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Full text of "Department of State bulletin"

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THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



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VOLUME III • Numbers 54-79 



July 6-December 28, 1940 










UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1941 



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Publication 1591 



INDEX TO THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Volume III: Numbers 54-79, July 6 -December 28, 1940 



Act (if Ilabaiia (Itesoliition XX of Final Act of 

Habaiia), text, 138 ; 260; 576. 
Actiii!,' Socrc'tary of State, U. S. Sec Welles. Sumner. 
Addresses, statements, etc. See names of i)idiiiduals 

and sitrciflc subjects. 
Advertising Club of Hallimore, Md. : Addre.ss by 

Under Secretary Welles before, 340. 
Agents of foreign principals: Registration of, 281. 
Agreements, international. Sec Trade agreements ; 

Treaties, agreements, etc. 
Agriculture : 
Coffee-marketing agreement, Inter-Amerlcan (1040), 

482. 
International trade relationships and, address by Mr. 

Grady, 433. 
Workers, convention on association rights (1021), 38. 
Air navigation. See Aviation. 
Air service. See Aviation. 
Aircraft. Spc Aviation. 
Alaska: U. S. reg\iIations on transit by Canadians 

through, ms. 
Albany River Hasiu : Diversion of waters into Great 

Lakes System, 430. 
Aliens (see also Refugees; Visas, U. S.) : 
Entry into U. S. — 

Documentary requirements, 198, 252, 280. 
I'lom Canada and Mexico, regulations, 14, 36, 176. 
Personnel of U.S. transportation lines, documentary 

requirements, 107. 
Residents of U. S., documentary requirements, 14. 
Seamen, entry Into U. S., documentary requirements, 
252. 
"American Legion" : Voyage to repatriate Americans, 

80, 115, 152. 
American Philosophical Society : Address by Ambassa- 
dor Bullitt before, 121. 
American Jlerchant Marine Conference, New Orleans, 

La. : Address by Mr. Saugstad before, 540. 
American republics (see aUo Commissions, etc., inter- 
national ; Conferences, etc., international ; Defense, 
Hemi.spherie ; Finance ; Pan American ; and indi- 
vidual countries) : 
Addresses, statements, etc., by Department otBcers, 
3, 5, 35, 42, 65, 103, 176, 224, 291, 205, 340, 347, 369, 
374, 441, 445, 448, 449. 461, 573. 
Anniversary of independence of Central American 

republics, statement by Secretary Hull, 224. 
Aviation Day, Pan American, 452, 515; address by 
Mr. Burke, 573. 



American republics — Continued. 

Cooperation, economic, 41, 141, 347, 374. 
Cooperative peace, address by Mr. Berle. 295. 
Coordination of Commercial and Cultural Relations 

between. Office of, 151. 
Dangers from war in Europe, address by Secretary 
HuU at Habana, 42; statements by Secretary 
Hull, 103, 176. 
Defense, address by Mr. Berle, 445; by I'resident 

Roosevelt, 201. 
Development of mineral resources, agricultural and 

forest products, and industrial plants, 4fr4. 
Economic position during last decade, address by Mr. 

Grady, 5. 
EuroiK-an possessions in Western Ileniisijhere, state- 
ment of Secretary Hull on German reply to V. S. 
note regarding, 3. 
Exchange of professors and students, 140, 254, 282. 
Export surpluses in, 41. 
Habana Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs, 11, 

25, 34, 42, 65, 104, 127, 178, 430, 5!K). 
Indian Institute, Inter-American, ,524. 
Naval and air bases leased by U. S. from Great Brit- 
ain, use by, 196. 
Problems, address by Secretary Hull at Habana, 65. 
Public health, cooperation in, 139, 46."i. 
Relations with — 
Address by Under Secretary Welle.s, 340, 369. 
Message by Secretary Hull to Latin American Lec- 
ture Series, 869. 
Shipping — 
Address by Under Secretary Welles, 461. 
Inter-American Maritime Conference on effects of 
European war, 224 ; resolutions, 516. 
Solidarity — 
Address by Mr. Berle, 441; Mr. Grady, 448; Mr. 

Wilson, 35. 
Continental, 135. 

Statement by Uruguayan Minister at Madrid to 
Spanish press, 452. 
Trade, address by Mr. Finley, 449. 
Visit to U. S. of Brazilian Chief of Staff, 409. 
Women, inter-American activities, 423. 
American vessels (see also Neutrality, U. S. ; Repatria- 
tion of Americans; Shipping, U. S.) : 
"American Legion", voyage to repatriate Americans, 
80, 115, 152. 

593 



594 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



American vessels — Continued. 

"City of Rayville", explosion off coast of Australia, 

407. 
"Manhatt.in", voyage to repatriate Americans, 24. 
"McKecsport", travel in combat areas, 24. 
Travel in combat areas, U. S. regulations, 24, 152, 381. 
Americans (see aUo Neutrality, U. S. ; and individual 
coiiittrics) : 
Entry into U. S. from Canada and Mexico, require- 
ments, 15. 
In foreign countries, 40S, 45.5, 454. 
Repatriation, 115. 318, 339, 408. 
Travel in combat areas, 24, 152. 314, 381, 420. 
America's Tovfu Meeting of the Air : Address by Mr. 

Berle on, 445. 
Ammunition. See Arms and miuiitions. 
Anderson, John Z., U. S. Representative: Letter from 
Secretary Hull regarding German representation 
in the U. S., 549. 
Anniversaries, national. See iiidiridiial countries. 
Antigua : Naval and air bases, lease from Great Britain, 

196, 199. 
Arbitration (.see also Conciliation; Peace; Permanent 
Court of International Justice) ; Appointment of 
member to Permanent Court of, 5S0. 
Argentina (.see iilso American republics) : 

Consul General at New Orleans (Servente), dinner 
honoring, aboard S. S. "Deltargentino" at New 
Orleans, 449. 
Delegation to Ilabana Meeting of Ministers of Foreign 
Affairs of American Republics, departure of 
Chairman from U. S., 115 ; dinner in honor of, 104. 
Press intervie\^' by President Ortiz, comments by Act- 
ing Secretary Welles, 453. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Postal, universal (1939), administrative enforce- 
ment, 272. 
Stabilization arrangement with U. S. (1940), 590. 
Ariea-Santos tran.soceanic railway: Final Act of 

Habana (X), 134. 
Arlington National Cemetery : Armistice Day address 

by President Roosevelt, 417. 
Armistice Day, 1940: 
Address by President Roosevelt, 417 ; by Mr. Berle 
before Women's Joint Congressional Committee, 
423. 
Proclamation, 314. 
Arms and munitions: 
Categories, 58. 

ExiMrt control in national defense, 11. 
Traffic statistics, 50, 155, 225, 351, 467. 
Army registraticm day, proclamation, 221. 
Artistic exhibitions, convention (1936), 525. 
Assistant Secretaries of State. See Berle, Adolf A., Jr. ; 

Grady, Henry F. ; Long. Breckinridge. 
Association of American Universities ; Address by Mr. 
Berle before, 419. 



Australia : 

Airplane accident near Canberra, 116. 
Explosion of "City of Rayville", 407. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Peace advancement, with U. S. (1040), amending 
treaty between U. S. and Great Britain (1914), 
signature, 207 ; U. S. Senate advice and consent 
to ratification, 481 ; U. S. ratification, .590. 
Permanent Court of International Justice, optional 
clause of Statute, termination and new condi- 
tions of acceptance, 324. 
Wool reserve in U. S., agreement between U. S. and 
Great Britain (1940), 5,54. 
Aviation : 

Aircraft and engines, export control in national de- 
fense of plans or designs for, 213. 
Gasoline, limitation of export, 94. 
Mission, U. S., to Peru, 98 ; to Ecuador, 551. 
Motor fuel, export control in national defense of 

equipment for pr<iduetion of, 213. 
Pan American airway route to Rio de Janeiro from 

Para, 177. 
Pan American Aviation Day, 452, 51.5, 573. 
Plane accident near Canberra, Australia, 116. 
Plane travel in combat area, regulations, 381. 
Treaties, agreements, etc., 18, 98, 551, 552. 
Washington National Airport, remarks of President 
Roosevelt at laying of cornerstone, 251. 
Avila, Camacho, General, President of Mexico : Inaugu- 
ration, 432. 
Azores : 
American Consulate at Horta, 115. 

Bahamas: Naval and air bases in, lease from Great 

Britain, 196, 199. 
Baltic republics. See Latvia, Lithuania, and Estonia. 
Batista, Fulgencio, President of Cuba : Inauguration, 

283. 
Belgium : 

American Amba.ssador (Cudahy), statement of Act- 
ing Secretary Welles on press interview, 108; 
resignation, 4(56. 
Debts to U. S., 566. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

International Institute for Unification of Private 
Law, Fundamental Statute, adherence, 110. 
Belize, question of: Final Act of Habana (XIX), 138. 
Belligerents. See Europe, war in ; Far East. 
Berle, Adolf A., Jr., Assistant Secretary of State: 
Addresses, statements, etc. — 
Defense, hemispheric, 445. 
Foreign policy, U. S., 295. 

Great Lakes Seaway and Power Conference. 520. 
Inter-American activity, organization of women in, 

423. 
Latin American Lecture Series, inter-American 

solidarity, 441. 
Universities in a democracy, 419. 



INDEX 



595 



Berle, Adolf A., Jr., Assistant Secretary of State — 
Continued. 
Great Lake.s-St. Lawrence waterway project, corre- 
spondence with Canadian Minister, 4'M). 
Bermuda : Naval and air bases in, lease from Great 

Britain. 196, 199. 
Birds, miRratory, conventions with Great Britain (1916) 

and with Mexico (19.36) for protection of, 116. 
Bolivia (.sec also American rcpulilics) : 

Railway between Vila Vila and Santa Cruz, U. S. 

survey of, 2tS3. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

International Institute for Unification of Private 

Law, Fundamental Statute, adherence, 110. 
Powers of attorney (1940), signature ad referen- 
dum, 286. 
Prisoners of war convention (1929), deposit of 

instruments of ratification. 258. 
Red Cross convention (192;)), depo.sit of instru- 
ments of ratification, 238. 
Bonsai, I'liilip W., Assistant Chief, Division of the 
American Republics of the Department : 
Appointment as Acting Chief, 351. 
Representative of Department at inauguration of 
air route from Par:'i to Rio de .Janeiro, 177. 
Boundary waters: Convention with Canada (1938), 

192, 218, 309, 325. 
Brazil (see also American republics) : 
Delegation to Habana Meeting of Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of American Reputilics, diinicr in 
honor of, 104. 
Profes.sors and studeut.s, exchange with U. S., 254. 
Second Brazilian Dental Congress at Rio de Janeiro, 

322. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Coffee-marketing, inter-American (1940), signa- 
ture, 482. 
Customs privileges for diplomatic and consular per- 
sonnel, reciprocal, with U. S. (1940), 482. 
Exchange of oflicial publications with U. S. (1940), 

27. 
International Institute for LTnification of Private 

Law, Fundamental Statute, adherence, 286. 
Permanent Court of International Justice, optional 
clause of the Statute, reservations regarding 
declarations of Australia, Canada, France, New 
Zealand. Union of South Africa. United King- 
dom, 170. 
Powers of attorney (1940), signature, 218. 
Visit to U. S. of Army C^ief of Staff (Goes Monteiro), 
409. 
British Guiana : 
American Consulate at Georgetown, 61. 



British Guiana — Continued. 

Naval and air ba.ses in, lease from Great Britain, 
196, 199. 
Broadcasting: North American regional agreement 

(1937), 238. 
Brun, E., Governor General of North Greenland : Visit 

to U. S., 25. 
Building industry: Convention on .safety provisions 

(19.37). 38. 
Bullitt, William C, American Ambassador to France: 
Address on war in Europe, 121 ; statement on reported 
resignation, 437. 
Burke, Thomas, Chief, Division of International Com- 
munications of the Department : .\ddress on Pan 
American Aviation Day, 573. 
Burma tsce also Far East) : 
Trade route to China, 36. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
International Relief Union (1927), ai)plication to, 

27. 
Opium and other drugs (1912), application on be- 
half of, 456. 

Canada [see also Aliens, Entry into U. S. ; Defense, 
Hemispheric) : 
American Consulates at Fort Erie, Ontario, 15, 237 ; 
Kingston, Ontario, 1.5, 237; London, Ontario, 18; 
Sarnia, Ontario, 1.5, 18: Sault Ste. Marie, On- 
tario, 15, 237; Sherbrooke, Quebec, 15, 237; Trail, 
Briti.sh Columbia, 15, 26S. 
Cattle, heavy, allocation for 1941 of U. S. tariff quota 

on, 522. 
Conservation of foreign exchange, 521. 
Defense, Permanent Joint Board, ^\'ith U. S., 154, 216. 
Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Waterway Project — 
Address by Mr. Berle before the Great Lakes Sea- 
way and Power Conference at Detroit, 520. 
Exchange of correspondence between Mr. Berle and 

Minister Christie, 430. 

Message of President Roosevelt to Great Lakes 

Seaway and Power Conference at Detroit, 518. 

Preliminary investigation of International Rapids 

Section, St. Lawrence River, 316. 

Immigration to U. S. from, U. S. regulations, 14, 36, 

176, 198. 
Suspension by U. S. of tonnage duties on vessels, 116. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Air-transport arrangement (1939), arrangement 
with U. S. to give effect to article III (19.0), 
552. 
Peace advancement, with U. S. (1910), amending 
treaty between U. S. and Great Britain (1914), 
signature, 207 ; U. S. Senate advice and con- 
sent to ratification, 481 ; U. S. ratification, 590. 



596 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Canada — Continued. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — Continued. 

Rainy Lalie, emergency regulation of level of 
(1938), U. S. Senate advice and consent to rati- 
fication, 192; ratification by U. S., 218; ex- 
change of ratifications witli U. S., 309; procla- 
mation by U. S. President, 325. 
Supplementary trade agreement with XJ. S. (1939), 
negotiations for revision, 409 ; 1940 agreement, 
signature, 553 ; proclamation by U. S. Presi- 
dent, 575; U. S. Treasury public notice, 591. 
Visa services, non-lmmigi-ation, temporary American 
Consulates for, 15. 
Catholic Conference of the South : Address by Mr. Long 
before National Conference of Christians and Jews 
in cooperation with University of North Carolina 
and, 491. 
Cattle: 

Heavy, allocation for 1941 of tariff quota on, .'j22. 
Herdbooks, convention on methods of keeping (1936), 
364, 412. 
Cayenne, French Guiana : American Con.sulate at, 115. 
Central Translating Office of the Department: Creation 

and functions, 26. 
Chile (see also American republics) : 

Professors and students, exchange with U. S., 150, 

254. 
Relations with Spain — 
Final Act of Habana (XVIII), 138. 
Severance, statement by Acting Secretary Welles, 
48. 
China : 

Burma trade route to, 36. 

Extraterritoriality in, comment by Acting Secretary 

Welles, 30. 
National anniver.sary, 306. 
U. S. credit, 521. 
Christie, Loring C, Canadian Minister to U. S. : Corre- 
spondence with Mr. Berle on Great Lakes- St. Law- 
rence waterway ijroject, 430. 
Churchill, Winston S., Prime Minister of Great Britain : 
Letter to Secretary Hull on death of Lord Lothian, 
562. 
"City of Rayvillo" : Explosion off coast of Australia, 407. 
Coal, coke, and coal briquets: Imports from U. S. S. R., 

167. 
Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz, Mexico: American Consulate 

at, 268. 
Coffee-marketing agreement, inter-American (1940), 

482. 
Colombia (see also American republics), treaties, agree- 
ments, etc. : 
Artistic exhibitions (1936), deposit of instrument of 

ratification, 525. 
Coffee-marketing, inter-American (1940), signature, 
482. 



Colombia, etc. — Continued. 

Cultural relations, inter-American (1936), deposit 

of instrument of ratification, 524. 
Educational and publicity films (1936), deposit of 

instrument of ratification, 525. 
Extradition, supplementary, with U. S. (1940), signa- 
ture, 218; U. S. Senate advice and consent to 
ratification, 525 ; U. S. ratification, 591. 
International Institute for Unification of Private 

Law, Fundamental Statute, adherence, 110. 
Pan American highway (1936), deposit of instru- 
ment of ratification, 526. 
Public instruction, peaceful orientation (1936), de- 
posit of instrument of ratification, 524. 
Publications, interchange (1936), deposit of instru- 
ment of ratification, 525. 
Columbus, Christopher : Address by President Roose- 
velt on anniversary of discovery of New World, 
291. 
Combat areas, travel in, 24, 381, 429. 
Commerce, international (see also Export surpluses, 
etc. ; Exports from U. S. ; Foreign trade, U. S'. ; Im- 
ports into U. S. ; Trade agreements ; Treaties, 
agreements, etc.) ; 
Addresses, statements, etc., by Mr. Edminster, 494; 
Mr. Geist, 87, 93, 536; Mr. Grady, 81, 433, 531; 
President Roosevelt, 81 ; Mr. Saugstad, 540. 
Agreement between U. S. and U. S. S. R. (1940), 105. 
Burma trade route to China, 36. 
Cotton piece goods, Japanese, importation into the 

Philippines, 36. 
Colfee-marketing agreement, inter-American, 482. 
Economic position of American republics during last 

decade, alterations in, 5. 
Fox furs and skins, black and silver, U. S.-Canada 
supplementary trade agreement (1939), 409; 
U. S.-Canada supplementary agreement (1940), 
553, 575, 591. 
Petroleum products, agreement to export from 

Netherlands Indies to Japan, 432. 
Tonnage duties, suspension by U. S. with respect to 
vessels of Canada, 116; Dominican Republic, 
433; Egypt, 432; Greenland, 403; Guatemala, 
433; Haiti, 433; Iceland, 285; Peru, 346; Vene- 
zuela, 433. 
U. S. and belligerents, regulations with respect to 
Greece, 429. 
Couunercial Treaties and Agreements, Division of the 
Department : 
Creation and functions, 16. 
Statement by Secretary Hull on, 16. 
Commissions, committees, etc., international (see also 
Commissions, committees, etc., national ; ('onfer- 
ences, congresses, etc.) : 
Development Commission, Inter-American, 4(34. 



INDEX 



597 



Commissions, committees, etc., International — Cont. 
European Colonies and Possessions in the Amerii-as, 
Emergency Committee for Provisional Adminis- 
tration of, 139, 177. 
Financial and Economic Advisory Committee, Inter- 
American, commissions and conferences under 
auspices of, 461, 516. 
Indian Institute, Inter-American, 524, 592. 
Permanent Joint Board on Defense, U. S. and Canada, 

154, 216. 
Nature Protection and Wildlife Preservation, Inter- 
American Committee of Experts on, 308. 
Territorial Administration, Inter-American Commis- 
sion for, 177. 
Conunissions, committees, etc., national (see also Com- 
missions, committees, etc., internutional ; Confer- 
ences, congresses, etc.) : 
Defense Communications Board, creation and func- 
tions, 2.").^. 
Federal Communications Commission, 238. 
Foreign Affairs Council, address by Under Secretary 

Welles, 243. 
Foreign Policy Association, address by Mr. Duggan, 

374. 
St. Lawrence Advisory Committee, creation, ,'U7. 
Communications Board, XI. S. Defense, creation and 

functions, 253. 
Conciliation {see aUo Arbitration) : Treaty witli 

Liberia (1939), 482, 591. 
Conferences, congresses, etc., international (see also 
Commissions, committees, etc. ; Conferences, con- 
gresses, etc., national) : 
International Institute for Unification of Private 

Law, 100, 286. 
Labor Conference. International. .18, 456. 
Maritime Conference, Inter-American, at Washing- 
ton, D. C, 224, 461, 516. 
Ministers of Foreign Affairs of American Republics, 
Meeting at Habana, 11, 25, 34, 42, 65, 104, 127, 
178, 436, 590. 
Second Brazilian Dental Congress at Rio de Janeiro, 
322. 
Conferences, congresses, etc., national (see also Com- 
missions, committees, etc. ; Conferences, congresses, 
etc., international; U. S. Congress) : 
Great Lakes Seaway and Power Conference, 518, 

520. 
International Relations Conference of the Institute 
of Latin American Studies, at University of 
Texas, address by Mr. Grady before, 5. 
National Conference of Christians and Jews, address 

by Mr. Long before, 491. 
National Foreign Trade Convention, Twenty-seventh, 
81, 87, 93. 
Congress, U. S. See U. S. Congress. 
Consular offices. See U. S. Foreign Service. 



Consultation procedure: Final Act of Habana (XVII), 

137. 
Continental solidarity: Final Act of Habana (XII), 

135. 
Contributions for relief. See Relief, etc. 
Control of exports in national defense. See under Ex- 
ports from U. S. 
Conventions, international. See Treaties, agreements, 

etc. 
Cooperation, economic, with American republics, 41, 151, 

374. 
Cooperative peace: Address by Mr. Berle, 20.5. 
Coordination of Commercial and Cultural Relations Be- 
tween the American Republics, Office, establish- 
ment, 151. 
Costa Rica (see also American republics) : 

Anniversary of independence, statement by Secretary 

Hull, 224. 
Professors and students, exchange with U. S., 149, 

254. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Coffee-marketing, inter-American (1940), signa- 
ture, 482. 
Indian Institute, inter-American (1940), signature, 

592. 
Nature protection and wildlife preservation (1940), 

signature, 402. 
Postal, universal (1939), approval, 62. 
Cotton: 

Piece goods to the Philippines, Japanese export, 36. 
Suspension of quotas on imports of certain types, 
584. 
Courts. See Permanent Court of Arbitration ; Perma- 
nent Court of International Justice. 
Credit, U. S. See Debts ; and under China, Great Brit- 
ain, Greece. 
Cuba (see also American republics) : 

Ambas.sador to U. S. (Martinez Fraga), luncheon of 
Under Secretary Welles upon retirement of, 584. 
Habana Meeting of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs 
of American Republics, 11, 25, 34, 42, 65, 104, 
127, 436, 590. 
Inauguration of President Batista, 283. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Coffee-marketing, inter-American (1940), signature, 

482. 
Indian Institute, Inter-American (1940), signature, 

592. 
Nature protection and wildlife preservation (1940), 
signature, 308. 
Cudahy, John, American Ambassador to Belgium : 
Press interview, statement by Acting Secretary Welles 

regarding, 108. 
Resignation, 466. 
Cultural relations, inter- American convention (1936), 
149, 254, 282, 524, 



598 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Customs (see also Quotas; Tariff) : 

Privileges for diplomatic and consular personnel, re- 
ciprocal agreement with Brazil (1040), 482. 

Revenue collection, convention with Dominican Re- 
public (1924), revision, negotiations, 117; agree- 
ment, 209; signature (1940), 271. 

Tonnage duties, U. S. suspension with respect to ves- 
sels of Canada, 116 ; Dominican Republic, 433 ; 
Egypt, 432; Greenland, 403; Guatemala, 433; 
Haiti, 433; Iceland, 285; Peru, 346; Venezuela, 
433. 
Czechoslovakia : 

American Consulate General at Prague, Bohemia, 364. 

Dairy Industries' Exposition, Atlantic City, N. J.: 

Pan American Day address by Mr. Geist, 347. 
Dakar, French West Africa : American Consulate at, 

108. 
Davies, Jcseph E., Special Assistant to the Secretary of 
State: Resignation, exchange of correspondence 
with Secretary Hull, 455. 
Dayton, Ohio : Address by President Roosevelt to the 

Western Hemisphere, 291. 
Death of U. S. employees: Payment of expenses in 

connection with, 281. 
Debts, intergovernmental, 501, 565 ; Belgium, 566 ; 
France, 507; Germany, 284; Great Britain, 568; 
Hungary, .569; Italy, 570; Poland, 571; Rumania, 
572; Yugoslavia, 572. 
Defense ; 

Hemispheric — 

Addresses, statements, etc., by Mr. Berle, 445 ; 

Secretary Hull, 42 ; President Roo.sevelt, 291. 

Continental solidarity, Final Act of Habana (XII), 

135. 
Cooperation, Final Act of Habana (XV), 136. 
Naval and air ba.';es leased by U. S. from Great 

Britain, 196, 199. 
Preparations for, 103, 176. 
Permanent Joint Board on, U. S. and Canada, 154, 

216. 
U. S. national — 

Addresses by Mr. Geist, 93 ; Mr. Long, 491 ; Under 

Secretary Welles, 243, 340. 
Aviation gasoline, limitation of export, 94. 
Defense Communications Board, establishment and 

functions, 253. 
Export Control Act, administration, address by Mr. 

Geist, 93 ; licenses under, 104. 
Export control in. 11, 49, 50, 213, 250, 279, 280, 529, 

559. 
Great Lakes - St. Lawrence waterway project, 430. 
Lease of naval and air bases in Western Hemi- 
sphere from Great Britain, 199. 
Pan American relations as an element in, address 
by Under Secretary Welles, 340, 



Defense — Continued. 
U. S. national — Continued. 

Registration Day proclamation, 221. 

Requisition of necessary equipnuMit, munitions, 

machinery, etc., 313. 
Requisition of planes ordered by Sweden, 338. 
St. Lawrence River, International Rapids Section, 
power development, 518, 520; preliminary in- 
vestigation, 316. 
Denmark: International Institute for Unification of 
Private Law, Fundamental Statute, adherence, 286. 
Dental Congress, Second Brazilian at Rio de Janeiro, 

322. 
Departmental orders. See State, Department of. 
Departments, U. S. See alphabetic entries. 
Development Commission, Inter-American, 464. 
Dies, Martin, U. S. Representative: Activities of Ger- 
man consuls and agents in the U. S., correspond- 
ence with Secretary Hull, 425. 
Diplomatic officers. See Foreign diplomatic officers in 

U. S. ; U. S. Foreign Service. 
Dominican Republic {see also American republics) : 
Permanent Court of Arbitration, appointment of 

member, 589. 
Professors and students, exchange with U. S., 149, 

254. 
Suspension by U. S. of tonnage duties for vessels of, 

433. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Coffee marketing, inter-American (1940), signa- 
ture, 482. 
Customs revenue collection, with U. S. (1924), ne- 
gotiations for revision, 117 ; agreement on re- 
vision, 209'; revision (1940), 271. 
European colonies and possessions in the Ameri- 
cas, pro^isiflnal administration (1940), ap- 
proval, 436; deposit of instrument of ratifica- 
tion, 590. 
Final Acts of Meetings of Ministers of Foreign 
Affairs of American Republics — 
Panama, 1930, deposit of instrument of ratifica- 
tion, 590. 
Habana, 1940, approval, 436; deposit of instru- 
ment of ratification, 590. 
Nature protection and wildlife preservation (1940), 
signature, 308. 
Duggan, Laurence, Adviser on Political Relations of 
the Department : 
Appointment, 350. 

Address on political and economic solidarity of Amer- 
ican republics, 374. 

Economic and Financial Advisory Committee, Inter- 
American : Maritime Conference under auspices of, 
224, 461, 516. 



INDEX 



599 



Ecuador (see also American republics), treaties, agree- 
ments, etc. : 
Coffee-marketing, inter-American (1940), signature, 

482. 
Extradition, supplementary, with U. S. (11)39), U. S. 
Senate advice and consent to ratification, 482; 
U. S. ratification, 591. 
Nature protection and wildlife preservation (1940), 

signature, 308. 
U. S. naval and military aviation missions (1940), 
551. 
Edminster, Lynn R., Special Assistant to the Secretary 

of State: Address on U. S. foreign policy, 494. 
Educational and publicity tilms, convention on facilities 

(1936), 525. 
Egypt : 
Tonnage duties for vessels of, U. S. suspension, 432. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Statistics of causes of death (1934), extension to 

certain districts, 576. 
Wages and hours of work in industries and agri- 
culture (1938), rjitification, 456. 
Eire. See Ireland. 
El Salvador (.see also American republics) : 

Anniversary of independence, statement by Secre- 
tary Hull, 224. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Act of Habana (1940), ratification, 576. 
Coffee-marketing, inter- American (1940), signa- 
ture, 482. 
European c<jlonies and possessions in the Americas, 
provisional administration (1940), ratilication, 
576. 
Indian Institute, Inter-American (1940), signa- 
ture, 592. 
Nature protection and wildlife preservation (1940) , 
signature, 308. 
Estigarribia. Gen. Josfi F61ix, President of Paraguay : 

Death, 214. 
Estonia : 
American Legation at Tallinn, 199. 
Property in the U. S., executive order and regula- 
tions regarding, 33. 
Territorial integrity of, statement by Acting Secre- 
tary Welles, 48. 
Europe, war in (see also American republics; American 
vessels ; Defense ; Foreign policy, U. S. ; Relief, 
etc.; and individual countries): 
Address by Ambassador Bullitt. 121. 
American Embassy in Berlin, damage during air raid, 

215. 
Americans, repatriation, 24, 80, 115, 1.52. 
The British Fleet, British policy regarding, 195. 
Neutrality proclamations and regulations of U. S. 

in war between Italy and Greece, 426-429. 
Passport regulations, U. S., during, 314. 
Refugees to U. S., 23, 31, 563. 

309195—41 2 



Europe, war in — Continued. 

Shipping, inter-American, effects upon, 224. 
Statements by Secretary Hull on danger to American 

republics, 42, 103, 176. 
U. S. aid to Great Britain, 581 ; to Greece, 503. 
European colonies and possessions in the Americas: 
German reply to U. S. note, statement by Secretary 

EuU regarding, 3. 
Provisional administration — 
Act of Habana (Resolution XX of the Final Act 

of Habana), text, 138; 269; 576. 
Convention (1940), text, 145 ; 178 ; 269 ; 309 ; 402 ; 

436; 576; 590. 
Emergency Committee, 139, 177. 
Exchange professors and students, U. S. and other 

American republics, 149, 254, 282. 
Executive agreements. See Treaties, agreements, etc. 
Executive orders: 

Death of U. S. employees, regulations on payment of 

expenses in connection with, 281. 
Export control regulations regarding iron and steel, 
530; certain additional articles and materials, 
560. 
Neutrality enforcement, 428. 
Property of Latvia, Estonia, and Lithuania in the 

U. S., 33; of Rumania in the U. S., 306. 
Requisitioning of equipment, munitions, machinery, 

etc., necessary to national defense, 313. 
St. Lawrence Advisory Committee and preliminary 
investigation of International Rapids Section, St. 
Lawrence River, 317. 
Selective service regulations, 2.52. 
Transportation expenses on effects of certain Gov- 
ernment employees and oflicers, 426. 
Export Control Act. See Exports from U. S. 
Export-Import Bank of Washington : 
Message of President Roosevelt on increase of capital 
and lending power, 41. 

Export Managers' Club of Chicago: Address by Mr. 

Geist before, 536. 
Export surpluses in the Western Hemisphere, 41. 
Exports from U. S. {see also Commerce, international; 
Foreign trade, U. S. ; Imports into U. S. ; Trade 
agreements; Treaties, agreements, etc.) : 
Arms and munitions, 50, 51, 1.55, 225, 351, 467. 
Aviation gasoline, limitation, 94. 
Control Act, administration, address by Mr. Geist, 93; 

licenses under, 104, 313. 
Control in national defense, 11, 49, 50, 213, 250, 279, 

280, 313, 338, 529, 559. 
Customs privileges to diplomatic and consular per- 
sonnel of Brazil in the U. S., 482. 
Fresh fruits and vegetables to Canada, lack of 

restrictions on, 521. 
HeUum, 60, 166, 237, 363, 479, 



600 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Exports from U. S. — Continued. 

Regulations with respect to Greece, 429. 

Tin-plate scrap, GO, 166, 236, 363, 479. 
Extradition, supplementary treaties, U. S. and — 

Colombia (1940), 218, 525, 591. 

Ecuador (1939), Guatemala (1940), Mexico (1939), 
482, 591. 

Switzerland (1940), 2.38, 482, 591. 
Extraterritoriality in China, 36. 

Far East (see also individual countries) : 
American.s, rei>atriation, 318, 339. 
Burma trade route to China, 36. 
Credit to China, U. S., 521. 
Extraterritoriality in China, 36. 
Defense forces in the International Settlement at 

Shanghai, statement by Secretary Hull, 197. 
Detention by Japanese in French Indochina of Amer- 
ican Vice Consul and press correspondent, 453. 
Oil agreement between Japanese importers and 

Netherlands Indies companies, 432. 
Status quo In French Indochina, statements by Sec- 
retary Hull, 196, 253. 
Federal Communications Commis.sion : Amendment of 
rules and regulations to carry out provisions of 
North American regional broadcasting agreement 
(1937), 238. 
Pinal Act of Habana, 127, 178, 436, 590. 
Finance : 
Advisory Committee, Financial and Economic, Inter- 
American : Maritime Conference at Washington, 
D. C, under auspices of, 224, 461, 516. 
Arrangement with Argentina for monetary stabiliza- 
tion (1940), 590. 
Arrangement with Haiti, supplementary (1940), 365. 
Convention with Dominican Republic (1940), 271. 
Economic and financial cooperation : Final Act of 
Habana (XXV), 141. 
Finland : 
Death of former President Kallio, 583. 
Debts to U. S., iwstponement of payment, 501. 
International Institute for Unification of Private 
Law, Fundamental Statute, adherence, 110. 
Finley, Harold D., Assistant Chief, Division of the 
American Republics of the Department: Address 
at dinner honoring Argentine Consul General 
(Servente) at New Orleans, 449; representative at 
negotiations for Dominican Republic customs con- 
vention, 117. 
Fire-control instruments, military searchlights, aerial 
camera.s, and other military equipment, export con- 
trol in national defense, 279. 
Foreign activities against domestic institutions: Final 

Act of Habana (VI), 132. 
Foreign Affairs Council, Cleveland, Ohio: Address by 
Under Secretary Welles, 243. 



Foreign diplomatic officers in the U. S. : 

Argentine Consul General (Servente) at New' Or- 
leans, address by Mr. Finley at dinner honoring, 
449. 
British Ambassador (Lord Lothian), death, 547, 562. 
German Consul General in New Orleans, report on 

newspaper interview, 4. 
German consuls and agents, activities and propa- 
ganda, 42.5. 
German representatives' activities, 549. 
Presentation of credentials, 215, 408, 574. 
Foreign exchange: Canadian conservation, 521. 
Foreign policy, U. S. (see also American republics; 
Defense ; Foreign trade, U. S. ) : 
Addresses, statements, etc., by Mr. Berle, 295; Mr. 
Edminster, 494 ; Secretary Hull, postponement 
of delivery, 315; text, 331; highlights, 337; text, 
407; Under Secretary Welles, 243. 
Association, Foreign Policy, New York, N. Y., 
address by Mr. Diiggan before, 374. 
Foreign principals: Registration of agents of, 281. 
"Foreign Relations of the United States, 1925", volumes 

I and II, 5.86. 
Foreign Service of the United States. See U. S. For- 
eign Service. 
Foreign trade, U. S. (see also Commerce, international; 
Exports; Finance; Imports; Trade agreements): 
Addresses by Mr. Geist, 87, 93, 347, 536 ; Mr. Grady, 

81, 319, 433; President Roosevelt, 81. 
Commerce with belligerents, regulations with respect 

to Greece, 429. 
Commercial agreement, U. S. and U. S. S. R., 105. 
Pox furs and skins, black and silver, supplementary 
agreement with Canada (1939), negotiationsi for 
revision, 400; supplementary agi'eemeiit wi,th 
Canada (1940), 553, 57.5, 591. 
Fort Erie, Ontario, Canada : American Consulate at, 

15, 237. 
Pox furs and skins, black and silver, agreement with 
Canada on imiwrtation into U. S., 409, 553, 575, 591. 
France : 
Ambas.sador to U. S. (Heury-Haye), presentation of 

credentials, 215. 
American Ambassador (Bullitt), address, 121. 
American Consulate at St. Pierre-Miquelou, 109; at 

Tananarive, Madaga.scar, 4.54. 
Debts to U. S., 567. 
French Guiana: American Consulate at Cayenne, 115. 
French Indochina : 

Detention by Japanese of American A'ice Consul and 

press correspondent, 453. 
Status quo, statement by Secretary Hull, 196, 253. 
French West Africa : American Consulate at Dakar, 

108. 
French West Indies : American Consulate at Martinique, 
61. 



INDEX 



6m 



Fur seals, convention for preservation and protection 
of (1911), abrogation by Japan, 412. 

Gelst, Raymond H., Chief, Division of Commercial Af- 
fairs of the Department : Addresses, statements, 
etc., on Foreign Service, 87 ; Exjiort Control Act, 
93; American republics, cooperation, 347; U. S. 
foreign trade, 536. 
General Pulaski's Memorial Day : Proclamation, 223. 
Georgetown, British Guiana: American Consulate at, 

61. 
Germany : 
Activities of agents and representatives in the U. S., 

425, 549. 
Alliance with Italy and Japan, statement by Secre- 
tary Hull, 251. 
American Embassy in Berlin, damage during air raid, 

215. 
American Embassy in Paris, detention by iwlice of 

clerlj in, 504. 
Consul General in New Orleans, report on newspaper 

Interview, 4. 
Debts to U. S., note from Secretary Hull to German 
Charge in Washington and statement of amounts 
due, 284. 
International Institute for Unification of Private 

Law, Fundamental Statute, adherence, 110. 
U. S. note regarding — 
Course of the "American Legion" from Petsamo, 

U. S. S. R., to New York, 152. 
European possessions in Western Hemisphere, re- 
ply, statement of Secretary Hull, 3. 
Voyage of American ship to Ireland to repatriate 
Americans, reply, 408. 
Gibraltar: American Consulate at, 467. 
Goes Monteiro, Pedvj A., Chief of Staff of Brazilian 

Army : Visit to the U. S., 409. 
Grady, Henry F., Assistant Secretary of State : 
Addresses, statements, etc. — 
Agriculture and international trade, 433. 
Economic position of American republics, 5. 
Foreign trade, U. S., 81, 319. 
Inter-American solidarity, 448. 
International trade, 531. 
U. S. delegate to Inter-American Maritime Confer- 
ence, appointment, 224. 
Great Britain : 
Ambassador to U. S. (Lord Lothian), death, 547, 562. 
American Consulate at Gibraltar, 467; at Sheffield, 

England, 237. 
Debts to U. S., 568. 

Fleet, British policy regarding, exchange of notes 
between Secretary Hull and Lord Lothian, 195. 
Refugee children, emigration to U. S., 23. 



Great Britain — Continued. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Australian wool reserve in U. S., with U. S. (1940), 

554. 
Lease to U. S. of naval and air bases in Western 

Hemisphere (1940), 196, 199. 
Migratory birds, with U. S. (191G), amendment of 

U. S. regulations, 116. 
Non-aggression, with Thailand (1940), 170. 
Peace advancement with U. S. (1914), amendatory 
treaties between U. S. and — 
Australia, Canada, and New Zealand (1940), 
Signature, 207 ; U. S. Senate advice and con- 
sent to ratification, 481 ; U. S. ratification, 
590. 
Union of South Africa (19-10), U. S. Senate ad- 
vice and consent to ratification, 482; U. S. 
ratification, 590. 
Refugees, conventions and additional protocol 
(19.33, 1938, 1939), instruments of adherence 
on behalf of dependencies, 38. 
U. S. aid to, telegram from prominent Americans 
to President Roosevelt, 581. 
Great Lakes- St Lawrence Waterway Project («ee also 
St. Lawrence River) : 
Address by Mr. Berle before the Great Lakes Seaway 

and Power Conference at Detroit, 520. 
Exchange of correspondence between Mr. Berle 

and Canadian Minister to U. S., 430. 
Message of President Roosevelt to Great Lakes Sea- 
way and Power Conference at Detroit, 518. 
Great Lakes Seaway and Power Conference, Detroit, 

Mich., 518, 520. 
Greece : 
International Institute for Unification of Private Law, 

Fundamental Statute, adherence, 110. 
U. S. aid to, exchange of correspondence between 

President Roosevelt and King George II, 503. 
War with Italy, U. S. neutrality proclamations and 
regulations on, 426—129. 
Greenland : 

Governor General of North Greenland (Brun), visit 

to U. S., 25. 
Tonnage duties for vessels of, U. S. suspension, 403. 
Guatemala (see also American republics) : 
Anniversary of independence, statement by Secretary 

HuU, 224. 
Professors and students, exchange with U. S., 254. 
Tonnage duties for vessels of, U. S. suspension, 433. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Coffee-marketing, inter- American (1940), signature, 

482. 
Extradition, supplementary (1940), U. S. Senate 
advice and consent to ratification, 482; U. S. 
ratification, 591. 
Telecommunication (1932) and Cairo revisions 
(1938), approval, 19. 



602 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Habana : 
Act of Habana (Resolution XX of the Final Act of 

Habana), text, 138; 269; 576. 
Final Act of Habana (1940), test, 127; 178; 436; 590. 
Meeting of the Minister.s of Foreign Ai¥air.s of Ameri- 
can Republics at, 11, 25, 34, 42, 05, 104, 127, 178, 
436, 590. 
Haiti (see also American republics) : 

Professors and students, exchange with U. S., 2.54. 
Tonnage duties for vessels of, U. S. suspension, 433. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Ck)ffee-marketing, inter-American (1940), signa- 
ture, 482. 
Haitiauization of the Garde, withdrawal of mili- 
tary forces from Haiti, and financial, supple- 
mentary, with U. S. (1940), 365. 
Health, public : 

Pan American Health Day proclamation, 465. 
Sanitary cooperation. Final Act of Habana (XXI), 

139. 
Statistics of causes of death, International agreement 
(1934), extension by Egypt to certain districts, 
576. 
Helium : Exportation, 60, 166, 237, 363, 479. 
Hemispheric defense. See American republics ; De- 
fense, Hemispheric. 
Henry-Haye, Gaston, Fi-ench Ambassador to U. S. : 

Presentation of credentials, 215. 
Honduras (see also American republics) : 
Aimiversary of independence, statement by Secretary 

Hull, 224:. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Coffee-marketing, inter-American (1940), signa- 
ture, 482. 
Indian Institute, Inter-American (1040), signa- 
ture, 592. 
Horta, Azores: American Consulate at, 115. 
House of Representatives. See wider U. S. Congress. 
Hull, Cordell: 

Addresses, statements, etc. — 

Alliance between Germany, Italy, and Japan, 251. 
Central American republics, anniversary of inde- 
pendence, 224. 
Commercial Treaties and Agreements, Division of 

the Department, creation, 16. 
Danger to American republics from war in Europe, 

42, 103, 176. 
Death of Lord Lothian, 547. 
Death of Senator Pittman, 426. 
Embargo tariffs, address by Senator McNary on, 

190. 
European possessions in Western Hemisphere, Ger- 
man reply to V. S. note regarding, 3. 
Foreign policy, U. S., postponement of delivery, 

315; text, 331; highlights, 337; text, 407. 
French Indochina, status quo, 196, 253. 



Hull, Cordell— Continued. 

Addresses, statements, etc. — Continued. 

Habana Meeting of tlie Ministers of Foreign Affairs 

of American Republics, 34, 42, 65. 
Jewish New Year celebration, 281. 
Kellogg-Briand Pact, anniversary of signing, 175. 
Pan American Aviation Day, 515. 
Shanghai, defense forces in the International Set- 
tlement at, 197. 
U. S. loan to Spain, erroneous reports, 561. 
Correspondence — 

Activities and propaganda of German agents in 

the U. S., with Representative Dies, 425. 
British Fleet, policy regarding, with Lord Lothian, 

195. 

Death of Lord Lothian, with American Charge in 

London, 548 ; with Prime Minister of Great 

Britain, 547. 

Death of President Estigarribia of Paraguay, 215. 

Debt payment by Finland, with Minister Procop6, 

501, 503. 
Debts to U. S., foreign, 566-573 passim; German, 

with German Charg(5 in Washington, 284. 
Departure of Dr. Leopoldo Melo of Argentina from 

U. S., 115. 
German representation in the U. S., with Repre- 
sentative Anderson, 549. 
Lease by U. S. of naval and air bases In Western 
Hemisphere from Great Britain, exchange of 
notes with Lord Lothian effecting arrange- 
ment, 199. 
Requisition by U. S. of planes ordered by Sweden, 

with Swedish Minister, 339. 
Eesignation of Joseph E. Davies as Special As- 
sistant to the Secretary of State, 455. 
Retirement of Hugh R. Wilson from Foreign Serv- 
ice, 466. 
Departmental orders — 
Appointment of officers in the Department, 26. 
Laurence Duggan as Adviser on Political Rela- 
tions, 350. 
Philip W. Bonsai as Acting Chief of Division ot 
the American Republics, 361. 
Central Translating Office, creation and functions, 

26. 
Commercial Treaties and Agreements, Division of, 

creation and functions, 16. 
Documentary requirements for aliens, entry into 
U. S., 198, seamen, 252, from Canada and Mex- 
ico, 176; entry into American Virgin Islands 
from British Virgin Islands and St. Bartholo- 
mew, 280; personnel of U. S. transportation 
lines, waiver, 197. 
Passport regulations for Americans during war, 314. 



INDEX 



603 



Hull, Coriiell — Continued. 
Dinner in honor of Canadian section of Permanent 
Joint Board on Defense, U. S. and Canada, 216. 
Instruction to Foreign Service on use by all Ameri- 
can republics of naval and air bases leased by 
U. S. from Great Britain, 106. 
Luncheon in honor of Minister of Foreign Affairs of 

Paraguay, 69. 
Message to the Latin American Lecture Series, Wash- 
ington, D. C, 369. 
Regulations — 

Commerce with Greece, 429. 
Relief contributions to Greece, 429. 
Travel in combat areas, 24, 381, 429. 
Report to the President on the convention for provi- 
sional administration of Euroiiean colonies and 
possessions in Americas, 209. 
Hungary : 

Debts to U. S., 569. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Cattle herdbooks, methods of keeping (1936), de- 
posit of instrument of ratification, 412. 
International Institute for Unification of Private 
Law, Fundamental Statute, adherence, 110. 

Iceland : 

International Institute for Unification of Private 

Law, Fundamental Statute, adherence, 286. 
Tonnage duties for vessels of, U. S. suspension, 285. 
Immigration and naturalization: 
Aliens entering U. S., 198 ; from Canada and Mexico, 

36, 176 ; seamen, 252. 
Refugees from Europe to U. S., 23, 31, 563. 
Visas, regulations, 14, 15, 23, 31, 176, 198, 252, 280, 
563. 
Imports into U. S. (sec aUo Commerce, international ; 
Exports from U. S. ; Foreign trade, U. S. ; Trade 
agreements; Treaties, agi-eements, etc.) : 
Arms and munitions, 58, 165, 235, 362, 478. 
Coal, coke, and coal briquets from U. S. S. R., 167. 
Cotton, suspension of quotas on certain types, 584. 
Customs privileges to Brazilian diplomatic and con- 
sular ijersonnel in U. S., reciprocal agreement, 
482. 
Fox furs and skins, black and silver, from Canada, 

409, 553, 575, 591. 
Tariff quota on heavy cattle, allocation for 1941, 522. 
Indian Institute, Inter-American, convention creating 

(1940), 524, 592. 
Institute of Latin American Studies, University of 
Texas : Address by Mr. Grady before Conference 
on International Relations of, 5. 
Institute of World Affairs : Address by Mr. Grady 

before, 531. 
Insurance and reinsurance: Final Act of Habana 
(XXIV), 141. 



Inter-American Commission of Women : Address by 
Mr. Berle at dinner given by Women's Joint Con- 
gressional Committee, 423. 
Inter-American relations. See American republics ; 
Commissions, etc. ; Conference, etc. ; Treaties, agree- 
ments, etc. ; and individual countries. 
Intergovernmental debts, 284, 501, 565. 
International commissions, committees, conferences, 

etc. See Commissions, etc. ; Conferences, etc. 
International Institute for Unification of Private Law, 

Fundamental Statute, 109, 286. 
International law, codification : Final Act of Habana 

(XI), 134. 
International Relief Union, convention and statute 

establishing (1927), 27. 
Iran: Postal convention, universal (1939), ratification, 

403. 
Ireland : 
Repatriation of Americans, 408. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

International Institute for Unification of Private 

Law, Fundamental Statute, adherence, 110. 
Whaling agreement (1937) protocol (1938), rati- 
fication, 117. 
Iron and steel scrap: Export control in national de- 
fense, 49, 50, 250, 280, 529. 
Italy : 
Alliance with Germany and Japan, statement by 

Secretary Hull, 251. 
Debts to U. S., 570. 
Reply to U. S. note regarding voyage of American 

ship to Ireland to repatriate Americans, 408. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Aircraft, damages to third parties (1933 and 1938), 

ratification, 18. 
International Institute for Unification of Private 
Law, Fundamental Statute, adherence, 110. 
War with Greece, U. S. neutrality proclamations and 
regulations in, 426-429. 

Jackson, Robert H., Attorney General of U. S. : Opinion 
regarding right of President to arrange with Great 
BriUiin for lease of naval and air bases in West- 
ern Hemisphere, 201. 
Jamaica : Naval and air bases in, lease from Great 

Britain, 196, 199. 
Japan (see also Far East) : 
Alliance with Germany and Italy, statement by Sec- 
retary Hull, 251. 
Detention in French Indochina of American vice 

consul and press correspondent, 453. 
Oil agreement by importers with Netherlands Indies 

companies, 432. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Cotton piece goods, exportation to the Philippines, 
arrangement with U. S. (1940), 36. 



604- 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Japan — Continued. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — Continued. 

Fur seals, preservation and protection (1911), ab- 
rogation, 412. 
Postal, universal (1939), ratification, 62. 

Jewish New Year celebration: Message by Secretary- 
Hull, 281. 

Johnson, Herschel V., American Charge in London : 
Response to message of Mr. Long to Foreign Service 
members, 585. 

Jones, Jesse H., Federal Loan Administrator : Letter 
on credit to Chinese Government, 522. 

Juliana, Princess of the Netherlands: Visit to Wash- 
ington, 550, 565, 583. 

Justice, International, Permanent Court of, optional 
clause of Statute, 37, 170, 324. 

Kallio, Kycisti, former President of Finland : Death, 

583. 
Kaunas, Lithuania : American Legation at, 199. 
Kellogg-Briand Pact : Statement by Secretary Hull on 

anniversary of signing, 175. 
Kingston, Ontario, Canada : American Consulate at, 15, 

237. 

Labor : 

Compulsory, convention (1930), 38. 
International Conference, 38. 

Wages and hours of work in industries and agri- 
culture, convention (19S8), 456. 
Latin American Lecture Series, Washington, D.C. : 
Message from Secretary Hull, 369; address by Mr. 
Berle, 441 ; by Under Secretary Welles, 369. ^ 

Latvia : 

American Legation at Riga, 190. 
Projierty in the U. S., executive order and regula- 
tions regarding, 33. 
Territorial integrity of, statement by Acting Secre- 
tary Welles, 48. 
Law Librarian's Society of Washington, D.C. : Address 
by Dr. Spaulding on Department publications be- 
fore, 301. 
Lease of naval and air bases in Western Hemisphere 
from Great Britain (1940) : Arrangement, text, 
199; message of President Roosevelt to Congress 
on, 201 ; opinion of U. S. Attorney General Jackson, 
201 ; use by all American republics, 196. 
Le Gallais, Hugues, Luxemburg IMinister to U. S. : 

Presentation of credentials, 408. 
Legislation (see aUo U. S. Congress), 15, 25, 99, 110, 
117, 192, 209, 218, 238, 268, 287, 327, 365-366, 404, 
584. 
Liberia: Conciliation treaty, with U. S. (1930), U. S. 
Senate advice and consent to ratification, 482; U. S. 
ratification, 591. 
Lithuania : 
American Legation at Kaunas, 199. 



Lithuania — Continued. 

International Institute for Unification of Private 

Law, Fimdamental Statute, adherence, 110. 
Property in the U. S., executive order and regulations 

regarding, 33. 
Territorial integrity of, statement by Acting Secre- 
tary Welles, 48. 
London, Ontario, Canada : American Consulate at, 18. 
Long, Breckinridge, Assistant Secretary of State: Ad- 
dress on national defense, 491 ; message to Foreign 
Service members, 585. 
Long Lac - Ogoki diversion of waters from Albany 

River Basin into Great Lakes System, 431. 
Lothian, The Marquess of, British Ambassador to U. S. : 
British policy regarding the Fleet, exchange of notes 

with Secretary Hull, 195. 
Death, 547, 562. 

Lease by U. S. of naval and air bases in Western 
Hemisphere, exchange of notes with Secretary 
Hull effecting arrangement, 199. 
Luxemburg: Minister to U. S. (Le Gallais), inesenta- 
tion of credentials, 408. 

Mackenzie King, W. L., Prime Minister of Canada : 
Joint statement with President Roosevelt on Per- 
manent Joint Board on Defense, U. S. and Canada, 
154. 
Madagascar : American Consulate at Tananarive, 454. 
"Manhattan" : Voyage for repatriation of Americans, 

24. 
Maritime Conference, Inter-American, at Washington, 
D.C: 
Address by Under Secretary Welles before, 461. 
Invitations to participate, 224. 
Resolutions, 516. 
Martinez Fraga, Dr. Pedro, Ambassador of Cuba: 
Luncheon of Under Secretary Welles upon retire- 
ment of, 584. 
Martinique, French West Indies: American Consulate 

at, 61. 
"McKeesport" : U. S. regulations on travel in combat 

areas, 24. 
McNary, Charles L., U. S. Senator: Comment by Sec- 
retary Hull regarding address on embargo tariffs, 
190. 
Melo, Dr. Leopoldo, Chairman, Argentine delegntion 
to Habana Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs 
of American Republics : Departure from U. S., 115. 
Messersmith, George S., American Ambassador to Cuba : 
Special representative of President Roosevelt at 
inauguration of President Batista, 283. 
Mexico (see also American republics) : 
American Consulate at Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz, 268. 
Death of Leon Trotsky, 152. 

Immigration to U. S. from, regulations, 14, 36, 176, 
198. 



INDEX 



605 



Mexico — Continued. 

Iimiigiiration of President Camaeho, appointment of 
Henry A. Wallace as special U. S. representative, 
432. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Coffee-marketing, inter-American (1940), signa- 
ture, 482. 
Extradition, supplementary (1939), U. S. Senate 
advice and eon.sent to ratiflcation, 482; U. S. 
ratification, 591. 
Inter-American Indian Institute (1940), signature, 

592. 
International Institute for Unification of Private 

Law, Fundamental Statute, adiiercuce, 286. 
Migratory birds, with U. S. (1936), amendment of 

U. S. regulations, 116. 
Nature protection and wildlife preservation (1940), 
signature, 52.5. 
Migratory birds, protection, conventions with Groat 

I5iitain (1916) and with Mexico (1936), 116. 
Military aviation mission, U. S., to Ecuador, 551. 
Military order: Export Control, designation of Admin- 
istrator of, 11-12. 
Military searchlights, fire-control instruments, aerial 
cameras, and other military equipment, export con- 
trol in national defense, 279. 
Ministers of Foreign Affairs of American Republics, 
Meeting at — 
Habana (liMO) : 

Addresses, statements, etc., by Secretary Hull, 34, 

42, 65. 
Convention on provisional administration of Euro- 
pean colonies and possessions In the Americas 
(text), 145. 
Dinners given by Acting Secretary Welles in honor 
of Argentine, Brazilian, and Uruguayan dele- 
gations, 104. 
Final Act (text), 127, 178; approval by Dominican 
Republic, 436; deposit of instrument of rati- 
flcation by Dominican Republic, 590. 
Final agenda, 11. 
U. S. delegation, 25, 34. 
Pananiii (1039) : Final Act, deposit of instrument of 
ratitication by Dominican Republic, 590. 
Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation: Address by Mr. 

Grady before, 433. 
Monetary stabilization arrangement, U. S. and Argen- 
tina (1940), 590. 
Morgenthau, Henry, Jr., Secretary of the Treasury : 
Statement regarding monetary stabilization ar- 
rangement with Argentina, 590. 
Letter from President Roosevelt on import restric- 
tions in Canadian trade agreement, 576. 
Morocco : 
Cattle herdbooks, convention on methods of keeping 
(1936), deposit of instrument of ratification on 
behalf of, 364. 



Morocco — Continued. 

U. S. treaty rights in Tangier, 430. 
Most-favored-nation clause: Treaties, agreements, etc., 

containing, 06. 
Munitions. See Arms and munitions. 

National commissions, conferences, etc. See Commis- 
sions, etc. ; Conferences, etc. 
National Conference of Christians and Jews: Address 

by Mr. Long before, 491. 
National defense of U. S. See Defense. 
National Foreign Trade Convention, Twenty-seventh : 
Addresses, statements, etc., by President Roosevelt, 
81 ; Mr. Grady, 81 ; Mr. Geist, 87, 93. 
National Press Club : Address by Secretary Hull on 
U. S. foreign iwlicy, 331 ; highlights, 337 ; iwst- 
ponement of delivery, 315. 
Nature protection and wildlife preservation In the 
Western Hemisphere, inter-American convention 
(1940), 308, 402, 525, 576. 
Naval and air ba.ses in Uruguay : 
Statements by Under Secretary Welles, 432, 452. 
Statement by Uruguayan Minister at Madrid to 
Spanish press, 452. 
Naval and air bases in the Western Hemisphere : Lease 

from Great Britain, 196, 199. 
Naval mission. V. S., to Ecuador, 551 ; Peru, 98. 
Naval radio stations, convention wltli Panama for trans- 
fer to Panama (1936), 525. 
Netherlands : 

International Institute for Unification of Private 

Law, Fundamental Statute, adherence, HO. 
Visit to Washington of Princess Juliana, 550, 565, 
583. 
Netherlands Indies: Oil agreement between Japanese 

importers and companies of, 432. 
Neutrality Committee, Inter-American : Final Act of 

Habana (I), 129. 
Neutrality of the U. S. (see also Arms and munitions; 
Defense, U. S. national; Relief, etc.): 
Proclamations, executive orders, and regulations with 
respect to the war between Italy and Greece, 
420-429. 
Travel in comltat areas, regulations, 24, 381, 429. 
Newfoundland : Naval and air bases in, lease from 

Great Britain, 196, 199. 
New York Herald! Tribune: Accidental death of corre- 
spondent in Yugoslavia, 454. 
New Zealand : Peace advancement, treaty with U. S. 
(1940), amending treaty between U. S. and Great 
Britain (1914), signature, 207; U. S. Senate advice 
and consent to ratification, 481 ; U. S. ratiflcation, 
590. 
Niagara Falls : Utilization by Ontario of power at, 430. 
Nicaragua {see also American republics) : 
Anniversary of independence, statement by Secre- 
tary Hull, 224. 



eee 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Nicaragua — Continued. 

Professors and students, exchange with U. S., 254. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Coffee-marketing, inter-American (1940), signa- 
ture, 482. 
International Institute for Unification of Private 

Law, Fundamental Statute, adherence, 110. 
Nature protection and wildlife preservation (1940), 

signature, 308. 
Kegional radio convention for Central America 
(1938), deposit of instrument of ratification, 
403. 
Non-aggression treaty, Great Britain and Thailand 

(1940), 170. 
Non-immigration visa services: 

Temporary American Consulates in Canada for per- 
formance of, 15. 
North Carolina, University of: 
Address by Mr. Berle before the International Rela- 
tions Club, 295. 
Address by Mr. Long before the National Conference 
of Christians and Jews in cooperation with, 491. 

Ogoki-Long Lac diversion of waters from Albany 

River Basin into Great Lakes System, 431. 
Oil agreement between Japanese Importers and Nether- 
lands Indies companies, 432. 
Opium : 

International convention (1925), 109. 
Other drugs and, convention and protocol (1912), 
456. 
Orders. See Executive orders; Military orders; and 

under State, Department of. 
Ortiz, Roberto M., President of Argentina : Press inter- 
view, comments of Acting Secretary Welles, 453. 

Pan American (see also American republics) — 
Airway route to Rio de Janeiro from Para, 177. 
Aviation Day : Address by Mr. Burke, 573 ; proclama- 
tion, 452 ; statement by Secretary Hull, 515. 
Day at Dairy Industries' Exposition, Atlantic City, 

N. J., address by Mr. Geist, 347. 
Health Day proclamation, 465. 
Highway: Convention (1936), 528; Final Act of 

Habana (XXIII), 140. 
Int<titutions, cooperation between: Final Act of Ha- 
bana (XXII), 140. 
Pan American Airways, Inc. : Regulations on plan* 

travel in combat area, 381. 
Pan American Union : 
Inter-American Maritime Conference at, 224, 461, 

516. 
Nature protection and wildlife preservation, inter- 
American committee of experts on, 308. 



Panama : 
Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs of American 
Republics at Panam.l, deposit of instrument of 
ratification of Final Act by Dominican Republic, 
590. 
Naval radio stations, convention with U. S. on trans- 
fer (1936), U. S. Senate advice and consent to 
ratification, 52.5. 
Professors and students, exchange with U. S., 149, 
254. 
Par.1 : Pan American airway route to Rio de Janeiro, 

177. 
Paraguay {see also American republics) : 
Death of President Estigarribia and wife, 214. 
Minister of Foreign Affairs (Salomoni), luncheon 

of Secretary Hull in honor of, 69. 
Minister to U. S. (Soler), presentation of creden- 
tials, 574. 
Professors and students, exchange with U. S., 149, 

254. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

International Institute for Unification of Private 

Law, Fundamental Statute, adherence, 286. 
Postal, universal (1989), ratification, 62. 
Telecommimicatlon (1932) and Cairci revisions 
(1938), ratification, 62. 
Paris, France : Detention by German police of clerk In 

American Embassy, 504. 
Passports : 
Precautionary measures in issuance. Final Act of 

Habana (V), 131. 
Regulations, 14, 176, 198, 280, 314. 
Peace (sec also Permanent Court of International 
Justice) : 
Advancement, treaty with Great Britain (1914), 
amendatory treaties between U. S. and — 
Australia, Canada, and New Zealand (1940), sig- 
nature, 207; U. S. Senate advice and consent 
to ratification, 481 ; U. S. ratification, 590. 
Union of South Africa (1910), U. S. Senate advice 
and consent to ratification, 482; U. S. ratifica- 
tion, 590. 
American republics, maintenance among. Final Act 

of Habana (XVI), 136. 
Cooperative, address by Mr. Berle, 295. 
Kellogg-Briaud Pact, statement by Secretary Hull 

on anniversary of signature, 175. 
Solution of conflicts, Final Act of Habana (XIV), 
136. 
Permanent Court of Arbitration : Appointment of mem- 
ber, 589. 
Permanent Court of International Justice, optional 

clause of the Statute, 37, 170, 324. 
Permanent Joint Board on Defense, U. S. and Canada, 
154, 216. 



INDEX 



607 



Peru (see also American republics) : 

Professors and students, exchange with U. S., 254. 
Tonnage duties for vessels of, U. S. suspension, 346. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Aviation mission, U. S. (1940), 98. 
CoftVe-niarkctiiig, inter-American (1940), signa- 
ture, 482. 
Nature protection and wildlife preservation (1940), 

signature, 308. 
Naval mission, U. S. (1040), 98. 
Petroleum products : 
Export control in national defense, 49, 50. 
Export to Japan from Netherlands Indies. 432. 
Pliilippiiies, CDniinonwealth of: 

Imporlalion of .lapanese cotton piece goods into, 36. 
Universal postal convention (1930), ratification, 27. 
Pittman, Key, U. S. Senator: Death. 426. 
Poland : Debts to U. S., 571. 
Police and judicial measures for defense: Final .\ct of 

Habana (III), 130. 
Portugal: American Consulate at Horta, Azores, 115. 
Postal convention, universal (1939), 27, 62, 272, 403. 
Powers of attorney protocol (1940), 218, 28G. 
Prague, Bohemia : American Consulate at, 364. 
President, U. S. Si-c Roosevelt, Franlvlin D. 
Prisoners of war convention (1929), 238. 
Private Law, International Institute for Unification: 
Fundamental Statute, KX), 286. 
Purpose, 286. 
Proclamations : 

Allocation of tariff quota on heavy cattle for 1941, 

522. 
Armistice Day, ISMO. 314. 
Existence of state of war between Italy and Greece, 

420. 
Export control in national defense of muiiilious and 
materials, 12; petroleum products, tetraethyl 
lead, and iron and steel scrap, 40; certain equip- 
ment for production of aviation motor fuel and 
plans or designs for aircraft and engines, 213; 
fire-control instrimicnts, military searchlights, 
aerial cameras, and other military (»fiuipment, 
279; iron and steel, 529; certain additional ma- 
terials and articles, 559. 
General Pulaski's Memorial Day, 223. 
Neutrality of U. S. in war between Italy and Greece, 

427. 
Pan American Aviation Day, 452. 
Pan American Health Day, 465. 
Registration Day, 221. 
Suspension of quotas on imports of certain cotton, 

584. 
Territorial waters of U. S., use by belligerent sub- 
marines, 427. 



Proclamations — Continued. 
Tonnage duties, U. S. suspension with respect to 
vessels of Canada, 116; Dominican Republic, 
433; Egypt, 432; Greenland, 403; Guatemala, 
433; Haiti, 433; Iceland, 285; Peru, 346; Vene- 
zuela, 433. 
Trade agreements with — 

Canada, supplementary (1940), 575. 
Switzerland (1936), partial termination, 48-.. 
Venezuela (1939), exchange of ratitieations, 436; 
supplementary U. S. proclamation, 481. 
Procop<>, Hjalmar J., Minister of Finland: Exchange 
of corresixindence with Secretary Hull on postpone- 
ment of debt payment to U. S., 502. 
Professors and students, exchange between U. S. and 

other American republics, 149, 254, 282. 
Propaganda : 

Agents of foreign princiiials, registration, 281. 
Foreign activities against domestic institutions, Final 

Act of Habana (VI), 132. 
German agents and representatives in the United 
States, activities, letters of Secretary Hull on, 
425, 549. 
Propeller Club of the United States : Address by Mr. 

Saugstad before, 54t>. 
Property of Latvia, Estonia, and Lithuania in the U. S., 

33 ; of Rumania, 306. 
Public health : 
Pan American Health Day proclamation, 465. 
Sanitary cooperation. Final Act of Habana (XXI), 

139. 
Statistics of causes of deatli, international agreement 
(1934), extension by Egypt to certain districts, 
576. 
Public in.struction, convention on peaceful orientation 

(19.36), 524. 
Publications [see also Regulation.s, etc.) : 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Exchange, with Brazil (1940), signature. 27. 
Interchange, inter-American (1936), deposit of 
instrument of ratification by Colombia, 525. 
U. S. Congress, 15, 25, 99, 110, 117, 192, 209, 218, 238, 

268, 2S7, 327, 365-366, 404, 584. 
U. S. Department of State — 
Address by Dr. Spaulding on law publications, 301. 
"Foreign Relations of the United States, 1925", 

volumes I and II, 586. 
List, 19, 62, 95, 110. 117, 167, 192, 209, 218, 273, 285, 
301, 307, 327, 4(M, 457, 526, 577, 588. 
Other U. S. Government agencies, 19, 95, 167, 192, 
218, 239, 285, 307, 437, 457, 551. 

Quotas (see also Customs; Tariff) : 
Cattle, heavy, allocation for 1911, 522. 
Cotton, suspension on imports, 584. 



ms 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Radio : 

Broadcasting, North American regional agreement 

(1937), 238. 
Convention, regional, for Central America (193S), de- 
posit of instrument of ratification by Nicaragua, 
403. 
Naval stations, convention on transfer to Panama 
(1036), 525. 
Railway in Bolivia, U. S. survey, 283. 
Rainy Lal^e, convention with Canada for emergency 

regulation of level of (193S), 192, 218, 309, 325. 
Red Cross (see also American vessels; Relief, etc.) : 
American, regulations by U. S. on travel in combat 

areas of vessels chartered by, 24. 
Convention (1929), deposit of instruments of ratifi- 
cation by Bolivia, 238. 
Societies, Inter-American League, Final Act of Ha- 
bana (IV), 131. 
Refugees (.see also Aliens; Visas, U. S. ) : 

Conventions and additional protocol (19S3, 1938, 

1939), 38. 
European, to U. S., 23, 31, 563. 
Final Act of Habana (IX), 134. 
Registration Day proclamation, 221. 
Registration of agents of foreign principals, 281. 
Regulations of U. S. Government agencies (see also 
State, Department of), 19, 32, 33, 118, 192, 209, 
217, 237, 238, 306, 307, 326, 305, 404, 413, 456, 526. 
Relief to belligerents, U. S. contributions: 
Funds, tabulations, 70, 178, 257, 391, 504. 
Greece, exchange of correspondence between Presi- 
dent Roosevelt and King George II, 503. 
Registrant lists, 69, 305, 382. 
Regulations with respect to Greece, 429. 
Relief Union, International, convention and statute 

establishing (1927), 27. 
Repatriation of Americans, 115, 318, 339, 408. 
Requisition of equipment, munitions, macliinery, etc., 
necessary to national defen.se, 313; of plaues or- 
dered by Sweden, 338. 
Re.servations to recommendations, etc., of Final Act of 

Habana, 143. 
Riga, Latvia : American Legation at, 199. 
Rio de Janeiro: Pan American airway route from 

Parfi to, 177. 
Roolvefeller, Nel.son E., Coordinator of Commercial and 
Cultural Relations Between American Republics: 
Appointment, 151. 
Roosevelt, Franklin D. (see also Executive orders; 
Proclamations) : 
Addresses, statements, etc. — 
Armistice Day, 417. 
Credit to China, 521. 
Death of Lord Lotliian, 547. 

Foreign diplomatic representatives, presentation 
of credentials, 216, 409, 575. 



Roosevelt, Franklin D. — Continued. 

Addresses, statements, etc. — Continued. 
National Foi'eign Trade Convention, 81. 
Great Lakes Seaway and Power Conference, de- 
livered by Jlr. Berle, 518. 
Permanent Joint Board on Defense, U. S. and 
Canada, joint statement with Prime Minister 
Mackenzie King, 154. 
Washington National Airixirt, laying of corner- 
stone, 251. 
Western Hemisphere, unity and defen.se, 291. 
Correspondence — 

Aid to Greece, witli King George II, 503. 

China, national anniversary, 306. 

Death of President Estigarribia of Paraguay, with 

Acting President Morinigo, 214. 
Death of former President Kallio of Finland, with 

President Ryti, 583. 
Death of Lord Lothian, with King George of 

Great Britain, 547, .548. 
Duties and other import restrictions with regard 
to supplementary trade agreement with Can- 
ada (1940), with Secretary Morgenthau, 576. 
Earthquake in Rumania, with King Mihai, 430. 
Venezuela, national anniversary, 11. 
Messages to Congress — 

European colonie.g and possessions in Americas, 

convention on provisional administration, 269. 

Export-Import Bank of Washington, increase in 

capital and lending power, 41. 
Lea.se of naval and air bases in Western Hemi- 
sphere from Great Britain, 201. 
St. Lawrence River, preliminary investigation of 
International Rapids Section. 316. 
Telegram from jirominent Americans on LT. S. aid 
to Great Britain, 581. 
Rumania : 
Debts to U. S., 572. 
Earthquake in, message of sympatliy from President 

Roosevelt to King Mihai, 4.30. 
International Institute for Unification of Prirate 

Law, Fundamental Statute, adherence, 110. 
Property in the U. S.. executive order and regulations 
regarding, 306. 

Safety of life at sea convention (1929), 208. 

St. Lawrence Advisory Committee: Establishment, 317. 

St. Lawrence River, International Rapids Section : 
Power development, 518, 520; preliminary investi- 
gation, 316, 430. 

St. Lawrence Waterway Project. See Great Lakes. 

St. Lucia : Naval and air bases in, lease from Great 
Britain, 196, 199. 

St. Pierre-Miquelon : American Consulate at, 109. 

St. Petersburg, Fla., Chamber of Commerce: Address 
by Mr. Grady before, 319. 



INDEX 



609 



SiUoiiioiii, Dr. Don Tomas A., Minister of Foreign 
Affairs of Paraguay: Luncheon of Secretary Hull 
in honor of, 69. 

Sanitary cooperation: Final Act of Habana (XXI), 
139. 

Sarnia, Ontario, Canada : American Consulate at, 
15, 18. 

Saugstad. Jesse E., Assistant Chief, Division of Inter- 
national Communications of the Department: 
Address on U. S. shipping, 540. 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada: American Consulate 
at, 15, 237. 

School of the Air of the Americas broadcast : Address 
by Mr. Grady, 448. 

Second Deficiency Act of 1040: Award of travel grants 
to professors and students from other American 
republics, 2S2. 

Secretary of State, U. S. See Hull, Cnidell. 

Security and neutrality of American republics, doc- 
trines Jeopardizing: Final Act of Habana (VII), 
132. 

Selective service regulations: Executive order prescrib- 
ing, 252. 

Senate, V. S. See U. S. Congress. 

Servente, Lorenzo A., Argentine Consul General at New 
Orleans : Address by Mr. Finley at dinner honor- 
ing, 449. 

Shanghai: Defense forces in the International Settle- 
ment at, 1!I7. 

Sheffield, England: American Consulate at, 237. 

Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada: American Consulate at, 
15, 237. 

Shipping, U. S. {.lee also American vessels; and under 
American republics) : Address by Mr. Saugstad, 
540. 

Siam. See Thailand. 

Sino-Japanese situation. S(c Far East. 

Soler, Dr. Don Juan Jost'', Paraguayan Minister to U. S. : 
Presentation of credentials, ,'>74. 

South America, gee American republics; and individ- 
ual count rics. 

Spain : 

International Institute for Unification of Private 

Law, Fundamental Statute, adherence, 110. 
Severance of diplnmatic relations with Chile, state- 
ment by Acting Secretary Welles, 48. 
Statement to pre.ss by Uruguayan Minister at Madrid 
regarding reports on air and naval bases in 
Uruguay, 452. 
U. S. loan to, erroneous reports, 561, 582. 
U. S. representations on action at Tangier, Morocco, 
430. 

Spaulding, E. Wilder, Chief, Division of Research and 
Publication of the Department : Address on law 
publications of the Department, 301, 



State, Department of {see also Hull, Cordell; Publica- 
tions; U. S. Foreign Service) : 
American Republics, Division of the. appointment of 

Philip W. Bonsai as Acting Chief, 3.51. 
Appointments of ofiicer.s, 26, 3.W, 351, 411, 584. 
Central Translating Office, creation and functions, 26. 
Commercial Treaties and Agreements, Division of — 
Creation and functions, 16. 
Statement by Secretary Hull on, 16. 
Departmental orders, 16, 26, 176, 197, 198, 252, 280, 

314, 350. 
Political Relations, Adviser on, appointment of 

Laiu'ence Duggan, 350. 
Regulations — 

Commerce with Greece, 429. 
Relief contributions to Greece, 429. 
Travel in combat areas, 24. 381, 429. 
Resignation of Joseph E. Davies as Special Assistant 
to the Secretary of State, 455. 
Statements, addresses, etc. See names of individual* 

and apceiflc. subjects. 
Statistics of causes of death, international agreement 
(1934) : Extension by Egypt to certain districts, 
576. 
Students and professors : Exchange between U. S. and 

other American republics, 149, 254, 282. 
Survey by U. S. of railway in Bolivia, 283. 
Sweden : 

International Institute for Unification of Private 

Law, Fundamental Statute, adherence, 110. 
Requisition by U. S. of planes ordered by, 338. 
Switzerland, treaties, agreements, etc. : 

Extradition, supplementary (1940), ratification by 
Switzerland, 238; U. S. Senate advice and con- 
sent to ratification, 482; U. S. ratification, 591. 
International Institute for Unification of Private 

Law, Fundamental Statute, adherence, 110. 
Labor conventions of International Labor Confer- 
ence, instruments of ratification, 38. 
Opium, international (1925), application of article 
10 to preparations based on Indian-hemp extract, 
non-acceptance, 109. 
Trade, with U. S. (1936), proclamation by U. S. 
President on partial termination, 480. 

Tallinn, Estonia : American Legation at, 199. 
Tananarive, Madagascar : American Consulate at, 454. 
Tangier, Morocco : U. S. treaty rights in, 430. 
Tariff (.see also Customs; Trade agreements) : 
Embargo, comment by Secretary Hull regarding 

address by Senator McNary on, 190. 
Quota on heavy cattle, allocation for 1941, 522. 
Tonnage duties, U. S. suspension with respect to 
vessels of Canada, 116 ; Dominican Republic, 4.33 ; 
Egypt, 432; Greenland, 403; Guatemala, 433; 
Haiti, 433; Iceland, 285; Peru, 346; Venezuela, 
433. 



^6*0 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Telecommunications : 
Broadcasting agreement, North American regional 
(1937), amendment of Federal Communications 
Commission's rules and regulations to carry out 
provisions, 238. 
Convention (1932) and 193,S revisions (Cairo), ap- 
proval by Guatemala, 19; ratification by Para- 
guay, 62. 
Radio convention, regional, for Central America 
(1938), deposit of instrument of ratification by 
Nicaragua, 403. 
Radio stations, naral, convention on transfer to 
Panama (1936), U. S. Senate advice and consent 
to ratification, 525. 
Territorial Administration, Inter-American Commis- 
sion for, 177. 
Territorial waters : 

Extension, Final Act of Habana (VIII), 134. 
Hostile acts in. Final Act of Habana (XIII), 135. 
U. S., use by belligerent .■submarines, proclamation, 
427. 
Tetraethyl lead, petroleum products, and iron and steel 
scrap: Export control in national defense, 49, 50. 
Texas and Virginia State Teachers' Associations con- 
ventions, Fort Worth, Tex. and Richmond, Va. : 
Radio address by Mr. Grady, 448. 
Texas, University of: Address by Mr. Grady before 

Institute of Latin American Studies, 5. 
Thailand : 

Non-aggression treaty, with Great Britain (1940), 

170. 
Permanent Court of International Justice, optional 
clause of Statute, note of declarations of France, 
Great Britain, India, 37. 
Tin-plate scrap: Exportation, 60, 166, 236, 363, 479. 
Tonnage duties : U. S. .suspension with resiject to ves- 
sels of Canada, 116; Dominican Republic, 433; 
Egypt, 4.32: Greenland. 4fl3 : Guatemala, 433; 
Haiti, 4.33; Iceland, 285; Peru, 346; Venezuela, 433. 
Town Hall, Inc., New York City : Address by Mr. Berle 
on America's Town Meeting of the Air conducted 
by, 445. 
Trade, international. Sec Commerce, international; 

Foreign trade, U. S. ; Tariff; Trade agreements. 
Trade agreements (.?ec also Commerce, international; 
Foreign trade, U. S. ; Tariff) : 
Division of the Department, abolition and creation 
of Division of Commercial Treaties and Agree- 
ments, 16. 
Program — 

Embargo tariffs versus, comment by Secretary Hull 
regarding address by Senator McNary on, 190. 
Most-favored-natiou clause, agreements under 1934 
Act containing, 97. 
U. S. and— 

Canada, supplementary (1939), negotiations for 
revision, 409; supplementary (1940), 553, 575, 
591, 



Trade agreements — Continued. 
U. S. and — Continued. 
Switzerland (1936), proclamation by U. S. Presi- 
dent of partial termination, 480. 
Venezuela (1939), exchange of Venezuelan rati- 
fication and U. S. proclamation, 436 ; supple- 
mentary proclamation by U. S. President, 481. 
Traffic .statistics on export 'and import of arms and 

munitions, 50, 155, 225, 351, 407. 
Trail. British Columbia, Canada: American Consulate 

at, 15, 268. 
Transportation expenses on effects of certain Govern- 
ment officers and employees : Executive order regu- 
lating, 426. 
Travel : 

Grants to professors and students from other Ameri- 
can republics, U. S. award, 282. 
American ves.sels in combat areas, 24, 115, 152, 381. 
Americans in combat areas, 24. 152, 314, 381, 429. 
Treasury Department : 

Monetary stabilization arrangement with Argentina, 

statement by Secretary Morgenthau, 590. 
Public notice regarding supplementary trade agree- 
ment with Canada (1940), 591. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. (sec also Trade agreements) : 
Agricultural workers, association rights (1921), in- 
struments of ratification by Switzerland, 3.S. 
Artistic exhilutions (1936), deposit of instrument 

of ratification by Colombia, .525. 
Australian wool, U. S. and Great Britain, for reserve 

in U. S. (1940), 554. 
Aviation — 

Air transport, U. S. and Canada (1939), arrange- 
ment to give effect to article III (1940), 552. 
Aircraft, damages to third parties (1933 and 1938), 

ratification by Italy, 18. 
Mission, U. S. and Peru (1940), 98; U. S. and 
Ecuador (1940), 551. 
Building industry, safety provisions (1937), instru- 
ments of ratification by Switzerland, 38. 
Cattle herdbooks, methods of keeping (19.36), deposit 
of instrument of ratification by Hungary, 412; 
on behalf of Morocco and Tunis, 364. 
Coffee-marketing, inter-American (1940) — 

Signature by U. S., Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, 
Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salva- 
dor, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, 
Nicaragua, Peru, and Venezuela, 482. 
Text, 483. 
Commercial, U. S. and U. S. S. R. (1910), 105. 
Conciliation, U. S. and Liberia (1939), U. S. Senate 
advice and consent to ratification, 4S2; U. S. 
ratification, 591. 
Cultural relations, inter-American (1936) — 

Deposit of instrument of ratification by Colombia, 

524. 
Exchange professors and students, 149, 254, 282. 



IXDEX 



m± 



Treaties, agreements, etc. — Continued. 
Customs privileges for diplomatic and consular jier- 

sonnel, reciprocal, U. S. and Brazil (1940), 482. 
Custonis-revenuo collection, V. S. and Dominican Re- 
public (1024), revision, negotiations, 117; agree- 
ment, 209; signature (1940), 271. 
Educational and publicity films (1936), deposit of 

instrument of ratification by Colombia, 525. 
European colonies and po.esessions in the Americas, 
provisional administration (1940) — 
Approval by Dominican Republic, 436. 
Deposit of instrument of ratification by U. S., 402; 

by Dominican Republic, 50O. 
Message of transmittal to Congress from President 
Roosevelt including report of Secretary Hull, 
209. 
Ratification by U. S., 309; by El Salvador, 570. 
Text, 145. 

U. S. Senate advice and consent to ratification, 
26.9. 

Extradition, supplementary. U. S. and — 
Colombia (1940). signature, 218; U. S. Senate ad- 
vice and consent to ratification, 525; U. S. 
ratification, 591. 
Ecuador (19.'i9), U. S. Senate advice and consent 

to ratification, 482; U. S. ralificalion. 591. 
Guatemala (1940), U. S. Senate advice and consent 

to ratification, 482; U. S. ratification, 591. 
Mexico (1939), U. S. Senate advice and consent to 

ratification, 482; U. S. ratification, 591. 
Switzerland (1940), ratification by Swilzerhind, 
238: U. S. Senate advice and consent to rati- 
fication, 482; U. S. ratification, 591. 
Financial, U. S. and — 

Argentina, stabilization (ISMO), 590. 
Dominican Republic, revision of 1924 customs con- 
vention (1940). 117. 209, 271. 
Haiti, supplementary (1940), 365. 
Fur seals, preservation and protection (1911). abro- 
gation by Japan. 412. 
Habana, Act of (Resolution XX of Final Act of 

Habana). ratification by El Salvador, 576. 
Habana Jleeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs 
of American Republics. Final Act (1940), text, 
127, 178; approval by Dominican Republic. 430; 
deposit of instrument of ratification by Domin- 
ican Republic. 590. 
Haitianization of the Garde, withdrawal of military 
forces from Haiti, and financial, supplementary, 
U. S. and Haiti (1940), 365. 
Health, statistics of causes of death (1934). exten- 
sion by Egypt to certain districts, 576. 
Indian Institute. Inter-American, creation (1940), 
signature by U. S., 524; Costa Rica, Cuba, El 
Salrador, Honduras, and Mexico, 592. 



Treaties, agreements, etc. — Continued. 

International Institute for Unification of Private 
Law, Fundamental Statute (1940) — 
Adherence by Belgium, 110: Bolivia, 110; Brazil, 
2S6; Colombia, 110; Denmark, 286; Finland, 
110; Germany, 110; Greece, 110; Hungary, 
110; Iceland, 2,S6; Ireland, 110; Italy, 110; 
Lithuania, 110; Mexico, 280; Netherlands, 110; 
Nicaragua. 110; Paraguay, 286; Rumania, 110; 
Spain, 110; Sweden, 110; Switzerland, 110; 
Uruguay. 110; Venezuela, 286; Yugoslavia, 
286. 
Provisions of article 20, 286. 
International Relief Union (1927). application to 

Burma. 27. 
Japanese cotton piece goods to the Philippines, im- 
portation, U. .S'. and Japan (19401, 30. 
Labor — 

Compulsory (1930). instruments of ratification by 

Switz(>rland, .38. 
Conventions and recommendations of International 
Labor Conferences. 38, 456. 
Migratory birds. U. S. and Great Britain (1916) 
and U. S. and Mexico (1936), iimendment of 
U. S. regulations, 116. 
Most-favored-nation clau.se — 

Executive agreements containing. 97. 98. 
Reciprocal trade agr<>ements vmder 1934 Act, 97. 
Treaties containing, 96, 98. 
Nature protection and wildlife preservation in West- 
ern Hemisphere (1940) — 
Provisions, 308. 

Signature by Costa Kica, 402; Cuba, 308; Domin- 
ican Republic, 308; El Salvador, 308; Mexico, 
525; Nicaragua, 368; Peru, 308; U. S., 308; 
Uruguay, 576; and Venezuela, 308. 
Naval and air bases in Western Hemisphere. U. S. 

lease from Great Britain (1940), text, 199. 
Naval mission, U. S. and Ecuador (1940), 551. 

U. S. and Peru (1940). 98. 
Naval radio stations, transfer to Panama (1936), 
U. S. Senate advice and consent to ratification, 
525. 
Non-aggression, Great Britain and Thailand (1940), 

170. 
Opium (1912), application on behalf of Burma, 456. 
(1925), application of article 10 to preparations 
based on Indian-hemp extract, non-acceptance 
by Switzerland, 109. 
Pan American Highway (1936), deposit of instru- 
ment of ratification by Colombia, 526. 
Panama Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs, of 
American Republics, final act (1939), deposit of 
instrument of ratification by Dominican Repub- 
lic, 590. 






DEPARTMENT OF STATE BXJLLETIN 



Treaties, agreements, etc. — Continued. 

Peace advancement with Great Britain (1914), 
amendatory treaties between U. S. and — 
Australia, Canada, and New Zealand (1940), sig- 
nature, 207 ; U. S. Senate advice and consent to 
ratification, 4S1 ; U. S. ratification, 590. 
Union of South Africa (1940), U. S. Senate advice 
and consent to ratification, 482 ; U. S. rati- 
fication, 590. 
Permanent Court of International Justice, optional 
clause of the Statute — 
Acceptance, termination and new conditions of, 

by Australia, 324. 
Note by Thailand of declarations of France, Great 

Britain, India, 37. 
Reservations by Brazil regarding declarations of 
Australia, Canada, France, New Zealand, 
Union of South Africa, United Kingdom, 170. 
Postal, universal convention (1939) — 
Administrative enforcement by Argentina, 272 ; 
approval by Costa Rica, 62; ratification by 
Iran, 403; Japan, 62; Paraguay, 62; Philip- 
pines, 27. 
Powers of attorney (1940), signature by Brazil, 218; 

by Bolivia ad referendum, 286. 
Prisoners of war convention (1929), deiwsit of in- 
strument of ratification by Bolivia, 238. 
Public Instruction, peaceful orientation (1936), de- 
posit of instrument of ratification by Colombia, 
524. 
Publications — 

Exchange, U. S. and Brazil (1940), 27. 
Interchange (1936), deposit of instrument of rati- 
fication by Colombia, 525. 
Rainy Lake, emergency regulation of level of, U. S. 
and Canada (1938), U. S. Senate advice and 
consent to ratification, 192; ratification by U. S., 
218; exchange of ratifications, 3U9; proclama- 
tion by U. S. President, 325. 
Red Cross convention (1929), deposit of instrument 

of ratification by Bolivia, 238. 
Refugees, conventions and additional protocol (1933, 
1938, 1939), instruments of adherence on behalf 
of British dependencies, 38. 
Safety of life at sea (1929), approval and dei^osit of 

instruments of adherence by Yugoslavia, 208. 
Telecommunications — 

1932 convention and 1938 (Cairo) revisions, ap- 
proval by Guatemala, 19; ratification by Para- 
guay, 62. 
Broadcasting, North American regional (1937), 
amendment of rules and regulations of Federal 
Communications Commission in order to carry 
out provisions, 238. 
Radio convention, regional, for Central America 
(1938), deposit of instrument of ratification 
by Nicaragua, 403. 



Treaties, agreements, etc. — Continued. 
Telecommunications — Continued. 

Radio stations, naval, transfer to Panama (1936), 
U. S. Senate advice and consent to ratification, 
525. 
Wages and hours of work in industries and agricul- 
ture (1938), instrument of ratification by Switz- 
erland, 38; ratification by Egypt, 456. 
Whaling agreement (1937) protocol (1938), ratifi- 
cation by Ireland, 117. 
Women, employment in mines (1935), instrument 
of ratification by Switzerland, 38. 
Trinidad: Naval and air bases in, lease from Great 

Britain, 1£»6, 199. 
Trot.sky, Leon : Death, 152. 

Truitt, Max O'Rell, Commis.sioner, U. S. Maritime 
Commission : U. S. delegate to Inter-American 
Maritime Conference, appointment, 224. 
Tunis: Cattle herdbooks, convention on methods of 
keeping (1936), deposit of instrument of ratifica- 
tion on behalf of, 364. 

Under Secretary of State, U. S. See Welles, Sumner. 
Union of South Africa : Peace advancement, treaty with 
U. S. (1940), amending treaty between U. S. and 
Great Britain (1914), U. S. Senate advice and con- 
sent to ratification, 482; U. S. ratification, 590. 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics : 
American Consulate General at Vladivostok, 551. 
Commercial agreement with U. S., 105. 
Exports of coal, coke, and coal briquets to U. S., 167. 
U. S. Congress {see also under Publications) : 
House of Representatives — 

German agents' activities in the U. S., exchange of 
correspondence between Mr. Dies and Secre- 
tary Hull, 425. 
German representation in the U. S., letter from 
Secretary Hull to Mr. Anderson, 549. 
Messages from the President — 

European colonies and possessions in Americas, 
convention on provisional administration of, 
269. 
Export-Import Bank of Washington, 41. 
Lease of naval and air bases in Western Hemi- 

spliere from Great Britain, 201. 
St. Lawrence River, preliminary investigation of 
International Rapids Section, 316. 
Senate — 
Death of Senator Pittman, 426. 
U. S. employees : Expense payments in death of, 281. 
U. S. Foreign Service (see also State, Department of) : 
Address by Mr. Geist, 87. 
Appointments, 18. 61, 95, 115, 191, 217, 237, 268, 307, 

364, 404, 413, 454. 466, 467, 578. 
Assignments, 17, 18, 37, 60, 9.5, 108, 114, 169, 191, 198, 
217, 237, 268, 285, 306. 363, 403, 413, 454, 467, 
523, 551, 577-578, 586. 



INDEX 






U. S. Foreign Service — Continued. 
Consulates — 
Closing at Fort Erie, Ontario, Canada, 237; Gi- 
braltar, 467; Kingston, Ontario, Canada, 237; 
London, Ontario, Canada, IS; Saiilt Ste. Marie, 
Ontario, Canada, 2:i7; Slieflield. EnKland, 237; 
Shorbrooke, Quebec, Canada, 237 ; Trail, Brit- 
ish Columbia, Canada, 268. 
Opening at Cayenne, French Guiana, 115; Coat- 
zacoalcos, Veracruz, Mexico, 268; Dakar, 
French West Africa, 108; Fort Erie, Ontario, 
Canada, 15 ; Georgetown. Uritish Guiana, 61 ; 
Horta, Azores, 115; Kingston, Ontario, Can- 
ada, 15; Martinique, French West Indies, 61; 
St. PierreMiquelon, 100 ; Sarnia, Ontario, 
Canada, 15, 18; Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, 
Canada, 15; Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada, 15; 
Tananarive, Madagascar, 454; Trail, British 
Columbia, Canada, 15. 
Consulates General — 

Prague, Bohemia, closing, 364. 
Vladivostok, U.S.S.U., opening, 551. 
Deaths, 190, 268, 413. 

Diplomatic and con.sular personnel in Brazil, agree- 
ment on customs privileges for, 482. 
Embassy in Berlin, damage during air raid, 215. 
Embassy in Paris, detention of clerk by German 

police, 504 ; transfer of three staff members, 586. 
Injury of Consul in accident at Brussels, 190. 
Instruction to U. S. diplomatic missions on use by all 
American republics of naval and air bases leased 
by U. S. from Great Britain, H)6. 
Legations, closing at Katinas, Lithuania ; Iliga, Lat- 
via ; Tallinn, Estonia, 199. 
Message of Mr. Long to members, and response of 

Mr. Johnson, 585. 
Nominations, confirmation, 523, 586. 
Press interview of Ambassador to Belgium, state- 
ment by Acting Secretary Welles regarding, 108. 
Promotions, 168. 
Regulations, 268, 326. 

Representation of foreign interests by American dip- 
lomatic missions, 113. 
Resignations, 466. 
Retirements, 466. 

Statement of Ambassador to France on reported res- 
ignation, 437. 
Transportation of effects of officers and employees, 

executive order regulating, 426. 
Vice consul, detention in French Indochina, 453. 
U.S.S. "Quincy" : Address by Minister to Uruguay at 
Montevideo luncheon honoring Captain Wickham, 
35. 

U. S. treaties, agreements, etc., signed July -Dec. 1940, 
with — 
Argentina : Monetary stabilization, 590. 



U. S. treaties, agreements, etc., signed July-Dec. 1940, 
with — Continued. 
Australia : Peace advancement, amending treaty of 
1914 (U. S. and Great Britain), 207, 481, 590. 
Brazil : Customs privileges for diplomatic and con- 
sular personnel, reciprocal, 482. 
Exchange of official publications, 27. 
Canada : Air-transport arrangement of 1939, ^•- 
rangement giving effect to article III, 552. 
Peace advancement, ameniling treaty of 1914 
(U. S. and Great Britain), 207, 4S1, 590. 
Colombia: Supplementary extradition, 218. 
Dominican Republic: Financial, 271. 
Ecuador: U. S. naval and military aviation missions, 

551. 
Great Britain: Lease of naval and air ba.ses in 
Western Hemisphere, 199. 
Reserve of Australian wool In U. S., 554. 
Haiti : Haltianization of the Garde, withdrawal of 
military forces from Haiti, and financial, sup- 
plementary, 365. 
Japan: Imijortation to the Philippines of Japanese 

cotton piece goods, 36. 
New Zealand: Peace advancement, amending treaty 
of 1914 (U. S. and Great Britain), 207, 481, 590. 
Other American republics — 
Coffee-marketing, 482. 

Final Act of Habana Meeting of Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs, 127. 
Indian Institute, Inter-American, 524. 
Nature protection and wildlife preservation, 308. 
Provisional administration of European colonies 
and possessions in the Americas, 145. 
Peru : Renewal of U. S. naval mission, 98 ; furnishing 

of U. S. aviation mission, 98. 
U.s:.S.R. : Commercial, 105. 
Universities in a democracy : Address by Mr. Berle, 419. 
Uruguay (see aluo American republics) : 
Air and naval bases in, statements by Under Secre- 
tary Welles, 432, 452 ; statement to Spanish press 
by Uruguayan Minister at Madrid, 452. 
American Minister (Wilson), address on inter- 
American relations, 35. 
Delegation to Habana Meeting of Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of American Republics, dinner in 
honor of, 104. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

International Institute for Unification of Private 

Law, Fundamental Statute, adherence, 110. 
Nature protection and wildlife preservation (1940), 
signature, 576. 

Venezuela (see also American republics) : 
National anniversary, 11. 



^t4 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Venezuela — Continued. 

Professors and students, exchange with U. S., 149, 

254. 
Suspension by U. S. of tonnage duties for vessels 

of, 433. 
Treaties, agreements, etc.- — 
Coffee-marketing, inter-American (1940), signa- 
ture, 482. 
International Institute for Unification of Private 

Law, Fimdamental Statute, adherence, 286. 
Nature protection and wildlife preservation (1940), 

signature, 308. 
Trade, with U. S. (1939), exchange of ratifica- 
tion and U. S. proclamation, 436; supplemen- 
tary proclamation by U. S. President, 481. 
Virgin Islands: Immigration from British Virgin 
Islands and St. Bartholomew into, regulations. 280. 
Virginia and Texas State Teachers' Associations con- 
ventions, Fort Worth, Tex. and Richmond, Va. : 
Radio address by Mr. Grady, 448. 
Visas, U. S. (see also Aliens; Refugees) : 

Immigration, regulations, 14, 23, 31, 176, 198, 252, 

280, 563. 
Non-immigi'ation, temporary American Consulates 
in Canada issuing, 15. 
Vladivostok, U.S.S.R. : American Consulate at, 551. 
Vote of thanks: Pinal Act of Habana (XXVI), 142. 

Wages and hours of work in industries and agriculture, 

convention (1938), 38, 456. 
Wallace, Henry A. : Appointment as special representa- 
tive to inauguration ceremonies of President 

Camaeho of Mexico, 432. 
War Department exhibit at the Second Brazilian 

Dental Congress at Rio de Janeiro, 322. 
Washington National Airport: Remarks of President 

Roosevelt at cornerstone laying, 251. 
Welles, Sumner : 

Addresses, statements, etc. — 

Air and naval bases in Umguay, 432, 452. 

American republics, U. S. relations with, 340. 

Baltic republics, territorial integrity of, 48. 

Commercial agreement with U.S.S.R., 105. 

Extraterritoriality in China, 36. 

Foreign policy and national defense, 243. 

Inter-American shipping, 461. 

Latin American Lecture Series, opening address 
on inter-American relations, 369'. 

Press interview of Ambassador to Belgium, 108; 
of President of Argentina, 453. 



Welles, Sumner — Continued. 
Addresses, statements, etc. — Continued. 

Severance by Spain of diplomatic relations with 

Chile, 48. 
U. S. loan to Spain, erroneous reports, 582. 
Airplane accident near Canberra, telegram to Prime 

Minister of Australia, 116. 
Dinners in honor of the Argentine, Brazilian, and 
Uruguayan delegations to the Habana Meeting 
of Ministers of Foreign Affairs of American Re- 
publics, 104. 
Luncheon honoring retiring Ambassador of Cuba 

(Martinez Fraga), 584. 
Regulations with respect to U. S. neutrality in war 
between Italy and Greece, 429. 
Western Hemisphere. See American republics ; De- 
fense; and individual countries. 
Whaling regulation, protocol (1938) amending agree- 
ment (1937), 117. 
Wheat League, Eastern Oregon : Address by Mr. Ed- 
minster before, 494. 
Wildlife preservation and nature protection in the 
Western Hemi.si)here, inter-American convention 
(1940), 308. 402, 525, 576. 
Wilson, Edwin C, American Minister to Urugua.v : Ad- 
dress on inter-American relations, 35. 
Wilson, Hugh R.. Special Assistant to Secretary of 
State : 
Negotiations for revision of customs convention with 
Dominican Republic, designation as special rep- 
resentative of Secretary Hull in, 117. 
Retirement from Foreign Service, 466. 
Women: Convention on employment in mines (1935), 

38. 
Women's .Toint Congressional Committee: Address by 

Mr. Berle before, 423. 
Wool, Australian, agreement with Great Britain for 

reserve in U. S., 554. 
Wounded: Red Cross convention (1929), 238. 

Yugoslavia : 
Accidental death of American press correspondent, 

454. 
Debts to U. S., 572. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

International Institute for Unification of Private 

Law, Fundamental Statute, adherence, 286. 
Safety of life at sea (1929), appi'oval and deposit 
of instrument of adherence, 208. 



o 



PUBLISHBD WITH THE APPEOVAL OP THE DIEECTOB OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDOET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 



JULY 6, 1940 
Vol. Ill: No. 54 — Publication 1480 



Qontents 




Europe: Page 
European possessions in the Western Hemisphere: 
Statement by the Scqretary of State on German re- 
ply to note of the United States 3 

Newspaper interview of German Consul General in 

New Orleans 4 

The American Republics: 

The Altered Economic Position of Latin America, 

1931-1939: Address by Assistant Secretary Grady . 5 
Meeting of the Foreign Ministers of the Ameriqan Re- 
publics at Habana: Final agenda 11 

Venezuela: National anniversary 11 

General: 

Control of exports from the United States of munitions, 
materials, and machinery essential to national de- 
fense 11 

Documentary requirements for alien residents of the 

United States 14 

Establisliment of temporary American Consulates in 

Canada for nonimmigration visa services 15 

Legislation 15 

Departmental Service: 

Division of Commercial Treaties and Agreements: 

Departmental order 16 

Statement by the Secretary of State 16 

\Oven 



U. 8. SUffRlNTFNDfNT OF nCCIIMrNT- 

AUG 7 1§40 



Foreign Service of the United States: Page 

Personnel changes 17 

Treaty Information: 
Aviation : 

Convention for the Unification of Certain Rules 
Relatmg to Damages Caused by Aircraft to Third 
Parties on the Surface, 1933, and Additional Pro- 
tocol, 1938 18 

Telecommunications : 

International Telecommunication Convention 

(Treaty Series Nos. 867 and 948) 19 

Publications 19 

Regulations 19 



Europe 



EUROPEAN POSSESSIONS IN THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE 

Statement by the Secretary of State on German Reply to Note of the United States 



[Released to the press July 5] 

The Secretary of State, the Honorable Cor- 
dell Hull, made the following statement on 
July 5: 

"The American Charge d'Affaires in Berlin 
has communicated to the Department the text 
of a note dated July 1, which he has received 
from the German Minister of Foreign Affairs. 

"The note in question refei-s to the note 
delivered l)y tlie American Charge d'Affaires 
under instructions of the Government of the 
United States on June 18,^ in which this Gov- 
eriuneiit informed the Government of tlie Ger- 
man Reich that it would not recognize any 
transfer of a geographical region of the West- 
ern Hemisphere from one non-American power 
to another non-American jjower, and that it 
would not acquiesce in any attempt to undertake 
such transfer. 

"The German Minister of Foreign Affairs 
states that the Government of the German 
Reich is unable to perceive for what reason the 
Government of the United States of America 
has addressed this connnunication to the Reich 
Government. He states that in contrast with 
other countries, especially in contrast with Eng- 
land and France, Germany has no territorial 
possessions in the American Continent, and has 
given no occasion whatever for the assumption 
that it intends to acquire such possessions, and 



' See the Bulletin of June 22, 1^0 (Vol. II, No. 52), 
pp. 6fel-6S2. 



he asserts that thus insofar as Germany is con- 
cerned, the communication addressed to the 
Reich Government is without object. 

"The German Minister of Foreign Affairs 
continues by remarking that in this case the 
interpretation of tliQ Monroe Doctrine implicit 
in the communication of the Government of the 
United States would amount to conferring upon 
some European countries the right to possess 
territories in the Western Hemisphere and not 
to other European countries. He states that 
it is obvious that such an interpretation would 
be untenable. He concludes by remarking that 
apart from this, the Reich Government would 
like to point out again on this occasion that the 
nonintervention in tlie affairs of the American 
Continent by I^uropcun nations which is de- 
manded by the Monroe Doctrine can in princi- 
ple be legally valid only on condition that the 
American nations for their part do not interfere 
in the affairs of the European Continent. 

"The foregoing is the substance of the Ger- 
man note. 

"I feel that no useful purpose will be served 
at this time for this Government to undertake 
to make any further communication to the Gov- 
ernment of the German Reich on the subject 
matter of the communication above quoted. 

"The fundamental questions involved are en- 
tirely clear to all of the peoples of the American 
republics, and undoubtedly as well to the ma- 
jority of the governments and peoples in the 
rest of the world. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



"The Monroe Doctrine is solely a policy of 
self-defense, which is intended to preserve the 
independence and integrity of the Americas. It 
was, and is, designed to prevent aggression in 
this hemisphere on the part of any non- Ameri- 
can power, and likewise to make impossible any 
further extension to this hemisphere of any 
non-American system of government imposed 
from without. It contains within it not the 
slightest vestige of any implication, much less 
assumption, of hegemony on the part of the 
United States. It never has resembled, and it 
does not today resemble, policies which apj^ear 
to be arising in other geographical areas of the 
world, which are alleged to be similar to the 
Monroe Doctrine, but which, instead of resting 
on the sole policies of self-defense and of re- 
spect for existing sovereignties, as does the 
Monroe Doctrine, would in reality seem to be 
only the pretext for the carrying out of con- 
quest by the sword, of military occupation, and 
of complete economic and political domination 
by certain powers of other free and independent 
peoples. 

"The Monroe Doctrine has, of course, not the 
remotest connection with the fact that certain 
European nations exercise sovereignty over 
colonies in the Western Hemisphere and that 
certain other European nation3 do not. This 
situation existed before the Monroe Doctrine 
was proclaimed. The Doctrine did not under- 
take to interfere with the existing situation, but 
did announce that further incursions would not 
be tolerated. It made clear that the future 
transfer of existing possessions to another non- 
American state would be regarded as inimical 
to the interests of this hemisphere. This has 
become a basic policy of the Government of the 
United States. As already stated in the com- 
munication addressed to the German Govern- 
ment by this Government under date of June 18, 
the Government of the United States will 
neither recognize nor acquiesce in the transfer 
to a non-American power of geographical re- 
gions in this hemisphere now possessed by some 
other non-American power. 



"The Government of the United States pur- 
sues a policy of nonparticipation and of non- 
involvement in the purely political affairs of 
Europe. It will, however, continue to cooper- 
ate, as it has cooperated in the past, with all 
other nations, whenever the policies of such na- 
tions make it possible, and whenever it believes 
that such efforts are practicable and in its own 
best interests, for the purpose of promoting 
economic, commercial, and social rehabilitation, 
and of advancing the cause of international law 
and order, of which the entire world stands so 
tragically in need today." 

■f -f -f 

NEWSPAPER INTERVIEW OF GER- 
MAN CONSUL GENERAL IN NEW 
ORLEANS 

[Released to the press July 5] 

Through the courtesy and assistance of the 
Governor of Louisiana, the Depailment of 
State has now received a report concerning the 
interview given by Edgar Freiherr Spiegel von 
iind zu Peckelsheim, German Consul General in 
New Orleans, to a reporter for the New Orleans 
States on June 14, 1940, excerpts from which 
appeared in that news^^aper and were later re- 
produced or summarized in other papers. It 
would appear that the German Consul General 
in this instance thought he was not speaking for 
quotation, and that his statement was not for 
jjublication, and that, perhaps due to a misun- 
derstanding, publication was made. 

The matter has been taken uji with the Ger- 
man Embassy here, and it has been pointed out 
that public discussion of questions relating to 
this country's policies and attitudes does not 
properly come within the province of foreign 
government officials in the United States. It 
was pointed out that i^ermission granted to for- 
eign goverimaent officials to continue to remain 
in this country is dei^endent on observance of 
this rule. 

The incident is considered closed. 



The American Republics 



THE ALTERED ECONOMIC POSITION OF LATIN AMERICA, 1931-1939 

Address by Assistant Secretary Grady - 



[Released to the press July 2] 

It is a pleasure for me to have been given the 
opportunity of taking part in this Conference 
on International Relations of the Institute of 
Latin American Studies. Such meetings not 
only serve to focus public attention on the im- 
portance of the general subject of our political, 
economic, and cultural relations with the other 
American republics, but more particularly they 
bring together scholars and specialists in that 
field to exchange views and define the problems 
for whose solution attention needs most specifi- 
cally to be directed. The objective of the Con- 
ference is, I understand, the formulation of 
definite proposals or plans for the prosecution 
of researcli projects, rather than the discussion 
of current problems alone, with a view to pro- 
viding a firm foundation upon which future 
discussions can be more intelligently conducted 
on the basis of new information developed by 
such projects. The work of such conferences 
as this one, opening today, deserves every 
encouragement and support. 

A consideration at this time of the altered 
economic position of Latin America during the 
last decade has more significance than the mere 
recital of a series of developments with which 
a group such as is gathered here today is, to 
a considerable extent, already familiar. Its 
greater significance and value lie in the oppor- 
tunity to analyze the effects of world-wide de- 
velopments and trends during the last 10 years 
on the other American republics, individually 
and severally, and to examine the status of our 
own relations with those countries. Only from 
such an analysis can come an intelligent ap- 
proach to today's problems. 



" Delivered at the third session of the Conference on 
International Relations of the Institute of Latin Ameri- 
can Studies, at the University of Texas, Austin, Tex., 
July 2, 1940. 



Although the individual nations of Latin 
America possess economic personalities which 
in some cases are as different from one another 
as from that of the United States, and while it 
is therefore difficult to indulge in generalities 
applying to 20 nations, there are nevertheless 
certain basic economic factors conunon to all of 
tliem. 

The economy of the republics of Latin Amer- 
ica is closely linked with that of the world 
because of the position of those countries as 
producers of raw materials for export, upon the 
sale of which they depend to a large extent for 
means of covering the debit items in their bal- 
ances of international payments. One of the 
most significant developments during the last 
decade has been the loss of control by many 
Latin-American nations of the proceeds of a 
considerable part of their exports through the 
operation of bilateral agreements with Euro- 
pean countries which forced such proceeds to be 
utilized only for imports from sucli countries or 
for specific financial purposes. Since the na- 
tions of Latin America have remained to a con- 
siderable extent producers of primarj- goods 
for world markets, their exports have been 
highly sensitive to conditions in world markets 
over which those nations have had little control. 
So long as the trend continues toward bilateral 
trade, and controls of the proceeds of Latin- 
American exports are operated as they have 
been in recent years or increased by European 
importing nations, the more vulnerable the 
southern countries of the Western Hemisphere 
will become to pressure from abroad. We can- 
not fail to take note of the possibility of such 
pressure being ajDplied for other than economic 
ends. 

Aggravating the problem just mentioned is 
that of the unitary nature of Latin-American 
exports : the effects of developments outside the 

5 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



hemisphere on the production of tin in Bolivia, 
copper and nitrate in Chile, coffee and cotton in 
Brazil, coffee and petroleum in Colombia, and 
coffee in Venezuela and in the Central American 
republics, to mention but a few outstanding ex- 
amples, have a profound influence on a large 
part of the economy of each of the affected 
countries. Although definite steps have been 
taken during the last decade looking toward 
diversification of agriculture and industry in a 
number of countries and a certain degree of 
progress has been achieved, the basic "one-crop" 
situation in the majority of the Latin-American 
countries remains substantially unchanged 
today. 

Closely allied to the problems just mentioned 
has been the relationship between foreign trade 
and governmental finances. Although consid- 
erable headway has been made in a few of the 
more economically advanced countries of Latin 
America during the last decade to broaden the 
tax base, it is still largely true that the most 
important single source of government revenue 
is customs duties. Developments in foreign 
trade, therefore, are especially significant in 
Latin America from the point of view of public 
finance, including the servicing of foreign obli- 
gations, and of the bearing of such finance on 
various aspects of national economic activity 
and growth. 

The basic position of the Latin- American 
countries as debtors on international account 
has not changed during the past decade. There 
is today and will be for some decades to come 
a real need for the investment of new capital 
in enterprises sound for both the lender and 
the borrower. The movement of capital for 
productive investment has in the past been 
closely related to the effect upon the national 
economies of sliarp fluctuations in foreign trade. 
Thus, the rapid decrease in foreign trade at the 
beginning of the past decade coincided with the 
cessation of our foreign lending which accel- 
erated the downward economic trend. I do not, 
of course, mean to imply that the basis or meth- 
ods of much foreign lending by this country 
during the twenties was sound. Continued in- 
discriminate lending to Latin America would 



not have been wise and very probably could not 
in any event have offset the effects upon that 
area of the general world situation. Neverthe- 
less, new capital carefully directed into lines 
which would have increased local productive 
capacity and raised living standards would have 
been of value during that period to both lender 
and borrower. 

At the beginning of the last decade the econ- 
omies of the American republics wei'e, generally 
speaking, in a relatively prosperous condition 
although the first rumblings were audible of 
the troubled days ahead. Foreign trade, at that 
time as now, one of the most obvious barometers 
of general conditions, was at a high level, sup- 
ported by high prices and a relative freedom of 
movement. The effect of foreign borrowing, 
although beginning to taper off, was still suf- 
ficient to permit international payments to be 
balanced and currencies to remain fairly stable. 

By the middle of 1930, however, appeared the 
first marked signs of the depression as raw- 
material price declines gained momentum. 
Falling more rapidly and to considerably lower 
levels than prices of finished goods and semi- 
manufactures, world prices for such important 
Latin-American export commodities as copper, 
wheat, coffee, sugar, and tin had declined by the 
end of 1932 to hardly more than 40 percent of 
the levels at the beginning of 1928. The price 
index for finished goods and semimanufactures 
in the United States, on the other hand, declined 
during that period only to 73 and 62 percent, 
respectively, of the 1928 levels. The effect on 
Latin- American foreign trade, of course, and in 
turn on the internal economy, was rapid and 
severe. Chilean foreign trade, hardest hit, had 
by 1932 declined to but 13 percent of its value 
in 1929. Tlie practical cessation of foreign in- 
vestments aggi-avated the difficulties resulting 
from the shrinking value of exports. Govern- 
ment revenues, dependent to an important ex- 
tent upon customs duties, declined rapidly and 
resulted not only in internal difficulties but also 
in suspension of foreign debt service in various 
countries. Gold stocks were depleted and cur- 
rency depreciation set in. Practically all ele- 
ments of the national economies were caught in 
the descending spiral. 



JULY 6, 1940 



The United States, of course, must accept its 
share of the blame for the trade-strangling 
measures throughout the world which have had 
a particularly destructive effect on the economies 
of the countries of Latin America. The 
Hawley-Smoot Tariff Act of 1930, the sanitary 
embarjj;o imposed by that act as a protection 
against foreign competition rather than against 
the danger of harmful diseases, and other re- 
strictive measures not only contributed directly 
to economic difficulties in certain Latin-Ameri- 
can countries but set in motion retaliatory or 
defensive measures in many countries in other 
parts of the world which in turn restricted the 
trade of the nations of this hemisphere. Dur- 
ing the last few years we have made some prog- 
ress through the trade-agreements program in 
meeting this problem but much of the task still 
lies before us. 

The Latin-American governments were faced 
early in the depression with the necessity of 
adopting drastic measures to meet the rapidly 
changing situation. Since the causes of the 
difficulties resulted primarily from the deteri- 
oration of economic relationships with the rest 
of the world, it was natural that the first de- 
fensive measures should involve readjustments 
in those relations. Thus, controls were estab- 
lished which, although varying in their details 
and manner of application from one country to 
another, were designed to restrict imports with- 
in reduced exchange availabilities and secondly 
to control those availabilities in a manner which 
would permit their most efficient use from the 
point of view of what seemed to be the national 
interest. 

These were in the first instance the primary 
objectives of increases in tariff rates and the 
operation of exchange control. Increased im- 
port duties were directed in a large part against 
articles regarded as luxuries and, in the case of 
exchange control, exchange for payments of 
such articles and for noncommercial purposes 
was subject to long delays or was supplied only 
at unfavorable rates in order that exchange 
availabilities could be utilized primarily for 
essential imports. 

Soon, however, the operation of exchange and 



trade controls became subject to pressure from 
foreign countries. The usual export surplus 
of Latin-American countries presented certain 
European importing nations with an oppor- 
tunity to accomplish two purposes : the liquida- 
tion of balances blocked in Latin-American 
countries for lack of exchange and the forcing 
of their own exports. Thus a large number of 
bilateral clearing or compensation agreements 
came into existence. This development has 
presented to the United States Government one 
of its most difficult problems in inter-American 
economic relations. 

The growth of manufacturing activities in 
Latin America during the past decade has been 
considerable, particularly in Argentina, Brazil, 
Chile, and Mexico. This expansion of indus- 
trial activity constitutes the second important 
period of industrialization in Latin America, 
the first having occurred during the 1914-18 
war-period when manufacturing was stimulated 
primarily by the loss of European sources of 
supply. During the past decade, however, the 
marked expansion of industrial activity may be 
ascribed largely to the foreign trade situation 
and its effect on foreign exchange availabilities, 
together with higher import duties imposed for 
protective purposes. 

As the economies of the American republics 
grow and mature, the trend toward industrial- 
ization may be expected to increase and, insofar 
as it rests on a sound economic basis, it may be 
reflected in a growing volume of international 
trade resulting in benefits to all countries con- 
cerned. The marked trend toward industrial- 
ization which has taken place in the last decade 
has been due partly, however, to abnormal eco- 
nomic conditions brought about by the develop- 
ment of bilateralism in the trade relations of 
Latin-American republics as well as of other 
countries. It reflects in part the disintegration 
of the international economic system on which 
the prosperity of Latin America is especially 
dependent. 

Comprehensive statistics showing the growth 
of manufacturing activity in all of the other 
American republics are not available. In Ar- 
gentina, however, an industrial census was 



8 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



taken in 1935 and another in 1937. The expan- 
sion during this 2-year period is evidence of tlie 
rapidity of growth in one of the leading coun- 
tries. Between 1935 and 1937 the number of 
persons engaged in manufacturing in Argen- 
tina increased from 526,000 to 642,000, or by 22 
percent; wages and salaries increased more than 
200 million pesos, from 737 million to 948 mil- 
lion pesos, or by 28.6 percent, and the value of 
finished goods increased from 3.4 to 4.7 billion 
pesos, or by 36.1 percent. 

Similar developments in Brazil have, among 
other things, placed that country on an export 
basis in textiles, and manufacturing has also 
expanded tremendously in many other lines. 

In the light of developments over the last 
decade, it is of interest to examine certain 
changes in the economies of the nations of Latin 
America : the apparent necessity in the majority 
of countries for some form of governmental con- 
trol over foreign trade or the means of inter- 
national payment; the trend toward the 
canalizing of foreign trade and the payments 
therefor into bilateral channels; certain grad- 
ual changes in the composition of both exports 
and imports, brought about not only by ad- 
justments in the domestic economies of the 
Latin-American countries but more impor- 
tantly because of trends in commercial policy in 
other countries, such as the movement in vari- 
ous European countries for self-sufficiency in 
certain products deemed essential ; and a some- 
what greater dependence on domestic sources 
for new investment capital. 

Continuing governmental controls over trade 
and payments in Latin America is a phenom- 
enon which seems attributable to two causes: 
the operation of a not inconsiderable part of 
Latin-American foreign trade under compen- 
sation agreements largely imposed from 
abroad, and the necessity of controlling the 
actual or potential demand for foreign ex- 
change which for all purposes considerably ex- 
ceed^ ex;change availabilities in many coun- 
tries. With respect to the former, it is not 
possible to foretell to what extent the post-war 
trade between a large part of Europe and Latin 
America will be conducted on any more liberal 



lines than during the last few years. In regard 
to exchange, the potential demand in the na- 
tions of Latin America is as great if not greater 
now than it was prior to the depression, par- 
ticularly if we include the demand for exchange 
for noncommercial purposes. The supply of 
exchange, on the other hand, is much smaller 
than it was 10 years ago, largely because of a 
much lower level of export values. 

The trend which has developed during the 
last few years to force trade and payments into 
bilateral channels is, of course, to the long-run 
disadvantage of the countries of Latin Amer- 
ica, whose real interest is in the development 
of international trade with a minimum of 
restrictions or artificial controls. 

The changes which have taken place in the 
composition of Latin-American foreign trade 
over the last decade are more noticeable in im- 
ports than in exports. Kefiecting, among other 
things, increased industrial activity, imports 
of raw materials and semifinished goods have 
in many lines of trade gradually tended to 
displace to some extent semifinished goods and 
manufactures, respectively, and imports of ma- 
chinery have increased. On the side of exports, 
noteworthy trends have included increased ex- 
ports of petroleum from Colombia and of 
cotton from Brazil. 

The net result of the foregoing factors upon 
the trade of the United States with Latin 
America, and upon our financial relationships 
with that area, may be summarized as follows: 

Our import trade, in dollar value, has under- 
gone a considerable change: in 1929 our im- 
ports from the 20 republics of Latin America 
amounted to $1,014,127,000. Wliile having re- 
covered from depression levels, they neverthe- 
less have averaged only $548,053,000 during 
the last 3 years. This is similarly true in the 
case of our exports to Latin America : a de- 
crease from $911,749,000 in 1929 to an average 
of $547,275,000 in 1937-39. These changes 
might be found to be even more marked if ac- 
count were taken of the change in the value 
of the dollar between 1929 and the present 
time. On the import side there have not been 
any marked changes in the commodities enter- 



JULY 6, 1940 



9 



in<r into tlio trade. On tlie export side, the 
changes liave heen somewhat more marked: as 
various American republics tended to become 
more economically developed, there was a trend 
toward greater industrialization and a result- 
ant shift toward the exportation from this 
country to Latin America of machinery and 
oflu'r producers goods. The share of the 
United States in the import trade of Latin 
America has remained steady during the last 
decade, amounting to 35.9 percent in 1930 and 
34.6 percent in 1938. The relative importance 
of Latin America as a market for our products 
and as a source of imports likewise has re- 
mained about the same: Latin America took 
17.4 percent of our exports in 1929 and 17.9 
percent in 1939, and supplied us with 22.3 per- 
cent of our imports in 1939 as compared with 
23.1 percent 10 years earlier. 

