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Full text of "Department of State bulletin"

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THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 






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VOLUME I • Numbers 1-27 /f3^ 



July I— December 30, 1939 




UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1940 



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Publication 1457 



INDEX TO THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Volume I: Numbers 1-27, July 1-December 30, 1939 



Acting Secretary of State. See Welles, Sumner. 
Addresses, remarks, statements, etc., by — 

Berle, Adolf A., Jr., 361-363, 368, 412, 659-663 
Cherrington, Ben M., 19-24 

Diplomatic oflScers, foreign, upon presentation of 
letters of credence, 58-59, 1'63-164, 186-187, 308- 
309, 370-371, 568-570 
Grady, Henry F., 254-255, 25(5-258, 376-379, 416- 

417. 507-508, 614-616, 633-639 
Grew, Joseph C, 509-516 
Hull, Cordell. See Hull, Cordell : Addresses and 

remarks; and Statements. 
Messersmith, George S., 380-388, 579-585 
Roosevelt, Franklin D. See Roosevelt, Franklin D. : 

Addresses and remarks; and Statements. 
Sayre, Francis B., 32-34, 95 
Thomson, Charles A., 26-31 
Welles, Sumner. See Welles, Sumner : Addresses 

and remarks; and Statements. 
Wilson, Hugh R., 188-192 
Winterton, the Earl, 401-402 
Aerial Legal Experts, International Technical Com- 
mittee of, 100 
Aerial Navigation, International Sanitary Conven- 
tion for, application to Burma, 49-50 
Aeronautics, Second International Salon of, 37 
Afghanistan, ratiiication of labor conventions, 62-63 
Agrarian Claims Commission, United States and 

Mexico, 631 
Agreements, international. See Treaties and Trade 

agreements. 
Agricultural Service. Foreign, consolidation with 
Foreign Service of the United States (Department 
of State), 38-39, 382-388 
Agriculture, benefits from trade-agreements program, 

664-670, 674-675 
Air navigation. See Aviation. 
Aircraft. See Aviation. 

American citizens. See U. S. citizens under Euro- 
pean situation ; under Far Eastern situation ; 
and under Neutrality. 
American Institute of Architects, address, 306 
American Red Cross, statement by President Roose- 
velt, 404 
American republics. See Inter-American relations. 
American Scientific Congress, Eighth, 470-471 
American ships. See U. S. ships under European sit- 
uation and under Neutrality. 
American states, international conferences of, 20, 251, 

287, 321, 489-490, 560 
American States Members of the International Labor 

Organization, Regional Conference, 572-573, 591 
Americanists, Twenty-seventh International Congress 

of, lOO-lOl, 194 
Amoy, Cliina, withdrawal of military forces from 

Kulaugsu, 407 
Anglo-Pranco-Turkish treaty of mutual assistance, 

544-546, 604 
Anglo-Polish agreement of mutual assistance, 
270-271 

224725—40 1 



Announcement, inauguration of "The Department of 

State :Bulletin," 3 
Antarctic Service, U. S., 57 
Anthropology and Prehistoric Archeology, Eighteenth 

International Congress of, 165 
Apprenticeship, recommendation of Labor Conference 

concerning, 574 
Appropriations, Department of State, 1940, 4-9 
Arbitration : 
Pacific settlement of international disputes, general 

act for, 352, .541 
Permanent Court of Arbitration, appointments, 65, 

83, 102, 172, 643 
Permanent Court of International Justice, optional 
clause of the Statute, 102, 352-354, 422-424, 473- 
474 
Treaty of nonaggression, conciliation, arbitration, 
and juridical procedure, Colombia and Venezu- 
ela, 734 
Archeology, Prehistoric, and Anthropology, Eighteenth 

International Congress of, 165 
Architects, American Institute of, address, 306 
Argentina ; 

Air service with United States, tenth anniversary, 

367-368 
Declaration of territorial rights, 333 
Treaties : 
Aviation instructors, military, agreement with 

United States for detail of, 271-272 
Intellectual property, treaty on, signature, 151-152 
Publication!?, official, agreement with United States 

for exchange of, 645 
Trade agreement with United States, proposed, 
166-170, 516-524 
Armament, limitation of, 583 
Armistice Day proclamation, 415-416 
Arms, ammunition, and implements of war. See under 

Neutrality, U. S. 
Army, U. S. : 

"Flying Portresses," visit to South America, 567- 

568, 589, 632 
Increase, 217 

Survey of Nicaraguan barge canal and highway 
project, 107 
Arosemena, Juan Dem6stenes, death, 699 
Art, Conference on Inter-American Relations in the 

Field of, 303, 339-341, 361-366 
Artistic exhibitions, iner-Americau convention on, 

ratification by Costa Rica, 36 
Assistant Secretary of State. Sec Berle, Adolf A., Jr. ; 
Grady, Henry F. ; Messersmith, George S. ; and 
Sayre, Francis B. 
Asylum and political refugees, treaty on, 144 
"Athenia," sinking, 227-229, 283-284, 434, 460 
Australia (see also European situation and Neu- 
trality) : 
Treaties : 

History, declaration regarding teaching of, signa- 
ture, 65 

757 



MAY ?5 1940 



758 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Australia — Continued. 
Treaties — Continued. 

League of Nations Covenant, amendment, signa- 
ture, 448 
London Naval Treaty of 1936, suspension of ap- 
plication, 291 
Pacific settlement of international disputes, gen- 
eral act for, denunciation, 352, 541 
Permanent Court of International Justice, denun- 
ciation of optional clause of the Statute, 352, 
473-474 
Wages and hours of work in industries and agri- 
culture, statistics of, ratification, 425 
Wool available to U. S. importers, 641 
Aviation : 
Air service between United States and Argentina, 

tenth anniversary, 367-368 
Aircraft shipments to nations bombing civilians, 

68.5-686 

Aviation meeting. United States and Canada, 99-100 

Bombardment from the air of civilian populations. 

See European situation : Aerial bombardments. 

Canal Zone, navigation of foreign aircraft in, 379 • 

380. 679 
Commissions, committees, etc. : 

Aerial Legal Experts, International Technical 

Committee of, 100 
Aviation meeting. United States and Canada, 99- 
100 
Flights of belligerent military aircraft, statement 

by Department of State, 679 
"Flving Fortresses," U. S., visit to South America, 

' 567-568, 589, 632 
Gasoline for aviation, prohibition of delivery of in- 
formation concerning production to certain for- 
eign countries. 714 
Neutral aircrtnft over Poland, German restrictions 

on movement of, 185 
Treaties. See Treaties : Aviation. 



BadgrankuUa, Finland, U. S. Legation at, 611 
Barbados, ijarcel post agreement with United States, 

272, 293 
Barkley, Alben W., statement on neutrality legisla- 
tion, 57 
Belgian Congo, trade agreement with United States, 

135-142, 170-171 
Belgium : 

Appeal for peace in Europe, endorsement by Presi- 
dent Roosevelt, 161 
Arbitration, Permanent Court of, appointment to, 83 
Commission of Inquiry, United States and Bel- 
gium, 591 
Debts, intergovernmental, 694-695 
Treaties : 
Designs and models, industrial, adherence, 644 
Protection of industrial property, adherence, 644 
Sanitary convention of 1926, modification, adher- 
ence, 85, 195 
Trade agreement with United States, 135-142, 

170-171 
Trade-marks, international registration, adher- 
ence, 644 
Belgo-Luxemburg Economic Union, trade agreement 

with United States, 13.5-142, 170-171 
Belligerents. Sec European situation. 
Berle, Adolf A. Jr., addresses, 361-363, 368, 412, 659- 

663 
Bills of lading. Sec under Treaties: Navigation. 
Blockade by British of German exports, 651-652 



Bohemia : 

Postal convention, universal, German notification 

regarding application to Bohemia, 644-645 
Telecommunication convention. German notification 
regarding application to Bohemia, 605, 756 
Bolivia : 

Commission of Inquiry, United States and Bolivia, 

13-14 
Intellectual property, treaty on, signature, 151-152 
President Busch, death, 164-165 
Books, libraries, and translations, inter-American con- 
ference on, 304. 408, 614-625 
Boyd, Augusto S., assumption of duties as President 

of Panama, 722 
Brazil : 
Aimiversary of independence, 236 
Anniversary of republic, fiftieth, 567-568, 589, 632 
Army Chief of Staff, visit to United States, 47- 

48, 82 
Declaration on continental waters, 333 
President Vargas, wife of, arrival in United States, 

1'65 
Treaties : 

Aircraft, damages caused by, to third parties on 
the surface, additional protocol, approval, 
707-708 
Cattle herdbooks. convention on methods of keep- 
ing and operating, ratification, 450 
Films, educational, proces-verbal, signature, 146- 

147 
Postal union of Americas and Spain, approval, 

708 
Radiocommunications convention, inter-American, 

approval, 177 
Sauitarv convention of 1926, modification, ap- 
proval, 424-425 
Breslau, Germany, closing of U. S. consulate. 238 
Broadcasting agreement. North American regional. 

ratification by Dominican Republic, 176 
Broadcasting in the cause of peace, convention con- 
cerning, application to British dependencies and 
New Hebrides. 146 
Bruggmann, Karl, presentation of letters of credence 

as Swiss Minister to United States, 370-371 
Bulgaria, ratification of — 
League of Nations Covenant, amendment, 389 
Postal convention, universal, 390 
"Bulletin, The Department of State," inauguration 

of, 3 
Burma, application of treaties, agreements, etc. : 
Films, edncational, convention for facilitating the 

international circulation of, 707 
Lightships, manned, agreement concerning, 197 
Obscene publications, convention for suppression of 

circulation of, 173-174 
Opium and narcotic drugs conventions, 314-315 
Sanitary convention for aerial navigation, 49-50 
Women and children, conventions for suppression 
of traffic in, 174-175 
Busch, German, death. 164-165 

Bvzantine Studies. Sixth International Congress 
of. 142-143 



Cables, codes acceptable to France and United King- 
dom for messages to and from United States, 
233, 305, 405-406, 742 

Caceres, Julian R., presentation of letters of credence 
as Honduran Minister to United States, ,58-59 

Cairo, regulations of. See Treaties : Telecommunica- 
tion convention, revisions of Cairo (1938). 



INDEX 



759 



Canada (sec also European situation and Neutrality) : 
"Athenia," sinking. 227-229, 283-2S4, 434, 460 
Aviation mcetinR, United States and Canada, 99-l(X) 
Minister to United States (Cliristie), presentation 

of letters of credence, 308-309 
Treaties : 

Air transport arrangement with United States, 

14S-150 
London Naval Treaty of 1936, su.spension of ap- 
plication, 291 
Telecommunication convention, approval of revi- 
sions of Cairo, 735 
Trade agreement with United States, 639-640, 640- 
641, 739-741 
Canal Zone (see also Panama Canal) : 

Aircraft, foreign, navigation in, 379-380, 679 
Neutrality proclamation, 213-215 
Radio convention, regional, for Central America, 
Panama, and Canal Zone, ratifications, 64, 89, 
153, 272, 295 
Capper, Arthur, letter from Secretary Hull on pro- 
posed trade agreement with Argentina, 516-524 
Cattle, heavy, allocation of tariff quota, 640-641 
Cattle herdbooks, convention on methods of keeping 

and operating, ratifications, 450 
Cayman Islands, application of conventions concern- 
ing stamp laws in connection with — 
Bills of exchange and promissory notes, 241-242 
Cheques, 240-241 
Central America : Regional radio convention for Cen- 
tral America, Panama, and Canal Zone, ratifica- 
tions, 64, 89, 153, 272, 295 
Chamber of Commerce, International, Biennial Con- 
gress of, 13 
Cherrington, Ben M., address, 19-24 
Children, employment at sea, convention, ratification 

by United States, 316-317 
Chile : 

Commission of Investigation and Conciliation, 

United States and Chile, 312 
Students, Chilean, in industrial plants in United 

States, 12-13 
Treaties : 

Safety of life at sea convention, adherence, 240 
Trade agreement with United States, 346-349, 733 
China. See Far Eastern situation. 
Christie, Loring C, presentation of letters of credence 

as Canadian Minister to United States, 308-309 
Chungking, China, bombings by Japanese planes, 48 
"City of Flint" : 
Capture by Germany, release, and return to United 

States, 429-432, 457-458, 556 
Rescue of U. S. citizens from "Athenia," 227 
Civil and Commercial Laws of the American Republics, 

Committee on Unification, 252 
Claims Commission, Agrarian, United States and Mex- 
ico, 631 
Claims Convention, Special, United States and Mexico, 

payment under, 7.')5 
Codes acceptable to France and the United Kingdom 
for me.s.sages to and from United States, 233, 305, 
405-406, 742 
Colombia : 
Ambassador to United States (Turbay), presenta- 
tion of letters of credence, 508-569 
American solidarity, expression of desire for, 235- 

236 
Treaty of nonaggression, conciliation, arbitration, 
and juridical procedure with Venezuela, 734 
Combat areas. See under Neutrality. 



Commerce, Department of : 

Consolidation of Foreign Service with Foreign Serv- 
ice of United States (Department of State), 
38-39, 382-388 
Duties with regard to enforcement of neutrality, 212 
Commerce, international (see also Exports and 
Imports) : 
Addresses, 254-255, 371-375, 380-388, 582-583 
Commerce with belligerents. See under Neutral- 
ity. 
Cotton piece goods, exports by Japan to the Phil- 
ippines, 81 
International Chamber of Commerce, Biennial Con- 
gress of, 13 
Philippine relations with United States, 95 
Trade agreements. See Trade agreements. 
Treaties. See Treaties : Coumierce. 
Commercial and Civil Laws of the American Repub- 
lics, Committee on Unification, 252 
Commissions, committees, etc. : 
Aerial Legal Experts, International Technical Com- 
mittee of, 100 
Agrarian Claims Commission, United States and 
Mexico, 631 
Antarctic Service, U. S., 57 

Arbitration, Permanent Court of, 65, 83, 102, 172, 643 
Architects, American Institute of, 306 
Civil and Commercial Laws of the American 

Republics, Committee on Unification of, 252 
Drug Supervisory Body, 44S-450 
Financial and Economic Advisory Committee, In- 
ter-American, 324-326, 331, 335-336, 564-567, 
631, 661, 721-722 
Geodesy and Geophysics, International Union of. 

Seventh General Assembly, 237-238 
Inquiry, Commission of. United States and — 
Belgium, 591 
Bolivia, 13-14 
Hungary, 704 
Peru, 91 
Portugal, 590 
Investigation and conciliation, inter-American com- 
missions of, 312 
Justice, International, Permanent Court of. See 

Treaties : Justice. 
Munitions Control Board, National, 46, 47 
Neutrality Committee, Inter-American, 328, 335, 

359-360, 661-662, 722 
Nutrition Committees of the American Republics, 

Meeting of, 309-310 
Opium Board, Permanent Central, 448-450 
Pan American League, 338 
Radio Consulting Committee, International, Fifth 

Meeting, 194 
Reciprocity Information, Interdepartmental Com- 
mittee for, 34, 236 
Refugees, Political, Meeting of Intergovernmental 

Committee on, 397-402, 434 
Sugar CouncU, International, 6.5-66 
Wildlife Preservation and Nature Protection, Inter- 
American Committee of Experts on, 471-472 
Conciliation and investigation, inter-American com- 
missions, 312 
Conciliation, inter-American, additional protocol to 

general convention, 103, 312 
Conciliation treaty. United States and Liberia, 291-292 
Conferences, congresses, etc., international : 
Aeronautics, Second InternSitional Salon of, 37 
American states, international conferences of, 20, 
251, 287, 321, 489-490, 560 



760 



DEPABTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Conferences, congresses, etc., international — Continued. 

Americanists, Twenty-seventh International Con- 
gress of, 100-101, 194 

Anthropology and Prehistoric Archeology, Eight- 
eenth International Congress of, 165 

Aviation meeting. United States and Canada, 99-100 

Byzantine Studies, Sixth International Congress of, 
142-143 

Chamber of Commerce, International, Biennial Con- 
gress of, 13 

Cultural relations. See Cultural relations. 

Documentation, Fifteenth International Conference 
on, 14 

Esperanto World Congress, Thirty-first, 6.5 

Finance Ministers of the American Republics, First 
Meeting of, 506-507, 625-631 

Foreign Ministers of the American Republics, Meet- 
ing for Consultation. See Foreign Ministers. 

Genetics, Seventh International Congress of, 91 

Geodesy and Geophysics, International Union of. 
Seventh General" Assembly, 237-238 

Graphology, International Congress on, 53 

Housing Conference, First Pan American, 269 

Inter-American relations in the fields of art, edu- 
cation, music, and publications and libraries. 
See under Cultui'al relations. 

International Law, Private, South American Con- 
gress of, 144-145 

Jurisconsults, Conference of, 144-145 

Jurists, International Conference of, recommen- 
dation to, 330-331 

Labor Conference, Intelrnation^l. See Treaties : 
Labor Conference. 

Labor Organization, International. Regional Con- 
ference of American States Members of, 572- 
573 591 

Lima Conference, 20, 251, 287, 321, 489-490, 560 

Linguists, Fifth International Congress of, 101 

Nordic States, Conference of, 403 

Nutrition Committees of the American Republics, 
Meeting of, 309-310 

Peace, Inter-American Conference for the Main- 
tenance of, 251. 287, 299, 321, 4.S9, 560 

Public Instruction, Eighth International Conference 
on, 52 

Radio Conference, Second Inter-American, 703-704 

Radio Consulting Committee, International, Fifth 
Meeting of. 194 

Refugees, Political, Meeting of Intergovernmental 
Committee on, 397^02, 434 

Scientific Congress, Eighth American, 470-^71 

Weights and Measures, Ninth General Conference 
on, 108 

Wlialing. Regulation of. International Conference 
for, 37 
Congress, U. S. («ee also Legislation) : 

Cultural relations conferences, inter-American, in- 
vitation to Members, 408 

Death of— 

Log.nn, Senator Marvel M., 351 
McReynolds, Representative Sam D., 47 

Neutrality. See Neutrality : Legislation. 

Trade-agreements program, correspondence of Sec- 
retary Hull. See under Trade agreements. 

Treaty of commerce and navigation. United States 
and Japan, letter of Secretary Hull to Senator 
Pittman, 61 
Consular convention. United States and Liberia, 103, 

197, 606, 643 
Consultation, Foreign Ministers of the American Re- 
publics, Meeting for. See Foreign Ministers, 



Continental solidarity, joint declaration of American 

republics, 326, 359 
Continental waters of American republics, 332-334 
Contraband of war: 

Announcements of belligerents, 250-251, 285, 555-556 
Resolution of American republics, 329-330 
Controversies, inter-American treaty on prevention of, 

ratification by Costa Rica, 35 
Conventions, international. See Treaties, agreements, 

etc. 
Copyright. See Intellectual property. 
Costa Rica : 
Anniversary of independence, 253 
Treaties, ratification of: 

Controversies, prevention of, inter-American, 35 

Cultural relations, inter-American, promotion of, 36 

Exhibitions, artistic, 36 

Films, educational and publicity, 37 

Good otBcea and mediation, 35 

Highway, Pan American, 36 

Maintenance, preservation, and reestablishment of 

peace, ratification, 144 
Nonintervention, additional protocol relative to, 

145 
Public instruction, peaceful orientation of, 37 
Publications, interchange of, 36 
Cotton and rubber, exchange of, agreement between 

United States and Great Britain, 240 
Cotton piece goods, exports by Japan to the Philip- 
pines, 81 
Coun.selor of Department of State. See Moore, R. 

Walton. 
Counterfeiting currency, convention and protocol for 
suppression of: 
Adherence by Latvia, 152-15.S 
Ratification by Rumania, 50 
Court of International Justice, Permanent. See 

Treaties: Justice. 
Covenant of League of Nations. See Treaties : 

League of Nations. 
Credits and loans to belligerent nations, 46, 47, 221, 

247-248, 278, 552-553, 588 
Cuba : 
Address, 718-722 

Sugar exported to United States, duty on, 349-350 
Trade agreement with United States, 729-733 
Cultural relations, inter- American : 

Addresses, 19-24, 26-31, 361-363, 364, 489-491, 491- 

493, 614-616 
Conference on Inter-American Relations in the Field 
of— 
Art, 303, 339-341, 361-366 
Education, 303-304, 408, 464-465, 489-506 
Music. 303, 408^15 

Publications and libraries, 304, 408, 614-625 
Convention for promotion of inter-American cultural 
relation.s, 21, 36, 289-291, 493 
Czechoslovakia, parcel-post service from United States, 
suspension by United States, 575 



Danzig: 

Anschluss to German Reich, 184-185 

Parcel-post service from United States, suspension 
by United States, .575 

Telecommunication convention, approval of revisions 
of Cairo. 177 
Debts, intergovernmental, 6.57-658 

Belgium, 604-695 

Estonia, 689 

Finland, 689-690 



INDEX 



761 



Debts, intergovernmental — Continued. 
France, 690-091 
Great Britain, 695-696 
Hungary, 6S7, 713 
Ital.v, 691-692 
Latvia, G92-693 
Litlniania, 658-659 
Poland, 6S7-6S8 
Rumania, 693-694 
Yugoslavia, 688-689 
Declarations : 

Continental solidarity, joint declaration of Ameri- 
can republics, 326, 359 
Continental waters (Brazil), 333 
History, teacbing of, signature by Australia, 65 
.Juridical personality of foreign companies, signa- 
ture by Dominican Republic, 574 
Lima, 20, 287, 299, 490, 660 

Maintenance of international activities in accord- 
ance with Christian morality, 330 
Neutrality, 326-328, 335, 359-360, 661-662, 722 
Panama, 331-333, 334, 336-337, 360, 463-4&4, 662 
Territorial rights (Argentina and Guatemala), 333- 
334 
Denmark : 
Conference of Nordic States, 403 
Minister to United States (de Kauffmanu), presen- 
tation of letters of credence, 163-164 
Treaties : 

Labor conventions, ratification of, 63 
Whaling agreement of 1937, protocol amending, 
adherence, 115 
Department of State : 

Appropriations for fiscal year 1940, 4-9 
Assistant Secretary of State : 

Appointment of Henry F. Grady, 135 
Resignation of Francis B. Sayre, 95, 134 
Attitude toward Americans going abroad, 162 
"Bulletin, The Department of State," announce- 
ment of inauguration, 3 
Committee for Reciprocity Information, jurisdiction 

of, 34 
Cultural Relations, Division. See Cultural rela- 
tions, inter-American. 
Passport regulations, 230-231 
Publications. See wider Publications. 
Records of the Department, use by research stu- 
dents, 10-12 
Regulations regarding travel in combat areas and 
on belligerent vessels, 219-220, 247, 345, 479- 
481, 553-555, 686 
Research and Publication, Division of: 
Death of Cyril Wynne, 307-308 
Appointment of E. Wilder Spaulding as Chief, 421 
Special Division, establishment, functions, and per- 
sonnel, 161, 193-194, 238 
Designs and models, industrial, agreement concerning 
registration of, adherences by Belgium and 
Switzerland, 644 
Diplomatic officers, foreign, in United States, presen- 
tation of letters of credence, 58-59, 163-164, 186- 
187, 308-309, 370-371, 568-570 
Diplomatic pouch, French, irregularities in use of, 133 
Disputes, International, general act for pacific settle- 
ment of, 352, 541 
Documentation, Fifteenth International Conference 

on, 14 
Dominican Republic : 

Arbitration, Permanent Court of, appointment 

to, 102 
General Receiver of Customs, retirement, 698-699 



Dominican Republic — Continued. 

Juridical Personality of Foreign Countries, Declara- 
tion of, signature, 574 
Treaties, ratification of: 

Broadcasting agreement. North American regional, 

176 
Radiocommunications arrangement, inter-Ameri- 
can, 176-177 
Drugs : 

Conventions. Sec under Treaties. 
Marihuana, foreign laws and regulations governing 
importation of, 90-91 



Earthquake In Turkey, 741 

Economic and Financial Advisory Committee, Inter- 
American, 324-326, 331, 335-336, 564-567, 631, 661, 
721-722 
Economic mission to Venezuela, U. S. Advisory, 58 
Ecuador : 

Endorsement of President Roosevelt's appeals for 

peace, 184 
Extradition treaty with United States, 313 
President Mosquera Narvaez, death, 590 
Education, Conference on Inter-American Relations in 

the Field of, 303-304, 408, 464-465, 489-506 
Education, role in International cultural relations, 

address, 19-24 
Egypt : 

Parcel-post agreement with United States, 272, 294 
Sanitary convention of 1926, modification, 195-196, 
475 
El Salvador, anniversary of Independence, 253 
Embargo provisions of Neutrality Act of 1935, 43-47, 

276-278, 280, 281 
Esperanto World Congress, Thirty-first, 65 
Estigarribia, Jos6 F(51ix, inauguration as President of 

Paraguay, 60, 133 
Estonia : 

Debts, intergovernmental, 689 

Mutual assistance pact with Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics, 543-544 
European situation (see also Neutrality) : 
Aerial bombardments of civilian populations : 
Appeal of President Roosevelt to — 

France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, and 
Poland (Sept. 1, 1930) and replies, 181-183 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and Fin- 
land (Dee. 1, 1939) and Finnish reply, 
609-610, 650-651 
German bombardment of Poland, 234, 249-250, 

282-283 
U. S. aircraft shipments, etc., to nations bombing 
civilians, prohibition of, 685-686, 714 
American republics : 

Neutrality. See Foreign Ministers of the Amer- 
ican Republics, Meeting for Consultation. 
Protest against warlike acts in American waters, 
723 
Blockade of German exports by British, 651-652 
Codes acceptable to France and United Kingdom for 
messages to and from the United States, 233, 
305, 405-406, 742 
Contraband of war, announcement by — 
France, 555 
Germany, 285 
Great Britain, 250-251 
New Zealand, 556 
Danzig, anschluss to German Reich, 184-185 



762 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



European situation — Continued. 
Finnish-Soviet relations : 

Correspondence between President Roosevelt and 

President Kalinin regarding, 395 
Finnish expression of gratitude to United States, 

402 
Good offices, U. S. offer of, 609, 610 
Helsinki, situation in, 610-611 
Statement by President Roosevelt, 609 
U. S. citizens. See U. S. citizens, infra. 
V. S. expressions of hope for peace, 369, 395 
German-Polish relations : 

Aerial bombardments bv German aviation, 234, 

249-250, 282-283 
Annexation by Germany of Polish territory, 458-459 
Proclamation by Germany claiming Polish re- 
jection of peaceful solution, 184 
Restrictions bv Germany on movement of neutral 
aircraft, 185 
"Graf von Spec" : 

Engagement with British off coast of Uruguay, 

697-698 
Sinking, 723 

Statement by American republics to France, Great 
Britain, and Germany, 723 
Nordic States Conference, 403 
Peace appeals by — 

Belgian King, endorsement bv President Roosevelt, 

161 
President Roosevelt (Apr. 14, 1939), endorsement 

bv Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, 459 
Pre.sident Roosevelt (Aug. 24-25, 1939) to Ger- 
many, Italy, and Poland, 157-159, 160 
Endorsement bv American republics, 184 
German reply, 183-184 
Italian reply, 183 
Polish reply, 1.59-160 
Poland (.see also German-Polish relations) : 

Diplomatic relations with United States, continu- 
ance, 342-343 
Government, changes in, 342-343 
Pi'otest against territory ceded to Lithuania by 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, 403 
Relief to belligerent countries, U. S. See Relief. 
Ships, foreign, sinking of: 

British ship "Athenia," 227-229, 283-284, 434, 460 
British ship "Sirdhana," 556-5.57 
Norwegian ship "Hoegh Transporter," 346 
Norwegian .ship "Rondo," 284, 305 
Spani.sh Government's appeal for localization of war 

activities, 233-234 
Treaties : 

Justice, International, Permanent Court of, op- 
tional clause of the Statute. See under 
Treaties. 
London Naval Treaty of 1936, suspension of ap- 
plication of. See tinder Treaties. 
Mutual assistance agreements. See under Treaties. 
Nonaggression treaty, Germany and Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics, 172-173, 239 
U. S. citizens : 

Evacuation from danger zones, 185-186, 232-233, 

251, 34.5-346, 370, 611, 649-6.50 
Execution by German military, 4.59—460 
Funds to protect, in foreign countries, 219 
Killed and missing, 28.3-284 
Protection of. 161-162, 345, 407, 431 
Rescue of, 227-229, 2S3-284, 284, 305, 346, 556-557 
U. S. Foreign Service personnel in — 
Finland, 611, 649 
Poland, 285-286, 369-370 



European situation — Continued. 

U. S. Legation in Finland, removal to BadgrankuUa, 

Oil 
U. S. policy. See Neutrality. 
U. S. property, bomb damage to home of American 

Ambassador to Poland. 234 
U. S. ships: 

"City of Flint." See "City of Flint." 
Halting and detention by belligerents, 249, 433- 
434, 461-462, 486^88, 557-560, 612-613, 696- 
697 
"Iroquois." German warning to United States, 407 
Statement by Secretary Hull on U. S. ships in 
belligerent waters, 34,3, 
Exchange of cotton and rubber, agreement. United 
States and Great Britain, ratification by United 
States, 240 
Exchange of professors, teachers, and students be- 
tween United States and other American repub- 
lics, 21, 289-291, 493 
Executive agreements. See Treaties. 
Executive orders : 
Army, increase, 217 

Committee for Reciprocity Information, 34 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, increase, 218 
Foreign Service, 15, 38-39, 40, 48 
Navy and Marine Corps, increase, 217-218 
Neutrality, enforcement, 212-213, 247 
Panama Canal, passage of vessels, 215-216 
U. S. citizens, making funds available for protec- 
tion of, 219 
Exhibitions, artistic, inter-American convention on, 

ratification by Costa Rica. 36 
Exports, German, British blockade of, 651-652 
Exports from United States (see also Trade agree- 
ments) : 
Address, 376-379 

Arras, ammunition, and implements of war, etc., 
66-74, 117-125, 208-211. 246-247, 259-267, 436- 
446, .593-602, 742-752 
Helium, 77, 127, 269, 447, 603, 753 
Pork, import quota imposed bv Sweden, 133-134 
Tin-plate scrap, 60, 76, 126-127, 268-269, 447, 603, 

677-679, 753 
Transfer of title of articles shipped to belligerent 
countries, 46, 47, 278, 485-486, 551-552, 588 
Expropriation of American-owned oil properties in 

Mexico, 131-132 
Extradition treaties. See Treaties : Extradition. 

V^T Eastern situation : 
Addresses, 509-516, 583 

Chungking, bombing by Japanese planes, 48 
Kulangsu, international settlement, military forces 

withdrawn from, 407 
Treaty of commerce and navigation. United States 

and Japan, termination, 61, 81 
U. S. citizens, attack by Japanese sentry, 164 
U. S. merchandise delayed by Japanese military at 
Tientsin, .589 
Farm Bureau Federation, American : 
Address before, 664-670 

Endorsement of trade-agreements program, 670 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, increa.se. 218 
Fernandez, Horacio A., presentation of letters of 
credence as Paraguayan Minister to United 
States, 569-570 
Films, educational, conventions concerning. See 

under Treaties. 
Finance Ministers of the American Republics, First 
Meeting of, 506-507, 625-631, 721-722 



INDEX 



763 



Financial agreement, United States and Haiti, 85-86 
Financial and commercial relations with other na- 
tions, address, 371-375 
Financial and Economic Advisory Committee, Inter- 
American. 324-326, 331, 335-336, 564-567, 631. 
661, 721-722 
Finland (see also Neutrality) : 
Anniversary of independence, 650, 696 
Conference of Nordic States, 403 
Debts, intergovernmental, 689-600 
Permanent Court of Arbitration, appointment to, 65 
Soviet-Finnish relations. See European situation : 
Aerial bombardments, Finnish-Soviet relations, 
and U. S. citizens. 
Treaties : 

Bills of lading, adherence, 115-116 
Nationality, double, convention with United 
States concerning military obligations in cases 
of, 103, 196, 355, 3S9-390 
"Flying Fortresses," of U. S. Army, visit to South 

America, 567-568, 589, 632 
Foreign Companies, Declaration on Juridical Per- 
sonality of, signature of Dominican Republic, 
574 
Foreign Ministers of the American Republics, Meet- 
ing for Consultation : 
Addresses and statements by U. S. delegate. 2.'il- 
2.52, 299-303, 334-337, 359-360, 560-564, 721-722 
Continental solidarity, joint declaration of, 326, 359 
Final Act, 321-334 
Financial and Economic Advisory Committee, 324- 

326, 331, 335-336, 564-567, 631, 661, 721-722 
Inter-American Neutrality Committee, 328, 335, 

359-360. 661-662, 722 
Invitation, 235 
Neutrality, general declaration of, 326-328, 335, 

359-360, 661-662, 722 
Panama, declaration of, 331-333, 334, 336-337, 360. 

463-464, 662 
U. S. delegation, 235. 252 
Foreign policy, fundamental features of, address. 579- 

585 
"Foreign Relations of the United States, 1924" publi- 
cation of, 540-541 
Foreign Service of the United States : 
Address, 380-388 
Appointments, 15, 92, 143 

Assignments, 15, 40, 48, 92, 101, 143, 171, 238, 307, 
350-351, 389, 421-422, 472, 570-571, 591-592, 
642, 704-705 
Bomb damage to home of American Ambassador In 

Warsaw, 234 
Commendation of William R. Morton, 369-370 
Consolidation of Foreign Services of Departments 
of State, Commerce, and Agriculture, 38-39, 
382-388 
Consulates, closing of, at — 
Breslau, 238 
Strasbourg, 238 
Deaths, 171, 194, 676-677 
Executive orders regarding, 15, 38-39. 40, 48 
Legation in Finland, removal from Helsinki, 611, 

649 
Promotions, 592 
Regulations, 15, 40, 48 
Removal from Helsinki and Warsaw, 285-286, 611, 

649 
Resignations, 15, 48, 92, 101, 472, 571 
Retirements, 40, 571, 642 
Training of officers, 387-388 



France (see also European situation and Neutrality) : 
Aerial bombardments of civilian populations, appeal 

of President Roosevelt, and reply, 181-182 
Codes acceptable for messages to and from United 

States, 233, 305. 405-406 
Contraband of war, 555 
Debts, intergovernmental, 690-691 
Diplomatic pouch. irregiUarities in use of, 133 
Postal service with United States, anniversary of 

inauguration, 16 
Treaties : 

Air navigation arrangement with United States, 

109-113 
Air transport agreement with United States, 

114-115 
Holidays with pay, ratification, 293 
Insurance, compulsory. .S'ee under Treaties : 

Labor Conference. 
London naval treaty of 1^36, suspension of ap- 
plication, 291 
Mutual assistance : 

Anglo-Franco-Turkish, 544-546, 604 
Franco-Polish protocol, 313-314 
Permanent Court of International Justice, de- 
nunciation of optional clause of the Statute, 
352-353, 473-174 
Safety of life at sea, application to French In- 
dochina, 175-176 
Sanitary convention of 1926. modification, ratifi- 
cation, 195 
Tax convention with United States, 86, 176 
U. S. consulate at Strasbourg, closing, 238 
U. S. ships. See under European situation. 
Friendship, commerce, and navigation treaties. See 

Treaties: Commerce; and Treaties: Navigation. 
Fuel, liquid, and lubricants used in air traffic, con- 
vention concerning exemption from taxation, 
292-293 
Fuel oil and petroleum, concession in trade agreement 

with Venezuela, 671-675, 700-703 
Furs, black and silver fox, supplementary trade agree- 
ment with Canada concerning, 639-640, 739-741 



Game mammals and migratory birds, convention. 
United States and Mexico, for protection of, 
U. S. regulations under, 148, 355 
Gasoline production for airplanes, prohibition of de- 
livery of information concerning to certain foreign 
countries, 714 
Genetics, Seventh International Congress of, 91 
Geodesy and Geophysics, International Union of. 

Seventh General Assembly, 237-238 
Germany (see also European situation and Neu- 
trality) : 
Aerial bombardments of civilian populations, ap- 
peal of President Roosevelt, and reply, 181, 183 
British blockade of exports, 651-6.52 
Contraband of war, 285 
Danzig, au.schluss to Reich, 184-185 
"Graf von Spec," sinking, 697-698, 723 
Parcel-post service from United States, suspension 

by United States, 575 
Peace appeals of President Roosevelt, and reply, 

157-158, 160, 183-184 
Polish relations. See German-Polish relations un- 
der European situation. 
Treaties : 
Bills of lading, ratification, 450, 575 



224725—40- 



764 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BXJLLETIN 



Germany — Continued. 
Treaties — Continued. 
Extradition treaty with United States, 546-5-17 
Nonaggression treaty, Germany and Union of 

Soviet Socialist Republics, 172-173, 239 
Postal convention, universal, German notification 
regarding application to Bohemia and Mo- 
ravia, 644-645 
Refugees from Germany, status, additional pro- 
tocol, signature of Great Britain, 734 
TelecommuniL-ation convention, German notifica- 
tion regarding application to Bohemia and 
Moravia, 605, 756 
Wounded and sick of armies in the field, 
amelioration of condition of, 270 
U. S. citizens and ships. See under European 

situation. 
U. S. consulate St Breslau, closing, 238 
Goes Monteiro, Pedro A., visit to United States, 47-48, 

82 
Good-neighbor policy, addresses, 20, 507-508 
Good offices, U. S. offer in Finnish-Soviet dispute, 609, 

610 
Good offices and mediation, inter-American treaty on. 

ratification by Costa Rica, 35 
Grady, Henry F. : 

Addresses, 254-255, 256-258, 376-379, 416-417, 507- 

508, 614-«16, 633-639 
Appointment as Assistant Secretary of State, 135 
Correspondence on trade-agreements program with 
Govenior of Rhode Island, 466-469 
"Graf von Spee." See under European situation. 
Graphology, International Congress on, 53 
Great Britain (sec also Euroi>can situation and Neu- 
trality) : 
Aerial bombardments of civilian populations, appeal 

of President Roosevelt, and reply. 181, 182 
Ambassador to United States (Lothian), presenta- 
tion of letters of credence, 186-187 
Blockade of German exports, 651-652 
Codes acceptable for messages to and from United 

States, 742 
Contraband of war, 250-251 
Debts, intergovernmental, 69.5-696 
"Graf von Spee," sinking, 607-698. 723 
Prime Minister Chamberlain, address, 632 
Ships, sinking, 227-229, 283-284, 434, 460, 556-557 
Treaties : 

Broadcasting in the catise of peace, convention 
concerning, application to British depend- 
encies, 146 
Cotton and rubber, agreement for exchange of, 

United States and Great Britain, 240 
Extradition treaty. United States and Great Brit- 
ain, extension to British territories, 147-148 
Films, educational, process-verbal, signature, 734 
London naval treaty of 1936, suspension, 239 
Migratory birds, convention. United States and 
Great Britain, U. S. regulations under, 148, 
355 
Mutual assistance: 
Anglo-Pranco-Turkish, 544-,546, 604 
Anglo-Polish agreement, 270-271 
Permanent Court of International Justice, de- 
nunciation of optional clause of the Statute, 
353-354, 473-474 
Refugees from Germany, status, additional pro- 
tocol, signature, 734 
Sanitary convention of 1926, modification, rati- 
fication, 85, 195 
Trade agreement with United States, 605, 670 



Great Britain — Continued. 

U. S. citizens and ships. See under European sit- 
uation. 
U. S. immigration visas, suspension of issuance at 

London, 234 
Wool, Australian, available to U. S. importers, 641 
Greece : 
Permanent Court of International Justice, acceptance 

of optional clause of the Statute, 422 
Sanitary convention of 1926, modification, ratifica- 
tion, 448 
Telecommunication convention, international, ratifi- 
cation, 294 
Grew, Joseph C. : 
Address, 509-516 

Conversation with Japanese Foreign Minister, 465 
Guatemala : 

Anniversary of independence, 253 

Declaration of territorial rights, 33.3-334 

Finance Ministers of the American Reijublics, First 

Meeting, 506-.507, 625-631 
Ti'eaties, ratification of: 

Aircraft, unification of rules relating to — 
Damages eau.sed by, to third parties on the 
surface, convention and additional protocol, 
109. 150 
Precautionary attachment of, 150 
Radio convention, regional, for Central America, 
Panama, and Canal Zone, 64 



Haiti : 

Endorsement of President Roosevelt's appeals for 

peace, 184 
Financial agreement with United States, 85-86 
President Vincent, visit to Washington, 663, 699 
Health. See Public Health and Sanitary <onventions 

under Treaties. 
Helium gas, exportation of, 77, 127, 260, 447, 603, 753 
Helsinki. Finland, bombing by Soviet forces, 610-611 
Herdbooks, cattle, convention on methods of keeping 

and operating, ratifications, 450 
Highway, Pan American, convention on, ratification 

by Costa Rica, 36 
Highway, Trans-Isthmian, convention between United 

States and Panama regarding construction, 89 
History, declaration regarding teaching of, signature 

by Australia, 65 
"Hoegh Transporter," sinking, 346 
Holidays with pay, convention, ratification by — 
Denmark, 63 
France, 293 
Honduras : 
Anniversary of independence, 253 
Foreign Minister Aguirre, departure from United 

States, 338 
Minister to United States (Caceres), presentation of 

letters of credence, 58-59 
Telecommunication convention, international, ratifi- 
cation, 50-51 
Hours of work in coal mines, convention concerning, 

ratification by Mexico, 425 
House of Representatives, U. S. See Congress, U. S. 
Housing Conference, First Pan American, 269 
Hull, Cordell: 
Addresses and remarks (.^ee also Statements) : 
Architects, American Institute of, 306 
Commercial and financial relations with other 

nations, 371-375 
Geodesy and Geophysics, International Union of, 
237-238 



INDEX 



765 



Hull, Cordell— Continued. 
Addresses and remarks — Confiuued. 
Inter-American relations, 1^64, 489-491 
Pan American movement, 286-289 
Political refugees. Meeting of Intergovernmental 

Committee on, 400-401 
War, peace, and the American farmer, 664-670 
Commendation of Vice Consul William R. Morton, 

369 
Correspondence on — 

Ceding of Polish territory to Germany, 458— l."i9 
Ceding of Polish territory to Lithuania, 403 
Debts, intergovernmental, 658-659, 687-696, 713 
Diplomatic relations with Poland, 342-343 
European situation, with Spanish Charge, 233-234 
Inter-American cultural relations conferences, 40S 
Opium and drug control boards, international, 

449-450 
Termination of treaty of commerce and navigation 

with Japan, 61, 81 
Trade agreements, with — 
Governor of Kansas, 671-675 
Senator Capper, 516-524 
Senator McNary, 726-729 
Senator Vandenberg, 724-726 
Departmental orders on — 

Original records of the Department, use of by re- 

.search students, 10-12 
Passport regulations, 230-231 

Special Division, Department of State, 193-194, 238 
Luncheon in honor of Crown Prince and Crown Prin- 
cess of Norway, 10 
Messages of sympathy, congratulation, etc., to — 
Bolivia, 164-165 

Chamber of Commerce, International, Biennial Con- 
gress of, 13 
Crown Prince and Crown Prince.ss of Norway, 24 
Foreign Minister of Honduras, 338 
Logan, Mrs. Marvel M., 351 
Panama, 699 
President of Haiti, 699 
Sheil, Bernard J., 371 
Turkey, 741 
Pan American League, presentation of gold medal 

by, 338 
Proclamation on death of Secretary of the Navy, 25 
Regulations on — 

Arms on U. S. vessels, 481-482 
Arms, traffic in, 226-227, 249 
Passports, 230-231 

Relief to belligerent countries, solicitation of con- 
tributions, 222-225, 248, 343-344, 482-484 
Tin-plate scrap, exportation of, 677-679 
Transfer of title, 285-286, 588 
Travel in combat areas and on belligerent ships, 
219-220, 247, 345, 479-481, 553-555, 686 
Six-point program, 4, 43, 46, 47, 278-279, 281 
Statements on — 
Address of British Prime Minister, 632 
American merchant shipping in belligerent waters, 

343 
"Athenia" survivors, assistance given to, 229 
Death of— 

McReynolds, Sam D., 47 
Swanson, Claude A., 25 
Wynne, Cyril, 307-308 
Diplomatic relations with Poland, 342 
Finnish-Soviet situation, 609 
Jewish New Year, 253 

Neutrality and peace, 4, 43-47, 47, 57, 245, 280, 453 
Trade agreement with Chile, 346 



Hull, Cordell— Continued. 
Statements on — Continued. 
Trade-agreements program, 670, 739 
Travel by American citizens on belligerent ships, 
345 
Humanization of war, re.solution of American repub- 
lics, 328-329 
Hungary : 
Commission of Inquiry, United States and Hungary, 

704 
Debts, intergovernmental, 687, 713 
Treaties : 

Permanent Court of Internationiil Justice, ac- 
ceptance of optional clause of the Statute, 102 
Telecommunication convention, approval of re- 
visions of Cairo, 36 



Iceland, presentation of letters of credence of Minis- 
ter to United States (de Kauffmann), 163-164 
Immigration visas, U. S., suspension of issuance in 

London and Warsaw, 231 
Import quota on salted pork, Swedish, 133-134 
Imports into United States (see also Trade agree- 
ments) : 
Address, 376-379 
Arms, ammunition, and implements of war, 74, 125- 

126, 267, 446, 602, 752 
Cuban sugar, duty on, 349-350 
Income tax, double, convention with — 
France, 86, 176 

Sweden, 103, 293, 315, 643, 686 
India (see also European situation and Neutrality) : 
London naval treaty, suspension, 239 
Permanent Court of International Justice, denun- 
ciation of oijtional clause of the Statute, 473 
Indigenous workers, draft conventions and recom- 
mendations concerning, 574 
Indochina, French : 
Load line convention, international, application to, 

196-197 
Safety of life at sea convention, application to, 
175-176 
Industrial property convention, 644 
Inquiry, Commissions of, United States and other 

countries. See under Commissions. 
Insurance, compulsory, conventions concerning, ratifi- 
cation by France, 293, 315 
Intellectual property, treaty on, 144, 151-152 
Inter-American relations (see also under individual 
countries) : 
Addresses, remarks, etc., by— 

Berle, Adolf A., Jr., 368, 412, 659-663 
Cherrington, Ben M., 19-24 
Grady, Henry F.. 507-508, 614-616 
Hull, Cordell, 286-289, 364, 373-374, 489-491 
Messersmith, George S., 580-581 
Thomson, Charles A., 26-31 

Welles, Sumner. See Welles, Sumner : Addresses 
and Statements. 
Air service with Argentina, tenth anniversary, 367- 

368 
American solidarity, expression of desire of Colom- 
bia for, 235-236 
Brazilian Chief of Staff, visit to United States, 

47-48, 82 
Claims, United States and Mexico, 631, 755 
Commissions, committees, etc. 8ee Commissions. 
Conferences, congresses, etc. See Conferences. 
Declarations. See Declarations. 
Economic mission to Venezuela, U. S. advisory, 58 



766 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Inter-American relations — Continued. 
European situation. See European situation: 
American republics ; and Foreign Ministers of 
the American Republics. 
Exchange of professors, teachers, and students, 

289-291 
Expropriation of American-owned oil properties in 

Mexico, 131-132 
Land titles in State of Veracruz, Mexico, perfect- 
ing of, 10 
Nicaraguau barge canal and highway project, U. S. 

survey of, 107 
Paraguayan Pre.sident, inauguration, 60, 133 
Treaties. See Treaties and Trade agreements. 
Intergovernmental debts. See Debts. 
International commissions, committees, conferences, 

etc. See Commissions and Conferences. 
International Law, Private, South American Congress 

of. 144-14.5 
Invalidity insurance. See under Treaties : Labor Con- 
ference : Insurance. 
Investigation and conciliation, inter-American com- 
missions, 312 
Iran, designation of members of Permanent Court of 

Arbitration, 172, 643 
Iraq, ratification of treaties : 

Commerce and navigation with United States, 103, 

196 
Workmen's compensation for occupational diseases, 
390 
"Iroquois," German warning to United States regard- 
ing, 407 
Italy (sec also European situation) : 
Aerial bombardments of civilian populations, aj)- 
peal of President Roosevelt and reply, ISl, 182 
Debts, intergovernmental, 691-692 
Peace appeals of President Roosevelt and reply. 

1.58-159, 183 
Treaties: 

London naval treaty of 1936, suspension of ap- 
plication, 424 
Sanitary convention of 1926, modification, ratifi- 
cation, 85, 195 



Jamaica, application of convention on stamp laws in 
connection with — 
Bills of exchange and promissory notes, 241-242 
Cheques, 240-241 
Japan (see also Far Eastern situation) : 

Exports of cotton-piece goods to the Philippines, 81 
Relations with United States, statement by Acting 

Secretary Welles. 588-589 
Treaty of commerce and navigation with United 

States, termination, 61, 81 
U. S. Ambassador to Japan : 
Address, 509-51G 

Conversation with Foreign Minister, 465 
Jewish New Year, 253 

Juridical Personality of Foreign Companies, declara- 
tion on, signature by Dominican Republic, 574 
Jurisconsults, Conference of, 144-145 
Jurists, International Conference of, recommendation 

to, 330-331 
Justice, Department of: 

Federal IJureau of Investigation, increase, 218 
Neutrality, duties with regard to enforcement of, 
212-213 
Justice, International, Permanent Court of, optional 
clause of the Statute. See Treaties : Justice. 



Kansas, Governor of, correspondence with Secretary 
Hall on trade agreement with Venezuela, 671-675 

Kaufifmann, Henrik de, presentation of letters of cre- 
dence as Minister of Denmark and Iceland to 
United States, 163-164 

Kulangsu, China, withdrawal of military forces, 407 



Labor : 
Regional Conference of American States Members 
of the International Labor Organization, 572- 
573, 591 
Treaties. See Treaties: Labor. 
Lagunillas, Venezuela, catastrophe, 508 
Latin American relations. See Inter-American re- 
lations. 
Latvia : 

Debts, intergovernmental, 692-693 
Treaties : 

Cattle herdbooks, convention on methods of keep- 
ing and operating, ratification, 450 
Counterfeiting currency, convention and protocol 

for suppression of, adherence to, 1.52-153 
Films, educational, proces-verbal, signature, 49 
Mutual assistance pact with Union of Soviet So- 
cialist Republics, 542-543, 680 
Postal convention, universal, ratification. 176 
Telecommunication convention, ratification of re- 
visions of Cairo, 605 
Laws, Civil and Commercial, of the American Repub- 
lics, Committee on Unification of, 2.52 
Laws and regulations, foreign, governing importation 

of marihuana, 90-91 
Lay, Julius G., death, 194 
League of Nations : 
Address, 416-417 

Covenant, protocol of amendment of preamble, of 
articles 1, 4, and 5, and of the annex. See 
Treaties: League of Nations. 
Legislation («ee also u^nder Neutrality), 16, 40, 53, 

86-89 
Liberal professions, treaty on exercise of, 144 
Liberia : 
Conciliation treaty with United States, 291-292 
Consular convention with United States, 103, 197, 606, 

643 
Extradition treaty with United States, 103, 195, 643 
Friendship, commerce, and navigation treaty with 
United States, 103, 196, 605, 643 
Libraries and Publications, Conference on Inter- 
American Relations in the Field of, 304, 408, 
614-625 
Lightships, manned, agreement concerning, application 

to Burma, 197 
Lima, Declaration of, 20, 287, 299, 400, 660 
Linguists, Fifth International Congress of, 101 
Liquid fuel and lubricants used in air traffic, conven- 
tion concerning exemption from taxation, 292-293 
Lithuania : 

Debts, intergovernmental, 658-659 
Polish territory ceded to Lithuania by the Union 
of Soviet Socialist Republics, protest of Poland, 
403 
Treaty of mutual assistance with Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics, 705-707 
Load line convention, international, application to 

French Indochina, 196-197 
Loans and credits to belligerent nations, 46, 47, 221, 

247-248, 278, 552-553, 588 
Logan, Marvel M., death, 351 



INDEX 



767 



London, Englaud, suspension by United States of issu- 
ance of immigration visas, 234 
Loudon naval treaty of 1936. See under Treaties. 
Lothian, Marquess of, presentation of letters of cre- 
dence as Britisli Ambassador to United States, 
1S6-187 
Lubricants and liquid fuel used iu air traffic, conven- 
tion concerning exemption from taxation, 292-293 
Luxemburg : 

Prince Consort and Crown Prince, visit to Wash- 
ington, 108, 163 
Trade agreement with United States, 135-142, 170- 
171 

Marihuana, foreign laws and regulations governing 

importation of, 90-91 
Marine Corps, increase, 217-218 

Masters and otficers on board merchant ships, con- 
vention concerning minimum requirements for: 
Ratification by — 
Mexico, 425 
United States, 316-317 
U. S. legislation concerning, 86-89 
McNary, Charles L. : 

Correspondence with Secretary Hull on trade- 
agreements program, 726-729 
Statement on neutrality legislation, 57 
McReynolds, Sam D., death, 47 
Messersmith, George S., address, 380-388, 579-585 
Mexico : 
Anniversary of independence, 253 
Claims. United States and Mexico, 631, 755 
Expropriation of American-owned oil properties, 

131-132 
Land titles in State of Veracruz, perfecting of, 10 
Treaties : 

Claims convention with United States, 755 
Extradition convention with United States, 147 
Labor conventions, ratification, 425 
Migratory birds and game mammals, convention 
with United States for protection of, U. S. 
regulations under, 148, 355 
Migrants for employment, etc., draft convention and 

recommendations concerning, 574 
Migratory birds, convention for the protection of. 
United States and Great Britain, U. S. regulations 
under, 148, 355 
Migratory birds and game mammals, convention for 
the protection of. United States and Mexico, U. S. 
regulations under, 148, 355 
Military obligations in cases of double nationality, 
convention regulating, United States and Finland, 
103, 196, 355, 389-390 
Monaco : 

Extradition treaty with United States, 103, 195 
Films, educational, proces-verbal to convention, sig- 
nature, 85 
Moore, R. Walton, letters to Swiss Minister regarding 
adherence to convention by — 
Germanv for Bohemia and Moravia, 645 
Slovak Republic, 573-574 
Moravia : 
Postal convention, universal, German notification 

regarding application to Moravia, 644-645 
Telecommunication convention, German notification 
regarding application to Moravia, 605, 756 
Morton, William R., commendation, 269-270 
Mosquera Narvaez, Aurelio, death, 590 
Mundelein, Cardinal, death, 351 

Munitions. See Neutrality, U. S. : Arms, ammunition, 
and Implements of war. 



Music, Conference on Inter-American Relations in the 

Field of, 303, 408-415 
Mutual assistance agreements. See under Treaties. 

Narcotic drugs. See Drugs. 

National defense, 216-218 

National Munitions Control Board, continuance of, 46, 

47 
.Xationality, double, convention regulating military 
obligations in cases of. United States and Fin- 
land, 103, 196, 355, 389-390 
Nature Protection and Wildlife Preservation, Inter- 
American Committee of, 471-472 
Naval treaty of 1936, London. See Treaties : London 

naval ti'eaty. 
Navigation treaties. See Treaties: Navigation; and 

Treaties : Commerce. 
Navy, increase, 217-218 
Navy, Secretary of, death, 25 

Navy Department, duties with regard to enforce- 
ment of neutrality, 212 
Netherlands, ratification of — 

League of Nations covenant, amendment, 546 
Workmen's compensation for occupational dis- 
eases, convention concerning, 390^391 
Neutrality, U. S. {see also European situation) : 
Addresses, 188-102, 201-202, 580-582 
Arms, ammunition, and implements of war : 
Arms on U. S. vessels, 481^82 
Categories of, 74-76, 209-210 
Embargo provisions of Neutrality Act of 1935, 

43-47, 276-278, 280, 281 
Exportation to belligerent states, proclamations 

concerning, 208-211, 246-247 
National Munitions Control Board, continuance 

of, 46, 47 
Traffic in arms, etc. : 
Regulations governing, 226-227, 249, 278-279 
Statistics, 66-77, 117-127, 259-269, 436-^47, 
593-603, 742-753 
Canal Zone. See Canal Zone and Panama Canal. 
Combat areas : 

Messages of the President to Congress, 46, 278 

Proclamation defining, 454—455 

Regulations concerning, 219-220, 247, 479-480, 

553-555, 686 
Statements regarding, 47, 345, 455-456 
Commerce with belligerents: 
Address, 372-373 
Analysis of section 2 of Neutrality Act of 1939, 

551-553 
British blockade of German exports, U. S. pro- 
test, 651-652 
Credits to belligerents, 46, 47, 221, 247-248, 278, 

552-553, 588 
Deliveries of military aircraft and information on 

gasoline production, 679, 685-686, 714 
Transfer of title of articles sold to belligerents, 
46, 47, 278, 485-486, 551-552, 588 
Enforcement of neutrality : 

Executive order regarding, 212-213, 247 
Foreign Ministers of the American Republics. 
Meeting for Consultation. See Foreign 
Ministers. 
Existence of a state of war, proclamation, 453-454 
Inter-American Neutrality Committee, 328, 335, 

359-360, 661-662, 722 
Legislation : 

Messages of the President to Congress, 43-47, 275- 
280 



768 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Neutrality ; U. S — Continued. 
Legislation — Continued. 

Statements on, 4, 43-47, 47, 57, 280, 453 
White House Conference, 281 
National defense, strengthening, 216-218 
Neutrality proclamations, 203-208, 213-215, 216, 246 
Panama Canal. See Canal Zone and Panama Canal. 
Relief to belligerent countries, U. S. See Relief. 
Six-point program. 4, 43, 46, 47, 278-279, 281 
Statement by Secretary Hull, 245 
Territorial waters and ports of United States, use 
by submarines of belligerent states, proclama- 
tions concerning, 396-397, 456-457 
U. S. citizens, protection of: 

Executive order mailing funds available for, 219 
Passjwrt regulations, 230-231 
Travel in combat areas and on belligerent ships, 
46, 47, 219-220, 247, 278, 345, 454-456, 479- 
481, 551, 553-555, 686 
U. S. ships: 

Arms on, 481-482 

Commerce with belligerents. See Neutrality : 

Commerce. 
Prohibition and warning against entering combat 
areas, 46. 47, 278, 343, 455 
Neutrality of the American republics. See Foreign 
Ministers of the American Republics, Meeting for 
Consultation. 
Newfoundland, approval of revisions of Cairo of tele- 
communication convention, 64, 177 
New Hebrides, application of convention concerning 

use of broadcasting in cause of peace, 146 
Newspaper opinion regarding trade-agreements pro- 
gram, 741 
New Zealand {see also European situation and Neu- 
trality) : 
Contraband of war, 556 
Treaties : 
League of Nations covenant, amendment, ratifica- 
tion, 49 
London naval treaty of 1936, suspension of appli- 
cation, 291 
Permanent Court of International Justice, de- 
nunciation of optional clause of the Statute, 
422-423, 473-474 
Nicaragua : 
Anniversary of independence, 253 
Barge canal and highway project, U. S. survey of. 

107 
Treaty adjusting debt payments. United States and 
Nicaragua, U. S. payment under, 187 
Nonaggression, conciliation, arbitration, and juridical 
procedure, treaty between Colombia and Venezii- 
ela, 734 
Nonaggression treaty, Germany and Union of Soviet 

Socialist Republics, 172-173. 239 
Nonintervention, additional protocol relative to, rati- 
fication by Costa Rica, 145 
Nordic States, Conference of, 403 
North American regional broadcasting agreement, rat- 
ification by Dominican Republic, 176 
Norway : 

Conference of Nordic States, 403 

Crown Prince and Crown Princess, visit to United 

States, 9-10, 24 
Sinking of Norwegian ships, 284, 305, 346 
Treaties : 

Unification of rules relating to precautionary at- 
tachments of aircraft, 62 
Visa-fee agreement with United States, termina- 
tion of, 295 



Nutrition Committees of the American Republics, 
Meeting of, 309-310 



Obscene publications, convention for suiapresslon of 
circulation, application to Burma, 173-174 

Occupational disea.ses, workmen's compensation for, 
convention, ratification by Denmark, 63 

Oil properties in Mexico, American-owned, expropria- 
tion, 131-132 

Olav, Crown Prince of Norwa.v, and Crown Princess 
Maertha, visit to United States, 9-10, 24 

Old-age insurance. See Treaties : Labor Conference : 
Insurance. 

Opium Board, Permanent Central, 448-4.50 

Opium convention (1925), 314-315, 680-6S1 

Origin of goods, arrangement for suppression of false 
indication of, adherence by Switzerland, 644 



Pacific settlement of international disputes, general act 

for, 352, 541 
Panama : 

Foreign Ministers of the American Republics, Meet- 
ing for Consultation. See Foreign Ministers of 
the American Republics. 
President Aro.semena, death, 699 
President Boyd, assumption of duties, 722 
Treaties : 
General treaty with United States: 
Provisions, 83-85 

Exchange of ratifications, 107-108 
Radio convention, regional, for Central America, 
Panama, and Canal Zone, ratifications, 64, 89, 
153, 272, 295 
Trans-Isthmian Highway, convention with United 
States regarding, ratification by United 
States, 89 
Panama, Declaration of, 331-333, 334, 336-337, 360, 

463-464, 662 
Panama Canal (see also Canal Zone), neutralit.v of: 
Executive order regulating passage of vessels 

through, 215-216 
Governor of, duties with regard to enforcement of 
neutrality, 212 
Pan American-Grace Airways service to Argentina, 

tenth anniversary, 367-368 
Pan American highway convention, ratification by 

Costa Rica, 36 
Pan American Housing Conference, First, 269 
Pan American League, presentation of gold medal to 

Secretary Hull, 3.38 
Pan American movement, addre.ss, 286-289 
Pan American relations. See Inter-American rela- 
tions. 
Paraguay : 
Minister to United States (Fernfindez), presentation 

of letters of credence, 569-570 
President Estigarribia, inauguration, 60, 133 
Treaties : 

Intellectual property, treaty on, signature, 151-152 
Sanitary convention, pan-American, ratification, 
109 
U. S. Army "Flying Fortresses," visit to, 568 
Parcel post. See under Treaties : Postal. 
Passport regulations, 230-231 

Peace (see also European situation; Neutrality; and 
Foreign Ministers of the American Republics). 
Addresses, 188-192, 254-255, 372, 579, 615-616, 659- 
663, 664-670 



INDEX 



769 



Peace — Continued. 

Inter-Americau Conference for Maintenance of 

Peace, 251, 2S7, 2!i9, 321, 4S9, 560, 660 
Treaties. Sec under Treaties. 
Peace, People's Mandate for, 368 
Permanent Court of Arbitration, 65, S3, 102, 172, 643 
Permanent Court of International Justice, optional 
clause of the Statute, 102, 352-354, 422-424, 473- 
474 
Peru : 

Commission of Inquiry, United States and Peru, 91 
Intellectual property, treaty on, signature, 151-152 
Petroleum and fuel oil, concessions in trade agree- 
ment with Venezuela, 671-675, 700^703 
Philippines, Commonwealth of : 

Imports of cotton piece goods from Japan, 81 
U. S. High Commissioner, apiiointment of, 95, 134 
Pittman, Key, correspondence with Secretary Hull on 

Far Eastern situation, 61 
Poland (see also European situation and Neutrality) : 
Debts, intergovernmental, 687-688 
Diplomatic relations with United States, continu- 
ance, 342-343 
German-Polish relations. See European situation : 
Aerial bomliftrdments, German-Polish relations, 
and U. S. citizens. 
Peace appeals by President Roosevelt, and reply, 

158, 159-160 
Pulaski's Memorial Day, proclamation by President 

Roosevelt, 406-407 
Territory ceded to Lithuania by Union of Soviet 

Socialist Republics, protest against, 403 
Treaties : 

Films, educational, proc&s-verbal, ratification, 19ii 
League of Nations Covenant, amendment, ratifica- 
tion, 195 
Mutual assistance : 

Anglo-Polish agreement, 270-271 
Franco-Polish protocol, 312-313 
U. S. immigration visas, suspension of issuance at 
Warsaw, 234 
Political refugees. See Refugees. 
Pope Pius XII, letter from President Roosevelt an- 
nouncing appointment of representative to Vati- 
can, 711-712 
Pork, salted, Swedish import quota, 133-134 
Ports and territorial waters of United States, proc- 
lamation restricting use of, 396-397, 456-4.57 
Portugal, Commission of Inquiry, United States and, 

591 
Postal conventions. See Treaties : Postal. 
Postal service. United States and France, anniversary 

of inauguration, 16 
Precautionary attachment of aircraft, convention anil 

additional protocol, 109, 150 
President, U. S. See Roo.sevelt, Franklin D. 
"Press Releases," discontinuance of publication of, 3 
Prisoners of war, convention relating to treatment of, 

adherence of Slovak Republic, 474-475, 573-574 
Proclamations : 

Armistice Day, 415-416 

Arms, ammunition, and implements of war, expor- 
tation of, 208-211, 246-247 
Canal Zone, regulations concerning neutrality of, 

213-215 
Combat areas, definition of, 454-455 
Death of Secretary of the Navy, 25 
Existence of a state of war. 453-454 
General Pulaski's Memorial Day, 406—407 
Migratory birds and game mammals, regulations, 
148, 355 



Proclamation.s — Continued. 
National emergency, 216 
Neutrality, 203-208, 246 
Tarifif quota, allocation of, on — 
Cattle, heavy, 640-641 
Crude petroleum and fuel oil, 700-703 
Territorial waters and ports of United States, re- 
striction of use, 396-397, 45(3-457 
Trade agreement with United Kingdom, 604, 670 
Professional drivers of private vehicles, recommenda- 
tion of Labor Conference concerning rest peri- 
ods, 575 
Professors and students, exchange of, with American 

republics. 21, 289-291, 493 
Public Health, International Office of, adherence of 

Slovakia, 239-240 
Public Instruction, Eighth International Conference 

on, 52 
Public instruction, inter-American convention on 
peaceful orientation of, ratification by Costa 
Rica, 37 
Publications : 
American Historical Association, 91 
"Bulletin, The Department of State," announcement 

of publication, 3 
Conventions on. ,S'ee Treaties: Publieation.s. 
Department of State, 16, 53, 77, 104, 127, 143, 171 
242, 253. 291, 310-311, 391, 426, 447, 469, 540- 
541, 576, 603, 646, 679, 704, 733, 753-755 
Executive orders. See Executive orders. 
"Foreign Relations of the United States, 1924," 

540-541 
Legislation, 16, 40, 53 
Other government agencies, listed, 16, 53, 104, 351, 

679, 704 
"Press Releases," discontinuance of publication, 3 
"Treaty Information," discontinuance of publica- 
tion, 3, 14 
Publications and Libraries, Conference on Inter- 
American Relations in the Field of, 304, 408, 
614-625 
Pulaski's Memorial Day, 406-407 
Pulliam, William B., retirement, 698-699 



Radio Conference, Second Inter-American, 703-704 
Radio Consulting Committee, International, Fifth 

Meeting, 194 
Radio conventions and arrangements. See Treaties: 

Telecommunications. 
Reciprocity Information, Interdepartmental Committee 

for, 34, 236 
Records of the Department of State, use by research 

students, 10-12 
Red Cross, American, statement bv President Roose- 
velt, 404 
Refugees : 
Meeting of Intergovernmental Committee on Po- 
litical Refugees, 397-402, 434 
Status of refugees from Germany, additional pro- 
tocol to convention, signature by Great Britain, 
734 
Relief to belligerent countries: 

List of registrants, 248-249, 281-282, 304-305, 344, 

404-405, 435, 484-485, 613-614, 652-657 
Rules and regulations governing solicitation of 

funds, 46, 47, 222-225, 248, 343-344, 482-484 
Statement by President Roosevelt, 404 
Table of funds collected, 585-587, 714-717 
Reorganisation Plan No. II, administration of Foreign 
Service under, 38-39, 382-383 



770 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Representatives, House of. See Congress, U. S. 
Besearch and Publication, Division of. Department of 
State : 
Death of Cyril Wynne, 307-308 
Appointment of E. Wilder Spaulding as Chief, 421 
Rhode Island, Governor of, correspondence with As- 
sistant Secretary Grady on trade-agreements pro- 
gram, 466-169 
Road transport, draft convention and recommenda- 
tions concerning, 574-575 
"Rondo," sinking, 284, 305 
Roosevelt, Franklin D. : 
Acceptance of resignation of Assistant Secretary 

Sayre, 134-135 
Addresses and remarks : 
Neutrality, 201-202 
Refugees, Political, Intergovernmental Committee 

on, 398-400 
Replies to remarks of foreign diplomatic repre- 
sentatives upon presentation of letters of 
credence, 59, 163-164, 187, 309, 371, 569, 570 
Appointment of representative to the Vatican, 711- 

712 
European situation : See European situation : Aerial 
bombardments; Finnish-Soviet relations; and 
Peace appeals. 
Executive orders. See Executive orders. 
Letter to Secretary of the Treasury on tariff conces- 
sions, 571-572, 740-741 
Message to Congress on peace and neutrality, 43-47, 
275-280 
Message to King of Sweden on Nordic States Con- 
ference, 403 
Messages of sympathy, congratulations, etc., to — 
Argentina, 367 
Brazil, 48, 82, 236, 567, 632 
Chamber of Commerce, International, Biennial 

Congress of, 13 
Colombia, 236 
Costa Rica, 253 
El Salvador, 253 
Finland, 650 
Guatemala, 253 
Haitian President, 699 
Honduras. 253 
Mexico, 253 
Nicaragua, 2.53 
Panama, 108, 699, 722 
Paraguay, 133 
Poland, 407 

Pulliam, William E., 698 
Turkey, 460, 741 
Uruguay, 165 
Yugoslavia, 234 
Proclamations. See Proclamations. 
Regulations on credits to belligerents, 221, 247-248 
Statements on — 
American Red Cross, 404 

Bombing of civilian populations from the air, 686 
Combat areas, 455-456 
Death of Secretary of the Navy, 25 
Finnish-Soviet situation, 609 
Neutrality and peace, 57 
White House conference on neutrality, 281 
Rubber and cotton, agreement for exchange of. United 

States and Great Britain, 240 
Rumania : 
Debts, intergovernmental, 693-694 
Treaties : 

Counterfeiting currency, convention and protocol 
for suppression of, ratification, 50 



Rumania — Continued. 
Treaties — Continued. 
Telecommunication convention, international, rati- 
fication, 294 
Visa-fee agreement with United States, 295 
Ryder, Oscar B., appointment as chairman of Inter- 
departmental Committee for Reciprocity Informa- 
tion, 236 



Safety of life at sea, convention for, 175-176, 240 
Sanitary conventions. See under Treaties. 
Sayre, Francis B. : 
Addresses and statements, 32-34, 95 
Resignation as A-ssistant Secretary of State and ap- 
pointment as U. S. High Commissioner to the 
Philippines, 95, 134 
Scientific Congress, Eighth American, 470-471 
Seamen, conventions concerning. See under Treaties : 

Labor Conference. 
Secretary of the Navy, death, 25 
Secretary of State. See Hull, Cordell. 
Security zone, 332-333, 337, 360, 463-464, C62, 723 
Senate, U. S. See Congress, U. S. 
Ships, foreign. See under European situation. 
Ships, U. S. See U. S. ships under European situation 

and Neutrality. 
Siam. See Thailand. 

Singapore, sliips sunk in harbor, 346, 556-557 
Sino-Japanese situation. See Far Eastern situation. 
"Sirdhana," sinking, 556-557 
Six-point program for peace and neutrality, 4, 43, 46, 

47, 278-279, 281 
Slovak Republic : 
Postal convention, universal, adherence, 35-36 
Prisoners of war, convention on treatment of, ad- 
herence, 474-475, 573-574 
Public Health, International Office of, adherence, 

239-240 
Wounded and sick of armies in the field, conven- 
tion for amelioration of condition of, adher- 
ence, 474, 573 
Somaliland Protectorate, application of conventions 
on stamp laws in connection with — 
Bills of exchange and promissory notes, 241-242 
Cheques, 240-241 
South America. See under countrii and under Inter- 
American relations. 
Spain, ai)peal for localization of war activities, 233- 

234 
Spaulding, E. Wilder, appointment as Chief of Di- 
vision of Research and Publication, Department 
of State, 421 
Special Division, Department of State, establishment, 

functions, and personnel, 161, 193-104, 238 
Stamp laws, conventions on. See under Treaties. 
State Department. See Department of State. 
Statements. See Addresses, remarks, statements, etc. 
Strasbourg, France, closing of U. S. consulate, 238 
Students, Chilean, training in United States, 12-13 
Students and professors, exchange of, with Ameri- 
can republics, 21', 289-291, 493 
Submarines, belligerent, use of U. S. iwrts or territo- 
rial waters, 396-397, 456-457 
Sugar, Cuban, U. S. import duty on, 349-350, 729-731 
Sugar Council, International, 65-66 
Swanson, Claude.A., death, 25 
Sweden : 
Conference of Nordic States, 403 
Import quota on salted pork, imposition of, 133-134 



INDEX 



771 



Sweden — Continued. 
Treaties : 

Tax convention with United States, 103, 293, 315, 

643. 086 
Telecommunication convention, approval of revis- 
ions of Cairo, 605-606 
Wages and tiours in industry and agriculture, 
ratification, 63 
Switzerland : 
Minister to United States (Bruggmann), presentation 

of letters of credence, 370-371 
Treaties : 

Benefit or allowances to the involuntarily unem- 
ployed, ratification, 50, 63 
Designs and models, industrial, adherence, 644 
Industrial property, protection of, adherence, 644 
League of Nations Covenant, amendment, ratifi- 
cation, 707 
Origin of goods, false indication of, adherence, 

644 
Trade marks, international registration, adher- 
ence, 644 
Pacific settlement of international disputes, gen- 
eral act for. revervation, 541 
Permanent Court of International Justice, reser- 
vation on denunciation of optional clause of 
the Statute, 473-474 



Tariff (.see also Trade agreements) : 
Addre.?s, 256-258 

Generalization of concessions under trade agree- 
ments, 571-572, 740-741 
Quotas, allocation of, on — 
Cattle, heavy, 640-641 
Crude petroleum and fuel oil, 700-703 
Tax convention. United States and — 
France, 86, 176 

Sweden, 103, 293, 315, 643, 686 
Taxation, convention concerning exemption of liquid 

fuel and lubricants used in air traffic, 292-293 
Taylor, Myron C, appointment as President's repre- 

.sentative to the Vatican, 711-712 
Telecommunication conventions. See tinder Treaties. 
Telegrams, codes acceptable to France and the United 
Kingdom for messages to and from United States, 
233, 305, 405-406, 742 
Territorial waters and ports of United States, restric- 
tion of use of, 396-397, 456-4.57 
Thailand : 

Change of name from Siam, 61 
League of Nations Covenant, amendment, signature, 
448 
Thomson, Charles A., address, 26-31 
Tientsin, China : 

Attack by Japanese sentry on American citizen, 1&4 
Tran.sportation of American merchandise delayed by 
Japanese military, 589 
Tin-plate scrap, exportation of: 
Regulations governing, 60. 677-679 
Statistics, 76, 126-127, 268-269, 447, 603, 753 
Tobacco, supplementary trade agreement with Cuba 

concerning, 729-731 
Trade, international. See Commerce and Trade agree- 
ments. 
Trade agreements : 

Addresses, remarks, statements, etc., by — 

Grady, Henry F., 2.54-2.55, 2.56-258, " 378-379, 508. 

615-616, 633-639 
Hull, Cordell, 374-375, 632, 664-670, 670, 739 
Messersmith, George S., 582, 584 



Trade agreements — Continued. 
Addresses, remarks, statements, etc., by — Continued. 
Sayre, Francis B., 32-34 
Welles, Sumner, 720-721 
Agreements with — 

Argentina, proposed, 166-170, 516-524 
Belgium, 135-142, 170-171 
Canada, 639-640, 640-641, 739-741 
Chile, 346-349, 733 
Cuba, 729-733 
Turkey, 292, 641 
United Kingdom, 604, 670 
Uruguay, proposed, 418-420 
Venezuela, 524-540, 571-572, 671-675, 700-703 
Agriculture, concessions obtained for, 664-670, 

674-675 
Committee for Reciprocity Information, 34, 236 
Correspondence of Assistant Secretary Grady with 

Governor of Rhode Island, 466-469 
Correspondence of Secretary Hull with — 
Governor of Kansas, 671-675 
Senator Capper, 516-524 
Senator McNary, 726-729 
Senator Vandenberg, 724-726 
Cuban sugar, import duty on, 349-3.50 
Endorsement of program by American Farm Bureau 

Federation, 670 
Newspaper opinion, 741 

Swedish import quota on salted pork, 133-134 
Tariff concessions, generalization of, 571-572, 

740-741 
Tariff quotas, allocation of, 640-641, 700-703 
Trade marks, international registration, adherences 

by Belgium and Switzerland, 644 
Trans-Isthmian highway convention with Panama, 

ratification by United States, 89 
Travel by American citizens in combat areas and on 
belligerent ships, 46, 47, 219-220. 247, 278, 345 
454-456, 479-481, 551, 553-555, 686 
Treasury Department, duties with regard to enforce- 
ment of neutrality, 212 
Treasury representatives of American republics, first 

meeting of, 506-507, 62.5-631 
Treaties, agreements, conventions, etc. (see also Trade 
agreements) : 
Asylum and political refugees, 144 
Aviation : 

Aerial navigation, sanitary (1933), application to 

Burma, 49-50 
Air navigation. United States and France (1939), 

text, 109-113 
Air transport. United States and — 
Canada (1939), text, 148-1.50 
France (1939), text, 114-115 
Aircraft, damages caused by to third parties on 
the surface: 
Convention (1933), ratification bv Guatemala, 

150 
Additional protocol (1938) : 
Approval by Brazil. 707-708 
Ratification by Guatemala, 109 
Aircraft, precautionary attachment of (1933), 
ratification by — 
Guatemala, 150 
Norway, 62 
Aviation instructors, military, detail of. United 

States and Argentina (19.39), 271-272 
Liquid fuel and lubricants used in air traflac, ex- 
emption from taxation, 292-293 
Broadcasting. See Treaties : Telecommunications. 



772 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Treaties, agreements, conventions, etc. — Continued. 
Claims, United States and Mexico (1934), payment 

under, 755 
Commerce (see also Treaties: Navigation) : 

Commerce and navigation. United States and — 
Iraq (1938), ratification by United States, 103, 

196 
Japan (1911), termination of, 61, 81 
Commercial, United States and Union of Soviet 

Socialist Republics (1939), 96-99 
Friendship, commerce, and navigation. United 
States and Liberia (1938), 103, 196, 605, 643 
Conciliation, Inter-Amerlcan (1933) : 
Adherence by Venezuela, 103 
U. S. appointment to Commission, 312 
Conciliation, United States and Liberia (1939), 291- 

292 
Consular. United States and Liberia (1938), 103, 

197, 606, 643 
Controver.sles, inter-American, prevention of (1936), 

ratification by Costa Rica, 35 
Copyright. See Intellectual property. 
Cotton and rubber, exchange of. United States and 
Great Britain (1939), ratification by United 
States, 240 
Counterfeiting currency, suppression of (1939) : 
Adherence by Latvia, 152-153 
Ratification by Rumania, .50 
Cultural relations, inter-American, promotion of 
(1936), 21, 36, 289-291, 493 
Ratification by Costa Rica, 36 
Debt payments, United States and Nicaragua, U. S. 

payment under, 187 
Designs and models (1934), adherence by — 
Belgium, 644 
Switzerland, 644 
Disputes, international, pacific settlement of (1928) : 
Accession of Australia, 352 
Reservation by Switzerland, 541 
Drugs : 

Dangerous drugs, suppression of Illicit traffic in 

(1936), adherence by Turkey, 146 
Narcotic drugs, manufacture and distribution 

(1931), 314-315, 448-450 
Opium (1925), 314-315, 680-681 
Exhibitions, artistic (1936), ratification by Costa 

Rica, 36 
Extradition, United States and — 
Ecuador (1930), 313 
Germany (1930). extension to former Austrian 

territory, 546-547 
Great Britain (1031), extension to British terri- 
tories, 147-148 
Liberia (1937), ratification by United States, 103, 

195, 643 
Mexico (1939), 147 

Monaco (1939), ratification by United States, 103, 
195 
Films, educational : 

Convention (10,33), participation by Burma, 707 
Proc&s-verbal (1938) : 
Ratification by Poland, 195 
Signature b.v — 
Brazil, 146-147 
Groat Britain, 734 
LStvia, 49 
Monaco, 85 
Films, ediiration'al and publicity, inter-American 

(19?!6). ratification by Costa Rica. 37 
Good offi<'es and mediation, inter-American (1936), 
ratification by Costa Rica, 35 



Treaties, agreements, conventions, etc. — Continued. 
Haitian finances. United States and Haiti (1939), 

85-86 
Herdbooks, cattle, methods of keeping and operat- 
ing (1936), ratification by — 
Brazil, 450 
Latvia, 450 
Highway, Pan American (1936), ratification by 

Costa Rica, 36 
Highway, Trans-Isthmian, construction. United 
States and Panama (1936), ratification by 
United States, 89 
History, teaching of (1937), signature bv Australia, 

65 
Industrial property (1934), 644 
Intellectual property (1939), 144, 151-152 
Juridical personality of foreign companies, signa- 
ture by Dominican Republic, 574 
Justice, International, Permanent Court of (optional 
clause of the Statute) : 
Acceptance by — 
Greece, 422 
Hungary, 102 
Denunciations by — 
Australia, 352, 473^74 
France, 353, 4T3-474 
Great Britain, 353-354, 473-474 
India, 473 

New Zealand, 422^23, 473-474 
Union of South Africa, 422, 423-424, 473-474 
Reservation by Switzerland concerning denuncia- 
tions, 473-474 
Labor Conference, International, conventions and 
recommendations of : 
Apprenticeship (1939), 574 

Benefit or allowance to the involuntarily unem- 
ployed (1934), ratification by Switzerland, 
50, 63 
Children, employment at sea (revised 1936), ratifi- 
cation by United States, 316-317 
Holida.vs with pay (1936), ratification by — 
Denmark, 63 
France, 293 
Hours of work in coal mines (revised 1935), ratifi- 
cation by Mexico, 425 
Indigenous workers (1039), 574 
Insurance, compulsory invalidity and old-age, for 
persons employed in agriculture, industry, com- 
merce, liberal professions, outworkers, and 
domestic servants (1933), ratifications by 
France, 293, 315 
Masters and oflScers on board merchant ships, mini- 
mum requirements for (1936) : 
Legislation by United States concerning, 86-89 
Ratification by — 
Mexico, 425 
United States, 316-317 
Migrants for employment, recruitment, placing, 

and conditions of labor (1939), 574 
Professional drivers of private vehicles, rest pe- 
riods (1939), 575 
Road transport (1939), .574-.575 
Seamen, employment (1920), ratification by Mex- 
ico, 425 
Seamen, liability of shipowners in case of sick- 
ness, in.inry, or death (1936), ratification by — 
Mexico, 425 
United States, 316-.S17 
Vocational training (1939), 574 



INDEX 



773 



Treaties, agreements, conventions, etc. — Continued. 
Labor Conference, International, conventions and 
recommendations of — Continued. 
Wages and hours of work in industries and agii- 
culture (1938), statistics, ratification by — 
Australia, 425 
Denmarlj, 63 
Sweden, 63 

Union of South Africa, 196 
Weekly rest in industry (1921), ratification by 

Afghanistan, 63 
White lead in painting, use of (1921), ratification 

by Afghanistan, 62-63 
Women, employment at night (1919, revised 1934), 

ratifications by Afghanistan, 62 
Workmen's compensation for occupational diseases 
(revised 1934), ratification by — 
Denmark, 63 
Iraq, 390 

Netherlands, 390-391 
League of Nations Covenant, amendments (1938) : 
Ratification by — 
Bulgaria, 389 
Netherlands, 546 
New Zealand, 49 
Poland, 1'95 
Switzerland, 707 
Union of South Africa, 145 
Signature of — 
Australia, 448 
Thailand, 448 
Liberal professions, exercise of (1939), 144 
Liquid fuel and lubricants used in air traffic, con- 
vention concerning exemption from taxation 
(1939), 292-293 
London naval treaty of 1936, suspension of applica- 
tion of, by — 
Australia, 291 
Canada, 291 
France, 291 
Great Britain, 239 
India, 239 
Italy, 424 
New Zealand, 291 
United States, 354 
Migratory birds, protection of. United States and 
Great Britain (1916), U. S. regulations under, 
148, 355 
Migratory birds and game mammals, protection of. 
United States and Mexico (1036), U. S. regu- 
lations under, 148, 855 
Mutual assistance : 

Anglo-Pranco-Turkish treaty (1939), 514-546, 604 
Anglo-Polish agreement (1939), 270-271 
Franco-Polish protocol (1939), 313-314 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and — 
Estonia (1939), 543-544 
Latvia (1939), 542-543, 680 
Lithuania (1939), 70.5-707 
Narcotic drugs. See Treaties : Drugs. 
Nationality, double, military obligations in cases of, 
United States and Finland (1939), 103, 196, 355, 
389-390 
Navigation {see also Treaties: Commerce) : 
Bills of lading (1924) : 
Adherence by Finland, 115-116 
Ratification by Germany, 450, 575 
Load line (1930), application to French Indo- 
china, 196-197 
Manned lightships (1930), application to Burma. 
197 



Treaties, agreements, conventions, etc. — Continued. 
Nonaggression, conciliation, arbitration, and juri- 
dical procedure, Colombia and Venezuela 
(1939), 734 
Nonaggression, Germany and Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics (1939) : 
Text, 172-173 

Ratification by Union of Soviet Socialist Repub- 
lics, 239 
Nonintervention (1936), ratification by Costa Rica, 

145 
Obscene publications, suppression of circulation 

(1923), application to Burma, 173-174 
Opium. See Treaties : Drugs. 
Origin of goods, false indication of (1934), adherence 

by Switzerland, 644 
Panama and United States, general treaty (1936), 

83-85, 107-108 
Peace, broadcasting in the cause of (1936), applica- 
tion to British dependencies and New Hebrides, 
146 
Peace, maintenance, preservation, and reestablish- 
ment of (1936), ratification by Costa Rica, 144 
Postal : 
Parcel post agreements. United States and — 
Barbados (1939), 272, 293 

Czechoslovakia, suspension of service under, 575 
Danzig, suspension of service under, 575 
Egypt (1939), 272, 294 

Germany, suspension of service under, 575 
Postal, universal (1934) : 
Adherences by — 

Germany for Bohemia and Moravia, 644-645 
Slovak Republic 35-36 
Ratification by — 
Bulgaria, 390 
Latvia, 176 
Postal, universal (1939), 756 

Postal Union of Americas and Spain (1936), ap- 
proval by Brazil, 708 
Prisoners of War, treatment of (1929), Adherence 

by Slovak Republic, 474-^75, 573-574 
Public Health, International Office of (1907), ad- 
herence of Slovokia, 239-240 
Public instruction, peaceful orientation of (1936), 

ratification by (5o.sta Rica, 37 
Publications, interchange of, inter- American (1936), 
ratification by — 
Costa Rica, 36 

United States, 103-104, 197, 476, 575 
Publications, obscene, suppression of circulation 
(1923), application to Burma, 173-174 
Publications, oflicial, exchange of. United States 

and Argentina (1939), 645 
Radio. See Treaties : Telecommunications. 
Refugees from Germany, status (1939), signature of 

Great Britain, 734 
Safety of life at sea (1929) : 
Adherence by Chile, 240 
Application to French Indochina, 175-176 
Sanitary, aerial navigation (1933), application to 

Burma, 49-50 
Sanitary, pan-American (1924), ratification by Par- 
aguay, 109 
Sanitary convention of 1926, modification (1938) : 
Adherence by — 
Belgium, 85, 195 
Union of South Africa, 292 
Approval by Brazil, 424-425 
Decree enforcing, by Egypt, 475 



774 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Treaties, agreements, conventions, etc. — Continued. 
Sanitary convention of 1926, modification (1938) — 
Continued. 
Ratification by — 
Egypt, 195-196 
Pi'ance, 195 
Great Britain, 85, 195 
Greece, 448 
Italy, 85, 195 
Turkey, 547 
Stamp laws in connection with — 
Bills of excliange and promissory notes, applica- 
tion to Jamaica, Turks and Caicos Islands, 
Cavman Islands, and Somaliland Protector- 
ate, 241-242 
Clieques. application to Jamaica, Turks and Cai- 
cos Islands. Cayman Islands, and Somaliland 
Protectorate. 240-241 
Tax, United States and — 
France (1939). 86. 176 
Sweden (1939). 103. 293, 315, 643, 686 
Telecommunications : 

Broadcasting, North American regional (1937), 

ratification by Dominican Republic, 176 
Broadcastint; in the cause of peace (1936). ap- 
plication to British dependencies and New 
Hebrides. 146 
Radio, regional, for Central America, Panama, and 
Canal Zone (1938), ratification by- 
Guatemala, 64 

United States for Canal Zone, 89, 153, 272, 295 
Radiocommunications arrangement, inter-Ameri- 
can (1937). ratification by Dominican Re- 
public. 176-177 
Radiocommunications convention, inter-American 

(1937). approval by Brazil, 177 
Telecommunication (1932) : 

Acceptance by Germany for Bohemia and 

Moravia, 605, 756 
Ratification by — 
Greece, 294 
Honduras, 50-51 
Rumania, 294 
Table of ratifications and adherences, 51-52 
Telecommunication, revisions of Cairo (1938) : 
Approval by — 
Canada, 735 
Danzig, 177 
Hungary, 36 
Latvia, 605 

Newfoundland. 64, 177 
Sweden, 605-606 
United States, 89, 294 
Table of approvals, 64 
Trade agreements. See Trade agreements. 
Trade marks, international registration (revised 
1934), adherences by — 
Belgium. 644 
Switzerland, 644 
Visa-fees, United States and — 

Norway (1929), termination of, 295 
Rumania (19.39), 295 
Whaling agreement of 1937, protocol amending 
(19.38) : 
Adherence by Denmark, 115 
Conference on, 37 
Women and children, suppression of traffic in (1904, 

1910), application to Burma, 174-175 
Wounded and sick of armies in the field, ameliora- 
tion of the condition of (1929) : 
Adherence of Slovak Republic, 474, 573 
Applicaion of, by Germany, 270 



"Treaty Information," discontinuance of publication 

of, 3, 14 
Turbay, Gabriel, presentation of letters of credence 
as Colombian Ambassador to United States, 
568-569 
Turkey : 

Earthquake, 741 
National anniversary, 460 
Treaties : 

Anglo-Franco-Turkish treaty of mutual assist- 
ance, 544-546, 604 
Drugs, dangerous, suppression of illicit traffic in, 

adherence, 146 
Sanitary convention of 1926, modification, rati- 
fication, 547 
Trade agreement with United States, 292, 641 
Turks and Caicos Islands, application of stamp laws 
in connection with — 
Bills of exchange and promissory notes, 241-242 
Cheques, 24fr-241 



Under Secretary of State. See Welles, Sumner. 
Unemployed persons, involuntarily, convention con- 
cerning benefit or allowances to, ratification by 
Switzerland, 50, 63 
Union of South Africa (.see also European situation 
and Neutrality) : 
League of Nations covenant, amendment, ratifica- 
tion, 145 
Permanent Court of International Justice, denuncia- 
tion of optional clause of the Statute, 422, 
423-424. 473-474 
Sanitary convention of 1926, modification, adherence, 

292 
Wages and hours of work In industries and agri- 
culture, convention concerning statistics of, ratifi- 
cation, 196 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (see also European 
situation and Neutrality) : 
Aerial bombardments of civilian populations, pro- 
test of President Roosevelt, 609-610 
Endorsement of President Roosevelt's appeal for 

peace of Apr. 16, 1939, 4.59 
Finnish-Soviet relations. See under European 

situation. 
Polish protest against territory ceded to Lithuania, 

403 
Treaties : 

Commercial agreement with United States, 96-99 
Mutual a.ssistance treaties with — 
Estonia, 543-544 
Latvia, 542-543, 680 
Lithuania, 705-707 
Nonaggression treaty with Germany, 172-173, 239 
U. S. citizens and ships. See under European 
situation. 
United Kingdom. See Great Britain. 
U. S. citizens. See tinder European situation; under 

Far Eastern situation; and under Neutrality. 
U. S. High (Commissioner to the Philippines, appoint- 
ment. 95, 134 
U. S. ships. See under European situation and under 

Neutrality. 
Uruguay : 

Anniversary of independence, 1()5 

Arbitration, Permanent Court of, appointments to, 83 

Naval engagement off coast of, 697-698, 723 

Treaties: 

Intellectual property, treaty on, signature, 151-152 
Trade agreement with United States, proposed, 
418-420 



INDEX 



775 



Vaiuipuliorjr. Arthur H.. coirospondenee with Secre- 
tary Hull ou trade-agreements program, 724-726 
Vanderbilt, William H., correspoudeuce with Assistant 
Secretary Grady on trade-agreements program, 
466-469 
Vargas, Senliora, arrival in United States, 165 
Vatican, representative of President Roosevelt 

appointed to, 711-712 
Venezuela : 
Economic mission, U. S. advisory, 58 
Lagunillas, catastrophe at, 568 
Treaties : 

Conciliation, inter-American, additional protocol 

to general convention, adherence, 103 
Nonaggression, conciliation, arbitration, and jurid- 
ical procedure with Colombia, 734 
Trade agreement with United States, 524-540, 
571-572, 671-675, 700-703 
Veracruz, Mexico, perfecting of land titles in State 

of, 10 
Veterans of Foreign Wars, address before, 188-192 
Vincent, St(?nio, visit to Washington, 663, 699 
Visa-fee agreements with United States, 295 
Visas, U. S. immigration, suspension of issuance in 

London and Warsaw, 234 
Vocational training, recommendation of Labor Con- 
ference concerning, 574 

Wages and hours of work in industries and agricul- 
ture, convention concerning statistics on. See 
under Treaties. 
War Department, duties with regard to enforcement 

of neutrality, 212 
Warsaw, Poland : 

Bomb damage to home of American Ambassador, 234 
U. S. citizens, protection of, 345 
U. S. Foreign Ser\-ice officers, removal, 285-286 
U. S. immigration visas, suspension of issuance 
of, 234 
Weekly rest in industry, convention, ratification by 

Afghanistan, 63 
Weights and Measures, Ninth General Conference 

on, 108 
Welles, Sumner: 
Addresses and remarks: 

Cultural relations, inter-American, 491-493 
Financial and Economic Advisory Committee, 

Inter-American, 565-567 
Foreign Ministers of the American Republics, 
Meeting for Consultation, 299-303, 334-337, 
560-564 
U. S,-Cuban relations, 718-722 



Welles, Sumner — Continued. 
Departmental order on — 
Assistant Secretary of State, appointment of, 135 
Travel by U. S. citizens in combat areas and on 
belligerent ships, 553-555 
Financial and Economic Advisory Committee, ap- 
pointment as U. S. representative on, 564 
Luncheon in honor of Economic Financial and 

Advisory Committee. 631 
Mes.sages of sympathy, congratulation, etc., to — 
Pulliam, William E., 698-699 
Venezuela, 568 
Statements on — 
Americans going abroad, 162 
Death of J. Butler Wright, 676 
Expropriation of American-owned oil properties 

in Mexico, 131-132 
Foreign Ministers of the American Republics, 

Meeting for Consultation, 251-252, 359-360 
Trade agreement with Argentina, proposed, 166 
U. S.-Japanese relations, 588-589 
Whaling, Regulation of, International Conference on, 

37 
Whaling agreement of 1937, protocol amending, adher- 
ence by Denmark, 115 
White House conference on neutrality, 281 
White lead in painting, convention concerning use of, 

ratification by Afghanistan, 62-63 
Wildlife Preservation and Nature Protection, Inter- 
American Committee of Experts on, 471-472 
Wilson, Hugh R., address, 188-192 
Winterton, the Earl, address, 401-402 
Women, employment at night, conventions concerning, 

ratifications by Afghanistan, 62 
Women and children, conventions for suppression of 

traffic in, application to Burma, 174-175 
Wool, Australian, av^ailable to U. S. importers, 641 
Workmen's compensation for occupational diseases, 
convention concerning, ratification by — 
Denmark, 63 
Iraq, 390 

Netherlands, 390-391 
World's Fair, addresses, 2.54-255, 416-417 
Wounded and sick of armies in the field, convention 
for the ameliortition of the condition of, 270, 474, 
573 
Wright, J. Butler, death, 676-677 
Wynne, Cyril, death, 307-308 

Yugoslavia : 

Debts, intergovernmental, 688-689 
King Peter II, birthday, 234 



U 5. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1940 



PUBLISHED WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIBECTOB OF THE BUEEAU OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



IRIIf I 



H 



TIN 



JULY I, 1939 
Vol. I: No. 1— Publication 1349 




Qontents 

Page 

Announcement 3 

Peace and neutrality legislation: Statement by the 

Secretary of State 4 

Department of State appropriations for the fiscal year 

1940 4 

Visit to Washington of the Crown Prince and Crown 

Princess of Norway 9 

Mexico: Perfecting of land titles in the State of Veracruz . 10 

Use of the original records of the Department of State . . 10 

Training of ChUean students in the United States ... 12 

International conferences, commissions, etc.: 
. Biennial Congress of the International Chamber of 

Commerce 13 

International Commission of Inquiry, United States 

and Bolivia 13 

Fifteenth International Conference on Documentation . 14 

Treaty information 14 

Foreign Service 15 

Anniversaries: 

Anniversary of inauguration of postal service between 

the United States and France 16 

Legislation 16 

Publications 16 






\A^^ 



^. 3, SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENT^ 
JUL ^e 1939 



Announcement 

'TpHE present issue inaugurates The Department of State Bulletin. This periodical will 

be published weekly and will contain the texts of press releases, information regard- 
ing treaties, and other material on current developments in American foreign relations 
and the work of the Department of State. It will take the place of the Department's 
weekly pamphlet Press Releases and monthly Treaty Information bulletin, which are being 
discontinued with the issues for June 1939. Indexes to The Department of State Bulletin 
will be prepared and published semiannually. 

The decision to discontinue the Treaty Information bulletin and the Press Releases 
pamphlet was arrived at after careful consideration by the Department of State and con- 
sultation with a number of organizations and persons outside the Government who use one 
or both of those publications. A large majority of the organizations and persons consulted 
were of the opinion that the publication in a single bulletin of the material which was 
being issued in the weekly and monthly periodicals mentioned would be most desirable. 
This opinion coincided with the belief of the Department that a single bulletin containing 
both treaty information and information on other closely related aspects of the conduct of 
American foreign relations would constitute a more useful and convenient source for 
current reference and for filing than two separate publications. 

The material to be published in The Department of State Bulletin will be so organized 
as to enable persons who are interested in certain special subjects to follow developments 
in their particular fields by reference each week to the appropriate section of the Bulletin. 
Data, for instance, of the character of that previously contained in the Treaty Information 
bulletin wiU henceforth be printed each week in a separate section of the Bulletin. 

The Department of State Bulletin is for sale by the Superintendent of Documents, 
Government Printing Office, Washmgton, D. C., for 10 cents a copy, or for $2.75 a year by 
subscription. 



161301—39 



PEACE AND NEUTRALITY LEGISLATION 



Statement by the Secretary of State 



[Released July 1] 

I am still thoroughly convinced that the six- 
point peace and neutrality program set forth in 
my letters to Senator Pittman and Representa- 
tive Bloom on May 27, 1939/ would be far 
more effective in the interests of peace and in 
keeping the country out of war than the pres- 
ent embargo law or any equivalent. 

This legislative proposal was submitted to the 
appropriate committees of the two Houses of 
Congress after lengthy conferences with mem- 
bers of these committees and with other lead- 
ing Members of Congress of all political per- 
suasions. It was my hope and belief that, while 
this proposal might not contain all that every 
individual Member of Congress or everj' offi- 
cial of the executive branch of the Govern- 
ment wished, it would in the present interna- 
tional exigencies be regarded as desirable by 



a majority of Congress. Its failure to pass the 
House by a narrow margin is a matter of re- 
gret and disappointment from the standpoint 
of peace and the best interests of this country 
in its international relations. 

This six-point peace and neutrality proposal 
is not only best calculated to keep this Nation 
out of war in the event war comes, but also, 
what is all-unportant at this time, best cal- 
culated to make a far greater contribution than 
could the present law or its equivalent toward 
the discouragement of the outbreak of war. At 
the same time, while doing this, it would like- 
wise keep this Goverimaent and Nation 100 
percent within the limits of universally recog- 
nized international law. 

In these circumstances, I must continue to 
urge the adoption of this proposal. 



+ + ^ -f + > + 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE FISCAL 

YEAR 1940 



The first of the following tables shows the 
increases and decreases in the State Depart- 
ment's appropriations for the 1940 fiscal year 
as compared with the 1939 fiscal year. The sec- 
ond table shows increases and decreases in the 



^ See Press Releases, Vol. XX, No. 505, June 3, 1939, 
pp. 475-477. 



estimates as submitted to the Congress by the 
Bureau of the Budget and as approved by the 
President compared with the 1940 appropria- 
tions approved by the Congress. 

The Department's appropriation bill for 
1940 was approved by the President on June 
29, 1939. 



JULY 1, 1939 



TABLE I 



Depaetment of State Atpbopeiations foe Fiscai. Teae 1940 Compabed With Fiscal Yeab 1939 

(Note. — For purposes of comparison it should be carefully noted that the 1939 column includes all deficiency 
appropriations in addition to those in the regular ann\inl appropriation bill, whereas for 1940 only the latter are 
shown since no deficiencies for that year have yet been passed.) 



Appropriation title 



Appropriations 
for 1940 



Appropriations 
for 1939 



Increases (+) 

Decreases (— ) 

for 1940 



Reasons for increases or decreases 



Department Proper 

Salaries, Department of State _ 



Salaries, Reciprocal Trade Agree- 
ments. 

Contingent Expenses, Depart- 
ment of State. 



$2, 192, 000 

225, 000 
138, 000 



$2, 072, 600 

250, 000 

95, 810 



+ $119,400 

-25,000 

+ 42, 190 



Printing and Binding, Depart- 
ment of State. 



225, 000 



172, 750 



+ 52,250 



Printing and Binding, Depart- 
ment of State (Supplemental 
for special items for 1939). 

Passport Agencies, Department 
of State. 

Collecting and Editing Terri- 
torial Papers. 

Promotion of Foreign Trade 



60, 000 
19, 800 
43, 000 



15, 000 

63, 500 
20, 000 
40, 000 



-15,000 

-3, 500 

-200 

+ 3, 000 



Increases of $92,640 for 47 addi- 
tional permanent positions; and 
$26,760 to reduce the deficit 
which is now required to be 
covered by lapses. 

General reduction which wUl re- 
quire readjustments in present 
set-up. 

Increases of $7,875 for general sup- 
plies and services; $2,000 for 
replacement of trucks and pur- 
chase of one additional car; 
$11,065 for equipment for addi- 
tional personnel and replace- 
ments, particularly of machines. 
Decrease of $4,500 in travel. 
The sum of $25,750 was continued 
available for 1939 from 1938 and, 
therefore, was in addition to the 
appropriation of $95,810. In- 
crease for 1940 over funds actu- 
ally available for 1939 is, there- 
fore, $25,750 less than the 
$42,190, which is on the basis of 
appropriations. 

Increases of $13,600 for consolida- 
tion of consular regulations and 
instructions to diplomatic offi- 
cers; $18,000 for Foreign Rela- 
tions; $4,500 for press releases; 
$4,110 for passports and passport 
forms; $9,000 for Foreign Service 
requirements; and $3,040 for mis- 
cellaneous items. 

Non-recurring for 1940. 



Decrease based on trend of expend- 
itures for past year. 
General decrease. 

Funds available for 1939 were 
$4,500 more than the appropria- 
tion of $40,000 due to the avail- 
ability of the unexpended balance 
for 1938. For 1940 no balance 
is brought forward. 



Total Department Proper. 2, 902, 800 



2, 729, 660 



+ 173, 140 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Appropriation title 



Appropriations 
(or 1940 



Appropriations 
for 1939 



Increases (+) 

Decreases (— ) 

for 1940 



Reasons for increases or decreases 



Foreign Service 

Salaries of Ambassadors and 
Ministers. 



Salaries of Foreign 
Officers. 



Service 



Transportation, Foreign Service. 



Office and Living Quarters, For- 
eign Service. 



Cost of Living Allowances. 



Representation Allowances. 



Retirement Fund 

Salaries of Foreign Service Clerks. 



Salaries of Foreign Service Clerks 
;, (Supplemental for urgent needs 

in 1939). 
Miscellaneous Salaries and Allow- 
ances, Foreign Service. 



Contingent Expenses, Foreign 
Service. 



Contingent Expenses, Foreign 
Service (Supplemental for tele- 
graph expenses in 1939). 

Emergencies Arising in the Diplo- 
matic and Consular Service. 

Total Foreign Service 

Foreign Service Buildings. 



$650, 000 

3, 580, 000 
600, 000 



2, 020, 000 



300, 000 



140, 000 



199, 400 
2, 550, 000 



700, 000 



1, 135, 000 



175, 000 



$640, 000 

3, 505, 100 
556, 700 



1, 962, 000 



280, 000 



125, 000 



187, 600 
2, 359, 020 



41, 700 
680, 180 

1, 158, 500 



140, 000 
175,000 



4- $10, 000 

+ 74,900 
+ 43,300 



+ 58,000 

+ 20, 000 
+ 15,000 



+ 11,800 
+ 190, 980 



-41, 700 
+ 19, 820 

-23, 500 



■140,000 



12,049, 400 



11,810,800 



+ 238, 600 



760, 000 



+ 750,000 



Increase of $22,500 required for 
raising ranks of Ministers to 
Colombia, Panama, and Vene- 
zuela to Ambassadors. De- 
creases of $10,000 for Minister to 
Czechoslovakia; and $2,500 addi- 
tional to be saved on lapses. 

Increases of $49,900 for automatic 
promotions and $25,000 for 10 
additional officers. 

Increases of $12,500 for transfers 
of Ambassadors and Ministers; 
$10,600 for new officers; $4,200 
for new clerks; $8,500 for tem- 
porary details; and $7,500 trans- 
ferred to this appropriation from 
Contingent Expenses for trade 
conference travel. 

Increases of $12,000 for 10 addi- 
tional officers; $11,970 for addi- 
tional clerks; and $34,030 to 
reduce deficit which it is neces- 
sary to cover by lapses on allow- 
ances for living quarters. 

Increases of $2,400 for additional 
officers; $3,150 for additional 
clerks; and $14,450 for increased 
living costs. 

To make readjustments in the in- 
terest of uniform treatment in the 
allotment of these funds, and to 
make more adequate provision 
for official entertainment le- 
quired by heads of mission. 

Increases of $100,000 for some 700 
promotions; $66,020 for 58 addi- 
tional permanent clerks; $15,920 
for transfers to this appropria- 
tion of personnel previously paid 
from other appropriations; and 
$9,040 for temporary clerks. 

Non-recuiring for 1940. 



Increases of approximately $18,000 
for some 600 promotions at an 
average of $30; $1,820 for addi- 
tional personnel. 

Reductions of $15,000 in program 
for purchase of household furni- 
ture; $10,000 for trade conference 
travel transferred to "Tran.s- 
portation. Foreign Service' 
$2,500 in item for special train- 
ing of Foreign Service officers 
$650 in automotive equipment 
Increase of $4,650 for supplies, 
postage, and miscellaneous items 

Non-recurring for 1940. 



New appropriation under act of 
May 25, 1938. 



JULY 1, 1939 



Appropriation title 


Approrriations 
for 1910 


Appropriations 
for 1939 


Increases (+) 

Decreases (-) 

for 1940 


Reasons for increases or decreases 


International Obligations 










Contributions, Quotas, etc. to In- 


$870, 000 


$835, 590 


+ $34, 410 


Increases of $1,319.67 for Pan 


ternational Bureaus. 








American Union; $27,303.44 for 
Pan American Sanitary Bureau; 
and $10,786.89 for International 
Labor Organization. Decrease of 
$5,000 for Meeting of Interna- 
tional Road Congress which is a 
non-recurring item. 


Convention for the Promotion of 


75, 000 




+ 75,000 


New item growing out of conven- 


luter-American Cultural Re- 








tion signed at Buenos Aires, De- 


lations. 








cember 23, 1936. 


Mexican Boundary Commission 


193, 000 


143, 300 


+ 49, 700 


Increase is entirely for operation 


(Regular) . 








and maintenance of the Rio 
Grande Rectification Project 
which is to be assumed by the 
regular Commission upon com- 
pletion. 


Rio Grande Rectification Project- 




229, 500 


-229, 500 


Anticipated completion of this 










project. 


Lower Rio Grande Flood Control 


800, 000 


311,500 


+ 488, 500 


Although there is an increase in the 


Project. 








actual amount appropriated for 
1940, there was a considerable 
balance brought forward to 1939 
from 1938 which made funds 
available for 1939 somewhat in 
excess of the appropriation for 
1940. 


Rio Grande Canalization Pro- 
ject. 
Fence Construction on the 


500, 000 


646, 500 


-146,500 


Reduction in construction work. 


25, 000 


25, 000 






Boundary, Arizona. 










International Boundary Commis- 


42, 000 


41, 500 


+ 500 


Increase is for additional field work. 


sion, United States and Can- 










ada, and Alaska and Canada. 










Salaries and Expenses, Interna- 


37, 500 


36, 600 


+ 900 


Increase for travel, supplies, com- 


tional Joint Commission, 








munication service, and miscel- 


United States and Great Brit- 








laneous items. 


ain. 
Special and Technical Investiga- 


47, 000 


49, 000 


-2, 000 


General reduction. 


tions, United States and Great 










Britain. 










International Fisheries Commis- 


25, 000 


25, 000 






sion. 
International Pacific Salmon Fish- 


40, 000 


25, 000 


+ 15, 000 


For more extensive field work in 


eries Commission. 








cooperation with Canada. 


Eighth American Scientific Con- 
gress. 


85, 000 




+ 85,000 


Special appropriation for participa- 
tion by the United States in this 


\J\Jf %i» \^ N^ 














conference. 


Seventh General Assembly of the 
International Union of Geodesy 


4, 500 




+ 4, 500 


Special appropriation for organiz- 
ing this Congress to be held in 








and Geophysics. 








the United States. 


Ninth International Seed Testing 
Congress. 


500 




+ 500 


Special appropriation in connection 
with holding this Congress in the 
















United States. 


Payment to Government of Nica- 
ragua. 


72, 000 




+ 72, 000 


Special appropriation under agree- 
ment with Nicaragua. 








Fifteenth International Congress 




15, 000 


-15,000 


Non-recurring. 


of Architects. 










Tenth Pan American Sanitary 
Conference. 




3,500 


-3, 500 


Non-recurring. 










International Committee on Po- 




50, 000 


-50,000 


Appropriation for 1940 undeter- 


litical Refugees. 








mined at present. 



8 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Appropriation title 


Appropriations 
lor 1940 


Appropriations 
for 1939 


Increases (-1-) 

Decreases (— ) 

for 1940 


Reasons for increases or decreases 


International Obligations — Con. 
Fourth International Conference 




$15, 500 

50, 000 
15, 000 

3,600 

50, 000 

10, 000 


-$15, 500 

-50,000 
- 15, 000 

-3,600 

-50,000 

- 10, 000 


Non-recurring. 


on Private Air Law. 
Pan American Highway 




Non-recurring. 


Third Pan American Highway 
Conference. 

Commission of Experts on Codifi- 
cation of International Law. 

Tenth International Congress of 
Military Medicine and Phar- 
macy. 




Non-recurring. 
Non-recurring. 




Non-recurring. 
Non-recurring. 


Controversy. 




Total International Obli- 
gations. 


$2, 816, 500 


2, 581, 090 


+ 235, 410 




Grand Total - _ 


18, 518, 700 


17, 121, 550 


+ 1,397, 150 









TABLE II 

Department op State Estimates as Submitted to Congress by the Bukeaij of the Budget Compared With 

Appropriations Approved by Congress, 1940 



Title of appropriation 



Estimate submitted 
to Congress 



Appropriation 

approved by 

Congress 



Increase (+) 
Decrease (— ) 



Department op State 

Salaries, Department of State 

Salaries, Reciprocal Trade Treaties 

Salaries, Inter-American Program 

Contingent Expenses, Department of State 

Contingent Expenses, Inter-American Program.. 

Printing and Binding, Department 

Printing and Binding, Inter- American Program. 

Passport Agencies 

Territorial Papers 

Promotion of Foreign Trade 

Total, Department of State 

Foreign Service 

Salaries of Ambassadors and Ministers 

Salaries of Foreign Service Officers 

Transportation, Foreign Service Officers 

Office and Living Quarters 

Cost of Living Allowance 

Representation Allowance 

Foreign Service Retirement and Disability Fund 

Salaries, Foreign Service Clerks 

Miscellaneous Salaries and Allowances 

Contingent Expenses, Foreign Service 

Emergency Fund 

Total, Foreign Service 

Foreign Sebvicb Buildings Fund 



$2, 205, 000. 00 

250, 000. 00 

39, 360. 00 

143, 000. 00 

5, 430. 00 

214, 500. 00 

45, 500. 00 

63, 500. 00 

20, 000. 00 

44, 500. 00 



$2, 192, 000. 00 
225, 000. 00 



138, 000. 00 
'225,'6o6."66' 



60, 000. 00 
19, 800. 00 
43, 000. 00 



3, 030, 790. 00 



2, 902, 800. 00 



655, 
3, 580, 

610, 
2, 030, 

308, 

145, 

199, 
2, 570, 

710, 
1, 154, 

175, 



000. 00 
000. 00 
000. 00 
000. 00 
500. 00 
000. 00 
400. 00 
000. 00 
500. 00 

5oa 00 

OOO 00 



650, 
3, 580, 

600, 
2, 020, 

300, 

140, 

199, 
2, 550, 

700, 
1, 135, 

175, 



000. 00 
000. 00 
000. 00 
000. 00 
000. 00 
000. 00 
40O 00 
OOO 00 
000. 00 
000. 00 
000. 00 



12, 137, 900. 00 



12, 049, 400. 00 



$13,000. 00 
-25, 000. 00 

- 39, 360. 00 
-5,000. 00 
- 5, 430. 00 

+ 10, 500. 00 

- 45, 600. 00 
-3, 500. 00 

-200. 00 
- 1, 600. 00 



- 127, 990. 00 



-5,000.00 



- 10, 000. 00 

- 10, 000. 00 

- 8, 600. 00 

-5,000. 00 



-20,000.00 
- 10, 500. 00 
- 19, 500. 00 



-88, 500. 00 



1, 000, ooa 00 



750, 000. 00 



-250,000.00 



JULY 1, 1939 



9 



Title of approprhition 



Estimftto submitted 
to Congress 



Appropriation 

approved by 

Congress 



Increase (+) 
Decrease {— ) 



International Obligations 

Contributions, Quotas, etc 

Convention for tlie Promotion of Inter-American Cultural 

Relations. 
Mexican Boundary Commission: 

Regular Commission 

Lower Rio Grande Flood Control 

Rio Grande Canalization 

Fence Construction 

International Boundary Commission: 

United States and Canada and Alaska and Canada 

International Joint Commission: 

Salaries and Expenses 

Special and Technical Investigations 

International Fisheries Commission 

International Pacific Salmon Fisheries Commission 

Eighth American Scientific Congress 

Seventh Assembly of International Union of Geodesy and 
Geophysics. 

Ninth International Seed Testing Congress 

Payment to Nicaragua 



$870, 133. 00 
75, 000. GO 



198, 300. 00 
1, 000, 000. 00 
1, 000, 000. 00 



43, 000. 00 

38, 500. 00 
49, 000. 00 
31, 500. 00 
40, 000. 00 
90, 000. 00 
5, 000. 00 

500. 00 
72, 000. 00 



$870, 000. 00 
75, 000. 00 



193, 000. 00 

800, 000. 00 

500, 000. 00 

25, 000. 00 

42, 000. 00 

37, 500. 00 
47, 000. 00 
25, 000. 00 
40, 000. 00 
85, 000. 00 
4, 500. 00 

500. 00 
72, 000. 00 



Total, International Obligations- 
Geand Total 



3, 512, 933. 00 



2, 816, 500. 00 



$133. 00 



-5, 300. 00 

-200,000. 00 

-500,000. 00 

+ 25,000. 00 

- 1, 000. 00 

-1,000. 00 
-2,000. 00 
-6,500. 00 



-5,000. 00 
-500. 00 



-696,433.00 



19, 681, 623. 00 



18, 518, 700. 00 



•1, 162,923.00 



VISIT TO WASHINGTON OF THE CROWN PRINCE AND CROWN 

PRINCESS OF NORWAY 



[Released June 26] 

Their Royal Highnesses the Crown Prince 
and Crown Princess of Norway will arrive in 
Washington, for an unofficial visit, at 9 : 15 
p. m., the evening of Tuesday, June 27. They 
will be accompanied by the Minister of Norway 
and will be met at the Union Station by the 
following committee : 

The Honorable Cordell Hull, Secretary of 
State, and Mrs. Hull 

Madame Munthe de Morgenstierne, wife of the 
Minister of Norway 

Mr. Jorgen Galbe, Counselor of the Norwegian 
Legation, and Madame Galbe 

Mr. George T. Summerlin, Chief of Protocol 

Mr. James C. Dunn, Adviser on Political Rela- 
tions, Department of State, and Mrs. Dunn 



Mr. John Hickerson, Acting Chief of the Divi- 
sion of European Affairs, Department of State, 
and Mrs. Hickerson 

Mr. Aage Bryn, First Secretary of the Nor- 
M'egian Legation, and Madame JBryn 

Mr. Ditlef Knudsen, Attache of the Norwegian 
Legation, and Madame Knudsen 

Mr. Torfinn Oftedal, Attache of the Norwegian 
Legation 

Lt. Col. H. M. Rayner, United States Army, 
Military Aide to the Crown Prince 

Comdr. R. B. Carney, United States Navy, 
Naval Aide to the Crown Prince 

On Wednesday, June 28, the Secretary of 
State and Mrs. Hull will give a luncheon for 
Their Royal Highnesses, who will remain in 
Washington until Friday afternoon, June 30. 



10 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



[Released June 28] 

Following is the list of guests attendiug the lunch- 
eon given by the Secretary of State and Mrs. Hull in 
honor of Their Royal Highnesses the Crown Prince 
and Crown Princess of Norway, June 28, 1939, at the 
Carlton Hotel: 

Their Royal Highnesses the Crown Prince and Crown 
Princess of Norway ; the Honorable the Minister of 
Norway and Madame Munthe de Morgenstierne ; Maj. 
N. R. 0stgaard aud Madame 0stgaard; Capt. N. A. 
Ramm ; Mr. Jens Scbive ; Mrs. Woodrow Wilson ; the 
Honorable the Attorney General ; the Honorable the 
Secretary of Commerce ; Mrs. Charles L. McNary ; the 
Honorable Walter F. George and Mrs. George ; the 
Honorable Robert L. Doughton and Mrs. Doughton; 
Mrs. Sol Bloom ; the Honorable Edith Nourse Rogers ; 
the Honorable Jere Cooper ; the Honorable the Under 
Secretary of State and Mrs. Welles; the Honorable 
Lucille F. McMillan; Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Roose- 
velt ; the Honorable Jesse Jones and Mrs. Jones ; Mr. 
George T. Summerlin ; Mr. David Lawrence ; Mr. 
Ulric Bell ; Miss Ramona Lefevre ; Miss Beth Camp- 
bell ; Lt. Col. Harold M. Rayner, United States Army, 
American military aide to His Royal Highness the 
Crown Prince of Norway ; Comdr. Robert B. Carney, 
United States Navy, American naval aide to His Royal 
Highness the Crown Prince of Norway. 



