash, entered at 103.75 advanced to 119.50 Marks per 100 kilos. 
Add packing. 



11655 Chemical salt, from Deutsche Gold and Silver Scheide Anstalt, Mainz, Mar. 6, 1896. 

Phosphate of ammonia, entered at 64.07 Marks per 100 kilos, add casks. No Advance. 

]]tq?i } Cotton-lace curtains (taped) from Hood, Morton & Co., Glasgow, Feb. 20, 1896. 

No. 5408, 32 yards, 96, & 4, entered at 3s/02d Sterling per pair. No Advance. 

No. 5458 32 yards, 40, entered at 2s/6d Sterling per pair. No Advance. 

No. 5459, 3 i yards, entered at 5s/3d Sterling per pair. No advance. 

No. 5451 32 yards, entered at 4s/9d Sterling per pair, advanced to 5s/- Sterling per 

pair. 
No. 5424, 32 yards, entered at 2s/2d Sterling per pair. No advance. 
No. 4818, Si yards, entered at ls/lld advanced to 2s/- Sterling per pair. 
No. 5343, 3 2 yards, entered at 2s/9d Sterling per pair. No advance. 
Add cases packing, making up &c. , Entered discount 5 per cent. 
Advanced discount 2 J per cent. 

lKi-22 Sweetmeats, from Melchers & Co., Canton, Sept. 13, 1895. 

Chuloong ginger entered at 8.75 advanced to 9.20 Mexican Dollars per picul. 
Discount 2 per cent. 

11640 Sweetmeats, from Bowe & Co., Canton, Feb. 7, 1896. 

Preserved cargo ginger, entered at 2.45 advanced to 2.50 Mexican dollars per cask of 

6 jars. 
Preserved cargo ginger, entered at 2.85 advanced to 2.90 Mexican dollars per cask of 

12 jars. 
Preserved cargo ginger, entered at 2.45 advanced to 2.50 Mexican dollars per cask of 

24 jars. 
Discount 2 per cent. Deduction of export duty deducted on entry, not allowed on 

reappraisement. 

11586 Cotton lace curtains, from Goodall & White, Glasgow, March 20, 1896. 

Lace curtains E. T. No. 893 & W. T. 843, 6f yards, entered at 5s/82d Sterling per pair, 

No Advance. 
Curtains E. T. No. 674, 6f yards, entered at 4s/32d advanced to 4s/62d Sterling per 

pair. 
Entered discount 31 per cent advanced discount 22 per cent. 
Add cases and packing. Less inland carriage. 
j:^ | Mfs.ofwool and cotton, from Simon, Israel & Co., Bradford, Mar. 2 and 6, 1896. & Mar. 

Siroz:::::::::) ' 13 - 1896 - 

50" melton H. 400 & H. 4010/2, entered at 62d advanced to 7d Sterling per yard. 

Black cotton coating 06056/7, entered at lOld advanced to 112d Sterling per yard. 

Discounts 22 per cent & 11 per cent. Add cases and packing. 
11520 Flax yarn, from Eobert Stewart & Sous, Lisburn, Mar. 4, 1896. 

Polished yarn w. brown 3 cord satin in hanks and bundles entered at 32s/- advanced 
to 36s/- Sterling per dozen. 

Polished yarn w. brown 3 cord satin in hanks and bundles entered at 36s/- advanced 
to 40s/- Sterling per dozen. 

Discount 25 per cent. Add packing bales. Less inland carriage. 
11254 Flax yam, from Thomas F. Adams & Co., Dundee, Jan. 25, 1896. 

2jply 5 lea]D/5 yarn, entered at 4 Id Sterling per lb., No Advance. 

Discount 3 per cent. 



11535 Wool dress goods, from Schulze & Sohn, Greize, Mar. 14, 1896. 

95 c/m, article 646, entered at .67 advanced to .70 Mark per meter. 

95 c/m article 682, 684 &c., entered at .98 Mark per meter, No Advance. 

11626 ) 

11627 [Mfs. of silk, from J. B. Henry Perrot & Co., Lyons, Dec. 26, 1895 and Jan. 22, 1896. 

&c ) 

78 c/m pongee orient I ecru, entered at .92 advanced to .95 Franc per meter. 
Discount 20 per cent. Add packing charges. 

11569 Mfs. of silk and cotton, from H. E. Schniewind, Elberfeld, Mar. 19, 1896. 

24" fancy R, 100/193}, entered at 1.46 advanced to 1.60 Marks per meter. 

24" crav. art. 319, entered at .77 advanced to .87 Franc per meter. 

24" all silk swivel E. H. 148, entered at 1.40 Marks per meter, ~No Advance. 

11644 Mfs. of silk &c. (Silk and cotton binding') from Henry Delafon, Paris, Mar. 11, 1896. 

Bone casing, entered at 7. advanced to 10. Francs per piece. 
Discount 14 & 2 per cent. Add cases and packing. 

11543 Wool and silk wearing apparel, &c, from Wiegandt & Riccard, Geneve, Mar. 4, 1896. 

Costume taffeta red, entered at 125. advanced to 165. Francs each. 
Costume green satin, entered at 225. advanced to 295. Francs each. 
Skirt black satin entered at 70. advanced to 90. Francs each. 
Blouse satin red, entered at 45. advanced to 60. Francs each. 
Skirt satin, ereme, entered at 40. advanced to 50. Francs each. 
Kobe wool, black, entered at 90. advanced to 120. Francs each. 

11456 Mfs. of silk and cotton, from Cerri Bourcard & Co., Milan, Feb. 27, 1S96. 

Dainas lombard 1/2 soie, 130 c/m, entered at 3.05 advanced to 4.25 Lire per meter. 
Goblin marguerite fd. chappe, 1/2 soie, 130 c/m, entered at 4. advanced to 5.25 Lire 

per meter. 
Lampas valois latte 1/2 soie, 130 c/m, entered at 5.25 advanced to 7.75 Lire per meter. 
Damas flamming lin, 130 c/m, entered at 3.30 Lire per meter, No Advance. 
Add cases and packing. 

11362 Mfs. of silk, from Henry Gorjus, Lyons, Feb. 26, 1896. 

Taffetas ray6, 46 c/m, entered at 1.48 advanced to 1.60 Francs per meter. 

Taffetas raye coul, 50 c/m, entered at 1.52 advanced to 1.60 Francs per meter. 

Taffetas, raye" coul 53 c/m, entered at 1.70 advanced to 1.85 Fraucs per meter. 

Taffetas raye" coul, 50 c/m, entered at 1. 70 advanced to 1. 85 Francs per meter. 

Faconne 54 c/m, entered at 2.60 advanced to 2.75 Francs per meter. 

Faconne 56 c/m, entered at 4.10 advanced to 4.25 Francs per meter. 

Faille coul, 53 c/m, entered at 1.70 advanced to 1.75 Francs per meter. 

Taffetas raye" coul, 53 c/m, entered at 1.70 advanced to 1.75 Francs per meter. 

Grosse de loudres 53 c/m, entered at 2.70 advanced to 2.75 Fraucs per meter. 

Faille coul 54 c/m and Faconne 55 c/m, entered at 3.65 advanced to 3.80 Francs per 

meter. 
Faille coul, 56 c/m, entered at 4.60 advanced to 4.90 Francs per meter. 
Faconne coul, 54 c/m, entered at 3.10 advanced to 3.30 Francs per meter. 
Faconne coul 56 c/m, entered at 4.60 advanced to 4.90 Francs per meter. 
Faconne coul, 56 c/m, entered at 5.10 advanced to 5.50 Francs per meter. 
Faconne coul, 56 c/m, entered at 4.10 advanced to 4.50 Francs per meter. 
Taffetas imp. 60 c/m, entered at 6.15 advanced to 6.50 Francs per meter. 
Taffetas imp. moire, 60 c/m, entered at 6.60 advanced to 7. Francs per meter. 



11362 Mfs. of silk, etc.— Continued. 

Faconne or 60 c/m, entered at 18.75 Francs per meter. No Advance. 

Quadrille coul 70 c/m, entered at 8.85 Francs per meter. No Advance. 

Pekin imp. 56 c/m, entered at 5.65 Francs per meter. No Advance. 

Pekin imp. 56 c/m, entered at 4.90 advanced to 5.25 Francs per meter. 

Satin imp. 56 c/m, entered at 6.50 Francs per meter, No Advance. 

Faconne imp. silk & worsted 55 c/m entered at 4.10 advanced to 4.50 Francs per 
meter. 

Scintillantz noir silk and worsted 80 c/m, entered at 3.50 advanced to 3.80 Francs per 
meter. 

Moire silk and worsted, 59 c/m, entered at 4.90 advanced to 5.20 Francs per meter. 

Moire imp. silk and worsted, 58 c/m, entered at 5.50 advanced to 5.75 Francs per 
meter. 

Faille black 51 c/m, entered at 1.55 Francs per meter, No Advance. 

Taffetas velours 60 c/m, entered at 18. Francs per meter. No advance. 

Faconne coul 58 c/m, entered at 10.15 advanced to 10.50 Francs per meter. 

Pekin taffetas coul fac. 54 & 56 c/m entered at 5.50 Francs per meter, No Advance. 

Discounts 20 per cent & 1 per cent. 
11665 Sugar not above 16 D. 8. from R. M. Leylea, Macoris, Feb. 25, 1896. 

Testing 95.60, entered at .02.35 add bags, advanced to .02.565 U. S. currency per lb., 
packed. 
11666 Sugar not above 16 D. 8. from F. de Castro, Macoris, Mar. 6, 1S96. 

First centrifugal sugar, testing 95.60 entered at .02.35 advanced to .02.565 IT. S. Cur- 
rency per lb., packed. 

To entered price add bags. 
11581 Sugar not above 16 D. 8. from Francke, Hijos & Co., Havana Mar. 5, 1896. 

Testing 93.38, entered at .021, less freight & N. D. charges advanced to .02.73 U. S. 
Gold per lb., packed. 
11643 Sugar not above 16 D. 8. from J. B. Yicini, Santa Domingo, Mar. 4, 1896. 

Testing 94.12, entered at .02.13, add bags, advanced to .02.4575 U. S. Currency per 
lb., packed. 

Testing 88.65, entered at. 01.60, add bags, advanced to .02.108 U. S. Currency per lb., 
packed. 
11661 Sugar not above 16 D. 8. from A. J. Blackwora, Saint Croix, Mar. 11, 1896. 

Testing 95.85, entered at .02.56 advanced to .02.71 U. S. Currency per lb., packed. 

Testing 87.30, entered at .02.14 advanced to. 02.164 TJ. S. Currency per lb., packed. 

To entered price add bags. 
11635 Sugar not above 16 D. 8. from Ehlers, Freidheim & Co., Macoris, Mar. 11, 1896. 

Testing 95.85, entered at .02.47 advanced to .02.58 U. S. Currency per lb., packed. 

Testing 96.30, entered at .02.35 advanced to .02.60 U. S. Currency per lb., packed. 

To entered price add bags. 
11691 Sugar not above 16 D.8. from Beattie & Co., Manzauilla, Feb. 25, 1896. 

Testing 96.7466, entered at .03. advanced to .03.150 Spanish gold per lb, packed. 

Testing 91.80, molasses, entered at .02.45 advanced to .02.70 Spanish gold per lb. 
packed. 



ir^i } Sugar not above and above 16 D. S. from Eobert Crooks & Co. Liverpool, Mar. 27, Amster- 

VrZi\ \ dam, Mar. 20, & Hamburg Mar. 24, '96. 

Fifths, entered at 10. 2s. 5d. advanced to 10. 10s. Od. Sterling per ton, packed. 

Fourths, entered at 12. 7s. 5d. advanced to 12. 10S Od. Sterling per ton, packed. 

Discount 2 i per cent. 

Eefined sugar, entered at 13s/7kl advanced to 14s/9:ld Sterling per 112 lbs., packed. 

To entered price add bags. 
Granulated, entered at 13s/9d, less N". D. charges, advanced to 13s/Sd, Sterling per 50} 

kilos. 

11676 Sugar not above 16 D. S., from Brooks & Co., Guantauamo, Feb. 14, 1896. 

Testing 95.66 entered at .02.6231, advanced to .02.977 Spanish gold per lb., packed. 
To entered price add bags at .30 each. 

11580 ) 

11579 [Sugar not above 16 B. S. from Eansohoff & Missler, Hamburg, Feb. 13, 1896. 

11575 ) 

Testing 80.63, entered at 9s/9d advanced to 10s/7 445 d Sterling per cwt., packed. 
Testing 89.65, entered at lls/9i ! d advanced to 12s/2 975 d Sterling per cwt., packed. 
Testing 79.80, entered at 9s /10Jd advanced to 10s /6.2d Sterling per cwt., packed. 
From entered price deduct N. D. charges and 1} per cent. 
i-jKg.)"" " Sugar not above 16 D. S. from C. Czarnikow, Antwerp, Feb. 4, and 15, 1896. 

Beetroot, entered at 9s /7id advanced to lis /0.59d Sterling per cwt., packed. 
Testing 89.67, entered at lis/- advanced to 12s /6d Sterling per cwt., packed. 
Less N. D. charges and 1} per cent. 

11573 Sugar not above 16 B. S. from T. V. Drake & Co., Brunswick, Feb. 13, 1896. 

Testing 75.40, entered at 9.70 advanced to 10. Marks per 50 kilos. 
Sa^Frui Cisco 1 M f Sm °f silk ' from Mendleson Bros., Yokohama, Mar. 3, 1896. 

White habutai, mommee grade 6J, quality 8919 36x50 yards, entered at 6.80 advanced 

to 7. Silver Yen per 100 momme. 
Fancy brocade, 27x50 yards, momme grade 9, quality 8900, entered at 7.50 advanced 

to 7.60 Silver Yen per 100 Momme. 
Fancy habutai, 27x60 yards, momme grade 9, quality 8814, entered 7.25 advanced to 

7.40 Silver yen per 100 Momme. 
Fancy twill, 27x50 yards, momme grade 12, quality 8735, entered at 7.25 advanced to 

7.40 Silver yen per 100 Momme. 
White oshu habutai, 27x50 yards, momme grade 5, quality S850 & 8606 entered at 

6.80 advanced to 7.25 Silver Yen per 100 momme. 
White habutai, 22x50 yards, momme grade 7, quality. 8860 and 8840, entered at 6.80 

advanced to 7. Silver Yen per 100 momme. 

q„ wlJL'lV^" [ Knitted cotton shirts and drawers, from G. Bollack, Paris, Feb. 27, 1896. 
feau r ran Cisco.. ) ' ' 

Shirts, size, 36, entered at 27. advanced to 28. Francs per dozen. 

Shirts, 38, entered at 28.50 advanced to 29.50 Francs per dozen. 

Shirts, size 40, entered at 30. advanced to 31. Francs per dozen. 

Shirts, size 42, entered at 31.50 advanced to 32.50 Francs per dozen. 

Drawers, size 32, entered at 28. 50 advanced to 29.50 Francs per dozen. 

Drawers, size 34, entered at 30. advanced to 31. Francs per dozen. 

Drawers, size 36, entered at 31.50 advanced to 32.50 Francs per dozen. 

Drawers, size 38, entered at 33. advanced to 34. Francs per dozen. 

Entered at a discount of 10 per cent, advanced discounts 8 per cent and 2 per cent. 

Add case and packing. 



6 



1^ °" P 1 Sugar not above 16 D. 8., from Nicolas Castang, Cienfuegos, Feb. 21, 1896. 

Testing 97.30, entered at .02£ advanced to .02.865 U. S. Currency per lb., packed. 

Prom entered price deduct freight and N. D. charges. 

2876o. p ^ 

2897 o. p ( Sugar not above 16 D. S. from Robert Crooks & Co., Liverpool Jan. 28, 1896, Feb. 5, 1896, 

2942 o. p. ....'... . I and Feb. 18, 1896. 
Phila J 

Entered at from £9. 12s. 5d. to £10. 2s. 5d., advanced to from £10. 5s. Od. to £10. 12s. 

6d. Sterling per ton, packed. 

Discount 2 J per cent. 

2844 o. p | Sugar not above and above 16 D. S. from Robert Crooks & Co., Liverpool, Jan. 15, 1896. 

Phila ) 

Fifths, entered at £9. 2s. 5d. advanced to £9. 15s. Od. Sterling per ton, packed. 

Fourths, entered at £11. 2s. 5d. advanced to £11. 12s. 6d. Sterling per ton, packed. 

Discount 2| per cent. 

2715o. p 1 

2891 o. p I Cigars, from H. Upmann & Co., Havana, Nov. 29, 1895, Jan. 17 and 30, 1896. 

Chicago J 

Entered at a discount of 21 per cent, advanced by disallowance of 2} per cent discount 

deducted from invoice prices. 

2955 o. p ~) g U(/ar aoove ana - not aoove le j)_ g m f rom Robert Crooks & Co., Liverpool Mar. 3 and 10. 

2956 0. p I J 18% 

Baltimore ) 

Fourths, entered at £12. 2s. 5d. advanced to £12. 5s. Od. Sterling per ton, packed. 

Fifths, entered at £9. 17s. 5d. advanced to £10. 8s. 4d. Sterling per ton, packed. 

Fourths, entered at £11. 17s. 5d. advanced to £12. 2s. 6d Sterling per ton, packed. 

Fifths, entered at £9. 17s. 5d. advanced to £10. 10s. Od. Sterling per ton, packed. 

Discount 2i per cent. 

3029 °- P I Kid dolls, from Geo. Borgfeldt & Co., Weimar, Mar. 17, 1896. 

Baltimore ( ' ° 

Kid dolls No. 152, 153, 159 &c, entered at discounts of 5 and 5 per cent add packing., 

no advance. 

29(57 °- P I Mfs. of wood, from Ullmann & Engelmann, Fuerth, Feb. 1896. 

Boston I J J ' 

Pencil boxes, 63/776, entered at 7. advanced to 7.35 Marks per gross. 

Writing boxes, 63/747, entered at 39.96 advanced to 41.95 Marks per gross. 

Writing boxes, 63/748, entered at 42.12 advanced to 44.25 Marks per gross. 

Writing boxes, 63/749, entered at 48.60 advanced to 51. Marks per gross. 

Add cases. 

3°1 3 I Mfs. of silk, from Ch. Cussett & Cie, Lyons. 

Chicago j J J ' 

Taffetas imp., entered at a discount of 20 per cent & 1 per cent, less tare and rebais, 

entered value sustained. 

EBAPPRAISBMBNTS BY BOARDS. 

3143 ~\ 

J? 928 [Mfs. of silk and cotton, from Carl Schiffer, Viersen, Dec. 24 and 31, 1895. 

3144 

10961 J 

36" mervilleux B. black, entered at 1.20 advanced to 1.30 Marks per meter. 

36" merveilleux C. black and rhadame 100 black, entered at 1.30 advanced to 1.40 

Marks per meter. 



7 

3143 1 

109*^8 

g-^ y Mfs. of silk and cotton, etc. — Continued. 

10961."..'.'.'.'.'."!!.'..' J 

36" merveilleux D. black, entered at 1.40 advanced to 1.50 Marks per meter. 

36" rhadame 76 black, entered at 1.02i advanced to 1.10 Marks per meter. 

36" rhadame 84 black, entered at 1.05 advanced to 1.12 Marks per meter. 

36" rhadame 85 black, entered at 1.10 advanced to 1.20 Marks per meter. 

36" rhadame 92 black, entered at 1.20 advanced to 1.35 Marks per meter. 

20 J" satin raye pat. 1/4 entered at .921 advanced to 1. Mark per meter. 

20J" satin de chine 143 black, entered at .821 advanced to .90 Mark per meter. 

202" satin de chine 163 black, entered at .86 advanced to .94 Mark per meter. 

20J" satin 144 black entered at .91 advanced to .98 Mark per meter. 

20 J" satin de chine 154 black, entered at .96 advanced to 1.05 Marks per meter. 

27" satin de chine 154 black, entered at 1.25 advanced to 1.37 Marks per meter. 

27" satin 40 black, entered at .96 advanced to 1.05 Marks per meter. 

27" satin A 1 black entered at 1.10 advanced to 1.25 Marks per meter. 

27" satin C, black, 36" black rhadame 105 black, entered at 1.45 advanced to 1.60 
Marks per meter. 

27" satin F. black, entered at 1.55 advanced to 1.75 Marks per meter. 

22" satin 64 black, entered at 1.05 advanced to 1.20 Marks per meter. 

36" rhadame 90 black, entered at 1.15 advanced to 1.25 Marks per meter. 

Add packing, cases labels and wrappers. 
3239 ) 

11296.........!.!!! J M f s - °f silk and cotton, from Edm. Corty & Co., Crefeld, Feb. 14, 1896. 

24" black satin quality F., entered at .95 advanced to 1.02 J Marks per meter. 
24" black satin quality E, entered at 1.10 advanced to 1.15 Marks per meter. 
24" black satin quality D, entered at 1.30 advanced to 1.35 Marks per meter. 
24" black satin quality C, entered at 1.55 Marks per meter, No Advance. 
24" black satin quality B, entered at 1.70 Marks per meter, No Advance. 
Add packing, labels and wrappers. 
3186 "| 

Ijf , 2 '. Su ff ar not aoove and above 16 D. S. from Eobert Crooks & Co. Liverpool, Feb. 13 and 17th 

olo8 [ 1896. 

11225 J 

Fifths, entered at 9. 14s. lid. advanced to 10. 12s. .075d Sterling per ton, packed. 

Fourths, entered at 11. 17s. 5d. advanced to 12. 4s. Hid Sterling per ton, packed. 

Fourths, entered at 11. 17s. 5d. advanced to 12. 14s. 6d. Sterling per ton, packed. 

Discount 21 per cent. 

322(1 / „ . .. . 

11141 | Gclatme, from Pans Feb. 14, 1896. 

Gelatine laine, entered at S. Francs per kilo, No advance. 
Discounts 40 per cent & 2 per cent. 
Add case and packing. 

11269.......!!!..!! ) Col °red cotton, from Paul Forelle & Voelpel, Breslau, Feb. 5, 1896. 

33" futel striped M 86, entered at .39 discount 10 per ceut advanced to .40 Mark per 

yard, discount 5 per cent. 
Add cases and packing. 



3204- j Mfs. cotton, N. S. P. P., from Win. Meyer & Co., St. Gall, Feb. 11, 1896. 

White brilliantine cloth 40" 20/ Hem. No. 310, entered at .60 advanced to .65 Franc 

per yard. 
Add case. 

''"J ;:: [ Cotton lace curtains, from W. E. Meats & Co., Nottingham, Jan. 10, 1896. 

B. & E. T. lace curtains No. 6495, 3J yards entered at 4s/2d advanced to 4s/8d Ster- 
ling per pair. 
E. T. & E. lace curtains, No. 6300, 6711, and 6479, 3i yards entered at 4s/ Id advanced 

to 4s. 6d Sterling per pair. 
W. T. lace curtains, No. 7036, 3:1 yards entered at 5s/6d advanced to 6s/- Sterling 

per pair. 
E. lace curtains, 6906, Si yards entered at ls/lld Sterling per pair, No Advance. 
E. & W. lace curtains, No. 2834, 31 yards entered 3s/4Jd Sterling per pair, No 

Advance. 
Discount 2} per cent. Add cases. 

??274 I 'W s - of cotton, froinM. Aronani, Damascus, Nov. 18, 1895. 

Table covers and curtains, advanced 10 per cent. 

"j?'*:' I Cotton neckwear, from H. A. Schmitz, Barmen, Dec. 9, 1895. 

Cotton neckties, art. 30000, from 900 to 930, entered at 21.35 Marks per gross, No 

Advance. 
Discount, 9 per cent. 

?}!};■ } Mfs. of wool and cotton, from Simon Israel & Co., Bradford, Feb. 27, 1896. 

56" Melton black H. 4010, No. 5982/5 &c. entered at 7id advanced to 7i'd Sterling 
per yard. 

Discounts 2i & 1} per cent. Add making and packing. 

S'55 ) 

\t n '• [ Cotton hose, from Heinrich, Christo Hartel, Waldenburg, Jan. 29, 1S96. 

11248 ) ' ' ' "' ' 

Men's brown cotton J hose 1/1 boxes, 9J to Hi, No. 159J entered at 1.60, advanced 

to 1.75 Marks per dozen. 
Men's hermsdorf black cotton } hose 1/1 boxes 9 to 11, No. 1200, entered at 2.15 

advanced to 2.60 Marks per dozen. 
Men's hermsdorf black cotton i hose boxes 1/1 9 to 11, No. 1220 entered at 2.50 

advanced to 2.90 Marks per dozen. 
Men's hermsdorf black cotton J hose 1/2 boxes^ 9 to 11, No. 1240 entered at 3.20 

advanced to 3. 75 Marks per dozen. 
Men's fast tan cotton i hose 1/2 boxes, 9 to 11, No. 1250 entered at 3.10 advanced to 

3.35 Marks per dozen. 
Men's hermsdorf black cotton hose boxes 1/2 9 to 11, No. 1260 entered at 3.70, 

advanced to 4.20 marks per dozen. 
Men's fast tan cotton >} hose 1/2 boxes, 9 to 11 No. 1270 entered at 3.60 advanced to 

4.10 Marks per dozen. 
Ladies hermsdorf black cotton hose 1/2 boxes, 85 to 10, No. 181 entered at 5.70 

advanced to 6.25 Marks per dozen. 
Men's brown cotton * hose 1/1 boxes 9£ to 11, No. 1503 entered at 1.70 advanced to 

2.10 Marks per dozen. 



11248 I Goiion / ' ose ' ete -— Continued. 



Men's fast tan cotton i hose 1/1 boxes 9} to 11, No. 503 entered 2.10 Marks per dozen, 

No Advance. 
Men's hernisdorf black cotton •} hose 1/1 boxes, 9] to 11, No. 6731 entered at 2.10 

advanced to 2.30 Marks per dozen. 
Men's fast tan cotton J hose 1/1 boxes 9 J to 11, No. 85 T entered at 2.15 advanced to 

2.40 Marks per dozen. 
Men's hernisdorf black cotton i hose 1/2 boxes 9* to 11, No. 74 B entered at 2.90 

advanced to 3.30 Marks per dozen. 
Ladies hermsdorf black cotton hose 1/1 boxes 81 to 10 No. 781 B. entered at 3.60 

advanced to 4.10 Marks per dozen. 
Ladies fast tan cotton hose 1/1 boxes 8J to 10, No. 781 T entered at 3.50 advanced to 4. 

Marks per dozen. 
Ladies hernisdorf black cotton hose 1/2 boxes 8J to 10, No. 671 B. entered at 4.80 

Marks per dozen, No Advance. 
Ladies white bleached cotton hose 1/1 boxes 8 § to 10, No. 981 W. entered at 3.70 

advanced to 4.20 Marks per dozen. 
Ladies brown cotton hose 1/2 boxes, 8i to 10, No. 831 entered at 4. advanced to 4.60 

Marks per dozen. 
Men's hermsdorf black cotton $ hose 1/2 boxes, 9} to 11, No. 481 B. entered at 3.65 

advanced to 4.15 Marks per dozen. 
Ladies brown cotton hose 1/1 boxes 8i to 10, No. 32 entered at 2.35 advanced to 2.60 

Marks per dozen. 
Ladies hermsdorf black cotton hose 1/2 boxes 8 to 10, No. 854 entered at 3.65 advanced 

to 4.35 Marks per dozen. 
Discount 5 per cent. 
I Wool dress goods, from Weiss Freiss & Co., Mulhausen, Jan. 28, 1896. 

Javanaise X 75 c/m and A. B. 75 c/m, No. 2 entered at .98 advanced to 1.10 Marks per 

meter. 
Javanaise A. F. 75 c/m, 2 entered at 1.05 advanced to 1.15 Marks per meter. 
Javanaise A. F. 75 c/m, 4 entered at 1.09 advanced to 1.19 Marks per meter. 
Javanaise A. B. 75 c/m, 3 entered at 1. advanced to 1.15 Marks per meter. 
Javanaise A. B. & X 75 c/m, 4 entered at 1.02 advanced to 1.17 Marks per meter. 
Javanaise X, 75 c/m, 3 & 4 entered at 1.01 advanced to 1.16 Marks per meter. 
Javanaise X 75 e/m, 1 & 2 entered at .97 advanced to 1.09 Marks per meter. 
Mousseline de laine 78 c/m, 3 & 4, entered at .58 advanced to .71 Mark per meter. 
Mousseline de laine 78 c/m, A & B, 1 & 2, entered at .54 advanced to .61 Mark per 

meter. 
Mousseline de laine 78 c/m, 2 entered at .56 advanced to .64 Mark per meter. 
Javanaise A. F. 75 c/m, 3 entered at 1.07 advanced to 1.17 Marks per meter. 
Mousseline de laine uni 78 c/m, entered at .50 advanced to .58 Mark per meter. 
Mousseline de laine 78 c/m, A & B. entered at .52 advanced to .62 Mark per meter. 
Mousseline de laine 78 c/m, 1 & 2, entered at .55 advanced to .62 Mark per meter. 
Javanaise A. F. 75 c/m, 3 & 4, entered at 1.08 advanced to 1.18 Mark per meter. 
Mousseline de laine 78 c/m, 3 entered at .58 advanced to .69 Mark per meter. 
Add packing and cases. 



10 



fl2r3 1 Flax lace tidies, from Kiefe Freres, Paris, Feb. 20, 1896. 

Voiles renaissance linens 100/36, entered at 11.70 advanced to 13. Francs each. 

Voiles renaissance linens 100/45, entered at 18.75 advanced to 22. Francs each. 

Voiles renaissance linens 100/32, entered at 9.55 advanced to 10.50 Francs each. 

Garniture bed spread and pillow 197, entered at 115. advanced to 120. Francs each. 

Garniture bed spread and pillow, entered at 139. advanced to 150. Fraucs each. 

Voiles renaissauce linens 100/24 entered at 5.10 advanced to 5.50 Francs each. 

Discount 3 per cent Cash discount i per cent. Add case and packing. 
3J 5 *" | Cocoanuts, from Gordon, Grant & Co., Trinidad, Feb. 5, 1896. 

Cocoanuts large pealed, entered at $8. advanced $10. U. S. Currency per 1000. 

Add cost of bags and bagging. 

?l?on [ Skins dressed and finished, from Albert Eeinhard, Luxembourg, Jan. 29, 1896. 

Lambskins, entered at 250. advanced to 300. Francs per 100. 
Add cases. 

??!)?L' [ Chemical salt, from Deutsche Gold and Silver Scheide Anstalt, Fraukfurt, Jan. 28, 1896. 

Vanadinsaures ammonia K., entered at 35. advanced to 45. Marks per kilo. 
Add case. 

720 o. p ) 

2857 [ Sugar above No. 16 D. S., from Eobert Crooks & Co., Liverpool, Jan. 26, 1896. 

Baltimore ) 

Fourths, entered at £11. 12s. 5d. advanced to £12. 0s. Od. Sterling per ton, packed. 

Discount 2J per cent. 

O 



EXTENSION OF TIME FOR UNLADING VESSELS. 



Depa^enY^u.arNo.7*. ^XtiXSViV^ ^ZpKVtmZXXtf 

Bureau of Navigation. 

BUREAU OF NAVIGATION, 

Washington, D. C, May 12, 1896. 
To Collectors of Customs and others: 

The attention of Collectors of Customs and others concerned is invited to the following act of 
Congress approved May 9, 1896, extending the time during which imported cargoes of vessels may be 
unladen : 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress 
assembled, That section twenty- eight hundred and eighty of the Revised Statutes of the United States be 
amended so as to read as follows : 

"Sec. 2880. Whenever any merchandise shall be imported into any port of the United States from 
any foreign port, in any vessel, at the expiration of ten working days if the vessel is less than five hundred 
tons register, and within fifteen working days if it is of five hundred tons register and less than one 
thousand, and within twenty working days if it is of one thousand tons register and less than fifteen 
hundred, and within twenty-five working days if it is of fifteen hundred tons register and upward, not 
including legal holidays and days when the condition of the weather prevents the unlading of the vessel 
with safety to its cargo, after the time within which the report of the master of any vessel is required to 
be made to the collector of the district, if there is found any merchandise other than has been reported 
for some other district or some foreign port, the collector shall take possession thereof; but with the 
consent of the owner or consignee of any merchandise, or with the consent of the owner or master of the 
vessel in which the same may be imported, the merchandise may be taken possession of by the collector 
alter one day's notice to the collector of the district. All merchandise so taken shall be delivered pursuant 
to the order of the collector of the district, for which a certificate or receipt shall be granted." 

' Article 125, Eegulations of 1892, is amended so as to read as follows : 

R. S. 2880, 2966, 2969. Art. 125. When merchandise remains on board a vessel after the expiration 
of legal time for discharging the same the collector may take possession thereof. 

The legal time allowed is as follows : 

Vessels of less than 500 tons, 10 working days after entry. 

Vessels of 500 tons and less than 1,000 tons, 15 working days after entry. 

Vessels of 1,000 tons and less than 1,500 tons, 20 working days after entry. 

Vessels of 1,500 tons and upwards. 25 working days after entry. 

The working days of a vessel are to be computed by excluding the date of entry, legal holidays, and 
stormy days when discharge is impracticable with safety to cargo. 

All merchandise found on board at the expiration of these periods, riot reported for transshipment to 
some other district or some foreign port or place, must be taken possession of by the collector. But with 
the consent of the owner or consignee, or of the owner or master of the vessel, such merchandise may be 
taken possession of after one day's notice to the collector of such consent. One working day must intervene 
between the giving of the notice and the obtaining of the order to discharge. 

EUGENE T. CHAMBERLAIN, 

Commissioner. 
Approved : 

S. WIKE, 

Acting Secretary of the Treasury. 



CERTIFICATES OF REGISTRY FOR THE SPECIAL-TAX YEAR ENDING JUNE SO, 1897. 



189G. 

Department Circular No. 73. 

Internal Revenue, No 458. 



OFFICE OF THE 

COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE, 



Washington. D. C, May 15, 1896. 

1. Immediately upon receipt of this circular collectors will make out and transmit to this office 
requisitions on Form 291 for certificates of registry for the special-tax year commencing July 1, 1896, 
and ending June 30, 1897. 

2. These certificates will be denominated " Series 1896," and requisitions therefor should have this 
denomination distinctly indorsed thereon. 

3. Collectors, in ordering certificates of registry, should base their estimates of the quantity they will 
need upon the number of each kind issued by them during the first three months of the current year, but 
in no case should less than one book of any kind be ordered, nor more than an estimated three montJis' supply. 

4. It is expected that all certificates for the coming year will be transmitted from this office on or 
before June 15, 1896. 

5. On June 30, 1896, collectors will return to this office all certificates of registry of the Series of 1895 
(D) remaining in their hands, reporting them on line 8 of Form 292 for June as "in transitu' 7 June 30, 
1896. Collectors are informed that this instruction is mandatory, that no excuse for not complying with 
the same will be accepted, but that in every case where a collector, for any reason, shall fail to comply 
herewith, he will be required to forward an amended Form 292, on which such certificates returned must 
be reported as "in transitu^ June 30, 1896. 

6. The attention of collectors is called to the printed instructions on the inside of cover of office 
Eecord No. 10, requiring them to register the names of all persons to whom these certificates are issued, 
business, place, from what time, date of issue, and serial number of certificates. 

JOS. S. MILLER, 

Commissioner. 
Approved : 

J. G. CARLISLE, 

Secretary 



RE APPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



^xtixmvvi ^tymxtmmt, 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 74. 

Division of Customs. 

office op THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, May IS, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The following reappraisements of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending May 2, 1896 : 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING MAY 2, 1896. 

N. B. — In corresponding with the Board of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference should always be made to the number of Reappraisement. 

No. of Reovppraisc- 
menl. 

11704 Colored cotton corduroy, from Thos. Barnes & Co., Ltd., Manchester, April, 1, 1896. 

27" navy cord No. 642, entered at 10 Id Sterling per yard 

27" drab, cord No. 201, entered at 9Jd Sterling per yard. 

27" drab, cord No. 642, entered at 7ffd Sterling per yard. 

27" brown cord, No. 100, entered at S^d Sterling per yard 

27" drab cord, No. 100, entered at 7 T Vd Sterling per yard 

27" drab cord, No. 194, entered at 10|d Sterling per yard, 

Less ^th, Discount 2£ per cent, add packing, 

No advance. 
11718 Embroidered flax handkerchiefs, from Lyons & Woods, Belfast, April 1, 1896. 

Ladies cambric initialed and hemstitched handkerchiefs unlaundried in parcels, 
entered at 2s/ld Sterling per dozen, discount 5 per cent, add cases and packing. 

No Advance. 
11705 Sauce and sweetmeats, from Messrs. Melchers & Co., Hongkong, Sept. 2, 1895. 

Soy, entered at 14. Mexican dollars per cask of 5.20 piculs. 

Ginger, entered at 9. Mexican dollars per picul 

No advance. 
11566 Mohair shawls, from Bert Winkler, Loebschutz, Mar. 6, 1896. 

Agnes, black and cream, entered at 15.75 advanced to 17.20 Marks per dozen. 

Bosa black and cream, entered at 16.01 advanced to 17.01 Marks per dozen. 

Nora black and cream, entered at 19.95 advanced to 21.80 Marks per dozen. 

Ana black and cream, entered art 17.33 advanced to 18.93 Marks per dozen. 

Discount 2 per cent. 



]ll^i } Colored paper, from Factura Von Gebruder Wilisch, Schneeberg, Mar. 21, 1896. 

Colored glazed paper, 20 x 24 51/61 entered at 5.40 Marks per 500 sheets 
Add cases &c., less inland freight, No Advance. 

11762 Blank books, from W. Loewenthal, Breig, Mar. 16,1896. 

Notes, 4186/2282, entered at 6. Marks per gross, Discounts 2 per cent and 5 per cent, 
add cases, advanced by disallowance of 5 per cent discount. 

10690 Decorated earthenware, from Eorstrands Aktiebolag, Stockholm, Aug. 31, 1895. 

Pedestals, vases, jardinieres &c. , entered at from .21 to 33. Crowns each, No Advance. 

11724 Decorated earthenware, china, vegetable substance, &c, from Kwong Hee Zing, Hongkong, 

Sept. 2, 1895. 
Common pottery, entered at .45 advanced to .56 Mexican dollars per total, of 225 

pieces. 
Bamboo baskets, entered at 1.50 advanced to 3. Mexican dollars per total, of 150 pieces. 

11724 Bamboo baskets, entered at 1. advanced to 1.25 Mexican Dollars per total. 

Common pottery, entered at 1.27 advanced to 1.50 Mexican dollars per total, of 20 

pieces. 
Soy, entered at 3. advanced to 3.15 Mexican dollars per barrel, of 132 catties. 
Sauce, entered at 2. advanced to 2.20 Mexican dollars per barrel, of 123 catties. 
Common pottery, entered at .05 advanced to .10 Mexican dollars per total, of 20 pieces. 
Decorated china ware, entered at 5. advanced to 10. Mexican dollars per total, of 25 sets. 
Decorated china ware, entered at 3.60, advanced to 8.25 Mexican dollars per total, of 

33 sets. 
Decorated china ware, entered at 9. Mexican dollars per total, No Advance. 

11503 Mfs. of flax and cotton, bleached cotton &c, from , St. Gall, Mar. 5, 1896. 

Checked linen cloth 32" No. 1238, 1240, and 1241 &c, entered at .56 advanced to .58 

Franc per yard. 
Plain Swisses 32" quality g, entered at .30 advanced to .32 Franc per yard. 
Add case. 

11198 Cotton netting and cotton lace curtains, from B. Walker & Co., Nottingham, Feb. 14, 1896. 

Ecru cotton Hamburg net, 40" 1502, entered at 2id advanced to 22d Sterling per yard. 
Ecru cotton Hamburg net, 50" 302, entered at 3d advanced to 3} Sterling per yard. 
White cotton Hamburg net 50" 304, entered at 3d Sterling per yard, No Advance. 
Ecru cotton Hamburg net 50" 404, entered at 42 d advanced to 5d Sterling per yard. 
Ecru cotton Hamburg net 50" 1003, entered at 6id advanced to 6|d Sterling per yard. 
Ecru cotton Hambur net 50", 110, entered at 21 d advanced to 3d Sterling per yard. 
White cotton Hamburg net 54", S. 100, entered at 3d advanced to 3}d Sterling per yard. 
White cotton Hamburg net 54", S. 200, entered at 3id advanced to 4id Sterling per 
yard. 

11198 White cotton Hamburg net, 54" S. 300, entered at 4Jd advanced to 5f Sterling per yard. 

Ivory cotton Hamburg net 50" 2, entered at 5d advanced to 6d Sterling per yard. 
Ivory cotton Hamburg net 50" 1, entered at 5d advanced to 6J Sterling per yard. 
Ivory cotton Hamburg net 272 75, entered at 2d advanced to 2 1 Sterling per yard. 
Ivory cotton Hamburg net 50" 334, entered at 3id advanced to 3s Sterling per yard. 
Ecru cotton Hamburg net 50" 806, entered at 5Jd, advanced to 6d Sterling per yard. 
E. T. curtains 3 J yards, 50", 3965, entered at 2s/2d advanced to 2s/4d Sterling per pair. 
Ivory T. curtains 3 J yards, 50" 3965, entered at 2s/2d advanced to 2s/6d Sterling per 
pair. 



11198 Cotton netting and cotton lace curtains, etc. — Continued. 

E. T. curtains 3 J yards 56", 3968, entered at 3s advanced to 3s/6d Sterling per pair. 
E. T. curtains, 3* yards 48", 1759, entered at 2s/3Jd, advanced to 2s/6Jd Sterling per 

pair. 
E. T. curtains 56" 3 J yards, 3960, entered at 2s/9d advanced to 3s/- Sterling per pair. 
W. T. Curtains 3£ yards, 54", 3988, entered at 4s/- advanced to 4s/6d Sterling per pair. 
E. T. curtains 3J yards, 48", 3908, entered at 2s/31d advanced to 2s/10J Sterling per 

pair. 
E. T. curtains, 3 yards, 48" 1925, entered at ls/8Jd advanced to ls/lOJ Sterling per 

pair. 
Ivory T. curtains 3* yards, 48", 1925, entered at 2s/- advanced to 2s/lid Sterling per 

pair. 
Ecru curtains. 'Si yards, 54", 3964, entered at 2s/- advanced to 2s/2d Sterling per pair. 
Bed sets, 6202 entered at 5s/9d advanced to 6s/3d Sterling per set. 
Discount 2£ per cent Add cases, less carriage. 

11723 Sugar above 16 D. 8. from H. M. Van Ecehur, Amsterdam, Mar. 20, 1896. 

Common refined sugar, entered at 14s/l*d, add bags, advanced to 14s/9 2 l d Sterling per 
112 lbs., packed. 

11594 Refined sugar above 16 D. 8. from Gebrixder Michahelles, Hamburg, Feb. 24, 1896. 

Extra fine granulated, entered at 13s/6d, less discount 1 per cent, brokerage i per cent, 
and cartage. Advanced to 13s/6s Sterling per cwt., packed. 

11697 ") Colored cotton velvet, unbleached corduroy and velvet, from Hithersay & Ram m, Manchester, 

11696 j Mar. 20 & 27, 1896. 

22" black velourita velvet 24, entered at 8}d advanced to 9id Sterliug per yard. 

22" black velourita velvet, 25, entered at 8 2 d Sterliug per yard, No Advance. 

22" black velourita velvet 25, entered at 8 Id advanced to 9 Id Sterling per yard. 

22" black velourita velvet, B x x, entered at 41 advanced to 4Id Sterling per yard. 

22" black velourita velvet 50, entered at 5d advanced to 5]d Sterling per yard. 

25" Black velvets, 30, entered at 6d advanced to 6 2 d Sterling per yard. 

27" Picker velveteens W. entered at 7*d advanced to 8d Sterling per yard. 

22" black velvets 100, entered at 7d advanced to 7§d Sterling per yard. 

Less measure ^-th. Discount 2£ per cent. Add cases, making up aud boxes. 
11448 Mfs. of silk and cotton, from F. Lafite &Co., Lyons, Feb. 29, 1896. 

Black 92 c/m, serge, No. 395, entered at .96 advanced to, 1.12 Francs per meter. 

Entered discounts 20 per ceut & 1 per ceut, Advanced discouut 20 per cent. 

Add case and packing. 
11373 Mfs. of silk and cotton, from Gindre & Co., Lyons, Feb. 23, 1896. 

Satin 48 c/m, Quality 82, entered at 1.05 advanced to 1.15 Francs per meter. 

Satin 47 c/m, entered at 1.10 advanced to 1.20 Francs per meter. 

Satin 60 c/m, entered at .88 advanced to .96 Francs per meter. 

Satin 60 c/m, quality 427, entered at 1.10 advanced to 1.20 Francs per meter. 

Entered discounts 20 per ceut & 1 per cent, Advanced discouut 20 per cent. 
11363 Mfs. of silk and cotton, from Henry Gorjus, Lyons, Feb. 26, 1896. 

Raw serge 92 c/m, No. 2673/62, entered at .85 advanced to .90 Franc per meter. 

Facoune coul 92 c/m, No. 26980/81, entered at 1.30 Francs per meter, No Advance. 

Serge 92 c/m, entered at .95 Franc per meter, No Advance. 

Satin quadrille No. 26985/92, entered at 1.95 Francs per meter, No Advance. 

Raw foulard 54 c/m, 26619 &c, entered at 1.45 advanced to 1.55 Francs per meter. 

Discounts 20 per cent & 1 per cent. Add cases and packing. 



11563 Mfs. of silk and cotton, from E. Chevillard & Co., Lyons, March 14, 1896. 

Satin 48 c/m, No. 56, entered at .75 advanced to .88 Franc per meter. 

Satin 61 c/m, No. 13, entered at .68 advanced to .82 Franc per meter. 

Entered discounts 20 per cent & 1 per cent. Advanced discount 20 per cent. 

Add case and packing. 
11593 Mfs. of silk and cotton, from Noyer & Collon, Lyons, March 16, 1896. 

Satin 92 c/m, entered at 1.10 advanced to 1.25 Francs per meter. 

Satin 92 c/m, entered at 1.20 advanced to 1.35 Francs per meter. 

Satin 92 c/m, entered at 1. advanced to 1.15 Francs per meter. 

Serge 92 c/m, entered at .90 advanced to 1.05 Francs per meter. 

Serge 92 c/m, entered at .90 advanced to 1.05 Francs per 

Serge 92 c/m, entered at .80, .82 and .85 advanced to 1. Franc per meter. 

Faconne impe 52 c/m, entered at 1.15 advanced to 1.25 Francs per meter. 

Discount 20 per cent. 
11564 Mfs. of silk and cotton, from Th. Schilling & Co., Lyons, March 14, 1896. 

60 c/m danier No. 184, entered at 1.58 advanced to 1.65 Francs per meter. 

80 c/m china No. 7204, entered at .61 advanced to .70 Franc per meter. 

60 c/m serge No. 42 S. entered at .64 advanced to .78 Franc per meter. 

Discounts 20 per cent & 1 per cent. Add case and packing. 
11318 Mfs. of silk and cotton, from A. Besson & Sauze, Lyons, Feb. 20, 1896. 

Quality No. 2874 suedoise 1 60 c'm, entered at .90 advanced to 1.05 Francs per meter. 

Quality No. 4270 suedoise 11 60 c/m, entered at .75 advanced to .90 Franc per meter. 

Quality No. 3922 faille 60 c/m, entered at 1.10 advanced to 1.20 Francs per meter. 

Quality No. 2874 suedoise 1, 60 c/m, entered at .75 advanced to .95 Franc per meter. 

Quality No. 4290, suedoise 11, 60 c/m, entered at .60 advanced to .80 Franc per meter. 

Quality No. 4319 serge 92 c/m, entered at .90 advanced to 1. Franc per meter. 

Quality No. 2875 pongee, 78 c/m, entered at .80 advanced to .98 Franc per meter. 

Quality No. 4337, Taffetas 54 c/m, entered at 2. advanced to 2.20 Francs per meter. 

Quality No. 4335, broderie 92 c/m, entered at 1.40 advanced to 1.53 Francs per meter. 

Quality No. 4291 broderie 46 c/m, entered at .75 advanced to .82 Franc per meter. 

Quality 4292 broderie 60 c/m, entered at .90 advanced to 1. Franc per meter. 

Quality No. 4336 satin 60 c/m, entered at .90 advanced to 1.05 Francs per meter. 

Quality No. 4327 pongee impe. 46 c/m, entered at 60 advanced to .66 Franc per mete.. 

Quality No. 2875 pongee 78 c/m entered at .70 advanced to .88 Franc per meter. 

Quality No. 4337 taffetas 54 c/m, entered at 1.50 advanced to 1.90 Francs per meter. 

Quality No. 4337 taffetas 54 c/m, entered at 1.75 advanced to 2. Francs per meter. 

Quality No. 4292 broiderie 60 c/m, entered at .80 advanced to 1. Franc per meter. 

Discount 20 per cent. 
11235 Colored cotton, &c, from Weiss, Fries & Co., Mulhouse, Jan. 24, 1896. 

Satinette robe serie 1, entered at .50 advanced to .53 Mark per meter. 

Plumetis 75 c/m, serie 2, entered at .54 advanced to .59 Mark per meter. 

Organdi 80 c/m serie 2, 3 and 4, entered at .49 advanced to .60 Mark per meter. 

Similar goods similar advances. 

Add packing at .24 per piece. Add cases. 
11654 Cotton hose, from Uhle & Wagner, Chemnitz, Mar. 6, 1896. 

Ladies cotton hose entered at from 3.50 to 7.80 Marks per dozen, entry sustained on 
some and on others advances up to 51 per cent. 

Men's cotton hose, entered at from 2.35 to 4.80 advanced to from 2.50 to 4.80 Marks 
per dozen. 



5 

J1523 | (j otton ] lose ^ f rom Heinrich C. Hartel, Waldenburg, Mar. 2, and 17th 1896. 

11688 ) 

Misses and ladies cotton hose, entered at from 3.60 to 12.20 advanced to from 3.60 to 

12.50 Marks per dozen. 
Men's cotton hose entered at from 2.15 to 4.30 advanced to from 2.35 to 4.60 Marks 
per dozen. 

11756 Sulphate of ammonia, from Peter E. McQuie & Son, Liverpool, March 25. 1896. 

Entered at £7. 18s. 9d. Sterling per ton, add bags at 2s /9d per ton and bagging at 
lid. per ton, No Advance. 

rh ° ^ i blueberries, pressed in their own juice, from J. H. Myrick & Co., Allerton, Nov. 4, 1895. 

Blueberries, entered at $2.20 per case of one dozen gallons each. 
Half cases, entered at $1.10 per case of one-half dozen gallons each. 
~So Advance. 

PmL° P 1 8wgar not above 16 D8 > from Eobert Crooks & Co -> Liverpool, Feb. 8, 1896. 

Sugar, entered at 10s/6d, Sterling per cwt., discount 21 per cent, No advance. 
Vh i'l ° P \ Sugar not above 16 D. S. from Persira Carneiro& Co., Pernambuco, Jan. 23, 1896. 

Testing 86.10, entered at a total of £5812. 18s. 4d. Advanced to 9s/6. 3d Sterling per 
cwt., packed. 

Phila P I Sugar not above 16 B ' 8 from Alexandria, Jan. 27, 1896. 

Testing 98.34, entered at 12s/4-ld, less freight and N". D. charges, discount 11 per cent, 
advanced to 12s/5.9d Sterling per cwt., packed. 

Ph1ki° P 1 Sugar not above 16 D ' 8 from Eaasolloff & Wissler, Magdeburg, Feb. 7, 1896. 

Testing 87.80, entered at 12.6875 Marks less N. D. charges, and 11 per cent discount, 
advanced to 1184 Marks per 50 kilos, packed. 

Boston P 1 8vgar not above 16 B - 8 - from Robert Crooks & Co., Liverpool, Feb. 26, 1896. 

Fourths, entered at £12. 2s. 5d. advanced to £12. 10s. Od. Sterling per ton, packed. 
Discount 1\ per cent. 

3011 o. p ) 

3012 o. p \Mica, from Webster & Co., Ottowa, Feb. 2S, and April 2, 1896. 

Boston J 

Crude mica, entered at .08 and .O82 advanced to $.08 2 per lb. 

Baltimore } Woolens > from Wallace & Co., Bradford, March 3, 1896. 

55/56" Quality 354, black worsted coatings, entered at 2s/3d advanced to 2s/5d Sterling 

per yard. 
Less measure ^-th, discount 5 per cent, add cases. 

Baltimore 1 8ugar above 1€ D ' 8 "> from Vibraus & Gerl off i Braunschweig March 20, 1896. 

German granulated, entered at $.03-^, less N. D. charges advanced to 13s/6d Sterling 
per cwt., packed. 



EEAPPKAISEMENTS BY BOARDS. 



3228... 

11285. 



I Mfs. of silk and silk and cotton, from J. & P. Michel & Co., Lyons, Feb. 25, 1896. 
Pongee 86 c/m, quality 6270, entered at .87 advanced to 1.05 Francs per meter. 
Diagonale 92 c/m, quality 2003. entered at .91 advanced to 1. Franc per meter. 
Discounts 16 per cent & 2 per cent. 



6 

^298 1 M f s - °f silk & coUo% i froin Naef Bros > Zurich, Feb. 25/96. 

Satin rhadames noir tre cot. 17 J", entered at 1.375 advanced to 1.50 Francs per aune. 

Satin rhadames noir tre cot. 20£", entered at 1.40 advanced to 1.54 Francs per aune. 

Satin rhadames noir tre cot. 36", entered at from 1.90 to 2.40 advanced to from 2.10 to 
2.75 Francs per aune. 

Discount 19 per cent. Add cases and packing. 
3217 ] 

1 1 oil 

in*- )-Mfs. of silk and cotton, from Lyons, Jan. 23, 1896. 

11242 J 

92 c/m serge quality No. 242, entered at .85 advanced to 1. Franc per meter. 

92 c/m austria quality 246, entered at .85 advanced to 1. Franc per meter. 

95 c/m austria quality No. 249, entered at .95 advanced to 1.10 Francs per meter. 

Discount 20 per cent. Add cases and packing. 

2768 



*!^ 5 \ Wool dress goods, (job lots) from A. Van Bergen & Co., Paris, Nov. 1, 1895. 

103U'.. .......... ) 

No. 941 silk and wool black vouvte. 47", entered at 3.25 advanced to 3.75 Francs per 

meter. 
No. 1800 all wool white and cream henrietta 44", entered at 1.37 advanced to 1.46 

Francs per meter. 
No. 1100 all wool blue black and jet black 34", eutered at .61 advanced to .66 Francs 

per meter. 
Discount 5 per cent. Add cases and packing. 

2 ^>\ } Wool dress goods, from Testart freres Paris, Oct. 29, 1895. 

F. A. 11/12 all wool henriettas 113/115 c/m, noir, entered at .95 advanced to 1.08 

Francs per meter. 
F. TJ. 12/13 all wool henriettas 113/115 c/m noir, entered 1.03 advanced to 1.16 Francs 

per meter. 
F. C. 13/14 all wool henriettas 113/115 c/m noir, entered at 1.11 advanced to 1.24 

Francs per meter. 
F. B. 17/18 all wool henriettas 113/115 c/m noir, entered at 1.43 advanced to 1.56 

Francs per meter. 
Discount 5 per cent. Add cases. 

?jjq.y } Mfs. of goat hair and cotton, from Ferdinand Heilbrun & Co., Bradford, Mar. 14, 1896. 

54" blue curl No. 32872, No. 33158 &c, entered at 2s/5d advanced to 2s/5.44d Sterling 

per yard. 
54" Black curl No. 31367, No. 27820, &c, entered at 3s/9d advanced to 3s/9.68d 

Sterling per yard. 
54" black curl No. 33214, entered at 4s/6d advanced to 4s/6.81d Sterling per yard. 
Less measure l/37th, discount 5 per cent. Add making up and packing. 

31^- 1 Worsted yam, from F. W. Bust & Co., Leicester, Feb. 18, 1896. 

8 oz. B. 12/3 No. 736, entered at ls/81d advanced to 2s Sterling per lb. Add cases. 



^J; 1 Paint, from Arthur Simons, Londou Jan. 30, 1896. 

11351 ) ' ' 

20 drums, entered at 22s/6d advanced to 24s/9d Sterling per cwt., packed. 

10 drums entered at 32s/6d advanced to 35s/9d Sterling per cwt., packed. 

10 d-iums entered at 37s/6d advanced to 41s/3d Sterling per cwt., packed. 

^^- 1 Oriental rugs, from H. Telfeyau, Constantinople, Feb. 13, 1896. 

72 Eugs, entered at 34.350 advanced to 37.785 Piasters per total. 
Discount 5 per cent. Add packing. 



EVIDENCE OF PROPER PAYMENT OF VOUCHERS. 

(Superseding Department Circular No. 48, of March 23, 1896.) 



Departmen^rcularNo.TS. ^XtUSViX^ ^tV^X\XatVi\ f 

office of COMPTROLLER OF THE TREASURY, 

Washington, D. C:, May 20, 1896. 

The following regulations, in the matter of the evidence required by the accounting officers as proof 
of payment of vouchers, are published for the information and guidance of disbursing officers of the United 
States : 

1. Vouchers must be stated in the name of the person, firm, company, or corporation rendering the 
service or furnishing the articles for which payment is made. 

2. If the payee be a firm, the receipt to the voucher should be in the usual firm signature, signed by 
a member of the firm ; if an incorporated or unincorporated company, the receipt should be in the com- 
pany name, followed by the autograph signature of the officer (with his title) authorized to receive the 
money and receipt therefor. 

3. Evidence of the authority of the officer receipting for an incorporated or unincorporated company 
must accompany the voucher unless the payment is made by a check drawn on a United States depository 
to the order of the company, and that fact, with the date and number of the check and name of the deposi- 
tory, is stated on the voucher. 

4. When a disbursing officer is satisfied that an attorney or agent is authorized to receipt for his 
principal, whether an individual, firm, company, or corporation, the receipt of the principal by the 
attorney or agent will be sufficient, without proof of authority accompanying the voucher, provided that 
payment is made by a check drawn on a United States depository and payable to the order of the principal, 
and the memorandum required in the preceding paragraph is made upon the voucher. 

5. These regulations will not affect any additional regulations of the several Departments, but are 
intended as a statement of all that is required by the accounting officers as proof that payments are made 
to the proper persons. 

R. B. BOWLER, 

Comptroller. 
Approved : 

J. G. CARLISLE, 

Secretary. 



ENTRY OF GOODS FOB IMMEDIATE TRANSPORTATION, UNDER ACT OF JUNE 10, 1880, MAY 
BE MADE AT THE PORT OF FIRST ARRIVAL ON PRO FORMA INVOICE, IN ABSENCE OF 
CERTIFIED INVOICE, AND WITHOUT BOND. 



X896. 
Department Circular No. 76* 

Division of Customs. 

Office op THE SECRETARY 



of THE SEGRETAR' 

Washington, D. C, May 25, 1896. 
To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The question has been presented to the Department whether, under the act of June 10, 1880, entries 
of imported goods valued at over $100, for immediate transportation, may be legally made at the port of 
first arrival on a pro forma invoice without the filing of a bond at such port for the production of a certi- 
fied invoice, in view of the provisions of section 4 of the act of June 10, 1S90, which prescribes that 
"except in the case of personal effects accompanying the passenger, no importation of any merchandise 
exceeding one hundred dollars in dutiable value shall be admitted to entry without the production of a 
duly certified invoice." 

The question was submitted to the Solicitor of the Treasury, and in his reply (annexed hereto) that 
officer advises the Department that section 4 of the Administrative Act does not apply to entries made 
at the first port of arrival under the act of June 10, 1880, and that entries for immediate transportation, 
under the last-named act, may be made at the port of first arrival on pro forma invoices, in the absence 
of certified invoices, without the filing of a bond at such port for the production of certified invoices. 

The Department accepts this opinion as a rule for the guidance of officers of the customs in the cases 
to which it refers. Nothing herein shall dispense with the filing of the proper bond on entry at the port 
of destination. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



Department of Justice, 
Office of the Solicitor of the Treasury, 

Washington, D. C, May 18, 1896. 

Sir : Acting Secretary Hamlin, under date of the 15th instant, incloses letters of the collectors of 
customs at New York and San Francisco, relating to entries for "immediate transportation," under the 
act of June 10, 1880, and requests my opinion as to whether entries for such transportation may be made 
at the port of first arrival on pro forma invoices in the absence of certified invoices, and whether the filing 
of bonds at such port for the production of such certified invoices is requisite. 

It is suggested that the decisions of the Department on this point have not been uniform, and that a 
definite settlement of the question is desired. 

It is admitted on the one hand that the procedure at the first port is mainly for the purpose of secur- 
ing proper record of the importation and of obtaining the material for liquidation of the ship's manifest ; 
and, on the other hand, it is claimed that under section 4 of the Administrative Act no entry can be made 
of which the value exceeds $100 without the production of a certified invoice or the filing of a bond 
to produce the same. 






It appears to have been frequently decided that the "immediate transportation" law was enacted 
for the purpose of establishing the equalization of conditions at the interior and exterior ports ; so that 
merchandise arriving under an "immediate transportation" entry is to be treated in all respects at the 
interior port as if it were the port of first arrival, and that the formalities at the port of first arrival are 
merely such as are indispensable to the custom-house records. 