Turning to other aspects of our economic 
relations with Latin America over the past 
decade, we find that most of our problems stem 
from the generally lower level of foreign trade 
throughout the world today than 10 years ago. 
In 1929, when Latin-American exports were 
at a high level and the proceeds therefrom 
could be freely utilized, the excess of Latin- 
American exports to Europe over imports from 
that area were used as needed to meet com- 
mercial and financial obligations in the United 
States. 

The unsatisfactory situation resulting from a 
lower level of Latin-American export values has 
heen aggravated by the control which various 
European countries have exercised over the pni- 
ceeds of Latin- American exports in order to 
promote the sale of their own products or for 
other purposes. Where such controls affect the 
proceeds of a large part of the exports of a 
particular Latin-American country, the general 
result has been that the supply of exchange 
available for payments to the United States has 
been limited and that our exporters have re- 
ceived the first call on this limited supply while 
our other economic interests, chiefly our inves- 
tors, have received less favorable treatment. 
Although a number of Latin- American govern- 
ments have made sincere efforts to resume serv- 

244569—40 2 



ice on their obligations on which service was 
suspended during the depression, their efforts, 
as well as the efforts of those goveriunents which 
have not resumed service in any degree, have 
been hampered by the exchange problem. A 
substantial increase in the value of Latin- 
American exports for which free foreign ex- 
change can be obtained would impiove the posi- 
tion of our investors as well as that of our 
exporters. 

This Government can contribute in consider- 
able measure to the easing of exchange difficul- 
ties in Latin America through the reduction of 
those trade barriers which have prevented a 
larger flow of imports from that area into this 
country and through the maintenance of those 
conditions under which goods moving freely 
may continue to be imported without restric- 
tions. During the last few yeais the trade- 
agi-eements program has been the most effective 
means utilized by this Government to create 
conditions favorable to a sound and profitable 
expansion of our foreign trade, imi)orts as well 
as exports. We have concluded 12 agreements 
with 11 of the Latin-American nations, includ- 
ing a supplementary agreement with Cuba. 
Negotiations are in progress with another coun- 
try, Chile. 

The fact is that the administration has 
throughout its term been actively seeking to 
promote economic relations with the other coun- 
tries of this hemisphere. Our efforts have, of 
course, not in all instances been successful, but 
the progress has been steady. The situation 
that faces us today calls for redoubled efforts 
toward inter-American economic cooperation. 
This is demanded, not only for sound business 
reasons, but also by our common interest in 
defense. 

We must continue and intensify our efforts, 
through our trade and other commercial poli- 
cies, to develop for our conmaon benefit trade 
relations within this hemisphere. At the same 
time, we cannot intelligently ignore the plain 
fact that the trade relations of the Americas 
are not, and cannot be dealt with as if they 
were, trade relations within the American hemi- 
sphere alone. A large share of the trade of this 



10 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



hemisphere is, and must continue to be, with the 
populous areas of the Old World, and in sig- 
nificant degree we nations of this hemisphere 
are not only mutual suppliers of each others' 
needs, but competitors in overseas markets. 
Even competitors, however, have common inter- 
ests, and we should study and clarify the nature 
of those interests in order to find tlie best means 
of furthering them by cooperative action. 

We frequently hear it proposed that produc- 
tion in Latin-American countries be adjusted 
so as to make it possible to substitute our mar- 
kets for their markets in the Old World. It is 
suggested in this connection that we assist the 
development in the Americas of the production 
of commodities such as rubber, cocoa, and tin, 
for which our necessity provides abundant and 
profitable markets and for which we are now 
dependent upon sources in remote corners of the 
earth. 

Proposals of this sort do not of course offer 
a solution to the current economic problems of 
the Americas. Even if ways can be found to 
surmount the difficult technical problems in- 
volved in such proposals, such as the question 
of labor supply, of climatic requirements, or of 
transportation, substantial results will require 
an extended period of persevering endeavor, 
and the needs of the situation are current and 
pressing. The problems of failing or block- 
aded markets, of unsold surpluses, and of their 
economic and political consequences among 
our neighbors are problems of today's finances 
and balances of payments for their govern- 
ments, and of today's livelihood for their 
peoples. 

But while the immediate problem of export 
surpluses is demanding our attention, we must 
not lose sight of the long-range view of our 
economic relations with the other American 
republics. This includes not only their possi- 
bilities of supplying more of our import needs, 
but also the opportunities for furthering their 
economic development which, in raising stand- 
ards of living, will provide improved markets 
in this hemisphere for our own products. 

I have attempted to point out some of the 
more important economic developments in 



Latin America during the past decade. It has 
been a period which has witnessed sharp fluctu- 
ations between prosperity and depression in 
nearly every phase of national life. If the diffi- 
culties which have arisen during the last 10 
years have served no other purpose, they have 
at least given us an insight into the problems we 
may expect to face in the near future upon a 
greatly intensified scale. It is important, there- 
fore, that we have a thorough understanding of 
economic developments in Latin America in 
the recent past in order that we may be better 
equipped to solve the difficulties which lie ahead 
for the nations of that area in their relations 
with the rest of the world and in our own rela- 
tions with them. Accordingly, it would seem 
desirable in formulating projects for the study 
of present and future inter-American economic 
problems to give adequate attention to recent 
trends and the factors involved in order that 
they may be understood and dealt with 
intelligently. 

Pressure upon the democracies of this hemi- 
sphere by the totalitarian powers, which has 
begun even before the cannon in Europe have 
ceased thundering, challenges directly the abil- 
ity of this country to establish a basis for inter- 
American economic relations which will permit 
the other nations of this hemisphere to resist 
trade bargains with political strings attached. 
Our first task, therefore, is to be as completely 
informed as possible, in the light of past de- 
velopments, on the problems faced by the Latin- 
American republics. To this the present gath- 
ering can contribute effectively by giving the 
widest possible dissemination to the results of 
the research projects it initiates. In the sense 
of a more positive program, groups such as this 
can also aid materially by their efforts to secure 
widespread supjiort for the practical measures 
necessary if we are to maintain political and 
defensive unity in this hemisphere through 
strengthened economic cooperation. Specifi- 
cally, if we are going to implement the good- 
neighbor policy at a time when it faces its sever- 
est test, we must be prepared to extend to the 
nations of Latin America every assistance in the 
solution of their export problems with a view 



JULY 6, 1940 



11 



to siifej^uardinj; their interests and ours against 
the totalitarian weapons of politico-economic 
penetration. In a word, we must exert our- 
selves in every way in order to maintain in this 
hemisphere the spirit and substance of those 
liberal economic and political relationships 
which make life worth while. 

-f -f -f 

MEETING OF THE FOREIGN MINIS- 
TERS OF THE AMERICAN REPUB- 
LICS AT HABANA 

Final Agenda 

The Governing Board of the Pan American 

Union has aj^itroved the final program or 
agenda for the forthcoming ctjiisultative meet- 
ing at Habana of the Ministers of Foreign Af- 
fairs of the American Republics, oi' their repre- 
sentatives. The final agenda as aj)proved is 
identical with the draft agenda which appeared 
on pages 705-706 of the Btdlctin of June 29. 
1940 (Vol. II, \o. 53), with the exception of 
paragraph 4 of section I, which reads in the 
final agenda as follows: 



"(4) Consideration of the humanitarian ac- 
tivities which, in a coordinated manner, can be 
conducted by the Governments of the American 
Republics, the National Red Cross societies, and 
other entities created for the purpose, for the 
benefit of refugees, prisoners, and other victims 
of the war." 

-f -f -f 

VENEZUELA: NATIONAL 
ANNIVERSARY 

[Released to the press July 5] 

The following telegram was sent July 5 by 
President Roosevelt to the President of Vene- 
zuela, Sefior Eleazar Ij('>pez Contreras: 

"July 5, 1940. 

"On this aniiiveisary which the people of 
Venezuela are celebrating today I take great 
pleasure in extending to Your Excellency on 
behalf of the people of the United States and in 
my own name sincere congratulations and ear- 
nest wishes for the prosperity of the Republic. 

Franklin D. Roose\elt." 



General 



CONTROL OF EXPORTS FROM THE UNITED STATES OF MUNITIONS, 
MATERIALS, AND MACHINERY ESSENTIAL TO NATIONAL DEFENSE 



[Released to the press by the White House July 2] 

The President on July 2 signed H. R. 9850, 
providing legal authority for the control of ex- 
poi'ts from the L'nited States of munitions, ma- 
terials, and machinery essential to our national 
defense. A proclamation issued under this au- 
thority sets up the controls considered neces- 
sary at this time. 

The items and materials listed in the procla- 
mation include certain strategic materials as 
well as semifinished products and machine tools 
of which there are actual or prospective short- 
ages as a result of the national defense program. 



The Materials and Production Divisions of 
the National Defense Advisory Commission are 
collaborating with the Administrator of Ex- 
port Control in the determination of the items 
to be controlled and the extent and character of 
the controls to be exercised. 

'\^^lile the control of exports is primarily a 
national-defense matter, the Department of 
State provides the machinery for the actual 
issue of licerises under which any controlled 
items are released for export. 

The President also signed and issued the fol- 
lowing military order: 



12 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



"The administration of section 6 of the act of 
Congress entitled 'An Act to expedite the 
strengtheninnf of the national defense,' ap- 
proved July 2, 1940, is essentially a military 
function, and by virtue of the authority vested 
in me as President of the United States and as 
Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy of 
the United States, I hereby designate Lieuten- 
ant Colonel Russell L. Maxwell, U. S. Army, 
Administrator of Export Control to administer 
the provisions of the said section under the di- 
rection and supervision of the President as 
Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy of 
the United States. 

"FiL\NKLiN D. Roosevelt 

'■^Commander-in-Chief. 

"The White House, 
''July 2, 19Jfi." 

The text of the above-mentioned i^roclama- 
tion follows : 

Administration or Section 6 or the Act En- 
titled, "An Act to Expedite the Strength- 
ening OF the National Defense" Approved 
July 2, 1940 

BY the president OF THE UNITED STATES OF 
AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Whereas section 6 of the act of Congress en- 
titled "An Act To expedite the strengthening 
of the national defense," approved July 2, 1940, 
provides as follows : 

"Wlienever the President determines that it 
is necessary in the interest of national defense 
to prohibit or curtail the exportation of any 
military equipment or munitions, or component 
parts thereof, or machinery, tools, or material or 
supplies necessary for the manufacture, servic- 
ing or operation thereof, he may by proclama- 
tion prohibit or curtail such exportation, except 
under such rules and regulations as he shall 
prescribe. Any such i^roclamation shall de- 
scribe the articles or materials included in the 
prohibition or curtailment contained therein. 



In case of the violation of any provision of any 
proclamation, or of any rule or regulation, is- 
sued hci'eunder, such violator or violators, upon 
conviction, shall be punished by a fine of not 
more than $10,000, or by imprisonment for not 
more than two years or by both such fine and 
imprisonment. The authority granted in this 
Act shall terminate June 30, 1942, unless the 
Congi-ess shall otherwise provide." 

Now, therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, 

President of the United States of America, 
acting under and by virtue of the authority 
vested in me by the said act of Congress, do 
hereby proclaim that the administration of the 
provisions of section 6 of that act is vested in 
the Administrator of Export Control, who shall 
administer such provisions under such rules and 
regulations as I shall from time to time pre- 
scribe in the interest of the national defense. 

And I do hereby further proclaim that upon 
the recommendation of the aforesaid Adminis- 
trator of Export Control, I have determined 
that it is necessary in the interest of the na- 
tional defense that on and after July 5, 1940, 
the articles and materials hereinafter listed 
shall not be exported from the United States 
except when authorized in each case by a 
license as hereinafter provided : 

1. Arms, anmiunition, and implements of 
war as defined in my Proclamation No. 2237, 
of May 1, 1937.- 

2. The following basic materials and prod- 
ucts containing tlie same: 

a. Aluminum 

b. Antimony 

c. Asbestos 

d. Chromium 

e. Cotton linters 

f. Flax 

g. Graphite 
h. Hides 

i. Industrial diamonds 

j. Manganese 

k. Magnesium 

1. Manila fiber 

m. Mercury 

n. Mica 



'See the Biillrtiii of Jiimiar}- 27, 1940 (Vol. II, No. 
31), pp. 119-120. 



JirLY 6, 1940 



13 



o. Molybdonum 

p. Optical glass 

q. Platinum group metals 

r. Quartz crystals 

s. Quinine 

t. Rubber 

u. Silk 

T. Tin 

w. Toluol 

X. Tungsten 

y. Vanadium 

z. Wool 

3. Chemicals as follows: 

a. Ammonia and ammonium compounds 

b. Chlorine 

c. Dimethylaniline 

d. Diphenylamine 

e. Nitric acid 

f. Nitrates 

g. Nitrocellulose, having a nitrogen con- 

tent of less than 12 percent 
h. Soda lime 

i. Sodium acetate, anhydrous 
j. Strontium chemicals 
k. Sulphuric acid, fuming 

4. Products as follows: 

a. Aircraft parts, equipment, and acces- 

sories other than those listed in my 
proclanuition of May 1, 1937. 

b. Armor plate, otlier than that listed in 

my iHoclamation of May 1, 1937. 

c. Ghiss, nonshatterable or bullet proof. 

d. Plastics, optically clear. 

e. Optical elements for fire control instru- 

ments, aircraft instruments, etc. 

5. Machine tools as follows: 
Metal-working machinery for — 

(1^ Melting or casting 

(2) Pressing into forms 

(3) Cutting or grinding, power driven 

(4) Welding 

And I do hereby empower the Secretary of 
State to issue licenses authorizing the exporta- 
tion of any of the said articles and materials 
the exportation of which is not already sub- 
jected to the requirement that a license be ob- 
tained from the Secretary of State authorizing 
their exportation and I do hereby authorize and 
enjoin him to issue or refuse to issue licenses 
authorizing the exportation of any of the ar- 



ticles or materials listed above in accordance 
with the aforesaid rules and regulations or such 
specific directives as may be, from time to time, 
communicated to him by the Administrator of 
Export Control. 

And 1 do hereby admonish all citizens of the 
United States and every person to abstain from 
every violation of the provisions of section 6 
of the act above set forth, of the provisions of 
this proclamation, and of the provisions of such 
regulations as may be issued thereunder, and I 
do hereby warn them that all violations of such 
provisions will be rigorously prosecuted. 

And I do hereby enjoin upon all officers of the 
United States, charged with the execution of the 
laws thereof, the utmost diligence in preventing 
violations of the said act, of this my proclama- 
tion, and of any regulations which may be is- 
sued pursuant hereto, and in bringing to trial 
and punishment anj- offenders against the same. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 

Done at the City of Washington this 2nd day 
of July, in the year of our Lord nineteen hun- 
dred and forty, and of the Inde- 
[seal] pendence of the United States of 
America the one hundred and sixty- 
fourth, at 11 a. m.. E. S. T. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 
By the President : 
CoRDELL Hull, 

Secretary of State. 

[No. 2413] 



The text of the regulations governing the ex- 
portation of articles and mateiials designated 
in the President's proclamation of July 2, 1940 
(No. 2413) , issued pursuant to the provisions of 
section 6 of the act of Congress approved July 
2, 1940, appears in the Federal Register of July 
4, 1940 (Vol. 5, No. 130), pages 2469-2472. 



14 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



DOCUMENTARY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALIEN RESIDENTS OF THE 

UNITED STATES 



[Released to the press July 3] 

Aliens already admitted into the United 
States for permanent residence have not been 
required under the new passport and visa regu- 
lations to obtain passports from the govern- 
ments to which they owe allegiance, for con- 
tinued residence in the United States. 

Under the Alien Registration Act of 1940, 
aliens in the United States will, however, be 
required to register. It is understood that ap- 
propriate instructions regarding the procedure 
to be followed in registering, will be given 
publicity in due course. 

Alien residents of the United States desiring 
to proceed to neighboring countries on visits, 
may, upon return to the United States, present 
a reentry permit obtained from the United 
States immigration authorities before depart- 
ing from the United States, or a nonquota im- 
migration visa obtained from an American con- 
sular officer abroad. Aliens who have been ad- 
mitted into the United States for permanent 
residence with immigration visas and who have 
been issued border identification cards, do not 
require further documentation for reentry into 
the United States. 

The text of the regulations, effective July 1, 
1940, relating to entries from Canada and Mex- 
ico, follows: 

Regulations Effective July 1, 1940, Relating 
TO Entries From Canada and Mexico 

Persons Other Than American Citizens 

I. temporary VISITS TO THE UNITED STATES; 
TRANSIT JOURNEYS THROUGH THE UNITED 

STATES. 

Passports. Citizens of Canada and citizens 
of Mexico should obtain passports or similar 
documents from the Canadian and Mexican 
authorities. Nationals of other countries 



should similarly obtain passports from the rep- 
resentatives of their governments. 

Visas. Application for a visitor's visa or 
transit certificate should be made at an Amer- 
ican consular office. 

Cost of Visa. In the case of Canadian and 
Mexican citizens, no charge will be made for the 
visa. (The charge for visas issued to persons 
of other nationalities will depend upon the 
schedule of fees applicable thereto). 

Validity of Visa. The visa will be valid for 
twelve months if the passport is valid for this 
period and may be used for any number of 
entries during the period of validity. 

Procedure When Entering and Departing 
From the United States. The visa will be 
placed upon consular form 257, which should be 
presented with the passport to the immigration 
authorities at the port of entry. The form will 
be retained by the immigration authorities dur- 
ing the holder's sojourn in the United States 
and will be returned to him upon his application 
at the immigration office when leaving the 
United States, for use in applying for further 
entries. 

Depatrture Through Different Port of Entry. 
If the holder of the visa intends to depart 
through a different port of entry, he should so 
advise the immigration authorities in order that 
the form bearing the visa may be sent to the 
immigration office at the proposed point of 
departure. 

Departure Without Awaiting Return of 
Form. If the person should depart from the 
United States without obtaining the form bear- 
ing the visa, he should write promptly to the 
immigration authorities requesting that the 
form be sent to the nearest American consular 
office to be returned to the person upon personal 
application; or if the person expects to return 
to the United States shortly through the same 



JtTLY 6, 1940 



15 



port of entry, lie may write to the immigration 
authorities and request that the form be re- 
tained until lie shall call at the immigration 
office. 

Passengers on Through T ransportation Lines 
which run from the territory of one country 
through the territory or waters of both coun- 
tries, do not require a passport or visa if pass- 
ing in direcl transit under supervision of the 
immigration authorities. 

II. IMMIGRATION INTO THE UNITED STATES. 

New Immigrants. Persons desiring to immi- 
grate into the United States should obtain a 
passport from the Canadian or Mexican au- 
thorities or from rejjresentatives of the country 
to which they ow-e allegiance. Application 
should be made at a consular office authorized 
to issue immigration visas. 

Immigrantx Refm^ing From a Temporary 
Visit Abroad. Aliens admitted into the United 
States for permanent residence may upon re- 
turn from a temporary visit abroad, present 
a reentry permit obtained from the immigra- 
tion authorities before departing from the 
United States, or a non-quota immigration visa 
obtained from an American consular officer 
abroad. 

Aliens who have been admitted into the 
United States for permanent residence with 
immigration visas and who have been issued 
border identification cards, do not require 
further documentntion for reentry into the 
United States. 

Procedure Relating to Entries From Canada 
AND Mexico 

American Citizens 

American citizens do not require American 
passports eitlier to leave or to reenter the 
United States. It is recommended, however, 
that they be in possession of such personal 
papers and other documents as may be helpful 
in establishing that they are American citizens. 



ESTABLISHMENT OF TEMPORARY 
AMERICAN CONSULATES IN CAN- 
ADA FOR NONIMMIGRATION VISA 
SERVICES 

[Released to the press July 11 

With reference to the Executive order issued 
by tlie President on June 5, 1940,^ which re- 
quires that all aliens entering the United States 
on and after July 1, 1940, be in possession of 
passports or other documents of identity and 
nationality and have visas obtained from Amer- 
ican consular officers, the Department of State 
has established temporary American Consulates 
for the performance of nonimmigration visa 
services only, at the following places in 
Canada : 

Fort Erie, Ontario 
Kingston, Ontario 
Sault Ste'. Marie, Ontario 
Sherbrooke. Quebec 
Trail, British Columbia. 

The regular consular offices in Canada will 
also perform these services. For the greater 
convenience of the public, the American Con- 
sulate in London, Ontario, has been moved to 
Sarnia, Ontario. 



'Sop tliP Bitllctin of .Tunc S, IfMO (Vol. II. No. .^0), 
I>I>. 622-024. 



Legislation 



Joint Resolution To authorize the postponement of 
payment of amounts payable to the United States by 
the Republic of Finland on its indebtedness under 
agreements between that KepuWie and the United 
States dated May 1, 1923. and May 23, 1932. (Public 
Res. 84, 76th Cong., 3d sess.) 1 p. 50. 

Joint Resolution To amend section 4 of Public Resolu- 
tion Numbered 54. approved November 4, 1939, entitled 
"Joint resolution to preserve the neutrality and the 
peace of the United States and to secure the safety of 
its citizens and their interests." (Public Res. 87, 76th 
Cong., 3d sess.) 1 p. 50. 



Departmental Service 



DIVISION OF COMMERCIAL TREATIES AND AGREEMENTS 

Departmental Order 



[Released to the press July 1] 

The Secretary of State has signed the fol- 
lowing Departmental order : 

"Departmental Order 

"In order most effectively to carry out the 
Department's function of the protection of 
American foreign commerce, there is hereby 
created in the Department of State a Division 
of Commercial Treaties and Agreements which 
shall have general charge of the formulation, 
negotiation, and administration of all commer- 
cial treaties and agreements having to do with 
the international commercial relations of the 
United States and shall cooperate in the formu- 
lation of international commercial policy. The 
new division shall have general responsibility 
for the Department's correspondence and con- 
tacts with American export and import inter- 
ests, witli our representatives abroad, and with 
representatives of foreign governments in this 
Country with regard to the negotiation, inter- 
pretation and enforcement of the terms of com- 
mercial treaties and agreements and problems 
arising in connection with the importation and 
exportation of goods. In carrying out these 
functions, the Division of Commercial Treaties 



and Agreements shall have the responsibility 
of enlisting the collaboration of other interested 
divisions and offices of the Department, particu- 
larly those charged with functions involving 
the formulation of policies, and shall maintain 
effective liaison with other interested depart- 
ments and agencies of the Government. 

"The Division of Trade Agreements is hereby 
abolished and its functions and staff transferred 
to the new division. 

"Mr. Harry C. Hawkins is designated Chief 
of the Division of Commercial Treaties and 
Agreements and Mr. Henry L. Deimel, Jr., and 
Mr. William A. Fowler are designated Assistant 
Chiefs. 

"The Division shall function under the super- 
vision of the Assistant Secretaiy of State 
charged with economic, financial, tariff, and 
general trade questions. The symbol designa- 
tion of the Division sliall be TA. 

"The provisions of this Order shall be effec- 
tive on July 1, 1940 and shall supersede the 
provisions of any existing Order in conflict 
therewith. 

"CoRDELL, Hull 

"June 29, 1940." 



Statement by the Secretary of State 



[Released to the press July 6] 

Following is a statement by the Secretary of 
State : 

"The recent creation of a new Division of 
Commercial Treaties and Agreements was an- 
other of a number of steps taken, from time to 
time, for the purpose of improving and mak- 
ing more effective the administrative machinery 
of the Department. The new Division will 
provide unified direction for carrying out im- 

16 



portant functions in the field of commercial pol- 
icy formerly handled by a number of divisions. 
"Far from signifying an abandonment or 
weakening of the trade-agreements program, 
this administrative change is intended to 
strengthen and make more efficient our efforts 
in the direction of the widest practicable imple- 
mentation of the program and of the basic prin- 
ciples of liberal commercial relations, which 
underlie that program. Continued advocacy of 



JULY 6, 1940 



17 



tlicse principles has been and remains our fixed 
policy. The only alternative, especially after 
the war, would be the destructive course of 
totalitarian autarchy. 

"I should like to call attention again to the 
following statement made by the President on 
June 21, 1940,'^ in connection with some of the 
emergency features of our current work in the 
field of inter- American economic cooperation: 

" '. . . In some of its essential features, this 
program of cooperative economic action by the 
American republic-s, and possibly by other 



countries, is being undertaken in response to 
new — but, we hope, temporary — developments 
in international relations. It is not intended to 
replace the program of reciprocal trade agree- 
ments which has been steadfastly pursued by the 
Government of the United States. We con- 
tinue to believe that the basic principles of that 
program oiler the most effective basis for 
mutually beneficial economic relations among 
nations, and we are determined to work, as cir- 
cumstances permit, for their fullest possible 
application.' " 



Foreign Service of the United States 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 



[Released to the press July G] 

Changes in the Foreign Service since June 
15, 1940: 

Erie R. Dickover, of Santa Barbara, Calif., 
Consul General at Batavia, Java, Netherlands 
Indies, has been assigned as Consul General at 
Melbourne, Australia. 

Walter A. Foote, of Hamlin, Tex., Consul 
at Me]lK)ui-np, Australia, has been assigned as 
Consul at Batavia, Java, Netherlands Indies. 

Reginald S. Castleman, of Riverside, Calif., 
Consul at Sao Paulo. Brazil, has been assigned 
as Consul at Bahia, Brazil. 

Daniel M. Braddock, of Grand Rapids, 
Mich., Second Secretary of Embassy at Cara- 
cas, Venezuela, has been assigned as Consul at 
Porto Alegre, Brazil. 

Gerald A. Drew, of San Francisco, Calif., 
now serving in the Department of State, has 
been designated Second Secretary of Legation 
and Consul at Quito, Ecuador, and will serve 
in dual capacity. 

John J. Macdonald, of St. Louis, Mo., now 
serving in the Department of State, has been 



'See the Bulletin of June 22, 1940 (Vol. II, No. 52), 
p. 675. 



designated Third Secretary of Embassy at 
Nanking, China. 

The assignment of Wliitney Young, of New 
York, N. Y., as Consul at Palermo, Italy, has 
been canceled. Mr. Young has now been as- 
signed for duty in the Department of State. 

John Davies, Jr., of Cleveland, Ohio, Vice 
Consul at Hankow, China, has been assigned 
for duty in the Department of State. 

Elim O'Shaughnessy, of New York, N. Y., 
Third Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul 
at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, has been assigned as 
Vice Consul at Natal, Brazil. 

Troy L. Perkins, of Lexington, Ky., Vice 
Consul at Yiinnanfu, China, has been assigned 
as Consul at Yiinnanfu, China. 

J. Graham Parsons, of New York, N. Y., 
Vice Consul at Mukden, Manchuria, China, has 
been designated Third Secretary of Legation 
and Vice Consul at Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, 
and will serve in dual capacity. 

Prescott Childs, of Holyoke, Mass., Consul 
at Barbados, British West Indies, has been 
designated Second Secretai-y of Embassy and 
Consul at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and will serve 
in dual capacity. 



18 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Edward D. McLaughlin, of Arkansas, Sec- 
ond Secretary of Embassy at Mexico City, 
Mexico, has been designated Second Secretary 
of Embassy and Consul at Rio de Janeiro, 
Brazil, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Eobert English, of Hancock, N. H., Second 
Secretary of Legation and Consul at Ottawa, 
Ontario, Canada, has been assigned as Consul 
at Wellington, New Zealand. 

Leys A. France, of Ohio, assigned to the De- 
partment of State and detailed to the Depart- 
ment of Commerce for duty, has been assigned 
33 Consul at Mexico City, Mexico. 

The following officers of the Foreign Service 
have been detailed to the places indicated, 
where American consulates have been estab- 
lished for the purpose of performing nonimmi- 
grant visa services only: 



Lynn W. Franklin, of Bethesda, Md., to Fort 
Erie, Ontario, Canada. 

Norris B. Chipman, of Washington, D. C, to 
Kingston, Ontario, Canada. 

Benjamin M. HuUey, of De Land, Fla., to 
Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada. 

Hedley V. Cooke, Jr., of Orange, N. J., to 
Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada. 

Thomas J. Cory, of Glendale, Calif., to Trail, 
British Columbia, Canada. 

The American Con3ulate at London, Ontario, 
Canada, has been transferred to Sarnia, On- 
tario, Canada. Charles E. B. Payne, of Mich- 
igan, has been appointed Vice Consul at Sarnia, 
Ontario, Canada. 

William R. Morton, of Brooklyn, N. Y., Vice 
Consul at Warsaw, Poland, has been appointed 
Vice Consul at Quebec, Canada. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled by the Treaty Division 



AVIATION 

Convention for the Unification of Certain 
Rules Relating to Damages Caused by 
Aircraft to Third Parties on the Surface, 
1933, and Additional Protocol, 1938 

A statement regarding the ratification by 
Italy of the Convention for the Unification of 
Certain Rules Relating to Damages Caused by 
Aircraft to Third Parties on the Surface, 
signed at Rome on May 29, 1933, and the Addi- 
tional Protocol signed at Brussels on Septem- 
ber 29, 1938, was printed in the Bulletin of 
March 2, 1940 (Vol. II, No. 36), page 273. 
The following is a translation of a note verhale 
dated June 4, 1940, which was received in reply 
to a request made to the Foreign Office regard- 
ing the deposit of the instrument of ratification 
by Italy : 



"Witli reference to Note Verbale F. O. No. 
1470 of the Embassy of the United States of 
America, the Royal Ministry of Foreign Affairs 
has the honor to state that Italy has depo3ited 
neither the instruments of ratification of the 
International Convention for the Unification 
of Certain Rules Relating to Damages Caused 
by Airplanes to Third Parties on the Surface, 
signed at Rome May 29, 1933, nor of the Addi- 
tional Protocol to the same Convention signed 
at Brussels September 29, 1938. 

"Up to the present time, the following States 
have deposited the instruments of ratification 
of the above-mentioned Convention on the dates 
indicated : 

Spain— June 28, 1934 
Rumania— March 23, 1935 
Belgium— October 14, 1936 
Guatemala— July 6, 1939 



JULY 6, 1940 



19 



"Tlie Republic of Guatemala has also de- 
posited, as of the same date, July 6, 1939, the 
instrument of ratification of the Additional 
Protocol. 

"The Convention is not yet in effect since the 
condition provided for in its Article 24 (Para- 
graph 2) has not arisen. 

"Rome, June J,, WJtO:' 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

International Telecommunication Conven- 
tion (Treaty Series Nos. 867 and 948) 

Cruatemdla 

The American Minister to Guatemala re- 
ported by a despatch dated June 21, 1940, that 
the Diario de Centra America published on 
June 18, 1940, a decree, No. 2456, dated April 
26, 1940, by which the Guatemalan Assembly 
approved with reservations the Interna- 
tional Telecommunication Convention and Tele- 
graphic Regulations signed at Madrid on 
December 9, 1932, as well as the General Radio 
Regulations and Additional Radio Regulations 
signed at Cairo on April 8, 1938. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Allocation of Tariff Quota on Heavy Cattle During the 
Calendar Year 1940: Proclaniatiou by the President of 
the United States Issued on November 30, 1939, Pursu- 



ant to Article III of the Reciprocal Trade Agreement 
Between the United States of America and Canada 
Signed November 17, 1938 (Executive Agreement Series 
No. 140). Executive Agreement Series No. 170. Pub- 
lication 1474. 4 pp. 50. 

Trans-Isthmian Joint Highway Board : Arrangement 
Between the United States of America and Panama. — 
Efifected by Exchanges of Notes Signed October 19 and 
23, 1939, December 20, 1939, and January 4, 1940. 
Executive Agreement Series No. 168. Publication 1475. 
5 pp. 50. 

Other Government Agencies 



Universal Postal Union Convention of Buenos Aires 
(May 23, 1939). (Post Office Dept.) 246 pp., tables. 
250. 



Regulations 



Government regulations of interest to readers 
of the ''BvZUtin": 

Anchorage Regulations : Regulations for the Control 
of Ves-^els in the Territorial Waters of the United 
States [issued under authority of the President's 
proclamation, No. 2412, of June 27, 1940]. (Treasury 
Department: Bureau of Customs.) T. D. 50182. 
Federal Kcyister, Vol. 5, No. 128, July 2, 1940, p. 2442 
(The National Archives of the United States). 

Delegation of Powers and Definition of Duties [relating 
to the administration of the Immigration and Natural- 
ization Service]. (Department of Justice.) [Order 
No. 38S8.] Federal Register, Vol. 5, No. 129, July 3, 
1940, pp. 2454-2455 (The National Archives of the 
United States). 



U. S. GOVERNUENT PR[HTINS OFFICE: 1940 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents ----- Subscription price, ?2.75 a year 

PnEUSHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOB OF THE BUBEAU OF THE BCDGBT 



,^<^^^~M^ 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 




riN 



JULY 13, 1940 
Vol. Ill: No. 55 — Publication 1 485 



Qontents 

Europe: 

Immigration of British refugee children to the United Page 

States 23 

Regulations relating to travel in combat area .... 24 

Repatriation of American citizens 24 

Greenland: 
Visit of the Governor General of North Greenland to 

the United States 25 

The American Republics: 

Meeting of the Foreign Ministers of the American 

RepubUcs at Habana 25 

Legislation 25 

Departmental Service: 

Central Translating Office ' . . . . 26 

Personnel changes 26 

Treaty Information: 
Postal : 

Universal Postal Convention of 1939 27 

Publications: 
Agreement with Brazil for the Exchange of Official 

Publications 27 

Social : 

Convention and Statute Establishing an International 

Relief Union 27 




U. S. SOPERINTENDENT OF DOCIIMFNTS 

AUG 7 ..-x^ 



Europe 



ENTRY OF BRITISH REFUGEE CHILDREN INTO THE 

UNITED STATES 



[Relpased to the press July H] 

Officials of the Department of State have co- 
operated whole-heartedly and enthusiastically 
with other officials of this Government charged 
with the control of immigration and also with 
interested private organizations, including the 
United States Committee for the Care of Euro- 
pean Children, which has its headquarters in 
New York City. The fact is that all the red ta{)e 
has been cut and all of the non-essential require- 
ments have been eliminated, and this has been 
eflFective to the extent that up to today no visa 
has been refused to any qualified child in Eng- 
land. The American Embassy at London has 
provided every facility for the prompt issuance 
of visas, and no delay whatever exists in acting 
in these cases. Within the last 24 hours the 
Department of State has been on several occa- 
sions in contact with Ambassador Kennedy at 
London by telegraph and telephone, in addi- 
tion to numerous communications to and from 
him since the subject of British refugee children 
first came up. The fact is that the United States 
is prepared to take children under its present 
requirements in much greater nimiber than have 
been made available by the British authorities. 
Under the present arrangements for visas, 
13,000 children can leave Great Britain for the 
United States by August 1. Only a fraction 
of that number have arrived in the past few 
weeks, though our officers jn England have 
offered every facility at their command for this 

246486 — 10 



purpose. The issuance of visas in greater num- 
ber than now authorized would not appear to 
be necessary until the present quota has been 
approximated. 

Any delay that may be occurring in the emi- 
gration from England of children refugees for 
the United States or Canada is not attributable 
in any way to American regulations or to failure 
of American officials to cooperate. 

The following excerpt of a telegi-am from 
Ambassador Kennedy to the Department of 
State last night is indicative of the situation in 
London : 

"I note in the press and elsewhere a disposi- 
tion to blame red tape for the small number of 
British children thus far sent to America. 
There is nothing to this charge. I dislike red 
tape more than most people, but I must admit 
that in this instance children are being passed 
by the American Consulate General faster than 
the British are able to find shipping accom- 
modations for them. As a mutter of record, 
many applicants who have received appoint- 
ments for visa interviews report that they have 
not yet been able to procure their British pass- 
ports. Visas for 1,735 additional children are 
now in process of issuance. The number who 
have actually been able to secure shipping ac- 
commodations is estimated to be around 600. 
In view of this situation, any discussion about 
cutting the red tape is purely academic at the 
moment." 

23 



24 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



REGULATIONS RELATING TO TRAVEL IN COMBAT AREA 



The following regulation has been codified 
under Title 22 : Foreign Relations ; Chapter I : 
Department of State; and Subchapter A: The 
Department, in accordance with the require- 
ments of the Federal Register and the Code of 
Federal Regulations: 

Part 55C— Travel 

By virtue of the authority vested in me by 
the President's proclamation numbered 2410/ 
of June 11, 1940, to promulgate such rules and 
regulations not inconsistent with law as may 
be necessary and proper to carry out the pro- 
visions of section 3 of the joint resolution of 
Congress approved November 4, 1939, as 
amended June 26, 1940, as made effective by 
that and previous proclamations, I hereby 
amend 22 CFR 55C.4 (c) to read as follows : 

§ 55C.4 American vessels in combat areas — 
(c) Vessels authoHzed' to evacuate American 
citizens and those under direction of Ameri- 
can Red Gross. The provisions of the procla- 
mation do not apply to any American vessel 
which, by arrangement with the appropriate 
authorities of the United States Government, 
is commissioned to proceed into or through this 
combat area in order to evacuate citizens of the 
United States who are in imminent danger to 
their lives as a result of combat operations in- 
cident to the present war, or to any American 
vessels proceeding into or through this area, 
unarmed and not under convoy, under charter 
or other direction and control of the Ameri- 
can Red Cross, on a mission of mercy only and 
carrying only Red Cross materials and per- 
sonnel: Provided, That where permission has 
not been given by the blockading power, no 
American Red Cross vessel shall enter a port 
where a blockade by aircraft, surface vessel, 
or submarine is being attempted through the 
destruction of vessels, or into a port of any 



country where such blockade of the whole 
country is being so attempted. (Sees. 3, 4, 
Public Res. 54, 76tli Cong., 2d sess., approved 
Nov. 4, 1939, as amended by Public Res. 87, 
76th Cong., 3d sess., approved June 26, 1940; 
Proc. No. 2410, June 11, 1940) 

[SEiiL] CORDELL HuLL, 

Secretary of State. 
JuLT 5, 1940. 



[Released to the press July 8] 

Regulation Under Section 3 of the Joint 
Resolution of Congress Approved NoxTiM- 
ber 4, 1939, as Amended June 26, 1940 

The Secretary of State announces that the 
S. S. McKeesport has, by arrangement with 
the appropriate authorities of the United 
States Government, been commissioned to pro- 
ceed into and through the combat area defined 
by the President in his proclamation, num- 
bered 2410,= of June 11, 1940, under charter by 
the American Red Cross. The provisions of 
the President's proclamation of June 11, 1940, 
therefore, shall not apply to the voyage which 
the S. S. McKeesport has been commissioned 
to undertake under the aforesaid auspices. 
Cordell Hull, 
■ Secretary of State, 

July 5, 1940. 



REPATRIATION OF AMERICAN 
CITIZENS 

[Released to the press July 13] 

The American steamship Manhattan sailed 
from Lisbon, Portugal, for New York at 4 : 35 
p. m., Lisbon time, July 12. She embarked 



'5 F. E. 2209. 



"See the Bulletin of June 15, 1940 (Vol. II, No. 51), 
pp. 641-643. 



JULY 13, 1940 



25 



approximately 800 American citizens and mem- 
bers of their families at Lisbon. 

All belligerent governments have been in- 
formed of the date of sailing and the course 
I he vessel will follow and that the vessel is 
returning to the United States with Americans 
evacuated from Europe. She carries no cargo 
taken aboard in Europe. She carries Ameri- 
can flags prominently displayed, is proceeding 
fully lighted at night, is imarmed, and is mov- 
ing without convoy. The belligerent govern- 
ments have also been informed that the Gov- 
ernment of the United States expects the ves- 
sel to make its return voyage without inter- 
ruption or molestation by the air, naval, or 
military forces of any belligerent. 

The Manhattan is due at New York on 
JmIv 18. 



Greenland 



VISIT OF THE GOVERNOR GENERAL 
OF NORTH GREENLAND TO THE 
UNITED STATES 

[Roloaseil to the press .Inly !1] 

Tlie Governor of North Greenland, Mr. E. 
Brun, with a gi'oup of Danish officials connected 
with the administration of (Jreenland, will 
arrive in Boston July 9 on board the U. S. 
Coast Guard cutter Campiell. They will be 
accompanied by Mr. James K. Penfield, the 
American Consul to Greenland, and will be 
met by a representative of the Secretary of 
State. 

Governor Brun and his associates are visiting 
( he United States for the purpose of discussing 
economic matters pertaining to the trade and 
commerce of Greenland, which for the time 
being has been diverted from Denmark by the 
interruption of direct communication with the 
mother country. After meeting Danish officials 
in New York, the Greenland delegation will 
visit Washington, where they will confer with 
American officials. 



An American Consulate was recently tem- 
porarily established in Greenland for the pur- 
pose of facilitating commerce between the 
United States and that Danish colony. 



The American Republics 



MEETING OF THE FOREIGN MINIS- 
TERS OF THE AMERICAN REPUB- 
LICS AT HABANA 

[Released to the press July IS] 

Following is the delegation of the United 
States of America to the Second Meeting of the 
Foreign Ministers of the American Republics, 
Habana, July 20, 1940 : 

Delegate: 

Tlio Honorable Cordell Hull, Secretary of 
State 

Advisers : 

The Honorable Adolf A. Berle, Jr., Assistant 
Secretary of State 

The Honorable William Dawson, Ambassador 
to Panama 

Mr. Green H. Hackworth, Legal Adviser, De- 
partment of State 

Mr. Leo Pasvolsky, Special Assistant to the 
Secretary of State 

Mr. Laurence Duggan, Chief, Division of the 
American Republics. Department of State 

Mr. Harry D. White, Director of Monetary 
Research. Department of the Treastiry 

Mr. Grosvenor M. Jones, Assistant Director, 
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Com- 
merce, Department of Commerce 

Mr. Leslie A. \\lieeler, Director, Office of 
Foreign Agricultural Relations, Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. 



Legislation 



An Act To provide for exercising the right with re- 
spect to red cedar shingles reserved in the trade agree- 
ment concluded November 17, 1938, betveeen the United 
States of America and Canada, and for other purposes. 
(Public No. 698, 76th Cong., 3d sess.) 1 p. 50. 



Departmental Service 



CENTRAL TRANSLATING OFFICE 



(Released to the press July 12] 

The Secretary of State, on July 9, issued the 
following depnif mental order establishing a 
Central Translating Office in the Department 
of State: 

"Departmental. Order No. 862 
"For the purpose of further implementing the 
program of cooperation with the other Amer- 
ican Republics, there is hereby established a 
Central Translating Office in the Department of 
State. 

"The Office shall have general charge of 
translating from English for distribution in the 
other American Republics certain publications 
of this Government, such as those of an educa- 
tional, scientific, and technical character and 
those relating to public health, commerce, and 
conservation. In cooperation with Divisions 
and Offices of the Department of State and the 
Interdepai'tmental Committee on Cooperation 
with the American Republics, it shall have re- 
sponsibility under the general supervision here- 
inafter indicated for the initiation and formu- 
lation of policy with respect to the adaptability 
of publications for distribution; and it shall 
have general charge of the administration of 
jn-ograms adopted for the distribution of trans- 
lated material. 

"The Central Translating Office shall func- 
tion under the general supervision of the Under 
Secretary of State and shall maintain effective 
liaison with the Divisions of the American Re- 
publics, Cultural Relations, and International 
Communications of the Department of State, 
and with interested Divisions and Offices of 

26 



other Departments and Agencies as well. The 
symbol designation of the Office shall be TC. 

"The Director of Personnel shall provide the 
necessary personnel and equipment for the new 
Office within the limitations of appropriated 
funds. 

"The provisions of this Order shall be effec- 
tive on July 9, 1940, and shall supersede the 
provisions of any existing Order in conflict 
( herewith. 

Cordell Hull" 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press July 12] 

By departmental order, the Secretary has 
appointed Mr. Bryton Barron as Assistant 
Chief of the Division of Research and Pub- 
lication, and Mr. Henry S. Villard as an As- 
sistant Chief of the Division of Near Eastern 
Affairs. I 

The Secretary has designated Mr. Edgar P. 
Allen as Acting Assistant Chief of the Divi- 
sion of Controls. Mr. Leonard H. Price has 
been designated to serve as Acting Assistant 
Chief of the same division in the absence of 
the Chief, the Assistant Chief, or the Acting 
Assistant Chief. 

Mr. Philip W. Bonsai has been designated 
Acting Assistant Chief of the Division of the 
American Republics. 

Mr. Richard Pattee has been designated Act- 
ing Assistant Chief of the Division of Cultural 
Relations. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled by the Treaty Division 



POSTAL 

Universal Postal Convention of 1939 

Philippine Islands 

The American Ambassador to Argentina re- 
ported by a despatch dated June 28, 19-10, that 
the instrument of ratification by tlie Govern- 
ment of the Commonwealth of tlie Philippines 
of tlie Universal Postal Convention, the regu- 
lations for its execution, the provisions for air- 
mail transportation, and their final protocols, 
all signed at Buenos Aires on May 23, 1939, 
was recorded by the Argentine Ministry for 
Foreign Affairs on May 13, 1940. 

PUBLICATIONS 

Agreement With Brazil for the Exchange 
of Official Publications 

An agreement effected by an exchange of 
notes undertaking a complete exchange of offi- 
cial publications between the United States and 
Brazil entered into force on June 24, 1940. 

The agreement provides that the exchange 
office for the transmission of the publications 
of the United States is the Smithsonian Insti- 
tution and that the exchange office on the part 
of Brazil is the Instituto Nacional do Li\TO. 
Each Government agrees to furnish to the 
other a full set of the official publications of 
its several branches, departments, bureaus, of- 
fices, and institutions. It also provides that 
publications of any new instrumentalities 
which may be created by either Government 
in the future shall be included without tlie 
necessity of subsequent negotiation. Neither 
Government is obligated by the agreement to 
furnish confidential publications, blank forms, 
or circular letters not of a public nature. Each 



party agrees to bear the postal, railroad, steam- 
ship, and other charges arising in its own 
country. 

SOCIAL 

Convention and Statute Establishing an 
International Relief Union 

Bui^na 

According to a circular letter from the 
League of Nations dated May 29, 1940, the 
British Government has notified the Secretary 
General of its desire that the Convention and 
Statute Establishing an International Relief 
Union, signed at Geneva on July 12, 1927, in 
which Burma formerly participated as a part 
of India, should be regarded as applying to 
Burma as a British overseas territory as fi"om 
April 1, 1937, the date on which Burma was 
separated from India and acquired its new 
status. 

The letter adds that the notification which 
was received by the Secretariat on May 10, 
1940, states that the declaration made at the 
time of the adherence of Great Britain, ex- 
cluding from the operation of the Convention 
His Britannic Majesty's colonies, protectorates, 
or territories under suzerainty or mandate, 
should not be regarded as applying to Burma. 

According to information received from the 
League of Nations the following countries have 
ratified or adhered to the convention: Albania, 
Belgium, Great Britain and Northern Ireland, 
New Zealand, India, Bulgaria, China, Cuba, 
Czechoslovakia, Ecuador, Egypt, Finland, 
France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iran, 
Iraq, Italy and Italian colonies, Luxemburg, 
Monaco, Poland and Free City of Danzig, 
Rumania, San Marino, Sudan, Switzerland, 
Turkey, Venezuela, and Yugoslavia. 



27 



D. 8. COVERNHENT PRINTING OFFICEi If40 



For sale by Uie Superintendent of Documenta, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents Subscription price, ?2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OP THE DIEECTOE OF THE BDEBA0 OF THE BDUGET 



J^'-i 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



.O ^ JL/JL/ 



LI/ 



riN 



Qontents 



JULY 20, 1940 

Vol. Ill: No. ^6 — Publication i486 



Europe: 

Admission of refugee children from the war zones . . 
Property of Latvia, Estonia, and Lithuania in the 

United States 

American Republics: 

Habana Meeting of the Foreign Ministers: 

Statement by the Secretary of State 

United States delegation 

Address by the American Minister to Uruguay .... 
The Far East: 

Extraterritoriality in China: Comment by the Acting 

Secretary of State 

Burma trade route to China 

Importation of Japanese cotton goods into the Philip- 
pines 

General: 

Immigration at Canadian and Mexican borders : ; : 
Treaty Information: 

Arbitration and Judicial Settlement: 

Permanent Court of International Justice . ; ; : ; 
Commerce: 

Importation of Japanese cotton goods into the 

Philippines 

Refugees: 

Conventions and Additional Protocol Concerning 

Refugees 

Labor: 
Conventions of the International Labor Conference . 



Page 

31 
33 



34 
34 
35 



36 

36 

36 
36 

37 

38 

38 
38 




-m 



^Wm 



EftlNTENDFNT OF DOCUMENTS 
AUG 7 194t 



I 



Europe 



ADMISSION OF REFUGEE CHILDREN FROM THE WAR ZONES 



[Released to the press July 14) 

The Department of State and the Depart- 
ment of Justice announced on July 14 the 
adoption of simplified procedure which -will 
make possible the admission of refugee chil- 
dren from the war zones in whatever numbers 
shippinij facilities and private assurances of 
support will permit. 

It is contemplated that visas and the neces- 
sary travel papers shall at all times during the 
period of the emergency be in the hands of at 
least 10,000 children in excess of those for 
whom shipping facilities are currently avail- 
able. The plan is designed to facilitate evac- 
uation of children regardless of their financial 
circumstances. 

The new regulations apply only to children 
under 16 years of age who seek to enter the 
United States to escape the dangers of war. 
The regulations authorize issuance of visitors' 
visas to such children upon a showing of inten- 
tion that they will return home upon the ter- 
mination of hostilities. For children travel- 
ing u[)()n either visitors' visas or quota visas 
the regulations provide for acceptance of a 
corporate affidavit that they will not be per- 
mitted to become a public charge, to be given 
by such charitable corporations as the United 
States Committee for the Care of European 
Children. 

The corporate affidavit will be backed by 
affidavits in greatly simplified form to be given 
to the corporation by individuals willing to 
care for children. It will be supported also by 
a trust fund equal to 50 dollars for each child 

248177 — 40 



brought to the United States under the cor- 
poration's auspices. This fund will be in the 
nature of an insurance fund to meet all con- 
tingencies respecting tlie care and departure of 
the children which may arise from failure of 
individual assurances of support. 

Formalities in the issuance of visas and other 
travel papers have been cut to the legal mini- 
mum. American Consuls abroad will be noti- 
fied through the Department of State that 
visas may be issued to named children or to a 
certain number of children for wjiom means of 
support are available. In the latter case the 
particular children will be selected by aiTange- 
ment with representatives abroad of the United 
States Committee for the Care of European 
children, or other such charitable corporation 
acting imder the plan. Arrangements have 
been made to assure that there will be no delay 
in giving medical examinaticms. The form of 
the various papers to be issued has been mate- 
rially simplified. 

Any charitable corporation acting under the 
new regulations must be organized for the pur- 
pose of assuring the care and support of 
refugee children and must be approved by the 
Attorney General for such purpose. The cor- 
poration must furnish the Attorney General 
with a general affidavit covering all children 
admitted under its auspices, assuring that they 
will be in proper custody during their stay in 
the country and that they will be cared for in 
conformity with the standards of the Chil- 
dren's Bureau of the Department of Labor. 

31 



32 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The corporation itself will receive from indi- 
viduals wishing to help refugee children either 
money, promises to pay money to support a 
child, or promises to receive a child and sup- 
port it directly. The 50 dollars for each child, 
which is to be placed in a trust fund, will be 
used solely to meet contingencies arising after 
the child's initial placement. Children will be 
placed in private homes only after investiga- 
tion by child-welfare agencies approved by the 
Children's Bureau and acting in accordance 
with the standards of the Children's Bureau. 

The new procedure is set forth in the fol- 
lowing regulation adopted by the Commis- 
sioner of Immigration and Naturalization with 
the approval of the Attorney General : 

Order 

By virtue of the authority conferred by Sec- 
tion 3 of the Immigration Act of 1917 and all 
other authority conferred by law upon the 
Commissioner of Immigration and Naturaliza- 
tion and the Attorney General, the following 
rule is issued governing the admission of alien 
children under sixteen years of age who seek to 
enter the United States to be safe from the 
dangers of war. 

1. Such children, when presenting visitors' 
visas and when otherwise admissible under this 
rule and under other applicable provisions of 
the immigration laws and regulations, may be 
admitted for a period of two years subject, 
however, to the power of the Attorney General 
to shorten or extend the period of admission. 

2. Such children, whether presenting visitors' 
visas or quota visas, shall not be excludable on 
the ground that, being under sixteen years of 
age, they are unaccompanied by or not coming 
to one or both of their parents, pi'ovided that 
they are admissible under the provisions of 
Paragraphs 4 or 5 of this rule. 

3. Such children, when presenting visitors' 
visas, shall not be excludable on the ground 
that their ticket or passage has been paid for 
by any corporation, association, society, munici- 
pality, or foreign government, nor, when pre- 
senting quota visas, on the ground that their 
tickets or passage has been paid for by any 



corporation not for profit and not operated, 
directly or indirectly, for profit. 

4. Such children, when presenting visitors' 
visas, shall not be excludable as likely to be- 
come a public charge, provided either that they 
would be admissible independently of the pro- 
visions of this rule or that the following condi- 
tions have been satisfied : 

That a corporation not for profit organ- 
ized for the purpose of assuring the care and 
support of refugee children, and approved by 
the Attorney General for such purpose, has 
given the Attorney General, with such sup- 
porting evidence as he may require and in 
such form as he may require, the following 
assurances: first, that an identified child or 
a child for whom pi'ovision for identification 
has been or will be made will not become a 
public chai'ge; second, that arrangements 
have been or will be made for the reception 
and placement of such child in accordance 
with the standai-ds of the Children's Bureau 
of the Department of Labor; and third, that 
the sum of fifty dollars for each such child 
has been or, upon the initial placement of the 
child, will be deposited in a trust fund estab- 
lished by and to be used by the corporation 
to meet all ct)ntingencies, not otherwise met 
or provided for, arising after such initial 
I>lacement respecting either the care of the 
child while in the United States or its de- 
parture therefrom. Every corporation ap- 
proved by the Attorney General to act under 
the provisions of this rule shall furnish the 
Attorney General with an affidavit contain- 
ing an undertaking that the children 
admitted under the provisions of this para- 
graph will be under continuous supervision, 
during the period of their stay in the coun- 
try, assuring that they are in proper custody 
and are being cared for in conformity with 
the standards of the Children's Bureau of the 
Department of Labor, and a further under- 
taking to comply with such directions as the 
Attorney General shall make respecting the 
admission, care and support, and departure 
of the children. 



JULY 20, 1940 



33 



5. Such children, when presenting quota visas, 
shall not be excludable, as likely to become a 
public charge, provided either that they would 
be admissible independently of the provisions 
of this rule or that the following conditions 
have been satisfied : 

That a corporation not for profit, approved 
by the Attorney General as provided in Para- 
graph 4 of this rule, has given the Attorney 
General, with such supporting evidence as he 
may require and in such form as he ma}' re- 
quire, the following assurances : first, that an 
identified child or a child for whom provision 
for identification has been or will be made 
will not become a public charge; second, that 
arrangements have been or will be made for 
the reception and placement of such child in 
accordance with the standards of the Chil- 
dren's Bureau of the Department of Labor; 
and third, that the sum of fifty dollars for 
each such child has been or, upon the initial 
placement of the child, will be deposited in 
the trust fund hereinbefore mentioned to be 
used by the corporation to meet all contingen- 
cies, not otherwise met or provided for, aris- 
ing after such initial placement respecting the 
care of the child while in the United States. 
Every corporation approved by the Attorney 
General to act under the provisions of this 
rule shall furnish the Attorney General with 
an aflBdavit containing an undertaking that 
the children admitted under the provisions of 
this paragraph will be under continuous super- 
vision, untn they have reached the age of 
eighteen and for such further period as the 
Attorney General may require assuring that 
they are in proper custody and are being 
cared for in conformity with the standards of 
the Children's Bureau of the Department of 
Labor, and a further imdertaking to comply 
with such directions as the Attorney General 
shall make respecting the admission, care and 
support of the children. 

6. Trust funds established in accordance with 
the provisions of this rule shall be subject to 

248177 — 40 2 



such terms, including terms respecting the ter- 
mination of the trust and distribution for the 
benefit of American children of any balance re- 
maining in the trust, as the Attorney General 
shall approve. 

7. This rule shall not be construed as modify- 
ing any provision of existing regulations re- 
specting the admission of aliens sixteen years 
of age or more, nor the provisions of existing 
regulations not inconsistent with this rule re- 
specting the admission of aliens under sixteen 
years of age. 

Edwahd J. Shaughnesst, 

Acting Commissioner of Immigration 

and Naturalization 

Approved : 

Lemuel B. ScHomaiD 
Special Assistant in Charge, 
Immigration and Naturalization Service 

Francis Biddle 
Acting Attorney General 

July 13, 1940. 



PROPERTY OF LATVIA, ESTONIA, 
AND LITHUANIA IN THE UNITED 
STATES 

On July 15, 1940, the President signed Execu- 
tive Order No. 8484, extending all the provi- 
sions of Executive Order No. 8389 of April 10, 
1940, as amended,^ to "property in which Latvia, 
Estonia or Lithuania or any national thereof 
has at any time on or since July 10, 1940, had any 
interest of any nature whatsoever . . ." The 
text of Executive Order No. 8484 appears in the 
Federal Register for July 17, 1940 (Vol. 5, No. 
138), page 2586, and the regulations of the 
Treasury Department, issued on July 15, 1940, 
under authority of this order, appear in the same 
issue of the Federal Register, page 2593. 



' See the Bulletin of May 11, 1940 (Vol. II, No. 46), 
p. 493, and June 22, 1940 (Vol. II, No. 52), p. 682. 



American Republics 



HABANA MEETING OF THE FOREIGN MINISTERS 



Statement by the Secretary of State 



[Released to the press Jnly 18] 

Following is a statement by the Secretary of 
State made upon leaving Washington to attend 
the Second Meeting of Foreign Ministers of the 
American Republics which wUl convene at 
Habana, Cuba, on July 21 : 

"The 21 American republics, pursuant to 
procedures agreed to at the Buenos Aires, 
Lima, and Panama conferences, are once again 
about to meet in conference through their For- 
eign Ministers or their representatives. A 
major purpose of the Habana Meeting is full 
and free consultation among the American 
republics with respect to the conditions, prob- 
lems, difficulties, and dangers confronting each 
of them. The complete exchange of informa- 
tion enables each government thoroughly to 
understand the problems, needs, and viewpoints 
of the others. The ground will thus be pre- 
pared for the adoption of basic and concrete 
measures, having common support, for the 
common benefit of each and all of the republics. 

"The agenda of the forthcoming Meeting 
calls for the consideration of certain immediate 
problems of economic and political security.^ 
The American republics approach their task in 
a spirit of complete friendliness toward all 
nations demonstrating their will to conduct 
international relations on the basis of peace 
and friendship. The American republics will 
deal with their problems realistically in the 
light both of emergency needs and broad 
objectives. 

"I am looking forward with great pleasure 
to meeting again the representatives of our sis- 



ter republics, many of whom are old friends 
and colleagues with whom it has been my privi- 
lege to be associated at previous inter- American 
gatherings." 



United States Delegation 

[Released to the press July 15] 

Following is an additional list ' of the per- 
sonnel of the United States of America who 
will attend the Habana Meeting: 

Secretary General: 

Dr. Warren Kelchner, Chief, Division of In- 
ternational Conferences, Department of 
State 

Assistants to the Secretary of State: 

Mr. Cecil W. Gray, Assistant to the Secre- 
tary of State 

Mr. Birney Imes, Editor and Publisher, 
Commerci-al Dispatch, Coliunbus, Miss. 

Press Officer: 

Mr. Michael J. McDermott, Chief, Division 
of Current Information, Department of 
State 

Secretaries: 

Mr. Ellis O. Briggs, Assistant Chief, Di- 
vision of the American Republics, Depart- 
ment of State 

Mr. Emilio G. Collado, Division of the 
American Republics, Department of State 

Assistant Secretary: 
Mr. Guillermo Suro. 



'See the Bulletin of June 29, 1940 (Vol. II, No. 53), 
pp. 705-706, and July 6, 1940 (Vol. Ill, No. 54), p. 11. 

34 



" For the previous list, see the Bulletin of July 13, 
1940 (Vol. Ill, No. 55), p. 25. 



JULY 20, 1940 



35 



ADDRESS BY THE AMERICAN MINISTER TO URUGUAY 



[Excerpt] 



As we look back over developments in inter- 
American relationships in the last few years, we 
can find, I believe, reason for quiet confidence. 
We have placed the relationships between our 
countries on a basis of law, not force. We recog- 
nize the juridical equality of every nation of 
this hemisphere, without regard to size or power. 
At the conference held here in Montevideo in 
1933 we reached agreement on tlie essential prin- 
ciples of what might be termed an inter- Ameri- 
can Bill of Rights, including complete respect 
for the sovereignty of every country, the elim- 
ination of intervention, and the perfecting of the 
mechanisms by which disputes can be solved by 
peaceful means. 

Three years later, in 1936, when the danger 
of warfare overseas was becoming apparent, the 
21 American republics met at Buenos Aires at 
the Conference for the Maintenance of Peace 
and concluded certain agreements for the pur- 
pose of making possible common action by all 
of the republics in the event that peace was 
threatened. 

During the next two years affairs in other 
parts of the world continued to deteriorate, and 
there were indications that foreign governments 
were interesting themselves unduly in the affairs 
of the American Continent. The Eighth Inter- 
national Conference of American States, which 
met at Lima in 1938, therefore conceived its task 
to be that of setting up the principles and the 
mechanics for defending the peace of the New 
World against any attempt to subvert it by any 
outside power or force. By the Declaration of 
Lima the 21 American republics agreed that 
they would defend and maintain the integrity 
of tlie republican institutions to which the New 
World is committed ; that they would regard an 
attack on any one of these nations as an attack 
on all ; and that they would consult together to 
take measures for the common defense in the 



' Delivered by the Minister, Mr. Edwin C. Wilson, at 
an official luncheon in honor of Captain Wickham of the 
U. S. S. Quitwy, at Montevideo, Uruguay, June 23, 1940. 



event of a threat to peace or attack on any one 
of the American republics. 

On the outbreak of the war last September 
the machinery of consultation was set in mo- 
tion, and a great demonstration of the imity 
and solidarity of the Americas took place at the 
Conference in Panama, where the first inter- 
American meeting was held over a himdred 
years ago. 

The striking advances made by the American 
republics in the attainment of this ideal of 
inter-American solidarity must not be endan- 
gered through carelessness or laxity. In con- 
fronting the dangers which threaten us all, we 
can work more effectively if we work together. 
For over 100 years the American republics have 
happily been able to maintain themselves free 
from the threat of foreign aggression. They 
oppose all intervention in their internal or ex- 
ternal affairs. They are earnestly desirous of 
preserving the libei-ty for which they fought in 
tlie early days of their independence. Today 
these liberties are gravely menaced. We of the 
Americas must accordingly reaffirm our strong 
determination to defend ourselves against any 
intervention coming from abroad and to pro- 
tect ourselves against poorly concealed activi- 
ties which threaten our very sovereignty. I am 
authorized to state that it is the intention and 
avowed policy of my Government to cooperate 
fully, whenever such cooperation is desired, 
with all of the other American governments in 
crushing all activities which arise from non- 
American sources and which imperil our politi- 
cal and economic freedom. Here in the Amer- 
icas we have abundant resources and abundant 
man power to cope with the task. We are 
proud of the free and independent spirit of our 
virile peoples ; we are confident of our power to 
meet and repel any attack. 

Gentlemen, I invite you to raise your glasses 
to the health of His Excellency President Bal- 
domir, to the prosperity of the noble Republic 
of Uruguay, to the progress of the Uruguyan 
armed forces, and to the solidarity of our 21 
American republics. 



36 



DEPABTMENT OF STATE BTJLLETIN 



The Far East 



EXTRATERRITORIALITY IN CHINA 
Comment by the Acting Secretary of State 

[Released to the press July 19] 

In response to inquiries from press corre- 
spondents with regard to the British Prime 
Minister's comments upon the question of ex- 
traterritoriality in China included in his state- 
ment of July 18,° the Acting Secretary of State, 
Mr. Sumner Welles, commented as follows : 

"The most recent statement of this Govern- 
ment on this subject is contained in a note 
presented on December 31, 1938,° to the Japanese 
Government, which mentions inter alia the 
progress made toward the relinquishment of 
certain rights of a special character which the 
United States together with other countries 
has long possessed in China. In 1931 discus- 
sions of the subject between China and each of 
several other countries, including the United 
States, were suspended because of the occurrence 
of the Mukden incident and subsequent disrupt- 
ing developments in 1932 and 1935 in the rela- 
tions between China and Japan. In 1937 this 
Government was giving renewed favorable con- 
sideration to the question when there broke out 
the current Sino-Japanese hostilities, as a result 
of which the usual processes of government in 
large areas of China were widely disrupted. 

"It has been this Government's traditional 
and declared policy and desire to move rapidly 
by process of orderly negotiation and agreement 
with the Chinese Government, whenever condi- 
tions warrant, toward the relinquishment of ex- 
traterritorial rights and of all other so-called 
'special rights' possessed by this country as by 
other countries in China by virtue of interna- 
tional agreements. That policy remains un- 
changed." 



BURMA TRADE ROUTE TO CHINA 

[Released to the press July 16] 

The Secretary of State, in reply to inquiries 
by press correspondents for comment in regard 
to reports that, at the instance of the Japanese 
Government, the British Government would 
prohibit temporarily the movement of certain 
commodities through Burma into China over 
what is known as the Burma Route, said that 
this Government has a legitimate interest in 
the keeping open of arteries of commerce in 
every part of the world and considers that 
action such as this, if taken, and such as was 
taken recently m relation to the Indocliina rail- 
way would constitute unwarranted interposi- 
tions of obstacles to world trade. 

IMPORTATION OF JAPANESE COTTON 
GOODS INTO THE PHILIPPINES 

[Released to the press July 15] 

The Department of State and the Japanese 
Embassy at Washington have arranged the 
continuance for a further period of one year, 
beginning August 1, 1940, of the existing 
arrangement relating to the importation of 
Japanese cotton piece goods into the Philippine 
Islands, which will expire on July 31, 1940. 
Under this arrangement the Association of 
Japanese Exporters of Cotton Piece Goods into 
the Philippine Islands agrees to limit the 
annual importation of Japanese cotton piece 
goods into the Philippines to 45,000,000 square 
meters. 



General 



° Not printed. 

'See the Press Releases of December 31, 1938 (Vol. 
XEX, No. 483), pp. 490-493. 



IMMIGRATION AT CANADIAN AND 
MEXICAN BORDERS 

[Released to the press July 15] 

The Department of State has been closely 
watching developments along the Canadian 
and Mexican borders arising from the recently 
imposed immigration regulations which require 



JULY 20, 1940 



37 



Canadian and Mexican visitors to obtain pass- 
ports from their governments and visas from 
American consular officers.' Consuls have been 
submitting reports every few days in order that 
the personnel needs of the various consular 
establishments may be given the fullest con- 
sideration. 

At a number of posts in Canada and in 
Mexico the added burden occasioned by the 
closer supervision of persons coming to the 
United States has been cushioned by the ina- 
bility of prospective visitors to obtain pass- 
ports on short notice from their governments. 
At others, there has been an unprecedented 
demand for visas, and consular officers have 
labored long hours daily and on holidays and 
week-ends in order that jiersons who have been 
accustomed to cross our borders frequently will 
be subjected to as little inconvenience and de- 
lay as possible. The Department of State has 
substantially augmented the personnel of all 
such offices and is prepared to authorize addi- 
tional assistance where needed. Representa- 
tions have been made to the Department to 
open a number of new consular establishments. 



'.See the lUiIlitin of June 15, 1040 (Vol. 11, No. 51), 
pp. CC6-CG7. 



Several such offices have already been opened 
at border points at which traffic converges upon 
entering the United States. While it is not 
possible to open consular offices at points op- 
posite every port of entry into the country, 
every effort is being made to meet the situa- 
tion. 

The Department is assigning consular offi- 
cers for temporary duty at various points along 
both borders. Vice Consul Frederick E. Farns- 
wortli at Montreal has been ordered to proceed 
to Cornwall, Ontario, for temporary duty in 
order to deal with the visa applications of 
Canadian visitors residing in the area of Corn- 
Mall and Prescott. After dealing with urgent 
cases in that area, Mr. Farnsworth or some 
other officer will be assigned temporarily to 
other points along the Canadian border at 
which there is urgent need for similar work. 

Vice Consul James G. Byington, now at Tor- 
reon, Mexico, is being ordered to proceed to 
Matamoros and thence to Reynosa in order to 
handle urgent visa cases at Reynosa. After a 
short period at Reynosa, Mr. Byington or some 
officer will be assigned to other points along the 
Mexican border for similar duty. Both Mr. 
Byington and Mr. Farnsworth are proceeding 
immediately to their new assignments. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



ARBITRATION AND JUDICIAL 
SETTLEMENT 

Permanent Court of International Justice 

Thailand 

There is printed below the text of a letter 
received by the Secretary General of the 
League of Nations on May 22, 1940, from the 
Government of Thailand concerning the atti- 
tude of certain governments in regard to the 
Optional Clause- of the Statute of the Perma- 
nent Court of International Justice : 



"The Minister of Foreign Affairs has the 
honour to acknowledge the receipt of several 
communications from the Secretary-General of 
the League of Nations relative to notifications 
from the Governments of the French Repub- 
lic. Great Britain, India and certain of the 
Commonwealth, that they will not regard their 
acceptance of the Optional Clause as covering 
disputes arising out of events occurring during 
the present hostilities. 

"His Majesty's Government in taking note of 
these communications desires to state that, hav- 
ing itself accepted the Optional Clause, it 
reserves its point of view." 



3& 



COMMERCE 



Importation of Japanese Cotton Goods Into 
the Philippines 

An announcement regarding the continua- 
tion of the arrangement relating to the impor- 
tation of Japanese cotton piece goods into the 
Philippine Islands appears in this Bulletin 
under the heading "Treaty Information." 

REFUGEES 

Conventions and Additional Protocol 
Concerning Refugees 

British Defendencies 

According to the League of Nations' publica- 
tion Registration of Treaties, No. 224, for May 
1940, the instriunents of adherence by certain 
British dependencies to the Convention Relating 
to the International Status of Refugees, signed 
October 28, 1933 ; the Convention Concerning the 
Status of Refugees Coming From Germany, 
signed February 10, 1938; and the Additional 
Protocol to the Provisional Arrangement and to 
the Convention (signed July 4, 1936, and Feb- 
ruary 10, 1938, respectively) Concerning the 
Status of Refugees Coming From Germany, 
signed September 14, 1939, were registered with 
the Secretariat on May 30, 1940. These depend- 
encies are: Aden Colony, Bahamas, Basuto- 
land, Bechuanaland Protectorate, British 
Guiana, British Honduras, British Solomon 
Islands Protectorate, Ceylon, Cyprus, Falkland 
Islands and Dependencies, Fiji, Gambia (Colony 
and Protectorate), Gilbert and Ellice Islands 
Colony, Gold Coast (Colony, Northern Terri- 
tories, Ashanti, Togoland under British 
mandate). Hong Kong, Kenya (Colony and 
Protectorate), Leeward Islands (Antigua, 
Montserrat, St. Christopher and Nevis, Virgin 
Islands), Federated Malay States (Negri Sem- 
bilan, Pahang, Perak, Selangor), Unfederated 



DEPAETMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

Malay States ( Johore, Kedah, Kelantan, Perils, 
Trengganu, and Brunei), Mauritius, Nigeria 
(Colony, Protectorate, Cameroons under Brit- 
ish mandate), Nyasaland Protectorate, St. 
Helena and Ascension, Sierra Leone (Colony 
and Protectorate), Somaliland Protectorate, 
Straits Settlements, Swaziland, Trinidad and 
Tobago, Uganda Protectorate, Windward Is- 
lands (Dominica, Grenada, St. Lucia, St. Vin- 
cent) , and Zanzibar Protectorate. 

LABOR 

Conventions of the International Labor 
Conference 

Switzerlofnd 

According to circular letters received from 
the League of Nations dated June 12, 1940, the 
instruments of ratification by Switzerland of 
the following conventions adopted by the 
International Labor Conference at various ses- 
sions were registered with the Secretariat on 
May 23, 1940 : 

Convention concerning the rights of associa- 
tion and combination of agricultural workers 
(third session, Geneva, October 25-November 
19, 1921) 

Convention concerning forced or compulsory 
labor (fourteenth session, Geneva, June 10-28, 
1930) 

Convention concerning employment of 
women on underground work in mines of all 
kinds (nineteenth session, Geneva, June 4r-25, 
1935) 

Convention concerning safety provisions in 
the building industry (twenty-third session, 
Geneva, June 3-23, 1937) 

Convention concerning statistics of wages 
and hours of work in the principal mining and 
manufacturing industi-ies, including building 
and construction, and in agriculture (twenty- 
fourth session, Geneva, June 2-22, 1938) . 

In regard to the last-named convention the 
ratification excludes parts III and IV of the 
convention in accordance with the first para- 
graph of its article 2. 



U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE; 1940 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 



^"'^ ^-^-Y 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 




ETIN 

JULY 27, 1940 
Vol. Ill: No.^y — Publication I48g 



Qontents 



American Republics: ^"^ 

Export-Import Bank of Washington: Message of the 
President regarding increase in capital and lending 

power 41 

Habana Meeting of the Foreign Ministers: Address by 

the Secretary of State 42 

Severance by Spain of diplomatic relations with Chile . 48 

Europe: 

Baltic Republics: Statement by the Acting Secretary 

of State, Mr. Welles 48 

General: 

Control of exports in national defense 49 

Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, etc.: 

Monthly statistics 50 

The Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 60 

Treaty Information: 
Postal : 

Universal Postal Convention of 1939 62 

Telecommunications : 

International Telecommunication Convention 

(Treaty Series Nos. 867 and 948) 62 

Publications 62 




U. S. SUPERINTFNDENT OF DOCUMENTS 

AUG 27 1940 



American Republics 



EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF WASHINGTON 

Message of the President Regarding Increase in Capital and Lending Power 



[Released to the press by the White House July 2'J) 

To THE Congress of the Umted States: 

As a result of the war in Europe, far-reach- 
in;; clianges in world affaii-s have occurred, 
w hich necessarily have repercussions on the eco- 
nomic life both of the United States and of the 
other American republics. All American re- 
publics in some degree make a practice of sell- 
ing, and should sell, surplus products to other 
parts of the world, and we in the United States 
export many items that are also exported by 
other countries of the Western Hemisphere. 

The course of the war, the resultant blockades 
and counterblockades, and the inevitable disor- 
ganization is preventing the flow of these sur- 
plus products to their normal markets. Neces- 
sarily this has caused distress in various parts 
of the New World, and will continue to cause 
distress until foreign trade can be resumed on 
a normal basis and the seller of these surpluses 
is in a position to protect himself in dispos- 
ing of his products. Until liberal commercial 
policies are restored and fair trading on a com- 
mercial plane is reopened, distress may be 
continued. 

I therefore request that the Congress give 
prompt consideration to increasing the capital 
and lending power of the Export-Import Bank 
of Washington by $500,000,000, and removing 
some of the restrictions on its operations to 
the end that the Bank may be of greater assist- 
ance to our neighbors south of the Rio Grande, 
including financing the handling and orderly 
marketing of some part of their surpluses. 



It is to be hoped that before another year 
■world trade can be reestablished, but, pending 
this adjustment, we in the United States should 
join with the peoples of the other republics of 
the Western Hemisphere in meeting their prob- 
lems. I call the attention of Congress to the 
fact that by helping our neighbors we will be 
helping ourselves. It is in the interests of the 
producers of our country, as well as in the 
interests of producers of other American coun- 
tries, that there shall not be a disorganized or 
cut-throat market in those commodities which 
we all export. 

No sensible person would advocate an at- 
tempt to prevent the normal exchange of com- 
modities between other continents and the 
Americas, but what can and should be done is 
to prevent excessive fluctuations caused by dis- 
tressed selling resulting from temporary inter- 
ruption in the flow of trade, or the fact that 
there has not yet been reestablished a gystem 
of free exchange. Unless exporting countries 
are able to assist their nationals, they will be 
forced to bargain as best they can. 

As has heretofore been made clear to the 
Congress, the Export-Import Bank is operated 
by directors representing the Departments of 
State, Treasury, Agriculture, and Commerce, 
and the Reconstruction Finance Corporation, 
and is under the supervision of the Federal 
Loan Administrator, so that all interested 
branches of our Government participate in any 

41 



42 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



loans that are authorized, and the directors of 
the Bank should have a free hand as to the 
purposes for which loans are authorized and 
the terms and condition^ upon which they are 
made. 



I therefore request passage of appropriate 
legislation to this end. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 
The White House, 
July 22, 1940. 



HABANA MEETING OF THE FOREIGN MINISTERS 
Address by the Secretary of State ^ 



[Released to the press July 22] 

Mr. Chairman, Fellow Representatives of the 
American Republics: 

Permit me, first of all, to express my deep 
personal pleasure in setting foot once more on 
the soil of the gi'eat nation whose guests we are 
at this time. Forty years have passed since my 
first visit to these shores, when I had the honor 
to serve with my regiment in the cause of 
Cuba's liberation. I doubly welcome the pres- 
ent opportunity to re-visit this country — both 
because of the personal gratification which it 
affords me and because of the vital importance 
of the purpose which has brought us together 
in this beautiful city of Habana. 

We are here as representatives of the 21 free 
and independent American republics. We meet 
when world conditions are perhaps graver than 
they have ever been before. Our purpose is to 
devise concrete measures by which a number of 
pressing problems may be met. Our objective 
is to safeguard the mdependence, the peace, and 
the well-being of the American republics. 

For nearly a year now, a new major war has 
raged with inci'easing fury over important 
areas of the earth. It came as a culmination of 
a process of deterioration of international con- 
duct and international morality, extending over 
a period of years, during which forces of ruth- 
less conquest were gathering strength in several 
parts of the world. 

These forces, now at work in the world, 
shrink from no means of attaining their ends. 
In their contempt for all moral and ethical val- 



' Delivered by Mr. Hull at Habana, July 22, 1940. 



ues, they are bent on uprooting the very foim- 
dations of orderly relations among nations and 
on subverting, undermining, and destroying 
existing social and political institutions within 
nations. They have already left in their wake 
formerly sovereign nations with their inde- 
})endence trampled into dust and millions of 
proud men and women with their liberties 
destroyed. 

Our American republics had no part in 
kindling the tragic conflagration which has thus 
been sweeping across the world. On the con- 
trary, severally and jointly, we did everything 
in our power to stay its outburst. Once the con- 
flict had begun, we did everything we could to 
limit its spreading. But it has been increas- 
ingly clear that in the vast tragedy which has 
befallen large portions of the earth there are 
dangers to the American nations as well which 
it would be suicidal not to recognize in time 
and not to prepare to meet fully and decisively. 

It has been increasingly clear that our nations 
must not blind themselves into fatal compla- 
cency — as so many nations have done to their 
mortal sorrow — regarding the possibility of 
attack against them from without or of exter- 
nally directed attempts from within to under- 
mine their national strength and to subvert their 
cherished social and political institutions, or 
both. Too many nations have only recently 
paid a tragic price for confidently placing re- 
liance for their safety and security solely upon 
clearly expressed desire to remain at peace, upon 
unequivocally proclaimed neutrality, upon 
scrupulous avoidance of provocation. Con- 



JULY 27, 1940 



43 



querors, invaders, and destroyers ignore or 
brush aside reasons such as these. 

Looming ominously on our horizon is the 
danger that attempts may be made to employ 
against our nations, too, the same means of sub- 
ordinating their destinies to control and dicta- 
tion from abroad that have already been notori- 
ously employed elsewhere against numerous 
other countries. We must recognize the serious 
possibility that no eflFort or method may be 
spared to achieve, with respect to some of us, 
economic domination and political penetration, 
and to sow, among our nations, the seeds of sus- 
picion, dissension, and discord — the frequent 
prelude to even more menacing action. 

Lest our nations, too, suffer the fate that has 
already befallen so many other peace-loving and 
peace-seeking nations, wisdom and prudence re- 
quire that we have in our hands adequate means 
of defense. To that end, in the face of common 
danger, our nations are already working to- 
gether, in accordance with their firmly estab- 
lished practice of free consultation among equals 
and of voluntary cooperation with regard to 
problems which are of comnum concern to all 
of us. It is to examine such of these problems 
as are immediately pressing and to seek for 
them most effective solutions that the repre- 
sentatives of the 21 American republics have 
come together at this time. 



I should like to consider first the situation 
which confronts us in the economic sphere. 

The war now in progress has brought with it 
a disruption in the channel^ of international 
commerce and a curtailment of foreign markets 
for the products of the Western Hemisphere. 
This has meant to many American nations a 
diminution of foreign-exchange resources and 
a loss of purchasing power sufficiently serious 
to place severe strains on their national econo- 
mies. In some cases, stagnant surpluses of com- 
modities, the exportation of which is essential 
to the economic life of the countries concerned, 
have accumulated and continue to accumulate. 
Their existence is a matter of present and 
future concern to farmery, workers, business- 



men, and governments throughout the conti- 
nental area. 

We must assume that these difficulties will 
continue certainly as long as the war exists. 
We must anticipate that these problems, and 
possibly others, will continue for some time 
after the war ends. 

If the standards of living of the American 
peoples are to be maintained at levels already 
achieved, and particularly if they are to be 
raised in accordance with the legitimate aspira- 
tions of these peoples, production and distribu- 
tion must expand, not only in this hemisphere,, 
but throughout the world. This same condition 
is essential to the well-being of all other areas. 
For no nation or group of nations can hope to 
become or to remain prosperous when growing 
poverty stalks the rest of the earth. 

Under existing conditions, the problem is 
singularly pressing. Though war now is in 
progress, we must contemplate its eventual 
end. At that time, perhaps 80 millions of 
people in Europe, and many millions in other 
parts of the world, who have been entirely 
engaged in war-work, must find a new place 
for themselves in the economics of peace. At 
the same time, it is to be assumed that, once 
the pressures of war are ended, there will be 
a general demand that reasonable conditions 
of life may be restored. To effect this transi- 
tion, and to supply the world with what it then 
needs, will necessitate a great increase in pro- 
duction, distribution, and exchange of goods. 
Failure to achieve this can only mean that the 
tragedy of war would be followed by the still 
greater horror of disintegration in great areas. 

It is plain that international commerce is 
indispensable if economic rehabilitation is to 
be achieved. It is also plain that the only 
available means of doing this is to resume, as 
soon as circumstances permit, the normal cur- 
rents of world trade. I have no doubt that 
the American republics are ready and indeed 
anxious to do their part in bringing this about ; 
though the extent to which we can thus play 
our part must depend materially on the eco- 
nomic methods and policies pursued by other 
countries. 



44 



DEPAETMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



We are confronted with two opposite trading 
methods. Oi^en trade, freed as rapidly as may 
be practicable from the obstruction and regi- 
mentation of excessive restrictions, can accom- 
plish the necessary task. Prosperity for the 
American republics or for any part of the world 
cannot be achieved — even the necessities of the 
war-torn areas of the earth cannot be met — by 
regimented or restricted trade, especially di- 
rected under a policy of national or regional 
autarchy. We recognize the need for a transi- 
tion period; but we are convinced that there 
can be only one satisfactory permanent policy. 

We have long known from experience that 
international trade inevitably declines in vol- 
ume and usefulness when it is conducted on a 
basis of exclusive bilateralism, or is pressed to 
unfair advantage, or is used to attempt eco- 
nomic domination. Eventually, such methods 
destroy the trade and the trader alike. In the 
present situation, they are totally unable to pro- 
vide that volume and distribution of goods 
which alone can save great areas from intense 
distress. Only where equal treatment, fair 
practices, non-discrimination, and peaceful mo- 
tives lie beneath trade, can it develop to the de- 
gree needed to rehabilitate a shattered world 
and to provide a foundation for further eco- 
nomic progress. 

Today, in spite of what has occurred in other 
parts of the world, the American nations con- 
tinue to adhere to liberal trade prmciples and 
are applying them in their relations with each 
other as fully as the present state of affairs per- 
mits. They should be prepared to resiune the 
conduct of trade with the entire world on this 
basis as rapidly as other nations are willing to 
do likewise. 

In the meantime, the American nations must 
and should do everything in their power to 
strengthen their own economic position, to im- 
prove further the trade and other economic 
relations between and among themselves, and to 
devise and apply appropriate means of effective 
action to cope with the difficulties, disadvan- 
tages, and dangers of the present disturbed and 
dislocated world conditions. To accomplish 
these purposes, the nations of the Western Hem- 



isphere should undertake the fullest measure of 
economic cooperation, so designed and so con- 
ducted as to serve the best interests of each na- 
tion and to bring injury to none. 

Progress has already been made toward the 
forging of new tools to carry out certain phases 
of economic cooperation on an inter-American 
basis. The Inter-American Financial and Eco- 
nomic Advisory Committee, which was estab- 
lished last November pursuant to a resolution 
of the Panama Meeting, has proven itself to 
be an efficient body for considering and work- 
ing out such mechanisms. It has recently 
created the Inter-American Development Com- 
mission to carry out the work of planning and 
promoting the development of new productive 
facilities in the American republics. In addi- 
tion, it prepared the framework for the estab- 
lishment of an Inter-American Bank to foster 
cooperation in the spheres of long-term devel- 
opment and of money and foreign exchange. 
The Government of the United States is taking 
steps to implement the Inter-American Bank 
Convention and urges that the Governments of 
the other American republics give their cooper- 
ation so that this important institution may be 
placed into operation as rapidly as possible. 

Useful as these organizations can be in the 
long run, there remains the immediately press- 
ing situation confronting the American repub- 
lics as a result of the curtailment and changed 
character of important foi'eign markets. Fully 
realizing that under present disturbed condi- 
tions no nation can expect to maintain a normal 
economic situation, and in order to meet the 
emergencies which confront their nations, the 
Governments of the American republics, it is 
believed, should give consideration to the 
following program of immediate cooperative 
action : 

1. Strengthening and expansion of the 
activities of the Inter-American Financial 
and Economic Advisory Committee as an 
instrument for continuing consultation with 
respect to trade matters, including especially 
the situation immediately confronting the 
American republics as a result of the curtail- 



JULY 27, 1940 



45 



ment and changed character of important 
foreign markets. 

2. Creation of facilities for the temporary 
handling and orderly marketing of accumu- 
lated surpluses of those commodities which 
are of primary importance to the mainte- 
nance of the economic life of the American 
republics, whenever such action becomes 
necessary. 

3. Development of commodity agreements 
■with a view to assuring equitable terms of 
trade for both producers and consumers of 
the commodities concerned. 

4. Consideration of methods for improv- 
ing the standard of living of the peoples of 
the Americas, including public-health meas- 
ures, nutrition studies, and suitable organi- 
zations for the relief distribution of some 
part of any surplus commodities. 

The Government of the United States of 
America has already utilized its existing 
agencies to enter into mutually advantageous 
cooperative arrangements with a number of 
American republics in connection with pro- 
grams for the development of their national 
economies and by way of assistance to their 
central banks in monetary and foreign-exchange 
matters. 

It is now taking steps which will make pos- 
sible the extension of both the volume and 
character of the operations of such agencies. 
When these steps have been completed, the 
Govermnent of the United States of America 
will be in a position to expand its cooperative 
efforts with other American nations in the fields 
of long-term development and of monetary and 
exchange matters. 

It will also be able to participate in immedi- 
ate joint action with other nations of this 
hemisphere to meet pressing trade situations 
which may arise before the program outlined 
has come into operation. 

Finally, it wiU be enabled to enter effectively 
into the cooperative program as it proceeds, 
assisting in the temporary handling and orderly 
marketing of the important commodities of 
the hemisphere; implementing, on its part, the 
commodity agreements which are developed; 



and carrying out other operations involving 
such export products. 

A^liile the proposed measures are being de- 
veloped, consideration should be given to the 
desirability of a broader system of inter- Ameri- 
can cooperative organization in trade matters 
to complement inter- American cooperative or- 
ganizations in the field of long-term economic 
development and of money and foreign ex- 
change. 

By helping each other, by carrying out with 
vigor, determination, and loyalty whatever de- 
cisions are reached, the American nations can 
build a system of economic defense that will 
enable each of them to safeguard itself from the 
dangers of economic subordination from abroad 
and of economic distress at home. It is no part 
of our thought to obstruct in any way logical 
and natural trade with Europe or with any 
other portion of the woi'ld, but rather to pro- 
mote such trade with nations willing to meet us, 
in good faith, in a spirit of friendly and peace- 
ful purpose, and on a plane of frank and fair 
dealing. Against any other kind of dealing, 
we naturally will protect ourselves. 

n 

The solution of our economic problems alone 
is not enough to preserve the peace and security 
of this hemisphere. There exist also other jjrob- 
lems, which are of an altogether different 
character but the solution of which is of no less 
importance to our freedom and independence. 

I refer to the threat to our security arising 
from activities directed from without the hemi- 
sphere but which operate within our respective 
borders. A new and evil technique has been 
invented which seeks by devious methods to cor- 
rupt the body politic in order to subject it to 
alien purposes. With cynical effrontery, sanc- 
tuary within the generous citadels of free 
speech and freedom of assembly is demanded by 
agents whose masters would obliterate those in- 
stitutions and foment instead dissension, preju- 
dice, fear, and hatred. 

Make no mistake concerning the purposes of 
this sinister campaign. It is an attempt to ac- 
quire domination of the American republics by 



46 



DEPARTME^TT OF STATE BULLETIN 



foreign governments in their own interest. Al- 
ready we have seen the tragic results abroad 
w^hen governmental structures have been under- 
mined and the fabric of established institutions 
riddled by the termites of alien propaganda. 

We long ago recognized the sources and ex- 
tent of this infection and have already taken 
some steps to eradicate it. At Lima we declared 
that it was incompatible with the sovereignty of 
any American republic that persons or groups 
within our countries should be controlled by any 
outside government for its own purposes. It 
is now urgently incumbent upon us to take de- 
cisive remedial action to the end that the inde- 
pendence and political integrity of each of the 
American republics may be fully safeguarded. 

To this, no friendly government can legiti- 
mately object. The inter- American system 
carries no implication of aggression and no 
threat to any nation. It is based solely on a 
policy of self-defense, designed to preserve the 
independence and the integrity of each of the 
American nations. It implies no hegemony on 
the part of any member of the inter- American 
group; but it equally rejects the thesis of he- 
gemony by anyone else. It resembles in no way 
regional policies recently pursued in other parts 
of the world, which pretend to invoke our inter- 
American system as precedent. The difference 
is that our sole purpose is self-defense, while 
these other policies seem instead to be pretexts 
for conquest by the sword, for military occupa- 
tion, and for complete economic and political 
domination of other free and independent 
peoples. 

Ill 

There are other pressing political problems 
arising out of the vast changes which have taken 
place on the Continent of Europe. The prin- 
ciples on which we act with respect to these 
problems have been forged by the American re- 
publics through years of discussion and practice. 
They are applied entirely without discrimina- 
tion, solely for the purpose of assuring that the 
security of the American hemisphere shall not 
be impaired by the repercussions of warfare 
elsewhere. 



Specifically, there is before us the problem 
of the status of European possessions in thi^ 
hemisphere. These geographic regions have 
not heretofore constituted a menace to the 
peace of the Americas; their administrations 
were established, for the most part, many gen- 
erations ago and, in our time, have acted as 
congenial neighbors. We have no desire to 
absorb these possessions or to extend our sov- 
ereignty over them or to include them in any 
form of sjjhere of influence. 

We could not, however, permit these regions 
to become a subject of barter in the settlement 
of European differences or a battleground for 
the adjustment of such differences. Either sit- 
uation could only be regarded as a threat to 
the peace and safety of this hemisphere, as 
would any indication that they might be used 
to promote systems alien to the inter-American 
system. Any effort, therefore, to modify the 
existing status of these areas — whether by ces- 
sion, by transfer, or by any impairment what- 
soever in the control heretofore exercised — 
would be of profound and immediate concern 
to all the American republics. 

It is accordingly essential that we consider 
a joint approach to this common problem. We 
must be in a position to move rapidly and with- 
out hesitation. 

It has been suggested that out action take 
the form of the establishment of a collective 
trusteeship, to be exercised in the name of all 
of the American republics. The Government 
of the United States endorses this suggestion 
and is prepared to cooperate, should occasion 
arise, in its execution. 

The establishment of a collective trusteeship 
for any region must not carry with it any 
thought of the creation of a special interest by 
any American republic. The purpose of a col- 
lective trusteeship must be to further the inter- 
ests and security of all of the American nations, 
as well as the interest of the region in question. 
Moreover, as soon as conditions permit, the 
region should be restored to its original sover- 
eign or be declared independent when able to 
establish and maintain stable self-government. 



JtTLY 27, 1940 



47 



IV 

Seldom has a meeting of friendly nations 
opened in an atmosphere of more widespread 
misconception and more flagrant misrepresen- 
tation as to its aims and purposes than has 
emanated in recent weeks, from responsible 
and irresponsible quarters, in connection with 
this meeting. 

We have met to consult together regarding 
our own pressing problems. We covet nothing 
anywhere in the world. We are free from the 
spirit of enmity toward any nation. But we 
cannot fail to be acutely conscious of the dan- 
gers which confront us as a result of present 
world conditions and against which we are 
taking and intend to take fully adequate meas- 
ures of defense. National life itself today im- 
poses as an absolute obligation the will to na- 
tional defense, should national institutions or 
integrity ever be threatened. Achievement of 
this requires that we call out anew the endless 
energ}', the complete spirit of sacrifice, the iron 
will, which characterized the pioneers, the liber- 
ators, and the defenders to whom we owe our 
present freedom. Let no man say that in the 
world of today any nation not willing to de- 
fend itself is safe. The fortitude and resolution 
of our forefathers won for us our free insti- 
tutions. We proudly have inherited them and 
proudly are prepared to maintain them. 

At the same time, while meeting the impera- 
tive needs of emergency conditions we must — 
and, I am certain, we will — continue our abiding 
faith that what is happening today is but a 
temporary interruption in the progress of civili- 
zation. Mankind can advance only when human 
freedom is secure; when the right of self-gov- 
ernment is safeguarded ; when all nations recog- 
nize each other's right to conduct its internal 
affairs free from outside interference; when 
there exist among nations respect for the 
pledged word, determination to abstain from 
the use of armed force in pursuit of policy, and 
willingness to settle controversies by none but 
peaceful means; when international economic 



relations are based upon mutual benefit, equal- 
ity of treatment, and fair-dealing. 

In 1937, in an attempt to prevent the impend- 
ing catastrophe of a new war, the Government 
of the United States addressed a communication 
to all nations, reciting these basic principles of 
orderly international relations under the rule of 
law as the foundation of its foreign policy and 
inviting comment thereon. More than 50 na- 
tions expressed on that occasion their belief in 
the validity of these principles. At Monte- 
video, at Buenos Aires, at Lima, at Panama, 
the 21 American republics proclaimed their 
acceptance. 

I am confident that, sooner or later, the entire 
world must return to a system of international 
relations based on those principles. They are 
the only possible foundation stones of an or- 
ganized society assured of enduring peace and 
of sustained prosperity. The price of their 
abandonment is the chaos of international 
anarchy and the inexorable impoverishment of 
nations and individuals, such as we witness 
today in Europe and in Asia. 

In a system of cooperative peace such as we 
envisage there is no exclusion. Its underlying 
principles are universal in their applicability; 
they can be accepted by all nations to the bene- 
fit of each and all ; they must be accepted by all, 
if the light of modern civilization is not to be 
extinguished. Any nation which in good faith 
accepts and practices them automatically shares 
in the vast benefits they confer. 

At this time, when these principles and these 
ideals are being widelj' challenged, when insti- 
tutions based on them are being crushed by force 
over large areas of the world, it is doubly es- 
sential that our nations keep them alive and re- 
dedicate themselves to the cause of their 
preservation. 

It is in this spirit, and in this spirit alone, that 
the Government which I have the honor to 
represent approaches the tasks that are before 
our present meeting — in complete confidence 
that in this vital respect all of the American 
nations stand today as united as ever. 



249782 — 40 



48 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BUULETIN 



SEVERANCE BY SPAIN OF DIPLO- 
MATIC RELATIONS WITH CHILE 

The Acting Secretary of State, Mr. Sumner 
Welles, made the following statement at his 
press conference on July 23, 1940 : 

"The Chilean Ambassador came yesterday by 
instruction of his Government to communicate 
to me the declaration made to the Government 
of Chile by the Government of Spain and the 
reply made by the Government of Chile.^ I 



think that the constitutional, democratic, and 
elected Government of Chile, with which this 
Government maintains the closest and most 
friendly relations, is amply capable of making 
such public statement in regard to this incident 
as may be necessary. I think, however, that I 
can add that any attempt on the part of any 
foreign government to interfere by direction or 
by indirection in the domestic concerns of any 
American republic will be unanimously resented 
by all of the American peoples." 



Europe 



BALTIC REPUBLICS 

Statement by the Acting Secretary of State, Mr. Welles 



[Released to the press July 23] 

During these past few days the devious 
processes whereunder the political independ- 
ence and territorial integrity of the three 
small Baltic republics — Estonia, Latvia, and 
Lithuania — were to be deliberately annihilated 
by one of their more powerful neighbors, have 
been rapidly drawing to their conclusion. 

From the day when the peoples of these 
republics first gained their independent and 
democratic form of government the people of 
the United States have watched their admir- 
able progress in self-goverimient with deep 
and sympathetic interest. 

The policy of this Government is univer- 
sally known. The people of the United States 
are opposed to predatory activities no matter 



'Not printed herein. 



whether they are carried on by the use of force 
or by the threat of force. They are likewise 
opposed to any form of intervention on the 
part of one state, however powerful, in the 
domestic concerns of any other sovereign state, 
however weak. 

These principles constitute the very founda- 
tions upon which the existing relationship be- 
tween the 21 sovereign republics of the New 
World rests. 

The United States will continue to stand 
by these principles, because of the conviction 
of the American people that unless the doc- 
trine in which these principles are inherent 
once again governs the relations between na- 
tions, the rule of reason, of justice, and of 
law — in other words, the basis of modern 
civilization itself — cannot be preserved. 



General 



CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL DEFENSE 



Administration of Section 6 of the Act 
Entitled, "An Act To Expedite the 
Strengthening of the National Defense" 
Approved July 2, 1940 

BY THE president OF THE UNITED STAINES OF 
AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Whereas section 6 of the act of Congress 
entitled ''An Act To expedite the strengthen- 
ing of the national defense," approved July 2, 
1940, provides as follows : 

"Whenever the President determines that it 
is necessary in the interest of national defense 
to prohibit or curtail the exportation of any 
military equipment or munitions, or compo- 
nent parts thereof, or machinery, tools, or ma- 
terial or supplies necessary for the manufac- 
ture, servicing or operation thereof, he may by 
})roclamation prohibit or curtail such exporta- 
tion, except under such rules and regulations 
as he shall prescribe. Any such proclamation 
shall describe the articles or materials included 
in the prohibition or curtailment contained 
therein. In case of the violation of any pro- 
vision of any proclamation, or of any rule or 
regulation, issued hereunder, such violator or 
violators, upon conviction, shall be punished by 
a fine of not more than $10,000, or by imprison- 
ment for not more than two years or by both 
such fine and imprisonment. The authority 
granted in this Act shall terminate June 30, 
1942, unless the Congress shall otherwise 
provide." 

And whereas by my proclamation No. 2413 
of July 2, 1940,* entitled "Administration of 



'For monthly statistics on the traffic in arms, tin- 
plate scrai), etc., see post. pp. 50-60. 

'See the BuUetin of July 6, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 54), 
pp. 12-13. 



Section 6 of the Act Entitled 'An Act To 
Expedite the Strengthening of the National 
Defense' Approved July 2, 1940," I proclaimed 
that upon the recommendation of the Admin- 
istrator of Export Control I had determined 
that it was necessary in the interest of the 
national defense that certain listed articles and 
materials should not be exported from the 
United States except when authorized in each 
case bv^ a license as provided for in the said 
proclamation. 

Now, therefore, I, Franklin D. Koosevelt, 
President of the United States of America, 
acting under and by virtue of the authority 
vested in me by the said act of Congress, do 
herebj' proclaim that upon the recommendation 
of the aforesaid Administrator of Export Con- 
trol I have determined that it is necessary in 
the interest of the national defense that on and 
after August 1, 1940, the additional materials 
hereinafter listed shall not be exported from 
the United States except when authorized in 
each case by a license a^ provided for in the 
aforesaid proclamation : 

1. Petroleum products 

2. Tetraethyl lead 

3. Iron and steel scrap 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 

Done at the City of Washington this 26th 
day of July, in the year of our Lord nineteen 
hundred and forty, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America 
[seal] the one hundred and sixty-fifth. 
Franklin D. Roosevelt 
By the President : 
Sumner Welles 

Acting Secretary of State. 

[No. 2417] 

49 



50 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



regtj1.ati0ns governing the exportation of 
Aeticles and Materials Designated in the 
President's Proclamation of July 2, 1940, 
Issued Pursuant to the Provisions of Sec- 
tion 6 of the Act of Congress Approved 
July 2, 1940 

Pursuant to the authority vested in me by the 
provisions of section 6 of the Act of Congress 
approved July 2, 1940, entitled "An Act to 
expedite the strengthening of the national de- 
fense"', I hereby prescribe the following addi- 
tional regulations governing the exportation of : 

1. Petroleum products 

2. Tetraethyl lead 

3. Iron and steel scrap 

1. As used in my proclamation of July 26, 
1940,^ issued pursuant to the provisions of sec- 
tion 6 of the Act of Congress approved July 2, 
1940, and in these regulations, the following 
terms shall be construed as defined herein : 

A. Petroleum Products. — (a) Aviation Motor 
Fuel, i. e. high octane gasolines, hydro- 
carbons, and hydrocarbon mixtures (in- 



cluding crude oils) boiling between 75° and 
350° F. which with the addition of tetra- 
ethyl lead up to a total content of 3 c. c. per 
gallon will exceed 87 octane number by the 
A. S. T. M. Knock Test Method; or any 
material from which by commercial distil- 
lation there can be separated more than 3% 
of such gasoline, hydrocarbon or hydro- 
carbon mixture, (b) Aviation Lubricating 
Oil, i. e. any lubricating oil of 95 or more 
seconds Saybolt Universal Viscosity at 210° 
F. with a viscosity index of 85 or more. 

B. Tetraethyl Lead. — Pure tetraethyl lead, 
etliyl fluid, or any mixture containing more 
than 3 c. c. of tetraethyl lead per gallon. 

C. Iron and Steel Scrap. — Number 1 heavy 
melting scrap. 

2. Regulations Nos. 2 to 12, inclusive, of the 
regulations issued on July 2, 1940, pursuant to 
the Act of July 2, 1940, are applicable to the 
exportation of aviation motor fuel, tetraethyl 
lead, and aviation lubricating oil. 



Franklin D. Roosevelt 



The White House 
Jvly 26, Wlfi. 




MONTHLY STATISTICS 



[Released to the press July 22] 

Note: The figures relating to arms, the licenses for 
the export of which were revoked before they were 
used, have been subtracted from the figures appear- 
ing in the cumulative column of the table below in 
regard to arms-export licenses issued. These latter 
figures are therefore net figures. They are not yet 
final and definitive since licenses may be amended or 
revoked at any time before being used. They are, 
however, accurate as of the date of this press release. 

The statistics of actual exports in these releases are 
believed to be substantially complete. It is possible, 
however, that some shipments are not included. If 
this proves to be the fact, statistics in regard to such 
shipments will be included in the cumulative figures 
in later releases. 



In certain cases shipments of arms, ammunition, and 
implements of war included in the tabulation of ex- 
ports were not, in fact, shipped to the country in- 
dicated in the table. By reason of lack of accurate 
information it has been found impossible to correct in 
all cases the tabulation of exports to take into account 
the diversion of some shipments licensed for exporta- 
tion to certain countries when the governments of 
those countries, due to conditions resulting from the 
European war, decided, after exportation had taken 
place, to divert the shipments to other destinations. 



' Supra. 



' For text of the proclamation of July 2, 1940. for the 
control of exportation of certain munitions, materials, 
and machinery essential to national defense, see the 
Bulletin of July 6, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 51), pp. 12-13. 
For text of the proclamation of July 26, 1910, specifying 
additional materials, see ante, p. 49. 



JULY 27, 1940 

Arms-Export Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war li- 
censed for export by the Secretary of State dur- 
ing the year 1940 up to and including the month 
of June : 



51 



Country o( destination 


Category 


Value of export licenses 
isiiued 


June 1940 


6 months end- 

ine June 30, 

1940 


Albania 


IV 

I 

V 


(1) 
(I 

(2) 




$67.00 








Angola - - .. .. .-.. 




24.00 






3,200.00 
605.00 












Total 




3,729.00 




I 

ni 

IV 
V 

VII 


(2) 
4) 
(6) 
(2) 
(1) 

\!^ 

(1) 

(2) 






Argentina ..... ....... 




23,211.60 




$S,24S.00 


6,415.00 
2,300.00 






5 141 84 






4, 212 OO 




3,761.00 
3, 625. 00 
3,250.00 
2,500.00 


6,481.00 

34,025.00 

165, 232. 71 

40,937.50 

10.00 




23, 952. 00 


87,961.51 


Total 


42,333.00 


361. 92a 06 




I 

in 

rv 

V 

vn 


(1) 
(4) 

(2) 
(3) 
(1) 




Australia 




446.53 




39.14 


458.08 
1, 509. 520. 00 




13.680.00 


13, 680. 00 
271.55 






509 00 






8, 348 00 




251.074.00 


844. 746. 10 
1, 409. 705. 00 






18, 274. 88 








Total 


2M, 793. 14 


3,805 959.12 




IV 

I 

IV 


(1) 

(4) 
(2) 








136.00 








nplgian Congo 




17.29 






1.87 












19.16 




I 

ra 
rv 

V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 










217.00 






103, 200, 00 






28, 779. 00 






2, 292, 000. 00 






69.00 






20, 745. 00 






243, 957. 00 






419,400.00 








Total 




3, 108, 367. 00 




I 

V 


(4) 
(1) 










16.00 




4,000.00 


8,000.00 


Total 


4,000.00 


8, 016. 00 




I 

IV 

V 

vn 


(4) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 

\f^ 
(2) 




Bolivia . . . 




1. 161. 00 






1, 285. 00 






6,500.00 






64.60 






45,3*1.00 




751. 36 
1.50 


1,953.68 
1.50 


Total. 


762.86 


66,349.78 



Country of destination 


Category 


Value of export licenses 
issued 


June 1940 


6 months end- 
ing Jur.e 30, 
1940 


Braiil 


I 

in 

IV 
V 


(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(!) 
(2) 
(3) 


$224.00 


$829.00 




6,438 00 




1,472.00 


5,570.00 
978, 200. 00 




493.00 
108.14 

290. 400. 00 
13.750.60 

100,122.00 


6, 812. 75 

19, 836. 14 

345,153.00 

103, 105, 06 

239,009.50 


Total- 


406, 569. 74 


1,703,963.46 




IV 
V 

vn 


(2) 








6.82 






2,500.00 
317 68 












Total. . .. 




2,824.50 




VII 


[J] 






British Honduras 




129.20 






108 30 








Total 




237.60 




I 

I 
rv 


(4) 

(4) 
(1) 
(2) 






British North Borneo 




2.43 












73.02 






472.00 






43 22 








Total 




588 2i 




I 
in 

IV 
V 

VI 
VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(1) 
2) 
U) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 






Canada 


10,779.87 

38.605.47 

3, 889. 41 


30. 306. 36 




39. 205. 47 
133. 812. 35 
90,000 00 




24.600.00 


16,481,500.00 
3,791 00 




6.013.72 

49. 703. 72 

772. 055. 57 

1,289.027.84 

1, 002, 398. 00 


9, 639. 40 

60,553.81 

1,048,876.57 

1,489,443.78 

1,656,181.85 

36 000.00 




31.433.08 
7.019.00 


87,031.41 
40. 751. 75 


Total 


3,234,425.68 


20, 196, 993. 75 




I 

IV 
V 

vn 


(2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(1) 
2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
CD 
(2) 




Chile 




2, 970. 00 






338.00 






5, 460 00 






47 365 00 




372.26 


6, 484. 26 
3 500 00 




3. 272. 50 

29,732.00 

16.00 


3.382.50 

30, 535. 00 

15.00 

12 607 15 








Total 


33,391.76 


111,646.91 




I 
m 

rv 

V 

vn 


(2) 

P^ 
(1) 

(2) 

(1) 

(2) 

(3) 

(1) 

(2) 




China 


3,210.00 


352. 440. 00 




2, 529, 106. 22 






97, 277. 94 




... 


178.60 






6.00 






94,600.00 






2, 222, 676. 44 






2, 196, 955. 35 




346,370.56 


1,018.225.56 
361,000.00 








Total ... 


349.580.66 


8, 872, 465. 11 




I 
rv 

V 

vn 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
C2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 






21.38 

10.90 

46.00 

4.90 

225,500.00 

300.00 

9,100.00 


21.38 




55.90 

1,757.90 

416. 66 

333, 750. OO 

1, 492. 00 

43,995.00 

1, 027. 31 






1,965 00 








Total 


234,983.18 


384, 481. 15 



52 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of export licenses 
issued 




June 1940 


6 months end- 
ing June 30, 
1940 




I 
IV 

V 
VII 


(4) 
(1) 
C2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 




$4.00 






137. 30 






16.25 




$25,000.00 


25,000.00 
2, 967. 62 






13, 104. 70 




164. 20 


1, 646. 26 


Total.- 


25, 164. 20 


42. 876. 13 




I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(2) 
(4) 

^1) 
(2) 

(1) 
(2) 
(3) 

(2) 


70.00 

43.00 

2,428.00 

980.00 


70.00 




489. 00 
2. 445. 50 
7,731.00 
1, 700. 00 






2, 700. 00 






2, 000. 00 




2,267.62 


2, 961. 80 
751.00 










6, 778. 62 


20, 848. 30 




IV 
V 

VII 


(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
3) 
(2) 








6.00 






307, 425. 00 






1, 798. 76 




18, 700. 00 


67,960.00 
17.50 








Total 


18,700.00 


367, 197. 26 




V 

IV 

V 
VII 


(3) 

(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(1) 








2, 040. 00 












357. 00 






615. 00 






600. 00 




iro.oo 


1,501.80 


Total - 


170. 00 


2, 973. 80 




I 

rv 

vn 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 






4172 


169. 72 




201.00 






123. 00 




3.636.00 


18, 483. 00 
226. 00 






900. 00 








Total 


3,680.72 


20, 102. 72 




I 

IV 

V 


(2) 
(3) 

\^ 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 




Egypt 


837.60 


837. 50 




3, 310. 00 




1, 664. 00 


1, 680. 21 
388. 00 






752. 31 






16, 993. 00 






60.00 








Total 


2. 491. 60 


24, 021. 02 




I 

m 

IV 

V 
VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 




El Salvador 




52.00 






1. 091. 00 






18, 200. 00 






76.00 






6. 436. 00 






375. 00 




3, 400. 00 


8, 350. 00 


Total 


3. 400. 00 


34, 680. 00 




I 

IV 

V 

vn 


(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




Finland 


17, 676. 00 


19, 660. 00 




638, 569. 60 






3, 806. 493. 89 






951. 50 






22, 334. 25 




60, 000. 00 


620,000.00 


Total - 


77, 675. 00 


4,908,009.24 




I 
m 

IV 


(1) 
(2) 
C3) 
(4) 
(5) 

a] 






201, 150. 00 
4, 259, 380. 71 
1, 658, 124. 00 
6, 903, 273. 00 

909. 000. 00 

2, 940. 000. 00 

4, 600. 00 


201,488.00 




4,887,420.71 

1, 700, 195. 00 

7,321,998.50 

909. 000 00 

35, 83.5. 933. 00 

10. 337. 00 

30.00 




i2,250.60 


741, 065. 00 



Country of destination 


Category 


Value of export licenses 
issued 


June 1940 


6 months end- 
ing Junp 30, 
1940 


France— Continued. 


V 
VII 


(1) 

(2) 
(3) 

(1) 

(2) 


$184. 000, 00 

11,674,178,34 

368, 470, 00 

2.00 


$730. 000. 00 

13, 723, 180. 85 

4, 905, 514. 00 

2.00 

56. 693. 00 








Total 


29, 114, 328. 05 


'■71. 022, 767. 06 




I 
IV 


(1) 

(4) 

(1) 

(2) 








78.60 






61.00 






3, 836. 00 






11.00 








Total 




3. 976. 60 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(6) 

III (1) 
C2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (I) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (I) 
(2) 






Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland. 


6. l.'i,^370 00 
14, ,'i83, 707. 19 

2. 919. 124. 52 

18, 479. 099 10 

212. 600. 70 

16, 373, 713. 86 


5. 155, 370. 00 

15,121.415.94 

3,088,624.52 

27, 029, 221. 90 

213. 301. 60 

71, 766. 613. 85 

36. 000. 00 




1,028,946 86 
1, 979, 575. 06 


1, 075, 666, 36 

1,970.675 06 

8, 000, 00 




623, 5f;0 29 

188, 944. 60 

7, 882. 880. 94 

1, 640, 615. 00 


1, 147. 957. 54 
906. 666 20 

8. 838. 798. 94 

2, 040, 615. 00 


Total 


70,968,038.11 


138. 407, 826. 91 




I 

IV 


(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(1) 




Greece 




150. 00 






60.00 






90, 900. 00 






21.00 








Total--- - 




91,121.00 




I 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 










1,016.48 






678. 30 






6, 674. 65 






1, 731. 67 








Total - 




10, 000. 00 




IV 
VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 






Guatemala 




186.00 






1, 340. OO 






226. 80 






3, 064. 00 








Total 




4,816.80 




IV 

V 
VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(1) 






Haiti 


1,090.00 


1, 366. 06 




23.00 






7,000.00 






24.30 








Total 


1, 090. 00 


8, 412. 36 




I 

IV 

V 
VII 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 




Honduras 


106. 00 


432. 00 




388. 00 




661.00 


1, 528. 00 
4, 238. 00 




131.00 


131.00 


Total 


798. 00 


6, 717. 00 




I 

IV 
V 

VI 


0) 
(4) 

h 

(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 








2,017.75 






1, 123. 10 






7, 363. 00 






67.75 




13, 370. 00 


21, 332. 00 
16, 500. 00 






120. 00 








Total 


13, 370. 00 


48, 623. 60 











" The apparent discrepancy between the values reported for the arms, 
ammunition, and implements of war authorized to be exported to France 
during the period Jan. 1-June 30, 1940. and the corresponding figures for 
the period Jan. 1-Mav 31. 1940. published in the press release issued on 
June 17, 1940 (see the Bulletin of June 22. 1940. vol. 2, no. 52, page 691), is 
due to the large number of lif^enpcs authorizing the exportation of arms, 
ammunition, and implomenis of war to France which were canceled 
during June at the request of the licensees. 



JULY 27, 1940 



53 







Value of export licenses 
issued 


Country of destination Category - 


6 
June 1940 


months end- 
ing June 30, 
1940 




rv (1) . 

(2) . 
VII (2) 




$1,920.00 






94.00 






7,890.00 






763. 00 




$65.00 


65.00 


Totnl 


65.00 


10, 732. 00 




I (1) ' 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (2 

VII (2) 


456.60 

1,919.20 

224. 75 

98.26 

47.000.00 

84.40 


2,442.49 




6. 245. 06 
3, 540. 64 
780. 55 
67, 500. 00 
1,496.40 
1,000.00 




180.00 


882 00 
65.00 








Total 


49,963.11 


83.952.14 


Iran 


V (1) 
in (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 


112,000.00 


112.000.00 


Iraq 




27, 165. 00 






116,823.00 






3, 270 60 






21,221.00 








Total 




141,314.60 


Italy 


V (2) 

rv (1) 

(2) 




13, 610. 00 






123 00 






41.45 


Total 




164.45 




I (1) 

rv h) 

2) 


107.00 
133.00 
102 00 
46.00 


107 OO 




23.V0O 
198 00 
191.00 


Total 


3S8.00 


731.00 


Leeward Islands 


vn (2) 

I (2) 
I (4) 

I (1) 

(5) 

rv (1) 

(2) 

V h) 

(2) 

(3) 

VI (2) 

VU (1) 

(2) 




162.45 


Macau 




555.00 


Mauritius 




137.00 






108.85 






112.50 




6, 970. 00 


10,84S 00 
;12 00 




1,600.00 

1,358.00 

23,375.00 


362,782.40 

7. \0X 00 

37,255.00 

112.50 




1,770.25 
2,850.00 


8,040.25 
32. 762. 00 


Total.. 


36,823.25 


459,336.50 




I (1) 

(4) 

V (1) 

(2) 

(3) 




116.00 






154.61 






282, 000. 00 




3,224.00 


15, 464. 00 
46. 620. 00 


Total 


3,224.00 


344.354.61 




. I (2) 

(4) 

(5) 

V (2) 

(3) 




12,866.00 






47.50 






155. 00 






20,411.43 






63,300.00 






96,779.93 




. I (2) 

(4) 

(5) 

ra (1) 

rv (1) 

(2) 




72,050.00 






658. 74 




825,000.00 


920, 200. OO 
. 1,472,250.10 




4,912.00 
,,^98.00 


50, 694. 90 
711.00 





rategory - 


Value of export licenses 
issued 


Country of destination < 


6 months end- 
June 1940 ing June 30, 
1940 


Netherlands Indies— Contd. 


V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 




$417,106.12 


$4,685.00 


154,698.00 
213, 510. 7« 




338.80 


338.80 


Total 


835,033.80 


3, 302, 218. 48 


New Caledonia 


I (4) " 

I (I) 
(4) 

rv (1) 

(2) 




923.82 






118.50 




13.00 

1, 250. 00 

164. 90 


95.24 

1,913.50 

195. 90 


Total 


1,427.90 


2, 323. 14 


New Guinea, Territory of 


rv (2) 

V (2) 




17.25 


1,250.00 


1, 250. 00 


Total 


1,250.00 


1, 267. 25 




in (1) 

IV h 

V (2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 




1,916,870.00 






202.00 




158, 017. 00 
127, 840. 00 


159, 617. 00 

130, 230 00 

6, 125. 00 








Total 


285, 857. 00 


2, 213, 044. 00 




V (2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 




480.00 






870. 00 






1, 292. 00 








Total 




2, 642. 00 




I (4) 

rv (1) 
I m 

(2) 
(4) 

in (1) 

(2) 

rv (1) 

(2) 

V (1) 

(2) 

(3) 




21.00 






25.50 






70.00 






450.00 






36, 645. 00 






712, 000. 00 






280.00 






222.00 






121.00 






2,200.00 






39, 604. 00 






1, 515. 00 








Total.- 




793,007.00 


Palestine 


V (3) 

I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

rv (1) 

(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 




400.00 






12,500.00 






3,900.00 




4,500.00 


6,600.00 
8,792.00 






1,207.00 




2,866.00 


2,866.00 
74.00 






580.00 






2,2.S7.60 








Total - 


7,366.00 


38,776.60 




I (4) 

rv (2) 




28.3.00 




1,876.70 


9, 705. 70 


Total 


1, 876. 70 


9, 988. 70 


Pera . . 


rv (1) 

(2) 

V (1) 

(2) 

(3) 

vn (1) 

(2) 


7, 276. 00 
240.00 


7,361.00 




240.00 
393, 138. 50 




1,526.00 
12, 019. 00 


5, 761. 00 

62,209.00 

1,000.00 






1, 130. 50 








Total 


21,091.00 


470,840.00 




. I (1) 

(4) 

IV ca 




61.80 






44.00 






80.00 



54 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BITLLETIN 



Country of destination 


Category 


Value of export licenses 
issued 


June 1940 


6 months end- 
ing June 30, 
1940 


Portugal — Continued. 