+ -f -f 

MEXICO: PERFECTING OF LAND 
TITLES IN THE STATE OF VERA- 
CRUZ 

[Released June 26] 

The Department of State has been informed 
that the State of Veracruz, Mexico, has ex- 
tended until July 22, 1939, tlie period within 
which proprietors of immovable property (in- 
cluding those who have inherited immovable 
property) may legalize their property rights 
by instituting the necessary proceedings to 
"perfect" the said rights in cases where titles 
of ownership are not properly inscribed in the 
Public Registry of Property. As stated in the 
Department's press release of March 21, 1939,- 
provision for such perfection of title was made 



in Veracruz State law promulgated September 
22, 1938. 

The American consul at Veracruz, in report- 
ing this extension, .states that in order to com- 
ply with the law it may be necessary for Amer- 
ican projierty owners affected by the law to 
engage an attorney. The consul will be glad, 
upon request, to furnish any interested Amer- 
ican citizen with a list of attorneys. He can- 
not, of course, assume any responsibility for 
the integrity or ability of any attorneys ap- 
pearing on the list who may be employed by 
such property owner. 



■f + -f 



USE OF THE ORIGINAL RECORDS OF 
THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

[Released July 1] 

In view of the contemporary international 
situation, the Department has found it neces- 
sary to revise in certain respects the regula- 
tions set forth in Departmental Order No. 751, 
of April 5, 1938, relating to the use of the 
original records of the Department of State.' 
The revised regulations as contained in De- 
partmental Order No. 796, dated June 19, 1939, 
are as follows: 

"Section 91, Title 20, of the United States 
Code reads in part as follows: 'The facilities 
for studj' research and illustration in the Gov- 
ernment departments . . . shall be accessible, 
under such rules and restrictions as the officers 
in charge of each department or collection may 
prescribe, subject to such authority as is now 
or may hereafter be permitted by law, to the 
scientific investigators and to duly qualified 
individuals, students and graduates of any in- 
stitution of learning in the several States and 
Territories and the District of Columbia . . .' 
Pursuant to the provisions quoted and in order 



'Press Releases, Vol. XX, No. 495, March 25, 1939, 
pp. 222-223. 



" See Press Releases, Vol. XIX, No. 479, December 3, 
1938, p. 401. 



JULY 1, 1939 



11 



to clarify the present procedure in the Depart- 
ment, the following regulations, superseding 
those contained in Departmental Order No. 751, 
dated April 5, 1938, and all previous depart- 
mental orders on the subject, are hereby pre- 
scribed to govern the use of the original records 
of the Department of State. 

"In view of the contemporary international 
situation it will not be possible to make the 
confidential or impublished files and records of 
the Department of a date later than December 
31, 1918, available to persons who are not offi- 
cials of the United States Government. In 
order that the Department's records may be 
made available as liberally' as circumstances 
permit, the Department each year will give con- 
sideration to the situation then existing with a 
view to advancing the date fixed whenever such 
action is deemed possible. The use of these 
records by Government officials will be subject 
to such conditions as the chiefs of the appro- 
priate policy divisions in the Department of 
State may deem it advisable to prescribe. 

"The confidential or unpublished records of 
the Department of a date prior to December 31, 
1918, or such subsequent date as may be fixed 
by the Department, may be made available to 
persons who are not officials of the United 
States Government, subject to the following 
conditions : 

"Files which are in current use in the De- 
partment or which cannot be made public with- 
out the disclosure of confidences reposed in the 
Department or without adversely affecting the 
public interest should not be made available 
to inquirers. Papers received by the Depart- 
ment from a foreign goverimient which have 
not been released for publication by that gov- 
ernment should not be made available to in- 
quirers without the consent of the government 
concerned. If there is reason to believe a for- 
eign government may be willing to permit the 
use of the papers in question under certain 
conditions the permission may, in the discre- 
tion of the appropriate officials of the Depart- 
ment, be requested. If such permission is re- 
quested, the expenses of communicating with 



the foreign govermnent (cost of telegrams, 
postage, etc.) will be met by the person desir- 
ing to consult the papers. 

"Permission to consult the records of the 
Department through the date fixed by the De- 
partment may be granted, subject to the limi- 
tations set forth in this order, to such persons 
as lawyers, publicists, historians, instructors, 
and professors in accredited colleges and uni- 
versities, and holders of the doctor's degree (or 
its equivalent) in foreign relations or allied 
subjects from such colleges and universities, 
provided that they are authorities of recog- 
nized standing in the field to which the records 
relate and that they have an important and 
definite use for the information desired. Due 
to lack of personnel the Department is not in 
a position to assemble large quantities of 
papers or extensive files for consultation by 
persons not officials of the Government, and 
requests for permission to consult material 
should therefore be definitely limited in scope 
and confined to specific subjects or particular 
papers. 

"An application from an alien to consult the 
Department's records under this order shall be 
considered only if accompanied by a letter 
from the head of the embassy or legation at 
Washington of the country of which the alien 
is a citizen, subject or national. Such a letter 
must show that the applicant is favorably 
known to the appropriate embassy or legation 
and that the mission is familiar with the pur- 
pose of the applicant's work. 

"All applications to consult the original 
records of the Department of date prior to 
the one fixed by the Department shall be re- 
ferred to the Chief of the Division of Research 
and Publication. If the Chief of the Divi- 
sion of Research and Publication is of the 
opinion that the a25plicant possesses the requi- 
site qualifications as set forth in this order, he 
shall have assembled and shall submit to the 
chief of the policy division charged with the 
consideration of questions in the field which is 
the object of the research or inquiry all of the 
relevant papers and files which the applicant 



12 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



desires to consult with the exceptions herein- 
after noted. If the applicant is permitted to 
use all or part of the papers desired, the chief 
of the policy division concerned will inform 
the Chief of the Division of Kesearch and 
Publication under what conditions the papers 
may be examined, that is, whether copies may 
be made of the relevant documents or whether 
only notes may be taken and whether the copies 
or notes may be published in whole or in part 
or used only for background information, or 
any other conditions which the chief of the 
policy division mentioned may deem it advis- 
able to prescribe. This decision will be final 
except in cases of unusual importance where 
the question may be referred to an Assistant 
Secretary of State or higher officer. Docu- 
ments or papers previously released or pub- 
lished, and unpublished papers clearly involv- 
ing no question of policy, may be made avail- 
able to qualified applicants by the Chief of the 
Division of Research and Publication without 
reference to other officials. 

"Upon receiving the decision of the chief of 
the policy division mentioned, with the condi- 
tions therein deemed advisable and necessary 
to prescribe, the Chief of the Division of Ee- 
search and Publication will thereupon arrange 
for the applicant to consult the files subject to 
the conditions mentioned. After the papers 
have been consulted the applicant will submit 
all notes, copies of documents, etc., which he 
has made to the Chief of the Division of 
Research and Publication. The latter, when 
necessary, will refer these notes, copies, etc., to 
the chief of the policy division concerned for 
examination if desired by the chief of the latter 
division. The chief of this policy division 
may, after such examination, return the papers 
to the Chief of the Division of Research and 
Publication for transmittal to the applicant or 
he may, in his discretion, retain the notes and 
refuse the applicant permission to use them. 

"The provisions of this order are to be inter- 
preted as liberally as possible. In this regard 
it is to be borne in mind that the further it is 
possible to go in the way of promoting legiti- 



mate historical research and the study of the 
foreign policy of the United States without 
violating the confidences necessary for the 
transaction of diplomatic affairs, the more 
likely the Department will be to receive the 
support and trust of the intelligent public." 

-f -f -f 

TRAINING OF CHILEAN STUDENTS IN 
THE UNITED STATES 

I Iteleased July 1] 

A group of graduate students of Chilean 
engineering schools today called on Assistant 
Secretary of State Berle to pay their respects, 
'fliey were presented by the Chilean Ambassa- 
dor. These students have come to the United 
States to spend several months in some of the 
important industrial plants of the country in 
order to obtain advanced instruction and prac- 
tical experience in certain branches of tech- 
nology. They are here under the sponsorship 
of the University of Chile and of a number of 
Chilean and American banks, transportation 
lines, and industrial concerns. 

One group is under the sponsorship of : 

The University of Chile (Engineering 
School) 

Mining Credit Bank of Chile 

Chilean State Railways 

Consulate General of Chile in New York 

Chile-American Association, Inc. 

Wessel-Duval & Co. 

General Motors Corp. 

Baldwin Locomotive Works & Associated 
Companies 

Bethlehem Steel Corp. & Associated Com- 
panies 

Standard Oil Co. of New Jersey & Asso- 
ciated Companies 

Westinghouse Electric International Co. 

Thomas A. Edison Co. 

Carrier Corporation 

Members of this group are located as follows : 

Luis Rojas, Westinghouse Electric Inter- 
national Co. 

Carlos A. Echazii, Westinghouse Electric 
International Co. 



JULY 1, 1939 

Fernando Suarez, Baldwin Locomotive 

Works 
Ramon Suarez, Bethlehem Steel Corp. 
Jorse Hevia, Bethlehem Steel Corp. 
Arturo Aranda, General Motors Corp. 
Isaac Faiguenbaum, General Motors Corp. 
Albert Arce, Carrier Corporation 
Alfonso Castro, Baldwin Locomotive 

Works 
Carlos Alvarez, Standard Oil Co. of New 

Jersey 

A second group is under the sponsorship of 



13 



W. R. Grace & Co., the General Electric Co., 
and Ingersoll-Rand Co. 

These students and their locations are as fol- 
lows: 

Ramon Cabezon B., General Electric Co. 
Julio Melnick A., Ingersoll-Rand Co. 
Luis Marti, Grace Industrial Department 

The students presented also included Alberto 
Cabero, Jr., son of the Chilean Ambassador to 
the United States, and Mario Barranza, who is 
under the sponsorship of the Panagra airlines. 



International Conferences, Commissions, etc. 



BIENNIAL CONGRESS OF THE INTER- 
NATIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

[Released June 26] 

Following is the text of a message from the 
President of the United States to Mr. Thomas 
J. Watson, in connection with the Congress of 
the International Chamber of Commerce being 
held at Copenliagen, Denmark, convening June 
26, 1939: 

"In these times of international uncertainty 
the existence of the Liternational Chamber of 
Commerce and its efforts to promote interna- 
tional economic activity are extremely hearten- 
ing to those of us who believe that only with 
the existence of stable and progressively im- 
proving world trade and finance will it be pos- 
sible to establish satisfactory international 
political relations. 

"I am glad to take this opportunity of ex- 
pressing again my appreciation of the work 
done in the promotion of world trade and un- 
derstanding by the International Chamber of 
Commerce, which has been under your leader- 
ship for the past two years. To the Interna- 
tional Chamber of Commerce and to your suc- 
cessor I extend my best wishes for continued 
successful activities in this direction. 

"Frankun D. Roosevelt" 



In transmitting the foregoing message to Mr. 
Watson, Secretary of State Hull wrote: 

"I have been requested by the President to 
transmit to you his message to the Interna- 
tional Chamber of Conunerce at the June 26, 
1939 Opening Session of its Biennial Congi-ess. 
I should like to have you know that I echo the 
words of the President and that I wish for the 
International Chamber of Commerce a success- 
ful congress. 

"CoRDELL Hull" 



-f -f -f 

INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION OF 
INQUIRY, UNITED STATES AND 
BOLIVIA 

[Released June 26] 

By the joint action of the Governments of 
the United States and Bolivia, Mr. Johannes 
Irgens, Norwegian diplomatist, has been ap- 
pointed to the position of Joint Commissioner 
for the International Commission provided for 
under the terms of the Treaty for the Advance- 
ment of Peace between the United States and 
Bolivia, signed January 22, 1914. 



14 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The present composition of the Commission 
is as follows: 

American Commissioners: 

National : A. R. Talbot, of Nebraska 
Nonnational : Ludvigs Seja, of Latvia 

Bolivian Commissioners : 
National: Vacant 
Nonnational: Vacant 

Joint Commissioner: 
Johannes Irgens, of Norway. 

FIFTEENTH INTERNATIONAL CON- 
FERENCE ON DOCUMENTATION 

[Released July 1] 

This Government has accepted the invitation 
of the Swiss Government to participate in the 
Fifteenth International Conference on Docu- 
mentation, which will be held at Zurich, Swit- 



zerland, from August 10 to 13, 1939, and the 
President has approved the appointment of the 
following persons as delegates on the part of 
the United States: 

Vernon D. Tate, Ph. D., Chief, Division of 
Photographic Archives and Research, The Na- 
tional Archives 

Miss Jose Meyer, European representative, Li- 
brary of Congress, Paris, France. 

This Government was represented at the 
Fourteenth International Conference on Docu- 
mentation which was held at Oxford, England, 
in September 1938. At that meeting the dis- 
cussions concerned the best methods of obtain- 
ing authoritative information on bibliographic 
work in such fields of learning as archeology, 
archive work, economics, history, and linguistic 
studies. 



Treaty Information 



All material for the month of June 1939 con- 
cerning treaties to which the United States is a 
party or may become a party or treaties of gen- 
eral international interest will appear in the 
Treaty Information bulletin for June 30, 1939 ; 



treaty data available after that date will be 
compiled in the Treaty Division and will ap- 
pear in this section of subsequent issues of The 
Department of State Bulletin. 



JTJLY 1, 1939 



15 



Foreign Service 



The July 1, 1939, issue of the Foreign Serv- 
ice List will contain the following changes in 
heads of American diplomatic missions : 

Norman Armour, of New Jersey, formerly 
Ambassador to Chile, appointed Ambassador 
to Argentina May 18, 1939. 

Claude G. Bowers, of New York, formerly 
Ambassador to Spain, appointed Ambassador 
to Chile June 22, 1939. 

Eobert Granville Caldwell, of Texas, re- 
signed as Minister to Bolivia effective upon 
expiration of leave of absence. 

Frank P. Corrigan, of Ohio, formerly Min- 
ister to Panama, appointed Ambassador to 
Venezuela January 20, 1939. 

William Dawson, of Minnesota, formerly 
Minister to Uruguay, appointed Ambassador 
to Panama March 23, 1939. 

Louis G. Dreyfus, Jr., of California, for- 
merly counselor of embassy at Lima, Peru, ap- 
pointed Minister to Iran July 7, 1939. 

Antonio C. Gonzalez, of New York, resigned 
as Minister to Venezuela effective June 8, 1939. 

Douglas Jenkins, of South Carolina, for- 
merly consul general at London, appointed 
Minister to Bolivia June 22, 1939. 

Daniel C. Koper, of South Carolina, ap- 
pointed Minister to Canada May 9, 1939. 

Laurence A. Steinhardt, of New York, for- 
merly Ambassador to Peru, appointed Ambas- 
sador to the Union of Soviet Socialist Repub- 
lics March 23, 1939. 

Alexander W. Weddell, of Virginia, formerly 
Ambassador to Argentina, appointed Ambas- 
sador to Spain May 3, 1939. 



Edwin C. Wilson, of Florida, formerly coun- 
selor of embassy at Paris, appointed Minister 
to Uruguay June 22, 1939. 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since June 24, 1939 : 

John G. Erhardt, of Brooklyn, N. Y., For- 
eign Service oflBcer detailed as inspector, has 
been designated first secretary of embassy and 
consul general at London, England. 

William M. Cramp, of Philadelphia, Pa., sec- 
ond secretary of legation at Tegucigalpa, Hon- 
duras, has been assigned as consul at Warsaw, 
Poland. 

William C. Trimble, of Baltimore, Md., now 
assigned to the Department of State, has been 
designated third secretary of embassy and vice 
consul at Paris, France. 

Douglas Flood, of Kenilworth, 111., vice con- 
sul at Barcelona, Spain, has been assigned as 
vice consul at Naples, Italy. 

Eobert C. Strong, of Beloit, Wis., vice consul 
at Frankfort on the Main, Germany, has been 
assigned as vice consul at Prague, Bohemia. 



The following Executive orders concerning 
the Foreign Service have recently been issued : 

Executive Order Amending tlie Foreign Service Reg- 
ulations of tlie United States ( Retirement of Foreign 
Service Officers). (E. O. 8176.) Federal Register, 
Vol. 4, No. 121, June 23, 1939, p. 2467 (Tlie National 
Archives of the United States). 

Executive Order Amending the Foreign Service Reg- 
ulations of the United States (Chapter III — Immu- 
nities, Powers, and Privileges). (E. O. 8181.) Fed- 
eral Register, Vol. 4, No. 123, June 27, 1939, p. 2491 
(The National Archives of the United States). 

[The above orders effect no material altera- 
tions in the Foreign Service Regulations but 
merely consolidate into one chapter the miscel- 
laneous sections throughout the Regulations 
pertaining to the diplomatic and consular 
branches of the Foreign Service as separate 
entities.] 

Executive Order: Effective Date of Election by Re- 
tired Foreign Service Officers to Receive Reduced An- 
nuities. (E. O. 8180.) Federal Register, Vol. 4, No. 
122, June 24, 1939, p. 2475 (The National Ai-chives of 
the United States). 



16 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BUU^TIN 



Anniversaries 



ANNIVERSARY OF INAUGURATION OF 
POSTAL SERVICE BETWEEN THE 
UNITED STATES AND FRANCE 

[Released July 1] 

Translation of a telegram from the Minister for For- 
eign Affairs of France (Georges Bonnet) to the Secre- 
tary of State 

Pasib, June 28, 1939. 
Seventy-five years ago a steamer to which France 
had been pleased to give the name of the American 
hero Washington insured for the first time, in thirteen 
and one-half days, the regular service of the French 
mail line between Le Havre and New York. On the 
occasion of this anniversary I desire to express to 
Your Excellency, recalling myself to your recollection, 
the deep satisfaction which I feel in noting the prog- 
ress made with respect to the rapidity of communica- 
tions between France and the United States, a tangi- 
ble testimony of the unfailing friendship which unites 
our two countries. 

Gbx)bges Bonnet 

Telegram from the Secretary of State to the Minister 
for Foreign Affairs of France 

June 30, 1939. 
I hasten to thank Your Excellency for your cordial 
telegram on the Seventy-fifth Anniversary of the in- 
auguration of a postal service between France and 
the United States by the French steamer Washington. 
The phenomenal expansion in transportation facilities 
between the United States and Europe since the 
maiden voyage of the French steamer Washington 



has had a profound influence on cultural and com- 
mercial relations between our two countries. 

CoEDELL Hull 



Legislation 



Communication from the President of the United 
States transmitting supplemental estimate of appro- 
priation for the War Department, for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1939, to remain available until ex- 
pended, amounting to $200,000, for investigation and 
survey of a canal and highway across the Republic 
of Nicaragua. (H. Doc. 351, 76th Cong., 1st sess.) 
2 pp. 50. 

Hearings before the Committee on Foreign Affairs 
of the House of Representatives on present neutrality 
law (Public Res. 27, 75th Cong.), proposed amend- 
ments thereto, and related legislation aflrecting the 
foreign policy of the United States, April 11, 12, 13, 
17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, and May 2, 1939. 
(76th Cong., 1st sess.) 639 pp. 600. 

An Act Making appropriations for the Departments of 
State and Justice and for the Judiciary, and for the 
Department of Commerce, for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1940, and for other purposes. (Public, No. 
156, 76th Cong., 1st sess.) 39 pp. 100. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Treaty Information, Bulletin No. 116, May 31, 1939. 
Publication 1342. iv, 20 pp. Subscription, $1 a year ; 
single copy, 100. 

Other Government Agencies 

Foreign Commerce Yearbook, 1938. (Department of 
Commerce : Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Com- 
merce.) 1939. 435 pp. $1 (cloth). 



U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE; 1939 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PCBLISHED WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DlttBCTOtt OP THE BHEEAD OF TUB BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 





j^ 



JULY 8, 1939 
Vol. I: No. 2 — Publication IJ^I 




Qontents 

Page 

The Role of Education in International Cultural 

Relations : Address by Ben M. Cherrington ... 19 
Visit to the United States of the Crown Prince and 

Crown Princess of Norway 24 

Death of the Secretary of the Navy : 

Statement by the President 25 

Statement by the Secretary of State 25 

Proclamation by the Secretary of State 25 

The Profits of Cultural Interchange: Address by 

Charles A. Thomson 26 

Commercial policy : 

iVmerican Commercial Policy and the Trade- 
Agreements Progi'am : Radio Address by Assist- 
ant Secretary Sayre 32 

Committee for Reciprocity Information 34 

Treaty information: 
Mediation : 

Inter- American Treaty on Good Offices and Media- 
tion (Treaty Series No. 925) 35 

Treaty on the Prevention of Controversies 

(Treaty Series No. 924) 35 

Commerce : 
Reciprocal trade agreements 35 

(Over) 



«. S. SUPERINTENDENT OF nnCllMfNT^ 

JUL 25 1939 



Treaty information — Continued. 

Fisheries : Page 

Protocol Amending the Agi-eement for the Regu- 
lation of Whaling of June 8, 1937 (Treaty 

Series No. 944) 35 

Postal : 

Universal Postal Convention of 1934 35 

Publications : 

Convention on Interchange of Publications ... 36 
Transit : 

Convention on the Pan American Highway 

(Treaty Series No. 927) 3G 

Telecommunications : 
International Telecommunication Convention 

(Treaty Series No. 867) 36 

Exhibitions : 

Convention Concerning Artistic Exhibitions 

(Treaty Series No. 929) 36 

Education : 

Convention for the Promotion of Inter- American 

Cultural Relations (Treaty Series No. 928) . . 36 
Convention Concerning Peaceful Orientation of 

Public Instruction 37 

Convention Concerning Facilities for Educa- 
tional and Publicity Films 37 

International conferences, commissions, etc. : 

International Conference for the Regulation of 

Whaling 37 

Second International Salon of Aeronautics 37 

Foreign Service of the United States : 

Administration of the Foreign Service under Reor- 
ganization Plan No. II 38 

Transfer of officers from the Foreign Commerce 

and Foreign Agricultui-al Services 39 

Changes in assignments 40 

Foreign Service Regulations 40 

Legislation 40 



THE ROLE OF EDUCATION IN INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL 

RELATIONS 

Address by Ben M. Cherrington ^ 



[Released for afternoon newspapers of July 6] 

The people of the Western Hemisphere al- 
ways have had an intuitive sense of their com- 
munity of interests, but only recently have they 
become acutely conscious of, the relation of 
those common interests to their future well- 
being and independence. Disturbed and 
threatening international developments have 
brought tq each of the American republics an 
awareness that the Panama Canal is not to be 
regarded as a symbol of the separateness of the 
peoples inhabiting the two continents but rather 
as a bond uniting them for the preservation of 
their liberties and the achievement of a com- 
mon destiny. Throughout the Americas we 
observe an increasing appreciation of our in- 
terdependence and the mutual advantages to be 
derived from closer cooperation. That effective 
cooperation has been so long delayed is in no 
small degree the fault of the United States. 
For several decades following the proclamation 
of the Monroe Doctrine in 1823 we were pre- 
occupied with the development of our internal 
life. We remained for the most part aloof 
from the countries to the south of us ; neverthe- 
less the era was characterized by attitudes of 
good will and friendship. Then came a period 
in our history of which we are not in the least 
proud. Other expanding powers were aggi-es- 
sively reaching out for territory. It was the 
mood of the hour which perhaps excuses us in 
part for succumbing to it. For a time we too 
became expansionist. While vigorously push- 
ing the exports of our goods to the other Ameri- 
can countries we curtailed the export of their 
goods to us by an ever-rising tariff wall. We 



' Delivered before tlie national convention of tlie 
National Education Association. San Francisco, Calif., 
July 6, 1939. Dr. Cherrington is Chief of the Division 
of Cultural Relations, Department of State. 
163027 — 39 1 



fought Spain and secured the Philippines and 
possessions in the Caribbean. "Dollar diplo- 
macy" led inevitably to outright physical inter- 
vention in several countries of the Caribbean 
area. We regarded what we were doing as 
a "big brother'' policy, but to Latin Ameri- 
cans it resembled a "big bully" policy. The 
friendly feeling toward the United States char- 
acteristic of the earlier decades of the nine- 
teenth century changed throughout the other 
Americas to distrust and antagonism. Speak- 
ing of that period, the present Under Secretary 
of State, the Honorable Sumner Welles, in an 
address before the American Academy of Po- 
litical Science in 1937 saidf 

"I know of no act of intervention undertaken by 
the United States which has accrued to the 
benefit of the American people. We reaped' 
only hostility, suspicion, and ill will; and, in 
similar degree, I am unable to find that the 
people of those countries where such interven- 
tion took jjlace gained any benefit other than 
the temporary advantage which the road con- 
struction or the sanitation imposed upon them 
brought them ; for it has been demonstrated by 
this experience — if such experience were nec- 
essary — that domestic peace and the utilization 
of the orderly processes of democratic self- 
government cannot be imposed from without 
by an alien people; they can only arise from 
the individual genius, the needs and the will of 
peoples themselves." 

Fortunately, that is a closed chapter in our 
history — closed, I believe, forever and with the 
unanimous approval of the people of the 
United States. In that same speech Mr. 
Welles gave lucid expression to the present pol- 
icy of our Government in the following state- 
ment : 

19 



20 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtTLLETIN 



"If there is one thing above all others that the 
Government of the United States today stands 
for in its relationship with the other republics 
of this hemisphere, it is its utter unwillingness 
to interfere, directly or indirectly, in the do- 
mestic concerns of those nations." 

By deeds as well as words we have sought to 
rectify the mistakes of previous years; the 
Piatt Amendment that gave the United States 
the right of intervention in Cuba has been 
abrogated; our marines have long since been 
withdrawn from occupied territory; treaties 
have been signed pledging this country not to 
interfere in the internal or external affairs of 
the other American republics; and reciprocal 
trade agreements are releasing the flow of 
commerce between many American states and 
ourselves. A new era of confidence and cooper- 
ation is supplanting the suspicions and hostili- 
ties of the past. What President Koosevelt 
happily designated as the good-neighbor policy 
in principle is becoming the established policy 
of all the Americas. Each of us in the Western 
Hemisphere is learning the lesson of self-re- 
straint in our relations to others. Out of this 
respect and consideration for the rights and 
needs of our neighbors is gi'owing the sense of 
community to which we alluded earlier — a 
feeling of common destiny, which lends added 
dignity and significance to each of us as inde- 
pendent states. The reality of the new era was 
clearly manifest at the recent Eighth Inter- 
American Conference held at Lima, Peru, 
which is accurately characterized in the follow- 
ing statement by the distinguished Peruvian, 
Fernando Carbajal: 

"The Lima Conference was a gathering of 
good friends. The suspicions and misgivings 
of earlier times were forced into the back- 
ground, thus leaving the field free for a frank, 
constructive effort to raise a firm structure of 
cooperation on the solid foundation of sincerity 
and confidence." 

From the free and frank discussion of the 
Conference emerged the Declaration of Con- 
tinental Solidarity, or the "Declaration of 



Lima" as it is called, denoting the unity of 
the jjeoples of the Western Hemisj)here. Its 
far-reaching significance justifies us in re- 
freshing our memory on its essential points. 
In part it reads : 

"Considering : 

"That the peoples of America have achieved 
spiritual unity through the similarity of their 
republican institutions, their unshakable will 
for peace, their profound sentiment of hu- 
manity and tolerance, and tlirough their ab- 
solute adherence to the principles of interna- 
tional law, of the equal sovereignty of states 
and of individual liberty without religious or 
racial prejudices; 

". . . the Governments of the American 
States 

"Declare : 

"First. That they reaffirm their continental 
solidarity and their purpose to collaborate in 
the maintenance of the principles upon which 
the said solidarity is based ; 

"Second. That faithful to the above-men- 
tioned principles and to their absolute sov- 
ereignty, they reaffirm their decision to main- 
tain them and to defend them against all 
foreign intervention or activity that may 
threaten them;" 

It was acknowledged by all at Lima that it 
is not enough for governments in their official 
relations to follow the good-neighbor policy, 
indispensable as that is ; it is necessary that the 
people themselves shall become good neighbors. 
The people of the Americas must know and 
understand each other ; their history, their out- 
look on life, their ideals and aspirations, their 
finest creations of mind and spirit — these must 
be shared in common. On every hand in the 
United States is unmistakable evidence of the 
eager desire of our people for better knowledge 
and understanding of our neighbors to the south 
and in turn to be known and understood by 
them. Anyone who recently has visited the 
other American countries will testify as to their 
readiness to share their cultural and intellectual 



JULY 8, 1939 



21 



attainments with us. In the United States ac- 
tive and effective societies, clubs, and organiza- 
tions of every kind exist to promote cultural 
interchange and sympathetic understanding of 
the culture, history, and social institutions of 
other peoples. Colleges and universities have 
taken an active part in the movement. The 
■work of many of these institutions has been 
worthy of the highest praise. Nevertheless, 
these institutions have been handicapped by the 
lack of an agency in our government to stimu- 
late, coordinate, and facilitate their endeavors. 
To meet this need the Division of Cultural Ke- 
lations has been created in the Department of 
State. In the words of the departmental order 
of July 28, 1938, the Division of Cultural Re- 
lations was established to have "general charge 
of official international activities of this De- 
partment with respect to cultural relations, 
embracing the exchange of professors, teachers, 
and students; cooperation in the field of music, 
art, literature, and other intellectual and cul- 
tural attainments; the formulation and distri- 
bution of libraries of representative works of 
the United States and suitable translations 
thereof; the preparations for and management 
of the participation by this Government in in- 
ternational expositions in this field ; supervision 
of participation by this Government in inter- 
national radio broadcasts; encouragement of a 
closer relationship between unofficial organiza- 
tions of this and of foreign governments en- 
gaged in cultural and intellectual activities; 
and, generally, the dissemination abroad of the 
representative intellectual and cultural works of 
the United States and the improvement and 
broadening of the scope of our cultural relations 
with other countries." 

The field of activities thus laid out for the 
Division is that of genuine cultural relations. 
It is not a "propaganda" agency, in the popu- 
lar sense of the term which carries with it 
implications of penetration, imposition, and 
unilateralism. If its endeavors are to be di- 
rected toward the development of a truer and 
more realistic understanding between the peo- 



ples of the United States and those of other 
nations, it is believed that such a goal can 
most surely be attained by a program which 
is definitely educational in character and which 
emphasizes the essential reciprocity in cul- 
tural relations. A primary function of the 
Division will be to serve as a clearinghouse 
and coordinating agency for the activities of 
private agencies in the field of cultural rela- 
tions. The efforts of the Division will have 
relation to nations in all parts of the world, 
but during the initial phase of its program 
particular attention will be given to the other 
American republics. 

Among the projects to which the Division is 
giving immediate attention is the Convention 
for the Promotion of Inter-American Cul- 
tural Eelations, signed in Buenos Aires in 
1936, which calls for the annual exchange of 
two gi'aduate students or teachers and one 
professor among the signatories. In addition 
to the United States, nine countries have rati- 
fied the instrument: Brazil, Chile, the Domini- 
can Eepublic, Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua, 
Panama, Peru, and Venezuela. It is hoped 
that the establishment of these government ex- 
changes may serve to stimulate the offering of 
additional scholarships and fellowships by 
universities and colleges in all sections of the 
United States. 

The Di^^sion is serving as a clearing center 
for activities of various departments and 
agencies of the Federal Govenunent of an in- 
ternational cultural or intellectual character. 
It will also offer every possible aid in behalf 
of the United States in the very important 
work of the Division of Intellectual Coopera- 
tion of the Pan American Union. 

In a democracy such as ours the initiative 
for cultural exchange quite properly resides 
with private agencies and institutions and, as 
already indicated, the major function of the 
Division of Cultural Eelations will be to make 
the good offices of government available to 
private enterprise. In other words, interna- 
tional cultural relations with us is essentially 
a people's movement. 



22 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



In this movement education inevitably will 
play a leading role. It is in order to suggest 
specific projects which educators will be 
especially interested in undertaking. The 
teaching of languages, quite logically, should 
be the first subject for consideration. Our 
schools can well give Spanish an important 
place in the program of studies, for we must 
remember that Spanish is one of the most vigor- 
ous of living tongues, world-wide in its diffu- 
sion, tremendously vital in its capacity to ex- 
pand, and the instrument of expression of more 
than 20 growing nations. Spanish and S^ian- 
ish- American thought, literature, and produc- 
tion contain a wealth of spiritual values which 
need to be tapped by the citizens of the United 
States. It may be emphasized at tlie same time 
that the teaching of the Portuguese language 
is a matter of the greatest importance and 
urgency. For reasons which are difficult to dis- 
cover, the Portuguese language has never re- 
ceived adequate attention in this country. 
Brazil constitutes geographically half of South 
America and with its 40 million people is one 
of the most vital nations of the New World. 
Its language, Portuguese, is part and parcel of 
its cultural heritage. It is high time that in 
the United States due recognition is given to 
the importance of the Portuguese language — 
rich in literature, energetic, expressive, and re- 
sourceful in mechanism — the instrument of 
thought of a remarkable people. It is hoped 
that more colleges and high schools will find it 
appropriate to establish courses in the Portu- 
guese language. 

We in the United States are unacquainted 
with the literature of our southern neighbors; 
their history, biography, fiction, and poetry re- 
main to be opened to us. As an immediately 
practical method of correcting the situation, 
their literature might be utilized to a gi-eater 
extent in the Spanish-language courses of our 
high schools and colleges. It is equally true 
that our literatui'e is little known in the other 
American republics and that the widespread 
distribution of our better works would meet 
with a ready welcome in those countries. If 



books in English on the United States are 
scarce in their libraries, those which have been 
translated into Spanish or Portuguese are even 
more rare. There is in fact no good one-vol- 
ume history of the United States available in 
either language. The Director of the National 
Library at Bogota, Colombia, when notified of 
his assignment to the Embassy at Washington, 
sought to discover in his library a history of 
the United States in Spanish which would pro- 
vide his wife with some information on this 
country. The only book available dealt with 
the seventeenth century. It is encouraging to 
note that the American Library Association re- 
cently has received a grant from the Rocke- 
feller Foundation for the promotion of library 
relations with the other American republics. 
Through an office to be established in Wash- 
ington, studies of books and library conditions 
will be directed, which will serve as a basis for 
increasing the exchange of publications and 
develoi^ing a larger degree of library coopera- 
tion. Investigation most assuredly will dis- 
close ways in which educators may participate 
effectively in this important matter of the 
exchange of literature. 

Another project in which many of our com- 
munities might participate would be to ex- 
change their teachers of Spanish with teachers 
of English in some of the Spanish-speaking 
countries. Each teacher while abroad would 
instruct in his own language and lecture on the 
cultural life of his homeland. 

Educational and informative films, minimiz- 
ing as they do the barrier of language differ- 
ences, can be utilized as an agency for conveying 
understanding and appreciation of the repre- 
sentative cultures of the American peoples. 
Well-established national organizations de- 
voted to the production and distribution of 
educational and informative films are now ex- 
ploring the possibilities of exchange relation- 
ships with a view to making available to local 
schools throughout our counti-y moving pic- 
tures expressive of the thought and life of our 
neighbors, while equivalent routing of our films 
is offered to them. 



JULY 8, 1939 

Educators certainly will find effective instru- 
ments for promoting understanding in the 
fields of art and music. The art of the United 
States is known only too little outside this coun- 
try, while the artistic productions of other 
American nations reach the people of the United 
States to a very limited degree. It should be 
possible to route exhibits of significant art 
achievements of our neighboring countries 
through our schools, colleges, and communities. 
Neither are we familiar with the music of the 
other Americas nor they with ours apart from 
modern dance music. Concerts by visiting mu- 
sicians, the use of records of native folk music, 
visits by individual artists — such activities as 
these would contribute notably to international 
cultural understanding. 

Perhaps the most effective way to develop 
understanding and appreciation of other peo- 
ples is to travel among them, and the excellent 
steamship and air services now available, com- 
bined with good hotel facilities and the warm 
hospitality that is assured in the other Ameri- 
cas, make a southern trip worthy of serious 
consideration for all citizens of good will. It 
is hoped that large numbers of educators in our 
country will find an early opportunity to visit 
their neighbors and conversely that an increas- 
ing flow of educators and cultural leaders from 
those countries may come to the United States. 

It is anticipated that summer schools will be 
established at convenient points in the Carib- 
bean and South American areas to which teach- 
ers and students from the United States may 
go for short courses. 

The radio undoubtedly will become increas- 
ingly important as an instrument for conveying 
understanding. 

The year 1940 will present a number of op- 
portunities to focus the attention of the entire 
American people upon inter-American rela- 
tionships. It will mark the fiftieth anniversary 
of the Pan American Union; also the fourth 
centennial of the explorations of Francisco Vas- 
quez de Coronado in the area which now con- 
stitutes the southwestern portions of the United 
States. These events can be utilized in every 
American community as the occasion for a 



23 



program designed to better acquaint our citi- 
zens with the culture of the other American 
countries. Educators may take the initiative 
in arranging for their communities traveling 
art exhibits, musical concerts, visiting lecturers, 
pageants, exchange/ of educational films, radio 
programs — to mention only a few practical pos- 
sibilities. Ill 1940 the Eighth Pan American 
Scientific Congress will convene in Washington, 
an event which should bring to our country 
distinguished scholars and students from the 
other American countries representing all fields 
of knowledge. It is hoped that following the 
Congress many of these visitors will travel in 
the United States and be available for lectures 
and conferences. 

It is unnecessary to give further examples of 
the part educators may have in the broad pro- 
gram of cultural relations. Your interest and 
desire to participate will lead you to the dis- 
covery of many other valuable forms of co- 
operation. You may find it in order to suggest 
that appropriate committees in each of the sec- 
tions of this association be requested to study 
the possibilities of cooperation in inter-Ameri- 
can cultural relations. 

What we seek is to establish the conditions 
of a friendly cooperation and peaceful exist- 
ence in the Western Hemisphere. But we do 
not seek this for the Americas alone ; to do so 
would be to mistake the nature of culture and 
destroy the thing we would create. For cul- 
ture in its essence is cosmic; any attempt to 
confine it exclusively within national bounda- 
ries is to cut it off from the sustenance by which 
it lives. No more is it possible to continental- 
ize culture without stultifying it. None of us 
who was in Lima will forget the address of the 
Secretary of State of the United States, Mr. 
Cordell Hull, delivered on Christmas Eve be- 
fore the Conference, in which he stressed the 
universal character of our common objectives. 
On that night before Christmas, Mr. Hull said : 

"All of us reach out, I know, toward peace- 
ful and fruitful relations with all the rest of 
the world. Each of us has lines of sympathy 
and interest that traverse the globe more finely 
than the lines of latitude and longitude, Our 



24 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtJIiLETIN 



bonds are strong with all who seek peaceful 
friendship and respect those principles of de- 
mocracy, tolerance, and equality by which we 
live. The principles of conduct which we have 
adopted and are carrying out in our relation- 
ships with each other are equally open as a 
basis of relationship with all other countries. 
It cannot be fairly said that we are trying to 
shut ourselves off in a hemisphere of our own ; 
any such effort would be futile. But it can be 
fairly said that the principles of conduct upon 
which the countries of this hemisphere have 
chosen to stand firm are so broad and essen- 
tial that all the world may also stand upon 
them. Speaking for my country, we seek uni- 
versal recognition and support for them. 
Were they adopted over all the world, a great 
fear would end. The young would see their 
future with more certainty and significance. 
The old would see their lives with more peace- 
ful satisfaction. 



"There are those who think the world is 
based on force. Here, within this continent, 
we can confidently deny this. And the course 
of history shows that noble ideas and spir- 
itual forces in the end have a greater triumph. 
Tonight especially we can say this, for on this 
night nearly two thousand years ago there was 
born a Son of God who declined force and 
kingdoms and proclaimed the great lesson of 
universal love. Without force His Kingdom 
lives today after a lapse of 19 centuries. It is 
the principality of peace; the peace which we 
here hope in a humble measure to help to give 
by His grace to the continent of the Amei'icas." 

These words of Mr. Hull reveal the urgency 
and the immeasurable importance of the role 
of education in international cultural relations. 
For we are striving to keep alive in the world 
the spirit of tolerance, self-restraint, and jus- 
tice, which alone can insure the freedom of 
men's minds and souls; it is a goal to whose 
attainment each of us will unreservedly dedi- 
cate himself, for the highest and best we know 
in civilization is at stake. 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF 
THE CROWN PRINCE AND CROWN 
PRINCESS OF NORWAY 

[ReleasedJuIy 6] 

Text of a telegram from the King of Norway 
to the President of the United States: 

Oslo, July 6, 1939. 
As my son and daughter-in-law are leaving 
today after their visit to the United States of 
America, I not only thank you and Mrs. 
Roosevelt for your hospitality to them but also 
all the American people of Norwegian origin 
as well as the American people at the different 
places where they have been, for their kind- 
ness and goodwill shown them wherever they 
have been. 

Haakon R. 

[Released July 8] 

Text of a telegram from, the Crown Prince 
and Croicn Princess of Norway to the Secretary 
of State and Mrs. Hidl: 

New York, N. Y., July 6, 1939. 
On leaving today for Norway, we want to ex- 
press to you both our warm thanks and appre- 
ciation. We shall always cherish the memory 
of your kindness and hospitality as well as the 
way in which you, Mr. Secretary, and your 
Department, have contributed to making our 
ten weeks in America such an unforgettable 
experience. 

Olav and Maertha 



Text of the reply of the Secretary of State: 

Washington, Jidy 7, 1939. 
I greatly appreciate your telegram and the 
gracious sentiments you express on your de- 
parture from the United States. Mrs. Hull and 
I were delighted to have you with us in Wash- 
ington, and we feel sure that you made many 
true friends in the course of your travels across 
the continent. With cordial best wishes for a 
safe and pleasant voyage to your homeland. 

CoRDELL Hull 



DEATH OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY 



Statement by the President 

It is with profound sorrow that I have 
learned of the death today at the Rapidan 
Camp, Va., of the greatly loved Claude A. 
Swanson. I join with the entire country in 
mourning him as one whose many years of 
faithful service to the Nation have endeared 
him to all. His wise counsel and his philo- 
sophic understanding of human problems will 
live after him in the hearts and minds of those 
of us who have had the privilege of being his 
associates. He brought to the public service not 
only ability and integrity but a loyalty to prin- 
ciple and to duty from which no consideration 
could move him. By his example he has pro- 
vided an inspiration for all public servants. 
I personally mourn the passing of a steadfast 
and intimate friend. 



Statement by the Secretary of State 

[Released July 7] 

I was distressed and grieved beyond meas- 
ure to learn of the passing this morning of 
Secretary Swanson. Throughout his career of 
almost a generation, he has rendered the Amer- 
ican people services of inestimable value. His 
high ideals, unselfishness, and steadfastness of 
purpose have always been a source of inspira- 
tion not only to those who were closely associ- 
ated with him but to the entire country. 

It was my great privilege to have been his 
close friend and colleague for many years, and 



his passing leaves me with a sense of irrepa- 
rable personal loss, which will be shared and 
mourned by the whole American Nation. 



Proclamation by the Secretary of State 

[Released July 7] 

To THE People or the United States : 

Claude Augustus Swanson, Secretary of the 
Navy, died at his camp on the Rapidan River in 
the Shenandoah National Forest on the morn- 
ing of Friday, July 7, 1939, at six minutes after 
eight o'clock. 

Greatly loved by those who were privileged 
to know him and widely honored for his many 
years of faithful public service, this distin- 
guished member of the President's Cabinet will 
be mourned throughout the nation. 

Born and educated in the Old Dominion, he 
represented Virginia in Congress from 1893 
until he resigned to become governor in 1906. 
Four years later he became a member of the 
United States Senate where he continued to 
serve until he was appointed Secretary of the 
Navy by President Roosevelt in 1933. It was 
a career which exemplifies the finest traditions 
of American public life. 

As an expression of national mourning, the 
President directs that the flag of the United 
States be displayed at half-mast until sunset of 
the day of interment on all public buildings 
and at all military posts and naval stations and 
on all vessels of the United States. 

By direction of the President, 

Cordell HuUi 
Secretary of State 

Department of State, 

Washington, July 7, 1939. 



183027—39- 



25 



THE PROFITS OF CULTURAL INTERCHANGE 
Address by Charles A. Thomson ^ 



[Released for publication July 8, 10 a. m.] 

It is a welcome privilege for me to partici- 
pate once more in the Institute of Public Af- 
fairs of the Univei-sity of Virginia. Six years 
ago I came to Charlottesville to speak before 
the Institute's round table on inter-American 
affairs. But even prior to that visit I had 
formed the habit of following with close atten- 
tion the yearly discussions here. Under the 
supervision of President John Lloyd New- 
comb and the direction, first, of Dr. Charles 
G. Maphis, and now, of Prof. Hardy Cross 
Dillard, the Institute of Public Affairs has be- 
come one of the most prominent focal points 
within the United States for enlightenment of 
public opinion. 

Among the "New Problems of Government" 
which clainii our attention at this year's session 
may well be included the question of our cultu- 
ral and intellectual relations with other na- 
tions, particularly those with our fellow 
republics of this hemisphere. That such re- 
lations are of importance to our Government 
was evidenced by the establishment a little less 
than a year ago of the Division of Cultural 
Kelations in the Department of State. While 
creation of the Division indicates recognition 
by government that it has a contribution to 
make in this field, the function of the new Divi- 
sion will not be to supplant in any degree the 
significant activities toward international un- 
derstanding now carried on by colleges, uni- 
versities, foundations, institutes, and other 
private agencies, but rather to render those 
activities more effective by the provision of an 
official agency serving as a clearinghouse for 
exchange of information and a center of coordi- 
nation and cooperation. 



' Delivered before the Institute of Public Affairs of 
the University of Virginia July 8, 1939. Mr. Thomson 
is Assistant Chief of the Division of Cultural Rela- 
tions, Department of State. 

26 



In much of our thinking within this country 
concerning cultural exchange, emphasis is 
placed on what we can contribute to the other 
American republics. Generosity seemingly pre- 
vails over self-interest. It is complacently and 
perhaps all too easily assumed that the United 
States is equipped to pour out knowledge and 
enlighteimient on the peoples of the south. 
There is much talk of the contributions which 
may be made to the other American republics 
by our teachers, writers, and technical experts, 
but little consideration of what gifts of value 
M-e may receive from their creative thinkers 
and artists. 

Yet cultural interchange in its nature is fun- 
damentally reciprocal. It is necessarily a mat- 
ter of give and take. It means influencing and 
being influenced. If we have much of value 
to contribute to the other American republics, 
we also have much to receive. It may be salu- 
tary to remember that during the colonial 
period what we commonly call Latin America 
far outweighed in importance Anglo-Saxon 
America. During the nineteenth century the 
balance swung in the other direction. But now 
the pointer has begun to swing back. The 
other American republics are growing in eco- 
nomic power and political significance. We 
may look forward to a day when their popula- 
tion will outstrip our own. It is worth-while 
then to turn our thoughts toward the profits 
M'hich may come to the United States and its 
people from inter-American exchange in the 
cultural and intellectual field. 

At the start we should do well to recall that 
a great expanse of our country — running west- 
ward from Louisiana and Texas across New 
Mexico and Arizona to California — has a cul- 
tural background on which has been indelibly 
fixed the Hispanic impress. Language, social 
institutions and customs, architecture, and 
many other phases of life bear witness to the 



JULY 8, 1939 



27 



strength of the contribution which Spain and 
Mexico have made to the development of this 
vast region. 

Yet another region of the United States has 
profited perhaps even more strikingly than the 
Southwest from Hispanic-American influence. 

1 refer to a contribution all too generally over- 
looked. Walter Prescott Webb, in his notable 
book The Great Pl-ains, has pointed out that 
the advancing movement of American pioneers 
successfully pushed westward during more than 

2 centuries through the forests, first of the 
eastern seaboard, then beyond the Appalach- 
ians, and then across the Mississippi Valley. 
But the frontiersmen came to a halt when they 
reached the Plains country in the neighborhood 
of the ninety-eighth meridian. The methods 
and ways of life — means of travel, weapons, 
tools, systems of agriculture — which had 
worked in the woods broke down when tried on 
this vast, level, treeless, and semiarid area. 
For the greater part of half a century, from 
1840 to 1885, the frontier stood still; or rather 
it leaped the Plains to the Pacific coast. 

In this interim the Plams, a broad belt 
stretching northward from Texas to Montana 
and the Dakotas, were won for American life 
by tecliniques and instruments that had been 
borrowed originally from Mexico. The horse, 
which entered Texas across the Rio Grande, 
first enabled man to dominate the Plains' im- 
mense seas of grass. It was the use of the horse 
in the management of cattle that created the 
ranch of the west as distinguished from the 
stock farm of the east. The cattle ranch, the 
range-cattle industry, were a contribution to the 
United States from Mexico. It was this con- 
tribution which created the Cattle Kingdom in 
the latter half of the nineteenth century, and 
gave to our history and tradition, to our pres- 
ent-day motion pictures and "pulp" magazines, 
that most dramatic and dynamic figure of 
American life — the cowboy. 

Mexico is continuing her gifts to us. The ar- 
tistic renaissance whicli has accompanied that 
nation's recent social and economic revolution 
has been a force markedly influencing art cur- 
rents in the United States. The Mexican paint- 



ers evolved in the mural a new technique for 
the modern world, and in their emphasis on the 
contemporary social struggle of their native 
land a new attitude toward the content of 
painting. For almost 20 years our painters and 
art students have been drawn southward to view 
the works of Jose Clemente Orozco, Diego 
Rivera, David Alfaro Siqueiros, and other 
leaders of the Mexican school. The murals by 
these painters which adorn the walls of the 
patio of the Ministry of Public Education, the 
Preparatory School, the National Palace, the 
Agricultural School at Chapingo, and the Pal- 
ace of Fine Arts have made of Mexico City a 
mecca for art lovers. These pictures reveal a 
movement which is living and vital as a result 
of its i-evolutionary strength, its impetuous 
force, its biting irony. 

We have not only gone to Mexico ; we have in- 
vited Mexican art to come to us. Pictures by 
Diego Rivera decorate the walls of the Stock 
Exchange Club of San Francisco, of the De- 
troit Institute, and of the Workers School in 
New York City. Murals by Orozco are to be 
found at Pomona College in California, at 
Dartmouth College in New England, and at the 
New School for Social Research in New York 
City. In addition, numerous pictures by these 
and other Mexican painters have been acquired 
by public and private galleries. 

One critic has remarked that the Mexicans 
are "a more creative influence in American 
painting than the modernist French masters. 
It is even possible that they will give us a tra- 
dition from which the American painters will 
draw. For, as their country like ours belongs 
to the New World, their work seems to be a part 
of our actual native expression. Mexico re- 
mains the one country which has produced a 
contemporary plastic art of national dimen- 
sions." ^ 

The influence of the Mexican school has been 
an important factor in the recent encourage- 
ment of mural painting for public buildings 
in the United States, which has been such a 
significant development within the past few 



' Charmion vou Wiegand, "Mural Painting in Amer- 
ica," Yale Review, June 1934. 



A 



28 

years. It is worthy of note that the mural, 
which in production is often a group creation 
and which exists not for the enjoyment of a 
privileged few but for all, is essentially a dem- 
ocratic art form. 

In music the influence of the "other Ameri- 
cans" has as yet been less significant than in 
painting. It is only within recent years that 
composers in the other American republics 
have sought to make of music a medium for 
expression of the distinctive quality of their 
national life, or, as one Mexican composer puts 
it, "to create a vigorous art that would stem 
from the people and would reach out to the 
people." These musicians have rich resources 
on which to call for development of an inde- 
pendent musical culture. Among North Amer- 
ican critics, Aaron Copeland and Paul Rosen- 
feld have pointed out the advantages over 
composers in the United States possessed, say, 
by Carlos Chavez, who may draw inspiration 
from the deep wells of an ancient civilization. 
Many of Chavez' own compositions are already 
well known: "The Four Suns," an Aztec bal- 
let; "H. P." (Horse Power: Dance of Men 
and Machines) , and "Indian Symphony." His 
"Piramide" was given its world premiere by 
the New York Philharmonic Symphony 
Orchestra. 

In Mexico as director of the Orquesta Sin- 
fonica, Chavez has been giving concerts for 10 
years to workers and peasants, in addition to 
his regular subscription audiences at the Pal- 
ace of Fine Arts. To link the musical tradi- 
tion of the early Indians to the present day, 
Chavez developed a special Mexican orchestra 
to play this characteristic music, in which con- 
ventional instruments were complemented by 
Indian huehueils, teponaxtles, chirirmas, water 
drums, and rasps. Chavez has himself directed 
some of our most famous orchestras — the New 
York Philharmonic, the Boston Symphony, the 
Philadelphia Symphony. 

In the person of Heitor Villa-Lobos, Brazil 
has given to South America, according to one 
critic, "its one great genius" among living 
musicians and "the most significant American 
composer of the twentieth century."* Villa- 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

Lobos' music has been presented in the United 
States by our leading orchestras and by the 
Schola Cantorum of New York; it has been 
employed by Martha Graham in her dances; 
it has appeared frequently on the programs 
of concert soloists. 

Villa-Lobos devoted years of study to his 
people's folklore, traveling through the most 
remote and isolated sections of the country. He 
so steeped himself in the cultural traditions 
of his nation that his music provides a com- 
prehensive and varied picture of the land of 
his birth. After a stay in Europe, where he 
had been widely applauded, he returned to 
Brazil in 1932. He abandoned composing and 
has since devoted his major efforts to the 
musical education of his countrymen, particu- 
larly of the school children. It is his theory 
that the child can best learn to love great music 
by singing it, and he has arranged for choral 
rendition the master works of musical history, 
which are now performed in Brazil by groups 
of thousands of school children. 

Time is not available to speak of other sig- 
nificant composers : of Eduardo Fabini of Uru- 
guay or of Amadeo Eoldan, whose music with 
its Afro-Cuban themes has been performed in 
New York and at the Hollywood Bowl. The 
new and dynamic composers of the other Amer- 
ican republics are better known to each other, 
and their music is better known to the outside 
world, in large part due to the efforts of Curt 
Lange, the German-Uruguayan, who founded 
and has maintained with sacrificial enthusi- 
asm the Latin-Amencan Bulletin, of Music. A 
distinctive contribution to the wider knowl- 
edge of Latin- American music in the United 
States has come from the Pan American Union, 
through the four concerts given each year in 
Washington, which often have been broadcast 
over national hookups. 

The best friends of the Latin-American com- 
posers would not have us overrate their ac- 
complishments. They are only at the begin- 



* William Berrien, "Latin American Composers and 
Tiieir Prolilems," Bulletin of the Pan American Union 
(Washington), October and November 1937. Citation 
from the November issue, p. 838. 



JtTLY 8, 1939 



29 



ning of the development of an authentic inde- 
pendent movement. To date, the serious mu- 
sic of the other American republics has had less 
extended influence probably than their popu- 
lar and folk music. In Mexico, Manuel Ponce, 
whose "Estrellita" and "A la orilla de un pal- 
mar" are so well loved, initiated as early as 
1921 a naovement to ^jopularize the ecnicion 
viexicana. "Estrellita" has been the ancestor 
of numerous Broadway "hits." Today this 
composition and many others of Mexico's me- 
lodious popular songs are known far beyond 
her borders, botli in the United States to the 
north and in the countries to the south. In 
this country Aaron Copeland has based his 
"Salon Mexico" on i^opular tunes. At Sao 
Paulo, Brazil, last September I attended ■ a 
concert in one of the largest theaters given by 
Pedro Vargas, the Mexican radio tenor. The 
building w^as packed by a polyglot audience — 
Italians, Spanish, Portuguese, Brazilians, Ger- 
mans, Syrians, Hungarians, and Japanese. 
The program was made up entirely of Mexican 
popular songs. Paulista audiences have a rep- 
utation for coohiess, but Vargas' singing 
brought forth warm applause and insistent de- 
mands for encores. 

According to some prophets, the popular 
music of Brazil itself may in the future prove 
as successful in winning foreign audiences as 
has that of Mexico. It may be welcomed in 
the United States, for this music is marked as 
is our own popular music by a distinctive ne- 
groid element. Already well established here 
are the Argentine tango, the Cuban son and 
rumba. Our daily radio programs include 
Mexican, Argentine, Cuban, and other Latin- 
American music, and the more serious produc- 
tions of the composers to the south are finding 
an increasing place in symphony and concert 
programs. 

Spanish architecture, it is well to recall, came 
to us through Latin America; and to men- 
tion it, particularly that of the "mission" type, 
is enough to suggest the large influence it has 
had in the United States. In addition the 
pre-Colombian styles of the Indian cultures 
have made their impress, as is exemplified, to 



cite only one example, by the Mayan Theater of 
Los Angeles. If we come to the present day, 
the development of modernist architecture in 
Mexico has been so significant that the Archi- 
tectural Record devoted in 1937 an entire num- 
ber to the subject, declaring that the United 
States cannot boast of a modern architectural 
movement so solidly based as that to be seen 
in Mexico. 

During recent years we have profited in- 
creasingly from the popular arts of the coun- 
tries to the south. Textiles, rugs, glass, and 
pottery have been employed extensively in 
interior decoration. One large New York 
department store carries goods with motifs 
drawn from the Indian arts of Mexico, Guate- 
mala, and Peru. We are producing footwear 
designed on Ecuadorian models and hats 
which show the influence of the curious in- 
verted-dishpan headgear of the Indian women 
in Cuzco, Peru. 

The above suggestions may suffice to indi- 
cate that the United States already owes much 
to the peoples of the other American republics 
in painting, music, architecture, and various 
popular arts. We may expect that the future 
will see the enhancement of this contribution 
both in the fields already mentioned and in 
many other areas of life. For the influence 
of our neighbors comes to bear upon us, not 
only directly, but also indirectly, through the 
students and investigators who in increasing 
numbers will go out from the United States 
to do research in the other American republics. 

Hispanic America has long attracted our 
workers in archeology and anthropology. The 
sites of the Maya culture in Guatemala, Hon- 
duras, and Yucatan and of the pre-Inca and 
Inca cultures of Peru, Bolivia, and Ecuador — 
to mention only two areas — have been visited, 
excavated, and studied by numerous North 
American scholars. Mexico and Peru now 
possess groups of native workers, headed by 
Alfonso Caso in the first country and by Julio 
Tello in the second, who not only know a great 
deal more about the antiquities of their re- 
spective nations than do North Americans, but 
who have developed field and laboratory 



30 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtJLLETIN 



methods which our archeologists recognize as 
in many ways superior to those in vogue in this 
country. Thus the opportunity to work in the 
otlier American reijublics has benefited the 
science of archeology in the United States, and 
also contributed to a more accurate knowledge 
of the pre-history of this country. Moreover, 
a broader concept of the development of Indian 
cultures in the whole Western Hemisphere has 
brought with it a clearer undei-standing of the 
character and possibilities of our own Indian 
population. The policy of our own Govern- 
ment toward the Indian may well benefit from 
a comparative study of the policies of other 
nati(ms in this hemisphere. In fact, Herbert 
E. Bolton, in his memorable presidential ad- 
dress to the 1932 meeting of the American His- 
torical Association, has pointed out that the 
entire history of our country is only to be 
understood, if it is studied, not as a movement 
to itself, but rather as part of the epic of that 
"greater America" which we share with the 
other nations of this hemisphere. 

ISIexico's educational program has been care- 
fully surveyed by educators in this country in 
the hope that it might be suggestive of funda- 
mental solutions, particularly with regard to 
the needs of different minority groups in con- 
tinental United States and in some of its out- 
lying possessions.'' Within recent years large 
numbers of our teachers and educational au- 
thorities have crossed the Rio Grande to view 
at first hand Mexico's dramatic expansion of 
rural education, whose goal has been to raise 
the economic and social level of native iJeoj^les 
speaking different languages and possessing 
different customs and traditions, and to "incor- 
porate" these peoples into the country's civili- 
zation and culture. Efforts have also been 
directed toward making the school a construc- 
tive community centei', an agency which will 
provide not only instruction but also serve to 
improve agricultural methods, standards of 
health and hygiene, and otherwise contribute 
to social welfare. After a visit to Mexico, Prof. 



'^ Katharine M. Cook, The Bouse of the People 
(Washington, U. S. Government Printing Office, 1932). 



Jolm Dewey declared: "There is no educa- 
tional movement in the world which exhibits 
more of the spirit of intimate union of school 
activities with those of the community than is 
found in this Mexican development." 

The experience of the other American repub- 
lics with regard to another racial groui), the 
Negro, may also prove of value to our students 
of social relations. In this hemisphere Brazil 
is second only to the United States in the num- 
bers of its colored po]3ulation. All phases of 
its economic, social, and political development 
have been profoundly influenced by the pres- 
ence of millions of Negroes and mulattoes. For 
example, the writings of Nina Rodrigues, Gil- 
berto Freyre, and Arthur Ramos have led to a 
revaluation of the African contribution to that 
country's development, somewhat similar in 
character to the reinterpretation of the role of 
the Indian in national culture which has taken 
place in Mexico. The African influence on 
Brazilian language, cooking, architecture, mu- 
sic, painting, and poetry is being studied with 
intense interest and sympathy. 

Thus the 20 other American republics may 
serve observers and students as an immense 
social laboratory, not only in the relationships 
between different racial groups, but also in the 
field of agricultural organization, the applica- 
tion of government control to economic activi- 
ties, and other questions. Interchange in the 
areas of tropical agriculture and tropical medi- 
cine may also bring direct benefits to the 
United States. Time is not available to attempt 
any discussion of these fields, but passing refer- 
ence may be made to the Department of Par- 
asitology in the Medical School of the 
University of Havana, which is ranked by some 
authorities as the best in the world. Very fine 
work has been done in Brazil, nmch of it in the 
Chagas Institute, in the field of South Ameri- 
can dysenteries and other diseases. I need not 
labor the point that this country has a direct 
and vital interest in the establishment of high 
standards of public health within the territories 
of our neighbor nations. The Butantan Insti- 
tute in Brazil has attained international leader- 



JULY 8, 1939 



31 



ship in the developinent of serums against 
snake bites, and the United States has profited 
from its work by the establishment of a branch 
station in this country. 

Cultural interchange with the other Ameri- 
can republics may offer to the United States — 
in addition to such direct contributions as have 
been already mentioned in painting, music, 
architecture, and popular arts, and such in- 
direct contributions as may result from the 
observations and researches of our students — 
profits of a more general and less tangible 
character. Our philosophy of life may be 
modified, our scale of values supplemented, our 
point of view enlarged by continuing contacts 
with our neighbors in this hemisphere. 

During my recent trip to South America I 
was profoundly impressed by the attitude of 
these peoples toward the future. In a world 
shadowed by dark portents, they have retained 
their optimism. In contrast with the prevail- 
ing attitude in Europe, in contrast with the 
shift in attitude which has taken place in this 
country since 1929, they definitely believe that 
the best lies ahead, not behind. They look to 
the future with confidence, assured that it will 
in its time bring to fruition their hopes and 
dreams. 



In conclusion then, the profits of cultural 
interchange are real. The future may bring 
them to us far more abundantly than has the 
past. Both the United States and the other 
American republics remained colonies in the 
cultural sense long after their political bonds 
with the mother countries had been broken. 
We looked to Britain for our models and 
standards; the countries to the south looked 
to Spain and France. But now we and they 
are coming of age. Both of us are learning 
to stand on our own feet, and to have confi- 
dence in our own judgments as to what is good 
in intellectual and cultural achievement. We 
in this hemisphere are developing, some more 
slowly than others, a culture which is not bor- 
rowed from across the seas, or reflected from 
other and older nations, but which is our own, 
which is made in America. Therefore the time 
is ripe as it has never been before for exchange 
between the two Americas. In the past the 
east-west bonds linking both Americas to 
Europe have been strong. Neither of us would 
see those bonds weakened. But now the two 
Americas have something to give each other. 
The argosies of the spirit for this hemisphere 
may come from the south and north, as well as 
from the east and west. 



Commercial Policy 



AMERICAN COMMERCIAL POLICY AND THE TRADE-AGREEMENTS 

PROGRAM 

Radio Address by Assistant Secretary Sayre " 



[Released for morning newspapers of July 3] 

The lengthening shadow of international 
lawlessness across the world today makes it im- 
perative for us to weigh carefully our national 
policies. It makes it imperative to choose the 
kind of policies which make for peace and which 
constitute the kind of foundations upon which 
alone peace can rest. 

In the field of commercial relations, nations 
must choose between two widely diverging and 
conflicting policies. On the one hand, in spite 
of the inescapable fact of the present-day vital 
interdependence of national economies, a nation 
may either ignore or seek to overcome this fact, 
and follow an economic policy based upon isola- 
tionism or upon a narrow nationalism. On the 
other hand, a nation recognizing the undeniable 
advantages that come from the international 
exchange of goods, may adopt an economic 
policy based upon a broad liberalism and the 
furtherance of international trade. The choice 
between these two alternative policies will have 
profound and far-reaching consequences not 
only in the nation itself but in the world at 
large. 

The policy of economic nationalism in the 
present-day world has certain fairly definite 
earmarks. Economic self-sufficiency necessarily 
means severely restricted imports. But, as 
everyone knows, trade is a two-way process; 
and the nation which cuts to a slender minimum 
its imports will sooner or later find itself unable 
to sell its exports. 

Two results follow — the one, increasing re- 
striction of foreign trade ; the other, accumulat- 
ing economic dislocation at home. 



'Delivered over the Columbia Broadcasting System, 
Sunday, July 2, 1939. 

32 



As to foreign-trade restriction, various forms 
of trade control have to be adopted in order to 
achieve economic self-sufficiency and cut down 
imports — quota restrictions, control of foreign 
exchange, import licensing, government busi- 
ness monopolies of one kind or another, or com- 
binations of some or all. 

But nations cannot cut down their imports 
without ruining their export markets. The 
loss of export trade leads to artificial methods 
to force exports. This may be attempted 
through trade arrangements forced by stronger 
nations upon weaker ones or througli various 
forms of international dumping. 

As the struggle to sell exports in world 
markets grows in intensity nations are driven 
to moi-e and more extreme forms of arbitrary 
and uneconomic trade control — exclusive pref- 
erences, bilateralistic balancing, blocked cur- 
rencies, and the like — all of which tend to in- 
jure and cripple the international trade of the 
world as well as the trade of the nation itself. 

The other inevitable result of economic self- 
sufficiency is growing dislocation at home. 
The inability to sell exports in foreign mar- 
kets residts either in diminished output and 
consequent unemployment or in piling up huge 
surpluses which glut domestic markets and de- 
press prices, not only for the surpluses for- 
merly exported but for the entire crop or out- 
put. Tlie further self-sufficiency is pushed, the 
tighter must government control become over 
domestic trade and domestic industry, since 
domestic industries are dependent for many of 
their necessary raw materials and their mar- 
kets upon foreign trade. Sooner or later the 
government must control and ultimately fix 



JULY 8, 1939 



33 



domestic prices; it must undertake to control 
and regulate capital outlays and expenditures; 
it must assume a degree of regimentation and 
strait jacketing of business and industry which 
denies economic freedom and initiative such 
as "we know in this country and which is in ut- 
ter conflict with the most fundamental prin- 
ciples of human liberty upon which our Nation 
was founded. 

Need I go further? The nation forced into 
such a rigid and arbitrary economy, denying 
individual liberty, undertaking a totalitarian 
regulation and control over its citizens or sub- 
jects, finding it necessary to deny them funda- 
mental rights such as defined in our own Con- 
stitution, comes to be the very antithesis of 
democracy. Surely, it is no accident that today 
the most outstanding dictatorships are in those 
nations most deeply committed to economic 
nationalism. 

In sharp contrast with the commercial pol- 
icy of a narrow economic nationalism is that 
of liberalized trade and freedom of economic 
initiative. This is the policy embodied in the 
American trade-agreements program. Its ob- 
jective is more trade for the United States and 
more trade for the world, for we realize that 
international trade is indispensable for the 
maintenance of national standards of living 
and human progress. It is based on equality 
of treatment of all nations, for only thus can 
economic conflict be avoided and the founda- 
tions for lasting peace be built. 

One of the fundamental objectives of such 
a policy is to allow trade to flow through nor- 
mal channels as shaped by economic consid- 
erations. I do not mean free trade, nor do I 
mean a return to nineteenth century laissez 
faire principles. What I mean is, that under the 
American policy trade is a matter of economics 
and not of international politics; that individ-, 
ual freedom and initiative under government 
control and given a vital and a large impor- 
tance, are not ruthlessly eliminated; that the 
supreme values sought are more abundant lives 
for individual human personalities and not the 
government's place in the sun. 



You see at once how deep-rooted are the con- 
sequences of a nation's choice of commercial 
policy today. We are touching close the crucial 
struggle of our times — the struggle between in- 
dividual freedom under law and the advance of 
civilization, on the one hand, and, on the other, 
ruthless suppression and the advent of a new 
dark age. 

So far as we can see, probably the one or the 
other policy must ultimately come to dominate 
the world. There is not room in the world for 
both. If the policy of a rigid economy with its 
earmarks of blocked currencies, trading in ex- 
clusive preferences, economic knifing of com- 
petitors, diversions and control of trade for po- 
litical as well as for economic ends— if this 
system triumphs it can be only through defeat 
of the other system of open trading, equality 
of treatment, and freedom of currency move- 
ments. For neither system is self-contained 
within a single nation. The resultant effects of 
each reach out over the world. 

What this means is not that we will refuse 
to trade with totalitarian states or that we will 
make economic war upon them. We want their 
trade and they need ours. Through trade lies 
the way of peace. Wliat it does mean is that in 
offering and hoping to trade with them we 
must not surrender our principles or adopt their 
commercial policies as our own. We want to 
make trade agreements with them, but these 
must be based fundamentally upon equality of 
commercial treatment and not upon a practice 
of exclusive privileges which discriminate 
against other nations or against our own trade. 
We will not make trade agreements based upon 
policies which make for economic conflict rather 
than for economic peace. 

In such a situation as this we cannot achieve 
our objectives by following the same trade-de- 
stroying practices adopted by the totalitarian 
states. For the United States to resort to trad- 
ing in preferences, to bilateralistic balancing 
practices, would be only tragically to weaken 
our own defenses. Our strength lies in our 
great market, our free exchange, our system of 
free economic initiative. The adoption of re- 



34 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



strictive trade practices but «'eakens our eco- 
nomic equii)inent ai^d courts defeat. It means 
partial surrender to the opposing system. 

Policies wliich restrict trade are in the end 
self-defeating. Tliey are the direct result of 
foreign-exchange shortages, of impaired credit, 
of waning assets, or of economic disequilibrium. 
They lead to economic deterioration, and, if 
persisted in, to ultimate defeat. 

If we are sufficiently resolute and intelligent 
to adhere to our liberal policies and to avoid 
being draT\n into contrary practices for the 
sake of temporary gains or in the interest of 
special groui^s, all the cards are on our side. 
We can win and hold strong foreign markets 
if only we keep true to our principles. 

As the American Constitution early in the 
nineteenth century powerfully influenced the 
spread of democratic government in many coun- 
tries, so today the American trade-agi'eements 
program is powerfully influencing the reestab- 
lishment of democratic and liberal principles of 
international trade throughout the world. Al- 
ready the United States has entered into trade 
agreements with countries accounting for three- 
fifths of our foreign trade ; and the total exports 
and imports of these countries and of the United 
States with all coimtries constitute three-fifths 
of the foreign trade of the world. The influence 
of the American program upon foreign com- 
mercial policy is becoming world-wide and 
profound. 



COMMITTEE FOR RECIPROCITY 
INFORMATION 

Text of Executive Order No. 8190 entitled 
''"Placing the Committee for Reciprocity Infor- 
mation Under the Jurisdiction and Control of 
the Department of State": 

By virtue of the authority vested in me by the 
Act of June 12, 1934, entitled "An Act to amend 
the Tariff Act of 1930" (48 Stat. 943), as 
amended, the Committee for Reciprocity Infor- 
mation, created by Executive Order No. 6750 of 
June 27, 1934, is hereby placed under the juris- 
diction and control of the Department of State, 
its functions to be exercised under the direction 
and supervision of the Secretary of State, who 
shall designate from the membership of the 
Committee the Chairman thereof. 

The Executive Committee on Commercial 
Policy, created by Executive Letter of Novem- 
ber 11, 1933, and continued by Executive Orders 
No. 6656 of March 27, 1934, and No. 7260 of 
December 31, 1935, shall continue to exercise its 
function of selecting certain members of the 
said Committee for Reciprocity Information. 

This order shall become effective on July 1, 
1939. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 

The White House, 
July 5, 1939. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled by the Treaty Division 



Note: In subsequent issues this section of the 
BuUetin will contain, in addition to new in- 
formation, summarized statements of the 
status of multilateral treaties or agreements 
as occasion may require. 

MEDIATION 

Inter-American Treaty on Good Offices and 
Mediation (Treaty Series No. 925)' 

Costa, Rica 

The Director General of the Pan American 
Union informed the Secretary of State by a 
letter dated June 29, 1939, that the instrument 
of ratification by Costa Rica of the Inter-Amer- 
ican Treaty on Good Offices and Mediation, 
signed at Buenos Aires on December 23, 1936, 
■was deposited with the Union on June 27, 1939. 

Treaty on the Prevention of Controversies 
(Treaty Series No. 924) 

Costa Rica 

The above-mentioned letter from the Direc- 
tor General of the Pan American Union states 
also that the instrument of ratification by Costa 
Rica of the Treaty on the Prevention of Con- 
troversies, signed at Buenos Aires on Decem- 
ber 23, 1936, was deposited with the Union on 
June 27, 1939. 

COMMERCE 

Reciprocal Trade Agreements 

An Executive order regarding the Commit- 
tee for Reciprocity Information appears in this 
Bulletin under the section "Commercial 
Policy." 



FISHERIES 

Protocol Amending the Agreement for the 
Regulation of Whaling of June 8, 1937 
(Treaty Series No. 944) 

A notice regarding an International Confer- 
ence for the Regulation of Wlialing appears in 
this Bulletin under the section "International 
Conferences, Commissions, etc." 



POSTAL 

Universal Postal Convention of 1934' 

There is quoted below a translation of a note 
dated June 30, 1939, from the Swiss Minister at 
Washington regarding the adlierence of "the 
Slovak State" to the Universal Postal Conven- 
tion aiid the subsidiary agreements signed at 
Cairo on March 20, 1934 : 

Mr. Secretary of State : 

On instructions from my Government, I have 
the honor to inform you that the Minister of 
Foreign Affairs at Bratislava has notified the 
Government of the Swiss Confederation of the 
adherence of the Slovak State to the Universal 
Postal Convention, signed at Cairo on March 
20, 1934, and to the Agreements mentioned in 
Article 3 of this international act. 

The adherence in question took effect on June 
17, 1939, the date of notification to the Swiss 
Government, in execution of articles 2 and 3 
of the Convention referred to above. 



'See Treaty Information, bulletin No. 114, March 
1939, p. 43. 

'See Treat!/ Information, bulletin No. 115, April 
1939, p. 80. 

36 



36 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Requesting you to be good enough to acknowl- 
edge the foregoing, I offer you, Mr. Secretary 
of State [etc.] 

Minister of Switzerland 

PUBLICATIONS 

Convention on Interchange of Publications ° 

Costa Rica 

By a letter dated June 29, 1939, the Director 
General of the Pan American Union informed 
the Secretary of State that the instrument of 
ratification by Costa Rica of the Convention on 
Interchange of Publications, signed at Buenos 
Aires on December 23, 1936, was deposited with 
the Union on June 27, 1939. 



TRANSIT 

Convention on the Pan American Highway 

(Treaty Series No. 927)" 

Costa Rica 

By a letter dated June 29, 1939, the Director 
General of the Pan American Union informed 
the Secretary of State that the instrument of 
ratification by Costa Rica of the Convention on 
the Pan American Highway, signed at Buenos 
Aires on December 23, 1936, was deposited with 
the Union on June 27, 1939. 



TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

International Telecommunication Conven- 
tion (Treaty Series No. 867)" 



Hungary 
According 



to notification No. 334, dated 



June 16, 1939, from the International Telecom- 
munication Union at Bern, the Hungarian 
Government has approved the following revi- 



' See Treaty Information, buUetiu No. 114, March 
1939, p. 57. 

" See Treaty Information bulletin No. 114, March 
1939, p. 59. 

"See Treaty Information, bulletin No. 117, June 
1939. 



sions of the regulations annexed to the Interna- 
tional Telecommunication Convention of 1932, 
as adopted at Cairo on April 4 and 8, 1938 : 

General Radio Regulations and Final Protocol 
(revision of Cairo, 1938) 

Additional Radio Regulations and Final Proto- 
col (revision of Cairo, 1938) 

Telegraph Regulations and Final Protocol 
(revision of (3airo, 1938) 

Teleplione Regulations and Final Protocol (re- 
vision of Cairo, 1938). 



EXHIBITIONS 

Convention Concerning Artistic Exhibitions 

(Treaty Series No. 929)" 

Costa Rica 

By a letter dated June 29, 1939, the Director 
General of the Pan American Union informed 
the Secretary of State that the instrument of 
ratification by Costa Rica of the Convention 
Concerning Artistic Exhibitions, signed at 
Buenos Aires on December 23, 1936, was de- 
posited with the Union on June 27, 1939. 



EDUCATION 

Convention for the Promotion of Inter- 
American Cultural Relations (Treaty 
Series No. 928)" 

Costa Rica 

By a letter dated June 29, 1939, the Director 
General of the Pan American Union informed 
the Secretary of State that the instrument of 
ratification by Costa Rica of the Convention 
for tlie Promotion of Inter-Ainerican Cultural 
Relations, signed at Buenos Aires on December 
23, 1936, was deposited with the Union on June 
27, 1939. 



"See Treaty Information, bulletin No. 114, March 
1939, p. 61. 

" See Treaty Information, bulletin No. 114, March 
1939, p. 47. 



JULY 8, 1939 



37 



Convention Concerning Peaceful Orienta- 
tion of Public Instruction 



Convention Concerning Facilities for Edu- 
cational and Publicity Films 



Costa Rica 

By a letter dated June 29, 1939, the Director 
General of the Pan American Union informed 
the Secretary of State that the instrument of 
ratification by Costa Eica of the Convention 
Concerning Peaceful Orientation of Public In- 
struction, signed at Buenos Aires on December 
23, 1936, was deposited with the Union on June 
27, 1939. 



Costa Rica 

By a letter dated June 29, 1939, the Director 
General of the Pan American Union informed 
the Secretary of State that the instrument of 
ratification by Costa Rica of the Convention 
Concerning Facilities for Educational and Pub- 
licity Films, signed at Buenos Aires on Decem- 
ber 23, 1936, was deposited with the Union on 
June 27, 1939. 



International Conferences, Commissions, etc. 



INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE FOR 
THE REGULATION OF WHALING 

[Released July 5] 

The British Government has called an Inter- 
national Conference for the Regulation of 
Wlialing to meet at London on July 17, 1939, 
for the purpose of discussing the results of the 
whaling seasons of 1938 and 1939 and the desir- 
ability of extending for a further year or two 
the prohibition on the killing of the hump- 
backed whale contained in article 1 of the 
protocol of 1938 ^* which modified the Interna- 
tional Agreement for the Regulation of Whal- 
ing signed at London on June 8, 1937. The 
British Government will convene at the same 
time a meeting of inspectors appointed to en- 
force the provisions of the international agree- 
ment. This meeting will consider the practice 
of the inspectors appointed by the various sig- 
natory governments and make recommendations 
with a view to securing uniformity. Tlie Presi- 
dent has approved the appointment of the fol- 
lowing persons as delegates on the part of the 
United States : 



"Press Releases, Vol. XX, No. 498, April 15, 1939, 
pp. 317-^18. 



Herschel V. Johnson, Esq., counselor of em- 
bassy, American Embassy, London, chairman 

Lt. Comdr. A. C. Richmond, United States 
Coast Guard, Treasury Department 

Lt. Q. R. Walsh, United States Coast Guard, 
Treasury Department 

Lieutenant Walsh has also been designated 
to represent the United States at the meeting of 
inspectors. 

SECOND INTERNATIONAL SALON OF 
AERONAUTICS 

[Released July 7] 

This Government has accepted the invita- 
tion of the Belgian Government to participate 
in the Second International Salon of Aeronau- 
tics, which will be held at Brussels from July 
8 to July 23, 1939. The President has ap- 
proved the appointment of the following per- 
sons as representatives on the part of the 
United States: 

Capt. John M. Sterling, Air Corps, United 
States Army, Assistant Military Attache for 
Air, Paris, France 

Mr. John J. Ide, Technical Assistant in Europe 
for the National Advisory Committee for 
Aeronautics, Paris, France. 



Foreign Service of the United States 



ADMINISTRATION OF THE FOREIGN SERVICE UNDER REORGAN- 
IZATION PLAN NO. II 



Text of Executive Order No. 8185 entitled 
'■'■Administration of the Foreign Service Under 
Reorganization Plan No. II": 

Under the autliority vested in me by the act 
of May 24, 1924, 43 Stat. 140, 144, the act of 
February 23, 1931, 46 Stat. 1207, 1211, and 
Reorganization Plan No. II, transmitted by the 
President to the Congress (H. Doc. 288) on May 
9, 1939, and by Public Eesohition No. 20, 76th 
Congress, 1st Session, approved June 7, 1939, I 
hereby jn-escribe the following regulations per- 
taining to the membership of the Board of 
Foreign Service Personnel : 

1. The officer of the Department of Commerce 
who shall be added to the membership of the 
Board of Foreign Service Personnel in accord- 
ance with the pi'ovisions of subsection (b) (5) 
of section 1 of Reorganization Plan No. II shall 
sit as a member of the Board only when nomi- 
nations and assignments of commercial attaches, 
the selection or assignment of Foreign Service 
officers for specialized training in commercial 
work, or other matters of interest to the Depart- 
ment of Conamerce are under consideration ; 

2. The officer of the Department of Agricul- 
ture who shall be added to the membership of 
the Board of Foreign Service Personnel in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of subsection (b) 
(5) of section 1 of Reorganization Plan No. II 
shall sit as a member of the Board only when 
nominations and assignments of agricultural 
attaches, the selection or assignment of Foreign 
Service officers for specialized training in agri- 
cultural work, or other matters of interest to 
tlie Department of Agriculture are under con- 
sideration. 

3. The officers of the Department of Com- 
merce and the Department of Agriculture who 

38 



shall be designated as members of the Board 
of Foreign Service Personnel shall also be mem- 
bers of the School Board directing the Foreign 
Service Officers' Training Scliool, as established 
and provided for by section 8 of Executive 
Order No. 5642 of June 8, 1931, which is hereby 
amended accordingly, and each shall sit as a 
member of the School Board when matters of 
interest to his respective Department shall be 
under consideration. 

4. With reference to the Board of Ex- 
aminers for the Foreign Service, the first 
paragraph of section 3 of the said Executive 
Order No. 5642 of June 8, 1931, is hereby 
amended to read as follows: 

"3. Examination for the Foreign Service. 
There is hereby constituted a Board of Ex- 
aminers, which shall conduct examinations to 
determine the eligibility of candidates for the 
Foreign Service, composed as follows: Three 
Assistant Secretaries of State designated by the 
Secretary of State, an officer of the Department 
of Commerce designated by the Secretary of 
Commerce and acceptable to the Secretary of 
State, an officer of the Department of Agricul- 
ture designated by the Secretary of Agricul- 
ture and acceptable to the Secretary of State, 
the Chief of the Division of Foreign Service 
Personnel, and the Chief Examiner of the Civil 
Service Commission. 

"Any member of the Board may, when he 
deems it necessary, designate another officer of 
his Department to serve for him on the Board, 
provided such officer as may be designated to 
represent a member of the Board shall be ac- 
ceptable to the Seci-etary of State and approved 
by him. 



JULY 8, 1939 

"The rules for the conduct of examinations 
as established in subsections (a) to (k), in- 
clusive, of section 3 of the said Executive Order 
No. 5642 of June 8, 1931, shall remain in full 
force and effect." 



39 

This order sliall become effective on July 
1, 1939. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 
The White House, 
Jvne 29, 1939. 



TRANSFER OF OFFICERS FROM THE FOREIGN COMMERCE AND 
FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL SERVICES 



Officers of the Foreign Commerce and Foreign 
Agricultural Services transferred to the For- 
eign Service of the United States {Department 
of State) effective July 1, 1939, pursuant to the 
provisions of the Reorganization Act of April 
3, 1939: 

TO BE FOREIGN SEKVICE OFFICERS OF CLASS 1 



Julean H. Arnold 
Henry M. Bankhead 
Alexander V. Dye 



Thomas L. Hughes 
Sam B. Woods 



TO BE FOEEION SERVICE OFFICERS OF (3LASS 2 



William E. Dunn 
H. Coit MacLean 



Lynn W. Meekins 
Lacey C. Zapf 



TO BE FOREIGN SERVICE 0FFICEK8 OF CLASS 3 



Ralph H. Ackerman 
H. Lawrence Groves 
George C. Howard 
Charles A. Livengood 
Thomas H. Lockett 



Daniel J. Reagan 
Ashley B. Sowell 
Earl C. Squire 
Loyd V. Steere 



TO BE FOREIGN SERVICE OFFICERS OF CIASS 4 



Don C. Bliss, Jr. 
Merwin L. Bohan 
Clarence C. Brooks 
Samuel H. Day 
Charles E. Dickerson, 
Walter J. Donnelly 
Julian B. Foster 
Homer S. Fox 
Thormod O. Klath 
Clayton Lane 
Albert F. Nufer 



Karl L. Rankin 
Gardner Richardson 
James T. Scott 
Jesse F. Van Wickel 
Jr. Frank S. Williams 
Owen L. Dawson 
Erwin P. Keeler 
Paul G. Minueman 
Paul O. Nyhus 
Clifford O. Taylor 



TO BE FORHGN SEKVICE OFFICBBS OF CLASS 5 



A. Bland Calder 
George R. Canty 
Archie W. Childs 



Robert G. Glover 
Julian C. Greenup 
Malcolm P. Hooper 



Leigh W. Hunt 
Edward B. Lawson 
Oliver B. North 
Harold M. Randall 
J. Bartlett Richards 
James Somorville, Jr. 



Paul P. Steintorf 
Robert M. Stephenson 
Howard H. Tewksbury 
Osborn S. Watson 
Charles L. Luedtke 
Lester D. Mallory 



TO BE FOREIGN SERVICE OFFICERS OF CLASS 6 



DuWayne G. Clark 
Basil D. Dahl 



John A. Embry 
A. Viola Smith 



TO BE FOREIGN SERVICE OFFIOBRS OF CLASS 7 



Barry T. Benson 
Charles E. Brookhart 
Carl E. Christopherson 
Charles H. Ducote 
Wilson C. Flake 
Leys A. France 
Paul S. Guinn 
R. Horton Henry 
Elisabeth Humes 



C. Grant Isaacs 
J. Wiusor Ives 
Edward D. McLaughlin 
Avery F. Peterson 
Alton T. Murray 
Harold D. Robison 
Donald W. Smith 
Jule B. Smith 
William P. Wright 



TO BE FOREIGN SERVICE OFFICERS OF CLASS 8 



Fritz A. M. Alfsen 
Carl H. Boehringcr 
Frederick J. Cunning 
B. Miles Hammond 
Coldwell S. Johnston 
George L. Jones, Jr. 
Charles F. Knox, Jr. 



George E. Miller 
Paul H. Pearson 
ham Archibald R. Randolph 
Henry E. Stebbins 
Joe D. Walstrom 
Rolland Welch 



TO BE FOREIGN SERVICE OFETCERS, UNCLASSIFIED 



John L. Bankhead 
F. Lestrade Brown 
Thomas S. Campen 
David M. Clark 
Edward A. Dow, Jr. 
John L. Goshie 
Theodore J. Hadraba 
John P. Hoover 
Hungerford B. Howard 
Frederick D. Hunt 
Donald W. Lanun 



Aldene B. Leslie 
Minedee McLean 
Eugene A. Masuret 
Kathleen Molesworth 
Jack B. Neathery 
Katherine E. O'Connor 
E. Edward Schefer 
William L. Smyser 
Earle C. Taylor 
Charles O. Thompson 
William Witman, 2d 



40 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



CHANGES IN ASSIGNMENTS 

[Released July 8] 

Changes in assignments in the Foreign Service 
since July i, 1939: 

Eobert D. Murpliy, of Milwaukee, Wis., first 
secretary and consul of embassy at Paris, 
France, has been designated counselor of em- 
bassy at Paris. 

Kollin R. Winslow, of Grand Rapids, Mich., 
consul at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, has been as- 
signed as consul at Quebec, Canada. 

John Randolph, of Niagara Falls, N. Y., con- 
sul at Quebec, Canada, has been assigned as 
consul at Belfast, Northern Ireland. 

Marcel E. Malige, of Lapwai, Idaho, consul 
at Warsaw, Poland, has been assigned as consul 
at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 

Archibald E. Gray, of Bethlehem, Pa., second 
secretai'y and consul of legation at Helsinki, 
Finland, has been assigned as consul at Barce- 
lona, Spain. 

Charles L. De Vault, of Winchester, Ind., 
consul at Mexico City, Mexico, will retire from 
the Foreign Service effective October 22, 1939. 

George M. Graves, of Bennington, Vt., consul 
at Vigo, Spain, has been assigned as consul at 
Colombo, Ceylon. 

Fred W. Jandrey, of Neenah, Wis., vice con- 
sul at Naples, Italy, has been assigned as vice 
consul at Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. 

David K. Caldwell, of Washington, D. C, 
vice consul at Kobe, Japan, has been assigned 
as vice consul at Canton, China. 

Walter Smith, of Oak Park, 111., vice consul 
at Canton, China, has been assigned as vice 
consul at Kobe, Japan. 

Livingston Satterthwaite, of Huntingdon 
Valley, Pa., vice consul at Caracas, Venezuela, 
has been assigned for duty in the Department 
of State. 



Orray Taft, Jr., of Santa Barbara, Calif., 
vice consul at Wai-saw, Poland, has been as- 
signed as vice consul at Algiers, Algeria. 

Roy M. Melbourne, of Ocean View, Va., 
now assigned for duty in the Department of 
State, has been assigned as vice consul at 
Tientsin, China. 

John F. Melby, of Bloomington, 111., now as- 
signed for duty in the Department of State, 
has been assigned as vice consul at Caracas, 
Venezuela. 

Aaron S. Brown, of Bloomfield Hills, Mich., 
now assigned for duty in the Department of 
State, has been assigned as vice consul at 
Warsaw, Poland. 

FOREIGN SERVICE REGULATIONS 

The following Executive order concerning the 
Foreign Service Regulations has been issued: 

Executive Order Amending the Foreign Service Regu- 
lations of the United States (Chapter IV — Administra- 
tion). (E. 0.8189.) Federal Register, Vol. 4, No. 129, 
July 7, 1939, pp. 2783-278,5 (The National Archives of 
the United States). [Consolidation of miscellaneous 
sections; no material alterations.] 



Legislation 



An Act Making appropriations to supply urgent defi- 
ciencies in certain appropriations for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1939, to provide appropriations re- 
quired immediately for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1940, and for other purposes. (Affects the follow- 
ing: Alaskan International Highway Commission; 
Eighth Pan American Child Congress ; First Pan Amer- 
ican Housing Conference ; International Committee on 
Political Refugees; Third International Congress for 
Microbiology ; Mixed Claims Commission, United States 
and Germany ; Emergencies Arising in the Diplomatic 
and Consular Service ; International Monetary and Eco- 
nomic Conference and General Disarmament Confer- 
ence.) (Public, No. 160, 76th Cong., 1st sess.) 11 pp. 
50. 



U. S. 60VERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1999 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents Subscription price, $2.75 a yeai | 

PUBLISHED WITH THE APPEOVAL OP THE DIRECTOR OF THE BDHEAn OF THE BODOEl 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 




J 



L 



H 

LL/ 



riN 



JULY 15, 1939 
Vol. I: No. j> — Publication 1 353 




Qontents 

Page 
Peace and neutrality legislation: Message of the 
President to Congress transmitting statement by 

the Secretary of State 43 

Death of Congressman McReynoIds 47 

Visit to the United States of the Brazilian Chief of 

Staff 47 

Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 48 

Foreign Service Regulations 48 

The Far East : 

U. S. protest against Japanese bombings of 

Chungking 48 

Treaty information : 
Organization : 
Protocol for the Amendment of the Preamble, of 
Articles 1, 4, and 5, and of the Annex to the 

Covenant of the League of Nations 49 

Education : 
Proces- Verbal Concerning the Application of 
Articles IV, V, VI, VII, XII, and XIII of the 
Convention of October 11, 1933, for Facilitat- 
ing the International Circulation of Films of 

an Educational Character 49 

Health : 

International Sanitary Convention for Aerial 
Navigation (Treaty Series No. 901) 49 

(Over) 



y. S. SOPfWNTFNOENT OF OnriiM,fni 

AUG 2 1939 



Treaty information — Continued. 
Finance : page 
Convention for the Suppression of Counterfeit- 
ing Currency, and Protocol 50 

Labor : 
Conventions of the International Labor Confer- 
ence 50 

Telecommunications : 
International Telecommunication Convention 

(Treaty Series No. 867) 60 

International conferences, commissions, etc. : 
Eighth International Conference on Public In- 
struction 52 

International Congress on Graphology 53 

Legislation 53 

Publications 53 



PEACE AND NEUTRALITY LEGISLATION 

Message of the President to Congress Transmitting Statement by the Secretary of State 



[Released to the press July 14] 

To THE Congress of the United States : 

I am advised that by a vote of twelve to 
eleven the Senate Committee on Foreign 
Relations has deferred action on peace and 
neutrality legislation until the next session of 
the Congress. 

I am appending hereto a statement from the 
Secretary of State which has my full approval, 
and which I trust will receive your earnest 
attention. 

It has been abundantly clear to me for some 
time that for the cause of peace and in the 
interests of American neutrality and security, 
it is highly advisable that the Congress at this 
session should take certain much needed action. 
In the light of present world conditions, I see 
no reason to change that opinion. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 

The White House, 
July H, 1939. 

[Enclosure] 

Statement on Peace and Neutralitt by the 
Secretaky of State 

The cornerstone of the foreign policy of the 
United States is the preservation of the peace 
and security of our nation, the strengthening 
of international law, and the revitalization of 
international good faith. The foreign policy 
of this Government may be misinterpreted or it 
may be misunderstood, but it cannot be de- 
stroyed. Peace is so precious and war so devas- 
tating that the people of the United States and 
their Goverimient must not fail to make their 
just and legitimate contribution to the preser- 
vation of peace. 

The Congress has pending before it at the 
present time certain proposals providing for 
the amendment of the existing so-called neu- 
rality legislation. Some of these proposed 
changes I regard as necessary to promote the 
peace and security of the United States. 

163881—39 



There is an astonishing amount of confusion 
and misundei-standing as regards the legisla- 
tion under consideration, and particularly with 
regard to the operation of the existing arms 
embargo. 

I shall try to bring out as clearly as I can 
the important points of agreement and dis- 
agreement between those who support the 
principles contained in the six point peace and 
neutrality program recommended by the Ex- 
ecutive branch of the Government and those 
who oppose these recommendations. 

In substance and in principle both sides of 
the discussion agree on the following points: 

1. Both sides agree that the first concern of 
the United States must be its own peace and 
security. 

2. Both sides agree that it should be the 
policy of this Government to avoid being 
drawn into wars between other nations. 

3. Both sides agree that this nation should at 
all tunes avoid entangling alliances or involve- 
ments with other nations. 

4. Both sides agree that in the event of for- 
eign wars this nation should maintain a status 
of strict neutrality, and that around the struc- 
ture of neutrality we should so shape our 
policies as to keep this country from being 
drawn into war. 

On the other hand, the following is the chief 
essential point of disagreement between those 
who favor the adoption of the recommenda- 
tions formulated by the Executive branch of 
the Government and those who are opposing 
these recommendations : 

The proponents, mcluding the Executive 
branch of the Government, at the time when 
the arms embargo was originally adopted 
called attention to the fact that its enactment 
constituted a hazardous departure from the 
principle of international law which recog- 
nizes the right of neutrals to trade with bellig- 
erents and of belligerents to trade with 

43 



44 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



neutrals. They believe that neutrality means 
impartiality, and in their view an arms em-, 
bargo is dii'ectly opposed to the idea of neu- 
trality. It is not humanly possible, by enact- 
ing an arms embargo, or by refraining from 
such enactment, to hold the scales exactly even 
between two belligerents. In either case and 
due to shifting circumstances one belligerent 
may find itself in a position of relative ad- 
vantage or disadvantage. The unportant dif- 
ference between the two cases is that when such 
a condition arises in the absence of an arms 
embargo on our part, no responsibility attaches 
to this country, whereas in the presence of an 
embargo, the responsibility of this country for 
the creation of the condition is inevitably 
direct and clear. 

There is no theory or practice to be found in 
international law pertaining to neutrality to 
the effect that the advantages that any par- 
ticular belligerent might procure thi'ough its 
geographic location, its suiJeriority on land or 
at sea, or through other circumstances, should 
be offset by the establishment by neutral na- 
tions of embargoes. 

The opposition to tlie present substitute pro- 
posal joins issue on this point, and stands for 
existing rigid embargo as a permanent part 
of our neuti-ality policy. And yet by insisting 
on an arms embargo in time of war they are, 
to that extent, for the reasons I have stated, 
urging not neutrality, but what might well 
result in actual imneutrality, the serious conse- 
quences of which no one can predict. 

Those who urge the retention of the present 
embargo continue to advance the view that it 
will keep this country out of war, — thereby 
misleading the American people to rely upon a 
false and illogical delusion as a means of 
keeping out of war. 

I say it is illogical, because while the trade 
in "arms, ammunition and implements of war" 
is at present banned, the trade in equally essen- 
tial war materials, as well as all the essential 
materials out of which the finished articles are 
made can continue. For example, in time of 
war, we can sell cotton for the manufacture of 
explosives, but not the explosives; we can sell 



the steel and copper for cannon and for shells 
but not the caimon nor the shells; we can con- 
tinue to sell to belligerents the high-powered 
fuel necessary for the operation of airplanes, 
but we are not able to sell the airplanes. 

I say it is a false delusion because a continu- 
ation of the trade in arms is a clearly recog- 
nized and traditional right of the nationals of 
a neutral country in time of war, subject only 
to effective blockade and to the right of bellig- 
erents to treat any such commodities as contra- 
band. The assertion frequently made that thisj 
country has ever engaged or may become en- 
gaged in serious controversy solely over the| 
fact that its nationals have sold arms to bellig- 
erents is misleading and unsupportable. All 
available evidence is directly to the contrary. 
Every informed person knows that arms, as 
absolute contraband, are subject to seizure by 
a belligerent and that neither the neutral ship- 
per nor his government has the slightest 
ground for complaint. There is, therefore, no 
reason to suppose that the sale of arms may 
lead to serious controversy between a neutral 
and a belligerent. Furthermore, under the 
proposals that have been made American na- 
tionals would be divested of all right, title and 
interest in these and other commodities before 
they leave our shores and American citizens 
and ships would be kept out of danger zones. 
As regards possible complications which might 
arise as a result of the extension of credits to 
belligerents or of extraordinary profits accru- 
ing to any group of producers in this country, 
it is wholly within the power of Congress at 
all times to safeguard the national interest ini 
this respect. 

Controversies which would involve the United 
States are far more likely to arise from the en- 
trance of American ships or American citize: 
in the danger zones or through the sinking o: 
the high seas of American vessels carrying com 
modities other than those covered by the armi 
embargo. In the recommendations formulatei 
by the Executive as a substitute for the present! 
legislation it was especially urged that provi 
sions be adopted which would exclude Ameri- 
can nationals and American ships from zones 



1 



JULY 15, 193 9 



45 



■where real danger to their safety might exist 
and which would divest goods of American 
ownership, thereby minimizing to the fullest 
extent the danger of American involvement. 

Those of us who support the recommenda- 
tions formulated for the elimination of the em- 
bargo are convinced that the arms embargo 
plays into the hands of those nations which 
have taken the lead in building up their fight- 
ing power. It works directly against the inter- 
ests of the peace-loving nations, especially those 
which do not possess their own munitions 
plants. It means that if any country is dis- 
posed towards conquest, and devotes its energy 
and resources to establish itself as a superior 
fighting power, that country may be more 
tempted to try the fortunes of war if it knows 
that its less well prepared opponents would 
be shut off from those supplies which, under 
every rule of international law, they should be 
able to buy in all neutral countries, including 
the United States. It means also that some of 
those countries which have only limited facili- 
ties for the production of arms, anmiunition 
and implements of war are put in a position 
of increased dependence. During peace-time 
they would feel the compulsion of shaping their 
political as well as their economic policy to suit 
the military' strength of others; and during 
war-time their powers of defense would be 
limited. 

For these reasons those who are supporting 
the recommendations for the amendment of 
existing legislation recognize definitely that the 
present embargo encourages a general state of 
war both in Europe and Asia. Since the pres- 
ent embargo has this effect its results arc 
directly prejudicial to the highest interests and 
to the peace and to the security of the United 
States. 

In the present grave conditions of interna- 
tional anarchy and of danger to peace, in more 
than one part of the world, I profoundly be- 
lieve that the first great step towards safe- 
guarding this nation from being drawn into 
war is to use whatever influence it can, compati- 
ble with the traditional policy of our country 
of non-involvement, so as to make less likely 



the outbreak of a major war. This is a duty 
placed upon our Government which some may 
fail to perceive or choose to reject. But it must 
be clear to every one of us that the outbreak 
of a general war increases the dangers confront- 
ing the United States. This fact cannot be 
ignored. 

I would emphasize that the course proposed 
through the substitute legislation recommended 
by the Executive is consistent with the rules of 
international law and with the policy of our 
own country over a period of 150 years. The 
basis for the recommendations made is the firm 
intention of keeping this country from being 
drawn into war. If there existed any desire to 
assist or to injure particular foi'eign countries 
this Governmeilt would not have been endeavor- 
ing persistently, within the limitations of our 
traditional policy, over a period of many years 
to do its utmost to avoid the outbreak of a gen- 
eral war. I earnestly hope that the Congress 
will lend the fullest measure of its cooperation 
in the endeavor to avoid war in the first place 
and to place this country in a position of the 
greatest security possible, should war break out. 
In the tragic event that peace efforts fail and 
that a major war occurs, there will be general 
agreement within the United States that every 
effort must be exerted to keep this country from 
being drawn therein. 

I must also refer to the impression sedulously 
created to the effect that the sale of arms, muni- 
tions and implements of war by this country is 
immoral and that on this ground it should be 
suppressed in time of war. 

As a matter of fact almost all sales of arms 
and ammunition made in recent years by our 
nationals have been made to governments whose 
policies have been dedicated to the maintenance 
of peace, but who have felt the necessity of creat- 
ing or of augmenting their means of national 
self-defense, thereby protecting otherwise help- 
less men, women and children in the event that 
other powers resort to war. In the face of the 
present universal danger all countries, including 
our own, feel the necessity of increasing arma- 
ment, and small countries in particular are de- 
pendent upon countries like the United States 



46 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



which have the capacity to produce armaments. 
Our refusal to make it possible for them to ob- 
tain such means of necessary self-defense in a 
time of grave emergency, would contribute 
solely towards making more helpless the law- 
abiding and peace-devoted peoples of the world. 
If such action is moral, and if, on the contrary, 
sales of the means of self-defense for the pro- 
tection of peaceful and law-abiding peoples are 
inamoral, then a new definition of morality and 
immorality must be written. This task might 
be left to the proponents of the arms embargo. 

I must also refer to another impression 
created by propaganda to the effect that the 
abandonment of the arms embargo would in- 
crease power of action on the part of the 
Executive branch of the Government and con- 
versely that the maintenance of the embargo 
would serve as an additional check on the 
powers of the Executive. It is difficult to see 
how either of these propositions could possibly 
hold true. An impartial granting of access to 
American markets to all countries without 
distinction gives the Executive no additional 
power to choose among them and to commit 
this country to any line of policy or action 
which may lead it either into a dangerous con- 
troversy or into war with any foreign power. 

The legislative proposals which were recom- 
mended to the Congress through the communi- 
cations which I transmitted to Senator Pittman 
and to Congressman Bloom on May 27 ^ provid- 
ing for the safeguarding of our nation to the 
fullest possible extent from incurring the risks 
of involvement in war contemplate the elimi- 
nation of the existing arms embargo and are 
as follows : 

(1) To prohibit American ships from enter- 
ing combat areas; 

(2) To restrict travel by American citizens 
in combat areas; 

(3) To require that goods exported from the 
United States to belligerent countries shall be 
preceded by the transfer of title to the foreign 
purchasers ; 



' Press Releases, Vol. X^, No. !i0.5, June 3, 1939. pp. 
475-477. 



(4) To continue the existing legislation 
respecting loans and credits to belligerent 
nations ; 

(5) To regulate the solicitation and collec- 
tion in this country of funds for belligerents; 
and 

(6) To continue the National Munitions 
Control Board and the licensing system with 
respect to the importation and exportation of 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war. 

This six-point program was the best that 
could be devised after much painstaking 
thought and study, and after many conferences 
with members of the Congress, of how best to 
keep this country out of a conflict should it 
arise. It rests primarily on the established 
rules of international law, plus the curtail- 
ment of certain rights of our nationals, the 
exercise of which is permitted under interna- 
tional law but which might lead to contro- 
versies with belligerents and eventual involve- 
ment in foreign wars. 

There has thus been offered as a substitute 
for the present act a far broader and more 
effective set of provisions, which in no con- 
ceivable sense could breed trouble, but which 
to a far greater extent than the present act 
would both aid in making less likely a general 
war, and, while keeping strictly within the 
limits of neutrality, would reduce as far as 
possible the risk of this nation of being drawn 
into war if war comes. 

In connection with our foreign affairs, I 
think aU must agree that, unless a spirit of 
collaboration and cooperation characterizes the 
relations between the Executive and Legislative 
departments of the Government, the peace and 
other vital interests of this country will inevi- 
tably be jeopardized. 

Having spent the best years of my life as 
a member of the two Houses of Congress, I 
have the warmest feeling of friendliness to- 
ward the membership of, and the greatest 
respect for, the Legislative Department, and, 
in that spirit, I earnestly hope for the closest 
possible cooperation in matters affecting our 
country's best interests and its security in the 
present grave international situation. 



47 



At this time when critical conditions obtain 
throughout the greater part of the world I am 
sure that we are all equally persuaded that 
wliile the fiillest measure of constructive crit- 
icism is helpful and desirable, and is of course 
most welcome, partisanship should play no 
part in the determination of the foreign policy 
of this country. 

In the present situation of danger a peaceful 
nation like ours cannot complacently close its 
eyes and ears in formulating a peace and neu- 
trality policy, as though abnormal and crit- 
ical conditions did not exist. The entire ques- 
tion of peace and neutrality at this serious 
juncture in its possible effects upon the safety 
and the interest of the United States during 
coming months is of the utmost importance. 
This question should, in my judgment, receive 
full and careful consideration and be acted 
upon by this Government without umiecessary 
or undue delay. 

CoRDELx. Hull 



(6) To continue the National Munitions Con- 
trol Board and the system of arms export and 
import licenses. 



+ 4 -f 

DEATH OF CONGRESSMAN 
McREYNOLDS 

[Released to the press July 11] 

Statement liy the Secretary of State: 

The death of my lifelong friend, Congress- 
man Sam D. McReynolds, fills me with deepest 
sorrow. I never knew a more honest, faithful 
public servant or a more loyal friend. His 
achievements are outstanding and lasting. 
His public services will be greatly missed. His 
standards were high, and his course and acts 
throughout his distinguished career were con- 
scientious, unselfish, and high-minded. The 
people of Tennessee and his friends every- 
where will feel a keen sense of personal loss. 



[Released to the press July 11] 

Statement of the Secretary of State at his press 
conference July 11: 

I feel as I have felt throughout each stage 
of the consideration of peace and neutrality 
legislation during this session of Congress, that 
the interests of peace and the security of the 
United States require that we should continue 
to urge the adoption of the principles of the 
six-point program. Those six points are as 
follows : 

(1) To prohibit American ships, irrespective 
of what they may be carrying, from entering 
combat areas; 

(2) To restrict travel by American citizens 
in combat areas; 

(3) To provide that the export of goods des- 
tined for belligerents shall be preceded by trans- 
fer of title to the foreign purchaser; 

(4) To continue the existing legislation re- 
specting loans and credits to nations at war; 

(5) To regulate the solicitation and collection 
in this country of funds for belligerents; 



4 + >■ 

VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF 
THE BRAZILIAN CHIEF OF STAFF 

[Released to the press July 11] 

Telegram from the Chief of Staff of the Bra- 
zilian Army (General Pedro Goes Monteiro) 
to the President of the United States: 

LotJisviLLE, Kt., July 3, 1939. 
The opportunity of being in great country 
on day commemoration its independence is for 
me an event not to be forgotten. In name of 
the Brazilian Army I have the honor to extend 
through your Excellency my congratulations 
to American people to whom Brazilian people 
are bound by strong ties and bonds of friend- 
ship. With the respects of Brazilian military 
delegation which I lead, for the great Presi- 
dent of friendly nation, I send to your Ex- 
cellency most cordial greetings on your Inde- 
pendence Day. 

Gen. P. Goes Mokteiro 



48 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Reply of President Roosevelt: 

July 8, 1939. 
I sincerely ajjpreciate your generous tele- 
gram on this country's Independence Day and 
I reciprocate warmly the cordial wishes you 
expressed in the name of the Brazilian Army 
and on behalf of the Brazilian Military of- 
ficers accompanying you. I wish to express 
my gi-atification at the friendly and mutually 
beneficial spirit of cooperation between the 
United States and Brazil which is again mani- 
fested by your most welcome visit to this 
country. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press July 15] 

Changes in the Foreign Service of the United 
States since July 8, 1939 : 

Stuart E. Grummon, of Newark, N. J., first 
secretary of embassy and consul at Moscow, has 
been designated first secretary of embassy at 
Tokyo, Japan. 

David Williamson, of Colorado Springs, 
Colo., second secretary of embassy at London, 
England, has been designated second secretary 
of embassy at Rome, Italy. 

Edward J. Sparks, of New York, N. Y., now 
assigned to the Department of State, has been 
designated second secretary of legation and con- 
sul at Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Mr. Sparks will 
serve in dual capacity. 

Allen Haden, of Memphis, Tenn., third sec- 
retary of embassy at Buenos Aires, Argentina, 
has been designated third secietary of legation 
and vice consul at Ciudad Trujillo, Dominican 
Republic. Mr. Haden will serve in dual 
capacity. 



Julius Wadsworth, of Middletown, Conn., 
consul at Danzig, now on leave of absence in 
the United States, will resign from the For- 
eign Service effective September 6, 1939. 

Robert M. McCIintock, of Altadena, Calif., 
third secretary of legation and vice consul at 
Ciudad Trujillo, Dominican Republic, has been 
designated third secretary of legation and vice 
consul at Helsinki, Finland. Mr. McCIintock 
will serve in dual cajjacity. 



FOREIGN SERVICE REGULATIONS 

The Federal Register for July 11, 1939, Vol- 
ume 4, No. 131, pages 2911-2912, contains Execu- 
tive Order No. 8196, amending Chapter IX, 
"Relations With Other Departments," of the 
Foreign Service Regulations of the United 
States. This amendment consolidates miscel- 
laneous sections throughout the Regulations 
but effects no material alterations. 



The Far East 



U. S. PROTEST AGAINST JAPANESE 
BOMBINGS OF CHUNGKING 

[Released to tlie press July 10] 

In connection with the bombings of Chung- 
king on July 6 and 7 by Japanese planes, 
American diplomatic and consular officials have 
made appropriate representations to the Japa- 
nese authorities against the indiscriminate 
bombings which seriously endangered Amer- 
ican life and property. The American Em- 
bassy at Tokyo reports that on July 10 the 
American Charge. d'Affaires at Tokyo, under 
instructions, made emphatic representations to 
the Japanese Minister for Foreign Affairs in 
regard to the matter. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled by the Treaty Division 



ORGANIZATION 

Protocol for the Amendment of the Pre- 
amble, of Articles 1, 4, and 5, and of the 
Annex to the Covenant of the League of 
Nations 

New Zealand 

According to a circular letter from the 
League of Nations dated June 15, 1939, the 
instrument of ratification by New Zealand of 
the Protocol for the Amendment of the Pre- 
amble, of Articles 1, 4, and 5, and of the Annex 
to the Covenant of the League of Nations, 
which was opened for signature at Geneva on 
September 30, 1938, was deposited with the 
Secretariat on June 5, 1939. 

According to the information of the Depart- 
ment the protocol has been ratified by the fol- 
lowing countries: China, Estonia, Finland, 
Great Britain, India, Latvia, Mexico, New 
Zealand, Norway, and Rumania. 

Denmark has signed the protocol but has not 
yet completed the signature by ratification. 

EDUCATION 

Proces-Verbal Concerning the Application 
of Articles IV, V, VI, VII, XII, and XIII 
of the Convention of October 11, 1933, for 
Facilitating the International Circulation 
of Films of an Educational Character 

Latvia 

According to a circular letter from the 
League of Nations dated Jvme 29. 1939, the 
Proces-Verbal Concerning the Application of 
Articles IV, V, VI, VII, XII, and XIII, of 
tlie Convention of October 11, 1933, for Facili- 
tating the International Circulation of Films 
of an Educational Character, which was opened 



for signature at Geneva on September 12, 1938, 
was signed on behalf of Latvia on June 20, 
1939. 

The letter adds that "as a result of the defin- 
itive signatures affixed to the said Proces- 
verbal by the Plenipotentiaries of the Govern- 
ments of the Union of South Africa, Denmark, 
Egypt, Greece, India, Ireland, Latvia, Norway, 
Sweden and Switzerland, and of the Assembly 
Resolution of September 26th, 1938, author- 
ising the International Committee on Intel- 
lectual Co-operation to perform the functions 
entrusted to it by the aforesaid Proces-verbal, 
this Proces-verbal will, in conformity with its 
paragraph III, enter into force sixty days 
after the date of the present notification, i. e. 
on August 28th, 1939." 

HEALTH 

International Sanitary Convention for 
Aerial Navigation (Treaty Series No. 901) 

Burma 

The American Minister to the Netherlands 
transmitted to the Secretary of State with a 
despatch dated June 22, 1939, a copy of a com- 
munication received from the Ministry for For- 
eign Affairs stating that by a note dated June 
9, 1939, the British Government informed the 
Netherlands Government of its desire to make 
the International Sanitary Convention for 
Aerial Navigation, signed at The Hague on 
April 12, 1933, applicable to Burma. 

The notice was made in accordance with the 
provisions of ai'ticle 65, paragraph 4, of the 
convention. 

According to the information of the Depart- 
ment the countries which have ratified or ad- 
hered to the convention are: LTnited States of 

49 



50 

America; Australia; Austria; Belgium; Bo- 
livia; Brazil; Chile; Egypt; Germany; Great 
Britain, including the following territories: 
Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda, Burma, British 
Guiana, British Honduras, Cyprus, Falkland 
Islands and Dependencies, Gold Coast (Colony, 
Ashanti, Northern Ten-itories, Togoland under 
British mandate). Hong Kong, Kenya (Colony 
and Protectorate), Leeward Islands (Antigua, 
Dominica, Montserrat, St. Kitts, Nevis, Virgin 
Islands), Federated Malay States (Negri 
Sembilan, Pahang, Perak, Selangor), Nonfed- 
erated Malay States ( Johore, Kedah, Kelantan, 
Perils, Trengganu, and Brunei), Mauritius, 
Nigeria (Colony and Protectorate, Cameroons 
under British mandate), North Borneo, Nyasa- 
land Protectorate, Palestine and Trans-Jordan, 
Sarawak, Sierra Leone (Colony and Protec- 
torate), Straits Settlements, Tanganyika, 
Uganda, Zanzibar, Papua, Norfolk Island, New 
Guinea, Northern Rhodesia, Fiji Islands, Gil- 
bert and Ellice Islands Colony, Solomon 
Islands, Tonga, and Ceylon; Greece; Iraq; 
Italy; Liberia; Monaco; Morocco; Nether- 
lands; Poland; Rumania; Sudan; Syria and 
Lebanon ; Tunis ; and Turkey. 

FINANCE 

Convention for the Suppression of Counter- 
feiting Currency, and Protocol 

Rwnania 

According to a circular letter from the League 
of Nations dated June 28, 1939, the instrument 
of ratification by Rumania of the Convention 
for the Suppression of Counterfeiting Currency 
signed at Geneva on April 20, 1929, which was 
deposited with the Secretariat on March 7, 
1939, should now be considered as also bearing 
ratification of the protocol annexed to the con- 
vention, which was signed by Rumania on the 
same date. 

The notification from the Rumanian Govern- 
ment regarding the ratification of the protocol 
was received at the Secretariat on June 14, 1939. 

According to the information of the Depart- 
ment the countries which are parties to the con- 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

vention and the protocol as a result of ratifica- 
tion or adherence are as follows : Belgium, Bra- 
zil, Bulgaria, Colombia, Cuba, Czechoslovakia, 
Free City of Danzig, Denmark, Ecuador, Es- 
tonia, Finland, Germany, Greece, Hmigary, 
Ireland, Italy, Mexico, Monaco, the Netherlands, 
Norway, Poland, Portugal, Rumania, Spain, 
Turkey, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, 
and Yugoslavia. 

The convention and protocol entered into 
force on February 22, 1931. 

LABOR 

Conventions of the International Labor 
Conference 

Switzerland 

According to a circular letter from the League 
of Nations dated June 22, 1939, the instrument 
of ratification by Switzerland of the Conven- 
tion Ensuring Benefit or Allowances to the In- 
voluntarily Unemployed, adopted on Jmie 23, 
1934, by the International Labor Conference at 
its eighteenth session, was registered with the 
Secretariat on June 14, 1939. According to the 
information of the Department the convention 
has been ratified by and is in force between 
Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Ireland, 
New Zealand and Switzerland. 



TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

International Telecommunication Conven- 
tion (Treaty Series No. 867)= 

Honduras 

There is printed below a translation of a 
letter received on June 3, 1939, by the Bureau 
of the International Telecommunication Union 
at Bern from the Ministry for Foreign Affairs 
of Honduras, as published in notification No. 
334 of June 16, 1939, from the Bureau : 

"Under date of May 13, 1939, this Ministry 
of Foreign Affairs transmitted to His Excel- 



' See Treaty Information, bulletin No. 112, January 
1939, p. 17 ; test of convention, 49 Stat. (pt. 2) 2391. 



lency the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the 
Republic of Spain the instrument of ratifica- 
tion by the Government of the Republic of 
Honduras of the International Telecommuni- 
cation Convention and of the General Radio 
Regulations, as likewise of the Final Protocol, 
which acts were signed at Madrid on December 
9, 1932. Two copies of the official journal La 
Gaceta, No. 9898 of May 15, 1936, in which is 
published the legislative decree of ratification 
No. 98 of February 20 of the same year, were 
enclosed. 

"In compliance with the provisions of article 
7 of the aforementioned convention, I beg to 
notify the Bureau of the Union of the approval 
given by my Government to the General Radio 
Regulations and its Final Protocol referred to 
above, sending you herewith an issue of tJie 
above-mentioned gazette." 

Status of RATinrATioxs and Adherences to the International 
Telecommunication Convention and Subsidiary Agreements 



Country 



United States of America (applying 
also to Alaska, Hawaiian Islands 
and other American possessions in 
Polynesia, the PhUippine Islands, 
Puerto Rico and other American 
possessions in the Antilles, and to 
the Panama Canal Zone). 

Afghanistan 

Albania 

Australia,* including the territories of 
Papua, Norfolk Island, New 
Guinea, and Nauru. 

Austria 

Belgium, including Belgian Congo 
and the Territory of Ruanda 
Urundi. 
Belgium, for the S. A. Beige de Cables 
Teifgraphique. 

Brazil 

Bulgaria. __ 

Canada 

China ' 

Colombia 

Cuba 

Czechoslovakia _ 

Danzig. _ 

Denmark 

Denmark, for Det Store Nordiske 
Telegrsfselskab. 

Dominican Republic 

Egypt 

Estonia _ _.. 

Ethiopia (Abyssinia) 

Finland 

France (including Colonies) 




Acts ratified or 
adhered to " 



A, B, D, E. 0._ 
A,B, C, D,E, F, 
G, H. 