It is conceded also by the Acting Secretary that no entry can be made at the port of delivery without 
certified invoice, or, in its absence, a proper bond for its production. The special question now pro- 
pounded relates to the port at which such bond shall be filed. 

In G. A. 968, the General Appraisers held that — 

"The manifest purpose of the act of June 10, 1880, was to place importers at interior ports upon a 
footing as nearly as practicable with importers at the exterior ports. The terms of the act sustain the 
theory that the entry required at the exterior port is simply for the purpose of clearing the records of 
such port, and of properly safeguarding the shipment of the merchandise to its destination, where real 
entry thereof may be made, duly verified by the required declaration of the owner, importer, or ultimate consignee.'' " 

It seems to me that while an entry is required to be made at the seaboard port of arrival, such entry 
is only formal in character. The object of such entry is for the purpose of tracing and identifying the 
same, or estimating the duties, or for comparison of the invoices and bills of lading of the goods, by 
description and quantity of the goods that have actually arrived. Upon the arrival of goods at the interior 
port of destination, the conductor, master, or agent is required to report to the collector at such port the 
fact of such arrival, and to deliver the manifest to him. Proceedings are then taken by way of appraise- 
ment, liquidation, etc., as in the case of goods entered for liquidation at the port of first arrival in this 
country. 

The last sentence of section 4 of the act of June 10, 1890, provides that when entry of merchandise 
exceeding one hundred dollars in value, is made by a statement in the form of an invoice, the collector 
shall require a bond for the production of a duly certified invoice. 

The act of June 10, 1880, providing for the "immediate transportation" of dutiable goods, directs 
that the collector at the port of first arrival shall allow the merchandise to be shipped immediately after 
the entry prescribed in section 2 of the act, has been made. Section 2 prescribes that the collector at the 
port of first arrival shall retain in his office a permanent record of the merchandise to be forwarded to 
the port of destination, and such record shall consist of a copy of the invoice and entry, whereon the 
duties shall be estimated as closely as possible on the merchandise so shipped ; but no oaths shall be 
required on the said entry. 

This section further prescribes that the merchandise shall not be subject to appraisement and liquida- 
tion of the duties at the port of first arrival, but shall undergo such examination as the Secretary of the 
Treasury shall deem necessary to verify the invoice ; and the same examination and appraisement shall 
be required and had at the port of destination as would have been required at the port of first arrival if 
such merchandise had been entered for consumption or warehouse at such port. The act proceeds to 
direct how the merchandise shall be transported ; the quadrupli cation of invoices ; the ports to which it 
may be transported, etc., etc. 

I do not think that section 4 of the Administrative Act, prescribing that no entry can be made of 
which the value exceeds $100 without the production of a certified invoice or the filing of a bond to pro- 
duce the same, applies to goods imported under the act of June 10, 1880. 

I am, therefore, of the opinion that entries for "immediate transportation" under the act of June 
10, 1880, may be made at the port of first arrival on pro forma invoices, in the absence of certified invoices, 
and that the filing of a bond at such port for the production of certified invoices is not requisite in such 



Yery respectfully, F. A. Reeve, Solicitor. 



Hon. J. G. Carlisle, 

Secretary of the Treasury. 



NO RELIQUIDATION REQUIRED OF ENTRIES OF CURRANTS LIQUIDATED FREE UNDER 
DECISION OF BOARD OF GENERAL APPRAISERS OF APRIL 1, 1895 (©. A. 3028), UNAP- 
PEALED FROM, PRIOR TO DECISION OF UNITED STATES CIRCUIT COURT HOLDING 
CURRANTS DUTIABLE UNDER PARAGRAPH 217 OF ACT OF AUGUST 28, 1891. 



I,e 1 ,a 1 tn,e„t X ^fularNo.7T. %XV8LSXLXQ ^t^XXXtitXiXy 

Division of Customs. 

office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, May 27, 1896. 
To Collectors and other Officers of the Custo?ns : 

The Department has received an opinion rendered on March 26, 1896, by the United States circuit 
court for the northern district of California, on the appeal of the collector at San Francisco from the 
decision of the Board of General Appraisers, in the matter of the classification of currants, of which 
the. following is a copy : 

In the Circuit Court of the United States, Ninth Circuit and Northern District of California. 

' ' Zante currants. ' ' 

In the Matter of the Application and Petition of John H. Wise, Esq., Collector * 
of Customs for the Port of San Francisco, State and Northern District of 
California, for a Review of the Questions of Law and Fact Involved in a I „ 
Decision of the Board of United States Appraisers on Duty at New York, / J*iU». 

in the Matter of the Classification of Certain Currants, Merchandise 
Imported by S. L. Jones & Co. 



An application and petition was filed by the collector of customs for the port of San Francisco for a 
review, under section 15 of the Customs Administrative Act of June 10, 1890, of the decision of the 
Board of United States General Appraisers in relation to the classification of and duty on certain currants 
imported by S. L. Jones & Co. The Board of General Appraisers held that the currants imported were 
not Zante currants and, therefore, did not come within the provisions of paragraph 217 of tariff act 
of August 28, 1894, commonly known as the Wilson Bill, but did come within the provisions of paragraph 
489, and were not subject to duty as being not otherwise provided for. Decision of the Board of General 
Appraisers reversed. 

H. S. Foote, Esq., United States district attorney, and Samuel Knight, Esq., assistant United States 
attorney. A. P. Van Duzer, Esq., for importers S. L. Jones & Co. 

Morrow, district judge : 

This is an application and petition by John H. Wise, collector of customs of the port of San Francisco, 
for a review of the questions of law and fact involved in the decision of the Board of United States General 
Appraisers, at the port of New York, in the matter of the classification of an importation of 500 barrels 



of currants at the port of San Francisco, under the act of Congress, entitled "An act to reduce taxation, to 
provide revenue for the Government, and for other purposes," approved August 28, 1894, and commonly 
known as the Wilson Bill. The currants were imported on March 19, 1895, from Liverpool, on board of 
the British ship Drumburton, and were invoiced as "Plum pudding label J. Currants," and were so 
entered at the custom house. They came originally from Patras, Greece. Thereafter, on April 12, 1895, 
the collector of customs classified said currants as " Zante currants," and as dutiable, under paragraph 217 
of the act of Congress above referred to, at the rate of one and a half cents per pound. The importers 
entered their protest against this ruling of the collector and appealed to the Board of General Appraisers, 
then on duty at the port of New York, claiming that said article was not Zante currants, but currants 
grown in the provinces of Greece, on the mainland, and, therefore, free of duty as dried fruit not other- 
wise provided for, and that said currants are not commercially known as raisins or dried grapes. The 
Board of General Appraisers decided in favor of the importers. To reverse this decision, the collector 
brings the question before this court, under section 15 of the Customs Administrative Act of June 10, 1890, 
for a review and for a construction of law respecting the classification of said currants and the duty, if 
any, imposed thereon. 

It is objected, at the outset, that this court has no jurisdiction of this matter for the reasons, first, that 
the decision of the Board of General Appraisers is final, and, second, that the collector had no authority 
from the Secretary of the Treasury to bring the matter into this court for a review of the decision of the 
Board. These objections are disposed of by the language of section 15 of the Customs Administrative 
Act of June 10, 1890, which provides as follows : "That if the owner, importer, consignee, or agent of any 
imported merchandise, or the collector, or the Secretary of the Treasury, shall be dissatisfied with the 
decision of the Board of General Appraisers, as provided in section fourteen of this act, as to the con- 
struction of the law and facts respecting the classification of such merchandise and the rate of duty 
imposed thereon under such classification, they, or either of them, may, within thirty days next after 
such decision, and not afterwards, apply to the circuit court of the United States, within the district in 
which the matter arises, for a review of the questions of law and fact involved in such decision." 
Nothing is said about first obtaining authority from the Secretary of the Treasury to bring the matter 
within the jurisdiction of the circuit court, and it is evident that no such authority is required. 

The collector of customs claims that the currants in question are Zante currants, and that they are 
expressly included in paragraph 217 of the present tariff act, which reads as follows: "Plums, prunes, 
figs, raisins, and other dried grapes, including Zante currants, one and one-half cents per pound." The 
importers contend that the currants are not Zante currants, but they are Provincial currants ; that is, 
that they come from Patras, Greece, on the mainland, and not from the Island of Zante, and are covered 
by paragraph 489, which places on the free list "Fruits, green, ripe, or dried, not specially provided for 
in this act." 

The evidence now before the court for its consideration consists (1) of the testimony and exhibits 
introduced before the Board of General Appraisers and incorporated in their return to the order of this 
court of July 17, 1895, directing them to transmit the record of said matter and the evidence taken by 
them therein, together with a certified statement of the facts involved in the case, and their decision 
thereon ; (2) of the testimony and exhibits introduced in this court before the special referee in San 
Francisco. 

Without entering into a minute consideration as to the effect and sufficiency of the evidence taken 
before the Board of General Appraisers at New York, it is sufficient to say that it is completely overcome 
bv the evidence taken in this court before the referee. Eight witnesses were called by the protestant in 
New York ; several of them professed to have more or less knowledge concerning Zante currants, but none 
of them appear to be experts. They certainly were not expert viticulturists or horticulturists, nor, so far 
as their testimony shows, had any of them made a special study of the Zante currant or of currants in 
general. Several of them admitted that they were not experts and knew but little about Zante currants. 
Such knowledge as they did possess appears to have been acquired in the course of dealing in dried fruits 
and by reason of importations made of currants, and while sufficient for the ordinary purposes of trade, 
it can not be said to be sufficiently competent to be accepted as binding expert testimony. Four of the 
witnesses identified a sample of the importation as being, not a Zante currant, but a Patras currant from 
the mainland. Four other witnesses testified that the expression " Zante currants " was understood to 
mean currants from the Island of Zante alone and not from the mainland. All these witnesses were sub- 
jected to little, if any, cross-examination. One witness, in the course of his examination, stated that a 
Zante or Patras currant was a fruit other than a grape. This was clearly an error, and is completely and 
conclusively overcome and refuted by the unanimous testimony of all the witnesses, both for the Govern- 
ment and the importers, who testified in this court before the referee. 

The testimony taken before the referee is in marked contrast to that given before the Board at New 
York. The witnesses, on the part of the Government, some 23 in number, were experts in every sense 
of the word, and proved themselves thoroughly conversant with the Zante currant, not only botanically 



but commercially as well. Among them were professors of viticulture and horticulture at the State and 
Stanford Universities, several experienced vineyardists and growers of raisins, and also dealers and 
importers of the Zante currant on this coast. Some of them testified that they had made experiments in 
the growing of Zante currants in this State. They were subjected to a rigid cross-examination. The 
protestaut produced but three witnesses, one of whom was the importer, and all of whom displayed a 
conspicuous want of knowledge upon the subject. Such opinions cau not stand as against the positive 
statements of the experts in the case, who have made the question one of actual study, observation, and 
experiment. It would prolong this opinion to an unwarrantable length to rehearse the testimony given. 
It preponderates largely to the effect that the term "Zante currants" is a well-known commercial expres- 
sion among importers, dealers, and growers of raisins, and relates to and comprehends a kind of raisin 
made from a small, seedless grape grown not only in the Island of Zante, but, also, and to a much 
greater exeut, on the mainland of Greece and other neighboring localities. "Zante currants" is simply 
its English name. It derives the name of "currants" from the fact that, in times past, it was shipped 
from the city of Corinth, Greece. In German it is called " Korinthen ; " in French, "raisin de 
Corinthe;" in Spanish, "pasasde Corinto." It is a raisin grape as distinguished from the shrub cur- 
rant, with wbichits name may confound it, but from which it is entirely distinct, the former belonging 
to the grapevine family, or vitis vinefera, of plants, the latter to the shrub, or ribes. A Zante currant, 
on the vine, is a small-sized grape; when picked and dried it is a "dried grape" or kind of raisin, 
whose popular and commercial designation is " Zante currants." 

In the Century Dictionary, "currant" is defined as "A very small kind of raisin or dried grape 
imported from the Levaut, chiefly from Zante and Cephalonia, and used in cooking." Precisely the 
same definition is given in Webster's International Dictionary, issued in 1890. In the Encyclopedia 
Brittanica (editiou 1877; the following definition is found : " Currant. The dried, seedless fruit of a 
variety of the grapevine, vitis vinefera, cultivated principally in Zante, Cephalonia, Ithaca, and near 
Patras in the Morea." In the Standard Dictionary of the English Language, published in 1885, a cur- 
rant is defined to be "a small seedless raisin imported from the Levant and called usually dried currant 
and Za7i1e currant." 

While it is true that dictionaries are not, of themselves, evidence, still they may be referred to "as 
aids to the memory and understanding of the court." (Nix v. Heddend, 149 U. S.,304, 307, and cases there 
cited.) 

It may be interesting, in this connection, to refer briefly to the testimony of Dr. Gustav Eisen, curator 
of the Academy of Sciences, of San Francisco, as acknowledged authority on viticulture and horticulture, 
who testified that he had made the Zante currant one of the objects of his researches and studies. He 
gave the following account of the history of that grape or vine : ' ' The first time we hear of the Zante 
currant is about the year 1333, when we know from some manuscripts and other publications in England 
that there was considerable trade carried on between the Venetians and the English in northern Europe, 
generally in a fruit that was known as the ' raisin of Corinth.' That fruit trade in ' Corinth,' or ' Corinths,' 
as they are known in several European languages to day, was carried on for several hundred years, until 
the time when the Turks conquered Greece. Then it was to their interest to prevent the foreign traders 
from entering the Gulf of Corinth. That was some time in the 16th century. * * * In other words, 
the Zante currant was originally only grown on the mainland of Greece, and shipped from the town of 
Corinth. The principal growth was along the Gulf of Corinth. After the Turks conquered Greece, the 
trade in currants died out completely. Then the currant was later on introduced to the Island of Zante, 
in about the middle of the 16th century, 1550 or 1560, or thereabouts, * * * in order to create a new 
industry for the islands. Since that time the currants have been known generally as Zante currants, 
regardless of their place of growth. For a long time afterwards there were no currants grown at all, or 
at least there were no currants shipped from the mainland of Greece. That is of much later date when 
the currant was again reintroduced from Zante to the mainland of Greece. , But during the last few years, 
or during the last years, the trade and cultivation of the currauts has increased enormously on the main- 
land of Greece, and to such an extent that now the proportion of currants from the mainland is a great 
many times more than that on the island. While the island produces about eight thousand tons, the 
mainland of Greece produces one hundred and forty thousand or one hundred and fifty thousand tons of 
Zante currants." E. W. Hilgard, professor of agriculture at the State University, testified that a Zante 
currant was "a raisiu made from a small grape which grows in the Ionian Islands, and also in the archi- 
pelago there ; also on the mainland of Asia Minor. They are dried and prepared in various ways, and 
shipped to the whole world. It is the only region that, so far, has produced tliis grape to perfection." 
Without going further into the evidence, it is enough to say that, as a whole, the following four proposi- 
tions of fact were, to my mind, conclusively established : (1) That the currants comprising the importa- 
tion in question, of which Exhibit " 1 " is a sample, are Zante currants ; (2) that Zante currants are a 
kind of raisin ; (3) that Zante currants are grapes dried ; and (4) that Zante currants are not the product 
exclusively of the Island of Zante, but they are produced also on the mainland of Greece, in the archi- 



pel ago, and other places, and in much larger quantities than on the island. Being Zante currants, they 
come within the language of paragraph 217, as above set forth, and are subject to the duty of one and a 
half cents per pound therein prescribed. 

But counsel for the importers claims that the use of the word " Zante" indicates that Congress meant 
to limit the imposition of the duty on currants produced only in the Island of Zante, and that, as the 
importation iuvolved in this case came originally from Patras, in Greece, on the mainland, and is a 
product of the provinces of Greece, therefore it is not subject to the duty imposed by paragraph 217, but, 
on the contrary, it is entitled to free entry under paragraph 489, which exempts from duty "Fruits, green, 
ripe, or dried, not especially provided for in this act." 

In interpreting a name or expression applied to articles upon which duties of importation are laid, it 
is well settled that Congress uses such terms in their ordinary commercial sense rather than in their 
distinctive or technical sense. As was said in Andrews on the Eevenue Laws (p. 1S1): "It may be 
asserted, as a general principle, that tariff laws are to be construed according to the commercial meaning 
of the terms used in them. They are written in the language of commerce rather than the language of 
science; and if resort was not had to the terms and usages of commerce for their interpretation, they 
would operate with injustice to the importer, and involve the revenue officers in constant controversy." 
See, also, to the same effect, the following authorities : Lee v. Lincoln, 1 Story, 610, Fed. cas. 8, 195 ; 
Two Hundred Cheats of Tea, 9 Wheat., 430; Barlow v. United States, 7 Pet , 404 ; United States v. 112 Casks 
of Sugar v. Martin, 3 How., 106 ; Tyng v. Grinnell, 92 U. S., 467 ; Arthur, 8 Pet., 277 ; Elliott v. Swartout, 10 
Pet., 137 ; Curtis v. Morrison, 96 U. S., 108 ; Swan v. Arthur, 103 U. S., 597 ; Schmieder v. Barney, 113 U. S., 
645 ; Drew v. Grinnell, 115 U. S., 477 ; Arthur v. Butterfield, 125 U. S., 70; Bobertson v. Salomon, 130 TJ. 
S., 412 ; Eartranft v. Wiegemann, 121 U. S., 609; Am. Net and Twine Co. v. Worthington, 141 TJ. S.. 468; 
Eamshaw v. Cadwalader, 145 TJ. S., 247 ; Nix v. Hedden, 149 U. S., 304. 

In Tyne v. Grinnell, supra, it was said by Mr. Justice Clifford that "Tariff laws are passed to raise 
revenue; and, for that purpose, substances are classed according to the general usage and known denomi- 
nations of trade. Whether a particular article is designated by one name or another in the country of its 
origin, or whether it is a simple or mixed substance, is a matter of very little importance in the adjust- 
ment of our revenue laws, as those who frame such laws are chiefly governed by the appellations which 
the articles bear in our own markets and in our domestic and foreign trade. {United States v. Smith, 9 
Wheat., 438.) Laws regulating the payment of duties are for practical application to commercial opera- 
tions, and are to be understood in a commercial sense ; and this court, sixty years ago, decided that Con- 
gress intended that they should be so administered and understood. ( United States v. Goodale, 8 Pet., 279.) 
Such laws, say this court, are intended for practical use and application by men engaged in commerce ; 
and hence it has become a settled rule, in the interpretation of statutes of the description, to construe the 
language adopted by the legislature, and particularly in the denomination of articles, according to the 
commercial understanding of the terms used. {Elliott v. Swartout, 10 Pet., 151.) 

Congress must be understood, says Taney, C. J., as describing the article upon which the duty is 
imposed, according to the commercial understanding of the terms used in the law, in our own markets ; 
and the court held in that case that Congress, in imposing the duty, must be considered as describing the 
article according to the commercial understanding of the terms used in the act of Congress when the law 
was passed imposing the duty. (Curtis v. Martin, 3 How., 109.) Suffice it to say, without multiplying 
authorities, that the rule of law is settled, that the question, whether an imported article is or is not 
known in commerce by the word or terms used in the act imposing the duty, is a question of fact for the 
jury, and not a question of construction; and of course it must, in a case like the present, be determined 
by the court as a question of fact, the issues of fact as well as of law, being submitted to the court. {Law- 
rence v. Allen, 7 How., 797.) In Am. Net and Twine Co. v. Worthington (141 TJ. S., 468, 471), this 
principle was thus briefly and succinctly summed up : "It is a cardinal rule of this court that, in fixing 
the classification of goods" for the payment of duties, the name or designation of the goods is to be under- 
stood in its known commercial sense, and that their denomination in the market when the law was passed 
will control their classification without regard to their scientific designation, the material of which they 
may be made or the use to which they may be applied." The word "commercial" in this connection, is 
to be understood in its comprehensive sense of buying, selling, and exchange in the general sales or traffic 
of our own markets. (18 Opinions of Attorney-General, 530, 532; Eamshaw v. Cadwalader, 145 TJ. S., 247, 
258.) It is, also, a rule in the interpretation of revenue laws that, "where Congress has designated an 
article by a specific name and imposed a duty upon it, general terms in the same act, though sufficiently 
broad to comprehend such article, are not applicable to it ; in other words, the article will be classified by 
its specific designation, rather than under a general description." (Homer v. The Collector, 1 Wall., 4S6 ; 
Arthur v. Lahey, 96 TJ. S., 112; Arthur v. Stephani, 96 TJ. S., 125; Moviusv. Arthur, 95 TJ. S., 144; Am. 
Net and Twine Co. v. Worthington, 141 TJ. S., 468, 474.) 

Applying these rules of interpretation to the facts of the case at bar, and it is obvious that the 
term. "Zante currants," used in paragraph 217 of the Wilson Act, was employed in its commercial sense, 



as understood iu this country, and applies to all currants of that name or kind wherever produced in 
foreign countries, and that it has no reference, technically, to currauts coming alone from the Island of 
Zante. No restrictions or exceptions as to places are either expressly or impliedly made. The mere fact 
that the currants, comprising the importation in this case, bear the name of "Zante," an island in the 
archipelago, is of itself devoid of particular significance as indicating that Congress meant to tax currants 
which come only from the Island of Zante. The tariff act, in the enacting clause, applies to " all articles 
inipoited from foreign countries." As a matter of fact, the evidence tended to show that much larger 
quantities of Zante currants, so-called, are grown and exported from the provinces of Greece than from 
the Island of Zante, and that those grown on the mainland are still known, commercially, iu this country, 
as Zante currants. In other words, " Zante currants" is the commercial name for this variety of grape 
when dried into raisins. It would be unreasonable to suppose that Congress, in imposing duties on Zante 
currants in the general language employed, intended to tax those coming from the Island of Zante alone, 
and not those which come, in much larger quantities, from other localities. Such an interpretation would 
result in an unfair and unwarranted discrimination between foreign places of produce, which, in the 
absence of clear and unambiguous words to the contrary, should not be imputed to Congress. It is but 
laii to assume that, had it intended to limit the imposition of import duties on Zante currants grown and 
exported from that island only, it would have so stated in clear and plain language. Counsel for the 
importers claims, however, that the fact that the statute has the capital letter " Z" in the word "Zante" indi- 
cates that Congress intended that currants from that island alone should be taxed. This argument is without 
merit. The use of the capital "Z" is of no significance as indicating such au intent as claimed. The 
observance of grammatical propriety would require the use of the capital. It is a proper name, and it is 
a well-settled rule of grammatical construction that proper names used as adjective elements, such as the 
word "Zante" in the phrase "Zante currants," should retain the capital letter. While it is true that 
the article in this case derives its name, etymologically, from the Island of Zante, yet, according to the 
greater weight of the evidence, the term "Zante currants," understood commercially in this country, 
applies to that article wherever produced, whether it be on the Island of Zante, or on the mainland in the 
provinces of Greece, or elsewhere. 

It is further claimed by counsel for the importers, that in view of the fact that Congress dropped the 
expression "or other," contained in the provision in the tariff law of 1883 (Morrison Act), paragraph 
293 thereof, which imposed a duty of one cent per pound on "currants, Zante or other," and, also, in the 
provisiou in the tariff law of 1890 (McKinley Act), paragraph 578 thereof, which declared "currauts, 
Zante or other," free of duty, indicates that, in referring to Zante currants in paragraph 217 of the 
present law, it had reference exclusively to currants grown on the Island of Zante. This was the view 
which seems to have been taken by the Board of Appraisers. 

The opinion of the Board contains this language: "In the tariffs named 'or other' followed 'Zante.' 
The omission of these words, the use of the word 'including,' and the specific enumeration of Zante 
currants in paragraph 217 would indicate that Congress excluded from the operation of the paragraph 
all but Zante currants. If it was the intention to make all currants dutiable it was very simple to say 
'all other dried grapes including currants,' and not as it reads, 'including Zaute currants.' " The Board 
found that: (1) " The goods were not Zante currants : (2) they are not commercially known as raisins 
or dried grapes." The appraisers were influenced largely, no doubt, in their conclusions, by the evidence 
introduced before them tending to show that this importation came originally from Patras, Greece, and 
that the term " Zante" referred exclusively to currants produced on the Island of Zante. But, as stated 
above, this evidence was met and completely overcome by the testimony of the experts and other 
witnesses in this court, who had had superior opportunities for study, observation, and experiment, and 
were, therefore, in a much better position to become familiar with and know the Zante curraut and its 
commercial relation and designation. It is urged, in this connection, that the decision of the Board of 
Appraisers should not be reversed where there is a substantial conflict of the evidence. Several cases in 
support of this position are cited by counsel for the importers, among them that of In re Bing et al. (06 
Fed.Bep., 727). The court there held that it would not set aside the decision of the Board, even if 
against the weight of the evidence, where the Board had sufficient evidence to warrant its finding. But 
such a rule can have little, if any, application to a case like the present, where additional testimony of 
the highest character was taken, and where the ultimate question decisive of the controversy is as much 
one of law as of fact. 

My opinion is, that the classification of the article imported and involved in this case as "Zante cur- 
rants," made by the collector of the port of San Francisco is correct, and that it is therefore subject to 
the duty prescribed in paragraph 217, of one and a half cents per pound. The opposite decision reached 
by the Board of General Appraisers is erroneous and should be reversed, and it is so ordered. 

(Indorsed: Opinion. Filed March 26, 1896. W. J. Costigan, clerk, by W. B. Beaizley, deputy 

clerk.) 



You will be guided by this decision iu all cases arising hereafter at your port. 

The question has arisen as to the reliquidation of entries liquidated free of duty, under a decision of 
the Board of General -Appraisers, rendered April 1, 1895, which decision was accepted by the Depart- 
ment and promulgated (Synopsis 16004) prior to the appeal taken by the collector at San Francisco in 
the case iu which the United States circuit court rendered the decision above quoted. 

On March 16, 1887, in a letter to the collector at Philadelphia, regarding a somewhat similar condi- 
tion, the Department used the following language : 

"It is questionable whether the right to reliquidate entries at advanced rates, and to proceed against 
importers for the amount thus found due after the duties have been paid and the goods have passed into 
consumption, has been extended to the Government. In any event the Department is satisfied that such 
an interpretation of the statute would be at least inequitable and unjust, and contrary to the principles 
set forth iu its decision of April 12, 1879 (Synopsis 3972), inasmuch as the parties, having disposed of the 
merchandise at prices based upon duties already collected, have uo means of reimbursing themselves for 
any additional duties subsequently collected by the Government." 

The collector was thereupon directed to apply the decision of the Department, as to the proper classi- 
fication, only to such entries as covered merchandise arriving subsequent thereto, and merchandise 
remaining in the possession of the Government. 

In accordance with the views expressed in this Synopsis, the Department now holds that no reliqui- 
dation shall be made of free entries of currants which were completed and the merchandise delivered, 
before the issuance of Department's notification to collectors, on April 4, 1896, of the recent decision of 
the United States circuit court for the ninth circuit. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



CONNEAUT, OHIO, A SUBPORT OF ENTRY IN THE DISTRICT OF CUYAHOGA, OHIO. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 7S. 

Division of Customs. 

office of THE SECRETARY, 



^rjeasxtrij gjepartttumt, 






Washington, D. C, May 28, 1896. 

To Officers of the Customs and others concerned: 

The following act of Congress, approved May 19, 1896, establishing the port of Conneaut, Ohio, a 
subport of entry in the district of Cuyahoga, Ohio, is published for the information of all concerned. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 

AN AOT To establish the port of Conneaut, in the State of Ohio, as a subport of entry in the district of Cuyahoga, in said 

State of Ohio. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assem- 
bled, That the port of Conneaut, in the State of Ohio, be, and the same is hereby, declared to be a subport 
of entry in the district of Cuyahoga, in said State of Ohio, from and after the passage of this Act. 

Approved, May 19, 1896. 



REAPPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED 8TATE8 GENERAL APPRAISERS. 






Department™- ■- *»• ^XtKSVLVV^ Qtp&VtofmXtf 

Division of Customs. 

Office op THE SECRETARY. 
Washington, D. C, May 28, 1896. 
To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The following reappraisements of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending May 9, 1896. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 

REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING MAY 9, 1896. 

N. H.—In corresponding with the Board of General Appraiser^ relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference should always be made to the number of Reappraisement. 

No. of reappraise- 
ment. 

11714 Flax lace tidies &c, from Paris, Mar. 25, 1S96. 

Linen renaissance tidies, entered at from 4.50 to 47.00 advanced to from 4.60 to 55.00 
Francs each. 

11776.. Mfs. of metal, (brass u-ire cloth) from Geo. Christie Lt'd Glasgow, Apr. 3, 1896. 

No. 70 mesh brass wire cloth, entered at 7d advanced to 8d Sterliug per square foot. 
No. 80 mesh brass wire cloth, entered at 8d advanced to 9d Sterling per square foot. 
Add cases and packing. 

11828 Fire crackers, from Melchers & Co., Canton, Feb. 28, 1896. 

2" 40/40 cannon crackers, and 2" 20/80 cannon crackers, entered at .70 advanced to 

.73 i Mexican dollar per box. 
64/40 cannon crackers, entered at .57J Mexican dollar per box, No Advance. 
Discount 2 per cent. 

Less export duty, freight and coolie hire, lekin tax deducted on entry not allowed on 
reappraisement. 

11779 Brushes, from The Star Brush Co., Lt'd. London, Mar. 28, 1896. 

No. 000 plain, entered at 6s /5d Sterling per gross. 
No. 000 varnished, entered at 8s /- Sterling per gross, 

No Advance. 
less Id allowed on varnishes, discount 2J per cent. 



HI?a 1 M/s. ofwooZ and cotton, from Simon, Israel & Co., Bradford Mar. 19 and 31, 1896. 

115/0 J 

50" black meltons, H 4010, entered at GJd advanced to 7d Sterling per yard. , 

Discounts 21 per cent & 1} per cent. Add making up and packing. 

11571 Mfs. of wool and cotton, from Bradford, Mar. 19 1896. 

54" black melton H. 4010, entered at GJd advanced to 7d Sterling per yard. 

56" black worsted coatings, No. 06050, entered at Is /41 Sterling per yard, advanced 

to ls/5d.- 
Discounts 2} per cent & 1} per cent? Add making up and packing. 
J Wool knit wearing apparel, (ladies sweaters, toool and mohair shawls') from A. Bounen, Halle, 

117JB I Mar. 30, 1896. 

Ladies sweaters, 100/3, 5121/5, 410/11, 411/11, 412/11, Entered at 43. Marks per dozen, 

No Advance. 
Ladies sweaters, 313/V and 100/4, entered at 45. Marks per dozen, No Advance. 
Ladies sweaters, 100/5, entered at 47. Marks per dozen, No Advance. 
Ladies sweaters, 511/92 and 1210/2, entered at 32. Marks per dozen, No advance. 
Ladies sweaters, 5124/2, entered at 33. Marks per dozen, No Advance. 
Ladies sweaters, 5102/3, entered at 72. Marks per dozen, No Advance. 
Mohair shawls, 145, entered at 27.25 advanced to 29.75 Marks per dozen. 

11740 Colored Cottons, &c, from Simon Israel & Co., Bradford, Mar. 13, 1896. 

54" fast black cotton coating 06056/9, entered at 10-id advanced to ll'>d Sterling per 

yard. 
56" black union coatings 06050, entered at ls/4ad advanced to ls/5d Sterling per yard. 
Discounts 2 1 per cent & 1} per cent. 
Add making up and packing. 

11234 Colored Cotton, from Weiss-Freis & Co., Mulhouse, Jan. 30, 1896. 

Organdi F. 80 c/m serie 2, entered at .58 advanced to .61 Mark per meter. 
Organdi a filets 80 c/m serie 4, entered at .70 advanced to .75 Mark per meter. 
Organdi 6 80 c/m, entered at .43 advanced to .47 Mark per meter. 
Plumetis 75 c/m serie 2, entered at .54, advanced to .59 Mark per meter. 
Plumetis 75 c/m, serie 3, entered at .56 advanced to .61 Mark per meter. 
Plumetis, 75 c/m, serie 3, entered at .52 advanced to .57 Mark per meter. 
Batiste a seillets 76 c/m, serie 1, entered at .72 advanced to .75 Mark per meter. 
Batiste a seillets, 76 c/m serie 2, entered at . 73 advanced to . 76 Mark per meter. 
Batiste a seillets 76 c/m, serie 3, entered at .74 advanced to .78 Mark per meter. 
Satinette robe 80 c/m, serie 1, entered at .50 advanced to .53 Mark per meter. 
Satinette uni 80 c/m, entered at .46 advanced to .48 Mark per meter. 
Add packing and cases. 

11690 Silk wearing apparel, from D. Scheidegger Graedel, Huttwyl Mar. 23, 1896. 

832 IV. L. N. N. S. ladies spun silk vests, cream, sky and pink, entered at 21.80 

advanced to 23.95 Francs per dozen. 
832 V. L. N. N. S. ladies spun silk vests, cream, sky and pink, entered at 23. 

advanced to 25. 30 Francs per dozen. 
832 VI. L. N. N. S. ladies spun silk vests, cream, sky and pink entered at 24.20 

advanced to 26.60 Francs per dozen. 
Entered discount 10 per cent, advanced discount 10 per cent & 2 per cent. 
Less inland freight to Havre. 



3 

11789 Mfs. of silk, from Yokohama, Mar. 27, 1896. 

23-50 white habutai, entered at 6.20 advanced to 6.50 Silver Yen per 100 momme. 

Add cases. 
11719 Decorated glassware, from August Parth, Arusdorf, March 6, 1896. 

Punch bowls, saucers, wine glasses, cups etc., entered at from .20 to 1.40 advanced to 
from .30 to 1.75 Florins each. 

112S8 "j 

I 1289 [ White and decorated china, from Societe la Ceramique, Limoges, Jan. 4, 23, and 31, and 

&c,7..!!!!!!!!!!!!!!j ' ' 

Advanced 10 per cent. 

11815 Decorated china etc., from Geo. Borgfeldt & Co., Prague, Mar. 20 1896. 

China plates, No. 176, entered at. 95 Florin per dozen, discount 10 per cent, advanced 

to .95 Florin per dozen, discount 5 per cent. 

10317 1 

10796!!!!!!!"!!!!! } Flax thread > from Robert Stewart & Son, Lisburn, Nov. 6 and Dec. 24, 1895. 

Polished yarn w. brown 3 and 4 cord satin in hanks and bundles, entered at 32s/- 

advaneed to 40s/- Sterling per dozen. 
Polished yarn w. brown 3 cord satin in hanks and bundles entered at 28s/- advanced 

to 32s/- Sterling per dozen. 
Polished yarn W. brown 6 cord satin in hanks and bundles entered at 36s/- advanced 

to 40s/- Sterling per dozen. 
Polished yarn W. brown 3 cord satin in hanks and bundles entered at 31s/ advanced 

to 32s/ Sterling per dozen. 
Discount 25 per cent add packing. Less inland freight. 

1° 31 $ Flax thread, from Eobert Stewart & Son, Lisburn, Oct. 23, 1895. 

Polished yarn W. brown 3 cord satin in hanks and bundles entered at 25d/- advanced 

to 29d/- Sterling per lb. 
Polished yarn W. brown 3 and 6 cord satin in hanks and bundles, entered at 28d/- 

advanced 32d/- Sterling per lb. 
Polished yarn \V. brown 4 cord satin in hanks and bundles entered at 32d/- advanced 

to 36d/- Sterling per lb. 
Polished yarn W. brown 2 and 3 cord satin in hanks and bundles entered at 22d/- 

advanced to 29d/- Sterling per lb. 
Discount 25 per cent. Add packing. Less inland freight. 

H787 Tickles, sauce, decorated earthenware and china, from Kwong Yuen Shing, Hongkong Oct. 

15, 1895. 
Pepper jams, entered at .90 Mexican dollar per barrel, No Advance. 
Fruit jams, entered at 2.35 advanced to 2.50 Mexican dollars per barrel. 
Earthenware, entered at .80 advanced to .90 Mexican dollar per package. 
China tetete, entered at .35 advanced to .50 Mexican dollar per bundle. 

1179l!!!!!!!!!!!!!! } PicMes i from J - Feyret, Bordeaux, Mar. 30, and April 3, 1896. 

Capers nonpareille, entered at 4.15 advanced to 4.45 Francs per case, of 12-2 flacons. 
Capers nonpereille, entered at 16.60 advanced to 17.80 francs per case, of 48-2 flacons. 
Less freight. 



11831 "I 

11864 ( Refined sugar above 16 D. 8. from C. Czarnikow, Hamburg, Mar. 22, 23, 28 and 31, 

11865 ( 1896. 

11S66 J 

Entered at various prices advanced to 13s/8d Sterling per cwt. packed. 

11808 Sugar not above 16 B. S. from Samuel Abbott, St. Kitts, Mar. 12, 1896. 

Testing 88.80 entered at .02.48 less N. I), charges, advanced to .02.41 U. S. Currency 
per lb., packed. 

11810 Sugar not above 16 B. S. from C. Brauet & Co., Guantanamo Mar. 18, 1896. 

Testing 96.00, centrifugal, entered at .02.15/16 add bags, advanced to .03.125 Spanish 
gold per Spanish lb., packed. 

11728 , Sugar not above 16 B. S. from J. B. Hufflngtou, Macoris, Feb. 14, 1896. 

Testing 96.30, first centrifugal, entered at .02.26 advanced to .02.51 TJ. S. Dollars per 

lb., packed. 
Testing 86.95, second centrifugal, entered at .01.84 advanced to .01.922 U. S. Dollars 

per lb., packed. 
To entered price add bags. 

11755 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from Julian Cendoya, Santiago, Feb. 28, 1896. 

Testing 92.25 molasses, entered at .02.30 advanced to .02.659 Spanish gold per lb., 

packed. 
To entered price add bags. 

11837 Sugar not above 16 B. S. from E. J. Sadler, Savauna-la-mar Mar. 31, 1896. 

Testing 99.30, ceutrifugal, entered at £12. 19s. 6d. advanced to £13. 8s. 7.43d Sterling 
per ton., packed. 

11799 Sugar not above 16 B. S. from E. Crooks & Co., Liverpool, Mar. 20, 1896. 

Entered at 10s /9d, discount 23 per cent, advanced to lis /- Sterling per cwt., packed., 
net. 

11838 Sugar not above 16 B. S. from Jos. Shearer, Falmouth, Mar. 30, 1896. 

Testing 90.65, entered at 11. 10s. lOd. advanced to 11. 15s. 6' d Sterling per ton., packed. 

11807 Sugar not above 16 B. S. from S. T. Horsford, St. Kitts. Mar. 10, 1S96. 

Testing 89.40, muscovado, entered at .025 less 1ST. D. charges, advanced to .02.4325, 

TJ. S. Dollars per lb., packed 
Testing 88.40, muscovado, entered at .0246 less N. D. charges, advanced to .02.3825 
TJ. S. Dollars per lb. packed. 

11S09 Sugar not above 16 B. S. from Eobert Glegg, Nevis, March 11, 1896. 

Testing 86.05, entered at 02.37 less NVD. charges, advanced to .02.236 TJ. S. Dollars 

per lb., packed. 
Testing 85.80, entered at .02.28 less N. D. charges, advanced to .02.22 TJ. S. Dollars 

per lb. packed. 

11834 Sugar not above 16 B. S. from B. Fereccio, Macoris, Feb. 28, 1896. 

Testing 95.40, centrifugal, entered at .02.13 advanced to .02.5525 TJ. S. Dollars per lb., 

packed. 
Testing 88.65, molasses, entered at .01.60, advanced to .02.118 TJ. S. Dollars per lb /, 

packed. 
Testing 95.95, centrifugal, entered at .02.13, advanced to .02.586 TJ. S. Dollars per 

lb., packed 
Add bags to entered prices, at 36 cents each. 



2694 o.p { 

San Francisco., j 



3025 o.p ) 

San Francisco.. } 



Sugar above 16 D. S. from Armbruster & Kalkow, Magdeburg, Dec. 30, 1895. 

Entered at 13s/8d less freight & N. D. charges, advanced to 12s/5d Sterling per cwt., 
packed. 
Sugar above 16 D. S. from Dudok De Wit & Co., Amsterdam, Jan. 22, 1896. 

W. S. E. granulated, entered at 14s/6d, less freight advanced to 14s/3d Sterling per 
cwt., packed. 
Deduct N. D. charges from entered price. 

Sugar not above 16 D. S. from Jas. Eougie & Co., Glasgow, Jan. 11, 1896. 

Entered at 9s/9d less freight and N. D charges, advanced to 9s/3d Sterling per cwt., 
packed. 

Sulphate of ammonia, from Bradbury & Hirsch, Liverpool, Jan. 29, 1896. 

Entered at £7. 17s. 91 d, add bags, at 7s/6d per ton, advanced to £8. 8s. 9d. Sterling 
per ton. 

Sulphate of ammonia, from Dunn Bros., Manchester, Jan. 21, 1896. 

Entered at £9. 2s. 6d. less freight and N. D. charges advanced to £8. 8s. 9d. Sterling 
per ton. 

Decorated earthenware, from Anthony Shaw & Co., Burslem, Dec. 30, 1895. 

Entered at discounts of 45 per cent, 5 per cent and 5 per cent, advanced discounts 40 
per cent 5 per cent and 5 per cent. 

Surf ace coated paper, from Leon Haenle, Munich, Jan. 17, 1896. 

Middle yellow new gold paper, entered at 10.90 Marks per ream, discount 2 per cent, 
add cases, less freight to Hamburg, advauced by disallowance of part of amount 
deducted as freight to Hamburg, amount of deduction allowed as freight 36 
Pfennige per ream. 

Beaded trimmings, from Marshall Field & Co., Aunaberg, Feb. 26, 1896. 

No. 184, entered at .80 Marks per 11 meters, discounts 5 per cent & 1 per cent No 
Advance, less inland freight. 

Mfs. of wool, from G. E. Portway, Leeds, Nov. 26, 1S95. 
Mixed worsteds, entered at from 2s/llid to 3s/3id Sterling per yard, No advance 
Black twill entered at 3s/10:!d Sterling per yard, No Advance. 
Blue and black twill, entered at 2s/3d and 3s/8d Sterling per yard, No Advance. 
Less } yard in 10, less ^fch discount 3} per cent. 

Green olives in casks, from Antonia Garcia, Seville, July 11, 1895. 

Padron, 90/100, entered at 75. reappraised at 50. Pesetas per fanega. 
120/30 Eeiua 1" entered at 25. advanced to 32.50 Pesetas per Fanega. 
130/40 Eeina 2", entered at 20. advanced to 27.50 Pesetas per Fanega. 

Plain white porcelain, from James P. Donald & Co., Hamburg, Nov. 25, 1895. 

Casserols i liter, entered at .50 Mark per piece, discount 25 per cent, add cases and 
packing, No Advance. 



3016 o. p. 

3017 o.p \Mfs. of sillc, from Mendelson Bros., Yokohama, Mar. 14, & 23, 1896. 

San Fran cisco.. _ 

White habutai, 2ud. quality, 50x22 yards 6 mo mine grade, entered at 6.60 Silver 

Yen per 100 moraine No advance. 
White habutai, 2nd. quality 22x50 yards 62 grade, entered at 6.80 Silver Yen per 

100 Momme No advance. 
Brocade, 24x25 yards, 10 grade, 2nd. quality, entered at 7.50, Silver Yen per 100 

momme, No Advance. 
Koshu kaiki, 20x50 yards, 91 grade, entered at 6.60 advanced to 6.75 Silver Yen per 

100 Momme. 
Dyed Oshu habutai, 20x50 yards, 5 J grade, entered at 6.75 Silver Yen per 100 momme, 

No advance. 

3002 o. p J Livg catt i e ^ f rom Ojniaga, Mexico, Dec. 5/95. 

Calves, entered at 4. Mexican dollars each, No Advance 
One year old steers, entered at 7. advauced to 8. Mexicau dollars each. 
Two year old steers, entered at 9. advanced to 10. Mexican dollars each. 
Three year old steers, entered at 14. advanced to 15. Mexican dollars each. 
Cows, entered at 10. advanced to 11. Mexican dollars, each. 

p 003 -fl'- P I Live cattle, from J. Goodman, Mexico. 

Calves, entered at 3. advanced to 4. Mexican dollars each 

One year old steers, entered at 6. advanced to 8. Mexican dollars each. 

Cows, entered at 9. advanced to 11. Mexican dollars each. 

One year old steers, entered at 7. advanced to 8. Mexican dollars each. 

Two year old steers, entered at 9. advanced to 10. Mexican dollars each. 

Three year old steers, entered at 14. advanced to 15. Mexicau dollars each. 

Cows, entered at 10. advanced to 11. Mexican dollars each. 

Calves, entered at 4. Mexicau dollars each, no advance. 

REAPPKAISEMENTS BY BOARDS 

1X5S4 1 Su(jar not above 16 D ' S ' fr0m J ' Bueu0 & Co -> Guantauamo Feb. 20, 1896. 

Testing 86.15, molasses, entered at .02.99 add bags, advanced to .02.372 Spanish Gold 
per lb./, packed. 

??i|o } Swffar not ahove 16 D S ' fl ' om J- Tlllbo > Jr -> Pernanibuco, Feb. 1, 1896. 

6500 bags, entered at a total of 4096. 14s. lOd. advanced to 19S/- Sterling per 100 
kilos. 

3251 1 

9633 [Asphaltum {Refined) manufactured article, from Trinidad Asphalt Co., Trinidad, Sept. 18, 

3252 f 1895. 

9716 J 

Asphaltum refined, entered at 40 cents advanced to $8.65 U. S. Currency per ton. 

Add carting and digging at 75 cents and boating at 60 cents per ton. 

llsi'i 1 Silk veiling, from Paris, Mar. 11, 1896. 

Chenillette, 35 c/m, No. 253, blanc and noir, entered at .22 advanced to .24 Franc per 

meter. 
Chenillette 70 c/m, No. 69, Magpie, entered at .44 advauced to .48 Franc per meter. 
Discount 2 per cent. Add cases. 



3283.. 
11404. 



Cotton toearing apparel, (gloves) from Carl Scherf, Limbach, Feb. 20, 1896. 
No. 40 M. size 5/10, mens white military Berlin gloves IB. L i" welt lisle pt., entered 

at 3.55 advanced to 3.60 Marks per dozen. 
No. 41 size 7/8 h mens white military Berlin gloves 1 B. L. 1" welt, silk pt., entered 

at 3.20 advanced to 3.70 Marks per dozen. 
No. 120 size 11/13 mens white Berlin gloves 1 B. L \" welt lisle pt., entered at 1.50 

advanced to 1.90 Marks per dozen. 
No. 500 E, size 12/13 mens white Berlin gloves 1 B L. i" welt, silk pt., entered at 1.80 

advanced to 1.90 Marks per dozen 
No. 500 E. size 12/13 mens white Berlin gloves 1 B. L. ¥' welt, silk pt., entered at. 

1.85 advanced to 1.90 Marks per dozen. 
No. 300 size 8/9 Boys white Berlin gloves 1 B. L. }" welt lisle pt. entered at 1.65 

advanced to 1.85 Marks per dozen. 
No. 1000 sizes 11/13 mens spoiled black &c, Berlin gloves 1 B. L. i" welt lisle pt. 

entered at 1.25 advanced to 1.80 Marks per dozen. 
No. 400 size 10/12 mens black taffeta gloves 2 B. L. 1" welt fine kid pt., entered at 7.25 

Marks per dozen, No advance. 
No. 300 size 10/12, mens black taffeta gloves 2 B. L. 1" welt fine kid pt., entered at 

5.65 advanced to 6.10 Marks per dozen. 
No. 700 size 10/12 mens imitation black taffeta gloves 2 B. L 1" welt fine kid pt. , 

entered at 3.65 advanced to 4.05 Marks per dozen. 
No. 710 size 11/13 mens imitation white taffeta gloves 2 B. L. 1" fine kid pt., entered 

at 3.50 advanced to 3.90 Marks per dozen. 
No. 25 size 11/13 Mens Berlin gloves job lot black and spoiled 1 B. L. }" welt lisle pt. 

entered at 1.25 advanced to 1.80 Marks per dozen. 
No. 2700 size 10/13 mens imitation taffeta black 1 B. L. I" welt silk pt., entered at 3. 

advanced to 3.35 Marks per dozen. 
No. 500 E size 12/13 mens white Berlin gloves 1 B. L. \" welt silk pt., entered at 1.60 

advanced to 1.80 Marks per dozen. 
Add packing charges. Discount 6 per cent. 



POETS OF DELIVERY AT PUEBLO, DURANGO, AND LEADVILLE, COLO. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 80. 

Division of Customs. 

office op THE SECRETARY, 



treasury QzpKvtmznt, 

eof THE SEORETA 
Washington, D. C, June 3, 1896. 



To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The following act of Congress, approved' May 22, 1896, establishing customs ports of delivery at 

Pueblo, Durango, and Leadville, Colo., and for other purposes, is published for the information of all 

concerned. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



AN ACT To establish customs ports of delivery at Pueblo, Durango, and Leadville, Colorado, and for other purposes. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress 
assembled, That Pueblo, Durango, and Leadville, all in the State of Colorado, be, and are hereby, made 
customs ports of delivery, and attached to the port of Denver, in said State, with all the rights and 
privileges now accorded by law to said port of Denver, the surveyor of customs of which port shall 
supervise the customs business at said Pueblo, Durango, and Leadville in the same manner and to the 
same extent as at Denver. 

Sec. 2. That such other places in the State of Colorado as the Secretary of the Treasury may 
designate from time to time shall be ports of delivery, with all the privileges now accorded by law to the 
port of Denver, Colorado, the surveyor of customs of which port shall supervise the customs business 
transacted at such places in the same manner and to the same extent as at Denver. 

Approved, May 22, 1896. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK, A PORT OF DELIVERY. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 81'. 



p THE SECRET^ 

Washington, D. C. June 3, 1896. 



of Customs. 

office op THE SECRETARY, 



To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 

The following act of Congress, approved May 18, 1896, constituting Syracuse, N. Y., a port of delivery, 
is published for the information of all concerned. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



AN ACT Constituting Syracuse, New York, a port of delivery, 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assem- 
bled, That Syracuse, in the State of New York, be, and is hereby, constituted a port of delivery, and that 
the privileges of immediate transportation of dutiable merchandise conferred by the seventh section of 
the Act of June tenth, eighteen hundred and eighty, entitled "An Act to amend the statutes in relation 
to the immediate transportation of dutiable goods, and for other purposes," be, and the same are hereby, 
extended to said port; and there shall be appointed a surveyor of customs to reside at said port, who shall 
receive a salary, to be determined by the Secretary of the Treasury, not exceeding one thousand dollars 
per annum. 

Approved, May 18, 1896. 



CERTIFICATES OF CHINESE. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 82. 

Division of Special Agents. 

office of THE SECRETARY. 



of THE SEORETAI 
Washington, D. C, June 4, 1896, 



To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The appended opinions, dated, respectively, the 20th and 26th ultimo, of The Honorable the Attorney- 
General, as to the proper construction of certain articles in the treaty between the United States and 
China, signed March 17, 1S94, and proclaimed by the President December 8, 1894, relating to the departure 
from and return to this country of Chinese laborers, are published for the information aud guidance of all 
concerned. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



Department of Justice, 

Washington, D. C, May 20, 1896. 

Sir : I have the honor to acknowledge your communication of May 13. asking an official opinion as 
to the construction and operation of Article ill of the Convention of 1894 between the United States aud 
China (28 Stat., 1211). 

This article provides that "Chinese subjects, being officials, teachers, students, merchants, or travel- 
lers for curiosity or pleasure, but not laborers," when seeking admission into the United States, ''may 
produce a certificate from their government or the government where they last resided." The question 
has arisen whether Chinese subjects belonging to the privileged classes above mentioned, aud who are 
residents of the British colony of Hongkong, may obtain admission to the United States upon production 
of a certificate signed by the registrar general in that colony. I assume, for the present purposes, that 
the registrar general is the proper representative of the Colonial Government. 

While called a convention, the document to which you refer is clearly a treaty within the meaning of 
the Constitution of the United States. It is, therefore, so far as its provisions are self-executing, a part 
of the supreme law of the land. It is my opinion that the provisions of the article uuder consideration 
are self-executing. Its language is clear. It requires a certificate from the Government of the colony of 
Hongkong ; it requires nothing more than that. Its requirements would not be satisfied by a certificate 
from the Government of China. 

The act of July 5, 1884, ch. 220, sec. 6, requires that certificates in similar cases should be issued by 
the Chinese Government, "or of such other foreign government of which at the time such Chinese person 
shall be a subject.'" Prior, therefore, to the treaty of 1894, a certificate from the authorities at Hongkong- 
would have been insufficient in the cases now under consideration, and a certificate from the Chinese 
Government would have been necessary. 

You ask my opinion whether the treaty "waives or modifies the requirement of" the act of 1884. 
As the treaty is subsequent to the statute, and as its provisions are self-executing, I am of the opinion 



(hat it does modify the requirement of the statute, so that the certificate must now come from Hongkong 
and not from China. (The Cherokee Tobacco, 11 Wall., 616, 621 ; Whitney v. Eobertson, 124 U. S., 190. 
194; 13 Op., 354.) 

Very respectfully, Holmes Conrad, 

Acting Attorney -General. 
The Secretary of the Treasury. 



Department of Justice, 

Washington, D. C, May 26, 1896. 

Sir : I have the honor to give my opinion, as requested in your letter of the 22d instant, upon the 
proper construction, of Article II of the convention between the United States and China, concerning the 
subject of emigration, proclaimed March 17, 1894. 

By Article I the coming of Chinese laborers to this country is absolutely prohibited for a period of 
ten years. Article II provides that such prohibition shall not apply to the return to this country of 
registered Chinese laborers having certain specified relatives here, or property, or debts of a certain value ; 
but requires, as a condition of the right of such laborer to return, the deposit by him with the collector 
of customs of the district from which he departs of a written description of his family, property, or 
debts. The collector is required to furnish him with a certificate of his right to return. Article II then 
proceeds as follows : 

"And such right of return to the United States shall be exercised within one year from the date of 
leaving the United States ; but such right of return to the United States may be extended for an additional 
period, not to exceed one year, in cases where by reason of sickness or other cause of disability beyond 
his control, such Chinese laborer shall be rendered unable sooner to return, which facts shall be fully 
reported to the Chinese consul at the port of departure, and by him certified, to the satisfaction of the 
collector of the port at which such Chinese subject shall land in the United States. And no such Chinese 
laborer shall be permitted to enter the United States by land or sea without producing to the proper 
officer of the customs the return certificate herein required." 

Your letter with its inclosure presents the case of three Chinese laborers duly registered at Boston, 
according to law and Treasury Regulations, and furnished with proper certificates in accordance with the 
treaty, who left the country from the district of Vermont, and after visiting China presented themselves 
for readmission at the same place in the district of Vermont, after an absence of almost thirteen months. 
They were refused admission because the facts justifying the extension of the period of return were not 
reported "to the Chinese consul at the port of departure, and by him certified," etc., the collector holding 
such port of departure to be Canton, China, at which place they left; that country, or Hongkong, a British 
port, at which they took ship. It appears that there is, of course, no Chinese consul at Canton, and that, 
for local and political reasons, the British Government permits none at Hongkong. 

Your inquiry is whether the "port of departure," at which the facts of sickness or disability are to 
be so reported, is the port from which the laborer goes from this country, or that from which he starts on 
his return. 

It is a well-known fact that Chinese laborers who leave this country almost invariably return to their 
own. This fact was, of course, well known to the framers of the treaty. They knew also that no country 
has consuls at its own ports. It seems clear, therefore, that they could not have meant the port of departure 
from China. 

If this be true, it appears to follow that the framers of the treaty must have meant the port from 
which the laborer departs from this country. He is required to deposit a written description of his 
family, property, or debts, " with the collector of customs of the district from which he departs." 

While, at first glance, the phrase "port of departure" may appear, from its use in connection with 
the phrase "port at which such Chinese subject shall land in the United States," to indicate the point of 
beginning of the voyage of return, this appearance must give way before the manifest necessity of so 
construing the treaty, if possible, as to give it the operation which the parties plainly intended it to 
have. Besides, the two phrases may both fairly be construed as referring to the United States, requiring 
the fact of unavoidable detention to be reported to the Chinese consul at the port where the person desir- 
ing to return left this country, and the certificate thereof to be sent to the collector of the port at which 
he desires to reenter it. 

As Chinese consuls in this country are received by our Government and subject to recall on their 
request, it was naturally willing to trust to their good faith, and the Chinese Government, one of the 
parties to the treaty, had the right to require of them the service it imposes. The only other possible 



construction is that the phrase, "Chinese consul at the port of departure," was intended to designate our 
consuls at Chinese ports, but such construction would require au entire chauge of the language used. 
When that meaning was intended, Article III shows that the makers of the treaty knew how to express 
it. That article, in providing for the rights of Chinese officials, students, merchants, etc., to come to 
and reside in the United States, authorizes "a certificate from their government or the government 
where they last resided vis6d by the diplomatic or consular representative of the United States in the 
country or port whence they depart." 

While the language of the section you submit is not explicit, and the question presented can not, 
therefore, be answered with entire freedom from doubt, my opinion is that the officer to whom the facts 
of sickness or disability are to be reported, is the consul who represents the Chinese Government at the 
place whence the laborer left the United States. While the words used, "port" and "land," usually 
relate to a sea voyage, they were used because the Chinese generally go and come by sea, and not because 
it was the intention to limit the right to return to such as travel in that way. This is apparent from the 
last sentence of the section: "And no such laborer shall be permitted to enter the United States by land 
or sea without producing to the proper officer of the customs the return certificate herein required." 
Instances where expressions suggested by the commonest form of the subject dealt with have been held to 
apply to all its forms, are not uncommon in judicial decisions. 

Moreover, the word "port" does not always meau a seaport when it is used in connection with our 
customs officers, and the word "land" is not necessarily limited to disembarkation from a ship. 

It appears to be necessary for the laborer to leave this country at a place which is a port and is 
within the jurisdiction of a Chiuese consul, and that he should return to it at a port of entry where there 
is a collector ; but as his right to depart and return by land as well as by sea is recognized by the treaty, 
these places need not be seaports. 

As the manifest object of this clause of the treaty was to relieve returning Chinese laborers from the 
consequences of sickness or casualty, the argument from inconvenience is not without weight. Detentions 
from these causes are quite likely to occur after the commeucemeut of a long voyage which, in their 
absence, would accomplish the return before the expiration of the year. Sickness, storms, or the many 
mishaps of ocean travel, may require the statement mentioned in the treaty on arrival in the United States, 
although it seemed unnecessary before starting. These facts must have been in the minds of the framers 
of the treaty; yet, if any other construction be adopted than that which I have indicated, the unfortunate 
traveler would have to return to the place from which he started, or undergo the long delay which would 
be required to communicate the facts to the officer at that point and receive his certificate thereof. 
Very respectfully, Judson Harmon, 

Attorney- General. 
O 



REAPPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



greasing g^jrartacut, 



1S96. 
Department Circular No. 83. 

Division of Customs. 

office of THE SECRETARY, 



Washington, D. C, June 4, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The following reappraisements of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending May 16, 1896. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING MAY 16, 1896. 

N. B. — In correspondina with the Board of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference should altvays be made to the number of Reappraisement. 

No. of Reappraise- 
ment. 

11945 Surface coated paper, from Leonard Biermans, Turnhout, Apr. 16, 1896. 

Eed flint No. 7948, green flint No. 2897 maroon flint No. 7957 Red flint No. 1923 & 
7954 and bronze flint No. 6008 20x24 24" entered at 4s/10d advanced to 5s/2d 
Sterling per 500 sheets. 
White flint No. 4733 20x24, 24" entered at 4s/10d advanced to 5s/Sd Sterling per 500 

sheets. 
Silk green flint No. 7988, 24x25, eutered at 6s/ld advanced to 6s/3d Sterling per 500 

sheets. 
Blue green flint No. 3963, 20x25, entered at 5s/ld advanced to 5s/2d Sterling per 500 

sheets. 
Discount 5 per cent. Less inland freight. 

11958 Razors, from "W. & S. Butcher, Sheffield, Apr. 23, 1896. 

Bazorsin cases, 304x5/8 &c. entered at 10s/- advanced to lls/8d Sterling per dozen. 
Eazors in cases, 305x5/8 &c, entered at 10s/ advanced to 12s/6d Sterling per dozen. 
Discount 5 per cent. Add cases. 

11465 Stereotype plates, from Sampson, Long, Marston & Co., Ltd., London, Feb. 28, 1896. 

Stereotype plates, entered at £5. 5s. 8d. advanced to £5. 19s. Od. Sterling per total. 
Stereotype plates, entered at £4. 8s. 8d. advanced to £4. 19s. 2d. Sterling per total. 

11796 Sponges, from Nassau, April 4, 1896. 

Medium small yellow, entered at 40 advanced to 44 cents U. S. currency per lb., 
Add packing at 50 cents per bale. 