V 
VII 


(1) 

(2 
(.3) 
(1) 




$4, 300. 00 




$16,650.00 


60. 699, 94 
33, 125.00 






841. 76 








Total 


16,650.00 


99, 142. 50 




V 
V 
I 

IV 


(2) 

(2) 

(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 




PilTTiftnij^ 




2, 500. 00 










760.00 


760. 00 










180. 00 






227. 60 




69.00 


333. 00 
82.00 








Total 


69.00 


822. 50 




I 

I 

rv 


(1) 

(2) 
(4) 
(2) 








9.12 








Surinam 


11,644.50 


11, 644 50 




1.64 






2.47 








Total 


11, 644. 60 


11, 648. 61 




I 
in 

IV 
V 


(2) 
(4) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 




Sweden 




108, 000. 00 






128. 047. 00 






4. 000. 00 




269, 640. 00 
6, 226. 90 


503, 265. 00 

486, Oil. 20 

3, 334, 380. 00 


Total 


275, 866. 90 


4, 663, 703. 20 




rv 

I 
m 

rv 

V 


(1) 

(1) 
0) 
(2) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 








20,00 








Thailand- 


16, 750. 00 


16, 750. 00 




449, 280. 00 






1, 543. 84 




1, 121. 93 


14,861,89 
5. 300. 00 






15. 953. 84 






156. 000. 00 








Total 


17, 871. 93 


659. 689. 67 




rv 

V 
VII 


fl) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 




Trinidad 


153. 00 


153. 00 




294.00 




12,625.00 
852.00 


18, 625. 00 
852. 00 


Total 


13, 630. 00 


19, 924. 00 




in 
rv 

V 


(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




Turkey -. -- 




5,610.00 
33.00 










6.20 






116, 760. 00 








Total 




121,409 20 




I 

in 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 








49.20 
272. 00 


308, 00 




620. 93 
173, 600. 00 






189, 757. 70 




69.00 

1,614.608,00 

21.384.00 

248, 000. 00 


66.00 

1,624,161.00 

42, 641. 83 

264,000.00 

1,56. 00 






40, 228. 00 








Total 


1,884,372.20 


2, 326, 439. 46 




I 

IV 
V 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 


Uruguay 




260. 00 




345.00 
1,068.00 


1, 622. 00 
6, 378. 00 
8, 600. 00 






100. 40 








Total 


1, 413, 00 


16, 860. 40 




I 
ni 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 






91 20 






226.00 






42 55 




40,850.00 


163,970.00 



Country of destination 


Category 


Value of export licenses 
issued 


June 1940 


6 months end- 
ing June 30, 
1940 


Venezuela— Continued. 


rv 

V 
VII 


(1) 

(2) 

(1) 

(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 


$162. 00 


$4,814.00 
191.45 






93, 060, 00 




22, 497, 66 

36, 660. 00 

1,696.35 


42. 809. 00 

92, 270. 00 

7. 496. 27 

19.277.40 


Total . , 


101,845.35 


424 246.87 




vn 

V 


(2) 

(2) 
(3) 






27.07 


27.07 










9,411.75 






30, 780. 00 








Total 




40, 191. 75 












108,486,019.73 


270,060.420.24 









During the month of June, 513 arms-export 
licenses were issued, making a total of 2,224 
such licenses issued during the current year. 

Akms Exported 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of 
the arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
exported during the year 1940, up to and in- 
cluding the month of June under export li- 
censes issued by the Secretary of State: 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


June 1940 


6 months 

ending June 

30, 1940 




I (4) 

V (1) 

(2) 




$24. 00 




$3,200.00 


3,200.00 
495. 00 








Total... 


3,200.00 


3,719.00 




I (2) 
(4) 
(5) 

rv (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(3) 




Argentina 




23 211.60 






240. 00 






2,418.00 




3,610.00 


4. 252. 00 
2, 743. 00 






23, 800. 00 




24. 678. 00 
15. 137. 50 


52, 992, 48 

255, 653. 50 

10.00 




1.98 


41.61 


Total 


43,427.48 


365, 261, 99 




I (1) 
(4) 

in (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 








816.63 




20.26 


418,94 
7, 806, 135. 00 






136.55 






509. 00 






13. 296. 00 




26, 145. 00 
58, 500. 00 


249. 297, 00 

468. 621, 00 

18. 274, 86 








Total.. 


84, 665. 26 


8, 667, 604, 88 



JXJLY 27, 1940 



55 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


e 

June 1940 


months end- 
ing June 30, 
1940 


Bahrein Islands 


rv (1) 




$136.00 




I (4) 
IV (2) 




17.29 






1.87 












19.16 




I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
<3) 










217.00 




$32,250.00 
2S, 598. 00 
687,600.00 


49. 460. 00 

28.809.79 

1,146,000.00 

69.00 




344.66' 


20, 745. 00 

6, 807. 00 

119,997.00 








Total 


748,792.00 


1,371,094.79 




I (1) 

(4) 

V (1) 




48,00 






16. IK) 






4,000.00 








Total 




4,004.00 


Bolivia 


I (4) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 


97.00 
240.00 


1,161.00 




1,285.00 
19,000.00 






1,041.69 






58,741.00 




578.00 
1.50 


1.528.00 
1.60 


Total 


916.50 


82, 768. 19 




I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 


224.00 


829.00 




6,438.00 




3,407.00 


8,181.00 
349, 750. 00 




96.06' 

152,41500 

2,547.68 

16,044.00 


6,962.75 

2U. U72. 00 

294, 970. IX) 

71. 2.58. 43 

135, 095. 75 

2.00 








Total 


174, 727. 68 


891,664.93 




IV (2) 
VU (1) 


6.82 
317.63 


6.82 




317.68 


Total.-- 


324.50 


324.60 




IV (1) 
(2) 

VU CI) 
(2) 




15.00 






laoo 






129.20 






10S.30 








Total - 




270.60 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV CI) 
(2) 




90.00 






169. 02 






472.00 






49.22 








Total 




780.24 


Canada. 


1 (1) 
(2) 
C4) 
(5) 

III CD 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(21 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (2) 
VU (1) 

C2) 


7,181.60 


20. 816. 74 




10.00 




34, 043. 95 


95. 936. 92 
94. 500. 00 




206,000.00 

17,670.85 

1, 36S. 62 

244.46 

470, 572. 07 

20, 485. 24 

31, 252. 40 


2. 620, 466. 00 

248.231.31 

6.010.22 

971.44 

740, 334. 57 

138. 764. 28 

535. 467. 90 

36, 000. 00 




24, 336. 56 
6, 427. 00 


77,533.68 
69, 307. 35 


Total 


819. 582. 75 


4, 684. 340. 29 


Chile 


I (4) 
(5) 




1 386 00 




3.025.66 


' 6, 300. 00 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


June 1940 


f months end- 
ing June 30, 
1940 


Chile— Continued. 


IV CD 
C2) 

V (1) 
C2) 
(3) 

VII C2) 


$12,866.00 
79.00 


$48,856.00 
5, 322. 00 
3,500.00 






110 00 






22, 946. 00 






12 607 16 








Total - 


16.969.00 


99, 027. 15 


China 


I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

III CD 
(2) 

IV CD 
(2) 

V CD 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




1.344.00 




166,472.00 


468, 005. 00 
850.00 






23, 753 00 






1,148,6,54. .W 






11,374 00 




78.00 
6.00 


268.60 

6,649.00 

114,600.00 




266.889.00 

17, 760. 00 

334.724.00 

342,000.00 


93.5,646.00 
162, 818. 00 
334, 724. 00 
342,000.00 


Total 


1.127,928.00 


3. 649, 686. 17 




I C4) 

IV (D 
(2) 

V CD 
C2) 
C3) 

VII Cl) 
(2) 




65.00 






1,629.20 






1. 793. 76 




120,750.00 

31.00 

9,000.00 


233, 350. 00 

5, 870. 00 

19,230.00 

1,027 00 






1, 966. 00 








Total 


129,781.00 


264,929.96 


Pnfitn Tllra 


I (« 

IV Cl) 
C2) 

V C2) 
C3) 

VII CD 
(2) 




4.00 






137 30 






16.25 






22, 057. 00 




200.00 
103.20 
61.00 


27, 376. 00 

2,235.26 

51.00 


Total 


354.20 


51,876.81 


Cuba 


I C4) 
IH CD 

IV CD 
C2) 

V CD 
(2) 
C3) 

VU CD 
(2) 


182.00 


501.00 




43, 350 00 






17.60 




1,670.00 


9, 667. 00 
1,700.00 




200.00 


6.555.00 
12 876 00 




1,500.00 
11.00 


4,620.20 
7.-1.00 


Total 


3,463.00 


79.937.70 




IV (2) 

V Cl) 
C2) 
C3) 

VII (2) 




6.00 


Luravao 




103. 975. 00 






768.00 






32, 750. 00 






17.50 












137, 516. 60 




IV (1) 
C2) 

V C2) 
VU (1) 






Dominican Republic 


344.00 


344.00 




515.00 






600.00 






618.80 










344.00 


2,077.80 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

VU C2) 








125.00 






226.00 






191.00 




2,163.00 


12,758.00 
900.00 


Total 


2.163.00 


14,200.00 




I C3) 
Cl) 

IV CD 
(2) 

V (2) 




Egypt 




2, 680. 00 




26.21 


26.21 
3, 519. 00 




436. 51 


989.31 
60.00 








Total - 


462.72 


7, 274. 52 



56 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


June 1940 


6 months end- 
ing June 30, 

1940 




I (1) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 

V (2) 
VII (2) 




$52. 00 






149. 00 






18, 200. 00 




"'"'$3,'466.'6o" 


76.00 

375. 00 

8, 350. 00 


Total -- --- 


3, 400. 00 


27,202.00 




I (2) 
C3) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 




Finland 


17,676.00 
306,704.00 
154,420.89 


184, 310. 00 




436, 694. 00 
1,364,078.89 
2, 321, 49fi. 00 




18.60 

5,386.00 

80, 808. 00 

193, 969. 00 


961.60 

93,861.00 

1,084,623.00 

369, 864. 00 


Total --- 


7.59,041.39 


5, 866, 878. 39 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






201, 150. 00 

4, 409, 520. 71 

466, 484. 00 

7, 216, 227. 00 

499,000.00 

11,806,499.00 

5, 837. 00 

51, 450. 00 


201, 228. 00 




4,841,072.71 

506, 047. 00 

7,463,300.60 

499, 000. 00 

53,364,001.00 

20, 845. 00 

368,316.00 

546, 000. 00 




434, 400. 60 

2,147,855.00 

2.00 

66,593.00 


3,661,078.50 

9,849,886.00 

2.00 

66,593.00 


Total 


27, 293, 018. 21 


81,377,368.71 




I (4) 

IV (1) 

(2) 




French Indochina 




61.00 






3, 836. 00 






11.00 








Total -- 




3, 898. 00 




I (4) 

I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 










33.83 








Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland, 


1,341,000.00 
2,899,481.00 

363, 733. 20 
3, 818, 769. 80 

150, 832. 00 
2, 600, 285. 00 

126,980.06 


1, 341, 000. 00 

3,098,761.75 

413, 467. 20 

4,096,228.80 

151,632.90 

12,796,886.00 

127,112.06 

8, 000. 00 




186, 514. 00 

148, 996. 00 

4, 297, 687. 04 

836,900.00 


1,011, 620. .50 

1, 804, 586. 00 

4, 301, 065. 04 

966, 900. 00 


Total . . 


16,770,078.10 


30, 105 159 26 




I (3) 
(4) 




Greece .-_. .. 




160 00 






50.00 












200 OO 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 






Greenland. - .. 




1,016.48 
678. 30 










6, 674. 66 
1, 731. 57 












Total ..- 




10,000.00 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








37.00 






12.00 






1,59 00 




56.00 
32.40 


1, 336. 00 

226 80 

3,064 00 








Total - 


88.40 


4, 834. 80 




IV (1) 

(2) 

VII (1) 

(2) 


Haiti 


54. 75 
16.00 


312 55 




23.00 
24.30 






6.00 








Total 


70.75 


365. 86 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


June 1940 


6 months end- 
ing June 30, 
1940 




I 
IV 

V 

VII 


(4) 

(I) 

(2) 

(1) 

(2) 
(2) 


$180. 00 


$303. 00 




388. 00 




983. 00 


1,092.00 
100, 000. 00 






3,213.00 




131.00 


301.00 


Total 


1, 294. 00 


105, 387. 00 




IV 

V 


(1) 

(2) 




JIous Kone 




7,363.00 




4,364.00 


4, 354. 00 


Total 


4, 364. 00 


11, 717. 00 




IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 








1, 920. 00 






83.00 






7,890.00 
763. 00 












Total 




10, 656. 00 




I 

IV 
V 

VI 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 










944. 53 




362.00 
161.00 
128.00 


5, 582. 56 

3, 148. 49 

1,049.31 

20, 600. 00 






1, 252. 00 






1,000.00 






749. 00 








Total 


631. 00 


34, 226. 89 




III 

IV 


(1) 

(2) 
(1) 
(2) 








694, 963. 00 




6, 693. 00 


27, 166. 00 
94.37 






26.85 








Total 


6, 693. 00 


722, 248. 22 




V 
IV 


(1) 

(1) 
(2) 




Ireland 




116, 823. 00 








Jamaica 




346.00 






27.60 








Total. .- 




373. 50 




V 

IV 

V 

I 


(2) 

(1) 

(3) 

(1) 
(4) 










4, 143. 00 










102. 00 


102. 00 










18, 077. 00 












261. 46 




48.00 


337. 28 


Total 


48.00 


688. 73 




I 
rv 

V 

VI 
VII 


(1) 
(5) 
(1) 
(2) 

^» 
(2) 

(3) 

(2) 

(1) 

(2) 




Mexico. . 




66. 00 






112.60 




638. 00 

212, 00 

61, 600. 00 

206. 00 

4,600.00 


4, 878. 00 

212. 00 

326, 840. 00 

2, 759. 00 

11, .380. 00 

112,60 




724. 50 
2,832.00 


14, 842. 26 
28,901.00 


Total 


60,612.60 


390, 093. 25 




I 

V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 




Mozambiciue--- 


116.00 

154. 61 

282,000.00 

3, 224. 00 


116.00 

164. 61 

282, 000. 00 

3,224.00 


Total 


285, 494. 61 


285,494.61 




I 
III 

V 


(2) 
(4) 
(6) 
(2) 
(1) 




Netherlands ._. 




26,663.00 
47.60 






165. 00 






9, 674. 00 






107, 740. 00 






163, 472. 50 






187, 137. 50 








Total... 




494, 879. 60 



JULY 27, 1940 



57 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


June 1940 


B months end- 
ing June 30, 
1940 




I 

ni 

IV 
V 

vn 


(2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(1) 
(2) 
0) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 




$75, 678. 00 




$428.00 


1. 247. 77 
281,075.00 




55, 133. 00 
16,200.00 


1, 509, 798. 00 
15,200.00 
35, 782. 40 




400.00 


1, 135. 17 
129, 727. 00 




35,285.00 


137,708.00 
130, 749. 00 






138, 000. 00 








Total 


106,446.00 


2, 456. 100. 34 




I 
I 

IV 


(4) 

(1) 

(*) 
(i) 
(2) 








203.00 












118.50 




13.00 


96.24 
663.60 




4.90 


35.90 


Total . 


17.90 


913. 14 




IV 

V 


(2) 
(2) 




New Guinea, Territory of - 




17. 2S 




1,600.00 








Total 




1, 617. 28 




rv 

V 

vn 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
CD 






New Zealand 




202.00 






1.971.18 






2; 640. 00 






^ 991. 00 












10. 704. 18 




I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(4) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 

(1) 










1,264.00 






4,035.00 




480.00 
870.00 


480.00 

870.00 

1,292.00 








Total 


1, 350. 00 


7, 941. 00 




I 

IV 

I 
ni 

IV 
V 


(4) 

(1) 

(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 




Nigeria 




33.00 








Northern Rhodesia 




26.60 








Norway 




70.00 






286.00 






36. 493. 20 






1,354, 114.00 






280.00 






30.00 






137.00 






2,200.00 






644.00 








Total 




1, 394, 253. 20 




V 

I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(3) 

a', 
'<^ 

(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 










400.00 








Panama.. . . 


12, 500. 00 


12, 500. 00 




3, 900. 00 






4,200.00 






8, 769. 00 






1, 207. 00 






1, 441. 13 






74.00 






647.00 




730.00 


2, 915. 60 


Total 


13, 230. 00 


35, 653. 73 




I 

IV 


(4) 
(2) 








283.00 




1, 860. 00 


6, 894. 00 


Total 


1,860.00 


7, 177. 00 




IV 
V 

vn 


(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




Peru 




85.00 






387. 810. 00 




350.00 


14, 696. 00 
50,568.00 






1,000.00 






1, 131. 00 








Total. 


350.00 


455, 290. 00 





Category 


Value of actual eiports 


Country of destination 


June 1940 


B months end- 
ing June 30, 
1940 




I (1) 

(4) 

in (1) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

vn (1) 




$51. 80 






44.00 




$147, 500. 00 


447, 500. 00 
80.00 






4, 663. 00 






369.00 






355. 76 








Total 


147, 600. 00 


453, 063. 56 




V (2) 

I (1) 
C2) 
(4) 

rv (1) 

(2) 




Rnmnntn 




600.00 












180.00 






227.50 






264.00 






82.00 






60.62 








Total 




814. 02 




I (I) 

I (2) 

(4) 

IV (2) 

vn (1) 










9.12 








Surinam , 


11,644.60 


11,644.50 




1.64 






2.47 






193.80 








Total 


11,644.50 


11, S42. 41 




I (2) 

(4) 

ni (1) 

(2) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 








108.000.00 




6, 125. 00 

l,036,2.'i0.00 

4,000.00 

22,250.00 


6.5, 307. 00 

3,724.925.00 

4.000.00 

44.501.00 

65. 000. 00 




28,374.00 
138.316.00 


215. 346. 95 
247. 267. 00 


Total 


1, 236, 315. 00 


4,474,316.95 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 




Thailand 




17.65 






1.93 




1,513.93 


15,307.89 
6,300.00 






2,637.00 






193, 120. 00 








Total 


1,513.93 


216, 384. 47 




rv (2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 








18.00 






3,094.00 




12,615.00 
852.00 


18.625.00 
852.00 


Total 


13, 477. 00 


22,589.00 




I (2) 
(5) 

in (J) 

(2) 

rv (1) 

(2) 

V (2) 

(3) 




Turkey 




148, 135. 00 






158, 750. OO 






1,191.084.00 






17. 070. 00 






14. 236. 00 






1.306.20 






104. 875. 10 






70. 344. 00 








Total 




1, 705. 800. 30 




I (1) 

(4) 

m (1) 
rv (1) 

(2) 

V (1) 

(2) 

(3) 

vn (I) 

(2) 






Union of South Africa 




111.00 




36.18 


173.06 
173, 600. 00 






567. 70 






7.00 






8. 103. 00 




7,155.93 


10, 653. 89 
6,000.00 






156. 00 






40, 064. 00 








Total 


7,192.11 


239. 426. 65 




V (3) 
I (4) 

rv (1) 

(2) 




Union of Soviet Socialist Re- 




120, 512. 00 


publics. 






Uruguay . . 


68.00 
345.00 
428.00 


299.00 




1. 522. 00 

2, 569. 00 



58 



DEPAETMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Catrgory 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


June 1940 


6 months end- 
ing June 30, 
1940 


Uruguay— Continued. 


V 


(1) 

(2) 


$2, 000. 00 


$5, 949. DO 
80.00 








Total 


2,841.00 


10, 419. 00 




I 

III 

IV 

V 

vn 


(1) 
C2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




61.40 






246.00 






39.00 






28, 000. 00 




250. 76 


3, 143. 00 
191.45 




12, 923. 00 
2, 035. 00 

28, 800. 00 
1, 746. 23 


27. 823. 00 
24, 884. 00 
78, 131. 00 
9, 192. 32 
15, 890. 40 








Total 


45, 764. 98 


187,601.57 




V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 








63, 000. 00 






23, 315. 00 






31, 080. 00 








Total 




117,395.00 












49, 929, 619. 47 


151,679,128.97 









Arms-Import Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of origin of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
licensed for import by the Secretary of State 
during the month of June 1940: 



Country of origin 


Category 


Value 


Total 


Brazil -- 


V (2) 
I (1) 

(2) 
(4) 

V (2) 

V (1) 
I (2) 

(4) 
III (2) 
I (3) 

(4) 
III (2) 
I (4) 

V (2) 
(3) 


$9, 800. 00 

45. 00 

1, 000. 00 

9.00 

60.00 

100, 000. 00 

6, 000. 00 

1, 005. 30 

697. 00 

1, 044, 52 

1,494.00 

1.00 

16.00 

200.00 

1, 500. 00 


$9, 800. DO 




1 




1,101.00 
100, 000. 00 


France 




Great Britain 


[ 7, 702. 30 




2, 639. 62 
16.00 




} 1, 700. 00 




Total 




122,860.82 











During the month of June, 19 import licenses 
were issued, making a total of 107 such licenses 
issued during the current year. 



Categories of Arms, Ammunition, and 
Implements of War 

The categories of arms, ammunition, and im- 
plements of war in the appropriate column 
of the tables printed above are the categories 
into which those articles were divided in the 
President's proclamation of May 1, 1937, enu- 
merating the articles which would be consid- 
ered a^ arms, ammunition, and implements of 
war for the purposes of section 5 of the joint 
resolution of May 1, 1937, as follows: 

Category I 

(1) Rifles and carbines using ammunition in 
excess of caliber .22, and barrels for those 
weapons ; 

(2) Machine guns, automatic or autoloading 
rifles, and machine pistols using ammunition in 
excess of caliber .22, and barrels for those 
weapons; 

(3) Guns, howitzers, and mortars of all cali- 
bers, their mountings and barrels ; 

(4) Ammunition in excess of caliber .22 for 
the arms enumerated under (1) and (2) above, 
and cartridge cases or bullets for such ammuni- 
tion; filled and unfilled projectiles for tlie arms 
enumerated under (3) above; 

(5) Grenades, bombs, torpedoes, mines and 
depth charges, filled or unfilled, and apparatus 
for their use or discharge; 

(6) Tanks, military armored vehicles, and 
armored trains. 

Category II 

Vessels of war of all kinds, including aircraft 
carriers and submarines, and armor plate for 
such vessels. 

Category III 

(1) Aircraft, unassembled, assembled, or 
dismantled, both heavier and lighter than air, 
which are designed, adapted, and intended for 
aerial combat by the use of machine guns or of 
artillery or for the carrying and dropping of 
bombs, or which are equipped with, or which 
by reason of design or construction are pre- 
pared for any of the appliances referred to in 
paragraph (2) below; 

(2) Aerial gun mounts and frames, bomb 
racks, torpedo carriers, and bomb oi' torpedo 
release mechanisms. 



JULY 27, 1940 

Categary IV 

(1) Revolvers and automatic pistols using 
anununition in excess of caliber .22 ; 

(2) Ammunition in excess of caliber .22 for 
the arms enumerated under (1) above, and 
cartridge cases or bullets for such ammunition. 

Categoiy V 

(1) Aircraft, unassembled, assembled or dis- 
mantled both heavier and lighter than air, 
other than those included in Category III; 

(2) Propellers or air screws, fuselages, hulls, 
wings, tail units, and under-carriage units; 

(3) Aircraft engines, unassembled, assem- 
bled, or dismantled. 

Category VI 

(1) Livens projectors and flame throwers; 

(2) a. Mustard gas (dichlorcthyl sulphide); 

b. Lewisite {chlorvinyklichlorai-sine and 

dichlordivinylchlorarsine) ; 

c. Methyldichlorarsine; 

d. Diphenylchlorarsine; 

e. Diphenylcyanarsine; 

f. Diphenylamincchlorarsine; 

g. Phenyldichlorarsine; 
h. Ethyldichlorarsine; 

i. Phcnyldibromarsinc; 

j. Ethyidibromarsine; 

k. Phosgene; 

1. Monoclilormethylchlorformate ; 

m. Trichlormethylclilorformate (diphos- 

gene); 
n. Dichlordimethjd Ether; 
o. Dibromdimethj'l Ether; 
p. Cyanogen Chloride; 
q. Ethylbromacetate; 
r. Ethyliodoacetate; 
s. Brombenzylcyanide; 
t. Bromacetone; 
u. Brommethylethyl ketone. 

Category VII 

(1) Propellant powders; 

(2) High explosives as follows: 

a. Nitrocellulose having a nitrogen con- 

tent of more than 12%; 

b. Trinitrotoluene; 

c. Trinitroxylene; 

d. Tetryl (trinitrophenol methyl nitra- 

mine or tetranitro methylaniline) ; 

e. Picric acid; 

f. A mm onium picrate; 

g. Trinitroanisol ; 



59 



h. Trinitronaphthalcne; 

i. Tetranitronaphthalene; 

j. Hexanitrodiphenylamine; 

k. Pentaerythritetetrauitrate (Penthrite 

or Pen trite); 
1. Trimethylenetrinitramine (Hexogen or 

T4); 

m. Potassium nitrate powders (black 
saltpeter powder); 

n. Sodium nitrate powders (black soda 
powder) ; 

o. Amatol (mixture of ammonium nitrate 
and trinitrotoluene); 

p. Ammonal (mixture of ammonium ni- 
trate, trinitrotoluene, and pow- 
dered aluminum, with or without 
other ingredients) ; 

q. Schneiderite (mixture of ammonium 
nitrate and dinitronaphthalene, 
with or without other Ingredi- 
ents). 

Special Statistics in Regard to Abms Exports 
TO Cuba 

In compliance with article II of the conven- 
tion between the United States and Cuba to 
suppress smuggling, signed at Habana, March 
11, 1926, which reads in part as follows : 

"The High Contracting Parties agree that 
clearance of shipments of merchandise by water, 
air, or land, from any of the ports of either 
country to a port of entry of the other country, 
shall be denied when such shipment comprises 
articles the importation of which is prohibited 
or restricted in the country to which such ship- 
ment is destined, unless in this last case there 
has been a compliance with the requisites de- 
manded by the laws of both countries." 

and in compliance with the laws of Cuba which 
restrict the importation of arms, ammunition, 
and implements of war of all kinds by requiring 
an import permit for each shipment, export 
licenses for shipments of arms, ammunition, and 
implements of war to Cuba are required for the 
articles enumerated below in addition to the 
articles enumerated in the President's proclama- 
tion of May 1, 1937: 



60 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



(1) Arms and small arms using ammunition 
of caliber .22 or less, other than those classed as 
toys. 

(2) Spare parts of arms and small arms of 
all kinds and calibers, other than those classed 
as toys, and of guns and machine guns. 

(3) Ammunition for the arms and small arms 
under (1) above. 

(4) Sabers, swords, and military machetes 
with cross-guaid hilts. 

(5) Explosives as follows : explosive powders 
of all kinds for all purposes ; nitrocellulose hav- 
ing a nitrogen content of 12 percent or less; 
diphenylamine; dynamite of all kinds; nitro- 
glycerine; alkaline nitrates (ammonium, potas- 
sium, and sodium nitrate); nitric acid; nitro- 
benzene (essence or oil of mirbane) ; sulphur; 
sulphuric acid ; chlorate of ]:)otash ; and acetones. 

(6) Tear gas (CH^COCH^Cl) and other 
similar nontoxic gases and apparatus designed 
for the storage or projection of such gases. 

The table piinted below indicates, in respect 
to licenses authorizing the exportation to Cuba 
of the articles and commodities listed in the 
preceding paragraph, issued by the Secretary 
of State during June 1940, the number of 
licenses and the value of the articles and com- 
modities described in the licenses : 



Number of licenses 


Section 


Value 


Total 


30 


(1) 

(2) 

(3) 

C5) 


$925. 00 

59.00 

8, 350. 50 

20, 296. 95 






$29. 631. 45 



The table printed below indicates the value 
of the articles and commodities listed above ex- 
ported to Cuba during June 1940 under licenses 
issued by the Secretary of State : 



(1) 

(2) 
(3) 
(6) 



Value 



$876. 30 

32.00 

6, 437. 00 

26, 734. 75 



Total 



$34, 080. 05 



Tin-Plate Scrap 

The table printed below indicates the number 
of licenses issued during the year 1940, up to 
and including the month of June, authorizing 
the export of tin-plate scrap under the provi- 



sions of the act approved February 15, 1936, 
and the regulations issued pursuant thereto, to- 
gether with the number of tons authorized to be 
exported and the value thereof : 



Country of destination 


June 1940 


6 months ending June 
30, 1940 


Quantity in 
long tons 


TotBl value 


Quantity in 
long tons 


Total 
value 




182 


$2,977.32 


2,966 


$56, 457. 70 









During the month of June, 4 tin-plate scrap 
licenses were issued, making a total of 47 such 
licenses issued during the current year. 

Heuum 

The table printed below gives the essential 
information in regard to the licenses issued 
during the month of Jime 1940, authorizing 
the exportation of helium gas under the pro- 
visions of the act approved on September 1, 
1937, and the regulations issued pursuant 
thereto : 



Applicant for license 


Purchaser in 
foreign country 


Country of 
destination 


Quan- 
tity in 
cubic 
feet 


Total 
value 


Bureau of Srientific 
Research of French 
Air Ministry. 


Bureau of Scien- 
tific Research 
of French Air 
Ministry. 


France 


90.000 


$1,680 




The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press July 27] 

Changes in the Foreign Service' since Jvly 
6, 1940: 

James Hugh Keeley, Jr., of California, 
Consul at Salonika, Greece, has been assigned 
for duty in the Department of State. 

Thormod O. Klath, of Sioux City, Iowa, 
Foreign Service officer, designated Commercial 
Attache at Oslo, Norway, has been designated 
Commercial Attache at Bern, Switzerland. 



JULY 27, 1940 



61 



Jesse F. Van Wickel, of Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Foreign Service officer, designated Commercial 
Attache at The Hague, Netherlands, has been 
assigned as Consul at Batavia, Java, Nether- 
lands Indies. 

Miss Frances E. Willis, of Redlands, Calif., 
Second Secretary of Embassy at Brussels, Bel- 
gium, has been designated Second Secretary 
of Embassy and Consul at Madrid, Spain. 

Thomas J. Mnleady, of Fall River, Mass., 
Second Secretary of Embassy and Consul at 
Bogota, Colombia, has been designated Second 
Secretary of Embassy at Caracas, Venezuela. 

Paul S. Guinn, of Pennsylvania, Foreign 
Service officer, designated Assistant Commer- 
cial Attache at Brussels, Belgium, has been 
assigned as Consul at Vienna, Germany. 

James C. H. Bonbright, of Rochester, N. Y., 
Second Secretary of Embassy at Brussels, Bel- 
gium, has been designated Second Secretary of 
Legation at Belgrade, Yugoslavia. 

Robert Janz, of Norman, Okla., now serving 
in the Department of State, has been assigned 
as Consul at Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

Donald D. Edgar, of Metuchen, N. J., Con- 
sul at Geneva, Switzerland, has been assigned 
for duty in the Department of State. 

John J. IMacdonald, of St. Louis, Mo., Third 
Secretary of Embassy at Nanking, China, has 
been designated Second Secretary of Embassy 
at Nanking, China. 

Guy W. Ray, of Wilsonville, Ala., Vice Con- 
sul at Porto Alegre, Brazil, has been assigned 
for duty in the Department of State. 



Howard Elting, Jr., of Chicago, 111., Third 
Secretary of Legation at The Hague, Neth- 
erlands, has been assigned as Vice Consul at 
Geneva, Switzerland. 

The assignment of Boies C. Hart, Jr., of 
Mystic, Conn., as Vice Consul at Genoa, Italy, 
has been canceled. Mr. Hart has now been 
assigned as Vice Consul at Shanghai, China. 

John Hubner, II, of Baltimore, Md., Vice 
Consul at Sao Paulo, Brazil, has been assigned 
as Vice Consul at Florianopolis, Brazil. 

Wallace W. Stuart, of Greeneville, Tenn., 
Vice Consul at Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, 
has been assigned as Vice Consul at Ciudad 
Juarez, Mexico. 

The assignment of William O. Boswell, of 
New Florence, Pa., as Vice Consul at Vienna, 
Germany, has been canceled. Mr. Boswell has 
now been assigned as Vice Consul at George- 
town, British Guiana, where an American Con- 
sulate will be established. 

Shiras Morris, Jr., of Hartford, Conn., Vice 
Consul at Montevideo, Uruguay, has been des- 
ignated Third Secretary of Legation at Monte- 
video and will serve in dual capacity. 

Hector C. Adam, Jr., of Brooklyn, N. Y., Vice 
Consul at Montevideo, Uruguay, has been desig- 
nated Third Secretary of Legation at Monte- 
video and will serve in dual capacity. 

V. Harwood Blocker, of Hondo, Tex., Vice 
Consul at Mexico City, Mexico, has been ap- 
pointed Vice Consul at Martinique, French 
West Indies, where an American Consulate will 
be established. 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



POSTAL 

Universal Postal Convention of 1939 

Costa Rica 

The American Minister to Costa Rica re- 
ported by a despatcli dated July 11, 1940, that 
the Diario Ojicial for July 6, 1940, publishes 
a decree whereby the Government of Costa 
Rica approves the Universal Postal Convention 
and annexes, the Parcel Post Arrangement and 
annexes, and the Money Order Arrangement 
and annexes, all signed at Buenos Aires on May 
23, 1939. 

Japan 

The American Ambassador to Japan reported 
by a despatch dated June 19, 1940, that the 
Official Gazette for June 15, 1940, publishes the 
ratification by Japan of the following acts 
signed at Buenos Aires on May 23, 1939: 

Universal Postal Convention, with final pro- 
tocol, provisions relating to transportation 
of air mail, and final protocol 

Arrangement Concerning Insured Letters and 
Boxes, with protocol 

Arrangementt Concerning Parcel Post, with 
protocol 

Arrangement Concerning Money Orders, with 
protocol 

Arrangement Concerning Postal Checks 

Arrangement Concerning Collection Orders. 



Universal Postal Convention, with final pro- 
tocol, regulations of execution, provisions re- 
lating to transportation of air mail, and 
final protocol 
Arrangement Concerning Insured Letters and 

Boxes 
Arrangement Concerning Parcel Post 
Arrangement Concerning Money Orders 
Arrangement Concerning Postal Checks 
Arrangement Concerning Collection Orders 
Arrangement Concerning Subscriptions to 
Newspapers and Periodicals. 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

International Telecommunication Conven- 
tion (Treaty Series Nos, 867 and 948) 

ParagvMy 

The American Minister to Paraguay re- 
ported by a despatch dated July 2, 1940, that 
accoi-ding to an announcement by the Ministry 
of Government and Labor on June 27, 1940, the 
Government of Paraguay has ratified the Inter- 
national Telecommunication Convention signed 
at Madrid on December 9, 1932, and the follow- 
ing acts signed at the International Telecom- 
munication Conference at Cairo, April 1938 : 

Telegi-aph Regulations, and final protocol (re- 
vision of Cairo, 1938) 

Telephone Regulations, and final protocol (re- 
vision of Cairo, 1938) 

General Radio Regulations, and final protocol 
(revision of Cairo, 1938) 

Additional Radio Regulations (revision of 
Cairo, 1938). 



Paragxmy 

The American Minister to Paraguay reported 
by a despatch dated July 2, 1940, that the Gov- 
ernment of Paraguay had ratified the follow- 
ing acts signed at Buenos Aires on May 23, 
1939: 



Publications 



Department of State 

Diplomatic List, July 1940. Publication 1481. ii, 91 pp. 
Subscription, $1 a year ; single copy 100. 



U. 5. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1940 



For Bale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPKOVAL OF THE DIBECTOK OV THE BUaEAU OF THE BUOQET 



62 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



-O Vy Jl yt Jl 4 






TIN 



Qontents 



AUGUST 3, 1940 
Vol. Ill: No. ^8 — Publication I^gi 



American Republics: 

Habana Meeting of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs: p«ge 

Statement of the Secretary of State 65 

Final Act and Convention 68 

Luncheon in honor of the Minister of Foreign Affairs of 

Paraguay 69 

United States naval and aviation missions to Peru ... 69 
Europe: 

Contributions for rehef in beUigerent countries: 

List of registrants 69 

Tabulation of contributions 70 

Repatriation of American citizens 80 

Commercial Policy: 

The National Foreign Trade Convention: 

Message of President Roosevelt 81 

Address by Assistant Secretary Grady : Taking Stock 

of Our Foreign-Trade Position 81 

Address by Raymond H. Geist: Reorganization 
Changes in the Foreign Service of the United 

States 87 

Statement by Raymond H. Geist: Administration of 

the Export Control Act 93 

Export of aviation gasoUne 94 

The Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 95 

Publications 95 

\(heT\ 




„OtNT OF DOCUMEl».'T« 

AUG 27 1940 



Treaty Information: 

Commerce : Page 
Treaties and agreements of the United States contain- 
ing the most-favored-nation clause 96 

Naval Missions: 

United States naval and aviation missions to Peru . . 98 

Legislation 99 



American Republics 



HABANA MEETING OF THE MINISTERS OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS 

Statement of the Secretary of State ^ 



[Released to tlie press July 30] 

The Habana Meeting of Foreign Ministers 
of the American Kepublics faced unprece- 
dented problems and conditions. 

Possibilities of danger to the peace, security, 
and welfare of the continent have been increas- 
ingly apparent in recent months and weeks. 
To meet them successfully it has been clear that 
the American nations must strengthen further 
their already strong ties of unity and solidaritj' 
and devise a constructive program for imple- 
menting, through consultation and cooperative 
action, effective means of continental protection 
and defense. 

We are confronted in this respect with three 
sets of problems and conditions: 

The first relates to the possible transfer of 
sovereignty at any time over certain islands 
and regions from one non-American state to 
another non-American state. 

The second involves the threat of subversive 
activities in the American nations directed 
from outside the continent. 

The third comprises extremely grave eco- 
nomic difficulties and dislocations resulting 
from war. 

With regard to all three of these sets of 
menacing conditions, the American govern- 
ments have manifested their full recognition of 
the dangers which confront them in common 
and have created machinery for common ac- 



' Delivered bv Mr. Hull at the close of the Meeting, 
Habana, July 30, 1940. 

251432 — 40 1 



tion. Instead of faltering and abandoning the 
spirit of unity and concerted steps for safety, 
they have demonstrated to the world their 
unalterable determination to preserve and 
strengthen the spirit and the system of conti- 
nental unity and solidarity. They have thus 
cleared the decks for effective action whenever 
such action may become necessary. 

The situation with respect to possessions 
in this hemisphere controlled by European 
powers for many years has for the first time 
become most acute by reason of the fact that 
the European territory of some of these powers 
is now under military occupation, and there 
exists the danger that change in sovereignty 
or control of any of these regions might make 
them objects of barter or a battleground for the 
settlement of differences between European na- 
tions. There also exists the danger that these 
regions might be used as a base for the carry- 
ing on of activities of a subversive character 
in the American countries. 

I cannot too strongly emphasize at this point 
that at no time has any American nation had 
the slightest thought of taking advantage of 
the European situation for the purpose of 
grabbing territory. Quite the contrary; the 
thought has been to protect the peace and 
safety of this continent. 

At the beginning of the meeting at Habana 
there was some difference of view as to the 
modus operandi for achieving the desired end 
in relation to the island possessions. In cer- 
tain quarters there was a feeling that until a 

65 



66 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



transfer of sovereignty or control had actually 
taken place it would be sufficient to have no 
more than a general declaration reasserting the 
principle of solidarity and consultation agreed 
upon at previous conferences. 

On the other hand, there was a strong feeling 
on the part of other delegations, including that 
of the United States, that having in mind the 
situation now obtaining in Europe, the fact 
that a transfer of sovereignty might be made 
overnight with or without formality and that 
activities in these regions detrimental to the 
peace and safety of the Americas might be 
begim momentarily, it was necessary to formu- 
late at this meeting definite methods of pro- 
cedure to cope with any situation that might 
thus arise. 

It was realized that provision should be 
made for prompt action in any emergency 
situation and that delay pending later con- 
sultation might be disastrous to the mainte- 
nance of peace and order in the Western Hemi- 
sphere. Happily, such differences of view as 
at first appeared to exist were reconciled, with 
the result that the Meeting of the Foreign Min- 
isters has unanimously agreed upon two docu- 
ments designed to take care of any situation 
that may arise. These documents consist of 
(1) a convention and (2) a declaration and 
resolution referred to as the Act of Habana. 

The convention contains definite provisions 
for the administration of any region which it 
may be found necessary for the American 
republics to administer. It has the twofold 
purpose of protecting the peace and safety of 
the American republics and of safeguarding 
and advancing the interests and welfare of 
the inhabitants of the region. 

The administration, which will be under an 
"Inter-American Commission of Territorial 
Administration", is to be provisional in char- 
acter and is to continue only until such time as 
the region is in a position to govern itself or is 
restored to its former status — whenever the 
latter is compatible with the security of the 
American republics — whichever of these al- 
ternatives shall be found to be the more prac- 
ticable and just. 



The convention condemns all violence, 
whether under the form of conquest, of stipu- 
lations imposed by belligerents in treaties, or 
by any other process, and states that no trans- 
fer or attempt to transfer or to acquire any in- 
terest or right in any such region shall be rec- 
ognized or accepted by the American repub- 
lics, regardless of the form that may be 
employed to attain such purposes. 

Temporary provisions in the Act of Habana 
are designed primarily to cover situations that 
may arise prior to the coming into force of 
the convention, which will require ratifica- 
tion by the various governments. They au- 
thorize the creation of an emergency committee 
composed of a representative of each of the 
American republics, which is to be regarded as 
constituted when two thirds of the members 
shall have been appointed. The appointments 
are to be made promptly. Should the com- 
mittee be under the necessity of administering 
any region before the effective date of the 
convention, it will utilize the applicable pro- 
visions of the convention. 

The act also recognizes the possibility of 
emergency situations and the right of any of 
the American republics, acting singly or jointly 
with others, to proceed in any manner required 
in its own defense or in the defense of the con- 
tinent. If action is taken as an emergency 
measure, the matter is to be placed before the 
committee as soon as practicable in order that 
it may adopt appropriate measures. 

The spirit of unity and solidarity has been 
likewise strengthened by the action of the con- 
ference on projects relating to subversive ac- 
tivities. I refer especially to the attitude 
toward propaganda designed on the one hand 
to stir up dissension in the Western Hemi- 
sphere by beguiling and misleading the people, 
and, on the other hand, to intimidate them by 
express or implied threats of what may happen 
if the American republics fail to recognize and 
to take into account the foreign purposes and 
policies of certain foreign governments. These 
activities at times have been in the nature of 
oral or written representations and at other 
times in the form of a promiscuous circulation 



AtTGXTST 3, 1940 



67 



of literature. In pursuing these policies, the 
personnel of diplomatic and consular missions 
has been increased out of all proportion to the 
needs for legitimate functions of such missions. 
It is well known that members of diplomatic 
missions have well-recognized functions and 
that the members of such missions are clothed 
with special immunities. When they engage 
in activities foreign to those that are recog- 
nized, they abuse their immunities, and the 
govei-nment tiiat has received them may well 
be concerned. Likewise, the functions of con- 
sular officers are generally defined in interna- 
tional law and practice, and the officers 
themselves enjoy certain special consideration 
by the local authorities. But when such offi- 
cials engage in activities divorced from the 
customary consular functions, they abuse the 
hospitality of the state in which they serve. 

That situations of the foregoing character 
have developed in many of the American re- 
publics, has been generallj' known for some 
time past. 

This Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs 
has taken cognizance of these matters in sev- 
eral resolutions, particularly the one relating 
to activities directed from abroad against do- 
mestic institutions and that relating to inter- 
American development of standards on diplo- 
matic officers. 

The first-mentioned resolution recites that 
the American republics have equal concern and 
equal responsibility for the preservation of 
peace and security of this hemisphere, and that 
each shall adopt all necessary measures to pre- 
vent and suppress activities directed, assisted, 
or abetted by foreign governments or foreign 
groups or individuals which tend to subvert 
the domestic institutions or to foment disorder 
in the internal political life of the Americas. 
It also provides for immediate consultation in 
the event that the peace of any of the Ameri- 
can republics is menaced by such activities and 
for a full interchange of information regard- 
ing subversive activities within their respective 
jurisdictions. 

In a word, there is in the resolution a defi- 
nite recognition by the American governments 



of an intrusion upon their hospitality and a 
disregard of their desire to live in peace, freed 
from systems of government and of interna- 
tional policies which are foreign to the pre- 
cepts of free and liberal mstitutions upon 
which the democracies of this hemisphere are 
based. The Habana Meeting recognized the 
common interest of all of the American repub- 
lics in these mattei'S and showed determination 
to maintain a solid front against any incur- 
sions. The resolution concerning improper ac- 
tivities of diplomatic and consular agencies sets 
forth the underlying principles relating to the 
functions of such missions and calls upon the 
respective governments to take action to pre- 
vent and suppi'ess such activities. 

In these, as in other matters of a kindred 
character discussed and acted upon by the Con- 
ference, there has been demonstrated not only 
a desire but a zeal and determination to face 
movements of a subversive character with a 
solid and united front. The American repub- 
lics have resolved that the political institutions 
and aggressive practices of other nations shall 
not be imposed upon the free and independent 
peoples of this hemisphere. 

In the economic field, too, we set out to 
examine together the dangers and difficulties 
confronting all of the American nations and 
to consult as to the best means of meeting them. 
The task was approached with a strong con- 
viction shared by all that the present state of 
affairs, as well as the outlook for the future, 
imperatively calls for the creation of instru- 
mentalities of economic defense that must nec- 
essarily gain in effectiveness in proportion to 
the degree of common action and cooperative 
effort which they represent. 

All of our nations are faced today with the 
distressing consequences of war-created disrup- 
tion of world trade. Surpluses of commodi- 
ties, the exportation of which is essential to the 
economic life of the American republics, have 
accumulated and continue to accumulate be- 
cause Europe at war is unable to absorb them. 
Their existence is a matter of serious concern 
throughout the continent. In addition, we 
must envisage the possibility that, after the 



68 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTTlXiETIN 



termination of hostilities, many important 
European markets for these commodities may 
be directed and controlled by governments 
•which regard international commerce as an 
instrument of domination rather than as a 
means of enabling all nations to share fully 
and on a basis of equality in a mutually bene- 
ficial exchange of their surplus products. 

The resolution on economic cooperation 
adopted by the Habana Meeting is designed to 
create and set into operation machinery of 
action to deal with and meet both of these 
situations. 

In that resolution the 21 American republics 
reafiu'med their adherence to liberal principles 
of international trade — those of equal treat- 
ment, of fair practices, and of peaceful motives. 
They declared their determination to apply 
these principles in their relations with each 
other as fully as present circumstances permit 
and their readiness to conduct trade in accord- 
ance with these principles with any non-Ameri- 
can country prepared to do likewise. 

At the same time, they announced their pur- 
pose "to devise and apply apf)ropriate means 
of effective action to cope with the difficulties, 
disadvantages, and dangers arising from the 
present disturbed and dislocated world condi- 
tions". 

It was the unanimous opinion of the Habana 
Meeting that continuing consultation among 
the American republics is essential to the at- 
tainment of these pressing objectives. Accord- 
ingly, it was decided to strengthen and expand 
the activities of the existing Inter-American 
Economic and Financial Advisory Committee 
as an agency of such consultation. The 
Habana Meeting sjiecifically instructed the 
Committee to proceed at once with the prepa- 
ration of detailed plans for cooperative tempo- 
rary handling and orderly marketing of 
existing and prospective surpluses; for the 
development, where feasible, of commodity 



production and marketing agreements and ar- 
rangements; and for the promotion among the 
American nations of mutually beneficial trade. 
The Committee was also instructed to devise 
methods of increasing consumption in the 
American re^jublics, through relief and in other 
ways, which would aid in the disposal of sur- 
plus commodities. Finally, the Committee was 
instructed to consider, while these measures 
and plans are being developed, the possibility 
of a broader system of inter- American coopera- 
tive organization in matters of trade, credit, 
money, foreign exchange, et cetera. 

Some of the measures proposed can be put 
into operation very quickly. Some will re- 
quire a certain amount of time for the matur- 
ing and execution of appropriate plans. Taken 
in its entirety, the program of action which is 
envisaged is flexible enough to apply to any 
emergency and effective enough to make it pos- 
sible for each of the American republics to 
meet moi-e fully the difficulties resulting from 
war-disrupted trade and to safeguard itself 
from possible dangers of economic subordina- 
tion from abroad. 

It is a system of economic defense under 
which the American republics will be prepared 
to trade with any nation willing to meet them 
in good faith, in a spirit of friendly and peace- 
ful purpose, and on a plane of frank and fair 
dealing; and under which they will be fully 
equipped to protect themselves against any 
other kind of dealing. 

Final Act and Convention 

The Final Act and Convention of the Sec- 
ond Meeting of the Ministers of Foreign Af- 
fairs of the American Republics at Habana, 
which were released to the press August 3, 
1940, will not be printed in the Bulletin until 
the certified copy of official texts has been 
received. 



AUGUST 3, 1940 



69 



LUNCHEON IN HONOR OF THE MIN- 
ISTER OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS OF 
PARAGUAY 

[Released to the press August 3] 

The following guests attended the luncheon 
given on August 3, 1940 by the Secretary of 
State in honor of the Minister of Foreign Af- 
fairs of Paraguay, Seiior Dr. Don Tomas A. 
Salomon! : 

The Secretary of State 

The Under Secretary of State 

His Excellency Sefior Dr. Don Tomfts A. Salomoni, 
Minister of Foreign Affairs of Paraguay 

The Honorable Sefior Dr. Uoracio A. Fernfindez, the 
Minister of Paraguay 

His Exopllency Seiior Don Alberto Cabero, the Am- 
bassador of Cliile 

The Honorable Dr. Oscar Schnake, Chairman of the 
Chilean Delegation to the Habana Conference 

Senator Rodolfo Michels, Member of the Chilean 
Delegation to tlie Habana Conference 

The Honorable Kenneth McKellar 

The Honorable Arthur Capper 

The Honorable Claude Pepper 

The Honorable Hamilton Fish 

The Honorable Sol Bloom 



The Honorable Jesse Jones 

The Honorable Green H. Hackworth 

The Honorable George T. Summerlin 

Mr. Leo Pasvolsky 

The Honorable L. S. Rowe 

Mr. W. L. Pierson 

Mr. Thomas H. MacDonald 

Mr. Laurence Duggan 

Mr. Michael J. McDermott 

Mr. Hobart Montee 

Mr. J. C. Stark 

Mr. James H. Baird 



UNITED STATES NAVAL AND AVIA- 
TION MISSIONS TO PERU 

An announcement regarding the agreements 
between the United States and Peru, signed 
July 31, 1940, providing for the renewal by the 
United States of a naval mission and for the 
furnishing of an aviation mission to cooperate 
with the Ministry of Marine and Aviation of 
Peru, appears in this Bulletin under the head- 
ing "Treaty Information". 



Europe 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 

List of Registrants 



[Released to the press August 1] 

The following persons and organizations have 
registered with the Secretary of State for the 
solicitation and collection of contributions pur- 
suant to section 8 of the Neutrality Act of 
1939 to be used in belligerent countries for med- 
ical aid and assistance or for food and clothing 
to relieve human suffering (the countries to 
which contributions are being sent are given in 
parentheses) :^ 



' For prior registrants, see the Bulletin of April 27, 
1940 (Tol. U, no. 44), pp. 443-450, and June 8, 1940 
(vol. II, no. 50), p. 626. 



331. Vincennes, France, Committee of Vincennes, 
Ind., 112 North Seventh Street, Vincennes, Ind. 
(France) 

332. Soci6t^ Israelite Frangaise de Secours Mutuels 
de New York, care of Mr. Gaston Meyer, Secre- 
tary, 2305 Grand Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
(France) 

333. Belgian War Relief Fund, care of Mr. L. V. 
Casteleyn, 344 Regina Building, Manila, P. I. 
(Belgium) 

334. British American Ambulance Corps, 420 Lexing- 
ton Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain and 
France) 

335. Allied Food Relief Committee,' 46 Cedar Street, 
New York, N. Y. (England and France) 



'Revoked at request of registrant. 



70 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



336. Tbe Seventh Column, Inc., West Fairlee, Vt. 
(France and England) 

337. Fi-iends of Children, Inc., 38 West Forty-fourth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain, France, 
Belgium, and the Netherlands) 

338. Belgian Relief Fund, Inc., Room 426, Graybar 
Building, 420 Lexington Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
(Belgium, France, and England) 

339. United British War Relief As.soelation, 16 
Sargent Avenue, Somerville, Mass. (Great Britain 
and Northern Ireland) 

340. Independent British War Relief Society of 
Rhode Island, Columbia Hall, 24S Weybosset 
Street, Providence, R. I. (Great Britain) 

341. St. Andrews (Scottish) Society of Washington, 
D. C, care of Robert A. Grahame, Inc., 1524 K 
Street, NW., Washington, D. C. (Scotland) 

342. French War Relief Fund of Nevada, 210 South 
Center Street, Reno, Nev. (France) 

343. Ukrainian Relief Committee, 78 St. Marks Place, 
New York, N. Y. (Germany, France, England, and 
Italy) 

344. The New Canaan Workshop, New Canaan, Conn. 
(British Empire) 

345. Nicole de Paris Relief Fund, 23 East Fifty-fifth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 

346. International Federation of Business and Pro- 
fessional Women, Hotel Biltmore, Madison Avenue 
and Forty-third Street, New York, N. Y. (Poland, 



Czechoslovakia, Norway, Belgium, Holland, and 
France) 

347. American Board of Missions to the Jews, Inc., 
27 Throop Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. (France, Bel- 
gium, and Germany) 

348. Great Lakes Command, Canadian Legion of the 
British Empire Service League, care of Walter 
Keith, Adjutant, 1492 Hurlbut Avenue, Detroit, 
Mich. (Great Britain and Canada) 

349. Scottish Games of New Jersey Association, Box 
23, Fairhaven, N. J. (Great Britain) 

350. Franco-American Federation, Corner of Salem 
and Dow Streets, Salem, Mass. (France) 

351. Refugees of England, Room 607, 511 Fifth Ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

352. American Friends of German Freedom, 342 
Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. (England and 
France) 

353. The Louisiana Guild for BriHsh Relief, 4534 St. 
Charles Avenue, New Orleans, La. (Briti-sh Em- 
pire) 

354. The American Hospital in Brit^iin, Ltd., 321 
East Forty-second Street, New York, N. Y. (Great 
Britain) 

355. Czechoslovak Relief, 4049 West Twenty-sixth 
Street, Chicago, 111. (Czechoslovakia, Great 
Britain and dominions, France, and Belgium) 



Tabulation of Contributions 



[Eelcased to the press July 31] 

The following tabulation shows contributions 
collected and disbursed during the period of 
September 6, 1939, through June 30, 1940, as 
shown in the reports submitted by persons and 
organizations registered with the Secretary of 
State for the solicitation and collection of con- 
tributions to be used for relief in belligerent 
countries, in conformity with the regulations 
issued pursuant to section 8 of the act of Novem- 
ber 4, 1939, as made effective by the President's 
proclamation of the same date. 

This tabulation has reference only to contri- 
butions solicited and collected for relief in bel- 
ligerent countries (France; Germany; Poland; 
the United Kingdom, India, Australia, Canada, 
New Zealand, and the Union of South Africa ; 
Norway; Belgimn; Luxemburg; the Nether- 
lands ; and Italy) or for the relief of refugees 



driven out of these countries by the present 
war. The statistics set forth in the tabulation 
do not include information regarding relief ac- 
tivities which a number of organizations reg- 
istered with the Secretary of State may be 
carrying on in nonbelligerent countries, but for 
which registration is not required under the 
Neutrality Act of 1939. 

The American National Red Cross is required 
by law to submit to the Secretary of War for 
audit "a full, complete, and itemized report of 
receipts and expenditures of whatever kind". 
In order to avoid an unnecessary duplication of 
work, this organization is not required to con- 
form to the provisions of the regulations 
governing the solicitation and collection of con- 
tributions for relief in belligerent countries, and 
the tabulation does not, therefore, include 
information in regard to its activities. 



AUGUST 3, 1940 



71 



Contributions fob Relief in Belligebent Countries 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and destination of 
contributions 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds 
spent for 
adminis- 
tration, 
publicity, 

afifairs. 

campaigns, 

etc. 



Unespended 
balance as of 
June 30, 1940, 

including 

cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

hand 



Estimated 
value of 

contribu- 
tions in 

kind sent 
to coun- 
tries 
named 



Estimated 
value of 

contribu- 
tions in 

kind now 
on hand 



Accion Democrata Espafiola, San Francisco, Calif., Mar. 29, 1940. 
France - - 

Allied Food Relief Committee, New York, N. Y., June 12, 1940.« 

England and France -- - 

Allied Relief Ball, Inc., New York, N. Y., Apr. 4, 1940. Great Britain 

and France - - 

Allied Relief Fund (formerly French and British Relief Funds, 

registered Oct. 1939; combined June 4, IMO), New York. N. Y. The 

United Kingdom, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Norway. . 
American Association for .\ssistance to French Artists, Inc., New 

York, N. Y.. Jan. 3, 1940. France - 

American Association of Teachers of French— Washington Chapter, 

Washington, D. C, Apr. 24, 1940.' France -. 

American Association of University Women, Washington. D. C. May 

23, 1940. France and Great Britain - 

American Auxiliary Committee de I,*Union des Femmes de France, 

New York, .N. Y. Nov. 8, 1939. France _. 

American Civilian Volimtcers, South Sudbury, Mass. May 27, 1940. 

France - 

.\mcrican Committee for Christian Refugees, Inc., New York, N. Y. 

Sept. 20, 1939. Germany and France 

American Committee for the Gorman Relief Fund, Inc., New York, 

N, Y. Mar. 27, 1940. Germany and Poland -.. 

American Committee for the Polish .\uil>ulance Fund, Chicago, HI. 

Feb. 12, 1910. France and Poland 

American Denial .\mbulance Committee, New York, N. Y. Mar. 12, 

1940. United Kingdom 

American Emeruoncy Volunteer Ambulance Corps, Inc^ New York, 

N. Y. Jan. 26, 1940. Great Britain and Franco 

American Employment for General Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y. 

May 1, 1910. England, France, Norway, i'oland, Belgium, Luxem- 
burg and the Netherlands 

American Field Service, New York, N. Y. Sept. 27, 1939. France and 

Great Britain - - 

American and French Students' Correspondence Exchange, New 

York.N.Y. Dec. 20, 1939. France - - --. 

American- French War Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y. Sept. 14, 1939. 

France. - 

American Friends of Czechoslovakia, New York, N. Y. Nov. 2, 

1939. Great Britain, France and Bohemia-Moravia 

American Friends of the Daily Sketch War Relief Fund, New York, 

N. Y. Dec. 1, 1939. Great Britain 

American Friends of France, Inc., New York, N. Y. Sept. 21, 1939. 

France 

American Friends of a Jewish Palestine, Inc., New Y'ork, N. Y. May 

9, 1940. Palestine, Germany. Poland, France, and United Kingdom. 
American Friends Service Committee. Philadelphia, Pa. Nov. 9, 

1939. United Kingdom, Poland, Germany, France, Norway, Bel- 
gium, and the Netherlands. 

The American Fund for Breton Relief, New York, N. Y. Oct. 31, 

1939. France --- 

American Fund for French Wounded, Inc., Boston, Mass. Jan. 3, 

1940. France - 

American Fund for Woimded in France, Inc., Worcester, Mass. Dec. 

15, 1939. France.--- - -- 

American-German Aid Society, Los Angeles, Calif. Nov. 16, 1939. 
Germany _ 



$204.09 
None 

.W. 889. 35 

522, 49fi. 49 

11,007.94 

310.86 

1,208.90 

12, 916. 31 

None 

11,801.86 

24, 995. 00 

26. 346. 16 

3, 039. 62 

None 

1. 953. 50 

239, 975. 51 

7, 079. 09 

33,861.93 

22, 456. 99 

1, 357. 00 

263. 222. 74 

2,209.22 

53, 618. 13 
6, 080. 17 

II, 168. 88 

200.00 

3, 767. 06 



$12,1. 00 

None 

34. 184. 00 

324, 807. 03 

7, 236. 80 

212.00 

225.00 

6, 188. 61 

None 

11,801.86 

None 

None 

2, 179. 76 

None 

None 

78,624.86 

3, 024. 85 

16, 938. 73 

13,231.32 

1,357.00 

146. 680. 94 

329.02 

49,571.10 
3, 786. 50 
7, 325. 36 

None 
None 



$3.1. 51 

None 

12, 179. 29 

27, 665. 85 

2, 675. 82 

98.85 

45.50 

1, 054. 98 

None 

None 

3,316.27 

1, 454. 04 

81.60 

None 

764 11 

5, 462. 69 

494.68 

3, 307. 78 
3, 665. 5S 

None 

17, 232. 48 

1. 423. 77 

4, 047. 03 
263.11 
326. 42 
None 
998.67 



$43.58 

None 

4, 526. 06 

170, 123. 61 

1,095.32 

None 

938.40 

6, 672. 72 

None 

None 

21, 678. 73 

24, 892. 12 

778. 27 

None 

1, 189. 39 

165. 987. 96 

3, 669. 66 

13. 606. 42 

6.680.09 

None 

99, 309. 32 

456.43 

None 

1, 030. 56 
3, 507. 10 

200.00 

2, 768. 38 



None 
None 
None 

$18,323.75 

1.605. 15 

None 

None 

2, 593. 87 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

39, 329. 82 

18, 440. 00 

None 

11.256.11 

None 

12, 473. 42 
4,611.60 

3, 660. 62 

None 
None 



None 
None 
None 

$13, 242. 82 
None 
None 
None 
197. 87 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 

1,553.00 
None 
None 

2, 291. 96 
None 

None 
None 
1, 183. 00 
None 
None 



• The registration of this organization was revoked on June 30. 1940, at the request of registrant. 
' The registration of this organization was revoked on May 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 

251432—40 2 



72 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Codntries — Contmued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and destination of 
contributions 


Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Funds 
spent for 
adminis- 
tration, 
publicity, 

affairs, 

campaigns, 

etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
June 30 1940, 

including 

cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

hand 


Estimated 
value of 
contri- 
butions 
in kind 
sent to 

countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of 
contri- 
butions 
in kind 
now on 
hand 


The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, Inc., New York, 

N. Y. Sept. 29, 1939.' All belligerent countries. 

American McAIl Association. New York, N. Y. Jan. 3, 1940. France- 
American Volunteer Ambulance Corps, New York, N. Y. Dec. 12, 


$1,344,5,84. 11 
637. 32 

220, 497. 55 
1,027.11 

2, 409. 72 
1,031. 10 
6. 663. 83 

10. 239. 68 

1, 138. 26 

15,371.88 
17, 869. 16 

10,808.14 

3, 163. 56 

2, 799. 27 

8, 576. 89 
273. 60 
187.83 

1,912.46 

9, 787. 94 
1. 089. 16 

1. 203. 40 

4, 677. 25 
3,109.96 


$1, 250, 852. 82 
417. 45 

98, 296. 82 
139. 59 

1,700.00 
625.00 
161.06 

6, 000. 00 

386.88 

7. 664. 08 
16,983.14 

7. 000. 00 

60.00 

2, 600. 00 

6, 766. 46 

225.00 

133. 30 

1, 000. 00 

3,97.3.00 

612.00 

975. 00 

1,835.00 

1,700.00 


$93, 731. 29 
None 

10, 430. 25 
265. 07 

41.47 

317.07 

5,464.64 

216. 18 

289. 22 

260.83 
450. 76 

288.46 

201. 00 

7.50 
453. 10 
None 

6.33 

85.67 
542.31 
97. IB 

117.65 

I, 287. 60 

433.88 


None 
$219. 87 

111,770.48 
622. 46 

068.25 

189. 09 

1, 048. 24 
4,023.50 

462. 16 

7, 446. 97 
429. 26 

3, 619. 69 

2, 912. 55 
101.77 

1,357.34 

48.60 

49.20 

826. 79 

5, 272. 63 

480. 00 

110.75 

1, 464. 65 

976. 08 


$51.00 
760.00 

1,500.00 
None 

None 

None 

4, 807. 15 

650.00 

164.00 

873. 26 
None 

None 

None 

None 

1,430.00 

None 

None 

None 

932. 18 

30.00 

None 

None 

1, 800. 00 


None 
$200.00 

None 


American War Godmothers, Pittsburgh, Pa. Mar. 6, 1940. France, 
American Women's Hospitals, New York, N. Y. Sept. 14, 1939. 


2.45 
None 


American Women's Unit for War Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y. Jan. 
1.5 1940 '' France - - - 


None 


American Women's Voluntary Services, Inc., New York, N. Y. Feb. 




Les Amis de la France k Puerto Rico, San Juan, P. R. Dec. 20, 1939. 


7.77 


hes Araitifes F6minines de la France, New York, N. Y. Dec. 19, 
1939. France - -- 


None 


Les Anciens Combattauts Fran^ais de la Grande Guerre, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. Oct 26, 1939. France - 


None 


Mrs Larz \nderson Boston, Mass Dec 12, 1939. France 


None 


Anthracite Relief Committee, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Sept. 8, 1939. 




Anzac War Relief Fund, New York, N. Y. May 23, 1940. Australia 


None 


Associated Polish Societies Relief Committee of Webster, Mass., 
Webster, Mass Sept 21, 1939. Poland . . .. 


None 


Associated Polish Societies' Relief Committee of Worcester, Mass., 


None 


Association of Former Juniors in France of Smith College, New York, 
N y. Dec. 18, 1939. France - 


Nod 


Association of Former Russian Naval OflBcers in America, Now York, 


None 


Association of Joint Polish-American Societies of Chelsea, Mass., 
Chelsea Mass. Sept. 15, 1939. Poland 


None 


I,' Atelier, San Francisco, Calif. Jan. 29, 1940. France - 

Mrs. Mark Baldwin, New York, N. Y. Mar. 4, 1940. France 

Basque Delegation in the United States of America, New York,N. Y. 


1,190.00 
None 

None 


Belgian Relief Fund, fnc, New York, N.Y. June 14, 1940. Belgium, 
France, and England - 

Belgian Relief of Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif. May 27. 
1940 Belgium _ . - 


None 
1,200.00 






The Benedict Bureau Unit, Inc., New York, N. Y. Nov. 29, 1939. 
France - 


5,471.17 

2. 739. 16 

7,211.65 

334, 834. 74 

6, 177. 10 


846. 74 

463.65 

5, 892. 20 

1S6, 324. 31 

4, 770. 50 


929.33 

2, 072. 51 

1, 237. 35 

46.23 

728.69 


3, 695. 10 

203.00 

82.10 

178, 464. 20 

677.91 


None 
None 
None 
None 

None 


None 


Beth-Lechem, Inc., New York, N. Y. Sept. 21, 1939. Poland, 


None 


Bethel Mission of Poland, Incorporated, Minneapolis, Minn. Nov. 
27,1939. Poland 


None 


Bishops' Committee for Polish Relief, Washington, D. C, Dec. 19, 
1939. Poland 


None 


Board of National Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United 
States of America, New York, N. Y. Sept. 26, 1939. Great Britain. 
France, and Germany , 


None 



< It will be noted that the figures for receipts and disbursements here reported are less than those appearing for this organization in the Department's 
press release- of June 24 f^ee the Bulletin of June 29, 1940, vol. II. no. 53, p. 709). This is due to the fact that the organization, at the request of the De- 
partment, has segreeated its records uf receipts and disbursements in belligerent countries for medical aid and assistance and for food and clothing to relieve 
human suffering from its records of receipts and disbursements for other relief. The figures reported by the organization are as of Apr. 30, 1940. Reports 
for the montlis (if May and June are still in course of preparation. 

"* No report for the month of June has been received from this organization. 

* No complete reports for the months of May and June have been received from this organization. 

/ No report has been received from this organization. 



AUGUST 3, 1940 



73 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, dato of roi^istration, and destination of 
contributions 



Britlsli-American Ambulance Corps, Now York, N. Y. June 11, 1940. 

England and France .-. - 

British- American Comfort League, Quincy, Mass. Feb. 21, 1940. 

England - 

BrltishAmcrican War Relief Association, Seattle, Wash. Nov. 17, 

1939. United Kingdom and allied countries- 

British Sailors' Book and Relief Society, New York, N. Y. May 2, 

1940. Burmuda, Canada, ami the British West Indies 

British War Relief .Association of Northern California, San Francisco, 

Calif. Oct. 20, 1939. Oreat Britain and France 

The British War Relief Association of the Philippines, Manila, P. I. 

Apr. U, 1940. • All belligerent countries 

The British War Relief Association of Southern California, Los 

Angeles, Calif. Dec. 8, 1939. Great Britain 

British War Relief Society, Inc., Now York, N. Y. Dec. 4, 1939. 

Oreat Britain 

Bundles for BritaUi, New York, N. Y. Dec. 28, 1939. Oreat Britain 

and Dominions 

Caledonian Club of Idaho, Boise, Idaho. Jan. 25, 1910. Scotland 

Catholic Medical Mission Board, Inc., New York, N. Y. Jan. 17, 

1940. India, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the Union of 

South .\(rica - 

The Catholic Student War Relief to Pat Romana, Washington, D. C. 

Dec. 13, 1939. Poland, France, Germany, and Great Britain 

Central Bureau for Relief of the Evangelical Churches of Europe, 

New York. N.Y. May 14. 1940 .\11 belllaerent countries 

Central Committee Knesseth Israel, New York, N. Y. Get. 27, 1939. 

Palestine 

Central Committee for Polish Relief, Toledo, Ohio. Feb. 29, 1940. 

Poland - 

Central Committee of the United Polish Societies, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Sept. 14, 1939. Poland 

Central Council of Polish Organizations, New Castle, Pa. Nov. 7, 

1939. England, Poland, and France 

Central Council of Polish Organizations in Pittsburgh, Pa., Pittsburgh, 

Pa. Sept. 14, 1939.' Poland.. .-. 

Centrala, Passaic, N. J. Oct. 12, 1939. Poland 

Cercle Franfais de Seattle, Seattle, Wash. Nov. 2, 1939. France and 

Oreat Britain. 

Chester (Delaware Co., Fa.) Polish Relief Committee, Chester, Pa. 

Sept. 15, 1939. Poland and France 

Children's Crusade for Children, Inc., New York, N. Y. Feb. 3, 

1940. France, Poland, and Germany _ 

Commission for Polish Relief, Inc., New York, N.Y. Sept 12, 1939.' 

Poland _ 

The Commission for Relief in Belgium, Inc., New York, N. Y. May 

21, 1940. Belgium and Lu.vemburg 

Committee for .\id to Children of Mobilized Men of the XX" Arron- 

dissement of Paris, New York, N. Y. Jan. 15, 1940. France 

Committee of French-American Wives, New York, N. Y. Nov. 15, 

1939. France 



Funds 
received 



$54, 092. 67 

818.04 

7, 803. 97 

104.30 

28, 685. Ti 



64,415.20 
189,031.67 



42,358 48 
477.64 



1, 074. 25 
945. U 

6,944.47 

22. 656. 94 

707.00 

6, 673. 72 

2. 190. 38 

28, 746. 57 
1, 412. 57 

1, 982. 34 

6,361.37 

175, 535. 49 

308, 744. 43 

42, 075. 92 

4, 923. 40 

15, 087. 08 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$11,500.00 

110.00 

4, 196. 40 

30.00 

22, 182. 12 



46, 126. 12 
45, 477. 65 



8, 692. 48 
300.30 



None 

704.50 

1, 709. 00 

13, 322. 58 

600.00 

5, 319. 70 

1,754.00 

23, 9.56. 09 
1, 300. 75 

658.28 

5, 455. 46 

None 

245,817.31 

4.165.00 

3, 365. 63 

9,414.33 



Funds 
spent for 
adminis- 
tration, 
publicity, 

affairs, 

campaigns, 

etc. 



None 

$14S. 72 

961.04 

55.00 

1,032.48 



5, 448. 58 

18, 108. 67 

12, 889. 04 
184.57 

None 

109.91 

1, 101. f6 

9, 334. 36 

98.14 

48 40 

37.00 

367.22 
11.65 

427. 33 

530.47 

52,419.35 

41, 945. 66 

131.21 

None 

1,343.01 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
June 30, 1940, 

including 
cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

hand 



$42, 592. 67 

559. 32 

2, 646. 53 

19.30 

5, 470. 62 



12, 810. 50 
1 A 445. 35 



20, 796. 96 
12.77 



1, 074. 25 
131.43 

4.073.91 

None 

108.80 

305. 62 

399.38 

4, 423. 26 
100.17 

996.73 

375. 44 

123, 116.14 

20,981.46 

37, 779. 71 

1, 557. 77 

4, 329. 74 



Estimated 
vahie of 
contri- 
butions 
in kind 
sent to 

countries 
named 



None 
None 
$85.00 
250.00 
6, 064. 41 



3, 040. 07 
11,241.05 



25, 958. 44 
None 



2, 510. 00 
None 
None 
None 
None 

1, 461. 95 

None 

23, 321. 69 
1,900.00 

525.00 

1,677.30 

None 

1,500.00 

None 

None 

3, 012. 84 



Estimated 
value of 
contri- 
butions 
in kind 
now on 
band 



None 
None 
None 
None 
None 



None 
$1,250.00 



8, 036. 60 
None 



1, 050. 00 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

950.00 
None 

1,215.00 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
572. 75 



• No report has been received from this organization. 

» The registration of this organization was revoked on May 31, 1910, at the request of registrant. 

* This registrant serves primariy as a clearingh?use for the distribution abrcid of contributions received from other registrants; these receipts and 
disbursements are not included in the figures here given, since they are shown elsewhere in this tabulation followmg the names of the original collecting 
registrants. 



74 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and destination of 
contributions 


Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Funds 
spent for 
adminis- 
tration, 
publicity, 

aflfairs, 

campaigns, 

etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Juno 30, 1940, 

including 
cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

hand 


Estimated 
value of 
contri- 
butions 
in kind 
sent to 

countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of 
contri- 
butions 
in kind 
now on 
hand 


Committee of Mercy, Inc., New York, N. Y. Sept. 16, 1939. France, 
Great Britain, Norway, Belgium, the Netherlands, and their allies_. 

Committee for Relief in Allied Countries, Washington, D. C. Feb. 
2, 1940. France, Great Britain, Poland, Norway, Belgium, Lux- 


$44,048.16 

4, 623. 03 
2, 426. 23 
7, 359. 48 

197. 00 

29. 379. 64 

4,806.10 

18, 104. 56 

225. 00 

5, 003. 37 
4, 244. 77 
5,397.85 
4,641 05 

615. 92 

579. 21 
125. 55 

197, 28.1. 17 

74, 259. 90 

6, 760. 22 

2, 743. 58 

729. 07 

33, 609. 80 


$24, 566. 41 

2, 716. 00 

2. 162. 72 
6, 142. 39 

197. GO 

12, 696. 23 

None 

12, 788. 84 

None 

4, 409. 75 

1,892.49 

801. 09 

3, 770. 76 

647. 44 

531. 21 
123. 60 

123, 222. 74 

41,414.67 
3, 920. 00 

971. 53 

306. 34 

20, 175. 49 


$4, 922. 34 

1, 805. 60 
256.71 
725. 91 

None 

5. 207. 16 

2, 226. 69 
1, 036. 92 

None 
250.48 
405. 15 
368. 63 
376. 14 

68.48 

None 
2, 05 

28, 015. 44 

15,793.06 

2, 685. 02 

161.32 
112.96 

3, 500. 27 


$14,659.41 

2.43 

7.80 

491. 18 

None 

11, .576. 25 

2, 578. 51 

4,278.80 

225.00 

343. 14 

1,947.13 

4, 228. 23 

494. 16 

None 

48.00 
None 

46, 046. 99 

17, 052. 17 
255. 20 

1,610.73 

309. 77 

9, 934. 04 


$510. 00 

None 

None 

4, 000. 00 

None 

5,009.61 
None 
6, 104. 63 
None 
2, 100. 00 
277. 55 
664.70 

7, 661. 43 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 
None 

8, 296. 75 
531. 17 

None 


None 
None 


Committee for the Relief for Poland, Seattle, Wash. Nov. 24, 1939. 
Poland 


None 


Committee for the Relief of War Sufferers in Poland, St. Louis, Mo. 
Oct ifi 1939 ' Poland 


None 


Committee Representing Polish Organizations and Polish People in 




The Emergency Aid of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. Oct. 13, 
1939. Great Britain, France, Norway, Belgium, Luxemburg, and 


None 


Emergency Relief Committee for Kolbuszowa, New York, N. Y. 
Mar 13 1940 Poland 


None 


English-Speaking Union of the United States, New York, N. Y. 
Dec 26 1939 Great Britain possibly France, and Canada 


$50.00 


Erste Pinchover Kranken Unterstuzungs Vereiu, Inc., Brooklyn, 


None 


Federated Council of Polish Societies of Grand Eapids, Mich., Grand 
Rapids Mich Sept 15,1939. Poland - - _- 


100.00 


Federation of Franco-Belgian Clubs of Rhode Island, Woonsocket, 
R I Nov 15 1939 France 


40.25 


Federation of French Veterans of the Great War, Inc., New York, 
N Y Oct 11,1939. France 


100.00 


Federation of Polish Jews in America, Inc., New York, N. Y. Sept. 
14 1939 Poland 


6, 000. 00 


The Federation of Polish Societies, Little Falls, N. Y. Oct. 9, 1939. >' 
Poland 


None 


FellowshipofReconciliation,NewYork,N. Y. Jan. 20,1940. France, 


None 




None 


Fortra, Incorporated, New York, N. Y. Mar. 7, 1940. Germany and 
Poland - -- - 


None 


Foster Parents' Plan for War Children, Inc., New York, N. Y. Sept. 


None 




None 


French Committee for Relief in France, Detroit, Mich. Oct. 17, 1939. 


3, 655. 65 


French Relief .^.ssociation, Kansas City, Mo. Feb. 3, 1940. France-. 
French War Relief, Inc., Los Angeles, Calif. Nov. 16, 1939. France- 
French War Relief Fund of Nevada, Reno, Nev. June 21, 1940.' 


530. 83 
None 


French War Veterans, Los Angeles, Calif. Dec. 5, 1939. France 

Friends of Children. Inc., New York, N. Y. June 13, 1940. Great 


822. 81 

1, 514. 00 

10. 290. 60 

2. 415. 50 

1, 288. 90 

514. 53 
894. 45 

2, 413. 01 


407. 75 

None 

997. 60 

1. 50O. 00 

600. 00 

96.15 

400. 00 

1, 726. 40 


171. 66 

None 

4,651.15 
160. 00 
96.87 

6.10 

325. 04 

42.11 


243. 40 

1, 514. 00 

4. 741. 85 
755. .50 
592. 03 

412. 28 

169. 41 

644.60 


None 

None 

None 
None 
None 

None 

None 

80.00 


None 
None 


The Friends of Israel Refugee Relief Committee, Incorporated, Phila- 


None 


The Friends of Normandy, New York, N. Y. Dec. 18, 19.39. France- 
Friends ol Poland, Chicago, 111. Dec. 6, 1939. Poland. .-- 

Fund for the Relief of Men of Letters and Scientists of Russia, New 
York, N. Y. Apr. 29, 1940. France, Czechoslovakia, and Poland-. 
General Qustav Orlicz Dreszer Foundation for Aid to Polish Chil- 
dren Washington, D. C. Nov. 3, 1939. Poland . . 


None 
None 

None 

None 


General Taufflieb Memorial Relief Committee for France, Santa 
Barbara. Calif. Nov. 17, 1939. France and England.. 


None 



( The registration of this organization was revoked on June 30, 1940, at the request of registrant. 
» No report lor the month of June has been received from this organization. 
' No report has been received from this organization. 



AUGUST 3, 19 40 



75 



CoNTKiBUTioNs FOR RELIEF IN Belligerei^t Coontries — ConUuued 









Funds 


Uneipended 


Estimated 


Estimated 
value of 
contrl- 

hill inns 








spent for 


balance as of 


value of 






Funds spent 


adminis- 


June 30. 1940. 


contri- 


Name of regL'itrant, location, date of registration, and destination of 


Funds 


for relief in 


tration. 


including 


butions 


contributions 


received 


countries 


publicity. 


cost of goods 


in kind 


in kind 

now on 

hand 






named 


aflairs. 


purchased 


sent to 








campaigns. 


and still on 


countries 








etc. 


hand 


named 


German American Relief Committee for Victims of Fascism, New 














York, N. Y. Apr. 18, 1940. France and Great Britain 


$1,046.57 


$276. 30 


$367. 80 


$402. 47 


None 


None 


Golden Rule Foundation, New York, N. Y. Nov. 2, 1939. Poland 












and Palestine 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


The Grand Duke Vladimir Benevolent Fund Association, New York, 




N. Y. Jan. 8, 1940. France - - 


411.18 


370. 79 


16.14 


24.25 


None 


None 


Grand Lodge. Daughters of Scotia, Hartford, Conn. Feb. 16, 1940. 




Scotland.- - 


6,007.50 


2, 501. 50 


None 


3,506.00 


None 


None 


Greater New Bedford British War Relief Corps, New Bedford, Mass. 














Dec. 19, 1939. Great Britain 


3,165.93 


2, 435. 16 


338. 13 


392.64 


$34. 93 


None 


Margaret-Oreblo Qrecnough (Mrs. Carroll Grecnough), Washington, 












D. C. Nov. 21, 1939. France 


1,073.00 


445.00 


None 


628.00 


None 


None 


Hadassah, Inc., New York, N.Y. Nov. IS, 1939. Palestine 


875, 150. 67 


544, 247. 24 


24, 580. 82 


306, 322. 61 


47,016.85 


$1,073.40 


Hamburg-Bremen Steamship Agency, Inc., New York, N. Y. Mar. 












21, 1940. Oermanyand Poland- - - 


67, 756. 74 


51,349.46 


17,781.01 


None 


None 


None 


Hebrew Christian Alliance of America, Chicago, HI. Jan. 3, 1940. 














Kngland Germany and Poland -. -,.- .--..-.. 


78.89 


75.00 


3.89 


None 


None 


None 


Holy Rosary Polish Roman Catholic Church, Passaic, N. J. Sept. 














15, 1939. Poland 


1, 126. 17 


1,049.00 


None 


77.17 


None 


None 


A. Seymour Houghton, Jr., et al.. Now York, N. Y. Nov. 27, 1939. 




France. . . 


17, 469. 17 


2, 722. 12 


104.19 


14.642.88 


448. 03 


None 


Humanitarian Work Committee, Glen Cove, N. Y. Bept. 30, 1939. 




Poland- - 


3, 360. 73 


2,200.00 


61.63 


1,099.10 


150.00 


None 


Independent British War Relief Society of Rhode Island, Providence, 




R.I. June 14, 1940. Great Britain 


123.35 


108.00 


None 


15 35 


None 


None 


Independent Kinsker Aid Association, Brooklyn, N. Y. Jon. 3, 1940. 




Poland 


469.64 


None 


None 


469. »4 


None 


None 


International Committee of Young Men's Christian Associations, 




New York, N. Y. Sept. 22, 1939. Poland, France, and India 


30.662.00 


24, 492. 50 


647.96 


5, 521. 54 


None 


None 


International Relief Association for Victims of Fascism, New York, 














N.Y. Sept. 25, 1939. France. England, and Germany --- 


8,147.85 


4, 207. 08 


3, 427. 30 


513.47 


1,970.00 


40.00 


Joint Committee of the United Scottish Clans of Greater New York 














and New Jersey, Brooklyn, N. Y. Jan. 30. 1940. Scotland 


2. 706. 25 


2,000.00 


606.50 


99.76 


None 


None 


Junior Relief Group of Tejtas, Houston, Tex. May 29, 1940. United 














Kingdom, France, Netherlands. Belgium, and Norway 


2. 895. 13 


None 


32.43 


2, 862. 70 


None 


None 


Marthe Th. Kahn. New York, N. Y. Apr. 16, 1940. France 


202.25 


25.00 


6.81 


170.44 


None 


None 


The Kindergarten Unit, Inc., Norwalk, Conn. Oct. 3, 1939. France, 














Poland, United Kingdom, India. Australia, and New Zealand 


372.21 


42.85 


329.36 


None 


None 


None 


The Kosciuszko Foundation, Inc., New York, N. Y. May 24, 1940. 














Poland -- 


1,669.12 


2, 100. 00 


124.99 


None 


None 


None 


Kuryer Publishing Company, Milwaukee, Wis. Sept. 16, 1939. 




Poland - 


5,978.90 


5,965.34 


13.56 


None 


None 


None 


Der Kyflhacuscrhund. League of German War Veterans in U. S. A., 




Philadelphia. Pa. Nov. 27, 1939. Poland and Germany 


26, 844. 51 


21, 575. 00 


1, 465. 83 


3.803.68 


None 


None 


Lackawanna County Committee for Polish Relief, Scranton, Pa. 














Sept. 15, 1939. Poland - 


8. 626. 54 
1.952.50 


7, 225. 56 
1. .540. 00 


831.80 
None 


569.18 
412.50 


None 
None 


None 


Lafayette Fund, New York, N. Y. Jan. 2, 1940. France 


None 


LaFayette Preventorium, Inc., New York, N. Y. Sept. 21, 1939. 














France 


15,437,72 


8, 597. 13 


3, 339. 29 


3,501.30 


None 


None 


La France Post American Legion, New York, N. Y. Feb. 7, 1940. 




France 


1,585.32 


None 


366.61 


1. 218. 71 


None 


None 


Mrs. Nancy Bartlett Laughlin, New York, N. Y. Jan. 31, 1940. 




Franco - -- 


309.50 


306.00 


None 


3.50 


None 


None 


League of American Writers, Inc., New York, N. Y. May 6, 1940. 




France, England, Poland, and Norway - 


1,913.60 


338.60 


346.12 


1,228.88 


None 


None 


League of Polish Societies of New Kensington, Arnold and Vicinity, 














New Kensington, Pa. Nov. 17, 1939. Poland 


1, 812. 45 


1, 304. 67 


78.19 


429.59 


1, 846. 05 


403.95 


Legion of Young Polish Women, Chicago. Hi. Oct. 2, 1939. Poland- - 


15, 459. 54 


9,642.00 


2, 404. 30 


3,413.24 


None 


None 


Uvy Maxime, ManUa, P. I. May 1, 1940." France - 















• No report has been received from this organization. 



76 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and destination of 
contributions 



The Little House of Saint Pantaleon, Philadelphia, Pa. Sept. 30, 

1939. France -.. 

The Maple Leaf Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y. Apr. 19, 1940. Can- 
ada, United Kingdom, and France 

The Maryland Committee tor the Relief of Poland's War Victims, 

Baltimore, Md., Oct. 21, 1939. Poland 

Massachusetts Relief Committee for Poland, Worcester, Mass. Nov. 

9, 1939. Poland-- 

Mennonite Central Committee, Akron, Pa. Feb. 13, 1940. Great 

Britain, Poland, Germany, and France- _ - 

Milford, Conn., Polish Relief Fund Committee, Milford, Conn. Nov. 

6, 1939. Poland .-- 

Kate R. Miller, New York, N. Y. Feb. 19, 1940. France 

Mobile Surgical Unit, Inc.. New York, N. Y. Jan. 13, 1940." France- 
The Mother Church, The First Church of Christ, Scientist, in Boston, 

U. S. A., Boston, Mass. Apr. 25, 1940. Canada, France, and the 

United Kingdom '..__ 

Fernanda Wanamaker Munn (Mrs. Ector Munn), New York, N. Y. 

Nov. 25, 19.39. France 

National Christian Action. Inc., New York, N. Y. May 23, 1940. 

Norway and Denmark -- 

Netherlands War Relief Committee, Manila, Philippine Islands. 

May 27, 1940.« Netherlands .-. 

New Jersey Broadcasting Corporation, Jersey City, N. J. Sept. 13, 

1939. Poland--. 

North Side Polish Council, Relief Committee of Milwaukee, Wis., 

Milwaukee, Wis. Dec. 5. 1939. Poland 

Norwegian Relief, Inc., Chicago, 111. May 1, 1940. Norway 

Nowe-Dworer Ladies Benevolent Association, Inc., New York, N.Y. 

Ort. 25, 1939. Poland 

Nowiny Publishing Apostolate, Inc., Milwaukee, Wis. Sept. 20, 1939. 

Poland.- 

Nowy Swiat Publishing Co., Inc., New York, N. Y. Sept. 11, 

1939. Poland and Franco 

Order of Scottish Clans, Boston, Mass. Jan. 25, 1940. Scotland 

Paderewski Fund for Polish Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y. Feb. 23, 

1910. Poland --- 

Le Paquot au Front, New York, N. Y. Oct. 6, 1939. France- 

The Paryski Publishing Co., Toledo, Ohio. Sept. 15, 1939. Poland - 
The Pawtucket and Blackstone Valley British Relief Society of Rhode 

Island, Pawtucket, R. I. Feb. 26, 1940. Great Britain 

Polish Aid Fund Committee of Federation of Elizabeth Polish Organ- 
izations, Elizabeth, N. J. Sept. 23, 1939. Poland 

Polish Aid Fund Committee of St. Casimir's Roman Catholic Church 

of the City of Albany, N. Y., Albany. N. V. Jan. 22, 1940. Poland. 
Polish-American Associations of Middlese.\ County, N. J., SajTeville, 

N.J. Jan. 22, 1940. Poland _ 

Polish-American Citizens Relief Fund Committee, Shirley, Mass. 

Dec. 16, 1939. Poland 

Polish-American Council, Chicago, m. Sept. 16, 1939. Poland 

Polish-American Forwarding Commitlee, Inc., New York, N. Y. 

Mar. 2.S, 1940. Poland and Germany 

Polish-American Volunteer Ambulance Section (Pavas), New York, 

N.Y. Feb. 13, 1940. France. 

Polish Broadcasting Corporation, New York, N. Y. Sept. 23, 1939. 

Poland ._ ._ 

Polish Business and Professional Men's Club, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Nov. 17, 1039. Poland 

Polish Central Committee of New London, Conn., New London, 

Conn. Oct. 13, 1939. Poland _. 



Funds 
received 



$20, 936. 71 

4, 317. 71 

9, 170. 48 

5,211.50 

9, 219. 00 

405. 33 

111.00 

1,113.00 

46, 283. 76 
10. 985. 81 
1, 539. 89 



1,210.65 

1.427.82 
206, 342. 53 

593. 88 

5, 086. 46 

25. 832. 41 
2, 321. 64 

86,224.92 
60,214.80 

6, 397. 65 

2. 178.38 

8, 648. 05 

1,916.70 

1, 057. 05 

427. 01 
351.8,54.68 

407. 86 

27, 540. 00 

2, 067. 08 

474. 60 

1, 264. 40 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$14, 029. 98 

None 

6, 774. 01 

6. 209. 75 

8, 445. 61 

250.20 
111.00 
None 

1, 502. 60 

3, 788. 69 

None 



1, 400. 28 
None 

None 

4, 589. 86 

24. 212. 00 
None 

,50. 000. 00 
42.119.26 
6,112.70 

258. 36 

7, 946. 85 

176.32 

800.00 

350. 31 
204, 2.S8. 50 

268. 35 

19, 094. 06 

None 

314.23 

994. 24 



Funds 
spent for 
adminis- 
tration, 
publicity, 

affairs, 

campaigns, 

etc. 



$36. 26 

2, 142. 10 

2, 396. 47 

1.75 

708. 14 

84.62 
None 
None 

415. 49 

4, 236. 22 

341.17 



19.18 
5, 463. 63 

92. .50 

None 

103. 39 

None 

28,697.17 

28, 848. 95 

None 

146, 35 

None 

7.00 

80.82 

21.67 
7, 743. 64 

1,081-42 

33,71 

35. 30 

158. 27 

148. 57 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
June 30, 1940, 

including 
cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

hand 



$6, 870. 47 

2, 175, 61 

None 

None 

65.25 

70.51 

None 

1,113,00 

44, 36,5. 77 
2, 960. 90 
1, 198. 72 



None 

8.36 
200, 878. 90 

601. 38 

495. 60 

1, 517. 02 
2,321.64 

7, 527. 75 

None 
284. 95 

1. 773. 68 

701. 20 

1, 733. 38 

176. 23 

5,5.03 
139,822,64 

None 

8, 412. 24 

2, 031. 78 

2,00 
111.69 



Estimated 
value of 
contri- 
butions 
in kind 
sent to 

countries 
named 



$10,160.05 

None 

None 

None 

5,461.60 

None 
None 
,500. 00 

None 

2, 851. 27 

None 



None 

1, 300. 00 
None 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

2, 707. 75 

None 

None 
1, 500. 00 
1, 200. 00 

None 

350.00 
73, ,500. 00 

None 

245. 40 

None 

None 

75.00 



Estimated 
value of 
contri- 
butions 
in kind 
now on 
hand 



■ No complete report for the month of June has been received from this organization. 
• No report has been received from this organization. 



77 



CoNTRIBtlTIONS FOR RELIEF IN BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES Continued 



Name o( registrant, location, date of t«RlJtratloD, and destination of 
contributions 



Polish Central Council of New Haven, New Haven, Conn. Sept. 29, 

1939. Poland 

Polish Civic League of Mercer County, Trenton, N. J. Sept. 19, 1939. 

Poland - 

PolL'hClvUlanRelietFund, Passaic, N.J. Oct. 27, 1939. Poland.. 
Polish Falcons Alliance of America, Pittsburgh, Pa. Sept. 20, 1939. 

Poland 

Polish Inter-Ori!;iiiizatlon "Centrala" of Waterbury, Waterbury, 

Conn. Feb. 28, 1940. Poland - 

Polish Literary Guild of New Britain, Conn., New Britain, Conn. 

Septembi>r21. IflW. Poland 

The Polish National .Alliance of Brooklyn, United States of America, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. Sejit. 19, 1939. Poland 

Polish National .\lliaDie of the United States of North America, 

Chicago, 111. Sept. 27, 1939. Poland 

Polish National Council of Montgomery County, Amsterdam, N. Y. 

Oct. 12, 1939. Poland 

Polish National louncll of New York, New York, N. Y. Sept. 14, 

1939. Poland and France 

The Polish Ntidirali/atlon Independent Club, Worcester, Mass. 

Sept. 20, 1939. Poland . 

PollshRelicfof Carteret, N.J. , Carteret, N.J. Oct. 11, 1939. Poland- 
Polish Relief Committee of Boston, Boston, Mass. Sept. 14, 1939. 

Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Brockton, Mass., Brockton, Mass. Sept. 

25, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Cambridge, Mass. Cambridge, Mass. 

Sept. 16, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Columbia County, Hudson, N. Y. Mar. 

16, 1940. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Delaware, Wilmington, Del. Sept. 22, 

1939. Poland _. __ 

Polish Relief Committee, Detroit. Mich. Sept. 11. 1939. Poland 
Polish Relief Committee of Fitchburg, Fitchburg, Mass. Mar. 29, 

1940. Poland 

Polish ReliefCommittee, Flint, Mich. Sept. 18, 1939. Poland 

Polish ReliefCommittee of Gardner, Mass., Gardner, Mass. Sept. 26, 

1939. Poland ---. 

Polish Relief Committee of Holyokc, Mass., Holyoke, Mass. Nov. 4, 

1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Jackson, Mich., Jackson, Mich, Nov. 9, 

1939. Poland. - - - -.- 

Polish Relief Committee, New Bedford, Mass. Oct. 31, 1939. Poland- 
Polish Relief Committee of Philadelphia and Vicinity, Philadelphia, 

Pa. Sept. 12, 1939. Poland -... -- 

Polish Relief Committee of the Polish National Home Association, 

Lowell, Mass. Nov. 27, 1939. Poland - - 

Polish Relief Committee, Rochester, N. Y. Nov. 8, 1939. r Poland... 

Polish Relief Committee. Taunton, Mass. Dec. 13, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund of Fall River, Mass., Fall River, Mass. Nov. 8, 

1939. Poland -- --- 

Polish Relief Fund, Jersey City, N.J. Sept. 12, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund, Jewett City, Conn. Oct. 3, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund of Meriden, Meriden, Conn. Oct. 12, 1939. 

Poland 

PoiishRellefFund, Middletown, Conn. Sept. 23, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund, Niagara Falls, N. Y. Oct. 26, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund of Palmer, Mass., Three Rivers, Mass. Oct. 20, 

1939. Poland - 

Polish ReUef Fund of Syracuse, N. Y., and Vicinity, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Oct. 31, 1939. Poland - 



Funds 
received 



S3, 482. 99 

6. 865. 90 
3, 966. 12 

9, 883. 24 

742. 2.5 

2. 678. 8-1 

7, 659. 68 

282. 416. 93 

3, 107. 76 

m, 706. 03 

2, 428. 64 
1,230.15 

7, 810. 58 

1, 708. 24 
2, 198. 24 

None 

7, 360. 16 

1 II), 767. 63 

749. 80 
4,350.80 

3, 862. 03 

5, 316. 32 

1.472.28 
8, 789. 31 

41, 382. 53 

2, 813. 84 
5.060.25 
2, 682. 60 

1,083.31 

58, 245. 40 

1, 188. 90 

1. 772. 69 
4, 539. 45 

2, 635. 72 

1,328.79 
9. 078. 66 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$3,131.00 

6. 392. 86 

3, 025. 00 

9, 022. 23 

607. 76 

2,000.00 

4,000.00 

231, 065. 00 

2, 610. 00 

.54, 762. 24 

2,200.00 
800.00 

61, 101. 19 

1,201.27 

1,142.30 

None 

6, 813. 42 
98, 603. 14 

446.00 
3,300.00 

2.979.20 

4, 728. 06 

572.60 

7, 397. 24 

32, 479. 00 

1, .500. 00 
4,473.38 

2, 257. 00 

1,000.00 

53, 108. 59 

1,086.90 

1,500.00 
2.968.85 
2, 500. 00 

620. 46 

6,869.00 



Funds 
spent for 
adminis- 
tration, 
publicity, 

affairs, 

campaigns, 

etc. 



$51. 26 

.89 
207.90 

20.00 

25. .50 

13,00 

None 

1, 399. 29 

89.16 

10, 806. 35 

8 65 
13.00 

418.95 

236.04 

116.89 

None 

230.07 
5. 637. 23 

41.09 
813.31 

710.11 

203. 35 

112.49 
595. 39 

687.54 

481.28 
57.06 
23.17 

30.10 
1,840.30 

101.08 

27.90 
18.20 
21.80 

86.92 

422.41 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
June 30, 1940, 

including 
cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

hand 



$300. 73 

472. 15 
733.22 

841.01 

108 99 

665. 84 

3. 0.59. 68 

49, 952. 64 
408.60 

20, 137. 44 

219.99 
417. 15 

1,290.44 

270.93 

939. 05 

None 

316. 67 
42, 527, 26 

262. 71 
237.49 

172. 72 

384.91 

787. 19 
796.68 

8, 215. 99 

812.56 
,529. 82 
402.43 

53.21 

3, 296. 61 

.92 

244.79 

1, 5.52. 40 

113.92 

621.41 

1, 787. 25 



Estimated 
value of 
contri- 
butions 
In kind 
sent to 

countries 
named 



$800.00 

4.000.00 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

6,000.00 

289, 633. 60 

None 
4.5. OO 

l.SOO. 00 

3.50. 00 

600.00 

None 

3,850.00 
51,974.00 

7.5, 00 
None 

1,307.05 

050.00 

7,50, on 

3, 8.50, 00 

None 

None 
1,6.5,3.00 
1,37.5.00 

None 

1, 575. 00 

400.00 

None 
None 
None 

4, 004. 95 

1,850.00 



Estimated 
value of 
contri- 
butions 
in kind 
now on 
hand 



$1,000.00 

None 
None 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
172,871.00 

None 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 

600.00 

None 

5.5.00 
None 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 

None 

None 



» The registration of this organization was revoked on May 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 



78 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions tor Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant. location, date of registration, and destination of 
contributions 



Polish Relief Fund Committee, Los Angeles, Calif. Dec. 13, 1939. 

Poland - 

Polish Relief Fund Committee of Milwaukee, Wis., Milwaukee, 

Wis. Sept. 2r., 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund Committee of Passaic and Bergen Counties, Inc., 

Passaic, N. J. Sept. 22, 1939. Poland 

Polish Union of the United States of North America, Wilkes-Barre, 

Pa. Sept. 8, 1939. Poland 

Polish United Societies of Holy Trinity Parish, Lowell, Mass. Sept. 

20, 1939. Poland 

Polish War Sufferers Relief Conmiittee (Fourth Ward), Toledo, 

Ohio. Sept. 21, 1939. Poland 

Polish Welfare Association, Hyde Park, Mass. Sept. 16, 1939.« 

Poland _ 

Polish Welfare Council, Schenectady, N. Y. Sept. 22, 1939. Poland, 
Polish White Cross Club of West Utica, Utica, N. Y. Oct. 20, 

1939. Poland..,. 

Polish Women's Fund to Fatherland, Lawrence, Mass. Sept. 23, 

1939. Poland 

Polish Women's Relief Committee, New York, N. Y. Nov. 24, 1939, 

France, Poland, and Germany 

Polski Komitct Ratunkowy (Polish Relief Fund), Binghamton, N. Y. 

Sept. 25, 1939. Poland 

Polsko Narodowy Komitet w Ameryce, Scranton, Pa. Sept. 8, 1939. 

Poland 

Pulaski Civic League of Middlesex County, N. J., South River, N. J. 

Sept. 30, 1939. Poland 

Pulaski League of Queens Comity, Inc., Jamaica, N. Y. Oct. 21, 

1939. Poland 

Queen Wilhelmina Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y. May 17, 1940. 

Netherlands, France, Poland, United Kingdom, India, Australia, 

New Zealand, Canada, Union of South Africa, Norway, Belgium, and 

Luxemburg _. 

Relief Agency for Polish War Sufferers, WUlimantic, Conn. Sept. 29, 

1939. Poland 

Relief Committee of United Polish Societies, Chicopee, Mass. Oct. 

21, 1939. Poland 

Relief Fund for Sufferers in Poland Committee, Kenosha, Wis. Sept. 

25, 1939. Poland 

Relief Society for Jews in Lublin, Los Angeles, Calif. Dec. 13, 1939. 

Poland 

Russian Children's Welfare Society, Inc., New York, N. Y. Sept. 29, 

1939. Germany, France, and Poland 

The Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church, Little Falls, N. Y., Little 

Falls, N. Y. Nov. 2, 1939. Poland. 

St. Andrews (Scottish) Society of Washington, D. C, Washington, 

D. C. June 18, 1910. Scotland 

St. Stephens PoIishRelief Fund of Perth Amboy, N. J., Perth Amboy, 

N. J. Sept. 27, 1939. Poland 

The Salvation Army, New York, N. Y. May 23, 1940. England, 

France, Norway, Belgium , and the Netherlands 

Save the Children Federation, Incorporated, New York, N. Y. Sept. 

8, 1939. England, Poland, Belgium, and the Netherlands 

Schuylkill and Carbon Counties Relief Committee for Poland, 

Frackville, Pa. Sept. 15, 1939. Poland 

Scots' Charitable Society, Boston, Mass. May 9, 1940. Scotland 

Secours Franco-Amerieain— War Relief, Pittsburgh, Pa. Nov. 20, 

1939. France 

The Seventh Column, Inc., West Fairiee, Vt., June 12, 1940. France 

and England 

Share A Smoke Club, Inc., Ithaca, N. Y. Nov. 14, 1939. England, 
France, Norway, Belgium, and the Netherlands 



Funds 
received 



$785. 89 
14. 594. 38 
12, 024. 79 
2, 053. 21 

4, 075. 39 

5, 294. 27 

434. 8S 

5, 516. 18 

6, 222. 28 

5, 650. 56 
6, 929. 19 
3, 430. 50 

26, 364. 46 

507. 63 

7, 376. 78 

197, 261. 04 

2, 747. 06 

6, 316. 97 

3, 366. 19 
811.33 

6, 610. 43 

239.95 

None 

2, 684. 46 

26, 773. 64 

9, 330. 96 

6, 363. 74 
100. 00 

1, 547. 63 

None 

276. 66 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$448. 00 

12. 232. 72 

9,173.92 

2, 000. 00 

1, 788. 31 

5, 177. 18 

350.00 
4,941.55 

4, 962. 70 



Funds 
spent for 
adminis- 
tration, 
publicity, 

affairs. 

campaigns, 

etc. 



1,821.10 


269. 72 


2, 354. 04 


24, 507. 67 


None 


6, 700. 00 


CO, 930. 00 


2, 080. 28 


4, 682. 99 


2, 560. 00 


175.00 


3, 848. 67 


200.00 


None 


None 


21, 164. 00 


6, 758. 25 


4, 460. 71 


None 


162. 11 


None 


100.00 



$112.17 

532. 96 

1,014.51 

None 

162.71 

117.09 

None 
57.32 

275.36 

642. 34 

2, 336. 56 

247. 13 

345. 76 

86.00 

159. 65 

13. 636. 64 
176. 72 
None 
343. 69 
280.82 

1, 279. 69 

1.00 

None 

None 

1, 062. 79 

2, 392. 40 

None 
None 

90.02 

None 
71.86 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
June 30. 1940, 

including 

cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

hand 



$225. 72 

1,828.70 

1, 836. 36 

53.21 

2, 124. 37 

None 

84.86 
617. 31 

984.23 
3, 187. 12 
4, 322. 91 

829. 33 
1,511.03 

422. 53 
1,617.13 

122, 796. 40 

491. 06 

633. 98 

472.50 

365. 61 

482. 17 

38.96 

None 

2, 684. 45 

4, 546. 76 

180.31 

903, 03 
100. 00 

1. 295. 60 

None 

104.80 



Estimated 
value of 
contri- 
butions 
in kind 
sent to 

countries 
named 



$160.00 

11, 607. 40 

2, 990. 50 

None 

1, 240. 00 

None 

None 
6,160.00 

I, 600. 00 

1,800.00 

859.00 

780. 00 

20. 685. 00 

None 

None 

None 
637. 10 

1, .886. 00 

1, 000. 00 
None 

1,166.20 
None 
None 
None 

2. 306. 00 

None 

None 
None 

386.00 

None 

None 



Estimated 
value of 
contri- 
butions 
in kind 
now on 
hand 



None 

$600.00 

None 

None 

None 

None 

3, 000. 00 
None 

None 

850.00 

1,209.80 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

1, 274. 70 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 

1.236.60 

None 

None 



« The registration of this organisation was revoked on May 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 



AUGUST 3, 1940 



79 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and destination of 
contributions 



Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

coi'ntries 

named 


Funds 
spent for 
adminis- 
tration, 
publicity, 

aftairs, 

campaigns, 

etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Juno 30. 1940, 

including 

cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

hand 


Estimated 
value of 
contri- 
butions 
in kind 
sent to 

countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of 
contri- 
butions 
in kind 
now on 
hand 


$1,214.24 


None 


$706. 13 


$508.11 


None 


None 


31, 199. 12 


$30,240.87 


958.25 


None 


None 


$200.00 


653.07 


373.49 


57 56 


222. 02 


None 


None 


217.00 


None 


2. SO 


214.20 


None 


None 


9,037 13 


4, fiOO. 00 


4, 052. 92 


384.21 


None 


None 


6,41,V30 


1,995.07 


202. 10 


4, 218. 13 


$7, 894. 40 


None 


1,084.92 


135.81 


20.91 


928.20 


700.00 


None 


58.00 


None 


None 


58.00 


None 


• 

None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


34, 195. 97 


10,024.01 


21,978.46 


2, 193. 60 


16,486.00 


None 


1, 078. 19 


1,000.00 


21.25 


56.94 


None 


None 


310.00 


310.00 


None 


None 


None 


500.00 


5,0.M.65 


4, 5.')0. 00 


213. 20 


291.45 


None 


None 


18, 550. 50 


10. 575. 64 


2, 997. 24 


4, 977. 62 


None 


None 


388. 10 


362. SI 


3.95 


21.34 


None 


None 


3,017 48 


3,017 46 


None 


None 


None 


None 


2. 293. 41 


400.27 


539. 76 


1,353.38 


315.00 


None 


14,291.04 


7,321.01 


990.50 


5, 979. 53 


None 


None 


3, 001. 74 


2, 400. 00 


136. 94 


461.80 


None 


None 


2.134.46 


938. 85 


1,108.54 


87.07 


None 


None 


1.091.97 


None 


146. 27 


945. 70 


None 


None 


530.66 


300.00 


161. 10 


69.56 


None 


None 


32. 142. 13 


I(i. 796. 90 


15. 485. 72 


None 


None 


None 


95. 138. 61 


3.5, 517. 94 


6, :is.\ 34 


63.237.33 


4.711.49 


2.666.23 


2,139.62 


I..=i00.0n 


130. 24 


.509. 38 


None 


None 


832. 96 


84.70 


191.96 


5.56. 30 


None 


None 


677. 15 


None 


.3.5. 21 


641.94 


None 


None 


8. 999. 77 


7. 019. 62 


231.94 


1,748.21 


4, 845. 00 


None 


1. 576. 75 


1,3,50.00 


212. 16 


14.59 


None 


None 


2, 489. 72 


1. 965. 27 


437. 91 


86.54 


595.00 


None 


1,211. 19 


576.80 


26.75 


607.64 


300.00 


None 


720.55 


450.00 


23.20 


247,35 


None 


Noo9 


at the request 


;of registrant, 











Sociedades Hispanas Aliadas, San Francisco, Calll. Mar. 29, 1940. 

France 

Sociedades Hispanas Confederadas, Brooklyn, N. Y. Jan. 22, 1940. 

France 

Soci«t« Fran^aise de St. LouLs, Inc., St. Louis, Mo. Nov. 15, 1939. 

France 

SoclCt6 Israelite Franjaisc de Secours Mutuels de New York, New 

York, N. Y. June 4, 1940. France 

Society of the Devotees of Jerusalem, Inc., New York, N. Y. Dec. 18, 

1939. Palestine 

The Somerset Workroom, Far Hills, N. J. Apr. 25, 1940. France and 

Great Britain 

Southbridge Allied Committee for Relief in Poland, Southbridge, 

Mass. Nov. 9, 1939. Poland 

Le Souvenir Fransais, Detroit, Mich. May 1, 1940. France and Bel- 
gium 

Spanish Committee Pro-Masonic Refugees in France, Now York, 

N. Y. Feb. 20, 1910. France 

Spanish Refugee Relief Campaign, New York, N. Y. Sept. 20, 1939. 

France — 

Springfield and Vicinity Polish Relief Fund Committee, Springfield, 

Mass. Sept. 23, 1939. Poland --. 

Superior Council of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, New York, 

N. Y. Apr. 5, 1940, France 

Toledo Committee for Relief of War Victims. Toledo, Ohio. Sept. 

19, 1939. Poland 

Tolstoy Foundation for Russian Welfare and Culture, New York, 

N. Y. Oct. 17, 1939. France. Poland, and England 

Mrs. Walter R. Tuckernian, Bethesda. Md. Nov. 24, 1939. Great 

Britain , 

Edmund Tyszka, Ilamtramck, Mich. Sept. 19, 1939. Poland 

L'Union Alsacienne, Inc., Now York, N. Y. Oct. 2.S. 1939. France.. 
Unitarian Service Committee of the American Unitarian Association, 

Boston, Mass. May 23, 1940. France 

United American Polish Organizations, South River, N. J., South 

River, N.J. Oot. 20, 1939. Poland --. 

UnitedAmcrlcan Spanish Aid Committee, New York, N. Y. Apr. 29, 

1940. United Kingdom and France - 

United Bilgorayer Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y. Mar. 21, 1940. 

Poland - - - 

United British War ReUef Association, Somcrville, Mass. June 14, 

1940. Great Britain and Northern Ireland..- 

United Charity Institutions of Jerusalem, New York. N. Y. Oct. 13, 

1939. Palestine.- - --- -- 

United Committee for French Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y. Oct. 26, 

1939. France - - -- 

United German Societies, Inc., Portland, Oreg., Portland, Oreg., Jan. 

8,1940. Germany 

United Nowy Dworer Relief Committee, New York, N. Y. Jan 3, 

1940. Poland 

United Opoler Relief of New York, New York, N. Y. Dec. 9, 1939. 

i^ Poland - - 

United Polish Central Council of Connecticut, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Oct. 16, 1939. Poland - 

United Polish Committees in Racine, Wis., Racine, Wis. Nov. 2, 
1939. Poland - - - 

United Polish Organizations of Salem, Mass., Salem, Mass. Oct. 20, 
1939. Poland --- - - 

United Polish Societies of Bristol, Conn., Bristol, Conn. Sept. 29, 
1939. Poland --- --- 

United Polish Societies of Immaculate Conception Church, Southing- 
ton, Conn. Oct. 13, 1939.' Poland- - 

' The registration of this organization was revoked on Apr. 30, 1940, 
251432—40 3 



80 



DEPARTMEKT OF STATE BULLETIN 

Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and destination of 
contributions 


Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Funds 
spent for 
adminis- 
tration, 
publicity, 

affairs, 

campaigns, 

etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
June 30, 1940, 

including 

cost of goods 

purchased 

and stil! on 

hand 


Estimated 
value of 

contri- 
butions 
in kind 

sent to 
countries 

named 


Estimated 
value of 
contri- 
butions 
in kind 
now on 
hand 


United Polish Societies of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, Calif. Oct. 21, 
'1939 Poland 


$2, 6.11. 21 

7. 146. 79 
18, 574. 63 
4,207.41 

None 
1, 691. 44 

1,316.12 

5, 436. 98 

143, 087. 16 


$2. 262. 10 

r>. 600. 14 
14, 327. 20 
3,897.31 

None 
1, 184. 80 

1,218.62 

1,632.48 

124,074.11 


$330. 82 

138.34 
526. 07 
40.46 

None 
96.31 

13.67 

8.02 

22,181.64 


$58. 29 

1, 408. 31 

3, 720. 76 

269. 65 

None 
410.33 

83.83 

3,796.48 

None 


None 

None 
$3, 159. 10 
3, 282. 00 

None 
1, 600. 00 

None 

3,851.45 

16, 247. 20 


None 


United Reading Appeal for Polish War Suflerers, Heading, Pa. Sept. 


None 


Urgent Relief for France, Washington, D. C. Dec. 26, 1939. France. . 

Mrs. Paul Verdier Fund, San Francisco, Calif. Oct. 11 , 1939. France. 

Vincennes, France, Committee of Viccennes, Ind., Vincennes, Ind., 

May 31, 1940 France . . 


$1, 66S. 05 
None 

None 


Ware Polish Relief Fund, Ware, Mass. Nov. 4, 1939.' Poland 

Woman's Auxiliary Board of the Scots' Charitable Society, Inc., 
Waverlev, Mass. Feb. 28, 1940. Scotland 


None 
None 


Women's Allied War Relief Association of St. Louis, Clayton, Mo. 
Dec. 18, 1939. Great Britain and France 


None 


Registrants whose registrations were revoked prior to June 1, 1940, and 


None 






Total ' " . 


8,384,095.30 


5,156,025.30 


698, 719. 79 


2, 546, 284. 22 


887,541.69 


235,834.54 







• The registration of this orp;anization wa^ revoked on Feb. 29, 1940. nt the request of rec^istrant. 

' It is not possible to strike an exact balance in these published totals, since some registrants have included in their expenditures moneys available from 
loans or advances, which are not considered by the Department to be "funds received" and hence are not reported as such. 
«* See footnote s page 72, on the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee. 



REPATRIATION OF AMERICAN 
CITIZENS 

[Released to the pres.s July 2!)] 

The Acting Secretary of State announces 
that the United State.s Army transport Ameri- 
can Legion has, by arrangement ■with the ap- 
propriate authorities of the United States 
Government, been commissioned to i>roceed 



into and througli tlie combat area defined by 
tlie President in his proclamation, numbered 
2410, of June 11, 1940,^ in order to evacuate 
citizens of the United States who are in im- 
minent danger to their lives as a result of 
combat operations incident to the present war. 



*See the Bulletin of June 15, 1940 (vol. II, no. 51), 
Ijp. 041-643. 



Commercial Policy 



THE NATIONAL FOREIGN TRADE CONVENTION 

Message of President Roosevelt 



The, Xatioiial Foreign Trade Council, Inc., 
has made puhlic a message wliicli, at the Coun- 
cil's invitation, tlie President sent to its Twenty- 
seventh National Foreign Trade Convention at 
San Francisco and which was read at tlic World 
Trade dinner on July 30. 

The text of the President's message to tlie 
convention follows : 

It is a great pleasure to offer my warm greetings 
to the delegates assembled for the Twentj'-Seventh 
National Foreign Trade Convention at San Francisco. 
I an» confident that your deliberation.s, which are 
characteristic of our democracy at work, will con- 
tribute substantially to the successful solution of 
your connnon i)rol(lcms — problems which are today of 
grave concern to the entire nation. 

Producers and workers in our exjwrt industries, 
both agricultural and industrial; consumers of im- 
ported products ; foreign traders ; banks, insurance 
and shipping companies; all of the millions of our 
IM'ople who have a vital stake in tlie nation's foreign 
trade, realize the .seriou.sness and tlie difliculty of 
the problems confronting us in this held today. You 
are all aw-are of the dislocations sulTcred by our 
foreign trade as a result of armed conllict in other 
parts of the world. Established trade channels 
have been disrupted, our exports of many important 
products, particularly agricultural, have been se- 
verely curtailed, our trade with virtually the entire 
Euro])eaii continent has dwindled to a small frac- 
tion of its former volun>e, and the weakening of the 
international economic structure has necessitated the 



imposition by many countries of even more drastic 
trade-control measures than existed before the war. 

Nevertheless, the substantial progress made during 
the past six years in our efforts to maintain trade 
between free nations on the basis of the liberal and 
democratic principles which underlie our trade agree- 
ment program lias not by any means been lost. In 
order to safegtiard the progress made thus far, 
and to meet any external threat to our economic 
security, we must redouble our efforts to bring about, 
by every practicable means, the closest jMssible eco- 
nomic cooperation with other countries, particularly 
with those in the western hemisphere. It is my 
profound conviction that such a vigorous program 
of economic defense is an essential part of our 
national defense program. 

It has been suggested or implied by a few faint- 
hearted defeatists in rt'cent weeks that we should 
abandon our efforts to conduct our foreign trade 
on the basis of liberal and democratic principles. 
The logic of such implications, if they be true, would 
lead us to embark upon a course of action which 
would subject our producers, consumers, and foreign 
traders, and ultimately the entire nation, to the 
regimentation of a totalitarian system. For it is 
naive to imagine that we could adopt a totalitarian 
control of our foreign trade and at the same time 
escape totalitarian regimentation of our internal 
economy. I, therefore, reject any implication that 
we have been defeated in our efforts to maintain 
liberal trade principles and, to the end that our 
continued efforts to maintain those principles uia.v 
be crowned wifli lasting success, I pledge you the 
whole-heart e<l cooperation of your Government. 



Address by Assistant Secretary Grady: Taking Stock of Our Foreign-Trade Position ■ 



[Released to tlie press July .'!1] 

In taking stock of our foreign-trade position, 
it is important for all of us to realize that, from 
the national point of view, foreign trade is not 

" Delivered at the final session of the Twenty -seventh 
National Foreign Trade Convention, San Francisco, 
JiUy 31, 1&40. 



an independent field of economic activity nor 
an end in itself but an integral part of our na- 
tional economy and of our international rela- 
tions. It is in this broad perspective that the 
commercial policy of the administration was 
formulated and is being carried out. Its ob- 
jective is to promote above all else the welfare 

81 



DEPABTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



of the Nation as a whole, which can be achieved 
in the fullest measure only under conditions 
of world peace. It was anticipated that such 
a policy, being based on the principles of reci- 
procity and equality of opportunity in interna- 
tional relations, would tend to reduce the causes 
of economic friction between nations and to 
make it possible for all nations to realize more 
fully their economic potentialities and would 
thereby facilitate the establishment of a sound 
and lasting peace in the international 
community. 

Such a peace did not materialize. Our fail- 
ure to adapt our commercial policy after the 
last world war to the change in our position 
from a debtor to a creditor country was in part 
responsible for the severity and long duration 
of the 1930-32 depression which affected the 
course of international events which followed. 
Our present commercial policy has been in effect 
for only six years and has in that short time 
contributed in an outstanding measure toward 
the restoration of sanity in international com- 
mercial relations. Nevertheless, owing to the 
direction which international developments had 
already taken by the time of its adoption, tlie 
cause of liberal trade was not advanced far 
enough to block the course of impending dis- 
aster. One factor making its progress less than 
it might have otherwise been was the strong 
opposition at home from those who regarded 
liberal trade principles as inimical to their 
privileges of exploitation under the excessive 
tariffs of 1930. Furthei-more, in its path lay 
a tangled undergrowth of false doctrines and 
blind prejudices deeply rooted in more than 50 
years of American high-protectionist tradition. 
Nevertheless, disaster having overtaken the 
world, our hope now is to pull through the 
troubled days ahead with strength to preserve 
for ourselves, if not for the world, the freedom 
and liberty which are possible only under the 
institutions of a democracy. That hope depends 
upon our subordinating immediate and selfish 
interests to the national welfare, on which all 
our interests ultimately depend, and vieM'ing 
our domestic problems in relation to world 
problems of which they are a part. 



I am sure that many people who have not 
realized the importance of this before, do now. 
The realization has been brought home to them 
suddenly by recent events in Eurojje and by 
their concern now for their country's security. 
The first hysterical impulse following such a 
belated realization is frequently to demand new 
and drastic measures. However, before throw- 
ing over basic pruiciples, such as those embod- 
ied in the trade-agreements program, which 
have been tried and tested, we should consider 
what the situation calls for, especially from the 
point of view of war conditions, the require- 
ments of national defense, and the outlook for 
trade in the post-war j^eriod. 

