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Full text of "Department of State bulletin"

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Given By 
TT. e SUPT. OF DOCUMENTS 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



.O vy JL/JL/ 



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LLj 



TIN 



SEPTEMBER 21, 1940 
Fo/. Ill: No. 6^ - Publication 150I 

Qontents 

General: Page 

Proclamation of Registration Day 221 

Proclamation of General Pulaski's Memorial Day . . . 223 
American Republics: 

Amiiversary of independence of Central American 

republics: Statement by the Secretary of State . . . 224 

Inter- American Maritime Conference 224 

Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, etc.: 

Monthly statistics 225 

The Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 237 

Regulations 237 

Treaty Information: 
Extradition : 

Supplementarj' Extradition Treaty with Switzer- 
land 238 

Telecommunications : 

North American Regional Broadcasting Agreement . 238 
Restriction of War: 

Convention for the Amelioration of the Condition of 
the Wounded and the Sick of Armies in the Field 
(Treaty Series No. 847) and Convention Relating 
to the Treatment of Prisoners of War (Treaty 

Series No. 846) 238 

Legislation 238 

Publications 239 




II, S, BUPERINTFNDENT OF DOCUMENTS 



General 



PROCLAMATION OF REGISTRATION DAY 



[Released to the press by tUe White House) 

Registration Day 
bt the president of the unitbd states of 

AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Whmji'IAs the Congress has enacted and I 
have this day approved the Selective Training 
and Service Act of 1940/ which dechiros that 
it is imperative to increase and train the per- 
sonnel of the armed forces of the United States 
and that in a free society the obligations and 
privileges of military training and service 
should be shared generally in accordance with 
a fair and just system of selective compulsory 
military training and service; and 

Whereas the said Act contains, in part, the 
following provisions : 

"Sec. 2. Except as otherwise provided in this 
Act, it shall be the duty of every male citizen 
of the United States, and of every male alien 
residing in the United States, who, on the day 
or days fixed for the first or any subsequent 
registration, is between the ages of twenty-one 
and thirty-six, to present himself for and sub- 
mit to registration at such time or times and 
place or places, and in such manner and in such 
age group or groups, as shall be determined by 
rules and regulations prescribed hereunder. 

"Sec. 5. (a) Commissioned officers, warrant 
officers, pay clerks, and enlisted men of the 
Regular Army, the Navy, the Marine Corps, 
the Coast Guard, the Coast and Geodetic Sur- 
vey, the Public Health Service, the federally 
recognized active National Guard, the Officers' 



' Public, No. 783, 76tli Cong., 3d sess. 
262604 — 40 1 



Reserve Corps, the Regular Army Reserve, the 
Enlisted Reserve Corps, the Naval Reserve, and 
the Marine Corps Reserve; cadets. United 
States Military Academy ; midshipmen. United 
States Naval Academy; cadets, United States 
Coast Guard Academy ; men who have been ac- 
cepted for admittance (commencing with the 
academic year next succeeding such acceptance) 
to the United States Military Academy as 
cadets, to the United States Naval Academy as 
midshipmen, or to the United States Coast 
Guard Academy as cadets, but only during the 
continuance of such acceptance; cadets of the 
advanced course, senior division, Reserve Offi- 
cers' Training Coi-jds or Naval Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps; and diplomatic representa- 
tives, technical attaches of foreign embassies 
and legations, consuls general, consuls, vice con- 
suls, and consular agents of foreign countries, 
residing in the United States, who are not cit- 
izens of the United States, and who have not 
declared their intention to become citizens of 
the United States, shall not be required to be 
registered under section 2 and shall be relieved 
from liability for training and service under 
section 3 (b)." 

"Sec. 10 (a) The President is authorized — 
(1) to prescribe the necessary rules and regu- 
lations to carry out the provisions of this Act;" 

"(4) to utilize the services of any or all de- 
partments and an}' and all officers or agents of 
the United States antl to accept the services of 
all officers and agents of the several States, Ter- 
ritories, and the District of Columbia and sub- 
divisions thereof in the execution of this Act;" 



221 



222 

"Sec. 14 (a) Every person shall be deemed to 
have notice of the requirements of this Act 
upon publication by the President of a procla- 
mation or other public notice fixing a time for 
any registration under section 2." 

Now, THEREFORE, I, FeANKLIN D. KoOSE^'ELT, 

President of the United States of America, 
under and by virtue of the authority vested in 
me by the aforesaid Selective Training and 
Service Act of 1940, do proclaim the following : 

1. The first registration under the Selective 
Training and Service Act of 1940 shall take 
place on Wednesday, the sixteenth day of Octo- 
ber, 1940, between the hours of 7 A. M. and 
9 P. M. 

2. Every male person (other than persons 
excepted by Section 5 (a) of the aforesaid Act) 
who is a citizen of the United States or an 
alien residing in the United States and who, 
on the registration date fixed herein, has at- 
tained the twenty-fii-st anniversary of the day 
of his birth and has not attained the thirty- 
sixth anniversary of the day of his birth, is 
required to present himself for and submit to 
registration. Every such person who is within 
the continental United States on the registra- 
tion date fixed herein shall on that date present 
himself for and submit to registration at the 
duly designated place of registration within 
the precinct, district, or registration area in 
which he has his permanent home or in which 
he may happen to be on that date. Every such 
person who is not within the continental United 
States on the registration date fixed herein 
shall within five days after his return to the 
continental United States present himself for 
and submit to registration. Regulations will 
be prescribed hereafter providing for special 
registration of those who on account of sick- 
ness or other causes beyond their control are 
unable to present themselves for registration at 
the designated places of registration on the 
registration date fixed herein. 

3. Every person subject to registration is re- 
quired to familiarize himself with the rules and 
regulations governing registration and to com- 
ply therewith. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

4. The times and places for registration in 
Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico will be fixed 
in subsequent proclamations. 

5. I call upon the Governors of the several 
States and the Board of Commissioners of the 
District of Columbia to provide suitable and 
feulficient places of registration within their re- 
spective jurisdictions and to provide suitable 
and necessary registration boards to effect such 
registration. 

6. I further call upon all officers and agents 
of the United States and all officers and agents 
of the several States and the District of Co- 
hunbia and subdivisions thereof to do and per- 
form all acts and services necessary to accom- 
Ijlish effective and complete registration ; and I 
especially call upon all local election officials 
and other patriotic citizens to offer their serv- 
ices as members of the boards of registration. 

7. In order that there may be full coopera- 
tion in carrying into effect the purposes of said 
Act, I urge all employers, and government 
agencies of all kinds — Federal, State and 
Local — to give those under their charge suffi- 
cient time off in which to fulfill the obligation 
of registration incumbent on them under the 
said Act. 

America stands at the crossroads of its des- 
tiny. Time and distance have been shortened. 
A few weeks have seen great nations fall. We 
cannot remain indifferent to the philosophy of 
force now ramj^ant in the world. The terrible 
fate of nations whose weakness invited attack 
is too well known to us all. 

We must and will marshal our great poten- 
tial strength to fend off war from our shores. 
We must and will prevent our land from be- 
coming a victim of aggression. 

Our decision has been made. 

It is in that spirit that the people of our 
country are assuming the burdens that now 
become necessary. Offers of service have flooded 
in from patriotic citizens in every part of the 
nation, who ask only what they can do to help. 
Now there is both the opportunity and the need 
for many thousands to assist in listing the 
names and addresses of the millions who will 



SEPTEMBER 21, 1940 



223 



enroll on registration day at school houses, 
polling places, and town halls. 

The Congress has debated without partisan- 
ship and has now enacted a law establishing a 
selective method of augmenting our armed 
forces. The method is fair, it is sure, it is dem- 
ocratic — it is the will of our people. 

After thoughtful deliberation, and as the 
first step, our young men will come from the 
factories and the fields, the cities and the towns, 
to enroll their names on registration day. 

On that eventful day my generation will 
salute their generation. May we all renew 
within our hearts that conception of liberty 
and that way of life which we have all in- 
herited. May we all strengthen our resolve to 
hold higli the torch of freedom in this darken- 
ing world so that our children and their chil- 
dren may not be robbed of their rightful 
inheritance. 

In wftness whereof I have hereunto set m}' 
hand and caused tlie seal of the United States 
to be affi.xed. 

Done at the City of Washington this six- 
teenth day of September in the year of our 
Lord nineteen hundred and fort}', 

[seal] and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the one 
hundred and sixty-fifth. 

FiLVNKiJN D. Roosevelt 

By the President: 
CoRDELL Hull, 

Secretary of State. 

[No. 2425] 

PROCLAMATION OF GENERAL 
PULASKI'S MEMORIAL DAY 

(Releasied to thp prpss by the White Housp] 

General Pulaski's Mejiorial Day 

BT THE president OF THE UNITED STATES OF 
AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Whereas, in a world seared by the ravaging 
hand of war and oppression, we Americans are 



increasingly grateful for the Republic which 
our fathers built on principles of freedom and 
equality; and 

Whereas the valiant struggle to win Ameri- 
can independence was advanced by the bravery 
of General Casimir Pulaski, a Pole who hated 
tyranny and who fought fiercely by the side of 
American patriots until he was wounded unto 
death, October 9, and drew his last breath on 
October 11, 1779; and 

Whereas Public Resolution 76 of the Sev- 
enty-sixth Congress, approved on June 6, 1940, 
provides : 

"That the President of the United States of 
America is authorized to issue a proclamation 
calling upon officials of the Government to dis- 
play the flag of the United States on all gov- 
ernmental buildings on October 11, 1940, and 
inviting the people of the United States to 
observe the day in schools and churches, or 
other suitable places, with appropriate cere- 
monies in commemoration of the death of 
General Casimir Pulaski." 

Now, therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, 
President of the United States of America, do 
hereby call upon officials of the Government to 
display the flag on Government buildings on 
October 11, 1940, and I invite the people of the 
L'nited States to participate in the observance 
of that day as General Pulaski's Memorial Day 
with appropriate ceremonies in schools and 
churches, or other suitable places. 

In witness whereof, I liave hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 

Done at the City of Washington this eight- 
eenth day of September, in the year of our 
Lord nineteen hundred and forty, 
[seal] and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the one 
hundred and sixty-fifth. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 
By the President: 
CoRDELL Hull 

Secretary of State. 

[No. 2427] 



224 



DEPABTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



American Republics 



ANNIVERSARY OF INDEPENDENCE OF CENTRAL AMERICAN 

REPUBLICS 

Statement by the Secretary of State 



[Released to the press September 15] 

It gives me great pleasure to send a message 
at this time to the republics of Central America 
on the occasion of the anniversary of their 
independence. I can recall no time in their 
history when the countries of the Western 
Hemisphere were justified in celebrating with 
greater gratitude the privileges bestowed by 
liberty on the citizens of free nations. 

Events during recent months have empha- 
sized anew how essential to our joint interest 
and defense is the maintenance of the very 
close and cordial relations existing among all 
the American republics and the continuing 
development of those relations in effective day- 



to-day collaboration in matters of common con- 
cern. The Meeting of Foreign Ministers in 
Habana last July constituted a notable mile- 
stone in the progress of practical cooperation, 
to which none contributed more loyally than 
the distinguished representatives of the five 
republics whose independence is celebrated 
today. 

Tiie peoples and Governments of Costa Rica, 
El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nica- 
ragua need no assurance on this their anni- 
vei'sary as independent nations of the sincerity 
of the good wishes of the United States and 
of all the Americas for their continued wel- 
fare, progress, and happiness. 



INTER-AMERICAN MARITIME CONFERENCE 



[Released to the press September 17] 

The President has approved the designation 
of the Honorable Henry F. Grady, Assistant 
Secretary of State, and the Honorable Max 
O'Rell Truitt, Commissioner, United States 
Maritime Commission, as this Government's 
delegates to the Inter- American Maritime Con- 
ference, which will convene in Washington, 
D. C, on October 2, 1940 under the auspices 
of the Inter- American Financial and Economic 
Advisory Committee. 

It will be recalled that the Advisory Com- 
mittee was created pursuant to a resolution of 
the First Meeting of the Foreign Ministers of 
the American Republics held in Panama in 
September 1939 and that since its installation 
at the Pan American Union the following No- 
vember, has met at frequent intervals to con- 
sider various problems of a financial and eco- 
nomic character. One of the questions which 
has received the attention of the Committee is 



the effect of present hostilities in Europe upon 
inter- American shipping. The Committee has 
deemed it advisable to hold a special meeting of 
Government experts in the field of shipping in 
order to facilitate a comprehensive review of 
the subject. In consequence, the Committee has 
issued invitations to the governments of the 21 
American republics to be represented at this 
special meeting, which will convene in Wash- 
ington on the above-noted date. 

The Committee included in its invitations the 
suggestion that each government arrange for 
the attendance, in a consultative capacity, of 
representatives of shipping companies of each 
country. In accordance with this suggestion, 
which has been incorporated in the regulations 
of the Conference, this Government has issued 
invitations to shipping interests in the United 
States engaged in inter-American trade to 
participate in the meeting. 



SEPTEMBER 21, 1940 



225 



Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, etc. 



MONTHLY STATISTICS 



[Released to the press September 21] 

Note: The tigures relating to arms, the licenses for 
the exiK)rt of wiiioh wore revoked before tliey were 
used, liiive lieeii subtrutted from the tignres appearing 
in the eumulative eoluinn of the table below in regard 
to arms expert licenses issued. These latter figures 
are tlierefore net figures. They are not yet final and 
definitive since licenses may be amended or revoked 
at any time before being used. They are, however, 
accurate as of the date of this press release. 

The statistics of actual exports in these relea.ses are 
believed to be substantially complete. It is possible, 
however, that some shipments are not included. If 
this proves to be the fact, statistics in regard to such 
shipments will be included in the cumulative figures 
in later releases. 

Arms Export Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of 
the arms, Muuuunition, and implements of war 
licensed for export by the Secretary of State 
during the year 1940 up to and includino; the 
month of August : 





Category 


Value of export licenses i&sued 


Country of destination 


August 1040 


8 month.s end- 
ing August 
31, 1940 


Albania 


IV (1) 

I (4) 

V (1) 
(2) 




$57.00 












24.00 






3,200.00 






630.00 








Total 




3, 854. 00 




I (2) 
(4) 
(6) 

III (2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 
(2) 






Argentina 




24, 095. 50 






5, 415. 00 






2,300.00 






5, 141. 84 




$2,300.00 


10,062.00 
6, 481. 00 






40,025.00 




6,039.00 


176.701.71 
40, 937. 50 






29.84 




5,410.00 


93,371.61 


Total 


12, 749. 00 


404.560.90 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


S months end- 

ng August 31, 

1940 


Australia _ . 


I (1) 
(4) 

in (1) 

(2) 

IV (1) 

(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 


$194.00 
27.14 


$693. 12 




561.23 
1, 509, 520. 00 






13, 680. 00 






271. 65 






509.00 






25. 648. 00 




12,832.00 


870, 669. 26 
2, 084, 705. 00 






33, 474. 86 








Total 


13. 053. 14 


4,539,632.01 




IV (I) 

I (4) 
IV (2) 




Bahrein Islands 




136.00 












17.29 






1.87 








Total 




19.16 




I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

m (1) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
C3) 










217.00 






103, 200. 00 






28, 779. 00 






2, 292, 000. 00 






69.00 






20, 746. 00 






243. 957. 00 






419,400.00 








Total 




3, 108, 367. 00 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 






Bermuda 




16.00 






84.70 




39.84 


74.84 
8.000.00 




5,000.00 


5,000.00 


Total 


6, 039. 84 


13, 176. 64 




I (4) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VU (1) 
(2) 






50.00 


1. 753. 00 




1. 285. 00 






6, 500. 00 






64.60 






45, 384. 00 






1.953.68 






1.50 








Total --- 


60.00 


56. 941. 78 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

ni (1) 




Brajil ,.. 


786.00 


1,773.00 




5, 438. 00 




1,897,325.00 
822.00 


1,897,325.00 

6,780.00 

978.200.00 



226 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTJLLETIN 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


8 months end- 
ing August 31, 
1940 


Brazil— Continued. 


IV 
V 


(I) 

(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 


$15, 401. 00 
2, 902. 00 

105,800.00 
7,121.00 
7.000.00 


$34, 713. 75 
24, 544. 14 
657, 453. 00 
110,684.86 
285,009.50 


Total 


2,037,167.00 


4, 001, 821. 25 




rv 

V 

vn 


(2) 
(1) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




■Rritish Guiana - . 




6.82 






2,500.00 






2, 500. 00 






1, 108. 84 




1,680.00 


1,680.00 


Total 


1,680.00 


7,795.66 




I 

IV 
VII 


(4) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 








12.00 




18.69 


98.69 
129.20 






108. 30 








Total 


18.69 


348. 19 




I 
I 

IV 


(4) 

(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 








2.43 












400.00 






133.64 






755. 26 






136.00 








Total 




1, 424. 79 




I 
m 

IV 
V 

VI 
VII 


(1) 

(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(6) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 








135,164.66 
76,440.00 


777, 370. 84 




180, 938. 97 
40, 668. 00 




69,536.04 


377, 686. 05 
90, 154. 00 




346,750.00 


19, 360, 344. 00 
4,141.00 




39, 316. 34 
500.51 


52,368.90 

61, 659. 35 

347, 976. 57 




86,062.82 

1,303,901.48 

45.00 

26,606.67 

92.92 


8,762,994.72 

12, 154, 150. 09 

36,063.00 

142, 266. 52 

44, 332. 67 


Total 


2,074,414.44 


42 422 903 68 




I 
in 

IV 
V 

vn 


(2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




Chile 


70.00 
27, 741. 28 


3 040 00 




37, 271. 28 
5,460.00 






3,630 00 




409, 660. 00 

719.00 

1,907.60 


409,560.00 
63,069.00 
7,391.86 
3 500 00 






3, 407. 50 






30 535 00 






15. 00 






12,607 16 








Total 


439, 997. 88 


569,476.79 



Country of destination 



Category 



China. 



Total.. 
Colombia 



Total.. 

Costa Rica.. 



Total.. 



Cuba.. 



Total.. 
Curajao 



Total 

Denmark 

Dominican Republic. 



Value of export licenses issued 



I (2) 

III (1) 

(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 



I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 



I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 



I (2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 



August 1940 



8 months end- 
ing AuJTUst 31, 
1940 



I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 



V (3) 

I (2) 

IV (1) 

(2) 



$3, 221. 71 
193, 300. 00 



196, 521. 71 



293.00 



9, 975. 00 
13, 500. 00 



2, 940. 00 



26, 708. 00 



985.00 
63.00 



156. 60 



1, 203. 60 



73.00 
20.00 



29.00 
6, 000. 00 



$352, 440. 00 

2, 629, 106. 22 

137, 950. 10 

178. 60 

3, 226. 71 

156,800.00 

2, 548, 480. 63 

2, 196, 955. 35 

1, 018, 225. 66 

361, 000. 00 



9, 304, 363. 17 



129.20 



639.00 
381.62 



6, 737. 60 
6.00 



7, 763. 12 



210.00 
1, 529. 00 



30.00 

157. 00 

2,310.90 

667. 76 

333, 750. 00 

12, 787. 00 

60. 995. 00 

1, 027. 31 

4, 906. 00 



416, 629. 97 



4.00 
1, 122. 30 
199.25 
26, 000. 00 
2, 967. 62 
13, 104. 70 
1, 801. 86 

44, 199. 73 



143.00 
131, 164. 00 

3, 315. 60 
9, 252. 00 
7, 700. 00 

4, 60a 00 

2, 000. 00 

3, 135. 00 
751.00 



161, 960. 50 



686.00 

77.39 

1, 293. 60 

696. 26 

105, 159. 00 

8, 636. 26 

67, 950. 00 

22.60 



174, 219. 91 



2, 040. 00 



210.00 

2, 396. 00 

843.00 



227 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


Aufnisl 1940 


8 months end- 

ng .August 31, 

1940 


Dominican Republic— Con. 


V f2) 
VII (1) 




$600.00 




1,501.80 








Total -. 


$1,739.00 


6, 550. 80 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (I) 

(2) 






38.80 


208.52 




201.00 






156.00 




666.00 


19, 149. 00 
1,022.00 






228.00 






900.00 








Total 


704.80 


21. 862. S2 




I (2) 
(3) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 








837.50 






3, 310. 00 






1,680.21 




50,000.00 


50,388.00 
752.31 






16, 993. 00 






60.00 








Total .- - - 


60,000.00 


74,021.02 




I (1) 

(4) 

HI (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (2) 








125, 052. 00 






1,111.00 






18, 200. 00 






76.00 






6, 460. 00 






376.00 






8,350.00 








Total 




159, 624. 00 




I (4) 

I (2) 
(3) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (2) 






Fill 


81.42 


81.42 










19.660.00 






.W8. !,m. m 






3, 806, 493. 89 






951. .W 




141.02 

15,680.00 
75,000.00 


141.02 

42, 463. 2.1 

640, 900. 00 


Total 


90. 821. 02 


5,049,179.26 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(S) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 

(2) 








201.488.00 






4. 842, 295. 71 






,506, 795. on 






7,32I.9,W.5« 






499. oon, on 






28, 111.023. nn 






10, 337. on 






30.00 






376, 315 00 






546. 000, no 






n, 950, 423. 01 






1. 644. 697. 00 






2.00 






66. 593 00 








Total... 




56,066,949.22 





Category 


Value ot export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


1 
August 1940 


8 months end- 

ng August 31, 

1940 


French Indochina 


I 

IV 
V 


(1) 

C4) 

(1) 

(2) 

(1) 

(2) 
(3) 




$78. 50 






51.00 






3, 836. 00 






11.00 






\25. 000. OO 






6,875.00 






21. 554. 00 








Total 




157, 406. 10 




I 

III 
IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 

(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 






Great Britain and N'orthern 
Ireland. 


»1, 060. 00 
1, 806, 822. 50 


5, 531. 430, 00 
19,217.025.94 
3. 598. 126. 52 




7.271,361.98 

12, 000. 000. 00 

43, 128. 341. 00 

25, 189. 34 

32, 677. 00 

6,674.00 


35. 919. 888. 88 

12. 484. 177. 10 

218, 592. 019, 85 

127.923, 14 

1,112.527,36 

2. 745. 295, 76 

61. 075, 00 




16,860,367.38 

16,206,084.88 

360, 135. 00 

3,350,000,00 


22. 113. 096, 19 

36, 044, 631, OO 

9, 260. 303, 94 

.5.473.039.80 


Total 


100, 0)7, 613, 08 


372, 280, 660. 48 




I 

IV 


(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(1) 




Greece 




160.00 






,10.00 






90. 900. 00 






21.00 












91,121.00 




I 

IV 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 










1,015.48 






.578. 30 






6, 674. 65 






1,731. .57 




540.00 
105.00 


.140. 00 
105.00 




646.00 


10, 645. no 




IV 
VII 


(1) 

(2) 
(1) 
(2) 








186.00 






1,340.00 






226. 80 






.1. 164.00 








Total _- 




6.916.80 




IV 

V 
VII 


(I) 
(2) 
(1) 
(1) 








244.80 


1.609,85 




23.00 






7. nno, 60 






24, 30 








Total 


244,80 


8. 657, 15 




I 

IV 

V 

VII 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




Uonduras 




432.00 






3S8.00 




10. 000. 00 


1.528.00 
10.000.00 
4, 238. 00 






131.00 








Total - 


10.000,00 


1 16. 717. 00 



228 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of e.xport licenses issued 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


s months end- 
ing .\UBiist 31, 
1940 




IV 
V 
VI 


(1) 

(2) 

(■1) 
(1) 

(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 


.$23.00 
93S.0O 
680. 00 


$2,040.75 




938. 00 
1,803.10 
7, 363. 00 






67. 75 






22, 832. 00 






24, 750. 00 






120.00 










1,641.00 


5»,i(14.60 




IV 

V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




Iceland - 




1,920.00 




374.00 






7, 890. 00 






763.00 






65.00 








Total 




11,012.00 




I 

IV 

V 

VI 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 






India.-- -- — 




3, 437. 39 




7, 326. 87 






3, 678. 64 






780. 55 






67, .TOO. 00 




163. 00 


1,409.40 
1,000 00 




2,586.00 


3,468.00 


Total 


2,749.00 


88, 660. 85 




I 
III 

V 


(2) 
(1) 
(1) 








37, 500. 00 






7G0 000 00 






112,000.00 








Total 




909, 500. CO 




I 
III 

V 


(2) 
(2) 
(2) 






Iraq 


47,866.00 


47, 865. 00 
27 165 00 




148, 000. 00 


148,000.00 


Total 


195, S65. 00 


223, 030. 00 




V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 


Ireland 




235 503 00 






3, 270. 60 






33 380 00 








Total --. 




272, 153. 60 




V 
IV 


(2) 

(I) 
(2) 




Italy 












Jamaica 




123 00 














Total 




164 45 




I 

IV 


(1) 
(4) 
(U 
(2) 






Kenya 




107 00 










616.00 


714.00 
35 00 








Total 


616.00 


916 00 




VII 


C2) 




Leeward Islands 




162. 45 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


.\ugust 1940 


S months end- 
ing August 31, 
1940 


Macau 


I 
I 
I 

IV 
V 

VI 
VII 


(2) 

(4) 

(1) 
(4) 
(5) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 




$666 00 








Mauritius 




137. 00 








Mexico 


$88. 65 
30.26 


220 76 




30.26 
112.60 




1, 787. 30 

547. 20 

32, 650. 00 

88.00 

1,000.00 

63.00 


16, 037. 30 

1, 023. 20 

438,682.40 

7, 443. 40 
38, 255 00 

175. 50 

8, 040. 25 




8, 825. 00 


49, 737. 00 


Total-- 


44,977.31 


559, 757. 66 




— 


Mozambique - 


I 

V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




116.00 






164. 61 






282, 000. 00 






17,144.00 






65, 710. 00 








Total--- 




366, 124. 61 













I 

V 


(2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(2) 
(3) 




12, 866. 00 






47. 50 






165.00 






17, 942. 19 






63, 300. 00 








Total 




94, 310. 69 




- " 








I 
III 

IV 
V 

VII 


(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(I) 
(2) 


3, 375, 900. 00 

975, 000. 00 

3, 031, 762. 90 

1, 384, 400. 00 

782, 868. 00 


3, 447, 950. 00 




975, 000. 00 

3,032,411.64 

2, 304, 600. 00 

6,399,118.10 

9, 081. 90 




5,689.80 
13, 103. 90 


68, 321. 65 

19, 792. 93 

622, 056. 12 




2, 487. 60 
208, 750. 00 


211, 777. 60 

441, 260. 79 

338. 80 




160, 749. 30 


160, 749. 30 


Total 


9,940,701.40 


17, 692, 468. 73 




I 


(4) 




New Caledonia 




923.82 








Newfoundland 


I 

IV 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 

(2) 


13.05 
868.43 

12,60 
167.90 


131.66 




1, 168. 72 

1,946.62 

398.22 


Total 


1, 061. 93 


3, 646. 11 








New Guinea, Territory of--. 


IV 
V 


(2) 
(2) 




17.25 






1, 250. 00 








Total..- 






1, 267. 25 












I 
III 


(4) 
fl) 




266, 750. 00 






1,916,870.00 



SEPTEMBER 21, 194 



229 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


8 months end* 

ing August 31, 

1940 




IV (1) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 




$202.00 






161. 5?7. 45 






130, ;aa. 00 






11,045.00 












2, 486, 624. 45 




I (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 






Nicaragua 




62, 500. 00 






9, 000. 00 




$25.00 


25.00 
480,00 






870.00 






1,292.00 








Total - 


25.00 


74, 167. 00 




I (2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 




Nigeria 




278.50 






21.00 






30.25 






89.04 












418. 79 




IV (1) 

I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 










25.50 












70.00 






450.00 






36, 545. 00 






712,000.00 






280.00 






222.00 






121.00 






2,200.00 






39, 601. 00 






1,515.00 








Total .. . . 




793, 007. 00 




V (3) 

I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






Palestine 


1,000.00 


1,400.00 










12,500.00 






3,900.00 






6,600.00 






8,804.75 






1,207.00 






27,866.00 




100.00 
800.00 


174.00 
1,380.00 
2. 262. 46 




728.00 


728.00 


Total 


1, 628. 00 


65. 422. 21 




I (4) 
IV (2) 








384.80 






12. 150. 45 








Total 




12. 535. 25 




IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 










7, 550. 90 






240.00 






393, 1.18. 50 




5, 694. .18 
24.457.00 


11,455.58 
86, 666. 00 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


■•< months end- 
ing -Vugust 
31, 1940 


Peru — Continued. 


VII 


(1) 

(2) 


$1, 148. 00 


$2, 140. 00 
1, 130. 50 








Total 


31,291.58 


502,521.48 




I 

III 

IV 

V 
VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(I) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
CD 
(2) 








51.80 






44.00 






103, 440. 00 






30.00 






422.00 






4, 300. 00 




2, 720. 00 


77,939.94 
66, 125. 00 




17,000.00 


841.76 
71,000.00 


Total . 


19.720.00 


324, 200. 50 




V 

I 

V 


(2) 

(1) 
(2) 








2, £00. 00 








Saudi Arabia - - - 




260.00 




760.00 








ToUl 




1, 020. 00 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 










495. 60 






227, :to 




184.46 

209.30 

35.00 


645.56 

317.30 

95. 52 

160, 226. 00 










428. 76 


162. 007. 48 




I 


(I) 
(4) 




Spain 


150.00 
25.00 


130 00 




25.00 


Total - 


155.00 


IS.i. 00 




I 
I 

IV 


(1) 

(2) 
(4) 
(2) 




Straits Settlements 




9.12 












11, 644. 50 






1.64 






2.47 








Total 




11, 648. 61 




I 
ni 

IV 

V 


(2) 

(4) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 






Sweden 




108, 000. 00 






65, 572 00 




. . 


4, 000. 00 






233, 625. 00 






96, 130. 53 






247, 298. 00 








Total 




" 754, 625. 53 




IV 


(1) 






Switzerland 




20.00 



» The apparent discrepancj* between the values reported for the arms, 
ammunition, and implements of war authorized to be exported to Sweden 
during the period Jan. I-Aug. 31. 1940, and the corresponding figures for 
periods covered in previous press releases, is due to a number of licenses 
authorizing the exportation of arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
to Sweden which were canceled. 



230 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


8 months end- 
ing Aucust 
31. 1940 




I (1) 
(4) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 




$27, 800. 00 




$8.57 


8.57 
707, 334. 00 






1, 643. S4 




1, 065. 00 
61.62 


16,994.89 

61.52 

97, 200. 00 




1, 467. 00 
9, 190. 00 


68, 070. 74 
165, 190. 00 


Total - - 


11,792.09 


1,084,203.56 




IV (1) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 








163.00 






294.00 






18, 625. 00 






852.00 








Total - 




19, 924. 00 




III (2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (2) 






Turkey— 




6, 610. 00 




33.00 






6.20 




24,000.00 
42, 857. 00 


139, 760. 00 
42, 867. 00 


Total . . -. 


60, 857. 00 


188, 266. 20 




I (1) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








308.00 






620 93 




280, 400. 00 


454, 000, 00 
190, 488. 70 






36. 257. 00 
2, 936, 030. 00 




36, 383. 45 
8,500.00 


91, 575. 28 

338, 260 00 

156.00 






40, 228. 00 








Total.-- 


325, 283. 45 


4,087,923.91 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

VII (2) 








260. 00 






1, 522 00 






6, 887. 30 






53, 600. 00 






100.40 






6(0. 00 








Total 




63, 029. 70 




I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

HI (1) 

IV CD 
C2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII CD 
C2) 








43.00 


184.20 




278.00 




27.00 


69.55 
163,970.00 




46.00 

1.25 

19, 000. 00 

3, 700. 00 


4, 881. 60 

192. 70 

113,860.00 

59, 301. 00 

95, 270 00 




1, 991. 40 


11,003.40 
19.277 40 








Total -- 


24, 808. 65 


468, 287. 86 





Category 


Value of export licenses isisued 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


8 months end- 
ing August 
31. 1940 


Windward Islands 


IV (2) 
VII v2j 


$10.00 
108. 30 


$10. 00 




1,36.37 


Total 


118. 30 


145. 37 




V C2) 
C3) 








9,411.76 






30, 780. 00 








Total 




40, 191. 75 












116,686.066.21 


530,614,605.21 









During tlie month of August, 438 arms- 
c-xport licenses were issued, making a total of 
3,153 such licenses issued during the current 
year. 

Arms Exported 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of the 
aims, ammunition, and implements of war 
exported during the year 1940 up to and in- 
cluding the month of August under export 
licenses issued by the Secretary of State: 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


S months end- 
ing August 31, 
1940 




I C4) 

V CD 

(2) 




$24.00 






3,200.00 






495.00 








Total 




3. 719. 00 




I C2) 
(4) 
(5) 

IV CD 
C2) 

V CD 
(2) 
C3) 

VII CD 
(2) 








$884.00 


24, 095. 50 




240.00 






2,41S 00 




3, 560. 00 


7, 802. 00 
6. 504. 00 




6, 025. 00 
250.00 


40. 025. 00 
63, 480. 48 
29U, 713. 50 






29.84 




650.00 


61,611.51 


Total 


11.369.00 


486,819.83 




I CD 
C4) 

ra CD 

IV CD 
C2) 








816. 53 






458. U8 






7,806,135.00 






136. 65 






£09.00 



SEPTEMBER 21, 1940 



231 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


Smonthsend- 

ing August 31, 

1940 




V 
VII 


(1) 

(2) 
(3) 
(1) 




$13,296.00 




$182,124.00 

362.829.00 

15,200.00 


588, 323. m 
831,460.00 
33,474.86 


Total 


560, 153. OO 


9,274 599.02 




rv 
I 

IV 


(1) 

(4) 
(2) 




Bahrein Islands ....... 




136 00 








Belcian ConKO ...... ... 




17 29 






1.87 








Total 




19.16 




I 
ni 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 










217.00 






49, 450. 00 






28, 809. 79 






1, 146, 000. 00 






69.00 






20, 746. 00 






6, 807. 00 






119,997.00 








Total 




1,371,094.79 




I 

IV 

V 


(1) 
(4) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 






Bermuda . . 




48.00 






16.00 




36.00 


35.00 
8,000.00 




2,600.00 


2,600.00 


Total 


2,636.00 


10, 699. 00 




I 

IV 
V 

vn 


(4) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




Bolivia 


426.00 


1, 742. 00 




1, 285 00 






19, 000. 00 






1, 041. 69 






68, 741. 00 




173.76 


1,881.88 
1.50 








Total . 


699.76 


83, 693. 07 




I 

ni 

IV 

V 

vn 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
<3) 
(2) 




Brazil 


158.00 


987.00 




6, 43a 00 




194.00 


8,689.00 

349, 750. 00 






18, 462, 75 




97.14 

201, 500. 00 

13, 068. 80 

32,637.50 


20. 169. 14 
613.672.00 
117,303.63 
171,855.25 
2.00 








Total - 


247, 655. 44 


1, 306, 208. 77 




IV 
V 

vn 


(2) 
(3) 
(1) 




British Quiana 




6.82 




2,600.00 
791. 16 


2. 500. 00 
1, 108. 84 


Total 


3, 291. 16 


3, 615. 66 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


8 months end- 
ing August 31, 
1940 




IV (1) 
(2) 

VU (1) 
(2) 




$15.00 






18.00 






129.20 






108. 30 








Total 




270.50 




I (1) 
(3) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 










90.00 






400.00 






229.54 






472.00 






49.22 








Total.- 




1,240.76 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(6) 

m (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (2) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








$627, 280. 48 
68,888.47 






128,394.47 
38, 569. 00 




166,979.06 

154.00 

1,887,244.00 


272, 202. 59 

94, 654. 00 

6,128,697.00 

248,581.31 




26,415.36 

107. 83 

28. 670. 00 

711,285.97 

692,854.30 

2.00 

16,125.47 


34,775.95 
73,213.69 
520, 704. 67 
1,400,160.44 
3,711,428.24 
36.008.00 
117,812.77 
84, 314. 35 








Total 


4,112,006.93 


13 643 413. 74 




I (2) 
(4) 
(6) 
(6) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (2) 




Chile 




2, 970. 00 
18, 770. 00 
6 300 00 




18,384.00 






3,630.00 






63,841.00 






6,351.00 






3,500.00 




3,297 50 
29,732.00 


3, 407. 50 
62, 678. 00 
12, 607 16 








Total 


51,413.50 


162, 054. 65 




I (1) 

(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 


China 




1 344 00 






468 005 00 






850.00 






23,753.00 






1, 148, 654. 57 




4,497.00 


18, 033. 00 
288.60 






5. 649. 00 






114.600 00 




25,419.00 
258,673.00 


1,333.432.50 
562. 481. 00 
334, 724. 00 






342, 000. 00 








Total 


288,589.00 


4,353,794.67 



232 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


8montl;scn(l- 

ing August 31, 

1940 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 


$30.00 
112.00 
260.00 
38.00 


$moo 




i7.\(X) 

1,9J5. 20 

1,831.76 

348, 350. 00 

6, 190. 00 




6, 702. 00 


35, 592. 00 
1,027.00 






1, 965. 00 








Total 


6,142.00 


397. 097. 96 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








4.00 






137. 30 




120.00 


136. 25 
26, 000. 00 






22, 067. 00 






27, 376. 00 






2, 236. 26 






61.00 








Totbl 


120.00 


76, 096. SI 




I (2) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






70.00 
155. 00 


70.00 




728.00 
43, 360. 00 




390.00 
1, 492. 00 
6,000.00 

540.00 


2, 445. 60 
11,673.00 

7, 700. 00 

8, 895. 00 
12, 876. 00 




767. 52 


6, 377. 72 
751.00 








Total 


9, 404. 52 


93 866.22 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 








585.00 






77.39 






654.60 






214. 64 






103, 975. 00 




135.50 

7,900.00 

5 00 


903.60 

63, 150. 00 

22.60 


Total 


8, 040. 60 


169, 582. 53 




I (2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (1) 


Dominican Republic 


210.00 


210.00 
854.00 






515.00 






600.00 






1,601 80 








Total 


210.00 


3,680.80 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (2) 






169 72 






226.00 






191 00 






16, 418. 00 




1,022.00 


1, 022. 00 
900.00 








Total -- 


1,022.00 


18. 926. 72 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


Smonthsend- 

ing AuBust 31, 

1940 


Egypt 


I (3) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 




$2, 680. 00 
26 21 










3, 619. 00 
989 31 










60.00 








Total 




7, 274. 52 




I (1) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (2) 






El Salvador . ,. - 


$126,000.00 
456.00 


125, 052. 00 




1,213.00 

18, 200. 00 

76.00 








2, 759. 00 


6, 436. 40 
375. 00 






8, 360. 00 








Total 




128, 21S. 00 


159, 702. 40 




I (2) 
(3) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 




Finland 




184 310 00 






436, 694. 00 






1 364 078 89 






2,321 496.00 






951 50 






120,681 00 






I, 200, 063. 00 






369,864 00 








Total 






5, 998, 138. 39 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(6) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 










201 228 00 






4,841.072.71 






.Wfi 047 00 






7, 463, 300. 50 
499 000 00 










53, 907 979 00 






20, 845. 00 






368 315 00 






540 000 00 






3, 927, 169. 82 






10 345 538 00 






2.00 






56 593 00 








Total 






82,683,090 03 




I (4) 

IV (1) 

(2) 










51 00 






3, 836. 00 






11.00 








Total 






3, 898. 00 




I (4) 

I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(6) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 










33.83 








Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland. 


1,060.00 
239, 606. 00 
19,901.00 
340, 745. 38 
258, 843. 00 
21,396,384.00 
20, 654. 00 
173, 422. 80 
172, 177. 65 


2,919,430.00 

6,003,451.56 

1,931,093.20 

7,930,339.38 

415,316.60 

43,689,392.00 

20. 654. 00 

616, 745. 86 

36.6,391.55 

8, 000. 00 




1,459,788.65 
6, 370, 824. 88 


3,316,894.79 
9, 270, 588. 48 



SEPTEMBER 21, 1940 



233 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


8 months end- 

inp Aupust 

31. 1940 


Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland— Continued. 


VII 


(I) 

(2) 


$69,038.00 
1,214,219.00 


$7,937,305.06 
2, 830, 854. 00 


Total -. -. 


31,735,664.16 


86,154,456.47 




I 


(3) 
(4) 






150.00 






50,00 








Total 




200.00 




I 

IV 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 






Qrccnland - .- 




1,015.48 
678.30 










6, 674. 65 






1,731., 17 




640.00 
105.00 


540.00 
105.00 


Total 


645.00 


10 645. 00 




I 

IV 

VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 








37.00 






12.00 






159.00 






1,336.00 






226.80 




2,100.00 


6,164.00 


Total 


2,100.00 


6, 934. 80 




IV 
VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 




Haiti 




.136. ,55 






23.00 






24.30 






6.0 








Total 




389.85 




I 

IV 

V 

VII 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 








29.00 


332.00 




388.00 




7.00 
10,000.00 


1,099.00 

110,000.00 

3,213.00 






391.00 








Total 


10,036.00 


115,423.00 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 




Hong Kong 


23.00 
12.00 


23.00 




12.00 
7, 363. 00 






5. 196. 00 








Total 


35.00 


12. 594 00 




rv 

V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




Iceland - - 




1, 920. 00 






363.00 






7. 890. 00 






763.00 






65.00 








Total 




11,001.00 




I 

IV 


(1) 
(4) 
CD 
(2) 






India 




2, 788. 45 






7,041.96 






3, 528. 64 






1,095.31 





Category 


Value of actual e.xports 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


8 months end- 
ing August 
31, 1940 




V 
VI 


(1) 

(2) 
(3) 
(2) 




$67, 500. 00 






1,. 136. 40 






1,000.00 






929.00 








Total 




85, 219. 76 




III 
IV 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 

(2) 










694, 903. 00 






27,165.00 






94.37 






25.85 








Total 




722. 248. 22 




V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 










110,823.00 




$3, 270. 60 
33,380.00 


3. 270. 00 
.33, rfSO. 00 


Total 


36. 650. 60 


153.473.60 




IV 


(1) 
(2) 








346.00 






27.60 








Total 




373.50 




V 
IV 

V 

I 


(2) 

(1) 

(3) 

(1) 
(4) 










4, 143. 00 










516.00 


618.00 






Latvia 




18.077.00 








Mauritiu.s . _. . 




251. 45 






337.28 








Total 




588.73 




I 

IV 
V 

VI 
VII 


(1) 
(5) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 
0) 
(2) 






Mexico 




56.00 






112.50 




6, 424. 60 

39, .542, 40 

48,00 

1,000.00 

63.00 


14, 704. 60 

470.00 

417,382.40 

2,937.00 

14,505.00 

175. 50 

16, 207. .50 




145.00 
47,223.00 


39,301.00 


Total 


505, 857. 50 




I 

V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 








116.00 






1.54. 61 






282, 000. 00 




4,080.00 
55,710.00 


7,304.00 
55,710.00 


Total 


59. 790. 00 


345, 284. 61 




I 
in 

V 


(2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(2) 
(I) 
(2) 
(3) 




Netherlands _ 




26, 653. 00 






47.50 






155.00 






9. 674. 00 






107. 740. 00 






163.472.50 






187. 137. 50 


Total 




494. 879. 50 



234 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destiniition 


August 1940 


8 months end- 
ing Aueust 
31, 1940 


Netherlands Indie? 


I (2) 
(4) 
(5) 

III (I) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 


$lfi, 806. on 
15,112.00 


$92. 484. 00 

16,359.77 

281.075.00 




61.160.00 
440.00 


1,570,958.00 

740.00 

40, 639. 35 




202. 38 


1,613.20 
334 677.00 




81,423.00 
82.446.00 
50, 169. 30 


234,331.00 
213. 195. 00 
188, 169. 30 


Total 


307, 758. 68 


2, 974, 141 . 62 




I (4) 

I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 




Mew Caledonia 




203 00 








Newfoundland 




IIR 50 






95.24 




1,271.00 
19.92 


1, 934. 50 
215. 82 


Total 


1, 290. 92 


2, 364. 06 




IV (2) 

V (2) 




New Guinea, Torriliiryuf 




17 25 


1,000.00 


2, 500. OO 


Total- 


1, 000. 00 


2, 517 25 




I (4) 

IV (1) 

V (2) 
(3) 

\^I (1) 




New Zealand 


24, 301. 00 


26, 615. 00 




202 00 






2,371.15 
2, 540. 00 
11,386.00 








5, 395. 00 


Total 


29,696.00 


43, 114. 16 




I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

IV (2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 








34,827.00 
8, 267. 00 
1 264 00 














4,035.00 
480 00 










870 00 






1, 292. 00 






Total -. . 




51, 035. 00 




I (2) 

(4) 

IV (2) 






278. 50 










8.00 


8.00 


Total... 


286.50 


319 60 




IV (1) 

I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

m (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 




Northern Rhodesia 




25 50 










1 














36, 493. 20 

1,364,114.00 

280 00 




















137 00 






2,200.00 












Total. 




l,39i263.20 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


8 months end- 
ing August 
31, 1940 


Palestine _ 


V (3) 

I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 




$400 00 








Panama ... 




12 500 00 






3, 900. 00 






8, 700 00 






8, 781. 75 






1, 207. OO 




$2, 866. 00 
lOOOO 
800.00 


21, 807. 13 

174.00 

1,447.00 

2, 915. 60 








Total . 


3,766.00 


61 432 48 




I (4) 

IV (2) 




Paraguay 


101.80 
3,286.00 


384 80 




11, 215. 45 


Total . . 


3,387.80 


11, 600. 26 




IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
C2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 


Peru 




7, 361. 00 







240.00 
387, 810 00 






15.872.00 






62 617 00 






1,000.00 






1, 131 00 








Total 




476. 031. 00 




I (1) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 




Portugal 




51 80 






44.00 






877, 298 00 






30.00 






422.00 






4, 663. 00 




230.00 


44, as.'). 91 
54, 265 00 




486.00 


841.76 


Total. 


706.00 


981. 851. 47 




V (2) 

V (2) 

I 0) 
(2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 








600 00 








Saudi Arabia 




760 00 










315. 60 






227 60 




88. .=0 

60.52 
13,300.00 


352.60 

82.00 

121.04 

13, 300. 00 


Total 


13,764.62 


14, 578. 64 




I (1) 

I (2) 

(4) 

IV (2) 

VII (1) 




Straits Settlements 




9 12 












11, 644. 50 






1.64 






2.47 






193.80 








Total 




11,842 41 




I (2) 
(4) 






Sweden . ... 




108, 000 OO 






65, 307. 00 



SEPTEMBER 21, 1940 



236 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


S months end- 
ing August 
31, 1940 


Sweden — Continued. 


m (1) 

(2) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3; 




$3, 724, 925. 00 






4.000.00 




$89,000.00 


133,501.00 
65,000.00 




11,520.00 


212,923.98 
247, 267. 00 








Total... 


100,620.00 


4. 560. 923. 98 




I (1) 
(4) 

III (1) 
(2) 

TV (1) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 








17.65 






1.93 




468,361.00 

1, 543. 84 

893.00 


468, 361. 00 
1, 543. 84 
16,380.89 
5, 300. 00 




9,420.00 


13,015.00 
193, 120. 00 








Total 


480,217.84 


697, 740. 31 




IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 




Trinidad 




153 00 






18 00 






3,094.00 






18, 625. 00 






852.00 








Total 




22, 742. 00 




I (2) 
(5) 

m (1) 

(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 






Turkey 




148, 135. 00 






168, 750. 00 






1, 191,084 00 






17, 070. 00 






14, 236. 00 






1, 306. 20 




45,997.00 


233,795.10 
70, 344. 00 








Total 


45.997.00 


1, 834, 720. 30 




I (1) 
(4) 

in (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (I) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 

(2) 




Union of South Africa. . 




296.00 






665.93 






173, 600. 00 




21,925.00 


91, 588. 70 
7.00 




401, 625. 00 
12, 775. 00 
81, 175. 00 


411,228.00 

24.806.64 

87. 175. 00 

156.00 






40,064.00 








Total 


517,500.00 


829, 487. 27 




V (3) 

I (4) 

IV (1) 

(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

vn (2) 




Union of Soviet Socialist Re- 




120, 512. 00 


publics. 






Uruguay 




299.00 






1, 522. 00 




1,068.00 


4.146.30 
35. 101 00 




20.40 


100.40 
660.00 








Total 


1.088.40 


41, 831. 70 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


August 1940 


8 months end- 
ing August 
31, 1940 


Venezuela 


I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

ni (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

(3) 

VII (1) 

(2) 




$111.40 






246.00 






39.00 






167, 970. 00 






3, 316. 60 






191. 45 




$1,800.00 


94, 783. 00 
28.271.00 




3.000.00 
2,317.53 


82. 131. 00 
11,807.01 
15, 890. 40 








Total 


7,117.53 


404,756.86 




V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 








63, 000. 00 






26. 806. 75 






31, 080. 00 








Total 




120, 886. 75 










Grand total 


38,837,513.86 


223, 506, 654. 19 









Arms Import Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of origin of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war li- 
censed for import by the Secretary of State 
during the month of August 1940: 



Country of origin 


Category 


Value 


Total 


Argentina . 


V (2) 
I (2) 

(3) 

(4) 

in 0) 

V (2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 
I (1) 

V (2) 
I (4) 

V (2) 
(3) 


$750.00 

2,650.00 

250.00 

227.00 

3.500.00 

20.00 

9,500.00 

1.00 

37.00 

100.00 

1,285.00 

2. 733. 00 

4, 000. 00 


$750.00 


Canada 




Dominican RepuDlic 

El Salvador 


10, 148. OO 

37.00 
100.00 


Great Britain.. 


1. 285. 00 


Venezuela . 


6, 733. 00 




Total 




25, 053. 00 











During the month of August, 16 import li- 
censes were issued, making a total of 145 such 
licenses issued during the current year. 

Categories of Arms, Ammunition, and Imple- 
siENTS OF War 
The categories of arms, ammunition, and 
implements of war in the appropriate column 



236 

of the tablt'S printed above are the categories 
into which those articles were divided in the 
President's proclamation of May 1, 1937, enu- 
merating tlio articles which would be consid- 
ered as arms, ammunition, and implements of 
war for the purposes of section 5 of the joint 
resolution of May 1, 1937 [see the Bulletin of 
July 27, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 57), pp. 58-59]. 

Special Statistics in Regabd to Arms Exports 
TO Cuba 

In compliance with article II of the conven- 
tion between the United States and Cuba to 
suppress smuggling, signed at Habana, March 
11, 1926, which reads in part as follows: 

"The High Contracting Parties agree that 
clearance of shipments of merchandise by wa- 
ter, air, or land, from any of the ports of either 
country to a port of entiy of the other country, 
shall be denied when such shipment comprises 
articles the importation of which is prohibited 
or restricted in the country to which such 
shipment is destined, unless in this last case 
there has been a compliance with the requisites 
demanded by the laws of both countries." 

and in compliance with the laws of Cuba which 
restrict the importation of arms, ammunition, 
and implements of war of all kinds by requir- 
ing an import permit for each shipment, ex- 
port licences for shipments of arms, ammuni- 
tion, and implements of war to Cuba are re- 
quired for the articles enumerated below in 
addition to the articles enumerated in the 
President's proclamation of May 1, 1937; 

(1) Arms and small arms using ammunition 
cf caliber .22 or less, other than those classed as 
toys. 

(2) Spare parts of arms and small arms of 
all kinds and calibers, other than those classed 
as toys, and of gims and machine guns. 

(3) Ammunition for the anns and small 
arms under (1) above. 

(4) Sabers, swords, and military machetes 
with cross-guard hilts. 

(5) Explosives as follows: explosive pow- 
ders of all kinds for all purposes; nitrocellu- 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

lose having a nitrogen content of 12 percent or 
less; diphenylamine; dynamite of all kinds; 
nitroglycerine; alkaline nitrates (ammonium, 
potassium, and sodium nitrate) ; nitric acid ; 
nitrobenzene (essence or oil of mirbane) ; sul- 
phur; sulphuric acid; chlorate of potash; and 
acetones. 

(6) Tear gas (CeHsCOCH.Cl) and other 
similar non-toxic gases and apparatus designed 
for the storage or projection of such gases. 

The table printed below indicates, in respect 
to licenses authorizing the exportation to Cuba 
of the articles and commodities listed in the 
preceding paragraph, issued by the Secretary 
of State during August 1940, the number of 
licenses and the value of the articles and com- 
modities described in the licenses : 



Number of licenses 


Sections 


Value 


Total 


22 - 


(2) 
(3) 
(5) 


$11.00 
7.006.40 
18, 205, 85 






$25, 223. 25 



The table printed below indicates the value 
of the articles and commodities listed above ex- 
ported to Cuba during August 1940 under 
licenses issued by the Secretary of State : 



Section 



(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(5) 



Value 



$582.00 

4,5.00 

9, 725. 90 

18, 437. 45 



Total 



$28, 790. 35 



Tin-Plate Scrap 

Tlie table printed below indicates the number 
of licenses issued during the year 1940, up to 
and including the month of August, authoriz- 
ing the export of tin-plate scrap under the pro- 
visions of the act approved February 15, 1936, 
and the regulations issued pursuant thereto, to- 
gether with the number of tons authorized to 
be exported and the value thereof: 



SEPTEMBER 21, 1940 



237 



Country of desti- 


August 1940 


8 months ending 
August 31, 1940 


nation 


Quantity in 
long tons 


Total 
value 


Quantity in 
long tons 


Total 
value 


Japan 






4,033 


$75,009.70 











During the month of August, no licenses 
were issued authorizing the exportation of tin- 
plate scrap. A total of 52 such licenses were 
issued during the first seven months of the 
current year. 

Helium 

No licenses authorizing the exportation of 
lieliiim gas under the provisions of the act 
approved on September 1, 1937, and the regu- 
lations issued pursuant thereto, were applied 
for or issued during the month of August 1940. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[KelPEsed to the press September 18) 

The following changes have occurred in the 
Foreign Service since September 7, 1940: 

Career Officers 

Lynn W. Franklin, of Bethesda, Md., Con- 
sul at Stockholm, Sweden, has been assigned as 
Consul at Niagara Falls, Out., Canada. 

Walter H. McKinney. of Sault Ste. Marie, 
Mich., Consul at Sheffield, England, has been 
assigned as Consul at London, England, upon 
the closing of the American Consulate at Shef- 
field, England. 

Eugene A. Masuret, of New Jersey, Third 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at 
Paris, France, has been assigned as Vice Con- 
sul at Bordeaux, France. 

Ernest de W. Mayer, of Flushing, Long Is- 
land, N. Y., Third Secretary of Embassy and 
Vice Consul at Paris, France, has been assigned 
as Vice Consul at Casablanca, Morocco. 



Non-career Officers 

Jones R. Trowbridge, of Augusta, Ga., Vice 
Consul at Moscow, Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics, has been appointed Vice Consul at 
Toronto, Ont., Canada. 

Worthington E. Hagerman, of Maryland, 
Vice Consul at Paris, France, has been ap- 
pointed Vice Consul at Bordeaux, France. 

Henry O. Ramsey, of Pierre, S. Dak., Vice 
Consul at Sheffield, England, has been ap- 
pointed Vice Consul at Manchester, England, 
upon the closing of the office at Sheffield, Eng- 
land. 

The following American Consulates, which 
were established for the purpose of perform- 
ing non-immigrant visa services only, will be 
closed September 30, 1940: 

American Consulate, Kingston, Ont., Can- 
ada. 

American Consulate, Fort Erie, Ont., Can- 
ada. 

American Consulate, Sherbrooke, Que., Can- 
ada. 

American Consulate, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., 
Canada. 



Regulations 



The following Government regulations may 
be of interest to readers of the Bvlletin: 

Visa.s; Documents Required of Bona Fide Alien 
Seamen Entering tlie United States. (Department of 
State.) September 16, 1940. Federal Repister, Sep- 
tember 19, 1940 (vol. 5, no. 183), p. 3740 (Tlie National 
Archives of the United States). 

Sugar Consumption Requirements and Quotas for 
the Calendar Tear 1940. (Agricultural Ad.1ustment 
Administration.) September 18, 1940. Federal Regis- 
ter, September 19, 1940 (vol. 5, no. 183), p. 3739-3740 
(The National Archives of the United States). 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



EXTRADITION 

Supplementary Extradition Treaty With 
Switzerland 

The American Minister to Switzerland re- 
ported by a telegram dated September 19, 1940 
that the Swiss Parliament ajjproved on Sep- 
tember 18, 1940 the ratification of the Supple- 
mentary Extradition Treaty between the 
United States and Switzerland signed on 
January 31, 1940. The supplementary treaty 
amends the extradition treaties between the 
two countries of May 14, 1900 and January 10. 
1935 (Treaty Series Nos. 354 and 889). 



TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

North American Regional Broadcasting 
Agreement 

In order to carry out the provisions of the 
North American Regional Broadcasting Agree- 
ment, signed at Habana on December 13, 1937, 
which agreement will enter into force on March 
29, 1941, the Rules and Regulations of the 
Federal Conununications Commission were 
amended and new regulations prescribing the 
restrictions and conditions necessary to carry 
out the provisions of the agreement were 
adopted. The notice of the amendment of the 
rules is printed on page 3696 of the Federal 
Register of September 17, 1940 (vol. 5, no. 181), 
and the amended rules are printed in the same 
issue on pages 3670-3671. These rules govern 
standard and high-frequency broadcast sta- 
tions and will become effective on the effective 
date of the agreement, namely, March 29, 1941. 

The United States has furnished the other 

governments signatory to the agreement — 

Canada, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Haiti, and 

Mexico — with lists of "broadcast stations actu- 

238 



ally in operation", the "changes authorized to 
be made with respect to said stations", and 
"new broadcast stations authorized but not yet 
in operation", as required under article III of 
the agreement. This information is required 
to be furnished by each party ratifying the 
agreement "not later than 180 days prior to the 
effective date thereof". The latest date on 
which such information is to be received is 
September 29, 1940. 

RESTRICTION OF WAR 

Convention for the Amelioration of the Con- 
dition of the Wounded and the Sick of 
Armies in the Field (Treaty Series No. 
847) and Convention Relating to the 
Treatment of Prisoners of War (Treaty 
Series No. 846) 

Bolivia 

By a note dated September 10, 1940, the 
Swiss Minister at Washington informed the 
Secretary of State of the deposit on August 
13, 1940, of the instruments of ratification by 
Bolivia of the Convention for the Amelioration 
of the Condition of the Wounded and the Sick 
of Armies in the Field and the Convention 
Relating to the Treatment of Prisoners of War, 
both signed at Geneva on July 27, 1929. 
According to the terms of the conventions, they 
will enter into force in respect of Bolivia on 
February 13, 1941. 



Legislation 



An Act To provide for the common defense by in- 
creasing the personnel of the armed forces of the 
United States and providing for its training. (Pub- 
lic. No. 783, 76th Cong.. 3d sess.) 14 pp. 5^. 



SEPTEMBER 21, 1940 



Publications 



The following Government publications may 
be of interest to readers of the Bulht'm: 

China Trade Act, 1922, with regulations and forms. 
Edition of 1935, with amendments as of Feb. 26, 1925, 
and June 25, 1938. (Department of Commerce: 
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Comnjerce. ) 1940. 
ii, 29 pp. [Regulations as amended Sept. 11, 19M6.J 
50. 



239 

United States imports and trade agreements con- 
cessions: Statistics of United States imports in se- 
lected years from 1931-39 for each product upon which 
United States has granted concession in trade agree- 
ments, together with rates of tariff duty before and 
after concession. (Tariff Commission.) Feb. 1940. 
S vols. 978 leaves (processed). Free (from Commis- 
sion). 

United States imports in 1939 of products on whicli 
concessions were granted in trade agreements. 
(Tariff Commission.) Apr. 1940. 168 leaves (proc- 
essed). [This report, containing preliminary import 
statistics for entire year 1939, supplements the above 
eight volumes, which contain statistics for only 11 
months of 1939.] Free (from Commission). 



U. 5. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFnCE: 1940 



For sale by the Superintendent o£ Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBI ISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPEOVAL OF THE DIEECTOE OF THE BUBBAU OF THE BUDGET 



J 




THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BU 



ji 



^ 



LL/ 



"^ r 



riN 



SEPTEMBER 28, 1940 
Vol. Ill: No. 66 — Publication I^o8 



Qontents 

General: Pat* 

Our Foreign Policy and National Defense: Address l)y 

the Under Secretary of State 243 

Control of iron and steel scrap exports 250 

Alliance between Germany, Italy, and Japan: State- 
ment by the Secretary of State 251 

Washington National Airport: Remarks of the Presi- 
dent 251 

Documejitat ion requirements of certain aliens .... 252 
E.xecutive order pr('scril)ing selective service regula- 
tions 252 

Defense Communications Board 253 

The F.\r E.\st: 

Developments in French Indochina 253 

American Republics: 

E.xchange professors and students 254 

HabanaConventionof July 30, 1940 256 

Financial Convention with Dominican Republic . . . 256 

Europe: 

Contributions for relief in belligerent coimtries . . . . 257 

The Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 268 

Foreign Service Regulations 268 

Legislation 268 

[Over] 




U, S, SUPEHINTEMDENT OF DOCUMENT? 

OCT 14 1940 



Treaty Information: Page 

Sovereignty : 

Convention on the Provisional Administration of 
European Colonies and Possessions in the Ameri- 
cas 269 

Special Assistance: 

Financial convention with the Dominican Republic 

revising the convention of 1 924 271 

Postal : 

Universal Postal Convention of 1939 272 

Publications 273 



General 



OUR FOREIGN POLICY AND NATIONAL DEFENSE 

Address by the Under Secretary of State ' 



[Released to tbc press September 28] 

I have been particularly glad to accept the 
invitation of the Foreign Affairs Council to 
address you today on the subject of "Our For- 
eign Policy and National Defense". 

I have been glad because of my conviction 
that, so far as the interests of the Nation war- 
rant and the exigencies of their duties make it 
possible, those who hold responsible positions 
in the Govenunent involving the conduct of 
our foreign relations should frequently make 
such public reports. Even more I hold the 
belief that in what is probably the most crit- 
ical moment in our life as an independent peo- 
ple, every man and woman in the United States 
should be fully advised as to the course of 
events ujjon this tragic international scene — ■ 
they must be aware of the part which their 
Government has played in trying to avert the 
present nature of that course — and be com- 
pletely cognizant of the steps which it has 
taken to safeguard the vital interests and the 
peace of the American people. 

I think we all of us have recognized increas- 
ingly clearly during these recent years that our 
foreign policy and our ability to defend our- 
selves are inextricably woven together. Out- 
side of the Western Hemisphere, the concept 
of international morality and the authority of 
international law have ceased to be determin- 
ing factors. Those nations which have relied 
upon their neutrality, or which have endeav- 
ored to exercise the weight of the prestige they 



' Delivered by Mr. Welles before the Foreign Affairs 
Council, Cleveland, Ohio, September 28, 1940. 



formerly enjoyed, and which did not possess 
the physical means to preserve their neutrality 
or to make their influence felt, have found to 
their bitter cost that a foreign policy, however 
righteous, however acutely devised, based 
mereh- on morality or prestige, counted for less 
than nothing against the impact of brute force. 
The peoples of the democracies have taken a 
long time to persuade themselves of this truth. 

The history of the recent international rela- 
tions of this country can perhaps be properly 
divided into two chaptei's. 

The first would cover that period between 
1933 and the early months of 1937, when it still 
seemed unbelievable that the impending calam- 
ity could not be averted through resort to rea- 
son and good-will. In that period this Gov- 
ernment exerted every effort, by offering its 
full cooperation in the negotiation of equitable 
and workable economic readjustments, and in 
the search for agreements for the limitation of 
armaments, and by urging the peaceful settle- 
ment of those political and geographic read- 
justments in which this country was not 
directly concerned, to prevent a world catas- 
trophe which must inevitably shake all civil- 
ized structures — our own by no means least. 

The second chapter is separated from the 
first by the events of those transition months 
which culminated in the agreements of Munich. 

That was in September 1938. Since then 
the policy of this Government has been con- 
cerned primarily and consistently with the 
assuring of our own national defense. It has 
been directed towards the perfection of our 

243 



244 



DEPABTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



means of cooperation with our sister republics 
of the New World, and towards assisting those 
nations outside the Western Hemisphere whose 
continued independence and integrity con- 
tribute towards the maintenance of peace, and 
whose continued freedom to live their own un- 
trammeled democratic way of life constitutes a 
bulwark for the maintenance of individual lib- 
erty in the Western Hemisphere. 

The basic reason for this change in objective 
is illustrated very clearly in a passage in Har- 
old Nicolson's admirable life of his father. 
In speaking of the years before the World War 
of 1914-18, he says, "It was not considered 
patriotic that one's own country should on 
every occasion set an example of unselfishness, 
humanity and intelligence. It thus came about 
that all but a small minority . . . approached 
the problem of civilization in a competitive 
und not in a cooperative spirit. In organized 
communities this competitive spirit can be con- 
trolled by the authority of law. The Euro- 
pean community of nations was not an organ- 
ized community, and for them the ultimate 
appeal was not to law, but to force." 

During the generation after the Treaty of 
Versailles not only had efforts to organize the 
community of nations failed but in the early 
years of the past decade signs were constantly 
on the increase that even that power of public 
opinion based on international agreement, 
known as international law, which had to a 
considerable extent been a deterrent to violence 
and moral anarchy, was fast disintegrating 
and was being steadily replaced by the rule of 
brute force. 

Let me at this point recall to you some of the 
many attempts which have been undertaken by 
tiiis country to induce the nations of the world 
to return to a sane economic order — to halt the 
armaments race — and to reestablish in interna- 
tional life the standard of morality and law 
which three centuries of civilization had pro- 
duced and which alone could make it possible 
for human beings to raise their standard of liv- 
ing, to know wliat happiness means, and to pass 
their natural lives unshadowed by constant fear. 



In the field of our economic relations with 
other countries your Government has never 
ceased striving to serve the end of peaceful de- 
velopment. In the depths of the depression the 
economic disorder within each country was at- 
tended by the great decline of all international 
commercial and financial activity. Our own ex- 
port trade had dwindled, our investors were 
struck with sudden immense losses in their secu- 
rity holdings. The very solvency of many of 
our main financial institutions was threatened 
by their large credits abroad which could not 
be liquidated as trade everywhere shriveled to 
incredibly low proportions. What was ob- 
viously required was, first of all, to stabilize, and 
then to bring stimulating recovery to the econ- 
omy which was suffering from the shocks of past 
errors and miscalculations. 

Early in 1933 the depression and unemploy- 
ment prevalent in most countries, including oui- 
own, was so severe as to require far-reaching 
measures for relief and recovery in each coun- 
try. This made it impossible, tragically enough, 
for the governments that met in London in 1933 
to agree upon international measures that would 
serve satisfactorily the pressing needs of all, but 
the United States during the succeeding years 
assumed the leadership in trying to make effec- 
tive the purpose which the 1933 conference had 
been summoned to acliieve. 

In undertaking to rebuild our trade with the 
rest of the world, it was necessary to convince 
unwilling minds that the policy pursued bj' 
this country during the 1920's of constantly 
increasing barriers to trade had brought in- 
jury to ourselves as well as to others. Under 
the Trade Agreements Act this Government 
negotiated 22 trade agreements with other 
nations, each of which enlarged commerce and 
employment in this and other countries with- 
out doing material injury to any branch of 
American production. By so doing, we cre- 
ated a renewed realization that in the interest 
of an increase in the standard of living, in the 
interest of renewing employment, in short, m 
the interest of recovery itself, commercial in- 
tercourse with the rest of the world was as 



SEPTEMBER 2 8, 1940 



245 



necessary to oui- country ns it was to other 
countries. 

The recovery in both internal and intei'- 
national affairs tliat took phice for a few years 
after 1933 for some time gave reason for hope 
that tlie world would gradually attain some 
new and more satisfactory economic balance. 
This hope spurred on the efforts of this Gov- 
ermncnt to keep before its own people and be- 
fore other i)eoi)les the principles of an inter- 
national program of mutual economic benefit. 
Hardly a day pas.sed without some effort on 
our part to bring other countries to join with 
us in the adoption of this program through 
gradual elimination of policies contraiy to it. 

I am convinced that those efforts might have 
succeeded if it had not become evident that 
certain powers had determined that all eco- 
nomic policies for the adjustment of human 
welfai-o would be subordinated bj- them to 
policies of seizing by force what they them- 
selves desired. An ironic situation was thus 
patent. Many ju\tions thereupon feared that 
if they extended their economic relations, they 
would strengthen their potential enemies. 
'J'hey feared that if they exchanged advantages 
with others they might inevitably become de- 
pendent upon others. The resulting discour- 
agement to trade, investment, and other eco- 
nomic activities necessarily increased the dis- 
position to seek relief by predatory action im- 
der desperate leadership; it prepared the way 
for war. 

That was the course which this Government 
had so clearly foreseen and which we had so 
often tried to offset, not only by wai-nings and 
appeals, but by the example which we aui"selves 
held up. 

Believing as this Government does, that one 
of the surest safeguards against war is the op- 
portunity of all peoples to buy and to sell on 
equal terms and without let or hindrance of a 
political character, we have never ceased to 
offer our full participation and cooperation in 
such a general economic program. 

The oncoming of the war and the complete 
dislocation of international trade have neces- 
sarily left that program in suspense, but the 
determination of your Government to resume 



it when the opiiortunity again occurs i-emains 
unaltered. 

Meanwhile, our economic policy has been ad- 
justed to safeguard and to sen'e our security 
in many vital relations. 

Let me turn now to the subject of our amied 
defense. During the first years of this admin- 
istration we participated in conferences de- 
signed to bring about an international agree- 
ment on the limitation and reduction of 
armament. Time after time this Government 
expressed our readiness to join with other na- 
tions in a common effort to bring about an 
effective agreement. 

While the Government was making efforts 
for arms limitation, our national defense was 
not neglected. Ever since he assumed office, 
President Roosevelt has woi-kod unceasingly 
towards an adequate national defense. In 
1934 steps were taken to bring our Navy up to 
treaty strength. Shortly thereafter, provision 
was made for rei^lacing and improving Army 
equipment, and for a very substantial increase 
in enlisted strength. 

The aim of this administration lias been to 
make our national defense adequate and effi- 
cient on land, on sea, and in the air. The 
definition of an adequate national defense, of 
course, is bound to change with changing in- 
ternational situations. It has been our policy 
to make no increase in our own armament un- 
less other powers by increasing theirs make 
increase by us necessai-y to our national safety. 

By the end of 1936 it had become apparent 
that under existing conditions there was no 
possibilitj^ of a general international agree- 
ment for a reduction in armament. Instead, 
there was a recrudescence of the militai-y spirit, 
resulting in the expansion of standing annies, 
in naval construction, in enormously increased 
militai-y budgets, and in feverish efforts to de- 
vise new instruments of warfare. 

Ihiring this period the administration re- 
peatedly pointed out the dangers in the inter- 
national situation. As early as Januaiy 4, 
1935, President Roosevelt stated in a message 
to Congress, "I cannot with candor tell you 
that general international relationships outside 
the borders of the United States are improved. 



246 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BUIXETIN 



On the surface of things many old jealousies 
are resurrected, old passions aroused; new 
strivings for armament and power, in more 
than one land, rear their ugly heads." 

Towards the end of 1937 the Nation was 
warned that international lawlessness was 
spreading; that the situation was of universal 
concern ; and that the peace, freedom, and secu- 
rity of 90 percent of the population of the world 
was being jeopardized by the remaining 10 per- 
cent who were threatening a break-down in all 
international order under law. 

In a message to Congi-ess of January 28, 1938, 
the President declared that as Commander-in- 
Chief of the Army and Navy of the United 
States it was his constitutional duty to report 
that "our national defense is, in the light of the 
increasing armaments of other nations, inade- 
quate for purposes of national security and re- 
quires increase for that reason." 

A few months after the Munich agi-eement 
President Roosevelt reported to Congress that 
although a war which had threatened to envelop 
the world in flames had been temporarily 
averted, it had become increasingly clear that 
peace was not assured. In this message of Janu- 
ary 4, 1939, he pointed out that the world had 
grown so small and weapons of attack so swift 
that no nation could be safe so long as any other 
powerful nation refused to settle its grievances 
at the council table; that weapons of defense 
gave the only safety from any highly armed 
nation which insists on policies of force; that 
we had learned that survival cannot be guar- 
anteed by arming after the attack begins. One 
week later the President submitted to Congress 
the progi'am required by the necessities of 
defense. 

With the outbreak of war in Europe in Sep- 
tember 1939, the President increased the 
strength of the Army and Navy within stat- 
utory authorizations. In January 1940 he sub- 
mitted a budget to the Congress which included 
estimates for the national defense, amounting 
to approximately $2,000,000,000, for the fiscal 
year 1941. On May 16 of this year he asked 
of the Congress, and the Congress approved, 
a tremendous increase in appropriations for the 
national defense. And subsequently requests 



have been made to bring our defense forces to 
a point capable of meeting any emergency. 

The recent agreement with Great Britain for 
a chain of naval and air bases extending from 
Newfoundland to the South American Conti- 
nent, and the agreement with Canada on de- 
fense, are of immeasurable assistance in pro- 
viding effectively for the defense of the 
Americas. 

From this brief summary I think you will 
agree that the administration has been fully 
aware of the dangers in the international sit- 
uation, that it has informed the country thereof, 
and that through the years it has been vigilant 
in preparing our national defense against any 
jDossible threats to our security. 

To serve that program of defense, a far- 
reaching effort is being carried forward to 
acquire adequate supplies of all essential and 
critical materials, and we are keeping under 
close supervision the export of all American 
products that we may need for an emergency. 

In reviewing the ever increasingly tragic his- 
tory of the international relations of the past 
seven years, there is just one bright picture 
of constructive achievement that stands out. I 
refer, of course, to the recent history of the 
relations between the 21 American republics. 

I doubt whether the people of the United 
States even remotely appreciate the vast 
changes which these past seven years have 
brouglit about in the relations between the 
United States and its neighbors in the New 
World. A short eight years ago, it is an un- 
derstatement to assert, suspicion of the motives 
of the United States existed throughout the 
major portion of the continent. Wliere open 
resentment did not exist because of some act 
of high-handed intervention on the part of 
this Government, or hostility smolder because 
of the assertion by this country of its power 
to dictate, there existed at least in many quar- 
ters, a very natural resentment because of our 
insistence, through the Tariff Act of 1930, upon 
closing our markets to our neiglibors. 

Today, that condition, fortunately, has van- 
ished. It began to disappear after the Inter- 
American Confei-ence of 1933 when Secretary 
Hull, in the name of this Government, made it 



SEPTEMBKR 2 8, 194 



247 



clear that the United States would ni) longer 
intervene in the internal a if airs of the other 
American republics. It was still further dis- 
sipated when this Government, tlirough tlie 
provisions of the Trade Agreements Act, made 
it evident that the United States was not only 
willing but anxious to trade with its neiglibors 
on tei-ms of mutual advantage; and thus the 
way was prepared for the holding of the Con- 
ference for the Maintenance of Peace in Buenos 
Aires in 1936 in a spirit of nascent understand- 
ing and mutual reliance by all of the American 
republics. 

Few of you probably recall today that the 
suggestion for the holding of this Conference 
was made by President Roosevelt so long ago 
as on January 30, 1936, through personal let- 
ters which he addressed to the Presidents of 
all of the other American republics.^ 

The war clouds over Europe were steadily 
darkening, and the President foresaw clearly 
that in the event of a new world war, no 
greater assurance could be oflFered to the na- 
tions of the New World that the peace of tlie 
Western Hemisphere would be maintained and 
that in the event that any aggression against 
the American Continent threatened, the United 
States could count ujwn the loyal friendship 
of her American neighbors, than through the 
perfection of agreements between them which 
would reduce the possibility of hostilities be- 
tween themselves and afford a connnon policy 
in the event of danger from abroad. 

That suggestion was made four and a half 
years ago, and it is now well worth while to 
remember that at that Conference there was 
for the first time proclaimed by the 21 Ameri- 
can republics in unanimous accord the great 
principle that any threat to the peace of any 
one of the American republics affects the peace 
of them all. 

Since tliat time there has been hdld the 
Inter-American Conference of Lima in 1938, 
which strengthened notably the earlier acts of 
the Conference at Buenos Aires, and which 
indicated still more clearlv the intention of 



' See Press Releases of February 15, 1936 (vol. XIV, 
no. 333), pp. 162-163. 



the American republics to assume a common 
front against any threat of aggression to the 
New World. As a result of machinery there 
set up, there have also been held since the 
war broke out two consultative meetings at 
Panama and at Habana. 

Three important achievements at the Pan- 
ama meeting are worthy of special attention. 

First, the declaration by the American re- 
publics that so long as this continent remains 
at peace the American nations are entitled 
as of inherent rigiit to have the waters adjacent 
to their shores, and which they regard as of 
primary utility to them in their normal rela- 
tions, free from the commission of hostile acts. 

Second, the creation of the Inter-American 
Neutrality Committee, which is in permanent 
session in Rio de Janeiro in order to study 
the problems of neutrality and to formulate 
recommendations with a view to coordinating 
action among the American republics. 

And third, the creation of the Inter-Ameri- 
can Financial and Economic Advisory Com- 
mittee, which has been in session in Washing- 
ton since November 15, 1939, and to which 
have been submitted for study and recommen- 
dation a wide range of problems in the fields 
of banking, shipping, customs procedure, and 
broad programs of economic development. 

In July 1940 there was held at Habana the 
second consultative meeting. Once more con- 
crete measures were adopted to enable the Amer- 
ican nations to cope effectively with new 
problems. Resolutions were adopted looking 
towards joint action through coordination of 
police activity in the combatting of subversive 
foreign influences, and, in the economic field, 
the Inter-American Committee at Washington 
was charged with additional responsibilities 
primarily with respect to the gi-ave problems 
of surplus commodities brought about by the 
disruption of normal markets. 

At the same time the Act of Habana was ap- 
proved providing for the assumption of joint 
provisional responsibilities with respect to 
European colonies in the Western Hemisphere 
in the event that a change of sovereignty of 
these colonies should threaten as a result of the 
European conflict. 



248 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Today, the governments of all the American 
republics are cooperating as one in the search 
for remedies for their common problems, and 
with a full and reciprocal recognition of their 
several needs and requirements. They are as 
one in their determination to preserve their 
domestic institutions, their ancient liberties, and 
their independence and integrity ; but more than 
that, they recognize today that the strength of 
every one of them is vastly enhanced by the 
combined strength of the rest. 

Speaking from the standpoint of a citizen of 
the United States, I can conceive of no greater 
safeguard to the national defense of the United 
States than the realization on our part that we 
possess the sympathy, the trust and the cooper- 
ation of our neighbors of the New World. 

Unfortunately it is not possible for me to 
refer with any measure of satisfaction to the 
course of events in the Far East during these 
past seven years. 

The policy of this Government in the Far East 
has differed in no way from the policies of this 
country in relation to other regions of the world. 
It is true, of course, that the problems which 
have arisen in our relations with the counti'ies 
of the Far East have had certain peculiarities 
because of the earlier rights of extraterritorial 
jurisdiction accorded to the nationals of occi- 
dental powers, along with various other special 
procedures adopted with special reference to 
si^ecial situations, but as situations have 
changed, the United States has by processes of 
negotiation and agreement voluntarily assented 
to the altei'ation and removal of these special 
features. 

From time to time the nations directly in- 
terested in the Far East have entered into 
treaties and international agreements which 
have created a network of common interests, 
as well as common responsibilities and 
obligations. 

In essence the primary requirements of the 
United States in the Far East may be thus 
simply set fortli : Complete respect by all pow- 
ers for the legitimate rights of the United 
States and of its nationals as stipulated by 
existing treaties or as provided by the gen- 



erally accepted tenets of international law; 
equality of opportunity for the trade of all 
nations; and, finally, respect for those inter- 
national agreements or treaties concerning the 
Far East to which the United States is a 
party, although with the expressed understand- 
ing that the United States is always willing to 
consider the peaceful negotiation of such modi- 
fications or changes in these agreements or 
treaties as may in the jtidgment of the sig- 
natories be considered necessary in the light of 
changed conditions. 

The Government of Japan, however, has de- 
clared that it intends to create a "new order 
in Asia". In this endeavor it has relied upon 
the instrumentality of armed force, and it has 
made it very clear that it intends that it alone 
shall decide to what extent the historic inter- 
ests of the United States and the treaty rights 
uf American citizens in the Far East are to 
be observed. 

As we here well know, many hundreds of 
incidents have occurred as a result of which 
the rights of this country and the rights of 
our nationals have been violated. 

On April 15 of this year, as a result of de- 
velopments in the European war, the Foreign 
ilinister of Japan, in a public statement, 
asserted that Japan desired the maintenance 
of the sfatiw quo of the Netherlands East In- 
dies. On April 17 the Secretary of State made 
a statement on behalf of the United States 
expressing the belief of this Government that 
the best interests of all nations called for 
maintenance of the status quo in the entiie 
Pacific area.^ On repeated occasions since 
then official spokesmen for the Japanese Gov- 
ei'nment have reiterated their desire for the 
maintenance of the present status of the 
Netherlands East Indies, and have .further 
specifically declared that this policy applied 
not only to the Netherlands East Indies, but 
to French Indochina as well. Nevertheless, 
and notwithstanding these official declarations, 
we are all familiar with the events of the past 
week which have culminated in measures 



""Sec the Bulletin of April 20, 1940 (vol. II, no. 43), 
p. 411, 



SEPTEMBER 28, 1940 



249 



undertaken by the Japanese military foi'ces 
which threaten the integrity of the French 
colony. 

From the standpoint of reason, of common 
sense, and of the best practical mterests of all 
of the powers possessing interests in the Far 
East, there is no problem presented which could 
not be peacefully solved through negotiation. 
provided there existed a sincere desii'e on the 
part of all concerned to find an equitable and 
a fair solution which would give just recogni- 
tion to the rights and to the real needs of all 
concerned. 

As the weeks pass, tides of anarchy and of 
chaos are threatening to engulf the continent 
of Europe. 

We have seen during the past 18 months the 
disappearance or the armed occupation of 
Czechoslovakia, Poland, Norway, Denmark, 
Holland, Belgium, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia; 
the defeat and partial occupation of the great 
Rei)ublic of France; the dismemberment, 
through the threat of force, of Kumania; and 
the spoliation, after an heroic resistance, <;f llie 
Republic of Finland. 

Warfare has now engulfed the Mediterranean 
region and threatens to s])read to the Near 
East. 

Alone, the British people, with a heroism 
which is worthy of the finest traditions of that 
brave people, are defending successfully their 
homes and their liberties — which are the same 
liberties which free men cherish everywhere. 

It is the policy of your Government, as ap- 
proved by the Congress of the United States, 
and, I believe, by the overwhelming majority of 
the American people, to render all material sup- 
port and assistance, through the furnishing of 
supplies and munitions, to the British Govern- 
ment and to the Governments of the British 
Dominions in what we hope will be their suc- 
cessful defense against armed aggression. 

It is becoming trite to say that what we are 
witnessing in the world today is not a world 
war but a world i-evolution. It is indeed an 
attempt at world revolution, a revolution in the 
sense that we are seeing a new manifestation of 
the age-old struggle of the lowest that is in 

264355 — 40 2 



himian nature against the highest, of barbarism 
against civilization, of darlcness against light. 

There is no question that the errors of omis- 
sion and of commission during the years which 
succeeded the negotiation of the Treaty of Ver- 
sailles and the other treaties arising from the 
World War paved the way for the vast confla- 
giation which we see today, but there is equally 
no question that during the five years which 
preceded the Munich agreements the Govern- 
ment of the United States did everything within 
its power to avert the final calamity. When the 
record is ultimately assayed, I believe this truth 
will be recognized. 

There could be no better demonstration of 
the purposes and of the beliefs of this Govern- 
ment than in the words which the President 
addressed to the Chiefs of the Governments 
directly concerned, at the time of the Czecho- 
slovak crisis, on September 26, 1938. He said : 

''The fabric of peace on the continent of Eu- 
rope, if not throughout the rest of the world, 
is in immediate danger. The consequences of 
its rupture are incalculable. Should hostilities 
break out the lives of millions of men, women 
ajid children in every country involved will 
most certainly be lost luider circumstances of 
mispeakable horror. 

"The economic system of every country in- 
volved is certain to be shattered. The social 
structure of every country involved may well 
be completely wrecked. 

"The traditional policy of the United States 
has been the furtherance of the settlement of 
international disputes by pacific means. It is 
my conviction that all people under the threat 
of war today pray that peace may be made 
before, rather than after, war." * 

In a further message sent to the German Chan- 
celor on September 27, the President said: 

"Present negotiations still stand open. They 
can be continued if you will give the word. 
Should the need for supplementing them become 
evident, nothing stands in the way of widening 

'See Press Releases of October 1, 1938 (vol. XIX, 
no. 470), pp. 2ia-220. 



250 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



their scope into a conference of all the nations 
directly interested in the present controversy. 
Such a meeting to be held immediately — in some 
neutral spot in Europe — would offer the oppor- 
tunity for this and correlated questions to be 
solved in a spirit of justice, of fair dealing, and, 
in all human probability, with greater per- 
manence." '^ 

If the nations directly interested in that con- 
troversy, including Czechoslovakia, had sat 
around the council table in some neutral city, oil 
equal terms, with no single one of them under 
the threat of aggression, as the President urged, 
the way might well have been paved for the 
avoidance of today's calamity. 

We as a nation face today as grave a danger 
as our people have confronted during the cen- 
tury and a half of tiicir independent life. We 
are confronting the emergency, however, I be- 
lieve, with vision, with courage, and with 
determination. 

Our security has been vastly enhanced by the 
relations of confidence and of trust which we 
have with all of the American republics, and 
through the strengthening of our traditional 
ties of understanding with our neighbor, the 
great Dominion of Canada. Our ability to repel 
aggression is likewise greatly increased by the 
naval and air bases which Ave have now leased 
from Great Britain, and our rearmament pro- 
gram is being carried on with efficiency and 
dispatch. 



We are profiting by the lessons which we 
have learned from the experience of others. We 
must increase our armed strength until the New 
World is unassailable. 

We must, and I believe we will, successfully 
repel any threat to the peace of this hemisphere. 

The lights of civilization are fast dimming in 
many other parts of the world. 

While your Government must continue in the 
future, as it has in the past, to prepare for all 
eventualities, this Nation must at the same time 
be ready, when the time comes, to aid in the 
construction of that kind of a world peace based 
on justice and on law through which alone can 
our security be fully guaranteed. 

I shall alwaj's remember that day last March, 
during the course of the mission in Europe with 
which the President had entrusted me, when I 
left London by plane on a day of blinding snow. 
I had with me Carl Sandburg's splendid life of 
Lincoln, and as I opened the volume my eyes 
first rested on these immortal phrases of the 
Second Inaugural : "Fondly do we hope — fer- 
vently do we pray — that this mighty scourge of 
war may speedily pass away" and "to do all 
Mhich may achieve and cherish a just and a 
lasting peace among oui'selves, and with all 
nations." 

As we arm with all haste and vigor to guard 
our New World from threatened danger, I can 
conceive of no nobler hope and exhortation in 
our course as a nation than those which are con- 
tained in these words. 



CONTROL OF IRON AND STEEL SCRAP EXPORTS 



[Released to the press by the White House September 26] 

The President has approved the early estab- 
lishment of additional controls of the exporta- 
tion of iron and steel scrap with a view to 
conserving the available supply to meet the rap- 
idly expanding requirements of the defense pro- 
gram in this country. 

Effective October 15, 1940 nil outstanding bal- 
ances of licenses which have been granted pur- 



• See ibid., p. 224. 



suant to the existing regulations of July 26, 
1940 for the exportation of No. 1 heavy melting 
steel scrap will be revoked. On October 16, 
1940 the exportation of all grades of iron and 
steel scrap will be placed under the licensing 
system. 

Under the new regulations which will be 
made effective on October 16, 1940, licenses will 
be issued to permit shipments to the countries 
of the Western Hemisphere and Great Britain 
only. 



SEPTEMBER 28, 1940 

ALLIANCE BETWEEN GERMANY, ITALY, AND JAPAN 

Statement by the Secretary of State 



251 



[Released to the press September 27) 

At his press conference todiiy, in response to 
inquiries, the Secretary of State said: 

"The reported agreement of alliance does not, 
in the view of the Governniont of the United 
States, snhstantially alter a situation which has 
existed for several years. Announcement of 
the alliance merely makes clear to all a relation- 



ship which has long existed in effect and to 
which this Government has repeatedly called 
attention. Tliat such an agreement has been 
in process of conclusion has been well known 
for some time, and that fact has been fully 
taken into account by the Govcrmnent of the 
United States in the detennining of this coun- 
try's policies." 



WASHINGTON NATIONAL AIRPORT 

Remarks of the President " 



[Released to the press by the White House September 28] 

First of all, I make this signal to the Army 
and the Navy that tlies: 

"Well done ! The Commander-in-Chief's 
compliments and thanks to all hands". 

The roar above us of American airplane 
engines in hundreds of American planes is 
symbolic of our determination to build up a 
defense on sea, on land, and in the air capable 
of overcoming any attack. They represent in 
a small way the power we ultimately must 
have — and will soon have. Rather let me de- 
scribe this as just a gratifying flexing of the 
kind of fighting muscle democracy can and 
does produce. 

They are here upon a peaceful mission. We 
all hope that their missions will always be in 
the ways of peace. We shall strive with all 
of our energies and skills to see to it that they 
are never called upon for missions of war. 
But the more of them we have the less likely 
we are to have to use them — the less likely are 
we to be attacked from abroad. 

Here, in this broad Potomac Vallej', George 
Washington and the other fathers sought to 
place the Nation's capital at a center of the 
then channels of transportation. There was 



* Delivered in connection with the laying of the 
cornerstone of the Administration Building of the 
Washington National Airport, September 28, 1940. 



long dispute about the plan. So, too, there 
has been long dispute about the plan for this 
airport, which will make the capital again the 
hub of transportation by air. A proper and 
adequate flying field has been a AVashington 
problem since the Wrights had their first crash 
on the parade ground at Fort Myer 30 years 
ago. We might go even further back, indeed, 
and say the problem has existed ever since Dr. 
Langley tried to fly his "Aerodrome" from a 
barge anchored just below us here in the 
Potomac. 