10273 Decorated glassware, from Mills, Walker & Co., Stourbridge Sept. 30, 1S95. 

Odd vases stock, entered at 6s/6d advanced to 10s/-Sterling per dozen. 
Add cases. 

11923 Distilled oil, (blast furnace creosote oil) from Eobert Crooks & Co., Liverpool, Feb. 28, 1896. 

Blast furnace creosote oil, (J. Greenshield & Co., Cowan & Kiughorn) entered at 2s/6d 

add barrels at 4s/2d and 4s/4d Sterling per barrel. 
Advanced by addition of cost of bunging, marking and cooperage. 

11645 Cod liver oil, from Harvey & Co., St. John's, /March, 27th 1896. 

Impl. cod liver oil, entered at 154.55 advanced to 170. U. S. Dollars per tun. 
Add packing charges. 

11907 Silver leaf, aluminum, leaf, bronze poioder &c, from Ludw. Spiegelberger, Furth, Apr. 1, 1896. 

Silver leaf, 3:1, entered at 2.30 Marks per pack of 500 leaves., no advance. 
Aluminum leaf, 4, entered at 2. Marks per pack of 500 leaves., no advance. 
Bronze powder, gold color, entered at 2.60 Marks per lb. 
Add cases. 

11774 Mfs. of shell and metal, from Abdallah J. Marcos & Freres, Bethlehem, Mar. 8, 1896. 

Chapelets nacre round quality 11. No. 1, entered at 3.50 advanced to 4.50 Francs per 

dozen. 
Chapelets nacre round 11. No. 2, entered at 4. advanced to 5.25 Francs per dozen. 
Chapelets nacre round 11. No. 3, entered at 4.50 advanced to 5.75 Francs per dozen. 
Chapelets nacre longue, quality 11. No. 1, entered at 4. advanced to 5.25 Francs per 

dozen. 
Chapelets nacre round quality 11 No. 2, entered at 5. advanced to 7.50 Francs per 

dozen. 
Chapelets nacre round, quality 1. No. 3, entered at 7. advanced to 8. Francs per dozen. 
Chapelets nacre round quality 1. No. 4, entered at 9. advanced to 11.50 Francs per 

dozen. 
Chapelets nacre round quality 1, No. 5, entered at 12. advanced to 15.35 Francs per 

dozen. 
Chapelets nacre longue, quality 1, No. 1, entered at 5. advanced to 6.25 Francs per 

dozen. 
Chapelets nacre longue quality 1, No. 2, entered at 7. advanced to 9.50 Francs per 

dozen. 
Chapelets nacre longue quality 1, No. 4, entered at 9. advanced to 12.25 Francs per 

dozen. 
Chapelets nacre longue quality 11. No. 2, entered at 5. advanced to 7.50 Francs per 

dozen. 
Discount 2 per cent. Add cases etc. 

11968 Brooms, from D. Kohlmann, Weyerdeeleu, Jan. 20, 1S96. 

1/XXXV. entered at .30 advanced to .43 Mark per dozen. Add packing. 

11540 Orange boxes, from A. Baker, Liverpool, Mar. 2, 1896. 

Entered at Is /2d advanced to Is /4d Sterling per box. 

11897 Bleached cotton, from Jos. Kraus, Nachod, Mar. 28, 1896. 

Brilliantine, entered at .30 Mark per meter, No advance. 
Add case and packing. 



11071 Table knives and forks, from "Win. Dawson, Sheffield, April 9, 1896. 

Nos. 119 and 112, self tip carvers boxed, entered at 2s/4d advanced to 2s/6d Sterling 
per pair. 

No. 115 stag carvers boxed, entered at ls/8d advanced to ls/lOd Sterling per pair. 

No. 109 "W. bone carvers boxed, entered at ls/9d advanced to ls/lld Sterling per pair. 

No. 116 stag carvers boxed, entered at 2s/ advanced to 2s/2d Sterling per pair. 

No. Ill } self tip carvers boxed, entered at lOd advanced to lid Sterling per pair. 

No. 113J stag carvers boxed, entered at 9d advanced to 9Jd Sterling per pair. 

No. 106 w. bone carvers boxed, entered at ls/3d advanced to ls/4d Sterling per pair. 

Add cartons, wrappers etc., 
11987 Silk wearing apparel etc /., from Soy Ying Chong, Hongkong, Mar. 17, 1896. 

Silk handkerchiefs, entered at 3.60 advanced to 4.10 Mexican dollars per box. 

Silk handkerchiefs, entered at 2.81] advanced to 3.30 Mexican dollars per box. 

Silk shirts, entered at 2.20 advanced to 2.75 Mexican dollars per piece. 

Silk shirts, entered at 2.25 advanced to 2.45 Mexican dollars per piece. 

Silk shirts, entered at 1.75 advanced to 2.00 Mexican Dollars per piece. 

Silk shirts, entered at 2.80 advanced to 3. Mexican dollars per piece. 

Silk shirts, entered at 1.70 advanced to 1.85 Mexican dollars per piece. 

Silk shirts, entered at 1.50 advanced to 1.65 Mexican dollars per piece. 

Silk shirts, entered at 1.75 advanced to 1.90 Mexican dollars per piece. 

Silk trousers, entered at 1.80 advanced to 1.95 Mexican dollars per pair. 

Silk trousers entered at 1.20 advanced to 1.50 Mexican dollars per pair. 

Silk ribbon, entered at 2.10 advauced to 2.30 Mexican dollars per total. 

Silk trousers, entered at 1.50 advanced to 1.65 Mexican dollars per pair. 

Silk shirts, entered at 2.80 advauced to 3.05 Mexican dollars per piece. 
11507 Silk velvets, from Riboud Freres, Lyons, Mar. 10, 1S96. 

50 c/m, black cotton velvet, entered at 7. advanced to 9.50 Francs per meter. 

Black cotton velvet, 50 c/m, entered at 8. advanced to 10.50 Francs per meter. 

Black cotton velvet, 50 c/m, entered at 6. 25 advanced to 8. Francs per meter. 

Blanc faille 53 c/m, entered at 2.15 Francs per meter, No advance. 

Blanc faille 53 c/m, entered at 2.40 Francs per meter. No Advance. 

Faille faeonne noir 54 c/m, entered at 3.10 Francs per meter, No Advance. 

Discount 20 per cent. Add packing. 
11783 Mfs. of silk and linen, from A. Plattard, Paris, April 9, 1896. 

No. 398 linen and silk, entered at 1.80 advanced to 1.95 Francs per meter. 

Entered discounts 15 per cent & i per cent, advauced discount 15 per cent 

A.dd cases and boxes. 
11814 Mfs. of silk and cotton, from Albert Lehmann, Lyons, April, 4, 1896. 

Bengaline 60 c/m, colored, entered at .90 advanced to 1.05 Francs per meter. 

Discount 20 per cent. 
11899 Matches, from G. Z. Akawo, Hiogo, Mar. 20, 1896. 

Safety matches, entered at 14.75 advanced to 16. 

Safety matches, entered at 14.50 advanced to 15. 

Silver Yen per case. 

1 1 fifif; ■) 

J£g£[ V Steel lubes, from Brown Bros., London, Mar. 12 & 26, 1S96. 

Entered at discounts of 70 per cent & 2} per cent, advanced discount 675 per cent. 



11905 ") 

11750 [ Worsted yarn, from Alfred Motte Freres, Eoubaix, Mar. 25, April 1, and 15, 1896. 

11663 ) 

Partie 934 ecru, quality 114, trame 1/60 anglais, entered at 5.35 advanced to 5.75 
Francs per kilo. 

Partie 997, ecru, quality 114, trame 1/75 anglais, entered at 5.73 advanced to 6.13 
Francs per kilo. 

Deduction of insurance and freight from entered price disallowed on reappraisement. 

10956 "| 

VJ£t I Tamboured cotton shams, from Hummel & Seelig, St. Gall, Jan. 14, 20 and 21, 1896. 

&c .."'.'.'..'........ J 

Cambric pillow sham and runners, invoice value sustained. 

11607 Cotton lace curtains, from Hood, Morton & Co., Glasgow, Mar. 11, 1896. 

White and ecru, 50" 31 yards, taped, No. 4820, aud white and ecru 48" No. 4817, 4818 

and 4820, 3£ yards, taped, entered at ls/lld advanced to 2s/ — Sterling per pair. 
White and ecru 60" 3 yards, taped, No. 6029 and 6030, entered at 5s/9d advanced to 

6s/ — Sterling per pair. 
White and ecru 54" 3 i yards, taped, No. 5454 and 5455 and white 54" No. 5456, 3 } 

yards, taped, entered at 3s/ld Sterling per pair, No Advance. 
White and ecru 60" 3} yards, taped, No. 6005 entered at 6s/3d advanced to 6s/6d 

Sterling per pair. 
Ecru 60" 33 yards, taped, No. 6031, entered at 3s/9d Sterling per pair, No Advance. 
White 54" 33 yards, taped, No. 5452, entered at 3s/6d advanced to 3s/9d Sterling per 

pair. 
Add cases and packing. Discount on entered price 23 per cent Advance discount 

5 per cent. 

119^5 1 Gottm lace curtains > from w - E - Meats & Co., Nottingham, Mar. 27 and Apr. 16, 1896. 

W. T. curtains, 3 3 yards, No. 6882, entered at 5s/9d advanced to 6s/3d Sterling per pair. 

E. T. curtains, 31 yards, No. 7036, 7050 and 7086 entered at 5s/6d advanced to 6s/— 
Sterling per pair. 

Dis. 23 per cent. Less inland carriage. Add cases. 
11675 Flax lace curtains and sets, from Celine Mayer, Paris, Mar. 24, 1896. 

Garniture M. Atte. creme, 1469, entered at 42.00 Francs per set. 

Garniture M. Atte. jaunes, No. 1472, entered at 50. Francs per set. 

Curtains renaiss. 33 yards No. 1385, entered at 30. Francs per pair. 

Curtains renaiss. 4 yards, No. 1483, entered at 40. Francs per pair. 

Curtains arabes, 4 yards, No. 1496, entered at 90. Francs per pair. 

Discount 5 per cent. Add cases. 
11383 Wool dress goods, from Hefti & Co., Hatzingen, Feb. 15, 1896. 

Vigoureux, 21366, 108/110 c/m, entered at 1.13 advanced to 1.30 Francs per yard. 

Vigoureux, No. 21375, 114 c/m, entered at 1.69 advanced to 1.90 Francs per yard. 

Vigoureux, No. 21379, 114, c/m, entered at 1.12 advanced to 1.30 Francs per yard. 

Vigoureux, No. 21380, 114 c/m, entered at 1.19 advanced to 1.35 Francs per yard. 

Vigoureux, No. 21369, 114 c/m, entered at 1.29 advanced to 1.45 Francs per yard. 

Discount 8 per cent. Add cases, packing etc. 



11638 Mfs. of wool and cotton, from Jos. Brooke & Co., Huddersfield, Mar. 24, 1896. 

54" fancy cheviots, 269/1, 4, 5 and 6, entered at 2s/3d advanced to 2s/3.68d Sterling 

per yard. 
54" fancy cheviots, 271/4, entered at 2s/4d advanced to 2s/4.70d Sterling per yard. 
54" fancy cheviots, 276/3, entered at 2s/6d advanced to 2s/6.75d Sterling per yard. 
54" fancy cheviots, 279/2, 2 and 6, entered at 2s/7§d advanced to 2s/8.29d Sterling per 

yard. 
Less measure l/37th, discount 5 per cent. Add making up and cases. 

11616 Mfs. of wool and cotton, from Halbot & Lens, Bradford, Mar. 18, 1896. 

55/6" black beavers, No. 700, entered at ls/4d advanced to ls/4.24d Sterling per yard. 
Less 1 yard per piece, less l/37th. discount 2 J per cent 
add making up at 6d. per piece. 

11760 Mfs. of wool, from Ferd Heilborn & Co., Bradford, Mar. 26, 1896. 

56" black French black twill, No. 32808 &c, entered at 3s/ld advanced to 3s/1.93d. 

Sterling per yard. 
Less measure l/37th. Discount 5 per cent, add making up and packing. 

11793 ) Mfs. of wool and cotton, from A. & S. Henry & Co., Ltd., Huddersfield, Mar. 29 and Apr. 

11647 j '10, 1896. 

54" fancy suiting wool, style 512 &c, entered at ls/lOd advanced to ls/10.55d Sterling 

per yard. 
54" fancy suiting wool, style 528 &c, entered at 2s/- advanced to 2s/0.60d Sterling 

per yard. 
54" fancy suiting wool style 536 &c, entered at 2s/3d advanced to 2s/3.6Sd Sterling 

per yard. 
Less l/37th. discount 5 per cent. Add making up etc. 

11615 1 M f s ' °f wo ° l and coUon ' from Thos - B - Lee > Bradford, Mar. 11, 1896. 

54" wool cheviots, No. 200, entered at ls/8d advanced to ls/8}d Sterling per yard. 
54" boucle cloakings No. 202, entered at ls/7d advanced to ls/7.48d Sterling per yard. 
Boucle cloakings No. 201, entered at ls/S^d advanced to ls/5.94d Sterling per yard. 
56" black cotton warp worsted, 15069 ■> entered at ls/ejd advanced to ls/6.96d Sterling 

per yard. 
Less l/37th, discount 5 per cent. Add case. 

11879 Sugar not above 16 D. 8. from Savanna-la-mar, Mar. 31, 1896. 

Testing 90.2848, entered at £11. 10s. Od. advanced to £11. 14s. 6d. Sterling per ton., 
packed. 

11889 Sugar not above 16 D. 8. from B. Lapean, Nevis, Mar. 12, 1896. 

Testing 84.05 entered at .02. add barrels, advanced to .02.111 U. S. dollars per lb., 
packed. 

JHJrp \sugar not above 16 D. 8. from J. B. Vicini, Santa Domingo, Mar. 27, 1S96 Azua, Feb. 28, 

^J^ f 1896, Santa Domingo Apr. 10/96 

Testing 94.12, centrifugal entered at .02.19, advanced to .02.5125 U. S. dollars per lb., 

packed. 
Testing 89.35 molasses entered at .01.60 advanced to .02.15 TJ. S. Dollars per lb., 

packed. 
Testing 86.05, muscovado entered at ./01.50, advanced to .02.1356 TJ. S. dollars per 

lb., packed. 



6 

11955 ") 

11956 V Sugar not above 16 D. 8., etc.— Continued. 

11977 ) 

Testing 93.00 centrifugal entered at .02.11 advanced to .02.4425 U. S. dollars per lb., 

packed. 
Testing 80.45, molasses entered at .01.60 advanced to .01.495 TJ. S. dollars per lb., 

packed. 
Testing 94.73, centrifugal entered at .02.23 advanced to .02.60 TJ. S. dollars per lb., 

packed. 
To entered prices add bags at 36 cents each. 

119C7 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from T. E. Williams, London, March 14, 1896. 

Testing 80.133, entered at 9.85 add packing and marking discount 1} per cent, advanced 
to 10.937 Marks per cwt. packed. 

11595 Sugar not above 16 D. S from E. Crooks & Co., Liverpool, Mar. 14, 1896. 

Entered at 10s /lid advanced to 10s /6d Sterling per cwt. packed. Discount 2i per 
cent. 

11559 Sugar above 16 B.S. from Eobert Crooks & Co., Liverpool Mar. 18, 1896. 

Standard granulated, entered at £14. 12s. 5d. advanced to £15. 0s. Od. Sterling per 

ton., packed. 
Fourths, entered at £12. 2s. 5d. advanced to £12. 10s Od. Sterling per ton, packed. 
Discount 2\ per cent. 

11912 Sugar not above 16 D.S. from J. M. Vanecva, Mauzanilla, March 20, 1896. 

Testing 95.50, entered at .0399, add bags, reappraised at .0313, Spanish gold per Spanish 
lb., packed. 

11888 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from L. Horsford, St. Kitts, Mar. 20, 1896. 

Testing 83.45, entered at 02.37 advanced to .02.1525 TJ. S. dollars per lb., packed. 

11885 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from Samuel Abbott, St. Kitts, Mar. 20, 1896. 

Testing 95.20, entered at .02.201 advanced to .02.27 TJ. S. dollars per lb., packed. 
Testing 89.15, entered at .02.202 advanced to .02.512 TJ. S. dollars per lb., packed. 
Testing 87.55 entered at .02.20} advanced to .02.4164 TJ. S. dollars per lb., packed. 
Testing 83.90, entered at .02.08 advanced to .02.188 TJ. S. Dollars per lb., packed. 
Add hogsheads at $2.50 each. 

11882 Sugar not above 16 T>. S. from Conrad Watson, Nevis, Mar. 20, 1896. 

Testing 89.25, entered at .02.44 advanced to .02.515 TJ. S. dollars per lb., packed. 
To entered price add bags. 

11944 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from W. C. Kerr, Montego Bay, April 14, 1896. 

Testing 90.20, entered at .02.4857 advanced to .02.545 TJ. S. dollars per lb., packed. 

11872 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from Booker Bros. & Co., Demerara, April 1, 1896. 

Testing 97.06, entered at .02£ advanced to 02.908 TJ. S. dollars per lb., packed. 

11873 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from Da Costa, & Co., Barbados, April 8, 1896. 

Testing 96.60, entered at .02.75 and .02.6 advanced to .02.859 TJ. S. dollars per lb., packed. 

11913 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from J. L. Bameres, Manzanilla Mar. 20, 1896. 

Testing 97.10, entered at .03. add bags, at .50 each, advanced to .03.198 Spanish gold per 
Spanish lb., packed. 



7 

\~Eoaa \ Sugar not above 16 D. 8. from J. V. Drake & Co., Eotterdaui, Magdeburg & Hamburg, 

"!** f Feb. 26, 25 and Mar. 12, 1896. 

Testing 92.434, entered at 12s/6d less N. D. charges, discount 11 per cent, advanced 

to 12s/10.15 Sterling per cwt. packed. 
Testing 79.62, entered at 10.375, less N. D. charges discount 11 per cent advanced to 

10.910 Marks per 50 kilos, packed. 
Testing 81.432, entered at 10s/ 3d less N. D. charges, discount 11 per cent, advanced 
to 10s/11.648 Sterling per cwt., packed. 

11824 Sugar not above 16 D. S., from F. G. Guerra, Havana, April 1, 1896. 

Testing 95.74, entered at .03^ less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to .02.883 U. 
S. Gold per lb., packed. 

11843 1 Sugar not above 16 D.S. from Eansohoff & "Wissler, Hamburg, Feb. 22, Brunswick, Mar. 

11868 } 14,1896. 

Testing 76.74, entered at 10s/4Jd, less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to 10s/6.11d 

Sterling per cwt., packed. 
Test 87.675, entered at 12.50 Marks per 50 kilos, advanced to 12s/0.7625d Sterling per 
50 kilos, packed. 

11S40 Sugar not above 16 D.S., from Luis Eedor, Guantanamo, March 25, 1896. 

Testing 93.92, entered at .02.875, add bags, advanced to .02.984 Spanish gold per 
Spanish lb., packed. 

11850 Sugar not above 16 D.S., from Antwerp, Feb. 27, 1896. 

Testing 91.16, entered at 12s/6d less N. D. charges, discount 11 per cent, advanced to 
12s/5.24d Sterling per cwt., packed. 

11832 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from L. A. Girand, Dominica, Mar. 16, 1896. 

Testing 93.95 centrifugal, entered at .02.25 advanced to .02.71 U. S. dollars per lb., 

packed. 
Testing 89.75, muscovado, entered at .02.25 advanced to .02.487 U. S. Dollars per lb., 

packed. 
To entered prices add hogsheads at $2. each. 

11823 Sugar not above 16 I). S. from J. M. Garcia, Manzanilla, March 4, 1896. 

Testing 96.10, entered at. 021 less freight & N. D. charges, advanced to .03.103 Spanish 
gold per Spanish lb., packed. 

11920 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from C. Czarnikow, Dunkirk, Feb. 22, 1896. 

Testing 90.66, entered at 10s/9.75d less N. D. charges, advanced to 12s/1.425d Sterling 
per cwt., packed. 

11820 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from C. Czarnikow, Eotterdam, Mar. 4, 1S96. 

Testing 73.95, entered at 10s/4]d, less N. D. charges, Dis. 11 per cent, advanced to 
10S/0.425d Sterling per cwt., packed. 

11867 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from C. Czarnikow, London, Mar. 10, 1896. 

Testing 81.08, entered at 10s/42d less N. D. charges, advanced to 10s/10.62d Sterling 
per cwt., packed. 

11851 ) 

11852 [Sugar not above 16 D. S. from C. Czarnikow, Antwerp, Feb. 29, 28 and Mar. 13,, 1896. 

11954 ) 

Testing 81.8549, entered at 108/4] d less H". D. charges, Dis. 11 per cent advanced to 
10s/11.775d Sterling per cwt., packed. 



11851 

11852 \ Sugar not above 16 D. 8., etc. — Continued. 

11954 

Testing 90.00 entered at 12s/6d, less N. D. charges, discount li per cent, advanced to 

12s/3Jd Sterling per cwt., packed. 
Testing 80.83, entered at 10s/4Jd, less N. D. charges, discount 11 per cent, advanced 
to 10s/10.73d Sterling per cwt., packed. 

11700 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from Hidalgo & Co., Havana, Jan. 18, 1896. 

Testing 85.60, entered at .02 T \ less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to .01.973 
U. S. Gold per lb. , packed. 

11702 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from I. Eigney & Co., Manzauilla Feb. 10, 1896. 

Testing 92.10, entered at .02. add bags, advanced to .02.4546 Spanish gold per Lb., 
packed. 

1 1 708 "^ 

11709 I Sugar not above 16 D. S. from Francke, Hijos, & Co., Havana, Mar. 18, 7, and Apr. 4, 

11736::::::::;:":.) 1896 - 

Testing 94.78, entered at .02f less freight & N. D. charges, advanced to .02.8175 TJ. S. 

gold per lb., packed. 
Testing 94.42, entered at .021 less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to .02.795 U. S. 

gold per lb., packed. 
Testing 94. entered at .021 less freight & N. D. charges advanced to .02.76875 U. S. 

gold per lb., packed. 

Chica 'o P } M f s ' °f wool > from LiddeT1 & Brierly, Huddersfield, Nov. 14, 1895. 

Black No. 20531 entered at 4s /9d and blue No. 20531 entered at 5s /3d Sterling per 
yard, No Advance. 

Less l/37th 1/4 yard in 10, discount 2£ per cent add packing charges. 

2947 0. p ^ 

^*>g °' p I Macaroni, from Talbot Freres, Bordeaux, Dec. 14, 1895 and Mar 2 and 14, 1896. 

Boston J 

Macaroni, entered at 5.84 advanced to 6.60 Francs per box of 25 one pound packages. 
Macaroni, entered at 5. advanced to 5.67 Francs per box of 25 one pound packages. 
Macaroni, invoiced at 9.80 advanced to 11. Francs per box of 50 one pound package.*. 
Macaroni, entered at 6. advanced to 6.60 Francs per box of 25 one pound packages. 

Boston P } Swgar not above 16 D8 ' from Eoberfc Crooks & Co -> Liverpool, Mar. 6, 1896. 

Entered at 10s /lid advanced to 10s /6d Sterling per cwt., packed. 
Discount 2z per cent. 

B?'^?- °' P . 1 English refined sugar above 16 D. S. from Eobert Crooks & Co. , Liverpool, Mar. 17, 1896. 

Entered at £12. 2s. 5d advanced to £12. 7s. 3d. Sterling per ton, discount 2$ per cent. 

B° 'l'tini P 1 8wffar above 16 D - S '> from L " E ' Lowenstam < Amsterdam, Mar. 27, 1896. 

Granulated entered at 17.415 Florins per 100 kilos, advanced to 14^ /9Jd Sterling per 
cwt., packed. 

Ph 9 ila° P } M f s - °fP a P er ' from G - Greinco &Co., London, Jan. 21, 1896* 

Lanterns and balloons, entered at various prices, add cost of packing, discounts 40 
per cent & 31 per cent, No Advance. 



Baltimore..".... j Suffar above 16 D ' Sm from Jas- Rou g ie & Co -> Glasgow, Mar. 18, 1896. 

Medium, entered at lis /9d less N. D. charges, advanced to lls]/10 2 l d Sterling per cwt., 
packed, net. 

Baltimore. Y Sulphate of Ammonia, from Dunn Bros., Manchester, April 11, 1896. 

Entered at 8. 10s. 0d., less freight, & N. D. charges. No Advance. 

Phila° P [ Su var not above 16 D. S. from J. M. Garcia, Manzanilla, Feb. 25, 1896. 

Testing 95.75, entered at .021 less freight & N.D. charges, advanced to .02.855 U. S. 
currency per lb., packed 

Phila°.. P . .... ... | Suffar not above 16 - - S - from W - ^ Gorrni, Sr., Arroyo, Nov. 16, 1995. 

Testing 88.30, entered at .02.88 add packing, advanced to .03. Porto Eieo Currency 
per lb., packed. 

Phila°... P ...... ... j 8wgar not aJ)0Ve 16 D - S - from Martin Greig & Co., Sourabaya, Nov. 1, 1895. 

Testing 96.65, Java sugar, entered at lis /3d less freight and N. D. charges, advanced 
to 9s /10a 1 d Sterling per cwt. packed. 

Fhila...?........... \ Suffar not above 16 D - S - from Erdmann & Sielcken, Samarang Sept. 23, 1895. 

Testing 97.34, Java 1st., entered at lis /3d less freight & N. D. charges, advanced to 
10s /10 Jd Sterling per cwt. packed. 

3021 o. p "I 

3038 o. p [■ Sulphate of ammonia, "from Peter McQuie& Son, Liverpool, Mar. 31, and Apr. 1, 1896. 

Phila ) 

Entered at £8. 0s. lljd and £8. Is. Ud Sterling per ton. No Advance. 

REAPPRAISEMENTS BY BOARDS. 



11015...!!!!!.!!.!. j Bruslies i 0»* ««<^ varnish brushes) from Ed. Flemming & Co., Schoenheide, Jan. 10, 1896. 
Varnish brushes S. 70, No. 7, entered at 1.20 Marks per dozen. No Advance. 
Varnish brushes, S. 70, No. 9, entered at 1.70 Marks per dozen. No Advance. 
Paint brushes, S. 71, No. 6, entered at 1.40 Marks per dozen. No Advance. 
Paint brushes, S. 71 No. 8, entered at 1.90 Marks per dozen. No Advance. 
Paint brushes S. 71 No. 10, entered at 2.55 Marks per dozen. No Advance. 
Entered discounts 15 per cent & 2 J per cent, advanced discount 10 per cent Add case. 



3273.. 
11484 
3276.. 
11568 
3288.. 
11625 



> Mfs. of wool and cotton, from M. Zossenheim, Leeds, Mar. 14, 21 and 28, 1896. 



No. 4698 chinchilla coton warp, entered at ls/8d advanced to ls/lOd Sterling per yard. 
No. 4670, chinchilla cotton warp, entered at ls/lOd advanced to 2s/- Sterling per yard. 
Less measure -^ and ^, discount 31 per cent, add packing. 

11426.!!!!!!!!!!!!! j M f s - °f wo °h from Lankisch & Marggraff, Schwiebus, Feb. 13, 1896. 

4x7 a blau, 128/30 & 136 c/m, entered at 2. advanced to 2.50 Marks per meter. 



10 

jjgoV [ Silk veiling, from Leon Levy, Paris, March 18, 1896. 

Chenille, creme, 45 c/m, No. 622, entered at .77 advanced to .81 Franc per meter. 
Discount 2 per cent. 
Add cases. 

jig-io " | W s - of silk and cotton, from L. Permezel & Co., Lyons, Feb. 6, 1896. 

60 c/m, satin blanc couleurs, entered at .87 advanced to .95 Franc per meter. 

60 c/m satin creme, entered at 1. advanced to 1.10 Francs per meter. 

60 c/m satin blanc. entered at .95 advanced to 1.04 Francs per meter. 

92 c/m serge noir, entered at 1.10 advanced to 1.20 Francs per meter. 

92 c/m serge noir, entered at 1.20 advanced to 1.32 Francs per meter. 

48 c/m satin blanc conleurs entered at .74 advanced to .81 Franc per meter. 

92 c/m, serge noir, entered at 1.05 advanced to 1.15 Francs per meter. 

Discount 20 per cent. Deduction from entered values 3 per cent for tares and holes, 
disallowed on reappraisement. 
ffll'o } Sugar not above 16 D. S. from W. Da Costa & Co., Barbados, Mar. 4, 1896. 

Testing 90.15, entered at .02.20 advanced to .02. 536 U. S. currency per lb., packed. 

Testing 86.70 entered at .02.30 advanced to .02.357 U S. currency per lb., packed. 
lUls j Sugar not above 16 D. S. from C. Brauet & Co., Guantanamo, Feb. 12, 1896. 

Testing 95.96, entered at .02.60 add bags, advanced to .03.004 Spanish gold per lb., 
packed. 
-...„„'' [ Sugar not above 16 D. S. from Louis Eider, Guantanamo, Mar. 26, 1896. 

Testing 91.30, entered at .02.0625 add bags, advanced to .02.626 Spanish gold per lb., 
packed. 
3280 1 

„„oi \Mfs. of India rubber, from , Hanover, Mar. 10, 1896. 

11648...'.'.."...!'.! J 

Enemas 3007 B, in cedar box, entered at 20. Marks per dozen. 

Entered discount 10 per cent, advanced discount 5 per cent. 

3282 ^l 

11317 

„ 9 qq "' " VMfs. of silk and cotton, from Gindre & Co., Lyons, Jan. 8 and Mar. 18, 1896. 

11642 J 

92 c/m black serge No. 827, entered at 1.10 advanced to 1.25 Francs per meter. 

60 c/m serge, No. 23, entered at .93 advanced to 1.02 Francs per meter. 

60 c/m, serge No. 206, entered at .60 advanced to .70 Franc per meter. 

56 c/m, pongee, No. 248, entered at 1.12 advanced to 1.23 Francs per meter. 

Discounts 20 per cent & 1 per cent Add packing. 
113Q4 \Mfs. of silk and cotton, from P. Gueman, Lyons, Feb. 26, 1896. 

92 c/m satin, entered at 1.45 advanced to 1.58 Francs per meter. 

92 c/m serge, entered at 1.30 advanced to 1.43 Francs per meter. 

92 c/m serge, entered at 1.45 advanced to 1.65 Francs per meter. 

Discounts 20 per cent and 1 per cent Add cases and packing. 

^£2 } M f s - of silk, from A. Gourd & Co., Lyons, Mar. 11, 1896. 

Damas 55 c/m, entered at 2.60 advanced to 3.25 Francs per meter. 
Damas 55 c/m, entered at 3. advanced to 3. 75 Francs per meter. 



11 

32S5 



'silk, etc. — Continued. 



;.;""} M f*> of sih 

Taffetas faconne 55 c/m, entered at 2.80 advanced to 3.50 Francs per meter. 

Damas, 56 c/m, entered at 3.50 advanced to 4.35 Francs per meter. 

Dainas 60 c/m, entered at 3.60 advanced to 4.50 Francs per meter. 

Damas 60 c/m, entered at 3.90 advanced to 4.80 Francs per meter. 

Discount 20 per cent Add cases and packing. 
3300 ) 

1J5jq >8ilk velvet, from Ducote & Cote, Lyons, Mar. 11, 1896. 

No. 9556, velours uni 49/51 c/m soie and cotton, entered at 6. advanced to 7. Francs 

per meter, 
velours uni tout soie, entered at from 6. to 12. advanced to from 7.25 to 13.50 Francs 

per meter. 
Discount 20 per cent. 

Add cases and packing. 

743 o p ] 

3028 [• Tubes of steel, from Mannesmann Tube Co., Ltd., London, March 11, 1896. 

Baltimore ) 

Cycle tubes, entered at discounts of 72J per cent & 2* per cent 

Advanced discount 67 i per cent. 

Less inland carriage to London, and F. O. B. charges. 

736o. p ) S 

2944 , [ Sugar not above 16 D. 8. from E. Crooks & Co., Liverpool, Feb. 12, 1896. 

Chicago J 

Fifths, entered at £9. 14s. lid. advanced to £10. 3s. Od. Sterling per ton, discount 21 
per cent. 

O 



CLEARANCES OF VESSELS PROCEEDING FOREIGN VIA A DOMESTIC PORT. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 84. 

Bureau of Navigation. 



2Er*asimj gjepartmjent, 



Office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, June S. 1896. 
To Collectors of Customs and Others: 

A foreign vessel clearing from a domestic port to a foreign port via a domestic port, where she is to 
stop for coal, supplies, or cargo, should proceed under sections 4367, 4368, and 4369, Eevised Statutes, 
delivering to the collector at the first port duplicate manifests, properly sworn to, and obtaining permit, 
as in other cases, to be presented at the port of destination in the United States. If imported cargo be 
retained on the vessel, the requirements of sections 2654, 2776, and 2777, Eevised Statutes, as to bond, 
must be observed. 

Shippers' manifests of exports should be accepted by the collector at the first port as if the vessel 
were to proceed from such port directly to a foieign port, and returns should be made to the Bureau of 
Statistics accordingly, the collector at the second port forwarding returns only of the merchandise laden 
at his port for export, or of merchandise laden elsewhere, covered by shipper's manifest presented at his 
port and not included in the returns of another collector. It is the practice for the master to file at the 
last port of departure for a foreign port a full manifest of the cargo. (Sec. 4197, Eev. Stat., S. 5644, 6893.) 
The fee for the coastwise permit is $2. 

Similar action as to returns should be taken in the case of a vessel of the United States clearing 
coastwise with cargo laden at one domestic port for export in her via another domestic port. 

Forms 483 and 5041 (Cat. Nos.) will be amended by the Department accordingly, so that they may 
show whether or not merchandise laden at a domestic port for exportation via another domestic port will 
be included in the statistical returns from the first port. 

W. E. CURTIS, 

Acting Secretary. 



CONTRACTS FOB THE CARE OF SEAMEN, ETC. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 85 



Marine-Hospital Service. 

OFFICE OF 

SUPERVISING SURGEON-GENERAL U. S. MARINE-HOSPITAL SERVICE, 

Washington, D. C, June 18, 1896. 

The following contracts for the care of seamen entitled to relief from this Service, for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1897, are published for the information of accounting officers of the Treasury Department, 
disbursing agents, medical officers of the Marine-Hospital Service, acting assistant surgeons, and customs 
officers. This circular is to be regarded as official notification of the acceptance of the proposals made 
by the parties designated, and must be cited, giving its number and date, on all bills for the treatment 
and maintenance of seamen, and for the burial of deceased patients, as the authority for any expenditure 
incurred under its provisions. Charges will be allowed for the day of admission of a hospital patient, 
but not for the day of discharge or death. The right is reserved by the Secretary of the Treasury to 
terminate any contract whenever the interests of the Service require it. All relief must be furnished in 
accordance with the Eevised Eegulations of the Marine-Hospital Service ; and, in consequence of the 
largely increased expenditures for relief, and of the limited sources of income, it has become necessary to 
give notice that, as provided in the Eegulations, no allowance will be made for expenditures incurred at 
any other station than those named in this circular. 

Upon admission to a contract hospital of a patient with disease or injury which, in the opinion of 
the medical officer, the acting assistant surgeon, or physician in charge of the case, will require more than 
twenty days' treatment in hospital, the collector of customs or other officer issuing the permit will at 
once request authority from the Marine-Hospital Bureau to transfer such .patient to the nearest marine 
hospital, provided the patient's condition, in the opinion of the medical officer, the acting assistant 
surgeon, or physician in charge of the case, is such as to admit of transportation. 

The attention of collectors of customs, medical officers, acting assistant surgeons, or other physicians 
in charge of patients of the Marine-Hospital Service at contract stations, is hereby called to the necessity 
of discharging patients promptly upon the termination of the necessary hospital treatment, and without 
awaiting the expiration of the period authorized in the permit. 

The term "contagious diseases" wherever occurring in this circular, specific contracts excepted, 



includes only those diseases which, under usual municipal regulations, are required to be treated iu a 
special hospital for contagious diseases. 



WALTER WYMAN, 

Supervising Surgeon- General U. S. Marine- Hospital Service. 



Approved : 

W. E. CUETIS, 

Acting Secretary of the Treasury. 



ALBANY, N. Y. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; Albany Hospital to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at $1 a day. 

APALACHICOLA, FLA. 

Dr. J. D. Eush to furnish medical attendance and medicines, at $30 a month ; Martha Campbell to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, and nursing, at $1 a day, and to provide for the burial of deceased patients, 
at $12.50 each. 

ASHLAND, "WIS. 

St. Joseph's Hospital to furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, medical attendance, and medicines, at 
$1 a day, and to provide for the burial of deceased patients, at $10 each. 

ASHTABULA, OHIO. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; Mrs. Henry Whelpley to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, and nursing, at $1 a day; contagious diseases, $1.50 a day ; John Ducro & 
Sons to provide for the burial of deceased patients, at $14 each. 

ASTOEIA, OBJEG. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon; St. Mary's Hospital to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at $1 a day. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

Hospital patients to be cared for in the United States Marine Hospital ; F. M. Denny to provide for 
the burial of deceased patients, at $16.50 each. 

BANGOE, ME. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon; Helen M. Stratton to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, and nursing, at $1 a day ; Abel Hunt to provide for the burial of deceased 
patients, at $10 each. 

BATH, ME. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon. Hospital care and treat- 
ment will be furnished only to patients who are unable to bear transportation to the United States Marine 
Hospital at Portland, Me. 



BEAUFORT, N. C. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon. 

BISMARCK, N. DAK. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon; Lamborn Hospital to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, and nursing, at 90 cents a day. 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Hospital patients to be cared for in the United States Marine Hospital at Chelsea, Mass.; burial ol 
deceased patients at the hospital cemetery ; burial of foreign patients, at $10 each. 

BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 

Bridgeport Hospital to furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, medical attendance, aud medicines, at 
$1 a day ; Hawley, "Wilmot & Reynolds to provide for the burial of deceased patients, at $16 each. 

BROWNSVILLE, TEX. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon. 

BRUNSWICK, GA. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; Johanna Foley to furnish 
quarters, subsistence, and nursing, at 90 cents a day ; Charles G. Moore to provide for the burial of 
deceased patients, at $15 each. 

BUFFALO, N. Y. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by a medical officer of the Marine-Hospital Service ; Buffalo 
Hospital (Sisters of Charity) to furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at 80 cents a day ; 
contagions diseases, at $2 a day ; and to provide for the burial of deceased patients, at $10 each. 

BURLINGTON, IOWA. 

Mercy Hospital to furnish quarters, subsistence, medical attendance, nursing, and medicines, at 90 
cents a day. 

CAIRO, ILL. 

Hospital patients to be cared for in the United States Marine Hospital ; Win. E. Feith to provide for 
the burial of deceased patients, at $8.70 each. 

CAMBRIDGE, MD. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; Charles J. Webb to furnish 
quarters, subsistence, and nursing, at 50 cents a day. 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by a medical officer of the Marine-Hospital Service ; St. 
Francis Xavier's Infirmary to furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at SO cents a day ; 
and to provide for the burial of deceased patients, at $12 each. 



CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; Hamilton County Hospital 
to furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at 60 cents a day. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Hospital patients to be cared for in the United States Marine Hospital ; Bartlett & Co. to provide for 
the burial of deceased patients, at $18 each. 

CINCINNATI, OHIO. 

Hospital patients to be cared for in the United States Marine Hospital ; dispensary at the hospital, 
southeast corner of Third and Kilgour streets ; F. & W. Seif ke to provide for the burial of deceased 

patients, at $16 each. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. 

Hospital patients to be cared for in the United States Marine Hospital ; Hogan & Sharer to furnish 
ambulance service, at $2 for each patient, and to provide for the burial of deceased patients, at $16 each. 

CORPUS CHRISTI, TEX. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; James E. Ellis to furnish 
quarters, subsistence, and nursing, at $1 a day. 

DARIEN, GA. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; patients requiring hospi- 
tal treatment will be furnished transportation to Brunswick, Ga. 

DELAWARE BREAKWATER, DEL. 

Hospital patients to be cared for in the United States Marine Hospital ; Wm. T. Atkins to furnish 
coffins at $10 each. 

DETROIT, MICH. 

Hospital patients to be cared for in the United States Marine Hospital ; out-patients to be treated at 
the dispensary, No. 90 Griswold street ; Ed. H. Patterson to provide for the burial of deceased patients, 
at $10 each. 

DUBUQUE, IOWA. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; St. Joseph's Mercy Hospi- 
tal to furnish ambulance service, quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines at $1 a day ; M. M. Hoff- 
man to provide for the burial of deceased patients, at $13.50 each. 

DULUTH, MINN. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; St. Luke's Hospital to fur- 
nish quarters, subsistence, nursiug, and medicines, at 75 cents a day ; John W. Stewart to provide for 
the burial of deceased patients, at $15 each. 

EDENTON, N. C. 

E. Dillard, M. D., to furnish quarters, subsistence, nursiug, medical attendance, and medicines, at 
$2 a day. For out-patients $1 will be allowed for each medical examination, and 25 cents additional for 
each time medicine is furnished. 



ELIZABETH CITY, N. O. 

The medical atteadaace to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon. 

ELLSWORTH, ME. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; hospital care and treat 
meut will be furnished only to patients who are unable to bear transportation to the United States Marine 
Hospital at Portland, Me. , 

ERIE, PA. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; Hamot Hospital Association 
to furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at 71 cents a day. Care and treatment of cases 
of contagious diseases to be furnished by the Health Department of the city of Erie, at $2.85 a day. 

ESCANABA, MICH. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon; Delta County Hospital to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, and nursing, at $1 a day. 

EUREKA, CAL. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon; Maria Anderson to furnish 
quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at 98 cents a day. 

EVANSVILLE, IND. 

Hospital patients to be cared for in the United States Marine Hospital ; Henry Klee & Son to provide 
for the burial of deceased patients, at $11.50 each. 

FERNANDINA, FLA. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon; A. G. Webster to furnish 
quarters, subsistence, and nursing, at $1 a day. 

FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon; Amelia Parrott to furnish 
quarters, subsistence, and nursing, at 90 cents a day; contagious diseases, at $2 a day; George Nossett to 
provide for the burial of deceased patients, at $12.50 each. 

GALLIPOLIS, OHIO. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon; Harriet J. Kinder to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, and nursing, at 60 cents a day; and to provide office quarters for the Actiu- 
Assistant Surgeon, at $10 a month ; Hayward & Son to provide for the burial of deceased patients, at $15 
each. 

GALVESTON, TEX. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by a medical officer of the Marine-Hospital Service- St 
Mary's Infirmary to furnish ambulance service, quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at $1 a day • 
contagious diseases, at $2 a day; and to provide for the burial of deceased patients, at $10 each 



GEORGETOWN, S. ('. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; hospital care and treatment 
will be furnished only to patients who are unable to bear transportation to Charleston, S. C. 

GLOUCESTER, MASS. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon. 

* THE GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE, D. C. 

Under act of Congress, March 3, 1875, to furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, medical attendance 
and medicines, at $4.50 a week, for each insane patient admitted upon the order of the Secretary of the 
Treasury. 

GRAND HAVEN, MICH. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; Anna Farnham to furnish 
quarters, subsistence, and nursing, at $1 a day. 

GREEN BAY, WIS. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; St. Vincent's Hospital to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at $1 a day ; Lefebvre & Schumacher to provide for 
the burial of deceased patients, at $16 each. 

HARTFORD, CONN. 

The Hartford Hospital to furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, medical attendance, and medicines, 
at $1 a day. 

JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistaut Surgeon ; William H. Jones to furnish 
quarters, subsistence, and nursing, at $1 a day ; Edward J. Gordon to provide for the burial of deceased 
patients, at $12.50 each. 

KEY WEST, FLA. 

Hospital patients to be cared for in the United States Marine Hospital ; Otto & Boza to provide for 
the burial of deceased patients, at $13.50 each. 

LA CROSSE, WIS. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; St. Francis' Hospital to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at $1 a day ; Frank Tillman & Co. to provide for the 
burial of deceased patients, at $19 each. 

LITTLE ROCK, ARK. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; Little Rock Infirmary to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at $1 a day ; F. Baer to provide for the burial of 
deceased patients, at $12 each. 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 

Hospital patients to be cared for in the United States Marine Hospital ; Schoppenhorst Bros, to pro- 
vide for the burial of deceased patients, at $15 each. 



7 

LUDINGTON, MICH. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeou ; Hanibal D. Linsley to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, and nursing, at 80 cents a day. 

MACHIAS, ME. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; Abiel E. Preble to furnish 
quarters, subsistence, and nursing, at 90 cents a day ; L. H. Hauscom to provide for the burial of deceased 
patients, at $10 each. 

MANISTEE, MICH. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by au Acting Assistant Surgeou ; Mercy Hospital to fur- 
nish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at 90 cents a day. 

MARQUETTE, MICH. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by au Acting Assistant Surgeon; St. Mary's Hospital to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at $1 a day, and to provide for burial of deceased 
patients, at $15 each. 

MARSHFIELD, OREG. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; John Snyder to furnish 
quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at $1.20 a day. 

MEMPHIS, TENN. 

Hospital patients to be cared for in the United States Marine Hospital ; John Walsh to provide for 
the burial of deceased patients, at $10 each. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by au Acting Assistant Surgeon ; St. Mary's Hospital to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at 80 cents a day; George L. Thomas to provide 
for the burial of deceased patients, at $14 each. 

MOBILE, ALA. 

Hospital patients to be cared for in the United States Marine Hospital ; Wm. V. Beroujon to 
provide for the burial of deceased patients, at $13 each. 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; Nashville City Hospital to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at 90 cents a day. 

NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; patients requiring hospital 
care and treatment, if able to bear transportation, will be sent to the United States Marine Hospital at 
Vineyard Haven, Mass. 

NEWBERN, N. C. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; Susan A. Collins to furnish 
quarters, subsistence, and nursing, at 85 cents a day ; H. W. Simpson to provide for the burial of deceased 
patients, at $15 each. 



NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; New Haven General Hospital 
to furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at $1 a day; and to provide for the burial of 
deceased patients, at $15 each ; New Haven Board of Health to furnish all necessary care and treatment 
in cases of any contagious disease, at $3 a day. 

NEW LONDON, CONN. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon. Memorial Hospital Associ- 
ation to furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at $1.50 a day ; hospital care and treatment 
will be furnished only to patients who are unable to bear transportation to the United States Marine 
Hospital at Stapleton, N. Y. ; Poran Furniture Company to provide for the burial of deceased patients, 
at $12 each. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Hospital patients to be cared for in the United States Marine Hospital ; T. J. McMahon & Sons Co. 
to provide for the burial of deceased patients, at $8.50 each. 

NEWPORT, ARK. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon. 

NEWPORT, R. I. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; Newport Hospital to furnish 
quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at $1 a day; Eobert C. Cotterell to provide for the burial 
of deceased patients, at $11.50 each. 

NEWPORT NEWS, VA. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon. 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Hospital patients to be cared for in the Marine Hospital, Stapleton, Staten Island, N. Y.; out-patients 
to be treated at the dispensary, near the "New Barge Office," Battery ; John T. Oates to provide for the 
burial of deceased patients, at $1 each. 

NORFOLK, VA. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by a medical officer of the Marine-Hospital Service ; St. 
Vincent's Hospital to furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, ambulance service, and medicines, at 83 cents 
a day ; J. E. Edwards to provide for the burial of deceased patients, at $10 each. 

OGDENSBTJRG, N. Y. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; City Hospital to furnish 
quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at $1 a day ; the city of Ogdensburg to care for contagious 
cases, at $3 a day ; H. S. Nutall to provide for the burial of deceased patients, at $9.45 each. 

OSWEGO, N. Y. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; Oswego Hospital to furnish 
quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at $1 a day. 



PENSACOLA, FLA. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; Anderson & Renshaw to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at $ L a day; Northup & Wood to provide for the 
burial of deceased patients, at $14.50 each. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by a medical officer of the Marine-Hospital Service; German 
Hospital to furnish ambulance service, quarters, subsistence, nursing, medicines, and one interne, at $1 a 
day ; and to provide for the burial of deceased patients, at $15 each. 

PITTSBURG, PA. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by a medical officer of the Marine-Hospital Service ; Mercy 
Hospital to furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, medicines, and a resident physician, at 94 cents a day, 
and $2 a day for contagious cases ; Burns & Giltinan to provide for the burial of deceased patients, at $ 13 each . 

PORT HURON, MICH. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; "Hospital and Home" to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at $1 a day. George Thompson to provide for the 
burial of deceased patients, at $10 each. 

PORTLAND, ME. 

Hospital patients to be cared for in the United States Marine Hospital ; Ilsley Brothers to provide 
for burial of deceased patients, at $10 each. 

PORTLAND, OREG. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by a medical officer of the Marine-Hospital Service; 
outpatients to be treated at the dispensary, Marquam Building; St. Vincent's Hospital to furnish 
quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at 70 cents a day ; contagious diseases, at $2 a day ; Dunni ng 
& Campion to provide for the burial of deceased patients, at $9.75 each. 

PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; Cottage Hospital to furnish 
quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines at $1 a day. 

PORT TAMPA, FLA. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon. 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

Hospital patients to be cared for in the United States Marine Hospital ; W. T. Lake to provide for 
the burial of deceased patients, at $5.75 each. 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

The Rhode Island Hospital to furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, medical attendance, and medi- 
cines, at $1 a day, and to provide for the burial of deceased patients, at $12 each. 



10 



RICHMOND, VA. 



The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; out-patients to be treated 
at the Marine-Hospital Office, Custom-house building; "Retreat for the Sick" Hospital to furnish 
quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at $1 a day. 

ROCKLAND, ME. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon. Hospital care and treat- 
ment will be furnished only to patients who are unable to bear transportation to the United States Marine 
Hospital at Portland, Me. 

ROME, GA. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; Martha Battey Hospital to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, and nursing, at $1 a day. 

SAGINAW, MICH. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; St. Mary's Hospital to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at 64 cents a day. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Hospital patients to be cared for in the United States Marine Hospital ; John Hahn to provide for the 
burial of deceased patients, at $12.50 each. 

ST. PAUL, MINN. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; St. Joseph's Hospital to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at $1 a day; and to provide for the burial of 
deceased patients, at $7 each. 

SAN DIEGO, CAL. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by a medical officer of the Marine-Hospital Service ; St. 
Joseph's Hospital to furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and ambulance service, at 59 cents a day; 
Johnson & Co. to provide for the burial of deceased patients, at $11 each. 

SANDUSKY, OHIO. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; Good Samaritan Hospital to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, and nursing, at $1 a day. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Hospital patients to be cared for in the United States Marine Hospital ; out-patients to be treated at 
the Marine Hospital Office, Eooms 1-3, Appraiser's building ; burial of deceased patients at the hospital 
cemetery ; burial of foreign seamen, at $10 each. 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

Eandolph W. Hill, M. D., to furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, medical attendance, and medi- 
cines, at 90 cents a day; contagious diseases, at $1.50 a day; and to provide for the burial of deceased 
patients, at $7 each. 






11 

SATJLT STB. MARIE, MIOH. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; Annie McNeeley to furnish 
quarters, subsistence, and nursing, at 70 cents a day ; J. Vanderhook to provide for the burial of deceased 
patients, at $15 each. 

SAVANNAH, GA. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by a medical officer of the Marine-Hospital Service ; St. 
Joseph's Infirmary to furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at $1 a day ; Joseph Goette 
to provide for the burial of deceased patients, at $7 each. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; Providence Hospital to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at 60 cents a day ; E E. Butterworth & Sons to 
provide for the burial of deceased patients, at $5.70 each. 

SHREVEPOET, LA. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; out-patients to be treated 
at the Marine Hospital Office ; Shreveport Charity Hospital to furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and 
medicines, at $1 a day ; W. W. Waring to provide for the burial. of deceased patients, at $16 each. 

SOLOMONS, MD. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; M. P. Morrison to furnish 
subsistence, nursing, fuel, and lights, at 95 cents a day ; T. M. White to provide for the burial of deceased 
patients, at $7.50 each. 

SUPERIOR, "Wis. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; St. Mary's Hospital to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, musing, and medicines, at 90 cents a day ; Patrick O'Reilly to provide for 
the burial of deceased patients, at $15 each. 

TACOMA, WASH. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; Fannie C. Paddock 
Hospital to furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at 55 cents a day. 

TAPPAHANNOCK, VA. 

W. G. Jeffries, M. D., to furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, medical attendance, and medicines, 
at Tappahannock ; Dr. W. J. Newbill at Carter's Creek, and Dr. W. S. Christian at Urbana, each at 
$1.50 a day. 

TOLEDO, OHIO. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; Toledo Hospital Association 
to furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at 80 cents a day ; contagious diseases, at $2 a 
day, and to provide for the burial of deceased patients, at $15 each. 

YICKSBURG, MISS. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon ; Vicksburg City Hospital 
to furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at $1 a day. 



12 



VINEYARD HAVEN, MASS. 



Hospital patients to he cared for in the United States Marine Hospital ; M. C. Vincent to provide for 
the burial of deceased patients, at $16 each. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by a medical officer of the Marine-Hospital Service; out 
patients to be treated at the dispensary, No. 3, B street SE.; Providence Hospital to furnish quarters, 
subsistence, nursing, interne attendance, and medicines, at 75 cents a day. 

WHEELING, W. VA. 

The medical attendance to be furnished by an Acting Assistant Surgeon; Wheeling Hospital to 
furnish quarters, subsistence, nursing, and medicines, at 75 cents a day. 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 

Hospital patients to be cared for in the United States Marine Hospital ; Walter E. Yopp to provide 
for the burial of deceased patients, at $11.50 each. 



At the following-named ports, hospital or other relief will be furnished only under the provisions of 
the Regulations for the Marine-Hospital Service as to third-class stations : 



Barnstable, Mass. 
Beaufort, S. C. 
Belfast, Me. 
Burlington, Vt. 
Castine, Me. 
Cedar Keys, Pla. 
Chatham, Mass. 
Dennis, Mass. 
Eastport, Me. 
Edgartown, Mass. 



Hyannis, Mass. 
Perth Amboy, N. J. 
Provincetown, Mass. 
Sag Harbor, N. Y. 
Salem, Mass. 
Sitka, Alaska. 
Somers Point, N. J. 
Waldoboro, Me. 
Wilmington, Del. 
Wiscasset, Me. 



The rate at ports not specifically provided for by this circular will, in each special case, be fixed by 
the Department, upon the recommendation of the proper officer, in accordance with the Regulations. 

The rate of charge for seamen from vessels of the Navy and Coast Survey, admitted to hospital under 
the provisions of the Regulations, and of foreign seamen admitted under the act of March 3, 1875, is 
hereby fixed at the uniform rate of $1 a day. 

At all ports not otherwise specified, the dispensary is located at the custom house or marine hospital 



FREE RETURN OF ARTICLES EXPORTED FROM THE UNITED STATES FOR EXHIBITION 

PURPOSES. 



Ixmsxxxi} fpjqmrtmettt, 



1S96. 
Department Circular No. 8G. 

Division of Customs. 

Office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, June 6, 1896. 
To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The Act of Congress approved May 18, 1896, entitled "An Act to allow the return, free of duty of 
certain articles exported from the United States for exhibition purposes," provides : 

" That whenever any article or articles or live stock shall be sent out of the United States for tem- 
porary use or exhibition at auy public exposition, fair, or conference, held in a foreign country, such 
articles shall be entitled to be returned to the United States, under such regulations as may be prescribed 
by the Secretary of the Treasury, without the payment of customs duty, whether they shall be of domes- 
tic or of foreign production : Provided, That the articles of foreign production have once paid duty in the 
United States aud no drawback has been allowed thereon, ami if any domestic articles are subject to 
internal revenue tax, such tax shall be proved to have been paid before exportation and not refunded.'' 

Entries of such merchandise returned to the port of origiual exportation must show the fact of regular 
clearance for a foreign destination by the records of the customs and by the declaration of the person 
making the entry. But when the reimportation is made into a port other than that of original exportation 
there shall be required, in addition to the declaration, a certificate from the collector aud the naval officer, 
if any, of the port where the exportation was made, showing the fact of exportation from that port. 



OATH FOR RETURN OF ARTICLES EXPORTED FOR EXHIBITION PURPOSES. 

I, , do solemnly, sincerely, aud truly swear (or affirm) that the several articles of 

merchandise mentioned in the entry hereto annexed are, to the best of my knowledge and belief, truly 
and bona fide exhibition goods; that they were truly exported and imported as therein expressed; that 
the articles of foreign production have ouce paid duty in the United States; that no drawback, bounty, 
or allowance has been paid or admitted thereon, or on any part thereof; and that the internal-revenue 
tax due upou the domestic articles therein mentioned has been paid and no part thereof has been refunded. 

Port of 

Sworn to this day of , 18 

, Collector. 



certificate of exportation of exhibition goods. 

District of , Port of 



This is to certify that there were cleared from this port on the , in the , whereof 



18- 



was master, for , the following articles of merchandise (here enumerate the number of packages, 



their denomination, marks, numbers, and contents) on which no drawback, allowance, or bounty has been 
paid or admitted. 

[seat..] , Collector. 

[seal.] , Naval Officer. 

If such certificate can not at once be procured, and the proof otherwise required be produced, free 
entry will be permitted on bond (Cat. No. 596) being given for the production of the certificate in a sum 
equal to what the duties would be if it were dutiable merchandise. 

To guard against fraud, and to insure identity, the collector shall require, in addition to proof of 
clearance, the production of a declaration made by the foreign exporter of the goods before the United 
States consul of the fact that the merchandise was imported from the United States, and that it was sent 

to for temporary use at the exhibition entitled , held at , on the day of -, 

18 . But if it be impracticable to produce such declaration at the time of making entry, bond may be 
given for the production thereof. (Synopsis, 14653.) 

Collectors, with concurrence of naval officers, if any, may waive the record evidence of clearance and 
above declaration, and in lieu thereof accept other satisfactory evidence of exportation, in the case of 
domestic goods on which no drawback has been allowed, valued at not over $100, if satisfied that the 
failure to produce the record evidence did not result from willful negligence on the part of the importers. 

In default of observance of the foregoing requirements, imported merchandise will be treated as 
dutiable. 

Should it appear that any internal-revenue tax was remitted or refunded by way of drawback, on the 
original exportation of any articles of the growth, manufacture, or product of ihe United States, a duty 
must be exacted upon their return equal in amount to the tax imposed by the internal-revenue laws upon 
such articles^it the time of their reimportation, but all articles manufactured in bonded warehouse will 
be subject to duty, on reimportation, as foreign merchandise, and all articles on which drawback was 
paid will be liable to a duty equal to the drawback allowed. 

Duties voluntarily paid on such returned goods can not be refunded in the absence of a timely protest 
under section 14 of the act of June 10, 1890, as the only importations exempted from protest by section 1 
of the act of March 3, 1875 (ISth Statutes, p. 469), are personal and household effects and other articles 
not merchandise, article 353 of the Eegulatious of 1892 applying only to goods brought in as personal or 
household effects or passenger's baggage. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



REPORTS OF PASSENGER MOVEMENTS. 



%xzkzux\} ^QtytdLxtmmt, 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 87. 

Division of Appointments. 

office op THE SECRETARY, 



Washington, D. C, June 8, 1896. 

To Principal Officers of the Customs : 

You are hereby directed to forward reports of the monthly and quarterly passenger movements in 
the future, as you have in the past, to the Bureau of Statistics, Treasury Department. These reports were 
formerly included in the reports of immigration, which are now forwarded to the Bureau of Immigration. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



RE APPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



2*rcasatrij JSepurtwimt, 



1896. 
■Department Circular No. 88. 

Division of Customs. 

office op THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, T). C, June 9, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The following reappraisements of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending May 23, 1S96. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING MAY 23, 1896. 

N. B. — In ' eorrespondina with the Hoard of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference should always be made to the number of Heappraisement. 

No. of Keappraise- 
ment. 

11992 White china, from J. B. Weimann Nachfolger, Bremen, April 12, 1S96. 

Porcelain buttons, entered at -1.80 advanced to 5.65 Marks per M. 
12056 Decorated china, from Geo. Borgfeldt & Co., Bodenbach, April 3, 1896. 

China plates 20 c/in, entered at a discount of 10 per cent, advanced discount 5 per 
cent. Add cases. 
12003 Gut glassware, from Ullmau & Seligmann, Wien, April 21, 1896. 

Entered discounts 15 per cent, 10 per cent and 5 per cent. No advance. 

12101 Prepared meat, from Giacomo Cajtolougo, Naples, March 18, 1896. 

Hams, entered at 1. advanced to 1.10 Lire per kilo. Add cases. 

12069 Silk handkerchiefs, from A. S. Rosenthal & Co., Yokohama, April 10, 1896. 

Style 666 b size 17 2 1, weight in momee 24, white handkerchiefs, entered at 1.73 

advanced to 1.85 Silver Yen per dozen. 
Style 666" size 17 2 1, momee weight 25^, white handkerchiefs, entered at 1.82 

advanced to 1.95 Silver Yen per dozen. 
Style 684" size 17 2 li, momee weight 24^, white handkerchiefs, entered at 1.76 

advauced to'1.88 Silver Yen per dozen. 
Add cases. 