The war in Europe has had a pronounced 
effect on our foreign trade, as may be observed 
from official figures for the first five months of 
this year. Both our exports and imports 
greatly increased in this jjeriod compared to 
those of the corresponding periods of the two 
previous years. Large percentage increases in 
our export sales between the fii-st five months 
of 1939 and 1940 were accounted for by the 
United Kingdom and France, 92 percent; Can- 
ada, 54 percent ; and South America, 70 pei'cent. 
One would not expect to find, of course, that 
these export increases occurred largely in re- 
sjiect of commodities on which concessions have 
been obtained abroad in peace time as the result 
of trade agreements. As a matter of fact, our 
export trade with many of the countries in 
Europe with which we have trade agreements 
has been seriously disrupted by the war, and, 
in the case of the United Kingdom and France, 
the benefits of the concessions obtained from 
them have in a large measure been offset by 
wai'-time trade controls which are permitted 
under the terms of agreements in the event of 
a national emergency. The type of goods 
which have been exjjorted in increased amounts 
to the United Kingdom, France, and Canada 
has been determined chiefly by their war needs, 
and our increased sales to South America have 
consisted in a large part of goods which that 
continent previously purchased from Europe. 

Nevertheless, trade agreements have been a 
factor of significance in our foreigii-trade posi- 



AUGUST 3, 1940 



83 



tion under war conditions. It is important to 
note in this connection tliat, altliough our im- 
ports increased also in the first five months of 
this year over tlie correspondinjr period of last 
year, they have not increased as nmch as have 
our exports, indicating on the part of the for- 
eign purchasei-s of our goods a drain on their 
sources of dollar exchange. This has in part 
caused the belligerents to limit their purchases 
from the United States to essential items in 
order to conserve their dollar funds for war 
materials. The American trade in agricultural 
products, many of which have not come under 
the category of essentials, has especially suffered 
as a result of this policy. Furthermore, the 
using up of dollar exchange now by the foreign 
countries concerned may mean, in the case of the 
belligerents, that their ability to buy American 
products required by post-war reconstruction 
will be impaired and, in the case of other coun- 
tries, that we shall not be able to hold onto the 
trade gains which have been made. 

The drain, however, on the doihir-exchange 
resources of foreign countries, the consequences 
suffei'ed as a result thereof by American agricul- 
ture, and its possible effects on future trade 
might be greater than is now the case were it 
not for the existence of trade agreements. The 
lowering of our tariffs as the result of these 
agreements has afforded foreign countries the 
opportunity of exchanging larger amounts of 
their goods for American products than would 
otherwise be possible and thus has relieved in 
some measure the pressure on their potential 
dollar-exchange reserves. 

In preparing in the present crisis to defend 
our interests, our homes, and our liberties, we 
must take into account the fact that foreign 
trade is regarded by totalitarian governments 
as a source, not of national prosperity, but of 
political and military power and is employed as 
an instrument of aggression. Wliereas we have 
sought in foreign trade a means for providing, 
i-eciprocally, for the fuller employment of labor 
and for raising living standards of the people 
in general, the dictators have used their trade- 
bargaining power to increase the dependence of 
small countries on totalitarian economy in order 



that such countries might, one at a time, be 
isolated from their friends and neighboi-s and 
more easily brought under their domination. 
That we may not, as the result of such methods, 
find ourselves without friends among our neigh- 
bors in this hemisphere and surrounded on all 
sides by the forces of aggression, tyranny, and 
persecution, we must press forward vigorously, 
but calmly and sanely, with our good-neighbor 
policy in the Americas. 

Tiie chief source of livelihood of our southern 
neighbors is the production of raw materials 
for world markets. Nearly half of their exports 
in 1937 was sold to Europe, but that trade is now 
disrupted as a result of the war. If the burden 
on Latin America of accumulating stocks of ex- 
poi't surpluses is permitted to grow, it may be 
expected that the resistance of the American 
republics to economic penetration from the Old 
World will be undermined and weakened. This 
problem of Latin-American export surpluses is 
one of immediate importance to which, as you 
know, this Government is giving serious atten- 
tion. Its solution is highly important to the 
security of this hemisphere. 

The basic need, however, of the defense and 
prosperity of the Americas is the continued de- 
velopment of closer economic relations among 
the American republics. There is need of each 
opening wider its markets to the products of the 
other republics, of developing industries to sup- 
ply those markets, and of lending financial and 
technical assistance for this and other purposes. 

I am sure that you are aware of the marked 
advance which has already been made in this 
direction under the administration's good- 
neighbor policy. Of outstanding importance in 
this connection are the trade agreements which 
this Government has entered into with 11 Amer- 
ican republics, containing mutual guaranties 
of fair treatment and providing reciprocally for 
increased market opportunities through a low- 
ering of import barriers. Even opponents of 
the trade-agreements program who have 
shouted "wolf, wolf" the loudest have benefited 
from its stimulus to foreign trade and the re- 
sulting expansion of the domestic market for 
their products. Nevertheless, the opposition of 



84 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



sectional and special interests has constituted a 
serious threat to the very existence of the trade 
program. Thanks to their short-sighted greed 
and also perhaps to the activities of similar 
privilege-seeking groups abroad, the trade- 
agreements program has not been advanced as 
far in our relations with the other American 
republics as might be desired, especially in view 
of the present need of American economic 
solidarity which the protection of conunon in- 
terests demands. In this connection attention 
may be called to our prohibition, under the guise 
of sanitary laws, against meat imports from 
certain areas of South America not aii'ected by 
the disease against which sanitary safeguards 
are sought. The failure of this Government to 
provide warranted relief from such sanitary 
regulations and the indifference which would 
appear to be evidenced thereby toward the de- 
velopment of closer mter- American relations do 
not inspire the cooperation which is necessary 
to the building up of an adequate hemispheric 
defense. 

Although the people of this country are on 
guard against fifth-column activities, they do 
not appear to be alert yet to the more subtle 
danger of the existence within our midst of a 
sixth column composed of special interests who, 
out of blind selfishness, would sacrifice the 
common good for personal gain. 

What the nature of our international trade 
i-elations will be after the war, no one of course 
knows. We are in a position however to exert 
a positive influence on such relations in this 
hemisphere. If the divided interests of this 
country would realize that their welfare is bas- 
ically dependent upon the welfare and strength 
of the Nation as a whole and would by united 
and vigorous efforts urge full cooperation with 
the other American republics, including recip- 
rocal reductions in trade barriers and mutual 
assurances of fair and equitable commercial 
treatment, we should be able not only to lay 
the economic foundations of hemispheric de- 
fense but also to secure compensation in larger 
inter-American trade for ourselves and other 
American republics for possible losses in trade 
■with other parts of the world. 



The future of our trade with other parts of 
the world depends in part, it appears, on fac- 
tors beyond our immediate control. Whatever 
the developments in this field may be, they are 
apt to bring home to the American businessman 
with a jolt the basic truth reflected in our trade- 
agreement policy ; namely, that exports depend 
ultimately on imports. 

For nearly two decades, American business, 
representing both agriculture and industry, has 
been trying to increase its sales abroad while 
at the same time seeking to restrict its foreign 
purchases. One of the factors making possible 
our large excess of exports over imports in the 
decade of the twenties was foreign loans. In 
the early years of the thirties, a large part of 
these loans were in default, and we virtually 
discontinued lending and investing abroad. 
We continued nevertheless to maintain an ex- 
cess of exports over imports, and foreign coun- 
tries were thus forced to balance their payments 
with us by large shipments of gold to this 
country until they have become largely drained 
of their gold reserves while we have accumu- 
lated a useless surplus. 

If we are to receive payment from abroad on 
account of goods exported, services rendered, 
and funds invested, it appears that we must be 
prepared to receive a lai'ger jjart of it in the 
form of goods for feeding, clothing, and shel- 
tering our population. 

The sooner we recognize that trade is essen- 
tially barter, an exchange of goods for goods, 
the better position we shall be in to safeguard 
our international commerce and protect Amer- 
ican agriculture and industry whose prosperity 
is dependent on world mai'kets and access to 
world supplies of raw materials. By what 
methods this exchange of goods is to be effected 
is, however, a matter of great concern to us. 
Shall it be conducted on a liberal most-favored- 
nation or multilateral basis, or on a preferential 
and restricted basis of bilateral trade-balancing? 
For instance, shall we, as has been possible under 
a most-favored-nation system of world trade, 
accept raw materials from southeastern Asia as 
payment in part for our exports to Europe, or 
shall we, as a result of bilateralism, be forced 



AUGUST 3, 1940 

to accept instead European products for wliicli 
we may liave less need. 

I suspect that those wlio advocate the adop- 
tion by this Government of barter or clearing 
urranpements are really at heart high-protec- 
tionists who mistake such streamlined trade 
controls as miracle-working devices for promot- 
ing exports without increasing imports. If our 
trade with southeastern Asia, for example, in 
which our imports far exceed our exports, were 
subject to such arrangements, efforts to bring 
about a more evenly balanced trade might con- 
ceivably result in a serious curtailment of our 
imports of essential raw materials. But assume 
for the sake of argument that we were able by 
such efforts to force southeastern Asia to in- 
crease its purchases of American products. 
This would necessitate naturally a curtailment 
of its imports from other countries, especially 
European countries, whose purchases of Amer- 
ican products exceed for the most part their 
sales to us. On the basis of actual experience 
of various countries with bilateralistic controls, 
it might be expected that the loss of European 
markets in southeastern Asia would lead the 
European countries eventually to seek a more 
evenly balanced ti-ade with us; in other words, 
to increase their sales in this market or to re- 
duce their imports of American products. 

Suppose that we should be trading after the 
war on a bilateralistic basis and should have 
open to us under a clearing arrangement a large 
European market for American products. Un- 
der such an arrangement, the American export- 
er would receive, in payment for their 
merchandise, credits abroad in terms of a for- 
eign currency. In order to convert the proceeds 
of their export sales into dollars, they would 
either have to use these credits themselves for 
the purchase of foreign goods for sale in this 
country or, directly or indirectly, sell them to 
American importers for the same purpose or 
to other Americans having financial obligations 
to meet abroad. But since the foreign funds 
could not be spent in any foreign market except 
the one employing the foreign currency in ques- 
tion, the American demand for the i^roducts 



85 



available in that market or obligations to be 
met in that particular curi-ency might not be 
great enough to provide for the disposal of the 
blocked funds. In order that the American ex- 
porters might finally obtain dollars for their 
goods, import duties on certain foreign products 
might be substantially reduced to encourage 
their sale in this country or, if the American 
exporters were permitted to do so under the 
terms of the clearing agreement, they might 
sell their foreign credits to American importers 
at a discount, which would also stimulate im- 
ports but at the expense of the exporters and 
domestic producers. It is more likely, however, 
that great pressure would be brought to bear 
on the Government to relieve the American 
exporters of their blocked funds and that the 
Govei-nment would come to possess a frozen 
supply of assets abroad in addition to its buried 
stocks of gold in Kentucky. 

Even if our foreign trade, in order to meet 
the demand in some quarters for further 
streamlining, were turned over to a Govern- 
ment-owned "Amtorg" corporation or any other 
new-model trade set-up. the necessity of accept- 
ing imports in payment for exports covM not 
he avoided. This necessity is the essence of 
trade, but, if the exchange of exports for im- 
ports were effected through bilateralistic chan- 
nels, we should not be free to buy where or what 
we pleased, nor to buy nor to sell in the best 
markets. Consequently, the benefits to be de- 
rived from such an exchange under bilateralism 
tend to disappear and trade, exports as well as 
imports, is discouraged. 

Incidentally, I might point out that merely 
the administrative requirements and compli- 
cated procedures arising in connection with 
trade controls would in themselves constitute 
a heavy burden on foreign commerce. Many of 
you have probably shared with us the recent 
experience which throws some light upon the 
nature of the administrative and regulatory 
problems which stem from any measure of trade 
control. I refer to the problems which attended 
the setting up of the export-licensing system 
required under the National Defense Act which 



86 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



went into effect at midniglit, July 4, 1940, to con- 
trol exports of military equipment and muni- 
tions and certain related manufactures and 
materials, which might be needed for our own 
defense purposes. 

I can well understand the difficulties which 
faced those of you who had to obtain at short 
notice licenses to cover shipments about to be 
loaded aboard the steamer; perhaps you can 
understand the difficulty which faced the admin- 
istrative officials in dealing with a sudden flood 
of thousands of applications at the very time 
that the entire set-up for examining applica- 
tions and issuing licenses had to be thought out 
and organized. Many of these problems are, of 
course, solved after the initial period is passed 
and the system settles down to a routine operat- 
ing basis, but let me remind you that each new 
control and each new regulation involves, first, 
some initial period of confusion and, secondly, 
additional routine and the inevitable prospect of 
recurrent problems of definition and interpre- 
tation, all of which is reflected in delay and 
expense. 

Control over the exports of a limited number 
of products for national-defense purposes is a 
comparatively simple matter. You can well 
imagine how complicated and burdensome the 
administrative problems and regulations might 
be in the event that our trade were conducted on 
the basis of barter transactions, clearing agree- 
ments, or exchange control. 

It is not because of fidelity to noble sentiments 
or of an allegiance to so-called old-fashioned 
doctrines that we must continue to uphold the 
multilateral principles of the trade-agreements 
program, but because practical considerations 
and hard-headed business sense leave no other 



course open. The basic proposition underlying 
our commercial policy is that foreign trade is a 
vital factor in the prosperity, strength and peace 
of the Nation ; our policy is to foster such trade. 
So long as we hold the national interests above 
those of any economic group or section of the 
country, no change in that policy is possible. 

We must, of course, be prepared to effect any 
adjustment in our trade program, or to adopt 
any supplementary measures, which conditions 
in a war-torn and chaotic world may require, 
and, possibly, as in other fields of our national 
life, to resort temporarily to measures for which 
we basically have no liking. A realistic ap- 
proach, however, to emergency problems of 
international commercial relations should not 
obscure from view the importance of taking 
now wliatever action is possible to preserve and 
strengthen the principles of liberal trade. 

The trade-agreements program is at this time 
a factor of vital significance to the future of 
our economic relations with the other countries 
of this hempisphere and also to the New-World 
defense of freedom and democracy. As long 
as we remain a free people, the question of 
whether this program shall be relegated "to 
the heaven of lost causes" will be decided, not 
bj' Mr. Hitler, but by you, through the demo- 
cratic right to vote, to make representations to 
your Government, and to speak freely. I can 
not believe that the cause of libei'al trade is 
lost any more than that the cause of liberalism 
and democracy itself is lost. It is my convic- 
tion that, notwithstanding the machinations of 
special interests, whether represented by petty 
lobbyists or power dictators, democracy will 
finally triumph in its struggle for prosperity, 
equality, and freedom. 



AUGUST 3, 194 



87 



Address by Raymond H. Geist : Reorganization Changes in the Foreign Service of the United 

States « 



[Released to the press July 29] 

I have been asked to present at this session 
of the Twenty-seventh National Foreign Trade 
Convention a statement regarding the recent 
reorganization changes in the Foreign Service 
of the United States. 

Under the President's Reorganization Plan 
No. II, which went into effect July 1, 1939, the 
Foreign Services of the Departments of Com- 
merce and Agriculture were combined with the 
Foreign Service of the United States. It will 
be recalled that, according to tliis plan, all com- 
mercial attaches and agricultural attaches be- 
came Foreign Service officers and, consequently, 
officers of the Department of State, functioning 
at our missions abroad under the direction of 
the Secretary of State. This plan has now been 
in effect over a year. These changes were 
brought about after mature deliberation by re- 
sponsible officers not only in the Department of 
State, but also in the Departments of Commerce 
and Agriculture. It was not a plan hastily de- 
vised. Tlie advantages inherent in effecting a 
well-unified organization in our Foreign Serv- 
ice, especially in connection with those factors 
having directly to do with the all-important task 
of promoting the foreign trade of the United 
States, have been recognized for many years. 
However, such changes are not readily brought 
about; they pass through a process of evolu- 
tion, which process is sometimes accelerated by 
the exigencies and imperative needs of the times. 
But such changes, when they are effected 
through the need of reaching a state of greater 
efficiency, represent a definite step forward. 

It is well known that one of the tendencies 
in government generally is to create overlap- 
ping and duplication of effort, and there must 
be a steady alertness at all times to counteract 
this. "We are always prone to add something 



"Delivered before the Twenty-seventh National For- 
eign Trade Convention, San Francisco, July 29, 1940. 
Mr. Geist is Chief of the Division of Commercial 
Aflfaii's, Department of State. 



new to what already exists, believing that a 
new or supplementary organization will take up 
the loose ends of the old. It is a far better prac- 
tice to strengthen existing organization and 
bring about efficient miiiication. This was the 
primary object of the reorganization recently 
put into effect in the Foreign Service. By this 
consolidation three separate organizations, 
under three different departments of the Gov- 
ernment, with three independent services and 
corps of officers, became one. 

These changes were not made, as must be em- 
phasized, solely for the sake of good adminis- 
tration. That alone would be sufficient reason 
for effecting unification, and much could be said 
from that point of view, but the primary reason 
has been to afford the commercial and agricul- 
tural interests of the United States the most 
effective and efficient Foreign Service i^ossible. 
This was the chief aim in view; this aim has 
been achieved. 

I may say briefly that at a time like this, 
when foreign affairs become so important to 
our national interests, it is highly important 
that no confusion exist in the organization of 
the machinery of government through which we 
conduct our foreign relations. Nearly all de- 
partments of our Government have some inter- 
ests abroad and are in need of information of 
one sort or another from other countries. The 
Foreign Service, uniting the abilities, talents, 
and energies of trained officers, is equipped to 
serve our national interests on the widest scale 
and to satisfy these demands to the fullest 
extent. It is not necessary except, probably, 
on temporary assignment, to send specialists 
abroad to supplement the qualifications of 
officers permanently on duty. With the addi- 
tion of the commercial and agricultural attaches 
to the staffs of diplomatic and consular offices 
stationed abroad, our Foreign Service is pre- 
pared to fulfill every task which circumstances 
and emergencies may impose upon it. We may 
congratulate ourselves that owing to the fore- 
sight of those officers in our Government who 



88 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



were willing to devote their energies, wisdom, 
and untiring elforts to these problems, our 
country faces the threatening international 
situation with a well-unified and splendidly 
organized and equipped Foreign Service, second 
to none. 

It is unnecessary at this time to go into the 
impelling reasons which prompted the Govern- 
ment to effect the consolidation of the various 
services abroad. The events which are now 
taking place on the international stage afford 
sufficient argimient to establish unity wherever 
it may be attained. It is singularly fortunate 
that at least on the diplomatic front our organ- 
izations have been adequately prepared to meet 
the added tasks and responsibilities which in- 
ternational events impose; the Foreign Service 
of the United States is ready to meet these 
emergencies. No one will deny that the conduct 
of foreign relations today is a matter of primary 
importance to any government. Hasty efforts 
to set up an efficient diplomatic and consular 
service might indeed prove more disappointing 
and difficult than putting the countiy in a state 
of adequate military defense. Both require 
time and a great wealth of experience and 
knowledge. The Foreign Service of the United 
States has been in process of formation foi- at 
least a hundred and fifty years. During the last 
generation great advances have been made, and 
only a year ago the last step toward luiity and 
completeness of organization has been achieved. 
In these times when international events have 
become not only the preoccupation of the Gov- 
ernment but of every American citizen, it will 
be some comfort to know that we have a strong 
Depai'tment of State and a strong and vigorous 
Foreign Service. It is of vital importance for 
the commercial and industrial interests of this 
country to know that our diplomatic and con- 
sular establishments abroad are efficiently or- 
ganized and adequately staffed ; that the officers 
from the ambassadors and ministers down 
through the ranks are experienced and compe- 
tent. But no matter how competent the officers 
are and how well qualified to undertake the im- 
portant tasks entrusted to them, it is well known 
that division of responsibility and lack of unity 



may well frustrate the most sincere and earnest 
efforts. It may be that this lack of unity in pre- 
vious years did not even then prevent a good 
job of trade promotion being done. The fine 
record of our commercial attaches and Foreign 
Service officers during the more normal years of 
international commercial intercourse, I believe, 
will sufficiently prove this. Let me quote from 
a memorandum prepared in the Department of 
State on the question of consolidation : 

"The first reason for consolidation arises 
from the fact that the fundamental factors 
involved in foreign-trade promotion have 
profoundly changed. After the passage of 
the M'ar yeai's there was a certain decrease in 
American shipments abroad, due to the reen- 
try of competing countries in world markets, 
but our exports increased annually until 1929, 
due largely to three factors: the quality of 
American goods, mass production in the 
United States, and the enormous amount of 
capital funds lent abroad by this country. 
The problem facing the consular officers of 
tlie Department of State and the commercial 
attaches of the Department of Commerce was 
in those day of I'elative simplicity. They 
were asked to find competent distributors in 
good standing with no competing lines for 
jn-oducts in which the American exporters 
were interested. A wealtli of information of 
a commercial natui'e was accinnulated ; exteii- 
sive lists of the importers of all kinds of proil- 
ucts in all countries in the woi'ld were com- 
piled ; thousands of reports on distribution, 
competition, and standing of foreign firms 
were written by our officers, until today the 
World Trade Directory file, largely prepared 
by consular officers, in the Department of 
Connnerce, contains the names of almost 700 
thousand firms. Under the old technique of 
exporting this would be all that the exporter 
would need to have. With the knowledge 
(hat he could compete with his merchandise 
and with precise information as to the stand- 
ing of a prospective distributor in a given 
country, he was ready to do business. In 
many instances the only obstacle to further 



AUGUST 3, 1940 



89 



advanceincnt of American expoi-tiiif; in a 
given market was the limit of the purchasing 
power of the population for imported goods. 

"This picture has completely and rapidly 
changed in the last few years and may be ex- 
pected to continue to change. In many mar- 
kets, the questions whether the American ex- 
porter is on a competitive basis, whether his 
goods are of better quality, or whether the 
importer and (he public in general are de- 
manding his merchandise, are of no conse- 
quence in the face of a local quota policy 
barring all imports of that connnodity in 
order to protect some incipient national in- 
dustry, or ill the presence of a clearing or 
barter agreement. On the otlier hand, the 
importer may be faced by an excliange-control 
policy so devised that if the American ex- 
porter is not actually precluded by it from 
entrance into the market he can only sell goods 
in that market with the realization that the 
proceeds of his sale may be tied up indefinitely 
in a central bank awaiting issuance of dollar 
exchange by the government authorities in 
sole charge of this function. 

"We must realize that the essence of this 
situation is that the old technique of trade 
promotion does not meet our present needs. 
The problem today of furthering our foreign- 
trade interest is in a large measure one of 
keeping open the channels of trade by nego- 
tiating with the central government through 
the medium of the Foreign Service of the 
Department of State, that is, ambassadors, 
ministers, and Foreign Service officei-s with 
representative capacities." 

I would not assume that the gentlemen who 
have come here as delegates to the Twenty- 
seventh Annual Convention of the National 
Foreign Trade Council are interested alone in 
the effectiveness of the Foreign Service of the 
United States from the point of view of trade 
promotion. Our interests today are broader and 
more vital than that. If we are threatened, 
the first onslaught may be against our economic 
security and the position of our trade in the 
markets of the world, against which eventuali- 



ties we shall need to avail oui-selves of every 
measure of protection. The task of defending 
our economic and commercial interests abroad is 
one of the paramount duties of the Department 
of State and the Foreign SerA-ice of the United 
States. Today this has become a major job, and 
according to the present outlook will become 
more imperative as time goes on. 

In every process of recession in the course of 
time there sets in a countermovement. Recov- 
ery of the position of our foreign trade may be 
achieved only through extraordinary effort 
which we must be prepared to put forth when 
the time comes. The Foreign Service has been 
organized to do its part not only in promoting 
our foreign trade, in protecting it, but is also 
ready and equipped to battle ahead in the 
struggle for its recovery. 

It will not be surprising to you to learn that 
during the last 12 months an unprecedented 
strain has been placed upon our officers in the 
field. Not only is this the fact with respect 
to nearly every office in the Service from the 
point of view of work and multiplicity of re- 
sponsibilities and duties, but also with regard 
to the Service as a whole. During this period 
the Government has closed 5 missions in vari- 
ous capitals of the world and 14 consular offices. 
During the same period 1 new mission has been 
opened and 17 consular offices. Diplomatic rep- 
resentation was withdrawn from Tirana, Al- 
bania, on September 16. 1939; from Brussels, 
Luxemburg, Oslo, and The Hague on July 15, 
1940. Since then the new mission at Canberra, 
Australia, has been opened. The Consulate 
General at Warsaw has never formally been 
closed, but it is no longer functioning. The 
Consulates have been closed at Strasbourg, 
Havre, Lille, Calais, and Cherbourg in France. 
The office at Danzig has been removed to 
Konigsberg in East Prussia. Breslau in Ger- 
many was closed a few days after the outbreak 
of war in Europe. We have closed our offices 
at Hull, England, and Dimdee, Scotland. In 
this hemisphere we have closed the Consulates 
at Saltillo, Mexico, and St. Pierre-Miquelon. 
The Consulate at Ensenada, Mexico, has been 
transferred to Tijuana, and that at London, 



90 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Ontario, to Sarnia. We have opened Consu- 
lates in Iceland and in Greenland. Additional 
consular establishments have been set up in 
certain jilaces in Canada, Colombia, West In- 
dies, British Guiana, and Brazil. These 
changes indicate the strain which the interna- 
tional crisis has placed upon diplomatic and 
consular activity in various parts of the world. 
Nevertheless, in spite of these grave events our 
Foreign Service establishments have continued 
to f miction at top speed ; and where our officers 
have had to carry on sometimes in the midst of 
invasions they have not failed to extend every 
protection and aid to American i^iterests 
affected by the course of the war. 

The Department, however, has not inter- 
rupted the program which has now been in 
progress for some time of combining the various 
governmental establishments at the capitals 
into unified offices. At present there are 33 
missions in the world where all the activities 
of the governmental agencies are under one 
roof, and where a single administration under 
the supervision of the Ambassador or Minister 
has been established. This scheme of uniting 
all governmental activities in one mission has 
made it possible to carry out effectively the pro- 
visions of the Reorganization Plan by which 
the commercial and agricultural attaches be- 
came officers of the Foreign Service of the 
United States. There have been established at 
the missions where we have combined offices 
sections which have been designated reporting 
units. These reporting units have been placed 
everywhere in charge of the commercial at- 
taches, whose duties are to direct the reporting 
work done primarily for the Department of 
Commerce, carry on trade promotion on behalf 
of the business interests of the United States, 
superintend the work of answering trade in- 
quiries, the preparation of World Trade Direc- 
tory Reports, trade lists, and other related 
activities. Besides, in order that as much unity 
may be achieved as is practicable, the reporting 
work of all consular establishments within the 
jurisdiction of the mission has been likewise 
placed under the supervision of the commercial 
attaches. This plan has now been in effect since 



July 1, 1939 ; but in certain cases the reporting 
units were not set up immediately, and the full 
scheme of coordination has been delayed owing 
to the sudden occurrence of events brought 
about by the war. Nevertheless the physical 
amalgamation of our agencies abroad under 
one roof in the various capitals where the De- 
partment has been able to carry the plan 
through has afforded almost everywhere in the 
Service the immediate opportunity of setting 
up the reporting units I have just described. 
The first year of this new organization has dem- 
onstrated the soundness of the plan, particu- 
larly from the administrative point of view. 
We have been able under this new arrangement 
to maintain fully unified organizations at a 
time when single administration was essential. 
Due to world conditions a large volume of re- 
ports from the field is being interrupted 
through lack of transportation and by the fact 
that certain offices abroad are having their re- 
porting work temporarily interfered with by 
events caused by the war, as in France and other 
countries now under military occupation. 
Nevertheless, the statistics of reporting work 
show a considerable increase during the first 
six months of 1940 compared to the same period 
in 1939. 

Volume of Work Increase * 
(6-months period from Jan. 1 to June 30) 



Type of work 


1939 


1940 


Percent of 
increase 


Economic reports 


13, 977 


17, 124 


22}^ 


for reading, distribution, 








grading, and filing. 








Telegraphic reports 


1,371 


2, 154 


57 


for reading and distribution . 








Letters from Dept. of Com- 


5,011 


6, 144 


23 


merce for transmittal, etc. 








Letters from firms 


291 


437 


50 


for reply and action. 









" Partial statistics of work performed in the Division of Commercial 
Affairs, i>epartment of State. 

Tlie volume of trade letters transmitted from 
the field in reply to trade inquiries from Amer- 
ican business interests is not included in the 
abo\'e figures, owing to the new system of reply- 
ing to certain types of trade inquiries prepared 



AUGUST 3, 1940 



91 



ill tlie form of reports whicli have been desig- 
nated as market surveys. 

The changes which have been made in the 
manner of transmitting certain material from 
the field are as follows: replies to trade in- 
([iiiries from American firms or individuals 
concerning an agency connection, or a market 
survey involving the recommendation of an 
agent or distributor, are eniliodied in the form 
of a report and transmitted in envelopes direct 
to the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Com- 
merce for transmission to the American in- 
quirer; World Trade Directory Reports, of 
which the automatic annual revision has been 
discontiiHied, are transmitted direct to the 
Bureau, likewise all trade lists, trade disputes 
and complaints, and invitations to alien busi- 
nessmen. 

It lias been, and will continue to be, the pri- 
mary duty of officei-s of the Foreign Service to 
further the agricultural and commercial inter- 
ests of the United States. They conduct care- 
ful studies and report on the potentialities of 
their districts as a market for American ])rod- 
ucts or as a competitor of American products in 
international trade. They investigate the stand- 
ing of firms and their distributing capacity and 
incorporate this information in World Trade 
Directory Reports which are sent to the Bureau 
of Foreign and Domestic Commerce where they 
are available to American interests. Officers 
throughout the Service compile and submit 
upon request trade lists of conmiercial firms in 
their districts. They are constantl}- on the alert 
for concrete trade opportunities which are 
promptly submitted by mail or telegraph. 
There is, besides, a constant endeavor to create 
within the scope of the duties of officers sta- 
tioned abroad a demand for American prod- 
ucts in the countries where such officers are 
assigned. American interests are also pro- 
moted by taking appropriate steps to facilitate 
the promotion of such import trade into the 
United States as the economic interests of the 
United States may require. These duties are 
in accordance with the requirements laid down 
in the Foi'eign Service regulations. 



There are, moreover, certain rules to be ob- 
served in replying to trade inquiries. I mention 
this because I understand that certain exporters 
are desirous of having more information as to 
the procedure followed in this respect by the 
commercial attaches and consuls abroad. The 
regulations provide that officers shall answer 
trade inrjuiries promptly and with their replies 
enclose trade-information sheets describing the 
commercial and economic aspects of their dis- 
trict. These answers are to be specific and com- 
plete. It happens sometimes that it is not pos- 
sible to complete an investigation at once, and 
in such cases acknowledgments are sent to the 
inquirer advising that the complete reply will 
follow. It may be pointed out, however, that if 
the inquiry concerns a subject on which the 
officer has already rendered an adequate report, 
he may confine his reply to a brief synopsis of 
the information contained in the report and also 
make the statement in his reply to the effect 
that current and comj^lete information may be 
obtained upon application to the Bureau of For- 
eign and Domestic Commerce or to the nearest 
district office. Firms seeking information con- 
cerning the markets for their goods in foreign 
countries should bear in mind that a large vol- 
ume of data and commercial information has 
been already made available in Washington; 
and it is possible tliat all the information re- 
quired is on file in the Bureau of P'oreign and 
Domestic Commerce. In any case when a report 
has been sent in on a specific commoditj', sub- 
sequent inquirers will be advised to address 
themselves to the Bureau of Foreign and Do- 
mestic Commerce. 

In view of the present condition of world 
trade in many countries today it would be a 
waste of tune for officers to undertake to make 
investigations and prepare market surveys for 
commodities and articles which cannot be im- 
ported. Owing to trade restrictions which exist 
in certain countries, such as import licenses, or 
lack of exchange, or the application of a com- 
mercial policy which temporarily prevents the 
importation of American goods, or the export 
of certain classes of material, it would be pur- 



92 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



poseless for the commercial attaches or con- 
sular officers to go farther in their replies to 
trade inquiries than to state the pertinent facts. 
It is obvious that no real purpose can be served 
in furnisliing complete market information 
when conditions beyond control render the ex- 
port of goods from the United States to certain 
countries impossible. 

Let lue also, in this connection, make an ex- 
planation about World Trade Directory Re- 
ports. American firms receive inquiries from 
foreign firms and individuals who are in no 
position to enter into contracts for the importa- 
tion of goods or make agency arrangements. 
Often tlie names of such inquirers are not con- 
tained in local directories or known even to 
existing credit-rating agencies. Their places of 
business are not infrequently situated in out- 
lying provincial towns outside of commercial 
centers to which a visit by a consular repre- 
sentative is impracticable and, from the point 
of view of expense, prohibitive. World Trade 
Directory Reports on such firms are unobtain- 
able. It would be better policy for American 
firms to refrain from seeking to do business with 
firms of this standing and character and con- 
fine their efforts to houses or individuals of 
establislied reputation and on whom credit 
information is readily available. 

Under the Economy Act of June 30, 1932, the 
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce has 
been obliged to make a charge, the amount to 
be fixed on a reasonable basis by the Secretary 
of Commerce, for certain services rendered to 
American business firms and individuals. Since 
the first of May 1940 a charge has been col- 
lected by the Bureau not only for World Trade 
Directory Reports, which charge has been fixed 
at $1.00, but also for trade lists compiled by 
the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Com- 
merce for distribution to American business 
firms desiring such lists. In connection with 
this service a new procedure has been adopted 
in replying to certain types of trade inquiries. 
On receipt of an inquiry from an American firm 
or individual concerning an agency connection, 
or a market survey involving the recommenda- 



tion of an agent or a distributor, prompt 
acknowledgments are made by the commercial 
attache or by the consular officer receiving tlie 
inquiry. In these acknowledgments it is stated 
that suitable connections are being investigated 
and that appropriate recommendations will be 
transmitted through the Bureau of Foreign and 
Domestic Commerce. After tlie commercial 
attache or consul has made the necessary inves- 
tigation and a personal canvass has been made 
of prospective agents or distributors, a reply in 
the form of a repoit is prepared and trans- 
mitted direct to the Bureau of Foreign and 
Domestic Commerce for transmission to the 
original inquirer. In connection with such re- 
port a list is transmitted of the names of agents 
or distributors who have expressed an interest 
in the goods offered. 

A new system has also been inaugurated with 
regard to the handling of trade opj^ortunities 
forwarded to the Bureau of Foreign and Dom- 
estic Commei-ce by the commercial attaches and 
consular officers. Trade opportunities are di- 
vided into two classes: those dealing with the 
outright purchase of goods and those affording 
opportunities for agency or distributor connec- 
tions. Those offering the outright purchase 
of goods are published, and those from firms 
seeking to act as agents or distributors are filed 
and furnished to American firms only on re- 
quest. A charge is made for this service. I 
may also add in summing up the activity of the 
Foreign Service in connection with the promo- 
tion of the trade of the United States that com- 
mercial attaches and consular officers whose 
positions abroad have afforded them unusual 
opportunities for becoming familiar with trade 
conditions in the countries where they have 
been stationed will be available for trade-con- 
ference work in the United States as heretofore 
when they return on leaves of absence. 

The Departments of State, Commerce, and 
Agriculture maintain tlie closest liaison in order 
to coordinate evei'y phase of tlie work of the 
Foreign Service on behalf of the agi-icultural 
and commercial interests of the United States 
carrying on foreign trade. I have given a de- 



AUGUST 3, 1940 

scription of the present status of oui- problems 
and efforts. It is impossible to foresee what 
changes may be necessary in organization or 
metliod to meet tlie situations wliicli the steadily 
shifting scene in mternational trade may create. 
It appears reasonable to expect, however, that 
any schemes which we may develop to further 
our interests abroad or any plans which may 
be elaborated to fortify and extend the com- 
mercial and economical prestige of the United 
States in international trade will have to be 
organized on a basis which takes into consid- 
eration the existing structure of the Foreign 



93 



Service, which is composed of officers possess- 
ing wide and extensive knowledge of the prob- 
lems involved in international trade. 

While studying and acting upon the grave 
political problems facing us in the international 
field, we must, above all, continue to establish 
our foreign trade and our economic position in 
the world on a sound and strong basis. What 
we must do will be courageously and boldly 
determined and carried out. The next step is 
to consider ways and means of organizing our- 
selves further, and then to determine how to 
strengthen and perfect the uistrunients of gov- 
ernment to meet these tasks. 



Statement by Raymond H. Geist: Administration of the Export Control Act^ 



[Released to the press July 30] 

For the benefit of those who might have ques- 
tions to ask regarding the procedure to be fol- 
lowed in making applications for licenses to 
export articles and materials (other than arms, 
anuininition, and implements of war and tin- 
plate scrap) designated by the President as nec- 
essary to the national defense pursuant to 
.section G of the act of Congress approved July 2, 
194U, and known generally as the "Export Con- 
trol Act", I might opportunely make a few 
suggestions. 

It must first of all be borne in mind that the 
provisions of the act went into effect on July 5, 
only three days after its api)roval, and that the 
Fourth of July, a national holiday, came in 
between. It was necessary during this period 
to have the text of the act made available to 
exporters as well as the regulations prescribed 
by the President and the forms of application. 
Though the forms and all the necessary ex- 
planatory material were rushed through the 
printers as fast as possible, it was not possible 
to get the forms into the hands of the exporters 
during the first few days before the Department 
of State was overwhelmed with requests for 



' Delivered before the Twenty-seventh National For- 
eign Trade Convention, San Francisco, July 29, 1940. 
Mr. Geist is Chief of the Division of Commercial 
Affairs, Department of State. 



information. As you know, tlie administration 
of the provisions of section 6 of the act is vested 
in an Administrator of Export Control to which 
office Colonel Maxwell, an Army officer, has been 
appointed. The mechanical work of handling 
tlie applications and acting upon them under 
t he direction of the Administrator of Controls is 
centralized in the Division of Controls in the 
Di'partment of State. The machinery thus set 
up must of necessity be centralizi'd in Wash- 
ington, and, therefore, any wish on the part of 
business interests of the country to have the 
procedure decentralized throughout various re- 
gions of the country is not feasible. 

The forms and texts and explanatory mate- 
rial have been sent out generally to those firms 
in the country who it was believed might be 
directly interested. Forms have also been 
made available at the New York Customhouse. 
They are immediately available now at the De- 
partment of State, Division of Controls. A 
few suggestions in coimection with the pro- 
cedure may be given : 

It would be in the interest of certain firms 
who are regularly engaged in export business 
to appoint a competent person to handle these 
applications, so that he can familiarize himself 
with the procedure and the details in making 
out the forms of applications for licenses. This 



94 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



will avoid the necessity of frequent long- 
distance calls and special trips to Washington 
by a representative of the company. An over- 
whelming majority of the questions which are 
asked would not be necessary if a representa- 
tive of the company would make it his special 
task to be familiar with the text of the procla- 
mation, the regulations, and the form of appli- 
cation. The fonns, regulations, and instruc- 
tions are clear enough; but, as in all matters, 
a certain amount of experience and familiarity 
with the procedure is valuable and contributes 
to the smooth and easy and prompt working 
of the whole process. 

In this connection it may be suggested that 
it is not necessary for export houses to engage 
the services of lawyers in Wasliington to make 
out these applications for a fee. No lawyers, 
agents, or intermediaries are necessary. 

By the end of the first week after the act 
had been signed, the Department had received 
10 thousand letters and telegrams asking ques- 
tions of various sorts, and it is easy to imagine 
to what degree the existing organization, which 
was rapidly being expanded, was overburdened 
and deluged beyond capacity. Tliese inquiries 
are now coming in at the rate of about 800 
a day. 

Exporters are asking many questions by tele- 
gram, by long-distance telephone, and letter, of 
which the following is typical, "Does the expor- 
tation of a patent medicine which has a drop of 
chlorine in it require an export license?" It is 
much better, and exporters are urged, to make 
out the application on the form provided for 
that pui'pose, giving a very careful description 
of the article or materials to be exported, and 
to send the application in to the Division of 
Controls in the Department of State as a test 
case. If directions are carefully followed as 
indicated in (c) of the General Instructions on 
the form of application, where it states, "Arti- 



cles and materials appearing under (7) below 
should be designated clearly and specifically, 
the type and model designation being included 
whenever applicable", it will be much easier 
for the Administrator of Export Control to act 
speedily on the application itself than to give 
information in advance without having all the 
details as required on the form of application. 
Finally, let me say that the attention of ex- 
porters is directed especially to the second from 
the last paragraph on page three of the mimeo- 
graphed regulations which reads: 

Except as otherwise iuclieated tbe terras used in 
these regiUations shall not include completely fab- 
ricated articles or materials which are ready for 
ultimate consumption. 

However, wherever there is legitimate doubt 
as to whether or not the article requires an ex- 
port license the question should be settled by 
making the application on the prescribed 
printed form. If no license is required, the form 
will be returned in a few days plainly stamped 
"No license required". The mechanics of han- 
dling these applications, granting or refusing 
the licenses, will presently be working smoothly, 
and it is believed that as a rule applications can 
be handled in Washington within a week's time. 
In all cases, it is advisable to make the applica- 
tion as much in advance of contemplated manu- 
facture or shipment as possible. 

EXPORT OF AVIATION GASOLINE 

[Released to the press by the White House July 31] 

Col. R. L. Maxwell, Administrator of Export 
Control, recommends, and the President ap- 
proves, the issuance of the following announce- 
ment: 

In the interests of the national defense the export 
of aviation gasoline is being limited to nations of the 
Western Hemisphere, except where such gasoline is 
required elsewhere for the operations of American- 
owned companies. 



AUGUST 3, 1940 



95 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press August 3] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
Foreign Service since July 27, 1940: 

Orme Wilson, of New York, X. Y., Coun- 
selor of Embassy at Bioissels, Belgium, has been 
assigned for duty in the Department of State. 

S. Walter Washington, of Charles Town, 
W. Va., Second Secretary of Legation and 
Consul at Riga, Latvia, has been assigned as 
Consul at Stockholm, Sweden. 

W. Leonard Parker, of Syracuse, N. Y., Vice 
Consul at Rangoon, Burma, has been assigned 
for duty in tlie Department of State. 

Wales W. Signor, of Ypsilanti, Mich., Vice 
Consul at Guadalajara, Mexico, has been as- 
signed as Vice Consul at Merida, Mexico. 

The assignment of Martin J. Hillenbrand, of 
Chicago, 111., as Third Secretary of Legation 
and Vice Consul at Baghdad, Iraq, has been 
canceled. Mr. Hillenbrand has now been as- 
signed as Vice Consul at Rangoon, Burma. 

The following have been appointed Foreign 
Service officers, uncla.'^sified ; vice consuls of ca- 
reer; and secretaries in the diplomatic service 
of the United States; and they have been as- 
signed as vice consuls at the posts indicated : 

Leonard J. Cromie, New Haven, Conn. ; Montreal 
W. William Duff, New Castle, Pa. ; Habana 
Richard E. Gnade, Oil City, Pa. ; Vancouver 
John M. McSweeney, Boston, Mass. ; Montreal 
Claude G. Ross, Huntington Park, Calif. ; Mexico 

City 
Robert Rossow, Jr.. Culver, Ind. ; Vancouver 
John W. Tuthill, Cambridge, Mass. ; Windsor 
Andrew B. Wardlaw, Jr., Greenville, S. C. ; Toronto 
Frazer Wilkins, Baltimore, Md. ; Halifax 
Elwood Williams, 3d, New York, N. T. ; Winnipeg 

U. Alexis Johnson, of Glendale, Calif., Vice 
Consul at Keijo, Chosen, has been assigned as 
Vice Consul at Mukden, ^Manchuria, China. 



Stephen C. Worster, of Maine, Vice Consul 
at Merida, Mexico, has been appointed Vice 
Consul at Salina Cruz, Oaxaca, Mexico, where 
an American Consulate will be established. 



Publications 



Department of State 



The American Foreign Service: General information for 
applicants and sample entrance examination questions 
Revised to June 1, 1940. Publication 1483. iv, 142 
pp. I'OV. 

Publications of the Department of State (A list cumu- 
lative from October 1, 1929). July 1, 1940. Publication 
14^. 23 pp. Free. 



Other Government Agencies 

Trade of United States with Belgium in 1939. (Depart- 
ment of Commerce: Bureau of Foreign and Domestic 
Commerce, Divisions of Regional Information and 
Foreign Trade Statistics.) May 1940. 7 pp. (proc- 
essed). 10<t. 

Trade of United States with France in 1939. (Depart- 
ment of (Commerce: Bureau of Foreign and Domestic 
Commerce, Divisions of Regional Information and For- 
eign Trade Statistics.) March 1940. 11 pp. (proc- 
essed ) . KV. 

Trade of United States with Germany in 1939. (De- 
partment of Commerce : Bureau of Foreign and Domes- 
tic Commerce, Divisions of Regional Information and 
Foreign Trade Statistics.) April 1940. 11 pp. (proc- 
essed), icy. 

Japan's trade in 1939, with special reference to trade 
with United States. (Department of Commerce: Bu- 
reau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Division of 
Regional Information, Far Eastern Section.) Special 
Circular 403. May 1940. 17 pp. (processed). 50. 

Trade of United States with Mexico in 1939. (Depart- 
ment of Conmierce : Bureau of Foreign and Domestic 
Commerce, Divisions of Regional Information and For- 
eign Trade Statistics.) April 1940. 7 pp. (processed). 

100. 

Trade of United States with Netherlands in 1939. 
(Department of Commerce: Bureau of Foreign and 
Domestic Commerce, Divisions of Regional Information 
and Foreign Trade Statistics.) May 1940. 7 pp. (proc- 
essed). 100. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



COMMERCE 

Treaties and Agreements of the United 
States Containing tlie Most-Favored-Na- 
tion Clause 

The following countries are those with which 
there were in force on July 31, 1940, treaties and 
other agreements of the United States contain- 
ing the most-favored-nation clause governing 
customs duties, regulations, and facilities and 
other charges affecting commerce : * 

Treaties in Force Containing Unconditional 
Most-Fa vobed-Nation Clause • 



Country 


Date in force 


When and how terminable 


China 


June 20, 1929 




(T. S. 773) 




nation. 


Danzig, Free 


Mar. 24, 1934 


Six months after notice by either party. 


City of. 






(T. S. 865) 






El Salvador.... 


Sept. 5,1930 


One year after notice by either party. 


(T. S. 827) 




but not before Sept. 5, 1940. 


Estonia 


May 22, 1926 


One year after notice by either party. 


(T. S. 736) 







Tbeaties in Force Containing Unconditional 
Most-Favoeed-Nation Clause " — Continued 



Country 


Date 


in force 


When and how terminable 


Finland 


Aug. 


10, 1934 


Six months after notice by either party. 


(T. S. 868) 








Honduras 


July 


19, 1928 


One year after notice by either party. 


(T. S. 764) 








Hungary 


Oct. 


4, 1926 


Do. 


(T. S. 748) 












19, 1940 




(T. S. 960) 






but not before June 19, 1943. 


Latvia 


July 


25, 1928 


One year after notice by either party. 


(T. S. 765) 








Liberia. 


Nov. 


21, 1939 


One year after notice by either party 


(T. S. 956) 






but not before Nov. 21, 1944. 


Morocco. 


Jan. 


28, 1837» 


Twelve months after notice by either 


(T. S. 244-2) 






party. 


Muscat 


Sept. 


30, 1835" 


Contains no provision regarding ter- 


(In force also 






mination. 


with Zanzi- 








bar ■<). 








(T. S. 247) 








Norway 


Sept. 


13, 1932 


One year alter notice by either party. 


(T. S. 852) 









*» The numbers in parentheses in this and the following tables refer to 
United States Treaty Series and Executive Agreement Series. 

* Date of ratification by the President of the United States; no date is 
specified in treaty for its entry into force and no ratification by Morocco 
was necessary. 

« Date of exchange of ratifications; the treaty does not specify the date 
of its entry into force. 

' Accepted by Zanzibar after separation from Muscat, Oct. 20. 1879. 



' The instruments listed are reciprocal, that is, the 
most-favored-nation clause applies equaUy to each party 
to the contract, except in the two cases of Morocco and 
Muscat, in which the clau.se is obligatory on the other 
party but not on the United States. Under the most- 
favored-nation clause in a bilateral treaty or agree- 
ment concerning commerce, each of the parties under- 
takes to extend to the goods of the country of the other 
party treatment no less favorable than the treatment 
which it accords to like goods originating in any third 
country. The unconditional form of the most-favored- 
nation clause provides that any advantage, favor, privi- 
lege, or immunity which one of tlie parties may accord 
to the goods of any third country shall be extended 
immediately and unconditionally to the like goods 
originating in the country of the other party. In this 
form only does the clause provide for complete and 
continuous imndiscriminatory treatment. Under the 
conditional form of the clause, neither party is obli- 
gated to extend immediately and unconditionally to 
the like products of the other party the advantages 
which it may accord to products of third countries in 
return for reciprocal concessions; it is obligated to 
extend such advantages only if and when the other 
party grants concessions "equivalent" to the concessions 
96 



made by such third countries. When one part of a 
treaty may be terminated in a different manner from 
other parts, the reference is to the part containing the 
most-favored-nation clause. Where such a clause is 
contained in more than one treaty or agreement with a 
country, the reference is to the later in date. 

Instruments are classified as treaties when they are 
ratified with the consent of the Senate ; as Executive 
agreements when they are acts of the Executive with- 
out reference to the Senate. 

The treaties of the United States relating to A and 
B mandates, with countries mandatories under the 
League of Nations, provide that the commerce of the 
United States shall receive in the mandated areas the 
treatment accorded to the commerce of countries mem- 
bers of the League of Nations. This is essentially most- 
favored-nation treatment. These treaties are with 
Belgium, for Ruanda-Urundi ; France, for Syria and the 
Lebanon, the Cameroun, and Togoland ; and Great Brit- 
ain, for Palestine and Tran.s-Jordan, the Cameroons, 
Tanganyika, and Togoland. The United States has 
not entered into treaties relating to C-mandated terri- 
tories except with Japan, which provides for the same 
treatment in the mandated area that is accorded in 
Japan under existing treaties. 



AUGUST 3, 1940 



97 



Treaties in Force Containing Unconditional 
Most-Favored-Natioit Ciacse " — Continued 



Executive Agreements in Force Containing Uncon- 
ditional Most-Favored-Nation Clause — Continued 



Country 


Date 


in force 


When and how terminable 




July 


9, 1933 


Six months after notice by cither party. 


(T. S. 862) 






Thailand (Si- 


Oct. 


1, 1938 


One year after notice by either party. 


am). 






Initial period Ave years. 


CT. S. WO) 








Turkey 


Apr. 


22, 1930 


One year after notice by cither party. 


(T. S. 813) 








YUROsIavia 


Nov. 


15, 1882 


Do. 


(T. S. 319) 








Zanzibar 








(Sec Muscat) 









Executive Agreements in Force Containing Uncon- 
ditional JIost-Favored-Natidn Clai'se 



Country 


Date in force 


When and how terminable 


Albania 


July 28, 1922- 


Contains no provision regarding termi- 


(not printed) 




nation. 


Bulgaria _ 


Aug. 18,1932 


Three months' notice by either party 


(E. A. S. 41) 




or by legislative action of cither party. 


Chile » 


Feb. 1, 1938 


Until superseded by a more compre- 
hensive commercial agreement or by 


(E. A. S. 119) 


(provision- 




ally) 


a definitive treaty of friendship, com- 




Jan. 6, 1940 


merce, and navigation, or 30 days' 




(definitively) 


notice by either party. 


Dominican Re- 


Sept. 2.5, 1924 


Thirty days after notice by either 


public. 




party, or by legislative action of 


(T. S. 700) 




either party. 


Egypt 


May 24, 1930 


Ninety days after notice by either 
party, or by legislative action of 


(E. A. S. 6) 








either party. 


Greece 


Jan. 1, 1939 


Until superseded by a more compre- 
hensive commercial agreement or by 


(E. A. S. 137) 








a definitive treaty of commerce and 






navigation, or 30 days' notice by 






either party. 


Iran 


May 10, 192S' 


Thirty days after notice by either 
party, or by legislative action of 


(E. A. S. 19) 








either party. 


Italy 


Dec. 16,1937 


Thirty days' notice by either party. 


(E. A. S. 116) 




Lithuania 


July 10, 1926 


Thirty days after notice by either 


(T. S. 742) 




party, or by legislative action of 
either party. 


Rumania _. 


Sept. 1.1930 


Thirty days after notice by either 


(E. A. S. 8) 




party, or by legislative action of 
either party. 


Saudi Arabia.-. 


Nov. 7,1933 


Upon entry into force of a definitive 


(E. A. S. 53) 




treaty of commerce and navigation, 
or by legislative action of the United 
States. 


Spain •* 


Nov. 27, 1927 


Three months* notice by either party. 


(T. S. 758-A) 







" Date of official recognition by the United States. 

* This ap-eeraent wns continued prorisionally in effect by qd exchange 
of notes signed Feb. 20 and 'J4. 1939 (Executive Agreement Series H4). 
By legislative action of the Chilean Government it was brought into 
definitive force as of Jan. 5, 1930. 

* Retroactively. 

"* Extending previous regime. 



Country 


Date in force 


When and how terminable 


Union of Soviet 


Aug. 6,1939 


Effective for 12 months. 


Socialist 






Republics. 






(E. A. S. 105 






and 151) 






Venezuela 


Dec. 16,1939 


Until supplanted by the entry Into 
force of the reciprocal trade agree- 
ment signed Nov. 6, 1939. 



Reciprocal Trade Agreements Signed Under the 
Trade Agreements Act of 1934" 



Country 



Belgo-Luxemburg Eco- 
nomic Union. 
(E. A. S. 75) 



Brazil 

(E. A. S. 82) 
Canada 

(E. A. S. 149) 



Date In force 



Canada ^.. 



Colombia 

(E. A. S. 89) 



Costa Rica 

(E. A. S. 102) 



Czechoslovakia ■ 
(E. A. S. 147) 



Ecuador' 

(E. A. S. 133) 

El Salvador 

(E. A. S. 101) 



Finland 

(E. A. S. 97) 
France' and Its colonies, 
dependencies, and 
protectorates other 
than Morocco. 

(E. A. S. 146) 



May 1, 1935 



Jan. 1, 1936 

Jan. 1, 1939 
(provisionally) 
June 17, 1939 
(definitively) 
Jan. 1, 1940 
(provisionally) 
May 20, 1936 



Aug. 2, 1937 



Apr. 16, 1938 
(provisionally) 



Oct. 23,1938 



May 31,1937 



Nov. 2,1936 

Jtme 15, 1936 
(provisionally) 



When and how terminable 



Six months' notice, or in spe- 
cial circumstances on 
shorter notice. 

Do. 

Six months* notice, or in spe- 
cial circumstances on 
shorter notice. Initial pe- 
riod until Dec. 31, I94I. 

Six months' notice, or In spe- 
cial circumstances on 
shorter notice. 

Six months' notice, or in spe- 
cial circumstances on 
shorter notice. Initial pe- 
riod three years. 

Six months' notice, or In spe- 
cial circumstances on 
shorter notice. Initial pe- 
riod one year. 

Six months' notice. 

Six months' notice, or In spe- 
cial circumstances on 
shorter notice. Initial pe- 
riod three years. 
Do. 

Six months' notice, or In spe- 
cial circumstances on 
shorter notice. 



"The trade agreement with Cuba (E. A. S. 67), effective Sept. 3, 1934, 
does not contain a most-favored-nation clause. It is the only agreement 
in force for the United States which provides for preferential treatment. 
A supplementary trade agreement entered into force Dec. 23, 1939 (E. A. 
S. 165). 

» Supplementary trade agreement re: certain foxes, fox furs, and fox-fur 
articles. 

'The rates of duty proclaimed in connection with this agreement have 
been terminated effective Apr. 22, 1939, by Presidential proclamation of 
Mar. 23, 1939. The agreement remains in effect but its operation has 
been suspended. 

■iUnder the provisions of art. VII Ecuador Imposed quantitative re- 
strictions on certain articles as a temporary measure. 

•This agreement supersedes the agreement on quotas of May 31, 1932, 
modified Jan. 21, 1935. 



98 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtTLLETIN 



Reciprocal Trade Agreements Signed Under the 
Trade Agi:;;ements Act of 1034 — Coutiuued 



Treaties in Force Containing Conditional Most- 
Favored-Nation Clause — Continued 



Country 



Guatemala 

(E. A. S. 92) 



Haiti 

(E. A. S. 78) 
Honduras.- 

(E. A. S. 86) 

Netherlands, including 
Netherlands Indies, 
Netherlands Guiana, 
and Netherlands 
West Indian Islands. 
(E. A. S. 100) 

Nicaragua^ 

(E. A. S. 95) 



Sweden... 

(E. A. S. 79) 
Switzerland 

(E. A. S. 90) 



Date in force 



Turkey 

(E. A. S. 163) 



United Kingdom.. 
(E. A. S. 164) 



Venezuela ». 



June 15, 



June 3, 1935 



Mar. 



Feb. 1, 1936 
(arts. I-XVI) 
May 8,1937 
(entire agree- 
ment) 

Oct. 1, 1936 



Aug. 5, 1935 

Feb. 15, 1936 
(arts.I-XVII) 
June 6. 1936 
(entire agree- 
ment) 
May 5, 1939 
(provision- 
ally) 
Nov. 20, 1939 
(definitively) 

Jan. 1, 1939 
(provision- 
ally) 
Dec. 24,1939 
(definitively) 



When and how terminable 



Sii months' notice, or in spe- 
cial circumstances on 
shorter notice. Initial pe- 
riod three years. 

Six months' notice. 

Six months' notice, or in spe- 
cial circumstances on 
shorter notice. 
Do. 



Six months' notice, or in spe- 
cial circumstances on 
shorter notice. Initial pe- 
riod three years. 
Do. 

Six months' notice, or in spe- 
cial circumstances on 
shorter notice. 



Two months' notice on Dec. 
31, 1939, Dec. 31, 1940, or 
Dec. 31, 1941. SU months' 
notice, or in special cir- 
cumstances ;on (Shorter 
notice. 

Six months' notice, or in 
special circumstances on 
shorter notice. Initial 
period until Dec. 31, 1941. 



/On Mar. 10, 1938, reciprocal tariff concessions ceased to be effective: 
remainder of agreement in force. 

• Signed Nov. 6, 1939, effective 30 days after the exchange of the proc- 
lamation by the President of the United States of America and the 
instrument of ratification by Venezuela. 

Treaties in Force Containing Conditional Most- 
Favoeed-Nation Clause "^ 



Country 


Date in force 


When and how terminable 


Argentina 

(T. S. 4) 
Belgium 

(T. S. 28) 


Dec. 20, 1851 ' 
June 11,1875 
Nov. 9, 1862 
July 11,1863' 


Contains no provision regarding termi- 
nation. 

Twelve months after notice by either 
party. 

One year after notice by either party. 


(T. S. 32) 
Borneo 


Contains no provision regarding termi- 


(T. S. 33) 


nation. 



« In accordance with a provision of the Trade Afrreements Act of 1934, 
which gives elTect to the unconditional most-favored-nation principle, 
the United States extends the benefits of concessions granted in trade 
agreements to all countries which do not discriminate against the trade 
of the United States, regardless of the nature or existence of obligations to 
extend most-favored-nation'treatment to them. 

f> Date of exchange of ratifications. 



Country 


Date in force 


When and how terminable 


Colombia _ 


June 10, 1848 » 


Twelve months after notice by either 


(T. S. 54) 




party. 


Costa Rica 


May 26, 1852 > 


Contains no provision regarding termi- 


(T.S.62) 




nation of covering most-favored- 
nation clause; 12 months after notice 
by either party, vii-a-vis other equal- 
ity-of-treatment provisions. 


Denmark ' 


Apr. 26, 1826 '' 


One year after notice by either party. 


(T. S. 65) 






Ethiopia 


Sept. 19, 1914 


One year after notice by either party. 


(T. S. 647) 




but not before Sept. 19. 1948. 


Great Britain v 


July 3,1816'' 


Twelve months after notice by '^'ther 


(In force also 




party. 


with Ire- 






land) 






(T. S. 110) 












(See Great 






Britain) 






Paraguay 


Mar. 7,1860 


Twelve months after notice by either 


(T. S. 272) 




party. 



' Date of exchange of ratifications. 

• Abrogated by notice, Apr. 15, 1856; renewed by convention of which 
ratifications were exchanged Jan. 12, 1858. 

<• The date given is that of signature. Though subject to ratification, 
the treaty provides that it shall be in force from its signature. 

• Extended by conventions of Oct. 20, 1818 (T. S. 112) and Aug. 6, 1827 
(T. S. 117). 



Executive Agreement in Force Containing Condi- 
tional Most-Favored-Nation Clause " 



Country 


Date in force 


When and how terminable 


Portugal 

(T. S. 6MH) 


June 28, 1910 


Contains no provision regarding termi- 
nation. 



•■ In accordance with a provision of the Trade Agreements Act of 1934, 
which gives effect to the unconditional most-favored-nation principle, 
the United States extends the benefits of concessions granted in trade 
agreements to all countries which do not discriminate against the trade 
of the United States, regardless of the nature or existence of obUgations 
to extend most-favored-nation treatment to them. 



NAVAL MISSIONS 

United States Naval and Aviation Missions 
to Peru 

In response to the request of the Government 
of the Eepublic of Peru agreements were signed 
on July 31, 1940, providing for the renewal by 
the United States of a naval mission and for the 
furnishing of an aviation mission to cooperate 
with the Ministry of Marine and Aviation of 
the Republic of Peru. The two missions will 



AUGUST 3, 1940 

function iii an advisory capacity to the Peru- 
vian Navy and Naval Aviation Force respec- 
tively. 

The naval mission will be composed of four 
officers and certain enlisted men headed by a 
captain, while the aviation mission will be made 
up of two officers from the United States 
Marine Corps, a colonel and a major. The term 
of each contract is for four years. Other pro- 
visions follow the general lines of previous 
agreements between the Government of the 
United States and the governments of certain 
other American republics. 



99 



Legislation 



Draft of proposed provision portaiiiing to supplies for 
the relief of refugees : Communication from the Presi- 
dent of the United States transmitting a draft of a 
proposed provision pertaining to the appropriation for 
the purchase, transportation, and distribution of agri- 
cultural, medical, and other supplies for the relief of 
refugee men, women, and children contained in section 
■10 (B) of the Emergencv Relief Appropriation Act, 
fiscal year 1941 [making available $125,000 to the 
Children's Bureau, Department of Labor, for expenses 
incident to tlie establishment and maintenance of stand- 
ards for the care of children obtaining refuge in the 
United States from the European warj. (H. Doc. 889, 
76th Cong,, 3d sess.) 2 pp. 50. 



D. S.60VERNMERT fRINTlNQ OFFICEi 1949 



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PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIEECTOE OF THE EtJREAU OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 



Qontents 



AUGUST lo, 1940 
Vol. Ill: No. 5p — Publication l^gj 



General: Page 

Statement by the Secrptary of State 103 

Licenses under the Export -Control Act 104 

American Republics: 

Dinners in honor of delegations to the Hahana Meeting 
of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs: 

Brazilian delegation 104 

Argentine and Uruguayan delegations 104 

Commercial Policy: 

Agreement with the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics 105 
The Foreign Service: 

Press interview by the American Ambassador to Bel- 
gium: Statement of the Acting Secretary of State, 

Mr. Welles 108 

Personnel changes 108 

Treaty Information: 
Opium : 

International Opium Convention (1925) 109 

Commerce : 

Agreement with the Union of Soviet Socialist Repub- 
lics 109 

International Law: 

International Institute for the Unification of Private 

Law 109 

Legislation HO 

Publications HO 




U, S, SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMF'.'T; 
AUG ?.7 194C 



General 



STATEMENT BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE 



[Released to tlie press August 6] 

The strong belief of the representatives of 
the 21 American nations at the recent Hubana 
Meeting was that the military and other sinister 
activities on the part of some nations in other 
large areas of the world present real possi- 
bilities of danger to the American republics. 
It was universally recognized that a threat to 
any important part of the Americas means a 
threat to each and all of the American nations. 
It was, therefore, agreed that full and adequate 
preparations for continental defense could not 
be taken too soon if the threatened danger from 
abroad was to be checked and terminated. It 
was also the unanimous view at Habana that 
the prompt strengthening of unity and 
solidarity for the purpose of continental defense 
and for its implementation by concrete pro- 
grams supported by the 21 nations was indis- 
pensable to the safety, security, peace, and wel- 
fare of this hemisphere. 

There was general agreement that if the 
peaceful nations of Europe had thus promptly 
organized themselves for self-defense on the 
most effective cooperative basis, the chances are 
that their situation and that of Europe would 
be vastly different today. Instead, many of 
those countries complacently relied upon utter- 
ances of iseaceful purpose and upon their own 
neutrality to safeguard them against the mighty 
forces of invasion, conquest, and destruction. 
Some of them have been overrun and destroyed 
by the ruthless invader. Their fate should be a 
tragic lesson to us. 

The vast forces of lawlessness, conquest, and 
destruction are still moving across the earth 
like a savage and dangerous animal at large. 
By their very nature, those forces will not stop 

253067 — 40 



unless and until they recognize that there exists 
unbreakable resistance. 

At Habana we forged new instrumentalities 
of continental defense. These will be of vast 
importance to our Nation and to every Ameri- 
can nation. But there are other and immense 
tasks still before us. 

I would greatly prefer to say that we are safe 
in this country and in this hemisphere from 
outside danger. But I am firmly convinced that 
what is taking place today in many areas of the 
earth is a relentless attempt to transform the 
civilized world as we have known it into a world 
in which lawlessness, violence, and force will 
reign supreme, as they did a thousand years ago. 
The people of this country cannot recognize too 
soon this fact and its overwhelming significance 
for our national safety and for the maintenance 
of our national institutions. 

The one and only sure way for our Nation to 
avoid being drawn into serious trouble or actual 
war by the wild and destructive forces now 
abroad elsewhere in the world and to command 
respect for its rights and interests abroad is for 
our people to become thoroughly conscious of 
the possibilities of danger, to make up their 
minds that we must continue to arm, and to 
arm to such an extent that the forces of con- 
quest and ruin will not dare make an attack on 
us or on any part of this hemisphere. To this 
end, each citizen must be ready and willing for 
real saci'ifice of time and of substance and for 
hard personal service. In the face of terrific 
problems and conditions, and until the present 
serious threats and dangers have disappeared, 
we cannot pursue complacently the course of 
our customary normal life. 

103 



104 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtlLLETIN 



I feel constrained thus to offer my views in 
(lie light of what is alreadj' a dangerously wide- 
spread movement for world conquest and for 
the destruction of most of the worthwhile things 
which civilization has given the human race. 

LICENSES UNDER THE EXPORT- 
CONTROL ACT 

[Released to the press August 9] 

During the period July 5-31, 1940, inclusive, 
the Division of Controls received 6,242 applica- 
tions for license to export articles or materials 
listed in the President's proclamation of July 
2, 1940,^ establishing export restrictions under 
the authority of section 6 of the act of Congress 
ajjproved the same day. Of this number, 5,397 
applications were disposed of on or before July 
31, and 845 remained pending at the end of the 
month. Of the applications disposed of, 4,361 
were granted, 236 were rejected on the ground 
that the articles or materials in question were 
essential to tlie national defense, 104 were re- 
turned with the request that further data be 
submitted, and 696 were returned with the 
statement that no license was required for the 
contemplated exportation. 



American Republics 



DINNERS IN HONOR OF DELEGATIONS 
TO THE HABANA MEETING OF THE 
MINISTERS OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS 

Brazilian Delegation 

[Released to the press August 6] 

The following guests attended the dinner 
given on August 6, 1940, by the Acting Secre- 
tary of State, the Honorable Sumner Welles, 
at his home, Oxon Hill, Md., in lionor of the 
Brazilian delegation to the Habana Meeting of 
the Ministers of Foreign Affairs: 

His Excellency Carlos Martins, Ambassador of Brazil 
His Excellency Dr. Maurieio Nabuco, Chairman of the 

Brazilian Delegation and Undersecretary of State 

for Foreign Affairs of Brazil 



'See the Bulletin of July 6, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 54), 
pp. 12-13. 



The Honorable Dr. Antonio Camillo de Oliviera, Mem- 
ber of Brazilian Delegation 

Dr. Abelardo Bueno do Prado, Member of Brazilian 
Delegation 

The Honorable Henry A. Wallace, Secretary of Agri- 
culture 

The Honorable Key Pittman, United States Senate 

The Honorable Sol Bloom, House of Representatives 

The Honorable Charles A. Eaton, House of Representa- 
tives 

The Honorable James A. Shanley, House of Repre- 
sentatives 

The Honorable Jesse Jones, Federal Loan Adminis- 
trator 

Mr. Drew Pearson 

Argentine and Uruguayan Delegations 

[Released to the press -August 7] 

The following guests attended the dinner 
given at the Mayflower Hotel, Washington, Au- 
gust 7, 1940, by the Acting Secretary of State, 
the Honorable Sumner Welles, in honor of the 
Argentine and Uruguayan delegations to the 
Habana Meeting of tlie Ministers of Foreign 
Affairs : 

His Excellency SeiJor Don Felipe A. Espil, Ambassador 

of .Argentina 
His Excellency Dr. Leopoldo Melo, Chairman of the 

.Argentine Delegation to the Habana Conference 
The Honorable J. Richling, Minister of Urtiguay 
His Excellency Dr. Pedro Manini Rios, Chairman of 
the Uruguayan Delegation to the Habana Conference 
The Honorable Dr. Jos^ A. Mora Otero, Member of the 

Uruguayan Delegation to the Habana Conference 
The Honorable Frank Knox, Secretary of the Navy 
The Honorable Tom Counally, United States Senate 
The Honorable Elbert D. Thomas, United States Senate 
The Honorable Guy M. Gillette, United States Senate 
The Honorable Luther Johnson, House of Representa- 
tives 
The Honorable Ed. V. Izac, House of Representatives 
The Honorable Foster Stearns, House of Representa- 
tives 
General George C. Marshall, Chief of Staff 
Admiral Harold R. Stark, Chief of Naval Operations 
The Honorable Henry F. Grady, Assistant Secretary of 

State 
The Honorable Breckinridge Long, Assistant Secretary 

of State 
Mr. Felix Beluir, Jr. 
Mr. Constantine Brown 
Mr. Ernest Lindley 

Mr. Philip \V. Bonsai, Department of State 
Mr. H. Charles Spruks, Department of State 



Commercial Policy 



AGREEMENT WITH THE UNION OF SOVIET SOCIALIST REPUBLICS 



[Released to the press August 7] 

The Acting Secretary of State, Mr. Sumner 
Welles, made the following statement regarding 
the commercial agreement with the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics : 

It may be noted that notes were exchanged August 
6, 1940, between this Government and the Soviet Gov- 
ernment extending until August 6, 1941, the commercial 
agreement which in its present form was first con- 
cluded between the two countries on August 4, 1937. 
The present agreement is similar to those in effect dur- 
ing the previous tliree years in all respects except that 
there has been added a proviso to the note referring 
to the minimum amount of purchases ($40,000,000) to 
be made in the United States by the Soviet economic 
organizations. This proviso taljes into account the 
possibility that various export restrictions imposed by 
the United States in the course of its national-defense 
program may malve it impossible for these organiza- 
tions to carry out their intentions. 

It is a source of deep gratification that we are able 
by means of this agreement to continue our commercial 
relations with the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics 
on the present basis, and it Is to be hoped that during 
the coming year they will develop In a manner advan- 
tageous to both parties. 



(Released (o the press Aupu.st 6] 

The commercial agreement between the 
United States of America and the Union of So- 
viet Socialist Republics which was proclaimed 
and became eti'ective on August 6, 1937, and 
which was renewed for successive periods of 
one year on August 5, 1938, and August 2, 1939, 
was continued in force for another year, that 
is until August 6, 1941, by an exchange of iden- 
tic notes at Moscow on August 6, 19-40, between 
the American Charge d'Affaires ad interim, Mi-. 
Walter C. Thurston, and the People's Commis- 
sar for Foreign Trade of the Soviet Union, Mr. 
A. I. Mikoyan. 



As in the previous three agi-eements, the So- 
viet Government has informed the American 
Government that the Soviet economic organi- 
zations intend to purchase during the next 12 
months American goods to the value of at least 
$40,000,000. The agreement takes into account 
the possibility that various export restrictions 
imposed by the United States in carrying out its 
national-defense program may make it impos- 
sible for these organizations to carry out their 
intentions. 

The Government of the United States under- 
takes in the agreement to continue to accord to 
the commerce of the Soviet Union unconditional 
most-favored-nation treatment, with a reserva- 
tion in respect of coal, deemed necessary be- 
cause of the nature of the coal-tax provisions of 
the Revenue Act of 1932. Under this agree- 
ment, therefore, the Soviet Union will continue 
to receive the benefits of concessions granted 
by the United States in trade agreements with 
countries other than Cuba entered into under 
the authority of the Trade Agreements Act. 

The Soviet Government has renewed in a 
note accompanying the agreement its commit- 
ment to export to the United States in the next 
12 months not more than 400,000 tons of Soviet 
coal which was approximately the quantity of 
Soviet coal exported to the United States in the 
calendar year 1936. While there were imports 
of coal during each of the first three agreement 
years, such imports did not in any such year 
amount to as much as one half the 400,000-ton 
limitation. Since October 1939 there have been 
no imports of Soviet coal. 

The following table gives the value in dollars 
of United States exports to and imports from 
the Soviet Union in the agreement years : 

10.5 



106 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Agreement year (Aug.-July) 



1935-36.. 

1936-37 

1937-38 - - — 

1938-39.... 

1939-^0 ■■ (first 11 months) 



U. S. do- 
mestic ex- 
ports to 
U.S. S. R. 
(thousands 
of U. S. 
dollars) 



33,286 
31,018 
64, 224 
60, 255 
67, 779 



V. S. im- 
ports for 
consump- 
tion from 
O. S. S. R. 
(thousands 
of U. S. 
dollars) 



21,200 
23, 210 
22, 874 
24,761 
23,916 



" Preliminary. 

The text of the identic notes exchanged at 
Moscow between the American Charge, Mr. 
Walter C. Thiir-ston, and the People's Com- 
missar for Foreign Trade of the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics, Mr. A. I. Mikoyan, 
is as follows : 

Moscow, August G, 19'iO. 

EXCEHXENCY : 

In accordance with the conversations which have 
taken place, I have the honor to confirm on behalf ot 
my Government the agreement which has been reached 
between the Governments of our respective countries 
that the agreement regarding commercial relations be- 
tween the United States of America and the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics recorded in the exchange of 
notes of August 4, 1937, between the Ambassador of 
the United States of America and the People's Com- 
missar for Foreign Affairs of the Union of Soviet So- 
cialist Republics, which cam'e into force on August 6, 
1937 on the date of proclamation thereof by the Presi- 
dent of the United States of America and approval 
thereof by the Council of People's Commissars of the 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, and which was re- 
newed on August 5, 1938, and August 2, 1039, shall 
continue in force until August 6, 1941. The present 
agreement should be proclaimed by the President of the 
United States of America and approved by the Council 
of People's Commissars of the Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics. 

Accept [etc.] 'Walter C. Thurston 

The following text is that of the agi'eement 
of August 4, 1937:=' 

With reference to recent conversations which have 
taken place in regard to commerce between the United 
States of America and the Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics, I have the honor to confirm and to make of 



' Executive Agreement Series No. 105. 



record by this note the following agreement which has 
been reached between the Governments of our respec- 
tive countries: 

One. The United States of America will grant to the 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics unconditional and 
unrestricted most-favored-nation treatment in all mat- 
ters concerning customs duties and charges of every 
kind and in the method of levying duties, and, further, 
in all matters concerning the rules, formalities and 
charges imposed in connection with the clearing of 
goods through the customs, and with respect to all laws 
or regulations affecting the sale or use of imported 
goods within the country. 

Accordingly, natural or manufactured products hav- 
ing their origin in the Union of Soviet Socialist Repub- 
lics shall in no case be subject, in regard to the matters 
referred to above, to any duties, taxes or charges other 
or higher, or to any rules or formalities other or more 
burdensome, than those to which the like products hav- 
ing their origin in any third country are or may here- 
after be subject. 

Similarly, natural or manufactured products exported 
from the territory of the United States of America and 
consigned to the territory of the Union of Soviet Social- 
ist Republics shall in no case be subject with respect to 
exportation and in regard to the above-mentioned mat- 
ters, to any duties, taxes, or charges other or higher, or 
to any rules or formalities other or more burdensome, 
than those to which the like products when consigned 
to the territory of any third country are or may here- 
after be subject. 

Any advantage, favor, privilege or immunity which 
has been or may hereafter be granted by the United 
States of America in regard to the above-mentioned 
matters, to a natural or manufactured product origi- 
nating in any third country or consigned to the territory 
of any third country shall be accorded immediately and 
without compensation to the like product originating in 
or consigned to the territory of the Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics. 

It is understood that so long as and in so far as 
existing law of the United States of America may 
otherwise require, the foregoing provisions, in so far as 
they would otherwise relate to duties, taxes or charges 
on coal, coke manufactured therefrom, or coal or coke 
briquettes, shall not apply to such products imported 
into the United States of America. If the law of the 
United States of America shall not permit the complete 
operation of the foregoing provisions with respect to the 
above-mentioned products, the Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics reserves the right within fifteen days after 
January 1, 1938, to terminate this agreement in its 
entirety on thirty days' written notice. 

It is understood, furthermore, that the advantages 
now accorded or which may hereafter be accorded by 



AUGUST 10, 1940 



107 



the United States of America, Its territories or pos- 
sessions, tlie Philippine Islands, or the Panama Canal 
Zone to one another or to the Republic of Cuba shall 
be excepted from the operation of this agreement. 

Nothing in this agreement shall be construed to pre- 
vent the adoption of measures prohibiting or restrict- 
ing the exportation or importation of gold or silver, 
or to prevent the adoption of such measures as the 
Government of the United States of America may see 
fit with respect to the control of the export or sale 
for export of arms, ammunition, or implements of war, 
and, in exceptional cases, all other military supplies. 
It is understood that any action which may be taken 
by the President of the United States of America under 
the authority of Section 2 (b) of the Neutrality Act 
of 1937 in regard to the passage of title to goods shall 
not be considered as contravening any of the provisions 
of this agreement relating to the exportation of natural 
or manufactured products from the territory of the 
United States of America. 

Subject to the requirement that no arbitrary dis- 
crimination shall be effected by the United States of 
America against importations from the Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics and in favor of those from any third 
country, the foregoing provisions shall not extend to 
prohibitions or restrictions (1) imposed on moral or 
humanitarian grounds. (2) designed to protect human, 
animal, or plant life, (3) relating to prison-made goods, 
or (4) relating to the enforcement of police or revenue 
laws. 

Two. On its part the Government of the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics will take steps to increase 
substantially the amount of purchases in the United 
States of America for export to the Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics of articles the growth, produce, or 
manufacture of the United States of America. 

Three. This agreement shall come into force on the 
day of proclamation thereof by the President of the 
United States of America and of approval thereof by 
the Soviet of People's Commissars of the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics, which proclamation and 
approval shall take place on the same day. It shall 
continue in effect for twelve months. Both parties 
agree that not less than thirty days prior to the 
expiration of the aforesaid period of twelve months 
they shall start negotiations regarding the extension 
of the period during which the present agreement shall 
continue in force. 



Tlie following communications, exchanged 
between the American Charge and the People's 
Commissar for Foreign Trade, concern the 
amount of purchases which the Government of 



the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics intends 
to make in the United States during the next 12 
months in connection with the commercial 
agreement entered into between the United 
States and the Soviet Union on August 6, 1940: 

Moscow, August 6, 19^0. 

EXCEIXENCY : 

I have the honor to refer to our recent conversations 
in regard to the commerce between the United States 
of America and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics 
and to ask you to let me know the value of articles, 
the growth, produce or manufacture of the United 
States of America, which the Government of the Union 
of Soviet Socialist Republics intends to purchase in the 
United States of America during the next twelve 
months for export to the Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics. 

Except [etc.] Walter C. Thubston 



[Translation] 

Moscow. August 6, Wf/O. 
Mr. CHARofi d'Affaihes : 

In reply to your inquiry regarding the intended pur- 
chases by the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics in 
the United States of America in the course of the next 
twelve months, I have the honor to inform you that 
the economic organizations of the Union of Soviet So- 
cialist Republics intend to buy in the United States of 
America in the course of the next twelve months Ameri- 
can goods to the value of at least $40,000,000. 

If, however, restrictions imposed on exports by the 
Government of the United States should render it diffi- 
cult for Soviet economic organizations to .satisfy their 
needs in the United States, it may be impossible for 
the.se organizations to carry out their intentions. The 
Government of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics 
is therefore not in a position at the present time to 
guarantee the above-mentioned value of its purchases 
in the United States. 

Accept [etc.] Watter C. Thubston 



[Released to the press August 10] 

The commercial agreement between the 
United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics, signed on August 6, 1940, was pro- 
claimed by the President on August 7. On the 
same day, the agreement was approved by the 
Council of People's Commissars of the Union 
of Soviet Socialist Republics. 



The Foreign Service 



PRESS INTERVIEW BY THE AMERICAN AMBASSADOR TO BELGIUM 

Statement of the Acting Secretary of State, Mr. Welles 



[Released to the press August 9] 

I have now received from the American Em- 
bassy in London a transcript of the notes of the 
press interview given by Ambassador Cudahy 
in London on Tuesday, August 6, last. 

From tlie transcript it would appear that Am- 
bassador Cudahy received at an informal gath- 
ering some American correspondents and rep- 
resentatives of the British press who had re- 
quested interviews with him. 

As I previously stated, the Ambassador's in- 
terview was given without prior authorization 
from, or without prior notification to, the De- 
partment of State. 

I am sure that no one will question the sin- 
cerity of the Ambassador's sym^Dathetic inter- 
est in the future well-being of the Belgian peo- 



ple, an interest which is shared by the people of 
the United States. Nevertheless, the interview 
given was in violation of standing instructions 
of the Department of State, and certain of the 
views expressed by the Ambassador are not to 
be construed as representing the views of this 
Government. 

The incident illustrates once again the impor- 
tance which must be attributed by American 
representatives abroad to the Department's in- 
structions to refrain at this critical time from 
making public statements other than those made 
in accordance with the instructions of the De- 
jjartment of State. 

By direction of the President, Ambassador 
Cudahy has been requested to return to the 
United States immediately for consultation. 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 



[Released to the press August 10] 

The following changes have occvirred in the 
Foreign Service since August 3, 1940 : 

Leiand B. Morris, of Philadelphia, Pa., Con- 
sul General at Vienna, Germany, has been desig- 
nated Counselor of Embassy and Consul General 
at Beilin, Germany, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

The assignment of James J. Murphy, Jr., of 
Pennsylvania, as Consul General at Rotterdam, 
Netherlands, has been canceled. Mr. Murphy 
has now been assigned as Consul General at 
Hamburg, Germany. 

Hugh S. Fullerton, of Springfield, Ohio, 
First Secretary of Embassy and Consul at Paris, 
108 



France, has been assigned as Consul at Marseille, 
France. 

Samuel H. Wiley, of Salisbury, N. C, Con- 
sul at Havre, France, has been assigned as 
Consul at Lisbon, Portugal. 

George J. Haering, of Huntington Station, 
N. Y., has been assigned as Consul at Vigo, 
Spain. 

The assignment of Joseph F. Burt, of Fair- 
field, 111., as Consul at Prague, Bohemia, has 
been canceled. Mr. Burt has now been assigned 
as Consul at Valparaiso, Chile. 

Thomas C. Wasson, of Newark, N. J., Consul 
at Vigo, Siaain, has been assigned as Consul at 
Dakar, French West Africa, where an American 
Consulate will be established. 



AUGUST 10, 1940 



109 



Jacob D. Beam, of Princeton, N. J., Third 
Secretary of Embassy at Berlin, Germany, has 
been assigned for duty in the Department of 
State. 



Maurice Pasquet, of New York, N. Y., Vice 
Consul at Dairen, Manchuria, has been assigned 
as Vice Consul at St. Pierre-Miquelon, where 
an American Consulate will be reopened. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



OPIUM 
International Opium Convention (192.5) 

Switzerland 

AA'ith refeience to the circular letter from the 
League of Nations dated October 25, 1939,^ com- 
municating for information the text of a letter 
addressed to the states parties to the Interna- 
tional Opium Convention of February 14, 1925, 
concerning the acceptance by certain states, in- 
cluding Switzerland, of a new resolution of the 
Health Committee applicable to the prepara- 
tions based on Indian-hemp extract or tincture, 
the Secretary General of the League transmitted 
to the Secretary of State with a circular letter 
dated May 27, 1940, the following letter from the 
Swiss Federal Political Department dated 
November 18, 19:^9: 

In a circular letter dated October 25th last, the Sec- 
retariat uf the League of Nations informed the Federal 
Political Department that, several countries, including 
Switzerland, having accepted the Health Committee's 
resolution of May 1939 concerning the application of 
Article 10 of the Convention of February 14th, 1925, to 
preparations based on Indian hemp extract or tincture, 
the provisions of that agreement had become imme- 
diately applicable to the preparations referred to by the 
said resolution in relations between States. This com- 
munication was immediately transmitted to the Federal 
Public Health Service. 

In agreement with this Service and referring to its 
note of August 7th, 1939, the Political Department has 
the honour to draw the Secretariat's attention to the 
fact that, as Indian hemp extract and tincture are not 



' See the Bulletin of December 9, 1939 (vol. I, no. 24), 
pp. 680-681. 



yet subject to the supervision instituted under the 
Swiss legislation on narcotics now undergoing revision, 
the acceptance by the competent Federal authorities of 
the Health Committee's resolution cannot take effect 
within Switzerland until the new Federal law comes 
into force. 

Requesting the Secretariat to bring the foregoing to 
the attention of the Governments concerned, the 
Department has the honour, etc. 

Berne, November ISth, 1939. 

To the Secretariat of the 

League of Nations, Geneva. 

COMMERCE 

Agreement With the Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics 

An announcement regarding the commercial 
agreement between the United States and the 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, signed 
August 6, 1940, appears in this Bulletin under 
the heading "Commercial Policy". 

INTERNATIONAL LAW 

International Institute for the Unification 
of Private Law 

The American Ambassador to Italy trans- 
mitted to the Secretary of State with a despatch 
dated May 16. 1940, a copy of tlie new Funda- 
mental Statute of the International Institute 
for the Linification of Private Law. The Insti- 
tute which is now established in Rome was for- 
merly a part of the League of Nations with 
headquarters in Geneva. 

According to information furnished by the 
Italian Foreign Office the statute, which is dated 



no 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



March 15, 1940, entered into force on April 21, 
1940. The follo^Ying countries have adhered 
to the statute : Belgium, Bolivia, Colombia, Fin- 
land, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, 
Italy, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Nicaragua, 
Kumania, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and 
Uruguay. 




Two Supplemental Estimates of Appropriations for 
State Department, 1941 : Comnmiuication from the 
President of the United States transmitting two supple- 
mental estimates of appropriations for the Department 
of State, for the fiscal year 1941, amounting to $305,500. 
(H. Doc. 892, 76th Cong., 3d sess.) 2 pp. 5^^ 



Publications 



Department of State 

Reciprocal Recognition of Load Line Regulations for 
Vessels Engaged in International Voyages on the Great 
Lakes : Arrangement between the United States of 
America and Canada. — Effected by exchanges of notes 
signed April 29, 1938, August 24, 1938, October 22, 1938, 
September 2, 1939, October 18, 1939, January 10, 1940, 
and March 4, 1940. Executive Agreement Series No. 
172. Publication 1482. 9 pp. 5^. 

Achievements of the Second Meeting of the Foreign 
Ministers of the American Republics : Statement of the 
Honorable Cordell Hull, Secretary of State, at the close 
of the Meeting, Habana, July 30, 1940. Conference 
Series 47. Publication 1488. 8 pp. 5t 



U, S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE; 1940 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington D. C. — Price 10 cents Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 



^'<=:'CZJr 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



.O \J JLiJL/ 



I — ^ r 
-i 



riN 




AUGUST 17, 1940 
Vol. Ill: No. 60 — Publication I^gj 

Qontenfs 

The Foreign Service: ^"** 
Representation of foreign interests by American diplo- 
matic and consular offices 113 

Personnel changes 114 

American Republics: 

Exchange of telegrams between the Secretary of State 

and Dr. Leopoldo Melo of Argentina 115 

Convention with Dominican Republic concerning 

customs revenue 115 

Europe: 

Repatriation of American citizens 115 

Canada : 

Suspension of tonnage duties 116 

Australia: 

Airplane accident in Austraha 116 

Treaty Information: 
Agriculture: 

Convention with Great Britain for the Protection of 
Migratory Birds (Treaty Series No. 628) and Con- 
vention with Mexico for the Protection of Migra- 
tory Bu'ds and Game Mammals (Treaty Series 

No. 912) 116 

Special Assistance: 

Convention with the Dominican Republic Concern- 
ing Collection and Apphcation of Customs Reve- 
nue (Treaty Series No. 726) 117 

\OveT\ 



^ik- ^ '^ 



Treaty Information — Continued. Page 

Fisheries : 

Protocol Amending the Agreement for the Regulation 
of Whaling of June 8, 1937 (Treaty Series No. 

944) 117 

Commercial Policy: 

Agreement with the Union of Soviet Socialist Re- 
publics 117 

Publications 117 

Legislation 117 

Regulations 118 



The Foreign Service 



REPRESENTATION OF FOREIGN INTERESTS BY AMERICAN 
DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR OFFICES 



[Released to the press August 16] 

Since the outbreak of hostilities, American 
diplomatic and consular offices have assumed, 
or have been authorized to assume, the repre- 
sentation of foreign interests as indicated in 
the following list:^ 

(1) Ami'rican Emha.ssy at Berlin (covering 

Germany and German-occupied Poland. 
Bohemia, and Moravia) : 

(a) Great Britain, including overseas posses- 
sions and mandated territories 

(h) Australia 

(c) New Zealand 

{d) Canada 

{e) France 

(/) Belgium 

{g) Luxemburg 

{h) Union of South Africa " 

(2) American consular offices in Belgium: 

{a) Great Britain, including overseas posses- 
sions 
{h) Union of South Africa 

(c) France 

(d) Australia 

(e) Canada 

(/) Luxemburg 
(g) Netherlands^ 
(A) New Zealand 



' For a previous list see the BuUrtin of May 18, 1940 
(vol. II, no. 47), pp. 54.3-544. 

^Turned over by the Swedish Legation on Aug. 
1, 1940, at 4 p. m. 

^To be turned over to the Swedish representative as 
soon as arrangements can be perfected. 
254808 — 40 



(3) Ameriran consular offices in the Nether- 

lands: 

(a) (ireat Britain, including overseas posses- 
sions 

(0) Australia 

(c) Union of South Africa 

(d) France 
((■) Belgium 
(/•) Egypt* 
(g) Canada 

(4) American Legation at Copenhagen: 

(a.) Great Britain, including ovei'seas posses- 
sions 
{b) Australia 

(c) Canada 

(<l) Union of South Africa 

(f) France 
(/') Belgium 

{g) New Zealand 

I.")) American considar offices in Norway: 

(a) Great Britain, including overseas posses- 
sions 

(b) Australia 
{c) Canada 

(d) Union of South Africa 

(e) France 
(/) Belgium 

(g) New Zealand 

(6) American Consulate at Luxemburg: 
(ff) Belgium 
(6) France 



* To be turned over to the Iranian representatives as 
soon as arrangements can be perfected. 

113 



114 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



(7) American Embassy at Paris (for occupied 

France) : 

(a) Australia 

{b) Belgium 

(c) Great Britain, including overseas pos- 
sessions 

{(1) Canada 

(<?) Luxemburg 

(/') New Zealand 

(17) Union of South Africa 

(8) ATnerican Embassy at Vichy (for unoccu- 

pied France and Monaco) : 

{a) Australia 

{h) Great Britain, including overseas pos- 
sessions 

(c) Canada 

{d) New Zealand 

(9) American Enibassy at Rome: 

(a) Austi'alia 

(b) Belgium 

(c) Great Britain, including overseas posses- 
sions (also for Albania and Italian East 
Africa) 

(d) Canada 

(e) EgjTt 

(/) France (not for Sardinia, Libya, or the 

Islands of the Aegean) 
(g) New Zealand 
(h) Norway 
(?) Union of South Africa 

(10) American Consulate at Lagos: 
(a) Italy 

(11) American Consulate General at Casa- 

blanca : 

(a) Great Britain, including overseas posses- 
sions 

(b) Canada 

(c) New Zealand 

(12) Amerieam, Considate Genercd at Algiers: 

(a) Great Britain, including overseas posses- 
sions 

(b) Canada 

(c) New Zealand 

(13) ATnerican Consulate at Tunis: 

(a) Great Britain, including overseas posses- 
sions 



(b) Canada 

(c) New Zealand 

(14) American Considate at Martinique: 

(a) Great Britain, including overseas posses- 
sions 

(b) Canada 

(c) New Zealand 

(15) American Consulate at Papeete, Tahiti: 
{a) Great Britain, including ovei^seas posses- 
sions 

(ft) Canada 

(c) New Zealand 

(16) American Considate at Saigon: 

(a) Great Britain, including overseas posses- 
sions 

(b) Canada 

(c) New Zealand 

(17) American Consulate at Dakau' (when 

opened for business) : 
{a) Great Britain, including overseas posses- 
sions 
{b) Canada 
{c) New Zealand 

PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press August 17] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
Foreign Service since August 10, 1940: 

Career Officers 

John Carter Vincent, of Macon, Ga., Consul 
r.t Geneva, Switzerland, has been assigned as 
Consul at Shanghai, China. 

Walter A. Foote, of Hamlin, Tex., Consul at 
Batavia, Java, Netherlands Indies, has been as- 
signed as Consul General at Batavia, Java, 
Netherlands Indies. 

Renwick S. McNiece, of Salt Lake City, 
Utah, Consid at Valparaiso, Chile, has been as- 
signed as Consul at Maracaibo, Venezuela. 

Leonard G. Dawson, of Staunton, Va., Con- 
sul at Lille, France, has been assigned as Consul 
at Ponta Delgada, Sao Miguel (St. Michael), 
Azores. 

James G. Carter, of Brunswick, Ga., Consul 
at Calais, France, has been assigned as Consul 
at Funchal, Madeira. 



AUGUST 17, 1940 



115 



Jolin Goodyear, of Springfield Center, N. Y., 
Vice Consul at Guatemala, Guatemala, has been 
assigned as Vice Consul at Panama, Panama. 

Adrian B. Colquitt, of Savannali, (ia., Tliinl 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at I'an- 
ama, Panama, has been assigned as Vice Consul 
at Cayenne, French Guiana, where an American 
Consulate will be establislied. 

Roger L. Heacock, of Baldwin Park, Calif., 
Third Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at 
I\io de Janeiro, Brazil, lias been assigned as 
Vice Consul at Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

Ivan B. White, of Salem, Oreg., Vice Consul 
at Yokohama, Japan, has been assigned for duty 
in the Department of State. 

NONCAREER OfTICERS 

Francis M. Witliey, of Michigan, Vice Consul 
at Florence, Italy, lias been appointed Vice 
Consul at Palermo, Italy. 

T. Monroe Fisher, of Strasburg, Va., Vice 
Consul at Leghorn, Italy, has been appointed 
Vice Consul at Florence, Italj". 

Foster H. Kreis, of Minnesota, Vice Consul 
at Funchal, ^ladeira, has been appointed Vice 
Consul at Horta, Azores, where an American 
Consulate will be established. 

The appointment of Donn Paul Medalie, of 
Illinois, as Vice Consul at Niagara Falls, On- 
tario, Canada, has been canceled. Mr. Medalie 
has now been appointed Vice Consul at Manila, 
Philippine Islands. 



American Republics 



EXCHANGE OF TELEGRAMS BE- 
TWEEN THE SECRETARY OF STATE 
AND DR. LEOPOLDO MELO OF AR- 
GENTINA 

[Released to the press August 13] 

The following telegrams were exchanged be- 
tween the Secretary of State, Cordell Hull, and 
Dr. Leopoldo Melo, Chairman of the Argentine 
delegation to the Habana Meeting of the Minis- 
ters of Foreign Affairs of the American Repub- 



lics, upon Dr. Melo's departure from New York 
on board the S. S. Argentina: 

"Please accept my cordial gi'eetings and this 
parting expression of my hope that the common 
endeavors of the Habana meeting may serve to 
strengthen still further the friendly relations 
between our jDeoples. 

Leopoldo Melo" 

"I am sincerely appreciative of your cordial 
message and regret that, prior to your depar- 
ture, I was unable once more personally to ex- 
press to you the pleasure which I derived from 
our association at Habana as well as my grati- 
tude for your constant and sympathetic 
cooperation. 

Cordell Hull" 

CONVENTION WITH DOMINICAN 
REPUBLIC CONCERNING CUSTOMS 
REVENUE 

An announcement regarding the negotiations 
in Ciudad Trujillo for revision of the Conven- 
tion with the Dominican Republic concerning 
collection and application of customs revenue, 
appeal's in this Bulletin under the heading 
"Treaty Information". 



Europe 



REPATRIATION OF AMERICAN 
CITIZENS 

[Released to the press August 16] 

The Acting Secretary of State on July 25, 
1940, announced that the Army transport 
American Legion was being sent to the port of 
Petsamo, Finland, in order to evacuate as many 
American citizens as possible who were stranded 
in the Baltic and Scandinavian areas and who 
could not return in any other safe way. 

The American Legion was directed to sail 
August 16 on her return voyage. This ship is 
filled to capacity with a total of 897 passengers 
from the following countries: Finland, 138; 
Estonia, 22; Latvia, 18; Lithuania, 102; 



116 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Sweden, 250; Norway, 182; Denmark, 84; Ger- 
many, 88 ; and the Netherlands, 13. The Crown 
Princess Martha of Norway and her three chil- 
dren are among the passengers. 



Canada 



SUSPENSION OF TONNAGE DUTIES 

On August 8, 1940, the President signed 
Proclamation No. 2419, which provides that 
"the foreign discriminating duties of tonnage 
and imposts within the United States are sus- 
pended and discontinued so far as respects the 
vessels of Canada and the produce, manufac- 
tures, or merchandise imported in said vessels 
into the United States from Canada or from any 
other foreign country; the suspension to take 
effect from the date of this proclamation, and to 
continue so long as the reciprocal exemption of 
vessels belonging to citizens of the United 
States and their cargoes shall be continued, and 
no longer. . . ." 

The text of this proclamation appears in full 
in the Federal Register for August 13, 1940, 
vol. 5, no. 157, page 2813. 



Australia 



AIRPLANE ACCIDENT IN AUSTRALIA 

[Released to the press August 14] 

The following telegram was sent by the Act- 
ing Secretary of State, the Honorable Sumnei' 
Welles, to the Prime Minister of Australia, the 
Honorable R. G. ^lenzies, K.C., P.C., regarding 
the plane crash near Canberra which took the 
lives of 10 persons, including the Australian 
Army Chief of Staff, the Minister of Air, the 
Minister of Defense, and the Vice President of 
the Executive Coiuicil: 



"August 13, 1940. 

"I am shocked and deeply distressed to learn 
of the tragic airplane accident as the result of 
which the Commonwealth of Australia has suf- 
fered so great a loss. 

"On behalf of my Government and in the 
name of the people of the United States, I de- 
siie to express my profound sympathy. 

Sumner Welles" 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 
AGRICULTURE 



Convention With Great Britain for the Pro- 
tection of Migratory Birds (Treaty Series 
No. 628) and Convention With Mexico for 
the Protection of Migratory Birds and 
Game Mammals (Treaty Series No. 912) 

On August 9, 1940, the President issued 
Proclamation No. 2420,= amending certain of 



° I'roclfimation No. 2420 is printed in the Federal 
Register of August 13, 1940 (vol. 5, no. 157), pp. 2813- 
2816. 



the regulations approved by Proclamation No. 
2345 of August 11, 1939 (4 F. R. 3621), as 
amended by Proclamation No. 2367 of Septem- 
ber 28, 1939 (4 F. R. 4107) , permitting and gov- 
erning the hunting, taking, cajiture, killing, 
possession, sale, purchase, shipment, transporta- 
tion, carriage, exportation, and importation of 
migratory birds and parts, nests, and eggs 
thereof, included in the terms of the Conven- 
tion between the United States and Great 
Britain for the protection of migratory birds 
concluded August 16, 1916, and the Convention 



117 



between the United States and the United Mexi- 
can States for the protection of migratory birds 
and game mammals conchided February 7, 1936. 

SPECIAL ASSISTANCE 

Convention With the Dominican Republic 
Concerning Collection and Application of 
Customs Revenue (Treaty Series No. 726) 

Negotiations have been proceeding at Wash- 
ington for several years with a view toward 
the revision or modification of the Convention 
between the United States and the Dominican 
Republic of December 27, 1924, to Replace the 
Convention of February 8, 1907, Providing for 
the Assistance of the United States in the Col- 
lection and Application of the Customs Rev- 
enue of the Dominican Republic. It has been 
decided to continue these negotiations at 
Ciudad Trujillo. 

For this purpose, Mr. Hugh R. Wilson, for- 
mer Ambassador to Germany, has been desig- 
nated as the special representative of the 
Secretary of State with rank of Ambassador, 
and he is sailing from New York to Ciudad 
Trujillo August 15 on the S. S. Borinquen of the 
Puerto Rican Line. 

Mr. Wilson will be accompanied by Mr. Har- 
old D. Finley, Assistant Chief of the Division 
of the American Republics, Department of 
State. 

FISHERIES 

Protocol Amending the Agreement for the 
Regulation of Whaling of June 8, 1937 
(Treaty Series No. 944) 

Ireland 

By a note dated July 30. 1940, the British Am- 
bassador at Washington informed the Secretary 
of State that the instrument of ratification by 
Ireland of the Protocol Amending the Agree- 
ment for the Regulation of Whaling of June 8, 
1937, which was signed on June 24, 1938, was 
deposited with the British Government on Jime 
20. 1940.' 



Commercial Policy 



AGREEMENT WITH THE UNION OF 
SOVIET SOCIALIST REPUBLICS 

On page 107 of the Bulletin for August 10, 
1940 (vol. Ill, no. 59), the signature of the 
translated note of August 6, 1940, addressed to 
the American Charge d'Affaires by the People's 
Commissar for Foreign Trade of the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics, should read A. 
Mikovan and not Walter C. Thurston. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Military Aviiition Mission : .\Kreeint'iit Between tlie 
United States of America and Cliile. — Signed April 23, 
1940: effective April 23, 1940. Executive Agreement 
Series No. 169. Publication 1473. 8 pp. .')('. 

Certificates of Airworthiness for Export : Arrange- 
ment Between the United States of America and New 
Zealand. — Effected by exchange of notes signed Janu- 
ary 30 and February 28, 1940; eftective March 1, 
1940. Executive Agreement Series Xo. 1G7. Publica- 
tion 1479. 17 pp. 5^. 

Exemptions From Exchange Control Measures ; 
Agreement Between the United States of America and 
Canada. — Effected by exchange of notes signed June 
18, 1940: effective June 18, 1940. Executive Agree- 
ment Series No. 174. Publication 1-S87. 3 pp. of. 



Legislation 



'See the Bulletin of August 12, 1939 (vol. I, no. 7), 
p. 115. 



Communication from the President of the United 
States transmitting a draft of a proposed provision 
liertaining to the appropriation for the State Depart- 
ment for cooperation with the American republics, 
contained in the Second Deficiency .Appropriation Act, 
1940, approved June 27, 1940 [making the appropria- 
tion available for compensation and traveling ex- 
I^enses of educational, professional, and artistic lead- 
ers in connection with the program of cooperation]. 
(H. Doc. 015, 76th Cong., 3d sess.) 2 pp. 5(t. 



118 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Regulations 



The following Government regulations may 
be of interest to readers of the Bulletin: 



Regailations Governing the Registration and Finger- 
printing of Aliens in Accordance With the Alien Regis- 
tration Aft, 1940. (Department of Justice: Immigra- 
tion and Naturalization Service.) [General Order No. 
C-21, August 8, 1940.] Federal Register, vol. 5, no. 
I.'jS, August 14, 19-10, pp. 2836-2841 (The National Ar- 
chives of the United States). 



U, S. eOVCRNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 19 40 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PCBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIBECTOB OF THE BCRBAC OF THE BUDGET 




I ^ -'-'■' 'I 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BU 



J 



ETIN 



AUGUST 24, 1940 
Vol. Ill: No. 61 -Publication I4g8 



Qontents 



General : Page 

Address by the American Ambassador to France, the 

Honorable William C. Bullitt 121 

American Republics: 

Habiina ]\Ieeting of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs: 

P'inal act and convention 127 

Exchange professors and students 149 

Office for Coordination of Commercial and Cultural 

Relations between the American Republics 151 

Death of Leon Trotsky 152 

Europe : 

Note to Germany on the course of the American 

Legion 152 

Canada : 

Permanent Joint Board on Defense, United States 

and Canada 154 

Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, etc. : 

Monthly statistics 155 

Commercial Policy : 

Coal, coke, and briquets from the Union of Soviet So- 
cialist Republics 167 

Publications 167 

The Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 168 

\P'veT'\ 




U. S. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS 

SEP 18 1940 



Treatt Information : Page 

Arbitration and Judicial Settlement : 

Permanent Court of International Justice 170 

Consultation : 
Final Act and Convention of the Habana Meeting 
of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the Amer- 
ican Ke^jublics 170 

Permanent Joint Board on Defense, United States 

and Canada 170 

Mutual Guaranties : 

Non-aggression Treaty between Great Britain and 

Thailand 170 



General 



ADDRESS BY THE AMERICAN AMBASSADOR TO FRANCE, 
THE HONORABLE WILLIAM C. BULLITT ' 



[Released to the press August 18] 

Fellow Citizens of Mt Country; Men and 
Women ; Americans : 

There are times, rare and infrequent, when 
a man feels he has a right to ask his fellow 
citizens to hear him. Here tonight, in my own 
city, in this Square where our Republic was 
created, I feel I have that right. 

For nearly four years I have sensed as Am- 
bassador of our Republic to the French 
Republic. That Republic, like our own, fol- 
lowed the gleam of liberty, equality, and fra- 
ternity for all men and all races. That 
Republic, like our own, strove for peace. 

I have seen the French Republic destroyed. 

As your emissary, as the representative of 
American democracy, I have witnessed the acts 
which destroyed the French democracy. I 
know of my own knowledge what blows were 
struck, what devices of intrigue and treachery 
and force were employed. I know who are 
the enemies of freedom because I have seen 
them at their work. I know how dangerous 
they are and by what means they are dangerous. 

Because I have seen these things and know 
them of my own knowledge, I know that dan- 
gers beset free institutions everywhere, and I 
know what those dangers are. The strategy 
of destruction by which the free nation of 
France was overthrown is the strategy of de- 
struction by which the enemies of freedom hope 



'Delivered at the invitation of tlie American Pliil- 
osophical Society in Independence Square, Philadelphia, 
Aug. 18, 1940. 



to overthrow liberty in this, the greatest of the 
nations that freedom has created. Because I 
have seen these things with my own eyes, heard 
them with my own ears, and felt them in my 
own body, I ask you, my fellow, fi-ee Ameri- 
cans, to hear what I feel it my duty to say. 

America is in danger. 

It is my conviction, drawn from my own expe- 
rience and from the information in tlie hands 
of our Government in Washington, that the 
United States is in as great peril today as was 
France a year ago. And I believe that unless 
we act now, decisively, to meet the threat we 
shall be too late. 

The dictators are convinced that all democra- 
cies will always be too late. You remember 
Hitler's statement : 

"Each country will imagine that it alone will 
escape. I shall not even need to destroy them 
one by one. Selfishness and lack of foresight 
will prevent each one fighting until it is too 
late." 

Control of government by public opinion is 
the essence of democracy. And it has always 
been our belief that free speech and a free press 
and free education would enable us to form and 
express our opinions sutEcientl}' swiftly not only 
to permit but to compel our Government to act 
quickly and effectively. But the problems of 
world affaii-s have become so complex, in this 
day of volcanic change, that the average citizen 
has the greatest difficulty in understanding them 
and judging what is best for his country before 
it is too late. 



121 



122 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BUIAETIH 



The dictators have developed a strategy of 
attack that is based on this difficulty. To pre- 
pare the way for military attack on a democ- 
racy they employ every possible variety of 
agent and propaganda to befuddle the public 
so that the democracy will not prepare in time. 
They succeeded in befuddling public opinion 
in France and England to such an extent that 
they were able to conquer France in a few 
days and are now striving to conquer an 
England which awakened late. 

They are not yet in a position to attack 
America by military means; but their cam- 
paign of befuddlement, their preparatory 
assault, is following the same lines in America 
that it followed in France. Do not imagine 
that the French citizen was less intelligent or 
cared less about his country than the American 
citizen. The honest French patriot did his 
best, but he just could not see through the 
smokescreens of bribery, propaganda, lies, and 
threats which the dictators spread in his coun- 
try. For every Frenchman who acted as the 
conscious agent of a foreign dictator, there 
were a thousand who, with good intentions and 
high patriotism, unwittingly played the dicta- 
tors' game. 

How many Americans today are playing the 
dictators' game without knowing it? 

In France, as in the United States today, 
there were many honest pacifists. There were 
many because after 1918 every Frenchman be- 
came in one sense a pacifist. The French 
wanted no more war. And when the German 
propagandists told the French that they could 
buy peace with Germany by making one con- 
cession after another, the French believed 
them. 

The French, who were much stronger at the 
time than were the Germans, let the Germans 
reconstruct an army, a navy, and an air force, 
let them reoccupy the Rhineland and the Saar, 
then Austria, then the Sudeten areas of 
Czechoslovakia, then the whole of Czechoslo- 
vakia. After that the Germans said that the 
price of peace was Danzig and Poland's outlet 
to the sea. By that time the French had 
learned that the lie, the solemn pledge given 



and broken, had become Germany's normal 
weapon in international affairs. Yet today 
there are Americans who argue that we should 
believe the dictators when they say that they 
have no intention of extending their conquests 
to the Western Hemisphere and certainly not 
to the United States. France believed. 
Where now is France? 

There are also Americans who argue that if 
Hitler should conquer Great Britain he would 
be content to stop there and tliat the United 
States would be able to cooperate happily with 
the Hitler Empire of Europe. To believe this 
is to misunderstand the entire nature of the 
Nazi system. It is not organized to develop an 
empire in peace. It is organized as a dynamic 
military machine. The ruthless hold of the 
Nazi leaders on the German people is based on 
the gearing of all energies for the sacrifices 
necessary to wage war. The continued sacri- 
fices by the great mass of the people which the 
Nazi system demands cannot be obtained except 
by maintaining a supercharged war tempera- 
ture. The German Nation has been made a 
predatory army of assault. Its organization is 
military. Its military operations have enor- 
mous momentum. It cannot stop in its tracks. 
It can only be stopped. 

Were Germany to try to resume the ways 
of peace, the military discipline which is the 
very foundation of the Nazi hiei-archy would 
crumble. In order to continue in power that 
hierarchy must continue to lead Germany on 
new predatory adventures. The Third Reich 
cannot change its objectives and methods with- 
out changing its entire orgaiaization and 
leadership. 

The Americans who believe that the Nazis 
will not have to be stopped but will stop of 
their own accord are indulging in the fatal 
vice of wishful thinking. They want to be- 
lieve this. Therefore they believe it. There 
is no other basis than their wish for their 
conclusion that the Nazis suddenly will become 
peace-loving men. 

The men and women who tell you that the 
dictators will not attack the Western Hemi- 
sphere may be honest, wishful thinkers or 



ATTGUST 24, 1940 



123 



they may be ajrf'nts of the dictators; but in 
eitlier case, by hilling you into a false feeling 
of security and retarding your preparations 
for defense, they are keeping the way clear 
for an assault on America by the dictators. 
They are enemies, consciously or unconsciously, 
of our country and our liberties. 

In France there were high-placed and in- 
fluential German agents who circulated in 
what was called society and argued, l)ccause 
Hitler had said he loved France, that Ger- 
many would never so much wish to invade 
France as to attack the Maginot Line, which 
was estimated to be such a tremendous obstacle. 
[ Today, we hear Americans of the same stripe 
arguing that the dictators will never so wish 
to invade the Americas as to cross the At- 
lantic, which is regarded as such a tremendous 
obstacle. They ask us to ignore the fact that 
the Atlantic is an obstacle only so long as 
the European exits to the Atlantic are 
controlled by a nation wliich is genuinely 
friendly to us. We can remember, however, 
that in the past when those exits have been 
in the hands of a power unfriendly to us, 
the Atlantic has become a bi'oad highway for 
the invasion of the Americas. By way of the 
Atlantic our own land was invaded twice: 
during our Revolution and the War of 1812 — 
and that with sailing ships. By way of the 
Atlantic, Mexico was invaded during our Civil 
War. 

The truth is that the destruction of the 
British Na^-y would be the turning of our 
Atlantic Maginot Line. Without the British 
Navy, the Atlantic would give us no more 
protection than the Maginot Line gave France 
after the German troops had marched through 
Belgium. The soothing words "Maginot Line" 
were the refrain of a lullaby of death for 
France. The soothing words "Atlantic Ocean" 
are being used now by the propagandists of 
the dictators in the hope that they may become 
a lullaby of death for the United States. 

The French knew that they were outnumbered 
two to one by the Germans and that all Ger- 
mans — men, women, and children — had been 
mobilized for war. They knew that Great Brit- 



ain was unprepared for war and that little help 
could come to France from England. When 
they thought hard, therefore, they knew that 
every French man, woman, and child ought to 
be working for the national defense. The 
French had, of course, universal military train- 
ing for the army. Even the French priests were 
trained to fight, and they fought at the front 
like other good soldiers and would not have been 
respected if they had not. But when the ques- 
tion arose of mobilizing the whole nation for 
national defense by compulsory national serv- 
ice, even as a temporary measure to save the 
liberties of France, the French found it more 
comfortable to listen to the voices, some sincere, 
some bought by the dictators, which told them 
tliat their individual liberties were sacred and 
must not be sacrificed for a moment even to save 
the liberties of the nation; that it was more im- 
portant for the individual to work only 40 hours 
a week than for his country to have enough 
airplanes; that the voluntary acceptance of na- 
tional service as a temporary measure would be 
an imitation of the dictatorships. Thus, in the 
name of the preservation of individual liberty, 
the national liberty of France was condemned 
in advance to destruction. 

Recently, in this country, we have heard men 
and women arguing that we ourselves would be 
imitating the dictatorships if we should create 
through conscription an army adequate to de- 
fend our country. They too are playing the 
dictators' game. 

Then there were many in France, some honest, 
some agents of the dictators, who argued that 
since airplane design was changing rapidly, 
France should have good models but should not 
manufacture planes in gi-eat quantity until 
after the outbreak of war. They were promi- 
nent and powerful. As a result, at one time 
French plane production was allowed to sink to 
37 a month while Germany was producing a 
thousand a month ! 

Have we been wiser during the past years? 
Have we built the planes or trained the aviators 
to man them? Have we prepared the tanks or 
the men to drive them? Have we trained and 
equipped even infantry for our national de- 



124 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



fense? Are there not among us many who 
tliink and talk as did the Frenchmen who op- 
posed adequate preparations ? Recently I heard 
a Senator who is as good an American as any 
of us state that while he would favor conscrip- 
tion the moment we should be attacked, he 
would oppose conscription until after we should 
have been attacked. The ruined homes of 
France, the women and children starving on the 
roads, cry out to him and to every one of us 
that wars are won or lost by the preparations 
made or not made before they begin ; that un- 
trained soldiers are not opponents but merely 
\ ictims for trained men with tanks and planes. 
The dictators, who are confident that all de- 
mocracies will always be too late, count not only 
on their agents to befuddle American opinion 
but also on honorable men like that Senator. 

Wliat 3tands today between the Americas and 
the unleashed dictatorships ? The British fleet 
and the courage of the British people. How 
long will the British fleet be able to hold the 
exits from Europe to the Atlantic? I cannot 
answer that question nor can any man. 

You have heard the appeal of General Persh- 
ing for aid to the British fleet. You have heard 
the appeal of Admiral Standley. You have 
heard the appeal of William Allen Wliite and 
his associates. If you let those appeals go 
unanswered and the British fleet goes under, 
do you realize what that would mean to you, 
to all of the people of this country? Great 
Britain and Ireland, along with the whole 
Continent of Europe, would be organized into 
one economic unit directed from Berlin ; a unit 
which would be far stronger in productive ca- 
pacity than the United States, which would 
have five times our capacity to produce war- 
ships; a unit whose trade would be controlled 
by one trading trust directed from Berlin. No 
country of North or South America would be 
able to trade with Europe except on such terms 
as might be pleasing to the dictators. Those 
conditions for many of the countries of South 
America would be the acceptance of a greater 
or les3 measure of Nazi control. 

For us, since we would not accept Nazi con- 
trol, they would mean the cutting off of our 



markets for cotton, tobacco, and other export 
products. That would be so fatal to the econ- 
omy of certain sections of our country that we 
should face the gravest economic crisis in our 
history; a crisis which it would be the task of 
Nazi and Communist agents to exploit. 

In the Pacific would be the Japanese Navy, 
cooperating with the dictators, which would 
be able to cut us off from our supplies of rubber 
and tin and would compel us to leave a large 
part of our fleet in the Pacific to defend Ha- 
waii and the West Coast. In the Atlantic 
would be combined fleets of the dictators which 
would be so close to our own fleet in strength 
that they would be able to cut us off from 
all commerce not only with Europe but also 
with Africa and would endanger even our com- 
munications with the southern portion of this 
hemisphere. 

Are you sure that under those circumstances 
the powerful Nazi and Communist movements 
which already exist in various countries of 
South America would not be able to seize power 
and would not invite the European dictators to 
organize air forces on their territories and that 
those air forces would not move northward with 
dive bombers to the Panama Canal and then 
move against this comitry? Are you sure that 
our existing fleet and air force would be able 
to defend even the northern route to the United 
States by way of Greenland, Newfoundland, 
and Canada? 

It is as clear as anything on this earth that 
the United States will not go to war, but it is 
equally clear that war is coming toward the 
Americas. 

The agents of the dictators are already here 
preparing the way for their armies. They are 
preparing the way in the same manner in which 
they prepared the way in France. 

In France much of the most terrible and 
traitorous work was done by the Fascists and 
Communists working together. Many honest 
French democrats and liberals had been snared 
by Communist propaganda and argued that, 
because the Communists called themselves a po- 
litical party and pretended at the time to be 
in favor of democracy, it would be undemo- 



AUGUST 84, 1940 



125 



cratic to deny to the Communists the rights of 
any other political party. The honest French 
patriots and democrats who protected the Com- 
munists did not discover until too late that the 
Communists Mere acting as spies and agents 
of the dictators, that the Communist Party was 
merely camouflaged as a political party and was 
in reality a conspiracy to commit patricide at 
the direction of a foreign dictator. They dis- 
covered too late that the Communi.sts were 
traitors who were claiming the protection of 
the -State which they intended to destroy only 
in order the better to prepare for its destruction. 

When the German invasion began to sweep 
into Belgium and France, there were Com- 
munist and Nazi agents of Germany in each 
town and village who produced panic among 
the civilian populations by spreading fantastic 
tales of murdering by the Gemian troops of 
men, women, and children. By this means 10 
million civilians were harried in fear from their 
homes and clogged all the roads, so that the 
French, British, and Belgian Annies could not 
maneuver, so that transport of supplies became 
almost impossible and a magnificent fighting 
force became a clotted mass of men and mate- 
riel, a perfect target for bombing and machine- 
gimning from the air. 

At the most critical moment of the fighting 
in Belgium, other German agents, this time 
Communist i-ailway men, stopped all traflSc on 
the Belgian railways so that there was no 
transport by train for the French, Bi-itish, and 
Belgian Armies. 

Throughout France, especially in Paris, there 
were liundreds of Communist and Nazi agents 
of the dictators with extremely short-wave 
portable radio-transmitting sets in their hiding 
places. They kept the Germans fully informed 
of the movements of the French Army and of 
the intentions of the French Govenmient. 
Since they could change their hiding places 
daily, the French were never able to track down 
more than one tenth of these spies. 

The French had been more hospitable than 
are even we Americans to refugees from Ger- 
many. More than one half the spies captured 
doing actual military spy work against the 



French Army were refugees from Gennany. 

Do }'ou believe that there are no Nazi and 
Communist agents of this sort in America? 