Two years ago the problem became so acute 
as, literally, to give me bad dreams. So, upon 
the passage of the Civil Aeronautics Act, one 
of the first tasks I asked of the new agency 
was the creation of an adequate airport for 
the Nation's capital. 

That was in August. On November 19, 1938, 
I watched a dredge bring the first mucky soil 
from beneath some 10 feet of water very near 
tlie spot where we now stand. They told me this 
field would be usable within two years. Today, 
well within that promise, the field was used. It 
will be in regular use within three more months. 
And Assistant Secretary Hinckley tells me that 
it will be so extensively used, because of the 
growth of civil aviation during these two years, 
that already we must begin to plan other sub- 
sidiary airports for Washington as we must 
do throughout the Nation. 



252 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



For proof of the value of the growth of avia- 
tion to the Nation's defense, we can make com- 
parisons with Washington's day. He had a 
citizenry ready to spring to arms because nearly 
every citizen had arms and knew how to use 
them. Every gentleman wore a sword and every 
farmer had a musket which he used almost 
daily to bring food to his table. But two years 
ago less than 25,000 of our people — only one 
fiftieth of one percent of the population — knew 
how to fly an airplane. If only that proportion 
of the American people had known how to use 
a musket in Washington's day the Continental 
Army would have consisted of little more than 
a corporal's guard. 

Today 50,000 young Americans are licensed 
flyers, and the number is growing by almost 
2,000 a month. They are not all military pilots — 
but they are as ready to become military pilots 
as were the farmers of Washington's day to be- 
come riflemen of the line. Whereas two years 
ago not more than a quarter of a million of our 
people used the airlines and private planes to 
travel in, that number — the number of citizens 
at least familiar with the airplane — has doubled 
and will soon be tripled. 

That is why an airport like this is important 
to the national defense. That is why this air- 
port, soon to be one of the world's greatest 
facilities, surely its most convenient and prob- 
ably its most beautiful, should be brought with 
all possible emphasis to the attention of our 
people during this awakening of America to 
the needs of national defense. This airport and 
many others which we hope will follow will 
draw free men freely to use a peacetime imple- 
ment of commerce which, we hope, will never 
be converted to wartime service. 

Our newspapers and the radio tell us day after 
day how increasingly important aircraft has 
become both as a weapon in the hands of aggres- 
sors and to those who light for their continued 
national existence. These reports easily explain 
why these squadrons of the Army and Navy air 
forces, the thunder of which still rings in our 
ears, were a prelude to the ceremonies here this 
afternoon — a prelude to the completion and 



operation today even of this civilian aviation 
center — the Washington National Airport. 



DOCUMENTATION REQUIREMENTS 
OF CERTAIN ALIENS 

The following regulation has been codified 
under Title 22: Foreign Relations (Chapter I: 
Department of State), in accordance with the 
requirements of the Federal Register and the 
Code of Federal Regulations ■' 

Part 65 — Visas ; Documents Required or Bona 
Fide Alien Seamen Entering the United 
States 

§ 65.51 Waiver of creio list visa requirements. 
Under the emergency provisions of section 30 
of the Alien Registration Act, 1940, and of 
Executive Order No. 8429,' of June 5, 1940, the 
crew list visa requirements are waived for ves- 
sels sailing between ports of the United States 
and Canada and Newfoundland which do not 
touch at ports of other countries. (Sec. 30, 
Public, No. 670, 76th Cong., 3d sess., approved 
June 28, 1940; E. O. 8429, June 5, 1940) 

CoRDELL Hull, 
Secretary of State. 
September 16, 1940. 

[Departmental Order No. 880] 



EXECUTIVE ORDER PRESCRIBING SE- 
LECTIVE SERVICE REGULATIONS 

On September 23, 1940, the President signed 
Executive Order No. 8545 prescribing selective 
service regulations governing the administration 
of the Selective Training and Service Act, ap- 
proved September 16, 1940. The text of the 
Executive order appears in the Federal Register 
for September 25, 1940 (vol. 5, no. 187) , pages 
3779-3791. 



' 5 F. R. 2145. 



SEPTEMBER 28, 1940 



253 



DEFENSE COMMUNICATIONS BOARD 



[Released to the press by the White House September 24] 

The purpose of the Defense Communications 
Board, created today by Executive order,* is 
to coordinate the relationship of all branches of 
communication to the national defense. 

The Defense Communications Board was ini- 
tiated jointly by the various Government de- 
partments and agencies having a vital interest 
in this phase of the preparedness program. 
The Board is basicallj' a planning agency, with- 
out operating or procurement functions. As 
such it is charged with the important duty of 
charting the utilization and control of our com- 
munication systems in the best interests of the 
national security. 

The Board will have no power to censor radio 
or other communications or to take over any 
facilities. 

This task of planning is not confined to radio 
broadcasting, but also embraces common car- 
riers such as commercial radiotelephone and 
radiotelegraph, as well as other telephone, tele- 
graph, and cable facilities. 

The Board does not propose to interfere with 
the normal operation of broadcasting or other 
forms of communication any more than is nec- 
essary for the national protection. Through 
correlated planning, it will seek to gear the 
great and strategically valuable American com- 
munications system, in both the domestic and 
international fields, to meet any situation the 
national interest may require. 

The various branches of the communications 
industr}' will cooperate in an advisory capacity 
with the Board, which will be composed of the 
Chairman of the Federal Communications Com- 
mission, the Chief Signal Officer of the Army, 
the Director of Naval Communications, an As- 
sistant Secretary of State, and an Assistant Sec- 
retary of the Treasury. Wliere the activities 



of the Board impinge upon any functions of 
Government departments, representatives of 
such departments will be placed upon appro- 
priate committees. 

The Board has had the cooperation of the 
radio industry in the preparation of this order. 
With industry cooperation, the Board will ap- 
point committees from every branch of com- 
munications — broadcast and other radio serv- 
ices, cable, telegraph, and telephone — as well as 
from labor groups. All plans involving the 
utilization of private facilities, or requiring in- 
dustry cooperation, will be adopted only after 
consultation with such industry representatives, 
and the particular private companies whose 
properties may be involved. 



The Far East 



'No. 8546. For text see the Federal Register for 
September 26, 1940 (vol. 5, no. 188), pp. 3817-3S18, and 
the Federal Register for September 27, 1940 (vol. 5, 
no. 189), p. 3827. 



DEVELOPMENTS IN FRENCH 
INDOCHINA 

[Released to the press September 23] 

In response to inquiries at the press confer- 
ence today, the Secretary of State said : 

"Events are transpiring so rapidly in the 
Indochina situation that it is impossible to get a 
clear picture of the minute-to-minute develop- 
ments. It seems obvious, however, that the 
status quo is being upset and that this is being 
achieved under duress. The position of the 
United States in disapproval and in deprecation 
of such procedures has repeatedly been stated." 

[Released to the press September 23] 

This Government has not at any time or in 
any way approved the French concessions to 
Japan. The attitude of this Government 
toward developments in French Indochina is as 
expressed by the Secretary of State this morn- 
ing and in previous public statements. 



American Republics 



EXCHANGE PROFESSORS AND STUDENTS 



[Released to the press September 24 J 

Under the terms of the Convention for the 
Promotion of Iiiter-American Cultural Rela- 
tions,^ the United States has now arranged 
exchanges of students and professors with nine 
of the American republics. Ten graduate stu- 
dents from the other American republics have 
been selected for study in the United States, 
and four additional students will soon be 
chosen. Eight graduate students and three 
professors from the United States have been 
invited to study and teach in other American 
countries. These arrangements have been 
made between the United States and the Gov- 
ernments of Chile, Costa Rica, the Dominican 
Republic, Guatemala, Haiti, Nicaragua, Pan- 
ama, Paraguay, and Venezuela. In addition, 
the United States has been informed that the 
Governments of Brazil and Peru will under- 
take similar arrangements in the near future. 
Plans for these exchanges have been worked 
out jointly by the Department of State and 
the Office of Education of the Federal Security 
Agency. 

The American graduate students include 
Miss Dorothy Field, of Phillips, Maine, and 
Miss Esther Matthews, of Denver, Colo., who 
have gone to Chile; Miss Edith Alida Bron- 
son, of Evanston, 111., who goes to Costa Rica; 
Mr. Charles Christian Hauch, of Chicago, 111., 
and Mr. Joseph John Montllor, of New York, 
N. Y., who go to the Dominican Republic (Mr. 
Montllor has sailed for Ciudad Trujillo) ; Mr. 
James S. Triolo, Jr., of Alameda, Calif., who 
goes to Panama, and Dr. George William Lut- 
termoser, of Detroit, Mich., who has gone to 
Venezuela. In addition, the Government of 
Costa Rica has selected a second graduate 
student, Mr. Don H. Walther. Mr. Walther 



9 Treaty Series No. 928. 
254 



is a teaching fellow at the University of North 
Carolina and proposes for his research project 
to make a study of the life and works of the 
historian, Ricardo Fernandez-Guardia. 

The three American professors selected are 
Dr. Charles C. Griffin, of Vassar College, whose 
appointment was announced on August 19 and 
who sailed for Venezuela on September 6, 1940 ; 
Dr. John Ashton, of the Agricultural and 
Mechanical College of Texas, College Station, 
Tex., who will sail for Nicaragua on September 
28, 1940, and Dr. Carroll William Dodge, of 
Washington University, St. Louis, Mo., who is 
exi^ected to leave for Guatemala within a few 
months. 

John Ashton, Ph. D., associate professor of 
agricultural journalism at the Agricultural and 
Mechanical College of Texas, has been selected 
by the Government of Nicaragua as exchange 
professor. He received the degree of Bachelor 
of Science from the Agricultural and Meclian- 
ical College of Texas and the degrees of Master 
of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy from the 
University of Missouri. Dr. Ashton is the 
author or co-author of several books dealing 
with tlie history of farm animals, as well as of 
several historical treatises. He has also con- 
tributed many articles to various agricultural 
journals, based on travel and research in the 
rural communities of the United States and 
EurojDe. While in Nicaragua Dr. Ashton will 
lecture in agricultural history and agricultural 
journalism. 

Carroll William Dodge, Ph. D., professor of 
botany at Washington University, St. Louis, 
Mo., has been selected by the Government of 
Guatemala as exchange professor. Professor 
Dodge was born in Danby, Vt., was awarded his 
Bachelor of Arts degree by Middlebury College 
in 1915, and in 1918 received the degree of Doc- 
tor of Philosophy from Washington University. 



SEPTEMBER 28, 1940 



255 



From 1919 to 1921 he was an instructor and 
assistant professor at Brown University; from 
1921 to 1931 he was an instructor and assistant 
professor at Harvard University; and since 
1931 he has been professor of botanj^ at Wash- 
ington University. He is the co-author of 
Comparatire Morphologij of Fungi and the 
author of Medical Mycologij. While in Guate- 
mala Professor Dodge will give technical lec- 
tures on mycology, plant pathology, and 
lichens, and popular lectures on botany and 
education in the United States, and will conduct 
research on the lichens and certain groups of 
fungi of the country, as well as on local plant 
diseases. 

In addition, the Governments of Chile, Costa 
Kica, the Dominican Republic, and Peru have 
indicated their desire to receive a professor from 
the United States, and negotiations are now 
in process. 

Arrangements have been made for students 
to come to the United States from Chile, the 
Dominican Republic, Panama, and Paraguay. 
The students from Chile as already announced 
are Senor Jorge del Canto Schram, of Santiago ; 
Senora Maria Marchant de Gonzalez Vera, of 
Santiago; Senor Carlos E. Salazar Justiniano, 
of Santiago ; Senor Leopoldo Seguel Fuentes, of 
Yungay (Nuble). In addition, fellowships have 
been awarded to two Dominican students. Oscar 
Rafael Batlle-Moi-el and Americo Alejandro 
Martinez y Martinez. Senor Martinez will 
carry out studies in construction with reinforced 
concrete and in the resistance of materials. 
Senor Batlle-Morel will carry on medical 
studies, specializing in eye, ear, nose, and 
throat. 

The two Panamanian students who have re- 
ceived fellowships are Sefior Cesar Augusto 
Quintero C. and Seiior Diego Manuel Domin- 
guez-Caballero. Seiior Quintero recently ob- 
tained his degree in law and political science 
from the National University of Panama and 
plans to continue his studies of international 
law under the fellowship. Seiior Domfnguez 
was graduated with honors in philosophj' and 
letters from the National University of Panama 
in 1939 and has been active in student affairs. 



He will take a specialized course in American 
history under his fellowship. 

Fellowships have also been awarded by the 
Government of the United States to two Para- 
guayan students, Julio C. Chenii-Bordon and 
Juan Guillermo Peroni. Doctor Chemi-Bordon 
is pediatrician at the Anti-Tuberculosis Dis- 
pensary of Asuncion and associate professor of 
pediatrics of the Faculty of Medicine at 
Asuncion. He is a member of several Para- 
guaj'an medical societies and the author of a 
number of articles in his field of interest. He 
plans to pursue special studies in pediatrics, 
puericulture, and child nutrition at the Univer- 
sity of Chicago. Senor Peroni holds the degree 
of law and social sciences and is at present pro- 
fessor of commercial law in the National School 
of Asuncion. He plans to pursue studies in 
finance and political law in this countrj'. 

Moreover, the Governments of Costa Rica 
and Haiti have submitted panels of graduate 
students which are now under consideration 
by the United States. Two additional govern- 
ments, those of Brazil and of Peru, have signi- 
fied their intention of soon initiating arrange- 
ments for exchanges. 

The present status of exchanges under the 
Convention for the Promotion of Inter-Ameri- 
can Cultural Relations is therefore as follows: 

The Government of Brazil has officially noti- 
fied this Government of its intention to inaugu- 
rate exchanges in the near future. 

The Government of Chile has awarded fel- 
lowships to two American students, and the 
Government of the United States has awarded 
fellowships to four Chilean students. Chile 
is also negotiating for an American professor. 

The Government of Costa Rica has awarded 
fellowships to two American students, and the 
Government of the United States will shortly 
award two fellowships to Costa Eican students. 
Costa Rica is also negotiating for an American 
professor. 

The Government of the Dominican Republic 
has awarded fellowships to two American stu- 
dents, and the Government of the United States 
has awarded fellowsliips to two Dominican stu- 



256 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULIiETIN 



dents. The Dominican Government is also 
negotiating for an iVmerican professor. 

The Government of Guatemala has selected 
an American professor. 

The Repuhlic of Haiti has submitted a panel 
of students for consideration by the United 
States. 

The Government of NicaTagua has selected 
an American professor and negotiations are in 
process for the exchange of students. 

The Government of Panama has awarded a 
fellowship to an American student, and the 
Government of the United States has awarded 
fellowships to two Panamanian students. 

Fellowships have been awarded by the United 
States to two students from the Republic of 
Paragnay. 

The Government of Pern has notified the 
United States that it will shortly initiate ex- 
change arrangements. 

The Government of Venezuela has selected an 
American professor, who is now in Venezuela, 
and has awarded a fellowship to an American 
student. 

The Buenos Aires convention was signed by 
each of the 21 American republics at the Inter- 
Americai: Conference for the Maintenance of 
Peace, held in Buenos Aires in 1936, and has 
been ratified by 13 countries. The exchange 
program is directed toward the development of 
a more realistic understanding between the peo- 
ples of the Western Hemisphere. Emphasiz- 
ing the essential reciprocity of cultural 
relations, tlie exchanges are designed to make 
available to the people of the other American 
republics a moi'e accurate knowledge of the 
progress of science, the humanities, the tech- 
nology, and the artistic achievements of the 
United States. In receiving the visiting 
professors, teachers, and graduate students 
from those nations, the program affords a sim- 
ilar diffusion in this country of the intellectual 
attainments of their people. 

The expenses involved in the exchange pro- 
gram are shared by the participating govern- 



ments. The nominating governments will pay 
the round-trip travel costs of students, together 
with other incidental expenses. The receiving 
government will pay tuition, subsidiai-y ex- 
penses, and board and lodging at the institu- 
tions in which the visiting students are enrolled. 
The Department of State has been assisted in 
choosing the panels of students and professors 
by a Committee on Exchange Fellowships and 
Professorships. This committee, in collabora- 
tion with the Department and with the United 
States Office of Education of the Federal Se- 
curity Agency, drew up the standards and 
application forms for fellowships and profes- 
sorships under the convention. The minimum 
requirements were designed to assure the two- 
fold purpose of making available to the quali- 
fied student in this country opportunity to 
])iu-sue advanced study in the other American 
republics and to afford opportunity for appli- 
cations from all sections of the United States. 



HABANA CONVENTION OF 
JULY 30, 1940 

X message from the President to the Senate 
transmitting the Habana Convention of July 
30, 1940, together with a report of the Secretary 
of State concerning the convention and "Act of 
Habana", appears in this Bulletin under the 
Iieading "Ti'eaty Information". 



FINANCIAL CONVENTION WITH DO- 
MINICAN REPUBLIC 

An announcement regarding a convention 
with the Dominican Republic revising the con- 
vention of 1924 appears in this Bulletin under 
the heading "TreatA- Information". 



Europe 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 



[Released to the press September 28] 

Tlie following tabulation shows contributions 
collected and disbui-sed during the period Sep- 
tember 6, 1939, through August 31, 1940, as 
shown in the reports submitted by persons and 
organizations registered with the Secretary of 
State for the solicitation and collection of con- 
tributions to be used for relief in belligerent 
countries, in conformity with the regulations 
issued pursuant to section 8 of the act of Novem- 
ber 4, 1939, as made effective by the President's 
proclamation of the same date. 

This tabulation has reference only to contri- 
butions solicited and collected for relief in bel- 
ligerent countries (France; Germany; Poland; 
the United Kingdom, India, Australia, Canada, 
New Zealand, and the Union of South Africa; 
Norway; Belgium; Luxemburg; the Nether- 
lands; and Italy) or for the relief of refugees 



driven out of these countries by the present 
war. The statistics set forth in the tabulation do 
not include information regarding relief activi- 
ties which a number of organizations registered 
with the Secretary of State may be carrying on 
in non-belligerent countries, but for which reg- 
istration is not required under the Neutrality 
Act of 1939. 

The American National Ked Cross is required 
by law to submit to the Secretary of War for 
audit "a full, complete, and itemized report of 
receipts and expenditures of whatever kind". 
In order to avoid an unnecessary duplication of 
work, this organization is not required to con- 
form to the provisions of the regulations 
governing the solicitation and collection of con- 
tributions for relief in belligerent countries, and 
the tabulation does not, therefore, include infor- 
mation in regard to its activities. 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries 



Name of registrant, locatiOD, date of registratioD, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Uneipended 
balance as of 
Aug. 31, 1940. 

including 

cost of goods 

purchased 

and still 

on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con 
tributions in 

kind now 
on hand 



Acci6n Domocrata Espafiola, San Francisco, Calif., Mar. 29, 
1940. France.- 

Allied Relief Ball, Inc., New York, N. Y.. Apr. 4, 1940. Great 
Britain and France 

Allied Relief Fund, New York, N. Y., June 4, 1940. United 

Kingdom, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Norway.. . 
American Association for Assistance to French Artists, Inc., 

New York, N. Y., Jan. 3, 1940. France _. 

American Association of University Women, Washington, 

D. C, May 23, 1940. France and Great Britain 

American Auxiliary Committee dc L'Union des Femmes de 

France, New York, N. Y., Nov. 8, 1939. France and Great 

Britain 

American Board of Missions to the Jews, Inc., Brooklyn, N. Y., 

July 5, 1940. France, Belgium, and Germany 

American Civilian Volunteers, South Sudbury, Mass., May 27, 

1940.'" France 

American Committee for Christian Refugees, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Sept. 26, 1939. Germany and France. 



$267. 45 

52, 346. 35 

711,683.61 

12. 427. 26 

9, 770. 61 

18, 489. 07 
725.00 
None 

11,801.86 



.$125. 00 

38, 104. 00 

639, 105. 24 

7, 987. 58 
225.00 

8, 213. 35 
725.00 

None 
11,801.86 



$35.51 
12, 630. 85 
53, 953. 41 
3, 220. 67 

455. 87 

1,407.19 
None 
None 
None 



$106. 94 

1,611.50 

118,624.96 

1,219.01 

9, 089. 74 

8,868.53 
None 
None 
None 



None 

None 

$39, 259. 22 

1,605.15 

None 

3,285.20 
None 
None 
None 



None 
None 
$7, 109. 15 
None 
None 

347. 74 
None 
None 
None 



• No reports for the months of July and August have been received from this organization. 
264355 — 40 3 



257 



258 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtTLLETIN 
Contributions fob Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Aug. 31, 1940, 

including 

cost of goods 

purchased 

and still 

on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 

kind now 
on hand 


American Committee for the German Relief Fund, Inc., New 
v,^rb M V IVTnr 27 1940 Germany and Poland . 


$31, 672. 14 

30,302.61 

3, 239. 52 

None 

2, 647. 50 
295,685.76 

7, 301. 65 
39, 973. 55 
23. 734. 67 

2, 136. 27 
322, 896. 58 

6, 780. 59 

3, 1'20. 38 

94, 439. 77 

5, 206. 17 

14,731.13 

200.00 

3, 856. 60 
5.150.00 

1, 968, 703. 56 

637. 32 

1,977.26 

224,899.47 

1,060.33 

2, 580. 72 

1,750.20 

19, 381. 01 

10,915.68 


$20, 000. 00 

17, 721. 33 
3, 133. 02 

None 

None 

208.416.36 

3,024.85 

21, 736. 42 

18, 881. 32 

1. 367. 00 
146, 680. 94 

2. 856. 10 

659. 02 

88, 079. 35 

3. 786. 50 
9, 576. 70 

None 
None 
None 

1, S15, 506. 24 

417.45 

1, 010. 00 

105,971.82 

155. 74 

2,304.20 

789.32 

7.626.23 

6,500.00 


$5, 178. 90 

2, 081. 63 

101. 60 

None 

1, 486. 01 
10,587.07 

651. 41 
6, 732. 68 
4, 220. 79 
None 
31, 620. 08 
3.707.81 

2, 290. 66 

6, 360. 42 
366.05 
478. 49 
None 
1. 003. 45 
None 

153,197.31 

None 

40.28 

16, 135. 19 

269.02 

42.62 

664.33 

10,432.98 

248.68 


$6, 393. 24 

10, 499. 65 

6.00 

None 

1, 061. 89 

78,682.33 

3, 625. 39 

12, 504. 45 

632. 66 

779.27 

144. 295. 66 

216. 68 

170.70 

None 
1,053.62 
4,675.94 

200 00 
2,863.05 
6, 150. 00 

None 

219. 87 

926.98 

102, 792. 46 

625.67 

233.90 

296.55 

1,321.80 

4,167.00 


None 

$471.00 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

47, 764. 96 

19, 240. 00 

None 

11,266.11 

None 

None 

12,473.42 

4,911.50 

7, 383. 42 

None 

None 

None 

51.00 
760.00 
None 
1,500.00 
None 
None 
None 
17,118.89 
650.00 


None 


American Committee for the Polish Ambulance Fund, Chicago, 


None 


American Dental Ambulance Committee, New York, N. Y., 


None 


American Emergency Volunteer Ambulance Corps, Inc., New 
York. N. y., Jan. 25, 1940. Great Britain and France -. 

American Employment for General Relief, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., May I, 1940. England, France, Norway, Poland, 


None 
None 


American Field Service. New York. N. Y.. Sept. 27, 1939. 


None 


American and French Students' Correspondence Exchange. 


None 


American- French War Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 14, 


$1, 560. 31 


American Friends of Czechoslovakia, New York, N. Y., Nov. 

2, 1939. Great Britain, France, and Bohemia-Moravia- 

American Friends of the Daily Sketch War Relief Fund, New 

York N Y Dec 1 1939 Great Britain 


None 
None 


American Friends of France, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 21, 
1939 France -- 


8,469.96 


American Friends of German Freedom, New York, N. Y., July 
24 1940 ^ England and France 


None 


American Friends of a Jewish Palestine, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
May 9, 1940. Palestine, Germany, Poland, France, and 


None 


American Friends Service Committee, Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 
9, 1939. United Kingdom, Poland. Germany, France, Nor- 
way Belgium, and the Netherlands 


None 


The American Fund for Breton Relief, New York, N. Y., Oct. 
31,19.39. France - . -- 


None 


American Fund for French Wounded, Inc., Boston, Mass., Jan. 
3,1940. France and England 


270.00 


American Fund for Wounded in France, Inc., Worcester, Mass., 
Dec. 15, 1939. Franco 


None 


American German Aiil Society, Los Angeles, Calif., Nov. 15, 
1939. Germany 


None 


The American Hospital in Britain, Limited, New York, N. Y., 
July 24, 1940. Great Britain .- 


None 


The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, Inc., 
New York, N. Y.. Sept. 29, 1939. United Kingdom, Poland, 
Germany, France, Norway. Belgium, Laxemburg, and the 
Netherlands. 


None 


American McAlI Association, New York, N. Y., Jan. 3, 1940. 
France 


600.00 


American-Polish National Council, Chicago, III., Aug. 14, 1940. 
Poland ^ 


None 


American Volunteer Ambulance Corps, New York, N. Y., Dec. 
12, 1939. France, Belgium, Holland, and England 


1, 194. 20 


American War Godmothers, Pittsburgh, Pa., Mar. 6, 1940. 
France.. -. 


2.45 


American Women's Hospitals. New York, N. Y., Sept. 14, 
1939. France and England. 


None 


American Women's ITnit for War Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Jan. 15, 1940. France 


190.16 


American Women's Voluntary Services, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Feb. 13, 1940. England 


None 


Les Amis de la France 4 Puerto Rico. San Juan, P. R., Dec. 20, 
1939. Ffanoe 


107.77 



* The registration of this organization was revoked on July 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 



SEPTEMBER 2 8, 1940 

Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



259 



Name of repi.strant, location, datp of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relie' in 

countries 

named 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, aflairs. 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Aug 31.1940. 

including 
cost of goods 
purchased 
and still 
on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 

kind now 
on band 


Les AmltiSs FSminlnes de la France, New York, N. Y., Dec. 
19, 1939. France.- 


$1,200.91 

18, 725. 30 
18,021.66 

10,808.14 

5,169.00 

2,829.27 

9, 875. 75 

273.50 

190.57 

2. 050. 08 

12, 676. 23 

1,114.46 

1.473.18 

17, 110. 19 

8, 217. 55 
1,118.31 

6. 481. 17 

3,376.16 

8,988.20 

339,498.43 

6,163.88 

312,608.23 

1.253.71 

12,306.01 

877.25 

55,984.48 

22,718.06 

147,610.49 

544. 427. 80 

134,964.38 

477.64 

400.00 


$386.88 

8, 242. 33 
16, 983. 14 

7,000.00 

3,056.00 

2,600.00 

6, 766. 45 

226.00 

133.30 

1,000.00 

7,857.98 

992.00 

978.00 

5,339.00 

2,401.40 
None 

846.74 

703.15 

6,227.40 

166.324.31 

4,770.80 

73,002.21 

310.00 

8,998.89 

56.00 

39.095.06 

18, 203. 12 

122, 169. 12 

275,463.95 

27, 618. 18 

300.30 

None 


$322.19 

461. 11 

456.76 

288.45 
292.67 

7.50 
463. 10 
None 

7.07 

86.67 

679.99 

97.16 

156.34 

7,198.90 

1, 890. 92 
2.60 

943.66 

2,527.00 

2,546.96 

46.23 

732.24 

25,525.62 

178. 72 

1. 142. 76 

817. 45 

1,577.92 

80.33 

9, 428. 86 

68. 887. 70 

43. 609. 34 

164.67 

30.68 


$491.84 

10.021.86 
681.76 

3, 519. 69 
1, 820. 33 

221.77 

2,666.20 

48.60 

60.20 

964.41 

4, 138. 26 

28.30 

341.81 

4, 672. 29 

925.23 

1,115.81 

3,690.87 

146. 01 

213. 85 

173.127.89 

661.14 

214,080.40 

764.99 

2. 164. 36 

4.80 

15,311.60 

4,434.61 

16, 015. 51 

206, 086. 16 

63,826.86 

12.77 

.369. 42 


$164.00 

2,826.56 
None 

None 

None 

None 

1,430.00 

None 

None 

None 

1,565.88 

30.00 

None 

9,566.00 

33, 182. 60 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 
None 
1,285.00 
850.00 

18, 713. 77 
76.10 

14.160.22 
155, 737. 78 

87,468.90 
None 
None 


Nona 

$160.00 
None 

None 

None 
None 
None 


Les Anciens Combattants Franfsls de la Qrand Guerre, San 
Francisco, Calif., Oct. 26, 1939. Franco . 


Mrs. Larz Anderson. Boston, Mass., Dec. 12, 1939. France 

Anthracite Relief Committee, Wilkes-Barrc, Pa., Sept. 8, 1939. 
Poland 


Anzac War Relief Fund, New York, N. Y., May 23, 1940. 

Australia and New Zealand 


Associated Polish Societies Relief Committee of Webster, Mass., 
Webster, Mass.. Sept. 21, 1939. Poland _ 


Associated Polish Societies' Relief Committee of Worcester, 
Mass., Worcester, Mass., Sept. 14, 1939. Poland 

Association of Former Juniors in Franco of Smith College, New 
York, N. Y., Dec. 18, 1939. France 


Association of Former Russian Naval Officers in America, New 
York, N. Y.. Feb. 21, 1940. France . 




Association of Joint Polish-American Societies of Chelsea, 
Mass., Chelsea, Mass., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland 




L'Ateller, San Francisco, Calif., Jan. 29, 1940. France 

Mrs. Mark Baldwin, New York, N. Y., Mar. 4, 1940. France.. 
Basque Delegation in the United States of America, New York, 
N. Y., Doc. 19, 1939. France 


712.00 
None 


Belgian Relief Fund. Inc., New York, N. Y., June 14. 1940. 
Belgium, France, and England 


1. 363. 00 


Belgian Relief of Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif., May 
27, 1940. Belgium 


Belgian War Relief Fund, Manila, P. I., June 7, 1940.« Belgium. 

The Benedict Bureau Unit, Inc., New York, N. Y., Nov. 2«, 

1939. France 


None 


Beth Lechem, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 21, 1939. Poland, 
France, and England .... 


None 


Bethel Mission of Eastern Europe, Minneapolis, Minn., Nov. 
27, 1939. Poland . . 




Bishops' Committee for Polish Relief, Washington, D. C, 
Dec. 19, 1939. Poland 




Board of National Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America, New York, N. Y., Sept. 26, 1939. 




British-.^merican .Ambulance Corps, New York, N. Y., June 
11,1940. England and France 




British-.\merican Comfort League, Quincy, Mass., Feb. 21, 
1940. England 




British-American War Relief Association, Seattle, Wash., Nov. 


232.65 


British Sailors' Book and Relief Society, New York, N. Y., 

May 2, 1940. Bermuda, Canada, and the British West IndicS- 

British War Relief .\ssociation of Northern California. San Fran- 


None 
1, 235. 89 


The British War Relief Association of the Philippines, Manila, 
P. I , Apr. 11, 1940 ** All belligerent countries 


76.88 


The British War Relief Association of Southern California, Los 
.\ngeles, Calif , Dec 8 1939 Great Britain 


None 


British War Relief Society, Inc., New York, N. Y., Dec. 4, 1939. 

Great Britain, Newfoundland, and British East Africa 

Bundles for Britain, New York, N. Y., Dec. 28, 1939. Great 


3. 500. 00 
6, 397. 75 


Caledonian Club of Idaho, Boise, Idaho, Jan. 25, 1940. Scot- 
land 


None 


The Canadian Society of New York, New York, N. Y., Aug. 20, 
1940. Great Britain and Canada 


None 



' No complete report for the month of -August has been received from this organization. 
' No reports for the months of July and August have been received from this organization. 



260 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
CONTKIBOTIONS FOR RELIEF IN BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Aug. 31. 1940, 

including 
cost of goods 
purchased 
and still 
on band 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 

kind now 
on band 



Catholic Medical Mission Board, Inc., New York, N. Y., Jan. 17, 
1940. India, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the Union 
of South Africa-- - - 

The Catholic Student War Relief of Pax Romana, Washington, 
D. C, Dec. 13, 1939. Poland, France, Germany, and Great 
Britain 

Central Bureau for Relief of the E vangelical Churches of Europe, 
New York, N. Y., May 14, 1940. All belligerent countries 

Central Committee Knesseth Israel, New York, N. Y., Oct. 27, 

1939. Palestine 

Central Committee for Polish Relief, Toledo, Ohio., Feb. 29, 

1940. Poland... 

Central Council of Polish Organizations, New Castle, Pa., Nov. 

7, 1939. England, Poland, and France 

Centrala, Passaic, N. J., Oct. 12, 1939. Poland... ., 

Cercle Fran^ais de Ueattle, Seattle, Wash., Nov. 2, 1939. France 
and Great Britain 

Chester (Delaware Co., Pa.) Polish Relief Committee, Chester, 
Pa., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland and France... 

Children's Crusade for Children, Inc., New York, N. Y., Feb. 
3, 1940. France, Poland, and Germany 

Commission for Polish Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 12, 
1939.' Poland... 

The Commission for Relief in Belgium, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
May 21, 1940. Belgium and Luxemburg 

Committee for Aid to Children of Mobilized Men of the XX" 
Arrondissement of Paris, New York, N. Y., Jan. 15, 1940. 
France 

Committee of French-American Wives, New York, N. Y., 
Nov. 15, 1939. France and Great Britain 

Committee of Mercy, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 16, 1939. 
France, Great Britain, Norway, Belgium, the Netherlands, 
and their allies 

Committee for Relief in Allied Countries, Washington, D. C, 
Feb. 2, 1840. France, Great Britain, Poland, Norway, Bel- 
gium, Luxemburg, and the Netherlands 

Committee for the Relief for Poland, Seattle, Wash., Nov. 24, 1939. 
Poland 

Committee Representing Polish Organizations and Polish 
People in Perry, N. Y., Perry, N. Y., Oct. 23, 1939. Poland.. 

Czechoslovak Relief, Chicago, 111., July 25, 1940. Czechoslo- 
vakia, Great Britain and Dominions, France, and Belgium 

District of Columbia Federation of Women's Clubs, Washing- 
ton, D. C, .\ug. 14, 1940. Great Britain 

The Emergency Aid of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 
13, 1939. Great Britain, France, Norway, Belgium, Luxem- 
burg, and the Netherlands _ _ _ 

Emergency Rehef Committee for Kolbuszowa, New York, 
N. Y., Mar. 13, 1940. Poland 

Emergency Rescue Committee, New York, N. Y., Aug.3, 1940.^ 
France, United Kingdom, Belgium, Norway, and the Nether- 
lands 



$1,074.25 

1. 039. 84 

9, 923. 62 

29, 880. 20 

707. 00 

2, 655. 30 
1, 440. 72 

2, 549. 45 

6, 503. 32 

107, C61. 37 

315, 609. 43 

4, 790. 92 

4, 923. 40 
20, 145. 10 

54, 225. 52 

4, 523. 03 
2, 426. 23 

197.00 
2, 362. 75 

None 

37, 235. 38 
4, 933. 85 



None 

$809. 00 

6, 824. 00 

18, 676. 83 

600, 00 

1. 754. 00 
1, 300. 75 

668. 28 

5, 465. 46 

SO, 500. 00 

257, 455. 27 

4, 165. 00 

3, 365. 63 
10, 114. 33 

33, 704. 41 

2. 500. 00 
2, 162. 72 

197. 00 

2, 000. 00 

None 

21, 991. 70 
None 



None 

$135.41 

2, 085. 61 

11,203.37 

126. 82 

39.74 
11.65 

568. 96 

553. 17 

27, 104. 92 

46, 725. 18 

287. 90 

None 
2, 067. 70 

5, 840. 16 

1,806.60 
255. 71 
None 
None 
None 

6, 960. 47 
2, 226. 69 



$1,074.25 

95 43 

1,014.01 

None 

80.18 

761. 56 
128. 32 

1,332.21 

484. 69 

56.45 

11,328.98 

338. 02 

1, 667. 77 
7, 963. 07 

14, 680. 95 

217. 43 
7.80 

None 
362. 76 

None 

8, 283. 21 
2, 707. 26 



$3, 220. 00 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
1, 900. 00 

2, 775. 00 

1, 677. 30 

None 
1,500.00 

None 

None 
3,012.84 

1, 240. 00 

None 
None 
None 
8, 100. 00 
None 

7, 090. 03 
None 



$1, 050. 00 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

1,603.75 

None 

None 
None 
None 

None 
None 

None 
None 



English-Speaking Union of the United States, New York, N. Y., 
Dec. 26, 1939. Great Britain, Canada, possibly France 

Erste Pinchover Eranken Unterstuzungs Verein, Inc., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., Apr. 22, 1940. Poland 



275.00 



34, 351. 77 



None 



2, 617. 54 



None 



16,600.93 



275 00 



13, 506. 08 



None 



None 



• This registrant serves primarily as a clearinghouse for the distribution abroad of contributions received from other registrants; these receipts and 
disbursements are not included in the figures here given, since they are shown elsewhere in this tabulation following the names of the original collecting 
registrants. 

' No complete report for the month of August has been received from this organization. 



SEPTEMBER 28, 1940 

Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



261 



Name of roglstnmt, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

counti ies 

named 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Aug 31,1940, 

including 
cost of goods 
purchased 
and still 
on band 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 

kind now 
on band 



Federated Council of Polish Societies of Orand Haplds, Mich., 

Orand Rapids. Mich.. Sept. 15, 1939. Poland 

Federation of Franco-Belgian Clubs of Rhode Island, Woon- 

socket, R. I., Nov. 15, 1939. France and England 

Federation of French Veterans of the Great War, Inc., New 

York, N. Y., Oct. 11. 1939.' France 

Federation of Polish Jews in America, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Sept. 14, 1939. Poland 

Fellowship of Reconciliation, New York, N. Y., Jan. 20, 1940. 

France, England, and possibly Germany 

Fortra, Incorporated, New York, N. Y., March 7, 1940. Ger- 
many and Poland 

Foster Parents' Plan for War Children, Inc., Now York, N. Y., 

Sept. 21, 1939. Frant'e 

Foyers du Soldat, New York, N. Y., Mar. 2, 1940. France 

Franco-American Federation, Salem, Mass., July 9, 1910. 

France 

French Committee for Relief in France, Detroit, Micb., Oct. 

17, 1939. France and Great Britain 

French Relief .\ssociation, Kansas City, Mo., Feb. 3, 1940. 

France. 

French War Relief, Inc., Los Angeles, Calif. Nov. 18, 1939.« 

France... 

French War Relief Fund of Nevada, Reno, Nov., Jane 21, 1940. 

France 

French War Relief Fund of the Philippines (formerly L^vy, 

Ma-xlme), Manila, P. I., May 1, 1940.» France 

French War Veterans, Los Angeles, Calif., Dec. 6, 1939. France 
Friends of Children, Inc., New York, N. Y., June 13, 1940. 

Great Britain. France, Belgium, and the Netherlands 

The Friends of Israel Refugee Relief Committee, Incorporated. 

Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 23, 1939. Canada, France, and Eng- 



land.. 



The Friends of Normandy, New York, N. Y., Dec. 18, 1939. 
Franco... 

Friends of Poland, Chicago, ni. Dec. 6, 1939. Poland 

Fund for the Relief of Men of Letters and Scientists of Russia. 

New York. N. Y., Apr. 29, 1940. France, Czechoslovakia, and 

Poland - 

Funds for France, Inc., New York, N. Y., Aug. 14, 1940. France. 
General Gustav Orlicz Dreszer Foundation for Aid to Polish 

Children. Washington, D. C, Nov. 3, 1939. Poland.. 

General Taufliieb Memorial Relief Committee for France, Santa 

Barbara, Calif., Nov. 17, 1939. France and England 

German-.\merican Relief Committee for Victims of Fascism. 

New York, N. Y., Apr. 18, 1940. France and Great Britain. . 
Mrs. George OUliland. New York, N. Y., Aug. 10, 1940.* 

Northern Ireland,. 

Golden Rule Foundation, New York, N. Y., Nov. 2, 1939. 

Poland and Palestine... 

The Grand Duke Vladimir Benevolent Fond Association, New 

York, N. Y.. Jan. 8, 1940. France 

Grand Lodge, Daughters of Scotia, Hartford, Coim., Feb. 16, 

1940. Scotland... 

Great Lakes Command, Canadian Legion of the British Empire 

Service League. Detroit, Mich., July 5. 1940. Great Britain 

and Canada 

Greater New Bedford British War Relief Corps, New Bedford, 

Mass., Dec. 19, 1939. Great Britain 



$7, 286. 69 

4, 933. 88 

9.896.62 

6. 244. 30 

590.21 

306, 503. 02 

97, 494. 62 
0. 760. 22 

630.32 

3, 344. 26 

747.07 

33. 609. 80 

None 

796.96 
822.81 

5. 672. 80 

12,370.73 

2, 445. 50 
1,421.95 

520.63 
1,391.57 

894.45 

2, 424. 01 

1.298.07 

159.25 

None 

480.48 

7, 953. 91 

1,11.'). 00 
4, 695. 49 



$4, 450. 93 

1,892.49 

801.09 

5, 020. 75 

531.21 

219,391.16 

54,414.67 
3,920.00 

None 

1.011.72 

332.90 

20. 176. 49 

None 

None 
407.75 

317 09 

997.60 

1, 500. 00 
600.00 

96.15 
None 

400.00 

1,726.40 

276.30 

159.25 

None 

370. 79 

6, 512. 10 

None 
3,341.58 



$845.60 

410.50 

406.68 

376. 14 

None 

40, 568. 33 

19.414.20 
2, 585. 02 

None 

222.99 

112.96 

3, 500. 27 

None 

10.00 
171.66 



5, 477. 01 



160.00 
91.89 



6.10 
558.59 

325.04 
52.10 

443.94 
None 
None 
17.70 
None 

None 
352.23 



$1,989.16 

2, 630. 89 

8, 688. 75 

847.41 

59.00 

40, 543. .53 

23. 665. 75 
255.20 

630.32 
2, 109. 66 

301.21 
9,934.04 

None 

786.96 
243.40 

5, 024. 47 

5, 896. 12 

785.60 
730.06 

418.28 
832.98 

169. 41 

645.61 

577.83 

None 

None 

91.99 

1,441.81 

1,116.00 
1,001.68 



$3,200.00 
277.55 
664.70 

7, G51. 43 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

8, 567. 96 
531. 17 

None 

None 

None 
None 

4, 924. 62 

None 

None 
None 

None 
None 

None 

80.00 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
307. 43 



$100.00 

191. 21 

100.00 

6,000.00 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

19, 382. 02 

886.83 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 



' No complete report for the month of August has been received from this orgam'zstion. 

• No complete reports for the months of July and August have been received from this orsanlzation. 

* No report (or the month of August has been received from thlsorganization. 



262 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Aug. 31, 1940. 

Including 
cost of goods 
purchased 
and still 
on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 

kind now 
on hand 


Margaret-Oreble Oreenough (Mrs. Carroll Greenough), Wash- 


$1, 073. 00 
919. 324 79 

93, 571. 11 

1, 781. 89 

1, 126. 17 

18, 326. 03 
3, 403. 21 

827.06 
476. 74 

36,929.15 

None 
10,483.96 

3, 417. 80 

11,835. 10 
222. 25 

1, 222. 21 
3, 544. 97 
6, 070 52 

37, 586. 37 

8, 689. 66 
2,017.50 

19, 098. 47 
1,586.32 

314.60 
6, 367. 77 
2, 035. 62 
16, 487. 79 
21, 365. 99 


$445. 00 
595, 158. 74 

72,603.88 

1,775.00 

1, 049. 00 

2, 720. 00 
2, 400. 00 

283. 06 
None 

25,002.50 

None 
6,654.23 

2,361.00 

10,000.00 
25. 00 

892. 85 

2, 660, 00 
6, 066. 96 

30,395.00 

7,225.56 
1,540.00 

8, 597. 13 

None 

306.00 

3, 583. 45 
1,363.77 
9, 642. 00 

16.318.08 


None 
$29, 292. 03 

25, 010. 18 

6.89 

None 

127. 73 

61.63 

19.60 

None 

940. 17 

None 
3,844.38 

634. 95 

1, 6S0. 89 
7.56 

329.30 

322. 79 

13.56 

3, 229. 02 

831. 80 
None 

3,981.02 

366.61 

None 
1,420.21 

78.19 
2,411.85 

36.26 


$628. 00 
294, 874. 02 

None 

None 

77.17 

15, 478. 30 

941. ,58 

624. 41 

475. 74 

9, 986. 48 

None 
985. 36 

431.85 

154. 21 
189. 69 

None 
572. 18 
None 

3, 962. 36 

632. 30 
477. 50 

6, 520. 32 

1,218.71 

8.60 

364.11 

693. 66 

3,433.94 

6,011.65 


None 
$63,670.60 

None 

None 

None 

767.30 

185.00 

None 

None 

None 

None 
2,020.00 

None 

None 
None 

None 
None 
None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

2, 284'. 46 

None 

12,791.97 




Hadassah. Inc., New York, N. Y., Nov. 16, 1939. Palestine.... 
Hamburg-Bremen Steamship Agency, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Mar 21 1940 Germany and Poland 


$122. 91 


Hebrew Christian Alliance of America, Chicago, lU., Jan. 3, 




Holy Rosary Polish Roman Catholic Church, Passaic, N. J., 
Sept. 15, 1939.' Poland 




A. Seymour Houghton, Jr., et ah. New York, N. Y., Nov. 27, 




Humanitarian Work Committee, Glen Cove, N. Y., Sept. 30, 




Independent British War Relief Society of Rhode Island, Green- 




Independent Kinsker Aid Association, Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan. 3, 
1940. Poland 


None 


International Committee of Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tions, New York, N. Y., Sept. 22, 1939. Poland, France, 
India. Norway, Belgium, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, 
Canada and the United Kingdom 




International Federation of Business and Professional Women, 
New York, N. Y., July 6, 1940. Poland, Czechoslo\akia, 
Norway, Belgium, France, and the Netherlands 


None 


Internationa! Relief Association for Victims of Fiscism, New 
York, N. Y., Sept. 25, 1939. France, England, and Germany. 

Joint Committee of the United Scottish Clans of Greater New 
York and New Jersey, Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan. 30, 1940. Scot- 
land 


None 


Junior Relief Group of Te.xas, Houston, Tex., May 29, 1940. 

United Kingdom, France, Netherlands, Belgium, and Norway. 
Marthe Th. Knhn, New York, N. Y., Apr. 16, 1940. France.. . 
The Kindergarten Unit, Inc., Norwalk, Conn., Oct. 3, 1939. 

France, Poland, United Kingdom, India, Australia, and New 


None 
None 


The Kosciuszko Foundation, Inc., New York, N. Y., May 24, 
1940. Poland . . _ 


None 


Kuryer Publishing Company, Milwaukee, Wis., Sept. 16, 1939. 




Der Kyflhaeuserbund, League of Genpan War Veterans in 
U. S. A., Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 27, 1939. Poland, Germany, 




Pa.. Sept. 15, 1939. Poland „ 


None 


Lafayette Fund, New York, N. Y., Jan. 2, 1940.' France 

LaFayette Preventorium, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 21, 1939. 
France 


None 
None 


La France Post American Legion, New York, N. Y., Feb. 7, 
1940. France and Great Britain 




Mrs. Nancy Bartlett Laughlin, New York, N. Y., Jan. 31, 1940. 




League of American Writers, Inc., New York, N. Y., May 6, 
1940. France. England, Poland, and Norway 


None 


League of Polish Societies of New Kensington, Arnold and 
Vicinity, New Kensington, Pa., Nov. 17, 1939. Poland 

Legion of Young Polish Women, Chicago, HI., Oct. 2, 1939. 
Poland 


115.55 
None 


The Little House of Saint Pantaleon, Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 
30, 1939. France and England 


691. 75 



' The registration of this organization was revoked on June 30, 1940, at the request of registrant. 
' No report for the month of August has been received from this organization. 



SEPTEMBER 2 8, 194 

Contributions fob Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



263 



Namo of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, aflairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Uneipended 
balance as of 
Aug. 31. 1940, 

including 
cost of goods 
purchased 
and still 
on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 

kind now 
on hand 



, July 



The Louisiana Guild for British Relief, New Orleans, La. 

24, 1940. British Empire 

The Maple Leaf Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y., Apr. 19, 1940. 

Canada, United Kingdom, and France.-. 

Massachusetts Relict Committee for Poland, Worcester, Mass., 

Nov. 9, 1939. Poland -- --- 

Medical and Surgical Supply Committee, New York, N. Y., 

Aug. 5, 1940. Poland, Great Britain, France, Netherlands, 

Norway, Lusemburg. and Belgium 

Mennonito Central Committee, Akron, Pa., Feb. 13, 1940. 

Great Britain, Poland, Germany, and France 

Milford, Connecticut. Polish Relief Fund Committee, Milford, 

Conn., Nov. 6. 1939. Poland 

Kate R. Miller. New York, N. Y., Feb. 19, 1940. Franco 

Mobile Surgical Unit, Inc., New York, N. Y., Jan. 13. 1940. 

France 

The Mother Church, The First Church of Christ Scientist, In 

Boston, U. S. A., Boston, Mass., Apr. 25, 1940. Canada, 

France, and the Unit«Hl Kingdom 

Fernanda Wanamakor Munn (Mrs. Ector Munn), New York, 

N. Y., Nov. 25. 1939. France and England 

Mutual Society of French Colonials, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Aug. 20, 1940. France 

National Christian Action, Inc., New York, N. Y., May 23, 

1940.' Norway and Denmark 

Netherlands War Relief Committee, Manila, P. I., May 27, 1940. 

Netherlands 

The New Canaan Workshop, New Canaan, Conn., July 1, 1940. 

British Empire 

New Jersey Broadcasting Corporation, Jersey City, N. J., Sept. 

13, 1939. Poland 

Nicole de Paris Relief Fund, New York, N. Y., July 1, 1940. 

France 

North Side Polish Council Relief Committee of Milwaukee, 

Wis., Milwaukee, Wis., Dec. 5. 1939. Poland 

Norwegian Relief. Inc., Chicago, 111., May 1, 1940. Norway 

Nowe-Dworer Ladies Benevolent Association, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Oct. 25, 1939. Poland 

Nowiny Publishing Apostolate, Inc., Milwaukee, Wis., Sept. 

26, 1939. Poland 

Nowy Swiat Publishing Co., Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 11, 

1939. Poland and France 

Order of Scottish Clans. Boston, Mass., Jan. 25. 1940. Scotland. 
Over-Seas League Tobacco Fund, New York, N. Y., Aug. 19. 

1940. British Empire 

Paderewski Fund for Polish Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y.. 

Feb. 23, 1940. Poland 

The Paryski Pubhshing Co., Toledo, Ohio, Sept. 15, 1939. 

Poland -- 

The Pawtucket and Blackstone Valley British Relief Society 

of Rhode Island, Pawtucket, R. I., Feb. 26, 1940. Great 

Britain 

Polish Aid Fund Committee of Federation of Elizabeth Polish 

Organizations, Elizabeth, N, J.. Sept. 23. 1939.' Poland 

Polish .Md Fund Committee of St. Casimir's Roman Catholic 

Church of the City of Albany, N. Y.. Albany, N. Y., Jan. 22, 

1940. Poland 



$1, 51S. 99 

25, 743. 71 

5, 211. 50 

4,783.00 

16,058.62 

405.33 
111.00 

12; 638. M 

118,273.71 
12, 102. 27 
None 
1,539.89 
2,844.99 
6,911.14 

1. 210. 55 

204.50 

1.4C9. 37 
302. 670. 39 

806.14 

6. 1?9. 46 

26, 545. 91 
4, 738. 59 

None 

108, 333. 78 

6,580.15 

3, 628. 95 
8, 687. 92 

2. 573. 22 



$579. 80 
5,415.55 
5, 209. 75 

None 

13,653.96 

210.20 
111.00 

11.072.76 

2,467.50 

4,788.69 

None 

None 

760.00 

4.750.00 

826.17 

None 

1,400.28 
None 

None 

4.589.86 

24. 712. 00 
3. 377. 00 

None 

60, 000. 00 

6, 501. 15 

332.00 
7. 946. 85 



$30.31 

6, 779. 46 
1.75 

2, 310. 27 

1, 783. 82 

84.62 
None 

1, 496 29 

1, 248. 42 

5,047.77 

48.40 

341.17 

11.50 

371.97 

384.38 

51.00 

19.18 
8,041.63 

141.00 

None 

103. 39 
None 

None 

31. 430. 27 

None 

351. 91 
15.00 

7.00 



$908.88 

13, 548. 70 

None 

2, 472. 73 

620.84 

70.51 
None 

69.53 

114, 657. 79 

2,265.81 

None 

1, 198. 72 

2,083.19 

1. 789. 17 

None 

153.50 

49.91 
294, 628. 76 

665. 14 

549.60 

1. 730 52 
1,361.59 

None 

16, 903. 51 

79.00 

2. 946. 04 
726. 07 

2, 339. 90 



$100.00 

9,914.00 

None 

4. 042. 48 

5, 461. 60 

None 
None 

500.00 

None 

4, 949. 90 

None 

None 

None 

450.00 

None 

None 

1. 300. 00 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 
1.500.00 

1.200.00 



None 
None 
None 

$3, 200. 00 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

1, 216. 67 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 
None 

None 
None 

None 



» No complete reports for the months of July and August have been received from this organization. 
' No report for the month of .\ugust has been received from this organization. 



264 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Xame of registrant. location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Aug. 31.1940. 

including 
cost of goods 
purchased 
and still 
on band 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 

kind now 
on hand 



Polish-American Associations of Middlesex County, N. J., 

Sayreville. N. .I.,Jan.22, 1940. Poland 

Polish-American Citizens Relief Fund Committee, Shirley, 

Majs., Dec. 10. 1939. Poland 

Polish-American Council. Chicago. 111., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland- . 
Polish-American Forwarding Committee, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Mar. 28. 1940. Poland and Germany 

Polish-American Volunteer Ambulance Section (Pavas), New 

York, N. Y., Feb. 13, 1940. France _ 

Polish Broadcasting Corporation, New York, N. Y., Sept. 23, 

IQ.W. Poland 

Polish Business and Professional Men's Club, Los Angeles, 

Calif., Nov. 17. 1939. Poland 

Polish Central Committee of New London, Conn., New London, 

Conn., Oct. 13, 1939. Poland 

Polish Centra! Council of New Haven, New Haven, Conn., 

Sept. 29, 1939. Poland -- 

Polish Civic League of Mercer County, Trenton, N. J., Sept. 

19, 1939. Poland-.- -- 

Polish Civilian Relief Fund, Passaic, N. J., October 27, 1939. 

Poland 

Polish Falcons Alliance of America, Pittsburgh, Pa., Sept. 20, 

1939. Poland -. 

Polish Inter-Organization "Centrala" of Waterbury, Water- 
bury, Conn., Feb. 28, 1940. Poland- - -- 

Polish Literary Guild of New Britain, Conn., New Britain, 

Conn., Sept. 21, 1939. Poland 

The Polish National Alliance of Brooklyn, United States of 

America, Brooklyn, N. Y., Sept. 19, 1939." Poland - 

Polish National Alliance of the United States of North America, 

Chicago, III., Sept. 27, 1939. Poland -.- - 

Polish National Council of Montgomery County, Amsterdam, 

N. Y., Oct. 12. 1939. Poland 

Polish National Council of New York, New York, N. Y., Sept. 

14, 1939. Poland and France 

The Polish Naturalization Independent Club, Worcester, Mass., 

Sept. 20, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief of Carteret, New Jersey, Carteret, N. J., Oct. 11, 

1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Boston, Boston, Mass., Sept. 14, 

1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Brockton, Mass., Brockton, Mass., 

Sept. 2.5. 1939. Poland- 

Polish Relief Committee of Cambridge, Mass., Cambridge, 

Mass., Sept. 16, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Columbia County, Hudson, N. Y., 

Mar. l.'i, 1940. Poland --- - _.. 

Polish Relief Committee of Delaware, Wilmington, Del., Sept. 

22. 1939. Poland - 

Polish Belief Committee, Detroit, Mich., Sept. 11, 1939. Po- 
land - - - 



Polish Relief Committee of Fitchburg, Fitchburg, Mass., Mar. 

29. 1940. Poland - __ __.. 

Polish Relief Committee. Flint, Mich., Sept. 18, 1939. Poland.. 
Polish Relief Committee of Gardner, Mass., Gardner, Mass., 

Sept. 26, 1939.- Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Holyoke, Mass., Holyoke, Mass., 

Nov. 4, 1939. Poland -- _ 

Polish Relief Committee of Jackson, Mich., Jackson, Mich., 

Nov. 9, 1939. Poland 



$1, 057. 05 

427. 01 
378, 939. 00 

1. 173. 05 

29,120.00 

2,147.08 

474.60 

1, 271. 10 

3. 712. 44 

6.903.47 

4. 164. 70 

10, 495. 11 

742. 26 

2, 826. 69 

8, 578. 73 

292, 505. 22 

4, 402. 62 

89, 655. 76 

2, 626. 75 

1, 330. 15 
8. 421. 55 
1.711.65 

2, 210. 84 

None 

7, 722. 12 

149,942.99 

749.80 
6,489.83 

4,175.09 

6. 616. 48 

1, 799. 60 



$800.00 

350.31 
210, 459. 60 

769. 35 

19. 094. 05 

None 

314.23 

994.24 

3, 131. 00 

6, 392. 86 

3, 025. 00 

9, 102. 23 

607. 76 

2, 000. 00 

4,000.00 

231,065.00 

2. 610. 00 

66. 640. 78 

2. 200. 00 

800.00 

7. 101. 19 
1,201.27 
1, 142. 30 

None 

7, 189. 84 

98, 603. 14 

460.40 
3, 300. 00 

2. 979. 20 
4, 922. 53 

622.60 



$80.82 

21.67 
9, 379. 60 

2, 198. 77 

73.83 

35.30 

158.27 

148. 57 

51.26 

1.19 

207.90 

20.00 

25.50 

13.00 

None 

1,619.64 

97.54 

11.616.96 

8.65 

13.00 

421.34 

247. 67 

116.89 

None 

235.63 

6, 816. 91 

41.09 
1,411.05 

771. 47 

203. 35 

270. 11 



$176. 23 

65.03 
159, 099. 90 

None 

9, 952. 12 

2,111.78 

2.00 

128.29 

530. 18 

509 42 

921. 80 

1, 372. 88 

108.99 

813. 59 

4, 678. 73 

59, 820. 58 

1, 696. 08 

12, 298. 02 

318. 10 

517. 15 

899.02 

262. 61 

961.65 

None 

296.65 

45, 622. 94 

248. 31 
1, 778. 78 

424. 42 

489.60 

906.89 



None 

$360. 00 
100. 500. 00 

None 

245.40 

None 

None 

75.00 

800.00 

4, OOO. 00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

5,000.00 

289,633.60 

None 

45.00 

2,600.00 
360.00 
600.00 
None 

4,250.00 

61,974.00 

130.00 
None 

1,307.05 

725.00 

760.00 



None 

$76.00 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

1,000.00 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

187, 627. 50 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

200.00 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 



• The registration of this organization was revoked on Aug. 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 



SEPTEMBER 28, 1940 

Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



265 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Au?.31. 1940, 

including 
cost of goods 
purcliased 
and still 
on band 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 

kind now 
on band 



Polish Relief Committee, New Bedford, Mass., Oct. 31, 1939. 

Poland $9,834.96 

Polish Relief Committee of Philadelphia and Vicinity, Phila- 
delphia, Pa., Sept. 12, 1939. Poland 42,211.01 

Polish Relief Committee of the Polish National Borne Associa- 
tion, Lowell, Mass., Nov. 27, 1939. Poland 2,840.34 

Polish Relief Committee, Taunton, Mass., Dec. 13, 1939. Po- 
land 2,720.22 

Polish Relief Fund of Fall River, Mass., Fall River, Mass. 

Nov. 8, 1939. Poland 1,170.13 

Polish Relief Fund. Jersey City, N. J., Sept. 12, 193».» Poland.. 88,860.15 
Polish Relief Fund, Jewett City, Conn., Oct. 3, 1939. Poland-. 1,292.75 

Polish Relief Fund of Meriden, .\teriden. Conn., Oct. 12, 1939." 

Poland 1,80«. 69 

Polish Relief Fund, Middletown, Conn., Sept. 23, 1939. Poland. 4,550.45 

Polish Relief Fund, Niagara Falls, N. Y., Oct. 28, 1939. Poland. 2,650.72 

Polish Relief Fund of Palmer, Mass., Three Rivers, Mass., Oct. 

20, 1939. Poland 1,736.01 

Polish Relief Fund of Syracasc, N. Y., and vicinity, Syracuse, 

N. Y., Oct. 31. 1939. Poland 12,305.16 

Polish Relief Fund Committee, Los Angeles, Calif., Dec. 13, 

1939. Poland 829.34 

Polish Relief Fund Committee of Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wis., 

Sept. 26, 1939. Poland 15,520.65 

Polish Relief Fund Committee of Passaic and Bergen Counties, 

Inc., Passaic, N. J., Sept. 22, 1939. Poland 12,089.96 

Polish Union of the United States of North America, Wilkes- 

Barre, Pa., Sept. 8, 1939. Poland 2,153.13 

Polish United Societies of Holy Trinity Parish, Lowell, Mass., 

Sept. 20. 1939. Poland 4,083.39 

Polish War Sufferers Relief Committee (Fourth Ward), Toledo, 

Ohio, Sept. 21, 1939. Poland 5,641.69 

Polish Welfare Council, Schenectady, N. Y., Sept. 22, 1939. 

Poland 5,550.76 

Polish White Cross Club of West Utica, Utlca, N. Y., Oct. 20, 

1939. Poland _ 6.697.16 

Polish Women's Fund to Fatherland, Lawrence, Mass., Sept. 23, 

1939. Poland - 5,699.56 

Polish Women's Relief Committee, New York, N. Y., Nov. 24, 

1939. France, Poland, and Germany 7,443.14 

Polski Komitet Ratunkowy (Polish Relief Fund), Binghamton, 

N. Y., Sept. 25, 1939. Poland 3,800.49 

Polsko Narodowy Komitet w Ameryce, Scranton, Pa., Sept. 8, 

1939.« Poland 26,738.80 

Pulaski Civic League of Middlesex County, N. J., South River, 

N. J., Sept. 30, 1939. Poland 507.53 

Pulaski League of Queens County, Inc., Jamaica, N. Y., Oct. 

21, 1939. Poland 7.443.93 

Queen Wilhelmina Fund. Inc., New York, N. Y., May 17, 

1940. Netherlands, France, Poland, United Kingdom, India, 
Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Union of South Africa, 

Norway, Belgium, and La\emburg.,_ 348,705.87 

Refugees of England, Inc., New York, N. Y., July 12, 1940.» 

Great Britain and France _. 8,005.97 

Relief Agency for Polish War Sufferers, Willimantic, Conn., 

Sept. 29, 1939. Poland.. 2,792.54 

Relief Committee of United Polish Societies, Chicopee, Mass., 

Oct. 21, 1939. Poland _ I 6,098.39 



$7, 397. 24 

32, 510. 00 

1,500.00 

2, 257. 00 

1,000.00 

S3, 108. 59 

1. 186. 90 

1,500.00 
2,968.85 
2,500.00 

620.46 
6,869.00 

448.00 
12,232.72 
9, 270. 17 
2,000.00 
1,788.31 
5, 326. II 
5, 260. 35 
4, 962. 70 
1,821.10 

269. 72 

2, 354. 04 

24.823.87 

None 
6, 700. 00 

75, 058. 40 
5,'Xi.m 
2,080.28 
5, 799. 66 






$870. 29 

750.54 

481.28 

23.17 

30.10 

1,840.30 

101.08 

27.90 
18.20 
21.80 

194. 75 

2,511.99 

165.73 

846.47 

1, 036. SI 

None 

162.71 

117.09 

57.32 

309.80 

642.34 

2, 379. 41 

267. 13 

381.11 

85.00 

159. 66 

27,804.44 
200.47 
175. 72 

None 



$1,567.43 

8, 950. 47 

859. 06 

440. 05 

140.03 

3,911.26 

4.77 

278.79 

1, 563. 40 
128.92 

920.80 

2, 924. 17 

215. 61 

2, 441. 46 
I, 783. 28 

15,3. 13 

2, 132. 37 

98.49 

233.09 
1, 424. 66 
3,236.12 
4, 794. 01 
1,179.32 
1, 633. 82 

422.53 

584.28 

245, 843. 03 

2,601.00 

636.64 

298.73 



$3,860.00 

None 

None 

1. 376. 00 

None 

1,675.00 

400.00 

None 
None 
None 

4, 0O4. 95 

1, 860. 00 

150. 00 
11,607.40 
3, 678. OO 

None 
1, 240. 00 

None 
6, 160. 00 
1,600.00 
1,800.00 

869.00 

780.00 
21, 345. 00 

None 

None 

None 

1,025.00 

537.10 

2, 190. 00 



None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

$500.00 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

860.00 

1,209.80 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 



* No report for the month of August has been received from this organization. 

• The registration of this organization was revoked on July 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 
» No complete report for the month of August has been received from this organization. 



266 



DEPABTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions fob Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registraDt, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Aug. 31. 1940, 

including 
cost of goods 
purchased 
and still 
on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 

kind now 
on hand 



Relief Fund for Sufferers in Poland Committee, Kenosha, Wis., 
Sept. 25, 1939. Poland.. , 

Relief Society for Jews in Lublin, Los Angeles, Calif., Dec. 13, 
1939. Poland 

Russian Children's Welfare Society, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 29, 1939. Germany, France, and Poland 

The Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church, Little Falls, N. Y., 
Little Falls, N. Y., Nov. 2, 1939.« Poland 

St. Andrews (Scottish) Society of Washington, D. C, Washing- 
ton, D. C, June 18, 1940. Scotland 

St. Stephens Polish Relief Fund of Perth Amboy, N. J., Perth 
Amboy, N. J., Sept. 27, 1939. Poland _ 

The Salvation Army, New York, N. Y., May 23, 1940. Eng- 
land, France, Norway, Belgium, and the Netherlands 

Save the Children Federation, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 8, 

1939. England, Poland, Belgium, and the Netherlands. 

Schuylkill and Carbon Counties Relief Committee for Poland, 

Frackville, Pa., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland... 

Scots' Charitable Society, Boston, Mass., May 9, 1940. Scot- 
land.. 

Scottish Games of New Jersey Association, Fairhaven, N. J., 
July 9, 1940. Great Britain 

Le Secours Franjais (formerly Le Paquet au Front), New York, 
N. Y., Oct. 6, 1939. France 

Secours Franco-AmSricain— War Relief, Pittsburgh, Pa., Nov. 
20, 1939. Great Britain... 

The Seventh Column, Inc., West Fairlee, Vt., June 12, 1940. 
France and England 

Share A Smoke Club, Inc., Ithaca, N. Y., Nov. 14, I939.« Eng- 
land, France, Norway, Belgium, and the Netherlands 

Sociedades Hispanas Aliadas, San Francisco, Calif., Mar. 29, 

1940. France 

Sociedades Hispanas Confederadas, Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan. 22, 

1940. France 

Soci6t6 Franfaisc de St. Louis, Inc., St. Louis, Mo., Nov. 16, 

1939. France 

Soci6l6 Israelite Francaise'de Secours Mutuels de New York, 

New York, N. Y., June 4, 1940. France... 

Society of the Devotees of Jerusalem, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Dec. 18, 1939. Palestine 

The Somerset Workroom, Far Hills, N. J., Apr. 25, 1940. France 

and Great Britain 

Southbridge Allied Committee for Relief in Poland, Southbridge, 

Mass., Nov. 9, 1939. Poland 

Le Souvenir Franjais, Detroit, Mich., May 1, 1940. France and 

Belgium 

Spanish Committee Pro-Masonic Refugees in France, New 

York, N. Y., Feb. 20, 1940,' France.... 

Spanish Refugee Relief Campaign, New York, N. Y., Sept. 20, 

1939. France... 

Springfield and Vicinity Polish Relief Fund Committee, Spring- 
field, Mass.. Sept. 23, 1939. Poland 

Superior Council of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, New 

York, N. Y., Apr. 5, 1940. France 

Toledo Committee for Relief of War Victims, Toledo, Ohio, 

Sept. 19, 1939. Poland 

Tolstoy Foundation, Inc., New York, N. Y., Oct. 17, 1939. 

France, Poland, England, and Czechoslovakia 



$3, 600. 59 

827. 58 

6, 426. 02 

239.95 

789. 28 

2, 691. 45 

167, 384. 65 

35, 163. 60 

6, 388. 74 

328.00 

237. 70 

60, 626. 16 

1, 768. 48 

None 

473. 71 

1, 214. 24 

31, 199, 12 

653, 07 

278, 00 

II, 67.1, 29 

9, 938. 24 

1, 084. 92 

58.00 

None 

34, 630. 52 

1,090. 14 

310. 00 

6,042.96 

18,764.66 



$3, 066, 60 

175. 00 

3, 896. 92 

200.00 

None 

None 

122, 764. 00 

24, 686, 25 

4,485,71 

None 

None 

42,119,26 

1,491.11 

None 

360,00 

None 

30, 240, 87 

373, 49 

None 

6, 100, 00 

3, 981, 41 

135, 81 

None 

None 

11,009,68 

1,000,00 

310,00 

4,601,17 

10, 816, 64 



$364. 41 

281,82 

1, 454. 64 

1.00 

"1.65 

None 

1, 610, 70 

9,131.14 

None 

None 

158, 17 

29, 707, 43 

90,02 

None 

113,60 

706, 13 

958, 25 

57,66 

2,80 

6, 347, 31 

334, 21 

20,91 

None 

None 

22, 804, 99 

21,26 

None 

629, 79 

3, 258, 14 



$169. 68 
370, 76 

1, 073, 46 

38.95 
717, 63 

2, 691, 45 
33, 109, 95 

1, 346, 21 
903, 03 
328, 00 

79,53 
None 
187, 35 
None 

10,11 
508, 11 
None 
222, 02 
276,20 
125, 98 
6, 622. 62 
928.20 

58,00 
None 
815, 96 

68,89 

None 

811,99 

4, 680, 87 



$1,000,00 
None 

1, 166, 20 
None 
None 
None 

3, 000. 00 
None 
None 
None 
None 

2, 707. 76 

1, 869. 60 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

9, 294. 40 
700.00 
None 
None 
16, 486. 00 
None 
None 
None 
None 



None 
None 
$2, 127. 75 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
1, 119. 71 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
8.00 
None 
None 
662. 16 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
600.00 
None 
None 



• The registration of this organization was revoked on July 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 

« No report for the month of August has been received from this organization. 

' The registration of this organization was revoked on Aug. 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 



SEPTEMBER 2 8, 1940 

Contributions fob Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



267 



Name of registrant. Incatlon. date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for rellpf in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity. afTain, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as nf 
.\ui;, 11. 1940, 

including 
cost of goods 
purchased 
and still 
on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions In 

kind now 
on hand 



Mrs. Walter R. Tuckerman, Bethesda, Md., Nov. 24, 1939. 

Qreat Britain -. 

Edmund Tyszka, Haratramck, Mich., Sept. 19, 1939. Poland.. 
Ukrainian Relief Committee, New York, N. Y., June 28, 1940. 

Germany, France, England, and Italy 

L'Union Alsacienne, Inc., New York, N. Y., Oct. 28, 1939. 

France 

Unitarian Service Committee of the American Unitarian Asso- 
ciation, Boston, Mass., May 23, 1940. France, British Isles, 

and the Netherlands 

United American Polish Organizations, South River, N. J., 

South River, N. J., Oct. 20, 1939. Poland 

United .\inerican Spani^^h .\id Committee, New York, N. Y., 

Apr. 29, 1910. United Kingdom and France 

United BUgorayer Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., Mar. 21, 1940. 

Poland - 

United British War Relief Association, Somerville, Mass., June 

14, 1940. Great Britain and Northern Ireland 

United Charity Institutions of Jerusalem, New York, N. Y., 

Oct. 13, 1939. Palestine 

United Committee for French Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Oct. 26, 1939. France 

United German Sonietles. Inc., Portland, Oreg., Portland, Oreg., 

Jan.8, 1940. Germany- 

United Nowy Dworer Relief Committee, New York, N. Y.. 

Jan. 3, 1940. Poland 

United Opolcr Relief of New York, New York, N. Y., Deo. 9, 

1939. Poland ---. 

United Polish Central Council of Connecticut, Bridgeport, 

Conn., Oct. 16, 1939.' Poland 

United Polish Committees in Racine, Wis., Racine, Wis., Nov. 

2, 1939. Poland 

United Polish Organizations of Salem, Mas3., Salem, Mass., 

Oct. 20, 1939. Poland-. 

United Polisb Societies of Bristol, Conn., Bristol, Conn., Sept. 

29, 1939. Poland 

United Polish Societies of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, Calif., Oct. 

21. 1939. Poland -- 

United Reading Appeal for Polish War Sufferers, Reading, Pa., 

Sept. 22, 1939. Pnland --- 

Urgent Relief for France, Washington, D. C, Dec. 26, 1939. 

France - 

Mrs. Paul Verdier Fund, San Francisco, CaUf., Oct. 11, 1939. 

France _ : 

Vincennes, France, Committee of Vinoennes, Ind., Vincennes, 

Ind., May 31, 1940.' France -- 

Woman's Auxiliary Board of the Scots' Charitable Society, Inc., 

Waverley, Mass., Feb. 28, 1940. Scotland.-- -. 

Women's Allied War Relief Association of St. Louis, Clayton, 

Mo., Dec. 18, 1939. Great Britain and France.. 

Registrants whose registrations were revoked prior to Aug. 1, 

1940, and who had no balance on hand as of that date 



$2, 673. 85 
3,031.46 

91.60 

2. 360. 16 

21,450.13 
3, 142. 22 
1, 626. 36 
1,091.97 
1,362.33 

37,634.91 
111,924.62 

2. 363. 17 
S32.96 
677. 15 

9, 597. 29 

2, 015. 39 

2,489.72 

1, 221. 19 

2, 739. 71 

7,668.29 

19,066.08 

4,207.41 

None 

1,316.12 

6, 241. 42 

217,411.79 



$1, 400. 85 
3, 031. 46 

40.00 

400.27 

12, 539. 36 

2, 400. 00 

938.85 

None 

656.00 

19, 866. 93 

53,246.83 

2,000.00 

84.70 

None 

9, 366. 35 

1, 350. 00 

1, 965. 27 

676.80 

2. 262. 10 

5, 657. 14 

14,338.17 

3,897.31 

None 

1, 218. 62 

2, 452. 27 

194, 463. 17 



$3.96 
None 

None 

585.47 

1, 995. 34 
136.94 
600.44 
146.27 
263.25 
18, 763. 65 
8, 575. 64 
133.99 
191. 96 

35.21 
231.94 
212. 16 
437. 91 

26.75 
346.62 
140.13 
659.74 

65.45 
None 

13.67 
8.02 
26, 117. 21 



$1, 269. 05 
None 

51.60 

1. 374. 42 

6. 915. 43 
605.28 

87.07 
945.70 
643.08 

None 
50, 102. 26 
229.18 
656.30 
641.94 

None 
463. 23 

86.64 

617.64 

131.09 

1,871.02 

4, 168. 17 

244.65 

None 

83.83 
3, 781. 13 

None 



None 
None 

None 

$315.00 

None 
None 
None 
None 
175.00 
None 

7, 452. 77 
None 
None 
None 

4, 845. 00 
None 
595.00 
300.00 
None 
None 

3, 169. 10 

3,282.00 
None 
None 

5, 538. 80 
61, 400. 06 



Total •- 



11, 244, 603. 82 



7, 264, 206. 1 



1,030,418.11 



2,971,231.04 



1, 308, 766. 93 



None 
None 

None 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
$592. 09 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
2, 632. 36 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 



267, 226. 19 



r The registration of this organization was revoked on Aug. 31, 1940, at the request of the registrant. 

• It is not possible to strike an exact balance in these published totals, since some registrants have included in their expenditures moneys available from 
loans or advances, which are not considered by the Department to be "funds received" and hence are not reported as such. 



268 




PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press September 28] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
Foreign Service since September 18, 1940: 

Caeeee Officers 

Dudley G. Dwyre, of Fort Collins, Colo., 
First Secretary of Legation and Consul Gen- 
eral at ISIontevideo, Uruguay, has been desig- 
nated First Secretary of Legation and Consul 
General at San Jose, Costa Rica, and wUl serve 
in dual capacity. 

John P. Hurley, of Brooklyn, N. Y., Consul 
General at Marseille, France, has been assigned 
for duty in the Department of State. 

William L. Peck, of Washington, Conn., 
Consul at Naples, Italy, has been assigned as 
Consul at Marseille, France. 

Charles L. Luedtke, of Minnesota, Foreign 
Service officer, assigned to the Department of 
State and detailed to the Department of Agri- 
culture, has been designated Agricultural At- 
tache at Panama, Panama; San Jose, Costa 
Rica ; and Quito, Ecuador. 

Benjamin M. Hulley, of De Land, Fla., Sec- 
ond Secretary of Embassy and Consul at Paris, 
France, has been assigned for duty in the De- 
partment of State. 

Ralph J. Blake, of Portland, Oreg., Language 
Officer at the Embassy, Tokyo, Japan, has been 
assigned as Consul at Tokyo, Japan. 

The assignment of Foy D. Kohler, of Toledo, 
Ohio, for duty in the Department of State, 
has been canceled. Mr. Kohler will remain at 
his present post, Athens, Greece. 

John Fremont Melby, of Bloomington, HI., 
Vice Consul at Caracas, Venezuela, has been 
designated Third Secretary of Embassy at 
Caracas, Venezuela. 

NON-CAKEEK OFFICERS 

Mr. Stephen C. Worster, of Maine, has been 
appointed Vice Consul at C o a t z a c o a 1 c o s 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtTLLETIN 

(Puerto Mexico), Veracruz, Mexico, instead of 
at Salina Cruz, Oaxaca, Mexico, where a con- 
sular office will not be established as previously 
reported. 

Edwin J. King, of Waynesboro, Pa., Vice 
Consul at Dublin, Ireland, died at his post on 
September 17, 1940. 

Francis M. Witliey, of Michigan, Vice Consul 
at Palermo, Italy, has been appointed Vice Con- 
sul at Nice, France. 

Leonard G. Bradford, of Boston, Mass., Vice 
Consul at Genoa, Italy, has been appointed Vice 
Consul at Marseille, France. 

George D. Whittinghill, of New York, Clerk 
at Milan, Italy, has been appointed Vice Consul 
at Lyon, France. 

The American Consulate at Trail, British 
Columbia, Canada, which was established for 
the purpose of performing non-immigrant visa 
services only, will be closed September 30, 1940. 



FOREIGN SERVICE REGULATIONS 

On September 24, 1940, the President signed 
Executive Order No. 8547 amending the For- 
eign Service Regulations of the United States 
(Chapter XX — Miscellaneous). For text of 
the Executive order, see the Federal Register for 
September 26, 1940 (vol. 5, no. 188), pages 
3818-3819. 



Legislation 



An Act To provide for increasing the lending author- 
ity of the Export-Import Bank of Washington, and for 
other purposes. (Public, No. 792, 76th Cong., 3d 
sess.) 1 p. 50. 

Export-Import Bank of Washington : Hearings be- 
fore the Banking and Currency Committee of the 
House, 76th Cong., 3d sess., on S. 3069 (H. R. 8477), 
to provide for increasing the lending authority of the 
Export-Import Bank of Washington, and for other 
purposes, Feb. 16, 39, and 20, 1940. 87 pp. 100. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



SOVEREIGNTY 

Convention on the Provisional Administra- 
tion of European Colonies and Possessions 
in the Americas 

On September 27, 1940, the Senate gave its 
advice and consent to the ratification by the 
President of the Convention on the Provisional 
Administration of European Colonies and Pos- 
sessions in the Americas, signed at Habana July 
30, 1940.'" 

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee 
made public on September 24 the message from 
the President to the Senate of the United States, 
transmitting the Habana convention, together 
Avith the report from the Secretary of State con- 
cerning the convention and "Act of Habana"'.'^ 
The texts read as follows : 

To THE Senate of the United States : 

To the end that I may receive the advice and 
consent of the Senate to ratification I transmit 
herewith, in certified form, a Convention en- 
titled "Convention on the Provisional Adminis- 
tration of European Colonies and Possessions in 
the Americas", signed at Habana on July 30, 
1940. Also enclosed, for the information of 
the Senate, but not requiring ratification, is a 
copy of the "Act of Habana", signed on the same 
date at the Second Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics and 
a report concerning the Convention and Act, 
from the Secretary of State. 

I commend the Convention to the early con- 
sideration of the Senate. 

Franklin D. RoosExrELT 

The White House, 

September IS, 191,0. 



[Enclosiuv 



" For text, see the Bulletin of August 24, 1940 ( vol. 
Ill, no. 61), pp. 14.V148. 

" For text, see ibid., pp. 13S-139. 



Department of State, 

Washington, September 12, 19^0. 
The President, 

The White Hotise. 

The undersigned, the Secretary of State, has 
the honor to lay before the President, in certi- 
fied form, with a view to its transmission to the 
Senate to receive the advice and consent of that 
body to ratification, if his judgment approve 
thereof, a Convention entitled "Convention on 
the Provisional Administration of European 
Colonies and Possessions in the Americas", 
signed at Habana on July 30. 1940. The Con- 
vention is accompanied by the "Act of Habana" 
which is included in the Final Act of the Con- 
ference, signed at the same time. This Act is 
impoi-tant as information and as a part of the 
record. 

Permit me also to make the following state- 
ment concerning the backgi-ound and provisions 
of the Convention. 

It will be recalled that the primary purpose 
of the American rejniblics in convoking the 
Meeting of Foreign Ministers at Habana last 
July was to consider the possibility that devel- 
opments in Europe might affect the status of 
the European possessions in the Western Hemi- 
sphere in such a manner as to constitute a threat 
to the peace and security of the American re- 
publics. Sovereignty over these possessions 
has been maintained for many generations and 
in some cases for several centuries by the 
French, British and Netherlands Governments. 
These geographic regions have not heretofore 
constituted a menace to the peace of the Amer- 
icas and we have maintained the most cordial 
relations with their respective administrations. 

It would not, however, be consistent with the 
policy of the United States or desirable from 
the point of view of the defense of the Western 

260 



270 

Hemisphere to permit these regions to become 
a subject of barter in the settlement of European 
difficulties, or a battleground for the adjustment 
of such difficulties. Either situation could only 
be regarded as a threat to the peace and safety 
of this Hemisphere, as would any indication 
that the possessions under consideration might 
be used to promote systems alien to the inter- 
American system. Any effort, therefore, to 
modify the existing status of these possessions 
whether by cession, by transfer, or by any im- 
pairment whatsoever in the control heretofore 
exercised would be of profound and immediate 
concern to all the American republics. 

The foregoing views are entirely consonant 
with the basic principle of foreign policy of 
the United States as enunciated over a century 
ago by President Monroe. 

This doctrine continues to represent the policy 
of the United States; it is fundamental to our 
national defense. Moreover, as I have pointed 
out to the Congi-ess in connection with legisla- 
tion designed to strengthen the defense of this 
country, the war at present raging in Europe is 
the result in part of the abandonment by certain 
European powers of those principles of respect 
for the pledged word and of peaceful negotia- 
tion of agi-eements for the modification of the 
established order to which the American 
republics adhere. 

The progress of that war to date has obliged 
the government of one of the countries having 
possessions in the American republics to aban- 
don its homeland ; the government of a second 
of these countries has been forced to sign an 
armistice involving, among other conditions, 
the hostile occupation of more than one-half 
of its territory. The third of the govermnents 
with whose possessions in this hemisphere we 
are now concerned is engaged in a struggle in 
which its very existence may be at stake. 

It was therefore altogether appropriate that 
the United States in company with the other 
free and sovereign republics of the Western 
Hemisphere, should consider the consequences 
which might result from the transfer of sov- 
ereignty over any of these British, French or 
Netherland possessions, especially if that trans- 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

fer were made t« a country which has demon- 
strated a lack of adherence to the established 
princiiiles of international law. It was equally 
obvious that such a transfer, by giving a foot- 
hold in the Americas to the representatives of 
a system of government and of international 
politics entirely alien to the traditions and 
practice of the American republics, would con- 
stitute a very serious danger to the peace and 
security of the two continents. 

It must also be recognized that this threat 
may become a reality, not only through a 
formal transfer of territory, but also through 
circmnstances arising out of the relative status 
of victor and vanquished, without there having 
been any formal expression regarding the 
disposition of these territories. 

On June 17, 1940, the Secretary of State, after 
the Government of the United States had been 
informed that the Government of France had 
requested of the German Government the terms 
of an armistice, directed the representatives of 
the United States at Berlin and Rome to make a 
communication to the German and Italian Gov- 
ernments the pertinent paragraph of which is 
the following: 

"The Government of the United States feels 
it desirable, in order to avoid any possible mis- 
understanding, to inform Your Excellency that 
in accordance with its traditional policy relating 
to the Western Hemisphere, the United States 
would not recognize any transfer, and would 
not acquiesce in any attempt to transfer, any 
geographic region of the Western Hemisphere 
from one non- American power to another non- 
American power." ^- 

The Governments of France, Great Britain, 
and the Netherlands were informed in the same 
sense. 

The Senate itself has also given evidence of 
its adherence to the policy which I have outlined 
above through the passage of S. J. Resolution 
271 on June 17, 1940, "approving nonrecogni- 
tion of the transfer of any geographic region in 
the Western Hemisphere from one non-Ameri- 



" See the BuUetin of June 22. 1940 (vol. II, no. 52), 
pp. 681-682. 



SEPTEMBER 28, 194 



271 



can power to another non-American powei", and 
providing for consultations with other Ameri- 
can republics in the event that such ti-ansfer 
should appear likely". 

On July 21, 1940 there assembled at Habana 
the Second Meetinji of the Ministers of Foreign 
Affairs of tlie American Republics for purposes 
of consultation in accordance with the proce- 
dure established at the Inter- American Confer- 
ence for the Maintenance of Peace held at 
Buenos Aires in December 1936 and the Eighth 
International Conference of American States 
held at Lima in December 1938. 

It was recognized that it would be contrary 
to the interests of the American Republics to 
permit the European possessions in the New 
World to become a subject of barter in the set- 
tlement of European differences and that such 
a situation would involve a threat to the peace 
and security of the hemisphere. Even in the 
absence of an actual transfer of sovereignty, it 
was evident that the use of these possessions to 
promote systems alien to the inter-American 
system could not be countenanced. Further- 
more, in approaching this matter, it appeared 
desirable that any solution which might be 
reached should not carry with it the creation of 
any special interest for the benefit of any partic- 
ular American republic or republics but that the 
solution should further the legitimate interests 
of all the American republics as well as the in- 
terests of the possessions that might be involved. 
It was therefore agreed that in the event that 
conditions should so permit, such possessions as 
might be taken under control by, or on behalf of, 
the American republics should be returned to 
their original sovereigns or declared independ- 
ent, as soon as possible after the passing of the 
emergency which furnished the basis for the 
assumption of control over them. 

To give eflFect to the foregoing, two measures 
were adopted at Habana, the Act of Habana, 
and the Convention submitted herewith. The 
former, a copy of which, as already stated, I 
enclose as essential information but not as 
requiring ratification, provides for the emer- 
gency establishment of a regime of provisional 
administration under specified conditions "when 
islands or regions in the Americas now under 



the possession of non-American nations are in 
danger of becoming the subject of barter of 
territory or change of sovereignty". The de- 
termination of the necessity for establishing 
such a provisional regime is entrusted to an 
emergency committee consisting of one repre- 
sentative of each of the American republics, 
although provision is also made for individual 
or joint action on the part of any of the Ameri- 
can republics should the need be so urgent that 
consideration by the committee cannot be 
awaited. In other words, full freedom of action 
is retained by each of the American republics, 
should the circumstances be such as in its esti- 
mation to require it to take provisional steps 
without prior submission of its views to the 
Committee. 

The purpose of the Convention is to obtain 
the acceptance in treaty form of the mutual 
obligations recognized by the American repub- 
lics with respect to the situation envisaged in 
the "Act of Habana". It is my belief that this 
convention should be brought into force at the 
earliest possible date. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CoKDELL Hull 



SPECIAL ASSISTANCE 

Financial Convention with the Dominican 
Republic Revising the Convention of 
1924 

A convention between the United States and 
the Dominican Republic was signed on Sep- 
tember 24, 1940 in Washington by Secretary 
Hull for the United States and by Dr. Rafael 
L. Trujillo, Ambassador Extraordinary of the 
Dominican Republic on Special Mission. The 
new convention when it comes into effect will 
supersede the convention between the two 
countries signed on December 27, 1924 (Treaty 
Series No. 726) relating to the collection and 
application of customs in the Dominican 
Republic. 

Under the provisions of the new convention 
the Government of the Dominican Republic will 
resume the collection of that country's customs 



272 



DEPABTMEXT OF STATE BULLETIN 



revenues wliich, under the provisions of the 
convention of 1924 had been collected by an 
official apijointed by the President of the United 
States, and the General Receivership of Do- 
minican Customs will be abolished. 

The con\ention provides that a depositary 
bank will be selected by mutual agreement be- 
tween the two Governments which will be the 
sole depositary of all the revenues of the Domin- 
ican Republic. The two Governments, likewise, 
will appoint a representative of the holders of 
the 1922 and 1926 bonds, who will be charged to 
receive from the Dominican Government during 
the first 10 days of each month the interest and 
amortization payments on the outstanding 
bonds. As soon as these payments have been 
made to the representative, the depositary bank 
will be authorized to make disbursements on 
behalf of the Dominican Government. The 
paj-ments of the service of the bonds, as well as 
the costs of the services of the bondholders' 
representative and of the depositary bank, will 
constitute an irrevocable first lien upon all the 
revenues of the Dominican Republic. 