A, B, D, E, Q... 

A, B, C. D, E, F 

A, E, F, G 

A, B, 

A, B, C,D, E. F 
A,B, C, D,E,F, 

G. 

A, B, D 

A, B, CD, E,F, 

G. 
A,B,C,D,E, F, 

O, H. 
A, B,C, D, E, F, 

G. 
A, B, D, E 

A, B, C, E, F.... 
A, B, C, D, E, F, 

O. 
A, B, C,D,E, F, 

G. 

A, E, F . 

A, B,C,D,E, F, 

O, H. 
A, B,C, D,E, F, 

G. 



Date of de- 
posit of rati- 
fication or 
adherence 



June 13,1934 



Oct. 3, 1935 
May 6, 1935 
Mar. 20, 1934 



Mar. 23, 1934 
Dec. 2, 1933 



May 30,1934 

Jan. 21,1938 

Dec. 13,1933 
Mar. 6,1934 

June 6. 1935 
Nov. 7,1934 

Apr. 13,1938 

Jan. 5. 1934 

Aug. 22,1938 

Feb. 6, 1934 

K\lg. 14.1934 

Dec. 6, 1935 

Jan. 11,1934 

Jan. 19,1935 

Not. 14, 1934 

Dec. 30,1933 

May 6, 1938 



51 

Status of Ratifications and Adherences to the International 
^ELEcoMM^NlCATIO^^ Convention and Subsidiary Agreements— 
Continued 



Country 



France, for Cables TfilSgrapbiques, 
Radio-France, GfnSrale Ti^l^- 
graphie Sans Fil, SociSt^ Radio- 
Orient, and Cables Sud-Am6ri- 
cains.** 

Germany 

Germany, for the Deutsch-Atlant- 
ische Telegrafengesellschaft. 

Great Britain • 

Great Britain, for Cable and Wireless, 
Ltd., African Direct Telegraph Co., 
Ltd., Cuba Submarine Telegraph 
Co., Ltd., Direct West India Cable 
Co., Ltd., Eastern Telegraph Co., 
Ltd., Eastern Extension Austral- 
asia and China Telegraph Co., Ltd., 
Eastern and South Africa Tele- 
graph Co., Ltd., Europe and Azores 
Telegraph Co., Ltd., Halifa-it and 
Bermudas Cable Co., Ltd., Pacific 
and European Telegraph Co., Ltd., 
River Plate Telegraph Co., Ltd., 
West African Telegraph Co.. Ltd., 
West Coast of America Telegraph 
Co., Ltd., West India and Panama 
Telegraph Co., Ltd., Western Tele- 
graph Co.. Ltd. 

Great Britain for Indian Radio and 
Cable Communications, Ltd. 

Great Britain for— 

Aden Colony... 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Basutoland 

Bechuanaland Protectorate 

Bermuda 

British Guiana 

British Honduras 

British Solomon Islands Protector- 
ate. 

Burma 

Ceylon 

Cyprus 

Falkland Islands and Dependencies- 
Fiji Islands- 

Gambia (Colony and Protectorate) . 



Acts ratified or 
adhered to • 



A, E 

A 

A, E 

A,B, C,D,E,F, 

G. 
A, B, D,E, 0_._ 



A,E, F, G 

A, B,D, E, F, G 

A, B, C, D 

A, B, C, D 

A,B, C, D 

A, B, C, D 

A,B, C, D 

A, B, C, D, E, F 
A, B, C, D, E, F 
A, B, C, D 

A, B,D, E, F, G 
A, B, C, D, E, F 
A, B,C, D, E, F 

A, B, CD 

A, B, C, D, E, F 
A, B, C, D 



Date of de- 
posit of rati- 
fication or 
adherence 



Mar. 6, 1934 



June 29,1934 
Sept. 3,1934 

May 29, 1935 

Oct. 4, 1934 



Apr. 26,1935 



Apr. 1, 1937 
Aug. 23,1936 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Apr. 1, 1937 
Aug. 23,1935 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 



« Acts are indicated as follows: 

A: International Telecommunication Convention. 

B: General Radio Regulations. 

C: Final Radio Protocol. 

D: Additional Radio Regulations. 

E: Telegraph Regulations. 

F: Final Telegraph Protocol. 

G: Telephone Regulations. 

H: Additional or European Protocol. 
' The acceptance of the regulations and protocols was reported Nov. 
20, 1935. 

'^ At the time of deposit of its instrument of ratification, the representa 
live of the National Government of the Republic of China stated: 

"The National Government of the Republic of China formally 
declares that it does not recognize or grant to any foreign country or to 
the nationals thereof the right to install or operate, without the express 
consent of the Chinese Government, any telegraph or radio station in 
the concessions, establishments, leased territories, Legations quarter, 
railway zones or other similar districts, and that nothing in this Con- 
vention or the annexed Regulations concerning the concessions and other 
special zones mentioned shall be interpreted, explicitly or implicitly, in 
such a way as to be susceptible of infringing in any way the sovereign 
rights of China." 

<" The Compagnie Gfn^rale de Tflfgraphie Sans Fil and the Sociftf 
Radio-Orient have declared, in conformity with the decision made by 
France and inserted in paragraph 4 of the final protocol of the telegraph 
regulations, that they do not accept any obligation relative to paragraph 
2 of article 26 and article 31 of the said convention. 

■ Notice was given Aug. 23, 1935, of adherence to the regulations and 
protocols. 



52 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



SiATCf OF Ratifications and Adheeences to the Inteknationai 
Telecommunication Convention and Subsidiary Agreements— 
Continued 



Status of Ratifications and Adherences to the International 
Telecommunication Convention and Subsidiary Agreements— 
Continued 



Country 


Acts ratified or 
adhered to <» 


Date of de- 
posit of rati- 
fication or 
adherence 


Great Britain for— Continued. 


A, B, C, D, E, F. 

A, B, C, D 

A, B. C, D, E, F. 

A, B, C, D,E, F. 
A, B, CD 

A, E, F 


Aug. 23, 1935 


Gilbert and Ellice Islands Colony- „ 
Gold Coast (Colony, Ashanti, 
Northern Territories, and Togo- 
land under British mandate). 
Hone Kone 


Do. 
Do. 

Do. 


Jamaica (including Turks and Cai- 
cos Islands and Cayman Islands). 

Kenya (Colony nnd Protectorate)-. 

Leeward Islands (AntiRua, Do- 
minica, Montserrat, St. Kittsand 
Nevis, Virgin Islands). 

Malay States (Straits Settlements 
and Federated Malay States of 
Perak, Selangor, Negri Sembilan, 
and Pahang, comprising the Ma- 
lay Postal Union; and the Non- 
federated Malay States of Johore, 
Kedah— also with telegraph serv- 
ices at Perils- Kelantan, Treng- 
ganu, and Brunei). 

Malta 


Do. 
Do. 


A, B, C, D -- 

A, B,C,D, E, F. 

A, B, CD, E, F. 
A, B, C, D, E, F. 
A,B, C, D 

A, B,CD, E,F. 
A, B, C, D, E, F. 

A,B,CD 

A,B,C,D,E,F.. 

A, B, CD - 

A, B, CD 

A, B, CD 

A,B,CD,E,F.. 

A, B, CD 

A, B, C, D 

A, B, C,D,E,r.. 

A,B,C,D 

A, E, F 


Do. 
Do. 

Do. 




Do. 


Nigeria (Colony, Protectorate, and 
Cameroons under British man- 
date). 

North Borneo State . . 


Do. 
Do. 


Northern Rhodesia 


Do. 


Nvasaland Protectorate 


Do. 


Palestine - 


Do. 


Saint Helena and Ascension 

Sarawak -- . 


Do. 
Do. 




Do. 


Sierra Leone (Colony and Protec 
torate). 


Do. 
Do. 




Do. 


Tanganyika Territory . 


Do. 




Do. 




Do. 




A,B,C,D 

A, B, CD, E, F.. 
A, B, CD 

A, B, CD 

A, B, D, E.- 

A, B, C 


Do. 


Uganda Protectorate 


Do. 


Windward Islands (Grenada, Saint 
Lucia, and Saint Vincent). 


Do. 
Do. 


Haiti... 


Aug. 3, 1935 




May 13. 1939 




A, B, D, E, G..- 
A,B,C,D,E, F, 

G. 
A,B,C,D,E,F, 

G. 
A, B, E 


June 10, 1935 


Iceland _ . - 


Mar. 9, 1931 


India/ _ 


Apr. 30, 1934 




July 20, 1934 


Irish Free State 


A,B,C,D,E,F, 
G, H. 

A 


Feb. 15, 1935 


Italy,/ including Italian Colonies and 


Dec. 26, 1933 


the Italian Islands of the Aegean. 
Italy, for Italeable and Italo-Radio — 
Japan . _ 


A,B,D.E,G .. 

A, B,CD,E, F, 
O. 

fA, E, F, O 

\B, C, D 


Jan. 27,1934 
Mar. 1, 1934 


TimrfiTnhnrg 


June 9. 1934 






Mexico -. - 


A,B,C,D, E,F, 

O, H. 
A, B, D, E. G..-- 

A, E, F 


Oct. 20 1935 


Morocco (French Zone) 

Morocco (Spanish Zone) 


Feb. 23, 1934 
June 27 1934 


Netherlands, including Netherlands 


A,B,C,D.E,F, 
G. 

A,B,C,D 

A, B, D 


Dec. 23.1933 
Aug. 23. 1935 


New Hebrides 


Dec. 9 1938 


New Zealand / . 


A,B,CD,E,F.. 
A, B, D 


Mar. 6, 1934 


Norway 


Dec. 15 19.37 




A, B, D 


Mar. 29, 1935 


Poland 


A,B,C,D,E,F, 
G. 

A,B,D,E,0 

A, B,C,D,E, F.. 
A,B,CD, E, F.. 
A,B,CD,E, F, 
G. 


May 31, 1934 


Portugal (including Colonies) 


Feb. 5. 1938 
Feb. 16, 1938 


Southern Rhodesia.. _ 

Spain _ 


Aug. 23, 1935 







Country 



Spain for — 

Direct Spanish Telegraph Co.. 

Spanish Colonies 

Spanish Territory of the Gulf of 
Guinea. 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Syria and the Lebanon 

Turkey 

Union of South Africa, including 

South. West Africa. 
Union of South Africa, for Overseas 

Communications of South Africa, 

Ltd., Capetown. 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. . . 

Uruguay 

Vatican City State 

Venezuela 

Yemen 

Yugoslavia 



Acts ratified or 
adhered to <■ 



A, E 

A, E, F 

A, B, CD 

A 

A,B,D, E,G... 
A, B, C,D, E,F, 

G. 
A,B, CD,E, F, 

G,H. 
A,B,C,D, E, F, 

G. 
A, B, D, E, O.. 



A,B,C,D, E, F, 

G. 
A, B,CD,E,F, 

G. 
A,B,CD,E,G 
A,B,C,D, E.F, 

O, H. 

A, E 

A 



Date of de- 
posit of rati- 
fication or 
adherence 



Apr. 30,1934 

June 27,1934 

Do. 

June 23, 1937 
Aug. 1, 1934 
May 22, 1934 

Nov. 1,1935 

May 30, 1935 

Oct. 5, 1935 

June 15,1935 

Apr. 27,1936 

Dec. 27,1933 
May 9, 1935 

May 18,1936 
Aug. 28,1934 



International Conferences, 
Commissions, etc. 



"See footnote on p. 61 . 

' The acceptance of the regulations and protocols was reported Nov. 20, 
1936. 



EIGHTH INTERNATIONAL CONFER- 
ENCE ON PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

[Released to the press July 11] 

This Government has accepted the invitation 
of the Swiss Government to participate in the 
Eighth International Conference on Public In- 
struction, which will convene at Geneva on July 
17, 1939. The President has approved the ap- 
pointment of Walter H. Gaumnitz, Ph. D., 
Office of Education, Department of the Interior, 
as delegate on the part of the United States. 

This Conference will be held under the aus- 
pices of the International Bureau of Education, 
an organization formed with the avowed pur- 
pose of attempting to provide the widest 
possible dissemination of information on 
educational reform and of initiating scientific 
research in this sphere. While the United 
States is not a member of the Bureau it was 
represented at the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and 
Seventh International Conferences on Public 
Instruction. 



JULY 15, 1939 



53 



INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON 
GRAPHOLOGY 

[Released to the press Julj' 13] 

This Government has accepted the invitation 
of tlie Belgian Government to participate in tlie 
International Congress on Graphology, which 
will be held at Liege from September 16 to 19, 
1939, under the auspices of the International 
Water Technique Exposition. The President 
has approved the appointment of Edmund P. 
Coffey, Chief of tlie Technical Laboratory, Fed- 
eral Bureau of Investigation, Department of 
Justice, as delegate on the part of the United 
States. 

The invitation contemplates the participation 
in the Congress of Graphologists of colleges of 
physicians, neurological and psychiatric asso- 
ciations, characterological and pedoteclmical 
societies, sociological institutes, schools of ergol- 
ogy, criminology, and social service, reformative 
institutions, etc. The purpose of the Congress 
is to discuss the present state of graphology and 
to illustrate to men of science the scientific char- 
acter and the possibilities of graphology. 



Legislation 



Agriculture, as subuiitted iu tlie budget for the fiscal 
year eiuliug June 30, 1940. (H. Doc. 393, 76th Cong., 
1st sess.) 2 pp. 50. 

Commuuication from the President of the United States 
trnusmitting supplemental estimates of appropriations 
for the tiseal .vear 1940, amounting to $19,000, for the 
Department of State. (For expenses for participation 
in the International Radio Consulting Committee, 
Stockholm, 1940, and the Seventh International Con- 
gress for the Rheumatic Diseases, 1940.) (H. Doc. 
394, 76th Cong., 1st sess. ) 2 pp. 50. 

Joint resolution providing for the presentation through 
the American Minister to Greece of a certain monu- 
ment to the people of Greece. {Public Res. 26, 76th 
Cong.) 1 p. 50. 



Publications 



Commimieation from the President of the United States 
transmitting a modification of the estimate of appropri- 
ation for Foreign Agricultural Service, Department of 



Department or State 

Peace Conference Records and Other State Depart- 
ment Publication Projects : Relevant extracts from 
the "Department of State Appropriation Bill for 1940: 
Hearings Before the Subcommittee of the Committee 
on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Seventy- 
sixth Congress, First Session, on the Department of 
State Appropriation Bill for 1940" and from the Re- 
port (No. 658, 76th Congress, 1st Session) of the 
Committee on Appropriations. Publication 1343. 72 
pp. 50. 

Some Problems of Today : Address by Cordell Hull, 
Secretary of State, before the Chicago Sunday Eve- 
ning Club, Chicago, May 28, 1939. Publication 1348. 
10 pp. 50. 

Other Government Agencies 

Agreement for the Exchange of Parcel Post Packages 
Between the Republic of Argentina and the United 
States of America. — Signed at Buenos Aires February 
28, 1939, and at Washington April 8, 1939. (Post 
Ofiice Department.) 14 pp. 50. 



U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1939 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WITH THE APPEOVAL OF THE DIBECTOR OF THE BUREAU OP THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 




JULY 22, 1939 
Vol. I: No. 4 Publication 1 357 

Qontents 

Paga 

Peace and neutrality legislation 57 

The United States Antarctic Service 57 

United States advisoi-y economic mission to Venezuela . . 58 

Presentation of letters of credence : Honduras 58 

Exportation of tin-plate scrap 60 

Inauguration of the President of Paraguay 60 

The Far East : 

Letters from the Secretary of State to Senator 

Pittman 61 

Change in name of Siam to Thailand 61 

Treaty information : 
Aviation : 

Convention for the Unification of Certain Eules Re- 
lating to the Precautionary Attachment of Air- 
craft 62 

Labor : 

Conventions of the International Labor Conference . 62 
Telecommunications : 

International Telecommunication Convention 

(Treaty Series No. 867) 64 

Eegional Radio Convention for Central America, 

Panama, and the Canal Zone 64 

Education : 

Declaration Regarding the Teaching of History ... 65 
Arbitration: 

Permanent Court of Arbitration 65 

International conferences, commissions, etc. : 

Thirty-first Esperanto World Congress 65 

International Sugar Council 65 

Traffic in arms : 

Monthly statistics 66 

Publications 77 



m\ 8T 9nv 

PEACE AND NEUTRALITY LEGISLATION 



IKelpased to the press by the White House July 18] 

Senator Burkley said : 

"Tlie consensus of opinion on the part of 
those members of the Senate present was that 
no action on neutrality legishition can be ob- 
tained in tlie Senate at the present session and 
that a majority of the Senate would concur in 
this view. 

"Senator McNary expressed the same belief. 

"They agreed that a majority of the Senate 
would consider neutrality legislation at the be- 
gimiing of the next session." 



[Released to the press by the White House July 18] 

"The President and the Secretary of State 
maintained the definite position that failure by 
the Senate to take action now would weaken the 
leadership of the United States in exercising its 
potent influence in the cause of preserving peace 
among other nations in the event of a new ciisis 
in Europe between now and next January." 



-f -f ^ -f -f -f -♦■ 



THE UNITED STATES ANTARCTIC SERVICE 



By letters dated July 7, 1939, the President 
requested the Secretaries of Slate, the Treasury, 
the Navy, and the Interior each to designate a 
representative to form an executive committee 
for the purpose of organizing, directing, and 
coordinating the conduct of an investigation 
and survey of the natural resources of the land 
and sea areas of the Antarctic regions for which 
there is provided an appropriation of $340,000 
in the urgent deficiency and supplemental ap- 
propriation act approved June 30, 1939. 

The President has designated the organiza- 
tion of the Government's activities in the Ant- 
arctic as The United States Antarctic Service. 

Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd, United 

163395—39 



States Navy, retired, was designated by the 
President to serve as commanding officer of the 
expedition which is being dispatched by The 
United States Antarctic Service and was also 
designated as an ex-officio member of the 
executive committee. 

The following have been appointed by their 
respective Departments as members of the exec- 
utive committee; Ernest Gruening, Director of 
the Division of Territories and Island Posses- 
sions of the Department of the Interior; Rear 
Admiral Russell R. Waesche, Commandant of 
the Coast Guard ; Capt. Charles C. Hartigan, of 
the United States Navy; and Hugh S. Gum- 
ming, Jr., of the Department of State. 

57 



58 

UNITED STATES ADVISORY ECO- 
NOMIC MISSION TO VENEZUELA 

[Released to the press July 18] 

At the request of the Venezuelan Government, 
the President of the United States has author- 
ized the temporary detail of several officers of 
the Government to advise the Venezuelan Gov- 
ernment in commercial, fiscal, taxation, mone- 
tary, and customs matters, under the provisions 
of Public, No. 63, of May 3, 1939. The advisory 
economic mission plans to depart from New 
York for Venezuela on July 21, 1939, to remain 
in Venezuela for approximately 3 months. 

The members of the mission are the Honor- 
able A. Manuel Fox, United States Tariff Com- 
missioner, who will be technical adviser in 
tariffs and commercial policies and chairman 
of the mission ; Mr. James H. Edwards, techni- 
cal adviser in customs administration; Mr. 
Harold V. V. Fay, commercial policy analyst of 
the United States Tariff Commission, who will 
be assistant on tariffs and commercial policies 
and secretary of the mission ; Mr. Martin Krost, 
senior economist of the Board of Governors of 
the Federal Reserve System, who will be tech- 
nical adviser in taxation methods and monetary 
matters; and Mr. Harold Spiegel, associate 
economic analyst of the Treasury Department, 
who will be research analyst. 

■f -f -f 

PRESENTATION OF LETTERS OF 
CREDENCE 

Honduras 

[Released to the press July 18] 

Translation of remarks of the neivly appointed 
Minister of HoTiduras, Dr. Don. Julian R. 
Caceres, upon the occasion of the presentation 
of his letters of credence, July 18: 

Mr. President: 

I have the honor to present to Your Ex- 
cellency the letters of credence whereby Gen- 
eral Don Tiburcio Carias A., Constitutional 
President of the Republic of Honduras, ac- 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

credits me in the capacity of Envoy Extraordi- 
nary and Minister Plenipotentiary of his Gov- 
ernment before the one over which Your 
Excellency worthily and meritoriously presides. 
I present at the same time the letter of recall 
of my honorable predecessor. 

The ties of good and cordial friendship which 
happily have existed and do exist between the 
people and the Government of the United 
States and the people and Government of Hon- 
duras are traditional. 

His Excellency President Carias instructs me 
very particularly to preserve and strengthen 
still more, if possible, those ties of good and 
cordial friendship. 

After my pleasing experiences in the diplo- 
matic capacity in which it has befallen me to 
act during my stay in this enchanting city of 
Washington and from which I have been able 
to observe the exquisite courtesy and spirit of 
friendly aid which distinguish the eminent col- 
laborators of Your Excellency's Government, 
emulating the cordiality and courtesy of Your 
Excellency, I do not have the slightest doubt 
that that noble objective, .so pleasing and honor- 
able for me, will be more easily attainable, par- 
ticularly when I consider that the Government 
of my country seconds and accepts as an essen- 
tial basis for the stability of peace and the 
normal growth of peoples the high and noble 
principles of continental solidarity and in- 
ternational cooperation proclaimed by Your 
Excellency. 

The Government of Honduras, ever attentive 
to the maintenance and strengthening of its 
international relations and ever eager to lend 
its aid in the attainment of the progress of 
peoples and orderly international existence, 
thinks and believes, as does Your Excellency, 
that only the rules of right and justice can 
properly guide and direct the nations "with 
and within a world of neighbors." 

I'lie common holding of those ideals and the 
common interest in those of democracy, the 
institutions of which the Government of Hon- 
duras maintains and defends in its system, 
render more propitious between the United 
States and the people of my country that policy 



JULY 22, 1939 



59 



of positive rapprochement^ mutual respect, and 
reciprocal cooperation which Your Excellency 
has outlined so brilliantly and which the Gov- 
ernment of Honduras is following fully, feeling 
itself to be solidary with that of Your Excel- 
lency in the efforts to have, in the international 
connuunit}', right be tlie factor that controls 
and decides, as the sole means of stabilizing 
peace, safeguarding justice, and augmenting 
the spiritual and cultural patrimony of the 
nations. 

That joint sharing of principles and also the 
geographical nearness of the two countries and 
their growing commercial and cultural inter- 
change, make it clear, in the logical compre- 
hension of their aspirations and interests, that 
the United States and Honduras are and ought 
to be "good neighbors," as their respective Gov- 
ernments are and ought to be good friends. No 
better support could be found for the perform- 
ance of my dut}', which has to do with drawing 
closer tlie relations of good and upright friend- 
ship existing between the two countries and 
Governments. 

In conclusion, permit me to present to Your 
Excellency the cordial greeting of highest 
esteem which President General Carias sends 
to Your Excellency through me and to join in 
the fervent wishes which he expresses, inter- 
preting the feeling of the people and the Gov- 
ernment of Honduras, for the increasing pros- 
perity of the people of the United States, the 
continuous success of its enlightened Govern- 
ment, and the personal happiness of its illus- 
trious and renowned President. 



President RooseveWs reply to the remarhs of 
Dr. Don Jtdian R. Caceres: 

Mr. Minister : 

I am happy to accept from you the letters 
V. hereby His Excellency the President of Hon- 
duras accredits j'ou as Envoy Extraordinary 
and Minister Plenipotentiary of his Govern- 
ment to the Government of the United States 
of America. 



I likewise receive from you the letters of re- 
call of your distinguished predecessor, Seiior 
Don Julio Lozano, who during his period of 
service in this country enjoyed such general 
esteem and made so many warm friends. 

I note with pleasure and heartily reciprocate 
the expression of hope which you convey on be- 
half of His Excellency President Carias that 
the close ties of friendship which have come to 
be traditional between the peoples and Govern- 
ments of Honduras and the United States may 
be still further strengthened. As you so aptly 
remark, the geographical nearness of our two 
countries, their expanding commercial rela- 
tions, their mutually beneficial cultural inter- 
change, and their common belief in those ideals 
of democracy which are the foundation of the 
institutions of government of this hemisphere 
render it the more natural that they should con- 
tinue to be the good friends and neighbors they 
have happily been in the past. 

In the furtherance of these common aims and 
in the development of new fields of economic, so- 
cial, and cultural cooperation between Hon- 
duras and the United States, you may rest as- 
sured, Mr. Minister, that I, personally, and the 
officials of my Government will at all times be 
prepared to assist and encourage you in the 
discharge of your important mission. I have 
no doubt that the several years of experience 
you have had in this country both as a mem- 
ber of the staff of the Honduran Legation and 
as your Government's Charge d'Affaires will 
stand you in good stead during your service as 
Minister; and I know that the respect and 
friendship you have won for yourself in official 
and private circles in the United States will be 
of great value in the years to come. 

I am deeply grateful for the generous greet- 
ing which His Excellency President Carias has 
been good enough to send me through you. 
Please assure His Excellency that the good 
wishes of the Govermnent and people of Hon- 
duras are heartilj' reciprocated by the Govern- 
ment and people of the United States and con- 
vey to him my own best wishes for the pros- 
perity of Honduras and for his personal well- 
being and happiness. 



60 



DEPAETMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



EXPORTATION OF TIN-PLATE SCRAP 

[Released to the press July 21] 

Rides of procedure governing the issuance of 
additional allotments for the exportation of tin- 
plate scrap during the calendar year 1939: 

In furtherance' of the purposes of the Act of 
Congress approved February 15, 1936, the Secre- 
tary of State, acting under and by virtue of the 
authority vested in him by Executive Order No. 
7297 of February 16, 1936, prescribed on July 
20, 1939, by and with the advice and consent of 
the National Munitions Control Board, the fol- 
lowing rules of procedure to govern the issuance 
of additional allotments under the provisions of 
paragraph (5) of the rules of procedure pre- 
scribed by the Acting Secretary of State on 
December 16, 1938,^ for the exportation of tin- 
plate scrap during the calendar year 1939 : 

(1) Additional allotments will be granted to 
producers of tin-plate scrap only and will be 
assigned in the order of the receipt of requests 
therefor, provided that, in the event that it 
shall be necessary in order that the quantity of 
tin-plate scrap to be exported during the calen- 
dar year 1939 shall not exceed the total figure 
agreed upon by the National Munitions Control 
Board, the available balance of such total shall 
be apjDortioned among the applicants on the 
basis of their production during the first 6 
months of 1939. Allotments will be based on 
the individual producer's request therefor with 
the provision that no allotment of more than 25 
long tons shall exceed in amount 20 percent of 
the quantity of tin-plate scrap produced by him 
during the first 6 months of the calendar year 
1939. No allotment assigned under the provi- 
sions of this paragi-aph to any one producer, in- 
cluding his affiliated or associated companies, 
shall exceed 1,000 long tons. Requests for allot- 
ments of 25 long tons or less may be gi-anted in 
full, subject to the qualifications set forth in the 
following paragraph. 



^ Press Rpleases, Vol. XIX, No. 482, December 24, 
1938, pp. 467-469. 



(2) No producer shall be eligible to receive 
an allotment under the provisions of paragraph 
(5) of the rules of procedure until the Secre- 
tary of State has received from him a sworn 
statement setting forth the quantity of tin-plate 
scrap, in long tons, produced by him during 
the first 6 months of the calendar year 1939, 
provided that requests for 25 long tons or less 
may be granted in full, without reference to 
the quantity of tin-plate scrap produced dur- 
ing the first 6 months of 1939, if the producer ■ 
concerned presents convincing evidence, in the 
form of a sworn statement, establishing that 
he will, so far as can be foreseen, produce dur- 
ing the calendar year 1939 at least the equiva- 
lent of the allotment requested by him in ex- 
cess of the total of any allotments previously 
assigned to him for export during the calendar 
year 1939. Sworn statements submitted imder 
the provisions of this paragraph shall include 
the name and address of the producer, the name 
and location of each factory, and the quantity 
of tin-jDlate scrap produced at each factory. 



-f + ■♦- 

INAUGURATION OF THE PRESIDENT 
OF PARAGUAY 

[Released to the press July 21] 

Gen. Jose Felix Estigarribia, President-elect 
of Paraguay, and until recently Paraguayan 
Minister to the United States, will be in- 
augurated on August 15, 1939, at Asuncion, 
Paraguay. In honor of the occasion and as a 
further testimony of the cordial and friendly 
relations existing between the United States 
of America and Paraguay, President Roose- 
velt has named the Honorable Norman Armour, 
Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipoten- 
tiary to the Argentine Republic, as his special 
representative with the rank of Ambassador at 
the ceremonies of the inauguration of General 
Estigarribia. 



The Far East 



LETTERS FROM THE SECRETARY OF STATE TO SENATOR PITTMAN 



[Released to the press July 21] 

Letter from the Secretary of State to Senator 
Key Pittmaiu chairman of the Senate Foreign 
ReIatio7\s Committee^ ivlth regard to Senate 
Joint Resolution 1^3, introduced by Senator 
Pittman: 

July 21, 1939. 
Mt Dear Senator Pittman : 

You have brought to my attention a motion 
adopted at a recent meeting of the Committee 
on Foreign Relations at the instance of Senator 
Johnson of California in connection with S. J. 
Res. 123. The motion reads as follows : 

"That this matter be submitted to the Secre- 
tary of State for an opinion upon the Resolu- 
tion presented by the Chairman, and the Resolu- 
tion presented by the Senator from Washington 
if he desires an opinion upon his Resolution as 
well, and that he inform this Committee 
whether in his opinion we would violate any 
treaty m adopting or passing such Resolution." 

In the light of the legislative situation re- 
lating to this and kindred proposals in regard 
to our foreign relations, it is reasonably ap- 
parent that there is a disposition in Congress 
to defer until the next session full and final con- 
sideration of proposed legislation on this gen- 
eral subject. Furthermore, as an early adjourn- 
ment of Congress appears to be tacitly agreed 
upon, it seems clear that there may not be suf- 
ficient time in which to consider and enact 
legislation such as is proposed. 

In these circumstances, I venture respectfully 
to inquire whether comment by the Department 
of State on the various proposals pertaining to 
this phase of our foreign relations could not be 
offered to a better advantage when Congress at 
its next session is ready to give full considera- 
tion to these and related proposals. 
Sincerely yours, 

CoRDELL Hull 



[Released to the press July 21] 

Letter from the Secretary of State to Senator 
Key Pittman, chairman, of the Senate Foreign 
Relations Committee, with regard to Senate 
Resolution 166, introduced by Senator Vanden- 
herg: 

July 21, 1939. 
JIy Dear Senator Pittman : 

I am in receipt of your letter of July 20, 1939 
requesting an expression of my views regarding 
S. Res. 166, introduced by Senator Vandenberg, 
stating that it is the sense of the Senate that the 
Government of the United States (1) should 
give Japan the six months' notice provided for 
in the treaty of 1911 for its termination and (2) 
should ask that the Conference of Brussels of 
1937 be reassembled. 

Notwithstanding the authority which is 
vested in the Executive in regard to the matters 
mentioned in the resolution, I am glad to say 
that the Executive is always pleased to have 
advice from the Senate and to give such advice 
full and careful consideration consonant with 
the great weight to which the opinions of the 
Senate are entitled. Such considei-ation will, 
therefore, be given to the opinion of the Senate 
as set forth in the resolution under reference, in 
the event of its passage. 
Sincerely yours, 

CoRDELL Hull 

CHANGE IN NAME OF SIAM TO 
THAILAND 

The Department has received a note from the 
Siamese Minister stating that in accordance 
with the Notification of the Presidency of the 
Council of Thailand, dated June 24, 1939, the 
word "Thailand" is now being used for the 
word "Siam" and the word "Thai" for the word 
"Siamese." The pronunciation of Thai is "tie." 

61 






Treaty Information 



Compiled by the Treaty Division 



AVIATION 

Convention for the Unification of Certain 
Rules Relating to the Precautionary At- 
tachment of Aircraft - 

Norway 

The Italian Ambassador at Washington in- 
formed the Secretary of State by a note dated 
July 17, 1939, that the Norwegian Government 
has notified the Italian Government of its rati- 
fication of the Convention for the Unification 
of Certain Rules Relating to the Precautionary 
Attachment of Aircraft, signed at Rome on 
May 29, 1933. The note adds that according to 
article XI, paragraph 2, of the convention this 
ratification will become effective on September 
20, 1939, the ninetieth day from the date when 
the instrument of ratification was deposited. 

According to the information of the Depart- 
ment the convention has been ratified by or 
adhered to by the following countries: Belgium, 
Brazil, Denmark (not including Greenland), 
Germany, Hungary, Italy (including colonies 
and possessions), Morocco (Spanish Zone), 
Netherlands, Norway, Rumania, Spain, and 
Sweden. 

LABOR 

Conventions of the International Labor 
Conference 

Afghanistan 

According to a circular letter from the League 
of Nations dated June 30, 1939, the instrument 
of ratification by Afghanistan of the Conven- 
tion Concerning the Employment of Women 
During the Night, adopted by the International 
Labor Conference at its first session (Washing- 
ton October 29-November 29, 1919), was regis- 

- See Treaty Information, bulletin No. 117, June 1939 
p. 112. 

62 



tered with the Secretariat on June 12, 1939. 
According to the informatioii of the Depart- 
ment the following countries have ratified this 
convention: Afghanistan, Albania, Argentina, 
Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Chile, Colombia, 
Cuba, Czechoslovakia, Estonia, France, Great 
Britain, Greece, Hungary, India, Ireland, Italy, 
Lithuania, Luxemburg, Netherlands, Nicaragua, 
Portugal (not including colonies), Rumania, 
Spain, Switzerland, and the Union of South 
Africa. 

This convention was denounced by the fol- 
lowing countries at the time of their ratification 
of the convention as revised in 1934 : Belgium, 
Brazil, Estonia, Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Nether- 
lands, Switzerland, and the Union of South 
Africa. 

On June 12, 1939, there was registered by 
the Secretariat of the League of Nations the 
ratification by Afghanistan of the Convention 
Concerning the Employment of Women During 
the Niglit (revised 1934), adopted by tlie In- 
ternational Labor Conference at its eighteenth 
session (Geneva, June 4-23, 1934). According 
to the information of the Department the coun- 
tries parties to this convention are : Afghanis- 
tan, Belgium, Brazil, Estonia, France, Great 
Britain, Greece, Hungary, India, Iraq, Ireland, 
Netherlands, New Zealand, Switzerland, and 
the Union of South Africa. 

On June 12, 1939, the instriunent of ratifi- 
cation by Afghanistan of the Convention Con- 
cerning the LTse of White Lead in Painting, 
adopted by the International Labor Confer- 
ence at its third session (Geneva, October 25- 
November 19, 1921), was registered with the 
Secretariat. According to the information of 
the Department the following countries have 
ratified this convention : Afghanistan, Argen- 
tina, Belgium, Bulgaria, Chile, Colombia, 
Cuba, Czechoslovakia, Estonia, Finland, 



JULY 22, 1939 



63 



France, Greece, Hungary, Latvia, Luxemburg, 
Mexico, Nicaragua, Norway, Poland, Rumania, 
Spain, Sweden, Uruguay, Venezuela, and 
Yugoslavia. 

On June 12, 1939, the ratification by Afghan- 
istan of the Convention Concerning Applica- 
tion of the Weekly Rest in Industrial Under- 
takings, adopted by the International Labor 
Conference at its third session, was registered 
with the Secretariat of the League of Nations. 
According to the information of the Depart- 
ment the following countries have ratified this 
convention : Afghanistan, Argentina, Belgium, 
Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, 
Czechoslovakia, Denmark (not including 
Greenland), Estonia, Finland, France, Greece, 
India, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, LithuaHia, Lux- 
emburg, Mexico, New Zealand, Nicaragua, 
Norway, Poland, Portugal, Rumania, Spain, 
Sweden, Switzerland, Uruguay, and Yugo- 
slavia. 

Denmark 

According to a circular letter from the 
League of Nations dated July 5, 1939, the 
instrument of ratification by Denmark of the 
Convention Concerning Workmen's Compensa- 
tion for Occupational Diseases (revised 1934), 
adopted by the International Labor Conference 
at its eighteenth session (Geneva, June 4^23, 
1934), was registered with the Secretariat on 
June 22, 1939. According to the information 
of the Department the countries which have 
ratified this convention are : Brazil, Cuba, Den- 
mark, Great Britain, Hungary, Ireland, Japan 
(including Taiwan and Karafuto), Mexico, 
New Zealand, Norway, and Sweden. 

On June 22, 1939, the instrument of ratifica- 
tion by Denmark, with the exception of Green- 
land, of the Convention Concerning Annual 
Holidays With Pay, adopted by the Interna- 
tional Labor Conference at its twentieth session 
(Geneva, June 4-24, 1936) , was registered with 
the Secretariat of the League of Nations. Ac- 
cording to the information of the Department 
this convention has been ratified by Brazil, Den- 
mark, and Mexico. 

165395—39 2 



On June 22, 1939, the instrument of ratifica- 
tion by Denmark, with the exception of Green- 
land, of the Convention Concerning Statistics 
of Wages and Hours of Work in the Principal 
Mining and Manufacturing Industries Includ- 
ing Building and Construction and in Agricul- 
ture, adopted by the International Labor Con- 
ference at its twenty-fourth session (Geneva, 
June 2-22, 1938), was registered with the Secre- 
tariat of the League of Nations. The ratifica- 
tion excludes part III of the convention, in 
accordance with the first paragraph of its arti- 
cle 2. According to information received from 
the Secretariat, this convention will enter into 
force in compliance with its article 26 twelve 
months after the date of registration by the 
Secretariat of the Danish ratification, this con- 
vention having already received one previous 
ratification, that of Sweden, on June 21, 1939. 

Sweden 

According to a circular letter from the League 
of Nations dated July 3, 1939, the instrument 
of ratification by Sweden of the Convention 
Concerning the Statistics of Wages and Hours 
of Work in the Principal Mining and Manu- 
facturing Industries Including Building and 
Construction and in Agriculture, adopted by 
the International Labor Conference at its twen- 
ty-fourth session (Geneva, June 2-22, 1938), 
was registered with the Secretariat on June 21, 
1939. The ratification excludes part III of the 
convention, in accordance with the first para- 
graph of its article 2. 

Switzerland 

According to a circular letter from the League 
of Nations dated June 22, 1939, the instrument 
of ratification by Switzerland of the Conven- 
tion Insuring Benefit or Allowances to the In- 
voluntarily Unemployed, adopted by the In- 
ternational Labor Conference at its eighteenth 
session (Geneva, June 4-23, 1934), was regis- 
tered with the Secretariat on June 14, 1939. 
According to the information of the Depart- 
ment the following countries have ratified this 
convention: Great Britain, Ireland, New Zea- 
land, and Switzerland. 



64 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

International Telecommunication Conven- 
tion (Treaty Series No. 867) 

Newfoundland 

According to notification No. 335, dated July 
1, 1939, from the Bureau of the International 
Telecommunication Union at Bern, the Gov- 
ernment of Newfoundland has approved the 
following revisions of the regulations annexed 



to the International Telecommunication Con- 
vention of 1932, adopted at Cairo on April 4 
and 8, 1938 : 

General Radio Regulations and Final Proto- 
col (revision of Cairo, 1938) 

Additional Radio Regulations and Final Pro- 
tocol (revision of Cairo, 1938). 

According to the information of the Depart- 
ment the countries which have approved the 
revisions of Cairo are as follows : 



REGULATIONS OF CAIRO, 1938 



Country 



Afghanistan 

Argentina 

Australia 

Belgian Congo, including 

Ruanda-Urundi. 

Belgium 

Bulgaria... 

Curacao and Surinam 

Czechoslovakia 

Danzig 

Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

Germany 

Great Britain 

Hungary. 

Italian East Africa 

Italian Islandsof the Aegean 

Italy 

Japan, Chosen, Taiwan, 

Karafuto, Kwantung, and 

South Sea Islands under 

mandate. 

Lehanon.. 

Libya... 

Morocco 

Morocco, Spanish Zone 

Netherlands 

Netherlands Indies 

Newfoundland. 

New Zealand.- 

Poland 

Portugal. 

Rumania 

Spain and Spanish colonies. 

Switzerland 

Syria 

Yemen 

Yugoslavia. 



Radio Regulations 



General 



May 25, 1939 
May 20, 1939 
Mar. 20, 1939 

Feb. 14,1939 
Nov. 22. 1938 
Feb. 17, 1939 
Oct. 19, 1938 
Jan. 1,1939 
Feb. 6, 1939 
Jan. 14, 1939 



Dec. 
Mar. 
June 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 



Mar. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

June 

Feb. 

Nov. 

Feb. 

Mar. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Mar. 



17, 1938 
10, 1939 
3, 1939 
1, 1938 
1, 1938 
1, 1938 
24, 1938 



28. 1939 

1, 1938 

4, 1939 

24, 1939 

21, 1938 

10, 1939 

6, 1939 

20, 1939 

8, 1938 

27, 1939 

23, 1939 

24, 1939 
14, 1939 
28, 1939 



Jan. 30, 1939 



Additional 



May 26, 1939 
May 20,1939 
Mar. 20, 1939 



Feb. 
Nov. 
Feb. 
Oct. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Jan. 



14, 1939 

22. 1938 
17, 1939 
19, 1938 

1, 1939 
6, 1939 

14. 1939 



Dec. 
Mar. 
June 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 



17. 1938 

10. 1939 
3, 1939 
1.193S 
1,1938 
1, 1938 



Dec. 24, 1938 



Mar. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

June 

Feb. 

Nov. 

Feb. 

Mar. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Mar. 



28. 1939 

1, 1938 

4, 1939 

24. 1939 

21, 1938 

10, 1939 

6, 1939 

20, 1939 

8, 193S 

27, 1939 

23, 1939 

24, 1939 

14, 1939 

28, 1939 



Jan. 30, 1939 



Finil Radio 
Prctocol 



May 25, 1939 
May 20, 1939 



Feb. 17,1939 



Jan. 1,1939 



Jan. 14,1939 



Dec. 
Mar. 
June 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 



17. 1938 

10. 1939 
3. 1939 
1,1938 
1, 1938 
1, 1938 

24, 1938 



Dec. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Jan. 



1. 1938 

4. 1939 
24, 1939 
21, 1938 
10, 1939 



Nov. 8, 1938 
Feb. 27,1939 



Jan. 24,1939 
Mar.'28,"i939' 
JanV'30,i939" 



Additional 
Radio Proto- 
col 



Dec. 17,1938 
Mar. 10, 1939 
June 3, 1939 



Nov. 8,1938 
Feb. 27, 1939 



Mar. 28, 1939 



Telepraph 
Regulations 



Feb. 3, 1939 
May 25, 1939 
May 20, 1939" 
Mar. 20, 1939 



Feb. 14, 
Nov. 22, 
Feb. 17, 
Oct. 19, 
Jan. 1, 
Feb 



Jan. 14, 
Jan. 11, 
Dec. 17, 
Mar. 10, 
June 3, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 24, 



1939 
1938 
1939 
1938 
1939 
19391 
1939 
1939 
1938 
1939 
1939 
1938 
1938 
1938 
1938 



Mar. 28, 1939 
Dec. 1, 1938 
Jan. 4, 1939 
Jan. 24, 1939 
Dec. 21, 1938 
Jan. 10, 1939 



Feb. 

Nov. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Jan. 
J:m. 
Mar. 
Nov. 
Jan. 



20, 1939 
8,1938 

27, 1939 

23, 1939 

24, 1939 
14, 1939 

28, 1939 
5, 1938 

30, 1939 



Final Tele- 
graph Proto- 
col 



May 26, 1939 



Nov. 22,1938 
Feb. 17,1939 
Oct. 19, 1938 
Jan. 1, 1939 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Mar. 
June 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 



14, 1939 

11, 1939 

17,1938 

in, 1939 

3. 1939 

1. 1938 

1, 1938 

1.1938 

24. 1938 



Dec. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Jan. 



1. 1938 

4. 1939 
24. 1939 
21, 1938 
10, 1939 



Nov. 8.1938 
Feb. 27, 1939 



Jan. 24, 1939 
MaV."28,'i939" 
Jan. '30,'i939 



Telephone 
Regulations 



May 25, 1939 
Mar."26,'i939" 



Feb. 

Nov. 

Feb. 

Oct. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Dec. 

Mar. 

June 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 



14, 1939 

22. 1938 

17. 1939 

19. 1938 
1, 1939 
6, 1939 

14. 1939 
11, 1939 
17, 1938 
10, 1939 

3, 1939 
1, 19.38 
1, 1938 
1, 1938 
24, 1938 



Dec. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Jan. 



1. 1938 

4. 1939 
24, 1939 

21. 1938 

10. 1939 



Nov. 8,1938 
Feb. 27, 1939 
Mar. 23, 1939 
Jan. 24, 1939 
Jan. 14, 1939 



Jan. 30,1939 



Final Tele- 
phone Proto- 
col 



May 25, 1939 





Nov 
Feb. 
Oct. 
Jan. 


22. 1938 

17. 1939 
19, 1938 

1, 1939 



Jan. 14,1939 

Jan. 11,1939 

Dec. 17,1938 

Mar. in. 1939 

June 3, 1939 

Dec. 1, 1938 

Dec. 1. 1938 

Dec. 1, 1938 

Dec. 24, 1938 



Dec. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Jan. 



1. 1938 

4. 1939 
24, 1939 

21. 1938 

10. 1939 



Nov. 8,1938 
Feb. 27,1939 



Jan. 24, 1939 



Jan. 30,1939 



• With a reservation that the Government has the right not to apply the provisions of article 21!, section 2, and of article 31 of this Regulation. 

' The approval of this ReRulation contains a statement which reads in translation as follows: 

"In view of the special conditions existing with regard to the radiotelegraph stations of Greenland, I take the liberty of calling your attention to the 
fact that the rules of article 90, §i, d) (1) of the Telegraph Retaliations concerning cases of reimbursement of charges in consequence of delays are not to be 
applied in relations with Greenland." 



Regional Radio Convention for Central 
America, Panama, and the Canal Zone 

GiMtemala 

By a note dated June 12, 1939, the Minister 
for Foreign Affairs of Guatemala informed 



the Secretary of State, in conformity with sec- 
tion D, part IV, of the Regional Radio Con- 
vention for Central America, Panama, and the 
Canal Zone, signed at Guatemala on Decem- 
ber 8, 1938, that on May 10, 1939, the con- 



JtJLY 22, 1939 



65 



vention was ratified by Guatemala and the 
instrument of ratification deposited with the 
Ministry for Foreign Affairs. 

According to the information of the Depart- 
ment of State, Guatemala is the first country 
to ratify the convention. The convention pro- 
vides tliat it shall enter into force as between 
the ratifying governments 30 days after the 
date on which instruments of ratification 
by two countries have been deposited with the 
Guatemalan Government, and for the remain- 
ing signatory governments on the date of the 
deposit of their instruments of ratification. 



EDUCATION 

Declaration Regarding the Teaching of 
History 

Australia 

According to a circular letter from the League 
of Nations dated July 3, 1939, the Declaration 
Regarding the Teaching of History (revision of 
school textbooks), which was opened for sig- 
nature at Geneva on October 2, 1937, was signed 
by the High Commissioner for the Common- 
wealth of Australia on behalf of his Govern- 
ment on June 24, 1939. According to the in- 
formation of the Department the declaration 
has now been signed by the following coun- 
tries: Afghanistan, Argentina, Australia, Bel- 
gium, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, 
Denmark, Egj'pt, Estonia, Finland, Greece, Ice- 
land, Iran, Netherlands, Norway, and Sweden. 



Arbitration, The Hague, dated June 23, 1939, 
the Finnish Government has appointed Mr. 
Kaarlo Kustaa Kaira, jDrofessor of constitu- 
tional law at the University of Helsinki and 
vice dean of the law school of the said Univer- 
sity, a member of the Permanent Court of 
Arbitration, to take the place of Prof. Alex- 
ander Wilhelm Gadolin, deceased. 



International Conferences, 
Commissions, etc. 



THIRTY-FIRST ESPERANTO WORLD 
CONGRESS 

[Released to the press July 17] 

This Government has accepted the invita- 
tion of the Swiss Government to participate 
in the Thirty-first Esperanto World Congress, 
which will be held at Bern, Switzerland, from 
July 29 to August 5, 1939. The President has 
approved the appointment of Miss Doris Tap- 
pan, New York, N. Y., as delegate on the part 
of the United States. 

The United States was represented at the 
Twenty-eighth Congress in this series, which 
was held at Vienna, Austria, in August 1936. 
The discussions at that meeting had to do with 
plans for establishing Esperanto as the second 
language in the various countries of the world. 



ARBITRATION 
Permanent Court of Arbitration 

Finland 

According to a communication from the In- 
ternational Bureau of the Permanent Court of 



INTERNATIONAL SUGAR COUNCIL 

[Released to the press July 21] 

The President has approved the appointment 
of Mr. Loyd V. Steere, agi'icultural attache, 
American Embassy, London, as a delegate on 



66 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



the part of the United States to the Interna- 
tional Sugar Council to take the place left 
vacant by the departure of Dr. Clifford C. 
Taylor, former agricultural attache. 

On March 22, 1938, the President ratified the 
International Sugar Agreement signed at Lon- 
don on May 6, 1937. This agi'eement established 
the International Sugar Council. Article 31 of 
the International Sugar Agi-eement provides 
that each contracting government shall appoint 
a delegation to the Council, which delegation 



shall consist of not more than three members. 
The present American delegation is constituted 
as follows: 

For the United States of America: 

Herschel V. Johnson, Counselor of Embassy, 

American Embassy, London 
Loyd V. Steere, Agi'icidtural Attache, Ameri- 
can Embassy, London 

Representing the Cormnonioealth of the Philip- 
pines on the American delegation: 
Joaquin M. Elizalde. 



Traffic in Arms 



MONTHLY STATISTICS 



[Released to the press July 19] 

Note: The figures appearing In the cumulative 
columns of the tables relating to arms or tin-plate 
scrap licensed for export are not final or definitive since 
licenses may be amended or revoked before being used. 
These figures are, however, accurate as of the date of 
the press release in which they appear. 

The statistics of actual exports in these releases are 
believed to be substantially complete. It is possible, 
however, that some shipments are not included. If 
this proves to be the fact, statistics In regard to such 
shipments will be included in the cumulative figures 
in later releases. 

Arms Export Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
licensed for export by the Secretary of State 
during the year 1939 up to and including the 
month of June : 



Country of destination 



Afghanistan. 
Albania 



Category 



I (4) 
IV (1) 



Value 



June 1939 



r, months 

ending June 

30, 1939 



$25, 000. 00 
360. 79 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


June 1939 


6 months 

ending June 

30, 1939 




I (4) 

V (1) 

C2) 




$59.00 




$3,000.00 
35.00 


4, 500. 00 
883.00 


Total.. 




3,035.00 


5,442.00 




I (4) 
(5) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (1) 

VII (2) 




463.00 






370. 00 






40, 000. 00 






1, 045. 50 






4, 709. 00 






155, 0.50. 00 




1,670.00 


15, 319. 10 
8, 752. 00 






6, 310. 00 






39, 196. 22 








Total 




1,670.00 


271, 214. 82 


Australia 


I (1) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 


409.06 
408.60 


2,616.69 




3.778.44 
4, 270. 870. 00 




108. 18 

17.00 

8,116.00 

134. 30 

78, 634. 00 


460.01 

494. 67 

10, 116. 00 

869. 56 

239,062.00 


Total — 




87, 727. 03 


4, 628, 266. 26 


Bahamas -- 


V (2) 




40.00 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 




2.00 






111.38 






87.00 






1, 610 00 






30.00 








Total .— 






1,840 38 



JULY 22, 1939 



G7 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


June 1939 


6 months 

ending June 

30, 1939 


Belgian Congo . _ 


V 


(1) 
(2) 




$1,249.00 






30.00 








Total - 






1, 279. 00 










Belgium 


I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 




666 21 




$1,000.00 
555. 62 
25.00 


7, 561. 00 

846.00 

79.48 

9.40 






6,260.00 






86,400.00 








Total 




1, 580. 52 


100,801.09 










IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




54 25 






17.46 






9,600.00 








Total. - 






9,671 70 










Bolivia 


I 

IV 

V 

VII 


fl) 
(4) 

(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 


203.00 






434 00 




66.00 
63.80 


487. 39 
550.80 

9, loa 00 






3, 772. 20 






60,000.00 






988 66 








Total 




332.80 


65, 907. 06 










Brazil . . 


I 
III 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 




45 00 






86.000.00 




16.00 


396.00 
274, 000. 00 




1,620.80 


1, 520 80 
7, 169. 00 




10,123.00 


362,797.00 
40, 365. 90 




31,828.00 


116,748.00 
54.86 








Total 




43, 487. 80 


889, 076 65 








British Quiana 


I 

IV 

V 

VII 


(4) 
(1) 
(3) 
(2) 


20.00 


20 00 




108. 38 






2, 500. 00 






1, 680. 00 








Total 




20.00 


4, 308 38 










IV 

vn 


(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




129 20 






75.00 






64.60 








Total.-.. 






268 80 










British North Borneo 


I 

V 


(1) 
(2) 
2) 
(3) 




26.43 






28.00 






50 00 






700.00 








Total 






804.43 










Burma 


I 

IV 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 


90.00 


359 70 




135.00 




272.85 


1, 326. 75 
128.46 








Total 




362. 85 


1, 949. 91 








Canada 


I 
III 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 


3, 885. 14 


13,942.99 
418.00 






1,663.91 

649, 900. 00 

1, 104. 36 

113.52 

44, 355. 13 

3, 570. 96 

26,056.60 

37.10 

284.05 


10, 013. 15 

549, 900. 00 

4, 217. 50 

610. 94 

832, 593. 17 

34, 752. 62 

79, 705. 92 

63, 288. 42 

301,356.87 


Total 


1 630,960.66 1 


1, 880, 799. 58 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


June 1939 


6 months 

ending June 

30, 1939 


Ceylon 


IV (1) 




$72.00 






Chile 


I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
VII (2) 




27 00 






13 048 96 






617 00 




$3,000.00 


15,600.00 
11,855.00 






Total 




3,000.00 


41,047.95 






China 


I (2) 
(3) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 




135,407.95 










8, 735. 00 

26, 042. OO 

1 796 00 




















193,646.00 
211 581 40 










80,115.00 
49.88 




49.88 


Total 




49.88 


668,995.48 






Colombia .. 


I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 


179. 70 

56.33 

1,629.60 

546.00 

393, 060. 00 

8,119.00 

23, 950. 00 

139. 73 


179. 70 

147. 33 

4, 273. 66 

2, 026. 10 

504, 560. 00 

22, 680. 00 

103. 890. 00 

764. 39 

840 00 










Total .. 




427,679.36 


639. 361. 17 






Costa Rica .. 


I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 


13.00 

69.00 

17.00 

6, 500. 00 

593. 54 

3, 479. 96 

120. 00 


13.00 

2, 610. 65 

484.00 

15, 500. 00 

5, 343. 54 

16,436.82 

807.60 

694 93 










Total 




10, 792. 50 


41, 750. 54 






Cuba 


I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (1) 

(2) 




57.00 
50, 547. 60 

6, 583. 19 

7, 738. 00 

96.30 




1, 614. 00 

208. 34 

1,618.00 

96.30 






11 00 








Total.. 




3,436.64 


67,439.73 






Curagao 


I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 










39 00 






14 49 






60 00 






8,850.00 






Total 






8, 976. 69 








Czechoslovakia... 


I (6) 
V (3) 




430 00 






12, 800. 00 








Total 






13,230.00 








Denmark _ . 


I (3) 
(4) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 


2, 750. 00 
340. 00 

2, 691. 56 
476.00 

1, 100. 00 


2, 760. 00 

340. 00 

11,130.62 

876.00 

5, 275. 00 




Total 




7, 357. 56 


20, 371. 52 


Dominican Republic.. 


I (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 




35.00 




100. 76 


100.75 
3, 594. 00 




13.00 


260. 00 
260.00 






11, 100.00 




361.60 


1,714.40 


Total 




475. 35 


17.054.16 



68 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


June 1939 


6 months 

ending June 

30, 1939 




I (4) - 

(5) 
IV (2) 




$60.00 






128.00 






147.00 














335.00 




I (1) 
(6) 

IV (1) 
(2) 




30.00 






518.00 




$19. 55 
1.15 


67.58 
1.15 


Total -- - 




20.70 


616. 73 




I (4) 

IV CD 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 




198.00 






4, 205. 58 






161.00 






1, 304. 00 






850. 00 






2, 760. 00 








Total - 






9, 478. 58 


Federated Malay States 


I (4) 

IV (1) 

C2) 




14.00 


33.58 


69.08 
10.00 








Total 




33.68 


83.08 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
C2) 
(3) 


111.75 
457. 02 

7.56" 


8,339.45 




6, 338. 41 
60.00 
96.67 

14, 550. 00 






123,250.00 




51,000.00 


311,000.00 


Total 




51, 676. 27 


463, 633. 63 




I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (1) 




83.04 




216,606.60 


210, 000. 00 
410. 39 




1,159,860.00 


20, 632, 260. 00 
1.620.00 






174. 96 




184. 400. 00 

734, 949. 00 

12, 954, 901. 00 

2, 200. 00 


464, 687. 00 

1,386,414.14 

13,553,301.00 

4,400.00 


Total 




15, 246, 310. 00 


36,242,350.62 


French Equatorial Africa- 


I (1) 
(■1) 


34.00 
30.00 


34.00 
30.00 


Total 




64.00 


64.00 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 




67.50 






63.01 






2,091.00 






763.03 


Total - - 






2,984.64 


French West Africa --- 


V (2) 




90.00 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 




69.05 




16.00 


661. 38 
995. 49 




3.00 


272. 56 
12, 800. 00 








Total - 




18.00 


14,698.48 




I (1) 
C3) 
(4) 
(5) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 


38.00 


116.85 




31. 100. 00 




28.00 


28, 642. 36 
430.00 






ll,3K'i,600.00 






1,970.00 




664.69 

89.62 

34,800.00 

23. 300. 00 

29, 434. 00 


836. 40 

389. 60 

419, 334. 25 

957,049.42 

1,406,018.00 

155, 279. 25 








Total 




88, 364. 31 


14,315,766.13 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


June 1939 


6 months 

ending June 

30, 1939 




I (6) 

V (2) 

(3) 




$126,980.00 






3, 600. 00 






2, 200. 00 








Total-- 






132,680.00 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




1,850.00 






28.00 




$28.00 


28.00 
60.00 






7, 565. 00 




93.00 


93.00 
4, 287. 60 








Total... - 




121. 00 


13,911. 60 




I (4) 
IV (1) 

(2) 
VII (1) 

(2) 


1,862.50 

4, 610. 00 

31.00 


1, 862. 60 




4, 678. 75 
41.11 
30.76 






332. 50 








Total — - 




6, 503. 60 


6,945.62 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (2) 




394. 38 






106. 00 






1, 505. 60 






51.00 






650.00 








Total.... 






2, 706. 98 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V C2) 
VII (2) 




880. 00 






664.66 




151.41 


25, 050. 62 
3, 21.5. 92 






40.00 






1,011.60 








Total..- 




151.41 


30, 862. 60 


Iceland-- 


V (3) 




3, 670. 00 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (2) 




1, 657. 96 




1. 400. 58 

103.98 

8.00 

2,600.00 


5, 109. 60 
2, 174. IS 
60. 30 
15,500.00 
1, 505. 00 






2,500.00 






334. 00 








Total 




4, 012. 56 


28,731.03 










IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 


133. 05 
27.80 


731.93 




120. 20 
40, 000. 00 






100. 00 








Total - 




160. 85 


40, 952. 13 




, 






I (3) 

V (1) 

(2) 

(3) 




26, 500. 00 






210, 000. 00 






4, 379. 00 






29, 266. 00 








Total .- .- 






270, 146. 00 


[t.^ly 


V (2) 
(3) 





9, 500. 00 






13, 900. 00 








Total- 






23, 400. 00 




I t4) 
'" [I] 




62.44 




320.76 
39.00 


1,889.76 
435. 17 


Total 




359.75 


2, 387. 37 










I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 




792. 20 




30.00 


390. 35 
173. 20 




22.00 
2, 300. 00 


124. 36 
2, 300. 00 


Total 




2, 352. 00 


3, 780. ! 



JULY 22, 10,-!9 



69 





Cati'porj 


Value 


Country of do-'Jtination 


Juno 11«'.l 


6 months 

pndinp .lime 

30, 1939 




VII (2) 
I (4) 




$494 00 


Liberia 


3.21 








I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 


$667. 75 


567. 75 




800. 00 




97.00 
1,312.00 
2, 592. 00 


97.00 
1,312.00 
2, 592. 00 


Total 




4,568.75 


5, 368. 75 










I (1) 
(4) 




96.43 






86 66 








Total - 






183. 09 












I (1) 

(4) 

HI (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 


29.60 
2.00 


759. 44 




11,518.00 






39, 124. 51 






16, 492 00 




109,200.00 

240.00 

6, 600. 00 

3, 076. 00 


367,763.00 

317,734.05 

873, 880. 00 

7, 468. 75 

22, 981. 21 












119,147.50 


2,663.320.96 






MnKftmhjqiiA 


I (1) 
(4) 

V (2) 
(3) 




30 40 






111.67 






1,000 00 




46, 800. 00 


46, 800. 00 


Total. 




46, 800. 00 


47 942 07 








Netherlands 


III (1) 

IV (1) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 








" fflo.osi.'oo 

74,142.00 
41,000.00 


45.00 

756. 531. 00 

168.013.67 

834, 600. 00 

37, 198. 89 








Total 




34.5,173.00 


2 867 928 .56 








Netherlands Indies 


I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 




65 25 






45, 645. 00 




82.00 


265. 37 
805, 362. 00 




400.00 
17.00 
13.00 


21, 026. 80 

39, 512. 30 

173. 00 

13, 000. 00 




2,280.00 


118, 256. 30 

36 ono. 00 






10.00 








Total 




2,792.00 


1,078,316.02 






New Caledonia 


I (1) 

(4) 

V (3) 


7.25 
3.62 


295 36 




348. 62 
14 000. 00 








Total 




10.87 


14, 643. 97 






Newfoundland.. . 


I (1) 
(4) 

IV (2) 

V (2) 


273. 87 
21.00 


474 04 




121.47 
126. 03 




3,000.00 


3.000.00 


Total . 




3,294.87 


3.721.54 






New Guinea, Territory of 


I (1) 
(4) 

IV (2) 

V (2) 
(3) 




17.00 






20.56 






35.00 




100.00 


26, 600. 00 
101, 600. 00 








Total _. 




100.00 


127, 172. 66 






New Zealand 


I (1) 
(4) 

IV (2) 

V (2) 
(3) 




353. 66 




5.6d' 

5, 997. 00 
14,000.00 


247.08 

82.68 

14, 640. 00 

19,300.00 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


June 1939 


6 months 

ending June 

30, 1939 




VII (1) 
(2) 




$6,000,00 
4, 244. 07 










Total ._ 




$20,002.00 












I (2) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (2) 








1, 345. 00 


1,346.00 

20, 906. 00 

427 00 








2,046.00 


2, 059. 70 




2.H) 


882.00 


Total 




3, 393. 60 


27,272 20 










IV (1) 

(2) 

VII (1) 










3 57 














Total.. 






67 33 










Norway 


I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 


40.32 
64.00 


376 40 




161.74 
30 00 






2.03 




860.00 
1,600.00 
1,225.00 


2, 640. 87 

3, 850. 00 
2,626.00 


Total .- 




3,769.32 


9, 585 04 








Palestine. . 


V (1) 
11] 




3, 062. 00 










450 00 








Total.. 






3. 662 00 










Panama... 


IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

VII (1) 
(2) 










7 00 






4, 100 00 






800 00 






1,809 20 






800 00 








Total 






7, 572. 68 








Peru 


I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

III (I) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 




45 00 






26, 600. 00 






955 36 






256, 260. 00 




10,038.00 


10, 038. 00 
150 00 






351 00 




5,000.00 


9,600.00 
32, 194 39 






15,602.52 




2.00 


26, 465. 00 


Total 




16, 040. 00 


378, 161. 27 






Pitcairn Island 


I (4) 


4.97 


7 47 






Poland 


I (1) 

IV Itl 




118 70 






44 48 






810.90 






111.39 






420.000.00 








Total 






421 086 47 










Portugal 


I (4) 

IV (1) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 


10.00 


10 00 




317.00 




1, 250. 00 
30.00 
475. 00 


8, 097. 00 

6,176.00 

475.00 


Total 




1, 766. 00 


16. 074. 00 


Rumania 


I (5) 

V (2) 

(3) 




1, 265 000 00 






3, 950. 00 






26, 100. 00 








Total .,.. 






1,295.060.00 


Southern Rhodesia 


I (1) 

(4) 

IV (1) 


103.26 
30.00 


500.37 




248. 70 
40.00 



70 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


June 1930 


6 months 

ending June 

30, 1939 


Southern Rhodesia— Con. 


V 


(1) 




$1, 900. 00 










$133, 26 


2,689.07 










I 

IV 


(1) 

(4) 

(1) 

(2) 


39.00 
40.00 


39.00 




60.63 
210. 80 




1.00 


27.76 


Total 




80 00 


328. 19 










I 

V 


(4) 

(1) 

(2) 
(3) 


14.00 


637. 37 




3, 660. 00 




5,795.40 
1,985.00 


103,776.84 
6,385.00 


Total 




7, 794. 40 


113,348.21 










I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 


62.90 


62.90 




346. 26 






116.800,00 






22. 570, 84 






20,200,00 








Total 




62.90 


159.979,99 








Syria — 


IV 


(2) 




19.00 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 




23.68 




2,932.71 


14, 3.50. 30 
31.00 






30. 840 00 






269, 110,00 








Total 




2,932.71 


314, 354, 88 








Trinidad 


I 

IV 
V 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




1,08 

82,60 

1, 055, 50 




4,500.00 


8,600,00 


Total 




4,600.00 


9, 636, 08 










I 

IV 

V 
VI 


(5) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(1) 




11,700,00 






170. 34 






6.26 






434, 777. 17 






8, 100. 00 








Total 






464, 762. 76 










Turk" and Caicos Islands 


IV 


(1) 
(2) 




18,70 






,80 








Total -- 






19,60 












I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(I) 
(2) 
(3) 


233. 25 
182. 75 
594. 50 
14.00 
20,713.00 
660. 25 


920,62 




1, 464. 60 

2. 648. 68 
287.24 

62.163.00 

9, 995. 07 

166.00 








Total - 




22, 387. 75 


67, 544. 01 








Union of Soviet Socialist Re- 


V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




702, 900. 00 


publics. 




61, 894. 23 




146,408.00 


Total 






911,202 23 












I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




40.00 






166. 00 






98.00 




6.090.76 
65.00 


19,374.77 
1, 182. 80 
2, 770. 00 




3, 160 56 

25, 350 00 

331.96 

4, 200. 00 


7, 796. 66 
89,636.60 
3, 518. 77 
6,300 00 


Total _ -- 




38, 198. 27 


130,882.40 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


June 1939 


6 months 

ending June 

30, 1939 


Yugoslavia _.. 


V (2) 
(3) 


$35,664.00 
2,000.00 


$38,679.00 




2,000.00 


Total. 




37,664.00 


40, 679. 00 








Grand total 




17,301,620.94 


72. 112. 319. 70 









During the month of June, 465 arms export 
licenses were issued, making a total of 2,407 
such licenses issued during the current year. 



Abms Exported 



The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of the 
arms, anununition, and imiDlements of war 
exported during the year 1939 up to and in- 
cluding the month of June under export licenses 
issued by the Secretary of State: 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


June 1939 


6 months 

ending June 

30, 1939 




IV 


CD 




$360. 79 










I 
V 


(4) 

(1) 

(2) 




69.00 






2. 956. 00 






545.00 








Total -- 






3, 560. 00 












I 
III 

IV 
V 

VI 
VII 


(4) 
(6) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




633.00 






340. 00 






244. 780. 00 






1.04,5.60 






4, 709. 00 




$117,000.00 
1,825.00 


153, 917. 00 
46, 281. 20 
8, 762. OO 






6,310.00 






20, 006. 00 












118,825.00 


486, 673. 70 








Australia 


I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
CI) 
C2) 
C3) 


477. 10 
227.00 

8.'66' 


2, 167. 84 

3, 100. 86 
361. 83 
486. 67 

2, 0(X). 00 




12. 250. 00 


166, 639. 00 
3, 450. 00 


Total 




12.962.10 


168, 085. 20 








Bahamas 


V 


f2) 




40 00 



JULY 2 2, 1939 



71 





Catpgorj 


Value 


Country of destiuation 


June 1939 


6 months 

ending June 

30. 1939 




. I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 










111 SS 


























Total.- 






1. 840. 38 








Belgian Congo 


. V (1) 
(2) 




1, 249. 00 
30.00 










Total 






1, 279. 00 








■Rplgiiim 


I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 


$69.00 


655. 21 

6, .161. 00 

341.50 

68.62 

24 23 

114,80o!o0 

5. 618. 00 

86, 400. 00 






285.52 












5, 618. 00 






Total. 




6, 872. 52 


214, 368. 66 






Bermuda 


IV (1) 
(2) 

V (3) 




54.25 

17.45 

9. 600. 00 




11.19 






Total. 




11.19 


9. 671. 70 






Bolivia .. 


I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 




371.00 

7,000.00 

860.00 

487. 39 

500.80 

9, 100. 00 

3, 772. 20 

47, 200. 00 

922. 16 












66.00 
13.80 




1,600.00 
15,000.00 






Total.. 




16,679.80 


70. 213. 55 






Brazil 


I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 




45.00 

86, 000. 00 

1,212.00 

274,000.00 

4, 932. 71 

1.3,011.00 

610, 716. 00 

60, 677. 33 

88, 413. 00 
















125.80 




22, 367. 00 

2, 962. 00 

15, 861. 00 


Total 




41, 316. 80 


1, 028. 907. 04 







British Guiana 


IV (1) 

V (3) 

vri (2) 




108. 38 
2,500.00 
1,680.00 














Total 






4,288.38 








British Honduras... . 


IV (1) 

(2) 

VII (2) 




129.20 
76.00 
172. 60 














Total _,.. 






376.80 








British North Borneo 


I (1) 

(2) 

V (3) 




26.43 
28.00 
760.00 










Total 






804. 43 








Burma 


I (1) . 

(4) . 
IV (1) 

(2) . 




269.70 








264. 35 


1, 318. 25 
128. 46 


Total __ 




264. 36 


1, 851. 41 







Canada 


I (1) 

(2) . 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 


3,798.73 


10, 005. 70 

418.00 

9,006.25 

3, 616. 10 

539.22 

271, 652. 13 

32, 900. 53 

36, 992. 79 






2, 872. 13 

474.89 

169. 76 

4, 185. 13 

1. 674. 95 

474.00 





Category 


Value 


Country of deiitination 


June 1939 


6 months 

ending June 

30, 19.39 


Canada— Continued. 


VII (1) 
(2) 


S317.00 
23, 130. 00 


$36, 626. 23 
108,461.22 


Total 




37,086.59 


609, 116. 17 






Ceylon 


IV (1) 




72.00 


Chile 


I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V h) 

(2) 
VII (2) 




116.00 

12, 975. 00 

730 00 














1, 600. 00 

36.00 

11,855.00 














Total 






27, 311. 00 








China... 


I (2) 
(3) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV 1) 
(2) 

V (I) 
(2) 
(3) 




136, 408. 00 

1, 490. 00 

8, 735. 00 

26, 042. 00 

1, 760. 00 

126. 00 

775, 200. 00 

92, 967. 00 

61, 900. 00 
















1, 760. 00 








25,065.00 






Total. 




26,825.00 


1, 103. 617. 00 






Colombia. 


I (1) 
(4) 

IV (I) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




102. 00 
133. 00 

2, 729. 05 

3, 344. 10 
230, 636. 00 

28, 861. 00 

97, 040. 00 

625. 00 

840. 00 








660. 00 
1, 385. 40 




3, 710. 00 
12, 000. 00 










Total... 




17, 665. 40 


364.310.16 


Costa Rica... 


I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 


13.00 
69.00 
17.00 


13.00 

2, 510. 65 

484. 00 

34, 000. 00 

2. 797. 00 

18, 711. 00 

608. 00 

666. 93 
























Total 




99.00 


59. 689. 58 






Cuba.... 


I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

VII (I) 
(2) 


34.00 

62.00 

208. 34 

2, 172. 00 

1, 247. 30 


67.00 
41, 404. 00 
6, 729. 36 
6. 487. 00 
1, 759. 14 

11 00 










Total 




3, 713. 64 


56.447.49 






Curacao 


I (4) 

IV (2) 

V (2) 
(3) 


13.10 


13.10 








60 00 














Total... 




13.10 


8,937.69 






Czechoslovakia. . 


V (1) 
(3) 




115 500 00 






12 800 00 








Total.. 






128, 300. 00 








Denmark 


I (2) 
(4) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 


2, 750. 00 

340.00 

4, 217. 00 


2, 750. 00 

340.00 

4,217.00 

2, 790. 00 








2. 676. 00 








Total 




7,307.00 


12,673.00 






Dominican Republic 


I (1) - 
(2) 
(4) . 

IV (1) . 
(2) 

V (2) . 
(3) 




35 00 




100.75 


100. 76 
19, 500. 00 






3, 499. 00 




13.00 


260.00 
260.00 




ii, 166.66 


11,100.00 



72 



DEPAETMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value 


Country o( destination 


June 1939 


6 months 

endini^ .lime 

311, 1939 


Dominican Republic— Con. 


VU (1) 




$1,352.80 






Total 




$11, 213. 75 


36, 097. 55 




I (4) 

(5) 

IV (2) 




60.00 






128. 00 






243.00 








Total 






431. 00 




I (1) 
(5) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 




30.00 






618.00 




19. 55 
1.15 


87.13 

2.25 

1, 600. 00 








Total 




20.70 


2, 237. 38 


El Salvador 


I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 


79.00 


119.00 




4, 324. 63 






129.00 






1,304.00 






850. 00 






1, 400. 00 








Total 




79.00 


8, 126. 63 




V (2) 
VII (1) 




44, 180. 00 






2.07 








Total-- -- 






44, 182. 07 


Federated Malay States _ 


I (4) 

IV (1) 

(2) 




14.00 


33.58 


59.08 
61.00 








Total 




33. .W 


134, 08 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (I) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 


3,345.85 
2, 987. 94 


7, 728. 30 




5, 675. 28 
60.00 




70. 12 


95.67 
14, 6.50. 00 




18,450.00 
61, 400. 00 


21,100.00 
111,900.00 


Total 




86, 253. 91 


161, 109. 25 










I (1) 
(4) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 




83.04 






86.00 




2, 493, 455. 00 


7,971,18.5.00 
660. 00 






63.00 






270, 685. 00 




15, 600. OO 
39. 907. 00 


401, .536. 14 
543, 259. 00 


Total 




2, 648, 962. 00 


9, 187, 557. 18 














2.00 










Frencli Indochina 


I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 




67.60 




5.06 


63.01 
51.00 






2.43 








Total --- 




5.06 


183. 94 










V (2) 




95.00 








Germany, - _ , . . . 


I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (3) 




123. 70 




322. 44 


694. 62 
1,020.99 




126.00 


269. 56 
7, 000. 00 








Total 




448.44 


9, 108. 87 








Great Britain 


I (1) 
(3) 
(4) 

HI (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 




77. 85 






34, 585. 00 




6.00 

3, 436, 279. 00 

472. 09 

23.00 

32, 300. 00 


61, .'88. 31 

13,113,310.00 

671.90 

336. 98 

455, 203. 00 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


June 1939 


6 months 

endin? Juno 

30, 1939 


Great Britain— Continued. 


V 
VII 


(2) 
(3) 
(2) 


$80, 60S. 00 
6,220.00 
34, 105. 00 


$329, 659. 08 
638, 197. 00 
114,517.00 


Total 


1 


3,589,013.69 


14, 648, 146. 12 




V 


(2) 
(3) 




3, 500. 00 






2, 200. 00 








Total - - 


-- 1 




5,700.00 




I 

IV 

V 

VII 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 


1,850.00 


1, 850. 00 




28.00 






150. 00 






1, 565. 00 






4, 5S8. 00 








Total -.- 


-.- 1 


1,860.00 


8,181.00 


Haiti 


1 

IV 

VII 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 


680. 00 
2,295.00 


680.00 

2, 360. 75 

10.11 






30.76 






334. 64 








Total --- 




2,975.00 


3, 410. 16 




I 

IV 

V 
VII 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 




394. 38 






106. 00 




509.00 


1, 505. 60 
51.00 






650. 00 








Total - 




,■109.00 


2, 706. 98 




I 

IV 

V 
VII 


CD 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 


818. 40 

654. 68 

3,785.41 

3,089.92 


818. 40 




654. 68 

22,448.08 

3, 215. 92 

40.00 






1,037.86 








Total- 




8, 348. 41 


28,214.94 


Iceland 


V 


(3) 




3, 670. 00 


India 


I 

IV 
V 

VI 


(1) 
(41 
(11 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 


390. 90 

896. 48 

153. 22 

3.00 


1, 474. 00 




3, 649. 14 

2,070.20 

46.30 

10,680.00 




600. 00 


1, 505. 00 

2, 500. 00 




334. 00 


334. 00 


Total --- 




2, 376. 60 


22, 157. 64 




IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 


154. 05 

29.80 

40,000.00 


729.81 




122.00 

40, 000. 00 

100. 00 








Total 




40,183.85 


40,951.81 




I 

V 


3) 

(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




26,500.00 






4, 958. 00 






210, 000. 00 




4,300.00 
29, 298. 00 


4, 300. 00 
29, 298. 00 


Total - - — 




33, 598. 00 


276, 056. 00 


Italy 


V 


(2) 


17,420.00 
13, 900. 00 


26, 740. 00 




13,900.00 


Total 




31, 320. 00 


40, 640. 00 




.1^ 

IV 


4) 
(1) 
(2) 




50,92 




240.00 
63.29 


1, 785. 01 
382. 90 


Total 




293. 29 


2, 218. 83 




.Iv 

V 


(1) 
(2) 




6, 380. 00 


jap n 




236,110.00 








Total 






241,490.00 



JtTLY 22, 1939 



73 





Category 


Value 


Country of dcstiuatiou 


June 1939 


6 months 

ending June 

30, 1939 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 


$i39.'6o" 


$792. 20 




360. 35 
173 20 






80 36 












139. 00 


1,415.11 










VII (2) 




864 00 








T>ihpria 


I (1) 
(4) 




30 80 






11.03 














41.83 










Macau 


I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 


667. 75 
800. 00 


56". 75 




3, 576. 00 
516 00 








Total. 




1, 367. 75 


4 659 75 








Mauritius 


I (1) 
(4) 




216 00 






123.66 








Total 






339. 66 












I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
C2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 










175.00 






9,330 00 






935, 600. 00 






18, 183. 89 






16, 660. 00 




44, 200. 00 

455.00 

6, 000. 00 


264. 650. 00 

324, 677. 00 

870, 746. 00 

6, 225. 50 




15, 000. 00 


23, 044. 87 


Total- 




65, 655. 00 


2, 468, 958. 20 








I (4) 




9 00 










I (1) 

(4) 

V (2) 










111.67 




1,000.00 


1, 000. 00 


Total. 




1,000.00 










Netherlands 


IV (1) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 




45 00 






352, 500. 00 






)S1,962. 67 






385, 463. 00 




2,000.00 


18, 550. 00 


Total 




2, 000. 00 


938. 520. 67 






Netherlands Indies. 


I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(5) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 




65. 25 






46, 645. 00 






183. 37 






491, 650. 00 




127, 212. 00 
21, 026. 80 


4,866,313.00 
21, 026. 80 
39, 495. 30 






281.00 




13,000.00 
10, 099. 00 


13,000.00 
38,614. 10 
35, 000. 00 






10.00 








Total 




171,337.80 


6 651 183 82 










I (1) 

(4) 

V (3) 


288.10 
345.00 






501. 24 
14,000.00 








Total 




633.10 


14 941.44 








Newfoundland. 


I (1) 
(4) 

IV (2) 

V (2) 




220.00 






99.38 




7.89 
2. 740. 00 


.56. 57 
2,740.00 


Total 




2, 747. 89 


3, 115. 95 








New Guinea, Territory of 


I (1) 
rV (2) 




17.00 






44.66 






63.00 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


June 1939 


6 months 

ending June 

30, 1939 




V (2) 
(3) 




$1,800.00 
41 ."inn 00 


Continued. 










Total 






44, 424. 66 










I (1) 
(4) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 


$33.16 






437 63 












4, 600. 00 
9, 756. 00 
6,300 00 




4, 250. 00 




5,578.00 


6, 578. 00 
4,262.00 






Total 




9,861.16 


30 400 82 








Nicaragua . . - - 


I (2) 

(4) 

in (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (2) 




1 finn on 




1,345.00 


1, 34.5. 00 

20, 906. 00 

427. 00 

2, 059. 70 

30 00 




37.40 
2,059.70 














Total 




3,442.10 


27, 247. 20 






Northern Ireland. 


IV (1) 

(2) 

VII (1) 




48 00 












5 76 








Total 


















I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 


244.92 
98.13 


446. 40 
114.74 
30.00 








2.03 






3 476 87 






2, 250. 00 
2,471.00 




1, 244. 00 


Total... 




1,687.06 


8,791.04 






Palestine... 


V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 




3, 0.'52. 00 
72.00 
404 00 




42.00 








Total 




42.00 


3,528.00 








IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

VII (I) 
(2) 










7 00 






4, 100. 00 






800.00 






2, 188. 00 






728.00 








Total 






7 879. .38 










Peru.- 


I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

HI (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
<3) 

VII (2) 




45 00 




26, 500. 66 

425. 00 

163, 044. 00 


37,000.00 

955. 36 

1, 019, 175. 00 

640. 40 






208. 60 






351.00 






4, 086. 00 






89, 344. 60 






48, 072. 00 






27. 143. 00 








Total . 




189,969.00 


1 227 019 86 








Pitcairn Island 


I (4) 




2.60 








Poland 


I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 




43.00 






141.00 






810. 90 






62.68 






257, 706. 00 








Total 






258, 762. 48 










Portugal 


IV (I) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 




317.00 






7, 885. 00 




30.00 


3, 280 00 
28. 000. 00 








Total _ 




30.00 


39, 482. 00 



74 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLKTIN 





Category 


Va 


uo 


Country of destination 


June 1939 


6 months 

ending June 

30, 1939 




I 
V 


(6) 
(2) 
(3) 


$835, 000. 00 


$835, 000. 00 




3, 970. 00 






26. 190. 00 








Total -- 




835, OOO. 00 


866, 160. 00 




I 

V 


(1) 

(4) 

(1) 


103. 25 


,500. 37 




218. 70 






1,900.00 








Total 




103. 26 


2, 619. 07 




I 

IV 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 


4.00 


10.63 




210. .80 




2.63 


26.76 


Total -- 




6.63 


248.19 




I 

V 


(4) 
(2) 
(3) 


244.00 
16, 682. 00 


566. 77 




26, 339. 44 
3, 400. 00 








Total 




16, 826. DO 


30, 306. 21 




I 

TV 
V 


(1) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 


62.00 
121.00 


62.90 




364. 25 
120,600.00 




3, 000. 00 


4. .544. 00 
20, 200. 00 








Total 




3,183.90 


145. 671. 15 








Syria.. — 


IV 


(2) 




19.00 




I 
IV 

V 


(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 




23. 68 




2, 167. 96 


14, 063. 48 
31.00 




14, 984. 00 
138, 720. 00 


40, 889. 00 
269,110.00 


Total 




155,871.96 


324, 107. 06 










I 

IV 
V 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




l.OS 






79. .10 






1,061, ,50 




1, 600. 00 


7,000.00 


Total 




1,500.00 


8, 132. 08 




IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




170. 34 






5.25 






.58, 480. 00 








Total - 






58.665.59 


Turks and Caicos Lslands 


IV 


(1) 
(2) 




18.70 






.80 








Total - 






19.50 










Union of South \frica - 


I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 


44.05 
51. 2,5 
62.50 
140.00 
4, 377. 00 
1, 129. 25 


841. 87 




1, 366. 31 
1,926.23 

308.24 

31, 377. 00 

9, 388. 57 

165.00 








Total 




6, 80-1. 06 


45, 373. 22 








Union of Soviet Socialist Re- 


V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




816, 966. 00 


publics. 


2, 262. 00 


65,675.78 
146, 408. 00 








Total 




2, 262. 00 


1,068,049.78 










V 


(2) 




160.00 










I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 




40.00 






41.00 






67.00 




6, 092. 92 

197.00 

45. 00 

36, 850. 00 


18, 285. 83 

1,128.60 

11,667 00 

104, 136. 50 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


June 1939 


6 monthp 

ending June 

30, 1939 




VII (1) 
(2) 




$3,410.98 






2, 100. 00 








Total 




$42, 184. 92 


140,856.81 










IV (1) 




48.00 










V (1) 
(2) 




182, 030. 00 




1,992.00 


5, 007. 00 


Total 




1.992.00 


187, 043. 00 








Grand total 




8, 160, 661. 22 


42, 533, 802. 68 









Akms Import Licenses Issued 

The table printed below iiKlicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries o± origin of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war li- 
censed for import by the Secretary of State 
durina: the month of June 19S9 : 



Country of origin 


Category 


Value 


Total 




I (5) 

V (2) 
VII (2) 
I (I) 

(4) 
(5) 
IV (1) 
(2) 
fl (2) 
tni (2) 
/I (2) 
tvil (2) 

V (3) 
I (4) 


$35. 00 

2,000.00 

3.76 

30.00 

6.00 

10.00 

67.00 

12.00 

6,000.00 

1,330.00 

18.00 

2.00 

,500. 00 

976.00 


$35.00 


Bolivia - - 


2, 000. 00 


Canada -. - 


3.T6 


Cuba - 


114.00 


France 


} 6,330.00 

} 20.00 
600.00 






Netherlands 


976. 00 






Total 






9, 978. 75 











During the month of June, 12 arms import 
licenses were issued, making a total of 108 such 
licenses issued during the current year. 



Categories or Arms, Ammunition, and Imple- 
ments or War 

The categories of arms, ammunition', and im- 
plements of war in the appropriate column of 
the tables printed above are the categories into 
which those articles were divided in the Presi- 



JULY 2 2, 1939 



75 



dent's proclamation of May 1, 1937, enunaerating 
the articles which would be considered as arms, 
ammunition, and implements of war for the 
purposes of section 5 of the joint resolution of 
May 1, 1937, as follows : 

Category I 

(1) Rifles and carbines using anmiunition in 
excess of caliber .22, and barrels for those 
weapons ; 

(2) Machine guns, automatic or autoloading 
rifles, and machine pistols using ammunition in 
excess of caliber .22, and barrels for those 
weapons ; 

(3) Guns, howitzers, and mortars of all cali- 
bers, their mountings and barrels; 

(4) Ammunition! in excess of caliber .22 for 
the arms enumerated under (1) and (2) above, 
and cartridge cases or bullets for such ammuni- 
tion ; filled and unfilled projectiles for the arms 
enumerated under (3) above; 

(5) Grenades, bombs, torpedoes, mines and 
depth charges, filled or unfilled, and apparatus 
for their use or discharge ; 

(6) Tanks, military armored vehicles, and 
armored trains. 

Gategoi'y II 

Vessels of war of all kinds, including aircraft 
carriers and submarines, and armor plate for 
such vessels. 

Category III 

(1) Aircraft, unassembled, assembled, or dis- 
mantled, both heavier and lighter than air, 
which are designed, adapted, and intended for 
aerial combat by the use of machine guns or of 
artillery or for the carrying and dropping of 
bombs, or which are equipped with, or which by 
reason of design or construction are prepared 
for, any of the appliances referred to in para- 
graph (2) below; 

(2) Aerial gun mounts and frames, bomb 
racks, torpedo carriers, and bomb or torpedo re- 
lease mechanisms. 

Category IV 

(1) Revolvers and automatic pistols using 
ammunition in excess of caliber .22; 

(2) Ammunition in excess of caliber .22 for 
the arms enumerated under (1) above, and 
cartridge cases or bullets for such ammunition. 

Category V 

(1) Aircraft, unassembled, assembled or dis- 
mantled, both heavier and lighter than air, other 



than those included in Category III; 

(2) Propellers or air screws, fuselages, hulls, 
wings, tail units, and under-carriage units; 

(3) Aircraft engines, unassembled, assem- 
bled, or dismantled. 

Category VI 

(1) Livens projectors and flame tlirowers; 

(2) a. Mustard gas (dichlorethyl sulphide); 

b. Lewisite (chlorviuyldiclilorarsine and 

dichlordivinylchlorarsiue) ; 

c. Methyldichlorarsine ; 

d . Diphenylclilorarsine ; 

e. Diphenylcyanarsine ; 

f . Diphenylamineclilorarsine ; 

g. Phenyldichlorarsine ; 
h. Ethyldichlorarsme ; 
i. Phenyldibromarsiiie ; 
j. Ethyldibromarsine; 
k. Phosgene; 

1. Monoclilormethylchlorf ormate ; 

m. Triclilormethylclilorf ormate (diphos- 

gene) ; 
n. Dichlordimethyl Ether; 
o. Dibromdimethyl Ether; 
p. Cyanogen Cliloride; 
ci . Ethyl bromacetate ; 
r. Ethyliodoacetate ; 
s. Brombenzylcyanide; 
t. Bromacetone ; 
u. Brommethylethyl ketone. 

Category VII 

(1) Propellant powders; 

(2) High explosives as follows: 

a. Nitrocellulose having a nitrogen con- 

tent of more than 12%; 

b. Trinitrotoluene; 

c . Trinitroxylene ; 

d. Tetryl (trinitrophenol methyl nitra- 

mine or tetranitro methylaniline) ; 

e. Picric acid; 

f. Ammonium picrate; 

g. Trinitroanisol ; 

h. Trinitronaphthalene ; 

i. Tetranitronaphthalene; 

j . Hexanitrodiphenylamine ; 

k. Pentaerythritetetranitrate (Penthrite 

or Pentrite) ; 
1. Trimethylenetrinitramine (Hexogen 

orT^); 
m. Potassium nitrate powders (black 

saltpeter powder); 
n. Sodium nitrate powders (black soda 

powder); 
o. Amatol (mixture of ammonium nitrate 

and trinitrotoluene) ; 



76 



DEPABTMENT OF STATE BULliETIN 



p. Ammonal (mixture of ammonium ni- 
trate, trinitrotoluene, and pow- 
dered aluminum, with or without 
other ingredients) ; 

q. Schneiderite (mixture of ammonium 
nitrate and dinitronaphthalene,with 
or without other ingredients). 

Special Statistics in Regard to Arms Exports 
TO Cuba 

In compliance with Article II of the conven- 
tion between the United States and Cuba to 
suppress smuggling, signed at Habana, March 
11, 1926, which reads in part as follows: 

"The High Contracting Parties agree that 
clearance of shii)ments of merchandise by wa- 
ter, air, or land, from any of the ports of either 
country to a port of entry of the other country, 
shall be denied when such shipment comprises 
articles the importation of which is prohibited 
or i-estricted in the country to which such ship- 
ment is destined, unless in this last case there 
has been a compliance with the requisites de- 
manded by the laws of both countries." 

and in compliance with the laws of Cuba which 
restrict the importation of arms, ammmiition, 
and implements of war of all kinds by requir- 
ing an import permit for each shipment, export 
licenses for shipments of arms, ammunition, 
and implements of war to Cuba are required for 
the articles enumerated below in addition to the 
articles enumerated in the President's procla- 
mation of May 1, 1937 : 

(1) Arms and small arms using ammunition 
of caliber .22 or less, other than those classed as 
toys. 

(2) Spare parts of arms and small arms of all 
kinds and calibers, other than those classed as 
toys, and of guns and machine guns. 

(3) Ammunition for the arms and small 
arms under (1) above. 

(4) Sabers, swords, and military machetes 
with cross-guard hilts. 

(5) Explosives as follows: explosive powders 
of all kincls for all purposes ; nitrocellulose hav- 
ing a nitrogen content of 12 percent or less ; di- 
phenylamine; dynamite of all kinds; nitro- 
glycerine; alkaline nitrates (ammonium, potas- 
sium, and sodium nitrate); nitric acid; nitro- 
benzene (essence or oil of mirbane) ; sulphur; 
sulphuric acid ; clilorate of potash ; and acetones. 



(6) Tear gas (CeH.COCH.Cl) and other 
similar nontoxic gases and apparatus designed 
for the storage or projection of such gases. 

The table printed below indicates, in respect 
to licenses authorizing the exportation to Cuba 
of the articles and commodities listed in the 
preceding paragraph issued by the Secretary of 
State during June 1939, the number of licenses 
and the value of the articles and commodities 
described in the licenses: 



Number of licenses 


Section 


Value 


Total 


26 


(1) 
(3) 
(5) 


$400.00 

7,419.00 

20,020.70 


1 




t $27,839.70 



The table printed below indicates the value 
of the articles and commodities listed above ex- 
ported to Cuba during June 1939 under licenses 
issued by the Secretary of State: 



Section 


Value 


Total 


(1) 


$828.00 

27.28 

4,751.00 

16, 820. 7S 


1 


(2) 


[ $21, 427. 03 


(3) -. 


(6) -- 


J 







Tin-Plate Scrap 

The table printed below indicates the number 
of licenses issued during the year 1939, up to 
and including the month of June, authorizing 
the export of tin-plate scrap under the provi- 
sions of the act approved February 15, 1986, 
together witli the number of tons authorized to 
be exported and the value thereof : 



Country of destina- 


June 1939 


6 months ending June 
30, 1939 


tion 


Qiiantitj 
in long tons 


Total value 


Quantity 
in long tons 


Total value 


jftppn 


180 


$3,323.00 


4,762 


$87, 943. 26 







During the month of June, 6 tin-plate scrap 
licenses were issued, malring a total of 87 such 
licenses issued during the current year. 



JULY 22, 1939 



77 



Helium 



The table printed below gives the esseiitiul 
information in regard to the licenses issued dur- 
ing (he month of June 1939 authorizing the ex- 
portation of helium gas under the provisions 
of the act approved on September 1, 1937, and 
the regulations issued pursuant thereto: 



Applicant for 
license 


Purchaser in 
foreign country 


Country of 
destina- 
tion 


Quantity 

in cubic 

feet 


Total 
value 


The Ohio Chemical 

& Mfg. Co. 
The Ohio Chemical 

& Mfg. Co. 
The Ohio Chemical 

& Mfg. Co. 
The Ohio Chemical 

& Mfg. Co. 

The Ohio Chemical 
& Mfg. Co. 


University of War^ 

saw. 

Oxygen Co. of 
Canada, Ltd. 

Condensed Gas 
Co., Ltd. 

Hon^ Kong Sana- 
tormm and Hos- 
pital. 

The Oxygen Co. 
of Canada, Ltd. 


Poland.- -- 

Canada. . . 

Great 

Britain. 

Hong 

Kong. 

Canada... 


392 
196 
196 
34 

980 


$:i2. 00 
8.15 
16.00 

7.20 

40.76 


Total 




104. 10 













Publications 



Department of State 

I Uplomatic List, July 1939. Publication 1347. ii, 80 pp. 
.SuhscTiption, $1 a year; single copy, 100. 

I'ubliciitious of the Department of State (a list cumu- 
lative from October 1, 1929). July i. 1939. Publicatiou 
1350. 31 pp. Free. 



U, S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1939 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C— Price 10 cents ----- Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 



a 



-I 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



J-3k. 




_J 



L 






r 




JULY 29, 1939 

Vol. I: No. 5 — Publication IJS9 




Qontents 

The Far East : i-ana 

Notice of termination of treaty of 1911 with Japan: 
Note from tlie Secretary of State to the Japanese 

Ambassador 81 

Japanese exports of cotton goods to the Philipjiines . . . 81 
Europe : 

Convention With France for the Avoidance of Double 

Taxation 82 

The American republics: 

Visit to the United States of the Brazilian Chief of 

Staff 82 

General Ti-eaty With Panama 82 

Convention With Panama Regarding Construction of a 

Trans-Isthmian Highway 82 

Treaty information : 
Arbitration : 

Permanent Court of Arbitration 83 

Conciliation : 
Treaty With Peru Looking to the Advancement of the 

Cause of General Peace (Treaty Series No. 613). . 88 
General relations : 

General Treaty With Panama (Treaty Series No. 

945) 83 

\Over\ 



q Y 



Treaty information — Continued. 

Education : Page 

Proces-Verbal Concerning the Application of Articles 
IV, V, VI, VII, IX, XII, and XIII of the Conven- 
tion of October 11, 1933, for Facilitating the Inter- 
national Circulation of Films of an Educational 

Character 85 

Health : 

Convention Modifying the International Sanitary 

Convention of June 21, 1926 85 

Commerce : 
Treaty of Commerce and Xavigation, and Protocol, 

With Japan (Treaty Series No. 558) 85 

Finance : 
Supplementary Executive Agreement With Haiti Ex- 
tending the Agi-eement of January 13, 1938 (Execu- 
tive Agreement Series No. 150) 85 

Convention With France for the Avoidance of 

Double Taxation 86 

Labor : 

Convention Concerning the Minimum Eequirement 
of Professional Capacity for IMasters and Officers 

on Board Merchant Ships 86 

Transit : 

Convention "With Panama Pegarding the Construc- 
tion of a Trans-Isthmian Highway (Treaty Sei'ies 
No. 946) 
Teleconununications : 

Regional Radio Convention of Central America, 

Panama, and the Canal Zone 89 

General Radio Regulations, Revision of Cairo, 1938 . 89 
General : 
Laws and regulations of foreign countries governing 

importation of marihuana 90 

International conferences, commissions, etc. : 

Seventh International Congress of Genetics 91 

International Commission of Inquiry, United States 

and Peru 91 

Publications 91 

Foreign Service of the United States: 
Persoimel changes 92 



The Far East 



NOTICE OF TERMINATION OF TREATY OF 1911 WITH JAPAN 
Note from the Secretary of State to the Japanese Ambassador 



[Released to the press July 26] 

July 26, 1939. 
Excellency : 

During recent years the Government of the 
United States has been examining the treaties 
of commerce and navigation in force between 
the United States and foreign countries with 
a view to determining what changes may need 
to be made toward better serving the purposes 
for which such treaties are conckided. In the 
course of this survey, the Government of the 
United States has come to the conchision that 
tlie Treaty of Commerce and Navigation be- 
tween the United States and Japan which was 



signed at Washington on February 21, 1911,^ 
contains provisions which need new considera- 
tion. Towaid preparing tlie way for such con- 
sideration and with a view to better safeguard- 
ing and promoting American interests as new 
develoi^ments may require, tlie Government of 
the United States, acting in accordance with 
tlie procedure jjrescribed in Article XVII of 
the treaty under reference, gives notice hereby 
of its desire that this treaty be terminated, 
and, having thus given notice, will expect the 
treaty, together with its accompanying j^roto- 
col, to expire six months from this date. 
Accept [etc.] Coedell Htjll 



JAPANESE EXPORTS OF COTTON GOODS TO THE PHILIPPINES 



; Released to the press July 25] 

The Department of State and the Japanese 
Embassy at Washington have arranged to con- 
inue for a further period of 1 year, beginning 
\.ugust 1, 1939, the existing arrangement re- 
ating to the importation of Japanese cotton 
:)iece goods into the Philippine Islands, which 
vill exiJire on July 31, 1939.^ Under this 



arrangement the Association of Japanese Ex- 
porters of Cotton Piece Goods into the Philip- 
pine Islands agrees to limit the annual im- 
portation of Japanese cotton piece goods into 
the Philippines to 45,000,000 square meters. 



1671S?,— 39 



'Treaty Series No. 558 (37 Stat. 1.504). 
'See Press Releases, Vol. XIX, No. 461, July 30, 
1938, p. 69. 



81 



•'•S.SUPFRINTFNDfNTOFOOqUVENTC 

AUG 18 1939 



82 



Europe 



CONVENTION WITH FRANCE FOR THE 
AVOIDANCE OF DOUBLE TAXATION 

An announcement regarding a convention be- 
tween the United States and France for the 
avoidance of double taxation and the estab- 
lishment of rules of reciprocal administrative 
assistance in the case of income and other taxes 
signed at Paris July 25, 1939, appears in this 
Bulletin under the heading "Treaty Informa- 
tion." 



The American Republics 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF 
THE BRAZILIAN CHIEF OF STAFF 

[Released to the press July 27] 

Telegram from the Chief of Staff of the Brazil- 
ian Army {Gen. Pedro A. Goes Monteiro) to 
the President of the United States : 

July 22, 1939. 
On leaving friendly shores of United States 
my most ardent desire is to express to Your 
Excellency not only my deep gratitude but also 
the sincere appreciation of my government for 
the warm fraternal reception tendered by you 
and your people to the representatives of the 
Brazilian army. We depart with regret and 
with the greatest of admiration for the progress 
and culture of the great nation so wisely ad' 
ministered by Your Excellency. Before return- 
ing to my country, I beg Your Excellency to 
accept this last expression of my confidence that 
the efforts of General Marshall and my own 
toward creating a friendly and active under- 
standing between the American and Brazilian 
staffs will have their happiest results in a fur- 



t)EPAETMENT 01* STATE BULLEllH 

ther strengthening of the warm friendship 
already existing between our two countries. 

Gen. Goes Monteieo 



Reply of President Roosevelt: 

July 26, 1939. 
I sincerely appreciate your generous message 
on your departure from this country. It was a 
very great pleasure to have had this visit from 
you and the members of your staff. This visit 
has been most useful in furthering the mutually 
beneficial cooperation which characterizes the 
friendly relations between Brazil and the United 
States, and your understanding of the prob- 
lems facing our countries will, I am sure, con- 
tribute greatly to their effective solution. It has 
been a genuine pleasure for the officials and 
Army officers of the United States Government 
to become personally acquainted with you and 
the officers accompanying you, and whatever 
hospitality was extended to you was a very 
small token of the deep and abiding friendship 
in which we hold 3'oii. 

Feankxin D. Roosevelt 



GENERAL TREATY WITH PANAMA 

An announcement regarding the exchange of 
ratifications of the General Treaty Between the 
United States and Panama, signed at Washing- 
ton March 2, 1936, and a summary of the pro- 
visions of the treaty appear in this Bulletin 
under the heading "Treaty Information." 

CONVENTION WITH PANAMA RE- 
GARDING CONSTRUCTION OF A 
TRANS-ISTHMIAN HIGHWAY 

An announcement regarding the exchange of 
ratifications between the United States and 
Panama of the Convention Regarding the Con- 
struction of a Trans-Isthmian Highway, signed 
at Washington March 2, 1936, and a summary 
of the provisions of the convention appear in 
this Bulletin under the heading "Treaty 
Information." 



I 



Treaty Information 



Compiled by the Treaty Division 



ARBITRATION 
Permanent Court of Arbitration 

Belgium 

According to a communication from the Sec- 
retary General of the Permanent Court of Ar- 
bitration dated July 8, 1939, the Belgian Gov- 
ernment has renewed the mandate of M. Joseph 
De Ruelle as a member of the Permanent Court 
of Arbitration. 



Uruguay 

According to a communication from the In- 
ternational Office of the Permanent Court of 
Arbitration dated July 10, 1939, the Uruguayan 
Government has renewed the mandate of Mi-. 
German Roosen as a member of tlie Permanent 
Court of Arbitration and has named as mem- 
bers of the Court Mr. Jacques Varela Acevedo, 
former Minister for Foreign Affairs; Mr. Joseph 
Espalter, former Minister for Foreign Affairs ; 
and Mr. Dardo Regules, professor in the Uni- 
versity of Montevideo, to replace Mr. Benito 
M. Cunarro, Mr. Abel J. Perez, and Mr. Juan 
Antonio Buero. 



CONCILIATION 

Treaty With Peru Looking to the Advance- 
ment of the Cause of General Peace 
(Treaty Series No. 613) 

The present composition of the international 
commission provided for under the terms of 
the Treaty Between the United States and 
Peru, signed July 14, 1914, Looking to the 
Advancement of the Cause of General Peace, 



appears in this Bulletin under the heading "In- 
ternational Conferences, Commissions, etc." 

GENERAL RELATIONS 

General Treaty With Panama (Treaty 
Series No. 945) 

On July 25, 1939, the Senate gave its advice 
and consent to ratification of the General 
Treaty Between the United States and Pan- 
ama, signed at Washington on March 2, 1936, 
providing for a revision in certain particulars 
and supplementation of the Convention for the 
Construction of the Panama Canal concluded 
between the United States and Panama at 
Washington on November 18, 1903 (Treaty 
Series No. 431). On July 26, 1939, the Presi- 
dent ratified the treaty, and on July 27, 1939, 
the exchange of ratifications took place and the 
treaty was proclaimed by the President. 

The provisions of the treaty, which entered 
into effect on the excliange of ratifications, are 
as follows: 

Article I establishes a basis of friendship and 
cooperation between Panama and the United 
States. 

Article II. The compliance of Panama with 
tlie provisions of article II of the convention 
of November 18, 1903, in turning over to the 
United States additional lands and waters be- 
yond those specifically mentioned therein is 
recognized. The requirement of further lands 
and waters is considered improbable by both 
Governments, but they nevertheless recognize 
their joint obligation to insure the continuous 
operation of the Canal and agree to reach the 
necessary understanding should additional 
lands and wat§fs be ill fact necessary for this 
purpose, 

88 



84 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Article III contains various provisions re- 
stricting the commercial activities of the 
United States in the Canal Zone in order that 
Panama may take advantage of the commercial 
opportunities inherent in its geographical sit- 
uation. In this article are listed the classes 
of persons who may reside in the Canal Zone 
and the persons who are entitled to make pur- 
chases in the Canal Zone commissaries. 

Article IV provides for the free entry of mer- 
chandise entering Panama destined for agencies 
of the United States Government and provides 
that no taxes shall be imposed upon persons in 
the service of the United States entering Pan- 
ama or upon residents of Panama entering the 
Canal Zone. 

Article V provides that port facilities other 
than those ov>ned by the Panama Railroad Co. 
in the ports of Panama and Colon may be oper- 
ated only by Panama; exempts from Pan- 
amanian taxation vessels using the Canal which 
do not touch at ports under Panamanian juris- 
diction; and provides for the establishment of 
Panamanian customhouses within the Canal 
Zone. Tlie United States undertakes to adopt 
such administrative regulations as may be nec- 
essary to assist Panama in conirolling immigra- 
tion into that country. 

Article VI revises article VII of the conven- 
tion of November 18, 1903, in that the United 
States renounces the right to acquire, by the 
exercise of the right of eminent domain, lands 
or properties in or near the cities of Panama and 
Colon, although retaining the right to purchase 
necessary lands or properties. The third para- 
graph of the said article VII, granting the 
United States the right to intervene in the cities 
of Panama and Colon and tiie territory adja- 
cent thereto for the purpose of maintaining 
order, is abrogated. 

Article VII provides that beginning with the 
1934 annuity payment the annual amounts of 
these payments shall be four hundred thirty 
thousand balboas (B/430 ,000.00) or the equiva- 
lent thereof. In a supplementary exchange of 
notes the balboa is defined as having a gold 
content equal to that of the present United 
States dollar. 



Article VIII provides for a corridor under 
Panamanian jurisdiction to connect the city of 
Colon with other territory of Panama. 

Article IX establishes a similar corridor un- 
der American jurisdiction to connect the Mad- 
den Dam area with the Canal Zone proper. 

Article X provides that in case of emergency 
both Governments will take such measures of 
prevention and defense as they may consider 
necessary for the protection of their conmion 
interests. 

Article XI reserves to each country all rights 
enjoyed by virtue of treaties now in force be- 
tween the two countries, and jDreserves all ob- 
ligations therein established, with the exception 
of those rights and obligations specifically re- 
vised by the present treaty. The juridical status 
of the Canal Zone, as defined in article III of 
the 1903 convention, thereby remains unaltered. 

Article XII provides that the treaty shall 
take effect immediately on the exchange of rati- 
fications in Washington. 

There were 16 exchanges of notes signed on 
March 2, 1936, and 1 signed on February 1, 
1939, interpreting and defining certain provi- 
sions of the General Treaty. These notes will 
be printed in Treaty Series No. 915. 

On the occasion of the exchange of ratifica- 
tions of the General Treaty Between the United 
States and Panama, signed March 2, 1936, the 
Secretary of State made the following remarks : , 

"The ])resent occasion marks an important 
milestone in our relations with the Republic of 
Panama. It will be recalled that the convention 
of 1903 was drafted at a time when the Panama' 
Canal was only a dream and that consequently 
it was impossible to foresee and to provide for 
the many varied phases of our relations with 
Panama which would spring from the con- 
tinuous operation of the Canal and its attend- 
ant works and establishments. 

"Dissatisfaction on the part of the Republic 
of Panama with certain of the provisions of 
the convention of 1903 arose early, and various 
attempts were made, many of them successful, 
to solve certain specific problems either infor- 
mally or by agreement. The present General 



I 



JULY 29, 1939 



85 



Treaty is the result of nuiny puinstakinj? hours 
of negotiation and preparation. It is a docu- 
ment wliich we hope responds to the geniiine 
and legitimate aspirations of the Government 
and i:)eople of Panama yet which not only con- 
tinues existing safeguai-ds and provisions for 
the operation, maintenance, sanitation, and pro- 
tection of the Canal from our point of view, but 
bj' associating the Republic of Panama in this 
work, accords even greater security and effi- 
ciency to the Canal, either in its present form 
or should it become necessary, in an expanded 
form." 

EDUCATION 

Proces-Verbal Concerning the ApplicatioH 
of Articles IV, V, VI, VII, IX, XII, and 
XIII of the Convention of October 11, 1933, 
for Facilitating the International Circu- 
lation of Films of an Educational Char- 
acter 

Monojco 

According to a circular letter from the League 
of Nations dated July 13, 1939, the Proces- 
Vei'bal Concerning the Application of Articles 
IV, V, VI, VII, IX, XII, and XIII of tlie 
Convention of October 11, 1933, for Facilitating 
the International Circulation of Films of an 
Educational Character, which was opened for 
signature at Geneva on September 12, 1938, was 
signed on behalf of Monaco on July 5, 1939. 

HEALTH 

Convention Modifying the International 
Sanitary Convention of June 21, 1926 

Belgiwm — Great Britain — Italy 

The American Ambassador to France re- 
ported by a despatch dated July 5, 1939, that 
he had been informed by the French Foreign 
Office that the Convention Modifying the In- 
ternational Sanitary Convention of June 21, 
1926, which was opened to signature on Oc- 
tober 31, 1938, has been ratified by and the 
instruments of ratification deposited by Bel- 
gium on June 5, 1939, Great Britain on May 
26, 1939, and Italy on June 9, 1939. 



According to tlie terms of the convention it 
will enter into force as from the date on which 
the French Government shall draw up a 
Ijroces-verbal to the effect that four states 
represented at the present time on the Sanitary, 
Maritime, and Quarantine Board of Egypt 
have deposited their ratifications or have ad- 
hered to the convention. 

According to the Department's information 
the states represented on the Board by a dele- 
gate include the Governments of Belgium, Den- 
mark, Egj'pt, France, Great Britain, Greece, 
Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, 
and Sweden. 

COMMERCE 

Treaty of Commerce and Navigation, and 
Protocol, With Japan (Treaty Series No. 

558) 

The notice of the terminatioii of the Treaty 
of Commerce and Navigation, and Protocol, 
between the United States and Japan, signed 
at Washington on February 21, 1911, appears 
in this BvUet'm. under the heading "The Far 
East." 

FINANCE 

Supplementary Executive Agreement With 
Haiti Extending the Agreement of Janu- 
ary 13, 1938 (Executive Agreement Series 
No. 150) 

On January 13, 1938, an agreement between 
tlie United States and Haiti was signed which 
provided for a temporary modification of the 
agreement of August 7, 1933 (Executive Agree- 
ment Series No. 46), concerning the Haitian- 
ization of the Garde, withdrawal of military 
forces from Haiti, and financial arrangement. 
This agreement, which allows the Haitian Gov- 
ernment to suspend partially the amortization 
service on the 1922 loan, was entered into for 
the period January 1, 1938, through Septem- 
ber 30, 1938, the balance of the Haitian fiscal 
year. 



86 



At the request of the Haitian Government a 
supplementary agreement was signed on July 
1, 1938, prolonging the agreement of January 
13, 1938, for a period of 1 year from October 
1, 1938, through September 30, 1939. The 
agreements of January 13, 1938, and July 1, 
1938, are printed as Executive Agreement 
Series Nos. 117 and 128, respectively (see 
Treaty Information^ bulletin No. 106, July 

1938, p. 248). 

A second supplementary executive agreement 
between the two countries was signed on July 
8, 1939, prolonging for a period of 1 year from 
October 1, 1939, the agreement of July 1, 1938. 
This agreement will shortly be printed as 
Executive Agreement Series No. 150. 

Convention With France for the Avoidance 
of Double Taxation 

A convention between the United States and 
France for the avoidance of double taxation 
and the establishment of rules of reciprocal 
administrative assistance in the case of income 
and other taxes was signed at Paris on July 25, 

1939. The convention provides for the avoid- 
ance of double income taxation in certain cases 
by credit against foreign taxes and in other 
cases by making certain types of income sub- 
ject to taxation in only one of the countries. 
The convention provides also that each Gov- 
ernment will transmit to the other Government 
information in relation to taxes to which the 
convention refers but not with respect to its own 
nationals or corporations. Other provisions 
concern mutual assistance in the collection of 
taxes. 

The convention signed on July 25, 1939, will, 
when it enters into force, supplant the conven- 
tion between the United States and France 
signed at Paris on April 27, 1932.^ The new 
convention amplifies and clarifies the conven- 
tion of 1932 and provides the means for the 
settlement of practically all outstanding income 
taxation problems bet'^veen the t^vg countries. 



'Treaty Series No. 886, 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

LABOR 

Convention Concerning the Minimum Re- 
quirement of Professional Capacity for 
Masters and Officers on Board Merchant 
Ships 

United States 

There are printed below two laws enacted 
by the Seventy-sixth Congress, First Session, 
namely, Public, No. 16 (H. R. 950), and Pub- 
lic, No. 188 (H. R. 3576), to make effective 
the provisions of the Convention Concerning 
the Minimum Requirement of Professional 
Capacity for Masters and OflBcers on Board 
Merchant Ships, adopted by the International 
Labor Conference at its twenty-first session on 
October 24, 1936. This convention was ratified 
by the United States with an understanding, 
on September 1, 1938, and the instrument of 
ratification was registered with the Secretariat 
of the League of Nations on October 29, 1938 
(see Treaty Information, bulletins Nos. 105, 
June 1938, p. 176; and 109, October 1938, p. 
334). The convention has been ratified by 
and will become effective on October 29, 1939, 
between the United States of America and 
Belgium, Brazil, Denmark, Estonia, New Zea- 
land, and Norway. The ratification by Egypt 
was registered with the Secretariat on May 20, 
1939, and will become effective 12 months 
thereafter. 

"AN ACT To exempt all vessels of the United 
States of less than two hundred tons gross 
registered tonnage from the provisions of the 
Officers' Competency Certificates Convention, 
1936 (being International Labor Conference 
Treaty, Convention Numbered 53, adopted 
by the International Labor Conference at 
Geneva in 1936). 

"5e it enacted hy the Senate and House of 
Representatives of the United States of 
America in Congress assembled, That pursuant 
to the authority granted in the second clause 
of Article One of the Officers' Competency 
Certificates ConventiQn, 1936, ratified by the 



87 



President of the United States on September 
1, 1938, by and with the advice and consent 
of the Senate of the United States, given June 
13, 1938 (being International Labor Conference 
Treaty, Draft Convention, Numbered 53, 
adopted by the International Labor Conference 
at Geneva in 1936), vessels of the United States 
of less than two hundred tons gross registered 
tonnage are hereby exempted from the pro- 
visions of such convention : Pro vided, hoivever, 
That neither the ratification of the said con- 
vention by the President of the United States, 
nor the advice and consent of the United States 
Senate given thereto, nor any provision of the 
said convention as ratified, nor any provision 
of this Act shall be deemed to alter, amend, or 
repeal any statute of the United States exist- 
ing at the time of said ratification, or there- 
after enacted, with regard to any such vessel 
of less than two hundred tons gross registered 
tonnage. 

"Approved, March 29, 1939." 

"AN ACT To make effective the provisions of 
the Officers' Competency Certificates Conven- 
tion, 1936. 

"5e it enacted by the Senate and House of 
Representatives of the United States of America 
in Congress assembled, That title 52 of the Re- 
vised Statutes is amended by inserting after 
section 4438 thereof a new section designated 
section 4438a, to read as follows : 

"'Sec. 4438a. (1) That the Officers' Compe- 
tency Certificates Convention, 1936 (Interna- 
tional Labor Organization Draft Convention 
Numbered 53, "concerning the minimum require- 
ment of professional capacity for masters and 
officers on board merchant ships"), as ratified 
by the President on September 1, 1938, with 
understandings appended, and this section shall 
apply to all vessels, however propelled, navigat- 
ing on the high seas, which are registered, en- 
rolled and licensed, or licensed under the laws 
of the United States, whether permanently, 
temporarily, or provisionally, including yachts 
enrolled and licensed, or licensed, with the 
exception of-^ 



" '(a) ships of war; 

"'(b) Government vessels, or vessels in 
the service of a public authority, which are 
not engaged in trade ; 

"'(c) wooden ships of primitive build, 
such as dhows and junks; 

"'(d) unrigged vessels; 

" ' (e) all vessels of less than two hundred 
gi-oss tons. 

'"(2) All laws in effect on the effective date 
of this section covering the issuance, duration, 
renewal, suspension, and revocation of licenses 
of masters, mates, chief engineers, and assist- 
ant engineers be, and they are hereby, made 
applicable to the issuance, duration, renewal, 
suspension, or revocation of licenses of masters, 
mates, chief engineers, and assistant engineers 
of all vessels to which the Officers' Competency 
Certificates Convention, 1936, and this section 
apply, to such extent and upon such conditions 
as may be required by the regulations of the 
Board of Supervising Inspectors with the ap- 
proval of the Secretary of Commerce : Provided, 
That examinations for licenses of masters, 
mates, chief engineers, and assistant engineers 
of fishing vessels, not subject to the inspection 
laws of the United States, shall be oral: Pro- 
vided further, That applicants for licenses as 
masters, mates, chief engineers, and assistant 
engineers of fishing vessels not subject to the 
inspection laws of the United States shall not be 
required to obtain a certificate from the United 
States Public Health Service based upon the 
subject of ship sanitation, and first aid. 

'"(3) Any license issued (whether before, or 
on, or after, the effective date of this section) 
to a master, mate, chief engineer, or assistant 
engineer of a vessel to which this section applies 
shall be deemed to be a certificate of competency 
for a master or skipper, navigating officer in 
charge of a watch, chief engineer, or engineer 
in charge of a watch, respectively. 

" '(4) No person shall be engaged to perform, 
or shall perform on board any vessel to which 
this section applies, the duties of master, mate, 
chief engineer, or assistant engineer unless he 
holds a license to perform such duties, issued 
in accordance with the provisions of subsection 
8 pf thig gection: Provided, That ^ license a? 



88 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



master, mate, chief engineer, or assistant en- 
gineer of vessels subject to this section may be 
issued without examination at any time prior 
to October 29, 1941, to any applicant who has 
had sufficient practical experience in the posi- 
tion for wliich he applies to be licensed and has 
no record of any serious technical error against 
him : Provided further^ That no person to whom 
a license as master, mate, chief engineer, or as- 
sistant engineer is issued without examination 
may serve under authority of that license as 
master, mate, chief engineer, or assistant en- 
gineer on any vessel subject to the inspection 
laws of the United States. 

"'(5) It shall be unlawful to engage or em- 
ploy any person or for any person to serve as 
a master, mate, or engineer on any such vessel 
who is not licensed by the inspectors; and any- 
one violating this section shall be liable to a 
penalty of $100 for each offense. 