On the tenth day of last May, the people 
of France were as confident as are the people 
of the United States today that their country 
could not be conquered. Three days later, on 
the thirteenth day of May, the Germans had 
smashed through the center of the French 
Army and France was doomed. 

The way had been prepared by spies, agents, 
and propagandists, but it was the strength of 
the German Army and the skill of its leaders 
that enabled Germany to strike the fatal blow. 
The blow was struck just where the French 
did not expect it. The attack was made by 
a new method that the French had never 
imagined. Waves of bombing planes preceded 
waves of tanks with perfect coordination main- 
tained by radio. The tanks cut through the 
French lines, then wheeled and lopped off piece 
after piece of the French Ai-my. 

The French soldier fought as courageously 
and magnificently as any soldier has ever 
fought. Division after division, cut off from 
supplies of all sorts, fought on until there 
were no more shells for the cannons or cart- 
ridges for the gims, then charged with the 
bayonet. The courage of the Fi'ench was mag- 
nificent but of no avail against the tanks and 
planes of the Germans. And, make no mis- 
take, the GeiTuan infantiTmen were as brave 
as the French. 

The entire western world had been lulled by 
stories of the inferiority of German equip- 
ment. I have seen, myself, hundreds of thou- 
sands of German soldiers with all their 
motorized and mechanized equipment. I have 
never seen one piece of that equipment broken 
down. 

The German military machine today is with- 
out question the most powerful that has ever 
been created. It has been used with consum- 
mate skill. And you may be sure that, if the 
Nazis have an opportunity to turn it against 
us, it will be as strong or stronger than it 
is today and will be used in the most un- 
expected manner. 



126 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



I cannot tell yon where and when the at- 
tack will come, any more than the French 
General Staff could have told you that the 
German attack would be made at Sedan on 
the thirteenth of May; but I am certain that 
if Great Britain is defeated the attack will 
come and that all the strength of this Nation 
will be needed — mobilized, organized, equipped, 
and readj' — if we are to parry it and save the 
independence of our country. 

Why are we sleeping, Americans? When 
are we going to wake up? Wlien are we 
going to tell our Government that we want 
to defend our homes and our children and 
our liberties, whatever the cost in money 
or blood? When are we going to give the 
lie to those who say that the people of the 
United States no longer care about their liber- 
ties, that they look on the United States just 
as a trough into which to get their snouts and 
not as the greatest adventure in human 
freedom that this earth has known? 

Wlien are we going to let the world know 
that in spite of all the efforts of all the propa- 
gandists who call their propaganda "debunk- 
ing" and ti-y to teach us to fear even truth, 
we still know that when anyone tries to de- 
bunk the Ten Commandments and the Sermon 
on the Mount, he prepares for himself hell in 
this world and in the next ? 

When are we going to let legislators in 
Washington know that we don't want any 
more politicians who are afraid of the next 
election and scared to ask us to make the sacri- 
fices that we know are necessary to preserve 
our liberties and our Declaration of Independ- 
ence and our Constitution? When are we go- 
ing to tell them that we want to know what are 
our duties, not what are our privileges? 
When are we going to say to them that we 



don't want to hear any longer about what we 
can get from our country but we do want to 
hear what we can give to our country. Wlien 
are we going to stand before God and say that 
we know a human being is worthy of freedom 
only when he serves the ideal in which he 
believes ? 

Do we want to see Hitler in Independence 
Hall making fun of the Liberty Bell? No! 

Then here, in this Square, where Washington 
walked with Jefferson, where our independence 
was declared, where our Constitution was 
framed, I ask you and all other Americans 
who hear my voice tonight to join in the fight 
to keep our country free. 

Write and telegraph to your Senators and 
Representatives. Write to your newspapers. 
Demand the privilege of being called into the 
service of the Nation. Tell them that we want 
conscription. Tell them that we back up Gen- 
eral Pershing. 

If you belong to great patriotic organiza- 
tions, make them act. If you want to make 
your will felt but do not know how to make it 
felt, write to me and I shall try personally to 
put you in touch with the men and women 
who know how you can help most effectively 
in your own home towns and villages. 

Our defense against the enemies who are 
already within our country has still to be or- 
ganized. Nearly all our defense against the 
enemies that are still outside our country has 
still to be organized. If we won't act, our 
Government can't. It is up to us. 

The fighting line of the war for the enslave- 
ment of the human spirit is nearing our shores. 
For every American "there is no discharge in 
that war." An American is a free man or he 
is nothing. Our fate and the fate of our chil- 
dren depends on what each one of us does — now. 



American Republics 



HABANA MEETING OF THE MINISTERS OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS 

Final Act and Convention 



The following texts of the Act and Conven- 
tion of the Second Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics at 
Habana ai-e being i)rinted in order that they 
may be generally available without further de- 
lay, although the certified copies have not yet 
been received. It is believed that they are 
correct. 

Final Act 

The Governments of the American Republics, 
in order that their Ministers of Foreign Affairs 
or their Pei-sonal Representatives might meet 
lor purposes of consultation in accordance with 
agreements approved at prior Inter-American 
Conferences, duly accredited the Delegates here- 
inbelow expressed (following the order of 
precedence determined by lot) who met in the 
City of Habana during the period comprised 
between the twenty-first and the thirtieth of 
July, one thousand nine liundred and forty, in 
answer to the invitation of the Government of 
the Republic of Cuba : 

HONDUKAS 

His Excellency Sil\'erio Laixez. Personal Rep- 
resentative of His Excellency The Minister of 



Foreign Affairs 



Haiti 



His Excellency Leon Laleau, Secretary of 
State for Foreign Affairs 

Costa Rica 

His Excellency Luis Anderson Morua, Per- 
sonal Representative of His Excellency The 
Secretary of Foreign Affairs 

256570 — 10 2 



Mexico 

His Excellency Edu^vrdo Suarez, Personal 
Representative of His Excellency The Secre- 
tary of Foreign Affairs 

Argentina 

His Excellency Leopoldo Melo. Personal Rep- 
resentative of His Excellency The Minister of 
Foreign Affairs 

Uruguay 

His Excellency Pedro Manini Rios. Personal 
Representative of His Excellency The Min- 
ister of Foreign Affairs 

Ecuador 

His Excellency Julio Tobae Donoso, Minister 
of Foreign Affairs 

Bolivia 

His Excellency Enrique Finot, Personal Rep- 
resentative of His Excellency The Minister of 
Foreign Affairs 

Chile 

His Excellency Oscar Schnakje, Personal Rep- 
resentative of His Excellency The Minister of 



Foreign Affairs 



Brazil 



His Excellency Mauricio Nabuco, Personal 
Representative of His Excellency The Min- 
ister of Foreign Affairs 

Cuba 

His Excellency Miguel Angel Campa, Secre- 
tary of State 

127 



128 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Paraguay 

His Excellency Tomas A. Salomoni, Minister 
of Foreign Affairs 

Panama 

His Excellency Narciso Garat, Secretary of 
Foreign Relations and Communications 

Colombia 

His Excellency Lms Lopez de Mesa, Minister of 
Foreign Affairs 

Venezuela 

His Excellency Diogenes Escalvnte, Personal 
Representative of His Excellency The Min- 
ister of Foreign Affairs 

El Salvador 

His Excellency Hector Escobar Serrano, Per- 
sonal Representative of His Excellency The 
Minister of Foreign Affairs 

Dominican Republic 

His Excellency Arturo Despradel, Secretary 
of State for Foreign Affairs 

Peru 

His Excellency Lino Cornejo, Personal Repre- 
sentative of His Excellency The Minister of 
Foreign Affairs 

Nicaragua 

His Excellency INIariano Arguello, Minister 
of Foreign Affairs 

Guatemala 

His Excellency Carlos Salazar, Secretary of 
Foreign Affairs 

United States of America 

His Excellency Cordell Hull, Secretary of 
State 

The Meeting held its inaugural session on the 
twenty-first day of July, one thousand nine 
hundred and forty, at four o'clock in the after- 
noon, in the Hall of Sessions of the House of 
Representatives, in the National Capitol, in the 
presence of His Excellency Dr. Federico La- 
redo Brii, President of the Republic of Cuba, 
under the provisional presidency of His Ex- 
cellency Miguel Angel Campa, Secretary of 



State, with Dr. Cesar Salaya y de la Fuente, 
acting as Secretary General. 

The Regulations for the Meeting were ap- 
proved by the Governing Board of the Pan 
American Union at a session held the twenty- 
ninth day of June, one thousand nine hundred 
and forty, and the Agenda at a session held by 
the same body on the fifth day of the current 
month. - 

The aforesaid Regulations and Agenda were 
ratified by the Meeting in the preliminary ses- 
sion held the twenty-second of July, one thou- 
sand nine hundred and forty, at ten o'clock in 
the morning. 

At the Plenary Session held the same day at 
four o'clock in the afternoon. Dr. Miguel Angel 
Campa, Secretary of State of the Republic of 
Cuba, was elected Permanent President of the 
Meeting. 

In compliance with the provisions of Articles 
VII and VIII of the Regulations, the following 
Committees were created : Credentials, Coordi- 
nation, Neutrality, Preservation of Peace in the 
Western Hemisphere and Economic Coopera- 
tion. For the constitution of the latter three 
Committees the division in three parts or chap- 
ters of the Agenda of the Meeting was taken 
into consideration. 

At the same Preliminary Session at which 
the Regulations were ratified, the members of 
the above mentioned five Committees were ap- 
pointed, as follows : 

Committee on Credentials : 

Their Excellencies: 

Narciso Garay (Panama) 

Tomas A. Salomoni (Paraguay) 

Carlos Salazar (Guatemala) 

Hector Escobar Serrano (El Salvador) 

SiLVERio Lainez (Honduras) 

Committee on Coordination : 

Their Excellencies : 

Leopoldo Melo (Argentina) 

Mauricio Nabuco (Brazil) 

Cordell Hull (United States of America) 

Leon Laleau (Haiti) 



= See thp Bulletin of June 29, 1940 (vol. II, no. 53), 
pp. 705-706, and July 6, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 54), p. 11. 



AUGUST 2 4, 1940 



129 



Committee on Neutrality: 
Their Excellencies: 

Leopoldo Melo (Argentina) 
Luis Anderson Moria (Costa Rica) 
Oscar Schnake (Chile) 
Pedro Manini Kios (Uruguay) 
Enrique Finot (Bolivia) 
Carlos Salazar (Guatemala) 
SiLVERio Lai'nez (Honduras) 

(Committee on Preservation of Peace in the 
Western Hemisphere: 

Their Excellencies : 

Cordell Hull (United States of America) 
Diogenes Escalante (Venezuela) 
Mauricio Nabuco (Brazil) 
Julio Tobar Donoso (Ecuador) 
Arturo Despradel (Dominican Republic) 
ToMAS A. Salomoni (Paraguay) 
Narciso Garay (Panama) 

Committee on Economic Cooperation: 

Their Excellencies : 

Eduardo Suarez (Mexico) 

Luis Lopez de Mesa (Colombia) 

Lino Cornjeo (Peril) 

Mariano Arguelo (Nicaragua) 

Leon Lai£.\u (Haiti) 

Hector Escobar Serr-^no (El Salvador) 

Miguel Angel Campa (Cuba) 

At the same Preliniinar_v Session already 
mentioned, it was unanimously resolved that the 
Committee referred to in Article VI was to be 
made up by the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of 
the American Republics or their Personal Rep- 
resentatives. 

It was likewise resolved that the Delegations 
that presented projects corresponding to mat- 
ters pertaining to any of the three last men- 
tioned Committees, had the right to belong to 
tlie corresponding Committee, as ex officio mem- 
bers. 

The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics ap- 
proved the following votes, motions, declara- 
tions, recommendations and resolutions: 



Inter-American Neutrality Committee 

The Second Meeting of the Ministei-s of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics 



Resolves: 

One: To urge the Inter- American Neutrality 
Committee to draft a preliminary project of 
convention dealing with the juridical effects of 
the Security Zone and the measures of interna- 
tional cooperation which the American States 
are ready to adopt to obtain respect for the said 
Zone. 

Two: To entrust the Inter- American Neu- 
trality Connnittee. which functions at Rio de 
Janeiro, with the drafting of a project of inter- 
American convention which will cover com- 
pletely all the principles and rules generally 
recognized in international law in matters of 
neutrality, and especially those contained in the 
Resolutions of Panama,-' in the individual legis- 
lation of the different American States, and in 
the recommendations already presented bj- the 
same Committee. 

Three: AA^hen the aforementioned project has 
been drafted, it shall be deposited in the Pan 
American Union, in order to be submitted for 
the signature, adhesion and ratification of the 
respective Governments of the American Re- 
publics. 

Four: Pending the drafting, acceptance and 
ratification of the project, it is recommended 
that the American States adopt in their respec- 
tive legislations concerning neutrality, the prin- 
ciples and rules contained in the Declarations 
of Panama and in the recommendations 
alreadj' drafted, or which may hereafter be 
drafted by the Inter- American Neutrality Com- 
mittee, it being suggested that the incorpora- 
tion of the said resolutions and recommenda- 
tions in the respective legislations be made, in 
so far as practicable, in a codified and joint 
form. 

Five: To direct that the aforementioned 
Inter-American Neutrality Committee submit, 
whenever it may deem advisable, its recom- 
mendations direct to the Governments of the 
American Republics, provided, however, that it 



' For text of the Final Act of the Meeting of Foreign 
Ministers at Panama in 1939, see the Bulletin of Octo- 
ber 7, 1939 (vol. I, no. 15), pp. 321-334. 



130 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



shall report also concerning them to the Pan 
American Union. 

Six.- To recommend that the Pan American 
Union circulate, among the Governments of the 
American States the minutes of the Inter- 
American Neutrality Committee of Rio de Ja- 
neiro, and that the minutes be published by the 
Pan American Union, when the said Committee 
deems it opportune. 

Seven: That the Inter- American Neutrality 
Committee may function with the attendance of 
a minimum of five members, and that, whatever 
be the number of members present at the meet- 
ings, resolutions shall be adopted with the 
favorable vote of at least four members. 

Eight: That even though the Committee is 
permanent in nature, it is authorized to hold 
periodical meetings and to adjourn for a speci- 
fied time, without pi-ejudice to the calling of 
extraordinary sessions by the President, when 
some urgent and important question is to be 
considered. 

Nine: To extend a vote of applause and con- 
gratvdations, for its meritorious work, to the 
Inter- American Neutrality Committee of Rio de 
Janeiro, and to its members, Their Excellencies 
Afranio de Mello Franco, L. A. Podesta Costa, 
Mariano Fontecilla, A. Aguilar Machado, 
Charles G. Fenwick, Roberto Cordoba, Gustavo 
Herrera, ISIanuel Francisco Jimenez and S. 
Martinez Mercado. 

n 

Norms Concerning Diplomatic and Consular 

Functions 

Whereas: 

1. One of the bases of the spiritual, unity of 
the Americas has its roots in the firm adherence 
by the peoples of the Continent to the principles 
of international law. 

2. The American Republics on February 20th, 
1928 signed, at llabana, a Convention on Diplo- 
matic OiEcers which contains the principles gen- 
erally accepted by all nations. 

3. The said Convention establishes, among 
others, the following principles: 

a) Foreign diplomatic officers shall not 
participate in the domestic or foreign poli- 



tics of the State in which they exercise their 
functions. 

b) They must exercise their functions 
without coming into conflict with the laws of 
the country to which they are accredited. 

c) They should not claim immunities 
which are not essential to the fulfillment of 
their official duties. 

(d) No State shall accredit its diplomatic 
officers to other States without previous 
agreement with the latter. 

e) States may decline to review a diplo- 
matic officer from another, or, having already 
accepted him, may request his recall without 
being obliged to state the reasons for such a 
decision. 

The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 
Resolves: 

To urge the Governments of the American 
Republics to prevent, within the provisions of 
international law, political activities of foreign 
diplomatic or consular agents, within the terri- 
tory to which they are accredited, which may 
endanger the peace and the democratic tradition 
of America. 

Ill 

Coordination of Police and Judicial Measures 
FOR THE Defense of Society and Institu- 
tions OF Each American State 

Whereas : 

1. The First Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics held at 
Panama, approved on October 3, 1939 a recom- 
mendation on the coordination of police and 
judicial measures for the maintenance of neu- 
Irality, article 1 of which states as follows: 

"That action be taken, as soon as possible, 
through an exchange of views between the For- 
eign Offices, or through an inter- American con- 
ference, for the formulation between themselves 
of coordinated rules and procedure of a useful, 
opportune and effective manner, that will facili- 
tate the action of the police and judicial author- 
ities of the respective countries in preventing 
or repressing unlawful activities that Individ- 



AUGUST 24, 1940 



131 



mils, whether they be nationals or aliens, may 
attempt in favor of a foreign belligerent 
State." •' 

2. Experience has shown that it is not only 
desirable to formulate such rules and procedure 
with reference to neutrality, but it has also dem- 
onstrated the need to organize in the most effec- 
tive manner possible the defense of society and 
of the institutions of each State not only against 
common crimes, but likewise with respect to cer- 
tain unlawful activities which may affect tluMii; 

3. Such defense nuist be undertaken by the 
authorities of each State, but its efficacy de- 
pends to a large extent upon a common orienta- 
tion, as uniform as possible, as well as upon an 
adequate and constant cooperation between such 
authorities; 

The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 

One: The Governing Board of the Pan 
American Union shall convoke the States which 
are members of the Union to an international 

I conference at such place and date as it may de- 
termine to draft the international conventions 
and recommendations which it deems necessary 
to assure through the action of the proper au- 
thorities in each State, and through the coordi- 
nation of such action with that of other States 
in the Continent, the most complete and effec- 
tive defense against acts of an unlawful char- 

^ acter, as well as against any other unlawful 
activities which may affect the institutions of 
American States. 

Two : In the said conference, each State shall 
be represented by a jurist with plenipotentiary 
powers accompanied, if deemed advisable, by 
experts on matters pertaining to the police 

I authorities. 

Three: Before the conference is convoked, the 
Pan American Union shall undertake the jjre- 
paratory work by means of an inquiry among 
the Governments of the Continent with regard 
to the existing legislative or administrative pro- 
visions, as M-ell as with respect to their opinions 



'See the Bulletin of October 7, 1939 (vol. I, no. 15), 
p. 330. 



on the various topics which it is deemed ad- 
visable to consider. 

IV 

Inter- American League of National Hed 
Cross Societies 

Whereas : 

It is America's unavoidable duty, for reasons 
of human solidarity, to contribute to the allevia- 
tion of the suffering and misery of victims of 
war. 

The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Recommends : 

That the Fourth Pan American Red Cross 
Conference, which will meet at Santiago, 
Chile next December, consider the desirability 
of organizing, along the general lines of the 
League of National Red Cross Societies, an 
Inter-American League of National Red Cross 
Societies, which shall coordinate the action of 
the said Red Cross Societies of the American 
countries and the cooi)eration of the Inter- 
American Leagiie and its Executive Committee 
with the League and the International Commit- 
tee of the Red Cross. 

V 

I'ukcautionary Measures With Reference to 
the Issuance of Passports 

AVhkreas : 

1. A passport is essentially an identification 
document which accredits in foreign countries 
the holder thereof as a national of the country 
which issues it; 

2. Such document has an eminently interna- 
tional character, inasmuch as its possessor uses 
it solely as a document of identification outside 
the territory of his country of origin or of 
adoption; 

3. The States of the American Continent 
must exercise the utmost care in issuing pass- 
ports for the use of their respective nationals, 
in order that they may find greater facilities in 
traveling through the countries of America ; 

4. It is their duty to prevent the use of 
counterfeit passports, 



132 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of tlie American Republics 

Resolves: 

Oiie. To recommend to the Governments of 
the American Republics the adoption of the 
precautionary measures in the issuance of pass- 
ports which each deems appropriate. 

Two. To recommend to the countries of 
America the adoption of uniform punitive meas- 
ures against the use of counterfeit or altered 
passports or passports of more than one country. 

VI 

Activities Directed From Abroad Against 
Domestic Institutions 

The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 

One. That having in mind the equal concern 
and equal responsibility of the American Re- 
publics for the preservation of the peace and 
security of the hemisphere, each one of the 
Governments of the American Republics shall 
adopt within its territory all necessary meas- 
ures in accordance with its constitutional 
powers to prevent and suppress any activities 
directed, assisted or abetted by foreign govern- 
ments, or foreign groups or individuals, which 
tend to subvert the domestic institutions, or to 
foment disorder in their internal political life, 
or to modify by pressure, propaganda, threats, 
or in any other manner, the free and sovereign 
right of their peoples to be governed by their 
existing democratic systems. 

In the event that the peace of any of the 
American Republics is menaced by such activi- 
ties, the respective Governments agree that they 
will immediately consult together, if the State 
directly interested wishes to request it, taking 
into account the provisions of this resolution 
and the special circumstances which may affect 
the peace or the tranquillity of the American 
Republics. 

The American Republics being juridically 
equal as sovereign and independent States, each 
shall act in its individual capacity in any steps 
undertaken in this connection. 



Tu'o. In order to make such consultation 
more efficacious, the Governments of the Amer- 
ican Republics further declare that the fullest 
interchange of information between them is 
essential with regard to the aforementioned 
activities within their respective jurisdictions. 

Three. The Governments of the American 
Republics agree that any government which 
obtains information purporting to show that 
activities of the aforementioned character are 
taking place, or are threatening to take place, 
within the territory of one or more of the Amer- 
ican Republics, shall at once communicate in 
the strictest confidence to the Foreign Minister 
of such nation or nations the information so 
obtained. 

Four. The Governments of the American Re- 
publics declare that, under existing world con- 
ditions, the fullest interchange between them of 
all information of the character described, is 
in the common interest of them all, and will 
assist in the preservation of the peace and in- 
tegrity of the Americas. 

VII 

Diffusion of Doctrines Tending To Place in 
Jeopardy the Common Inter-American 
Democratic Ideal or To Threaten the Se- 
curity and Neutrality of the American 
Republics 

Whereas : 

1. At the First Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs held at Panama the American 
Republics once more affirmed their adherence to 
the democratic ideal that prevails in this Conti- 
nent, considering that this ideal might find it- 
self endangered by virtue of the action of 
foreign ideologies inspired by diametrically 
opposed principles; 

2. That the General Declaration of Neutral- 
ity of the American Republics, signed at Pan- 
ama on October 3, 1939,'* recognized as one of 
the principles of neutrality, admitted by the 
American States, that they "shall prevent in 
accordance with their internal legislation, the 
inhabitants of their territories from engaging 



"See the Bulletin of October 7, 1939 (vol. I, no. 15), 
pp. 326-328. 



AUGUST 24, 1940 



133 



in activities capable of affecting the neutral 
status of the American Republics" ; 

3. The Convention on the Rights and Duties 
of States in the event of Civil Strife was signed 
at the Sixth International Conference of Amer- 
ican States at Habana in 1928, vrhich has been 
ratified by the majority of the American 
States; 

4. The exclusion of foreigners from the en- 
joyment and exercise of strictly political rights 
is a general rule of internal public law incor- 
porated in the constitutions and laws of States; 

5. The Sanchez de Bustamante Code of Pri- 
vate International Law, accepted and put into 
force through the Convention concluded and 
signed at the Sixth Inter-American Confer- 
ence on February 20, 1928, establishes an iden- 
tical rule excepting, of course, special provi- 
sions contained in the internal legislation of the 
American States; 

6. The aforesaid exclusion from the enjoy- 
ment of political rights implies the tacit pro- 
hibition for foreigners to engage in political 
activities within the territory of the State in 
which they reside ; 

7. The present European conflict has revealed 
the existence of foreign political organizations 
in certain neutral States with the deliberate 
purpose of making attempts against public or- 
der, the system of government and the very 
personality of such States ; 

8. Such foreign political organizations would 
constitute in the American States a denial of 
the latter's democratic institutions, a menace to 
their right of self-preservation and a threat of 
violation of their regime of neutrality, and 

9. In order to protect the security and neu- 
trality of the American Republics in so far as 
they might be affected by illicit activities on the 
part of individuals or associations, either na- 
tional or foreign, tending to foment civil strife 
or internal disturbances and to propagate sub- 
versive ideologies, it is advisable to coordinate 
the measures which may be adopted either in 
common or individually to combat these dan- 
gers. 

The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 



Resolves: 

One. To reiterate the recommendation made 
at the First Consultative Meeting held at 
Panama to the effect that the Governments of 
the American Republics "take the necessary 
measures to eradicate from the Americas the 
spread of doctrines that tend to place in jeop- 
ardy the common inter-American democratic 
ideal'V and also that they take the measures 
which may be advisable to prevent any activi- 
ties susceptible of jeopardizing American neu- 
trality. 

Two. To recommend to the Governments of 
the American Republics the following rules with 
respect to civil strife, internal disturbances, or 
the spread of subversive ideologies: 

a. To use the necessary means to prevent 
the inhabitants of their territory, nationals 
or aliens, from participating in, collecting 
supplies, crossing the boundary or sailing 
from their territory for the purpose of start- 
ing or promoting civil strife, internal dis- 
turbances, or spreading subversive ideologies 
in another American country; 

b. To disarm and intern every rebel force 
crossing their boundaries. There shall be ob- 
served, in so far as they are applicable, the 
rules of internment drafted by the Inter- 
American Neutrality Committee at Rio de 
Janeiro; 

c. To forbid the traffic in arms and war 
materiel, except when intended for the Gov- 
ernment, unless the belligerency of the rebels 
has been recognized, in which latter case the 
rules of neutrality shall be ajiplied, and 

d. To prevent that within their jurisdic- 
tion there be equipped, armed or adapted for 
warlike purposes any vessel intended to oper- 
ate in favor of the rebellion. 

Three. To reiterate the recommendation of 
the First Consultative Meeting, held at Pana- 
ma, to the effect tliat action be taken, as soon 
as possible for the adoption of the rules and 
procedure that may be judged useful to facili- 
tate the action of the police and judicial author- 



*See the Bulletin of October 7, 1939 (vol. I, no. 15), 
p. 331. 



134 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BUIXETIN 



ities of the respective countries in repressing 
unlawful activities that individuals, either na- 
tionals or foreigners, may attempt at any time 
in favor of a foreign State. 

Four. To recommend to the Goverimients of 
the American States that they adopt the fol- 
lowing legislative or administrative norms, 
without prejudice to the respect due to their 
individual and sovereign right to regulate the 
juridical status of foreigners: 

a. Effective prohibition of every political 
activity by foreign individuals, associations, 
groups or political parties, no matter what 
form they use to disguise or cloak such ac- 
tivity; 

b. Eigorous supervision of the entry of 
foreigners into national territory, particu- 
larly in the case of nationals of non-Amer- 
ican States; 

c. Effective police supervision of the ac- 
tivities of foreign non-American groups es- 
tablished in the American States; 

d. Creation of an emergency penal sys- 
tem for the offenses set forth in this article. 

Five. To encourage the reciprocal communi- 
cation, directly or through the Pan American 
Union, of information and data concerning the 
entry, rejection and expulsion of foreigners 
and the adoption of the preventive and repres- 
sive measures provided for in the previous 
article ; 

Sixth. Any of the American Eepublics di- 
rectly affected by the activities referred to in 
this resolution may initiate the procedure of 
consultation. 

vni 

Project on Extension or Tereitorial Waters 

The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 
That the project presented by the Delegation 
of Uruguay, concerning the extension of terri- 
torial waters, together with the modifications in- 
troduced by the present Consultative Meeting 
be transmitted for study to the Committee of 
Experts for the Codification of International 



Law ; and that there also be requested the opin- 
ion of the Inter- American Neutrality Commit- 
tee at Rio de Janeiro regarding the same 
project. 

IX 

Project on Refugees 

The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resol/ves: 
That the projects presented to the Meeting by 
the Delegations of Argentina, Uruguay and 
Mexico (Projects Nos. 35, 36 and 42) concern- 
ing refugees and assistance to minors proceed- 
ing from evacuated areas be referred for con- 
sideration to the Pan American Union. 



Transoceanic Railway Between Arica and 
Santos by way of Bolivia 
The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 
To recognize the importance and usefulness 
for continental defense of the Arica ( Chile )- 
Santos (Brazil) transoceanic railway, through 
Bolivia, and to recommend to the American 
nations, especially to those directly interested 
in the project, the advisability of proceeding as 
soon as possible with the financing of the sec- 
tion still to be constructed. 

XI 

Codification of International Law 

Whereas : 

l.-The Eighth International Conference of 
American States approved several resolutions 
with the purpose of coordinating, intensifying 
and accelerating the work of codification of in- 
ternational law in America; 

2.-The said Conference also adopted other 
resolutions on the coordination and improve- 
ment of the inter- American peace instruments; 

3.-According to historical tradition and the 
most profound convictions of the American peo- 
ples it is urgent at this time, when the bases of 
law and of pacific relations among peoples are 



AUGUST 24, 194 



135 



the object of serious attacks, that the nations of 
America once again reaffirm their effective sup- 
jiort of the principles of international law and 
of the pacific settlement of international con- 
troversies and prove their firm intention to 
work for the maintenance and picservation of 
tliose principles, 

The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves : 

One.-To reconnnend to the Governments of 
the American Republics that they adopt the 
necessary measures to carry out the resolutions 
approved by the Eighth International Confer- 
ence of American States relative to the codifi- 
cation of international law and the improve- 
ment and coordination of the inter-American 
peace instruments. 

Tiro.-To urge the various organizations in 
charge of the study of matters to which the 
above mentioned resolutions refer, to submit, 
as soon as possible, their recommendations and 
observations so that the Governing Board of 
the Pan American Union may convoke the 
meeting of the International Conference of 
American Jurists within the next two years. 

Three.-To request the Pan American Union 
to communicate the present resolution to all 
Governments members of the Union, together 
with a report on the present status of the work 
provided for in the above mentioned resolu- 
tions of the Eighth Conference. 

XII 

Promotion of Continental Solidaritt 
Whereas : 

The sentiment of solidarity between the 
American Republics constitutes a genuine force 
for continental defense, to which all of them 
should lend unreservedly their maximum co- 
operation, removing any obstacle that might 
jeopardize this principle of American public 
law, in order that no State of this Continent 
may find itself deterred from offering its full- 
est and most decided cooperation, both in the 
political and economic fields, to the fulfillment 
of that ideal, 

256570—40 3 



The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Besolves: 
To recommend to the American States that 
in any case in which internal legislation or con- 
tractual acts in force constitute a hindrance to 
the fullest cooperation which a State should 
lend to the principle of continental solidarity, 
it initiate, through legal means, the revision of 
such acts, in so far as this may be possible. 

XIII 

Hostile Acts in Territorial Waters and in 
THE Security Zone 

Whereas : 

l.-At the First Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Afl'airs held at Panama for the purpose 
of preserving peace, the neutrality of the 
American Republics was established, during the 
war begun in Europe; the irrevocable purpose 
was asserted of complying strictly with those 
duties within the principles of international law 
and the clauses of the conventions codifj'ing 
them, and due respect was demanded for the 
situation created by those norms; 

2.-Within this purpose of maintaining secur- 
ity on this Continent, a maritime zone, adja- 
cent to the territorial area of each nation was 
established, excluding such zone from hostile 
acts from the land, sea, or air; 

3.-In the hostilities, belligerency has trans- 
gressed the principles of international law, has 
disregarded the duties imposed by neutrality, 
and has also brought about hostile acts, not only 
in the zone excluded by the XV Resolution of 
Panama, but also contrary to sovereignty in 
the maritime zone of some of the Republics; 

4. Without prejudice to the juridical proced- 
ure and settlement which should be given in 
each case to the claims raised because of these 
transgressions, it is necessary and opportune 
that the voice of the Republics of America con- 
demn them and state the irrevocable purpose of 
practicing and demanding respect to the fullest 
extent for the norms regulating the existence of 
the international community, 



136 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Second Meeting of the Ministers of the 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics 

Declaires: 

<9??€.-That it condemns hostilities within ter- 
ritorial waters, as contrary to the right of sover- 
eignty of the nation having jurisdiction over 
them and to the tenets of international law. 

T'tpo.-That it considers such hostilities within 
the Security Zone to be prejudicial to the votes 
and joint resolutions of the Republics of 
America for the preservation of peace on this 
Continent. 

XIV 

The Peaceful Solution of Conflicts 

Whekeas : 

In behalf of the closest possible unity of the 
Continent, it is imperative that differences ex- 
isting between some of the American nations 
be settled, 

The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves : 

To recommend to the Governing Board of 
the Pan American Union that it organize, in 
the American capital deemed most suitable for 
the purpose, a Committee composed of repre- 
sentatives of five countries, which shall have 
the duty of keeping constant vigilance to insure 
that States between which any dispute exists or 
may arise, of any nature whatsoever, may solve 
it as quickly as possible, and of suggesting, with- 
out detriment to the methods adopted by the 
parties or to the procedures which they may 
agree upon, the measures and steps which may 
be conducive to a settlement. 

The Committee shall submit a report to each 
Meeting of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs and 
to each International Conference of American 
States regarding the status of such conflicts 
and the steps which may have been taken to 
bring about a solution. 



XV 

Reciprocal Assistance and Cooperation for 
THE Defense of the Nations of the Amer- 
icas 

The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Declares: 

That any attempt on the part of a non- 
American State against the integrity or in- 
violability of the territory, the sovereignty or 
the political independence of an American State 
shall be considered as an act of aggression 
against the States which sign this declaration. 

In case acts of aggression are committed or 
should there be reason to believe that an act of 
aggression is being prepared by a non-Ameri- 
can nation against the integrity or inviolability 
of the territory, the sovereign or the political 
independence of an American nation, the na- 
tions signatory to the present declartion will 
consult among themselves in order to agree 
upon the measure it may be advisable to take. 

All the signatory nations, or two or more of 
them, according to circumstances, shall proceed 
to negotiate the necessary complementary agree- 
ments so as to organize cooperation for defense 
and the assistance that they shall lend each 
other in the event of aggressions such as those 
referred to in this declaration. 

XVI 

Maintenance of Peace and Union Among the 
American Republics 

The Second Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics 

Declares: 
One. That the Governments of the American 
Republics are irrevocably determined to main- 
tain and strengthen their union, in order that 
America may fulfill its high mission on behalf 
of civilization; 



AUGUST 2 4, 19 40 



13^ 



TiDO. That they will, therefore, omit no ef- 
fort to prevent any controversy which might 
impair their solidarity; 

Three. That tliey will also make every effort 
to settle in a friendly manner and as soon as 
possible the differences which exist between 
them, in order that their reciprocal confidence 
and their cooperation for continental defense 
against any foreign aggression may be further 
strengthened ; 

Four. That they reaffirm their strong de- 
sire to avoid the use of force in this Continent 
as a means of solving differences between na- 
tions and, therefore, to resort exclusively to 
juridical and pacific methods; 

Fh'c. That tlicy consider it essential to ex- 
tend the sphere of action of these methods, so 
that in all cases they may be decisively effective 
for the preservation of peace; 

Six. That tliey will, likewise, make every ef- 
fort to the end that these principles and aspi- 
rations may be adopted in the relations between 
the nations of America and those of other conti- 
nents ; 

Seven. That during the present period of 
hostilities they will strive for the maintenance 
of law and justice, in accordance witli llie Decla- 
rations of Panama ; 

Eight. That they vehemently desire that 
peace be established on bases which will be 
lasting and inspired by the connnon welfare 
of all peoples ; 

Nine. That they are disposed to nuiintain 
international relations on juridical bases rest- 
ing on the solid foundation of moral forces, in 
order to reestablish definitely the bonds of 
human community; and 

Ten. That, faithful to their ideals, they will 
coordinate their own interests with the duties 
of universal cooj^eration. 

XVII 

Pkocedube on Consultation 

Whereas: 

1. It is incumbent upon the present Meeting, 
as provided in paragraph 3 of Chapter II of 
the Agenda, to examine the functioning of the 



system of consultation among the Govern- 
ments of the American Republics established by 
the resolutions of the Inter-American Confer- 
ence for the Maintenance of Peace and of the 
Eighth International Conference of American 
States, for the purpose of suggesting measures 
susceptible of perfecting it ; 

2. The high motives which led the American 
Republics to put the aforementioned system into 
effect, will continue to make advisable the con- 
voking of other Meetings such as those of 
Panama and of Habana, whenever the lofty 
interests of the Continent so require ; 

3. Future Meetings, as in the case of the 
present one, will have to be convoked under the 
pressure of events and under emergency condi- 
tions which will make it difficult and inadvis- 
able to determine in advance the most appi'o- 
priate time and country for the Meeting; 

4. Prior to the First and the Second Consul- 
tative Meetings, the experience and knowledge 
of the Governing Board of the Pan American 
Union was resorted to, and in convoking future 
Meetings, it would be advisable to take ad- 
vantage of the collaboration of that body. 

The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 

One. The Government which desires to ini- 
tiate consultation in any of the cases contem- 
plated in the conventions, declarations and 
resolutions of the Inter- American Conferences, 
and to propose a Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Relations or of their representatives, 
shall address the Governing Board of the Pan 
American Union indicating the questions with 
which it desires the consultation to deal, as well 
as the approximate date on which the Meeting 
should be held. 

Two. The Governing Board shall immedi- 
ately transmit the request, together with a list 
of the subjects suggested, to the other Govern- 
ments, members of the Union, and invite the 
observations and suggestions which the respec- 
tive Governments may desire to present. 

Three. On the basis of the answers received, 
the Governing Board of the Pan American 



138 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Union will determine the date for the Meeting, 
prepare the appropriate Agenda, and adopt, in 
accordance with the respective Goveriunents, all 
other measures advisable for the preparation 
of the Meeting. 

Four. The Governing Board of the Pan 
American Union shall proceed to draft regula- 
tions for Consultative Meetings which shall be 
submitted to all the American Governments for 
their ajiproval. 

Five. The Third Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics 
will be held at Rio de Janeiro, the capital of 
Brazil. 

Six. After the next Meeting, the designation 
of the country where each Consultative Meet- 
ing shall be held, shall be made by the Govern- 
ing Board of the Pan American Union in ac- 
cordance with the procedure set forth in the 
present resolution. 

XVIII 

RiaATioNs Between the Governments of 
Chile and Spain 

at the Consultative Meeting at Panama in 1939, 
eign Affairs of the American Republics, 

Pursuant to the Declaration of Continental 
Solidarity proclaimed at the Eighth Pan 
American Conference held at Lima and ratified 
at the Consultative Meeting at Panama in 1939, 

Declares: 

That it has followed with concern the conflict 
which has arisen between Chile and Spain, and 
that, notwithstanding its cordial sentiments to- 
ward Spain, it expresses its lively sympathy 
and fraternal solidarity with the attitude as- 
sumed by the Government of Chile in defense 
of principles fundamental for the free peoples 
of America, and that it expresses its hope that 
the relations between the two States will be re- 
established as soon as possible. 

XIX 

The Question or Belize 

The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 



Resolves: 

To express the keen desire and wishes of the 
American countries in favor of a just, peaceful, 
and prompt solution of the question of Belize 
between Guatemala and Great Britain. 

XX 

Act of Habana Concerning the Provisional 
Administration of European Colonies and 
Possessions in the Americas 

Whereas : 

1. The status of regions in this Continent 
belonging to European powers is a subject of 
deep concern to all of the Governments of the 
American Republics ; 

2. As a result of the present European war 
there may be attempts at conquest, which has 
been repudiated in the international relations 
of the American Republics, thus placing in 
danger the essence and f)attern of the institu- 
tions of America ; 

3. The doctrine of inter- American solidarity 
agreed upon at the meetings at Lima and at 
Panama requires the adoption of a policy of 
vigilance and defense so that systems or regimes 
in conflict with their institutions shall not upset 
the peaceful life of the American Republics, 
the nonnal functioning of their institutions, or 
the rule of law and order ; 

4. The course of military events in Europe 
and the changes resulting from them may cre- 
ate the grave danger that European territorial 
possessions in America may be converted into 
strategic centers of aggression against nations 
of the American Continent; 

The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Declares: 
That when islands or regions in the Americas 
now under the possession of non-American na- 
tions are in danger of becoming the subject of 
barter of territory or change of sovereignty, 
the American nations, taking into account the 
imperative need of continental security and the 
desires of the inhabitants of the said islands 
or regions, may set up a regime of provisional 



AUGUST 24, 1940 

administration under the following conditions: 

(a) That as soon iis the reasons requiring 
this measure shall cease to exist, and in the 
event that it would not be prejudicial to the 
safety of the American Republics, such ter- 
ritories shall, in accordance with the prin- 
ciple reaflirnied by this declaration that peo- 
ples of this Continent have the right freely 
to determine their own destinies, be organ- 
ized as autonomous states if it shall appear 
that they are able to constitute and maintain 
themselves in such condition, or be restored 
to their previous status, whichever of these 
alternatives shall appear the more practicable 
and just ; 

(b) That the regions to which this declara- 
tion refers shall be placed temporarily under 
the provisional administration of the Ameri- 
can Republics and this administration shall 
be exercised with the two-fold purpose of 
contributing to the security and defense of 
the Continent, and to the economic, political 
and social progress of such regions and, 

Resolves : 

To create an emergency committee, composed 
of one representative of each of the American 
Republics, which committee shall be deemed 
constituted as soon as two-thirds of its members 
shall have been appointed. Such appointments 
shall be made by the American Republics as soon 
as possible. 

The committee shall meet on the request of 
any signatory of this resolution. 

If it becomes necessary as an imperative 
emergency measure before the coming into ef- 
fect of the convention approved by this Consul- 
tative Meeting, to apply its provisions in order 
to safeguard the peace of the Continent, taking 
into account also the desires of the inhabitants 
of any of the above mentioned regions, the 
committee shall assume the administration of 
the region attacked or threatened, acting in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of the said conven- 
tion. As soon as the convention comes into 
effect, the authority and functions exercised by 
the committee shall be transferred to the Inter- 



139 

American Commission for Territorial Adminis- 
tration. 

Should the need for emergency action be so 
urgent that action by the committee cannot be 
awaited, any of the American Republics, in- 
dividually or jointly with others, shall have the 
right to act in the manner which its own de- 
fense or that of the Continent requires. Should 
this situation arise, the American Republic or 
Republics taking action shall place the matter 
before the committee immediately, in order that 
it may consider the action taken and adopt ap- 
propriate measures. 

None of the provisions contained in the pres- 
ent Act refers to territories or possessions which 
are the subject of dispute or claims between 
European powers and one or more of the Re- 
publics of the Americas. 

XXI 

IXTER-AArERICAN SANriARY COOPERATION 

Whereas : 

1. According to reports received by the Meet- 
ing the principal epidemic diseases, such as 
bubonic plague, yellow fever and malignant 
malaria, which were an international menace 
and could be spread through international com- 
merce, have been effectively controlled to such 
an extent that for all practical purposes the 
danger of their international propagation is be- 
lieved to have been eliminated; 

2. Diseases and epidemics are intensified in 
cases of alterations in the normal life of peoples, 
reaching alarming degrees whenever wars be- 
tween nations are unleashed ; and 

3. The satisfactory results obtained have been 
due to effective cooperation between various 
countries, the Pan American Sanitary Bureau 
and the Rockefeller Foimdation, pursuant to 
the sanitary treaty known as the Pan American 
Sanitary Code, which has been ratified by all 
the Governments, 

The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 
To express its satisfaction for the efficient re- 
sults obtained to date and to recommend that 



140 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



cooperation with relation to sanitary activities 
continue and, as far as possible, be extended 
with a view to further improving sanitary, so- 
cial and economic conditions, recognized as es- 
sentially interdependent and beneficial nation- 
ally as well as internationally. 

XXII 

Project Eegarding Cooperation Between Pan 
American Institutions 

The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Afl'airs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 
That the project presented by the Dominican 
Delegation regarding cooperation betM'een offi- 
cial Pan American institutions in defense of 
the continental principles of peace and democ- 
racy be transmitted for consideration to the 
Pan American Union. 

XXIII 

Pan American Highway 

Whereas : 

1. It has been the invariable desire of all the 
American Republics, expressed since the First 
Inter-American Conference, to make effective 
and practical their solidarity by means of the 
construction of a network of highways to unite 
all of their capital cities, and the satisfaction of 
this desire, as a result of world circumstances, 
has become a vital and urgent need; 

2. In carrying out these aims, the American 
Republics signed at Buenos Aires, on Decem- 
ber 23, 1936, at the Inter- American Conference 
for the Maintenance of Peace, a convention to 
advance the financing, the technical studies, and 
the construction of tlie highway referred to;' 

3. The recommendations contained in Reso- 
lution III, approved at the First Meeting of 
the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the Ameri- 
can Republics, held at Panama in 1939, included 
the following: 

"10. To make every effort in order to com- 
plete their respective sections of the Pan Ameri- 
can Highway and to recommend to tlie countries 



which have ratified the Buenos Aires convention 
that they designate as soon as possible one or 
more experts to expedite the fulfillment of the 
recommendations of the Third Pan American 
Highway Congi-ess." ' 

4. The Pan American Highway, by promot- 
ing close relations and commerce between na- 
tions, would benefit equally all the inhabitants 
of the Americas ; and 

5. The distribution of the cost of construct- 
ing the Highway among the nations which it 
crosses on the sole basis of the territorial ex- 
tension of each country, in addition to not being 
equitable, makes impossible or delays indefi- 
nitely its construction ; 

The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 

One. To invite the American nations which 
as yet have not ratified the Convention of 
Buenos Aires relating to the Pan American 
Highway, to do so as soon as possible. 

Two. To recommend to the Financial Com- 
mission created by that Convention that, in 
drafting the plans for financing the construc- 
tion of the Highway, it study the desirability 
of taking into account, in distributing the total 
cost among the nations linked by it, the fol- 
lowing factors: the economic capacity of the 
individual nations ; their population ; their rev- 
enues; the length of the Highway in the ter- 
ritory of each of them ; and the benefits which 
each nation will derive ivonx the Highway. 
The said Commission sliould also take into 
account the right of those nations which have 
constructed all or part of their respective sec- 
tions to have the estimated value of the work 
completed by them accepted as all or part of 
the contribution which would be allocated to 
the particular country as its share in the total 
cost of the Pan American Highway. 

Three. To recommend to the Inter-American 
Financial and Economic Advisory Committee 
that it collaborate fully with the Pan American 
Highway Financial Commission with a view 



'Tro.-ity Scrios Xo. OL'T. 



' See the Bulletin of October 7, 19:^9 (vol. I, no. 15), 
p. 326. 



AUGUST 24, 1940 



141 



to the prompt and efficacious accomplishment 
of its task. 

XXIV 

Insurance and Reinsurance 

Whereas : 

1. The Delegation of the Dominican Re- 
public has presented to this Second Meeting 
a draft resolution recommending to the 
American nations that they encourage by ap- 
propriate legislation the development of insur- 
ance, and especially of reinsurance facilities; 
and 

2. Because of its complex technical charac- 
ter, a detailed study of the various aspects of 
this recommendation is required, which tliis 
Meeting is not in a position to undertake in 
view of the shortness of the time at its disposal. 

The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 
To transmit to the Inter- American Financial 
and Economic Advisory Committee, at Wash- 
ington, the project of the Dominican Republic 
to the end that it proceed to make a study of it 
and to report its conclusions to the (iovernments 
of the American Republics. 

XXV 

Economic and Financial Cooperation 
Whereas : 

1. At the First Consultative Meeting held at 
Panama it was resolved to declare that in view 
of existing circumstances, it had become more 
desirable and necessary than ever to establish a 
close and sincere cooperation between the 
American Republics in order that they might 
protect their economic and financial structure, 
maintain their fiscal equilibrium, safeguard the 
stability of their currencies, promote and ex- 
pand their industries, intensify their agricul- 
ture, and develop their commerce ; 

2. In order to attain the objectives of the pre- 
ceding paragraph, it was agreed to create an 
Inter-American Financial and Economic Ad- 
visory Committee, in Washington; 

3. The war now in progress has increased the 
disruption in the channels of international com- 



merce and the curtailment of markets for cer- 
tain products of the Americas ; 

4. The existence of surpluses of commodities, 
the exportation of which is essential to the eco- 
nomic life of the countries of the Americas, is 
economically, socially, financially, and in other 
respects a matter of great importance to the 
masses of the population, and especially to 
those groups participating in the production 
and distribution of wealth in each country, and, 
finally, to the Governments of the entire Con- 
tinent ; 

5. It must be anticipated that these difficul- 
ties will exist as long as the war continues and 
that some of them, as well as other new ones, 
will exist after the war ends; and 

6. It is of great importance that the economic 
development of the American countries be di- 
rected towards a diversification of their produc- 
tion and, at the same time, towards an increase 
in their consumption capacity. 

The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 
One. To declare : 

(a) That the American nations continue to 
adhere to the liberal principles of interna- 
tional trade, conducted with peaceful motives 
and based upon equality of treatment and fair 
and equitable practices; 

(b) That it is the purpose of the American 
nations to apply these principles in their re- 
lations with each other as fully as present cir- 
cumstances permit; 

(c) That the American nations should be 
prepared to resume the conduct of trade with 
tlie entire world in accordance with these 
principles as soon as the non-American na- 
tions are prepared to do likewise ; 

(d) That, in the meantime, the American 
nations shall do everything in their power 
to strengthen their own economic position; 
to improve further the trade and other eco- 
nomic relations between and among them- 
selves; and to devise and apply appropriate 
means of effective action to cope with the dif- 
ficulties, disadvantages and dangers arising 



142 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



from the present disturbed and dislocated 
world conditions; and 

(e) That the American nations consider it 
necessary to maintain or improve the normal 
economic situation established between them 
in order to assure the preservation or im- 
provement of the position enjoyed in their 
respective markets. 

Two. To strengthen and expand the activities 
of the Inter- American Financial and Economic 
Advisory Committee as the instrument, for con- 
tinuing consultation among the American Re- 
I^ublics with respect to economic and trade 
matters and arrangements, having in mind espe- 
cially the immediate situations which must be 
met as a result of the curtailment and changed 
character of important foreign markets. For 
the purpose of dealing with special problems, 
there may be organized subcommittees, com- 
posed of representatives of the interested coun- 
tries, which should meet at such places as may 
be deemed most appropriate for their effective 
functioning. 

Three. Specifically, to instruct the said Com- 
mittee that it proceed forthwith : 

( a ) To cooperate with each counti-y of this 
Continent in the study of possible measures 
for the increase of the domestic consumption 
of its own exportable surpluses of those com- 
modities which are of primary importance 
to the maintenance of the economic life of 
such countries; 

(b) To propose to the American nations 
immediate measures and arrangements of mu- 
tual benefit tending to increase trade among 
them without injury to the interests of their 
respective prodvicers, for the purpose of pro- 
viding increased markets for such products 
and of expanding their consumption; 

(c) To create instruments of inter-Ameri- 
can cooperation for the temporary storing, 
financing and handling of any such com- 
modities and for their orderly and systematic 
marketing, having in mind the normal 



conditions of production and distribution 
thereof ; 

(d) To develop commodity arrangements 
with a view to assuring equitable terms of 
trade for both producers and consumers of 
the commodities concerned; 

(e) To recommend methods for improv- 
ing the standard of living of the peoples of 
the Americas, including public health and 
nutrition measures ; 

(f) To establish appropriate organiza- 
tions for the distribution of a part of the 
surplus of any such commodity, as a hu- 
manitarian and social relief measure; 

(g) To consider, while these plans and 
measures are being develoiaed, the desira- 
bility of a broader system of inter- American 
cooperative organization in trade and indus- 
trial matters, and to propose credit meas- 
ui'es and other measures of assistance which 
may be immediately necessary in the fields 
of economics, finance, money, and foreign 
exchange. 

Four. To reaffirm Resolution XIII of the 
Inter-American Financial and Economic Ad- 
visory Committee, and to recommend that, in 
order to promote the economic development of 
the American nations under the terms of said 
resolution, each nation, upon its own initiative 
and in consonance with the program of the 
Inter-American Development Commission, es- 
tablish apjjropriate enterprises with govern- 
ment or private capital provided by two or 
more American Republics. Such enterprises 
may deal directly with the Inter-American 
Bank or other official or private credit insti- 
tutions, it being recommended that the said 
Bank give its sympathetic consideration to the 
possibility of granting them financial aid. 

XXVI 

Vote of Thanks 

The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Afi'airs of the American Republics 



AUGUST 24, 1940 



143 



Resolves : 

One. To express its gratitude to His Excel- 
lency, The President of the Republic of Cuba, 
Dr. Federico Laredo Bri'i, and to his illustrious 
Government for all the attentions and cour- 
tesies extended to all the delegations attending 
the Meeting. 

Two. To record its profound appreciation of 
the efficacious and admirable work performed 
by His Excellency, Dr. Miguel Angel Campa, 
President of the Meeting and Secretary of State 
of Cuba, and of the skillful and courteous man- 
ner in which he has conducted the delibera- 
tions of the Meeting. 

Three. To congratulate the Secretary Gen- 
eral, Dr. Cesar Salaya y de la Fuente, and the 
personnel of the Secretariat, for their ad- 
mirable contribution to the work of the Meet- 
ing, and the many courtesies extended to the 
members of the several Delegations. 

In witness whereof, the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics or tlieir 
Pei-sonal Representatives, sign and seal the 
present Final Act. 

Done in the City of Habana, this thirtieth 
day of July, one thousand nine hundred and 
forty, in texts in tlie English, Spanish, Portu- 
guese and French languages, which shall be de- 
posited in the archives of the Pan American 
Union. The Secretary General of tlie Meeting 
shall transmit the original of the present Final 
Act to the Pan American Union through the 
intermediary of the Department of State of 
Cuba. 

Reservations. 

Reservation of the Argentine Delegation : 
1. — As to the Declaration with reference to 

the relations between the Governments of Chile 

and Spain (XVIII) : 

"The Delegation of Mexico adheres to the 
declaration which has been approved only be- 



cause it expresses its lively sympathy and 
fraternal solidarity with the attitude which 
the Government of the Sister Republic of 
Chile has assimied in defense of principles 
fundamental for the free peoples of 
America". 

Reservation of the Argentine Delegation: 
2. — As to the Act of Habana : 

"The Delegate of the Argentine Republic 
in signing this Act places on record that it 
does not refer to or include the Malvinas 
Islands, because the latter do not constitute a 
colony or possession of any European nation, 
since they are a part of the Argentine terri- 
tory and are included within its dominion and 
sovereignty, as was stated at the Panama 
meeting, which statement he considers re- 
iterated hereby in its entirety, and also with 
reference to other southern Argentine regions 
as he has stated in the deliberations of this 
Conamission. He likewise states that the 
signing of this Act and Resolution does not 
affect and leaves intact his Government's 
powers established in the constitutional 
norms which obtain in Argentina, with re- 
spect to the procedure applicable in order that 
tliis Act and Resolution may acquire validity, 
force and effectiveness". 

Reservation of the Uruguayan Delegation: 
3.— As to the Act of Habana (XX) : 

"The Delegation of the Republic of Uru- 
guay states that the purpose of this Act is 
to anticipate the carrying out of the Conven- 
tion approved on this subject, in case it is 
necessary to apply the Convention before the 
munber of ratifications requisite for its taking 
effect has been obtained. 

"It wishes, therefore, to place on record a 
reservation respecting the attitude of its Gov- 
ernment, under the latter's express instruc- 
tions, in case it should deem necessary, prior 
to the application of the Act, to examine the 
question of whether under the Uruguayan 



256570 — 40- 



144 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BUTJ.KTIN 



constitutional regime, prior legislative ratifi- 
cation is required". 

Reservation of the Bouvian Delegation : 

4. — As to the Resolution conceming the Inter- 
American Committe* of Rio de Janeiro (I) : 

"The Bolivian delegation desires that the 
peculiar situation of its country be borne in 
mind, mediterranean state lacking coasts, 
whose right to free transit has been recog- 
nized in the Convention of Habana, of 1928, 
on Maritime Neutrality and by bilateral 
treaties entered into with frontier nations. 

"The application of the principles suggested 
by the Inter-American Committe* on Neu- 
trality, in so far as respects internment, 
would signify a disregard of the rights of 
Bolivia on this subject, which has surely not 
been in the minds of the authors of the proj- 
ect, and would lead to the danger that, in the 
event of war, the internment of the members 
of the armed forces of its country, who were 
forced to cross into neutral territory would 
take place." 

Reservation of the Chilean Delegation :* 

5. — "The Delegation of Chile, convinced of 
the need of giving practical application to 
continental solidarity, approves the agree- 
ments with the understanding that Chile will 
only assume obligations and responsibilities 
when the aforementioned agreements are 
ratified by its constitutional bodies." 

Reservation of the Chilean Delegation : 

6. — As to the Resolution on Economic and 
Financial Cooperation (XXV) : 

"The Delegation of Chile, as it did at the 
First Consultative Meeting of Panama, quali- 
fies its vote in respect of 'liberal principles of 
inteiTiational trade' to which reference is 
made in paragraphs a, b and c of Section 1, 
for the reasons stated before the Committee 



* For additional reservation by Chile, see mfra. 



which dealt with this project. It requests 
that record of this qualification be made in 
the appropriate document." 

Reservation of the Colombian Delegation : 

7.— As to the Act of Habana (XX) and the 
Declaration concerning Reciprocal Assistance 
and Cooperation for the Defense of the Ameri- 
can Nations (XV) : 

"I vote affirmatively with the statement 
that I shall sign the Act of Habana and the 
Declaration concerning Reciprocal Assistance 
and Cooperation for the Defense of the Na- 
tions of the Americas, subject to approval by 
my Govermnent and to the constitutional 
norms of my country." 

Reservation of the Venezuelan Delegation ; 

8. — As to the Act of Habana (XX) : 

"The Venezuelan Delegation signs with the 
understanding that the Act of Habana rela- 
tive to colonial possessions is subject to rati- 
fication by the Public Power of the Nation in 
accordance with its constitutional provisions." 

Reservation of the Peruvian Delegation: 

9. — As to the Resolution on Pacific Solution 
of Conflicts : 

"Peru accepts the proposal of the Haitian 
Delegation with the reservation that the Com- 
mittee shall function only at the request of 
the interested parties." 

[Here follow signatures.] 

Additional Reservation of the Chilean 
Delegation : 

As to the Act of Habana (XX) : 

"The Chilean Delegation, at the time of 
signing the present Final Act, makes reserva- 
tion in addition to the reservation set forth 
in yesterday's Private Plenary Session, of the 
rights of Chile in Antarctica." 



AUGUST 24, 1940 



145 



Convention 

The Governments represented at the Second 
Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the 
American Kepublics, 

Considering: 

One. That the American Republics have 
formulated at the Second Consultative Meeting 
the Act of Habana with regard to the destiny 
of colonies of non-American countries located 
in this hemisphere as well as with respect to 
the provisional administration of such colonies; 

Two. That as a result of the events which are 
taking i)lacc in the European continent situa- 
tions may develop in the territories of the pos- 
sessions which some of the belligerent nations 
have in the Americas which may extinguish or 
materially impair the sovereignty which they 
exercise over them, or leave their government 
without a leader, thus creating a state of danger 
to the peace of the continent and a state of af- 
fairs in which the rule of law, order, and respect 
for life, liberty and the property of inhabitants 
may disappear; 

Three. That the American Republics consider 
that force cannot constitute the basis of rights, 
and they condemn all violence whether under 
the form of conquest, of stipulations which may 
have been imposed by the belligerents in the 
clauses of a treaty, or by any other process; 

Four. That any transfer, or attempted trans- 
fer, of the sovereignty, jurisdiction, possession 
or any interest in or control over any such 
region to another non- American State, would be 
regarded by the American Republics as against 
American sentiments and principles and the 
rights of American States to maintain their 
security and political independence; 

Five. That no such transfer or attempt to 
transfer or acquire any interest or right in any 
such region, directly or indirectly, would be 
recognized or accepted by the American Repub- 
lics no matter what form was employed to 
attain such purposes ; 



Six. That by virtue of a principle of Ameri- 
can international law, recognized by various 
conferences, the acquisition of territories by 
force cannot be permitted ; 

Seven. That the American Republics, through 
their respective government agencies, reserve 
the right to judge whether any transfer or at- 
tempted transfer of sovereignty, jurisdiction, 
cession or incorporation of geographic regions 
in the Americas, possessed by European coun- 
tries up to September 1, 1939, has the effect of 
impairing their political independence even 
though no formal transfer or change in the 
status of such region or regions shall have taken 
place ; 

Eif/ht. That in the cases foreseen, as well as 
any others which might leave the government 
of such regions without a leader, it is, therefore, 
necessarj' to establish a provisional administra- 
tive regime for such regions until such time as 
their definitive regime is established by the free 
determination of their people; 

Nine. That the American Republics, as an 
international community which acts strongly 
and integrally, using as a basis political and 
juridical principles w-hich they have applied 
for more than a century, have the unquestion- 
able right, in order to preserve their unity and 
security, to take such regions under their ad- 
ministration and to deliberate as to their des- 
tinies, in accordance with their respective de- 
grees of political and economic development ; 

Ten. That the pro\-isional and transitory 
character of the measures agreed to does not 
imply an oversight or abrogation of the prin- 
ciple of non-intervention which regulates inter- 
American life, a principle proclaimed by the 
American Institute, recognized by the meeting 
of jurists held at Rio de Janeiro and fully re- 
affirmed at the Seventh International American 
Conference held at Montevideo ; 

Eleven. That this community has therefore 
international juridical capacity to act in this 
manner ; 



146 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Twelve. That in this case, the most appro- 
priate regime is that of a provisional admin- 
istration ; and that this system entails no danger 
because the American Republics do not enter- 
tain any purpose whatsoever of territorial 
aggrandizement ; 

Thirteen. That the establishment of a special 
provisional regime in the present convention 
and in the Act of Habana concerning the pro- 
visional administration of European colonies 
and possessions in the Americas does not elimi- 
nate or modify the system of consultation 
agreed upon at Buenos Aires, confirmed at 
Lima, and practiced at Panama and Habana. 

Fourteen. Being desirous of protecting their 
peace and safety and of promoting the interests 
of any of the regions herein referred to which 
may fall within the purview of the foregoing 
recitations, have resolved to conclude the 
following convention : 



If a non-American State shall directly or in- 
directly attempt to replace another non-Ameri- 
can State in the sovereignty or control which 
if exercised over any territory located in the 
Americas, thus threatening the peace of the con- 
tinent, such territory shall automatically come 
under the provisions of this convention and 
shall be submitted to a provisional administra- 
tive regime. 

n 

The administration shall be exercised, as may 
be considered advisable in each case, by one or 
more American States, with their previous 
approval. 

ni 

Wlien the administration sJiall have been 
established for any region it shall be exercised in 
the interest of the security of the Americas, and 
for the benefit of the region under administra- 
tion, with a view to its welfare and progress, 
until such time as the region is in a position 



to govern itself or is restored to its former 
status, whenever the latter is compatible with 
the security of the American Republics. 

IV 

The administration of the region shall be 
exercised under conditions which shall guar- 
antee freedom of conscience and of worship, 
subject to the regulations which public order 
and good habits may demand. 

V 

The administration shall enforce the local 
laws coordinating them with the purposes of 
this convention, but it may furthermore adopt 
such measures as may be necessary to meet 
situations in which such laws do not exist. 

VI 

In all that concerns commerce and industry, 
the American nations shall enjoy the same sit- 
uation and benefits, and the administrator is 
forbidden to establish a privileged position for 
itself or its nationals or for certain states. Open 
economic i-elations shall be maintained with 
all countries on a reciprocity basis. 

VII 

Natives of the region shall participate, as 
citizens, in public administration and in the 
courts of justice without further qualification 
than their capacity so to do. 

vin 

To the extent that it may be practicable, 
rights of every soil shall be governed by local 
law and custom, and vested rights shall be 
protected in accordance with such law. 

IX 

Forced labor shall be abolished in tlie regions 
where it exists. 



The administration shall provide facilities 
for education of all kinds with the two-fold 



AUGUST 24, 1940 



147 



purpose of developing the -wealth of the region 
and improving the living conditions of the 
population, especially as regards public and in- 
dividual hygiene and preparation for the exer- 
cise of political autonomy as soon as possible. 

XI 

The natives of a region under admuiistration 
shall have their own Organic Act which the 
administration shall establish, consulting the 
people in whatever manner is possible. 

XII 

The administration shall submit an annual 
report to the inter- American organization en- 
trusted with the control of the regions under 
administration, of the manner in which it has 
fulfilled its functions, attaching thereto copies 
of its accounts and of the measures adopted in 
the region during the year. 

xin 

The organization referred to in the preceding 
article shall be competent to take cognizance of 
the petitions submitted by inhabitants of the 
region through the medium of the adminis- 
tration, with reference to the exercise of the 
provisional admuiistration. The administra- 
tion shall transmit, with this petition, such 
observations as it may deem proper. 

XIV 

The first administration shall be granted for 
a period of three years. At the end of this 
period, if necessary, it shall be renewed for suc- 
cessive periods not longer than ten years. 

XV 

The expenses incurred in the exercise of the 
administration shall be defrayed with the reve- 
nues of the region under administration but 
in case they are insufficient the deficit shall be 
met by the State or States which act as 
administrators. 



XVI 

A commission to be known as the "Inter- 
American Commission for Territorial Admin- 
istration'* is hereby established, to be composed 
of a representative from each one of the States 
which ratifies this convention; it shall be the 
international organization to which this con- 
vention refers. Once this convention has be- 
come effective, any country which ratifies it 
may convoke the first meeting proposing the city 
in which it is to be held. The Commission shall 
elect its chairman, complete its organization and 
fix its definitive seat. Two-thirds of the mem- 
bers of the Commission shall constitute a quo- 
rum and two-thirds of the members present may 
adopt decisions. 

XVII 

The Commission is authorized to establish a 
provisional administration in the regions to 
which the present convention refers ; allow such 
administration to be exercised by the number 
of States which it may determine in each case, 
and supervise its exercise under the terms of 
the preceding articles. 

xvin 

None of the provisions contained in the pres- 
ent convention refers to territories or posses- 
sions which are the subject of dispute or claims 
between European powers and one or more of 
the Republics of the Americas. 

XIX 

The present convention is open for signature 
by the American Eepublics at the city of Ha- 
bana and shall be ratified by the High Con- 
tracting Parties in conformity with their con- 
stitutional procedures. The Secretary of State 
of the Republic of Cuba shall transmit at the 
earliest possible date authentic certified copies 
to the governments for the aforementioned 
purpose of ratification. The instrument of rati- 
fication shall be deposited in the archives of 



148 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



the Pan American Union in Washington, which 
shall notify the signatory governments of said 
deposit. Such notification shall be considered 
as an exchange of ratifications. 
XX 

The present convention shall enter into force 
when two-thirds of the American Eepublics 
have deposited their respective instruments of 
ratification. 

Ik witness whereof, the undersigned Pleni- 
potentiaries, having deposited their full powers 
found to be in due and proper form, sign this 
convention on behalf of their respective Gov- 
ernments and affix thereto their seals on the 
dates appearing opposite their signatures. 

Eeservations 
Eeservation of the Chilean Delegation 

1. — The Chilean Delegation, convinced of 
the necessity of effecting practically the con- 
tinental solidarity, approves the resolution, 
making clear that Chile shall only acquire 
commitments and responsibilities when the 
said resolutions shall have been ratified by its 
constitutional organisms. 

Reservation of the Argentine Delegation 

2. — Tlie Delegate of the Argentine Republic 
m signing this Act places on record that it 
does not refer to or include the Malvinas 
Islands, because the latter do not constitute a 
colony or possession of any European nation, 
since they are a part of the Argentine terri- 
tory and are included within its dominion 



and sovereignty, as was stated at the Panama 
meeting, which statement he considers re- 
iterated hereby in iits entirety, and also with 
reference to other southern Argentine regions 
as he has stated in the deliberations of this 
Commission. He likewise states that the 
signing of this Act and Resolution does not 
affect and leaves intact his Government's 
powers established in the constitutional 
norms which obtain in Argentina, with re- 
spect to the procedure applicable in order that 
this Act and Resolution may acquire validity, 
force, and effectiveness. 

Reservation of the Colombian Delegation 

3. — I vote in the affirmative with the sug- 
gestion that I shall sign the Convention, sub- 
ject to the approval by my Government and 
the constitutional standards of my country. 

Reservation of the Venezuela Delegation 

4. — The Venezuelan Delegation signs with 
the understanding that the Convention con- 
cerning the colonial possessions remains sub- 
ject to the public powers of the nation, in ac- 
cordance with its constitutional provisions. 

Additional Reservation of the Chilean 
Delegation 

5. — The Chilean Delegation, at the time of 
signing this Convention, in addition to the 
reservation set forth at yesterday's Meeting, 
makes reservation of Chile's rights in Ant- 
arctica. 

[Here follow signatures.] 



AUGUST 24, 1940 



149 



EXCHANGE PROFESSORS AND STUDENTS 



[Released to the press August 10] 

Professor and student exchanges have now 
been arranged with five of the American re- 
publics under the Buenos Aires Convention for 
the Promotion of Inter- American Cultural Re- 
lations.' In addition to two American students 
who are already in Chile/" fellowships have been 
awarded to students of the United States by 
the Governments of Costa Rica, the Dominican 
Republic, Panama, and Venezuela. The Gov- 
ernment of Venezuela has agreed to receive an 
exchange professor from the United States, and 
negotiations are in progress concerning sim- 
ilar decisions made by several other countries. 
Four graduate students from Chile have been 
selected by the United State3 Government for 
a year's study in educational institutions in 
this country. At the present time a panel of 
graduate students from Paraguay is under con- 
sideration by the United States. It is antici- 
pated that before the commencement of the aca- 
demic year in September, presentation of sim- 
ilar panels will be made by several of the 
other governments'. 

The Government of Costa Rica has selected 
Miss Edith Alida Bronson, of Evanston, Illi- 
nois, as an exchange student in that Republic 
Miss Bronson was chosen from a panel of five 
students submitted to the Government of Costa 
Rica by the United States on March 31, 1940. 
For research in Costa Rica, Miss Bronson, sec- 
retary of the Department of Romance Lan- 
guages of Northwestern University, proposes to 
study the dramatic literatures of the South and 
Central American countries with special atten- 
tion to Costa Rica. 



' Treaty Series No. 928. 

'"See the Bulletin of March 9, 1940 (vol. 11, no. 37), 
pp. 279-281. 



Another student selected was unable to ac- 
cept, and the Costa Rican Government has been 
asked for an alternative name. 

The Dommican Republic has announced the 
selection as exchange students of Mr. Charles 
Christian Hauch, of Chicago, Illinois, and Mr. 
Joseph John Montllor, of New York, New York. 
I\Ir. Hauch is at piesent working for the de- 
gi'ee of Doctor of Philosophy at the University 
of Chicago, from which he received his Master's 
degree in 1936. His field of activity has been 
political science and international relations. He 
plans to continue his study on the history of the 
Dominican Republic since 1844. Mr. Montllor 
is a gi-aduate student at Columbia University. 
He plans to devote his attention during his stay 
in the Dominican Republic to a study of the 
history of diplomatic relations between that re- 
public and the United States, using Dominican 
sources. 

The Govermnent of Panama has announced 
the selection of one American graduate student 
to pursue advanced work in that Republic. Mr. 
James S. Triolo, Jr., of Alameda, California, 
has been chosen for this exchange service. Mr. 
Triolo holds the degree of Master of Arts from 
Stanford University and has spent some time 
as a teacher of the social sciences, English, and 
Spanish in the secondary schools of California. 
He proposes to continue his study of diplomatic 
relations between the United States and Pan- 
ama during the period of time that he serves 
as an exchange student in that Republic. 

The Government of Venezuela has chosen Dr. 
George William Luttermoser of Detroit, Michi- 
gan, as exchange student. Dr. Luttermoser 
holds the degree of Doctor of Science from the 
School of Hygiene of The Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity and has spent several summers at the 
biological station of the University of Michi- 



150 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtTLLETIN 



gan. He plans to devote his attention during 
his year in Venezuela to studying the nature of 
the immunity developed against the blood-fiuke 
disease. Dr. Luttermoser is now serving as par- 
asitologist with the Bureau of Animal Hus- 
bandry of the United States Department of 
Agriculture. 

As exchange professor from the United States, 
the Government of Venezuela has selected Dr. 
Charles C. Griffin, assistant professor of history 
at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York. 
Dr. Griffin holds degi'ees from Harvard and 
Columbia Universities. He has served as re- 
search assistant of the Library of Congress and 
since 1934 as a member of the faculty of Vassar 
College. His principal interest in historical re- 
search has been the period of emancipation of 
the Spanish-American nations. In 1937 he pub- 
lished a study entitled The United States and 
the Disniption of the Spanish Empire, 1810- 
1822. Dr. Griffin plans to leave for Venezuela 
in September to take up his teaching and re- 
search activities in that Republic. 

The Chilean students selected by the United 
States for a year of study in this country are 
Sefior Jorge del Canto Schram, of Santiago; 
Senora Maria Marchant de Gonzalez Vera, of 
Santiago; Senor Carlos E. Salazar Justiniano, 
of Santiago ; and Senor Leopoldo Seguel Fuen- 
tes, of Yungay (Nuble). Senor del Canto ex- 
pects to continue his studies in economic geog- 
raphy and international commerce, which he 
pursued during the past academic year at the 
University of California. Seiiora de Gonzalez 
Vera, who has specialized in English and edu- 
cation, plans to do further graduate work in 
these fields. Senor Salazar will continue his 
studies in the field of engineering at the Uni- 
versity of Indiana, while Seiior Seguel will do 
graduate work hi mathematics at Oregon State 
College. 

Under the terms of the Buenos Aires Con- 
vention, it is possible, if one country manifests 
its intention of not sending students to the 
United States, to award those fellowships to 



another participating country. Two additional 
graduate fellowships were therefore granted to 
Chile, making a total of four. 

The Buenos Aires Convention was signed by 
each of the 21 American republics at the Inter- 
American Conference for the Maintenance of 
Peace held in Buenos Aires in 1936. The ex- 
change program is directed toward the develop- 
ment of a more realistic understanding between 
the peoples of the Western Hemisphere. 
Emphasizing the essential reciprocity of cul- 
tural relations, the exchanges are designed to 
make available to the people of the other Ameri- 
can republics a more accurate knowledge of the 
progress of science, the humanities, the tech- 
nology, and the artistic achievements of the 
United States. In receiving the visiting pro- 
fessors, teachers, and graduate students from 
those nations the program affords a similar dif- 
fusion in this country of the intellectual attain- 
ments of their people. 

The expenses involved in the exchange pro- 
gi'am are shared by the participating govern- 
ments. The nominating government will pay 
the round-trip travel costs of students, together 
with other incidental expenses. The receiving 
government will pay tuition, subsidiary ex- 
penses, and board and lodging at the institu- 
tions in which the visiting students are 
enrolled. 

The Department of State has been assisted 
in choosing the panels of students and professors 
by a Committee on Exchange Fellowships and 
Professorships. This committee, in collabora- 
tion with the Department and with the United 
States Office of Education of the Federal Secur- 
ity Agency, drew up the standards and applica- 
tion forms for fellowships and professorships 
under the Convention. The minimum require- 
ments were designed to assure the two-fold pur- 
pose of making available to the qualified student 
in this country opportunity to pursue advanced 
study in the other American republics and to 
afford opportunity for applications from all 
sections of the United States. 



AUGUST 24, 1940 151 

OFFICE FOR COORDINATION OF COMMERCIAL AND CULTURAL 
RELATIONS BETWEEN THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS 



Order Establishing the Oftice for Coordi- 
nation OF Commercial and Cultural Rela- 
tions Between the American Repoblics 

Pursuant to authority vested in it by section 
2 of the Act of Aug:ust"29, 1916 (39 Stat. 649), 
the Council of National Defense, with the 
approval of the President, hereby establishes 
as a subordinate body to the Council an office 
to be known as the Office for Coordination of 
Commercial and Cultural Relations between 
the American Republics, at the head of which 
there shall be a Coordinator of Commercial 
and Cultural Relations between the American 
Republics (hereinafter referred to as the Co- 
ordinator). The Coordinator shall serve as 
such without compensation but shall be entitled 
to actual and necessary transportation, sub- 
sistence and other ex))ense incidental to the 
performance of his duties. 

The Coordinator shall: 

(1) establish and maintain liaison between 
the Advisory Commission, the several depart- 
ments and establishments of the Government 
and with such other agencies, public or private, 
as the Coordinator may deem necessary or de- 
sirable to insure proper coordination of. and 
economy and efficiency in, the activities of the 
Government with respect to Hemisphere de- 
fense, with particular reference to the commer- 
cial and cultural aspects of the problem, and 
shall also be available to assist in the coordina- 
tion and carrying out of the purposes of Pub- 
lic Resolution No. 83 — 76th Congress (H. J. 
Res. 367) ; 

(2) be a member and chairman of the Inter- 
Departmental Committee on Inter-American 
affairs, which shall include the President of 
the Export-Import Bank, one designate from 
each of the following Departments: State, 
Agriculture, Treasury, and Commerce, and 
such representatives from other agencies and 
departments as may be needed from time to 
time, the Committee to consider and correlate 



proposals of the Government with respect to 
Hemisphere defense, commercial and cultural 
relations and to make recommendations to the 
appropriate Government departments and 
agencies ; 

(3) be responsible directly to the President, 
to whom he shall submit reports and recom- 
mendations with respect to the activities of his 
office; 

(4) review existing laws, coordinate research 
by the several Federal agencies, and recom- 
mend to the Inter-Departmental Committee 
such new legislation as may be deemed essen- 
tial to the effective realization of the basic 
objectives of the Government's program ; 

(5) be charged with the formulation and the 
execution of a progi-am in cooperation with the 
State Department M-hich, by effective use of 
Governmental and private facilities in such 
fields as the arts and sciences, education and 
travel, the radio, the press, and the cinema, will 
further national defense and strengthen the 
Iwnds between the nations of the Western 
Hemisphere. 

Nelson A. Rockefeller is hereby appointed 
Coordinator of Commercial and Cultural Re- 
lations between the American Republics. 
Henry L. Stimson, 

Secretary of War. 
Frank Knox, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Harold L. Ickes, 
Secretary of the Interior. 
H. A. Wallace, 
Secretary of Agriculture. 
Robert H. Hinckley, 
Acting Secretary of Cominerce. 

C. V. McLaughlin, 

Acting Secretary of Labor. 
Approved : 

Franklin D. Roosevelt, 
The White House, 
August 16, 1940. 



152 



DEATH OF LEON TROTSKY 



[Released to the press August 24] 

In response to an inquirs* from the American 
Consul at Mexico City, the Dei^artment has 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

informed him that it perceives no reason for 
bringing Mr. Trotsky's body to the United 
States and that to do so would be inappropriate. 




NOTE TO GERMANY ON THE COURSE OF THE "AMERICAN LEGION" 



[Released to the press August 18] 

The American Charge in Berlin, Mr. Alex- 
ander W. Kirk, was instructed on the after- 
noon of August 17 to deliver to the German 
Foreign Office a communication, the text of 
which follows: 

"The Government of the United States de- 
sires first to point out that the course on which 
it was proposed that the American Legion 
should sail from Petsamo to New York was 
indicated to the German Government through 
the American Embassy at Berlin on August 
ninth, together with a statement of the dis- 
tinguishing characteristics of the ship for her 
ready identification and a statement that she 
was scheduled to sail from Petsamo on Au- 
gust 16, in sufficient time for the German 
Government to notify the appropriate Ger- 
man authorities so as to assure the vessel 
against attack by the German fighting forces. 
The United States Government was informed 
on August thirteenth that the German For- 
eign Office had stated that the appropriate 
German authorities had been informed of the 
date of departure, course and description of 
the ATn^rican Legion, the understanding being 
that the vessel would depart on August 16 
and, if she should depart at a later date, then 
the Foreign Office would again have to be 
notified three days before the actual departure 
since otherwise it would not be possible to 
give informatoi-y instructions to the appro- 
priate German authorities. The German For- 
eign Office called attention to its previous com- 
munications to the American Embassy on. the 
subject of the Amencan Legion, in which the 



Foreign Office had stated that instructions to 
the German combatant forces with respect to 
possible action against neutral ships were, in 
accordance with international rules, and the 
German Prize Law Codes, limited to merchant 
ships. The Foreign Office had further stated 
that it was, therefore, out of the question that 
German forces should stop neutral vessels of 
war or take any other measures against them 
and that in view of those facts there was no 
occasion, in the opinion of the German Gov- 
ernment, to give any special assurances with 
regard to a neutral war vessel. The German 
Government was, however, prepared to notify 
the German forces for their information in 
order to avoid confusion with enemy warships 
that an American war vessel (namely, the 
American Legion) would travel on a specified 
course at a specified time. 

"Subsequently, and not until the late after- 
noon of August 14, as reported to the American 
Government that same day, the Foreign Office 
stated that the German Air Force had pointed 
out that the proposed course of the American 
Legion, passing between N. Rona and Cape 
Wrath, would bring the vessel into the field 
of dangerous air operations, and that the Ger- 
man authorities, therefore, recommended a 
more northern route. LTpon inquiry of the For- 
eign Office as to how much advance notice of 
the change of course of the vessel would be 
required by the Foreign Office in order that 
it might effect complete notification of all Ger- 
man combat units the vessel might encounter, 
the answer was made that if 3uch notice were 
received by noon, Berlin time, August 15 there 
would be time to effect proper notification and 



AUGUST 2 4, 1940 



153 



the vessel could leave Petsamo August 16 as 
scheduled. 

"Under instructions of the United States 
Government, on August 14, the attention of the 
Foreign Office was invited to the assurances 
which it had given that the appropriate Ger- 
man authorities had been duly informed of the 
date of departure, course and description of 
the Americati Legion, and it was asked to stand 
by its original acceptance of the course of the 
American Legion. In reply, Dr. Eitter of the 
Foreign Office stated that if the American Gov- 
ernment insisted on the ship following the pro- 
posed course, then the German Government had 
nothing to do but accept the decision, pointing 
out again the great danger involved. Dr. Rit- 
ter also stated that the Foreign Office liad 
merely agreed to notify the appropriate Ger- 
man authorities for their information of the 
course and description of the vessel, and that it 
had never guaranteed the safe conduct of the 
vessel for assurances of safe conduct could only 
be given in the cases of merchant vessels and 
not in the cases of naval vessels, in which cate- 
gory the American Legion falls. The United 
States Government considers in that connection, 
that Dr. Ritter's statement was hardly in line 
with the previous commimication of the For- 
eign Office, referred to above, when the Foreign 
Office stated that there was no occasion, in the 
opinion of the Geiman Government, to give any 
special assurances with regard to a neutral war 
vessel since it was out of the question that Ger- 
man forces should stop neutral vessels of war 
or take any other measures against them, and 
that the German foi'ces would be notified in 
order to avoid confusion of the American 
Legion with enemy warships. 

''Following the United States Govenmient's 
learning of Dr. Ritter's conversation, and of the 
American Charge d'Affaires' communication of 
the Foreign Office s note in confirmation of the 
conversation, the subject of the course to be 
followed by the Ainerican Legion had the seri- 
ous and protracted consideration of the United 
States Government. However, it was deter- 
mined that no other practical course existed for 
the vessel to follow than tliat proposed, the 



vessel to sail on August 16 as scheduled and 
already notified to all the belligerent govern- 
ments. As instructed by his Government, the 
American Charge d'Affaires informed the Ger- 
man Foreign Office on August 15 accordingly, 
and stated that the Government of the United 
States consequently reverted to its original com- 
munication to the German Government on the 
subject and took note of the fact that the Ger- 
man Government had brought the voj'age of the 
vessel to the attention of its appropriate 
agencies. 

"The United States Government is of the 
opinion, therefore, that the German Govern- 
ment received sufficient advance notice of the 
sailing of the American Legion from Petsamo 
on the date scheduled and the course to be fol- 
lowed, to take every precaution against attack 
on the vessel by the German combat forces. The 
German Government acknowledged the receipt 
of this notification prior to the vessel's departure 
and stated that the appropriate German author- 
ities had been informed of the date of departure, 
course, and description of the vessel. The Ger- 
man Government did not give assurance of safe 
conduct for the vessel but explained that there 
was no occasion to give any such assui-ance with 
regard to the vessel as it was out of the question 
lliat German forces should stop the vessel or 
take any other measures against her. All the 
ether belligerent governments have given assur- 
ance of safe conduct for the vessel for her sail- 
ing on the date scheduled and on the course 
indicated. 

"The German Government now points out 
that it did not receive final notification of the 
ship's departure from Petsamo on August 16 
until noon of that day and that the American 
Fmbassy at Berlin had been informed that 
August 15 was the latest date for such notifica- 
tion of tlie intended route. However, the stipu- 
lation of the German Foreign Office that it be 
notified by noon, Berlin time, August 15, with 
respect to the vessel's course was in reply to the 
I^mbassy's inquiry as to how much advance 
notice of the change of course of the vessel 
would be required by the Foreign Office. Since 
no change was made in the course of the vessel, 



154 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTJLLETIN 



further advance notice became entirely unnec- 
essary. 

"Stated briefly, the Gei-man Government has 
on several occasions during the conversations 
about the voyage of the American Legion stated 
tliat the vessel in question as a public vessel of 
the United States, actually being a transport 
of the United States Army, needed no safe con- 
duct from the German Government because safe 
conducts were reserved only for merchant ves- 
sels. The German Government having repeat- 
edly made tluif statement and having stated also 
that they would notify their armed forces of 
the route on which it was informed the vessel 



would proceed and of the date of her departure 
from Petsamo and of the description of the 
vessel, and having assured the Government of 
tlie United States that it had actually notified 
its armed forces of the route, date of sailing and 
description of the American Legion, and in con- 
tinuing reliance upon the original statements 
of the German Government, the American 
Charge d'Affaires is instructed to inform the 
German Government that under the circum- 
stances above related the Government of the 
United States expects that the vessel will not 
suffer molestation by any action undertaken by 
tlie German armed forces." 



Canada 



PERMANENT JOINT BOARD ON DEFENSE, UNITED STATES 

AND CANADA 



[Released to the press by the White House August IS] 

The following joint statement was issued by 
President Roosevelt and the Prime Minister of 
Canada, W. L. Mackenzie King : 

"The Prime Minister and the President have 
discussed the mutual problems of defense in 
relation to the safety of Canada and the United 
States. 

"It has been agreed that a Permanent Joint 
Board on Defense shall be set up at once by 
the two countries. 

"This Permanent Joint Board on Defense 
shall commence immediate studies relating to 
sea, land, and air problems including personnel 
and materiel. 

"It will consider in the broad sense the defense 
of the north lialf of the Western Hemisphere. 

"The Permanent Joint Board on Defense will 
consist of four or five members from each coun- 
try, most of them from the services. It will 
meet shortly." 

[Released to the press by the White House August 22] 

On August 22, 1940, President Roosevelt and 
Prime Minister Mackenzie King of Canada 



appointed the following members to serve on the 
Joint Permanent Board on Defense, United 
States and Canada, which will hold its first 
meeting in Ottawa on August 26, 1940 : 
For the United States : 

Hon. Fiorello H. La Guardia, President, 

United States Conference of Mayors 
Lt. Gen. Stanley D. Embick, Commanding the 
Fourth Corps Area; Headquarters, At- 
lanta, Ga. 
Capt. Harry W. Hill, United States Navy, 
War Plans Division, Office of Chief of 
Naval Operations 
Comdr. Forrest P. Sherman, United States 

Navy 
Lt. Col. Joseph T. McNarney, United States 

Army Air Corps 
Mr. John D. Hickerson, Assistant Chief, Di- 
vision of European Affairs, Department of 
State, to be Secretary of the American sec- 
tion of the Joint Board 
For Canada: 

Mr. O. M. Biggar, K.C. 
Brigadier K. Stuart, D.S.O., M.C., Deputy 
Chief, General Staff 



AUGUST 24, 1940 

Captain L. W. Murray, K.C.N., Deputy Chief, 

Naval StuflF 
Air Commander A. A. L. Cuffe, Air member, 

Air Staff, Royal Canadian Air Force 



155 

Mr. Hugh L. Kennleyside, Counselor, Depart- 
ment of External Affairs, to be Secretary of 
the Canadian section of the Joint Board 



Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plat e Scrap, etc. 



MONTHLY STATISTICS 



[Released to the press August 21] 



Note: The tlgiire.s relating to arms, the licenses for 
the export of which were revolied before they were 
u.sed, have been subtracted from the figures appearing 
in the cumulative column of the table below in regard 
to arms-exixirt licenses issued. The.se latter figures 
are therefore net figures. They are not yet final and 
definitive since licenses may be amended or revolted 
at any time before being used. They are, however, 
accurate as of the date of this press release. 

The statistics of actual exports in these releases are 
believed to be substantially complete. It is possible, 
however, that some shipments are not included. If 
this proves to be the fact, statistics in regard to such 
shipments will be included in the cumulative figures 
lu later releases. 

Abms-Export Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war li- 
censed for export by the Secretary of State 
during the year 1940 up to and including the 
month of July. 





Category 


Value of export licenses 
issued 


Country of destination 


July 1940 


7 months 

ending 

July 31, 1940 


Albania 


IV 

I 
V 


(1) 

(4) 
(1) 
(2) 




$57.00 












24.00 






3, 200. 00 




$125.00 


630.00 


Total- 


125.00 


3,854.00 




I 

m 


(2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(2) 




Argentina 


884.00 


24, 095. 60 




S, 415. 00 






2, 300. 00 






8,141.84 





Category 


Value of export licenses 
Issued 


Country of destination 


July 1940 


7 months 

ending 

July 31, 1940 


Argentina— Continued. 


IV (1) 

(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 

(2) 


$3, 550. 00 


$7, 762. 00 
6 481 00 




6,000.00 
16, 430. 00 


40, 026. 00 
171,662.71 
40, 937. 60 
29.84 
87 961 61 




19.84 








Total 


26,883.84 


391,811.90 




I (1) 

(4) 

in (1) 

(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 




62.69 
76.01 


499. 12 




534.09 
1, 509. 620 00 






13, 680. 00 






271 56 






509.00 




17,300.00 

12,991.15 

676,000.00 

16,200.00 


25, 648. 00 

857,737.26 

2,084,706.00 

33,474.86 


Total 


720,619.76 


4,626,678.87 




IV (1) 

I (4) 
IV (2) 






136.08 












17.29 






1.87 








Total 




19.14 




I (1) 

(2) 

(4) 

lU (1) 

rv (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 










217.00 






103, 200. 00 






28, 779. 00 






2, 292, 000. 00 






69.00 






20, 745. 00 






243,957.00 






419, 400. 00 








Total 




3, 108, 367. 00 




I (4) 

rv (1) 

(2) 
V (1) 






Bermuda ._ 




16.00 




84.70 
36.00 


84.70 

35.00 

8,000.00 








Total 


119.70 


8,136.70 



156 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 









Value of export licenses 




Category 


issued 


Country of destination 




7 months 








July 1940 


ending 
July 31, 1940 




I 


(4) 


$542. 00 


$1,703.00 




TV 


(21 




1,286.00 




V 


(1) 
(2) 




6,600.00 








64.60 






(3) 




45,384 00 




VTT 


(1) 
(2) 




1, 953. 68 








1.60 










642.00 


66,891.78 




I 


(1) 
(2) 




Brazil - 


168.00 


987.00 




5, 438. 00 






(4) 


388.00 


5,958.00 




ITT 


(1) 




978, 200. 00 




IV 


(1) 


12, 600. 00 


19, 312. 75 






(2) 


1,806.00 


21,642.14 




V 


(1) 


206, 600. 00 


551,653.00 






(2) 


958. 80 


103, 463. 86 






(3) 


39, 000. 00 


278,009.60 




261, 310. 80 


1,964,664.25 




TV 


CI 








6.82 




V 


ni 




2, 600. 00 






(3) 


2, 500. 00 


2, 500. 00 




VII 


(1) 


791. 16 


1, 108. 84 


Total 


3,291.16 


6,115.66 




T 


(i) 






12.00 


12.00 




IV 


(2) 


80.00 


80.00 




VII 


(1) 
(2) 




129.20 








108. 30 








Total - - - 


92.00 


329. 60 




I 
I 


(4) 
(21 




Rritish North Borneo 




2.43 










400.00 


400. 00 






(4) 


60.52 


133. 54 




IV 


(1) 
(2) 




755. 26 




92.78 


136.00 


Total - 


663. 30 


1, 424. 79 




T 


(11 




Canada - 


611,969.93 


642, 209. 89 






(2) 


65, 293. 60 


104. 498. 97 






(3) 


40, 668. 00 


40,668.00 






(4) 


184,381.61 


318,193.86 






(5) 


154. 00 


90, 154. 00 




III 


(1) 


2, 815, 194. 00 


18, 578, 194. 00 






(2) 


360.00 


4,141.00 




IV 


(1) 


3, 532. 16 


13,063.56 






(2) 


606. 03 


51, 058. 84 




V 


(1) 


18,6.60.00 


786,026.67 






(2) 


7, 187, 488. 12 


8,676,931.90 






(3) 


9, 194, 066. 76 


10, 850, 248. 61 




VI 


(2) 


8.00 


36,008.00 




VII 


CD 


28, 628. 44 


116,669.86 






(2) 


3,488.00 


44, 239. 76 


Total 


20,164,377.46 


40,361,286.80 





Category 


Value of export licenses 
issued 


Country of destination 


July 1940 


7 months 

ending 

July 31, 1940 


Chile 


I (2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




$2,970.00 
9, 630. 00 
6, 450. 00 
3,630.00 

62. 360. 00 
6, 484. 26 
3 500 00 




$9, 192. 00 




3, 630. 00 

4, 985. 00 








41.00 


3,423.50 
30, 635. OO 










12, 607. 15 






Total - 


17,848.00 


129, 494. 91 




I (2) 

m (1) 

(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 


China --- 




362, 440. 00 

2, 529, 106. 22 

137, 950. 10 

178 60 








40, 672. 16 










62,200.00 
123, 249. 19 


156,800.00 
2, 365, 180. 63 
2,196,965.35 
1,018,225.56 
















Total 


226,121.35 


9, 107, 841. 46 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




30.00 
112.00 
306.00 
256.00 


30.00 




157.00 

2,017.90 

667. 76 




1, 320. 00 
3, 500. 00 


2,812.00 

47, 496. 00 

1, 027. 31 






1 965 00 








Total 


5, 524. 00 


389, 921. 97 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 




Costa Rica 




4.00 






137 30 




120.00 


136. 25 
25 000 00 






2 967 62 






13, 104. 70 






1, 646. 26 








Total 


120.00 


42, 996. 13 




I (2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
C2) 




Cuba 




70.00 




130, 655. 00 

870.00 

1, 492. 00 


131,144.00 
3,316.60 
9, 223. 00 
1, 700. 00 




1,800.00 


4, 500. 00 
2, 000 00 




44.00 


3, 005. 80 
761 00 








Total . 


134,861.00 


166, 709. 30 




I (1) 
(4) 




Curacao . 


586.00 
77.39 


685.00 




77.39 



AUGUST 24, 1940 



157 





Category 


Value of e.tport Ucea^es 
issued 


Country of destination 


July 1943 


7 months 

ending 

July 31, 1940 


Curasao— Continued. 


IV 
V 

VII 

V 
IV 

V 

VII 


(1) 

(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 

(2) 

(3) 

(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(1) 


$654. .W 
208.64 


$654.50 

214.64 

307. 425. 00 






1, 798. 76 






67, 950. OO 






17.50 








Total 


1,525.53 


368,722.79 






2,040.00 










510.00 
328.00 


867.00 




843.00 
600.00 






1,501.80 








Total 


838.00 


3, 811. 80 




I 

IV 

V 
VU 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 








169. 72 






201.00 




33.00 


156.00 
18, 483. 00 




1,022.00 


1,022.00 
226.00 






900.00 








Total 


1,055.00 


21, 157. 72 




I 
rv 

V 


(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 




Egjrpt 




837.50 






3, 310. 00 






1,680.21 






388.00 






752.31 






16, 993. 00 






60.00 








Total . 




24.021.02 




I 

m 
rv 

V 
VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 








125,000.00 
20.00 


125, 052. 00 




1,111.00 
18, 200. 00 






76.00 




24.00 


6,460.00 
375.00 






8,350.00 








Total 


125,044.00 


159, 624. 00 




I 

IV 
V 

vn 


(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




Fiyilftnrt 




19, 660. 00 






538, 569. 60 






3, 806, 493. 89 






951.50 




4,449.00 
45, 900. 00 


26, 783. 25 
565,900.00 


Total- . 


50,349.00 


4, 958, 358. 24 




I 

UI 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(1) 
(2) 








201,488.00 






4, 887. 420. 71 






1.700.195.00 






7,321,998.50 






499, 000. 00 






33, 0S6. 853. 00 







10,337.00 





Category 


Value of export licenses 
issued 


Country of destination 


July 1940 


7 months 

ending 

July 31, 1940 




IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




$30.00 






376,315.00 






730, 000. 00 






13, 010, 790. 51 






1, 493, 167. 00 






2,00 






56, 593. 00 








Total 




"63,374,189.72 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 










78.50 






51.00 






3, 836. 00 






11.00 




$125,000.00 
6,875.60 
21.554.00 


125,000.00 
6. 875. 60 
21,554.00 


Total 


153,429.00 


157,406 10 




I (D- 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(6) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








5, 530. 370 00 


Ireland. 


1,934,787.50 

,101,652.00 

458,284.12 

270, 875. 60 

103,697,006.00 

60, 733. 80 

4,184.00 

718, 259. 34 

53. 075. 00 

4. 084, 771. 27 

19, 886, 579. 92 

60,380.00 

82,424.80 


17. 410. 203. 44 

3. 598. 126. 62 

27.487,506.02 

484, 177. 10 

175,463,678.85 

102. 733. 80 

1,079,850.36 

2,717,834.40 

61,071;. 00 

5. 262. 728. 81 

20. 863, 246. 12 

8.900,168.94 

2,123,039.80 


Total 


131,818,972.25 


271,084,739.16 




I (3) 
(4) 
(5) 

rv (1) 


Greece 




150 00 






60.00 






90,900.00 






21 00 








Total -- 




91, 121 00 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 






Greenland 




1,015 48 






678. 30 






6, 674. 65 






1, 731 57 








Total _ 




10,000 00 




IV (1) 
(2) 

VU (1) 
(2) 










186 00 






1, 340. 00 






226.80 




2,100.00 


5, 164, 00 


Total _. 


2.100.00 


6.916.08 



• The apparent discrepancy between the values reported for the arms, 
ammunition, and implements of war authorized to be exported to France 
during the period Jan. 1-July 31, 1940. and the corresponding figures for 
periods covered in previous press releases, is due to the large number of 
licenses authorizing the exportation of arms, ammunition, and imple- 
ments of war to France which were canceled during June and July at 
the request of the licensees. 



158 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of export licenses 
issued 


Country of destination 


July 1940 


7 months 

ending 

July 31, 1940 




IV 

V 
VII 


(1) 

(2) 

(1) 
(1) 




$1,36,5.05 






23. 00 






7, 000. 00 






24.30 












8,412.35 




I 

IV 

V 
VII 


(4) 

(1) 

(2) 
(2) 
(2) 










432. 00 






388. 00 






1,528.00 






4, 238. 00 






131. 00 








Total - -- 




6, 717. 00 




I 

IV 

V 

VI 


(1) 

(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 






Hone Kong - - 




2, 017. 75 






1, 123. 10 






7, 363. 00 






67.75 




$1, 500. 00 
8, 250. 00 


22, 832. 00 

24,750.00 

120.00 








Total 


9, 750. 00 


68,273.60 




IV 

V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 








1,920.00 




280.00 


374. 00 
7, 890. 00 






763. 00 






65.00 








Total 


280.00 


11,012.00 




I 

IV 
V 

VI 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 




India 


994. 90 

1,081.81 

277.94 


3,437.39 




7, 326. 87 

3, 818. 58 

780. 55 






67, 600. 00 






1, 496. 40 






1, 000. 00 






882.00 








Total . 


2, 354. 65 


86, 241. 79 




I 
III 

V 


(2) 
(1) 
(1) 






37, 500. 00 
760,000.00 


37,600.00 




760, 000. 00 
112,000.00 








Total 


797,500.00 


909, 600. 00 




III 

V 


(2) 

(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




Iraq - - . - _ _ 




27, 165. 00 








Ireland _ . _ 


118,680.00 


236, 503. 00 




3, 270. 60 






21, 221. 00 








Total 


118,680.00 


269, 994. 60 




V 
IV 


(2) 

(1) 
(2) 




Italy 




13, 610. 00 












123.00 






41.45 








Total 




104.45 





Category 


Value of export licenses 
issued 


Country of destination 


July 1940 


7 months 

ending 

July 31, 1940 




I CD 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 




$107. 00 




$226. 94 


461. 94 
198. 00 






191.00 








Total 


226.94 


957.94 




VII (2) 
I (2) 

I (4) 

I (1) 
(5) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (2) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




Leeward Islands 




162. 45 












665.00 












137. 00 








Mexico.- 


25.35 


134. 20 




112.60 




3, 678. 00 

264.00 

43, 350. 00 

252.40 


14, 526. 00 

476. 00 

406, 132. 40 

7, 366. 40 

37, 266. 00 






112. 60 






8, 040. 25 




8,160.00 


40, 912. 00 


Total - . - 


55, 719. 75 


616,066.25 




I (1) 
(4) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 








116.00 






154.81 






282, 000. 00 






17, 144.00 






65, 710. 00 












356. 124. 61 




I (2) 
(4) 
(6) 

V (2) 
(3) 










12, 866. 00 






47.60 
155. 00 






17, 942. 19 






63. 300. 00 












94, 310. 69 




I (2) 
(4) 
(6) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 










72, 050. 00 






658. 74 






920, 200. 00 




4, 144, 000. 00 
9,081.90 
11,936.95 
6, 978. 03 
204, 950. 00 
59, 567. 00 
19, 000. 00 


5,616,250.10 

9,081.90 

02, 631. 85 

6,689.03 

622, 066. 12 

214,265.00 

232, 610. 79 

338. 80 








Total 


4, 464, 613. 88 


7, 766, 732. 33 




I (4) 

I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 








923. 82 












118.50 




205. 00 
20.62 
44.42 


300.24 

1, 934. 12 

240.32 


Total- - 


270. 04 


2, 593. 18 



AUGUST 24, 19 40 



159 





Category 


Value of export licenses 
issued 


Ooiintry of destination 


July 1940 


7 months 

endlDR 

July 31, 1940 


New Guinea, Territoi? of 


IV 

V 


(2) 
(2) 




$17.25 




1,250.00 






Total 




1, 267. 25 




I 

III 
IV 
V 

\1I 


(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 






New Zealand . 


$266,750.00 


266, 760. 00 




1,916,870.00 






202.00 




1,910.45 


161, 627. 45 
130, 230. 00 
11,045.00 




4,920.00 


Total 


273,680.45 


2,486,624.45 




I 

V 

vn 


(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 




Niciraeua 


62,600.00 
9,000.00 


62, 500. 00 




9,000.00 
480.00 






870 OO 






1, 292. 00 








Total 


71,500.00 


74, 142. 00 




I 

IV 


(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 






278.60 


278.60 




21.00 




30.25 
89.04 


30.25 
89.04 


Total 


397.79 


418. 79 




IV 

I 
ni 

IV 
V 


(1) 

(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 








25.50 












70.00 






460.00 






36,545 00 






712, 000. 00 






280.00 






222 00 






121.00 






2,200.00 






39,604.00 
1, 515. 00 












Total 




793,007.00 




V 

I 

IV 
V 

vn 


(3) 

(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 








400.00 












12, 500. 00 






3,900.00 
6,600.00 








12.75 


8,804.75 
1,207.00 




25,000.00 


27,866.00 
74.00 






680.00 




4.86 


2,262.46 


Total 


25,017.61 


63, 794. 21 




I 

IV 


(4) 
(2) 




Paraguay - . _- 


101.80 
4,226.45 


384.80 




12,160.46 


Total... 


4,328.25 


12,535.25 





Category 


Value of export licenses 
issued 


Country of destination 


July 1940 


7 months 

ending 

July 31, 1940 


Peru . , 


IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 

(2) 

(1) 

(2) 
(3) 

(1) 

(2) 


$189.90 


$7, 550. 90 




240 00 






393. 138 60 






5, 761. 00 






62, 209 00 






1. 000. 00 






1, 130. 60 








Total 


189.90 


471, 029. 90 




I 

in 

IV 
V 

vn 


(1) 

(4) 

(1) 
(I) 

(2) 

(1) 

(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




Portugal 




51.80 






44.00 




103, 446. 00 
30.00 
342.00 


103, 446. 00 

30.00 

422.00 

4, 300. 00 






14,520.00 
33, 000. 00 


75. 219. 94 

66,125.00 

841.76 




64, 000. 00 


54,000.00 


Total 


206,338.00 


304, 480. 50 




V 

I 
v 


(2) 

(1) 
(2) 


Rumania - 




2 500 00 








Saudi Arabia 


280.00 


260 00 




760 00 








Total 


260.00 


1,020.00 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 

(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




Southern Rhodesia 


316.60 


495 60 




227 60 




128.10 

26.00 

60.62 

160.226.00 


461. 10 

108.00 

m.h2 

160,226.00 


Total 


160,766.22 


161, 578. 72 




I 
I 
rv 


(1) 

(2) 
(4) 
(2) 








9.12 












11,644 60 






1.64 






2.47 








Total 




11,548.61 




I 

in 
rv 

V 


(2) 

(4) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 




Sweden 




108,000.00 
128 047 00 










4,000 00 






603, 265. 00 






486,011 20 






3, 334, 380. 00 








Total 




4,563,703.20 




IV 

I 
in 

rv 


(1) 

(1) 
CI) 
(2) 
(1) 




Switzerland 




20.00 








Thailand. 


11,050.00 
258, 054. 00 


27,800.00 

707,334.00 

t i 1, 543. 84 






1,068.00 


£ 15,929.89 



160 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of export licenses 
issued 


Country of destination 


July 1940 


7 months 

ending 

July 31, 1940 


Thailand— Continued. 


V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 


$91, 900. 00 
60, 649. 90 


$97, 200. 00 
66, 603. 74 
156, 000. 00 








Total 


412,721.90 


1,072,411.47 




IV (1) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 




Trinidad . - - 




153.00 






294.00 






18, 625. 00 






862.00 








Total 




19, 924. 00 




III (2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 






Turkey . - - - 




8, 610. 00 






33.00 






6.20 






116, 760. 00 








Total - 




121, 409. 20 




I (1) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (I) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 

(2) 






Union of South Africa 




308.00 






620.93 






173, 600. 00 




961. 00 

36, 250. 00 

1,311,869.00 

8, 400. 00 

64,000.00 


190, 718. 70 

36,316.00 

2, 936, 030. 00 

65, 191. S3 

329, 760. 00 

166.00 






40, 228. 00 








Total 


1,421,480.00 


3, 762, 929. 46 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

VU (2) 




Uruguay . . . 




260.00 






1, 622. 00 




609.30 
46, 000. 00 


6, 887. 30 

53,600.00 

100.40 




660.00 


660.00 


Total ... 


46, 169. 30 


63, 029. 70 




I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

m (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (I) 

(2) 




Venezuela ... 


60.00 
63.00 


141.20 




278.00 
42.65 






163, 970. 00 




21.60 


4,835.60 
191. 45 




1, 800. 00 
8, 350. 00 
3,000.00 
1, 515. 73 


94,860.00 
65,601.00 
95,270.00 
9, 012. 00 
19, 277. 40 








Total 


14, 790. 33 


443, 479. 20 




VII (2) 

V (2) 
(3) 








27.07 












9,411.76 






30, 780. 00 








Total 




40, 191. 76 












161,781,627.74 


425, 086, 997. 37 









During the month of July, 491 arms-export 
licenses were issued, making a total of 2,715 
such licenses issued during the current year. 

Arms Exported 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of ' 
the arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
exported during the year 1940 up to and in- 
cluding the month of July under export 
licenses issued by the Secretary of State: 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


July 1040 


7 months end- 
ing July 30, 
1940 




I 

V 


(4) 

(1) 

(2) 




$24. 00 






3,200.00 






496.00 








Total - . 




3, 719. 00 




I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(2) 
(4) 
(6) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 










23,211.60 






240.00 






2, 418. 00 






4, 252. 00 




$3, 761. 00 
10, 200. 00 
238.00 
36, 160. 00 
19.84 
60, 820. 00 


6,504.00 

34, 000. 00 

53, 230. 48 

290, 713. 60 

29.84 

60, 861. 51 


Total 


110,198.84 


476, 460. 83 




I 
ni 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(I) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 




Australia 




816.63 




39.14 


468.08 
7, 806, 136. 00 






136 65 






509.00 






13, 296. 00 




136, 162. 00 


406,199.00 
468, 621. 00 






18, 274. 86 








Total 


136, 191. 14 


8, 714, 446. 02 




IV 

I 

IV 


(1) 

(4) 
(2) 








136. 00 












17.29 






1.87 












19.16 




I 
III 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 










217.00 






49, 460. 00 






28, 809. 79 






1,146,000.00 






69.00 






20, 745. 00 






6, 807. 00 






119,997.00 








Total 




1,371,094.79 



I 



AtTGUST 24, 1940 



161 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 




7 months end- 








July 1940 


ing July 30, 
1940 




I 


(1) 

(4) 




$48.00 






16.00 




V 


(1) 


$4,000.00 


8,000.00 


Total 


4,000.00 


8,064.00 




I 
IV 


(4) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 






155.00 


1,316.00 




1,285.00 




V 




19, 000. 00 








1,041.69 








58, 741. 00 




vn 


180.12 


1,708.12 






(2) 




1.60 








Total . . 


33S.12 


83,093.31 




1 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 








829.00 






S, 438. 00 






194.00 


8,375.00 




III 


(1) 
(1) 




349, 750. 00 




IV 


12,500.00 


18, 462. 75 






(2) 
(1) 




20.072.00 




V 


117,196.00 


412, 172. 00 






(2) 


32,976.40 


104,234.83 






(3) 


4,122.00 


139, 217. 75 




vn 


(2) 




2.00 








Total 


166,988.40 


1,058,553.33 




rv 
vn 


(2) 
(1) 




British Guiana 




6.82 






317 68 








Total 




324.50 




rv 


(1) 
(2) 

01 






British Honduras 




15.00 






18.00 




vn 




129.20 






(2) 




108.30 








Total 




270.50 




I 


(1) 
(2) 










90.00 




400.00 


400.00 






(4) 


60.52 


229. M 




TV 


fn 




472.00 






(2) 




49.22 








Total 


460.52 


1, 240. 76 




T 


(1) 




Canada 


7,794.24 


28,610.98 






(2) 


67, 496. 00 


67. 506. 00 






(3) 


38,569.00 


38, 569. 00 






(4) 


8,566.61 


105, 223. 53 






(5) 




94, 500. 00 




m 


(1) 


1,227,487.00 


4,150,953.00 






(2) 


350.00 


248.581.31 




rv 


(1) 


3, 350. 37 


9, 360. 59 






(2) 


72,134.33 


73, 105. 77 




V 


(1) 


56, 700. 00 


494.034.67 






(2) 


470, 106. 41 


60S, 880. 47 






(3) 


2,583,106.04 


3,118,573.94 




VI 


(2) 


6.00 


36, 006. 00 




vn 


(1) 


25, 153. 72 


102,687.30 






(2) 


3,977.00 


84, 314. 36 


Total... 


4, 564, 796. 72 


9,260,906.81 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


July 1910 


7 months end- 
ing July 30, 
1940 


Chile 


I (2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 


$2,970.00 


$2. 970. 00 




386.00 






5,300 00 




3,630.00 

4,985.00 

29.00 


3, 630. 00 

53,841.00 

6, 351. 00 

3,500.00 






110 00 






22, 946. 00 






12, 607. 15 








Total 


11,614.00 


110, 641. 15 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

m (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




China 




1, 344. 00 






468, 006. 00 






850.00 






23, 763. 00 






1, 148, 654 57 




2, 162. 00 


13,536.00 
268.60 






5.649 00 






114. 600. 00 




372, 367. 60 
12.700.00 


1, 308, 013. 50 
176, 518. 00 
334, 724 00 






342, 000. 00 








Total 


387, 229. 60 


3,936,915 67 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 
(2) 








65 00 




46.00 


1, 675. 20 
1, 793. 70 







233, 350. 00 




320.00 
10,660.00 


6, 190. 00 

29,890.00 

1, 027. 00 






1,905.00 








Total 


11,026.00 


275, 956. 96 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 
(2) 




Costa Rica 




4.00 






137. 30 






16.25 




25,000.00 


25.000.00 
22, 057. 00 






27, 376. 00 






2, 235. 26 






51.00 








Total - 


25,000.00 


76, 876. 81 




I (4) 

m (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




Cuba 


72.00 


573.00 




43, 350. 00 




2.038.00 
614.00 


2, 056. 50 
10,181.00 
1, 700. 00 




1,800.00 


8, 355. 00 
12, 876. 00 






4,620.20 






751.00 








Total 


4,624.00 


84.461.70 




I (1) 

(4) 

IV (1) 




Curasao .. , . . . 


685.00 

77.39 

654.50 


685.00 




77.39 
654.50 



162 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


July 1940 


" months end- 
ing July 30, 
1940 


Curacao— Continued. 


IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 


$208.64 


$214. 64 
103, 975. 00 






768. 00 




12,600.00 


45, 250. 00 
17.60 








Total 


14,025.63 


161,642.03 




IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VU (1) 




Dominican Republic 


610.00 


864.00 




616.00 






600.00 




883.00 


1,501.80 


Total 


1, 393. 00 


3,470.80 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

VII (2) 






44.72 


169. 72 




226. 00 






191.00 




3,660.00 


16,418.00 
900.00 








Total -- 


3, 704. 72 


17,904.72 




I (3) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 








2, 680. 00 






26.21 






3, 519. 00 






989. 31 






60.00 








Total -- 




7, 274. 52 




I (1) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (2) 










52.00 




608.00 


7.57. 00 
18,200.00 






76.00 




3, 677. 40 


3, 677. 40 
375. 00 






8, 350. 00 








Total 


4,285.40 


31, 487. 40 




I (2) 
(3) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 








184, 310. 00 






436, 694. 00 






1, 364, 078. 89 






2, 321, 496. 00 






951. 60 




26.820.00 
116,440.00 


120,681.00 

1, 200, 063. 00 

369, 864. 00 








Total -- 


142,260.00 


6, 998, 138. 39 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 








201,228.00 






4,841,072.71 






506, 047. 00 






7, 463, 300. 50 






499,000.00 

63, 886, 407. 00 

20, 845. 00 














368,315.00 






546, 000. 00 






3, 864, 909. 62 






10,026,838.00 
2.00 









Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


July 1910 


7 months end- 
in? Julv 30, 
" 1940 




VII (2) 




$56, 593. 00 






Total 




82, 279, 257. 83 




I (4) 

IV (1) 

(2) 










51.00 






3, 836. 00 






11.00 








Total -- - 




3.898.00 




I (4) 

I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(6) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 










33.83 








Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland. 


$1,577,370.00 

1, 666, 083. 80 

1,497,725.00 

3, 494, 365. 20 

4, 840. 70 

9, 497, 123. 00 

215,211.00 

159, 216. 00 


2, 918, 370. 00 

4. 763, 845. 55 

1.911,192.20 

7, 589, 594. 00 

166,473.60 

22, 294, 008. 00 

342,323.06 

193.080.00 

8,000.00 




845, 585. 74 
1,095,177.60 
3, 432, 691. 97 

660, 735. 00 


1,857,106.24 
2,899,763.60 
7, 733, 657. 01 
1,616,635.00 




24, 145, 025. 01 


64,284,048.26 




I (3) 

(4) 








160.00 






50.00 








Total 




200.00 




I (I) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 






Greenland 




1, 01,5. 48 
.578. 30 






6. 674. 65 






1,731.67 








Total 




10,000.00 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

VII (1) 
(2) 










37.00 






12.00 






159.00 






1, 336. 00 






226. 80 






3, 064. 00 








Total 




4, 834. 80 




IV (1) 

(2) 

VII CD 

(2) 






Haiti 


24.00 


336. 55 




23.00 






24.30 






6.00 








Total 


24.00 


389. 86 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V 0) 
(2) 

VII (2) 








303.00 






388.00 






1,092.00 






100,000.00 






3,213.00 






391.00 








Total 




106,387.00 



AUGUST 24, 1940 



163 





Catt 


gory 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


July 1940 


7 months end- 
ing July 30. 
1940 


Hong Kong... 


IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 




$7, 363. 00 




$842.00 


5, 196. 00 


Total 


842.00 


12, 559. 00 




IV 
V 
VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 

(2) 




Ici^land 




1, 920. 00 




280,00 


363.00 
7, 890. 00 






763.00 




65.00 


65.00 


Total . . 


345.00 


11,001.00 




I 

IV 

V 

VI 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 






1,843.92 

1, 459. 40 

380,15 

46.00 

47,000.00 

84.40 


2, 788. 45 




7,041.96 
3,528.64 
1,095.31 
67,600.00 
1,336.40 
1,000.00 




180.00 


929.00 


Total 


50,993.87 


85, 219. 76 




III 
rv 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 




Iraf] 




6M, 963. 00 






27,165.00 






94 37 






25.85 








Total 




722, 248. 22 




V 
IV 


(1) 

(1) 
(2) 






Ireland 




116 823.00 












346.00 






27.50 


Total 




373.60 




V 

IV 

V 

I 


(2) 

(1) 

(3) 

(1) 
(4) 






Japan 




4,143.00 










102.00 








Latvia 




18, 077. 00 












251.45 






337.28 








Total 




588.73 




I 
rv 

V 
VI 

vn 


(1) 
(6) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 






Mexico 




56.00 






112.50 




3, 402. 00 

264.00 

51,000.00 

130.00 

2,125.00 


8,280.00 

476.00 

377, MO. 00 

2,889.00 

13, 505. 00 

112.50 




1, 365. 25 
10,255.00 


16, 207. 50 
39,156.00 


Total 


68,541.25 


458,634.50 




I 

V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 








116.00 






154.61 






282,000.00 






3,224.00 








Total 




285,494.61 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


July 1940 


7 month.s end- 
ing July 30, 
19W 


Nethprlnnrts 


I 

UI 
V 


(2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




$26,653 00 






47.50 






155 00 






9, 674. 00 






107, 740. 00 






163, 472. 50 






187, 137. 50 








Total 




494, 879. 60 




I 

UI 
IV 

V 

vn 


(2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 




Netherlands Indies 




75,678.00 
1, 247. 77 










281, 075. 00 






1, 509, 798. 00 






15,200 00 




$4,856.95 

175. 85 

204, 950. 00 


40,639.35 

1, 310. 82 

334,677.00 

137, 708. OO 






130, 749. 00 






138,000.00 






Total 


209,982.60 


2,666,082.94 




I 

I 
rv 


(4) 

<1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 


T^ew Cfllpdnpift 




203 00 












118.60 






95.24 






663.50 




160.00 


195.90 


Total 


160.00 


1, 073. 14 




rv 

V 


(2) 

(2) 




New Guinea, Territory of 




17.25 






1,500.00 








Total 




1,517.25 




I 

IV 

V 

vn 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 






New Zealand 


2,314.00 


2, 314. 00 




202.00 




400.00 


2, 371. 15 
2,540.00 






6,991.00 








Total 


2,714.00 


13, 418. 16 




I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 




Nicarap'ft 


34,827.00 
8,267.00 


34,827.00 




8,267.00 
1,264.00 






4, 036. 00 






480.00 






870.00 






1, 292. 00 








Total 


43,094.00 


61, 035. 00 




I 

IV 

I 

m 

rv 


(4) 

(1) 

(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 




Nigeria 




33.00 








Northern Rhodesia 




25.50 








Norway ... 




70.00 






285.00 






36, 493. 20 






1,354,114.00 






280.00 






30.00 






137 00 



164 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


July 1940 


7 months 

ending 

July 30, 1940 


Norway— Continued. 