In the event that the Dominican revenues ex- 
ceed $12,500,000 in any given j'ear, specified 
percentages of the excess will be paid into the 
sinking fund for the additional redemption of 
the 1922 and 1926 bonds. The agreement be- 
tween the Dominican Republic and the Foreign 
Bondholders Protective Council concluded in 
1934 regarding the rate of amortization of the 
outstanding bonds remains in effect. Existing 
Dominican accounting and treasury law may 
not be changed without the consent of both 
Governments. Arbitration is provided in case 
controversies should arise between the two Gov- 
ernments which cannot be settled by diplomatic 
means. The new convention will enter into 
force upon the exchange of ratifications, which 
shall take place within 30 days following 
ratification by the Government which ratifies 
later in point of time. On the date of entering 
into effect of the new convention, the convention 
of December 27, 1924 will cease to have effect 
although certain provisions of the old conven- 
tion will remain in force until the necessary 
measures have been taken by both countries to 



put the jirovisions of the new convention into 
operation. 

Simultaneously with the signing of the con- 
vention, notes were exchanged by the Govern- 
ments of the United States and of the 
Dominican Republic providing for the liquida- 
tion at the rate of $125,000 annually of the 
claims of United States nationals against the 
Dominican Republic; and for the payment of 
benefits to two retired officials who served in the 
General Receivership of Dominican Customs 
for many years. 

The signing of the new convention inaugu- 
rates a new era in the friendly relations which 
exist between the United States and the Domin- 
ican Republic as well as an additional step in 
the development and coordination of the good- 
neighbor policy based on mutual respect and 
confidence among the countries of this hemi- 
sphere. 

POSTAL 
Universal Postal Convention of 1939 

Argentina 

There is printed below in translation a decree 
signed on October 23, 1940, by the Acting Presi- 
dent of Argentina providing for the administra- 
tive operation of the Universal Postal Conven- 
tion and Subsidiary Agreements signed at 
Buenos Aires on May 23, 1939 : 

Authorizing the Administrative Enforce- 
ment OF THE Convention and Agreements 
Signed at the XI Congress of the Universal 
Postal Union 

Buenos Aires, Augv^st 23, IQJfi. 

Having considered the report issued by the 
Ministry of the Interior No. 16, 791-C-1940, 
whereby the Direction General of Posts and Tel- 
egraphs, in accordance with the provisions of 
article 82 of the Universal Postal Convention, 
requests authorization to enforce administra- 
tively the convention and agreements signed at 
the XI Congress of the Universal Postal Union 
held in this federal capital in 1939, and 



SEPTEMBER 28, 194 



273 



Whereas : 

For reasons of administrative character it is 
fitting and necessary to establish the jurid- 
ical situation of the Argentine administration 
regarding the international agreements men- 
tioned, the enforcement of which, as stipulated 
in the above-mentioned article, is to take place 
on July 1, 1940, 

The Vice President of the Argentine Nation. 
Acting Executive Power, tlu'ough a ministerial 
resolution, 

Decrees : 

Article 1. The administrative enforcement as 
from July 1, 1940 of the convention and agree- 
ments signed in Buenos Aires on May 23, 1939 
is hereby authorized subject to ratification by 
the Honorable National Congress: 

(a) Universal postal convention, the final 
protocol thereof, rules for its execution and 
additional provisions regarding airmail; 

(b) Agreement relative to letters and boxes 



with declared value, the final protocol thereof 
and rules for its execution ; 

(c) Agi-eement relative to parcel-post pack- 
ages, the final protocol thereof, rules for its 
execution and additional provisions regarding 
air transportation of parcel-post packages; 

(d) Agreement relative to money ordere, 
rules for its execution and supplement regard- 
ing travel postal orders: 

(e) Agi-eement regarding postal transfers 
and rules for its execution; 

(f) Agi-eement relative to postal drafts and 
rules for its execution ; 

(g) Agreements relative to subscriptions to 
newspapers and periodicals and rides for their 
execution. 

Article 2. Let this be communicated, pub- 
lished in the O^eicd Bullefin, and transmitted 
to the National Registry. 

C.xsTiLLo. — JosK Maria Cantilo. — Di- 
ogenes Taboada. — Pedro Groppo. — 
Luis A. Barberis. — Massini Exctjrra 



Publications 



Department of State 

During the quarter beginning Julj' 1, 1940, 
the following publications have been released : " 

1466. The Chaco Peace Conference: Report of the 
Delegation of the United States of America to the 
Peace Conference Held at Buenos Aires July 1. 
1935-January 23, 1939. Conference Series 46. i\-, 
19S pp., Including maps. $1. 

1473. Military Aviation Mission : Agreement Betwe^^n 
the United States of America and Chile — Signed 
April 23, 1940: effective April 23, 1940. Executive 
Agreement Series Xo. 169. ii. S pp. 5^. 

1474. Allocation of Tariff Quota on Heavy Cattle During 
the Calendar Year 1940: Proclamation by the Presi- 
dent of the United States Issued on November 30, 
1939, Pursuant to Article III of the Reciprocal 



'^ Serial numbers which do not appear in this list 
have appeared previously or will appear in subsequent 
lists. 



Trade Agreement Between the United States of 
America and Canada Signed November 17, 1938 
(Executive Agreement Series No. 149). Executive 
Agreement Series No. 170. ii, 4 pp. 5^. 

1475. Trans-Isthmian Joint Highway Board : Arrange- 
ment Between the United States of America and 
Panama — Effected by exchanges of notes signed Oc- 
tober 19 and 23, 1939, December 20, 1939, and Jan- 
uary 4, 1940. Executive Agreement Series No. 168. 
Ii, 5 pp. 5<i. 

1478. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. II, No. 
.13, June 29, 1940. 21 pp. 10^." 

1479. Certificates of Airworthiness for Export : Ar- 
rangement Between the United States of America 
and New Zealand — Effected by exchange of notes 
signed January 30 and February 28, 1940; effective 
March 1, IMO. Executive Agreement Series No. 167. 
ii, 17 pp. 50. 

1480. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. Ill, No. 
54, July 6, 1940. 19 pp. 100. 



'* Subscription, $2.75 a year. 



274 



DEPARTMENT OP STATE BULLETIN 



1481. Diplomatic List, July 1940. ii, 91 pp. Subscrip- 
tion, $1 a year ; single copy, 10(f. 

1482. Reciprocal Recognition of Load Line Regulations 
for Vessels Engaged in International Voyages on the 
Great Lakes: Arrangement Between the United 
States of America and Canada— EfCected by ex- 
changes of notes signed April 29, 1938, August 24, 

1938, October 22, 1038, September 2, 1939, October 18, 

1939. .Tanuary 10. 1940, and March 4, 1940. Execu- 
tive Agreement Series No. 172. ii, 9 pp. 5(f. 

1483. The American Foreign Service : General Informa- 
tion for Applicants and Sample Entrance Examina- 
tion Questions. Revised to June 1, 1940. iv, 142 pp. 
Free. 

1484. Publications of the Department of State (a list 
cumulative from October 1, 1929). July 1, 1940. ii, 
23 pp. Free. 

14S5. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. Ill, No. 

55, July 13, 1940. 7 pp. 100. 

1486. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. Ill, No. 

56, July 20, 1940. 10 pp. 10^. 

1487. Exemptions From Exchange Control Measures: 
Agreement Between the United States of America 
and Canada— Effected by exchange of notes signed 
June 18, 1940; effective June 18, 1940. Executive 
Agreement Series No. 174. ii, 3 pp. 5^. 

1488. Achievements of the Second Meeting of the For- 
eign Ministers of tlie American Republics : Statement 
of the Honorable Cordell Hull, Secretary of State, at 
the Close of the Meeting, Habana, July 30, 1940. 
Conference Series 47. ii, 8 pp. 50. 

1489. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. Ill, No. 

57, July 27, 1940. 24 pp. 100. 

1490. Exchange of Otflcial Publications: Agreement 
Between the United States of America and Nicara- 
gua — EfCected by exchange of notes signed February 
14 and 19, 1940; effective February 14, 1940. Ex- 
ecutive Agreement Series No. 171. ii, 7 pp. 5^. 

1491. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. Ill, 
No. 58, August 3, 1940. 37 pp. 100. 

1492. Diplomatic List, August 1940. ii, 91 pp. Sub- 
scription, $1 a year; single copy, 100. 

1493. The Department of State Bulletin. Vol. Ill, 
No. 59, August 10, 1940. 10 pp. 100. 

1494. Foreign Service List, July 1, 1040. iv, 107 pp. 
Subscription, 500 a year ; single copy, 15<i'. 

1495. Statistics of Causes of Death : Protocol Between 
the United States of America and Other Powers 
Revising the Minimum Nomenclature of Causes of 
Death Annexed to the International Agreement 
Signed at London June 19, 1934 (Executive Agree- 
ment Series No. 80)— Signed at Paris October 6. 



1938; effective January 1, 1940. Executive Agree- 
ment Series No. 173. ii, 12 pp. 50. 

1496. Military Aviation Instructors : Agreement Be- 
tween the United States of America and Argentina — 
Signed June 29, 1940; effective June 29, 1940. Ex- 
ecutive Agreement Series No. 175. ii, 10 pp. 50. 

1497. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. Ill, No. 

60, August 17, 1940. 8 pp. 100. 

1498. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. Ill, N.). 

61, August 24, 1940. 53 pp. 100. 

1499. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. Ill, No. 

62, August 31, 1940. 20 pp. 100. 

1500. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. Ill, Ni. 

63, September 7, 1940. 17 pp. 100. 

1501. DiiJlomatic List, September 1940. ii, OvS pp. 
Subscription, $1 a year ; single copy, 100. 

1503. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. Ill, No. 

64, September 14, 1940. 8 pp. 100. 

1507. The Department of State Bulletin, Vol. Ill, No. 

65, September 21, 1940. 21 pp. 100. 

Treaty Series : 

960. Commerce and Navigation : Treaty Between the 
United States of America and Iraq — Signed at Bagh- 
dad December 3, 193S; proclaimed May 29, 1940. 
ii, 10 pp. 50. 

The Department of State also publishes the 
slip laws and Statutes at Large. Laws are 
issued in separate series and are numbered in the 
order in which they are signed. Treaties are 
also issued in a separate series and are numbered 
in the order in which they are proclaimed. All 
other publications of the Department since 
October 1, 1929, are numbered consecutively in 
the order in which they are sent to press, and, in 
addition, are subdivided into series according to 
general subject. 

To avoid delay, requests for publications of 
the Department of State should be addressed 
directly to the Superintendent of Documents, 
Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C, 
except in the case of free publications, which 
may be obtained from the Department. The 
Superintendent of Documents will accept de- 
posits against which the cost of publications 
ordered may be charged and will notify the de- 
positor when the deposit is exhausted. The 
cost to depositors of a complete set of the publi- 
cations of the Department for a year will prob- 



SEPTEMBER 2 8, 1940 

ably be somewhat in excess of $15. Orders may 
be placed, however, with the Superintendent of 
Documents for single publications or for one or 
more series. 

The Superintendent of Documents also has, 
for free distribution, the following price lists 
which may be of interest : Foreign Relations of 



275 

the United States; American History and Bi- 
ography; Tariff; Immigration; Alaska and 
Hawaii; Insular Possessions; Laws; Commerce 
and Manufactures; Political Science; and Maps. 
A list of publications of the Bureau of Foreign 
and Domestic Commerce may be obtained from 
the Department of Commerce. 



U, S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1940 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents _ _ Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PLBLISHED WEEKLT WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIKECTOE OF THE BCBEAC OP THE BUDGET 



^XZJr 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 





riN 



OCTOBER 5, 1940 
Vol. Ill: No. 67 — Publication 150^ 



Qontents 

General: Page 

Control (jf exports in national dclVnse: 

Fu'e-i'ontrol inslrunients, military searchlights, and 

other military (.•quipnient 279 

Iron and steel scrap 280 

Uocunientation requirements of certain aliens 280 

Registration of agents of foreign principals 281 

Celebration of the Jewish New Year 281 

Payment of expenses in connection with the death of 

United States employees 281 

American Republics: 

Travel grants to professors and students 282 

Railway survey in Bolivia 283 

Inangnration of President of Cuba 28:3 

Europk: 

Gcrnuiii debts 284 

Suspension of tonnage duties for vessels of I rel.ind . . . 2Sr) 

PfnLHATIONS 285 

The Forkign Service: 

Personnel changes : 285 

Treaty Information: 
International law: 

International Institute for the Unification of Private 

Law 286 

Legal assistance: 

Protocol on Uniformity of Powers of Attorney Which 

Are To Be Utihzed Abroad 286 

Legislation 287 



^■^■■' .iOEKT OF DOCUMENTS 

OCT 19 1940 



General 



CONTROL OF EXPORTS m NATIONAL DEFENSE 

Fire-Control Instruments, Military Searchlights, and Other Military Equipment 



[Released to the press by the White House October 1] 

Acting to further strengthen the national de- 
fense, the President, in a prochimation dated 
September 30, has placed under the licensing 
system fire-control instruments, military search- 
lights, aerial cameras, and other types of mili- 
tary equipment containing optical elements. 

A study recently completed by the War and 
Navy Departments disclosed that the rapidly ex- 
panding national defense effort has made urgent 
the control of exports of these vital articles of 
equipment. 

Tlie proclamation reads as follows: 

Administration of Section 6 of the Act En- 
titled "An Act To Expedite the Strength- 
ening of the National Defense," Appro\'ed 
July 2, 1940 

BY THE president OF THE UNITED STATES OF 
AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Whereas section 6 of the act of Congress en- 
titled "An Act To expedite the strengthening 
of the national defense," approved July 2, 1940, 
provides as follows: 

"Sec. 6. Wlienever the President determines 
that it is necessary in the interest of national de- 
fense to prohibit or curtail tlie exportation of 
any military equipment or munitions, or com- 
ponent parts thereof, of machinery, tools, or 
material, or supplies necessary for the manufac- 
ture, servicing, or operation thereof, he may by 

266324 — 40 



proclamation prohibit or curtail such exporta- 
tion, except under such rules and regulations as 
he shall prescribe. Any such proclamation shall 
describe the articles or materials included in 
the prohibition or curtailment contained therein. 
In case of the violation of any provision of any 
proclamation, or of any rule or regulation, is- 
sued hereunder, such violator or violators, upon 
conviction, shall lie punished by a fine of not 
more than $10,000.00 or by imprisonment for 
not more than two years, or by both such fine 
and imprisonment. The authority granted in 
tills section shall terminate June 30, 1942, unless 
the Congress shall otherwise provide." 

Now, THEREFORE, I, FrANKLIN D. RoOSEVT^LT, 

President of the United States of America, act- 
ing under and by virtue of tlie authority vested 
in me by the aforesaid act of Congress, do 
hereby proclaim that upon the recommendation 
of the Administrator of Export Control I have 
determined that it is necessary in the interest of 
the national defense that on and after October 
15, 1940, the following-described articles and 
materials shall not be exported from the United 
States except when authorized in each case by a 
license as provided for in Proclamation No. 
2413 ^ of July 2, 1940, entitled "Administration 
of section 6 of the act entitled 'An Act to expe- 
dite the strengthening of the national defense' 
approved July 2, 1940," and in the regulations 
issued pursuant thereto: 



•See the Bulletin of July 6, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 54), 
pp. 12-13. 

279 



280 



DEPABTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Fire Control Instruments, Military Searcli- 
lights, Aerial Cameras and other types of Mili- 
tary Equipment containing optical elements. 

In witness whereof, I have heremito set my 

hand and caused the seal of the United States of 

America to be affixed. 

Done at the City of Washington this 30" day 

of September, in the year of our 

[seal] Lord nineteen hundred and forty, 

and of the Independence of the 

United States of America the one hundred and 

sixty-fifth. 

Fkanklin D. Roosevelt 
By the President : 
CoEDELL Hull, 

Secretary of State. 

[No. 2428] 



Iron and Steel Scrap 

The following additional regulations govern- 
ing the exportation of iron and steel scrap ex- 
ports have been issued by the President : 

Regulations Governing the Exportation of 
Articles and Materials Designated in the 
President's Proclamation of July 26, 1940,^ 
Issued Pursuant to the Provisions of Sec- 
tion 6 OF the Act of Congress Approved July 
2,1940 

Pursuant to the authority vested in me by 
the provisions of section 6 of the Act of Con- 
gress approved July 2, 1940, entitled "An Act 
to expedite the strengthening of the national 
defense", I hereby prescribe the following addi- 
tional regulations governing the exportation of : 

Iron and Steel Scrap 

1. As used in my proclamation of July 26, 
1940, issued pursuant to the provisions of sec- 
tion 6 of the Act of Congress approved July 2, 
1940, and in the regulations of July 26, 1940,^ 

' See the BtiUetin of .Tuly 27, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 57), 
p. 49. 

'Ibid., p. no. 



issued in accordance with that proclamation, 
the construction and definition of the term "iron 
and steel scrap", is hereby amended to read : 

Iron and Steel Scrap. All iron and steel 
scrap of every kind and description, classified 
or unclassified. 

2. Regulations 2 to 12, inclusive, of the regu- 
lations issued on July 2, 1940, pursuant to the 
act of July 2, 1940, are applicable to the exporta- 
tion of iron and steel scrap. 

3. This regulation shall become effective Oc- 
tober 16, 1940. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 
The White House 

September 30, IQJfi. 

DOCUMENTATION REQUIREMENTS 
OF CERTAIN ALIENS 

The following regulation has been codified 
under Title 22: Foreign Relations (Chapter 
I: Department of State), in accordance with 
the requirements of the Federal Register and 
the Code of Federal Regulations: 

Part 61 — Visas; Documents Required of 
Aliens Entering the United States, Its 
Territories, or Possessions 

§ 61.101 Waiver of passport and visa re- 
quirements for certain aliens. 



(d) Aliens desiring to enter Virgin Islands 
for less than 30 days; 7'esident aliens of Virgin 
Islands. Under the emergency provisions of 
section 30 of the Alien Registration Act, 1940, 
and of Executive Order No. 8430,^ of June 5, 
1940, British subjects domiciled in the British 
Virgin Islands and French citizens domiciled 
in the French island of St. Bartholomew, who 



*See the Bulletin of June 8, 1940 (vol. II, no. 50), 
pp. 622-624. 



OCTOBER 5, 1940 



281 



seek admission into the Virgin Islands for busi- 
ness or pleasure for a period of less than 30 
days on any one visit, may present a nonresi- 
dent alien's border-crossing identification card 
issued by the immigration authorities of the 
Virgin Islands. Border-crossing identification 
cards may also be issued to aliens residing in 
the Virgin Islands who may have occasion to 
proceed temporarily to the British Virgin Is- 
lands or to the French island of St. Bartholo- 
mew. (Sec. 30, Public, No. 670, 76th Cong., 
3d sess., approved June 28, 1940; E.O. 8430, 
June 5, 1940) 



[se.\l] 
October 3, 1940. 



CoRDELL Hull, 

Secretaiy of State, 



[Departmental Order No. 884] 



REGISTRATION OF AGENTS OF FOR- 
EIGN PRINCIPALS 



bj' the Department with the contents thereof. 
The Department finds, however, that this reg- 
istration statement contains surplusage inimi- 
cal to the foreign policy of the United States 
and has therefore canceled it. 



CELEBRATION OF THE JEWISH NEW 
YEAR 

[Released to the press October 3] 

The Secretary of State has issued the follow- 
ing message on the occasion of the celebration 
of the Jewish New Year on October 3, 1940: 

"On the occasion of the celebration of the 
Jewish New Year it gives me great pleasure to 
extend my greetings to our fellow Americans of 
the Jewish faith and to express the earnest hope 
and desire that the coming year may hold in 
store for them abundant health and happiness." 



[Released to the press October 5] 

On September 20, 1940 INIr. Francisco A. 
Cardenas, Post Office Box 266, Station A, San 
Antonio, Tex., submitted a registration state- 
ment in compliance with the provisions of the 
act of June 8. 1938, as amended, requiring the 
registration of agents of foreign principals. In 
this statement he named as his foreign prin- 
cipals "Partido Revolucionario de Unificacion 
Nacional (Revolutionary Party of National 
Unification) of Mexico and Gen. Juan Andreu 
Almazan, as legitimate President-elect of 
Mexico". 

The acceptance and filing of a registration 
statement submitted by the agent of a foreign 
principal does not, of course, imply agreement 



PAYMENT OF EXPENSES IN CON- 
NECTION WITH THE DEATH OF 
UNITED STATES EMPLOYEES 

An Executive order (no. 8557) prescribing 
regulations governing the payment of expenses 
incurred in connection with the death of certain 
civilian officers and employees of the United 
States was signed by the President on September 
30, 1940. 

The text of this Executive order appears in 
full in the Federal Register for October 3, 1940 
(vol. 5, no. 193), pages 3888-3890. 



American Republics 



TRAVEL GRANTS TO PROFESSORS AND STUDENTS 



[Released to the piess September 30] 

Travel grants have been awarded by the Gov- 
ernment of the United States under the Second 
Deficiency Act of 1940 to 18 students and pro- 
fessors from the other American republics, as 
part of the program to develop closer inter- 
American relations. These grants were made 
available to persons from the more distant re- 
publics who otherwise would not have been 
able to take advantage of scholarships which 
had been awarded them in the United States, 
principally through the Institute of Interna- 
tional Education of New York, N. Y. Payment 
of their necessary travel expenses from their 
homes to this country and return was authorized 
under an appropriation voted by the Seventy- 
sixth Congress. 

Four of the students come from Argentina, 
six from Biazil, six from Chile, one from Ecua- 
dor, and one from Peru. They have been 
awarded fellowships by the following institu- 
tions in this country : Stanford University, 
Tufts College, University of Florida, University 
of Pennsylvania, Johns Hopkins University, 
University of Minnesota, Rollins College, Uni- 
versity of California (2), University of Chi- 
cago, New York University, University of Mich- 
igan, Catholic University of America, Iowa 
State College, Bryn Mawr College, Ohio State 
Univei'sity, and Louisiana State University (2). 
The awards made by these institutions are in 
addition to the Government fellowships under 
the Buenos Aires Convention for the Promotion 
of Inter-American Cultural Relations.^ 

A wide range of interests is revealed by the 
fields of study in which these individuals are to 
specialize, as follows: Medicine, political 
science, civil engineering, meteorology, food 
analysis, railroad economics, electrical engi- 
neering, social work (2), library science (2), 



"Treaty Series No. 928. 
282 



psychology, economics, education (2), botany, 
agriculture, and methods of teaching history 
and literature. 

Included in this group is Dr. Cesar Vargas 
Cakleron, professor of botany in the University 
of Cuzco, Peru, who was awarded a fellowship 
by the University of California. 

Through the cooperation of Acting President 
Paul M. Hebert, of Louisiana State University, 
and the Committee on Library Cooperation 
with Latin America of the American Library 
Association, two fellowships in the School of 
Librar}' Science at Baton Rouge were made 
available to two members of tlie staff of the 
Municipal Library of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The 
recipients of these fellowships are Senhor Fran- 
cisco Jose de Almeida Azevedo, wlio is assistant 
to the chief cataloguer, and Senhorita Maria 
Leonor Voigtlander, assistant librarian. The 
Sao Paulo Municipal Library now has under 
construction a magnificent new building, which 
is expected to be one of the finest and most mod- 
ern library structures in the world. The 
director of the Library, Dr. Rubens Borba de 
Moraes, made a visit to the United States a year 
ago under the auspices of the Rockefeller 
Foundation. 

Brief biographies of the students awarded 
travel grants follow: 

Argentina 

Nob Epstein — of the Weather Bureau, Ministry of 
Agriculture of Argentina. His field is general meteor- 
ology with special reference to synoptical meteorology. 
He will study at New York University. 

LucBECiA MoKENO Freks — of the Maternity and In- 
fancy Division, National Department of Hygiene. Her 
field is sociology. She will study at Ohio State 
Universit.v. 

Pablo Mario Nooues — a graduate of the School of 
Engineering of the University of Buenos Aires. His 
field Is civil engineering. He will study at the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota. 



OCTOBER 5, 1940 



283 



Rebexxja SokoI/ — a graduate of the Institute Nacional 
del Profcsorado Secundario, Buenos Aires. Her field 
of study will be methods of teaching history and litera- 
ture. She will study at Rollins College, Fla. 

Brazil 

Roberto AsstTMPCAO de Abaitjo — a graduate of the 
Law School of the University of Brazil ; educational 
technician In the National Institute of Educational 
Cinema of the Ministry of Education. He will pursue 
a course in political science. He will study at the 
University of Chicago. 

Fkancisco Josfi DK ALMEIDA AzEVEDO — a graduate of 
the Silo Paulo Library School. He has been with the 
library since 193.") and is now assistant to the chief 
cataloger. He will pursue special studies in cataloging 
at Louisiana State University. 

JosiS Sali.es de Ouveria Coutinho — a graduate of 
the Medical School at Rio de Janeiro. He will con- 
tinue liis mediciil studies at Johns Hopkins University. 

Otto Lyra Schkadee — a graduate of the Superior 
School of Agriculture and Veterinary Science at 
Vi(;osn, Minas Geraes ; and an inspector for the Bra- 
zilian Ministry of Agriculture. He will continue his 
studies in the agricultural field at the University of 
Florida. 

Neto Thomaz Scott Newlands — a graduate of the 
Law School of the University of Brazil. He is an edu- 
cational specialist in the Ministry of Education of 
Brazil. He will pursue advanced work in education at 
the University of Pennsylvania. 

Maria Leonor Voigti^nder — a graduate of the Nor- 
mal School and of the Sao Paulo Library School. She 
has had 15 years of library experience and is now the 
assistant librarian. She will undertake advanced li- 
brary work at the University of Louisiana. 

Chile 

Maria Josefina Aguirre — the head of the Spanish 
Department at Santiago College, She will pursue 
courses in American educational methods at Bryn Mawr 
College. 

Enrique Echea-errIa Heitmann — a graduate of the 
Faculty of Economics and Commerce of the University 
of Chile. He is secretary of the Energy Department 
in the Corporation of Production Development. He will 
pursue studies in economics and international trade 
at the Catholic University of America. 

Cablos a. Freebe Alabc/)n — a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Concepcion and secretary of the "Escuela 
Industrial de Concepcion". He will pursue courses in 
education and psychology at Tufts College. 

Danilo Lvksic — a graduate of the School of En- 
gineering, University of Chile. He will pursue an 
advanced course in civil engineering with especial 
reference to construction in earthquake regions. He 
will study at the University of California. 



Renato Salazar — a graduate of the School of En- 
gineering, University of Chile, and assistant engineer 
in the Electrical Service Board of the Chilean Govern- 
ment. His field of study will be electrical engineering, 
which he will pursue at Stanford University. 

Luis Antonio Severo de Costa — a graduate of the 
Law School of the University of Brazil and a member 
of the staff of the "Institute of Superannuation and 
Pensions of Industrial Workers". He will pursue 
studies in sociology, with special reference to rural 
communities, at the University of Michigan. 

Ecuadob 

JosiS Crusellas Ventura — a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Guayaquil ; teaches chemistry at the Univer- 
sity and is municipal chemist of the city of Guayaquil. 
He will pursue courses at Iowa State College. 

Pesu 

Ci::sAR Vargas Calderon— professor of botany at the 
University of Cuzco. He will pursue advanced studies 
at the University of California. 



RAILWAY SURVEY IN BOLIVIA 

[Released to the press October 4] 

At the request of the Bolivian Government, 
the Department of State lias arranged for a 
survey of the cost and feasibility of completing 
the railway in Bolivia between Vila Vila and 
Santa Cruz. Capt. LeRoy Bartlett and Lieut. 
Irving M. Parry, Engineer Corps, United 
States Army, are shortly to leave for Bolivia to 
undertake this survey. * 



INAUGURATION OF PRESIDENT 
OF CUBA 

[Released to the press October 3] 

The President has named the Honorable 
George S. Slessersmith as his special representa- 
tive with the rank of Ambassador Extraordi- 
nary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the United 
States of America at the inauguration of Ful- 
gencio Batista as President of Cuba. 



GERMAN DEBTS 



[Released to the press October 1] 

The following note has been sent by the Sec- 
retary of State to the German Charge d'Affaires : 

September 12, 1940. 

Hekr Hans Thomsen, 

German Charge (P Affaires ad interim. 

Sir: 
I am requested by the Secretary of the Treas- 



ury to transmit to you the enclosed statement 
of amounts due and payable on September 30, 
1933 to March 31, 1940, inclusive, and Septem- 
ber 30, 1940, from the German Government pur- 
suant to the terms of the Debt Agreement of 
June 23, 1930, and the Moratorium Agi-eement 
of May 26, 1933. 
Accept [etc.] C!ordell Hull 



[Enclosure] 
Statement of Amounts Due From the Government of Gbrmany, From September 30, 1933 to March 31, 1940, 

Inclusive, and September 30, 1940 
(in Reichsmarks)' 



Mixed Claims 



Army Costs 



Annuity under 
Moratorium 
Agreement 



Amount due September 30, 1933 

(Deposited by the German Government in the Konver 
sionsliasse fur Deutsche Auslandeschulden) 

Amount due March 31, 1934 

Amount due September 30, 1934 

Amount due March 31, 1935 

Amount due September 30, 1935 

Amount due March 31, 1936 

Amount due September 30, 1936 

Amount due March 31, 1937 

Amount due September 30, 1937 

Amount due March 31, 1938 

Amount due September 30, 1938 

Amount due March 31, 1939 

Amount due September 30, 1939 

Amount due March 31, 1940 

Total 



2, 040, 000. CO 



458, 562. 50 



122, 400, 
23, 460, 

23, 970, 

24, 480, 

24, 990, 

25, 500, 

26, 010, 

26, 520, 

27, 030, 

27, 540, 

28, 050, 

28, 560, 

29, 070, 



000. 00 
000. 00 
000. 00 
000. 00 
000. 00 
000. 00 
000. 00 
000. 00 
000. 00 
000. 00 
000. 00 
000. 00 
000. 00 



795, 
63, 464, 
10, 432, 
10, 601, 
10, 769, 
10, 938, 
10, 007, 
10, 155, 
10, 304, 
10, 452, 
11,701, 
11,870, 



687. 50 
250. 00 
812. 50 
375. 00 
937. 50 
500. 00 
062. 50 
687. 50 
312. 50 
937. 50 
502. 50 
125. 00 



439, 620, 000. 00 



171, 952, 812. 50 



1, 529, 049. 45 



1, 529, 
1, 529, 
1, 529, 
1, 529, 
1, 529, 
1, 529, 
1, 529, 
1, 529, 
1, 529, 
1, 529, 
1, 529, 
1, 529, 
1, 529, 



049. 45 
049. 45 
049. 45 
049. 45 
049. 45 
049. 45 
049. 45 
049. 45 
049. 45 
049. 45 
049. 45 
049. 45 
049. 45 



21, 406, 692. 30 



Ainount due September SO, 1940 
Mixed Claims — 
Semi-annual interest due Septem- 
ber 30, 1940 on bonds A-4 to 
A-21, inclusive, in the principal 
amount of 20,400,000 reichs- 

marks each 9, 180,000.00 

Principal of Bond A-22 20, 400, 000. 00 

Army Costs — 

Semi-annual interest due Septem- 



« One reichsmark>=$.4033. 
284 



ber 30, 1940 on bonds B-6 to 

B-21, inclusive 2, 738, 687. 50 

Principal of bond B-22 9, 300, 000. 00 

Moratorium Agreement — 

Semi-annual installment due Sep- 
tember 30, 1940 on the annuity 
of 3,058,098.90 reichsmarks un- 
der moratorium agreement of 
May 26, 1932 1,529,049. 45 



Amount due 43, 147, 736. 95 



OCTOBER 5, 1940 



285 



SUSPENSION OF TONNAGE DUTIES 
FOR VESSELS OF ICELAND 

A proclamation (no. 2429) providing that 
"the foreign discriminating duties of tonnage 
and imposts within the United States" be 
"suspended and discontinued so far as respects 
the vessels of Iceland and the produce, manu- 
factures, or merchandise imported in said 
vessels into the United States from Iceland or 
from any other foreign country ; the suspension 
to take effect from September 13, 1940, and to 
continue so long as the reciprocal exemption of 
vessels belonging to citizens of the United States 
and their cargoes shall be continued, and no 
longer", was signed by the President on Sep- 
tember 30, 1940. 

The text of this proclamation appears in full 
in the Federal Register for October 3, 1940 (vol. 
5, no. 193), page 3887. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Telecommunication: General Radio Regulations 
(Cairo Revision, 1938) and Final Radio Protocol 
(Cairo Revision, 1938) Annexed to the Telecommuni- 
cation Convention (Madrid, 1932) between the United 
States of America and Other Powers.- — Signed April 8, 
1938; proclaimed by the President September 18, 1939. 
Treaty Series No. 948. iv, 335 pp. 30<f. 

Other Go\'ernment Agencies 

The following Government publications may 
be of interest to readers of the Bulletin: 

Manual of the international list of causes of death, 
as adopted for use in the United States, based on the 
fifth decennial revision by the International Com- 
mission, Paris, October 3-7, 1938 ; manual of joint 



causes of death. (Bureau of the Census.) 1940. 445 
pp. $1.25 (cloth). 

Report of the Alaskan International Highway Com- 
mission to the President, AprU 1940. (House Doc. No. 
711. 76th Cong., 3d sess.) vi, 33 pp., lllus., maps. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press October 5] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
Foreign Service since September 28, 1940 : 

Lymi W. Meekins, of Pennsylvania, Foreign 
Service officer assigned to the Department of 
State and detailed to the Department of Com- 
merce, has been designated Commercial Attache 
at Pretoria, Union of South Africa. 

The assignment of Rolland Welch, of Texas, 
as Third Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul 
at Panama, Panama, has been canceled. Mr. 
"Welch has now been designated Third Secretary 
of Embassy and Vice Consul at Lima, Peru, and 
will serve in dual capacity. 

Charles A. Cooper, of Humboldt, Nebr., Vice 
Consul at Shanghai, China, has been designated 
Third Secretary of Embassy at Tokyo, Japan. 

Harold E. Montamat, of Westfield, N. J., 
Third Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul at 
La Paz, Bolivia, has been designated Third 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at 
Panama, Panama, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

E. Edward Schefer, of New York, N. Y., Vice 
Consul at Manila, P. I., has been assigned as 
Vice Consul at Batavia, Java, Netherlands 
Indies. 

Elbert G. Mathews, of Oakland, Calif., Vice 
Consul at Sydney, Australia, has been desig- 
nated Third Secretary of Legation and Vice 
Consul at Managua, Nicaragua, and will serve 
in dual capacity. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



INTERNATIONAL LAW 

International Institute for the Unification 
of Private Law 

The Italian Ambassador at Washington trans- 
mitted to the Secretary of State with a note 
dated September 6, 1940 a certified copy of the 
Statute of the International Institute of Rome 
for the Unification of Private Law, which is 
dated March 15, 1940. 

Article 20 of the statute provides that any 
government may adhere thereto by notification 
to the Italian Government. Each adherence is 
made for six years, and unless a notice of de- 
nunciation is given in writing one year before 
the expiration of the six-year period, each ad- 
herence is tacitly renewed. The adherences and 
denunciations are notified to each participating 
government by the Italian Government. 

The purpose of the Institute as set forth in 
article I of the statute is "to study the methods 
for the assimilation and coordination of private 
law as between States or groups of States, and 
to prepare for the gi'adual adoption by the var- 
ious states of uniform private law legislation". 
The seat of the Institute is at Rome. The or- 
gans of the Institute are (1) the General 
Assembly, composed of a representative of each 
participating government; (2) the President 
appointed by the Italian Government; (3) the 
Governing Body, composed of the President 
and from 10 to 14 members chosen by the Gen- 
eral Assembly; (4) the Standing Committee, 
composed of the President and 4 members 
chosen by the Governing Body from among its 
members; (5) the Secretariat, composed of a 
Secretary General appointed by the Governing 
Body, on the proposal of the President, two 
Assistant Secretaries General of different na- 

286 



tionalities, likewise appointed by the Governing 
Body, and such officials and clerks as provided 
by the rules for the administration of the 
Institute. 

The Ambassador's note states that the follow- 
ing countries have adhered to the statute : Bel- 
gium, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Denmark, Fin- 
land, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, 
Mexico, the Netherlands, Nicaragua, Paraguay, 
Rumania, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Uru- 
guay, Venezuela, and Yugoslavia. 



LEGAL ASSISTANCE 

Protocol on Uniformity of Powers of Attor- 
ney Which Are To Be Utilized Abroad 

Bolivia 

The Dii'ector General of the Pan American 
Union informed the Secretary of State by a 
letter dated October 1, 1940 that the Protocol 
on Unifoi'inity of Powers of Attorney Which 
Are To Be Utilized Abroad, which was opened 
for signature on February 17, 1940, was signed 
ad referendum on behalf of Bolivia on Sep- 
tember 26, 1940. 

The representative of Bolivia in signing the 
protocol inserted a statement, a translation of 
which reads as follows : 

"The Representative of Bolivia signs this 
protocol with the following clarification re- 
garding article I, section 2 : 

"For the correct api^lication of article I, sec- 
tion 2 of the protocol on uniformity of the 
legal regime concerning powers of attorney in 
the tei'ritory of the Republic of Bolivia, it is 



OCTOBER 5, 1940 287 



Legislation 



necessary that the notary or functionary 
charf!:ed with the authentication of documents 
should insert in the powers of attorney which 

are issued by delegation or by substitution the 

. . Workmen's Compensation for Seamen : Hearings 

nitegral text of the original powers of attorney before the Commerce Committee of the Senate, 76th 

and of all those documents which prove the Cong., 3d sess., on H. R. 6S81, to implement the pro- 

i„ 1 „„„;i„ „£ i.i,„ „„„„„„ „„„x • _ ii visions of the Shipowners' Liability Convention, 1936 

legal capacity or the person conierring the , . , , . . , . , , ^ „, ^ „_ .^.^ 

'^ ' •' ^ '^ (sick and injured seamen), July 23, 24, and 25, 1940. 

power." 359 pp. 30«;. 



U- S. GOVERNMENT PRINTIN6 OFFICE: 1940 



For sale by tho Superintendent of Dofuments, Washington, D. C. — Pricp 10 rents - - - - Subscription price, 

PrRLISHED WEEKLY WITH THB APPROVAL OF THR DIKECTOR OP THE FUBKAU OP THE BUDGET 




THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



.O ^ JL/ 



Lj 



H 



■^ ^ 



J 



rm 




OCTOBER 12, 1940 
Vol. Ill: No. 68 — Publication I^IJ 

Qontents 

General: Page 

Address by the President to the Western Hemisphere . 29 1 
Fundamental Values in American Foreign Policy: 

Address by Assistant Secretary Berle 295 

Law Pu])Iications of the Department of State: Address 

by E. Wilder Spaulding 301 

Europe: 

Contributions for relief in belligerent countries .... 305 
Executive order regarding property of Rumania in the 

United States 306 

The Far East: 

China: National anniversary 306 

The Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 306 

Regulations 307 

Publications 307 

Treaty Information: 

Nature protection and wildlife preservation: 

Convention on Nature Protection and Wildlife 

Preservation in the Western Hemisphere .... 308 
Sovereignty: 

Convention on the Provisional Administration of 
European Colonies and Possessions in the Amer- 
icas 309 

Boundary : 

Convention with Canada for the Emergency Regula- 
tion of the Level of Rainy Lake and of Certain 
Other Boundary Waters 309 



V 



U. S, SUPERINTENPENT OF DOCUMENTS 
OCT 29 i940 



General 



ADDRESS BY THE PRESIDENT TO THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE 



My Friends of the Americas : 

It is no mere coincidence thai this radio broatl- 
cast to the entire Western Hemisphere — North 
America. Central America and Soutli Amer- 
ica — should take place on the anniversary of 
Christopher Columbus' discovery of the New 
AVorld. No day could be more appropriate than 
this day on which we celebrate the exploits of 
(he bold discoverer. 

Today, all of us Americans of North and Cen- 
tral and South America join with our fellow cit- 
izens of Italian descent to do honor to the name 
(if Columbus. 

Many and numerous have been the fjroups of 
Italians who have come in welcome waves of 
innnigration (o this lieniisphere. They have 
been an essential element in the civilization and 
make-up of all of the 21 republics. During these 
centuries Italian names have been high in the 
list of statesmen in the United States and in the 
other republics — and in addition, those who 
have helped to create the scientific, commercial, 
professional, and artistic life of the New World. 

The Americas have excelled in the adventure 
of many races living together in harmony. In 
the wake of the discoverers came the first set- 
tlers, the first refugees from Europe. They 
came to plough new fields, build new homes, 
establish a new society in a new world. Later, 
the}- fought for liberty. Men and women of 
courage, of enterprise, of vision, they knew 



' Delivered from the President's train at Da.vton, Ohio, 
October 12, 1940. 

26S029— 40 1 



what they were figliting for; they gained it — 
and tliereby "gave liope to all the world for all 
future time". 

They formed, here in the Western Hemi- 
sphere, a new human reservoir, and into it has 
I»ured the blood, the culture, the traditions of 
all the races and peoples of the earth. To the 
Americas they came — the "masses yearning to 
be free" — "the multitudes brought hither out of 
many kinch-eds and tongues", cherishing com- 
mon aspirations, not for economic betterment 
alone, but for the personal freedoms and liber- 
ties which had been denied to them in the Okl 
World. 

They came not to concpier one another but to 
live with one another. They proudly carried 
with them their inheritance of culture, but they 
cheerfully left behind the burden of prejudice 
and hatred. 

In this New World were transplanted the 
great cultures of Spain and Portugal. In our 
own day the fact is that a great part of the Span- 
isli and Portuguese culture of the entire world 
now comes from the Americas. 

It is natural that all American citizens from 
the many nations of the Old World should 
kindly remember the lands where their ancestors 
lived and the great attributes of tlie old civiliza- 
tion in those lands. But in every single one of 
tlie American republics, the first and final alle- 
giance and loyalty of these citizens, almost with- 
out exception, is to tlie republic in which they 
live and move and have their being. 

291 



292 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



For when our forefathers came to these shores, 
they came with a determination to stay and to 
become citizens of the New World. As it estab- 
lished its independence, they wanted to become 
citizens of America — not an Anglo-Saxon 
America, nor an Italian, nor a German, nor a 
Spanish, nor a Portuguese — but just citizens of 
an indej^endent nation of America. 

Here, we do not have any dual citizenship. 
Here, the descendants of the very same races who 
had always been forced to fear or hate each 
other in lands across the ocean have learned to 
live in peace and in friendship. 

No one group or race in the New World has 
any desire to subjugate the others. No one 
nation in this hemisphere has any desire to 
dominate the others. In the W^estern Hemi- 
sphere no nation is considered a second-class 
nation. And that is something worth remem- 
bering. 

We know that attempts have been made — we 
know that they will continue to be made — to di- 
vide these groups within a nation and to di- 
vide these nations among themselves. 

There are those in the Old World who persist 
in believing that here in this new liemisphere the 
Americas can be torn by the hatreds and fears 
which have drenched the battlegrounds of Eu- 
rope for so many centuries. Americans as indi- 
viduals, American republics as nations, remain 
on guard against those who seek to break up our 
imity by preaching ancient race hatreds, by 
working on old fears, or by holding out glitter- 
ing promises which they know to be false. 

"Divide and conquer" has been the battle-cry 
of the totalitarian powers in their war against 
the democracies. It has succeeded on the con- 
tinent of Europe for the moment. On our 
continents it will fail. 

We are determined to use our energies and our 
resources to counteract and repel the foreign 
plots and propaganda — the whole technique of 
underground warfare originating in Europe 
and now clearly directed against all the rejDub- 
lics on this side of the ocean. 

That propaganda repeats and repeats tliat de- 
mocracy is a decadent form of government. 
They tell us that our old democratic ideal, our 



old traditions of civil liberties, are things of the 
past. 

We reject this thought. We say that we are 
the future. We say that the direction in which 
they would lead us is backward, not forward — 
backward to the bondage of the Pharaohs, back- 
ward to the slavery of the Middle Ages. 

The command of the democratic faith has 
been ever onward and upward. Never have free 
men been satisfied with the mere maintenance of 
any status quo, however comfortable or secure 
it may have seemed at the moment. 

We have always held to the hope, the belief, 
the conviction that there is a better life, a better 
world, beyond the horizon. 

That fire of freedom was in the eyes of Wash- 
ington, and Bolivar, and San Martin, and Arti- 
gas, and Juarez, and Bernardo O'Higgins, and 
all the brave, rugged, ragged men who followed 
them in the wars of independence. 

That fire burns now in the eyes of those who 
are fighting for freedom in lands across the sea. 

On this side of the ocean there is no desire, 
there will be no effort, on the part of any one 
race, or people, or nation, to control any other. 
The only encirclement sought is the encircling 
bond of good old-fashioned neighborly friend- 
ship. So bound together, we are able to with- 
stand any attack from the east or from the west. 
Together we are able to ward off any infiltration 
of alien political and economic ideas which 
would destroy our freedom and democracy. 

Wlien we speak of defending this Western 
Hemisphere, we are speaking not only of the 
territory of North, Central, and South America 
and the immediately adjacent islands. We in- 
clude the right to the peaceful use of the At- 
lantic and Pacific Oceans. That has been our 
traditional policy. 

It is a fact, for example, that as far back as 
1798 the United States found that its peaceful 
trade and commerce with other parts of the 
Americas were threatened by armed privateers 
sent to the West Indies by nations then at war 
in Europe. Because of this threat to peace in 
this hemisphere of ours, the United States Ships 
Constellation, Constitution, United States, and 
many others were fitted out ; and they drove the 



OCTOBER 12, 1940 



293 



armed vessels of Europe out of the waters to the 
south of us, and made commerce between the 
Americas once more peaceable and possible. 

We of the Americas still consider that this 
defense of these oceans of the Western Hemi- 
sphere against acts of aggression is the first fac- 
tor in the defense and protection of our own 
territorial integrity. We reaffirm tliat policy, 
lest there be any doubt of our intention to main- 
tain it. 

There are some in every single one of the 21 
American republics who suggest that the course 
the Americas are following is slowly drawing 
one or all of us into war with some nation or 
nations beyond the seas. 

The clear facts have been stated over antl 
over again. This country wants no war with 
any nation. This hemisphere wants no war with 
any nation. The American republics are deter- 
mined to work in unity for peace, just as we 
work in unity to defend ourselves from attack. 

For many long years every ounce of energy I 
have had has been devoted to keeping this nation 
and the other republics at peace with the rest of 
the world. That is what continues uppermost 
in my mind today — the objective for which I 
hope and work and pray. 

We arm to defend ourselves. The strongest 
reason for that is that it is the strongest guar- 
antee for peace. 

The United States of America is mustering 
its men and resources, arming not only to defend 
itself, but, in cooperation with the other Ameri- 
can republics, to help defend the whole hemi- 
sphere. 

We are building a total defense on land and 
sea and in the air, sufficient to repel total at- 
tack from any part of the world. Forewarned 
by the deliberate attacks of the dictators upon 
free peoples, the United States, for the first time 
in its history, has undertaken the mustering of 
its men in peacetime. Unprecedented dangers 
have caused the United States to midertake the 
building of a navy and an air force sufficient to 
defend all the coasts of the Americas from any 
combination of hostile powers. 

We have asked for, and we have received, the 
fullest cooperation and assistance of industry 



and labor. All of us are speeding the prepara- 
tion of adequate defense. 

And we are keeping the nations of this hemi- 
sphere fully advised of our defense prepara- 
tions. We have welcomed the military missions 
from neighboring republics; and in turn our 
own military experts have been welcomed by 
tiiem. We intend to encourage this frank in- 
terchange of information and plans. 

We shall be all for one and one for all. 

This idea of a defense strong enough and wide 
enough to cover this half of the world had its 
beginnings when the Government of the United 
States announced its policy with respect to 
South America. It was the policy of the good 
neighbor, the neighbor who knew how to mind 
his own business, but was always willing to lend 
a friendly hand to a friendly nation which 
sought it, the neighbor who was willing to dis- 
cuss in all friendship the problems which will 
always arise between neighboi-s. 

From the day on which that policy was an- 
nounced, the American republics have consulted 
with each other; they have peacefully settled 
their old problems and disputes; they have 
gi"Own closer and closer to each other; until at 
last in 1938 at Lima, their unity and friendship 
were sealed. 

There was then adopted a declaration that 
the New World proposed to mamtain collec- 
tivel}' the freedom upon which its strength had 
been built. It was the culmination of the good- 
neighbor policy, the proof of what was said by 
that famous Argentinian of Italian birth, Al- 
berdi — "The Americas are a great political sys- 
tem : the parts draw life from the whole ; and the 
whole draws life from its parts." 

Through the acquisition of eight naval bases 
in territories of the British Empire lying within 
the sphere of the New World, from Newfovmd- 
land to Guiana, we have increased the immediate 
effectiveness of the great Navy which we now 
have and of the greater Navy we have imder 
construction. These bases were acquired by the 
United States ; but not for the protection of the 
United States alone. They were acquired for 
the protection of the whole Western Hemi- 
sphere. The unity of the American republics 



294 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



was iiroven to the world when these naval bases 
-were promptly opened by the United States to 
the other republics for cooperative use. In that 
act was typified the good-neighbor conception of 
hemispheric defense through cooperation by and 
for all of us. 

American radio stations will play their part 
in the new unity which has been built so solidly 
between the American nations during the past 
eight years. They nuist be effective instruments 
for the honest exchange and communication of 
ideas. They must never be used as stations in 
other lands are used, to send out on the same day 
one false story to one country, and a different 
false story to another. 

The core of our defense is the faith we have in 
the institutions we defend. The Americas will 
not be scared or threatened into the ways the 
dictators want us to follow. 

No combination of dictator countries of Eu- 
rope and Asia will halt us in the path we see 
ahead for ourselves and for democracy. 

No combination of dictator countries of Eu- 
rope and Asia will stop the hel-p we are giving to 
almost the last free people fighting to hold them 
at bay. 

Our course is clear. Our decision is made. 
We will continue to pile up our defense and our 
armaments. We will continue to help those who 
resist aggi'ession, and who now hold the aggres- 
sors far from our shores. Let no American in 
any part of the Americas question the possi- 
bility of danger from overseas. Why should we 
accept assurances that we are immune ? History 
records that not long ago those same assurances 
were given to the people of Holland and Bel- 
gium and Norway. 

It can no longer be disputed that forces of evil 
which are bent on conquest of the world will 
destroy whome\er and whenever they can de- 
stroy. We have learned the lessons of recent 



years. We know now that if we seek to appease 
them by withholding aid from those who stand 
in their way, we only hasten the day of their 
attack upon us. 

The people of the United States, the people of 
all the Americas, reject the doctrine of appease- 
ment. They recognize it for what it is — a major 
weapon of the aggressor nations. 

I speak bluntly. I speak the love the Amer- 
ican people have for freedom and liberty and 
decency and humanity. 

That is why we arm. Because, I repeat, this 
nation wants to keep war away from these two 
continents. Because we all of us are determined 
to do everything possible to maintain peace on 
this hemisphere. Because great strength of 
arms is tlie practical way of fulfilling our hopes 
for peace and for staying out of this war or any 
other war. Because we are determined to mus- 
ter all our strength so that we may remain free. 

Tlie men and women of Britain have shown 
how free peojde defend what they know to be 
right. Their heroic defense will be recorded for 
all time. It will be perpetual proof that democ- 
racy, when put to the test, can show the stufl' 
of wliich it is made. 

I well recall during my recent visit to three 
great capital cities in South America, the vast 
throngs which came to express by their cheers 
their friendship for the United States. I espe- 
cially remember that above all the cheers I heard 
one constant cry again and again — one shout 
above all others: ''jViva la Democracia !"' — 
"Long live democracy !" 

Tliose three stirring words cry out tlie abiding 
conviction of people in all the democracies that 
freedom shall rule in the land. 

As I salute the peoples of all the nations in 
the western world, I echo that greeting from 
our good neighboi's of the Americas: "jViva la 
democracia !'' — "Long live democracy !" 



OCTOBER 12, 194 



295 



FUNDAMENTAL VALUES IN AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY 

Address by Assistant Secretary Berle ^ 



(Released to the press October 8] 

Properly, it seems to me, universities througli- 
out the country are discussing American foreign 
policy. Now. if ever, the youth of this country 
ought to be considering, very soberly, what that 
policy is, whore it is going, and why it is going 
there. 

The events of the past few years have conclu- 
sively settled one question. The United States 
does not stand apart as a detached spectator 
in world events. We no longer debate foreign 
policy as an academic issue. It was perhaps 
possible in 1914 for us to choose whether the 
American Continent would have a part in the 
world events then taking place or whether we 
might pass them by. Today we do not have 
that choice. The American public was a direct 
spectator of the fall of Austria, the abortive 
peace effort of Munich, the crushing of Czecho- 
slovakia, the invasion of Poland, and the out- 
break of the war in September 1939. Its 
emotions, its economics, and its foreign relations 
were profoundly affected by the rapid spread of 
the war both on land and at sea. 

Propaganda of the various belligerents, speci- 
fically directed at us, was present in varying 
degrees in many parts of the United States. 
That same propaganda was and still is carried 
on in our sister republics on this hemisphere 
with an intensity and an anti-American direc- 
tion designed to threaten not only the conven- 
tional "American interests" of commerce and 
trade, but also security, communications, and 
even political stability. The word "isolation" 
originally meant the creditable desire of great 
masses of Americans to steer clear of foreign 
disputes. As events moved forward, it began 
to mean being suiTounded by nations or groups 
of nations whose intentions, judging at least 
from the propaganda put out by orders of their 
governments, were not reassuring. Propa- 



' Delivereii before the International Relations Club 
of the University of North Carolina. Chapel Hill, Octo- 
ber 7, 1940. 



ganda is frequently a better test of a govern- 
ment's intentions than official statements. 

I think, in retrospect, that it has been thor- 
oughly good for the United States to be brought 
face to face with these elemental international 
forces. I think it is not at all a bad thing for 
us, every once in so often, to have to stand up 
and make affirmation of faith; to say to our- 
selves and to everyone else what we are all about, 
and wh}'. I think that it is, on the whole, fortu- 
nate that we are having to do so now. For 
there was, in my judgment, a very real danger 
threatening the United States. 

That danger was a tendency to become soft, to 
assume that everyone could consider his own in- 
terests and did not need to consider those of any- 
one el.se, and to believe that there were, after all, 
no real guiding principles by which men, and 
particularly young men, must live. 

I think I know how this came about, because 
I lived through the long process which began 
just after the "World War and ended only a short 
time ago. 

After the AVorld War, disillusionment rap- 
idly became complete. We entered that war 
with the highest ideals of any belligerent in his- 
tory. We were unable to see that those ideals 
had been realized in any waj-. ilany Americans, 
and particularly many American liberals, be- 
gan to drink deeply at the poisoned well of cer- 
tain sterile European revolutionary movements. 

You know the line. These movements had no 
positive values. They began by denying God in 
any form, insisting that He was a device in- 
vented by special privilege to intrench its own 
position. There actually were Americans silly 
enough to swallow that idea, forgetting that 
centuries of Americans had believed in and 
served a God who had taken them through the 
wilderness, past frontier after frontier, and had 
by resolute faith built on this continent a nation 
unrivaled in power. Religion then did not pro- 
tect privilege : there was none to protect. It 
gave strength to the settlers and builders. 



296 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Wliat we used to call virtues, such as honesty, 
consideration, kindness, and fair dealing were 
summarily disposed of as merely dogmas in- 
vented by weaklings to protect themselves 
against the strong, who thus were prevented 
from using their full powers. This blithely dis- 
regarded the continuous historic fact that mere 
strength, in and of itself, never built or settled 
anything, either in the Old World or the New. 
Strength is only useful as it protects the devel- 
opment of some positive belief by which men 
live together, work together, and get a result we 
call civilization. 

Finally, the doctrine was rapidly expanded in 
Europe — it finds some repercussions here — that 
the world belongs to the young and the young 
only, because the young are strong enough to 
use brass knuckles and bludgeons to seize what 
they want and make the most out of it. Propa- 
gandists of this idea always conceal the fact 
that behind the youngsters thus invited to take 
charge of the world there are invariably certain 
scheming, organized heads, who know that the 
young men with force in their hands are merely 
their tools, and that, if you like, the youngster is 
being swindled into becoming a cat's paw for 
cleverer men, who stay behind the lines, and 
quietly take advantage of the disorder created. 
The "brave young men" who wei'e used to cre- 
ate the European disorders out of which the 
present situation has come have quietly van- 
ished — they are cannon fodder in army ranks, 
they are dead by assassination, or they arc other- 
wise disposed of. It is the oldest trick in re\- 
olutionary technique. 

It was possible to involve the young men of 
Europe, and Europe generally, in these tragic 
and disastrous movements only because there 
had come to be a huge emptiness in European 
thought. No one felt it necessary to point out 
that the great civilization which Europe and we 
inherited had not come merely from the casual 
ambitions of men who had seized power. No 
one arose to point out that the permanent insti- 
tutions of the world had never been built in 
that fashion. Institutions which have lasted in 
the world have been built on faith far more than 
force, have been built not on selfishness, but on 



selflessness. No serious student today swallows 
whole the so-called "economic interpretation" 
of history. The happiness which has existed in 
the world has come not because men sought di- 
rectly to advance themselves at all costs, but 
because many men, some known, some for- 
gotten, elected to try to do something for each 
other which made possible cooperative living in 
the world. 

Appeal is often made to the fact that some 
groups now wield material force on a huge scale. 
This is called a "biological justification" in the 
overseas jargon. Let us see. 

Certain foreign political groups today claim 
preponderant force, and by it claim a "biological 
right" to dominate everything around them. 
This force they rely on is mechanical. It comes 
from steam railways, from motor-driven tanks 
and transport, from aircraft, from radio, from 
electric controls, from naval construction, both 
surface and submarine. Now it so happens that 
every one of these technical developments is of 
American origin. They are American tools. 
Steam was developed here. The gasoline en- 
gine and the modern armored tank were de- 
veloped in America. Airplanes were thought 
of, invented, and developed in the United States. 
Most of the naval construction which today 
dominates sea warfare was worked out in this 
country. Kadio, and its companion arts, is of 
mixed origin, but was primarily brought into 
practical use through American laboratories and 
American commercial exploitation. 

These tools came into existence as a result of 
the demands of peace, and not of war. They 
were designed to aid life, and not to spread 
death. If there is philosophic right to claim 
mastery by reason of these things, the right rests 
with American scientists, American labora- 
tories, American research, and American engi- 
neering. The men who accomplish these things 
are in great measure unknown to history. Most 
of them toiled unselfishly as students, scientists, 
workers, who lived happily as productive himian 
beings, and died leaving civilization in their 
debt. They are the exact opposite of force- 
politicians. 



OCTOBER 12, 194 



297 



For these thinp;s were the results of positive 
vahies. To deveh)p a scientific principle you 
must believe in truth. You cannot tell lies to 
science and get a result. In large measure, you 
must be altruistic. One foundation which 
makes possible either peace or war is the devel- 
opment of medicine. No one can argue that 
medical science, which has had as great or even 
greater advance than mechanical invention, has 
been primarily driven by the profit motive, for 
the medical profession in the main has held to 
the ancient and great conception tliat every ad- 
A'ance in the art of healing or {preventing disease 
belongs to the world and not to tlie discoverer. 

Overseas we now watch the i)erversion of these 
developments. No sane student can appraise 
them without realizing that the use which is 
now being made of tiiem has little in common 
Avith the mental processes which brought them 
into being. The free aiul selfless countries go on 
developing. The apostles of the negative, who 
were talking in terms of mere force, do not and 
cannot continue this development. That is why 
no regime, in Europe or elsewhere, based on the 
philosophy of every man for himself and the 
sheer use of force has ever maintained itself 
more than a few short years; why. inevitably, 
the last spark of freedom has always broken 
through to ultimate triumph. 

If I have made my point, it is that we must 
once more affirm tlie positive values : must insist 
on virtue in the great sense of that word, nu-an- 
ing thereby those qualities which properly befit 
a man ; on ideals which are bigger than the indi- 
vidual and therefore permit the individual to 
serve them without limit, yet without losing his 
own freedom of personality in the process. The 
test of virtue is whether it contributes to build- 
ing a world in which people can live together 
to their mutual happiness, as against the cynical 
doctrine which assumes that ambition is the only 
motive worthwhile, and that power to take 
means the right to hold, and that the end is 
death in anj- case. 

You will be saying, I imagine, at this point, 
that it is strange to base a talk on foreign af- 
fairs with an essay on philosojihy. Yet, if you 
were in daily contact with the handling of 

20S020 — 10 2 



foreign affaii's you would be aware that the 
present conflict, which has compelled the United 
States to equip a huge army and to ring its 
shores with floating and static steel, is distinctly 
philosophical. Only when you understand that 
can you get the guy ropes of what happens from 
day to day in present foreign affairs — as well as 
the outlines of what must be at long last the 
basis of peace and final settlement. 

In practice the conflict is briefly and simply 
this: 

We had, until recently, a world whose pri- 
mary organization was intended to permit na- 
tions and individuals to live as happily as they 
could. It had all kinds of defects, of course. 
There were plenty of individuals, groups, and 
occasionally nations which violated that under- 
lying compact. There were all kinds of in- 
equalities in distributing the world's goods, the 
world's territory, antl the worlil's power. There 
were outbreaks of war and trouble, bnt behind 
these outbreaks there was always a realization 
that eventually matters must once more come 
to rest, and that the eiul nuist be to solve the 
difficulties. 

Na])oleon. perhaps the greatest of those who 
sought to achieve and seize by force the domi- 
nation of Europe, spent an endless amount of 
time and thought in endeavoring to discover 
how he could recreate the situation which he 
himself had destroyed. It was no part of his 
jilan to be a temporary meteor, rushing through 
glory, to a disastrous end. He proposed, if 
possible, to establish an international system. 
But he found — it is (me of the most tragic pages 
in history — that in the process of seizing power 
he had violated the only basis on which stability 
could at length be restored. He had upset the 
conceijtion that there was any law except force. 
"When, as presently he did, his empire appealed 
to law, to good faith, to good relations, to re- 
spect for the rights of men to live, he discovered 
that, once broken, those laws exacted his down- 
fall as the price of their reestablishment. You 
cannot appeal to law and morals this week, and 
to force next week, and expect to have it both 
ways. It is either one or the other — but never 
both. 



298 



DEPARTIMEKT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Now it is that realization which dominates 
American foreign policy. We have never had 
the illusion that you could chop the world up 
into sections, allowing force-politics to dominate 
one section while other sections followed the 
cooperative virtues of good faith, respect for 
the pledged word, honest dealing, and fair and 
generous attempts to settle controversies in a 
spirit of give-and-take. President Roosevelt 
has made that point, time and again ; and Sec- 
retary Hull, who is great as a philosopher as 
well as a statesman, has explained this to the 
country time and again. In the early stages, 
some Ameiicans did not realize how deadly 
serious he was. He knew — as all the world 
knows now — that once appeal is made to force 
without underlying justice, the nation or na- 
tions which take the sword can rarely, if ever, 
put it down, unless they have come to realize 
that the process was itself a mistake, and that 
the position is impossible. 

We could, accordingly, and did, stand ready 
to assist wherever possible the rectification of 
the many difficulties which existed in the world 
in which we could offer any help. Because 
political difficulties in Europe have not been of 
pi'imary concern to us, we could only endeavor 
to encourage settlement if settlement were pos- 
sible. But because we are a huge factor — per- 
haps a determining factor — in world economics, 
we could and repeatedly did offer economic co- 
operation to the fullest in endeavoring to make 
it easier for men to live. 

What we could not do was to recognize that 
the temporary possession of force by any one 
nation or group of nations, and the use of that 
force to subject great masses of population to 
death, hunger, or servitude, offered any solution. 
On the contrary, we considered that such "so- 
lutions" ultimately threatened the safety of the 
entire world, ourselves included. Though many 
of the problems seemed far away, we had no 
real doubt that once the process of force-politics 
began, its area would widen until it lapped 
across even the two broad seas which separate 
us from the Old World. 

We were consistent in this. We applied the 
doctrine to ourselves as rigorously as to anyone 



else. When the present administration came 
into office there were in this hemisphere certain 
remnants of past mistakes of which the United 
States itself had been guilty ; interventions by 
force and violent seizures of rights or positions 
of advantage. These incidents we liquidated, 
making such settlement as justice required. To 
us the fabric of cooperative living in interna- 
tional affairs means abiding by law and respect- 
ing national and human rights. I think we can 
say with truth that we have given tangible proof 
of that respect. This gave us, and gives us now, 
the right to say that we believe in a rule of co- 
operation and of law, and that, so far as we can 
do so, we will recognize no other. 

Indeed, this is the only position we can take. 
It is the only position which preserves the safety 
of the United States and of its sister republics 
in the New World ; and it also assures to the men 
and women in these countries anything like a 
reasonable life. The New World was built by 
men who desired to get away from the outworn 
imperial notion that people existed merely as 
property of a sovereign, personal or impersonal. 
AVhat made the New World great was the fact 
that it liberated the genius of millions of indi- 
viduals which had been stifled by older systems 
— systems which regarded men as serfs, or as 
servants, or as cannon fodder, or as breeding 
animals, but never as men. The combination of 
that liberated genius, used cooperatively, has 
created a modern industrial organization. 
These powerful tools we have in general used 
for the service of everyone. Elsewhere they 
have been used as military weapons. As to 
that, there is every evidence that in the hands 
of free men working together, these weapons 
are far more effective than they are in the hands 
of men who are forced to surrender their right 
to think; but the point is that the American 
processes of life which brought these things into 
existence were processes of life under law for 
the purpose of cooperation. 

It so happens that the Western Hemisphere 
has made one great contribution to the practice 
of foreign relations. It originated the doctrine 
of what has come to be called the "cooperative 
peace". This happens to have been an epoch- 



OCTOBER 12, 194 



299 



making discovery and its success has been little 
short of amazing. Before the doctrine was elab- 
orated more than 100 years ago by a Spanish- 
American statesman, Bolivar, only two ideas for 
keeping international peace had attained gen- 
eral acceptance. One of them was the idea of 
universal empire, and it was practised by Rome. 
It did not woi'k very well, since Roman history 
is one long chronicle of rebellion and civil war. 
The second idea was that of the balance of 
power — nations of more or less equal strength, 
armed to the hilt, and so balanced between them- 
selves that no one who started a war could be 
sure of winning it. This method, which has 
obtained in our own time abroad, has had only 
a limited degree of success, though it did pro- 
vide from time to time relatively long periods 
of quiet. 

The ideal of the cooperative peace proposed 
that nations, and specifically the nations of the 
Western Hemisphere, should live together on a 
plane of understanding so groat that the prob- 
lem of any one of them became the problem of 
all ; that the resources of all could be drawn >ipon 
to assist any neighbor in need; and tluit wliile 
there was to be complete respect for independ- 
ence and sovereignty, these independent nations 
should always remain in a state of complete co- 
operation. This system — despite many sins 
against it — has given more of peace to more 
millions of people, and has spread tranquility 
over more of the earth's surface and for a longer 
period of time, than any system of peace of 
which history gives us record. Critics some- 
times point to the breaches of it which have 
taken place in the New World and with truth ; 
but the fact is that there have been fewer 
breaches and they more easily healed than has 
been the case in any other part of the globe. 
Cj'uics sometimes insist that the success of the 
cooperative peace has been due to the fact that 
the New World has had ample land for expan- 
sion and is in general under-populated, an ob- 
servation which entirely ignores the fact that 
Europe had a bloody history centuries before 
her vacant land was exhausted and before popu- 
lation became a serious factor. 

The cooperative peace, you will readily real- 
ize, did involve the acceptance of certain prin- 



ciples — which is of the essence of what we call 
law. We did regard ourselves as limited by 
considerations of justice and decency. This is 
why the United States, which disposes of more 
material power than any country in the world, 
has not seized an empire two or three times the 
size of any the world has yet seen. The result 
of it was peace, and was an internal develop- 
ment whose strength we have already noted. 
This was carried out in considerable degi'ee in 
our internal life ; and the result of that has been 
that the nations which have accepted it are in 
the main well taken care of, wliile it still re- 
mains to be proven that any of the modern 
dictatorships can satisfy even the elementary 
need of feeding and clothing their people in 
reasonable comfort. 

It is perhaps well then to emphasize this point 
now. In the United States we have been so 
anxious to remedy the many faults in our sys- 
tem that it has been fashionable to tell only of 
the many unsolved problems which we had and 
still have. To read the literature of the past 
10 years you would suppose that the United 
States was made up exclusively of degenerates, 
or dispossessed tenants, or miserable unem- 
ployed. It was right that we should give a 
great deal of attention to this. It was wholly 
wrong to draw from this desire for reform the 
idea that our civilization was a failure. The fact 
has always been that 90 percent of our people 
have been taken care of better than any popula- 
tion in the world; that even the dispossessed 
have literally more to eat than many of the set- 
tled groups overseas ; and that we have steadily 
been decreasing rather than increasing the area 
of unhappiness. What has increased has been, 
not the area of misery, but our own awareness 
that any economic or social injustice anywhere 
has to be remedied. By way of parenthesis I 
should like to say that it is about time someone 
began to point out that so far from havmg 
failed, the American civilization with its co- 
operative ideal in national and international 
affairs is not only good, but amazingly good 
when you compare it with anything else that 
exists in the world today. 

It is right for us to be talking about things 
left undone, to stimulate our people to get at 



300 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



the remedies. It is wrong for anyone else to 
conclude from that fact that the American 
■world is not thoroughly capable of taking care 
of its problem, both internal and external. I 
have no patience with these apostles of despair. 

The cooperative peace which has these deep 
internal roots has become the settled doctrine 
of tiie American Continent. It is already de- 
termined that this must be defended by the 
entire hemispliere and for the entire hemisphere. 
The international document which determined 
that fact is called the Declaration of Lima ; and 
I still cherish as a liappy memory that Christ- 
mas Eve in Peru when the statesmen of the 21 
sister republics of the New World came to their 
feet to acclaim the recognition of an era of New 
Wt>rld solidarity, resolved to defend its success- 
ful way of life against all outside enemies. 

This is not the place for a review of the 
achievements of the cooperative peace, nor of 
the steps which are now being taken from the 
Straits of Magellan to Davis' Strait to make 
that defense effective. I think I can assure 
you that these steps are being taken, in the 
field of economics, in the field of social devel- 
opment, and in the fields of military', naval, 
and aviation arrangements. It is enough to 
say that this, the American ideal, was no moral 
milksop expression of pious hope but a solid 
driving force which I am confident will prove 
quite capable of assuring the safety of our ocean 
borders. 

And yet, we must squarely face the fact that 
no order of things anywhere will be safe as long 
as any considerable part of tlie world fails to 
accept the ideal of cooperation, and its necessary 
adjunct, the rule of law. We are prepared to 
defend to the limit ; yet the object is to have a 
world in which perpetual defense is unnecessary. 
"\^niat are called "new orders" are being famil- 
iarly talked of in various parts of the world; 
but it is interesting to note that each of these 
new orders somehow finds it necessary to muster 
ever greater inilitary forces against its compan- 
ion "new orders" awaiting the day when one 
of them will fall upon the other. We could, 
of course, resign ourselves to doing likewise, and 
with considerable assurance ; for when it comes 



to the game of piling ai'mament on armament, 
ship on ship, plane on plane, we probably can 
do that more effectively than any area in the 
woi'ld. Yet we know that this can be no perma- 
nent settlement of affairs: ultimately matters 
must once more come to rest. 

We also have learned something else. We 
know that only by cooperation can any nation 
or group of nations — with the possible excep- 
tion of the American Hemisphere — really give 
to their people the comfort which they have a 
right to expect from modern life. That is why, 
in the thinking of the United States Govern- 
ment, the cooperative peace and relations based 
on law have gone hand in hand with the idea 
of open, economic relations, promoting open 
commerce, and a willingness to try to support 
the economics of other countries. We know 
that this means a great increase in the natural 
resources of all countries and in the ability 
within any country to distribute the result 
among its people. We have proved this time 
and again. 

During a state of general war, these avenues 
of cooperative economics are, of course, choked 
by blockades, counter-blockades, war restric- 
tions, and connnercial paralysis. Yet we know 
that at long last the channels must reopen, the 
preferential ai'eas must disappear, the possi- 
bility of open exchange must be replaced. 

It is already clear that so much has been 
wasted overseas and so much more is likely to 
be destroyed before the present war is ended 
as to make restoration impossible without the 
help of the Western Hemisphere. Every gov- 
ernment in Europe knows this, just as every 
European government knows, though it does 
not ojjenly admit it, that conquest will never 
solve an economic need. Part of the tremen- 
dous preoccupation over our attitude, which ex- 
ists in Europe and in the Far East, is due to 
this realization. It is becoming clear that any- 
one may smash the fabric of international peace 
and economics, but that only the entire world 
can put it together again. 

From all of this certain conclusions appear 
inescapable. 

Whatever of strength now exists in the world 



OCTOBER 12, 194 



301 



came as tlie result of a cooperative pi'ocess 
operated by free men. There is no reason to 
suppose that institutions built on any other basis 
will lonfi endure. 

This cooperative peace may have to be de- 
fended by force; but there is not the slightest 
reason to believe that defense by that force will 
impair the values which have made it strong. 

The cooperative peace requires the defense 
of the Western Hemisphere winch adopted it; 
but to be complete there must be general accept- 
ance of a rule of law, designed to promote in- 
ternational stability and generous relations, as 
it is also designed to foster individual safety 
and development within countries like our own. 

At the close of the jjresent war more and 
not less cooperation in the field of politics and 
economics will be required and nnist be fieely 
opened to any nation or group of nations which 
is jirepared to accept the basic obligations 
which cooperation imposes. 

As the strongest clement in tlie cooperative 
peace, we must take a leading part in realizing 
this ideal. 



Within a few days the youth of the United 
States will be asked to register for military 
service. This means that they will be asked 
to do at this time what ever}' generation has 
done: my own in 1917, my father's in the 
Spanish War, my grandfather's in the Civil 
War. This means something more than the 
jihysical business of training to bear arms. It 
means an affirmation that there is something 
here worth fighting for. Tliat something is 
the cooperative life, just as the only peace 
possible is the cooperative peace. It has given 
to us everything we have, has made us every- 
thing we are, and has been so fertile that its 
purj)lus has even provided weapons for less 
hajjpy nations who seek another way of life. 
Truly this thing we call America is something 
more than a word. It has been life, and 
strength, and fertility; it has meant power and 
glory; it offers the hope of peace. Its ma- 
terial benefits have been more widely diffused 
than in any civilization yet knf)wn; and it holds 
within its womb an endless prospect of still 
greater glorv vet to come. 



LAW PUBLICATIONS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



Address by E. Wilder Spaulding ' 



[Released to the press October 10] 

It is with considerable temeritj' that I under- 
take to address a group of experts like you on 
a subject falling within your own field : Publi- 
cations of interest to law librarians. I assure 
you, however, that I recognize my personal lim- 
itations in such a field, and I shall confine my- 
self almost entirely to the publications which 
the Department of State is producing and which 
one might expect to find in a law library. 

Compared with many other Government agen- 
cies the Department of State is not a large pub- 



' Delivered before the Law Librarian's Society of 
Washinston. D. C, October 9. 1940. Dr. Spavildiug is 
Chief of the Division of Research and Publication, De- 
partment of State. 



lishing house. Its printing and binding appro- 
priation amounts only to some $225,000 a year, 
and a major portion of that sum is consumed 
in printing letterheads, forms, and such pro- 
saic material. On the other hand, some of the 
basic publications which the Department does 
compile or edit, like the "slip laws", the Stat- 
utes at Large, the Treaty Series, and the Execu- 
tive Agreement Series, are not paid for out of 
the Department's own printing appropriation. 



One very naturally looks to the Department 
of State for publications on treaties and other 
international agreements of the United States. 



302 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Dejiartment is, in fact, publishing a wealth 
of data on American treaties for the inter- 
national lawyer. You need not, of course, be 
reminded that the texts of treaties, conven- 
tions, and other international acts to which 
this Government is a party are published in 
the United States Statutes at Large, as well 
as in the Department's Treaty Series or Ex- 
ecutive Agreement Series pamphlets, and that 
the definitive compilation of the texts of our 
early treaties is Mr. Hunter Miller's pains- 
taking and scholarly edition of Treaties and 
Other International Acts of the United States 
of America. Volume 5 of the Miller edition, 
ending in 1852, is already out ; volume 6, which 
may be published in 1941, and volume 7 are 
in preparation. Mr. Miller's notes, always 
illuminating and erudite, should be of special 
interest when he comments in volume 6 on such 
famous documents as the Gadsden Treaty of 
1853 with Mexico and Commodore Perry's 
treaty of 1854 witli Japan. The instrument of 
ratification of the Perry treaty, which was 
prepared for transmission to Japan, was one 
of the most princely documents that ever 
passed under the hand of a Chief Executive 
of this Republic. The treaty text, on vellum, 
was bound in a blue velvet portfolio with blue 
and gold tasseled cords, and to the cords was 
attached the great wax pendant seal of the 
United States encased in a box of solid gold. 
The whole was placed in an elegant rosewood 
box with gold clasps and hinges. Little won- 
der that the jeweler's bill in connection with this 
unusual document amounted to $1,220, without 
including all the accessories! Editorial notes 
about such a document will by no means be 
dull reading for the historian or the inter- 
national lawyer. 

Pending the completion of the Miller treaty 
edition we have the very useful four volumes 
of Treaties, Con.ventio7is, Tnternational Acts, 
Protocols, and Agreements between the United 
States of America and Other Powers, 1776- 
1937, which are Senate documents and not pub- 
lications of the State Department. 

The treaty editions which I have mentioned 
are well known, but I believe that the researcher 



in the field will find almost equally valuable for 
reference purposes such pamphlet aids issued 
by the Department as the Subject Index of the 
Treaty Series and the Executive Agreement 
Series, published in 1931, the List of Treaties 
Submitted to the Senate, 1789-1934, and subse- 
quent supplements to that list, the List of 
Treaties Submitted to the Senate, 1789-1931, 
Which Have Not Gone Into Force, and the 
List of Treaties and Other International Acta 
of the United States of Amenca in Force Decem- 
ber 31, 1932. The latter list, one of the most 
useful guides available to workers in the foreign 
relations field, is now being revised and brought 
up to date by the Department's Treaty Division. 
The current record of treaty developments 
published by the Department is the "Treaty 
Information" section of the weekly Defartment 
of State Bidletin. Here are printed many of 
the Department's press releases and other 
authoritative information regarding treaties to 
which the United States is or may become a 
party or treaties of general international inter- 
est. Many experts on international law, both 
within and without the Department, have ex- 
pressed the opinion that a file of the weekly 
Bidletin with its semiannual indexes is a sine 
qua non for them in their work. 

II 

Another essential publication for the inter- 
national lawyer will be the new Digest of Inter- 
national Law. These eight volumes, now being 
compiled by the Department's Legal Adviser, 
Gi'een H. Hackworth, will do much more 
than merely supplement Judge John Bassett 
Moore's fine Digest of International Law. They 
will contain a mine of new material based 
almost entirely upon the archives of American 
foreign policy since 1906, when Moore's Digest 
was published. We expect that the first two 
volumes of the new Digest will appear during 
the approaching winter. 

A considerable quantity of the essential diplo- 
matic correspondence upon which such compila- 
tions as the Digest of International Law are 
based is, of course, contained in the bulky vol- 
umes of the series entitled Foreign Relations of 



OCTOBEE 12, 194 



303 



the United States. These volumes, ■which by 
Departmental order must be "substantially com- 
plete", have since 1861 constituted the definitive 
official record of American foreign policy. The 
publication of the 1925 Foreign Relations vol- 
umes late this fall will show that there is still 
a 15-year gap between the date of the diplomatic 
correspondence contained in these publications 
and the year in which it is released — a gap which 
we hope to reduce to 14 years by 1942. 

I very much wish that time allowed a discus- 
sion of some of the Department's other publica- 
tions which are of interest to the international 
lawyer — such titles as those in the Arbitration 
Series and Dr. Whiteman's Damages vn Interna- 
tional Lair. For the legal profession in general, 
however, there is nothing much more basic than 
the publication of the Federal laws themselves, 
and I therefore turn to the Department's role 
in nuiking those te.xts available to the public. 

Ill 

The Dei)artment has custody, in its fireproof 
files, of the originals of all congressional acts, 
joint resolutions, concurrent resolutions, and 
proposed amendments to the Constitution, of the 
last 17 yeai"s. The originals of acts and joint 
resolutions which have been approved by the 
President are sent to the Department by the 
White House ; the originals of concurrent reso- 
lutions, of resolutions proposing amendments to 
the Constitution, and of acts and joint resolu- 
tions Mhich become law after the Congress has 
overridden the President's veto are received by 
the Department direct from the Congress. If 
a bill becomes law without the President's ap- 
proval after the Constitutional 10-day period, 
the White House sends it to the Department. 
On the other hand, the originals of bills that 
have not survived a veto, or which have been 
pocket- vetoed, are not now sent to the Depart- 
ment. As a matter of fact bills that have en- 
countered the pocket veto are to be found scat- 
tered in several files in Washington. All the 
originals for the period before 1924, which were 
once in the Department, were transferred in 
1937 to The National Archives, which has the 



finest possible facilities for storing those irre- 
placeable documents. 

As soon as an original law is received by the 
office of the Department's Director of Personnel, 
it is sent to the Laws Section of the Division of 
Research and Publication. That section pre- 
pares a printed copy of the enrolled bill as manu- 
script to be used by the Government Printing 
Office in tlie preparation of the type for the 
printing of the "slip law". Within a few hours 
the Printing Office returns the proof, wliich is 
read once against the original document in the 
Laws Section for accuracy before the "slip law", 
or fii-st print of the law, is sent to press. The 
"slip laws" were printed by order of Congress 
and sent to the Governors of the States even 
before the establishment of the Department of 
State and are therefore more venerable than the 
precursors of the modern Statutes at Large. 

You may recall that in September 1789 the 
name of the Department of Foreign Relations 
was changed to Department of State and that 
the new establishment was charged with certain 
functions which had little or nothing to do with 
foi'eign polic}'. Among these functions was the 
custody and recording of the original laws and 
the responsibility for causing them to be pub- 
lished, distributed to the Congress and the State 
Governors, and printed in three or more news- 
papers. The provision for newspaper publica- 
tion gave our early administrations a very 
effective device for rewarding the friendly 
press; however, except for one gap, from 1795 
to 1799, such publication was continued until 
1875. Less than a year after its establishment 
the Department was also charged with causing 
the treaties to be published in the same manner 
as the laws. 

There was, of course, no Government Print- 
ing Office in 1789, and therefore all the early 
official editions of the laws had to be i^rinted 
by commercial printers under contract with the 
Government. The first editions of what are 
now known as the United States Statutes at 
Large are in consequence generally identified 
by the names of their respective printere. The 
first, or Folwell edition, authorized in 1795, cov- 
ered the period from 1789 to 1814, when it was 



304 



depart:\iext of state bulletin 



succeeded by the Bioren and Duane volumes 
carrying the conii)ihition back to 1789 and on 
to 1845. Neither Fohvell nor Bioren and Duane 
jjrinted all of the volumes in the editions now 
known by their names. The only other official 
edition before that of the Department of State 
was printed by Little, Brown, and Company, 
covering the entire period from 1789 to 1873 
under the title Public tStatiites at Large or 
Stafittes at Large. Except for the volume for 
the first session of the Thirty-seventh Congress, 
the Statutes at Large have never been issued in 
the congressional numbered series. 

By an act of June 20, 1874 the contract with 
Little, Brown, and Company was discontinued 
and the Secretary of State was ordered to pub- 
lish the Statutes at Large. He is in 1940 still 
publishing those volumes. 

The task of preparing the Statutes at Large 
has increased greatly in volume and complexity 
since Kichard Fohvell printed his first volume 
in 1796. As regards size alone the bulk of the 
volumes for the last three Congresses is 70 per- 
cent greater than the bulk of the volumes for 
the eight or nine preceding Congi-esses. Each 
volume must contain "all the laws and concur- 
rent resolutions enacted during each regular 
session of Congress; all treaties to which the 
United States is a party that have been pro- 
claimed since the date of the adjournment of the 
I'egular session of Congress next preceding; all 
international agreements other than treaties to 
which the United States is a party that have 
been signed, proclaimed, or with reference to 
which any other final formality has been exe- 
cuted, since that date ; all ])roclamations by the 
President in the numbered series issued since 
that date; and also any amendments to the 
Constitution of the United States proposed or 
ratified pursuant to article V thereof since that 
date, together with the certificate of the Sec- 
retary of State issued in compliance with the 
provision contained in section 205 of the Revised 
Statutes of the United States." 

The Statutes nt Large must carry marginal 
notes indicating the subject-matter of the instru- 
ments which the notes accompany, marginal 
citations to the Statutes at Large themselves and 
often to the United States Code if the latter is 



not cited in the text itself, elaborate lists of the 
papers printed in the volumes, and an index. 
In these days when legislation is so often highly 
technical and involved, the preparation of the 
citations, notes, and indexes is a long, pains- 
taking, demanding task. Finally, when the 
plates for printing the volumes are ready at 
the Printing Office, proof must be read in the 
Department's Laws Section against the original 
documents themselves to make certain that no 
errors have crej^t in. The plates are made from 
the same type tliat the Printing Office used to 
print the enrolled bills and the ''slip laws", but 
there is always the danger that in adding the 
marginal notes and citations or in changing the 
pagination a few lines of type have had to 
be reset and inaccuracies have resulted. And 
such inaccuracies do occur. For example, one 
ei'ror in the plate proof for volume 52 of the 
Statutes resulted in the omission of the item 
"two assistant clerks at $3,900" and substituted 
for it the not very intelligible term "assistant 
derk, $5,000 and $2,500". Occasionally whole 
lines are dropped out and other lines which 
belong elsewhere on the page are substituted 
for them. These volumes must be as nearly 
perfect as editor and printer can make them for 
they are legal evidence of the laws in the courts 
of the United States, the several States, and the 
Territories. 

Tluinks to the coojjeration of the Govern- 
ment Printing Office even the binding of the 
last few volumes of the Statutes has been vastly 
imj)rt)ved. Backstrips of leather with gold 
lettering protected by high ridges which give 
better legibility, and finer buckram covers 
firmly hand-stitched, coml)ine to give us volumes 
\vhich will stand constant use for many years. 

Of the many problems encountered in the 
course of the pul)Iication of the acts and joint 
resolutions, that of classification deserves some 
mention. You will recall that the "slip laws" 
are printed in four series : The acts designated 
as "Public", the "Public Resolutions", the acts 
designated as "Private", and the "Private Reso- 
lutions". Each of these series is numljered 
separatelj^ In most cases there is little doubt 
as to whether an enactment is public or private 
but the Department must sometimes split some 



OCTOBER 12, 1940 



305 



very fine hairs in coming to a decision. In gen- 
eral, classification as "public" or "private" is 
based upon the consideration as to whether tlie 
interest of the public is paramount or whether 
the legislation was passed for the benefit of an 
individual or group of individuals. If it is 
amendatory legislation its classification is 
usually, but not always, obvious. And gen- 
erally there are officials of the Congress itself 
who know from their background of precedent 
and experience how the Congress would expect 
the laws to be classified. 

The numbering of the laws becomes more 
complex when the time-honored chapter num- 
bers are added. These chapter nmnbers whicli 
are affixed to all public and private acts and 
resolutions, but not to concurrent resolutions, 
run in one series only and are therefore not 
continuous either in the section of the Statutes 
which contains the ))ublic acts and resolutions 
or in the section which contains the private acts 
and resolutions. The chapter numbers now 
(beginning with the first session of the Seventy- 
fifth Congress) appear on the "slip laws" as well 
as in the Statutes at Large. All in all the num- 
bering of tlie laws would seem to be somewhat 
more intricate than helpful, and I suspect that 
it might profitably be simplified. Possibly one 
step in that direction would be to combine the 
public acts and the public resolutions into one 
series of "Public Laws" and the private acts and 
private resolutions into one series of "Private 
Laws". If that were done their numbering in the 
"slip laws" would correspond to their grouping 
in the Statutes at Large. The fact that Public 
Resolution 54 of the Seventy-sixth Congress 
may by its own provisions be cited as the "Neu- 
trality Act of 1939" would indicate what I be- 
lieve is generally conceded, that there has come 
to be no distmction except in form between a 
public act and a public resolution. 

I have omitted mention of the invaluable 
United States Code because the Department has 
no part in its compilation. I have also omitted 
reference to the old "session laws" or "pamphlet 
laws" which the Department of State issued in 
paper covers after each session of Congress up 
through 1936. The act of June 20, 1936 spelled 



the doom of the session laws and provided that 
henceforth the Statutes at Large, previously 
issued only at the end of the last session of a 
Congress (volumes 13 to 49 inclusive), should 
be issued after every regular session. The Stat- 
utes at Large thus remains the only complete 
official compilation of Federal legislation. The 
Department, under the Secretary of State, will 
make every effort to continue the production of 
volumes of the Statutes worthy of the important 
place that they must fill in every law library. 



Europe 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF 
BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 



IN 



[Keleased to the press October 7] 

The following pei-sons and organizations have 
registered with the Secretary- of State for the 
solicitation and collection of contributions pur- 
suant to section 8 of the Neutrality Act of 1939 
to be used in belligerent countries for medical 
aid and assistance or for food and clothing to 
relieve human suffering (the countries to which 
contributions are being sent are given in 
parentheses) :* 

356. Emergency Rescue Committee, 122 East Foity- 
.second Street, New York, N. Y. (France, United 
Kingdom, Belgium, Norway, and tlie Netlierlands) 

.'iST. Medical and Surgical Supply Committee, 420 I>ex- 
ington Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain, 
France, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Luxem- 
burg, and Belgium) 

3oS. Mrs. George Gilliland, 530 East Eighty-fifth Street, 
New York, N. Y. (Northern Ireland) 

359. District of Columbia Federation of Women's Clubs, 
Broad Branch and Grant Roads, Washington, D. C. 
(Great Britain) 

360. American-Polish National Council, Care of Mr. 
V. M. Spunar, 4730 North Lawndale Avenue, Chicago, 
m. (Poland) 

.361. Funds for France, Inc., 32 East Fifty-seventh 

Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 
362. Over-Ssas League Tobacco Fund, Care of Lambert 



' For prior registrants, see the BuUetin of April 27, 
1940 (vol. II, no. 44), pp. 443-150, June 8, 1940 (vol. II, 
no. 50), p. 626, and August 3, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 58), 
pp. 69-70. 