"'(6) If any collector of customs has reason 
to believe, on complaint or otherwise, that a 
vessel subject to this section and to the regula- 
tions established thereunder is about to proceed 
to the high seas from a port in the United 
States or any Territory over which the United 
States exercises jurisdiction, except the Philip- 
l^ine Islands and the Panama Canal Zone, in 
violation of any provision of this section or of 
any provision of the Officers' Competency Cer- 
tificates Convention, 1936, he may, by written 
order served on the master or officer in charge 
of such vessel, detain her until such time as 
this section shall have been complied with. 
Clearance shall be refused to anj' vessel which 
shall have been ordered detained. If the vessel 
be ordered detained the master may, within 
five days, ap2)eal to the Secretary of Commerce, 
who may, after investigation, affirm, set aside, 
or modify the order of the collector. 

" ' (7) Foreign vessels to v/hich the Officers' 
Competency Certificates Convention, 1936, ap- 
plies shall be subject to such inspection, within 
the jurisdiction of the United States, except the 
Philippine Islands and the Panama Canal 
Zone, as may be necessary to determine that 
there has been a compliance with the terms of 
the convention, and in case of any breach of 



the jarovisions of the convention by such vessel 
the collector of customs may, by written order 
served on the master or officer in charge of such 
vessel, detain her and refuse clearance to her 
until such time as the convention shall have 
been complied with; the collector shall also im- 
mediately notify the consul of the counti-y in 
which the vessel is registered. If the vessel 
be ordered detained the master may, within . 
five days, appeal to the Secretary of Commerce, 
who may, after investigation, affirm, set aside, 
or modify the order of the collector. 

"'(8) No provision of the Officers' Com- < 
petency Certificates Convention, 1936, or of i 
this section, shall apply to any vessel of the 
United States of less than two hundred gross 
tons, nor shall any provision of that convention 
or this section be deemed to alter, amend, or 
repeal any statute of the United States in effect 
on the effective date of this section with regard 
to any such vessel. • 

"'(9) The Secretary of Commerce shall es- - 
tablish such regulations as may be necessary 
to secure the enforcement of the provisions of 
this section by any officer of the United States 
authorized to enforce the navigation or inspec- 
tion laws of the United States. 

"'(10) The Secretary of Commerce or any 
officer of the Department of Commerce au- 
thorized by the Secretary of Commerce may, 
upon application therefor, remit or mitigate 
any fine or penalty incurred under this section 
or any regulation thereunder. 

"'(11) No provision of the Officers' Com-,, 
petency Certificates Convention, 1936, nor of 1 
this section, shall apply to any vessel, however J 
propelled, navigating on the Great Lakes. 1 

'"(12) Where used in this section — 

"'(a) the term '"high seas" means all 
waters outside the line dividing the in- 
land waters from the high seas, as defined 
in section 2 of the Acf of February 19, 
1895; 

"'(b) the term "unrigged vessel" means 
any vessel that is not self-propelled. 

"'(13) Nothing contained in the Officers'" 
Competency Certificates Convention, 1936, nor 
in this section, shall be deemed to extend any 



JULY 2 9, 193 9 



89 



provision of section 2 of the Act of March 4, 
1915, as amended (U. S. C, 1934 edition, Supp. 
IV, title 4(5, sec. 673), or to aher, modify, or 
repeal any statute of the United States in effect 
on the effective date of this section, except as 
hereinbefore provided. 

'' '(14) This section shall become effective on 
October 29, 1939 : Provided, That licenses may 
be issued by boards of local inspectors in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of this section at 
any time prior to such date. 

" ' ( 15 ) There are hereby authorized to be 
appropriated such sums as may be necessary to 
carry out the provisions of this section.' 

"Approved, July 17, 1939." 



TRANSIT 

Convention With Panama Regarding the 
Construction of a Trans-Isthmian High- 
w^ay (Treaty Series No. 946) 



highway when completed. As a contribution 
to the completion of the highway, the United 
States will construct, at an estimated expense 
of $300,000, a stretch of about 3 miles within 
the Canal Zone on the Atlantic side near Colon, 
which portion shall thereafter be maintained 
by Panama at its expense. The balance of the 
uncompleted construction of the highway will 
be paid for by Panama, including a short sec- 
tion under American jurisdiction near Madden 
Dam. This latter section is to be constructed 
by the Canal Zone authorities at an estimated 
expense to Panama of about $125,000. 

In connection with the exchange of ratifica- 
tions of the Trans-Isthmian Highway Conven- 
tion, it may be recalled that the only present 
means of surface transit across the Isthmus, 
other than the Canal itself, is by means of the 
Panama Railroad. 



TELECOMMUNICATIONS 



On July 25, 1939, the Senate gave its advice 
and consent to ratification of the Convention 
Between the United States and Panama, signed 
March 2, 1936, Regarding the Construction of 
a Trans-Isthmian Highway between the cities 
of Panama and Colon. The convention was 
ratified by the President on July 26, 1939, and 
the exchange of ratifications took place at 
Washington on July 27, 1939. The President 
proclaimed the convention immediately after 
the exchange of ratifications. 

Under the Trans-Isthmian Highway Con- 
vention, the United States undertakes to ob- 
tain from the Panama Railroad Co. a waiver 
of that company's exclusive right to establish 
roads across the Isthmus of Panama in order 
to permit the construction of a Trans-Isthmian 
highway between the cities of Panama and 
Colon. The specifications of the proposed 
highway are set forth, provision is made for 
the establishment of a joint board to deal with 
questions of detail, the two Governments agree 
to coordinate the construction work to be per- 
formed by them respectively, and each Gov- 
ernment shall enjoy equally the use of the 



Regional Radio Convention of Central 
America, Panama, and the Canal Zone 

United States 

On July 21, 1939, the Senate gave its advice 
and consent to ratification by the President of 
the Regional Radio Convention of Central 
America, Panama, and the Canal Zone, signed 
at Guatemala City on December 8, 1938. 

General Radio Regulations, Revision of 
Cairo, 1938 

United States 

On July 21, 1939, the Senate gave its advice 
and consent to the ratification by the Presi- 
dent of the General Radio Regulations annexed 
to the International Telecommunication Con- 
vention, signed at Madrid December 9, 1932, as 
adopted on April 8, 1938, by the International 
Telecommunication Conferences at Cairo. 

A table showing the status of this and the 
other Regulations and Protocols adopted at 
Cairo is printed on page 64 of the Bulletin of 
July 22, 1939 (Vol. I, No. 4) . 



90 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



General 



LAWS AND REGULATIONS OF FOR- 
EIGN COUNTRIES GOVERNING IM- 
PORTATION OF MARIHUANA 

[Released to the press July 27] 

Pursuant to the provisions of section 6 of the 
Marihuana Tax Act of 1937, approved August 
2, 1937 (Public, No. 236, 75th Cong., 1st sess.), 
reading as follows : 

"Sec. 6. (a) It shall be unlawful for any per- 
son, whether or not required to pay a special 
tax and register under section 2, to transfer 
marihuana, except in pursuance of a written 
order of the person to whom such marihuana 
is transferred, on a form to be issued in blank 
for that purpose by the Secretary (of the Treas- 
ury). 

"(b) Subject to such regulations as the Secre- 
tary may prescribe, nothing contained in this 
section shall apply — 

• ■ • • • 

"(3) To the sale, exportation, shipment, or 
delivery of marihuana by any person within 
the United States, any Territory, the District 
of Columbia, or any of the insular possessions 
of the United States, to any person in any for- 
eign country regulating the entry of mariliuana, 
if such sale, shipment, or delivery of marihuana 
is made in accordance with such regulations 
for importation into such foreign country as are 
prescribed by such foreign country, such regula- 
tions to he pronvulgated from time to time hy 
the Secretary of State of the United States.'''' 

the Secretary of State announces that he has 
received the laws and regulations of the fol- 
lowing governments governing the importation 
of cannabis sati/va and its derivatives: 



Argentina 


Brazil 


Belgium 


Bulgaria 


Belgian Congo 


Canada 


Euanda-Urun^i 


Chile 


PoUvin 


Colombia 



Costa Rica 


Great Britain— Cont. 


Cuba 


New Zealand 
Samoan Mandated 


Danzig, Free City of 


Denmark 


Territory 


Iceland 


Pacific Islands under 


Dominican Republic 


jurisdiction of New 


Ecuador 


Zealand 


Egypt 


Newfoundland 


El Salvador 


Barbados 


Estonia 


St. Vincent 


Finland 


St. Lucia 


France 


Leeward Islands 


Indochina 


Dominica 

British Honduras f 


Kwang Chow-Wan 


Algeria 


Bermuda 


French West Indies 


•Jamaica 


Society Islands 


Bahama Islands 


Tunisia 


Trinidad 


Syria 


Grenada 


Great Britain 


British Guiana 


Northern Ireland 


Greece 


Gibraltar 


Guatemala 


Malta 


Haiti 


India 


Honduras 


Aden, Colony of 


Hungary 


Ceylon 


Iran 


Hong Kong 


Iraq 


Straits Settlements 


Ireland 


Federated Malay 


Italy 


States 


Japan 


Nonfederated Malay 


Leased Territory of 


States of Johore, 


Kwantung 


Kedah, Perils, Kel- 


Chosen 


antan, and Brunei 


Formosa and Pesca- 


Sarawak 


dores Islands 


British North Borneo 


Latvia 


Nigeria 


Liberia 


Gold Coast 


Lithuania 


Sierra Leone 


Mexico M 


Kenya Colony 


Monaco ^M 


Tanganyika Territory 


Morocco. " 


Uganda 


Netherlands 


Nyasaland Protector- 


Netherlands Indies i 


ate 


Curagao i 


Australia 


Surinam Bj 


Papua 


Nicaragua ■ 


Mandated Territory 


Norway 


of New Guinea 


Palestine and Traiis- 


Mandated Territory 


.Tordan 


of Nauru 


Panama ■■ 


Territory of Norfolk 


Paraguay H 


Island 


Peru H 


British Solomon Is- 


Poland H 


lands 


Portugal H 


Gilbert and EUice Is- 


Angola H 


lands 


Guinea H 


New Hebrides 


Macau ■ 



JULY 29, 1939 



91 



Portugal — Continued. 

Mozambique 

Timor 
Rumania 
San Marino 
Spain 
Sweden 
Switzerland 

The laws and regulat 
been deposited ■with the 
Treasury Department, 
consulted. 



Thailand (Siam) 
Turkey 

Union of South Africa 
Union of Soviet So- 
cialist Republics 
Uruguay 
Venezuela 
Yugoslavia 

ions in question have 
Bureau of Narcotics, 
where they may be 



International Conferences, 
Commissions, etc. 



SEVENTH INTERNATIONAL CON- 
GRESS OF GENETICS 

[Released to the press July 24] 

This Government has accepted the invitation 
transmitted by the British Government on be- 
half of the organizers of the Seventh Interna- 
tional Congress of Genetics lo participate in 
the congress, which will be held at Edinburgh, 
Scotland, from August 23 to 30, 1939. The 
President has approved the appointment of the 
following persons as delegates on the part of 
the United States : 

Dr. Hugh C. McPhee, Chief of the Animal Hus- 
bandry Division, Bureau of Animal Industry, 
Department of Agi-iculture, chairman of the 
delegation 

Dr. Albert Francis Blakeslee, Carnegie Institu- 
tion, Cold Spring Harbor, Long Island, N. Y. 

Dr. Lewis J. Stadler, Principal Geneticist, Bu- 
reau of Plant Industry, Department of Agri- 
culture, University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. 

Dr. Sewall Wright, Burton Distinguished Serv- 
ice Professor of Zoology, University of Chicago, 
Chicago, 111. 

The congress will discuss human genetics as 
well as genetics as related to animal breeding 
and plant breeding. 



INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION OF 
INQUIRY, UNITED STATES AND 
PERU 

[Released to the press July 25] 

By the joint action of ilie Governments of the 
United States and Peru, Mr. Paul Claudel, 
former French Ambassador to the United States, 
has been appointed to the position of joint com- 
missioner on the International Commission of 
Inquiry provided for under the terms of the 
Treaty for the Advancement of Peace between 
the United States and Peru, signed July 14, 
1914.* 

The present composition of the Commission 
is as follows: 

United States Commissioners : 

National: Eugene Wambaugh, of Massachu- 
setts 

Nonnational: David Stanley Smith, of New 
Zealand 

Peruvian Cormnissioners: 
National : Anselmo Barreto 
Nonnational : (vacant) 

Joint GommissioTier: 
Paul Claudel, of France. 



Publications 



Writings on American History, 1935: A bibliography 
of books and articles on United States and Canadian 
history published during the year 1935, with some 
memoranda on other portions of America, by Grace 
Gardner Griffin and Dorothy M. Louraine. Annual 
report of the American Historical Association for the 
year 1935 (in two volumes). Volume II. (H. Doc. 323, 
Vol. 2, 74th Cong., 1st sess.) xxxil, 563 pp. $1.25. 



'Treaty Series No. 613 (39 Stat., pt. 2, 1611). 



Foreign Service of the United States 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 



[Released to the press July 29] 

The follo-n-ing changes have occurred m the 
Foreign Service since July 15, 1939 : 

Career Officers 

Donald C. Dunham, of Cleveland, Ohio, vice 
consul at Aden, Arabia, has resigned from the 
Foreign Service effective upon the expiration 
of authorized leave of absence. 

Samuel J. Fletcher, of Kittery Point, Maine, 
consul at Canton, China, has been assigned as 
consul at Tientsin, China. 

Charles S. Reed, 2d, of Cleveland, Ohio, sec- 
ond secretary of embassy at Peiping, China, 
has been assigned as consul at Saigon, French 
Indochina. 

Harry E. Stevens, of Alameda, Calif., consul 
at Hankow, China, has been assigned as second 
secretary of embassy at Peiping, China. 

The Senate has confirmed the following as 
Foreign Service officers, unclassified, vice con- 
suls of career, and secretaries in the Diplo- 
matic Service of the United States, and they 
have been assigned as vice consuls at the posts 
indicated : 

Lampton Berry, of Columbia, Miss., assigned 
as vice consul at Durban, Union of South 
Africa. 

Roland K. Beyer, of Kaukauna, Wis., as- 
signed as vice consul at Toronto, Ontario, 
Canada. 

Robert P. Chalker, of Pensacola, Fla., as- 
signed as vice consul at Berlin, Germany. 

Meredith Weatherby, of Waco, Tex., as- 
signed as vice consul at Habana, Cuba. 



Alfred T. Wellborn, of New Orleans, La., as- 
signed as vice consul at Montreal, Quebec, 
Canada. 

Ralph C. Getsinger, of Detroit, Mich., as- 
signed as vice consul at Hamburg, Germany. 

George D. Henderson, of Palo Alto, Calif., 
assigned as vice consul at Ciudad Juarez, Chi- 
huahua, Mexico. 

E. Kenneth Oakley, of Fort Smith, Ark., as- 
signed as vice consul at Mexico City, Mexico. 

M. Robert Rutherford, of Missoula, Mont., 
assigned as vice consul at Winnipeg, Manitoba, 
Canada. 

J. Kittredge Vinson, of Houston, Tex., as- 
signed as vice consul at Warsaw, Poland. 

NONCAEEER OFFICERS 

Walter T. Costello, of San Francisco, Calif., 
vice consul at Moscow, Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics, has been appointed vice consul at 
Budapest, Hungary. 

Erich W. A. Hoffman, of Milwaukee, Wis., 
vice consul at Tirana, Albania, has been ap- 
pointed vice consul at Moscow, Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics. 

The appointment of Stephen B. Vaughn of 
Hasbrouck Heights, N. J., now vice consul at 
Breslau, Germany, as vice consul at London, 
England, has been canceled. In lieu thereof, 
Mr. Vaughn has been appointed vice consul at 
Berlin, Germany. 

Casimii- T. Zawadzki, of Buffalo, N. Y., vice 
consul at Berlin, Germany, has been appointed 
vice consul at London, England. 



92 



U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1939 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents ----- Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WITH THE APPEOVAL OP THE DIRECTOR OP THE BUREAU OP THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 




■^ 



Tf 



-JJL^ 



I 

Li 



^1 I IL 



'V' 




Qontents 



AUGUST 12, 1939 
Vol. I: No. 1 — Publication Ij63 




The American I'epublics: 
United States survey of Nicaraguan barge canal and Page 

highway project 107 

General Treaty Witli Panama 107 

Europe : 

Aviation arrangements with France 108 

Visit to the United States of the Prince Consort and 

Crown Prince of Luxemburg 108 

International conferences, commissions, etc. : 

Ninth General Conference on Weights and Measures . . 108 
Treaty information : 
Health : 

Pan American Sanitary Convention (Treaty Series 

No. 714) 109 

Aviation : 

Additional Protocol to the Convention for the Unifi- 
cation of Certain Rules Relating to Damages Caused 

by Aircraft to Third Parties on the Surface 109 

Arrangement With France Relating to Air Naviga- 
tion (Executive Agreement Series No. 152) 109 

Agreement With France for the Operation of Air 
Transport Services (Executive Agreement Series 
No. 153) 114 

[Orer] 



1 



Treaty information — Continued. i 

Fisheries : Page 

Protocol Amending tlie Agreement for the RegiUa- 
tion of Whaling of June 8, 1937 (Treaty Series 

No. 944) 115 

Navigation : 
International Convention for the Unification of Cer- 
tain Rules Relating to Bills of Lading for the Car- 
riage of Goods by Sea (Treaty Series No. 931) . . . 115 
Traffic in arms, tin-plate scrap, etc. : 

Monthly statistics 117 

Publications 127 



'J-S.SUPER,NTFNDENTOFDOCllMF,r^ 
AUG 28 1939 



The American Republics 



UNITED STATES SURVEY OF NICA- 
RAGUAN BARGE CANAL AND HIGH- 
WAY PROJECT 

[Released to the press August 8] 

Tlie Department of State announced today 
that a boai'd of eijilit members, including officers 
of the Corps of Engineers, United States Army, 
and officials of the United States Engineer De- 
partment, will sail from New York on August 
10 on the S. S. Panama en route to Nicaragua 
for the purpose of carrying out necessary studies 
and surveys of a barge canal and jjarallel high- 
way project to link the eastern and western 
regions of Nicaragua. This project was one of 
the subjects included in the letters exchanged 
on May 22, 1939,i between the President and 
President Anastasio Somoza of Nicaragua. 

The board will be under the command of Lt. 
Col. Charles P. Gross, United States Army. 
The other members of the board are as follows : 

it. Col. Paul R. Hawley, Medical Corps 

Capt. Leslie R. Groves, Corps of Engineers 

Capt. Thomas H. Stanley, Corps of Engineers 

Lt. William B. Bunker, Corps of Engineers 

Mix. Edwin E. Abbott, senior engineer, U. S. 
Engineer Department 

^Ir. Carter Page, senior engineer (civil), U. S. 
Engineer Department 

^r. Eugene F. Heyler, clerk, U. S. Engineer 
department 

This group will be joined in Nicaragua by 
I!apt. Raphael B. Ezekiel, Corps of Engineers, 
)fficer in charge, Hydrogi-aphic Office, Nica- 
ragua Canal Survey. 



' See FreBs Releases, Vol. XX, No. 504, May 27, 1939, 
>p. 439-444. 



GENERAL TREATY WITH PANAMA 

[Released to the press August 8] 

Telegram from the President of Panama {Dr. 
Juan Demostenes Arosemena) to the President 
of the United States: 

July 28, 1939. 
Tlie instruments of ratification of the general 
treaty between the Republic of Panama and 
the United States of America, signed in that 
capital on March 3, 1936, having been exchanged 
yesterday in the Department of State at Wash- 
ington, and this pact between our two countries 
having accordingly begun to exercise its effects, 
I have the honor to inform Your Excellency of 
the deep pleasure and satisfaction with which 
Panamanian citizens, without distinction of 
parties, received within the last few days the 
news of the approval of the treaty by the Senate 
of the United States. This last gesture of the 
American upper chamber is a most important 
contribution to harmony between our two 
peoples and governments and likewise to the 
cause of universal peace. From today on, we 
should pledge ourselves to fulfil the provisions 
of the treaty in the spirit of good friendship 
and neighborliness which inspired them and in 
this respect I offer Your Excellency my fullest 
and most spontaneous cooperation. The Gov- 
ernment and people of Panama will always 
remember with gi-atitude Your Excellency's 
work of justice and conciliation in your rela- 
tions with the Latin American republics and 
particularly with Panama. I accordingly con- 
gratulate Your Excellency on the happy result 
of our common efforts over so many years, and 
on this most felicitous occasion I renew the 
expression of my highest consideration and 
unalterable friendship. 

J. D. Arosemena 

107 



108 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETS 



Re fly of President Roosevelt: 

August 7, 1939. 

I wish to thank Your Excellency for your 
generous message on the occasion of the ex- 
change of ratifications of the general treaty 
between the United States of America and the 
Republic of Panama. 

You may be assured tliat Your Excellency's 
kind offer of continued friendly cooperation in 
the fulfillment of the provisions of the new 
treaty is sincerely appreciated, and that I share 
with you the confident expectation that the 
relations between the peoples and governments 
of Panama and the United States will be 
further strengthened by the entry into effect 
of that agreement. 

I extend to Your Excellency cordial good 
wishes for your personal happiness and for the 
welfare of the Republic of Panama. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Royal Highness Prince Consort Felix of 
Luxemburg and Crown Prince Jolm expect to 
visit the United States the latter part of 
August 1939, the President and Mrs. Roosevelt 
extended an invitation to Their Highnesses to 
be their guests at the White House or Hyde 
Park upon arrival in this country. The 
invitation of the President and Mrs. Roosevelt 
has been accepted by Their Highnesses. 



International Conferences, 
Commissions, etc. 



NINTH GENERAL CONFERENCE ON 
WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



Europe 



AVIATION ARRANGEMENTS WITH 
FRANCE 

The Department has announced to the press 
the negotiation of two aviation arrangements 
with France which were effected by exchange 
of notes between the American Embassy in 
Paris and the French Foreign Office on July 
15, 1939. The texts of these arrangements ap- 
pear in this Bulletin in the section "Treaty 
Information." 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF 
THE PRINCE CONSORT AND CROWN 
PRINCE OF LUXEMBURG 

[Released to tlie press August 7] 

The Department of State has been informed 
that upon the receipt of information that His 



[Released to tlie press August 8] 

This Government participates in the activi- 
ties of the International Bureau of Weights and 
Measures. The Director General of the Bureau 
has announced that the Ninth General Confer- 
ence on Weights and Measures will be held at 
Paris, France, from October 4 to 11, 1939. The 
President has apjDroved the appointment of 
Daniel J. Reagan, Commercial Attache, Ameri- 
can Embassy, Paris, France, as a delegate on the 
part of the United States. 

The Bureau is under the direction and super- 
vision of the International Committee of 
Weights and Measures. Most of the technical 
work of the International Connnittee is per- 
formed by advisory committees, which include 
representatives of specified national standardiz- 
ing laboratories, one of which is the National 
Bureau of Standards. Mr. Eugene C. Critten- 
den, Assistant Director, National Bureau of 
Standards, partici^jated in three advisory com- 
mittee meetings which were held at Sevres in 
June and July of this year. The proceedings 
of the general conferences on weights and meas- 
ures are ordinarily of a formal and diplomatic^ 
nature. 



i 



Treaty Information 



Compiled by the Treaty Division 



HEALTH 

Pan American Sanitary Convention (Treaty 
Series No. 714) 

Paraguay 

With a note dated August 7, 1939, the Charge 
d'Affaires ad interim of Cuba at Wasliington 
transmitted to tlie Secretary of State a commu- 
nication stating that the Government of Para- 
guay had dejDosited on July 21, 1939, its instru- 
ment of ratification of the Pan American Sani- 
tary Convention signed at Habana on Novem- 
ber 14, 1924. 

According to the information of the Depart- 
ment tlie countries which are parties to the con- 
vention are as follows : United States of Amer- 
ica, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colom- 
bia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, 
Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Hon- 
duras, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uru- 
guay, and Venezuela. 

AVIATION 

Additional Protocol to the Convention for 
the Unification of Certain Rules Relating 
to Damages Caused by Aircraft to Third 
Parties on the Surface 

Guatemala 

By a note dated August 1, 1939, the Italian 
Ambassador at Washington informed the Sec- 

etary of State in conformity with article 4 of 
the additional protocol to the International 
Convention for the Unification of Certain Rules 
Relating to Damages Caused by Aircraft to 
Third Parties on the Surface signed at Rome 
yiay 29, 1933, which was signed at Brussels on 

ieptember 29, 1938, that the Guatemalan Gov- 



ernment deposited on July 6, 1939, its instru- 
ment of ratification of the additional protocol. 
The text of the protocol is printed in Treaty 
Information^ bulletin No. Ill, December 1938, 
page 399. 

Arrangement With France Relating to Air 
Navigation (Executive Agreement Series 
No. 152) 

By an exchange of notes dated July 15, 1939, 
an arrangement was entered into between the 
United States and France relating to air naviga- 
tion. In accordance with the terms of the ar- 
rangement, it will become effective on August 
15, 1939. 

The text of the arrangement is printed below : 

Article 1 
Pending the conclusion of a convention be- 
tween the United States of America and France 
on the subject of air navigation, the movement 
of aircraft of one Contracting Party over the 
territory of the other Contracting Party shall 
be governed by the following provisions : 

Article 2 
The present arrangement shall apply to the 
metropolitan territory of France and the 
United States of America, as well as the follow- 
ing territories, possessions or colonies, including 
their territorial waters, over which the two 
countries respectively exercise jurisdiction : 

(a) St. Pierre and Miquelon; 
Martinique ; 

Guadeloupe and dependencies; and 
French Guiana 

(b) Puerto Rico; 

Virgin Islands of the United States; 

and 
American Samoa 



109 



no 



Abticle 3 



The term "aircraft" employed in the present 
agreement shall be understood to mean private 
aircraft, and state aircraft, other than military, 
customs and police aircraft, duly registered in 
the territory of either of the Contracting 
Parties. 

The present arrangement does not apply to 
military, customs or police aircraft of either 
Contracting Party, which may not, without 
special authorization, be flown over the terri- 
tory of the other Contracting Party nor land 
there. 

Article 4 

Each of the Contracting Parties shall grant, 
in time of peace, to aircraft of the other Con- 
tracting Party, duly registered in the territory 
of such Party, liberty of passage above its 
territory, provided that the conditions set forth 
in the present arrangement are observed. 

It is, however, agreed that the establishment 
and operation by an enterprise of one of the 
Contracting Parties, of a regular air route or 
air transport service to, over or away from the 
territory of the other Contracting Party, with 
or without a stop, shall be subject to the con- 
sent of such other Party. Any air transport 
enterprise of either Party applying for per- 
mission to operate such regular air route or air 
transport service shall be required to submit its 
application through diplomatic channels. 

With the reservation of the stipulations con- 
tained in the second paragraph above concern- 
ing regular air routes or air transpoi-t services 
for which special consent is necessary, the air- 
craft of either Contracting Party may proceed 
to one or more points of the territory of the 
other Party, either to land part or all of their 
passengers or of their cargo of foreign origin, 
or to take aboard part or all of their passen- 
gers, or of their cargo for a foreign destination. 
Each of the Parties to this arrangement may 
reserve to its own aircraft air commerce wholly 
within its own territory. 

The term "air commerce" as used in the 
preceding paragraph shall, with respect to the 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

Parties to this arrangement, be understood to 
mean : — (a) navigation of aircraft in territory 
of either Party in the conduct or furtherance , 
of a business; (b) the commercial transport oflj 
persons or goods between any two points in the 
territory of either Party. 



Article 5 



I 



The aircraft of each of the Contracting 
Parties, their crews and jjassengers, and goods 
carried thereon, shall, while within the terri- 
tory of the other Party, be subject to the laws 
in force in that territory, including all regula- 
tions relating to air navigation applicable to 
foreign aircraft, the transport of passengers 
and goods, and jjublic safety and order, as well 
as any regulations concerning immigration, 
quarantine, customs and clearance. 

The Contracting Parties agree to adopt all 
practicable measures, through the issuance of 
special regulations or otherwise, to facilitate 
and expedite communication by aircraft be 
tween their respective territories, and to pre 
vent unnecessary delays to aircraft, their crewi 
and passengers, cargo, and the personnel of th( 
aircraft comjianies traveling on business of the 
companies, especially in the administi-ation of 
the laws relating to immigration, customs and 
clearance. 

Subject to the provisions of the first para- 
graph of this article and to the laws and regu- 
lations therein specified, the carriage of passen- 
gers, and the import or export of all merchan- 
dise which may be legally imported or exported, 
will be permitted in aircraft of the one Party 
into or from the territory of the other Party; 
and, subject to the provisions of the first para- 
graph of this article and to the laws and regula- 
tions therein specified, such aircraft, their 
crews, passengers and cargoes, shall enjoy in the 
territory of the other Party the same privileges 
as are enjoyed by aircraft, their crews, passen- j 
gers, and cargoes of the mentioned territory or 
foreign aircraft engaged in international com- 
merce, their crews, passengers and cargoes ; and 
they shall not, merely by reason of the nation- 
ality of the aircraft, be subjected to duties or 



AUGUST 12, 1939 



111 



charges otlier or higher than tliose which are or 
may be imposed on aircraft of the territory 
referred to or on aircraft of another foreign 
country engaged in international commerce, or 
on their crews, passengers or cargoes, it being 
understood that in this resj^ect the claimant has 
the choice of national or most-favored-nation 
treatment. 

Upon arrival in the territory of either of the 
Contracting Parties, the fuel and lubricants 
contained in the tanks of the aircraft shall be 
admitted free of customs and other duties. 
However, no quantity can be unloaded free of 
duty except temporarily and under customs 
control. 

Upon departure of aircraft of either Con- 
tracting Party from territory of the other 
Contracting Party for a point outside of 
such territory, fuel and lubricants intended for 
the refueling and lubrication of such aircraft 
will, on a basis of reciprocity and to the extent 
permitted by the laws and regulations of the 
Contracting Party in force in the territory of de- 
parture, be furnished either free of customs and 
other duties or, alternatively, the duties levied 
on such fuel and lubricants will be refunded. 

The expression "customs and other duties" 
includes import, export, excise, and internal 
duties and taxes of all kinds levied upon the 
fuel and lubricants. 

Aircraft of either Party, and also their equip- 
ment and spare parts on board, are in principle 
liable, on landing in a territory of the other 
Party, to customs and otlier duties of all kinds 
normally chargeable on importation. 

If they are to be re-exported, they are entitled 
to temporary admission free of duty under the 
conditions contemplated by the Customs regu- 
lations of each of the contracting Parties, who 
will endeavor to reduce their formalities to the 
strict minimum, especially as regards aircraft 
belonging to regular lines. 

Similar treatment shall be accorded to spare 
parts and material imported separately for the 
repair of such aii-craft; parts replaced must, if 
the customs so require, be re-exported under 
customs supervision. 



Article 6 

Each one of the two Contracting Parties shall 
have the right, for reasons of a military 
nature or in the interest of public safety, to 
prohibit flights over certain areas of its terri- 
tory by all aircraft private or commercial of 
the other Contracting Party, under the penal- 
ties i^rovided by its legislation, it being under- 
stood that in any case at issue no distinction 
in this matter will be made between its air- 
craft engaged in international commerce and 
the aircraft of the other Party likewise 
engaged. The 'areas above which air navi- 
gation is thus prohibited by either Party must 
be notified to the otlier Party. 

Each of the Contracting Parties reserves 
to itself in addition, the right, in time of 
peace, under exceptional circumstances, to 
limit or prohibit temporarily and with im- 
mediate effect, air navigation above its terri- 
tory or any part thereof on condition that 
this restriction or prohibition shall be made 
applicable without any distinction of na- 
tionality between them, to the aircraft of the 
other Party and to the aircraft of any other 
foreign country. 

Article 7 

Any aircraft which finds itself over a pro- 
hibited area shall, as soon as it is aware of the 
fact, give the signal of distress prescribed by 
the air regulations in force in the country 
flown over; it sliall furthermore land as soon 
as possible at an aerodrome situated in the 
territory of said country and as near as pos- 
sible; to such prohibited area. 

This same obligation applies to aircraft 
flying over a prohibited area and to which the 
special signal intended to draw their atten- 
tion shall have been given. 

Article 8 

All aircraft shall carry clearly visible dis- 
tinctive marks by which their identity may be 
recognized during flight (nationality and 
registration marks). 

All aircraft must be provided with cer- 
tificates of registration and airworthiness and 
with all other documents prescribed for air 



112 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BUTJ.KTIN 



navigation in the country in which they are 
registered. 

Article 9 

All members of the crew who perform in an 
aircraft of either of the Contracting Parties, 
duties for which certificates or licenses are 
required in the country in which such air- 
craft is registered, must be provided with said 
certificates and licenses delivered by the 
authorities of such country. 

The other members of the crew must carry 
documents mentioning their duties on board, 
their profession, identity and nationality. 

The crew and passengers, vmless otherwise 
specified, must carry the documents required 
by the regulations in force governing interna- 
tional traffic. 

Article 10 

The certificates of airworthiness, certificates 
of competency and licenses, issued or rendered 
valid by the country whose nationality is pos- 
sessed by the aircraft, shall be considered by 
the other country as being in accordance with 
the regulations governing air traffic to thei 
same extent as the corresponding documents 
delivered or rendered valid by the latter. 

However, each of the Contracting Parties 
reserves the right to refuse to recognize, for 
the purpose of flight witliin the boundaries 
of and above its own territory, certificates of 
competency and licenses issued to its own na- 
tionals by the other Contracting Party. 

Article 11 

Aircraft, their crews and jiassengers, may 
not carry arms, ammunition, noxious gases, 
explosives, carrier pigeons, or photographic 
apparatus, except by permission of the country 
within whose air space the aircraft is navi- 
gating. 

However, the transportation of accessories 
necessary to the operation and navigation of 
the aircraft (rockets, flares, etc.) is not pro- 
hibited. 

If the carriage of photographic apparatus 
is permitted it must, unless otherwise espe- 
cially authorized, be so placed that utilization 
thereof during flight will be impossible. 



Each of the Contracting Parties has the 
right, for reasons of public order and safety, 
to limit or prohibit on its territory the trans- 
portation of articles other than those enumer- 
ated in the first paragraph of the present ar- 
ticle, provided that no difference is made in 
that respect between its national aircraft em- 
ployed in international traffic and the aircraft 
of the other Contracting Party so employed. 

Article 12 

Upon the departure or landing of aircraft, 
each Contracting Party may, within its own 
territory, and through its competent authori- 
ties, search the aircraft of the other Party and 
examine the certificates and other documents 
prescribed. 

Article 13 

Aerodromes open to public air traffic in the 
territory of one of the Parties to this arrange- 
ment shall, in so far as they are under its con- 
trol, be open to all aircraft of the other Party, 
which may equally utilize the meteorological 
information services, the wireless services, the 
lighting services and day and night signalling 
services, in so far as those several classes of 
services are under the control of the Party 
in whose territory they respectively are sit- 
uated. Any charges, landing, accommodation 
charges, et cetera, in so far as such charges 
are under the control of the pertinent Con- 
tracting Party, shall be the same for the air- 
craft of each of the two Contracting Parties. 

Article 14 

Upon entry or dejDarture, aircraft going to or 
proceeding from the territory of either of the 
Contracting Parties shall land at or depart 
from an aerodrome open to public air traffic and 
classed as a customs aerodrome (with passport 
control service), at which facilities exist for 
clearance of aircraft and enforcement of immi- 
gration regulations. No intermediary landing j 
sliall be effected between the frontier and that 
aerodi'ome. In special cases, the competent au- 
thorities may allow aircraft to dei^art from or 
land at other aerodromes, at which customs, 



AtTGl'ST 12, 1939 

immigration, clearance and passport control 
formalities shall be accomplished. The cost en- 
tailed by this special service shall, to such extent 
as may be required under the local regulations, 
then be paid by the owner or person in charge 
of the aircraft. The prohibition of any inter- 
mediary landing applies also in these special 

cases. 

In the event of a forced landing outside the 
aerodrome referred to in the first paragraph of 
this article, the captain of the aircraft, the crew 
and passengers, must conform with the na- 
tional regulations applying to such cases. 

The Parties to this arrangement shall ex- 
change lists of the aerodromes in their terri- 
tories from time to time designated by them as 
ports of entry and departure. 

Article 15 

Each of the Contracting Parties reserves the 
right to determine that the frontiers may be 
crossed only between certain points. In such 
case notification of the decision will be given to 
the other Party. 

Article 16 

It is forbidden to drop, from aircraft in flight, 
any ballast other than fine sand or water. 

Article 17 

In the course of flight, only those articles or 
substances, other than ballast, may be dropped 
or otherwise discharged, for which a special 
authorization shall have been given by the au- 
thorities of the country flown over. 

Article 18 

Aircraft of either of the Pjirties operating in 
the territory of the other Party may be equipped 
with wireless apparatus only if the necessary 
license to install and work such apparatus, 
issued by the competent authorities of the Con- 
tracting Party in which the aircraft is regis- 
tered, shall have been obtained. The use of such 
apparatus shall be in accordance with the regu- 



113 

lations on the subject issued by the competent 
authorities of the Contracting Party flown over. 
Such apparatus shall be used only by such 
members of the crew as are provided with a 
special license for the purpose issued by the 
competent authorities of the Contracting Party 
in which the aircraft is registered. 

Article 19 

In all questions of nationality that may arise 
in carrying out the present arrangement, it is 
agreed that aircraft possess the nationality of 
the country in whose territory they are duly 
registered. 

The registration of aircraft referred to in 
the preceding paragraph shall be performed in 
compliance with the laws and special provisions 
of each Contracting Party. 

Article 20 

The Contracting Parties shall communicate 
to each other from time to time the regulations 
relative to air navigation in force in their re- 
spective territories. 

Article 21 

Either Party may, at any time after the pres- 
ent arrangement comes into force, apply the 
provisions of the arrangement to any of the 
territories under its jurisdiction, including ter- 
ritorial waters, that are not mentioned in Arti- 
cle 2. Such application shall be by notification 
in writing, given to the other Party, and shall 
become effective sixty days from the day when 
the notification shall have been given. 

The Party extending this arrangement to the 
additional territory under its jurisdiction cited 
in the preceding paragraph, may subsequently 
terminate such application, the decision coming 
into effect only upon sixty days' notice. 

Article 22 

The present arrangement shall be subject to 
termination by either Party upon sixty days' 
notice given to the other Party. 



170301—39- 



114 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTJLi,ETIN 



Agreement with France for the Operation of 
Air Transport Services (Executive Agree- 
ment Series No. 153) 

By an exchange of notes dated July 15, 1939, 
an agreement was entered into between the 
United States and France for the operation of 
air transport services. In accordance with the 
terms of the agreement, it will become effective 
on August 15, 1939. 

The text of the agreement is printed below : 

Article 1 

The Government of the United States of 
America agrees that aircraft of French regis- 
tration belonging to French air carrier enter- 
prises, holding proper authorization from the 
French Government, shall be permitted to op- 
erate into United States territory in the con- 
duct of transatlantic air transport services car- 
rying passengers, goods and mail, subject to the 
conditions hereinafter specified. 

The Government of France agrees that air- 
craft of United States registration, belonging 
to United States air carrier enterprises, hold- 
ing proper authorization from the Government 
of the United States, shall be permitted to 
operate into French territory in the conduct of 
transatlantic air transport services carrying 
passengers, goods and mail, subject to the con- 
ditions hereinafter specified. 

The Government of the United States will 
accord to French air carrier enterprises a 
number of frequencies equal to that requested 
of the Government of France by the Govern- 
ment of the United States and accorded by the 
Government of France to the Government of 
the United States for use by the hitter's air 
carrier enterprises engaged in transatlantic 
services with final points of destination in 
France ; provided, that the number of such fre- 
quencies shall not be less than two round trips 
per week. The Government of France will 
also accord to the Government of the United 
States additional frequencies for use by its 
authorized air carrier enterprises engaged in 
transatlantic air services, with the right to fly 



into, through and away from France en route 
to and from a final point of destination in 
other countries, and on such additional fre- 
quencies to embark and disembark passengers, 
goods and mail in France. 

The air carrier enterprises of each Party will 
be required to qualify before the competent 
aeronautical authorities of the other Party 
under its applicable laws before being per- 
mitted to engage in the operations contem- 
plated in this agreement. 

The terms of the permits, the airports to be 
used for the respective services, the routes or 
airways to be flown within the respective terri- 
tories of the Parties between the designated 
airports, the frequency of schedules and other 
appropriate details of the conduct of the air 
transport services contemplated by this agree- 
ment shall be determined by the competent 
authorities of the Parties. Any permit issued 
by the competent aeronautical authorities for 
the air transport services contemplated here- 
under shall be valid only so long as the holder 
thereof shall be authorized by its own govern- 
ment to engage in the service envisaged by such 
permit. The holding of such permit shall be 
subject to compliance by the holder with all 
applicable laws of the issuing government and 
with all valid rules, regulations and orders is- 
sued thereunder. Such permit may not be 
revoked for any other cause except on two 
years' notice, given by the issuing government 
to the other government. 

Teclmical and commercial agreements may 
be entered into between the air transport enter- 
prises authorized by the Governments of 
France and the United States to operate the 
services contemplated herein. Such agree- 
ments shall be subject to the approval of the 
competent authorities of the two Governments. 

Article 2 

The Parties hereto agree not to impose any 
restrictions or limitations as to airports, routes, 
or connections with other transportation serv- 
ices, and facilities in general to be utilized 
within their respective territories which might 



AUGUST 12, 19 3 9 



115 



be competitive! J' or otherwise disadvantageous 
to the air carrier enterprises of the other Party. 

Article 3 

The aircraft operated by the United States 
air carrier enterprises shall conform at all times 
with the airworthiness requirements prescribed 
by the competent aeronautical authorities of the 
United States for aircraft employed in air 
transportation of the character contemplated 
by this agreement. 

The aircraft operated by French air carrier 
enterprises shall conform at all times with the 
airworthiness requirements prescribed by the 
competent aeronautical authorities of France 
for aircraft employed in air transportation of 
the character contemplated by this agreement. 

The competent aeronautical authorities of the 
Parties hereto may conmiunicate with a view to 
bringing about uniformity of safety standards 
for the operations contemplated by this agree- 
ment and compliance therewith, and whenever 
the need therefor appears, the Parties may 
enter mto an agreement prescribmg such mii- 
form safety standards. 

Articue 4 

The matter of the transportation of mail 
shall be subject to agreement between the com- 
petent authorities of both Parties. 

Article 5 

The present agreement has been negotiated 
pursuant to the provisions of Article 4 of the 
air navigation arrangement between the United 
States and France, signed at Paris on July 15, 
1939, and the operations contemplated hereun- 
der shall be conducted subject to the applicable 
terms thereof. 

Article t5 

This agi-eement shall be subject to termina- 
tion on two years' notice given by either Gov- 
ernment to the other Government. 



FISHERIES 

Protocol Amending the Agreement for the 
Regulation of Whaling of June 8, 1937 
(Treaty Series No. 944) 

Denmark 

By a note dated August 8, 1939, the British 
Ambassador at Washington informed the Sec- 
retary of State that the instrument of adlierence 
of the Danish Government to the protocol 
amending the Agreement for the Regulation of 
Whaling of June 8, 1937, which was signed on 
June 24, 1938, was notified to the Foreign Office 
and took effect in accordance with article 22 
of the agreement on July 10, 1939. 

According to the information of the Depart- 
ment the countries parties to the protocol are 
the United States of America, Denmark, Ger- 
many, Great Britain, and Norway. 



NAVIGATION 

International Convention for the Unifica- 
tion of Certain Rules Relating to Bills of 
Lading for the Carriage of Goods by Sea 
(Treaty Series No. 931) 

Finland 

By a note dated July 26, 1939, the Belgian 
Ambassador informed the Secretary of State 
that the adherence of Finland to the Inter- 
national Convention for the Unification of Cer- 
tain Rules Relating to Bills of Lading for the 
Carriage of Goods by Sea signed at Brussels 
on August 25, 1924, was notified to the Belgian 
Government on July 1, 1939. 

The note states that the adherence will be- 
come effective on January 1, 1940. The adlier- 
ence is made subject to the following reservations 
as translated from the notice given to the 
Belgian Government : 

"The adherence of Finland to the above Con- 
vention, as well as to the Protocol of Signature 
annexed thereto, is given subject to the reserva- 



116 



DEPABTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



tion that the other Contracting States raise no 
objection to the application of the provisions 
of the Convention being limited in the follow- 
ing manner in so far as Finland is concerned : 

"1. The Fiimish maritime law will continue 
to jDermit, in the national coasting trade, bills 
of lading and similar documents to be issued in 
accordance with the provisions of that law, 
without having the provisions of the Conven- 
tion applied to them or applied to the relations 
of the carrier and of the holder of the document 
which are determined by those documents. 

"2. There shall be considered as equivalent to 
the national coasting trade, for the purposes 
mentioned in paragraph (1) — in case a provi- 
sion should be promulgated in this sense by vir- 
tue of Article 122, last paragraph, of the Fin- 
nish maritime law — carriage by sea between 
Finland and the other northern States the navi- 
gation laws of which contain analogous provi- 
sions. 

"3. The provisions of the International Con- 
ventions concerning the transportation of trav- 
ellers and baggage and concerning the carriage 
of goods by railways, signed at Rome on No- 
vember 23, 1933, shall not be affected by this 
Convention. 

"These reservations, which are the same as 
those made by Denmai'k, Norway and Sweden 
at the time of their adherence to the said Con- 
vention, and most particularly that mentioned 
under No. (2), result from the fact that, col- 



laborating on this matter, Finland and the other 
three so-called northern States have made their 
maritime laws relating to carriage by sea and 
bills of lading similar, both as concerns the form 
and content thereof." 

According to the information of the Depart- 
ment the countries which have ratified and 
adhered to tlie convention are : United States of 
America, Belgium, Demnark, Finland, France, 
Great Britain, Hungary, Monaco, Norway, Po- 
land, Portugal, Rumania, Spain, and Sweden; 
Great Britain has adhered to the convention on 
behalf of the following dependencies : Bahamas, 
Barbados, Bermuda, Bj'itish Guiana, British 
Honduras, Ceylon, Cyprus, Falkland Islands 
and Dependencies, Fiji, Gambia, Gibraltar, 
Gold Coast, Hong Kong, Jamaica (including 
Turks and Caicos Islands and the Cayman 
Islands), Kenya (Colony and Protectorate), 
Leeward Islands (Antigua, Dominica, Montser- 
rat, St. Christopher and Nevis, Virgin Islands), 
Federated Malay States (Negri Sembilan, Pa- 
hang, Perak, Selangor), Unfederated Malay 
State of Johore, Mauritius, Nigeria (Colony, 
Cameroons under British mandate), North 
Borneo, Palestine, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, 
Somaliland Protectorate, Straits Settlements, 
Tanganyika Territory, Triniaad and Tobago, 
Islands of Western Pacific (British Solomon 
Islands Protectorate, Gilbert and EUice Islands 
Colony, Tonga), Windward Islands (Grenada, 
St. Lucia, St. Vincent), Zanzibar Protectorate, 
St. Helena and Ascension, and Sarawak. 



Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, etc. 



MONTHLY STATISTICS 



[Released to the press August 11] 

Note: The figures appenring in the cumulative col- 
umns of the tiibles relating to arms or tin-plate scrap 
licensed for export are not final or definitive since 
licenses may be amended or revoked before being used. 
These figures are, however, accurate as of the date of 
the press release in which they appear. 

The statistics of actual exports in these releases are 
believed to be substantially complete. It is possible, 
hijwever, that some shipments are not included. If this 
proves to be the fact, statistics in regard to such ship- 
ments will be included in the cumulative figures in later 
releases. 



Arms Export Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war li- 
censed for export by the Secretary of State dur- 
ing the year 1939 up to and including the month 
of July : 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


July 1939 


7 months 

ending July 

31, 1939 


Afghanistan 


I 
IV 

I 

V 


(4) 

(1) 

(4) 

(1) 

(2) 




$25, 000. 00 
360. 79 
















69.00 






4 500 00 






883.00 








Total 




5, 442. 00 




I 
III 

IV 
V 

VI 
VII 


(4) 
(5) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 








$105. 00 

"'235,606.06' 

51.00 

2, 317. 00 

1, 700. 00 

1,100.00 


568.00 




370.00 

275, 000. 00 

1,096.50 

7, 026. 00 
156, 750. 00 

16, 419. 10 

8, 762. 00 






6, 310. 00 






39, 196. 22 








Total 


240, 273. 00 


611,487.82 




I 
III 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




Australia 

Total 1 _ 


706. 45 

664.20 

380,320.00 

380. 73 


3,322.04 

4, 342. 64 

4, 651, 190. 00 

840. 74 

494. 67 


9, 680. 00 
1, 434. 65 


19,796.00 

2, 304. 20 

239, 052. 00 






393,086.03 


4,921,342.29 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


July 1939 


7 months 

ending July 

31, 1939 


Bahamas 


V 
I 
IV 

V 


(2) 
(4) 

(1) 

(2) 

<1) 

(2) 




$40 00 






2 00 






111 38 






87 00 






1, 610. 00 
30 00 












Total 




1, 840. 38 




V 


(1) 
(2) 




Belgian Congo 




1,249.00 
30 00 












Total 




1, 279. 00 




I 

IV 
V 


(I) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 






Belgium 




655. 21 






7, 561. 00 

867.00 

79 48 




$21.00 




10.88 


20.28 

5, 260. 00 

86, 400. 00 












Total 


31.88 


100, 832. 97 




IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
C3) 




Bermuda 




54.25 






17 45 






9, 600. 00 






Total- 




9, 671. 70 




I 

IV 
V 

VXI 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 






Bolivia 




574.00 






434 00 






487. 39 






650. 80 






9, 100. 00 






3, 772. 20 






50 000. 00 






988.66 








Total .. 




65, 907. 06 




I 
III 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 






Brazil 


157. 00 


202.00 




86, 000. 00 






396 00 






274, 000. 00 




431. 38 

7,804.00 

1, 600. 00 

18,000.00 

4,000.00 


1, 952. 18 

14, 963. 00 

364, 297. 00 

58, 365. 90 

120, 748. 00 

64 85 








Total- 


31,892.38 


920, 968. 93 




I 

IV 

V 
VII 


(4) 
(1) 
(3) 
C2) 




British Guiana. 




20.00 






108. 38 






2, 500. 00 




2, 620. 00 


4, 200. 00 


Total 


2, 620. 00 


6, 828. 38 




IV 
VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(2) 








129.20 




27.83 
129.20 


102.83 
193.80 


Total.. 


167.03 


426. 83 




I 

V 


(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 








26.43 






28.00 






50.00 






700.00 








Total 





804.43 



H7 



118 



DEPABTMENT OF STATE BUULiETIN 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


July 1939 


7 months 

ending July 

31, 1939 


British Solomon Islands.. 


I 


(2) 
(4) 


$175. 00 
10.00 


$176.00 
10.00 


Total.. 


185.00 


1S5. 00 




IV 


(1) 
(2) 


23.00 
2.30 


23 00 




2.30 


Total 


25.30 


26.30 




I 

IV 


(1) 
C4) 
CI) 
(2) 


162. 40 
93.00 
193. 60 


622. 10 




228. 00 

1, ,520. 35 

128.46 








Total 


449.00 


2.398.91 




I 
III 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 


4, 673. 06 


18,616.05 




418. 00 




4, 631. 12 


14, 639. 26 
549, 900. 00 




1, 089. 49 

262. 62 

4, 593. 88 

6. 557. 90 

52,813.00 

2, 267. 04 

3, 405. 00 


5, 306. 99 

865. 70 

837,187.05 

41,310.52 

132,618.92 

55, 555. 46 

304,761.87 


Total 


80, 193. 11 


1,960.979.82 




IV 

I 

IV 

V 
VII 


(1) 

(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 

!» 
(2) 




Ceylon .. 


14.88 


86.88 






Chile .- . 


60.00 


60.00 




27 00 




184. 46 


13, 233. 40 
617.00 






15, .500. 00 






11, 855. 00 








Total 


244. 46 


41, 292. 40 




I 
III 

IV 
V 

vn 


(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 








135, 407. 95 






1, 490. 00 






8, 735. 00 






26, 042. 00 






1, 796. 00 






132. 25 






193, 646. 00 




4,615.00 
7,000.00 


216,096.40 

87,115.00 

49.88 








Total 


11,515.00 


670, 610. 48 




I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(4) 
0) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




Colombia - 




179.70 






147. 33 






4, 273. 65 






2,026.10 




2, 800. 00 
2,141.00 
11,670.00 


607. 360. 00 

24, 821. 00 

115,560.00 

764.39 






840.00 








Total 


16,611.00 


655,972.17 




I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(4) 
(I) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




Costa Rica 




13.00 




2, 510. 65 
484. 00 






16, 500. 00 




685. 00 
6, 553. 78 

1,040.' 66' 


6.028.54 

21,990.60 

867.60 

1,634.93 


Total 


7. 278. 78 


49 029. 32 




I 
III 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




Cuba 




57.00 




"""57,'866.'66' 


.50, 547. 60 
57,800.00 
6. 583. 19 






7, 738. 00 
96.30 









Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


July 1939 


7 months 

ending July 

31, 1939 


Cuba— Continued. 


VII 


(1) 

(2) 


$1,072.00 


$3,446.34 








Total 


68,872.00 


126, 279. 43 




I 
IV 

V 


(4) 

(I) 

(2) 
(2) 
(3) 


Curacao 


12.00 


25 10 




39 00 












60 00 






8,850.00 






Total,. 


12.00 


8, 988. 69 




I 

V 


(5) 
(3) 




Czechoslovakia 




430 00 






12 800 00 








Total 




13, 230. 00 




I 

V 


(3) 

(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 










2, 750 00 






340 00 






11, 130.52 






876 00 






6, 275. 00 






Total 




20 371 52 




I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 










35.00 






100. 75 




48.00 


48.00 
3,594 00 






260.00 




19,000.00 


19,000.00 
250.00 






11,100.00 






1, 714. 40 








Total.. 


19, 048. 00 


36, 102. 15 




I 

IV 


(4) 
(5) 
(1) 
(2) 








60.00 






128.00 




67.00 
2.00 


67.00 
149.00 


Total 


69.00 


404.00 




I 

IV 


(1) 
(5) 
(1) 
(2) 




Egypt 




30.00 






518.00 




90.38 
4.15 


157. 96 
6.30 


Total 


94.63 


711.26 




I 

IV 

V 

VII 


(4) 
(I) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 




El Salvador 


20.00 


218. 00 
4, 205. 58 






161. 00 




200.00 


1, 504. 00 
850.00 






2, 760. 00 








Total.... 


220.00 


9,698.68 




I 

IV 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 




Federated Malay States 




14.00 






59.08 




6.10 


15.10 


Total 


6.10 


88.18 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 

(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(I) 
(2) 
(3) 




Finland 


1, 119. 00 


9, 458. 45 




6, 338. 41 






60.00 






95.67 






14, 550. 00 




18, 500. 00 


141,750.00 
311,000.00 








Total .. 


19,619.00 


483, 252. 63 




I 
III 

IV 

V 


(1) 
(2) 
4) 

h) 

(2) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
3) 




France . 


34.46 


117 49 




210, 000. 00 




42.50 
31, 623, 300. 00 


452.89 

52,155,660.00 

1,620.00 




3.00 

12, 275. 00 

1,112,717 53 

2, 771, 000. 00 


177.95 

466, 962. 00 

2, 603, 868. 67 

16, 324, 301. 00 



AUGUST 12, 1939 



119 





Categorj' 


Value 


Country of destination 


July 1939 


7 months 

ending July 

31, 1939 


Prance— Continued. 

Total 


VI 


(1) 




$4, 400. 00 






$35,419,372.48 


71, 667, 460. 00 


French Equatorial Africa 


I 


(1) 

(4) 






34.00 




30.00 






Total 




64.00 




I 
IV 


fl) 

(4) 

(1) 

(2) 










67.60 


Total 


13.00 

2, 040. 00 

386. 80 


76.01 
4,131.00 
1, 149. S3 


2, 439. 80 


5, 424. 34 


French West Africa 

Germany 


V 

I 

IV 
V 


(2) 

(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 






90.00 








69.05 


Total _. . 


92.08 
18.00 
17.86 


653. 46 

1,013.49 

290. 42 

12, 800. 00 






127.94 


14, 826. 42 


Great Britain 


I 
m 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(1) 
(2) 

§ 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 




313.00 


428. 85 


Total 


31, 100. 00 


817. 26 


29, 4,59. 62 
430. 00 




11, 315, 600. 00 




1, 970. 00 


46.00 

22.03 

29, 800. 00 

43, 960. 00 

444. 50 


881. 40 

411.63 

445, 634. 25 

1,001.009.42 

1, 405, 462. 60 

155, 279. 25 






76, 401. 79 


14, 387, 666 92 


Greece _ 


I 

V 


(5) 
(2) 
(3) 






126, 980, 00 


Total 




3. 600. 00 




2, 200. 00 








132, 080 00 


Guatemala 


I 

IV 

V 

VII 


(4) 

(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 








1, 850. 00 


Total.... 




28.00 




28.00 




60.00 




7, 565. 00 




93.00 




4, 287. 60 








13,911.50 


Haiti 


I 

IV 
VII 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 






34,790.00 


36 652 50 


Total. 


2, 383. 75 


676.00 


717. U 
30.76 




332. 50 






35,466.00 


40, 116. 62 


Honduras 


I 

IV 

V 
VII 


(4) 
(I) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 




182.00 

335.00 

1,030.00 


576. 38 


Total 


441.00 

2, 535. 60 

51.00 




650.00 






1, 647. 00 


4, 253. 98 


Hong Kong 


I 

IV 

V 
VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 






880.00 


Total. 


10.00 
160. 70 


674. 56 

26, 211. 32 

3, 216. 92 




40.00 




1,011.60 






170. 70 


31, 033. 30 




I 

V 


(1) 
(4) 

(3) 




43.40 
6.00 


43.40 


Total 


5.00 
3, 670. 00 






48.40 


3, 718. 40 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


July 1939 


7 months 

ending July 

31, 1939 


India 


I 

IV 

V 

VI 


(1) 

(4) 

(1) 

(2) 

(1) 

(2) 
C3) 
(2) 


$408. 80 

1,151.08 

166. 00 


$1, 966. 75 




6, 260. 68 
2, 330. 18 






15, 500. 00 
1, 905. 00 
2 500 00 




400.00 














Total 


2,115.88 


30,846.91 




IV 
V 


(1) 

(2) 
(1) 
(2) 






201. 97 
42.05 


933.90 




162. 26 

40,000.00 

100 00 








.. .. 




Total.. 


244.02 


41, 196. 16 




I 
V 


(3) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




26, 500. 00 






210 OOf) 00 






4,379 00 






29, 266. 00 






Total.... 




270, 146. 00 


Italy 


V 


(2) 
C3) 




9,500.00 






13,900.00 






Total 




23, 400. 00 




I 

IV 


(4) 

(1) 
(2) 










62.44 




661. 28 
16.50 


2,451.04 
450. 67 


Total 


576. 78 


2, 964. 16 




V 


(1) 
(2) 






757,000.00 
100.00 


767, 000. 00 




100. 00 


Total 


757, 100. 00 


757, 100. 00 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 






69.00 
6.00 


861. 20 




396. 35 
173.20 






124. 36 






2, 300. 00 








Total 


74.00 


3, 854. 11 




VII 

I 
I 

IV 


(2) 

(4) 

(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 




Leeward Lslands 




494. 00 










7.80 


11.01 










567. 76 






800. 00 






97.00 






1, 312. 00 






2, 592. 00 








Total 




6, 368. 75 




I 


(1) 
(4) 






Mauritius. 




96.43 




86.66 








Total... 




183. 09 




I 
III 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 










759. 44 






11,518.00 






995, 600. 00 






36, 090. 61 






16, 492. 00 




35,000.00 

354. 00 

600.00 

2, 207. 60 


402, 763. 00 
318,088.05 
874, 480. 00 
8, 900. 25 
22,981.21 








Total... 


38, 161. 60 


2,687,672.46 




I 

V 


(1) 
(4) 
(2) 
(3) 








30.40 






111.67 






1,000.00 






46, 800. 00 








Total 


47,942.07 



120 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


July 1939 


7 months 

ending July 

31, 1939 


Netherlands 


III 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 

(2) 
(1) 
(1) 
^2) 
(3) 
(2) 




$1,071,640.00 




$20,341.80 


20, 341. 80 
45.00 




1.957,353.00 

202, 181. 26 

42, 000. 00 

2, 852. 59 


2, 713, 884. 00 
370, 194. 92 
876,600.00 
40, 051. 48 


Total - --- 


2. 224, 728. 64 


5, 092, 657. 20 




I 
III 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(6) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 






150.00 


215. 25 




45, 646. 00 




91.11 
4,000.00 


356.48 

4,000.00 

805,362.00 






21,026.80 






39, 512. 30 




20.82 


193. 82 
13, 000. 00 




2,700.00 
283, 210.' 00 


120, 966. 30 

318, 210. 00 

10 00 








Total 


290,171.93 


1, 368, 487. 95 




I 

V 


(1) 
(4) 
(3) 




New Caledonia . 


251.80 
151.03 


547.16 




499. 66 
14,000.00 








Total 


402.83 


16,046.80 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 






72.00 

409.00 

24.00 


546.04 




630.47 

150.03 

3, 000. OO 




14,500.00 


14,500.00 


Total 


15,005.00 


18,726.54 




I 
rv 

V 


(1) 
(4) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 




New Guinea, Territory of 




17.00 




20.56 






35.00 




2,500.00 


2S, 100. 00 
101, 500. 00 








Total 


2,600.00 


129,672.56 




I 

I 
rv 

V 
VII 


(4) 

(1) 
(4) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 






116. 10 


116.10 










353.66 






247. 08 






82.68 






14, 640. 00 






19, 300. 00 






6, 000. 00 






4, 244. 07 








Total 




44, 767. 49 




I 
III 

IV 

V 
VII 


(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 










1,600.00 






1,346.00 






20, 906. 00 






427.00 






2, 059. 70 






62.60 






882.00 








Total 




27, 272. 20 




I 

IV 
VII 


(4) 

(I) 
(2) 
(1) 








8.00 


8.00 










48.00 






3.57 






5.76 








Total- 




67.33 




I 

IV 
V 

vn 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 










375. 40 




60.13 


221. 87 
30.00 






2.03 






2, 640. 87 






3, 860. 00 






2, 526. 00 








Total 


60.13 


9,646.17 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


July 1939 


7 months 

ending July 

31, 1939 




V 


(1) 




$3,052.00 
60.00 










450. 00 








Total 




3, 662. 00 




IV 

V 

VII 


(1) 

(2) 

(1) 

(2) 
(3) 

(1) 

(2) 










56.38 




$468. 00 


466.00 
4, 100. 00 






800 00 




1,029.39 


1,029.39 
1 809 20 






800.00 








Total. 


1, 487. 39 


9, 059 97 




IV 

I 

II 
III 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 

(1) 
(2) 
(4) 

(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




Paraguay.. 


8.00 


8.00 


Peru . 




45 00 






26, 500. 00 






955 36 




16,000.00 


16,000 00 
266 260 00 






10,038.00 
160 00 










361.00 






9, 600. 00 

36. 664. 39 

29, 927. 62 

160 OO 

28, 130 00 




3, 460. 66 

14,325.00 

160 00 

1,665,00 


Total 


35,600.00 


413, 761. 27 




I 
I 

IV 
V 


(4) 

(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 




Pitcairn Island 




7.47 








Poland 




118.70 






44.48 




245. 65 


1, 056. 56 
111.39 






420,000.00 








Total 


246. 65 


421. 331. 12 




I 

IV 
V 


(4) 
0) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




Portugal... 




10.00 






317.00 




68.42 


68.42 
8, 097. 00 




3, 000. 00 


9, 176. 00 
475.00 








Total 


3,068.42 


18, 142. 42 




I 

V 


f5) 
(2) 
(3) 








1, 265, 000. 00 






3, 960. 00 






26, 100. 00 








Total 




1, 296, 060. 00 




I 

IV 

■V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 










600.37 




10.00 
131.76 


268. 70 

171.78 

1,900.00 








Total 


141.75 


2, 830. 82 




I 

IV 


fl) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 








39.00 




66.74 


116.37 
210.80 




7.00 


34.76 


Total 


72.74 


400. 93 




I 

V 


(4) 
(I) 
(2) 
(3) 




Sweden . . 




637. 37 




1, 870. 00 
39, 130. 00 


5, .520. 00 

142. 906. 84 

5, 385. 00 








Total 


41,000.00 


164, 348. 21 




I 

IV 
V 


(1 
(2) 
(3) 




Switzerland 




62.90 




270. 60 
6, 182. 00 


616. 76 
122. 952. 00 
22, 670 84 






20. 200. 00 








Total 


6,422.60 


166, 402. 49 



I 



^lUGUST 12, 193 9 










Country of destination 


Category 


Value 


July 1939 


7 months 

ending July 

31, 1939 


Syria 


IV 
I 

IV 
V 


(2) 

(4) 

(2) 
(2) 
(3) 




$19. 00 


Thailand (Siam) 




23.68 


Total 


$12 18 

3,581.01 

10.83 

1,507.61 

2,850.00 


12.18 

17,931.94 

41.83 

32,347.61 

271,960.00 


7,962.26 


322,317.14 




I 

IV 
V 


(4) 

b) 

(2) 
(3) 






1.08 


Total -- 




82.50 


37.00 


37.00 
1,056.50 




8,500.00 






37.00 


9,676.08 




I 

IV 

V 
VI 


(5) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(1) 






11, 700. 00 


Total - - 




170 34 




6.25 




434,777. 17 




8, 100. 00 








454, 762. 76 


Turks and Caicos Islands 

Total 


IV 


(1) 
(2) 








18.70 




.80 








19.60 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 






34.45 
197. 22 
348. 20 
67.00 
7, 600. 00 
640.00 
3, 600. 00 


956. 07 


Total.,.- 


1,661.72 
2,896.78 
354.24 
59, 663. 00 
10, 635. 07 
3, 765. 00 


12, 386. 87 


79, 930. 88 


Union of Soviet Socialist Re- 
publics 


V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 






702, 900. 00 


30.00 


61,921.23 
146, 408. 00 






Total 


30.00 


911,232.23 




I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




Venezuela 




40.00 






166. 00 






98.00 




809.90 

93. 25 

19, 100. 00 

5, 360. 70 

36, 950. 00 

1, 698, 55 


20, 184. 67 
1,276.05 
21, 870. 00 
13, 157. 26 
123, 586. 50 
5, 217. 32 
6, 300. 00 








Total 


64,012.40 


191, 894. 80 




V 


(2) 
(3) 




Yugoslavia ... 




38, 679. 00 






2, 000. 00 








I Total 




40, 679. 00 










Grand total 


39,920,738.17 


112,026,044.70 









During the month of July, 3'96 arms export 
licenses were issued, making a total of 2,803 
such licenses issued during the current year. 

In a press conference on June 11', 1938, the 
Secretary of State declared that he had made 



121 

repeated public statements condemning the 
bombing of civilian populations. He said that 
he was continuing to maintain that position and 
to declare to everybody that this Government 
does condemn the bombing of civilian popula- 
tions or its material encouragement. On July 1, 
1938, the Department addressed to all manufac- 
turers and exporters of aircraft and aircraft 
parts registered under the Neutrality Act a cir- 
cular letter pointing out that, in accordance 
with the policy enunciated by the Secretary on 
June 11, "the Department would with great 
regret issue any licenses authorizing exporta- 
tion, direct or indirect, of any aircraft, aircraft 
armament, aircraft engines, aircraft parts, air- 
craft accessories, aerial bombs or toi'pedoes to 
countries the armed forces of which are making 
use of airplanes for attack upon civilian popula- 
tions." Since the issuance of a license in De- 
cember 1938, reported in the Department's press 
release of January 12, 1939, American manufac- 
turers of aircraft and aircraft parts, with one 
exception, have conformed to this policy. This 
exception is the Kellett Autogiro Corporation, 
Philadelphia, Pa. The above tabulation in 
regard to arms export licenses issued during the 
month of July includes a license for the expor- 
tation of one autogiro and two spare wheel 
assemblies, valued at $32,100, sold by this cor- 
poration for export. 

This tabulation also includes a license for the 
exportation of one Douglas Model DC-4 air- 
plane, valued at $725,000, sold by the Douglas 
Aircraft Company, Inc., under a contract en- 
tered into on March 1, 1938. It will be noted 
that this contract antedated the statement of 
the Secretary referred to above. 

Arms Exported 

The table printed below indicates the charac- 
ter, value and countries of destination of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
exported during the year 1939 up to and includ- 
ing the month of July voider export licenses 
issued by the Secretary of State : 



122 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


July 1939 


7 months 

ending July 

31, 1939 




IV 

I 
V 


(1) 

(4) 

(1) 

(2) 




$360.79 








1 




69,00 




$1,600.00 


4, 466. 00 
545.00 








Total 


1,500.00 


6, 060. 00 




I 

III 
IV 

V 

VI 
VI] 


(4) 
(5) 

(1) 
(1) 

(2) 

(1) 

(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 






105. 00 


638.00 




340. 00 




37, 768. 00 


669, 948. 00 
1, 046. 50 




2,317.00 


7,026.00 
153,917.00 




3,412.00 


49, 693. 20 
8. 752. 00 






6, 310. 00 




1,604.00 


22,246.00 


Total 


46. 206. 00 


819,915.70 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 






571. 05 
677. 16 
117.73 


3, 002. 54 




4, 126. 04 
469. 56 
494. 67 




6, 616. 00 
500.00 


7,616.00 

157,039.00 

3, 450. 00 








Total 


7,481.94 


176, 197. 81 




V 

I 

IV 

V 


(2) 

(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 








40.00 












2.00 






111.38 






87.00 






1, 610. 00 






30.00 








Total 




1, 840. 38 




V 


(1) 

(2) 






Bftleian Coneo -- 




1, 249. 00 






30.00 








Total -- 




1,279.00 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 










665. 21 




1,000.00 
66.00 
26.00 


7, 561. 00 
407. 60 
93.62 
24.23 






114, 800. 00 






5, 518. 00 






88,400.00 








Total --- 


1,091.00 


215, 459. 66 




IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 








54.25 






17.45 






9,600.00 








Total, 




9, 671. 70 




I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 








203.00 


574. 00 




7, 000. 00 






860.00 






487. 39 




50.00 


550. 80 
9, 100. 00 






3, 772. 20 






47, 200. 00 






922.16 








Total.. 


263.00 


70, 466. 55 




I 
III 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




Brazil 




45 00 






86, 000. 00 




16.00 

394, 240. 00 

431.38 


1,228.00 

668, 240. 00 

6,364.09 

13,011 00 






510.716.00 




30,470.00 
8,000,00 


78,086.33 
108,041.00 


Total 


433,157.38 


1,470,730.42 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


July 1939 


7 months 

ending July 

31, 1939 




IV 

V 

VII 


(1) 

(3) 
(2) 










2, 600. 00 




$2,094.00 


3, 774. 00 


Total ... 


2, 094. 00 


6 382 38 




IV 
VII 


(1) 

(2) 

(2) 




British Honduras . _ 




129 20 






75.00 






172 60 








Total 




376 80 




I 
V 


(I) 

(2) 
(3) 






British North Borneo 




26 43 




28 00 






750. 00 








Total 




804 43 




IV 


(1) 
(2) 






Bulgaria 


23.00 
2.30 


23 00 




2.30 


Total.. 


25.30 


25 30 




I 
IV 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 




Burma.. 


90.00 


359 70 




135.00 




8.50 


1,326.75 
1 28. 46 








Total 


98. 50 


1, 949. 91 




I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(I) 
(2) 
(3) 
(I) 
(2) 


Canada 


3, 496. 84 


13, 501. 64 
418.00 






2. 942. 68 

1, 806. 96 
206. 55 

47, 043. 88 

2. 967. 50 
7, 925. 00 

1.00 
16, 452. 00 


11,947.93 
6, 422. 06 
744. 77 
31.S. 696. 01 
35. Sng. 03 
44.917.79 
35, 526. 23 
124, 913. 22 


Total 


82,840.41 


591 955 .58 




IV 

I 

IV 

V 

VII 


(1) 

(1) 
(4) 
(I) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




Ceylon... 


14.88 


86 88 






Chile 


60.00 


60 00 




116.00 




165. 75 


13. 140. 75 
730.00 






1, 600. 00 






35.00 






11,865.00 








Total. 


225. 75 


27 536 76 




I 
III 

IV 
V 

VII 


(2) 
(3) 
(45 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 




China. 




135,408.00 
1,490.00 










8, 735. 00 






26, 042. 00 






1, 760. 00 






125.00 






775, 200. 00 




7,948.00 

7, 000. 00 

49.88 


115,495.00 

68,900.00 

49 88 


Total 


14,997.88 


1, 133, 204. 88 




I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(I) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 


Colombia 


179, 70 

6,'>, 33 

1, 349. 10 

646. 00 


281 70 




188.33 

4, 078. 16 

3, 890. 10 

2.30, 636. 00 




2, 030. 00 
23,120.00 


30,891.00 

120, 160. 00 

625.00 






840.00 








Total 


27, 280. 13 


391, 690. 28 




I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(4) 
(1) 

(2) 
(1) 
<2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




Costa Rica 




13,00 






2, 510. 65 






484.00 






34,000.00 




4,36.00 
4,247.00 


3, 233. 00 

23, 458. 00 

728.00 






665. 93 








Total 


4,683.00 


64,992.58 



I 






AUGUST 12, 193 9 



123 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


July 1930 


7 monttis 

ending July 

31, 1939 


Cuba 


I 

IV 

VII 


(n 

(4) 

(1) 

(2) 

(1) 

(2) 




$57.00 




$9, 164. 00 


60, 568. 00 
6, 729. 35 




1,684.00 


8,171.00 
1,759 14 






11.00 








Total 


10,848.00 


67, 295, 49 




I 

IV 

V 


(4) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 






12.00 


25.10 




14.49 






60 00 






8, 860. 00 








Total 


12.00 


8, 949. 59 




V 


CI) 
(3) 




Czechoslovalvia 




115, 500. 00 






12, 800. 00 








Total 




128,300.00 




I 

V 


(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 










2, 760. 00 






340.00 




6,994.48 

196, 00 

2,924.00 


11,211.48 
2, 986. 00 
5, 500. 00 


Total.-.. 


10, 114, 48 


22, 787. 48 




I 

IV 

V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(I) 








36.00 






100.76 






19, 500. 00 






3, 499. 00 






260.00 






260.00 






11,100.00 






1,714.40 








Total 




36, 459. 15 




I 

IV 


(4) 
(6) 
(1) 
(2) 






Ecuador. 




60 00 






128.00 




34.00 
2.00 


34.00 
245. 00 


Total 


36.00 


467. 00 




IV 

I 

IV 
V 

vn 


(1) 

(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 




Egypt.... 


14.88 


14.88 






E! Salvador 


20.00 


139. 00 




4, 324. 63 




32.00 


161.00 
1, 304. 00 






850. 00 






2, 760. 00 








Total 


52.00 


9, 638. 63 




V 
VII 


(1) 




Estonia 




44, 180. 00 






2.07 








Total 




44, 182. 07 




I 

IV 


(1) 

(2) 










14.00 






59.08 






61 00 








Total... 




134. 08 




r 

IV 
V 


(1~ 

(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 






Finland 


624. 75 
602. 14 


8, 253 05 




6,277.42 
60.00 






95.67 






14, 560 00 




1,050.00 


22, 150. 00 
111,900.00 








Total 


2,176.89 


163,286.14 




I 
in 

IV 

V 


(iT 

(4) 

(1) 

(2) 

(2) 

(1) 

(2) 

(3) 




France 




83.04 






86.00 




2,629,575.00 


10,600,760 00 
660. 00 






63.00 




12, 276. 00 

6,046.00 

383, 665. 00 


282, 960. 00 
406, 581. 14 
926, 924. 00 


Total... 


3,030,660.00 


12, 218, 117. 18 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


July 1939 


7 montlis 

ending July 

31, 1939 


French Equa\orial Africa 


I 


CD 
(4) 


$34. 00 
30.00 


$34.00 
32,00 


Total 


64.00 






I 
IV 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 


















2, 040. 00 
760. 60 


2,091.00 
763. 03 


Total ... 


2, 800. 60 


2, 984. 64 




V 

I 

IV 
V 


(2) 

"! 
(4) 

(1) 
(2) 
(3) 


French West Africa 




95.00 










99.08 
18.00 
17.86 


793. 70 
1, 038. 99 

287.42 
7,000.00 






Total 


134. 94 


9, 243. 81 


Great Britain. . 


I 

III 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(3) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 


38.00 


115 85 




34 685 00 




807. 00 

6,421,946.00 

45.00 

66.62 

17, 200. 00 

108, 164.00 

3,776.50 

142, 857. 00 


62, 395. 31 

18, 897, 306. 00 

716.90 

402. 60 

472, 403. 00 

437, 823. 08 

641,973.60 

257, 374. 00 


Total 


5,694,900.12 


20, 705, 095. 24 




v.. 


(2) 
(3) 






3,500 00 






2, 200. 00 






Total. . . 




5, 700. 00 




I 

IV 

V 

VII 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




Guatemala 




1 850 00 






28 00 




28.00 


28.00 






7, 665. no 
93 00 










4, 688 00 








Total 


28.00 


14, 302 00 




I 
rv 

vn 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 




Haiti 


1, 182. 60 
20.00 
320. 00 


1 862 50 




2, 380. 75 
330. 11 
30.76 














Total.... 


1, 522. 60 






I 

IV 
V 

vn 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 












336. 00 


441.00 
1,505 60 






51 00 






660 00 








Total. 


335.00 






I 

IV 

V 
VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 














654.68 




160. 70 


22, 608. 78 
3,215.92 






40.00 






1, 037. 86 








Total . — 


160. 70 


28 375 64 




I 

V 


(4) 
(3) 




Iceland 


5.00 


5 00 




3, 670. 00 








Total 


5.00 


3, 675. 00 




I 

IV 
V 

VI 


(I) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 




India 


61.60 
274.88 
103. 98 


1,636.60 




3,824.02 

2, 174. 18 

45 30 




2, 500. 00 
400.00 


13,180.00 
1,906.00 
2, .500. 00 






334 00 








Total 


3,340.46 


26, 498. 10 



124 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


July 1939 


7 months 

ending July 

31, 1939 




IV 
V 


(1) 

(2) 

(1) 

(2) 


$66. 30 
4.80 


$796.11 




126. 80 
40, 000. 00 






100. 00 








Total _ , - 


71.10 


41,022.91 




I 

V 


(3) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




, 




26, 500. 00 






4, 958. 00 






210,000.00 






4, 300. 00 






29, 298. 00 












275, 056. 00 




V 


(2) 
(3) 










26, 740, 00 






13, 900. 00 












40, 640. 00 




I 

IV 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 








11.52 

262. 83 

55.27 


62.44 




2. 047. 84 
438. 17 


Total 


329.62 


2, 548. 45 




IV 

V 


(1) 
(1) 
(2) 








6, 380. 00 




32,000.00 


32, 000. 00 
235, 110. 00 








Total - 


32.000.00 


273, 490. 00 




I 

IV 
V 


(4) 

(1) 

(2) 
(1) 






69.00 
17.00 


861. 20 




377. 35 
173. 20 




35.00 
2, 300. 00 


124.36 
2, 300. 00 


Total --- 


2,421.00 


3, 836. 11 




VII 

I 


(2) 

fl) 
(4) 




T,ppward Islands 




864.00 












30.80 






11.03 








Total - - 




41.83 




I 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 










667. 75 






3, 576. 00 






516.00 








Total 




4, 659. 75 




I 


(1) 
(4) 










216. 00 






123. 66 








Total 




339. 66 




I 

III 

rv 

V 
VII 


CD 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 

!■> 

2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 










765. 94 






176. 00 






9, 330. 00 






935, 600. 00 






18, 183. 89 






16,660.00 




37,000.00 
54.00 


301, 550. 00 
324,731.00 
870, 746. 00 




1,714.60 
121.21 


6, 940. 00 
23,166.08 


Total 


38,889.71 


2,607,847.91 




I 
I 

V 


(4) 

(1) 
(4) 
(2) 






9.00 












30.40 






111.67 






1,000.00 








Total 




1,142.07 




III 

IV 
V 

VII 


(2) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 








449.00 


449.00 




45.00 




239,016.00 
16,699.00 

177,636.00 
27, 869. 00 


591, 615. 00 
198,661.67 
698, 760. 00 
46,419.00 


Total 


461,668.00 


1 1,435,849.67 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


July 1939 


7 months 

ending July 

31, 1939 




I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(5) 

III (I) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII CD 




$65. 25 






45, 645. 00 




$82.00 
4,000.00 


265. 37 

495, 550. 00 

4, 866, 313. 00 






21,026.80 




167.00 
13.00 


39, 662. 30 

294. 00 

13, 000. 00 




1,024.00 


39, 638. 10 
35. 000. 00 






10.00 








Total 


5,286.00 


5, 666, 469. 82 




I CD 

C4) 

V C3) 








440.20 






501.24 






14, 000. 00 








Total 




14.941.44 




I CD 
C4) 

IV (2) 

V C2) 
C3) 








273.87 
22.09 
69.46 


493. 87 




121.47 

126.03 

2, 740. 00 




14, 600. 00 


14, 500. 00 


Total 


14, 866. 42 


17, 981. 37 




I CD 
C4) 

IV C2) 

V C2) 
C3) 








17.00 






44.66 






63.00 




6,014.00 


7,814.00 
42, 500. 00 








Total --. 


6,014.00 


50, 438. 66 




I (4) 
I CD 

C4) 

IV C2) 

V CD 
C2) 
C3) 

VII CD 
C2) 






116. 10 


116. 10 










466. 61 






437. 63 




5.00 


ion. 68 
4, 600. 00 




2, 997. 00 
14, 000. 00 


12, 752. 00 
19,300.00 
5, 578. 00 






4, 262. 00 








Total 


17,002.00 


47,402.82 




I C2) 
C4) 

m CD 

IV (1) 
C2) 

V C2) 
VII C2) 








1,600.00 






l,34.'i.00 






20, 906. 00 






427.00 






2, 059. 70 






30.00 






879.60 








Total 




27, 247. 20 




IV CD 

C2) 

VII (1) 






Northern Ireland 




48.00 






3.67 






6.76 








Total 




67.33 




I CD 
C4) 

IV CD 
C2) 

V C2) 
C3) 

VII C2) 


34.00 
64.00 


480.40 




168. 74 
30.00 






2.03 






3,476.87 




1,582.00 


3, 832. 00 
2,471.00 








Total - 


1, 670. 00 


10,461.04 




V CD 

C2) 
C3) 








3, 052. 00 






72.00 






404.00 








Total 




3, 528. 00 




IV CD 
C2) 

V CD 
C2) 
C3) 










56.38 




4S8.00 


465.00 
4, 100. 00 






800.00 




1,486.66 


1, 486. 00 



126 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


July 1939 


7 months 

ending July 

31, 1939 




VII 


(1) 

(2) 




$2, 188. 00 






728.00 








Total 


$1,944.00 


9, 823. 38 




IV 
I 

III 
IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(1) 

(2 
(4S 
(1) 
(2) 

h) 

(2) 

h) 

(3) 
(1) 
(2) 






8.00 


8.00 






Peru 




46.00 






37, 000. 00 






955. 36 






1,019,175.00 




10, 038. 00 


10, 678. 40 
208.50 






351.00 




6,000.00 


9, 085. 00 
89, 344. 60 






48, 072. 00 




150.00 
1,667.00 


150.00 
28,810.00 


Total 


16,865.00 


1, 243, 874. 86 




I 

I 

IV 
V 


(4) 

(1) 
(4) 

(1) 
(2) 
(1) 






4.97 


7.47 






Poland 


75.70 

26.48 

245.65 

48.81 


118. 70 




167. 48 

1,056.65 

111.39 

257, 706. 00 








Total - 


396.64 


259, 169. 12 




IV 
V 


(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 








317.00 






7, 886. 00 




3,000.00 


6,280.00 
28, 000. 00 








Total 


3,000.00 


42, 482. 00 




I 

V 


(5) 
(2) 
(3) 








835, 000. 00 






3, 970. 00 






26,190.00 








Total 




865, 160. 00 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 










500. 37 




30.00 
40.00 


248. 70 

40.00 

1, 900. 00 








Total 


70.00 


2, 689. 07 




I 

IV 


(1) 

(4) 
(1) 
(2) 






39.00 
62.00 


39.00 




72.63 
210. 80 




8.00 


34.76 


Total --- 


109.00 


367. 19 




I 

V 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 








566. 77 




2,000.00 
41,776.00 


2.000.00 

68,115.44 

3, 400. 00 








Total 


43,776.00 


74, 082. 21 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




Switzerland 




62.90 




270. 50 
6,482.00 


634. 75 

126.982.00 

4, 544. 00 






20, 200. 00 








Total 


6,762.60 


152, 423. 65 




IV 

I 

IV 

y 


(2) 

(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 




Syria 




19.00 








Thailand fSiam) — 




23.58 




3,941.36 


17,994.84 
31.00 




12, 674. 61 
2.850.00 


63, 563. 61 
271,960.00 


Total 


19,466.97 


343, 673. 03 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


July 1939 


7 months 

ending July 

31, 1939 


Trinidad 


I 

IV 

V 


(4) 

(1) 

(2) 
(3) 




$1.08 






79.60 






1, 051. 50 




$3,000.00 


10,000.00 


Total . 


3,000.00 


11,132.08 




IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




Turkey 




170. 34 






6.26 




10,171.00 


68,661.00 


Total 


10,171.00 


68,826.69 




IV 


(1) 
(2) 




Turks and Caicos Islands . 




18.70 






.80 








Total - 




19.60 




I 

IV 
V 


^4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 








189.20 

266. 75 

96.00 

18.00 

10, 988. 00 

640.00 

3,600.00 


1,031.07 




1, 622. 06 

2,022.23 

326. 24 

42,365.00 

10, 219. 57 

3,765.00 


Total 


15, 786. 95 


61, 361. 17 




V 


(1) 

(2) 
(3) 




Union of Soviet Socialist Re- 




845,966.00 


publics. 


30.00 


66,705.78 
146, 408. 00 








Total - 


30.00 


1, 058, 079. 78 




V 

I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(2) 

(!) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(i) 
(1) 
(2) 




Uruguay -. 




160.00 








Venezuela . 




40.00 






41.00 






57.00 




584.94 

88.31 

16,222.00 

4,760.00 


18,870.77 
1,216.81 
16, 222. 00 
16,417.00 
104, 136. 50 




331.95 
3, 960. 00 


3, 742. 93 
6.060.00 


Total 


25, 947. 20 


166, 804. 01 




IV 
V 


(1) 

(1) 
(2) 
(3) 








48.00 








Yugoslavia 




182,036.00 




6.756.00 
1,906.00 


11,763.00 
1, 906. 00 


Total . . 


8,662.00 


195, 706. 00 








Grand total 


10,114,366.92 


63, 366, 488. 87 











Arms Import Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of origin of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war li- 
censed for import by the Secretary of State 
during the month of July 1939: 



Country o( origin 


Category 


Value 


Total 




I (4) 
VII (1) 
V (2) 


$1.00 

749. 76 

3,000.00 


$1.00 


France, . 


749. 76 


Oreat Britain 


3,000.00 



126 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Country of origin 


Category 


Value 


Total 




V (1) 
1 (4) 

V (2) 
I (2) 

(4) 


$4, 500. 00 

195. 00 

76.00 

830.00 

448.00 


$4, 500. 00 


Netherlands - - 


195.00 




75.00 


Turkey _ _ _ 


} I, 278. 00 




Total 




9,798.76 











During the month of July, 8 arms import 
licenses were issued, making a total of 116 such 
licenses issued during the current year. 

Categories of Aems, Ammunition, and 
Implements of War 

The categories of arms, ammunition, and 
implements of war in the appropriate columns 
of the tables printed above are the categories 
into which those articles were divided in the 
President's proclamation of May 1, 1937, enu- 
merating the articles which would be consid- 
ered as arms, ammunition, and implements of 
war for the purposes of section 5 of the joint 
resolution of May 1, 1937 [see pages 74-76 of 
the Bulletin of July 22, 1939 (Vol. 1, No. 4)]. 

Special Statistics in Kegard to Arms 
Exports to Cuba 

In compliance with Article II of the con- 
vention between the United States and Cuba 
to suppress smuggling, signed at Habana, 
March 11, 1926, which reads in part as follows : 

"The High Contracting Parties agree that 
clearance of shipments of merchandise by 
water, air, or land, from any of the ports of 
either country to a port of entry of the other 
country, shall be denied when such shipment 
comprises articles the importation of which is 
prohibited or restricted in the country to 
which such shipment is destined, unless in this 
last case there has been a compliance with the 
requisites demanded by the laws of both 
countries." 

and in compliance with the laws of Cuba 
which restrict the importation of arms, am- 
munition, and implements of war of all kinds 
by requiring an import permit for each ship- 
ment, export licenses for shipments of arms, 
ammunition, and implements of war to Cuba 



are required for the articles enumerated below 
in addition to the articles enumerated in the. 
President's proclamation of May 1, 1937: 

(1) Arms and small arms using ammunition 
of caliber .22 or less, other than those classed 
as toys. 

(2) Spare parts of arms and small arms of 
all kinds and calibers, other than those classed 
as toys, and of guns and macliine guns. 

(3) Ammunition for the arms and small 
arms under (1) above. 

(4) Sabers, swords, and military machetes 
with cross-guard hilts. 

(5) Explosives as follows: explosive pow- 
dera of all kinds for all purposes; nitrocellu- 
lose having a nitrogen content of 12 percent 
or less ; diphenylamine ; dynamite of all kinds ; 
nitroglj'cerine ; alkaline nitrates (ammonium, 
potassium, and sodimn nitrate); nitric acid; 
nitrobenzene (essence or oil of niirbane) ; sul- 
phur; sulphuric acid; chlorate of potash; and 
acetones. 

(6) Tear gas (CeH.COCH.Cl) and other 
similar nontoxic gases and apparatus designed 
for the storage or projection of such gases. 

The table printed below indicates, in respect 
to licenses authorizing the exportation to 
Cuba of the articles and commodities listed in 
the preceding paragraph issued by the Secre- 
tary of State during July 1939, the number of 
licenses and the value of the articles and com- 
modities described in the licenses: 



Number of licenses 


Section 


Value 


Total 


20 .... 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(5) 


$850. 50 

6.00 

2.888.00 

18, 714. 19 






$22, 453. 69 



The table printed below indicates the value 
of the articles and commodities listed above 
exported to Cuba during July 1939 under 
licenses issued by the Secretary of State : 



Section 



(1) 
(3) 
(5) 



Value 



$342. 00 
7. 986. 00 
6, 798. 00 



Total 



$15, 126. 00 



Tin-Plate Scrap 

The table printed below indicates the num- 
ber of licenses issued during the year 1939, 



AUGUST 12, 193 9 



127 



up to and including the month of July, auth- 
orizing the export of tin-plate scrap under the 
provisions of the act approved February 15, 
1936, together with the number of tons auth- 
orized to be exported and the value thereof: 



Country of destina- 
tion 



Japan- 



July 1939 



Quantity 

in long 

tons 



Total 
value 



*48, 789. 27 



7 months ending 
July 31, 1939 



Quantity 

in long 

tons 



Total 
value 



$136, 732. 52 



Applicant for 
license 


Purchaser in 
foreign country 


Country of 
destina- 
tion 


Quantity 

in cubic 

feet 


Total 
value 


The Ohio Chemical 
& Mfg. Co. 

The France Manu- 
facturing Co. 

The Ohio Chemical 
& Mfg. Co. 


Physikalisches In- 
stitute der Eidg. 
Technischen 
Hochschule. 

Decker and Wlg- 
dorsky Ltd. 

Oxygen Co. of 
Canada, Ltd. 


Switzer- 
land. 

Chile 

Canada... 


3.8 

0.140 

784 


$2.00 

36.00 
32.60 


Total 




70 60 













During the month of July, 26 tin-plate scrap 
licenses were issued, making a total of 113 such 
licenses issued during the current year. 

Helium 

The table printed below gives the essential 
information in regard to the licenses issued 
during the month of July 1939 authorizing the 
exportation of helium gas under the provisions 
of the act approved on September 1, 1937, and 
Ithe regulations issued pursuant thereto: 



Publications 



Department of State 



Foreign Consular Offices in the United States, July 1, 
1939. Publication 1355. iv, 59 pp. 150. 

Pa.ssports for American Citizens in Foreign Countries. 
(Revi-sed to May 8, 1939.) Passport Series 1. 
Publication 1358. 6 pp. Free. 



U S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE; 1939 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WITH THE APPROVAL OP THE DIRECTOR OF THE BDEEAD OF THE BUDGET 



i 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 




J 



L 



7^ r 






riN 



AUGUST 19, 1939 
Vol. I: No. 8 — Publication 1364 



Qontents 




Page 



The American republics: 

Expropriation of American-owned oil properties in 

Mexico: Statement by Acting Secretary Welles . . 131 
Supplementary extradition convention with Mexico . 132 
Paraguay: Inauguration of President Estigarribia . . 133 
Europe: 

Irregularities in use of French diplomatic pouch . . . 133 

Swedish import quota on salted pork 133 

Arrangement with Canada relating to air transport serv- 
ices 134 

Department changes: 

Resignation of Francis B. Sayre as Assistant Secretary 

of State 134 

Appointment of Henry F. Grady as Assistant Secretary 

of State 135 

Commercial policy: 

Negotiations for a new trade agreement with Belgium . 135 
International conferences, commissions, etc.: 

Sixth International Congress of Byzantine Studies . . 142 
Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 143 

Publications 143 

Treaty information: 
Consultation : 

Convention for the Maintenance, Preservation, and 
Reestablishment of Peace (Treaty Series No. 

922) 144 

International law: 

Conference of Jurisconsults 144 



H. S. SIJPERINTENOENT OF DOCUMINTk 

SEP 13 1939 



Treaty information — Continued. 
Nonin tervention: 
Additional Protocol Relative to Nonintervention Pags 

(Treaty Series No. 923) 145 

Organization: 

Protocol for the Amendment of the Preamble, of 
Articles 1, 4, and 5, and of the Annex to the Cove- 
nant of the League of Nations 145 

Radio broadcasting: 

Convention Concerning the Use of Broadcasting in 

the Cause of Peace 146 

Opium and other dangerous drugs: 

Convention for the Suppression of the Illicit Traffic 

Ln Dangerous Drugs 146 

Education: 

Proces- Verbal Concerning the Application of Articles 
IV, V, VI, VII, IX, XII, and XIII of the Conven- 
tion of October 11, 1933, for Facilitating the 
International Circulation of Films of an Educa- 
tional Character 146 

Extradition: 

Supplementary Extradition Convention With Mex- 
ico 147 

Extradition Treaty With Great Britain (Treaty 

Series No. 849) 147 

Agriculture: 

Convention With Great Britain for the Protection of 
Migratory Birds (Treaty Series No. 628) and 
Convention With Mexico for the Protection of 
Migratory Birds and Game Mammals (Treaty 

Series No. 912) 148 

Aviation: 

Arrangement With Canada Relating to Air Transport 

Services 148 

Convention for the Unification of Certain Rules 
Relating to the Precautionary Attachment of 

Aircraft 150 

Convention for the Unification of Certain Rules 
Relating to Damages Caused by Aircraft to Third 

Parties on the Surface 150 

Commerce: 

Trade Agreement With Belgium 150 

Copyright: 

Treaty on Intellectual Property 151 

Finance: 
International Convention for the Suppression of 

Counterfeiting Currency 152 

Telecommimications: 
Regional Radio Convention of Central America, 

Panama, and the Canal Zone 153 



The American Republics 



EXPROPRIATION OF AMERICAN-OWNED OIL PROPERTIES IN MEXICO 

Statement by Acting Secretary Welles 



[Eeleased to the press August 14] 

On March 18, 1938, the Mexican Government 
by decree undertook to expropriate the proper- 
jties in Mexico of certain foreign-owned, in- 
jcluding A m e r i c a n - o w n e d, oil companies 
!operating there. 

TMs action was similar in nature, although 
involving investments of far greater magni- 
tude, to the steps taken by the Mexican Gov- 
jrmnent in recent years to expropriate farm 
ind other properties belonging to American 
citizens. With regard to the seizure of these 
igrarian properties, tliis Government had con- 
sistently pointed out that in the exercise of the 
idmitted right of all sovereign nations to ex- 
3ropriate private property, such expropriation 
nust be accompanied, in accordance with the 
■ecognized principles of international law, by 
provision on the part of the Government of 
Viexico for adequate, effective, and prompt 
)ayment for the properties seized. This latter 
problem was largely settled when on November 
' to 12, 1938, the two Governments exchanged 
■ommunications agreeing upon a satisfactory 
)rocedure for the determination of the fair 
ompensation to be given American citizens 
vhose lands have been taken subsequent to Au- 
gust 30, 1927,^ and in consequence of which 
agreement the Mexican Government will pro- 
■ide compensation in cash for such properties. 

Immediately following the action taken to 
xpropriate the petroleum properties belong- 

' See Press Releases, Vol. XIX, No. 477, November 
9, 1938, pp. 339-342. 



171510—39- 



ing to American citizens, this Government in- 
formed the Mexican Government of its expec- 
tation that prompt compensation would be 
made in the form of just and effective pay- 
ment to the extent of the fair and equitable 
valuation of such properties. This Govern- 
ment's position is firmly based not only on 
well-recognized rules of international law; the 
elemental considerations of justice and of fair 
dealing which should govern the relations be- 
tween nations demand such payment for the 
properties taken. The attitude of applying 
the principles of established international law 
in the solution of this problem has been con- 
sistently maintained by every official of the 
United States Government in its representa- 
tions to both parties to the controversy 
throughout the period of the discussion. Fur- 
thermore, the close and friendly understand- 
ing which this Government desires to continue 
to maintain with the Govei-nment of Mexico 
requires the reciprocal assurance on the part of 
both Governments that their relations will in 
fact be governed by such principles of justice 
and of fair dealing. 

In the decree of expropriation itself, and on 
numerous occasions subsequently, the Mexican 
Government recognized its liability to make 
compensation and stated its willingness to dis- 
cuss terms with the petroleum companies con- 
cerned. Since that time there have been 
discussions between representatives of the 
Mexican Government and of the petroleum 
companies in an endeavor to come to some fair 

131 



132 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



and equitable agreement. This Government 
has continuously and consistently sought to 
facilitate and to further these negotiations by 
conferring with both sides, first with one and 
then with the other. For a time the conver- 
sations between both parties proceeded satis- 
factorily, appearing to hold promise of an 
eventual solution. A set of bases of discus- 
sion, within the scope of which there might be 
found an agreement for the future operation 
of the industry, were believed to be determined, 
but recently a serious obstacle to final agree- 
ment was encountered. In this situation this 
Government, without prior consultation with 
either party and in accordance with its re- 
peatedly demonstrated desire to further an 
agreement, informally laid before both parties 
a suggested solution of this obstacle, without 
requesting or receiving any commitment or ob- 
ligation on the part of either party to accept it. 
This proposal was as follows: Each party 
had claimed that it must control the manage- 
ment and operation of new companies wdiicli, 
it had been agi-eed in principle, might be estab- 
lished to operate the properties seized. In an 
endeavor to overcome the deadlock, this Gov- 
ei'nment informally oifered the suggestion that 
the Boards of Directors, as a temporary ar- 
rangement and pending a final agreement, be 
composed of nine persons, three appointed by 
the Mexican Government, three appointed by 
the petroleum companies, and three selected by 
the two parties from a panel of nine drawn up 
in mutual agreement by the Governments of 
Mexico and of the United States. In order to 
attain complete impartiality on this panel of 
nine, no persons were to be included who came 
from any country whose citizens had a direct 
and important interest in any of the petroleum 
companies involved. These persons were all to 
be of demonstrated integrity and standing, and 
of practical experience in commerce, finance, or 
in the petroleum industry itself. This proposal 
seemed to offer a temporary middle ground on 
which the Mexican Government and the pe- 
troleum companies could have met, with the 
balance between them resting in the hands of 
impartial and competent persons. 



This Government naturally regi'ets that a 
proposal suggested for no other purpose than 
to reconcile a major difference of approach 
wliich threatened a break-down in the present 
negotiations shoidd have been discarded by 
either party without the fullest exploration of 
its possibilities, especially when both parties 
fully comprehended the purpose for which it 
was put forward. 

It is of course evident that a solution of this 
controversy must be found in accordance with 
the basic principles of international law, as this 
Government has invariably insisted at every 
step of the present negotiations. A continu- 
ance of the dispute not only will dislocate still 
further beneficial commercial relations between 
Mexico and the United States, with great eco- 
nomic losses to both, countries, but, more im- 
portant still, it M'ill constitute a material' 
barrier to the maintenance of that close and 
friendly understanding between Mexico and the 
United States which both Governments regard 
as in the best interests of the two peoples. 

The discontinuance of the present discussions 
can of course in no sense relieve the Mexican 
Govermnent of its obligation to make prompt, 
adequate, and effective compensation for the 
petroleum properties which have been taken if 
the expropriation is to be regarded as valid. 
At the same time, however, this Government 
expects that its own citizens with direct inter- 
est in this controversy will give the most ample 
and attentive consideration to all constructive 
proposals that are advanced to overcome the 
difficulties now standing in the way of a fair 
settlement of the controversy which exists. In 
the rapid, fair, and equitable solution of this 
controversy, the interests of their Government 
are directly concerned. 

4 

SUPPLEMENTARY EXTRADITION 
CONVENTION WITH MEXICO 

An amiouncement to the press regarding the 
signing of a supplementary extradition conven- 
tion with Mexico appears in this Bulletin in 
the section "Treaty Information." 



AUGUST li), 19 39 



133 



PARAGUAY: INAUGURATION OF 
PRESIDENT ESTIGARRIBIA 

[Released to the press August 15] 

Telegram from the President of the United. 
States to the President of Paraguay {Jose 
Felix Estigarrihia) : 

The White House, August 15, 1939. 

Upon this day when you are inaugurated 
r President of the Republic of Paraguay, I wish 
t.i send you this message of sincere felicitation 
together with my best wishes for the utmost 
measure of success in the high office to which 
your fellow citizens have called you. This 
Government felt it a privilege to have you in 
AVashington as the Minister of your country 
and believes that through the personal friend- 
ships which you created here the relations be- 
tween our two countries have been rendered 
still closer. 

Please accept [etc.] 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Europe 



IRREGULARITIES IN USE OF FRENCH 
DIPLOMATIC POUCH 

[Released to tbe pre.ss August 15] 

Translation, of a note from the French Ambas- 
sador {de Saint-Quentin) to the Acting Secre- 
'arij of State {Welles) : 

Washington, August H, 1939. 
Mr. Secretary of State: 

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt 
)f Your Excellency's letter of August 11, 
vvhich communicated to me the report of a 
.aand jury under the jurisdiction of the Fed- 
'lal District Court for the Southern District 
if New York. This report points out that 
ipon two occasions, in April 1938 and in Jan- 
lary 1939, an American moving-picture pho- 
ographer, Mr. de la Varre, was able to use the 
['rench diplomatic pouch to bring films into 



the United States without paying the customs 
duties. 

I shall not fail to transmit the document to 
my Government to be used in the investiga- 
tion of this matter which it began independ- 
ently immediately the matter was brought to 
its attention by the Embassy last March. 

Your Excellency has had on several occa- 
sions since that time information regarding 
the result of these investigations. 

They have established that there may have 
been ignorance of the American regulations or 
lack of surveillance on the part of certain of 
the French officials who handled the shipment 
by the pouch of the films in question. I express 
to you my regrets on this account, but I am 
pleased to be able to give you assurance that 
not one of the officials in question deliberately 
facilitated the usage of the diplomatic pouch 
by an American businessman in order to per- 
mit him to defraud the Federal customs. 

Nor was that the intention, I am convinced, 
of the directors of the French Line, who make 
it their duty to respect the laws in the United 
States as in France. 

I have no need to add that the French Gov- 
ernment has taken all measures necessary to 
correct the irregularities which may have been 
committed in the use of the diplomatic pouch 
and to prevent their recurrence. 

Please accept [etc.] de Saint-Quentin 

+ + > 

SWEDISH IMPORT QUOTA ON SALTED 
PORK 

[Released to the press August 15] 

The Government of Sweden has notified the 
State Department, in a note dated August 10, 
1939, of its intention to impose an import quota 
on salted pork, effective not earlier than 30 days 
from the date of the note, in accordance with 
the provisions of article XIV of the trade 
agreement between the United States and 
Sweden." The quota will permit an annual 



' Executive Agreement Series No. 79. 



134 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



importation into Sweden of 855 metric tons of 
salted pork originating in the United States. 
Swedish imports of sahed pork originating in 
tlie United States totaled 171 metric tons in 
1938. 

The text of article XIV of tlie trade agi-ee- 
ment between the United States and Sweden, 
referred to above, is as follows : 

"The Government of each country reserves 
the right to withdraw the concession granted 
on any article under this Agi-eement, or to im- 
pose quantitative restrictions on any such arti- 
cle if at any time there should be evidence that, 
as a result of the extension of such concession 
to any third country, such counti-y will obtain 
the major benefit of such concession and in con- 
sequence thereof an miduly large increase in 
importations of such article will take place: 
Provided that before the Government of either 
country shall avail itself of the foregoing res- 
ervation, it shall give notice in writing to tha 
other Government of its intention to do so, and 
shall afford such other Government an oppor- 
tunity within thirty days after receipt of such 
notice to consult with it in respect of the pro- 
posed action ; and if an agi-eement with respect 
thereto is not reached within thirty days fol- 
lowing receipt of the afoi-esaid notice, the 
Government which proposes to take such action 
shall be fi-ee to do so at any time thereafter, 
and the other Government shall be free within 
fifteen days after such action is taken to ter- 
minate this Agreement in its entirety on thirty 
days' written notice." 



Department Changes 



ARRANGEMENT WITH CANADA RE- 
LATING TO AIR TRANSPORT 
SERVICES 

The Department has announced to the press 
the negotiation of an arrangement with Can- 
ada relating to air transport services. The text 
of the arrangement appears in this Bulletin in 
the section "Treaty Information." 



RESIGNATION OF FRANCIS B. SAYRE 

AS ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF 
STATE 

[Released to the press by the White House August 10] 

The following exchange of letters between 
the President and Francis B. Sayre was made 
public today : 

Mr Dear Mr. President: 

May I tender you herewith my resignation as 
Assistant Secretary of State to take effect next 
Tuesday, August eighth. 
Faithfully yours, 

Francis B. Sayre 
The President, 

The White House. 

My Dear Frank: 

In accepting your resignation as Assistant 
Secretary of State, effective as of the date spec- 
ified in your letter of August fifth, I have fewer 
misgivings than would be the case if you were 
leaving the Department of State to return to 
private life. 

You have in a critical time discharged duties 
of the highest importance as Assistant Secre- 
tary of State. I am grateful to you and I feel 
wherever your fine work is known that it is 
appreciated. I appreciate also your active 
interest in all questions bearing upon our work 
in the Philippine Islands. As adviser in mat- 
ters of Philippine legislation and Far Eastern 
jiolicy your counsel has been wise and 
constructive. 

To my mind it is a fortunate circumstance 
that you will carry to your new duties as 
United States High Commissioner to the Com- 
monwealth of the Philippines the rich experi- 
ence of these last few years." 

"See the Bulletin of August 5, 1939 (Vol. I, No. 6), 
page 95. 



AUGUST 19, 193 9 



135 



With thanks for splendid sei-vice in the post 
you have relinquished and with best wishes for 
your happiness and success in the Far East, 
Very sincerely yours, 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 

Honorable Francis B. Satre, 
JjSSS Rockwood ParJcway, 

W ashmgton, D. C. 



APPOINTMENT OF HENRY F. GRADY 

AS ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF 
STATE 

Departmental Order No. 805, of August 8, 1939: 

The Honorable Henry F. Grady took the oath 
of office today, August 8, 1939, as Assistant Sec- 
retary of State. The office designation is A-G. 

Sumner Welles 
Acting Secretary 



Commercial Policy 



NEGOTIATIONS FOR A NEW TRADE AGREEMENT WITH BELGIUM 



[Released to the press August 16] 

The Acting Secretary of State issued today 
formal notice of intention to negotiate a new 
trade agreement with Belgium, and invited 
interested persons to submit their views in re- 
gard thereto to the Committee for Reciprocity 
Information. The negotiations will apply to 
the Belgo-Luxemburg Economic Union and to 
the Belgian Congo. 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
issued at the same time a notice setting the 
dates for the submission to it of information 
and views in writing and of applications to 
appear at public hearings to be held by the 
Committee, and fixing the time and place for 
the opening of the hearings. Suggestions with 
regard to the form and content of presentations 
addressed to the Committee for Reciprocity In- 
formation are included in a statement released 
by that Committee on December 13, 1937, and 
are available upon request. 

The notice of intention to negotiate is accom- 
panied by a list of products which will come 
under consideration for the possible granting 
of concessions by the Government of the United 
States. Like previous lists of a similar nature 
relating to negotiations with other countries, 
the list is published in order to obtain from 
interested persons information regarding each 
product listed, opinions as to whetlier it should 



or should not be included in the agreement, and 
suggestions as to the form, nature, and extent 
of any possible concessions which might 
advisedly be granted. 

Presentations which interested persons may 
wish to make to the Committee for Reciprocity 
Information need not be confined to the articles 
appearing on this list but may cover any arti- 
cles of actual or potential interest in the import 
or export trade of the United States with the 
Belgo-Luxemburg Economic Union or the Bel- 
gian Congo, or any other matter pertaining to 
the proposed negotiations. However, only the 
articles contained in the list issued today or in 
any supplementary list issued later will come 
under consideration for the possible granting 
of concessions by the Government of the United 
States. 

This list includes all the products on which 
concessions have already been made in the exist- 
ing agreement with Belgium. The fact that 
concessions have already been granted on these 
products will of course be fully taken into ac- 
count, and due consideration will be given to 
the information and views as to these conces- 
sions previously presented to the Committee for 
Reciprocity Information as well as to the ex- 
perience under these concessions during the 
time that they have been in force. 



136 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The inclusion of any product in this list does 
not mean that a concession with respect to it 
will necessarily be granted. The concessions 
to be granted are not decided upon until after 
interested persons in the United States have 
been given full opportunity to present infor- 
mation and views in writing and orally. The 
information thus presented will be given full 
consideration h\ reaching decisions with re- 
spect to each item as to whether any concession 
may be granted at all, and, if so, as to whether 
the existing duty is merely to be bound with- 
out reduction, whether the concession shall ap- 
ply to the entire tariiff classification, as listed, 
or only to a part of it, and whether it shall be 
fui-ther limited as to the quantity of the prod- 
uct to which, or the season during which, the 
concession is applicable. No further reduction 
will, of course, be made in any import duty 
which has already been reduced by 50 percent 
in any agreement concluded under the author- 
ity of the Trade Agreements Act. 

Trade between the United States and Bel- 
gium has increased substantially since the first 
trade agreement became effective on May 1, 
1935. Belgium's total imports from the United 
States rose steadily from ^6,500,000 in 1934 to 
$80,500,000 in 1937 and to $86,500,000 in 1938. 
The principal United States commodities im- 
ported by Belgium are automotive products, 
raw cotton, wheat, linseed oil cake, petroleum 
products, sawn wood, and copper and scrap. 
United States imports from Belgium increased 
from $26,500,000 in 1931 to $74,100,000 in 1937 
but fell in 1938 to $42,000,000 when total 
United States imports also dropped. Dia- 
monds, coney and rabbit furs, dead or creosote 
oil, barley malt, imitation oriental rugs of cot- 
ton, jute fabrics, and glue stock constitute 
about half, by value, of the commodities im- 
ported into the United States from Belgium. 

Public Notice 
trade aoreement negotiations with belgium 
Pursuant to section 4 of an act of Congress 
approved June 12, 1934. entitled "An Act to 
Amend the Tarifl' Act of 1930," as extended by 
Public Resolution No. 10, approved March 1 



1937, and to Executive Order No. 6750, of June 
27, 1934, I hereby give notice of intention to 
negotiate a trade agreement with the Govern- 
ment of Belgium on behalf of the Belgo-Lux- 
emburg Economic Union and the Belgian 
Congo. 

All presentations of information and views 
in writing and applications for supplemental 
oral presentation of views with respect to the 
negotiation of such agreement should be 
submitted to the Committee for Reciprocity 
Information in accordance with the announce- 
ment of this date issued by that Committee 
concerning the manner and dates for the sub- 
mission of briefs and applications, and the 
time set for public hearings. 

Sumner Welles 
Acting Secretary of State 

Washington, D. C, August 16, 1939. 

Public Notice 
trade agreement negotiations with belgixjm 

Closing date for submission of briefs, September 

16, 1939 ■» 
Closing date for application to be heard, 

September 16, 1939 " 
Public hearings open, October 2, 1939 ° 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
hereby gives notice that all inforaiation and 
views in writing, and all applications for sup- 
plemental oral presentation of views, in regard 
to the negotiation of a trade agreement with the 
Government of Belgium, notice of intention to 
negotiate which has been issued by the Acting 
Secretary of State on this date, shall be sub- 
mitted to the Committee for Reciprocity In- 
formation not later than 12 o'clock noon, Sep- 
tember 16, 1939. Such communications should 
be addressefl to "Chairman, Committee for Rec- 
iprocity Information, Old Land OfEce Build- 
ing, Eighth and E Streets, NW., Washington, 
D. C." 

A public hearing will be held beginning at 
10 a. m. on October 2, 1939, before the Commit- 
tee for Reciprocity Information! in the hearing 

■* Siibseq\U'ntIy postponed to September 27. 
' Subsequently postisoned to October 9. 



AUGUST 19, 19 39 



137 



room of the Tariff Commission in the Old Land 
OflBce Building, where supplemental oral state- 
ments will be heard. 

Six copies of written statements, either type- 
written or printed, shall be submitted, of wliich 
one copy shall be sworn to. Appearance at 
hearings before the Committee may be made 
only by those persons who have filed written 
statements and who have within the time pre- 
scribed made written application for a hearing, 
and statements made at such hearings shall be 
under oath. 

By direction of the Committee for Reciproc- 
ity Information this 16th day of August, 1939. 

John P. Gregg 

Secretary 

Washington, D. C, August 16, 1939. 

List of Products on Which the United 
States Will Consider Granting Conces- 
sions TO the Belgo-Luxemburg Economic 
Union and the Belgian Congo 

For the purpose of facilitating identification 
of the articles listed, reference is made in the 
list to the paragraph numbers of the tariff 
schedules in the Tariff Act of 1930 and to the 
sections of the Internal Revenue Code. The 
descriptive phraseology, however, is limited in 
some cases to a narrower field than that cov- 
ered by the numbered paragraph or section. 
In such cases only the articles covered by the 
descriptive phraseology of the list will come 
under consideration for the granting of con- 
cessions. 

In the event that articles which are at pres- 
ent regarded as classifiable under the descrip- 
tions included in the above list are excluded 
therefrom by judicial decision or otherwise 
prior to the conclusion of the agreement, the 
list will nevertheless be considered as including 
such articles. 

The rates of duty shown are those now ap- 
plicable to products of the Belgo-Luxemburg 
Economic Union. The following symbols are 
used in the fourth column : 



MR — a reduction of 50 percent in the rate of 
duty has been made in a trade agreement which 
is now in effect. 

E — a reduction of less than 50 percent has 
been made in a trade agreement which is now 
in effect. 

C — a reduction was made in the trade agree- 
ment with Czechoslovakia but was suspended 
April 22, 1939. 

S — if any reduction is made in the proposed 
agreement, it will probably apply to a nar- 
rower description than that listed so as to cover 
only that part of the item which is of special 
interest to the Belgo-Luxemburg Economic 
Union. 

B — the existing rate has been bound in a trade 
agreement now in effect. 



United States 








Tarifl Act of 
1930 


Description 


Present rate of 
duty 


Sym- 
bol 


Paragraph 








1. 


Stearic acid, valued "at not 
more than 8 cents per 


25% (subject to 
import tax of 










pound. 


3^ lb. under 
sec. 2491 (c) 
Int. Rev. 
Code; see be- 
low). 




1 


Carbon dioxide, weighing with 


\i per lb. on 


B 




immediate containers and 


contents, im- 






carton, 1 pound or less per 


mediate con- 






carton. 


tainers and 
carton. 




Q 


Aluminum sulphate 


H^perlb 

Uiliperlh 

liiperlb 

2)i per lb 


R 




Ammonium chloride 




7 


Ammonium nitrate.. - 




g 


Antimony oxide — 




20 


Chalk or whiting or Paris 










Dry, ground, or bolted 


Hliperlb 


MR 




Ground in oil (putty) 


J^fiperlb. 


R 


24 


Flavoring extracts, and nat- 
ural or synthetic fruit 












flavors, fruit esters, oils, 








and essences, all the fore- 








going and their combina- 








Containing more than 20 per 


30f! per lb. -1-18% 


R 




centum and not more than 


ad val. 






50 per centum of alcohol. 








Containing more than 60 per 


60(iperlb.-fl8% 


R 




centum of alcohol. 


ad val. 




27 (a) (1) and 


Naphthalene which after the 


20% ad val.+ 


MR 


(5). 


removal of all water pres- 
ent has a solidifying point 
of 79 degrees centigrade or 


■iVit per lb." 






above. 


W per lb. 

6^ per lb. 

\H per lb 

12% ad val.-(- 


MR 






MR 


40 


Hexamethvlenetetramine 

Edible gelatin, valued at less 




41 






than 40 cents per pound. 


2H(i per lb. 




68 


Ultramarine blue, dry, m 
pulp, or ground in or 












mixed with oil or water. 








wash and all other blues 








containing ultramarine; 








If valued at more than 10 


3(!perlb.. 






cents per pound. 








It valued at 10 cents per 


Zi per lb 




72. 


pound or less. 
Lead pigments: White lead.... 


2Moi'perlb 


R 



• The ad valorem rate is ba.sed on American 
competitive article manufactured or produced 



selling price of any similar 
in the United States. 



171510—39- 



138 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



United States 






United States 








Tariff Act of 
1930 


Description 


Present rate of 
duty 


Sym- Tariff Act of 
bol 1930 


Description 


Present rate of 
duty 


Sym- 
bol 


Paragraph 






Paragraph 








77 _, 


Zinc oxide and leaded zinc 
oxides containing not more 




219,224 


embossed, engraved, 
flashed, stained, colored 












than 25 per centum of lead; 






(except glass not plate 








In any form of dry powder.- 


l^ii per lb 




glass and not less than one- 








Ground in or mixed with 


2Ut per lb 




fourth of one inch in thick- 








oil or water. 






ness, when obscured by 






81 


Sodium phosphate (except 






coloring prior to solidifica- 
tion), painted, ornamen- 








pyrophosphate): 












Containing by weight less 


10 per lb 


R 


ted, or decorated. 








than 45 per centum of 




220 


Laminated glass composed of 


45% ad val - 


R 




water. 






layers of glass and other 








Not specially provided for... 


at per lb - 


E 


material or materials, and 






81 


Sodium sulphide: 






manufactures wholly or 
in chief value of such glass. 








Containing not more than 


?^)Sperlb. 










35 per centum of sodium 




221__ _. 


Rolled glass (not sheet glass) 


IHi per lb 






sulphide. 






fluted, figured, ribbed, or 








Containing more than 35 


%t per lb 




rough, or the same con- 








per centum of sodium 






taining a wire netting 








sulphide. 






within itself. 






83 _. 


Rice starch 


IMjSperlb 

liUt per lb 


222 (a), 224-... 


Plate glass, by whatever proc- 
ess made: 
Not exceeding 384 square 






93 _. 