12027 M/'d. articles, N. E. from Weil Bros., Paris, April 22, 1896. 

Tooth quills No. 5, entered at 2.15 advanced to 2.36 Francs per pack of 40 bundles of 
15 quills. 

Tooth quills No. 4, entered at 2. advanced to 2.19 Francs per pack of 40 bundles of 
15 quills. 

Discount 2 per cent. Add case and packing. 
12065 Gelatine, from Deutsche Gelatine Fabriken, Hochst a Main April 8, 1896. 

Gelatine white 4 b silver label, entered at 155. advanced to 171. Marks per 100 kilos. 

Gelatine white 4, silver label, entered at 165. advanced to 180.50 Marks per 100 kilos. 

Gelatine white 3" silver label, entered at 180. advanced to 194.75 Marks per 100 kilos. 

Gelatine white 5 copper label, entered at 140. advanced to 156. 75 Marks per 100 kilos. 
11860 Decorated china, from B. Ouwens, Untermhans, Nov. 9, 1895. 

No. 154 decorated tassen, entered at 1.50 advanced to 1.65 Marks per dozen. 

Discount 5 per cent. Add cases at 6. Marks each. 
11991 Ornamental feathers, from Max Eosenberg, Paris, April, 23, 1896. 

Samples of feather boas, entered at 3.50 advanced to 5.60 Francs per total. 

Add eases and packing. 
12001 Mfs. of metal, from Chr. Wandel, Eeutlingen, April 9, 1896. 

Fourdrinier wires No. 80, 12 m 19xl m 829, entered at 6.50 Marks per square meter, add 
8 per cent, add packing. No Advance. 
11936 Stereotype plates, from London, Apr. 10, 1896. 

Stereotype plates of commentary psalms volume 11. entered at £35. 0s. Od. advanced 
to £114. 0s. Od. Sterling per set. 
12002 Mfs. of metal and leather, from F. Brampton & Co., Birmingham, April 23, 1896. 

No. 50 saddles 7/8 enameled, entered at 3s/ld Sterling each. No advance. 

No. 55, saddles 7/8 enameled, entered at 3s/6d Sterling each. No advance. 

^066 ) 8ted Mlets from Abrutz & Co., Stockholm, Apr. 2, 1896. 

120oo ) 

Steel billets, from 21 to 3f, entered at 140. Crowns per 1000 kilos. No advance. 

11892 Flaw lacetidies and sets, from Celine Meyer, Paris, April 17, 1896. 

Set M. A. blanche, entered at 40. Francs per set. No Advance. 

Sets M. V. faunes, entered at 40. Francs per set. 

No advance. 

Bideaux renaiss. 372, entered at 29. Francs per pair. 

No advance. 

Vitrages 275, entered at 19. Francs per pair. 

No Advance. 

Discount 5 per cent. 
11830 Flax lacetidies, from Lahey & Duncan, Paris, Apr. 8, 1896. 

Guipure d'art tidies, entered at .38 advanced to .40 Francs per piece. 

Guipure d'art tidies, entered at 2.15 advanced to 2.35 Francs per piece. 

Linen renaissance tidies, entered at 18.60 advanced to 19.60 Francs per piece. 

Linen renaissance tidies, entered at 13.45 advanced to 14. Francs per piece. 

Linen renaissance tidies, entered at 6.40 advanced to 7.50 Francs per piece. 

Linen renaissance tidies, entered at 26. advanced to 28. Francs per piece. 

Add cases. Similar goods similar advances. 



11490 -) 

11738 I ^ otton nei ting and cotton lace curtains, from B. Walker & Co., Ltd., Nottingham, Mar. 13, 

11890"""!!!"". f 16 ' Apr- 2 ' 10 ' 1896- 
&c '.'"."Z.'.'.'.j 

Ecru cotton Hamburg nets, 50", 101 entered at 2|d advanced to 3d. Sterling per yard. 

Ivory cotton Hamburg net 50", 409, entered at 4Jd advanced to 5d Sterling per yard. 

W. T. & E. T. curtains, 1925, 48" 3£ yards, entered at 2s/- advanced to 2s/2d Ster- 
ling per pair. 

E. T. & "W. T. curtains 1908, 48" 3J yards, entered at 2s/3*d advanced to 2s/6Jd Ster- 
ling per pair. 

W. T. curtains No. 3965, 50" 3* yards, entered at 2s/2d advanced to 2s/4d Sterling 
per pair. 

Similar goods similar advances. 

Discount 21 per cent. Add cases, deduct inland freight. 

11660 ] 

11693 ! Mfs. of wool and cotton, from Simon Israel & Co., Bradfard, March 17, 30, Apr. 9 and 16, 

11794 f 1896. 

11900 J 

54" blue and black serge, M9049 entered at lOJd advanced to lljd Sterling per yard. 

54" black cheviot M. 9079, entered at lOd. advanced to 11D. Sterling per yard. 

56" black melton, H. 4010, entered at 7 Id advanced to 7fd Sterling per yard. 

50" blue meltons, H. 4010, entered at 6}d avanced to 7d. Sterling per yard. 

Less damage, discounts 2J per cent & 11 per cent, add making up and packing. 
12024 Mfs. of goat hair and cotton, from Thos. Cresswell & Co., Huddei-sfield, April 22, 1896. 

54" black and blue curl serge, quality 2503, entered at 2s/3d Sterling per yard. No 
Advance. 

54" Blue beaver, quality 19, entered at ls/lOd Sterling per yard. No Advance. 

Less l/37th and 1/yard per piece, discount on serge 3 1 per cent and on beaver 3f per 
cent, add cases and making up. 
12025 1 

12L05" " \ ^f 8 ' °fy° at Jiair an ^ cotton > f roni Ferd. Heilborn & Co., Bradford, April 15 and 29, 1896. 

54" black knit fabric, No. 179, entered at 2s/- advanced to 2s/-.36d. Sterling per 

yard. 
54/55" black and blue beaver, L. "W. 55, entered at ls/9£d advanced to ls/9.82d. 

Sterling per yard. 
54/black boucle No. 167, entered at ls/lOJd advanced to ls/10.84d. Sterling per 

yard. 
54" black boucle, No. 171, entered at 2s/ld advanced to 2s/1.38d. Sterling per yard. 
54" black and blue beaver L. W. 15, and 54" black boucle No. 165, entered at ls/5Jd. 

advanced to ls/5. 76d. Sterling per yard. 
54" black knit fabrics, 215 entered at 2s/8d advanced to 2s/8.48d. Sterling per yard. 
54/55" black knit fabrics 198 &c, entered at 2s/10d. advanced to 2s/10.51d. Sterling 

per yard. 
54" blue melton, 141 entered at ls/6Jd. advanced to ls/6.78d Sterling per yard. 
54" black and blue melton, 191 entered at ls/ld advanced to Is /1.20d. Sterling per 

yard. 
54" fancy knit fabrics, 189/5 entered at 2s/7d advanced to 2s/7.47d. Sterling per 

yard. 



~ "'.! !• Mfs. of goat hair and eotton, etc. — Continued. 

53" black, 226 entered al Is lod. advanced to ls/l0.33d. Sterling per yard! 

54" black, L87 entered al 2s/lld. advanced to 2s/11.53d. Sterling per yard. 

54" blue boucle, 172 entered at 2s/6d. advanced to 2s/6.45d. Sterling per yard. 

54" fancy mantling, 177/4 entered at 3s/4d advanced to 3s/4.60d Sterling per yard. 

Less l/37th, discount 5 per cent. Add making up and packing. 

I is; i Sugar not above D. 8. from Toland & Range, Dantzig, Feb. 29, L896. 

Analysis 86.96, beetroot, invoiced at 12s/6d, less N. 1). charges, advanced lo lis 
/10.94d, Sterling per cwt., packed. 

I I 153 Sugar not above 16 />. 8. from J. B. Vicini, Macoris, Feb. 5, L896. 

Testing 96.30, entered at .02. 17, add bags, advanced to ./02. II!) U. S. dollars per lb., 
packed. 

I L978 Sugar not above 16 I). 8. from J. De Lomos, Santa Domingo, Feb. 20, L896. 

Testing 94.80, centrifugal, entered at .02.16 add bags, advanced to .02.515 U. S. 
currency per lb., packed. 

11075 Sugar not, above 16 D. S. from Emil I>u Banlay, St. Lucia, April 2, 1896. 

Testing 96.13, entered at .02.82, less N. D. charges, advanced to. 02.879 U. S. Currency 
per lb., packed. 

I 1072 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from J. Bueno & Co., Guantanamo, April 15, 1896. 

Testing 93.85, centrifugal, entered at .03. add bags, advanced to .03.08 Spanish gold 
per Spanish lb., packed. 

1 1050 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from Nicolas Castano, Cienfuogos, April 10, 1896. 

Testing 97.28, centrifugal, entered at .03.4 less freight advanced to .02.08 U. S. Gobi 

per lb., packed. 
Testing 00.55, molasses, entered at .02.5 less freight, advanced to .02.41 U. S. Gold 

per lb., packed. 
Deduct 1ST. D. charges. 

11042 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from A. C. Handler, Falmouth, March 30, 1896. 

Testing 91.20, entered at 11. 10s. lOd. advanced to 11. 17s. Id. Sterling per ton. 
packed. 

12042 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from Zuchscheverd & Benchill, Magdeburg, Feb. 24, 1896. 

Testing 81.04, entered at 10s/6.360d. less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to 
lls/0.56d. Sterling per cwt., packed. 

12015 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from C. Czarnikow, Antwerp, April 3, 1806. 

Testing 90.16, beetroot, entered at 12s/6d less freight and N. D. charges, advanced to 
12s/6.74d. Sterling per cwt., packed. 

12010 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from Magdeburg, Feb. 29, 1S06. 

Testing 82.56, beetroot, entered at lls./2.35875d. less freight and N". D. charges, 
advanced to lls/2.84d. Sterling per cwt., packed. 

12014 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from Eansohoff & Wissler, Bremerhaven, April 2, 1896. 

Testing 75.80, beetroot, entered at 10s/4Jd less freight & N. D. charges, advanced to 
10s/3.2d. Sterling per cwt., packed. 

11060 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from M. D. Foote, Antigua, April 2, 1896. 

Testing 86.60, entered at from .02.188 to .02.375 advanced to .02.35 U. S. Currency 

per lb., packed. 
Add weighing and marking to entered value. 



11811 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from Edward Benn & Sou, Bahai, Feb. 7, 1S96. 

Testing S3. 25, entered at 9s/6d less freight & N. D. Charges advanced to 9s/6d 
Sterling per cwt., packed. 

11911 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from Jno. A. Somerville, St. Kitts, Mar. 4, 1896. 

Testing 78.95, muscovado, entered at .02.42 less N. D. charges, reappraised to 01.721 

TJ. S. Currency per lb., packed. 
Testing 89.05, muscovado, entered at .02.42, less 1ST. D., charges, advanced to 02.5085 
TJ. S. Currency per lb., packed. 

12007 Sugar not above 16 D. S. from T. V. Drake & Co., Hamburg, March 3, 1896. 

Testing 81.532, invoiced at 10.375 less E". D. charges, deduct discount, advanced to 
11.19 marks per 50 kilos. 

11940 Sugar not above 16 B. S. from , St. Anns Bay, March 16, 1896. 

Testing 88.60, entered at .02.4375, advanced to 02.4S2 TJ. S. Dollars per lb., packed. 
11798 ~\ 

11P04 )■ Sugar not above 16 D. S. fromBoxwell, Williams & Co., Maceio, Jan. 8, Feb. 21, 17 1896. 

11603 J 

Entered at a total value of £14618. 12s. lid. advanced to 18/9.6 Sterling per 100 

kilos. 
Testing 85.86, invoiced at 10s/42d less freight & N. D. charges, advanced to 10/10"°, 

Sterling per cwt., packed. 
Testing 86.44, entered at a total value of £6923. 6s. Od. advanced to lis/- Sterling per 

cwt., packed. 
Testing 85.55, entered at a total of £11325. 5s. lid. advanced to 10s/8kl Sterling per 

cwt., packed. 

REAPPRAISEMENTS BY BOARDS. 
P 1 

[Sugar not above 16 D. S. from Robert Crooks & Co., Liverpool, Feb. 4, 1S96, Feb. 8, and 

p ' Mar. 6, 1S96. 

P I 

J 

Entered at 10s/ discount 2J per cent, advanced to lOs/ld. Sterling per cwt., net, 

packed. 

Entered at 10s/4kl discount 21 per cent, advanced to l.Os/fid. Sterling per cwt., net, 

packed. 
Entered at 10s/l]d, discount 21 per cent, advanced to 10s/3d Sterling per cwt., net, 

packed. 

I Mfs. of silJc and cotton, from Ruby & Co., Lyons, Oct. 2, 1895. 

Satin faconne 53 c/m, blanc, entered at 1.60 advanced to 1.75 Francs per meter. 
Mauresquine coul 68 and 90 c/m, entered at .63 advanced to .80 Franc per meter. 
Armure .Tile 46 c/m, Job lot, entered at .65 advanced to .75 Franc per meter. 
Serge coul 90 c/m, entered at .80 advanced to 1.05 Francs per meter. 
Serge noir 90 & 92 c/m, entered at 1.02 advanced to 1.15 Francs per meter. 
Satin blanc 60 c/m entered at .82 advanced to 1.25 Francs per meter. 
Satin blanc 69 c/m, entered at 1.30 advanced to 1.65 Francs per meter. 
Serge ecru 90 c/m, entered at .60 advanced to .85 Franc per meter. 
Discount 20 per cent. Add packing. 



3392.. 
11924. 



3190... 
1123(1. 



3344.. 
11771. 



3316... 
11588. 



2974 
1079 
2975 
10994 



3317.. 
11589. 



3295.... 
11082.. 
3296.... 
11083.. 
3297.... 
11182., 



[ Cotton lace curtains, from W. E. Meats & Co., Nottingham Jan. 24, 1896. 

Ecru curtains 3i yards, No. 6479, entered at 4s/ld advanced to 4s/6d Sterling per 

pair. 
W. T. curtains 3J yards, No. 7050 & 7036, entered at 5s/6d advanced to 6s/- Sterling 

per pair. 
E. M. curtains 3J yards, No. 6495, entered at 4s/2d advanced to 4s/8d Sterling per 

pair. 
Discount 2* per cent, less inland carriage, add cases. 
| Mfs. of wood, N. 8. P. F., from L. Bennusskendorf, Altenaw, Jan. 30, 1896. 

Wood pulp, entered at 6. advanced to 6.75 Marks per 100 kilos. 
"" [ Gelatine, from P. Drelcher & Co., Hochst a Main, Mar. 25, 1896. 

Gelatine white 4 b silver label, entered at 155. advanced to 171. Marks per 100 kilos. 
Gelatine white 5, copper label, entered at 140. advanced to 156.75 Marks per 100 kilos. 
Gelatine white 3 silver label, entered at 180. advanced to 194.75 Marks per 100 kilos. 
■" 1 Mfs. of wool & cotton, from Chas. Semon & Co., Bradford, Mar. 18, 1896. 

52/54" cloakings 1799/1, entered at 2s/8d advanced to 2s/8.80d Sterling per yard. 
54" black union cloth, 1941, entered at ls/lOd advanced to ls/10.55d. Sterling per yard. 
54" chinchilla, 1896/1 entered at 3s/4d advanced to 3s/5d Sterling per yard. 
52/54" black curls, 1782, entered at 2s/6d. advanced to 2s/6.75d. Sterling per yard. 
Less ^7-th. Discount 5 per cent. Add packing charges. 



1°™ 4 \ Wool dress goods, from Dazin, Notti Pils, Eoubaix, Dec. 23, 1895 and Jan. 16, 1896. 



Coating 12152, 104, 107 and black 112/114 c/m, entered at .80 advanced to 1.05 Francs 

per meter. 
Add packing. 
| Mfs. of wool and cotton, from Ferdinand Heilborn, Bradford, Mar. 19, 1896. 
54" blue boucle, 171, entered at 2s/ld advanced to 2s/1.38d. Sterling per yard. 
54" blue boucle, 166, entered at ls/8d advanced to ls/8.30d. Sterling per yard. 
54" blue boucle, 172, entered at 2s/6d, advanced to 2s/6.45d. Sterling per yard. 
54" black union melton, 141, entered at ls/6Jd advanced to ls/6.78d. Sterling per yard. 
54" black stockinette curl, 179, entered at 2s/- advanced to 2s/-.36d. Sterling per yard. 
54" black stockinette curl, 186, entered at 2s/10d. advanced to 2s/10.51d. Sterling per 

yard. 
Less ^yth, discount 5 per cent, add making up and packing. 

Sugar not above 16 D. S. from Francke Hijos & Co., Havana, Jan. 23, 28 and Feb. 6, 1896. 

Testing 93.879, entered at .021 less freight, & N D charges advanced to .02.618 U.S. 

Gold per lb., packed. 
Testing 93.8957, entered at .021 less freight, & N D charges advanced to .02.601, U. S. 

Gold per lb., packed. 
Testing 95.35, centrifugal, entered at .021 less freight and N D charges advanced to 

.02.599 U. S. Gold per lb., packed. 



3269 

„ 27 o \W S - of straw, from Conti & Mannozzi, Florence, March, 23, 1896. 



Monach pointe, 2nd. quality, Eef. 140, No. 17, entered at 9.50 advanced to 13.45 Lire 

per dozen. 
Monach pointe 2nd. quality, Eef. 140, No. 18, entered at 10.50, advanced to 14.95 Lire 

per dozen. 
Monach pointe 1st quality, Eef. 161 No. 19, entered at 12.50 advanced to 17.35 Lire 

per dozen. 
Monach pointe 1st. quality Eef. 161, No. 20, entered at 13.50, advanced to 18.55 Lire 

per dozen. 
Monach pointe 1st. quality Eef. 161 No. 22, entered at 16.50 advanced to 21.30 Lire 

per dozen. 
Monach pointe 2nd. quality Eef. 140, No. 18, entered at 11.50 advanced to 15.95 Lire 

per dozen. 
Monach pointe 1st. quality Eef. 161, No. 21, entered at 15. advanced to 20.05 Lire 

per dozen. 
Monach pointe 2nd. quality, Eef. 140, No. 12, entered at 4. advanced to 5.45 Lire per 

dozen. 
Monach pointe, 2nd. quality, Eef. 140, No. 13, entered at 5.50 advanced to 7.15 Lire 

per dozen. 
Monach pointe 2nd. quality Eef. 140, No. 14, entered at 6.50 advanced to 8.75 Lire 

per dozen. 
Monach pointe, 2nd. quality Eef. 140, No. 15, entered at 7.50 advanced to 10.35 Lire 

per dozen. 
Monach pointe 2nd. quality Eef. 140, No. 16, entered at 8.50 advanced to 11.95 Lire 

per dozen. 
Monach pointe 2nd. quality Eef. 140, No. 17, entered at 9.50 advanced to 13.45 Lire 

per dozen. 
Monach pointe 2nd. quality Eef. 140, No. 20, entered at 12.50 advanced to 18.05 Lire 

per dozen. 
Monach pointe 2nd. quality Eef. 140, No. 21, entered at 14. advanced to 19.55 Lire per 

dozen. 
Monach pointe 2nd. quality, Eef. 140, No. 22, entered at 15.50 advanced to 20.80 Lire 

per dozen. 
Monach pointe, 1st. quality Eef. 161, No. 12, entered at 4.50 advanced to 5.95 Lire 

per dozen. 
Monach pointe 1st. quality, Eef. 161, No. 13, entered afr 6. advanced to 7.65 Lire per 

dozen. 
Monach, pointe, 1st. quality, Eef. 161 No. 14, entered at 7.50 advanced to 9.25 Lire 

per dozen. 
Monach pointe, 1st. quality Eef. 161 No. 15, entered at 8.50 advanced to 10.85 Lire 

per dozen. 
Monach pointe, 1st. quality, Eef. 161, No. 16, entered at 9.50 advanced to 12.45 Lire 

per dozen. 



3269 

in;:: 
3270 
L1680 



.'..V-,', 1 ' j J//V of straw, etc.— Continued. 



Monad] pointe, 1st. quality, Bef. Hi, No. 17, entered at LO. 50 advanced to 13.95 Lire 

per dozen. 
Monaci pointe, tab. quality, Kef. 161, No. 18, entered at 1 1.50 advanced to 15.95 Lire 

per dozen. 

Add getting at 3.50 Lire per do/en, add lor eases and packing I. Lira per dozen. 



PROPER DISPOSITION OF CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT. 



1S96. 
Department Circular No. 89. 

Division of Public Moneys, 

office of THE SECRETARY, 



3*i*easnrtj gjepartumtt, 



Washington, D. C.,June 11, 1896. 

Section 3621, Eevised Statutes of the United States, as amended by section 5 of the Legislative, 
Executive, and Judicial Appropriation Act, approved May 28, 1896, requires that the Treasurer and 
assistant treasurers of the United States and all national bank depositaries shall transmit forthwith to 
the Secretary of the Treasury the original of every certificate of deposit issued by them and deliver 
to the depositor the remainder of the set. 

Accordingly the instructions on this subject contained in Department Circular No. 18, dated February 
2. 1894, are hereby revoked and the following regulations are hereby prescribed, to take effect July 
1, 1896. 

The originals of all certificates issued for the deposit of any and all public moneys of^every character 
and description, except as stated in the next succeeding paragraph, must be forwarded immediately upon their 
issuance to the Secretary of the Treasury by the depositaries, who, before transmitting them, should see 
that their amounts correspond with the amounts actually deposited with them. 

EXCEPTIONS. 

Those issued by an assistant treasurer for the shipment of silver coin, in duplicate, the original to be 
transmitted by the assistant treasurer to the office from which the coin is to be shipped, and the duplicate 
to the depositor ; those issued by a national bank depositary for shipment of silver coin, in duplicate, the 
original to be transmitted by the depositary to the Treasurer of the United States and the duplicate to the 
depositor ; those issued for 5 per cent redemption fund and for the transfer of funds from one depositary 
to another, in duplicate, the origiual to be transmitted by the depositary to the Treasurer of the United States 
and the duplicate to the depositor ; and those issued for the deposit of moneys pertaining to the Post-Office 
Department, in duplicate, the original to be transmitted by the depositary to the Auditor for the Post- 
Office Department and the duplicate to the depositor. 

Certificates of deposit should be issued and disposed of as hereinafter provided, and in no case should 
a second or duplicate set of certificate be issued for any deposit, except upon special authority from the 
Secretary of the Treasury, viz : 

ON ACCOUNT OP CUSTOMS, ETC. 

Those issued in the name of customs officers at ports where naval officers are located, on account of 
duties on imports, etc., including repayments of disbursing funds, in triplicate; those issued in the name 
of customs officers at other ports, in duplicate; the originals of the former class to be transmitted by the 
depositary to the Secretary of the Treasury, the duplicates to the naval officers and the triplicates to the 
depositors ; and of the latter class, the originals to the Secretary of the Treasury and the duplicates to 
the depositors. 



INTERNAL REVENUE. 

Those issued in the name of collectors of internal revenue on account of internal-revenue collections, 
internal-revenue stamps, or repayments of disbursing funds, in triplicate; the original to be transmitted by 
the depositary to the Secretary of the Treasury and the remainder of the set to the depositor, who should 
forward the duplicate to the Commissioner of Internal Revenue and retain the triplicate. 

SALES OF PUBLIC LANDS, ETC. 

Those issued in the name of receivers of public moneys on account of sales of public lands, etc., 
including repayments of disbursing funds, in triplicate; the original to be transmitted by the depositary to 
the Secretary of the Treasury and the remainder of the set to the depositor, who should forward the 
duplicate to the Commissioner of the General Land Office and retain the triplicate. 

JUDICIARY. 

Those issued in the name of judicial officers, district attorneys, marshals, clerks of court, etc., in 
duplicate; the original to be transmitted by the depositary to the Secretary of the Treasury and the 
duplicate to the depositor. 

ARMY AND NAVY. 

Those issued in the name of military or naval officers, on account of repayments, sales of public 
property, or otherwise, in duplicate; the original to be transmitted by the depositary to the Secretary of 
the Treasury and the duplicate to the depositor. 

SURVEYS OF PUBLIC LANDS. 

Those issued on account of surveys of public lands, in triplicate; the original to be transmitted by the 
depositary to the Secretary of the Treasury, and the remainder of the set to the depositor, who should 
forward the duplicate to the Surveyor-General and retain the triplicate. 

PATENT FEES. 

Those issued ou account of patent fees, in triplicate; the original to be transmitted by the depositary 
to the Secretary of the Treasury, and the remainder of the set to the depositor, who should forward the 
duplicate to the Commissioner of Patents and retain the triplicate. 

SEMI-ANNUAL DUTY. 

Those issued on account of semi-annual duty, in triplicate; the original to be transmitted by the 
depositary to the Secretary of the Treasury, and the remainder of the set to the depositor, who should 
forward the duplicate to the Treasurer of the "United States and retain the triplicate. 

MISSING COUPONS. 

Those issued on account of coupons missing from bonds forwarded for redemption, or otherwise, in 
duplicate; both the original and duplicate to be transmitted by the depositary to the Secretary of the 
Treasury. 

LOANS, INTEREST ON THE PUBLIC DEBT, CIVIL REPAYMENTS, CONSULAR FEES, MISCELLANEOUS AND 

OTHER RECEIPTS. 

Those issued on account of subscriptions to any loan, repayments of interest on the public debt, 
civil repayments, except as hereinbefore otherwise provided for, consular fees, miscellaneous and other 



receipts, in duplicate; the original to be transmitted by the depositary to the Secretary of the Treasury 
and the duplicate to the depositor. 

secretary's special accounts. 

Those issued for deposits to the credit of the Secretary of the Treasury, special accounts Nos. 1 and 
5, in triplicate; the originals to be transmitted by the depositary to the Secretary of the Treasury, and the 
remainder of the set to the depositor ; those issued to the credit of the Secretary of the Treasury, special 
account No. 3, in duplicate, the original to be transmitted by the depositary to the Secretary of the Treas- 
ury and the duplicate to the depositor. 

The depositor should forward the duplicate pertaining to account No. 1 to the Commissioner of 
Internal Eevenue and retain the triplicate ; he should forward the duplicate pertaining to account No. 5 
to the Solicitor of the Treasury and retain the triplicate ; he should retain the duplicate pertaining to 
account No. 3. 

DISBURSING OFFICERS' RECEIPTS. 

For each deposit made to the official credit of a disbursing officer a single receipt should be issued 
and delivered to the depositor. 

GENERAL REMARKS. 

In no case are certificates of deposit required to be filed with accounts rendered by Government 
officers to the accounting officers of the Treasury Department, nor does such a disposition of any 
certificates of deposit secure to the officers transmitting them proper credits in their accounts. Credit for 
^eposits is given officers in the settlement of their accounts only upon warrants issued by the Secretary 
of the Treasury, based upon the report of the depositary and verified by the original certificate of 
deposit. In taking credit in their accounts current, however, for money deposited, officers should state 
specifically the date of deposit, with whom deposited, and the source from which the money was derived. 
All original certificates issued for deposits by military, naval, and other officers, the amounts of which are 
required to be recorded in any of the bureaus of the "War, Navy, Interior, or other Executive Departments, 
will, immediately upon their receipt by the Secretary of the Treasury, be compared with the proper 
depositary account, recorded, and forwarded to the head of the Department to which the deposits pertain 
for designation of the proper appropriations, etc. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



REGULATIONS FOR THE DEPOSIT OF PUBLIC MONEYS. 



%tzk$vlx\} geparttujetxt, 



1S96. 
Department Circular No. 90. 

Division of Public MoneyB. 

Office of THE SECRETARY, 
Washington, D. C, June 12, 1896. 

To Collectors and Surveyors of Customs, Collectors of Internal Revenue, Receivers of Public Moneys, 
Marshals, Clerks of Courts, and all other Officers or Agents of the United States engaged in 
Collecting, Depositing, or Transmitting Public Moneys : 

The following regulations, based upon specific provisions of existing laws, for the violation of which 
penalties of a severe character are provided, are hereby prescribed, and a strict compliance therewith 
enjoined : 

COLLECTIONS. 

Collectors and surveyors of customs, collectors of internal revenue, and receivers of public moneys, 
living in the same city or town with the Treasurer or an assistant treasurer of the United States, or a 
national bank depositary, must deposit their receipts at the close of each day. Officers at such a distance 
from a depositary that daily deposits are impracticable must forward their receipts as often as they 
amount to $1,000, and at the end of each month without regard to the amount then accumulated. 

All collections must be deposited to the credit of the Treasurer of the United States, except moneys 
received by collectors of internal revenue from sales under section 3460, Revised Statutes of the United 
States, or from offers of compromise when received prior to the acceptance of the offer, which must be deposited 
to the credit of the Secretary of the Treasury. 

District attorneys, marshals, and clerks of courts, who receive public moneys accruing to the United 
States from fiues, penalties and forfeitures, fees, costs (includiug costs in civil and criminal suits for viola - 
lation of the postal laws), forfeitures of recognizances, debts due the United States, interest on such debts, 
sales of public property, or from any other sources, except as stated below, will deposit the same in 
accordance with the foregoing paragraphs. Moneys accruing from customs (including navigation) should 
be paid to the collector or surveyor of customs of the district in which the case arose, a receipt accepted 
therefor to be sent to the Solicitor of the Treasury. Moneys accruing from internal revenue cases should 
be paid to the collector of internal revenue of the district in which the case arose, a receipt accepted 
therefor to be sent to the Commissioner of Internal Eevenue. Moneys accruing from civil post-office suits, 
and_/wies in criminal cases for violation of the postal laws should be deposited to the credit of the Treas- 
urer of the United States for the use of the Post- Office Department. 

The Department encourages the practice of a deputy collector depositing directly with a depositary 
in the name of his principal, believing that greater economy and dispatch will thereby be attained. In 
such cases the deputy will see that certificates are issued in the name of the collector for whom he is 
acting, to whom he should forward the portion of the set received by him from the depositary. 

DISBURSING FUNDS. 

Disbursing officers or agents must deposit disbursing funds to their official credit and draw upon such 
funds in their official capacity only. Unless otherwise directed, they must deposit such moneys with the 



2 

Treasurer or an assistant treasurer <>l the United States, or a national bank depositary if specially author- 
ized by the Secretary of the Treasury for that purpose under the provisions of section 3620, Revised 
Statutes of the United States. In case no such special authority has been given to a convenient deposi- 
tary, application should be made to the Secretary of the Treasury tor such authorization. 

Reference is hereby made to Department's Circulars of March 12, 1889, relative to the transporta- 
tion of public moneys by express: August 24, 1876, relative to disbursing funds; November 28, 1879, 
and June 2, 1882, relative to offers of compromise, and June 11, 1896, concerning the issuance and dispo 
sition of certificates of deposit ; also, to Act of Congress of January 22, 1894, sections 3216, 3218, 3617, 
3620, 3621, (as amended by act of May 28, 1896,) 3625, and 5481 to 5505, inclusive, of the Revised Statues 
of the United States. 

This circular supersedes circular regulations for the deposit of public moneys, dated January 12, 1888. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



REVOCATION OF CIRCULAR REQUIRING CHARGES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF 
NATIONAL BANK NOTES FOR REDEMPTION TO BE PAID BY SENDERS. 



grjeastxrtj ^tpuxtmmt. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 91. 

Treasurer's Office, No, 65 

Office of THE TREASURER, 

Washington, D C, June 13, 1896. 
Circular No. 174, of November 17, 1893, requiring the charges for the transportation of national- 
bauk notes to the Treasurer of the United States for redemption, under the act of June 20, 1874, to be 
paid by the senders, is hereby revoked, to take effect on and after July 1, 1896. 

D. N. MORGAN, 

Treasurer U. S. 
Approved : 

J. G. CARLISLE, 

Secretary of the Treasury. 



CIVIL SERVICE CLASSIFICATION, TREASURY DEPARTMENT 



1896- 
Departinent Circular No. 92. 

Division of Appointments. 



*Qxci\suv\$ ^zjpKxtm&nt, 



Office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, JD. C, June 13, 1896. 

By direction of the President of the United States, and in accordance with the third clause of section 
6 of the Act entitled 'An Act to regulate and improve the civil service of the United States," approved 
January 16, 1883 : 

It is ordered, That the officers and employees in or under this Department included within the provi- 
sions of the civil service law and rules be, and they are hereby, arranged in the following classes : 

Class A, all persons receiving an annual salary of less than $720, or a compensation at the rate of 
less than $720 per annum. 

Class B, all persons receiving an annual salary of $720 or more, or a compensation at the rate of $720 
or more, but less than $840 per annum. 

Class C, all persons receiving an annual salary of $S40 or more, or a compensation at the rate of $840 
or more, but less than $900 per annum. 

Class D, all persons receiving an annual salary of $900 or more, or a compensation at the rate of $900 
or more, but less than $1,000 per annum. 

Class E, all persons receiving an annual salary of $1,000 or more, or a compensation at the rate of 
$1,000 or more, but less than $1,200 per annum. 

Class 1, all persons receiving an annual salary of $1,200 or more, or a compensation at the rate of 
$1,200 or more, but less than $1,400 per annum. 

Class 2, all persons receiving an annual salary of $1,400 or more, or a compensation at the rate of 
$1,400 or more, but less than $1,600 per annum. 

Class 3, all persons receiving an annual salary of $1,600 or more, or a compensation at the rate of 
$1,600 or more, but less than $1,800 per annum. 

Class 4, all persons receiving an annual salary of $1,800 or more, or a compensation at the rate of 
$1,800 or more, but less than $2,000 per annum. 

Class 5, all persons receiving an annual salary of $2,000 or more, or a compensation at the rate of 
$2,000 or more, but less than $2,500 per annum. 

Class 6, all persons receiving an annual salary of $2,500 or more, or a compensation at the rate of 
$2,500 or more, per annum. 

It is provided, That this classification shall not include persons appointed to an office by and with the 
advice and consent of the Senate, nor persons employed as mere laborers or workmen; but all positions 
whose occupants are designated as laborers or workmen, and who were, prior to May 6, 1896, and are now, 
regularly assigned to work of the same grade as that performed by classified employees, shall be included 
within this classification. Hereafter, no person who is appointed as a laborer or workman, without 



examination under the civil service sules, shall be assigned to work of the same grade as that performed 
by classified employees. 

II is also ordered, That no person shall be admitted into any place not excepted from examination by 
the civil service rules, in any of the classes above designated, until he shall have passed an appropriate 
examination prepared by the United States Civil Service Commission and his eligibility has been certified 
lo this Department by said Commission. 

J. G. CARLISLE, 

Secretary. 



REAPPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



treasury gjep&rtmmt, 



1S96, 
Department Circular No, 93. 

Division of Customs. 

office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, June 15, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The following reappraisenients of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending May 29, 1896. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING MAY 29, 1896. 

Jf. B. — In corresponding with the Board of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference should always be made to the number of Meappraisement. 

No. of Reappraise- 
ment. 

11677 1 

11fi „ 9 [■ Manufactures of flax from Eegenhart, Eozmann, Freiwaldau, Feb. 28, 1896. 

Napkins, white hem-st. 500, entered at 1.95 florins per dozen; no advance. 

Cloths 5/4, white hem-st. 285, entered at .93 florins per piece; no advance. 

Tray cloths, 20/28, white hem-st., entered at 5.65 florins per dozen ; no advance. 

Sets of cloths, 10/12/22, entered at 10.70 florins per piece ; no advance. 
11987 CoVd cot. velvet unbleached, from Hithersay & Eanini, Manchester, April 17/96. 

22 in blk. velvet ends, qual. 25, entered at 816.. per yd.; no advance. 

22 in. blk. velvet ends, qual. 24, entered at 8d. per yd.; advanced to 8Jd. per yd. 

24 in. blk. velvet ends, qual. 120, entered at Sid., advanced to 9d. per yd. 

24 in. blk. velvet ends, qual. 125, entered at 8|d., advanced to 9Jd. per yd. 

27 iu. picker velvets, qual. W, entered at 7Jd., advanced to 8d. per yd. 

27 in. Picker cords, qual. 621x, entered at 8, advanced to Sid. per yd. 

27 in. Fawn (24) Cords, qual. 400, entered at 14f d. per yd. ; no advance. 

Less yT-th. 

11 in. blk. skirt binding (Crescent), entered at 6/9 per gross; no advance. 

li in. blk. skirt binding (Shield), entered at 4/3 pei gross ; no advance. 

27 in. brown Con. cord ends, 97, entered at 18d. per yd ; no advance. 

Similar goods ; no advance. 

Less ^th on cords. 

Less 2J per cent discount on all above. 

Add cases. 

Add making up and boxing cords, at lOd. 



2 

[If?? } Mft. of metal, from Ohr. Wandel, Reutligen, .March 7/96. 

Wire cloths, No. 90, entered al 7 minks persq. meter; ao advance. 

Add packing. 
12226 M/x. of metal, from Co-operative Knitting Machine Co., Leicester, May 25, L896. 

Knitting machines, entered at G60, advanced to B210 per total. 
L1666 Ufa. 8Uk& Oot. from Ruby & Co., Lyons, Men. 14/96. 

92 c/m serge ooir, (32), entered at LOO, advanced to LOS francs per meter. 

92 c/m serge coir, (39), entered at L10, advanced to L20 francs per meter. 

48 satin col'd, entered at 1.25 francs per meter; no advance. 

60 c/m satin blanc, entered at L10, advanced to 1.20 francs per meter. 

60 c/m satin blanc, entered at 1.70, advanced to 1.75 francs per meter. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

Add packing charges. 
1 L829 Wool dressgoods, from Theodor Fierz, Zurich, March 18, 1896. 

76 c/m chatties, entered at .68, advanced to .70 francs per meter. 

76 c/m challies, entered at .70 to .75 francs per meter ; no advance. 

78 c/m silk striped challies, entered at 1.29, 1.31, 1.33 francs per meter ; no advance. 

78 c/m silk striped challies, entered at 1.37 francs per meter ; no advance. 

Discount 2 per cent. 

Add cases and packing. 
11!)!):; Oot, Galloons, from Carl Hinnenberg & Son, Schwelm, April 1, 1896. 

Cotton tape, 450/3:1, entered at 1.96, advanced to 2.80 marks per piece of 200 yds. 

450/5 cotton tape, entered at 2.66, advanced to 3.90 marks per piece of 200 yds. 

Discount 3 per cent. 

Carriage deducted on entry ; disallowed on reappraisement. 
12097 



\}' : l* \ Cot. netting & cot. lace curtains, from B. Walker & Co., Nottingham, Apr. 2, 24, 30, 1896. 

11020.'..'. j 

Wt. curtains, 1750, 3? yds., 54 in., entered at 2/2, advanced to 2/6 per pair. 

Wt. curtains, 1922, 3' yds., 60 in., entered at 2/3z advanced to 2/62 per pair. 

Ivory curtains, 1930, 3i yds., 60 in., entered at 2/3}. advanced to 2/6» per pair. 

Ecru curtains, 189, 3 $ yds., 43 in., entered at 1/1, advanced to 1/2 per pair. 

Ivory cot. Hambg. net, 1010, 54 in., entered at 6}, advanced to 6|d. per yard. 

Ecru cot. Hambg. net, 501, 50 in., entered at 5 2 d. per yd.; no advance. 

Ecru cot. Hambg. net, 1002, 50 in., entered at 61, advanced to 63d. per yard. 

"White cot. Hambg. net 62-94, 50 in., entered at 4J, advanced to 5d. per yard. 

Similar goods, similar advances. 

Less 2i per cent discount. 

Add cases. 

Less inland carriage. 

12103 Cot. lace curtains, from Knauth, Nachod & Kuhne, Nottingham, April 30, 1896. 

Ivory curtains, 3$ yds., 52 in., 1701, entered at 5/4, advanced to 5/10 per pair. 

Ecru & ivory curtains, 50 in., 1918, 3 2 yds., entered at 2/2, advanced to 2/4 per paii 

Ivory curtains, 3i yds., 52 in., 3961, entered at 3/9, advanced to 4/- per pair. 

Ecru curtains, 3} yds., 43 in., 189, entered at 1/1, advanced to 1/2 per pair. 

Less discount 2i per cent, 

Add cases. 

Less freight. 



12181 SilJc hdkfs. Mfs. silk &c (white habutai), from Kaitsio Gomei Kiraisha, Tokio, April 16, 1896. 

21-U White H. S. hdkfs. E2103, entered at 2.63, advanced to 2.85 S. Ten per dozen. 
23-1} White H. S. hdkfs. No. B2306, entered at 3.18, advanced to 3.48 S. Yen per dozen. 
White H. S. Hdkfs. B1205 12-J, entered at .91, advanced to .99 S. Yen per dozen. 
White H. S. hdkfs., D2101 21-1, entered at 2.82, advanced to 3.07 S. Yen, per dozen. 
White H. S. hdkfs., D1856, 18-1} entered at 2.35, advanced to 2.55 S. Yen per dozen. 
White habutai, No. 42, 26-50 entered at 14.11, advanced to 14.45 S. Yen per piece. 
Add cases and packing. 

12112 \CoVd cot. velvet unbl'd, cot. velvet & corduroy, from Hithersay & Rainm, Manchester' 

12192 j April 24, 1896. 

24 in. Blk. velvet, No. 29, entered at 9V, advanced to lOld. per yd. 

24 in. Blk. velvet, No. 30, entered at 9}, advanced to 103d. per yd. 

22 in. blk. velvet, 26x, entered at 9}, advauced to 9Jd. per yd. 

24 in. Blk. velvet, 120, entered at 84, advanced to 9d. per yd. 

191 in. blk. velvet, 21, entered at 7, advanced to 7|d. per yd. 

27 in. Picker V teens, W, entered at 7 J, advanced to 8d. per yd. 

27 in. Picker cords, 621x, entered at 8, advanced to 8Jd. per yard. 

22 in. Blk. velvet, 50, entered at 5, advanced to 5 id. per yd. 

24 in. Blk. velvet, 125, entered at 81, advanced to 9Jd. per yd. 

19 in. Blk. velvet, 19, entered at 51, advanced to 6d. per yd. 

27 in. picker cords, qual. M. B., entered at 51, advauced to 6}d. per yd. 

Less ^-th. 

Less 2* per cent discount. 

Add cases, making up and boxing. 

11998 ") 

12120 > CoVd cot. corduroy, from Hardt & Co., Manchester, Apr. 24/96. 

12121 ) 

27 in. "B" cot. cords, 537a, entered at Hid. per yd.; no advance. 

28 in. Blk. & Wht. Partridge cords, 708, entered at 11f, advauced to 12Id. per yard. 
28 in. drab II cot. cords, 537 a, entered at 9 T 9 F d. per yd. ; no advance. 

27 in. dk. drab II, cot. cords, 560, entered at Sid. per yd.; no advance. 

28 in. cream cot. cords, 24, entered at lOff, advanced to Hid. per yd. 
Less ^ 7 th. 

Less discount 2f per cent. 
Add cases. 

11430.. Soap n. s. p.f., from C. C. Bartley, Birmingham, Feb. 8, 1896. 

Qts. soft soap, entered at 9/6, advanced to 10/- per doz. 
Pts. soft soap, entered at 6/-, advanced to 6/6 per doz/. 
Add casks. 

12196 Mfs. Cot. & Metal, from S. Shehfg, Damascus, April 3, 1896. 

Curtains, entered at 42.20, advanced to 46 piasters per pair. 
Curtains, entered at 40, advanced to 44 piasters per pair. 
Curtains, entered at 37.20, advanced to 40 piasters per pair. 
Table covers, entered at 22.20, advanced to 24 piasters per piece. 
Table covers, entered at 19, advanced to 20 piasters each. 
Similar goods, .similar advances. 



[jgQQ [ Fire crackers, from Melcliers & Co., Canton, Sep. 9/96. 

40/64 longstenimed firecrackers, entered at $.58}, advanced to $.59 Mexican currency 
per box. 

Less 2 per cent discount. 

Less export duty and boat and coolie hire. 

Lekin taxes deducted on entry ; disallowed on reappraisement. 
L2155 Firecrackers, from Canton, Nov. 14/95. 

Cannon crackers, 40/40, entered at $.71 Mexican currency per box; no advance. 

Less 2 per cent discount. 

Less export duly, and boat and coolie hire. 

Importer deducts Lekin taxes; disallowed on reappraisenient. 
12154 Firecrackers, from Carlowitz, Canton, May 16/96. 

2" Cannon crackers, 40/40 entered at .73 1 Mex. currency ; reappraised at $.73 per box. 

Less 2 per cent discount. 

Importer deducts Leking taxes ; disallowed on reappraisement. 

Less export duty and boat and coolie hire. 
12111 Precious stones uncut, from B. Schlesinger, Antwerp, May 1, 1896. 

Diamonds, entered at $400, advanced to $1600 per total. 
11591 Wool felt, from Ignaz Sgalitzer, Wien, Feb. 29/96. 

B Hamsnerfilz, 27 x 4, entered at 3.20, advanced to 3.50 crowns per lb. 

A Hamsnerfilz, 28x4, entered at 3.64, advanced to 4.00 crowns per lb. 

Discount 2 per cent. Add case. 
L2113 Fans, from Zee Chong, Hong Kong, Feb. 28/96. 

Bone handle palm leaf fans, entered at $7.56, advanced to $18.90 Mexican currency, 
per total of 252 pieces. 

Bamboo handle palm leaf fans, entered at $2.10, advanced to $4.80 Mexican currency, 
per total of 60 pieces. 

Horn handle palm leaf fans, entered at $.30, advanced to $.72 Mexican currency, per 
total of 12 pieces. 

Similar goods, similar advances. 

Packing chgs. included in prices. 

11770 ) 

1 2 1 34 [ Chemical preparation, from Fahlberg List & Co. , Saltke- Westerhusen, Mar. 14/96. 

12135 ) 

Saccharine Brand B, entered at 52.95, advanced to 58.00 marks per kilo pkd. 

Do. Brand B, entered at 57. 73, advanced to 58. 00 marks per kilo pkd. 

Add packing charges and cases. 
12058 Refined sugar above No. 16 D. S., from E. Crooks & Co., Liverpool, April 24, 1896. 

Fourths, entered at 13/-, advanced to 13/3 per cwt. pkd. 

Sugar not above 16 D. S., Fifths, entered at 10/9, advanced to 11 '3 per cwt. pkd. 

Discount 21 per ceut. 

Bags included. 
11822 Sugar not above 16 D. 8., from Boxwell, "Williams & Co., Pemambuco, Feb. 17/96. 

Sugar, test 85.47, entered at 9/5 3/10, advanced to 10/2 7/10 per cwt pkd. 
11981 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from Ker & Co., Iloilo, Feb. 4/96. 

Sugar entered at 4.62}, advanced to 4.825 Manilla currency per picule, packed. 

Sugar entered at 4.25, advanced to 4.45 Manilla currency per picule, packed. 

Sugar entered at 4.00, advanced to 4.20 Manilla currency per picule packed. 



12006 Sugar not above No. 16 B. 8., from Bea Bellido, Matanzas, April 17/96. 

Centrifugal sugar, test 95.20, entered at $.02813, advanced to $.02936 per lb. pkd. 
12034 Sugar not above Wo. 16 B. 8., from S. V. Drake & Co., Madgeburg, March 16, 1896. 

Sugar, test 79.60, entered at 9.634, advanced to 10.785 marks per 50 kilos pkd. 
12075 Stigar not above No. 16 B. 8., from F. Clarke, St. Anns Bay, April 18, 1896. 

Sugar, test 87.40, entered at £11/10/0, advanced to £11/1/7 per ton pkd. 

Cost of bags included in entered price. 

}^. Q . | Sugar not above No. 16 B. S., from Bansohoff & Wessler, Eotterdam, March 28/96, & Mch. 

|K:::::::::::j 26 / 96 - 

Beetroot sugar, analysis 77.65, entered at 9/7, advanced to 10/7.475 per ewt. pkd. 

Beetroot sugar, analysis S9.54, entered at 11/7.12, advanced to 12/5.56 per ewt. pkd. 

Beetroot sugar, analysis 89.40, entered at 11/7, advanced to 12/5.6 per cwt. pkd. 
12146 Sugar not above No. 16 B. S., from E. J. Sadlis, Sav.la Mar, April 23, 1896. 

Musco. sugar, test 91.18, entered at 11/10/0, advanced to 11/17/0 per ton pkd. 

Bags included in price. 
12148 Sugar not above No. 16 B. S., from William Kerr, Montego Bay, April 8, 1896. 

Baw muscarado sugar, test 88.60, entered at £9/-/-, advanced to £11/0/3} per ton pkd. 

Raw muscavado sugar, test 86.10, entered at 9/-/-, advanced to £10/14/2 per ton pkd. 

Add hhds. and packing at 11/- per hhd., and bags and packing at 7d. per bag, to 
entered value. 
12141.... Sugar not above No. 16 B. 8., from Jose de Olozaga, Vera Cruz, April 1 96. 

Muscarado sugar, test 96.10, entered at $.02305, advanced to $.02592 per lb. pkd. 
11965 Sugar not above No. 16 B. 8., from The Colonial Company, Ltd., Trinidad, April 11, 1896. 

Centrifugal muscavado sugar, test 94.60, entered at $.0255, advanced to $.02725 per 
lb. pkd. 
12127 Sugar not above No. 16 B. S., from H. F. E. L. Aschoff, Batavia, Feb. 27/96. 

Java sugar, test, 97°, entered at 11/3, advanced to 11/11 2 per cwt. pkd. 

Phi ° P 1 Worsfed dress ff° ods > from A - Van Ber g en & Co -> Paris > A P ril 3 / 96 - 

1900 all wool blue black henriettas, 44 in., entered at 1.18, advanced to 1.26 francs 
per meter. 

Less 5 per cent discount. 

Add cases and packing. 

To entered price add making up and bands. 

Add cases and packing. 
11816 Mfs. Silk & cotton, from H. E. Schneiwind, Elberfield, April 9/96. 

24 J Crav. art. 248, entered at .70, advanced to .85 marks per meter. 

24 J Fig. satin, C. H. 319, entered at .91, advanced to .98 marks per meter. 

24 J Crav. art. 276, entered at 1.05, advanced to 1.18 marks per meter. 

24 J. Dam. swivel, E. H. 207, entered at 2.25 marks per meter; no advance. 

24 J, Fancy H. F., entered at 1.55. advanced to 1.70 marks per meter. 

24 J, Fancy E, 100/193} entered at 1.46, advanced to 1.55 marks per meter. 

12000 .Mfs. Silk & Got, from Albert Lehmann, Lyons, April 18/96. 

3 J creme Rubans. No. 100, entered at 24.00, advanced to 26.00 francs per 1000 meters'. 

Discounts 20 per cent and 2 per cent. 

60 c/m Bengaline No. 5774, entered at .95, advanced to 1.05 francs per meter. 



12000 Mfs. Sill; ,(• Cat., etc.— Continued. 

49 c/iii Faille faconne, No. 5765, entered at 1.65 francs per meter; no advance. 

60 c/m Bengaline, 5542, entered at 1.00, advanced to 1.15 francs per meter. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

Packing, etc. included in price. 
L1970 Mfs. Bilk & Cat., from Buby & Co., Lyons, April 22/96. 

Serge ecrne, 94 o/m, entered at .75. advanced to .79 francs per meter. 

Serge ecru 94 c/m, entered at .72."). advanced to .77 francs per meter. 

Add packing. 

Less 20 per cent discount. 
11966 Wfs. Silk & dot., from O. B. Bettman. Bheydt, April 15/96. 

122 Gloriosa L. S. Blk., entered at .98 marks per meter; no advance. 

112 Gloriosa L. S. Cordeaux, entered at .953 marks per meter; no advance. 

120/2 Gloriosa A. V. Blk.. entered at .98 marks per meter ; no advance. 

60/1 Gloriosa L. S. Blk., entered at .40 marks per meter; no advance. 

60/1 Gloriosa L. S. Blk., entered at .48 marks per meter; no advance. 

56 Gloriosa L. S. Cordeaux, entered at .47 J marks per meter; no advauce. 

Less inland freight. 
L2092 Mfs. Silk & Cot., from A.. Lehman, Lyons, April 28/96. 

60 c/m Bengaline No. 5846, col'd, entered at 1.00, advanced to 1.10 francs per meter. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

Cases and packing included in price. 
3046 o. p ) Sugar above m D 8} from Qebruder Michahelles, Hamburg, Mch. 23/96. 

Granulated sugar, entered at 13/10, reappraised at 13/8 per cwt. pkd. 

B° 3 t ° P 1 Sngar alove N °' 16 B ' S '' fr0m E ° bt " Crooks & Co -' Liver P° ol > A P ril 2 > 1896 - 

Standard granulated, entered at £14.17.5, advanced to £15 per ton pkd. 

Discount 2'. per cent. 

3033 o. p | s b No m D s from E Crooks & Co Liverpool, March 2, 1S96. 

Boston j J ' 

Sugar, entered at £12.2.5, advanced to £12.5.0 per ton, pkd. 

Discount 2 J per cent. 

Boston P } Chinese Mdse > from Honk-Kong, Dec. 2/95 

Medical glne, entered at $1.00, advanced to $2.60 Mex. currency. 

Brown sugar (not above 16 D. S.), entered at $23.00, advanced to $25.30 per total of 

10 boxes of 51 catties each, Mex. currency. 
Medical pills, entered at $7.00, Mex. currency per box ; no advance. 
Packages included, in price of goods. 

KEAPPBAISBMENTS BY BOARDS. 

2933 o.p ) 

748 [ Decorated earthenware, from Anthony Shaw & Co., Burslem, Feb. 6, 1896. 

Phila ) 

Dishes entered at discounts of 45 per cent, 5 per cent and 5 per cent, advanced to dis- 

counts of 40 per cent, 5 per cent and 5 per cent. 
Add case and straw. 



o.,-^ ■' '" y Wool dress goods, from Sonntag & Loscker, Bremen, April 18, 1896. 

No. 0592, 112 c/m, entered at 1.30, advanced to 1.50 marks per meter. 
No. 0601, 96 c/m, entered at 1.07, advanced to 1.30 marks per meter. 
No. 0617, 96 c/m, entered at 1.05, advanced to 1.25 marks per meter. 
No. 1000, 115 c/m, entered at 1.27, advanced to 1.60 marks per meter. 
No. 1005, 115 c/m, entered at 1.61, advanced to 2.02 marks per meter. 
No. 1003, 115 c/m, entered at 1.50, advanced to 1.90 marks per meter. 
Add packing charges. 

Lead pencils, from H. C. Kurz, Nurnberg, Feb. 22, 1S96. 
Ordinary assorted colors ; entered at 2.50, advanced to 4 marks per gross. 
Ordinary red and blue pencils ; entered at 2.50, advanced to 5.00 marks per gross. 
Add case. 

Printed music, from F. W. Garbricht, Leipzig, April 1, 1896. 
Bonvin, Op. 30 No. 1, 300, 4, 1J Papier druch, entered at 17.50, advanced to 36.00 

marks per total. 
1486 Bonvin, Op. 30 No. 2, 300, 3, 1£ papier druch, entered at 16.00, advanced to 
36.00 marks per total. 

Manufactures of wool, from Jacob Bobn, Aix la Chapelle, April 3, 1896. 

6/3 blk. worsteds, No. 18291/3 & 371 & 69, 180S4/5 & 95/6, 17943, 18460, 18370, 18297, 

17942/4, entered at 4.25, advanced to 4.65 marks per meter. 
Add packing. 

Manufactures of wool, from Crous & Hoffmann, Aachen, Feb. 20, 1896. 

Wool cloth, 1368/1 &c, entered at 4.20, advanced to 4.60 marks per meter. 
Wool cloth, 1532/2 &c, entered at 4.00, advanced to 4.40 marks per meter. 
Wool cloth, 1535/6 &c, entered at 3.50, advanced to 3.80 marks per meter. 
Wool cloth, 1528/1, entered at 4.00, advanced to 4.40 marks per meter. 
Wool cloth, 1535/3, entered at 3.50, advanced to 3.80 marks per meter. 
Wool cloth VI blk. 17 U &c, entered at 3.70, advanced to 4.00 marks per meter. 
Add case and packing. 

Printed matter, from F. W. Garbrecht, Leipzig, April 14, 1896. 

No. 1801, M. S. Brown, Mass in b flat, entered at 140., advanced to 280. marks per 

total. 
Add case and packing at .08 pfg. per sheet. 



Manufactures of metal (brass wire cloth), from Geo. Christie, Ltd., Glasgow, April 3, 1896. 

No. 70 mesh brass wire cloths, entered at 7d. , advanced to 8d. per sq. foot. 
No. 80 mesh brass wire cloths, entered at 8d., advanced to 9d. per sq. foot. 
Add cases and packing. 

Decorated China Plaques (Painting on porcelain'), from Franz J. Thallmaier, Munchen, Feb. 
26, 1896. 
Mignon, 25-40 m., entered at 170, advanced to 280 marks. 
Auf der Lauer, 20-33, entered at 120, advanced to 150 marks. 



iH„ I Decorated China Plaques [Painting on porcelain), etc. — Continued. 

-till'- j 

Liebesweibung, 16-23, entered at 50, advanced i<> !>»> marks. 

Echo. Ruth, Clarissa, entered at n>. advanced to 65 marks each. 

Magdalene, entered at 40, advanced to 80 marks. 

Lorelei, L9-25 m., entered at 60, advanced to 110 marks. 

Small Ein Ley & ein Ima, 12-15.5, entered at 20, advanced to 40 marks. 

Add ease and packing. 

1 ,°' i: - :!) } Olives, from Joan di Diosdi Soto, Sevilla, October L7/95. 

Ml i ) 

Manzanilla olives, entered at 14. , advanced to L9. pesetas per fanaga, packed. 

Add barrels at 12 pesetas each to entered value. 
} } '^ 1 Olives, from Antonio Alonso, Seville, June 18, 1895. 

Manzanilla olives, entered at 14 pesetas per fanaga; no advance. 
qma 9 } Chemical preparation, from Fahlberg, List & Co., Saltke-Westerlnisen, Feb. 8, 1896. 

Saccharine, Brand P, entered at 34, advanced to 38 marks per kilo, packed. 
Do. Brand R, entered at 52, advanced to 58 marks per kilo, packed. 

Add cases, packing, etc., to entered value. 
^|°3 I Cot. Hose, from , Chemnitz, Mch. 20 96. 

Men's tan cot. I hose, No. 1161, entered at 2.70, advanced to 2.75 marks per dozen. 

Men's Herm. Blk. I hose, No. 1258, entered at 3.60, advanced to 3.75 marks per 
dozen. 

Men's Herm. Blk. I hose No. 1259, entered at 3.90, advanced to 4.20 marks per dozen. 

Discount 5 per cent. 

Chgs. for cases, boxes &c, included in price. 

WY* 7 | EmVd cotton hdkfs, from , Rebstein, March 4/96. 

Handkerchiefs, 676 stitches, 4233 entered at 2.17, advanced to 2.30 francs per dozen. 
Handkerchiefs, 964 stitches, 4452 entered at 2.65, advanced to 2.80, francs per dozen, 
Handkerchiefs, 836 stitches, 4251 entered at 2.47, advanced to 2.55 francs per dozen. 
Handkerchiefs, 432 stitches, 4462 entered at 1.66, advanced to 1.78 francs per dozen. 
Handkerchiefs, 644 stitches, 3908 entered at 2.09, advanced to 2.20 francs per dozen. 
Handkerchiefs, 782 stitches, 3901 entered at 2.36, advanced to 2.50 francs per dozen. 
Handkerchiefs, 888 stitches, 2993 entered at 2.56, advauced to 2.70 francs per dozen. 
Handkerchiefs, 696 stitches, 3197 entered at 2.18, advanced to 2.30 francs per dozen. 
Handkerchiefs, 768 stitches, 3169 entered at 2.34, advauced to 2.46 francs per dozen. 
Add 5 per cent for general expenses, 8 per cent for profit. Add boxes, case and 
packing. 

. 1 ,.V r ^ !l ] Mfs. Silk & Cotton, from Albert Lehmann, Lyons, March 28, 1896. 

60 c/m Bengalene, 5542, entered at .90, advanced to 1.15 francs per meter. 

Less 20 per cent discount. 

Cases, packing, tickets, labels, etc., included in price. 

}™® IsUk Velvet, from F. Reichert's Sons, Wiess, Jan. 7/96. 

Vel. soie D, No. 25832 &c, entered at 2.05, advanced to 2.65 florins per yd. 
Vel. soie D 31153 &c, entered at 2.15, advanced to 2.75 florins per yd. 
Add cases and packing. 



9 

lolq 2 1 W- Wool (Bile. & fancy wstd), from Arnold Etueck, Huckeswagen, March 27/96. 

Fancy worsted 8083, entered at 4.40, advanced to 5.50 marks per meter. 

Blk. worsted, 6S39, entered at 4.20, advanced to 4.75 marks per meter. 

Blk. worsted, 7790, entered at 4.30, advanced to 5.50 marks per meter. 

Blk. worsted, 8025, entered at 4.10, advanced to 4.50 marks per meter. 

Blk. worsted, 7790, entered at 4.30, advanced to 5.50 marks per meter. 
l^ 1 1 Mfs. of Silk & Cotton, from A. Bessbus & Sawze, Lyons, Apr. 16/96. 