V (1) 

(2) 




$2, 200. 00 




644.00 








Total 




1, 394, 263. 20 




V (3) 

I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 






Pilp-tinf 




400.00 












12.600.00 






3, 900. 00 




$4,500.00 
12.75 


8, 700. 00 
8, 7S1. 75 
1,207.00 




17, 500. 00 


18,041.13 
74.00 






647. 00 






2, 915. 60 








Total 


22,012.75 


57, 666. 48 




I (4) 
IV (2) 








283.00 




1,035.45 


7,929.45 


Total 


1,036.45 


8,212.45 




IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




Peru - - 


7, 276. 00 
240. 00 

1, 176. 00 
12,049.00 


7,361.00 




240.00 

387,810.00 

15, 872. 00 

62, 617. 00 

1,000.00 






1,131.00 








Total- - 


20,741.00 


476,031.00 




I (1) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 








51.80 






44.00 




429,798.00 
30.00 
342. 00 


877,298.00 

30.00 

422.00 

4, 663. 00 




43, 646. 91 
64, 265. 00 


44,016.91 

64,266.00 

356. 76 








Total 


528,081.91 


981, 146. 47 




V (2) 

V (2) 

I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 




Rumania 




600. 00 








Saudi Arabia 


760.00 


760. 00 






Southern Rhodesia - 




180.00 






227.60 






264.00 






82.00 






60. 62 








Total 




814. 02 




I (1) 

I (2) 

(4) 

IV (2) 

vn (1) 










9.12 












11,644.50 






1.64 






2.47 






193. 80 








Total 




11,842.41 





Category 


Value of actual e.xports 


Country of destination 


July 1940 


7 months 

ending 

July 30, 1940 


Sweden 


I 

in 

IV 
V 


(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




$108, 000. 00 






65, 307. 00 






3, 724, 926. 00 






4, 000. 00 






44,501.00 






65, COO. 00 




$12, 637. 03 


227,883.98 
247, 267. 00 








Total 


12,637.03 


4, 486, 883. 98 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




Thailand 




17.66 






1.93 




180.00 


16,487.89 
6, 300. 00 




9S8.00 


3,696.00 
193, 120. 00 








Total 


1,138.00 


217, 622. 47 




IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 

(1) 






163.00 


153. 00 




18.00 






3,094.00 






18, 626. 00 






862.00 








Total : 


163.00 


22, 742. 00 




I 
m 

IV 
V 


(2) 
(5) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 








148,135.00 






168, 750. 00 






1, 191. 084. 00 






17, 070. 00 






14,236.00 






1,306.20 




69,003.00 


173, 878. 10 
70,344.00 








Total --- 


69, 0O3. 00 


1,774,803.30 




I 
III 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
C4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 






186. 00 
392. 87 


296.00 




665. 93 
173,600.00 




69, 106. 00 


69,663.70 
7.00 




1, 600. 00 
1,377.76 


9,603.00 
12. 031. 64 
6,000.00 






166.00 






40, 064. 00 








Total - -.- 


72, 561. 62 


311,987.27 




V 

I 

IV 

V 

VII 


(3) 

C4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




TTninn of Soviet Socialist Re- 




120, 512. 00 


publics. 










299.00 






1, 522. 00 




509.30 
3, 700. 00 


3, 078. 30 

9.649.00 

80.00 




660.00 


660.00 


Total 


4, 869. 30 


16, 288. 30 




I 


(1) 
(2) 






60.00 


111.40 




246.00 



AUGUST 24, 19 4 



165 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country o( destination 


July 1940 


7 months 

ending 

July 30, 1940 


Venezuela— Continued. 


I (4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (I) 
(2) 




$39.00 


$139,970.00 
173.60 


167.970.00 

3, 316. 60 

191.45 




65,160.00 

3,387.00 

1,000.00 

297.16 


92,983.00 
28.271.00 
79, 131. 00 
9, 489. 48 
15.890.40 








Total -- 


210,037.76 


397,639.33 




V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 








63,000.00 




3,491.75 


26,806.75 
31,080.00 








Total 


3,491.75 


120,886.75 








Grand total 


31,056,177.19 


183,703,579.08 









Arms-Import Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of origin of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
licensed for import by the Secretaiy of State 
during the month of July 1940: 



Country of origin 


Category 


Value 


Total 


Argentina 


m (n 

I (2) 
(4) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

V (2) 
I (3) 
I (3) 

(4) 

n 

V (2) 

V (3) 

V (1) 

V (3) 


$40,000.00 

510.00 

280.76 

100. 000. 00 

1,400.00 

2,000.00 

19, 000. 00 

900.00 

5.000.00 

53. 300. 00 

75,000.00 

65.00 

8,500.00 

100. 000. 00 

28,000.00 


$40,000.00 




790.76 
1 






} 103,400.00 
19.000.00 


France ._ 


900.00 






India 


133, 365. 00 
8,500.00 




100. 000. 00 




28,000.00 






Total -- 




433, 955. 76 











During the month of July, 22 import licenses 
were issued, making a total of 129 such licenses 
issued during the current year. 



Categortes of Arms, Ammunition, and 
Implements of War 

The categories of arms, ammunition, and 
implements of war in the appropriate column 
of the tables printed above are the categories 
into which those articles were divided in the 
President's proclamation of May 1, 1937, enu- 
merating the articles which would be considered 
as arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
for the purposes of section 5 of the joint resolu- 
tion of May 1. 1937 [see the BuUethi of July 27, 
1940 (vol. Ill, no. 57), pp. 58-59]. 

Special Statistics in Regard to Arms 
Exports to Cuba 

In compliance with article II of the conven- 
tion between the United States and Cuba to sup- 
press smuggling, signed at Habana, March 11, 
1926, which reads in jjart as follows: 

"The High Contracting Parties agree that 
clearance of shipments of merchandise by water, 
air, or land, from any of the ports of either 
country to a port of entry of the other country, 
sliall be denied when such shipment comprises 
articles the importation of which is prohibited 
or restricted in the country to which such ship- 
ment is destined, unless in this last case there 
has been a compliance with the requisites de- 
manded by the laws of both countries." 

and in compliance with the laws of Cuba which 
restrict the importation of arms, animmiition, 
and implements of war of all kinds bj' requiring 
an import permit for each shipment, export 
licenses for shipments of arms, ammunition, and 
implements of war to Cuba are i-equired for the 
articles enumerated below in addition to the 
articles enumerated in the President's proclama- 
tion of May 1, 1937 : 

(1) Arms and small arms using ammunition 
of caliber .22 or less, other than those classed 
as toys. 

(2) Spare parts of arms and small arms of 
all kinds and calibers, other than those classed 
as toys, and of guns and machine guns. 



166 



DEPABTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



(3) Ammunition for the arms and small 
arms under (1) above. 

(4) Sabers, swords, and military machetes 
with cross-guard hilts. 

(5) Explosiveg as follows : explosive powders 
of all kinds for all purposes; nitrocellulose hav- 
ing a nitrogen content of 12 percent or less; 
diphenylamine ; dynamite of all kinds; nitro- 
glycerine; alkaline nitrates (ammonium, po- 
tassium, and sodium nitrate) ; nitric acid ; nitro- 
benzene (essence or oil of mirbane) ; sulphur; 
sulphuric acid; chlorate of potash; and ace- 
tones. 

(6) Tear gas (CeHsCOCH.Cl) and other 
similar nontoxic gases and apparatus designed 
for the storage or projection of such gases. 

The table printed below indicates, in respect 
to licenses authorizing the exportation to Cuba 
of the articles and commodities listed in the pre- 
ceding paragraph, issued by the Secretary of 
State during July 1940, the number of licenses 
and the value of the articles and commodities 
described in the licenses: 



Number of license? 


Section 


Value 


Total 


32 


(1) 


$432. 40 

38.00 

4, 829. 00 

22, 737. 23 






(2) — -. 

(3) 


$28, 030. 63 




(5) 











The table printed below indicates the value 
of the articles and commodities listed above 
exported to Cuba during July 1940 under 
licenses issued by the Secretary of State: 



Section 



(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(5) 



Value 



$624. 20 

5.00 

6, 656. 00 

12, 680. 96 



Total 



$19, 866. 16 



Tin- Plate Scrap 

The table printed below indicates the number 
of licenses issued during the year 1940, up to 
and including the month of July, authorizing 
the export of tin-plate scrap under the pro- 
visions of the act approved February 15, 1936, 
and the regulations issued pursuant thereto, 
together with the number of tons authorized to 
be exported and the value thereof : 





July 1940 


7^nionths ending July ' 
31, 1940 


tion 


Quantity 

in long 

tons 


Total value 


Quantity 

in long 

tons 


Totallvalue 


Japan _ _ 


667 


$9,927.00 


3,633 


$66, 384. 70 







During the month of July, 4 tin-plate scrap 
licenses were issued, making a total of 51 such 
licenses issued during the current year. 

Helium 

The table printed below gives the essential 
information in regard to the licenses issued 
durmg the month of July 1940, authorizing the 
exportation of heliimi gas under the provisions 
of the act approved on September 1, 1937, and 
the regulations issued pursuant thereto: 









Quan- 






Purchaser in foreign 


Country of 


tity in 


Total 


Applicant for license 


country 


destination 


cubic 
feet 


value 


Ohio Chemical & 


Standard Glass 


India- 


17 


$4.50 


Mfg. Co. 


Blowing Works. 








Puritan Compressed 


Messrs. Duxval P. 


BrazU 


180 


25.88 


Gas Corp. 


Ramos. 








Ohio Chemical & 


Dominion Dental 


New Zea- 


200 


35.00 


Mfg. Co. 


Supplies Co. 


land. 






Air Reduction Sales 


Canadian General 


Canada 


5 


830. m) 


Co. 


Electric Co., 
Ltd. 








The Cheney Chem- 


Cheney Chemi- 


Canada 


120 


14.00 


ical Co. 


cals, Ltd. 









AUGUST 24, 1940 



167 



Commercial Policy 



COAL, COKE, AND BRIQUETS FROM 
THE UNION OF SOVIET SOCIALIST 
REPUBLICS 

In view of the extension until August 6, 1941, 
of the commercial agreement between the 
United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics," the Coimnissioner of Customs an- 
nounced on August 16, 1940, that "coal, coke 
made from coal, and coal or coke briquets pi-o- 
duced in the Union of Soviet Socialist Repub- 
lics, imported directly or indirectly therefrom, 
and entered for consumption or withdrawn 
from warehouse for consumption during the 
period from January 1 to December 31, 1940, 
inclusive, should be released as unconditionally 
free merchandise without any deposit on ac- 
count of tiie tax provided for" in the Internal 
Revenue Code, section 3423. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Exchange of Official Publications : Agreement Be- 
tween the United States of America and Nicaragua. — 



"See the Bulletin of August 10, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 
59), pp. 105-107, and August 17, 1940 (vol. Ill, no 
60), p. 117. 



Effected by exchange of notes signed February 14 
and 19, 1940; effective Feliruary 14, 1940. Executive 
Agreement Series No. 171. Publication 1490. 7 pp. 50. 
Diplomatic List, August 1940. Publication 1492. 
ii, 91 pp. Subscription, $1 a year ; single copy, 10#. 

Other Go\'ernment Agencies 

The following publications issued recently by 
the Divisions of Regional Information and For- 
eign Trade Statistics of the Bureau of Foreign 
and Domestic Commerce, United States Depart- 
ment of Conunerce, may be of interest to readers 
of the Bulletin: 

Trade of United States with Brazil in 1939. May 
1940. 6 pp. (processed). 10^. 

Trade of United States with Chile in 1939. June 
1940. 5 pp. (processed). lOf^. 

Trade of United States with China, Hong Kong and 
Kwantung in 1939. June 1940. 9 pp. (processed). 
(Statistics for 1939 subject to revision.] 10^. 

United States trade with 20 republics of Latin Amer- 
ica for 6 months' period ended Feb. 1940 as compared 
with same months of preceding years. May 1940. 
28 pp. (processed). Free. 

United States trade with Mediterranean area in 1939 
as compared with 1937 and 1938. 18 pp. (processed). 
Free. 

Trade of United States with Netherlands Indies in 

1939. May 1940. 5 pp. (processed). 10*. 

Trade of United States with Peru in 1939. June 

1940. 4 pp. (processed). 100. 

Trade of United States with Philippine Islands in 
19.39. June 1940. 7 pp. (processed). [Statistics for 
1939 subject to revision.] 100. 

Trade of United States with Venezuela in 1939. 
June 1940. 5 pp. (processed). [Statistics for 1939 
suliject to revision.] 100. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press August 231 

The following Foreign Service officers were nominated for promotion effective from August 1, 1940: 



Name 



Post 



Title 



Home address 



From class II to class I 

William C. Burdett.- 

Nathaniel P. Davis... 

John O. Erhardt 

Charles B. Hosraer 

Robert D. Murphy 

Avra M. Warren 

From class III to class II 

WUlard L. Beaulac 

William P. Blocker 

Howard Bucknell, Jr 

Richard P. Butrick 

Cecil M. P. Cross 

Hugh S. Fullerton 

H. Freeman Matthews 

Rudolf E. SchoenJeld 

George P. Shaw 

From class IV to class III 

Ellis 0. Briggs- 

Herbert S. Bursley 

Curtis T. Everett 

Samuel J. Fletcher 

Walter A. Foote 

Waldemar J. Qallman 

Sydney B. Redecker.. _. 

Edwin F. Stanton 

Fletcher Warren 

From class Vto class IV 

Howard Donovan 

Albert M. Doyle... 

Richard Ford 

Thomas McEnelly... 

Edwin A. Plitt 

Christian M. Ravndal 

From class VI to class V 

Lewis Clark 

Cabot Coville 

John H. Morgan 

Edward J. Sparks. 

168 



Rio de Janeiro. 



Department. 
London 



Department. 

Paris.. 

Department. 



Habana.. 

Ciudad JuSrez. 

Madrid 

Shanghai 

Paris 

Paris 

Paris.. 

London.. 

Mexico City... 



Department., 
Department. 

Geneva 

Tientsin 

Batavia 

Department. 

Frankfort 

Shanghai 

Department.. 



Bombay 

Sydney, N. S. W.. 

Montreal. 

Palermo. 

Paris 

Buenos Aires 



Department 

Department 

Madrid 

Port-au-Prince.. 



Consul General and Counselor of 
Embassy. 

Consul General 

Consul General and First Secre- 
tary. 

Consul 

Consul and Counselor of Embassy. 

Consul General 



First Secretary 

Consul General 

First Secretary 

Consul 

Consul and First Secretary. 
Consul and First Secretary.. 
Consul and First Secretary.. 

First Secretary 

Consul. 



Second Secretary- 
First Secretary 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul... 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul... _.. 



Consul.. 

Consul - 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul and Second Secretary. 
Consul 



Second Secretary 

Second Secretary 

Second Secretary. 

Consul and Second Secretary. 



Knoxville, Tenn. 

Princeton, N. J. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lewiston, Maine. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Ellicott City, Md. 



Pawtucket, R. I. 
Hondo, Tex. 
Atlanta, Oa. 
Lockport, N. Y. 
Providence, R. I. 
Springfield, Ohio. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Washington, D. C. 
San Diego, Calif. 



Topsfleld, Maine. 
Washington, D. C. 
Nashville, Tenn. 
Kittery Point, Maine. 
Hamlin, Te.x. 
Wellsville, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
Wolfe City, Tex. 



Windsor, 111. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 
New York, N. Y. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Decorah, Iowa. 



Montgomery, Ala. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
Watertown, Mass. 
New York, N. Y. 



AUGUST 24, 1940 



169 



Name 


Post 


Title 


Home address 


From class VII to class VI 
James C. H. Bonbright 


Brussels and Luxemburg 


Second Secretary 


Rochester, N. Y. 










Herv6 J. L'Hcureux.- 


Antwerp 


Consul 


Manchester, N. H. 


Sheldon T. MUls 








Edward T. Wailes . . ... 


Department _ 




Northport, L. I., N. Y. 
Portsmouth. Va. 


Frovt class VIII to dass VII 
Win. E. Flournoj", Jr . . . _ 


Managua 


Vice Consul and Third Secretary.. 
Vice Consul 


Guy W. Ray 


Department 


Wilsonville, Ala. 


From unclassified (A) to class VIII 
John K. Emmerson ... 


Tokyo ... 


Third Secretftfv 


Canon City, Colo. 
Clearwater, Fla. 


Beppo R. Johansen 


Harbin 


Vice Consul 




Keljo 




Glendale, Calif. 


Carmel Offie . .. 


Paris 


Vice Consul and Third Secretary.. 


Port^e, Pa. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 


Edward E. Rice 




Max W. Schmidt 


Tokyo 






William E. Yuni 


Tientsin 


Vice Consul 


Hoquiam, Wash. 









The following were promoted effective August 1, 1940: 



Name 


Post 


Title 


Home address 


From unclassified (B) to unclassified (A) 

John Hubner, 2d 


S5o Paulo 


Vice Consul 


Baltimore, Md. 


Milton P. Thompson __ . 


Sftnt'flpo d*^ (^tiba 


Vice Consul 


Chattanooga, Tenn. 


From unclassified (C) to unclassified (B) 
Niles W. Bond 






William 0. Boswell _.. 


Vienna 


Vice Consul 


New Florence, Pa. 






Third Secretary and Vice ConsuL. 
Third Secretary and Vice Consul. . 
Vice Consul 


New York, N. Y. 


Charles R. Burrows . 


La Paz 


Willard, Ohio. 


V. Lansing Collins, 2d _ 


Batavia 


New York, N. Y. 










Nicholas Feld 


Madras 


Vice Consul 


VicksburEt Miss. 


William N. Fraleigh 


A t.hpns 


Third Secretary and Vice Consul.. 


Summit, N. J. 






Pasadena, Calif. 


John C. Fuess _ . 


Department 


Vice Consul „ _ 


Andover, Mass. 










Boies C. Hart, Jr 


Shanghai 






Richard H. Hawkins, Jr 


Brisbane 


Vice Consul . 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 






Vice Consul and Third Secretary.. 


Chicago. 111. 






Washington, D. C. 


Robert C. Strong 


Durban 


Vice Consul . . 


Beloit, Wis. 











[Released to the press August 24] 

The following changes have occuiTed in the 
Foreign Sei-vice since August 17, 1940 : 

Cornelius Van H. Engert, of Berkeley, Calif., 
Counselor of Legation at Tehran, Iran, has been 
assigned as Consul General at Beirut, Lebanon. 

Ely E. Palmer, of Providence, E. I., Consul 



General at Beirut, Lebanon, has been assigned 
as Consul General at Sydney, Australia. 

Elvin Seibert, of New York, N. Y., Third 
Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul at 
Bangkok, Thailand, has been designated Third 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at Rio 
de Janeiro. Brazil. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



ARBITRATION AND JUDICIAL 
SETTLEMENT 

Permanent Court of International Justice 

Brazil 

There is printed below tlie text of a letter 
received by the Secretary General of the League 
of Nations on July 5, 1940, from the Brazilian 
Govei'nment concerning the attitude of certain 
governments in regard to the Optional Clause 
of the Statute of the Permanent Court of Inter- 
national Justice, which reads in translation as 
follows : 

"By letters dated September 13th, 19th and 
20th and December 18th, 1939, you infomied 
me that the Government of the French Republic, 
the Government of Canada and His Majesty's 
Governments in the LTnited Kingdom, in the 
Commonwealth of Australia, in New Zealand 
and in the Union of South Africa had notified 
you that their acceptance of the Optional Clause 
of the Statute of the Permanent Court of Inter- 
national Justice will not be regarded by them 
as applying to disputes which might arise out 
of events occurring during the present hos- 
tilities. 

"2. With reference to the letters of November 
21st, 1939 and January 26th, 1940, by which I 
acknowledged the receipt of these communica- 
tions, I now have the honour to inform you that 
the Bi'azilian Government desires to make the 
fullest reservations as regards the unilateral 
action undertaken by the above-mentioned 
Governments, in so far as concerns all matters 
relating to its rights as a neutral in the present 
war and coming within the jurisdiction of the 
Court. 

"3. I should be obliged if you would notify 
all the interested Parties of the views of the 
Brazilian Government." 

170 



CONSULTATION 

Final Act and Convention of the Habana 
Meeting of the Ministers of Foreign Af- 
fairs of the American Republics 

The texts of the Final Act and Convention of 
the Second Meeting of the ISIinisters of Foreign 
Affairs of the American Republics at Habana, 
July 21-30, 1940, appear in this Bulletin under 
the heading "American Republics". 

Permanent Joint Board on Defense, United 
States and Canada 

The joint statement of President Roosevelt 
and Prime Minister Mackenzie King of Canada 
regarding the establishment by the United 
States and Canada of a Permanent Joint 
Board on Defense and a list of the members 
of the Board appointed by both countries, ap- 
pear in this Bulletin under the heading 
"Canada". 

MUTUAL GUARANTIES 

Non-aggression Treaty Between Great 
Britain and Thailand 

The American Embassy at London trans- 
mitted to the Department with a despatch 
dated June 18, 1940, copies of the Treaty of 
Non-aggression Between Great Britain and 
Thailand signed on June 12, 1940. The treaty 
will enter into effect upon the exchange of 
ratifications. It will remain in force for a 
period of five years and thereafter until one 
year from the date on which either paxty 
gives notice of its intention to terminate it. 
Each party agrees not to resort to war or 
aggression against the other, either alone or 
in concert with one, or more than one, third 
power; to respect the territorial integrity of 
the other party; and not to give, directly or 



AUGUST 24, 1940 

indirectly, aid or assistance to the aggressor 
if one of tlie parties is the object of an act 
of war or aggression by one or more third 
poM'ers. Each party declares that it is not 
bound by any agreement which carries with 
it an obligation to participate in an act of 
war or of aggression committed by a third 
power against the other party ; and each party 



171 

guarantees to respect the sovereignty or author- 
ity of the other party over its territories and 
not to intervene in the internal affairs of such 
territories and to abstain from all forms of 
agitation, propaganda, or intervention aimed 
against such territory or which purposes the 
changing by force of the form of government 
of any such territory. 



U. S GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1940 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPEOTAL OF THB DIBECTOH OP THE EDBEAD OP THE BUDGET 



I 



7^-^ J '/nz^u 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 




J 



J- 



J 



ETIN 



AUGUST 31, 1940 
Vol. Ill: No. 62 - Publication 1 4gg 



Qontents 




General: Page. 

Annivcrsan' of the signing of the Kellogg-Briand Pact: 

Statement by the Secretary of State 175 

Immigration facihties at Canadian and Mexican bor- 
ders 176 

American Republics: 

Threat of danger : Statement by the Secretary of State . 176 
Emergency Committee for Provisional Administration 

of European Colonies and Possessions 177 

New Pan American Airway route to Rio de Janeiro . . 177 
Habana Meeting of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs: 

Final Act and Convention 178 

Europe: 

Contributions for relief in belligerent countries . . . 178 
Commercial Policy: 

Embargo tariffs : Comment of the Secretary of State . . 190 
The Foreign Service: 

Death of Consul General Sussdorff and injury to Consul 

Broy 190 

Personnel changes 191 

Treaty Information: 
Boundary : 

Convention with Canada for the Emergency Regula- 
tion of the Level of Rainy Lake and of Certain 

Other Boundary Waters 192 

Publications 192 

Legislation 192 

Regulations 192 



U. S. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENT* 

SEP 181940 



i 



General 



ANNIVERSARY OF THE SIGNING OF THE KELLOGG-BRIAND PACT 



Statement by the Secretary of State 



[Released to the press August 29] 

Twelve ye^irs ago today, there was signed a 
solemn treaty outlawing war, to which this 
country and 60 other countries gave their un- 
qualified adherence. In article 1 of that treaty, 
the high contracting parties renounced war as 
an instrument of national policy in their rela- 
tions with one another. In article 2, the high 
contracting parties agreed that "the settlement 
or solution of all disputes or conflicts of what- 
ever nature or of whatever origin they may be 
which may arise among them, shall never be 
sought except by pacific means". In exchanges 
of views preceding and accompanying the rati- 
fication of that treaty, it was accepted as a part 
of the general understanding that the right of 
self-defense is implicit in sovereignty and re- 
mains with each and all of the signatory and 
adhering states. 

In recent years, the renunciation made in 
article 1 of the Kellogg-Briand Pact has been 
disregarded by some of the signatories ; and the 
pledge given in article 2 of that treaty has been 
violated by those signatories. Several nations 
have sent their armed forces into and against 
other countries. In consequence, destruction of 
life and of property, of material values and of 
spiritual values — destruction on a vast scale — 
not alone in the countries invaded but also in the 
countries whose annies are the invaders, is 
going on in various parts of the world. 

Some of the invaded nations have been de- 

258319 — 40 1 



stroyed, some are fightmg desperately in self- 
defense, and every other country, perceiving the 
manner in which activities of conquest spread 
and become enlarged as operations of conquest 
proceed, finds itself forced to arm as speedily as 
possible and to the utmost of its capacity in 
preparation for self-defense — toward preserv- 
ing its own security by preventing war from 
reaching and crossing its boundaries. 

Today no country and no individual is se- 
cure against the destructive effects of the exist- 
ing armed conflicts. No human being anywhere 
can be sure that he or she will be allowed for 
long to live in peace. Only by vigorous and 
adequate preparation for self-defense can any 
country, including our own, hope to remain at 
peace. 

It was to spare the human race the untold 
suffering and indescribable tragedy of the kind 
we are witnessing today that the Kellogg-Briand 
Pact was signed. The soundness of its under- 
lying principles has in no way been impaired 
by what has taken place since then. Sooner or 
later they must prevail as an unshakeable 
foundation of international relations unless war 
with its horroi-s and ravages is to become the 
nonnal state of the world and mankind is to 
relapse into the chaos of barbarism. And I am 
certain that there are in the human race re- 
sources of mind and of spirit sufficient to insure 
that these sane bases of civilized existence will 
become firmly established. 

176 



176 DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

IMMIGRATION FACILITIES AT CANADIAN AND MEXICAN BORDERS 



[Released to the press August 25] 

The Department of State has been giving fur- 
ther attention to the matter of facilitating the 
border crossing for temporary visitors from 
neighboring countries. Tlie Secretary of State 
is authorizing American consular and diplo- 
matic offices, as of August 28, 1940, to issue a 
nonresident alien's border-crossing identifica- 
tion card to the citizens of Canada, Newfound- 
land, and Mexico domiciled therein, and British 
subjects domiciled in Canada and Newfound- 
land, as provided by law. This card will be 
valid for visits not exceeding 29 days and for 
any number of such visits during the period of 
one year without the necessity of I'egistration 
and formal fingerprinting and with a very sim- 
2)lified form of application. The immigration 
officers at land-border stations are being simi- 
larly authorized by the Attorney General. It is 
believed that tliis arrangement will alleviate the 
irritations which have existed in American com^ 
munities along the border and will continue 
effective control. 

[Released to the press August 27] 

The Secretary of State on August 24, 1940, 
signed the following departmental order : 



"Departmental Order No. 874 

"Under the emergency provisions of Section 
30 of the Alien Registration Act, 1940 and of 
Executive Order No. 8430 of June 5, 1940,^ 
citizens of Canada, Newfoundland, or Mexico, 
domiciled therein, and British subjects domi- 
ciled in Canada or Newfoundland do not re- 
quire passports, visas, reentry permits, or 
border-crossing identification cards when pass- 
ing from and to such coiuitry in continuous 
transit through the territory of the United 
States under arrangements satisfactory to the 
Immigration authorities; and aliens lawfully 
resident in the United States shall not require 
passportsi, visas, reentry permits, or border- 
crossing identification cards when reentering 
the United States after continuous transit 
through foreign contiguous territory under 
arrangements satisfactory to the Innnigration 
authorities. 

CoRDELL Hull 

"Department of State, 
''August 2Jf, 19^0." 



"See the Bulletin of June 8, IMO (vol. II, no. 50), 
pp. 622-624. 



American Republics 



THREAT OF DANGER: STATEMENT BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE 



[Released to the press August 25] 

Upon his return from his vacation, the Secre- 
tary of State, the Honorable Cordell Hull, after 
reviewing the international situation, felt con- 
strained to re-emphasize the views which he ex- 
pressed when he came back from the Habana 
Conference and, therefore, on August 25 issued 
the following statement : 

"I feel constrained to re-emphasize the view 
expressed upon my return from the Habana 



Conference, that the possibilities of danger to 
the American republics are real; that a threat 
to any important part of the Americas means a 
threat to each and all of the American nations. 
"The conclusion is therefore inescapable that 
full and adequate preparations for hemispheric 
defense cannot be completed too soon. I desire 
again to apjjeal for the fullest possible measure 
of unity on the part of our people in support of 
such program of defense and of related foreign 
policies." 



AUGUST 31, 1940 



177 



EMERGENCY COMMITTEE FOR PROVISIONAL ADMINISTRATION OF 
EUROPEAN COLONIES AND POSSESSIONS 



[Released to the press August 29] 

The Government of tlie United States has 
designated the Honorable Sumner Welles, 
Under Secretary of State, as its representative 
on the Emergency Committee for the Provi- 
sional Administration of European Colonies 
and Possessions in the Americas. This Emer- 
gency Committee is provided for in the "Act of 
Habana" adopted by the Second Meeting of the 
Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the American 
Republics at Habana on July 30, 1940. 

The "Act of Habana" provides for an Emer- 
gency Committee composed of a representative 
of each of the American republics and will be 
constituted as soon as two thirds of the Amer- 
ican republics shall have appointed their 
members. The Committee .shall assume the 
administration of any region in the Western 
Hemisphere now controlled by a European 
power whenever an attempt shall be made to 
transfer the sovereignty or control of such ter- 
ritory to another non-American nation. It is 
to function only until tlie Convention on the 
Provisional Administration of European Col- 
onies and Possessions in the Americas shaJl 
come into effect. The purpose of the "Act of 
Habana" in establishing the Emergency Com- 
mittee was to give immediate effect to the main 
provisions of the convention, also signed at 
Habana, regarding the setting up of a provi- 
sional administrative regime over any of the 
possessions now under the jurisdiction of a non- 
American government whenever an attempt 
may be made to transfer control or sovereignty 
thereof to another non-American government. 

The American governments have declared 
that any transfer or attempted transfer of the 
sovereignty, jurisdiction, possessions, or any 
interest in or control over any such region to 
another non-American state would not be rec- 
ognized or accepted by the American republics. 
The Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the Ameri- 
can republics agreed at Habana that they have 
the right, in order to preserve their unity and 



security, to take such regions under their col- 
lective administration. The establishment of 
such provisional administration is to be exer- 
cised in the interest of the security of the Amer- 
icas and for the benefit of the region under 
administration until such time as the region is 
in a position to govern itself or is restored to its 
former status. The "Act of Habana" puts into 
immediate effect the principle of solidarity with 
regard to European colonies and possessions in 
the Western Hemisphere. 

It also contains the important provision that, 
should the need for emergency action be so 
urgent that action by the Committee cannot be 
awaited, any of the American republics may act 
individually or jointly with others in the manner 
which its own defense or that of the continent 
requires. The American republic or republics 
taking action under these circumstances must 
place the matter before the Committee immedi- 
ately in order that it may adopt appropriate 
measures. 

The convention which was also signed at 
Habana will go into effect when two thirds of 
the American governments shall have ratified it. 
This convention provides for the establishment 
of a connnission known as the Inter-American 
Commission for Territorial Administration, 
which is to be composed of representatives of 
the ratifying countries. As soon as the conven- 
tion goes into effect the Emergency Committee 
established under the "Act of Habana" will be 
superseded by the Inter-American Commission 
for Territorial Administration. 

NEW PAN AMERICAN AIRWAY ROUTE 
TO RIO DE JANEIRO 

(Released to the press -iugust 30] 

Mr. Philip W. Bonsai, Assistant Chief of the 
Division of the American Republics, has been 
designated to i-epresent the Department of State 
at Para (Belem) and Rio de Janeiro on the 
occasion of the inauguration of the Pan Ameri- 



178 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



can Airways' cut-ofF route between those cities. 
This service will reduce by approximately one 
day and a half the flying time between Kio de 
Janeiro and the United States. Mr. Bonsai, 
who will leave Miami by airplane September 1, 
will take with him a letter of greeting from 
President Eoosevelt to President Vargas. 

HABANA MEETING OF THE MIN- 
ISTERS OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS 

Final Act and Convention 

The texts of the Final Act and Convention of 
the Habana Meeting of the Ministers of Foreign 



Affairs, as printed in the Bulletin for August 
24, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 61), contain a number of 
obvious typographic errors, the most serious of 
which are as follows: 

Page 130. In the second column, section e) 
should read : "States may decline to receive a 
diplomatic officer from another . . ." 

Page 138. In the first column, the opening 
paragraph under Part XVIII should begin: 
"The Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics . . ." 

Page 143. In the first column, the first reser- 
vation should be headed "Reservation of the 
Mexican Delegation", instead of "Argentine 
Delegation". 



Europe 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 



[Released to the press August 31] 

The following tabulation shows contributions 
collected and disbursed during the period Sep- 
tember 6, 1939, through July 31, 1940, as shown 
in the reports submitted by persons and or- 
ganizations registered with the Secretary of 
State for the solicitation and collection of con- 
tributions to be used for relief in belligerent 
countries, in conformity with the regulations 
issued pursuant to section 8 of the act of No- 
vember 4, 1939, as made effective by the Presi- 
dent's proclamation of the same date. 

This tabulation has reference only to contri- 
butions solicited and collected for relief in bel- 
ligerent countries (France; Germany; Poland; 
the United Kingdom, India, Australia, Canada, 
New Zealand, and the Union of South Africa ; 
Norway; Belgium; Luxemburg; the Nether- 
lands; and Italy) or for the relief of refugees 



driven out of these countries by the present 
war. The statistics set forth in the tabulation 
do not include information regarding relief ac- 
tivities which a number of organizations regis- 
tered with the Secretary of State may be 
carrying on in nonbelligerent countries, but for 
which registration is not required under the 
Neutrality Act of 1939. 

The American National Red Cross is required 
by law to submit to the Secretary of War for 
audit "a full, complete, and itemized report of 
receipts and expenditures of whatever kind". 
In order to avoid an unnecessary duplication 
of work, this organization is not required to 
conform to the provisions of the regulations 
governing the solicitation and collection of con- 
tributions for relief in belligerent countries, 
and the tabulation does not, therefore, include 
information in regard to its activities. 



AUGUST 31, 194 



179 



Contributions fob Relief in Belligebent Cotjntbies 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and destina- 
tion of contributions 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
July 31, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on band 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
hand 



Acclon Dem6crata Espafiola, San Francisco, Calif., Mar. 29, 
1940. France -.. 

Allied ReHef Ball, Inc., New York, N. Y., Apr. 4, 1940. Oreat 
Britain and France 

Allied Relief Fund, New York, N. Y., June 4, 1940. United 

Kingdom, France, Belgium, tbe Netherlands, and Norway 

American Association for Assistance to French Artists, Inc., New 

York, N. Y., Jan. 3, 1940. France 

American As.sociation of University Women, Washington, D. C, 

May 23, 1940. France and Oreat Britain 

American Auxiliary Committee de L'Union des Femmes de 

France, New York, N. Y., Nov. 8, 1939. France 

American Board of Missions to the Jews, Inc., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

July 5. 1940. France, Belgium, and Germany 

American Civilian Volunteers, South Sudbury, Mass. May 27, 

1940 • France 

American Committee for Christian Refugees, Inc., New York, 

N. Y. Sept. 20, 1939. Germany and France 

American Committee for tbe German Relief Fund, Inc., New 

York, N. Y. Mar. 27, 1940. Germany and Poland 

American Committee for the Polish Ambulance Fund, Chicago, 

111. Feb. 12, 1940. France and Poland 

American Dental Ambulance Committee, New York, N. Y. 

Mar. 12, WO. United Kingdom 

American Emergency Volunteer Ambulance Corps, Inc., New 

York, N. Y. Jan. 25. 1910. Great Britain and France 

American Employment for General Relief, Inc., New York, 

N. Y. May 1, 1940.' England, France, Norway, Poland, 

Belgium, Luxemburg, and the Netherlands 

American Field Service, New York, N. Y. Sept. 27, 1939. 

France and Great Britain 

American and French Students' Correspondence Exchange, 

New York, N. Y. Dec. 20, 1939. France 

American- French War Relief. Inc., New York, N. Y. Sept. 14, 

1939. France and Great Britain 

American Friends of Czecho-Slovakia, New York, N. Y. Nov. 

2, 1939. Great Britain, France, and Bohemia- Mora via 

American Friends of the Daily Sketch War Relief Fund, New 

York, N. Y. Dec. 1, 1939. Great Britain 

American Friends of France, Inc., New York, N. Y. Sept. 21, 

1939. France 

American Friends of German Freedom, New York, N. Y. 

July 24, 1940.' England and France- 

American Friends of a Jewish Palestine, Inc., New York, N. Y. 

May 9, 1940. Palestine, Germany, Poland, France, and 

United Kingdom 

American Friends Service Committee. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Nov. 9, 1939. United Kingdom, Poland, Germany, France, 

Norway, Belgium, and the Netherlands 

The American Fund for Breton Relief, New York, N. Y. 

Oct. 31, 1939. France _ 

American Fund for French Wounded, Inc., Boston, Mass. 

Jan. 3. 1940. France 

American Fund for Wounded in France, Inc., Worcester, Mass. 

Dec. 15, 1939. France 



$246. 45 

51, 846. 35 

603,467.80 

11,911.13 

6, 629. 10 

17,920.38 

725.00 

None 

11,801.88 

29, 200. 72 

27,381.95 

3, 239. 52 

None 

1, 953. 50 

277, 199. 90 

7.214.09 

38, 372. 74 

23,455.99 

2,136.27 

294, 942. 46 



$125.00 

38. 104. 00 

406, 653. 43 

7, 987. 58 

225.00 

7, 713. 35 

726.00 

None 

11,801.80 

20,000.00 

17,721.33 

3. 133. 02 

None 

None 

185, 410. 86 

3, 024. 85 

17, 769. 18 

16,261.32 

1, 357. 00 

146, 680. 94 



$35.51 
12, 630. 85 
42,971.53 

2, 977. 38 
322.42 

1, 210. 70 
None 
None 
None 

4, 200. 03 

1, 787. 27 
101.. W 
None 

764.11 
7, 560. 23 

589.84 
4, 768. 73 
4,034.28 

None 
21, 256. 78 



$85.94 

1,111.50 

163,842.84 

946. 17 

6,081.68 

8, 996. 33 

None 

None 

None 

5, 000. 69 

7, 873. 35 

5.00 

None 

1. 189. 39 
84,228.81 

3. 699. 40 
15,834.83 

3, 160. 39 

779. 27 

127,004.74 



None 

None 

$28, 862. 05 

1,605.15 
None 

3, 000. 61 
None 
None 
None 
None 
471.00 
None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

43, 040. 74 

18, 690. 00 

None 

11,266.11 



2, 734. 93 

77, 848. 88 

5, 196. 17 

11, 562. 60 

200.00 



669. 02 

72, 368. 10 

3, 786. 50 

7, 325. 36 

None 



1, 990. 62 

5, 480. 78 
363.05 
362.40 
None 



85.29 

None 
1, 046. 62 
3,874.84 

200.00 



None 

12, 473. 42 

4,911.50 

3, 560. 62 

None 



None 
None 
$11,838.58 
None 
None 
416. 73 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 

4, 106. 21 
None 
None 

7, 969. 96 



None 

None 

None 

3, 726. 13 

None 



" No complete report for the month of July has been received from this organization. 
» No report for the month of July has been received from this organization. 
• No report has been received from this organization. 



180 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and destina- 
tion of contributions 



American-German Aid Society, Los Angeles, Calif. Nov. 16, 

1939. Germany.- 

The American Hospital in Britain, Ltd., New York, N. Y. 

July 24, 1940. Great Britain _ 

The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, Inc., New 

York, N. Y. Sept. 29, 19.39.' United Kingdom, Poland, Ger- 
many, France, Norway, Belgium, Luxemburg, and the Neth- 
erlands 

American McAll Association, New York, N. Y. Jan. 3, 1940. 

France 

American Volunteer Ambulance Corps, New York, N. Y. Dec. 

12, 1939. France, Belgium, Holland, and England 

American War Godmothers, Pittsburgh, Pa. Mar. 6, 1940. 

France... 

American Women's Hospitals, New York, N. Y. Sept. 14, 

1939.' Franceand England. 

American Women's Unit tor War Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y. 

Jan. 15, 1940. France 

American Women's Voluntary Services, Inc., New York, N. Y. 

Feb. 13, 1940. England 

Les Amis de la France & Puerto Rico, San Juan, P. R., Dec. 

20, 1939. France 

Les AmitiSs F6minines de la France, New York, N. Y. Dec. 

19, 1939. France. 

Les Anciens Combattants Frangais de la Grande Guerre, San 

Francisco, Calif. Oct. 26, 1939. France 

Mrs. Larz Anderson, Boston, Mass. Dec. 12, 1939. France 

Anthracite Relief Committee, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Sept. 8, 1939. 

Poland 

Anzac War Relief Fund, New York, N. Y. May 23, 1940. 

Australia and New Zealand 

Associated Polish Societies' Relief Committee of Webster, Mass., 

Webster, Mass. Sept. 21, 1939. Poland 

Associated Polish Societies Relief Committee of Worcester, 

Mass., Worcester, Mass. Sept. 14, 1939. Poland 

Association of Former Juniors in France of Smith College, New 

York, N. Y. Dec. 18, 1939. France 

Association of Former Russian Naval Officers in America, New 

York, N. Y. Feb. 21, 1940. France 

Association of Joint Polish-American Societies of Chelsea, 

Mass., Chelsea, Mass. Sept. 15. 1939. Poland 

L' Atelier, San Francisco. Calif. Jan. 29, 1940. France.. 

Mrs. Mark Baldwin, New York, N. Y. Mar. 4, 1940. France. 
Bastjue Delegation in the United States of America, New York, 

N. Y. Dec. 19, 1939. France 

Belgian Relief Fund. Inc., New York, N. Y. June 14, 1940. 

Belgium, France, and England 

Belgian Relief of Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif. May 

27, 1940. Belgium 

Belgian War Relief Fund, Manila, P. I. June 7, 1940. 

Belgium 

The Benedict Bureau Unit, Inc., New York, N. Y. Nov. 29, 

1939. France 

Beth-Lechem, Inc., New York, N. Y. Sept. 21, 1939. Poland, 

France, and England 

Bethel Mission of Eastern Europe (formerly Bethel Mission o( 

Poland, Inc.), Minneapolis, Minn. Nov. 27, 1939. Poland... 
Bishops' Committee for Polish Relief, Washington, D. C, 

Dec. 19, 1939.' Poland 



Funds 
received 



$3,831.50 
15, 100. 00 

1,521,311.85 

637. 32 

222, 288. 65 

1,050.33 

2, 409. 72 

1,740.73 

16.681.41 

10, 623. 68 

1,197.91 

17,339.15 
17, 990. 16 

10, 808. 14 

4, 938. 00 

2, 829. 27 

8, 604. 99 

273. 60 

189. 70 

2,001.08 
11,848.96 
1,094.41 

1, 349. 40 
12,047.20 

6, 166. 55 
1,118.31 
6,481.17 

2, 990. 16 
8, 322. 50 

334, 834. 74 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



None 
None 

, 410, 642. 82 

417.45 

102, 795. 82 

155. 74 

1, TOO. 00 
672. 11 

4, 6,50. 44 

6, 600. 00 

386.88 

8, 042. 33 
16, 983. 14 

7, 000. 00 

3, 066. 00 

2, 600. 00 

6, 766. 45 

225.00 

133. 30 

1 , 000. 00 

6. 107. 98 

612. 00 

975. 00 

2, 339. 00 
2,3,54.80 

None 

846. 74 

703. 15 

6, 007. 40 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
July 31, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



• No complete reports for the months of June and July have been received from 
' No report for the month of July has been received from this organization. 



156, 324. 31 

this organization 



$1,003.45 
124. 93 

110,669.03 

None 

13,842.56 

269. 02 

41.47 

626. 09 

8, 339. 25 

223. 68 

303. 22 

370. 07 
466. 76 

288.46 

267. 67 

7.60 
463. 10 
None 

6.20 

86.67 
639, 43 
97.16 

132. 64 

3,944.73 

1,956.42 

2.60 

932. 64 

2, 253. 44 

2, 161. 60 

46.23 



$2, 828. 05 
14.975.07 

None 

219. 87 

106, 660. 18 

625. 67 

668. 25 

442. 53 

3,691.72 

3, 900. 00 

607. 81 

8, 926. 76 
650.26 

3, 619. 69 

1, 614. 33 

221. 77 

1,386.44 

48.50 

60.20 

915. 41 

6, 101. 55 

486. 26 

241.76 

5, 763. 47 

855. 33 

1,115.81 

3,701.89 

33 67 

153. 60 

178, 464. 20 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



None 
None 

$51.00 

760.00 

1, 500. 00 

None 

None 

443. 40 

14,960.98 

650.00 

164. 00 

I, 626. 66 
None 

None 

None 

None 

1,430.00 

None 

None 

None 

1,349.88 

30.00 

None 

6, 783. 00 

33, 182. 50 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
hand 



AUGUST 31, 1940 



181 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and destina- 
tion of contributions 



Board of National Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the 

United States of America, New York, N. Y. Sept. 26, 1939. 

Great Britain, France, and Germany -- 

British-American Ambulance Corps, New York, N. Y. June 

II, 1940. England and France... 

British- American ComfortLeague, Quincy, Mass. Feb. 21, 1940. 

England 

Brltish-.^merican War Relief Association, Seattle, Wash. Nov. 

17, 1939. United Kingdom and allied countries 

British Sailors' Book and Relief Society, New York, N. Y. 

May 2, 1940. Bermuda, Canada, and the British West Indies. 
British War Relief .Association of Northern California, San 

Francisco, Calif. Oct. 20, 1939. Groat Britain and Franco . . . 
The British War Relief Association of the Philippines, Manila, 

P. I. April 11, 1940." All belligerent countries. 

The British War Relief .Association of Southern California, Los 

Angeles, Calif. Dec. 8, 1939. Great Britain - 

British War Relief Society, Inc., New York, N. Y. Dec. 4, 

1939. Great Britain.- 

Bundles for Britain, New York, N. Y. Dec. 28, 1939. Great 

Britain and Dominions... 

Caledonian Club of Idaho, Boise, Idaho. Jan. 25, IS40. Scot- 
land - 

Catholic Medical .ML'slon Board, Inc., New York, N. Y. Jan. 

17, 1940. India, .Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the 

Union of South .Africa 

The Catholic Student War Relief nf Pax Romana, Washington, 

D. C. Dec. 13. 1939. Poland, France. Germany, and Great 

Britain . 

Central Bureau for Relief of the Evangelical Churches of Europe. 

New York, N. Y. May 14, 1940. All belligerent countries. . 
Central Committee Knesseth Israel, New York, N. Y. Oct. 27, 

1939. Palesttoe. 

Central Committee for Polish Relief, Toledo, Ohio. Feb. 29, 

1940. Poland 

Central Committee of the United Polish Societies, Bridgeport, 

Conn., Bridgeport, Conn. Sept. 14, 1939.' Poland 

Central Coimcil of Polish Organizations, New Castle, Pa. Nov. 

7, 1939. England, Poland, and France 

Centrala, Passaic, N. J. Oct. 12, 1939. Poland 

Cercle Franfais de Seattle. Seattle, Wash. Nov. 2, 1939. 

France and Great Britain 

Chester (Delaware Co., Pa.) Polish Relief Committee, Chester. 

Pa. Sept. 15, 1939. Poland and France 

Children's Crusade for Children, Inc., NewYork, N. Y. Feb. 3, 

1940. France, Poland and Germany 

Commission for Polish Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y. Sept. 12, 

1939.' Poland 

The Commis.sion for Relief in Belgium, Inc., New York, N. Y. 

May 21, 1940. Belgium and Laxemburg 



Funds 
received 



Se, 156. 92 

180,630.01 

1,118.65 

10, 820. 33 

781.30 

40. 642. 78 

11, 707. 52 

96, 034. 68 

349, 728. 47 

72.991.98 

477.64 

1. 074. 25 

964.84 
8. 387. 51 
28, 189. 44 

707.00 

5. 745. 10 

2,555.30 
1,420.67 

2, .14.'). 45 
6. 500. 32 

163, 176. 53 

314, 609. 43 

4, 790. 92 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$4. 770. JO 

30.000.00 

110.00 

6, 935. 89 

30 00 

30, 779. 19 

6, 135. 94 

78, 053. 61 

108, 137. 83 

17, 720. 71 

300.30 

None 

809.00 
4, 724. 00 
15,770.11 

500.00 

5, 696. 37 

1.754.00 
1.300.75 

6!J8.28 

5.455.46 

None 

250,985.31 

4, 165. 00 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



$732. 24 

10. 803. 00 

174. 72 

1,074.63 

542.33 

I, 296. 68 

53.04 

7, 223. 31 

27, 0S4. 65 

23, 622. 85 

164.57 

None 

135. 41 

r. 774. 54 

10, 419. 33 

126.82 

48.73 

38.31 
11.65 

850 16 

553.17 

27, 032. 95 

44,756.32 

184. 40 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
July 31, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



$654. 18 

139,827.01 

83.3.93 

2, 509. 81 

208.97 

8, 566. 91 

5, 518. 54 

10, 757. 76 

214, 505. 99 

31,648.42 

12.77 

1,074.25 

20. 43 

1,888.87 

None 

80.18 

None 

762.99 
108.17 

1.337.01 

491. 69 

136, 143. 58 

18, 767. 80 

441.52 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



None 

None 

None 

$585.00 

650.00 

11,014.59 

None 

9, 844. 36 

56, 342. 05 

54, 579. 75 

None 

2, 390. 00 

None 

None 

None 

None 

1,461.95 

None 
1,900.00 

525.00 

1,677.30 

None 

1,500.00 

None 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
hand 



None 

None 

None 

$100.00 

None 

None 

31.38 

None 

1,500.00 

8,808.00 

None 

1. 0.50. 00 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 

2. 036. 00 

None 

None 

None 

None 



» No reports for the months of June and July have been received from this organization. 

» The registration of this organization was revoked on JiUy 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 

* This registrant serves primarily as a clearinghouse for the distribution abroad of contributions received from other registrants: these receipts and 
disbursements are not included in the figures here given, since they are shown elsewhere in this tabulation following the names of the original collecting 
registrants. 



288319 — 40- 



182 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and destina- 
tion of contributions 



Committee for Aid to Children of Mobilized Men of the XX" 
Arrondissement of Paris, New York, N. Y. Jin. 15, 1940. 
France...-- — — 

Committee of French- American Wives, New York, N. Y. Nov. 
15, 1939. France 

Committee of Mercy ,| Inc.. New York, N. Y. Sept. 10, 1939. 
France, Great Britain, Norway, Belgium, the Netherlands, 
and their allies 

Committee for Relief in Allied Countries, Washington, D. C. 
Feb. 2, 1940. France, Great Britain, Poland, Norway, Bel- 
gium, Luxemburg, and the Netherlands 

Committee for the Relief for Poland, Seattle, Wash. Nov. 24, 
1939. Poland-..- 

Committee tor the Relief of War Sufferers in Poland, St. Louis, 
Mo. Oct. 10, 1939.' Poland 

Committee Representing Polish Organizations and Polish People 
in Perry. N.Y., Perry, N.Y. Oct. 23, 1939. Poland 

Czechoslovak Relief. Chicago, 111. Jiily 25, 1940. Czechoslo- 
vakia, Great Britain and Dominions. France, and Belgium 

The Emergency Aid of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia. Pa. Oct. 
13. 1939. Great Britain. France, Norway, Belgium, Luxem- 
burg, and the Netherlands.- 

Emergency Relief Committee for Kolbuszowa, New York, N. Y. 
Mar. 13, 1940. Poland.. - ---- 

English-speaking Union of the United States. New York, N. Y. 
Dec. 26, 1939. Great Britain, possibly France, and Canada-.. 

Erste Pinchover Kranken Unterstuzungs Verein, Inc., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. Apr. 22, 1940. Poland 

Federated Council of Polish Societies of Grand Rapids, Mich., 
Grand Rapids, Mich. Sept. 15, 1939. Poland 

Federation of Franco-Belgian Clubs of Rhode Island, Woon- 
socket. R. I. Nov. 15. 1939. France and England 

Federation of French Veterans of the Great War, Inc., New 
York, N. Y. Oct. 11. 1939. France 

Federation of Polish Jews in America, Inc., New York, N. Y. 
Sept. 14, 1939. Poland.-.- 

Fellowship of Reconciliation, New York, N. Y'. Jan. 20, 1940. 
France, England, and possibly Germany 

Five for France, Atlanta, Oa. Feb. 26, 1940.' France 

Fortra, Inc., New York, N. Y. Mar. 7, 1940. Germany and 
Poland 

Foster Parents' Plan for War Children, Inc., New York, N. Y. 
Sept. 21, 1939. France - 

Foyers du Soldat, New York, N. Y. Mar. 2, 1940.' France.... 

Franco-American Federation, Salem, Mass., July 9, 1940.' 
France 

French Committee for Relief in France, Detroit, Mich. Oct. 
17, 1939. France and Great Britain 

Frcncli Relief Association, Kansas City, Mo. Feb. 3, 1940. 
France 

French War Relief, Inc., Los Angeles, Calif. Nov. 16, 1939." 
France 

French War Relief Fund of Nevada. Reno. Nev. June 21, 1940. 
France 



Funds 
received 



$1,923.40 
I,'), 405. 55 

•M. 014. 72 

4, 523. 03 

2. 426. 23 

7, 359. 48 

197. no 

None 

33,453.71 
4. 836. 35 

32. 954. 71 

275. 00 

7. 060. 4.'. 

4, 66S, 56 

9. 896. 62 

4,641.05 

580. 21 
125. 55 

249. 754. 07 

82, 349. 00 
6. 760. 22 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$3, 365. 63 
9, 414. 33 

24,704.41 

2.715.00 

2, 162. 72 

0,142.39 

197.00 

None 

18, 476. 56 

None 

21,061.22 

None 

4, 450. 93 

1, 892 49 

801.09 

3. 770. 75 

531. 21 
123. .50 

166.373. 16 

45.414 67 
3. 920. 00 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs. 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
July 31, 19411, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



None 
$1. 570. 84 

5. 730. 88 

1,805.60 
255. 71 
725. 91 
None 
None 

6. 526. 02 
2, 226. 59 
2, 033. S2 

None 

845. 50 

407. 25 

406.68 

370. It 

None 
2.05 

33. 248. 97 

17. 485. 64 
2, 685. 02 



$1, 557. 77 
4, 480. 38 

23, 579. 43 

2.43 

7.80 

491. 18 

None 

None 

8, 451. 13 

2, 609. 76 

9, 859. 67 

275. 00 

1, 764. 02 

2. 368. 82 
8. 688. 75 

494. 16 

49.00 
None 

50, 131. 94 

19, 448. 69 
255. 20 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



None 

$3,012.84 

1,010.00 

None 
None 
4,000,00 
None 
None 

6. 448. 05 
None 

9, 707. 48 
None 

2. 700. 00 
277. 55 
664. 70 

7.651.43 

None 
None 

None 

None 
None 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
hand 



3. l.M. 3S 

739. 07 

33. 609. 80 

None 



9S8. 34 

324. 40 

20, 175. 49 

None 



221.08 

112.90 

3, 500. 27 

None 



1, 944. 96 
301. 71 

9, 934. 04 
None 



8, 296. 75 
531. 17 
None 
None 



• The registration of this organization was revoked on June 30, 1910, at the request of registrant. 
» The registration of this organization was revoked on July 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 
' No report for the month of July has been received from this organization. 
"No complete report for the month of July has been received from this organization. 



AUGUST 31, 1940 



183 



CONTRIBOTJONS FOB RELIEF IN BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and destina- 
tion of contributions 



French War Veterans, Los Angeles, Calif. Dec. 6, 1939. France. 

Friends of Children, Inc., New York, N. Y. June 13, 1940. 
Great Britain, France. Belgium, and the Netherlands _ 

The Friends of Israel Refugee Relief Committee, Inc., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. Oct. 23, 19.39. Canada, France, and England... 

The Friends of Normandy, New York, N. Y. Dec. 18, 1939. 
France 

Friends of Poland, Chicago, 111. Dec. 6, 1939. Poland 

Fund for the Relief of Men of Letters and Scientists of Russia, 
New York, N. Y. Apr. 29, 1940. France, Czechoslovakia, 
and Poland 

General (lustav Orlicz Dreszer Foundation for Aid to Polish 
Children, Wa!!hinKton, D. C. Nov. 3, 1939. Poland 

General Taufflieb Memorial Relief Committee fur France, Santa 
Barbara, Calif. Nov. 17, 1939. France and England 

German-.A.nierican Relief Committee for Victims of Fascism, 
New York, N. Y. Apr. 18, 1940. France and Great Britain. . 

Golden Rule Foundation, New York, N. Y. Nov. 2, 1939. 
Poland and Palestine 

The Grand Duke Vladimir Benevolent Fund Association, New 
York.N.Y. Jan. 8,1940. France.. 

Grand Lodge, Daughters of Scotia, Hartford, Conn. Feb. 16. 
1940. Scotland 

Great Lakes Command, Canadian Legion of the British Empire 
Service League, Detroit, Mich. July S, 1940. Great Britain 
and Canada 

Greater New Bedford British War Relief Corps, New Bedford, 
Ma,ss. Dec. 19, 19.3(1. Great Britain 

Margaret-Greble Qrecnouph (Mrs. Carroll Oreenough), Wash- 
ington, D. C. Nov. 21, 1939. France. 

Hadafsah. Inc., New York. N. Y. Nov. 15, 1939. Palestine 

Hamburg-Bremen Steamship Agency, Inc., New York, N. Y. 
Mar. 21, 1940. Germany and Poland 

Hebrew Christian Alliance of America, Chicago, Ul. Jan. 3, 
1940. England, Germany, and Poland 

Holy Rosary Polish Roman Catholic Church, Pas-saic, N. J. 
Sept. 15, 1939." Poland 

A. Seymour Houghton, Jr., et al.. New York, N. Y. Nov. 27, 
1939. France 

Humanitarian Work Committee, Glen Cove, N. Y. Sept. 30, 
1939. Poland 

Independent British War Relief Society of Rhode Island, Provi- 
dence, R. I. June 14, 1940. Great Britain.. 

Independent Kinsker Aid Association, Brooklyn, N. Y". Jan. 
3. 1940. Poland 

International Committee of Young Men's Christian Associ- 
ations, New York, N. Y. Sept. 22, 1939. Poland, France, 
India, Norway. Belgium, Lu.\emburg, the Netherlands, 
Canada, and the United Kingdom 

International Federation of Business and Professional Women, 
New York, N. Y. July 5, 1940.* Poland, Czechoslovakia, 
Norway, Belgium, the Netherlands, and France _., 

International Relief Association for Victims of Fascism, New 
York, N. Y. Sept. 25, 1939. France, England, and Germany. 

Joint Committee of the United Scottish Clans of Greater New 
York and New Jersey, Brooklyn, N. Y'. Jan. 30, 1940. 
Scotland 

Junior Relief Group of Teias, Houston, Tex. May 29, 1940. 
United Kingdom, France, Netherlands, Belgium, and Nor- 
way... ...i 



Funds 
received 



$822. 8! 
.5, 055. 00 
11,950.99 

2, -145. 50 
1,421.95 

520. 53 

894.45 

2.424.01 

1.258.07 

None 

454.24 

7, 159. 25 

303.50 

4. 060. 86 

1.073 00 
905. 858. 33 

78, 906.8-1 
1.781.89 
1. 126. 17 

IS, 322. 28 

3. 403. 21 
522. 37 
469.64 

33,182.83 



9, 750. 45 



11,511.10 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$407. 75 

None 

997.60 

1,500.00 
600.00 

96.15 
400.00 

1.726.40 
276. 30 
None 
370. 79 

6, 512. 10 

None 

2. 837. 33 

445.00 
.WO. 140. 19 

63. 338. 61 

1.77.-..0fl 

1.049.00 

2. 720. no 

2. 40O. 00 

28.3.00 

None 



4, 747, 25 



2,201.00 



None 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
July 31. 1940, 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 



$171.66 

203.97 

5, 395. 36 

160.00 
91.89 

6.10 
325.04 
52.10 
426.60 
None 
16.70 
None 

None 

344. 23 

None 
27.003. 13 



None 
123. 9S 
61.63 
8.50 
None 



3. 662. SO 



616.50 



chased and 
still on band 



countrips 
named 



$243.40 

4. 851. 03 

5, 5.1«t. 03 

7K5. 50 
730. Ofi 

418.28 
169. 41 
645.51 
555. 17 
None 
66.75 
647. 15 

363.50 

885.30 

628.00 
308. 715. 01 

None 

None 

77. 17 

15.478.30 

941.58 

230.87 

4G9.64 

7.821.51 



1,340.40 



None 

$2. 638. 76 

None 

None 
None 

None 
None 
80.00 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 

164.93 

None 
53. 670. 50 

None 

None 
None 
757. 30 
185. 00 
None 
None 

None 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
hand 



1,970.00 



None 



None 



None 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 

None 

None 

None 
$122. 91 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 



50.00 



None 



Noqe 



" The registration of this organization was revoked on June 30, 1940, at the request of registrant. 
• Isfo report has been received from this organization. 



184 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Codntries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and destina- 
tion of contributions 



Marthe Th. Kahn, New York, N. Y. Apr. 16, 1940. France... 
The Kindergarten Unit, Inc., Norwilk, Conn. Oct. 3, 1939. 

France, Poland, United Kingdom, India, Australia, and New 

Zealand.. 

The Kosciuszko Foundation, Inc., New York, N. Y. May 24, 

1940. Poland 

Kuryer Publishing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. Sept. 16, 1939. 

Poland... 

Der Kyflhaeuscrbund, League of German War Veterans in U. S. 

A., Philadelphia, Pa. Nov. 27, 1939. Poland and Germany .. 
Lackawanna Coimty Committee for Polish Relief, Scranton, 

Pa. Sept. 15, 1939. Poland.. 

Lafayette Fund, New York, N. Y. Jan. 2, 1940. Franco 

LaFayette Preventorium, Inc., New York, N. Y. Sept. 21, 

1939. France 

La France Post American Legion, New York, N. Y. Feb. 7, 

1940. France 

Mrs. Nancy Bartlett Laughlin, New York, N. Y. Jan. 31, 1940. 

France 

League of American Writers, Inc., New York, N. Y. May 6, 

1940. France, England. Poland, and Norway 

League of Polish Societies of New Kensington, Arnold, and 

vicinity. New Kensington, Pa. Nov. 17, 1939. Poland 

Legion of Young Polish Women, Chicago, III. Oct. 2, 1939. 

Poland 

L6vy, Maxime, Manila, Philippine Islands. May 1, 1940.^ 

France 

The Little House of Saint Fantaleon, Philadelphia, Pa. Sept. 

30, 1939. France 

The Louisiana Guild for British Relief, New Orleans, La. July 

24, 1940. British Empire 

The^Maple Leaf Fund, Inc., New^York, N. Y. Apr. 19, 1940. 

Canada, United Kingdom, and France 

The Maryland Committee for the Relief of Poland's War 

Victims, Baltimore, Md. Oct.21, 1939.» Poland 

Massachusetts Relief Committee lor Poland, Worcester, Mass. 

Nov. 9, 1939. Poland 

Mennonite Central Committee, Akron, Pa. Feb. 13, 1940. 

Great Britain, Poland, Germany, and France 

Milford; Conn., Polish Relief Fund Committee, Milford, Conn. 

Nov. 6, 1939. Poland 

Kate R. Miller, New York, N. Y. Feb. 19, 1940. France 

Mobile Surgical Unit, Inc., New York, N. Y. Jan. 13, 1940. 

France 

The Mother Church, the First Church of Christ, Scientist, in 

Poston, U. S. A., Boston, Mass. Apr. 25, 1940. Canada, 

France, and the United Kingdom 

Fernanda Wanamaker Munn (Mrs. Ector Munn), New York, 

N. Y. Nov. 25, 1939. France 

National Christian Action, Inc., New York, N. Y. May 23, 

1940.' Norway and Denmark 

Netherlands War Relief Committee, Manila, Philippine Islands. 

May 27, 1940. Netherlands 



Funds 
received 



$222. 25 

372, 21 

3, .W?. 42 

R, 010. 15 

33. 080. 82 

8, 689, 6fi 

2, 017, 50 

18, 122. 22 

1, 585. 32 
309. 50 

3, 766. 61 

2, 026, 37 
1.^474, 29 



18,874,67 
1. 104, 24 

13,902.42 
9. 170. 48 
.5, 211. .50 

12.149.02 
406, 33 

111, on 

12.638,58 

96, 366. 49 
11,380.98 

1, 539. 89 

2, 548. 54 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$25.00 

42.85 
2, 250, 00 

6, 968. 34 
28, 390. 00 

7, 225. 56 
1,640,00 

8, 697. 13 

None 
306. 00 
990.60 

1,363.77 

9, 642. on 



14, 029, 98 

3.56. 63 

6, 309, 02 

6, 774. 01 

5, 209. 75 

10, 895. 61 

2.50. 20 
111.00 

6,234.99 

2, 467. 50 

4, 788. 69 

None 

750. 00 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



$7.56 

329. 36 

300.29 

13.56 

2, 932. 55 

831.80 
None 

3, 696. 61 

366. 61 

None 

966. 49 

78.19 
2, 406. 55 



36,26 

16,94 

4. 243. 39 

2, 396. 47 

1.75 

1.703.82 

84.62 
None 

1,413.03 

1,028.19 

6, 040. 73 

341. 17 

10.50 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
July 31, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



$189, 69 

None 
1,047.13 

28.26 
1, 758. 27 

632, 30 

477. .50 

6, 828. 48 
1,218.71 
3.50 
1, 809. 62 
584. 41 
3, 425, 74 



4, 808 43 
730, 67 

4. S50. 01 

None 

None 

None 

70. 51 
None 

4, 990. 56 

92, 870. 80 
1. 551. 56 
1, 198. 72 
1,788.04 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

$2, 284. 45 

None 



10. 160 05 
.WOO 

5, 286. 00 
None 
None 

5, 461. 60 

None 
None 

500.00 

None 

4, 949. 90 

None 

None 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
hand 



None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

$90,55 

None 



2. 4rel 67 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 



*• No report has been received from this organization. 

« The registration of this organization was revoked on July 26, 1940, at the request of registrant. 

' No report for the month of July has been received from this organization. 



AUGUST 31, 1940 



185 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and destina- 
tion of contributions 



Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
July 31. 1940. 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
cliased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
hand 


$2,873.39 


None 


$253. 77 


$2, 619. P2 


$450.00 


None 


1, 210. 55 


$826. 17 


384.38 


None 


None 


None 


168.50 


None 


51.00 


117.50 


None 


None 


1,427.82 


1,400.28 


19.18 


8.36 


1.300.00 


None 


253,340.58 


None 


7.036.25 


246, 313. 33 


None 


None 


806.14 


None 


141.00 


665. 14 


None 


None 


5, 106. 46 


4,589.86 


None 


516.60 


None 


None 


25,883.91 


24.212.00 


103. 39 


1, 568. 52 


None 


None 


3, 769. 09 


3,377.00 


None 


392.09 


None 


None 


104, 639. 37 


S.'i.OOO.OO 


29.795.07 


19. 844. 30 


None 


None 


60.347.94 


42.119.26 


29. 319. 35 


None 


2, 707. 75 


$987. 61 


6,501.15 


6. 397. 65 


None 


103.50 


None 


None 


2,893.75 


310. 60 


328. 04 


2,255.11 


None 


None 


8,687.92 


7,946.85 


15.00 


726. 07 


1,500.00 


None 


1,955.45 


176. 32 


7.00 


1,772.13 


1,200.00 


None 


1,057.05 


800.00 


80.82 


176.23 


None 


None 


427.01 


350.31 


21.67 


65.03 


350.00 


75.00 


309,072.26 


208, 288. 50 


8,696.61 


152.087.15 


100. 500. 00 


None 


868.05 


464.35 


1.520.82 


None 


None 


None 


29,120.00 


19,094.05 


66.15 


9,959.80 


245. 40 


None 


2,112.08 


None 


35.30 


2, 076. 78 


None 


None 


474.50 


314.23 


158.27 


2.00 


None 


None 


1,271.10 


994.24 


148. 57 


128.29 


75.00 


None 


3,572.99 


3,131.00 


51.26 


390.73 


800.00 


1.000.00 


6,903.37 


6, 392. 86 


1.09 


S09.42 


4,000.00 


None 


4, 016. 12 


3.025.00 


207.90 


783.22 


None 


None 


10, 134. 45 


9, 022. 23 


2a 00 


1. 092. 22 


None 


None 


742.25 


607. 76 


25.50 


108.99 


None 


None 


2,737.84 


2,000.00 


13.00 


724.84 


None 


None 


7,842.87 


4,000.00 


None 


3, 842. 87 


None 


None 


288,611.30 


231,065.00 


1,510.08 


66, 036. 22 


None 


None 



The New Canaan Workshop, New Canaan, Conn. July 1, 

1940. British Empire - 

New Jersey Broadcasting Corporation, Jersey City, N. J. Sept. 

13, 1939. Poland 

Nicole de Paris Relief Fund, New York, N. Y., July 1, 1940. 

France -. 

North Side Polish Council Relief Committee of Milwaukee, 

Wis, Milwaukee, Wis. Dec. 5, 1939. Poland 

Norwegian Relief. Inc.. Chicago. 111. May 1, 1940. Norway — 
Nowe-Dworer Ladies Benevolent Association, Inc., New York, 

N. Y. Oct. 25, 19.39. Poland., 

Nowiny Publishing Apostolate, Inc., Milwaukee, Wis. Sept. 

26. 19;i9. Poland 

Nowy Swiat Publishing Co., Inc., New York, N. Y. Sept. 11, 

1939. Poland and France 

Order of Scottish Clans, Boston. Mass. Jan. 20, 1940. Scotland. 
Paderewski Fund for Polish Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y. Feb. 

23, 1940. Poland 

Le Paquct au Front, New York, N. Y. Oct. 6, 1939. France. - 
The Paryski Publishing Co., Toledo, Ohio. Sept. 15, 1939. 

Poland 

The Pawtucket and Blnckstone Valley British Relief Society 

of Rhode Island, Pawtucket, R. I. Feb. 28, 1940. Great 

Britain 

Polish Aid Fund Committee of Federation of Elizabeth Polish 

Organizations, Elizabeth, N. J. Sept. 23, 1939. Poland 

Polish Aid Fund Committee of St. Casimir's R. C. Church of 

the City of Albany, N. Y., Albany, N. Y. Jan. 22, 1940. Po- 
land - 

Polish-American Associations of Middlesex County, N. J., 

Sayreville. N. J. Jan. 22. 1940. Poland 

Polish-American Citizens Relief Fund Committee, Shirley, 

Mass., Dec. 16, 1939. Poland 

Polish-American Council, Chicago, 111. Sept. 15, 1939. Poland. 
Polish-Araerican Forwarding Committee, Inc., New York, 

N. Y. Mar. 28, 1940. Poland and Oermany 

Polish-American Volunteer Ambulance Section (Pavas), New 

York, N. Y. Feb. 13, 1940. France 

Polish Broadcasting Corporation, New York. N. Y. Sept. 23, 

1939. Poland 

Polish Business and Professional Men's Club, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Nov. 17, 1939. Poland.- 

Pohsh Central Committee of New London, Conn., New London. 

Conn. Oct. 13. 1939. Poland 

Polish Central Council of New Haven, New Haven, Conn. 

Sept. 29, 1939. Poland... 

Polish Civic League ol Mercer County, Trenton, N. J. Sept. 19, 

1939. Poland 

Polish Civilian Relief Fund, Passaic, N. J. Oct. 27, 1939. 

Poland 

Polish Falcons Alliance of America, Pittsburgh, Pa. Sept. 20, 

1939. Poland 

Polish Inter-Organization "Centrala" of Waterbury, Water- 
bury, Conn. Feb. 28, 1940. Poland 

Polish Literarj- Guild of New Britain, Conn., New Britain, 

Conn. Sept. 21, 1939. Poland 

The Polish National .Mliance of Brooklyn, United States of 

America, Brooklyn. N. Y. Sept. 19. 1939. Poland... 

Polish National Alliance of the United States of North America, 

Chicago, lU. Sept. 27, 1939. Poland 



186 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Cottntries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and destina- 
tion of contributions 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
July 31, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
hand 



Polish National Council of Montgomery County, Amsterdam, 

N. Y. Oct. 12, 1039.' Poland-- 

Polish National Council of New Yort, New York, N. Y. Sept. 

14, 1939. Poland and France - - 

The Polish Naturalization Independent Club, Worcester, 

Mass. Sept. 20, 1939. Poland- 

Polish Relief of Carteret, N. ]., Carteret, N. J. Oct. 11, 1939. 

Poland -■ 

Polish Relief Committee of Boston, Boston, Mass. Sept. 14, 

1939. Poland -- 

Polish Relief Committee of Brockton, Mass., Brockton, Mass. 

Sept. K, 1939. Poland-.-- --. 

Polish Relief Committee of Cambridge, Mass., Cambridge, 

Mass. Sept. 16, 1939. Poland— 

Polish Relief Committee of Columbia County, Hudson, N. Y. 

Mar. 16, 1940. Poland - 

Polish Relief Committee of Delaware, Wilmington, Del. Sept. 

22, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee, Detroit, Mich. Sept. 11, 1939. Poland. 
Polish Relief Committee of Fitchburg, Fitchburg, Mass. 

Mar. 29, 1940. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee, Flint, Mich. Sept. 18, 1939. Poland - . 
Polish Relief Committee of Gardner, Mass., Gardner, Mass. 

Sept. 26, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Holyoke, Mass., Holyoke, Mass. 

Nov. 4, 1939. Poland- 

Polish Relief Committee of Jackson, Mich., Jackson, Mich. 

Nov. 9, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee, New Bedford, Mass. Oct. 31, 1939. 

Poland -- 

Polish Relief Committee of Philadelphia and Vicinity, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. Sept. 12, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of the Polish National Home Associa- 
tion, Lowell, Mass. Nov. 27, 1939. PoKand 

Polish Relief Committee, Rochester, N. Y. Nov. 8, 1939.' 

Poland 

Polish Relief Committee, Taunton, Mass. Dec. 13, 1939. 

Poland 

Polish Relief Fund of Fall River, Mass., Fall River, Mass. 

Nov. 8, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund, Jersey City, N. J. Sept. 12, 1939.' Poland. 
Polish Relief Fund, Jewett City, Conn. Oct. 3, 1939. Poland - 
Polish Relief Fund of Meriden, Meriden, Conn. Oct. 12, 1939. 

Poland 

Polish Relief Fund, Middletown, Conn. Sept. 23, 1939. Poland- 
Polish Relief Fund, Niagara Falls, N. Y. Oct. 26, 1939. Poland. 
Polish Relief Fund of Palmer, Mass., Three Rivers, Mass. 

Oct. 20, 1939. Poland--- _. 

Polish Relief Fund of Syracuse, N. Y ., and vicinity, Syracuse, 

N. Y. Oct. 31, 1939. Poland-.- - -- - 

Polish Relief Fund Committee, Los Angeles, Calif. Dec. 13, 

1939. Poland - 

Polish Relief Fund Committee of Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Sept. 26, 1939. Poland --- 

Polish Relief Fund Committee of Passaic and Bergen Counties, 

Inc., Passaic, N. J. Sept. 22, 1939. Poland 



$3. 107. 76 

88, 668. 75 

2, 481. 90 

1, 230. 15 

8, 168. 76 

1,711.55 

2, 200. 84 

None 

7, 378. 61 
149, 045. 32 

749. 80 

4, 357. 96 

4, 083. 57 

5, 491. 67 
1, 604. 19 
9, 751. 51 

41, 930. 96 

2, 838. 34 

5,060.25 

2, 682. 60 

1, 170. 13 

58, 245. 40 

1. 240. 40 

1, 806. 69 
4, 539. 45 
2, 635. 72 

1, 474. 89 

9, 113. 06 

796.84 

15, 080. 09 

12, 076. 79 



$2, 610. 00 
66, 640. 78 

2, 200. 00 
800.00 

6,101.19 

1,201.27 

1, 142. 30 

None 

6, 813. 42 
98, 603. 14 

460. 40 

3, 300. 00 

2, 979. 20 

4, 781. 16 
672. 60 

7, 397. 24 
32. 610. 00 

1, 600. 00 
4,473,38 

2. 257. 00 

I, 000. 00 
63, 108. 59 
1, 136. 90 

1, 500. 00 

2, 968. 85 
2, 600. 00 

620. 46 

6, 869. 00 

448.00 

12, 232. 72 

9, 173. 92 



$89.16 

L, 419. 77 

8.05 

13.00 

420. 61 

247. 67 

116.89 

None 

230.07 
i, 768. 56 

41.09 
813.31 

762. 97 

203. 36 

190. 68 

870. 29 

696. 29 

481. 28 

67.05 

23.17 

30.10 

, 840. 30 

101.08 

27.90 
18.20 
21.80 

121. 20 

422. 21 

112. 17 

792. 39 

,017.51 



$408, 60 

11,698.20 

273. 26 

417. 15 

1, 646. 96 

262. 61 

941.65 

None 

335. 02 
44, 673. 62 

248. 31 
244. 65 

341.40 

607. 17 

841.01 

1, 483. 98 

8, 726. 67 

867. 06 

629. 82 

402. 43 

140. 03 

3, 296. 51 

2.42 

278. 79 

1, 652. 40 
113.92 

733. 23 

1,821,65 

236. 67 

2, 054, 98 
1,885.36 



$5, 000. 00 

289, 633. 50 

None 

45.00 

1, 800. 00 

360. 00 

600, 00 

None 

3, S.W, 00 
51,974.00 

130, 00 
None 

1, 307. 06 
650. 00 
760, 00 

3, 850, 00 
None 
None 

1, 663, 00 

1, 376. 00 

None 

1, 575, 00 
400. 00 

None 
None 
None 

4, 004. 95 

1, 850. 00 

150. 00 

11,607.40 

2, 990. 50 



None 

$180, 297. 50 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

600.00 
None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

Non* 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

500.00 

None 



• The registration of this organization was revoked on May 31 
' No report lor the month of July has been received from this 



, 1940, at the request of registrant, 
organization. 



AUGUST 31, 1940 



187 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and destina- 
tion of contributions 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
July 31. mo, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
hand 



Polish Union of the United States of North America, Wilkes- 
Barre, Pa. Sept. 8, 1939. Poland 

Polish United Societies of Holy Trinity Parish, Lowell, Mass. 
Sept. 20, 1939. Poland 

Polish War Sufferers Relief Committee (Fourth Ward), Toledo, 
Ohio. Sept. 21, 1939. Poland ---. 

Polish Welfare Association, Hyde Park, Mass. Sept. 16, 1939. ■ 
Poland 

Polish Welfare Council, Schenectady, N. Y. Sept. 22, 1939. 
Poland 

Polish White Cross Club of West Utica, Utica, N. Y. Oct. 20, 
1939. Poland 

Polish Women's Fund to Fatherland, Lawrence, Mass. Sept. 
23, 1939. Poland 

Polish Women's Relief Committee, New York, N. Y. Nov. 24, 
1939. France, Poland, and Germany 

Polski Komitet Ratunkowy (Polish Relief Fund), Bingham- 
ton, N. Y. Sept. 25, 1939. Poland 

Polsko Narodowy Komitet w Ameryce, Scranton, Pa. Sept. 8, 
1939.' Poland 

Pulaski Civic League of Middlesex County, N. J., South River, 
N.J. Sept. 30, 1939. Poland 

Pulaski League of Queens County, Inc., Jamaica, N. Y. Oct. 
21, 1939. Poland 

Queen Wilhelmina Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y. May 17, 1940. 
Netherlands, France, Poland, United Kingdom, India, Aus- 
tralia, New Zealand, Canada, Union of South Africa, Norway, 
Belgium, and Luxemburg 

Refugees of England, New York, N. Y. July 12, 1940. Great 
Britain 

Relief Agency for Polish War SnSerers, Willimantic, Conn. 
Sept. 29, 1939. Poland 

Relief Committee of United Polish Societies, Cbicopee, Mass. 
Oct. 21, 1939. Poland 

Relief Fund for Sufferers in Poland Committee, Kenosha, Wis. 
Sept. 25, 1939. Poland 

Relief Society for Jews in Lublin, Los Angeles, Calif. Dec. 13, 
1939. Poland ...- 

Russian Children's Welfare Society, Inc., New York, N. Y. 
Sept. 29, 1939. Germany, France, and Poland 

The Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church. Little Falls, N. Y., 
Little Falls, N. Y. Nov. 2, 1939." Poland 

St. Andrews (Scottish) Society of W^ashington, D. C, Wash- 
ington, D. C. June 18, 1940. Scotland _ 

St. Stephens Polish Relief Fund of Perth Amboy, N. J., Perth 
Amboy, N. J. Sept. 27, 1939. Poland 

The Salvation Army. New York, N. Y. May 23, 1940. Eng- 
land. France, Norway, Belgium, and the Netherlands 

Save the Children Federation. Inc., New York, N. Y. Sept, 
8, 1939. England, Poland, Belgium, and the Netherlands 

Schuylkill and Carbon Counties Relief Committee for Poland, 
Frackville, Pa. Sept. 15, 1939. Poland 

Scots' Charitable Society, Boston, Mass. May 9, 1940. Scot- 
land _ _ 

Scottish Games of New Jersey Association, Fairhaven, N. J. 
July 9, 1940. Great Britain .._ 



$2, 053. 21 
4, 083. 39 
5, 443. 20 
434.85 
5, 550. 76 
6, 687. 61 
5, 650. 56 
7, 434. 14 
3,776.44 

26. 364. 45 

607.53 

7,443.93 

307,345.12 

8,005.97 

2, 780. 64 

S, 610. 47 

3,600.59 

827.58 

6, 840. 48 

239.95 

720.99 

2, 691. 45 

115,401.71 

23, 364. 33 

5, 388. 74 

208.00 

None 



$2, 000. 00 

1, 788. 31 

5,328.11 

350.00 

5, 260. 35 

4. 962. ro 

1,821.10 

269. 72 

2,354.04 

24, 507. 67 

None 

6. 700. 00 

65, 058. 40 

5, 204. 60 

2, 080. 28 

5, 229. 66 

2,666.50 

175.00 

4,150.67 

200.00 

None 

None 

72, 764. 00 

16, 858. 25 

4, 485. 71 

None 

None 



None 

$162.71 

117.09 

None 

57.32 
309.80 
642. 34 
2, 377. 04 
247.13 
345. 75 

85.00 
159.65 

23, 049. 83 

200.47 

175. 72 

None 

343. 89 

281. 82 

1,326.17 

1.00 

71.15 

None 

1, 445. 52 

6, 169. 36 

None 

None 

None 



$53. 21 

2, 132. 37 

None 

84 85 

233.09 
1,415.11 
3, 187. 12 
4, 787. 38 
1, 175. 27 
1,511.03 

422.53 

584.28 

219, 236. 89 

2, 601. 00 

524.64 

380.81 

690.20 

370. 76 

363.64 

38.95 

649.84 

2, 691. 45 

41, 192. 19 

336.72 

903.03 

208.00 

None 



None 

$1, 240. 00 

None 

None 

6,150.00 

1,600.00 

1,800.00 

S69.00 

780.00 

20, 685. 00 

None 

None 

None 

1,025.00 

S37.10 

2, 190. 00 

1,000.00 

None 

1, 166. 20 

None 

None 

None 

2, 305. 00 

None 

None 

None 

None 



None 
None 
None 
$3, 000. 00 
None 
None 
860 00 
1,209.80 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
1, 678. 35 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 



• The registration of this organization was revoked on May 31, 1940. at the request of registrant. 

• No report for the month of July has been received from this organization. 

• The registration of this organization was revoked on July 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 



188 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and destina- 
tion of contributions 



Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
.July 31, 1910, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 


$1, 744. 23 


$159. 20 


.$90. 02 


$1,495.01 


$385. 00 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


473. 71 


350.00 


113.60 


10.11 


None 


1,214.24 


None 


706. 13 


608. 11 


None 


31,199.12 


30, 240. 87 


958. 25 


None 


None 


653. 07 


373. 49 


57.56 


222. 02 


None 


278. 00 


None 


2.80 


275. 20 


None 


10, fi84. 42 


5, 100. 00 


4,742.13 


842. 29 


None 


8, 560. 98 


2,968.87 


325. 21 


6, 256. 90 


8, 794. 40 


1, 084. 92 


135.81 


20.91 


928.20 


700.00 


58.00 


None 


None 


58,00 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


35, 844. 74 


11,009.58 


22,800.81 


2, 034. 36 


16, 486. 00 


1, 083. 44 


1,000.00 


21.25 


62.19 


None 


310.00 


310.00 


None 


None 


None 


5, 166. 56 


4, 601. 17 


233. 46 


331.94 


None 


18,711.50 


10, 815. 64 


3,156.14 


4, 739. 72 


None 


495. 50 


397. 81 


3.95 


93.74 


None 


3,024.46 


3, 024. 46 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


2,360.16 


400.27 


585. 47 


1, 374. 42 


315.00 


17,977.34 


12, 539. 36 


1, 463. 48 


3, 974. 60 


None 


3, 142. 22 


2, 400. 00 


136. 94 


605.28 


None 


2, 134. 46 


938. 85 


1, 108. 54 


87.07 


None 


1,091.97 


None 


146. 27 


945. 70 


None 


781.03 


450.00 


200. 19 


130. 89 


None 


35, 204. 92 


18, 208. 50 


17, 334. 96 


None 


None 


106, 785. 28 


41, 587. 58 


7, 477. 29 


57, 720. 41 


7, 452. 77 


2. 242. 39 


1, 500. 00 


130. 24 


612. 15 


None 


832. 96 


84.70 


191.96 


556. 30 


None 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
hand 



S ecours Franco-AmSricarn— War Relief, Pittsburgh, Pa. Nov. 

20, 1939. Franc. 

The Seventh Column, Inc., West Fairlee, Vt. June 12, 1940. 

France and England 

Share A Smoke Club, Inc., Ithaca, N. Y. Nov. 14, 1939. Eng- 
land, France, Norway, Belgium, and the Netherlands 

Sociedades Hispanas Aliadas, San Francisco, Calif. Mar. 29, 

1940. France 

Sociedades Hispanas Confederadas, Brooklyn, N. Y. Jan. 22, 

1910. France 

SociSt6 Franfaise de St. Louis, Inc., St. Louis, Mo. Nov. 15, 

1939. France. _ 

Soci^tS IsraSlite Franjaise de Secours Mutuels de New York, 

NewYork,N. Y. June 4, 1940. France 

Society of the Devotees of Jerusalem, Inc., New York, N. Y. 

Dec. 18, 1939. Palestine 

The Somerset Workroom, Far Hills, N. J. Apr. 26, 1940. 

France and Great Britain .._ 

Southbridge Allic 1 Committee for Relief in Poland, South- 

bridee, Mass. Nov. 9, 1939. Poland 

Le Souvenir Frangais, Detroit, Mich. May 1, 1940. France 

and Belgium. 

Spanish Committee Pro-Masonic Refugees in France, New 

York, N.y. Feb. 20, 1940. France _ ___. 

Spanish Refugee Relief Campaign, New York, N. Y. Sept. 20, 

1939. France 

Springfield and Vicinity Polish Relief Fund Committee, Spring- 
field, Mass. Sept. 23, 1939. Poland 

Superior Council of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, New 

York, N.Y. Apr. 5, 1940. France 

Toledo Committee for Relief of War Victims, Toledo, Ohio. 

Sept. 19, 1939. Poland 

Tolstoy Foundation, Inc. (formerly Tolstoy Foundation for 

Russian Welfare and Culture), New York, N. Y. Oct. 17, 

1939. France, Poland, and England 

Mrs. Walter R. Tuckerman, Bethesda, Md. Nov. 24, 1939. 

Great Britain 

Edmund Tyszka. Hamtramck, Mich. Sept. 19, 1939. Poland.. 
Ukranian Relief Committee, New York, N. Y. June 28, 1940. 

Germany, France, England, and Italy 

L'Union Alsacienne, Inc., New York, N. Y. Oct. 28 1939. 

France 

Unitarian Service Committee of the American Unitarian Asso- 
ciation, Boston, Mass. May 23, 1940. France, British Isles, 

and the Netherlands. 

United American Polish Organizations, South River, N. J., 

South River, N. J. Oct. 20, 1939. Poland.. 

United American Spanish Aid Committee, New York, N. Y. 

Apr. 29, 1940. United Kingdom and France.. 

United Bilgorayer Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y. Mar. 21, 1940. 

Poland 

United British War Relief Association, Snmerville, Mass., June 

14, 1940. Great Britain and Northern Ireland 

United Charity Institutions of Jerusalem, New York, N. Y. 

Oct. 13, 1939. P.-lcstine 

United Committee for French Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y. 

Oct. 26, 19.39. France 

United German Societies, Inc., Portland, Oreg., Portland, Oreg. 

Jan. 8, 1940. Oernmny _ _ 

United Nowy Dworer Relief Committee, New York, N. Y. 

Jan. 3, 1940. Poland --. 



AUGUST 31, 1940 



189 



Co^fTRIBUTIONs FOR RELIEF IN Belligbeent COUNTRIES — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and destina- 
tion of contributions 



Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Une.xpended 
balance as of 
.luly 31, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
hand 


$677. 15 


None 


$35.21 


$M1.94 


None 


None 


9,379.68 


$7, 019. 62 


231.94 


2, 128. 12 


$4,845.00 


None 


1,730.09 


1, 350. 00 


212. 16 


167.93 


None 


None 


2,489.73 


1,905.27 


437. 91 


86.54 


595.00 


None 


1,211.19 


576.80 


26.75 


607.64 


300.00 


None 


2,727.71 


2,262.10 


346. 52 


119.09 


None 


None 


7, 521. 74 


5,657 14 


140.13 


1, 724. 47 


None 


None 


18,949.83 


14, 338. 17 


544.04 


4,067.02 


3, 159. 10 


$2, 419. 75 


4, 207. 41 


3,897.31 


40.45 


209.65 


3. 282. 00 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


1, 316. 12 


1, 218. 62 


13.67 


83.83 


None 


None 


5,882.94 


2,226.50 


8.02 


3.648.42 


4,686.85 


None 


189,516.08 


169,797.67 


22,887.00 


None 


41,285.11 


None 


9,770,335.59 


6,009,088.06 


823, 160. 54 


2,959,733.20 


1,097,808.66 


268, 201. 14 



United Opoler Relief of New York, New York, N. Y. Dec. «, 

1939. Poland 

I'nlted Polish Central Council of Connecticut, Bridgeport, 

Conn. Oct. 16, 1939. Poland 

United Polish Committees in Racine, Wis., Racine, Wis. Nov. 

2, 1939. Poland 

I'nitod Polish Organizations of Salem, Mass., Salem, Moss. 

Oct. 20, 1939. Poland 

United Polish Societies of Bristol, Conn., Bristol, Conn. Sept. 

29, 1939. Poland - - 

United Polish Societies of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, Calil. Oct. 

21, 1939. Poland 

United Reading .Appeal for Polish War Sullercrs, Reading, Pa. 

Sept. 22, 1939. Poland 

Urgent Relief for France, Washington, D. C, Dec. 26, 1939. 

France , 

Mrs. Paul Verdier Fund, San Francisco, Calif. Oct. 11, 1939." 

France ._ 

Vincennes, France, Committee of Vinccnnes, Ind., Vincennes, 

Ind.. May 31, 1940." France... 

Woman's Au.xiliary Board of the Scots' Charitable Society, Inc., 

Waverlcy, Mass., Feb. 28. 1940. Scotland 

Women's Allied War Relief .\ssoeiation of St. Louis, Clayton, 

Mo., Dec. 18, 1939. Great Britain and France 

Registrants whose registrations were revoked prior to July 1, 

1940, and who had no balance on band as of that date. 



Total •.. 



• No report for the month of July has been received from this organization. 

• It is not possible to strike an exact balance in these published totals, since some registrants have included in their expenditures moneys available from 
cans or advances, which are not considered by tlie Department to be "funds received" and hence are not reported as such. 



Commercial Policy 



EMBARGO TARIFFS: COMMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 



[Released to the press August 28] 

At his press conference on August 28, the 
Secretary of State said that he had received a 
number of questions about some phases of Sena- 
tor McNary's address on the evening of August 
27, in which he referred to conunercial policy. 
The Secretary then made the following com- 
ment : 

"I am sure that it will be a matter of disap- 
pointment to the country to see that Senator 
McNary, instead of dealing with existing acute 
problems and conditions in a modernized and 
constructive manner which is so urgently de- 
manded, complacently falls back on antiquated 
and discredited economic nostrums such as the 
theory that the farmers can be saved by em- 
bargo tariffs. The Senator and his associates 
some years ago led the farmers into bankruptcy 
under the slogan of embargo tariffs. 

"The farmers of the country will not soon 
forget that under this identical leadership the 
cash fann income of the Nation in 1932 had 
fallen to the ridiculously low level of $4,700,- 
000,000, when our export markets had become 
restricted largely as a result of our own embargo 
policy. The American farmers will also keep 
in mind the fact that amidst every sort of im- 



pediment and difficulty growing out of wars 
and preparations for wars, cash fann income 
rose to $7,700,000,000 in 1939, exclusive of bene- 
fit payments. American farmers will of course 
take their choice of policies and of leadership. 
As against the only alternative policy of au- 
tarchy, the reciprocal-trade program and the 
policy on which it rests needs no defense. 

"As to the misleading figures cited relative 
to the home market. Secretary Wallace stated 
the entire truth of the matter as follows : 

" 'By all means, let us make the most of 
the home market. But I want you to think 
seriously about the fact that farmers have 
more to lose through nationalistic policies 
than any other group. In the present year, 
1936, farmers are cultivating probably 35 to 
45 million acres that are going to produce 
things which will be sold abroad. The most 
additional land they could use by cutting out 
imports would be perhaps 10 million acres. 
It just wouldn't be good sense to risk having 
to leave 35 or 45 million acres idle in order 
to try to gain a market for 10 million acres. 
I don't think farmers are foolish enough to 
trade dollars for quarters, no matter how 
strong the pressure may be by those who are 
busy grinding their own axes.' " 



The Foreign Service 



DEATH OF CONSUL GENERAL SUSSDORFF AND INJURY TO 

CONSUL BROY 



[Released to the press August 30] 

It is with profound regret that the Depart- 
ment of State announces that, according to a 
telephone message received by the American 
Embassy at Berlin from the Foreign Office, two 
American Foreign Service officers, Mr. Louis 
190 



Sussdorff, Jr., and Mr. Charles C. Broy, were in 
a motor accident on their way from Cologne to 
Brussels on August 29, and that Mr. Sussdorff 
was killed and Mr. Broy injured. The accident 
took place in the neighborhood of Bergheyn 
near Cologne. 



AUGUST 31, 1940 



191 



The American Charge at Berlin, Mr. Alex- 
ander C. Kirk, upon receipt of the above mes- 
sage, telephoned to Mr. Alfred W. Klieforth, 
American Consul General at Cologne, who has 
proceeded to Bergheyn and communicated with 
the Department. 

Mr. Sussdorflf was the American Consul Gen- 
eral at Antwerp. Mr. Broy is American Consul 
at Brussels. 

The biographies of these officers follow : 

SussDORFF, Louis, Jr. — Born In Elmhurst, N. Y., Janu- 
ary 7, 18SS ; St. Paul's School graduate ; Harvard, A. B. 
1910; Harvard Law School 1010-13; as.sistant in 
history and government, Harvard, 1011-12; appointed, 
after examination, third secretary of embassy at Paris 
May 22, 1914 ; secretary of embassy or legation of class 
five by act approved February 5, 1015; assigned to 
Rio de Janeiro March 6, 1915 ; class four May 10, 1916 ; 
class three August 3, 1916; assigned to Asuncion July 
5, 1917; to the Department August 24, 1918; to Berne 
April 4, 1919; to Helsingfors January 15, 1921; class 
two August 24, 1921 ; assigned to The Hague September 
27, 1921 ; Foreign Service ofHcer of class four July 1, 
1924 ; class three September 20, 1024 ; assigned as first 
secretary at Tokyo May 1, 1025; at Riga, Kovno, and 
Tallinn December 30, 1926; class two May 9, 1930; 
counselor of legation at Riga, Kovno, and Tallinn May 
20, 1030; at Bucharest November 11, 1930; assigned to 
the Department October 17, 1932; counselor of em- 
bassy at Brussels and Luxemburg September 8, 1933; 
consul general May 14, 1936; class one June 1, 1937; 
consul general at Antwerp July 13, 1937. 

Broy, Charles Clinton. — Born in Sperryville, Va., 
July 26, 1887 ; Roanoke College, A. B. 1906, A. M. 1907 ; 
Princeton, A. M., 1908; National University Law School 
1924-25; clerk 190S-9; appointed, after examination, 
consular assistant July 19, 1909; vice and deputy consul 
general at Boma September 1, 1909; vice and deputy 
consul at Milan March 16, 1911 ; detailed to the Depart- 
ment September 5, 1913 ; appointed vice consul at Dub- 
lin May 25, 1916; consul of class eight July 12, 1916; 
assigned to Karachi August 3, 1916 (canceled) ; de- 
tailed to London October 19, 1918; representative, 
International Conference on Passport Control, London, 
1919 ; class six September 5, 1919 ; resigned November 
16, 1919; reappointed consul of class six November 15, 
1920; assigned to Lille December 13, 1920; to Cher- 
bourg July 21, 1921 ; to proceed to Washington Septem- 
ber 9, 1922 ; Foreign Service oflicer of class seven July 
1, 1924; class six August 8, 1924; member, Inter- 
Departmental Committee on Codification of Navigation 
Laws, 1926-27 ; assigned to Nassau December 15, 1926 ; 
to London September 12, 1929 ; class five December 19, 
1929 ; to Brussels October 2, 1936 ; secretary in the Dip- 
lomatic Service December 1, 1937 ; married. 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press .\ugust 31] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
Foreign Service since August 24, 1940: 

Career Officers 

Earl L. Packer, of Ogden, Utah, First Sec- 
retary of Legation and Consul at Riga, Latvia, 
has been designated First Secretary of Lega- 
tion and Consul at Budapest, Hungary, and 
will sei-v'e in dual capacity. 

Robert S. Ward, of Cincinnati, Ohio, Consul 
at Foochow, China, has been assigned as Consul 
at Hong Kong. 

Bernard Gufler, of Tacoma, Wash., Second 
Secretary of Legation and Consul at Kaunas, 
Lithuania, has been designated Second Secre- 
tary of Embassy and Consul at Berlin, Ger- 
many, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Montgomery H. Colladay, of Hartford, 
Conn., Second Secretary of Legation and Con- 
sul at Tallinn, Estonia, has been assigned as 
Consul at Winnipeg, Canada. 

E. Allan Lightner, Jr., of Mountain Lakes, 
N. J., Third Secretary of Legation and Vice 
Consul at Riga, Latvia, has been designated 
Third Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul 
at Moscow, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, 
and will serve in dual capacity. 

Raymond P. Ludden, of Fall River, Mass., 
Language Officer at the American Embassy, 
Peiping, China, has been assigned as Vice Con- 
sul at Canton, China. 

Arthur B. Emmons, 3d., of Dover, Mass., Vice 
Consul at Hankow, China, has been assigned as 
Vice Consul at Keijo, Chosen. 

Edward E. Rice, of Milwaukee, Wis., Vice 
Consul at Canton, China, has been assigned as 
Vice Consul at Foochow, China. 

Philip D. Sprouse, of Springfield, Tenn., 
Language Officer at the American Embassy, 
Peiping, China, has been assigned as Vice Con- 
sul at Hankow, China. 

NONCAREER OFFICERS 

Basil F. Macgowan, of Lynchburg, Va., Vice 
Consul at Kaunas, Lithuania, has been ap- 
pointed Vice Consul at Nice, France. 



192 



DEPAETMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 

BOUNDARY 

Convention With Canada for the Emergency 
Regulation of the Level of Rainy Lake and 
of Certain Other Boundary Waters 

On August 30, 1940, the Senate gave its ad- 
vice and consent to ratification by the President 
of the Convention for the Emergency Regula- 
tion of the Level of Rainy Lake and of Certain 
Other Boundary Waters Between the United 
States and Canada, signed on September 15, 
1938. 



issued recently by the United States Tariff Com- 
mission and are available at that office for free 
distribution : 

The Foreign Trade of Latin America 

Part I : The Trade of Latin America With the World 

and With the United States. (Also in Spanish.) 
Part II (in 20 sections") : 

[Section 1] : Report on Commercial Policies and 

Trade Relations of Argentina. 
[Section 2] : Report on Commercial Policies and 

Trade Relations of Brazil. 
[Section 3] : Report on Commercial Policies and 
Trade Relations of Chile. 
Part III : Selected Latin American Export Com- 
modities. 



Legislation 



Publications 



Department of State 

Statistics of Causes of Death : Protocol Between the 
United States of America and Other Powers Revising 
the Minimum Nomenclature of Causes of Death An- 
nexed to the International Agreement Signed at London 
June 19, 1934 (Executive Agreement Series No. 80). — 
Signed at Paris October 6, 1938; effective January 1, 
1940. Executive Agreement Series No. 173. Publica- 
tion 1495. 12 pp. 50. 

Commerce and Navigation : Treaty Between the 
United States of America and Iraq. — Signed at Bagh- 
dad December 3, 1938; proclaimed by the President 
May 29, 1940. Treaty Series No. 960. 10 pp. 50. 

Other Government Agencies 

The following publications, wdiich may be of 
interest to readers of the Bulletin, have been 



An Act To pez-mit American vessels to assist in the 
evacuation from the war zones of certain refugee chil- 
dren. (Public No. 776, 76th Cong., 3d sess.) 1 p. 50. 



Regulations 



The following Government regulations may 
be of interest to readers of tlie BuUetm: 

Regulations Governing the Registration and Finger- 
printing of Alien Seamen in Accordance With the Alien 
Registration Act, 1940. (DeiDartment of Justice: Im- 
migration and Naturalization Service.) [General Order 
No. CV22, August 23, 1940.] Federal Register, vol. 5, 
no. 167, August 27, 1940, pp. 3173-3174 (The National 
Archives of the United States). 



" When complete, the 20 sections of part II will cover 
the commercial policy and foreign trade of each of the 
20 Latin American republics. 



0. S. GOVERNyENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1940 



For sale by the Superintenaent of Documents, Washington, D. C— Price 10 cents Subscription price, ,$2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPEOVAL OP THE DIKECTOK OF THE BUEBAn OF THE BUDGET 



J^bch-- 



' ^ -^ ' r T 



/\ 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BUI 



J 



J- 



J 



ETIN 



SEPTEMBER 7, 1940 
Vol. Ill: No. 63 - Publication l$00 



Qontents 




Europe: p^^. 

The British fleet: Exchange of notes between the 

Secretary of State and the British Ambas?ador. . . 195 
Lease of naval and air bases : Arrangement with Great 

Britain I95 

Amendatory treaties for the advancement of peace. . . 196 
American Republics: 

Use of leased naval and air bases by other American 
republics: Instruction to American diplomatic mis- 
sions 196 

Convention with Dominican Republic concerning col- 
lection and application of customs revenue 196 

The Far East: 

Maintenance of the "status quo" in French Indochina: 

Statement by the Secretary of State 196 

Defense forces in the International Settlement at 

Shanghai : Statement by the Secretary of State. . ; 197 
General: 

Documentation requirements of certain aliens. ; : : 197 
The Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes ;;....; 198 

Treaty Information: 
Naval and air bases: 

Arrangement with Great Britain for the Lease of 

Naval and Air Bases 199 

[Oer] 



SEP 30 1940 



Treaty Infoehation — Continued. 

Promotion of peace: Pag, 

Treaties with New Zealand, Canada, and Australia 
Amending the Treaty for the Advancement of 
Peace with Great Britain, Signed September 15, 

1914 207 

Safety : 

Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (Treaty 

Series No. 910) 208 

Special assistance: 

Convention with the Dominican Republic Concerning 
Collection and Application of Customs Revenue 

(Treaty Series No. 726) 209 

Publications 209 

Legislation 209 

Regulations 209 



Europe 



THE BRITISH FLEET 

Exchange of Notes Between the Secretary of State and the British Ambassador 



[Released to the press September 3] 

On August 29, 1940, the Secretary of State, 
the Honorable Cordell Hull, sent the following 
communication to the British Ambassador, the 
Eight Honorable the Marquess of Lothian : 

"The Prime Minister of Great Britain is re- 
ported to have stated on June 4, 1940, to Parlia- 
ment in effect that if during the course of the 
present war in which Great Britain and the 
British Commonwealth are engaged the waters 
surrounding the British Isles should become un- 
tenable for British ships of war, the British 
Fleet would in no event be surrendered or sunk 
but would be sent overseas for the defense of 
other parts of the Empire. 

"The Government of the United States would 
respectfully inquire whether the foregoing state- 
ment represents the settled policy of the British 
Government. 

C. H. 

"Department of State, 

''Washington, August 29, WlfiP 



The British Ambassador replied on Septem- 
ber 2, 1940, as follows : 

"In his Aide-Memoire of August 29th, 1940, 
the Secretary of State enquired whether the 
Prime Minister's statement in Parliament on 
June 4th, 1940, regarding the intention of His 
Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom 
never to surrender or sink the British Fleet in 
the event of the waters surrounding the British 
Isles becoming untenable for His Majesty's 
Ships 'represents the settled jaolicy of His Maj- 
esty's Government'. 

"His Majesty's Ambassador is instructed by 
the Prime Minister to inform Mr. Secretary 
Hull that this statement certainly does repre- 
sent the settled policy of His Majesty's Govern- 
ment. iMr. Churchill nuist however observe that 
these hypothetical contingencies seem more 
likely to concern the German fleet or what is left 
of it than the British Fleet. 

L. 

"British Embassy, 

"Washington, D. C, 

''September 2nd, WltOr 



LEASE OF NAVAL AND AIR BASES 

Arrangement With Great Britain 



The President's message to Congress of Sep- 
tember 3, 1940, transmitting notes exchanged 
between the British Ambassador at Washington 
and the Secretary of State on September 2, 1940, 
under which the Government of the United 
States acquired the right to lease certain naval 

259556 — 40 



and air bases from Great Britain, and a copy 
of an opinion of the Attorney General dated 
August 27, 1940, regarding the authority of the 
President to consummate this arrangement, ap- 
pears in this BulUtin under the heading "Treaty 
Information." 

195 



196 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



AMENDATORY TREATIES FOR THE 
ADVANCEMENT OF PEACE 

An announcement regarding treaties between 
the United States and New Zealand, Canada, 
and Australia, respectively, signed at Washing- 



ton on September 6, 19J:0, amending the Treaty 
for the Advancement of Peace between the 
United States and Great Britain, which was 
signed at Washington September 15, 1914, ap- 
pears in this Bulletin under the heading "Treaty 
Information". 



American Republics 



USE OF LEASED NAVAL AND AIR BASES BY OTHER AMERICAN 

REPUBLICS 

Instruction to American Diplomatic Missions 



[ Released to the press September 7] 

The Secretary of State on September 6 sent 
the following instruction to diplomatic missions 
of the United States in all the other American 
republics : 

"It is desired that you formally notify the 
Government to which you are accredited that 
the United States has acquired the right to lease 
naval and air bases in Newfoundland, and in 
the islands of Bermuda, the Bahamas, Jamaica, 
St. Lucia, Trinidad, and Antigua, and in 
British Guiana. 

"The Government of the United States has 
taken this step to strengthen its ability not only 
to defend the United States but in order the 
more effectively to cooperate with the other 
American republics in the common defense of 
the hemisphere. 



"The resulting facilities at these bases will, 
of course, be made available alike to all Ameri- 
can republics on the fullest cooperative basis for 
the common defense of the hemisphere and in 
entire harmony with the spirit of the pro- 
nouncements made and the understandings 
reached at the conferences of Lima, Panama, 
and Habana." 

CONVENTION WITH DOMINICAN RE- 
PUBLIC CONCERNING COLLECTION 
AND APPLICATION OF CUSTOMS 
REVENUE 

An announcement regarding a new agreement 
with the Dominican Republic which provides 
for the closing of the General Receivership of 
Customs and the resimiption by Dominican 
authorities of the collection of customs, appears 
in this BuUeUn under the heading "Treaty 
Information". 



The Far East 



MAINTENANCE OF THE "STATUS QUO" IN FRENCH INDOCHINA 

Statement by the Secretary of State 



[Released to the press September 4] 

In response to inquiries by press correspond- 
ents, the Secretary of State made the following 
statement : 



"I have noted the reports in the press regard- 
ing which inquiry is made to the effect that 
Japanese military authorities have delivered an 
ultimatum to the local authorities of French 



197 



Iiidocliina in connection with demands for pas- 
sage of Japanese troops across Indochina and 
for use of bases in Indochina for military 
operations against China. It will be remem- 
bered that during recent months this Govern- 
ment and several other governments, including 
the Japanese Government, have given expres- 
sion to their desire that the principle of the 
status quo be respected and be preserved unim- 
paired in the Pacific, with special references to 
the Xetherlands East Indies and French Indo- 



china. In the absence of official confirmation 
of the reports of a Japanese ultimatum to the 
authorities of French Indochina, this Govern- 
ment is reluctant to give credence to the reports 
now under reference. The situation and the 
subject to which these reports relate is, however, 
a matter to which this Government attaches 
importance, and it stands to reason that, should 
events prove these reports to have been well- 
founded, the effect upon public opinion in the 
United States would be unfortunate." 



DEFENSE FORCES IN THE INTERNATIONAL SETTLEMENT AT 

SHANGHAI 

Statement by the Secretary of State 



[Released to the press September 4] 

In response to inquiries by press correspond- 
ents, the Secretary of State made the following 
statement : 

"On August 15, at a meeting made necessary 
by notification that the British defense forces 
at Shanghai would be withdrawn, the Shang- 
hai Defense Committee voted to assign Sector 
D in the International Settlement Defense 
Plan to the Japanese defense forces and Sector 
B to the American defense forces. This deci- 
sion was reached by a majority vote, the com- 
manding officer of the Japanese forces voting 
'Xo'. The majority vote was subsequently ap- 
proved by the Shanghai Mimicipal Council. 
As the American Consulate General and a con- 
siderable number of other important American 
interests are located in Sector B, which sector 
lies between the present American sector and 
the waterfront at which American naval ves- 
sels are customarily anchored, the Government 
of the United States gave its approval and in- 
formed the Japanese Government that this plan 
was agreeable to it. 

"In view of the Japanese dissent, neither Sec- 
tor D nor Sector B has been taken over by the 
defense forces. Special protection in Sector B 
is temporarily being provided by the Shanghai 
Volunteer Corps, pending arrival at an agree- 



ment. As this matter is of substantial impor- 
tance to all concerned, discussions are in prog- 
ress between this Government and the Japanese 
Government with regard especially to Sector 
B, and it is the hope of this Government that 
a reasonable settlement, considerate of all in- 
terests involved, for assumption of responsibil- 
ity in Sector D by the Japanese defense forces 
and in Sector B by the American defense forces 
will soon be arrived at." 



General 



DOCUMENTATION REQUIREMENTS 
OF CERTAIN ALIENS 

War-er of Documentation Requirements for 
Certain Alien Personnel Members of 
Transportation Lines 

Under the emergency provisions of section 30 
of the Alien Registration Act, 1940, and of 
Executive Order No. 8430, of June 5, 1940,^ alien 
members of operating personnel of transporta- 
tion lines operating regular services, who shall 



'5 F. R. 2146. 



198 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



not have obtained the appropriate documenta- 
tion before August 27, 1940, shall be exempted 
from such requirements until September 15, 
1940, in order to avoid any disruption in such 
essential services. 

[seal] Cordell Huxl, 

Secretary of State. 

August 24, 1940. 

[Departmental Order No. 875] 

The following regulations have been codified 
under Title 22 : Foreign Eelations ( Chapter I : 
Department of State), in accordance with the 
requirements of the Federal Register and the 
Code of Federal Regulations: ^ 

Part 61 — Visas; Documents Required of 
Aliens Entering the United States 

§ 61.101 Waiver of fosspart atid visa re- 
quirements for certain aliens . . . 

(c) Certain aliens when passing from terri- 
tory of Canada to the Yukon territoiy of Can- 
ada in direct transit through Alaskan territoin/. 
Under the emergency provisions of section 30 of 
the Alien Registration Act, 1940, and of Execu- 
tive Order No. 8430, of June 5, 1940,' residents 
of Canada and New-foundland do not require 
passports, visas, reentry permits, or border- 
crossing identification cards when passing from 
territory of Canada to the Yukon territory of 
Canada in direct transit through Alaskan terri- 
tory, under arrangements satisfactory to the 
Inmiigi-ation authorities. (Sec. 30, Public No. 
670, 76th Cong., 3d sess., approved June 28, 
1940; E. O. 8430, June 5, 1940) 

Cordell Hull, 
Secretary of State. 

August 24, 1940. 

[Departmental Order No. 876] 



' Departmental Order No. 874, which was printed in 
the Bulletin of Aug. 31, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 62), p. 176, 
appears in codilied form in the Federal Register for 
Sept. 7, 1940 (vol. 5, no. 175), p. 3591, col. 1. 

' 5 F. R. 2146. 



Part 61 — Visas; Documents Required of 
Aliens Entering the United States 

§ 61.101. Waiver of passport and visa re~ 
quiremenfs for certain aliens . . . 

(b) Certain aliens desiring to enter United 
States for period less than 30 days on any one 
visit. Under the emergency provisions of sec- 
tion 30 of the Alien Registration Act, 1940, and 
of Executive Order No. 8430, of June 5, 1940,* 
citizens of Canada, Newfoundland, and Mexico 
domiciled therein, and British subjects domi- 
ciled in Canada or Newfoundland, desiring to 
enter the United States for a period of less than 
30 days on any one visit, may present a passport, 
or document in the nature of a passport duly 
issued by the government of the country to 
which they owe allegiance, and a nonresident 
alien's border-crossing identification card, issued 
by either an American diplomatic or consular 
officer or by an immigi-ant inspector. (Sec. 30, 
Public, No. 670, 76th Cong., 3d sess., approved 
June 28, 1940; E.O. 8430, June 5, 1940) 
Cordell Hull, 

Secretary of State. 

August 24, 1940. 

[Departmental Order No. 877] 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press September 7] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
Foreign Service since August 31, 1940 : 

Wesley Frost, of Berea, Ky., Counselor of 
Embassy at Santiago, Chile, has been assigned 
as Consul General at Wellington, New Zealand. 

Joseph E. Jacobs, of Jolmston, S. C, now 
serving in the Department of State, has been 
designated Counselor of Legation and Consul 



«5 F.R. 2146. 



SEPTEMBER 7, 1940 



199 



General at Cairo, Egypt, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

Ellis O. Briggs, of Topsfield, Maine, now 
serving in the Department of State, has been 
designated First Secretary of Embassy and 
Consul at Santiago, Chile, and will serve in 
dual capacity. 

Slieldon Thomas, of New York, now serving 
in the Department of State, has been designated 
Second Secretary of Embassy at Buenos Aires, 
Argentina. 



Cyril L. F. Thiel, of Chicago, 111., Consul at 
Habana, Cuba, has been assigned as Consul at 
Guayaquil, Ecuador. 

Brewster H. Mon-is, of Villanova, Pa., Vice 
Consul at Dresden, Germany, has been assigned 
as Vice Consul at Berlin. Germany. 

The American Legations at Kaunas, Lithu- 
ania, Tallinn, Estonia, and Riga, Latvia, in- 
cluding the consular sections of each, have been 
closed as of September 5, 1940. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



NAVAL AND AIR BASES 

Arrangement With Great Britain for the 
Lease of Naval and Air Bases 

The texts of the notes e.xchanged between the 
British Ambassador at "Washington and the 
Secretary of State on September '2, 11)40, under 
which the Government of the United States ac- 
quired the right to lease naval and air bases in 
Newfoundland, and in the islands of Bermuda, 
the Bahamas, Jamaica, St. Lucia, Trinidad, 
and Antigua, and in British Guiana, together 
with the texts of the message of the President 
to the Congress and the opinion of the Attorney 
General dated August 27, 1940, regarding the 
authority of the President to consummate this 
arrangement, are as follows: 

The British Ambassador to the /Secretary of 

State 

Brftish Embassy, 
Washington, D. C, 
September 2, IQJfl. 
Sir: 

I have the honour under instructions from 
His Majesty's Principal Secretaiy of State for 
Foreign Affairs to inform you that in view of 



the friendly and sympathetic interest of His 
Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom 
in the national security of the United States 
and their desire to strengthen the ability of the 
United States to cooperate effectively with the 
other nations of the Americas in the defence 
of the Western Hemisphere, His Majesty's Gov- 
ernment will secure the grant to the Govern- 
ment of the United States, freely and without 
consideration, of the lease for immediate estab- 
lishment and use of naval and air bases and 
facilities for entrance thereto and the operation 
and protection thereof, on the Avalon Penin- 
sula and on the southern coast of Newfound- 
land, and on the east coast and on the Great 
Bay of Bermuda. 

Furthermore, in view of the above and in 
view of the desire of the United States to ac- 
quire additional air and naval bases in the 
Caribbean and in British Guiana, and without 
endeavouring to place a monetai-y or commercial 
value upon the many tangible and intangible 
rights and properties involved. His Majesty's 
Government will make available to the United 
States for immediate establishment and use 
naval and air bases and facilities for entrance 
tliereto and the operation and protection 
thereof, on the eastern side of the Bahamas, the 



200 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



southern coast of Jamaica, the western coast of 
St. Lucia, the west coast of Trinidad in the Gulf 
of Paria, in the island of Antigua and in Brit- 
ish Guiana within fifty miles of Georgetown, 
in exchange for naval and military equipment 
and material which the United States Govern- 
ment will transfer to His Majesty's Govern- 
ment. 

All the bases and facilities referred to in the 
preceding paragraphs will be leased to the 
United States for a period of ninety-nine years, 
free from all rent and charges other than such 
compensation to be mutually agreed on to be 
paid by the United States in order to compen- 
sate the owners of private property for loss by 
expropriation or damage arising out of the es- 
tablishment of the bases and facilities in 
question. 

His Majesty's Government, in the leases to 
be agreed upon, will grant to the United States 
for the period of the leases all the rights, power, 
and authority within the bases leased, and 
within the limits of the territorial waters and 
air spaces adjacent to or in the vicinity of such 
bases, necessary to provide access to and defence 
of such bases, and appropriate provisions for 
their control. 

Without prejudice to the above-mentioned 
rights of the United States authorities and their 
jurisdiction within the leased areas, the adjust- 
ment and reconciliation between the jurisdiction 
of the authorities of the United States within 
these areas and the jurisdiction of the authorities 
of the territories in which these areas are sit- 
uated, shall be determined by common agi'ee- 
ment. 

The exact location and bounds of the afore- 
said bases, the necessary seaward, coast and anti- 
aircraft defences, the location of sufficient mili- 
tary garrisons, stores and other necessary aux- 
iliary facilities shall be determined by conmion 
agi-eement. 

His Majesty's Government are prepared to 
designate immediately experts to meet with ex- 
perts of the United States for these purposes. 
Should these experts be unable to agree in any 
particular situation, except m the case of New- 



foundland and Bermuda, the matter shall be set- 
tled by the Secretary of State of the United 
States and His Majesty's Secretai-y of State for 
Foreign Affairs. 
I have [etc.] Lothian 

The Honourable Cordell Hull, 

Secretary of State of the United States, 
Washington, D. G. 



The Secretary of State to the British 
Ambassador 

Department of State, 
Washington, September £, 19JfO. 
Excellency : 

I have received your note of September 2, 1940, 
of which the text is as follows : 

[Here follows text of the note, printed above.] 

I am directed by the President to reply to your 
note as follows : 

The Government of the United States appre- 
ciates the declarations and the generous action 
of His Majesty's Government as contained in 
your communication which are destined to en- 
hance the national security of the United States 
and gi'eatly to strengthen its ability to cooperate 
effectively with the other nations of the Amer- 
icas in the defense of the Western Hemisphere. 
It therefore gladly accepts the proposals. 

The Government of the United States will im- 
mediately designate experts to meet with ex- 
perts designated by His Majesty's Government 
to determine upon the exact location of the naval 
and air bases mentioned in your communication 
under acknowledgment. 

In consideration of the declarations above 
quoted, the Government of the United States 
will immediately transfer to His Majesty's Gov- 
ernment fifty United States Navy destroyers 
generally referred to as the twelve hundred-ton 
type. 

Accept [etc.] Cordell Hull 

His Excellency 

The Right Honorable 

The Marquess of Lothian, C.H., 
British Ambassador. 



SEPTEMBER 7, 1940 



201 



Message of the President 
To THE Congress of the United States : 

I transmit herewith for the information of 
the Congress notes exchanged between the 
British Ambassador at Washington and the 
Secretary of State on September 2, 1940, under 
which this Government has acquired the right to 
lease naval and air bases in Newfoundland, and 
in the ishmds of Bermuda, the Bahamas, 
Jamaica, St. Lucia, Trinidad, and Antigua, and 
in British Guiana; also a copy of an opinion of 
the Attorney General dated August 27, 1940, 
regarding my authority to consimimate this 
arrangement. 

Tlie right to bases in Newfoundland and Ber- 
muda are gifts — generously given and gladly re- 
ceived. The other bases mentioned have been 
acquired in exchange for fifty of our over-age 
destroyers. 

This is not inconsistent in any sense with our 
status of peace. Still less is it a threat against 
any nation. It is an epochal and far-reaching 
act of preparation for continental defense in the 
face of gi'ave danger. 

Preparation for defense is an inalienable pre- 
rogative of a sovereign state. Under present 
circumstances this exercise of sovereign right is 
essential to the maintenance of our peace and 
safety. This is tlie most important action in 
the reinforcement of our national defense that 
has been taken since the Louisiana Purchase. 
Then as now, considerations of safety from over- 
seas attack were fundamental. 