Zinc chloride - 




205(b) - 


Roman. Portland, and other 


i'Ai per 100 lbs.. 


R 


8Mo)! per sq.ft.. 


E 




hydraulic cement or cement 


including 




inches. 








clinker. 


weight of con- 




Above that, and not exceed- 


llMo^ per sq.ft.. 


E 


205(b) - 


White nonstaining Portland 
cement. 


tainer. 
6i! per 100 lbs., 
including 


R 


ing 720 square inches. 
Above that, and not exceed- 
ing 1,008 square inches. 


UJi'o^ per sq.ft.. 


R 






weight of con- 




All above that 


13Mo0 per sq.ft.. 


K 






tainer. 




Prorided, That none of the 




207 - 


Sand containing 95 per centum 
or more of silica and not 


$1 per ton _ 


MR 


foregoing measuring ^^ 
inch or over in thickness 












more than six-tenths of 1 






shall be subject to a less 








per centum of oxide of 






rfttp of dutv than 


60% ad val - 

5% ad val. in ad- 
dition. 


B 




iron and suitable for use 
in the manufacture of 






ItHnCxJiViUL'j' i-iiai-k — --- 

Any of the foregoing, when 
bent, frosted, sanded, en- 




218(0 — 


glass. 
Table and kitchen articles and 
utensils, and all articles of 
every description not spe- 
cially provided for, com- 
posed wholly or in chief 
value of glass, blown or 




222 (b), 224.. - 


ameled, beveled, etched, 
embossed, engraved, 
flashed, stained, colored, 
painted, ornamented, or 
decorated. 
Plate glass containing a wire 
netting within itself: 

Not exceeding 384 square 
inches. 

Above that, and not exceed- 
ing 720 square inches. 

All above that 








partly blown in the mold 
or otherwise, or colored. 






lOi per sq. ft 


E 




cut, engraved, etched, 
frosted, gilded, ground 
(except such grinding as is 
necessary for fitting stop- 
pers or for purposes other 
than ornamentation), 
painted, printed in any 
manner, sand-blasted, sil- 
vered, stained, or deco- 
rated or ornamented in any 






iSJ-io)! per sq.ft.. 

ISMofipersq.ft 
5%ad val. in ad- 
dition. 


E 
E 




Any of the foregoing, when 
bent, frosted, sanded, en- 
ameled, beveled, etched, 
embossed, engraved, 
flashed, stained, colored, 
painted, ornan.ented. or 
decorated. 
Rolled, cvlinder, crown, and 






manner, whether filled or 
unfilled, or whether their 
contents be dutiable or 
free: 

If cut or engraved, and 
valued at not less than $1 
each. 

All other, not specially pro- 
vided for. 
Cylinder, crown, and sheet 
glass, by whatever process 
made, and for whatever 
purpose used: 

Not exceeding 150 square 
inches. 

Above that, and not exceed- 
ing 3S4 square inches. 




222(d), 224 


Subject to spe- 


E 








sheet glass, not plate glass, 
if ground wholly or in part 


cific duties in 
222 (a) or (b) 






45% ad val 


RS 


(whether or not polished) 
otherwise than for the pur- 
pose of ornanentatinn. or 


above. 






60%adval 


CS 


if one-fourth of one inch 
or more in thickness and 






219,224 






obscured by coloring prior 
tn s^'Iidificfltion. 
Provided. That noneof the fore- 
going measuring K» inch or 








imttpetlb...^ 


C 


more in thickness and not 
containing a wire netting 








I'Hiliperlb.... 


C 


within itself shall be sub- 
ject to less than the follow- 
ing rates of duty: 

If ground wholly or m part 
(whether or not polished) 
otherwise than for the pur- 
pose of ornamentation. 

If not ground wholly or in 
part. 
Any of the foregoing, when 
bent, frosted, sanded, enam- 
eled, beveled, etched, em- 
bossed, engraved, flashed, 
stained, colored (except 
glass not less than H 








Above that, and not exceed- 
ing 720 square inches. 

Above that, and not exceed- 
ing Sfi4 square inches. 

Above that, and not exceed- 
ing 1.200 square inches. 


l"Aii per lb 

I«H4)iperlb.... 
2H((perlb 


C 
C 
C 


50% ad val 

40% ad val 


E 
E 




Above that, and not exceed- 
ing 2,400 square inches. 
Above that 


23H4(;perlb.... 
2»M««perlb.... 


C 

c 


5% ad val. In 
addition. 






Provideil. That none of the 
foregoing weighing less 
than 16 ounces but not less 






than 12 ounces per square 






inch in thickness, when 








foot shall be subject to a 

less rate of duty than 

Any of the foregoing, when 


37M%adval.._. 
6% ad val. in 


c 


obscured by coloring prior 
to solidification), painted, 
ornamented, or decorated. 








bent, frosted, sanded, 
enameled, beveled, etched. 


addition. 


231 


Opal, enamel or cylinder glass 
tUes and tUlog. 


30% ad val 


R 









AUGUST • 


19, 1939 










iijy 


United States 






United States 








TaritI Act of 
1930 


Description 


Present rate of 
duty 


Sym- Tariff Act of 
bol 1930 


Description 


Present rate of 
duty 


Sym- 
bol 


Paragraph 






Paragraph 








232 Ca) 


Marble, commercially known 
as black marble, in block, 
rough or squared only. 


65^ per cubic ft. 


308,309 

312 


metals, or any alloy of 
those metals. 
Beams, girders, joists, angles. 






303 


Muck bars, pieces thereof ex- 
cept crop ends, bar iron, 






channels, car-truck chan- 
nels, tees, colunms and 












and round iron in coils or 






posts, or parts or sections 








rods, iron in slabs, blooms, 






of colun.ns and posts, and 








loops, or other forms less 






deck and bulb bean s, to- 








finished than iron in bars 






gether w:th all other struc- 








and more advanced than 






tural shapes of iron or steel: 








pig iron, except castings; 






any of the forego. ng: 








all the forego'ng: 






Not asseii.bled, manufac- 


S-Wperlb 






Valued at not above U^ 


Mtiperlb 


R 


tured or advanced beyond 








cents per pound. 






hammering, rolling, or 






304 


Steel ingots, cogsed ingots. 






casting. 








blooms and slabs, by 






Machined, drilled, punched, 


15% ad val 


R 




whatever process made. 






assembled, fitted, fabri- 








die blocks or blanks: bil- 






cated for use, or otherwise 








lets and bars, whether 






advanced beyond ham- 








solid or hollow: shafting: 






mering, roll ng, or casting. 








pressed, sheared, or 
stamped shapes, not ad- 




313 


Hoop, band, and scroll iron or 
steel, not specially pro- 














vanced in value or con- 






vided for, valued at 3 cents 








dition by any process or 






per pound or less, eight 








operation subsequent to 






inches or less in width: 








the process of stamping: 






Thinner than H and not 


25-1000 per lb 






hammer molds or swaged 






thinner than '"Slooo of 1 








steel : gun-barrel molds not 






inch. 








in bars: concrete reinforce- 






Thinner than ""Aooo and 


^■iiooi per lb 






ment bars: all descriptions 






not thinner than ^Siooo of 








and shapes of dry sand. 






1 inch. 








loam, or iron molded steel 






Thinner than 3s.i„jo of 1 


^■>iooi per lb 






castings: sheets and plates 






inch 








and steel not specially pro- 






Provided, That barrel hoops 








vided for: all the foregoing: 






of iron or steel, and hoop 








Valued at not above IH 


Hi per lb 


R 


or band iron, or hoop or 








cents per pound. 






band steel, flared, splayed. 








Valued above 1}^, and not 






or punched, with or with- 








above m cents per 






out buckles or fastenings. 








pound: 






shall pay no more duty 








Billets and bars, whether 


HipeTlb 


R 


than that imposed on the 








solid or hollow, weighing 






hoop or band iron or steel 








more than 30 pounds 






from which they are made. 








per linear foot: steel in- 
gots, cogged ingots. 




314 _ 


Hoop or band iron, and hoop 
or band steel, cut to 


Hi per lb 


R 










blooms and slabs. 






lengths, or wholly or 








All other 


IS!" per lb 

0.3,'i<perlb 


R 


partly manufactured into 
hoops or ties, coated or not 
coated with paint or any 






307 --- 


Boiler or other plate iron or 
steel, except crucible plate 


R 












steel and saw plate steel. 






other preparation, with or 








not thinner than io?1 ooo of 






without buckles or fasten- 








1 inch, cut or sheared to 






ings, fur baling cotton or 








shape or otherwise, or un- 






any other commodity. 








sheared, and skelp iron or 
steel sheared or rolled in 




315 


Wire rods: Rivet, screw, fence 
and other iron or steel 


at: per lb 


R 










grooves, valued at not 






wire rods, whether round. 








above 3 cents per pound. 






oval, or square, or in any 






308 


Sheets of iron or steel, com- 
mon or black, of whatever 






other shape, nail rods and 
flat rods up to 6 inches in 












dimensions, and skelp 






width ready to be drawn 








iron or steel, valued at 3 






or rolled into wire or strips. 








cents per pound or less: 






all of the foregoing in coils 








Thinner than >09-iooo and 


0.35(iperlb 


R 


or otherwise, valued at not 








not thinner than ^J-fooo of 






over 2).'2 cents per pound. 








1 inch. 




316(a) 


Wire strand 


35% ad val 






Thinner than ^^ooo and not 

thinner than 22^000 of 1 

inch. 
Thinner than ^aiooo and not 

thinner than 191 000 of I 

inch. 
Thinner than i9<ooo of 1 

inch. 
Corrugated or crimped 


0.45j!perlb 


" 317 


All galvanized wire not spe- 
cially provided for, not 


at per lb.. 












0.60j!perlb 


R 


larger than 29100 and not 
smaller than sioo of 1 
inch in diameter, of the 








0.70iperlb 


R 


kind commonly used for 
fencing purposes, galvan- 








O.fm per lb 


R 


ized wire fencing composed 
of wires not larger than 
29100 and not smaller than 
than M 00 of 1 inch in diam- 








All the foregoing when valued 
at more than 3 cents per 
pound. 
Provided, That all sheets or 
plates of common or black 
iron or steel not thinner 
than io?iooo of 1 inch shall 
be subject to duty as plate 
iron or plate steel. 

Sheets of iron or steel, common 


20%ad val 










20% ad val.-f 


322. 


eter; and all wire com- 
monly used lor baling hay 
or other commodities. 

Railway fishplates or splice 
bars, and tie plates, made 
of iron or steel. 

Rail braces, and all other rail- 
way bars made of iron or 
steel, and railway bars 
made in part of steel, T 
rails, and punched iron or 
steel flat rails. 


Wiper lb 

Moiperlb. 




308,309 


322 


S 








or black, of whatever di- 
mensions, valued at more 
than 3 cents per pound, 
when galvanized or coated 
with zinc, spelter, or other 


Mo0 per lb. 









140 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



United States 

Taria Act ot 

1930 

Paragraph 



Description 



Wheels for railway purposes, 
and parts thereof, of iron 
or steel, and steel-tired 
wheels for railway pur- 
poses, wholly or partly 
finished, and iron or steel 
locomotive, car, or other 
railway tires and parts 
thereof, wholly or partly 
manufactured. 
Pruvided. That when wheels 
for railway purposes, or 
parts thereof, of iron and 
steel, are imported with 
iron or steel axles fitted in 
them, the wheels and axles 
together shall be dutiable 
at the same rate as is pro- 
vided for the wheels when 
imported separately. 

Lap - welded, butt - welded, 
seamed, or jointed iron or 
steel tubes, pipes, flues, 
and stays, not thinner 
than 65/1000 of 1 inch, if 
not less than ?4 of 1 inch in 
diameter. 
Provided, That no tubes, 
pipes, flues, or stays made 
of charcoal iron shall be 
subject to a less rate of 
duty than 

Bolts, with or without threads 
or nuts, and bolt blanks, 
of iron or steel. 

Nails, spikes, tacks, brads, 
and staples, made of iron 
or steel wire, not less than 
1 inch in length nor small- 
er than 65/1000 of 1 inch in 
diameter. 

Rivets of iron or steel, not spe- 
cially provided for. 

Electrical telephone appara- 
tus, instruments (other 
than laboratory), and de- 
vices; all the foregoing, 
and parts thereof, finished 
or unfinished, wholly or in 
chief value of metal, not 
specially provided for. 

Barrels for shotguns, further 
advanced in manufacture 
thaji rough bored only. 

Stocks for shotguns, wholly or 
partly manufactured. 

Parts of shotguns, and fittings 
for shotgun stocks or bar- 
rels, finished or unfinished. 

Shotguns imported without a 
lock, or locks or other fit- 
tings. 

Shotgun barrels, in single 
tubes, forged, rough bored. 

Shotguns: 
Valued at not more than $5 

each. 
Valued at more than $5 and 

not more than $10 each. 
Valued at more than $10 and 

not more than $25 each. 
Valued at more than $2.5 and 

not more than $.50 each. 
Valued at more than $.50 each 

Brewery machines, finished or 
unfinished, not specially 
provided for, and parts 
thereof, not specially pro- 
vided for, wholly or In 
chief value of metal or por- 
celain. 

Alloys or combinations of lead 
not specially provided for. 



Zinc In sheets 

Woven wire fencing and 
woven wire retting, all 
the foregoing composed of 



Present rate of 
duty 



H per lb. 



at per lb. 



IVit per lb 
10 per lb.. 

Mo^perlb- 



H per lb... 
35% ad val- 



$2 each-f 25% ad 


MR 


val. 




$2.60 each-1-25% 


MR 


ad val. 




S7H%advaI.... 


MR 


$5 each-|-27H% 


MR 


ad val. 




5% ad val 


MR 


7H each4-22H% 


MR 


ad val. 




$2 each+22H% 


MR 


ad val. 




$3 each+22V^% 


MR 


ad val. 




$5 each-f22H% 


MR 


ad val. 




32U%advaL... 


MR 


271,2% ad val.... 


S 



2m per lb. on 
the leAd con- 
tained therein 
2 per lb. 



Sym- 
bol 



United States 

TarifT Act of 

1930 

Paragraph 



397. 



722. 
742. 



769 

775 

776.. 

904(c) 

904 (c) (d). 



905. 



907. 



910.... 

911 (b) 

921.... 
923.... 



Description 



wire smaller than 8/100 
and not smaller than 3/100 
of 1 inch in diameter: 
Coated with zinc or other 

metal before weaving. 

Coated with z.inc or other 

metal after weaving. 

Barley malt .- 

Hothouse grapes in bulk, 
crates, barrels, or other 
packages. 



Peas, prepared or preserved 
in any manner, valued at 
10 cents or more per pound. 

Carrots, not divided into 
pieces, prepared or pre- 
served, in airtight cans. 

Chicc-y, crude, including en- 
dives in their natural 

Cotton cloth, printed, dyed, 
or colored, containing 
yarns the average number 
of which does not exceed 
number 30, and if valued 
at not more than 90 cents 
per pound. 

Cotton cloth, printed, dyed, 
or colored, containing 
yarns the average number 
of which does not exceed 
number 30, if woven with 
8 or more harnesses, or 
with Jacquard, lappet, or 
swivel attachments, and 
if valued at not more than 
80 cents per pound. 

Cloth, in chief value of cotton, 
containing silk, or rayon 
or other synthetic textile, 
printed, dyed, or colored, 
if woven with 8 or more 
harnesses, or with Jac- 
quard, lappet, or swivel 
attachments, and if valued 
at not more than 90 cents 
per pound: 
Containing yarns the aver- 
age number of which does 
not exceed 30. 
Containing yarns the aver- 
age number of which ex- 
ceeds 30 but does not 
exceed 40. 

Waterproof cloth, wholly or 
in chief value of cotton or 
other vegetable fiber, 
whether or not in part of 
India rubber. 

Tapestries and other Jac- 
quard-figured upholstery 
cloths (not including pile 
fabrics or bed ticking) in 
the piece or otherwise, 
wholly or in chief value 
of cotton or other vege- 
table fiber. 

Table damask, wholly or in 
chief value of cotton, and 
all articles, finished or 
unfinished, made or cut 
from such table damask. 

Polishing cloths, dust cloths, 
and mop cloths, wholly or 
in chief value of cotton, 
not made of pile fabrics. 

Imitation oriental rugs, whol- 
ly or in chief value of 
cotton 

Manufactures, wholly or In 
chief value of cotton, not 
specially provided for. 



Present rate of 
duty 



60% ad val. 
60% ad val- 



400 per 100 lbs 

250 per cu. ft. of 
such bulk or 
the capacity 
of the pack- 
ages, accord- 
ing as im- 
ported. 

1H0 per lb. on 
entire contents 
of contauier. 

35% ad val 



U«0perlb. 



16.35% to 26.5% 
ad val. 



21.36% to 31.5% 
ad val. 



26.36% to 36.6% 
ad val. 

36.86% to 40% 
ad val. 



25% ad val. 



56% ad val. 



30% ad val. 



25% ad val.. 



20% ad val. 



40% or 30% ad 
val.' 



Sym- 
bol 



O'S 



K 
E'S 



' The reduction in the Czechoslovak agreement applied only to cloth 
valued at 750 or more per pound. 

■ The reduced rate applies only to specific Items. 



AUGUST 19, 19 39 



141 



United States 

Tariff Act of 

1930 

Paragraph 



Dascription 



Flax, not hackled 

Cordage, including cables, 
tarred or untarred. com- 
posed of 3 or more strands, 
each strand composed of 2 
or more yarns, wholly or 
in chief value of sunn, or 
other bast fiber, but not 
including cordage made of 
jute. 

Cords and twines (whether or 
not composed of three or 
more strands, each strand 
composed of two or more 
yarns), tarred or untarred, 
single or pljed, wholly or 
in chief value of manila 
(abaca), si,sal. henequen, 
or other hard fiber. 

Woven fabrics, such as are 
commonly used for pad- 
dines or inter-linings in 
clothing: 
"Wholly or in chief value of 
flax, or hemp, or of which 
these substances or either 
of them is the component 
material in chief value, 
exceeding 30 and not ex- 
ceeding 120 threads to the 
square inch, counting the 
warp and filling, and 
weighing not less than 4?^ 
and not more than 12 
ounces per square yard. 
Wholly or in chtef value of 
jute, ex,ceeding 30 threads 
to the square i,nch, count- 
ing the warp and filling, 
and wcisihinc not less than 
4V'> ounces and not more 
than 12 ounces per square 
yard. 

Woven fabrics, in the piece or 
otherwise, wholly or in 
chief value of vegetable 
fiber, except cotton, filled, 
coated, or otherwise pre- 
pared for use as artists' 
canvas. 

Woven fabrics, not including 
articles finished or unfin- 
ished, of flax, hemp, ramie, 
or other vegetable fiber, 
except cotton, or of which 
these substances or any of 
them is the component 
material of chief value, not 
specially provided for. 

Plain-woven fabrics, not in- 
cluding articles finished 
or unfinished, wholly or 
in chief value of flax, hemp, 
ramie, or other vegetable 
fiber, except cotton, weigh- 
ing less than four ounces 
per square yard. 
Fabrics, with fast edges, not 
exceeding twelve inches 
in width, and articles 
made therefrom, wholly 
or in chief value of jute. 
Carpets, carpeting, mats, mat- 
ting, and rugs, wholly or 
in chief value of jute. 
Floor coverings, not specially 

provided for. 
All manufactures, wholly or 
in chief value of flax, not 
specially provided for. 
Wool and hair wastes: 

Oarnetted waste 

Noils, carbonized 

Woven green billiard cloths, 
in the piece, weighing 
more than eleven ounces 
hut not more than fifteen 
ounces per square yard, 
wholly of wool. 



Present rate of 
■ duty ^ 



?j^ per lb._ 
Ihf^perlb. 



20%ad vaK. 



30% ad val,. 



30%ad val. 



30% ad val- 



20% ad val. 



Sym- 
bol 



United States 

Tariff Act of 

1930 

Paragraph 



MR 
R 



1405. 
1405, 
1406 



1410 (See I 
1404). 



MR 



20%, ad val. 



35% ad val 

35% ad val 

40% ad val 

40% ad val 

18^ per lb 

21(iperlb 

60fiperlb.-f40% 
ad val. 



1413 

1501 (c). 



Description 



1503- 
1503. 



Uncoated papers, including 
wrapping paper, with the 
surface or surfaces wholly 
or partly decorated or 
covered with a design, 
fancy effect, pattern, or 
character, except designs, 
fancy effects, patterns, or 
characters produced on a 
paper machine without at- 
tachments, or produced by 
Uthographic process, if em- 
bossed, or printed other- 
wise than lithographically, 
or wholly or partly covered 
with metal or its solu- 
tions, or with gelatin or 
flock. 
Vegetable parchment paper by 

whatever name known. 
Sensitized paper, to be used in 

photography. 
Transparencies, printed litho- 
graphically or otherwise: 
In not more than five print- 
ings (bronze printing to be 
counted as two printings) . 
In more than five printings 
(bronze printing to be 
counted as two printings). 
Unbound books of all kinds, 
bound books of all kinds 
except those bound 
wholly or in part in leath- 
er, sheets or printed pages 
of books hound wholly or 
in part in leather, and 
printed matter, all of the 
foregoing not specially 
provided for: 
If of bona fide foreign au- 
thorship: 
Prayer books and sheets 
or printed pages of 
prayer books. 
If of other than bona fide 
foreign authorship: 
Prayer hooks and sheets 
or printed pages of 
prayer books. 
Any of the foregoing com- 
posed in chief value of 
India paper or bible paper 
weighing less than 20^^ 
pounds to the ream. 
Ribbon fly catchers or fly rib- 
bons in chief value of 
paper. 
Asbestos shingles and articles 
in part of asbestos, if con- 
taining hydraulic cement 
or hydrauHc cement and 
other material: 
If not coated, impregnated, 
decorated, or colored, in 
any manner. 
If coated, impregnated, 
decorated, or colored, in 
any manner. 
Spangles and beads, includ- 
mg bugles, not specially 
provided for. 
Ladies' handbags and plates 
therefor, not ornamented 
with beads, spangles, or 
buglps, nor embroidered, 
tamboured, appliqued, or 
scalloped, composed 
wholly or in chief value of 
heads or spangles (other 
than imitation pearl 
beads, beads in imitation 
of precious or semiprecious 
stones, and beads in chief 
value of synthetic resin). 
Hatters' furs, or furs not on 
the skin, prepared for 
hatters' use, including fur 
skins carroted. 



Present rate of 
duty 



^H per lb. and 
20% ad val. 



2('perlb. +10% 

ad val. 
221.2% ad val... 



30% ad val.-. 
37!-^% ad val. 



7H'%ad val. 



12^2% ad val. 



Minimum duty 
provided for 
in par. 1404. 



27^2% ad val. 
H^ per lb 



Sym- 
bol 



Hi per lb- - 
9^(', perlb-, 
35% ad val. 
60% ad val. 



MR 
R 

R 
R 

R 
R 
C 
C 



27H%adval. 



142 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



United States 

Tarifl Act of 

1930 

Paragraph 



1606 (a), (b). 



1613.. 
1651.. 
1652.. 
1668.. 



1675.. 
1685.. 
16S5.. 



1523..-. 

1625.-. 

1625..., 
1626 (a) 



1628 

1529 (a). 



Description 



1537 (b) 
1551.-.. 
1651.... 



1551. 



Human hair, cleaned or com- 
mercially known as 
drawn, but not manufac- 
tured. 

Hair felt, made wholly or In 
chief value of animal hair, 
not specially provided 
for. 

Manufactures of hair felt, not 
specially provided for. 

Hats, for men's or boy's wear, 
trimmed or untrimmed, 
including bodies for hats, 
composed wholly or in 
chief value of fur of the 
rabbit, beaver, or other 
anjmals. 

Diamonds, cut but not set, 
and sui table for use in the 
manufacture of jewelry. 

Laces, lace fabrics, and lace 
articles, if exceeding two 
inches in width, and made 
wholly by hand without 
the use of any machine- 
made material or article 
provided for in para^aph 
1.529 (a); articles made 
wholly of any of the fore- 
going; and articles, not 
wearing apparel, in part 
of any of the foregoing and 
containing no machine- 
made material or article 
provided for in paragraph 
l.')29 (a); all the foregoing, 
finished or unfinished, 
however described and 
provided for in paragraph 
1529 (a): 
■Valued at more than $50 and 
less than $1S0 per pound. 
Valued at $150 or more per 
pound. 

Bicycle tires composed wholly 
or in chief value of rubber. 

Photographic dry plates, not 
specially provided for. 

Photographic films, sensitized 
but not e.xposed or devel- 
oped, of every kind except 
motion-picture films hav- 
ing a width of one inch or 
more. 

Motion-picture films, sensi- 
tized but not exposed or 
developed, having a width 
of one inch or more. 



Agricultural Implements, not 
specially provirled for: 
Steel wire bale ties used in 
baling hay or other agri- 
cultural conmioditles. 

Horses imported by a citizen 
of the United States spe- 
cially for breeding pur- 
poses. 

Sulphide of arsenic 

Dead or creosote oil 

Cobalt and cobalt ore 

Glaziers' and engravers' dia- 
monds, not set, miners' 
diamonds, and diamond 
dust. 

Ferrous sulphate or copperas.. 

Basic slag 

Preci|)itated hone of a grade 
used chieHy for fertilizers, 
or chiefly as an ingredient 
in the manufacture Qf fer- 
tilizers. 



Present rate of 
duty 



207o ad val. 



20% ad val- 



20% ad val 

$1.25-1-25% ad 
val. to $16-1- 
15% ad val. 



10% ad val. 



60% ad val 

45% ad val 

10% ad val 

15% ad val 

12M%ad val.. 



Moi per linear 
ft. ofthe stand- 
ard width of 
1^4 in., and all 
other widths 
of 1 in. or more 
shall be sub- 
ject to duty in 
equal propor- 
tion thereto. 

Free 



Free.. 



Free 
Free.. 
Free.. 
Free.. 



Free.. 
Free.. 
Free . 



Sym- 
bol 



R 

SR'' 



R 

MR 



R 

MR 



MR 



United States 

Tariff Act of 

1930 

Paragraph 


Description 


Present rate of 
duty 


Sym- 
bol 


1685 


Ammonium phosphates, used 
chiefly for fertilizer. 

Ammoniated superphosphates, 
used chiefly for fertilizer. 


Free 




1685 


Free 




16?6 


Free 


B 


1689 




Free 


B 


1732 . . 


Expressed or extracted palm 
oil. 

Medicinal oil obtained from 
petroleiun. 

Radium, and salts of 


Free (subject to 
processing tax 
of 3i per lb. 
upon first do- 
mestic process- 
ing under sec. 
2470, Int. Kev. 
Code; see be- 
low). 

Free (subject to 
import tax of 
J'i* per gal. un- 
der sec. 3422, 
Int. Rev. 
Code; see be- 
low). 

Free 


B 


1733 .... 




1749 


B 


1792 


Uranium, oxide and salts of. . . 
All barbed wire, whether plain 
or galvanized. 


Free 




1800 


Free- 










Internal Rev- 
enue Code 
Section 


Description 


Present rate of 
tax 


Sym- 
bol 


2470 


Expressed or extracted palm 
oil. 

Stearic acid, valued at not 
more than 8 cents per 
pound. 

Medicinal oil obtained from 
petroleum. 


30 per lb. upon 
first domestic 
processing. 

3i per lb 

Kfipergal. 


B 


2491 (c). 

3422--- 









International Conferences, 
Commissions, etc. 



' Reduction gjven 1 n the trade agreement with the United Kingdom 
effective January 1, 1639, applies only to hats valued at more than $48 
per dozen. 



SIXTH INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS 
OF BYZANTINE STUDIES 

[Released to the press August 14] 

This Government has accepted an invitation, 
transmitted by the French Minister for For- 
eign Affairs on behalf of the organizers of the 
Sixth International Congress of Byzantine 
Studies, to participate in the Congress which 
will be held in Algiers, Algeria, from October 
2 to 7, 1939. The President has approved the 



AUGUSX 19, 1939 



143 



appointment of the following persons as dele- 
gates on the part of the United States : 

Mr. Thomas Whittemore, director, Byzantine 
Institute, Boston, Mass., chairman 

Dr. Kirsopp Lake, professor emeritus. Har- 
vard University 
Mr. Eoyall Tyler, Paris, France. 

Mr. Whittemore represented the United 
States at the Fifth International Congress of 
Byzantine Studies, which was held at Eome, 
Italy, in 1936. At that meeting a series of 
papers on Byzantine art were read by various 
members of the Congress, and the American 
delegate delivered a lecture on the mosaics of 
Aya Sofya. 



Foreign Service 



thereof, Mr. Melbourne has been assigned as 
vice consul at Kobe, Japan. 

Paul J. Eeveley, of East Haven, Conn., vice 
consul at Palermo, Italy, has been assigned as 
vice consul at London, England. 

The assignment of Walter Smith, of Oak 
Park, 111., now vice consul at Canton, China, 
as vice consul at Kobe, Japan, has been can- 
celed. He will remain at Canton, China. 

Mr. James J. Murphy, Jr., of Pennsylvania, 
Chief of the Consular Commercial Office of the 
Department of State, has been appointed For- 
eign Service officer of class III, consul, and 
secretary in the Diplomatic Service of the 
United States, effective August 7, 1939, and 
has been assigned for duty in the Department 
of State, where he will continue to serve in his 
present capacity. 

Jones E. Trowbridge, of Augusta, Ga., vice 
consul at Paris, France, has been appointed 
vice consul at Moscow, Union of Soviet Social- 
ist Eepublics. 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press August 19] 

Changes in the Foreign Service of the United 
States since August 5, 1939: 

The assignment of Eoy M. Melbourne, of 
Ocean View, Va., vice consul now assigned to 
the Department of State, as vice consul at 
Tientsin, China, has been canceled. In lieu 



Publications 



Department of State 

Diplomatic List, August 1939. Publication 1360. ii, 
80 pp. Subscription, $1 a year; single copy 100. 

Index to Press Releases, Vol. XX, Nos. 484-508, Jan- 
uary 7- June 24, 1939. Publication 1361. 11 pp. 50. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled by the Treaty Division 



CONSULTATION 
Convention for the Maintenance, Preserva- 
tion, and Reestablishment of Peace 
(Treaty Series No. 922) 

Costa Rica 

The American Ambassador to Argentina 
transmitted to the Secretary of State with a 
despatch dated August 3, 1939, a copy and 
translation of a note dated July 31, 1939, from 
the Argentine Ministry for Foreign Affairs 
stating that the instrument of ratification by 
Costa Rica of the Convention for the Mainte- 
nance, Preservation, and Reestablishment of 
Peace, signed at Buenos Aires on December 23, 
1936, was deposited with the Argentine Gov- 
ernment on July 21, 1939. 

The countries which are parties to this con- 
vention are as follows: United States of Amer- 
ica, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, 
Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, 
Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Nicai-agua, Panama, 
Paraguay, and Venezuela. 



INTERNATIONAL LAW 

Conference of Jurisconsults 

The Conference of Jurisconsults, which met 
in Montevideo on July 18, 1939, to commemo- 
rate the fiftieth anniversary of the South 
American Congress of Private International 
I.,aw held in 1889, was participated in by rep- 
resentatives from Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, 
Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay, tlie countries 
which, with Brazil, participated in the original 
conference of 1889. The purpose of the Con- 
ference was to revise the conventions signed in 
144 



1889 to meet the new phases which have been 
brought about by the present changed condi- 
tions of international relations. 

On August. 4, 1939, the Conference con- 
cluded its meetings with the signing of three 
treaties, a Treaty on Asylum and Political 
Refugees, a Treaty on Intellectual Property 
(Copyright), and a Treaty on the Exercise of 
Liberal Professions. A resolution was passed 
declaring an adjournment of the Conference 
for 6 months, the delegations to meet again on 
February 5, 1940. The adjournment was to 
enable the delegates to study various questions 
connected with the proposed amendments to 
the treaties embracing civil law, penal law, 
processal law, commercial law, and commercial 
navigation, upon which no definite conclusions 
were reached. It was announced that other 
countries of the continent not represented at 
the Conference would be invited to participate 
in the deliberations upon the resumption of 
sessions in February. 

The representatives of all the six countries 
signed the Treaty on Asylum and the Treaty 
on the Exercise of Liberal Professions. The 
Treaty on Intellectual Property was signed by 
all the countries with the exception of Chile, 
^^ hich refrained from signing. The text of this 
treaty is printed on p. 151. 

The list of the eight treaties signed at the 
South American Congress of Private Interna- 
tional Law in 1889, showing the countries which 
signed and ratified them, is printed below : 

Treaty of Processal Lain 
Signed by Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, 

Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay. 

Ratified by Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay, 

Peru, and Uruguay. 



AUGUST 19, 1939 



145 



Treaty on Literary and Artistic Property 
Signed by Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, 

Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay. 

Ratified by Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay, 

Peru, and Uruguay. 

Treaty on Patents of Invention 
Signed by Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, 

Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay. 

Ratified by Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay, 

Peru, and Uruguay. 

Treaty on Trade and Factory Marhs 
Signed by Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, 

Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay. 

Ratified by Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay, 

Peru, and Uruguay. 

Treaty on. International Penal Laio 
Signed by Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay, 

Peru, and Uruguay. 

Ratified by Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay, 

Peru, and Uruguay. 

Convention on the Exercise of Liberal 
Professions 
Signed by Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay, 
Peru, and Uruguay. 

Ratified by Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay, 
Peru, and Uruguay. Colombia adhered. 

Treaty of International Civil La/w 
Signed by Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay, 

Peru, and Uruguay. 

Ratified by Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay, 

Peru, and Uruguay. 

Treaty of Intemationdl Commercial Law 
Signed by Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, 

Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay. 

Ratified by Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay, 

Peru, and Uruguay. 

NONINTERVENTION 

Additional Protocol Relative to Noninter- 
vention (Treaty Series No. 923) 

Costa Rica, 

The American Ambassador to Argentina 
transmitted to the Secretary of State with a 



despatch dated August 3, 1939, a copy and 
translation of a note dated July 31, 1939, from 
the Argentine Ministry for Foreign Affairs, 
stating that on July 21, 1939, the instrument 
of ratification by Costa Rica of the Additional 
Protocol Relative to Nonintervention, signed 
at Buenos Aires on December 23, 1936, was 
deposited with the Argentine Government. 

The countries which are parties to the addi- 
tional protocol are as follows: United States 
of America, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, 
Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, 
Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, 
and Venezuela. 

ORGANIZATION 

Protocol for the Amendment of the Pream- 
ble, of Articles 1, 4, and 5, and of the 
Annex to the Covenant of the League of 
Nations 

Union of South Africa 

According to a circular letter from the 
League of Nations dated August 4, 1939, the 
instrument of ratification by the Government 
of the Union of South Africa of the Protocol 
for the Amendment of the Preamble, of Arti- 
cles 1, 4, and 5, and of the Annex to the Cove- 
nant of the League of Nations, which was 
opened for signature at Geneva on September 
30, 1938, was deposited with the Secretariat on 
July 25, 1939. 

Sweden 

According to a circular letter from the 
League of Nations dated July 17, 1939, the in- 
strument of ratification by Sweden of the Pro- 
tocol for the Amendment of the Preamble, of 
Articles 1, 4, and 5, and of the Annex to the 
Covenant of the League of Nations, opened for 
signature on September 30, 1938, was deposited 
with the Secretariat on July 7, 1939. 

According to information received fi-om the 
League of Nations the protocol has been rati- 
fied by the following countries : China, Estonia, 
Finland, Great Britain, India, Latvia, Mexico, 
New Zealand, Norway, Rumania, and Sweden. 
Denmark has signed the protocol but has not 
yet deposited its instrument of ratification. 



146 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



RADIO BROADCASTING 

Convention Concerning the Use of Broad- 
casting in the Cause of Peace 

British dependencies — Neio Hebrides 

According to a circular letter from the 
League of Nations dated August 1, 1939, a 
notification was received by the Secretariat on 
July 14, 1939, from the British Government 
stating that it desires that the Convention 
Concerning the Use of Broadcasting in the 
Cause of Peace, signed September 23, 1936, 
shall apply to the following British colonies, 
protectorates and protected states and man- 
dated territories, and to the New Hebrides 
which are subject to the Franco-British con- 
dominium : Aden Colony, Bahamas, Barbados, 
Basutoland, Bechuanaland Protectorate, Ber- 
muda, British Guiana, British Honduras, 
British Solomon Islands Pi'otectorate, Ceylon, 
Cyprus, Falkland Islands and dependencies, 
Fiji, Gambia (Colony and Protectorate), Gi- 
braltar, Gilbert and Ellice Islands Colony, 
Gold Coast (Colony, Ashanti, Northern Terri- 
tories, Togoland under British mandate), 
Hong Kong, Jamaica (including Turks and 
Caicos Islands and the Cayman Islands) , Kenya 
(Colony and Protectorate), Leeward Islands 
(Antigua, Dominica, Montserrat, St. Chris- 
topher and Nevis, Virgin Islands), Federated 
Malay States (Negri Sembilan, Pahang, 
Perak, Selangor), Unfederated Malay States 
(Johore, Kedah, Kelantan, Perils, Trengganu, 
and Brunei), Malta, Mauritius, Nigeria (Col- 
ony, Protectorate, Cameroons imder British 
mandate), State of North Borneo, Northern 
Rhodesia, Nyasaland Protectorate, Palestine 
(excluding Trans-Jordan), St. Helena and 
Ascension, Sarawak, Seychelles, Sierra Leone 
(Colony and Protectorate), Somaliland Pro- 
tectorate, Straits Settlements, Swaziland, 
Tanganyika Territory, Tonga, Trans-Jordan, 
Trinidad and Tobago, Uganda Protectorate, 
Windward Islands (Grenada, St. Lucia, St, 
Vincent), Zanzibar Protectorate, New Heb- 
rides (the New Hebrides are included by 
covenant of Groat Biitain and France who 
hold a condominium there). 



According to the information of the Depart- 
ment the following countries have ratified or 
adhered to the convention: Australia; Brazil; 
Burma; Denmark; Egypt; El Salvador; Es- 
tonia; Finland; France, including colonies; 
Great Britain and certain dependencies; Ire- 
land; Latvia; Luxemburg; Netherlands; New 
Hebrides; New Zealand; Norway; Southern 
Rhodesia ; Sweden ; Switzerland ; and Union 
of South Africa, including South-West Africa. 



OPIUM AND OTHER DANGEROUS 
DRUGS 

Convention for the Suppression of the Illicit 
Traffic in Dangerous Drugs 

Turkey 

According to a circular letter from the 
League of Nations dated August 4, 1939, the 
instrument of adherence by Turkey to the Con- 
vention for the Suppression of the Illicit Traf- 
fic in Dangerous Drugs, and Protocol of 
Signature, signed at Geneva on June 26, 1936, 
was deposited with the Secretariat on July 28, 
1939. 

According to the information of the Depart- 
ment the countries which have ratified or ad- 
hered to the convention are as follows : Belgium, 
Brazil, Canada, China, Greece, Guatemala, 
Haiti, India, Rumania, and Turkey. 

The above-mentioned circular letter adds that 
the convention will enter into force in accord- 
ance with the provisions of its article 22 on 
October 26, 1939, the ninetieth day after the 
receipt of the instrument of adherence of 
Turkey. 

EDUCATION 

Proces-Verbal Concerning the Application 
of Articles IV, V, VI, VII, IX, XII, and 
XIII of the Convention of October 11, 
1933, for Facilitating the International 
Circulation of Films of an Educational 
Character 

Brazil 

According to a circular letter from the 
League of Nations dated July 25, 1939, the 



AUGUST 19, 1939 



147 



Proces-Verbal Concerning the Application of 
Articles lY, V, VI, VII, IX, XII, and XIII 
of the Convention of October 11, 1933, for 
Facilitating the International Circulation of 
Films of an Educational Character, which was 
opened for signature at Geneva on September 
12, 1938, was signed on behalf of Brazil on 
July 19, 1939. 

EXTRADITION 

Supplementary Extradition Convention 
With Mexico 

A supplementary extradition convention be- 
tween the United States and Mexico was signed 
at Mexico City on August 16, 1939. This sup- 
plementary convention makes as an extra- 
ditable offense participation as an accessory 
before or after the fact in any of the crimes 
enumerated in the extradition treaty of Febru- 
ary 22, 1899, between the two countries (Treaty 
Series No. 242), and the supplementary extra- 
dition conventions between them of June 25, 
1902 (Treaty Series No. 421), and December 
23, 1925 (Treaty Series No. 741). 

The treaty of 1899 contains a list of 21 crimes 
or offenses for which extradition is usually 
stipulated in the treaties entered into by the 
United States. One crime was added by the 
supplementary convention of 1902, and three 
other crimes or offenses were added by the 
supplementary convention of 1925. 

Extradition Treaty With Great Britain 
(Treaty Series No. 849) 

There are printed below the texts of notes 
exchanged between this Government and the 
British Government regarding the extension of 
the Extradition Treaty between the two coun- 
tries signed on December 22, 1931, to the Fed- 
erated Malay States of Negri Sembilan, Pa- 
hang, Perak, and Selangor; the Unfederated 
Malay States of Johore, Kedah, Kelantan, Per- 
ils, and Trengganu; Brunei; and the State of 
North Borneo: 



Note from the British Ambassador to the 
Secretary of State: 

British Embassy, 



No. 295 



Washington, D. C, July 31st, 1939. 



Sir, 

In accordance with instructions from His 
Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for For- 
eign Affairs, I have the honour to inform you 
that His Majesty The King of Great Britain, 
Ireland, and the British Dominions beyond the 
seas. Emperor of India, desires that the provi- 
sions of the Extradition Treaty signed in Lon- 
don on the 22nd December, 1931, should be ex- 
tended, in accordance with Article 17 thereof, 
to the under-mentioned territories :• — 

The Federated Malay States of Negri Sem- 
bilan, Pahang, Perak and Selangor; 

The Unfederated Malay States of Johore, Ke- 
dah, Kelantan, Perlis and Trengganu; 

Brunei ; 

The State of North Borneo. 

By the provisions of Article 17 of the said 
treaty the stipulations of Articles 14 and 15 
are to be deemed to apply to these territories 
from the date and in the manner prescribed in 
the notes to be exchanged for the purpose of 
effecting the proposed extension. I have there- 
fore the honour to propose that the stipulations 
of Articles 14 and 15 be regarded as having 
been applied, mutatis mutandis, to the above- 
mentioned territories as from the date of the 
present note. 

If the United States Government agree to 
this proposal I would suggest that the present 
note and your reply to that effect be regarded 
as constituting a formal agreement regarding 
this matter. 

I have [etc.] R. C. Lindsay 



Note from the Secretary of State to the British 
Ambassador: 

July 31, 1939. 
Excellency : 
I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt 



148 



DEPABTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



of your note of July 31, 1939, which is word for 
word as follows: 

"In accordance with instructions from His 
Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for For- 
eign Affairs I have the honour to inform you 
that His IMajesty the King of Great Britain, 
Ireland, and the British Dominions beyond the 
seas. Emperor of India, desires that the provi- 
sions of the Extradition Treaty signed in Lon- 
don on the 22nd December, 1931, should be 
extended, in accordance with Article 17 thereof, 
to the under-mentioned territories : — 

"The Federated Malay States of Negri Sem- 
bilan. Pahang, Perak and Selangor; 

"The Un federated Malay States of Johore, 
Kedah, Kelantan, Perlis and Trengganu; 

"Brunei ; 

"The State of North Borneo. 

"2. By the provisions of Article 17 of the 
said treaty the stipulations of Articles 14 and 
15 are to be deemed to apply to these territories 
from the date and in the manner prescribed in 
the notes to be exchanged for the purpose of 
effecting the proposed extension. I have there- 
fore the honour to propose that the stipula- 
tions of Articles 14 and 15 be regarded as hav- 
ing been applied, mutatis mutandis to the 
above-mentioned territories as from the date of 
the present note. 

"3. If the United States Government agree 
to this proposal I would suggest that the pres- 
ent note and your reply to that effect be re- 
garded as constituting a formal agreement re- 
garding this matter." 

In reply I have the honor to inform you that 
the Government of the United States of Amer- 
ica agrees to the above quoted proposal that 
the provisions of the Extradition treaty be- 
t-ween the United States of America and His 
Majesty, signed at London on Decemter 22, 
1931, shall, as from July 31, 1939, the date of 
your note, be regarded as having been applied 
to the Federated Malay States of Negri Sem- 
bilan, Pahang, Perak and Selangor; the Un- 
federated Malay States of Johore, Kedah, 
Kelantan, Perlis and Trengganu; Brunei* 
and the State of North Borneo, and regards 



your note and this note of acknowledgment as 

constituting a foimal agreement to that effect. 

Accept [etc.] Coedell Hull 

AGRICULTURE 

Convention With Great Britain for the Pro- 
tection of Migratory Birds (Treaty Series 
No. 628) and Convention With Mexico for 
the Protection of Migratory Birds and 
Game Mammals (Treaty Series No. 912) 

The President of the United States, by proc- 
lamation dated August 11, 1939 (No. 2345), has 
approved regulations "permitting and govern- 
ing (1) the hunting, taking, capture, killing, 
possession, sale, purchase, shipment, transpor- 
tation, carriage, exportation, and importation 
of migratory birds and parts, nests, and eggs 
thereof, included in the terms of the Conven- 
tion between the United States and Great Brit- 
ain for the protection of migratory birds 
concluded August 16, 1916, and the Conven- 
tion between the United States and the United 
Mexican States for the protection of migratory 
birds and game mammals concluded February 
7, 1936, and (2) the exportation and importa- 
tion to and from Mexico of game mammals, 
parts and products thereof, included in the 
aforesaid Convention between the United 
States and the United Mexican States." 

The proclamation is printed in the Federal 
Register, Volume 4, No. 157, August 16, 1939, 
pages 3621-3627. 

AVIATION 

Arrangement With Canada Relating to Air 
Transport Services 

As a result of the United States-Canada 
Civil Aviation Conference which was held at 
Ottawa from August 9 to 11, 1939, the follow- 
ing arraiigement, which became effective on 
August 18, 1939, was entered into between the 
Governments of the United States and Canada. 
Tlie arrangement was brought into effect by 
notes exchanged on August 18, 1939, between 
the Department of External Affairs at Canada 
and the American Legation at Ottawa. 



AUGUST 19, 19 39 



149 



Arrangement Between the United States of 
America and Canada Relating to Air 
Transport Services 

Article 1 

Having in mind the desirability of mutually 
stimulating and promoting the sound economic 
development of air transportation between the 
United States and Canada, the Parties to this 
Arrangement agree that the establishment and 
development of air transport services between 
their respective territories by air carrier enter- 
prises holding proper authorizations from 
their respective governments, shall be governed 
by the following provisions: 

Article 2 

The present Arrangement shall apply to con- 
tinental United States of America, including 
Alaska, and to Canada, including their terri- 
torial waters. 

The privileges accorded by this Arrangement 
shall be available only to air carrier enterprises 
hona -fide owned and controlled by nationals of 
the respective Parties. 

Article 3 

Each of the Parties agrees, subject to compli- 
ance with its laws and regulations, to grant to 
air carrier enterprises of the other Party per- 
mits for non-stop services through the air space 
over its territory between two points within the 
territory of the other Party ; provided however 
that inland non-stop services between the 
United States and Alaska shall be the subject 
of a separate understanding. 

Each party further agrees, subject to compli- 
ance with its laws and regulations, and on a 
basis of reciprocity to grant operating rights to 
the air carrier enterprises of the other Party 
for the operation of international services be- 
tween a place in the territory of one Party and 
a place in the territory of the other Party. 

The details of the application of the prin- 
ciple of reciprocity contained herein shall be 
the subject of amicable adjustment between the 
competent aeronautical authorities of the 
parties to this arrangement. 



Article 4 

Any air carrier enterprise of either Party 
applying for permission to operate in territory 
of the other Party shall be required to transmit 
its application through diplomatic channels in 
accordance with Article 3 (c) of the air navi-; 
gation arrangement effected by an exchange of 
notes between the two Parties, signed on July 
28, 1938.^ 

The air carrier enterprises of each Party will 
be required to qualify before the competent 
aeronautical authorities of the other Party un- 
der the latter's applicable laws and regulations 
before being permitted to engage in the opera- 
tions contemplated by this Arrangement, and 
upon so qualifying will be issued permits or 
licenses by such authorities accordingly. 

Article 5 

The terms of the permits referred to in Ar- 
ticle 4, the airports to be used by the respective 
services, the routes or airways to be flown 
within the respective territories of the Parties 
between the designated airports, and other ap- 
propriate details of the conduct of the air 
transport services contemplated by this Ar- 
rangement shall be determined by the compe- 
tent aeronautical authorities of the Parties. 
Any permit issued by the competent aeronau- 
tical authorities for the air transport services 
contemjilated hereunder shall be valid only so 
long as the holder thereof shall be authorized 
by its own Government to engage in the service 
envisaged by such permit. The holding of 
such permit shall be subject to compliance by 
the holder with all applicable laws of the issu- 
ing Government and with all valid rules, regu- 
lations and orders issued thereunder. Such 
permit may not be revoked for any cause other 
than non-compliance with such laws, rules, 
regulations or orders or for such reasons as the 
public interest may require. 

Article € 

Each of the Parties hereto agrees not to im- 
pose, and to use its best efforts to prevent the 



' Executive Agreement Series No. 129. 



150 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtTLLETIN 



imposition of, any restrictions or limitations 
as to airports, airways or connections with 
other transportation services, and facilities in 
general to be utilized within its territory which 
might be competitively or otherwise disad- 
vantageous to the air carrier enterprises of the 
other Party. 

Article 7 

The aircraft operated by United States air 
carrier enterprises shall conform at all times 
with the airworthiness requirements prescribed 
by the competent aeronautical authorities of 
the United States for aircraft employed in air 
transportation of the character contemplated 
by this Arrangement. 

The aircraft operated by Canadian air car- 
rier enterprises shall conform at all times with 
the airworthiness requirements prescribed by 
the competent aeronautical authorities of Can- 
ada for aircraft employed in air transporta- 
tion of the character contemplated by this 
Arrangement. 

The competent aeronautical authorities of 
the Parties hereto may communicate with a 
view to bringing about unifonnity of safety 
standards for the operations contemplated by 
this Arrangement and compliance therewith, 
and whenever the need therefor appears, the 
Parties may enter into an agreement prescrib- 
ing such uniform safety standards. 

Article 8 

The matter of the transportation of mail 
shall be subject to agreement between the com- 
petent authorities of both Parties. 

Article 9 

The operations contemplated hereunder 
shall be conducted subject to the applicable 
terms of the air navigation arrangement ef- 
fected by an exchange of notes between the two 
Parties signed on July 28, 1938. 

Article 10 

This arrangement shall remain in force for a 
period of two years and thereafter until termi- 



nated on six months notice given by either 
Government to the other Government. 

Convention for the Unification of Certain 
Rules Relating to the Precautionary At- 
tachment of Aircraft 

Guatemala 

By a note dated August 1, 1939, the Italian 
Ambassador at Washington informed the Sec- 
retary of State that the instrument of ratifica- 
tion by Guatemala of the Convention for the 
Unification of Certain Rules Relating to the 
Precautionary Attachment of Aircraft, signed 
at Rome on May 29, 1933, has been deposited 
with the Italian Govermnent. The note adds 
that m accordance with article 11, paragraph 
2, of the convention the ratification will become 
effective on October 4, 1939, the ninetieth day 
from the date when the instrument of ratifica- 
tion was deposited. 

Convention for the Unification of Certain 
Rules Relating to Damages Caused by 
Aircraft to Third Parties on the Surface 

GuateTnala 

The Italian Ambassador at Washington in- 
formed the Secretary of State by a note dated 
August 1, 1939, that the instrument of ratifica- 
tion by Guatemala of the Convention for the 
Unification of Certain Rules Relating to Dam- 
ages Caused by Aircraft to Third Parties on 
the Surface, signed at Rome on May 29, 1933, 
has been deposited with the Italian Govern- 
ment. The note adds that in accordance with 
the provisions of article 24, paragraph 2, of the 
convention the ratification will become effective 
on the ninetieth day from the date of the de- 
posit of the instrument of ratification, namely, 
on October 4, 1939. 

According to the information of the Depart- 
ment the convention has been ratified by Bel- 
gium, Guatemala, Rumania, and Spain, 
including the Spanish Zone of Morocco. 

COMMERCE 
Trade Agreement With Belgium 

The notice of the intention to negotiate a new 
trade agreement with Belgium, which will ap- 



AUGUST 19, 19 39 



151 



ply to the Belgo-Luxemburg Economic Union 
and to the Belgian Congo, appears in this 
Bulletin in the section "Commercial Policy." 

COPYRIGHT 

Treaty on Intellectual Property 

There is printed below a translation of the 
text of the Treaty on Intellectual Property, 
which was signed at the Conference of Juris- 
consults at Montevideo on August 4, 1939, by 
the following countries: Argentina, Bolivia, 
Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay: 

Treaty on Intellectual Property 

Article 1. The signatory states agree to rec- 
ognize and insure (asegurar) the rights of in- 
tellectual property and their exercise in 
accordance with the stipulations of the present 
treaty. 

Article 2. There are hereby declared to be 
included in such stipulations the authors of 
any productions which may be classed as an 
intellectual creation and which may be sus- 
ceptible of publication or reproduction by any 
procedure whatever; and in particular, the 
authors of books, pamphlets, and literary com- 
positions of any nature, distribution, and 
scope; lectures, school or university lessons, 
speeches, addresses, sermons, and oratoiical 
works in general; musical compositions, with 
or without words, dramatic, dramatico-musical, 
choreographic, pantomimic, and merely spec- 
tacular works, provided it be possible to iden- 
tify them by written or graphic description; 
original works intended for projection by 
\ means of cinematography, and their corre- 
sponding musical accompaniments; engineer- 
ing works, drawings, paintings, sculpture, ar- 
chitectonic compositions, engravings, lithogra- 
phy, photography, and similar arts; graphic 
and plastic illustrations made for scientific, 
technical, and artistic purposes; cartographic, 
diagrammatic, and statistical works. 

Article 3. The authors' rights referred to in 
the foregoing article include the rights to dis- 
pose of their works, to publish them, to trans- 
fer them (enajenarlas), to translate, adapt. 



and authorize their translation and adaptation, 
as well as their orchestration, execution, repro- 
duction, and diffusion by means of cinematog- 
raphy, photography, telephotography, radio 
broadcasting, or any other technical medium. 

Article 4- Translations, adaptations, musical 
arrangements, and all other transformed repro- 
duction of literary and artistic works, as well 
as motion-picture versions of the same, includ- 
ing digests of various works, shall be consid- 
ered, for the purposes of this treaty as original 
productions, without prejudice to the rights 
which, in each case, the authors of the original 
works might pass on to their legitimate suc- 
cessors. 

Article 5. The persons who edit, translate, 
adapt, arrange, reproduce, or broadcast by any 
process works concerning which there do not 
exist or have expired the rights guaranteed 
by the present treaty, shall enjoy for their 
works the rights declared in article 3. But 
they cannot prevent the execution of new issues, 
translations, adaptations, arrangements, repro-' 
ductions, or broadcasts of the work. 

Article 6. The authors whose works enjoy 
protection in accordance with existing legisla- 
tion in any of the states adhering to this treaty, 
with the exception of rights the origin of 
which is derived from treaties between that 
state and other nonadhering states, shall enjoy 
in all the others the same rights and guar- 
anties which the respective laws grant them, 
the necessary coordination to be established 
among the legal organisms of the adhering 
states to enable them to furnish each other di- 
rectly the information and data relative to the 
said works, at the expense of the interested 
parties. 

The entities legally created for the protec- 
tion of authors' rights, and provided they are 
sufficiently empowered by the interested par- 
ties, shall be qualified to exercise in the other 
states the respective action, being subject, in 
such exercise, to the laws of the country of the 
particular case. 

Article 7. No state shall be required to rec- 
ognize the right of literary or artistic prop- 
erty for a greater period than that which 



152 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



governs for the authors who obtain such right 
in that state. This period may be limited to 
that indicated in the country of origin, if a 
lesser period. 

A/'tlcIe 8. Articles from periodicals may be 
reproduced with a mention of tlieir origin. 

Article 9. There may be published in the 
press (prensa periodica), without the necessity 
of any authorization whatever, the speeches de- 
livered or read in deliberative assemblies, before 
courts of justice, or in public meetings. 

Article JO. There shall be considered as 
illegal reproductions, indirect and unauthorized 
appropriations of a literary or artistic work, 
and which are designated by various names, 
without displaying the nature of an original 
work. 

Article 11. The rights of authorship shall be 
recognized, unless proof is shown to the con- 
trary, in favor of the persons whose names or 
pseudonyms are indicated in the literary or 
artistic work. 

Should the authors desire to withhold their 
names, the publishei's must state that the au- 
thor's rights belong to them. 

Article 12. The responsibilities incurred by 
those who usurp the rights protected under this 
treaty shall be determined by the courts and 
the legislation of the state in which the illegal 
act shall have been committed or in whose terri- 
tory the effects of such act shall have been 
produced in the event that the act shall have 
been consummated in a nonadliering state. 

Article 13. Any illegal reproduction of a 
work whose author has a right to legal pro- 
tection may be seized by the competent authori- 
ties of any of the adhering states. 

Article H. The recognition of the right of 
ownership of literary or artistic works does 
not deprive the signatory states of the right to 
prohibit, in compliance with their laws, the re- 
production, publication, circulation, presenta- 
tion, or exposition of works considered contrary 
to public morals or propriety. 

Arti-cle IS. Independently of the property 
rights protected by this treaty, the authors re- 
tain the right to claim the authorship (pater- 
nidad) of the work, as well as to oppose any 



change, mutilation, or other modification of 
such work which they may consider prejudicial 
to their honor or reputation. 

Tliis right may be exercised by the legitimate 
successors of the author, in accordance with 
the internal legislation of each adhering state. 

Article 16. For the effectiveness of this 
treaty the simultaneous ratification by all sig- 
natory nations is not indispensable. Any one 
which approves it shall so communicate to the 
Governments of the Argentine Republic and 
the Oriental Republic of Uruguay, in order that 
they may notify the other conti'acting nations. 
This i^rocedure will take the place of an ex- 
change [of ratifications]. 

Article 17. The exchange having been ex- 
ecuted in the manner indicated in the fore- 
going article, this treaty shall remain in effect 
from that moment for an indefinite period, the 
treaty signed in Montevideo on February 11, 
1889, being, therefore, without effect. 

Article 18. Should any of the signatory na- 
tions deem it advisable to withdraw from the 
treaty or to make changes in it, it shall inform 
the other countries ; but it shall not be released 
from its obligations until 2 years after the 
denouncement so made, during which period 
efforts shall be made to reach a new agreement. 

Article 19. Article 16 extends to the nations 
which, not having been represented in this con- 
gress, may desire to adhere to the present 
treaty. 

In faith whereof, the plenipotentiaries of the 
nations referred to sign the present treaty in 
Montevideo, this 4th day of August of the year 
one thousand nine hundred and thirty-nine. 

FINANCE 

Internalional Convention for the Suppres- 
sion of Counterfeiting Currency 

Latvia 

According to a circular letter from the 
League of Nations dated August 4, 1939, the 
instrument of adherence by Latvia to the Con- 
vention for the Suppression of Counterfeiting 
Currency, the Protocol and Optional Protocol, 



AUGUST 19, 193 9 

signed at Geneva, April 20, 1929, was deposited 
with the Secretariat on July 22, 1939. 

According to information furnished by the 
League of Nations the following countries arei 
parties to the convention and the protocol: 
Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Colombia, Cuba, 
Czechoslovakia, Danzig, Denmark, Ecuador, 
Estonia, Finland, Germany, Greece, Hungary, 
Ireland. Italy, Latvia, Mexico, ISIonaco, the 
Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, 
Rumania, Spain, Turkey, Union of Soviet 
Socialist Eepublics, and Yugoslavia. 

The countries parties to the optional proto- 
col are : Brazil, Bulgaria, Colombia, Cuba, 



153 

Czechoslovakia, Estonia, Finland, Greece, Lat- 
via, Poland, Portugal, Rumania, Spain, and 
Yugoslavia. 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

Regional Radio Convention of Central 
America, Panama, and the Canal Zone 

United States 

On August 11, 1939, the President ratified 
the Regional Radio Convention of Central 
America, Panama, and the Canal Zone, which 
was signed at the city of Guatemala on Decem- 
ber 8, 1938. 



U.SGOVEnNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 1939 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents ----- Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WITH THE APPROVAL OP THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OP THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT. OF STATE 



BU 



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J 



\1j 



•\ f 



riN 



Qontenis 



AUGUST 26, 1939 
Vol. I: No. g— Publication Ij6j 




Europe: 

Appeals for peace: page 

Comnaunication from President Roosevelt to Chan- 

celor Hitler of Germany 157 

Communication from President Roosevelt to Presi- 
dent Moscicld of Poland 158 

Communication from President Roosevelt to King 

Victor Emmanuel of Italy 1 58 

Reply to President Roosevelt from President 

Moscicld of Poland 159 

Second communication from President Roosevelt to 

Chancelor Hitler of Germany 160 

Communication from President Roosevelt to King 

Leopold of Belgium 161 

Protection of American nationals abroad 161 

Attitude of Department regarding Americans going 

abroad 162 

Visit to Washington of the Prince Consort and Crown 

Prince of Luxemburg 163 

Presentation of letters of credence: Minister of Den- 
mark and Iceland 163 

The Far East: 

Attack on American citizen m Tientsin 164 

The American republics: 

BoUvia: Death of the President 164 

Uruguay: Anniversary of independence 165 

Arrival in United States of wife of the President of 

Brazil 165 

[Over] 



H. S, SlIFERiNTENDENT OF DOCUMlMIU 

SEP 13 1939 



International conferences, commissions, etc.: Page 

Eighteenth International Congress of Anthropology and 

Prehistoric Archeology 165 

Commercial policy: 

Proposed trade agreement with Argentina: 

Statement by Acting Secretaiy Welles 166 

Announcement of proposed negotiations 167 

Trade-agreement negotiations with Belgium: Post- 
ponement of dates for submission of briefs and open- 
ing of hearings 170 

Publications 171 

Foreign Service: 

Personnel cltanges 171 

Treaty information: 
Arbitration: 

Permanent Court of Arbitration 172 

Mutual guarantees: 

Nonaggression Treaty Between Gennany and the 

Union of Soviet Socialist Republics 172 

Education: 

Convention for Facilitating the International Circu- 
lation of Films of an Educational Character ... 173 
Publications: 

International Convention for the Suppression of the 

Circulation of and Traffic in Obscene Publications . 173 
Women and children: 

International Conventions for the Suppression of 

Traffic in Women and Children 174 

Safety: 

Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (Treaty 

Series No. 910) 175 

Finance: 

Convention With France for the Avoidance of 

Double Taxation 176 

Postal: 

Universal Postal Convention of 1934 176 

Telecommunications: 

North American Regional Broadcasting Agreement . 176 
Inter-American Arrangement Concerning Radio- 
communications 176 

Inter-American Radiocommunications Convention 

(Treaty Series No. 938) 177 

International Telecoirmaunication Convention (Trea- 
ty Series No. 867) 177 



Europe 



APPEALS FOR PEACE 



Communication From President Roosevelt 
to Chancellor Hitler of Germany 

[Released to the press by the White House August 24 ] 

Following is the text of a commimication 
dispatched the evening of August 24 by the 
President to the Chancellor of the German 
Keich : 

"In the message wliich I sent to you on April 
14 last I stated that it appeared to me that 
the leaders of gi-eat nations had it in their 
power to liberate their peoples from the dis- 
aster that impended, but that unless the effort 
■were immediately made with good will on all 
sides to find a peaceful and constructive solu- 
tion of existing controversies, the crisis which 
the world was confronting must end in catas- 
trophe. Today that catastrophe appears to be 
very near at hand indeed. 

"To the message which I sent to you last 
April I have received no reply, but because of 
my confident belief that the cause of world 
peace — which is the cause of humanity itself — 
rises above all other consideiations, I am again 
addressing myself to you with the hope that 
the war which impends and the consequent dis- 
aster to all jDeoples everywhere may yet be 
averted. 

"I therefore urge with all earnestness — and 
I am likewise urging the President of the Re- 
public of Poland — that the Governments of 
Germany and of Poland agree by common ac- 
cord to refrain from any positive act of hos- 
tility for a reasonable and stipulated period, 
and that they agree likewise by common ac- 

173248—30 1 



cord to solve the controversies which have 
arisen between them by one of the three fol- 
lowing methods: first, by direct negotiation; 
second, by submission of these controversies to 
an impartial arbitration in wliich tliey can both 
have confidence; or, third, that they agree to 
the solution of these controversies through the 
jjrocedure of conciliation, selecting as concilia- 
tor or moderator a national of one of the tra- 
ditionally neutral states of Europe, or a na- 
tional of one of the American republics which 
are all of them free from any connection with 
or participation in European political affairs. 

"Both Poland and Germany being sovereign 
governments, it is understood, of course, that 
upon resort to any one of the alternatives I 
suggest, each nation will agree to accord com- 
plete respect to the independence and terri- 
torial integrity of the other. 

"The people of the United States are as one 
in their opposition to policies of military con- 
quest and domination. They are as one in re- 
jecting the thesis that any ruler, or any people, 
possess the right to achieve their ends or ob- 
jectives through the taking of action which will 
plunge countless millions of people into war 
and which will bring distress and suffering to 
every nation of the world, belligerent and neu- 
tral, when such ends and objectives, so far 
as they are just and reasonable, can be satis- 
fied through processes of peaceful negotiation 
or by resort to judicial arbitration. 

"I appeal to you in the name of the people 
of the United States, and I believe in the name 

157 



158 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



of peace-loving men and women everywhere, to 
agree to tlie solution of the controversies exist- 
ing between your Government and that of 
Poland through the adoption of one of the al- 
ternative methods I have proposed. I need 
hardly reiterate that should the Governments 
of Germany and of Poland be willing to solve 
their differences in the peaceful manner sug- 
gested, the Government of the United States 
still stands prepared to contribute its share to 
the solution of the problems which are en- 
dangering Morld peace in the form set forth in 
my message of April 14. 

Franklix D. Roosevelt" 



Communication From President Roosevelt 
to President Moscicki of Poland 

[Released to the press by the White House August 24] 

Following is the text of a communication 
dispatched the evening of August 24 by the 
President to the President of the Polish Re- 
public : 

"The manifest gravity of the existing crisis 
imposes an urgent obligation upon all to ex- 
amine every possible means which might pre- 
vent the outbreak of general war. 

"With this in mind, I feel justified in sug- 
gesting that certain possible avenues of solu- 
tion be considered. 

"The controversy between the Government 
of Poland and the Government of the German 
Reich might be made the subject of direct dis- 
cussion between the two governments. 

"Should this prove impossible or not feas- 
ible, a second avenue might be that of submis- 
sion of the issues to arbitration. 

"A third method might be conciliation 
through a disinterested third party, in which 
case it would seem appropriate tlutt the parties 
avail tliemselves of the services of one of the 
traditionally neutral states, or a disinterested 
Republic of tlie Western Hemisphere wholly 
removed from the area and issues of the pres- 
ent crisis. Should you determine to attempt 
solution by any of these methods, you are as- 
sured of the earnest and complete sympathy of 



the United States and of its peoi^le. During 
the exploration of these avenues, I appeal to 
you, as I have likewise appealed to the Gov- 
ernment of the German Reich, to agree to re- 
frain from any positive act of hostility. 

"Both Poland and Germany being sovereign 
governments, it is understood, of course, that 
upon resort to any one of the alternatives I 
suggest, each nation will agree to accord com- 
plete respect to the independence and terri- 
torial integrity of the other. 

"It is, I think, well known to you that speak- 
ing on behalf of the United States I have 
exerted and will continue to exert every in- 
fluence in behalf of peace. The rank and file 
of the population of every nation, large and 
small, want peace. They do not seek military 
conquest. They recognize that disputes, 
claims, and counter claims will always arise 
from time to time between nations, but that all 
such controversies without exception can be 
solved by peaceful procedure if the will on 
both sides exists so to do. 

"I have addressed a communication in sim- 
ilar sense to the Chancellor of the German 
Reich. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt" 

Communication From President Roosevelt 
to King Victor Emmanuel of Italy 

[Released to the press by the White House August 24] 

Following is the text of a communication 
dispatched August 23 by the President and de- 
livered August 24 to the King of Italy by 
Ambassador Phillips : 

"Again a crisis in world aifairs makes clear 
the responsibility of heads of nations for the 
fate of their own people and indeed of hu- 
manity itself. It is because of traditional 
accord between Italy and the United States 
and the ties of consanguinity between millions 
of our citizens that I feel that I can address 
Your Majesty in behalf of the maintenance of 
world peace. 

"It is my belief and that of the American 
people that Your Majesty and Your Majesty's 



AUGUST 2 6, 1939 



159 



Government can greatly influence the averting 
of an outbreak of war. Any general war 
■would cause to suffer all nations whether bel- 
ligerent or neutral, whether victors or van- 
quished, and would clearly bring devastation 
to the peoples and perhaps to the governments 
of some nations most directly concerned. 

"The friends of the Italian people and 
among them the American people could only 
regard with grief the destruction of great 
achievements which European nations and the 
Italian nation in particular have attained dur- 
ing the past generation. 

"We in America having welded a homo- 
geneous nation out of many nationalities, often 
find it difficult to visualize the animosities 
which so often have created crises among na- 
tions of Europe which are smaller than ours 
in population and in territory, but we accept 
the fact that these nations have an absolute 
right to maintain their national independence 
if they so desire. If that be sound doctrine 
then it must apply to the weaker nations as 
well as to the stronger. 

"Acceptance of this means peace, because 
fear of aggression ends. The alternative, 
which means of necessity efforts by the strong 
to dominate the weak, will lead not only to war, 
but to long future years of oppression on the 
part of victors and to rebellion on the part of 
the vanquished. So history teaches us. 

"On April fourteenth last I suggested in 
essence an understanding that no armed forces 
should attack or invade the territory of any 
other independent nation, and that this being 
assured, discussions be undertaken to seek pro- 
gressive relief from the burden of armaments 
and to open avenues of international trade in- 
cluding sources of raw materials necessary to 
the peaceful economic life of each nation. 

"I said that in these discussions the United 
States would gladly take part. And such 
peaceful conversations would make it wholly 
possible for governments other than the 
United States to enter into peaceful discussions 
of political or territorial problems in which 
they were directly concerned. 



"Were it possible for Your Majesty's Gov- 
ernment to formulate proposals for a pacific 
solution of the present crisis along these lines 
you are assured of the earnest sympathy of the 
United States. 

"The Government of Italy and the United 
States can today advance those ideals of Chris- 
tianity which of late seem so often to have been 
obscured. 

"The unheard voices of countless millions of 
human beings ask that they shall not be 
vainly sacrificed again." 

Arrangements for Ambassador Phillips to 
deliver the message to the King in person at 
Turin, Italy, were made by Premier Mussolini 
and the Italian Foreign Minister Ciano. Am- 
bassador Phillips was authorized to give Pre- 
mier Mussolini a copy of the communication. 

Reply to President Roosevelt From 
President Moscicki of Poland 

[Released to the press August 25] 

Following is the text of the communication 
received the evening of August 25 by the Presi- 
dent from the President of the Republic of 
Poland : 

"I highly appreciate the most important and 
noble message which Your Excellency was 
good enough to address to me. 

"I would like to emphasize that the Polish 
Government always considered direct negotia- 
tions between governments as the most appro- 
priate method of solving difficulties which may 
arise between states. We consider this method 
all the more fitting when adopted between 
neighboring countries. It was with this prin- 
ciple in view that Poland concluded pacts of 
non-aggression with Germany and the Union 
of Soviet Republics. 

"We consider likewise the method of con- 
ciliation through a third party as disinterested 
and impartial as Your Excellency to be a just 
and equitable method in the solution of con- 
troversies arising between nations. 

"While naturally wishing to avoid even the 
semblance of availing myself of this occasion 



160 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



to raise the points at issue, I nevertheless con- 
sider it my duty to point out that in this crisis 
it is not Poland wlio is proffering any claims 
or demanding concessions from any other 
nation. 

"It is therefore only natural that Poland 
agrees to refrain from any positive act of hos- 
tility provided the other pai'ty also agrees to 
refrain from any such act, direct or indirect. 

"In conclusion may I express my ardent 
wish that Your Excellency's appeal for peace 
may contribute towards general appeasement 
which the people of the world so sorely need 
to return once more to the blessed path of 
progress and civilization. 

Ignace Moscicki" 

Second Communication From President 
Roosevelt to Chancellor Hitler of Ger- 
many 

[Released to the press August 25] 

Following is the text of a communication 
dispatched the evening of August 25 by the 
President to tlie Chancellor of the German 
Et'ich : 

"I have this hour received from the Presi- 
dent of Poland a reply to the message which I 
addressed to Your Excellency and to him last 
night. The text of President Moszicki's reply 
is as follows: 

" 'I highly appreciate the most important 
and nolik' nu^ssagc wliich Your Excellency was 
good enough to address to me. 

" 'I would like to emphasize that the Polish 
Government always considered direct negotia- 
tions between governments as the most appro- 
priate method of solving difficulties which may 
arise between states. AVe consich'i' this method 
all the more fitting when adopted between 
neighboring countries. It was with this prin- 
ciple in view that Poland concluded pacts of 
non-aggression with Germany and the Union 
of Soviet Bepublics, 



" 'We consider likewise the method of con- 
ciliation through a third party as disinterested 
and impartial as Your Excellency to be a just 
and equitable method in the solution of con- 
troversies arising between nations. 

" 'Wliile naturally wishing to avoid even 
the semblance of availing myself of this occa- 
sion to raise the points at issue I nevertheless 
consider it my duty to point out that in this 
crisis it is not Poland who is proffering any 
claims or demanding concessions from any 
other nation. 

" 'It is therefore only natural that Poland 
agrees to refrain from any positive act of hos- 
tility provided the other party also agrees to 
refrain from any such act direct or indirect. 

" 'In conclusion may I express my ardent 
wish that Your Excellency's appeal for peace 
may contribute towards general appeasement 
which the people of the world so sorely need 
to return once more to the blessed path of 
progress and civilization.' 

"Your Excellency has repeatedly and pub- 
licly stated that the ends and the objectives 
sought by the German Reich were just and 
reasonable. In his reply to my message the 
President of Poland has made it plain that 
the Polish Government is willing, upon the 
basis set forth in my messages, to agree to 
solve the controversy which has arisen between 
the Republic of Poland and the German Reich 
by direct negotiation or through the process 
of conciliation. 

"Countless human lives can be yet saved and 
hope may still be restored that the nations of 
the modern world may even now construct a 
foundation for a peaceful and a happier re- 
lationship if you and the Government of the 
German Reich will agree to the pacific means 
of settlement accepted by the Government of 
Poland. 

"All the world prays that Germany, too, will 
accept. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt" 



AUGUST 



1939 



161 



Communication From President Roosevelt 
to King Leopold of Belgium 

[Released to the press August 26] 

Following is tlie text of a communiciition 
dispatched the afternoon of August 25 by the 
President to the King of the Belgians : 

"I have read with the utmost measure of 
satisfaction Your Majesty's address of August 
23 and the appeal for the maintenance of peace 
made therein in the name of the powers of the 



Oslo group. Your Majesty expressed the hope 
that other heads of states might join their 
voices with yours in the same desire for the 
peace and security of their peoples. 

"I take this occasion to assure you that the 
people of the United States and their Govern- 
ment wholeheartedly share the hopes and the 
aspirations so eloquently expressed by Your 
Majesty. 

Franklin D. Eoose\'elt" 



-f -f 4 -f -♦■ -f -f 



PROTECTION OF AMERICAN NATIONALS ABROAD 



[Released to tlie press August 2G] 

The responsibility for the protection of the 
interests of American nationals abroad at all 
times rests with the Department of State. 
This responsibility is particularly onerous in 
a time of trouble. 

In recent months, the Department of State 
has in all prudence had to keep very much 
in mind the possibility of an outbreak of hos- 
tilities in Europe and to formulate a careful 
plan to meet an emergency. This jilan 
involves : 

(1) The establishment in the Department of 
State of a special unit which will occupy itself 
with the many details relating to the repatri- 
ation and protection of nationals in disturbed 
areas. This unit will absorb and centralize 
existing facilities in the Department which 
are adequate for meeting peacetime problems 
but must be expanded to meet the burdens 
which would fall upon them during a period 
of major hostilities in Europe. 

(2) The setting up in certain of our es- 
tablishments in foreign capitals and in impor- 
tant commercial centers abroad of a special 
section to deal with these and related prob- 
lems, such as the protection of the interests of 
foreign governments after a rupture of diplo- 
matic relations; and 



(3) Appropriate arrangements, where it has 
not ajjpeared to be necessai'y to set up a spe- 
cial section, for adequate attention to be 
devoted to these problems by the existing 
staff. 

Working with this machinery, every effort 
is being made to solve the immediate prob- 
lem of the repatriation of the very consider- 
able number of Americans resident in Europe 
for business and other reasons and of the 
great number of Americans who are at present 
in European countries as tourists. 

It will, of course, not be possible for all of 
the Americans in Europe to return as rapidly 
as some of them may wish. It has always 
been envisaged in the i^lans formulated by 
this Government for such a situation that the 
Americans in Europe should be advised, in 
case of emergency, to leave metropolitan cen- 
ters for as safe places as may be found wiiere 
they may await the availability of transporta- 
tion. Our diplomatic and consular officers in 
Europe have been giving thought to this prob- 
lem for months and are in a position to give 
appropriate advice and counsel to Americans 
in their respective districts. 

Pressure on existing steamship facilities is 
already pronounced, and it will increase mani- 
foldly in the event of an actual outbreak of 



162 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



hostilities. The Department of State, as a 
consequence, in collaboration with the Navy 
Department and the Maritime Commission, 
has been considering carefully all means of 
assisting in the immediate return to this coun- 
try of the many thousands of Americans who 
will wish to return without delay. A well- 
considered program has been worked out, 
which will be put into effect as the situation 
develops. 

This program contemplates the use of Amer- 
ican merchant shipping under the American 
flag. It is not intended that naval vessels 
shall be used for the purpose of repatriation 
since naval vessels are not adapted or intended 
for the transportation of passengers. How- 
ever, naval vessels now in European waters 
may be made use of for emergency transporta- 
tion from isolated places to places from which 
passengers can be embarked to the United 
States. 

In effecting repatriation, it has been the in- 
variable practice of this Government not to 
assume the cost of transportation, but ar- 
rangements have been made whereby limited 
amounts may be advanced on the basis of a 
promissory note to individuals who have satis- 
fied the consular officer that they are without 
funds and are not in a position to obtain them 
from private sources. 

There are at present facilities available for 
the transportation of passengers from Europe 
on American-flag vessels. The American 
Scantic Line has vessels in the service from 
Scandinavian and Baltic ports. The United 
States Lines have vessels in service from 
French, English, and German ports. The ves- 
sels of the American President Line and the 
American Export Line are available in service 
from Mediterranean ports. While these ves- 
sels may not be sufficient to bring back all of 
the Americans in Europe as rapidly as they 
may wish to be repatriated, there is reason to 
believe that for the present the American pri- 
vately owned services will be able to take care 
of the problem in an orderly manner. 



It is essential not to disturb the regular 
services of American-flag vessels more than is 
absolutely necessary. In certain cases diver- 
sion of American vessels from regular ports 
of call may be essential and will be practiced 
if the circumstances make it desirable. It is 
not intended at this stage, however, to take 
measures which would involve the comman- 
deering of vessels; but if circumstances make 
it necessary the chartering of American ships 
in other services by existing private lines is 
l^lanned. 

The Department of State, the Navy Depart- 
ment, and the Maritime Commission are work- 
ing in close and contiiuious cooperation on this 
matter and are in constant touch with the pri- 
vate shipping interests. Every effort will be 
made by this Government to aid in facilitating 
the return of Americans to the United States 
as rapidly as available facilities will permit. 

The American Red Cross, which has ren- 
dered such valuable service in similar situations 
in the past, has informed the Department that, 
as usual, it is prepared to cooperate with the 
Government in solving all pi-oblems that may 
arise in the event of hostilities. 



■f -f -f 

ATTITUDE OF DEPARTMENT REGARD- 
ING AMERICANS GOING ABROAD 

[Released to the press August 23] 

At his press conference today. Acting Secre- 
tary Welles was asked what the Department 
was saying to American citizens who were 
thinking of going abroad. Mr. Welles stated 
that the Department had received inquiries 
from a few citizens who were thinking of go- 
ing abroad and that the Department was reply- 
ing that in view of llie very uncertain state of 
affairs in Europe, the Department certainly 
would not encourage any American citizens to 
go abroad unless there was some compelling 
reason for it. 



163 



VISIT TO WASHINGTON OF THE 
PRINCE CONSORT AND CROWN 
PRINCE OF LUXEMBURG 

[Released to the press August 23] 

Their Royal Highnesses tlie Prince of Lux- 
emburg and his son, Crown Prince John, are 
expected to arrive in Washington on Sunday 
August 27, wliere they will be the guests of the 
President at the White House. During the 
visit to the Capital, the Royal party will ob- 
serve the following schedule: 

Sunday, August 27 
Arrival at Union Station at 5 : 30 p. m. 
Procession from the Station to the Wliite 

House, with military escort. 
Informal family dinner at the White House. 
The Royal party to remain at the "White House 

overnight. 

Monday, August 28 
Drive to Mount Vernon, leaving the White 

House at 9 : 30 a. m. 
A wreath will be laid on Washington's tomb. 
Return to Washington by way of Arlington 

National Cemetery. 
Official luncheon at the Wliite House at 1 p. m. 
Departure from Union Station at 3 p. m. for 

New York. 

-f -f -f 

PRESENTATION OF LETTERS OF 

CREDENCE 

Minister of Denmark and Iceland 

[Released to the press August 26] 

Remarks of the newly appointed Minister of 
Denmark and Iceland^ Mr. Henrik de Kauff- 
mann, upon the occasion of the presentation 
of his letters of credence: 

Mk. President: 

I have the honor to present to you the letter 
from His Majesty the King of Denmark and 
Iceland containing my credentials as His 
Majesty's Envoy Extraordinary and Minister 
Plenipotentiary to you, and at the same time 
to hand over to you the letters of recall of my 
predecessor, Mr. Otto Wadsted. 



The King, in appointing me to this impor- 
tant post, has asked me to convey to you, Mr. 
President, the expression of His Majesty's 
sentiments of esteem and friendship and com- 
manded me to use all efforts to maintain and 
further develop the friendly and intimate re- 
lations which so happily exist between thd 
peoples of Denmark and Iceland and the people 
of the United States. 

It will be a most pleasant duty for me to 
carry out this royal order to the best of my 
ability, and I venture to hope that I may, in 
my endeavor, count upon your good will, Mr. 
President, and upon the assistance and coop- 
eration of your administration. 

I was received by my Sovereign shortly be- 
fore I left Copenhagen. His Majesty particu- 
larly instructed me to express to you, Mr. 
President, his very sincere appreciation of and 
deep-felt gratitude for the cordial welcome that 
was extended to Their Royal Highnesses the 
Crown Prince and the Crown Princess during 
their recent visit to the United States. 

President RooseveWs reply to the remarks of 
Mr. Henrik de Kauffmann: 

Mr. Minister: 

It gives me great pleasure to receive from 
your hands the letter by which His Majesty the 
King of Denmark and Iceland has requested 
me to receive you as his Envoy Extraordinary 
and Minister Plenipotentiary. I am happy to 
receive you in that capacity and to welcome 
you to Washington. 

I accept also the letters of recall of your dis- 
tinguished predecessor, Mr. Otto Wadsted, who 
during his long service in Washington notably 
furthered the friendship which has so happily 
marked relations between the people of the 
United States and the peoples of Denmark 
and of Iceland. 

You may be assured, Mr. Minister, that in 
the execution of your high mission you will 
receive my sympathetic cooperation and that 
of all officials of the Government of the United 
States. 



173248—39- 



164 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



I shall be most grateful if you will convey to 
His Majesty King Christian my most cordial 
wishes for his happiness and well-being and for 
the continued peace and prosperity of the 
peoples of Denmark and of Iceland. Please 
also express to His Majesty the pleasure it 
gave me and the people of this country to wel- 
come Their Royal Highnesses the Crown Prince 
and the Crown Princess of Denmark and Ice- 
land during their recent visit to the United 
States. Their visit served as a fresh reminder 
of the similarity of the fundamental political 
principles which inspire the peoples of Den- 
mark, of Iceland, and of the United States. 



The Far East 



ATTACK ON AMERICAN CITIZEN IN 
TIENTSIN 

[Released to the press August 21] 

The Department has received from the 
American consul at Tientsin, Mr. David C. 
Berger, the text of a letter dated August 17, 
1939, from the Japanese consul general to Mr. 
Berger in reply to a letter from Mr. Berger 
with regard to the incident at the barrier on 
Asahi Road in Tientsin, in which Mrs. Frances 
M. Richard, an American citizen, was reported 
to have been struck by a Japanese sentry. The 
Japanese consul general stated that he wished 
to express on behalf of the Japanese author- 
ities concerned sincere regret for what had 
happened; that there existed some inconsist- 
ency between Mrs. Richard's statement pub- 
lished in the local press and the result of the 
investigations by the Japanese authorities; 
that he had been informed that the Japanese 
sentry in question, who had never caused any 
trouble nor received any complaint in his 
(reatment of Americans in the past, had been 
duly dealt with in accordance with the military 
regulations; and that, in addition to instruc- 
tions repeatedly issued, furl her instructions 



had been sent to all soldiers concerned "to 
accord courteous treatment to all American 
citizens as far as they assume similarly courte- 
ous attitude." 

In response to representations made by the 
American Charge at Tokyo, Mr. Eugene Doo- 
man, concerning this incident, the Vice 
Minister for Foreign Affairs informed Mr. 
Dooman on August 18 that the Japanese consul 
general at Tientsin had already delivered a 
note to the American consul at Tientsin ex- 
pressing regret, stating that the sentry would 
be disciplined according to the military code 
and stating that instructions had again been 
issued to all concerned to be courteous to 
Americans. 

Representations had also been made by the 
American Embassy at Peiping. In response, 
a representative of the Japanese Embassy ex- 
pressed regret for the treatment suffered by 
Mrs. Richard and said that he would discuss 
with the military authorities the possibility of 
adopting adequate measures to remove future 
causes of complaint of this character. The 
Japanese Embassy representative also men- 
tioned the apology which had been made by 
the Japanese consul general in the letter to Mr. 
Berger described above. 

The account given above has been corrobo- 
rated by a memorandum dated August 18, 1939, 
received by the Department from the Jaji- 
anese Embassy in Washington. 



The American Republics 



BOLIVIA: DEATH OF THE PRESIDENT 

(Released to the press August 24] 

Telegram from, the Secretary of State to the 
Foreign Minister of Bolivia {Carlos Salinas 
Aramayo) : 

August 24, 1939. 
I wish to express my most profound sym- 
pathy on the tragic death of President Busch 



AUGUST 2 6, 19 39 



165 



and ask that you convey to his family a per- 
sonal exjjression of my deep sorrow for their 
loss. 

CoRDELL Hull 

^ -f 4- 

URUGUAY: ANNIVERSARY OF 
INDEPENDENCE 

[Released to the press August 25] 

Telegram from the President of the United 
States to the President of the Oriental Repub- 
lic of Uruguay {General Alfredo Baldomir) : 

August 25, 1939. 
Upon this anniversary of the independ- 
ence of Uruguay I am happy to extend to Your 
Excellency sincere congratulations and cordial 
good wishes for the happiness and prosperity 
of the Uruguayan people. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



■f -f > 

ARRIVAL IN UNITED STATES OF WIFE 
OF THE PRESIDENT OF BRAZIL 

[Released to the press August 24] 

The American Ambassador to Brazil, the 
Honorable Jefferson Caffery, has informed the 
Department that Senhora Vargas, wife of the 
President of Brazil, will arrive at Miami by 
airplane of the Pan American Airways on 
August 25 to be near her daughter, Senhora 
Ernani do Amaral Peixoto, and her son-in-law, 
Commander Peixoto, Governor of the State of 
Rio de Janeii'o, who were injured in an auto- 
mobile accident on August 21 at Kingston, 
Ontario, Canada. Commander and Senhora 
Peixoto are understood not to have been crit- 
ically injured, but they are at present confined 
to the Kingston General Hospital. 



The Brazilian Ambassador, the Honorable 
Carlos Martins, has indicated that he will meet 
Senhora Vargas at Miami. The Secretary of 
State has designated Mr. Walter N. Walmsley, 
Jr., a Foreign Service officer of the United 
States now on duty in the Department of State, 
to represent him in receiving Senhora Vargas 
at Miami and to accompany her on her journey 
north. Senhora Vargas plans to proceed via 
Eastern Air Lines from Miami to New York 
where an airplane of the United States Coast 
Guard will be placed at her disposal by this 
Government for her trip to Kingston, Ontario. 



International Conferences, 
Commissions, etc. 



EIGHTEENTH INTERNATIONAL CON- 
GRESS OF ANTHROPOLOGY AND 
PREHISTORIC ARCHEOLOGY 

[Released to the press August 21] 

This Government has accepted the invitation 
of the Turkish Government to participate in 
the Eighteenth International Congress of 
Anthropology and Prehistoric Archeology, 
which will be held at Istanbul, Turkey, from 
September 18 to 25, 1939. The President has 
approved the appointment of the following 
persons as delegates on the part of the United 
States : 

Dr. Kirsopp Lake, professor emeritus. Har- 
vard University, Cambridge, Mass., chairman 
of the delegation 

Mr. James H. Gaul, Sofia, Bulgaria 

Mr. Bruce Howe, Athens, Greece. 

After the sessions of the Congress, where 
scientific papers will be presented, the dele- 
gates will make excursions to the principal 
archeological sites of Turkey. 



Commercial Policy 



PROPOSED TRADE AGREEMENT WITH ARGENTINA 



Statement by Acting Secretary Welles 



[Released to the press August 23] 

I believe that a conclusion of the proposed 
trade agreement with Argentina would repre- 
sent one of the most outstanding accomplish- 
ments under the authority of the Trade Agree- 
ments Act, coming particularly at this time, 
and, indeed, one of the most important accom- 
plishments of this administration in the field 
of international relations. It would be the 
first comprehensive commercial arrangement 
between the United States and Argentina 
since 1855, when the present treaty of friend- 
ship, commerce, and navigation became effec- 
tive. This treaty is to a large extent obsolete, 
particularly with reference to the treatment 
of commerce. I can think of no better way 
to promote the "good neighbor" policy and 
the type of relations which it represents than 
through instruments designed to bring about a 
mutually profitable increase in trade. 

The benefits to be gained for our producers 
and exporters from such an agreement are ob- 
vious. Argentina was, next to Canada, our 
most important foreign market in this hemi- 
sphere in 1938. It is, moreover, a market of 
great potentialities, in view of the country's 
practically unlimited capacity for economic 
development. 

It may be noted that during the 15-year 
period 1924-38, our exports to Argentina have 
exceeded our imports from that country by 
$480,900,000. 

Our trade with Argentina has suffered in 

recent years for lack of a trade agreement. 

The trade of certain European countries with 

Argentina has been developing at our expense 

166 



under the influence of their commercial agree- 
ments with Argentina. The placing of Amer- 
ican commerce in Argentina on a footing of 
full equality with that of our European com- 
petitors was a subject which was gone into 
fully in preliminary discussions leading up to 
the present announcement. The agreement 
will enable us to maintain our competitive 
position in a market of great present and pros- 
pective importance. 

On our side we must, of course, offer re- 
ciprocal benefits. The products of interest to 
Argentina with respect to which considera- 
tion will be given in the course of the negotia- 
tions, with a view to seeing what concessions 
could be granted, are listed in connection with 
the announcement of the proposed negotia- 
tions. The concessions, which will in due 
course be formulated, should, of course, per- 
mit an increase in Argentina's exports to this 
country but will not have injurious effect upon 
American production. The record of the 
trade-agreements organization since the au- 
thority to negotiate these agreements was 
granted in 1934 should provide adequate as- 
surance with respect to the skill and care with 
which matters of this kind are handled. It 
will be noted that the list of products does not 
include fresh, chilled, or frozen meat. Im- 
ports of such meat from Argentina are pro- 
hibited entry into the United States by section 
306 of the Tariff Act of 1930. Nor "does the 
list include wools finer than 44's. The types 
of wool included in the list are the coarser 
types of which there is only a very small pro- 
duction in this country. 



AUGUST 2 6, 1939 



167 



Announcement of Proposed Negotiations 



[Released to the press August 23] 

The Acting Secretary of State issued today 
formal notice of intention to negotiate a trade 
agreement witli the Government of Argentina. 

Imports into Argentina from certain coun- 
tries with which Argentina normally has an 
export balance of trade have in recent years 
received more favorable exchange treatment 
than have imports from the United States. 
The Government of Argentina has agreed that 
the proposed trade agreement will be based 
upon the principles of multilateral trade 
which underlie the trade-agreements program 
of the United States. The proposed trade 
agreement will assure that imports into Ar- 
gentina from the United States will be ac- 
corded any advantage given competing imports 
from any other source and that any govern- 
mental regulation of imports into Argentina 
will be applied in a nondiscriminatory 
manner. 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
issued sunultaneously today a notice setting 
the dates for the submission to it of infor- 
mation and views in writing and of applica- 
tions to appear at public hearings to be held 
by the Committee, and fixing the time and 
place for the opening of the hearings. Sug- 
gestions with regard to the form and content 
of presentations addressed to the Committee 
for Reciprocity Information are included in a 
statement released by that Committee on De- 
cember 13, 1937. 

It is the general policy of the United States 
in negotiating trade agreements with foreign 
countries to consider concessions only on 
products of which the other country is the 
chief or an important source of our imports. 
The annexed list includes most of the products 
of which Argentina is the chief or an impor- 
tant source of supply. Representations which 
interested persons may wish to make to the 
Committee for Reciprocity Information need 
not be confined to the articles appearing on 



this list, but may cover any articles of actual 
or potential interest in the import or export 
trade of the United States with Argentina. 
However, only the articles contained in the 
list issued today or in any supplementary list 
issued later will come under consideration for 
the possible granting of concessions by the 
Government of the United States. 

The inclusion of any product in this list does 
not mean that a concession with respect to it 
will necessarily be granted. The concessions 
to be granted are not decided upon until after 
interested parties in the United States have 
been given full opportunity to present infor- 
mation and views in writing and orally. In 
the case of many of the products included in 
this list it may be that no concession will be 
made ; it may be that the existing import duty 
will merely be bound, without reduction; it 
may be that only a part of a given tariff clas- 
sification, as set forth in the list, will be af- 
fected by the agreement; or it may be that a 
concession, if made, will be limited as to the 
quantity of the product to which, or the season 
during which, the concession is applicable. 

United States trade with Argentina de- 
clined drastically between 1929 and 1932. 
Since then it has increased, but remains well 
below the 1929 level. 



Year 


U. S. imports 

from Argentina » 

(thousands of 

dollars) 


U. S. exports to 
Argentina (thou- 
sands or dollars) 


1929 . 


117, 581 
15, 779 
33, 841 
29, 435 
63, 847 
65, 318 

136, 303 
41, 672 


210, 288 


1932 ... . 


31, 133 


1933- 


36, 927 


1934... 


42, 688 


1935. .. ... . 


49, 374 


1936 


56, 910 


1937 - 


94, 173 


1 938 (preliminary) 


86, 479 



« General teports 1929-33: imports for consumption 1934-38. 

A compilation showing the principal prod- 
ucts involved in the trade between the United 
States and Argentina during the years 1936 



168 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



to 1938 was issued in March 1939 by the Bu- 
reau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce of 
tlie Department of Commerce and may be ob- 
tained, upon request, from tlie Bureau of For- 
eign and Domestic Commerce in Washington 
or from any district or cooperative office. 

August 23, 1939. 

department of state 

Public Notice 

Trade Agreement Negotiations With 
Argentina 

Pursuant to section 4 of an act of Congress 
approved June 12, 1934, entitled "An Act to 
Amend the Tariff Act of 1930," as extended by 
Public Resolution No. 10, approved March 1, 
1937, and to Executive Order No. 6750, of June 
27, 1934, I hereby give notice of intention to 
negotiate a trade agreement with the Govern- 
ment of Argentina. 

All presentations of information and views 
in writing and applications for supplemental 
oral presentation of views with respect to the 
negotiation of such agreement should be sub- 
mitted to the Committee for Reciprocity In- 
formation in accordance with the announce- 
ment of this date issued by that Committee 
concerning the manner and dates for the sub- 
mission of briefs and applications, and the 
time set for public hearings. 

Sumner Welles 
Acting Secretary of State 

committee for reciprocity information 

Public Notice 

Trade Agreement Negotiations With 
Argentina 

Closing date for submission of briefs, Octo- 
ber 4, 1939 

Closing date for application to be heard, Octo- 
ber 4, 1939 

Public hearings open, October 16, 1939 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
hereby gives notice that all information and 
views in writing, and all applications for sup- 



plemental oral presentation of views, in re- 
gard to the negotiation of a trade agreement 
with the Government of Argentina, notice of 
intention to negotiate which has been issued by 
the Acting Secretary of State on this date, 
shall be submitted to the Committee for Reci- 
procity Information not later than 12 o'clock 
noon, October 4, 1939. Such communications 
should be addressed to "Chairman, Committee 
for Reciprocity Information, Old Land Office 
Building, Eighth and E Streets, NW., Wash- 
ington, D. C." 

A public hearing will be held beginning at 
10 a. m. on October 16, 1939, before the Com- 
mittee for Reciprocity Information in the 
hearing room of the Tariff Commission in the 
Old Land Office Building, where supplemental 
oral statements will be heard. 

Six copies of written statements, either 
typewritten or printed, shall be submitted, of 
which one copy shall be sworn to. Appear- 
ance at hearings before the Committee may be 
made only by those persons who have filed 
written statements and who have within the 
time prescribed made written application for 
a hearing, and statements made at such hear- 
ings shall be under oath. 

By direction of the Committee for Reci- 
procity Information this 23rd day of August 
1939. 

E. M. Whitcomb, 

Acting Secretary 

Washington, D. C, August 23, 1939. 

List of Products on Which the United 
States Will Consider Granting Conces- 
sions TO Argentina 

Note : The rates of duty indicated are those 
now applicable to products of Argentina. 
Where the rate is one which has been reduced 
pursuant to a previous trade agreement by 50 
percent (the maximum permitted by the Trade 
Agreements Act) it is indicated by the symbol 
MR. Where the rate represents a reduction 
pursuant to a previous trade agreement, but 
less than a 50-percent reduction, it is indicated 
by the symbol R. Where a rate has been bound 



AUGUST 2 6, 1939 



169 



against increase, but lias not been reduced in 
a previous trade agi'eement, it is indicated 
by the symbol B; likewise, items which have 
been bound free of duty are indicated by the 
symbol B. 

For the purpose of facilitating identification 
of the articles listed, reference is made in the 
list to tlie paragraph numbers of the tariff 
schedules in the Tariff Act of 1930, or, as the 
case may be, to the appropriate sections of the 
Internal Kevenue Code. The descriptive 
phraseology is, however, in many cases limited 
to a narrower field than that covered by the 
numbered tariff paragraph or section in the 
Internal Revenue Code. In such cases only 
the articles covered by the descriptive phrase- 
ology of the list will come under consideration 
for the granting of concessions. 

In the event that articles which are at pres- 
ent regarded as classifiable under the descrip- 
tions included in the above list are excluded 
therefrom by judicial decision or otherwise 
prior to the conclusion of the agreement, the 
list will nevertheless be considered as including 
such articles. 



United 
States Tariff 
Act of 1930 
Paragraph 


Description of article 


Present rate of 
duty 


Symbol 


19 


Casein or lactarene and mix- 
tures of which casein or 
lactarene is the component 
material of chief value, 
not specially provided for. 

Extracts, dyeing and tanning, 
not containing alcohol: 
Quebracho .. 


6H(iperIb 

15% ad val. 

Mo* per lb. 

4H((perlb 

65* per cu. ft 

35% ad val 

m per lb. (plus 
3* per lb. un- 
der sec. 2491(a) 
of the Internal 
Revenue 
Code; see be- 
low.) 

10 per lb. (plus 
3* per lb. un- 
d e r sec. 
2491 (c) of the 
Internal 
Revenue 
Code; see be- 
low.) 




38 








42 


Glycerin, crude 


R 


53 


Oils, vegetable: 
Linseed or flaxseed, and 
combinations and mix- 
tures in chief value of such 
oil. 

Onyx, in block, rough or 
squared only. 

Osier or willow, including 
chip of and split willow, 
prepared for basket mak- 
ers' use. 

Tallow 




232(a) 

409 




701 




701 


Oleo oil and oleo stearin 









United 








States Tarifl 
Act of 1930 


Description of article 


Present rate of 
duty 


Symbol 


Paragraph 








705. 


Extract of meat, including 


IS* per lb 


B 




fluid. 


706 


Beef and veal, pickled or cured. 


6* per lb. but 
not less than 






not packed in airtight 






containers, not specially 


20% ad val. 






provided for. 






706. 


Beef and veal, prepared or pre- 
served, packed in airtight 


6* per lb. hut not 
less than 20% 










containers, not specially 


ad val. 






provided for. 






710 


Cheese 


4* per lb. to 7i 
per lb. with 


R 

(vari- 




Note: If any concession is 




made in the proposed 


minimum 


ous 




agreement, it will apply 


rates of 20% 


types) 




to a narrower description 


ad val. to 35% 






than that listed so as to 


ad val. 






cover only that part of the 








item which is of special 








interest to Argentina. 






712 


Turkeys, dead, dressed or un- 


10* per lb.. _ 






dressed, fresh, chilled, or 






frozen. 






712 


Birds, dead, dressed or un- 


5* per lb 


MR 




dressed, fresh, chilled, or 




frozen (except chickens. 








ducks, geese, guineas, and 








turkeys). 






713... 


Eggs of chickens, in the shell. . 


5* per doz 

25* per bu. of 56 
lbs. 


MR 


724 


Corn or maize, including 
cracked corn. 






730 


Dog food, consisting of an ad- 
mixture of grains or grain 


5% ad val 


MR 






products with other feed- 








stuBs, unfit for human 








consumption. 






742 


Grapes in bulk, crates, bar- 
rels, or other packages. 


25* per cu. ft. of 
such bulk or 


B (as 
to hot- 








the capacity of 


house 






the packages. 


grapes) 






according as 
imported. 
H* per lb. 




749. 


Pears: green, ripe, or in brine.. 




762.- 


Flaxseed 


65* per bu. of 56 




763. 


Grass seeds and other forage 
crop seeds: 












Alfalfa 


4* per lb 

?i*perlb 

60% ad val 

$20 per ton of 
2,000 lbs. 


MR 
R 


764 


Canary seed 


774 


Asparagus in its natural state . 


779.. 


Broom corn 




1101(a) 


Wools: Donskoi, Smyrna, Cor- 






dova, Valparaiso, Ecua- 








dorean, Syrian, Aleppo, 








Georgian, Turkestan, 








Arabian, Bagdad, Persian, 








Sistan, East Indian, Thi- 








betan, Chinese, Manchur- 








ian, Mongolian, Egypt- 








ian, Sudan, Cyprus, Sar- 








dinian, Pyrenean, Oporto, 








Iceland, Scotch Blackface, 








Black Spanish, Kerry, 








Haslock, and Welsh 








Mountain; similaj wools 








without merino or English 








blood; all other wools of 








whatever blood or origin 








not Dner than 40s; all the 








foregoing — 








In the grease or washed 


24* per lb. of 
clean content. 






Scoured 


27* per lb. of 
clean content. 












On the skin 


22* per lb. of 








clean content. 






Sorted, or matchings, if not 


25* per lb. of 






scoured. 


clean content. 




1101 (b) 


Any of the foregoing entered 


Free, subject to 






or withdrawn from ware- 


the provisions 






house under bond and used 


of paragraph 






in the manufacture of press 


noi of the 






cloth, camel's hair belting. 


Tarifl Act of 






knit or felt boots, heavy 


1930, as amend- 






fulled lumbermen's socks. 


ed. 






rugs, carpets, or any other 








floor coverings. 







170 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



United 
States Tariff 
Act of 1930 


Description of article 


Present rate of 
duty 


Symbol 


Paragraph 








1102(a) 


Wools, not specially provided 






for, not finer than 44s: 








In the grease or washed 


29fi per lb. of 
clean content. 








3% per lb. of 
clean content. 












On thesfein -- 


27t per lb. of 








clean content. 






Sorted, or matchings, if not 


30* per lb. of 






scoured. 


clean content. 




1630(a).---- 


Hides and skins of cattle of the 
bovine species (except 
hides and skins of the 


10%adval 






India water buflalo im- 


• 






ported to be used in the 








manufacture of rawhide 








articles), raw or uncured, 








or dried, salted, or pickled. 






1668- 


Dog food, manufactured, un- 
fit for human consump- 
tion, not specially pro- 
vided for. 


20%ad val 




1625 


Blood, dried, not specially 
provided for. 










1627 




Free . - 




ground; bone dust, bone 








meal, and bone ash; and 








animal carbon suitable 








only for fertiUzing pur- 








poses. 






1670 - 


Dyeing or tanning materials: 








Quebracho wood, whether 
crude or advanced in value 


Free - 












or condition by shredding. 








grinding, chipping, crush- 








ing, or anv similar process. 








and not containing alcohol. 






1681-- - 


Furs and fur skins, not spe- 
cially provided for, un- 
dressed: 










Free -- 








Free 






Otter 


Free 


B 






Free 


B 




black fox). 








Wildcat 


Free 






Ocelot 


Free.. 






Lamb 


Free- 


B 


1686 


Tankage of a grade used chief- 
ly for fertilizers, or chiefly 
as an ingredient in the 
manufacture of fertilizers. 


Free- -. 


B 


1688 


Hair of the horse, cleaned or 
uncleaned, drawn or un- 
drawn, but unmanufac- 
tured, not specially pro- 
vided for: 










Free-. 


B 




Other . 


Free : 




1765 




Free ; 






testines, bladders, ten- 
dons, and integuments, 
all the foregoing not of 
sheep, lambs, or goats, 
and not specially provid- 
ed for. 






1766 


Horse, colt, ass, and mule 
hides, and raw skins. 


Free- 










1780 


Tankage, unfit for human con- 
sumption. 


Free- 











Internal Rev- 
enue Code 
Section 


Description 


Present rate of import 
tax 


2491(a) 

2491 (c) 


Tallow . ... 


3tf per lb. (in addition 


Oleooil and oleo stearin 


to tariff duty). 
3t per lb. (in addition 
to tariff duty). 



TRADE-AGREEMENT NEGOTIATIONS 
WITH BELGIUM 

Postponement of Dates for Submission of 
Briefs and Opening of Hearings 

[Released to the press August 22] 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
today announced that information and views 
in writing concerning the negotiation of a 
trade agreement with Belgium would be re- 
ceived by that Committee up to and including 
September 27, 1939, and that the opening of 
public hearings would be deferred to October 
9, 1939. This notice amends the notice of Au- 
gust 16, in which it was announced that infor- 
mation and views in writing would be received 
up to noon, September 16, and that the public 
hearing would open on October 2. 

This postponement of the dates for submis- 
sion of briefs and for the opening of the public 
hearing is intended to give interested persons 
a longer time to prepare their statements, par- 
ticularly in view of the fact that the Labor 
Day holidays will intervene during the time in 
which such statements are being prepared. 

The Acting Secretary of State issued a pub- 
lic notice of intention to negotiate a trade 
agreement with Belgium on August 16, 1939.^ 

committee for kecipkocity information 
Public Notice 
Trade- Agreement Negotiations With Belgium: 
Postponement of Date for Submission of 
Briefs amd for Applicatio-ns To Be Heard and 
Date of Opening of Hearings 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
hereby gives notice that the dates given in its 
public notice of August 16, 1939, are changed 
as follows: 

Closing date for submission of briefs post- 
poned from — September 16, 1939, to Septem- 
ber 27, 1939 

Closing date for application to be heard post- 
poned from — September 16, 1939, to Sejitem- 
ber 27, 1939 

> See the Bulletin of August 19, 1939 (Vol. I, No. 8), 
p. 135. 



AUGUST 2 6, 193 9 



171 



Opening of public hearings postponed from — 
October 2, 1939, to October 9, 1939 

All information and views in writing, and all 
applications for supplemental oral presenta- 
tion of views, in regard to the negotiation of a 
trade agreement with Belgium shall be submit- 
ted to the Committee for Reciprocity Informa- 
tion not later than 4 p. m. on September 
27, 1939. 

A public hearing will be held beginning at 
10 a. m. on October 9, 1939. 

Except for the dates mentioned above, the 
public notice issued by this Committee on Au- 
gust 16, 1939, remains unchanged. 

Bj' direction of the Committee for Reciproc- 
ity Information this 22nd day of August, 1939. 
E. M. Whitcomb, 

Acting Secretary 

Washington, D. C, Augmt 22. 1939. 



Publications 



Department of State 

International Radio Consulting Committee (C. C. 
I. R. ), Fourth Meeting, Bucharest, May 21-June 8, 
1937: Report of the Delegation of the United State.s 
of America, and Appended Documents. Conference 
Series 41. Publication 1352. 1939. x, 290 pp. 35^. 



Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press August 26] 

Changes in the Foreign Service of the United 
States since August 18: 

Robert W. Heingartner, of Canton, Ohio, 
consul at Frankfort on the Main, Germany, has 
been assigned as consul at Regina, Canada. 

John S. Calvert, of Wilmington, N. C, con- 
sul at Regina, Canada, has been assigned as 
consul at Bilbao, Spain. 

Perry N. Jester, of Richmond, Va., consul 
at Southampton, England, has been assigned 
as consul at Lagos, Nigeria, West Africa. 

Norris B. Chipman, of Washington, D. C, 
second secretary of embassy and consul at Mos- 
cow, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, has 
been assigned as consul at Cairo, Egypt. 

Walter; J. Linthicum, of Baltimore, Md., 
third secretary of legation and vice consul at 
Kaunas, Lithuania, has been assigned as vice 
consul at Pernambuco, Brazil. 

Herbert O. Williams, of Sacrament o, Calif., 
retired Foreign Service officer, died at Forest 
Glen, Md., on August 17, 1939. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled by the Treaty Division 



ARBITRATION 

Permanent Court of Arbitration 

Iran 

According to a letter from the International 
Office of tlie Permanent Court of Arbitration 
dated August 3, 1939, the Government of Iran 
has designated His Excellency Matine- 
Daftary, Minister of Justice, as a member of 
the Permanent Court of Arbitration. 

MUTUAL GUARANTEES 

Nonaggression Treaty Between Germany 
and the Union of Soviet Socialist Re- 
publics 

According to a telegram dated August 24, 
1939, from the American Embassy at Berlin, 
a Nonaggression Treaty Between Germany 
and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics 
was signed at Moscow on August 23, 1939, a 
translation of which reads as follows: 

"The Governments of the German Reich and 
the Union of Soviet Socialist Repviblics di- 
rected by tlie wish to strengthen the cause of 
peace between Germany and the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics and proceeding upon 
tlie basic ]>i-ovisi()ns of the treaty of neutnility 
concluded between Germany and the Union 
of Soviet Socialist Republics in April 1926 
have reached (lie following agreement: 

'■'■Article I. 

"The two contracting parties undertake to 
refrain from any act of violence, any aggres- 
sive action or any attack against one another 
whether individually or jointly with other 
powers. 
172 



''Article II. 

"In case one of the contracting parties 
should become the object of war-like acts on 
the part of a third power the other contract- 
ing party will not support that third power in 
any form. 

'■'Article III. 

"The Governments of the two contracting 
parties will in future remain in contact with 
each other through continuous consultations in 
order to inform each other concerning ques- 
tions affecting their mutual interests. 

"■Article IV. 

"Neither of the two contracting parties will 
participate in any grouping of powers which 
is indirectly or directly aimed against the 
other party. 

''Article V. 

"Should disputes or conflicts arise between 
the contracting parties regarding questions of 
any kind whatsoever, the two parties would 
clear aM-ay these disputes or conflicts solely by 
means of friendly exchanges of views or if nec- 
essary, by arbitration commissions. 

"Article VI. 

"The present treaty is concluded for a period 
of ten years with the provision that unless one 
of the contracting parties denounces it one year 
before tlie end of this period the duration of 
the validity of this treaty is to be regarded 
as automatically prolonged for another five 
years. 



AUGUST 2 6, 19:!!) 

''Article VII. 

"The present treaty is to be ratified within 
the sliortest possible time. The docnnients of 
ratification are to be exchanged in Berlin. 
The treaty becomes effective immediately upon 
signature. 

"Drawn up in duplicate texts in the German 
and Russian languages. 

"Moscow, August 23, 1939. 

RiBBENTROP 
MOLOTOV" 

EDUCATION 

Convention for Facilitating the Interna- 
tional Circulation of Films of an Educa- 
tional Character 

By a circular letter dated June 29, 1939, the 
Secretary General of the League of Nations 
notified tlie countries on behalf of which the 
Convention for Facilitating the International 
Circulation of Films of an Educational Char- 
acter concluded at Geneva on October 11, 1933, 
was signed or acceded to, that the proces- 
verbal adopted at Geneva on September 12, 
1938, had been signed by 10 countries bound by 
the convention and that it would come into 
force on August 28, 1939, in conformity with 
paragraph III of the proces-verbal. 

According to a circular letter from the 
League of Nations dated August 14, 1939, the 
following was brought to the notice of the 
countries parties to the convention of October 
11, 1933: 

1. By the proces-verbal of September 12, 
1938, the functions allowed to the Inter- 
national Educational Cinematographic Insti- 
tute by articles IV, V, VI, VII, IX, XII, and 
XIII of the convention of October 11, 1933, 
are to be performed by the International Com- 
mittee on Intellectual Cooperation; 

2. The International Conmiittee on Intel- 
lectual Cooperation, having been authorized 
by the Assembly resolution of September 26, 
1938, to undertake those functions, appointed 



173 

a committee of experts to draft regulations for 
the application of the convention in accord- 
ance with article XIII; 

3. The committee of experts met at Paris 
from March 6 to 7, 1939, and adopted draft 
regulations, which were examined by the Ex- 
ecutive Committee of the International Com- 
mittee at its session held at Paris from April 
5 to 6, 1939 ; 

4. The i-egulations thus drawn up were ap- 
proved by the Council of the Leagaie of Na- 
tions, in accordance with article XIII of the 
convention, on May 27 last. 

According to the information of the Depart- 
ment the countries which have ratified or ad- 
hered to the convention of October 11, 1933, 
are as follows : Australia, including the terri- 
tories of Papua and Norfolk Island and the 
mandated territories of New Guinea and 
Nauru; Belgium; Bi-azil; Bulgaria; Chile; 
Cuba; Denmark; Egypt; Estonia; Great 
Britain; Greece; Hungary; India; Iran; 
Iraq; Ireland; Italy; Latvia; Monaco; New- 
foundland; Nicaragua; Norway; Poland; Ru- 
mania; Sweden; Switzerland; and Union of 
South Africa. 

This convention came into force on January 
15, 1935. 

PUBLICATIONS 

International Convention for the Suppres- 
sion of the Circulation of and Traffic in 
Obscene Publications 

Burma 

According to a circular letter from the 
League of Nations dated August 14, 1939. the 
Secretariat received on August 4, 1939, a noti- 
fication from the British Secretary of State for 
Foreign Affairs that, in accordance with the 
provisions of article 13 of the International 
Convention for the Suppression of the Circu- 
lation of and Traffic in Obscene Publications, 
signed at Geneva on September 12, 1923, in 
which Burma formerly participated as a part 
of India, His Majesty desires that the conven- 
tion should be regarded as having applied to 



174 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Burma as an overseas possession of His Maj- 
esty as from April 1, 1937, the date on which 
Burma was separated from India and acquired 
its new status. 

According to the information of the De- 
partment the following countries have ratified 
or adhered to the convention: Afghanistan; 
Albania; Australia, including the territories 
of Papua and Norfolk Island and the man- 
dated territories of New Guinea and Nauru; 
Belgium; Brazil; Bulgaria; Canada; China; 
Colombia; Cuba; Czechoslovakia; Danzig; 
Denmark; Egypt; Estonia; Finland; Ger- 
many; Great Britain, including the following 
territories : Bahamas, Barbados, Basutoland, 
Bechuanaland, Bermuda, British Guiana, Brit- 
ish Honduras, British Solomon Islands Pro- 
tectorate, Burma, Ceylon, Cyprus, Falkland 
Islands and dependencies, Fiji, Gambia (Col- 
ony and Protectorate), Gibraltar, Gilbert and 
Ellice Islands Colony, Gold Coast, Hong Kong, 
Jamaica, Kenya (Colony and Protectorate), 
Leeward Islands, Federated Malay States, Non- 
federated Malay States (Brunei, Johore, 
Kedah, Kelantan, Trengganu), Malta, Mau- 
ritius, Nigeria (Colony, Protectorate, and 
Cameroons under British mandate), Northern 
Khodesia,- Nyasaland, Palestine, St. Helena, 
Seychelles, Sierra Leone (Colony and Protec- 
torate) , Somaliland, Straits Settlements, Swazi- 
land, Tanganyika Territory, Trans-Jordan, 
Trinidad and Tobago, Uganda, Windward Is- 
lands, and Zanzibar); Greece; Guatemala; 
Hungary; India; Iran; Iraq; Ireland; Italy; 
Japan; Latvia; Luxemburg; San Marino; 
Monaco; the Netherlands, including the Neth- 
erlands Indies, Surinam, and Curasao; New- 
foundland; New Zealand, including the man- 
dated territory of Western Samoa; Norway; 
Paraguay; Poland; Portugal; Rumania; El 
Salvador; Southern Rhodesia; Spain; Switzer- 
land; Thailand (Siam) ; Tiu'key; Union of 
South Africa, including the mandated terri- 
tory of South-Wcst Africa; Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics; and Yugoslavia. 

The convention came into force on August 7 
1924. 



WOMEN AND CHILDREN 

International Conventions for the Suppres- 
sion of Traffic in Women and Children 

Burma 

There is quoted below the text of a note 
dated April 4, 1939, addressed to the French 
Minister for Foreign Affairs by the British 
Embassy at Paris, setting forth the conditions 
under which the Agreement for the Repression 
of the Trade in White Women, signed in Paris 
May 18, 1904 (Treaty Series No. 496; 35 Stat., 
pt. 2, 1979), and the Convention Relating to 
the Suppression of the White Slave Trade, 
signed at Paris Ma}' 4, 1910, are applicable to 
Burma which now possesses the status of a 
British ovcr.seas territory : 

4th April, 1939. 
Monsieur le Ministee, 

On the instructions of His Majesty's Prin- 
cipal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, 
I have the honour to inform Your Excellency 
that Burma, which participated as part of 
India in the International Agreement for the 
Suppression of the White Slave Traffic, signed 
at Paris on the 18th May 1904 and in the 
International Convention of the White Slave 
Traffic, signed at Paris on the 4th May, 1910, 
was separated from India on the 1st April 
1937, and now possesses the status of a British 
overseas territory. Consequently, His Majesty 
the King of Great Britain, Ireland and the 
British Dominions Beyond the Seas, Emperor 
of India, hereby gives notice (1) that the 
above-mentioned agreement of 1904 is to be 
regarded as applying to Burma as a British 
possession in accordance with Article 2 of the 
Proces-Verbal of signature attached thereto; 
and (2) that the Convention of 1910 is to be 
regarded as applying to Burma as a British 
Possession in accordance with Article 11 
thereof, subject to the following reservation 
which corresponds to that made in respect of 
India at the time of her accession, viz: 

"Burma reserves the right at her discretion 
to substitute the age of 16 years or any greater 



AUGUST 2 6, 19 3 9 

age that may subsequently be decided upon for 
the age limit prescribed in paragraph B of the 
Final Protocol of the Convention". 