Bragance, 4261, 60 c/m, entered at .93. advanced to 1.00 franc per meter. 

Ponge, 2875, 78 c/m, entered at .88, advanced to .96 franc per meter. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

Packing charges included in cost. 

10832 ~) 

3174 J 

10851 J- Wool dress goods, from Burgess, Petel & Co., Boubaix, Dec. 20/95, Jan. 10/96, etc. 

3169 I 

&c J 

All wool cashmere, 44/45 in. 19/20 twill, entered at 1.50, advanced to 1.72 francs per 

meter. 
All wool cashmere, 44/45 in. 17/18 twill, entered at 1.35, advanced to 1.57 francs per 

meter. 
All wool cashmere, 44/45 in. 16/17 twill, entered at 1.25, advanced to 1.49 francs per 

meter. 
All wool cashmere, 44/45 in., 20/21 twill, entered at 1.57a. advanced to 1.80 francs 

per meter. 
All wool cashmere, 44/45 in., 22/23 twill, entered at 1.75, advanced to 1.97 francs per 

meter. 
All wool cashmere, 44/45 in. 14/15 twill, entered at 1.14, advanced to 1.34 francs per 

meter. 
All wool serge, 36/37 in. 10/11 twill, entered at .76* advanced to .87 franc per meter. 
All wool cashmere, 35 in., 9/10 twill, entered at .66, advanced to .75 franc per meter. 
All wool cashmere, 37/38 in. 11/12 twill, entered at .875, advanced to .98 franc per 

meter. 
Less 5 per cent discount. 
Add cases and packing. 
10703.. 
3141... 
10686.. 
3139... 

10687 ] 

3140 J 

Blk. serge, 62, 49 in., entered at 1.02, advanced to 1.20 francs per meter. 

Col'd serge, 116, 331 in., entered at .625, advanced to .70 franc per meter. 
Col'd serge, 131, 331 in., entered at .625, advanced to .70 franc per meter. 
Col'd cashmere 1200, 371 in., entered at .75, advanced to .88 franc per metei-. 
Blk. cashmere, 1000, 33 J in. entered at .61, advanced to .70 franc per meter. 
Navy & blk. serge, 403, 49J in., entered at 1.16, advanced to 1.35 francs per meter. 
Col'd serge, 50 W, 44f in., entered at 1.05, advanced to 1.23 francs per meter. 
Col'd cashmere Junior, 331 in., entered at .61, advanced to .70 franc per meter. 
Col'd serge Meteor, 331 in., entered at .625, advanced to .70 franc per meter. 
Discount 5 per cent. 

Add rolling pieces at .25 ; cases and packing. 
2—93 



)■ Wool dress goods, from J. Warnier & P. David, Eheims, Dec. 13/95, Dec. 6/95. 



10 

10474 1 

3193 

10494 I 

3194 \ Wool drestgoods, from A. Van Bergen & Co., Paris, Nov. 16/95, Nov. 19/95, etc. 

10632 I 

3195 I 

&C J 

270 silk <X: wool sublime, .'57 in., entered at 1.70, advanced to 1.85 francs per meter. 

L600 all wool cream henriettas, it in., entered at L.22, advanced to 1.49 francs per 
meter. 

284 Bine black serge, 44 in., entered at .636, advanced to .75 francs per meter. 

117 all wool col'd serge, 44 in., entered at .1)7, advanced to 1.15 francs per meter. 

606 all wool serge, 44 in., entered at 1.13, advanced to 1.33 francs per meter. 

AX all wool blue black cathon, 43 in., entered at. 85, advanced to. 98 francs per meter. 

155 all wool bine black hem id In, 43 in., entered at .85, advanced to .98 francs per 
meter. 

155 all wool cream Henrietta, 43 in., entered at .83, advanced to 1.00 franc per meter. 

Similar goods, similar advances. 

Less 5 per cent discount. 

Add cases and packing. 

Silk & wool Nougeante, 37 in., Nos. 2113, 2107, entered at 1.825, advanced to 2.00 
francs per meter. 

Silk & wool nougeante, No. 200, entered at 1.50, advanced to 1.65 francs per meter. 

Silk & wool nouveaute, entered at 1.275, advanced to 1.45 francs per meter. 

Less 7 per cent discount. 

Add cases and packing. 

All wool printed bossele, 20 7 in., entered at 2.25 francs per meter; no advance. 

Discount 6 per cent. 

Add cases and packing. 

All wool suiting, 44 in., No. 75, entered at 1.275, advanced to 1.45 francs per meter. 

Less 7 per cent discount. 

Add case and packing. 



SUBPORTS OF ENTRY AND DELIVERY IN TEE STATE OF FLORIDA. 



treasury ^zp&vtmmt f 



1S96. 
Department Circular No. i)4. 

Division of Customs. 

office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, June 17, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 

The following act of Congress, approved June 10, 1896, providing for subports of entry and delivery 
in the State of Florida, is published for the information of all concerned. 

W. E. CURTIS, 

Acting Secretary. 

AN ACT To provide for subports of entry and delivery in the State of Florida. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, 
That such places in the collection districts in the State of Florida as the Secretary of the Treasury may 
from time to time designate shall be subports of entry and delivery, and customs officers shall be stationed 
at snch subports, with authority to enter and clear vessels, receive duties, fees, and other moneys, and 
perform such other services and receive such compensation as, in the judgment of the Secretary of the 
Treasury, the exigencies of commerce may require. 

Sec. 2. That all acts or parts of acts in conflict with the provisions of this Act are hereby repealed. 

Approved, June 10, 1896. 



ERIE, PA., A PORT OF IMMEDIATE TRANSPORTATION. 



treasury Jteparintjewi, 



Department Circular No. 95. 

Division of Customs. 

office of THE SECRETARY. 

Washington, D. C, June 17, 1896. 
To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 

The following act of Congress, approved June 11, 1896, making Erie, Pa., a port of immediate 
transportation, is published for the information of all concerned. 

W. E. CURTIS, 

Acting Secretary. 



AS ACT To make the city of Erie, Pennsylvania, a port of immediate transportation. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and Souse of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, 
That the privileges of the seventh section of the Act approved Juue tenth, eighteen hundred and eighty, 
governing the transportation of dutiable merchandise without appraisement, be, and the same are hereby, 
extended to the port of Erie, in the State of Pennsylvania. 

Approved, June 11, 1896. 



MANUFACTURED ARTICLES EXPORTED BI THE MANUFACTURER THEREOF FOR 

BENEFIT OF DRAWBACK. 



Oepartment^uiarNo.OG. ^XZUSIXXX} ^Z^itXtttXtVLtf 

Division of Customs. 

office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, June 19, 1896. 
To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 

The Department's circular of May 18, 1894, (Synopsis 14981) supplementing the regulations of 1892, 
relative to drawback, is hereby amended so as to omit the requirement of a certificate of transfer from 
manufacturer to exporter, in cases where the goods are exported by the manufacturer thereof. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



ALLOTMENTS. 



I89e. 

Department Circular No. 97. 



%xmmxy£ IPjep&rlmettt, 



Division of Revenue Cutter Service, No. 66, 

office op THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, June 22, 1896. 

The following extract from the act of Congress approved June 1L, 1896, making appropriations for 
the sundry civil expenses of the Government, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1897, is published for the 
information and guidance of officers and others of the Revenue Cutter Service : 

"That the Secretary of the Treasury be, and he is hereby, authorized to permit officers and others of 
the Revenue Cutter Service to make allotments from their pay, under such regulations as he may prescribe, 
for the support of their families or relatives, for their own savings, or for other proper purposes, during 
such time as they may be absent at sea, on distant duty, or under other circumstauces warranting such 
action." 

Applications for allotments in cases where the officers or other persons are not "absent at sea" or 
"on distant duty" should show all the circumstances in order that the Department may determine whether 
they be such as to warrant favorable action. In no case will the amount of the allotment exceed 70 per 
cent of the monthly pay as provided for in paragraph 874 of the Regulations of the Revenue Cutter Service. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



IMPORTATION OF "FILLED CHEESE 1 



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1896. 
Department Circular No. 98. 

Pivision of Customs. 

Office of THE SECRETARY, 



Washington, D. C, June 23, 1896. 
To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The attention of collectors and other officers of the customs is called to section 11 of the annexed act, 
approved June 6, 1896, entitled "An Act Defining cheese, and also imposing a tax upon and regulating 
the manufacture, sale, importation, and exportation of 'filled cheese,'" which is as follows: 

"Sec. 11. That all filled cheese as herein defined imported from foreign countries, shall, in addition 
to any import duty imposed on the same, pay an internal-revenue tax of eight cents per pound, such tax 
to be represented by coupon stamps ; and such imported filled cheese and the packages containing the same 
shall be stamped, marked, and branded, as in the case of filled cheese manufactured in the United States." 

Paragraph 195 of the act of August 28, 1894, provides for a duty of four cents per pound on imported 
cheese ; and provision is made in the foregoing section for the collection of an internal-revenue tax of 
eight cents per pound in addition to the import duty imposed by said paragraph 195. This additional 
tax must be paid before the removal of the goods from the custody of the Government. 

The Commissioner of Internal Eevenue will prepare regulations covering the manner of collecting 
this tax, the issuance of the requisite stamps, etc., printed copies of which in sufficient numbers for the 
use of customs officials may be had on requisition. 

The act goes into effect ninety days after the date of its passage, to wit, September 4, 1896. 

In addition to the marking of the packages of such goods, required by section 5 of the act of August 
28, 1894, as to the quantity of contents, and indication of country of origin, each and every cheese, and 
each and every package if not, on importation, found to be duly marked in accordance with the provi- 
sions of said section, and section 6 of said act of June 6, 1896, must be marked, stamped, and branded 
in the manner provided, before delivery from the custody of the officers of the customs, the expense 
of unpacking, marking, and repacking in original packages to be borne by the importer ; and it is the duty 
of officers of the customs to require the opening of a sufficient number of the packages, and inspection 
of the cheeses in any invoice to verify proper compliance with the above provisions of law. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



AN ACT Defining cheese, and also imposing a tax upon and regulating the manufacture, sale, importation, and exportation 

of " filled cheese," 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assem- 
bled, That for the purposes of this Act, the word "cheese" shall be understood to mean the food product 
known as cheese, and which is made from milk or cream and without the addition of butter, or any 



animal, vegetable, or oilier oils or fata foreign to each milk or cream, with or without additional coloring 
matter. 

Seo. •_'. That for the purposes of this Aet certain sabstances and compounds shall be known and 
designated as "filled cheese," namely: All substances made of milk or skimmed milk, with the admix- 
ture of butter, animal oils or fats, vegetable or any other oils, or compounds foreign to such milk, and 
made in imitation or semblance of cheese. 

Seo. '■'•■ That special taxes are imposed as follows: 

Manufacturers of filled cheese shall pay four hundred dollars for each and every factory per annum. 
Every person, firm, or corporation who manufactures filled cheese for sale shall be deem< d a manufacturer 
Of filled cheese. Wholesale dealers in tilled cheese shall pay two hundred and fifty dollars per annum. 
Every person, linn, or corporation who sells or offers for sale filled cheese in the original manufacturer's 
packages for resale, or to retail dealers as hereinafter defined, shall he deemed a wholesale dealer in filled 
Cheese. But any manufacturer of tilled cheese who has given the required bond and paid the required 
special tax, and who sells only tilled cheese of his own production, at the place of manufacture, in the 
original packages, to which the tax paid stamps are affixed, shall not be required to pay the special tax 
of a wholesale dealer in tilled cheese on account of such sales. 

Retail dealers in filled cheese shall pay twelve dollars per annum. Every person who sells filled 
cheese at retail, not for resale, and for actual consumption, shall be regarded as a retail dealer in filled 
cheese, and sections thirty-two hundred and thirty-two, thirty two hundred and thirty three, thirty-two 
hundred and thirty-four, thirty-two hundred and thirty-five, thirty-two hundred and thirty-six, thirty-two 
hundred and thirty-seven, thirty-two hundred and thirty-eight, thirty-two hundred and thirty- nine, 
thirty-two hundred and forty, thirty-two hundred and forty-one, thirty-two hundred and forty-three of 
the Revised Statutes of the United States are, so far as applicable, made to extend to and include and 
apply to the special taxes imposed by this section and to the persons, firms, or corporations upon whom 
they are imposed : Provided, That all special taxes under this Act shall become due on the first day of 
July in every year, or on commencing any manufacture, trade, or business on which said tax is imposed. 
In the latter case the tax shall be reckoned proportionately from the first day of the month in which the 
liability to the special tax commences to the first day of July following. 

Sec. 4. That every person, firm, or corporation who carries on the business of a manufacturer of filled 
cheese without having paid the special tax therefor, as required by law, shall, besides being liable to the 
payment of the tax, be fined not less than four hundred dollars and not more than three thousaud dollars ; 
and every person, firm, or corporation who carries on the business of a wholesale dealer in filled cheese 
without having paid the special tax therefor, as required by law, shall, besides beiug liable to the payment 
of the tax, be fined not less than two hundred and fifty dollars nor more than one thousand dollars ; and 
every person, firm, or corporation who carries on the business of a retail dealer in filled cheese without 
having paid the special tax therefor, as required by law, shall, besides beiug liable for the payment of 
the tax, be fined not less than forty nor more than five hundred dollars for each and every offense. 

Sec. 5. That every manufacturer of filled cheese shall file with the collector of internal revenue of 
the district in which his manufactory is located such notices, inventories, and bonds, shall keep such 
books and render such returns of materials and products, shall put up such signs and affix such number 
to his factory, and conduct his business under such surveillance of officers and agents as the Commissioner 
of Internal Revenue, with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, may by regulation require. 
But the bond required of such manufacturer shall be with sureties satisfactory to the collector of internal 
revenue, and in a penal sum of not less than five thousand dollars ; and the amount of said bond may be 
increased from time to time, and additional sureties required, at the discretion of the collector or under 
instructions of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue. Any manufacturer of filled cheese who fails to 
comply with the provisions of this section or with the regulations herein authorized, shall be deemed 
guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction thereof shall be fined not less than five hundred nor more 
than one thousand dollars. 

Sec. 6. That filled cheese shall be packed by the manufacturers in wooden packages only, not before 
used for that purpose, and marked, stamped, and branded with the words "filled cheese" in black-faced 
letters not less than two inches in length, in a circle in the center of the top and bottom of the cheese ; 
and in black-faced letters of not less than two inches in length in line from the top to the bottom of the 
cheese, on the side in four places equidistant from each other ; and the package containing such cheese 
shall be marked in the same manner, and iu the same number of places, and in the same description of 
letters as above provided for the marking of the cheese ; and all sales or consignments made by manu- 
facturers of filled cheese to wholesale dealers in filled cheese or to exporters of filled cheese shall be in 
original stamped packages. Retail dealers in filled cheese shall sell only from original stamped packages, 
and shall pack the filled cheese when sold in suitable wooden or paper packages, which shall be marked 



and branded in accordance with rules and regulations to be prescribed by the Commissioner of Internal 
Revenue with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury. Every person who knowingly sells or offers 
to sell, or delivers or offers to deliver, filled cheese in any other form than in new wooden or paper 
packages, marked and branded as hereinbefore provided and as above described, or who packs in any 
package or packages filled cheese in any manner contrary to law, or who falsely brands any package or 
affixes a stamp on any package denoting a less amount of tax than that required by law, shall upon con- 
viction thereof be fined for each and every offense not less than fifty dollars and not more than five 
hundred dollars or be imprisoned not less than thirty days nor more than one year. 

Sec. 7. That all retail and wholesale dealers in filled cheese shall display iu a conspicuous place in 
his or their sales room a sign bearing the words "Pilled cheese sold here" in black-faced letters not less 
than six inches in length, upon a white ground, with the name and number of the revenue district in 
which his or their business is conducted ; and any wholesale or retail dealer in filled cheese who fails or 
neglects to comply with the provisions of this section shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall 
on conviction thereof be fined for each and every offense not less than fifty dollars and not more than two 
hundred dollars. 

Sec. 8. That every manufacturer of filled cheese shall securely affix, by pasting on each package 
containing filled cheese manufactured by him, a label on which shall be printed, besides the number of 
the manufactory and the district and state in which it is situated, these words : "Notice. — The manu- 
facturer of the filled cheese herein contained has complied with all the requirements of the law. Every 
person is cautioned not to use either this package again or the stamp thereon again, nor to remove the 
contents of this package without destroying said stamp, under the penalty provided by law iu such 
cases." Every manufacturer of filled cheese who neglects to affix such label to any package containing 
filled cheese made by him or sold or offered for sale by or for him, and every person who removes any 
such label so affixed from any such package, shall be fined fifty dollars for each package in respect to 
which such offense is committed. 

Sec. 9. That upon all filled cheese which shall be manufactured there shall be assessed and collected 
a tax of one cent per pound, to be paid by the manufacturer thereof; and any fractional part of a pound 
in a package shall be taxed as a pound. The tax levied by this section shall be represented by coupon 
stamps ; and the provisions of existing laws governing the engraving, issue, sale, accountability, efface- 
ment, and destruction of stamps relating to tobacco and snuff, as far as applicable, are hereby made to 
apply to stamps provided for by this section. 

Sec. 10. That whenever any manufacturer of filled cheese sells or removes for sale or consumption 
any filled cheese upon which the tax is required to be paid by stamps, without paying such tax, it shall 
be the duty of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, within a period of not more than two years after 
such sale or removal, upon satisfactory proof, to estimate the amount of tax which has been omitted to be 
paid and to make an assessment therefor and certify the same to the collector. The tax so assessed shall 
be in addition to the penalties imposed by law for such sale or removal. 

Sec. 11. That all filled cheese as herein defined imported from foreigu countries shall, in addition to 
any import duty imposed on the same, pay an internal-revenue tax of eight cents per pound, such tax to 
be represented by coupon stamps ; and such imported filled cheese and the packages containing the same 
shall be stamped, marked, and branded, as in the case of filled cheese manufactured in the United States. 

Sec. 12. That any person who knowingly purchases or receives for sale any filled cheese which has 
not been branded or stamped according to law, or which is contained in packages not branded or marked 
according to law, shall be liable to a penalty of fifty dollars for each such offense. 

Sec. 13. That every person who knowingly purchases or receives for sale any filled cheese from any 
manufacturer or importer who has not paid the special tax herein provided for shall be liable, for each 
offense, to a penalty of one hundred dollars and to a forfeiture of all articles so purchased or received, or 
of the full value thereof. 

Sec. 14. That whenever any stamped package containing filled cheese is emptied it shall be the duty 
of the person iu whose hands the same is to destroy the stamps thereon ; and any person who willfully 
neglects or refuses so to do shall, for each such offense, be fined not exceeding fifty dollars or imprisoned 
not less than ten days nor more than six months. 

Sec. 15. That the Commissioner of Internal Revenue is authorized to have applied scientific tests, 
and to decide whether any substances used in the manufacture of filled cheese contain ingredients dele- 
terious to health. But in case of doubt or contest his decision in this class of cases may be appealed from 
to a board hereby constituted for the purpose, and composed of the Surgeon-General of the Army, the 
Surgeon-General of the Navy, and the Secretary of Agriculture, and the decision of this board shall be 
final in the premises. 

Sec. 16. That all packages of filled cheese subject to tax under this Act that shall be found without 
stamps or marks as herein provided, and all filled cheese intended for human consumption which contains 



ingredients adjudged as hereinbefore provided i<> i>e deleterious to the public health, shall be forfeited to 
the United States. 

Seo. 17. That all lines, penalties, and forfeitures imposed by this Act may be recovered in auy court 
of competent jurisdiction. 

Sec. 18. That the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, with the approval of the Secretary of the 
Treasury, shall make all needful regulations for the carrying into effecl the provisions of this Act. 

Sec. I!>. Thai this Ad shall go into effecl on the ninetieth day after its passage, and all wooden 
packages containing ten or more pounds of filled cheese found on the premises of any dealer on and after 

the ninetieth day succeeding the date of the passage <>f this Act, shall lie deemed to be taxable under 
section nine of I bis Act. and shall be taxed, and shall have affixed thereto the stamps, marks, and brands 
required by this Act or by regulations made pursuant to this Act; and for the purpose of securing the 
affixing of the stumps, marks, and brands required by this Act. the tilled cheese shall be regarded as 
having been manufactured and sold or removed from the manufactory for consumption or use on or after 
the day this Act takes effect; and such stock on hand at the time of the taking effect of this Act may be 
stamped, marked, and branded under special regulations of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, 
approved by the Secretary of the Treasury; and the Commissioner of Internal Revenue may authorize 
the holder of such packages to mark and brand the same and to atlix thereto the proper tax-paid stamps. 
Approved, June C, L896. 



NUMBERING OF ENTRIES OF IMPORTED GOODS. 



Depart^ent^ularNo.99. ^XtnSUX^ QtyUXttlXXtti, 

Di vision of Customs. 

office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, June 25, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

At all customs ports, except those at which there are naval officers, the numbering of entries in 
accordance with the Eegulations, article 297, will be by the fiscal year, instead of the calendar year, 
commencing No. 1, July 1, 1896. 

The above rule will be applied to I. T. entries at all ports, including those at which there are naval 
officers. 

W. E. CURTIS, 

Acting Secretary. 



TENNESSEE CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION. 



Division of Customs. 

Office of THE SECRETARY.. 

Washington, D. C, June 24, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 

The following public resolution (No. 49) was approved by the President on May 18, 1896 : 

JOINT RESOLUTION Authorizing foreign exhibitors at the Tennessee Centennial Exposition, to he held in Nashville, Tennessee, 
in eighteen hundred and ninety-seven, to bring to this country foreign laborers from their respective countries for the pur- 
pose of preparing for and making their exhibits, and allowing articles imported from foreign countries for the sole purpose 
of exhibition at said exposition to be imported free of duty, under regulations prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury. 

Whereas the Tennessee Centennial Exposition Company of Nashville, Tennessee, have extended 
invitations which have been accepted by the several nations, and space for installing foreign exhibits has 
been applied for and duly apportioned, and concessions and privileges granted by the exposition manage- 
ment to the citizens and subjects of foreign nations ; and 

Whereas for the purpose of securing the production upon the exposition grounds of scenes illustrative 
of the architecture, dress, habits, and modes of life, occupation, industries, means of locomotion and 
transportation, amusements, entertainments, and so forth, of the natives of foreign countries, it has been 
necessary for the Tennessee Centennial Exposition Company to grant concessions and privileges to certain 
firms and corporations conceding the right to make such productions : Therefore, 

Besolved by the Senate and Bouse of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, 
That the Act of Congress approved February twenty-sixth, eighteen hundred and eighty-five, prohibiting 
the importation of foreigners under contract to perform labor, and the Acts of Congress prohibiting the 
coming of Chinese persons into the United States, and the Acts amendatory of these Acts, shall not be so 
construed, nor shall anything therein operate to prevent, hinder, or in any wise restrict any foreign 
exhibitor, representative, or citizen of a foreign nation, or the holder, who is a citizen of a foreign nation, 
of any concession or privilege from the Tennessee Centennial Exposition Company of Nashville, Tennes- 
see, from bringing into the United States, under contract, such mechanics, artisans, agents, or other 
employees, natives of their respective foreign countries, as they or any of them, may deem necessary for 
the purpose of making preparations for installing or conducting their exhibits or of preparing or install- 
ing or conducting any business authorized or permitted under or by virtue of or pertaining to any con- 
cession or privilege which may have been granted by the Tennessee Centennial Exposition Company of 
Nashville, Tennessee, in connection with such exposition : Provided, however, that no alien shall by virtue 
of this Act enter the United States under contract to perform labor except by express permission, naming 
such alien, of the Secretary of the Treasury ; and any such alien who may remain in the United States 
for more than one year, after the close of said exposition, shall thereafter be subject to all the processes 
and penalties applicable to aliens coming in violation of the alien-contract-labor law aforesaid. 

Sec. 2. That all articles which shall be imported from foreign countries for the sole purpose of exhi- 
bition at said exposition, upon which there shall be a tariff or customs duty, shall be admitted free of 
payment of duty, customs fees, or charges, under such regulations as the Secretary of the Treasury 
shall prescribe ; but it shall be lawful at any time during the exhibition to sell, for delivery at the close 
of the exposition, any goods or property imported for and actually on exhibition in the exposition build- 
ings or on its grounds, subject to such regulations for the security of the revenue and for the collection of 
import duties as the Secretary of the Treasury shall prescribe : Provided, That all such articles, when 
sold or withdrawn for consumption in the United States, shall be subject to the duty, if any, imposed 



upon such article by the revenue laws in force at the date of importation, and all penalties prescribed by 
law shall be applied and enforced against such articles and against the persons who may be guilty of any 

illegal sale or withdrawal. 
Approved, May is. L896. 

1. Tn order to secure the privileges of free entry above accorded, every package destined for the 
Exposition should have affixed to it by the foreign shipper one or more labels representing the flag of the 

country to which if belongs. This label should be about 8 by 12 inches in size, and should bear across 
the face, in plain black letters, the inscription : "Exposition at Nashville." 
All packages should lie plainly marked as follows ; 

(1) "Surveyor of Customs, Nashville." 

(2) "Exhibits for Tennessee Centennial Exposition." 

(3) Name of consignee or agent at the port of first arrival in the United States. 

(4) The shipping marks and numbers. 

(5) Name and address of the exhibitor. 

2. Every exhibit shall be accompanied by an invoice in duplicate, which shall show the name of 
the exhibitor, the marks and numbers of the packages, with a description of their contents, and a declara- 
tion of the quantity and the market value of each separate kind thereof in the country of production. 
This invoice must be signed by the exhibitor, but will require no further verification. One of the 
invoices will be transmitted by mail to the surveyor of customs at Nashville, and the other to the con- 
signee of the goods at the port of first arrival. 

3. As a matter of convenience, it is recommended that all packages intended for the Exposition shall 
be consigned to an agent, or forwarder, or commissioner, at the port of first arrival, who will attend to 
customs business incident to the transfer of packages from the importing vessel to a bonded route for 
transportation to Nashville. 

4. The names of duly bonded companies will be furnished by collectors of customs at the ports of 
arrival. The goods may be transported to Nashville by companies duly bonded for the carriage of 
either appraised or unappraised merchandise. Examination and appraisal of exhibits at the port of 
original entry are hereby waived. 

5. The consignee of the merchandise at the first port of arrival must present at the custom house the 
invoice above described, with a bill of lading and an entry in duplicate made out upon the special form 
to be prescribed for this purpose by the Treasury Department, which will show the name of the foreign 
shipper or owner, the name of the importing vessel, the marks and numbers of the packages, with a 
statement of the nature of their contents and of their foreign value, as declared in the invoice. The 
entry must also indicate the bonded route by which the goods are to be transported to Nashville, and 
must be signed by the consignee. No other declaration will be required. The consolidation of dif- 
ferent shipments on one entry will not be allowed ; such practice having obtained in regard to previous 
expositions has proved to be a fruitful source of confusion. Each entry will comprise, therefore, the 
consignment of a single exhibit only. The goods will be consigned, on the customs entry, to "Surveyor 
of Customs, Nashville,'' and there need be no computation of duties upon this entry, but the amount 
charged against the bond of the transportation company shall be double the invoice value. 

6. The collector will thereupon issue a special permit bearing the words "Nashville Exposition," 
authorizing the transfer of the goods from the ship to the bonded railroad for transportation to Nashville, 
and will record and file one of the entries in his office, and send the other, by mail, with the invoice, to 
the surveyor at Nashville. 

7. The permit will be taken by the agent or consignee to the inspector on board the importing vessel, 
who will thereupon send the goods, by a cartman duly licensed, to be delivered under the supervision of 
a customs officer to the transportation company. 



8. The consignee will also prepare a manifest of the goods, which, after being duly certified, will be 
handed to the conductor of the car containing the same, and a duplicate copy must be sent by mail to the 
surveyor of customs at Nashville. Upon the arrival at Nashville of any car containing such articles, the 
conductor or agent of the railroad company will report such arrival by the presentation of the manifest 
to the customs officer designated to receive it, who shall compare the same with the copy received by 
mail, and superintend the opening of the car, taking care to identify the packages by marks and numbers, 
as described in the manifest. 

9. These regulations will also apply to goods sent to the Exposition from foreign contiguous territory. 
All articles destined for the Exposition arriving from Canada or Mexico, on through cars, under consular 
seal, must be consigned by the foreign shipper to the "Surveyor of Customs" at Nashville. 

10. The buildings and spaces set apart for the purposes of the Exposition are constituted "construct- 
ive bonded warehouses and yards," and all foreign articles placed therein under the supervision of the 
customs officers, and which have been specially imported for exhibition therein, will be treated the same 
as merchandise in bond. No warehouse entry will be required at Nashville in order to obtain entrance 
for such goods, but the latter will be kept under customs supervision, in accordance with the general 
regulations governing merchandise in bonded warehouses. 

11. Under the special act of Congress establishing the Tennessee Centennial Exposition, sales are 
permitted during its continuance, but delivery of goods sold is to be withheld until the close of the Fair. 
The enforcement of this latter restriction devolves properly upon the Exposition authorities, who, being 
in control of the local police, are responsible for the protection of the exhibits. When the duties have 
been received by the surveyor upon the merchandise contained in any exhibit, he will regard such exhibit 
as released from customs control, except so far as concerns the supervision necessary to secure export with 
refund of duty. 

12. At the close of the Exposition all goods intended for exportation will be transported in bond to 
the seaboard or exterior port, and exported therefrom under the general regulations for immediate export 
in bond, as modified by special regulations to be in due time provided. 

13. Any merchandise imported by an exhibitor in excess of the articles duly installed as exhibits 
will be placed and retained in a storage warehouse at the expense of the importer until duly entered for 
payment of duty or exportation. ' Withdrawals of merchandise stored under these conditions, if made 
for the purpose of placing the same within the Exposition, will be treated under the provisions for entry 
on arrival at first port of entry, and no duty will be required to be paid. Such merchandise must be 
delivered at the Exposition in charge of a customs officer. 

Goods which have been imported by exhibitors in excess of those used as exhibits, and stored on their 
account, may be withdrawn at any time for consumption on payment of duty and charges. Whenever 
duty-paid goods of this class shall be exported without having left the custody of the surveyor, the duty 
paid thereon, less 1 per cent, will be refunded, provided the duty paid on any such exported package 
shall have amounted to $50. Exhibits entered for exportation without payment of duty are not subject 
to appraisement. 

14. Articles brought by proprietors or managers of theatrical exhibitions for temporary use may be 
entered free of duty upon the filing of satisfactory bonds for their export within six months after such 
importation, as provided for in paragraph 596 of the tariff act. 

15. It is to be distinctly understood that the United States is not liable for any loss, casualty, or injury 
to the merchandise imported as exhibits at the Exposition, nor for any debt, contract, or expense incident 
to the transportation, care, or treatment of such merchandise. 

16. All entries, invoices, permits, abstracts, and reports relating to merchandise imported under the 



act of May 18, 1896, must be separately made, and must be stamped with the words, "Tenuessee Cen- 
tennial Exposition. " 

17. Additional special regulations will be provided in due time covering the withdrawal of exhibits 
for consumption, transportation, or exportation at the close of the Exposition. 

18. The privileges granted by virtue of these regulations are intended solely for the benefit of exhib- 
itors at the Tennessee Centennial Exposition, and with the view of relieving them, so far as practicable, of 
delays and vexations in connection with the customs business pertaining to their importations. 

Any attempt to take advantage of these regulations in order to evade the tariff laws of the United 
States will subject the offender to all the penalties prescribed by those laws, including confiscation of goods 
and fine and imprisonment. 

W. E. CURTIS, 

Acting Secretai-y. 
O 



INSPECTION OF MEATS EXPORTED. 



1896 %vmsuxv( Setrartmeni, 

Department Circular No. 101. ^— ■ > *J c — •• H ' 

Bureau of Navigation. 

Office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, June 25, 1896. 
To Collectors of Customs and others: 

Attention is invited to the order of the Department of Agriculture, appended hereto, dated the 19th 
instant, relative to certificates of inspection of meats exported from the United States, and especially to 
that portion which revokes the order of February 25, 1896, embodied in the circular of the Treasury 
Department, dated February 28, 1896, and numbered 32. 

W. E. CURTIS, 

Acting Secretary. 



Order Postponing the Certification of Export Beef to March 15, 1897. 



U. S. Department oe Agrictjlttjbe, 

Office of the Secretary, 

Washington, D. C, June 19, 1896. 

Whereas section 2 of the act of Congress, approved March 3, 1891, as amended in the act approved 
March 2, 1895, provides as follows : 

"Sec. 2. That the Secretary of Agriculture shall also cause to be made a careful inspection of all live 
cattle, the meat of which, fresh, salted, canned, corned, packed, cured, or otherwise prepared, is intended 
for exportation to any foreign country, at such times and places, and in such manner as he may think 
proper, with a view to ascertain whether said cattle are free from disease, and their meat sound and 
wholesome, and may appoint inspectors who shall be authorized to give an official certificate clearly 
stating the condition in which such cattle and meat are found, and no clearance shall be given to any 
vessel having on board any fresh, salted, canned, corned, or packed beef being the meat of cattle killed 
after the passage of this act for exportation to and sale in a foreign country from any port in the United 
States until the owner or shipper shall obtain from an inspector appointed under the provision of this act 
a certificate that said cattle were free from disease, and that their meat is sound and wholesome." 

And whereas it has been found impossible to establish inspection prior to July 1, 1896, at all points 
where beef is prepared and packed for the export trade, and 

Whereas legislation is pending modifying the requirement for certificates with all exported beef, 

It is ordered, That the requirement of certificates shall be postponed until March 15, 1897. All orders 
and regulations of this Department inconsistent with this order are hereby revoked. 

The greater part of the exported beef is now inspected and will be certified, and any Government 
desiring to secure inspected beef exclusively may do so by making the proper regulations. It is not, 
however, deemed practicable to exclude from exportation to countries which gladly accept it the beef 
which the retail butchers find unsalable because it is cut from inferior portions of the carcass. Much of 
this beef has been inspected, but there is no way of identifying it after the carcass has been cut. As a 
considerable number of firms collect these special cuts from the retailers and pack them for exportation, 
to enforce the statute as it stands would destroy their business. An amendment to the law which will avoid 
this undesirable result has been favorably reported from the proper committee in each branch of the 
Congress, and I deem it my duty to postpone the order requiring certificates until this bill has been duly 
considered and acted upon by the law-making power of the Government. 

J. Steeling Morton, 

Secretary. 



BE AW BACK ON SUGAR AND SIRUP. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 102. 

i of Customs. 



office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, June 25, 1896. 
To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

On the exportation of refined sugars and sirups, made wholly from imported raw sugars, drawback 
will be allowed equal in amount to the duty paid on the material used, less the legal deduction of 1 per 
cent. 

When the exported sugars are "hard refined," of standard test, commercially known as loaf, cut 
loaf, cube, granulated, crushed or powdered, and are made wholly from imported raw cane sugars, the 
amount of drawback shall be determined by allowing for each 100 pounds of the exported article, the 
duties paid on the respective grades and quantities of material used, as indicated in the following schedule : 



Test of raw sugar used. 


Allowance for 100 pounds 
hard refined. 


Degrees. 


Pounds. 


no 


101. 87 


98 


103. 73 


!)7 


105. 60 


96 


107. 47 


95 


109. 34 


94 


111.20 


03 


113. 07 


92 


114. 94 


91 


116. 81 


90 


118. 67 


89 


120. 54 


88 


122. 41 


87 


124. 27 


86 


126. 14 


85 


128. 01 


84 


129. 88 


83 


131. 74 


82 


133. 61 


81 


135. 48 


80 


137. 35 


79 


139. 21 


78 


141.08 


77 


142. 95 


76 


144. 82 


75 


146. 68 



When the "hard refined" sugars hereinbefore described are made wholly from imported raw beet 
sugars, the duty paid on the material used for each pound of the exported article may be determined by 
dividing the duty paid on 1 pound of the material by the decimal denoting the "net analysis" of such 
material, and then deducting from the amount so found, a§ au equivalent of the value of the material for 



the sirup product, the percentage of that amount corresponding to the polariscope test of the raw sugar 
used, indicated in the following schedule: 



Polariscope test of raw 
beet sugars used. 


Percentages lo tic deducted to 

find duty paid on materia] 

for refined sugar. 


Polariscope te«t of raw- 
beet sugars used. 


Percentages to be deduoted to 

find duty paid on material 

for refined sugar. 


" Firsts:" 

Degrees. 
96 
95 
94 
B8 
92 


Per cent. 
1.2 
1.5 
1.9 
2.4 
3 


"Seconds:" 
Degrees. 
92 

HI 

90 

S!l 

B8 


Per cent. 
3.7 

4.5 
5.4 
6.4 
7.5 



When "soft refined" sugars, made wholly from imported raw sugars, are exported with benefit of 
drawback, the drawback entry must show the respective values of such soft sugars and of standard granu- 
lated sugar on the same market; and the drawback per pound on the "soft refined" sugar shall be such 
part of the drawback per pound provided for "hard refined" sugar, made from the same kind and grade 
of material, as the value of such soft sugar is of the value of such granulated sugar. 

The rate of drawback on the "soft refined" sugar may be fixed by use of the following proportion : 
As the value of 1 pound of standard granulated sugar is to the value of 1 pound of the "soft refined" 
sugar, so is the drawback provided for the pound of granulated sugar, to the drawback allowable on the 
pound of "soft refined" sugar, made from like material. 

The required values of the refined sugars declared on the drawback entry, shall be verified by refer- 
ence to standard market quotations on date of shipment. 

The amount of drawback which may be allowed on the exported sirup products of raw sugars, shall 
be determined by allowing for each gallon of the exported article, valued at 5 cents in condition as 
"thrown" from the "centrifugal," the duties paid on the respective grades and quantities of material 
used, as indicated in the following schedule : 



Test of raw sugar used. 


Allowance for one gallon 
of sirup. 


Degrees. 


Pounds. 


99 


1.36 


98 


1.37 


97 


1.39 


96 


1.40 


95 


1.41 


94 


1.43 


93 


1.44 


92 


1.46 


91 


1.48 


90 


1.49 


89 


1.51 


88 


1.53 


87 


1.55 


86 


1.56 


85 


1.58 


84 


1.60 


83 


1.62 


82 


1.64 


81 


1.66 


80 


1.68 


79 


1.70 


78 


1.72 


77 


1.74 


76 


1.77 ■ 


75 


1.79 



The value of the sirup, in condition as thrown from the centrifugal, shall be declared by the manu- 
facturer on the drawback entry, which declaration shall be verified by the collector ; and if the declara- 
tion so verified shows a value per gallon above or below 5 cents, the allowance shall be determined by 
increasing or reducing the schedule allowance in proportion to the increase or reduction above or below 
the 5 cents per gallon above specified ; but in no case shall the allowance be based on a value of sirup 
exceeding 8 cents per gallon, without special authority from the Department. 

When imported raw cane and beet sugars are "blended" or mixed in the process of manufacturing 
refined sugars and sirups, the manufacturer's declaration must show separately the respective quantities 
of the different kinds and grades of the sugars so mixed. In liquidating entries covering portions of the 
products of such mixtures, drawback shall be based on proportionate quantities of material corresponding 
to the quantities of the different kinds and grades of materials so mixed. 

For a fraction of a degree of test of the raw sugar used in the manufacture of either refined sugar or 
sirup, the allowance of quantity of material shall be fixed by a proportionate division of the difference 
between the schedule allowances for the degrees next above and below such fraction. 

The quantities of sugar and sirup exported shall be ascertained by United States weighers and 
gaugers, respectively ; and samples shall be taken as ordered by the collector to be submitted to the 
appraiser, for report of polariscope test and such other expert inspection as may be requisite. 

On requisition of collectors, appraising officers shall furnish polariscope tests, "net analyses," and 
other conditions of valuation of raw sugars, not found on the import invoice, for use in liquidation of 
drawback entries. 

Department's Circular No. 20, of February 1, 1896 (Synopsis 16738), is hereby superseded. 

W. E. CURTIS, 

Acting Secretary. 



REAPPRAISEMENT8 OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



Division of Customs. 

Office of THE SECRETARY, 
Washington, D. C, June 25, 1896. 
To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 

The following reappraisements of merchandise have been made by the United States General 
Appraisers during the week ending June 6, 1896. 

W. E. CURTIS, 

Acting Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING JUNE 6, 1896. 

N. IJ. — In corresponding with the Board of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in i 
report, reference should always be made to the number of JReappraisement. 

No. of reappraise- 
menl. 

12183 Chemical salts, from Julius Hulsen & Co., Newcastle on Tyne, April 17/96. 

Hyposulphite Soda, entered at 3.17.0, advanced to 5.0.0. per ton. 

Hyposulphite Soda, entered at 4.7.0 per ton, advanced to 5.10.0 per ton. 

Packages and cost of filling included in price. 
12152 Carbonate Ammonia, from W. Caudevy & Co., London, May 2/96. 

Carbonate ammonia, entered at 21, advanced to 3d. per lb. P. O. B. London. 

Discount 2 J per cent. 
12119 Sulphate of ammonia, from Peter E. McQuie & Son, Liverpool, Jan. 22/96. 

Grey color, entered at 8. 0.10 i, advanced to 8.5.0. per ton pkd. 
11636 Steel billets, from A. Proding & Co., Gothenburg, Mch. 4/96. 

Brand H, entered at 245.82, advanced to 257.82 crowns per ton. 

Less li per cent discount for cash. 
12215 Picldes (capers), from J. Peyret, Bordeaux, May 2/96. 

Nbupareilles, entered at 4.15, advanced to 4.55 francs per case of 121 flacons. 

Similar goods, similar advances. 

11997 ) 

12225 [ Cotton yam, from McConnel & Co., Ltd., Manchester, Apr 17, May 8, May 27/96. 

11969 ) 

95 A cotton yarn, entered at 1/6 3/4, advanced to 1/9 per lb, 

110 A cotton yarn, entered at 1/9, advanced to 2/- per lb. 

Discount 21 per cent. 

Add cases and packing at 5/- each. 



11260 Flax Lace Ourtaina, from W. H. Fletcher & Co., Paris, Feb. 20/96. 

Ren'ce curtains, Si yds., No. 13478, entered at 36.35, advanced to 39.95 francs per 

pair. 
Add case and packing. 

11786 ! // '" "'"' ( '" L Ij '"' ( ' ( ' nrlui "^ ll "" 1 Fml B™ith Doughty, Paris, Mar. 18/96, Apr. 1/110. 

Ren'ce curtains, 3] yds., No. 13466/4, entered at 30. advanced to 33. francs per pair. 
Ren'ce curtains, No. 13478 3* yds., entered at 36.35, advanced to 39.95 francs per 

pair. 
Add cases and packing. 

11621 Cot. Netting and Got. Lace Curtains, from B. Walker & Co., Mar. 24/96. 

Ecru No. 312 cot. Hambg. net, 30 in., entered at 3d., advanced to 31d. per yd. 
Wht. F 10 cot. Hambg. net, 27 in., entered at 2d., advanced to 2id. per yd. 
Ecru No. 10 cot. Hambg. net, 45 in., entered at 33d., advanced to 3Jd. per yd. 
Ecru No. 15 cot. Hambg. net, 45 in., entered at 33d., advanced to 3]d. per yd. 
Wht. tape curtains No. 1759, 50 in., 33 yds., entered at 2/33, advanced to 2/63 per 

pair. 
Ecru tape curtains, No. 1781, 48 in., 3 3 yds., entered at 2/- advanced to 2/4 per pair. 
Similar goods, similar advances. 
Add cases at 8/-. 
Discount 23 per cent. 
Less inland carriage. 

11682 Mf. of Wool, from F. H. Galloway & Co., Leeds, Mch. 11/96. 

54" Green wool Med'm cloth, entered at 2/10, advanced to 3/6 per yd. 

48" Green wool dress cloth, entered at 1/1, advanced to 1/4 per yd. 

54" Green wool med'm cloth, entered at 1/11, advanced to 2/10 per yd. 

52" green wool med'm cloth, entered at 1/4, advanced to 2/1 per yd. 

54" green wool dress cloth, entered at 1/1, advanced to 1/3 per yd. 

54" green wool med'm cloth, entered at 1/11, advanced to 2/8 per yd. 

Less -^r-th. 

Less 2 J per cent discount. 

Add making up ends at 1/- each. 

11658 Mfs. Wool & cotton, from Simon, Israel & Co., Bradford, Mch. 26/96. 

Blue serge, M 9049, 54 in., entered at 103, advanced to lid. per yd. 
Blue & blk. Cheviot, M 9079, entered at 10, advanced to 103d. per yd. 
Less trade discount 2 J per cent; cash discount 1} per cent. 
Add making up and packing. 

12235 Col'd cot. corduroy, &c, from Chas. Openshaw & Sons, Manchester, May 5/96. 

27 in Dk. drab 9/S af 615 J, entered at 10|d. per yd. ; 

27 in. Picker V'teen 622, entered at 8Jd. per yd. ; 

28 blk 8/S af 102, entered at 91 d. per yard.; 

All advanced by disallowance of 23 per cent commission deducted on entry. 



"3T 



•th. 



Less 5 per cent discount. 
Add cases. 



12191 CoVd cot. corduroy, from Nathans Sons, Manchester, April 17/96. 

Dk. drab corduroy, eutered at 101, advanced to lUd. per yd. 

Add packing. 

2b per cent commission deducted on entry ; disallowed on reappraisement. 

12184 ) Unbleached cotton corduroy, from C. B. Richards & Co., and Ehrenbach, Brumm & Co 

12185 j Manchester, May 6/96. 

3/4 Dress off corduroy NH, entered at 8d., advanced to 8M. per yd. 

Less -^-th. 

Less 2J per cent, discount. 

Add packing. 

12179 Sugar not above No. 16 I). 8., from Societe pour l'exportation des sucres, Antwerp, Feb. 

7/96. 

Beet root sugar, test 80.05, entered at 9/4, advanced to 10/5.075 per cwt. pkd. 

12168 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from Societe pour l'exportation des sucres, Antwerp, April 

20/96. 

Sugar, test 75.38, entered at 10/- per cwt., advanced to 10/8.57 per cwt. pkd. 

12180 Sugar not above No. 16 B. S., from Societe pour l'exportation des sucres, Antwerp, March 

26/96. 

Beet root, test 89.91, entered at 11/91, advanced to 12/6.365 per cwt. pkd. 
12176 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from Zucksehurdt & Bechel, Hamburg, April 18/96. 

Beet root sugar, analysis 78°, entered at 10/1, advanced to 11/0 J per cwt. pkd. 
12209 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from Zucksehurdt & Bechel, Magdeburg, Mar. 17/96. 

Beet sugar, analysis 80.89, entered at 10/4.66, advanced to 10/10.835 per cwt. pkd. 
12160 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from Zucheshurdt & Bechel, Mar. 26/96. 

Beet sugar, analysis 80., entered at 10/55, advanced to 10/10J per cwt. pkd. 
12169 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from , Antwerp, May 25/96. 

Sugar, analysis 89.79, entered at 11/9.36, advanced to 12/8.435 per cwt. pkd. 
12210 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from Nicolas Castano, Cieufuegos, April 30/-96. 

Centrifugal sugar, test 97.13, entered at $.0291, advanced to $.02976 per lb. pkd. 

Molasses sugar, test 91.10, entered at $.0244, reappraised at $.02427 per lb. pkd. 
12223 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from Chas. Morrison & Co., Montego Bay, May 2/96. 

Eaw muscarado sugar, test 87°, entered at £10.7.6, advauced to £10.19.3] per ton pkd. 

Raw muscarado sugar, test 85.20, entered at £10.7.6, advanced to £10.8.11 per ton pkd. 
12172 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from , Hamburg, April 11/96. 

Beet root sugar, analysis 78.87, entered at 9/9, advanced to 11/0.305 per cwt. pkd. 
12175 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from Tolim & Runge, Hamburg, April 18/96. 

Beet root sugar, analysis 75°, entered at 10/1, advanced to 10/8 per cwt. pkd. 
12140 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from J. Buno & Co., St. Iago de Cuba, April 25/96. 

Sugar, test 89.20, entered at $.02469, advanced to $.02557 Sp. gold per lb. pkd. 
12243 Sugar notabove No. 16 D. S., from E. Tennant &Sons Co., Trinidad, April 29/96. 

Sugar, test 94. 15, entered at $2,638 per 100 lbs.; advanced to $.0271 per lb. pkd. 
12049 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from Victoria Fleming, St. Croix, Apr. 9/96. 

Muscarado sugar, test 90°, entered at $.0246, advanced to $.02481 per lb. pkd. 

Muscarado sugar, test 88.20, entered at $.0246, reappraised at $.0240 per lb. pkd. 
12246 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from J. B. Yicini, Macores, Mch. 31/96. 

Centrifugal sugar, test 94.65, entered at $.02492, advanced to $.02546 per lb. pkd. 



4 

12021 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from L. A. Girana, Dominico, April 1, 1896. 

Granulated sugar, test 94.50, entered at $.02373, advanced to $.02717 per Lb. pkd. 

Granulated sugar, test 1)5.20, entered at $.0225, advanced to $.0276 per lb. pkd. 

Granulated sugar, test 96.50, entered at $.0225, advanced to $.0282(1 per Lb. pkd. 
12079 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from J. H. Parkin, Montego Bay, April 23/96. 

Sugar, test 87.55, entered at $.023036, advanced to $.02417 per lb. pkd. 
L1938 Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from G. P. Denal, Montego Bay, Ja., April 12/96. 

Sugar, test. 94.10, entered at $.024857, advanced to $.02067 pkd. 
12207 Sugar not above 16 D. 8., from C. Tennant Sugar Co., Triuidad, April 29/96. 

Sugar, test 95.80, entered at $.02861, advanced to $.02918 per lb. pkd. 
12165 Sugar not above 16 D. 8., from T. E. Williams, London, April 11/96. 

Sugar, test 82.06, entered at 9.90, advanced to 11.50 per cwt. pkd. 
1 IMS Sugar not above 16 D. 8., from , Prague, Feb. 26/96. 

Sugar, test 91.20, entered at 11/3, advanced to 11/11.3 per cwt. pkd. 
11869 Sugar not above 16 D. 8., from Schenker & Co., Prague, Mar. 3/96. 

Austrian beet root sugar, anal. 90.115, entered at 11/3, advanced to 11/6.4175 per cwt. 
of 112 lbs. pkd. 

12208 Sugar not above 16 D. S., from C. Czarnikow, Hamburg, Mar. 10/96. 

Beetroot sugar, anal. 79.43, entered at 9/7, advanced to 10/8.345 per cwt. pkd. 
12167 Sugar not above 16 D. S., from Eansochoff & Wessler, Antwerp, April 16/96. 

Beetroot sugar, anal. 89.81, entered at 12/-, advanced to 13/0.215 per cwt. pkd. 
11976 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from Eansochoff & Wissler, London, Mar. 30/96. 

Sugar, anal. 80.20, entered at 10/8.25, advanced to 10/11.3 per cwt. pkd. 
12174 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from Eansochoff & Wissler, Eotterdam, April 17/90. 

Beetroot sugar, anal. 78, entered at 10/-, advanced to 11/0 1/2 per cwt. pkd. 
12170 Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from Eansochoff & Wissler, Antwerp, Mch. 24/96. 

Beetroot sugar, anal. 90.026, entered at 11/9.36, advanced to 12/8.789 per cwt. pkd. 

3006 OP "I 

3007 OP ^ Earthenware, from Wood & Son, Stoke on Trent, Mar. 3/96. 

Boston, &c J 

Plain white granite earthenware entered at discounts of 60 per cent, 5 per cent, 5 

per cent, 2} per cent and 2J per cent, no advance. 

3098 OP ( 

TRogf on ( Decorated china, from Fasott & Eichel, Blankenhain, Feb. 29/96. 

China entered at discounts of 15 per cent, 2 per cent and 5 per cent, advanced to 

discounts 15 per cent and 2 per cent. 

3009 OP 1 

3010 OP | 

3092 OP [ Dressed furs, from C. M. Lampson & Co., London, Feb. 28/96, &c. 

&c 

Boston J 

Furs, entered at 2\ per cent discount, less 2 } per cent commission ; advanced by disal- 
lowance of deduction of 2* per cent commission. 

3019 OP ) 

Boston I ^ mo ^ cea sprats in oil, from Claus Andersens, Bnke's, Stavenger, March 17/96. 

Smoked sprats in oil, entered at .19 kroner per tin pkd.; no advance. 



5 

2998 OP ) 

Phila.... " j S' ll P hate of Ammonia, from Dunn Bros., Manchester, Mar. 18/96. 

Sulphate of ammonia, entered at £9/0/0, less freight shipping chgs. &c., advanced to 
£8/3/4 per ton pkd. 
3077 OP ) 

Boston ... " [ Gi ff arettes > from Joseph Bartolo & Co., Alexandria, Mch. 28/96. 

Cigarettes entered at £31/12/0 per total of 26000 cigarettes ; no advance. 

Boston.. [ Chemical salt, from Lemm & Weber, Anvers, Feb. 8/96. 

Carbonate of potash, entered at 31.00 francs per 100 kilos. No advance. 
Less freight. 

11989 Cotton hose, from Heinrich Christ & Hartel, Waldenburg, Mar. 24/96. 

Cotton hose entered at from 3.00 to 7.15 marks per dozen; advanced to from 3.15 to 
8.00 marks per dozen. 

Cotton hose, entered at from 2/30 to 2/55 marks per dozen ; no advance. 
11896 Mfs. Silk, from J. H. Brandenburger, Zurich, April 11/96.' 

50 c/m satin armure noir, entered at 1.85, advanced to 2.00 francs per aune. 

Less 20 per cent discount. 

Add packing charges. 

2960" OP ) 

Boston.. > Hides, from , Madras, Jan. 15/96. 

Hides, entered at 

cent. 
Add packing, &c. 



Hides, entered at 8/7 J rupees per lb., advanced by addition of commission of 2$ per 
cent. 



2969 I 

Boston.....! ..." | Wf^te wool tops, from Kammgarn-Spinnerei Stohr & Co., Plagwitz, Oct. 18/95. 

White tops, entered at 3.40, per kilo ; no advance. 
Add packing. 

3073 OP ) 

p^ilj,, ......... ) Su ff ar ' from w - F - Stevenson & Co., Tloilo, Feb. 15/96. 

Sugar entered at 4.125, advanced to 4.16 Phillipine ccy. per picul packed. 

2792 OP ~\ 

2966 OP I Sugar above Mo. 16 D. S., from China Sugar Penning Co., Hongkong, Sep. 14/96 

PortTownsend. ) ' 

Penned sugar, entered at 6.49}, advanced to 6.88 Mex. currency per picul. pkd. 

Add packing charges at 20c per bag to entered price. 

2795 OP -\ 

2793 OP [• Sugar above No. 16 D. S., from The Taikoo Sugar Ref. Co., Hongkong, Dec. 2/95 

Port Towusend. ) ' 

Sugar entered at 7.05, advanced to 7.32 per picul pkd. 

Sugar entered at 6.89, advanced to 7.16 per picul pkd. 

Mexican currency. 

2794 OP \ 

2J96 OP C Sugar above No. 16 D. S., from China Sugar Eef. Co., Hongkong, Oct. 7/95, Oct. 28/95 

PortTownsend. ) ' ' ' 

Eef'd sugar, entered at 6.901, advanced to 7.16 per picul pkd. Mexican currency. 

Ref'd sugar, entered at 7.11, advanced to 7.45 per picul pkd. Mexican currency. 
11909 Suffer not above No. 16 D. S., from Francke, Hijos & Co., Havana, Apr. 9/96. 

Centrifugal sugar, test 94.66, entered at $.0275, advanced to $.02857 per lb. pkd. 



6 

B°ston P 1 S " ! '"'' mt aho '' € N ' K W "' ft ' ll '°" 1 The Colouial Company, Ltd., Triuidad, Mar. 9/96. 

Su^ar, test 96.58, entered at $2.75 per 100 lbs., advanced to $.02836 per lb. pkd. 
IMt' ° P 1 s "-"" r "'" >re No ' 16 D ' S- ' from Braunschweig, Apr. 9/96. 

Granulated sugar, entered at $.0305 per lb., advanced to 13/91 Sterling per cwt. pkd. 

REAPPRAI8EMENTS BY HOARDS. 



[ Lead pencils, from H. C. Kurz, Nurnberg, Mar. 7/96. 



11678 

3862 

Ordinary copying pencils, entered at 3.20, advanced to 5.25 marks per gross. 

Add cases. 

~ ~ [■ Medicinal Proprietory Preparation, from H. Schaffner, Paris, April 8/96. 

Pepto-Fer du Docteur Jaillet, entered at 1.75 francs per bottle; no advance. 
qoj-7 [ Surface coaled paper, from Bunt & Luxuspapier Fabrik, Goldbach, March 20/96. 

Blue, red, bronze, green, black & light maroon glazed, 51/61 c/m, entered at 5.20, 

advanced to 5.40 marks per 500 sheets. 
Red glazed, 71/71* c/m, entered at 7.20, advanced to 7.50 marks per 500 sheets. 
Bed glazed, 61/71* c/m, entered at 6.50, advanced to 6. SO marks per 500 sheets. 
Green unglazed, entered at 4.70, advanced to 4.90 marks per 500 sheets. 
Scytogene tan, design 32, 43.5/71.5 c/m, entered at 23., advanced to 24.15 marks per 

500 sheets. 
Scytogene tan, unglazed, 43.5/71.5 c/m, entered at 20.70, advanced to 21.73 marks 

per 500 sheets. 
Scytogene ret, 43.5/71.5, entered at 11.50, advanced to 12.08 marks per 500 sheets. 
Scytogene tan, design 32, 57J/61, entered at 26.50, advanced to 27.83 marks per 500 

sheets. 
Scytogene ret, 57*/61, entered at 13.25, advanced to 13.92 marks per 500 sheets. 
Scytogene tan, design 32, 46/571, entered at 20., advanced to 21.00 marks per 500 

sheets. 
Scytogene unglazed, 46/571, entered at 18., advanced to 18.90 marks per 500 sheets. 
Scytogene ret., 46/571, entered at 10., advanced to 10.50 marks per 500 sheets. 
Less 2 per cent discount 
Less freight to Hamburg. 
Add cases and packing chgs. 

33gg 3 ]Mf. of Hemp, from B. L. Mullen, Obersehlema, April 18/96. 

Filtering cloth, entered at 80, advanced to 110 marks per 100 kilos. 
Add case. 

,,„?o | Spun silk, from Filature de Chappe Ringwald, Basle, April 1/96. 

Cann extra super. 100/1, entered at 17.06, advanced to 17.50 francs per kilo. 

33^° 1 Mf. sak & cot., from L. Permezel & Co., Lyons, March 4/96. 

Serge ecru, 92 c/m, entered at 1.05, advanced to 1.24 francs per meter. 

Less 20 per cent, discount. 

Tare discount of 3 per cent disallowed on reappraisement. 

Add cases and packing. 



12193 1 

f^QA I Bronze powder, from Adolf Baer & Co., Fuerth, April 18/96. 

3391.. J 

Copper brocade deep, entered at .90, advauced to .95 mark per lb. 

Lemon, Orange brocade, entered at .87, advanced to .95 mark per lb. 

Fire brocade, entered at .94, advanced to 1.00 mark per lb. 

Light green, light blue brocade, entered at .93, advanced to 1.05 marks per lb. 

Less 3 per cent. 

2543 OP ) 

771 [Sugar, from V. Eighen, V. Helt & Co., Amsterdam, Oct. 1/95. 

Phila ) 

Eefined sugar, entered at 13/3, advanced to 14/3 per cwt. pkd. 

28640P ) 

756 y Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from Jas. Bougie&Co., Glasgow, Jan. 11/96. 

Phila ) 

Sugar entered at 8/10.9 per cwt., advanced to 9/3 per cwt. pkd. 

**^ 3 \m/s. of silk and linen, from A. Plattard, Paris, Apr. 9/96. 

Linen and silk, 120 c/m, entered at 1.80, advanced to 1.90 francs per meter. 

Less 15 per cent discount. 

Cash discount i per cent deducted on entry ; disallowed on reappraisement. 

Add boxes and cases. 

Putting up included in prices. 

2847 OP ) 

759 V Steel, from Jonas & Colver Ltd., Sheffield, July 31/95. 

Boston ) 

Cold rolled steel, 4 x 21G, 3 x 21G, 31 x 21G, 4} x 21G, entered at 10. 7. 6. , advanced to 

11.8.3 per ton. 

Less 3 per cent discount. 

26990P ) 

732 y Oriental goods, from Gavaved S. Terrizian, Constantinople, Nov. 12/95. 

Boston ) 

Satin Emb'd slippers, entered at 10.00 piasters per pair ; no advance. 

Satin emb'd table covers, entered at SO. 00 piasters each ; no advance. 
Cotton emb'd table covers, entered at 30.00 piasters each ; no advance. 
Letter paper, entered at 8.00 piasters per pack ; no advance. 
Cigarette paper, entered at 2. 50 piasters per box ; no advance. 
Satin emb'd cushion covers, entered at 15.00 piasters each ; no advance. 
Similar goods, no advance. 
Add cases, shipping &c. 