The value to the AVestern Hemisphere of these 
outposts of security is beyond calculation. 
Their need has long been recognized by our 
country, and especially by those primarily 
charged with the duty of charting and organiz- 
ing our own naval and military defense. They 
are essential to the protection of the Panama 
Canal, Central America, the Northern portion 
of South America, The Antilles, Canada, 
Mexico, and our own Eastern and Gulf Sea- 
boards. Their consequent importance in hemi- 
spheric defense is obvious. For these reasons I 

259556 — 40 2 



have taken advantage of the present opportunity 
to acquire them. 

Franklin D. Koosevelt 

The White House, 
September 3, 191fi. 



Opinion of the Attorney General 

August 27, 1940. 
The President, 

The White House, 
My Dear Mr. President : 

In accordance with your request I have con- 
sidered your constitutional and statutory au- 
thority to proceed by Executive Agreement with 
the British Government immediately to acquire 
for the United States certain off-shore naval and 
air bases in the Atlantic Ocean without awaiting 
the inevitable delays which would accompany 
the conclusion of a formal treaty. 

The essential characteristics of the proposal 
are: 

(a) The United States to acquire rights for 
immediate establishment and use of naval 
and air bases in Newfoundland, Bermuda, 
the Bahamas, Jamaica, St. Lucia, Trinidad 
and British Guiana ; such rights to endure 
for a period of 99 years and to include ade- 
quate provisions for access to, and defense 
of, such bases and appropriate provisions 
for their control. 

(b) In consideration it is proposed to trans- 
fer to Great Britain the title and posses- 
sion of certain over-age ships and obso- 
lescent military materials now the property 
of the United States, and certain other small 
patrol boats which though nearly completed 
are already obsolescent. 

(c) Upon such transfer all obligation of the 
United States is discharged. The acquisi- 
tion consists only of rights, which the 
United States may exercise or not at its op- 
tion, and if exercised may abandon without 
consent. The privilege of maintaming such 
bases is subject only to limitations necessary 
to reconcile United States use with the sov- 



202 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



ereignty retained by Great Britain. Our 
government assumes no responsibility for 
civil administration of any territory. It 
makes no promise to erect structures, or 
maintain forces at any point. It undertakes 
no defense of the possessions of any coun- 
try. In short it acquires optional bases 
■which may be developed as Congi-ess ap- 
propriates funds therefor, but the United 
States does not assume any continuing or 
future obligation, commitment or alliance. 

The questions of constitutional and statutory 
authority, with which alone I am concerned, 
seem to be these. 

First. May such an acquisition be concluded 
by the President under an Executive Agree- 
ment or must it be negotiated as a Treaty sub- 
ject to ratification by the Senate? 

Second. Does authority exist in the President 
to alienate the title to such ships and obsoles- 
cent materials, and if so, on what conditions? 

Third. Do the statutes of the United States 
limit the right to deliver the so-called "mos- 
quito boats" now under construction or the 
over-age destroyers by reason of the belligerent 
status of Great Britain? 



There is, of course, no doubt concerning the 
authority of the President to negotiate with 
the British Government for the proposed ex- 
change. The only questions that might be 
raised in connection therewith are (1) whether 
the arrangement must be put in the form of a 
treaty and await ratification by the Senate or 
(2) whether there must be additional legisla- 
tion by the Congress. Ordinarily (and assum- 
ing the absence of enabling legislation) the 
question whether such an agreement can be con- 
cluded under Presidential authority or whether 
it must await ratification by a two-thirds vote 
of the United States Senate involves consider- 
ation of two powers which the Constitution 
vests in the President. 

One of these is the power of the Commander- 
in-Chief of the Army and Navy of the United 
States, wliich is conferred upon the President 



by the Constitution but is not defined or lim- 
ited. Happily, there has been little occasion in 
our history for the interpretation of the powers 
of the President as Commander-in-Chief of the 
Army and Navy. I do not find it necessary to 
rest upon that power alone to sustain the pres- 
ent proposal. But it will hardly be open to 
controversy that the vesting of such a function 
in the President also places upon him a re- 
sponsibility to use all constitutional authority 
which he may possess to provide adequate bases 
and stations for the utilization of the naval and 
air weapons of the United States at their high- 
est efiiciency in our defense. It seems equally 
beyond doubt that present world conditions for- 
bid him to risk any delay that is constitution- 
ally avoidable. 

The second power to be considered is that 
control of foreign relations which the Constitu- 
tion vests in the President as a part of the 
Executive function. The nature and extent of 
this power has recently been explicitly and au- 
thoritatively defined by Mr. Justice Sutherland, 
writing for the Supreme Court. In 1936, in 
United States v. Curtiss-Wr'ight Export Corp., 
et al, 299 U. S. 304, he said : 

"It is important to bear in mind that we are 
here dealing not alone with an authority vested 
in the President by an exertion of legislative 
power, but with such an authority plus the very 
delicate, plenary and exclusive power of the 
President as the sole organ of the federal gov- 
ernment in the field of international relations — 
a power which does not require as a basis for 
its exercise an act of Congress, but which, of 
course, like every other governmental power, 
must be exercised in subordination to the appli- 
cable provisions of the Constitution. It is quite 
apparent that if, in the maintenance of our in- 
ternational relations, embarrassment — perhaps 
serious embarrassment — is to be avoided and 
success for our aims achieved, congi-essional leg- 
islation which is to be made effective through 
negotiation and inquiry within the international 
field must often accord to the President a degree 
of discretion and freedom from statutory re- 
striction which would not be admissible were 
domestic affairs alone involved. Moreover, he, 



SEPTEMBER 7, 1940 



203 



not Congress, has the better opportunity of 
knowing the conditions which prevail in for- 
eign countries, and especially is this true in time 
of war. He has his confidential sources of in- 
formation. He has his agents in the form of 
diplomatic consular and other officials. Secrecy 
in respect of information gathered by them may 
be higUy necessary, and the premature disclo- 
sure of it productive of harmful results." 

The President's power over foreign relations 
■while "delicate, plenary and exclusive" is not 
unlimited. Some negotiations involve commit- 
ments as to the future which would carry an 
obligation to exercise powers vested in the 
Congi-ess. Such Presidential arrangements are 
customarily submitted for ratification by a two- 
thirds vote of the Senate before the future legis- 
lative power of the country is committed. 
However, the acquisitions which you are pro- 
posing to accept are without express or implied 
promises on the part of the United States to be 
performed in the future. The consideration, 
which we later discuss, is completed upon trans- 
fer of the specified items. The Executive 
Agi'eement obtains an opportunity to establish 
naval and air bases for the protection of our 
coastline but it imposes no obligation upon the 
Congress to appropriate money to improve the 
opportunity. It is not necessary for the Senate 
to ratify an opportmiity that entails no 
obligation. 

Tliere are precedents which might be cited, 
but not all strictly pertinent. The proposition 
falls far short in magnitude of the acquisition 
by President Jefferson of the Louisiana Terri- 
tory from a belligerent during a European war, 
the Congress later appropriating the considera- 
tion and the Senate later ratifj'ing a treaty em- 
bodying the agi'eement. 

I am also reminded that in 1850, Secretary 
of State Daniel Webster acquired Horse Shoe 
Reef, at the entrance of Buffalo Harbor, upon 
condition that the United States would engage 
to erect a lighthouse and maintain a light but 
would erect no fortification thereon. This was 
done without awaiting legislative authority. 
Subsequently the Congress made appropria- 
tions for the lighthouse, which was erected in 



1856. Malloy, Treaties and Conventions^ Vol. 
1, p. 663. 

It is not believed, however, that it is neces- 
sary here to rely exclusively upon your constitu- 
tional power. As pointed out hereinafter (in 
discussing the second question), I think there is 
also ample statutory authority to support the 
acquisition of these bases, and the precedents 
perhaps most nearly in point are the numerous 
acquisitions of rights in foreign countries for 
sites of diplomatic and consular establish- 
ments — perhaps also the trade agreements re- 
cently negotiated under statutory authority and 
the acquisition in 1903 of the coaling and naval 
statioas and rights in Cuba under the act of 
March 2, 1901, c. 803, 31 Stat. 895, 898. In the 
last-mentioned case the agi'eement was subse- 
quently embodied in a treaty but it was only one 
of a number of undertakings, some clearly of a 
nature to be dealt with ordinarily by treaty, and 
the statute had required "that by way of further 
assurance the government of Cuba will embody 
the foregoing provisions in a permanent treaty 
with the United States." 

The transaction now proposed represents 
only an exchange with no statutory requirement 
for the embodiment thereof in any treaty and 
involving no promises or undertakings by the 
United States that might raise the question of 
the propriety of incorporation in a treaty. I 
therefore advise that acquisition by Executive 
Agreement of the rights proposed to be con- 
veyed to the United States by Great Britain will 
not require ratification by the Senate. 

II 

The right of the President to dispose of ves- 
sels of the Navy and unneeded naval material 
finds clear recognition in at least two enact- 
ments of the Congress and a decision of the 
Supreme Court — and any who assert that the 
authority does not exist must assume the burden 
of establishing that both the Congress and the 
Supreme Court meant something less than the 
clear import of seemingly plain language. 

By section 5 of the act of March 3, 1883, c. 
141, 22 Stat. 582, 599-600 (U. S. C, title 34, sec. 
492), the Congress placed restrictions upon the 



204 

methods to be followed by the Secretary of the 
Navy in disposing of naval vessels, which have 
been found unfit for further use and stricken 
from the naval registry, but by the last clause of 
the section recognized and confirmed such a 
right in the President free from such limita- 
tions. It provides : 

"But no vessel of the Navy shall hereafter be 
sold in any other mamier than herein provided, 
or for less than such appraised value, unless the 
President of the United States shall othenmse 
direct in writing.''^ (Underscoring [this print, 
italics] supplied) 

In Levimon v. United States, 258 U. S. 198, 
201, the Supreme Court said of this statute that 
"the power of the President to direct a depar- 
ture from the statute is not confined to a sale for 
less than the appraised value but extends to the 
manner of the sale," and that "the word 'unless' 
qualifies both the requfrements of the conclud- 
ing clause." 

So far as concerns this statute, in my opinion 
it leaves the President as Commander-in-Chief 
of the Navy free to make such disposition of 
naval vessels as he finds necessary in the public 
interest, and I find nothing that would indicate 
that the Congress has tried to limit the Presi- 
dent's plenary powers to vessels already stricken 
from the naval registry. The President, of 
course, would exercise his powers only under 
the high sense of responsibility which follows 
his rank as Commander-in-Chief of his nation's 
defense forces. 

Furthermore, I find in no other statute or in 
the decisions any attempted limitations upon 
the plenary powers of the President as Com- 
mander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy and as 
the head of the State in its relations with for- 
eign countries to enter into the proposed ar- 
rangements for the transfer to the British 
Government of certain over-age destroyers and 
obsolescent military material except the limita- 
tions recently imposed by section 14 (a) of the 
act of June 28, 1940 (Public No. 671). This 
section, it will be noted, clearly recognizes the 
authority to make transfers and seeks only to im- 
pose certain restrictions thereon. The section 
reads as follows : 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

"Sec. 14. (a) Notwithstanding the provision 
of any other law, no military or naval weapon, 
ship, boat, aircraft, munitions, supplies, or 
equipment, to which the United States has title, 
in whole or in part, or which have been con- 
tracted for, shall hereafter be transferred, ex- 
changed, sold, or otherwise disposed of in any 
manner whatsoever unless the Chief of Naval 
Operations in the case of naval material, and the 
Chief of Staff of the Army in the case of mili- 
tary material, shall first certify that such mate- 
rial is not essential to the defense of the United 
States." 

Thus to prohibit action by the constitutional- 
ly-created Commander-in-Chief except upon au- 
thorization of a statutory officer subordinate in 
rank is of questionable constitutionality. How- 
ever, since the statute requires certification only 
of matters as to which you would wish, irre- 
spective of the statute, to be satisfied, and as 
the legislative history of the section indicates 
that no arbitrary restriction is intended, it 
seems unnecessary to raise the question of con- 
stitutionality which such a provision would 
otherwise invite. 

I am informed that the destroyers involved 
here are the survivors of a fleet of over 100 built 
at about the same time and under the same de- 
sign. During the year 1930, 58 of these were de- 
commissioned with a view toward scrapping and 
a corresponding number were recoimnissioned as 
replacements. Usable material and equipment 
from the 58 vessels removed from the service 
were transferred to the recommissioned vessels 
to recondition and modernize them, and other 
usable material and equipment were removed 
and the vessels stripped. They were then 
stricken from the navy register, and 50 of them 
were sold as scrap for prices ranging f lom $5,260 
to $6,800 per vessel, and the remaining 8 were 
used for such purposes as target vessels, experi- 
mental construction tests, and temporary bar- 
racks. The surviving destroyers now under con- 
sideration have been reconditioned and are in 
service, but all of them are over-age, most of 
them by several years. 

In construing this statute in its application to 
such a situation it is important to note that this 



SEPTEMBER 7, 1940 



205 



subsection as originally proposed in the Senate 
bill provided that the appropriate staff officer 
shall first certify that "such material is not es- 
sential to and cannot be used in the defense of 
the United States." Senator Barkley and others 
objected to the subsection as so vrorded on the 
ground that it would prevent the release and ex- 
cliange of surplus or used planes and other sup- 
plies for sale to the British and that it would 
consequently nullify the provisions of the bill 
(see section" 1 of the act of July 2, 1940, II. R. 
9850, Public No. 703) which the Senate had 
passed several days earlier for that very purpose. 
Although Senator Walsh stated that he did not 
think the proposed subsection had that effect, he 
agi-eed to strike out the words "and cannot be 
used." Senator Barkley observed that he 
thought the modified language provided "a 
nnich more elastic term." Senator Walsh fur- 
ther stated that he would bear in mind in confer- 
ence the views of Senator Barkley and others, 
and that he had "no desire or purpose to go be- 
yond the present law, but to have some certificate 
filed as to whether the proj^erty is surplus or 
not." (Cong. Rec, June 21, 1940, pp. 13370- 
i;5;}71) 

In view of this legislative history it is clear 
that the Congress did not intend to prevent the 
certification for transfer, exchange, sale or dis- 
position of property merely because it is still 
used or usable or of possible value for future use. 
The statute does not contemplate mere transac- 
tions in scrap, yet exchange or sale except as 
scrap would hardly be possible if confined to 
material whose usefulness is entirely gone. It 
need only be certified as not essential, and "essen- 
tial," usually the equivalent of vital or indis- 
pensable, falls far short of "used" or "usable." 

Moreover, as has been indicated, the congres- 
sional authorization is not merely of a sale, 
which might imply only a cash transaction. It 
also authorizes equipment to be "transferred", 
"exchanged" or "otherwise disposed of" ; and in 
connection with material of this kind for which 
there is no open market value is never absolute 
but only relative — and chiefly related to what 
may be had in exchange or replacement. 

In view of the character of the transactions 



contemplated, as well as the legislative history, 
the conclusion is inescapable that the Congress 
has not sought by section 14 (a) to impose an 
arbitrary limitation upon the judgment of the 
highest staff officers as to whether a transfer, 
exchange or other disposition of specific items 
would impair our essential defenses. Specific 
items must be weighed in relation to our total de- 
fense position before and after an exchange or 
disposition. Any other construction would be 
a virtual prohibition of any sale, exchange or 
disposition of material or supplies so long as 
they were capable of use, however ineffective, 
and such a prohibition obviously was not, and 
was not intended to be, written into the law. 

It is my opinion that in proceeding under 
section 14 (a) api)ropriate staff officers may and 
should consider remaining useful life, strategic 
importance, obsolescence, and all other factors 
affecting defense value, not only with respect to 
what the Government of the United States gives 
up in any exchange or transfer, but also with 
respect to what the Government receives. In 
tliis situation good business sense is good legal 
sense. 

I therefore advise that the appropriate staff 
officers may, and should, certify imder section 
14 (a) that ships and material involved in a 
sale or exchange are not essential to the defense 
of the United States if in their judgment the 
consummation of the transaction does not im- 
pair or weaken the total defense of the United 
States, and certainly so where the consumma- 
tion of the arrangement will strengthen the 
total defensive position of the nation. 

With specific reference to the pi-oposed 
agreement with the Government of Great 
Britain for the acquisition of naval and air 
bases, it is my opinion that the Chief of Naval 
Operations may, and should, certify under sec- 
tion 14 (a) that the destroj'ers involved are not 
essential to the defense of the United States if 
in his judgment the exchange of such destroyers 
for such naval and air bases will strengthen 
rather than impair the total defense of the 
United States. 

I have previously indicated that in my opin- 
ion there is statutory authority for the acquisi- 



206 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



tion of the naval and air bases in exchange for 
the vessels and material. The question was not 
more fully treated at that point because depend- 
ent upon the statutes above discussed and which 
required consideration in this section of the 
opinion. It is to be borne in mind that these 
statutes clearly recognize and deal with the 
authority to make dispositions by sale, transfer, 
exchange or otherwise ; that they do not impose 
any limitations concerning individuals, corpo- 
rations or governments to which such disposi- 
tions may be made ; and that they do not specify 
or limit in any manner the consideration which 
may enter into an exchange. There is no reason 
whatever for holding that sales may not be 
made to or exchanges made with a foreign gov- 
ernment or that in such a case a treaty is con- 
templated. This is emphasized when we con- 
sider that the transactions in some cases may be 
quite unimportant, perhaps only dispositions of 
scrap, and that a domestic buyer (unless re- 
strained by some authorized contract or em- 
bargo) would be quite free to dispose of his 
purchase as he pleased. Furthermore, section 
14 (a) of the act of June 28, 1940, su.pra, was 
enacted by the Congress in full contemplation 
of transfers for ultimate delivery to foreign 
belligerent nations. Possibly it may be said 
that the authority for exchange of naval vessels 
and material presupposes the acquisition of 
something of value to the Navy or, at least, to 
the national defense. Certainly I can imply no 
narrower limitation when the law is wholly 
silent in this respect. Assuming that there is, 
however, at least the limitation which I have 
mentioned, it is fully met in the acquisition of 
rights to maintain needed bases. And if, as I 
hold, the statute law authorizes the exchange of 
vessels and material for other vessels and ma- 
terial or, equally, for the right to establish bases, 
it is an inescapable corollary that the statute 
law also authorizes the acquisition of the ships 
or material or bases which form the considera- 
tion for the exchange. 

Ill 

Wliether the statutes of the United States 
prevent the dispatch to Great Britain, a bellig- 



erent power, of the so-called "mosquito boats" 
now under construction or the over-age destroy- 
ers depends upon the interpretation to be placed 
on section 3 of title V of the act of Jime 15, 
1917, c. 30, 40 Stat. 217, 222. This section reads : 

"During a war in which the United States 
is a neutral nation, it shall be unlawful to send 
out of the jurisdiction of the United States any 
vessel, built, armed, or equipped as a vessel of 
war, or converted from a private vessel into a 
vessel of war, with any intent or under any 
agreement or contract, written or oral, that such 
vessel shall be delivered to a belligerent nation, 
or to an agent, officer, or citizen of such nation, 
or witli reasonable cause to believe that the said 
vessel shall or will be employed in the service 
of any such belligerent nation after its depar- 
ture from the jurisdiction of the United States." 

This section must be read in the light of sec- 
tion 2 of the same act and the rules of interna- 
tional law which the Congress states that it was 
its intention to implement. (H. Eep. No. 30, 
65th Cong., 1st Sess., p. 9) So read, it is clear 
that it is inapplicable to vessels, like the over- 
age destro3'ers, which were not built, armed, 
equipped as, or converted into, vessels of war 
with the intent that they should enter the serv- 
ice of a belligerent. If the section were not so 
construed, it would render meaningless section 
2 of the act which authorizes the President to 
detain any armed vessel until he is satisfied that 
it will not engage in hostile operations before 
it reaches a neutral or belligerent port. The 
two sections are intelligible and reconcilable 
only if read in light of the traditional rules of 
international law. These are clearly stated by 
Oppenheim in his work on International Law, 
5th ed., Vol. 2, sec. 334, pp. 574^576 : 

"Wliereas a neutral is in no wise obliged by 
his duty of impartiality to prevent his subjects 
from selling armed vessels to the belligerents, 
such armed vessels being merely contraband of 
(var, a neutral is bound to employ the means at 
his disposal to prevent his subjects from build- 
ing, fitting out, or arming, to the order of either 
belligerent, vessels intended to be used as men- 
of-war, and to prevent the departure from his 



i 



SEPTEMBER 7, 1940 

jurisdiction of any vessel which, by order of 
either Ix-lligorent, has been adapted to warlike 
use. The difference between selling armed 
vessels to belligerents and building them to 
order is usually defined in the following way : — 

"An armed ship, being contraband of war, is 
in no wise different from other kinds of contra- 
band, pi-ovided that she is not manned in a neu- 
tral port, so that she can commit hostilities at 
once after having reached the open sea. A sub- 
ject of a neutral who builds an armed ship, or 
arms a merchantman, not to the order of a bel- 
ligerent, but intending to sell her to a belliger- 
ent, does not differ from a manufacturer of arms 
who intends to sell them to a belligerent. There 
is nothing to prevent a neutral from allowing 
his subjects to sell armed vessels, and to deliver 
them to belligerents, either in a neutral port or 
in a belligerent port. . . . 

"On the other hand, if a subject of a neutral 
builds armed ships to the order of a belligerent, 
he prepares the means of naval operations, since 
the ships, on sailing outside the neutral terri- 
torial waters and taking in a crew and amnuuii- 
tion, can at once commit hostilities. Thus, 
through the cari-ying out of the order of the bel- 
ligerent, the neutral territory has been made the 
base of naval operations; and as the duty of 
impartiality includes an obligation to prevent 
either belligerent from making neutral terri- 
tory the base of military or naval operations, a 
neutral violates his neutrality by not prevent- 
ing his subjects from carrying out an order of 
a belligefent for the building and fitting out of 
men-of-war. This distinction, although of 
course logically correct, is hair-splitting. But 
as, according to the present law, neutral States 
need not prevent their subjects from supplying 
arms and ammunition to belligerents, it will 
^Jrobably continue to be drawn." 

Viewed in the light of the above, I am of the 
opinion that this statute does prohibit the re- 
lease and transfer to the British Government of 
the so-called "mosquito boats" now under con- 
struction for the United States Navy. If these 
boats were released to the Bi-itish Government, 
it would be legally impossible for that Govern- 
ment to take them out of this country after their 



207 

completion, since to the extent of such comple- 
tion at least they would have been built, armed, 
or equipped with the intent, or with reasonable 
cause to believe, that they would enter the serv- 
ice of a belligerent after being sent out of the 
jurisdiction of the United States. 

This will not be true, however, with respect 
to the over-age destroyers, since they were 
clearly not built, armed, or equipped with any 
such intent or with reasonable cause to believe 
that they would ever enter the service of a 
belligerent. 

In this connection it has been noted that dur- 
ing the war between Russia and Japan in 190-1: 
and 1905, the German Government permitted 
the sale to Russia of torpedo boats and also of 
ocean liners belonging to its aiixiliary navy. 
See Wlieaton's International Law, 6th ed. 
CKeith),Vol. 2, p. 977. 

IV 

Accordingly, you are respectfully advised! 

(a) That the proposed arrangement may be 
concluded as an Executive Agi-eement, effective 
without awaiting ratification. 

(b) That there is presidential power to 
transfer title and possession of the proposed 
considerations upon certification by appropri- 
ate staff officers. 

(c) That the dispatch of the so-called "mos- 
quito boats" would constitute a violation of the 
statute law of the United States, but with that 
exception there is no legal obstacle to the con- 
summation of the transaction, in accordance, of 
course, with the applicable provisions of the 
Neutrality Act as to delivery. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert H. Jackson, 

Attorney General. 

PROMOTION OF PEACE 

Treaties With New Zealand, Canada, and 
Australia Amending the Treaty for the 
Advancement of Peace With Great Britain, 
Signed September 15, 1914 

Treaties between the United States and New 
Zealand, Canada, and Australia, respectively, 



208 

amending in their application to each of those 
dominions the provisions which concern the or- 
ganization of commissions for the settlement of 
disputes contained in the Treaty for the Ad- 
vancement of Peace between the United States 
and Great Britain signed at Washington, Sep- 
tember 15, 1914, were signed at Washington on 
September 6, 1940, at noon, by Mr. Cordell Hull, 
Secretary of State, and the Eight Honorable the 
INIarquess of Lothian, C.H., British Ambassador 
at Washington, for New Zealand, Mr. Loring 
Cheney Christie, Minister of Canada at Wash- 
ington, and the Right Honorable Richard Gar- 
diner Casey, D.S.O., M.C., Minister of Australia 
at Washington, respectively. 

The duties of the commissions under the 
treaties with New Zealand, Canada, and Aus- 
tralia, as well as under the treaty of 1914 with 
Great Britain, are to make investigations and 
reports to the governments with reference to dis- 
putes arising between them. 

The treaty of 1914 between the United States 
and Great Britain (Treaty Series No. 602), pro- 
vides for the establishment of an international 
commission of five members, one member to be 
chosen from each country by the government of 
the country, one member to be chosen by each 
government from some third country, and a 
fifth member to be chosen by agreement between 
the two governments from a country of which 
no other member of the commission is a citizen. 
It also provides that in the event the interests 
affected by the dispute to be investigated should 
be mainly interests of one of the self-governing 
dominions of the British Empire the dominion 
concerned might furnish a list of persons from 
which a member of the commission might be ap- 
pointed by His Majesty's Government to serve 
in place of the British national member. 

The amendatory treaties provide for the es- 
tablishment of separate commissions between the 
United States and New Zealand, Canada, and 
Australia, respectively, analogous as to the num- 
ber of commissioners and method of appoint- 
ment to the American-British Commission 
established under the treaty of 1914. The com- 
mission under each amendatory treaty will con- 
sist of five members: one member to be chosen 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

from the United States by the Government of 
the United States; one member to be chosen 
from New Zealand, Canada, or Australia, as the 
case may be, by the government of that 
dominion; one member to be chosen by each 
government from a third country; and a fifth 
member to be chosen by agreement between the 
Government of the United States and the Gov- 
erimient of New Zealand, Canada, or Australia, 
as the case may be, from a country of which no 
other member of the commission is a citizen. 

The substantive provisions of the treaty of 
1914 between the United States and Great Brit- 
ain, as to the type of disputes to be submitted to 
the Commission and other matters are made an 
integi-al part of each of the amendatory treaties 
for observance and fulfillment between the 
United States and New Zealand, Canada, and 
Australia, respectively. 

An amendatoi-y treaty similar to the treaties 
signed today by the United States with New 
Zealand, Canada, and Australia, was signed on 
April 2, 1940, between the United States and the 
Union of South Africa.^ It was referred to the 
Senate, has been reported favorably by the Com- 
mittee on Foreign Relations, and is now on the 
Executive Calendar of the Senate. 

SAFETY 

Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea 
(Treaty Series No. 910) 

Yugoslavia 

By a note dated September 3, 1940, the Yugo- 
slav Minister at Washington informed the Sec- 
retary of State that his Government had ap- 
proved the Convention for the Safety of Life at 
Sea, signed at London on May 31, 1929, and that 
the convention was published in the Ojfieial 
Gazette for May 16, 1940. 

The American Ambassador to Great Britain 
reported by a telegram dated August 28, 1940, 
that the instrument of adherence by Yugoslavia 
to the convention was deposited with the British 
Government on August 13, 1940. In accordance 
with the provisions of the convention the adher- 



'See the Bulletin of Apr. 6, 1940 (vol. II, no. 41), 
p. 365. 



SEPTEMBER 7, 194 



209 



eiice of Yugoslavia will become effective on No- 
vember 13, 1940. For a list of the countries 
which have ratified or adhered to the conven- 
tion, see the Bulletin of September 9, 1939 (vol. 
I,no. ll),p.240. 

SPECIAL ASSISTANCE 

Convention With the Dominican Republic 
Concerning Collection and Application of 
Customs Revenue (Treaty Series No. 726)" 

A commission representing the Government 
of the United States, headed by Ambassador 
Hugh Wilson and assisted by Harold D. Finley 
of the Department of State, has been negotiat- 
ing at Ciudad Trujillo with a commission 
appointed by the Dominican Government, 
lieaded by His Excellency Arturo Despradel, 
Seci'etary of State for Foreign Affairs of the 
Dominican Re{)ublic, and assisted by Jose 
Maria Bonnetti Burgos, Secretary of State for 
the Presidency, and Jesus Maria Troncoso 
Sanchez, Under Secretary of State for the Pres- 
idency, for the purpose of drafting a convention 
to supersede the convention of 1921 now in 
effect between the two Governments which con- 
cerns the service of the bonds of the Dominican 
external debt of 1922 and 1926. 

The two commissions have happily reached 
agi-eement. A document embodying this agree- 
ment was initialed at Ciudad Trujillo the after- 
noon of September 7 by the Dominican Secre- 
tary of State for Foreign Affairs and Ambassa- 
dor Wilson and will be signed subsequently in 
AVashington in treaty form. 

The new convention provides for the closing 
of the General Receivership of Customs and the 
resumj^tion by the Dominican authorities of the 



collection of customs, in as much as the two Gov- 
ernments have agreed upon a new arrangement 
for guaranteeing the service of the bonds, which 
provides, among other things, for a first lien 
upon the total revenues of the Dominican nation 
in lieu of a first lien upon only the customs 
revenues. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Military Aviation Instructors: Agreement Between 
the United States of America and Argentina. — Signed 
June 29, 1940 ; effective June 29, 1940. Executive Agree- 
ment Series No. 175. Publication 1496. 10 pp. 5^. 



Legislation 



An Act Relating to transportation of foreign mail by 
aircraft [providing for the settlement of accounts for 
carriage of foreign mail by U. S. aircraft]. (Public 
No. 774, 76th Cong., 3d sess.) 2 pp. 5#. 



Regulations 



'See the BuUctin of Aug. 17, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 60), 
p. 117. 



The following regulation may be of interest 
to readers of the BuUetin: 

[American] Vessels Denied Clearance to Belligerent 
States. (Department of Commerce: Bureau of Marine 
Inspection and Navigation.) [Order No. 53.] Septem- 
ber 4, 1940. Federal Register, September 6, 1940 (voL 
5, no. 174), p. 3582 (The National Archives of the 
United States). 



a. S. 60VERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1940 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents. Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PCBLISHBD WEEKLY WITH THE APPEOVAL OF THE DIRECTOB OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 




THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 




LETIN 



Qontents 



SEPTEMBER 14, 1940 
Vol. Ill: No. 64 - Publication I^OJ 



Gener.\l: 

Control of exports in national defense 

American Republics: 

Death of the President of Paraguay 

Supplementary extradition coiwention with Colombia . 

EUHOPE : 

Damage to American Embassy in Berlin 

Presentation of letters of credence by the Ambassador 

of the French Republic 

Canada : 

Dinner in honor of Canadian Section, Joint Perma- 
nent Board of Defense, United States and Canada . . 
Foreign Sermce: 

Appointments 

RFGrUVTlONS 

Treaty Information: 
Boundary : 

Convention with Canada for the Emergency Regu- 
lation of the Level of Rainy Lake and of Certain 

Other Boundary Waters 

Extradition : 

Supplementary Extradition Convention witli C<j- 

lombia 

Legal Assistance: 

Protocol on Uniformity of Powers of Attorney 

Which Are To Be Utilized Abroad 

Publications 

Legislation 



Page 

213 



214 
215 

215 

215 

216 

217 
217 



218 



218 



218 

218 
218 







U, S. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOC'Mf^NI? 

OCT 11 1940 



General 



CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL DEFENSE 



IRelensod to tlie pii'ss by the White House September 13] 

In order to further strengthen the national 
defense, the President, actin<i upon a recom- 
mendation of Col. It. L. Maxwell, the Adminis- 
trator of Export Control, has issued a proclama- 
tion dated Septemher 12, 1940, subjecting the 
following additional materials to license re- 
quirements for export from the United States: 
Equipment used for tlie production of aviation 
motor fuel and tetraethyl lead or any plans or 
specifications useful in the design, construction, 
or operation of sucli equipment or in connection 
with sucli pi'ocesses; plans, specifications, and 
descriptive or technical information of any kind 
setting forth the design or construction of air- 
craft or aircraft engines. 

These items are in addition to those announced 
in a previous proclamation by the President, 
dated July 26, 1940,' placing petroleum prod- 
ucts, tetraethyl lead, and iron and steel scrap 
under license requirements for exportation. 

The President's proclamation of May 1, 1937,^ 
requires that exports of aircraft and aircraft 
engines be licensed. The present proclamation, 
taken with the preceding ones mentioned, has 
the effect of putting under the control of the 
President for export purposes not only the air- 
craft and engines but also the plans and designs 
for building them. 



^BtiUctm of July 27, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 57), p. 49. 
See also Bulletin of July 6, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 54), 
pp. 12-13. 

= See Press Releases of May 1, 1937 (vol. XVI, no. 
396), pp. 288-290. 



CONTKOL OF THE ExPORT OF CeRTAIN AkTICLES 

AND Materials 

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF 
AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Whereas section 6 of the act of Congress en- 
titled "An Act to expedite the strengthening of 
the national defense," approved July 2, 1940, 
provides as follows : 

"^^Hienever the President determines that it is 
necessary in the interest of national defense to 
prohibit or curtail the exportation of any mili- 
tary equipment or munitions, or component 
parts thereof, or machinery, tools, or material, 
or supplies necessary for the manufacture, serv- 
icing, or operation thereof, he may by proclama- 
tion prohibit or curtail such exportation, except 
under such rules and regidations as he shall 
prescribe. Any such proclamation shall de- 
scribe the articles or materials included in the 
prohibition or curtailment contained therein. 
In case of the violation of any provision of any 
proclamation, or of any rule or regulation, 
issued hereunder, such violator or violators, 
upon conviction, shall be punished by a fine of 
not more than $10,000, or by inqDrisonment for 
not more than two years, or by both such fine 
and imprisonment. The authority gi-anted in 
this section shall terminate June 30, 1942, miless 
the Congress shall otherwise provide."; 

Now, therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, 
President of the United States of America, act- 



261071—40 



213 



214 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



ing under and by virtue of the authority vested 
in me by the aforesaid act of Congress, do hereby 
proclaim that upon the recommendation of the 
Administrator of Export Control I have deter- 
mined that it is necessary in the interest of the 
national defense that on and after this date the 
following-described articles and materials shall 
not be exported from the United States except 
when authorized in each case by a license as pro- 
vided for in Proclamation No. 2413 of July 2, 
1940, entitled "Administration of section 6 of 
the act entitled 'An Act to expedite the 
strengthening of the national defense' approved 
July 2, 1940," and in the regulations issued 
pursuant thereto : 

1. Equipment (excluding minor component 
parts) which can be used, or adapted to use, for 
the production of aviation motor fuel from pe- 
troleum, petroleum products, hydrocarbons, or 
hydrocarbon mixtures, by processes involving 
chemical change; and any plans, specifications, 
or other documents containing descriptive or 
technical information of any kind (other than 
that appearing in any form available to the gen- 
eral public) useful in the design, construction, 
or operation of any such equipment, or in con- 
nection with any such processes. Aviation 
motor fuel shall mean such fuel as is defined in 
the regulations issued pursuant to Proclamation 
No. 2417 of July 26, 1940, as may from time to 
time be amended. 

2. Equipment (excluding minor component 
parts) which can be used, or adapted to use, for 
the 23i'od"ction of tetraethyl lead; and any 
plans, specifications, or other documents con- 
taining descriptive or technical information of 
any kind (other than that appearing in any 
form available to the general public) useful in 
the design, construction, or operation of any 
such equipment, or in connection with any such 
jDrocesses. Tetraethyl lead shall mean such tet- 
raethyl lead as is defined in the regulations 
issued pursuant to Proclamation No. 2417 of 
July 26, 1940, as may from time to time be 
amended. 

3. Plans, specifications, and other documents 
containing descriptive or technical information 



of any kind (other than that appearing in any 
form available to the general public) setting 
forth the design or construction of aircraft or 
aircraft engines. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States of 
America to be affixed. 

Done at the City of Washington this twelfth 
day of September in the year of our 
Lord nineteen hundred and forty, 
[seal] and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the one 
hundred and sixty-fifth. 

Fran KIN D. Roosevelt 
By the President : 
CoKDELL Hull 

Secretary of State. 

[No. 2423] 



American Republics 



DEATH OF THE PRESIDENT OF 
PARAGUAY 

[Released to the press September 8] 

The following telegram was sent by the Presi- 
dent to His Excellency, Col. Higinio Morinigo, 
Acting President of Paraguay : 

"September 8, 1940. 
"Mrs. Roosevelt and I are profoundly shocked 
by the news of the tragic accident which has 
cost the lives of our sincere friends, His Excel- 
lency the President of Paraguay and Sefiora de 
Estigarribia. The gi-ief of Paraguaj' is shared 
by my fellow countiymen who join with me in 
extending through you to the people of Para- 
guay and to the President's family our heartfelt 
sympathy. 

Franklin D. Roose\'elt" 



The following telegram was sent by the Sec- 
retary of State to His Excellency, Seiior Dr. 



SEPTEMBER 14, 1940 



215 



Tonias A. Salomoni, Minister for Foreign 
Affairs of Paraguay : 

"September 8, 1940. 
''Mrs. Hull and I are distressed beyond meas- 
ure by tlie tragic deatli of the President and 
Senora de Estigarribia and we have the honor 
of sharing with the people of Paraguay and 
tlieir many other friends in tliis country a feel- 
ing of an irreparable loss. I hope you will con- 
vey to their families our deepest sympathy in 
this hour of sadness. 

CoRDELL Hull. 
Secretary of State 
of the United Statex of America!'' 



SUPPLEMENTARY EXTRADITION 
CONVENTION WITH COLOMBIA 

An announcement regarding the signing of a 
supplementary extradition convention between 
the United States and Colombia api)ears in this 
Bulletin under the heading "Treaty Informa- 
tion". 



Europe 



DAMAGE TO AMERICAN EMBASSY IN 
BERLIN 

[Released to the press September 11] 

The American Charge d'Affaires at Berlin, 
Mr. Alexander Kirk, reported to the Depart- 
ment of State today that during an air raid last 
night five incendiary bombs fell in the garden 
of the American Embassy without doing any 
appreciable damage. One large splinter 
entered one of the rooms of the Chancery 
through the window, traversed the room, and 
buried itself in the wall on the other side. The 
damage was trivial. 

Mr. Kirk further reported that so far as is 
known, no Americans have been injured. 



PRESENTATION OF LETTERS OF 
CREDENCE BY THE AMBASSADOR 
OF THE FRENCH REPUBLIC 

[Released to the press September 13] 

Translation of the remarks of the newly ap- 
pointed Amhassador of the French RepuMic, 
Mr. Henry Haye, upon the occasion of the 
presentation of hi-a letters of credence: 

Mr. PRESinE>fT: 

The Marshal of France, Philippe Henri 
Pi'tain, Chief of tlie French State, has entrusted 
to me the great honor of handing to Your 
Excellency the letters accrediting me near you 
as Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipoten- 
tiary of the French Republic. 

The Government of France has likewise di- 
rected me to hand to you the letters of recall of 
my eminent predecessor, Mr. Doynel de Saint- 
Quentin, who has been called to another diplo- 
matic post. 

I have, Mr. President, the privilege of know- 
ing and loving the great country over whose 
destinies you preside with such higli authority. 
I have made frequent journeys and long visits 
here and I know the generosity of heart and 
spirit of the citizens of the United States. This 
exi)erience encouraged me to accept the mission 
of representing my country in yours in hours 
the tragedy of which it is needless to empha- 
size. 

Never, in the course of the history of our two 
nations, has a French Ambassador assumed a 
task like that for which I today take the respon- 
sibility. 

My unhappy country has just suffered the 
most cruel reverses which it has ever had to 
record in the course of the vicissitudes of its long 
and glorious past. Having entered into this 
war for the sake of European solidarity and to 
fulfill obligations which it had contracted, 
France has been terribly wounded thereby and 
must now submit to the implacable law of the 
victor. But, Mr. President, I can say to you 
that even if my country cannot free itself from 
the hard obligations which are the result of its 
defeat, the ideal, for the defense of which my 



216 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



countrymen courageously took up arms again 
only 20 years after the most bloody of victories, 
still remains alive in the heart of Frenchmen. 

Despite appearances, the war is not over for 
us. Cruel sufferings, both material and spirit- 
ual, will still for long be felt in innumerable 
homes. The majority of French families are 
scattered. Our women and children will await 
for a long time yet the return of men who, at 
the present moment, are enduring a hard captiv- 
ity. Other women will await, in vain, alas, the 
return of their husbands, their sons, or their 
brothers, who will never return again. 

In spite of these new misfortunes, let me as- 
sure you, Mr. President, that there is a force 
which no power can crush, it is that force which, 
despite apparent and transitory differences, 
will proudly maintain that French unity con- 
secrated by so many sacrifices. 

Allow me, Mr. President, to compare the mis- 
sion with which I am entnisted by the French 
Eepublic with that which, in 1776, was confided 
to the great Benjamin Frankliia by the thirteen 
United States of America. I shall certainly not 
have the presumption to claim to possess the in- 
comparable attributes of the American Ambas- 
sador Extraordinary. But I may doubtless 
hope, in attempting to solve the difficult prob- 
lems before me, to have the benefit of your per- 
sonal good will and the generous understanding 
of your counti'ymen. 

The ardent patriotic faith which I express to 
Your Excellency will inspire and guide all my 
undertakings and all my actions in the accom- 
plishment of my mission. 

Such, Mr. President, simply but sincerely ex- 
pressed, is the spirit in which I shall endeavor 
worthily to represent my country in youre. 

May Providence aid me in the accomplish- 
ment of the task M-hich the Government of 
France has entrusted to me near you. 

President RooseveWs reply to the remarks of 
Mr. Henry Haye : 

Mr. Ambassador : 

I am happy to welcome you on your return to 
this country as Ambassador Extraordinary and 



Plenipotentiary of the Republic of France near 
the Government of the United States of Amer- 
ica and to receive from your hands the letters 
accrediting you near the Government of the 
United States in that capacity. I likewise ac- 
cept the letters of recall of your predecessor. 
Count Doynel de Saint-Quentin, who has so ably 
represented your country here during the recent 
eventful years. I wish him success in his new 
mission. 

I have been particularly pleased to hear from 
you that France in its travail bears still in its 
heart the ideals for which it took up arms. 
Frenchmen have my sympathy and the sympa- 
thy of the people of the United States, and I 
hope with you that despite all, French unity, 
which has been consecrated by so many sacri- 
fices, will continue to subsist. 

I wish to assure you, Mr. Ambassador, of a 
cordial welcome to Washington. You may 
count uj^on my cooperation, as well as that of 
the officials of this Government, in your efforts 
to solve the problems which will confront you, 
and to develop the understanding and friendly 
relations which have so happily existed between 
our two nations. 



Canada 



DINNER IN HONOR OF CANADIAN 
SECTION, JOINT PERMANENT 
BOARD OF DEFENSE, UNITED 
STATES AND CANADA 

[Released to the press September 10] 

Tlie following guests attended the dinner 
given by the Secretary of State in honor of the 
Canadian Section of the Joint Permanent Board 
of Defense, United States and Canada, at the 
Carlton Hotel, September 10, 1940: 

Canadian Section 

The Honorable O. M, Biggar, K.C. 

Brig. K. Stuart, D.S.O., M.C., Deputy Chief, General 
Staff 



217 



Capt. L. W. Murray, R.C.N., Deputy Chief, Naval Staff 
Air Comdr. A. A. L. Cuffe, Air Staff, R. C. A. F. 
Mr. Hugli Keenleyside, Secretary of the Canadian 
Section 

United States Sectiow 

The Honorable Fiorello H. La Guardia 
Lt. Gen. Stanley D. Embick, U. S. A. 
Capt. Harry VV. Hill, U. S. N. 
Comdr. Forrest P. Sherman, U. S. N. 
Lt. Col. Joseph T. McXarney, V. S. A. 
Mr. John D. Hickerson, Department of State, Secretary 
of the United States Section 

Other Guests 

The Honorable Loring C. Christie, Minister of Canada 
The Honorable Henry L. Stimson, Secretary of War 
The Honorable Key Pittmaii, United States Senate 
The Honorable Warren R. Austin, United States Senate 
The Honorable Sol Bloom, House of Representatives 
The Honorable Melviii Maas, House of Representatives 
The Honorable Walter G. Andrews, House of Repre- 
sentatives 
The Honorable Andrew J. May, House of Representa- 
tives 
The Honorable James V. Forrestai, Acting Secretary of 

the Navy 
The Honorable Adolf A. Berle, Jr., Assistant Secretary 

of State 
1"he Honorable Robert P. Patterson, Assistant Secretary 

of War 
The Honorable Louis Compton, Assistant Secretary of 

the Navy 
Gen. George C. Marshall, the Chief of Staff 
Admiral Harold R. Stark, the Chief of Naval Operations 
Rear Admiral Royal E. Ingersoll, Assistant Chief of 

Naval Operations 
Maj. Gen. Henry H. Arnold, Chief of the Air Corps 
Rear Admiral John H. Towers, Chief of the Bureau 

of Aeronautics 
Brig. Gen. W. Bryden, Deputy Chief of Staff 
Brig. Gen. R. C. Moore, Deputy Chief of Staff 
Air Commodore W. R. Kenny, D.F.C., Air Attach^ to 

the Canadian Legation 
The Honorable George T. Summerlin, Chief of Protocol, 

Department of State 
Col. H. F. G. Letson, M.C., E.D., Military Attach^ to the 

Canadian Legation 
Maj. C. K. Galley, U. S. A. 
Mr. H. Charles Spruks, Department of State 



Foreign Service 



APPOINTMENTS 

[Released to the press September 10] 

The following have been appointed American 
Foreign Service officers, unclassified, vice con- 
suls of career, and secretaries in the Diplomatic 
Service of the United States, and they have 
been assigned as vice consuls at the posts indi- 
cated: 

Charles W. Adair, Jr., Xeuia, Ohio Nogales 

H. Gardner Ainsworth, New Orleans, 

La Winnipeg 

Stewart G. Anderson, Chicago, 111 Toronto 

Irven M. Eitreim, Mt. Vernon, S. Dak-_ Nuevo Laredo 
C. Vaughan Ferguson, Jr., Schenectady, 

N. Y Winnipeg 

W. Horton Schoellkopf, Jr., Miami, 

Fla Mexican 

Harry H. Schwartz, Los Angeles, Calif- Vancouver 

Bromley K. Smith, San Diego, Calif Montreal 

Henry T. Smith, Atlanta, Ga Matiunoros 

Oscar S. Straus, II, Purchase, N. T Montreal 

John L. Topping, New York, N. Y Montreal 

Livingston D. Watrous, Fort Hamilton, 

N. T Agua Prieta 



Regulations 



The following regulations may be of interest 
to readers of the Bulletin: 

Regulations Governing the Charter to Persons Not 
Citizens of the United States of Vessels Documented 
Under the Laws of the United States or the Last Docu- 
mentation of Which Was Under the Laws of the United 
States. (U. S. Maritime Commission.) [General Or- 
der No. 34, Sept. 4, 1940.] Federal Register, vol. 5, 
no. 180, Sept. 14, 1940, p. 3658 (The National Archives 
of the United States). 



218 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 
BOUNDARY 

Convention With Canada for the Emergency 
Regulation of the Level of Rainy Lake 
and of Certain Other Boundary Waters 

On September 10, 1940, the President ratified 
the Convention for the Emergency Regnlation 
of the Level of Rainy Lake and of Certain Other 
Boundary Waters, between the United States 
and Canada, signed on September 15, 1938. 

The convention was ratified by Canada on 
May 19, 1939, and it will enter into force upon 
the exchange of ratifications, which will take 
place at Ottawa in the near future. 

EXTRADITION 

Supplementary Extradition Convention 
With Colombia 

A Supplementary Extradition Convention be- 
tween the LTnited States and Colombia adding 
several crimes and offenses to those enimierated 
in the extradition treaty of May 7, 1888, between 
the two countries (Treaty Series No. 58), for 
which extradition may be granted, was signed 
at Bogota on September 9, 1940. 

LEGAL ASSISTANCE 

Protocol on Uniformity of Powers of Attor- 
ney Which Are To Be Utilized Abroad 

Brazil 

The Director General of the Pan American 
Union informed the Secretary of State by a let- 
ter dated September 11, 1940, that the Protocol 
on Uniformity of Powers of Attorney Which 
Are To Be Utilized Abroad, which was opened 
for signatni-e on February 17, 1940, was signed 
on behalf of Brazil on August 6, 1940. The 



protocol has been signed by Brazil, Colombia 
(ad referendum ) , El Salvador {ad referendum) , 
Nicaragua {ad referendum) ^VaxiaLxaa, {ad refer- 
endum)^ and Venezuela. 



Publications 



Department or State 

The Chaco Peace Confereuee : Report of the Delega- 
tion of the United States of America to the Peace 
Conference Held at Buenos Aires July 1, 1935-January 
23, 1939. Conference Series 46. Publication 1466. iv, 
108 pp., incl. maps. $1. 

Foreign Service List, July 1, 1940. Publication 1494. 
iv, 107 pp. Subscription, 500 a year ; single copy, 150. 

Other Government Agencies 

The following publications issued recently by 
the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
Department of Commerce, may be of interest to 
readers of the Bulletin: 

Commercial Travelers' Guide to Latin America : 

Part I. West Coast of South America. (Trade Pro- 
motion Series No. 179.) 1939. iv, 116 pp., maps. 

Part II. East Coast of South America. (Trade Pro- 
motion Series No. 187.) 1939. vi, 97 pp., maps. 

Part III. Mexico, Central America, and Caribbean 
Countries. (Trade Promotion Series No. 208.) 
1940. vi, 238 pp., maps. 40<». 



Legislation 



Red Cross Supply Vessels : Hearings before the Sen- 
ate Committee on Foreign Relations, 76th Cong., 3d 
sess., on S. J. Res. 279, to amend section 4 of Public 
Resolution Numbered 54, approved Nov. 4, 1939, en- 
titled "Joint resolution to preserve the neutrality and 
the peace of the United States and to secure the safety 
of its citizens and their interests", June 18, 1940. 19 
pp. 50. 



U, S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE; 1940 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPKOVAL OF THE DIBECTOB OF THE BOBEAU OF THE BUDGET 



~h 



y^o^^^i^Ji^ 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 



SEPTEMBER 21, 1940 
Vol. Ill: No. 6^ - Publication I^OJ 

Contents 

GkNERAL: Page 

Proclamation of Registration Day 221 

Proclamation of General Pulaski's Memorial Day . . . 223 
American Republics: 

Anniversary of independence of Central American 

republics : Statement by the Secretary of State . . . 224 

Inter-American Maritime Conference 224 

Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, etc.: 

Monthly statistics 225 

The Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 237 

Regulations 237 

Treaty Information: 
Extradition: 

Supplementary Extradition Treaty with Switzer- 
land 238 

Telecommunications : 

North American Regional Broadcasting Agreement . 238 
Restriction of War: 

Convention for the Amelioration of the Condition of 
the Wounded and the Sick of Armies in the Field 
(Treaty Series No. 847) and Convention Relating 
to the Treatment of Prisoners of War (Treaty 

Series No. 846) 238 

Legisl.ation 238 

Publications 239 




II. S, SUPERINTFNDENT OF DOCUMENTS 



General 



PROCLAMATION OF REGISTRATION DAY 



[Released to the press by the White House] 

Registration Day 
bt the president of the united states of 

AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Wheri':as the Congress has enacted and I 
have this day approved the Selective Training 
and Service Act of 1940,^ which dechircs that 
it is imperative to increase and train tlie per- 
sonnel of the armed forces of the United States 
and that in a free society the obligations and 
privileges of military training and service 
should be shared generally in accordance with 
a fair and just system of selective compulsorj' 
military training and service; and 

Whereas the said Act contains, in part, the 
following provisions : 

"Sec. 2. Except as otherwise provided in this 
Act, it shall be the duty of every male citizen 
of the United States, and of every male alien 
residing in the United States, who, on the day 
or days fixed for the first or any subsequent 
registration, is between the ages of twenty-one 
and thirty-six, to present himself for and sub- 
mit to registration at such time or times and 
place or places, and in such manner and in such 
age group or groups, as shall be determined by 
rules and regulations prescribed hereunder. 

"Sec. 5. (a) Commissioned officers, warrant 
officers, pay clerks, and enlisted men of the 
Regular Army, the Navy, the ilarine Corps, 
the Coast Guard, the Coast and Geodetic Sur- 
vey, the Public Health Service, the federally 
recognized active National Guard, the Officers' 



' Public, No. 783, 76th Cong., 3d sess. 
262604 — 40 1 



Reserve Corps, the Regular Army Reserve, the 
Enlisted Reserve Corps, the Naval Reserve, and 
the Marine Corps Reserve; cadets, United 
States Military Academy; midshipmen. United 
States Naval Academy; cadets, United States 
Coast Guard Academy ; men who have been ac- 
cepted for admittance (commencing with the 
academic year next succeeding such acceptance) 
to the United States Military Academy as 
cadets, to the United States Naval Academy as 
niidsliipmen, or to the United States Coast 
Guard Academy as cadets, but only during the 
continuance of such acceptance; cadets of the 
advanced couree, senior division, Reserve Offi- 
cers' Training Corps or Naval Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps; and diplomatic representa- 
tives, technical attaches of foreign embassies 
and legations, consuls general, consuls, vice con- 
suls, and consular agents of foreign countries, 
residing in the United States, who are not cit- 
izens of the United States, and who have not 
declared their intention to become citizens of 
the United States, shall not be required to be 
registered under section 2 and shall be relieved 
from liability for training and service under 
section 3 (b)." 

"Sec. 10 (a) The President is authorized — 
(1) to prescribe the necessary rules and regu- 
lations to carry out the provisions of this Act;" 

"(4) to utilize the services of any or all de- 
partments and any and all officers or agents of 
the United States and to accept the services of 
all officers and agents of the several States, Ter- 
ritories, and the District of Colmnbia and sub- 
divisions thereof in the execution of this Act;" 



221 



222 

"Sec. 14 (a) Every person shall be deemed to 
have notice of the requirements of this Act 
upon publication by the President of a procla- 
mation or other public notice fixing a time for 
any registration under section 2." 

Now, THEREFOKE, I, FrANKLIN D. RoOSEVELT, 

President of the United States of America, 
under and by virtue of the authority vested in 
me by the aforesaid Selective Training and 
Service Act of 1940, do proclaim the following : 

1. The first registration under the Selective 
Training and Service Act of 1940 shall take 
place on Wednesday, the sixteenth day of Octo- 
ber, 1940, between the hours of 7 A. M. and 
9 P. M. 

2. Every male person (other than persons 
excepted by Section 5 (a) of the aforesaid Act) 
who is a citizen of the United States or an 
alien residing in the United States and who, 
on the registration date fixed herein, has at- 
tained the twenty-fii-st anniversary of the day 
of his birth and has not attained the thirty- 
sixth anniversary of the day of his birth, is 
required to present himself for and submit to 
registration. Every such person who is within 
the continental United States on the registra- 
tion date fixed herein shall on that date present 
himself for and submit to registration at the 
duly designated place of registration within 
the precinct, district, or registration area in 
which he has his permanent home or in which 
he may happen to be on that date. Every such 
person who is not within the continental United 
States on the registration date fixed herein 
shall within five clays after his return to the 
continental United States present himself for 
and submit to registration. Regulations will 
be prescribed hereafter providing for special 
registration of those who on account of sick- 
ness or other causes beyond their control are 
unable to present themselves for registration at 
the designated places of registration on the 
registration date fixed herein. 

3. Every person subject to registration is re- 
quired to familiarize himself with the rules and 
regulations governing registration and to com- 
ply therewith. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

4. The times and places for registration in 
Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico will be fixed 
in subsequent proclamations. 

5. I call upon the Governors of the several 
States and the Board of Commissioners of the 
District of Columbia to provide suitable and 
sufficient places of registration within their re- 
spective jurisdictions and to provide suitable 
and necessary registration boards to effect such 
registration. 

6. I further call upon all officers and agents 
of the United States and all officers and agents 
of the sevei-al States and the District of Co- 
hunbia and subdivisions thereof to do and per- 
form all acts and services necessary to accom- 
plish effective and complete registration ; and 1 
especially call upon all local election officials 
and other patriotic citizens to offer their serv- 
ices as members of the boards of registration. 

7. In order that there may be full coopera- 
tion in carrying into effect the purposes of said 
Act, I urge all employers, and government 
agencies of all kinds — Federal, State and 
Local — to give those under their charge suffi- 
cient time off in which to fulfill the obligation 
of registration incumbent on them under the 
said Act. 

America stands at the crossroads of its des- 
tiny. Time and distance have been shortened. 
A few weeks have seen great nations fall. We 
cannot remain indifferent to the philosophy of 
force now rampant in the world. The terrible 
fate of nations whose weakness invited attack 
is too well known to us all. 

We must and will marshal our great poten- 
tial strength to fend off war from our shores. 
We must and will prevent our land from be- 
coming a victim of aggression. 

Our decision has been made. 

It is in that spirit that the people of our 
country are assuming the burdens that now 
become necessary. Offers of service have flooded 
in from patriotic citizens in every part of the 
nation, who ask only what they can do to help. 
Now there is both the opportunity and the need 
for many thousands to assist in listing the 
names and addresses of the millions who will 



SEPTEMBER 21, 1940 



223 



enroll on registration clay at school houses, 
polling places, and town halls. 

The Congress has debated without partisan- 
ship and has now enacted a law establishing a 
selective method of augmenting our armed 
forces. The method is fair, it is sure, it is dem- 
ocratic — it is the will of our people. 

After thoughtful deliberation, and as the 
first step, our young men will come from the 
factories and the fields, the cities and the towns, 
to enroll tlieir names on registration day. 

On that eventful day my generation will 
salute their generation. May we all renew 
within our hearts that conception of liberty 
and that way of life which we have all in- 
herited. May we all strengthen our resolve to 
hold high the torch of freedom in this darken- 
ing world so that our children and their chil- 
dren may not be robbed of their rightful 
inheritance. 

In wriNESS whereof I have hei-eunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
to be affixed. 

Done at the City of Washington this six- 
teenth day of September in the year of our 
Lord nineteen hundred and forty, 

[seal,] and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the one 
hundred and sixty-fifth. 

FiLVNKIJN D. E00SE\TXT 

By the President: 
C'ORDELL Hull, 

Secretary of State. 

[No. 2425] 

PROCLAMATION OF GENERAL 
PULASKI'S MEMORIAL DAY 

[Released to the press by the White House] 

General Pulaski's Mejiorial Day 
by the president of the united states of 

AMERICA 

A Proclammtion 

Whereas, in a world seared by the ravaging 
hand of war and oppression, we Americans are 



increasingly grateful for the Republic which 
our fathers built on principles of freedom and 
equality; and 

Whereas the valiant struggle to win Ameri- 
can independence was advanced by the bravery 
of General Casimir Pulaski, a Pole who hated 
tyranny and who fought fiercely by the side of 
American patriots mitil he was wounded unto 
death, October 9, and drew his last breath on 
October 11, 1779; and 

Whereas Public Resolution 76 of the Sev- 
enty-sixth Congress, approved on June 6, 1940, 
provides : 

"That the President of the United States of 
America is authorized to issue a proclamation 
calling upon officials of the Government to dis- 
plaj- the flag of the United States on all gov- 
ernmental buildings on October 11, 1940, and 
inviting the people of the United States to 
obsei-ve the day in schools and churches, or 
other suitable places, with appropriate cere- 
monies in commemoration of the death of 
General Casimir Pulaski." 

Now, therefore. I. Franklin D. Roosevelt, 
President of the United States of America, do 
hereby call upon officials of the Government to 
display the flag on Government buildings on 
October 11, 1940, and I invite the people of the 
LTnited States to participate in the observance 
of that daj' as General Pulaski's Memorial Day 
with appropriate ceremonies in schools and 
churches, or other suitable places. 

In WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 

Done at the City of Washington this eight- 
eenth day of September, in the year of our 
Lord nineteen hundred and forty, 
[seal] and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the one 
hundred and sixty-fifth. 

Franklin D. Roosea-elt 
By the President: 
CoRDELL Hull 

Secretary of State. 

[No. 2427] 



224 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



American Republics 



ANNIVERSARY OF INDEPENDENCE OF CENTRAL AMERICAN 

REPUBLICS 

Statement by the Secretary of State 



[Released to the press September 15] 

It gives me great pleasure to send a message 
at this time to the republics of Central America 
on the occasion of the anniversary of their 
independence. 1 can recall no time in their 
history when the countries of the Western 
Hemisphere were justified in celebrating with 
greater gratitude the privileges bestowed by 
liberty on the citizens of free nations. 

Events during recent months have empha- 
sized anew how essential to our joint interest 
and defense is the maintenance of the very 
close and cordial relations existing among all 
the American republics and the continuing 
development of those relations in effective day- 



to-day collaboration in mutters of common con- 
cern. The Meeting of Foreign Ministers in 
Habana last July constituted a notable mile- 
stone in the progress of practical cooperation, 
to which none contributed more loyally than 
the distinguished representatives of the five 
republics whose independence is celebrated 
today. 

The peoples and Governments of Costa Rica, 
El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nica- 
ragua need no assurance on this their anni- 
versary as independent nations of the sincerity 
of the good wishes of the United States and 
of all the Americas for their continued wel- 
fare, progress, and happiness. 



INTER-AMERICAN MARITIME CONFERENCE 



[Released to the press September 17] 

The President has approved the designation 
of the Honorable Henry F. Grady, Assistant 
Secretary of State, and the Honorable Max 
O'Rell Truitt, Commissioner, United States 
Maritime Commission, as this Government's 
delegates to the Inter-American Maritime Con- 
ference, which will convene in Washington, 
D. C, on October 2, 1940 under the auspices 
of the Inter- American Financial and Economic 
Advisory Committee. 

It will be recalled that the Advisory Com- 
mittee was created pursuant to a resolution of 
the First Meeting of the Foreign Ministers of 
the American Republics held in Panama in 
September 1939 and that since its installation 
at the Pan American Union the following No- 
vember, has met at frequent intervals to con- 
sider various problems of a financial and eco- 
nomic charactei'. One of the questions which 
has received the attention of the Committee is 



the effect of present hostilities in Europe upon 
inter- American shipping. The Committee has 
deemed it advisable to hold a special meeting of 
Government experts in the field of shipping in 
order to facilitate a comprehensive review of 
the subject. In consequence, the Committee has 
issued invitations to the governments of the 21 
American republics to be represented at this 
special meeting, which will convene in Wash- 
ington on the above-noted date. 

The Committee included in its invitations the 
suggestion that each government arrange for 
the attendance, in a consultative capacity, of 
representatives of shijiping companies of each 
country. In accordance with this suggestion, 
which has been incorporated in the regulations 
of the Conference, this Government has issued 
invitations to shipping interests in the United 
States engaged in inter-American trade to 
participate in the meeting. 



SEPTEMBER 21, 1940 



225 



Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plat e Scrap, etc. 



MONTHLY STATISTICS 



[Released to the press September :;1J 

Note: The figures relating to arras, the licenses for 
the exiiort of which were revoked before they were 
used, have been sul)tractecl from the tlgiires appearing 
in the cumulative column of the table l)el(iw in regard 
to arms export licenses issued. Tliese latter figures 
are therefore net figures. They are not yet final and 
definitive since licenses may be amended or revoked 
at any time before being used. They are, however, 
accurate as of the date of this press release. 

The statistics of actual esjiorts in these releases are 
believed to be substantially complete. It is possible, 
however, that .some .shipments are not incluiled. If 
this proves to be the fact, statistics in regard to such 
shipments will be included in the cumulative figures 
In later releases. 

Arms Export Licenses Issued 

The table printed below iiidicutes the char- 
acter, value, iiiul countries of destination of 
the arms, niuniunitioii, and iniplenieiits of war 
licensed for expoit by the Secretary of State 
during the year 1940 up to and including the 
month of August : 





CHtcgory 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of tlestiuation 


August 1940 


8 months end- 
ing .\u^st 
31, 1940 




IV (1) 

I (4) 

V (1) 
(2) 




$57.00 












24 00 






3,200.00 






630.00 








Total... 




3,854.00 




I (2) 
(4) 
(6) 

m (2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VU (1) 
(2) 




ArgentiDft 




24, 095. 50 






5, 415. 00 






2,300.00 






5,141.84 




$2,300.00 


10,062.00 
6, 481. 00 






40,025.00 




6,039.00 


176,701.71 
40, 937. 50 






29.84 




5,410.00 


93,371.51 


Total 


12,749.00 


404,560.90 





Category 


ValuB of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


8 months end- 
ing August 31, 
1940 




I (1) 
(4) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 


$104. 00 
27.14 


$693. 12 




561. as 

1,509, .WO. 00 






13 680 00 






271. 55 






509.00 






25,648 OO 




12,832.00 


870, 569. 25 

2,084,705.00 

33, 474. 86 












Total 


13,053.14 


4, 539, 632. 01 




IV (1) 

I (4) 
IV (2) 








136.00 












17.29 




, 


1 87 








Total 




19.16 




I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 










217 00 






103 200 00 






28, 779. 00 

2,292,000.00 

69.00 














20, 745 00 






243, 957. 00 






419 400 OO 








Total - 




3 108 367 00 




I (4) 

IV (1) 

(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 










16.00 






84.70 




39.84 


74.84 
8,000.00 




5,000.00 


5,000.00 


Total-. 


5,039.84 


13 175 54 




I (4) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 
(2) 




Bolivia . 


50.00 


1 753 00 




1,285.00 






6,600.00 
64.60 










45, 384. 00 






1,953.68 






1.50 








Total... 


50.00 


.56, 941. 78 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

UI (1) 




BraiU 


786.00 


1,773.00 




5, 438. 00 




1,897,325.00 
822.00 


1,897,325.00 

6, 780. 00 

978,200.00 



226 



DEPARTJIENT OF STATE BULLETIIT 



Country of destination 



Category 



Brszil— Continued. 



Total 

British Guiana. 



Total 

British Honduras . 



Total 

British North Borneo 
Burma 



Total. 
Canada 



Total. 



Chile.. 



IV (I) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 



rv (2) 

V (1) 
(3) 

vn (1) 

(2) 



I (i) 

IV (2) 

VII (1) 

(2) 



(4) 



I (2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 



Total. 



in 



IV 



VI 
VII 



Value of export licenses issued 



August X940 



8 months end- 
ing Augu.sl 31, 
1940 



I (2) 
(4) 
(« 
(6) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 



$15, 401. 00 
2. 902. 00 

105, 800. 00 
7,121.00 
7,000.00 



2, 037, 157. 00 



18.69 



135, 164. 66 
76, 440. 00 



59, 536. 04 



346,750.00 



39, 315. 34 
500.61 



$34, 713. 75 
24, 544. 14 
657, 463. 00 
110,584.86 
285, 009. 60 



4, 001, 821. 25 



6.82 
2, 500. 00 
2, 500. 00 
1, 108. 84 
1, 680. 00 



7, 795. 66 
12.00 



129.20 
108. 30 



348. 19 



2.43 



400.00 
133.64 
755. 25 
136.00 



1, 424. 79 



86,062.82 

1,303,901.48 

45.00 

26, 606. 67 

92.92 



2, 074. 414. 44 



70.00 
27, 741. 28 



409, 660. 00 

719.00 

1,907.60 



439, 997. 88 



777, 

180, 

40, 

377, 

90, 

19, 360, 

4, 

52, 

61, 

347, 

8, 762, 

12, 154, 

36, 

142, 

44, 



370. 84 
938. 97 
668.00 
585. 05 
164.00 
344.00 
141.00 
368.90 
559. 35 
976. 57 
994. 72 
150.09 
053. 00 
266. 52 
332. 67 



42, 422, 903. 68 



3, 040. 00 

37, 271. 28 

5, 450. 00 

3, 630. 00 

409, 560. 00 

53, 069. 00 
7, 391. 86 
3, 500. 00 
3, 407. 50 

30, 535. 00 
1.5.00 

12, 607. 16 



Country of destination 



Category 



China. 



Total. 
Colombia... 



Total.. 
Costa Rica.. 



Total.. 



Cuba. 



Total.. 
Curasao 



Total... .- 

Denmark 

Dominican Republic. 



I (2) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 



I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 



669, 476. 79 



Value of export licenses issued 



8 months end- 
August 1940 ing Aueust 31, 
1940 



I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 



I (2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 



I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 



V (3) 

I (2) 

IV (1) 

(2) 



$3, 221. 71 
193, 300. 00 



196, 521. 71 



293.00 



9. 975. 00 
13, 500. 00 



2, 940. 00 



26, 708. 00 



985.00 
63.00 



156. 60 



1, 203. 60 



73.00 
20.00 



29.00 
6,000.00 



6, 251. 20 



639.00 
381. 62 



6, 737. 60 
6.00 



7, 763. 12 



210. 00 
1, 529. 00 



$352, 440. 00 

2, ,529, 106. 22 

137, 950. 10 

178. 60 

3, 226. 71 

156, 800. 00 

2, 548, 480. 63 

2, 196, 955. 35 

1,018,225.66 

361,000.00 



1, 304, 363. 17 



30.00 

157.00 

2,310.90 

667. 76 

333, 750. 00 

12, 787. 00 

60, 995. 00 

1,027.31 

4, 905. 00 



416, 629. 97 



4.00 
1, 122. 30 
199.25 
26, 000. 00 
2, 967. 62 
13, 104. 70 
1, 801. 86 



44, 199. 73 



143.00 
131, 164. 00 
3, 315. 60 
9, 252. 00 
7, 700. 00 
4, 600. 00 
2, 000. 00 
3, 135. 00 

761.00 



161, 960. 50 



685.00 

77.39 

1, 293. 50 

696. 26 

106, 159. 00 

8, 536. 26 

67, 960. 00 

22.60 



174, 219. 91 



2, 040. 00 



210.00 

2, 396. 00 

843.00 



SEPTEMBER 21, 1940 



227 





Category 


Value of e\port licenses issued 


Country o( destination 


August 1940 


8 months end- 
ing .\ugust 31, 
1940 


Dominican Republic— Con. 


V (2) 
VII (I) 




$600.00 




1,501.80 








Total.... 


$1,739.00 


5,550.80 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (I) 

(2) 




Ecuador ._ . 


38.80 


208.52 




201.00 






156.00 




666.0O 


19, 149. 00 
1,022.00 






226.00 






900.00 








Total . . 


704.80 


21. 862. 52 




I (2) 
(3) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 




Egypt. . --- 




837.50 






3, 310. 00 






1 630 21 




50,000.00 


50,388.00 
752. 31 






16 993. 00 






60.00 








Total 


60,000.00 


74, 021. 02 




I (1) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
vn (2) 




El Salvador 




125 052. 00 






1,111.00 






18,200.00 
76.00 










6, 460. 00 






375 00 






8 350 00 








Total 




159, 624. 00 




I (4) 

I (2) 
(3) 
(4) 

rV (I) 
(2) 

V (2) 

VII (2) 






Fiji 


81.42 


81.42 










19 660.00 






S», 569. 60 






3, 806, 493. 89 






951.50 




141.02 
15,680.00 
75,000.00 


141.02 

42,463.25 

640,900.00 


Total - 


90,821.02 


5,049,179.26 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 

m (1) 

(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 

(2) 


France 




201 488 00 






4,842 295 "I 






.506, 795. 00 






7,321 950 50 






499, 000. 00 






28, 111,023.00 






10, 337. OO 






30 00 






376. 315. no 






546, 000. 00 






11, 950, 423. 01 






1, 644, 697. 00 






2.00 






56, 593. OO 








Total 




56,066,949.22 





Category 


Value o( export licenses issued 


Country o( destination 


August 1940 


8 months end- 
ing AUEUSt 31, 
1940 


French Indochina 


I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 




$78 50 






51.00 






3, 836. 00 






11.00 






125, 000. 00 






6, 875. 00 






21. ,"154. 00 








Total 




157 406 10 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 

HI (I) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (I) 
(2) 






Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland. 


$1. 060. 00 
1,806,822.50 


5, 531, 430. 00 
19,217,025.94 
3, 598, 126. 52 




7, 271, 361. 98 

12, 000, 000. 00 

43,128.341.00 

25, 189. 34 

32, 677. 00 

5,574.00 


35,919,888.88 

12, 484, 177. 10 

218, 592. 019. 85 

127, 923. 14 

1,112,527.36 

2, 745, 295. 76 

61, 075. 00 




16,850,367.38 

16,206,084.88 

360. 135. 00 

3,350,000.00 


22.113.096.19 

36, 044, 631. 00 

9.260,303.94 

5, 473, 039. 80 


Total 


100, 037, 613. 08 


372, 280, 560. 48 




I (3) 
(4) 
(5) 

IV (1) 












.W.OO 






90,900.00 






21.00 








Total 




91 121 00 




I (I) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 






Greenland 




1,015.48 
.578. 30 










6.B74 65 







1,731.57 




540.00 
105.00 


.MO. 00 
105.00 


Total 


645.00 


10. 645. 00 




rv (1) 

(2) 

VII (1) 

(2) 


Guatemala.. 




186 00 






I.:t40.00 






226 80 






.5. 164. 00 








Total 




6,916.80 




IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 

vn (1) 




Haiti... - 


244.80 


1,609.85 
23 00 






7,000.60 






24.30 


Total 


244,80 


8 657 15 




I (4) 

IV (I) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

\^I (2) 








432.00 






388.00 






1.528.00 




10, 000. 00 


10. 000. 00 
4, 238. 00 






131.00 








Total 


10, 000. 00 


16,717.00 



262604 — 40- 



228 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


s months end- 
ing August 31, 
1940 




I 

IV 
V 
VI 


(1) 

(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 


$23.00 
938. 00 
680. 00 


$2,040.75 




938.00 
1, 803. 10 
7, 363. 00 






67.75 






22, 832. 00 






24, 750. 00 






120.00 










1,641.00 


59, it 14. 60 




IV 

V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 








1,920.00 






374.00 






7, 890. 00 






763.00 






65. 00 








Total 




11,012.00 




I 

IV 

V 

VI 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 






India 




3, 437. 39 






7, 326. 87 






3, 678. 64 






780. 55 






67, 500. 00 




163. 00 


1,409.40 
1,000 00 




2, 586. GO 


3.468.00 


Total 


2,749.00 


88, 660. 85 




I 
III 

V 


(2) 
(1) 
(1) 








37, 500. 00 






700 000 00 






112,000.00 








Total 




909, 500. 00 




I 
III 

V 


(2) 
(2) 
(2) 






Iraq.- 


47,865.00 


47, 865. 00 
27 165 00 




148, 000. 00 


148,000.00 


Total 


195,865.00 


223, 030. 00 




V 


(1) 
<2) 
(3) 




Ireland 




235, 503. 00 
3, 270. 60 
33,380.00 














Total 




272, 153. 60 




V 
IV 


(2) 

(1) 
(2) 




Italy-- 




13, 610. 00 








Jamaica 




123 00 






41.45 








Total 




164 45 




I 

IV 


(1) 
(4) 
(I) 
(2) 






Kenya - 




107 00 






60.00 




616.00 


714.00 
35 00 








Total 


616. 00 


916 00 




VII 


(2) 




Leeward Islands 




162. 46 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


8 months end- 
ing August 31, 
1940 


MacaU- 


I (2) 
I (4) 

I (1) 
(4) 
(5) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (I) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (2) 

VII (1) 
C2) 




$555. 00 








Mauritius --- 




137.00 








Mexico.- - - - - 


$86. 65 
30.26 


220 75 




30.26 
112.60 




1, 787. 30 

547. 20 

32, 560. 00 

88.00 

1, 000. 00 

63.00 


16, 037. 30 

1, 023. 20 

438, 682. 40 

7, 443. 40 
38, 255. 00 

175. 50 

8, 040. 25 




8,825.00 


49, 737. 00 


Total - - 


44, 977. 31 


559 757 56 








Mozambique-. 


I (1) 
(4) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 




116 00 






154. 61 






282, 000. 00 






17, 144. no 






55,710.00 








Total - 




356, 124. 61 










Netherlands 


I (2) 
(4) 
(5) 

V (2) 
(3) 




12 866 00 






47.50 






165.00 






17, 942. 19 






63, 300. 00 








Total 




94, 310. 69 










Netherlands Indies 


I (2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(6) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 


3, 375, 900. 00 

975, 000. 00 

3, 031, 752. 90 

1, 384, 400. 00 

782,868.00 


3, 447, 960. 00 
975, 000. 00 
3, 032, 411. 64 
2, 304, 600. 00 
6,399,118.10 
9, 081. 90 






5,689.80 
13, 103.90 


68, 321. 65 

19, 792. 93 

622, 056. 12 




2, 487. 50 
208, 750. 00 


211, 777. 60 

441, 260. 79 

338. 80 




160, 749. 30 


160, 749. 30 


Total 


9, 940, 701. 40 


17, 692, 458. 73 




I (4) 






923.82 








Newfoundland. .- 


I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 


13.05 
868.48 

12.50 
157. 90 


131 55 




1, 168. 72 

1,946.62 

398.22 


Total -- 


1, 051. 93 


3,645 11 








New Guinea, Territory of... 


IV (2) 

V (2) 




17.25 






1, 250. 00 








Total . .. 






1, 267. 25 










New Zealand 


I (4) 
III CD 




266, 750. OO 






1, 916, 870. 00 



SEPTEMBER 21, 194 



229 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country ot destination 


-\uKUSt 1940 


8 month.s end- 
ing August 31, 
1940 


New Zealand — Continued. 


IV (1) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 




$202.00 






161. 5->7. 45 






130, 230 00 






11, 045. 00 








Total. 




2, 486, 624. 45 




I (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 






Nicaragua 




62. 500. 00 






9,000.00 




$25.00 


25.00 
480.00 






870.00 






1, 292. 00 








Total 


25.00 


74, 167. OO 




I (2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 




Nigeria 




278.50 






21.00 






30.25 






89.04 








Total 




418.79 




IV (1) 

I (I) 
(2) 
(4) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 






Northern Rhodesia 




25.50 












70.00 






450.00 






36, 545. 00 






712. 000. 00 






280.00 






222.00 






121.00 






2,200.00 






39,601.00 






1.515.00 








Total 




793, 007. 00 




V (3) 

I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






Palestine 


1,000.00 


1,400.00 










12. 600. 00 






3,900.00 






6,600.00 






8, 804. 75 






1.207.00 






27. 866. 00 




100.00 
800.00 


174.00 

1. 380. 00 

2. 262. 46 




728.00 


728.00 


Total 


1, 628. 00 


65. 422. 21 




I (4) 
IV (2) 








384.80 






12, 150. 45 








Total 




12, 535. 25 




IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 






Peru 




7. 550. 90 






240.00 






393. 138. 50 




5. 694. 58 
24. 457. 00 


11.455.58 
86. 666. 00 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


S months end- 
ing August 
31, 1940 


Peru— Continued. 


VII 


(1) 

(2) 


$1, 146. 00 


$2. 140. 00 
1, 130. 50 








Total 


31.291.58 


502.S21.48 




I 

III 
IV 

V 
VII 


(1) 

(4) 

(1) 
(1) 

(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




Portugal 




51.80 






44.00 






103, 446. 00 






30.00 






422.00 






4,300.00 




2,720.00 


77,939.94 
66,125.00 






841.76 




17,000.00 


71,000.00 


Total 


19,720.00 


321. 200. 50 




V 

I 

V 


(2) 

(1) 
(2) 








2.500.00 












260.00 




760.00 








Total 




1.020.00 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 










495.60 






227. .'0 




184.46 

209.30 

35.00 


545.56 

317. 30 

95. .52 

160. 226. 00 








Total 


428.76 


162, 007. 48 




I 


(1) 
(4) 






150. 00 
25.00 


130 00 




25.00 


Total . . 


155.00 


15.T 00 




I 
I 

IV 


(1) 

(2) 
(4) 
(2) 




Straits Settlements 




9. 12 












11. 644. 50 






1.64 






2 47 








Total 




11.548 61 




I 

III 

IV 
V 


(2) 
(4) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 






Sweden 




108.000 OO 






65. 572. 00 






4. 000. 00 






233. 625. 00 






96. 130.53 






247, 298. 00 








Total 




" 754, 625. 53 




IV 


(1) 1 






Switzerland 




20.00 



" The apparent discrepancy between the values reported for the arms, 
ammunition, and implements of war authorized to be exported to Sweden 
during the period Jan. 1-Aug. 31. 1940. and the corresponding figures for 
periods covered in previous press releases, is due to a number of licenses 
authorizing the exportation of arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
to Sweden which were canceled. 



230 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


8 months end- 
ing August 
31. 1940 


Thailand 


I (1) 
(4) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 




$27, 800. 00 




$8.67 


8.67 
707, 334. 00 






1, 643. 84 




1, 066. 00 
61.62 


16,994.89 

61.62 

07, 200. 00 




1, 467. 00 
9, 190. 00 


68, 070. 74 
166, 190. 00 


Total 


n, 792. 09 


1, 084, 203. 56 




IV (1) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 




Trinidad -- 




163.00 






294.00 






18, 625. 00 






862.00 








Total ..-- 




19, 924. 00 




III (2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (2) 






Turliev 




6, 610. 00 






33.00 






6.20 




24, 000. 00 
42, 857. 00 


139, 760. 00 
42,857.00 


Total 


60, 857. 00 


188, 266. 20 




I CD 
(4) 

III CI) 

IV CD 
C2) 

V CI) 
C2) 
C3) 

VII CD 
C2) 




Union of i-'outh Vfr'ca 




308. 00 






620. 93 




280,400.00 


454,000.00 
190, 488. 70 






30, 257. 00 






2, 936, 030. 00 




36, 383. 46 
8,600.00 


91, 575. 2S 

3?8, 2110. 00 

156.00 






40, 228. 00 








Total 


326, 283. 46 


4, 087, 923. 91 




I (4) 

IV CD 
C2) 

V CD 
(2) 

VII C2) 








2B0. 00 






1, 622. 00 






6, 887. 30 






53, 600. 00 






100. 40 






660.00 








Total 




63, 029. 70 




I CD 

C2) 
C4) 

III CD 

IV CD 
C2) 

V CD 
C2) 
C3) 

VII CD 
C2) 






Venezuela. . 


43.00 


184 20 




278.00 




27.00 


69. 55 
163,970.00 




46.00 

1.26 

19,000.00 

3, 700. 00 


4,8S1. 60 

192. 70 

113, SCO. 00 

69,301.00 

95, 270 00 




1,991.40 


11, 003. 40 
19 277 40 








Total.... 


21,808.65 


468.287.88 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


8 months end- 
ing August 
31, 1940 




IV (2) 
VII ^2) 


$10.00 
108. 30 


$10. 00 




136. 37 


Total 


118. 30 


145. 37 




V C2) 
C3) 




Yugoslavia 




9,411.75 






30, 780. 00 








Total 




40, 191. 75 












116,686,060.21 


530, 614, 606. 21 









During the month of August, 438 arms- 
export licenses were issued, making a total of 
3,153 such licenses issued during the current 
year. 

Arms Exported 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
exported during the year 1940 up to and in- 
cluding the month of August under export 
licenses issued by the Secretary of State : 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


Smonthsend- 

ing August 31, 

1940 




I (4) 

V CD 

C2) 




$24.00 






3,200.00 






496.00 








Total 




3, 719. 00 




I C2) 
C4) 
(5) 

IV CD 
C2) 

V CD 
C2) 
C3) 

VII CD 
C2) 






Argentina 


$884.00 


24, 095. 50 




240.00 






2,418.00 




3,560.00 


7, 802. 00 
6. 504. 00 




6, 025. 00 
250.00 


40. 026. 00 
63,480.48 
290,713.60 






29 84 




660.00 


61,611.61 


Total 


11,369.00 


486,819.83 




I CD 

C4) 

HI CD 

IV CD 

C2) 








816. 63 






468.08 






7, 806, 135. 00 






136. 65 






609.00 



SEPTEMBER 21, 1940 



231 





CateKory 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


8 months end- 
ing August 31, 
1940 




V 
VU 


(1) 

(2) 
(3) 
(1) 




$13, 296. 00 




$182, 124. 00 

362,829.00 

15,200.00 


688,32^.0(1 
831,450.00 
33,474.86 


Total 


560,153.00 


9, 274, 599. 02 




IV 

I 
IV 


(1) 

(4) 
(2) 








136.00 








Belgian Congo 




17.29 






1.87 












10.16 




I 
ni 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
<1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 






Belgium 




217.00 






49, 450. 00 






28, 809. 79 






1, 146, 000. 00 






69.00 






20, 745. 00 






6, 807. 00 






119,997.00 








Total 




1, 371, 094. 79 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 






Bermuda 




48.00 






16.00 




36.00 


36.00 

8,000.00 




2,600.00 


2, 500. 00 


Total 


2.635.00 


10, 599. 00 




I 

IV 
V 

VU 


(4) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




Bolivia 


426.00 


1, 742. 00 




1.285.00 






19. 000. 00 






1,041.69 






58. 741. 00 




173.78 


1,881.88 
1,60 








Total -. 


699. 76 


83, 693. 07 




I 
m 

IV 
V 

vn 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 




Brazil - 


158.00 


987.00 




5. 438. 00 




19100 


8, 569. OO 
349, 750. 00 






18, 462. 75 




97.14 

201, 500. 00 

13,068.80 

32, 637. 50 


20, 169. 14 

613. 672 00 

117,303.63 

171, 855. 25 

2.00 








Total -- 


247, 655. 44 


1, 306, 208. 77 




IV 
V 

vn 


(2) 
(3) 
(1) 




British Guiana 




6.82 




2,600.00 
791. 16 


2. 500. 00 
1, 108. 84 


Total ._,. 


3,291.16 


3,615.66 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


Smonthsend- 

ing Aueust 31, 

1940 


British Honduras 


IV (1) 

(2) 

VU (1) 

(2) 




$15.00 






18.00 






129.20 






108.30 








Total 




270 50 




I (1) 
(3) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 






Burma 




90 00 






400.00 






229.54 






472.00 






49.22 








Total 




1, 240. 76 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 

in (1) 

(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (2) 
VU (1) 

(2) 






Canada. .... . . 


$627, 280. 48 
68,888.47 


655.891.46 
126, 394. 47 
38. 569. 00 






166,979.06 

154.00 

1,887,244.00 


272. 202. 59 

94, 654. 00 

6, 128, 697. 00 

248, .Wl. 31 




25,415.36 

107. 63 

26. 670. OO 

711,285.97 

592,864.30 

2.00 

16,125.47 


34, 775. 95 
73, 213. 59 
520, 704. 57 
1,400,166.44 
3,711,428.24 
36.008.00 
117,812.77 
84, 314. 35 








Total 


4,112,006.93 


13,543 413.74 




I (2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 




ChUe 




2 970 00 




18,384.00 


18, 770. 00 
5 300 00 






3, 630. 00 






63,841.00 






6,351.00 






3,500.00 




3, 297 50 
29,732.00 


3, 407. 50 
62,678.00 
12,607 15 








Total - 


51,413.50 


162 054 65 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VU (1) 
(2) 




Cliina 




1 344 00 






468, 005. 00 






850.00 






23, 753. 00 






1, 149, 654. 57 




4,497.00 


18,033.00 
268.60 






5. 649. 00 






114,600.00 




25, 419. 00 
258,673.00 


1,333.432.50 
662, 481. 00 
334. T24. 00 






342, 000. 00 








Total 


288, 589. 00 


4,353,794.67 



232 



DEPAETMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


8 niontl;s end- 
ing August 31, 
1940 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 


$30. 00 
112.00 
260.00 
38.00 


$30.00 




iTT. 00 

1,935.20 

1,831.76 

348, 350. 00 

6, 190. 00 




5,702.00 


35, 592. 00 
1 , 027. 00 






1, 985. 00 










6, 142. 00 


397, 097. 96 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
C2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








4.00 






137. 30 




120.00 


136. 25 
25, 000. 00 






22, 057. 00 






27, 376. 00 






2, 235. 26 






51.00 










120.00 


76, 996. 81 




I (2) 
(4) 

III CD 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






70.00 
155.00 


70.00 




728.00 
43, 350. 00 




390.00 
1, 492. 00 
6,000.00 

540.00 


2, 445. 50 
11,673.00 
7, 700. 00 
8,895.00 
12,876.00 




757.52 


5, 377. 72 
751.00 








Total 


9, 404. 52 


93, 866. 22 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 








585.00 






77.39 






654.50 






214.64 






103, 975. 00 




135.50 

7,900.00 

5.00 


903.50 

63,150.00 

22.50 




8,040.50 


159, 582. 53 




I (2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (1) 




Dominican Republic 


210.00 


210.00 
S.M. 00 






515.00 






600.00 






1,501.80 








Total 


210.00 


3,680.80 




I (I) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (2) 








169. 72 






226.00 






191.00 






16,418.00 




1,022.00 


1,022.00 
900.00 








Total 


1,022.00 


18, 926. 72 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


Smonthsend- 

ing August 31, 

1940 


Egypt 


I (3) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 




$2, 680. 00 




26.21 






3, 519. 00 






989. 31 






60.00 


Total 




7, 274, 52 




I (I) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (2) 






El Salvador 


$125,000.00 
456.00 


125, 052. 00 




1,213.00 
18, 200. 00 






76.00 




2,759.00 


6, 436. 40 
375. 00 






8. 350. 00 








Total 




128, 215. 00 


159, 702. 40 




I (2) 
(3) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 








184.310.00 






436, 694. 00 
1, 364, 078. 89 






2,321,496.00 






951. 50 






120, 681. 00 






1,200,063.00 






369, 864. 00 








Total 






5, 998, 138. 39 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 










201,228.00 






4,841.072.71 






.506 047.00 






7, 463, 300. 60 






499, 000. 00 






53, 907, 979. OO 
20, 845. 00 






368, 315. 00 
540 000. OO 






3, 927, 169. 82 






10, 345, 538. 00 
2.00 






56, 693 00 








Total 






82, 683, 090. 03 




I (4) 

IV (1) 

(2) 










51.00 






3. 836. 00 






11.00 








Total 






3, 898. 00 




I (4) 

I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(6) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 






French West Africa 




33.83 








Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland. 


1,060.00 

239,606.00 

19,901.00 

340, 745. 38 

258, 843. 00 

21,395,384.00 

20, 654. 00 

173, 422. 80 

172, 177. 65 


2, 919, 430. 00 

5,003,451.55 

1,931,093.20 

7,930,339.38 

415,316.60 

43,689,392.00 

20, 654. 00 

515,745.86 

365, 391. 55 

8, 000. 00 




1, 459, 788. 65 
6,370,824.88 


3, 316, 894. 79 
9, 270, 588. 48 



SEPTEMBER 21, 19 4 



233 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


8 months end- 

inp August 

31, 1940 


Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland— Continued. 


VII 


(1) 

(2) 


$69,038.00 
1,214,219.00 


$7,937,305.06 
2,830,854.00 




31,735,664.16 


86, 154, 456. 47 




I 


(3) 

(4) 




Greece -... - 




150.00 






50.00 








Total 




200.00 




I 
IV 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 










1,015.48 






678.30 






6,674.65 






1,731.57 




640.00 
105.00 


540.00 
105.00 


Total 


645.00 


10,645.00 




I 

IV 

VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 








37.00 






12.00 






198.00 






1,336.00 






226.80 




2,100.00 


5,164.00 




2,100.00 


6, 934. 80 




IV 
VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 




Haiti 




336. .M 






2.1.00 






24.30 






6.0 








Total 




389.85 




I 

IV 
V 

vn 


(4) 
(I) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 






Honduras . 


29.00 


332.00 




388.00 




7.00 
10,000.00 


1,099.00 

110,000.00 

3, 213. 00 






391.00 








Total - . 


10,036.00 


115,423.00 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(I) 
(2) 






23.00 
12.00 


23.00 




12.00 
7, 363, 00 






5, 196. 00 








Total.. 


35.00 


12, 594 '00 




IV 

V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(I) 
(2) 
(2) 








1,920.00 
363 00 










7, 890. 00 






763.00 






65.00 








Total - . 




11 001 00 




I 

IV 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 






India 




2. 7SS. 45 






7,041.96 






3, 528. 64 






1.095.31 





Cat«Rory 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


8 months end- 
ing .\ugust 
31, 1940 


India — Continued. 


V 
\1 


(1) 

(2) 
(3) 
(2) 




$67, 500. 00 






1, 336. 40 






1,000.00 






929.00 








Total 




85, 219. 76 




III 
IV 


(1) 
(2) 
(I) 
(2) 










694, 963. 00 






27, 165. 00 






94.37 






25.85 








Total 




722. 248. 22 




V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 






Ireland 




116 823.00 




$3, 270. 60 
33. 380. 00 


3. 270. 60 
.33, J80. 00 


Total 


36, 650. 60 


153.473.60 




IV 


(1) 
(2) 




Jamaica 




346 00 






27.60 








Total 




373.60 




V 

IV 

V 

I 


(2) 

(I) 

(3) 

0) 
(4) 






Japan 




4, 143. 00 








Kenya 


516.00 


618.00 






Latvia 




18.077.00 








Mauritius . .... 




251.45 






337.28 








Total 




688.73 




I 

IV 
V 

VI 
VII 


(I) 
(5) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 






Mexico 




.56.00 






112.50 




6,424.60 


14, 704. 60 
476.00 




39.542.40 

48.00 

1,000.00 

63.00 


417,382.40 

2. 937. 00 

14,505.00 

175. 50 

16, 207. .50 




145.00 


39,301.00 


Total 


47,223.00 


505, 857. 50 




I 

V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 








116.00 






154.61 






282, 000. 00 




4,080.00 
55, 710. 00 


7, 304. 00 
55, 710. OO 


Total 


59.790.00 


345, 284. 61 




I 
ni 

V 


(2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 








26, 653. 00 






47.50 






155.00 






9. 674. 00 






107, 740. 00 






163,472.50 






187, 137. 50 


Total..- 




494,879.50 



234 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


8 months end- 
ing Au.eust 
31, 1940 


Netherlands Indies 


I 

III 
IV 
V 

VII 


(2) 
(4) 
(6) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 


$16,806.00 
15,112.00 


$92,484.00 

16.359.77 

281.075.00 




61.160.00 
440.00 


1,570,958.00 

740.00 

40, 639. 36 




202.38 


1,613.20 
334 677 00 




81,423.00 
82, 446. 00 
50, 169. 30 


234, 331. 00 
213. 195. 00 
188, 169. 30 


Total-,- 


307, 758. 68 


2,974,141.62 




I 
I 

IV 


(4) 

(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 








203.00 












lis 60 






96 24 




1, 271. 00 
19.92 


1,934.50 
215. 82 


Total 


1, 290. 92 


2, 364. 06 




IV 
V 


(2) 
(2) 




New Guinea, Territory of 




17 25 


1,000.00 


2, 500. 00 


Total 


1, 000. 00 


2, 517. 25 




I 

IV 

V 

VII 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 


New Zealand.. 


24, 301. 00 


26 615. 00 




202 00 






2,371.15 
2, 640. 00 
11,386.00 








6, 395. 00 


Total - 


29, 696. 00 


43, 114. 16 




I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 

(2) 
(4) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 








34,827.00 
8, 267. 00 
1, 264. 00 














4 036 00 






480 00 






870 00 














Total 




51,035.00 




I 

IV 


(2) 
(4) 
(2) 




Nigeria 


278. 50 


278 50 








8.00 


8.00 


Total ._ 


286.50 


319 60 




IV 

I 
m 

IV 
V 


(1) 

(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(I) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 


















( 








286 00 






36, 493. 20 

1,364,114.00 

280 00 














30 00 






137 00 






2,200.00 
644 OO 












Total 




1,394,263.20 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


8 months end- 
ing Aupust 
31, 1940 


Palestine-.- 


V 

I 

IV 
V 

VII 


<3) 

(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 




$400. 00 








Panama 




12. 500 00 






3. 900. 00 






8, 700. 00 






8, 781. 75 






1, 207. 00 




$2, 866. 00 
100.00 
800.00 


21,807.13 

174. 00 

1,447.00 

2 916. 60 








Total 


3,766.00 


61,432.48 




I 

IV 


(4) 

(2) 




101.80 
3. 286. 00 






11,215.45 


Total - 


3, 387. 80 


11, 600. 25 




IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
W) 
0) 
(2) 


Peru 




7 361 00 






2J0. 00 






387, 810 00 






15,872.00 






62. 617. 00 






1, 000. 00 






1, 131.00 








Total- 




476. 031. 00 




I 
III 

IV 

V 

VII 


(1) 
(4) 
CD 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(I) 






Portugal --- 




51 80 






44 00 






877. 298. 00 






30.00 






422.00 






4. 663. 00 




220.00 


44. Z& 91 
54. 26.5. 00 




488.00 


841. 76 


Total 


706.00 


981, 851. 47 




V 
V 

I 

IV 
V 


(2) 

(2) 

(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




Rumania 




000 00 












760. 00 










316. 60 






227. .10 




88.60 


352.50 
82.00 




60.52 
13,300.00 


121.04 
13,300.00 


Total - --. 


13, 764. 62 


14, 678. 64 




I 
I 
rv 

VII 


(1) 

(2) 
(4) 

(2) 

(1) 




Straits Settlements 




9 12 












11,644.60 






1 64 






2.47 






193.80 








Total 




11,842 41 




I 


(2) 
(4) 






Sweden 




108,000 00 






65, 307. 00 



SEPTEMBER 21, 1940 



235 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


8 months end- 
ing August 
31, 1940 




in (1) 

(2) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 




$3,724,925.00 






4,000.00 




$89,000.00 


133,501.00 
65, 000. 00 




11,520.00 


212,923.98 
247, 267. 00 








Total 


100, 620. 00 


4, 580, 923. 98 




I (1) 
(4) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 




'i'liailand 




17.65 






1.93 




468, 361. 00 

1, M3. 84 

893.00 


468,361.00 

I, 543. 84 

16, 380. 89 

5, 300. 00 




9,420.00 


13,015.00 
193, 120. 00 








Total 


480, 217. 84 


697, 740. 31 




IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 






153.00 






18 00 






3,094 00 






18, 025. 00 






852.00 








Total 




22, 742. 00 




I (2) 
(6) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 






Turkey. 




148, 135. 00 






168. 750. 00 






1. 191.084.00 






17 070 00 






14. 236. 00 






1,306.20 
233.795.10 
70, 344. 00 




45, 997. 00 








Total 


45,997.00 


1,834,720.30 




I (1) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 


Union of South Africa. - 




296.00 






585. 93 






173, 600. 00 




21,925.00 


91. 588. 70 
7.00 




401, 625. 00 
12, 775. 00 
81, 175. 00 


411.228.00 

24, 806. 64 

87.175.00 

156.00 






40. 064 OO 








Total 


617, 500. 00 


829.487.27 




V (3) 

I (4) 

IV (1) 

(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

vn (2) 


Union of Soviet Socialist lie- 




120, 512. 00 


publics. 








299 00 






1,522 00 




1,068.00 


4. 146. 30 
35. 104. 00 




20.40 


100.40 
660 00 




■ 




Total 


1,088.40 


41,831.70 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


8 months end- 
ing August 
31, 1940 




I 

ni 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 

(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




$111.40 






246.00 






39.00 






107, 970. 00 






3,316.60 






191.45 




$1,800.00 


94, 783. 00 
28, 271. 00 




3.000.00 
2,317.53 


82. 131. 00 
11.807.01 
l,'i.800, 40 








Total 


7, 117. 53 


404, 756. 86 




V 


(I) 
(2) 
(3) 




Yugoslavia 




63. 000. 00 






26. 806. 75 






31. 080. 00 








Total ... 




120 886. 76 










Grand total 


38,837,613.86 


223. 606. 654. 19 









Arms Import Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of origin of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war li- 
censed for import by the Secretary of State 
during the mouth of August 1940: 



Country of origin 


Category 


Value 


Total 


Argentina 


V (2) 
I (2) 

(3) 

(4) 

m (1) 

V (2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 

I (I) 

V (2) 
I (4) 

V (2) 
(3) 


$7.50.00 

2, 650. 00 
250.00 
227. 00 

3. 500. 00 

20.00 

9. 500. 00 

1.00 

37.00 

100.00 

1. 285. 00 

2. 733. 00 
4.000.00 


$750.00 






Dominican Republic 

El Salvador 


10.148.00 

37.00 
100. 00 


Great Britain 


1.285.00 




J 6.733.00 




Total 




25. 053. 00 











During the month of August, 16 import li- 
censes were issued, making a total of 145 such 
licenses issued during the cun-ent year. 

Categories or Arms, AMMUNmoN, and Imple- 
ments OF War 
The categories of arms, ammunition, and 
implements of war in the appropriate column 



236 

of the tables printed above are the categories 
into which diose articles were divided in the 
President's proclamation of May 1. 1937, enu- 
merating the articles which would be consid- 
ered as arms, ammunition, and implements of 
war for the purposes of section 5 of the joint 
resolution of May 1, 1937 [see the Bulletin of 
July 27, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 57), pp. 5&-59]. 

Special Statistics in Regard to Arms Exports 
TO Cuba 

In compliance with article II of the conven- 
tion between the United States and Cuba to 
suppress smuggling, signed at Habana, March 
11, 1926, which reads in part as follows: 

"The High Contracting Parties agi'ee that 
clearance of shipments of merchandise by wa- 
ter, air, or land, from any of the ports of either 
country to a port of entry of the other country, 
shall be denied when such shipment comprises 
articles the importation of which is prohibited 
or restricted in the country to which such 
shipment is destined, unless in this last case 
there has been a compliance with the requisites 
demanded by the laws of both countries." 

and in compliance with the laws of Cuba which 
restrict the importation of anns, ammunition, 
and implements of war of all kinds by requir- 
ing an import permit for each shipment, ex- 
port licenses for shipments of arms, ammuni- 
tion, and implements of war to Cuba are re- 
quired for the articles enumerated below in 
addition to the articles enumerated in the 
President's proclamation of May 1, 1937; 

(1) Arms and small arms using ammunition 
cf caliber .22 or less, other than those classed as 
toys. 

(2) Spare parts of arms and small arms of 
all kinds and calibers, other than those classed 
as toys, and of guns and machine gims. 

(3) Ammunition for the anns and small 
arms under (1) above. 

(4) Sabers, swords, and military machetes 
with cross-guard hilts. 

(5) Explosives as follows: explosive pow- 
ders of all kinds for all purposes; nitrocellu- 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

lose having a nitrogen content of 12 percent or 
less; diphenylamine; djmamite of all kinds; 
nitroglycerine; alkaline nitrates (ammonium. 
IMjtassium, and sodium nitrate); nitric acid; 
nitrobenzene (essence or oil of mirbane) ; sul- 
I)hur; sulijhuric acid; chlorate of potash; and 
acetones. 

(6) Tear gas (CeH^COCH.Cl) and other 
similar non-toxic gases and apparatus designed 
for the storage or pi-ojection of such gases. 

The table pi-inted below indicates, in respect 
to licenses authorizing the exportation to Cuba 
of the articles and commodities listed in the 
preceding paragraph, issued by the Secretary 
of State during August 1940, the numter of 
licenses and the value of the articles and com- 
modities described in the licenses : 



Number of licenses 


Sections 


Value 


Total 


22 .. 


(2) 
(3) 
(5) 


$11.00 
7, 006. 40 
18. 205. 85 






$25, 223. 25 



The table printed below indicates the value 
of the articles and commodities listed above ex- 
ported to Cuba during August 1940 under 
licenses issued by the Secretary of State : 



Section 



(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(5) 



Value 



$582.00 

45.00 

9, 725. 90 

18, 437. 45 



Total 



$28, 790. 35 



Tin-Plate Scrap 

The table printed below indicates the number 
of licenses issued during the year 1940, up to 
and including the month of August, authoriz- 
ing the export of tin-plate scrap under the pro- 
visions of the act approved February 15, 1936, 
and the regulations issued pursuant thereto, to- 
gether with the number of tons authorized to 
be exported and the value thereof: 



SEPTEMBER 21, 1940 



237 



Country of desti- 


Angust 1940 


8 months ending 
August 31, 1940 


nation 


Quantity in 
long tons 


Total 
value 


Quantity in 
long tons 


Total 
value 


Japan 






4,033 


$75, 009. 70 











During the niontli of August, no licenses 
were issued authorizing the exportation of tin- 
plate scrap. A total of 52 such licenses were 
issued during tlie first seven months of the 
current year. 

Helittm 

No licenses autliorizing the exportation of 
helium gas untlcr the provisions of the act 
approved on September 1, 1937, and the regu- 
lations issued pursuant thereto, were applied 
for or issued duiiiig tiie month of August 1940. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Keleaaed to the press September 18] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
Foreign Service since September 7. 1940: 

Career Officers 

Lynn W. Franklin, of Bethesda, Md., Con- 
sul at Stockholm, Sweden, has been assigned as 
Consul at Xiagara Falls, Ont., Canada. 

Walter H. McKinney, of Sault Ste. Marie, 
Mich., Consul at Sheffield, England, has been 
assigned as Consul at London, England, upon 
the closing of the American Consulate at Shef- 
field. England. 

Eugene A. Masuret, of New Jersey, Third 
Secretary of P]mbassy and Vice Consul at 
Paris, France, has been assigned as Vice Con- 
sul at Bordeaux, France. 

Ernest de W. Mayer, of Flushing, Long Is- 
land, N. Y.. Third Secretary of Embassy and 
Vice Consul at Paris, France, has been assigned 
as Vice Consul at Casablanca, Morocco. 



Non-career Officers 

Jones R. Trowbridge, of Augusta, Ga., Vice 
Consul at Moscow, Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics, has been appointed Vice Consul at 
Toronto, Ont., Canada. 

Worthiiigton E. Hagerman, of Maryland, 
Vice Consul at Paris, France, has been ap- 
pointed Vice Consul at Bordeaux, France. 

Henry O. Ramsey, of Pierre, 8. Dak., Vice 
Consul at Sheffield, England, has been ap- 
pointed Vice Consul at Manchester, England, 
upon the closing of the office at Sheffield, Eng- 
land. 

The following American Consulates, which 
were established for the purpose of perform- 
ing non-immigrant visa services only, will be 
closed September 30, 1940: 

American Consulate, Kingston, Ont., Can- 
ada. 

-\nierican Consulate, Fort J^i-ie, Ont., Can- 
ada. 

American Consulate, Sherbrooke, Que., Can- 
ada. 

American Consulate, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., 
Canada. 



Regulations 



The following Government regulations may 
be of interest to readers of the Bidletin: 

Visas ; Documents Required of Bona Fide Alien 
Seamen Entering tie United States. (Department of 
State.) September 16, 1940. Federal Register, Sep- 
tember 19, 1940 (vol. 5, no. 183), p. 3740 (The National 
Archives of the United States). 

Sugar Consumption Requirements and Quotas for 
the Calendar Tear 1940. (Agricultural Adjustment 
Administration.) September 18, 1940. Federal Regis- 
ter, September 19, 1940 (vol. 5, no. 183), p. 3739-3740 
(The National Archives of the United States). 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



EXTRADITION 

Supplementary Extradition Treaty With 
Switzerland 

The American Minister to Switzerland re- 
ported by a telegram dated September 19, 1940 
that the Swiss Parliament approved on Sep- 
tember 18, 1940 the ratification of the Supple- 
mentary Extradition Treaty between the 
United States and Switzerland signed on 
January 31, 1940. The supplementary treaty 
amends the extradition treaties between the 
two countries of May 14, 1900 and January 10, 
1935 (Treaty Series Nos. 354 and 889) . 



TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

North American Regional Broadcasting- 
Agreement 

In order to carry out the provisions of the 
North American Regional Broadcasting Agree- 
ment, signed at Habana on December 13, 1937, 
wliich agreement will enter into force on ilarch 
29, 1941, the Rules and Regulations of the 
Federal Communications Commission were 
amended and new regulations prescribing the 
restrictions and conditions necessary to carry 
out the provisions of the agreement were 
adopted. The notice of the amendment of the 
rules is printed on page 3696 of the Federal 
Register of September 17, 1940 (vol. 5, no. 181), 
and the amended rules are printed in the same 
issue on pages 3670-3671. These rules govern 
standard and high-frequency broadcast sta- 
tions and will become effective on the effective 
date of the agreement, namely, March 29, 1941. 

The United States has furnished the other 

governments signatory to the agreement — 

Canada, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Haiti, and 

Mexico — with lists of "broadcast stations actu- 

238 



ally in operation", the "clianges authorized to 
be made with respect to said stations", and 
"new broadcast stations authorized but not yet 
in operation", as required under article III of 
the agreement. This information is required 
to be furnished by each party ratifying the 
agreement "not later than 180 days prior to the 
effective date thereof". The latest date on 
which such information is to be received is 
September 29, 1940. 

RESTRICTION OF WAR 

Convention for the Amelioration of the Con- 
dition of the Wounded and the Sick of 
Armies in the Field (Treaty Series No. 
847) and Convention Relating to the 
Treatment of Prisoners of War (Treaty 
Series No. 846) 

Bolivia 

By a note dated September 10, 1940, the 
Swiss Minister at Washington informed the 
Secretary of State of the deposit on August 
13, 1940, of the instruments of ratification by 
Bolivia of the Convention for the Amelioration 
of the Condition of the Wounded and the Sick 
of Armies in the Field and the Convention 
Relating to the Treatment of Prisoners of War, 
both signed at Geneva on July 27, 1929. 
According to the terms of the conventions, they 
will enter into force in respect of Bolivia on 
February 13, 1941. 



Legislation 



An Act To provide for the common defense by in- 
creasing the personnel of the armed forces of the 
United States and providing for its training. (Pub- 
lic. No. 783, 76th Cong., 3d sess.) 14 pp. 5^. 



SEPTEMBEK 21, 1940 



239 



Publications 



The following Government publications may 
be of interest to I'eaders of the Bulletin: 

China Trade Act, 1922, with regulations and forms. 
Edition of 1935, with amendments as of Feb. 26, 1925, 
and June 25, 1938. (Department of Commerce: 
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.) 1940. 
11, 29 pp. [Regulations as amended Sept. 11, 1936.] 
50. 



United States imports and trade agreements con- 
cessions : Statistics of United States imports in se- 
lected years from 1931-39 for each product upon which 
United States has granted concession in trade agree- 
ments, together with rates of tariff duty before and 
after concession. (Tariff Commission.) Feb. 1940. 
8 vols. 978 leaves (processed). Free (from Commis- 
sion). 

United States imports in 1939 of products on which 
concessions were granted in trade agreements. 
(Tariff Commission.) Apr. 1940. 168 leaves (proc- 
essed). [This report, containing preliminary import 
statistics for entire year 1939, supplements the above 
eight volumes, which contain statistics for only 11 
months of 1939.] Free (from Commission). 



U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 1940 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington. D. C. — Price 10 cents Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBI ISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPHOVAL OF THE DIRECTOB OF THE BURBAC OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 



SEPTEMBER 28, 1940 
Vol. Ill: No. 66 — Publication I^o8 



Qontents 

General: Pa^e 

Our Foreign Policy and National Defensor Address hy 

the Under Secretary of State 243 

Controlof iron and steel scrap exports 250 

Alliance between Germany, Italy, and Japan: State- 
ment by the Secretary of State 251 

Washington National Airport : Remarks of the Presi- 
dent 251 

Documentation requirements of certain aliens .... 252 
Executive order prescribing selective service regula- 
tions 252 

Defense Communications Board 253 

The Far East: 

Developments in French Indochina 253 

American Republics: 

Exchange professors and students 254 

Habana Convention of July 30, 1940 256 

Financial Convention with Dominican Republic . . . 256 

Europe: 

Contributions for relief in belligerent countries .... 257 

The Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 268 

Foreign Service Regulations 268 

Legislation 268 

[Over] 




U. S, SUPEKINTENDtNT OF DOCUMENT? 

OCT 14 1940 



Treaty Information: Page 

Sovereignty : 

Convention on the Provisional Administration of 
European Colonies and Possessions in the Ameri- 
cas 269 

Special Assistance: 

Financial convention with the Dominican Republic 

revising the convention of 1 924 271 

Postal : 

Universal Postal Convention of 1939 272 

Publications 273 



General 



OUR FOREIGN POLICY AND NATIONAL DEFENSE 

Address by the Under Secretary of State ' 



[Released to the press September 28] 

I have been particularly gbid to accept the 
invitation of the Foreign Affairs Council to 
address you today on the subject of "Our For- 
eign Policy and National Defense". 

I have been glad because of ray conviction 
that, so far as the interests of the Nation war- 
rant and the exigencies of their duties make it 
possible, those who hold responsible positions 
in the Government involving the conduct of 
our foreign relations should frequently raake 
such public reports. Even more I hold the 
belief that in what is probably the most crit- 
ical moment in our lift? as an independent peo- 
ple, every man and woman in the United States 
should be fully advised as to the course of 
events np(m this tragic international scene — 
they must be aware of the part which their 
Goveriunent has played in trj'ing to avert the 
present nature of that course — and be com- 
pletely cognizant of the steps which it has 
taken to safeguard the vital interests and the 
peace of the American people. 

I think we all of us have recognized increas- 
ingly clearly during these recent years that our 
foreign policy and our ability to defend our- 
selves are inextricably woven together. Out- 
side of the Western Hemisphere, the concept 
of international morality and the authority of 
international law have ceased to be determin- 
ing factors. Those nations which have relied 
upon their neutrality, or which have endeav- 
ored to exercise the weight of the prestige they 



' Delivered by Mr. Welles before the Foreign Affairs 
Council, Cleveland, Ohio, September 28, 1940. 



formerlj' enjoyed, and which did not possess 
the physical means to preserve their neutrality 
or to make their influence felt, have found to 
their bitter cost that a foreign policy, however 
righteous, however acutely devised, based 
merely on morality or prestige, counted for less 
than nothing against the impact of brute force. 
The peoples of the democracies have taken a 
long time to persuade themselves of this truth. 

The history of the recent international rela- 
tions of this country can perhaps be properly 
divided into two chapters. 

The first would cover that period between 
1933 and the early months of 1937, when it still 
seemed unbelievable that the impending calam- 
ity could not be averted through resort to rea- 
son and good-will. In that period this Gov- 
ernment exerted every effort, by offering its 
full cooperation in the negotiation of equitable 
and workable economic readjustments, and in 
the search for agreements for the limitation of 
armaments, and by urging the peaceful settle- 
ment of those political and geographic read- 
justments in which this country was not 
directly concerned, to prevent a world catas- 
trophe which must inevitably shake all civil- 
ized structures — our own by no means least. 

The second chapter is separated from the 
first by the events of those transition months 
which culminated in the agreements of Munich. 

That was in September 1938. Since then 
the policy of this Government has been con- 
cerned primarily and consistently with the 
assuring of our own national defense. It has 
been directed towards the perfection of our 

243 



244 



DEPAETMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



means of cooperation with our sister republics 
of the New World, and towards assisting those 
nations outside the Western Hemisphere whose 
continued independence and integrity con- 
tribute towards the maintenance of peace, and 
whose continued freedom to live their own un- 
trammeled democratic way of life constitutes a 
bulwark for the maintenance of individual lib- 
erty in the Western Hemisphere. 

The basic reason for this change in objective 
is illustrated very clearly in a passage in Har- 
old Nicolson's admirable life of his father. 
In speaking of the years before the World War 
of 1914-18, he says, "It was not considered 
patriotic that one's own country should on 
every occasion set an example of unselfishness, 
humanity and intelligence. It thus came about 
that all but a small minority . . . approached 
the problem of civilization in a competitive 
■and not in a cooperative spirit. In organized 
communities this competitive spirit can be con- 
trolled by the aufliority of law. The Euro- 
pean community of nations was not an organ- 
ized conununity, and for them the ultimate 
appeal was not to law, but to force." 

During the generation after the Treaty of 
Versailles not only had efforts to organize the 
community of nations failed but in the early 
years of the past decade signs were constantly 
on the increase that even that power of public 
opinion based on international agreement, 
known as international law, which had to a 
considerable extent been a deterrent to violence 
and moral anarcliy, was fast disintegrating 
and was being steadily replaced by the rule of 
brute force. 

Let me at this point recall to you some of the 
many attempts which have been undertaken by 
this country to induce the nations of the world 
to return to a sane economic order — to halt the 
armaments race — and to reestablish in interna- 
tional life the standard of morality and law 
which three centuries of civilization had pro- 
duced and which alone could make it possible 
for human beings to raise their standard of liv- 
ing, to know what happiness means, and to pass 
their natural lives unshadowed by constant fear. 



In the field of our economic relations with 
other countries your Government has never 
ceased striving to serve the end of peaceful de- 
velopment. In the depths of the depression the 
economic disorder within each country was at- 
tended by the great decline of all international 
commercial and financial activity. Our own ex- 
port trade had dwindled, our investors were 
struck with sudden inmiense losses in their secu- 
rity holdings. The very solvency of many of 
our main financial institutions was threatened 
by their large credits abroad which could not 
be liquidated as trade everywhere shriveled to 
incredibly low proportions. What was ob- 
viouslj' required was, first of all, to stabilize, and 
then to bring stimulating recovery to the econ- 
omy which was suffering from the shocks of past 
errors and miscalculations. 

Early in 1933 the depression and unemploy- 
ment prevalent in most countries, including our 
own, was so severe as to require far-reaching 
measures for relief and recovery in each coun- 
try. This made it impossible, tragically enough, 
for the governments that met in London in 1933 
to agree upon international measures that would 
serve satisfactorily the pressing needs of all, but 
the United States dui-ing the succeeding years 
assumed the leadership in trying to make effec- 
tive the purpose which the 1933 conference had 
been siunmoned to achieve. 

In undertaking to rebuild our trade with the 
rest of the world, it was necessary to convince 
unwilling minds that the policy pursued bj' 
this country during the 1920's of constantly 
increasing barriers to trade had brought in- 
jury to ourselves as well as to others. Under 
the Trade Agreements Act this Government 
negotiated 22 trade agreements with other 
nations, each of which enlarged commerce and 
employment in this and other countries with- 
out doing material injury to any branch of 
American production. By so doing, we cre- 
ated a renewed realization that in the interest 
of an increase in the standard of living, in the 
interest of renewing employment, in short, in 
the interest of recovery itself, commercial in- 
tercourse with the rest of the world was as 



SEPTEMBER 2 8, 194 



245 



necessary to our country as it was to other 
countries. 

The recovery in both internal and inter- 
national affairs that took place for a few years 
after 1933 for some time gave reason for hope 
that the world would gradually attain some 
new and more satisfactory economic balance. 
This hope spurred on the efforts of this Gov- 
ernment to keep before its own people and be- 
fore other peo])les the principles of an inter- 
national program of mutual economic benefit. 
Hardly a day passed without some effort on 
our part to bring other countries to join with 
us in the adoption of this program through 
gradual elimination of policies contrarj- to it. 

I am convinced that tliose efforts might have 
succeeded if it had not become evident that 
certain powers had determined that all eco- 
nomic policies for the adjustment of human 
welfare would be subordinated by them to 
policies of seizing by force what they them- 
selves desired. An ironic situation was thus 
patent. Many nations thereupon feared that 
if they extended their economic relations, they 
would strengthen their potential enemies. 
They feared that if they exchanged advantages 
with others they might inevitably become de- 
pendent upon others. The resulting discour- 
agement to trade, investment, and other eco- 
nomic activities necessarily increased the dis- 
position to seek relief by predatory action un- 
der desperate leadership; it prepared tlie way 
for war. 

That was the course which this Government 
had so clearly foreseen and which we had so 
often tried to offset, not only by warnings and 
appeals, but by the e.xample which we oui-selves 
held up. 

Believmg as this Government does, that one 
of the surest safeguards against war is the op- 
portunity of all peoples to buy and to sell on 
equal terms and without let or hindrance of a 
political character, we have never ceased to 
offer our full participation and cooperation in 
such a general economic program. 

The oncoming of the war and the complete 
dislocation of international trade have neces- 
sarily left that program in suspense, but the 
determination of your Government to resume 



it when the opportunity again occurs remains 
unaltered. 

Meanwhile, our economic policy has been ad- 
justed to safeguard and to serve our security 
in many vital relations. 

Let me turn now to the subject of our anned 
defense. During the first years of this admin- 
istration we participated in conferences de- 
signed to bring about an international agree- 
ment on tlie limitation and reduction of 
armament. Time after time this Government 
expressed our readiness to join with other na- 
tions in a common effort to bring about an 
effective agreement. 

While the Government was making efforts 
for arms limitation, our national defense was 
not neglected. Ever since he assumed office, 
President Roosevelt has worked unceasingly 
towards an adequate national defense. In 
1934 steps were taken to bring our Navy up to 
treaty strength. Shortly thereafter, provision 
was made for replacing and improving Army 
equipment, and for a very substantial increase 
in enlisted strength. 