2. As regards the fourth sub-paragraph of 
Article 11 of the Convention of 1910, I have 
the honour to inform Your Excellency that 
the methods of transmission which are recog- 
nised for Letters of Request addressed to or 
emanating from Burma are the second and 
third of those set forth in Article 6 of the 
Convention. 

3. I have the honour to request that the 
other States parties to the above-mentioned 
Conventions may be informed of the new posi- 
tion of Burma under them, and that Your Ex- 
cellency will be so good as to acknowledge 
the receipt of the present Note. 

I have [etc.] Eric Phipps 

According to the information of the De- 
partment the countries which have ratified or 
adhered to the agreement of 1904 are as fol- 
lows: United States of America; Australia; 
Belgium; Brazil; Bulgaria; Canada; China; 
Colombia ; Cuba ; Czechoslovakia ; Free City of 
Danzig ; Deimiark ; Dutch East Indies ; Egypt ; 
El Salvador; Estonia; Finland; France and 
French colonies ; Germany ; Great Britain (in- 
cluding Bahamas, Barbados, British Guiana, 
Central Africa, Ceylon, Fiji Islands, Gambia, 
Gibraltar, Gilbert and Ellice Islands, Gold 
Coast, Hong Kong, Jamaica, Kenya, Leeward 
Islands, Malta, Mauritius, Newfoundland, 
Northern Nigeria, Nyasaland, Solomon 
Islands, Sarawak, St. Helena, Senegambia, 
Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somaliland, South- 
ern Rhodesia, Straits Settlements, Tanganyika, 
Trinidad, Uganda, Weihaiwei, Windward 
Islands, and Zanzibar); Hungary; Iceland; 
Italy; India; Japan; Luxemburg; Monaco; 
Morocco; the Netherlands; New Zealand; Nor- 
way; Palestine and Trans- Jordan ; Poland; 
Portugal; Thailand (Siam) ; Spain; Sweden; 
Switzerland; Tunis; Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics; Uruguay; and Yugoslavia. 

The countries which have ratified or adhered 
to the convention of 1910 are as follows: Bel- 
gium, Brazil, Great Britain (including Ba- 



175 

hamas, Barbados, Ceylon, Cyprus, Falkland 
Islands, Fiji Islands, Gibraltar, Gilbert and 
Ellice Islands, British Guiana, Guernsey, 
Grenada, Gold Coast, Honduras, Hong Kong, 
Isle of Man, Jamaica, Jersey, Kenya, Leeward 
Islands, Malta, Mauritius, Nyasaland, Sey- 
chelles Islands, Southern Rhodesia, Saint 
Lucia, Saint Vmcent, Sarawak, Sierra Leone, 
British Solomon Islands Protectorate, Straits 
Settlements, Trinidad, and AVindward Islands) , 
Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, 
Cuba, Curasao, Czechoslovakia, Free City of 
Danzig, Dutch East Indies, Egypt, Estonia, El 
Salvador, Finland, France and French 
colonies, Germany, Hungary, India, Iraq, 
Italy, Japan, Monaco, Morocco (French), 
Newfoundland, New Zealand, Netherlands, 
Nicaragua, Norway, Palestine, Poland, Portu- 
gal, South Africa, Spain, Surinam, Sweden, 
Switzerland, Thailand (Siam), Tunis, Union 
of Soviet Socialist Republics, Uruguay, and 
Yugoslavia. 

SAFETY 

Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea 
(Treaty Series No. 910) 

Indochina 

The British Ambassador in Washington in- 
formed the Secretary of State by a note dated 
August 16, 1939, that the date of the effect of 
the application to French Indochina of the 
International Convention for the Safety of 
Life at Sea, signed at London on May 13, 1939, 
was January 15, 1939, and not November 15, 
1938, as previously stated in the Ambassador's 
note of April 27, 1939. 

The countries which have ratified or adhered 
to the convention are as follows : United States 
of America; Argentina; Australia; Belgium; 
Brazil; Bulgai'ia; Burma; Canada; China; 
Danzig ; Denmark ; Egypt ; Eire ; Estonia ; Fin- 
land; France; French Indochina; Germany; 
Great Britain ; Greece ; Hong Kong ; Hungary ; 
Iceland; India; Italy; Italian colonies of 
Libya, Eritrea, and Somaliland, and Italian 
islands in the Aegean; Japan; Japan for 
Chosen, Taiwan, and leased territory of Kwan- 



176 



DEPAETMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



tung; Netherlands; Netherlands East Indies; 
New Zealand; Norway; Panama; Poland; Por- 
tugal; Eumania; Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics; Spain; Straits Settlements; and 
Sweden. 

FINANCE 

Convention With France for the Avoidance 
of Double Taxation 

The American Ambassador to France re- 
ported by a telegram dated August 11, 1939, 
that the Convention With France for the 
Avoidance of Double Taxation, signed at Paris 
on July 25, 1939, was ratified by the President 
of France by a decree dated July 29, 1939. 

POSTAL 

Universal Postal Convention of 1934 

Latvia 

The Egyptian Minister in Washington in- 
formed the Secretary of State by a note dated 
March 6, 1939, of the deposit with the Egyp- 
tian Government on January 26, 1939, of the 
jnstrum(!nt of ratification by Latvia of the 
Universal Postal Convention, signed at Cairo 
on March 20, 1934, and the following acts 
signed on the same day: 

Arrangement Concerning Letters and Parcels 
of Declared Value, and annexes 

Arrangement Concerning Parcels, and annexes 

Arrangement Concerning Postal Money Or- 
ders, and annexes 

Arrangement Concerning Check Accounts, and 
amiex 

Arrangement Concei'uing Postal Collections, 
and annex 

Arrangement Concerning Subscriptions to 
Newsi)ai)ers and Periodicals, and annex. 

According to the information of the De- 
partment the countries which have ratified or 
adhered to the convention are as follows: 
United States of America; Aden; Afghanis- 
tan; Albania; Algeria; Australia; Belgian 
Congo; Belgium; Burma; Canada; Chile; 
China; Colombia; Cuba; Czechoslovakia; 
Denmark; Dominican Republic; Ecuador; 
Egypt; El Salvador; Estonia; Ethiopia; Fin- 



land; France, including colonies and protec- 
torates of Indochina; Germany; Great Brit- 
ain; Guatemala; Haiti; Honduras; Hungary; 
Iceland; India; Iran; Iraq; Italy, including 
Tripolitania, Cyrenaica, Eriti'ea, and Somali- 
land; Japan, including dependencies; Latvia; 
Liberia ; Lithuania ; Luxemburg ; Mexico ; 
Morocco (French); Netherlands; New Zea- 
land; Norway; Panama; Peru; Philippine 
Islands; Poland; Portugal; Rumania; Saudi 
Arabia; Union of South Africa; Union of So- 
viet Socialist Republics; Spain; Sweden; 
Switzerland ; Syria and Lebanon ; Thailand 
(Siam) ; Tunisia; Turkey; Vatican City State; 
Venezuela; Yemen; and Yugoslavia. 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

North American Regional Broadcasting 

Agreement 

Dominican Republic 

The American Legation at Cividad Trujillo 
transmitted to the Department with a despatch 
dated July 26, 1939, a copy of the Ofjicial 
Gazette of July 8, 1939 (No. 5332), which con- 
tains the text of Resolution No. 135, promul- 
gated by the President of the Dominican Re- 
public on June 27, 1939, by which the Domini- 
can Congress approves the ratification of the 
North American Regional Broadcasting Agree- 
ment signed at Habana on December 13, 1937. 
According to the information of the Depart- 
ment the countries which have deposited their 
instruments of ratification of this agreement 
are the United States, Canada, Cuba, and 
Haiti. 

This agreement has not yet entered into 
force. 

Inter-American Arrangement Concerning 
Radiocommunications 

Dominican Repuhlic 

Tlie Official Gazette of July 8, 1939 (No. 
5332), transmitted to the Department by the 
American Legation at Ciudad Trujillo under 
date of July 26, 1939, publishes the text of 
Resolution No. 136 of the Dominican Congress 



promulgated by the President of the Domini- 
can Re23ublic on June 27, 1939, approving the 
ratification of the Inter-American Arrange- 
ment Concerning Radiocommunications signed 
at Habana on December 13, 1937. According 
to the information of the Department the 
countries wliicli have deposited instruments 
of ratification of this ai'iangement are the 
United States, Canada, Chile, Haiti, Mexico, 
Panama, and Peru. 

Inter-American Radiocommunications Con- 
vention (Treaty Series No. 938) 

Brazil 

The Amei'ican Embassy at Rio de Janeiro 
transmitted to the Department with a despatch 
dated August 4, 1939, a copy of Decree Law 
No. 1435, of July 20, 1939, published in the 
Diario Oficial of July 27, 1939, by which the 
Brazilian Government approves, with reserva- 



177 

tions, the Inter-American Radiocommunica- 
tions Convention signed at Habana on Decem- 
ber 13, 1937, and annexes. 

According to the information of the Depart- 
ment the countries which have deposited their 
instruments of ratification of this convention 
ai'e the United States of America, Canada, 
Cuba, Dominican Republic, Haiti, Mexico, 
Panama, and Peru. 

International Telecommunication Conven- 
tion (Treaty Series No. 867) 

In the Bulletin for July 22, 1939 (Vol. I, 
No. 4), page 64, the date of approval by 
Danzig of the Regulations of Cairo, 1938, 
should read January 7, 1939, instead of Janu- 
ary 1, 1939, and the date of approval by New- 
foundland of the General and Additional 
Radio Regulations of Cairo, 1938, should read 
June 22, 1939, instead of June 6, 1939. 



U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1939 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D, C. — rrice 10 cents - - . - _ Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRBCTOE OP THE BtJEEAU OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 




^sr 




-A^ 



SEPTEMBER 2, 1939 
Vol. I: No. 10 — Publication l^yi 



Qontents 




Europe: 

Bombardment from the air of civilian populations: Page 

President Roosevelt's appeal 181 

Reply of France 181 

Reply of Great Britain 182 

Reply of Italy 182 

Reply of Poland 182 

Reply of Germany 183 

Appeals for peace: 

Reply of King Victor Emmanuel of Italy to President 

Roosevelt's appeal for peace 183 

Reply of Chancellor Hitler of Germany to President 

Roosevelt's appeal for peace 183 

Endorsement by Ecuador 184 

Endorsement by Haiti 184 

German- Polish relations and the anschluss of Danzig . 184 
German restrictions on movement of neutral aircraft . 185 
Evacuation of American citizens from Europe .... 185 
Presentation of letters of credence by the British 

Ambassador 186 

The American republics: 

Payment to Nicaragua in settlement of treaty obliga- 
tion ... 187 

General: 

Remarks by Hugh R. Wilson before the Veterans of 

Foreign Wars 188 

[Ower] 



i^ 



Departmental changes: Page 

Special Division established 193 

Foreign Service: 

Death of Julius G. Lay 194 

International conferences, commissions, etc.: 
Fifth Meeting of the International Radio Consulting 

Committee 194 

Twenty-seventh International Congress of American- 
ists 194 

Treaty information: 
Organization: 

Protocol for the Amendment of the Preamble, of Ar- 
ticles 1, 4, and 5, and of the Annex to the Covenant 

of the League of Nations 195 

Education: 

Proc^s-Verbal Concerning the AppUcation of Ar- 
ticles IV, V, VI, VII, IX, XII, and XIII of the 
Convention of October 11, 1933, for Facilitating 
the International Circulation of Films of an Edu- 
cational Character 195 

Extradition: 

Extradition Treaty With Liberia 195 

Extradition Treaty With Monaco 195 

Health: 

Convention Modifying the International Sanitary 

Conventionof June 21, 1926 195 

NationaUty: 

Convention With Finland Regulating MiUtary Obli- 
gations in Certain Cases of Double Nationahty . . 196 
Commerce: 

Treaty of Commerce and Navigation With Iraq . . . 196 
Treaty of Friendship, Commerce, and Navigation 

With Liberia 196 

Labor: 

Conventions of the International Labor Conference . 196 
Navigation: 

International Load Line Convention (Treaty Series 

No. 858) 196 

Agreement Concerning Manned Lightships Not on 

Their Stations 197 

Publications: 

Convention on Interchange of PubUcations 197 

Consular: 

Consular Convention With Liberia 197 



Europe 



BOMBARDMENT FROM THE AIR OF CIVILIAN POPULATIONS 



President Roosevelt's Appeal 

[Released to the press September 1] 

The President at 4 : 30 o'clock the morning 
of September 1 addressed the following mes- 
sage to the Governments of Great Britain, 
France, Italy, Germany, and Poland : 

"The ruthless bombing from the air of civil- 
ians in unfortified centers of population dur- 
ing the course of the hostilities which have 
raged in various quarters of the earth during 
the past few years, which has resulted in the 
maiming and in the death of thousands of 
defenseless men, women and children, has 
sickened the hearts of every civilized man and 
woman, and has profoundly shocked the con- 
science of humanity. 

"If resort is had to this form of inhuman 
barbarism during the period of the tragic con- 
flagration with which the world is now con- 
fronted, hundreds of thousands of innocent 
human beings who have no responsibility for, 
and who are not even remotely participating 
in, the hostilities which have now broken out, 
will lose their lives. I am therefore addressing 
this urgent appeal to every government which 
may be engaged in hostilities publicly to affirm 
its determination that its armed forces shall in 
no event, and under no circumstances, under- 
take the bombardment from the air of civilian 
populations or of unfortified cities, upon the 
understanding that these same rules of war- 
fare will be scrupulously observed by all of 
their opponents. I request an immediate reply. 
Franklin D. Roosevelt" 



Reply of France 

[Released to the press September 1] 

Following is the text of the reply of the 
French Government to the President's message 
of September 1, 1939. Ambassador William 
C. Bullitt at Paris received the text at 6:15 
(Paris time) the evening of September 1 from 
the French Foreign Office: 

"Mr. Ambassador : 

"You kindly handed me this morning an 
urgent message from the President of the 
United States of America. 

"I have the honor to address to you here- 
with the reply of the French Government. 

"The French Government hastens to reply to 
the appeal, which the President of the United 
States of America addresses to all Govern- 
ments which may find themselves engaged in 
the conflict, to ask them to avoid all recourse, 
in every case and in every circumstance, to 
bombardment from the air of civilian popula- 
tions. 

"The French Government highly appreciat- 
ing the spirit which inspires the initiative of 
President Franklin D. Roosevelt, affirms its 
firm intention to conduct hostilities, if war 
should be imposed upon it as a result of the 
German aggression, in strict accord with the 
laws of war ; and to do everything in its power 
to spare civilian populations the sufferings 
which modern war may entail. It is in this 
spirit of humanity, which has always dictated 
in all circumstances the conduct of the French 
Government, that orders have already been 

181 



182 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BXnXETIN 



given to the Commander-in-Chief of all the 
French forces. 

"These orders exclude in particular the bom- 
bardment of civilian populations, and limit 
bombardment from the air to strictly military 
objectives. 

"It goes without saying that the French 
Government reserves the right to have recourse 
to any action which it might consider appro- 
priate, if the adversary should not observe the 
restrictions to which the French Government 
itself has subjected the operations of its air 
forces." 

Reply of Great Britain 

[Released to the press September 1] 

Following is the text of the reply from His 
Britannic Majesty's Govennnent to the Presi- 
dent's message of September 1, 1939: 

"His Majesty's Government welcome the 
weighty and moving appeal of the President 
of the United States against the bombardment 
from the air of civilian populations or of un- 
fortified cities. Deeply impressed by the 
humanitarian considerations to which the 
President's message refers, it was already the 
settled policy of His Majesty's Government 
should they become involved in hostilities to 
refrain from such action and to confine bom- 
bardment to strictly military objectives upon 
the understanding that those same rules will 
be scrui^ulously observed by all their oppo- 
nents. Tliey had already concerted in detail 
with certain other governments the rules that 
in such an event they would impose upon them- 
selves and make publicly known." 

Reply of Italy 

[Released to the press September 1] 

Ambassador William Phillips at Rome on 
September 1 reported that the following oral 
statement was given to him by an official at the 
Foreign Office at 5 p. m. (Italian time) , in reply 
to the President's message of September 1, 1939 : 

"Since the Fascist Government after today's 
meeting of the Council of Ministers has offi- 



cially declared and announced 'that Italy will 
not take any initiative in military operations' 
the possibility which formed the object of the 
message from the President of the United States 
dated September 1 is therefore to be excluded 
as far as concerns Italy." 



Reply of Poland 

[Released to the press September 1] 

Following is the text of a note received by the 
Sexjretary of State the night of September 1 
fi'om the Polish Ambassador in answer to the 
President's message of September 1 : 

"Sir: 

"Upon instructions of my Government I have 
the honor to request your good offices in trans- 
mitting to the President the following reply of 
the Polish Government to his message of this 
morning. 

"The text of the reply is as follows : 

" 'The Polish Government acknowledge with 
thanks President Roosevelt's telegram regard- 
ing bombing from the air of civilians in un- 
fortified centers of population during war. 
They entirely agree with the principles ex- 
pressed and with the feelings which inspire 
them. It is with these principles in mind that 
the supreme military authorities in Poland is- 
sued formal orders to refrain in the event of 
war from the bombardment of open towns and 
from such similar action as would be of direct 
danger to the civilian population. Unfor- 
tunately Poland whose territory has been since 
this early morning the object of unprovoked 
aggression by German forces has already been 
the victim of several attacks by air. The re- 
ported losses in civilian population render it 
doubtful as to whether the opposing side is re- 
specting the rules to which the President refers. 
These rules which are the outcome of natural 
human feelings remain in force on condition 
and on the understanding that they will be also 
scrupulously observed by the opposing party.' 



"Accept [etc.] 



Jerzt Potocki" 



SEPTEMBER 2, 19 39 



183 



Reply of Germany 

[Released to the press September 2] 

The American Charge at Berlin, Mr. Alex- 
ander C. Kirk, reported to the Dejjartment of 
State the night of September 1 that he was in 
receipt of a note signed by the Minister for 
Foreign Affairs forwarding a message from 
the German Chancellor, of which the follow- 
ing is a ti-anslation, with the request that it be 
transmitted immediately to the President: 

"Berlin, September 1, 1939. 
"Dear Mr. Charge d'affaires: 

"With reference to your note of today, in 
which you communicated to me a message from 
tlie President of the United States concerning 
the bombing of nomnilitary objectives, I have 
the honor to convey to you below the reply of 
the Eeich Chancellor to tliis message: 

" 'The view expressed in the message of 
President Roosevelt that it is a humanitarian 



principle to refrain from the bombing of non- 
military objectives under all circumstances in 
connection with military operations, corre- 
sponds completely with my own point of view 
and has been advocated by me before. I, 
therefore, unconditionally endorse the proposal 
that the governments taking part in the hos- 
tilities now in progress make public a declara- 
tion in this sense. 

" 'For my own part, I already gave notice 
in my Reichstag speech of today that the Ger- 
man air force had received the order to re- 
strict its operations to military objectives. It 
is a self-understood prerequisite for the main- 
tenance of this order that opposing air forces 
adhere to the same rule. Adolf Hitler.' 

"I should be very grateful to you if you 
would communicate the above answer immedi- 
ately to President Roosevelt. 

"I avail myself [etc.] Ribbentrop" 



+ + + -f -f -f > 



APPEALS FOR PEACE 



Reply of King Victor Emmanuel of Italy to 
President Roosevelt's Appeal for Peace 

[Released to the press August 30] 

Following is a translation of a message from 
the King of Italy to the President of the 
United States: 

"August 30, 1939. 

"I am grateful to you for your interest. I 
have iminediately transmitted your message to 
my Government. As is known to all, there has 
been done and there is being done by us what- 
ever is possible to bring about a peace with 
justice. 

VlTTORIO EmANXTELe" 

Reply of Chancellor Hitler of Germany to 
President Roosevelt's Appeal for Peace 

[Released to the press September 1] 

Following is a translation of a message re- 
ceived this afternoon by the Secretary of State 



from the German Charge in tlie United States, 
Mr. Hans Thomsen: 

"German Embassy, 
Washington, D. C, August 31^ 1939. 

"Mr. Secretary of State: 

"By order of my Government, I wish to use 
your kind intermediary for the purpose of 
stating to the President of the United States 
that his messages of August 25 and 26 ad- 
dressed to the German Fuehrer and Reich 
Chancellor have been greatly appreciated by 
the latter. 

"The German Fuehrer and Reich Chancellor 
has also, on Ms side, left nothing untried for 
the purpose of settling the dispute between 
Germany and Poland in a friendly manner. 
Even at the last hour he accepted an offer from 
the Government of Great Britain to mediate in 
this dispute. Owing to the attitude of the 



184 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Polish Government, however, all these en- 
deavors have remained without result. 
"Accept [etc.] Thomsen" 

Endorsement by Ecuador 

Following are a translation of a message re- 
ceived by the President from the President of 
the Republic of Ecuador and President Roose- 
velt's reply: 

[Released to the press August 28] 

"Quito, August 26, 1939. 
"In this grave hour I adhere to the new 
urgent appeal which Your Excellency has 
made to European countries to seek the neces- 
sary solution of their differences by pacific 
means. 'Wliether that noble invitation is ac- 
cepted or not. Your Excellency will have de- 
sei-ved the applause of all men who are 
observing, with fear, the approach of a 
catastrophe for civilization. 

AuKELIO MOSQUERA NaRVAEZ" 

[Released to the press August 30] 

"August 29, 1939. 
"I have received with the deepest apprecia- 
tion Your Excellency's message. It is indeed 
heartening to have this additional proof of the 
devotion of Your Excellency and of the 
Government of Ecuador to the cause of peace 
and to learn that the efforts which I have made 
on behalf of the maintenance of peace meet 
with your support and with your approval. 
Franklin D. Roosevelt" 

Endorsement by Haiti 

[Released to the press August 31] 

Following are a translation of a message re- 
ceived by the President from the President of 
the Republic of Haiti and President Roosevelt's 
reply : 

"Port-au-Prince, August 30, 1939. 
"Both in my name and in that of the Haitian 
people I ask Your Excellency to accept my 
most cordial felicitations on your recent and 



always generous interventions in favor of peace. 
The Haitian people, which is developing in 
peace, is happy to take this opportunity to 
renew to Your Excellency the assurance of its 
complete devotion to the noble cause which you 
are defending with so much faith and energy 
in the higher interest of humanity and civili- 
zation. I confirm to Your Excellency my 
former precise declarations on the complete 
collaboration of my country in the work of 
defending peace by all the means in its power. 

Stenio Vincent" 

"The White House, August 31, 1939. 
"At this critical time I am indeed grateful 
for the message which in Your Excellency's 
name and in that of the Haitian people so reso- 
lutely supports the efforts of this Government 
for peace, and reaffirms the determination of 
Haiti, by all the means in its power, to co- 
operate in its preservation. Your Excellency's 
message will encourage and hearten all of 
those who, joining with the peoples of the 
Americas, favor the settlement of international 
differences by peaceful means. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt" 

-♦■ ^ -f 

GERMAN-POLISH RELATIONS AND 
THE ANSCHLUSS OF DANZIG 

[Released to the press September 1] 

Tlie Department of State received the fol- 
lowing telegram at 4:28 a. m., September 1, 
from the American Charge in Berlin, Mr. Alex- 
ander C. Kirk: 

"A proclamation by Hitler has just been is- 
sued declaring that the Polish State has re- 
jected a peaceful solution of the problem of 
neighborly relations with Germany and after 
enumerating offenses committed by Poland 
against German rights and territory states that 
force must be met by force and that the bat- 
tle will be fought in defense of German terri- 
tory and honor. 



SEPTEMBER 2, 1939 



185 



"It is also announced that the anschluss of 
Danzig to the Reich has been declared and has 
been communicated by Forster to Hitler. 

"The Embassy has been notified by the For- 
eign Office that a meeting of the Reichstag will 
take place at 10 o'clock this morning." 

-f -f > 

GERMAN RESTRICTIONS ON MOVE- 
MENT OF NEUTRAL AIRCRAFT 

[Released to tlie press September 1] 

The American Charge at Berlin, Mr. Alex- 
ander C. Kirk, reported to the Department of 
State September 1 that the following is a 
translation of a note dated September 1 which 
he had just received from the German Foreign 
Office: 

"The Foreign Office has the honor to inform 
the Embassy of the United States of America 
as follows with the request for immediate 
forwarding to the Government of the United 
States of America : 



"Declaration of Territort or Aviation 
Warning 

"For the sake of protection against hostile 
attacks by Polish air forces, military opera- 
tions over the Danzig Bay and the territory 
of the Polish state must be expected from the 
time of this announcement. All neutral air- 
craft are warned in their own interest against 
flying over the territories mentioned below. 
These territories are the territory of the Polish 
state and the sea area bounded on the west by 
the parallel of longitude 18 degrees 5 east, also 
the Polish border, on the east by the parallel 
of longitude 20 degrees east (near Bruesterort) 
on the north by the parallel of latitude 55 de- 
grees north. In these areas neutral aircraft are 
exposed to the danger of being shot at if they 
render assistance to Polish forces, if they do 
not land immediately on warning shots given 
by German air forces with tracer shells in 
front of the warned aircraft, or if they act 
contrary to the instruction to keep to a given 
course or to abstain from communications." 



■f -f -f -f 4 -f -f 



EVACUATION OF AMERICAN CITIZENS FROM EUROPE 



[Released to the press September 1] 

As it is obviously the wish of the Govern- 
ment of the United States to facilitate the re- 
moval of American citizens from the Euro- 
pean scene of possible danger, there was 
formed, as of August 23, a committee consist- 
ing of representatives for the State and Navy 
Departments and the Maritime Commission, 
for the purpose of studying practical means 
for making available to the numerous Ameri- 
cans now in Europe transportation to the 
United States. With the same end in view, 
certain American ambassadors in Europe have 
issued warnings to American citizens to return 
to the United States. These precautionary 
measures have the support of the United States 
Government, which, while refraining from or- 
dering Americans out of Europe, considers 



that those of its citizens who are there in the 
capacity of tourists and others who have no 
impelling reason for remaining would be well 
advised to return to this country. 

In order to facilitate this, the United States 
Government has been cooperating with certain 
American shipping concerns, which have al- 
tered schedules and itineraries of certain of 
their vessels in order to shorten turnaround 
and thus make more voyages available for the 
rapid evacuation of American citizens. The 
Government is endeavoring to bring about this 
program of orderly evacuation with the least 
possible disturbance to existing commercial 
shipping services. In view of the emergency 
the Government has seen fit in certain in- 
stances to grant permission for certain well- 
equipped and fast freight ships to carry pas- 



186 



DEPARTMENT OP STATE BUIJ:,ETIN 



sengers in addition to permitting the carriage 
of an increased number of persons by passen- 
ger vessels. 

The success of these governmental measures 
is evidenced by tlie fact that, according to a 
report from the Embassy in London yester- 
day, passenger accommodations on vessels sail- 
ing to the United States from Great Britain 
exceed the demand for such accommodations. 
Some vessels were reported to have as many as 
12, 30, and even 40 berths available. 

According to statistics available to the De- 
partment for the week ended September 1, 
some 9,300 passengers arrived at United States 
Atlantic ports from Europe. In addition to 
these, for the same period, some 1,200 pas- 



sengers, a large percentage of whom were pos- 
sibly Americans, arrived at Canadian ports. 

It is interesting to note that of those enter- 
ing United States ports, some 54 persons ar- 
rived by trans-Atlantic airships. Thus, for 
the first time in history, air travel has served 
as a transoceanic means of evacuation. 

From September 1 to October 4 scheduled 
westbound sailings of American vessels have 
a capacity of about 9,000 passengers while 
scheduled westbound ships of prospective neu- 
tral countries have accommodations for some 
8,000 passengers, a total of 17.000. In addition 
a considerable number of passengers may be 
accommodated on vessels of the around-the- 
world services returning to United States ports 
through the Mediterranean. 



+ -f -f ^ -f -♦- -f 



PRESENTATION OF LETTERS OF CREDENCE BY THE BRITISH 

AMBASSADOR 



f Released to the press August 30] 

Bemarks of the newly appointed British Am- 
hanHudor, the Most Honorable the Marquess of 
Lothian, C . Tl., upon the occasion of the presen- 
tation of his letters of ci'edence: 

Mr. PKEsmENT: 

In handing you today the Royal letter ac- 
crediting me as His Majesty's Ambassador to 
the United States I ani instructed by the King, 
my august sovereign, to convey to you his 
friendly greetings and to express to you his 
earnest hope foi- the happiness and prosperity of 
the United States. 

I have further been instructed by Their 
Majesties the King and Qtiecn to convey to you, 
Mr. President, and through you to the Ameri- 
can people, their most grateful thanks for the 
cordial welcome and the unbounded hospitality 
that were extended to them on the occasion 
of their recent visit to the United States. The 
friendly impressions they derived from that 
visit will not soon fad", from Their Majesties' 



minds, and they feel that it was evidence not 
only of the good will and understanding which 
now exist between the British and the American 
peoples but that nothing that can arise is likely 
to disturb this happy state of affairs. 

These sentiments are shared to the full by 
His Majesty's Government in the United King- 
dom. Following the example set by my dis- 
tinguished predecessor. Sir Ronald Lindsay, 
and in accordance with my instructions, I shall 
do my utmost to maintain and fortify the good 
relations which now for many years have ex- 
isted between Great Britain and the United 
States, and I trust that in this congenial task 
I shall receive your support, Mr. President, and 
that of your administration. 

Unfortunately, I assume my office at a time 
when the whole world is disturbed by war, by 
rumors of war, and by preparations for war. 
It is the first purpose of the Government I have 
the honor to represent to do everything in its 
power to maintain peace, to bring about what- 



SEPTEMBER 2, 19 39 



187 



ever political and economic adjustments reason 
and justice may require by pacific means, and so 
help to bring the nations back to stable pros- 
perity and stable peace. They are confident 
that in this search for peace they are only pur- 
suing the same ends which you, Mr. President, 
and the American people also have at heart. 

May I in conclusion express my own keen 
pleasure in being accredited as His Majesty's 
Ambassador to the United States. I have for 
many years been a frequent visitor to these 
shores, and I have long entertained a deep 
affection and admiration for the remarkable 
qualities and achievements of the American 
people and for the institutions under which 
they live. 

President Roosevelfs reply to the remarks of 
the Marquess of Lothian: 

Mr. Ambassador: 

It is a source of special gratification to re- 
ceive you as His Britannic Majesty's Ambas- 
sador and to acknowledge His Majesty's kind 
and friendly wishes on my behalf and on that 
of the American people. 

I cordially reciprocate these good wishes and 
ask you to convey to your sovereign, whose re- 
cent visit to the United States in company with 
Her Majesty emphasized the close friendship 
between the American and British peoples, my 
earnest hope for the tranquillity, prosperity, 
and hapjiiness of the British people and the 
success of the wise and patriotic labors of His 
Majesty for their welfare. 

It is the sincere desire of the American Gov- 
ernment and people that the relationship of 
mutual cordiality and mutual respect now hap- 
pily existing between our countries shall con- 
tinue to prevail as one of the cornerstones upon 
which the structure of peace is founded. Your 
predecessor, Sir Eonald Lindsay, won a dis- 
tinguished place in the esteem of my country- 
men for his labors over many years to foster 
practical understanding between the British 
and American Nations, and I confidently antic- 
ipate that you, Mr. Ambassador, whose achieve- 
ment in the field of international cooperation is 
well known to us, have come prepared to work 
hard in the same cause. 



The principal task of international states- 
manship is to effect peaceful and constructive 
solutions of controversies between nations and 
thus to obviate the folly of war, which unhap- 
pily seems to overshadow the world today. The 
American Government and people have con- 
sistently over many years devoted themselves to 
the search for permanent peace and an end of 
the fear of aggression. In this effort, I am 
happy to record, they have always found that 
the British Government and people were pur- 
suing the same ends. It is particularly gratify- 
ing, therefore, to receive from you, Mr. Ambas- 
sador, at this time of crisis, renewed assurance 
of your Government's determination to main- 
tain the peace. 

I take pleasure in welcoming you to the 
United States and in expressing the hope that 
your stay in this country may be long and 
happy. 



The American Republics 



PAYMENT TO NICARAGUA IN SETTLE- 
MENT OF TREATY OBLIGATION 

[Released to the press September 2] 

The Minister of Nicaragua in Washington, 
Dr. Don .Leon De Bayle, called at the Depart- 
ment of State today to receive from the Under 
Secretary, Mr. Sumner Welles, a check on the 
Treasurer of the United States in the amount 
of $72,000. This payment was made in ac- 
cordance Avith the provisions of article II of 
the treaty of April 14, 1938, between the United 
States of America and the Republic of Nicara- 
gua. An appropriation for this purpose was 
contained in the Department of State Appro- 
priation Act for the fiscal year 1940. 

This treaty provided for the adjustment of 
certain accounts of indebtedness and a claim 
for a refund of income taxes between the United 
States and Nicaragua. A description of the 
treaty will be found in the Press Releases of 
April 16, 1938 (Vol. XVIII, No. 446), pp. 
488-489. 



General 



REMARKS BY HUGH R. WILSON BEFORE THE VETERANS OF FOREIGN 

WARS^ 



[Released to tbe press August 29] 

Mr. Chairman, my most genuine thanks for 
your references to me. They are deeply ap- 
preciated. 

It is my privilege to speak to the Veterans 
of Foreign Wars on the fortieth anniversary 
of the founding of your organization. Forty 
years in our lives comprises events of immense 
historical significance. Your organization 
epitomizes the crucial points of the history of 
our lifetimes. Gentlemen, I congratulate you 
on your organization and on your anniversary. 
May you have many hapj^y returns of the day. 

Surely there is no group of men in the 
United States who have a deeper interest than 
yourselves in the foreign policy of your Gov- 
ernment. You have taken your risks and 
given your service at times when the use of 
force has been necessary in our relations with 
some foreign nation ; you have every right and 
every reason to have a deep interest in the 
tendencies and fluctuations, in the struggle of 
opposing theories, which in a democracy make 
the resultant of foreign policy. 

Let there be no mistake about this irjatter ; in 
our form of govermnent, policy in respect of 
foreign affairs, as policy in respect of internal 
matters, is not determined in a vacuum. Plans 
arc not laid and moves are not made irrespec- 
tive of what the American public is thinking 
and feeling, merely in accordance with the 
persoiuil predilections of a small group of men 
working behind closed doors and in secret. 
The men who shape; our foreign policy know 
better than otliers tliat in the final analysis the 
public opinion of (he American people is going 

'Delivered by Mr. Wilson, American Ambassador to 
Germany, at the annuMl linnquet of the fortieth na- 
tioual encampment of Veterans of Foreign Wars, Bos- 
ton, Mass., August 28, 1030. 
188 



to prevail and that a policy can only be con- 
sidered seriously if it is in harmony with that 
opinion. Public opinion can sometimes be 
altered, or if you like, educated into a different 
direction. It may be influenced, canalized, 
molded, or encouraged, but it would be a 
bold executive indeed who would dare to 
disregard it. 

I am told that during encampments of pre- 
vious years 3'our subject for discussion, under 
different names, has been the means of keep- 
ing the United States from being under the 
necessity of entering another war. I am told 
further that there has been wide evolution in 
your thought as to how this purpose was to be 
accomplished. It will be in line with your 
earlier endeavors then if I discuss this prob- 
lem. I shall try to add my bit to the finding 
of a way to prevent a further influx of young 
recruits qualified to join the Veterans of 
Foreign Wars. 

We use the phrase constantly, "How shall we 
keep the United States out of war?" I prefer 
the phrase "How shall we keep the United 
States at peace?" Tliere is not perhaps a very 
deep distinction; certainly, however, there is 
some. We might perhaps keep the country out 
of war but still have a country that was torn 
by internal dissension, that was riven by its 
sentimental predispositions, that was torn by 
class struggle as a result of the sympathies or 
antipathies for one or the other parties to a 
struggle abroad. We might have all these 
things and still keep the coimtry out of war. 
But could we say imder such circumstances 
that the United States was at peace? A peace- 
ful nation presup^joses internal harmony, unity 
of purpose in its foreign objectives, a sense of 
patriotism and duty to the state pervading all 
strata of society. Only thus can our Nation 



SEPTEMBER 2, 1939 



189 



be at peace, and only thus can we exercise the 
authority and the ability to further our own in- 
terests, which our resoiu'ces and abilities hold 
open for us. Hence I submit that our prob- 
lem is to keep the Nation at peace and that 
such is and should be the major objective of 
your Government. 

I state without fear of contradiction that all 
men of good will in the country share this ob- 
jective. I have yet to meet the mentally adult 
man who does not proclaim that such is his in- 
tention and desire. We are as united in our 
primary ojiposition to war as we are in our 
opposition to sin, and we are about as widely 
split in our methods of gaining our first pur- 
pose as we are in our methods of making the 
world a better place to live in. Men of the 
most unquestioned patriotism are profoundly 
divided on the method of keeping the United 
States at peace. But all of them desire to 
do so. 

The great difficulty of legislating in time 
of peace in anticipation for war is that you 
are passing legislation to provide for a con- 
tingency of which you are unaware of the 
facts. Men with finite minds cannot foresee 
the infinite complexities that may arise, and 
legislation designed to meet one contingency 
may prove totally inadequate to meet the 
actual phenomenon which does arise. Indeed 
it may be that in the way in which the crisis 
presents itself, the legislation already adopted 
may accomplish a purpose the exact opposite 
of that anticipated. At the time of the out- 
break of hostilities between Japan and China 
there was a so-called "neutrality law" on our 
statute books. The President did not find that 
"a state of war" existed, in the language of the 
act, and the law was not put into effect. And 
this action or rather this omission to act met 
with the general approval of the people of the 
United States. At the time of beginning of 
the civil war in Spain a scrutiny of the neu- 
trality law showed at once that its provisions 
were inadequate to meet the situation, so a 
law had to be enacted hastily to cover a situa- 
tion which could not have been foreseen by 
our legislators. Thus experiences have shown 



that in two important external contingencies 
of the past few years the neutrality legislation 
was not adequate to meet the situation. Legis- 
lation prepared in advance may favor the side 
in a conflict to which our public opinion is 
overwhelmingly hostile ; equally its rigid terms 
may be the very conditions that would involve 
us in the risk of war. 

Furthermore, can anyone conceive that laws 
prepared in time of peace could survive any 
appreciable time against a public opinion in- 
flamed by the passions engendered by a foreign 
war of any magnitude? Certainly, if such a 
war breaks out and if the provisions of the 
existing laws on neutrality do not happen to 
coincide with the sympathies and desires of the 
American people, then the law, unless, as I 
propose to explain later, it is strictly limited 
in scope and designed primarily to prevent 
an unwarranted or unnecessary loss of Ameri- 
can lives, will be swept away like chaff. When 
I was at college a number of years ago, it was 
the custom, whenever Yale was fortunate 
enough to defeat Harvard or Princeton at a 
football game in New Haven, for the under- 
graduates to pour into the evening perform- 
ance at the old Hyperion Theater and there 
give vent to their jubilation in a manner that 
might be termed by carping critics, riotous and 
indecorous. Each year the management of the 
theater would publish in the lobby regulations 
as to how far the celebration would be tol- 
erated. Viewing the results year by year I 
was struck with wonder at the simple opti- 
mism of the management. Watching attempts 
at legislation for the event of war fills me with 
the same sort of wonder when that legislation 
attempts to prescribe in advance the attitude of 
the American people toward the parties to any 
war. American youth and the American pub- 
lic have something of the same sort of ruth- 
less determination to do what they please when 
sufficiently aixjused. 

A distinction may, however, be made be- 
tween a statute designed to save us from being 
involved, which could have no unneutral effect, 
and statutes which might and probably would 
have such effect. Under the former category 



190 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTTLLETIN 



there arc certain domestic acts which can serve 
a useful purpose in minimizing our risks and 
in tlie safeguarding of our economic system. 
Past experience seems to show us that the 
greatest danger to the peace of this country is 
most likely to arise from the destruction of 
American lives. Legislation of the first cate- 
gory described would restrict certain rights of 
individual American citizens or groups, serve 
to avoid incidents which might arouse public 
opinion and result in ovir becoming involved 
in a conflict although the majority of our na- 
tionals were not affected, and would not con- 
stitute the abandonment of our neutral rights 
but only a reasonable restriction of them in the 
public interest by domestic legislation. For 
example, American citizens might well be pre- 
vented from performing acts such as traveling 
on armed belligerent vessels or in certain zones 
of combat, and American ships could be re- 
strained )from entering these combat areas, 
where such acts would bring about a situation 
which could endanger our neutrality. At least 
our citizens must understand clearly that if 
they choose to engage in such acts they must 
do so entirely at their own risk and that they 
have forfeited all right to claim government 
assistance if such acts bring them into dif- 
ficulty. Further measures might be taken to 
provide that the export of goods to belligerents 
should be preceded by transfer of title and 
to curtail or supervise loans which would pre- 
vent an undue sudden expansion and subse- 
quent dislocation of our economic life. It 
might also be possible to regulate the solicita- 
tion and collection in the United States of 
funds for belligerents with all the attendant 
propaganda and appeals for sympathy in a 
foreign cause. These would be domestic acts 
which would have only an indirect relation to 
the hostilities in question. The touchstone as 
to whether legislation is practical or imprac- 
tical in accomplishing its purpose of keeping 
the United States at peace is whether such 
legislation may bring about a situation which 
will increase or decrease our risk. All the lat- 
ter, it seems to me, should be discarded and 
legislation be adopted only when the matters 



involved are of concern purely to the people 
of the United States and without direct re- 
lationship to the hostilities in progress. 

The attempt to differentiate between various 
sorts of shipments to belligerents on the 
grounds that a particular sort of shipment is 
immoral, on the other hand, seems to me to be 
predicated on unsound reasoning. You Vet- 
erans of Foreign Wars can be under no mis- 
apprehension in tliis respect. You know that 
materials are just as important to a belligerent 
as the finished article; you fail, I am sure, to 
see a distinction between the morality of ship- 
ping arms and munitions of war and the moral- 
ity of shipping copper for fuses, steel for shells, 
and cotton for explosives. I can understand 
the argiunent, though I think it is untenable, 
which urges a complete embargo of all arti- 
cles to both parties to a conflict in the event of 
war. This is an argument which has as its 
logical basis the concept that if you want to 
keep out of trouble the thing to do is to keep 
away from trouble. I say I think the argu- 
ment is untenable mainly because a complete 
embargo of all articles would bring about such 
a dislocation of our economic structure that we 
would be paralyzed both economically and 
politically. 

There is another aspect to the question of 
embargoes which in my opinion is worthy of 
consideration. The threat of closing access to 
all markets of foodstuffs and raw materials is 
a definite encouragement to those abroad who 
argue that their countries must be made eco- 
nomically self-sufficient so that in time of crisis 
they will not be deprived of essential goods. 
To advocate economic recovery through the en- 
couragement of freer trade, the relaxation of 
tariff barriers, and the elimination of excessive 
obstacles to exchange of goods, while in the 
next breath threatening to close our markets 
to all parties engaged in the hostilities consti- 
tutes such an apparent contradiction as to cre- 
ate legitimate doubts as to the sincerity of the 
American trade program. Moreover any im- 
petus given to economic nationalism and au- 
tarchy merely intensifies trade rivalries and 






SEPTEMBER 2, 19 39 



191 



fertilizes the ground with the germs of mistrust, 
suspicion, and eventually war. 

In any case it does not seem to be necessary 
to discuss this point at length since the project 
for a complete embargo of all articles is not 
being pushed vigorously and does not there- 
fore enter into the realm of practical consider- 
ation. But the differentiation between various 
categories of permissible shipment does not 
seem to me logical or likely to accomplish any 
useful pixrpose. Rather, the contrary, it would 
seem in many cases to put a penalty where our 
public opinion would not care to put it. 

The Secretary of State in discussing this 
phase of the neutrality problem said on Novem- 
ber 6, 1935, and reiterated in his letter of May 
27, 1939, to the chairman of the appropriate 
Committees in the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives that "To assume that by placing an 
embargo on arms we are making ourselves se- 
cure from the dangers of conflict with belliger- 
ent countries is to close our eyes to manifold 
dangers in other directions. We cannot assume 
that when provision has been made to stop the 
shipment of arms, which as absolute contra- 
band have always been regarded as subject to 
seizure by a belligerent, we may complacently 
sit back with the feeling that we are secure 
from all danger." 

After all, there is a thing called interna- 
tional law. Many have denied that it still 
exists, but the fact that it still does exist is one 
of the principles for which our Government 
has most steadily contended. We have strug- 
gled for the maintenance and observance of 
international law in every quarter of the globe. 
International law is the result of slow growth 
in the practice of nations ; it has slowly evolved 
in struggle and dispute and has been found 
by and large the most adequate way for na- 
tions to preserve their neutrality in case of 
conflict. It has been well said that there is 
nothing new under the sun; future conflicts 
will have a fundamental similarity to those of 
the past; and the broad rules of international 
law will be found the most useful, together 
with such purely domestic acts as will mini- 
mize our risk and maintain our economic struc- 



ture, to preserve us at peace if the rest of the 
world is in conflict. Those rules provide that 
belligerents may purchase in the markets of 
neutrals and not that they may purchase only 
certain commodities. 

I have discussed at some length what I 
might call the negative aspects of this ques- 
tion. Is there a positive approach to the prob- 
lem? If it is meant by that question to ask 
whether there is any means which will guar- 
antee us immunity if the world is torn by a 
first-class struggle, then I must regretfully but 
decisively answer in the negative. There is no 
guarantee. There can be no assurance that 
certain acts of belligerents will not so inflame 
us or endanger our interests that we will feel 
an irresistible urge to enter the conflict. You 
will notice I do not use the phrase "we may be 
drawn into the conflict." I sincerely hope that 
if we ever enter a conflict, which God forbid, it 
will not be because we are "drawn into it." 
Being drawn in implies a slipping through 
carelessness, a submergence of our own will to 
others. Our remote geographical position 
gives us time for choice. Let us take advan- 
tage of it to think clearly and decide our course 
by reason, even in the storm of passion and 
propaganda that al great war will call forth. 

That thought brings me to one of the posi- 
tive considerations, namely, that the better 
educated our public opinion the less the like- 
lihood of our entering a conflict and the greater 
the hope of our remaining at peace. The 
more our people have considered and dis- 
cussed the various contingencies which may 
arise, the more they will keep their heads in 
a moment of crisis, the less likely they are to 
fall a prey to propaganda and to their own 
passions. Let me state again that in our 
democratic land it is inconceivable that we 
should enter a war unless the American peo- 
ple feel that they must do so. The people will 
have the final decision — the more reason that 
every one of us should study and ponder and 
keep his mind clear for the real decision. 

We have better means than most peoples 
for study and for comprehension of what 
takes place in the world. I have lived in many 



192 

lands but in none of them have I found such 
a wealth of material, such abundance of im- 
partial information on foreign affairs. There 
is a flow into our press from every corner of 
the globe, a lot of it written by conscientious 
men and women earnestly trying to present 
pictures as they see them. But the very abun- 
dance of the material available makes selection 
indispensable, so each one of us is obliged to 
select those writers from different points of 
the world whose wisdom we can trust and 
whose stories stand the test of time. "We haven't 
time for the purely sensational in a period 
when we must get at facts for ourselves. 
There are hundreds of organizations for study 
of foreign affairs, all trying for mutual en- 
lightenment. You Veterans of Foreign Wars 
have recognized the necessity for study and 
discussion. Every such discussion, all such 
reading and study renders each one of us more 
competent to form an opinion in the crucial 
moment and to form an enlightened opinion, 
provided we realize the responsibility that lies 
on us. 

Few crises arise suddenly and out of a clear 
sky. They are nearly always preceded by a 
whole chain of events before they culminate. 
Obviously, the attitude of any government, its 
day-by-day decisions in the development of a 
crisis, have a profound effect upon the way in 
which the crisis presents itself and upon the 
shaping of public opinion and the attitude 
with which the people of the land will confront 
a crisis. Wise maneuvei-s during the initial 
or diplomatic stages of a struggle may often 
avert the struggle itself and indeed may and 
frequently have averted struggle between other 
powers. Certain it is that with or without legis- 
lation the Executive is charged with great re- 
sponsibility. Nevertheless, that responsibility 
can only be discharged wisely and in such a 
way as to avert danger — if it is operated in a 
field sufficiently broad to give scope for supple- 
ness. It cannot be operated with the full meas- 
ure of success if the Executive is bound by 
hard and fast limitations or even if it is under 
the appearance of being so bound. Wisdom 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTILLETIN 

on the part of the Executive, then, is the sec- 
ond of the means that will keep this country 
at peace; but I repeat that even the greatest 
wisdom can be really effective only if sufficient 
scope is given for its exercise. 

This Nation is so mighty both industrially 
and in manpower that any attitude it adopts is 
of paramount and probably decisive moment 
to the rest of the world. We may think that 
a purely passive attitude on our part will 
leave the rest of the world to work out its 
problems unaffected. Such is not the case. 
Even a passive or disinterested attitude on our 
part would have the most immediate effects 
upon other nations of the world. We cannot 
escape the conviction that whatever we decide 
is profoundly important to others as well as 
to ourselves. Such being the case we have to 
make our studies and reach our conclusions 
with the realization that in so doing we are 
influencing world events as well as determin- 
ing our own. 

Let me summarize in concluding. There is 
no guaranteed panacea that will keep this Na- 
tion at peace. By legislation we can only cut 
the risk through restricting certain activities 
of our citizens and our vessels to provide that 
thoughtless acts or an uncontrolled desire for 
profit on the part of irresponsible individuals 
or limited groups will not involve the Nation 
in the holocaust of war. There are two factors, 
however, that will contribute the most to the 
maintenance of peace. First the exercise by 
the Executive of wisdom and prudence in the 
initial stages of a dispute, provided that 
sufficient scope is given so that he can operate 
with a degree of suppleness and be free enough 
to meet with ingenuity any one of the count- 
less aspects of foreign difficulties which may 
arise. Let there be no fear that any Executive 
will treat lightly this mighty responsibility. 
The second factor is an enlightened and vigor- 
ous public opinon so educated and so resolute 
that it can exercise reason even during the pas- 
sions and propaganda that a great foreign 
war would let loose. May God give us both at 
the decisive moment. 



Departmental Changes 



SPECIAL DIVISION ESTABLISHED 



[Released to the press September 2] 

The Department of State has, in view of the 
developing situation in Europe, set up a Special 
Division in the Department which is to handle 
the special problems growing out of the repatri- 
ation of American citizens now in Europe, the 
representation of the interests of other Gov- 
ernments which may be entrusted to us, and 
such other special problems which from time to 
time may be assigned to it. The Secretary of 
State has appointed Mr. Breckinridge Long, 
former Ambassador to Italy, who had offered 
his services, as the head of this unit. Mr. Hugh 
R. Wilson, former Ambassador to Germany, 
will for the present assist Mr. Long in the ad- 
ministration of this unit. George L. Brandt, 
a Foreign Service officer, has been designated 
as the Administrative Officer. A number of 
Foreign Service officers of the Department of 
State who have been on leave of absence in 
this country have been ordered to Washington 
and assigned to this Division. 

[Released to the press September 2] 

The Secretary of State, on September 1, 1939, 
issued the following Departmental Order: 

There is hereby established in the Depart- 
ment of State a Special Division, the routing 
symbol of which will be SD, to handle special 
problems arising out of the disturbed condi- 
tions in Europe, such as aiding in the repatria- 
tion of American citizens, the representation of 
the interests of other Governments taken over 
by this Govei-nment, and such other related 
problems which may be assigned to the Division. 

Mr. George L. Brandt, a Foreign Service 
officer, with the title of Administrative Officer, 
will temporarily direct the Division pending 
the appointment of the permanent head thereof. 
Mr. Brandt will sign as — Administrative Of- 
ficer, Special Division. 



The Welfare and Whereabouts Section pre- 
sently forming part of the Division of Foreign 
Service Administration is hereby transferred 
to the Special Division with the following 
personnel : 

Mrs. Madge M. Blessing 
Miss Marguerite R. Roddy 
Mrs. Viola W. Faust 
Miss Marion W. Sealey 

Accordingly the Special Division will handle 
inquiries regarding the welfare and where- 
abouts of American citizens abroad, the trans- 
mission to those citizens of funds received for 
them, and matters connected with the evacua- 
tion and repatriation of such citizens, as hereto- 
fore handled in the Whereabouts and Welfare 
Section. 

The Division will function under the general 
administrative supervision of Mr. Messersmith, 
Assistant Secretary of State, in close coopera- 
tion with the Geographical and other Divisions 
concerned. 

The officers of the Special Division will be 
located in rooms 225-229 and 291-299. 

The telephone numbers of the Division will 
be 502-503. Telephone inquiries regarding the 
whereabouts and welfare of Americans abroad 
and requests for their assistance will be received 
on telephone numbers 512-513. 

All incoming correspondence for the Special 
Division will be routed direct to the Division 
by the Division of Communications and Rec- 
ords, with such secondary routing as may be 
necessary. 

The Director of Personnel will provide the 
necessary clerical assistance and equipment for 
the hew Division within the limits of the ap- 
propriated funds. 

The provisions of this Order shall be ef- 
fective on September 1, 1939, and shall super- 

193 



194 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



sede the provisions of any existing Order in 
conflict tlierewith. 

CORDELL HtILL 

Department OF State, 
September i, 1939. 



Foreign Service 



DEATH OF JULIUS G. LAY 

[Released to the press August 29] 

The Department lias learned with regret that 
Mr. Julius G. Lay, American Minister, retired, 
died in Massachusetts August 28. Mrs. Lay 
survives him. 

The remains are being brought to Washing- 
ton, where the funeral will be held Friday, 
September 1, at 10 a. m., in St. Matthew's 
Church, Rhode Island Avenue near Connecti- 
cut Avenue. 

Mr. Lay's biography, taken from the Depart- 
ment of State Register for October 1, 1937, is 
as follows : 

Lay, Julius Gareche. — Born Washington, 
D. C, August 9, 1872; Columbia Grammar 
Scliool ; appointed messenger in American Con- 
sulate at Ottawa September 12, 1889; clerk at 
Ottawa July 1, 1892; vice and deputy consul 
general at Ottawa September 1, 1893; consul at 
Windsor, Ontario, October 26, 1896; consul gen- 
eral at Barcelona May 3, 1899; at Canton Octo- 
ber 3, 1904; at Cape Town May 24, 1906; at Rio 
de Janeiro May 2, 1910; at Berlin June 24, 1914; 
consul general of class two by act approved 
February 5, 1915; detailed to the Department 
March 15, 1917; acting foreign trade adviser 
February 18, 1918; resigned March 1, 1920; 
with international banking firm 1920-24; ap- 
pointed, under Executive order, consul gen- 
eral of class two June 5, 1924; detailed to the 
Department June 27, 1924; Foreign Service 
officer of class one July 1, 1924; assigned to 
Calcutta Aufjust 15, 1924; secretary in the 
Diplomatic Service June 8, 1927; assigned as 
counselor of embassy at Santiago, Chile, Octo- 
ber 13, 1927; Envoy Extraordinary and Minis- 
ter Plenipotentiary to Honduras December 16, 
1929; to Uruguay December 14, 1934; delegate, 
Pan American Commercial Conference, Buenos 
Aires, 1935 ; retired August 31, 1937, under the 
provisions of the act of February 23, 1931. 



International Conferences, 
Commissions^ etc. 



FIFTH MEETING OF THE INTERNA- 
TIONAL RADIO CONSULTING COM- 
MITTEE 

[Released to the press August 31] 

Meetings of the Conference Committee, 
under the chairmanship of Dr. J. H. Dellinger, 
preparing for United States participation in 
the fifth meeting of the International Radio 
Consulting Committee (C. C. I. R.), to be con- 
vened at Stockholm, Sweden, about June 25, 
1940, are to be held in room 474, Department 
of State, on September 11 and 12, 1939. 

The reports of the several subcommittees 
studying specified questions in which the 
United States is a collaborating administra- 
tion, will be examined by the Conference Com- 
mittee for final approval before transmission 
to the Bern Bureau and to foreign centralizing 
and collaborating administrations. 

The meeting will be open to anyone inter- 
ested in the deliberations. 



-f 4- -f 

TWENTY-SEVENTH INTERNATIONAL 
CONGRESS OF AMERICANISTS 

[Released to the press September 1] 

With reference to the State Department's 
press release of July 31, 1939," concerning the 
participation by this Government at the 
Twenty-seventh International Congress of 
Americanists in Mexico City and Lima, this 
Government has designated Dr. Samuel K. 
Lothrop, Peabody Museum, Harvard Univer- 
sity, and Dr. Albert A. Giesecke, of the Ameri- 
can Embassy staff, Lima, Peru, as additional 
delegates of the United States at the Lima 
meeting. 



'See the Bulletin of August 5, 1939 (Vol. I, No. 6), 
p. 100. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled by the Treaty Division 



ORGANIZATION 

Protocol for the Amendment of the Pream- 
ble, of Articles 1, 4, and 5, and of the 
Annex to the Covenant of the League of 
Nations 

Poland 

According to a circular letter from the 
League of Nations dated August 19, 1939, the 
instrument of ratification by Poland of the 
Protocol for the Amendment of the Preamble, 
of Articles 1, 4, and 5, and of the Annex to 
the Covenant of the League of Nations, which 
was opened for signature at Geneva on Sep- 
tember 30, 1938, was deposited with the 
Secretariat on August 7, 1939. 

EDUCATION 

Proces-Verbal Concerning the Application 
of Articles IV, V, VI, VII, IX, XII, and 
XIII of the Convention of October 11, 1933, 
for Facilitating the International Circula- 
tion of Films of an Educational Character 

Poland 

According to a circular letter from the 
League of Nations dated August 19, 1939, the 
instrmnent of ratification by Poland of the 
Proces-Verbal Concerning the Application of 
Articles IV, V, VI, VII, IX, XII, and XIII 
of the Convention of October 11, 1933, for 
Facilitating the International Circulation of 
Films of an Educational Character, which was 
opened for signature at Geneva on September 
12, 1938, was deposited with the Secretariat on 
August 7, 1939. The signature of the Proces- 
Verbal by Poland, which had been given sub- 
ject to ratification, should be considered as 
definitive as from August 7, 1939. 



EXTRADITION 

Extradition Treaty With Liberia 

On August 30, 1939, the President ratified 
the Extradition Treaty between the United 
States and Liberia, signed on November 1, 
1937. 

Extradition Treaty With Monaco 

On August 30, 1939, the President ratified 
the Extradition Treaty between the United 
States and Monaco, signed on February 15, 
1939, 

HEALTH 

Convention Modifying the International 
Sanitary Convention of June 21, 1926 

The American Ambassador to France trans- 
mitted with a despatch dated August 9, 1939, 
a proces-verbal dated July 24, 1939, received 
from the French Government, recording the 
adherence of Belgium to the convention signed 
at Paris on October 31, 1938, modifying the 
International Sanitary Convention of June 21, 
1926, and the deposit of the instruments of rati- 
fication of the convention of 1938 of Egypt, 
France, Great Britain, and Italy. A second 
proces-verbal, also dated July 24, 1939, was re- 
ceived from the French Govermnent in fulfill- 
ment of the formalities required of that Gov- 
ermnent by article 5 of the convention with re- 
spect to the deposit of the instrument of rati- 
fication by Egypt of the convention of October 
31, 1938. 

The two proces-verbaux each contained the 
following statement, which was inserted 
therein at the request of the Egyptian repre- 
sentative : 

195 



196 

[Translation] 

"The Egyptian Government wishes to point 
out that, both because of the nature thereof and 
because of the absence in their text of a pro- 
vision relative to their ratification, neither the 
Final Act nor the Declaration attached thereto 
should be ratified and that, accordingly, the 
ratification of the Egyptian Government ap- 
plies only to the Convention itself." 

By virtue of the provisions of article 6 
therof, the convention of October 31, 1938, en- 
tered into force as of July 24, 1939, when the 
requisite number of four instruments of rati- 
fication had been deposited. 

NATIONALITY 

Convention With Finland Regulating Mili- 
tary Obligations in Certain Cases of 
Double Nationality 

On August 14, 1939, the President ratified 
the Convention Regulating Military Obliga- 
tions in Certain Cases of Double Nationality 
between the United States and Finland, signed 
on January 27, 1939. 

COMMERCE 

Treaty of Commerce and Navigation With 
Iraq 

On August 30, 1939, the President ratified 
the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation be- 
tween the United States and Iraq, signed on 
December 3, 1938. 



Treaty of Friendship, Commerce, and 
Navigation With Liberia 

On August 30, 1939, the President ratified 
the Treaty of Friendship, Commerce, and 
Navigation between the United States and 
Liberia, signed on August 8, 1938. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

LABOR 

Conventions of the International Labor 
Conference 

Union of South Africa 

According to a circular letter fi'om the 
League of Nations dated August 19, 1939, the 
instrument of ratification by the Government 
of the Union of South Africa of the Conven- 
tion Concerning Statistics of Wages and Hours 
of Work in the Principal Mining and Manu- 
facturing Industries Including Building and 
Construction and in Agriculture, adopted by 
the International Labor Conference at its 
twenty-fourth session (Geneva, June 2-22, 
1938), was registered with the Secretariat on 
August 8, 1939. The said ratification excludes 
parts II and IV of the convention in accord- 
ance with the first paragraph of its article 2. 
According to the information of the Depart- 
ment the following countries have ratified the 
convention: Denmark, Sweden, and the Union 
of South Africa. 

NAVIGATION 

International Load Line Convention 
(Treaty Series No. 858) 

Indochina 

The British Ambassador at Washington in- 
formed the Secretary of State by a note dated 
August 16, 1939, that the date of the effect of 
the application to French Indochina of the 
International Load Line Convention, signed at 
London on July 5, 1930, was January 15, 1939, 
and not November 15, 1938, as previously 
stated in the Ambassador's note of April 27, 
1939. 

The countries which have ratified or adhered 
to the convention are as follows : United States 
of America, Argentina, Australia, Belgium, 
Brazil, Bulgaria, Burma, Canada, Chile, 



SEPTEMBER 2, 1939 



197 



China, Cuba, Danzig, Denmark, Egypt, Es- 
tonia, Finland, France, French Indochina, 
Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Hong Kong, 
Hungary, Iceland, India, Ireland (Eire), 
Italy, Japan, Japan for Chosen, Taiwan, and 
Leased Territory of Kwantung, Latvia, Mex- 
ico, Netherlands, Netherlands East Indies and 
Curasao, Newfoundland, New Zealand (in- 
cluding Western Samoa), Norway, Panama, 
Peru, Poland, Portugal, Rumania, Spain, 
Straits Settlements, Sweden, Thailand, Union 
of Soviet Socialist Eepublics, Uruguay, and 
Yugoslavia. 

Agreement Concerning Manned Lightships 
Not on Their Stations 

Burma 

According to a circular letter from the 
League of Nations dated August 19, 1939, a 
notification was received by the Secretariat on 
August 9, 1939, from the British Government 
stating that it desires that the Agreement Con- 
cerning Manned Lightships Not on Their Sta- 
tions, signed at Lisbon on October 23, 1930, in 
which Burma formerly participated as part 
of India, should be regarded, by virtue of para- 
graph 2 of article 8 of the agreement, as ap- 
plying to Burma as a British overseas terri- 
tory, with effect as from April 1, 1937, the date 
on which Burma was separated from India 
and acquired its new status. 

According to the information of the De- 
partment the countries in respect of which the 
agreement is now in force as a result of defini- 
tive signature, ratification, or adherence are: 
Belgium, Brazil, Burma, China, Danzig, Den- 



mark, Estonia, Finland, France (including 
French West Africa, French Equatorial Af- 
rica, Togoland, Cameroun, Madagascar, 
French Settlements in India, Indochina, Re- 
union, French Coast of Somaliland, New Cale- 
donia, Oceania, Martinique, Guadeloupe, 
Guiana, and St. Pierre and Miquelon), Great 
Britain, Greece, India, Iraq, Latvia, Monaco, 
Morocco, the Netherlands (including the 
Netherlands Indies), Poland, Portugal, Ru- 
mania, Spain, Sweden, Tunis, Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics, Turkey, and Yugoslavia. 
The agreement entered into force on Jan- 
uary 21, 1931. 

PUBLICATIONS 

Convention on Interchange of Publications 

On August 14, 1939, the President ratified, 
subject to the understanding contained in the 
Senate resolution of August 1, 1939, giving its 
advice and consent to ratification,^ the Con- 
vention on Interchange of Publications, signed 
at the Inter-American Conference for the 
Maintenance of Peace at Buenos Aires on 
December 23, 1936. 

CONSULAR 

Consular Convention With Liberia 

On August 14, 1939, the President ratified 
the Consular Convention between the United 
States and Liberia, signed on October 7, 1938. 

• See the Bulletin for August 5, 1939 (Vol. I, No. 6). 
pp. 103-1(M. 



0. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE; 1939 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents - . - - . Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WITH THE APPEOVAL OF THE DIKBCTOB OF THE BUBEAU OF THE BUDGET 



..><jxl^ 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 




J 



LETI 



^sr 




Qontents 



SEPTEMBER 9, 1939 
Vol. I: No. II — Publication 1 3^6 




Europe: 

Neutrality: Page 

Radio address by the President 201 

Proclamations of neutrality of the United States . . . 203 

Executive orders regulating enforcement of neutrality . 212 

Proclamation concerning neutrality of the Canal Zone . 213 
Executive order regulating passage of vessels through 

the Panama Canal 215 

Proclamation of national emergency 216 

Executive order increasing the Army 217 

Executive order increasing the Navy and Marine 

Corps 217 

Executive order increasing the Federal Bureau of 

Investigation 218 

Funds to protect American citizens in foreign coun- 
tries 219 

Travel on belligerent ships 219 

Credits to belligerents 221 

Contributions for relief in belligerent countries . . . 222 

Regulations on traffic in arms 226 

Sinking of the Athenia 227 

Suspension by Great Britain of Treaty for the Limita- 
tion of Naval Armament 229 

New passport regulations 230 

Evacuation of Ajnerican citizens from Europe 232 

Transmission of cables to France 233 

Appeal by Chief of the Spanish Government 233 

Suspension of issuance in London and Warsaw of quota 

immigration visas 234 

Bomb damage to home of American Ambassador in 

Warsaw 234 

Yugoslavia: Birthday of the King 234 

Agreement with Great Britain for exchange of cotton 234 

and rubber 

[Over] 



The American republics: Page 
Inter-American Consultative Conference at Panama . . 235 
Desire of Colombia to cooperate for American solidar- 
ity 235 

Brazil: Anniversary of independence 236 

Commercial policy: 

Appointment of Chairman of Committee for Keciprocity 

Information 236 

International conferences, commissions, etc.: 

Address of the Secretary of State to the International 

Union of Geodesy and Geophysics 237 

Departmental changes: 

The Special Division 238 

Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 238 

Treaty information: 
Armament reduction: 

London Naval Treaty of 1936 (Treaty Series No. 

919) 239 

Mutual guarantees: 

Nonaggression Treaty Between Germany and the 

Union of Soviet Socialist Republics 239 

Health: 

Arrangement for the Establishment of the Interna- 
tional OfBce of Public Health (Treaty Series No. 

511) 239 

Safety: 

International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea 

(Treaty Series No. 910) 240 

Commerce: 

Agreement With Great Britain for the Exchange of 

Cotton and Rubber (Treaty Series No. 947) ... 240 
Finance: 

Convention on the Stamp Laws in Connection With 

Checjues, and Protocol 240 

Convention on the Stamp Laws in Connection With 

Bills of Exchange and Promissory Notes 241 

Publications 242 



«J- S. SUPERINTFNDENT OF DOCUMENTS 

OCT 4 1939 



Europe 



NEUTRALITY 

Radio Address by the President 



[Released to the press by the White House September 3] 

Tonight my single duty is to speak to the 
whole of America. 

Until 4 : 30 this morning I had hoped against 
hope that some miracle would prevent a dev- 
astating war in Europe and bring to an end 
the invasion of Poland by Germany. 

For 4 long years a succession of actual wars 
and constant crises have shaken the entire 
world and have threatened in each case to 
bring on the gigantic conflict which is today 
unhappily a fact. 

It is right that I should recall to your minds 
the consistent and at times successful efforts 
of your Government in these crises to throw 
the full weight of the United States into the 
cause of peace. In spite of spreading wars I 
think that we have every right and evei-y rea- 
son to maintain as a national policy the funda- 
mental moralities, the teachings of religion, 
and the continuation of efforts to restore 
peace — for some day, though the time may be 
distant, we can be of even greater help to a 
crippled humanity. 

It is right, too, to point out that the unfor- 
tunate events of these recent years have been 
based on the use of force or the threat of force. 
And it seems to me clear, even at the outbreak 
of this great war, that the influence of Amer- 
ica should be consistent in seeking for human- 
ity a final peace which will eliminate, as far 
as it is possible to do so, the continued use of 
force between nations. 

It is, of course, impossible to predict the 
future. I have my constant stream of infor- 



mation from American rejjresentatives and 
other sources throughout the world. You, the 
people of this country, are receiving news 
through your radios and your newspapers at 
every hour of the day. 

You are, I believe, the most enlightened and 
the best informed people in all the world at 
this moment. You are subjected to no censor- 
ship of news; and I want to add that your 
Government has no information which it has 
any thought of withholding from you. 

At the same time, as I told my press confer- 
ence on Friday, it is of the highest importance 
that the press and the radio use the utmost 
caution to discriminate between actual veri- 
fied fact on the one hand and mere rumor on 
the other. 

I can add to that by saying that I hope the 
jjeople of this country will also discriminate 
most carefully between news and rumor. Do 
not believe of necessit}' everything you hear or 
read. Check up on it first. 

You must master at the outset a simple but 
unalterable fact in modern foreign relations. 
When peace has been broken anywhere, peace 
of all countries everywhere is in danger. 

It is easy for you and me to shrug our shoul- 
ders and say that conflicts taking place thou- 
sands of miles from the continental United 
States, and, indeed, the whole American hemi- 
sphere, do not seriously affect the Americas — 
and that all the United States has to do is to 
ignore them and go about our own business. 
Passionately though we may desire detach- 
ment, we are forced to realize that every word 



201 



202 

that comes through the air, every ship that 
sails the sea, every battle that is fought does 
affect the American future. 

Let no man or woman thoughtlessly or 
falsely talk of America sending its armies to 
European fields. At this moment there is being 
prepared a proclamation of American neutral- 
ity. This would have been done even if there 
had been no neutrality statute on the books, 
for this proclamation is in accordance with 
international law and with American policy. 

This will be followed by a proclamation re- 
quired by the existing Neutrality Act. I trust 
that in the days to come our neutrality can be 
made a true neutrality. 

It is of the utmost importance that the peo- 
ple of this country, with the best information 
in the world, think things through. The most 
dangerous enemies of American peace are those 
who, without well-rounded information on the 
whole broad subject of the past, the present, 
and the future, undertake to speak with au- 
thority, to talk in terms of glittering generali- 
ties, to give to the Nation assurances or 
prophecies which are of little present or future 
value. 

I myself cannot and do not prophesy the 
course of events abroad — and the reason is that 
because I have of necessity such a complete pic- 
ture of what is going on in every part of the 
woi'ld, I do not dare to do so. And the other 
reason is that I think it is honest for me to 
be honest with the people of the United States. 

I cannot prophesy the immediate economic 
effect of this new war on our Nation, but I do 
say that no American has the moral right to 
profiteer at the expense either of his fellow 
citizens or of the men, women, and children 
who are living and dying in the midst of war 
in Europe. 

Some things we do know. Most of us in the 
United States believe in spiritual values. Most 
of us, regardless of what church we belong to, 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

believe in the spirit of the New Testament — a 
great teaching which opposes itself to the use 
of force, of armed force, of marching armies, 
and falling bombs. The overwhelming masses 
of our people seek peace — peace at home, and 
the kind of peace in other lands which will not 
jeopardize peace at home. 

We have certain ideas and ideals of national 
safety, and we must act to preserve that safety 
today and to preserve the safety of our chil- 
di'en in future years. 

That safety is and will be bound up with the 
safety of the Western Hemisphere and of the 
seas adjacent thereto. We seek to keep war 
from our firesides by keeping war from coming 
to the Americas. For that we have historic 
jirecedent that goes back to the days of the ad- 
ministration of President George Washington. 
It is serious enough and tragic enough to every 
American family in every State in the Union 
to live in a world that is torn by wars on other 
continents. Today they affect every American 
home. It is our national duty to use every ef- 
fort to keep them out of the Americas. 

And at this time let me make the simple plea 
that partisanship and selfishness be adjourned, 
and that national unity be the thought that 
underlies all others. 

This Nation will remain a neutral nation, 
but I cannot ask that every American remain 
neutral in thought as well. Even a neutral has 
a right to take account of facts. Even a neu- 
tral cannot be asked to close his mind or his 
conscience. 

I have said not once but many times that I 
have seen war and that I hate war. I say that 
again and again. 

I hope the United States will keep out of 
this war. I believe that it will. And I give 
you assurances that every effort of your Gov- 
ermnent will be directed toward that end. 

As long as it remains within my power to 
prevent, there will be no blackout of peace in 
the United States. 



SEPTEMBER 9, 1939 



203 



Proclamations of Neutrality of the United States 



[Released to the press September 5] 

In order to avoid any confusion regarding 
the two proclamations relating to this coun- 
try's neutrality which are being issued today, 
September 5, it should be thoroughly under- 
stood that the general neutrality proclamation 
■which is being issued first has to do with our 
activities as a neutral under the rules and pro- 
cedure of international law and those of our 
domestic statutes in harmony therewith. This 
proclamation would have been made according 
to customary usage even if we had not on the 
statute books the act of May 1, 1937. This 
proclamation is in general conformity with 
neutrality proclamations isstied by the United 
States during previous international conflicts. 

Another proclamation to be issued today ^ is 
based upon the act of May 1, 1937. Several 
proposals for modifying that act were made 
during the last session of Congi-ess and are still 
pending. It was generally understood in Con- 
gress at the close of the last session that final 
action on these proposed modifications would 
be taken at the next session of Congress. 

[Released to the press September 5] 

Proclaiming the Neutrality or the United 
States in the War Between Germany and 
France; Poland; and the United Kingdom, 
India, Australia and New Zealand 

BY THE president OF THE UNITED STATES OF 
AMERICA 

A Proclaination 

Whereas a state of war unhappily exists be- 
tween Germany and France; Poland; and the 
United Kingdom, India, Australia and New 
Zealand. 

And whereas the United States is on terms 
of friendship and amity with the contending 
powers, and with the persons inhabiting their 
several dominions; 



' See vost, p. 208. 



And whereas there are nationals of the 
United States residing within the territories or 
dominions of each of the said belligerents, and 
carrying on commerce, trade, or other business 
or pursuits therein; 

And whereas there are nationals of each of 
the said belligerents residing within the terri- 
tory or juriscliction of the United States, and 
carrying on commerce, trade, or other business 
or pursuits therein ; 

And whereas the laws and treaties of the 
United States, without interfering with the free 
expression of opinion and sympathy, neverthe- 
less impose upon all persons who may be 
within their territory and jurisdiction the duty 
of an impartial neutrality during the existence 
of the contest; 

And whereas it is the duty of a neutral gov- 
ernment not to permit or suffer the making of 
its territory or territorial waters subservient to 
the purposes of war; 

Now, therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, 
President of the United States of America, in 
order to preserve the neutrality of the United 
States and of its citizens and of persons within 
its territory and jurisdiction, and to enforce its 
laws and treaties, and in order that all persons, 
being warned of the general tenor of the laws 
and treaties of the United States in this behalf, 
and of the law of nations, may thus be pre- 
vented from any violation of the same, do hereby 
declare and proclaim that by certain provi- 
sions of the act approved on the 4th day of 
March, A. D. 1909, commonly known as the 
"Penal Code of the United States" and of the 
act approved on the 15th day of June, A. D. 
1917, the following acts are forbidden to be 
done, under severe penalties, within the terri- 
tory and jurisdiction of the United States, to 
wit: 

1. Accepting and exercising a commission to 
serve one of the said belligerents by land or by 
sea against an opposing belligerent. 

2. Enlisting or entering into the service of 
a belligerent as a soldier, or as a marine, or sea- 



204 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTXLLETIN 



man on board of any ship of war, letter of 
marque, or privateer. 

3. Hiring or retaining another person to en- 
list or enter himself in the service of a bellig- 
erent as a soldier, or as a marine, or seaman 
on board of any ship of war, letter of marque, 
or privateer. 

4. Hiring another person to go beyond the 
limits or jurisdiction of the United States with 
intent to be enlisted as aforesaid. 

5. Hiring another person to go beyond the 
limits or jurisdiction of the United States with 
intent to be entered into service as aforesaid. 

6. Retaining another person to go beyond 
the limits or jurisdiction of the United States 
to be enlisted as aforesaid. 

7. Retaining another person to go beyond 
the limits or jurisdiction of the United States 
with intent to be entered into service as afore- 
said. (But the said act of the 4th day of 
March, A. D. 1909, as amended by the act of 
the 15th day of June, A. D. 1917, is not to be 
construed to extend to a citizen or subject of 
a belligerent who, being transiently within the 
jurisdiction of the United States, shall, on 
board of any ship of war, which, at the time 
of its arrival within the jurisdiction of the 
United States, was fitted and equipped as such 
ship of war, enlist or enter himself or hire or 
retain another subject or citizen of the same 
belligerent, who is transiently within the juris- 
diction of the United States, to enlist or enter 
himself to serve such belligerent on board such 
ship of war, if the United States shall then be 
at peace with such belligerent.) 

8. Fitting out and arming, or attempting to 
fit out and arm, or procuring to be fitted out 
and armed, or knowingly being concerned in 
the furnishing, fitting out, or arming of any 
ship or vessel with intent that such ship or 
vessel shall be employed in the service of one 
of the said belligerents to cruise, or commit 
hostilities against the subjects, citizens, or 
property of an opposing belligerent. 

9. Issuing or delivering a commission within 
the territory or jurisdiction of the United 
States for any ship or vessel to (he intent that 
she may be employed as aforesaid. 



10. Increasing or augmenting, or procuring 
to be increased or augmented, or knowingly 
being concerned in increasing or augmenting, 
the force of any shij) of war, cruiser, or other 
armed vessel, which at the time of her arrival 
within the jurisdiction of the United States 
was a ship of war, cruiser, or anned vessel in 
the service of a belligerent, or belonging to a 
national thereof, by adding to the number of 
guns of such vessel, or by changing those on 
board of her for guns of a larger caliber, or 
by the addition thereto of any equipment 
solely applicable to war. 

11. Kiaowingly beginning or setting on foot 
or providing or preparing a means for or fur- 
nishing the money for, or taking part in, any 
military or naval expedition or enterprise to 
be carried on from the territory or jurisdiction 
of the United States against the territory or 
dominion of a belligerent. 

12. Despatching from the United States, or 
any place subject to the jurisdiction thereof, 
any vessel, domestic or foreign, which is about 
to carry to a warship, tender, or supply ship 
of a belligerent any fuel, arms, ammunition, 
men, supplies, despatches, or information 
shipped or received on board within the juris- 
diction of the United States. 

13. Despatching from the United States, or 
any place subject to the jurisdiction thereof, 
any armed vessel owned wholly or in part by 
American citizens, or any vessel, domestic or 
foreign (other than one which has entered the 
jurisdiction of the United States as a public 
vessel), which is manifestly built for warlike 
purposes or has been converted or adapted 
from a private vessel to one suitable for war- 
like use, and which is to be employed to cruise 
against or commit oj- attempt to commit hos- 
tilities upon the subjects, citizens, or property 
of a belligerent nation, or which will be sold or 
delivered to a belligerent nation, or to an 
agent, officer, or citizen thereof, within the 
jurisdiction of the United States, or, having 
left that jurisdiction, upon the high seas. 

14. Despatching from the United States, or 
any place subject to tlie jurisdiction thereof, 
any vessel built, armed, or equipped as a ship 



SEPTEMBER 9, 1939 



205 



of war, or converted from a private vessel 
into a ship of war (other than one which has 
entered the jurisdiction of the United States as 
a public vessel), with any intent or under any 
agreement or contract, written or oral, that 
such vessel shall be delivered to a belligerent 
nation, or to any agent, officer, or citizen of 
such nation, or where there is reasonable cause 
to believe that the said vessel shall or will be 
employed in the service of such belligerent 
nation after its departure from the jurisdiction 
of the United States. 

15. Taking, or attempting or conspiring to 
take, or authorizing the taking of any vessel 
out of port or from the jurisdiction of the 
United States in violation of the said act of 
the 15th day of June, A. D. 1917, as set forth 
in the jareceding paragraphs numbered 11 to 
14 inclusive. 

16. Leaving or attempting to leave the ju- 
risdiction of the United States by a person be- 
longing to the armed land or naval forces of 
a belligerent who shall have been interned 
within the jurisdiction of the United States 
in accordance with the law of nations, or leav- 
ing or attempting to leave the limits of intern- 
ment in which freedom of movement has been 
allowed, without permission from the proper 
official of the United States in charge, or wil- 
fully overstaying a leave of absence granted 
by such official. 

17. Aiding or enticing any interned person 
to escape or attempt to escape from the juris- 
diction of the United States, or from the limits 
of internment prescribed. 

And I do hereby further declare and pro- 
claim that any frequenting and use of the 
waters within the territorial jurisdiction of 
the United States by the vessels of a bellig- 
erent, whether public ships or privateers for 
the purpose of preparing for hostile opera- 
tions, or as posts of observation upon the ships 
of war or privateers or merchant vessels of 
an opposing belligerent must be regarded as 
unfriendly and offensive, and in violation of 
that neutrality which it is the determination 
of this government to observe; and to the end 



that the hazard and inconvenience of such ap- 
prehended practices may be avoided, I further 
proclaim and declare that from and after the 
fifth day of September instant, and so long 
as this proclamation shall be in effect, no ship 
of war or privateer of any belligerent shall be 
permitted to make use of any port, harbor, 
roadstead, or waters subject to the jurisdiction 
of the United States as a station or place of 
resort for any warlike purpose or for the pur- 
pose of obtaining warlike equipment; no 
I^rivateer of a belligerent shall be permitted to 
depart from any port, harbor, roadstead, or 
waters subject to the jurisdiction of the United 
States, and no ship of war of a belligerent 
shall be permitted to sail out of or leave any 
port, harbor, roadstead, or waters subject to 
the jurisdiction of the United States from 
which a vessel of an opposing belligerent 
(whether the same shall be a ship of war or a 
merchant ship) shall have previously departed, 
until after the expiration of at least twenty- 
four hours from the departure of such last 
mentioned vessel beyond the jurisdiction of 
the United States. 

If any ship of war of a belligerent shall, 
after the time this notification takes effect, be 
found in, or shall enter any port, harbor, road- 
stead, or waters subject to the jurisdiction of 
the United States, such vessel shall not be per- 
mitted to remain in such port, harbor, road- 
stead, or waters more than twenty-four hours, 
except in case of stress of weather, or for delay 
in i-eceiving supplies or repairs, or when de- 
tained by the United States; in any of which 
cases the authorities of the port, or of the near- 
est port (as the case may be), shall require her 
to put to sea as soon as the cause of the delay 
is at an end, unless within the pi'eceding twen- 
ty-four hours a vessel, whether ship of war or 
merchant ship of an oi>posing belligerent, shall 
have departed therefrom, in which case the 
time limited for the departure of such ship of 
war shall be extended so far as may be neces- 
sary to secure an interval of not less than 
twenty-four hours between such departure and 
that of any ship of war or merchant ship of 
an opposing belligerent which may have previ- 



206 

ously quit the same port, harbor, roadstead, or 
waters. 

Vessels used exdusively for scientific, re- 
ligious, or philanthropic purposes are exempt- 
ed from the foregoing provisions as to the 
length of time ships of war may remain in 
the ports, harbors, roadsteads, or waters sub- 
ject to the jurisdiction of the United States. 

The maximum number of ships of war be- 
longing to a belligerent and its allies which 
may be in one of the ports, harbors, or road- 
steads subject to the jurisdiction of the United 
States simultaneously shall be three. 

When ships of war of opposing belligerents 
are present simultaneously in the same port, 
harbor, roadstead, or waters, subject to the ju- 
risdiction of the United States, the one entering 
first shall depart first, unless she is in such con- 
dition as to warrant extending her stay. In 
any case the ship which arrived later has the 
right to notify the other through the competent 
local authority that within twenty-four hours 
she will leave such jwrt, harbor, roadstead, or 
waters, the one first entering, however, having 
the right to depart within that time. If the 
one first entering leaves, the notifying ship 
must observe the prescribed interval of twenty- 
four hours. If a delay beyond twenty-four 
hours from the time of an-ival is granted, the 
termination of the cause of delay will be con- 
sidered the time of arrival in deciding the 
right of i)riority in departing. 

Vessels of a belligerent shall not be permitted 
to depart successively from any port, harbor, 
roadstead, or waters subject to the jurisdiction 
of the United States at such intervals as will 
delay the departure of a ship of war of an 
opposing belligerent from such ports, harbors, 
roadsteads, or waters for more than twenty- 
four hours beyond her desired time of sailing. 
If, however, the dejiarture of several ships of 
war and merchant shi^DS of opposing belliger- 
ents from the same port, harbor, roadstead, or 
waters is involved, the order of their departure 
therefrom shall be so arranged as to afford the 
opportunity of leaving alternately to the ves- 
sels of the opposing belligerents, and to cause 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

the least detention consistent with the objects 
of this proclamation. 

All belligerent vessels shall refrain from use 
of their radio and signal apparatus while in the 
harbors, ports, roadsteads, or waters subject to 
the jurisdiction of the United States, except 
for calls of distress and communications con- 
nected with safe navigation or arrangements 
for the arrival of the vessel within, or depar- 
ture from, such harbors, ports, roadsteads, or 
v/aters, or passage through such waters; pro- 
vided that such communications will not be of 
direct material aid to the belligerent in the con- 
duct of military operations against an oppos- 
ing belligerent. The radio of belligerent mer- 
chant vessels may be sealed by the authorities 
of the United States, and such seals shall not 
be broken within the jurisdiction of the United 
States except by proper authority of the 
United States. 

No ship of war of a belligerent shall be per- 
mitted, while in any port, harbor, roadstead, or 
waters subject to the jurisdiction of the United 
States, to take in any supplies except provisions 
and such other things as may be requisite for 
the subsistence of her crew in amounts neces- 
sary to bring such supplies to her peace stand- 
ard, and except such fuel, lubricants, and feed 
water only as may be sufficient, with that al- 
ready on board, to carry such vessel, if without 
any sail power, to the nearest port of her own 
country; or in case a vessel is rigged to go 
under sail, and may also be propelled by ma- 
chinery, then half the quantity of fuel, lubri- 
cants, and feed water which she would be 
entitled to have on board, if dependent upon 
propelling machinery alone, and no fuel, lubri- 
cants, or feed water shall be again supplied to 
any such ship of war in the same or any other 
port, harbor, roadstead, or waters subject to the 
JTU'isdiction of the United States until after the 
expiration of three months from the time when 
such fuel, lubricants and feed water may have 
been last supplied to her within waters subject 
to the jurisdiction of the United States. The 
amounts of fuel, lubricants, and feed water 
allowable under the above provisions shall be 
based on the economical speed of the vessel, 



SEPTEMBEB 9, 1939 

plus an allowance of thirty per centum for 
eventualities. 

No ship of war of a belligerent shall be per- 
mitted, while in any port, harbor, roadstead, 
or waters subject to the jurisdiction of the 
United States, to make repairs beyond those 
that are essential to render the vessel sea- 
worthy and which in no degree constitute an 
increase in her military strength. Repairs 
shall be made without delay. Damages which 
are found to have been produced by the 
enemy's fire shall in no case be repaired. 

No ship of war of a belligerent shall effect 
repairs or receive fuel, lubricants, feed water, 
or provisions within the jurisdiction of the 
United States without written authorization of 
the proper authorities of the United States. 
Before such authorization will be issued, the 
commander of the vessel shall furnish to such 
authorities a written declaration, duly signed 
by such commander, statmg the date, port, and 
amounts of supplies last received in the juris- 
diction of the United States, the amounts of 
fuel, lubricants, feed water, and pi'ovisions on 
board, the port to which the vessel is proceed- 
ing, the economical speed of the vessel, the rate 
of consumption of fuel, lubricants, and feed 
water at such speed, and the amount of each 
class of supplies desired. If repairs are de- 
sired, a similar declaration shall be furnished 
stating the cause of the damage and the nature 
of the repairs. In either case, a certificate 
shall be included to the effect that the desired 
services are in accord with the rules of the 
United States in that behalf. 

No agency of the United States Government 
shall, directly or indirectly, provide supplies 
nor effect repairs to a belligerent ship of war. 

No vessel of a belligerent shall exercise the 
right of search within the waters under the 
jurisdiction of the United States, nor shall 
prizes be taken by belligerent vessels within 
such waters. Subject to any applicable treaty 
provisions in force, prizes captured by bellig- 
erent vessels shall not enter any port, harbor, 
roadstead, or waters under the jurisdiction of 
the United States except in case of unsea- 
worthiness, stress of weather, or want of fuel 

176395—39 2 



207 

or provisions ; when the cause has disappeared, 
the prize must leave immediately, and if a 
prize captured by a belligerent vessel enters 
any port, harbor, roadstead, or waters subject 
to the jurisdiction of the United States for any 
other reason than on account of unseaworthi- 
ness, stress of weather, or want of fuel or pro- 
visions, or fails to leave as soon as the circum- 
stances which justified the entrance are at an 
end, the prize with its officers and crew will be 
released and the prize crew will be interned. 
A belligerent Prize Court camiot be set up on 
territory subject to the jurisdiction of the 
United States or on a vessel in the ports, har- 
bors, roadsteads, or waters subject to the juris- 
diction of the United States. 

The provisions of this proclamation per- 
taming to ships of war shall apply equally to 
any vessel operating under public control for 
hostile or military purposes. 

And I do further declare and proclaim that 
the statutes and the treaties of the United States 
and the law of nations alike require that no 
person, within the territory and jurisdiction 
of the United States, shall take part, directly 
or indirectly, in the said war, but shall remain 
at peace with all of the said belligerents, and 
shall maintain a strict and impartial neutrality. 

And I do further declare and proclaim that 
the provisions of this proclamation shall apply 
to the Canal Zone except in so far as such pro- 
visions may be specifically modified by a proc- 
lamation or proclamations, issued for the Canal 
Zone. 

And I do hereby enjoin all nationals of the 
United States, and all persons residing or 
being within the territory or jurisdiction of 
the United States, to observe the laws thereof, 
and to commit no act contrary to the provi- 
sions of the said statutes or treaties or in viola- 
tion of the law of nations in that behalf. 

And I do hereby give notice that all nationals 
of the United States and others who may claim 
the protection of this government, who may 
misconduct themselves in the premises, will do 
so at their peril, and that they can in no wise 
obtain any protection from the government of 



208 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BXJLLETIN 



the United States against the consequences of 
their misconduct. 

This proclamation shall continue in full force 
and effect unless and until modified, revoked or 
otherwise terminated, pursuant to law. 

In wrrNESs whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this fifth day 

of September in the year of our Lord nineteen 

hundred and thirty-nine, and of the 

[seal] Independence of the United States 
of America the one hundred and 
sixty-fourth. 

Franklin D. Eoosevelt 
By the President : 
CoRDELL Hull 

Secretary of State. 

[Released to the press September 8] 

Proclaiming the Neutrality of the United 
States in the War Between Germany, on 
THE One Hand, and the Union of South 
Africa, on the Other Hand 

BY the president OF THE UNITED STATES OF 
AMERICA 

A Proclcmiation 

Whereas a state of war unhappily exists be- 
tween Germany, on the one hand, and the Union 
of South Africa, on the other hand ; 

Now, therefore, I, Franklin D. Eoosevelt, 
President of the United States of America, in 
order to preserve the neutrality of the United 
States and of its citizens and of persons within 
its territory and jurisdiction, and to enforce its 
laws and treaties, and in order that all pei-sons, 
being warned of the general tenor of the laws 
and treaties of the United States in this behalf, 
and of the law of nations, may thus be pre- 
vented from any violation of the same, do 
hereby declare and proclaiui that all of the pro- 
visions of my proclamation of September 5, 
1939, proclaiming the neutrality of the United 
States in a war between Germany and France ; 
Poland; and the United Kingdom, India, Aus- 



tralia and New Zealand apply equally in re- 
spect to the Union of South Africa. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the Seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this 8th 
day of September, in the year of our Lord nine- 
teen hundred and thirty-nine, and of 

[seal] the Independence of the United 
States of America the one hundred 
and sixty-fourth. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 
By the President : 
CoRDELL Hull 

Secretary of State. 

[Released to the press September 5] 

Export of Asms, Ammunition, and Imple- 
ments OF War to France; Germany; Po- 
land; AND THE United Kingdom, India, 
Australia and New Zealand 

by the president of the united states of 

AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Whereas section 1 of the joint resolution of 
Congress apjiroved May 1, 1937, provides in 
part as follows: 

"Wlienever the President shall find that there 
exists a state of war between, or among, two or 
more foreign states, the President shall pro- 
claim such fact, and it shall thereafter be un- 
lawful to export, or attempt to export, or cause 
to be exported, arms, ammunition, or imple- 
ments of war from any place in the United 
States to any belligerent state named in such 
proclamation, or to any neutral state for trans- 
shipment to, or for the use of, any such bellig- 
erent state." 

And whereas it is further provided by sec- 
tion 1 of the said joint resolution that 

"The President shall, from time to time by 
proclamation, definitely enumerate the arms, 
ammunition, and implements of war, the ex- 
port of wliich is prohibited by this section. 



SEPTEMBER 9, 1939 



209 



The arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
so enumerated shall include those enumerated 
in the President's proclamation Numbered 2163, 
of April 10, 1936, but shall not include raw 
materials or any other articles or materials 
not of the same general character as those 
enumerated in the said proclamation, and in the 
Convention for the Supervision of the Inter- 
national Trade in Arms and Anmiunition and 
in Implements of War, signed at Geneva Jmie 
17, 1925." 

And whereas it is further provided by sec- 
tion 1 of the said joint resolution that 

"Whoever, in violation of any of the pro- 
visions of this Act, shall export, or attempt to 
export, or cause to be exported, arms, ammuni- 
tion, or implements of war from the United 
States shall be fined not more than $10,000 or 
imprisoned not more than five years, or both, 
and the property, vessel, or vehicle containing 
the same shall be subject to the provisions of 
sections 1 to 8, inclusive, title 6, chapter 30, of 
the Act approved June 15, 1917 (40 Stat. 
223-225; U. S. C, 1934 ed., title 22, sees. 
238-245)." 

And whereas it is further provided by sec- 
tion 1 of the said joint resolution that 

"In the case of the forfeiture of any arms, 
ammunition, or implements of war by reason 
of a violation of this Act, no public or private 
sale shall be required ; but such arms, ammiuii- 
tion, or implements of war shall be delivered to 
the Secretary of War for such use or disposal 
thereof as shall be approved by the President 
of the United States." 

And whereas it is further provided by sec- 
tion 11 of the said joint resolution that 

"The President may, from time to time, 
promulgate such rules and regulations, not in- 
consistent with law, as may be necessary and 
proper to carry out any of the provisions of 
this Act; and he may exercise any power or 
authority conferred on him by this Act through 



such officer or officers, or agency or agencies, as 
he shall direct." 

Now, THEREFORE, I, FrANKLIN D. RoOSEVELT, 

President of the United States of America, act- 
ing under and by virtue of the authority con- 
ferred on me by the said joint resolution, do 
hereby proclaim that a state of war unhappily 
exists between Germany and France; Poland; 
and the United Kingdom, India, Australia and 
New Zealand, and I do hereby admonish all 
citizens of the United States, or any of its pos- 
sessions, and all persons residing or being with- 
in the territory or jurisdiction of the United 
States, or its possessions, to abstain from every 
violation of the provisions of the joint resolu- 
tion above set forth, hereby made effective and 
applicable to the export of arms, ammunition, 
or implements of war from any place in the 
United States or any of its possessions to 
France; Germany; Poland; and the United 
Kingdom, India, Australia and New Zealand, 
or to any other state for transshipment to, or 
for the use of, France ; Germany ; Poland ; and 
the United Kingdom, India, Australia and New 
Zealand. 

And I do hereby declare and proclaim that 
the articles enumerated below shall be consid- 
ered arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
for the purposes of section 1 of the said joint 
resolution of Congress: 

Category I 

(1) Rifles and carbines using ammunition 
in excess of caliber .22, and barrels for those 
weapons ; 

(2) Machine guns, automatic or autoloading 
rifles, and machine pistols using ammunition 
m excess of caliber .22, and barrels for those 
weapons; 

(3) Guns, howitzers, and mortars of aU 
calibers, their mountings and barrels; 

(4) Ammunition in excess of caliber .22 for 
the arms enumerated under (1) and (2) above, 
and cartridge cases or bullets for such ammuni- 
tion ; filled and unfilled projectiles for the arms 
enumerated under (3) above; 

(5) Grenades, bombs, torpedoes, mines and 
depth charges, filled or unfilled, and apparatus 
for their use or discharge; 

(6) Tanks, military armored vehicles, and 
armored trains. 



210 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Category II 

Vessels of war of all kinds, including air- 
craft carriers and submarines, and armor plate 
for such vessels. 

Category III 

(1) Aircraft, unassembled, assembled, pr 
dismantled, both heavier and lighter than air, 
which are designed, adapted, and intended for 
aerial combat by the use of machine guns or of 
artillery or for the cai-rying and dropping of 
bombs, or which are equipped with, or which 
by reason of design or construction are pre- 
pared for, any of the appliances referred to in 
paragraph (2) below; 

(2) Aerial gun mounts and frames, bomb 
racks, torpedo carriers, and bomb or torpedo 
release mechanisms. 

Category IV 

(1) Revolvers and automatic pistols using 
ammunition in excess of caliber .22; 

(2) Ammunition in excess of caliber .22 for 
the arms enumerated under (1) above, and 
cartridge cases or bullets for such ammunition. 

Category V 

(1) Aircraft, unassembled, assembled or dis- 
mantled, both heavier and lighter than air, 
other than those included in Categoi'y III; 

(2) Propellers or air screws, fuselages, hulls, 
wings, tail units, and under-carriage units; 

(3) Aircraft engines, unassembled, assem- 
bled, or dismantled. 

Category VI 

(1) Livens projectors and flame throwers; 

(2) a. Mustard gas (diclJorethyl sulpliide) ; 

b. Levvisite (chlorvinykliclilorarsine and 

dichlordivinylclilorarsme) ; 

c. Methyldichlorarsine; 

d. Diphenylchlorarsine; 

e. Diphenylcyanarsine; 

f. Diphenylaminechlorarsine; 

g. Phenyldicldorarsine; 
h. Ethyldichlorarsine; 

i. Phenyldibromarsine ; 
j. Ethyidibromarsine; 
k. Phosgene; 

1. Monochlormetliylclilorformate ; 
m. Trichlormcthylchlorformate (diphos- 

gene) ; 
n. Dichlordimethyl Ether; 
o. Dibromdimethyl Ether; 
p. Cyanogen Chloride; 
q. Ethylbromacetate; 
r. Ethyliodoacetate; 
s. Brombenzylcyanide; 
t. Bromacetone; 
u. Brommethylethly ketone. 



Category VII 

(1) Propellant powders ; 

(2) High explosives as follows: 

a. Nitrocellulose having a nitrogen con- 

tent of more than 12 % ; 

b. Trinitrotoluene; 

c. Trinitroxylene ; 

d. Tetryl (trinitrophenol methyl nitra- 

mine or tetranitro methylaniline) ; 

e. Picric acid; 

f. Ammonium picrate; 

g. Trinitroanisol ; 

h. Trinitronaphthalene ; 

i. Tetranitronaphthalene ; 

j. Hexanitrodiphenylamine ; 

k. Pentaerythritetetranitrate (Penthrite 
or Pen trite) ; 

1. Trimethylenetrinitramine (Hexogen 
orT4); 

m. Potassium nitrate powders (black 
saltpeter powder) ; 

n. Sodium nitrate powders (black soda 
powder) ; 

o. Amatol (mixture of ammoniimi ni- 
trate and trinitrotoluene); 

p. Ammonal (mixture of ammonium ni- 
trate, trinitrotoluene, and powdered 
aluminum, with or without other 
ingredients) ; 

q. Schneiderite (mixture of ammonium 
nitrate and dinitronaphthalene, with 
or without other ingredients). 

And I do hereby enjoin upon all officers of 
the United States, charged with the execution 
of the laws thereof, the utmost diligence in 
preventing violations of the said joint reso- 
lution, and this my proclamation issued there- 
under, and in bringing to trial and punislunent 
any offenders against the same. 

And I do hereby delegate to the Secretary 
of State the power to exercise any power or 
authority conferred on me by the said joint 
resolution, as made effective by this my proc- 
lamation issued thereunder, and the power to 
promulgate such rules and regulations not in- 
consistent with law as may be necessary and 
proper to carry out any of its provisions. 

In wrrNESS whereof, I have hereunto set 
my hand and caused the Seal of the United 
States of America to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this fifth 
day of September, in the year of our Lord 



SEPTEMBER 9, 1939 

nineteen hundred and thirty-nine, 
[seal] and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the one 
hundred and sixty-fourth. 

Franklin D. Eoosevelt 
By the President: 
CoRDELL Hull 

Secretary of State. 

[Released to the press September 8] 

Export of Arms, Ammunition, and Imple- 
ments OF War to the Union of South 
Africa 

BY THE president OF THE UNITED STATES OF 
AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Whereas section 1 of the joint resokition of 
Congress approved May 1, 1937, amending the 
joint resokition entitled "Joint resolution pro- 
viding for the prohibition of the export of 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war to 
belligerent countries; the prohibition of the 
transportation of arms, ammunition, and im- 
plements of war by vessels of the United States 
for the use of belligerent states ; for the regis- 
tration and licensing of persons engaged in 
the business of manufacturing, exporting, or 
importing arms, ammunition, or implements 
of war; and restricting travel by American 
citizens on belligerent ships during war", ap- 
proved August 31, 1935, as amended February 
29, 1936, provides in part as follows: 

"Whenever the President shall find that 
there exists a state of war between, or among, 
two or more foreign states, the President shall 
proclaim such fact, and it shall thereafter be 
unlawful to export, or attempt to export, or 
cause to be exported, arms, ammunition, or im- 
plements of war from any place in the United 
States to any belligerent state named in such 
proclamation, or to any neutral state for trans- 
shipment to, or for the use of, any such bel- 
ligerent state." 



211 

And whereas it is further provided by sec- 
tion 1 of the said joint resolution that 

"The President shall, from time to time, by 
proclamation, extend such embargo upon the 
export of arms, ammunition, or implements of 
war to other states as and when they may be- 
come involved in such war." 

Now, THEREFORE, I, FrANKLIN D. KoOSEVELT, 

President of the United States of America, 
acting under and by virtue of the authority 
conferred upon me by the said joint resolu- 
tion, do hereby proclaim that all of the pro- 
visions of my proclamation of September 5, 
1939, in regard to the export of arms, ammu- 
nition, and implements of war to France ; Ger- 
many; Poland; and the United Kingdom, 
India, Australia, and New Zealand, henceforth 
apply to the Union of South Africa. 

And I do hereby enjoin upon all officers of 
the United States, charged with the execution 
of the laws thereof, the utmost diligence in 
preventing violations of the said joint resolu- 
tion, and this my proclamation issued there- 
under, and in bringing to trial and punishment 
any offenders against the same. 

And I do hereby delegate to the Secretary 
of State the power to exercise any power or 
authority conferred on me by the said joint 
resolution, as made effective by this my procla- 
mation issued thereunder, and the power to 
promulgate such rules and regulations not in- 
consistent with law as may be necessary and 
proper to carry out any of its provisions. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set 
my hand and caused the seal of the United 
States of America to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this 8th 

day of September, in the year of our Lord 

nineteen hundred and thirty-nine, and 

[seal] of the Independence of the United 

States of America the one hundred 

and sixty-fourth. 

Franklin D. Koosevelt 

By the President: 
CoRDELL Hull 

Secretary of State. 



212 



DEPAETMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Executive Orders Regulating Enforcement of Neutrality 



[Released to the press September 5] 

Executive Order 

Prescribing Regulations Governing the En- 
forcement of the Neutrality of the United. 
States 

Whereas, under the treaties of the United 
States and the law of nations it is the duty of 
the United States, in any war in which the 
United States is a neutral, not to permit the 
commission of unneutral acts within the juris- 
diction of the United States ; 

And whereas, a proclamation was issued 
by me on the fifth day of September declaring 
the neutrality of the United States of America 
in the war now existing between Germany and 
France; Poland; and the United Kingdom, 
India, Australia, and New Zealand. 

Now, thereeore, in order to make more ef- 
fective the enforcement of the provisions of 
said treaties, law of nations, and proclama- 
tion, I hereby prescribe that, during said war, 
the departments and independent offices and 
establishments of the United States Govern- 
ment shall have the following duties to per- 
form in enforcing the neutrality of the United 
States, which duties shall be in addition to the 
duties now prescribed, or hereafter prescribed, 
by law, or by other executive order or regula- 
tion not in conflict herewith, for the depart- 
ments and independent offices and establish- 
ments of the United States Government: 

1. War Department: Enforcement of the 
neutrality of the United States as prescribed 
in the above-mentioned proclamation so far as 
concerns the military land forces of neutral 
and belligerent powers; except as provided in 
paragraphs numbered 2b and 4 hereof. 

2. Navy Department: Enforcement of the 
neutrality of the United States as prescribed 
in the above-mentioned proclamation, (a) so 
far as concerns vessels of the naval establish- 
ments of neutral and belligerent powers and 
other vessels operating for hostile or military 
purposes, except as provided in paragraph 
numbered 4 hereof; (b) enforcement of the 



neutrality of the United States as prescribed 
in said proclamation in outlying possessions 
subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the 
Navy Department; (c) in the Philippine 
Islands, enforcement of the neutrality of the 
United States as respects all vessels as pre- 
scribed in said proclamation, with the special 
cooperation of the Department of State and 
the Dejjartment of the Interior. 

3. Treasury Department and Commerce 
Department: (Under such further division of 
responsibility as the Secretary of the Treasury 
and the Secretary of Commerce may mutually 
agree upon) Enforcement of the neutrality 
of the United States as prescribed in the 
above-mentioned proclamation so far as con- 
cerns all vessels except those referred to in 
paragraph numbered 2 hereof, with the special 
cooperation of the Department of the Interior 
in the territories and outlying possessions 
where the Treasury Department and the Com- 
merce Department are required by law to carry 
out their respective functions, and except in 
the Philippine Islands, the Canal Zone, and the 
outlying possessions subject to the exclusive 
jurisdiction of the Navy Department. 

4. Governor of the Panama Canal: Enforce- 
ment within the Canal Zone of the neutrality 
of the United States as prescribed in the 
above-mentioned proclamation, and adminis- 
trative action in connection therewith. The 
military and naval forces stationed in the 
Canal Zone shall give him such assistance for 
this purpose as he may request. If an officer 
of the Army shall be designated to assume 
authority and jurisdiction over the operation 
of the Panama Canal as provided in Section 
8 of Title 2 of the Canal Zone Code, such of- 
ficer of the Army shall thereafter have the 
duties above assigned to the Governor of the 
Panama Canal. 

5. Department of Justice: Enforcement of 
the neutrality of the United States as pre- 
scribed in the above-mentioned proclamation, 
not especially delegated to other departments, 
independent offices and establishments of the 



213 



United States Government, and prosecution of 
violations of the neutrality of the United 
States. 

6. AU Departments and Inde-pende^it Of- 
-fices and EstdblishTnents of the United States: 
Enforcement of neutrality in connection with 
their own activities, furnishing information to, 
and assisting all other departments and inde- 
pendent offices and establishments of the 
United States Government in connection with 
the duties herein assigned; and issuing rules 
and regulations necessary for carrying out the 
duties herein assigned. 

Fkanklin D. Eoosevei/t 
The White House, 
September 5, 1939. 

[Released to the press September 8] 

Executive Order 

Prescribing Regulations Governing the En- 
forcement of the Neutrality of the United 
States 

Whereas, under the treaties of the United 
States and the law of nations it is the duty of 



the United States, in any war in which the 
United States is a neutral, not to permit the 
commission of unneutral acts within the juris- 
diction of the United States ; 

And whereas, a proclamation was issued 
by me on the 8th day of September declaring 
the neutrality of the United States of America 
in the war now existing between Germany, on 
the one hand, and the Union of South Africa, 
on the other hand : 

Now, therefore, in order to make more ef- 
fective the enforcement of the provisions of 
said treaties, law of nations, and proclama- 
tion, I hereby prescribe that the provisions of 
my Executive Order No. 8233 of September 
5, 1939, prescribing regulations governing the 
enforcement of the neutrality of the United 
States, apply equally in respect to the Union 
of South Africa. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 

The White House, 

8th September, 1939. 



Proclamation Concerning Neutrality of the Canal Zone 



[Released to the press September 5] 

Prescribing Regulations Concerning Neu- 
trality IN THE Canal Zone 

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES Or 
AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Whereas a proclamation having been issued 
by me on the fifth day of September instant 
declaring the neutrality of the United States 
of America in the war now existing between 
Germany and France; Poland; the United 
Kingdom, India, Australia, and New Zealand. 

And whereas the provisions of the said proc- 
lamation apply to the Canal Zone except in so 
far as such provisions may be modified by a 
proclamation issued for the Canal Zone; 



Now, therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, 
President of the United States of America, do 
declare and proclaim that, from and after the 
fifth day of September instant, the said proc- 
lamation issued by me on the fifth day of 
September instant, in its application to the 
Canal Zone, is hereby modified as follows : 

1. The limit of twenty-four hours prescribed 
by the above proclamation, with certain excep- 
tions, as the maximum time a belligerent ship 
of war may remain within the jurisdiction of 
the United States shall apply to the total time 
such ship of war may remain in all the waters 
of the Canal Zone, except that the time re- 
quired to transit the Canal shall be in addi- 
tion to the prescribed twenty-four hours. Such 
transit shall be effected with the least possibla 



214 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BITLLETIN 



delay in accordance with the Canal regulations 
in force, and onlj'^ with such intermission as 
may result from the necessities of the service. 

2. The maximum number of ships of war be- 
longing to a belligerent and its allies which 
may be simultaneously in either terminal port 
and the terminal waters adjacent to such port 
shall be three. The maximum number of such 
vessels in all the waters of the Canal Zone 
simultaneously, including those in transit 
through the Canal, shall be six. 

3. Belligerent ships of war, not carrying 
aircraft, departing from the jurisdiction of the 
Canal Zone from one of the terminal ports 
shall not be required to observe the prescribed 
interval of time between such departure and 
the departure from such jurisdiction of a ves- 
sel of an opposing belligerent from the other 
terminal port. 

4. The time of original arrival of vessels 
within the jurisdiction of the Canal Zone, 
whether or not they transit the Canal, shall be 
used as the time of arrival in deciding the 
right of priority, between vessels of opposing 
belligerents, in departing from the jurisdiction 
of the Canal Zone. 

5. If a belligerent ship of war which has left 
the waters of the Canal Zone, whether she has 
transited the Canal or not, returns within a 
period of one week after her departure, she 
shall lose all right of priority in departure 
from the Canal Zone, or in passage through 
the Canal, over vessels of an opposing bellig- 
erent which may enter those waters after her 
return and before the expiration of one week 
subsequent to her previous departure. In any 
such case, the time of departure of a vessel 
which has so returned shall be fixed by the 
Canal authorities, who may in so doino- con- 
sider the wishes of the commander or master 
of a vessel or vessels of an opposing bellig- 
erent then present within the waters of the 
Canal Zone. 

6. If it is wholly impossible, as determined 
by the Governor of the Panama Canal, for a 
belligerent ship of war to effect repairs 
through, or to obtain fuel, lubricants, feed 
water, and provisions from, a private con- 



tractor within the Canal Zone or the Republic 
of Panama, the agencies of the United States 
administered by the Canal authorities may, in 
order to facilitate the operation of the Canal 
or its appurtenances, effect such repairs and 
furnish such supplies in accordance with the 
Canal regulations in force, but when repairs 
and supplies are so obtained they shall be lim- 
ited to such repairs and such amounts of fuel, 
lubricants, feed water, and provisions, with 
that already on board, as may be necessary to 
enable the vessel to proceed to the nearest ac- 
cessible port, not an enemy port, in the general 
direction of her voyage, at which she can ob- 
tain further repairs or supplies necessary for 
the continuation of the voyage. The amounts 
of fuel, lubricants, feed water, and provisions 
so received shall be deducted from the amounts 
otherwise allowed in ports, harbors, roadsteads, 
and waters subject to the jurisdiction of the 
United States, including the Canal Zone, dur- 
ing any time within a period of three months 
thereafter. No public vessel of a belligerent 
shall receive fuel or lubricants while within 
the territorial waters of the Canal Zone except 
under written authorization of the Canal 
Authorities, specifying the amount of fuel and 
lubricants which may be received. Moreover, 
the repair facilities and docks belonging to the 
United States and administered by the Canal 
Authorities shall not be used by a public vessel 
of a belligerent, except when necessary in case 
of actual distress, and then only upon the 
order of the Canal Authorities, and only to 
the degree necessary to render the vessel sea- 
worthy. Any work authorized shall be done 
with the least possible delay. 

7. In the Canal Zone, prizes shall be in all 
respects subject to the same rules as ships of 
war of the belligerents. 

And I do further declare and proclaim that, 
from and after the fifth day of September in- 
stant, the following additional provisions shall 
be effective in the Canal Zone : 

1. No belligerent shall embark or disembark 
troops, munitions of war, or warlike materials 
in the Canal Zone, except when required by 



SEPTEMBER 9, 19 3 9 



215 



the Canal authorities, or in case of accidental 
hindrance of the transit. In such cases the 
Canal authorities shall be the judges of the 
necessity, and the transit shall be resumed with 
all dispatch. 

2. No belligerent aircraft shall be navigated 
into, within, or through the air spaces above 
the territory or waters of the Canal Zone. 

3. The enforcement of neutrality of the 
United States within the Caiial Zone and ad- 
ministrative action in connection therewith 
shall be the responsibility of the Governor of 
the Panama Canal ; and the military and naval 
forces stationed in the Canal Zone shall give 
him such assistance for this pui'pose as he may 
request; provided that, if an officer of the 
Army is designated to assume authority and 
jurisdiction over the operation of the Panama 
Canal as provided in Section 8 of Title 2 of the 
Canal Zone Code, such officer of the Army 
shall thereafter have such responsibility. 

And I do further declare and proclaim that 
the provisions of this proclamation and the 



provisions of the proclamation of the fifth day 
of September instant are in addition to the 
"Rules and Kegulations for the Operation and 
Navigation of the Panama Canal and Ap- 
proaches Thereto, including all AVaters under 
its jurisdiction" prescribed by Executive Order 
No. 4314, of September 25, 1925, as amended. 

This proclamation shall continue in full 
force and effect unless and until modified, re- 
voked, or otherwise terminated pursuant to 
law. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my 
Iiand and caused the seal of the United States 
to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this fifth 

day of September, in the year of our Lord 

nineteen hundred and thirty-nine, 

[seal] and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the one 
hundred and sixty-fourth. 

Franklin D. Roose\'elt 
By the President: 
Cokdell Hull 

Secretary of State. 



Executive Order Regulating Passage of Vessels Through the Panama Canal 



[Released to the press September 5] 

Executive Order 

Prescrihing Regulations Governing the Pas- 
sage and Control of Vessels Through the 
Panama Canal in any War in Which the 
United States Is Neutral 

Whereas the treaties of the United States, 
in any war in which the United States is a 
neutral, impose on the United States certain 
obligations to both neutral and belligerent 
nations ; 

And whereas the treaties of the United 
States, in any war in which the United States 
is a neutral, require that the United States 
exert all the vigilance within their power to 
carry out their obligations as a neutral; 

And whereas treaties of the United States 
require that the Panama Canal shall be free 

176395—39 3 



and open, on terms of entire equality, to the 
vessels of commerce and of war of all nations 
observing the rules laid down in Article 3 of 
the so-called Hay-Pauncefote treaty concluded 
between the United States and Great Britain, 
November 18, 1901 ; 

Now, therefore, by virtue of the authority 
vested in me by section 5 of the Panama Canal 
Act, approved August 24, 1912 (ch. 390, sec. 
5, 37 Stat. 562), as amended by the act of 
July 5, 1932 (ch. 425, 47 Stat. 578), I hereby 
prescribe the following regulations governing 
the passage and control of vessels through the 
Panama Canal or any part thereof, including 
the locks and approaches thereto, in any war 
in which the United States is a neutral ; 

1. Whenever considered necessary, in the 
opinion of the Governor of the Panama Canal, 
to prevent damage or injury to vessels or to 



216 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



prevent damage or injury to the Canal or its 
appurtenances, or to secure the observance of 
the rules, regulations, rights, or obligations of 
the United States, the Canal authorities may 
at any time, as a condition precedent to transit 
of the Canal, inspect any vessel, belligerent or 
neutral, other than a jjublic vessel, including 
its crew and cargo, and, for and during the 
passage through the Canal, place armed 
guards thereon, and take full possession and 
control of such vessel and remove therefrom 
the officers and crew thereof and all other per- 
sons not specially authorized by the Canal 
authorities to go or remain on board thereof 
during such passage. 

2. A public vessel of a belligerent or neutral 
nation shall be permitted to pass through the 
Canal only after her commanding officer has 



given written assurance to the authorities of 
the Panama Canal that the rules, regulations, 
and treaties of the United States will be faith- 
fully observed. 

The foregoing regulations are in addition to 
the "Rules and Regulations for the Operation 
and Navigation of the Panama Canal and Ap- 
proaches Thereto, including all "Waters under 
its Jurisdiction" prescribed by Executive Order 
No. 4314 of September 25, 1925, as amended, 
and the provisions of proclamations and execu- 
tive orders "pertaining to the Canal Zone issued 
in conformity with the laws and treaties of the 
United States. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 
The White House, 

September 5, 1939. 



Proclamation of National Emergency 



[Released to the press September 8] 

Proclaiming a National Emergency in Con- 
nection With the Observance, Safeguard- 
ing, and Enforcement of Neutrality and 
the Strengthening of the National De- 
fense AViTHiN THE Limits of Peace-Time 
Authorization s 

BY the president OF THE UNITED STATES OF 
AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Whereas a procliunation issued by me on 
September 5, 1939, proclaimed the neutrality of 
the United States in the war now unhappily 
existing between certain nations; and 

Whereas this state of war imposes on the 
United States certain duties with respect to the 
proper obsei'vance, safogiuu-ding, and enforce- 
ment of such neutrality, and the strengthening 
of the national defense within the limits of 
peace-time authorizations ; and 

Whereas measures required at this time call 
for the exercise of only a limited number of the 
powers granted in a national emergency : 



Now, therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, 
President of the United States of America, do 
proclaim that a national emergency exists in 
connection with and to the extent necessary for 
the pro^^er observance, safeguarding, and en- 
forcing of the neutrality of the United States 
and the strengthening of our national defense 
within the limits of peace-time authorizations. 
Specific directions and authorizations will be 
given from time to time for carrying out these 
two purposes. 

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 

Done at the City of AVashington this eighth 

day of September, in the year of our Lord 

nineteen hundred and thirty-nine, 

[seal] and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the one 
hundred and sixty-fourth. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 
By the President : 
Cordell Hull 

Secretary of State. 