306 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



and Feasley, 9 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 
(British Empire) 

363. Mutual Society of Frencli Colonials, Inc., Care of 
Executive Secretary, 322 Convent Avenue, New York, 
N. Y. (France) 

364. Tlie Canadian Society of New York,° Room 500, 
2 Wall Street, New York, N. Y. (Canada and Great 
Britain) 

365. American Friends of Britain, Inc., 1 Park Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

366. Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. (Great 
Britain I 

367. Methodist Connuittee for Overseas Relief, 150 Fifth 
Avenue, New York. N. Y. (France, Poland, Czecho- 
slovakia, Norway, Belgium, and the Netherlands) 

368. British War Relief Fund, 1635 Hearthstone Drive, 
Dayton, Ohio. (Great Britain) 

309. Monmouth War Relief, Red Bank, N. J. (England 
and France) 

370. Polish Prisoner's of War Relief Committee. Box 20. 
Station W. Brooklyn, N. Y. (Germany) 

371. The Mobile Circle for Benefit of the Royal Navy 
Hospital Comforts Fund, Care of Miss Hilda Broad- 
wood, Chainimii. Route 2, Mobile, Ala. (British 
Isles) 

372. Isthmian Pro-British Aid Committee, Post Office 
Box 621, Ancon, Canal Zone. (England) 

.373. The Fall River British War Relief Society, 79 
Campbell Street, Fall River, Mass. (Great Britain) 

37-1. American Aid for German War Prisoners, 16 Duer- 
stein Street, Buffalo, N. Y. (Canada) 

375. Ladies Auxiliary of the Providence Branch of the 
Federation of the Italian World War Veterans in the 
United States, 296 Atwells Avenue, Providence, R. I. 
(Italy) 

376. International Children's Relief Association, tempo- 
rary address : Care of Mr. John W. D'Arcy, 342 Madi- 
son Avenue, Suite 005, New York, N. Y. (Great 
Britain) 



thereof has at any time on or since October 9, 
1940, had any interest of any nature whatso- 
ever . . ." The text of Executive Order No. 
8565 appears in the Federal Register for October 
12, 1940 (vol. 5, no. 200), page 4062, and the 
regulations of the Treasury Department, issued 
on October 10, 1940 under authority of this 
order, appear in the same issue of the Federal 
Register, pages 4063-4064. 



The Far East 



CHINA: NATIONAL ANNIVERSARY 

[Released to the jness October 10] 

The President has transmitted the following 
message for delivery today to His Excellency 
Lin Sen, Chairman of the National Government 
at Chungking, China : 

"My fellow countrymen join with me in ex- 
tending to Your Excellency and to the people 
of China sincere felicitations upon this national 
anniversary and in reaffirming the traditional 
friendship which exists between our two coun- 
tries." 



EXECUTIVE ORDER REGARDING 
PROPERTY OF RUMANIA IN THE 
UNITED STATES 

On October 10, 1940 the President signed Ex- 
ecutive Order No. 8565, amending Executive 
Order No. 8389, of April 10, 1940,'> as amended, 
so as to extend all the provisions thereof to 
"property in which Rumania or any national 



° Revoked at request of registrant. 
'See the Federal Register for April 12, 1&40 (vol. 5, 
no. 72), pp. 1400-1401. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press Octolier 1-] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
Foreign Service since October 5, 1940: 

Career Officers 

Alexander C. Kirk, of Chicago, 111., Coun- 
selor of Embassy at Berlin, Germany, has been 



OCTOBER 12, 194 



307 



designated Counselor of Embassy at Rome, 
Italy. 

Edward L. Reed, of Wayne, Pa., Counselor 
(,f Embassy at Rome, Italy, has been assigned 
for duty in the Department of State. 

L. Randolph Higgs, of AVest Point, Miss., 
Third Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul 
at Helsinki, Fiidaiid, has been assigned for 
duty in the I)ei)aHment of State. 

Willard L. Beaulac, of Pawtucket, R. I., 
First Secretary of Embassy at Hal)aiia. Cuba, 
has been designatetl Counsi'lor of Embassy at 
Habana, Cuba. 

Howard Bmknell, Ji'.. of Atlanta, Ga., First 
Secretary of Embass}- and Consul (lenei'al at 
Madrid, Spain, has been designated Counselor 
of Embassy at Madrid, Spain, and will con- 
tinue to serve in dual capacily. 

Clayton Lane, of Iowa, Connnercial Attache 
at Pretoria, Union of St)nth Africa, has been 
assigned as Consul at Calcutta, India. 

Kennett F. Potter, of St. Louis, Mo., Consul 
at Prague. Bohemia, has been assigned as Con- 
sxd at Habana, (\iba. 

Carl F. Norden, of New York, N. Y.. Vice 
Consul at Prague, Bohemia, has been designated 
Third Secretary of Embassy at Berlin, 
Germany. 

E. Tomlin Bailey, of Hasbrouck Heights, 
N. J., Vice Consul at Prague, Bohemia, has been 
designated Third Secretary of Embassy at Ber- 
lin, Germany, upon the closing of the office at 
Prague, Bohemia. 

John K. Davis, of AVoosler, Ohio, Consul Gen- 
eral at Dublin, Ireland, lias been assigned for 
duty in the Department of State. 

George D. La Mont, of Albion, X. Y., Consul 
at Shanghai, China, has been assigned as Con- 
sul at Canton, China. 

Kenneth C. Krentz. of Waterloo, Iowa, Con- 
sul at Canton, China, has been assigned as 
Consul at Mukden, ^Manchuria, China. 

NoN-CAKEiaj Officeks 

F. Willard Calder, of New York, Vice Consul 
at Southampton, England, has been appointed 
Vice Consul at London, England. 



Regulations 



The following Government regulations may 
be of interest to readers of the Bulletin : 

Values of Foreign Moneys. (Treasury Dei>iirtiueMt.) 
[liMO Department Circulai- No. 1.1 October 1, 1940. 
Federal Kegistvr. OctoliiT 10, 1!I40 (vol. 5, no. 198), 
pages 4042-4043 (Tlic Xati(in;il Archives of the Uniteil 
States). 

Obtaining of Bills of Health by and Quarantine In- 
.spection of Vessels Plying Between Foreign Ports on 
or Near the Frontiers of the United States and Ports 
of the riintinenta\ United Slates and Alaska. (U. S. 
I'nhlic Health Service.) fAmendment no. 20, Quaran- 
tine Regulations.] October 3, 1940. Federal Reyixter, 
October 11, 1940 (vol. T,, no. 199), page 40.51 (The 
National Archives of the United States). 



Publications 



Departsient of State 

Naval Mission : Agreement Between the United States 
of America and Peru — Signed July 31, 1940; effective 
July 31, 1940. Executive Agreement Series No. 177. 
Publication 1504. 12 jip. 5e. 

Naval Aviation Mission: Agreement Between the 
United States of America and Peru — Signed July 31, 
1940; effective July 31, 1940. Executive Agreement 
Series No. 178. Publication 1505. 12 pp. 5(^. 

Commercial Relations : Agreement Between the 
United States of America and the Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics Continuing in Force Until August 
6, 1041 the Agreement of August 4. 19.37 (Executive 
Agreement Series No. lO.o), and Related Notes — Agree- 
ment effected by exchange of notes signed at Moscow 
August 6, 1940; effective August 6, 1940. Executive 
Agreement Series No. 179. Publication 1502. 10 iip. 5<'. 

Other Government Agencies 

The following Government publications may 
be of interest to readers of the Bulletin : 

Trade of United States With Central America in 
1939. ( Department of Commerce : Bureau of Foreign 
and Domestic Commerce, Divisions of Regional Infor- 



308 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



mation and Foreign Trade Statistics.) 12 pp. (pro- 
cessed). 100. 

Trade of United States With Colombia in 1939. (De- 
partment of Commerce : Bui-eau of Foreign and Domes- 
tic Commerce, Divisions of Regional Information and 
Foreign Trade Statistics.) 5 pp. (processed). 100. 

Chemical Developments Abroad, 1939: Effect of 
Munitions and Preparedness Upon Chemical Produc- 
tion, Consumption, and Foreign Trade. (Department 



of Commerce : Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Com- 
merce, Chemical Division.) Trade Promotion Series 
211. 189 pp. 200. 

Traffic in Opium and Other Dangerous Drugs, Year 
Ended December 31, 1939: Report by Government of 
United States. (Treasury Department : Narcotics Bu- 
reau.) 122 pp. 200. [For distribution through the 
Secretary of State to the nations signatory to the Inter- 
national Drug Conventions of 1912 and 1931.] 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



NATURE PROTECTION AND WILDLIFE 
PRESERVATION 

Convention on Nature Protection and Wild- 
life Preservation in the Western Hemi- 
sphere 

The Convention on Nature Protection and 
Wildlife Preservation in the Western Hemi- 
sphere was opened for signature at the Pan 
American Union on October 12, 1940 by the 
plenipotentiaries of the American republics, and 
was signed on that day on the part of Cuba, 
the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salva- 
dor, Nicaragua, Peru, the United States, and 
Venezuela. 

The convention remains open for signature by 
other American governments. It will enter into 
force three months after the deposit of not less 
than five ratifications with the Pan American 
Union. 

The convention is the result of a study insti- 
tuted in pursuance of resolution XXXVIII 
adopted on December 23, 1938 at the Eighth 
International Conference of American States, 
Lima, Peru. In accordance with a recom- 
mendation in the resolution, the Pan American 
Union established the Inter- American Com- 
mittee of Experts on Nature Protection and 
Wildlife Pi-eservation, the membership of which 
consisted of one representative from each of the 
American republics, to formulate a draft con- 



vention for inter- American cooperation in the 
protection and preservation of fauna and flora 
in their natural habitat, and in the establishment 
of national parks, national reserves, and nature 
monuments. The member of the committee on 
behalf of the United States was Dr. Alexander 
Wetmore, Assistant Secretary of the Smithso- 
nian Institution. 

The Committee of Experts submitted its re- 
port to the Governing Board of the Pan Amer- 
ican Union on March 7, 1939. From May 13 
to May 16, 1940 the Committee met at the Pan 
American Union to consider and revise a pre- 
liminary draft convention. A draft of the 
convention as signed was approved unanimously 
by the Committee of Experts on May 16, 1940. 

Tlie convention provides for the establish- 
ment, whenever practical, of national parks, 
national reserves, nature monuments, and strict 
wilderness resen-es, including the protection of 
natural fauna and flora. The contracting gov- 
ernments agree to adopt, or to propose the 
adoption of, suitable laws and regulations for 
the preservation of flora and fauna and of 
natural scenery, striking geological formations, 
and regions of natural objects of aesthetic inter- 
est or historic or scientific value. Provision is 
jnade for cooperation by the American republics 
in encouraging scientific research and study in 
regard to the objectives of the convention. The 
convention provides that the contracting gov- 



OCTOBER 12, 194 

ernments shall take measures to control and 
regulate the hnportation, exportation, and 
transit of protected fauna and flora. It does 
not replace international agreements previ- 
ously entered into by one or more of the con- 
tracting parties. The convention provides that 
the Pan American Union shall notify the con- 
tracting parties of information relevant to the 
purposes of the convention communicated to it 
by interested organizations. 

BOUNDARY 

Convention with Canada for the Emergency 
Regulation of the Level of Rainy Lake and 
of Certain Other Boundary Waters 

The American Minister to Canada reported 
by a despatch dated October 3, 1940 that he 
had on that day exchanged, with the Prime 



309 

Minister of Canada and Secretary of State for 
External Affairs, the instruments of ratification 
of the Convention for the Emergency Regula- 
tion of the Level of Rainy Lake and of Certain 
Other Boundary Waters, between the United 
States and Canada signed on September 15, 1938. 
Tlie convention entered into force upon the 
exchange of ratifications. 

SOVEREIGNTY 

Convention on the Provisional Administra- 
tion of European Colonies and Possessions 
in the Americas 

United States 

On October 10, 1940 the President ratified the 
Convention on the Provisional Administration 
of European Colonies and Possessions in the 
Americas, signed at Habana July 30, 1940. 



U- S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1940 



For sale by tlie Suiierintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents . - . . Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

Prnl.ISHED WEEKLY WITH rTHE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 



^J^-UJ-^ 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



.O \j JL/ 



J 



ETI 




Qontents 



OCTOBER 19, 1940 
VoJ. Ill: No. 6g - Publication Ijl^ 




General: Page 

Requisitions for national di"fense 313 

Armistice Day proclamation 314 

Passports 314 

Postponement of addiess on foreign policy by the 

Secretary of State 315 

Cana da : 

Great Lakes-St. Lawrence waterway project 316 

Convention for the Emergency Regulation of the Level 
of Rainy Lake and of Certain Other Boundary 

Waters 318 

The Far East: 

Repatriation of American citizens 318 

Commercial Policy: 

The Need of a Sound Commercial Policy: Address by 

Assistant Secretary Grady 319 

International Conferences, Commissions, etc.: 

Second Brazilian Dental Congress 322 

Treaty Information: 
Judicial settlement: 

Permanent Court of International Justice 324 

Boundary : 

Convention with Canada for the Emergency Regu- 
lation of the Level of Ramy Lake and Certain 
Other Boundary Waters (Treaty Series No. 961) . 325 

[OveT\ 



Treaty Information — Continued. 

Waterway : Page 

Great Lakcs-St. Lawrence waterway project .... 326 
The Foreign Service: 

Foreign Service Regulations 326 

Regulations 326 

Legislation 327 

Publications 327 



General 



REQUISITIONS FOR NATIONAL DEFENSE 



[Released to the press by the White House October 15] 

The President on October 10 approved an act 
which confers on him authority to requisition 
arms, ammunition, implements of war, machine 
tools, and other articles and materials whicli 
are needed for the national defense. 

Under the Neutrality Acts of 1935, 1936, 1937, 
and 1939, and under the Export Control Act of 
Jidy ^, 1940, certain articles and materials 
needed for the national defense have been sub- 
ject to the export-licensing system. Since the 
passage of the last-named act. many applica- 
tions for licenses have been refused as a result 
of decisions by the Administrator of Export 
Control that the proposed exportation would be 
contrary to the interests of the national defense. 
The articles or materials for which export li- 
censes have been refused have in many cases 
already been sold and the title has passed to a 
foreign purchaser. It has been found that, in 
some of these cases, purchasers did not desire 
to sell the article or material in the United 
States or, because they were acting in a repre- 
sentative capacity, they were not legally in a 
position to do so. This situation has been par- 
ticularly acute in the case of some exportations 
of machine tools. A great many of these tools 
for which export licenses have been refused are 
especially needed to meet national-defense 
requirements. 



The President on October 15 issued an Exec- 
utive order 1 directing the Secretary of War 
and the Secretary of the Navy, acting jointly 
through the agency of the Anny and Navy 
Munitions Board, to determine the necessity 
for the requisitioning of any equipment, muni- 
tions, or machinery, tools, materials, or supplies 
necessary for the manufacture of munitions, or 
the servicing, or operation of facilities for the 
national defense, and to determine whether in 
any case it is in the public interest to sell, or 
otherwise dispose of, any of the articles and 
materials so requisitioned. The administration 
of the other provisions of the act has been 
vested in the Administrator of Export Control. 

The President at the same time issued the 
necessary regulations - for tlie carrying out of 
his Executive order. 

As a result of his approval of this act and 
the issuance of this Executive order and these 
regulations, the President is assured the use of 
the critical articles and materials required in 
the national-defense program which might 
otherwise be unobtainable. 



' For text of this Executive order (no. 8567), see the 
Federal Register of October 18, 1940 (vol. 5, no. 204) 
p. 4121. 

° For text of these regulations, see ibid., pp. 4122- 
4123. 

313 



314 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

ARMISTICE DAY PROCLAMATION 



[Released to the press by the White House] 

Armistice Day — 1940 
bt the president of the united states of 

AMERICA 

A Proclaim at ion 

Whereas on November 11, 1918, the nations 
then at war laid down their weapons and 
turned their thoughts to the hoped-for dawn 
of an era of peace and order; and 

Whereas Senate Concurrent Resolution 18, 
Sixty-ninth Congress, passed June 4, 1926 (44 
Stat. 1982), requests the President of the 
United States to issue a proclamation calling 
for the display of the flag of the United States 
on all Government buildings on November 11 
and for the observance of the day with appi'o- 
priate ceremonies, and the act of May 13, 1938 
(52 Stat. 351) designates the 11th day of No- 
vember of each year as a legal public holiday; 
and 

Whereas observance of the anniversary of 
the armistice of 1918 will direct our minds to 
the need of the world then as now not only for 
peace but also for peace with understanding, 



not only for a cessation of hostilities but also 
for mutual respect in the intercourse between 
nations: 

Now, therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, 
President of the United States of America, do 
hereby direct that the flag of the United States 
be displayed on all Government buildings on 
November 11, 1940, and I call upon the peo- 
ple of the United States to observe the day 
with appropriate ceremonies in schools and 
churches, or other suitable places. 

In witness avhereof. I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
(if America to be affixed. 

Done at the City of Washington this I7th 
clay of October, in the year of our 
Lord nineteen hundred and forty, 
[seal] and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the one 
hundred and sixty-fifth. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 
By the President : 
CoRDELL Hull 

Secretary of State. 

[No. 2433] 



PASSPORTS 



Tlie following regulations have been codified 
under Title 22: Foreign Relations (Chapter I: 
Department of State), in accordance with the 
requirements of the Federal Register and the 
Code of Federal Regulations : 

Part 32 — Validation and Issuance of Pass- 
ports During Existence of War 

additional regulations 

§ 32.9 Passport to contain name of each coun- 
try citizen intends to visit and ohject of visit. 
In view of the exigencies of international travel, 



particularly the spread of military operations, 
the increasing hazards and difficulties involved 
in foreign travel and residence, and the fact 
that after October 16, 1940, male citizens be- 
tween the ages of twenty-one and thirty-five 
years will be required, before departing from 
the United States, to obtain a permit on Form 
351 to leave this country, the Secretary of State 
has deemed it desirable to revert to the former 
policy of the Department of State of setting 
forth in each passjDort issued by it or under its 
authority the names of the countries which the 
citizen intends to visit and the object of the 



OCTOBKR 19, 1940 



315 



visit to each country named in the passport. 
This policy shall become effective at once and 
shall apply to passports heretofore issued and 
presently valid, as well as to passports which 
may hereafter be issued, with the exception of 
passports intended for use in countries of the 
Western Hemisphere. In consequence, no pass- 
port liei'etofore issued shall be valid for travel 
from the United States to any foreign country 
requiriiic: such a document, except countries of 
the Western Hemisphere, uidess it is first sub- 
mitted to the Department of State for validation 
in the same manner as is provided for by 
SJJ 32.1-32.8 issued September 4, 1939,-> for the 
validation of passpoi'ts for use in traveling from 
the United States to any comitry in Europe. In 
submitting a passport to the Department for 
validation for use elsewhere than in the coun- 
tries of tlie Western Hemispliere, a person to 
wliom such document was issued nuist also state 
the names of the countries in which he intends to 
travel, the reason for his intended travel to each 
country named and, if the reason for the pro- 
posed travel to each such country is susceptible 
of documentary cori-oboration. he should sub- 
mit such documentary corroboration. The pro- 
visions of § § 32.1-32.8 shall apply, so far as 
may be practicable, to travel elsewhere through- 
out the woi-ld except in countries of the Western 
Hemisphere, save tliat where an individual de- 
sires to travel to a country in which conditions 
are normal and the routes of travel thereto are 
reasonably safe, in applying the test of neces- 
sity for such travel a more lenient policy will be 
followed. (Sec. 1, 44 Stat. 887 ; 22 U. S.'c. 211a ; 
Proc. No. 7856, Mar. 31, 1938) 

?5 32.10 Prerioiis irquhitioiiy .still effective. 
However, nothing in § § 32.9-32.10 shall be 
construed as rendering ineH'cctive the pi-ovi- 
sions of the regulation of November 6, 1939,^ 
under which an American citizen may not 



'4 F. K. 3892. These regulations have lieeu codified 
since publication in the Federal Rcgislcr. 
M F. R. 4509. 



travel on a vessel of a belligerent country 
on or over the North Atlantic Ocean north 
of 35 degrees north latitude and east of 66 
degrees west longitude except when specifi- 
cally authorized to do so. The authorization 
may be granted by the Passport Division of 
the Department of State. American con- 
sular officers in the Dominion of Canada and 
in Newfoundland are authorized to endorse 
passports for travel on a vessel of a belligerent 
state in any case where the vessel begins its 
journey in a port in the Dominion of Canada or 
in Newfoundland, including Labrador, and ends 
at a port in any such place or the United States, 
provided the vessel is not scheduled to travel, 
between the beginning and ending of any such 
journey, in the waters above mentioned, except 
in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Hudson Strait and 
the coiustal or contiguous waters of the Domin- 
ion of Canada or Newfoundland, including Lab- 
rador, which are customarily navigated between 
points on these coasts. (Sec. 1. 44 Stat. 887; 
22 U.S.C. 211a; Proc. No. 7856, Mar. 31, 1938) 

[seal] Cordell Hull, 

Secretary of State. 
October 11, 1940. 

fDepartmrntMl Order Xo. 888] 



POSTPONEMENT OF ADDRESS ON 
FOREIGN POLICY BY THE SECRE- 
TARY OF STATE 

[Released to the press October 16] 

The Secretary of State will deliver on October 
26 before the National Press Club in Washing- 
ton a comprehensive address on the recent de- 
veloi^ment and present status of the foreign pol- 
icy of the United States. Emergency tasks of 
the Department make it impossible to prepare 
and deliver such an address at an earlier date. 
Therefore, the announcement previously made 
that Secretary Hull would make a radio address 
on October 18 has been withdrawn. 



Canada 



GREAT LAKES - ST. LAWRENCE WATERWAY PROJECT 



[Released to the press October 15] 

111 order to assure adequate power supplies 
to meet the requirements of defense produc- 
tion in tlie northeastern part of the United 
States and in Canada, steps have been taken 
by the Governments of the United States and 
Canada to initiate immediately preliminary en- 
gineering and otlier investigations for that 
part of the Great Lalies - St. Lawrence Basin 
project which is located in the International 
Rapids Section of the St. Lawrence River. 
These steps have been taken in order that the 
entire project may be started without loss of a 
favorable construction season when final deci- 
sion is reached between the two Governments. 
The investigations will be made under the di- 
rection of temporary committees to be ap- 
pointed by the two Governments. 

Meanwhile, to assist in providing an ade- 
quate supply of power to meet Canadian de- 
fense needs, and contingent upon the Province 
of Ontario's agreeing to provide immediatelj' 
for diversions into the Great Lakes System of 
■waters from the Albany River Basin which 
normally flow into Hudson Bay, the Govern- 
ment of the United States has informed the 
Canadian Government that it will interpose 
no objection, pending the conclusion of a final 
Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Basin agreement 
between the two countries, to the immediate 
utilization for power at Niagara Falls by the 
Province of Ontario of additional waters 
equivalent in quantity to the diversions into 
the Great Lakes Basin above referred to. 

[Released to the press by the White House October 17] 

To THE Congress of the United States : 

The surveys of the Federal Power Commis- 
sion and the National Power Policy Committee 
have convinced me that the development of the 
International Rapids Section of the St. Law- 

316 



rence River should be undertaken at the earli- 
est possible date as a part of adequate provi- 
sion to meet the continuing power requirements 
of the defense program in certain essential cen- 
ters of war material production in the north- 
eastern States. 

Tlie potential power at this site is best 
adapted to meet the requirements of expansion 
in certain essential defense industries, includ- 
ing aluminum, magnesium, ferro-alloys, chemi- 
cals, etc. Actually, the Aluminum Company 
of America has recently arranged for the im- 
port of 30,000 kilowatts of additional power 
from Canada to meet the pressing requirements 
of its existing plant located at the very site of 
tlie proposed St. Lawrence project and, I am 
reliably informed, is seeking additional sup- 
plies from across the border. Such imported 
supplies are, in effect, on an annual basis, sub- 
ject to being withdrawn if required by the 
Canadian power market. 

It is urgent that this project be undertaken 
at the present time, not only from the point of 
view of our own defense but also in terms of 
those of our neighbor, Canada. The Province 
of Ontario needs to be able to count upon the 
early availability of this power to meet its 
growing load. The project may, therefoi"e, be 
considered as an essential part of the program 
of continental defense which is being actively 
worked out by representatives of the two 
peoples. 

I am informed that if the potential power of 
the International Rapids is to be available to 
carry the peak load of 1945, preliminaiy in- 
vestigations, particularly engineering surveys 
of the site, including core borings, test pits, soil 
analyses, etc., must be undertaken immediately. 
I have, therefore, allocated $1,000,000 of the 
special defense fund to the Federal Power 
Commission and Corps of Engineers, United 



OCTOBER 19, 1940 



317 



States Army, for this preliminary work and 
liave appointed a committee of four to advise 
me in planning the work and to cooperate with 
appropriate agencies of the Canadian Govern- 
ment. The members of this committee are 
Leland Olds, Chairman of the Federal Power 
Commission, as chairman; A. A. Berle, Assist- 
ant Secretary of State; Brigadier General 
Thomas M. Robins of the Board of Engineers 
for Rivers and Harbors, Corps of Engineers, 
United States Army; and Gerald V. Cruise, 
representative of the Trustees of the Power 
Authority of the State of New York. I have 
directed the U. S. Corps of Engineers to begin 
the necessary investigations immediately. 

The preliminary investigations which I have 
authorized involve no actual constraction or 
commitment to construct. In taking this 
means of advising Congress of the surveys I 
am having made, I wish to make it clear that 
Congress will be kept advised of such further 
steps as may be necessary. 

Franklin D. Roose\-elt 

The White House, 
Octohcr 17, WJfO. 

ExECCTi\-E Order 

Esfablishing the St. Lawrence Adi'isoiy Com- 
ndttee and Providing fw a Preliminary In- 
vestigation of Intei'natiomal Rapids Section, 
Si. Lawrence River 

By virtue of the authority vested in me by the 
act entitled "An Act making appropriations for 
(he Navy Department and the Naval Service 
for the fiscal year ending June 30. 1941, and for 
other purposes"', approved June 11, 1940 (Pub. 
No. 588, 76th Cong.), and by the Military Ap- 
propriation Act, 1941, approved June 13, 1940 
(Pub. No. 611, 76th Cong.), and as President 
of the United States, and in order to provide for 
emergencies affecting the national security and 
defense, it is hereby ordered as follows: 

1. There is hereby established the St. Law- 
rence Advisory Committee, consisting of Leland 
Olds, Chairman of the Federal Power Commis- 
sion, as chairman ; A. A. Berle, Assistant Sec- 
retary of State ; Brigadier General Thomas M. 
Robins of the Board of Engineers for Rivers 



and Harbors, Corps of Engineers, U^nited States 
Army ; and Gerald V. Cruise, representative of 
the Trustees of the Power Authority of the 
State of New York. It shall be the duty of the 
Committee to advise the President with respect 
to the matters hereinafter set forth, and to per- 
form such other functions as the President may 
determine. 

2. The Federal Power Commission and the 
Corps of Engineers, United States Armj', are 
authorized, empowered, and directed — 

(a) To make such preliminary investigations 
as the Advisory Committee may consider ap- 
propriate or necessary with respect to develop- 
ment of navigation and hydroelectric power in 
the International Rapids Section of the St. 
Lawrence River, including, among other things, 
(1) preliminary investigations of the potential 
dam site by means of core borings, test pits, soil 
analyses, etc., (2) preliminarj' surveys of the 
lands necessai-y for such development, and in- 
vestigation of the titles to such lands, and (3) 
preparation of jjreliminary plans and specifi- 
cations. 

(b) To make periodic reports, with recom- 
mendations to the Preirident, of the results of 
the aforesaid investigations. 

(c) To consult and cooperate with appropri- 
ate agencies of the Canadian Government. 

3. In the performance of their fimctions and 
duties under this order the Federal Power 
Commission and the Corps of Engineers, United 
States Army, may avail themselves of the serv- 
ices, records, reports, and information of the 
Executive departments and other agencies of 
the Government. 

4. The Federal Power Commission and Corps 
of Engineers, United States Army, shall have 
authoritj' to appoint, without regard to the civil 
service laws, such officers, experts, and employ- 
ees as they may deem necessary to carry out 
their functions under this order, and to pre- 
scribe their functions, duties, responsibilities, 
and tenure. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 
The White House, 
October 16, Wlfi. 

[No. 8568] 



318 



DKPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



CONVENTION FOR THE EMERGENCY 
REGULATION OF THE LEVEL OF 
RAINY LAKE AND OF CERTAIN 
OTHER BOUNDARY WATERS 

All announcement regarding the proclama- 
tion on October 18, 1940, by the President of 



the convention witli Canada for the emer- 
gency regulation of the level of Eainy Lake 
and of certain other boundai-y waters in 
tlie Rainy Lake Avatershed, appears in this 
BuUetin under the heading "Treaty Infor- 
mation". 



The Far East 



REPATRIATION OF AMERICAN CITIZENS 



IKeloased to the press October 14] 

The American steamships Moiiterey and 
Maripom, of the Matson Line and the WaxJiinf/- 
toib of the United States Lines are being dis- 
patched to the Far East for the purpose of 
repatriating Americans. The Monferey will 
sail from Los Angeles October 16 for Honolulu 
and will carry equipment and supplies for the 
Mariposa which is now en route to Honolulu 
from New Zealand. The Monterey will leave 
the supplies for the Manposa at Honolulu and 
proceed to Chinese and Japanese ports. The 
Mariposa, will transfer her cargo and passen- 
gers at Honolulu and return to Australia and 
Xew Zealand, stopping en route !it Chinese and 
Japanese jwrts to take on Americans there de- 
siring repatriation. 

The S. S. Washington- is being prepared for 
a special journey to China and Japan to provide 
additional accoiiiinodatious for Americans there 
desiring rejjatiiation. She is expected to leave 
New York, Saturday. October 19, and will go 
via the Panama Canal. 



[Released to the press October 19] 

Under arrangements made by the Depart- 
ment of State ill conjunction with other agen- 
cies of the Government and with the cooperation 
of the Oceanic Steanishi]") Co., the steamshiii 
Monterey., \\hicli sailed from Los Angeles on 



October 16, 1940, will call at Yokohama and 
Shanghai for the purpose of providing addi- 
tional shipping accommodations for Americans 
withdrawing from Japan and China to the 
United States. The vessel is due to arrive at 
Yokohama on October 29 and at Shanghai on 
November 1. She will have loom for 425 peo- 
l)le from Yokohama and 425 from Shanghai. 
She will take only American citizens, including 
alien spouses and unmarried minor children. 
The ship will then proceed on her regular sched- 
uled itinerary to Australia and New Zealand 
and return to the United States. 

The Monterey will be followed by the steam- 
sliip Mariposa also of the Oceanic Steamship 
Co., which will leave Honolulu on October 30 
for Shanghai, arriving there about November 9. 
The vessel will possibly ]>roceed from Shanghai 
to Chinwangtao to embark Americans from 
north China, and thence to Kobe, returning 
from that port to the United States. It is ex- 
pected that Americans in Korea will proceed 
either to Chinwangtao or Kobe for embarka- 
tion. The Mariposa has accommodations for 
1,100 people. 

Fares for passengers embarked at Japan and 
China on both vessels will approximate those 
charged by the American President Lines for 
])assengers from Manila to the United States. 
The American President Lines' office in the Far 
EmsI will handle bookings for both vessels. 



Commercial Policy 



THE NEED OF A SOUND COMMERCIAL POLICY 

Address by Assistant Secretary Grady ^ 



[Rrloaspri to the press October 16J 

Until very recently it appeared that tlic 
world had forgotten the nature and the pur- 
pose of trade. 

The trend in commercial policy for the past 
two decades has had, for the most part, little 
regard for the hearing of international trade 
on national welfare. This was true also of 
our trade policy until the present administra- 
tion came into l)eing in 1933 and estahlished 
in the following year the trade-agreements 
program. Our foreign trade before that time 
had been looked tipon more or less as a sideline 
activity of the Nation's business and as a legiti- 
mate field for exploitation by special interests. 
Before the advent of the present administra- 
tion the Government's relation to foreign trade 
was determined in a large part by considera- 
tions of gain for particular interests ratiier 
than by n sound regard for the standard of 
living of the American people as a whole. Our 
foreign-trade policy at that time was not di- 
rected principally toward making available to 
American workers and farmers more of the 
good things of life. Through its trade-pro- 
motion activities abroad, the Government 
sought to encourtige the shipments of goods 
out of the country and, through its policy of 
high protectionism, sought to discourage the 
shipments of goods into the country, leaving 
for the consumption of the American people a 
smaller volume of goods than that which they 
themselves produced. 

Exports are. of coui'se, important and should 
be encouraged. The reason they are impor- 
tant, however, is because they can be ex- 
changed for imports and because the exchange 



^Delivered at a dinner meeting of the St. Peters- 
burg Chamber of Commerce, St. Petersburg, Fla., 
October 16, 1940. 

260830—40 3 



of exports, which we can produce relatively 
cheaply, for imports, which we are not as well 
adapted to produce or cannot produce at all, 
means that we as a nation are able to obtain 
for consumption more goods than would other- 
wise be possible and also certain essential 
goods which otherwise would not be available. 

On the other hand, imports are important, 
not only because they supply consumption 
needs, but also because they provide our for- 
eign customers with means for paying for our 
exports and thus give employment in indus- 
tries in this country whose output exceeds do- 
mestic demands. 

Thus it may be seen that the benefits of for- 
eign trade cannot be identified with either ex- 
ports or imports alone; they arise out of the 
process of trade, that is, out of the exchange of 
goods for goods. Recognit ion of this fact con- 
stitutes the basis of the trade-agreements pro- 
gram. 

The traditions of high protectionism in this 
country, however, have left a deep imprint on 
the economic thinking of the average American. 
They have obscured his view of the true value of 
exports and left him with an unreasonable and 
irrational hostility toward imports. The failure 
on the part of many Americans, including busi- 
nessmen, industriali.sts, farmers, and factory 
Avorkers, to appreciate the vital importance of 
imports in the national economy has denied the 
trade-agreements program the whole-hearted 
support which sound judgment and interest in 
the national welfare would warrant. 

It is especially interesting to note that this 
importance has not been overlooked by militarj* 
authorities, who keenlj' appreciate the fact that 
the ability of a nation to defend itself and to 
carry on war is largely based on its economic 
potentialities and that these in turn are depend- 

319 



320 

ent on imports. Ever since the outbreak of the 
life-and-death struggle in Europe, a year ago 
last September, the destruction of import trade, 
essential to a nation's existence, has been a major 
factor in war strategy. 

The British blockade -was first aimed at pre- 
venting shipments of goods to Germany; its 
extension later to cover shipment of goods from 
Germany is evidence of the appreciation also of 
the military authorities of the reciprocal rela- 
tion between imports and exports. An attack on 
the enemy's export trade constitutes an attack 
on the source of foreign exchange for its pur- 
chases of imports, including those shipped by 
inland routes beyond the reach of naval action. 
It may furthermore have the aim of drying up 
the enemy's sources of foreign funds for carry- 
ing on propaganda and subversive activities 
abroad. 

Further evidence of the basic importance of 
import trade is found in the program which is 
under way in this country for buOding up large 
reserves of essential imported materials in the 
interest of national defense. 

A national emergency, such as the necessity of 
winning a war or of the building up of national 
defenses, demands that due consideration be 
given to the necessary function of imports in the 
national economy. The recognition of this func- 
tion is essential to the support of a sound com- 
mercial policy which is especially important at 
tliis time to the further promotion of inter- 
American solidarity. 

The chief source of livelihood of our southern 
neighbors is the production of raw materials for 
world markets. Nearly half of their exports in 
1937 was sold to Europe, but that trade is now 
disrupted as a result of the war. If the burden 
on Latin America of accumulating stocks of ex- 
port surpluses is permitted to grow, it may be 
expected that the resistance of the American re- 
publics to economic penetration from the Old 
World will be undermined and weakened. This 
problem of Latin-American export surpluses is 
one of immediate importance to which, as you 
know, this Government is giving serious atten- 
tion. Its solution is highly important to the 
security of this hemisphere, 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtTLLETIN 

The basic need, however, of the defense and 
prosperity of the Americas is the continued 
development of closer economic relations 
among the American republics. There is need 
of each oiDening wider its markets to the prod- 
ucts of the other republics, of developing 
industries to supply those markets, and of 
lending financial and technical assistance for 
this and other purposes. 

I am sure that you are aware of the marked 
advance which has already been made in this 
direction under the administration's good- 
neighbor policy. Of outstanding importance in 
this connection are the trade agreements which 
this Government has entered into with 11 
American republics, containing mutual guaran- 
ties of fair treatment and providing recipro- 
cally for increased market opportunities 
through a lowering of import barriers. Even 
opponents of the trade-agreements program 
who have shouted "wolf, wolf" the loudest have 
benefited from its stimulus to foreign trade 
and the resulting expansion of the domestic 
market for their products. 

As an illustration of this fact let me point to 
Florida's winter vegetable industry. Six 
growing seasons have elapsed since the import 
duties on tomatoes, cucmnbers, potatoes, lima 
beans, peppers, eggplant, squash, and okra 
were reduced as a result of our trade agree- 
ment with Cuba, but there is no evidence to 
indicate that these duty reductions, which are 
seasonal and applicable only to imports from 
Cuba, have hindered the development of our 
winter vegetable industry ; in fact, it has stead- 
ily expanded. 

That no harm has come to this industry is 
shown by the fact that the growing of winter 
vegetables in Florida has been substantially 
more profitable since the trade-agreements 
program has been in effect than it was prior 
to that time. The annual average farm in- 
come in Florida from the six most important 
vegetables affected by the Cuban agreement, 
namely, tomatoes, new potatoes, green beans, 
peppers, cucumbers, and eggplant, has in- 
creased by about one-third since the pre- 
agreement period. This increase in income has 



OCTOBER 19, 194 



321 



been accompanied also by increases in vege- 
table acreage and production. 

Tomatoes are the most important vegetable 
to Florida affected by the Cuban agreement 
but, notwithstanding that agreement, tomato 
growing in your State has continued to expand 
and become more profitable under the trade- 
agreements program. The average annual in- 
come received by your tomato growers in ths 
three seasons prior to that program was 
$6,128,000 ; in the 1938-39 season it reached the 
record-breaking level of $12,236,000, a 100-per- 
cent increase. The disastrous freezes of this 
past season, 1939-40, resulted, of course, in a 
serious set-back to tomato production — due to 
the weather, not to imports. 

The demand for tomatoes is especially sensi- 
tive to changes in consumer purchasing power. 
Investigation has revealed that families with in- 
comes ranging from $1,000 to $1,500 a year 
spend more than three times as much on toma- 
toes as do families with incomes under $500 per 
year. The increase in consumer purchasing 
power, therefore, resulting from the restoration 
and expansion of our foreign trade under the 
trade-agreeniPiits program is of pa7-ticular im- 
portance to the tomato industry. 

Florida has benefited directly as well as 
indirectly from trade agreements. Increased 
market opportunities abroad have been obtained 
through trade agreements for many commodi- 
ties of major importance to Florida, such as 
lumber, canned fruits and vegetables, and tur- 
pentine. Latin America, moreover, is an im- 
portant market for such products, and Florida 
is therefore in an especially favorable position 
to share directly in the benefits of closer inter- 
American trade relations. In 1938 Latin Amer- 
ica purchased about one-third of our exports of 
vegetables and vegetable preparations, 17.5 per- 
cent of our cigar exports, 16.5 percent of our 
naval-stores exports, and 4 percent of our ex- 
ports of fruits and nuts. 

When protests against the trade-agreements 
program are carefully examined they are usu- 
ally found, as in the case of tomatoes, to be 
groundless. Nevertheless, the opposition of sec- 
tional and special interests have constituted a 
serious threat to the very existence of the pro- 



gram. Thanks to their short-sighted greed and 
also perhaps to the activities of similar privi- 
lege-seeking groups abroad, the trade-agree- 
ments program has not been advanced as far in 
our relations with the other American republics 
as might be desired, especially in view of the 
present need of American economic solidarity 
which the defense of this hemisphere demands. 

In this connection attention may be called to 
our prohibition, under the guise of sanitary 
laws, against meat imports from certain areas 
of South America not affected by the disease 
against wliich sanitary safeguards are sought. 
The failure of this Government to pi'ovide war- 
ranted relief from such sanitary regulations 
and the indifference which would appear to be 
evidenced thereby toward the development of 
closer inter-American relations do not inspire 
the cooperation which is necessary to the fur- 
ther strengthening of hemispheric defense. 

Although the people of this country are on 
guard against fifth-column activities, they do 
not appear to be alert yet to the more subtle 
danger of the existence within our midst of a 
sixth column composed of special interests who, 
out of blind selfishness, would sacrifice the 
common good for personal gain. 

The need for a sound commercial policy ex- 
ists not only in the relations between the 
American republics but also in the relations 
between the American i-epublics and the rest 
of the world. Regardless of how successful 
efforts may be to bring about greater economic 
adhesion in inter-American relations, the fact 
remains that the Western Hemisphere will con- 
tinue to have surplus products for sale to Eu- 
rope. If our trade with Europe is to be main- 
tained and developed, if it is to be conducted 
on a self-respecting basis of equality between 
nations, if it is not to be exploited as an in- 
strument of political extortion and blackmail, 
then it must be established on a basis of lib- 
eral principles; that is, a multilateral most- 
favored-nation basis, such as is embodied in 
the trade-agreements program. And the 
American republics have already made it clear 
that these are the terms on which they are 
prepared to do business. At the Inter-Ameri- 
can Conference at Habana last July it was re- 



322 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



solved that the "American nations continue to 
adhere to the liberal principl&s of interna- 
tional trade ... in their relations with each 
other as fully as present circumstances per- 
jnit" and declared that "the American nations 
should be prepaied to resiune the conduct of 
trade with the entire world in accordance with 
these principles as soon as the non-American 
nations are prepared to do likewise.'' 

After the war, the world will be faced with 
problems of economic reconstruction. It is 
not possible, of course, to predict what condi- 
tions will exist at that time. It is all the more 
important, therefore, that our Government 
possess ready and effective means, such as are 



provided by the Trade Agreements Act, for 
dealing with new problems as they arise. Gur 
efforts at post-war rehabilitation should, in our 
own interests as well as in those of other coun- 
tries, be directed toward facilitating a return 
throughout the world to normal liberal trade 
practices. The mutually advantageous char- 
acter of the trade agreements which the United 
States has concluded with 21 countries will be 
one of the strongest influences favoring such a 
program. Only by keeping our present com- 
mercial policy alive and active can we hope to 
achieve prosperity after the war on a sound 
and lasting basis. 



International Conferences, Commissions, etc. 



SECOND BRAZILIAN DENTAL CONGRESS 



[Released to the press October 14] 

Prof. Abelardo de Britto, Dean of the Fac- 
ulty of Odontology of the National University 
at Eio de Janeiro, who is also President of the 
General Federation of Dental Associations of 
Brazil, requested the assistance of the Depart- 
ment of State to obtain motion pictures on 
dental science and practice in the United States 
for display at the Second Brazilian Dental 
Congress. This Congress, which is under the 
patronage of President Vargas, is scheduled 
to meet in Rio de Janeiro from October 18 to 
25, 1940. The Department of State requested 
the cooperation of the War Department, and 
in consequence the Medical Department of the 
United States Army has made available for 
sliowing at the Brazilian Congress the exhibit 
which it had on display at the annual meeting 
of the American Dental Association at Cleve- 
land in September. At the close of the Cleve- 
land meeting the War Department's exhibit 
was flown by Army bomber from Cleveland to 
Baltimore and there transshipped to steamer 
for Brazil. Professor de Britto has expressed 
to the Departments of State and of War the 
appreciation of the Brazilian Federation. 



The Dental School of the University of Cali- 
fornia and the American Dental Association 
have also sent motion-ijicture films for display 
at the Brazilian Congress. 

Tiie War Department's exhibit consists of 
trans-illuminated photo-micrographs made 
from microscopic sections of various patho- 
logical lesions of the oral cavity including 
caries, pyorrhea, various types of infectious dis- 
eases of the soft tissues, and benign and malig- 
nant tumors encountered by dental surgeons in 
this field. Many pathological conditions of 
the teeth, such as abrasion, caries, hypercemen- 
tosis, enamel pearls, true and false germina- 
tion, deposits of calculus, and anomalies, ai-e 
shown by mounted specimens. 

Placards with mounted photographs show 
the Army Dental School and its various de- 
partments. As soon as practical after being 
commissioned in the Regular Army, dental offi- 
cers are sent to the School for post-graduate 
instruction and special training in military 
dentistry. 

By use of models recent developments in the 
treatment of fractures of the mandible, max- 
illa, and other maxillo-facial injuries are dera- 



OCTOBKR 19, 1940 

onstrated. This includes a simplified method 
of reduction and immobilization of the parts 
by intramaxillary wiring with elastic ti'action. 
improved ty[K's of sectional splints, and appli- 
ances for extra-oral traction which can be 
made quickly from simple materials readily 
available in any locality. 

Photographs show the operation of tlie Reg- 
istry of Dental and Oral Pathology of the 
American Dental Association, which is located 
at the Army Medical IVIuscum. The Registry 
is supervised by officers of the Dental Corps 
who have had special training in pathological 
wf)rk. Since the Registry was established in 
1933 many hundreds of cases from both Aiiiiy 
and civilian sources have been collected. Each 
case is made up of a history, X-rays, micro- 
scoijic sections of diseased tissue, and clinical 
jihotographs when available. All material 
sent to the Museum from those parts within 
(lie fiekl of the general practitioner of den- 
tistry and oral and maxillo-facial surgery is 
listed in the Registry after study, diagnosis, 
and report lia\e been made. An index lists the 
various diseases by accession niuubers .so that 
all cases of any particular condition can be 
readily obtained for study. The material in 
the Registry is available for study by all ethi- 
cal professional men. 

An ilhuninated viewbox contains represent- 
ative slides from the loan sets of micro.scopic 
slides which have been prepared from material 
in the Registry. These slides are available for 
use by schools, study clubs, and individuals. 

Illustrative pages from the Atlas of Dental 
and Oral Pathology are included in the ex- 
liibit. These books were prepared at the Army 
Medical Museum for the American Dental 
Association as a part of its educuti(mal pro- 
gram and are sold by the Association at the 
l>rice which it cost to produce them. The 
Atlas covers comprehensively pathologic con- 
ditions of the lips, cheeks, mouth, tongue, teeth, 
jaws, and neck. It is not a textbook but is 
designed to aiford the opportunity to study 
tlie pathology of these parts. The material is 
presented by the case method with an abstract 
of the clinical data, clinical photographs and 
roentgenograms where available, description of 



323 

the pathology, annotated photomicrographs, 
and references to comprehensive articles in the 
recent literature where appropriate. All of 
the approximately IGO plates made up of over 
400 illustrations are actual photographic 
prints. The book is really a post-graduate 
course in pathology in one volume. 

The motion-picture films comprised in this 
exhibit cover many of the latest and most scien- 
tific procedures in dental practice as exemplified 
by the liigliest standards of American dentistiy. 
New developments in oral surgery, recognized 
improvements in denture service, and great ad- 
vancement in ceramics or porcelain restorations 
are among the subjects covered in the films 
sent for the use of the dentists of Brazil. The 
educational value of the films will surely be 
gi'eatly aj^preciated by those who desii'e to keep 
abreast with the latest developments of dental 
practice in the United States. 

The progress in American dentistry does not 
confine itself solely to the restorative measures 
which characterized the earlier developments of 
dentistry as an art and science. The dental 
profession has been deeply concerned with the 
disease processes which so greatly influence 
dental health. Histo-jiathology has become of 
increasing importance to dentistry. The tissues 
involved, the progress of disease, the normal 
reparative processes, and the identification of 
pathological as well as normal tissue are essen- 
tial projects in the larger consideration of den- 
tal health and the necessary steps required for 
intelligent treatment. 

Recognizing these important factors in the 
newer development of the science of dentistry, 
the Dental Corps of the Army has created a 
section on dental pathology at the Army Medi- 
cal Museum. Dental officers especially trained 
in this particular field are detailed to the Mu- 
seum for special research, in the field of dental 
histology and pathology. Their work is out- 
standing and their contributions to dentistry 
are a significant part of the general advance- 
ment of the science of dentistry, for, through 
a very desirable sponsorshi]3 of this work on 
the pait of the American Dental Association, 
the studies and exhibits are made available to 
the entire dental profession in the United States. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



JUDICIAL SETTLEMENT 
Permanent Court of International Justice 

AuMralia 

There is printed below the text of a circular 
letter from the Acting Secretary General of the 
League of Nations, dated September 17, 1940, 
regarding the termination by Australia of the 
Optional Clause (article 36, paragraph 2) of 
the Statute of the Permanent Court of Inter- 
national Justice and its acceptance thereof on 
new conditions: 

"Gene\'a, 17 Sept. 1940. 
"Sir: 

"I have the honour to inform you that the 
High Commissioner in London for His 
Majesty's Government in the Commonwealth 
of Australia, by a communication which was 
received in the Secretariat on September 2nd, 
1940, has transmitted to me a declaration dated 
August 21st, 1940, terminating the acceptance 
by His Majesty's Govermnent in the Common- 
wealth of Australia of the compulsory juris- 
diction of the Permanent Court of Interna- 
tional Justice (Article 36, paragraph 2, of the 
Statute of the Court). 

"This declaration reads as follows : 

" 'On the 20th of September, 1929, Major- 
General the Honourable Sir Granville Ryrie, 
at that time High Commissioner in London for 
His Majesty's Govenmient in the Common- 
wealth of Australia, made the following de- 
claration on behalf of His Majesty's Govern- 
ment in the Commonwealth of Australia. The 
declaration was ratified on the 18th August, 
1930:- 

" ' "On behalf of His Majesty's Government 
in the Commonwealth of Australia and subject 
to ratification, I accept as compulsory ipso facto 
324 



and without special convention, on condition of 
reciprocity, the jurisdiction of the Court in 
conformity with Article 36, paragraph 2, of 
the Statute of the Court, for a period of ten 
years and thereafter until such time as notice 
may be given to terminate the acceptance, over 
all disputes arising after the ratification of the 
present declaration with regard to situations or 
facts subsequent to the said ratification, other 
than :- 

" ' "Disputes in regard to which the par- 
ties to the dispute have agreed or shall agree 
to have recourse to some other method of peace- 
ful settlement; and 

" ' "Disputes with the Government of any 
other Member of the League which is a Member 
of the British Commonwealth of Nations, all of 
which disputes shall be settled in such manner 
as the parties have agreed or shall agree; and 

" ' "Disputes with regard to questions which 
by international law fall exclusively within the 
jurisdiction of the Commonwealth of Australia. 

" ' "And subject to the condition that His 
Majesty's Government in the Commonwealth 
of Australia reserve the right to require tliat 
proceedings in the Court shall be suspended in 
respect of any dispute which has been sub- 
mitted to and is under consideration by the 
Council of the League of Nations, provided 
that notice to suspend is given after the dis- 
pute has been submitted to the Council and 
is given within ten days of the notification of 
the initiation of the proceedings in the Court, 
and provided also that such suspension shall 
be limited to a period of twelve months or such 
longer period as may be agreed by the parties 
to the dispute or determined by a decision of 
all the Members of the Council other than the 
parties to the dispute." 

" 'On behalf of His Majesty's Government in 



OCTOBER 19, 1940 



325 



the Commonwealth of Australia I, S. M. Bruce, 
the High Commissioner in London for His 
Majesty's Government in the Commonwealth 
of Australia, hereby terminate their acceptance 
of the jurisdiction of the Court in conformity 
with paragraph 2 of Article 36 of the Statute. 
" 'London, 

21st August, 19]fi. 

S. M. Bruce' 

"By the same communication, the High Com- 
missioner in London for His Majesty's Govern- 
ment in the Commonwealth of Australia 
transmitted to me a further declaration dated 
August 21st, 1940, by which, subject to the 
reservations therein set out. His Majesty's 
Government in the Commonwealth of Australia 
accepted the compulsory jurisdiction of the 
Court for a further jieriod. 

''This second declaration reads as follows: 

" 'In my declaration of today's date, I, S. M. 
Bruce, the High Commissioner in London for 
His Majesty's Government in the Common- 
wealth of Australia, announced the termina- 
tion by His Majesty's Government in the Com- 
monwealth of Australia of their acceptance 
of the jurisdiction of the Permanent Court of 
International Justice in confonnity with para- 
graph 2 of Article 36 of the Statute of the 
Court. 

" 'On behalf of His Majesty's Government 
in the Commonwealth of Australia I now de- 
clare that they accept as compulsoi-j' ipso facto 
and without special convention, on condition of 
reciprocitj', the jurisdiction of the Court, in 
conformity with paragraph 2 of Article 36 of 
the Statute of the Court, for a period of five 
years from today's date and thereafter until 
such time as notice may be given to tenninate 
the acceptance, over all disputes arising after 
the 18th August, 1930, with regard to situa- 
tions or facts subsequent to the said date ; other 
than :- 

" 'Disputes in regard to which the parties 
to the dispute have agreed or shall agi-ee to 
have recourse to some other method of peace- 
ful settlement; 

" 'Disputes with the Government of any 



other Member of the League which is a Mem- 
ber of the British Commonwealth of Nations, 
all of which disputes shall be settled in such 
manner as the parties have agreed or shall 
agree ; 

" 'Disputes with regard to questions which 
by international law fall exclusively within 
the jurisdiction of the Commonwealth of 
Australia; and 

" 'Disputes arising out of events occurring 
at a time when His Majesty's Government in 
the Commonwealth of Australia were involved 
in hostilities, 

" 'And subject to the condition that His 
Majesty's Government in the Commonwealth 
of Australia reserve the right to require that 
proceedings in the Court shall be suspended 
in respect of any dispute which has been sub- 
mitted to and is under consideration by the 
Council of the League of Nations, provided 
that notice to suspend is given after the dis- 
pute has been submitted to the Council and 
is given within ten daj's of tlie notification of 
the initiation of the proceedings in the Court, 
and provided also that such suspension shall 
be limited to a period of twelve months or 
such longer period as may be agreed by the 
parties to the dispute or determined by a de- 
cision of all the Membei's of the Council other 
than the parties to the dispute. 

" 'London, 

21st August, lOlfi. S. M. Bkuce' 

"I have [etc.] 

For the Acting Secretary-General. 
Yj. Giraud 
Acting Legal Adviser 

of the Secretariat^'' 

BOUNDARY 

Convention With Canada for the Emergency 
Regulation of the Level of Rainy Lake and 
Certain Other Boundary Waters (Treaty 
Series No. 961) 

The convention between the United States 
and Canada providing for the emergency reg- 



326 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Illation of the level of Rainy Lake and of cer- 
tain otliei- boiindai-y waters in the Rainy Lake 
watershed, signed at Ottawa on September 15, 
1938, was proclaimed by the President on Oc- 
tober 18. 1940. The convention was ratified 
in respect of Canada by His Britannic Majesty 
at a Court held at Ottawa on May 19, 1939. 
The Senate of the United States gave its advice 
and consent to ratification of the convention on 
August 30, 1940, and it was ratified by the 
President on September 10, 1940. It went into 
effect on October 3, 1940 by the exchange of the 
ratifications of the President and the King at 
Ottawa on that date. 

The convention clothes the International 
Joint Commission established under the treaty 
relating to questions arising between the 
United States and Canada, signed at Wash- 
ington on January 11, 1909, with power to 
determine when emergenc}' conditions exist in 
the Rainy Lake watershed, whether by reason 
of high or low water, and empowers the Com- 
mission to adopt such measures of control as 
to it may seem proper with respect to existing 
dams at Kettle Falls and International Falls, 
as well as with respect to any existing or future 
dams or works in boundary waters of the 
Rainy Lake watershed, in the event the Com- 
mission shall determine that such emergency 
condition exists. 

WATERWAY 

Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Waterway 
Project 

An announcement regarding development of 
the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Watenvay 
Basin, together with a message from the 
President to Congress on that portion of the 
project located in tJie International Rapids 
Section of the St. Lawrence River, and an 
Executive order establishing the St. Lawrence 
Advisory Connnittee, appear in this Bulletin 
under the heading "Canada". 



The Foreign Service 



FOREIGN SERVICE REGULATIONS 

On October 15. 1940, the President signed 
Executive Order No. 8566 amending the For- 
eign Service Regulations of the United States 
(section XXII-4 of Chapter XXII: Duties of 
officers of the Foreign Service in connection 
with admission of aliens into the Philippine 
Islands). For text of the Executive order, 
see tlie Federal Register for October 17, 1940 
(vol. 5, no. 203), page 4107. 



Regulations 



The following Government regulations may 
be of interest to readers of the Bulletin: 

Documentation, Entrance and Clearance of Vessels, 
etc. : American Vessels Denied Clearance to Belligerent 
States — [Amendment regarding] Foreign Clearance. 
(Department of Commerce: Bureau of Marine In- 
.spection and Navigation.) [Order No. 57.] October 
14, 1940. Federal Retjister, October 15, 1940 (vol. 5, 
no. 201), p. 4078 (The National Archives of the United 
States). 

Documentation, Entrance and Clearance of Vessels, 
etc. : Instructions to Supervising and Local Inspectors 
and Collectors of Customs Amended. (Department of 
Commerce: Bureau of Marine Inspection and Naviga- 
tion.) [Order No. 58.] October 15, 1940. Federal 
Register. October ](j, 1940 (vol. 5, no. 202), p. 4089 
(The National Archives of the United States). 

Anchorage Regulations : Enforcement of Regulations 
Relating to Anchorages and Movements of A'essels. 
(Treasury Department: Coast Guard.) [General 
Order No. 2.] October 8, 1940. Federal Register, Oc- 
tober 15, 1940 (vol. 5, no. 201), p. 4078 (The National 
Archives of the United States). 



OCTOBER 19, 1940 



327 



Legislation 



An Act T<i amend section 4021 of the Revised 
Statutes and to rejieal section 4023 of the Revised 
Statutes rehiting to establishment of postal agencies 
[providing for the establishment of postal agencies 
at such foreign scaiMrts or airports as may in the 
judgment of the Postmaster General promote tlie 
I'tticieiicy of the foreign mail service of the United 
Slates]. (Public, Xo. 708, 76th Cong., .'id sess.) 
1 p. .V. 

All Act To amend section 4472 of the Revised 
Statutes (U. S. C, 1034 edition, title 40, stv. 46.">» to 
provide for the safe carriage of explosives or other 
dangerous or semidangerous articles or substances on 
tmard vessels; to make more effective the provisions 
of the International Convention for Safety of Life at 
Sea, 1929, relating to the carriage of dangerous goods; 
and for other purposes. (Public, No. 809, 76th Cong., 
3d sess. ) 1 p. 50. 

First Supplemental Civil Functions Appropriation 
Act, 1941 : Au Act Making supplemental ai)propria- 
lioiis for the sujiport of the tJovernmerit for the iiscal 
year ending June 30, 1941. and for otlier i)urposes 



[including an additional .$290,000 for .salaries and an 
additional $15,500 for contingent expenses. Department 
of State, 1941; $12,0<X) for expenses of the Alaskan 
International Highway Commission ; and making 
available the appropriation for "Cooperation with the 
American republics" contained in the Second Defi- 
ciency Appropriation Act, 1940, for compensation and 
traveling expenses of educational, professional, and 
artistic leaders in connection with the program of 
cooperation]. (Public. No. 812, 76th Cong.. 3d sess. i 
31 pp. ,"(•. 

An Act To amend the Act entitled "An Act to provide 
better facilities for the enforcement of the customs 
and immigration laws" [along the Canadian and Mexi- 
can bor<iers], approved June 2fi, 19,30. (Public, No. 
830. 7(;tli Cong.. 3d sess.) 1 p. Sfi. 



Publications 



Departbient of State 

Diplonuilic List. October 1940. Publication 1510. 
ii. 94 pp. Subscription. $1 a year: single copy, 10»'. 



U. S. GOVERNMSNT PRINTING OFFICE: 1940 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price. $2 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OP THE DIRECTOR OP THE Bl'RE.\C OP THE BUDGET 



; -r:. r 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



^ 




ETIN 




OCTOBER 26, 1940 
Vol. Ill: No. -JO -Publication l^20 

Qontents 

General : Pa^,e 

Our Koreifiii Policy: 

Acldri'ss by tlie Secretary of State 331 

Hifjhlijfhts of the address by the Secretary of State . 373 
Reciuisitioii by the United States of planes ordered by 

Sweden 338 

The Far East : 

Repatriation of Ainorican citizens 339 

American Kei'Ublics : 

Address by the Under Secretary of State 340 

Suspension of tonnage duties for vessels of Peru . . 346 
Commercial Policy : 

Commercial Cooperation in the Western Hemispliere: 

Address by Raymond H. Geist 847 

The Department : 

Appointment of officers 350 

TR.VFFIC IN Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, etc 351 

The Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 363 

Treaty Information : 
Agriculture : 

Convention for the Standardization of the Methods of 

Keeping and Operating Cattle Herdbooks .... 364 
Finance: 

Supplementary Executive Agreement with Haiti Fur- 
ther Modifying the Agreement of August 7, 1933, 
Executive Agreement Series No. 146 (Executive 

Agreement Series No. 183) 365 

Regulations 365 

Legislation 365 



U, S. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENT^ 

NOV 21 1940 



i 



General 



OUR FOREIGN POLICY 

Address by the Secretary of State 



[Kpleased to the press October 26] 

It is with no light heart tliat I address you and 
any others who may be listening tonight on the 
subject of our international relations. I should 
be lacking in candor if I did not emphasize the 
gravity of the present situation. 

Onlj' once before in our national existence 
has as grave a danger from without threatened 
this Nation as the danger wliich looms today on 
the international horizon. That was in the stir- 
ring days when the founders of this Republic 
staked everything on their unshakable convic- 
tion that a nation of free men could be estab- 
lished and would endure on the soil of America. 
Theirs was a struggle and a victory the fruits of 
which have been the proud inheritance of suc- 
ceeding generations of Americans for more than 
a century and a half. These generations, in- 
cluding our own, have enjoyed this inheritance 
in a world where human freedom, national inde- 
pendence, and order under law were steadily be- 
coming more and more firmly established as a 
system of civilized relations among nations and 
among individuals. 

Today that system and all peaceful nations, 
including our own, are gravely menaced. The 
danger arises out of the plans and acts of a small 
group of national rulers who have succeeded in 
transforming their peoples into forceful instru- 
ments for widespread domination by conquest. 

To understand the significance of this dan- 
ger and to prepare to meet it successfully we 



' Delivered at the Natioual Press Club dinner, Wash- 
ington, October 26, 1940, and broadcast over the blue 
network of the National Broadcasting Co. 



nuist see clearly the tragic lessons taught by 
wliat has occurred since the protagonists of 
conquest began their march across the earth. 
I ask you to review with me the whirlwind 
developments of one of the saddest and most 
crucial decades in the history of mankind — 
that of the nineteen-thirties. 



The opening years of the decade were filled 
with ominous rumblings of impending disas- 
ter. Profound economic dislocation had 
spread rapidly to every part of the world. 
It had disrupted international economic rela- 
tions and was causing untold distress every- 
where. The structure of international peace 
was still intact, but a dangerous breach was 
opened in it bj' the Japanese occupation of 
Manchuria in 1931. That act, universally con- 
demned at the time, proved to be only the 
beginning of an epidemic of callous disregard 
of international commitments — probably un- 
paralleled in the annals of history. Inter- 
national discussions for the reduction and 
limitation of armaments, begun much earlier, 
were dragging along. Their failure to result 
in effective agreements was adding to the gen- 
eral feeling of apprehension and insecurity. 

These developments were bound to create 
grave difficulties and grave dangers for our 
country, as well as for the rest of the world. 
The problems which they presented impera- 
tively demanded on our part vigorous initia^ 



331 



332 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



tive and leadership in the promotion and de- 
fense of tlie national interest. 

Accordingly, in the conduct of foreign policy, 
thisi Government directed its efforts to the fol- 
lowing objectives: (1) Peace and security for 
the United States with advocacy of peace and 
limitation of armament as universal interna- 
tional objectives; (2) support for law, order, 
justice, and morality and the principle of non- 
intervention ; (3) restoration and cultivation of 
sound economic methods and relations; (4) de- 
velojjment of the maximum measure of inter- 
national cooperation; (5) promotion of the se- 
curity, solidarity, and general welfare of the 
Western Hemisphere. These basic objectives of 
a good-neighbor policy represented a sound 
and practical middle course between the ex- 
tremes of internationalism and isolation. They 
have been consistently pursued throughout. 
The sweep of events has, of course, required 
the focusing of our attention at different 
periods upon different problems and different 
geographic areas. 

II 

In the early thirties, the relations among the 
American republics left much to be desired. 
Elements of mistrust, apprehension, and dis- 
union had to be eliminated if a good-neighbor 
policy was really to prevail on the American 
Continent and provide a foundation upon 
which 21 free and independent American re- 
publics could establish peaceful and mutually 
beneficial relations among themselves and 
with the rest of the world. 

The Seventh International Conference of 
American States, meeting at Montevideo in 
December 1933, offered an opportunity for a 
far-reaching move in this direction. There, a 
solid foundation was laid for a new structure 
of inter-American relations built on lines so 
broad that the entire program of principles 
was of universal application. At that meet- 
ing, the American republics took effective action 
for the maintenance of inter-American peace, 
agreed upon non-intervention, and adopted an 
economic program of common benefit based on 
the rule of equal treatment. During the years 



which immediately followed, the United Stat«s 
gave tangible proofs of its determination to 
act in accordance with the newly created sys- 
tem of inter-American relations. 

At the same time we inaugurated a new 
policy in the sphere of economic relations. 
In the summer of 1934, this country adopted 
the reciprocal-trade-agreements program, de- 
signed to restore and expand international 
commerce through the reduction of unreason- 
able trade barriers and the general reestablish- 
ment of the i-ule of equality of commercial 
treatment. Tliis program proved to be the 
greatest constructive effort in a world racing 
toward economic destruction. 

In the meantime, other phases of interna- 
tional relations were undergoing further and 
rapid deterioration. Efforts to achieve inter- 
national security through the reduction and 
limitation of armaments were unsuccessful. 
The long and weary conferences at Geneva dur- 
ing wliich plan after plan failed of adoption 
showed that the world was not ready to grasp 
an opjiortunity for action which, had it been 
taken, might have prevented subsequent dis- 
asters. This and the notice given by Japan 
in December 1934 of her intention to terminate 
the Washington Treaty for the Limitation of 
Naval Armaments opened the way for a new 
annament race. 

At this juncture, Italy announced her inten- 
tion to secure control over Ethiopia — by force 
of arms, if necessary. While there was still 
a possibility for an amicable settlement of the 
difficulties between Italy and Ethiopia, the at- 
titude of the Government of the United States 
was made clear on September 13, 1935, in a 
statement which read in part as follows: 

"Under the conditions which prevail in the 
world today, a threat of hostilities anywhere 
cannot but be a threat to the interests — politi- 
cal, economic, legal and social — of all nations. 
Armed conflict in any part of the world camiot 
but have undesirable and adverse effects in 
every part of the world. All nations have the 
right to ask that any and all issues between 
whatsoever nations be resolved by pacific 
means. Every nation has the right to ask that 



OCTOBER 2 6, 194 



333 



no nations subject it and other nations to the 
liazards and uncertainties that must inevitably 
accrue to all from resort to arms by any two." 

During the summer of 1935 under the influ- 
ence of these rapidly unfolding developments 
threatening the peace of the world the Con- 
gress enacted a statute known as the Neutrality 
Act of 1935. The purpose of this act was to re- 
duce the risks of our becoming involved in 
war. Unfortunately, it contained as its prin- 
cipal feature the provision for a rigid embargo 
on export of arms to belligerents. This provi- 
sion was adopted under the influence of a falla- 
cious concept temporarily accepted by a large 
number of our people that tliis country's en- 
trance into the World War had been bi"ought 
about by the sale of arms to belligerents and 
the machinations of so-called "international 
bankers". 

It was clear then, and has become even clearer 
since, that a rigid embargo on export of arms 
might have an effect the opposite of that which 
was intended. On the occasion of the signing 
of the act, the President pointed out that "his- 
tory is filled with unforeseeable situations" and 
that conditions might arise in which the wholly 
inflexible provision for an arms embargo "might 
drag us into war intead of keeping us out". I 
myself repeatedly pointed out that in addition 
to the unforeseeable consequences of the provi- 
sion itself reliance upon that concept might 
mean the closing of our eyes to manifold dangers 
in other directions and from other sources. 

By 1938, there was no longer any doubt that 
the existence of the arms embai'go provision was 
definitely having the effect of making wide- 
spread Mar more likely. Accordingly, early in 
1939, the executive branch of the Government 
urgently recommended to Congress the repeal 
of that provision. That was finally "accom- 
plished, after the outbreak of war in Europe, at 
a special session of Congress called by the Presi- 
dent for that specific purpose. 

Ill 

The Italo-Ethiopian war and its attendant 
circumstances left, in an already shaken Europe, 



a new condition of intense bitterness and mi- 
settlement. Into that situation, Germany, after 
three years of intensive military preparation, 
flung, early in 1936, her first serious challenge 
to world order under law. The German Gov- 
ernment tore up the Treaty of Locarno, into 
which Germany had freely and voluntarily en- 
tered, and proceeded to fortify the Khineland 
in violation of the express provisions of that 
treaty. In the sunnner of that year, a violent 
civil conflict flared up in Spain, and that unfor- 
tunate country became a battleground of newly 
emerging power politics. 

During this period, the President and I on 
numerous occasions emphasized the gathering 
dangers in the world situation. In June 1935, 
I made the following statement: 

"We witness all about us a reckless, competi- 
tive building up of armaments, a recurrence of 
the mad race which prior to 1914 led the nations 
of the world headlong to destruction. If per- 
sisted in, this course will again plunge the world 
into disaster." 

Tragic indeed is the fact that, from the end of 
1935, the voice of reason became increasingly 
di-owned by the rising clangor of the furious 
rearmament by nations preparing for conquest. 

We continued our efforts for peace. We 
continued to carry forward our program of 
economic restoration through the trade-agree- 
ments policy. We intensified the process of 
strengthening our naval armaments and of 
improving in other ways our means of de- 
fense. Speaking for the Government, I 
pointed out that we would not serve the cause 
of peace by not having adequate powers of 
self-defense; that we must be sure that in 
our desire for peace we would not appear to 
any other country unable to protect our just 
rights. 

In view of the imminence of an impending 
world crisis, we proposed to our sister re- 
publics of the Americas, in January 1936, an 
extraordinary conference to consider the best 
means of safeguarding the peace of this hemi- 
sphei'e. At this Inter-American Conference 
for the Maintenance of Peace, convoked at 



334 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Buenos Aires, the 21 American republics, 
building on the foundations laid down at 
Montevideo, adopted for the first time the 
great principle that a threat from without the 
continent to the peace of any of them should 
be regarded by the American republics as a 
threat to each and every one of them. They 
established in contractual form the obligation 
to consult together whenever the peace of the 
Americas is menaced, either from within or 
from without. 

During the year 1937, while the cauldron 
of European politics seethed dangerously, the 
focus of world events again shifted to the Far 
East. In the summer of that year, Japan 
struck a further and more extensive blow at 
China. This new threat to the peace of the 
world rendered appropriate a restatement of 
the fundamental aims and principles of the 
foreign policy of the United States. In a 
statement issued on July 16, 1937, I set forth 
those principles. We urged upon all nations 
the acceptance and observance of those prin- 
ciples. We repeatedly offered to be of assist- 
ance toward composing the Chinese-Japanese 
conflict in accordance with those principles. 
We participated — and Japan refused to par- 
ticipate — in the Brussels conference of the sig- 
natories to the Nine Power Pact, convoked 
for the purpose of bringing about a peaceful 
solution of that conflict. 

IV 

During the year 1938, the focus of events 
returned to Europe. In March of that year, 
the armed forces of Germany passed beyond 
that country's borders, and the annexation of 
Austria marked the first forcible alteration of 
the frontiers establislied in Europe by the 
treaties of peace. This was followed, within 
a few months, by an intense crisis, culminat- 
ing in the Munich conference and the first dis- 
memberment of Czechoslovakia. The darken- 
ing shadows of an approaching war deepened 
over the fields and homes of the European 
Continent. 

It is not necessary for me to dwell in detail 
on the kaleidoscopic events of the anguished 



year that preceded the outbreak of the Euro- 
pean war, nor of the 14 months we have since 
lived through. All of us recall the feverish 
activity in Europe which became a prelude 
to war and our repeated attempts to influence 
the contending nations to adjust their differ- 
ences by pacific means on the basis of justice, 
equality, and fair-dealing, without recourse to 
force or threat of force. The tragic and the 
heroic developments of the war months and 
the brutal invasion and ruthless extinguish- 
ment of the independence and freedom of many 
countries are too vivid in the minds of all of 
us to need recapitulation. 

The appalling tragedy of the present world 
situation lies in the fact that peacefully dis- 
posed nations failed to recognize in time the 
true nature of the aims and ambitions which 
have actuated the rulers of the heavily arming 
nations. Recoiling from the mere contempla- 
tion of the possibility of another widespread 
war, the peoples of the peaceful nations per- 
mitted themselves to be lulled into a false sense 
of security by the assurances made by these 
rulers that their aims were lunited. This con- 
tinued even as succeeding events left less and 
less room for doubt that, behind the screen of 
these assurances, preparations were being made 
for new attempts at widespread conquest. To 
mask still further this monstrous deception, 
these rulei"s and their satellites attempted to 
brand as "war mongers" and "imperialists" 
all who warned against the clearly emerging 
dangers, and poured upon them vituperation 
and abuse. 

The United States, together with most other 
nations, has stood firmly for the basic princi- 
ples underlying civilized international rela- 
tions — peace, law, justice, treaty observance, 
non-intervention, peaceful settlement of differ- 
ences, and fair-dealing, supported by the full- 
est practicable measure of international coop- 
eration. The advocacy of these principles has 
won for us the friendship of all nations, except 
those which, vaguely describing themselves as 
the "have-nots" and claiming a superior right 
to rule over other peoples, are today on the 
march with great armies, air fleets, and navies 



OCTOBER 26, 1940 



335 



to take by force wliat they say they need or 
want. 

The rulers of these nations have repudiated 
and violated in every essential respect the long- 
accepted principles of peaceful and orderly in- 
ternational relations. Merciless armed attack; 
unrestrained terrorization through slaughter of 
non-combatant men, women, and children; de- 
ceit, fraud, and guile; forced labor; confisca- 
tion of property; imposed starvation and 
deprivations of every sort — all these are 
weapons constantly used by the conquerors for 
the invasion and subjugation of other nations. 

They adhere to no geogiaphic lines and they 
fix no time limit on their programs of invasion 
and destruction. They cynically disregard 
every right of neutral nations, and, having 
occupied several such countries, they then pro- 
ceed to warn all peaceful nations that they must 
remain strictly neutral until an invading force 
is actually crossing their borders. They have 
as a fixed objective the securing of control of 
the high seas. They threaten peaceful nations 
with the direst consequences if those nations 
do not remain acquiescent, while the conquerors 
are seizing the other continents and most of the 
seven seas of the earth. 

Let no one comfort himself with the delusion 
that these are mere excesses or exigencies of war, 
to be voluntarily abandoned when fighting 
ceases. By deed and by utterance, the would-be 
conquerors have made it abundantly clear that 
they are engaged upon a relentless attempt to 
transform the civilized world as we have known 
it into a world in which mankind will be reduced 
again to the degradation of a master-and-slave 
relationship among nations and among indi- 
viduals, maintained by brute force. 

The hand of crushing assault has struck 
again and again at peaceful nations, com- 
placent and unprepared in their belief that 
mere intention on their part to keep peace was 
an ample shield of security. 

There can be nothing more dangerous for 
our Nation than for us to assume that the 
avalanche of conquest could under no circiun- 
stances reach any vital ix)rtion of this hemi- 
sphere. Oceans give the nations of this 



hemisphere no guaranty against the possibility 
of economic, political, or military attack from 
abroad. Oceans are barriers but they are also 
highways. Barriers of distance are merely 
barriers of time. Should the would-be con- 
querors gain control of other continents, they 
would next concentrate on perfecting their con- 
trol of the seas, of the air over the seas, and 
of the world's economy; they might then be 
able with ships and with planes to strike at 
the communication lines, the commerce, and 
the life of this hemisphere ; and ultimately we 
might find ourselves compelled to fight on our 
own soil, under our own skies, in defense of 
our independence and our very lives. 

These are some of the governing facts and 
conditions of the present-day international sit- 
uation. These are the dangers which must be 
recognized. Against these dangers, our pol- 
icies and measures must provide defense. 



We are in the presence not of local or re- 
gional wars, but of an organized and deter- 
mined movement for steadily expanding con- 
quest. Against this drive for power no nation 
and no region is secure save as its inhabitants 
create for themselves means of defense so 
formidable that even the would-be conquerors 
will not dare to raise against them the hand 
of attack. 

The first need for all nations still masters 
of their own destiny is to create for themselves, 
as speedily and as completely as possible, im- 
pregnable means of defense. This is the stag- 
gering lesson of mankind's recent experience. 

To meet that need, we are bringing our mili- 
tary, naval, and air establishments to maximum 
practicable strength. Production of military 
supplies is being brought to a greater and 
greater pitch of speed and eifectiveness. 
■\Vherever necessary for the carrying out of the 
defense program, export of essential materials 
is being stringently regulated. Arrangements 
are being carried forward to provide military 
and technical training for the youth of this 
country. We intend to continue and intensify 
our effort in all these directions. 



336 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



We are taking measures toward dealing with 
subversive activities in this country directed 
from abroad. The experience of many other 
countries has brought us the shocking realiza- 
tion of the manner in which, and the extent 
to which, such activities ai-e employed to under- 
mine social and political institutions and to 
bring about internal disintegi-ation and decay 
in the countries which they plan to make' their 
victims. We intend to act in this field with 
unremitting vigor. 

We are seeking to advance by every appro- 
priate means the spirit of inter- American soli- 
darity and the system of continental defense. 
In conformity with the procedure set up at 
Buenos Aires and Lima, the Panama Consulta- 
tive Meeting of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs 
of the American Republics adopted important 
measures to safeguard the national and collec- 
tive interests of the American nations, their 
peace, and their economic security. Last sum- 
mer they met again, at Habana, to consult with 
regard to several threats to the peace and secu- 
rity of the Americas, the danger of which, they 
unanimously agreed, existed. To ward off these 
threats, they took positive steps to prevent any 
transfer of sovereignty in the Western Hemi- 
sphere from one non-American nation to aii- 
other, embodied in an international convention 
and in the Act of Habana. They also agreed 
upon procedures for combating subversive ac- 
tivities in the American nations and they 
adopted measures of economic defense and col- 
laboration. 

We have concluded an arrangement with 
Great Britain under which we have acquired 
long-time leases of eight strategically located 
naval and air bases which will enable us to create 
a protective girdle of steel along the Atlantic 
seaboard of the American Continent— bases 
which will be available for use by all of the 
American republics. We are engaged in de- 
fense consultations with our neighbors to the 
south, and we have created facilities for such 
consultations with Canada. In all these fields, 
we intend to continue vigorous effort. 

We have sought in every api^ropriate way to 



discourage conquest and to limit the area of war. 
We have followed consistently the policy of re- 
fusing recognition of territorial changes effected 
by force or threat of force. We have taken 
every opportunity to express our concern over 
threatened changes by force in the existing po- 
litical status of colonial possessions, disturbance 
of which would extend the area of hostilities. 
We have placed under license the funds of in- 
vaded countries. In these respects, too, we in- 
tend to continue our activities. 

We believe that the safety and the primary 
interests of the United States must be upheld 
with firmness and resolution — supported by the 
speediest and fullest possible armament for all 
defensive i^urposes. In view of the unprece- 
dented character of menacing developments 
abroad, we have frankly recognized the danger 
involved and the increasing need for defense 
against it. As an important means of strength- 
ening our own defense and of preventing attack 
on any part of the Western HemisjDhere, this 
country is affording all feasible facilities for the 
obtaining of supplies by nations which, while 
defending themselves against barbaric attack, 
are checking the spread of violence and are thus 
reducing the danger to us. We intend to con- 
tinue doing this to the greatest i^racticable ex- 
tent. Any contention, no matter from what 
source, that this country should not take such 
action is equivalent, in the present circum- 
stances, to a denying of the inalienable right of 
self-defense. 

VI 

In our democracy the basic determination 
of foreign policy rests with the people. As 
I sense, the will of our people today, this 
Nation is determined that its security and 
rightful interests shall be safeguarded. 

The clangers with which we are confronted 
are not of our making. We cannot know 
at what point, or when, we may possibly be 
attacked. We can, however, be prepared, first, 
to discourage any thought of assault upon our 
security and, if any such assault should be 
attempted, to repel it. 

The peojile of this country want peace. To 



OCTOBER 2 0, 1040 



337 



have peace, we luust liave seciiiily. To lia\'e 
security, we imist be strong. Tliese are times 
that test the fiber of men and of nations. 

Our system of defense must, of necessity, 
be many-sided, because the dangers against 
wliicli safeguards are imj^eratively required 
are manifold. Essential to effective national 
defense are constant and skilful use of politi- 
cal and economic measures, possession of mili- 
tary weapons, and continuous exeri'ise of wis- 
dom and of high moral qualities. We must 
liave planes and tanks and ships and guns. 



We nuist have trained men. We must hold 
to the ideal of a world in which the rights 
of all nations are respected and each respects 
the rights of all; in which principles of law 
and order and justice and fair-dealing pre- 
vail. Above all, we nmst be a united peo]>le — 
united in purpose and in effort to create im- 
])iegnable defense. 

Thus can we maintain our inheritance. 
Thus will we continue to make this country's 
high contribution toward the ])rogress of man- 
kind on the i-oadwav f)f civilized effoit. 



Highlights of the .\ddre.ss by the Secretary of State 



[Roleasfd to llw pi-oss Octoln'r lit* I 

The Secretary of State has selected the fol- 
lowing higldights fi'om his address given at 
the National Press Club dinner October 20: 

'i'oday all peaceful nation~, including our 
own. arc gravely menaced. 



I ask you to review witli uw the wliirlwiiu! 
developmentti of one of the saddest and most 
crucial decades in tlie liisloiy of mankind — 
that of the nineteen-thii-ties. 



true nature of the aims and anihilions which 
have actuated tiie rulers of the heavily arming 

nations. 

•f 

Merciless armed attai'k: unrestrained ter- 
rorization through slaughter of non-combatant 
men, women, and children; deceit, fraud, and 
guile; forced labor; confiscation of property; 
imposed starvation and deprivations of every 
sort — all these are weapons constantly used by 
the conquerors for the invasion and subjuga- 
tion of other nations. 



Tragic indeed is the fact that, from the 
end of 1935, the voice of reason became in- 
creasingly drowned by the rising clangor of 
the furious rearmament by nations pre[)ai-ing 
for conquest. 

-♦■ 

Speaking for the Government. I pointed o)it 
that we would not serve the cause of peace by 
not having adequate powers of self-defense; 
that we must be sure that in our desire for 
peace we would not appear to any other coun- 
try unal)le to protect our just rights. 



Let no one comfort himself with the delu- 
sion that these are mere excesses or exigencies 
of war, to be voluntarily abandoned when 
fiehting ceases. Bv deed and by utterance, 
the would-be conquerors have made it abun- 
dantly clear that they are engaged upon a re- 
lentless attempt to transform the civilized 
world as we have known it into a world in 
which mankind will be reduced again to the 
degradation of a master-and-slave relationship 
among nations and among individuals, main- 
tained by brute force. 



The appalling tragedy of the present world 
situation lies in the fact that peacefully dis- 
posed nations failed to recognize in time the 

2718:;-— 40 2 



There can be nothing more dangerous for 
our Nation than for us to assume that the 
avalanche of conquest could under no circum- 



338 

stances reacli any vital portion of this hemi- 
sphere. 

We are in the presence not of local or re- 
gional wars, but of an organized and deter- 
mined movement for steadily expanding con- 
quest. Against this drive for power no nation 
and no region is secure save as its inhabitants 
create for themselves means of defense so for- 
midable that even the would-be conquerors will 
not dare to raise against them the hand of 
attack. 

We believe that the safety and the primary 
interests of the United States must be upheld 
with firmness and resolution — supported by the 
speediest and fullest possible armament for all 
defensive purposes. 

As I sense the will of our people today, this 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

Nation is deterniined that its security and 
rightful interests shall be safeguarded. 



The people of this country want peace. To 
have peace, we must have security. To have 
security, we must be strong. These are times 
that test the fiber of men and of nations. 



Our system of defense must, of necessity, be 
many-sided, because the dangers against which 
safeguards are imj^eratively required are mani- 
fold. . . . We must have planes and tanks 
and ships and guns. We must have trained 
men. We must hold to the ideal of a world 
in which the rights of all nations are respected 
and each respects the rights of all; in which 
principles of law and order and justice and 
fair-dealing prevail. Above all, we must be a 
united people — united in purpose and in effort 
to create impregnable defense. 



REQUISITION BY THE UNITED STATES OF PLANES ORDERED BY 

SWEDEN 



[Released to the press October 22] 

The Swedish Government in 1939 placed 
orders with the Seversky Aircraft Corporation 
(now reorganized as the Republic Aviation Cor- 
poration), Farmingdale, Long Island, N. Y., 
for 60 type EP-1 single-seater pursuit airplanes 
and 50 2-PA single-seater bombers, complete 
with engines, spare parts, accessories, etc. 

The Administrator of Export Control deter- 
mined that the proposed exportation of these 
planes to Sweden would be contrary to the 
interests of the national defense. As a result 
of this decision the licenses which had been 
issued by the Department to authorize the 
exportation of some of these planes were re- 
voked and applications for further licenses to 
export these shipments were denied. 

The appropriate authorities of this Govern- 
ment having determined that these planes were 



required by the Army Air Corps for national 
defense purposes endeavored to negotiate and 
purchase these planes from the Swedish Gov- 
ernment. These endeavors having failed, requi- 
sition Mas decided upon in accordance with the 
Executive order and the President's regulations 
issued on October 15, 1940,- jDursuant to the 
Requisition Act approved October 10, 1940. 

The Swedish Legation in Washington, acting 
under instructions from its Government, pro- 
tested to the Department against the proposed 
requisition proceedings. In reply to this pro- 
test, the Department addressed notes to the 
Swedish Minister on October 18 and 21, re- 
spectively. The texts of these two notes are as 
follows : 



' See the Federal Register for October 18, 1940 (vol. 5, 
no. 204), pp. 4121 and 4122-23. 



339 



"October 18, 1940. 
"Sir: 

"I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt 
of your note of October 16, 1940,^ stating that 
you have been instructed by your Government to 
make earnest representations to this Govern- 
ment against the requisition of war materials 
ordered in this country by your Government. 

"In reply, I have to inform you that the in- 
terests of the national defense have made it 
necessary for this Government to refuse, in the 
instances to which you refer, to issue licenses 
authorizing the exportation of war materials 
to Sweden. I am informed that some of these 
materials — in particular certain airplanes — are 
urgently needed by the armed forces of tliis 
country for their own use. You will under- 
stand, I am sure, that in these circumstances 
this Government must exercise the right which 
inheres in all governments to requisition the 
war materials within its jurisdiction which are 
required for its own defense. I may add that, 
altliough this procedure may cause unavoid- 
able inconvenience to your Government, it is 
my understanding that, when war materials 
are requisitioned pursuant to the Act to M-hich 
your note refers, fair and just compensation 
will be paid to the owners after discussions in 
which the owners will be given every oppor- 
tunity to set forth their claims. 

"Accept [etc.] Cordell Hull" 



"October 21, 1940. 
"Sir: 

"I have the honor to refer to my notes of 
October 15,^ and October 18, 1940, and pre- 
vious correspondence in regard to the possible 
requisition by this Government of airplanes 
and other war materials purchased in this 
country by the Swedisli Government, and have 
to inform you that in accordance with the Ex- 
ecutive Order of October 15, 1940, and the 
President's regulations of the same date, is- 
sued i^ursuant to the Eequisition Act of Oc- 
tober 10, 1940, the appropriate authorities of 



this Government have requisitioned airplanes, 
the property of your Government, as follows: 

"60 Type EPl, single-seater pursuit air- 
planes, complete with engines, spares, acces- 
sories, equipment, and technical data, located 
at Eepublic Airplane Factory, Farmingdale, 
New York. 

"50 Type 2PA single-seater bombers, com- 
plete with engines, spares, accessories, equip- 
ment, and technical data, located at Republic 
Airplane Factory, Farmingdale, New York. 

"I have been informed by the Administrator 
of Export Control that owners of articles or 
materials requisiticmed pursuant to the Act of 
October 10, 1940, will be given full oj^jportunity 
to present evidence of the cost of these articles, 
and that this evidence will be accorded full 
consideration in the determination of the reim- 
bursement to be paid by this Government. 

"Accept [etc.] Cordell Hull" 



The Far East 



'Not printed. 



REPATRIATION OF AMERICAN 
CITIZENS 

[Released to the press October 23] 

Following the suggestion which has been 
made to Americans in certain areas of the Far 
East that in view of abnormal conditions in 
those areas they withdraw so far as is practi- 
cable therefrom to the United States, the De- 
partment of State and the United States 
Maritime Commission, in conjunction with 
other agencies of the Government and in co- 
operation with American shipping lines, 
arranged for the dispatch of the S. S. Monte- 
rey, the S. S. Mariposa, and the S. S. Wash- 
ington to the Far East. This was necessary 
in as much as it was determined that available 
accommodations on ships regularly operating 
to the Far East were booked to capacity for 
some time to come and reports were received 



340 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



by the State Department from consular offi- 
cials and steamship company booking offices 
that the demands of American citizens desir- 
ing to come to the United States would require 
the additional accommodations. 

In order to make these ships available, it was 
necessary to divert them from their regular 
scheduled sailings, thus causing extraordinary 
expense to the operating companies. As was 
ascertained by the Department of State and 
the Maritime Commission, the ships would in- 
cur a financial loss even though they were 
booked to capacity on the return voyage. The 
operating companies, having cooperated in di- 
verting their ships from their regular sched- 
ules and in making them available, could not 
be justly asked to stand the loss. Accordingly, 
the Govermnent was obliged to guarantee the 
companies against financial loss and agreed to 
make up any deficit which might occur, as has 



been done before in the cases of special ships 
sent to evacuate Americans from Europe. 