The aim of this administration luis been to 
make our national defense adequate and effi- 
cient on land, on sea, and in the air. The 
definition of an adequate national defense, of 
coui'se, is bound to change with changing in- 
ternational situations. It has been our policy 
to make no inci'ease in our own armament un- 
less other powers by increasing theirs make 
increase by us necessary to our national safety. 

By the end of 1936 it had become appai-ent 
that under existing conditions there was no 
possibility of a general international agree- 
ment for a reduction in annament. Instead, 
there was a recrudescence of the militaiy spirit, 
resulting in the expansion of standing armies, 
in naval constniction, in enormously increased 
militaiy budgets, and in feverish efforts to de- 
vise new instruments of warfare. 

IXiring this period the administration re- 
peatedly pointed out the dangers in the inter- 
national situation. As early as January 4, 
1935, President Roosevelt stated in a message 
to Congress, "I cannot with candor tell you 
that general international relationships outside 
the borders of the United States are improved. 



246 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



On the surface of things many old jealousies 
are resurrected, old passions aroused; new 
strivings for armament and power, in more 
than one land, rear their ugly heads." 

Towards the end of 1937 the Nation was 
warned that international lawlessness was 
spreading; that the situation was of universal 
concern ; and that the peace, freedom, and secu- 
rity of 90 percent of the population of the woiid 
was being jeoi^ardized by the remaining 10 per- 
cent wlio were threatening a break-down in all 
international order under law. 

In a message to Congress of January 28, 1938, 
the President declared that as Commander-in- 
Chief of the Army and Navy of the United 
States it was his constitutional duty to report 
that "our national defense is, in the light of the 
increasing armaments of other nations, inade- 
quate for purposes of national security and re- 
quires increase for that reason." 

A few months after the Munich agi'eement 
President Roosevelt reported to Congress that 
although a war which had threatened to envelop 
the world in flames had been temporarily 
averted, it had become increasingly clear that 
peace was not assured. In this message of Janu- 
ary 4, 1939, he pointed out that the world had 
grown so small and weapons of attack so swift 
that no nation could be safe so long as any other 
powerful nation refused to settle its grievances 
at the council table; that weapons of defense 
gave the only safety from any highly ai'med 
nation which insists on policies of force; that 
we had learned that survival cannot be guar- 
anteed by arming after the attack begins. One 
week later the President submitted to Congress 
the program required by the necessities of 
defense. 

With the outbreak of war in Europe in Sep- 
tember 1939, the President increased the 
strength of the Army and Navy within stat- 
utory authorizations. In January 1940 he sub- 
mitted a budget to the Congress which included 
estimates for the national defense, amounting 
to approximately $2,000,000,000, for the fiscal 
year 1941. On May 16 of this year he asked 
of the Congress, and the Congress approved, 
a tremendous increase in appropriations for the 
national defense. And subsequently requests 



have been made to bring our defense forces to 
a point capable of meeting any emergency. 

The recent agreement with Great Britain for 
a chain of naval and air bases extending from 
Newfoundland to the South American Conti- 
nent, and tlie agreement with Canada on de- 
fense, are of immeasurable assistance in pro- 
viding effectively for the defense of the 
Americas. 

From this brief summary I think you will 
agree that the administration has been fully 
aware of the dangers in tlie international sit- 
uation, that it has informed the country thereof, 
and that through the years it has been vigilant 
in preparing our national defense against any 
possible threats to our security. 

To serve that program of defense, a far- 
reaching effort is being carried forward to 
acquire adequate supplies of all essential and 
critical materials, and we are keeping under 
close supervision the export of all American 
products that we may need for an emergency. 

In reviewing the ever increasingly tragic his- 
tory of the international relations of the past 
seven years, there is just one bright picture 
of constructive achievement that stands out. I 
refer, of course, to the recent history of the 
relations between the 21 American republics. 

I doubt whether the people of the United 
States even remotely appreciate the vast 
changes which these past seven years have 
brought about in the relations between the 
United States and its neighbors in the New 
World. A short eight years ago, it is an un- 
derstatement to assert, suspicion of the motives 
of the United States existed throughout the 
major portion of the continent. Where open 
resentment did not exist because of some act 
of high-handed intervention on the part of 
this Government, or hostility smolder because 
of the assertion by this country of its power 
to dictate, there existed at least in many quar- 
ters, a very natural resentment because of our 
insistence, through the Tariff Act of 1930, upon 
closing our markets to our neighbors. 

Today, that condition, fortunately, has van- 
ished. It began to disappear after the Inter- 
American Conference of 1933 when Secretary 
Hull, in the name of this Government, made it 



247 



clear that the United States would no longer 
intervene in the internal affairs of tlie other 
American republics. It was still further dis- 
sipated wheJi this Government, through the 
provisions of the Trade Agreements Act, made 
it evident that the United States was not only 
willing but anxious to trade with its neighbors 
on tenns of mutual advantage; and thus the 
way was prepared for the holding of the Con- 
ference for the Maintenance of Peace in Buenos 
Aires in 1936 in a spirit of nascent understand- 
ing and mutual i-eliance by all of the American 
republics. 

Few of you probably recall today that the 
suggestion for the holding of this Conference 
was made by President Roosevelt so long ago 
as on January 30, 1936, through personal let- 
ters which he addressed to the Presidents of 
all of the other American republics.^ 

The war clouds over Europe were steadily 
darkening, and the President foresaw clearly 
that in the event of a new world war, no 
greater assurance could be offered to the na- 
tions of the New World that the peace of the 
Western Hemisphere would be maintained and 
that in the event that any aggression against 
tlie American Continent threatened, the I'nited 
States could count ujion the loyal friendship 
of her American neighbors, than through the 
perfection of agreements between them which 
would reduce the possibility of hostilities be- 
tween themselves and afford a common policj- 
in the event of danger from abroad. 

That suggestion was made four and a half 
years ago, and it is now well worth while to 
remember that at that Conference there was 
for the first time proclaimed by the 21 Ameri- 
can republics in unanimous accord the gi'eat 
principle that any threat to the peace of any 
one of the American republics affects the peace 
of them all. 

Since that time there has been helld the 
Inter-American Conference of Lima in 1938, 
which strengthened notably the earlier acts of 
the Conference at Buenos Aires, and which 
indicated still more clearly the intention of 



' See Press Releases of February 15, 1936 (vol. XIV. 
DO. 333). pp. 162-163. 



the American republics to assume a common 
front against any threat of aggression to the 
New World. As a result of machinery there 
set up, there have also been held since the 
war broke out two consultative meetings at 
Panama and at Habana. 

Three important achievements at the Pan- 
ama meeting are worthy of special attention. 

First, the declaration by the American re- 
publics that so long as this continent remains 
at peace the American nations are entitled 
as of inherent right to have the waters adjacent 
to their shores, and which they regard as of 
primary utility to them in their normal rela- 
tions, free from the commission of hostile acts. 

Second, the creation of the Inter-American 
Neutrality Committee, which is in permanent 
-session in Rio de Janeiro in order to study 
the problems of neutrality and to formulate 
recommendations with a view to coordinating 
action among the American republics. 

And third, the creation of the Inter-Ameri- 
can Financial and Economic Advisory Com- 
mittee, which has been in session in Washing- 
ton since November 15, 1939, and to which 
have been submitted for study and recommen- 
dation a wide range of problems in the fields 
of banking, shipping, customs procedure, and 
broad programs of economic development. 

In July 1940 there was held at Habana the 
second consultative meeting. Once more con- 
crete measures were adopted to enable the Amer- 
ican nations to cope effectively with new 
problems. Resolutions were adopted looking 
towards joint action through coordination of 
police activity in the combatting of subversive 
foreign influences, and, in the economic field, 
the Inter-American Committee at Washington 
was charged with additional responsibilities 
primarily with respect to the gi-ave problems 
of surplus commodities brought about by the 
disruption of normal markets. 

At the same time the Act of Habana was ap- 
proved providing for the assumption of joint 
provisional responsibilities with respect to 
European colonies in the Western Hemisphere 
in the event that a change of sovereignty of 
these colonies should threaten as a result of the 
European conflict. 



248 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIlSr 



Today, the governments of all the American 
republics are cooperating as one in the search 
for remedies for their common problems, and 
with a full and reciprocal recognition of their 
several needs and requirements. They are as 
one in their determination to preserve their 
domestic institutions, their ancient liberties, and 
their independence and integrity ; but more than 
that, they recognize today that the strength of 
every one of them is vastly enhanced by the 
combined strength of the rest. 

Speaking from the standpoint of a citizen of 
the United States, I can conceive of no greater 
safeguard to the national defense of the United 
States than the realization on our part that we 
possess the sympathy, the trust and the cooper- 
ation of our neighbors of the New World. 

Unfortunately it is not possible for me to 
refer with any measure of satisfaction to the 
course of events in the Far East during these 
past seven years. 

The i)olicy of this Government in the Far East 
has differed in no way from the policies of this 
country in relation to other regions of the world. 
It is true, of course, that the problems which 
have arisen in our relations with the countries 
of the Far East have had certain peculiarities 
because of the earlier rights of extraterritorial 
jurisdiction accorded to the nationals of occi- 
dental powei's, along with various other special 
procedures adopted with special reference to 
special situations, but as situations have 
changed, the United States has by processes of 
negotiation and agreement voluntarily assented 
to the alteration and removal of these special 
features. 

From time to time the nations directly in- 
terested in the Far East have entered into 
treaties and international agreements which 
have created a network of common interests, 
as well as common responsibilities and 
obligations. 

In essence the primary requirements of the 
United States in the Far East may be thus 
simply set forth : Complete respe^-t by all pow- 
ers for the legitimate rights of the United 
States and of its nationals as stipulated by 
existing treaties or as provided by the gen- 



erally accepted tenets of international law; 
equality of opportunity for the trade of all 
nations; and, finally, respect for those inter- 
national agreements or treaties concerning the 
Far East to which the United States is a 
party, although with the expressed understand- 
ing that the United States is always willing to 
consider the peaceful negotiation of such modi- 
fications or changes in these agreements or 
treaties as may in the judgment of the sig- 
natories be considered necessary in the light of 
changed conditions. 

The Government of Japan, however, has de- 
clared that it intends to create a "new order 
in Asia". In this endeavor it has relied upon 
the instrumentality of armed force, and it has 
made it very clear that it intends that it alone 
shall decide to what extent the historic inter- 
ests of the United States and the treaty rights 
of American citizens in the Far East are to 
be observed. 

As we here well know, many hundreds of 
incidents have occurred as a result of which 
the rights of this country and the rights of 
our nationals have been violated. 

On April 15 of this year, as a result of de- 
velopments in the European war, the Foreign 
ilinister of Japan, in a public statement, 
asserted that Japan desired the maintenance 
of the status quo of the Netlierlands East In- 
dies. On April 17 the Seci*etary of State made 
a statement on behalf of the United States 
expressing the belief of this Govermnent that 
the best interests of all nations called for 
maintenance of the status quo in the entire 
Pacific area.^ On repeated occasions since 
then official spokesmen for the Japanese Gov- 
ernment have reiterated their desire for the 
maintenance of the present status of the 
Netherlahds East Indies, and have further 
specifically declared that this policy applied 
not only to the Netherlands East Indies, but 
to French Indochina as well. Nevertheless, 
and notwithstanding these official declarations, 
we are all familiar with the events of the past 
week which have culminated in measures 



'See the BiiUetin of April 20, 1940 (vol. II. no. 43), 
p. 411. 



SEPTEMBER 2 8, 1940 



249 



undertaken by tlie Japanese military forces 
which threaten the integrity of the French 
colony. 

From the standpoint of reason, of common 
sense, and of the best practical interests of all 
of the powers possessing interests in the Far 
East, there is no problem presented which could 
not be peacefully solved through negotiation, 
provided there existed a sincere desire on the 
part of all concerned to find an equitable and 
a fair solution which would give just recogni- 
tion to the rights and to the real needs of all 
concerned. 

As the weeks pass, tides of anarchy and of 
chaos are threatening to engulf the continent 
of Europe. 

We have seen during the past 18 months the 
disappearance or the armed occupation of 
Czechoslovakia, Poland, Norway, Denmark. 
Holland, Belgium, Lithuania. Latvia, Estonia; 
the defeat and partial occupation of the great 
Republic of France; the dismemberment, 
through the threat of force, of Kumania; and 
the spoliation, after an heroic resistance, <;!' ilie 
Republic of Finland. 

Warfare has lunv engulfed the Mediterianeau 
region and threatens to spread to the Near 
East. 

Alone, the Biitish people, with a heroism 
which is worthy of the finest traditions of that 
brave people, are defending successfully their 
homes and their liberties — which are the same 
liberties which free men cherish eveiywhere. 

It is the policy of your Government, as ap- 
proved by the Congress of the L^nited States, 
and, I believe, by the overwhelming majority of 
the American people, to render all material sup- 
port and assistance, through the furnishing of 
supplies and munitions, to the British Govern- 
ment and to the Governments of the British 
Dominions in what we hope will be their suc- 
cessful defense against armed aggression. 

It is becoming trite to say that what we are 
witnessing in the world today is not a world 
war but a world revolution. It is indeed an 
attempt at world revolution, a revolution in the 
sense that we are seeing a new manifestation of 
the age-old struggle of the lowest that is in 

264355 — 40 2 



hiunan nature against the highest, of barbarism 
against civilization, of darkness against light. 

There is no question that the errors of omis- 
sion and of commission during the years which 
succeeded the negotiation of the Treaty of Ver- 
sailles and the other treaties arising from the 
World War paved the way for the vast confla- 
gi-ation which we see today, but there is equally 
no question that during the five years which 
preceded the Munich agreements the Govern- 
ment of the United States did everj'thing within 
its power to avert the final calamity. When the 
record is ultimately assaj-ed, I believe this truth 
will be recognized. 

There could be no better demonstration of 
the purposes and of the beliefs of this Govern- 
ment than in the words which the President 
addressed to the Chiefs of the Governments 
directly concerned, at the time of the Czecho- 
slovak ci'isis, on September 26, 1938. He said : 

"The fabric of peace on the continent of Eu- 
rope, if not throughout the re-st of the world, 
is in immediate danger. The consequences of 
its rupture are incalculable. Should hostilities 
break out the lives of millions of men, women 
and children in every country involved will 
most certaiidy be lost imder circumstances of 
unspeakable horror. 

"The economic system of every country in- 
volved is certain to be shattered. The social 
structure of every country involved may well 
be completely wrecked. 

"The traditional policy of the United States 
has been the furtherance of the settlement of 
international disputes by pacific means. It is 
my conviction that all people under the threat 
of war today pray that peace may be made 
before, rather than after, war."' 

In a further message sent to the German Chan- 
celor on September 27, the President said: 

"Present negotiations still stand open. They 
can be continued if you will give the word. 
Should the need for supplementing them become 
evident, nothing stands in the way of widening 

'See Press Releases of October 1, 1938 (vol. XIX, 
no. 470), pp. 219-220. 



250 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



their scope into a conference of all the nations 
directly interested in the present controversy. 
Such a meeting to be held immediately — in some 
neutral spot in Europe — would offer the oppor- 
tunity for this and correlated questions to be 
solved in a spirit of justice, of fair dealing, and, 
in all human probability, with greater per- 
manence." ^ 

If the nations directly interested in that con- 
troversy, including Czechoslovakia, had sat 
around the council table in some neutral city, on 
equal terms, with no single one of them under 
the threat of aggression, as the President urged, 
the way might well have been paved for the 
avoidance of today's calamity. 

We as a nation face today as grave a danger 
as our people have confronted during the cen- 
tury and a half of their independent life. We 
are confronting the emergency, however, I be- 
lieve, with vision, with courage, and with 
determination. 

Our security has been vastly enhanced by the 
relations of confidence and of trust which we 
have with all of the Ajnerican republics, and 
thi-ough the strengthening of our traditional 
ties of understanding with our neighbor, the 
great Dominion of Canada. Our ability to repel 
aggression is likewise greatly increased by the 
naval and air bases which we have now leased 
from Great Britain, and our rearmament pro- 
gram is being carried on with efficiency and 
dispatch. 



We are profiting by the lessons which we 
have learned from the experience of others. We 
must increase our armed strength until the New 
World is unassailable. 

We must, and I believe we will, successfully 
repel any threat to the peace of this hemisphere. 

The lights of civilization are fast dimming in 
many other parts of the world. 

While your Government must continue in the 
future, as it has in the past, to prepare for all 
eventualities, this Nation must at the same time 
be ready, when the time comes, to aid in the 
construction of that kind of a world peace based 
on justice and on law through which alone can 
our security be fully guaranteed. 

I shall always remember that day last March, 
during the course of the mission in Europe with 
which the President had entrusted me, when I 
left London by plane on a day of blinding snow. 
I had with me Carl Sandburg's splendid life of 
Lincoln, and as I opened the volume my eyes 
first rested on these immortal phrases of the 
Second Inaugural : "Fondly do we hope — fer- 
vently do we pray — -that this mighty scourge of 
war may speedily pass away" and "to do all 
which may achieve and cherish a just and a 
lasting peace among ourselves, and with all 
nations." 

As we arm with all haste and vigor to guard 
our New World from threatened danger, I can 
conceive of no nobler hope and exhortation in 
our course as a nation than those which are con- 
tained in these words. 



CONTROL OF IRON AND STEEL SCRAP EXPORTS 



[Released to the press by the White House September 26] 

The President has approved the early estab- 
lishment of additional controls of the exporta- 
tion of iron and steel scrap with a view to 
conserving the available supply to meet the rap- 
idly expanding requirements of the defense pro- 
gram in this country. 

Effective October 15, 1940 all outstanding bal- 
ances of licenses which have been granted pur- 



' See ibid., p. 224. 



suant to the existing regulations of July 26, 
1940 for the exportation of No. 1 heavy melting 
steel scrap will be revoked. On October 16, 
1940 the exportation of all grades of iron and 
steel scrap will be placed under the licensing 
system. 

Under the new regulations which will be 
made effective on October 16, 1940, licenses will 
be issued to permit shipments to the countries 
of the Western HemisiDhere and Great Britain 
only. 



SEPTEMBER 2 8, 1940 

ALLIANCE BETWEEN GERMANY, ITALY, AND JAPAN 

Statement by the Secretary of State 



251 



[Released to the press September 27] 

At his press conference today, in response to 
inquiries, the Secretary of State said : 

"The reported agreement of alliance does not, 
in the view of the Government of tlie United 
States, substantially alter a situation which has 
existed for several years. Announcement of 
the alliance merely makes clear to all a relation- 



ship which has long existed in effect and to 
which this Government has repeatedly called 
attention. That such an agreement has been 
in process of conclusion has been well known 
for some time, and that fact has been fully 
taken into account by the Government of the 
United States in the detennining of this coun- 
try's policies." 



WASHINGTON NATIONAL AIRPORT 

Remarks of the President " 



[Releaeed to the press by the White House September 28] 

First of all, I make this signal to the Army 
and the Navy that flies: 

"Well done ! The Commander-in-Chief's 
compliments and thanks to all hands''. 

The roar above us of American airplane 
engines in hundreds of American planes is 
symbolic of our determination to build up a 
defense on sea, on land, and in the air capable 
of overcoming any attack. They represent in 
a small way the power we ultimately must 
have — and will soon have. Rather let me de- 
scribe this as just a gratifying flexing of the 
kind of fighting muscle democracy can and 
does produce. 

They are here upon a peaceful mission. We 
all hope that their missions will always be in 
the ways of peace. We shall strive with all 
of our energies and skills to see to it that they 
are never called upon for missions of war. 
But the more of them we have the less likely 
we are to have to use them — the less likely are 
we to be attacked from abroad. 

Here, in this broad Potomac Valley, George 
Washington and the other fathers sought to 
place the Nation's capital at a center of the 
then channels of transportation. There was 



« Delivered in connection with the laying of the 
cornerstone of the Administration Building of the 
Washington National Airport, September 28, 1940. 



long dispute about the plan. So, too, there 
has been long dispute about the plan for this 
airport, which will make the capital again the 
hub of transportation by air. A proper and 
adequate flying field has been a Washington 
problem since the Wrights had their first crash 
on the parade ground at Fort Myer 30 years 
ago. We might go even further back, indeed, 
and say the problem has existed ever since Dr. 
Langley tried to fly his "Aerodrome" from a 
barge anchored just below us here in the 
Potomac. 

Two years ago the problem became so acute 
as, literally, to give me bad dreams. So, upon 
the passage of the Civil Aeronautics Act, one 
of the first tasks I asked of the new agency 
was the creation of an adequate airport for 
the Nation's capital. 

That was in August. On November 19, 1938, 
I watched a dredge bring the first mucky soil 
from beneath some 10 feet of water very near 
the spot where we now stand. They told me this 
field would be usable within two years. Today, 
well within that promise, the field was used. It 
will be in regular use within three more months. 
And Assistant Secretary Hinckley tells me that 
it will be so extensively used, because of the 
growth of civil aviation during these two years, 
that already we must begin to plan other sub- 
sidiary airports for Washington as we must 
do throughout the Nation. 



252 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BTJLXiETIN 



For proof of the value of the growth of avia- 
tion to the Nation's defense, we can make com- 
parisons with Washington's day. He had a 
citizenry ready to spring to arms because nearly 
every citizen had arms and knew how to use 
them. Every gentleman wore a sword and every 
farmer had a musket which he used almost 
daily to bring food to his table. But two years 
ago less than 25,000 of our people — only one 
fiftieth of one percent of the population — knew 
how to fly an airplane. If only that proportion 
of the American people had known how to use 
a musket in Washington's day the Continental 
Army would have consisted of little more than 
a corporal's guard. 

Today 50,000 young Americans are licensed 
flyers, and the number is growing by almost 
2,000 a month. They are not all military pilots — 
but they are as ready to become military pilots 
as were the farmers of Washington's day to be- 
come riflemen of the line. Whereas two years 
ago not more than a quarter of a million of our 
people used the airlines and private planes to 
travel in, that number— the number of citizens 
at least familiar with the airplane — has doubled 
and will soon be tripled. 

That is why an airport like this is important 
to the national defense. That is why this air- 
port, soon to be one of the world's greatest 
facilities, surely its most convenient and prob- 
ably its most beautiful, should be brought with 
all possible emphasis to the attention of our 
people during this awakening of America to 
the needs of national defense. This airport and 
many othere which we hope will follow will 
draw free men freely to use a peacetime imple- 
ment of commerce which, we hope, will never 
be converted to wartime service. 

Our newspapers and the radio tell us day after 
day how increasingly important aircraft has 
become both as a weapon in the hands of aggres- 
sors and to those who fight for their continued 
national existence. These reports easily explain 
why these squadrons of the Army and Navy air 
forces, the thunder of which still rings in our 
ears, were a prelude to the ceremonies here this 
afternoon — a prelude to the completion and 



operation today even of this civilian aviation 
center — the Washington National Airport. 



DOCUMENTATION REQUIREMENTS 
OF CERTAIN ALIENS 

The following regulation has been codified 
under Title 22: Foreign Relations (Chapter I: 
Department of State), in accordance with the 
requirements of the Federal Register and the 
Code of Federal Regulations: 

Part 65 — Visas ; Documents Required of Bona 
Fide Alien Seamen Entering the United 
States 

§ 65.51 Waiver of creio list visa requirements. 
Under the emergency provisions of section 30 
of the Alien Registration Act, 1940, and of 
Executive Order No. 8429,' of June 5, 1940, the 
crew list visa requirements are waived for ves- 
sels sailing between ports of the United States 
and Canada and Newfoundland which do not 
touch at ports of other countries. (Sec. 30, 
Public, No. 670, 76th Cong., 3d sess., approved 
June 28, 1940; E. O. 8429, June 5, 1940) 

CoRDELL Hull, 
Secretary of State. 
September 16, 1940. 

[Departmental Order No. 880] 



EXECUTIVE ORDER PRESCRIBING SE- 
LECTIVE SERVICE REGULATIONS 

On September 23, 1940, the President signed 
Executive Order No. 8545 prescribing selective 
service regulations governing the administration 
of the Selective Training and Service Act, ap- 
proved September 16, 1940. The text of the 
Executive order appears in the Federal Register 
for September 25, 1940 (vol. 5, no. 187), pages 
3779-3791. 



' 5 F. R. 2145. 



SEPTEMBER 2 8, 1940 



253 



DEFENSE COMMUNICATIONS BOARD 



[Released to the press by the White House September 24] 

The purpose of the Defense Communications 
Board, created today by Executive order,* is 
to coordinate the relationship of all branches of 
communication to the national defense. 

The Defense Communications Board was ini- 
tiated jointly by the various Government de- 
partments and agencies having a vital interest 
in this phase of the preparedness program. 
The Board is basically a planning agency, with- 
out operating or procurement functions. As 
such it is charged with the important duty of 
charting the utilization and control of our com- 
munication systems in the best interests of the 
national security. 

The Board will have no power to censor radio 
or other communications or to take over any 
facilities. 

This task of plaiuiing is not confined to radio 
broadcasting, but also embraces common car- 
riers such as commercial radiotelephone and 
radiotelegraph, as well as other telephone, tele- 
graph, and cable facilities. 

The Board does not propose to interfere with 
the normal operation of broadcasting or other 
forms of communication any more than is nec- 
essary for the national protection. Through 
correlated planning, it will seek to gear the 
great and strategically valuable American com- 
munications system, in both the domestic and 
international fields, to meet any situation the 
national interest may require. 

The various branches of the communications 
industry will cooperate in an advisory capacity 
with the Board, which will be composed of the 
Chairman of the Federal Communications Com- 
mission, the Chief Signal Officer of the Army, 
the Dii'ector of Naval Communications, an As- 
sistant Secretary of State, and an Assistant Sec- 
retary of the Treasury. Wliere the activities 



of the Board impinge upon any functions of 
Government departments, representatives of 
such departments will be placed upon appro- 
priate committees. 

The Board has had the cooperation of the 
radio industry in the preparation of this order. 
With industry cooperation, the Board will ap- 
point committees from every branch of com- 
munications — broadcast and other radio serv- 
ices, cable, telegraph, and telephone — as well as 
from labor groups. All jjlans involving the 
utilization of private facilities, or requiring in- 
dustry cooperation, will be adopted only after 
consultation with such industry representatives, 
and the particular private companies whose 
properties may be involved. 



The Far East 



'No. 8546. For text see the Federal Register for 
September 26, 1940 (vol. 5, no. 188), pp. 3817-3818, and 
the Federal Register for September 27, 1940 (vol. 5, 
no. 189), p. 3827. 



DEVELOPMENTS IN FRENCH 
INDOCHINA 

( Released to the press September 23 ] 

In response to inquiries at the press confer- 
ence today, the Secretary of State said : 

"Events are transpiring so rapidly in the 
Indochina situation that it is impossible to get a 
clear picture of the minute-to-minute develop- 
ments. It seems obvious, however, that the 
status quo is being upset and that this is being 
achieved under duress. The position of the 
United States in disapproval and in deprecation 
of such procedures has repeatedly been stated." 

[Released to the press September 23] 

This Government has not at any time or in 
any way approved the French concessions to 
Japan. The attitude of this Government 
toward developments in French Indochina is as 
expressed by the Secretary of State this morn- 
ing and in previous public statements. 



American Republics 



EXCHANGE PROFESSORS AND STUDENTS 



[Released to the press September 24] 

Under the terms of the Convention for the 
Promotion of Inter-American Cultural Kela- 
tions,' the United States has now arranged 
exchanges of students and professors with nine 
of the American republics. Ten graduate stu- 
dents from the other American republics have 
been selected for study in the United States, 
and four additional students will soon be 
chosen. Eight graduate students and three 
professors from the United States have been 
invited to study and teach in other American 
countries. These arrangements have been 
made between the United States and the Gov- 
ernments of Chile, Costa Rica, the Dominican 
Republic, Guatemala, Haiti, Nicaragua, Pan- 
ama, Paraguay, and Venezuela. In addition, 
the United States has been informed that the 
Governments of Brazil and Peru will under- 
take similar arrangements in the near future. 
Plans for these exchanges have been worked 
out jointly by the Department of State and 
the OfEce of Education of the Federal Security 
Agency. 

The American graduate students include 
Miss Dorothy Field, of Phillips, Maine, and 
Miss Esther Matthews, of Denver, Colo., who 
have gone to Chile; Miss Edith Alida Bron- 
son, of Evanston, 111., who goes to Costa Rica; 
Mr. Charles Christian Hauch, of Chicago, 111., 
and Mr. Joseph John MontUor, of New York, 
N. Y., who go to the Dominican Republic (Mr. 
Montllor has sailed for Ciudad Trujillo) ; Mr. 
James S. Triolo, Jr., of Alameda, Calif., who 
goes to Panama, and Dr. George William Lut- 
termoser, of Detroit, Mich., who has gone to 
Venezuela. In addition, the Government of 
Costa Rica has selected a second graduate 
student, Mr. Don H. Walther. Mr. Walther 



9 Treaty Series No. 92S. 
254 



is a teaching fellow at the University of North 
Carolina and proposes for his research project 
to make a study of the life and works of the 
historian, Ricardo Fernandez-Guardia. 

The three American professors selected are 
Dr. Charles C. Griffin, of Vassar College, whose 
appointment was announced on August 19 and 
who sailed for Venezuela on September 6, 1940 ; 
Dr. John Ashton, of the Agricultural and 
Mechanical College of Texas, College Station, 
Tex., who will sail for Nicaragua on September 
28, 1940, and Dr. Carroll William Dodge, of 
Washington University, St. Louis, Mo., who is 
expected to leave for Guatemala within a few 
months. 

John Ashton, Ph. D., associate professor of 
agricultui'al journalism at the Agricultural and 
Mechanical College of Texas, has been selected 
by the Government of Nicaragua as exchange 
professor. He received the degree of Bachelor 
of Science from the Agricultural and Mechan- 
ical College of Texas and the degrees of Master 
of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy from the 
University of Missouri. Dr. Ashton is the 
author or co-author of several books dealing 
with the history of farm animals, as well as of 
several historical treatises. He has also con- 
tributed many articles to various agricultural 
journals, based on travel and research in the 
rural communities of the United States and 
Europe. Wliile in Nicaragua Dr. Ashton will 
lecture in agricultural history and agricultural 
journalism. 

Carroll William Dodge, Ph. D., professor of 
botany at Washington University, St. Louis, 
Mo., has been selected by the Government of 
Guatemala as exchange professor. Professor 
Dodge was born in Danby, Vt., was awarded his 
Bachelor of Arts degi-ee by Middlebury College 
in 1915, and in 1918 received the degree of Doc- 
tor of Philosophy from Washington University. 



SEPTEMBER 28, 194 



255 



From 1919 to 1921 he was an instructor and 
assistant professor at Brown University; from 
1921 to 1931 he was an instructor and assistant 
professor at Harvard University; and since 
1931 he has been professor of botany at AVash- 
ington University. He is the co-author of 
Comparative Morphology of Fungi and the 
author of Medical Mycology. While in Guate- 
mala Professor Dodge will give technical lec- 
tures on mycology, plant pathologj', and 
lichens, and popular lectures on botany and 
education in the United States, and will conduct 
research on the lichens and certain groups of 
fungi of the country, as well as on local plant 
diseases. 

In addition, the Governments of Chile, Costa 
Rica, the Dominican Republic, and Peru have 
indicated tlieir desire to receive a professor from 
the United States, and negotiations are now 
in process. 

Arrangements have been made for students 
to come to the United States from Chile, the 
Dominican Republic, Panama, and Paraguay. 
The students from Chile as already announced 
are Sefior Jorge del Canto Schram, of Santiago ; 
Senora Maria Marchant de Gonzalez Vera, of 
Santiago; Seiior Carlos E. Salazar Justiniano, 
of Santiago ; Sefior Leopoldo Seguel Fuentes, of 
Yungay (Nuble). In addition, fellowships have 
been awarded to two Dominican students. Oscar 
Rafael Batlle-Morel and Americo Alejandro 
Martinez y Martinez. Senor Martinez will 
carry out studies in construction with reinforced 
concrete and in the resistance of materials. 
Sefior Batlle-Morel will carry on medical 
studies, .specializing in eye, ear, nose, and 
throat. 

The two Panamanian students who have re- 
ceived fellowships are Seiior Cesar Augusto 
Quintero C. and Seiior Diego Manuel Domin- 
guez-Caballero. Sefior Quintero recently ob- 
tained his degree in law and political science 
from the National University of Panama and 
plans to continue his studies of international 
law under the fellowship. Sefior Dominguez 
was graduated with honors in philosophy and 
letters from the National University of Panama 
in 1939 and has been active in student affairs. 



He will take a specialized course in American 
history under his fellowship. 

Fellowships have also been awarded by the 
Government of the United States to two Para- 
guayan students, Julio C. Chenu-Bordon and 
Juan Guillermo Peroni. Doctor Chenii-Bordon 
is pediatrician at the Anti-Tuberculosis Dis- 
pensary of Asuncion and associate professor of 
pediatrics of the Faculty of Medicine at 
Asuncion. He is a member of several Para- 
guayan medical societies and the author of a 
number of articles in his field of interest. He 
jjlans to pursue special studies in pediatrics, 
puericulture, and child nutrition at the Univer- 
sity of Chicago. Seiior Peroni holds the degree 
of law and social sciences and is at present pro- 
fessor of commercial law in the National School 
of Asuncion. He plans to pursue studies in 
finance and political law in this countrj'. 

Moreover, the Governments of Costa Rica 
and Haiti have submitted panels of graduate 
students which are now under consideration 
by the United Stntes. Two additional govern- 
ments, those of Brazil and of Peru, have signi- 
fied their intention of soon initiating arrange- 
ments for exchanges. 

The present status of exchanges under the 
Convention for the Promotion of Inter-Ameri- 
can Cultural Relations is therefore as follows: 

The Government of Brazil has officially noti- 
fied this Government of its intention to inaugu- 
rate exchanges in the near future. 

The Government of Chile has awarded fel- 
lowships to two American students, and the 
Government of the United States has awarded 
fellowships to four Chilean students. Chile 
is also negotiating for an American professor. 

The Government of Costa Rica has awarded 
fellowships to two American students, and the 
Government of the United States will shortly 
award two fellowships to Costa Rican students. 
Costa Rica is also negotiating for an American 
professor. 

The Government of the Dominican Repvhlic 
has awarded fellowships to two American stu- 
dents, and the Government of the United States 
has awarded fellowsliips to two Dominican stu- 



256 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



dents. The Dominican Government is also 
negotiating for an American professor. 

The Government of Guatemala has selected 
an American professor. 

The Republic of Haiti has submitted a panel 
of students for consideration by the United 
States. 

The Government of Nicaragua has selected 
an American professor and negotiations are in 
process for the exchange of students. 

The Government of Panama has awarded a 
fellowshij) to an American student, and the 
Government of the United States has awarded 
fellowships to two Panamanian students. 

Fellowships have been awarded by the United 
States to two students from the Republic of 
Paraguay. 

The Government of Peru has notified the 
United States that it will shortly initiate ex- 
change arrangements. 

The Government of Venezuela has selected an 
American professor, who is now in Venezuela, 
and has awarded a fellowship to an American 
student. 

The Buenos Aires convention was signed by 
each of the 21 American republics at the Inter- 
American Conference for the Maintenance of 
Peace, held in Buenos Aires in 1936, and has 
been ratified by 13 countries. The exchange 
program is directed toward the development of 
a more renlistic understanding between the peo- 
ples of the Western Hemisphere. Emphasiz- 
ing the essential reciprocity of cultural 
relations, the exchanges are designed to make 
available to the people of the other American 
republics a more accurate knowledge of the 
progress of science, the humanities, the tech- 
nology, and the artistic achievements of the 
United States. In receiving the visiting 
professors, teachers, and graduate students 
from those nations, the program affords a sim- 
ilar diffusion in this country of the intellectual 
attainments of their people. 

The expenses involved in the exchange pro- 
gram are shared by the participating govern- 



ments. The nominating governments wiU pay 
the round-trip travel costs of students, together 
with other incidental expenses. The receiving 
government will pay tuition, subsidiaiy ex- 
penses, and board and lodging at the institu- 
tions in which the visiting students are enrolled. 
The Department of State has been assisted in 
choosing the panels of students and professors 
by a Committee on Exchange Fellowships and 
Professorships. This committee, in collabora- 
tion with the Department and with the United 
States Office of Education of the Federal Se- 
curity Agency, drew up the standards and 
application forms for fellowships and profes- 
sorships under the convention. The minimum 
requirements were designed to assure the two- 
fold purpose of making available to the quali- 
fied student in this country opportunity to 
l^ursue advanced study in the other American 
republics and to afford opportunity for appli- 
cations from all sections of the United States. 



HABANA CONVENTION OF 
JULY 30, 1940 

A message from the President to the Senate 
transmitting the Habana Convention of July 
30, 1940, together with a report of the Secretary 
of State concerning the convention and "Act of 
Habana", appears in this Bulletin under the 
heading "Treaty Information". 



FINANCIAL CONVENTION WITH DO- 
MINICAN REPUBLIC 

An announcement regarding a convention 
with the Dominican Republic revising the con- 
vention of 1924 appears in this Bulletin under 
the heading "Treaty Information". 



Europe 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF EN BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 



[Released to the press September 2S] 

The following tiibulation sliows contributions 
collected and disbui-sed during the period Sep- 
tember 6, 1939, through August 31, 1940, as 
shown in the reports submitted by persons and 
organizations registered with the Secretary of 
State for the solicitation and collection of con- 
tributions to be used for relief in belligerent 
countries, in conformity with the regulations 
issued pursuant to section 8 of the act of Novem- 
ber 4, 1939, as made effective by the President's 
proclamation of the same date. 

Tliis tabulation has reference only to contri- 
butions solicited and collected for relief in bel- 
ligerent countries (France; Germany; Poland; 
the United Kingdom. India, Australia, Canada, 
New Zealand, and the Union of South Africa; 
Norway; Belgium; Luxemburg; the Nether- 
lands; and Italy) or for the relief of refugees 



driven out of these countries by the present 
war. The statistics set forth in the tabulation do 
not include information regarding relief activi- 
ties which a number of organizations registered 
with the Secretary of State may be carrying on 
in non-belligerent countries, but for which reg- 
istration is not required under the Neutrality 
Act of 1939. 

The iVmerican National Red Cross is required 
by law to submit to the Secretary of War for 
audit "a full, complete, and itemized report of 
receipts and expenditures of whatever kind". 
In order to avoid an unnecessary duplication of 
work, this organization is not required to con- 
form to the provisions of the regulations 
governing the solicitation and collection of con- 
tributions for relief in belligerent countries, and 
the tabulation does not, therefore, include infor- 
mation in regard to its activities. 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries 



Name of registrant, locatioc, date of reglstratioo, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Aug. 31,1940, 

including 

cost of goods 

purchased 

and still 

on band 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con 
tributions in 

kind now 
on hand 



Accion Democrata Espafiola, San Francisco, Calif., Mar. 29, 

1940. France - $267.45 $125.00 

Allied Relief Ball. Inc., New York, N. Y., Apr. 4, 1940. Great 

Britain and France - 52,346.35 38,104.00 

Allied Relief Fund, New York, N. Y., June 4, 1940. United 

Kingdom, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Norway. . . 711, 683. 61 639, 105. 24 
American Association for Assistance to French Artiste, Inc. 

New York, N. Y., Jan. 3, IWO. France .. 12,427.26 7,987.58 

American Association of University Women, Washington, 

D. C, May 23, 1940. France and Great Britain 9,770.61 225.00 

American Auxiliary Committee do L'Union de5 Femmes de 

France, New York, N. Y., Nov. 8, 1939. France and Great 

Britain --- 18,489.07 8,213.35 

American Board of Missions to the Jews. Inc., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

July 5, 1940. France, Belgium, and Germany 725.00 725.00 

American Civilian Volunteers, South Sudbury, Mass., May 27, 

1940.« France None None 

American Committee for Christian Refugees, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Sept. 26, 1939. Germany and France 11,801.86 11,801.86 

• No reports for the months of July and August have been received from this organization, 
264355 — 40 3 



$35.51 
12, 630. 85 
63,953.41 
3, 220. 67 

455. 87 

1, 407. 19 
None 
None 

None 



$106. 94 

1,611.50 

118,624.96 

1,219.01 

9, 089. "4 

8, 868. 53 
None 
None 
None 



None 

None 

$39, 259. 22 

1,605.15 

None 

3,285.20 
None 
None 
None 



$7, 



None 
None 
109.15 
None 
None 

347. 74 
None 
None 
None 



257 



258 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



American Committee for the German Relief Fund, Inc., New 

York, N. Y., Mar. 27, 1940. Germany and Poland 

American Committee for the Polish Ambulance Fund, Chicago, 

111., Feb. 12, 1940. France and Poland 

American Dental Ambulance Committee, New York, N. Y., 

Mar. 12, 1940. United Kingdom - 

American Emergency Volunteer Ambulance Corps, Inc., New 

York, N. Y., Jan. 25. 1940. Great Britain and France --. 

American Employment for General Relief, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., May 1, 1940. England, France, Norway, Poland, 

Belgium, Luxemburg, and the Netherlands 

American Field Service, New York, N. Y., Sept. 27, 1939. 

France, Great Britain, and British East Africa 

American and French Students' Correspondence Exchange, 

New York, N. Y., Doc. 20. 1939. France - 

American-French War Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 14, 

1939. France and Great Britain 

American Friends of Czechoslovakia, New York, N. Y., Nov. 

2, 1939. Groat Britain, Franco, and Bohemia-Moravia 

American Friends of the Daily Sketch War Relief Fund, New 

York, N. Y.. Dee. 1. 1939. Great Britain 

American Friends of France, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 21, 
1939. France 

American Friends of German Freedom, New York, N. Y., July 
24, 1940.' England and Franco ,, 

American Friends of a Jewish Palestine, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
May 9, 1940. Palestine, Germany, Poland, France, and 
United Kingdom 

American Friends Service Committee, Philadelphia. Pa., Nov. 
9, 1939. United Kingdom, Poland. Germany, France, Nor- 
way, Belgium, and the Netherlands 

The American Fund for Breton Relief, New York, N. Y., Oct. 
31, 1939. France 

American Fund for French Wounded, Inc., Boston, Mass., Jan. 

3, 1940. France and England 

American Fund for Wounded in France, Inc., Worcester, Mass., 

Dec. 15, 1939. France 

American German Aid Society, Los Angeles, Calif., Nov. 16, 

1939. Germany. 

The American Hospital in Britain, Limited, New York, N. Y., 

July 24, 1940. Groat Britain - 

The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, Inc., 

New York, N. Y.. Sept. 29, 1939. United Kingdom, Poland. 

Germany, Franc-e. Norway, Belgium, LtLxcmburg, and the 

Netherlands _ 

American McAlI Association, New York, N. Y., Jan. 3, 1940. 

France _ 

American-Polish National Council, Chicago, El., Aug. 14, 1940. 

Poland 

American Volunteer Ambulance Corps, New York, N. Y., Dec. 

12, 1939. France. Belgium, Holland, and England 

American War Godmothers, Pittsburgh, Pa., Mar. 6, 1940. 

France 

American Women's Hospitals. New York, N. Y., Sept. 14, 

1939. France and England... 

American Women's Unit for War Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Jan. 15, 1940. France. 

American Women's Voluntary' Services, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Feb. 13. 1940. England 

Les Amis de la France S Puerto Rico. San Juan, P. R., Dec. 20. 

1939. rfanoB 



Funds 
received 



$31,572.14 

30. 302. 51 

3, 239. 52 

None 

2, 647. 50 

295, 685. 76 

7, 301. 65 

39. 973. 55 

23. 734. 67 

2, 136. 27 

322, 596. 58 

6, 780. 59 

3. 120. 38 

94, 439. 77 
5, 206. 17 

14,731.13 

200.00 

3, 856. 50 

5. 1.10. 00 

1,968,703.55 

637. 32 

1, 977. 26 

224,899.47 

1,0.W.33 

2, 6S0. 72 

1, 760. 20 

19,381.01 

10,916.68 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$20, 000. 00 

17,721.33 

3, 133. 02 

None 

None 

208, 416. 36 

3, 024. 85 

21, 736. 42 

18,881.32 

1, 367. 00 
146. 680. 94 

2. 856. 10 

069. 02 

88, 079. 35 

3, 786. 50 

9, 676. 70 

None 

None 

None 

1, S16, 506. 24 
417.45 

1, 010. 00 
105,971.82 

155. 74 

2, 304. 20 
789. 32 

7, 626. 23 
6,500.00 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



$5. 178. 90 

2.081.63 

101.60 

None 

1. 485. 01 
10. 587. 07 

661. 41 

6, 732. 68 

4. 220. 79 

None 

31,620.08 

3. 707. 81 

2, 290. 66 

6, 360. 42 
360. 05 
478. 49 
None 
1, 003. 46 
None 

163, 197. 31 

None 

40.28 

16, 135. 19 

269. 02 

42.62 

664.33 

10, 432. 98 

248. 68 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Aug. 31. 1940, 

including 

cost of goods 

purchased 

and still 

on hand 



$6, 393. 24 

10, 499. 56 

6.00 

None 

1. 061. 89 

76, 682. 33 

3. 625. 39 

12, 504. 46 

632.66 

779.27 

144. 295. 56 

216.68 

170. 70 

None 

1, 053. 62 
4, 676. 94 
200.00 
2, 863. 06 
5, 150. 00 

None 
219. 87 
926.98 
102, 792. 46 
626.87 
233. SO 
296. S6 
1,321.80 

4, 167. on 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



None 

$471. 00 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

47, 764. 96 

19. 240. 00 

None 

11,256.11 

None 

None 

12,473.42 

4,911.60 

7, 383. 42 

None 

None 

None 

51.00 
760.00 
None 
1,600.00 
None 
None 
None 
17,118.89 
650.00 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 

kind now 
on band 



None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
$1, 660. 31 
None 
None 
8, 469. 96 
None 

None 

None 

None 
270.00 
None 
None 
None 

None 
600.00 
None 
1, 194. 20 
2.45 
None 
190.15 
None 
107.77 



' The registration of this organization was revoked on July 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 



SEPTEMBER 28, 1940 

Contributions for Relief in Belligerent ConNTHiES — Continued 



259 



Name of rcEistrant. location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relie' in 

countries 

named 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Aug 31,1941). 

including 

cost of goods 

purchased 

and still 

on band 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions In 

kind now 
on hand 


Les Amltife Ffminlnes de la France, New York, N. Y., Dec. 
19,1939. France 


$1,200.91 

18. 726. 30 
18.021.66 

10,808.14 

5, 169. 00 

2,829.27 

9.875.75 

273.60 

190.57 

2.050.08 
12. 676. 23 
1. 114. 46 

1. 47.3. 15 

17.110.19 

6. 217. 55 
1,118.31 

5.481.17 

3.376.16 

8,988.20 

339,498.43 

6,163.88 

312,608.23 

1, 263. 71 

12,306.01 

877.25 

65,984.48 

22,718.06 

147,610.49 

544, 427. 80 

134,964.38 

477.54 

400.00 


$386.88 

8, 242. 33 
16,983.14 

7.000.00 

3,056.00 

2,600.00 

6, 766. 45 

226.00 

133.30 

1,000.00 

7,857.98 

992.00 

975.00 

5,339.00 

2,401.40 
None 

846.74 

703.15 

6,227.40 

166. ,124. 31 

4, 770. 50 

73.002.21 

310.00 

8.998.89 

65.00 

39.095.06 

18,203.12 

122, 169. 12 

275,463.95 

27, 618. 18 

300.30 

None 


$322.19 

461.11 

456.76 

288.45 
292.67 

7.50 
463.10 
None 

7.07 

85.07 

679.99 

97.16 

156.34 

7.198.90 

1.890.92 
2.50 

943.56 

2.527.00 

2.546.95 

46.23 

732.24 

25,525.62 

178.72 

1.142.76 

817.45 

1.577.92 

80.33 

9,425.86 

58,887.70 

43, 509. 34 

164.57 

30.58 


$491. 84 

10, 021. 86 
681.76 

3, 519. 69 
1,820.33 

221.77 

2,656.20 

48.50 

50.20 

964.41 

4, 138. 26 

25.30 

341.81 

4, 672. 29 

925.23 

1,115.81 

3,690.87 

146.01 

213. 85 

173, 127. 89 

661.14 

214,080.40 

764.99 

2, 164. 36 

4.80 

16,311.60 

4, 434. 61 

16, 015. 51 

206,086.15 

63,826.86 

12 77 

369.42 


$164.00 

2, 826. 56 
None 

None 

None 

None 

1,430.00 

None 

None 

None 

1,665.88 

30.00 

None 

9,566.00 

33, 182. 50 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
1,285.00 
850.00 

18,713.77 
76.10 

14, 160. 22 
155,737.76 

87, 468. 90 
None 
None 


None 


Les Anciens Combattants Franjais de la Grand Guerre, San 


$160.00 


Mrs. Larz Anderson. Doston, Mass., Dec. 12, 1939. France 

Anthracite Relief Committee, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Sept. 8, 1939. 
Poland 


None 


Anzac War Relief Fund, New York, N. Y., May 23, 1940. 
Australia and New Zealand 


None 


Associated Polish Societies Relief Committee of Webster, Mass., 
Webster, Mass.. Sept. 21, 1939. Poland 


None 


Associated Polish Societies' Relief Committee of Worcester, 




Association of Former Juniors In France of Smith College, New 
York. N. Y.. Dec. 18. 1939. France- 

Association of Former Russian Naval Officers in America, New 
York, N. Y., Feb. 21. 1940. France 


None 
None 


Association of Joint Polish-American Societies of Chelsea, 


None 


L' Atelier. San Francisco, Calif., Jan. 29, 1940. France 

Mrs. Mark Baldwin, New York, N. Y., Mar. 4, 1940. France 
Basque Delegation in the United States of America, New York, 
N. Y., Doc. 19, 1939. France 


71200 
None 

None 


Belgian Relief Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y.. June 14, 1940. 


1,363.00 


Belgian Relief of Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif., May 
27, 1940. Belgium 


None 


Belgian War Relief Fund, Manila, P. I., June 7, 1940.« Belgium. 

The Benedict Bureau Unit, Inc., New York, N. Y., Nov. 29, 

1939 France 


None 
None 


Beth I^hem. Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 21, 1939. Poland. 


None 


Bethel Mission of Eastern Europe, Minneapolis, Minn., Nov. 
27.1939. Poland 


None 


Bishops' Committee for Polish Relief. Washington, D. C, 
Dec 19.1939. Poland --- 


None 


Board of National Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America. New York. N. Y., Sept. 28, 1939. 
Great Britain, France, and Germany 


None 


British-American .\mbulance Corps, New York, N. Y.. June 
11,1940 England and France 


None 


British-American Comfort League, Quincy, Mass., Feb. 21, 
1940 England 


None 


British-American War Relief Association, Seattle, Wash., Nov. 
17 1939 United Kingdom and allied countries 


232.65 


British Sailors' Book and Relief Society, New York, N. Y., 

May 2, 1940. Bermuda, Canada, and the British West Indies. 

British War Relief .Association of Northern California, San Fran- 


None 
1,235.89 


The British War Relief Association of the Philippines, Manila, 


76.88 


The British War Relief Association of Southern California, Los 
Angeles Calif Dec 8 1939 Great Britain 


None 


British War Relief Society. Inc.. New York. N. Y., Dec. 4, 1939. 

Great Britain. Newfoundland, and British East Africa .- 

Bundles for Britain. New Y'ork, N. Y., Dec. 28, 1939. Great 


3,600.00 
6,397.75 


Caledonian Club of Idaho, Boise, Idaho, Jan. 25, 1940. Scot- 
land 


None 


The Canadian Society of New York. New York, N. Y.. Aug. 20. 
1940. Great Britain and Canada 


None 



' No complete report for the month of August has been received from this organisation. 
' No reports for the months of July and August have been received from this organization. 



260 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant. location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Aug. 31. 1940, 

including 
cost of goods 
purchased 
and still 
on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 

kind now 
on hand 



Catholic Medical Mission Board, Inc.. New York. N. Y., Jan. 17, 
1940. India, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the Union 
of South Africa 

The Catholic Student War Relief of Pax Romana, Washington, 
D. C, Dec. 13, 1939. Poland, France, Oermany, and Great 
Britain - 

Central Bureau for Relief of the Evangelical Churches of Europe, 
New York, N. Y., May 14, 1940. All belligerent countries 

Central Committee Knesseth Israel, New York, N. Y., Oct. 27, 

1939. Palestine 

Central Committee for Polish Relief, Toledo, Ohio., Feb. 29, 

1940. Poland 

Central Council of Polish Organizations, New Castle, Pa., Nov. 

7, 1939. England, Poland, and France 

Centrala, Passaic, N. J., Oct. 12, 1939. Poland 

Cercle FranfaisdeUeattle, Seattle, Wash., Nov. 2, 1939. France 
and Great Britain 

Chester (Delaware Co., Pa.) PoUsh Relief Committee, Chester, 
Pa., Sept. 16, 1939. Poland and France 

Children's Crusade for Children, Inc., New York, N. Y., Feb. 
3, 1940. France, Poland, and Germany 

Commission tor Polish Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 12, 
1939.' Poland _. 

The Commission for Relief in Belgium, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
May 21, 1940. Belgium and Lu.xemburg .-. 

Committee for Aid to Children of Mobilized Men of the XX" 
Arrondissement of Paris, New York, N. Y., Jan. 16, 1940. 
France 

Committee of French-American Wives, New York, N, Y., 
Nov. 16, 1939. France and Great Britain 

Committee of Mercy, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 16, 1939. 
France, Great Britain, Norway, Belgium, the Netherlands, 
and their allies 

Committee lor Relief in Allied Countries, Washington, D. C, 
Feb. 2, 1940. France, Great Britain, Poland, Norway, Bel- 
gium, Luxemburg, and the Netherlands 

Committee for the Relief for Poland, Seattle, Wash., Nov. 24, 1939. 
Poland ---- 

Committee Representing Polish Organizations and Polish 
People in Perry, N. Y., Perry, N. Y., Oct. 23, 1939. Poland.. 

Czechoslovak Relief, Chicago, 111., July 25, 1940. Czechoslo- 
vakia, Great Britain and Dominions, France, and Belgium — 

District of Columbia Federation of Women's Clubs, Washing- 
ton, D. C. Aug. 14, 1940. Great Britain 

The Emergency Aid of Permsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 
13, 1939. Great Britain, France, Norway, Belgium, Luxem- 
burg, and the Netherlands 

Emergency Relief Committee for Kolbuszowa, New York, 
N. Y., Mar. 13, 1940. Poland _ 

Emergency Rescue Committee, New York, N. Y., Aug. 3. 1940.' 
France, United Kingdom, Belgium, Norway, and the Nether- 



lands. 



$1,074.25 

1. 039. 84 
9, 923. 02 

29, 880. 20 
707.00 

2, 565. 30 
1,440.72 

2, 549. 45 

6,603.32 

107,661.37 

315, 509. 43 

4, 790. 92 

4, 923. 40 
20, 146. 10 

54, 225. 52 

4, 523. 03 
2, 426. 23 

197.00 
2, 362. 76 

None 

37, 236. 38 
4, 933. 86 



None 

$809. 00 

6, 824. 00 

18, 676. 83 

500.00 

1,764,00 

1. 300. 75 

658. 28 

6,465.46 

SO, 500. 00 

267, 466. 27 

4, 166. 00 

3, 366. 63 
10, 114. 33 

33, 704. 41 

2. 500. 00 
2, 162. 72 

197. 00 

2, 000. 00 

None 

21,991.70 
None 



None 

$135. 41 

2, 085. 61 

11,203.37 

126. 82 

39.74 
11.65 

558. 9G 

553. 17 

27, 104. 92 

46, 725. 18 

287. 90 

None 
2, 067. 70 

6,840.16 

1, 805. 60 
266. 71 
None 
None 
None 

6, 960. 47 
2, 226. 69 



$1, 074. 26 

96.43 

1, 014. 01 

None 

80.18 

761. 56 
128. 32 

1, 332. 21 

484. 69 

56.45 

11, 328. 98 

338. 02 

1, 557. 77 
7, 963. 07 

14, 680. 96 

217. 43 
7.80 
None 
362. 75 
None 

8, 283. 21 
2, 707. 26 



$3, 220. 00 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
1,900.00 

2, 776. 00 

1, 677. 30 

None 
1, 500. 00 

None 

None 
3,012.84 

1, 240. 00 

None 
None 
None 
8, lOO 00 
None 

7, 090. 03 
None 



$1, 050. 00 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

1, 503. 76 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 



Englisb-Spoaking Union of the United States, New York, N. Y., 
Dec. 26, 1939. Great Britain, Canada, possibly France 

Erste Pinchover Kranken Unterstuzungs Verein, Inc., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., Apr. 22, 1940. Poland... 



63, 570. 24 



276.00 



34, 361. 77 



None 



2, 617. 64 



None 



16,600.93 



276.00 



13, 606. 08 



None 



None 

• This registrant serves primarily as a clearinghouse for the distribution abroad of contributions received from other registrants; these receipts and 
disbursements are not included in the figures here given, since they are shown elsewhere in this tabulation following the names of the original collecting 
registrants. 

' No complete report for the month of August has been received from this organization. 



SEPTEMBER 28, 1940 

Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



261 



Name of ri'gistrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Funds spent 
for admmis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Aug 31, 1940, 

including 
cost of goods 
purchased 
and still 
on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 

kind now 
on hand 


Federated Council of Polish Societies of Grand Rapids, Mich., 


$7,285.69 

4, 933. 88 

9,896.52 

6.244.30 

590.21 

306,603.02 

97, 494. 62 
6. 760. 22 

630.32 

3,344.26 

747.07 

33,609.80 

None 

796.96 
822.81 

5,67Z80 

12,370.73 

2. 445. 50 
1,421.95 

520.53 
1,391.57 

894.45 

2,424.01 

1,298.07 

159.25 

None 

480.48 

7,953.91 

1,115.00 
4.695.49 


$4,450.93 

1,892.49 

801.09 

5,020.75 

531.21 

219,391.16 

64,414.67 
3, 920. 00 

None 

1.011.72 

332. 90 

20.175.49 

None 

None 
407.75 

317.09 

997.60 

1,500.00 
600.00 

96.15 
None 

400.00 

1.726.40 

276.30 

159.25 

None 

370. 79 

6, 512. 10 

None 
3, 341. .58 


$845.50 

410.50 

406.68 

376. 14 

None 

46,568.33 

19,414.20 
2.585.02 

None 

222.99 

112.96 

3, .500. 27 

None 

10.00 
171.66 

231.24 

5,477.01 

160.00 
91.89 

6.10 
568.59 

325.04 

52.10 

443.94 

None 

None 

17.70 

None 

None 
352.23 


$1,989.16 

2,630.89 

8,688.75 

847.41 

59.00 

40, 513. 53 

23. 665. 75 
255. 20 

630.32 
2. 109. 55 

301.21 
9,934.04 

None 

786.96 
243. 40 

5,024.47 

5,896.12 

785. 50 
730.08 

418.28 
832.98 

169.41 

645.51 

677.83 

None 

None 

91.99 

1,441.81 

1.115.00 
1,001.68 


$3,200.00 

277. 56 

664.70 

7,651.43 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

8,567.95 

531.17 

None 

None 

None 
None 

4,924.62 

None 

None 
None 

None 
None 

None 

80.00 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
307. 43 


$100. 00 


Federation of Franco-Belgian Clubs of Rhode Island, Woon- 


Federation of French Veterans of the Great War, Inc., New 
York, N. Y., Oct. 11, 1939.' France 


100 00 


Federation of Polish Jews in America, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Sept 14 1939 Poland 


6,000.00 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

19,382.02 

886 83 


Fellowship of Reconciliation, New York, N. Y., Jan. 20, 1940. 
France England and possibly Germany .. . 


Fortra, Incorporated, New York, N. Y., March 7, 1940. Ger- 


Foster Parents' Plan for War Children, Inc., New York, N. Y., 


Foyers du Soldat, New York, N. Y., Mar. 2, 1940. France 

Franco-American Federation, Salem, Mass., July 9, 1940. 


French Committee for Relief in France, Detroit, Mich., Oct. 


French Relief Association, Kansas City, Mo., Feb. 3, 1940. 
France .. - 


French War Relief, Inc., Los Angeles, Calif. Nov. 16, I939.» 
France _ 


None 


French War Relief Fund of Nevada, Reno, Nev., June 21, 1940. 




French War Relief Fund of the Philippines (formerly L«vy, 




French War Veterans, Los Angeles, Calif., Dec. 5, 1939. France. 
Friends of Children, Inc., New York, N. Y., June 13, 1940. 
Great Britain, France, Belgium, and the Netherlands 


None 


The Friends of Israel Refugee Relief Committee, Incorporated. 
Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 23, 1939. Canada, France, and Eng- 
land. 


None 


The Friends of Normandy, New York, N. Y., Dec. 18, 1939. 








Fund for the Relief of Men of Letters and Scientists of Russia, 
New York, N. Y., Apr. 29, 1940. France, Czechoslovakia, and 
Poland . . 


None 


Funds tor France, Inc., New York. N. Y., Aug. 14, 1940. France, 

General Oustav Orllcz Dreszer Foundation for Aid to Polish 

Children, Washington. D. C, Nov. 3. 1939. Poland 


None 


General Taufflieb Memorial Relief Committee for France, Santa 
Barbara, Calif., Nov. 17, 1939. France and England 


None 


German-American Relief Committee for Victims of Fascism, 
New York, N. Y., Apr. 18, 1940. France and Great Britain.. 

Mrs. George Oilliland, New York, N. Y., Aug. 10, 1940.' 
Northern Ireland 


None 


Golden Rule Foundation, New York, N. Y., Nov. 2, 1939. 




The Grand Duke Vladimir Benevolent Fund Association, New 
York. N. Y., Jan. 8, 1940. France 


None 


Grand Lodge, Daughters of Scotia, Hartford, Conn.. Feb. 16, 
IMO. Scotland 


None 


Great Lakes Command, Canadian Legion of the British Empire 
Service League, Detroit, Mich., July S, 1940. Great Britain 




Greater New Bedford British War Relief Corps, New Bedford, 
Mass., Dec. 19, 1939. Great Britain 


None 



' No complete report for the month of August has been received from this orgam'zation. 

• No complete reports for the months of July and August have been received from this organization. 

* No report for the month of August has been received from this organization. 



262 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 











Unexpended 












Funds spent 


balance as of 


Estimated 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 

kind now 
on hand 






Funds spent 


for adminis- 


Aug. 31, 1940. 


value of con- 


Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 


Funds 


for relief in 


tration, pub- 


including 


tributions in 


destination of contributions 


received 


countries 


licity, affairs. 


cost of goods 


kind sent to 






named 


campaigns, 


purchased 


countries 








etc. 


and still 


named 










on hand 






Margaret-Greble Oreenough (Mrs. Carroll Qreenough), Wash- 














ington, D. C, Nov. 21, 1939. France 


$1,073.00 


$446. 00 


None 


$628. 00 


None 


None 


Hadassah. Inc., New York, N. Y., Nov. 16, 1939. Palestine.... 


919, 324 79 


595, 158. 74 


$29, 292. 03 


294, 874. 02 


$63, 670. 60 


$122. 91 


Hamburg-Bremen Steamship Agency, Inc., New York, N. Y., 














Mar. 21, 1940. Germany and Poland 


93,571. 11 


72, 603. 88 


25, 010. 18 


None 


None 


None 


Hebrew Christian Alliance of America, Chicago, III., Jan. 3, 












1940. England, Germany, and Poland 


1, 781. 89 


1, 775. 00 


6.89 


None 


None 


None 


Holy Rosary Polish Roman Catholic Church, Passaic, N. J., 














Sept. 15, 1939.' Poland 


1, 126. 17 


1,049.00 


None 


77.17 


None 


None 


A. Seymour Houghton, Jr., et at.. New York, N. Y., Nov. 27, 














1939. France 


18, 326. 03 


2, 720. 00 


127. 73 


15,478.30 


767. 30 


None 


Humanitarian Work Committee, Glen Cove, N. Y., Sept. 30, 














1939. Poland 


3, 403. 21 


2, 400. 00 


61.63 


94L58 


185.00 


None 


Independent British War Relief Society of Rhode Island, Green- 














wood, R. I.. June 14, 1940. Great Britain 


827.06 


283. 05 


19.60 


624.41 


None 


None 


Independent Kinsker Aid Association, Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan. 3, 














1940. Poland 


475. 74 


None 


None 


475. 74 


None 


None 


International Committee of Young Men's Christian Associa- 




tions, New York, N. Y., Sept. 22, 1939. Poland, France, 














India, Norway, Belgium, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, 














Canada, and the United Kingdom 


35, 929. 16 


25, 002. 50 


940. 17 


9, 986. 48 


None 


None 


International Federation of Business and Professional Women, 














New York, N. Y., July 6, 1940. Poland, Czechoslo\akia, 














Norway, Belgium, France, and the Netherlands 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


International Relief Association for Victims of Fascism, New 














York, N. Y., Sept. 25, 1939. France, England, and Germany. 


10, 483. 96 


5, 054. 23 


3, 844. 38 


985. 35 


2,020.00 


None 


Joint Committee of the United Scottish Clans of Greater New 














York and New Jersey, Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan. 30, 1940. Scot- 














land - 


3, 417. 80 


2,351.00 


634.95 


431.85 


None 


None 


Junior Relief Group of Te.ias, Houston, Tex., May 29, 1940. 




United Kingdom, France, Netherlands. Belgium, and Norway. 


11,836.10 


10,000.00 


1, 680. 89 


154.21 


None 


None 


Marthe Th. Kahn, New York, N. V., Apr. 16, 1940. France... 


222. 25 


25.00 


7.66 


189. 69 


None 


None 


The Kindergarten Unit, Inc., Norwalk, Conn., Oct. 3, 1939. 














France, Poland, United Kingdom, India, Australia, and New 














Zealand 


1, 222. 21 


892. 85 


329.36 


None 


None 


None 


The Kosciuszko Foundation, Inc., New York, N. Y., May 24, 




1940. Poland 


3, 544. 97 


2, 650. 00 


322. 79 


672. 18 


None 


None 


Kuryer Publishing Company, Milwaukee, Wis., Sept. 16, 1939. 














Poland 


6, 070. 52 


6, 056. 96 


13.66 


None 


None 


None 


Der Kyflhaeuserbund, League of Gom?an War Veterans in 














U. S. A., Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 27, 1939. Poland, Germany, 














and Canada., 


37, 686. 37 


30, 395. 00 


3, 229. 02 


3,962.36 


None 


None 


Lackawanna County Committee for Polish Relief, Scranton, 














Pa.. Sept. 15, 1930. Poland 


8, 689. 66 
2,017.50 


7, 225. 56 
1,640.00 


831. 80 
None 


632. 30 
477. 60 


None 
None 


None 


Lafayette Fund, New York, N. Y., Jan. 2, 1940.f France 


None 


LaFayette Preventorium, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 21, 1939. 














France 


19, 098. 47 


8, 697. 13 


3,981.02 


6, 520. 32 


None 


None 


La France Post American Legion, New York, N. Y., Feb. 7, 














1940. France and Great Britain 


1, 686. 32 


None 


366. 61 


1,218.71 


None 


None 


Mrs. Nancy Bartlett Laughhn, New York, N. Y., Jan. 31, 1940. 




France 


314.60 


306. 00 


None 


8.60 


None 


None 


League of American Writers, Inc., New York, N. Y., May 6, 




1940. France, England, Poland, and Norway 


6, 367. 77 


3, 683. 45 


1,420.21 


364. n 


None 


None 


League of Polish Societies of New Kensington, Arnold and 














Vicinity, New Kensington, Pa., Nov. 17, 1939. Poland 


2, 035. 62 


1,363.77 


78.19 


693. 66 


2, 284'. 45 


115.65 


Legion of Young Polish Women, Chicago, HI., Oct. 2, 1939. 














Poland 


15, 487. 79 


0, 642. 00 


2,411.85 


3, 433. 94 


None 


None 


The Little House of Saint Pantaleon, Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 












30,1939. France and England 


21.366.99 


16. 318. 08 


36.26 


6,011.66 


12, 791. 97 


691. 76 



' The registration of this organization was revoked on June 30, 1940, at the request of registrant. 
' No report for the month of August has been received from this organization. 



SEPTEMBER 2 8, 194 

Contributions fob Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



263 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination ol contributions 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Aug.Sl.lWO, 

including 
cost of goods 
purchased 
and still 
on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions In 

kind now 
on band 



The Louisiana Guild for British Relief, New Orleans, La., July 

24, 1940. British Empire 

The Maple Leaf Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y., Apr. 19, 1940. 

Canada, United Kingdom, and France-. 

Massachusetts Relief Committee for Poland, Worcester, Mass., 

Nov. 9, 1939. Poland 

Medical and Surgical Supply Committee, New York, N. Y., 

Aug. 5, 1940. Poland, Great Britain, France, Netherlands, 

Norway, Luxemburg, and Belgium 

Mennonito Central Committee, Akron, Pa., Feb. 13, 1940. 

Great Britain, Poland, Germany, and France 

MiUord, Connecticut, Polish Relief Fund Committee, Milford, 

Conn., Nov. 6, 1939. Poland 

Kate R. Miller, New York, N. Y., Feb. 19, 1940. Franco 

Mobile Surgical Unit, Inc., New York, N. Y., Jan. 13. 1940. 

France 

The Mother Church, The First Church of Christ Scientist, In 

Boston, U. S. A., Boston, Mass., Apr. 25, 1940. Canada, 

France, and the Uniti'il Kingdom _ 

Fernanda Wanamakcr Munn (Mrs. Ector Munn), New York, 

N. Y., Nov. 25, 1939. France and England 

Mutual Society of French Colonials, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Aug. 20, 1940. France 

National Christian Action, Inc., Now York, N. Y., May 23, 

1940.' Norway and Denmark 

Netherlands War Relief Committee, Manila, P. I., May 27, 1940. 

Netherlands 

The New Canaan Workshop, New Canaan, Conn., July 1, 1940. 

British Empire 

New Jersey Broadcasting Corporation, Jersey City, N. J., Sept. 

13, 1939. Poland 

Nicole de Paris Relief Fund, New York, N. Y., July 1, 1940. 

France 

North Side Polish Council Relief Committee of Milwaukee, 

Wis., Milwaukee, Wis., Dec. 6. 1939. Poland 

Norwegian Relief. Inc.. Chicago, 111., May 1. 1940. Norway 

Nowe-Dworer Ladies Benevolent Association, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Oct. 25, 1939. Poland 

Nowiny Publishing Apostolate, Inc., Milwaukee, Wis., Sept. 

26, 1939. Poland.. 

Nowy Swiat Publishing Co., Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 11, 

1939. Poland and France 

Order of Scottish Clans. Boston, Mass., Jan. 25, 1940. Scotland. 
Over-Seas League Tobacco Fund, New York, N. Y., Aug. 19, 

1940. British Empire. 

Paderewski Fund for Polish Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Feb. 23, 1940. Poland 

The Paryski Publishing Co., Toledo, Ohio, Sept. 15, 1939. 

Poland.... 

The Pawtuckot and Blackstone Valley British Relief Society 

of Rhode Island, Pawtuoket, R. I., Feb. 26, 1940. Great 

Britain 

Polish Aid Fund Committee of Federation of Elizabeth Polish 

Organizations, Elizabeth, N. J., Sept. 23, 1939.' Poland 

Polish .Md Fund Committee of St. Caslmir's Roman Catholic 

Church of the City of Albany, N. Y., Albany, N. Y., Jan. 22, 

1940. Poland 



$1, 518. 99 
25, 743. 71 
5,211.50 

4, 783. 00 

10,058.62 

405.33 
in. 00 

12, 635. K 

118,273.71 

12, 102. 27 

None 

1,539.89 

2.844.99 

6,911.14 

1, 210. 55 

204.50 

1,469.37 
302, 670. 39 

806.14 

5, 1?9. 46 

26, 545. 91 
4, 738. 59 

None 

108, 333. 78 

6, 580. 15 

3, 628. 95 
8, 687. 92 

2, 573. 22 



$579. 80 
5,415.56 

5, 209. 75 

None 

13, 653. 96 

201.20 
111.00 

11. 072. 76 

2. 467. 60 
4, 788. 69 
None 
None 
760.00 
4,760.00 
826.17 
None 

1, 400. 28 

None 

None 

4, 589. 86 

24,71Z00 
3,377.00 

None 

60,000.00 

6, SOL 15 

332.00 
7,946.85 



$30.31 

6, 779. 46 
1.75 

2, 310. 27 

I, 783. 82 

84.62 
None 

1, 496 29 

1, 248. 42 

6, 047. 77 

48.40 

341.17 

11.50 

37L97 

384.38 

5L00 

19.18 
8.041.63 

14L00 

None 

103. 39 
None 

None 

31,430.27 

None 

351. 91 
15.00 

7.00 



$908.88 

13, 548. 70 

None 

2, 472. 73 

620.84 

70.51 
None 

69.53 

114, 657. 79 

2, 265. 81 

None 

1, 198. 72 

2, 083. 49 

1, 789. 17 

None 

163.50 

49.91 
294, 628. 76 

665. 14 

549.60 

1, 730. 52 
1,361.59 

None 

16,903.51 

79.00 

2, 946. 04 
726. 07 

2, 339. 90 



$100.00 

9,914.00 

None 

4, 042. 48 

.5,461.60 

None 
None 

500.00 

None 

4, 949. 90 

None 

None 

None 

450.00 

None 

None 

1, 300. 00 
None 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
1, 600. 00 

1,200.00 



None 
None 
None 

$3. 200. 00 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

1, 216. 67 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 



» No complete reports for the months of July and August have been received from this organization. 
' No report for the month of .August has been received from this organization. 



2G4 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Aug, 31, 1940, 

including 
cost of goods 
purchased 
and still 
on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 

kind now 
on hand 



Polish-American Associations of Middlesex County, N. J., 

Sayre^ille. N,.I.,JaD. 22, 1910. Poland 

Polish-American Citizens Relief Fund Committee, Shirley, 

Mass., Dec. 16, 1939. Poland - 

Polish-American Council, Chicago, 111.. Sept. 15, 1939. Poland . . 
Polish-American Forwarding Committee, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Mar. 28. 1940. Poland and Germany 

Polish-American Volunteer Ambulance Section (Pavas), New 

York. N. Y.. Feb. 13, 1940. France 

Polish Broadcasting Corporation, New York, N. Y., Sept. 23, 

19.39. Poland --- -- 

Polish Business and Professional Men's Club, Los Angeles, 

Calif., Nov. 17. 1939. Poland - 

Polish Central Committee of New London, Conn., New London, 

Conn., Oct. 13, 1939. Poland - 

Polish Central Council of New Haven, New Haven, Conn., 

Sept. 29, 1939. Poland -.- 

Polish Civic League of Mercer County, Trenton, N. J., Sept. 

19, 1939. Poland - 

Polish Civilian Relief Fund, Passaic, N. J., October 27, 1939. 

Poland - 

Polish Falcons Alliance of America, Pittsburgh, Pa., Sept. 20, 

1939. Poland - --- - 

Polish Inter-Organization "Centrala" of Waterbury, Water- 
bury, Conn.. Feb. 28, 1940. Poland 

Polish Literary Guild of New Britain, Conn.. New Britain, 

Conn., Sept. 21, 1939. Poland 

The PoUsh National Alliance of Brooklyn, United States of 

America, Brooklyn, N. Y., Sept. 19, 1939." Poland 

Polish National Alliance of the United States of North America, 

Chicago, m., Sept. 27, 1939. Poland... 

Polish National Council of Montgomery County, Amsterdam, 

N. Y., Oct. 12. 1939. Poland 

Polish National Council of New York, New York, N. Y., Sept. 

14, 1939. Poland and France 

The Polish Naturalization Independent Club, Worcester, Mass., 

Sept. 20, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief of Carteret, New Jersey, Carteret, N. J., Oct. 11, 

1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Boston, Boston, Mass., Sept. 14, 

1939. Poland. 

Polish Relief Committee of Brockton, Mass., Brockton, Mass., 

Sept. 2.'i. 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Cambridge, Mass., Cambridge, 

Mass., Sept. 16, 1939. Poland.. 

Polish Relief Committee of Columbia County, Hudson, N. Y., 

Mar. in, 1940. Poland... 

Polish Relief Committee of Delaware, Wilmington, Del., Sept. 

22. 1939. Poland.. 

Polish Relief Committee, Detroit, Mich., Sept. II, 1939. Po- 
land 



Polish Relief Committee of FItchburg, Fitchburg, Mass., Mar. 

29. 1940. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee, Flint, Mich., Sept. 18. 1939. Poland.. 
Polish Relief Committee of Gardner, Mass., Gardner, Mass., 

Sent. 26, 1939.'" Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Holyoke, Mass., Holyoke, Mass., 

Nov. 4, 1939. Poland... _ 

Polish Relief Committee of Jackson, Mich., Jackson, Mich., 

Nov. 9, 1939. Poland 



■ The registration of this organization was revoked on Aug. 31, 



$1, 057. 05 

427. 01 
378, 939. 00 

1. 173. 05 

29,120.00 

2. 147. 08 
474.50 

1, 271. 10 
3. 712. 44 
6, 903. 47 
4, 164. 70 

10, 495. 11 
742. 26 

2, 826. 69 
8, 578. 73 

292, 505. 22 
4, 402. 62 
89. 555. 76 
2, 526. 75 
1, 330. 15 
8, 421. 55 
1,711.55 
2, 210. 84 
None 
7, 722. 12 

149, 942. 09 

749.80 
6, 489. 83 

4. 175. 09 

6, 616. 48 

1.799.60 
, 1940, at the 



$800.00 

350.31 
210, 469. 60 

769. 35 

19, 094. 05 

None 

314. 23 

994.24 

3, 131. 00 

6, 392. 86 

3, 026. 00 

9, 102. 23 

607.76 

2, 000. 00 

4,000.00 

231,065.00 

2. 610. 00 

65, 640. 78 

2,200.00 

800.00 

7, 101. 19 

1,201.27 

1, 142. 30 

None 

7, 189. 84 

98, 603. 14 

460.40 
3, 300. 00 

2,979.20 

4,922.53 



622.60 
request of registrant. 



$80.82 

21.67 
9, 379. 60 

2, 198. 77 

73.83 

35.30 

158.27 

148. 57 

51.26 

1.19 

207.90 

20.00 

25.60 

13.00 

None 

1,619.64 

97.54 

11,616.96 

8.65 

13.00 

421. 34 

247. 67 

116. 89 

None 

235.63 

6, 816. 91 

41.09 
1,411.05 

771. 47 

203. 35 

270. 11 



$176. 23 

66.03 
169, 099. 90 

None 

9, 952. 12 

2, 111. 78 

2.00 

128.29 

630. 18 

509 42 

921. 80 

1,372.88 

108.99 

813. 59 

4, 678. 73 

59, 820. 58 

1,695.08 

12,298.02 

318. 10 

517. 15 

899.02 

262. 61 

961. 65 

None 

296.65 

45, 522. 94 

24S. 31 
1, 778. 78 

424.42 

489.60 

906.89 



None 

$zm. 00 
100, 600. 00 

None 

245.40 

None 

None 

76.00 

800.00 

4, 000. 00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

5,000.00 

289, 633. 50 

None 

45.00 

2,600.00 
350.00 
600.00 
None 

4. 250. 00 

61, 974. 00 

130.00 
None 

1, 307. 05 

726.00 

750.00 



None 

$76. 00 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

1, 000. 00 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

187, 627. 50 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

200.00 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 
None 



SEPTEMBER 28, 1940 

Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



265 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Aup.31,1940, 

including 
cost of goods 
purchased 
and still 
on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 

kind now 
on hand 



Polish Relief Committee, New Bedford, Mass., Oct. 31, 1939. 
Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Philadelphia and Vicinity, Phila- 
delphiii, Pa., Sept. 12, 1939. Poland, 

Polish Rullef Committee of the Polish National Home Associa- 
tion, Lowell, Mass., Nov. 27, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Conmiittee, Taunton, Mass., Dec. 13, 1939. Po- 
land.. 

Polish Relief Fund of Fall River, Mass., Fall River, Mass., 
Nov. 8, 1939. Poland.... 

Polish Relief Fund, Jersey City, N. J., Sept. 12, 1939." Poland. 

Polish Relief Fund, Jewett City, Conn., Oct. 3, 1939. Poland.. 

Polish Relief Fund of Meriden, Moriden, Conn., Oct. 12, 1939." 
Poland 

Polish Relief Fund, Middletown, Conn., Sept. 23, 1939. Poland . 

Polish Relief Fund, Niagara Falls, N. Y., Oct. 26, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund of Palmer, Mass., Three Rivers, Mass., Oct. 

20, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund of Syracuse, N. Y., and vicinity, Syracuse, 

N. Y„ Oct. 31. 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund Committee, Los Angeles, Calif., Dec. 13, 

1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund Committee of Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wis., 

Sept. 26, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund Committee of Passaic and Bergen Counties, 

Inc., Passaic, N. J., Sept. 22. 1939. Poland 

Polish Union of the United States of North America, Wilkes- 

Barre, Pa., Sept. 8, 1939. Poland.. 

Polish United Societies of Holy Trinity Parish, Lowell, Mass., 

Sept. 20, 1939. Poland 

Polish War Sufferers Relief Committee (Fourth Ward), Toledo, 

Ohio, Sept. 21, 1939. Poland 

Polish Welfare Council, Schenectady, N. Y., Sept. 22, 1939. 

Poland 

Polish White Cross Club of West Utlca, Utlca, N. Y., Oct. 20, 

1939. Poland 

Polish Women's Fund to Fatherland, Lawrence, Mass., Sept. 23, 

1939. Poland. 

Polish Women's Relief Committee, New York, N. Y., Nov. 24, 

1939. France, Poland, and Germany 

PolskI Komitet Ratunkowy (Polish Relief Fund), Binghamton, 

N. Y., Sept. 25, 1939. Poland 

Polsko Narodowy Komitet w Ameryce, Scranton, Pa., Sept. 8, 

1939.' Poland 

Pulaski Civic League of Middlesex County, N. J., South River, 

N. J., Sept. 30, 1939. Poland 

Pulaski League of Queens County, Inc., Jamaica, N. Y., Oct. 

21, 1939. Poland 

Queen Wilhelmlna Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y., May 17, 

1940. Netherlands, France. Poland, United Kingdom, India, 
Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Union of South Africa, 
Norway, Belgium, and Lu-\emburg 

Refugees of England, Inc., New York, N. Y., July 12, 1940.» 
Great Britain and France 

Relief Agency for Polish War Sufferers, Willimantic, Conn., 
Sept. 29, 1939. Poland 

Relief Committee of United Polish Societies, Chicopee, Mass., 
Oct. 21, 1939. Poland 



$9,834.96 

42,211.01 

2, 840. 34 

2. 720. 22 

1, 170. 13 

68, 880. 15 

1, 292. 76 

1, 806. 69 
4, 550. 45 
2, 650. 72 

1,736.01 

12,305.18 

829.34 

15, 520. 65 

12, 089. 96 

2. 163. 13 

4, 083. 39 

5, 641. 69 
6,550.76 

6, 697. 16 
5, 699. 56 

7. 443. 14 
3, 800. 49 

26, 738. 80 

507.53 

7. 443. 93 



348, 705. 87 
8, 005. 97 
2, 792. 54 
6,098.39 



$7, 397. 24 

32, 510. 00 

1,.V)0.D0 

2, 257. 00 

1,000.00 

53, 108. 59 

1.186.90 

1,600.00 
2,968.86 
2,500.00 

620.46 
6, 869. 00 

448.00 
12,23172 
9, 270. 17 
2,000.00 
1,788.31 
5,326.11 
6, 260. 36 
4, 962. 70 
1,821.10 

269. 72 

2, 354. 04 

24. 823. 87 

None 
6, 700. 00 

75, 058. 40 
5,204.50 
2,080.28 
5, 799. 66 



$870. 29 


750.54 


481.28 


23.17 


30.10 


1,840.30 


101.08 


27.90 


18.20 


21.80 


104.75 


2,511.99 


165. 73 


846.47 


1, 036. 61 


None 


162.71 


117.00 


57.32 


309. 80 


642.34 


2,379.41 


267. 13 


381.11 


85.00 


159. 65 


27,804.44 


200.47 


175.72 


None 



$1,567.43 

8, 950. 47 

859. 06 

410. 05 

140.03 

3,911.20 

4.77 

278. 79 

1, S63. 40 
128.92 

920. 80 

2, 924. 17 

215. 61 

2, 411. 46 
1, 783. 28 

163.13 

2,132.37 

98.49 

233.09 
1, 424. 66 
3,236.12 
4, 794. 01 
1, 179. 32 
1,633.82 

422.63 

584.28 

245,843.03 

2,601.00 

536.64 

298.73 



$3, 860. 00 

None 

None 

1,376.00 

None 

1,575.00 

400.00 

None 
None 
None 

4, 004. 95 

1, 850. 00 

150. 00 

II, 607. 40 

3, 678. 00 

None 

1, 240. 00 

None 

6,150.00 

1, 600. 00 

1,800. 00 

869.00 

780. 00 

21,345.00 

None 

None 

None 
1,025.00 

537. 10 
2, 190. 00 



None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

$600.00 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

850.00 

1,209.80 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 



■ No report for the month of .Vugust has been received from this organization. 

• The registration of this organization was revoked on July 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 

» No complete report for the month of August has been received from this organization. 



266 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Aug. 31.1940, 

including 
cost of goods 
purchased 
and still 
on band 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 

kind now 
on band 



Relief Fund for Sufferers in Poland Committee, Kenosha, Wis., 
Sept. 25, 1939. Poland 

Relief Society for Jews in Lublin, Los Angeles, Calif., Dec. 13, 
1939. Poland .--. 

Russian Children's Welfare Society, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 29, 1939. Germany, France, and Poland 

The Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church, Little Falls, N. Y., 
Little Falls, N. Y., Nov. 2, 1939.' Poland 

St. Andrews (Scottish) Society of Washington, D. C, Washing- 
ton, D. C, June IS. 1940. Scotland 

St. Stephens Polish Relief Fund of Perth Amboy, N. J., Perth 
Amboy, N. J., Sept. 27, 1939. Poland.. 

The Salvation Army, New York, N. Y., May 23, 1940. Eng- 
land, Franco, Norway, Belgium, and the Netherlands 

Save the Children Federation, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 8, 

1939, England, Poland, Belgium, and the Netherlands 

Schuylkill and Carbon Counties Relief Committee for Poland, 

Frackville, Pa., Sept. 16, 1939. Poland 

Scots' Charitable Society, Boston, Mass., May 9, 1940. Scot- 
land 

Scottish Games of New Jersey Association, Fairhaven, N. J., 
July 9, 1940. Great Britain 

Le Secours Fran^ais (formerly Le Paquet au Front), New York, 
N. Y., Oct. 6, 1939. France.. 

Secours Franco-Am6ricain — War Relief, Pittsburgh, Pa., Nov. 
20, 1939. Great Britain _. 

The Seventh Column, Inc., West Fairlee, Vt., June 12, 1940. 
France and England 

Share A Smoke Club, Inc., Ithaca, N. Y., Nov. 14, 1939.« Eng- 
land, France, Norway, Belgium, and the Netherlands 

Sociedades Hispanas Aliadas, San Francisco, Calif., Mar. 29, 

1940. France 

Sociedades Hispanas Confederadas, Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan. 22, 

1940. France 

SociftS Frangaisc de St. Louis, Inc., St. Louis, Mo., Nov. 15, 

1939. France 

Soci6t6 Israelite Frangaise de Secours Mutuels de New York, 

New York, N. Y., June 4, 1940. France 

Society of the Devotees of Jerusalem, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Dec. 18. 1939. Palestine 

The Somerset Workroom, Far Hills, N. J., Apr. 2!), 1940. France 

and Great Britain.. 

Southbridge Allied Committee for Relief in Poland, Southbridge, 

Mass., Nov. 9, 1939. Poland 

Lc Souvenir Franf ais, Detroit, Mich., May 1, 1940. France and 

Belgium _. 

Spanish Committee Pro-Masonic Refugees in France, New 

York, N. Y., Feb. 20, 1940.' France 

Spanish Refugee Relief Campaign, New York, N. Y., Sept. 20, 

1939. France 

Springfield and Vicinity Polish Relief Fund Committee, Spring- 

fleld, Mass., Sept. 23, 1939. Poland... 

Superior Council of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, New 

York, N. Y., Apr. 5, 1940. France 

Toledo Committee for Relief of War Victims, Toledo, Ohio, 

Sept. 19, 1939. Poland 

Tolstoy Foundation, Inc., New York, N. Y., Oct. 17, 1039. 

France, Poland, England, and Czechoslovakia. 



$3, 600. 69 

827.68 

6, 425. 02 

239.96 

789. 28 

2,691.45 

157, 384. 65 

35, 163. 60 

6, 388. 74 

328.00 

237. 70 

60, 625. 16 

1, 768. 48 

None 

473. 71 

1, 214. 24 

31, 199, 12 

653. 07 

278. 00 

11,573.29 

9, 938, 24 

1, 084, 92 

68.00 

None 

34, 630. 52 

1,090, 14 

310, 00 

6, 042, 95 

18, 754, 65 



$3,060,60 

175, 00 

3, 896, 92 

200, 00 

None 

None 

122, 764, 00 

24, 686, 26 

4,486,71 

None 

None 

42,119.26 

1,491.11 

None 

360,00 

None 

30, 240, 87 

373. 49 

None 

6, 100. 00 

3,981.41 

135. 81 

None 

None 

11,009.58 

1,000,00 

310,00 

4,601,17 

10,816,64 



$364, 41 

281,82 

1, 464. 64 

1,00 

71,66 

None 

1, 510, 70 

9, 131. 14 

None 

None 

168, 17 

29, 707, 43 

90.02 

None 

113.60 

706. 13 

958, 25 

57,66 

2.80 

5, 347, 31 

334, 21 

20,91 

None 

None 

22, 804, 99 

21,25 

None 

629, 79 

3, 258. 14 



$169. 68 

370. 76 

1, 073. 46 

38.95 

717,63 

2, 691, 45 

33, 109, 96 

1, 346. 21 

903, 03 

328.00 

79.63 

None 

187. 35 

None 

10.11 

608.11 

None 

222. 02 

276. 20 

125.98 

5, 622, 62 

928.20 

58.00 

None 

816. 95 

68.89 

None 

811.99 

4, 680, 87 



$1,000,00 
None 

1, 166, 20 
None 
None 
None 

3, 000, 00 
None 
None 
None 
None 

2, 707, 75 

1,869,60 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

9, 294. 40 
700.00 
None 
None 
16. 486, 00 
None 
None 
None 
None 



• The registration of this organization was revoked on July 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 

« No report for the month of August has been received from this organization. 

' The registration of this organization was revoked on Aug. 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 



SEPTEMBER 28, 1940 

Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



267 



Name of registrant. location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relipf in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, aflaiis. 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as nf 
Aug. ■?!. 1940, 

including 
cost of goods 
purchased 
and still 
on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 

kind now 
on hand 



Mrs. Walter R. Tuckerman, Bethesda, Md., Nov. 24, 1939. 

Great Britain -.- 

Edmund Tyszka, Hamtramck, Mich., Sept. 19, 1939. Poland.. 
Ukrainian Relief Committee, New York, N. Y., June 28, 1940. 

Germany, France, England, and Italy 

L'Union Alsacienne, Inc., New York, N. Y., Oct. 28, 1939. 

France 

Unitarian Service Committee of the American Unitarian Asso- 
ciation, Boston, Mass., May 23, 1940. Franco, British Isles, 

and the Netherlands- 

United American Polish Organizations, South River, N. J., 

South River, N. J., Oct. 20, 1939. Poland 

United American Spanish Aid Committee, New York, N. Y., 

Apr. 29, IMO. United Kingdom and France 

United Bilgorayer Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., Mar. 21, 1940. 

Poland -- 

United British War Relief Association, Somerville, Mass., June 

14, 1940. Great Britain and Northern Ireland 

United Charity In.«titutions of Jerusalem, New York, N. Y., 

Oct. 13. 1939. Paicstino. 

United Committee for French Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Oct. 26, 1939. Franco 

United Gorman Societies, Inc., Portland, Greg., Portland, Greg., 

Jan. 8, 1940. Germany 

United Nowy Dworer Relief Committee, New York, N. Y., 

Jan. 3, 1940. Poland 

United Opoler Relief of New York, New York, N. Y., Dec. 9, 

1939. Poland 

United Polish Central Council of Connecticut, Bridgeport, 

Conn., Oct. 16, 1939.' Poland 

United Polish Committees in Racine, Wis., Racine, Wis., Nov. 

2, 1939. Poland 

United Polish Organizations of Salem, Mass., Salem, Mass., 

Oct. 20, 1939. Poland 

United Polish Societies of Bristol, Conn., Bristol, Conn., Sept. 

29, 1939. Poland 

United Polish Societies of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, Calif., Oct. 

21, 1939. Poland 

United Reading Appeal for Polish War Sufferers, Reading, Pa., 

Sept. 22, 1939. Poland 

Urgent Relief for France, Washington, D. C, Dec. 26, 1939. 

France 

Mrs. Paul Verdier Fund, San Francisco, Calif., Oct. 11, 1939. 

France _ 

Vincennes, France, Committee of Vincennes, Ind., Vincennes, 

Ind., May 31, 1940.' France 

W^oman's Auxiliary Board of the Scots' Charitable Society, Inc., 

Waverloy, Mass., Feb. 28, 1940. Scotland 

Women's Allied War Relief Association of St. Louis, Clayton, 

Mo., Dec. 18, 1939. Great Britain and France 

Registrants whoso registrations were revoked prior to Aug. 1, 

1940, and who had no balance on hand as of that date 



$2, 673. 85 
3,031.46 

91.50 

2, 360. 16 

21,450.13 

3, 142. 22 

1,626.36 

1,091.97 

1, 362. 33 

37, 634. 91 

111,924.62 

2,363.17 

832.96 

677. 15 

9, 597. 29 

2, CIS. 39 

2, 489. 72 

1,221.19 

2, 739. 71 

7,668.29 

19, 066. 08 

4, 207. 41 

None 

1,316.12 

6, 241. 42 

217, 411. 79 



$1, 400. 85 
3.031.46 

40.00 

400.27 

12,539.36 

2, 400. 00 

938.85 

None 

556.00 

19, 866. 93 

53,246.83 

2,000.00 

84.70 

None 

9, 365. 35 

1, 350. 00 

1,965.27 

576.80 

2, 262. 10 

6, 657. 14 

14.338.17 

3,897.31 

None 

1,218.62 

2, 462. 27 

194, 463. 17 



$3.95 
None 

None 

585.47 

1, 995. 34 

136.94 

600.44 

146.27 

263.25 

18, 763. 65 

8, 575. 54 

133.99 

191.96 

36.21 

231.94 

212. 16 

437. 91 

26.75 

346. 62 

140.13 

659. 74 

65.45 

None 

13.67 

8.02 

26,117.21 



$1, 269. 05 
None 

51.50 

1. 374. 42 

6. 915. 43 
605.28 

87.07 

945.70 

643.08 

None 

50, 102. 25 

229.18 

556.30 

641.94 

None 

453.23 

86.64 

617.64 

131.09 

1,871.02 

4, 168. 17 

244.65 

None 

83.83 

3, 781. 13 

None 



None 
None 

None 

$315.00 

None 
None 
None 
None 
175.00 
None 

7, 462. 77 
None 
None 
None 

4, 845. 00 
None 
595.00 
300.00 
None 
None 

3, 159. 10 

3,282.00 
None 
None 

5, 638. 80 
61,400.06 



Total- 



11,244,603.82 



7. 264, 206. 1 



1, 030, 418. 11 



2, 971, 231. 04 



1,308,766.93 



None 

None 

None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
$592. 09 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
2, 532. 35 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 



267, 226. 19 



' The registration of this organization was revoked on Aug. 31, 1940, at the request of the registrant. 

• It is not possible to strike an exact balance in these published totals, since some registrants have included in their expenditures moneys available from 
loans or advances, which are not considered by the Department to be "fimds received" and hence are not reported as such. 



268 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BUXUETIN 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press September 28] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
Foreign Service since September 18, 1940: 

Career Officers 

Dudley G. Dwyre, of Fort Collins, Colo., 
First Secretary of Legation and Consul Gen- 
eral at Montevideo, Uruguay, has been desig- 
nated First Secretary of Legation and Consid 
General at San Jose, Costa Rica, and will serve 
in dual capacity. 

John P. Hurley, of Brooklyn, N. Y., Consul 
General at Marseille, France, has been assigned 
for duty in the Department of State. 

William L. Peck, of "Washington, Conn., 
Consid at Naples, Italy, has been assigned as 
Consul at Marseille, France. 

Charles L. Luedtke, of Minnesota, Foreign 
Service officer, assigned to the Department of 
State and detailed to the Department of Agri- 
culture, has been designated Agricultural At- 
tache at Panama, Panama; San Jose, Costa 
Eica ; and Quito, Ecuador. 

Benjamin M. HuUey, of De Land, Fla., Sec- 
ond Secretary of Embassy and Consul at Paris, 
France, has been assigned for duty in the De- 
partment of State. 

Ealpli J. Blake, of Portland, Oreg., Language 
Officer at the Embassy, Tokyo, Japan, has been 
assigned as Consul at Tokyo, Japan. 

The assignment of Foy D. Kohler, of Toledo, 
Ohio, for duty in the Department of State, 
has been canceled. Mr. Kohler will remain at 
his present post, Athens, Greece. 

John Fx'emont Melby, of Bloomington, Bl., 
Vice Consul at Caracas, Venezuela, has been 
designated Third Secretary of Embassj' at 
Caracas, Venezuela. 

Non-career Officers 

Mr. Stephen C. Worster, of Maine, has been 
appointed Vice Consul at C o a t z a c o a 1 c o s 



(Puerto Mexico), Veracruz, Mexico, instead of 
at Salina Cruz, Oaxaca, Mexico, where a con- 
sular office will not be established as previously 
reported. 

Edwin J. King, of Waynesboro. Pa., Vice 
Consul at Dublin, Ireland, died at his post on 
Sei)tember 17, 1940. 

Francis M. Withey, of Michigan, Vice Consul 
at Palermo, Italy, has been appointed Vice Con- 
sul at Nice, France. 

Leonard G. Bradford, of Boston, Mass., Vice 
Consul at Genoa, Italy, has been appointed Vice 
Consul at Marseille, France. 

George D. Whittinghill, of New York, Clerk 
at Milan, Italy, has been appointed Vice Consul 
at Lyon, France. 

The American Consulate at Trail, British 
Columbia, Canada, which was established for 
the purpose of performing non-immigrant visa 
services only, will be closed September 30, 1940. 



FOREIGN SERVICE REGULATIONS 

On September 24, 1940, the President signed 
Executive Order No. 8547 amending the For- 
eign Service Regulations of the United States 
(Chapter XX — Miscellaneous). For text of 
the Executive order, see the Federal Register for 
September 26, 1940 (vol. 5, no. 188), pages 
3818-3819. 



Legislation 



An Act To provide for increasing the lending author- 
ity of the Export-Import Bank of Washington, and for 
other purposes. (Public, No. 792, 76th Cong., 3d 
sess.) 1 p. 50. 

Export-Import Bank of Washington : Hearings be- 
fore the Banking and Currency Committee of the 
House, 76th Cong., 3d sess., on S. 3069 (H. R. 8477), 
to provide for increasing the lending authority of the 
Export-Import Bank of Wasiiiugton, and for other 
purposes, Feb. 16, 19, and 20, 1940. 87 pp. 100. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



SOVEREIGNTY 

Convention on the Provisional Administra- 
tion of European Colonies and Possessions 
in the Americas 

On September 27, 1940, the Senate gave its 
advice and consent to the ratification by the 
President of the Convention on the Provisional 
Administration of European Colonies and Pos- 
sessions in the Americas, signed at Habana July 
30, 1940."' 

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee 
made public on September 24 the message from 
the President to the Senate of the United States, 
transmitting tlie Habana ccmvention. together 
with the report from the Secretary of State con- 
cerning the convention and "Act of Habana''." 
The texts read as follows : 

To THE Senate of the United States : 

To the end that I may receive the advice and 
consent of the Senate to ratification I transmit 
Iierewith, in certified form, a Convention en- 
titled "Convention on the Provisional Adminis- 
ti-ation of European Colonies and Possessions in 
the Americas", signed at Habana on July 30, 
1940. Also enclosed, for the information of 
the Senate, but not requiring ratification, is a 
copy of the "Act of Habana"\ signed on the same 
date at the Second Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics and 
a report concerning the Convention and Act, 
from the Secretary of State. 

I commend the Convention to the early con- 
sideration of the Senate. 

Fraxklin D. Roosevelt 

The White House, 

September 13, 19 kO. 



[Enclosure] 



"For text, see the Bulletin of August 24, 1940 (vol. 
Ill, no. 61), pp. 14.V148. 

" For text, see ibid., pp. 13S-139. 



Depabtsient of State, 

Washington, September 12, 191^0. 
The President, 

The White House. 

The undersigned, the Secretary of State, has 
the honor to laj' before the President, in certi- 
fied form, with a view to its transmission tf) the 
Senate to receive the advice and consent of that 
body to ratification, if his judgment approve 
thereof, a Convention entitled "Convention on 
the Provisional Administration of European 
Colonies and Po.ssessions in the Americas", 
.signed at Habana on July 30. 1940. The Con- 
vention is accompanied by the "Act of Haliana"' 
which is included in tlie Final Act of the Con- 
ference, signed at the same time. This Act is 
important as information and as a part of the 
record. 

Permit me also to make the following state- 
ment concerning the backgi-ound and proAnsions 
of the Convention. 

It will be recalled that the primaiy purpose 
of the American republics in convoking the 
Meeting of Foreign Ministers at Habana last 
July was to consider the possibility that devel- 
opments in Europe might affect the status of 
the European possessions in the Western Hemi- 
sphere in such a manner as to constitute a threat 
to the peace and security of the American re- 
publics. Sovereignty over these possessions 
has been maintained for many generations and 
in some cases for several centuries by the 
French, British and Netherlands Governments. 
These geographic regions have not heretofore 
constituted a menace to the peace of the Amer- 
icas and we have maintained the most cordial 
relations with their respective administrations. 

It would not. however, be consistent with the 
policy of the United States or desirable from 
the point of view of the defense of the Western 

269 



270 

Hemisphere to permit these regions to become 
a subject of barter in the settlement of European 
difficulties, or a battleground for the adjustment 
of such difficulties. Either situation could only 
be regarded as a threat to the peace and safety 
of this Hemisphere, as would any indication 
that the possessions under consideration might 
be used to promote systems alien to the inter- 
American system. Any effort, therefore, to 
modify the existing status of these possessions 
whether by cession, by transfer, or by any im- 
pairment whatsoever in the control heretofore 
exercised would be of profound and immediate 
concern to all the American i-epublics. 

The foregoing views are entirely consonant 
with the basic principle of foreign policy of 
the United States as enunciated over a century 
ago by President Monroe. 

Tills doctrine continues to represent the policy 
of the United States; it is fundamental to our 
national defense. Moreover, as I have pointed 
out to the Congress in connection with legisla- 
tion designed to strengthen the defense of this 
country, the war at present raging in Europe is 
the result in part of the abandonment by certain 
European powers of those principles of respect 
for the pledged word and of peaceful negotia- 
tion of agi-eements for the modification of the 
established order to which the American 
republics adhere. 

The progress of that war to date has obliged 
the government of one of the countries having 
possessions in the American republics to aban- 
don its homeland ; the government of a second 
of these countries has been forced to sign an 
armistice involving, among other conditions, 
the hostile occupation of more than one-half 
of its territory. The third of the governments 
with whose possessions in this hemisphere we 
are now concerned is engaged in a struggle in 
which its very existence may be at stake. 

It was therefore altogether appropriate that 
the United States in company with the other 
free and sovereign republics of the Western 
Hemisphere, should consider the consequences 
which might result from the transfer of sov- 
ereignty over any of these British, French or 
Netherland possessions, especially if that trans- 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

fer were made to a country which has demon- 
strated a lack of adherence to the established 
principles of international law. It was equally 
obvious that such a transfer, by giving a foot- 
hold in the Americas to the representatives of 
a system of government and of international 
politics entirely alien to the traditions and 
practice of the American republics, would con- 
stitute a very serious danger to the peace and 
security of the two continents. 

It must also be recognized that this threat 
may become a reality, not only through a 
formal transfer of territory, but also through 
circimistances arising out of the relative status 
of victor and vanquished, without there having 
been any formal expression regarding the 
disposition of these territories. 

On June 17, 1940, the Secretary of State, after 
the Goveriunent of the United States had been 
informed that the Government of France had 
requested of tlie German Government the terms 
of an armistice, directed the representatives of 
the United States at Berlin and Rome to make a 
coimnunication to the German and Italian Gov- 
ernments the pertinent paragraph of which is 
the following: 

"The Government of the United States feels 
it desirable, in order to avoid any possible mis- 
understanding, to inform Your Excellency that 
in accordance with its traditional policy relating 
to the Western Hemisphere, the United States 
would not recognize any transfer, and would 
not acquiesce in any attempt to transfer, any 
geographic region of the Western Hemisphere 
from one non- American power to another non- 
American power." ^° 

The Governments of France, Great Britain, 
and the Netherlands were informed in the same 
sense. 

The Senate itself has also given evidence of 
its adherence to the policy which I have outlined 
above through the passage of S. J. Resolution 
271 on June 17, 1940, "approving nonrecogni- 
tion of the transfer of any geographic region in 
the Western Hemisphere from one non-Ameri- 



" See the Bulletin of June 22, 1940 (vol. II, no. .52), 
pp. 681-6S2. 



SEPTEMBER 28, 194 



271 



can power to another non-American power, and 
providinfj for consultations witli other Ameri- 
can republics in tlie event that such transfer 
should appear likely". 

On July 21, 1940 there assembled at Habana 
the Second Meeting of the Ministers of Foreign 
Affairs of the American Republics for purposes 
of consultation in accordance with the proce- 
dui'e establisiied at the Inter- American Confer- 
ence for the Maintenance of Peace held at 
Huenos Aii'es in December 1936 and the Eighth 
International Conference of American States 
held at Lima in December 1938. 

It was recognized that it would be contrary 
to the interests of tlie American Republics to 
jK'rmit the European possessions in the New 
Woild to become a subject of barter in the set- 
tlement of European differences and that such 
a situation would involve a threat to the peace 
and security of the hemisphere. Even in the 
absence of an actual transfer of sovereignty, it 
was evident that the use of these possessions to 
promote systems alien to the inter-American 
system could not be countenanced. Further- 
more, in approaching this matter, it appeared 
desirable tliat any solution which might be 
reached should not carry with it the creation of 
any special interest for tlie benefit of any partic- 
ular American republic or republics but that the 
solution should further the legitimate interests 
of all the American republics as well as the in- 
terests of the possessions that miglit be involved. 
It was therefore agreed that in the event that 
conditions should so permit, such possessions as 
might be taken under control by, or on behalf of, 
the American republics should be returned to 
their original sovereigns or declared independ- 
ent, as soon as possible after the passing of the 
emergency which furnished the basis for the 
assumption of control over them. 

To give effect to the foregoing, two measures 
were adopted at Habana, the Act of Habana, 
and the Convention submitted herewitli. The 
former, a copy of which, as already stated, I 
enclose as essential information but not as 
requiring ratification, provides for the emer- 
gency establishment of a regime of provisional 
administration under specified conditions "wlien 
islands or regions in the Americas now under 



the possession of non-American nations are in 
danger of becoming the subject of barter of 
territory or change of sovereignty". The de- 
termination of the necessity for establishing 
such a provisional regime is entrusted to an 
emergency committee consisting of one repre- 
sentative of each of the American republics, 
although provision is also made for individual 
or joint action on the part of any of the Ameri- 
can republics should the need be so urgent that 
consideration by the committee cannot be 
awaited. In other words, full freedom of action 
is retained by each of the American republics, 
should the circumstances be such as in its esti- 
mation to require it to take provisional steps 
without prior submission of its views to the 
Committee. 

The purpose of the Convention is to obtain 
the acceptance in treaty form of the mutual 
obligations recognized by the American repub- 
lics with respect to the situation envisaged in 
the "Act of Habana". It is my belief that this 
convention should be brought into force at the 
earliest possible date. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CORDELL HtTLL 



SPECIAL ASSISTANCE 

Financial Convention with the Dominican 
Republic Revising the Convention of 
1924 

A convention between the United States and 
the Dominican Republic was signed on Sep- 
tember 24, 1940 in Washington by Secretary 
Hull for the United States and by Dr. Rafael 
L. Trujillo, Ambassador Extraordinary of the 
Dominican Republic on Special Mission. The 
new conventicm when it comes into effect will 
supersede the convention between the two 
countries signed on December 27, 1924 (Treaty 
Series No. 726) relating to the collection and 
application of customs in the Dominican 
Republic. 

Under the provisions of the new convention 
the Government of the Dominican Republic will 
resume the collection of that coimtry's customs 



272 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



revenues which, under the provisions of the 
convention of 1924 had been collected by an 
official appointed by the President of the United 
States, and the General Keceivership of Do- 
minican Customs will be abolished. 

The convention provides that a depositary 
bank will be selected by mutual agreement be- 
tween the two Governments which will be the 
sole depositary of all the revenues of the Domin- 
ican Republic. The two Governments, likewise, 
will appoint a representative of the holders of 
the 1922 and 1926 bonds, who will be charged to 
receive from the Dominican Government during 
the first 10 days of each month the interest and 
amortization payments on the outstanding 
bonds. As soon as these payments have been 
made to the representative, the depositary bank 
will be authorized to make disbursements on 
behalf of the Dominican Government. The 
payments of the service of the bonds, as well as 
the costs of the services of the bondholders' 
representative and of the depositary bank, will 
constitute an irrevocable first lien upon all the 
revenues of the Dominican Republic. 

In the event that the Dominican revenues ex- 
ceed $12,500,000 in any given 3'ear, specified 
percentages of the excess will be paid into the 
sinking fund for the additional redemption of 
the 1922 and 1926 bonds. The agreement be- 
tween the Dominican Republic and the Foreign 
Bondholders Protective Council concluded in 
1934 regarding the rate of amortization of the 
outstanding bonds remains in effect. Existing 
Dominican accounting and treasury law may 
not be changed without the consent of both 
Governments. Arbitration is provided in case 
controversies should arise between the two Gov- 
ernments which cannot be settled by diplomatic 
means. The new convention will enter into 
force upon the exchange of ratifications, which 
shall take place within 30 days following 
ratification by the Government which ratifies 
later in point of time. On the date of entering 
into effect of the new convention, the convention 
of December 27, 1924 will cease to have effect 
although certain provisions of the old conven- 
tion will remain in force until the necessary 
measures have been taken by both countries to 



put the provisions of the new convention into 
operation. 

Simultaneously with the signing of the con- 
vention, notes were exchanged by the Govern- 
ments of the United States and of the 
Dominican Republic providing for the liquida- 
tion at the rate of $125,000 annually of the 
claims of United States nationals against the 
Dominican Republic; and for the jjayment of 
benefits to two retired officials who sei'ved in the 
General Receivership of Dominican Customs 
for many years. 

The signing of the new convention inaugu- 
rates a new era in the friendly relations which 
exist between the United States and the Domin- 
ican Republic as well as an additional step in 
the development and coordination of the good- 
neighbor policy based on mutual respect and 
confidence among the countries of this hemi- 
sphere. 

POSTAL 
Universal Postal Convention of 1939 

Argentina 

There is printed below in translation a decree 
signed on October 23, 1940, by the Acting Presi- 
dent of Argentina providing for the administra- 
tive operation of the Universal Postal Conven- 
tion and Subsidiary Agreements signed at 
Buenos Aires on May 23, 1939 : 

Authorizing the Administrative Enforce- 
ment OF THE Convention and Agreements 
Signed at the XI Congress or the Universal 
Postal Union 

Buenos Aires, Aicgust 23, J 940. 

Having considered the report issued by the 
Ministry of the Interior No. 16, 791-C-1940, 
whereby the Direction General of Posts and Tel- 
egraphs, in accordance with the provisions of 
article 82 of the Universal Postal Convention, 
requests authorization to enforce administra- 
tively the convention and agreements signed at 
the XI Congress of the Universal Postal Union 
held in this federal capital in 1939, and 



SEPTEMBER 2 8, 1940 



273 



Whereas : 

For reasons of administrative character it is 
fitting and necessary to establish the jurid- 
ical situation of the Argentine administration 
regarding the international agreements men- 
tioned, the enforcement of which, as stipulated 
in the above-mentioned article, is to take place 
on July 1, 1940, 

The Vice President of the Argentine Nation. 
Acting Executive Power, through a ministerial 
resolution. 

Decrees : 

Article 1. The administrative enforcement as 
from July 1, 1940 of the convention and agree- 
ments signed in Buenos Aires on May 23, 1939 
is hereby authorized subject to ratification by 
the Honorable National Congress : 

(a) Universal postal convention, the final 
l)rotocol thereof, rules for its execution and 
additional provisions regarding airmail ; 

(b) Agreement relative to letters and boxes 



with declared value, the final protocol thereof 
and rules for its execution ; 

(c) Agreement relative to parcel-post pack- 
ages, the final protocol thereof, rules for its 
execution and additional provisions regarding 
air transportation of parcel-post packages; 

(d) Agreement relative to money ordei-s, 
rules for its execution and supplement regard- 
ing travel postal orders; 

(e) Agi-eement regarding postal transfers 
and rules for its execution; 

(f ) Agreement relative to postal drafts and 
i-ules for its execution ; 

(g) Agreements relative to subscriptions to 
newspapei-s and periodicals and rules for their 
execution. 

Article 2. Let this be communicated, pub- 
lished in the Official BvUetin, and transmitted 
to the National Registry. 

Castillo. — Jose Maria Cantilo. — Di- 
ogenes Taboada. — Pedro Groppo. — 
Luis A. Barberis. — Massixi Excurra 



Publications 



Department of State 

During the quarter beginning July 1, 1940, 
the following publications have been released : ^ ' 

1466. The Chaco Peace Conference: Report of the 
Delegation of the United States of America to the 
Peace Conference Held at Buenos Aires July 1, 
1935-January 23, 1939. Conference Series 46. Iv, 
19S pp., including maps. $1. 

1473. Military .\viation Mission : Agreement Betwe-.'ii 
the United States of America and Chile — Signed 
April 23, 1940; effective April 23, 1940. Executive 
Agreement Series No. 169. ii, S pp. ^. 

1474. Allocation of Tariff Quota on Heavy Cattle During 
the Calendar Year 1940: Proclamation by the Presi- 
dent of the United States Issued on November SO. 
1939, Pursuant to Article III of the Reciprocal 



'^ Serial numbers which do not appear in this list 
have appeared previously or will appear in subsequent 

lists. 



Trade .Agreement Between the United States of 
America and Canada Signed November 17, 1938 
(Executive Agreement Series No. 149). Executive 
Agreement Series No. 170. ii, 4 pp. 5^. 

1475. Trans-Isthmian Joint Highway Board : Arrange- 
ment Between the United States of America and 
Panama — Effected by exchanges of notes signed Oc- 
tober 19 and 23, 1939, December 20, 1939, and Jan- 
uary 4, 1940. Executive Agreement Series No. 168. 
ii, 5 pp. 50. 

1478. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. II, No. 

53, June 29, 1940. 21 pp. 10«'." 

1479. Certificates of Airworthiness for Export : .\r- 
rangement Between the United States of America 
and New Zealand— Effected by exchange of notes 
signed January 30 and February 28, 1940; effective 
March 1, 1940. Executive Agreement Series No. 167. 
ii, 17 pp. 50. 

1480. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. Ill, No. 

54, July 6, 1940. 19 pp. 100. 



" Subscription, $2.75 a year. 



274 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



1481. Diplomatic List, July 1940. ii, 91 pp. Subscrip- 
tion, $1 a year ; single copy, 10(f. 

1482. Reciprocal Recognition of Load Line Regulations 
for Vessels Engaged in International Voyages on the 
Great Lakes: Arrangement Between the United 
States of America and Canada— Effected by ex- 
changes of notes signed April 29, 1938, August 24, 

1938, October 22, 1038, September 2, 1939, October 18, 

1939, January 10. 1940, and March 4, 1940. Execu- 
tive Agreement Series No. 172. ii, 9 pp. 5^. 

1483. The American Foreign Service : General Informa- 
tion for Applicants and Sample Entrance Examina- 
tion Questions. Revised to June 1, 1940. iv, 142 pp. 
Free. 

1484. Publications of the Department of State (a list 
cumulative from October 1, 1929). July 1, 1940. ii, 
23 pp. Free. 

1485. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. Ill, No. 

55, July 13, 1940. 7 pp. 100. 

1486. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. Ill, No. 

56, July 20, 1940. 10 pp. 10«t. 

1487. Exemptions From Exchange Control Measures: 
Agreement Between the United States of America 
and Canada— Effected by exchange of notes signed 
June 18, 1940; effective June 18, 1940. Executive 
Agreement Series No. 174. ii, 3 pp. 5(^. 

1488. Achievements of the Second Meeting of the For- 
eign Ministers of the American Republics : Statement 
of the Honorable Cordell Hull, Secretary of State, at 
the Close of the Meeting, Habana, July 30, 1940. 
Conference Series 47. ii, 8 pp. 50. 

1489. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. Ill, No. 

57, July 27, 1940. 24 pp. 100. 

1490. Exchange of Official Publications: Agreement 
Between the United States of America and Nicara- 
gua—Effected by exchange of notes signed February 
14 and 19, 1940; effective February 14, 1940. Ex- 
ecutive Agreement Series No. 171. ii, 7 pp. 5^. 

1491. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. Ill, 
No. 58, August 3, 1940. 37 pp. 100. 

1492. Diplomatic List, August 1940. ii, 91 pp. Sub- 
scription, $1 a year; single copy, 100. 

1493. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. Ill, 
No. 59, August 10, 1940. 10 pp. 100. 

1494. Foreign Service List, July 1, 1940. iv, 107 pp. 
Subscription, 500 a year ; single copy, 15^. 

1495. Statistics of Causes of Death : Protocol Between 
the United States of America and Other Powers 
Revising the Minimum Nomenclature of Causes of 
Death Annexed to the International Agreement 
Signed at London June 19, 1934 (Executive Agree- 
ment Series No. 80)— Signed at Paris October 6. 



1938 ; effective January 1, 1940. Executive Agree- 
ment Series No. 173. ii, 12 pp. 50. 

1496. Military Aviation Instructors: Agreement Be- 
tween the United States of America and Argentina — 
Signed June 29, 1940; effective June 29, 1940. Ex- 
ecutive Agreement Series No. 175. ii, 10 pp. 50. 

1497. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. Ill, No. 

60, August 17, 1940. 8 pp. 100. 

1498. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. Ill, N.). 

61, August 24, 1940. 53 pp. 100. 

1499. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. Ill, No. 

62, August 31, 1940. 20 pp. 100. 

1.500. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. Ill, No. 

63, September 7, 1940. 17 pp. 100. 

1501. Diplomatic List, September 1940. ii, aS pp. 
Subscription, $1 a year ; single copy, 100. 

1503. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. Ill, No. 

64, September 14, 1940. 8 pp. 100. 

1507. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. Ill, No. 

65, September 21, 1940. 21 pp. 100. 

Treaty Seeibs : 

960. Commerce and Navigation : Treaty Between the 
United States of America and Iraq — Signed at Bagh- 
dad December 3, 1938; proclaimed May 29, 1940. 
ii, 10 pp. 50. 

The Department of State also publishes the 
slip laws and Statutes at Large. Laws are 
issued in separate series and are niunbered in the 
order in which they are signed. Treaties are 
also issued in a separate series and are numbered 
in the order in which they are proclaimed. All 
other publications of the Department since 
October 1, 1929, are numbered consecutively in 
the order in which they are sent to press, and, in 
addition, are subdivided into series according to 
general subject. 

To avoid delay, requests for publications of 
the Department of State should be addressed 
directly to the Superintendent of Documents, 
Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C, 
except in the case of free publications, which 
may be obtained from the Department. The 
Superintendent of Documents will accept de- 
posits against which the cost of publications 
ordered may be charged and will notify the de- 
positor when the deposit is exhausted. The 
cost to depositors of a complete set of the publi- 
cations of the Department for a year will prob- 



SEPTEMBER 2 8, 1940 

ably be somewhat in excess of $15. Orders may 
be placed, however, with the Superintendent of 
Documents for single publications or for one or 
more series. 

The Superintendent of Documents also has, 
for fi'ee distribution, the following price lists 
which may be of interest : Foreign Relations of 



275 

the United States; American History and Bi- 
ography; Tariff; Immigration; Alaska and 
Hawaii, Insular Possessions; Laws; Commerce 
and Manufactures; Political Science; and Maps. 
A list of publications of the Bureau of Foreign 
and Domestic Commerce may be obtained from 
the Department of Commerce. 



U.S GOVERHMEMT PRINTING OFFICE: 1940 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents . _ Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPEOVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 



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BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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