[ Mfs. silk &silk veiling, from E. D. Warburg & Co., Lyons, March 11/96. 

105 c/m mousseline, II, entered at 1. 15 francs per meter ; no advance. 

42 c/m mousseline, 22, entered at .48, advauced to .65 fraucper meter. 

Discounts 16 per cent and 2 per cent. 

Crepe francais, 10, entered at .24 franc per meter ; no advance. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

Tulle maline application, 416, entered at .24 franc per meter, discoxints 5 per cent and 

2 per cent; advanced to .24 franc per meter, discount 2 per cent. 
Similar goods similar advances. 
Add cases and packing. 



11509. 
3315... 



8 

. 1 ,.'. ( ' ) 1 1 '' J Mf. of fax, from C. A. Hottsch, Ringenham, Feb. 21/96. 

No. 127 18/27 crepe trays plain figs., entered at 3.00, advanced to 3.15 marks per 
dozen. 

No. 88, 7/7 doyleys, sewn frgs., entered at .33, advanced to .39 mark per dozen. 

No. 84, 8/8, doyleys, sewn frgs., entered at .50, advanced to .GO mark per dozen. 

No. 151, 16/50, Crepe scarf cut selvage, entered at 6.00, advanced to 7.20 marks per 
dozen. 

No. 90, 7/7 Crepe doyleys round, entered at .33, advanced to .39 mark per dozen. 

No. 92 10/10 Crepe doyleys, entered at .80, advauced to .96 mark per dozen. 

No. 155, 16/50 Crepe Scarfs knotted, entered at 6.00, advanced to 7.20 marks per 
dozen. 

No. 201, 17/24, H. S. Damask trays, entered at 4.00, advanced to 4.80 marks per dozen. 

Similar goods, similar advances. 

Less freight. 

Cases and packing included in price. 
0070 optical instruments, from Richards & Co., Ltd., Wien, April 8/96. 

Lenses No. 18 6 entered at 40.00, advanced to 46.50 Au. florins each. 

Add cases and packing. 

3059 OP ) 

758 [■ Earthenware, from T. & G. Meaken, Ltd., Hanley, Sep. 16/95. 

New Orleans... ) 

Teas Hd. L. Bait. Vict. W. G.R. K. , entered at 3/4 per Am. doz. ; no advance. 

Teas. Hd. L. Bait. Chinese W. G. R. K., entered at 3/4 per Am. doz., advanced to 
6/- per Eng. doz. 

Less discount 60 per cent. 

Add package. 

Less discounts 5 per cent and 5 per cent. 
\}^ \ Mfs. Silk &■ Cotton, from Bompiat, Brasseur & Pelletier, Lyons, Mch. 16/96. 

60 c/m Polouaise, entered at .52, advanced to .62 franc per meter. 

Discounts 20 per cent and 1 per cent. 

Cases included in price. 
3^.j° [ Mfs. Silk & Cotton, from E. Chevillard & Co., Lyons, Jan. 18/96. 

No. 706 92 c/m Austria, entered at .83, advanced to 1.05 francs per meter. 

No. 707 92 c/m, Austria, entered at .85, advanced to 1.05 francs per meter. 

Add cases and packing. 

Discounts 20 per cent and 1 per cent. 
g^gg 2 j- Mfs. Silk & Cotton, from C. E. Bettman, Rheydt, Dec. 23/95. 

120/2 c/m gloriosa A. U. Blk, entered at .945, advanced to .97 mark per meter. 

120/2 c/m gloriosa I. S. blk., entered at .945, advanced to .97 mark per meter. 

120/2 c/m I. S. gloriosa blk., entered at .98 mark per meter; no advance. 

112 c/m, I. S. gloriosa, blk., entered at .895, advanced to .92 mark per meter. 

60/1 c/m gloriosa A. U. blk., entered at .471, advanced to .48 mark per meter. 

60/1 c/m gloriosa I. S. blk., entered at .47i, advanced to .48 mark per meter. 

60/1 c/m gloriosa I. S. blk., entered at .49 mark per meter ; no advance. 

56 c/m gloriosa I. S. blk., entered at .44$, advanced to .46 mark per meter. 

From entered price only deduct inland freight. 






9 

1173° ) 

3336"'" '" I ~^f s ' ^ * Cotton, from Hofamman & Vollenweider, Zurich, Mch. 27/96. 

36 in. blk. rhadames, entered at 1.55, advanced to 1.85 francs per aune. 

Inferior 36 in. blk. rhadames, entered at 1.30, advanced to 1.60 francs per aune. 

Striped satin de chine, 20i in., entered at 1.40, advanced to 1.54 francs per aune. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

Cases included in price. 

2688 OP ~) 

731 v Silk Embroideries, Wg. apparel, from Gavahed S. Terrizian, Constantinople, Nov. 2/95. 

Boston... ) 

Satin embroidered slippers, entered at 14 piasters per pair; no advance. 

Satin embroidered cushion covers, entered at 10 piasters each ; no advance. 

Similar goods, no advance. 

Add case and shipment. 



103—2 



1S96. 
Department Circular No. 104. 

Division of Appointments. 

office of THE SECRETARY, 



Office of THE SEORE 1 
Washington, D. C, June 25, 1896. 



To Heads of Bureaus, Treasury Department, 

and Chiefs of Divisions, Secretary's Office, Treasury Department. 
Hereafter all communications to the Civil Service Commission concerning persons or positions in 
this Department, will be made by the Secretary of the Treasury (Appointment Division), and you are 
instructed to transmit to that division all communications concerning those subjects which you deem it 
desirable to make. 

J. G. CARLISLE, 

Secretary. 



VALUES OF FOREIGN COINS. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 105. 



BUREAU OF THE MINT, 



Hon. John G, Carlisle, Washington, D. C, July 1, 1896. 

Secretary of the Treasury. 
Sir : In pursuance of the provisions of section 25 of the act of August 28, 1894, I present in the 
following table an estimate of the values of the standard coins of the nations of the world : 



VALUES OF FOREIGN COINS. 



Monetary unit. 



a CO 






Argentine Republic 



Austria-Hungary. . 



Belgium 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

British Possessions N. 
A. (except Newfound- 
land). 
Central Amer. States — 

Costa Rica 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Salvador 

Chile 



Colombia . 

Cuba 

Denmark.. 
Ecuador ... 



Egypt .. 



Finland 

France 

German Empire 

Great Britain 

Greece 

Haiti 

India 

Italy 

Japan 

Liberia , 

Mexico 



Netherlands 

Newfoundland . . 

Norway 

Persia 

Peru 

Portugal 

Russia 



Gold and silver . 



Gold and silver . 

Silver 

Gold 

Gold 



Franc 

Boliviano . 

Milreis 

Dollar 



Amoy 

Canton 

Chefoo 

Chin Kiang. 
Fuchau 



Silver 

Gold and silver . 

Gold 

Silver 



Peso 

Peso 

Crown . 
Sucre ... 



(Customs). 

Hankow 

Hongkong.. 
Niuehwang 

Ningpo 

Shanghai 

Swatow 

Takao 

Tientsin 



Gold. 



Gold 

Gold and silver . 

Gold 

Gold 

Gold and silver . 
Gold and silver . 

Silver 

Gold and silver . 
Gold and silver* 

Gold 

Silver 



Pound (100 piasters).. 



Mark 

Franc 

Mark 

Pound sterling.. 

Drachma 

Gourde 

Rupee 

Lira 

/Gold.. 



Yen i Silver!: 

Dollar 

Dollar 



Gold and silver . 

Gold 

Gold 

Silver 

Silver 

Gold 

SilverJ 



Florin .. 
Dollar., 
Crown . 
Kran ... 



Milreis . 
Ruble.... 



Gold: argentine ($4,824) and % argentine. Silver: peso and 

divisions. 
[Gold: former system— 4 florins (81.929), 8 florins ($3,858), 
ducat ($2.287) and 4 ducats ($9,149). Silver: land 2 florins. 
I Gold : present system— 20 crowns ($4.052) ; 10 crowns ($2.026) . 
Gold: 10 and 20 francs. Silver: 5 francs. 
Silver: boliviano and divisions. 
Gold : 5, 10, and 20 milreis. Silver : %, 1, and 2 milreis. 



Silver : peso and divisions. 



Gold: escudo ($1,825), doubloon ($3,650), and condor ($7.3 
Silver: peso and divisions. 



4.866% 



.540 

.402 
1.014 

.268 
.092 
.497 
1.080 
.772 



Gold: condor ($9,647) and double-condor. Silver: peso. 

Gold: doubloon ($5,017). Silver: peso. 

Gold : 10 and 20 crowns. 

Gold: condor ($9,647) and double-condor. Silver: sucre and 

divisions. 
Gold : pound (100 piasters), 5, 10, 20, and 50 piasters. Silver : 

1, 2, 5, 10, and 20 piasters. 
Gold : 20 marks ($3,859), 10 marks ($1.93). 
Gold : 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 francs. Silver : 5 francs. 
Gold : 5, 10, and 20 marks. 

Gold : sovereign (pound sterling) and % sovereign. 
Gold : 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 drachmas. Sdver : 5 drachmas. 
Silver: gourde. 

Gold : mohur ($7,105). Silver : rupee and divisions. 
Gold : 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 lire. Silver : 5 lire. 
Gold : 1, 2, 5, 10, and 20 yen. 
Silver: yen. 

Gold : dollar ($0,983), 2%, 5, 10, and 20 dollars. Silver: dollar 

(or peso) and divisions. 
Gold : 10 florins. Silver: %, 1, and 2% florins. 
Gold: 2 dollars ($2,027). 
Gold : 10 and 20 crowns. 

Gold: 341,and2tomans($3.409). Silver: %,%,l,2,and5krans. 
Silver: sol and divisions. 
Gold : 1, 2, 5, and 10 milreis. 
Gold: imperial ($7,718), and % imperial t($3.86). 
Silver : %, %, and 1 ruble. 
Gold: 25 pesetas. Silver: 5 pesetas. 
Gold: 10 and 20 crowns. 

« ii c in tin kk nn Jimf™nna Silver* 5 francfl. 



VALUES OF FOREIGN COINS. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 105. 



Hon. 



BUREAU OP THE MINT, 

Washington, D. C, July 1, 1896. 



John G. Carlisle, 

Secretary of the Treasury. 

Sir : In pursuance of the provisions of section 25 of the act of August 28, 1894, I present in the 
following table an estimate of the values of the standard coins of the nations of the world : 



VALUES OF FOREIGN COINS. 



Argentine Republii 



Austria-Hungary.. 



Belgium 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

British Possessions N. 
A. (except Newfound- 
land). 
Central Amer. States — 

Costa Rica 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Salvador 

Chile 



Colombia . 

Cuba 

Denmark.. 
Ecuador .., 



Egypt .. 



Finland 

France 

German Emph 
Great Britain.. 

Greece 

Haiti 

India 

Italy 

Japan 



Gold and silver . 



Gold and silver . 



Silver.. 
Gold... 



Silver 

Gold and silver . 

Gold 

Silver 



Gold. 



Gold 

Gold and silver . 

Gold 

Gold 

Gold and silver . 
Gold and silver . 

Silver 

Gold and silver . 
Gold and silver* 



Netherlands E Gold and silver . 



Newfoundland.. 

Norway 

Persia 

Peru 

Portugal 

Russia 

Spain 

Sweden , 

Switzerland . 

Tripoli 

Turkey 

Venezuela.... 



Gold. 

Gold... 
Silver.. 
Silver.. 
Gold ... 



Silver \ 

Gold and silv 



Gold 

Gold and sil 

Silver 

Gold I Piaster 

Gold and silver I Bolivar 



Monetary unit. 



Franc 

Boliviano . 

Milreis , 

Dollar 



Peso.. 

Peso.. 



Canton 

Chefoo , 

Chin Kiang, 

Fuchau 

Haikwan 
(Customs). 

Hankow 

Hongkong.. 
Niuchwang 

Ningpo 

Shanghai 

Swatow 

Takao 

Tientsin 



Peso 

Crown , 
Sucre ... 



Pound (100 piasters).. 



Mark 

Franc 

Mark 

Pound sterling.... 

Drachma 

Gourde 

Rupee 

Lira 

/Gold.... 

(Silver.. 

Dollar 

Dollar 



Yen.. 



Florin .. 
Dollar.. 
Crown . 
Kran ... 



Sol.. 
Milreis . 



.497 
.546 
1.000 



.193 
.965 
.236 



j ($4,824) and % argenti 



Silver: peso and 
929), 8 florins ($3. 



Gold: argent 

divisions. 
[Gold: former system — 4 flor 

ducat ($2.287) and 4 ducats ($9,149). Silver: land 2 florins'. 
I Gold : present system— 20 crowns ($4,052); 10 crowns 02.020) 
Gold: 10 and 20 francs. Silver: 5 francs. 
Silver: boliviano and divisions. 
Gold : 5, 10, and 20 milreis. Silver : %, 1, and 2 milreis. 



Silver: peso and divisions. 



5.650), and condor ($7,300). 



/Gold.. 



Ruble i silver':::::: 

Peseta 

Crown 

Franc 

Mahbub of 20 piasters. 



.193 
.449 
.044 
.193 



Gold: condor (89. 647) and double-condor. Silver: peso. 

Gold : doubloon (85.017). Silver : peso. 

Gold: 10 and 20 crowns. 

Gold : condor (89.647) and double-condor. Silver : eucre and 

divisions. 
Gold : pound (100 piasters), 5, 10, 20, and 50 piasters. Silver : 

1, 2, 5, 10, and 20 piasters. 
Gold : 20 marks (83.859), 10 marks (81.93). 
Gold : 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 francs. Silver : 5 francs. 
Gold : 5, 10, and 20 marks. 

Gold : sovereign (pound sterling) and % sovereign. 
Gold : 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 drachmas. Sliver : 5 drachmas. 
Silver : gourde. 

Gold: mohur (87.105). Silver: rupee and divisions. 
Gold: 5, 10, 20, 50, a i id loolire. Silver: 5 lire. 
Gold : 1, 2, 5, 10, and 20 yen. 
Silver: yen. 

Gold: dollar (80.983), 2%, 5, 10, and 20 dollars. Silver: dollar 

(or peso) and divisions. 
Gold: 10 florins. Silver: J4 1. and 2% florins. 
Gold: 2 dollars (82.027). 
Gold : 10 and 20 crowns. 

Gold: %,l,and2tomans(83.409). Silver: M.K.I. 2,and5krans. 
Silver: sol and divisions. 
Gold: 1, 2, 5, and 10 milreis. 
I Gold: imperial (47.718), and % imperial t($3.86). 
Silver : %. %< an( * * ruble. 
Gold : 25 pesetas. Silver: 5 pesetas. 
Gold : 10 and 20 crowns. 
Gold ■ 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 francs. Silver : 5 francs. 



' r Gold the nominal standard. Silver practically the standard. 

t Coined since January 1, 1886. Old half-imperial = 83.986. 

t Silver the nominal standard. Paper the actual currency, the depreciation of which 

I The " British dollar " has the same legal value as the Mexican dollai 



measured by the gold standard. 

gkong, the Straits Settlements, and Labuan . 



Eespectfully, yours, 



R. E. PRESTON, 

Director of the Mint. 



Office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, July 1, 1896. 

The foregoing estimate by the Director of the Mint, of the values of foreign coins, I hereby proclaim 
to be the values of such coins in terms of the money of account of the United States, to be followed in 
estimating the value of all foreign merchandise exported to the United States on or after July 1, 1896, 
expressed in any of such metallic currencies. 

J. G. CARLISLE, 
Secretary of the Treasury. 



APPOINTMENTS rN THE CUSTOMS SERVICE. 



X896. 
»epa rtm entCta«tarNo.IOG. ^XZilSXlXXl BtpiiXhUtXlt 

Division of Appointments. ■^ ^— y * ' 

office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, June 29, 1896. 

To the Principal Officers of the Customs: 

It is hereby ordered that all appoiutments for temporary service, by the day, month, or portions 
of the year, shall be made probational or permanent, with pay only while actually on duty in aid of the 
customs, in order that the persons thus appointed may be reassigned to duty in cases of emergency. By 
thus creating an unassigned list of persons, from which selections for duty and pay may be made, the 
necessity for the issuance of certificates of reinstatement will be avoided. 

In cases of temporary appointments, upon recommendation, authority will be granted for the employ- 
ment and for the payment of the compensation of such employees for the specified period for which their 
services are requested, and no longer; but in cases of emergency, where immediate service is absolutely 
necessary, the oath of office may be administered, the officer put on duty, and the approval of the Depart- 
ment immediately requested. 

Employment without authority, except as herein provided, will not be approved. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



REGULATIONS UNDER THE ACT OF JUNE 8, 1896, TO EXPEDITE THE ENTRY AND DELIV- 
ERY OF PACKAGES IMPORTED IN VESSELS OF THE UNITED STATES. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 107. 

Division of Customs. 

office of THE SECRETARY 



of THE SEORETA] 
Washington, D. C, June SO, 1896. 



To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 
The following is the act of Congress above referred to : 

AN ACT To expedite the delivery of imported parcels and packages not exceeding five hundred dollars in value, 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress 
assembled, That articles, not merchandise intended for sale, not exceeding five hundred dollars in value, 
imported in packages not exceeding one hundred pounds in weight, in vessels of the United States, may 
be specially delivered to and appraised at the public stores, and the entry thereof liquidated by the 
collector under such regulations as the Secretary of the Treasury may prescribe, and after such appraise- 
ment and liquidation may be delivered, upon payment of the liquidated duties under the bond provided 
for in this Act, to express companies or other duly incorporated inlaud carriers bonded for the transpor- 
tation of appraised or unappraised merchandise between the several ports iu the United States : Provided, 
That not more than one such consignment to one ultimate consignee from the same consignor shall be 
imported in any one vessel: And provided, That the original appraisement of and liquidation of duties on 
such importations shall be final against the owner, importer, agent, or consignee, except in the case of 
manifest clerical errors, as provided for in section twenty-four of the Act of June tenth, eighteen hundred 
and ninety : Provided, That nothing contained in this Act shall apply to explosives, or any article the 
importation of which is prohibited by law. 

Sec. 2. That such express companies or other inland carriers shall be responsible to the United 
States under bond for the safe delivery of such articles to the ultimate consignee : Provided, That if any 
package shall not be delivered to the ultimate consignee by the express company or other inland carrier, 
and shall be returned to the collector of the port where such articles are entered under the provisions of 
this Act within ninety days from the date of importation intact, the collector shall take charge of such 
package and dispose of it as unclaimed merchandise, and the duties, including additional duties, if any, 
under section seven of the Act of June tenth, eighteen hundred and ninety, paid shall be refunded by the 
Secretary of the Treasury out of any moneys in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated ; and the express 
company or other inland carriers shall be relieved of any liability therefor' under its bond ; and before 
any express company or other inland carrier shall be permitted to receive and transport any such articles 
they shall become bound to the United States in such bonds, in such form and amount, and with such 
conditions not inconsistent with law as the Secretary of the Treasury may require. 

Sec. 3. That articles transported under the provisions of this Act shall be corded and sealed in such 
manner as shall from time to time be prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury ; and the collector of 
the port of first arrival shall retain in his office a permanent record of such merchandise so forwarded. 

Sec. 4. That such packages may be consigned to and entered by the agents of the express company 
or other inland carrier or steamship company, who shall at the time of entry state the ultimate consignee, 
and in all cases where a certified or other invoice is now required by law such invoice may be attached to 
or inclosed in the package, under such regulations as the Secretary of the Treasury may prescribe.; and 
the delivery of such articles to the express company or other inland carrier shall not be delayed because 
of the nonarrival of the triplicate invoice, but the ultimate cousig nee shall be liable for any increased 
duty found due on reliquidation, if any, after receipt of said merchandise from the express company or 



2 

other inland carrier or steamship company making entry under this Act ; and the provisions of section 
twenty-eight hundred and fifty-seven, Revised Statutes, shall not apply to importations under this Act. 
Approved, June 8, 1896. 

In accordance with the provisions of the above act, the following regulations are hereby prescribed : 
L Application for special entry under the provisions of the above act shall be made in the following 
form: 

Application to enter articles, not merchandise intended for sale, under the provisions of the act of June 8, 1896. 

To the Collector of Customs, Port of : 



I, , of the firm of , hereby make application to make special entry of 

packages, containing articles, not merchandise intended for sale, and not exceeding five hundred dollars 
($500) in value, nor weighing more than one hundred (100) pounds per package, imported per steamship 

, a vessel of the United States, from on for , ultimate consignee, residing 

at . 



And I do certify that there is but one consignment from any one consignor to said ultimate consignee, 
imported in the vessel above specified on the date above mentioned. 

(Signed) . 

Declared to before me this day of , 189 — . 

, Deputy Collector. 

On the back of this application will be printed the special order for appraisement to be made in these 
cases, the form for the return of the appraiser, and the form of subsequent entry. The application herein 
prescribed having been duly made, the collector shall issue the following order for appraisement: 



SPECIAL OEB-EE FOE APPEAISEMENT. 



Port of 



Collector's Office, , 189— . 

To the Appraiser : 

You will examine promptly and report the contents and value of packages imported by 

in the from . 



Marks and numbers. 



Description of articles. 



Deputy Collector. 

II. Every package imported under the provisions of this act must be plainly marked "Special 
delivery package." Packages so marked may be landed on the dock immediately after the entry of the 
vessel, and the inspector in charge will forthwith forward such packages to the appraiser's stores, notify- 
ing the collector of customs of his action and stating the number and marks of the packages and the vessel 
by which imported. The contents of packages thus sent to public store shall, upon receipt of the collec- 
tor's special order, be examined immediately and appraised, the appraiser's report to be in the following 
form : 



3 

appraiser's report.* 

In pursuance of your special order, we have examined the following-described articles, and do certify 
the contents of the packages and the value thereof to be as follows, viz : 



Marks and numbers. Description of articles. Value. Suggested rate. 



Examiner. 



Appraiser. 



III. Upon receipt by the collector of the appraiser's return, the entry shall be immediately liqui- 
dated, and upon payment of the ascertained duties the packages shall be delivered to the proper steam- 
ship company, express company, or other inland carrier. 

IV. The following form of bond is prescribed under these regulations : 

Form No. 112$ — Bond upon entry under act of June 8, 1896. 

Know all men by these presents, That we, , as principals, and , as sureties, 

are held and firmly bound unto the United States of America in the sum of ten thousand dollars for the 
payment whereof, to the United States, we firmly bind ourselves, our heirs, executors, administrators, 

and assigns, jointly and severally, by these presents, as witness our hands and seals, at the port of , 

this day of , eighteen hundred and . 

Whereas, the undersigned, principals on this bond, propose to enter at the custom house and to 
transport merchandise imported under the provisions of the act entitled "An Act to expedite the delivery 
of imported parcels and packages not exceeding five hundred dollars in value," approved June 8, 1896. 

Now, therefore, the condition of this obligation is such that if the herein-mentioned obligors shall 
duly observe and faithfully comply with all the requirements and provisions of the above-specified act, 
and with the regulations prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury thereunder, then this obligation to 
be void ; otherwise to remain in full force. 

. [seal.] 

. [seal.] 

. [seal.] 

Signed, sealed, and delivered in presence of 



V. The liquidation herein provided for is, by the terms of the act, made final and conclusive against 
the owner, importer, agent, or consignee, except in the case of manifest clerical errors. 

VI. If any package shall not be delivered to the ultimate consignee by the bonded carrier, and shall 
be returned intact within ninety days from date of importation to the collector of customs at the port of 
entry under this act, the collector at such port shall make the proper record thereof, and the duties. 



* To the Collector of Customs: Where invoices mentioned in section 4 of the Act are found attached to or within the package, 
the appraiser will return the same with his report to the collector. 



including additional duties, if any, under section 7 of the act of June 10, 1890, shall be refunded, and 
(lie common carrier relieved of any liability therefor. 

VII. Inasmuch as section 1 requires that all liquidated duties shall be paid before delivery of the 
goods to the common carrier, only such packages will be corded and sealed which the common carrier 
may desire to reserve the right of returning to the customs authorities for refund of duties paid. The 
carrier must notify the collector of such desire before delivery of the goods from customs custody, so that 
the proper record can be made in the collector's office, and the packages duly corded and sealed under 
the supervision of a customs officer, as provided in section 2 of the act. 

VIII. Whenever a package which has been sent to the appraiser's office, under the provisions of 
this act, shall be found to contain articles of more than live hundred dollars in value, or to weigh over 
one hundred pounds, a report of the facts shall be made to the collector, who shall cause the package to 
be treated as if unclaimed. 

IX. Nothing contained in these regulations shall beheld to relieve importers from the necessity of 
submitting duly certified invoices for any importation exceeding one hundred dollars in value. When- 
ever such invoices shall accompany the package, as provided in the act, they shall be transmitted to the 
collector with the appraiser's report. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



DRAWBACK ON DOMESTIC MANUFACTURES MADE WHOLLY OR IN PART FROM 
IMPORTED MATERIALS AND EXPORTED. 



op THE SECRET 
Washington, D. C, July 1, 1896. 



X896. 
Oepartuoent Circular No. 108. 

Division of Customs. 

Office op THE SECRETARY 



To Officers of the Customs and others conceited: 

Section 22 of the Tariff Act of August 28, 1894, provides: 

That where imported materials ou which duties have been paid are used in the manufacture of 
articles manufactured or produced in the United States, there shall be allowed on the exportation of such 
articles a drawback equal in amount to the duties paid on the materials used, less one per centum of such 
duties : Provided, That when the articles exported are made in part from domestic materials the imported 
materials, or the parts of the articles made from such materials, shall so appear in the completed articles 
that the quantity or measure thereof may be ascertained ; And provided further, That the drawback on 
any article allowed under existing law shall be continued at the rate herein provided. 

That the imported materials used in the manufacture or production of articles entitled to drawback 
of customs duties when exported shall, in all cases where drawback of duties paid on such materials is 
claimed, be identified, the quantity of such materials used and the amount of duties paid thereon shall be 
ascertained, the facts of the manufacture or production of such articles in the United States and their 
exportation therefrom shall be determined, and the drawback due thereon shall be paid to the manu- 
facturer, producer or exporter, to the agent of either or to the person to whom such manufacturer, 
producer, exporter, or agent shall in writing order such drawback paid, under such regulations as the 
Secretary of the Treasury shall prescribe. 

Articles manufactured from materials on which duties were paid under previous tariffs are entitled 
to a drawback of such duties under the provisions of section 22, act of August 28, 1894, whenever such 
articles are exported under proper entries. 

In case material identified by a manufacturer was imported prior to August 28, 1894, and deposited 
in bonded warehouse, customs officers will be careful to ascertain the exact date and corresponding rate of 
duty under which such material was withdrawn for consumption. 

Drawback allowance being based on quantities and kinds of the articles exported, customs officers 
must in all cases use due diligence to ascertain weight, gauge, measure, or count, as the case may require, 
of all merchandise entered for drawback ; and in cases where expert official inspection or analysis is 
necessary, such officers will be careful to secure samples which will correctly represent the merchandise 
to be exported. 

In some cases articles heretofore listed for drawback do not appear in the following schedule because 
of changes in tariff rates ; in other cases such articles have been dropped because of changes in processes 
of manufacture, affecting quantities of material used, wastage, etc., and in still other cases rates have 
become obsolete from disuse. 

Articles entitled to drawback so dropped from the schedule will be restored and new rates will be 
fixed, on application to the Secretary of the Treasury, under article 789, Customs Eegulations, 1892. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



DETAILS OF EMPLOYEES. 



Departmen^fu'lax No. X09. ^VtUSVLVQ Q&p®X\mZtl\ f 

Division of Appointments. 

Office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, July 2, 1896. 

To Heads of Bureaus, Treasury Department, 

and Chiefs of Divisions, Secretary^ Office, Treasury Department : 

The legislative, executive, and judicial appropriation act for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1897, 
approved May 28, 1896, provides that all details of employees from one office to^another in this Department 
must be made upon the written order of the head of the Department, and for periods not exceeding one 
hundred and twenty days. 

Under the above provision of law, notice is hereby given that all details which have been made 
heretofore, except those made by written direction of the Secretary of the Treasury, must be canceled, 
and the employees so detailed returned to their respective offices. 

Hereafter, when it becomes necessary for the detail of an employee from one office to another, a 
written request must be made therefor to the head of the Department by the head of bureau, or chief of 
division, Secretary's Office, desiring the detail. No verbal details will hereafter be allowed under any 
circumstances. 

J. G. CARLISLE, 

Secretary. 



THE ANCHORAGE OF VESSELS IN THE PORT OF NEW YORE. 



Department 1 ^,. No. 110. ^XZ^UV^ ^P^XtmZU^ 

Division Revenue-Cutter Service, No. 67. 

Office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, July 1, 1896. 

The regulations governing the anchorage of vessels in the port of New York will be strictly- 
enforced, and all officers of vessels of the Revenue-Cutter Service at the port of New York are 
Hereby empowered and directed, in cases of necessity, or when a proper notice has been disregarded, 
to use the force at their command to remove from the channel ways any vessel found violating the 
rules, a copy of wbich is subjoined. 

All vessels of the Revenue- Cutter Service assigned to the duty of enforcing the Anchorage 
Regulations will carry a distinctive flag at the bow. Said flag shall be a white field with a blue 
foul anchor in the center placed at an angle of 45 degrees. 

Violations of the regulations that require immediate action shall be communicated to the 
Supervisor of Anchorages at the Barge Office, who, in the absence of the special patrol boat, is 
authorized to call upon any other revenue steamer available to perform the duty required. 

All communications referring to the rules and limits of anchorage grounds at the port of 
New York will be addressed to the Supervisor of Anchorages, Barge Office, New York. 

J. G. CARLISLE, 

Secretary. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE ANCHORAGE OF VESSELS IN THE PORT 

OF NEW YORK. • 



Treasury Department, July 1, 1896. 
The following-described anchorage grounds for vessels in the bay and harbor of New York, 
and in the Hudson and East Rivers, respectively, are hereby defined and established, and the 
following revised Rules and Regulations governing the same are published for the government 
of the owner, master, pilot, or other person in charge of or anchoring any vessel in the port of 
New York, pursuant to the act of Congress approved May 16, 1888, as follows: 

AN ACT relating to the anchorage of vessels in the port of New York. 

Be it enacted, by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in 
Congress assembled, That the Secretary of the Treasury is authorized, empowered, and directed 
to define and establish an anchorage ground for vessels in the bay and harbor of New York, and 



in tlie Hudson and East Rivers, to adopt suitable roles and regulations in relation thereto, and to 
take all necessary measures for the proper enforcement of such roles and regulations. 

Sec. -. That in the event of the violation of any such rules or regulations by the owner, 
master, or person in charge of any vessel, such owner, master, or person in charge of such vessel 
shall be liable to a penalty of one hundred dollars; and the said vessel may be holden for the 
payment of such penalty, and may be seized and proceeded against summarily by libel for the 
recovery of the same in any United States district court for the district within which such vessel 
may be, and in the name of the officer designated by the Secretary of the Treasury. 

Sec. 3. That this act shall take effect immediately. 

Approved, May Hi, 1888. 

Vessels shall anchor only within the following specified limits: 

EAST RIVER ANCHORAGES. 

1. To the northward of a line from the south point of Hart Island to Wrights Point. 

2. To the westward of a line from Wrights Point to Throgs Neck. 

3. To the southward of a line from buoy off Sands Point to buoy off Gangway Rock. 

4. To the southward of a line from buoy off Gangway Rock to center of Stepping Stones 
Light-House. 

5. To the eastward of a line from the center of Stepping Stones Light-House to Willets Point. 

6. On Hammond Flats, to the northward of a line from Throgs Neck to Old Ferry Point. 

7. To the southward of a line from Willets Point to Whitestone Point. 

8. On the north side of the channel, north of a line between Old Ferry Point and Hunts 
Point. 

!). On the south side of the channel, south of a line between Whitestone Point and buoy 
(No. 1) off College Point, and to the eastward of a line running from said buoy to College Point. 

10. In Flushing Bay, to the southward of a line from College Point to the north end of Hikers 
Island. 

11. To the southward of a line from the north end of Pikers Island to the north end of South 
Brother Island, thence to Lawrences Point. 

12. To the westward of a line from Stony Point to northeast end of Wards Island; and 
between Wards Island and Randalls Island, and between Randalls Island and Port Morris. 

13. To the westward of a line from the foot of One hundred and sixteenth street, New York, 
to the north end of Avenue B, New York ; but no vessel shall anchor on this anchorage within 
150 feet of any wharf or pier, or so as to impede the movements of a ferry, or so as to prevent 
ready access to or from the piers. 

14. To the eastward of a line from Hatters Dock to Gibbs Point (Hallets Cove, Astoria). 

15. To the southward of Thirty-first street and northward of Twenty-first street piers, and 
to the westward of a line passing through buoy No. 1, off Thirty-fourth street, and danger buoy, 
off Twentieth street. Small vessels of the United States Government and vessels carrying a 
distinctive signal prescribed by the Secretary of the Navy may anchor anywhere within these 
limits, provided they do not obstruct the approach to any pier or impede the movements of any 
ferryboat; and the officer in charge of anchorage grounds may, whenever he deems it advisable, 
move or cause to move any vessel not, in his opinion, complying with this proviso. 

HUDSON RIVER ANCHORAGES. 

16. Vessels may anchor in the Hudson River to the westward of the center line of said river 
running NE. § N. (correct magnetic) from Castle Point, and above Fourteenth street, Hobokeu ] 
Ferry Landing; provided that in no case shall a vessel anchor within 200 yards of the shore or in 
such position as to impede the movements of a ferry or to prevent ready access to or from a pier. 
A line of three white buoys marks the east limit of this anchorage ground. 

WESTERN ANCHORAGE, UPPER BAY. 

17. To the southward of the range passing through Wall Street Ferry, Brooklyn, and the 
white buoy to the north and east of Ellis Island, to the westward of a line running SW. by S. 



(nearly) from the said white buoy to the white buoy south of Bedloes Island and the white buoy 
j mile east from Bobbins Eeef Light- House, and to the northward of a line from Constables 
Point, through Bobbins Eeef Light-House, to the last-mentioned white buoy; provided that no 
vessel anchors in Ellis Island Channel or so as to obstruct the approaches to any pier within 
these limits. 

GOVERNORS ISLAND ANCHORAGE. 

IS. To the southward of Governors Island, within the triangular space included in lines 
running from Castle William to buoy No. 1, thence to buoy No. 3 in Buttermilk Channel. 

EASTERN ANCHORAGES, UPPER AND LOWER BATS. 

19. To the southward of a line passing through the Statue of Liberty on Bedloes Island, the 
two white buoys marking north limit of anchorage ground and the southern point of the north 
entrance to the Brie Basin; to the eastward of a range passing through Produce Exchange 
Tower, the east edge of Castle William, the white buoy marking north limit of anchorage ground, 
and buoys No. 14 and bell buoy off Owls Head; and to the eastward of a range passing through 
bell buoy off Owls Head, the western edge of Long Island in the Narrows, and eastern side of 
Fort Lafayette as far south as the East Channel, between buoys Nos. 4 and C ; provided that no 
vessel shall anchor within 300 yards of the Erie Basin, and that no vessel shall anchor so as to 
impede the movements of a ferry or so as to prevent ready access to or from the piers. 

20. Vessels may anchor on Dry Bomer Shoal and Plynns Knoll. 

STATEN ISLAND ANCHORAGE. 

21. To the southward of a line from St. Georges Ferry Landing, Staten Island, to the white 
buoy off St. Georges Landing and the railroad terminal docks at Bay Eidge, Long Island, and to 
the westward of a line running S. § W. (nearly) from the white buoy off St. Georges Landing, 
through the white buoys off Tompkinsville and Stapleton, Staten Island. To the westward of a 
line running SSE. £ S. (nearly) from Fort Tompkins to the buoy on Cravens Shoal, thence to 
buoys Nos. 11, 9, and 7, thence to Conovers Beacon ; but in no case shall a vessel anchor so as 
to impede the movements of any ferry or prevent ready access to or from any pier. 

The part of anchorage 21 lying between its northern boundary and the white buoy 800 yards 
soutli of said boundary is reserved for ships of war of all nations and vessels of the United States 
Government. 

[Note.— Vessels detained at upper quarantine may anchor between Fort Tompkins Light and Quarantine 
Wharf at Clifton, Staten Island.] 

SANDY HOOK BAT ANCHORAGE. 

22. To the southward of a line extending from East Beacon to Bayside Beacon (Point 
Comfort), provided they do not impede the movements of vessels in getting to and from the 
piers. In order to prevent injury to the submarine cables, vessels are forbidden to anchor when 
the East Beacon Light-House bears anywhere between the compass bearings of WSW. \ W. and 
SW. by W. % W. from the vessel, unless the said vessel is to the northward of the northern line 
of buoys of Gedneys Channel. No vessel shall anchor in any of the following channels : Gedneys 
Channel, Main Channel, Swash Channel, and East Channel, excepting in cases of great emergency, 
and then outside of the channels as marked by the buoys, and only until such time as they can 

procure assistance. 

23. Vessels carrying gunpowder or other explosives may anchor only as follows : 

First.— On the shoal ground to the eastward of Eickers Island, East Eiver, from \ to f of a 
mile from this island. 

Second.— On Jersey Flats, to the westward of a line running NE. by N. from the outer end of 
the pier, east of Black Tom Island; provided that such vessels do not anchor within 800 yards 
of Ellis Island or within 500 yards of any pier. 



6 

Third.— On the flats to the south of a line drawn from Bedloes Island to Oavena Point, New 
Jersey, and to the westward of a line from Bedloes island to Bobbins Beef; provided that they do 
not anchor within 1,000 yards of either Bedloes Island or Bobbins Beef Light or within 500 yards 
of any pier. Vessels (carrying explosives) of too great draft to use this anchorage may anchor 
only in (iravesend Bay, but not within 1,000 yards of the shore. 

All vessels laden with explosives while within the port will display at all times a red flag of 
at least 10 square feet surface at the masthead. Vessels so laden and without masts will display 
the Mag at least 10 feel above the uppermost deck. Points where cables and water pipes cross are 
clearly marked in red on the accompanying map, and all vessels are cautioned not to anchor so as 
to interfere with them. 

Ash scows, I he property of the municipalities bordering on the waters of the port, may be 
anchored in such places as the supervisor of anchorages may designate. 

The white mooring buoys off the upper Quarantine Station, in the Narrows, are exclusively 
for the use of vessels awaiting the first visit of the health officer, and are not to be occupied at 
any other time. 

All officers of revenue vessels at the port of New York are charged witli the enforcement of 
these rules and regulations, and are empowered to remove from her anchorage any vessel not 
anchored withiu the prescribed limits. 



REPORTS OF PASSENGER MOVEMENTS. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 111. 

Bureau of Navigation. 



Washington, I). C, July S, 1896. 



To Principal Officers of the Customs : 

You are hereby directed to forward reports of the monthly and quarterly passenger movements, 
mentioned in circular 87, current series, to the Bureau of Navigation. Treasury Department. These 
reports were formerly included in the reports of immigration, which are now forwarded to the Bureau of 
Immigration. 

Circular 87 is amended accordingly. 

W. E. CURTIS, 

Acting Secretary. 



RELATING TO LIFEBOATS AND RAFTS. 



greasnrtj; ^tpKt\mtu\ f 



Department Circular No. 112. 

STEAMBOAT-INSPECTION SERVICE, 

OFFICE OF 

THE SUPERVISING INSPECTOR-GENERAL, 

Washington, D. C, July 2, 1896. 
To Supervising and Local Inspectors of Steam Vessels, 

Boat and Baft Manufacturers, a.nd others: 

The Department having been informed that certain life rafts, not built according to the specifications 
presented to the Board of Supervising Inspectors at the time of the approval of such rafts, have been 
placed on steam vessels, all inspectors of steam vessels are hereby directed Dot to accept or pass hereafter 
'any life raft or lifeboat unless there shall be furnished with each a written guarantee, over the signature 
of the builder, that such raft or boat is constructed in strict accordance with the specifications presented 
to the Board of Supervising Inspectors at the time of its approval. 

It is further ordered, that on and after August 1, 1896, no life raft or lifeboat shall be accepted or 
passed by the inspectors of steam vessels unless it shall have permanently attached thereto a metallic 
plate having thereon, in raised letters and figures, the name of the maker of the raft or boat, the place 
where manufactured, the shop number, and date of manufacture ; and, if built of metal, the thickness 
thereof, Birmingham gauge. 



JAS. Ao DUMONT, 

Supervising Inspector- General. 



Approved : 

W. E. CUBTIS, 

Acting Secretary. 



REAPPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



%vz%mx% gjepartmcitt, 



1S96. 
Department Circular No. 113. 

Division of Customs. 

office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, July 7, 1896. 

To Collectors cvnd other Officers of the Customs: 

The following reappraisements of merchandise have been made by the United States General 

Appraisers during the week ending June 20, 1896. 

W. E. CURTIS, 

Acting Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEKS ENDING JUNE 13 AND 20, 1896. 

y. B. — In corresponding with the Board of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference should always be made to the number of lieappraisement. 

No. of Reappraise- 
ment, 

12280 Mirrors from Ullman & Engelmaun, Fuerth, April 20/96. 

Reclaim Spugel, No. 1995, entered at 1.40 marks per gross ; no advance. 
Add cases. 

12283 Cotton shoe laces, from Teussen & Bnren, Barmen, May 6, 1896. 

34 in. Art. 864, entered at .95, advanced to 1.04 marks per gross net. 
43 in. Art. 364, entered at 1.18, advanced to 1.29 marks per gross net. 
34 in. Art. 369, entered at 1.15, advanced to 1.26 marks per gross net. 
43 in. Art. 369, entered at 1.44, advanced to 1.58 marks per gross net. 
34 in. art. 370, entered at 1.19, advanced to 1.30 marks per gross net. 
43 in. Art. 370, entered at 1.50, advanced to 1.65 marks per gross net. 

12329 Mfs. Cotton & metal, from Sartrau Shehfz, Damascus, April 2, 1896. 

Bideanx, entered at 36.00, 41.00 and 43.20, advanced to 39.00, 45.00 and 47.00 piasters 

per pair. 
Drap de table, entered at 16.00, advanced to 17.00 piasters per piece. 
Chaise, entered at 4.00, 8.00 and 10.00 piasters per piece; no advance, 
Chaise entered at 10.20, advanced to 11.00 piasters per piece. 



12308 Colored cotton yarn, from Goldscbmidt, Hahlo&Co., Manchester, May L8/96. 

2/20 Tussali <;, entered at 3/24 per lb.; do advance. 

2/20 Tussali G, entered at 3/43 per lb.; do advance. 

•2/20 Wug. Tussali, entered at 3/3J per lb,; no advance. 

Case included in price. 
L2300 ...Mjs. Wool & Cotton, from Boessneck, Broesel & Co., Bradford, Mas 1 1/90. 

.'it in. Beaver, entered at 1/8, advanced to 1/4 per yd. 

54 in heavy (wills, entered at I'j'il., advanced to L3d per yd. 

r> i in. heavy Dunkin, entered at 1/6 per yd.; do advance. 

Less 31 per cent discount. 

Add making up and packing. 
J2257 ! Cigars, from Win. Hy. Tuoma.s & Bro., Havana, May 10/90. 

1/40 Perlas anillop, 1" [ntimidad, entered at $110.00 Sp. gold per L000; no advance. 

1/20 Delistes, 1" Intimidad, entered at $35.00 Sp. gold per L000; no advance. 

1/20 Bega. Especial, 1" Intimidad, entered at 69.00 Sp. gold per L000 ; no advance. 

1/40 PerfectOS, 1" Intimidad, entered at $105.00 Sp. gold per L000; no advance. 

1/20 Conchas Expecs. 1" Iutimidad, entered at $45.00 Sp. gold, per 1000; no advance. 

1/20 Durlanos linos, 1" Intimidad, entered at $50.00 Sp. gold per 1000; no advance. 

1/20 Petal Maria Anille, 1" Intimidad, entered at $69.00 Sp. gold per 1000; 110 advance. 

1/40 Marias Anille, 1" Intimidad, entered at $125.00 Sp. gold per 1000; no advance. 

Less 2' per cent discount. 

Add casing and stamps. 
1241!) Toys, from Samuel Neuhauser, Idar, Dec. 21/95. 

Cornelian marbles No. 1, entered at 42.00 marks per 1000; no advance. 

Flint marbles, No. 5 entered at 00.00 marks per 1000; no advance. 

Cornelian marbles No. 2, entered at 72.00 marks per 1000; no advance. 

Cornelian marbles, No. 2*, entered at 03.00 marks per 1000; no advance. 

flint marbles No. 4, entered at 27.00 marks per 1000; no advance. 

Discount 2^ per cent. 

From entered value deduct boxing and cases. 
12387 Silk embroidery & mfs. silk & mfs. cot. & metal, from Surhan Shehfz, Damascus, April 2006. 

Drap, entered at 52.20, advanced to 56.28 piasters each. 

Hakra, entered at 33.00, advanced to 35.25 piasters each. 

Ceinture, entered at 10.00, advanced to 10.32 piasters each. 

Drap de soie, entered at 155.00, advanced to 167.16 piasters each. 

Charbe, entered at 24.00, advanced to 25.36 piasters each. 

Coufie, entered at 67.20, advanced to 72.36 piasters each. 

Similar goods, similar advances. 
12285 Dressed furs on the skin, from Eysoldt & Co., London, May 14/06. 

Thibet lambs skins, entered at 8/11 and 8/6 each ; Discount 2] per cent. 

Add lot money and brokerage at •] per cent; dyeing at 1/-; packing, stamping &c. 

Advanced by addition of insurance at dyers, and amount of commission. 
12313 Colored cotton corduroy, from Hardt von Beruuth & Co., Manchester, May 15, 1S06. 

Blk. & white Partridge Cord, No. 2272, entered at 12 r V, advanced to L2||d. per yd. 

Bro. & white Partridge cord, No. 2690/91 &c, entered at 12^, advanced to 12};;d. 
per yd. 



12313 Colored cotton corduroy, etc. — Continued. 

Bro. & white Partridge cord, No. 2598, entered at 12£, advanced to 12f|d. per yd. 

Drab I (seconds) No. 342, entered at 9ff, advanced to 10|fd. per yd. 

Less -^fth. 

Less 21 per cent discount. 

Add cases and making up. 
12355 Colored cot. corduroy, from Tootal Broadhurst Lee Company, Manchester, May 18/96. 

27/28 col'd cot. corduroys (Myrtle 465, ivory 488, grey 454, &c.) entered at 8£, 
advanced to 9 Id. per yd. 

Less 2 J per cent discount. 

Add cases. 
12279 Colored cotton, from John Bernhardt, Hamburg, May 11/96. 

27 in. cot. printed flannels 1ST, entered at .34} mark per meter ; no advance. 

27 in. cot. printed flannels, N, entered at .35^ mark per meter; no advance. 

Discount 2 per cent. 

Add packing charges and labels. 
12118 Musical instruments, from T. & Ct. Jaccard du Grand, St. Croix, April 15/96. 

Cartels, entered at 14.00, advanced to 15.00 francs each. 

Add packing. 
12385 Gelatine, from Laughick & Co., Esslingen, May 8/96. 

60/40 c/m farblos gelatine, St. Ill, entered at 30.00, advanced to 32.00 marks per 100 
sheets. 

60/40 c/m farblos gelatine St. II, entered at 22.50, advanced to 24.00 marks per 100 
sheets. 

Less 3 per cent discount. 

Less 5 per cent discount. 

Add cases. 
12293 Mfs. wool & cotton, from Simon Israel & Co., Bradford, May 14/96. 

Blue and blk. serge, M 9049, entered at 10 1 d., advanced to lid. per yd. 

56 in. Blk. Un. coatings 06050, entered at 1/41 d. per yd.; no advance. 

Less discounts of 21 per cent and 11 per cent. 

Add making up and packing. 
11931 Mf. Wool & Cot, from J. Zossenheim & Partners, Leeds, April 9/96. 

Naps 27/702, entered at 1/10, advanced to 2/- per yd. 

Less -jVth and ^th. 

Less 31 per cent discount. 

Add cases &c. 

12217 ) 

12218 [Dec. & while earthenware, from A. J.Wilkinson, Ltd., Burslem, Apr. 15, 22, 1896. 

12219 ) 

Printed and gilt earthenware with handles, entered at discounts of 35 per cent, 5 per 
cent, 5 per cent and 2} per cent; no advance. 

Printed and gilt earthenware, entered at discounts of 37a per cent, 5 per cent, 5 per 
cent and '21 per cent; no advance. 

Add casks and straw at L8/6 less 5 per cent, 5 per cent and 2J per cent. 

Enameled and gilt earthenware entered at discounts of 30 per cent, 5 per cent, 5 per 
cent aud 2a per cent; no advance. 

Add cases and packiug less 5 per cent, 5 per cent and 2J per cent. 



12371 Surface coaled paper, from Bunt & Lnxnspapier I'abrik, Goldbach, April 23/96. 

61 c/m green and red glaze, entered at "..-jo. advanced to •".. to marks per 500 bogen. 
Bremerblan and green glaze, entered al 7. 7n. advanced to 8.10 marks per 500 bogen. 
Bremerblan and green anglazed, entered al 7. on. advanced to 7. •_'."> marks per 500 bogen. 
Discount 2 per cent. 
Less inland freight. 
Add eases, paper &c. 

10191"" Cotton Lace curtains and cotton nettings, from P>. Walker & Co., Ltd., Lenton, Notting- 

ham, May 8, 29/96. 

Et. curtains, No. 1918, 60 in., 3J yds., entered al 2/2, advanced to 2/4 per pair. 

Bern Cot. Hambg. net, No. 003, 50 in., entered at 5'd. per yd.; no advance. 

IvoryCol. Hambg. netting, No. 901, 50 in., entered at 6d., advanced to 6id. per yd. 

Lvorj iS: while cot. Hambg. net, F L5, 15 in., entered at 31, advanced to 3$d. per yd. 

Ivory bed sets. No. 6202, entered at 5/9, advanced to (i/.'i per set. 

Wht. S LOO Cot. Hambg. net, 54 in., entered at 3d., advanced to 33d. per yd. 

Wht. S 100 cot. Hambg. net, 60 in., entered at 5d., advanced l<> 6Jd. per yd. 

Similar goods, similar advances. 

Add cases at 8/- each. 

Discount 12 '• per cent. 

Inland carriage deducted. 

L2369 Spun silk, from John Keenan & Co., Bradford, May 20/96. 

Tussah Gnssed warps, entered at 3/6 per lb.; no advance. 
Less 2J per cent discount. 

12290 Spun silk, from A. Allen & Co., Bradford, May 14/96. 

Spun silk warps entered at 3/6 per lb.; no advance. 

Less 2j per cent discount. 
11000 Metal thread, from Max Rosenberg, Paris, April 16/06. 

Gold thread faux, entered at 4.75 francs per kilo ; advanced by disallowance of 5 per 
cent discount deducted on entry. 

Add cases and packing. 
12314 Bleached cotton, from Tootal Broadhnrst Lee Company, Ltd., Manchester, May ls/Ofi. 

29/30 White picque, 0/307. entered at 6Jd. ; no advance. 

Less 3 per cent. 

Add cases &c. and tickets. 

12236 Cotton braid and shoe laces, from E. End Hummel, Barmen, May 6th, 1S0G. 

51 in. Eusset philipol, entered at 1.27, advanced to 1.32 marks per gross. 
43 in. russet philipol, entered at 1.09, advanced 1.14 marks per gross. 
36 in. termopol, entered at 1.10, advanced to 1.17 marks per gross. 
36 in. cosmopol, entered at 1.33, advanced to 1.37 marks per gross. 
Inland freight, paper, labels &c, and cases included in price. 

12271 Sugar not above No. 16 J). S., from Robt. Crooks & Co., Liverpool, May 9/96. 

Fifths, entered at 10/0, advanced to 11/li per cwt. pkd. 
Less 2} per cent discount. 
Packages included in price. 



12336 Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from Bobert Crooks, & Co., Liverpool, May 15/06. 

Fourths, entered at 13/3, advanced to 13/6 per cwt. pkd. 
Less 2 J per cent discount. 
Packages included in price. 

12363 Sugar above No. 16 B. 8., from L. E. Lcweustam, Amsterdam, May 7/06. 

Super. Granulated, entered at 17.85, advanced to 18.07 lloiins per 100 kilos pkd. 

12348 1 

Joqto" \-8ngar not above No. 16 D. 8., from Kausohoff & Wessler &c, Hamburg, April 21/06 &c. 

&c.....7.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.J 

Beetroot sugar entered at 11/11 per cwt. on basis of 88° analysis ; advanced to 12/0 

per cwt. on basis of 88.66 analysis, pkd. 
Beetroot sugar entered at 0/11 per cwt. on basis of 75° analysis; advanced to 11/7.88 
on basis of 82.025 analysis, pkd. 

12316 Sugar not above No. 16 J). 8., from T. & E. Williams, Hamburg, April 28/06. 

Sugar entered at 11.70 per cwt. on basis of SS°; advanced to 12.00 marks per cwt. on 
basis of 80.10 analysis, pkd. 

12212 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from I. E. A. Cladyen, Magdeburg, April 13/06. 

Sugar entered at 0.022 marks per 50 kilos on basis of 75° test; advanced to 11.176 
marks per 50 kilos on basis of 70.425 test. 

11876 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from E. II. Kerr, Montego Bay, Mch. 31/06. 

Sugar entered on basis of S0° test, at £11.10.0 advanced to £11.15.6 per ton pkd. on 

basis of 90. 65 test. 
Add cost of filling, & hhds. to entered value. 

12335 Sugar not abave No. 16 B. S., from Ker & Co., Iloilo, Feb. 25, 1806. 

Superior No. 1 sugar, entered at $4.81 i, advanced to $5,063 per pel. pkd. 

12262 Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from Hidalgo & Co., Havana, April 15/06. 

Centrifugal sugar, entered on basis of 03° test, at $.02657, advanced to $.0200 per lb. 

pkd., on basis of 96.10 test. 
Centrifugal sugar, entered on basis of 03° test, at $.02657, advanced to $.02548S per 
lb. pkd., on basis of 80° test. 

12307 Sugar not above No. 16 I). 8., from Jas. Lee & Co., St. Ann's Bay, May 6, 1896. 

Jamaica Muscavado sugar, entered on basis of 89° test at 11.2.7 per ton ; advanced to 

11. 10. 11 i per ton pkd. on basis of 91.90 test. 
Costs of bags included in entered price. 

12086 Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from Sam'l Abbot, St. Kitts, April 7/96. 

Muscavado sugar, entered, on basis of 92° test, at $.02669, advanced to $.024915 per 
lb. pkd., on basis of 88.75 test. 

12394 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S.. from Wm. Fisk, Trinidad, May 14, 1S96. 

Muscavado sugar entered, on basis of 93° test, at $.02548 advanced to $.0265 per lb. 
pkd., on basis of 94.45 test. 

12380 Sugar not above No. 16 T>. 8., from Nicolas Castano, Cienfuegos, April 21/96. 

Centrifugal sugar, entered, on basis of 96° test, at $.02781, advanced to $.0297 per lb. 

pkd., on basis of 96.20. 
Molasses sugar, entered, on basis of 89° test, at $.02281, advanced to $.0240 per lb. 
pkd. on basis of 90.85 test. 



12366 sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from A. Rauscbenplat, San Juan, May 11, 1896. 

.Molasses sugar, entered, on basis of 89° test, at $.03077 advanced to $.03354 on basis 
ofS9.:;<> test, per lb. pkd. 

12367 Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from Hidalgo & Co.. Havana, May 8, 1896. 

Sugar entered on basis of 94° test at $.0261, advanced to $.02907 per lb. pkd. on basis 
of 95. I 22 lest. 

L2345 Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from Zuckflchuerd & Bnchel, Magdeburg, April 21/96. 

Beetroot sugar, entered, on basis of >S0.0i)<; analysis, at LO/6, advanced to 11/1.08 per 

ewt. pkd.. on basis of 80.3875 analysis. 

L2241 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from Frederico Flunicke, Cienfuegos, April 22/96. 

La Rosa and Jacqua sugar entered, on basis of 93 test, at $.02695, reappraised at 

$.02(;:i:: per lb. pkd., on basis of 90.852. 

12321 Sugar not above No. 16 T>. 8., from S. B. Vicini & Co., Macoris, April 29, 1896. 

Centrifugal sugar, entered, on basis of 92° test, at $.02327, advanced to $.02675 per 

lb. pkd., on basis of 95.92 test. 

Molasses sugar entered, on basis of 83° test, at $.01697, advanced to $.0210 per lb. 

pkd., on basis of 88.35 test. 

12417 Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from , Manzanilla, May 18, 1896. 

Centrifugal sugar, entered, on basis of 96° test, at $.02872 Sp. gold., reappraised at 

$.028645 Sp. gold per lb. pkd. on basis of 94.05 test. 

121 1 1 Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from Edward Benn & Son, Bahia, Mar. 12, 1896. 

Sugar entered, on basis 84° test, at 10/1.1, reappraised at 9/9.14 per cwt. pkd. on 

basis of 82.68 test. 

12221 Sugar nut above No. 16 D. S., from Frank Holland, Antigua, April 13/96. 

Sugar entered, on basis of 83° test, at $.02117, advanced to $.02282 per lb. pkd. on 

basis of S5.40 test. 

Sugar entered, on basis of 86° test, at $.02304. advanced to $.02326 per lb. pkd. on 

basis of 86. 10 test. 

Sugar entered, on basis of 85° test, at $.02242, advanced to $.0230 per lb. pkd. on 

basis of 85.70 test. 

12244 Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8. from E. G. Todd, St. Kitts, May 2/96. 

Sugar, entered, on basis of 89° test, at $.02506, reappraised at $.02438 per lb. pkd. on 

basis of 87. 90 test. 

•3041 OP "j 

!° 420P \Mfs. Silk, from Meckel & Co., Elberfeld, April 9/96, April 2/96, etc. 

Phiia J 

24 J Faconne No. 14584/92 &c, entered at .81, advanced to .89 mark per meter. 

27 J, Satin 2 a black, Nos. 6525 and 43', entered at .94, advanced to 1.03 marks per 

meter. 
27 J Satin 3! blk. & brown, No. 6522.31.34. entered at 1.08, advanced to 1.25 marks 

per meter. 
27 J Satin 15 brown No. 6527, entered at 1.30, advanced to 1.42 mai'ks per meter. 
30 J II silk reps. L 3, No. 691S.6927, entered 2.05, advanced to 2.10 marks per meter. 
36 J Serge 1 1 blk. & col'd, No. 6539.6501 &c, entered at 1.07, advanced to 1.17 marks 

per meter. 
21 J figured silk, No. 1297, entered at 2.10, advanced to 2.30 marks per meter. 



3041 OP . 

3042 OP . 

&c 

Phila 



\ Mfs. 



SilJc, etc. — Continued. 



J 



24 Satin blk., No. 12, entered at 1.10, advanced to 1.20 marks per meter. 

H silk Eeps. T If, entered at .95, advanced to 1.04 marks per meter. 

51 H silk cloakiugs B 75500, entered at 2.10, advanced to 2.30 marks per meter. 

Cases, packing, rolls, paper, tickets, etc., included in price. 

Similar goods, similar advances. 

3090 OP ) 

3014 OP Y Woolens, from Wallace & Co., Bradford, Feb. 28/96, May 1/96. 

Baltimore ) 

55/56 No. 398 blk. cott. coatings, entered at 1/5], reappraised at 1/5 per yd. 

55/56 No. 279 blk. Avorsted coatings, entered at 2/1 per yd. ; no advance. 

55/56 No. 443 blk. worsted coatings, entered at 2/5, advanced to 2/8 per yd. 

55/56 No. 2S5 blk. worsted coating, entered at 1/9], advanced to 1/10 per yd. 

55/56 No. 394 blk. worsted coating, entered at 2/2, advanced to 2/4 per yd. 

55/56 No. 354 blk. worsted coating, entered at 2/3, advanced to 2/4] per yd. 

Less ^fth. Less 5 per cent discount. 

Add cases. 
3043 OP 1 

30^° OP 

^ c \-Mfs. of Silk, from Job. Gobi & Sons, Wien, Mar. 21, 28, Apr. 4, 11, 1896. 

Phila.".".'.'"'.".'.* J 

Arnmre, entered at .69, advauced to .75 florins per meter. 

Halb retten, entered at .50, advauced to .55 florins per meter. 

Asphalt, entered at .84, advanced to .92 florins per meter. 

Amazone Cashmere, entered at 1.28, advanced to 1.40 florins per meter. 

Mylord, entered at 1.14, advanced to 1.25 florins per meter. 

Mosaikj entered at .76, advauced to .83 florins per meter. 

Figured satin, entered at 1.25, advauced to 1.37 florins per meter. 

Brocat H, entered at 1.61, advauced to 1.77 florins per meter. 

Add cases and packiDg. 
Sugar above No. 16 D.S., from Herman Remcke, Hamburg, Apr. 4/96. 

Granulated sugar, entered at 13/-, advanced to 13/81 per 50 ] kilos pkd. 
Sugar above No. 16 D. S., from Bobt. Crooks & Co., Hamburg, May 2/96. 

Granulated sugar entered at 14/4], less nondutiable charges, advauced to 14/0] per 50 
I kilos net. 