SEPTEMBER 9, 1939 



217 



Executive Order Increasing the Army 



[Released to the press September 8] 

ExEcurrvE Order 

Authonsing an Inci^ease in the Strength of the 
Army 

Whereas a proclamation issued by me on 
September 8, 1939, proclaimed that a national 
emergency exists in connection with and to the 
extent necessary for the proper observance, 
safeguarding, and enforcing of the neutrality 
of the United States and the strengthening of 
our national defense within the limits of peace- 
time authorizations; and 

Whereas the authorized enlisted strength of 
the active list of the Regular Army in x^eace 
time is 280,000 men; and the authorized en- 
listed strength of the National Guard in peace 
time is not less than 424,800 men ; and 

Whereas the military forces will be charged 
with additional and important duties in con- 
nection with such national emergency requiring 
an increase in the pi'esent enlisted strength 
within the limits of this authorization ; 

Now, therefore, by virtue of the authority 
vested in me by the Constitution and by section 
2 of the National Defense Act of 1916, as 
amended by section 2 of the act of June 4, 1920, 
41 Stat. 759, and by Revised Statutes, section 
3667, as amended (U.S.C, title 31, sec. 665) ; 



section 62 and section 37a of the National De- 
fense Act as amended (U.S.C. title 32, sec. 121 ; 
U.S.C. title 10; sec. 369), it is hereby ordered 
as follows: 

1. The enlisted strength of the active list of 
the Regular Army shall be increased as rapidly 
as possible by voluntary enlistments to 227,000 
men. 

2. The commissioned strength of the Regular 
Army may be supplemented by the use of re- 
serve officers as may be necessai'y, provided the 
limitation on numbers and grades prescribed 
in the act approved April 3, 1939 (Pub. 18, 76th 
Congress) is not exceeded. 

3. The increase, as quickly as possible, in the 
enlisted strength of the existing active units 
of the National Guard to 235,000 men, is au- 
thorized, with such increase in commissioned 
strength as is essential for command. 

4. To the extent made necessary by this order 
the Department of War is authorized to waive 
or modify the monthly or other apportionment 
of its appropriation for contingent expenses or 
other general purposes for the fiscal year end- 
ing June 30, 1940. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 
The Whtte House, 
September 8, 1939. 



Executive Order Increasing the Navy and Marine Corps 



[Released to the press September 8] 

ExECTTTivE Order 

Authorizmg Increases in the Enlisted Strengths 
of the Navy and the Marine Corps 

Whereas a proclamation issued by me on 
September 8, 1939, proclaimed that a national 
emergency exists in connection with and to the 
extent necessary for the proper observance, 
safeguarding, and enforcing of the neutrality 
of tiie United States and the strengthening of 
our national defense within the limits of peace- 
time authorizations; and 



Whereas the authorized enlisted strength of 
the active list of the Regular Navy in peace 
time is 131,485 men with authority in the 
President when a sufficient emergency exists to 
increase this strength to 191,000 men, and the 
authorized enlisted strength of the active list 
of the Marine Corps in peace time is 20 per 
centum of the total authorized enlisted 
strength of the active list of the Navy ; and 

Whereas the Navy and the Marine Corps 
will be charged with additional and important 
duties in connection with such national emer- 
gency requiring increases in their present en- 



218 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



listed strengths within the limits of these 
authorizations : 

Now, THEREFORE, by vii'tue of the authority 
vested in me by the Constitution and by the 
act of July 1, 1918, as amended by the act of 
July 11, 1919 (U. S. C, title 34, sec. 151), sec- 
tion 15 (d) of the act of June 23, 1938 (U. S. C, 
title 34, sec. G91), by the act of July 1, 1918, as 
amended by section 17 of the act of June 10, 
1922 (U. S. C, title 34, sec. 423), by the act of 
June 25, 1938, Title I, section 5 (U. S. C, Supp. 
title 34, section 853c), and Revised Statutes, 
section 3667, as amended (U. S. C, title 31, sec. 
665), it is hereby ordered as follows: 

1. The enlisted strength of the active list of 
the Regular Navy shall be increased as rapidly 
as possible by voluntary enlistments as may be 
deemed necessary by the Secretary of the Navy 
not to exceed 145,000 men. 

2. The enlisted strength of the active list of 
the Marine Corps shall be increased as rapidly 
as possible by voluntary enlistments to 25,000 
men. 



3. The Secretary of the Navy is authorized, 
in his discretion, to order to active duty such 
commissioned and warrant officers of the Navy 
and Marine Corps on the retired list, and such 
transferred members of the Fleet Reserve and 
the Marine Corps Fleet Reserve as he may 
deem necessary. 

4. The Secretary of the Navy is also author- 
ized to order to active duty such officers and 
men of the Naval Reserve and Marine Corps 
Reserve other than transferred members of the 
Fleet Reserve and the Fleet Marine Cor^^s 
Reserve, including aviation cadets, as he may 
deem necessary and as agree voluntarily to 
serve. 

5. To the extent made necessary by this 
order, the Department of the Navy is hereby 
authorized to waive or modify the monthly or 
other apportiomnents of its appropriations for 
contingent expenses or other general purposes 
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1940. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 
The White Hodse, 
September 8, 1939. 



Executive Order Increasing the Federal Bureau of Investigation 



[Reloasoil to tbe press Septembei- 8) 

Executive Order 

Authorizing Increases in the Personnel of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, De-part- 
msnt of Justice 

Whereas a proclamation issued by me on 
September 8, 1939, proclaimed that a national 
emergency exists in connection with and to the 
extent necessary for the proper observance, 
safeguarding, and enforcing of the neutrality 
of the United States and the strengthening of 
our national tlefense within the limits of peace- 
time authorizations; and 

Whereas the Federal Bureau of Investiga- 
tion, Department of Justice, will be charged 
with additional and important duties in con- 
nection with such national emergency, requir- 
ing an increase in its personnel : 

Now, therefore, by virtue of the authority 
vested in me by the Constitution and by Re- 



vised Statutes, section 3667, as amended (U. 
S. C, title 31, sec. 665), it is hereby ordered as 
follows : 

1. The Attorney General shall increase the 
personnel of the Federal Bureau of Investiga- 
tion, Department of Justice, in such number, 
not exceeding 150, as he shall find necessary 
for the proper iJerformance of the additional 
duties imposed upon the Department of Justice 
in connection with the national emergency. 

2. To the extent made necessary by this 
order the Department of Justice is hereby 
authorized to waive or modify the monthly or 
other apportionments of its appropriations for 
contingent expenses or other general purposes 
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1940. 

Franklin D. Roose\'elt 
The White House. 

September S, 1939. 



SEPTEMBER 9, 19 39 



219 



Funds to Protect American Citizens in Foreign Countries 



[Released to the press September 8] 

Executive Order 

Making Funds Available for the Protection of 
American Citizens in Foreign Countries 
During the Existing Emergency 

AVhereas the Department of State Appro- 
priation Act, 1940 (53 Stat. 890), provides, in 
part, as follows: 

"emergencies arising in the diplomatic and 

CONSULAR service 

"Emergencies arising in the Diplomatic and 
Consular Service: To enable the President to 
meet unforeseen emergencies arising in the 
Diplomatic and Consular Service, and to extend 
the commercial and other interests of the United 
States and to meet the necessary expenses at- 
tendant upon the execution of the Neutrality 
Act, to be expended pursuant to the requirement 
of section 291 of the Revised Statutes (31 
U.S.C. 107), $175,000: Provided, That when- 
ever the President shall find that a state of 
emergency exists endangering the lives of 
American citizens in any foreign country, he 
may make available for expenditure for the pro- 
tection of such citizens, by transfer to this ap- 
propriation, not to exceed $500,000 from the 
various appropriations contained herein under 
the heading 'Foreign Intercourse'; and reim- 
bursements by American citizens to whom relief 
has been extended shall be credited to any ap- 



proi^riation from which funds have been trans- 
ferred for the purposes hereof, except that reim- 
bursements so credited to any appropriation 
shall not exceed the amount transferred there- 
from." 

And whereas I find and declare that an 
emergency exists endangering the lives of 
American citizens in foreign countries within 
the meaning of the said Act: 

Now, therefore, by virtue of and pursuant 
to the authority vested in me by the above- 
quoted statutory provisions, and in order to 
meet such emergency and make funds avail- 
able for the protection of American citizens 
in foreign countries, I hereby direct the Sec- 
retary of the Treasury, when so requested by 
the Secretary of State, to transfer on the books 
of the Treasury, for expenditure from the 
appropriation "Emergencies Arising in the 
Diplomatic and Consular Service", from any 
appropriation in the said Act under the head- 
ing "Foreign Intercourse", such sums not to 
exceed in all $500,000 as the Secretary of State 
may from time to time during the existing 
emergency find necessary; and funds so trans- 
ferred shall be expended subject only to the 
requirement of section 291 of the Revised Stat- 
utes of the United States (31 U. S. C. 107). 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 
The White House, 

September 8, 1939. 



Travel on Belligerent Ships 



[Released to the press September 5] 

Regulations Under Section 9 of the Joint 
Resolution of Congress Approved May 1, 
1937 

Section 9 of the joint resolution of Congress 
approved May 1, 1937, amending the joint 
resolution approved August 31, 1935, provides 
as follows: 

"Whenever the President shall have issued 
a proclamation under the authority of section 

17639—39 4 



1 of this Act it shall thereafter be unlawful 
for any citizen of the United States to travel 
on any vessel of the state or states named in 
such proclamation, except in accordance with 
such rules and regulations as the President 
shall prescribe: Provided, however. That the 
provisions of this section shall not apply to a 
citizen of the United States traveling on a ves- 
sel whose voyage was begun in advance of the 
date of the President's proclamation, and who 
had no opportunity to discontinue his voyage 



220 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



after that date: And provided further, That 
they shall not apply under ninety days after 
the date of the President's proclamation to a 
citizen of the United States returning from a 
foreign state to the United States. Whenever, 
in the President's judgment, the conditions 
which have caused him to issue his proclama- 
tion have ceased to exist, he shall revoke his 
proclamation and the provisions of this sec- 
tion shall thereupon cease to apply with re- 
spect to the state or states named in such proc- 
lamation, except with respect to offenses com- 
mitted prior to such revocation." 

Section 12 of the said joint resolution pro- 
vides as follows: 

"In every case of the violation of any of the 
provisions of this Act or of any rule or regula- 
tion issued pursuant thereto where a specific 
penalty is not herein provided, such violator 
or violators, upon conviction, shall be fined not 
more than $10,000, or imprisoned not more than 
five years, or both." 

Section 11 of the said joint resolution pro- 
vides as follows : 

"The President may, from time to time, pro- 
mulgate such rules and regulations, not incon- 
sistent with law, as may be necessary and 
proper to carry out any of the provisions of 
this Act; and he may exercise any power or 
authority conferred on him by this Act 
through such officer or officers, or agency or 
agencies, as he shall direct." 

The President's proclamation of September 
5, 1939, issued pursuant to the provisions of 
section 1 of the above-mentioned joint resolu- 
tion, provides in part as follows : 

"And I do hereby delegate to the Secretary 
of State the power to exercise any power or 
authority conferred on me by the said joint 
resolution, as made effective by this my proc- 
lamation issued thereunder, and the power to 



promulgate such rules and regulations not in- 
consistent with law as may be necessary and 
proper to carry out any of its provisions." 

In pursuance of those provisions of the law 
and of the President's proclamation of Sep- 
tember 5, 1939, which are quoted above, the 
Secretary of State announces the following 
regulations : 

American diplomatic and consular officers 
and their families, members of their staffs and 
their families, and American military and 
naval officers and personnel and their families 
may travel pursuant to orders on vessels of 
France; Germany; Poland; or the United 
Kingdom, India, Australia and New Zealand 
if the public service requires. 

Other American citizens may travel on ves- 
sels of France; Germany; Poland; or the 
United Kingdom, India, Australia and New 
Zealand, provided, however, that travel on or 
over the north Atlantic Ocean, east of 30 de- 
grees west and north of 30 degrees north or 
on or over other waters adjacent to Europe or 
over the continent of Europe or adjacent 
islands shall not be permitted except when spe- 
cifically authorized by the Secretary of State in 
each case. 

CoRDHLL Hull 
Secretary of State 

[Released to the press September 9] 

Kegulations Under Section 9 or the Joint 
Kesolution or Congress Approved May 1, 
1937 

The Secretary of State announces that the 
regulations under section 9 of the joint resolu- 
tion of Congress approved May 1, 1937, which 
he promulgated on September 5, 1939, hence- 
forth apply equally in respect to travel by citi- 
zens of the United States on vessels of the 
Union of South Africa. 

CoRDELL Hull 



SEPTEMBER 9, 1939 



221 



Credits to Belligerents 



[Released to the press September 6] 

Regulation Concerning Credits to 
Belligerents 

Section 3 of the joint resolution of Congress 
approved May 1, 1937, reads in part as follows : 

"Sec. 3. (a) Whenever the President sliall 
have issued a proclamation under the author- 
ity of section 1 of this Act, it shall thereafter 
be unlawful for any person within the United 
States to purchase, sell, or exchange bonds, 
securities, or other obligations of the govern- 
ment of any belligerent state or of any state 
wherein civil strife exists, named in such 
proclamation, or of any political subdivision 
of any such state, or of any person acting 
for or on behalf of the government of any 
such state, or of any faction or asserted gov- 
ernment within any such state wherein civil 
strife exists, or of any person acting for or 
on behalf of any faction or asserted govern- 
ment within any such state wherein civil strife 
exists, issued after the date of such proclama- 
tion, or to make any loan or extend any credit 
to any such government, political subdi- 
vision, faction, asserted government, or person, 
or to solicit or receive any contribution for 
any such government, political subdivision, 
faction, asserted goverranent, or person: Pro- 
vided^ That if the President shall find that 
such action will serve to protect the commercial 
or other interests of the United States or 
its citizens, he may, in his discretion, and to 
such extent and under such regulations as 
he may prescribe, except from the operation 
of this section ordinary commercial credits 
and short-time obligations in aid of legal 
transactions and of a character customarily 
used in normal peacetime commercial trans- 
actions. Nothing in this subsection shall be 
construed to prohibit the solicitation or col- 
lection of funds to be used for medical aid 
and assistance, or for food and clothing to 
relieve human suffering, when such solicita- 
tion or collection of funds is made on behalf 
of and for use by any person or organization 
which is not acting for or on behalf of any 



such government, political subdivision, faction, 
or asserted government, but all such solicita- 
tions and collections of funds shall be subject 
to the approval of the President and shall be 
made under such rules and regulations as he 
shall prescribe. 

"(b) The provisions of this section shall not 
apply to a renewal or adjustment of such in- 
debtedness as may exist on the date of the 
President's proclamation. 

"(c) Whoever shall violate the provisions of 
this section or of any regulations issued here- 
under shall, upon conviction thereof, be fined 
not more than $50,000 or imprisoned for not 
more than five years, or both. Should the vio- 
lation be by a corporation, organization, or as- 
sociation, each oiBcer or agent thereof par- 
ticipating in the violation may be liable to the 
penalty herein prescribed." 

I hereby find that it will serve to protect the 
commercial and other interests of the United 
States and its citizens to except from the opera- 
tion of Section 3 of the joint resolution of 
Congress approved May 1, 1937, as made ap- 
plicable to Germany and France, Poland, and 
the United Kingdom, India, Australia and New 
Zealand by the Proclamation of the President 
of September 5, 1939 issued under the author- 
ity of Section 1 of such joint resolution, ordi- 
nary coimnercial credits and short-time obliga- 
tions in aid of legal transactions and of a 
character customarily used in normal peace- 
time commercial transactions; and they are 
therefore hereby excepted. 

I hereby authorize the Secretary of the 
Treasury to administer the provisions of this 
regulation and to promulgate such rules and 
regulations not inconsistent with law as may 
be necessary and proper to carry out such 
provisions. 

This regulation shall continue in full force 
and effect unless and until modified, revoked, 
or otherwise terminated, pursuant to law. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 

The White House, 
September 6, 1939. 



222 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries 



[Rpleased to the press September 5] 

Rules and Regltlations Governing the Solici- 
tation AND Collection of Contributions 
FOR Use in France; Germany; Poland; and 
THE United Kingdom, India, Australia, and 
New Zealand 

Section 3 of the joint resolution of Congress 
approved May 1, 1937 (Public Res. 27, 75th 
Cong., 1st sess.), amending the joint resolution 
approved August 31, 1935, as amended, pro- 
vides in part as follows: 

"(a) Whenever the President shall have 
issued a proclamation under the authority of 
section 1 of this Act, it shall thereafter be un- 
lawful for any person within the United States 
to purchase, sell, or exchange bonds, securities, 
or other obligations of the government of any 
belligerent state or of any state wherein civil 
strife exists, named in such proclamation, or of 
any political subdivision of any such state, or 
of any person acting for or on behalf of the 
government of any such state, or of any fac- 
tion or asserted government witliin any such 
state wherein civil strife exists, or of any per- 
son acting for or on behalf of any faction or 
asserted government within any such state 
wherein civil strife exists, issued after the date 
of such proclamation, or to make any loan or 
extend any credit to any such government, 
political subdivision, faction, asserted govern- 
ment or person, or to solicit or receive any con- 
tribution for aw/ .such government, political 
subdivision, faction, asserted government or fer- 
son: Provided, That . . . Nothing in this sub- 
section shall be construed to 'prohibit the solici- 
tation or collection of funds to be used for 
7nedical aid and assistance, or for food and 
clothing to relieve human suffering, when such 
solicitation or collection of funds is made on be- 
half of and for use by any person or organiza- 
tion which is not acting for or on behalf of any 
such government, political subdivision, faction, 
or asserted government, but all such solicita- 
tions and collectio7is of funds shall be subject to 
the approval of the President and shall be made 



under such rides and regulations as he shall 
prescribe. [Italics supplied.] 

" (c) Wlioever shall violate the provisions of 
this section or of any regulations issued here- 
under shall, upon conviction thereof, be fined 
not more than $50,000 or imprisoned for not 
more than five years, or both. Should the vio- 
lation be by a corporation, organization, or as- 
sociation, each officer or agent thereof partici- 
pating in the violation may be liable to the 
penalty herein prescribed." 

On SeiJfember 5, 1939, the President issued 
a proclamation in respect to France ; Germany ; 
Poland; and the United Kingdom, India, Aus- 
tralia, and New Zealand, under the authority 
of section 1 of the said joint resolution, thereby 
making effective in respect to those countries 
the provisions of section 3 of the said joint 
resolution quoted above. 

Section 11 of the said joint resolution \iVO- 
vides as follows: 

"Sec. 11. The President may, from time to 
time, promulgate such rules and regulations, 
not inconsistent with law, as may be necessary 
and proper to carry out any of the pi'ovisions 
of this Act; and he may exercise any power 
or authority conferred on him by this Act 
through such officer or officers, or agency or 
agencies, as he shall direct." 

The President's proclamation of September 
5, 1939, referred to above, issued pursuant to 
the provisions of section 1 of the above- 
mentioned joint resolution provides in part as 
follows : 

"And I do hereby delegate to the Secretary 
of State the power to exercise any power or 
authority confeiTed on me by the said joint 
resolution, as made effective by this my proc- 
lamation issued thereunder, and the power to 
promulgate such rules and regulations not in- 
consistent with law as may be necessary and 
proper to carry out any of its provisions." 

In pureuance of those provisions of the law 
and of the President's j^roclamation of Sep- 
tember 5, 1939, which are referred to above, 



SEPTEMBER 9, 193 9 



223 



the Secretary of State promulgates the follow- 
ing regulations : 

(1) The term "person" as used herein and 
in the act of May 1, 1937, includes a partner- 
ship, company, association, organization, or 
corporation, as well as a natural person. 

(2) Any person within the United States, 
its territories, insular possessions (including 
the Philippine Islands), the Canal Zone, and 
the District of Columbia who desires to engage 
in the solicitation or collection of contributions 
to be used for medical aid and assistance in 
France; Germany; Poland; or the United 
Kingdom, India, Australia and New Zealand, 
or for food and clothing to relieve human suf- 
fering in any of those countries, and who is 
not acting for or on behalf of the Govern- 
ments of France; Germany; Poland; or the 
United Kingdom, India, Australia and New 
Zealand, or any political subdivision of any of 
such countries, shall register with the Secre- 
tary of State. To this end, such person shall 
make application to the Secretary of State 
upon the form provided therefor. 

(3) Organizations or associations having 
chapters shall list them in their application 
for registration and shall set forth therein the 
addresses of such chapters. In case chapters 
are formed after the registration of the parent 
organization, tlie parent should immediately 
inform the Secretary of State in order that 
its registration may be amended to name the 
new chapter or chapters. 

(4) No person shall solicit or collect con- 
tributions without having in his possession a 
notice from the Secretary of State of accept- 
ance of registration which has not been re- 
voked; Provided, however, That nothing in this 
regulation .shall be construed as requiring a 
duly authorized agent of a registrant to have 
in his possession a notice of acceptance of regis- 
tration. Chapters named in the parent or- 
ganization's registration may, of course, op- 
erate under this registration. Notices of 
acceptance of registration shall not be ex- 
hibited, used, or referred to, in any manner 
which might be construed as implying offi- 
cial endorsement of the persons engaged in 



the solicitation or collection of contributions. 

(5) All persons registered with the Secre- 
tary of State must maintain for his inspection 
or that of his duly authorized agent, complete 
records of all transactions in wliich the regis- 
trant engages. 

(6) Persons receiving notification of accept- 
ance of registration shall submit to the Secre- 
tary of State not later than the tenth day of 
every month following the receipt of such noti- 
fication sworn statements, in duplicate, on the 
form provided therefor setting forth fully the 
information called for therein. 

(7) The Secretary of State reserves the 
right to reject applications or to revoke regis- 
trations for failure on the part of the regis- 
trant to comply with the provisions or pur- 
poses of the law or of these regulations. 

(8) A registrant may act as an agent for 
the transmittal abroad of funds received by 
another registrant but such funds shall not be 
accountable as contributions received by the 
transmitting registrant. 

(9) Any changes in the facts set forth in 
the registrant's application for registration*, 
such as change of address, of officers, or of 
means of distribution abroad, should be re- 
ported promptly to the Secretary of State in 
the form of a supplemental application, in 
duplicate, properly sworn to. 

(10) In view of the jaurposes and special 
status of "The American National Red Cross" 
as set forth in the act of Congress approved 
January 5, 1905, entitled "An Act to incor- 
porate the American National Red Cross" 
(33 Stat. 599), and particularly in view of the 
fact that it is required by law to submit to 
the Secretary of War for audit "a full, com- 
plete, and itemized report of receipts and ex- 
penditures of whatever kind," so that the sub- 
mission to the Secretary of State of reports 
of funds received and expended would con- 
stitute an unnecessary duplication, "The 
American National Red Cross" is not re- 
quired to conform to the provisions of these 
regulations. 

CoRDELL Hull 
September 5, 1939. Secretary of State 



224 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



[Released to the press September 9] 

Etjles and Regulations Governing the 
Solicitation and Collection of Contribu- 
tions roR Use in the Union of South 
Africa 

The Secretary of State announces that the 
rules and regulations under the provisions of 
section 3 (a) of the joint resolution of Congress 



approved May 1, 1937, in regard to the solici- 
tation and collection of funds for use in 
France; Germany; Poland; and the United 
Kingdom, India, Australia, and New Zealand, 
which he promulgated on September 5, 1939, 
henceforth apply equally in respect to the 
solicitation and collection of funds for use in 
the Union of South Africa. 

Cordell Hull 



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

Department of State 



APPLICATION FOR REGISTRATION 

pursuant to the provisions of section 3 (a) of the joint resolution of Congress approved by the President on May I, 1937, of persons engaged in the solici- 
tation or collection of contributions for use in the countries named in Presidential proclamations issued pursuant to section 1 of that joint resolution. 

(The applicant shall fill in all of the following spaces. If spaces provided are inadequate, applicant may incorporate additional information in a supple- 
mental statement attached to and forming part of this apphcation.) 

(1) Name of person (the term "person" includes a partnership, company, association, or corporation, as well as a natural person): 

(2) Principal business address: 

(3) Addresses of ciiapters or of other places of business in the United States or elsewhere: 

(4) if otiier than a natural person, the names and addresses of the principal officers of the registeant and of the chapters included In the registration of the 
registrant: 



(5) Means proposed to be employed to solicit or collect contributions. (Describe fully) : 

(6) Tiie name or names of the country or countries for which the contribution'sarelntended: 

(7) Tlie name or names, address or addresses, and occupation of the distributor or distributors abroad to whom the contrfbutions are to be sent: 



(8) The maimer in which the funds are to be distributed and expended in the country or countries named under (a) above: 

(9) ii funds are to be transmitted abroad by persons or organizations in ttiis country, the names and addresses of such persons or organizations: 

I solemnly swear that the contributions to be solicited and collected by me will be used for medical aid and assistance, or for food and clothins to re- 
lieve human sulTering in and - and that no contribution solicited or 

c:ilIectoii by me shall be distributed by any person or orffanization which is acting for or on behalf of the governments of Fr.inco: Ocrmany: Poland; the 
United Kingdom, India, Australia, or New Zealand; or of any political subdivision of France; Germany; Poland: the United Kingdom, India, Australia, 
or New Zealand. 



(Signature) 
(If the applicant is a partnership, company, as-wciation. or corporation, 
the signature shall be that of its duly authorized repre.sentativo.) 



Signed and .sealed in my prosetico this day of _._ , 19 . 



(Notary public) 



SEPTEMBER 9, 19 3 9 225 

REPORT 

FOE THE Month of 19 , as Required by Regulation (6) of 

THE Rules and Regulations Promulgated by the Secretary op State on September 5, 
1939, Governing the Solicitation or Collection of Contributions for Use in the Coun- 
tries Named in Presidential Proclamations Issued Pursuant to Section 1 of the Act 
OF May 1, 1937 

Instructions 

1. Gross receipts and gross eipenditures only should be reported under paragraphs (4) and (5). For example, the receipts and expenditures of a benefit 
pageant which cost $101) and at which $200 was collected should be recorded as $200 and $100. respectively. 

2. Donations of food, clotliing, etc., are considered to be contributions in kind, and an estimated value should 710/ be included in the gross receipts. The 
estimated value of contributions in kind should be set forth under paragraph (9) of this report. 

3. Funds received from other registrants for transmission abroad should not be included in the gross receipts. Such funds should be reported under 
paragraph (8). 

4. 11 the space provided in this report is inadequate, include the additional information in a supplemental report attached to and forming a part of this 
report. 

h) Name __ 

2) Address _ 

(3) No. of Notice of Acceptance of Registration 

(4) Gross funds received by registrant during the month, either directly or through chapters included in his registration: 

(a) From donations 

(b) From pageants, affairs, etc. :_ 

(ci From other sources (indicate sources) : 



Total 

(6) Gross funds expended by registrant during the month, directly or through chapters included in his registration, for purposes other than relief; 

(a) For administrative expenses, salaries, etc. 

(6) For staging of pageants, etc. _, 

(c) For other purposes (indicate purposes) 

Total 

(6) Estimated value of contributions in kind received by registrant or by chapters included in his registration: 

(7) Funds transmitted abroad: 

Counfry to which funds Country in which funds 

tvere transmitted were expended Name of distributor Amount 



Total 

(8) Funds transmitted to other registrants in this country for retransmission abroad: 

Names of oiher registrants Address Amount 



Total 

(9) Contributions in kind transmitted abroad: 
Country to u'hich contributions were Country in which contributions were 

transmitted distributed Name of distributor Estimated value 



Total 

(10) Contributions in kind transmitted to other registrants in this country for retransmission abroad: 

Names of other registrants Address Estimated value 



Total . 

(II) Unexpended balance on hand as of the last day of -- - ., 19 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this day of , 19 , at 



(Signature and title) 
(Notary public) 



226 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Regulations on Traffic in Arms 



[Released to the press September 5] 

Supplement to the Pamphlet, "International 
Tkaitic in Arms — Laws and Regulations 
Administered bt the Secretary of State 
Governing the International Traffic in 
Arms, Ammunition, and Implements of 
War and Other Munitions of War" 

part IX — special provisions in regard to ex- 
portation TO FRANCE ; GERMANY ; POLAND ; AND 
THE UNITED KINGDOM, INDIA, AUSTRALIA AND 
NEW ZEALAND 

The President's proclamation of September 
5, 1939, issued pursuant to section 1 of the 
joint resolution of Congress approved May 1, 
1937, reads as follows: 

[Proclamation printed ante p. 208.] 

No export licenses will be issued for ship- 
ments destined to France; Germany; Poland, 
or the United Kingdom, India, Australia and 
New Zealand of any of the arms, ammunition, 
or implements of war enumerated in the Presi- 
dent's proclamation of September 5, 1939. 

By virtue of the power delegated to the Sec- 
retary of State by this proclamation of Sep- 
tember 5, 1939, to promulgate such rules and 
regulations not inconsistent with law as may 
be necessary to carry out any of the provisions 
of the joint resolution of Congress approved 
May 1, 1937, as made effective by this procla- 
mation, the Secretary of State may require ex- 
porters of any of the arms, ammunition, or 
implements of war enumerated in the procla- 
mation to present convincing evidence that 
they are not destined to France; Germany; 
Poland; or the United Kingdom, India, Aus- 
tralia and New Zealand and may refuse to issue 
an export license for the same until such con- 
vincing evidence has been presented to hhn. 



Section G of the joint resolution of Congress 
approved May 1, 1937, reads as follows: 

"Sec. 6. (a) Whenever the President shall 
have issued a proclamation under the authority 
of section 1 of this Act, it shall thereafter be 
unlawful, until such proclamation is revoked, 
for any American vessel to carry any arms, 
ammunition, or implements of war to any bel- 
ligerent state, or to any state wherein civil 
strife exists, named in such proclamation, or to 
any neutral state for transshipment to, or for 
the use of, any such belligerent state or any 
such state wherein civil strife exists. 

"(b) Whoever, in violation of the provisions 
of this section, shall take, or attempt to take, or 
shall authorize, hire, or solicit another to take, 
any American vessel carrying such cargo out 
of port or from the jurisdiction of the United 
States shall be fined not more than $10,000, or 
imprisoned not more than five years, or both; 
and, in addition, such vessel, and her tackle, 
apparel, furniture, and equipment, and the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war on 
board, shall be forfeited to the United States." 

Section 10 of the same joint resolution reads 
as follows : 

"Sec. 10. Whenever the President shall 
have issued a proclamation under the authority 
of section 1, it shall thereafter be unlawful, 
until such proclamation is revoked, for any 
American vessel engaged in commerce with any 
belligerent state, or any state wherein civil 
strife exists, named in such proclamation, to be 
armed or to carry any armament, arms, am- 
munition, or implements of war, except small 
arms and ammunition therefor which the 
President may deem necessary and shall pub- 
licly designate for the preservation of disci- 
pline aboard such vessels." 



SEPTEMBER 9, 1939 



227 



Under the i^rovisions of this section and by 
virtue of the power delegated to the Secretary 
of State by this proclamation of September 5, 
1939, to promulgate such rules and i-egulations 
not inconsistent with law as may be necessary 
to carry out any of the provisions of the joint 
resolution of Congress approved May 1, 1937, 
the Secretary of State announces that Amer- 
ican vessels engaged in commerce with France; 
Germany; Poland; or the United Kingdom, 
India, Australia and New Zealand may carry 
such small arms and ammunition as the masters 
of these vessels may deem indispensable for the 
preservation of discipline aboard the vessels. 

CORDELL HtTIX 

Secretwnj of State 



[Released to the press September 9] 

Supplement to the Pamphlet, "Interna- 
tional Traffic in Arms — Laws and Regula- 
tions Administered by the Secretary of 
State Governing the International Traf- 
fic IN Arms, Ammunition, and Implements 
of War and Other Munitions of War" 

part X — special provisions in regard to expor- 
tation TO THE UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA 

The Secretary of State announces that the 
special provisions in regard to exportation to 
France; Germany; Poland; and the United 
Kingdom, India, Australia and New Zealand, 
promulgated on September 5, 1939, and set 
forth in part IX of this pamphlet, henceforth 
apply equally in respect to the Union of South 
Africa. 

CoBDELL Hull 



■f -f -f -f -f -f -f 
SINKING OF THE "ATHENIA" 



[Released to the press September 8] 

Following is the text of a telegram from the 
American Minister to Ireland, Mr. Jolin 
Cudahy, to the Secretary of State. The tele- 
gram was filed from Galway, Ireland, and re- 
ceived in the Department September 5 : 

'■'■Athenia carrying 1,400 passengers of which 
the Captain tells me about one-half were 
American torpedoed 7 :40 p. m. September 3d 
north of Ennistrahull 10 miles beyond North 
Irish Coast at 7 : 40 p. m. September 3d. Testi- 
mony of officers and number of American pas- 
sengers I have interviewed is that ship was 
struck amidship and that shortly thereafter 
was struck again wrecking engine room by 
projectile projected through air. Witnesses 
state immediately after second explosion they 
saw a line of black smoke from water surface 
800 to 1,000 yards on port side to where the 
ship was hit. One witness states he saw the 
jjeriscope of submarine. Second explosion hit 
with terrific force and ship abandoned at 9 :30 
p. m. Norwegian ship Knut Nelson with 430 
survivors landed here this morning. Authori- 
ties with splendid human spirit provided shel- 
ter, provisions, clothing, and hospital facilities 
for 10 wounded by explosion. Capt. James 



Cook of destroyed ship tells me three British 
destroyers, a tanker City of Flint and Swedish 
ship the Southern Cross picked up other sur- 
vivors but he cannot state whether capacity of 
these craft was sufficient for all nor can he give 
their destination. He states many killed by at- 
tack which caught most passengere in dining 
room. Cannot too higlily praise efficient han- 
dling of situation by Galway and Irish Gov- 
ernment and splendid human spirit." 

[On September 4 and 5, the Department re- 
leased to the press four partial lists of Amer- 
icans who embarked on board the S. S. Athenia 
at Glasgow and their home addresses as ob- 
tained from the passport files of the Depart- 
ment.] 

[Released to the press September 8] 

Following is the text of a telegram from the 
American Ambassador to Great Britain, Mr. 
Joseph P. Kennedy, to the Secretary of State : 

"Report of Commander Hitchcock, Assistant 
Naval Attache, and agreed to by Captain Kirk, 
who together made investigation regarding 
Athenia survivors landed at Galway, follows: 

" 'We proceeded inmiediately to Galway, 
Ireland, where we landed in an improvised 
field and proceeded to the dock where the 



228 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



tender was disembarking the refugees from the 
Athenia. 

" 'The officers and crew of the Athenia 
talked fi-eely to Captain Kirk and myself. 
They were courteous and under close ques- 
tioning no conflict in their stories could be 
discerned. 

"'It was established by the evidence of the 
Commander of the Athenia, the Officer of the 
Watch, the Assistant Officer of the Watch, the 
Quartermaster of the Watch, the Quarter- 
master off duty but on the bridge, the Chief 
Engineer and Assistant Engineer Officer and 
several other crew members that at evening 
twilight, 3 September, a torpedo struck the 
port side of the Athenia, slightly abaft mid- 
ships in the way of the bulkhead between the 
fireroom and the engineroom. 

" 'The explosion caused a large volume of 
water in the outside of the ship to be blown 
into the air; destroyed the bulkhead between 
the fireroom and the engineroom, shattering 
the oil tank and destroying access of stairs 
from the third class and tourist dining saloons 
to the upper decks. It was impossible for the 
passengers trapped in the dining room to es- 
cape and they were drowned below decks. 

" 'From evidence given by a quartermaster 
not on watch, submarine conning tower broke 
surface about 800 yards on the port quarter 
of the Athenia. A gun or explosive signal was 
fired fi'om the conning tower platform. If a 
gun, it was of small calibre according to one 
of these men who had served for years as a 
gun layer in the Royal Navy. 

" 'As the submarine was on the weather side 
of the Athenia the smoke from this discharge 
blew down over the Athenia and a distinct 
smell of cordite was recognized. No witness 
heard a shell in the air; no witness heard a 
shell strike the ship; only one such discharge 
was seen. The flash was distinctly reported by 
three witnesses; the smoke of the discharge 
was seen by the Coimnander and many wit- 
nesses. No splash of the projectile was seen. 
The commander of the Athenia stated that it 
occurred to him that the submarine might be 



attempting to destroy their radio but said that 
any statement by him that this was so was an 
error as he had no evidence to this effect. 

" 'Immediately after the explosion which 
sank the Athenia the Officer of the Watch 
sounded eight short blasts and one long blast 
of the whistle and the submarine submerged 
and was not again seen. 

"'The Officer of the Watch immediately 
closed the "long arm watertight doors," which 
apparently prevented the ship sinking for 
many hours. All officers and crew and a few 
passengers interviewed indicated there was no 
panic aboard the ship and women and children 
passengers, as well as the crew and men pas- 
sengers were calm in going to their boat sta- 
tions and in abandoning ship. 

" 'Some little difficulty was had in lowering 
the starboard side life boats as the ship pri- 
marily took a considerable list to port, but all 
boats got off without casualty. One boat 
alongside the rescue ship, Knute Nelson, 
drifted aft into the propellers and was sunk, 
resulting in the loss of several of the occupants. 

" 'The Irish authorities kept a careful list 
of all survivors disembarking at Galway.' " 



[Released to the press September 5] 

Ambassador Kennedy reported to the Depart- 
ment of State at 1 p. m., eastern standard time, 
September 5, that some of the survivors of the 
Athenia have arrived in Galway aboard the 
Norwegian steamship Knute Nelson. 

The American Minister to Ireland, Mr. John 
Cudahy, is now in Galway and reported at 
noon (Galway), September 5, that he had just 
interviewed the captain of the Athenia, a num- 
ber of the crew, and a number of American 
passengers, who said that the ship was subma- 
rined. Mr. Cudahy reports that many of those 
landed at Galway have lost all possessions. 

[A list of 97 American survivors of the 
Athenia rej)orted to have landed at Galway 
September 5 from the rescue vessel Knute Nel- 
son, was released to the press by the Depart- 
ment September 5.] 



SEPTEMBER 9, 1939 



229 



[Released to the press September 6] 

Ambassador Kennedy reported at midnight, 
September 5, Greenwich time, that lie had re- 
ceived the following telegram from Lord 
Provost DoUan from Glasgow: 

"Glasgow will look after American and other 
survivors of Athenia disaster who have arrived 
in our city. 

Lord Provost Dollan" 

Ambassador Kennedy replied as follows : 

"Deeply appreciate your telegram. May I on 
behalf of the President and people of the 
United States express heartfelt thanks to you 
and the citizens of Glasgow for this hmnane 
and generous action in aiding survivors of 
Athenia disaster." 

[Released to the press September 7] 

Following is a statement by the Secretary of 
State : 

"I wish to express my profound appreciation 
and the gratitude of the American Government 
for the prompt aid and invaluable assistance 
rendered in rescuing American survivors of the 
S. S. Athenia by the personnel of the Nor- 
wegian vessel S. S. Knute Nelson, of the 
Swedish vessel S. S. Southern Gross, and by the 
British Navy. 

"I also wish to extend our sincere thanks to 
those officials and private persons in Eire and 
Scotland who have shown the utmost kindness 
and thoughtful aid to the survivors since they 
arrived at their ports. 

CoRDELL Hull" 

[Released to the press September 5] 

The Maritime Commission tanker City of 
Flint has reported directly to the Maritime 
Commission the news of about 110 American 
citizens which it picked up after the sinking of 
the steamship Athenia. In addition she has on 
board about 100 aliens who were also picked up. 

The Maritime Commission is asking the Coast 
Guard to meet the City of Flint and supply her 
with food and water. The City of Flint will 
not arrive at a United States port for about a 
week. 



[A list of the American survivors and a list 
of non- American survivors abroad the City of 
Flint, as furnished by Capt. J. A. Gainard, 
were released by the Department on September 
5, 6, and 8.] 

[Released to the press September 5] 

The Department of State this morning re- 
ceived reports that approximately 400 survivors 
from the steamship Athenia had been landed in 
Glasgow. All the survivors landed are re- 
ported as practically destitute and without ade- 
quate clothing. Reports received state that of 
the 400 at least 100 were seriously injured and 
had been taken immediately to hospitals. Other 
survivors of a number as yet undetermined are 
reported to have been landed in Galway. Am- 
bassador Kennedy has sent the American naval 
attache by special airplane to find out how 
many Americans were included. One Ameri- 
can is reported to have landed at Glasgow and 
to have stated that he personally had seen the 
submarine which had torpedoed the Athenia. 

[A list of the American survivors of the 
Athenia who landed at Glasgow September 5 
was released to the press by the Department 
September 5 and 8.] 

[Released to the press September 8] 

Ambassador Kennedy reported to the Depart- 
ment today that the Embassy at London is 
working night and day on Athenia survivors 
lists but that in the absence of authoritative 
sailing lists and in view of inconsistencies, it is 
impossible at present to give definite figures for 
missing Americans. He added that data will 
be sent as soon as possible. 

-f ^ -f 

SUSPENSION BY GREAT BRITAIN OF 
TREATY FOR THE LIMITATION OF 
NAVAL ARMAMENT 

An announcement to the press regarding 
the suspension by Great Britain of the obliga- 
tions of the Treaty for the Limitation of Naval 
Armament appears in this Bulletin in the sec- 
tion "Treaty Information." 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



NEW PASSPORT REGULATIONS 



[Released to the press September 4] 

In view of the exigencies of the present 
situation in Europe, particularly the danger of 
travel to and from Europe, the hazards which 
may be encountered in residing in belligerent 
countries, and the shortage of steamship facil- 
ities to transport the many thousands of 
American citizens now in Europe who have 
been urged to return to the United States, the 
Secretary of State has deemed it advisable to 
prescribe regulations under which no passport 
which has heretofore been issued shall be valid 
for use in traveling from the United States to 
any country in Europe unless it is submitted to 
the Department for validation for such use. 
Under the new regulations, before the Depart- 
ment of State will validate any passport here- 
tofore issued or issue any new passports for 
use in Europe, it will be required that docu- 
mentary evidence be submitted to it showing 
the imperative necessity for traveling to Eu- 
rope. It is contemplated by the new regula- 
tions to restrict the use of passports only to 
those who can show an imperative necessity 
for traveling in Europe and at the same time 
to take every possible precaution to assure the 
importance of American passports as deftnite- 
Ij' identifying and establisliing the citizenship 
of the person to whom they are issued. Ex- 
traordinary care will thus be taken in this re- 
gard, and consequently persons desiring to 
have passports already issued to them validated 
for future use in Europe and persons desiring 
to obtain new passports for use therein are 
urged to submit their applications at least 3 
weeks in advance of their expected sailing. 

In order to assure strict compliance with the 
new regulations, passports of American citi- 
zens intending to depart for Eiu-ope will be 
carefully examined to see that they have been 
validated for use in Europe. Upon the return 
of American citizens, their passports will be 
taken up and returned to the Department of 
State for safekeeping and to assure that they 
230 



will not again be used except in accordance 
with the new regulations. 

The passport agencies in New York, Boston, 
Chicago, and San Francisco are being advised 
of the new regulations, and for the convenience 
of the officers in the various foreign consulates 
situated in the cities mentioned they are being 
instructed to furnish each such officer with a 
copy of the new regulations requiring the 
validation by the Department of passports 
heretofore issued, in order that they may here- 
after be used in traveling to Europe. The new 
regulations are as follows : 

DEPARTJfENTAL OedER No. 811 

By virtue of and pursuant to the authority 
vested in me by Section I of the Act of July 
3, 1926, 44 Stat. 887 (U. S. C, Title 22, Sec- 
tion 211a), and by Executive Order No. 7856 of 
March 31, 1938, prescribing rules governing 
the granting and issuing of passports in the 
United States, I, the undersigned. Secretary 
of State of the United States, hereby prescribe 
the following regulations: 

No passport heretofore issued shall be valid 
for use in traveling from the United States to 
any country in Europe unless it is submitted to 
the Department of State for validation. 

Before the Department of State will vali- 
date any passport heretofore issued for use 
in any country in Europe, it will be necessary 
for the pereon to whom the passport was is- 
sued to submit documentary evidence concern- 
ing the imperativeness of his proposed travel. 
A person who desires to travel in Europe for 
commercial purposes must support his appli- 
cation for the validation of his passport or for 
the issue of a passport with a letter from the 
head of the firm in the interests of which he 
intends to go to Europe. Such letter must 
state not only the names of the European 
countries which the applicant expects to visit 
and the objects of his visits thereto, but in 



SEPTEMBER 9, 1939 



231 



addition, whether or not the applicant is a 
sahiried employee of the firm concerned; and 
if so, how long he has been known to the firm 
and for what period of time he has been in 
its employ. If the applicant is going to 
Europe on a commission and not a salary basis, 
that fact also should be specifically stated. If 
the applicant for a passport is himself the 
head of the concern for which he is going to 
Europe, he must submit a letter from another 
officer of the concern or a letter from the head 
of some other reputable concern who~lias had 
business transactions with the applicant and 
has knowledge of the business in which the 
applicant is engaged and the object and neces- 
sity of his proposed trip to Europe. 

An applicant who is going to Europe for 
any purpose other than commercial business 
must satisfy the Department of State that it 
is imperative that he go, and he must submit 
satisfactory docimientary evidence substantiat- 
ing his statement concerning the imperative- 
ness of his proposed trip. 

In view of the exigencies of the present 
situation and the consequent necessity of exer- 
cising the greatest care in the validation of 
passports or the issue of new passports, the 
Department of State will be obliged to hold 
applicants and firms responsible for any false 
or misleading statements made by them in con- 
nection with applications for passports, and 
any such false or misleading statements would 
be in violation of Section 220 of Title 22 of 
the U. S. Code, which reads as follows : 

"Wlioever shall willfully and knowingly 
make any false statement in an application for 
passport with intent to induce or secure the 
issuance of a passport under the authority of 
the United States, either for his own use or 
the use of another, contrary to the laws regu- 
lating the issuance of passports or the rules 
prescribed pursuant to such laws, or whoever 
shall willfully and knowingly use or attempt 
to use, or furnish to another for use, any pass- 
port the issue of which was secured in any 
way by reason of any false statement, shall be 



fined not more than $2,000 or imprisoned not 
more than five years or both." 

Women and children will not be included in 
passports issued to their husbands or fathers 
unless the urgent and imperative necessity of 
accompanying them is conclusively established. 

Passports will not, as a rule, be validated or 
issued for travel in opposmg belligerent 
countries. 

Should a person now having a valid pass- 
port proceed to any European country without 
first having submitted his passport to the De- 
partment of State for validation, the protec- 
tion of the United States may be witMaeld 
from him while he is abroad. 

Should a person to whom a passport has 
been issued use it in violation of the conditions 
or restrictions contained therein, the protection 
of the United States may likewise be withheld 
from him while he is abroad and he will be 
liable for prosecution under the provisions of 
Section 221 of Title 22 of the U. S. Code, 
which reads in part as follows: 

". . . whoever shall willfully and know- 
ingly use or attempt to use any passport in 
violation of the conditions or restrictions 
therein contained, or of the rules prescribed 
pursuant to the laws regulating the issuance 
of passports, which said rules shall be printed 
on the passport; . . . shall be fined not more 
than $2,000 or imprisoned not more than five 
years, or both." 

Hereafter when a passport is validated for 
or issued for use in Europe, its validity shall 
be restricted to the period necessary to accom- 
plish the purpose of the intended visit to Eu- 
rope but in no case beyond a period of six 
months. 

Passports in possession of persons now resid- 
ing abroad shall in due course be submitted to 
American consular officers for a^jpropriate 
endorsement under special instructions to be 
sent to such officers at a later date. 



CoRDELL Hull 



Depaetment of State, 
September 4, 1939. 



232 



DEPABTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



EVACUATION OF AMERICAN CITI- 
ZENS FROM EUROPE 

[Released to the press September 6] 

The Department of State was informed to- 
day that the S. S. President Roosevelt is sailing 
tonight for Europe. The S. S. Orizaba is now 
signing on its crew and will sail as soon as the 
crew has signed up. The S. S. Manhattan has 
agreed to return to Europe as soon as possible 
after arrival in the United States. Arrange- 
ments have been made to place 4 more ships in 
this service, which will sail this week for Eu- 
ropean ports and will be equipped to transport 
3,000 persons on the return voyage to the 
United States. 

The United Fruit Company subsidiary. 
Elders and Fyfes Steamship Line of London, 
has 2 sailings a week and has offered accom- 
modations for a maximum of 250 people each 
trip from Bristol, England, to transship at 
Jamaica for New York at the price of the fare 
from Bristol to New York. 

[Released to the press September 6] 

The American Minister to the Netherlands, 
Mr. George A. Gordon, reported to the Depart- 
ment of State yesterday that with the sailing 
of the Statendam on the morning of September 
5 some 276 Americans (this figure is accurate 
within a dozen or two at most) have left Hol- 
land by 6 ships of the Holland-America Line 
which sailed within the last 10 days. This, of 
course, is apart from the substantial number 
of Americans on these ships booked and sailing 
from outside Holland. 

Since a week ago the Holland-America Line 
has been unable to call at Boulogne, and the 
American Legation has been instrumental in 
arranging special train service from Paris and 
in obtaining relaxation of frontier control and 
other emergency regulations, which has en- 
abled between 350 and 400 additional Ameri- 
cans to catch these boats. As a result of tliis 
exodus Mr. Gordon has had no difficulty in ob- 
taining through the courtesy of the Netherlands 
authorities the facilitation of the entry of 
Americans into Holland. 



The Legation is making a consolidated com- 
pilation of the transient Americans known to 
it, to the consulate general at Amsterdam, and 
to the consulate at Rotterdam to be present in 
Holland, under the following headings: 1, des- 
titutes; 2, awaiting funds; 3, those endeavor- 
ing to secure passage who have not yet reported 
the result of their efforts; 4, passage in hand 
and awaiting future sailing; 5, those refusing 
to make a decision pendmg developments. 

With regard to category 3, Mr. Gordon has 
made special arrangements with the head of 
the Holland-America Line which is now op- 
erating most smoothly whereby when intend- 
ing American passengers are unable to obtain 
23assage at the steamship offices he has been 
able to obtain last-minute accommodations for 
a substantial number thereof. 

This is happening at every sailing. As of 
the present moment there are still 524 transient 
Americans in Holland, of whom, however, 201 
already have passage for futui'e sailings. Of 
the remainder, 195 are in the category of those 
who still do not feel the situation warrants 
makmg an effort to leave, and the Legation is 
doing its best to urge them to do so at once. 

[Released to the press September 7] 

Minister John Cudahy reports 2,800 Ameri- 
can citizens in Ireland desiring reiaatriation. 
The Department has cabled Ainbassador 
Joseph P. Kennedy in London to request the 
steamship lines from England to reserve a por- 
tion of their space for Americans at Irish ports 
of call and also plans to send one of the spe- 
cially diverted ships to Ireland for their use. 
The ships Orizaba, Shawnee, St. Johns, In- 
quois, and Acadia are being diverted to this 
service. 

[Released to the press September 8] 

Steamship sailings from France 

The Department of State has received in- 
formation that the port of Le Havre will not 
be available to American passenger vessels 
after September 9, 1939. The Department is 
informed, however, that on September 12 the 
United States Lines will have an office estab- 



SEPTEMBER 9, 1939 



233 



lished at Bordeaux, where passengers not re- 
siding in the city of Paris will be able to book 
their accommodations on their vessels. The 
address of this office will be: Care of James 
Moss, 25 Cours Marechal Foch, Bordeaux. 

Stea?)iship sailings from Italy 

Ambassador William Phillips has reported 
to the Department of State that the steamship 
Rex will sail for New York on September 9, 
followed by the Vulcania on September 13, and 
by the Conte de Savoia on September 14. 
These sailings were amiounced in the Italian 
afternoon papers on September 7. It was an- 
nounced at the same time that the steamship 
Augustus will sail for South America on Sep- 
tember 14 or 15. 

-f -f -f 

TRANSMISSION OF CABLES TO 

FRANCE 

[Released to the press September 6] 

Ambassador William C. Bullitt has reported 
from Paris that the French Commission de Con- 
trole Telegraphique International, responsible 
for censoring all cables coming from the United 
States to France or through France for relay to 
neutral or friendly countries, has informed the 
Embassy that it is holding up an increasing 
number of cables from New York and other 
points in the United States because they are 
phrased in nonusual codes. The French Bu- 
reau will not deliver or forward any cable which 
it camiot decipher. It requests that American 
senders of cables using French lines be informed 
that only those phrased in plain language 
(English or French) or in one of the approved 
codes (code National Frangais, ABC code 
sixth edition, Bentley's complete phrase code, 
Bentley's second phrase code, Cogef Laggagne 
1929, Acme commodity and phrase code, Peter- 
son banking code third edition, new Boe code 
and appendix) will be forwarded for delivery 
by the French Bureau. The Bureau stated that 
one or two more codes of common usage in 
America, should such codes exist, might be 
added to the above official list on the condition 
that the French Bureau be provided with com- 
plete keys to such codes. 



APPEAL BY CHIEF OF THE SPANISH 
GOVERNMENT 

[Released to the press September 5] 

Following is a translation of a memorandum 
left with the Secretary of State by the Spanish 
Charge in the United States, Sehor Don Luis 
de Silva: 

"Memorandum 

"His Excellency the Chief of the Spanish 
Government has made public the following 
appeal : 

" 'With the authority which is given me by the 
fact of having suffered during three years the 
burden of a war for the liberation of our coun- 
try I address myself to the Governments in 
whose hands lies the responsibility for releasing 
a catastrophe without pi'ecedent in history, in 
order that they may avoid for their peoples the 
sufferings and tragedies which befell the Span- 
ish people notwithstanding the voluntary limi- 
tation upon the use of methods of destruction, 
horrors which would be multiplied a hundred- 
fold in a new war. It is a great responsibility 
to extend the conflict to seas and places distant 
from the actual scene of the war without an 
imperious reason to justify it. Its extension 
without benefit to the belligerents would pro- 
duce intense and insuperable disturbance of the 
economy of the world, incalculable losses in its 
riches, paralyzation of its commerce, with grave 
repercussions in the standard of life of the 
humbler classes. The more the conflict is ex- 
tended the more the germ of future wars is 
sown. In these circumstances I appeal to the 
common sense and the responsibility of the rul- 
ers of the nations in order to direct the efforts 
of all toward the localization of the present 
conflict.' 

"Washington, September 4, 1939." 

Following is a note from the Secretary of 
State to the Spanish Charge in the United 
States : 

"Washington, September 6, 1939. 
"My Dear Mr. Charge d' Affaires : 

"I have received and have read with deep in- 
terest the moving appeal which has been ad- 



234 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



dressed by the Chief of the Spanish Govern- 
ment to governments of other nations calling 
upon them to use all their efforts to prevent the 
extension of the present unfortunate conflict 
in Europe. 

"The Government of the United States is in 
accord with the sentunents expressed in the 
message of the Chief of the Spanish Govern- 
ment, and fully shares the conviction that ex- 
tension of the present conflict is bound to result 
in untold suffering for the innocent popula- 
tions of the countries which may become in- 
volved, as well as for the people of other 
nations. My Government is profoundly con- 
vinced that resort to foi'ce or the threat of 
force in an attempt to settle disputes between 
nations or to impose a solution on a basis of 
aggression can never be morally or materially 
justified. For this reason the Government of 
the United States welcomes the initiative of the 
Chief of the Spanish State and for its part 
stands prepared to use all of its influence in the 
future as it has in the past for the restoration 
and the maintenance of peace between nations. 

I am [etc.] Cordell Hull" 

■f -f -f 

SUSPENSION OF ISSUANCE IN LON- 
DON AND WARSAW OF QUOTA IM- 
MIGRATION VISAS 

[Keleased to the press September 6] 

In view of the emergency situation abroad 
and the need for giving the fullest assistance 
to American citizens, the Ambassador at Lon- 
don requested authority to suspend the issu- 
ance of quota immigration visas during as 
much of the month of September as present 
conditions continue. A similar request was 
received from the Ambassador at Warsaw, and 
both requests have been granted by the 
. Department. 



BOMB DAMAGE TO HOME OF AMERI- 
CAN AMBASSADOR IN WARSAW 

[Released to the press September 3] 

The American Ambassador to Poland, Mr. 
Anthony J. Drexel Biddle, reported to the De- 
partment of State today that shortly before 9 
o'clock the morning of September 3 at Con- 
stanza, a German bomber in a power dive 
drojDped six heavy bombs, one of which seri- 
ously damaged a villa adjacent to that of the 
American Ambassador and to a lesser degree 
damaged that of the Ambassador. An incen- 
diary bomb struck in the grounds of the Am- 
bassador's villa but failed to explode. Neither 
the Ambassador nor members of his family, all 
of whom were present in the villa at the time, 
were injured. 

Constanza is about 8 miles outside Warsaw. 

-f -f -f 

YUGOSLAVIA: BIRTHDAY OF THE 
KING 

[Released to the press September 6] 

The President sent the following telegram 
on September 6 to His Royal Highness Prince 
Regent Paul of Yugoslavia : 

"The White House, September 6, 1939. 
"Upon this anniversary of the birth of His 
Majesty I am happy to extend cordial wishes 
for his pereonal welfare and for the continued 
peace of Yugoslavia. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt" 

^ -f -f 

AGREEMENT WITH GREAT BRITAIN 
FOR EXCHANGE OF COTTON AND 
RUBBER 

An announcement to the press regarding 
ratification by the President of the Agreement 
with the United Kingdom for the Exchange of 
Cotton and Rubber appears in this Bulletin in 
the section "Treaty Information." 



The American Republics 



INTER-AMERICAN CONSULTATIVE CONFERENCE AT PANAMA 



[Released to the pi'es.s September 7] 

Ambassador William Dawson has reported 
to the Department that the press in Panama 
September 6 carried the following statement 
by the Panamanian Minister for Foreign 
Aifairs : 

"In view of the recent international events 
which have stirred the entire world, the Gov- 
ernment of Panama has joined with the 
greatest pleasure the joint request which the 
Governments of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Co- 
lombia, Cuba, the United States of America, 
Mexico, and Peru have sent to the sister repub- 
lics of the American Continent for the purpose 
of placing into operation the procedure of 
consultation provided for and agreed upon in 
the pertinent conventions and declarations of 
Buenos Aires and Lima, and to hold, with that 
purpose in mind, a conference among the Min- 
isters of Foreign Relations of the 21 American 
republics in Panama City. 

"The selection of the Panamanian capital as 
the seat for this transcendental conference is 
a high honor which has been tendered to our 
Republic by the 8 nations which have joined 
ours in the initiative for the conference, as 
well as by the 12 remaining republics which 
shall not delay in joining the cause of the 
others, and the Government of Panama j^ledges 
itself to reply to that signal honor by welcom- 
ing its illustrious guests with the fraternal 
cordiality which has characterized at all times 
its relations with the countries they represent. 

"The invitations were sent out last night by 
cable, and September 21 has been suggested as 
a possible date for the inauguration of the 
conference." 



[Released to the press September 9] 

Following is the delegation of the United 
States to the Inter-American Consultative 
Conference at Panama : 

Delegate : 

The Honorable Sumner Welles, Under Secre- 
tary of State 

Advisers: 

The Honorable Edwin C. Wilson, Minister to 
Uruguay 

Dr. Herbert Feis, Economic Adviser, Depart- 
ment of State 

Dr. Warren Kelchner, Acting Chief, Division 
of International Conferences, Department of 
State 

Dr. Marjorie M. Whiteman, Assistant to the 
Legal Adviser, Department of State 

Secretary to the United States Delegate: 
Mr. Paul C. Daniels, Second Secretary, Ameri- 
can Embassy, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 

Assistant to the United States Delegate: 
Miss Anna L. Clarkson, Assistant to the Under 
Secretary of State. 

^ + -f 

DESIRE OF COLOMBIA TO COOPER- 
ATE FOR AMERICAN SOLIDARITY 

[Released to the press September 3] 

Following are a translation of a message re- 
ceived by the President from the President of 
Colombia and President Roosevelt's reply : 

"Bogota, September 1, 1939. 
"In view of the extreme gravity of the events 
which are developing in Europe, I wish to 
reiterate to you the firm determination of the 

235 



236 



DEPARTMEIfT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Government of Colombia, unanimously suji- 
ported by its people, to proceed in close agree- 
ment with the Governments of America and on 
the basis of the principles of solidarity pro- 
claimed at the Pan American Conferences, in 
defense of the essential rights which are com- 
mon to us: the fullness of our independence 
and sovereignty, the normality of our economic 
development, the essential features of our 
democratic Governments, and peace within 
whose fertile shade the peoples of this hemi- 
sphere desire to attain their destinies. It will 
be for my Government a pleasure and an honor 
to proceed in constant accord with Your Excel- 
lency's Government and to cooperate by what- 
ever means are within its power to render 
American solidarity effective and to bring 
about all the benefits which we have the right 
to hope from it and to have, in these most 
bitter hours for mankind, the joint action of 
America exerted in behalf of the ideals which 
animate it, and in such a way that it may serve 
to avoid, mitigate, or remedy the threatening 
catastrophe. 

Eduardo Santos" 



accept, Mr. President, my gratitude for the en- 
couragement imparted by your message to- 
gether with the assurances of my most cordial 
IJersonal esteem. 

Franklin D. Koosevelt" 

+ + > 

BRAZIL: ANNIVERSARY OF 
INDEPENDENCE 

[Releaser! to the press September 8] 

Following is a telegram from the President of 
the United States to President Getulio Vargas 
of Brazil: 

"The White House. September 7, 1939. 
"This memorable anniversary of the inde- 
23endence of Brazil gives me the welcome op- 
portunity to express my heartiest wishes for 
the peace and prosperity of the Brazilian peo- 
ple. I renew the assurances of my sincere and 
cordial friendshii:) and my highest pei'sonal 
esteem. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt" 



"The White House, September 5, 1939. 
"I am profoundly heartened by Your Excel- 
lency's eloquent message reiterating in this 
critical hour the earnest determination of the 
Government and people of Colombia to act in 
common accord with the nations of this con- 
tinent to safeguard the vital principles, already 
set forth in instruments of inter-American col- 
laboration, for which our nations stand. Your 
generous assurance that in the adoption of 
measures destined to meet the grave and diffi- 
cult problems created for all the American 
Republics by the situation in Europe today, 
Your Excellency's Government desires also to 
move in close cooperation with the Government 
of the United States is deeply gratifying alike 
to this country and to me personally. Please 



Commercial Policy 



APPOINTMENT OF CHAIRMAN OF 
COMMITTEE FOR RECIPROCITY 
INFORMATION 

[Released to the press September 6] 

The Secretary of State today announced that 
Mr. Oscar B. Ryder, vice chairrhan of the 
United States Tariff Commission, has been 
named chairman of the Interdepartmental 
Committee for Reciprocity Information in 
place of Mr. Henry F. Grady, who recently re- 
signed from the vice chairmanship of the 
Tariff Commission to become Assistant Sec- 
retary of State. 



\ 



International Conferences, Commissions, etc. 



ADDRESS OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE TO THE INTERNATIONAL 
UNION OF GEODESY AND GEOPHYSICS^ 



[Released to the press September 6] 

I am pleased to have this opportunity to 
greet and welcome on behalf of the Govern- 
ment and people of the United States the dis- 
tinguislied delegates to the Seventh General 
Assembly of the International Union of 
Geodesy and Geophysics. It is regretted that 
recent events in Europe have prevented the 
attendance of many of your colleagues, and we 
all sincerely deplore the circumstances which 
have made their absence necessary. We deeply 
appreciate your selection of Washington as the 
seat of this important conference, and we are 
honored by your presence. I offer to you our 
warmest hospitality. 

You have assembled not only as official rep- 
i-esentatives of your resjiective govermnents 
but also as the I'epresentatives of one of the 
most eminent of scientific bodies. The fruits 
of your tireless efforts are everywhere evident 
and universally enjoyed. All humanity bene- 
fits directly from your findings. 

The discussions at past general assemblies 
have contributed immeasurably to the store of 
knowledge of the earth's sciences. Delegates 
have brought to these international meetings 
important scientific facts growing out of their 
researches and experiences and in a spirit of 
true unselfishness have imparted this knowl- 
edge to their colleagues in all parts of the 
world. This free exchange of scientific infor- 
mation is a practical demonstration of the 
interdeijendence of science and a recognition 
of the benefits accruing to the entire world 
through the wide dissemination of significant 
professional truths. 



^ Read for the Secretary of State by the Honorable 
Hugh R. Wilson, at the opening session of the Sev- 
enth General Assembly of the International Union of 
Geodesy and Geophysics, Departmental Auditorium, 
September 6, 1939. 



The work of a number of our governmental 
bureaus and private institutions is influenced 
directly by the discoveries and decisions made 
by members of your international organiza- 
tion. This Government constantly avails it- 
self of the valuable publications of the 
International Union of Geodesy and Geo- 
physics which could be duplicated by any one 
govermnent or private organization only with 
great cost and difficulty. Your studies in the 
fields of seismology, volcanology, meteorology, 
terrestrial magnetism and electricity, oceanog- 
raphy, and hydrology are of daily interest 
and importance not only to our governmental 
agencies responsible for official activities in 
those spheres but also to innumerable private 
organizations and individuals whose economic 
existence is dependent upon your efforts. Mil- 
lions of persons throughout the world owe in 
a large measure their comfort and livelihood 
to your notable contributions to the improve- 
ment of scientific aids to transportation by 
water, land, and air, of building methods 
designed to minimize danger from earth- 
quakes, of agricultural practices utilizing 
knowledge of surface and subterranean water 
supplies, of geophysical methods of prospect- 
ing, and of the study of underground forma- 
tions. It is the good fortune of the Govern- 
ment and people of the United States to have 
the opportunity of serving as hosts to those 
distinguished scientists who have labored dili- 
gently and unostentatiously in these fields so 
that the lot of their fellow men may be 
improved. 

This evening you meet as friends and col- 
leagues to inaugurate the seventh in this series 
of scientific discussions. Through modern in- 
ternational cooperation science has progressed 
with strides which would have been impossible 

237 



238 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



if restricted within national and economic bor- 
ders. This cooperation is made possible 
through international gatherings such as we 
are opening this evening. Individually and 
collectively your work is facilitated through 
the knowledge that your fellow scientists 
throughout the world are friends whose un- 
selfish efforts are directed toward the creation 
and clarification of knowledge that can be 
utilized in everyday life to the advantage of 
all. The prevailing spirit in tliis assembly is 
one of friendliness, good will, and mutual 
understanding and respect. It is my fervent 
hope, which the people of this country share, 
that the day may soon come when the states- 
men of the world will take a leaf from the 
book of the scientists and solve international 
political problems in the same dignified and 
friendly spirit. 



Departmental Changes 



THE SPECIAL DIVISION 

(Released to tbe press September 7] 

The Secretary of State on September 6, 1939, 
issued the following Departmental Order : 

Departmental Order No. 813 

Mr. Breckinridge Long has been appointed a 
Special Assistant in the Department and will 
be in charge of the Special Division which has 
been created for the purpose of handling 
special problems arising out of disturbed con- 
ditions in Europe, as set forth in Departmental 
Order No. 810, dated September 1, 1939.^ 

Mr. Hugh R. Wilson, who recently tendered 
his resignation as Ambassador to Germany, has 
been temporarily detailed to the Department 
and has been designated as a Special Assistant 
in the Special Division. 



Mr. George L. Brandt, a Foreign Service 
officer on detail in the Department, will con- 
tinue to act as Administrative Officer of the 
SjDccial Division. 

As indicated in Departmental Order No. 810, 
the Special Division will function under the 
general administrative supervision of Mr. Mes- 
sersmith. Assistant Secretary of State. 

CORDELL HtJLL 

Department of State, 

September 6, 1939. 



Foreign Service 



' See the Bulk-tin of September 2, 1939 (Vol. I, No. 
10), p. 193. 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press September 9] 

Changes in the Foreign Service of the United 
States since August 26: 

The American consulate at Breslau, Ger- 
many, was closed on September 3, 1939. 

The Amei'ican consulate at Strasbourg, 
France, was closed on September 3, 1939. 

Oliver Edmund Clubb, of St. Paul, Minn., 
second secretary of embassy at Peiping, China, 
has been assigned as consul at Shanghai, China. 

Walter N. Walmsley, Jr., of Annapolis, Md., 
consul at Pernambuco, Brazil, has been as- 
signed for duty in the Department of State. 

Jay Walker, of Washington, D. C., vice 
consul at Cairo, Egypt, has been assigned as 
vice consul at Para, Brazil. 

John F. Claffey, of Connecticut, vice consul 
at Bristol, England, has been appointed vice 
consul at London, England. 

John H. E. McAndrews, of Minnesota, clerk 
at London, England, has been appointed vice 
consul at Nassau, Bahamas. 

Paul Dean Thompson, of Los Angeles, 
Calif., vice consul at Hull, England, has been 
appointed vice consul at London, England. 

John Paul Squire, of Boston, Mass., vice 
consul at Havre, France, has been appointed 
vice consul at Port Said, Egypt. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled by the Treaty Division 



ARMAMENT REDUCTION 

London Naval Treaty of 1936 (Treaty Series 
No. 919) 

Great Britain — India 

The American Ambassador to Great Britain 
transmitted to the Secretary of State by a tele- 
gram dated September 3, 1939, the text of a 
note received by him on that day from the 
British Foreign Office informing this Govern- 
ment of the suspension in respect of the 
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Nortli- 
ern Irehmd of all the obligations of the Treaty 
for the Limitation of Naval Armament signed 
at London on March 26, 1936. The text of the 
note is as follows : 

"I have the honour to request Your Excel- 
lency to be so good as to notify the United 
States Government that in consequence of the 
state of war which exists with Germany and in 
accordance with the provisions of Article 24 
of the Treaty for the Limitation of Naval 
Armament signed at London on the 25th March 
1936 His Majesty the King of Great Britain, 
Ireland and the British Dominions beyond the 
Seas Emperor of India in respect of the 
United Kingdom of Great Britain and North- 
ern Ireland hereby suspends in so far as he 
is concerned all of the obligations of the said 
treaty. 

"2. A similar note is being addressed to 
his Excellency the French Ambassador and 
the Italian Charge D'Affaires." 

On September 6, 1939, the American Am- 
bassador to Great Britain informed the Secre- 
tary of State that he had on that day received 
an identical note from the Foreign Office noti- 
fying the suspension of the obligations of the 
treaty in respect of the Government of India. 



MUTUAL GUARANTEES 

Nonaggression Treaty Between Germany 
and the Union of Soviet Socialist Re- 
publics 

The American Ambassador to the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics reported by a tele- 
gram dated August 31, 1939, that the Supreme 
Soviet ratified on that day the Nonaggression 
Treaty between Germany and the Soviet 
Union, signed at Moscow on August 23, 1939. 
A translation of the text of the treaty is 
printed on page 172 of the Bulletin of August 
26,1939 (Vol. I, No. 9). 

HEALTH 

Arrangement for the Establishment of the 
International Office of Public Health 
(Treaty Series No. 511) 

In accordance with the terms of article VI 
of the Arrangement for the Establishment of 
the International Office of Public Health, 
signed December 9, 1907, the following note 
was addressed to the Secretary of State by the 
Italian Ambassador at Washington under date 
of August 19, 1939 : 

"The Italian Ambassador presents his com- 
pliments to the Honorable Secretary of State 
and, under instructions from the Royal Minis- 
try for Foreign Affairs, has the honor to in- 
form him that, by its Note Verbale of June 27, 
1939, the Legation of Slovakia at Rome has 
notified the Italian Government its adherence, 
in the capacity of a regular member, to the In- 
ternational Bureau of Public Health founded 
following to the Agreement signed at Rome 
on December 9, 1907. 

239 



240 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTJLLETIN 



"The above is brought to the knowledge of 
the Honorable Secretary of State in conformity 
with the terms of the said Agreement." 

SAFETY 

International Convention for the Safety of 
Life at Sea (Treaty Series No. 910) 

Chile 

The British Ambassador at Washington in- 
formed the Secretary of State by a note dated 
September 1, 1930, that the adherence of Chile 
to the International Convention for the Safety 
of Life at Sea, signed at London on May 31, 
1929, was notified to the British Government on 
June 22, 1939, and will take effect in accordance 
with the provision of article 64 of the conven- 
tion on September 22, 1939. 

A list of the countries which have ratified 
or adliered to the convention was enclosed with 
the Ambassador's note and is printed below : 
United Kingdom; Argentina; Australia (Com- 
monwealth of) ; Belgium ; Brazil ; Bulgaria ; 
Burma; Canada; Chile; China; Danzig; Den- 
mark ; Egypt ; Eire ; Estonia ; Finland ; France ; 
French Indochina; Germany; Greece; Hong 
Kong ; Hungary ; Iceland ; India ; Italy ; Italian 
colonies of Libya, Eritrea and Somaliland, and 
Italian islands in the Aegean; Japan; Japan 
for Chosen, Taiwan, and leased territory of 
Kwantung; Netherlands; Netherlands East 
Indies; New Zealand; Norway; Panama; Po- 
land; Portugal; Rumania; Soviet Union; 
Spain; Straits Settlements; Sweden; United 
States of America. 



COMMERCE 

Agreement With Great Britain for the Ex- 
change of Cotton and Rubber (Treaty 
Series No. 947) 

On July 17, 1939, the President ratified the 
Agreement between the United States and 
Great Britain for the Exchange of Cotton and 



Rubber, signed on June 23, 1939.= The instru- 
ment of ratification by the United States was 
deposited with the British Government on 
August 25, 1939. 

In accordance with the provisions of article 

8 of the agreement it was agreed upon by both 
Governments that the agreement should enter 
into force on August 25, 1939. On that day 
by an exchange of notes the effective date was 
formally made of record. 

On September 6, the President proclaimed the 
agreement, and it will shortly be printed as 
Treaty Series No. 947. 

FINANCE 

Convention on the Stamp Laws in Connec- 
tion With Cheques, and Protocol 

Jamaica — Turks and Caicos Islands — Cayman 
Islands — Somaliland Protectorate 

According to a circular letter from the 
League of Nations dated August 14, 1939, the 
Secretariat received on August 3, 1939, a noti- 
fication from the British Government in ac- 
cordance with the second paragraph of article 

9 of the Convention on the Stamp Laws in 
Connection With Cheques, signed at Geneva 
on Marcli 19, 1931, that it desires that the con- 
vention shall apply to Jamaica (including the 
Turks and Caicos Islands and the Cayman 
Islands) and to the Somaliland Protectorate. 

According to the information of the Depart- 
ment the following countries have ratified or 
adhered to the convention : Australia (includ- 
ing territories of Papua and Norfolk Island 
and the mandated territories of New Guinea 
and Nauru); Danzig; Denmark; Finland; 
France; Germany; Great Britain (including 
Bahamas, Barbados, Basutoland, Bechuana- 
land Protectorate, Bermuda, British Guiana, 
British Honduras, British Solomon Islands 
Protectorate, Ceylon, Cyprus, Falkland Islands 
and dependencies, Fiji, Gambia (Colony and 



° For text of agreement, see Press Releases of June 
24, 1939 (Vol. XX, No. 508), pp. 547-549. 



SEPTEMBER 9, 19 39 



241 



Protectorate), Gibraltar, Gilbert and Ellice 
Islands Colony, Gold Coast (Colony, Ashanti, 
Xorthern Territories, and Togoland under 
British mandate), Jamaica (including Turks 
and Caicos Islands and the Cayman Islands), 
Kenya (Colony and Protectorate), Federated 
Malay States (Negri Sembilan, Pahang, Perak, 
Selangor), Unfederated Malay States (Johore, 
Kedah, Kelantan, Perils, Trengganu, and 
Brunei), Malta, Mauritius, Northern Rhodesia, 
Nyasaland Protectorate, Palestine, St. Helena 
and Ascension, Seychelles, Sierra Leone 
(Colony and Protectorate), Somaliland Pro- 
tectorate, Straits Settlements, Swaziland, Tan- 
ganyika Territory, Tonga, Trans-Jordan, 
Trinidad and Tobago, Uganda Protectorate, 
AVindward Islands (Gi'enada, St. Lucia, St. 
Vincent), and Zanzibar); Greece; Ireland; 
Italy; Japan; Monaco; the Netherlands (in- 
cluding the Netherlands Indies, Curagao, and 
Surinam) ; Nicai'agua; Norway; Poland; Por- 
tugal; Sweden; and Switzerland. 

The convention and protocol came into force 
on November 29, 1933. 

Convention on the Stamp Laws in Connec- 
tion With Bills of Exchange and Promis- 
sory Notes 

Jamaica — Turks and Caicos Islands — Cayman 
Islands — Somaliland Protectorate 

According to a circular letter from the 
League of Nations dated August 14, 1939, the 
Secretariat received on August 3, 1939, a noti- 
fication from the British Government in ac- 
cordance with the second paragraph of article 
9 of the Convention on the Stamp Laws in 
Connection With Bills of Exchange and Prom- 
issory Notes, signed at Geneva on June 7, 1930, 
that it desires that the convention shall apply 
to Jamaica, including the Turks and Caicos 



Islands and the Cayman Islands, and to the 
Somaliland Protectorate, subject to the limita- 
tions mentioned in section D of the protocol 
to that convention. 

According to the information of the Depart- 
ment the following countries have ratified or 
adhered to the convention: Australia (includ- 
ing Papua, Norfolk Island, New Guinea, and 
Nauru) with limitation; Belgium; Danzig; 
Denmark; Finland; France; Germany; Great 
Britain (including Bahamas with limitation, 
Barbados with limitation, Basutoland, Bechu- 
analand Protectorate, Bermuda with limita- 
tion, British Guiana with limitation, British 
Honduras, British Solomon Islands with limi- 
tation, Ceylon with limitation, Cyprus with 
limitation, Falkland Islands and dependencies 
-with limitation, Fiji with limitation, Gambia 
(Colony and Protectorate), Gibraltar with 
Innitation, Gilbert and Ellice Islands Colony 
with limitation. Gold Coast (Colony, Ashanti, 
Northern Territories, and Togoland under 
British mandate), Jamaica (including Turks 
and Caicos Islands and Cayman Islands) with 
limitation, Kenya (Colony and Protectorate) 
with limitation, Federated Malay States (Negri 
Sembilan, Pahang, Perak, Selangor) with lim- 
itation, Unfederated Malay States (Johore, 
Kedah, Kelantan, Perils, Trengganu, and 
Brunei) with limitation, Malta, Mauritius, 
Northern Rhodesia, Nyasaland Protectorate, 
Palestine, St. Helena and Ascension with lim- 
itation, Seychelles, Sierra Leone (Colony and 
Protectorate) with limitation, Somaliland Pro- 
tectorate with limitation. Straits Settlements 
with limitation, Swaziland, Tanganyika Terri- 
tory with limitation, Tonga with limitation, 
Trans-Jordan M'ith limitation, Trinidad and 
Tobago with limitation, Uganda Protectorate 
vv'ith limitation. Windward Islands (Grenada, 
St. Lucia, St. Vincent) with limitation, and 



242 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Publications 



Zanzibar); Ireland; Italy; Japan; Monaco; 
the Netherlands (including Netherlands Indies, 
Surinam, and Curagao) ; Newfoundland ; New 
Hebrides; Norway; Poland; Portugal; Swe- 
den ; Switzerland ; and the Union of Soviet Department of State 

Socialist Republics. International Traffic in Arms: Laws and Regulations 

Tha ^r>,,,.r„.f; 1 ^. ^ • i X Administered by the Secretary of State Governing the 

Ihe convention and protocol came into force international Traffic in Arms, Ammunition, and Imple- 

on January 1, 1934. ments of War and Other Munitions of War. 6th edi- 

' tion. Publication 1368. vi, 37 pp. 100. 



U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1939 



For sale by the Superintendent Of Documents, Washington, D. C. -Price 10 cents Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WITH THE APPROVAL OP THE DIRECTOH OF THE BUREAD OP THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 




ETIN 



SEPTEMBER i6, 1939 
Vol. I: No. 12 — Publication I^JJ 




Qontents 

Europe: 

Neutrality: Page 

Statement by the Secretary of State 245 

Proclamations of the neutrality of the United States . 246 
Executive order regulating enforcement of the neu- 
trality of the United States 247 

Travel on belligerent ships 247 

Credits to belligerents 247 

Contributions for reUef in belligerent countries . . . 248 
Kegulations on traffic in arms 249 

Halting of American vessel by German submarine . . 249 

Aerial bombardments by German aviation: Reports of 

the American Ambassador to Poland 249 

Proclamation by Great Britain of articles of contra- 
band 250 

Facilities for return of Americans from Europe ... 251 
The American republics: 

Inter-American Consultative Conference at Panama: 

Statement by Under Secretary Welles 251 

Committee on Unification of Civil and Commercial 
Laws of the American Republics 252 

Anniversaries of independence 252 

General: 

Celebration of the Jewish New Year 253 

[Over] 



Page 
Publications 253 

Commercial policy: 

The World's Fair and Peace: Remarks by Assistant 

Secretary Grady 254 

Consumer Interest in Tariffs: Remarks by Assistant 

Secretary Grady 256 

Traffic in arms, tin-plate scrap, etc.: 

Monthly statistics 259 

International conferences, commissions, etc.: 

First Pan American Housing Conference 269 

Treaty information: 
Restriction of war: 

Convention for the Amelioration of the Condition of 
the Sick and Woimded of Armies in the Field 

(Treaty Series No. 847) 270 

Mutual guarantees: 

Anglo-Polish Agreement of Mutual Assistance . . . 270 
Aviation: 

Agreement With Argentina for the Detail of Mihtary 

Aviation Instructors 271 

Postal: 

Parcel Post Agreement With Barbados 272 

Parcel Post Agreement With Egypt 272 

Telecommunications: 

Regional Radio Convention of Central America, 

Panama, and the Canal Zone 272 



U. S. SUPERINTFNOENT OF DOCUMENTS 

OCT 4 1939 



Europe 



NEUTRALITY 

Statement by the Secretary of State 



[Released to the press September 14] 

The Secretary of State made the following 
statement at the press conference on September 
14 regarding neutrality: 

"The Government of the United States has 
not abandoned any of its rights as a neutral 
under international law. It has, however, for 
the time being prescribed, by domestic legisla- 
tion, certain restrictions for its nationals which 
have the effect of requiring them to refrain 
from the exercise of privileges which but for 
such legislation they would have the right to 
exercise under international law, such as the 
right to travel on belligerent vessels, to make 
loans and extend credits to belligerent govern- 
ments, et cetera. These restrictive measures do 
not and cannot constitute a modification of the 
l^rinciples of international law but rather they 
require nationals of the United States to forego, 
until the Congress shall decide otherwise, the 
exercise of certain rights under those prin- 
ciples. Furthermore, this Government gives 
the widest possible notice to American ship- 
ping regarding danger areas as the information 
is acquired by it. This Government also warns 
American nationals and American shipping 
against actual danger in any other respect as 
situations involving such danger are brought to 
its attention, whether those situations result 
from lawful or unlawful activities of the bel- 
ligerents. It endeavors to exercise all due dili- 
gence in the protection of American lives and 

177810—39 1 



property and of course must expect American 
nationals likewise to exercise due diligence in 
keeping clear of danger — actual or potential. 

"In the letters which I addressed to Senator 
Pittman and Representative Bloom on May 27, 
1939, I stated the situation as follows : 

" '. . . The rights of our nationals under 
international law may properly be restricted by 
our own legislation along certain lines for the 
purpose of avoiding incidents which might in- 
volve us in a conflict. In indicating certain re- 
strictions upon the exercise of our rights as a 
neutral I do not wish to be considered as advo- 
cating the abandonment of these, or indeed of 
any, neutral rights; but there is reasonable 
ground for restricting at this time the exercise 
of these rights.' 

"The principles of international law as re- 
gards neutrals and belligerents have been 
evolved through the centuries. Wliile bellig- 
erents have frequently departed from these 
principles on one pretext or another and have 
endeavored to justify their action on various 
grounds, the principles still subsist. 

"This Government, adhering as it does to 
these principles, reserves all rights of the 
United States and its nationals under interna- 
tional law and will adopt such measures as may 
seem most practical and prudent when those 
rights are violated by any of the belligerents." 

245 



246 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

Proclamations of the Neutrality of the United States 



[Released to the press September 10] 

PKOCLAIlVnNG THE NeuTRALITT OF THE UNITED 

States in the War Between Germany, on 
THE One Hand, and Canada, on the Other 
Hand 

BY the president OF THE UNITED STATES OF 
AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Whereas a state of war unhappily exists 
between Germany, on the one hand, and 
Canada, on the other hand; 

Now, THEREFORE, I, FrANKLIN D. E.00SEVELT, 

President of the United States of America, in 
order to preserve the neiitrahty of the United 
States and of its citizens and of persons within 
its territory and jurisdiction, and to enforce its 
laws and treaties, and in order that all persons, 
being warned of the general tenor of the laws 
and treaties of the United States in this behalf, 
and of the law of nations, may thus be pre- 
vented from any violation of the same, do 
hereby declare and proclaim that all of the pro- 
visions of my proclamation of September 5, 
1939, proclaiming the neutrality of the United 
States in a war between Germany and France ; 
Poland; and the United Kingdom, India, 
Australia and New Zealand apply equally in 
respect to Canada. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the Seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this tenth 

day of September, in the year of our Lord 

nineteen hundred and thirty-nine, 

[seal] and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the one 
hundred and sixty-fourth. 

Frankun D. Roosevelt 
By the President: 
CoRDELL Hull 

Secretary of State. 



[Released to the press September 10] 

Export of Arms, Ammunition, and Imple- 
ments OF War to Canada 

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF 
AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Whereas section 1 of the joint resolution of 
Congress approved May 1, 1937, amending the 
joint resolution entitled "Joint resolution pro- 
viding for the prohibition of the export of 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war to 
belligerent countries; the prohibition of the 
transportation of arms, ammunition, and im- 
plements of war by vessels of the United States 
for the use of belligerent states; for the regis- 
tration and licensing of persons engaged in the 
business of manufacturing, exporting, or im- 
porting arms, ammunition, or implements of 
war; and restricting travel by American citi- 
zens on belligerent ships during war", ap- 
proved August 31, 1935, as amended February 
29, 1936, provides in jjart as follows: 

"Wlienever the President shall find that 
there exists a state of war between, or among, 
two or more foreign states, the President shall 
proclaim such fact, and it shall thereafter be 
unlawful to export, or attempt to export, or 
cause to be ex^Dorted, arms, ammunition, or im- 
plements of war from any place in the United 
States to any belligerent state named in such 
IJroclamation, or to any neutral state for trans- 
shipment to, or for the use of, any such bellig- 
erent state." 

And whereas it is further provided by sec- 
tion 1 of the said joint resolution that 

"The President shall, from time to time, by 
proclamation, extend such embargo upon the 
export of arms, anamunition, or implements of 
war to other states as and when they may 
become involved in such war." 

Now, therefore, I, Frankun D. Koosevelt, 
President of the United States of America, 



SEPTEMBER 16, 19 3 9 



247 



acting under and by virtue of the authority 
conferred upon me by the said joint resohition, 
do hereby proclaim that all of the provisions 
of my proclamation of September 5, 1939, in 
regard to the export of arms, ammunition, and 
imijlements of war to France; Germany; Po- 
land; and the United Kingdom, India, Aus- 
tralia, and New Zealand, henceforth apply to 
Canada. 

And I do hereby enjoin upon all officers of 
the United States, charged with the execution 
of the laws thereof, the utmost diligence in pre- 
venting violations of the said joint resolution, 
and this my proclamation issued thereunder, 
and in bringing to trial and punishment any 
offenders against the same. 

And I do hereby delegate to the Secretary of 
State the j^ower to exercise any power or au- 
thority conferred on me by the said joint reso- 
lution, as made effective by this iny proclama- 
tion issued thereunder, and the power to pro- 
mulgate such rules and regulations not incon- 
sistent with law as may be necessary and proper 
to carry out any of its provisions. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the Seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this tenth 

day of September, in the year of our Lord 

nineteen hundred and thirty-nine, 

[seal] and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the one 
hundred and sixty-fourth. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 

By the President: 
Cordell Hull 

Secretary of State. 

Executive Order Regulating Enforcement of 
the Neutrality of the United States 

[Released to the press September 10] 

Executive Order 

Prescribing Regulations Governing the En- 
forcement of the Neutrality of the United 
States 

Whereas, under the treaties of the United 
States and the law of nations it is the duty of 



the United States, in any war in which the 
United States is a neutral, not to permit the 
commission of unneutral acts within the juris- 
diction of the United States ; 

And whereas, a proclamation was issued by 
me on the tenth day of September declaring 
the neutrality of the United States of America 
in the war now existing between Germany, on 
the one hand, and Canada, on the other hand : 

Now, therefore, in order to make more effec- 
tive the enforcement of the provisions of said 
treaties, law of nations, and proclamation, I 
hereby prescribe that the provisions of my 
Executive Order No. 8233 of September 5, 1939, 
prescribing regulations governing the enforce- 
ment of the neutrality of the United States, 
apply equally in respect to Canada. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 

The White House, 

September 10, 1939. 

Travel on Belligerent Ships 

[Released to the press September 11] 

Regulations Under Section 9 of the Joint 
Resolution of Congress Appro\'ed Mat 1, 
1937 

September 11, 1939. 
The Secretary of State announces that the 
regulations under section 9 of the joint resolu- 
tion of Congress approved May 1, 1937, which 
he promulgated on September 5, 1939, hence- 
forth apply equally in respect to travel by 
citizens of the United States on vessels of 
Canada. 

Cordell Hull 

Credits to Belligerents 

[Released to the press September 11] 

Regulation Concerning Credits to 
Belligerents 

I hereby prescribe that the provisions of my 
regulation of September 6, 1939, concerning 
credits to France; Germany; Poland; and the 
United Kingdom, India, Austi-alia and New 
Zealand shall henceforth apply equally in re- 



248 

spect to credits to Canada and the Union of 
South Africa. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 
The White House, 

September 11, 1939. 

Contributions for Relief in Belligerent 
Countries 

[Released to the press September 11] 

Rules and Regul.\tions Governing the Solici- 
tation AND Collection of Contributions 
for Use in Canada 

September 11, 1939. 
The Secretary of State announces that the 
rules and regulations under the provisions of 
section 3 (a) of the joint resolution of Con- 
gress approved May 1, 1937, in regard to the 
solicitation and collection of funds for use in 
France; Germany; Poland; and the United 
Kingdom, India, Australia, and New Zealand, 
which he promulgated on September 5, 1939, 
henceforth apply equally in respect to the so- 
licitation and collection of funds for use in 
Canada. 

CoRDELL Hull 

[Released to the press September 14] 

The following persons and organizations 
have registered with the Secretary of State 
under the rules and regulations governing the 
solicitation and collection of contributions to 
be used for medical aid and assistance or for 
the supplying of food and clothing to relieve 
human suffering in the countries now at war, 
jjromulgated pursuant to the provisions of sec- 
tion 3 (a) of the Neutrality Act of May 1, 
1937, as made effective by the President's proc- 
lamations of September 5, 8, and 10, 1939: 

1. Polsko Narodowy Komitet w Ameryce, 1002 
Pittston Avenue, Scranton, Pa. 

2. International Save the Children Fund of 
America, Inc., 1 Madison Avenue, New York, 
N. Y. 

3. Anthracite Relief Committee, 53-59 North 
Main Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULX.ETIN 

4. Polish Union of the United States of North 
America, 53-59 North Main Street, Wilkes- 
Barre, Pa. 

5. Polish Relief Fund, 1550 East Canfield Ave- 
nue, Detroit, Mich. 

6. Nowy Swiat Publishing Co., Inc., 380 Sec- 
ond Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

7. Polish Relief Committee of Philadelphia 
and Vicinity, 3111 Richmond Street, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

8. Waher Golanski and Edmund B. Krot- 
kiewicz, co-partners of Polish Radio Pro- 
grams Bureau, 11301 Joseph Campau 
Avenue, Hamtramck, Mich. 

9. Polish Relief Fund, 355 Grove Street, Jer- 
sey City, N. J. 

10. American Committee for Relief of Polish 
Non-Combatant Women, Children, Refugees 
(New York headquarters' address to be sup- 
plied later). 

11. New Jersey Broadcasting Corporation, 2866 
Hudson Boulevard, Jersey City, N. J. 

12. Federation of Polish Jews in America, Inc., 
225 West Thirty-fourth Street, New York, 
N. Y. 

13. Rekord Printing & Publishing Company, 
603-605 North Shamokin Street, Shamokin, 
Pa. 

14. General Council of Polish Organizations in 
Pittsburgh, 3509 Butler Street, Pittsburgh, 
Pa. 

15. American Women's Hospitals, Medical 
Service Committee of the American Medical 
Women's Association, 50 West Fiftieth 
Street, New York, N. Y. 

16. American Committee for Civilian Relief in 
Poland, 401 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

All of these registrants, with the exception 
of the International Save the Children Fund 
of America, Inc., and the American Women's 
Hosj^itals, have stated in their applications that 
they intend to use the funds collected for re- 
lief in Poland. The International Save the 
Children Fund of America, Inc., states that it 
intends to distribute its funds through its rep- 
resentatives in England, probably Poland, and 



SEPTEMBER 16, 19 39 



249 



possibly other countries which may appeal to 
it. The American Women's Hospitals states 
that it intends to distribute its funds through 
its representatives in France. 

Regulations on Traffic in Arms 

[Released to the press September 11] 

StJPPLEMEXT TO THE PaMPHLET, "INTERNA- 
TIONAL TRAmc IN Arms — Laws and Regu- 
lations Administered by the Secretary of 
State Go\'erning the International Trat- 
ric IN Arms, Ammunition, and Implements 
of War and Other Munitions of War" 



part XI — special provisions in regard to 

exportation to CANADA 

September 11, 1939. 
The Secretary of State announces that the 
special provisions in regard to exportation to 
France; Germany; Poland; and the United 
Kingdom, India, Australia and New Zealand, 
promulgated on September 5, 1939, and set 
forth in Part IX of this pamphlet, henceforth 
apply equally in respect to Canada. 

CoRDELL Hull 



■f -f -f + + + + 



HALTING OF AMERICAN VESSEL BY GERMAN SUBMARINE 



[Released to the press September 12] 

Following is the text of a telegram received 
by the Department of State from the Water- 
man Steamship Corporation: 

"Mobile, Alabama, 
September 11, 1939. 
"The following radio message was received 
from our American S. S. Waxosta bound Glas- 
gow to New York with general cargo and a few 
passengers. 



" 'Stopped Saturday afternoon detained three 
hours by German submarine, papers examined 
and holds searched, warned that vessels not 
stopping immediately at any signals of ap- 
proaching sub will be fired on, flags displayed 
as per instructions received Glasgow'. 

"This message has also been transmitted to 
United States Maritime Commission. 

Waterman Steamship Corporation" 



+ ^ -f -f + + ■♦- 



AERIAL BOMBARDMENTS BY GERMAN AVIATION 

Reports of the American Ambassador to Poland 



t Released to the press September 13] 

The following is a paraphrase of a telegram 
received from the American Ambassador to 
Poland, Mr. Anthony J. Drexel Biddle, Jr., 
dated September 8 : 

"Aerial bombardments by German aviation 
definitely include industrial establishments 
which are engaged in war production (the 
bombardment of which endangers surrounding 
communities) ; railroads (the bombardment of 



which frequently endangers hospital and 
refugee trains) ; bridges, and the general pub- 
lic crossing them, and populations residing near 
bridges, airports, and troop centers throughout 
the country. (The Polish Army in making its 
defensive retreat is billeting military forces in 
civilian communities, there being hardly any 
community that does not house some troops. In 
addition, there are barracks in practically every 
smaller center and in all cities.) 



250 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



"Although they are ostensibly appearing to 
follow the principle of limiting bombardments 
from the air to objectives of a military char- 
acter, in my opinion the German forces are tak- 
ing advantage of every opportunity, without 
regard to the danger to the civilian population 
which may be involved. It is also evident that 
the German bombers are releasing the bombs 
they carry even when they are in doubt as to 
the identity of their objectives. 

"There may also be cited the attacks made 
on my villa and that of my neighbor ; a heavy 
attack on modern apartment buildings in the 
suburbs of Warsaw, situated one kilometer 
from military barracks; the destruction of a 
sanitorium, involving the death of ten children, 
in the woods near Otwock; the bombing of a 
refugee train on its way from Kutno; damage 
done to a hospital train carrying a party of 
wounded soldiers, which was plainly marked 
with a Red Cross on the roof and drawn up 
at the uncovered East Station of Warsaw, and 



the destruction of a Girl Guide hut in which 
12 girls were killed. 

"According to the best available information 
to date, the fortifications, factories, and bridges 
surrounding the cities of Lublin and Lwow are 
being subjected to increasing bombardment 
from the air, although there has been no bomb- 
ing of the centers of the cities named." 

The following telegram was received from 
Ambassador Biddle September 13 from the 
Polish town where the Embassy is now located : 

"This place a defenseless open village was 
bombed at 11 a. m. today by flight of four Ger- 
man planes which dropped at least 12 bombs 
not only on outskirts but also along main street 
300 yards from this Embassy and within even 
closer proximity of other missions as well as 
the Foreign Office now located here. Verified 
casualties include 11 killed 40 seriously injured 
and many business properties. Population 
terrorized by suddemiess and unexpectedness 
of raid." 



-f ■♦- > -f >- + 4- 



PROCLAMATION BY GREAT BRITAIN OF ARTICLES OF CONTRABAND 



[Released to the press September 13] 

The Department of State has been informed 
by the British Ambassador in Washington that 
a proclamation has been issued in London 
specifying the articles to be treated as contra- 
band of war by His Majesty's Goverimient, 
and that these articles are as follows: 

"Schedule I 

'■''Absolute Contraband 

"(a) All kinds of arms, ammunition, explo- 
sives, chemicals, or appliances suitable for use 
in chemical warfare and machines for their 
manufacture or repair; component parts 
thereof; articles necessary or convenient for 
their use; materials or ingredients used in 
their manufacture; articles necessary or con- 
venient for the production or use of such ma- 
terials or ingredients. 



"(b) Fuel of all kinds; all contrivances for, 
or means of, transportation on land, in the 
water or air, and machines used in their manu- 
facture or repair; component parts thereof; in- 
struments, articles, or animals necessary or 
convenient for their use; materials or ingredi- 
ents used in their manufacture; articles neces- 
sary or convenient for the production or use 
of such materials or ingredients. 

"(c) All means of communication, tools, im- 
plements, instruments, equipment, maps, pic- 
tures, papers and other articles, machines, or 
documents necessary or convenient for carry- 
ing on hostile operations; articles necessary or 
convenient for their manufacture or use. 

"(d) Coin, bullion, currency, evidences of 
debt; also metal, materials, dies, plates, ma- 
chinery, or other articles necessary or conven- 
ient for their manufacture. 



SEPTEMBER 16, 1939 

"Schedule II 

^'■Conditioned Contraband 

"(e) All kinds of food, foodstuffs, feed, 
forage, and clothing and articles and materials 
used in their production." 

-f ^ >■ 

FACILITIES FOR RETURN OF AMERI- 
CANS FROM EUROPE 

[Released to the press September 14] 

According to the most reliable statistics avail- 
able to the Department, some 9,900 passengers 
arrived at United States Atlantic ports from 
Europe during the week ended September 7. 
Reports of the number of passengers carried 
by several foreign lines to Atlantic ports, in- 
cluding Canadian, are not being received. How- 
ever, two ships of foreign registry, with an un- 
reported iDassenger list but having a total capac- 
ity of 2,350 passengers, arrived in New York 
during the period under review. It may be as- 
sumed, therefore, that at least 12,000 passengers 
arrived at the Atlantic ports from Europe dur- 
ing the week ended September 7. For the week 
preceding, 9,300 passengers arrived from Eu- 
rope at United States Atlantic ports and 1,200 
at Canadian ports, according to the Depart- 
ment's information. 



251 

Additional facilities for the transportation 
next week (the week ending September 23) of 
a greater number of passengers will be avail- 
able. 

Every operator of a freight steamer under 
the American flag has been requested to make 
his vessels available to American citizens at any 
port of call in Europe, and American consular 
officials have been authorized to issue the ap- 
propriate emergency certificates enabling such 
ships to carry extra passengers. Many freight- 
ers have already sailed carrying passengers to 
their maximum capacity, which in general 
ranges between 18 and 25. 

The S. S. Orizaba is due shortly at an Eng- 
lish port and will pick up survivors of the 
S. S. Athenia. The S. S. Shawnee has sailed 
for a French port, and three other passenger 
vessels are about to sail. These five ships will 
have a combined passenger capacity of 3,520. 

Certain neutral-flag ships are resuming their 
services and affording accommodations to the 
United States. It is understood that Nether- 
lands ports and the Mediterranean area, in par- 
ticular, are covered by these neutral services. 

In addition to the sj^ecial ship facilities which 
have been arranged, the regular North Atlantic 
passenger ships of United States registry are 
continuing to make quick passages to and from 
Europe, and quick turnarounds. 



The American Republics 



INTER-AMERICAN CONSULTATIVE CONFERENCE AT PANAMA 

Statement by Under Secretary Welles ^ 



[Released to the press September 15] 

The meeting of the Ministers for Foreign 
Affairs, or special representatives, of all of the 
American republics, which is to take place in 
Panama on September 23, creates a precedent. 
In accordance with the agreements unani- 
mously reached at the Inter- American Confer- 
ence for the Maintenance of Peace which met 



in Buenos Aires in 1936 and at the Inter- Amer- 
ican Conference which met in Lima last year, 
this meeting, which will now be held for the 
first time, is for the purpose of consultation — 
a consultation considered necessary by all of 



^Statement made by Mr. Wolles, U. S. delegate to 
the Conference, on sailing from New York for Panama, 
September 15, 1939. 



177810—39- 



252 

the American republics in view of the outbreak 
of a general war in Europe, because such a 
general war is regarded as a potential menace 
to the peace of the New World. 

It is significant that at a moment like this 
the representatives of the 21 sovereign Amer- 
ican neighbors should assemble on equal terms 
to consider the peaceful measures which they 
may individually or collectively take in order 
to safeguard their neutrality ; in order to pre- 
serve so far as may be possible their economic 
and commercial interests from dislocation as 
the result of the outbreak of war abroad ; and 
above all else, in order to keep war away from 
this continent. 

Finally, I feel confident that it will be the 
general desire on the part of all to support in 
every practical manner those principles of in- 
ternational conduct for which the American 
democracies severally and jointly stand and 
only through the observance of which can 
there be the restoration of a world order based 
on law. 



[Released to the press September 12] 

Following is the delegation of the United 
States to the Inter- American Consultative Con- 
ference at Panama: 

Delegate : 

The Honorable Sumner Welles, Under Secre- 
tary of State 

Advisers: 

The Honorable Edwin C. Wilson, Minister 

Designate to Uruguay 

Dr. Herbert Feis, Adviser on International 

Economic Affairs, Department of State 

Dr. Warren Kelchner, Acting Chief, Division 

of International Conferences, Department of 

State, secretary general of the delegation 

Dr. Marjorie M. Whiteman, Assistant to the 
Legal Adviser, Department of State 

Press officer: 

Mr. Slieldon Thomas, Assistant Chief, Division 

of Current Information, Department of State 

Secretary to the United States delegate: 
Mr. Paul C. Daniels, Second Secretary, Ameri- 
can Embassy, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtrLLETIN 

Assistant to the United States delegate: 
Miss Anna L. Clarkson, Assistant to the Under 
Secretary of State 

Translator: 

Mr. Guillermo Suro 

Clerical staff: 

Miss Muriel Kluczny 

Miss Frances M. Beach 

Miss Gladys E. Schukraft 

Mr. Gustav Sallas 

Code: 

Mr. Burton E. Kirby 

Mr. Delbert D. Mehaffy. 

■f -f + 

COMMITTEE ON UNIFICATION OF 
CIVIL AND COMMERCIAL LAWS OF 
THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS 

[Released to the press September 13] 

The President has appointed Wesley Alba 
Sturges, J. D., a member of the Yale Law 
Scliool, as American representative to the Per- 
manent Committee of Jurists to Study and 
Prepare the Unification of the Civil and Com- 
mercial Laws of the American Republics. 

This Committee is a result of a resolution 
passed by the Eighth International Conference 
of American States held at Lima, Peru, in De- 
cember 1938 which provided for the establish- 
ment of a permanent committee of jurists to 
study and prepare the unification of the civil 
and commercial laws of the American repub- 
lics. The Committee is composed of three 
members of whom one is designated by the 
Government of the United States and the two 
remaining members detennined by lot by the 
Director of the University of San Marcos at 
Lima from a list of jurists made up by the 
designation of one member by each of the 20 
other American republics. 

ANNIVERSARIES OF INDEPENDENCE 

[Released to the press September 15] 

The following telegrams were addressed 
September 15 by President Roosevelt to the 
Presidents of the Central American republics 



SEPTEMBER 16, 1939 



253 



on the occasion of the anniversaries of their 
independence : 

"His Excellency Leon Coktes, 
President of Costa Rica, 

San Jose. 
"I take pleasure in extending to Your Ex- 
cellency on this anniversary of the independ- 
ence of your country cordial felicitations and 
sincere wishes for the welfare of the people of 
Costa Rica. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt" 

"His Excellency 
General Maximiliano Hernandez Martinez, 
President of El Salvador, 

San Salvador. 
"On behalf of my fellow countrymen and in 
my own name I convey to Your Excellency 
cordial greetings and the assurances of my best 
wishes on the occasion of the anniversary of the 
independence of El Salvador. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt" 

"His Excellency General Jorge Ubico, 

President of Guatemcda, 

Guatemala. 
"I am happy to extend to Your Excellency 
and through you to your fellow countrymen 
heartiest felicitations upon this anniversary of 
the independence of Guatemala. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt" 

"His Excellency General Tiburcio Carias A., 
President of the Republic of Honduras, 

Tegiicigal'pa. 
"On this national anniversary of the inde- 
pendence of Honduras it gives me pleasure to 
extend to Your Excellency my cordial congrat- 
ulations and best wishes for the peace and pros- 
perity of your country. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt" 

"His Excellency General Anastasio Somoza, 

President of Nicaragua, 

Managua. 
"Upon this national anniversary it is a great 
pleasure to extend to Your Excellency friendly 



greetings and the assurances of my personal 
regards. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt" 

[Released to the press September 16] 

September 16, 1939. 
"His Excellency General Lazaro Cardenas, 
President of the United Mexican States, 

Mexico, D. F. 
"Upon this national holiday please accept my 
cordial felicitations and my best wishes for the 
welfare of the Mexican people. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt" 



General 



CELEBRATION OF THE JEWISH NEW 
YEAR 

[Released to the press September 13] 

The Secretary of State has issued the fol- 
lowing message on the occasion of the celebra- 
tion of the Jewish New Year on September 13, 
1939: 

"I am happy to extend to our fellow citizens 
of the Jewish faith my heartfelt congratula- 
tions on the occasion of the celebration of the 
Jewish New Year and to express my best wishes 
for their happiness and well-being during the 
coming year." 



Publications 



Department of State 



Agents of Foreign Principals and of Foreign Govern- 
ments : Laws and Regulations Administered by the 
Secretary of State Governing the Registration of 
Agents of Foreign Principals and the Notification of 
Agents of Foreign Governments. Publication 1370. vi, 
16 pp. 50. 

Diplomatic List, September 1939. Publication 1372. 
ii, 82 pp. Subscription, $1 a year ; single copy, 100. 



Commercial Policy 



THE WORLD'S FAIR AND PEACE 

Remarks by Assistant Secretary Grady = 



[Released to the press September 13] 

It is a pleasure and an honor for me to come 
here this evening and extend to you on behalf 
of the Secretary of State greetings and felicita- 
tions. 

This World's Fair has been and will con- 
tinue to be a great success, and the participa- 
tion of foreign governments has gone far to 
make it that. The opportunity which the 
Fair affords of displaying the products and 
of giving evidence of the resources and enter- 
prise of the countries that are participating 
here, makes it a great agency for peace. I say 
this despite the unhappy circumstance of war 
in the world, for war surely is but a frightful 
interlude in the progress and advancement of 
manliind. Even though the war should last 
longer than all of us fervently hope, it can only 
interrupt and not destroy the great forces of 
peace and progress that constantly are at work 
in the world. This fair is such a force. 

It would be most unfortunate if because of 
the tragedy of another great war now going on 
we should lose confidence and faith in the 
powerful forces of peace and progress which 
are at work. We must maintain our faith in 
the possibilities of a truly peaceful world and 
turn all our efforts to bring this about. 

The World's Fair is a symbol of world co- 
operation for trade and peaceful relations 
among the nations. It is a concrete embodi- 
ment of the spirit of the good neighbor, which 



^ Delivered at a dinner in honor of the Foreign 
Commissioners-General to the New York World's Fair, 
at Perylon Hall, New York Cit.v, September 13, 1939, 
and broadcast over station WEVD. 

254 



is the spirit actuating our Goveriunent's whole 
foreign policy. To the extent that the coun- 
tries of the world can conduct peaceful and 
profitable relations will peace prevail. The 
concept of an international order in trade> 
currency, shipping, and travel is the concept of 
mutual dependence and common interest in ad- 
vancing standards of living and prosperity 
everywhere. 

Wliile economic, factors are not the only cause 
of war, they are in most instances the basic 
and primary cause of conflict between coim- 
tries. Racial and cultural differences are 
quickly dissolved when it is possible to carry 
on successful and mutually profitable commer- 
cial intercourse. This is not materialism, for 
spiritual values tend quickly to disappear when 
men struggle hard for life. Successful inter- 
national relations are based on the concept of 
cooperation and recognition of the reality of 
world unity and the dependence of countries 
on each other for their well-being and pros- 
perity. There is no place for war in a true 
world system, because war, especially war 
based on aggression, grows out of a philosophy 
of national irresponsibility to the world order. 

It is because our President and Secretary of 
State feel so strongly that successful world 
commerce is the basis for a j)eacef ul world that 
they have been working since 1934 to secure 
from the countries of the world cooperation 
in the reestablishment of the international eco- 
nomic and political system which is a condition 
of world peace — in a word, the application of 
the "good neighbor" policy to our international 
trade and political relations. 



SEPTEMBER 16, 1939 



255 



May I quote here from a speech by Secretary 
Hull delivered in Chicago in May of this year : 

"... the maintenance of world order under 
law is the sole effective instrumentality for the 
preservation of enduring peace. Such world 
order calls for acceptance and application by 
nations of certain basic principles of justice and 
fair dealing in civilized international relations : 
Respect for national independence and sover- 
eignty; scnipulous observance of international 
obligations; willingness to adjust all interna- 
tional disputes solely by pacific means. To the 
establislinient of such world order we can con- 
tribute by our own firm adherence to these 
principles ; by using our moral influence to in- 
duce other nations to give them their adher- 
ence; by cooperating in all peaceful efforts to 
give practical reality to the application of these 
principles; by maintaining our strength and 
our courage, to the end that no nation will be 
tempted to challenge anywhere our vital na- 
tional interests. 

"... our role in foreign affairs is concerned 
with the promotion of sound and healthy inter- 
national economic relations as an indispensable 
foundation of world order under law and, 
therefore, of enduring peace. Today the well- 
being of every nation increases in proportion as 
its citizens have peaceful access to the resources 
of the world rather than merely to those within 
its own frontiers. Such access is possible only 
through mutually beneficial trade and through 
all those other innumerable international re- 
lationships which have already enriched so 
magnificently the lives of individuals and of 
nations." 

A world system founded on nondiscrimina- 
tion and fair dealings in the trade relations of 
the nationals of all countries, without the in- 
tervention of governments to use trade for na- 
tional political purposes, has been the dream 



of the statesmen of this country. That we have 
fairly succeeded is attested by the fact that we 
have made 21 agreements with 20 countries, all 
of which are based on principles which alone 
can rebuild the world order. The threat of war 
and the intensification of nationalism as a re- 
sult of that threat have kept this program from 
achieving far greater results even than it has 
achieved. 

Had there not been the development of politi- 
cal aggression during the past few years — had 
the world been peace-minded — this program 
would have undoubtedly accomplished its full 
objectives, and we would have had not only 
world peace but greater world prosperity. 

But even in these dark days we must con- 
tinue the struggle for the reestablishment of a 
world order based on cooperation and 
mutuality. It is the intention of our President 
and our Secretary of State to pursue the ''good 
neighbor" policy in all its aspects and in par- 
ticular to press the program of trade agree- 
ments as energetically as the circumstances con- 
fronting us will permit. We will continue to 
offer the world the opportunity for cooperation 
in the lowering of the excessive barriers to 
commerce and economic intercourse. 

It matters not how long the war may last or 
how it may terminate; the necessity for the 
establishment of conditions under which inter- 
national trade can function and flourish will 
still exist. We know that many of the problems 
which have resulted in war remain the same 
after war is over ! In fact war intensifies these 
problems, and constructive remedies are the 
more difficult to apply. 

I wish to say to this distinguished gathering 
that it is the intention of the American Gov- 
ernment to press for all the peace objectives to 
which it has dedicated itself and invites and 
urges the fullest cooperation from all the 
countries represented at this gathering. 



CONSUMER INTEREST IN TARIFFS 



Remarks by Assistant Secretary Grady 



[Released to the press September 14] 

Consumers are vitally interested in prices, 
and taxes of all kinds have a bearing on prices. 
TaritTs are taxes. But historically, the people 
of this country have been more concerned with 
the interest of producers than with the interest 
of consumers in our tariff rates. 

The trade-agreements program, which has for 
its purpose the making of agreements with for- 
eign countries for the mutual lowering of taxes 
on imports, is of vital concern to those who con- 
sume not only imported merchandise but do- 
mestically produced merchandise. 

An import duty in many cases raises not only 
the price of the imported article but of similar 
articles domestically produced. The theory of 
a sound tax is one that is collected for the in- 
terest of the community or country as a whole 
with the least possible burden on production. 
No tax is a good tax in itself. It is good only 
to the degi-ee that the purpose for which it is 
levied is good. 

Taxes levied for the benefit of particular 
groups or to enable particular gi'oups to enjoy 
special privilege impose a cost on the commu- 
nity which must be specifically justified. There 
are many such taxes, including those sometimes 
referred to as punitive taxes. For example, 
taxes on chain stores in the interest of inde- 
pendents are not taxes for revenue but taxes 
to restrict the operations of one group of mer- 
chants in the interest of another. The con- 
sumer's interest is apt to be overlooked. Tar- 
iffs when imposed for the purpose of penalizing 
tl-e importer in the interest of the domestic pro- 
ducer are not unlike taxes imposed on one type 
of domestic merchant in the interest of another. 
There may be reasons of a broad economic na- 
ture for using the taxing power to favor one 
type of merchandise distributor as against an- 



" Delivered at a banquet of the National Consumers 
Tax Commission at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, New 
Yorlv City, Sei)teml)er 14, 1939, and broadcast by the 
Columbia Broadcasting Co. 

256 



other or for aiding domestic industry by tax- 
ing foreign jDroducts, but in all of these in- 
stances the interest of the consumer is all too 
often forgotten and seldom taken into full ac- 
count. The consumer interest and the national 
interest are of course identical — certainly in the 
long run. This is not to deny that there are 
many cases where reasonable protection is jus- 
tified. Among such instances are the building 
up of new industry and new enterprise. How- 
ever, such protection presupposes a time when 
the industry has grown to full maturity and 
continued assistance through the taxing power 
of the Government is unnecessary, in fact na- 
tionally harmful because of its cost to the tax- 
payers and to the consumers; and all types of 
justifiable protection must be weighed against 
this cost and be reexamined from time to time 
in the light of changed conditions. 

In the nature of things it is not possible to 
measure the exact cost to consumers of exces- 
sive tariff pi-otection. It is interesting to note, 
however, that in May 1934 the Foreign Policy 
Association estimated that by reason of tariff 
duties some 20 dutiable products imported into 
the United States cost American consumers 
over half a billion dollars a year more than 
they otherwise would. Of this the Association 
estimated that the sugar tariff alone cost con- 
sumers $184,000,000 annually. The cost of 
tariff protection on dairy products was esti- 
mated at $105,000,000 a year. There are indus- 
tries in the United States whose entire income 
is less than the increased cost which the tariffs 
on their products force consumers to pay. 

In trade agreements with other countries the 
United States has reduced certain of our ex- 
cessive customs duties on articles of special in- 
terest to consumers and has thus reduced the 
prices which American consumers have to pay 
for such articles. Among these may be men- 
tioned alcoholic beverages, including the full 
50-percent reduction on all whiskey of more 
than 4 years ageing in wooden containers and 



SEPTEMBER 16, 1939 

on champagne and other sparkling wines. The 
full 50-percent reduction was also made in the 
duty on cocoa and chocolate and on edible gela- 
tin. Substantial duty i-eductions have also been 
made in the case of other foodstuffs, such as 
fish, Swiss and Roquefort cheese, canned mush- 
rooms, various flavoring extracts, and the food 
specialties of a number of foreign countries. 

Under the Cuban agreement duty reductions 
have been granted on limes and on jellies, jams, 
and marmalades made primarily from tropi- 
cal fruits not commercially produced in this 
country. 

In the Cuban agreement, also, duty reduc- 
tions were made on a number of fresh vege- 
tables, such as lima beans, tomatoes, cucumbers, 
eggplant, and squash, for periods during which 
our domestic production is at a minimum. 

In various agreements duties have been re- 
duced on rugs of different types, on laces, on 
photographic films, on glassware, bone china, 
and enameled ware, on safety matches, on 
handkerchiefs, on linen goods, and on a num- 
ber of other articles of everyday use. 

If the tariff is excessive, not only does it have 
the effect of raising the price to those who con- 
tinue to buy the protected article, but many 
whose incomes are small find that they must go 
without these articles. There are undoubtedly 
many commodities which people would like to 
enjoy but of which they cannot avail them- 
selves because selfish interests have secured a 
tariff rate so high that the articles must sell at 
prices prohibitive to a large nmnber of con- 
sumers. Excessively high tariffs tend to act as 
log jams preventing the flow of goods into 
consumption. 

The tariff lobbyist in his zest for scarcity 
conditions for his product frequently does not 
stop at securing rates which will restrict im- 
ports that directly compete with his product, 
but seeks to prevent through high tariffs im- 
ports of products that compete only indirectly 
with his commodity. One hears a great deal of 
criticism these days against the concept of 
scarcity economics, but the tariff lobbyist was 
historically the first to introduce that concept 



257 

into American thinking. The agricultural and 
mining groups which have pressed for various 
types of controls in the interest of scarcity and 
liiglier prices have simply been operating on a 
high-tariff idea with reverse English. 

I do not mean to say that production should 
not be rationally controlled, whether it be in- 
dustrial or agricultural. Production must be 
for the market ; but, if the producers can con- 
trol the situation without the tempering effect 
of the Government or of public opinion, they 
will carry the scarcity concept to extremes 
harmful to the consumer and to the economic 
organization of the country. The producer, 
whether industrial or agricultural, is entitled to 
a fair price, not a monopoly price. A fair price 
is one which makes possible decent wages and 
profits, but no industrial or agricultural group 
has the right to exact from the public prices 
that are excessive; and if it does this by politi- 
cal pressure it is using its power to secure 
special privilege; and the multiplication of 
special privilege is destructive of democracy. 

Rarely does the producer who has the power 
to introduce artificial scarcity understand the 
wisdom of restraint. The Government may be 
able to correct such tendencies, but the most 
effective force is public opinion; and the best 
antidote to excessive i^rotectionism and the 
rapacity of high-tariff lobbies is an understand- 
ing on the part of such groups as yours of the 
tariff question in all its implications. 

If the cattle interests, speaking through their 
lobbies, demand the exclusion of canned corned 
beef by increased tariffs or other means of a like 
character, they seek to deprive the consumers 
of a product which the consumer wishes to have 
and which is not produced in volume to meet 
normal demand in this country. 

The advocates of scarcity, as exemplified in 
demands for exclusion of such products, often 
defeat their own ends, because the alternative 
to a can of corned beef is not a tenderloin steak 
or lamb chops. If the housewife finds the cost 
of canned corned beef raised to a point where 
she feels that she cannot afford it she will select 
perhaps some other kind of canned food. In 



258 

other words, a can of pork and beans or of chili 
con carne will be probably the competitor of 
the canned corned beef rather than some other 
more expensive kind of meat. Producers seem 
to find it most difficult to learn the lesson of 
excessive prices, as illustrated in the way high 
meat prices recently resulted in a consumers' 
strike, which then had to be overcome by 
extensive and costly publicity. 