The shipping companies have advised their 
booking offices in the Far East that the pas- 
senger rates will be based upon the class of ac- 
commodation purchased and will be at the regu- 
lar conference rates from ports of embai-kation 
to the west coast of the United States. The 
Maritime Commission has informed the Depart- 
ment that the rates to be charged are those regu- 
larly charged for comparable accommodations 
on passenger vessels regularly in the Far East 
trade and in accord with the rates determined 
by the Trans-Pacific Passenger Conference and 
having the approval of the Maritime Commis- 
sion for American vessels. 

The three shijJS will have acconnnodations 
available at first- and second-class rates, with 
lower rates for emergency accommodations in 
cots. 



American Republics 



ADDRESS BY THE UNDER SECRETARY OF STATE ' 



[Released to the press October 23] 

The thought and energy of tlie men and 
women in the United States, and of their Gov- 
ernment, are today being directed as never be- 
fore to the successful solution of the problem of 
adequate national defense. Our people must 
rest assured that the security of the United 
States is safeguarded. The greater the power 
of the United States to prevent any act of ag- 
gression against the New World, the more likely 
it will be that this Nation of ours can remain at 
peace. 

In speaking of national defense, it is not 
unnatural that one usually thinks of our naval 
strength, of the number of planes or of tanks 



'Delivered by Mr. Welles before the Advertising 
C:iub of Baltimore, October 23, 1940, on a coast-to- 
coast broadcast. 



which may be aviiilable at a given moment, or 
of the number of American citizens who are 
properly trained and ready to take part in the 
defense of their country. 

There is, however, another essential element 
in our preparedness, and particularly so be- 
cause of the realization to which we have all 
too recently come that a defense of the United 
States, to be successful, cannot be restricted 
solely to the defense of the United States 
proper. It must involve our ability to repel 
an attack against, or an attempted invasion of, 
any part of the New World. These recent 
years have made it more than ever clear that 
the Panama Canal cannot be rendered secure, 
nor our own territory be regarded as safe from 
invasion by air, unless the territory of our 
neighbors to the south is equally secure. And 



OCTOBER 2 6, 194 



341 



that cannot be achieved without the loyal 
friendship of the other American powers. 

It is refiiirdinp; tliis element in our capacity 
for national defense — namely, what is usually 
called the Pan American relationship — of 
which I wish to speak to you today. 

For eight j-ears your Government lias been 
cooperating to the utmost extent of its ability 
in the construction of this relationship. It 
has been doing so because, among other reasons, 
of its full realization long since that the tragic 
situation which today exists in the world might 
come to pass, and becau.se of its conviction 
that in a world where there are on the march 
the forces of military conquest and of social 
revolution, and where there has been brought 
about a break-down in the standards of inter- 
national law and of international morality, one 
of the gi'eatest bulwarks which could be con- 
structed to safeguard the peace and security 
of our own Nation, was the creation of that 
kind of relationship with the other 20 repub- 
lics of the Western Hemisjjhere which meant 
a solid front in the moment of crisis. 

If the situation which had prevailed for so 
many decades up to the j-ear 1933 existed today, 
the people of this country would have con- 
fronted the present crisis with a New World 
divided and, in many quarters, animated by 
suspicion of the ulterior motives of the United 
States; with a continent torn with local dis- 
putes, and in certain regions suffering from tliat 
extreme degree of economic distress which gives 
rise to social disorder and to political instabil- 
ity. In such muddy waters the agents of the 
totalitarian powers would have found good fish- 
ing. Fortunately, today the waters of inter- 
American luiderstanding and confidence are 
clear. 

During these past eight years the American 
republics have, either by formal agreement or 
by implicit understanding, arrived at these basic 
accords : 

1. Mutual recognition of the equality and 
inviolability of the sovereignty of each of the 
21 republics, so that each is an equal partner in 
the American community of nations. 

2. The settlement of all disputes which may 



arise between them by pacts whicli provide the 
practical machinery for peaceful negotiation, 
mediation, or arbitration. 

3. The joint determination of all that any 
tlireat from without the continent to the peace, 
security, or territorial integrity of any one of 
tlie republics is a menace to each and every one 
of them. 

4. Full cooperation within the limits of their 
respective capacities, and always with complete 
respect for their individual liberty of decision, 
against any attempt by any non-American 
power or by any n(m-American combination 
of powers to dominate by force, by economic 
duress, or by any other means, any portion of 
tlie New World. 

5. The common decision to work together in 
intimate collaboration so as to make impossible 
the overthrow, by means of subversive activities 
directed from abroad, of the institutions of the 
American democracies. 

6. Witliin the economic, connnercial, and 
financial field to undertake a progressive re- 
ductitm of all excessive or artificial barriers to 
trade; and to attemi)t in the most practical 
manner possible the development of those non- 
discriminatory measures and policies whicli will 
enlarge the opportunity for profitable inter- 
American investment and which will increase 
the volume of inter-American exports and 
imports. 

These six fundamental accords represent a 
record of progress which would have seemed 
Utopian eight years ago. 

In this new regional understanding of the 
New World one finds the antithesis of those so- 
called "new orders" of military and economic 
overlordship which are being proclaimed in 
other continents. Here we find a combination 
of free and independent republics which con- 
stitutes no menace to any nation. There is in- 
herent in this understanding no policy of 
aggression and no attempt at domination. 
There is involved therein no effort at obtaining 
political hegemony through the utilization of 
economic blackmail. On the contrary, in es- 
sence, this is a friendly partnership, freely 
entered into by 21 sovereign democracies, ready 



342 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BXJLLETIN 



to trade on terms of equal opportunity with all 
nations whose policies make such trade possible, 
but determined as one people to keep our New 
World independent and our rights and liberties 
as free men secure. 

Today I wish particularly to stress the eco- 
nomic aspects of this regional understanding. 
To a very great extent the success or failure of 
the new relationship which has been created will 
depend upon the businessmen of the United 
States and upon the businessmen of the other 
republics, for there is no greater reinforcement 
to friendly political relations between countries 
than a large volume of fair and profitable trade. 
And I am especially glad therefore that I am 
afforded the privilege of addressing in this way 
so distinguished a group of business and pro- 
fessional men as those gathered together in the 
Advertising Club of Baltimore. 

When this administration took office in 1933, 
it found a large proportion of our business with 
!the other Americas crippled by the restric- 
tions of Smoot-Hawleyism, and the remainder 
in the depths of the economic depression of that 
year. 

Our first attack on this trade situation was 
through the medium of the trade-agreements 
program. Our purpose was the revival of inter- 
national trade through the removal of artificial 
barriers, and the application of the most- 
favored-nation clause in such a maimer as to 
extend the benefits of negotiated concessions be- 
tween two nations to the community of trading 
nations which accepted the basic theories 
involved. 

During the six years which have elapsed 
since the inauguration of the trade-agi-eements 
program, agreements have been signed with 
11 of the other American republics. In some 
cases, such as that of Cuba, the agreements 
have represented a very important contribu- 
tion to the maintenance of economic stability 
and, consequently, of social security in the 
countries concerned. At the same time, these 
agreements have opened large markets for the 
products of our export industries and agri- 
culture. In our own country they have greatly 
stimulated recovery and have increased em- 
ployment. I think all of you are familiar with 



the benefits derived by our own port of Balti- 
more from the policy pursued. 

Yet it is, of course, obvious that the condi- 
tions of world trade during recent years have 
not been such as to facilitate the growth and 
development of these fair trading practices. 
The autarchic methods and jiroceclures of the 
totalitarian powers have tended seriously to 
handicap free enterprise in those American 
republics which had in the past found a con- 
siderable part of their export market in these 
countries. These methods and procedures, 
while in some cases temporarily efficient for 
the furtherance of policies of military con- 
quest, are bound inevitably to reduce to dis- 
astrously low levels living standards in all 
those nations which employ them, and should 
they by any tragic possibility predominate in 
the world for any length of time, they would 
assuredly bring peoples back to the primitive 
system of barter of the Dark Ages. 

Each one of our rei^ublics has its own indi- 
vidual commercial and economic problems. 
However, I believe it is worth while recalling 
that in the period just prior to the outbreak of 
the war the other American republics as a 
whole sold about one third of their products to 
the United States and over half to Europe. 
During the same period the American repub- 
lics looked to the United States for over 35 
percent of their imports, wliile the countries 
of Europe, principally Germany and the 
United Kingdom, supplied them with over 
one third of the articles which they did not 
produce within their own borders. This state- 
ment, although it does not reflect the indi- 
vidual situation of any one of the re2)ublics, 
will, I believe, give you a fair idea of the 
basic problem with which the continent is 
faced. 

One phase of the problem, namely, the 
furnishing by the United States during the 
present emergency of articles which the Ameri- 
can republics formerly imported from Europe, 
has been quite promptly and adequately met 
by our export industry. Our exports to this 
area during the first year of the war were 
valued at some 240 million dollars more than 
those of the comparable year earlier. It is 



OCTOBER 2 6, 194 

gratifying to be able to report that in most 
lines the prices of the goods included in this 
figure liave increased only slightly, if at all. 
This fact reflects great credit upon the vision 
of our merchants. They have in general been 
farsighted enough, and I may say patriotic 
enough, not to take undue advantage of their 
privileged position in the South American 
markets resulting from the elimination of 
European competition. 

During this same first year of warfare, our 
imports from the other American republics have 
also substantially increased. The increase has 
not, however, been conunensurate with the in- 
crease in our exports. In round figures it has 
amounted to 147 million dollars. In other 
words, the exchange position of the other Amer- 
ican republics vis-a-vis the United States has 
deteriorated. It is essential, if they are to con- 
tinue to buy our goods, that we buy more of 
their goods, use more of the services such as 
shipping wliich Ihcy have to offer, and send 
more tourists to the lands to the south, since 
few of the other republics can ship gold in 
settlement of balances. 

We have not, of coui'sc, found as yet a ])erfect 
or a compreliensivc solution of the problem so 
presented. But it is encouraging to be able to 
report that that community of interest which 
all of the American rei)ublics now recognize, 
enabled the representatives of the 21 republics 
to meet at Panama less than three weeks after 
the outbreak of the war to consider the emer- 
gency created. This meeting of consultation, 
the sessions of which lasted only 10 days, 
adopted a number of highly important inter- 
American policies providing for the preserva- 
tion of the neutrality of the New "World, and it 
set up as well the machinery for a common ap- 
proach to common problems in several fields. 

In the economic field there was created the 
Inter-American Economic and Financial Ad- 
visory Committee, consisting of one delegate 
from each of the American republics. This 
body assembled in Washington last November 
15 and has been continuously in session ever 
since. 

It has been my privilege to preside over the 



343 

meetings of this Committee, and I wish it were 
possible for me to convey to you adequately 
tlie cooperative and constructive nature of its 
tlelibe'-ations. The primary service performed 
by the Committee has been to furnish the 
medium whereby the economic pioblems with 
which the several American nations are con- 
fronted may be examined for the purpose of 
finding a practical soiution. Because of the 
existence of tliis Committee I believe that every 
one of the 21 governments has achieved a new 
undeistanding and a new appreciation of the 
factors governing the economic life of our 
continent. It is my hope that this machinery 
will be preserved even after the passing of the 
present emergency, and that it will remain a 
part of the new system of international rela- 
tions which has been created in this hemisphere. 
A part of the Committee's efforts during the 
earlier part of this year was devoted to the 
drafting of a convention for an Inter-Ameri- 
can Bank to be created under government 
auspices. This project has been advocated by 
inter-American gatherings ever since the first 
Intcr-Anierican Conference was held in Wash- 
ington in 1889. The convention was signed 
last April, and it is my hope that the bank will 
come into being in the relatively near future 
and serve as a new and valuable instrument 
of inter-American cooperation. 

The Committee also devoted its attention to 
the question of ocean-freight rates — a most im- 
portant factor either in facilitating or ob- 
structing the flow of goods. Due to the activ- 
ities of the Committee in this respect and to 
the imfailingly helpful cooperation of the 
United States Maritime Commission, as well 
as of the steamship companies themselves, 
it can be safely asserted that increases in 
freight rates have been kept to an absolute 
minimum. Through the initiative of the Com- 
mittee, an Inter-American Maritime Confer- 
ence will be held next month in order to af- 
ford both the governments of the American 
rejiublics and the shipping companies con- 
cerned an opportunity for a comprehensive re- 
view of the entire situation. 

The Committee was also responsible for the 
creation of the Inter-American Development 



344 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Coiniiiissioii. Tliis is a sinall body consisting 
of five nicnibers repiosentinir all of the Amer- 
ican republics. Its function is to encourage 
the development of enterprises of mixed 
T'nited States and local ownership and man- 
agement, in order to expand production in the 
other American republics and especially the 
production of Don-conipetitive. complementary 
products readily marketable in the United 
States. One of the more important of the 
projects in which the Development Commission 
has aroused practical interest is that of find- 
ing sources of supply in the other American 
re])ublics for manufactured articles formerly 
imported bj- tlie United States from the con- 
quered or occupied areas of Europe. 

AVith the intensification of the war in Europe 
last siunmer, the economic problems facing the 
American republics were rendered more acute. 
It was recognized that a fresh approach was 
required. Partly in order to determine the 
nature of that approach the second consultative 
meeting was held at Hnbana in July. In a 
speech before that gathering Secretary Hull 
outlined the problem along four definite lines. 
The effective four-point program wliich was sub- 
sequently adopted by the meeting consisted t)f 
the following : 

"1. Strengthening and expansion of the ac- 
tivities of the Inter- .Vuierican Financial and 
Economic Advisory Committee as an inslru- 
inent for continuing consultation with respect 
to trade matters, including especially the situa- 
tion inunediately confronting the American re- 
publics as a result of the curtailment and 
changed character of important foreign markets. 

"2. Creation of facilities for the temporary 
handling and orderly marketing of accumulated 
siu-pluses of those commodities which are of 
primary importance to the maintenance of the 
economic life of tiw American republics, when- 
ever such action becomes necessarv. 

"3. Develo])ment of connnodity agreements 
with a vi(>w to assuring equitable terms of trade 
foi- both producers and consumers of the com- 
modities concerned. 

"4. Consideration of methods for improvini>- 
the standard of living of the peoples of the 



Americas, including public-health measures, 
nuti'ition studies, and suitable organizations 
for the relief distribution of some pai't of any 
surjilus commodities." 

At tlie same time that Secretary Hull was 
presenting this program to the Habana meet- 
ing. President Roosevelt transmitted a message 
to the Congress recommending that the lending 
authority of the Export-Import Bank for 
transactions with the otlier American republics 
l)e increased by r)t)0 millions of dollars. The 
])urpose of this increase was to permit the 
United States to assume its share of the re- 
sponsibility for continental economic stability 
implicit in its comparatively favored situa- 
tion. The Export-Import Bank, organized in 
1934, has rendeied a nuniljer of very valuable 
services to American business and industry and 
to the odier American republics. Its scope of 
action will now be largely increa.sed and it 
will play a most important part in the co- 
operative program to which we may confi- 
dently look forward. The ultimate decision 
concerning the policies and transactions of the 
l)ank is Aestcd in the hands of Secretary Jesse 
Jones, and I think you will agree that the 
American taxi)ayer may rest assured that the 
ti'ansactions undertaken by the Iianlc will there- 
fore be along I he soundest business lines and 
likewise in the best interests of our own 
economy. 

I think it may tndy be said that the primary 
ol)jectivc of all of the American republics at 
this time is to strengthen the economies of all 
of them. One great essential is an increased 
diversification of exports so that the economy of 
certain American republics will no longer be 
dependent upon a small number of exports 
liighly sensitive to world developments. Of 
course, a country whose economic life is wholly 
dependent upon events or decisions which take 
place in other continents many thousands of 
miles away, and in the determination of which 
it has no voice, is not a country economically 
independent. The partnership of the Ameri- 
can rejjublics which is now being evolved will 
in great degree tend to correct this situation. 

AVhile the exchange of raw materials for man- 



OCTOBER 2 6, 194 



345 



ufactured products used to bo considered the 
l)erfect illustration of liberal trade doctrine 
based upon inherent advantage, most of us will 
agree that scientific developments and techno- 
logical advantages have changed this situation. 
It is no longer true in the case of several of 
the other American republics that, even if all 
trade barriers were removed, it would be to their 
advantage to concentrate their activities solely 
on the production and export of a limited num- 
ber of raw materials. On the contrary, the 
economy of the future, if that economy is to be 
the i-eflection of tlie progress of which the New 
World is theoretically capable, will represent 
in every quarter of this continent a mucli higlier 
degree of diversified local production, both of 
raw materials and of manufactured articles. 
This development should not result in a decrease 
in the volume of inter- American Irade; it 
would, however, represent a change in the char- 
acter of that trade. And by vastly increasing 
the diversity of human opportunity in this part 
of the world, it will insure a richer, fuller life 
to millions of people in the Americas whose 
choice of occupation is now eitlier extremely 
limited or even, in times of economic depression, 
non-existent. 

The arrangement recently concluded by the 
Brazilian Government and the Export-Import 
Bank for the creation of a steel industry in 
Brazil to which both Governments will bring 
capital is an outstanding example of the prac- 
tical working out of this policy of diversifica- 
tion. 

This same theme enters into another approach 
to our continental economic problem, and one 
which holds out very substantial promise. 
From the point of view of national defense, the 
United States can no longer continue to rely 
upon sources of supply of vital raw materials 
located in other continents. Rubber is one out- 
standing example of this type of commodity. 
Our Department of Agriculture, in cooperation 
with the governments concerned and with pri- 
vate enterprise, is currently conducting exten- 
sive surveys in Central and South America for 
the purpose of determining the best location, 
and most suitable varieties of plant, for the 

271837—^0 3 



restoration to our continent of that position in 
the supply of rubber whicli was lost over 30 
years ago to the planters of the Netherlands 
East Indies and of Malaysia. 

A catalog of strategic materials, the produc- 
tion and processing of which in this hemispliere 
to a greater extent than at present would be 
desirable, includes quinine, manila hemp, man- 
ganese, tin, and chromium. I am glad to say 
that in furtherance of our new policy an agree- 
ment has been reached between the Metals Re- 
serve Co., a subsidiary of the Reconstruction 
Finance Corporation, and Bolivian producers, 
under a guaranty of the Bolivian Government, 
under whicli this country will purchase 18,000 
tons of tin each year for a period of five years. 

Mutually beneficial arrangements of this 
character hold out high hopes for the future; 
they do not, however, solve the problem of sur- 
pluses of certain raw materials which have 
accumulated or of the lack of markets for these 
same materials, which must be produced in the 
near future if the economic life of the peoples 
concerned is to proceed normally. 

As an outstanding exami)le of inter- American 
cooi^eration directed towards the solution of the 
jiroblem created by surplus commodities in the 
other American republics, I may mention 
the current negotiation of a coffee agreement. 
In broad outline, the proposed agreement will 
check the dumping of coffee in this market at 
ruinous prices, through a flexible-quota plan 
approved by all of the producing countries, 
with consequent beneficial results to their re- 
spective economies, and to their ability to 
continue to buy from the United States. 

Of equal importance has been the aid the 
Export-Import Bank has extended for the con- 
struction of public works in the other Amei'ican 
republics. Another type of operation in whicli 
the bank has participated has been the exten- 
sion of credits to the central banks in certain 
of the other republics for the purpose of mak- 
ing available the amomits of foreign exchange 
needed for the orderly settlement of accounts 
due by local importers. 

In presenting to you some aspects of these eco- 
nomic problems and in outlining some of the 



346 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



approaches which have been made towards their 
solution, you will, I know, understand that there 
cannot be a single, all-embracing solution for 
these questions. The measures most favored 
by your Government, and I believe by the other 
American governments, are those which, in ad- 
dition to meeting emergency situations, are con- 
sonant with the long-term developinent of 
diversified stable economies and with the con- 
sistent enhancement of commercial and financial 
relations between all of our several nations. 

For all too many decades, persons in respon- 
sible positions, both in official and business life 
in the United States, have seemed to harbor the 
peculiar illusion that the understanding, the 
friendship, and the loyal support of our neigh- 
bors in the New World can be obtained solely 
by fine words and lofty i^rofessions on our own 
part, which as often as not have been completely 
belied in practice. 

I was reminded of that only a few days ago 
when I read in an editorial appearing in the 
Baltimore Sun these sentences: 

"The Roosevelt administration did not invent 
the good-neighbor policy. The honor of con- 
ception and initiation of this policy belongs 
rather to former President Hoover and his Sec- 
retary of State, Mr. Stimson, who had the good 
sense early in 1930 to scrap the interventionist 
imperialism of the Coolidge era and to coop- 
erate with our neighbors south of the Rio 
Grande in unselfish friendliness." 

The writer of that statement would appear to 
have forgotten (what the peoples of the other 
American republics have not forgotten) that 
after making what he considered a gesture of 
good-will to the other American republics by 
undertaking as President-elect a rapid trip 
around South America, Mr. Hoover returned to 
Washington to become President and then em- 
phasized his policy of "unselfish friendliness", 
by signing the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act. The 
tariff rates and other restrictions to inter-Ameri- 
can trade contained in that act constituted a 
devastating blow to the economies of many of 
our neighbors, and brought about, in that re- 
public which is bound to us by the most intimate 



ties of association and friendship, economic 
ruin, social upheaval, and finally revolution. 

Gentlemen, the time has fortunately passed 
when phrases and sporadic gestures of good- 
will constitute our policy towards our neigh- 
bors in the New World. The good-neighbor 
policy, as the Roosevelt administration has 
practiced it, is a broad program of construc- 
tive and friendly cooperation, based on deeds 
and not on words. 

We must all of us here in this hemisphere, 
at this moment of grave danger, be prepared 
to make such sacrifices as may be required in 
the common interest. We must be prepared to 
maintain and to continue strengthening, not 
only through our governments, but likewise 
tlirough the initiative and devotion of our cit- 
izens, that kind of foundation for inter-Amer- 
ican cooperation which has been steadily grow- 
ing during the past eight years. 

There has never been a time in the history of 
this country when hemispheric solidarity was 
more vitally necessary to each one of the 
American republics, including the United 
States — and never a time when hemispheric 
solidarity was such a reality. 



SUSPENSION OF TONNAGE DUTIES 
FOR VESSELS OF PERU 

A proclamation (no. 2432) providing that 
"the foreign discriminating duties of tonnage 
and imposts within the United States" be "sus- 
pended and discontinued so far as respects the 
vessels of Peru and the produce, manufactures, 
or merchandise imported in said vessels into 
the United States from Peru or from any other 
foi'eign country; the suspension to take effect 
from October 1, 1940, and to continue so long 
as the reciprocal exemption of vessels belong- 
ing to citizens of the United States and their 
cargoes shall be continued, and no longer", 
was signed by the President on October 17, 
1940. 

The text of this proclamation appears in full 
in the Federal Register for October 22, 1940 
(vol. 5, no. 206), p. 4163. 



Commercial Policy 



COMMERCIAL COOPERATION IN THE ^VESTERN HEMISPHERE 

Address by Raymond H. Geist = 



[Released to the press October 23] 

Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen : 

It is an honor to be one of the speakers on 
this occasion, wliich you have designated as Pan 
American Day at the Dairy Industries' Exposi- 
tion now being held in Atlantic City. No place 
could be more appropriate than this great resort 
devoted to the health, recreation, and enjoy- 
ment of the American Nation. The techno- 
logical, sanitation, ineliistrial, and educational 
exhibits could find no better background than 
here on the shore of the Atlantic Ocean, which, 
as a great highway of commerce, links our coun- 
try to the otlier nations in this hemisphei'e. 

It has been the policy of the American Gov- 
erinnent lo foster and promote good relations 
between the nations of this hemisphere; but 
never in the history of these continents has this 
impetus found more common acceptanci' than 
now. In international relations, as in hunuin 
friendship, the value of such ties depends upon 
the service rendered and not upon the material 
advantages which may be obtained. This great 
Nation of ours with all its wealth and resoui'ces, 
with its manifold actualities and potentialities 
of leadership, has much to otfer fully and hon- 
estly to its neighbors. This, I understand, is the 
purpose of organizing Pan American Day at 
the Dairy Industries' Exposition. In giving 
intercontinental emphasis to the importance of 
the dairy industry it is proposed to make avail- 
able to all peoples in this hemisphere the bene- 
fits of our research and progress. We are dis- 
posed to place fully at the service of the other 
nations in South, Central, and North America 



^ Delivered at a luucheon held in honor of Pan Ameri- 
can Day at the Dairy Industries' Exposition, Atlantic 
City, N. J., October 23, 1940. Mr. Geist is Chief of the 
Division of Commercial Affairs, Department of State. 



the vast experience that we have acquired in 
developing dairy products in the United States 
and in raising the standard of living and health 
among our people. 

At this particular time in our national his- 
tory, when the impact of world events arouses 
us to greater effort on behalf of the general 
health and strength of every individual in our 
commonwealth, the development of dairy in- 
dustries goes hand in hand with the common 
effort, not only in this country but in all the 
nations of the Americas. The development of 
new machinery and the technological progress 
made in the United States invite tiie attention 
of nations not only of this hemisphere but of 
the whole world. At this exposition details of 
the progress and achievement connected with 
the dairy industries are displayed for the ben- 
efit of those who, not only at home but abroad, 
are interested in the health and liappiness of 
their fellow citizens. 

It wiU ever be the chief concern of mankind, 
as it was from the beginning of the human 
race, to develop the art of agriculture and the 
natural fruits of the soil. Those countries 
of the earth are especially fortunate whose 
basic industry and commerce have had their 
origin in the products of rich and fruitful 
lands, which have not only provided suste- 
nance for the inhabitants but also surpluses 
for peoples living beyond the national borders. 

The inventive genius of man during the last 
hundred years has made such progress that the 
existence of human life has become revolution- 
ized. And where this process has been to 
ameliorate the lot of humankind and to make 
commonly available advantages which previ- 
ously were reserved for the few or entirely 
unknown, the nations of the earth have been 



347 



348 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



uplifted and advanced definitively to a higher 
standard. Such is the achievement which this 
exposition reveals to all. It is fitting, too, that 
enterprises which have as their object not alone 
tlie furthering of commerce but the advance- 
ment of knowledge and technical skill should 
receive common support. 

To any careful observer of international rela- 
tions it will be noticed that in recent years rap- 
procheinents of a "cultural" nature have been 
formed between certain nations of which the 
purpose has been primarily to open the way 
for the propagation of political ideologies, a 
development on foreign soil which often has 
proved unpalatable and repugnant to the most 
solid and discreet citizens. The virus of the 
pseudo-cultural relations has been known to 
poison the body politic and to corrupt and un- 
dermine the state. On the other hand, the na- 
tions of this hemisphere have established their 
coopei'ation on principles of mutual respect and 
helpfulness. 

The Government of the United States has 
initiated a program of cooperation with the 
other American republics which has been con- 
ceived in the spirit of friendly and neighborly 
service, and designed to make available, wher- 
ever it is desired and needed, the sort of tech- 
nical progress and development which the 
exhibits at this exposition typify. I am speak- 
ing of two important acts of the Congress in 
this field, the first of which is the act of May 
25, 1938, as amended by Public No. 63, 76th 
Congress, which authorizes the loan of civilian 
technical personnel of the United States to the 
governments of the other American republics. 
This act of the Congress was in support of the 
policy of the United States to further in every 
practical way the development of cordial and 
friendly relations with our neighbors to the 
south. This willingness of the United States to 
assist its neighbors in the practical way has 
been met with cordiality on the part of the 
other American republics. Since the enactment 
of the act, 11 American states have taken advan- 
tage of it. Experts have been detailed for a 
limited period to collaborate in an advisory 
capacity in highway engineering, immigration 



procedure, customs administration, road build- 
ing, and fishery problems, and a number of 
others. It must not be imagined that the 
United States Government has been able to 
carry out this program without making some 
sacrifices. The experts who have gone to other 
countries to lend their assistance and advice 
have been obliged to defer for the time being 
the services they were rendering at home ; and 
in certain instances their colleagues have had 
to carry on the work of those who were absent. 

The second legislative measure of which I 
speak is the act of August 9, 1939, which au- 
thorizes the President to render closer and more 
effective the relationships between the Ameri- 
can republics. This measure was approved by 
the Congress to implement the program of an 
Interdepartmental Committee on Cooperation 
with the Other American Kepublics, established 
some time prior thereto at the instance of the 
President and which now includes 16 separate 
agencies of the United States Government. 
These separate agencies include not only the 
great Departments of the Government, such as 
the Departments of Agi*iculture, Commerce, 
State, and the Interior, but also independent 
branches, such as the Federal Communications 
Commission, the United States Public Health 
Service, the Maritime Commission, and the 
Smithsonian Institution. Kepresentatives of 
these agencies are studying projects the object 
of which is to further in every practicable and 
concrete way the good relations between the 
United States and its neighbors to the south. 
Most of the projects of the Interdepartmental 
Committee have been carried out with the use 
of funds available to the Departments con- 
cerned, but some 16 require additional funds 
for the fiscal year 1940-41, and the Congress 
has made the necessary appropriations. 

Among the projects for which funds have 
been appropriated by the Congress special 
mention may be made of the following : 

Public HeaTtlh Service.— For increased coop- 
eration with the Pan American Sanitary Bu- 
reau by the assigmiient thereto of additional 
doctors, nurses, and sanitary engineers for serv- 
ice in the other American republics, and for 



OCTOBER 2 6, 1940 



349 



scholarships for medical students from the other 
American republics. 

O^ce of Education. — Inter-American educa- 
tional relations including assistance in fellow- 
ship and professorship exchanges, studies bear- 
ing on inter-American cultural relations and 
the promotion of a better understanding and 
appreciation of the other American republics 
in American schools and colleges. 

In this general program of cooperation with the 
other nations of this hemisphere, probably none 
will be of more interest to the delegates assem- 
bled at this exposition than the projects involv- 
ing the collaboration of the Department of 
Agriculture. The chief of these are the investi- 
gations now being carried on and projected in 
coiuiection with complementary trade. As you 
all know, in recent years since the inauguration 
of the trade-agreements program the attention 
(if this Government has been seriously devoted 
to every phase of international commercial rela- 
tions. It has not only been our concern to sell 
American products and manufactured goods in 
foreign markets, but to buy the products and 
goods of other countries as well. The time has 
come when American merchants must give as 
nuich attention, if indeed not more, to the pos- 
sibilities of buying from other countries as to 
the opportunities of selling. If our neighbors 
have resources which are now only partially de- 
veloped and which we need as normal consumers 
or users in our industrial processes, we should 
hasten to assist them in order that the produc- 
tion of such resources inci'ease and become an 
ever-increasing item in our regular import 
trade. 

We are bound, in view of the gravity of in- 
ternational developments in the political field, 
to dedicate ourselves profoimdly to a realistic 
solution of the problems which consequently 
arise in our economic relations with other 
countries, particularly with our neighbors in 
the Americas. We must take a long-range 
view of these economic problems and endeavor 
to build up a permanent trade on a comple- 
mentary basis. We can exchange our goods for 
many products which we need and which can 
be produced in tropical and subtropical areas. 



The Department of Agriculture has under- 
taken projects which will eventually enable us 
to obtain an increasing amount of such pro- 
ducts from our neighbors in the south. The 
import statistics of the United States indicate 
such commodities as tin, rubber, and quinine, 
the consumption of which is so large in this 
country that if eventually we were able to 
satisfy our needs by purchases fi'om our Latin 
American neighbors there would be created in 
those countries a tremendous purchasing power 
likewise for American goods. The list of non- 
competitive products of interest to the United 
States can be greatly increased. One has only 
to mention woods, gums, tropical oils, plants, 
seeds, and fibers. The surveys proposed under 
the Department of Agriculture cover investi- 
gations and geological studies in soils, climatic 
factors, disease conditions, et cetera, in the 
tropical areas in the other American repub- 
lics, especially as to rubber, quinine, anel other 
products not grown in the United States. 
Moving with an accelerated momentum to- 
ward closer collaboration with our neighbors 
in every sphere of international activity will 
speedily produce added benefits and advan- 
tages to all. Certain of these acts of coopera- 
tion, notably that of defense, may be necessary 
only while our common peace and tranquility 
are threatened; but in those spheres of collab- 
oration of which the results are permanently 
beneficial we shall continue to march together 
even after the present turmoil in world affairs 
has passed. 

It is important in seeking in the American 
republics markets for the kind of equipment dis- 
played at this exposition to bear in mind that 
the whole problem of exports is bound up with 
and to a large degree dependent upon the vol- 
ume of our imports. Our neighbors will be 
unable to buy from us unless they are in a posi- 
tion to dispose of their products in the world's 
markets and thus create the international ex- 
change required to adjust accounts. American 
merchants must be prepared to engage in more 
extensive methods in promoting trade with the 
republics of the south. This will require closer 
business contacts, travel to and protracted visits 



350 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



in the countries concerned. Business must put 
forth intensive efforts in buildmg up commer- 
cial intercourse with our neighbors. Indeed, 
if we are to succeed, our energy and skill must 
surpass in brilliance of execution the commer- 
cial feats of those European nations whose rep- 
resentatives have been able to establish fruit- 
ful and valuable trade relations in this 
hemisjihere. Always maintaining the highest 
business ethics we must go to the limit in meet- 
ing competition: selling better goods, giving 
better terms, and establishing permanent con- 
tacts. It will be increasingly imperative for 
American firms to establish their own branch 
houses or to found enterprises with American 
capital in charge of American citizens in those 
countries where our commercial destiny lies. 

The time has undoubtedly come for Ameri- 
can business films to take a serious view of the 
character of the agents and firms which repre- 
sent them abroad. To protect their own inter- 
ests and those of their clients American bus- 
iness will want to consider what measures to 
adopt in order to eliminate as their represen- 
tatives once and for all those unreliable non- 
American agents in Latin America, who, on 
account of their servility and obedience to po- 
litical systems repugnant to our hemisphere, 
ai'e neither loyal to the republics whose hos- 
pitality they enjoy or to the business inter- 
ests of the United States from which they de- 
rive lucrative profits. Firms in this counti-y 
seriously engaged in the impoi-t and export 
trade with the other American republics will 
do well to take speedily into account whether 
or not they can expect to develop a long-range 
program of mutually beneficial complementary 
trade if they continue to entrust the fulfill- 
ment of these commercial projects, if only in 
part, to persons whose known intentions and 
purposes are ultimately to wreck them. 

Much emphasis has been placed repeatedly 
upon the obligations of our Government to 
assist in establishing sound economy and mu- 
tually beneficial international trade among 
the nations of this hemisphere. Our own Gov- 
erinnent, in collaboration with the other na- 
tions of the Americas, is moving as swiftly, as 



resolutely, and as directly in the solution of all 
our problems as government can ; but business 
and industry cannot be spectators in this his- 
torical and epochal effort. The whole weight 
of our national strength martialed and set in 
motion under the leadership of our captains 
of industry and commerce must move forward 
to the task. The Government of the United 
States, through the various departments and 
independent agencies, is facing these questions, 
not only in our own behalf, but with the deter- 
mination of securing for all the countries in 
the western world the maximum of prosperity 
and well-being. Moreover, the loyal coopera- 
tion of all the governments concerned is essen- 
tial to ultimate success. Finally, if the long- 
range program of making all the nations on 
this side of the Atlantic economically sound 
and stable is to succeed, there will be required 
as well the unstinted cooperation of all the 
financial, industrial, and commercial interests 
of all tlie countries in the Americas. 



The Department 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

[Released to tbe press October 25] 

The Secretary of State on October 24, 1940, 
issued the following departmental orders: 

"Departmental Order No. 892 

"Mr. Laurence Duggan has been appointed 
Adviser on Political Relations, effective on 
this date. In this capacity, he is charged, un- 
der the Secretary of State and the Under Sec- 
retary of State, with the supervision of such 
divisions having geneial charge of relations 
with foreign states as may be assigned to him, 
and with giving advice on special questions and 
performing other duties of a supervisory or 
advisory nature. 

"The designation of the Office of Adviser on 



OCTOBKR 2 6, 1940 



351 



Political Relations, now created, is PA/LD. 

"Departmental Order No. 686 of May 21, 
1937, is amended accordingly. 

CoRDELL Hull 
"Dki'ahtment of State, 
'■October 2k, m.',()P 



Depaijtmental Order No. 893 

"Mr. Pliiiip W. Bonsil is hereby designated 
Acting Chict' of the Division of the American 
Kepublics. 

CoRDELL Hull 
"Defaktment of State, 
"■October fU, mo:' 



[Released to the press October 22) 

The following recent appointments to offices 
in the Department have been made by the Sec- 
letary of State: 

Mr. Panl T. Meyer was appointed Assistant 
Chief of the Division of Commercial Affairs, 
effective June 24. 

Mr. John AV. Perkins was designated Assist- 
ant Chief of the Translating Bureau on July 12. 



Mr. Guillermo A. Suro was designated Acting 
Chief of the Central Translating Office on Au- 
gust 9, and Mi'. Arttu'o Morales was designated 
Acting Assistant Chief of the same office on 
October 2. 

Mr. Edward G. Trueblood, a Foreign Service 
officer of class VI, was designated Assistant 
Chief of the Division of Cultural Relations on 
August 15. 

Mr. Oime Wilson, a Foreign Service officer 
of class II, was designated Liaison Officer on 
September 17, to have charge under the Under 
Secretary of the Liaison Office. 

Mr. Leroy D. Stinebower was, on September 
19, appointed Assistant Adviser on Interna- 
tional Economic Affairs, effective from July 16. 

Mr. James Hugh Keeley, Jr., a Foreign Serv- 
ice officer of class III, was designated Assistant 
Administrative Officer of the Special Division 
on October 11, effective from October 1. 

Mr. Paul C. Daniels, a Foreign Service officer 
of class V, was designated an Assistant Chief of 
the Division of the American Republics on Sep- 
tember 19, effective the following daj\ 

Mr. Emilio G. Collado was appointed an As- 
sistant Chief of the Division of the American 
Republics on October 19, effective from October 
16. 



Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, etc. 



MONTHLY STATISTICS 



[Released to the press October 25] 

Note : The figures relating to arms, the licenses for 
the export of which were revolied before they were 
lused, have been subtracted from the figures appearing 
in the cumulative column of the table below in regard 
to arms export licenses issued. These latter figures 
are therefore net figures. They are not yet final and 
definitive since licenses may be amended or revoked 
at any time before being used. They are, however, 
accurate as of the date of this press release. 

The statistics of actual exports in these releases are 
believed to be substantially complete. It is possible, 



however, that some shipments are not included. If 
this proves to be the fact, statistics in regard to such 
shipments will be included in the cumulative figures in 
later releases. 

Arms Export Licenses Issued 
The table printed below indicates the charac- 
ter, value, and countries of destination of the 
arms, anununition, and implements of war li- 
censed for export by the Secretary of State dur- 
ing the year 1940 up to and including the month 
of September. 



352 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


September 
1940 


9 months end- 
ing September 
30, 1940 




IV 

I 

V 


(1) 

(4) 

(1) 

(2) 




$57.00 












24.00 






3,200.00 






630.00 








Xotal 




3, 854. 00 




1 

III 
IV 

V 
VII 


(2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 










24, 096. 60 




$62.00 


5, 477. 00 
2, 300. 00 




10.00 


6, 151. 84 
10, 062. 00 




113.00 


6, 694. 00 
40, 026. 00 




1, 4G0. 80 


178, 162. 61 
40, 937. 60 






29.84 




13.00 


93, 384. 61 




1, 658. 80 


400, 219. 70 




I 

III 

IV 
V 

VII 


(I) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 




Vustralia . 


90.00 


783. 12 




661.23 




517, 300. 00 


2,026,820.00 
13, 680. 00 






271. 65 






509.00 






26, 648. 00 




7,010.00 
72,086.68 


877, 679. 25 

2,166,791.58 

33, 474. 86 








Total -- 


596, 486. 58 


5, 136, 118. 69 




IV 

I 

IV 


(1) 

(4) 
(2) 




Bahrein Islands 




136.00 








Bf^lsian Coneo 




17 29 






1.87 








Total 




19.16 




I 
III 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 










217.00 






103, 200. 00 






28, 779. 00 






2, 292, 000. 00 






69.00 






20, 745. 00 






243, 967. 00 






419, 400. 00 








Total - - 




3,108,367.00 




I 

IV 
V 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 




Bermuda - 




16 00 






84.70 






74.84 






8,000 00 






6,000.00 








Total 




13, 176. 54 




I 

IV 

V 


(4) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




Bolivia -.. 


21.00 
243.00 


1,774 00 




1,528.00 
6,500 00 






64.60 






46.384.00 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


September 
1940 


9 months end- 
ing September 
30, 1940 


Bolivia— Continued. 


VII (1) 

(2) 


$286.76 


$2,239.44 
1.50 








Total 


649.76 


57, 491. 54 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 




Bra7,il 




1,773.00 




3,050.00 


8,488.00 
1,897,32.5.00 




7,920.00 
364,500.00 

1,734.00 
16,509.00 

5, 364. 00 
49, 465. 00 
71,894.01 

8,000.00 


14,700.00 
1, 342, 700. 00 
1,734.00 
51,222.75 
29,908.14 
706,918.00 
182,478.87 
293, 009. 60 


Total 


528, 436. 01 


4, 630, 267. 26 




IV (2) 

V (1) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






7.60 


14.32 




2, 500. 00 






2, 500. 00 




115.52 


1, 224. 36 
1,680.00 








Total 


123.02 


7,918.68 




I (4) 
IV (2) 
VII (1) 

(2) 




British Honduras 




12.00 






93.69 






129.20 






108.30 








Total 




348.19 




I (4) 

I (2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 










2.43 












400. 00 






133. 54 






766. 25 






136.00 








Total - 




1,424.79 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 

m (1) 

(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (2) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






Canada 


6, 172. 53 
20, 536. 60 
250.00 
104,666.67 
346, 264. 00 
43, 200. 00 
1, 516, 668. 00 


782, 803. 99 




201,475.47 

40, 918. 00 

482, 250. 72 

436, 408. 00 

43, 200. 00 

20,816,102.00 

4, 141. 00 




300, 233. 93 

2, 242. 77 

626, 524. 41 

19,933.14 

468, 6S7. 50 

46.00 

27, 570. 36 

267.26 


362, 579. 09 

63, 802. 12 

974, 600. 98 

7, 596, 322. 86 

8, 461, 016. 19 

36,098.00 
169, 836. 88 
44, 599. 93 


Total 


3, 472, 251. 07 


40, 496, 056. 23 




I (2) 
(4) 
(S) 
(6) 




Chile 




3, 040. 00 




37, 271. 28 






6, 460. 00 






3, 630. 00 



ocior.Kii 



Mi, lit 4 



353 





Category 


Value of oiport liconses issued 


Country of (Ip.'^tiuation 


September 
1940 


9 month.s end- 
ing September 
30, 1940 


Chile — Continued. 


III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VU (1) 
(2) 




^09 .^jO. 00 






53. 069. 00 




$50.52 
3,300.00 


7, 442. 38 
6.800.00 
3. 407. no 






30. 53.5. 00 






15.00 






12, 607. 15 








Tot.ll 


3,350.52 


572, 827. 31 




I (2) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 

(2) 




China 




3,'>2, 440. 00 






2, 529. 106. 22 






137.950. 10 






178. GO 






3. 226. 7! 






156, 800. 00 




157,953.00 
1.177,270.00 


2. 700, 801. 63 

3, 374, 225. 35 
1, 018. 225. 56 






361,000 00 








Total 


1,335,223.00 


10, 639, 964. 17 




I (1) 

(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VU (1) 
(2) 








30.00 






157 00 






2. 310. 90 




12.00 


679. 76 
333, 750. 00 




1,900.00 


14.687.00 
60, 995. 00 




30.78 


1,058.09 
4,905.00 








Total 


1.M2.78 


418,572.75 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 




Co.sta Rica 


3.7.'iO.0O 

6,624.00 

808.00 


3.754.00 




7. 746. 30 

1,007. as 

25 000.00 






2. 967. 62 






13 104 70 




228.00 


2. 029. 86 


Total 


11,410.00 


55, 609. 73 




I (2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (I) 
(2) 




Cuba 




143.00 




363.00 

50.00 

3.824.00 


131.527.00 
3, 365. 50 
13. 076. 00 
7. 700. 00 






4. 500. 00 






2. noo. 00 




874.80 


4, 009. 80 
751. 00 








Total 


5, 111. 80 


167,072.30 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 






19, 125. 00 

2, 048. OO 

1,120.00 

30.32 

950.00 


19, 710. 00 




2, 123. 39 

2, 413. 50 

626. 5S 

106, 109. 00 

8.536. 26 






57, 950. 00 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country or destination 


September 
1940 


9 months end- 
ing September 
30, 1940 


Curasao— Continued. 


VII (2) 




$22. 50 






Total -- - 


$23,273.32 


197, 493. 23 




V (3) 

I (2) 

IV (1) 

(2) 

V (2) 
VII (1) 








2, 040. 00 








DomiDican Republic . - 


96.52 


306.52 




2, 396 00 






843.00 






600 00 






1.501.80 


Total 


96.62 


6, 647. 32 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (1) 

(2) 




Kcuador 




208 52 




12.00 


213.00 
156 00 




6.00 
1,025.00 


19,155.00 

2, 047. 00 

226 00 






900.00 


Total 


1,043.00 


22,905.52 




I (2) 
(3) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 




Egypt 




837 50 






3. 310. 00 






1,680.21 




1,579.00 


50, 38S. 00 

2, 331. 31 

16, 993. OO 

60 00 








Total 


1,579.00 


75, 600. 02 




I (1) 

(4) 

Ul (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VU (2) 








12i. 052. on 






1,111 IK) 






18. 200. 00 






76.00 






6. 460 00 






375. 0(1 






8,350.00 








Total 




159, 624. 00 




I (4) 

I (3) 
(3) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (1) 

(2) 






Fiji . . 




81.42 








Finland 




19, 660 00 






538, .509. 60 






3. 806. 493. 89 
951. .W 




2,177.04 
35,056.00 


141.02 
44. 640. 29 
.•i.5. 056. 00 
641, 032. 50 








Total.... 


37, 233. 04 


.5. OSfi. .144 SO 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

Ul (1) 
(2) 




France 




338.00 






1, 204. 202. 71 






42,071.00 






452, 145. 50 






28,111.023.00 






10, 337. no 



354 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtTLLETIN 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


September 
1940 


9 months end- 
ing September 
30, 1940 


France— Continued. 


IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




$30.00 




376, 315. 00 






646, 000. 00 






11, 960, 423. 01 






1, 644, 697. 00 






2.00 






56, 693. 00 








Total -- 




44,394,177.22 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 










78.50 




$254.60 


305. 60 
3, 836. 00 




519.90 


530.90 


Total 


774.40 


4,750.90 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(6) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 

(2) 




Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland. 


1,876,500.00 
90, 793. 57 


7,608,080.00 
22,945,912.51 
4, 062, 850. 52 




1,615,476.03 

239,230.00 

12, 276, 400. 00 

18.000.00 

3, 498. 30 

987,867.15 

900,000.00 

3, 206, 008. 16 

13, 170, 691. 00 

4,666,600.00 

40,000.00 


44, 405, 169. 91 

13,222,407.10 

229,090,078.85 

146, 140. 14 

1, 113, 105. 66 

3, 733, 162. 91 

968, 000. 00 

25, 319, 104. S.'i 

49,215,322.00 

13,926,803.94 

5,513,039.80 


Total- 


39,089,964.21 


421,269,177.69 




I (3) 
(4) 
(5) 

IV (1) 




Greece 




150.00 






50.00 
90, 900. 00 






21.00 








Total.- 




91,121.00 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 










1,015.48 






678. 30 






6, 674. 65 






1, 731. 57 






540.00 






105. 00 








Total - 




10, 645. 00 




IV (1) 
(2) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






Guatemala 




186.00 






1, 340. 00 






226. SO 






6, 164. 00 








Total 




6 916 80 




IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
VII (1) 






Haiti 




1 609 85 




7.66 


30.66 
7,000.00 












Total 


7.66 


8,664.81 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


Septomber 
1940 


9 months end- 
ing September 
30, 1940 




I (1)' 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

VU (2) 


$32.00 
258.00 


$32.00 




690.00 
388.00 




136.00 


1,664.00 
10, 000. 00 






4,238.00 






131.00 








Total 


426.00 


17,143.00 




I (I) 

(2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VI (2) 








2, 040. 75 






938.00 






1, 803. 10 






7, 363. 00 






67.75 






22, 832. 00 






24, 750. 00 






120.00 








Total 




69, 914. 60 




IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

VII (2) 










1, 920. OO 






374.00 






7, 890. 00 






763. 00 






65.00 








Total 




11,012.00 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (2) 






luilia - _ -- - 


232.00 
177. 57 
25.50 


3,267.74 




7,311.94 

3, 704. 14 

780. 66 






67, 500. 00 






1, 469. 40 






1,000.00 






3, 468. 00 








Total 


435.07 


88,491.77 




I (2) 

III (1) 

V (1) 

(2) 








37, 600. 00 






760, 000. 00 






112,000.00 




93.00 


93.00 


Total 


93.00 


609, 593. 00 




I (2) 
III (2) 
V (2) 








47, 865. 00 






27, 165. 00 






148, 000. 00 








Total 




223, 030. 00 




V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 










235, 603. 00 






3, 270. 60 






33, 380. 00 








Total 




272, 163. 60 




V (2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 










13. 610. 00 












123. DO 






41.45 








Total - 




164.46 



OCTOBER 26, 1940 



355 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


September 
1940 


9 months end- 
ing Seplember 
30, 1940 


Kenya 


I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 




$107.00 






00.00 






714.00 






35.00 












916.00 




VII (2) 

I (2) 

I (*) 

I (1) 
(4) 
(6) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (2) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






Leeward Islands 




162. 46 








Macau 


K 117. 50 


4, 672. 50 










137.00 








Mexico ... ... 


60.00 
27.500.00 


280.75 




27,630.26 
112.60 




46.500.00 

123.13 

2,600.00 

6.084.75 
8,538.00 


16,0.17.30 

1,023.20 

485, 182. 40 

7,568.53 

40,855.00 

175.60 

14,125.00 

58,276.00 


Total 


01, 405. 88 


651. 163. 44 




I (1) 
(4) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 








116.00 






164.61 




1,200.00 
30.00 


283,200.00 
17. 174. 00 
55. 710. 00 








Total 


1.230.00 


366,354.61 




I (2) 
(4) 
(S) 

V (2) 
(3) 








12,866.00 






47.50 






156.00 






17,942.19 






63,300.00 








Total 




94. 310. 69 




I (2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (1) 
VU (1) 

(2) 










3.417.950.00 






975. 000. 00 




764,030.71 


3. 796, 418. 01 
2, 304, 600. 00 




241.800.00 


241,800.00 
6,399.118.10 






9, 081. 90 


. 




68,321.65 




39,329 36 


58,644.01 
622, 056. 12 




127.764.70 
20. 755. 18 
4,950.00 


339,642.20 

462, 015 97 

4.950.00 

338.80 






160. 749. 30 










1, 198, 629. 95 


18.890.486.09 




I (4) 




New Caledonia 




923.82 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


September 
1940 


9 months end- 
ing September 
30. 1940 


Newfoundland 


I 
IV 


(1) 

(4) 

(1) 

(2) 


$11.10 
2.17 


$142.65 




1.170.89 
1, 946. 62 






398.22 








Total 


13.27 


3, 658. 38 




IV 
V 


(2) 
(2) 




New Guinea, Territory of 




17. 25 




1,250.00 








Total 




1, 267. 25 




I 
III 

IV 
V 

VU 


(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 






New Zealand 




266, 750. 00 






1, 916, 870. 00 






202.00 




67.50 


161,594.95 
130, 230 00 






11,045.00 








Total .. . . 


67.60 


2, 486, 691. 95 




I 

IV 
V 

VII 


m 

(2) 
(I) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 




NicarnPiift 




62, 500. 00 






9.000.00 




1,183.00 


1, 208. 00 
480.00 






870.00 






1, 292. 00 








Total 


1.183.00 


75, 350. 00 




I 

IV 


(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 




Nigorta .... .. 




278.50 






21.00 






30.25 






89.01 








Total 




418. 79 




I 

IV 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 






Northern Rhodesia ., . . - 


336.80 
198.27 


336.80 




198.27 
26.50 








Total 


535.07 


560.57 




I 

lU 
IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 








70 00 






450.00 






36, 545. 00 






712 000 00 






280.00 






222 00 






121.00 






2, 200. 00 






39. 604 00 






1.515.00 








Total 




793. 007. 00 




V 

I 

IV 


(3) 

(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 






Palestine 




1.400.00 








Pap^ma 




12, 600. 00 






3,900 00 






6,600.00 
8 804. 75 






1,207.00 



356 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


September 
1940 


9 months end- 
ing September 
30, 1940 


Panama— Continued. 


V 
VII 


(I) 

(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




$27, 866. 00 




174. 00 






1. 380. 00 






2. 202. 46 






728.00 








Total 




65, 422. 21 




I 

IV 


(4) 
(2) 










384. 80 






12, 150. 45 








Total 




12,535.25 




IV 

V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 










7, 650. 90 






240.00 






393, 138. 50 




$2,545.00 


14, 000. 58 
86. 666. 00 






2, 140. 00 






1, 130. 50 








Total 


2, 645. 00 


504, 866. 48 




I 

III 
IV 

V 
VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 








61.80 






44.00 






103, 446. 00 






30.00 






422. 00 






4, 300. 00 




2.500.00 


SO, 439. 94 
66, 126. 00 






841.76 






71, 000. 00 








Total 


2.500.00 


326, 700. 50 




V 

I 

V 


(2) 

(1) 
(2) 








2, 500. 00 








Saudi Arabia.. . . 




260.00 






760.00 








Total 




1, 020. 00 




I 

IV 
V 


CD 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 






Southern Rhodesia 


106.00 


601.60 




227.60 




64.00 
170.00 


699. 56 
487. 30 
95. 52 






160, 226. 00 








Total - 


330.00 


162, 337. 48 




I 


(1) 

(4) 


Spain ..- 




130 00 






25.00 








Total -.- 




155 00 




I 
I 

IV 
VII 


(1) 

(2) 
(4) 
(2) 
(1) 






Straits Settlements 






















1.64 






2 47 




323.00 


323.00 


Total 


323.00 


11,971.61 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


September 
1940 


9 months end- 
ing September 
30, 1940 


Sweden 


I 

HI 
IV 
V 


(2) 
(4) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 




$108. 000. 00 






65,307 00 






4, 000. 00 






233. 62.5. 00 






91,419.53 






247,298.00 








Total 




749, 649. .53 




IV 

I 
III 

IV 
V 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 

(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 

(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 










20.00 








Thailand 


$105. 72 
47.95 


27, 905. 72 




66.52 
258, 054. 00 






1,543.84 




1,315.00 
184.29 


IS, 309. 89 

24.5.81 

97, 200. 00 




1,130.00 
40, 070. 00 


69, 200. 74 
211,260.00 


Total 


48, 852. 96 


683, 776. 52 










153.00 






294.00 






18, 626. 00 




2.125.00 
162. 45 


2. 977. 00 
102. 45 


Total 


2, 287. 45 


22,211.45 




in 

IV 

V 
VII 


(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 








6,610.00 






33 00 






6.20 






139, 760. 00 




73,920.00 


116,777.00 


Total 


73,920.00 


262, 186. 20 




I 

III 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(21 
(3) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 








308.00 




200, 000. 00 

55, 500. 00 

13.00 


200, 000. 00 

55, 500. 00 

633.93 

454, 000. 00 




96,921.00 


237.409.70 
36, 257. 00 






3, 344, 553. 00 




32,942.00 


124,617.28 
338, 260. 00 






166.00 






40, 228. 00 








Total 


385, 376. 00 


4, 881, 822. 91 




I 

IV 

V 
VII 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 








260.00 






1,522.00 






6, 887. 30 






53, 600. 00 






100.40 






660.00 












63,029.70 




I 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 






Venezuela 




184.20 






278.00 






69.60 



(KTOllKK 2(i, ISMO 



357 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


September 

mo 


9 months end- 
ing September 
30, 194U 




III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




$163,970.00 






4, 881. 60 






192. 70 




$185,000.00 

5,516.30 

31,000.00 

4.253.59 

1,860.00 


298,860.00 
64,817.30 

126, 270. 00 
16, 25«. 99 
21,127.40 


Total 


227,619.89 


695,907.74 




IV (2) 
VII (2) 




Windward Islands 




10.00 






135. C7 








Tolai 




145. 37 




V (2) 
(3) 










9,411.76 






30, 780. 00 








Total . -. 




40, 191. 75 










Grand total 


47,162,405.03 


570,392,922.88 









During the inoiith of September. 4(53 arms 
export licenses were issued, nuikiiifr :• total of 
3,G16 such licenses issued iluring the current 
year. 

Arms Exi'outi':d 

The table jirinted below iiuHcales the charac- 
ter, value, and counti'ies of destination of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war ex- 
ported durinji the year 1S)40 up to and includiiifr 
the month of September under ex]iort licenses 
issued by the Secretary of State. 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destinatinn 


September 
IMO 


9 months end- 
ing September 
30,1940 




I (4) 
V (1) 

(2) 




.524. 00 






3. '200. 00 




$125.00 


620.00 


Tolal 


125.00 


3,844.00 




I (2) 
(4) 
(5) 

III (2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








24. 095. 50 






240.00 






2.418.00 




10.00 
650.00 


10.00 
8. 452. 00 
6,504.00 






40. 025. 00 




13,459.00 


66,939.48 
290, 713. 50 






29.84 




5.805.80 


67,317.31 


Total - 


19. 924. 80 


506,744.63 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


September 
1940 


9 months end- 
ing September 
30, 1940 




I 


(1) 

(4) 


$194.00 


$1,010.53 




458.08 




III 


(1) 


51,730.00 


7,8.57,865.00 




IV 


(1) 




136 55 








509.00 




y 


(I) 




13. 290. no 






(2) 


32, 575. 00 


,=;20.89S.OO 






(3) 


127,620.00 


959. 07G. 00 




VH 


(1) 




33, 474. 86 








Total 


212,125.00 


9,380,724.02 




IV 

1 
IV 


(1) 

(4) 
(2) 








13G.00 








Belgiiin Congo 




17 29 




1.87 








Total 




19. IG 




I 


(1) 
(2) 






BelRium 




217 00 




49, 450. 00 






(4) 
(I) 




2S, 809. 79 




III 




1. 146.000.00 




IV 


(2> 




69. 00 




V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




20. 745. 00 






.5, 807. 00 








119,997.00 












1,371,094.79 




1 


(1) 
(4) 
(2) 










48.00 






16.00 




IV 


39.84 


74.84 




y 


d) 




8,000.00 






(2> 




2,600.00 








Total 


39.84 


10. 638. 84 




I 

IV 
V 


(4) 
C2) 
(1) 






11.00 


1, 753. 00 




1, 285. 00 






19, OOO. 00 






(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




1,041.69 








.^.741.00 




VTl 




1.881.88 








1.50 








Total 


11.00 


83,704.07 




1 


(1) 
(2) 




Brazil - _ .. 


224.00 


1,211.00 




5, 438. 00 






(3) 


9, 225. 00 


9, 225. 00 






(4) 


8.308.00 


16,877.00 




III 


(1) 


218. 700. 00 


568,450.00 




IV 


(1) 


13, 897. 00 


32, 359. 75 






(2) 


1.612.00 


21, 781. 14 




V 


(1) 


52. 400. 00 


666, 072. 00 






(2) 


1,020.00 


118,323.63 






(3) 


53,268.00 


225, 123. 25 




vn 


(2) 




2.00 








Total 


358,654.00 


1,664,862.77 




IV 
y 


(2) 




British Ouiana 




6.82 






2,500.00 




VII 


(1) 

(2) 




1,108.84 






1,680.00 


1.680.00 


ToUL. - 


1,680.00 


6, 295. 66 



358 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value ot actual exports 


Country of destination 


September 
1940 


9 months end 

ing September 

30, 1940 




IV (1) 
(2) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




$16.00 






18.00 






129. 20 






108. 30 












270. 50 




I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 










90.00 






400. 00 






229. 64 






472. 00 






49.22 








Total 




1. 240. 76 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 

III CD 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (2) 

VII CI) 
C2) 








$5, 568. 63 

11,477.00 

250.00 

86,947.07 


661.460.09 




137. 871. 47 
38. 819. 00 

328, 149. 66 
94, 664. 00 




988, 366. 00 


7.519.493.00 
248, 681. 31 




13, 363. 31 

785. 71 

19, 792. 00 

209, 426. 90 

234. 886. 36 

46.00 

27. 645. 11 

6,831.54 


48, 139. 26 
73, 999. 30 
640, 496. 57 
1, 609, 693. 34 
3, 971, 014. 60 
36.063.00 
145, 467. 88 
91. 145. 89 


Total 


1,674.373.63 


16, 544, 928. 37 




I C2) 
C4) 
C6) 
C6) 

IV CD 

C2) 

V CD 
C2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
C2) 




Chile -- 


70.00 
18, 384. 00 


3, 040. 00 




37. 154. 00 
6,300.00 
3, 630. 00 








213.00 

396. 80 

3,300.00 


64, 064. 00 
6, 747. 80 
6, 800. 00 
3, 407. 50 






62. 678. 00 




15.00 


16.00 
12,607 16 








Total 


22,378.80 


184 433 45 




I CD 
C2) 
C3) 
C4) 

m (1) 

(2) 

IV (D 

(2) 

V CD 
C2) 
C3) 

VII CD 
C2) 




China - 




1 344 00 






468 005 00 






860.00 






23. 763. 00 




633. 791. 00 
481.00 


1. 782, 445. 67 
18.514.00 






6. 649. 00 

114, 600. 00 

1, 667. 606. 60 

593, 291. 00 








297.074.00 
24. 886. 00 






342, 000. 00 






Total 


966,231.00 


6. 262. 960. 67 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


September 
1940 


9 months end- 
ing September 
30, 1940 




I CD 
(4) 

IV CD 
C2) 

V CD 
C2) 
C3) 

VII CD 
C2) 




$30. 00 






177. 00 






1,935 20 




$218.00 


2. 049. 76 
348 350 00 




6. 361. 00 
9.364.00 


12.551.00 

44. 966. 00 

1, 027. 00 




2. 940. 00 


4. 905. 00 


Total .. 


18, 883. 00 


416. 980. 96 




I C4) 

IV CD 
C2) 

V CD 
C2) 

C3) 

VII CD 

C2) 




Costa Rica 




4.00 






137. 30 




63.00 


199.25 
2,'"., 000. 00 






22. 057. 00 




1, 600. 00 


28.976.00 
2. 236. 26 






61.00 








Total -- 


1. 663. 00 


78. 669. 81 




I C2) 
C4) 

III CD 

IV CD 
C2) 

V CD 

C2) 

C3) 

VII CD 

C2) 




Cuba 




70.00 




26. 158. OO 


26, 886. 00 
43, 350 00 






2, 446. 50 




29.00 


11, 702. 00 
7, 700 00 






8, 895. 00 






12, 876. 00 




173. 20 


5, 650. 92 
761.00 








Total 


26, 360 20 


120, 226. 42 




I (D 

C4) 

IV CD 
C2) 

V CD 

C2) 

C3) 

VII (2) 




Curasao _ 




686 00 




2,048.00 
639. 00 
381. 62 


2,125.39 

1, 293. 50 

596. 26 

103, 976. 00 




3, 379. 76 


4, 283. 26 
53, 160 00 






22.60 








Total 


6, 448. 38 


166. 030 91 




I C2) 

IV (1) 
C2) 

V C2) 
VII CD 








210. 00 






854 00 






515 00 






600.00 
1. 601. 80 


Total 




3, 680 80 




I CD 

C4) 

IV CD 

C2) 

V C2) 
VII CD 

C2) 






Ecuador _ 


38.80 
12.00 


208 62 




238.00 
191. 00 




672.00 


17. 090. 00 
1. 022. 00 




225.00 


226.00 
900.00 








Total 


947. 80 


19, 874. 52 



OCTOBER 26, 1940 



359 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


September 
1940 


9 months end- 
ing September 
30, 1940 




I (3) 
(■■) 

IV (1) 

(2) 

V (2) 




$2,680.00 






26.21 






53,519.00 






989. 31 






60.00 








Total 




87, 274. 82 




I (1) 
(4) 

m (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 

vn (2) 






El Salvador 




125, 052. 00 




$20.00 


1,233.00 
18, :sOO. 00 






76.00 






6, 436. 40 






375.00 
8,350.00 










20.00 


189, 722. 40 




I (1) 

(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

m (1) 

IV (1) 

V (2) 

(3) 
VII (2) 






326.50 


325.50 




184, 310. 00 




58,256.00 


494,950.00 
1, 364, 078. 89 






2 321 496. 00 






951.50 




9,409.00 


130,180.00 
1, 200 063. 00 




132, 685. 00 


487,619.00 


Total 


200, 765. 50 


6, 183, 973. 89 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

in (1) 
(2) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








78.00 






1,202,979.71 






41, 323. 00 






593,495.60 
83, 907, 979. 00 






20,848.00 
368, 315. 00 






546, 000. 00 






3 927 169 82 






10,348,638.00 
2.00 










86, 693. 00 








Total - 




71, 010, 318. 03 




I (4) 

IV (1) 

(2) 








61 00 






3,836.00 
11.00 












Total .. - -- 




3,898.00 




I (4) 

I (r) 

(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 

m (1) 

(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 






French West Africa 




33.83 








Oreat Britain and Northern 
Ireland. 


1,493,250.00 

701,221.72 

59,382.00 

761,659.85 

20,000.00 

6,734,626.00 

1, 347. 00 

49,210.00 

348,078.00 

60,000.00 

1,304,052.00 

4,316,386.00 


4,613,830.00 

9, 342, 766. 27 

2. 455, 199. 20 

15, 561. 804. 23 

934.316.60 

50, 424, 018. 00 

22,001.00 

864,955.86 

713,469.55 

68,000.00 

4,620,946.79 

13,586,974 48 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of de.^tination 


September 
1940 


9 months end- 
ing September 
30, 1940 


Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland — Continued. 


VII 


(1) 

(2) 


$190,490.00 
133,511.00 


$8,127,795.06 
2,964,365.00 


Total 


16, 173, 213. 57 


114, 000, 442. 04 




I 


(3) 
(4) 
(5) 








150.00 






60.00 




85,850.00 


85,850.00 


Total 


85,850.00 


86, 050. 00 




I 

IV 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 








1,016.48 






578. 30 






6, 674. 65 






1, 731. 57 






540.00 






105.00 








Total 




10, 645. 00 




I 

IV 

VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 










37.00 






12.00 






159.00 






1, 336. 00 






226.80 






5, 164. 00 








Total 




6, 931 80 




IV 
VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 






Haiti 


1,264.80 


1, 601. 36 




23.00 






24.30 






6.00 








Total 


1,264.80 


1,654.65 




I 

IV 
V 

vn 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




Honduras 


74.00 


406.00 




388.00 




422.00 


1,521.00 
110,000.00 






3, 213. 00 






391 00 








Total 


496.00 


115,919.00 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
C3) 




Hong Kong 


1, 135. 50 


1, 158. 50 




12.00 






7, 363. 00 






5, 196 00 




16,550.00 


16, 550. 00 


Total 


17, 685. 50 


30, 279. 50 




IV 
V 

vn 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 








1,920.00 






363.00 






7, 890. 00 






763.00 






65.00 








Total 




11,001.00 




I 

IV 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 






India _ 


112.50 

607.73 

61.00 

50.29 


2,900.95 




7, 649. 69 
3, 579. 64 
1, 145. 60 



360 



llEPARTMEXT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


September 
1940 


9 months end- 

ine September 

30, 1940 


Ind ia— C ont inued . 


V 
VI 


(1) 

(2) 
(3) 
(2) 




$67. 500. 00 


$163.00 


1, 499. 40 
1. 000. 00 






929.00 








Total - - 


984.52 


86,204.28 




III 

IV 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 








694, 963. 00 






27 165 00 






94.37 






25 85 








Total 




722,248.22 




V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 








116,823.00 

3, 270. 60 

33,380.00 














Total 




163,473.60 




IV 


(1) 
C2) 




Jamaica . 




346.00 






27.50 








Total 








V 

IV 

V 

I 


(2) 

(1) 

(3) 

(1) 
(4) 










4 143 00 












618.00 












18, 077. 00 






Mauritius 




251.45 






337 28 








Total 




588 73 




I 

IV 
V 

VI 
VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(5) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 






Mexico _ 




56 00 




30.26 


30.26 
112.50 




647. 70 

547. 20 

33. 300. 00 

1, 353. 00 


15,352.30 

1, 023. 20 

450, 682. 40 

4, 290. 00 

14, 505 00 






175 50 




405.00 
16, 206. 00 


16,612.60 
55, 507. 00 


Total 


52.489.16 


668, 34(i. IS 




I 

V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 


Mozambique 




116.00 










282,000.00 

7, 304. 00 

55 710 00 












Total 




345, 284. 61 




1 

111 


(2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(2) 




Netherlands __. 





26,653.00 

47.50 

155.00 

9, 674. 00 





Category 


Value of actual csports 


Country of destination 


September 
1940 


9 months end- 
ing September 
30, 1940 


Netherlands — ContiQued. 


V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 




$107,740 00 






163, 472 50 






187, 137. 50 








Total 




494 879 .50 




I (1) 
(■■i) 
(4) 
(5) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (1) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








$108. 66 

16, 463. 00 

7, 179. 10 

116. 618. 00 

256. 872. 00 

7, 003. 49 


108 56 




108, 947. 00 

23, 001. 87 

397, 693. 00 

1, 827, 830. 00 

740.00 

52, 519. 35 

14, 133. 69 

334 677 00 




64,071.50 

1, 752. 00 

4, 950. 00 

33S. 80 

16,740.00 


301, 339. 5fl 

214, 947. 00 

4, 960. 00 

338. 80 

204.909.30 


Total.... ... 


492,096.45 


3.486,735 07 




I (4) 

I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 




New Caledonia 


720.82 


923 82 










118 50 




205.00 


300.24 




24.50 


240. 32 


Total 


229.50 


2,593.56 




IV (2) 

V (2) 


New Guinea, Territory of 




17 25 




2,500.00 






Total 




2, 517. 25 




I (4) 

IV (1) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 






New Zealand. 


43, 122. 00 


69, 737. on 




202 00 






2,371.15 
2, 540. 00 










11 386 00 








Total 


43, 122. 00 


86, 236 15 




I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 




Nicaragua 




34,827 00 






8, 267. 00 






1 264 00 




25.00 


25.00 
4, 035. 00 






480.00 






870 00 






1,292.00 


Total . . 


25.00 


51.060.00 




I (2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 








278. 50 






33 00 




30.00 


30.00 
88 00 








Total 


30.00 


429. .-iO 




IV (1) 




Northern Rhodesia. 


— 


25.60 



OCTOBER 2 6, 1940 



361 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country or destination 


September 
1940 


9months end- 
ing September 
30, 1940 


Norway -- 


I 

III 
IV 
V 


(1) 

(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 




$70.00 




285.00 






36,493.20 






1,354,114.00 






280.00 






30.00 






137,00 






2,200.00 






044.00 








Total 




1, 394, 253. 20 




V 

I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(3) 

(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 






Palestine 


$1, 000. 00 


1,400.00 










12.500.00 






3,900.00 






8, 700. 00 






8, 781. 75 






1, 207. 00 






21,.S07. 13 






174.00 






1, 447. 00 




5.00 
728.00 


2,920.60 
728.00 


Total- 


733.00 


62. 165. 48 




I 

IV 


(4) 

(2) 








384.80 






11,215.45 


Total 




11,600.25 




IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 










7,650.90 






240.00 






387. 810. 00 




3,764.00 
7.957.00 
1.140.00 


19. 636.00 

70. 574. no 

2. 140. 00 

1, 131.00 








Total 


12, 861. 00 


489,081.90 




I 
III 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




Portugal 




51.80 






44.00 






877, 298. 00 






30.00 






422.00 






4. 663. 00 






44. 235. 91 






54, 265. 00 






841.76 




17,000.00 


17. 000. 00 


Total 


17,000.00 


998,851.47 




V 
V 

I 

IV 
V 


(2) 

(2) 

0) 
(2) 
(4) 
(I) 
(2) 
(2) 








600.00 












760 00 












495.60 






227.60 






352.50 






82.00 






121.04 




11. 32.'). 60 


24. 62,'). 00 


Total 


11, .325. 00 


25,903.64 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


September 
1940 


9 months end- 
ing September 
30, 1940 




I (1) 

I (2) 

(4) 

IV (2) 

VII (1) 




$9.12 












11,644.50 






1.64 






2 47 




$129.20 


323.00 


Total 


129.20 


11.971.61 




I (2) 
(4) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 








108,000.00 






65. 307. 00 






3 724 925 00 






4.000.00 




44,600.00 


178, 001. 00 
65. 000. 00 






212.923.98 






247, 267. 00 








Total 


44,600.00 


4, 605, 423. 98 




I (I) 
(4) 

III (2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 






105. 72 
a 39 


123.37 




10.32 
1, 543. 84 






16,380 89 




87.39 


57.39 
5 300 00 






13.015 00 






193, 120. 00 








Total 


171.50 


229, 550. 81 




IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

^^I (1) 

(2) 




Trinidad 




153.00 






18.00 






3,094 00 






18.625 00 






852.00 




162.45 


162. 45 




162.45 


22, 904. 45 




I (2) 
(5) 

lU (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 








148, 135 00 






158, 750 00 






1,191,084 00 






17,070 OO 






14. 236 00 






1,306 20 




68,085.00 


301, 880. 10 
70, 344. 00 




42,857.00 


42,857.00 


Total . . 


110,942.00 


1, 945, 662 30 




I (1) 
(4) 

III CD 

IV (1) 
C2) 

V CD 
(2) 
C3) 

VII CD 
(2) 








296.00 






565 93 




280,400.00 
13,098,00 
3, 625, 00 


454,000.00 

104. 686. 70 

3,632.00 

411,228.00 




15, 440, 00 
72, 500, OO 


40. 246. 64 

159, 675. 00 

156 00 






40, 064. 00 








Total. 


385,063.00 


1,214.550 27 




V (3) 




Union of Soviet Socialist 




120, 512. 00 


Republics. 







362 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of actual ciports 


Country of destination 


September 
1940 


9 months end- 
ing September 
30, 1940 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

VII (2) 




$299.00 






1, 522. 00 




$1,461.00 


6, 607. 30 
35, 104. 00 






100,40 






660.00 










1,461.00 


43, 292. 70 




I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

III (I) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








111.40 






246.00 






39.00 






167, 970. 00 






3, 316. 60 






191. 45 




12,784.00 
16, 000. 00 
3,051.98 


94,783.00 
41, 055. 00 
98, 131. 00 

14, 858. 99 

15, 890. 40 








Total 


31,836.98 


436, 592. 84 




V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 








63, 000. 00 






26, 806. 75 






31,080.00 


Total 




120, 886. 76 










Grand total 


20, 886, 022. 40 


244, 250, 218. 49 









Arms Import Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of origin of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
licensed for import by the Secretary of State 
during the month of September 1940 : 



Country of origin 


Category 


Value 


Total 


Bermuda 


V (2) 

I (2) 
(3) 
(4) 

V (2) 
(3) 

I (1) 

(6) 


$2,600.00 


$2,500.00 




.342. 60 
540.00 
421.40 
501.00 
9, 227. 37 


















11,032.27 


Oreat Britain 


83.25 
13,000.00 






13,083.25 


Total 




26, 616. 52 









During the month of September, 18 import 
licenses were issued, making a total of 163 
such licenses issued during the current year. 



Categories of Arms, Ammunition, and Imple- 
ments OF War 

The categories of arms, ammunition, and im- 
plements of war in the appropriate column of 
the tables printed above are the categories into 
which those articles were divided in the Presi- 
dent's jDrocIamation of May 1, 1937, enumerat- 
ing the articles which would be considered as 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war for 
the purposes of section 5 of the joint resolution 
of May 1, 1937 [see the Bulletin of July 27, 
1940 (vol. Ill, no. 57), pp. 58-59]. 

Speci.vl Statistics in Regard to Arms Exports 
TO Cuba 

In compliance with article II of the conven- 
tion between the United States and Cuba to 
suppress smuggling, signed at Habana, March 
11, 1926, which i-eads in part as follows: 

"The High Contracting Parties agree that 
clearance of shipments of merchandise by water, 
air, or land, from any of the ports of either 
country to a port of entry of the other country, 
shall be denied when such shipment comprises 
articles the importation of which is prohibited 
or restricted in the country to which such ship- 
ment is destined, unless in this last case there 
has been a compliance with the requisites de- 
manded by the laws of both countries." 

and in compliance with the laws of Cuba which 
restrict the importation of anns, ammunition, 
and implements of war of all kinds by requiring 
an import permit for each shipment, export 
licenses for shipments of arms, ammunition, 
and implements of war to Cuba are required 
for the articles enumerated below in addition to 
the articles enumerated in the President's 
proclamation of May 1, 1937; 

(1) Arms and small arms using ammunition 
of caliber .22 or less, other than those classed as 
toys. 

(2) Spare parts of arms and small arms of 
all kinds and calibers, other than those classed 
as toys, and of guns and machine guns. 

(3) Ammunition for the arms and small arms 
under (1) above. 



OCTOBER 26, 1940 



363 



(4) Sabers, swords, and military machetes 
with cross-guard hilts. 

(5) Explosives as follows : explosive powders 
of all kinds for all purposes; nitrocellulose hav- 
ing a nitrogen content of 12 percent or less; 
diphenylamine; dynamite of all kinds; nitro- 
glycerine; alkaline nitrates (ammonium, po- 
tassium, and sodium nitrate); nitric acid; ni- 
trobenzene (essence or oil of mirbane) ; sulphur; 
sulphuric acid; chlorate of potash; and ace- 
tones. 

(6) Tear gas (CoH.COCHcCl) and other 
similar non-toxic gasp.s and ai)])ariitus designed 
for the storage or projection of such gases. 

The table printed below indicates, in respect 
to licenses authorizing the exportation to Cuba 
of the articles and commodities listed in the pre- 
ceding paragraph, issued by the Secretary of 
State during September 1940, the number of li- 
censes and the value of the articles and com- 
modities described in the licenses : 



Number of licenses 


Sections 


Value 


Total 


30 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(8) 


$1,117.20 

180.15 

6.98S00 

13,804.81 


^ 




$21,088.16 



The table printed below indicates the value 
of the articles and commodities listed above 
exported to Cuba during September 1940 under 
licenses issued by the Secretary of State : 



Section 


Value 


Total 


(1) 


$239.20 

U.OO 

20.034 00 

13,961.98 




(2) 




(3) 


$34, 249. IS 


(5) 









Tin-Plate Scr.\p 

No licenses authorizing the exportation of 
tin-plate scrap under the provisions of the act. 
approved February 15, 1936, and the regula- 



tions issued pursuant thereto, were applied for 
or issued during the month of September 194<J. 

Helium 

The table printed below gives the essential 
information in regard to the licenses issued 
during the month of September 1940, authoriz- 
ing the exportation of helium gas under the 
provisions of the act approved on September 1, 
1937, and the regulations issued pursuant 
thereto : 



Applicant for 
license 


Purchaser In 
foreign country 


Country 
of destina- 
tion 


Quantity 

in cubic 

feet 


Total 
value 


The Cheney Chem- 
ical Co. 

The Ohio Chemical 
& Mfg. Co. 


Dr. Miguel Yr- 

rutia Lino. 
CompaniaMarx. 

S. A. 


Cuba.... 
Meiico.. 


10 
20 


$12.00 
18.50 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[ReleasPd to the press October 26J 

The following changes have occurred in the 
Foreign Service since October 12, 1940: 

Carekr Officers 

Irving N. Linnell. of Boston, Mass., now serv- 
ing in the Department of State, has been as- 
signed as Consul General at Yokohama, Japan. 

Robert B. Macatee, of Front Royal, Va., Con- 
sul at Belgrade, Yugoslavia, has been designated 
First Secretary of Legation at Belgrade and 
will serve in dual capacity. 

Karl L. Rankin, of New York, Commercial 
Attache at Belgrade. Yugoslavia, has been as- 
signed as Consul at Belgrade and will sei-ve in 
dual capacity. 

James C. H. Bonbright, of Rochester, N. Y., 
Second Secretary of Legation at Belgrade, 



364 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Yugoslavia, has been assigned as Consul at. 
Belgrade and will serve in dual capacity. 

T] Muldrup Forsyth, of Esmont, Va., Vice 
Consul at Cartagena, Colombia, has been as- 
signed as Consul at Cartagena. 

AValter J. Linthicum, of Baltimore, Md., Vice 
Consul at Pernambuco, Brazil, has been assigned 
as Consul at Pernambuco. 

Patrick Mallon, of Cincinnati, Ohio, Vice 
Consul at Leopoldville, Belgian Congo, has been 
assigned as Consul at Ix^opoldville. 

Maurice Pasquet, of New York, N. Y., Vice 
Consul at St. Pierre-Miquelon, has been assigned 
as Consul at St. Pierre-Miquelon. 

Edward E. Rice, of Milwaukee, Wis., Vice 
Consul at Foochow, China, has been assigned 
as Consul at Foochow. 

Wales W. Signor, of Ypsilanti, Mich., Vice 
Consul at Merida, Mexico, has been assigned 
as Consul at Merida. 

Clare H. Timberlake, of Jackson, Mich., Vice 
Consul at Aden, Arabia, has been assigned as 
Consul at Aden. 

Jay Walker, of Washington, D. C, Vice Con- 
sul at Para, Brazil, has been assigned as Consul 
at Parsi. 

The assignment of Herbert P. Fales, of Pasa- 



dena, Calif., as Vice Consul at Tokyo, Japan, 
has been canceled. Mr. Fales has now been 
assigneci for duty in the Department of State. 

Non-career Officers 

James E. Callahan, of Allston, Mass., Vice 
Consul at London, England, has been ap- 
pointed Vice Consul at Cork, Ireland. 

Carroll C. Parry, of St. Joseph, Mo., Vice 
Consul at Prague, Bohemia, has been ap- 
pointed Vice Consul at Vienna, Germany. 

Walter W. Wiley, of Salisbury, N. C, Clerk 
at Marseille, France, has been appointed Vice 
Consul at Marseille. 

Joseph A. Frisz, of Terre Haute, Ind., Clerk 
at Santiago, Chile, has been appointed Vice 
Consul at Santiago. 

Wendell S. Howard, of Uniontown, Pa., 
Clerk at Berlin, Germany, has been appointed 
Vice Consul at Berlin. 

Dee G. Davis, of Santa Paula, Calif., Clerk 
at Nagasaki, Japan, has been appointed Vice 
Consul at Nagasaki. 

The American Consulate Genei'al at Prague, 
Bohemia, was closed on October 14, 19-10. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



AGRICULTURE 

Convention for the Standardization of the 
Methods of Keeping and Operating Cattle 
Herdbooks 

Morocco — Timis 

By a note dated October 11, 1940, the Italian 
Ambassador at Washington informed the Sec- 
retary of State that the instruments of ratifi- 



cation on behalf of Morocco and Tunis of the 
Convention for the Standardization of the 
Methods of Keeping and Operating Cattle 
Herdbooks, signed at Rome on October 14, 1936, 
were deposited by the French Ambassador with 
the Italian Government on June 3, 1940. 

According to information received from the 
Italian Government, the convention has been 
ratified by: Brazil, Czechoslovakia, France, 
Germany, Italy, Latvia, Morocco, and Tunis. 



365 



FINANCE 

Supplementary Executive Agreement With 
Haiti Further Modifying the Agreement 
of August 7, 1933, Executive Agreement 
Series No. 46 (Executive Agreement Series 
No. 183) 

On Sejjteniber 27, 1940 a supplement ary ex- 
ecutive afrreeinent between the United States 
and Haiti, was signed, prolonging until and 
including September 30, 1941 the agreement 
signetl July 8, 1939 (Executive Agreement Se- 
ries No. 150) , providing for a temporary modi- 
fication of the Agreement Concerning the 
Haitianization of the Garde, Withdrawal of 
Militaiy Forces from Haiti, and Financial Ar- 
rangement, which was signed by the two coun- 
tries on August 7, 1933 (Executive Agreement 
Series No. 46) . 

The agreement of August 7, 1933 was tem- 
porarily modified by an agreement signed Janu- 
ary 13, 1938 (Executive Agreement Series No. 
117). This agreement was prolonged by a sup- 
plementary agreement signed on July 1, 1938 
( Executive Agreement Series No. 128) and it in 
turn was prolonged by the supplementary agree- 
ment signed on July 8, 1939 (Executive Agree- 
ment Series No. 150). The agreement of Sep- 
tember 27, 1940 will shortly be published as 
Executive Agi-eement Series No. 183. 



Regulations 



The followijig Government regulations may 
be of interest to readers of the Bulletin: 

Amondments to Customs Regulations. (Treasury 
Department: Bureau of Customs.) [Treasury Deci- 
sion 50251.] Federal Rcf/ister, October 26, 1940 (vol. 
5, no. 210). pp. 4236-4240. 

Form of Bond Prescribed for Use in Connection With 
Release of Examined Packages Pursuant to Article 
315 (E), Customs Regulations of 1937, as Amended. 
(Treasury Department: Bureau of Customs.) [Treas- 
ury Decision 502.")2.] October 19, 1910. Federal Reg- 
ister, October 26, 1940 (vol. 5, no. 210), p. 4240. 



Documentation, Entrance, and Clearance of Vessels. 
etc. — [Amendments regarding] Evidence of citizenship 
of owners and officers, S<>amen'.s protection certificates, 
etc. (Department of Commerce: Bureau of Marine 
In.spection and Navigation.) [Order No. 60.] October 
24, 1940. Federal ReyMer, October 26, 1940 (vol. 5, 
no. 210), p. 4242. 



Legislation 



An Act To amend section .S-19.3 of the Internal Rev- 
enue Code, formerly section 404 of the Sugar Act of 
1937 [to provide for refund by Commissioner of Inter- 
nal Revenue of taxes paid under the provisions of 
section .3490]. Approved October 8, 1940. (Public, 
No. 807, 7«th Cong., 3d -sess.) 1 p. Sv'. 

An Act To reiM'uI sections 45S8 and 4591 of the 
Revised Statutes of tlie I'nited States [regarding is- 
suance of citizenship certitlcates to seamen]. Ap- 
proved October 9, 1940. (Public, No. 816, 76th Cong., 
3d sess.) 1 p. o^. 

An Act To restrict or regulate the delivery of checks 
drawn against funds (if the United Stales, or any agency 
or instrumenlality thereof, to addresses outside the 
United States, its Territories, and jiossessions, and for 
other purposes. Approved October 9, 1940. (Public, 
No. 828, 76th Cong., 3d sess.) 3 pp. 50. 

.\n Act To provide fi>r uniformity of allowances for 
tlie transiHjrtation of household goods of civilian offi- 
cers and employees wlien transferred from one official 
station t<> another for iH'rmanent duty. Approved 
October 10, 1940. (Public, No. 839, 76th Coug., 3d 
sess.) 1 p. 50. 

Joint Resolution Authorizing the participation of 
the United States in the celebration of a Pan Amer- 
ican Aviation Day, to be observed on December 17, of 
each year, the anniversary of the first successful 
flight of a heavier-thau-air machine. Approved Oc- 
tober 10, 1940. (PubUc Res. 105, 76th Cong., 3d sess.) 
1 p. 50. 

An Act To extend, for an additional year, the pro- 
visions of the Sugar Act of 1937 and the taxes with 
respect to sugar. Approved October 15, 1940. (Pub- 
lic, No. 860, 76th Cong., 3d sess.) 2 pp. 50. 

An Act To amend section 4551 of the Revised 
Statutes, as amended, and for other purposes [pro- 
viding for reports by masters of vessels of the em- 
ployment, discharge, or termination of services of 
every seaman not shipped or discharged before a 
sliipping commissioner]. Approved October 17, 1940. 
(Public, No. 869, 76th Cong., 3d sess. ) 1 p. 50. 



366 DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

An Act To require the registration of certain or- resentatives, 76tli Cong., 3(1 sess.. on H. R. 8497, H. R. 

ganlzations carrying on activities within the United &502, H. R. 10083, H. R. 10150, H. J. Res. nm, H. J. 

States, and for other purposes. Approved October 17, Res. 581, superseded by H. R. 10323, to provide a 

1940. (Public, No. 870, 76th Cong., 3d sess.) 4 pp. 5^. temporary haven from the dangers or effects of war 

European children : Hearings before the Immigration for European children under the age of sixteen, 

and Naturalization Committee of the House of Rep- August 8 and 9, 1940. 38 pp. 100. 



U. S. GOVERNMCNT PRtNTING OFFICE, 1940 



For sale by tlip Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.7!; a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH .THE APPROVAL OP THE DIEECTOK OF THE BDBEAD OF THE BDDliET 



J 



I 



^r-^ 



^ 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



.O \j JL^ 



LETIN 



NOVEMBER 2, 1940 
Vol. Ill: No. Jl -Publication I 5 22 

Qontents 

American Republics: Page 

Latin American Lecture Series: 

Message from the Secretary of State 369 

Address by the Under Secretary of Stale 369 

The PoHtical and Economic SoUdarity of the Americas: 

Address by Lam-ence Duggan 374 

Europe: 

AirpUinc travel in combat area 381 

Contributions for reUef in belligerent countries: 

List of registrants 382 

Tabulation of contributions 391 

Treaty Information: 
Sovereignty : 

Convention on the Provisional Administration of 
European Colonies and Possessions in the Amer- 
icas 402 

Nature protection and wildlife preservation: 

Convention on Natm-e Protection and Wildlife Preser- 
vation in the Western Hemisphere 402 

Postal: 

Universal Postal Convention of 1939 403 

Telecommunications : 

Regional Radio Convention of Central America, 
Panama, and the Canal Zone (Treaty Series No. 
949) 403 

[Over] 




U. S, SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUi.'ENT. 

NOV 21 1940 



Greenland: ^"^^ 

Suspension of tonnage duties for vessels of Greenland. . 403 

Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 403 

Regulations 404 

Legislation 404 

Publications 404 



LATIN AMERICAN LECTURE SERIES 



Message From the Secretary of State ' 



[Released to the press October 29] 

I welcouie the initiative of you wlio have un- 
dertaken to organize this Latin American Lec- 
ture Series, and I want to extend a greeting to 
all of those who are to take part in this series 
of discussions on inter-American problems. 