3085 OP 
Phila 



3135 OP 

Boston... 



3068 OP.. 
Baltimore. 



3121 OP... 
Baltimore. 



3123 OP... 
Baltimore. 



Sugar above No. 16 T>. S., from L. E. Lowenstein, Amsterdam, April 13/96. 

Sugar entered at 17.733 florins per 100 kg., advauced to 15/3] percwt. of 112 lbs. pkd. 
Sugar above No. 16 D. S., from Suikerraffiuaderij, Rosendaal, April 20/96. 
Granulated sugar entered at $3,168 per 100 lbs., less cartage; advanced to 15/5 per 
cwt. pkd. net. 
Sugar above No. 16 D. S., from Gebr. Michalles, Hamburg, April 15/96. 
Extra f. grauulated, entered at $3. 1185 per 100 lbs., less 5/6 per cent discount and 
cartage ; advanced to 14/3-5 per cwt. pkd. net. 



','.'• .'.' ■ Bugw above No. 16 l>. 8., from Aunbruster & Kalkow. Magdeburg, May 11/96. 

German granulated BUgar, entered at L5/- per cwt., less I per oenl freight and N. D. 
charges, advanced to 13/10J per cwt. pkd. net. 
12106 Wf. Sill,- A- Cotton, from L. Permeze] & Co., Lyons. Apr. 28, 1896. 

is sai i lii-, entered at . 75, advanced to .92 franc per meter. 

is satin conlenr, entered al .70, advanced to .si' franc per meter. 

IS sal in conlenr, entered at .75, advanced to .02 franc per meter. 

Is satin conlenr. entered :it .98, advanced to L.12 francs per meter. 
is satin blanc, entered at .80, advanced to 1.02 franc per meter. 

Less 20 per cent discount. 

Farther advanced by disallowance of second discount of 8 per cent. 
Add cases and packing. 

L2372 l//'. silk A- Cotton, from Wra. Schroeder & Co., Crefeld, May 18/96. 

27 in. satin noir. entered at L.30, 1. 10, L.65, L.50 marks per meter; no advance. 

27 in. satin noir, entered at 1.30 marks per meter; advanced to I. I<> marks per meter. 

36 in. Bad noir, entered at 1.40, advanced to 1.50 marks per meter. 

36 in. rad noir, entered at 1.30, advanced 1.45 marks per meter. 

36 in. rad (job) entered at 1.20, advanced to 1.32 marks per meter. 

36 in. rad, entered at 1.00, advanced to 1.15 marks per meter. 

36 in. rad, entered at 1.10, advanced to 1.30 marks per meter. 

27 in. satin noir, entered at 1.10, advanced to 1.20 marks per meter. 

Add cases, packing, labels and wrappers. 
12221 !(/'. silk, from Kallmann, Streuli & Co., Zurich, May 7/96. 

51 e/m Taffetas blc, entered at 1.90, advanced to 2.30 francs per aune. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

1227H 1//'. silk & cation, from Foyer Durand & Collon, Lyons, May 4/96. 

!)4 c/iu ecru faconne, entered at 1.50, advanced to 1.60 francs per meter. 
94 c/m ecru Austria, entered at .SO, advanced to .85 francs per meter. 
Less 20 per cent discount. 

12299 1//'. Silk, from A. Bisson & Sairzi, Lyons, May 15/96. 

t>0 c/m cristalline noir soie & coton, entered at .75, advanced to 1.05 francs per meter. 
10 c/m cotele soie & coton, noir & couleur, entered at .60, advanced to .85 franc per 

meter. 
■10 c/m, Arnmre soie & coton noir. entered at .674, advanced to 1.00 franc per meter. 
60 c/m Satin imprime soie & coton, entered at 1.20, advanced to 1.30 francs per meter. 
Less 20 per cent discount. 
Cost of packing included in price. 

12:150 Wf. silk & cotton, from Chr. Sponem Herzog, Lyons, May 21/96. 

Satin, blanc & creme, entered at .75, advanced to .90 francs per meter. 

Less 20 per cent discount. 
12201 Col'd COt. pel pel & ool'd collon, from Weiss, Fries & Co., Mulhouse, May 5/96. 

80 c/m velours meuble c, entered at 1.70, advanced to 2.10 marks per meter. 

SO c/m toile a voile, entered at .85 marks per meter ; no advance, 

Add packing and cases, 



9 

12425 Cotton hose, from I. S. Glaiser, Jun., Chemnitz, May 11/96. 

Half hose, blk., entered at 2.35 marks per doz., less 5 per cent discount plus case, 
boxes, labels, packing, etc., advanced to 3.40 marks per dozen pkd., discount 5 
per cent. 

12357 Mf. silk, from Bretthal & Co., Crefeld, May 20/96. 

60 c/m XXII, entered at 2.10, advanced to 2.25 marks per meter. 

Add packing, labels and wrappers. 
12057 Silk velvet, from Guise & Co., Lyons, April 30/96. 

Velours coul., 55 c/m, entered at 9.70 francs per meter; no advance. 

Pekin 53 c/m, entered at 2.05, advanced to 2.25 francs per meter. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

Add cases. 

REAPPKAISEMENTS BY BOARDS. 

11175 1 

3416 I 

11200 I 

3417 y Tantb' d cot. sash&c, from Sturzenegger & Tanner, St. Gall, Feb. 6, 20, April 30, 1896, etc. 

12130 

3418 | 

&c J 

Tamboured muslin sash, 30 J white, Xo. 268, entered at .52, advanced to .57 franc 

per yd. 
Tamboured muslin sash 30 J white, Xo. 894, entered at .45, advanced to .49 franc 

per yd. 
Tamboured muslin sash 30 J white, Xo. 903, entered at .46, advanced to .50 franc 

per yard. 
Tamboured muslin sash 30 J white, Xo. 773, entered at .47, advanced to .52 franc 

per yard. 
Tamboured muslin sash 30 J white, Xo. 775, entered at .50, advanced to. 55 franc 

per yard. 
Tamboured muslin sash 30 J white, Xo. 774, entered at .51, advanced to .54 franc 

per yard. 
Irish point lace 30 J Xo. white 877, entered at 1.80 francs per yard ; no advance. 
Tamboured cot. sash, 30 J white, 895 S B, entered at .53, advanced to .58 franc per 

yard. 
Tamboured cot. sash 30 J white 895 D B, entered at .66, advanced to .72 franc per 

meter. 
Similar goods, similar advances. 
Add cases, boxes and packing. 

12117 ) 

3396 > Gelatine, from Deutsche Gelatine-Pabriken, Hoechst-a-Main, April 20/96. 

White gelatine, 4B silver label, entered at 155.00, advanced to 171.00 marks per 100 

kilos. 
White gelatine white 5 loose, entered at 140.00, advanced to 156. 75 marks per 100 kilos. 
White gelatine B loose, entered at 125.00, advanced to 147.25 marks per 100 kilos. 
Costs of packing, cases, etc. included in price. 
113—2 



10 

1 1 988 1 

.,.,'.'.' V 8Uk & wool veilinff, from Win. Openhym & Sons, Paris, April 16/96. 

tin o/m *'■'>/(!, entered at .39, advanced (<> . 16 franc per meter. 
60 o/in 113/K, entered at .47, advanced to .■">"> franc per meter. 
60 o/m 500/0, entered at .31, advanced to .36 franc per meter. 
60 e/m (i00/E, entered at .35, advanced to .41 franc per meter. 
60 o/m 800/J, entered at .42, advanced to .49 franc per meter. 
60 c/m 900/K, entered at .47. advanced to .55 franc per meter. 
Similar goods, similar advances. 
Discount 7i per cent ; bonification 1 per cent. 
Add cases. 

10050 1 

"',' [ Manufactures of Wool, from Chas. Lemon & Co., Bradford, May 0/96. 

57/58 in. Vent. blk. 688, entered at 3/9, advanced to 3/10.13 per yd. 

Less ^7-th. 

Less 5 per cent discount. 

Add case, oil cloth and making up. 

*|J*j° I Mf. Goat hair & cotton, from David & Co., Berlin, April 20/96. 

Art. 117, entered at 4.20, advanced to 4.50 marks per meter. 
Discount 7 per cent. 
Add packing charges. 

}Jfjfi 9 I Mf. goat hair and cotton, from Henry Walker & Sons, Mirfield, April 29/96. 

390 & 392, entered at 3/6, advanced to 4/- per yd. 
Less ¥ Vtii and \ yd. iu 10. 
Less 2} per cent discount. 
Add cases. 
12254 ") 

•21QO I 

1 ,;," \ Mf. goat hair and cotton, from Ferdinaud Heilborn & Co., Bradford May 6, 15, 1896. 

3442................ J 

Mixed knit fabric No. 342/6, entered at 3/3, advanced to 3/3.59 per yd. 

Mixed knit fabric No. 512, entered at 1/10, advanced to 1/10.33 per yd. 

Fancy mantling No. 392/6, entered at 3/3, advanced to 3/3.59 per yd. 

Fancy knit fabric No. 510/4, entered at 2/5, advanced to 2/5.44 per yd. 

Fancy mantling No. 392/1/5, entered at 3/4, advanced to 3/4.60 per yd. 

Blk. knit fabric a445, entered at 3/8, advanced to 3/8.66 per yd. 

Blk fancy curl, No. 433, entered at 3/11, advanced to 3/11.71 per yd. 

Similar goods, similar advances. 

Less 3^ measure. 

Less 5 per cent discount. 

Add making up and packing. 

i 2 _„ [ Cement non-hydraulic, from B. Friedr. Meyer, Frieburg, Feb. 1/96. 

Meyers German Stone Cement, entered at 2.00 francs per kilo; no advance. 
Add demijohn and cases. 



11 

3395........."!!.! [ Chemical preparation, from Fahlberg, List & Co., Saltke Westerhusen, Mar. 25/96. 

Saccharine, Brand S R, entered at 49.00, advanced to 54.50 marks per kilo packed. 

Add cases, packing &c, to entered value. 
g 394 "■" [ Cigarettes, from Philip Morris & Co., Ltd., London, Jan. 17/96. 

Blues carp, tipped cigarettes, entered at 46/10, advanced to 52/- per 1000. 

Cambridge carp, tipped cigarettes, entered at 42/4, advanced to 47/- per 1000. 

Add case. 

Add boxes to appraised value. 
3059 '" [ Pocket knives, from Edward Owen & Co., Birmingham, Dec. 6, 1895. 

Pocket knives 1094, entered at 14/3, advanced to 18/- per gross pkd. 

Add case and packing to entered value. 
I9074 ) 

g 415 y Sponges, from Fernando Solozatar, Havana, May 16/96. 

Coupe forms, white, entered at $1.15, advanced to $1.25 Sp. gold per lb. 

Light red forms, entered at $1.30, advanced to $1.40 Sp. gold per lb. 

Light red coupe forms, entered at $1.00, advanced to $1.10 Sp. gold per lb. 

Bed, entered at .90, advanced to .95 Sp. gold per lb. 

Velvet grass, entered at .80, advanced to .85 Sp. gold per lb. 

And cases and packing. 
11927 ) 

3404..'!!!.".!!!!!!!! J Cot Mlc f s - & cot - Jidkfs. in the piece, from Jas. McCorry, Belfast, April S/96. 

Bordered cot. No. 252, 4/8 (15), entered at 5d., advanced to 5-ld. per dozen. 

Hemstitched printed, 4/8 (14j, entered at 6|d., advanced to 7Jd. per dozen. 

Discount 2] per cent. 

Add cases. 

Similar goods, similar advances. 

10098 ) 

3371....!!!!!!!!!! { M f- wo ° l & cotton i from A - & S. Henry & Co., Ltd., Huddersfield, Apr. 22/96. 

54 in. blk. President wool & cotton, 6206/1, entered at 1/4 J, advanced to 1/4.91 per yd. 

Less ^th. 

Less 5 per cent discount. 

Add making up at 6d. per piece ; cases at 35/- each. 

11560 1 ' ' 

3338 j 

116 99 \Mf. wool & cotton, from Clover Bros., Leeds, Mar. 11, Jan. 23/96. 

3340 I ' ' 

&c J 

54 in. 24 ozs. woolens cotton warp, entered at 1/2, advanced to 1/4 per yd. 

54 in. 28 J ozs. woolens cotton warp, entered at 1/4, advanced to 1/5* per yd. 

Add cases and packing. 

LT 54 in. 141 ozs., entered at 9f, advanced to lOd. per yd. 

T4, 54 in., 17/18 ozs., entered at 1/-, advanced to 1/1 per yd. 

T, 54 in. 16 ozs., entered at 1/-, advanced to 1/1 per yd. 

Melton, 54 in, 18/19 ozs., entered at 1/2, advanced to 1/3 per yd. 

PP, 54 in., 24 ozs., entered at 1/2 1, advanced to 1/5 per yd. 

Similar goods, similar advances. 

Less ^,-th. 

Less 31 per cent discount. 

Add cases and packing charges. 



11110.. 
321')... 



12 

11794 1 

3378 

g^?g \-Mfs. wool & cotton, from Simon Israel & Co., Bradford, April 9, 16, Mar. 17, 30, 1896. 

11660..! '.'. | 

3376 J 

54 in cheviot-, M9049, entered at 10J, advanced to lid per yd. 

50 in. melton H 4010, entered at 6J, advanced to 7d. per yd. 

54 in. blk. cheviot, M 9079, entered at 10, advanced to lid. per yd. 

50 in. melton H 4010, entered at 71, advanced to 73 d. per yd. 

Loss trade discount 2\ per cent. 

Less cash discount 11 per cent. 

Add making up and packing. 

12133 "J 

iiq?r"" \ Surface coated paper, from Leonard Biermans, Turnhout, April 16, 30, 1896. 

3369 I 

Bed flint Nos. 4978, 7948, 1923, 7954, Green flint, No. 2897, Maroon flint, No. 7957, 

green flint No. 7989, 24 in., entered at 4/10, advanced to 5/2 per ream of 500 

sheets. 
White flint No. 4733, 24 in., eutered at 4/10, advanced to 5/7 per ream of 500 sheets. 
Silk green, 7988, 24 x 25, entered at 6/1, advanced to 6/3 per ream of 500 sheets. 
Blue flint No. 3963, 20 x 25, entered at 5/1, advanced to 5/2 per ream of 500 sheets. 
Bronze flint, No. 6008, 20 x 24, entered 4/10, advanced to 5/2 per ream of 500 sheets. 
Bed flint No. 4978, 20 x 25, entered at 5/1, advanced to 5/4 per ream of 500 sheets. 
Bronze watered, No. 6008/1025, 24 in. wide, entered at 6/8, advanced to 7/- per ream 

of 500 sheets. 
Less inland freight and shipping charges. 
Add cases. 
Less 5 per cent discount. 

°™ | Mfs. Gomp. of Wool pulp, from Heinrich Helurg, Mannheim, June 10/95. 

Wood pulp for filtering, bleached entered at 50., advanced to 100.00 marks per 100 

kilos. 
Wood pulp for filtering, unbleached, entered at 35, advanced to 85 marks per 100 
kilos. 



Wool lining, from J. Cawthra & Co., Ltd., Bradford, Feb. 7/96. 
32 in. blk. Italians, No. 617, entered at 7|d. per yd.; no advance. 
32 in. Blk. Italians, No. 630, entered at 9Jd., advanced to 9}d. per yd. 
32 in. blk. Italians, No. 625, entered at 8|d., advanced to 8|d. per yd. 
54 in. twills, No. 748, entered at lid., advanced to 11 td. per yd. 
54 in. fan. Italians, No. 4390, entered at 16|d. per yd.; no advance. 
54 in. fan. Italians, No. 4391, entered at 183d. per yd.; no advance. 
54 in. Pan. Italians, No. 4392, entered at 193d. per yd.; no advance. 
32 in. twills, No. 748, entered at 61, advanced to 6|d. per yd. 
Similar goods, similar advances. 
Less allowance of 1 yd. per piece. 
Less 3 J per cent discount. 



13 



12043. 
3414... 



10960. 
3266... 



1 Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from Rousohoff & Wessler, Rotterdam, Mar. 23/96. 

Beet root sugar entered, on basis of 75° test, at 9/9, advanced to 10/10.655 per cwt. 
pkd. on basis of 79.77 test. 

1 Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from Prancke Hijos & Co., Havana, Jan. 18/96. 

Sugar entered, on basis of 93° test, at $.02489, advanced to f.025 per lb. pkd., on 
basis of 95. 30 test. 

2995 OP ^) 

741 I Woolens, from Weise & Newmann, Summerfeld, Jan. 20/96. 

Baltimore ) 

No. 30106 C, 74 J, entered at 7.50 marks per meter ; no advance. 

No. 30212 C 74 J, entered at 7.50 marks per meter ; no advance. 

No. 30558 P 74 J, entered at 5.00 marks per meter ; advanced to 5.50 marks per meter. 

Discount of 2 per cent allowed from appraised value; not deducted on entry. 

Packing and case included in price. 



2776 O P.. 

710 

2775 OP... 

709 

&c 

San Francisco.., 



> Refined sugar above No. 16 D. 8., from Taikoo Sugar Refining Company, Hong Kong, 
Aug. 26, Aug. 17 and Sep. 6/95. 



Sugar entered at $6.53. $6,715 and $6.48 Mexican curreucy, advanced to 
currency per picul pkd. 

9GAC OP . "} 

754 (• Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from R. Crooks & Co., Liverpool, Jan. 8/96. 

Phila ) , , 

Fifths, entered at 9/2/5, advanced to 9/10/1 per ton pkd. 

Less 2J per cent discount. 

1 



.97 Mex. 



2961 OP 

774 

Boston .. 
3008 OP 

775 

Boston .. 



11733.. 
3393... 



11788.. 
3374... 



\ Maccaroni, from Talbot Freres, Bordeaux, Mch. 2, 14, 1896. 

: 

Macaroni Pastisca, entered at 5.00, advanced to 5.67 francs per box of 25 1 lb. pkgs. 

packed. 
Macaroni, entered at 10.78, advanced to 11.00 francs per case of 50 1 lb. pkgs. pkd. 
Macaroni, entered at 6.60 francs per case of 25 1 lb. pkgs.; no advance. 

| Mf. silk & Cot, from L. Permezel & Co., Lyons, Feb. 6/96. 

19" Gascogue imprime, entered at .90, advanced to .99 francs per meter. 
19" Tornea imprime, entered at 86, advanced to 1.00 franc per meter. 
Less discount 20 per cent ; tares 3 per cent. 
Add case and packing. 
■ \ Mf. silk & Cotton, from Bayard Aine & Fils, Lyons, April 8/96. 

Satin 46 c/m No. 1301, entered at .60, advanced to .65 frauc per meter. 
Satin 46 c/m No. 1302, entered at .77, advanced to .90 franc per meter. 
Satin 58 c/m, No. 3289, entered at .70, advanced to .85 frauc per meter. 
Satin 61 c/m, No. 4243, entered at 2.25 francs per meter; no advance. 
Serge 61 c/m, No. 3724, entered at .72, advanced to .85 franc per meter. 



14 

11788 *) 

f.o-^, Mf. xilk <fc Cotton, etc. — Continued. 

Bengaline, grege & cot., No. 4349, entered at 1.25, advanced to 1.35 francs per meter. 
Satin 46 c/m No. 1301 (second), entered at .50, advanced to. 55 franc per meter. 
Similar goods, similar advances. 
Discount 20 per cent. 
Packing included in cost of goods. 
3310... | "^ ® ilk ^ < '" llon - ,I ' om Henry Gorgus, Lyons, Feb. 26/96. 

Raw serge 92 c/m, entered at .85, advanced to .87 franc per meter. 

Faconne coul., 92 c/m. entered at 1.30 francs per meter; no advance. 

Serge coul., 92 c/m, entered at .95 and 1.30 francs per mater ; no advance 

Satin quadrille 92 c/m, entered at 1.95 francs per meter; no advance. 

Raw foulard last 54 c/m jumello, entered at 1.45 francs per meter; no advance. 

Less discounts of 20 per cent and 1 per cent. 

Add cases and packing. 



RULES AM) REGULATIONS 



RELATING TO THE 



ANCHORAGE AND MOVEMENT OF VESSELS IN 
THE HARBORS OF CHICAGO. 



JULY, 1 8 Q e. 



THE ANCHORAGE AND MOVEMENT OF VESSELS IN THE PORT OF CHICAGO, ILL. 



Department Circular No. 114. 



Division of Revenue-Cutter Service, So. 68. 

Office of THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, July V, 1896. 

The Rules and Regulations relating to the Anchorage and Movement of Vessels in the 
harbors of Chicago 'will be strictly observed, and all officers of revenue cutters at the port 
of Chicago are hereby empowered and directed, in cases of necessity or -when a proper notice 
has been disregarded, to use the force at their command to remove from the channel ways 
any vessel found violating the rules, a copy of which is subjoined. 

Violations of the Regulations that require immediate action shall be reported to the 
Commanding Officer of the Revenue Steamer Calumet, and all communications referring to 
the rules aud limits of Anchorage Grounds at the port of Chicago will be addressed to that 
officer. 

J. G. CARLISLE, 

Secretary. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS RELATING TO THE ANCHORAGE OF VESSELS IN THE PORT OF CHICAGO. 



The following-described Anchorage Grounds for vessels in the harbors of Chicago and the 
waters of Lake Michigan adjacent thereto are hereby denned and established, and the following 
Rules and Regulations in relation to the same are hereby adopted and published for the govern- 
ment of the owners, masters, or persons in charge of vessels in the port of Chicago, pursuant to 
the act of Congress approved February 6, 1893, as follows : 

AN ACT relating to the anchorage and movement of vessels in the port of Chicago. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in 
Congress assembled, That the Secretary of the Treasury be authorized and directed to define and 
establish anchorage grounds for vessels in the harbors of Chicago and waters of Lake Michigan 
adjacent thereto, to adopt suitable rules and regulations in relation to the same, and also to adopt 
suitable rules and regulations governing the use of marked inshore channels in Lake Michigan, 
in front of the city of Chicago, and to take all necessary measures for the proper enforcement of 
such rules aud regulations. 

3 



Sec. 2. That in the event of the violation of any such rules or regulations by the owner, 
master, or person in charge of any vessel, such owner, master, or person in charge of such vessel 
shall bo liable to a penalty of one hundred dollars, and tbe said vessel may be holden for the 
payment of such penalty and may be seized and proceeded against summarily by libel for 
the recovery of the same in any United States district court for the district within which such 
vessel may be, and in the name of the officer designated by the Secretary of the Treasury. 

Vessels shall anchor within the following specified limits: 

1. United States Exterior Breakwater Anchorage, within lines running from Chicago Pierhead 
Light on North Pier, Chicago Eiver, to the easterly and westerly ends of Exterior Breakwater, 
and a line parallel to said Breakwater, 2,000 feet southwesterly from the same. 

2. Anchorage Grounds in the Harbor of Refuge: Yachts and small excursion vessels shall 
anchor west of a line drawn from Light House Slip south, to South entrance, south of the line of 
Washington street and north of the line of Jackson street. The intersecting points are marked 
by white spar buoys. This area contains 44.3 acres. 

3. Other vessels anchoring in the Harbor of Refuge will take such position as will keep the 
channels and fairways clear for vessels entering either the North, South, or East entrance. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS. 

No vessel shall anchor within 100 feet of any United States Pier or Breakwater. 

Nothing in these regulations shall be held to prevent any vessel in stress of weather, or in 
great emergency, from anchoring anywhere that may seem necessary for safety at the time, but 
the revenue-cutter officer charged with the enforcement of these regulations shall be the judge 
as to when such emergency shall have terminated. 

The commanding officer of the Revenue Cutter at the port of Chicago is charged with the 
enforcement of these Rules and Regulations, and is empowered — 

(1) To remove from her anchorage any vessel not anchored within the limits hereby 
prescribed. 

(2) To require, when he may deem it advisable, vessels to moor head and stern. 

(3) To assign vessels to such part of the Anchorage Grounds as is suitable to their draft. 

(4) To assume such general direction of the movement of vessels in the inshore channels 
as shall least obstruct navigation of the same. 

(5) To see that the acts of Congress prohibiting dumping of solids into navigable waters of 
the United States are complied with and enforced. 



, n»"'* 




■scale /"=/soo" 



^gJJUUL ii 

ifinnrtnoaDittb&DP^ 






MAP O F 

CHICAGO HARBOR 

ILLIN I S 

showing anchorage Grounds 

18<)6. 



M I C H I G A N 



ftt-Y BffEAtt WA T£X. 




.!_! lL 



REAPPRAISEMENTS OF MERCHANDISE BY UNITED STATES GENERAL APPRAISERS. 



Division of Customs. 

OfhobofTHE SECRETARY, 
Washington, D. C, July 10, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 

The following reappraisements of merchandise have been made by the United States General 

Appraisers during the week ending Juue 27, 1896. 

W. E. CURTIS, 

Acting Secretary. 



REPORT ON REAPPRAISEMENTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING JUNE 27, 1896. 

N. 15.— In. corresponding with the Board of General Appraisers relative to any of the items in this 
report, reference should always be made to the number of Reappraisement, 

No. of reappraise- 
ment. 

12384 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from J. M. Vinccia, Manzanillo, April 25/96. 

Centrifugal sugar, entered, on basis of 96° test, at $.03267, reappraised at $.0304 Sp. 
gold, per lb. pkd., on basis of 94° test. 

12365 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from CI. Su. Eamon, S. A., Manzanillo, April 25/96. 

Centrifugal sugar, entered, on basis of 96°, at $.03266, reappraised at $.03162 Sp. 
gold per lb. pkd., on basis of 95.80 test. 

12364 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from Jose L. Kaminz, Manzanillo, April 25, 1896. 

Centrifugal sugar, entered, on basis of 96° test, at $.03261, advanced to $.03226 Sp. 

gold per lb. pled., on basis of 97.50 test. 
Molasses sugar, entered, on basis of 89° test, at $.0258, reappraised at $.025095 Sp. 
gold per lb. pkd., on basis of 88.40 test. 

chV^o } mk toces ' from Marsba11 Field & 0o > Calais > Ma y 7 > 1896 - 

Blk. silk laces, etc., entered at 6835.90 francs per total of 1 case, less 1 per cent 
discount ; advanced by disallowance of export bounty, deducted on entry. 

12481 ) 

124S2 \Mf.fiax, from Castle Island Linen Co., Belfast, May 14/96. 

12511 ) 

20 x 40 towels, No. 256, entered at 4/6 per dozen ; no advance. 

22 x 40 towels, No. 227, entered at 4/9 per dozen ; no advance. 



:)• 



L2481. 

12482 \Mf. flax, etc.— Continued. 

L2511. 

20 x 40 towels, No. 27!), entered at i/- per dozen ; qo advance. 

24 x 48 towels, No. 303, entered at 6/10 per dozen ; no advance. 
20 in Hack linen, No. 303, entered at 51d. per yard ; no advance. 

25 x 36 H. B. pillow cases, No. 206/110, entered at L'4/l per dozen : no advanee. 
22 x 43 Heiu'd towels. No. 463, entered at 6/5 per dozen : no advance. 
Similar goods, no advance. 

Less 5 per cent discount. 

Add case &c. 

12377 1 Col. netting and coL lace curtains, from B. Walker & Co., Ltd., Nottingham, May 15, 22, 

12378 j 1896. 

No. 1749 Ivory curtains 52 in., 33 yds., entered at 3/1 1, advanced to 4/6 per pair. 

No. 1925 Et. curtains, 48 in., 3 yds., entered at 1/85, advanced to 1/101 per pair. 

No. 3965 Ivory curtains, 50 in., Si yds., entered at 2/2, advanced to 2/4 per pair. 

No. 332 Ecru cot. Hambg. net, 50 in., entered at 3}, advanced to 3J per yd. 

1922 Et. curtains, 60 in., 3J yds., entered at 2/3!, advanced to 2/6', per pair. 

Similar goods, similar advances. 

Add cases. 

Less discount of 2£ per cent ; less inland carriage. 
12380 Wool dress goods, from Testart Freres, Paris, May 19/96. 

Faconne pure laine 93/95 uoir, entered at 1.30, advanced to 1.40 francs per meter. 

Discount 5 per cent. 

Add packing. 
~ . !'.' " [ Wool dress goods, from Max. Funke, Meerane, Apr. 2, 18/96. 

95 c/m genre No. 912, entered at .90, advanced to .95 mark per meter. 

95 c/m genre No. 921, entered at .665, advanced to .72 mark per meter. 

110 c/m genre No. 874, entered at 1.105, advanced to 1.25 mark per meter. 

95 c/m genre No. 934. entered at .85, advanced co .90 mark per meter. 

95 c/m genre 733 C, entered at .645, advanced to .70 mark per meter. 

95 c/m genre No. 905, entered at .75, advanced to .82 mark per meter. 

Similar goods, similar advances. 

Add packing. 
12508 Basor blades, from Friedrich Morsbach, Weyer, May 20/96. 

Eazor blades, entered at 2.90, advanced to 4.00 marks pe dozen. 
12461 Pocket knives, from Hermann Boker & Co., Solingeu, May 29/96. 

Knives No. 6385, entered at 2.85, advanced to 3.25 marks per dozen. 

Less 2 per cent discount. 

Add cases and packing. 
12154 Gelatine, from Deutsch Gelatine Fabriken, Hockst a. Main, May 15/96. 

White I gelatine gold label, entered at 300, advanced to 330 marks per 100 kilos. 

White 2B gold label gelatine, entered at 210, advanced to 230 marks per 100 kilos. 

White 5 copper C, entered at 145, advanced to 156.75 marks per 100 kilos. 

Broken leaves loose II gelatine, entered at 200, advanced to 220 marks per 100 kilos. 

Shredded gelatine white, entered at 210, advanced to 230 marks per 100 kilos. 

Similar goods, similar advances. 

Cases and casks, labeling and packing included in price. 



12381 Cotton tape, from J. & A. Norris, Manchester, May 12/96. 

No. 17 Pink cotton tape, entered at 2/11, advanced to 3/- per reel. 
No. 25 pink cotton tape, entered at 4/3 per reel ; no advance. 
Discount advanced from 10 per cent to 5 per cent. 
Add cases. 

12211 Sugar not above No. 16 D. 8., from I. B. Vicini, Santo Domingo, Mar. 27/96. 

Centrifugal sugar, entered, on basis of 92° test, at $.02307, advanced to $.02549 on 

basis of 94.70 test and $.02587 on basis of 95.30 test, per lb. pkd. 
Molasses sugar, entered, on basis of 83° test, at $.01716, reappraised at $.01622 per 
lb. pkd., on basis of 81.80 test. 

1240S Vugar not above No. 16 B. 8., from Zuckicher & Buchel, Madgeburg, April 27/96. 

Beetroot sugar, entered, on basis of 84.25 analysis, at 10/9, reappraised at 11/6.35 per 
cwt. pkd. on basis of 82.90 analysis. 

12407 Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from T. V. Drake & Co., Madgeburg April 25/96. 

Sugar, entered, on basis of 88° analysis, at 11.10}, advanced to 12.72 marks per 50 

kilos, pkd. on basis of 89.05 analysis. 
Sugar, entered, on basis of 75° aualysis, at 9.11, advanced to 11.616 marks per 50 
kilos pkd., on basis of 82° analysis. 

REAPPRAISES! ENTS BY BOARDS. 

^°* 8 I Sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from S. Flurich, Manzanillo, April 4, 1896. 

Centrifugal sugar entered, on basis of 96° test, at $.03104, advanced to $.03179 Sp. 
gold, per lb., pkd., on basis of 97.60 test. 

1201 7 1 sugar not above No. 16 D. S., from Beola & Co., Gibara, April 10/96. 

Centrifugal sugar, entered on basis of 94° test, at $.02975, advanced to $.03199 Sp. 
gold, per lb. pkd., on basis of 96.70 test. 

12258 ~) 

3456 I 

^259 !. j/y, Wool & cotton, from I Phillip & Co., Bradford, April 30/96. 

12260..!!!..!.!!!!! j 

3458 j 

Heavy twills 54 in., No. 951, entered at 12*, advanced to 13 d. per yd. 

52/54 cot. & wool knitted fabric, No. 17992, entered at 3/- per yd ; no advance. 

52/54 cot. & wool knitted fabric, No. 17780, entered at 2/3, advanced to 2/7 per yd. 

52/54 Cot. & M'ool knitted fabric, Nos. 17651, 17653, 17655, entered at 2/3, advanced to 

2/7 per yd. 

54 in. fancy curls, No. 17790, entered at 2/8, advanced to 3/2 per yd. 

54 in. Fancies, Nos. 17355, 17357, entered at 2/1, advanced to 2/4 per yd. 

Similar goods, similar advances. 

Less 31 per cent discount. 

Add making up and packing. 

3^ S ] Wool dress goods, from Paul Chevalier, Mylau, Feb. 27/96. 

110/112 Henrietta No. 1970, entered at 1.09, advanced to 1.13 marks per meter. 

110/112 Henrietta 1971, entered at 1.12, advanced to 1.19 marks per meter. 

110/112 Henrietta, 1972, entered at 1.15, advanced to 1.25 marks per meter. 

110/112 Henrietta, 1973, entered at 1.18, advanced 1.31 marks per meter. 

110/112 Henrietta, 1974, eatered at 1.21, advanced to 1.37 marks per meter. 

Add cases. 

O 



OFFICERS ON DUTY UNDER THE LIGHTHOUSE ESTABLISHMENT. 



Jueasttrtj gjepartmswi, 



X896. 

Department Circular No. 116. 

Light-House Board No. 1 of 1896. 

office of THE LIGHT-HOUSE BOARD, 

Washington, JD. C, July 15, 1896. 

The following is a list of the officers on duty under the Light-House Establishment on this date, 
with the residence or post-office address of each : 

MEMBERS OP THE LIGHT-HOUSE BOAED. 

Hon. John G. Carlisle, Secretary of the Treasury and ex officio President of the Board, Treasury 
Department, Washington, D. C. 

Bear Admiral John G. Walker, U. S. N., Chairman, 1202 Eighteenth Street JW., Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Walter S. Franklin, office 2552 Madison Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Col. John M. Wilson, U. S. A., War Department, Washington, D. C. 

Mr. W. W. Duffield, Superintendent U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, Washington, D. C. 

Capt. John R. Bartlett, U. S. N., 1836 Jefferson Place NW., Washington, D. C. 

Lieut. Col. Alexander Mackenzie, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A., War Department, Washington, D. C. 

Commander George P. P. Wilde, U. S. N., Naval Secretary, Washington, D. C. 

Capt. John Millis, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A., Engineer Secretary, 1815 Biggs Place NW., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

INSPECTORS. 

1st Dist. — Commander N. Mayo Dyer, U. S. N., Custom House, Portland, Me. 
2d Dist— Commander Francis M. Green, U. S. N., Post-Office Building, Boston, Mass. 
3d Dist. — Commander Albert S. Snow, U. S. N., Tompkinsville, N. T. 
Jfih Dist— Commander Charles J. Train, U. S. N., Post-Office Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 
5th Dist— Commander Benjamin P. Lameerton, U. S. N., Post-Office Building, Baltimore, Md. 
6th Dist— Commander SethM. Ackley, U. S. N., Brown's Wharf, Charleston, S. C. 
7th Dist— Commander William B. Newman, U. S. N., Navy Yard, Pensacola, Fla. 
8th Dist— Commander Joseph B. Coghlan, U. S. N., Custom House, New Orleans, La. 
9th Dist. — Commander James H. Dayton, U. S. N., Room 1308, Chamber of Commerce Building, 
corner Washington and La Salle Streets, Chicago, HI. 



2 

loth Dist, — Commander CHARLES V. GRIDLEY, U. S. N., Post-Office Building, Buffalo, N. Y. 

11th Dist. — Commander WILLIAM M. Folgee, U. S. N., 80 Griswold Street, Detroit, Mich. 

12th Dist.— Commander Frank Courtis, U. S. N., Safe Deposit Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

13th Dist. — Lieut. Commander John P. Merrell, U. S. N., 623-25 Marquani Building,Portland, Oreg. 

l.'/ih Dist. — Lieut. Commander William W. Cili.patriok, U. S. N., Post-Office Building, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

15th Dist. — Commander Abraham B. H. Lillie, U. S. N., New Custom House, St. Louis, Mo. 

16th Dist,— Commander WILLIAM T. Burwell, U. S. N., Custom House, Memphis, Tenn. 

ENGINEERS. 

1st Dwrf.— Maj. William R. Livermore, U. S. A., Rooms 141 and 142, Post-Office Building, Boston, Mass. 

2d Dist.— Maj. William R. LIVERMORE, U. S. A., Rooms 141 and 142, Post-Office Building, Boston, Mass. 

Sd Dist, — Lieut. Col. William Ludlow, U. S. A., Tompkinsville, Statcn Island, N. V. 

4th Dist. — Maj. William H. Bixby, U. S. A., Post-Office Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

5th Dist,— Maj. Ernest H. Ruffner, U. S. A., Post-Office Building, Baltimore, Md. 

6th DisL—Capb. Frederic V. Abbot, U. S. A., 33 Custom House, Charleston, S. C. 

7th Dist.— Maj. James B. Quinn, U. S. A., 349 Carondelet Street, New Orleans, La. 

8th Dist— Maj. James B. Quinn, U. S. A., 349 Carondelet Street, New Orleans, La. 

9th Dist.— Maj. Milton B. Adams, U. S. A., 18 Bagley Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 
10th Dist. — Lieut. Col. Jared A. Smith, U. S. A., Hickok Building, 185 Euclid Avenue, corner of Erie 

Street, Cleveland, Ohio. 
11th Dist.—lSIsLJ. Milton B. Adams, U. S. A., 18 Bagley Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 
12th Dist. — Maj. Charles E. L. B. Davis, U. S. A., Room 89, Flood Building, San Francisco, Cal. 
18th Dist.— Capt. Walter L. Fisk, U. S. A , 73 Fourth Street, Portland, Oreg. 
Uth Dist. — Maj. William H. Hetter, U. S. A., Custom House, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
15th Dist. — Lieut. Col. Amos Stickney, U. S. A., 1515 Locust Street, St. Louis, Mo. 
16th Dist. — Lieut. Col. Amos Stickney, TJ. S. A., 1515 Locust Street. St. Louis, Mo. 

JOHN G. WALKER, 

Bear Admiral, TJ. 8. N., Chairman. 
George F. F. Wilde, 

Commander, TJ. 8. W., Naval Secretary. 
John Millis, 

Captain, Corps of Engineers, TJ. 8. A., Engineer Secretary. 
Approved : 
JOHN G. CARLISLE, 

Secretary. 



PROOF OF LANDING ABROAD OF GOODS EXPORTED FROM BONDED MANUFACTURING 

WAREHOUSES WAIVED. 



Division of Customs. 

Ofmceof THE SECRETARY. 

Washington, D. C, July 14, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs: 

Article 68 of the special regulations (Synopsis 15442) relating to the establishment of bonded 
manufacturing warehouses under the provisions of the tariff act of August 28. 1894, is hereby modified as 
follows : 

The following words will be omitted from the form of bond as given in said article, viz : 

"And if the certificates and other proofs required by the regulations of the Secretary of the Treasury, in 
pursuance of law, showing the delivery of the same at the said port of destination, or at any other port 
or place without the limits of the United States, shall be produced and deposited with the collector of 
the customs at the said port of withdrawal within from the date hereof." 

The first clause of said article 68 is hereby amended so as to read as follows : 

The collector may accept as proof of due exportation the bill of lading and entry of the merchandise 
on the outward manifest of the vessel of exportation and the usual certificates of shipment and clearance, 
the same as in the exportation of merchandise from bond. 

The proof of landing abroad may hereafter be waived in the above-mentioned transactions. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



LIFEBOATS AND LIFEBAFT8 ON OCEAN, LAKE, AND SOUND STEAM VESSELS. 



Qxmsuxy ^zmxttumt. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 118. 

Steamboat Inspection Service. 

office op THE SECRETARY, 

Washington, D. C, July 10, 1896. 
To Supervising and Local Inspectors of Steam Vessels : 

The act of Congress approved March 1, 1895, repealing the act creating the offices of Special 
Inspectors of Foreign Steam Vessels, also repealed section 3 of the same act authorizing the Secretary of 
the Treasury to make regulations for the government of said special inspectors. Therefore such regulations 
heretofore published in pages 11 to 15, inclusive, in Form 2180, ceased by limitation with the approval of 
the act repealing the authority to prescribe them. 

Supervising and local inspectors were notified in Department Circular No. 55, dated March 19, 1895, 
that thereafter the inspection of foreign passenger steam vessels would be made by the local inspectors, 
"under the laws and rules and regulations for the inspection of such vessels (Form 2180)." 

Supervising and local inspectors are now informed that so much of Circular No. 55, March 19, 1895, 
as contains the words above quoted is hereby rescinded, and foreign steam vessels will be inspected here- 
after under the laws governing such vessels (Form 2100), and the rules and regulations contained in 
Form 2101. 

The rules and regulations contained in Forms 2180 and 2101 being practically the same, except the 
rules for lifeboats and life rafts, Eule 9, Form 2180, and Eule III, Form 2101, sections 2, 12, and 14, 
General Rules and Regulations of the Board of Supervising Inspectors. For the information of agents 
of foreign steam vessels a table is attached hereto showing the number of boats and rafts required for 
ocean steamers of all tonnage from 100 to 12,500 gross tons. 

Inspectors are further informed that where either steam vessels of the United States or foreign steam 
vessels are, at the date of this circular, fully equipped with boats alone of the full capacity of boats and 
rafts as determined by the rules of the Board of Supervising Inspectors, as given in the table, they shall 
be deemed to be in compliance with the rules ; but where new outfits are to be supplied the proportionate 
cubical contents of the boats and rafts must be observed, subject, however, to the following proviso from 
section 12, Rule III, Rules and Regulations, namely: "That no steamer shall be required to have more 



lifeboats than sufficient i<> carrj the passengers she is allowed by her oertificate of inspection, togethe 

with tier officers and crew." 

J. G. CARLISLE, 

Secretary. 



BOATS AND RAFTS REQUIRED ON OCEAN, LAKE, AM) SOUND STEAMERS, KILE III, SECTIONS 2, 12, AND 14, 

FORM ->1U1, RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



Steamers between 

l(KI:lll(l 200. .7. 

200 ami 300 .... 

:;oi>and -ion... 

400 and 500... 

500 and 1.00(1.... 

1,000 and 1,5011 .... 

1,5(10 and 2,000.... 

2, 000 and 2,500.... 

2, 500 and 3,008.'... 
:!. (lllil and 3,600.... 

3, 500 and 4,000... 

4, 000 and 5,000.... 

5, Dili) and 5,500.... 
5, 5(H) and 6,000.... 
0, O00 and 0.500... 
0. 500 and 7,000.... 

7. 000 and 7,500... 
7,50(1 and 8, 000.... 

8, 000 and s, 5nO ... 
8, 500 and 9.000... 
(I, 000 and 0,500 ... 
0.500 and 10,000.... 

10,000 and 10, 500.... 
10.51)0 and 11,000 .... 

11, 0(10 and 11,500.... 
11,500 and 12.1)00.... 

12, 000 and 12,500.... 

- 



360 

540 

720 

900 

1,080 

1,200 

1,440 

1,020 

1,800 

1, 980 
2,160 

2, 340 
2,835 
3,330 
3,825 
4,320 
4,815 

5, 310 
5,805 

6, 300 

6, 795 

7, 200 
7, 785 
8,280 

8, 775 
9,270 

9, 765 



BouttlKC 

Capacity of rafts, 

cubic feet. 


Total capacity of 

boats ami rafts, 

cubic feet. 


180 


540 


180 


720 


360 


1,080 


360 


1,260 


540 


1,620 


540 


l.HII) 


720 

720 

ooo 


2, 160 
2, 340 

2,700 


900 


2, 880 


1,0*0 


3, 240 


1,080 


3,420 


1,260 


4, 095 


1,260 


4, 590 


1,440 


5. 205 


1,440 
1,620 

1,020 


5, 760 

6, 435 
6, 030 


1,800 


7, 605 


1,800 


8, 100 


1,980 
1,980 


8, 775 
0,270 


2,160 


0,015 


2, 160 
2, 540 


10, 440 
11.115 


2,340 


11,610 


2, 520 


12, 285 



ADDITIONAL RULES TO GOVERN THE APPRAISEMENT AND CLASSIFICATION OF 

IMPORTED RAW SUGARS. 



grjeasuvij gepartuiettt, 



1890. 
Department Circular No. 119. 

Division of Customs. 

office of THE SECRETARY, 



Washington, D. C, July 14, 1896. 

To Collectors and other Officers of the Customs : 

The attention of chief officers of customs is hereby called to the following decision of the United 
States circuit court for the southern district of New York, January 7, 1896, in the trial of the appeal 
of the United States from the decision of the Board of General Appraisers, July 20, 1895, regarding 
the classification for duty of certain sugars imported per steamship Twnuri by the American Sugar 
Eefining Company : 

"This importation is of sugar, entered on the invoice as 'Basis 81°' with a memorandum attached, 
becoming a part of the invoice, stating it as 'Purchased at 1} cents per Spanish pound net, basis 81° 
average, -£% cent per pound to be added for each degree above 81° test, or ^ cent per pound to be 
deducted for each degree below 81° test, fractional of a degree pro rata.' 

"This meant, and was understood at the custom house to mean, a polariscopic test, such as is in use 
there ; and that the price was to vary according to the quality as should be shown by the test agreeably 
to the memoraudum. It tested considerably above 81°, and the appraised value was more than 10 per 
cent above the price of 1} cents per pound and much less than that above the price according to the test 
and the memorandum. The Government claims that this is an undervaluation of more than 10 per cent 
and that an additional duty should be imposed for it as such under section 7 of the Administrative 
Customs Act of 1890. Invoices must show the actual cost of goods purchased for importation, which 
becomes the value declared in the entry, if not raised by the importer, and the additional duty is imposed 
only in cases of 10 per cent above this value. The act does not require that the actual cost be stated in 
any sums total, nor prohibit stating it by reference to prices of measurable quantities or qualities, but 
only that it shall somehow be stated. Now this actual cost, as stated in the body of this invoice, was not 
1} cents per pound in quantity only, but at 81° in quality, as a basis, also. The memorandum added the 
variation in price by the quality. The price by quality was as ascertainable and as well ascertained as 
that by quantity ; and both together made the actual cost of the purchase, without question as to the 
correctness of either. This was the entered value below which the collector would have had no right to 
go if the appraised value had been less; and above which the appraised- value must be reckoned to find 
the 10 per cent. As the appraised value did not reach 10 per cent above this entered value, no liability 
for any additional duty on that account arose. 

"Judgment affirmed." 

I. 

Appraisement. 

The above decision establishes the rule under which appraisements of raw sugars and liquidation of 
entries covering the same shall hereafter be made. 

II. 

In conformity with section 10 of the Administrative Act, the appraiser shall ascertain, estimate, and 
appraise the actual market value and wholesale price of the sugar, at the time of exportation to the 



United States, in packed condition, in the principal markets of the country whence the same has been 
imported. 

III. 

The appraiser shall also describe the character of the sugar for the information of the collector, and 
sliall report to him the degree of polariscope test actually found by him on appraisement, and the market 
value of the sugar on such test. 

IV. 

The regulations as to the sampling and appraisement of sugars are hereby extended to apply to all 
imported sugars on arrival. In case no entry is made of sugars thus sampled and appraised, careful 
record shall be kept of all the facts of each case, and the return of the appraisement shall be the basis of 
liquidation, should entry be made subsequently. Whenever any sugars shall have been entered for 
transportation to another port, either in bond or otherwise, a report of the facts found on appraisement 
shall be transmitted to the collector at the port of destination. 



The "additional sample " provided for in paragraph 33 of the regulations issued May 13, 1895 (Synopsis 
16045), shall, without delay, be marked and kept in safe custody. In the case of sugars of low grade, 
or (hose containing sand, additional reserved samples should be kept, so as to provide for additional tests, 
should the appraiser find them desirable, in order to arrive at an average test by which to determine the 
true degree of saccharine strength. The appraiser shall informally report to the importer the degree of 
saccharine strength which he finds on examination of the first sample. Should the importer, within two 
official days after such notice has been mailed to him by the appraiser, claim an error in the reported test 
and request a report of test on the reserved samples, such test may be made, and the appraiser's return 
may then be made according to the result of such second test, and his return shall, in either case, be held 
to be the date of appraisement, and the test returned by the appraiser shall be held to be the true test, 
without regard to any other test made by unofficial persons. 

VI. 

In conformity with the decision of the United States circuit court, above quoted, the dutiable value 
of imported sugars may be controlled by the stipulations and conditions of purchase, or of value specified 
in said opinion whenever they shall be duly set forth in the invoice or entry ; the court having held that 
"the price by quality was as ascertainable, and as well ascertained, as that by quantity." 

For the purpose of determining whether the additional (penal) duty accrues under section 7, act of 
June 10, 1890, the entered value shall be adjusted to accord with the specification, as to the test basis of 
purchase set forth in the invoice or entry ; and when the entered value thus adjusted shows that the 
appraised value does not exceed by more than 10 per cent the entered value thus adjusted, no additional 
(penal) duty accrues. When the appraised value exceeds the adjusted entered value by more than 10 per 
cent on the basis above mentioned, the appropriate additional (penal) duty shall be levied — that is to say, 
penal duties shall not accrue on imported sugars in case the advanced value on liquidation exceeds the 
entered value by more than 10 per cent, whenever such advanced value above 10 per cent is caused by a 
difference between the test as reported by the appraiser and the test basis of purchase named in the 
invoice or entry : Provided, That the test basis of invoice valuation shall appear in the invoice or entry, 
and that the terms of sale shall appear in the invoice or entry of purchased sugars. 



VII. 

The entered value, when adjusted to the conditions expressed in the invoice or entry, will be the 
minimum value for duty purposes, "below which the collector would have no right to go" (see court 
decision), even although the appraised value when similarly adjusted may show a lower value than such 
entered value. 

VIII. 

In the liquidation of invoices of sugar, in regard to which no polariscope test is set forth as the basis 
of value, and no terms of sale appear on the invoice or entry, the computation to establish dutiable value 
shall be made upon the appraiser's report of market value. 

IX. 

Whenever the appraiser shall report that, in his opinion, the value of any imported sugars has been 
advanced over 10 per cent by reason of the higher polariscope test, produced by unusual drainage or 
evaporation on the voyage of importation, no additional or penal duties shall be exacted, unless the 
aggregate appraised value of the quantity actually landed shall exceed the aggregate invoice or entered 
value by more than 10 per cent. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



SCHEDULE OF ARTICLES ENTITLED TO DRAWBACK ON EXPORTATION UNDER THE 
PROVISIONS OF SECTION 22, ACT OF AUGUST 28, 1894, WITH RULES AND RATES FOR 
DETERMINING QUANTITIES OF IMPORTED MATERIALS USED IN THE MANUFAC- 
TURE OF SUCH ARTICLES, AND FOR ASCERTAINING THE AMOUNT OF DRAWBACK 
TO BE PAID TEEREON. 



1896. 
Department Circular No. 130. 

Division of Customs. 



Office of THE SECRETARY, 



Washington, D. 0., August 1, 1896. 
To Officers of the Customs and others concerned : 

Section 22 of the Tariff Act of August 28, 1894, provides : 

That where imported materials on which duties have been paid are used in the manufacture of 
articles manufactured or produced in the United States, there shall be allowed on the exportation of such 
articles a drawback equal in amount to the duties paid on the materials used, less one per centum of such 
duties : Provided, That when the articles exported are made in part from domestic materials the imported 
materials, or the parts of the articles made from such materials, shall so appear in the completed articles 
that the quantity or measure thereof may be ascertained ; And provided further, That the drawback on 
any article allowed under existing law shall be coutinued at the rate herein provided. 

That the imported materials used in the manufacture or production of articles entitled to drawback 
of customs duties when exported shall, in all cases where drawback of duties paid on such materials is 
claimed, be identified, the quantity of such materials used and the amount of duties paid thereon shall be 
ascertained, the facts of the manufacture or production of such articles in the United States and their 
exportation therefrom shall be determined, and the drawback due thereon shall be paid to the manu- 
facturer, producer or exporter, to the agent of either or to the person to whom such manufacturer, 
producer, exporter, or agent shall in writing order such drawback paid, under such regulations as the 
Secretary of the Treasury shall prescribe. 

Articles manufactured from materials on which duties were paid under previous tariffs are entitled 
to a drawback of such duties under the provisions of section 22, act of August 28, 1894, whenever such 
articles are exported under proper entries. 

In case material identified by a manufacturer was imported prior to August 28, 1894, and deposited 
in bonded warehouse, customs officers will be careful to ascertain the exact date and corresponding rate of 
duty under which such material was withdrawn for consumption. 

Drawback allowance being based on quantities and kinds of the articles exported, customs officers 
must in all cases use due diligence to ascertain weight, gauge, measure, or count, as the case may require, 
of all merchandise entered for drawback ; and in cases where expert official inspection or analysis is 
necessary, such officers will be careful to secure samples which will correctly represent the merchandise 
to be exported. 

In some cases articles heretofore listed for drawback do not appear in the following schedule because 
of changes in tariff rates ; in other cases such articles have been dropped because of changes in processes 
of manufacture, affecting quantities of material used, wastage, etc., and in still other cases rates have 
become obsolete from disuse. 

Articles entitled to drawback so dropped from the schedule will be restored and new rates will be 
fixed, on application to the Secretary of the Treasury, under article 789, Customs Eegulations, 1892. 

CHARLES S. HAMLIN, 

Acting Secretary. 



SCHEDULE. 

Agate ironware, manufactured by the Lalance & Grosjeau Manufac- 
turing Company, of Woodhaven, N. Y., from imported sheet iron or 
steel ; allow under Synopsis 9780 and letter July 6. 1892, to collector 
New York. 

Almondine, manufactured by the Chapman & Smith Company, of 
Chicago, 111., from imported albumen and shelled almonds and from 
sugar refined from imported raw sugar; allow under Synopsis 10450. 

Almond paste, manufactured by Henry Heide, of New York City, 
from imported albumen and almonds and from sugar refined from 
imported raw sugar; allow under letter November 28, 18S5, to col- 
lector, New York. 
Almonds, sugar-coated. (See Sugar-coated almonds.) 
Aluminum bearing. (See Magnolia antifriction metal, etc.) 
Ammonia, liquid anhydrous. (See Liquid anhydrous ammonia.) 
Ammonia, aqua. (See Aqua ammonia.) 

Angora goatskins, prepared for use as "rugs" or "mats" by pro- 
cesses of dressing, tanning, and finishing ; allow under Synopsis 15921. 
Anhydrous ammonia, liquid. (See Liquid anhydrous ammonia.) 
Antifriction metal, Magnolia. (See Magnolia antifriction metal, etc.) 
Antipyrine pills. (See Pills. ). 

Aqua ammonia, manufactured from imported sulphate of ammonia ; 
base allowance on a quantity of material used, to be determined by 
dividing the percentage of ammonia gas contained in the exported 
article by the percentage of such gas contained in the imported sulphate, 
and multiplying the quotient so found by the weight of the exported 
article as ascertained by a United States weigher. The gross weight, 
the tare, and the net weight shall be marked by the manufacturer or 
exporter on each package. 

The drawback entry must show the gross and net weights of the 
exported article and the percentage of ammonia gas contained therein, 
and the manufacturer's declaration must show the quantity of the 
imported material used and the percentage of ammonia gas therein, as 
shown by the certificate of analysis accompanying the import invoice, 
which certificate, or a sworn copy thereof made by the importers, must 
be filed with the drawback entry referring to such importation. 

Whenever ordered by the collector, samples shall be taken by the 
inspecting officer and transmitted to the appraiser for verification of 
the statements of the manufacturer and exporter. 

Asphaltum coated steel pipes. (See Steel pipes galvanized, asphaltum 
and tar coated.) 

Atomizers, toilet. (See Toilet atomizers.) 

Ayer's cherry pictoral and sarsaparilla, manfactured by the J. C. 
Ayer Company, of Lowell, Mass., in part from imported alcohol ; allow 
under letter May 28, 1896, to collector, Boston. 

Bags, manufactured from imported burlaps or other cloth suitable for 
bags, and exported either empty or filled ; base allowance on quantity 
of such imported cloth used, to be determined either by weight of the 

(3) 



finished bags and proper allowance for any additions of twine or other 
material used in process of manufacture, or by measurement of the 
quantity of cloth appearing in the exported bags. 

Band saws and "■blanks," manufactured by Joshua Oldham, of New 
York City, from imported steel plates ; allow under Synopsis 15067. 

Barbed wire fencing. (See Wire fencing.) 

Bar iron, fish-plate bolts, fish plates, railroad spikes, and railway car forg- 
ings. manufactured from imported old iron rails or old scrap iron, and 
Fish-plate bolts, railroad spikes, and railway car forgings, manufactured 
from imported bar iron; allow under Synopsis 15284, as follows: 

The quantity of imported material used in the manufacture of lish 
plates and bar iron shall be determined by adding to the net weight of 
the exported articles, when made from old iron rails, 17 per cent, and 
when made from old scrap iron 25 per cent of such weight. 

The quantity of bar iron used in the manufacture of railroad spikes, 
fishplate bolts with nuts fitted, and miscellaneous railway car forgings 
shall be determined by adding to the net weight of the exported arti- 
cles percentages as shown below — railroad spikes, 3 per cent; fish-plate 
bolts with nuts fitted, 8 per cent ; and miscellaneous railway car forg- 
ings, 5 per cent, the quantity of imported material used in the manu- 
facture of such bar irou being determined in manner as hereinbefore 
directed. 

The manufacturer's statement on the drawback entry must show sep- 
arately the weight of each kind of article exported, and the kind and 
quantity of imported material used in the manufacture of the same ; 
and the weight of the articles as declared in such entry shall be verified 
by the return of a United States weigher. 

The percentages herein prescribed to be added to the net weight of 
the exported articles to determine the quantity of bar iron used in the 
manufacture shall apply to such manufactures from imported bar iron, 
as well as to those manufactured iu this country from imported old iron 
rails or old scrap iron. 

Barrel hoops. (See Petroleum barrels.) 

Barrel rivets. (See Petroleum barrels.) 

Barrels, petroleum. (See Petroleum barrels.) 

Barry's Florida water, manufactured by Barclay & Co., of New York 
City, in part from imported alcohol ; allow under Synopsis 17227. 

Barry 1 s pain relief, manufactured by Barclay & Co., of New York 
City, in part from imported alcohol ; allow under Synopsis 17227. 

Barry's tricopherous, manufactured by Barclay & Co., of New York 
City, in part from imported alcohol and castor oil ; allow under Synop- 
sis 16931 and letter June 23, 1896, to collector, New York. 

Bars, cross. (See Cross bars.) 

Bars, steel. (See Steel bars.) 

Bath and wash tubs, manufactured by the J. L. Mott Iron Works, of 
New York City, from imported unglazed fire- clay tubs and domestic 
fittings and attachments ; allow under letter January 14, 1891, to col- 
lector, New York. 

Bedsteads, brass. (See Brass bedsteads.) 

Beer, manufactured wholly or in part from imported materials ; allow 
under letters November 28, 1888, and March 26, 1890, to collector, 
New York. 

Before allowance of drawback the brewer of the beer must file with 
the collector of the port from which exportation is to be made a for- 
mula verified by the sworn declarations of both the proprietor and fore- 
man of the brewery showing specifically the materials and the propor- 
tions thereof used in brewing the beer to be exported. 



The manufacturer's declaration on each drawback entry must show, 
in addition to the usual averments, that the beer covered by such entry 
was manufactured from the materials used in proportions as set forth in 
the formula filed. For verification of manufacturer's declaration on 
formulas and export entries, samples shall be taken as ordered by the 
collector for analysis and report by a Government chemist. 

The declared quantities of beer exported either in bottles, kegs, or 
casks shall be verified by reference to bottlers' certificates and other 
official records of quantity, filed with collectors of internal revenue. 

Bicycles, manufactured by the Sterling Cycle Works, of Chicago 111. 
in part from imported steel tubing ; allow under Synopsis 15647? ' 

Bicycles and frames, manufactured by Geo. S. McDonald, of New York 
City, the bicycles being made in part from wheels, handles, frames, and 
parts of frames imported "in the rough," and the frames being made 
from parts of frames imported "in the rough" and domestic materials; 
allow under Synopsis 14430 and letter February 4, 1895, to collector, 
New York. 

Billiard tables, manufactured by the Brunswick-Balke-Collender Com- 
pany, of New York City, the "coverings of which are made wholly from 
imported billiard cloth ; allow under Synopsis 15913. 

Bitters, Ramsay's Trinidad aromatic. (See Eamsay's Trinidad aro- 
matic bitters.) 
Blanks, band-saw. (See Band saw blanke.) 
Blanks, tin-can. (See Tin boxes, cans, etc. ) 

Blasting caps and electric exploders, manufactured in part from imported 
fulminate of mercury: allow under Synopsis 13465; and on electric 
exploders, manufactured by the Aetna Powder Company, of Indiana in 
part from imported percussion caps or detonators ; allow under Synopsis 
13286. 
Blast pipes. (See Locomotives. ) 
Blue vitriol. (See Sulphate of copper.) 
Boilers, locomotive. (See Locomotive and steam boilers.) 
Boilers, steam. (See Locomotive and steam boilers.) 
Boiler tubes. (See Locomotive and steam boilers.) 
Bolts, carriage. (See Carriage and tire bolts.) 
Bolts, fish-plate. (See Bar iron, fish-plate bolts, etc.) 
Bolts, tire. (See Carriage and tire bolts.) 