Imported lace, because of attractive new de- 
signs, may stimulate the use of lace by the 
dressmakers, with the result that the domestic 
production of lace tends to increase rather than 
decrease. The exclusion of imported lace may, 
on the other hand, have the effect only of re- 
ducing the interest of the style makers in lace 
for women's garments, with the result, actually 
apparent in recent years, that little or no lace 
will be imported and little or no lace domes- 
tically produced. 

The apple producers of the country might 
succeed in putting a high tariff on bananas so 
that bananas would be gi'eatly increased in 
price and consumption reduced ; but what makes 
the apple interests certain that when people 
cannot get a banana they will reach for an 
apple ? 

The basic fallacy in the scarcity philosophy 
is that generally people do not have to buy any 
particular product, and when prices are in- 
creased through one device or another, includ- 
ing the tariff, consumers turn to alternative op- 
portunities. A radio may be a competitor not 
of another radio but of a new dress for the lady 
of the house, who has with her limited budget 
to think always in terms of alternative pur- 
chases. 

Many examples could be cited. As I have 
said, it is not economically desirable to have 
gluts of any kinds of products so that they 
have to be sold for less than they cost to pro- 
duce. A reasonable adjustment of supply to 
demand is fully justified; but, let me stress the 
importance of reasonableness. Let me point 
out that the wise manufacturer or producer 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

seeks broad distribution at small profits because 
of his desire to hold the consumer's loyalty. 
The consumer rightly resents being forced to 
pay prices geared to monopoly profits; but 
though maximum sales at fair prices is sound 
business policy, the consumer has the respon- 
sibility of constantly bringing this truth home 
to those who cater to his wants and seek his 
steady patronage. 

The most wholesome development, in my 
opinion, in the country today is the awakened 
interest and developing understanding on the 
part of the consumers of the country in the 
basic economic problems that we must face and 
solve if we are to make our democracy truly 
succeed. It is the function of business, indus- 
try, agriculture, mining, and government to 
work cooperatively for the purpose of increas- 
ing the country's total consumption of goods 
and services. This is merely another way of 
saying that all should seek and strive for in- 
crease in the national income. The possibilities 
for expansion in the national income and con- 
sequently the real wages of all are almost un- 
limited. The impediments to that expansion 
are maladjustments in the economic organiza- 
tion of the country which occur from time to 
time. The reduction to a minimum of special 
private monopolistic privileges and the giving 
of full play to the creative and productive pos- 
sibilities of the people would bring a stability 
into the economic system which we have not in 
the past enjoyed for any long uninterrupted 
period. Such stability, through the minimizing 
of monopolistic tendencies would insure steady 
progress toward greater and greater national 
well-being. In this matter the making of the 
tariff an instrument of national progi-ess rather 
than one of special privilege is vital. It is the 
responsibility of members of an organization 
like yours interested in the consumer, and hence 
in all the people, to exert every effort to bring 
about and maintain the conditions necessary to 
this achievement. 



Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plat e Scrap, etc. 



MONTHLY STATISTICS 



[Released to the press September 14] 

Note: The figures appearing in the cumulative col- 
umns of the tables relating to arms or tin-plate scrap 
licensed for export are not final or definitive since 
licenses may be amended or revoked before being used. 
These figures are, however, accurate as of the date of 
the press release in which they appear. 

The statistics of actual exports in these releases are 
believed to be substantially complete. It is possible, 
however, that some shiiiments are not included. If 
this proves to be the fact, statistics in regard to such 
shipments will be included in the cumulative figures in 
later releases. 

Aems Export Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war li- 
censed for export by the Secretaiy of State 
during the year 1939 up to and including the 
month of August : 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


August 1939 


8 months end- 
ing August 
31. 1939 




I 
IV 


(4) 
(1) 




$25, 000. 00 






360.79 










I 
V 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 




69.00 






4, 500. 00 






883. 00 








Total 






5,442.00 












I 
III 

IV 
V 

VI 

vu 


(4) 
(5) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




568.00 




$500.00 


500.00 
275, 000. 00 




1, 200. 00 


1,200.00 
1,096.60 






7, 026. 00 






156,750.00 




71,198.40 


87,617.60 
8, 752. 00 






6,310.00 






39, 196. 22 








Total -.- 




72, 898. 40 


584, 016. 22 








Australia - - - 


I 
m 

IV 
V 


CD 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 


1, 289. 30 
1, 019. 00 


4.611.34 




5,361.64 
4,651,190.00 




290.70 

17.38 

4, 500. 00 

96.30 

183, 246. 00 


1,131.44 

612.06 

24, 296. 00 

2. 400. .50 

422, 298. 00 


Total 




190, 458. 68 


6,111,800.97 


Bahamas. 


V 


(2) 




40.00 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


August 1939 


I months end- 
ing August 
31, 1939 




I 
IV 

V 


(4^ 

(1) 

(2) 

(1) 

(2) 




$2.00 






111 38 






87.00 






1,610.00 
30.00 


















1, 840. 38 












V 


(1) 

(2) 




1 249.00 






30 00 








Total 






I, 279. 00 










Belgium 


I 

IV 
V 


(1) 

C2) 
(4) 

(1) 

(2) 
(2) 
(3) 




665. 21 




$1, 200. 00 
68.85 


8,761.00 

935. 85 

79 48 






20.28 






5,260.00 
86,400.00 












Total 




1, 268. 85 


102, 101. 82 










IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 


14.88 


09.13 




17 46 






9, 600. 00 








Total 




14.88 


9,686.68 










I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 




574.00 




78.00 


612.00 
487.39 






550.80 






9, 100. 00 




3,200.00 
5, 600. 00 


6,972.20 

56, 600. 00 

988. 66 








Total. 




8, 878. 00 


74, 785. 05 








Brazil 


I 
III 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 




202. 00 




38.00 
526.00 


86,038.00 

922.00 

274, COO. 00 




1,289.37 

768. 00 

46,750.00 

101,944.82 

46,646.00 


3, 241. 55 

15,731.00 

411,047.00 

160, 300. 72 

166,393.00 

64.85 








Total 




196, 961. 19 


1,117,930.12 








British Guiana. 


I 

IV 

V 

VII 


(4) 

!" 
(3) 

(2) 




20.00 






108. 38 




2,000.00 


4,500.00 
4, 200. 00 








Total 




2, 000. 00 


8, 828. 38 








British Honduras 


IV 
VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




129. 20 






102.83 






193.80 








Total 






426.83 












I 

V 


(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 




26.43 






28.00 






60.00 






700.00 








Total.... 






804. 43 



259 



260 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


August 1939 


8 months end- 
ing August 
31, 1939 


British Solomon Islands 


I (2) 
(4) 




$176. 00 




10.00 








Total 






185.00 












IV (1) 
(2) 




23.00 






2.30 








Total -- 






25.30 












I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 




522. 10 






228.00 






1, 520. 36 






128. 46 














2, 398. 91 












I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(5) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 


$6,536.51 


25, 046. 74 




418.00 




2,460.91 
600.00 


17, 100. 17 

600. 00 

649, 900, 00 




334. 37 
222. 61 
63, 949. 13 
20, 666. 95 
23, OOO. 00 
729.60 
13, 997. 62 


5,641,36 

1, 088. 31 

863, 636. 18 

61, 877. 47 

163, 015. 92 

56,284.96 

318, 769. 49 


Total 




132, 397. 60 


2, 063, 368. 60 










IV (1) 




86.88 








Chile 


I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
VII (2) 




60.00 






27 00 






13, 233. 40 






617.00 






16, ,™i 00 






11,8.5,5.00 














41, 292. 40 












I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 


1,344.00 


1,344.00 




135, 407. 95 
1,490.00 




643.00 


9. 278, 00 
26, 042. 00 




90.00 

44.00 

66,261.00 

1, 746. 52 

8,082.00 


1,886.00 

176.25 

269, 907. 00 

217, 842. 92 

95,197.00 

49 88 








Total- - 




78,110.62 


748, 621. 00 








I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








23.23 


170. 66 
4 273 65 






2,026 10 






507 360 00 




6, 319. 60 

10,490.00 

320.76 


30, 140. 50 

126,050.00 

1,085.15 

840 00 








Total 




16, 153. 49 


672, 126. 66 






Costa Rica 


I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VH (1) 
(2) 










2 610 65 






484 00 




3,600.00 


19,000.00 




2,78I.U 


24,771.71 






1 634 93 








Total - 




6, 281. 11 


55, 310. 43 








I (1) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 








40.00 


60, 687. 60 




273.00 

461.00 

1,000.00 


6,8.56.19 
8, 189. 00 
1,096.30 





Gate 


gory 


Value 


Country of destination 


August 1939 


8 months end- 
ing August 
31, 1939 




VU 


(1) 
(2) 




$3, 446. 34 






11.00 








Total 




$1,764.00 


128, 043. 43 










I 
IV 

V 


(4) 

(1) 

(2) 
(?) 
(3) 




25.10 






39.00 




34. 65 


49.14 
60.00 






8. S.50. 00 












34. 66 


9, 023. 24 










V 


(3) 




12, f 00. 00 










I 

V 


f4) 
0) 
(2) 
(3) 




2, 7.50. 00 






340.00 






11. 130. .52 






876. 00 






6,276.00 








Total 






20, 371. 62 












I 

IV 
V 

VII 


fl) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2 
(li 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 




36.00 






100. 75 






48.00 




363. 00 


3,9.';7.00 
260. 00 






19,000 00 






250. 00 






11,100.00 






1,714.40 








Total --- 




363. 00 


36,465.15 










I 

IV 


(4) 
(6) 
(U 
(2) 




60.00 






128-00 






67.00 






149.00 








Total 






404.00 










Egypt -. -- . 


1 

TV 


(n 

(51 

(1) 

(2) 




SO. 00 




518. 00 




14.88 


172. 84 
5.30 








Total 




14.88 


726.14 










I 

rv 

V 
VII 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 


41.00 


269. 00 




4, 205. 68 






161.00 






1, 504. 00 






860. 00 






2, 760. 00 








Total 




41.00 


9, 739. 58 








Federated Malay States 


I 

IV 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 




14.00 




18,70 


77.78 
16.10 








Total 




18.70 


106.88 










I 

IV 
V 


(I) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 


871, 60 
828.33 


10,330.06 




7, 166. 74 
60.00 






95.67 




1, 850, 00 
850.00 


10,400.00 
142, 600. 00 
311,000.00 








Total - - 




4, 399. 93 


487, 662. 46 










I 
III 

IV 
V 

VI 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 


34.46 


161.94 




210, 000. 00 






462. 89 






51, 025, 560. 00 




38, 248. 70 


39, 868. 70 
174. 95 






466, 962. 00 




993, 956. 24 
119,800.00 


3,671,709.91 

16,444,101.00 

4,400.00 








Total - 




1, 162, 039. 39 


72,363,381.39 



SEPTEMBKR 16, 19 39 



261 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


August 1939 


8 months end- 
ing August 
31, 1939 




I 


(1) 

(4) 


$32.50 
5.92 


$32.60 




6.92 


Total 




38.42 


38.42 








French Equatorial Africa 


I 


(1) 
(4) 




34 00 




30.00 








Total 






64.00 










French Indochina 


I 
IV 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 




67.60 




2.30 


78.31 
4,131.00 




4.93 


1.164.76 


Total.— -- 




7.23 


5,431.57 




I 
V 


(I) 
(4) 
(2) 


10.85 
41.63 


10.85 




41.63 
90.00 








Total --- 




52 48 


142. 43 










I 

IV 
V 


(2) 
(2) 




69.05 




46.00 
121.13 


699. 46 

1,134.62 

290 42 






12,800.00 






Total- . --- 




167. 13 


14,993.56 










I 
m 

IV 

V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(6) 

P 
(2) 

(I) 
(2) 

(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 




428. 85 




1,000.00 


1,000.00 
31,100.00 




189.76 


29,649.37 
430. 00 






11, 315, 600. 00 






1,970.00 




66.38 

74.22 

215, 600. 00 

596.00 

17,700.00 

S6, 217. 34 


937. 78 

486. 85 

661, 134. 26 

1,001,605.42 

1,423. 162. .50 

241,496.59 


Total. ... . 




321, 433. 69 


14,709,000.61 








Greece 


I 

V 


(6) 
(2) 
(3) 




124,400.00 






3, 500. 00 






2, 200. 00 








Total 






130, 100. 00 










Guatemala 


I 

IV 

V 

VII 


(4) 
(I) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




1,850.00 






28.00 






28.00 






60.00 






7. 565. 00 






93.00 




1, 200. 00 


5, 487. 50 


Total 




1,200.00 


15.111.50 








Haiti 


I 

IV 
VII 


C4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 




36, 662. 50 




8.20 


2,391.95 
717.11 




30.76 


61.62 
332. 50 








Total 




38.96 


40, 156. 58 










I 

IV 
V 
VII 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




676.38 






441. 00 






2, 535. 60 




250,000.00 


260,000.00 
51.00 




325.00 


975. 00 


Total 




260,325.00 


254, 678. 98 










I 

IV 
V 

vn 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 


63. 00 
327. 00 


933.00 




1,001.56 
25,211.32 




276.00 


3,490.92 
40.00 






1,011.50 








Total 




6SS.00 


31,688.30 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


August 1939 


8 months end- 
ing August 
31, 1939 




I 
V 


(1) 

(4) 
(3) 




$43. 40 












3 670 00 








Total 






3,718.40 










India 


I 

IV 

V 

VI 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 


$220. 00 

729. 11 

1, 186. 38 

9.34 

183, 600. 00 

7,900.00 


2,186.75 




6, 989. 79 

3, 516. 56 

69.64 

199, 100. 00 

9,805.00 

2, 500. 00 

334 00 
















193,644.83 


224, 491. 74 










IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 




933. 90 






16'' 25 






40,000.00 
100 00 












Total 






41,196. 15 












I 

V 


(3) 
CD 
(2) 
(3) 




28, 500. 00 






210 000 00 






4, 379. 00 
29, 266. 00 






Total 






270, 145. 00 












V 


(2) 
(3) 




9, 500. 00 






13, 900. 00 






Total 






23, 400. 00 












I 

IV 


(4) 
CD 
C2) 




62.44 




260.93 


2,711.97 
450. 67 








Total 




260. 93 


3, 225. 08 








Japan 


V 


CD 
C2) 




757, 000. 00 






100. 00 








Total 






757, 100. 00 












I 
rv 

V 


CD 
C4) 
CD 
C2) 

CD 


196.60 


1, 057. 80 




.395. 35 






na. 20 






124. 36 






2, 300. 00 








Total 




196. 60 


4, 050. 71 








Leeward Islands 


VII 

I 


C2) 
C4) 




494. 00 


Liberia.. 




11.01 








Macau ._ . 


I 

7IV 


CD 
C2) 
(4) 
CD 
C2) 




667. 75 






800. 00 






97.00 






1,312.00 






2, 592. 00 








Total 






6, 368. 76 










Mauritius 


I 


CD 

C4) 




96.43 






86.66 








Total 






183. 09 












I 

III 

IV 

V 
VII 


CD 
C3) 
(4) 
CD 
CD 
C2) 
CD 
C2) 
C3) 
CD 
C2) 




769. 44 




304, 000. 00 
27, 500. 00 


304. 000. 00 

39,018.00 

995, 600. 00 




90.00 


36, 180. 51 
16, 492. 00 




42,250.00 

850. 00 

3, 600. 00 

2, 923. 60 

9, 675. 00 


446,013.00 

318,938.05 

877,380.00 

10, 098. 75 

32, 656. 21 


Total 




390, 788. 50 


3, 076, 135. 96 










I 


CD 
C4) 




30.40 






111.67 



262 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BUULETIN 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


August 1939 


8 months end- 
ing August 
31, 1939 


Mozambique- Continued. 


V 


(2) 
(3) 




$1, 000. 00 




46, 800. 00 








Total 






47, 942. 07 










Netherlands . _ 


I 
III 

IV 
V 

VII 


(2) 
(1) 
(2) 

ai 

(2) 
(3) 
(2) 


$17. 50 


17.50 




1,071,540.00 






20, 341. 80 






45.00 




10. 150 00 

2. 400. 00 

194,862.00 


2, 724, 034. 00 

372, 594. 92 

1, 071, 462. 00 

40, 051. 48 








Total — 




207.419.60 


6. 300, 076. 70 








Netherlands Indica 


I 
in 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 




66.25 






45, 646. 00 






356. 48 






4. 000. 00 






805. 362 00 






21, 026. 80 






39, 662 30 






193. 82 




129,478.00 
8, 680. 00 


142, 478. 00 
129, 636. 30 
318,210.00 






10 00 








Total- 




138. 158. 00 


1. .508, 645. 95 








New Caledonia. 


I 

V 


(1) 
(4) 
(3) 




647 15 




346. 61 


846. 16 
14, 000 00 








Total 




346. 51 


15 393 31 








Newfoundland 


I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 


119. 00 
^.00 
16.50 


593 04 




678. 47 

166. 63 

3,000 00 






14, 600. 00 








Total- 




183. 50 


18 838 04 








New Guinea, Territory of 


I 

IV 

V 


(2) 
(2) 
(3) 




17.00 




47.00 
19.00 


67.66 

64.00 

28 100 00 






101, 600 00 








Total 




66.00 


129.738.56 








I 


(4) 












New Zealand 


I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




363 66 




164.80 


401.88 
82 68 




191.00 


14. 731. 00 
19, 300. 00 
6, 000. 00 
9, 501. 69 








6, 257. 52 


Total 




6, 603. 32 


50, 370. 81 








I 

in 

IV 

V 
VII 


(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 




1, 600. 00 
1 346 00 










20, 906. 00 

407 OQ 










2,069.70 
62 50 


















Total 






27, 272. 20 










I 


(4) 


33.00 


41.00 






IV 
VII 


2) 
(1) 




48.00 
3 67 


















Total 






57 33 












I 

IV 


(1) 

(2) 




375. 40 
257.14 




36.27 






2.03 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


August 1939 


8 months end- 
ing August 
31, 1939 


Norway — Continued. 


V 
VII 


(2) 
(3) 
(2) 




$2, 640. 87 




3, 860. 00 






2, 525. 00 








Total 




$36.27 


9, 680 44 










V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




3, 062. 00 






60 00 




400.00 


850.00 


Total 




400.00 


3, 962. 00 


PanftTTlf^ 


IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




66. 38 






465. 00 




1, 441. 13 


5, 541. 13 
800.00 




725.00 


1, 754. 39 
1, 809. 20 






800.00 








Total 




2. 166. 13 


11, 220. 10 










IV 


(1) 




8 00 








Peru 


I 
II 

ni 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 

(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




45.00 






26, 500. 00 






955. 36 






16, 000. 00 






256, 260. 00 






10. 038. 00 






160.00 






351.00 




27,600.00 
900.00 


37.100.00 
36, 554. 39 
29, 927. 52 






150. 00 






28, 130. 00 








Total 




28, 400. 00 


442. 161. 27 








Pitcairn Island 


I 


(4) 




7.47 










I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
0) 
(2) 




118.70 






44.48 






1,056.65 






111.39 






420, 000. 00 




175.00 


175.00 


Total 




175.00 


421, 506. 12 








Portugal - .- 


I 

IV 
V 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




10.00 






317.00 






68.42 






8, 097. 00 






9,17.5.00 






475.00 








Total 






18, 142. 42 












I 

V 


(5) 
(2) 
(3) 




1, 266, 000. 00 






3, 960. 00 






26, 100. 00 








Total 






1, 295, 050 00 












I 
rv 

V 


(1) 
f4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 


282.05 
45.26 
30.00 
11.00 


782. 42 




303.95 

201.75 

11.00 

1, 900. 00 








Total 




368.30 


3, 199. 12 








Straits Settlements 


I 
rv 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 




39.00 






116.37 




18.70 


229. ,50 
34.76 








Total 




18.70 


419.63 










I 

V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 


71.25 
690.37 


71.25 




1, 127. 74 
6, 620. 00 






142, 905. 84 




11,000.00 


16, 385. 00 


Total - 




11,661.62 


166,009.83 



SEPTEMBER 16, 1939 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


August 1939 


8 months end- 
ing AuEust 
31, 1939 




I 

IV 

V 


(1) 
(1) 
(1) 

(2) 
(3) 




$62 90 






616.75 






122, 952. 00 






22, 570. 84 






20, 200. 00 








Total -- 






166, 402. 49 










Syria 


IV 


(2) 




19.00 










I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 




23.68 






12. 18 




$1,807.89 


19,739.83 
41.83 






32, 347. 61 






271,960.00 








Total 




1. 807. 89 


324, 125. 03 








Trinidad 


I 

IV 
V 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 




1.08 






82.50 






37.00 






1, 056. 60 






8, 600. 00 








Total 






9, 676. 08 












I 

IV 

V 
VI 


(5) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 




11, 700. 00 




16, 502 00 
1,200.00 


16, 672. 34 

1, 206. 26 

434,777.17 




116,025.00 


116,025.00 
8, 100. 00 








Total 




132,727.00 


687, 479. 76 










IV 


(1) 
(2) 




18.70 






.80 








Total 






19.50 










Union of South Africa 


I 

IV 

V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 


211.61 
154. 61 
132.68 


1, 166. 68 




1. 805. 33 

3, 029. 46 

354. 24 




6, 450. 00 
1, 195. 00 


65,113.00 
11,830.07 
3, 766. 00 








Total 




7,143.90 


87. 063. 78 










V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




702. 900. 00 


publics. 




61, 924. 23 




146, 408. 00 








Total 






911,232.23 












I 


(4) 


13.00 


13.00 








I 

IV 
V 

vri 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




40.00 






165. 00 






98.00 




266. 75 


20. 450. 42 
1, 276. 05 




66,566.66 
3, 100. 50 


82.370.00 

16, 257. 76 

123. 686. 60 




668.29 


5,885.61 
6,300.00 












64,534.54 


256, 429. 34 








Yugoslavia - . 


V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 


63,000.00 
48.00 


63, 000. 00 




38, 727. 00 
2, 000. 00 








Total _ - 




63.048.00 


103, 727. 00 








Grand total _ . . 




3, 687, 216. 22 


116, 221, 346. 10 









263 

3,212 such licenses issued during the current 
year. 

Arms Exported 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of 
the arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
exported during the year 1939 up to and in- 
cluding the month of August under export 
licenses issued by the Secretary of State: 



During the month of August, 409 arms ex- 
jDort licenses were issued, making a total of 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


August 1939 


8 months end- 
ing August 
1939 




IV 

I 
V 


(1) 

(4) 

(1) 

(2) 




$360. 79 






69.00 




$1,471.00 


6, 927. 00 
645.00 








Total 




1,471.00 


6, 631. 00 










I 

III 
IV 

V 

VI 
VII 


(4) 
(6) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




638. 00 






340. 00 




87,220.00 
61.00 


667,168.00 
1, 096. 60 
7, 026. 00 




1,359.00 


155. 276. 00 
49. 591. 20 






8, 752. 00 






6, 310. 00 




1,031.00 


23,277.00 






89,661.00 


909, 474. 70 










I 
rv 

V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 


630. 25 
166. 22 
528.63 


3,632.79 




4, 292. 26 
998. 19 
494. 67 




9,680.00 
37.00 


17, 296. 00 

167, 076. 00 

3, 450. 00 








Total... 




11,042.10 


187, 239. 91 










V 


(2) 




40.00 








I 

IV 
V 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 




2.00 






111.38 






87.00 






1,610.00 






30.00 








Total 






1, 840. 38 


Belgian Congo 


V 


(1) 
(2) 




1, 249. 00 






30.00 








Total 






1,279.00 












I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




656. 21 




1, 200. 00 
464.80 


8, 761. 00 

872. 30 

93.62 




10.88 


35.11 
114,800.00 






5, 518. 00 






86, 400. 00 








Total 




1, 676. 68 


217.136.24 








Bermuda 


IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 


14.88 


69.13 




17.45 






9, 600. 00 








Total 




14.88 


9,686.58 



264 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BUX1,ETIN 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


August 1939 


8 months end- 
ing August 
31, 1939 




I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 

(2) 
(4) 

(1) 

(2) 

(1) 

(2) 
(3) 
(1) 




$574.00 






7, 000. 00 






860.00 






487.39 






650.80 






9, 100. 00 






3, 772. 20 






47, 200. 00 






922. 16 








Total -- 






70, 466. 55 


Brazil 


I 
in 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 

(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 


$157. 00 
38.00 
263.00 


202.00 




86, 000. 00 

1, 491. 00 

668, 240. 00 






5, 364. 09 




4, 670. 00 
6, 806. 00 


17, 681. 00 
617, 522. 00 
78, 085. 33 




2, 855 00 


110, 896. 00 


Total 




14, 789. 00 


1, 486, 519. 42 








British Guiana 


I 

IV 

V 

VII 


(4) 
(1) 
(3) 
(2) 


20.00 


20.00 
108. 38 






2, 500. 00 




2. 620. 00 


4, 200. 00 


Total - -- 




2, 540. 00 


6,828.38 








British Honduras 


IV 
VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




129. 20 






75.00 




130.00 


302. 60 


Total 




130.00 


606.80 








British North Borneo 


I 

V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




26.43 






28.00 






750.00 








Total - 






804.43 












I 


(2) 
(4) 


175.00 
10.00 


176.00 




10.00 


Total 




185.00 


186.00 








Bulgaria _ 


IV 


(2) 




23.00 






2.30 








Total.-.- 






25.30 










Burma 


I 

IV 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 


207.40 
68.00 
193.60 


667 10 




203. 00 

1,520.36 

128.46 








Total 




469. 00 


2. 418. 91 










I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(2) 
4) 
^5) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 


6, 608. 32 


19,109.86 
418. 00 






3,839.90 

600. 00 

295. 49 

241.44 

61, 082. 13 

1, 252. 05 

23, 364. 00 

13, 923. 04 

14, 483. 00 


16, 787. 83 

600.00 

6, 717. 65 

986. 21 

379, 778. 14 

37, 370. 08 

68,281.79 

49, 449. 27 

139, 396. 22 


Total 




124,689.37 


718,894.95 








IV 


(1) 












Chile 


I 

IV 

V 

VII 


(1) 

(4) 
(1) 
(2) 

(2) 
(2) 











116 00 




18.70 


13, 159. 46 
730 00 






1,600.00 
36 00 










11,85.5.00 


Total 




18.70 


27,566.46 






China 


I 


(2) 
(3) 
(4) 




136,408.00 
1,490.00 
8,736.00 













Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


August 1939 


8 months end- 
ing August 
1939 




III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 




$26, 042. 00 






1, 760. 00 






125. 00 






775, 200. 00 




$152.00 


115,647.00 
68, 900. 00 






49.88 








Total — 




162.00 


1,133,366.88 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




281. 70 






188.33 




280.60 


4, i58. 65 
3,890.10 






230,636.00 




7, 251. 60 


38, 142. 50 
120, 160. 00 






625. 00 






840.00 








Total . 




7,532.00 


399, 122. 28 








Costa Rica ... _ _. 


I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (!) 
(2) 




13.00 






2, 610. 65 






484. 00 






34,000.00 




1,236.00 


4, 469. 00 
23,458.00 






728. 00 






.165.93 








Total 




1,236.00 


66, 228. 68 








Cuba 


I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

Vn (1) 
(2) 




67.00 




40.00 


60,608.00 
6, 729. 35 




64.00 


8,226.00 
1. 759. 14 






11.00 








Total 




94,00 


67, 3S9. 49 










I (4) 

IV (2) 

V (2) 
(3) 




25.10 




34.66 


49.14 
60.00 






8, 850. 00 








Total 




34.66 


8, 984. 24 










V (1) 
(3) 




115,600.00 






12,800.00 








Total - - 






128, 300. 00 












I (2) 

(4) 

V fl) 

h) 

(3) 




2, 760. 00 






340.00 






11,211.48 




280.00 


3, 266. 00 
6, .100. 00 








Total 




280.00 


23, 067. 48 










I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 




36.00 






100.76 




48.00 
363.00 


19, 548. 00 

3. 862. 00 

260.00 






250.00 






11,100.00 






1,714.40 








Total 




411.00 


36, 870. 15 










I (4) 
(6) 

IV (1) 
(2) 




60.00 






128.00 






34.00 






246.00 








Total 






467.00 












I (1) 

(6) 

IV (n 

(2) 

V (1) 




30.00 






518.00 




75.50 
4.16 


177.61 

6.40 

1.000.00 








Total 




79.65 


2,331.91 



I 



SEPTEMBER 16, 1939 



265 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


August 1939 


S months end- 
ing August 
1939 


El Sftlvador 


I 
IV 

V 

VII 


(4) 

(1) 

(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 




$139.00 






4, 324. 63 






161.00 




$200.00 


1, 504. 00 
850.00 






2. 760. 00 








Total - - 




200.00 


9, 738. 63 










V 
VII 


(2) 
(1) 




44, 180. 00 






2.07 














44,182.07 










Federated Malay States 


I 
rv 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 




14.00 




69.08 




5.10 


66.10 


Total - 




5.10 


139. 18 








Finland 


I 

IV 
V 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 


264. 00 
638. 70 


8,517.05 




6.916.12 
60.00 






95.67 






14, 550. 00 






22,150.00 






111,900.00 








Total - - 




902. 70 


164, 188. 84 








France 


I 

ni 

rv 

V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 


68.90 

253. 00 

1,638,171.00 


161.94 




339. 00 

12,238,931.00 

660. 00 




55.00 

96, 102. 00 

229, 944. 00 

1, 478, 607. 00 


118.00 

379, 062. 00 

636, 625. 14 

2, 405, 531. 00 


Total - 




3,443,200.90 


15,661.318.08 










I 


(1) 
(4) 


32.60 
6.92 


32.60 




5.92 


Total - - 




38.42 


38.42 








French Equatorial Africa 


I 


(1) 
(4) 




34.00 




32.00 








Total.— - — - 






66.00 




I 

IV 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 




67.50 




15.30 

2, 040. 00 

396.23 


78.31 
4,131.00 
1, 159. 26 


Total 




2, 451. 53 


6, 436. 07 








French West Africa 


V 


(2) 




9.5.00 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 




123.70 






793. 70 




121. 13 


1, 160. 12 
287. 42 




13,300.00 


13, 300. 00 
7,000.00 








Total 




13,421.13 


22, 664. 94 




I 
m 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(1) 

(2) 

!« 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 


38. CO 
1,000.00 


1.53. 85 




1,000.00 
34, 685. 00 




222.01 

295, 050. 00 

248. 38 

48. 95 

20, 061. 00 

9, 945. 00 

107, 250. 00 

20, 469. 00 


62,617.32 

19, 192, 356. 00 

966. 28 

451. 65 

492, 464. 00 

447, 768. 08 

649. 223. 60 

277,843.00 


Total 




454, 332. 34 


21, 159, 427. 58 




V 


(2) 
(3) 




3,500.00 






2, 200. 00 








Total 






6,700.00 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


August 1939 


8 months end- 
ing August 
1939 




I 
IV 

V 

VII 


(4) 

(1) 

(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




$1, 850. 00 






28 00 






28.00 






150.00 






7, 566. 00 






93.00 






4, 588 00 














14. ,302. 00 










Haiti 


I 

IV 
VII 


(4) 

b 

(2) 


$34,790.00 


36, 652. 60 




2, 380. 75 




398.00 


728. 11 
30.76 






334.64 








Total 




36,188.00 


40, 126. 66 










I 

IV 

V 
VII 


(4) 

» 
(2) 

(2) 

(2) 


182. 00 


676. 38 




441.00 




1, 030. 00 


2, 636. 60 
51.00 






650.00 








Total 




1, 212. 00 


4, 253. 98 










I 

IV 

V 
VII 


^1> 
(4) 

h) 

(2) 
(2) 




818. 40 






654. 68 






22, 608. 78 






3, 215. 92 






40.00 






1, 037. 86 








Total - 






28, 375. 64 










Iceland 


I 

V 


(4) 
(3) 


43.40 


43.40 




5.00 






3, 670. 00 








Total-..- 




43.40 


3, 718. 40 








India 


I 

IV 
V 

VI 


(1) 
(4) 

(2) 

(2) 
(3) 
(2) 




1, 636. 60 




1,063.68 

471. 08 

5.00 


4. 877. 10 

2, 646. 26 

50.30 

13, 180. 00 






1.905.00 






2, 500. 00 






334. 00 








Total 




1, 629. 16 


27,027.26 










rv 

V 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 


178. 97 
36.05 


975.08 




162. 86 
40, 000. 00 






100. 00 








Total 




215.02 


41,237.93 








Ireland 


I 
v 


(3) 
C4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




26, 600. 00 






4, 958. 00 






210, 000. 00 






4,300.00 






29, 298. 00 








Total. 






275,056.00 


Italy 


V 


(2) 
(3) 




26,740.00 






13,900.00 








Total 






40,640.00 




I 

IV 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 




62.44 




609. 13 
15.60 


2,656.97 
453.67 


Total... 




624. 63 


3,173.08 




IV 
V 


(1) 
(1) 
(2) 




6.380.00 






32,000.00 






235,110.00 








Total 






273,490.00 


Kenya . 


I 




93.25 
18.00 


964.45 




396.35 



266 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


August 1939 


3 months end- 
ing August 
1939 


Kenya — Continued. 


IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 




$173. 20 




124. 36 






2. 300. 00 








Total - 




$111.25 


3, 947. 36 




VII (2) 




864. 00 










I (1) 
(4) 




30.80 






11.03 








Total --- 






41.83 












I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

IV (2) 




667. 75 






3, 576. 00 




97.00 
1,276.00 


613. 00 
1, 276. 00 


Total — 




1,373.00 


6,032.75 










I (1) 
(4) 




216.00 






123. 66 








Total - 






339. 66 












I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

III 0) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




765. 94 






n.'i.OO 






76,000.00 






9, 330. 00 






936, 600. 00 






18.183.89 






16, 660. 00 




7,250.00 


308,800.00 
324.731.00 






870, 746. 00 




5, 619. 60 


12, 559. .50 
23,166.08 








Total 




12, 869. 50 


2 596 717.41 








Morocco - 


I (4) 




9 00 








Mozambique _ 


I (1) 
(4) 

V (2) 
(3) 




30 40 






111.67 






1,000.00 




20, 610. 00 


20,610.00 


Total 




20, 610. 00 


21 752 07 








Netlierlands- _ - 


I (2) 
HI (2) 

IV (1) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 


17.60 


17 50 




449 00 






45 00 




131, 229. 00 

14, 640. 00 

21,800.00 

4,980.00 


604. 029. 00 

213.301.67 

620, .560. 00 

61. 399. 00 


Total 




172,666.50 


1, 489, 801. 17 






Netherlands Indies 


I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(5) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (I) 










45,645.00 

333. 48 

495 650 00 




68.11 






4 971 143 00 












39, 662. 30 
314 82 
77, 739. 00 
69, 640. 10 
176, 33.'-.. 00 




20. S2 
64,739.00 
30, 002. 00 
141,335.00 








Total -- 




236,164.93 


6,897,464.75 






New Caledonia 


I (I) 

(4) 

V (3) 




440. 20 

847. 76 




346.61 








Total 




346. 61 


15. 287. 95 






Newfoundland 


I (1) 
(4) 

IV (2) 

V (2) 
(3) 


119.00 
327.00 
32.60 


gjo fi7 




448. 47 

188. 53 

2,740.00 

14,600.00 










Total 




478.60 


18,459.87 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


August 1939 


i months end- 
ing August 
1939 


New Guinea, Territory of- 


I (1) 
(4) 

IV (2) 

V (2) 
(3) 




$17.00 




44.66 






63.00 




$7,886.00 


16,699.00 
42, 600. 00 








Total 




7, 886. 00 


68,323.66 










I (4) 




116. 10 










I (1) 
(4) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




466. 61 




164.80 


592.43 
106. 68 






4, 500. 00 






12, 762. 00 






19, 300. 00 






5,678.00 




1, 702. 00 


5,964.00 


Total 




1, 856. 80 


49, 259. 62 










I (2) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (2) 




1,600.00 






1, 346. 00 






20, 906. 00 






427. 00 






2,059.70 






30.00 






879. 50 








Total 






27, 247. 20 












I (4) 


8.00 


8.00 








IV (1) 

(2) 

VII (1) 




48.00 






3.57 






6.76 














67.33 












I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 




480. 40 




62.01 


230.75 
30.00 






2.03 




850.00 


4, 326. 87 
3, 832. 00 






2, 471. 00 








Total -- 




912. 01 


11, 373. 06 








Palestine -- - 


V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 




3, 052. 00 






72.00 






404.00 








Total - - 






3. 628. 00 












IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




56.38 






466. 00 






4, 100. 00 






800.00 






1, 486. 00 






2, 188. 00 






728. 00 














9, 823. 38 












IV (1) 




8.00 








Peru - 


I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

III 1) 
(2) 

rv (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




46.00 






37, 000. 00 






955. 36 




64,066.00 


1, 083, 240. 00 
10, 678. 40 






208.60 






361.00 






9,086.00 




60.00 
14,325.00 


89,404.60 

62,397.00 

160.00 






28,810.00 








Total 




78. 450. 00 


1, 322 324. 86 


Pitcairn Island 


I (4) 




7.47 


Poland 


I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 




118.70 






167. 48 






1, 056. 65 






111.39 



SEPTEMBER 16, 1939 



267 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


August 1939 


8 months end- 
ing August 
1939 




V 


(1) 

(2) 




$257, 705. 00 




$39.00 


39.00 


Total 




39.00 


259, 198. 12 










I 

IV 

V 


(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 


10.00 


10.00 




317. 00 




1,250.00 


9, 136. 00 
6, 280. 00 




475.00 


28, 475. 00 


Total - - - 




1, 735. 00 


44, 217. 00 








Kumania - 


I 

V 


(5) 
(2) 
(3) 




835, 000. 00 






3, 970. 00 






26, 190. 00 








Total- 






865, 160. 00 












I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
0) 


109. 65 
29.25 


609.92 




277. 95 
40.00 






1, 900. 00 








Total - 




138. 80 


2, 827. 87 








Straits Settlements -_. 


I 

IV 






39.00 




43.74 


116. 37 
210. 80 






34.76 








Total - 




43.74 


400.93 








Sweden _ - - 


I 

V 


(0 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 


38.75 
14.00 

""'l7,'869.'66' 
1,986.00 


38.75 




680. 77 
2, 000. 00 
85, 924. 44 
5, 385. 00 


Total- 




19, 846. 75 


93, 928. 96 








Switzerland 


I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




62.90 






634. 75 






245, 697. 00 




9,000.00 


13, 544. 00 
20, 200. 00 








Total 




9,000.00 


280, 138. 66 








Syria - — - - 


IV 


(2) 




19.00 


Thailand- 


I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 




23.58 




12.18 

1, 501. 89 

10.83 

11,604.00 


12.18 

19,496.73 

41.83 

65. 167. 61 

271, 960. 00 








Total-..- 




13,128.90 


356, 701. 93 








Trinidad - 


I 

IV 
V 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 




1.08 






79.60 




37.00 


37.00 
1,051.60 






10,000.00 








Total 




37.00 


11, 169. 08 


Turkey- .- 


IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 




170. 34 






5.2.5 




101,539.00 
25.00 


170, 190. 00 
25.00 


Total 




101, 664. 00 


170, 390. 59 








Turks and Caicos Islands- 


rv 


(1) 
(2) 




18.70 






.80 








Total 






19.50 


Union of South Africa.. 


I 
rv 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 


52.10 

94.22 

264.13 

18.00 


1, 083. 17 




1.716.28 

2,286.36 

344. 24 





Category 


Value 


Country of destination 


August 1939 


8 months end- 
ing August 
1939 


Union of South Africa— Contd. 


V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 


$20,813.00 
334.00 


$63,178 00 
10, 553. 57 
3,766.00 






Total 




21, 575. 45 


82,926.62 








V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 




845,966.00 
65, 705. 78 
146,408.00 


publics. 












Total 






1,058,079.78 








Uruguay . _ 


I (4) 
V (2) 


13.00 


13.00 










Total - 




13.00 


173.00 






Venezuela 


I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




40.00 










67 00 




1,306.80 
69.94 


20, 177. 67 

1,286.75 

16 222 00 




2, 5.50. 00 
2,5, 000. 00 
2, 002. 04 


18,967.00 

129, 136. 50 

6, 744. 97 

6 060 OO 








Total- 




30, 928. 78 


197 7^'' 70 








Windward Islands 


IV (1) 














V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 




182,036.00 

24, 327. 00 

1, 906. 00 




12,564.00 








Total.- - 




12,564.00 


208,269.00 






Grand total- 




4, 954, 216. 78 


68,499,588.65 







Arms Import Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of origin of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
licensed for import by the Secretary of State 
during the month of August 1939: 



Country of origin 


Category 


Value 


Total 




V (I) 
(3) 

V (2) 
I (4) 
VII (1) 
I (4) 
I (4) 
I (4) 


$4,600.00 

1, 350. 00 

100.00 

3 710. 00 

■ 749. 76 

212. 50 

219. 50 

160.50 


1 $5, 850. 00 
100 00 


El Salvador 


France 


} 4, 459. 76 
212 50 


Germany . .. 


Great Britain- 


219. 50 


Netherlands.-- - 


160. 50 






Total.-.- - 






11 002. 26 











During the month of August, 10 arais import 
licenses were issued, making a total of 126 such 
licenses issued during the current year. 



268 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Catexjories of Arms, Ammunition, and 
Implements of War 

The categories of arms, ammunition, and 
implements of war in the appropriate cohimn 
of the tables printed above are the categories 
into which those articles were divided in the 
President's proclamation of May 1, 1937, enu- 
merating the articles which would be consid- 
ered as arms, ammunition, and imialements of 
war for the purposes of section 5 of the joint 
resolution of May 1, 1937 [see pages 74^76 of 
the BulUtin of July 22, 1939 (Vol. I, No. 4)]. 

Special Statistics in Regard to Arms Exports 
TO Cuba 

In compliance with Article II of the con- 
vention between the United States and Cuba 
to suppress smuggling, signed at Habana, 
March 11, 1926, which reads in part as follows: 

"The High Contracting Parties agree that 
clearance of shipments of merchandise by 
water, air, or land, from any of the ports of 
either country to a port of entry of the other 
country, shall be denied when such shipment 
comprises articles the importation of which is 
prohibited or restricted in the country to which 
such shipment is destined, unless in this last 
case there has been a compliance with the 
requisites demanded by the laws of both coun- 
tries." 

and in compliance with the laws of Cuba which 
restrict the importation of arms, ammunition, 
and implements of war of all kinds by requir- 
ing an import permit for each shipment, export 
licenses for shipments of arms, ammunition, 
and implements of war to Cuba are required 
for the ai-ticles enumerated below in addition 
to the articles enumerated in the President's 
proclamation of May 1, 1937 : 

(1) Arms and small arms using ammunition 
of caliber .22 or less, other than those classed 
as toys. 

(2) Spare parts of arms and small arms of 
all kinds and calibers, other than those classed 
as toys, and of guns and nuicliine guns. 

(3) Ammunition for the arms and small 
arms under (1) above. 



(4) Sabers, swords, and military machetes 
with cross-guard hilts. 

(5) Explosives as follows : explosive powders 
of all kinds for all puqioses ; nitrocellulose hav- 
ing a nitrogen content of 12 percent or less; 
diphenylamine ; dynamite of all kinds; nitro- 
glycerine; alkaline nitrates (ammonium, potas- 
sium, and sodium nitrate); nitric acid; nitro- 
benzene (essence or oil of mirbane) ; sulphur; 
sulphuric acid; chlorate of potash; and ace- 
tones. 

(6) Tear gas (CeHjCOCHoCl) and other 
similar nontoxic gases and apparatus designed 
for the storage or projection of such gases. 

The table printed below indicates, in respect 
to licenses authorizing the exportation to Cuba 
of the articles and commodities listed in the 
preceding paragraph issued by the Secretary 
of State during August 1939, the number of 
licenses and the value of the articles and com- 
modities described in the licenses: 



Number of licenses 


Sections 


Value 


Total 


30 - 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(5) 


$1,075.00 

59.00 

7, 619. 00 

10,015.03 


] 




■ $18. 768. 03 



The table printed below indicates the value 
of the articles and commodities listed above 
exported to Cuba during August 1939 under 
licenses issued by the Secretary of State: 



Section 



(1) 
(3) 
(5) 



Value 



$948. 50 
2, 742. 00 
1, 356. 94 



Total 



$.5, 047. 44 



Tin-Plate Scrap 

The table printed below indicates the num- 
ber of licenses issued during the year 1939, up 
to and including the month of August, au- 
thorizing the export of tin-plate scrap under 
the provisions of the act approved February 
15, 1936, together with the number of tons 
authorized to be exported and the value 
thereof ; 



I 



SEPTEMBER 16, 1939 



269 



Country of destina- 
tion 


August 1939 


8 months ending 
August 31, 1939 


Quantity 

in long 

tons 


Total value 


Quantity 

in long 

tons 


Total value 




1,635 


$31,501.25 


8,853 


$166,676.77 







During the month of August, 29 tin-plate 
scrap licenses were issued, making a total of 
142 such licenses issued during the current year. 

Helium 

The table printed below gives the essential 
information in regard to the licenses issued 
during the month of August 1939 authorizing 



the exportation of helium gas under the pro- 
visions of the act approved on September 1, 
1937, and the regulations issued pursuant 
thereto: 



Applicant for 
license 


Purchaser in 
foreign country 


Country of 
destina- 
tion 


Quantity 

in cubic 

feet 


Total 
value 


The Ohio Chemical 
& Mfg. Co. 

The Ohio Chemical 

& Mfg. Co. 
Puritan Compressed 

Qas Corp. 
The Ohio Chemical 

& Mfg. Co. 


Chief Dispenser, 
St. Thomas Hos- 
pital. 

0.vygen Co. of 
Canada, Ltd. 

Audrain & Me- 
dina. 

The Clarendon 
Laboratory, 
University Mu- 
seum. 


Great 
Britain. 

Canada... 

Cuba 

Great 
Britain. 


1,428 

784 

143.3 

200 


$168. 00 

32.60 
40.00 
30.00 


Total 




270.60 













International Conferences, Commissions, etc. 



FIRST PAN AMERICAN HOUSING CONFERENCE 



[Released to the press September 11] 

This Government has accepted the invitation 
of the Argentine Govermnent to participate in 
the First Pan American Housing Conference, 
which will be held at Buenos Aires from Octo- 
ber 2 to 7, 1939. The Conference is being con- 
vened pursuant to resolutions of the Seventh 
and Eighth International Conferences of 
American States and will undertake a practical 
study of the hygienic, economic, and social 
aspects of the low-cost housing program. 

The President has approved the designation 
of the following delegates to the forthcoming 
meeting : 

The Honorable Claude G. Bowers, American 
Ambassador, Santiago, Chile, chairman 
Mr. C. B. Baldwin, Assistant Administrator, 
Farm Security Administration, Department of 
Agriculture, Washington, D. C, 



Mr. Raymond T. Cahill, Assistant Administra- 
tor, Federal Housing Administration, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Mr. Silver L. Tesone, Chief Architect, Tech- 
nical Division, United States Housing Author- 
ity, Washington, D. C. 

The Argentine Government has arranged for 
a housing exhibit to be held in conjunction 
with this Conference. The interested depart- 
ments and agencies of the Government, includ- 
ing the Federal Housing Administration, 
United States Housing Authority, and the 
Farm Security Administration, have prepared 
in collaboration with the Central Housing Com- 
mittee a comprehensive exhibit, containing 
photographs, charts, panels, and Goveriunent 
publications, which has already been forwarded 
to Buenos Aires, 



Treaty Information 



Compiled by the Treaty Division 



RESTRICTION OF WAR 

Convention for the Amelioration of the Con- 
dition of the Sick and Wounded of Armies 
in the Field (Treaty Series No. 847) 

GerTnany 

In accordance with article 10, paragraph 2, 
of the Convention for the Amelioration of the 
Condition of the Sick and Wounded of Armies 
in the Field, signed July 27, 1929, the German 
Charge in Washington informed the Secretary 
of State by a note dated September 5, 1939, 
that the Government of the German Reich has 
empowered the German Red Cross to cooperate 
in the official medical services of the German 
armed forces. 

MUTUAL GUARANTEES 

Anglo-Polish Agreement of Mutual 
Assistance 

The text of the Anglo-Polish Agreement of 
Mutual Assistance, which was signed on August 
25, 1939, and which became effective on signa- 
ture, is printed below as published in the 
London Daily Telegraph: 

Anglo-Polish Agreement of Mutual 
Assistance 

The Government of the United Kingdom of 
Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the 
Polish Government, desiring to place on a per- 
manent basis the collaboration between their 
respective countries resulting from the assur- 
ances of mutual assistance of a defensive char- 
acter which they have already exchanged, have 
resolved to conclude an agreement for that pur- 
pose and have appointed as their plenipoten- 
tiaries : 

270 



The Government of the United Kingdom of 
Great Britain and Northern Ireland : The Rt. 
Hon. Viscount Halifax, K. G., G. C. S. I., 
G. C. I. E., Principal Secretary of State for 
Foreign Affairs; the Polish Government: His 
Excellency Count Edward Raczynski, Ambas- 
sador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of 
the Polish Republic in London; 

Wlio, having exchanged their Full Powers, 
found in good and due form, have agreed on 
the following provisions: 

Article 1 

Should one of the Contracting Parties be- 
come engaged in hostilities with a European 
Power in consequence of aggression by the lat- 
ter against that Contracting Party, the other 
Contracting Party will at once give the Con- 
tracting Party engaged in hostilities all the 
support and assistance in its power. 

Article S 

(1) The provisions of Article 1 will also ap- 
ply in the event of any action by a European 
Power which clearly threatened, directly or in- 
directly, the independence of one of the Con- 
tracting Parties, and was of such a nature that 
the Party in question considered it vital to 
resist it with its armed forces. 

(2) Should one of the Contracting Parties 
become engaged in hostilities with a European 
Power in consequence of action by that Power 
which threatened the independence or neu- 
trality of another European State in such a 
way as to constitute a clear menace to the 
security of that Contracting Party, the provi- 
sions of Article 1 will apply, without prejudice, 
however, to the rights of the other European 
State concerned. 



SEPTEMBER 16, 1939 

Article 3 

Should a European Power attempt to under- 
mine the independence of one of the Contract- 
ing Parties by processes of economic penetra- 
tion or in any other way, the Contracting 
Parties will support each other in resistance to 
such attempts. Should the Eiu-opean Power 
concerned thereupon embark on hostilities 
against one of the Contracting Parties, the 
provisions of Article 1 will apply. 

Article ^ 

The methods of applying the undertakings 
of mutual assistance provided for by the pres- 
ent Agreement are established between the 
competent naval, military and air authorities 
of the Contracting Parties. 

Article 5 

Without prejudice to the foregoing imder- 
takings of the Contracting Parties to give each 
other mutual support and assistance imme- 
diately on the outbreak of hostilities, they will 
exchange complete and speedy information 
concerning any development which might 
threaten their independence, and, in particular, 
concerning any development which threatened 
to call the said imdertakings into operation. 

Article 6 

(1) The Contracting Parties will commmii- 
cate to each other the terms of any undertak- 
ings of assistance against aggression which 
they have already given or may in future give 
to other States. 

(2) Should either of the Contracting Parties 
intend to give such an undertaking after the 
coming into force of the present Agreement, 
the other Contractmg Party shall, in order to 
ensure the proper functioning of the Agree- 
ment, be informed thereof. 

(3) Any new undertaking which the Con- 
tracting Parties may enter into in future shall 
neither limit their obligations imder the pres- 



271 

ent Agreement nor indirectly create new obli- 
gations between the Contracting Party not 
participating in these undertakings and the 
third State concerned. 

Article 7 

Should the Contracting Parties be engaged 
in hostilities in consequence of the application 
of the jjresent Agreement, they will not con- 
clude an armistice or treaty of peace except 
by mutual agreement. 

Article 8 

(1) The present Agreement shall remain in 
force for a period of five years. 

(2) Unless denounced six months before the 
expiry of this period it shall continue in force, 
each Contracting Party having thereafter the 
right to denounce it at any time by giving six 
months' notice to that effect. 

(3) The present Agreement shall come into 
force on signature. 

In faith whereof the above-named Pleni- 
potentiaries have signed the present Agreement 
and have affixed thereto their seals. 

Done in English in duplicate, at London, the 
25th of August, 1939. A Polish text shall sub- 
sequently be agreed upon between the Contract- 
ing Parties, and both texts will then be 
authentic. 

AVIATION 

Agreement With Argentina for the Detail of 
Military Aviation Instructors 

On September 12, 1939, an agreement be- 
tween the United States and Argentina was 
signed by the Secretary of War on behalf of 
this Government and the Argentine Ambas- 
sador in Washington acting as representative 
and agent of the Argentine Ministry of War, 
regarding the detail of United States Army 
Air Corps officers to assist the Argentine War 
Department. The agreement provides that it 
shall continue in effect for 1 year from the date 
of signature and may be extended for a further 



272 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



period of 1 year by mutual consent. It may 
be canceled by either party subject to 30 days' 
notice. 

POSTAL 

Parcel Post Agreement With Barbados 

An agreement for the exchange of parcels by 
parcel post between the United States and Bar- 
bados was signed at Bridgetown on August 14, 
1939, and at Washington on September 13, 1939. 
Article XXXII of the agreement provides that 
it enter into force on the first day of No- 
vember 1938 and shall remain in operation until 
the expiration of 1 year from tlie date on which 
it may have been denoimced by either of the 
two postal administrations. Detailed regida- 
tions for carrying out tlie agreement were 
signed on the same dates and are annexed to the 
agreement. 

Parcel Post Agreement With Egypt 

An agreement concerning the exchange of 
parcels post between the United States and 
Egypt was signed at Cairo on July 17, 1939, 
and at Washington on September 13, 1939. 

Article XXX provides that the agreement 
shall become effective upon ratification, but, 
pending ratification, it may be put into force 
administratively on a date to be mutually set- 
tled between the postal administrations of the 
two countries. It will remain in effect as long 



as it has not been terminated 6 months in ad- 
vance by one or the other of the two administra- 
tions. Detailed regulations for carrying out the 
agreement were signed on the same dates and 
are annexed to the agreement. 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

Regional Radio Convention of Central Amer- 
ica, Panama, and the Canal Zone 

Canal Zone 

The American Minister to Guatemala re- 
ported by a telegram dated September 8, 1939, 
that he had on that day deposited with the 
Guatemalan Government the instrument of 
ratification by the United States in behalf of 
the Canal Zone of the Regional Radio Conven- 
tion of Central America, Panama, and the 
Canal Zone, signed on December 8, 1938. 

The convention provides that it "shall be- 
come effective, as between ratifying Govern- 
ments, thirty days after instruments of ratifi- 
cation have been deposited by at least two of 
them, with the Ministry of Foreign Relations 
of the Government of Guatemala." It will 
therefore enter into force as between the 
Canal Zone and Guatemala on October 8, 
1939, Guatemala being the only other country 
which has deposited its instrument of ratifi- 
cation. 



U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1939 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C— Price 10 cents - - - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 



PDBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPHOVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OP THE ETIREAU OF THE BUDGET 



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THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 




L^J 



U/ 



ETI 




SEPTEMBER 23, 1939 
Vol. I: No. I J — Publication Ij8o 



Qontents 



Europe: 
Neutrality: 

Message of the President to the Congress 

Statement by the Secretary of State 

White House conference on neutrahty 

Contributions for relief in belligerent countries . . . 
Bombardment from the air of civilian populations . . 

Americans missing from the Athenia 

Sinking of the Norwegian ship Rondo 

Announcement by German Government of articles of 

contraband 

Removal of American Foreign Service officers from 

Warsaw 

The American republics: 

The Significance of the Pan American Movement: 

Address by the Secretary of State 

Exchange of professors and students between the United 

States and other American republics 

Publications ' 

Treaty information: 
Armament reduction: 

London Naval Treaty of 1936 (Treaty Series No. 

919) 

Conciliation: 

Conciliation Treaty With Liberia 

Education: 

Convention for the Promotion of Inter-American 
Cultural Relations (Treaty Series No. 928) . . . 

[Over] 




Page 

275 
280 
281 
281 
282 
283 
284 

285 

285 

286 

289 
291 



291 
291 

292 



M. -m 



Treaty information — Continued. 

Health: Page 

Convention Modifying the International Sanitary 

Convention of Jime 21, 1926 292 

Commerce: 

Reciprocal Trade Agreement With Turkey .... 292 
Customs: 

Convention Concerning Exemption From Taxation 
for Liquid Fuel and Lubricants Used in Air Traf- 
fic 292 

Finance: 

Double Income Taxation With Sweden 293 

Labor: 

Conventions of the International Labor Conference . 293 
Postal: ( 

Parcel Post Agreement With Barbados 293 , 

Parcel Post Agreement With Egypt 294 

Telecommunications: 

International Telecommunication Convention 

(Treaty Series No. 867) 294 

Regional Radio Convention for Central America, 

Panama, and the Canal Zone 295 

Visa fees: 

Agreement With Norway 295 

Agreement With Rumania 295 



i 



Europe 



NEUTRALITY 



Message of the President to the Congress 



[Released to the press by the White House September 21] 

To THE Congress of the United States : 

I have asked the Congress to reassemble in 
extraordinary session in order that it may 
consider and act on the amendment of certain 
legislation, wliich, in my best judgment, so 
alters the historic foreign policy of the United 
States that it impairs the peaceful relations of 
the United States with foreign nations. 

At the outset I proceed on the assumption 
that every member of the Senate and of the 
House of Representatives, and every member 
of the executive branch of the Government, 
including the President and his associates, per- 
sonally and officially, are equally and without 
reservation in favor of such measures as will 
protect the neutrality, the safety, and the in- 
tegrity of our country and at the same time 
keep us out of war. 

Because I am wholly willing to ascribe an 
honorable desire for peace to those who hold 
different views from my own as to what those 
measures should be, I trust that these gentlemen 
will be sufficiently generous to ascribe equally 
lofty purposes to those with whom they disagree. 
Let no man or group in any walk of life as- 
sume exclusive protectorate over the future 
well-being of America — because I conceive 
that regardless of party or section the mantle 
of peace and of patriotism is wide enough to 
cover us all. Let no group assume the exclu- 
sive label of the peace "bloc." We all belong 
to it. 

I have at all times kept the Congress and the 
American people informed of events and trends 

179614—39^—1 



in foreign affairs. I now review them in a 
spirit of understatement. 

Since 1931 the use of force instead of the 
council table has constantly increased in the 
settlement of disputes between nations — except 
in the Western Hemisphere, where there has 
been only one war, now happily terminated. 

During these years also the building up of 
vast armies, navies, and storehouses of war has 
proceeded abroad with growing speed and in- 
tensity. But, during these years, and extend- 
ing back even to the days of the Kellogg-Briand 
Pact, the United States has constantly, consist- 
ently, and conscientiously done all in its power 
to encourage peaceful settlements, to bring 
about reduction of armaments, and to avert 
threatened wars. We have done this not only 
because any war anywhere necessarily hurts 
American security and American prosperity, 
but because of the more important fact that 
any war anywhere retards the progress of 
morality and religion and impairs the security 
of civilization itself. 

For many years the primary purpose of our 
foreign policy has been that this Nation and 
this Government should strive to the utmost 
to aid in avoiding war among other nations. 
But if and when war unhappily comes, the 
Government and the Nation must exert every 
possible effort to avoid being drawn into the 
war. 

The executive branch of the Government did 
its utmost, within oiu- traditional policy of 
noninvolvement, to aid in averting the present 
appalling war. Having thus striven and failed, 

275 



276 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



this Government must lose no time or effort 
to keep the Nation from being drawn into the 
war. 

In my candid judgment we shall succeed in 
these efforts. 

We are proud of the historical record of the 
United States and of all the Americans during 
all these years because we have thrown every 
ounce of our influence for peace into the scale 
of peace. 

I note in passing what you will all remem- 
ber — the long debates on the subject of what 
constitutes aggression, on the methods of de- 
termining who the aggressor might be, and, on 
who the aggi-essor in past wars had been. 
Academically this may have been instructive, 
as it may have been of interest to historians to 
discuss the pros and cons and the rights and 
wrongs of the World War during the decade 
that followed it. 

But in the light of problems of today and 
tomorrow responsibility for acts of aggi'ession 
is not concealed, and the writing of the record 
can safely be left to future historians. 

There has been sufficient realism in the United 
States to see how close to our own shores came 
dangerous paths which were being followed on 
other continents. 

Last January I told the Congress that "a war 
which threatened to envelop the world in flames 
has been averted, but it has become increasingly 
clear that peace is not assured." By April new 
tensions had developed ; a new crisis was in the 
making. Several nations with whom we had 
friendly, diplomatic and commercial relations 
had lost, or were in the process of losing, their 
independent identity and sovereignty. 

During the spring and summer the trend 
was definitely toward further acts of military 
conquest and away from peace. As late as 
the end of July I spoke to members of the Con- 
gress about the definite possibility of war. 
I should have called it the probability of war. 

Last January, also, I spoke to this Congress 
of the need for further warning of new threats 
of conquest, military and economic; of chal- 
lenge to religion, to democracy, and to inter- 
national good faith. I said: "An ordering 



of society which relegates religion, democracy, 
and good faith among nations to the back- 
ground can find no place within it for the 
ideals of the Prince of Peace. The United 
States rejects such an ordering and retains 
its ancient faith. . . . 

"We know what might happen to us of the 
United States if the new philosophies of 
force were to encompass the other continents 
and invade our own. We, no more than other 
nations, can afford to be surrounded by the 
enemies of our faith and our humanity. For- 
tunate it is, therefore, that in this Western 
Hemisphere we have, under a common ideal 
of democratic government, a rich diversity of 
resources and of peoples functioning together 
in mutual respect and peace." 

Last January, in the same message, I also 
said: "We have learned that when we delib- 
erately try to legislate neutrality, our neu- 
trality laws may operate unevenly and un- 
fairly — may actually give aid to an aggressor 
and deny it to the victim. The instinct of 
self-preservation should warn us that we 
ought not to let that happen any more." 

It was because of what I foresaw last Janu- 
ary from watching the trend of foreign 
affairs and their probable effect upon us that 
I recommended to the Congress in July of this 
year that changes be enacted in our neutrality 
law. 

The essentials for American peace in the 
world have not changed since January. That 
is why I ask you again to reexamine our own 
legislation. 

Beginning with the foundation of our con- 
stitutional government in the year 1789, the 
American policy in respect to belligerent na- 
tions, with one notable exception, has been 
based on international law. Be it remem- 
bered that what we call international law has 
liad as its primary objectives the avoidance 
of causes of war and the prevention of the 
extension of war. 

The single exception was the policy adopted 
by this Nation during the Napoleonic Wars, 
when, seeking to avoid involvement, we acted 
for some years under the so-called Embargo 



SEPTEMBER 23, 1939 



277 



and Non-Intercourse Acts. That policy turned 
out to be a disastrous failure — first, because 
it brought our own Nation close to ruin, and, 
second, because it was the major cause of 
bringing us into active participation in Euro- 
pean wars in our own War of 1812. It is 
merely reciting history to recall to you that 
one of the results of the policy of embargo 
and nonintercourse was the burning in 1814 
of part of this Capitol in which we are as- 
sembled. 

Our next deviation by statute from the sound 
principles of neutrality and peace through in- 
ternational law did not come for 130 years. It 
was the so-called Neutrality Act of 1935 — only 
4 years ago — an act continued in force by the 
joint resolution of May 1, 1937, despite grave 
doubts expressed as to its wisdom by many 
Senators and Representatives and by officials 
charged with the conduct of our foreign rela- 
tions, including myself. I regret that the Con- 
gi-ess passed that act. I regret equally that I 
signed that act. 

On July fourteenth of this year I asked the 
Congress in the cause of peace and in the in- 
terest of real American neutrality and security 
to take action to change that act. 

I now ask again that such action be taken in 
respect to that part of the act which is wholly 
inconsistent with ancient precepts of the law 
of nations — ^the embargo provisions. I ask it 
because they are, in my opinion, most vitally 
dangerous to American neutrality, American 
security, and American peace. 

These embargo provisions, as they exist to- 
day, prevent the sale to a belligerent by an 
American factory of any completed implements 
of war, but they allow the sale of many types 
of uncompleted implements of war, as well 
as all kinds of general material and supplies. 
They, furthermore, allow such products of in- 
dustry and agi'iculture to be taken in Ameri- 
can-flag ships to belligerent nations. There in 
itself — under the present law — lies definite 
danger to our neutrality and our peace. 

From a purely material point of view what 
is the advantage to us in sending all manner 
of articles across the ocean for final processing 



there when we could give employment to thou- 
sands by doing it here? Incidentally, and 
again from the material point of view, by svich 
employment we automatically aid our own 
national defense. And if abnormal profits ap- 
pear in our midst even in time of peace, as a 
result of this increase of industry, I feel cer- 
tain that the subject will be adequately dealt 
with at the coming regular session of the 
Congress. 

Let me set forth the present paradox of the 
existing legislation in its simplest terms: If, 
prior to 1935, a general war had broken out in 
Europe, the United States would have sold to 
and bought from belligerent nations such goods 
and products of all kinds as the belligerent na- 
tions, with their existing facilities and geo- 
graphical situations, were able to buy from us 
or sell to us. This would have been the nor- 
mal practice under the age-old doctrines of 
international law. Our prior position accepted 
the facts of geography and of conditions of 
land power and sea power alike as they existed 
in all parts of the world. If a war in Europe 
had broken out prior to 1935, there would have 
been no difference, for example, between our 
exports of sheets of aluminum and airplane 
wings; today there is an artificial legal differ- 
ence. Before 1935 there would have been no 
difference between the export of cotton and 
the export of gun cotton. Today there is. 
Before 1935 there would have been no differ- 
ence between the shipment of brass tubing in 
pipe form and brass tubing in shell form. To- 
day there is. Before 1935 there would have 
been no difference between the export of a mo- 
tor truck and an armored motor truck. Today 
there is. 

liet us be factual and recognize that a bel- 
ligerent nation often needs wheat and lard and 
cotton for the survival of its population just 
as much as it needs anti-aircraft guns and anti- 
submarine depth-charges. Let those who seek 
to retain the present embargo position be 
wholly consistent and seek new legislation to 
cut off cloth and copper and meat and wheat 
and a thousand other articles from all of the 
nations at war. 



278 



DEPABTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



I seek a gi-eater consistency through the re- 
peal of the embargo provisions and a return 
to international law. I seek reenactment of 
the historic and traditional American policy 
which, except for the disastrous interlude of 
the Embargo and Non-Intercourse Acts, has 
served us well for nearly a centui'y and a half. 
It has been erroneously said that return to 
that policy might bring us nearer to war. I 
give to you my deep and unalterable convic- 
tion, based on years of experience as a worker 
in the field of international peace, that by 
the repeal of the embargo the United States 
will more probably remain at peace than if the 
law remains as it stands today. I say this be- 
cause with the repeal of the embai'go this Gov- 
ernment clearly and definitely will insist that 
American citizens and American ships keep 
away from the immediate perils of the actual 
zones of conflict. 

Repeal of the embargo and a return to in- 
ternational law are the crux of this issue. 

The enactment of the embargo provisions 
did more than merely reverse our traditional 
policy. It had the effect of putting land 
powers on the same footing as naval powers, 
so far as sea-borne commerce was concerned. 
A land power wliich threatened war could thus 
feel assured in advance that any prospective 
sea-power antagonist would be weakened 
through denial of its ancient right to buy any- 
thing anywhere. This, 4 years ago, gave a 
definite advantage to one belligerent as against 
another, not through his own strength or geo- 
graphic position, but through an afcmative 
act of ours. Removal of the embargo is mere- 
ly reverting to the sounder international prac- 
tice and pursuing in time of war as in time of 
peace our ordinary trade policies. This will be 
liked by some and disliked by others, depend- 
ing on the view they take of the present war, 
but that is not the issue. The step I recom- 
mend is to put this country back on the solid 
footing of real and traditional neutrality. 

Wlien and if repeal of the embargo is ac- 
complished, certain other phases of policy re- 
inforcing American safety should be consid- 
ered. Wliile nearly all of us are in agreement 



on their objectives, the only question relates to 
method. 

I believe that American merchant vessels 
should, so far as possible, be restricted from 
entering danger zones. War zones may 
change so swiftly and so frequently in the days 
to come, that it is impossible to fix them 
permanently by act of Congress ; specific legis- 
lation may prevent adjustment to constant and 
quick change. It seems, therefore, more prac- 
tical to delimit them through action of the 
State Department and administrative agencies. 
The objective of restricting American ships 
from entering such zones may be attained by 
prohibiting such entry by the Congress ; or the 
result can be substantially achieved by execu- 
tive proclamation that all such voyages are 
solely at the risk of the American owners 
themselves. 

The second objective is to prevent American 
citizens from traveling on belligerent vessels 
or in danger areas. This can also be accom- 
plished either by legislation, through con- 
tinuance in force of certain provisions of exist- 
ing law, or by proclamation making it clear 
to all Americans that anj' such travel is at 
their own risk. 

The third objective, I'equiring the foreign 
buyer to take transfer of title in this country 
to commodities purchased by belligerents, is 
also a result which can be attained by legisla- 
tion or substantially achieved through due 
notice by proclamation. 

The fourth objective is the preventing of 
war credits to belligei'ents. This can be ac- 
complished by maintaining in force existing 
provisions of law, or by proclamation making 
it clear that if credits are granted by American 
citizens to belligerents our Government will 
take no steps in the future to relieve them of 
risk or loss. The result of these last two will 
be to require all purchases to be made in cash 
and cargoes to be carried in the purchasers' 
own ships, at the purchasers' own risk. 

Two other objectives have been amply at- 
tained by existing law, namely, regulating col- 
lection of funds in this country for belliger- 
ents, and the maintenance of a license system 



SEPTEMBER 2 3, 1939 



279 



covering import and export of arms, ammuni- 
tion, and implements of war. Under present 
enactments, such arms cannot be carried to bel- 
ligerent countries on American vessels, and 
this provision should not be disturbed. 

The Congress, of course, should make its 
own choice of the method by which these safe- 
guards are to be attained, so long as the 
method chosen will meet the needs of new and 
changing day-to-day situations and dangers. 

To those who say that tliis program would 
involve a step toward war on our part, I reply 
that it offers far greater safeguards than we 
now possess or have ever possessed to protect 
American lives and property from danger. It 
is a positive program for giving safety. This 
means less likelihood of incidents and contro- 
versies which tend to draw us into conflict, as 
they did in the last World War. There lies 
the road to peace ! 

The position of the executive branch of the 

Government is that the age-old and time- 

■ honored doctrine of international law, coupled 

I with these positive safeguards, is better calcu- 

'i lated than any other means to keep us out of 

this war. 

In respect to our own defense, you are aware 
that I have issued a proclamation setting forth 
"A National Emergency in Connection with the 
Observance, Safeguarding, and Enforcement ol 
Neutrality and the Strengthening of the Na- 
tional Defense Within the Limits of Peace- 
Time Authorizations." This was done solely to 
make wholly constitutional and legal certain 
obviously necessary measures. I have avithor- 
ized increases in the personnel of the Army, 
Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard, which 
will bring all four to a total still below peace- 
time strength as authorized by the Congress. 

I have authorized the State Department to 
use, for the repatriation of Americans caught 
in the war zone, $500,000 already authorized by 
the Congress. 

I have authorized the addition of 150 persons 
to the Department of Justice to be used in the 
protection of the United States against subver- 
sive foreign activities within our borders. 

At this tune I ask for no other authority from 



the Congress. At this time I see no need for 
further executive action under the proclamation 
of limited national emergency. 

Therefore, I see no valid reason for the con- 
sideration of otlier legislation at this extraor- 
dinary session of the Congress. 

It is, of course, possible that in the months 
to come unforeseen needs for further legislation 
may develop, but they are not imperative today. 

These perilous days demand cooperation be- 
tween us without trace of partisanship. Our 
acts must be guided by one single hard-headed 
thought — keeping America out of this war. In 
that spirit, I am asking the leaders of the two 
major parties in the Senate and in the House 
of Representatives to remain in Washington 
between the close of this extraordinary session 
and the beginning of the regular session on 
January third. They have assured me that 
they will do so, and I expect to consult with 
them at frequent intervals on the course of 
events in foreign affairs and on the need for 
future action in this field, whether it be execu- 
tive or legislative action. 

Further, in the event of any future danger 
to the security of the United States or in the 
event of need for any new legislation of im- 
portance, I will immediately reconvene the 
Congi-ess in another extraordinai-y session. 

I should like to be able to offer the hope that 
the shadow over the world might swiftly pass. 
I cannot. The facts compel my stating, with 
candor, that darker periods may lie ahead. The 
disaster is not of our making; no act of ours 
engendered the forces which assault the founda- 
tions of civilization. Yet we find ourselves af- 
fected to the core ; our currents of commerce are 
changing, our minds are filled with new prob- 
lems, our position in world affairs has already 
been altered. 

In such circumstances our policy must be to 
appreciate, in the deepest sense the true Ameri- 
can interest. Rightly considered, this interest 
is not selfish. Destiny first made us, with our 
sister nations on this hemisi:)here, joint heirs of 
European culture. Fate seems now to compel 
us to assume the task of helping to maintain in 
the western world a citadel wherein that civil- 



280 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



ization may be kept alive. The peace, the in- 
tegrity, and the safety of the Americas — these 
must be kept firm and serene. In a period 
when it is sometimes said that free discussion 
is no longer compatible with national safety, 
may you by your deeds show the world that we 



of the United States are one people, of one mind, 
one spirit, one clear resolution, walking before 
God in the light of the living. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 
The White House, 

September 21, 1939. 



Statement by the Secretary of State 



[Released to the press September 21] 

At the press conference at the Department 
of State September 21, the Secretary of State 
made the following statement: 

"In my testimony during the hearings be- 
fore the Senate Committee on Foreign Rela- 
tions in the early part of 1936, 1 made as clear 
a statement on that point (change in neu- 
trality act through lifting the arms embargo 
following the outbreak of war) as I could, 
namely, that most of the progress made in the 
development of the law of neutrality has been 
made by acts or steps taken during war. It 
is common knowledge that belligerents change 
their rules, practices, methods, and policies in 
various directions during the progress of hos- 
tilities. The law of neutrality has been de- 
veloped in the direction of recognizing greater 
rights in the neutral than he was formerly able 
to assert. If neutrals were required to deter- 
mine upon their policy in advance of war and 
in advance of conditions which they cannot 
possibly foresee, and to hold rigidly to that 
policy throughout the war while the belliger- 
ents are adopting such new policies as they may 
see fit to adopt, regardless of their damaging 
effect upon neutrals, determination of the 
rights and duties of neutrals and belligerents 
would be left primarily in tlie hands of the 
belligerents. This is not in accord with my 
understanding of the basic principles of the 
law of neutrality. It harks back to the days 
when belligerents regarded neutrals as friends 
or enemies, depending upon whether they were 
willing to do the bidding of the belligerent. 

"I think that you will find from a careful 
analysis of the underlying principles of the 



law of neutrality that this Nation, or any 
neutral nation, has a right during a war to 
change its national policies whenever experi- 
ence shows the necessity for such change for the 
protection of its interests and safety. I do not 
mean to be understood as saying that such ac- 
tion may be taken at the behest or in the inter- 
est of one of the contending belligerents, it 
being understood, of course, that any measures 
taken shall apply impartially to all belliger- 
ents. 

"In advocating repeal of the embargo pro- 
visions of the so-called neutrality act, we are 
endeavoring to return to a more rational posi- 
tion and one tliat is more in keeping with real 
neutrality under international law. The ques- 
tion whether such proposed action is unneutral 
should not, in my judgment, be a matter of 
serious debate. There has never in our time 
been more widespread publicity and notice in 
advance of the outbreak of war of a change in 
our policy than there has in this instance. 
This Government has given notice for well- 
nigh a year — at least since the first of the pres- 
ent year — that such a change of policy was in 
contemplation. Numerous bills were intro- 
duced in Congress, long hearings were held in 
both Houses, and it was generally understood 
when Congress adjourned that this subject 
would be on the agenda when it again con- 
vened. The President gave notice through a 
public statement, which would hardly be sup- 
jjosed to have escaped the attention of all gov- 
ernments and people, that if war should occur 
he would reconvene the Congress for the pur- 
pose of renewing consideration by it of the 
neutrality legislation that was pending as un- 
finished business when Congress adjourned." 



SEPTEMBER 2 3, 1939 



281 



White House Conference on Neutrality 



[Released to the press by the White House September 20] 

Tlie conference with unanimous thought dis- 
cussed the primary objective of keeping the 
United States neutral and at peace. 

Tliere was complete accord that in congres- 
sional and executive action the whole subject 
and its many ramifications be dealt with in a 
wholly nonpartisan spirit. 

It was made clear that the most important 



subject is the repeal of the embargo and a re- 
turn to processes of international law. 

Finally the conference discussed the methods 
of dealing with the six points relating to 
Americans traveling on belligerent ships, cash 
and carry, etc. 

It was the consensus of opinion that the 
Senate Committee on Foreign Relations take 
up the legislation as soon after the Congress 
convenes as possible. 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries 



[Released to the press September 20] 

The following pei-sons and organizations 
have registered with the Secretary of State 
since September 14, 1939 (the names of 16 
registrants were published on that date), 
under the rules and regulations governing the 
solicitation and collection of contributions to 
be used for medical aid and assistance or for 
the supplying of food and clotliing to relieve 
human suffering in the countries now at war, 
promulgated pursuant to the provisions of sec- 
tion 3 (a) of the Neutrality Act of May 
1, 1937, as made effective by the President's 
proclamations of September 5, 8, and 10, 1939 : 
(The names in parentheses represent the coun- 
tries to which contributions are being sent.) 

17. Polish Club of "Washington, Stansbury 
Hall, 5832 Georgia Avenue, NW., Washing- 
ton, D. C. (Poland) 

18. French and American Association for the 
Relief of War Sufferers, 229 East Sixty-first 
Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 

19. Polish Emergency Council of Essex Coim- 
ty, N. J., 790 Broad Street, Newark, N. J. 
(Poland) 

20. Central Committee of the United Polish 
Societies, Bridgeport,, Conn., 405 Barnum 
Avenue, Bridgeport, Conn. (Poland) 

21. Associated Polish Societies' Relief Com- 
mittee of Worcester, Mass., 15 Richland 
Street, Worcester, Mass. (Poland) 

179614—30 2 



22. Polish National Council of New York, 25 
St. Marks Place, New York, N. Y. (Po- 
land) 

23. Polish Relief Committee of Boston, 11 
Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. (Poland) 

24. Central Citizens Committee, 2281 East 
Forest Avenue, Detroit, Mich. (Poland) 

25. Lackawanna County Committee for Polish 
Relief, 1213 Prospect Avenue, Scranton, Pa. 
(Poland) 

26. The Council of Polish Organizations in the 
United States of America, 1200 North Ash- 
land Avenue, Chicago, 111. (Poland) 

27. James F. Hopkins, Inc., 65-59 Hamilton 
Avenue, Detroit, Mich. (Poland) 

28. Chester (Delaware County, Pa.) Polish 
Relief Committee, 2718 West Third Street, 
Chester, Pa. (Poland) 

29. Federated Council of Polish Societies of 
Grand Rapids, Mich., in care of Sigmund S. 
Zamierowski, Attorney, 908 Grand Rapids 
Trust Building, Grand Rapids, Mich. 
(Poland) 

30. The Paryski Publishing Co., 1154 Nebraska 
Avenue, Toledo, Ohio. (Poland) 

31. Modjeska Educational League Welfare 
Club at the International Institute, 303 
Condley Drive, Toledo, Ohio. (Poland) 

32. Schuylkill and Carbon Counties Relief 
Committee for Poland, Spring and Line 
Streets, Frackville, Pa. (Poland) 



282 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



33. Holy Rosary Polish Roman Catholic 
Church, 6 Wall Street, Passaic, N. J. 
(Poland) 

34. Association of Joint Polish-American 
Societies of Chelsea, Mass., in care of St. 
Stanislaus Roman Catholic Rectory, 163 
Chestnut Street, Chelsea, Mass. (Poland) 

35. Club Amical Fran^ais, International Cen- 
ter of the Y. W. C. A., 2431 East Grand 
Boulevard, Detroit, Mich. (France, and per- 
haps Poland and Great Britain) 

36. Polish National Catholic of The Holy 
Saviour Church, 500 North Main Street, 
Union City, Conn. (Poland) 

37. Committee of Mercy, Inc., 254 Fourth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (France, Great 
Britain, and their allies) 

38. Kuryer Publishing Co. (publishers of the 
daily and Sunday "Kuryer Polski" and "The 
American Courier"), 747 North Broadway, 
Milwaukee, Wis. (Poland) 

39. Polish Falcons of America, First District, 
Inc., 188 Grand Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
(Poland) 

40. Polish Relief Committee of Cambi'idge, 
Mass., 135 Otis Street, Cambridge, Mass. 
(Poland) 



41. Polish Committee to Aid Poland's War 
Sufferers, 6968 Broadway, Cleveland, Ohio. 
(Poland) 

42. Polish Welfare Association, 1450 River 
Street, Hyde Park, Mass. (Poland) 

43. Polish Relief Committee, 3809 Industrial 
Avenue, Flint, Mich. (Poland) 

44. The Polish National Alliance of Brooklyn, 
United States of America, 142 Grand Street, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. (Poland) 

45. Polish Civic League of Mercer Coimty, 
N. J., 822 Ohio Avenue, Trenton, N. J. 
(Poland) 

46. Polish-American Central Civic Committee 
of South Bend, Ind., 1101-1107 Western 
Avenue, South Bend, Ind. (Poland) 

47. Toledo Committee for Relief of War Vic- 
tims, 1344 Nebraska Avenue, Toledo, Ohio. 
(Poland) 

48. Edmund Tyszka, 11403 Joseph Campau 
Avenue, Hamtramck, Mich. (Poland) 

49. The Polish Naturalization Independent 
Club, 45 Millbury Street, Worcester, Mass. 
(Poland) 

50. Polish Falcons Alliance of America, 97-99 
South Eighteenth Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
(Poland) 



-f -f ^ + + -♦■ -f 



BOMBARDMENT FROM THE AIR OF CIVILIAN POPULATIONS 



[Released to the press St'ptomber 18] 

Following is the text of a message which 
President Moscicki of Poland sent to the Presi- 
dent of the United States : 

"Mr. President: 

"In reply to your telegram regarding the 
nonbombardment of open towns you received 
from the Polish Government a clear and 
straightforward answer. In connection with 
this, I consider it my duty to inform you that 
for some days past German aircraft have de- 
liberately and methodically been bombing Po- 
lish towns and villages which contain no con- 



ceivable military objectives. Among the civil 
population there are thousands of dead and 
wounded. As this is a question which con- 
cerns the whole civilized world and as you, Mr. 
President, have shown a special interest in it, 
I wish to inform you of these facts. 

Ignace Moscicki" 

The American Ambassador to Poland, Mr. 
Anthony J. Di'exel Biddle, Jr., was instructed, 
on the night of September 18, to convey to the 
President of Poland the following reply from 
President Roosevelt to President Moscicki's 



SEPTEMBER 2 3, 1939 



283 



telegram regarding attacks made from the air 
upon open villages and upon the civilian popu- 
lation of Poland : 

"I have received your telegram stating that 
as the result of tlie bombing by German air- 
craft of Polish towns and villages possessing no 
considerable military objective thousands of 
the civil population of Poland are dead or 
wounded. 

"It had been my hope following the receipt 
from the several belligerent powers of the re- 
plies to my appeal of September 1, in which 
they stated their intentions to limit the opera- 
tions of their air forces to military objectives, 
that the world would be spared the horror of 
witnessing during this war the bombing of 
open towns and villages and the slaughtering 



of thousands of innocent and defenceless men, 
women, and children. 

"I have been deeply shocked, therefore, by 
the statements contained in your telegram as 
well as by reports received from other sources 
including officials of this Government in Po- 
land at the scene of hostilities. 

"In view of the hundreds of thousands of 
lives which may be at stake, it is my earnest 
hope that the Goverimients of the belligerent 
covmtries will renew their orders prohibiting 
the practice of bombing civilians in unfortified 
centers of population from the air, and that 
they will take measures to assure themselves 
that their respective air forces are showing 
that regard for the lives of non-combatants 
which their I'eplies to my appeal of Septem- 
ber 1 have led the world to expect." 



> + -f + > -f -f 



AMERICANS MISSING FROM THE "ATHENIA" 



[Released to the press September 17] 

The Department of State is unable to state 
with certainty the names of American citizens 
who were passengers on board the British 
steamship Ath^nia, and who perished in the 
sinking of that vessel on September 3, 1939. 

Immediately upon the sinking of the vessel 
a passenger list was obtained from the oper- 
ators of the vessel by the American Ambas- 
sador at London and telegraphed to the De- 
partment. That list has necessarily been sub- 
jected to considerable revision as it was ascer- 
tained from various sources that certain per- 
sons named thereon had not embarked on that 
ship and that other persons whose names were 
not on the list had embarked on that ship and 
that some listed as Americans were not Ameri- 
can citizens. Information in correction of the 
list is still being received by the Department. 

Immediately upon the landing of the rescued 
survivors, the Ambassador in London, the 
Minister in Dublin, and the Consul General in 
Glasgow obtained preliminary lists of names 
of those survivors and telegraphed them to the 



Department. The names on these lists did not 
correspond in many instances with the original 
passenger list. These lists of survivors are 
still being supplemented as additional persons 
are located. Efforts continue to be made by 
the Ambassador in London, the Minister in 
Dublin, and the Department's other officers in 
Great Britain and Ireland to locate American 
citizens reported to have sailed with the vessel 
but who remain unaccounted for. As fast as 
the names of survivors are received by the De- 
partment, the relatives and friends of the 
survivors inquiring about them are informed 
by telegi-aph or by telephone. 

By far the larger number of Americans be- 
lieved to have embarked on board the ship 
were rescued and have been located. 

Relatives and friends of persons unac- 
counted for who inquire of the Department are 
being informed that the Department is at pres- 
ent without information of the persons still 
missing but that efforts continue to be made 
by the Department's officers in Great Britain 
and Ireland to locate them, that information 



284 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



of their rescue when received will be promptly 
communicated to the inquirers and that the 
Department still hopes other names may be 
eliminated from the list. 

The list of persons as yet unaccounted for 
and compiled as indicated above, together with 
their home addresses and ports of departure, 
follows : 

Name and home address Port of departure 

Bernard, John Lucian, 51 Elm Street, Glasgow 

Somerville, Mass. 
Birchall, Peter, 30S North Avenue 66, Liverpool 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
Bown, Hubert, the Leamington, Miu- Liverpool 

neapolis, Minn. 
Brown, William (uuable to identify), Glasgow 

Chicago, 111. 
Burdett, Mrs. Sarah J., 270 Mt. Au- Liverpool 

burn Street, Cambridge, Mass. 
Campbell, Mrs. Margaret (uuable to Glasgow 

identify). 
Gilroy, Cora, 13S22 Seymour Avenue, Glasgow 

Detroit, Mich. 
Gilroy, John Clark, 13822 Seymour Glasgow 

Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 
Hannah, Mrs. Helen, 101 Bellum Glasgow 

Street, Elizabeth, N. J. 
Harrington, Ellen, 127 7th Street Liverpool 

South Boston, Mass. 
Harris, Robert Shenton, 1308 Win- Liverpool 

Chester Street, Fredericksburg, Va. 
Howland, Mrs. Ellen Swann, 400 Liverpool 

South 15th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
McErlean, Bridget, 2100 East Susque- Belfast 

hanna Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 
McGoorty, Margaret K., 4378 45th Belfast 

Street, Woodside, L. I., N. Y. 
Nicol, Alexander, 28 Philips Court, Glasgow 

North Andover, Mass. 
Nicol, Mrs. Edith, 28 Philips Court, Glasgow 

North Andover, Mass. 
Nicol, Marion Edith, 28 Philips Court, Glasgow 

North Andover, Mass. 
Park, Alexander Ross, 132 North Belfast 

Millich Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Quine, Mrs. Annie, 200 West Wll- Liverpool 

shire Avenue, Fullerton, Calif. 
Reed, Mrs. Frank George (Gertrude), Liverpool 

25 Midway, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Robinson, Mrs. William (Alice Gra- Glasgow 

ham), 340 East 62d Street, Apt. 22, 

New York City. 
Tinney, Fred, 805 State Street, Madi- Glasgow 

son. Wis. 
Tinney, Madeleine, 805 State Street, Glasgow 

Madison, Wis. 



Name and home address 



Port of departure 



ToUey, Harriet, 206 Virginia Avenue, Liverpool 

Ponca City, Okla. 
Warenreich, Sarah (unable to iden- Liverpool 

tify). 
Wilkes, Mrs. E. T. (Mathilde), 4401 Glasgow 

Skillman Avenue, New York City. 
Wilkes, Jonathan, 4401 Skillman Ave- Glasgow 

nue. New York City. 
Wright, David, Heathcote Inn, Po- Belfast 

pham Road, Scarsdale, N. Y. 

The Department is unable to say with cer- 
tainty that the foregoing addresses are correct. 

It is possible some of the persons whose 
names are listed may have been landed some- 
where and failed to communicate with local 
officials or with our Ambassador or Minister. 
If any friend or relative has received a com- 
munication from any jJerson whose name ap- 
pears on this list, indicating that that person 
has survived, the Department of State will be 
glad indeed to receive that information. 

-f -f ^ 

SINKING OF THE NORWEGIAN SHIP 
"RONDO" 

[Released to the press September 17] 

Consul General Harold D. Clum, at Rotter- 
dam, reported to the Department of State 
today that the Norwegian sliip Roiido bound 
from Antwerp to Oslo struck a mine off Ter- 
schelling on Wednesday afternoon, September 
13, and sank. 

Of six American passengers, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Etchison and Miss Josephine Allen, both of 
Richmond, Va., Mr. K. Hilgendorf of Milwau- 
kee, and Mr. Douglas Miller of Ann Arbor 
were saved. Miss Xan Etchison of Richmond 
and Mr. Gordon Felts of Odessa, Mo., were 
drowned. 

Survivors were rescued by an Italian 
steamer and brought to Flushing, the Nether- 
lands, on the night of September 16. 

Consul General Clum has authorized the 
Norwegian consul to provide clothing and to 
send the survivors to Rotterdam. The Nor- 
wegian consul informed Mr. Clum that they 
had lost everything. 



SEPTEMBER 23, 19 3 9 



285 



ANNOUNCEMENT BY GERMAN GOVERNMENT OF ARTICLES OF 

CONTRABAND 



[Released to the press September 19] 

The American Charge in Berlin, Mr. Alex- 
ander C. Kirk, has reported to the Department 
of State that two amendments have been issued 
to the Prize Law Code which increase the 
articles and materials to be considered as abso- 
lute and conditional contraband by the Ger- 
man Government. The Government of the 
Reich has enacted and promulgated the fol- 
lowing law : 

"Article 1 

"The following articles and materials will 
be regarded as contraband (absolute contra- 
band) if they are destmed for enemy territory 
or the enemy forces : 

'•'•One. Arms of all kinds, their component 
parts and their accessories. 

'•'•Two. Ammunition and parts thereof, 
bombs, torpedoes, mines and other types of 
projectiles; appliances to be used for the shoot- 
ing or dropping of these projectiles; powder 
and explosives including detonators and ignit- 
ing materials. 

'•'■Three. Warships of all kinds, their com- 
ponent parts and their accessories. 

'•'•FouT. Military aircraft of all kinds, their 
component parts and their accessories; air- 
plane engines. 

'•'•Five. Tanks, armored cars and armored 
trains ; armor plate of all kinds. 

'•'•Six. Chemical substances for military pur- 
poses ; appliances and machines used for shoot- 
ing or spreading them. 

'■^Seven. Articles of military clothing and 
equipment. 

'•^Eight. Means of communication, signaling 
and military illumination and their component 
parts. 

'•'•Nine. Means of transportation and their 
component parts. 

^'•Ten. Fuels and heating substances of all 
kinds, lubricating oils. 



^'■Eleven. Gold, Silver, means of payment, 
evidences of indebtedness. 

'•'•Ticelve. Apparatus, tools, machines and 
materials for the manufacture or for the utili- 
zation of the articles and products named in 
numbers one to eleven. 

"Article Two 

"Article one of this law becomes article 22 
paragraph one of the Prize Law Code. 

"This law becomes effective on its promulga- 
tion." 

The Government of the Eeich on September 
12, 1939, made an announcement relating to 
conditional contraband which read in part : 

"The following is accordingly announced : 

"The following articles and materials will be 
regarded as contraband (conditional contra- 
band) subject to the conditions of article 24 
of the Prize Law Code of August 28, 1939 
(Reichsgesetzblatt part one page 1585) : 

"Foodstuffs (including live animals) bev- 
erages and tobacco and the like, fodder and 
clothing; articles and materials used for their 
preparation or manufacture. 

"This announcement becomes effective on 
September 14, 1939." 

■If -i- -tr 

REMOVAL OF AMERICAN FOREIGN 
SERVICE OFFICERS FROM WARSAW 

[Released to the press September 22] 

The American Charge in Berlin, Mr. Alex- 
ander C. Kirk, reported to the Department of 
State September 22 that he had spoken on the 
telephone with Mr. Douglas Jenkins, American 
vice consul at Warsaw, who had just arrived 
by train in Konigsberg from Warsaw. Mr. 
Jenkins stated that the following American 



286 



DEPAETMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Foreign Service officers were on their way 
from Warsaw to Konigsberg probably by 
automobile : 

Consul General John K. Davis 
Consul George J. Haering 
Consul William M. Cramp 
Vice Consul M. Williams Blake 



Vice Consul E. Tomlin Bailey 
Vice Consul Carl Birkeland 
Also Dr. Waldemar J. A. Wickham, of the 
U. S. Public Health Service. 

Vice Consul Thaddeus H. Chylinski has re- 
mained at Warsaw and is at the Chancery 
with a number of other Americans. 



The American Republics 



THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE PAN AMERICAN MOVEMENT 

Address by the Secretary of State ^ 



[Released to the press September 22] 

Mr. Chairman, Members of the Governing 

Board of the Pan American Union, Mr. 

Whalen, Distinguished Guests, Ladies and 

Gentlemen : 

In the name of the Governing Board of the 
Pan American Union, I should like, first of 
all, to express our gratitude to the manage- 
ment of the New York World's Fair for their 
courtesy in designating this day as Pan Ameri- 
can Day. For myself, I welcome this oppor- 
tunity to make a few brief remarks regarding 
the significance of the pan-American movement 
in the present, singularly unhappy juncture of 
world affaii'S. 

Around us here are striking achievements 
of scientists and engineei-s, of architects and 
artists, revealing what could be done for the 
advancement of the human race if only their 
genius could be given free scope for construc- 
tive effort everywhere. There is a poignant 
contrast between what we behold here and the 
soul-searing pictures of suffering and destruc- 
tion brought to us hourly from those portions 
of the earth in which armed hostilities are now 
taking place. That contrast should strengthen 
in all of us a determination to assure an or- 



' Delivered on the occasion of the celebration of 
Pan American Day at the New Yorlv World's Fair, 
September 22, 1939. Mr. Hull is chairman of the 
Governing Board of the Pan American Union. 



ganization of world affairs which would make 
possible the use of such magnificent teclmical 
skill as is here assembled solely and uninter- 
ruptedly for the creative work of peaceful 
progress. 

The attainment of such an organization of 
world affairs has always been one of the un- 
derlying purposes of the American republics. 
It has always been one of the principal ob- 
jectives of the great movement of cooperation 
and solidarity, the ties of which, happily, have 
grown ever stronger among our nations. 

Today, the American republics are supremely 
fortunate in that they are at peace within and 
without our hemisphere. Each of our repub- 
lics is ready to defend itself against any threat 
to its security that may come from any part of 
the world. At the same time, it is the unalter- 
able desire of each and every one of our na- 
tions to remain at peace ourselves and to ex- 
ercise all influence in our power toward the 
end that just and enduring peace may become 
firmly established everywhere. 

Less than a quarter of a century ago, 12 of 
our American republics were involved in a 
world war. Wien that ordeal ended, all of us 
were determined to devote our best efforts to- 
ward the establishment of a world order in 
which recourse to war as an instrument of ac- 
complishing national aims would be mithink- 



SEPTEMBER 2 3, 1939 



287 



able. Within the limitations of its own tra- 
ditional policy, each of our nations has since 
sought to make its fullest practicable contribu- 
tion toward the attainment of that objective. 

This attitude on oiu' part is a direct result of 
our own American experience. From the very 
beginning of their independent existence, the 
American republics have sought to shape their 
international policies in accordance with cer- 
tain cardinal principles. Crucial among these 
are, first, recognition that each nation is a jurid- 
ically equal member of the family of nations; 
and second, recognition that civilization and 
progress are possible only when there is uni- 
versal acceptance of order, implemented by in- 
ternational law, and based upon justice, fair 
dealing, mutual respect, cooperation, and the 
sanctity of agreements, freely made, faithfully 
observed, and honorably altered by peaceful 
methods when need arises. 

By applying these principles among our- 
selves, we have gradually built up in the West- 
ern Hemisphere an international system which 
is our American way of peace. 

Among the 21 American republics are found 
various degrees of numerical strength and of 
military power, as well as diiferent degrees of 
wealth and of industrial and financial organ- 
ization. Yet we have arranged and have man- 
aged to live side by side. Among us, small 
countries do not feel menaced by their power- 
ful neighbors. Among us, no group of na- 
tions is allied against any other group. Our 
peace does not rest on fear. 

There are, to be sure, causes for controversy 
here as there are in other parts of the world. 
But mechanisms for resolving them have been 
set up by mutual agreement. These mecha- 
nisms are in operation, and there is a growing 
realization that just claims advanced by any 
member or members of the group will be fairly 
dealt with. 

All this is the fruit of our persistent endeav- 
ors to give form and substance to the ideals 
which we profess. We have striven for years 
to remove causes of distrust and friction be- 
tween and among our several countries. Many 



of us, including the United States, have had to 
recognize that mistakes were made and that 
rectification was in order. We have had to 
overcome false pride and to correct errors. 
Much of this has been done ; and the doing of 
it has established faith and trust among the 
American nations. 

Our periodic inter-American conferences 
have played a great role in this development. 
I should like to recall to your attention the 
work done by the three most recent ones. 

At the Seventh International Conference of 
American States, held at Montevideo in 1933, 
substantial progress was made toward remov- 
ing the individual causes for controversy 
through agreement on a treaty to govern the 
rights and duties of states. 

In 1936, the Inter- American Conference for 
the Maintenance of Peace, at Buenos Aires, 
considered the need of strengthening the meth- 
ods by which the peace of the American na- 
tions could be safeguarded and maintained. 
One result of that conference was a Conven- 
tion for the Maintenance, Preservation, and 
Reestablislnnent of Peace, which provided for 
consultation between the 21 republics in case 
the peace of the western world were menaced 
from within or from without. 

Finally, at Lima, last year, the Eighth In- 
ternational Conference of American States, in 
its basic declaration, affirmed the solidarity of 
the nations of America, based on "the similarity 
of their republican institutions, their unshak- 
able will for peace, . . . their absolute ad- 
herence to the principles of international law, 
of the equal sovereignty of states, and of in- 
dividual liberty without religious or racial 
prejudices." With this in mind, the 21 re- 
publics affirmed their determination to main- 
tain these principles, to defend them against 
any threat from outside our hemisphere, and, 
in the event of danger, to consult among them- 
selves as to measures which might be taken in 
cooperation for the common safety. 

At this very moment representatives of all 
of the American governments are assembling 
in Panama for the purpose of taking the meas- 



288 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



ures necessary to safeguard the peace of the 
Americas. Here we see the functioning of an 
international system of cooperative peace 
designed to assure internal concord and ex- 
ternal security for the nations of our hemi- 
sphere. 

At all three of the conferences, important 
steps were taken in the direction of a mitiga- 
tion of unreasonable trade barriers among our 
various countries and between each of them 
and the rest of the world. At all three, means 
were devised for strengthening cultural and 
other relationships — those indispensable foun- 
dations of international understanding and co- 
operation — again, among our various countries 
and between each of them and the rest of the 
world. The resolutions and recommendations 
of the conferences along these lines have been 
or are being put into effect by the American 
republics. Here, too, we see the functioning 
of a system of cooperative peace. 

We of the Americas are justly proud of 
these achievements. And yet we know that, 
however precious, however gratifying is this 
onward march of inter-American solidarity 
and cooperation, it is not enough by itself to 
give our nations the fullest attainable measure 
of security, progress, and prosperity. 

In every line of national endeavor, each of 
our countries is thoroughly conscious of the 
interrelated and interconnected character of 
the present-day world. Under modern condi- 
tions, peace and stability are indivisible in the 
sense that a major break-down of one or the 
other in any important portion of the globe 
inevitably affects the life of the entire world. 
For several years, the impairment of normal 
international economic relations and the dis- 
astrous deterioration of international morality 
in many parts of the earth have retarded our 
material progress and have filled us with anx- 
iety and apprehension. For the past 2 years, 
the conflict that has been going on in far-off 
Asia has cast its shadow upon us too. The 
tragic hostilities in Europe — the greatest 
calamity of all — have been in operation but 3 
short weeks and already their fateful effects 
have laid a heavy hand upon many phases of 
the lives of our nations. 



We know that our nations will be materially 
poorer and spiritually poorer in proportion as 
the flames of protracted war impair or destroy, 
in the areas directly involved, the foundations 
of modern civilization. 

Knowing all this, our nations have sought 
steadfastly to exert their influence in the direc- 
tion of an avoidance of a wides^Dread war any- 
where. We have endeavored, by appeal and 
by example, to convince other nations that a 
system of international relations based upon 
action in conformity with the dictates of inter- 
national law and morality, upon fair and 
fruitful cooperation among nations for the 
greatest good of all, and upon soimd, healthy, 
and mutually beneficial trade relations is prac- 
ticable and attainable; that a system, based 
on these principles, is far more conducive to 
the welfare of each and every nation than a 
state of affairs in which callous disregard of 
law and morality, with resort to brute force 
and unbridled violence, are the methods de- 
liberately chosen for the attainment of national 
aims. 

Now that a major war in Europe is a grim 
reality, there is greater necessity than ever be- 
fore for all nations, still in a position to do 
so, to increase their exertions for the preserva- 
tion of those fundamental principles of civ- 
ilized international relations, through the ap- 
plication of which alone, we of the Americas 
are firmly convinced, the progress of the 
human race can be maintained. There is no 
other basis of enduring peace, of cultural and 
material advancement for nations and for in- 
dividuals, of social and political institutions 
founded upon human freedom and the dignity 
of the human soul. 

It is our devout hope that the conflict now 
raging in Europe will not extinguish upon that 
continent the light of that resplendent civiliza- 
tion with which it has, in modern times, il- 
lumined the world. It is our fervent prayer 
that all nations may find in themselves suffi- 
cient strength of conscience, of reason, of the 
very instinct of self-preservation to return — 
before it is too late — to the tried and proven 
highway of those basic principles of interna- 
tional relations which, for the moment, con- 



SEPTEMBER 23, 1939 



289 



tinue to function fully only in our hemisphere 
and in a constantly diminishing area elsewhere. 
In the Xew AVorld we have found that ac- 
ceptance of these fundamental principles has 
made for progress and peace. To these same 
princijjles all nations can adhere, whenever 
they choose, and so, together with us, attain 



once more the blessing of an ordered and law- 
governed world. Meanwhile, in these hours of 
tragic trial, it is our duty to ourselves to keep 
these principles alive in our own midst and to 
make intensive and unceasing effort toward 
bringing about adherence to them throughout 
the world. 



■f -f ■♦- ^ -f -f -f 



EXCHANGE OF PROFESSORS AND STUDENTS BETWEEN THE UNITED 
STATES AND OTHER AMERICAN REPUBLICS 



[Released to the press September IS] 

The Department of State, in conjunction 
with the United States Office of Education, 
Federal Security Agency, has perfected plans 
which will set in motion the official exchange 
of professors, teachers, and graduate students 
between the governments of the United States 
and the- other American republics which to date 
have ratified the Convention for Inter- Ameri- 
can Cultural Kelations. 

The convention, signed December 23, 1936, 
by the United States and the 20 other Ameri- 
can republics at the Inter- American Conference 
for the Maintenance of Peace held in Buenos 
Aires, provides for the annual exchange of one 
professor and two teachers or graduate students 
between the United States and each of the 
other republics which have ratified this instru- 
ment. To date the Governments of Brazil, 
Chile, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, 
Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua, Pan- 
ama, Peru, Venezuela, and the United States 
have ratified the convention. 

Leaflets and application forms have been pre- 
pared explaining the provisions of the conven- 
tion. These will immediately be distributed 
by the Office of Education to the colleges, uni- 
versities, scientific institutions, and technical 
schools of this country for professors, teachers, 
and graduate students interested in submitting 
applications for official exchange professor- 
ships and fellowships. These exchanges are 
available for professors, teachers, or graduate 



students in the humanities, natural sciences, so- 
cial sciences, law, medicine, pharmacy, journal- 
ism, technology, and engineering. All prelim- 
inary work in the selection of nominees for 
professorships and fellowships will be handled 
by the Office of Education, and that agency is 
now prepared to accept and evaluate applica- 
tions of those seeking exchange professorships 
and fellowships. "Teachers" as distinguished 
from "professors" is understood to refer to 
teachers in primary or secondary schools. 

No limitation as to color, sex, or creed will be 
made in the nominations for the exchange 
posts. The utmost possible latitude has been 
allowed in the field of intellectual activity in 
which professors, teachers, and students may 
engage to encourage applications from those in- 
terested in any field of learning, facilities for 
which may exist in the country in which the 
applicant is interested. Prospective students 
or teachers are required to describe a particu- 
lar project of lectures, research, or study in the 
country for which application is made. Ap- 
propriate information from qualified persons 
given as references as to the value of the un- 
dertaking and the ability of the individual to 
carry it out, will also be required. Similar 
statements attested to by recognized instructors 
should indicate the applicant's ability to do 
independent study. 

Specific requisites adopted by the Govern- 
ment as qualifications for applicants include 
proof of American citizenship ; good health ; in 



290 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



the case of teachers or graduate students, refer- 
ences as to good moral character and intellec- 
tual ability, together with suitable personal 
qualities. The upper age limit for fellowships 
is set at 35 years. Applicants must have prac- 
tical reading, writing, and speaking knowledge 
of the language of the country for wliich ap- 
plication is made. In the case of professor- 
ships, ability to lecture in the language of the 
country for which application is made is de- 
sirable. In the case of Brazil, candidates 
offering Spanish or French instead of Portu- 
guese will be considered. Applicants for ex- 
change professorships must occupy a position 
of professorial rank in a college, university, or 
technical institution and must have done 
scholarly work in the field of their specializa- 
tion. A list of publications in the candidate's 
field will be required with the application. 

At the time of making application, the stu- 
dent or teacher must have completed a curricu- 
lum normally requiring 5 years beyond the 
secondary school, although in exceptional 
cases, a selection may be made from those who 
have completed a 4-year course. 

Founded upon the thesis that peace and 
orderly progress is best grounded upon the mu- 
tual understanding of the fimdamental social, 
political, and economic ideals among peoples of 
all nations, the exchange program growing out 
of the Convention for the Promotion of Inter- 
American Cultural Relations is designed to 
make available to the peoples of the other 
American republics a more accurate knowledge 
of the progress of science, the humanities, and 
the technology of the United States, and, in re- 
ceiving the visiting professors, teachers, and 
graduate students from those nations, to attain 
a similar diffusion in this country of the intel- 
lectual attainments of their peoples. The 
United States, in carrying out its obligations 
assumed by ratification of the convention, sets 
in motion a progi-am definitely educational in 
character, directed toward the development of 
a truer and more realistic understanding be- 
tween the people of the United States and their 
neighbors to the south, which emphasizes the 
essential reciprocity in cultural relations. 



As soon as other governments have com- 
pleted arrangements to enter into the ex- 
changes, the Government of the United States 
will prepare, from the applications received 
for the student or teacher exchange fellow- 
ships, a panel of five names for each of the 
countries with which it has entered into the 
exchange relationslup. From this list of five, 
the receiving government will select two to 
whom the award will be granted. Tentative 
plans are that panels prepared by the United 
States are to be submitted to the other par- 
ticipating governments late in November of 
this year. 

In the case of exchange professorships, from 
the applications received, a complete list of pro- 
fessors available for exchange service from the 
outstanding universities, scientific institutions, 
and technological schools of the country will be 
prepared and commmiicated by the United 
States to each of the other governments by 
January 1, 1940. Additional lists will be sub- 
mitted each alternate year. From this list each 
of the other countries will arrange to select a 
visiting professor who will either give lectures 
in various centers, or conduct regular courses of 
instruction, or pursue special research in some 
designated institution and who, it is expected, 
will in other appropriate ways promote better 
understanding between the nations cooperating. 
Preference will be given to teaching rather than 
to research work in the selection of nominees. 

Expenses involved in the exchange program 
are shared by the jjarticipating governments. 
In the case of fellowships, the nominating gov- 
ernment will pay the round-trip ti-avel costs to 
the country chosen, together with other inci- 
dental expenses of the graduate students or 
teachers selected. The receiving government 
will pay tuition and subsidiary expenses, to- 
gether with board and lodging at the institu- 
tion designated. Exchange fellowships will 
cover a single academic year. Under unusual 
and exceptional circumstances they may be re- 
newed for 1 additional year. 

All expenses incident to the exchange of pro- 
fessors will be met by the sending government. 
Such expenses will include travel to and from 



SEPTEMBER 23, 19 39 



291 



the country to which exchange professors are 
sent as well as maintenance and local travel 
costs during the period of residence in the 
foreign country. The term of an exchange pro- 
fessor will not exceed 2 years, unless he shall 
liave been included on the next list after first 
being selected, and thereafter again selected. 
By agreement between the two interested gov- 
ernments, the term of an exchange professor 
may be limited to less than 2 years and another 
selection made from the cui'rent list. Vacancies 
caused by the voluntary withdrawal of an ex- 
change professor or by his death or disability 
to continue service will likewise be filled from 
the current list. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Haitian Finances : Supplementary Agreement be- 
tween the United States of America and Haiti further 
modifying the agreement of August 7, 1933 (Executive 
Agreement Series No. 46). — Signed .luly 8, 1939; ef- 
fective October 1. 1939. Executive Agreement Series 
No. 150. Publication 1373. ii, 2 pp. 5i^. 

Commercial Relations : Agreement between the United 
States of America and the Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics continuing in force until August 6, 1940 
the agreement of August 4, 1937 ( Executive Agree- 
ment Series No. 105), and related notes. — Effected by 
exchange of notes signed at Moscow August 2, 1939 ; 
effective August 6, 1939. Executive Agreement Series 
No. 151. Publication 1375. ii, (5 pp. 5^. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled by the Treaty Division 



ARMAMENT REDUCTION 

London Naval Treaty of 1936 (Treaty Series 
No. 919) 

Australia — New Zealand 

The American Ambassador to Great Britain 
reported by a telegram dated September 11, 
1939, that he had received on that day a note 
from the British Government notifying the 
suspension in respect of Australia and New 
Zealand of all the obligations of the Treaty 
for tlie Limitation of Naval Armament signed 
at London on March 26, 1936. 

Canada 

The American Legation at Ottawa trans- 
mitted to the Secretary of State with a des- 
patch dated September 12, 1939, a copy of a 
note (No. 190) of September 11, 1939, from the 
Department of External Affairs, notifying this 
Government that "in consequence of the state 
of war which exists with Germany, and in ac- 



cordance with article 24 of the London Naval 
Treaty signed March 25, 1936, His Majesty the 
King, in respect of Canada, hereby suspends, 
insofar as he is concerned, all obligations of 
the said Treaty." 

France 

The American Ambassador to France re- 
ported by a telegi-am dated September 22, 1939, 
that he had received a note from the French 
Government dated September 10, 1939, stating 
that in view of the state of war existing be- 
tween France and Germany and by virtue of 
article 24 of the London Naval Treaty of 1936, 
the French Government suspends, insofar as 
it is concerned, the application of the treaty. 

CONCILIATION 

Conciliation Treaty With Liberia 

A conciliation treaty was signed between the 
United States and Liberia at Monrovia on 
August 21, 1939. 



292 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The treaty, which will enter into force upon 
the exchange of ratifications, provides for the 
establishment of a Permanent International 
Commission to which disputes may be sub- 
mitted for investigation and report which have 
failed of settlement through ordinary diplo- 
matic proceedings, and when the High Con- 
tracting Parties do not have recourse to 
adjudication by a competent tribunal. 

The treaty will remain in force continuously 
unless and until terminated by 1 year's written 
notice given by either party. 

EDUCATION 

Convention for the Promotion of Inter- 
American Cultural Relations (Treaty Se- 
ries No. 928) 

A statement regarding the plans for the of- 
ficial excliange of professors, teachers, and 
graduate students between the Governments of 
the United States and the other American re- 
publics which have ratified the Convention for 
the Promotion of Inter-American Cultural Re- 
lations, signed on December 23, 1936, appears in 
this Bulletin in the section "The American 
Republics." 

HEALTH 

Convention Modifying the International 
Sanitary Convention of June 21, 1926 

Union of South Africa 

The American Ambassador to France re- 
ported by a despatch dated August 28, 1939, 
that he had received a note dated August 24, 
1939, from the French Ministry for Foreign 
Affairs stating that the Union of South Africa 
had notified to the French Government its ad- 
herence to the Convention Modifying the In- 
ternational Sanitary Convention of June 21, 
1926, signed at Paris on October 31, 1938. 

This convention came into force on July 24, 
1939. It has been ratified by Egypt, France, 
Great Britain, and Italy and has been adhered 
to by Belgium and the Union of South Afi-ica. 



COMMERCE 

Reciprocal Trade Agreement With Turkey 

By a note dated September 9, 1939, the Turk- 
ish Ambassador at Washington infoi-med the 
Secretary of State that the Grand National 
Assembly of Turkey ratified the Reciprocal 
Trade Agreement between the United States 
and Turkey, which was signed on April 1, 1939, 
by law No! 3646 of June 20, 1939. 

CUSTOMS 

Convention Concerning Exemption From 
Taxation for Liquid Fuel and Lubricants 
Used in Air Traffic - 

The British Ambassador at Washington 
transmitted to the Secretary of State with a 
note dated September 12, 1939, a cei'tified copy 
of the Convention Concerning Exemption 
From Taxation for Liquid Fuel and Lubri- 
cants LTsed in Air Traific signed at London on 
March 1, 1939. In addition to the signatory 
states which were reported in Treaty Informa- 
tion^ bulletin No. 115, April 1939, page 78, the 
convention has now been signed by the follow- 
ing countries : Greece, Hungary, Italy, Switzer- 
land, and the Union of South Africa. 

The Ambassador stated in his note that the 
adherence of Denmark to the convention was 
notified to the British Foreign Oifice on July 
17, 1939, and that the reservation in respect of 
Poland included in the annex to the convention 
was withdrawn by a note from the Polish 
Ambassador dated May 30, 1939. 

The reservation made by Poland, in the 
translation of the British print. Miscellaneous 
No. 7 (1939), International Conference for the 
Exemption Fi'om Taxation for Liquid Fuel 
and Lubricants Used in Air Traffic, Cmd. 6001, 
reads as follows: 

"The Polish Government, to whom it per- 
tains to ensure the conduct of the foreign af- 
fairs of the Free City of Danzig under Article 



^ See Tn-iitii Information, bulletin No. 115, April 
1939, p. 76. 



SEPTEMBER 2 3, 19 39 



293 



104: of the Treaty of Versailles and Articles 2 
and 6 of the Convention between the Republic 
of Poland and the Free City of Danzig, signed 
in Paris on the 9th November, 1920, reserves 
the right to declare at any time while Poland 
is a party to the present Convention that the 
Free City of Danzig is a Contracting Party to 
the present Convention and assumes the obliga- 
tions and acquires the rights arising therefrom. 

"This reservation does not refer to those pro- 
visions of the present Convention which the 
Republic of Poland has accepted with regard 
to the Free City of Danzig in accordance with 
the rights flowing from the Treaties under 
which Poland and Danzig form one Customs 
territory. 

"The above-mentioned declaration shall be 
addressed to the Government of the United 
Kingdom. 

"It shall take effect three months after the 
date on which it is received by the Government 
of the United Kingdom. 

"The Polish Government may at any time 
terminate the application of the Convention 
to the Free City of Danzig by means of a 
notification addressed to the Government of 
the United Kingdom. Such termination shall 
take effect six months after the date of its re- 
ceipt by the Government of the United King- 
dom. That Government shall inform the Gov- 
ernments of all countries on whose behalf the 
Convention has been signed or a notification 
of accession thereto deposited, of any declara- 
tion or notification of termination given under 
the preceding paragraphs." 

FINANCE 

Double Income Taxation With Sweden 

On September 8, 1939, the President ratified 
the Convention for the Avoidance of Double 
Taxation between the United States and Sweden 
signed on March 23, 1939. 

Under the terms of the convention it will 
become effective on the first day of January 
following the exchange of the instruments of 
ratification, which will take place at Stockliolm. 



LABOR 

Conventions of the International Labor 
Conference 

France 

The American Ambassador to France re- 
ported that the Journal Officiel of July 9, 1939, 
contained laws authorizing the Minister for 
Foreign Affairs to ratify the following conven- 
tions adopted by the International Labor Con- 
ference : 

Convention Concerning Compulsory Old-Age 
Insurance for Persons Employed in Indus- 
trial or Commercial Undertakings, in the 
Liberal Professions, and for Outworkers and 
Domestic Servants (seventeenth session, 
June 8-30, 1933) 

Convention Concerning Compulsory Invalidity 
Insurance for Persons Employed in Indus- 
trial or Commercial Undertakings, in the 
Liberal Professions and for Outworkers and 
Domestic Servants (seventeenth session, June 
8-30, 1933) 

Convention Concerning Annual Holidays With 
Pay (twentieth session, June 4-24, 1936). 

The Ambassador also reported that the Jour- 
nal O-fjiciel of July 12, 1939, contained laws au- 
thorizing the Minister for Foreign Affairs to 
ratify the following conventions adopted by the 
International Labor Conference: 

Convention Concerning Compulsory Old-Age 
Insurance for Persons Employed in Agricul- 
tural Undertakings (seventeenth session, June 
8-30, 1933) 

Convention Concerning Compulsory Invalidity 
Insurance for Persons Employed in Agricul- 
tural Undertakings (seventeenth session, June 
8-30,1933). 

POSTAL 

Parcel Post Agreement With Barbados 

On September 20, 1939, the President ap- 
proved and ratified the Parcel Post Agreement 
between the United States and Barbados signed 
at Bridgetown on August 14, 1939, and at 
Washington on September 13, 1939. 



294 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Parcel Post Agreement With Egypt 

On September 18, 1939, the President ap- 
proved and ratified the Parcel Post Agreement 
between the United States and Egypt signed 
at Cairo on July 17, 1939, and at Washington 
on September 13, 1939. 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

International Telecommunication Conven- 
tion (Treaty Series No, 867) 

Greece 

The American Minister to Greece transmit- 
ted to the Secretary of State with a despatch 
dated August 17, 1939, a translation of an oiE- 
cial announcement of the Greek Ministry for 
Foreign Affairs stating that the instrument of 
ratification by Greece of the International Tele- 
communication Convention signed at Madrid 
on December 9, 1932, was deposited with the 
Spanish Ministry for Foreign Affairs on June 
3, 1939. 

Rumania 

According to notification No. 339, dated Sep- 
tember 1, 1939, from the International Tele- 
communication Union at Bern, the Instrument 
of ratification by Rumania of the International 
Telecommunication Convention signed at Ma- 
drid on December 9, 1932, together with the 
General Radio Regulations, the Additional 
Radio Regulations and Addition