The happiest phase of the present interna- 
tional scene is the collaboration of the American 
republics. Thej' have undertaken cooperative 
endeavors more far-reaching than have ever 
been undertaken by independent countries in 
time of peace. The Pan American Union is the 
oldest functioning group of governments in the 
world. The American family of nations has 
achieved a system of peace more successful than 
any yet devised. 

Maintenance of this system depends not 
merely on diplomatic relations but also on the 
establishment of far-reaching economic arrange- 
ments and cultural contacts. These arrange- 
ments and their defense become possible only if 
there is fundamental understanding by each of 



the American nations of the life and problems 
of tlie others. 

The need of close inter-American cooperation 
in the interest of hemispheric defense is fore- 
most in our minds today. I am glad to know, 
therefore, that j^ou have planned a program of 
wide scope embracing consideration of economic 
and cultural as well as jjolitical aspects of the 
relations between the American states. The 
fortunes of this country are bound to those of 
the other American nations by many links, in- 
cluding those of geography, economics, history, 
culture, and tradition. A broad approach 
therefore to the subject which you have imder 
consideration will, I think, help you to under- 
stand and to appreciate more fully the sound 
basis which exists for the maintenance in this 
hemisphere of a community of nations in which 
the principles of democracy and liberty may be 
preserved and strengthened as the only prin- 
ciples on which lasting peace and international 
relations can ultimately be established. 



Address by the Under Secretary of State ^ 

THE IMPORTANCE OF LATIN AMERICA TO THE UNITED STATES 



[Beleased to the press October 29) 

May I at the outset say to you with very real 
sincerity how greatly I appreciate tlie privilege 

' Message to the Latin American Lecture Series pro- 
gram October 29, 1940. The lecture series is to be lu-kl 
at the Shoreham Hotel, Washington, on six consecutive 
Tuesdays, beginning October 29, 1940. 



you have afforded me of addressing you today 
and of thus initiating the series of Latin Ameri- 
can lectures undertaken by this most important 
and representative organization. I can conceive 

' Delivered at the opening lecture of the Latin Ameri- 
can Lecture Series program, Shoreham Hotel, Washing- 
ton, October 29, 1940. 

369 



370 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



of no more highly useful task than that which 
you have set for yourselves. There has never 
before been a time in the history of the Ameri- 
can republics when it was more imperative that 
the peoples of all of the American republics 
should know each other better, should appreciate 
each other better, and should have the fullest 
comprehension of their respective political, cul- 
tural, and economic lives. 

I admit, however, that I am somewhat puz- 
zled to know how best to address myself to the 
topic assigned to me, "The Importance of Latin 
America to the United States". In all frank- 
ness, it has seemed to me that during these re- 
cent years that importance had come to be so 
fuUy realized as to be axiomatic. I am confi- 
dent that the mutual interdependence of the 
American republics has happily become a fact 
which is recognized as basic in the national poli- 
cies of all of the American peoples, and I feel, 
therefore, that it would hardly be necessary for 
me to have to persuade you of the importance 
to the people of the United States — from the 
as^Dect of national defense, of policy, culture, 
commerce, and of finance — of the loyal friend- 
ship and cooperation of our American neighbors 
to the south. 

Consequently, I would prefer to be permitted 
the opportunity this morning of stressing more 
particularly certain phases of our inter-Ameri- 
can relationships, and to dwell upon some of the 
developments in those relationships which have 
occurred during these recent years. 

For one thing, I think that to a veiy great 
degree the people of the United States are 
beginning to learn a great deal about the in- 
dividuality of their neighbors. They are, for- 
tunately, beginning to get the idea that Latin 
America is a term that means very much more 
today than the fact that it refers to American 
republics whose inhabitants are predominantly 
of Spanish or Portuguese origin. They have 
come to learn that an Argentine, a Brazilian, 
a Chilean, or a Peruvian, a Mexican, and a 
Cuban, are just as much the matured and indi- 
vidual product of the national genius and 
heritage of their I'espective countries as is a 
citizen of the United States. 



And more than that, our people are beginning 
to remember that French, Spanish, and Portu- 
guese names are numbered among the illustrious 
names of our own early days as an independent 
nation. Wliat is more, they are learning that in 
the national scrolls of honor in the other Ameri- 
can republics there are found standing very high 
in the list such names as O'Higgins, Brown, 
Rawson, Cochrane, and Sai'sfield. 

In other words, we are beginning to see more 
clearly a significant truth — namely, that all of 
the peoples of the 21 independent nations of the 
New World have had their being in very much 
the same kind of crucible, and what is more im- 
portant yet, that they have achieved their in- 
dividual national destiny through similar sacri- 
fices and through the exercise of the same degree 
of human effort, courage, and determination. 

What perhaps we here in this country do 
not yet fully grasp, however, is that, during 
these latter years when there has grown up the 
concept of a man controlling a state, and deter- 
mining for millions of human beings under its 
jurisdiction what they were to do, what they 
were to say, what they were to think, and how 
they were to worship — if they were to be per- 
mitted to worship at all — the peoples of all of 
the American republics have been bound to- 
gether as never before in their determination 
that no ideology, no concept of government, 
which implied the obliteration of the individual 
spirit and soul and the destruction of all human 
rights as we in this hemisphere have enjoyed 
them for a century and a half, would be tol- 
erated in the life of our New World. 

Both in the cultural and the political life of 
the American republics from their colonial 
days, the struggle of the individual against op- 
pression, against tyranny, against any form of 
inhuman compulsion has always been out- 
standing. 

Let me be very blunt. Purely national dic- 
tatorships have existed from time to time in the 
histories of the other American nations, but at 
no time have the citizens of those nations ac- 
quiesced in, or supported, the theory that such 
dictatorships could be more than a passing phase 
in the course of their history, nor would they 



NOVEMBER 



1040 



371 



ever have tolerated such a form of control im- 
posed from without. In other words, the spirit 
of democracy, in the truest sense of the word, 
has always been latent throufrhout our 
continent, even though at times, and in diverse 
regions, it may have been temporarily obscured. 
At the present moment I am confident that 
our neifihbors see just as clearly as we do that 
what is threatened from beyond the seas is a new 
form of tyranny, a new moans of providinii for 
the asphyxiation of the individual, which at this 
very moment endangers all of the splendid 
achievements of human progress in the New 
World gained since the moment of our birth as 
independent peoples. They realize as do we 
that if these forces gain their ends through 
world conquest, human liberty as we have en- 
joyed it will be utterly destroyed. 

The past eight years of common endeavor on 
the part of all of the American republics to up- 
root the causes of misunderstanding which had 
existed between them, to allay the suspicions and 
jealousies which had arisen, and to attain that 
goal which they have now fortunately achieved 
of becoming equal partners in a friendly part- 
nership, liave played a powerful part in the 
creation of inter-American unity. But I am 
sure that an even greater driving force towards 
the achievement of this unity has been the un- 
shakable determination on the part of every one 
of us that into the confines of the Western Hem- 
isphere the forces of totalitarianism, of au- 
tarchy, of blind and brute force, shall not pass. 
However great the need for it, in the interest 
of every one of the American nations, such unity 
could never have been possible but for the reali- 
zation throughout the hemisphere that the 
United States was determined by deed, as well 
as by word, to respect, as equal to its own, the 
sovereignty of every one of the other American 
republics, and to regard tlieir sovereign rights 
as inviolate. But the confidence whiih the 
other American republics feel in the present 
government of the United States is not a con- 
fidence which is unshakable, nor one which a 
change of policy on the part of this Government 
could not immediately destroy. 
A few days ago a distinguished citizen of one 



of the other American nations, a scholar whose 
name is i-espected throughout the length and 
breadth of the continent, sent me spontaneously 
an appreciation of the policy which this admin- 
istration has pursued in its relations with the 
other American republics, which moved me very 
deeply. I want to quote this paragraph from it: 

"President Roosevelt in treating with equal 
respect the gi'eat and small peoples of the con- 
tinent, in being friendly and helpful towards 
their governments, in feeling the anxieties and 
problems of all America as if they were his own, 
has laid down the foundations of a new Amer- 
ican international. On that foundation a 
glorious future can be built. But let no one 
think that everything is finished and that by 
magic ai't that movement which has hardly 
begun is going to be .self-supporting. It may 
be said in all Latin America there is a piecari- 
ous balance which may prove to be unstable if 
future events are not propitious. It must be 
said with blunt frankness that the public 
opinion of almost all tlie countries of Latin 
America turns against the United States with 
astonishing facility." 

AVhat is set forth in that paragraph which I 
have just read is everlastingly true. The whole 
fabric of inter-American relations so vitally 
necessary, in the highest interests of every one 
of our peoples, will be rapidly destroyed unless 
we continue to practice the simple principles 
inherent in what is known as the good-neighbor 
policy. 

I had thought that there hatl passed long since 
the old bad days when any citizen of the United 
States would support the pursuit by the Gov- 
ernment of the United States of a policy of mili- 
tary intervention in the territory of our neigh- 
bors, of the sending of armies and navies to 
occupy their lands in order to overthrow their 
governments, and to set up the kind of govern- 
ments there that we felt we wanted. 

But in the heat of a national political cam- 
paign truth often will out. To my amazement 
the Associated Press reports that in Chicago 
on October 26 Gen. Robert E. Wood, Chairman 
of the Board of Sears Roebuck & Co., in the 



372 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



course of an iHldrcss in which he belittled Ihc 
danger to the United States of the present world 
situation nnd made llie baseless (•har<j;p that the 
course of your (iovernnient was involving this 
Nation in war, said he believed we should make 
it "clearly understood" that "no government in 
Mexico, Cential America, and the Caribbean 
South American ((niiid'ies would be tolerated 
iniless it is friendly to the United States and 
that, if necessary, we are prepared to use force 
to attain that object." 

I had hoped tliat that kind of doctrine was as 
dead as tlie dinosaui-, but tragically enough it 
seems still to persist in some high quarters of 
reaction. 

Where is tlio difference between the policy 
which General Wood recommends and the policy 
now being jiuisuod by the German and Italian 
dictators? Is not I lie attempt to justify the in- 
vasion of Greece which we are witnessing today 
based on the licniand of the invading nation that 
there exist in (Jreece a govennnent which it 
regards as friendly '( Are we, the United States, 
in a world where international law and morality 
are disintegrating and in which our security can 
never be fully assuied mitil international law 
and moi'ality are once more miiversally recog- 
niy.ed, to follow the course so marked out? Are 
we thus to destroy one of the strongest elements 
in our national defense which we today possess, 
tlie unswerving IVicn(lshi|), (rust, and coopera- 
tion of our neighbors of the New World, by re- 
verting to those ini(|uitous policies of the l>ast 
which for so many generations made any kind 
of friendship and understanding between the 
other American republics and the United States 
inipossil)le ? I am convinced that the over- 
whelming majority of the people of the United 
States would repuriiate through every influence 
at their conuuand a inversion to such policies. 

In recent weeks 1 have had the occasion to 
speak publicly, in some detail, of political and 
economic relations between the American re- 
publics and of the efforts which your Govern- 
ment has undei'taken to participate fully and 
effectively in co()])erating in these spheres of 
inter-American activity. The structure of inter- 
American understanding would not be complete, 



liowever, were the emphasis to be limited solely 
to cooperation through political and commercial 
(•hannels. In addition to these lines of endeavor 
is another wliicli is somewhat less tangible but 
perhaps more personal and more sensitive — the 
exchange of cidtural and spiritual values which 
aie a nec^essary concomitant to the other forms 
of relations which I have mentioned. 

The concept of the good neighbor envisages 
an individual understanding and appreciation 
which goes much beyond the formal relations of 
government to government or of trader to 
tiader. Economic and political relations must 
be buttressed by a more conscious and intense 
feeling on our part for the human values in- 
volved — the emotions, sentiments, sense of 
beauty, and creative genius of the peoples of 
the other American republics. This aspect of 
our interest in the nations of South and Central 
America is much more difficult to define and to 
delimit. Its implications involve not only the 
governments, but the mass of our i)opulation, 
since every individual citizen, who normally 
may feel that he has little or no place in the 
inti'icate workings of international politics and 
business, can contribute in some practical way 
to this broader cultural understanding. 

During the past few years, as cultural rela- 
tions have assumed a more prominent place in 
our thinking, your Government has consistently 
em])hasized the idea that in this program a high 
degree of reciprocity must be developed. It is 
not enough that we place our own resources at 
the disposal of the other American republics. 
It is equally important that we open our minds 
and spirits to the impact of cultural influences 
from these countries. 

In both the United States and the other re- 
l)ublics of this hemisphere is to be found the 
same ceaseless pursuit of a distinctly national 
culture. In a real sense the United States par- 
takes of the newness, the fluidity, and the flex- 
ibility of the other young nations of the hem- 
isphere. I believe that in this common search 
for adequate expression we have a common bond 
with the other republics which is of extreme im- 
l)ortance in working out our common destiny. 



no\'emim;i; 2, 194 



373 



The spiritual potentialities of the other Amer- 
ican peoples are extraordinary. In these times 
of stress it is particularly desirable that we tap 
the resources which our neighbors offer us. For- 
tunately the importance of Ibero- American cul- 
ture to the United States has already impressed 
itself on the opinion of this country. Prior to 
1918 it was dillicult to find institutions of 
higher learning in this country which were de- 
voting time, thought, and energy to the diffusion 
of a knowledge of the civilization of the other 
American republics. Ignorance was matched 
by indifference to the need for a more adequate 
examinalion of the essentials of Iberic culture. 
After two decades there are few large universi- 
ties or colleges which do not offer an oppor- 
tunity for acquaintance with the peoples of 
America. In many of our secondary schools 
the same spirit has made itself manifest, to the 
end that Hispanic-American and Portuguese- 
American letters, art, history, and languages 
have attained a recognition which bids well to 
becoming a permanent part of our educational 
order. 

In art, music, literature, and in the sciences, 
the other American republics have much about 
which we may pr<>lital)ly learn. A modest 
beginning has already been achieved in recent 
art exhibits in this country of the works of 
eminent Mexican, Argentine, and Brazilian 
painters. The remarkable nnisical culture of 
contemporary Brazil and Cuba has begun to 
win a place for itself in this country. In like 
manner we are becoming increasingly cognizant 
of the place of the new literature of these 
countries, much of it the outgrowth of social 
and ethnic conditions, the understanding of 
which is so necessary to cultural understanding. 

It is encouraging to note that throughout this 
country private organizations of every kind 
are devoting attention and thought to the im- 
portance of the other American republics to the 
United States. The Government is fully aware 
of the necessity for active and constant collab- 



oration with such agencies in the wider dissem- 
ination of a knowledge of this culture among our 
people. Numerous government agencies are 
engaged in this field. Initial steps have been 
taken to encourage tiavel to these countries of 
American professors, students, and researchers. 
Government aid has been extended to make pos- 
sible residence in these countries of those who 
are desirous of investigating more fully cer- 
tain jihases of their cultural life. Under the 
Convention for the Promotion of Cultural Re- 
lations, signed at Buenos Aires in 1936, several 
American graduate students are now in South 
America and a number of American professors 
are serving in the educational institutions of 
those countries. Tliro\igh travel grants, the 
(Jovernment has sought to stinmlate still fur- 
ther the travel to these republics of outstanding 
men and women from this coimtry. In the field 
of books and libraries, art, nuisic, and the cin- 
ema, every effort is being made to permit our 
l)eo])le to have first-hand and authentic infor- 
mation regarding the scope and character of the 
civilization of the other American republics. 

And so, as the months and years pass, I be- 
lieve that we shall see as great an advance to- 
wards understanding of our respective cultural 
lives by all of the American jieoples as that 
advance which will be made in other more ma- 
terial forms of cooperation. 

Tliere may, after all, be some truth in the old 
adage that out of every evil tliere nuist come 
some good. If the grave danger with which the 
Western Hemisphere is confronted has brought 
all of our several nations closer together and 
has made us all realize the need for a real iden- 
tity of policy and of purpose, the American 
republics will have derived one great and prac- 
tical advantage from this crisis ip world history. 
In our unity we shall find increasing strength, 
strength to defend not only our independence 
and our homes, but strength to defend the ideals 
which all of us in the New World have come to 
hold more dear than life itself. 



374 DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

THE POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC SOLIDARITY OF THE AMERICAS 

Address by Laurence Duggan ^ 



[Released to the press November 2] 

A decade ago, if you had been told that within 
a few years the 21 independent republics of this 
hemisphere would have agreed that a threat to 
the peace, security, or territorial integrity of 
any one of them was a threat to all and that to 
repel this threat they would cooperate together, 
you would probably have branded this person 
as a confused and impractical visionary or an 
irresponsible scaremonger — a ^asionary, because 
the history of intervention on the jDart of the 
United States and the territorial conflicts be- 
tween pairs of countries had made impossible 
agreement on any platform of hemisphere 
solidarity; a scaremonger, because the skies 
were clear of trouble, although from time to 
time a cloud, perhaps no bigger than a man's 
hand, appeared on the horizon. 

During the kaleidoscopic developments of the 
last few months, did you ever stop a moment to 
consider what the predicament of the United 
States would be if, instead of friendship with 
our southern neighbors, we had their suspicion 
or hostility. 

Only a few days ago, the Secretary of State in 
a public address said that only once before in 
our national existence has as grave a danger 
from without threatened the Nation. This dan- 
ger would be more acute by manyfold if our 
relations with the other American countries 
were as deplorable today as they were 10 years 
ago. Happily they are on a more friendly basis 
than at any time since the days when Henry 
Clay was making eloquent speeches in the House 
of Representatives pleading for the recognition 
of the independence of the republics which, 
after heroic efforts reminiscent of our own Revo- 
lution, had thrown off Spanish control. 

It is not pertinent to the subject of this meet- 
ing to discuss how hemisphere solidarity came 

' Delivered at a luncheon of the Foreign Policy Asso- 
ciation, New York City, November 2, 1040. Mr. Duggan 
is Adviser on Political Relations, Department of State. 



to pass. It was the result of the far-sighted- 
ness and patient efforts of many people in each 
one of the 21 countries. But, before entering 
upon a discussion of what it is and how it 
operates, it might be in order to point out that 
this solidarity could be lost overnight, if the 
United States were to revert to the policy of 
the "big stick", "dollar diplomacy", and inter- 
vention ; in other words, if we again undertook 
to dictate to the other American countries how 
they should run their own affairs. This would 
mean the end of the good-neighbor policy be- 
cause that policy is based upon the recognition 
that each of the 21 coimtries is an equal part- 
ner entitled to full respect in the American 
community of nations. To fortify their de- 
termination in this regard, the 21 countries have 
engaged never to intervene directly or indi- 
rectly in the internal or external affairs of any 
of the other countries. This country has 
scrupulously respected this commitment in small 
as well as large ways. It has modified prior 
existing treaties in order to bring them into 
conformity. It has hewed to the non-inter- 
vention line in all of its actions. I make par- 
ticular mention of this because intervention and 
hemisphere solidarity are incompatible. If 
the people of this country prize the friendship 
of the other American peoples, then their Gov- 
ernment must base its relations on recognition 
of the equality and inviolability of the sover- 
eignty of each of the 21 republics. 

Let us consider first the political aspects of 
hemisphere solidarity. For machinery, there 
exists the consultative procedure developed at 
the successive Buenos Aires and Lima confer- 
ences. The American republics have under- 
taken to consult with one another whenever the 
peace or security of the Americas is threatened 
either from within or without. 

At Lima it was agreed that a "threat" to the 
peace included threats of all kinds, not those 
merely of a military character; that consulta- 
tions might be initiated by any country; and 



NOVEMBER 2, 1940 



375 



that the consultations wei'e to be attended by 
foreign ministers or their representatives. 

This machinery has been thought by some in- 
adequate and cumbersome. They have urged a 
more precise definition of tlie conditions under 
■which meetings should be called, of the proce- 
dure of the meetings, and of the commitments 
to be entered into under this or that contingency. 
They have urged an international covenant, 
spelled out to the last detail. It is perhaps 
sufficient to observe that the pi-act icability and 
efficiency of the present arrangement have al- 
ready been proved. Two meetings of foreign 
ministers have been held. The fii'st was con- 
vened at Panama within tliree weeks after the 
outbreak of the war in Europe. The second 
was held at Habana witliin a short time after 
the rapid developments in Europe lield forth 
the possibility of a transfer in sovereignty or 
control of certain European possessions in this 
hemisphere. Botii of these meetings achieved 
the purposes for whicli they were called. In the 
face of emergenc}- conditions, the 21 countries 
met, worked, and agreed upon several decisions 
and procedures of the first importance. This 
demonstrates tliat the consultative machinen* 
corresponds to necessities and realities. It hns 
worked, and worked well, althougli it doubt- 
lessly will be improved upon bit by bit as ex- 
perience points to the desirability of changes. 

At both the Panama and the Habana meetings, 
it was the unanimous determination of all the 
countries to prevent, bj^ any overseas power, 
interference in their own affairs or any attempt 
to dominate by force, by economic duress, or by 
any other means any portion of the New World. 

Two manifestations of this determination 
miglit be mentioned. 

It is well known that certain non-American 
powers have been endeavoring openly and cov- 
ertly to subvert the internal institutions of the 
coimtries of this hemisphere. Through deceit, 
fraud, and guile, through threats and intimida- 
tion, they have relentlessly tried to upset exist- 
ing political and social institutions in order to 
replace them with new ones under their own 
domination. 

Recognizing that this was a danger to all 
countries equally, the American countries agreed 

273249 — 40 2 



at Habana that they would fully cooperate with 
one another within the limits of their respective 
capacities and alwaj's with complete respect for 
their individual liberty of decision. They have 
undertaken the fullest exchange of information 
with regard to such activities, so that the pattern 
uncovered in one country becomes known to all 
the othei-s to aid them in unmasking and com- 
bating these alien efforts. 

Of equal importance to the future security of 
the New World was the action taken with re- 
spect to the possessions in this hemisphere of 
non-American powers. AVith the occupation of 
the Netherlands and France, the possibility that 
the possessions of these countries in the Amer- 
icas might be used as bases for activities of 
all kinds again.st this hemisphere had to be con- 
sidered. Transfer of sovereignty would not 
necessarily have been involved. Control might 
have passed into other hands even though nomi- 
nal sovereignty rested with the original owners. 
To prevent these possessions' serving as a focus 
for the extension of totalitarian ideas and ac- 
tivities, the American countries in the incredibly 
short space of 10 days agreed upon a detailed ar- 
rangement for the temporary occupation and 
administration of the possessions in question. 
This knotty problem presented a real test of 
hemisphere solidarity. The Americas rose to 
the occasion in unanimous agreement on a very 
practical and workable arrangement under 
which action by them at a moment's notice is 
possible. No more stirring or convincing ex- 
ample of collaboration for the mutual benefit 
of all could possibly have been given than the 
agreement at Habana on this question. 

Let us now turn to the economic aspects of 
hemisphere defense and solidarity. At every 
one of the inter- American meetings beginning 
with Montevideo in 1933, the American repub- 
lics have stated their objectives to be the im- 
provement of their standard of life through the 
expansion of international commerce, and 
tlirough the development of their internal 
resources. 

This objective may be discussed under two 
headings, from the long-range point of view 
and from the standpoint of the problems arising 



376 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



out of the dislocation of international trade 
on account of the war. 

Let us take up the long-range aspect of this 
question first. As a very important step to- 
ward the restoration and expansion of inter- 
national commerce, the Executive was given 
authority by the Congress to enter into recip- 
rocal trade agreements. The purpose here was 
the revival of international trade, which had 
been drastically curtailed as a result of the 
world-wide depression. The method was the 
reduction of unreasonable trade barriers and 
the general reestablishment of the rule of 
equality of commercial treatment. In the six 
years since this program was initiated, 11 agree- 
ments have been entered into with the other 
American republics. That these agreements 
have contributed to the expansion of our for- 
eign commerce is evidenced by the fact that 
our trade has increased with the countries with 
which we had agreements more than with those 
with which, for one reason or another, it has not 
yet been possible to conclude agreements. The 
authority to conclude trade agreements was ex- 
tended at this session of Congress for another 
three years. Although the disturbed world con- 
ditions introduce new complications, neverthe- 
less it is hoped that during the coming years it 
will be possible to negotiate further agreements 
with the other American countries and perhaps 
to revise and extend some of those already 
concluded. 

Equally important to the expansion of inter- 
national trade between the Americas is the di- 
versification of exports so that the economy of 
many, if not most, of the American republics 
will no longer have to rely upon a small number 
of exports highly sensitive to world develop- 
ments. The experience of the world depression 
has demonstrated that no country is truly inde- 
pendent when its economic life is almost ex- 
clusively dependent upon events or decisions 
which take place in other continents many 
thousands of miles away and in the determina- 
tion of which it has no voice. An export econ- 
omy, particularly when it is confined to one or 
two products, is extremely jserilous for the jDro- 
ducing countries, as they are never able to count 



upon a continuous and steady consumption of 
their production. 

The soil and climate and other natural con- 
ditions are excellent for the production in the 
other American republics of raw materials 
which we have heretofore been purchasing al- 
most exclusively from other more distant parts 
of the world. Rubber is an outstanding exam- 
])le of this type of commodity. Forty years 
ago practically the entire world's supply came 
fioni the Amazon Basin. Rubber seedlings 
wei'e smuggled out of Brazil to the Far East, 
and plantation rubber soon replaced the wild 
rubber of Brazil. Just as the original habitat 
of rubber was the Amazon Basin, so there is 
no reason why that area again should not be- 
come a great source of rubber. It has been 
objected that rubber in this hemisphere can not 
be produced as cheaply as in the Far East on 
account of the very low cost of labor in the 
Netherlands East Indies and Malasia. Cer- 
tainly our inter-American objective of an in- 
crease in the standard of living would not be 
attained by payment of wages comparable with 
those paid in the Far East. Living standards, 
already too low in some localities, would be 
lowered still further. The solution to this 
problem may rest in the development of new 
high-yielding strains of rubber. The experi- 
ments which have been carried on for many 
years, not on one acre, but on thousands of 
acres of trees in Brazil, in Panama, and in 
Costa Rica, show that new strains have been 
perfected in this hemisphere, which on the aver- 
age yield more than three times as much as the 
trees in the Far East. 

This high yield should more than offset the 
low cost of plantation labor in the Far East 
and make possible economic rubber production 
in the Americas. In fact we may anticipate a 
considerable reduction in the cost of rubber to 
the United States consumers as this develop- 
ment proceeds. The price of rubber, largely 
because of the controls exercised by the rubber 
cartel, has tended to be maintained at the level 
of about 20 cents a pound. Experts of the De- 
partment of Agriculture feel that it is quite 
practicable to grow rubber in the American re- 



NO\'EMBEK 2, 1940 



377 



publics, using the new high-yielding strains and 
with modern production tecliniques, at a cost 
of less than 10 cents per pound. At a price of 
10 cents per pound, 130 million dollars would 
have been saved the American importers of 
rubber during the past year. It is clear, there- 
fore, that there exist great possibilities for a 
great development of rubber production in this 
hemisphere of benefit both to producers in the 
other American republics and to consumers in 
the United States. Important areas of Central 
America, Panama, and Colombia have been 
found to be well suited to rubber production. 
Furthermore, the Amazon Basin might again 
become a great rubber-producing area. Thou- 
sands now making a scant living could be given 
steady employment at decent wages. The 
President of Brazil, with this among other pos- 
sibilities in mind, has recently suggested a con- 
ference of all of the Amazon countries to 
consider the utilization and development of the 
resources in that vast area. 

Another strategically important product 
which can be grown in this liemisphere and thus 
supplant a supply which today comes mainly 
from the Far East is abaca, or manila hemp. 
The United States Navy uses the production 
from about 75,000 acres annually. Abaca is 
unusually valuable because the fiber is more 
resistant to salt water than any other in com- 
mon usage. There are a great many abandoned 
banana areas which could be utilized for its 
production, and 2.000 acres of abaca are already 
under cultivation in Central America. 

Another important product for which there 
is a ready market in the United States and other 
nations is quinine, which, although originally 
produced mainly in the Andean region, is now 
supplied almost entirely from the Orient, under 
the control of a monopoly which sells it at a 
price far above what millions of persons can 
afford in malarial areas of the tropics of this 
hemisphere. The Department of Agriculture 
in its experiment station in Mayaguez, Puerto 
Rico, has carried out considerable research on 
quinine production during the last six years and 
has developed improved methods of producing 
high yields, not only of the cinchona bark, but 
of high percentages of the alkaloid. 



Common to the tropics are many types of 
the so-called "fish poison" or rotenone-bearing 
plants, which are extremely valuable for in- 
secticidal purposes. Entomologists are keenly 
interested in these plants because they offer a 
l)ossible solution to the spray residue problem 
presented by lead arsenate, particularly in the 
spraying of vegetables. Importations of these 
products have increased from two million 
pounds in 1936 to an estimated seven million 
])ounds valued at about one million dollars for 
tliis year — 1940. Since farmers and horticul- 
turists each year use in excess of 100 million 
dollars' worth of insecticides, there is an im- 
])ortant future market for rotenone-bearing 
plants. 

It has become clear, despite the market for 
these products, that it will be necessary first to 
gather together the scientific information as a 
preliminary to the development of these natural 
resources. Today, thanks to an appropriation 
by our Congress, the Department of Agricul- 
ture, in collaboration with similar departments 
in several countries, has four field parties in the 
other American republics studying the condi- 
tions and places where rubber may best be 
grown. Already preliminary surveys have been 
completed or are now under way covering 10 
of the other republics of this hemisphere, and 
additional surveys of rubber possibilities are 
contemplated in five of the remaining countries. 
In addition, the Department of Agriculture pro- 
poses to carry out investigations and geological 
studies in soils, climatic factors, disease condi- 
tions, et cetera, in areas where many other tropi- 
cal products flourish. Soon there will exist the 
scientific information for use by those who are 
interested in the development of these comple- 
mentary, non-competitive agricultural products 
which are so vitally important to the United 
States. 

There is likewise a demand in this country 
for a number of mineral products which either 
are not produced at all in this country or in in- 
sufficient quantities and which are present in 
large deposits in the other American coimtries. 
Mention might be made of manganese, tin, tung- 
sten, and chromium. For instance, with the 
exception of a few small domestic deposits of 



378 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



tin, this country is entirely dependent upon 
imports of tins vital product. Although the 
ore equivalent to approximately one third of 
our total consumption of fine tin is produced 
every year in Bolivia, heretofore Bolivian tin 
ore has gone to England for smelting and thence 
has been reexported to the United States. Bo- 
livian tin has crossed the Atlantic twice en route 
to the United States. 

For years the Bolivian Government has not 
been satisfied with this arrangement. It has 
wished to diversify not so much its production 
as its market outlets. An agi-eement has now 
been reached in principle between the Metals 
Reserve Co., a subsidiary of the Reconstruction 
Finance Corporation, and Bolivian producers, 
under guaranty of the Bolivian Government, by 
which this country will purchase Bolivian tin 
ore under contract for a period of five years for 
smelting in the United States. 

This type of operation, whether in the field 
of non-competitive agriculture or non-competi- 
tive mining, means an improvement in the stand- 
ard of living in the other American republics 
as a result of new jobs and better wages. It 
also means additional security for the United 
States through the obtaining of important raw 
materials vital to our industry from friends who 
will always assure us a continuous supply. 

Another way of bringing about an improve- 
ment in the economy of the other American 
countries is by the production of articles for in- 
ternal consumption. The economy of the future, 
if that economy is to be the reflection of the 
progress of which the New World is theoreti- 
cally capable, will represent in every quarter 
of this continent a high degree of diversified 
local production of manufactured articles. Sci- 
entific developments and technicological advan- 
tages today make it possible for every country 
to produce to the greater or lesser extent con- 
sumers' goods. It has been argued in certain 
quarters that this may result in a diminution 
of the volume of our export trade. It is per- 
haps suflRcient to state that the largest export 
trade of the United States has been with the 
countries most advanced industrially. Indus- 
trialization, carrying with it an increase in liv- 
ing standards, creates new wants and desires. 



An outstanding example of the practical 
working out of this policy of diversification is 
the arrangement recently concluded by the Bra- 
zilian Government and the Export-Import Bank 
for the creation of a steel industry in Brazil. 
If this steel industry will mean cheaper steel 
in Brazil and will help to develop Brazilian in- 
dustry, it will inevitably result in an improve- 
ment in living standards and an expanded mar- 
ket for American exports. This country is thus 
not only helping the people of Brazil by open- 
ing up new opportunities to them, but is help- 
ing itself in paving the way for an expanded 
volume of purchases by the 4.5 million Bra- 
zilians. 

Although the Brazilian steel proposition is 
an outstanding example, many other possibil- 
ities in agriculture and industry await only 
imagination, the investment of capital, and hard 
work. In order to provide a mechanism, which 
could take the initiative in fostering enterprises 
of mixed United States and local ownership and 
management, to develop such possibilities, the 
Inter-American Financial and Economic Ad- 
visory Committee established last June the 
Inter-iVmerican Development Commission, 
which is now functioning under the chairman- 
ship of Mr. Nelson A. Rockefeller and with pri- 
vate and public representation of the United 
States and the other American republics. The 
Development Commission has already arranged 
for a special commission of retail buyers who, 
headed by Mr. Oswald Knauth, will shortly 
leave for South America to investigate the pos- 
sibilities of establishing there small industries 
to supply the type of retail merchandise for- 
merly obtained in Central Europe. In addition, 
the Development Commission has actively been 
furthering the development of plants in Brazil 
to produce mandioca starch. The Development 
Commission has established subcommissions in 
Brazil, and several other countries to advise 
with it on the particular problems of the indi- 
vidual countries. Although the Development 
Commission has started in a rather modest way, 
it is rapidly expanding its activities and should 
be considered, I believe, a most important in- 
strument of inter- American economic coopera- 
tion, both for the long-run developmental 



NOVEMBER 2, 194 



379 



objectives and the immediate problems arising 
out of the war's dislocations. 

In this regard it seems fundamental in any 
new development of the resources of the other 
American republics that the countries and 
l^eoples concerned participate to a greater ex- 
tent in the future than they have in the past 
in the benefits resulting therefrom. The be- 
lief is too widespread and perhaps too true 
that exploitation of natural resources has meant 
only higher wages for a few, some increased 
taxes for the government, and the depletion of 
the resources at the end of their development. 
Just as in the field of inter- American govern- 
mental cooperation there has been developed the 
feeling of partnership, so among businessmen a 
similar arrangement, in both logic and practice, 
should be developed. Local capital should not 
only be given every opportunity but should be 
encouraged to participate in new enterprises. 
Citizens of the country where the enterprises 
are located should be on the board of directors. 

And may I say a word about the position 
of citizens of this country who participate in 
these new enterprises? These must not only 
be willing to share the opportunity for invest- 
ment and the responsibilities of management 
and administration, but they must be ready to 
throw their lot in with the future destinies of 
the countries where their enterprises are located. 
Absenteeism will not work, and it will be neces- 
sary, if these enterprises are to have their 
maximum benefit, for the participating citizens 
of this country to plan to go to the other Amer- 
ican countries with their families with the in- 
tent of staying there indefinitely. Only in this 
way will a real partnership effort be accom- 
plished and practical demonstration given of 
the intention of our country to work for the 
benefit of all. 

We have now discussed briefly the long-range 
economic objectives of inter-American coopera- 
tion. Let us now turn to the immediate prob- 
lems arising out of the dislocation of interna- 
tional trade on account of the war. Since Eu- 
rope has in normal times provided a market for 
more than 50 percent of the exports of the 
20 other American republics, the progressive 



spread of warfai'e in Europe, with its accom- 
panying blocking of markets, has had far-reach- 
ing repercussions on the exports, the exchange 
situation, and the internal economies of those 
nations. Some of these difficulties were antic- 
ipated at the outbreak of the war, and the First 
Meeting of Foreign Ministers at Panamd. 
shortly thereafter pro^nded for the creation of 
an Inter-American Financial and Economic 
Advisory Committee to proceed immediately 
to consider possible methods of alleviating the 
situation. This Committee, which has met con- 
tinuously at Washington since November 15, 
li)39, has undertaken a wide variety of studies 
and has recommended a number of important 
measures. In the rather short time that it has 
been in existence, it has come to be recognized 
as one of the most important intergovernmental 
advisory groups ever established. Recogniz- 
ing this, and in view of the increasing gravity 
of the international eccmomic situatitm, the Sec- 
ond Meeting of Foreign Ministers at Habana 
last July resolved to strengthen and expand the 
activities of the Committee in a broad program 
for the maintenance and improvement of the 
economic and social well-being of the peoples 
of the Western Hemisphere. 

With respect to those commodities which are 
of primar}' importance to the maintenance of 
the economic life of the hemis-phere. this pro- 
gram en^-isages measures for increasing their 
consumption and interchange among the Amer- 
ican republics, facilities for the temporary 
handling and orderly marketing of such sur- 
pluses as are not immediately marketable be- 
cause of the war's dislocations, and the devel- 
opment of appropriate commodity arrange- 
ments with a view to assuring equitable terms 
of trade for both producei's and consumers of 
the individual commodities concerned. 

Within this general framework numerous 
specific measures have been taken and institu- 
tions set up. After a very careful study and 
analysis over a period of six months by some 
of the outstanding financial experts of the 
Americas, the Inter- American Committee rec- 
ommended the establishment by the 21 govern- 
ments of an Inter-American Bank. Already 



380 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



nine of the republics, including the United 
States, have indicated their intention to par- 
ticipate in such an institution by signing the 
appropriate convention, and it is my belief 
that many more, if not all, of the nations will do 
so during the next six months or a year. 

The bank is designed to promote the fuller 
exploitation of the natural resources of the 
Americas, to intensify economic and financial 
relations among the American republics, and to 
mobilize for the solution of economic problems 
the best thought and experience in the Americas. 
Specifically, it is believed that the bank's prin- 
cipal importance will lie in investigating and 
facilitating rather long-term development proj- 
ects in the other American republics, and that a 
secondary activity of consequence will be the 
extension of shorter term facilities to the mone- 
tary authorities of this hemisphere to assist them 
in eliminating seasonal and temporary fluctua- 
tions in their exchanges. Its creation will fill 
a gap in that wide zone of economic and financial 
activity for which the existing machinery of 
inter-American cooperation has been inadequate. 
I should also like to point out that it is the 
clear intention of all concerned that the Inter- 
American Bank shall complement existing 
financial institutions rather than provide a sub- 
stitute for them. The bylaws of the proposed 
institution clearly carry out this intention. The 
safeguarding of the interests of individual na- 
tions is inherent in the entire plan and appears 
thi'oughout the drafting. No action may be 
taken by the bank which may affect any par- 
ticular nation until after that nation has been 
given an opportunity to object to, or to give its 
consent, approval or guaranty to the operation. 

The Inter-American Financial and Economic 
Advisory Committee has also been active in the 
field of the problems of specific commodities. 
Following the conclusion of the Third Pan 
American Coffee Conference in New York last 
summer, it established a special coffee subcom- 
mittee which last week completed the prepara- 
tion of an Inter- American Coffee Marketing 
Agreement. The Inter-American Committee 
has referred this agreement to the 15 interested 
governments for their approval, and it is ex- 



pected that their action will soon be taken. 
This coffee agreement represents the first broad 
attempt of the American nations producing and 
consuming an important product to get to- 
gether to work out a marketing arrangement in 
the best interests of both the producers and 
consumers. It represents an undertaking to 
avoid ruinous competition between 14 pro- 
ducers of a single commodity for markets 
sharply restricted by the European situation. 
It represents an endeavor to obtain for the 
coffee producer a reasonable and equitable re- 
turn, without prejudicing the interests of the 
consumer. It is an example of the type of co- 
operation on specific commodities which may be 
attained. 

In all of these discussions and studies the 
United States has played an active role, con- 
tributing technical advice and factual back- 
ground information prepared by the various 
agencies of the Government. It has also uti- 
lized its existing agencies, including especially 
the Export-Import Bank on the financial side, to 
enter into mutually advantageous arrangements 
with a number of American republics in con- 
nection with the development of particular in- 
dustries and by way of assistance to their 
central banks in monetary and foreign-exchange 
matters. The Congress has, moreover, recently 
expanded the operations of the Export-Import 
Bank, allocating an additional 500 million dol- 
lars "to assist in the development of the re- 
sources, the stabilizations of the economies, and 
the orderly marketing of the products of the 
countries of the Western Hemisphere". With 
this authority the United States is in a position 
to expand its cooperative efforts with other 
American nations in the fields of long-term 
development and of monetary and exchange 
matters, to participate in immediate joint action 
with such other nations to meet pressing trade 
situations, and to enter effectively into ar- 
rangements for the temporary handling of 
important commodities. 

I am confident that you share my belief that 
the governments of the 21 American republics 
have done their share to build firm foundations 
for the structure of inter- American unity and 



NOVEMBER 2, 19 40 



381 



solidarity. But governments can do only so 
much. They alone cannot complete the struc- 
ture. 

The people of this country as a result of the 
rapid changes in European politics during the 
last six months have indicated their desire for 
a strengthening of our relations with our 
southern neighbors. They must not expect that 
their Government alone can do this job. If 
you, the people of the United States, set a high 
value on the friendship of the other American 
countries, you must do your share toward bring- 
ing this about. In as much as there are prob- 
ably represented in this audience a very wide 
variety of professions and occupations, it would 
be fruitless to endeavor to explain what contri- 
bution each one could make. I would, how- 
ever, like to be permitted two observations. In 
the first place, real statesmanship on the part 
of our business and financial interests can help 
to ameliorate the economic diflSculties now be- 
setting every country in the Americas. There 
is a belief in many quarters throughout the 
hemisphere that our export interests are taking 
advantage of the temporary absence of com- 
petitors from the market to charge whatever the 
market will bear in order to reap a rich harvest. 
It should be our policy to fill the import needs 



of the other American countries at as low a 
price as possible. 

Again, there is a belief that our private 
financial institutions are failing to realize that 
moderate credit terms during these critical days 
will not only help the countries to which they 
are extended, but also, from the long-term point 
of view, the position of the banks which extend 
them. Wise policy would seem to indicate the 
desirabilitj^ of our banking interests' making 
credit available on as reasonable terms as 
possible. 

In the second place, it is as impossible to be 
friendly with a country that you do not know 
as with a person whom you do not know. If, 
therefore, you really believe in the solidarity 
of the Americas, you will undertake, if indeed 
you have not already done so, to learn the lan- 
guages of the countries and to familiarize 
yourself with their historical heritage and 
their cultural achievements. "When the peo- 
ple of this country know as nnich about the 
other countries of this hemisphere as they do 
of certain European countries, then we will 
have advanced a long way along tlie road to- 
ward real understaiuling. without wliich the 
structure of inter-American solidarity will 
never be complete. 



Europe 



AIRPLANE TRAVEL IN COMBAT AREA 



The following regulation has been co<lified 
under Title 22: Foreign Relations (Chapter I: 
Department of State; Subchapter C: Netitral- 
ity; Part 156: Travel), in accordance with the 
requirements of the Federal Register and the 
Code of Federal RegvJatioTis : 

Additional Regulations 

§ 156.7 Airplanes belonging to Pan American 
Airways, Incorporated, etc. Airplanes belong- 
ing to Pan American Airways, Incorporated, 
and American citizens, members of the crew or 
passengers, traveling thereon, when proceeding 



between Lisbon and African ports south of 30° 
north latitude, may henceforth proceed into and 
through that portion of the combat area defined 
by the President in his proclamation numbered 
2410, of June 11, 1940,* which is bounded as 
follows : 

Beginning at the intersection of the coast of 
Portugal with the meridian of 8°55' west 
longitude ; 

Thence due south to the parallel of 33"10' 
north latitude; 

' 5 F.R. 2209. 



382 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Thence due west to the meridian of 20° west 
longitude; 

Thence due north to the parallel of 37°05' 
north latitude; 

Thence due east to the coast of Portugal. 



(54 Stat. 7; 22 U.S.C, Supp. V, 245J-2; Proc. 
No. 2410, June 11, 1940) 

CoRDELL Hull, 

Secretary of Stute. 
October 28, 1940. 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 

List of Registrants 



[Released to the press October 28] 

The following persons and organizations are 
now registered with the Secretary of State, pur- 
suant to section 8 of the Neutrality Act of 1939, 
for the solicitation and collection of contribu- 
tions to be used in belligeivnt countries for med- 
ical aid and assistance or for food and clothing 
to relieve human suifering. The countries to 
which contributions are being sent are given in 
parentheses. 

"1. Polsko Narodowy Komitet w Aineryce, 1002 Pitts- 
ton Avenue, Scranton. Pa. (Poland) 

2. Save the Children Federation, Inc., One Madison 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (formerly International 
Save the Children Fund of America, Inc.) (Great 
Britain, Poland, Brlsium, and tlie Netherlands) 

3. Anthracite Relief Committee, 53-59 North Main 
Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. (Poland) 

4. Polish Union of the United States of North America, 
53-59 North Main Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
(Poland) 

5. Polish Relief Committee, 1550 East Canfield Avenue, 
Detroit, Mich. (Poland) 

6. Nowy Swiat Publishing Co., Inc., 380 Second Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. ( Poland ) 

7. Polish Relief Committee of Philadelphia and vicinity, 
3111 Richmond Street, Philadelphia, Pa. (Poland) 

"8. Walter Golanski and Edmund P. Krotkicwicz, co- 
partners of Polish Radio Programs Bureau, 11301 
Joseph Campau Avenue, Hamtramck, Mich. (Po- 
land) 

9. Polish Relief Fund, Hotel Plaza, Jersey City, N. J. 
(Poland) 

10. Commission for Polish Relief, Inc., 420 Lexington 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (formerly American 
Committee for Relief of Polish Non-combatant 
Women, Children, Refugees.) (Poland) 

11. New Jersey Broadcasting Corporation, 2866 Hud- 
son Boulevard, Jersey City, N. J. (Poland) 

12. American Federation for Polish Jews, Inc., 225 
West Thirty-fourth Street, New York, N. Y. (for- 



merly Federation of Polish Jews in America, Inc.) 
(Poland) 

» 13. Rekord Printing & Publishing Company, 603-605 
North Shamokin Street, Shamokin, Pa. (Poland) 

" 14. Central Council of Polish Organizations in Pitts- 
burgh, 3509 Butler Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. (Poland) 

15. American Women's Hospitals, 50 West Fiftieth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (France and Great Britain) 

" 16. American Committee for Civilian Relief in Po- 
land, 401 Broadway, New York, N. Y. (Poland) 

" 17. Polish Club of Washington. Stansbury Hall, 5832 
Georgia Avenue NW., Washington, D. C. (Poland) 

IS. American French War Relief, Inc., 744 Fifth Ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y. (formerly French and Ameri- 
can Association for the Relief of War Sufferers.) 
(France and Great Britain) 

° 19. Polish Emergency Council of Essex County, N. J., 
Room 619, 790 Broad Street, Newark, N. J. ( Poland) 

" 20. Central Committee of the United Polish Societies, 
Bridgeport, Conn., 405 Barnum Avenue, Bridgeport, 
Conn. (Poland) 

21. Associated Polish Societies' Relief Committee of 
Worcester, Mass., 15 Richland Street, Worcester, 
Mass. (Poland) 

22. Polish National Council of New York, 25 St. Mark's 
Place, New York, N. Y. (Poland and France) 

23. Polish Relief Committee of Boston, Room 303, 11 
Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. (Poland) 

"24. Central Citizens Committee, Room 3, Edwin Build- 
ing, 9701 Joseph Campau Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 
(Poland) 

25. Lackawanna County Committee for Polish Relief, 
1213 Prospect Avenue, Scranton, Pa. (Poland) 

26. Polish American Council, 1018 Noble Street. Chi- 
cago, 111. (formerly The Council of Polish Organi- 
zations in the United States of America, 1200 North 
Ashland Avenue, Chicago, 111.). (Poland) 

"27. James F. Hopkins, Inc., 65.59 Hamilton Avenue, 
Detroit, Mich. (Poland) 

28. Chester (Delaware Co., Pa.) Polish Relief Com- 
mittee, 2718 West Third Street, Chester, Pa. (Po- 
land and France) 



KOATMBER 2, 1940 



383 



29. Fedonited Council of Polish Societies of Graiul 
Riipids, Mich., in care of Sigmiind S. Zainierowski, 
Attorney, 908 G. R. Tni.st BiiildiiiK. Grand Rapids, 
Mich. (Poland) 

30. The Paryski P\iblishing Co., llo4 Nebraska Avenue, 
Toledo, Ohio. (Poland) 

"31. Modjpi^ka Educjitional League Welfare Club at 

The International Institute, 303 Condley Drive, 

Toledo, Ohio. (Poland) 
32. Schuylkill and Carbon Counties Relief Couuuittec 

for Poland, Spring and Line Streets, Frackville, Pa. 

(Poland) 
"33. Holy Rosary Polish R. Catholic Church, 6 Wall 

Street, Passaic, N. .1. (Poland) 
34. Association of Joint Poli-sh-American Societies of 

Chelsea, Mass., in care of St. Stanislaus Roman 

Catholic Rectory, 163 Chestnut Street, Chelsea, 

Mass. (Poland) 
"35. Club Aniical Frangais, International Center of the 

Y. W. C. A., 2431 East Grand Boulevard, Detroit, 

Mich. (France, Poland, and Great Britain) 
"36. Polish National Catholic of The Holy Saviour 

Church, 500 North Main SUvct. rnimi City. Conn. 

(Poland) 
37. Counnittee of M.rcy, Inc.. iiill Fonrlli Avenue, New 

York, N. Y. (France, Great Britain, Norway, 

Belgium, and the Netherlands) 
"38. Kuryer Publishing Company, 74" North Broad- 
way. Milwaukee, Wis. (Poland) 
" 39. Polish Falcons of America, First District, Inc., 

188 Grand Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. (Poland) 
40. Polish Relief Committee of Cambridge, Mass., 210 

Columbia Street. Cambridge, Mass. (Poland) 
"41. Poland War Sufferers Aid Committee, 6968 Broad- 
way, Cleveland, Ohio (formerly Polish Committee 

to Aid Poland's War Sufferers.) (Poland) 
"42. Polish Welfare Association, 1450 River Street, 

Hyde Park, Mass. (Poland) 
43. Poli.sh Relief Counnittee, 3809 Industrial Avenue, 

Flint, Mich. (Poland) 
"44. The Polish National Alliance of Brooklyn. United 

States of America, 142 Grand Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

(Poland) 
45. Polish Civic League of Mercer County, 822 Ohio 

Avenue, Trenton, N. J. (Poland) 
"46. Polish American Central Civic Committee of South 

Bend, Ind., 1101-07 Western Avenue, South Bend, 

Ind. (Poland) 

47. Toledo Committee for Relief of War Victims, 1116 
Nebraska Avenue, Toledo, Ohio. (Poland) 

48. Edmund Ty.szka, 11403 Joseph Campau Avenue, 
Hamtramok, Mich. (Poland) 

49. The Polish Naturalization Independent Club, 45 
Milbury Street, Worcester, Mass. (Poland) 

50. Polish Falcons Alliance of America, 97-99 South 
Eighteenth Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. (Poland) 



"51. Circle of Poles of St. Hedwig, Polish American 
Citizens' Committee, 17 Orange Street, New Brit.-iin, 
Conn. (Poland) 

52. Spanish Refugee Relief Campaign, 381 Fourth Ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y. (France) 

.53. Poli.sh United Societies of Holy Trinity Parish, 340 
High Street, Lowell, Mass. (Poland) 

54. American Friends of France, Inc., 300 Park Avenue, 
New York, K Y. (France) 

''55. American Committee for Aid to British Medical 
Societies, Empire State Building, New York, N. Y. 
(formerly American Committee for Aid to British 
Medical Society, 1660 Crotona Park East, New York, 
N. Y.). ((Jreat Britain) 

!j6. Associated Polish Societies Relief Committee of 
Webster, Mass., 51 Whitcomb Street, Webster, Mass. 
(Poland) 

57. Foster Parents' Plan for War Children, Inc., ."5 
West Forty-second Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 

58. LaFayette Preventorium, Inc., 254 Fourth Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. (Prance) 

59. United Fund for Refugee Children, Inc., 233 West 
Forty-second Street, New York, N. Y. (formerly Beth- 
Leehem, Inc.) (Poland, France, and England) 

liO. Poli.sh War Sufferers Relief Counnittee (Fourth 

Ward, Toledo, Ohio), 2929 Lagrange Street, Toledo, 

Ohio. (Poland) 
" 61. Central Spanish Committee for Relief of Refugees, 

647 Earle Building. Washington, D. C. (France) 
62. Polish Literary Guild of New Britain. Conn., care 

of Mrs. Helen E. Bloch. 5;!8 Kddy Glover Boulevard, 

New Britain, Conn. (Poland) 
6S. Polish Relief Fund Conunittee of Passaic and 

Bergen Counties, in care of Mr. Stanley J. Polack, 

145 Passaic Street, Passaic, N. J. (Poland) 

64. United Reading Appeal for Polish War Sufferers, 
1100 Sj)ruce Street, Reading, Pa. (Poland and 
England) 

65. International Committee of Young Men's Christian 
Associations, 347 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
(All belligerent countries) 

" 66. Modem Committee. Inc., 175 East Broadway, New 
York, N. Y. (Poland) 

67. Polish Welfare Council, 233 Broadway, Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. (Poland) 

68. Polish Relief Committee of Delaware, care of Mrs. 
Angela C. Turoczy, 302 Matthes Avenue, Elmhurst, 
Wilmington, Del. (Poland) 

69. Polish Women's Fund to Fatherland, 31 Basswood 
Street. Lawrence. Mass. (Poland) 

70. Polish Relief Fund, 164 Court Street, Middletown, 
Conn. (Poland) 

71. Polish Broadcasting Corporation, 260 East Cue 
Hundred and Sixty-first Street, New York, N. Y. 
(Poland) 

72. Polish Aid Fund Committee of Federation of Bliza- 



273249 — iO 



384 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



beth Polisl) Organizations, 111-115 First Street, Eliz- 
abetli, N. J. (Poland) 

73. Springfield and Vicinity Polish Relief Fund Com- 
mittee, 91 Charles Street, Springfield, Mass. 
(Poland) 

74. International Relief Association for Victims of 
Fascism, Room 310, 20 Vesey Street, New York, N. Y. 
(France, Great Britain, and Germany) 

" 75. Polish Medical Relief Fund of Mt. Desert Island, 
Maine, Bar Harbor, Maine. (I'oland) 

76. Polish Relief Committee of Brockton, Mass., 40 
Emerson Avenue, Brockton, Ma.ss. (Poland) 

"77. Polish Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Penn- 
sylvania, 2961 Richmond Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Poland) 

"78. The Catholic Leader, 480 Burritt Street, New 
Britain, Conn. (Poland) 

79. Relief Fund for Sufferers, 2514 Fiftieth Street, 
Kenosha, Wis. (Poland) 

80. Polski Komitet Ratunkowy (Polish Relief Fund), 
25 Miles Street, care of Peter Majka, Binghamton, 
N. Y. (Poland) 

" 81. Scott Park Mothers and Daughters Club, 712 De- 
troit Avenue, Toledo, Ohio. (Poland) 

"82. California State Committee for Polish Relief, 
10202 Washington Boulevard, Culver City, Calif. 
(Poland) 

83. Polish Relief Fund Committee of Milwaukee, care 
of Mr. J. P. Michalski, 703 W. Mitchell Street, Mil- 
waukee, Wis. (Poland) 

"S4. Ruth Stanley de Luze (Baroness de Luze), "Luth- 
any", Pleasantville Road, BriarclifC Manor, N. Y. 
(France) 

"85. Poli.sh Relief Committee of Gardner, Mass., 227 
Pine Street, Gardner, Mass. (Poland) 

86. Board of National Missions of the Presbyterian 
Church in the United States of America, 156 Fifth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain, France, 
and Germany) 

87. American Committee for Christian Refugees, Inc., 
287 Fourth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (formerly 
American Committee for Christian German Refu- 
gees.) (Germany and France) 

88. Nowiuy Publishing Apostolate, Inc., 1226 W. 
Mitchell Street, Milwaukee, Wis. (Poland) 

"89. Polish Relief Fund of Irvington, N. J., 415 Six- 
teenth Avenue, Irvington, N. J. (Poland) 

90. St. Stephens Polish Relief Fund of Perth Amboy, 
N. J., 490 State Street, Perth Amboy, N. J. (Poland) 

" 91. Polish Army Veterans Association of America, 
Inc., 56 St. Marks Place, New York, N. Y. (Poland) 

"92. Holy Cross Relief Fund Association of New 
Britain, Conn., Holy Cross Rectory, Biruta Street, 
New Britain, Conn. (Poland) 

" 93. United Polish Societies of Hartford, Conn., Polish 
National Home, 100 Governor Street, Hartford. Conn. 
(Poland) 



94. American Field Service, Room l."i31, 120 Broadway, 
New York, N. Y. (France, Great Britain, and 
British East Africa) 

05. Polish National Alliance of the United States of 
North America, 1514-20 West Division Street, Chi- 
cago, 111. (Poland) 

"96. Reverend .John Wieloch, 5 Church Street, Millers 
Fall, Mass. (Poland) 

" 97. Orrin S. Good, 1410 Old National Bank Building, 
Spokane, Wash. (Great Britain) 

98. United Polish Societies of Bristol, Conn., 462 North 
Main Street, Bristol, Conn. (Poland) 

09. Russian Children's Welfare Society, Inc., 51 East 
One Hundred and Twenty-first Street, New York, 
N. Y. (Germany, France, and Poland) 

100. The American Jewish Joint Distribution Commit- 
tee, Inc., 100 East Forty-second Street, New York, 
N. Y. (All belligerent countries) 

101. Polish Central Council of New Haven, St. Stanis- 
laus School Building, 9 Eld Street, New Haven, 
Conn. (Poland) 

102. Relief Agency for Polish War Sufferers, Polish 
National Home, Ives Street, Willimantic, Conn. 
(Poland) 

103. The Little House of Saint Pantaleon, 2201 De- 
lancey Street, Philadelpliia, Pa. (France and 
England) 

* 104. Connecticut Radio Bureau, 185 Sherman Avenue, 
Meriden, Conn. (Poland) 

105. Pulaski Civic League of Middlesex County, N. J., 
13 Miller Street, South River, N. J. ( Poland ) 

106. Humanitarian Work Committee, Polish National 
Home, 10 Hendrick Avenue, Glen Cove, N. Y. 
(Poland) 

" 107. Mrs. W. Forbes Morgan, 320 Park Avenue, New 

York, N. Y. (Poland) 
' 108. Association Franco-Americaine des Parrains et 

Marraines de Guerre des U. S..A., Raleigh Hotel, 

Washington, D. C. (France) 

109. Legion of Young Polish Women, 1263 North Pau- 
lina Street, Chicago, 111. (Poland) 

110. Poli.sh Relief Fund, 10 Main Street, Jewett City, 
Conn. (Poland) 

111. The Kindergarten Unit, Inc., 128 East Avenue, 
Norwalk, Conn. (France, Poland, Great Britain, 
India, Australia, and New Zealand) 

112. Le Secours Praneais, 745 Fifth Avenne, New York, 
N. Y. (formerly Le Paquet an Front). (France) 

"113. International Artists' Community Club, 701 Barr 
Building, Washington, D. C. (Poland) 

"114. The Federation of Polish Societies, 45 Furnace 
Street, Little Falls, N. Y. (Poland) 

"115. Polish Interorganization Council, 5090 Lonyo 
Avenue, Detroit, Mich. (Poland) 

"116. Mrs. Bradford Norman, Jr., in care of Mr. Brad- 
ford Norman, Jr., Commercial National Bank and 



NOVEMBER 2, 1940 



385 



Trust Compauy, 5G Wall Street, New York, N. Y. 
(France) 

117. Polish Relief of Carteret, N. J., 42 Hudson Street, 
Carteret, N. J. (Poland) 

118. Federation of French Veterans of the Great War, 
Inc., 610 Fifth Avenue, New Yorlv, N. Y. (France) 

119. Mrs. Paul Veriiier Fund, 199 Geary Street, City 
of Paris Dry Goods Stores Company, San Francisco, 
Calif. (France) 

120. Polish National Council of Montgomery County, 
54 Cornell Street, Amsterdam, N. Y. (Poland) 

121. Centrala, 1-3 Monroe Street, Passaic, N. J. (Po- 
land) 

122. Polish Relief Fund of Meriden, 9 West Main Street, 
Meriden, Conn. (Poland) 

123. United Charity Institutions of Jerusalem, 207 
East Broadway, New York, N. Y. (Palestine) 

"124. United Polish Societies of Innnaculate Conception 

Church, in care of Mr. Kleniens Markowski, 3G Hill 

Street, Southiugtou, Conn. (Poland) 
125. Allied Relief Fund, 57 William Street, New York, 

N. T. (formerly the French and British Relief 

Funds.) (United Kingdom, France, Belgium, the 

Netherlands, and Norway) 
126. Polish Welfare Association of the Archdiocese of 

Chicago, 203 North Wabash Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

(Poland) 

127. Polish Central Committee of New London, Conn., 
362 Main Street, New London, Conn. (Poland) 

128. The Emergency Aid of Penn.sylvania, Twentieth 
and Sansom Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. (Great 
Britain, France, Norway, Belgium, Luxemburg, and 
the Netherlands) 

129. United Poli.sh Roman Catholic Parish Societies 
of Greenpoint, Brooklyn, N. Y., St. Stanislaus Kostka 
Roman Catholic Church, 607 Humboldt Street, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. (Poland) 

130. East Chicago Citizens' Committee for Polish War 
Sufferers and Refugees, 4902 Indianapolis Boulevard, 
East Chicago, Ind. (Poland) 

ol31. Committee for the Relief of War Sufferers in 
Poland, l.")05 Cass Avenue, St. Ixniis, Mo. (formerly 
Citizens Committee for Relief of War Sufferers in 
Poland.) (Poland) 

132. United Polish Central Council of Connecticut, 
471 Park Avenue, Bridgeport, Conn. (Poland) 

133. French Committee for Relief in France, 12245 
Abington Avenue, Detroit, Mich. (France and Great 
Britain) 

134. Tolstoy Foundation. Inc., Room 54, 289 Fourth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (formerly Tolstoy Founda- 
tion for Russian Welfare and Culture.) (France, 
Poland, Czeclioslovakia, and England) 

135. Polish Relief Association, Town of North Hemp- 
stead, 120 Jericho Turnpike, Mineola, Long Island, 
N. Y. (Poland) 

136. American Society for Britisli Medical and Civil- 
ian Aid, Incorporated, 46 Cedar Street, New York, 



N. Y. (formerly American Society for British Medi- 
cal and Hospital Aid, Incorporated.) (Great Britain 
and France) 

137. United American Polish Organizations, South 
River, N. J., 13 Jackson Street, South River, N. J. 
(Poland) 

1.38. United Polish Organizations of Salem, Mass., care 
of airs. Sallie Augustynowicz, 5 Turner Street, 
Salem, Mass. (Poland) 

139. British War Relief Association of Northern Cali- 
fornia, 316-322 Shell Building, San Francisco, Calif. 
(Great Britain and France) 

140. Polish Relief Fund of Palmer, Mass., 20 Oak 
Street, Three Rivers, Mass. (Poland) 

141. Polish White Cross Club of West Utica, 1416 Mar- 
tin Street, Utica, N. Y. (Poland) 

142. Fund for the Relief of Scientists, Men of Let- 
ters and Artists of Moscow, in care of Eitingon Schild 
Co., Inc., 224 West Thirtieth Street, New York, N. Y. 
(France and Great Britain) 

143. St. Michael's Roman Catholic Parish, 75 Derby 
Avenue, Derby, Conn. (Poland) 

o 144. The Polish Relief Committee, 11 East Lexington 
Street, Baltimore, Md. (Poland) 

145. The Maryland Committee for the Relief of Po- 
land's War Victims, 11 East Lexington Street, Balti- 
more, Md. (Poland) 

140. I'ulaski Lt>agne of Queens County, Inc., 108-11 
Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, Queens County, N. Y. 
(Poland) 

147. Relief Committee of United Polish Societies, 142 
Cabot Street, Chicopee, Mass. (Poland) 

148. United Polish Societies of Los Angeles, 4200 Ava- 
lon Boulevard, Los Angeles, Calif. (Poland) 

149. Committee Representing Polish Organizations and 
Polish I'eople in Perry, N. Y., 20 Elm Street, Perry, 
N. Y. (Poland) 

150. The Friends of Israel Refugee Relief Committee, 
Inc., 710 Witherspoon Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Canada, France, and Great Britain) 

151. Nowe-Dworer Ladies Benovelent Association, Inc., 
care of Beatrice Stone, 203-05 Lafayette Street, New 
York, N. Y. (Poland) 

l."2. Lt's Anciens Combattants Fran(;als de la Grande 
Guerre, French Library, 414 Ma.son Street, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. (France) 

153. Polish Relief Fund, Echo Club, 341 Portage Road, 
Niagara Falls, N. Y. (Poland) 

1.'4. United Committee for French Relief, Inc., Peat, 
Marwick, Mitchell and Company, attention Mr. H. I. 
Jones, 70 Pine Street, New York, N. Y. (France and 
England) 

l."i5. Polish Civilian Relief Fund. St. Joseph's School 
Hall, Monroe Street, Passaic, N. J. (Poland) 

o l."i6. Polish Aid Association of the Sixth Congressional 
District, including Perham and Browerville, Minn., 
Little Fails, Minn. (Poland) 



386 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



157. Central Committee Knesseth Israel, 214 East 
Broadway, New York, N. Y. (Palestine) 

« 158. Polish Relief Committee of Nassau County, N. Y., 
450 Front Street, Hempstead, N. Y. (Poland) 

159. L'Union Alsacienne, Inc., 45 West Fifty-second 
Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 

laO. The American Fund for Breton Relief, Mr. John 
L. Swasey, Bankers Trust Company, 16 Wall Street, 
New York, N. Y. (France and England) 

161. Polish Relief Fund of Syracuse, N. Y., and vicinity, 
1411 West Genesee Street, Syracuse, N. Y. (Poland) 

162. Polish Relief Committee, 1680 Acushnet Avenue, 
New Bedford, Mass. (Poland) 

163. American Friends of Czecho.slovakia, Room 2213, 
8 West Fortieth Street, New York, N. Y. (Great 
Britain, France, and Bohemia and Moravia) 

" 1&4. The Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church. Little 
Falls, N. Y., Sacred Heart Rectory, Furnace Street, 
Little Falls, N. Y. (Poland) 

165. Golden Rule Foundation, 60 East Forty-second 
Street, New York, N. Y. (Poland and Palestine) 

166. United Polish Committees in Racine, Wis., 1809 
Howe Street, Racine, Wis. (Poland) 

" 167. Saint Adalbert's Polish Relief Association, Po- 
lish National Home, Thompsonville, Conn. (Poland) 

168. Cercle Frangais de Seattle, 308 Marion Street, 
Seattle, Wash. (France and Groat Britain) 

169. General Gustav Orlicz Dreszer Foundation for 
Aid to Polish Children, Kennedy-Warren, Washing- 
ton, D. C. (Poland) 

170. Polish Relief Connnittee of Holyoke, Mass., 200 
Main Street. Holyoke, Mass. (Poland) 

" 171. Ware Polish Relief Fund, Pnla.ski Street, Ware, 
Mass. (Poland) 

172. Milford, Conn., Polish Relief Fund Committee, 
61 Lafayette Street, JMilford, Conn. (Poland) 

173. Central Council of Polish Organizations, 103 West 
Miller Street, New Castle, Pa. (Great Britain, Po- 
land and France) 

"174. Polish Relief Committee, 138 Bernard Street, 
Rochester, N. Y. (Poland) 

175. Polish Relief Fund of Fall River, Mass., 872 Globe 
Street, Fall River, Mass. (Poland) 

176. American Auxiliary Committee de I'Union des 
Femmes de France, 56 East Sixty-eighth Street, New 
York, N. Y. (France and Great Britain) 

177. Massachusetts Relief Committee for Poland, 340 
Main Street, Worcester, Mass. (Poland) 

178. Southbridge Allied Committee for Relief in Po- 
land, 10 Old Sturbridge Road, Southbridge, Ma.ss. 
(Poland) 

179. American Friends Service Committee, 20 South 
Twelfth Street. Pliiladelpliia, Pa. (Great Britain, 
Poland, Germany, France, Norway, Belgium, and the 
Netherlands) 

"180. Refugies d'Alsace-Lorraine en Dordogne, 486 Cali- 
fornia Street, San Francisco, Calif. (France) 



"181. United Polish Societies of Manchester, 158 El- 
dridge Street, Manchester, Conn. (Poland) 

182. Polish Relief Committee of Jackson, Mich., 1425 
Joy Avenue, Jackson, Mich. (Poland) 

183. Share A Smoke Club, Inc., 504 Stewart Avenue, 
Ithaca, N. Y. (Great Britain, France, Norway, Bel- 
gium, and the Netherlands) 

184. Committee of French-American Wives, 18 East 
Forty-sixth Street, New York, N. Y. (France and 
Great Britain) 

185. Hadassah, Inc., 1860 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 
(Palestine) 

186. Federation of Franco-Belgian Clubs of Rhode 
Island, care of Mr. J. O. Oury, Post Office Box 950, 
Woonsocket, R. I. (France and England) 

187. Society Frangaise de St. Louis, Inc., care of Miss 
Irma Ponscarme, 5630 Pershing Avenue, St. Louis, 
Mo. (France) 

188. American-German Aid Society, 2206 West Twenty- 
first Street, Los Angeles, Calif. (Germany) 

189. French War Relief, Inc., 1209 Pershing Square 
Building, 448 South Hill Street, Los Angeles, Calif. 
( Fi'ance ) 

190. General TaufHieb Memorial Relief Committee for 
Prance, 265 Miramar Avenue, Santa Barbara, Calif. 
(Prance and Great Britain) 

101. Polish Business and Professional Men's Club, Inc., 
5252 South Broadway, Los Angeles, Calif. (Poland) 

192. League of Polish Societies of New Kensington, 
Arnold, and vicinit.v, 857 Kenneth Avenue, New Ken- 
sington, Pa. (Poland) 

193. British-American War Relief Association, in care 
of Dr. Ira L. Neill, Cobb Building, Seattle, Wash. 
(Great Britain) 

"194. The Fashion Group, Inc., 30 Rockefeller Plaza, 

New York, N. Y. (France) 
195. Sccours Franco-American — War Relief, 2555 

Woodward Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. (Great Britain) 
" 196. Mrs. Carroll Greenough, 1408 Thirty-first Street 

NW., Washington, D. C. (France) 
" 197. The United Polish Societies of Bronx County, 

70.5-09 Courtlandt Avenue, Bronx, New York, N. Y. 

(Poland) 

198. Connnittee for the Relief for Poland, care of Mr. 
Stephen F. Kluck, 916 Twentieth North, Seattle, 
Wa.sh. (Poland) 

199. PolLsh Women's Relief Committee, 149 East Sixty- 
seventh Street, New York, N. Y. (France, Poland 
and Germany) 

200. Mrs. Walter R. Tuckerman, Edgemoor, Bethesda, 
Md. (Great Britain) 

201. Fernanda Wauamaker Munn, 17 East Ninetieth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (Prance) 

202. Dor Kyffhaeuserbund, League of German War 
Veterans In U. S. A., 3827 North Thirteenth Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. (Poland, Germany, and Canada) 

203. Bethel Mission of Eastern Europe, 2316 West 



NOVEMBER 2, 19 4 



387 



Fifty-fourth Street, Minneapolis, Minn, (formerly 
Bethel Mission of Poland, Inc.) (Poland) 

204. Polish Relief Committee of the Polish National 
Home Association, 10 Coburn Street, Lowell, Mass. 
(Poland) 

205. A. Seymour Housliton, Jr., et at, 30 Broad Street, 
New Yorlj, N. Y. (France) 

206. The Benedict Bureau Unit, Inc., care of Mr. J. 
Henry Harper, 30 Broad Street, New Yorli, N. Y. 
(France) 

207. American Friends of the Daily Sketch War Relief 
Fund, 15 Broad Street, New York, N. Y. (Great 
Britain) 

208. British War Relief Society, Inc., 620 Fifth Avenue, 
New Y'ork, N. Y. (Great Britain, Newfoundland, and 
British East Africa) 

209. French War Veterans, 5722 Banner Street, Los 
Angeles, Calif. (France) 

210. North Side Polish Council, Relief Committee of 
Milwaukee, Wis., 2962 North Bremen Street, Mil- 
waukee, Wi.s. (Poland) 

211. Friends of Poland, 55.")8 South Fairfield Avenue, 
Chicago, III. (Poland) 

212. Tlie British War Relief Association of Southern 
California, Studio 43, AmlMssador Hotel, Los An- 
geles, Calif. (Great Britain) 

213. United Opoler Relief of New York, care of Joe 
Grossman, 7(K) Dawson Street, New York, N. Y. 
(Poland) 

214. American Field Ho.spital Corps, 610 Fifth Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. (formerly American Volunteer Ani- 
liulance Corps). (Francn^, Belgium, Holland, and 
England) 

"215. Mrs. Larz Anderson, 19 Congress Street, Boston, 
Mas.s. (France) 

216. The Catholic Student War Relief of Pax Romnna, 
Pax Romana Office, Catholic University of America, 
Washington, D. C. (Poland, France, Germany and 
Great Britain) 

217. Polish Relief Fund Committee, care of Mrs. K. 
Troy, 4531 i/i Avalon Boulevard, Los Angeles, Calif. 
(Poland) 

218. Polish Relief Committee, 30 Chandler Avenue, 
Taunton, Mass. (Poland) 

219. Relief Society for Jews lu Lublin, 1200 South 
Lacienega Boulevard, Los Angeles, Calif. (Poland) 

220. American Fund for Wounded in France, Inc., 72 
Pearl Street, Worcester, Mass. (France) 

221. Polish American Citizens Relief Fund Commit- 
tee, R. F. D. Box No. 42A. Shirley, Mass. (Poland) 

"222. Irvin McD. Garfield, 30 State Street, Boston, 
Mass. (Great Britain) 

223. Society of the Devotees of Jerusalem, Inc., 400 
East Houston Street, New York, N. Y. (Palestine) 

224. Association of Former Juniors in France of Smith 
College, care of Smith College Club, 34 East Fiftieth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 



225. The Friends of Normandy, 993 Park Avenue, New 

York, N. Y. (France) 
22G. Women's Allied War Relief Association of St. 

Louis, 21 Dartford Avenue, Clayton, Mo. (France 

and Great Britain) 

227. B.Tsque Delegation in the United States of America, 
30 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (France) 

228. Greater New Bedford British War Relief Corps, 
74 Penniman Street, Now Bedford, Mass. (Great 
Britain) 

229. Les Amitife F^minines do la France, care of 
Miss B. A. Weill, 31.'> East Sixty-eighth Street, New 
York, N. Y. (France and England) 

23lt. Bi.ahops' Committee for Polish Relief. 1312 Massa- 
chusetts Avenue, NW., Washington, D. C. (Poland) 

231. American and French Students' Correspondence 
Exchange, care of Prof. H. C. Olinger, School of 
Education, New York University, Washington 
Square, New York, N. Y. (France and England) 

2.32. Les Amis de la France il Puerto Rico, Ponce do 
Leon Avenue and Cuervillas Street, San Juan, P. R. 
(France) 

2;!3. English Speaking Union of the United States, 30 
Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. (Franco and 
Great Britain) 

234. Urgent Relief for France, care of Mrs. A. G. 
Pinckney, Riggs National Bank, 1.j03 Pennsylvania 
Avemie, Washington, D. C. (France and Great 
Britain^ 

2.33. Bundles for Britain, care of Mr. John Delafield, 
20 Exchange Place, Now York, N. Y. ( Great Biitaiu 
and dominions) 

236. American Fund for French Wounded, Inc., 256 
Beacon Street, Bo.ston, Mass. (France and England) 

237. Hebrew Christian Alliance of America, 3508 Og- 
den Avenue, Chicago, III. (Poland, Germany, and 
Great Britain) 

238. United Nowy Dworer Relief Committee, care of 
Mr. Louis Kirstein, 2528 Cruger Avenue, Bronx, 
New York, N. Y. (Poland) 

239. American Association for Assistance to French 
Artists, Inc., care of Mrs. David Randall-Maclver, 
535 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y. (France) 

240. Independent Kinsker Aid Association, care of 
Mr. Benj. W. Salzman, Secretary, 51 West Mosholu 
Parkway, New York, N. Y. (Poland) 

241. American McAll Association, 297 Fourth Avenue, 
New York. N. Y. (England) 

242. Lafayette Fund, care of Miss Susan W. Street, 
2.35 East Seventy-third Street, New York, N. Y. 
(France) 

243. The Grand Duke Vladimir Benevolent Fund Asso- 
ciation, 562 West One Hundred and Forty-fourth 
Street (Apartment 63), New York, N. Y. (France) 

244. United German Societies, Inc., 222 American Bank 
Building, Portland, Oreg. (Germany) 



388 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



"245. Mobile Surgical Unit, Inc., 29 East Sixty-ninth 
Street, New York, N. T. (formerly Emily Morris 
[Mrs. Lewis Spencer Morris]). (France) 

246. American Women's Unit for War Relief, Inc., in 
care of Comtesse Ae Janze, 888 Parl£ Avenue, New 
York, N. Y. (formerly American Unit for War Relief 
Association.) (France) 

247. Committee for Aid to Children of Mobilized Men 
of the XX" Arrondissement of Paris, in care of Ber- 
nard Douglas, 35 West Thirty-fourth Street, New 
York, N. Y. (France) 

248. Catholic Medical Mission Board, Inc., 8 West 
Seventeenth Street, New York, N. Y. (India, Au.s- 
tralia, Canada, New Zealand, and Union of South 
Africa) 

«249. Polish Young Men's Club, Danielson, Conn. 
(Poland) 

250. Fellowship of Reconciliation, 2929 Broadway, New 
York, N. Y. (France, England and possibly Ger- 
many) 

251. Sociedades Hispanas Confederadas, 59-61 Henry 
Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. (France) 

252. Polish American Associations of Middlesex 
County, N. J., St. Stanislaus Kostka Rectory, Sand- 
fleld Road, Sayreville, N. J. (Poland) 

253. Polish Aid Fund Committee of St. Casimir's 
Roman Catholic Church of the City of Albany, N. Y., 
care of Miss Valeria C. Sowek, 111 Central Avenue, 
Albany, N. Y. (Poland) 

"254. American Emergency Volunteer Ambulance 
Corps, Inc., 60 Wall Tower, New York, N. Y. (Great 
Britain and France) 

"255. Polish Roman Catholic Priests Union, Group No. 3, 
of New York Archdiocese, care of the Reverend Felix 
F. Burant, 101 East Seventh Street, New York, N. Y. 
(Poland and France) 

256. Caledonian Club of Idaho, 418 North Fifth Street, 
Boise, Idaho. (Scotland) 

257. Order of Scottish Clans, 150 Causeway Street, 
Boston, Mass. (Scotland) 

258. L'Atelier, Room 806, DeYoung Building, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. (France) 

259. Joint Committee of the United Scottish Clans of 
Greater New York and New Jersey, care of Mr. Alex 
McF. Malcolm, 1880 De Kalb Avenue, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. (Scotland) 

260. Mrs. Nancy Bartlett Laughlin, 139 East Sixty- 
sixth Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 

"261. Relief Coordination Service, 315 Lexington Ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y. (France) 

262. Committee for Relief in Allied Countries, Dum- 
barton Oaks, Georgetown, Washington, D. C. 
(France, Great Britain, Poland, Luxemburg, Belgium, 
the Netherlands, and Norway) 

"263. Children's Crusade for Children, care of Mr. Harry 
Scherman, Treasurer, 385 Madison Avenue, New 
York, N. Y. (France and Poland) 

264. French Relief Association, care of Mrs. Halbert 



White, President, 5431 Wyandotte Street, Kansas 
City, Mo. (France) 

265. La France Post American Legion, 610 Fifth Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. (France and Great Britain) 

266. American Committee for the Polish Ambulance 
Fund, in care of Dr. Peter F. Czwalinski, Wicker 
Park Medical Center, 1530 North Damen Avenue, 
Chicago, 111. (France) 

267. Polish-American Volunteer Ambulance Section 
(Pavas), Inc., 597 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
(France and England) 

268. American Women's Voluntary Services, 7 East 
Fifty-first Street, New York, N. Y. (England) 

269. Mennonite Central Committee, Akron, Pa. (Great 
Britain, Poland, Germany, and France) 

270. Grand Lodge Daughters of Scotia, 71 Cabot Street, 
Hartford, Conn. (Scotland) 

271. Kate R. Miller, 277 Park Avenue, Apartment 8-K, 
New York, N. Y. (France) 

"272. Spanish Committee Pro-Masonic Refugees, 95 
Roosevelt Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 

273. Association of Former Russian Naval Officers in 
America, 634 West One Hundred and Thirty-fifth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 

274. British American Comfort League, 2 Thompson 
Street, Quincy, Mass. (England) 

275. Paderewski Fund for Polish Relief, Inc., 37 East 
Thirty-sixth Street, New York, N. Y. (Poland) 

276. The Pawtucket and Blackstone Valley British Re- 
lief Society of Rhode Island, care of Mr. William 
Taylor, 230 West Forest Avenue, Pawtucket, R. I. 
(Great Britain) 

"277. Five for France, Box 267, Atlanta University, 
Atlanta, Ga. (France) 

278. Woman's Auxiliary Board of the Scots' Charitable 
Society, Inc., Post Office Box C, Waverly, Mass. 
(Scotland) 

279. Polish Inter-Organization "Centrala" of Water- 
bury, 87 Oak Street, Waterbury, Conn. (Poland) 

280. Central Committee for Polish Relief, 224 Security 
Bank Building, Toledo, Ohio. (Poland) 

" 281. Helena Rubenstein-Titus, 300 Park Avenue, New 
York, N. Y. (Poland) 

282. Foyers du Soldat, Savoy Plaza, New York, N. Y. 
(France) 

283. Mrs. Mark Baldwin, 25 Clarcmont Avenue, Apart- 
ment 5A, New York, N. Y. (France) 

284. American War Godmothers, 601 Clyde Street, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. (France) 

285. Fortra, Incorporated, Suite 312, 61 Broadway, 
New York, N. Y. (Germany and Poland) 

2S6. American Dental Ambulance Committee, care of 
Mr. Benjamin L. Barringer, 32 Broadway, New York, 
N. Y. (United Kingdom) 

287. Emergency Relief Committee for Kolbuszowa, 40 
East Seventh Street, New York, N. Y. (Poland) 

288. Polish Relief Committee of Columbia County, 
N. Y. , Sacred Heart Church Rectory, 75 North 
Second Street, Hudson, N. Y. (Poland) 



289. nainlnirg-Bremen Steamsbii) Agency, Inc., 218 
East S6tU Street, New York, N. Y. (Germany and 
Poland) 

290. United Bilgorayer Relief, Inc., care of Mr. David 
Goldstein, 93 Pitt Street, New York, N. Y. (Poland) 

291. American Committee for the German Relief Fund, 
Inc., 331 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Ger- 
many aufl Poland) 

292. Polish-American Forwardinp Committee, Inc., 542 
Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Poland and 
Germany) 

293. Polish Relief Committee of Fitchburg, 167 Sum- 
mer Street, Fitchburg, Ma.ss. (Poland) 

2;M. Accion Democrata Espaiiola, S31 Broadway, San 

Francisco, Calif. (France) 
29.5. Soeiedades Hispanas Aliadas, 831 Broadway, San 

Francisco, Calif. (France) 
296. Allied Relief Ball, Inc., care of Mr. Alfred 0. 

Howell, 524 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Great 

Britain and France) 
"297. Greater New York Committee to Save Spanish 

Refugees, Room 1004, 5.") West Forty-second Street, 

New York, N. Y. (JVance and United Kingdom) 

298. Superior Council of the Society of St. Vincent de 
Paul, 2S9 Fourth Avenue, New York, N. T. (France) 

299. The British War Relief Association of the Philii)- 
piues, care of Fleming and Williamson, Post Office 
Box 214, Manila. P. I. (All belligerent countries) 

300. Marthe Th. Kahn, 390 Riverside Drive, New York, 
N. Y. (France) 

°301. Club des Femmes de France, 190 Beacon Street, 
Boston, Mass. (France) 

302. German American Relief Connnittee for Victims 
of Fascism, 381 Fourth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
(France and Great Britain) 

303. The Maple Leaf Fund, Inc., 601 Fifth Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. (Canada, United Kingdom, and 
France) 

304. Erste Pinchover Kranken Unterstuzungs Verein, 
Inc., care of Mr. Alexander Kekoler, 110 Maujer 
Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. (Poland) 

"305. American Association of Teachers of French, 
Washington Chapter, care of Mrs. Corrington Gill, 
2630 Adams Mill Road, NW., Washington, D. C. 
(France) 

306. The Somerset Workroom, Far Hills, N. J. (Great 
Biitain and France) 

307. The Mother Church, The First Church of Christ, 
Scientist, in Boston, U. S. A., 107 Falmouth Street, 
Boston, Mass. (Canada, France, and the United 
Kingdom) 

308. Fund for the Relief of Men of Letters and Scien- 
tists of Russia, 310 West Ninety-ninth Street, New 
York, N. Y. (France, Czechoslovakia, and Poland) 

309. United American Spanish Aid Committee, 55 West 
Forty-second Street, Room 10(M, New York, N. Y. 
(formerly North American Spanish Aid Committee). 
(France and the United Kingdom) 



389 

310. Le Souvenir Frangais, International Center, 2431 
East Grand Boulevard, Detroit, Mich. (France and 
Belgium) 

311. American Employment for General Relief, Inc., 
30 East Seventy-first Street, New York, N. Y. (Eng- 
land, France, Norway, Poland, Belgium, Luxemburg, 
and the Netherlands) 

312. French War Relief Fund of the Philippines, Post 
Office Box 597, 46 Escolta, Manila, P. I. (formerly 
Mr. Maxiine LiH-y). (France) 

313. Norwegian R.^lief, Inc., 135 South La Salle Street, 
Chicago, III. (Norway) 

314. British Sailors' Book and Relief Society, care of 
Mr. Donald Neville-Willing, 18 East Seventieth Street, 
New York, N. Y. (Bermuda, Canada, British West 
Indies, and Newfoundland) 

315. League of American Writers, Inc., 381 Fourth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (France, England, Poland 
and Norway) 

310. Scots' Charitable Society, 355 Newbury Street, 
Boston, Mas.s. (Scotland) 

317. American Friends of a Jewish Palestine, Inc., 285 
Madi.son Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Palestine, Ger- 
many, Poland, France, and the United Kingdom) 

318. Central Bureau for Relief of the Evangelical 
Churches of Europe, 297 Fourth Avenue, New York, 
N. Y. (All belligerent countries) 

319. Queen Wilholmina Fund, Inc., Holland House, 10 
Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. (The Nether- 
lands; France; Poland; the United Kingdom, India, 
Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the Union of 
South Africa; Norway; Belgium; and Luxemburg) 

320. The Commission for Relief in Belgium, Inc., 420 
Lexington Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Belgium and 
Luxemburg) 

321. National Christian Action, Inc., 6 Water Street, 
New York, N. Y. (Norway) 

322. Unitarian Service Committee of the American Uni- 
tarian Association, 25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 
(France, British Isles, and the Netherlands) 

323. The Salvation Army, Inc., 122 West Fourteenth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (England, France, the 
Netherlands, Belgium, and Norway) 

324. American Association of University Women, 1634 
Eye Street, Washington, D. C. (France and Great 
Britain) 

325. Anzac War Relief Fund, 405 Lexington Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. (Australia and New Zealand) 

326. The Kosciuszko Foundation, Inc., 149-151 East 
Sixty-seventh Street, New York, N. Y. ( Poland ) 

327. Belgian Relief of Southern California, 617 South 
Dunsmuir Avenue, Los Angeles, Calif. (Belgium, 
France, and Great Britain) 

328. American Civilian Volunteers, care of Mr. Her- 
nand Behn, Treasurer, 135 East Seventy-fourth Street, 
New York, N. Y. (France) 

329. Netherlands War Relief Ck)mmittee, care of Wise 
& Company, Inc., 176 Juan Luna, Manila, P. I. 

(Netherlands) 



390 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



330. Juuior Relief Group of Texas, 1111 Main Street, 
Houston, Tex. (The United Kinsdoui, France, the 
Netherlands, Belgium, and Norway) 

"331. Vincennes, France Committee of Vincennes, Ind., 
112 North Seventh Street, Vincennes, Ind. (France) 

332. Soeiet(5 Israelite Fran(;aise de Secours Mutuels de 
New York, care of Mr. Gaston Meyer, secretary, 2303 
Grand Avenue, New York, N. Y. (France) 

335. Belgian War Relief Fund, care of Mr. L. V. 
Casteleyn, 344 Regina Building, Manila, P. I. 
(Belgium) 

334. British American Ambulance Corps, Inc., 420 
Lexington Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain 
and France) 

«335. Allied Food Relief Committee, 46 Cedar Street, 
New York, N. Y. (England and France) 

336. The Seventh Column, Inc., West Fairlee, Vt. 
(France and England) 

337. Friends of Children, Inc., 36 West Forty-fourth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain, France, 
Belgium, and the Netherlands) 

338. Belgian Relief Fund, Inc., Room 426, Graybar 
Building, 420 Lexington Avenue, New Yoi'k, N. Y. 
(Belgium. France, and England) 

330. United British War Relief Association, 16 Sargent 
Avenue, Somerville, Mass. (Great Britain and 
Northern Ireland) 

340. Independent British War Relief Society of Rhode 
Island, care of Mrs. Agnes S. Hutcheon, Main 
Avenue, Greenwood, R. I. (Great Britain) 

341. St. Andrews (Scottish) Society of Washington, 
D. C, care of Robert A. Grahame, Inc., 1524 K Street, 
NW., Washington, D. C. (Scotland) 

342. French War Relief Fund of Nevada, 210 South 
Center Street, Reno, Nev. (France) 

343. Ukrainian Relief Committee, 78 St. Mark's Place, 
New York, N. Y. (Germany, France, England, and 
Italy.) 

344. The New Canaan Workshop, New Canaan, Conn. 
(British Empire) 

345. Nicole de Paris Relief Fund, 23 East Fifty-fifth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 

346. International Federation of Business and Profes- 
sional Women, care of Miss Isabelle Claridge, Valley 
Camp Coal Company, Wheeling, W. Va. (Poland, 
Czechoslovakia, Norway, Belgium, Holland, and 
France) 

347. American Board of Missions to the Jews, Inc., 27 
Throop Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. (France, Belgium, 
and Germany) 

348. Great Lakes Command, Canadian Legion of the 
British Empire Service League, 18419 Santa Rosa 
Avenue, Detroit, Mich. (Great Britain and Canada) 

349. Scottish Games of New Jersey Association, Box 
23, Fairhaven, N. J. (Groat Britain) 

350. Franco-American Federation, care of Mr. Philip 
L. Morency, Secretary, 9 Cherry Street, Salem, Mass. 
(France) 



351. Refugees of England, Inc., Room 607, 511 Fifth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain and 
France) 

" 352. American Friends of German Freedom, 342 Mad- 
ison Avenue, New York, N. Y. (England and 
France) 

" 353. The Louisiana Guild for British Relief, 4534 St. 
Charles Avenue, New Orleans, La. (British Empire) 

354. The American Ho.spital in Britain, Limited, 321 
East Forty-second Street, New York, N. Y. (Great 
Britain) 

355. Czechoslovak Relief, 4049 West Twenty-sixth 
Street, Chicago, 111. (Czechoslovakia, Great Britain 
and Dominions, France, and Belgium) 

356. Emergency Rescue Committee, 122 East Forty- 
second Street, New York, N. Y. (Fi-ance, United 
Kingdom, Belgium, Norway, and the Netherlands) 

357. Medical and Surgical Supply Committee, 420 Lex- 
ington Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain, 
France, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Luxem- 
burg, and Belgium) 

358. Mrs. George Gilliland, 530 East Eighty-flfth Street, 
New York, N. Y. (Northern Ireland) 

359. District of Columbia Federation of Women's Clubs, 
Broad Branch and Grant Roads, Washington, D. 0. 
(Great Britain) 

360. American-Polish National Council, care of Mr. V. 
M. Spnnar, 4730 North Lawndale Avenue, Chicago, 
111. (Poland) 

361. Funds for France, Inc., 32 East Fifty-seventh 
Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 

362. Over-Seas League Tobacco Fund, care of Lambert 
and Feasley, 9 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 
(British Empire) 

368. Mutual Society of French Colonials, Inc., care of 

Executive Secretary, 322 Convent Avenue, New York, 

N. Y. (France) 
"364. The Canadian Society of New York, Room 500, 

2 Wall Street, New York, N. Y. (Canada and Great 

Britain) 

365. American Friends of Britain, Inc., 724 Fifth Ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

366. Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. (Great 
Britain) 

367. Methodist Committee for Overseas Relief, 150 
Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (France, Poland, 
Czechoslovakia, Norway, Belgium, and the Nether- 
lands) 

368. British War Relief Fund, 1635 Hearthstone Drive, 
Dayton, Ohio. (Great Britain) 

369. Mnmnouth War Relief, Red Bank, N. J. (England 
and France) 

370. Polish Prisoner's of War Relief Committee, Box 
20, Station W, Brooklyn, N. Y. (Germany) 

371. The Mobile Circle for Benefit of the Royal Navy 
Hospital Comforts Fund, care of Miss Hilda Broad- 
wood, Chairman, Route 2, Mobile, Ala. (British 
Isles) 



KOVEMBER 2, 194 



391 



372. Isthmian Pro-British Aid Committee, Post Office 
Box 621, Ancon, C. Z. (England) 

373. The Fall River British War Relief Society, 79 
Campbell Street, Fall River, Mass. (Great Britain) 

374. American Aid for GeniMin War Prisoners, 16 Diier- 
stein Street, Buffalo, N. Y. (Canada) 

375. Ladies Auxiliary of the Providence Branch of the 
Federation of the Italian World War Veterans in the 
United States, 296 Atwells Avenue, Providence, B. I. 
(Italy) 

376. International Children's Relief Association, tem- 
porary address: care of Mr. John W. D'Arcy, 342 
Madison Avenue, Suite 90.J, New York, N. Y. (Great 
Britain) 

377. Parcels for the Forces, 1133 Broadway, New York, 
N. Y. (Great Britain) 

378. William Henry Mooritis, 272 South La Peer Drive, 
Beverly Hills, Calif. (England) 



379. The Pacific Steam Navigation Company, Cristobal, 
C. Z. (England) 

380. Universal Conmiittee for the Defense of Democracy, 
35 South William Street, New York, N. Y. (England 
and France) 

381. Pelham Overseas Knitting Circle, 252 Irving Place, 
Pelham, N. Y. (Scotland) 

382. Solidaridad Internacional Antifascista, 229 Avenue 
A, New York, N. Y. (France) 

383. Elizabeth Arden Employees Association, 681 Fifth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

38-J. Canadian Women's Club of New York City, Inc., 
Savoy Plaza Hotel, Fifth Avenue at Fifty-eighth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain, Canada, 
and Newfoundland) 



"Registration revoked at request of registrant. 
'Registration revoked for failure to observe rules 
and regulations. 