Borine, manufactured by the Boriue Medical Company, of New York 
City, in part from imported alcohol ; allow under Synopsis 16788. 
Boxes, tin. (See Tin boxes, cans, etc. ) 
Boxes, wooden. (See Wooden boxes. ~) 

Box shooks, manufactured from imported lumber ; base allowance on 
quantity of imported lumber used, to be determined by adding to the 
board measure of the shooks 9^ per cent of such measure. 
Brakes, vacuum. (See Bail way cars.) 

Brass bedsteads, manufactured by H. L. Judd & Co., of New York 
City, in part from imported brass tubing ; allow under Synopsis 11474. 
Brass boiler tubes. (See Locomotive and steam boilers.) 
Buffers, locomotive coupling. (See Locomotives.) 
Bullets, manufactured from imported lead, or from imported lead and 
tin or antimony; base allowance on quantity of imported materials used 
to be determined by weight of the exported bullets, together with the 
declaration of the manufacturer showing quantities and proportions of 
materials used, which declaration shall be verified by an analysis and 
report of weight by a Government chemist, of samples taken as ordered 
by the collector. 



Burnett' a extract a of lemon, almond, and cochineal, and essence of Jamaica 
ginger, manufactured by the Joseph Burnett Company, of Boston, Mass., 
in pari from imported alcohol; allow under Synopsis L6151. 

Butter, refined. (See Refined butter.) 

Cables, dectric-UghUng. (See Electric- lighting cables.) 

Cables, wire. (Sue Wire rope.) 

Cables, wire and hemp. (See Wire rope.) 

(Jake, oil. (See Linseed oil cake.) 

Cameras, photographic. (Sec Photographic cameras.) 

Candy. (See Confectionery.) 

Cans, tin. (See Tin boxes, cans, etc.) 

Caps, blasting. (See Blasting caps and electric exploders.) 

Caps, tin. (See Petroleum cans and parts.) 

Car bodies. (See Railway cars.) 

Car brakes. (See Railway cars.) 

Car drawbars. (See Railway cars.) 

Car forgings. (See Bar iron, fish-plate bolts, etc.) 

Oar yas equipments. (See Railway cars.) 

Carpet, sweepers, manufactured by the Bissell Carpet Sweeping Com- 
pany, of Grand Rapids, Mich., in pari from imported tin plate; allow 
under Synopsis 13831. 

Carriage and tire bolts, manufactured by Townsend, Wilson & Hubbard 
Bolt Company, and by A. M. Hayden, all of Philadelphia, Pa.; allow- 
under letter of October 1, 1891, to collector, New York, and Synopsis 
13471, respectively. 

Carriage bolts. (See Carriage and tire bolts.) 

Carriages and wagons, manufactured by J. B. Brewster & Co., of New 
York City, linings, trimmings, and cushion covers being made wholly 
from imported cloth ; allow under Synopsis 12603. 

Cars, horse. (See Railway cars. ) 

Cars, railway. (See Railway cars.) 

Cartridges, "loaded" with bullets manufactured from imported lead, 
or from imported lead and tin or antimony; allow as on "Bullets," 
which see. 

Cartridges, shot. (See Shot cartridges.) 

Car ventilators. (See Railway cars.) 

Car wheels. (See Locomotive and railway car wheels.) 

Car windows. (See Railway cars.) 

Cases, packing. (See Wooden boxes.) 

Cases, petroleum. (See Wooden boxes.) 

Castor oil and castor pomace, manufactured wholly from imported castor 
beans or seeds ; allow duty paid on 20] pounds of the imported beans 
or seeds used for each gallou of oil exported, and duty paid on 13 
pounds of such beans or seed for each 100 pounds of pomace exported, 
quantities to be determined by gauge or weight, as ordered by the col- 
lector. 

Ceiling. (See Dressed lumber.) 

Celery rock and rye cordial or celery tonic, manufactured by the Cook 
& Bernheimer Company, of New York City, in part from imported alco- 
hol ; allow under letter September 18, 1895, to collector, New York. 

Celery tonic. (See Celery rock and rye cordial, etc.) 

Centers, locomotive and railway car wheel. (See Locomotive and rail- 
way car wheels.) 

Chairs, manufactured by Hale & Co. , of New York City, from domes- 
tic wood and imported chair cane: allow under Synopsis 11783; and 



on those manufactured by B. Souto, of New York City, from parts 
imported "in the rough," allow under Synopsis 15045. 

Channel bars and fastenings, manufactured from imported materials ; 
allow as on portable railway sections. 

Cherry pectoral, Ayer's. (See Ayer's cherry pectoral and sarsaparilla.) 

China goatskins, prepared by process of cleaning, dyeing, and resew- 
ing imported tanned China goatskins; base allowance on number of 
skins used equal to number exported. 

Chocolate, sweetened. (See Sweetened chocolate.) 

Cigarettes, manufactured by the American Tobacco Company, of New 
York City, and by Cameron & Cameron, of Richmond, Va., wrapped 
wholly with imported cigarette paper ; allow under Synopsis 11103 
and letter August 28, 1891, respectively. 

Cleaned rice, manufactured wholly from imported uncleaned rice ; 
base allowance on quantity of the imported rice used, to be determined 
by adding to the weight of the exported article ascertained by a United 
States weigher, 10 per centum of such weight. 

Clocks, manufactured by the Ansonia Clock Company, of New York 
City, in part from imported porcelain and onyx cases, porcelain and 
zinc dials, and imported glass ; allow under Synopsis 16675 ; if manu- 
factured by the Seth Thomas Clock Company, of Thomastown, Conn., 
in part from imported glass, allow under Synopsis 14113 ; and if manu- 
factured by the E. Ingraham Clock Company, of Bristol, Conn., in part 
from imported glass, allow under Synopsis 1 4256 and letter January 4, 
1894, to collector, New York. 

Clock-spring material, manufactured by R. H. Wolff & Co., limited, 
of New York City, from imported steel- wire rods ; allow under Synopsis 
14796. 

Clock springs, manufactured by R. H. Wolff & Co., limited, of New 
York City, frcm imported steel-wire rods ; allow under Synopsis 14474. 

Clothed iron flats (parts of carding machines), manufactured by E. A. 
Leigh & Co., of Boston, Mass., wholly from imported "flats, card cloth- 
ing and clips ; " allow under Synopsis 16068. 

Clothing, icaterproof. (See Waterproof clothing.) 

Cloths, printed and finished. (See Printed and finished cloths.) 

Cocoanut, desiccated. (See Desiccated cocoauut.) 

Cod-liver oil, Scotfs emvlsion of. (See Scott's emulsion of cod-liver oil.) 

Cologne water. (See Toilet waters, etc.) 

Colors, dry. (See Dry colors. ) 

Composition metal, manufactured by the Burnham Smelting and Refin- 
ing Company, of Bridgeport, Conn., in part from imported old and scrap 
copper ; allow under Synopsis 13280. 

Compound, lard. (See Lard compound.) 

Condensed milk, manufactured in part from imported refined sugar, or 
sugar refined from imported raw sugar ; base allowance on quantity of 
such materials used, provided that no domestic sugar has been used in 
the manufacture of the article. 

The entry under which the merchandise is to be inspected and laden 
must show the number and description of the cans contained in each 
shipping package, and the manufacturer's declaration on the drawback 
entry must show the weight of the condensed milk in each variety of 
can, and the kind and quautity or percentage of sugar used in the man- 
ufacture of the exported article, which declarations shall be verified by 
official weight and analysis of samples taken as ordered by the collector. 

Where sugar refined from imported raw sugar is used, drawback 
shall be allowed as on the refined sugar if exported separately. 



8 

Confectionery, manufactured wholly or in part from imported refined 
sugar, or sugar refined from imported raw sugar; base allowance on 
quantity of such material used, provided that no domestic sugar has 
been used in the manufacture of the article. 

The entry under which the merchandise is to lie inspected and laden, 
must show separately the kinds and quantities of the varieties of con- 
fectionery contained in each shipping package : and the manufacturer's 
declaration on the drawback entry must show the kind and quantity or 
percentage of refined sugar used in each variety of confectionery exported. 
Declarations of manufacturers and exporters shall be verified by offi- 
cial analysis of samples taken as ordered by the collector, and by weights 
ascertained by a United States weigher. 

Before liquidation of entries lor draw hack on confectionery, a sworn 
statement of the manufacturer, showing formula and processes of manu- 
facture of each kind on which drawback is claimed, must be filed with 
the collector, and verified by official inspection of methods of manu- 
facture and official analysis of samples. 

The manufacturer's declaration on the drawback entry must show 
that the articles covered thereby were made as set forth in such state- 
ment. 

Where the exported confectionery was made from sugar refined from 
imported raw sugar, drawback shall be allowed as on the refined sugar 
used, if exported as sugar. 

Connecting rods, manufactured by the Abner Doble Company, of San 
Francisco, Cal., wholly from imported iron bars; allow under Synopsis 
15944. 

Copper boiler tubes. (See Locomotive and steam boilers.) 

Copper plates for locomotives. (See Locomotives.) 

Copper plates, perforated. (See Perforated copper plates.) 

Copper, refined. (See Refined copper.) 

Copper, sulphate of. (See Sulphate of copper.) 

Comets, manufactured in part from imported valves ; base allowance 
on number and kind of such valves used, which must be described in 
the manufacturer's declaration on the drawback entry as they were 
described on the invoice under which they were imported. 

Before ladiug for exportation the valves appearing in the cornets must 
be identified with the imported valves described in the manufacturer's 
declaration by expert official inspection. 

Corrugated and galvanized iron roofing. (See Iron roofing.) 

Corrugated and painted iron roofing. (See Iron roofing.) 

Corsets, manufactured by Roth & Goldsmith, of South Norwalk, 
Conn., in part from imported materials ; allow under Synopsis 11742. 

Cotton gin saws, manufactured by J. F. Turner's Sons, of Sing Sing, 
N. Y., from imported steel plates ; allow under letter January 3, 1891, to 
collector, New York ; and on such saws manufactured by the Eagle Cot- 
ton Gin Company, of Bridge water, Mass., from imported steel plates, 
allow uuder Synopsis 12402. 

Coupling buffers. (See Locomotives.) 

Crank pins. (See Locomotives.) 

Creosoted lumber, manufactured by the Carolina Oil and Creosote 
Company, in part from imported dead oil of coal tar ; allow under Syn- 
opsis 13283. 

Cross barsj manufactured from imported material ; allow as on porta- 
ble railway sections. 

Crystal fashion plates, manufactured by the Crystal Fashion Plate 
Company, of New York City, in part from imported sheet celluloid ; 
allow under Synopsis 16924. 



Crystallized tin plates, manufactured from imported tin plates • base 
allowance on quantity of material used equal to the quantity of the 
exported plates, to be determined by either weight or measurement and 
inspection of such exported articles. 
Gups, tin. (See Tin boxes, cans, etc.) 
Cuspidors, tin. (See Tin boxes, cans, etc.) 

Decorated lamp shades, manufactured by Clark Brothers' Lamp Brass 
and Copper Company, of Trenton, N. J., from imported plain porcelain 
shades, and by Trenton Lamp Company, of Trenton, N. J., from 
imported plain glass shades; allow under Synopses 13479 and"'l4340 
respectively. 

Decorated tin plates, manufactured from plain tin plates ; base allow- 
ance on quantity of the plain plates used equal to the quantity of such 
material in the exported plates, to be determined by weight or measure- 
ment and inspection of the finished plates, proper allowance being 
made for addition to such weight in process of manufacture. 

Degreased sheepskins, manufactured by the United States and Canada 
Degreasmg Company, of Brooklyn, N. T., from imported skins: allow 
under Synopsis 16235. 

Desiccated cocoanut, manufactured by L. Schepp & Co., of New York 
City, wholly from imported cocoanuts aud refined granulated sugar, used 
in condition as imported, or refined from imported raw sugar: allow 
under Synopsis 16780. 

Doors and moldings, manufactured from imported lumber; base 
allowance on quantity of lumber used, to be determined by "board 
measurement" of parts of doors and of finished moldings. 
Drawbars, car. (See Bail way cars.) 

Dress binding, velveteen. (See Velveteen dress binding, etc.) 
Dressed lumber, manufactured from imported rough lumber, if planed 
on two sides, or on one side and both edges ; base allowance on quantity 
of rough lumber used, to be determined by "board measurement" of 
the exported dressed lumber. 

Dress shields, manufactured by the I. B. Kleinert Rubber Company, of 
New York City, in part from imported cotton galloon binding and piece 
silk ; allow under letter January 15, 1896, to collector, New York 
Drills, steel. (See Steel drills.) 

Dry colors, manufactured by Pfeiffer & Lavanburg, of New York City 
in part from imported quicksilver, orange mineral or red lead, and by 
the F. W. Devoe and C. T. Eaynolds Company, of New York City, in 
part from imported quicksilver ; allow under Synopses 11770 and 14010 
respectively. 
Dry plates, photographic. (See Photographic dry plates.) 
Dyed silks. (See Silks, printed and dyed.) 

Dynamite and other explosives, in the * manufacture of which all the 
glycerin used was imported ; base allowance on a quantity of glycerin 
so used, to be determined by allowing 46 T 2 T pounds of the same for each 
100 pounds of nitroglycerin contained in the exported articles. 

The drawback entry must show the number and size of cartridges and 
other packages contained in each shipping case, the trade names or 
marks by which the several forms and grades of the explosives are 
designated, the quantity of each kind and grade, and the percentage of 
nitroglycerin contained in each grade, respectively. 

The weights of the several kinds of uniform packages shown by the 
drawback entry shall be tested by a United States weigher when ordered 
by the collector, and on order of the coUector, samples shall be taken 



10 

for analysis and verification of the statements contained in the entry as 
to the percentage of nitroglycerin contained in the several kinds and 
grades of the exported article. 

The samples shall be taken by an officer specially designated by the 
collector for that purpose, who shall take the same under instructions 
from the Government chemist by whom such samples are to be analyzed, 
as to manner of taking the same and the quantities to he taken. Before 
the liquidation of any such drawback entry, there must he tiled with the 
collector at the port of exportation, a sworn formula or statement by the 
proprietor and foreman of the factory where the explosives were made, 
showing the percentages of nitroglycerin used in the manufacture of 
the several brands or grades of explosives made in such factory for 
exportation, and no drawback shall be allowed on any excess over the 
quantity shown in the manufacturer's formula so filed, without special 
instructions from the Department. 

When the glycerin used has been refined from imported crude glycerin, 
the quantity of crude glycerin so used shall be determined by adding to 
the allowance of t(i,"„ pounds of glycerin for each 100 pounds of nitro- 
glycerin contained in the exported article, 22 percent of such allowance. 
'Electric exploders. (See Blasting caps and electric exploders.) 

Elecbric-liglding cables, manufactured by the Norwich Insulating Wire 
Company, of Brooklyn, N. Y., in part from imported lead; allow under 
Synopsis 11513. 

Electric-light .witches, manufactured by the Star Electric Company, of 
Philadelphia, Pa., iu part from imported china ware; allow under 
Synopsis 12409. 

Embossed leather, manufactured from imported plain leather; base 
allowance on a quantity of the imported material equal to the quantity 
of the exported article. 

Embossed sheet iron. (Sec Painted and embossed sheet iron.) 

Embossed tin plates, manufactured from imported tin plates, base 
allowance on a quantity of the material used, to be determined by 
either weight or measurement and inspection of the exported plates. 

Embroidered sill: handkerchiefs, manufactured from imported plain 
silk handkerchiefs, by embroidering thereou letters, monograms, or 
other ornamental designs ; base allowance on number of plain hand- 
kerchiefs used equal to number of embroidered handkerchiefs exported. 

The entry under which the merchandise is to be inspected and laden 
must show the number and size of each kind of embroidered hand- 
kerchief in each box or package and the number of such packages in 
each shipping case to be exported. The manufacturer's statement on 
the drawback entry must describe the plain handkerchiefs as they are 
described in the invoice under which they were imported. 

When ordered by the collector, the inspecting officer shall take 
samples of the manufactured articles, to be submitted to the appraiser 
for verification of the manufacturers statement as to the kind and 
quality of the imported plain handkerchiefs used. 

Essence of Jamaica ginger, Burnett's. (See Burnett's extracts, etc.) 

Exploders, electric. (See Blasting caps and electric exploders.) 

Explosives, dynamite and other. (See Dynamite and other explosives.) 

Extract of uitchhazel, fluid. (See Fluid extract of witchhazel.) 

Extracts, fluid. (See Fluid extracts.) 

Extracts of lemon, almond, and cochineal, Burnett's. (See Burnett's 
extracts, etc.) 

Eyeglasses. (See Lenses, spectacles, and eyeglasses.) 

Fashion plates, crystal. (See Crystal fashion plates.) 



11 

Fellows' compound syrup of liypophosphi1.es, manufactured by the Fel- 
lows Medical Manufacturing Company, of New York City, in part from 
imported glycerin and sugar; allow under Synopses 16741 and 17197. 
Felt, hammer. (See Hammer felt.) 
Fencing, barbed-ioire. (See Wire fencing.) 
Fencing, galvanised. (See Wire fencing.) 
Fencing, wire. (See Wire fencing.) 

Ferrotype plates, manufactured in part from imported taggers iron • 
base allowance on quantity of imported iron used appearing in the 
exported article. 

The entry under which the plates are to be inspected and laden must 
show, separately, the number and dimensions of each variety of plate 
exported, and the manufacturer's declaration must show the number, 
dimensions, gauge, and net weight of the imported plates used. 

When ordered by the collector, samples shall be taken by the inspect- 
ing officer and submitted to the appraiser, who shall report the gauge 
of the plate appearing iu the finished article. 

The superficial quantity of the exported ferrotype plates shall be 
determined by the count and measurement of such plates, as certified 
by the inspecting officer, and the weight of the imported taggers iron 
used shall be determined by ascertaining from the import entry the 
weight of a like superficial quantity of the material identified. 
Filters. (See Pasteur's germ-proof filters.) 
Finch gas equipments. (See Railway cars.) 

Finished split leather, manufactured by J. C. Crane & Co., of Boston, 
Mass., from imported rough leather or dressing hides; allow under 
Synopsis 10610. 

Fish nets, manufactured wholly from imported thread ; base allowance 
on quantity of thread used, to be determined by adding to the net weight 
of the exported nets 2 per cent of such weight. 

The entry under which the nets are to be inspected and laden must 
show the gross and net weight, the number of meshes from top to bot- 
tom, and the size of tjie meshes, and describe the thread used as it 
is described in the invoice under which it was imported. Declared 
weights shall be verified by a United States weigher. 
Fish-plate bolts. (See Bar iron, fish-plate bolts, etc.) 
Fishplates. (See Bar iron, fish-plate bolts, etc.) 
Fish preserver, manufactured by Johnson & Shaw, of Boston, Mass., 
from imported boracic acid and domestic salt; allow under Synopsis 
14207. i 

Flats, clothed iron. (See Clothed iron flats.) 
Floor tiles, marble. (See Marble floor tiles, etc.) 
Florida water. (See Toilet waters, etc.) 
Florida water, Barry' s. (See Barry's Florida water.) 
Flour bags. (See Bags.) 

Fluid extract of witchhazel, manufactured by W. Burton & Co., of 
New York City, in part from imported alcohol ; allow under Synopsis 
17211. 

Fluid extracts, manufactured by Parke Davis & Co., of Detroit, Mich., 
in the manufacture of which no other than imported alcohol was used ; 
allow under Synopsis 14977. 
Forgings, railway car. (See Bar iron, fish-plate bolts, etc. ) 
Frames, bicycle. (See Bicycles and frames.) 
Furs, imitation seal. (See Imitation seal furs.) 
Galvanized fencing. (See Wire fencing.) 
Galvanized-iron gutters. (See Iron roofing. ) 
Galvanized-iron roofing. (See Iron roofing.) 



12 

Galvanized-steel pipes. (See Steel pipes, galvanized or asphaltum and 
tar coated.) 

Galvanized wire. (See Wire, round, plain, or galvanized.) 

Gas equip in mis, Fiuvli. (See Railway cars.) 

Germ-proof filters. (See Pasteur's germ-proof filters. ) 

Glass, ornamental plate. (See Ornamental plate glass.) 

Glasses, mirror. (See Minor glasses.) 

Glass signs, manufactured by Horrid n & Co., of New York City, from 
imported glass, by processes of embossing, gilding, and painting ; allow 
under letter May 7, 1896, to collector, New York. 

Gloves, leather. (See Leather gloves.) 

Glue sizing, manufactured from glue imported in lumps ; base allow- 
ance on quantity of material used equal to weight of exported article, 
to be ascertained by a United States weigher. 

Glycerin, refined. (See Eefined glycerin.) 

Goatskins, China. (See China goatskins.) 

Gold-dust washing powder, manufactured by the W. J. Wilcox Lard 
and Refining Company, of New York City, ia part from "cotton seed 
oil foots" and imported soda ash ; allow under Synopsis 15758. 

Gold paint, manufactured by A. Sartorius & Co., of New York City, 
in part from imported bronze powder ; allow under Synopsis 11482. 

Grain bags. (See Bags.) 

Gutters, galvanized-iron. (See Iron roofing.) 

Hammer felt, manufactured by Alfred Dolge, of New York City, 
wholly from imported wools ; allow under Synopses 7702 and 17232. 

Hammers, piano. (See Piano hammers.) 

Handkerchiefs, embroidered silk. (See Embroidered silk bander chiefs.) 

Handles, tin. (See Petroleum cans and parts.) 

Hay knives, manufactured by the Hiram Holt Company, of East Wil- 
ton, Me., in part from imported iron ; allow under Synopsis 11793. 

Hoops, barrel. (See Petroleum barrels.) 

Horse ears. (See Railway cars.) 

House-furnishing goods, tin. (See Tin boxes, cans, etc.) 

Imitation seal furs, manufactured by the North American Electric, 
Seal Unhairing Company, of New York City, from imported, dressed, 
dyed, and sheared rabbit skins ; allow under Synopsis 15084. 

Insulator, micanite. (See Micanite insulator.) 

Iron, bar. (See Bar iron, fish-plate bolts, etc.) 

Iron roofing : 

Corrugated and galvanized roofing, manufactured from imported sheet 
iron and spelter ; base allowance on quantity of materials used. Manu- 
facturer's declaration on the drawback entry must show gauge, size, 
and number of sheets of iron used ; also the weight of the same and the 
quantity of spelter added in process of galvanizing. Such declarations 
shall be verified by expert official examination of samples, to be taken 
as ordered by the collector. " Quantities of materials used shall be deter- 
mined by reference to such verified statements and the weight of the 
exported article, as ascertained by a United States weigher. 

Corrugated and painted roofing, manufactured from imported sheet iron 
and domestic paint ; base allowance on quantity of such sheet iron used, to 
be determined by deducting from the weight of the exported article, as 
determined by a United States weigher, not less than 4 per cent of such 
weight. Samples shall be taken, as ordered by the collector, for expert 
official examination, to determine if deduction should be made in excess 
of 4 per cent. 



13 

Iron roofing — Continued. 

Corrugated gutters, leaders, ridging, sheets, and tiles, manufactured by 
the Mosely Iron Bridge and Eoof Company, of Jersey City, N. J., from 
imported galvanized-iron sheets ; allow under letter September 2, 1893, 
to collector, New York. 

Ironware, agate. (See Agate ironware.) 

Jewelry, manufactured in part from imported precious stones, requir- 
ing expert examination for purposes of "inspection" and "identifica- 
tion," no general regulation can be prescribed. 

On application to the Secretary of the Treasury, relative to inspection, 
custody; and lading of the articles to be exported, special instructions 
will be issued in each case. 

Kettles, patent cooking. (See Patent cooking kettles.) 

Key chains, nickel-plated. (See Nickel -plated key chains.) 

Knives, hay. (See Hay knives.) 

Labels. (See Signs, labels, and show cards.) 

Lamp shades, decorated. (See Decorated lamp shades.) 

Lanterns, tin. (See Tin boxes, cans, etc.) 

Lard compound, manufactured from imported oleostearin and domes- 
tic cotton seed oil, or from imported oleostearin and domestic cotton 
seed oil and lard ; base allowance on quantity of such oleostearin used, 
to be determined under the following instructions : 

Before allowance of drawback, the exporter must file with the col- 
lector of customs at the port from which the exportation is to be made, 
a sworn statement made by the manufacturer, showing the place, pro- 
cesses, and conditions of manufacture, and mode of packing for export, 
and also the formula, showing the materials and the proportions thereof 
entering into the manufacture of the compound, which statement shall 
be verified by the collector. 

The collector with whom such manufacturer's statement was first 
filed shall furnish certified copies thereof on request of collectors at 
other ports from which exportations are made. 

The entry for inspection and lading must show, separately, marks, 
numbers, and gross and net weights of packages, or must be accompa- 
nied by a certified invoice giving such particulars. Weights must be 
marked on packages and verified by a United States weigher by test of 
packages designated by the collector. 

The quantity or percentage of oleostearin in the exported article 
must be shown by the manufacturer's declaration on the drawback 
entry, which declaration must be verified by official expert analysis of 
samples taken by the inspecting officer as ordered by the collector. 

Quantity of oleostearin which may be taken as basis of liquidation 
shall in no case exceed quantity shown by formula filed, manufactur- 
er's declaration on entry, or that found by official analysis. Manufac- 
turer's declaration on entry must show that the exported article was 
made in accordance with sworn formula filed with collector. 

Leaded black plates. (See Tin and terne plates.) 

Lead, pig. (See Pig lead. ) 

Leaders, iron. (See Iron roofing.) 

Lead pipe, manufactured wholly from imported lead; base allowance 
on quantity of imported lead used, equal to weight of the exported 
article, to be ascertained by a United States weigher. 

Lead, red. (See Litharge and red lead.) 

Lead seals, manufactured wholly from imported lead ; base allowance 
on quantity of imported lead used, equal to weight of exported articles, 
to be ascertained by a United States weigher. 

Lead, sheet. (See Sheet lead.) 



14 

Lead, white. (See White lead.) 

Lead wire, manufactured wholly from imported lead; base allowance 
on quantity of imported lead used, equal to weight of exported article, 
to be ascertained by a United .Slates weigher. 

Leather, embossed. (See Embossed leather.) 

Leather gloves, manufactured by Foster. Paul & Co., of New York 
City, from partly made imported gloves and the manufacturers' patent 
domestic fasteners; allow under letter July 21, 1894, to collector, New 
York, and Synopsis ir>()ir>. 

Leather, sole. (See Sole leather.) 

Leather, split. (See Finished split leather.) 

Lenses, spectacles and eyeglasses, manufactured by T. A. Wilson & Co., 
of Beading, Pa., from imported lenses; allow under letter March 4, 
1891, to collector, Philadelphia. 

Linen netthui, manufactured by H. & G. W. Lord, of Boston, Mass., 
wholly from imported linen gilling twine; allow under Synopsis 12267. 

Linoleum, manufactured on an imported burlap "foundation;" base 
allowance on quantity of burlaps so used, equal to surface measurement 
of the exported article. 

Linseed oil and linseed oil calce, the oil being expressed from seed imported 
under the tariff act of August 28, 1894, and the oil cake being com- 
posed of the solid substance of such seed, the refuse matter in the seed 
and a small percentage of oil not recoverable, the parts of the seed and 
the refuse being separated by the processes of crushing, steaming, and 
pressing; base allowance on quantities and values of materials used in 
the manufacture of the respective products, to be ascertained under the 
following instructions: 

The manufacturer's and exporter's declarations on the drawback entry 
shall show the cost of the seed used per bushel of 56 pounds, and the 
wholesale market values of the oil per gallon of 7 1 pounds, and of the 
oilcake per ton of 2,000 pounds, at the place of manufacture at the time 
of exportation ; which declared cost and values shall be verified by the 
collector with whom the entry is lodged. 

Nineteen and ninety-one hundredths pounds (2.654 gallons) of oil 
and 35.87 pounds of oil cake being the ascertained average product of 
1 bushel (56 pounds) seed, such quantities, together with the cost and 
values above specified, shall be used as indicated in the following pro- 
portions, for the purpose of fixing the rate of drawback on each kiud of 
product. 

First, from the declared and verified values of oil and cake products 
and from the known quantities above noted, find the values of such 
products from 56 pounds seed. 

To find rate of drawback on oil, per gallon, say — 

Value of oil and ) C v , „, ., „ 1 (-<r„i„„ e s«l f Value of material 

i e re Value 01 oil li om 1 Value ul 66 1 } ~„ -, • rn 
cake from 56 } : { r „ . , }■::■{ ., j„ „„„., M for oil m 56 



^se^Tl 56pou n dsseed.}= : l pounds seed. J : j ^seed 



and 



„. „ ,„) ( Value of material 1 ("n,,^™. k« ™„„/i<,1 f Duty on material 

Value of 56 I I f a iu m ! I Duty on 5o pounds I 1 f .J „ ■ 56 

pounds seed. J \ pounds seed . J \ seed (20 cents) . J j pounds seed. 



Then 



Duty on material for j f D id Qn teW | f Rate f drawback 

divmed P bT2 65r d 'ri --ne ga.lon oil. } = { per gallon. 



15 



To find rate of drawback on oil cake per 100 pounds, say — 
Value of oil and | f Value of cake from) J Value of 56 ) ("Value of material 



And 



Value 
pounds 



of 56 1 f V »! ue •f"**' If Duty on 56 pounds 1 j ^ on material 

■~ d -| : l po r unt e see m d. 56 r-l -d( 2 0ceL). j : { J^ft,"" 

Then 

}C 1 f Duty on material 1 f Rate of drawback 

: -j 100 pounds, r '■ 'A for 35.87 pounds j- : -j on 100 pounds 
(. J (. of oil cake. j ( of oil cake. 



In case the dutiable quantity of imported seed used was ascertained 
on liquidation of the import entry, by deducting from the weight of the 
seed in condition as imported, an allowance for "draff" on account of 
dirt or other refuse matter therein, the rate of duty paid on such seed 
per bushel of 56 pounds may be determined by deducting from the tariff 
rate of 20 cents per bushel a percentage thereof corresponding to the 
percentage of weight allowance for draff ; and the rates of allowance of 
drawback on the oil and oil cake products of such seed used without 
previous winnowing or cleaning may be found by substituting and using 
the duty rate found by such deduction (per bushel of 6G pounds) in 
place of the 20-cent duty rate used in the foregoing proportions and 
formulas. 

Samples shall be taken as ordered by the collector, and quantities 
shall be ascertained by official weighing or gauging, as the case may 
require. 

When such oil is weighed, the number of gallons shall be determined 
by allowing 11 pounds of oil per gallon. 

Liquid anhydrous ammonia, manufactured wholly from imported sulphate 
of ammonia ; base allowance on quantity of such material used, to be 
determined by allowing 4 pounds of sulphate of ammonia for each 
pound of the exported article. 

Litharge and red lead, manufactured from imported lead ; base allow- 
ance on quantity of such material used. The entry under which the 
merchandise is to be inspected and laden must show, separately, the 
number and the gross and net weights of each of the various sizes oi 
packages in which the articles are, respectively, packed for shipment ; 
and the manufacturer's declaration on the drawback entry must show 
the quantities and percentages of metallic lead contained in the 
exported articles, which declaration shall be verified by the report of a 
United States weigher, and by analysis to be made by a Government 
chemist, of samples taken by the inspecting officer, as ordered by the 
collector. 

Lithographic tin plates, manufactured by S. A. Illsley & Co., of Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., from imported tin plates; allow under Synopsis 9782. 

Locomotive and other steam boilers, manufactured wholly or in part 
from imported boiler plates, brass and copper boiler tubes, etc.; base 
allowance ou quantities of imported materials used, under the following 
instructions : 

The drawback entry under which the boilers are to be inspected and 
laden must show the kind and description of boiler, giving dimensions 
of the same ; also the number, size, shape, and gauge of the various parts 
made from imported materials on which drawback of duties is claimed. 
Such entry must be accompanied by a draft or diagram of the boiler, 
illustrating the description given in the entry by showing the measure- 



16 

inents, number, and relative position of the different parts named in the 
entry, which description and measurements shall be verified by the 
inspecting officer. 

The manufacturer's declaration shall show the quantity and kind of 
imported material used, describing the same by giving dimensions, 
gauge, and weight of plates and other parts in condition as imported, 
and indicating the parts of the completed boiler in which the same 
appear. 

Such declaration shall also show, separately, the quantities and values 
of the different kinds of resultant scrap, and the value at the factory 
of the different kinds of imported material used in the manufacture. 

In case it shall be found on liquidation of the drawback entry that 
the weights of the different materials identified are not separately shown 
in the entry under which the same were imported, reference may be 
had for verification of the manufacturer's statements to standard tables 
and rules for determining by measurement the weights of different 
kinds of boiler materials, which may be found in "Haswell's Engineers' 
and Mechanics' Pocket Book." 

Locomotive and railway car wheels, manufactured wholly or in part from 
imported tires, centers, retaining bolts and retaining rings, and such 
imported wheels fitted and permanently attached to domestic axles; 
base allowance on quantity of imported materials used, under the follow- 
ing instructions : 

The entry under which such wheels are to be inspected and laden 
must show, separately, the kinds of wheels, the dimensions of the same, 
aud the dimensions and weights of the several parts on which drawback 
allowance must be made. The dimensions of tires given must include 
inside diameter, width on inside face, and thickness on "tread," and 
the given dimensions of centers must include outside diameter of rim, 
width of rim on face, and diameter and length of axle bore. 

The entry must be accompanied by drawings of the wheels and parts, 
or refer to such drawings on file with the collector of the port from 
which exportation is to be made, illustrating the description given in 
such entry by showing the measurements of the wheels and parts, 
which description and measurements shall be verified by the inspecting 
officers. When practicable the weights given in the entry of the sev- 
eral parts of the wheels shall be verified by a United States weigher. 

The manufacturer's declaration on the drawback entry must show, 
separately, the kinds, dimensions, and weights of the imported materials 
used in the manufacture of the wheels, describing the material for each 
part of the finished wheel as the same was described in the invoice 
under which it was imported and in the drawing accompanying such 
invoice or referred to therein. Such declarations shall also show, sepa- 
rately, the quantities and values of the different kinds of resultant 
scrap or "waste," and the values at the factory of the respective kinds 
of imported material from which such "waste" is produced. 

In determining the weight of imported material which shall be 
made the basis of allowance of drawback on the finished article, the 
weight of the material in condition as imported shall be reduced by a 
number of pounds equal in value to the value of the " waste" result- 
ing from manufacture, according to the values of material and waste 
shown in the manufacturer's declaration. 

Locomotive coupling buffers. (See Locomotives.) 

Locomotives, manufactured in part from imported materials; base 



17 

allowance on quantities of imported materials so used, uuder the fol- 
lowing instructions : 

Blast pipes, Copperplates, Coupling buffers, and Crank pins, in locomo- 
tives built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works, of Philadelphia Pa 
allow under Synopses 11168, 16878, and 11472, and letter July 15, 1896, 
to collector, New York, respectively. 

Boilers. (See Locomotive and other steam boilers.) 
Wheels. (See Locomotive and railway car wheels.) 
Lubricating oils, manufactured wholly from imported rape-seed oil and 
the products of domestic petroleum ; base allowance on quantity of the 
imported rape seed oil used, to be determined as follows : 

The entry under which the merchandise is to be inspected and laden 
must show, separately, the number and kind of shipping packages, and 
the quantity and quality or kind of the manufactured article contained 
in each package. 

In case the exported article is made under a standard formula the 
manufacturer must file with the collector, prior to the liquidation of the 
drawback entry, a sworn statement showing such formula, and the mode 
of manufacture and packing for shipment, and in all other cases the 
special formula of manufacture, together with a description of the mode 
of manufacture and packing, must accompany the drawback entry. 

The drawback entry must show, separately, the quantity and quality 
or kind of the manufactured article contained in each package, and in 
the entire shipment ; and the manufacturer's declaration on such entry 
must show the percentages and quantities of rape-seed oil appearing in 
each kind or quality, respectively. 

Such declaration must further show, in addition to the usual aver- 
ments, that the exported oils were manufactured and packed for ship- 
ment in manner as set forth in standard formulas and statements filed 
with the collector, referring thereto by date, or in special formulas and 
statements accompanying the drawback entry. 

Samples shall be taken, as ordered by the collector, to be submitted 
to the appraiser for report of the percentage of rape-seed oil appearing 
therein. 

In liquidating entries the quantity of rape-seed oil on which allow- 
ance of drawback may be based, shall be determined for each kind or 
quality of oil by use of the minimum quantity and percentage relating 
to each such kind or quality, respectively, as shown by the manufac- 
turer's sworn formula and statement, the declaration on the drawback 
entry, or by the appraiser's report of percentages and a United States 
gauger's report of quantities. 

Lumber, creosoted. (See Creosoted lumber.) 
Lumber, dressed. (See Dressed lumber.) 

Magnolia antifriction metal, and other antifriction metals known as 
Aluminum bearing and "No. 1 metal," manufactured by the Magnolia 
Antifriction Metal Company, of New York City, from imported lead, 
tin, and antimony, and "Mystic" and " Pyramid' " metals, from lead and 
antimony ; allow uuder Synopses 12772, 14901, and letters March 22, 
1894, and August 15, 1894, to collector, New York. 

Maltine and cod-liver oil, Mattine with coca wine, and Plain maltine, man- 
ufactured by the Maltine Manufacturing Company, of New York City, 
in part from imported alcohol, glycerine, and cod-liver oil ; allow under 
letter July 30, 1896, to collector, New York. 
Malt, screened. (See Screened malt.) 

Marble floor tiles, posts, risers, slabs, tombstones, and treads, manufac- 
tured from marble imported in blocks rough, or squared ; base allowance 
on quantity of imported material used, equal to quantity determined 
by measurements of exported articles. 
3 



18 

Mattress fabric, woven-wire. (See Wooven-wire mattress fabric.) 
Metal, aluminum Inuring. (See Magnolia antifriction metal, etc.) 
Metal, composition. (See Composition metal.) 
Metal, magnolia mil i friction. (See Magnolia antifriction metal, etc.) 
Metal, ■• Mystic," "'No. 1," and " Pyramid." (See Magnolia antifric- 
tion metal, etc.) 

Metal shingles, manufactured by Marchaut & Co., Incorporated, of 
Philadelphia, l'a., from imported tin plates and black plates; allow 
under Synopsis 16161. 

Metal, white. (See White metal.) 

Mieanite insulator, manufactured by the Mica Insulator Company, of 
Schenectady, N. Y., from shellac and imported mica; allow under 
Synopsis 14673. 
Milk, condensed. (See Condensed milk.) 

Mirror glasses, manufactured from imported plate glass by the pro- 
cesses of cutting, beveling, and polishing, either with or without the 
addition of "silver coating;" base allowance on quantity of material 
used, to be determined by count and measurement of the exported 
articles. The entry must show, separately, the number and dimensions 
of each sine and variety of mirror glass exported. 

Mixed paints, manufactured in part from imported linseed oil ; base 
allowance on quantity of imported oil used, under the following 
instructions : 

The manufacturer's declaration on the drawback entry must show, 
separately, the quantity of oil used in the manufacture of each kind 
and quality of paint. Samples shall be taken by the inspecting officer 
as ordered by the collector, and submitted to a Government chemist for 
analysis and determination of the percentages "by weight" of oil con- 
tained therein. The quantity of oil used shall be determined by 
reference to such chemist's reports, and weights of the exported articles 
returned by a United States weigher, which quantity shall be reduced 
to gallons on the basis of 7i pounds for each gallon of oil. 

Moldings. (See Doors and moldings.) 

" Mystic" metal. (See Magnolia antifriction metal, etc.) 

Nails, steel wire. (See Steel wire nails.) 

Nets, fish. (See Fish nets.) 

Netting, linen. (See Linen netting.) 

Nickel-plated key chains, manufactured by the Lane Manufacturing 
Company, of Waterbury, Conn., from nickel and imported polished steel 
chains, by the process of nickel plating ; allow under Synopsis 14343. 

"No. 1" Metal. (See Magnolia antifriction metal, etc.) 

Nozzles for petroleum cans, tin. (See Petroleum cans and parts.) 

Nuts for bolts. (See Pish plate bolts, and Carriage and tire bolts.) 

Oil cake, linseed. (See Linseed-oil cake.) 

Oil, castor. (See Castor oil.) 

Oil cloths, manufactured in part from imported burlaps or oilcloth 
foundations ; base allowance on a quantity of such material used equal 
to the surface measurement of the exported article. 

Oil, Unseed. (See Linseed oil.) 

Oil, lubricating. (See Lubricating oil.) 

Ornamental plate glass, manufactured from imported plain plate glass 
by process of cutting or engraving ornamental designs on the same ; 
base allowance on a quantity of the material used, to be determined by 
measurement of the exported articles. 

Packing cases. (See Wooden boxes.) 

Pails, tin. (See Tin boxes, cans, etc.) 



19 

Pain Jciller, Perry Davis'. (See Perry Davis' pain killer.) 
Pain relief, Barry's. (See Barry's pain relief.) 

Painted and embossed sheet iron, manufactured from imported plain 
sheet iron ; base allowance on quantity of such iron used, to be deter- 
mined by deducting from the weight of the exported article, as ascer- 
tained by a United States weigher, the weight of the paint on the 
finished sheets. The. manufacturer's declaration on the drawback entry 
must show the quantity or percentage of paint adhering to the finished 
sheets, and such declaration shall be verified by expert official inspec- 
tion of samples to be taken as ordered by the collector. 
Painted iron roofing. (See Iron roofing. ) 

Painted tin shingles, manufactured by the Cortright Metal Roofing 
Company, of Philadelphia, Pa., from imported tin plates and domestic 
paint ; allow under Synopsis 13642. 
Paint, gold. (See Gold paint.) 
Paints, mixed. (See Mixed paints.) 
Pans, tin. (See Tin boxes, cans, etc.) 

Paper wrappers, surface- coated. (See Surface-coated paper wrappers.) 
Pasteur' s germ-proof filters, manufactured by the Pasteur- Chamberland 
Filter Company, of Dayton, Ohio, in part from imported filtering tubes ; 
allow under Synopsis 12087. 

Patent cooking Jcettles, manufactured by A. W. Oberman, of Pittsburg, 
Pa., in part from imported enameled iron forms; allow under Synopsis 
14337. 

Patent metallic shingles, manufactured from imported tin plates or tag- 
gers iron ; base allowance on quantity of imported material used equal 
to net weight of exported articles, as ascertained by a United States 
weigher. 

Pearline, manufactured by James Pyle & Sons, of New York City, in 
part from imported soda ash and caustic soda ; allow under Synopsis 
12594. J * 

Peas, split. (See Split peas. ) 
Pens, steel. (See Steel pens.) 

Perforated copper plates, manufactured from imported copperplates; 
base allowance on quantity of material used, equal to weight of exported 
articles, ascertained by a United States weigher. 

Perry Davis' pain killer, manufactured by Davis & Lawrence Com- 
pany, of New York City, in part from imported alcohol ; allow under 
letter January 10, 1896. 

Petroleum barrels, manufactured in part from imported hoop steel or 
wire rods, if made by the Standard Oil Company, of New York, or the 
Atlantic Refining Company, of Philadelphia, Pa., allow for wire rods 
used under letter December 9, 1891, and Synopsis 12277, respectively ; 
if made by the Tide Water Oil Company, of New York City, allow 
for hoop steel under Synopsis 13475. 
Petroleum cans and parts : 

Cans. (See Tin boxes, cans, etc.) 

Gaps, handles, nozzles, screw rings, and screw tops, manufactured wholly 
or in part from imported tin plates and attached to petroleum cans ; 
base allowance on quantity of such material used, to be determined 
by adding to the quantity of tin plate appearing in such articles 
a quantity equal to that actually destroyed or converted into worthless 
scrap in process of manufacture. In case the resultant scrap is not 
worthless, the quantity to be added to cover such wastage in manufac- 
ture shall be reduced by a number of pounds equal in value to the 
value of such scrap. Values of such tin plate and scrap shall be 



20 

Petroleum cans and parts — Continued, 
declared by manufacturers on requisition of collectors. No drawback 
shall be allowed on attachments made from scrap tin. 

Solder, made wholly from imported tin and had, when used by the 
Tide Water Oil Company and the Standard Oil Company, of New York, 
in soldering petroleum cans, allow under Synopses 14592 and 14798; 
and when used by the Atlantic Refining Company, of Philadelphia, Pa., 
allow under Synopsis 1427.'!. 

Petroleum cases. (See "Wooden boxes.) 

Phenacetine pills. (See Pills.) 

Photographic cameras, manufactured by W. II. Lewis, of Greenpoint, 
N. Y., in part from imported Dallmever lenses ; allow under Synopsis 
11735. 

Photographic dry plates, manufactured from imported glass plates and 
gelatine; base allowance on quantity of glass, to be determined by add- 
ing to the net weight of the exported plates, ascertained by a United 
States weigher, 15 per cent of such weight, and on the quantity of gela- 
tine used, not in excess of three-eights of a grain for each square inch 
of the coated surface. 

The manufacturer's declaration on the drawback entry must show 
the quantity of gelatine used, which declaration must be verified by 
tests made by a Government chemist, of samples taken as ordered by 
the collector. 

Piano liammers, manufactured by Alfred Dolge, of New York City, 
in part from sheet felt made by him, wholly from imported wool ; 
allow under Synopses 958(3 and 17232. 

Pickets, manufactured from imported lumber ; base allowance on 
quantity of lumber used, equal to "board measure" of exported 
articles. 

Pig lead, manufactured from imported lead ore ; base allowance on 
quantities of pure lead contained in the exported article. Such quan- 
tity shall be determined by reference to the weight of the exported pig 
lead, ascertained by a United States weigher, and the percentage of 
pure lead therein, ascertained by a United States chemist's analysis of 
samples taken in each case by the lading officer. 

The rate of allowance per pound of pure lead exported shall be 
determined by dividing the rate of duty paid on the imported ore by 
the per cent of pure lead found in such ore on importation. 

On each entry of pig lead for drawback, under the provisions of 
section 22 of the act of August 28, 1894, the exporters shall be required 
to file, in addition to the usual declarations, a special declaration, veri- 
fied by one general officer and the foreman of the smelting works pro- 
ducing such lead, setting forth specifically that the lead covered by the 
entry was produced wholly from imported ores, without any admixture 
of domestic ores containing lead. 

Pills, manufactured by John Wyeth & Bro., of Philadelphia, Pa., in 
part from imported antipyrine, phenacetine, salol or sulphonal ; allow 
under Synopses 13911 and 14041. 

Pipe, lead. (See Lead pipe.) 

Pipes, blast. (See Locomotives.) 

Pipes, steel. (See Steel pipes, galvanized, etc.) 

Planed rails. (See Dressed lumber.) 

Plate glass, ornamental. (See Ornamental plate glass.) 

Plates, ferrotype. (See Ferrotype plates.) 

Plates, fish. (See Bar iron, fish-plate bolts, etc.) 

Plates, perforated copper. (See Perforated copper plates.) 



21 

Plates, photographic, dry. (See Photographic dry plates.) 

Plates, terne and tin, (See Tin and terne plates.) 

Plug tobacco, manufactured in part from imported licorice paste ; base 
allowance on quantity of such paste used, to be determined under the 
following instructions : 

The entry under which the tobacco is laden must show, separately, 
the number and description of packages of each brand or quality laden, 
and the drawback entry must show, separately, the quantity of each 
kind and quality covered thereby and the quantity of licorice paste 
used in the manufacture of each. Before the liquidation of any such 
drawback entry, there must be filed with the collector at the port of 
exportation a sworn formula or statement of the proprietor and foreman 
of the factory where the tobacco was made, showing the percentages of 
licorice paste used in the manufacture of the several brands and grades 
of tobacco made in such factory for exportation. 

Manufactured tobacco being" exported under the supervision of the 
internal-revenue authorities, the weights reported by them shall be 
accepted by collectors of customs, and, on the request of the collector 
with whom a manufacturer's formula is filed, the internal-revenue officer 
in charge of the factory shall procure and transmit to such collector 
samples of the tobacco described in such formula, to be submitted to a 
Government chemist for analysis and verification of the percentages of 
licorice paste shown in the formula. 

When ordered by the collector, the customs officer inspecting the 
tobacco shall take samples for use in verifying the manufacturer's state- 
ment on the drawback entry. 

No drawback shall be allowed on any excess over the quantity shown 
in the manufacturer's formula submitted without special instructions of 
the Department. 

Plumbers' traps, manufactured wholly from imported lead; base 
allowance on quantity of such lead used, equal to weight of exported 
articles, found by a United States weigher. 

Plush, silk. (See Silk plush.) 

Pomace, castor. (See Castor pomace.) 

Portable railroad sections, manufactured wholly or in part from 
imported materials; base allowance on quantities of such materials 
used, equal to weight of exported parts made from such materials, to be 
determined by a United States weigher. 

Posts, marble. (See Marble floor tiles, etc.) 

11 Potash," manufactured by Leon Hirsh & Sons, and William Archi- 
bald, of New York City, and by the Philadelphia Lye and Chemical 
Company; Limited, of Philadelphia, from imported caustic soda ; allow 
under Synopses 13716, 15891, and 17039, respectively. 

Preserver, fish. (See Pish preserver.) 

Printed and finished cloths, manufactured by Gil more & Haigh, of 
Somerville, Mass., from imported plain cotton cloth; allow under 
Synopsis 16696. 

Printed silJcs. (See Silks, printed and dyed.) 

"Pyramid" metal. (See Magnolia antifriction metal, etc.) 

Rackarock. (See Solid ingredient of rackarock.) 

Railroad sections, portable. (See Portable railroad sections.) 

Railroad spikes. (See Bar iron, fish-plate bolts, etc.) 

Rails, planed. (See Dressed lumber.) 

Rails, steel. (See Steel rails.) 

Railway car forgings. (See Bar iron, fish-plate bolts, etc.) 



22 

Railway oars: 
Car bodies, manufactured by the Gilbert Car Manufacturing Com- 
pany, of Troy, N. Y., in part from imported glass ; allow under Synopsis 
L0695. 

Oars, manufactured by the Harlan & Hollingsworth Company, of 
Wilmington, Del., in part from imported drawbars, gas equipments, 
-lass lor windows, vacuum brakes, and ventilators; allow under Synopsis 
11955. 

llor.se ears, manufactured by the John Stephenson Company, Limi- 
ted, of New York City, in part from imported glass ; allow under Synopsis 
1 1927. 

Wheels, car. (See Locomotive and railway car wheels.) 

Ramsay's Trinidad aromatic bitters, manufactured by Tyrer & Mul- 
larkey. of Xew York City, in part from imported rum; allow under 
Synopsis 14569. 

h'ril lead. (See Litharge and red lead.) 

Refined butter, manufactured by Lestrade Brothers and John Scheel, 
both of Xew York City, in part from imported "grease butter;" allow 
under letter October 13, 1891, to collector, New York, and Synopsis 
12590. On that manufactured by Bartram Brothers and Kurzman 
Brothers, of Xew York City, in part from imported "grease butter," 
allow under Synopsis 145 7S. 

Refined copper, manufactured from copper ore, blister, scrap or matte ; 
base allowance on quautity of fine copper in the imported material 
used, equal to the quantity of fine copper in the exported article, to be 
determined by reference to the weight of the exported article, ascer- 
tained by a Government weigher, and to the per cent of pure copper 
found therein by a Government chemist on analysis of samples to be 
taken in each case by the inspecting officer. 

Refined glycerin, manufactured wholly from imported crude glycerin ; 
base allowance on quautity of imported glycerin used, to be deter- 
mined by adding to the net weight of the exported article, ascertained 
by a United States weigher, 22 per cent of such weight ; provided that 
the exported glycerin, if colorless, shall be of a density not less than 
1.25 specific gravity (29° Baum6), and, if tinted, not less than 1.26 spe- 
cific gravity (30° Baume), at 60° Fahrenheit. 

Samples of the crude material and of the refined product must, in all 
cases, be submitted to a Government chemist for his report relative to 
the requisite conditions noted. 

Refined sirup. (See Sugars and sirups, refined, and Sirup.) 

Refined sugar. (See Sugars and sirups, refined. ) 

Retaining bolts and rings. (See Locomotive and- railway car' wheels.) 

Renter' 1 s syrup, manufactured by Barclay & Co., of Xew York City, in 
part from imported alcohol; allow under Synopsis 17227. 

Rice, cleaned. (See Cleaned rice.) 

Ridging, iron. (See Iron roofing.) 

Risers, marble. (See Marble floor tiles, etc.) 

Rivets, manufactured from imported iron or steel wire rods, or rivet 
rods ; base allowance on quantity of material used, to be determined 
by adding to the weight of the exported rivets, as ascertained by a 
United States weigher, 3 per cent of such weight. 

Rods, connecting. (See Connecting rods.) 

Roofing, iron. (See Iron roofing.) 

Roofing sheets and tiles. (See Iron roofing.) 

Rope, wire, and wire and hemp. (See Wire rope.) 



23 

Bound wire, plain or galvanized. (See Wire, round, plain or gal- 
vanized. 

Bugs, Wilton. (See Wilton rugs.) 

Bugs, Zanoni. (See Zanoni rugs and velvets.) 

Salol pills. (See Pills.) 

Sapolios. (See Soaps, soap powder, and sapolios.) 

Sarsaparilla, Ayer's. (See Ayer's cherry pectoral and sarsaparilla. ) 

Saws and blanks, land. (See Band saws and blanks.) 

Saws, cotton-gin. (See Cotton-gin saws.) 

Saios, not specially provided for, manufactured wholly from imported 
materials; base allowance on a quantity of materials used, equal to net 
weight of exported articles, ascertained by a United States weigher. 

Scotfs Emulsion of God-Liver Oil, manufactured by Scott & Bowne, of 
New York City, iu part from imported cod-liver oil, hypophosphites of 
lime and soda, and glycerin refined from imported crude glycerin ; 
allow under Synopsis 14677, amended to allow 22 per cent for waste in 
refining crude glycerin. 

Screened malt, manufactured wholly from imported barley ; base allow- 
ance on quantity of such barley used, to be determined by allowing 
.905 of a bushel of barley weighing 48 pounds per bushel for each 
bushel of the exported malt weighing 34 pounds ; but in no case shall 
allowance be based on a ratio of barley used, to the malt produced 
therefrom, in excess of that shown by the manufacturer's declaration on 
the drawback entry. Weight of exported article shall be ascertained 
by a United States weigher. 

Screws, wood. (See Wood screws.) 

Screw tops, tin. (See Petroleum cans and parts.) 

Seal furs, imitation. (See Imitation seal furs.) 

Seals, lead. (See Lead seals.) 

Shades, decorated lamp. (See Decorated lamp shades. ) 

Sheepskins, degreased. (See Degreased sheepskins. ) 

Sheet iron, painted and embossed. (See Painted and embossed sheet 
iron.) 

Sheet lead, manufactured wholly from imported lead ; base allowance 
on quantity of imported lead used, equal to weight of exported article, 
ascertained by a United States weigher. 

Sheets, roofing. (See Iron roofing.) 

Shelving. (See Dressed lumber.) 

Shields, dress. (See Dress shields. ) 

Shingles, metal (made by Marchant & Co.). (See Metal shingles, etc.) 

Shingles, painted, tin. (See Painted tin shingles.) 

Shingles, patent metallic. (See Patent metallic shingles.) 

Shirts, silk outing. (See Silk outing shirts.) 

Shooks, box. (See Box shooks.) 

Shot, manufactured wholly from imported lead and exported in bags 
or boxes ; base allowance on quautity of such material used, equal to 
weight of exported article, ascertained by a United States weigher. 

Shot cartridges, manufactured by the Union Metallic Cartridge Com- 
pany, of Bridgeport, Conn., and loaded with shot made wholly from 
imported lead ; allow under Synopsis 15928. 

Shoic cards. (See Signs, labels, and show cards. ) 

Siding. (See Dressed lumber.) 

Signs, glass. (See Glass signs.) 

Signs, labels, and show cards, manufactured from imported tin plates 
or "black plates," by varied processes of shaping, painting, printing, 



24 

varnishing, enameling, and embossing: base allowance on quantity of 
imported plates used. 

The entry under which the merchandise is to be inspected and laden 
must show, separately, the number, kind, size, and weight of articles, 
and must specify the articles in each package, Or must be accompanied 
by a sworn invoice, separately describing the articles in each package. 

Manufacturer's declaration on drawback entry must show number, 
si/.c, gauge, and weight of imported plates used, and also the amount or 
per cent of increase of weight added to such plates by processes of man 
ufacture. Samples shall be taken as ordered by I he collector for expert 
official examination and verification of declared gauges and additions. 
Quantities of material used shall be determined by reference to such 
verifications and weight of exported articles ascertained by a United 
States weigher, provided that such quantities shall in no case exceed 
the weight of the plates "identified " as shown by the records of importa- 
tion. 

Sill: handkerchiefs, embroidered. (See Embroidered silk handkerchiefs.) 

Sill- outing shirt*, manufactured by Lewis Frank & Sons, of New York 
City, from imported silk shirtings; allow under Synopsis 12101. 

Silk plush, manufactured by the Peerless Plush Manufacturing Com- 
pany, of Paterson, N. J., the back being made of cotton and the face 
or "pile" being made wholly from imported "spun" silk; allow under 
Synopsis 15491. 

Silks, printed and dyed: 

Printed silks, manufactured from pongee silks, imported "in the 
grey;" base allowance on quantity of imported silk used, to be deter- 
mined by reference to the report of the inspecting officer showing num- 
ber of yards exported, and the manufacturer's declaration on the 
drawback entry showing percentage of increase of yardage consequent 
on the stretching of the imported fabric in process of printing and 
finishing. Samples shall be takeu as ordered by the collector, to be 
submitted to the appraiser for verification of the manufacturer's decla- 
ration relative to kind and quality of imported silk used. 

Dyed silks, manufactured from pongee silks, i m ported ' ' in the white ' ' 
or "in the grey," or from imported "Habutai" silks; base allowance 
on quantity of imported silks used, equal to the number of yards of the 
exported article, to be determined by the inspecting officer, who shall 
take samples as ordered by the collector, for use as in case of printed 
silks, which see. 

Sirup, manufactured wholly from imported raw sugars. (See Sugars 
and sirups, refined.) 

Sirup, manufactured wholly from molasses imported under the tariff of 
August 28, 1894, subject to duty at 2 cents per gallon ; base allowance 
on quantity of material used, to be determined under the following 
rules : 

The manufacturer's declaration on the drawback entry must show, in 
addition to the usual averments, the number of gallons of the molasses 
"boiled" and used in producing the sirup exported, the number of 
gallons and value per gallon of such sirup, and also the weight and 
the value per pouud of the sugar product of such molasses. 

The declared values of such sugar and sirup products must be their 
values, exclusive of packages, at the refinery at the time of shipment 
for exportation ; and such values and declared quantities must be veri- 
fied by the collector before use in finding the duty paid on the material 
used in the manufacture of the sirup. 



25 

The amount of duty paid on such material shall be determined by 
use of such verified quantities and values as shown in the following 
proportion : 

As the total value of the sugar and sirup products of a given quan- 
tity of molasses is to the value of the sirup product of such molasses, 
so is the duty paid on the molasses (the material for both products) to 
the duty paid on the material for the sirup. 

The duty paid on the material "used" being so found, the proper 
rate of drawback per gallon of the exported sirup shall be determined 
by dividing such amount of duty paid by the number of gallons of the 
sirup product; but in no case shall drawback be allowed on any excess 
over 43 gallons of sirup for each 100 gallons of molasses " boiled" in 
the manufacture of the sirup, unless such allowance be specially author- 
ized by the Secretary of the Treasury. 

The quantity of the exported sirup shall be ascertained by a United 
States gauger, and samples shall be taken as ordered by the collector, 
to be submitted to the appraiser for expert official inspection and 
report. 

Sizing, glue. (See Glue sizing.) 

Skins, China goat. (See China goatskins.) 

SMns, dressed. (See Dressed skins.) 

Slabs, marble. (See Marble floor tiles, etc.) 

Soaps, soap powders, and sapolios, manufactured in part from imported 
caustic soda and soda ash ; base allowance on quantities of such caustic 
soda or soda ash, or both, used in the manufacture of the exported 
articles; provided always that no domestic material of the kind on 
which drawback is claimed shall have been used in the manufacture of 
the exported articles. 

Before allowance of drawback the exporter must file with the collector, 
at port of exportation, a sworn statement showing place, processes, and 
conditions of manufacture, and mode of packing the article for export, 
and showing also the ingredients of the article to be exported, and the 
proportions thereof, which statement shall be verified by the collector. 

The collector with whom such verified statement is filed shall, on 
application of collectors of other ports from which exportations are 
made, furnish certified copies thereof for use at such other ports. 

The entry under which the merchandise is to be inspected and laden 
must show, separately, the quantities of the different kinds of mer- 
chandise, the marks, numbers, and sizes of the packages containing 
the same, and the gross and net weights of each package, or must be 
accompanied