Tabulation of Contributions 



[Released to the press Octolier 201 

Following is a tabulation of contributions 
collected and disbursed during the period Sep- 
tember 6, 19;?9, through September 30, 1940, as 
shown in the reports submitted by persons and 
organizations registered with the Secretary of 
State for the solicitation and collection of con- 
tributions to be used for relief in belligerent 
countries, in conformity with the regulations 
issued pursuant to section 8 of the act of No- 
vember 4, 1939, as made effective by the 
President's proclamation of the same date. 

This tabulation has reference only to con- 
tributions solicited and collected for relief in 
belligerent countries (France; Germany; 
Poland; the United Kingdom, India, Australia, 
Canada, New Zealand, and the Union of South 
Africa; Norway; Belgium; Luxemburg; the 
Netherlands; and Italy) or for the relief of 



lefugces driven out of these countries by the 
present war. The statistics set forth in the 
labidation do not include information regard- 
ing relief activities which a number of organi- 
zations registered with the Secretary of State 
may be carrying on in nonbelligerent countries, 
but for which registration is not required under 
the Neutrality Act of 1939. 

The American National Red Cross is required 
by law to submit to the Secretary of War for 
audit "a full, complete, and itemized report of 
receipts and expenditures of whatever kind". 
In order to avoid an unnecessary duplication of 
work, this organization is not required to con- 
form to the provision of the regulations govern- 
ing the solicitation and collection of contribu- 
tions for relief in belligerent countries, and the 
tabulation does not, therefore, include infor- 
mation in regard to its activities. 



Contributions for 


Relief in 


Belligerent Countries 














Unexpended 












Funds spent 


balance as of 


Estimated 


Estimated 






Funds spent 


for adminis- 


Sept. 30, 1940, 


value of con- 


value of 


Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 


Funds 


for relief in tration, pub- 


Including 


tributions in 


contribu- 


destination of contributions 


received 


countries licity, aflairs. 


cost of goods 


kind sent to 


tions in 






named 


campaigns, 


purchased 


countries 


bind now 








etc. 


and still on 
hand 


named 


on hand 


Accion Dem6crata Espailola, San Francisco, Calif., Mar. 29, 1940. 














France 


$300. 19 


$12.'>. 00 


$55.51 


$119. 68 


None 


None 


Allied Relief Ball. Inc., New York, N. Y., Apr. 4, 1940. Great 












Britain and France 


62. 34C. 35 


38,104.00 


12,630.85 


1,611.50 


None 


None 



392 



DEPARTMEKT OF STATE BULLETIN 
CONTKIBUTIONS FOE RELIEF IN BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Sept. 30, 1940, 

including 

cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of 
contribu- 
tions in 
kind now 
on hand 


Allied Kelief Fund, New York, N. Y., June 4, 1940. United 

Kingdom, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Norway 

American Association for Assistance to French Artists, Inc., New 


$1,081,707.95 
13, 16S. 26 
9. 443. 40 

18, 966. 86 

1,537.69 

None 

11.801.86 

36, 438. 24 

30.302.61 

3, 239. 52 

None 

2, T07. 00 

6, 244. 30 

223, 399. 47 
312,088.57 

7, 365. 07 
41,844.00 


$751, 837. 02 
8, 435. 58 
4,277.50 

8,713.35 

1,525.00 

None 

11.801.86 

25,000.00 

17,721.33 

3, 133. 02 

None 

None 

5, 020. 76 

105, 121. 82 

232,188.04 

3, 024. 85 

21, 736. 42 


$64, 428. 51 

3, 221. 17 

473. 55 

2, 312. 31 
12.69 
None 
None 
6,213.11 
2, 126. 63 
101.50 
None 

1, 776. 73 

376. 14 

17,860.07 

13, 430. 45 

985. 70 

6, 534. 56 


$205, 442. 42 
1, 508. 61 
4, 692. 35 

7,941.20 

None 

None 

None 

4, 225. 13 

10, 454. 55 

6.00 

None 

930. 27 

847.41 

100,417.68 
66, 470. 08 
3, 354. 62 
13, 673. 02 


$45,606.80 

1, 605. 15 

None 

3. 285. 20 
None 
None 
None 
None 
471.00 
None 
None 

None 

7,661.43 

1, 500. 00 

None 

None 

47, 764. 96 


$8,247.97 
None 


American Association of University Women, Washington, D. C, 


None 


American Auxiliary Committee de L' Union des Femmes de 
France, New York, N. Y., Nov. 8, 1939. France and Great 


1, 313. 56 


American Board of Missions to the Jews, Inc., Brooklyn, N. Y., 


None 


American CivUian Volunteers, New York, N. Y., May 27, 1940. 


None 


American Committee for Christian Refugees, Inc., New York, 


None 


American Committee for the German Relief Fund, Inc., New 
York N Y Mar 27 1940 Germany and Poland 


None 


American Committee for the Polish Ambulance Fund, Chicago, 
ni Fph T> IfJIO France and Poland 


None 


American Dental Ambulance Committee, New York, N. Y., 


None 


American Emergency Volunteer Ambulance Corps, Inc., 
New York, N. Y., Jan. 2i. I«40.» Great Britain and France. ,_ 

American Emplojrmcnt for General Relief, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., May 1, 1940. England, France, Norway, Poland, Bel- 


None 
None 


American Federation for Polish Jews, Inc., (formerly Federa- 
tion of Polish Jews in America, Inc.), New York, N. Y., Sept. 


6, 000. OJ 


American Field Hospital Corps, (formerly American Volunteer 
Ambulance Corps), New York, N. Y., Dec. 12, 1939. France, 


1, 194. 20 


American Field Ser\nee, New York. N. Y., Sept. 27, 1939. France, 


None 


American and French Students' Correspondence Exchange, New 


None 


American-French War Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 14, 


2,973.79 


American Friends of Britain, Inc., New York, N. Y., Aug. 30, 




American Friends of Czechoslovakia, New York, N. Y., Nov. 2, 


24, 104. 67 

2, 3.17. 00 

326, 670. 31 

6. 780. m 

3, 552. 04 

96, 690. 39 
5, 248. 95 
15, 302. 94 


18, 881. 32 

2, 3.W. 00 

158, 1X0. 94 

2,856.10 

659.02 

89, 160. 24 
3,786.60 
10,681.66 


4.244.84 

None 

32,218.53 

3. 707. 81 

2, 648. 82 

6, 530. 15 
368.09 
.553. 38 


978. 51 

None 

136,270.84 

216. 68 

244 20 

None 
1,094.36 
4, 067. 91 


19,240.00 
None 

11,256.11 
None 

None 

14,612.17 
4,911.50 
9,381.67 


None 


American Friends of the Daily Sketch War Relief Fund, New 


None 


American Friends of Franco, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 21, 


8, 648. 85 


American Friends of (Jerman Freedom, Now York, N. Y., July 


None 


.American Friends of a Jewish Palestine, Inc.. New York, N. Y., 
May 9, 1940. Palestine, Germany, Poland, France, and United 
Kingdom - - 


None 


American Friends Service Committee, Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 9, 
1939. Unted Kingdom, Poland, Germany, France, Norway, 
Belgium, and the Netherlands 


None 


The American Fund for Breton Relief, New York, N. Y., Oct. 31, 
1939 France and England 


None 


American Fund for French Wounded, Inc., Boston, Mass., Jan. 
3, 1940. France and England 


180.00 



• The registration of this organization was revoked on Sept. 30, 1940, at the request of registrant. 

^ No report has been received from this organization. 

. The registration of this organization was revoked on July 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 



NOVEMBER 2, 194 



393 



Contributions fob Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant , location, date ot registration, and 
destination of contributions 



American Fund for Wounded in France, Inc., Worcester, Mass., 
Dec. 16, 1939. France 

American German Aid Society, Los Angeles, Calif., Nov. 15, 1939. 
Germany _ - - 

The American Hospital in Britain, Ltd., New York, N. Y., July 
24, 1940. Great Britain -.- 

The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, Inc., Now 
York, N. Y., Sept. 29, 1939. United Kingdom, Poland, Ger- 
many, France, Norway, Belgium, Luxemburg, and the Nether- 



lands. 



American McAU Association, New York, N. Y., Jan. 3, 1940. 

England- --- 

American-Polish National Council, Chicago, 111., Aug. 14, 1940. 

Poland - 

American War Godmothers, Pittsburgh, Pa., Mar. 6, 1940. 

France 

American Women's Hospitals, New York, N. Y., Sept. 14, 1939. 

France and England - 

American Women's Unit for War Belief, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Jan. 15, 1940. France 

American Women's Voluntary Services, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Feb. 13, 1940. England , 

Les Amis de la France & Puerto Rico, San Juan, P. R., Deo. 20, 

1939. France , 

Les Amities FSminines de la France, New York, N. Y., Dec. 19, 

1939. Franceand England 

Les Anciens Combattants Francais de la Grande Guerre, San 

Francisco, Calif., Oct. 26, 1939. France 

Mrs. Lars Anderson, Boston, Mass., Dec. 12, 1939.'' France 

Anthracite Relief Committee, Wilkes-Barrc, Pa., Sept. 8, 1939. 

Poland - 

Anzac War Relief Fund, New York, N. Y., May 23, 1940. 

Australia and New Zealand 

Associated Polish Societies Relief Committee of Webster, Mass., 

Webster, Mass., Sept. 21, 1939. Poland 

Associated Polish Societies' Relief Committee of Worcester, 

Mass., Worcester, Mass., Sept. 14, 1939. Poland. .- 

Association of Former Juniors in France of Smith College, New 

York, N. Y., Dec. IS. 1939. France 

Association of Former Russian Xaval Officers in America, New 

York, N. Y., Feb. 21, 1940. France 

Association of Joint Polish-American Societies of Chelsea, Mass., 

Chelsea, Mass., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland 

L'Atelier, San Francisco, Calif., Jan. 29, 1940. France 

Mrs. Mark Baldwin, New York, N. Y., Mar. 4, 1940. France... 
Basque Delegation in the United States of America, New York, 

N. Y., Dec. 19, 1939. France 

Belgian Relief Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y., June 14, 1940. Bel- 
gium, France, and England 

Belgian Relief of Southern California. Los Angeles, Calif.. May 

27,1940. Belgium, France, and Great Britain 

Belgian War Relief Fund, Manila, P. I., June 7, 1940.' Belgium.. 
The Benedict Bureau Unit, Inc., New York, N. Y., Nov. 29, 

1939. France _ 

Bethel Mission of Eastern Etirope, Minneapolis, Minn., Nov. 

27, 1939. Poland 

Bishops' Committee for Polish Relief, Washington, D. C, Dec. 

19, 1939. Poland 

Board of National Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the 

United States of America, New York, N. Y., Sept. 26, 1939. 

Great Britain, France, and Germany 



Funds 
received 



$200.00 
4,047.50 
5. 345. 00 

2, 5.W, 403. 20 

762. 32 

2, 460. 29 

1,080.22 

2, 64a 92 

2, 402. 82 

21,806.14 

10, 920. 68 

1, 216. 97 

19, 702. OS 
17, 439. 90 

10,827.14 

6, 340. 03 

2. 829. 27 
9, 908. 25 

273. 50 

191.44 

2. 087 08 

13.151.26 

1, 143. 81 

1,591.15 

18. 760. 28 

a. 238. 07 
1.469.41 

5, 481. 17 
10, 115. 29 

383, 240. 84 

6, 379. 13 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



None 
None 
None 

$2, 348, 185. 01 

542.45 

1,010.00 

180.07 

2, 606. 30 

1,085.73 

8, 610. 49 

6,500.00 

432. 48 

9, 696. 33 
16, 983. 14 

7,000.00 

4, 061. 10 

2,600.00 

6, 766. 45 

225.00 

133. 30 

1, 000. 00 

7, 857. 98 

992.00 

975.00 

5. 339. 00 

2. 430. 60 
None 

846.74 

6, 780. 40 

166,324.31 

4, 77a 60 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, attairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



None 

$1,003.45 

None 

210, 218. 19 
None 

6a IS 

269.58 

42.62 

664.33 

11,192.34 

274.93 

344.82 

656.61 
456.76 

288.46 

312.17 

7.50 

453.10 

None 

7.94 

85.67 
730. IS 
97.10 

182. 67 

9. 573. 02 

1, 927. 13 
2.50 

943.56 

2. 708. 39 

49.73 

735. S2 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Sept. 30, 1940, 

including 

cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

band 



$200.00 
3, 044. 05 
6, 345. 00 

Non.. 

219. 87 

1,390.11 

630.57 

None 

652.76 

2. 003. 31 

4, 145. 75 

439. 67 

9, 510. 11 
None 

3, 538. 69 

1,966.76 

221.77 

2,688.70 

48.50 

50.20 

1,001.41 

4. .ifi3. 10 

54.65 

433. 48 

3, 848. 26 

880.34 
1.466.91 

3. 690. 87 

626.50 

216, 866. 80 

872. 81 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



None 
None 
None 

$,'.!. (10 
750.00 
None 
None 
None 
494.20 
19, 140. 17 
650.00 
265.25 

2, 826. 56 

None 

None 

None 

None 

1,430.00 

None 

None 

None 

1. 565. 88 

-30.00 

None 

9.566.00 

33. 182. 50 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 



Estimated 
value of 

contribu- 
tions in 

kind now 
on band 



None 
None 
None 

None 

$mn. 00 

None 
2.45 

None 
143. 45 

None 
107. 77 

None 

256.00 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
847.00 
None 

None 

3, 528. 00 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 



■■ The registration of this organization was revoked on Sept. 30, 1940, at the request of registrant. 
• No report for the month of September has been received from this organization. 



394 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Sept. 30, 1940. 

including 

cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of 

contribu- 
tions in 

kind now 
on hand 


British-American Ambulance Corps, Inc., New York, N. Y., 


$407, 573. 72 

1,341.48 

23, 538. 85 

1, 187. 69 

67,959.57 

33, 727. 48 

239. 087. 90 

74.90 

874. 342. 68 

210,811.47 
477.64 

1, 037. 58 
1, 074. 25 

1. 157. 3C 

11.82^;. 62 

33. 235. 27 

707.00 

2, 807. 83 
1,460.72 

2, 549. 45 
6, 947. 92 

97, 819. 45 

319,904.77 

6, 790. 92 

4, 923. 40 
20, 286. 87 


$138,609.20 

377. 50 

19, 798. 89 

55.00 

53, 205. 48 

31,238.24 

212. 738. 52 

69.80 

381, 069. 55 

77. 603. 97 
300.30 

1. 600. 00 

None 

1,014.50 

8,124.00 

21,187.40 

500.00 

1, 790. 90 
1, 300. 75 

658.28 

5, 475. 46 

80,500.00 

264,853.87 

4, 165. 00 

3, 365. 63 
10, 524. 21 


$39, 092. 44 
198. 72 

1, 276. 75 
1,117.83 
1,856.31 

705. 58 
11,373.83 

None 

87, Oil. 49 

56, 948. 35 
164. 57 

37.58 
None 
135. 41 

2. 577. 66 
12,047.87 

126. 82 

41.08 
11.65 

660.24 

648. 52 

17, 263. 00 

49, 441. 34 

771. 45 

None 
2,222.09 


$229, 872. 08 

705.26 

2, 463. 21 

14.86 

12,897.78 

1.783.66 

14. 975 55 

5.10 

500,231.64 

76. 259. 16 
12.77 

None 

1, 074. 25 

7.45 

1,12(1.96 

None 

80.18 

975.86 
138.32 

1, 330. 93 

823.94 

66. 45 

6, 609. 56 
1, 854. 47 

1, 557. 77 

7, 540 57 


None 

None 

$1, 835. 00 

2,223.00 

25,603.30 

280.12 

19, 049. 36 

None 

194.341.96 

131,645.84 
None 

None 

3, 420. 00 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
1,900.00 

2,775.00 

1,677 30 

None 

1,500.00 

None 

None 
3, 903. 84 




British-American Comfort League, Quincy, Mass., Feb. 21, 1940. 


None 


British-American War Relief Association, Seattle, Wash., Nov. 


$102. 65 


British Sailors' Book and Relief Society, New York, N. Y., May 
2, 1940. Bermuda, Canada, and the British West Indies 

British War Relief Association of Northern California, San Fran- 
cisco Calif Oct 20, 1939. Great Britain and France 


50.00 
None 


The British War Relief Association of the Philippines, Manila, 




The British War Relief Association of Southern California, Los 




British Wa* Relief Fund, Dayton, Ohio, Sept. 12, 1940. Great 


None 


British War Relief Society, Inc., New York. N. Y., Dec. 4, 1939. 

Great Britain, Newfoundland, and British East Africa .. 

Bundles for Britain, New York, N. Y., Dec. 28, 1939. Great 


4, 250. 00 
13, 749. 25 


Caledonian Club of Idaho, Boise, Idaho, Jan. 25, 1940. Scotland. . 
The Canadian Society of New York, New York, N. Y., Aug. 20, 


None 


Catholic Medical Mission Board, Inc., New York, N. Y., Jan. 


1, 050 00 


The Catholic Student War Relief of Pax Romana, Washington, 
D. C, Dec. 13, 1939. Poland, France, Germany, and Great 




Central Bureau for the Relief of the Evangelical Churches of 
Europe, New York, N. Y., May 14, 1940. All belligerent 




Central Committee Knesseth Israel, New York, N. Y., Oct. 27, 
1939. Palestine. .. 


None 


Central Committee for PoUsh Relief, Toledo, Ohio, Feb. 29, 1940. 
Poland -. . ...... 


None 


Central Council of Polish Organizations, New Castle, Pa., Nov. 
7, 1939. France, Poland, and England 


None 


Centrala, Passaic, N. J., Oct. 12, 1939. Poland 




Ccrcle Francais de Seattle, Seattle, Wash., Nov. 2, 1939. France 
and Great Britain 




Chester (Delaware Co., Pa.) Polish Relief Committee, Chester. 
Pa., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland and France 


None 


Children's Crusade for ChUdren, Inc., New York, N. Y., Feb. 3, 
1940.* France, Poland, and Germany 


None 


Commission for Polish Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 12, 
1939.' Poland 


None 


The Commission for Relief in Belgium, Inc., New York, N. Y., 


None 


Committee for Aid to Children o( Mobilized Men of the XX' 
Arrondissement of Paris, New York, N. Y., Jan. 15, 1940. 
France _ 


None 


Committee of French-American Wives, New York, N. Y., Nov. 
15, 1939. France and Great Britain 


812. 75 



/ No reports for the months of August and September have been received from this organization. 
B The registration of this organization was revoked on Sept. 21, 1940, at the request of registrant. 

* The registration of this organization was revoked on Aug. 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 

* This registrant serves primarily as a clearing house for the distribution abroad of contributions received from other registrants; these receipts and 
disbursements are not included in tho figures here given, since they are shown elsewhere in this tabulation following the names of the original collecting 
registrants. 



NOVEMBER 2, 194 

CoNTRiBt,'TioNS FOB Ueijef IN Bbxugfuknt COUNTRIES — Continued 




395 


Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributioDS 


Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
c-ampaigns, 
etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Sept. 30, 1940, 

including 
cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

band 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of 

contribu- 
tions in 

kind now 
on hand 


Committee of Mircy, Inc., Now Yorli, N. Y., Sept. 16, 1939. 
France, Great Britain, Norway, Belgium, the Netherlands, 


$56,327.77 

4,523.03 
2,426.23 
197.00 
5, 462. 75 
Z 012. 90 

39.952.10 
5.0*4.60 

27.723.75 

78.187.83 

275.00 

7.374.99 

5.142.88 

11.059.68 

S90.21 

366,614.22 

104.514.77 
6.760.22 

636.30 

3,688.55 

752.82 

37,973.58 

None 

798.96 
822.81 

9,801.83 

13,012.03 

2.445.50 
1,421.95 

533.53 


$34,868.91 

2,500.00 
2, 162 72 
197.00 
2. 620. 42 
1,641.79 

24. 418. 27 
None 

8, 685. 55 

SS,703.23 

None 

4. 450. 93 

1,892.49 

801.09 

531.21 

231, 433. 27 

66,497.19 
3,920.00 

None 

1,011.72 

332 90 

27,060.38 

None 

None 

407.75 

767. «9 

1,822.37 

1,500.00 
680.00 

128.37 


$6,196.86 

1,805.60 

255.71 

None 

8.55 

371.11 

7, 460. 30 
2, 239. 59 

3,675.85 

3,403.77 

None 

883.52 

412 55 

444.68 

None 

55.579.59 

21.242.95 
2.585.02 

None 

239.70 

112.96 

4,729.64 

None 

10.00 
171.66 

2,617.49 

5,900.02 

160.00 
92.28 

29.10 


$15,262 00 

217. 43 

7.80 

None 

2.933.78 

None 

8, 083. 47 
2,815.01 

15,302.35 

19,080.83 

276.00 

2,040.54 

2,837.84 

9,813.91 

59.00 

79,601.36 

26,774.63 
255.20 

636.30 
2,437.13 

306.96 

6, 183. 56 

None 

788.96 
243.40 

6,416.75 

5,289.64 

785.50 
649.69 

376.06 


$1,790.00 

None 
None 
None 
10, 100. 00 
None 

7, 563. 38 
None 

None 

40, 746. 32 

None 

3,200.00 

277.55 

664.70 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

25,902 44 

531.17 

195. 47 

None 

None 
None 

9, 324. 53 

None 

None 
None 

None 




Committee for Relief in Allied Countries, Washington, D. C, 
Feb. 2, 1940. France, Qreat Britain. Poland, Norway, Bel- 


Nod© 


Committee for the Relief for Poland, Seattle, Wash., Nov. 24, 
1939. Poland.. . 




Committee Representing Polish Organizations and Polish People 
in Perry, N. Y., Perry, N. Y., Oct. 23, 1939. Poland 




Czechoslovak Relief, Chicago, 111., July 25, 1940. Czechoslovakia, 
Great Britain and Dominions, France, and Belgium 


None 


District of Columbia Federation of Women's Clubs, Washington, 
D. C, Aug. 14. 1940 Great Britain 


None 


The Emergency AUl of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa.. Oct. 13. 
1939. Great Britain. France. Norway. Belgium, Luxemburg, 
and the Netherlands 


None 


Emergency Relief Committee lor Kolbusiowa, New Yorlt. N. Y.. 
Mar. 13, 1940. Poland 




Emergency Rescue Committee, New York, N. Y., Aug. 3. 1940. 
France, United Kingdom, Belgium. Norway, and the Nether- 




English-Speaking Union of the United States. New York. N. Y.. 
Dec. 26, 19.39. Great Britain. Canada, and France 


$295 65 


Erste Pinchover Kranken Unterstuzungs Verein, Inc.. Brooklyn. 
N. Y., Apr 22, 1940. Poland 


None 


Federated Council of Polish Societies of Grand Rapids, Mich., 
Grand Rapids, Mich., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland. - . .- 


100.00 


Federation of Franco-Belgian Clubs of Rhode Island, Woonsocket. 
R. I., Nov. 15, 1939. France and England 


206.55 


Federation of French Veterans of the Great War, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Oct. 11, 1939. France 


600 00 


Fellowship of Reconciliation, New York, N. Y, Jan. 20, 1940. 

France, England, and possibly Germany 


None 


Fortra, Inc., New York, N. Y., Mar. 7, 1940. Germany and 
Poland 




Foster Parents' Plan for War Children, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 21, 1939. France 




Foyers du Soldat, New York, N. Y., Mar. 2, 1940. France 

Franco-.\merican Federation, Salem, Mass., July 9, 1940. 


None 


French Committee for Relief in France, Detroit, Mich., Oct. 17, 

193Q Pronre mid Grpnt Britain 


3, 650. 38 


French Relief Association, Kansas City, Mo., Feb. 3, 1940. 


936.83 


French War Relief, Inc., Los Angeles, Calif., Nov. 16, 1939. 




French War Relief Fund of Nevada. Reno, Nev.. June 21. 1940. 
France - - ... 


None 


French War Relief Fund of the Philippines. ManUa, P. I.. May 
1. 1940.' France 


None 


Friends of Children. Inc.. New York. N. Y.. June 13. 1940. Great 
Britain. France. Belgium, and the Netherlands 


None 
None 


The Friends of Israel Refugee Relief Committee, Inc., Philadel- 
phia, Pa., Oct. 23, 1939. Canada, France, and England.. 

The Friends of Normandy, New York, N. Y., Dec. 18, 1939. 
France 


None 
None 


Friends of Poland, Chicago, III., Dec. 6, 1939. Poland . 


None 


Fund lor the Relief of Men of Letters and Scientists of Russia, 
New York. N. Y., Apr. 29, 1940. France, Czechoslovakia, 


None 



' No report for the moath of September has been received from this organization. 



396 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions fob Relief in Belligekent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date or registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Sept. 30, 1940, 

including 

cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of 

contribu- 
tions in 

kind now 
on hand 


Funds for Franco, Inc., New Yorlj, N. Y., Aur. 14, 1940. France. 
General Gustav Orlicz Dreszer Foundation for Aid to Polisli 
rhilHrpn Wi.shinpton D C Nov 3. 1939 Poland 


$2,959.82 
894. 45 

2, 424. 01 
1, 592. 34 

159. 25 

None 

540.88 

9, 534. 06 

1, 258. 23 

6, 450. 30 

1,073.00 
930, 818. 10 

109, 985. 71 

24, 570. 00 

1, 781. 89 

1, 120. 17 

18. 435. 28 

3, 601. 3S 
827. 06 
488.64 

37, 477. 87 

None 

14, 903. 02 

None 

4,737.06 

11.842.10 
222. 25 


$1,000.00 
400. 00 

1, 726. 40 
579. 76 
159. 25 
None 
370. 79 

6.512.10 

None 

4, 465. 08 

445.00 
659, 960. 39 

96. .503. 65 

None 

1,776.00 

1,049.00 

2,720.00 

2,400.00 

283.06 

None 

26, 263. 50 

None 

6, 494. 70 

None 

2, 351. 00 

10, 000. 00 
25.00 


$998. 31 
32.5.04 
52.10 
516. 19 
None 
None 
22.20 
None 

5.00 

361. 17 

None 
32, 030. 67 

29, 217. 87 

488. 10 

6.89 

None 

136. 98 

61.63 

19.60 

None 

1,013.24 

None 
4, 046. 94 

None 
1,041.65 

1, 684. 18 
7.56 


$961. 51 
169. 41 
645.51 
496. 39 
None 
None 
147. 89 
3,021.96 

1, 253. 23 

630. 11 

628.00 
244, 831. 04 

None 

24, 081. 90 

None 

77.17 

15,578.30 

1,039.75 

524. 41 

488.64 

10, 201. 13 

None 
4, 362. 38 

None 
1, 344. 41 

167.92 
189. 69 


None 
None 
$80.00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 

502.43 

None 
60,078.31 

None 

None 

None 

None 

757. 30 

186. 00 

None 

None 

None 

None 

2, 020. 00 

None 

None 

None 
None 


None 


General TauflQieb Memorial Relief Committee for France, Santa 
Rnrhnra Calif Nov 17 1939 France and Ensland 




German-American Relief Committee for Victims of Fascism, 

New Yorlc, N. Y., Apr. 18, 1940. France and Great Britain. . . 

Mrs. George GillUand, New Yorlj, N. Y., Aug. 10, 1940. North- 


None 


Golden Rule Foundation, New York, N. Y., Nov. 2, 1939. 
Poland and Palestine 




Grand Duke Vladimir Benevolent Fund Association, New York, 
N Y Jan 8 1940 France 




Grand Lodge, Daughters of Scotia, Hartford, Conn., Feb. 16, 
1940 Scotland 




Great Lakes Command, Canadian Legion of the British Empire 
Service League, Detroit, Mich., July 5, 1940. Great Britain 


None 


Greater New Bedford British War Relief Corps, New Bedford, 
Mass Dec 19, 1939. Great Britain . _ 


None 


Margaret-Qreble Oreenough (Mrs. Carroll Greenough), Wash- 
in''ton D C , Nov 21, 1939.*= France 


None 


Hadassah, Inc., New York, N. Y., Nov. 15, 1939. Palestine 

Hamburg-Bremen Steamship Agency, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Mar 21,1940 Germany and Poland - 


None 
None 


Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., Aug. 30, 1940. Great 


None 


Hebrew Christian Alliance of America, Chicago, 111., Jan. 3, 1940. 




Holy Rosary Polish Roman Catholic Church, Passaic, N. J., 
Sept. 15, 1939.' Poland .. 


None 


A. Seymour Houghton, Jr., el at.. New York, N. Y., Nov. 27, 
1939. France 


None 


Humanitarian Work Committee, Glen Cove, N. Y., Sept. 30, 
1939. Poland _ ._ .- . . - 




Independent British War Relief Society of Rhode Island, Green- 
wood, R. I., June 14, 1940." Great Britain 




Independent Kinsker Aid Association, Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan. 3, 
1940. Poland -_- 




International Committee of Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tions, New York, N. Y., Sept. 22, 1939. Poland, France, India. 
Norway, Belgium, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, Canada, and 
the United Kingdom _ 


None 


International Federation of Business and Professional Women, 
Wheeling, W. Va., July 6, 19t0. Poland, Czechoslovakia, 




International Relief Association for Victims of Fascism, New 
York, N. Y., Sept. 2.5, 1939. France, England, and Germany __ 

Isthmian Pro-British Aid Committee, Ancon, C. Z., Sept. 20, 
1940. England... 


None 


Joint Committee of the United Scottish Clans of Greater New 
York and New Jersey, Brooklyn. N. Y., Jan. 30, 1940. Scotland- 
Junior Relief Group of Texas, Houston, Tex., May 29. 1940. 
The United Kingdom, France, the Netherlands, Belgium, 


None 


Martho Th. Kahn, New York. N. Y., Apr. 16, 1940. France 


None 



'The registration of this organization w.is revoked on Sept. 30, 1940, at the request of registrant. 
' The registration of this organization was revoked on June 30, 1940, at the request of registrant. 
"• No complete report for the month of September has been received from this organization. 



NOVEMBER 2, 1940 



397 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date ot registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Sept. 30. 1940, 

including 

cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
l^ind sent to 
countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of 

contribu- 
tions in 

kind now 
on hand 



The Kindergarten Unit. Inc., N'orwalk, Conn., Oct. 3, 1939. 
France, Poland, United Kingdom, India, Australia, and Xew 
Zealand 

The Kosciuszko Foundation, Inc., New York, N. Y., May 24, 
1940. Poland - --- - 

Kuryer Publishing Co., Milwaukee, Wis., Sept. 10, 1939." Poland. 

Der Kyflhaeuserbund, League of German War Veterans in 
U. S. A., Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 27, 1939. Poland, Germany, 
and Canada 

Lackawanna County Committee for Polish Relief. Scranton, Pa., 
Sept. l.'J. 1939. Poland. 

Lafayette Fund, New York, N. Y., Jan. 2, 1940. France 

LaFayette Preventorium, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 21,1939. 
France 

La Fra ncc Post American Legion, New York, N. Y., Feb. 7, 1940. 
France and Great Britain 

Mrs. Nancy Bartlett LaughUn, New York, N. Y., Jan. 31, 1940. 
France --- 

League of American Writers, Inc., New York. N. Y., May 6, 
1940.' France, England, Poland, and Norway... - 

League of Polish Societies of New Kensington, Arnold, and vicin- 
ity. New Kensington, Pa., Nov. 17, 1939. Poland 

Legion of Young Polish Women, Chicago, 111., Oct. 2, 1839. 
Poland - - 

The Little House of Saint Pantaleon, Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 30, 
1939. Franceand England 

The Louisiana Guild for British Relief, New Orleans, La., July 24, 
1940."' British Empire 

The Maple Leaf Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y., Apr. 19, 1940. 
Canada, United Kingdom, and France 

Massachusetts Relief Committee for Poland, Worcester, Mass., 
Nov. 9, 1939. Poland 

Medical and Surgical Supply Committee, New York. N. Y., Aug. 
5, 1940. Poland. Great Britain, France, the Netherlands, 
Norway, Luxemburg, and Belgium. 

Mennonite Central Committee, .^kron. Pa., Feb. 13, 1940. Great 
Britain, Poland, Germany, and France 

Methodist Committee for Overseas Relief, New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 4, 1940.' France, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Norway, Bel- 
gium, and the Netherlands 

Milford, Conn., Polish Relief Fund Committee, Milford, Conn., 
Nov, 6, 1939. Poland 

Kate R. Miller, New York, N. Y., Feb. 19, 1940. France 

The Mobile Circle for Benefit of the Royal Navy Hospital Com- 
forts Fund, Mobile, Ala., Sept. 18, 1940.' British Isles 

Mobile Surgical Unit, Inc., New York, N. Y., Jan. 13, 1&40.' 
France 

Monmouth War Relief, Red Bank, N. J., Sept. 12, 1940. Eng- 
land and Franco _ 

The Mother Church, The First Church ot Christ, Scientist, in 
Boston, U. S. A., Boston, Ma.ss., Apr. 25, 1940. Canada, 
France, and the United Kingdom 

Fernanda Wanamaker Munn (Mrs. Ector Munn), New York, 
N. Y., Nov. 25, 1939. France and England 



$1,222.21 



3, 794. 72 
6, 119. 02 



41, 889. 54 

8, 689. 66 
2,027..W 

19,642.47 

1, 585. 32 

314. .V) 

5, 367. 77 
2,058.96 

10, lOS. 52 
22, 618. 16 

1, 518. 99 
32, 284. 67 

5,211.50 

6, 792. 05 
19, 634. 62 



$892. 85 



3. 160, 00 
6. 102. 46 



35, 492. 00 

7, 22.';. 56 
1. 540. 00 

8, 597. 13 

None 

306.00 

3, 583. 45 

1,363.77 

9,642.00 

18,972.10 

1,488.68 

5.435.65 

5. 209. 75 

None 
16, 160. 46 



$329. 30 



345.49 
16.56 



83L80 
2.02 

4,129.99 

366.61 

None 

1,420.21 

78.19 

2,662.01 

36.26 

30 31 

10,811.37 

1.75 

3. 326. 80 
2, 248. 62 



None 



$299.23 
None 



2,485.08 

632.30 
485. 48 

6.915.35 

1,218.71 

8.50 

364.11 

617.00 
3,804.51 
3,609.80 

None 
16, 037. 75 

None 

2,465.25 
1,225.54 



None 



None 
None 



None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

$2, 284. 45 
None 

15, 797. 32 
100.00 

16.712.00 
None 

21, 975. 00 
5,461.60 



405.33 
in. 00 



250.20 
111.00 



84.62 
None 



70.51 
None 



None 
None 



12,638.58 
214. 82 



134, 356. 09 
12,904.21 



11.102.32 
None 

6, OOS. 88 
5, 788. 69 



I, 536. 26 
32 08 

1,430.06 
5, 124. 58 



None 
182 74 

126, 317. 16 
1,990.94 



500.00 
None 

None 
5. 0.'Hi. 36 



" The registration of this organization was revoked on Sept. 30. 1940, at the request of registrant. 

• No complete report for the month of September has been received from this organization. 

p The registration of this organization was revoked on Aug. 31, 1940, at the request of registrant, 
« No complete report has been received from this organization. 
' No complete report has been received from this organization. 

• The registration of this organization was revoked on Sept. 30, 1940. at the request of registrant. 



None 
None 



None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

$115. 55 

None 

37.00 

None 

10. 000. 00 

None 

6,600.00 
3, 179. 37 



None 
None 



None 
None 

1, 107. 31 
1,441.19 



398 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
(icstination of contrihutions 



Funds 
received 



Mutual Society of French Colonials, Inc., New York, N. Y., Aug. 

20, 1940. France - 

National Christian Action, Inc., New York, N. Y., May 23, 1940.' 

Norway and Denmark -- --■ 

Netherlands War Relief Committee, Manila, P. I., May 27, 

1940." Netherlands — 

The New Canaan Workshop, Nfew Canaan, Conn., July 1, 1940. 

British Empire. 

New Jersey Broadcasting Corporation, Jersey City, N. J., Sept. 

13, 1938. Poland.- 

Nicole de Paris Relief Fund, New York, N. Y., July 1, 1940. 

France 

North SidePolish Council Relief Committee of Milwaukee, Wis., 

Milwaukee, Wis., Dee. 5, 1939. Poland 

Norwegian Relief, Inc., Chicago, 111., May 1, 1940. Norway 

Nowe-Dworer Ladies Benevolent Association, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Oct. 2S, 1939. Poland 

Nowiny Publishing Apostolate, ftc, Milwaukee, Wis., Sept. 

26, 1939. Poland 

Nowy Swiat Publishing Co., Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 11, 

1939. Poland and France 

Order of Scottish Clans, Boston, Mass., Jan. 25, 1940. Scotland. 
Over-Seas League Tobacco Fund, New York, N. Y., Aug. 19, 

1940. British Empire -- - 

Paderewski Fund for Polish Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Feb. 23, 1940. Poland -- 

The Paryski Publishing Co., Toledo, Ohio, Sept. 15, 1939. 

Poland - - 

The Pawtucket and Blackstone Valley British Relief Society of 

Rhode Island, Pawtucket, R. 1., Feb. 26. 1940. Great Britain. 
Polish Aid Fund Committee of Federation of Elizabeth Polish 

Organizations, Elizabeth, N. J., Sept. 23, 1939. Poland 

Polish Aid Fund Committee of St. Casimir's Roman Catholic 

ChurchoftheCityof Albany, N.Y., Albany, N. Y., Jan. 22, 

1940. Poland 

Polish- American Associations of Middlesex County, N. J., Say- 

reville, N. J., Jan. 22, 1940. Poland ---- 

Polish-American Citizens Relief Fund Committee, Shirley, Mass., 

Dec. 16, 19?9. Poland --- 

Polish-American Council, Chicago, 111., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland. . 
Polish-American Forwarding Committee, Inc., New York, N Y., 

Mar. 28, 1940. Poland and Germany 

Polish-American Volunteer Ambulance Section, Inc. (Pavas), 

New York, N. Y., Feb. 13, 1940. France and England 

Polish Broadcasting Corporation, New York, N. Y., Sept. 23, 

1939. Poland 

Polish Business and Professional Men's Club, Los Angeles, Calif., 

Nov. 17, 1939. Poland - 

Polish Central Committee of New London, Conn., New London, 

Conn., Oct. 13, 1939. Poland 

Polish Central Council of New Haven, New Haven, Conn, Sept. 

29, 1939. Poland 

Polish Civic League of Mercer County, Trenton, N. J, Sept. 19, 

1939. Poland 

Polish Civilian Belief Fund, Passaic, N. J., Oct. 27, 1939. Poland 
Polish Falcons Alliance of America, Pittsburgh, Ps., Sept. 20, 

1939. Poland 

Polish Inter-Organization "Centrala" of Waterbury, Waterbury, 

Conn., Feb. 28, 1940. Poland 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



$145. 00 
1, 639. 89 
2, 845. CO 
7, 207. 10 
1,210.55 
194. 50 

1, 514. 37 
337, 667. 34 

80G. 14 

6, 146. 46 

26, 657. 91 
5, 035. 89 

10, 279. 90 

110,261.6" 

6, 682. 03 

5. 673. 91 

8. 862. 97 

2, 622. 67 

1,057.05 

427.01 
406, 905, 49 

2, 036. 85 

29, 120. 00 

2, 196. 08 

474.50 

1,294.10 

3, 787. 72 

6.915.63 

4, 273. 67 

10, 947. 37 



None 

None 

$750. 00 

5, 250. 00 
826. 17 

None 

1, 400. 28 
None 

None 

4, 689. 86 

25,147.00 
3, 377. 00 

7, 745. 15 

60,000.00 

6, 580. 15 
361. 25 

7, 946. 85 

226. 32 

800.00 

350.31 
251, 298. 05 

1, 160. 55 

19, 769. 05 

None 

314.23 

994.24 

3, 142. 00 

6, 392. 86 
3, 025. 00 

9, 102. 23 

607. 76 



$223.90 
341. 17 

11.50 
393. 93 
384.38 

51.00 

19.18 
8, 455. 88 

141.00 

None 

103. 39 
None 

2, 534. 75 

31,868.09 

None 

481. 34 

16 00 

7.00 

80.82 

21.67 
10, 334. 72 

2, ,536. 18 

132. 26 

36.30 

158. 27 

148. 57 

61.26 

1.34 
207.90 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Sept. 30. 1940, 

including 

cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



None 

$1, 198. 72 

2, 083. 50 

1, 663. 17 

None 

143. 50 

94.91 
329,111.46 

665. 14 

556. 60 

1, 407. 52 
1,658.89 

None 

18, 393. 58 

101.88 

4, 831. 32 

901.12 

2, 389. 25 

176. 23 

65.03 
145, 272. 72 

None 

9, 218. 69 

2, 160. 78 

2.00 

151.29 

594. 46 

521.43 
1,040.77 

1,825.14 

108. 99 



Estimated 
value of 

contribu- 
tions in 

kind now 
on hand 



None 

None 

None 

$850. 00 

None 

None 

1,300.00 
None 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

1, 600. 00 

1,200.00 

None 

3.10. 00 
100, 500. 00 

None 

265.40 

None 

None 

75.00 

1,800.00 

4, 000. 00 
None 

None 

None 



None 

None 

None 

$250. 00 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

75.00 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 



• No complete reports for the months of July, August, and September have been received from this organization. 
■ No report for the month of September has been received from this organization. 



NOVEMBER 2, 19 40 



399 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries— Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Polish Literary Guild of New Britain, Conn., New Britain, 

Conn.. Sept. 21, 1939. Poland.. 

Polish National -\lliance of the United States of North America, 

Chicago, 111., Sept. 27, 1939. Poland 

Polish National Council of Montgomery County, Amsterdam, 

N. Y., Oct. 12, 1939. Poland 

Polish National Council of New York, New York, N. Y., Sept. 14, 

1939. Poland and France... 

The Polish Naturalization Independent Club, Worcester, Mass., 

Sept. 20. UI39. Poland... 

Polish Prisoners of War Kelief Committee, Brooklyn, N. Y., 

Sept. 14. 1940.' Germany 

Polish Relief of Carteret. N. J., Carteret, N. J., Oct. 11, 1939. 

Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Boston, Boston, Mass., Sept. 14, 1939. 

Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Brockton, Mass., Brockton, Mass., 

Sept. 25, 1939. Poland , 

Polish Relief Committee of Cambridge, Mass., Cambridge, Mass. 

.Sept. 16, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Columbia County, Hudson, N. Y., 

Mar. 15, 1940. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Delaware, Wilmington, Del., Sept. 

22, 1939. Poland ^ 

Polish Relief Committee, Detroit, Mich.. Sept. 11. 1939. Poland 
Polish Relief Committee of Fitchburp. Fitchburj:. Mass., Mar. 

29, 1940. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee. Flint. Mich., Sept. 18, 1939. Poland.. 
Polish Relief Committee of Holyoke, Mass., Holyoke, Mass., 

Nov. 4, 1939. Poland , 

Polish Relief Committee of Jackson, Micb., Jackson, Mich., 

Nov. 9. 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee, New Bedford, Mass., Oct. 31, 1939. 

Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Philadelphia and vicinity, Phila- 

dolphla. Pa., Sept. 12, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of the Polish National Home Associa- 
tion, Lowell, Mass., Nov. 27, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee, Taunton, Mass., Dec. 13, 1939. Po- 
land 



Polish Relief Fund of Fall River, Mass., Fall River, Mass., Nov. 

8. 1939. Poland , 

Polish Relief Fund, Jersey City, N. J.. Sept. 12, 1939. Poland... 
Polish Relief Fund. Jewott City, Conn.. Oct. 3, 1939. Poland... 
Polish Relief Fund of Meriden, Meriden, Conn., Oct. 12, 1939. 

Poland 

Pplish Relief Fund, Middletown. Conn., Sept. 23, 1939. Poland. 
Polish Relief Fund, Niagara Falls, N. Y., Oct. 26. 1939. Poland. 
Polish Relief Fund of Palmer, Mass., Tliree Rivers, Mass., Oct. 

20, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund of Syracuse, N. Y., and vicinity, Syracuse, 

N. Y., Oct. 31, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund Committee, Los Angeles, Calif., Deo. 13, 1939. 

Poland 

Polish Relief Fund Committee of Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wis., 

Sept. 26, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund Committee of Passaic and Bergen Counties, 

Inc., Passaic, N. J., Sept. 22, 1939. Poland. 

Polish Union of the United States of North America, Wilkes- 

Barre, Pa., Sept. 8, 1939. Poland 



• No complete report for the month of September has been received from this 



Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Sept. 30, 1940. 

including 
cost of goods 

purchased 

and still ou 

hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of 

contribu- 
tions in 

kin<l now 
on band 


$2, 882. 59 


$2,000.00 


$13.00 


$S69. 59 


None 


None 


296,270.37 


231.065.00 


1, 729. 33 


63, 476. 04 


None 


None 


4, 402. 62 


2,910.00 


97.64 


1, 395. 08 


$6,000.00 


None 


90.886.83 


70.640.78 


11,803.98 


8,44Z07 


280. 633. 50 


$189, 258. 50 


3. 609. 12 


3.200.00 


8.65 


400.47 


None 


None 


125.31 


109.95 


14.36 


1.00 


None 


None 


1, 330. IS 


800.00 


13.00 


517. 16 


45.00 


None 


8,626.82 


7. 101. 19 


422.84 


1. 102. 79 


2,600.00 


None 


1,835.48 


1,201.27 


247.67 


386.54 


360.00 


None 


2, 620. 08 


1,142.30 


396. 16 


1.083.22 


600.00 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


7,637.62 


7,089.84 


235.83 


312. 15 


4,250.00 


200.00 


158, 220. 49 


08,603.14 


6,893.33 


53, 724. 02 


56, 974. 00 


None 


749.80 


460.40 


41.09 


248. 31 


130.00 


None 


0, .■»!. 53 


3.300.00 


1. 433. 87 


I. 827. 06 


None 


None 


5.887.28 


5, 026. 56 


208.35 


483.37 


775.00 


None 


1.790.50 


622.60 


270.48 


906.52 


7.50.00 


None 


10.077.56 


7,397.24 


870.29 


1, 810. 03 


3, 850. 00 


None 


43.276.92 


32.510.00 


702.04 


10,003.88 


None 


None 


2,840.34 


1,500.00 


481. 28 


859.06 


None 


None 


2,820.62 


2.257.00' 


23.17 


540.36 


1,375.00 


None 


1. 180. 78 


1.000.00 


30.10 


i.'io.es 


None 


None 


fiO. 285. 25 


5.3. 108. 59 


1.891.80 


6,284.86 


1. 575. 00 


None 


1, 343. 40 


1.236.90 


101. 08 


5.42 


400.00 


None 


1. 806. 69 


1.500.00 


27.90 


278. 79 


None 


None 


4, 776. 56 


3. 061. 37 


18.20 


1, 696. 99 


None 


None 


2,660.72 


2.500.00 


21.80 


128.92 


None 


None 


1. 7.';6. 90 


620.46 


212.29 


954.15 


4,004.95 


None 


12. 370. 16 


8.869.00 


2.511.99 


989. 17 


1,850.00 


None 


870. 99 


448.00 


173. 14 


249.85 


150.00 


None 


15,997.07 


13, 732. 72 


895. 55 


1.368.80 


11,607.40 


500.00 


12,112.06 


9, 270. 17 


1,036.51 


1.805.38 


3,678.00 


None 


2. 156. 24 


2,000.00 


None 


I.W. 24 


None 


None 


ved from this 


srganlzatipn. 











400 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions tor Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Polish United Societies of Holy Trinity Parish, Lowell, Mass., 

Sept. 20, 1939. Poland 

Polish War SufTerers Relief Committee (Fourth Ward), Toledo, 

Ohio, Sept. 21, 1939. Poland.. -- 

Polish Welfare Council, Schenectady, N. Y., Sept. 22, 1939. 

Poland - --- 

Polish White Cross Club of West Utica, Utica, N. Y., Oct. 20, 

1939. Poland -- 

Polish Women's Fund to Fatherland, Lawrence, Mass., Sept. 

23,1939. Poland.-.. 

Polish Womin's Relief Committee, New York, N. Y., Nov. 24, 

1939. France, Poland, and Germany 

Polski Komitet Ratunkowy (Polish Relief Fund), Binghamton, 

N. Y., Sept. 25, 1939. Poland 

Pulaski Civic League of Middlesex County, N. J., South River, 

N. J., Sept. 30, 1939. Poland 

Pulaski Loaeue of Queens County, Inc., Jamaica, N. Y., Oct. 21, 

1939. Poland 

Queen Wilhclmina Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y., May 17, 1940. 

Netherlands. France, Poland, United Kingdom, India, Aus- 
tralia, New Zealand, Canada, Union of South Africa, Norway, 

Belgium, and Luxemburg 

Refugees of England, Inc., New York, N. Y., July 12, 1940." 

Great Britain and France 

Relief Agency for Polish War Sufferers, Willimantic, Cotm., 

Sept. 29, 1939. Poland 

Relief Committee of United Polish Societies, Chicopee, Mass., 

Oct. 21, 1939. Poland 

Relief Fund for SufTerers in Poland Committee, Kenosha, Wis., 

Sept. 25, l'.i:'.'j. Poland.... 

Relief Society for Jews in Lublin, Los Angeles, Calif., Dec. 13, 

1939. Poland 

Russian Cliildrcn's Welfare Society, Inc., Now York, N. Y., 

Sept. 29. 1939. Germany, France, and Poland 

St. Andrews (Scottish) Society of Washington, D. C, Washington, 

D. C, Juno IS, 1940. Scotland 

St. Stephens Polish Relief Fund of Perth Amboy, N. J., Perth 

Amboy, N, J., Sept. 27, 1939. Poland 

The Salvation Army, New York, N. Y., May 23, 1940. England, 

France, Norway, Belgium, and the Netherlands 

Save the Children Federation, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 8, 

1939. England, Poland, Belgium, and the Netherlands... 

Schuylkill and Carbon Counties Relief Committee for Poland, 

Frackville, Pa., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland.. 

Scots' Charitable Society, Boston, Mass., May 9, 194G.« Scot- 
land — 

Scottish Games of New Jersey Association, Fairhaven, N. J., 

Julys, 1940. Great Britain 

Le Secours Frangais, New York, N. Y., Oct. 6, 1939. France 

Secours Franco- .\m6ricain — War Relief, Pittsburgh, Pa., Nov. 20, 

1939. Great Britain 

The Seventh Column, Inc., West Fairlee, Vt., June 12, 1940." 

Franco and England 

Share A Smoke Club, Inc., Ithaca, N. Y., Nov. 14, 1939. Eng- 
land, France, Norway, Belgium, and the Netherlands 



Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Sept. 30, 1940, 

including 

cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of 
contribu- 
tions in 
kind now 
on hand 


K 083. 39 


$1, 788. 31 


$162. 71 


$2, 132. 37 


$1 , 240. 00 


None 


.1, 739. 86 


5, 424. 60 


117.09 


198. 17 


None 


None 


5, 550. 76 


5, 260. 35 


57.32 


233.09 


6, 160. 00 


Nono 


7, 021. 17 


4. 962. 70 


421. 66 


1, 636. 81 


1,600.00 


None 


5, 724. 56 


1, 821. 10 


642. 34 


3, 261. 12 


1, 800. 00 


$850.00 


7, 443. 14 


1,487.37 


2, 423. 81 


3,53L96 


2. 068. 80 


Nono 


3. 881. 90 


2. 619. 04 


267. 13 


995.73 


780. 00 


None 


639.29 


None 


85.00 


564.29 


None 


None 


7,443.93 


6, 700 00 


159.66 


584. 28 


None 


None 


362, 605. 45 


79,061.70 


28, 530. 80 


256,012.95 


None 


None 


14, 604. 50 


7,036.77 


2, 946. 18 


4, 622. 55 


2,506.00 


None 


2, 813. 24 


2,080.28 


175. 72 


667.24 


637.10 


None 


7. 146. 57 


5, 799. 66 


None 


1,346.91 


2, 190. 00 


None 


3, 600. 59 


3, 066. .50 


3(M. 41 


169.68 


1,000.00 


None 


865.58 


175.00 


281.82 


408. 76 


None 


None 


6,425.02 


4, 483. 92 


1,. 566. 65 


374. 55 


1, 1()6. 20 


2,337.05 


802.03 


None 


71.65 


730. 38 


None 


None 


2,691.48 


None 


None 


2,691.45 


None 


None 


184,358.81 


117,764.00 


1, 734. 47 


34,860.34 


13,414.00 


None 


63, 295. 53 


32, 732. 25 


13, 335. 26 


7, 228. 02 


None 


None 


5, 602. 24 


4, 760. 71 


None 


841. 63 


None 


None 


328.00 


None 


None 


328.00 


None 


None 


1,456.12 


None 


954. 02 


502. 10 


None 


None 


60. 652. 16 


42,119.26 


30, 253. 88 


None 


2, 707. 75 


1.186.91 


1, 790. 48 


1, 510. 11 


96.14 


184.23 


1, 869. 60 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


629.70 


360.00 


113.60 


166. 10 


None 


None 



• This registrant serves primarily as a clearing house for the distribution abroad of contributions collected by other registrants; those receipts and dis- 
bursements arc not included in the figures here given, since they are shown elsewhere in this tabulation following the names of the original collecting regis- 
trants. 

• No report for the month of Septemberhas been received from this organization. 



NOVEMBER 2, 194 



401 



Contributions for Relief in Bellioerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of re(;istration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Sept. 30. 1940, 

including 

cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of 

contribu- 
tions in 

kind now 
on band 



Sociedades Hispanas Aliadas, San Francisco, Calif., Mar. 20, 1940. 

France 

Sociedades Hispanas Confedcradas, Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan. 22, 1940. 

France 

Soci6t6 Franfaise de St. Louis, Inc., St. Louis, Mo., Nov. 15, 1939. 
France 

Soci6t* Israelite FraiivMise de Socours Mutuols de New York, New 

York, N. Y., Juno 4, 1940. France 

Society of the Dovotoos of Jerusalem, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Dec. 18, 1939. Pn!i'£tino 

The Somerset Workroom, Far Hills, N. J., Apr. 25, 1940. France 

and Great Britain _ .._ 

Soutlihridgo Allied Coramittiie for Relief in Poland, Southbridge, 

Mass., Nov. 9, 19:w. Poland 

Le Souvenir Fran^ais, Detroit, Mich., May 1, 1940. France and 

Belgium 

Spanish Refugee Belief Campaign, New York, N. Y., Sept. 20, 

1939. France 

Springfield and Vic'nity Polish Relief Fund Committee, Spring- 
field, Mass., .''epi. -.S, 1939. Poland 

Superior Council of the Society of St. Vincent do Paul, New 

York, N. Y., Apr. 5, 1940. France .- 

Toledo Committee for Relief of War Victims, Toledo, Ohio, 

Sept. 19, 1939. Poland - - --.. 

Tolstoy Foundation, Inc., New York, N. Y., Oct. 17, 1939. 

Franco, Poland, England, and Czechoslovakia — 

Mrs. Walter U. Tuckerman, Bothesda, Md., Nov. 24, 1939. 

Great Britain - 

Edmund Tyszka, namtramck, Mich.. Sept. 19, 1939. Poland... 
Ukrainian Relief Committee, New York, N. Y., June 28, 1940. 

Germany , France, England, and Italy. 

L'Union Alsacienne, Inc., New York, N. Y., Oct. 28, 1939. 

France _ 

Unitarian Service Committee of the American Unitarian .\ssocia- 

tion, Boston, Mass., May 23, 1940. France, British Isles, and 

the Netherlands ,. 

United .American Polish Organizations, South River, N. J., South 

River, N. J., Oct. 20, 1939. Poland 

United .American Spanish Aid Committee, New York, N. Y., 

Apr. 29, 1940. United Kingdom and France 

United Bilgorayer Hclief, Inc., New York, N. Y., Mar. 21, 1940. 

Poland -.- - - 

United British War Relief .\ssociation, Somerville, Mass., June 

14, 1940. Great Britain and Northern Ireland^ 

United Charity Institutions of Jerusalem, New York, N. Y., Oct. 

13. 1939. Palestine.. 

United Committee for French Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Oct. 26, 1939. France and England 

United Fund for Refugee Children, Inc.(formerly Beth-Lechem, 

Inc.), New York, N. Y., Sept. 21, 1939. Poland, France, and 

England _ , 

United German Societies, Inc., Portland, Oreg., Portland, Oreg., 

Jan. 8, 1940. Germany 

United Nowy Dworer Reliel Committee, New York, N. Y., Jan. 

3, 1940. Poland -.. _ 

United Opoler Relief of New York, New York, N. Y., Dec. 9, 

1939. Poland 

United Polish Committees in Racine, Wis., Bacine, Wis., Nov. 2, 

1939. Poland.. 

United Polish Organizations of Salem, Mass., Salem, Mass., Oct. 

20, 1939. Poland. 

United Polish Societies of Bristol, Conn., Bristol, Conn., Sept. 

29, 1939. Poland.. 



$1, 277. 72 

31, 199. 12 

852.81 

314.00 

12,835.04 

11.088.76 

1,084.92 

58.00 

35,889.14 

1,090.14 

310 00 

6, 197. 61 

19, 344. 00 

3,505.25 
3, 037. 4C 

323.60 

2, 400. 31 

23, 167. 78 
3, 147. 22 
2,514.23 
1,213.47 
2,534.20 

45,948.00 
117,490.18 

4. 088. 16 

2. 379. 17 
832.96 
677. 15 

2, 052. 19 
2. 526. 83 
1,221.19 



None 

$30, 240. 87 

373. 49 

None 

6,800.00 

4, 513. 02 

135. 81 

None 

11,534.58 

1.000.00 

310.00 

4,601,17 

10, 815. 64 

1, 572. 82 
3, 037. 46 

40.00 

400.27 

14,551.8$ 

2, 400. 00 

1, 438. 85 

None 

556.00 

23, 509. 95 

75,995.46 

918. 15 

2, 000. 00 

84.70 

None 

1, 350. 00 

1,965.27 

576. 80 



$706. 13 

958.25 

57.56 

2.80 

5, 854. 49 

581.85 

20.91 

None 

23, 219. 83 

21.25 

None 

629.79 

3, 464. 72 

3.95 
None 

176.89 

685.47 

2,942.57 
136. 94 

1,099.58 

147.94 

401.54 

21,822.54 

9, 839. 95 

2, 956. 52 
133.99 
191.96 

35.21 
212. 16 
437. 91 

26.75 



$571. 59 

None 

421. 7C 

311.20 

170. 55 

5, 993. 88 

928.20 

68.00 

1, 134. 73 

68.89 

None 

966.65 

5,063.64 

1,928.48 
None 

107. 71 

1, 420. 57 

5, 673. 36 

610.28 

None 

1, 065. 53 

1, 576. 66 

615. 51 

31, 663. 77 

213. 49 
245.18 
556.30 
641.94 
490.03 
123.65 
617.64 



None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

$9, 509. 40 
700.00 
None 

16,486.00 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

315.00 

100.00 
None 
None 
None 

175.00 

None 

8, 188. 87 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
595.00 
300.00 



None 
None 

$aoo 

None 

None 

1, 474. 20 

None 

None 

None 

None 

500.00 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
404.45 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

V- 

None 



402 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
CONTRIBITTIONS FOR RELIEF IN BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Sept. 30, 1940, 

including 
cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of 

contribu- 
tions in 

kind now 
on band 



United Polish Societies of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, Calif., Oct, 

21, 1939. Poland --- - 

United Reading Appeal for Polish War Sufferers, Reading, Pa., 

Sept. 22, 1839. Poland 

Urgent Relief for France, Washington, D. C, Dec. 26, 1939. 

France and Great Britain 

Mrs. Paul Verdier Fund, San Francisco, Calif., Oct. 11, 1939. 

France - - 

Woman's Auxiliary Board of the Scots' Charitable Society, Inc., 

Waverly, Mass., Feb. 28, 1940. Scotland 

Women's Allied War Relief Association of St. Louis, Clayton, 

Mo., Dec. 18, 1939. Great Britain and France - 

Registrants whose registrations were revoked prior to Sept. 1, 

1940, and who had no balance on hand as of that date 

Total" 



$2, 749. 01 
7, 668. 29 

19, 528. 34 
4, 207. 41 
1,481.12 
6, .537. 65 
266,741.65 



$2. 262. 10 
5, 729. 14 

14,962,17 

3, 897. 31 

1, 368. 10 

3, 763. 00 

242, 407. 51 



$346. 52 

140. 13 

575. 42 

76.45 

13.67 

8.02 

27, 502. 73 



$140, 39 

1,799.02 

3. 990. 75 

233.65 

99.35 

2, 776. 63 

None 



None 

None 

$4, 085. 55 

3. 282. 00 

None 

6, 123. 80 

1,336,263.98 



None 
None 
$2, 285. 10 
None 
None 
None 
None 



13, 358, 326. 1 



8, 732, 371. 73 



1, 223, 842. 06 



3, 434, SOI. 46 



2,781,641.1 



281, 555. 73 



■ It is not possible to strike an exact balance in these published totals, since some registrants have included in their expenditures monies available 
from loans or advances, which are not considered by the Department to be "funds received" and hence are not reported as such. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



SOVEREIGNTY 

Convention on the Provisional Adminis- 
tration of European Colonies and Pos- 
sessions in the Americas 

Vnifed States 

On October 24, 1940, the instrument of ratifi- 
cation on behalf of the United States of the 
Convention on the Provisional Administration 
of Euroi^ean Colonies and Possessions in the 
Americas, signed at Habana on July 30, 1940, 
was deposited with the Pan American Union.'* 
The United States is thus the first signatory 
government to deposit its instrument of ratifi- 
cation of this convention. 



'' The text of the convention is printed in the BiiUf- 
tin for August 24, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. (jl) pp. 14.5-14S. 



NATURE PROTECTION AND WILDLIFE 
PRESERVATION 

Convention on Nature Protection and Wild- 
life Preservation in the Western Hem- 
isphere 

Costa Rica 

By a letter dated October 28, 1940, the Direc- 
tor General of the Pan American Union in- 
formed the Secretary of State that the Conven- 
tion on Nature Protection and Wildlife 
Preservation, which was opened for signature 
at the Pan American Union on October 12, 1940, 
was signed on behalf of the Government of 
Costa Rica on October 24, 1940. The conven- 
tion has now been signed by the following coim- 
tries: United States of America, Costa Rica, 
Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salva- 
dor, Nicaragua, Peru, and Venezuela. 



NOVEMBER 2, 194 

POSTAL 

Universal Postal Convention of 1939 

Ivan 

The American Lep:ation at Teheran reported 
by a despatch dated August 7, 19-10, that the 
Iranian Majlis ratified on August 3, 1940, the 
Universal Postal Convention, with final proto- 
col and provisions relating to transportation of 
airmail, the Parcel Post Arrangement, and the 
Monej' Order Arrangement, adopted by the 
Eleventh Postal Union Congress at Buenos 
Aires on May 23, 1939. 



403 

vessels into the United States from Greenland 
or from any other foreign country ; the suspen- 
sion to take effect from October 9, 1940, and to 
contiiHie so long as the recipi'ocal exemption of 
vessels belonging to citizens of the United States 
and their cargoes shall be continued, and no 
longer", was signed by the President on October 
29, 1940. 

The text of this proclamation appears in full 
in the Federal Reghter for November 1, 1940 
(vol. 5, no. 214), page 4329. 



TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

Regional Radio Convention for Central 
America, Panama, and the Canal Zone 
(Treaty Series No. 949) 

Nicaragua 

The American Minister to Guatemala re- 
ported by a despatch dated October 14, 1940, 
that the instrument of ratification by Nicaragua 
of the Regional Radio Convention for Central 
America, Panama, and the Canal Zone, signed 
at Guatemala City on Deceml)er 8, 1938, was 
deposited with the Guatemalan Ministry for 
Foreign Affairs on October 11, 1940, The con- 
vention has been ratified by the United States 
of America, Guatemala, and Nicaragua. 



Greenland 



SUSPENSION OF TONNAGE DUTIES 
FOR VESSELS OF GREENLAND 

A proclamation (no. 2434) providing that 
"the foreign discriminating duties of tonnage 
and imposts within the United States" be "sus- 
pended and discontinued so far as respects the 
A'essels of Greenland and the produce, manu- 
factures, or merchandise imported in the said 



Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Keleased to tlie press November 2] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
^Vmerican Foreign Service since October 26, 
1940: 

Career Officers 

Howaril Bucknell, Jr., of Atlanta, Ga., Coun- 
selor of Embassy and Consul General at Madrid, 
Spain, has been assigned for duty in the Depart- 
ment of State. 

Joseph Flack, of Doylestown, Pa., now serv- 
ing in the Department of State, has been desig- 
nated Counselor of Embassy and Consul Gen- 
eral at Madrid, Spain. 

AVilliam E. DeCourcy, of Amarillo, Tex., Con- 
sul at Naples, Italy, has been assigned for duty 
in the Department of State. 

William E. Flournoy, Jr., of Portsmouth, Va., 
Third Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul 
at Managua, Nicaragua, has been designated 
Second Secretary of Legation and Consul at 
that post, and will serve in dual capacity. 

C. Burke Elbrick, of Louisville, Ky., Third 
Secretary of Embassy, Poland, has been assigned 
as Vice Consul at Lisbon, Portugal. 



404 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Harry M. Donaldson, of West Newton, Pa., 
Vice Consul formerly assigned to Havre, France, 
has been assigned as Vice Consul at Lisbon, 
Portugal. 

Non-career Officers 

Mazzeo, of Washington, D. C, Vict' 
La Guaira, Venezuela, has been ap- 
ice Consul at Mexico City, Mexico, 
d W. Lamprecht, of Chicago, 111., Vice 
merly assigned to Cherbourg, France, 
appointed Vice Consul at Lisbon, 



Louis B 
Consul at 
pointed V 

Eeinhar 
Consul foi 
has been 
Portugal. 



Regulations 



The following Government regulations may 
be of interest to readers of the Bulletin: 

General Sugar Regulations: AmeudmeDt to Regu- 
lations Governing Entry of Sugar into the Continental 
United States for Re-Export. (Department of Agricul- 
ture: Agricultural Adjustment Administration.) [G. S. 
R. Series 2, No. 8.] October 26, 1940. Federal Register, 
October 29, 1940 (vol. 5, no. 211), p. 4257 (The National 
Archives of the United States). 

Invoices, Entry, and Assessment of Duties : Mer- 
chandise Subject to Purchase Tax under British Fi- 
nance (No. 2) Act, 1940. (Treasury Department: Bu- 
reau of Customs.) [Treasury Decision 50254.] October 
26, 1940. Federal Register, October 30, 1940 (vol. 5, 
no. 212), p. 4301 (The National Archives of the United 
States). 

Relief from Duties on Merchandise Lost, Stolen, De- 
stroyed, Injured, Abandoned, or Short-Shipi)ed : 
[Amendments Regarding] Special Procedure with Re- 
spect to Relief from Duty on the Ground of Nonim- 
portation in the Case of Perishable Merchandise. 
(Treasury Department: Bureau of Customs.) [Treas- 
ury Decision 50259.] October 24, 1940. Federal Register, 



November 1, 1940 (vol. 5, no. 214), p. 4330 (The Na- 
tional Archives of the United States). 

Wild Animals from Bolivia and Argentina : Consular 
Certificates Required in Connection with the Importa- 
tion of Chinchillas from Bolivia and Argentina, as Well 
as Vicunas and Alpacas from Bolivia. (Treasury De- 
partment : Bureau of Customs.) [Treasury Decision 
50260.] October 30, 1940. Federal Register, November 
1, 1940 (vol. 5, no. 214), p. 4336 (The National Ar- 
chives of the United States). 



Legislation 



An Act To revise and codify the nationality laws of 
the United States into a comprehensive nationality 
code. Approved October 14, 1940. (Public, No. 853, 
70th Cong., 3d sess.) 42 pp. 100. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Our Foreign Policy and National Defense : Address 
by Sumner Welles, Under Secretary of State, Before 
tlie Foreign Affairs Council, Cleveland, September 28, 
1940. Publication 1511. 17 pp. 5^. 

Publications of the Department of State : A List 
Cumulative From October 1, 1929. October 1, 1940. 
Publication 1512. 24 pp. Free. 

Establishment of Board of Inquiry for the Great 
Lakes Fisheries : Agreement Between the United 
States of America and Canada — Effected by exchange 
of notes signed February 29, 1940; effective February 
29, 1940. Executive Agreement Series No. 182. Pub- 
lication 1514. 2 pp. 5^. 



U. S. GOVERNMSNT PRINTING OFFICE: 1940 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents . . - . Subscription price, $2.75 a year. 

PUBLISHED WBEELT WITH THB APPROVAL OF THB DIEECTOB OF THE BnHEAO OF THE BDDaDT 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 




Jl 



J 



H 



riN 



NOVEMBER 9, 1940 
Vol. Ill: No. 12 -Publication I 526 

Qontents 

General: " Page 

Statement by the Secretary of State 407 

Sinking of American vessel 407 

Europe: 

Repatriation of American citizens 408 

Presentation of letters of credence by the Minister of 

Luxemburg 408 

American Repurlics: 

Visit of the Brazilian Chief of Staff 409 

Commercial Policy: 

Supplementary-trade-agrcement negotiations with 

Canada 409 

The Department: 

Appointment of officers 411 

Treaty Information: 
Agriculture: 

Convention for the Standardization of the Methods 

of Keeping and Operating Cattle Herdbooks . . 412 
Fisheries : 

Convention for the Preservation and Protection of 

Fur Seals (Treaty Series No. 564) 412 

Commerce : 

Supplementary Trade Agreement with Canada . . 413 
The Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 413 

Regulations 413 




25 1940 



General 



STATEMENT BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE 



[Released to tbe press November 6] 

Consciousness of the tremendous responsi- 
bility which rests upon all of us in the present 
crisis should overshadow any sense of personal 
elation or disappointment over the election 
result. 

It is a matter of profound si<rnificance that 
our foreign policies, the basic features of which 
were supported by both the leading candidates 
for President, were given yesterday Nation- 
wide approval. 

With the election over, our Nation can now go 
forward with (he fullest measure of practical 



teamwork by the Government and the people in 
the firm continuance of those foreign policies. 
Tliis course offers the greatest contribution our 
country can make toward the restoration of 
stable international relations wliicli are so es- 
sential to the vital interests of this Nation and 
of all nations. 

In a spirit of n()n-i)artisanship and non-fac- 
tionalism, I want to appeal again for united 
effort to carry forward a program of principles 
and practical measures, the success of which 
means everything to the peace and safety and 
welfare of the American people. 



SINKING OF AMERICAN VESSEL 



[Released to the press November 0] 

The American Consul at Melbourne, Aus- 
tralia, Mr. Erie R. Dickover, reported to the 
Department of State on November 8, 11 p. m. 
(Australian time), that the American Pioneer 
Line steamer Cifi/ of RaijviUe had an explo- 
sion that night while off Cape Otway, about 
120 miles from ^lelbourne, according to a re- 
port from the lighthouse-keeper at that place. 
There were no radio messages from the ship 
and her lights were still burning. The Aus- 
tralian naval authorities were sending tugs 
and mine sweepers to the scene and notifying 
all fishing boats in the vicinity. There was no 

2742()G — 40 



definite information as to the cause of the 
explosion. 

[Released to the press November 9] 

The American Consul at Melbourne reported 
at 11 a. m., November 9 (Melbourne time), that 
the City of RayvUle sank soon after the explo- 
sion. The third engineer is the only member of 
the crew who is missing. He was believed to 
have gone down with the ship. The other 37 
members of the crew, one of whom was slightly 
injured, were landed at Apollo Bay. Vice Con- 
sul Fred W. Jandrey is en route to Apollo Bay 
to investigate. 

407 



Europe 



REPATRIATION OF AMERICAN CITIZENS 



[Released to tlie press November 7] 

The Department of State announces that a 
request was made of the German Government 
and of the Italian Government to grant a safe- 
conduct for an American vessel to proceed to a 
port on the west coast of Ireland to bring home 
about 1,200 American citizens still in Great 
Britain. The Italian Government very 
promptly responded favorably. A copy of the 
Italian reply was furnished to the German Gov- 
ernment with the suggestion that the Govern- 
ment of the United States would be glad to 
receive similar assurances. 

After a considerable delay the following note, 



dated November 6, 1940, has been received from 
the German Government : 

"The Foreigii Office has the honor to acknowl- 
edge the receipt of the notes of October 27 
and November 1 regarding the voyage of an 
American ship to repatriate American citizens 
from an Irish port. 

"On the basis of the previous statement of the 
German Government to the effect that the areas 
around England are areas of military opera- 
tions the Reich Government is not in a position 
to furnish any sort of assurance of the nature 
requested." 



PRESENTATION OF LETTERS OF CREDENCE BY THE 
MINISTER OF LUXEMBURG 



[Released to the press November 8] 

Remarks of the neidy appointed Minister of 
Luxemburg, Mr. Hugues Le Gallais, upon the 
occasion of the presentation of his letters of 
credence : 

The President: 

I have the honor to place in your excellency's 
hands the letters which accredit me to you as 
Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipo- 
tentiary of Her Eoyal Highness the Grand 
Duchess of Luxemburg. 

It is a great honor for me to have been desig- 
nated by My Gracious Sovereign to fulfill this 
high mission, the importance of which I fully 
realize. 

No doubt you are aware, Mr. President, that 

the most friendly sentiments have always been 

manifested by the people of Luxemburg to the 

people of the United States. After the war 

408 



of 1914-1918, to these sentiments was added 
one of deep gratitude when the United States 
and their Allies restored to the Grand Duchy 
of Luxemburg its independence and freedom. 

At this tragic hour in my country's history, 
our eyes are again turned to the United States, 
which, under your enlightened leadership, have 
become the foremost guardian of the traditions 
of justice and right. 

Your declaration, Mr. President, that the 
United States would never recognize territorial 
acquisition by violence inspires my country- 
men while they await a happier future. 

Mr. President, all my efforts will be directed 
toward strengthening the bonds existing be- 
tween our two countries, and I am convinced 
that in the future, as has been the case in the 
past, I can always rely on your kind support 
in the fulfilment of my task. 



NOVEMBER 9, 194 



409 



President Roosevelfs reply to the remarks of 
Mr. H agues Le Gallais: 

Mr. Minister: 

It is a pleasure to receive from your hands 
the letters of Her Royal Highness the Grand 
Duchess of Luxemburg accrediting you near 
the Government of the United States of Amer- 
ica as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister 
Plenipotentiary. 

I am gratified to hear from you that the 
people of Luxemburg continue to hold toward 
the people of the United States the friendly 
sentiments you have expressed. The people of 
the United States cherish the friendship of the 
people of Luxemburg and reciprocate those 
sentiments to the fullest extent. 

In this tragic hour in the history of your 
country the sympathy of the United States 
goes out to the people of Luxemburg, who may 
take comfort in the assurance that the people 
of the United States desire nothing more than 
to see them happy once more in full independ- 
ence under their Gracious Sovereign. 

You may count upon my full cooperation 
and that of the competent officers of tlie Gov- 



ernment of the United States in your efforts 
to strengthen the bonds which exist between 
our two countries. 



American Republics 



VISIT OF THE BRAZILIAN CHIEF OF 
STAFF 

[Released to the press November 0] 

The following telegram was received by the 
President from the Chief of Staff of the Bra- 
zilian Army, Gen. Goes Monteiro: 

"S. S. Argentina, 
November 6, lOJfi. 
"President Roosevelt, 

Waskmgtan, D. C. 
"On returning from my second visit to the 
United States I wish to ex]>ress my great ad- 
miration for a people frieiuily to Brazil and 
to offer my homage to Your Excellency. 

"General Goes Monteiro" 



Commercial Policy 



SUPPLEMENTARY-TRADE-AGREEMENT NEGOTIATIONS WITH 

CANADA 



[Released to the press November S] 

The Secretary of State today issued formal 
notice of intention to negotiate with Canada a 
trade agreement to revise in certain respects 
and replace the supplementary trade agree- 
ment concerning the importation of silver- 
and black-fox furs and skins signed at Wash- 
ington on December 30, 1939 and now in force. 
Interested persons are invited to submit their 
views in regard to these proposed negotiations 
to the Committee for Reciprocity Information. 

294266 — 40 2 



The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
issued at the same time a notice setting Novem- 
ber 22, 1940 as the closing date for the submis- 
sion to it by interested persons of information 
and views in writing and of applications to 
appear at public hearings to be held by the 
Committee. This notice also set Wednesday, 
November 27, 1940, at 10 a. m. as the time for 
the opening of public hearings with respect to 
these negotiations, which hearings will be held 
before the Committee for Reciprocity Infor- 



410 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



mation in the hearing room of the United 
States Tariff Commission in the Tariif Com- 
mission Building, Eighth and E Streets NW., 
Washington, D. C. 

The projiosed negotiations will be of a lim- 
ited character and are intended to deal only 
with certain modifications of the provisions 
contained in the supplementary agreement 
with Canada signed December 30, 1939,^ con- 
cerning the importation of silver or black 
foxes, silver- or black-fox furs and skins 
(dressed and undressed), parts of such furs 
and skins, and articles made wholly or in cliief 
value of sucli furs and skins. The present 
United States import duty on silver- or black- 
fox furs and skins originating in Canada, as 
fixed in item 1519 (c) of article I of the sup- 
plementary trade agreement between the 
United States and Canada signed December 30, 
1939, is 35 percent ad valorem. The agree- 
ment also limited the total imports into the 
United States of live silver or black foxes, and 
silver- or black-fox furs and parts and articles 
made thereof, to 100,000 units in the 12-month 
period begimiing December 1 in each year. 
Of this quota, 58,300 units were allocated to 
Canada, and 41,700 units were allocated to 
other foreign countries. The quota for Can- 
ada for tiae 12 months beginning December 1, 
1939 was filled on March 1, 1940, and the quota 
for other foreign countries was filled on May 
1, 1940. 

For the purposes of the agreement, a unit 
was defined as a whole silver- or black-fox fur 
or skin or any separated part thereof or any 
article made wholly or in chief value of one of 
the foregoing, or a silver or black fox ; and any 
article made wholly or in chief value of two or 
more of the aforesaid furs, skins, or parts 
thereof was considered as consisting of the 
total number of such units in such article. 
While the bulk of the imports under the 
quotas in the current quota year consisted of 
whole furs or skins, there were also imported 



' See the Bulletin of December 2, 1939 (vol. I, no. 
23), pp. 639-640, and the Bullttin of December 30, 
1939 (vol. I, no. 27), pp. 739-741. 



678 units in the form of tails, paws, heads, and 
other separate pieces, and 1,569 live animals 
(of which it is believed the greater number 
were entered for pelting). No piece plates 
were imported during the curi'ent quota year, 
but it is estimated that there are approxi- 
mately 360 pounds of these articles now in 
warehouse awaiting entry when the new quota 
period opens on December 1. 

Experience in the administration of the 
quota has indicated the desirability of making 
certain changes in the provisions of the agree- 
ment of December 30, 1939. Tlie proposed 
negotiations, whicli are intended to effect these 
changes, will, apart from matters of an essen- 
tially technical nature, be restricted to con- 
sideration of : 

1. Confining the present quota of 100,000 
units to whole skins and live silver foxes for 
pelting purposes, such quota to be allocated 
among supplying countries. It is not intended 
to change tlie quota figure of 100,000, which, 
however, under the present agreement now ap- 
plies to imports of live foxes, whole furs or 
skins, and parts and articles made thereof. 

2. The establishment of separate, unallo- 
cated quotas for the importation of parts of 
silver- or black-fox furs and skins and articles 
made of such furs and skins, as follows : 

(a) Tails, paws, heads, and other separate 

pieces ; 

(b) Piece plates; 

(c) Articles other than piece plates made 

wdiolly or in chief value of fox fur. 

3. The exemption of silver foxes for breed- 
ing purposes from quota limitations, suitable 
provision to be made to differentiate breeding 
stock from animals to be imported for pelting 
purposes. 

No consideration will be given in tlie pro- 
posed negotiations to any change in the import 
duties on these products, or to the treatment 
by the United States of articles other than 
those mentioned above, or to the treatment by 
Canada of articles imported from the United 
States. 



NOVEMBER 9, 1940 



411 



department of state 

Trade Agreement Negotiations With Canada 

Notice of Intention, to Negotiate 
Pursuant to section 4 of an act of Congress 
approved June 12, 1934, entitled "An Act to 
Amend tlie Tariff Act of 1930," as extended by 
Public Resolution No. 61, approved April 12, 
1940, and to Executive Order No. 6750, of June 
27, 1934, I hereb)' give notice of intention to 
negotiate a trade agreement with the Govern- 
ment of Canada, to replace the supplementary 
trade agreement with that Government signed 
at Washington, December 30, 1939. 

All presentations of information and views in 
writing and applications for supplemental oral 
jjresentation of views with respect to the nego- 
tiation of such agreement should be submitted 
to the Committee for Reciprocity Information 
in accordance with the announcement of this 
date issued by that Committee concerning the 
manner and dates for the submission of briefs 
and applications, and the time set for public 
liearings. 



[seal] 



NOA'EMBER 8, 1940. 



Cordell Hull, 
Secretary of State. 



committee for reciprocity INFORMATION 

Trade Agrep;ment Negotl\tions AVitii Canada 
Public Notice 

Closing Date for Submission of Briefs, Novem- 
ber 22, 1940; Closing Date for Application 
To Be Heard, November 22, 1940; Public 
Hearings Open, November 27, 1940 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
hereby gives notice that all information and 
views in writing, and all applications for sup- 
IDlemental oral presentation of views, in regard 
to the negotiation of a trade agreement with the 
Government of Canada, notice of intention to 
negotiate which has been issued by the Secre- 
tary of State on this date, shall be submitted to 
the Committee for Reciprocity Information not 
later than 12 o'clock noon, November 22, 1940. 



Such communications should be addressed to 
"Chairman, Committee for Reciprocity Infor- 
mation, Tariff Commission Building, Eighth 
and E Streets NW., Washington, D. C." 

A public hearing will be held beginning at 10 
a. m. on November 27, 1940, before the Commit- 
tee for Reciprocity Information in the hearing 
room of the Tariff Commission in the Tariff 
Conunission Building, where supplemental oral 
statements will be heard. 

Six coi^ies of written statements, either type- 
written or printed, shall be submitted, of which 
one copy shall be sworn to. Appearance at hear- 
ings before the Committee may be made only by 
tliose persons who have filed written statements 
and who have within the time prescribed made 
written application for a hearing, and state- 
ments made at such hearings shall be under oath. 

By direction of the Committee for Reciprocity 
Information this 8th day of November 1940. 

John P. Gregg, 

Secretann/. 



The Department 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

[Released to tUe press November 9] 

The following recent appointments to offices 
in the Department have been made by the Sec- 
retary of State: 

Mr. Walter A. Adams, a Foreign Service offi- 
cer of class I, has been designated an Assistant 
Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs, 
effective November 7. 

Mr. Clark L. Willard was designated on Octo- 
ber 23 to serve as Acting Assistant Chief of the 
Division of International Conferences at such 
times as the Assistant Chief is absent from the 
Division. 

Mr. Dorsey Gassaway Fisher, a Foreign 
Service officer of class VII, was designated 
on November 4 Acting Assistant Chief of the 
Division of Current Information, effective as of 
October 2. 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



AGRICULTURE 

Convention for the Standardization of the 
Methods of Keeping and Operating Cattle 
Herdbooks 

Hungary 

By a note dated October 29, 1940, the Italian 
Ambassador at Washington informed the Secre- 
tary of State that on September 9, 1940 the 
Minister of Hungary in Rome deposited the 
instrument of ratification by Hungary of the 
International Convention for the Standardiza- 
tion of the Methods of Keeping and Operating 
Cattle Herdbooks, signed at Rome on October 
14, 1936. 

FISHERIES 

Convention for the Preservation and Pro- 
tection of Fur Seals (Treaty Series No. 
564) 

Japan 

By a telegram dated October 25, 1940, the 
American Ambassador at Tokyo reported the 
receipt of a note dated October 23, 1940 from 
the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs stat- 
ing that the Japanese Government abrogated 
the Convention for the Preservation and Pro- 
tection of Fur Seals, signed at Washington 
July 7, 1911, in accordance with the provisions 
of article XVI thereof. The note also stated 
that the Japanese Government continues to be 
concerned M'ith the preservation and protection 
on a reasonable basis of seals in the North Pa- 
cific Ocean, and that the Japanese Government, 
for that purpose, is prepared to conclude a new 
agreement. 

Article XVI of the convention provides that 
it shall enter into effect on December 1.5, 1911 
412 



and continue in force for a period of 15 years 
from tliat date and thereafter until terminated 
by 12 months' written notice given by one of 
the parties to all of the others, and that such 
notice may be given at the expiration of 14 
years or at any time thereafter. The article 
also provides that at any time prior to the ter- 
mination of the convention, there shall be 
held a conference, upon the request of any of 
the parties to the convention, to consider and 
if possible agree upon a further extension of 
the convention, with sueh additions and modi- 
fications, if any, as may be found desirable. 

The countries which are parties to the conven- 
tion are the United States of America, Great 
Britain, Canada, Japan, and the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics. 

Under the provisions of the convention the 
contracting parties agree that theii' citizens and 
subjects, respectively, and all persons subject to 
their laws and treaties, and their vessels, shall 
be prohibited, while the convention remains in 
force, from engaging in pelagic sealing in the 
waters of the North Pacific Ocean, north of the 
thirtieth parallel and including the Seas of 
Bering, Kamchatka, Okhotsk, and Japan. Pe- 
lagic sealing is defined in the convention as 
meaning the killing, capturing, or pursuing in 
any manner whatsoever of fur seals at sea. 
Each of the parties to the convention also agrees 
that it will not permit its citizens or subjects or 
their vessels to kill, capture, or pursue beyond 
the distance of three miles from the shore line of 
its territories sea otters in any part of the waters 
in which the fur seals are protected. The con- 
vention provides for compensation by each of 
the parties to the other parties concerned for the 
fur seals taken by it on the islands under its 
jurisdiction. Provision is also made in the con- 
vention for the payment of compensation to 



NOVEMBER 9, 194 



413 



Great Britain and Japan by the United States 
in the event that no killing of seals is permitted 
on the islands under its jurisdiction during any 
particular year or years. 

COMMERCE 

Supplementary Trade Agreement With 
Canada 

An announcement regarding intention to ne- 
gotiate a supplementary trade agreement with 
Canada appears in this Bulletin under the head- 
ing "Commercial Policy". 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press November 0] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since November 2, 
1940: 

Career Officers 

Richard F. Boyce, of Lansing, Mich., Consul 
at Yokoliama, Japan, has been assigned as Con- 
sul at Lima, Peru. 

The assignment of Gordon H. Mattison, of 
Wooster, Ohio, as Vice Consul at Madras, India, 
has been canceled. Mr. Mattison will remain 
at Baghdad, Iraq, as Third Secretary of Lega- 
tion and Vice Consul. 

Leslie W. Johnson, of Minneapolis, Minn., 
assigned to the Department of State, has been 
assigned as Vice Consul at Buenos Aires, 
Argentina. 



Milton Patterson Thompson, of Chattanooga, 
Tenn., Vice Consul at Santiago de Cuba, Cuba, 
has been assigned as Vice Consul at Habana, 
Cuba. 

Norval Richardson, of Mississippi, former 
Secretary of Legation at Lisbon, Portugal, died 
in Paget, Bermuda, October 22, 19-10. 

Non-career Officers 

William B. Douglass, Jr., of Washington, 
D. C, Vice Consul at Gibraltar, has been ap- 
pointed Vice Consul at Horta, the Azores, where 
a consulate will be established. 

George L. Tohiian, of Denver, Colo., Vice 
Consul at Toronto, Ont., Canada, has been ap- 
pointed Vice Consul at Edmonton, Alberta, 
Canada. 

The appointment of Foster H. Kreis, of ]\Iin- 
nesota, as Vice Consul at Horta, the Azores, has 
been canceled. Mr. Kreis will remain at Fun- 
clial, Madeira, as Vice Consul. 

Cliristian K. Nielsen, has been appointed Con- 
sular Agent at Freetown, Sierra Leone, British 
West Africa, where an American consular 
agency will be established January 1, 1911. 



Regulations 



The following Government regulation may be 
of interest to readers of the Bulletin: 

Assistance to Aircraft of Foreign Registry. (War 
Department. ) October 10, 1940. Federal RegMet; No- 
vember 5, 1940 (vol. 5, no. 216), p. 4365, and November 
7, 1^0 (vol. 5, no. 218), p. 4410. 



0. S. GOVERNMEM PRINTING OFFICE; 1940 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C— Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, ?2.75 a year. 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 






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Qontenfs 



NOVEMBER 16, 1940 
Vol. HI: No. Jj — Publication Ij2S 




GENEnAI.: Paee 

Armistice Day address by the President 417 

The Place of the University in a Moilern Democracj': 

Address i)v Assistant Secretary B(Mle 419 

Tlie Organization of Women in Inter-American Ac- 
tivity: Address by Assistant Secretary Bcrle . . . . 42o 

TTearings regarding activities of German agents in the 

I'nited States 425 

Death of Senator Pittman: Statement by the Secretary 

of State 42G 

Executive oriier prescribing transportation regulations . 420 

Europe: 

The neutrality of the United States in the war between 

Italy anil Greece 426 

Treatj- rights in Tangier 430 

Earthquake in Rumania 430 

Canada: 

Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Waterway project .... 430 

The Far East: 

Oil agreement between Japanese importers and Nether- 
lands Indies companies 432 

The Near East: 

Suspension of tonnage duties for vessels of Egypt . . . 432 

American Republics: 
Reports regarding air and naval bases in Uruguay . . 432 

Inauguration of President of Mexico 432 

Suspension of tonnage duties for vessels of Guatemala, 

the Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Venezuela . . . 433 

[Over] 



U. S. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS 

DEC 3 1940 



Commercial Policy: ^"^* 

Agriculture and International-Trade Relationships: 

Addressby Assistant Secretary Grady 433 

Treaty Information: 
Sovereignty : 

Convention on the Provisional Administration of 
European Colonies and Possessions in the Americas 
and Final Act of the Second Meeting of Ministers 

of Foreign Affairs held at Habana 436 

Commerce: 

Reciprocal Trade Agreement between the United 
States and Venezuela (Executive Agreement Series 
No. 180) 436 

The Foreign Service: 

Statement by Ambassador Bullitt 437 

Publications 437 



General 



ARMISTICE DAY ADDRESS BY THE PRESIDENT ' 



tRt'lpnsed to the press November 11] 

On this day which commemorates the end of 
fighting between human beings in a world 
war, it is permissible for me to search far back 
in the history of civilization in order to vis- 
ualize important trendy. 

On the Great Seal of the United States, 
which, for a century and a half, has reposed in 
the loving care of a long line of Seci-etaries of 
State of the United States, ai)])ear these words: 
"nocu.v ordo f<ccIoriim'\ which means: ''a new 
order of the ages". 

In almost every century since the day that 
recorded history began, people have thought 
that they were creating or establishing ;^omo 
kind of "new order of the ages". 

But in the scheme of civilization from which 
ours descends I suppose that we can properly 
recognize that in 2,500 yeare there have been 
only a very few *'new orders" in the develop- 
ment of human living under a thing called 
government. 

Without question, the philosophy of orderly 
government in which the governed had some 
form of voice in a civilized society goes back to 
the days of ancient Greece. AVe must remem- 
ber, however, that while the philosophy of de- 
mocracy was there first expressed in words and 
on paper, the practice of it was by no means 
consistent and was confined to a relatively 
small number of human beings and to a rela- 
tively small geographical area. 



' Delivered in the Amplaitheuter, Arlington National 
Cemetery, November 11, 1940. 
275359 — 40 1 



We came to the age of Rome — an age of a 
strange admixture of elections and law,s and 
military conquest and personal dictatorship. It 
was an age which extended the civilization of 
the period to the greater part of the then known 
world. It was an age which forced its own 
conception of laws and ways of life on millions 
of less civilized people who previously had 
lived under tribal custom or centralized direc- 
tion. Definitely, Rome wa.s an age. 

With Rome's collapse and the overrunning of 
Europe by vast population movements from 
farther east, orderly progress deteriorated and 
the sword drove learning into hiding. That 
dark period could hardly be called an age be- 
cause it was an interim between ages. 

Then, with the reawakening of a thousand 
years ago, with the crusades, the feudal system, 
the guilds, the kings, and the Renaissance, that 
age which inunediately preceded our own was 
born and grew and flourished. That was an 
era of enoi-mous distinction — arts and literature 
and education and exploration — marching 
armies, barons, and empires. Human security 
was still non-existent — democracy was not per- 
mitted. 

Toward its close, however, the appearance of 
tiny movements in tiny places, led by tiny i^eople, 
forecast the next vast step forward — the era of 
1776 — the age in which, thank God, we still live. 

Those beginnings originated, it is true, in the 
old world — among the philosophers, among the 
seekers of many kinds of freedom forbidden by 
those who governed. 

417 



418 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Those beginnings found tlieir freest develop- 
ment in the colonies that were organized along 
the seaboard of North America. Thei'e, by the 
processes of trial and error, democracy as it has 
since been accepted in so many lands had its 
birth and its training. 

There came into being the first far-flung gov- 
ernment in all the world whose cardinal princi- 
ple was democracy — the United States of 
America. 

We must accept that as fact because, truly and 
fundamentally, it was a new order — nothing 
like it had ever been seen before. We must ac- 
cept it because the new order spread into almost 
every part of the civilized world. It spread in 
many forms — and over the next century almost 
all peoples had acquired some form of popular 
expression of opinion, some form of election, of 
franchise, of the right to be heard. The Amer- 
icas and the British Isles led the world in 
spreading the gospel of democracy among 
peoples great and small. 

And the world as a whole felt with much right 
that it had discarded feudalism, conquest, and 
dictatorship. 

People felt that way until 1914, when a defi- 
nite effort was made in a part of the world to 
destroy this existing "new order of the ages" — 
to destroy it after its relatively short trial, and 
to substitute for it the doctrine that might 
makes right. The attempt failed 22 years ago 
today. 

You and I who served in the period of the 
World War have faced in later years unpatri- 
otic efforts by some of our own countrymen to 
make us believe that the sacrifices made by our 
own Nation were wholly in vain. 

A hundred years from now, historians will 
brand such efforts as puny and false. 

A hundred years from now, historians will 
say rightly that the World War preserved the 
new order of the ages for at least a whole gen- 
eration — a full 20 years — and tiiat if the axis of 
1918 had been successful in military victory 
over the associated nations, resistance on be- 
half of democracy in 1940 would have been 
wholly impossible. 



America, therefore, is pi'oud of its share in 
maintaining the era of democracy in that war 
in which we took part. America is proud of 
you who served — and ever will be proud. 

I, for one, do not believe that the era of de- 
mocracy in human affairs can or will be snuffed 
out in our lifetime. I, for one, do not believe 
that mere force will be successful in sterilizing 
the seeds which had taken such firm root as a 
harbinger of better lives for mankind. I, for 
one, do not believe that the world will revert 
either to a modern form of ancient slavery or to 
controls vested in modern feudalism or modern 
emperors or modern dictators or modern oli- 
garchs in these days. The very people under 
their iron heels will, themselves, rebel. 

What are a few months or even a few years in 
the lifetime of any of us ? We, alive today, live 
and think in terms of our grandparents, and our 
own parents, and ourselves, and our children — 
yes, and our grandchildren. We, alive today — 
not in the existent democracies alone, but also 
among the populations of the smaller nations 
already overrun — are thinking in the larger 
terms of the maintenance of the new order to 
which we have been accustomed and in which 
we intend to continue. 

We recognize certain facts of 1940 which did 
not exist in 1918 — a need for the elimination of 
aggressive armaments, a need for the breaking 
down of barriers in a more closely knitted 
world, a need for restoring honor in the 
written and spoken word. We recognize that 
the processes of democracies must be greatly 
improved in order that we may attain those 
purposes. 

But over and above the present, we recognize 
and salute the eternal verities that lie with us 
in the future of mankind. 

You, the men of 1917 and 1918, helped to pre- 
serve those truths of democracy for our genera- 
tion. 

We still unite, we still strive mightily to pre- 
serve intact that new order of the ages founded 
by the Fathers of America. 



THE PLACE OF THE UNIVERSITY IN A MODERN DEMOCRACY 

Address by Assistant Secretary Berle - 



[Kck'ni-i'd to llio press Novombor 15] 

It lias been suggested that we discuss tonight 
llie phice of tlie university in a modern democ- 
racy. The subject is sufficiently challenging. 

Universities were conceived and existed be- 
fore democracy appeared as a world force ; yet 
in large measure what we call democracj' today 
is the pniduct of universities. These helped to 
release intellectual forces which finally flowered 
in a great revolution — the revolution which es- 
tablished democracy as a world system a century 
and a quarter ago. 

Now there is in i)r()gress a counter-revolution, 
whose avowed object is to drive democracy out 
of existence. In historical rhythm, this is pre- 
cisely what we should expect. Rarely has a new 
force gained ascendancy without having to 
struggle for its very life against the re-formed 
battalions of the ideas which it has displaced. 
At present the struggle takes the form of a 
world war, carried on by the methods of revolu- 
tion quite us much as by those of military 
science. AVe are in the midst of a crucial phase 
of that war. The diflference between this and 
most wars lies in the fact that a cliallenge has 
been thrown, not merely to the force of the re- 
>isting luitions. but also to the ideas and intel- 
lectual structuie of those nations. As a result, 
the conflict is fought not only on laud and sea 
and air, but in the mind of every thinking man. 

For myself, I can find it in my heart to be 
profoundly thankful for this challenge, despite 
the workl-witle misery which is being let loose. 
It seems to me that if democracy itself, and if 
the universities which have played so large a 
part in developing it, had not been forced to 
meet certain issues squarely, this system of ours 
which we love so dearly might well have de- 
generated into a weak and sprawling mass, 
without form or direction, and ultimately with- 
out content. As matters have transpired, we 
are one and all required to think things through, 



■ Delivered at a dinner of the Association of American 
Universities, Washington, November 15, 1940. 



take a position, bring ourselves into agreement 
with others who feel as we do, and so united, 
to stand and deliver in the hour of a great crisis. 



The thesis here proposed is that universities 
in the democracy of today have as their funda- 
mental (ask the choice and the guardiaushij) of 
eternal and spiritual values. This is their pri- 
mary reason for existence and their ultimate 
reason for survival. 

As will presently appear, in developing this 
thesis I am also pleading a cause. For it seems 
to me that in some measure modern miiversities 
have allowetl their fundamental justification to 
become obscured and have taken refuge in con- 
siderable degree in the less difficult occupation 
of creating tools, without guiile to their use. 

I take it we are agreed that democracy is not 
a body of dogma, but a method of evolution. 
Its precise objective, indeed, was to remove from 
any external agency, such as the state, the power 
to prescril)e for each or any man tlie life he 
ought to live. In seeking to offer human beings 
liberty and the pursuit of happiness, the plain 
intent was to evolve a means by which each man 
could, in the widest possible measure, choose 
and follow his own conception of the "good 
life", rather than have some leader or dictator, 
some state or feudal lord, some banker or em- 
ployer, determine what his "good life" ought 
to be and thereupon ram it down his tluoat. 
The institutions of democracy were designed 
to i^ermit the successive and peaceful displace- 
ment of any group or gi-oups, political, social, or 
economic, which might attempt to attain or use 
power over the lives of other men. 

But by reason of this very freedom, democracy 
of necessity assumes that there will be a body 
of agreement on spiritual, social, and aesthetic 
values not imposed from above, but based on free 
choice. These are the values which must guide 
men in a democracy toward a conception of the 
"good life". They have in their hands the 

419 



420 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



political tools which adapt the mechanism of 
the state toward making theii- conceptions pos- 
sible of attainment ; but to them is left responsi- 
bility for finding and choosing these basic 
principles. 

Unless we are to assume that every individual 
is born with all the wisdom of civilization in- 
side his head — a manifest absurdity — it is suffi- 
ciently plain that the democratic doctrine builds 
heavily indeed upon the work of the artists, the 
writers, the schools, and most of all, upon uni- 
versities and their cousins in spiritual responsi- 
bility, the churches, to maintain that constant 
flow of education, moral as well as secular, which 
enables men to choose their values, find their 
way of life, and develop sentient, gi-acious, and 
productive existence. 

To us, trained in this school of thought, the 
claims of the counter-revolution seem merely 
ridiculous. When one world power talks of a 
"new order", we remember that we have here a 
new order as rapidly as men can develop and 
digest new ideas. When another speaks of 
"youthful and virile national organization", we 
remember that in the evolution of democracy we 
have a world which is perpetually young. Only 
when the effectiveness of some of our institu- 
tions is called into question do we have to re- 
consider our premises; and that is entirely 
healthy, since we should always be reexamining 
the functioning of our life. 

At the moment, the question is raised whether 
or not our democratic institutions provide a 
sufficiently commanding choice of value to 
maintain the dynamic quality which has made 
democracy successful. 

II 

The fundamental challenge to American uni- 
versities today is whether they make a maximum 
contribution toward integrating the thought 
and the taste, the emotions and the will, of men 
in a democracy to work toward a constantly 
higher end. This is no idle question. Democ- 
racy itself, and its continued existence, must 
.stand or fall by the cohesive strength created by 
this integration. 

The area of thought and knowledge with 



which modern universities are concerned can 
be roughly divided into two great classes. 

There is a body of thought and of knowledge 
which acts as a director of desire; which tends 
to guide men in the choice of values on which 
they will build their lives. Properly speaking, 
this is philosophy in its great sense. It is the 
spiritual, if not the historical, reason why the 
true scholar in any field was given the degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy — a teacher of the love 
of wisdom. 

The second great classification consists in 
knowledge and thought which is fundamentally 
auxiliary to life, but is neutral in chai'acter. 
This field includes the tools for civilized exist- 
ence, but it offers little or no guide toward the 
use M'hich may be made of them. Thus a physi- 
cist may work out a new principle for the re- 
lease of energ}' and may thereby vastly increase 
the powers of men. The question as to how the 
new tool will be used — whether for good or for 
evil — remains wholly unsolved. Most of the 
strictly analytic studies, such as economics, in 
and of themselves can merely record the effects 
of human desire made concrete through exist- 
ing and potential economic mechanisms. When- 
ever in either of these fields there is a directive 
toward what is assumed to be good or evil, that 
directive comes from a concealed premise — a 
premise based on value, derived from less techni- 
cal, philosophical speculations which do con- 
cern themselves with the better and the worse, 
the good and the evil. 

Ill 

We have, then, these two great fields of intel- 
lectual endeavor: The one which seeks to dis- 
criminate between values and guide men to- 
ward the gieater ; the other, a neutral field which 
creates new tools and leaves to others the task 
of 'directing their use. 

I cannot escape the conclusion that American 
universities have taken an undue refuge in this 
second, or neutral field, when they ought to have 
maintained their primal leadership in the first, 
or positive field. 

I use the word "refuge" advisedly. The 
choice of values, the discrimination between 



NO^^;MBER 16, 1940 



421 



good and evil, is always hard. Frequently it 
is tinder bitter attack ; for no one yet undertook 
to establish standards or values in life without 
finding: himself in conflict with some self- 
interested group which believed itself threat- 
onod. In fact, in a ])erpetually evolving democ- 
lacy, which healtiiily includes progressive im- 
provement in social morals, every advance in 
ideas almost by hypothesis threatens a group 
of interests built around older conceptions. In 
consequence, one who seeks the good life is in 
a perpetual and unavoidable struggle. It is 
infinitely easier to flee to neutral ground and 
to abandon the more difficult task. A chemist 
in a laboratory, a mathematician with his equa- 
tions and foi'nuUae. a scientific historian merely 
interest etl in giving an exact picture of the past 
situation, can retire to an ivory tower. He can 
avoid conflicts which at best are intellectually 
and morally difficult and at worst are actually 
dangerous to his career. 

The flight to neutrality has, of course, been 
rationalized by the academic world, and this 
rationalization has a measure of truth in it. 
as rationalizations usually do. It is said that 
a scholar who begins with preconceptions spoils 
that perfect detachment which alone makes pos- 
sible a just determination of fact in his chosen 
field. To some degree the great foundations 
which have subsidized research by universities 
and scholars have aided and abetted this dogma. 
In my earlier university years, a grant for re- 
search piu-poses was conunoidy accompanied by 
the caution that a scholar's business was to de- 
termine ''facts", leaving others to draw conclu- 
sions. Further, in stating his facts he was to 
be careful not to give them a slant either one 
way or the other which might tend to bias the 
reader in making up his own mind. 'Wliat 
criteria the reader was expected to use appeared 
not to concern anyone. Scholarly work ac- 
cordingly was thus definitely steered in the di- 
rection of creating bodies of knowledge which 
were, really, sterilized : The more sterile tlie 
work, the more perfect the scholarship. 

It is, of course, true that the search for fact 
is aided by absence of preconception. But no 
one save a mental eunuch can accumulate a body 



of facts without speculating a little as to their 
interpretation and significance. I have no 
quarrel with the early attempt to sterilize the 
fact-finding process, since it was a normal and 
natural and perhaps a healthy reaction from 
an earlier phase in which facts were assembled 
only to prove a preexisting thesis. But I can- 
not lielp wishing that the advice which used to 
be given to the younger men had been enlarged 
upon. They should have been told that it was 
their duty to seek, find, and face facts and 
state them with scrupulous fairness; but tliat, 
having done so, they were bound tt) consider 
them, interpret them, and in the interpretation 
lay out their philosophical premises so that the 
work done might contribute to tliat choice of 
values which is, I suppose, the principal distin- 
guishing mark between men and animals. 

Actually, in the field of physical, mechanical, 
and scientific research, the results have been so 
coldly neutral that a world has seized and used 
the best product of the best scientific minds — and 
has therewith succeeded in creating, overseas 
at least, the closest replica of hell which perhaps 
this planet has yet experienced. No wonder 
that a European generation has cried out against 
the "sterile intellectuals", the men whose thought 
contributed everything to power, and nothing to 
choice of values or use in building life. 

We have turned loose knowledge on an im- 
precedented scale. We have not comparably 
developed that moral control of the use of the 
knowledge which alone can make it construc- 
tive. In result, the world at this moment is not 
looking for another great scientist. It is look- 
ing, instead, for a great saint. 

IV 

It is perhaps allowable here to digress and 
pay a little attention to another academic 
dogma, not without its justification, but which 
has been pressed to an undue extreme. This is 
the classic theory that every honest scholar has 
a right to his own opinion and to his own 
conclusions. 

This right to my mind is of the essence of 
academic freedom, and it must be cherished by 
every university in a democracy as the very 



422 



DEPAKTMEXT OF STATE BULLETIN 



foimdation on wliich its free existence is based. 

But, while I personally would die to maintain 
that right, I should go almost equally far in 
asserting the counter-proposition : All opinions 
are not of equal value— and they must be 
evaluated. 

It seems to me that an honest scholar may. 
quite honorably, come to the conclusion that 
men are biological animals and that the proper 
construction of society is accordingly on the 
basis of a purely animal life. It is possible for 
a student of jurisprudence to come to the con- 
clusion that honesty is merely a conventional 
fiction designed to safeguard property interests 
and to conclude that it would be perfectly pos- 
sible to reorganize society in a fashion which 
would honor the skilful thief quite as much as 
it honored the productive toiler. In the evolu- 
tion of thought which is the strength of de- 
mocracy, there is a real utility in having men 
who continuously challenge and reexamine the 
premises on which we run things. Out of this 
welter of different but honest opinions, we do 
arrive at advances in our thought and in our 
organization. But precisely because we do per- 
mit this freedom to reach and hold opinions, 
we are subject to a higher obligation of dis- 
criminating between these opinions — what they 
do, what they mean, what effect they have on 
men, the results with which other men may have 
to cope. 

V 

And so my plea tonight is that the universi- 
ties reemphasize that part of their work which 
is dedicated to seeking and maintaining eternal 
values. 

In older times this entered into the thinking 
of every university president and of evei'y 
faculty. Those were not the days when one 
sought additional money to bring a particularly 
noted scientist to serve on a faculty in order 
to advertise the intellectual wares which the 
university had to offer. Those were the days in 
which men were valued for their personalities, 
and for two older qualities not often heard of 
today : The quality of goodness and the quality 
of faith. 



I think our fathers knew something in this 
field which we have forgotten. I think they 
knew that all truth in any field involves of 
necessity an act of faith. Particularly in the 
higher field they considered this act of faith 
essential. 

They were not afraid to use the word ''sin", 
i;i the glorious sense of that abused phrase. Sin 
was then defined as the choice of a lower course 
(even though it might be good in itself) when 
a higher course was available; the acceptance 
of a lower value when higher values could be 
expressed. In large measure the great days of 
our greatest universities were due as much to 
this quality in their teachers a,s to the scientific 
and scholarly attainments of these men. Wil- 
liam James was great as a pioneer in psychol- 
ogy, but he was even greater as William James; 
and his line has gone out to the end of the earth 
because of those qualities in him. It is the 
tragedy of today that many teachei'S have a 
lingering and not always suppressed ambition 
to be great politicians, at precisely the moment 
when most first-rate politicians sincerely and 
passionately wish that they were great teachers. 
It is a contradiction in the times that now, 
when the greatest body of knowledge is avail- 
able, the greatest affairs have to be determined 
on instinct, which is. analyzed, an affirmation 
of unexpressed faith. The practically univer- 
sal yearning for a way of life which gives 
spiritual release will never be satisfied by a 
formula for utilizing atomic energy. 

I am very clear that our fathers knew this. 
In their thinking, the great and coldly splendid 
fields of neutral knowledge were always sub- 
ordinate. The controlling conceptions had to 
do with values — values which they believed to 
be universal and which by faith they considered 
eternal. These values they tested, as well as 
they could, and their hunum results; by what 
happened to men who followed them, to com- 
munities which expressed them, to nations 
which guarded them, and to international sys- 
tems which gave them place. 

The perpetuation of these great values is 
the proper work of universities in a de- 
mocracy. 



THE ORGANIZATION OF WOMEN IN INTER-AMERICAN ACTIVITY 

Address by Assistant Secretary Berle ' 



I Ueli'af.i'il to till' prixH Novoiiibor 11] 

Tliere is a certain fitness in weiconiinp llu- 
members of the Iiiter-Americiin Omunission of 
Women and their cDlleafriies in women's orjian- 
izatioiis in America on tiie anniversary we 
rifrlttly call Armistice Day. We had hoped 
that the Armisticeof lOlH mifriit direct the work 
of the world into ciiannels of reconstruction 
and iiope. We know now that another jrenera- 
tion mus( a<iain win for itself a new o[)p(tr- 
tunity. 

It nsed to he said in Enrope tliat men donii- 
nated the life of today; tliat children were the 
generation of tomorrow; hul that women, as 
mothers of chiklien yet unliorn, controlled the 
future. 

It took modern civilization a ionji time to 
learn that life does not divide itself a^ easily a- 
that. The life of today necessarily shapes the 
children of tomorrow and the unborn heirs of 
the day aflei-. Yet only within the past 4it 
years liave we recofrnized tlie necessity of l>rin<i- 
inp women into daily life as full co-partners in 
a continniti}: evolution. 

Perliaps this lonjf-ovenlue act of justice was 
due to the opening of new vistas of intelli<^nce: 
or perhaps we may owe it to the fact that mod- 
ern machinery has lil)erated us in considerable 
measure fronr tests of meiv physical strength. 
But I believe the greatest influence was exerted 
by the steady progress of education, in whii'h 
women were early admitted in this hemisphere 
and which at once produced women who were 
able to take part in the political, social, and 
economic debates of our times, not as romantic 
figures, but as factors of i-eason and intelligence 
in their own right. These women, knowing that 
they could not act alone, organized and unified 
their sisters and friends and released a new in- 
fluence in the world. 



' Deliveied at n tliiiner given hy the Women"*: Joint 
Congressional Committee for the members of the Inter- 
American Commission of Women, Washington, Novem- 
lH>r 11, 1940. 

275359 — 40 2 



The organization of wonieii and the ('(|i nil pail 
they i)lay in affairs is,I think, a dist iiict i\e con- 
iriliiition of the Western Ilemisphere. As a re- 
•^ult, women's activities are perhaps better or- 
ganized and more eifectivelj' directed in the 
I'nited States at least than aic any other. In 
this coimtry they have produced a greatei- con- 
tinuing inci-ement of social progress than any 
other organized groups. The political pioneers 
fought for and obtained iheir ecpiality of politi- 
cal rights before the law, without sacrificing 
those special advantages to which women are 
entitled because of their special contribution. 
Most of these women we have had the privilege 
of knowing in our own lifetime. Only this year 
ue moiuned the ileath of Lillian Wald, a great 
woman, a great jjolitical figure, and a great 
nui-se. To her we owe the di-velopment of pub- 
lic-health mu'sing; the plans she developed in a 
New York slum are now found throughout the 
length and breadth of the civilized world. To 
•lane Addams, and to that host of pupils trained 
at Hull House, we owe the scientific and system- 
al ic development of social work. To (irace Ab- 
liott we owe the l)eginning — it is only a begin- 
ning — of the scientific protection of children. 
To Alice Hamilton and Florence Sabin we owe 
the entiy of women into the highest altitudes of 
American medical science. 

While this was going on. we .saw the gradual 
disappearance of the merely emotional attitude 
toward women's wf)rk. Even in my own youth 
I rememl:)er the attempt to cover women's clubs 
with ridicule. However, as not tmusiially hap- 
pens, the scoflFers showed their own weaknesses, 
rather than hitting their target. Instead of 
demonstrating the uselessness of women's clubs, 
they showed up all too clearly the very obvious 
weaknesses of men's clubs, whicli had, in the 
early decades of this century, given no very 
good account of themselves. Today the Gen- 
eral Federation of "Women's Clubs and other 
similar organizations have been steadily and 
consistently called upon to support the social 

423 



424 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



legislation, to attack the obvious economic prob- 
lems, and to assist in providing remedies. 

These women and these organizations had the 
good sense to cast their thinking in practical 
lines. A mere mushy good-will does not, after 
all. take you very far. The work of integrat- 
ing women's activities, like the work of for- 
warding the cooperative inter- American peace, 
calls not only for pleasant thought, but for a 
vast amount of hard-headed technical work. 
All of us are going to be judged in the next few 
years, not by our good intentions, but by the 
results we are able to get. By consequence, I 
welcome the fact that we have represented in 
the women's movement of tt)day the trade-union 
leagues, the instruments of political education 
like the League of Women Voters, the societies 
of technical women in the other American re- 
publics, the gi'oups which have carried on both 
here and elsewhere in the American Continents 
the work of social welfare and in large measure 
the administration of social measures. I am 
glad that theie are women who are scientists 
as well as society leaders; that there are women 
who are technically expert in labor, in medicine, 
in education, and in community orga)iization. 

Yet as we salute the achievements of women as 
citizens, we must recognize as do they that, like 
every citizen, they are part of an indivisible 
whole. The whole quality of development is 
not toward separating the work of women from 
the work of men. but toward the liberating, in 
practical action, of a huge and only partly 
tapped reservoir of thought and ability. 

It is therefore an especial pleasure to welcome 
here the chairman of the Inter-American Com- 
mission of Women, Sra. Martinez Guerrero, 
foremost among the social and political forces 
in our great sister Republic of Argentina. She 
is too modest to tell you very much about her- 
self. Yet there are many in the Argentine Re- 
public who have known of her work in social 
affairs for years, but who also remember that 
Avhen the familiar totalitarian technique of un- 
dermining the American institutions began to 
make headway in South America. Sra. Martinez 
Guerrero played a great part in organizing the 
Accion Argentina; in bringing into its ranks 
hundreds of thousands of members; in meeting 



that propaganda not merely in the cultivated 
circles of prosperous .society, but on the streets, 
ill the factories, at the doors of industrial plants, 
whenever and wherever men and women con- 
gregated. If she will permit me to say so, she 
added to her manifest grace as a woman the 
attributes of a strong and capable mind 
e()uipped to deal with public aifairs. 

May I suggest, in all humility, that we may 
take advantage of this opjjortunity to recall the 
old maxims which used to be leveled against 
women's organizations and which now return to 
us in strange and dramatic form. It used to be 
said that women's task was to defend the home. 
If ever that task existed, it is today; for there 
are doctrines abroad overseas which denj' the 
right even to have a home. No longer is the 
defense an emotional matter of quiet and sub- 
missive romance; it has become the task of an 
organized and embattled civilization to main- 
tain this, the fundamental principle on which 
it was built. In doing this I believe that the 
women's organizations have a contribution pe- 
culiar to themselves. I revert to the maxim 
([uoted at the beginning. I am by no means 
clear that men have the day; but I am very 
clear that men do tend to live for the day. It 
was a man, not a woman, who said ; "After us 
the deluge". I do not think any woman could 
have said that. The quality of thinking con- 
stantly for the future, of planning for develop- 
ments we cannot yet see, of realizing that what- 
ever happens to any one of us individually, life 
goes on — that is an essential element in the work 
which falls to us today of defending our present 
existence and, even more, our right to change the 
f viture. It is my firm belief that the groups here 
represented, covering the entire Western Hemi- 
sjihere, will more diligently maintain and more 
faithfully serve this hope for the future than 
any other organized groups. 

In ancient times men used to speak in par- 
ables. Two myths are constant. In one, 
women were made the symbols of fate. In an- 
other, woman was the symbol of wisdom. In 
tlie life of today, when we hope that fate can 
still be modified by wisdom, we hail the grow- 
ing knowledge and confidence of women's 
groups in the American family of nations. 



HEARINGS REGARDING ACTIVITIES OF GERMAN AGENTS IN THE 

UNITED STATES 



[Releawrd to tin* press Novt»nil>er 13] 

Tlic following telcjirains have In-eu cxehaiiged 
liy the Honorable Martin Dies. Member of Cou- 
•rress from Texas, ami tlie Secretary of State: 

Ohaxge, Tex., 

Xorcmhrr 12. 1!)',0- 
.Vlidiit si.\ weeks ago our ('(iMimittee turned 
oxer (ij llie State Department cerlain evidence 
which w c obtained showing the acti\ities and 
]>rn|iagMnda of (lerinan C"onsul> and Agents. 
I ailvised you that in view of the international 
situation I did not think that we >hould hold 
public hearings if you thought that it miglit 
embarrass you in the conduct of our interna- 
tional lehitions or in any seriotis way com[)li- 
cate the situai ion. Assistant Secretary of State 
Tvung talked with me several times on the tele- 
l)iione and his last suggestion to me was that 
the proper course to pursue was for the State 
Department to refer the evidence to the Depart- 
ment of Justice for prosecution and that our 
Commit tee should not hold hearings or make 
piiiilic the information until after the Depart- 
ment ol Justice had proceeded. In view of 
this conversation with Secretary Long I have 
delayed lioldiug hearings. But since our Com- 
mittee will expire on January third it is neces- 
sary that we dispose of this matter as .soon as 
possible. If you have no objection and do not 
believe thai ])ublic hearings would embarrass 
you in the conduct of our relations with Ger- 
many and will not create any strained relation- 
ship or jeopardize the position of i>ur repre- 
sentatives in Germany it is my intention to call 
a public hearing to begin on the twenty-second 
of this month in the city of Washington. I 
shall a))preciate the courtesy if you will advise 
me by wire at once just wiiat your views are 
with respect to the advisability of public hear- 
ings as it is necessary for me to make an im- 
mediate decision with respect to the disposition 
of this matter. 

Martin Dies, M. C. 



Washinotox, November JS, lOIfi. 
I have received your telegram of today about 
certain evidence wliich you t)btained concerning 
the activities of German agents in I lie United 
Slates. At that time you very courteously vol- 
unteered that you would withiiold [)roceeding 
with any public heariiigs until the Department 
of State had liad time to digest the substance of 
the papers which you refeired to us. Having 
carefully considered the matter, the officials of 
the Department decided that as long as tlie De- 
partment of State was neither an investigating 
nor a prosecuting agency, that the matters in 
question should Ix' referred to the Attorney Gen- 
eral for his consideration and for his decision as 
t(j what action, if any, should be taken in con- 
nection with them. That was done and the 
papers were leferred to the Attorney General. 
Since then I ha\e had no foi-mal report from the 
Department of .Instice in the matter. About 
that lime Mr. Long talked to you again and 
advised you of our decision about the papers 
and you expressed entire approval of the course 
whicli had been taken and in his last conver- 
sation with you, advised you thsit, while you 
had veiy courteously and thoughtfully offered 
to withiiold public hearings during the period 
in question, that the time had come when the 
De])artmeiit of State felt that the matter of 
pul)lic hearings was entirely one for your own 
decision. That is the situation as it has existed 
since that time and in response to your telegram 
I can only express my ap])iecialion for your co- 
operation in this matter and for having made 
available to me and to my associates the papers 
in question and to reiterate that the matter of 
public hearings before your Committee is one 
which concerns tlie policy of an agency of the 
legislative branch of the Government which. I 
think, you as the responsible head of that 
agency, must decide in the exercise of your own 
discretion and judgment. 

CoRDELL Hull, ^eevrtunj of State 

425 



426 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



DEATH OF SENATOR PITTMAN 

Statement by the Secretary of State 

[Released to the press November 10] 

I was grieved and distressed beyond measure 
to learn this morning of the death of Senator 
Pittman. It was a privilege and an honor to 
have had his friendship and to have been his 
colleague for many years. He devoted his life- 
time to unselfish and unstinted public service, 
and we have all been truly fortunate that during 
these critical years the chairmanshii) of the 
Senate Committee on Foreign Relations has 
been in the skilful hands of a man with the out- 
standing abilities of leadership and keen in- 
tellect possessed by Key Pittman. I join with 
his friends throughout the entire country in 
mourning his passing. 



EXECUTIVE ORDER PRESCRIBING 
TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS 

An Executive order prescribing regulations 
governing the payment of expenses of trans- 
l^ortation of household goods and personal 
effects of certain civilian officers and employees 
of the United States was signed by the President 
on November 7, 1940, effective as of October 10. 
The provisions of these regulations ".shall not 
apply to the transportation of effects of officers 
and employees of the Foreign Service of the 
Department of State" except when a transfer 
is made ''at the request and primarily f(n' the 
convenience or benefit of an employee". 

The text of the Executive order is printed in 
the Federal Register for November 13, 1940 
(vol. 5. no. 221) . pages 4448 to 4449. 



Europe 



THE NEUTRALITY OF THE UNITED STATES IN THE WAR BETWEEN 

ITALY AND GREECE 



[Releaseil to the press November 151 

Proclamation of a State of War Between 
Italy and Greece 

BY THE president OF THE UNITED STATES OF 
AMERICA 

^4 PioeJamation 

Whereas section 1 of the joint resolution of 
Congress appioved November 4, 1939, provides 
in part as follows: 

"That whenever the President, or tlie Con- 
gress by couem'rent resolution, shall find that 
there exists a state of war between foreign 
states, and that it is necessary to piromote the 
security or preserve the peace of the United 
States or to protect the lives of citizens of the 
United States, the President shall issue a proc- 
lamation naming the states involved; and he 
shall, from time to time, by proclamation, name 
other states as and when they may become in- 
volved in tlie war." 



And whereas it is further provided by section 
13 of the said joint resolution that 

■'The President may, from time to time, pro- 
nudgate such rules and regulations, not incon- 
sistent with law, as may be necessary and propei' 
to carry out any of the provisions of this joint 
resolution; and he may exercise any power or 
authority conferred on him by this joint reso- 
lution through such officer or officers, or agency 
or agencies, as he shall direct." 

Now, THEREFORE, I, FraNKLIN D. RoOSEVELT, 

President of the United States of America, act- 
ing under and by virtue of the authority con- 
ferred on me by the said joint resolution, do 
hereby proclaim that a state of war unhappily 
exists between Italy and Greece, and that it is 
necessary to promote the security and preserve 
the peace of the United States and to protect 
the lives of citizens of the United States. 

And I do hereby enjoin upon all officers of tlie 
United States, charged with the execution of the 



NOVEMBEU 16, 194 



427 



laws thereof, tlie utmost diligence in preventing 
violation of the said joint resolution and in 
bringing to trial and punishment any offenders 
against the same. 

And I do hereby lielegate to the Secretary of 
State the power to exercise luiy jmwer oi- au- 
thority confeired on me by the said joint resolu- 
tion, as made effective by this my jjrociamation 
issued thereunder, which is not specifically 
delegateti by Executive ordei- to some other of- 
licer oi- agency of this Government, and the 
powiT Id pronndgate such r\des and regulations 
111)1 inconsistent with law as may be neces.sary 
iiiiil pioper to carry out any of its provisions. 

In wit.ves.s wiikhkof. T have iiereiuilo set my 
hand and causeil the seal of tiic United States <»f 
America to Ih- affi.xed. 
Done at the City of Washington this fifteenth 

day of Noveml)er in the year of our 

Lord nineteen huu<lred and forty, 
|.sE.M>| and of tiie Independence of the 

United States of America the one 

hundred and sixty-fifth. 

Fh.XNKI-IN I). K(HiSE\Er.T 

By the President : 

COKDELL HlI.I, 

Secnfary of jStafe. 
I No. 244.S I 

( Ki'U>Hsi(l to the iires.-i Novoinbei- lij] 

Procl.aimino the Neutrauty of the Unfted 
States ix the Wak Between Italy, on the 
One Hand, and (ireece, on the Other Hand 

BY the PRE.SIDENT OF THE INITED STATE.S OF 
AMERICA 

A Pi'oclam/ition 

Whereas h state of war unhappily exists be- 
tween Italy, on tlie one liand. and Greece, on 
the other haiul; 

Now. TIIEREIX)RE. I, FrANKLIN D. RoOSE\'ELT, 

President of the United States of America, in 
onler to preserve the neutrality of the United 
States and of its citizens and of persons within 
its territor_v and jurisdiction, and to enforce its 
laws and treaties, and in order that all per- 
sons, being warned of the general tenor of the 



laws and treaties of the United States in this 
behalf, and of the law of nations, may thus be 
prevented from any violation of the same, do 
hereby declare and proclaim that all of the pro- 
visions of my proclamation of Sejjtember 5, 
1939. proclaiming the neutrality of the United 
States in a war between Germany and France; 
Poland; and the United Kingdom, India. Aus- 
tralia and New Zealand apply eqiuilly in 
i-espect to Greece. 

In wftness whereof. I luive hereunto set my 
hand and caused the ,seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 

Done at the City of Washington thisHfteenlh 
day of November in the year of our I^)rd nine- 
teen hundred and forty, and of the 
[seal] Independence of the United States of 
Ameriiji the one liimdi-ed and sixty- 
fifth. 

Fraxki.in D. Roosevelt 
By the President : 
CoRDELL Hull 

/Secretary of State. 

[No. 2444] 

[Ri^leaited to the press November 1.5] 

Use of Ports or Territori.vl Waters of the 
UNrrEi) States hy Sihmarinks of Fokkkjn 
Bei.i.kjkrent States 

uv the i'kesujent of the i nited st.ates of 

AMERICA 

. I Proclamation 

WntjtEAs section 11 of the joint resolution 
ajjproved November 4, 1939, provides: 

"AVhenever, during any war in which the 
United States is neutral, the President shall find 
that special restrictions placed on the use of the 
ports and territorial waters of the United States 
by the submarines or armed merchant vessels of 
a foreign state will serve to maintain peace be- 
tween the United States and foreign states, or 
to protect the commercial interests of the United 
States and its citizens, or to promote the secur- 
ity of the United States, and shall make procla- 
mation thereof, it shall thereafter be unlawful 



428 



DEPABTMBNT OF STATE BULLETIN 



for any such submarine or armed merchant ves- 
sel to enter a port or the territorial waters of the 
United States or to depart therefrom, except 
under such conditions and subject to such limi- 
tations as the President may prescribe. When- 
ever, in his judgment, the conditions which have 
caused him to issue his proclamation have ceased 
to exist, he shall revoke his proclamation and 
the provisions of this section shall thereuiDon 
cease to apply, except as to offenses committed 
l)rior to such revocation." 

Whereas there exists a state of war between 
Italy and Greece; 

Whereas the United States of America is 
neutral in such war; 

Whereas by my proclamation of November 
4, 1939, issued pursuant to the provision of law 
quoted above. I placed special restrictions on the 
use of ports and territorial waters of the United 
States by the submarines of France ; Germany ; 
Poland ; and the United Kingdom. India, Aus- 
tralia, Canada, New Zealand, and the Union of 
South Africa ; 

Now, THEREFORE, I, FrANKLIN D. RoOSEVELT, 

President of the United States of America, act- 
ing under and by virtue of the authority vested 
in me by the foregoing provision of section 11 
of the joint resolution approved November 4. 
1939, do by this proclamation declare and pro- 
claim that the provisions of my proclamation of 
November 4, 1939, in regard to the use of the 
ports and territorial waters of the United States, 
exclusive of the Canal Zone, by the submarines 
of France; Germany; Poland; and the United 
Kingdom, India, Australia, Canada, New Zea- 
land, and the Union of South Africa, shall also 
apply to the use of the ports and territorial 
waters of the United States, exclusive of the 
Canal Zone, by the submarines of Greece. 

And I do hereby enjoin upon all officers of 
the United States, charged with the execution of 
the laws thereof, the utmost diligence in pie- 
venting violations of the said joint resolution, 
and this my proclamation issued thei-eunder. 
and in bringing to trial and punislunent any 
offenders against the same. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my 



hand and caused the seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 

Done at the City of Washington this fifteenth 
day of November in the year of our 
Lord nineteen Inuidred and forty, 
[seal] and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the one 
hundred and sixty-fifth. 

Franklin D. IloosE^'ELT 
By the President : 
CoRDELL Hull 

Secretary of State. 

[No. 2445] 
[Released to the pre.s.s Xovoiiiber 15] 

Executive Order 

Prescribing Regulatioiis Governing the En- 
forcement of the Netotrality of the Umted 
States 

Whereas, under the treaties of tlie United 
States and the law of nations it is the duty of 
the United States, in any war in which the 
United States is a neutral, not to jiermit the 
commission of unneutral acts within the juris- 
diction of the United States; 

And whereas, a proclamation was issued by 
me on the fifteenth day of November declaring 
the neutrality of the United States of America 
in the war now existing between Italy, on the 
(»ne hand, and Greece, on the other hand: 

Now, THEREFORE, ill Order to make more effec- 
tive the enforcement of the provisions of said 
treaties, law of nations, and proclamation, I 
hereby prescribe that the provisions of my Ex- 
ecutive Order No. 8233 f)f Septembei' 5, 1939, 
prescribing I'egulations governing the enforce- 
ment of the neutrality of the United States. 
a))ply equally in respect to Greece. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 

The White House, 
November 15, 1940. 

[No. 8503] 



The following regulations have been codified 
under Title 22: Foreign Relations (Chapter I: 



NOVEMBER IP. 194 



429 



Departineiit of State; Subchapter C: Neu- 
trality), in accordance with tlie requirements of 
the Federal Rey Inter and the Code of Federal 
Regulations : 

Part 149 — Commerck With States Engaged in 
Armed Conflict * 

Additional Regulationix 

>j 149.1 Fd'/xirtatian or transportation of 
(trtieles or inut( rials . . . 

(j) Greece. The regulations under section 2 
(c) and (i) of the joint resohition of Congress 
approved Novcniher 4, 19;i9. wliich the Secre- 
tary of State promulgated on November 10 '^ 
and November 2.5," 19.39, liencefortli apply 
(•(|ualiy ill respect to the export or transport of 
articles and materials to Greece. (54 Stat. 4. 
«; 2-2 IT. S. C. Siipp. V. 245J-1 : Proc. No. 244.".. 
November 15, liilO) 

[seal] Sumner Welles, 

Acting Secretary of State. 
November 15, 1940. 



Part Ifil — Solicitation and Collection of 
Funds and CoNTiiimTKiNs • 

Additional Regulations 

^ 161.20 Contributions for use in Greece. 
The rules and regulations (22 CFR 161.1-16) 
under section 8 of the joint resolution of Con- 
gress approved November 4, 1939, which the 
Secretary of State promulgated on November 6, 
1939," henceforth ap])ly e([ually to tlie solicita- 
tion and collection of contributions for use in 
Greece. (54 Stat. 8: 22 U. S. C, Supp. V, 
245J-7; Proc. No. 2443, November 15, 1940) 

[seal] Sumner Welles, 

Acting Secretary of State. 
November 15. 1940. 



'The number of tliis part has been cliange<l from 
12 to 140. 

''22 CFR 149.1 (a)-(dK 4 F.R. 4.=i08. 

"22 CFR 140.1 (e). 4 F. R. 4701. 

' The number of this part has been changed from 
40 to 161. 

' 4 F. R. 4510. 



Part 156— Travel' 

Pursuant to the provisions of section 5 of the 
joint resolution of Congress, approved Novem- 
ber 4, 1939, and of the President's proclamation 
of April 10, 1940, the regulations in 22 (TH 
150.1 and 156.2 of November 6, 1939,'" as 
amended November 17, 1939,'' April 25, 1940,'= 
May 11, 1940,'^ and June 10, 1940,'^ are hereby 
amended to read as follows: 

§ 150.1 American diplomalic, con.'odar, mili- 
tary, and naral officers. American dii)Ionialic 
and consular officers and their families, mem- 
l>ers of their staifs and their families, and 
American military and naval offirers and i>er- 
sonnel and their families may travel pursuant 
to ordei-s on vessels of France; (Jermany; 
I'oland; or the United Kingdom. India, Aus- 
tralia, Canada, New Zealand, the Union of 
South Africa; Norway: Belgium; the Nether- 
lands: Italy: and Greece if tiie piiiilic service 
requires. (54 Stat. 7; 22 U. S. C, Supp. V, 
24.5J-1: Proc. No. 2443. November 15, 1940) 

§ 156.2. Other American citizens. Other 
American citizens may travel on vessels of 
France ; Germany ; Poland ; or the United King- 
dom, India, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, 
the Union of South Afi-ica; Norway; Belgium; 
the Netherlands; Italy; and Greece: Prodded, 
hotrever, That travel on or over the north At- 
lantic Ocean, north of 35 degrees north latitude 
and east of 66 degrees west longitude or on or 
over other waters adjacent to Europe or over the 
continent of Europe or adjacent islands shall 
not be permitted except when specifically au- 
thorized by the Passport Division of the De- 
partment of State or an American diplomatic 
or consular officer abroad in each case. ( 54 Stat. 
7; 22 U. S. C, Supp. V, 245J-4; Proc. No. 2443. 
November 15, 1940) 

[seal] Sumner Welles, 

Acting Secretary of State. 

No\-EMBER 15, 1940. 



'The number of this ))art ha.s been chauKecI fnim 
o5C to 156. 

'°4 F. R. 4509. "5 F. R. 1695. 

"4 F. R. 4640. "5 F. R. 2211. 

"-"5 F. R. 1597. 



430 



nKPARTJrENT OF STATE BULL-ETIN 



TREATY RIGHTS IN TANGIER 

[Released to tlio press November 15] 

Upon instructions of the Department of State, 
the American Ambassador to Spain has made 
certain representations to the Spanish Govern- 
ment concerning the recent action of the Spanisli 
military antliorities at Tangier. Morocco. Al- 
thougli the United States has not adhered to 
the convention of December 18, 1923, revised on 
July 2.5, 1928, regarding the organization of the 
Statute of the Tangier Zone, it possesses certain 
treaty rights in Morocco, including the Interna- 
tional Zone of Tangier, on which the rejjresen- 
tatious of this Government have been based. 



EARTHQUAKE IN RUMANIA 

[Released to the press November 14] 

The President yesterday sent the following 
fflegrani to His Majesty King Mihai of Ru- 
mania : 

"The White House. November 13, 194.0. 
"His Majesty 

KiN(i MiH.Ai or Rumania. 

Buchai'ent. 
"I extend the very deep sympathy of the 
American people for the thousands who have 
suffered or liave been made homeless by the 
earthquake in Rumania, and I express to Your 
Majesty my own profound sj'inpathy in this 
tragic loss to your cfnintry. 

"Franklin D. Roosevelt'" 



Canada 



GREAT LAKES - ST. LAWRENCE WATERWAY PROJECT 



[Released to tbe press November 12] 

The following notes have been exchanged be- 
tween tlie Honorable Loring C. Christie, the 
Canadian Minister to the United States, and 
the Honorable Adolf A. Berle, Jr., Assistant 
Secretary of State, concerning the diversion of 
waters into the Great Lakes system for power 
purposes : 

October 14. 1940. 
Tlie Honorable 

Loring C. Christie, 
Minister of Ccmada. 
Sir: 

I have the honor to refer to the conversations 
which have taken place recently between offi- 
cials of the Governments of the United States 
and Canada in regard to the desirability of 
taking immediate steps looking to the early de- 
velopment of certain portions of the Great 
Lakes -St. Lawrence Basin project. These 
conversations have indicated that there is appre- 
hension in both countries over the possibility 
of a power shortage ; these apprehensions have 
been heightened by the necessity for increased 
supplies of power in consequence of Canada's 



war effort and of the major national defense 
effort in the United States. 

In the light of these considerations the Gov- 
ernment of the United States proposes that each 
Government appoint forthwith a Temporary 
Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Basin Committee 
consisting of not more than five members. 
These two Committees would cooperate in pre- 
liminary engineering and other investigations 
for that part of the project which is located in 
the International Rapids Section of the St. 
Lawrence River, in order that the entire project 
may be undertaken without delay when final 
decision is reached by the two Governments. 
The Government of the United States is pre- 
pared to advance the necessary funds up to 
$1,000,000 to pay for these preliminary engi- 
neering and other investigations on the under- 
standing that their cost shall ultimately be pro- 
rated by agreement between the two Govern- 
ments. 

Meanwhile, to assist in providing an adequate 
supply of power to meet Canadian defense 
needs and contingent upon the Province of 
Ontario's agreeing to provide immediately for 



XOVEMBKK 115, 1940 



431 



divei'sions into the Great Lakes System of wa- 
ters from the Albany River Basin whicli nor- 
mally flow into Hudson Bay, the Government 
of the I iiited States will interpose no objection, 
|)en(iin<r the conclusion of a final (ireat Lakes - 
St. Lawrence Basin a^rreement between the two 
countries, to the ininiedialc utilization for power 
at Niapara Falls by the Province of Ontario of 
additional waters equivalent in quantity to the 
tliversions into the (ireat Lakes Basin above 
referred to. 

I shall 1k' filad if you will let me know if your 
Goverinnent is in accord with the foregoing 
proposals. 

Accept [etc! 

For the Secretary of State: 

AiHii.K A. Bkici.e, Jr. 



No. 31('> Canadian Leo.vtion, 

Washhif/ton, Ortobir J.',, lf).',n. 

The Honourable Cokdell Hull. 

Si'rirtari/ of Stdtv of the United iStateg, 
Wmhiiifffoti. />. ('. 
Sir: 

I have the honour to ref'ei- to your note of 
October 14, in which you proposed that the Gov- 
ernments of Canada and the United States 
take innnediate step> looking to the early de- 
velopnieiil of certain portions of the Cireat 
Lakes -.'^t. Lawience BaVin project. 

I am instiucted to inform you that the Cana- 
dian Government is in accord with the proposals 
which you have made. 

I have [etc. J Ixjiuxg C. Christie 



No. 340 Canadian Legation, 

Wmhingtotu October JJ, 10.^0. 

The Honourable Cordei.l Hull. 

i^ecretarij of State of the United States. 
Washington, D. C. 

Sir: 

I have the honour to refer to the third para- 
graph of your note of Octol)er 14 concerning 
the Great Lakes -St. Lawrence Basin project, 
in which you state that to assist in providing an 
adequate supply of power to meet Canadian de- 



fence needs and contingent upon the Province 
of Ontario's agreeing to provide immediately 
for diversions into the Great Lakes System of 
waters from the Albany Kiver Basin which nor- 
mally flow into Hmlson Bay. the Government 
of the United States would interpose no ob- 
jection, |)ending the conclusion of a final (treat 
Lakes -St. Lawrence Basin agreement between 
the two countries, to the immediate utilization 
for power at Niagara Falls by the Province of 
Ontario of additional waters equivalent in 
quantity to the diversions into the Great Lakes 
Basiu above referred to. 

I am instructed to inform you that the Cana- 
dian (lovermnent has received appropiiale as- 
surances that the Hydro-Electric Power 
Commission of Ontario is prepared to proceed 
inunediately with the Long Lac-Ogoki iliver- 
-ioii.-. and that this action has been api)roved b^' 
the Government of the Province. 

The Canadian (Jovernment is therefore giv- 
ing ai)propriale instructions to authorize the 
additional diversion of 5,0(X) cubic feet per 
secoiul at Niagara by the Hj'dro- Electric Power 
Commission of (Jutario. 

I have [etc.] Loring C. Christie 



.,., „ ,, No\t:mbei! 7. 1!I4(). 

1 he Honorable 

LoRiNG C. Christie. 

Mini.'iter of Canada. 
Sir: 

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt 
of your Note No. 340 of October 31, 1940, stat- 
ing that the Hydro-Electric Power Commis- 
sion of Ontario is prepared to proceed imme- 
diately with the Long Lac-Ogoki diversions 
of waters from the Albany River Basin into 
the Great Lakes System and that this action 
hius been approved by the Govei-nment of the 
Province. 

I note also that the Canadian Government 
is giving approjiriate instructions to authorize 
the additional divei-sion of 5.000 cubic feet per 
second of water at Niagara Falls by the Hydro- 
Electric Power Commission of Ontario. 

Accept [etc.] 

For the Secretary of State: 

A. A. Berle. Jr. 



432 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Far East 



OIL AGREEMENT BETWEEN JAPA- 
NESE IMPORTERS AND NETHER- 
LANDS INDIES COMPANIES 

[Released to tlie press November 14] 

Consul Walter A. Foote at Batavia, Java, 
Netherlands Indies, has informed the Depai-t- 
ment that an agreement was initialed in Batavia 
on November 12 by representatives of Japanese 
oil importers and representatives of the local oil 
companies. The agreement provides for the ex- 
port of 1,800,000 tons of petroleum products per 
annum to Japan from the Netherlands Indies. 
These exports will be composed of 250,000 tons 
of motor gasoline, 73,000 tons of fuel oil, 57,000 
tons of kerosene. 100.000 tons of crude for lubri- 
cants, 540,000 tons of other crude, 120,000 tons 
of aviation crude, 50,000 tons of gas oil, and 
116,000 tons of diesel oil, in addition to the 
normal import quota of 494,000 tons of 
petroleum products. 



The Near East 



SUSPENSION OF TONNAGE DUTIES 
FOR VESSELS OF EGYPT 

A proclamation (no. 2435) providing that 
"the foreign discriminating duties of tonnage 
and imposts within the United States" be "sus- 
pended and discontinued so far as respects the 
vessels of Egypt and the produce, manufac- 
tures, or merchandise imported in said vessels 
into the United States from Egypt or from 
any other foreign country; the suspension to 
take effect from October 3, 1940, and to con- 
tinue so long as the reciprocal exemption of 
vessels belonging to citizens of the United 
States and their cargoes shall be continued, and 
no longer", was signed by the President on 
November 7, 1940. 

The text of this i)roclamation appears in full 
in the Federal Register for November 13, 1940 
(vol. 5, no. 221), page 4441. 



I 



American Republics 



REPORTS REGARDING AIR AND 
NAVAL BASES IN URUGUAY 

[Released to the press November 13] 

At his i^ress conference today, the Acting 
Secretary of State, Mr. Sunnier Welles, said 
that he wished to make a brief reference to a 
published story of some purported agreement 
between the United States and the Government 
of Uruguay with regard to air and naval bases. 
Mr. Welles said : 

"I want to make it very clear that the United 
States Government has never sought directly or 
indirectly to obtain the lease or cession of air 
and naval bases in Uruguay. As Secretary Hull 
has frequently stated, in none of our conversa- 
tions with any of the other American republics 



has there ever been involved the possibility of 
any suggestions on our part which would affect 
in any sense the sovereignty of any other Amer- 
ican nation." 



INAUGURATION OF PRESIDENT OF 
MEXICO 

[Released to the press November 13] 

The President has named the Honorable 
Henry A. Wallace. Vice President-elect, as his 
special representative with the rank of Ambas- 
sador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary at 
the ceremonies of the inauguration of Gen. 
Avila Camacho a^ President of Mexico, De- 
cember 1, 1940. 



NOVEMBER 16, 194 



433 



SUSPENSION OF TONNAGE DUTIES 
FOR VESSELS OF GUATEMALA, THE 
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, HAITI, AND 
VENEZUELA 

Till' Pri'sidcnt lias issued procliiiiiatiotis pro- 
viding lliiil I lie fon'ifj;!! dis<-riiiiiiiatiii;i duties 
of tonnage and imposts within the United 
States he suspended and discdnliiiued s<i far as 
resi)ect,s tlie vessels of (Juatemala, the Domini- 
can Repul)lie, Haiti, and Venezuela and the 
proihice, iiiaiiufattures. oi- nierehandise im- 
puiii'd in said vessels into the Uniled Slates 



from those comitries or from any othei- for- 
eign country, the suspension to take effect from 
October 19 for Guatemala, the Dominican Re- 
l)ublic, and Haiti, and from Octoher 23 for 
Venezuela. 

The proclamations are numbered and dated 
as follows: (iuatemala, no. 2436, of Novem- 
ber 7, 1940; the Dominican Republic, no. 2437, 
of November 7; Haiti, no. 2438, of November 7; 
and Venezuela, no. 2440, of November 8. 

The text3 of these proclamations appear in 
fidl in the Fidiral Rff/i-tfi r for November 13. 
1!)4() (vol. '). no. 221), pages 4441 4443 and 4444. 



Commercial Policy 



AGRICITTURE AND INTERNATIONAL-TRADE REL.\TION SHIPS 

Address by Assistant Secretary Grady '• 



( Relt'iiscd to (ho |>r^^^ Nnvcinlipi- H] 

International trade has deep significance for 
every American farmer. Not only United 
States exports and imports of agricultural 
products, but international trade in all com- 
modities and among all countries of the world 
affect the welfare of agriculline in the United 
States. When world trade is healthy and vig- 
orous American farmers prosper; when it 
stagnates or is throttled, they suffer. 

Foreign trade is especially important to 
farmers in this country producing such com- 
modities as cotton, tobacct), lard, rice, wheat, 
and fruits, who are dependent on foreign mar- 
kets for the sale of their surplus production. 
The proihicers of these and other export prod- 
ucts of the soil know very well what the loss 
of foreign markets means. It means one of 
three things: (1) their proiluction must be 
scaled down to a level determined by the do- 
mestic demand, (2) they must shift over into 
producing other crops to which their expe- 
rience and their farms are not so well adapted, 



"Delivered at the annual twMuiuet of the Mississippi 
Farm Bureau Feileratioii, Jackson, Miss., November 
14, 1940. 



or (3) unsalable surpluses will ]iile up in this 
country anil force the i)iices of their products 
down to ruinous levels. 

Foreign trade is important also to American 
producers of such products as beef cattle, dairy 
|)roducfs, wool, and sugar, of which the United 
States does not have export surpluses under 
normal conditions. 'V\\e prosperity of these 
farming groups depends primarily upon the 
prosperity of the domestic market. When 
American consumers are prosperous this do- 
mestic market is good. When American con- 
simiers are not jjrosperous they drop out of 
the domestic market as customers, and farmers 
producing primarily for that market suffer in 
the 3ame way as do the farmers who pro- 
duce agricultural commodities for export. The 
prosperity of the domestic market depends, of 
course, in large degree upon the prosperity of 
our export trade, in non-agricultural as well 
as in agi-icultural products. 

The bearing of industrial exports on the pros- 
perity of American agriculture is pointed out 
concretely in a study made by Professor Schultz 
of the Iowa State Agricultural Experiment Sta- 



434 



DEP.\IITMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



tion at the request of the American Farm Bu- 
reau Federation. He states as follows : 

"For example, the total output of farm ma- 
chinery rose in value about $273,000,000 from 
1935 to 1937. About 16 percent of this resulted 
from inci'eased exports. Purchases of food- 
stuffs increased perhaps $1,500,000 as a result 
of the rise in j^ayrolls due to larger exports. 
For automobiles and motor vehicles, foodstuffs 
expenditures probably rose around $2,800,000 
as a result of larger export business. For pri- 
mary iron and steel products the gain was 
perhaps $5,000,000. 

"The list could be extended by including elec- 
trical and industrial machinery, petroleum and 
its products, advanced manufactures of iron and 
steel, automobile parts, chemicals, copper and 
copper manufactures, and many others." 

It may be seen, therefore, that American farm- 
ers, whether they arc producing for export or 
for the domestic market, are benefited by ex- 
ports of manufactures as well as of farm prod- 
ucts. But international trade, like any other 
trade, is a two-way transaction and the Ameri- 
can farmer has an interest in imports as well 
as in exports. 

Thei'e is no profit in growing crops and live- 
stock products for sale abroad unless the farm- 
ers receive something in return for them. Sell- 
ing them on credit is merely postponing pay- 
ment. Furthermore, few foreign countries are 
now in a position to pay the United States in 
gold for their purchases of American merchan- 
dise and, moreover, the United States already 
has more gold than it knows what to do with. 
Therefore, American exports, an important 
factor in the prosperity of American agricul- 
ture, must eventually be paid for largely with 
foreign goods. 

Imports, moreover, consist of goods which 
American consumers need and want. They 
may be raw materials essential to American in- 
dustrial operation, or special products which 
help to raise the standard of American living. 
Some of these commodities, which are not pro- 
duced at all in the United States, are not sub- 
ject to import duties. Many of them, however, 
have been imported over high tariffs, and of 
course the American farmer, together with other 



American consumers, has had to pay the high 
duties. 

Notwithstanding the need of imports to main- 
tain and expand the foreign markets of our 
farmers and manufacturers and to provide an 
adequate standard of living at price levels with- 
in reach of our workers in the fields and in the 
factories, the Congress, nevertheless, enacted in 
1930 the highest tariff wall in our history — the 
Hawley-Smoot Act. The decline in our imports 
which followed the adoption of excessive and 
economically unsound tariff rates was poor sat- 
isfaction to American farmers, since the decline 
in our imports which followed enactment of the 
Hawley-Smoot Tariff was accompanied by dis- 
astrous shrinkage of farm exports, farm prices, 
and farm income. Obviously, in order to regain 
lost export markets for American farm and 
factory products and thus to contribute to the 
restoration of prosperity for American agricul- 
ture and industry, it was essential that we scale 
down the excessive tariff wall, which was pre- 
venting American consumers from purchasing 
foreign products and which was depriving 
foreign consumers of the wherewithal to pay for 
American export surpluses — agricultural and 
industrial. Accordingly, with a Aiew to facili- 
tating economic recovery, there was enacted in 
the early part of the present administration the 
Trade Agreements Act of 1934, since extended 
in 1937 and again in 1940. 

The trade-agreements program has now been 
in operation for more than six years and, in view 
of the revival and growth which has come about 
in that time in industrial activity, employment, 
and agricultural income in the United States, 
there are few people today, I believe, who have 
any genuine doubts as to the wisdom of the com- 
mercial policy embodied in that program. 

Nevertheless, some people may point out that 
while such a policy is of great benefit in time of 
peace, international trade in wartime is affected 
largely by other than economic considerations, 
and they may ask what benefit the trade-agree- 
ments progi-am is to American foreign trade, 
especially to American agricultural exports, 
under the abnormal conditions which now 
prevail. 

Our agricultural exports for the first 12 



NOVEMBER 16, 1940 



435 



inontlis iif tlic war wen- liir;rcr than thoy were in 
tlie procetliiijj; lii-nnjiitli peiiud. 'Jlie gain was 
accounted for larfjely by cotton, but it occurred 
in the first half of the [Kriotl and was chie in a 
hirj^fe part to the fail tliat foreign stocks of 
American cotton were nearly exhausted at the 
beginninfr of tlie war. La'^t August, our cotton 
exports were smaller than in any month since 
August 1914. 

For the most pai't f)nr agricultural exports 
have bei'ii luuxl hit by the war. ihiv industrial 
exports, however, have increased, and the pros- 
pects are that they will continue to increase. 
It is pretlicted that this increase, together with 
national-defense activities, will result in a large 
enough expansion in the domestic market for 
American farm commodities to produce in the 
coming year a rise in the total agricultural in- 
come of the United States. es|)ecial!y in the in- 
comes of the farmers who produce ciiielly f(jr 
home consumption. Of course, the position of 
the farmers wjio have surpluses for export will 
not be as favorable, for, while they may exjH-ct 
to increase their sales in the domestic market, 
the prosi)ects are that their sales abroad will 
continue to decrease. The question is. what can 
the trade-agreements program do about it ? 

As a matter of fact, trade agreements have 
been a factor of significance in our foreign- 
trade positicm under war conditions. It is 
important to note in this connection that, 
although our imports increased in the first nine 
months of this year over the corresponding 
period of last year, they have not increased as 
much as have our exports, indicating on the 
part of the foivign purcha.sers of our goods, a 
drain on their sources of dollar exchange. 
This has in part caused the belligerents to 
limit their iiurchases from the United States 
to essential items in order to conserve their dol- 
lar funds for war materials. The American 
trade in agricidtural products, many of which 
have not come under the category of essentials, 
has especially suflFered as a re.sult of this pol- 
icy. Furthermore, the using up of dollar ex- 
change now by the foreign countries concerned 
may mean, in the case of the belligerents, that 
their ability to buy American farm products 



after the war will be impaired and. in the case 
of other countries, that we shall not be able to 
iiold on to the trade gains which have been 
made and which, indirectly, have benefited 
American agriculture. 

The drain, however, on the dollar-exchange 
resources of foreign countries, the consequences 
suffered as a re.sult thereof by American agri- 
culture, and its possible effects on future trade 
might be greater than is now the cas<> were it 
not foi- tiie existence of tiade agreements. The 
lowering of our tuiiffs as the result of these 
agieements has afforded foreign countries the 
opportimily of exchanging larger amounts of 
their goods for American jjroducts than would 
otherwise be possible and thus has relieved in 
some measure the pressure on their potential 
ilollar-cxchange reserves. 

It may be pointed oiu, moieover, that the pos- 
sibilities of providing further relief to American 
agriculture from the pressure of dollar-exchange 
shortages are not yet exhausted. There are 
many countries outside of Europe with which 
we do not have trade agreements, and the 
prospects (rf concluding mutually profitable 
agreements with such countries are being con- 
staiuly exploretl. 

The prospects of minimizing the present de- 
cline in cxjOTrt trade of American farm prod- 
ucts and of expanding the foreign markets for 
such products after the war depend on a 
recogniticju of the fact that imports provide the 
means of payment for exports and that f(jreign 
trade, if it is to be encouraged, must be con- 
ducted on a triangular or multilateral basis, as 
provided for by the principle of most-favored- 
nation treatment. These considerations are 
fundamental in the commercial policy under- 
lying the trade-agreements program. 

Multilateral trade, based on the principle of 
equal treatment, makes it possible for each na- 
tion to buy and sell in the best markets. On 
the other hand, bilateralistic trade, effected by 
such discriminatory devices as clearing agree- 
ments and barter arrangements, requires a coun- 
try to buy in the same foreign market in which 
it sells. Since that market is, of course, limited 
in its capacity to satisfy the import needs of 



436 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



its foreign suppliers, both the sales to and the 
i:)urchases in that market are smaller than they 
would otherwise be. 

The American farmer should beware of sales- 
men with a line of bilateralistic goods who rep- 
resent their wares as miracle-working devices 
for promoting exports. They are merely high 
protectionists in disguise who would like to 
embargo imports. Although our merchandise 
sales to Europe in the past 20 years have ex- 
ceeded our purchases of European products by 
about 20 billion dollars, the advocates of bilat- 
eralism are not likely to argue that we should 
have increased our imports from Europe in that 
period by such a sum in order to balance the 
exports. They know very well from the world's 
experience with bilateralism in the last decade 
that the balance in trade is effected in the other 
way, by a decrease in exports. 

Our present conunercial policy, which has 



served us well in the past, offers us now the 
only means for safeguarding our international 
commerce and for protecting American agricul- 
ture and industry whose prosperity is depend- 
ent on world markets and access to world 
supplies of raw materials. 

It is not because of fidelity to noble sentiments 
or of an allegiance to so-called old-fashioned 
doctrines that we must continue to uphold the 
multilatei-al principles of the trade-agreements 
program, but because practical considerations 
and hard-headed business sense leave no other 
course open. The basic proposition underlying 
our commercial policy is that foreign trade is a 
vital factor in the prosperity, strength, and 
peace of the Nation ; our policy is to foster such 
trade. So long as we hold the national inter- 
ests above those of any economic group or sec- 
tion of the countrj', no change in that policy is 
possible. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



SOVEREIGNTY 

Convention on the Provisional Administra- 
tion of European Colonies and Posses- 
sions in the Americas and Final Act of 
the Second Meeting of Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs Held at Habana 

Dominican Repuhlie 

According to a despatch dated October 31, 
1940 from the American Legation at Monte- 
video, the Dominican Congress, by Law No. 336, 
of September 30, 1940, published in the Gaceta 
Of-cial No. 5507, of October 2, 1940, has approved 
the Convention on the Provisional Administra- 
tion of European Colonies and Possessions in 
the Americas, signed at Habana on July 30, 



"For toxt of the final act and convention, see the 
Bulletin of August 24, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 61), pp. 
127-148. 



1940. It was also reported in the despatch that, 
by Law No. 337, of the same date, published in 
the same Gaceta Oficial^ the Dominican Con- 
gress appi'oved the Final Act of the Second 
Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs, signed 
in Habana on July 30, 1940.'° 



COMMERCE 

Reciprocal Trade Agreement Between the 
United States and Venezuela (Executive 
Agreement Series No. 180) 

The exchange of the proclamation by the 
Pre,sident of the United States and the 
Venezuelan ratification of the reciprocal trade 
agreement between the United States and 
Venezuela, signed at Caracas November 6, 1939, 
was effected at Washington on November 14, 



NOVEMBER 16, 1940 



437 



1940, by the Actiiip SoiTetary of Stute. Mr. 
Sumner Welles, aiul tlie VenezueliUi Ambassa- 
dor to the United States, Senor Dr. Don Dio- 
genes Esculante. Tiie provisions of the trade 
agreement and the schedules annexcil theieln 
have been applied provisionally since Decem- 
ber 16, 1939, pursuant to the provisions of the 
modm r/cf//(^// effected by an exchange of notes 
signed at Caracas November C, 1939 and pro- 
claimed by the President November 16. 1939. 

Pursuant to the provisions of article XIX, 
the trade agreement will enter definitively into 
full force on December 14, 1940, 30 days after 
the exchange of the instruments mentioned 
above, on which date the modwi vivendi of 
NovemI)er 6, 19,39 will terminate. 

Trade agreements conchuled pursuant to the 
provisions of the act of June 12, 1934. entitled 
"An Act to amend the Taiiff Act of 1930", as 
extended, are now in force between the United 
States and 11 of the other American republics, 
namely. Cuba, Brazil, Haiti, Colombia, Hon- 
duras, Nicaragua. Guatemala, Costa Rica. El 
Salvador, Ecuador, and Venezuela. 



The Foreign Service 



STATEMENT BY AMBASSADOR 
BULLITT 

[Released to the presa November 14) 

In answer to inquiries with regard to reports 
that he had resigned as American Ambassador 



to France, Ambassador William C. Bullitt stated 
this morning : 

"Since last August I have expressed my de- 
sire to resign as Ambassador to France, several 
times orally to the President, and on November 
7 I submitted my resignation to him in writing. 
I have felt that I could be of more service to 
my country if I were free to write and speak 
without the restrictions imposed by official posi- 
tion. The President again, as previously, ex- 
pressed his wish that I should not resign, and 
there for the present the matter rests." 



Publications 



The foHowing i)ublications i.ssued by the 
United States Tariff Conunission and available 
at that office may be of interest to readers of 
the BuNetin: 

Tlie Fori'lgn Trade of Latin America : 
Part II (ill 20 sections") : 

(Section 5] : Rciiort on Commerfiul Policies uiid 

Ti-iiile Itplatidiis of Colombia, vil, r>2 pp. 

( processed ) . 
(Section 10] : Kejiort on Commercial Policies and 

Trade Relations of Venezuela, vil, 67 pp. 

( processed ) . 



" When complete, the 20 sections of part II will 
cover the commercial policy and foreign trade of each 
of the 20 Latin American republics. 



U. 5. COVERNyENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1940 



For sale by the Superintendent of Doounicnt.'i. Washinfrton. D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - . - Subscription price, $2.7ij a year 

PCBLISllED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIEECTOB OF THE BUBEAD OF THE BCDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 




L^J 



J 



I 

Li 



H 1 1 




Qontents 



NOVEMBER 23, 1940 
Vol. Ill: No. J 4 - Publication I^JO 




Amehican Republics: • 

The Building of Solidarity in the Western Hemisphere: 

Address by Assistant Secretory Berle 

The Defense of the Western Hemisphere: Address by 

Assistant Secretary Berle 

Pan American Solidarity: Address by Assistant Secre- 

liuy Grady 

Commercial Trends in the American Republics: Address 

by Harold D. Fiidoy 

Reports rej^arding air and naval bases in Uruguay . . 

Pan American Aviation Day proclamation 

Press interview by the President of Argentina: Com- 
ments by Acting Secretary Welles 

The Far East: 

Detention in French Indochina of American Vice 

Consul and press correspondent 

Europe: 

Accidental death of American correspondent in Yugo- 
slavia 

The Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 

The Depautment: 

Resignation of Joseph E. Davies as Special Assistant 

to the Secretary of State ; ; . 

Treaty Information: 
Opium: 

Convention and Protocol for the Suppression of the 
Abuse of Opium and Other Drugs, 1912 (Treaty 

Series No. 612) 

Labor: 

Convention Concerning Statistics of Wages and 

Hom^ of Work, 1938 

Regulations 

Publications 



Page 
441 

445 

448 

449 
452 
452 

453 

453 

454 
454 

455 



456 



456 
456 
457 



American Republics 



THE BUILDING OF SOLIDARITY IN THE WESTERN HEiMISPHERE 

Address by Assistant Secretary Berle ' 



[HeleaHcd to llii> press No»'cnibor lU) 

For iniiny yeai-s it was the custom to i-egard 
intiT-Ainerican conferences as meetings at 
whidi speeches were exchanged, but witliout 
tahgil)Ie effect. 

Kuri'ly in tiie liistory of international rela- 
tions liave continuing conferences produced re- 
suhs as far-readiing and as pragmatic as those 
wliich have flowed from tlie intei- American sys- 
tem. Tins is partly becau.se the ilevelo[)ment of 
the inter-American family of nations has pro- 
ceeded, not from the top down, but from tlie 
bottom up. It is emphatically an organization 
rooted in the problems and desires of the indi- 
vidual nations; and its great strength has \K'ei\ 
that inter-American work has kept steady pace 
with the rapidly growing community of interest 
between the 21 American republics. The nuit- 
ters discussed at these conferences were in no 
way glittering generalities. They had real and 
effective significance in tangible action taken and 
joined in by the govermuents involved. 

Let us consider briefly the situation as it 
stands today. 

The American hemisphere is almost the only 
great area in the world not directly threatened 
by war operations. This is not the result of 
mere distance. 

By 1936 we had already begun to experience 
the preliminary tremors of the European dis- 



' Delivered on the Latin American Lecture Series 
program, Shoreham Hotel, Washington, November 19, 
1040. 



turbance which has now brought that gi-eat con- 
tinent into a new world war. It was plain 
that mechanisms were needed by wliich the 
continent could operate l(»gether in the face of 
a common danger. We had not yet arrived at 
the point where a conunon agreement on certain 
es.sentials of foreign policy could take place; 
but it was plain that every government was 
feeling toward such an agreement, realizing, 
perhaps intuitively, that stormy times were 
ahead. At Buenos Aires in 1936 there was, vir- 
tually, only one great issue. Had the 21 Amer- 
ican nations reached a point at which they 
could agree to consult with each other in the 
case of any thi-eatened danger to the jjeace of 
the continent, whether it came from within the 
hemisphere or from without? The debates at 
that conference indicated plainly that the con- 
tinent was ripe for such a .system of consulta- 
tion; and it was accordingly embodied in the 
Buenos Aires treaties. 

At that time, also, the beginnings of the out- 
line of the economic hemisphere, as we under- 
stand it today, were roughly sketched in. We 
had learnt that inter-American c^)operation 
must include cooperation in the fields of trade, 
and of finance, as well as in those of diplomacy 
and foreign affaii-s. One by-product of the 
Buenos Aires Conference was the initiation of 
discussions between the United States and 
Brazil looking toward a closer financial rela- 
tionship between the United States Treasury 
and the Brazilian Government, for the purpose 

441 



442 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BXJLX.ETIN 



of assisting the Brazilian Government in cer- 
tain monetary measures which it wished to take. 
We were, as you will see, feeling toward a pos- 
sible relationship in which the economics of the 
hemisphere might be put on a more nearly co- 
operative basis. 

The year which followed is stamped on the 
minds of all of us as a crucial period in inter- 
American relationships. We know now that 
tlie year 1937 marked the beginning of the or- 
ganization by certain European powers of their 
groups of nationals and the beginning of prop- 
aganda on a large scale. Nazi and Fascist gov- 
ernments were not, so their protagonists 
claimed, articles of export; but Nazi and 
Fascist propaganda certainly was exported, 
and tliat on no small scale. The jirecise use to 
which this weapon could be put became tragi- 
cally plain as European affairs went steadily 
from bad to worse. The history of the attempts 
to organize centers of foreign-directed power 
in evei'y country in the New World has yet to be 
written; and when it is written, it will be a 
cloudy piece of unpleasant reading. Rapidly 
it became plain that the foreign affairs of 
Europe were beginning to establish contact with 
the internal life of the American republics; and 
the American republics, including our own, dis- 
like the process intensely. This, perhaps more 
than any other single factor, made it plain that 
at the Lima Conference some common ground 
in international affairs could be taken and 
should be taken by the American group; and 
the result was the Declaration of Lima. This 
was, in effect, the adoption of a common for- 
eign policy in certain respects by 21 American 
nations; and it has proved the greatest single 
safeguard for all of us. 

It is interesting to note that at the exact 
moment when European nations were moving 
farther away each from the other — when the 
process of fear and danger was leading each gov- 
ernment there to try to pursue a lone course — 
the effect here was to solidify the countries into 
a common determination to work together in 
the common interest of keeping aggression off 
this hemisphere in any form, whether direct or 
indirect, whether by arms or by propaganda. 



For the Declaration of Lima at the end of the 
tragic year 1938 was the direct answer to the 
campaign of 1938 which had ended the exist- 
ence of Austria, had partitioned Czechoslovakia, 
had led to the crisis of Munich, and had already 
threatened the existence of Poland. We had 
had an object lesson that the choice was hang- 
ing together or hanging separately. 

Following the Declaration of Lima, an un- 
ha^jpy world waited tensely for the inevitable 
conflagration overseas to break into full flame. 
During that time you would have found that the 
inter- American republics were steadily follow- 
ing two lines of constant cooperation. They 
were exchanging among themselves informa- 
tion as to the progress of affairs. Meanwhile, 
the}' were looking to their economics. There 
was reason for this: Germany had introduced 
her so-called "barter agreements" to tlie South 
American Continent, and we were being intro- 
duced to that modern innovation, the "aski" 
mark. Stripped of technical language, these 
were arrangements by whicli South American 
goods were bought for Germany and were paid 
for in currency which could only be used to buy 
certain specified German products. A bank 
loaded with "aski" marks would find, for ex- 
ample, that they could only be used to purchase 
German flutes ; and at least one bank thereupon 
had to organize a department for the sale of 
flutes, in order to convert the "aski" marks once 
more into something which could serve as a use- 
ful currency. A Colombian friend of mine com- 
plained bitterly to me of the number of opera 
glasses in circulation in Colombia. The stores 
in Rio were filled with merchandise whose merit 
was that it was cheap, but whose disadvantage 
was that its quality was so poor as to be practi- 
cally unusable. For once, bankers and mer- 
chants learned that to have money in the bank 
was a positive disadvantage—- if the money 
happened to be in a European bank and there 
was no way of making it valid. 

Through all this you would have found that 
Treasury experts of the various countries, in- 
cluding the Treasury of the United States, were 
studying, watching, and working out possible 
methods by which something could be done. 



NOVEMBER 2 3, 194 



443 



The Export-Import Bank of Wiisliin<Tton, a 
ui^'l'ul iiistriiinent whicli hud luul too little use, 
was being given funds and was staffed so that 
it could undertake a major program, should 
occasion arise; and meanwhile it was being used 
to assist in financing certain exports which 
would strengthen the economy of the country 
in which investments were being made. 

There was thus a fairly wide experimental 
knowledge when, in September of 1939, the 
(Jermans marched into Poland, the British and 
French declared war, blockades were announced, 
and the full task of meeting a wartime economy 
was forced on the Western Hemisphere. 

When, on September 23. 1939, the Foreign 
Ministers of the American republics met in 
Pananui. they had a fiini basis for action, and 
they had two definite ideas to which they pro- 
posed to give reality. Their authority for ac- 
tion was found in the agi'eements adopted at 
I'uenos Aires in 1936 and the agreements 
adopted at the Lima Conference in 1938. The 
ideas to which they proposed to give form were 
two. First, if humanly possible, the horrors 
of war were to be kept off the western conti- 
nent. Second, so far as possible, they proposed, 
by sharing burdens, to alleviate the crushing 
effects of war on the economic life of these 
countries. No greater task has jx-rhaps ever 
faced any group of statesmen. 

At the suggestion of President Roosevelt, a 
safety zone was laid out. This was not a mere 
"happj' thought''. It was the revival of an old 
proposal first made in the time of President 
Madison and again urged by a number of South 
American rei)ublics as a safetj- measure in 191.5. 
Unhappily in 1915 the proposal was not seri- 
ously taken uji — had it been, the history of the 
World A\'ar might have been different. The 
principle was that the peaceful rights of neu- 
trals trading together in the waters near their 
shores were higher than the rights of belliger- 
ents. Practical effect was given by the adop- 
tion of common measures to i-egidate the in- 
coming and outgoing of belligei'ent craft and 
to control the supplies which they could take 
on. It thus ceased to be convenient to carry on 
belligerent onerations close to American shores. 



A fleet cannot operate on this side of the Atlan- 
tic very long unless it is assured of supplies; 
and these supplies became extremely difficult to 
get. A cooperative neutrality patrol carried 
out by warships and by airplanes gave assur- 
ance that at all times the American nations 
w-ould be informed of any attempt to bring the 
war to this side of the ocean. 

Thus far, these measures taken at Panama 
have been conspicuously successful. The prin- 
cipal exception — the case of the German war- 
ship Graf Spce — is perhaps an illustration. 
The Graf Spec seems to have steamed into 
Uruguayan waters only because she was run- 
ning low on supplies and i)articularly fuel oil; 
she hoped to make contact with a supply ship 
which clandestinely was attempting to pi-ovide 
her with necessities. The result you know. It 
has now become difficult for an overseas war 
vessel to operate freely in the American zone, 
and the i-esult .since then has been that the naval 
war has thus far remained on its own side of 
the sea. 

This is merely an illustration of the effective- 
ness of the measures taken. In detail, of course, 
they are far more technical. You would find 
that there was virtually common action in re- 
sjject of the regiUation and entry of war ves- 
.st^ls, the inspection of mercluuit vessels, the 
handling of vessels blockaded in the harbors, 
the surveillance exercised over supplies. 

A by-product of this particular job has been 
singidarly interesting. Cooperation between 
the military and civil authorities on a common 
end quite usually brings understanding; and 
this was the case here. The men in the various 
services of the American republics came to 
know each other personally, much as the states- 
men of these republics had come to be friends 
through the system of inter-American confer- 
ences. This made it easy to discuss problems 
and easy to find points of agi-eement. As wiU 
appear, this has later proved very useful. 

The second great end — to protect, so far as 
possible, the economic life of the republics — 
proved at once more difficult, and more exciting. 
An Inter-American Economic Advisory Com- 
mittee was created, given a permanent head- 



444 

quarters in Wasliington, and told to go to work. 
Among the. tasks of this committee was the 
modest one of "considering any problem of 
monetary relationships, foreign-exchange man- 
agement, or balance of international-payment 
situation, which may be presented to it by the 
government of any of the American republics" ; 
and to study the most practical and satisfactory 
means of obtaining stability of monetary and 
commercial relationships between them. 

I need hardly observe that this committee, 
meeting in Washington shortly after the Ha- 
bana convention, surveyed the scene with a 
certain amount of concern. The task indeed 
was enormous. It could not be attacked by any 
doctrinaire methods. Problems multiplied at 
once. I do not try to detail them all, but merely 
to give illustrations. 

Many of the other American republics tradi- 
tionally sell raw materials to Europe and buy 
finished products there. The combined effect 
of war and blockade meant they had to buy 
their finished products, which they badly 
needed, from us; yet this did not increase our 
need of their raw materials. We were, and are, 
of course, the largest financial factor in the 
hemisphere and could justly be asked to do what 
■we could in the situation. Plainly, some 
method had to be found by which the American 
republics could buy their necessities here, which 
meant, likewise, that some method had to be 
found by which they could pay for these neces- 
sities; further, some activity had to be made 
possible to take the place in some measure at 
least of their overseas commerce, which neces- 
sarily dwindled as the war econ6my imposed 
itself. 

To meet this, the experimental experience of 
the Export-Import Bank, accumulated through 
1937 and 1938, was promptly drawn upon. Ex- 
panding somewhat the earlier practice of the 
Export-Import Bank, endeavors were made to 
use it so that its investments could increase the 
amount of productive economic activity carried 
on by governments which found themselves cut 
off from their normal chamiels. 

Inter- American trade depends on ships; so 
measures had to be taken to keep ships running 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

and to keep freight rates from skyrocketing. 
A shipping committee has been working on that 
problem continuously — which is why inter- 
American freight rates are still within hailing 
distance of normal. 

Movements of capital which are continuous in 
normal times were cut off by war conditions. 
An inter-American commission was organized 
to stimulate mixed enterprises, owned partly by 
the capital which is available in the United 
States and partly by capital available in the 
other American republics. 

Finally, a careful survey of the supplies and 
materials and possible demands for them was 
made, with a view to stimulating increased pur- 
chases by the United States in South America, 
thereby making it possible for the other Ameri- 
can republics to fill their needs here. 

As the first year of the war ran its tragic 
course, a new problem — that of hemispheric de- 
fense — began to appear. With the fall of 
France, it was perfectly possible that aggressive 
powers might commence to operate in the At- 
lantic. Further, the European colonies on this 
side of the water might become centers of ag- 
gression against the American republics. A 
second consultation of Foreign Ministers was 
called, which met at Habana last July. Three 
main problems came to the fore: The problem 
of handling possible disturbance in European 
colonies, which was met by the Act of Habana ; 
the problem of curbing to some extent subver- 
sive movements within the continent, which was 
met by an agreement to interchange information 
and take common measures; and finally, the 
increased economic pressure resulting from the 
fact that practically all European markets were 
now cut off. 

You are familiar with the Act of Habana, 
and with the fact that it was promptly followed 
by conferences between the inter- American mil- 
itary chiefs. One such conference has just been 
held in Washington, at which plans for the de- 
fense of the xVmerican Continent have been can- 
vassed. Building almost directly on the prin- 
ciple laid down in Habana that each American 
republic has the right and the duty to defend 



I 

I 



NOVEMBER 23, 1940 



445 



wherever aggression is threatened, the United 
States concluded an arrangement for naval 
bases with Great Britain running all the way 
from Newfoundland to the shoulder of Brazil ; 
and these were, again under the cooperative 
principle, promptly made available on the cus- 
tomary basis to our American neighbors. Other 
American republics liave strengthened their 
own defenses; and the problem of air defense 
lias not failed to receive attention. 

On the economic side, the process of coojiera- 
tion was intensified. President Roosevelt 
asked, and the Congress granted, a sum of 500 
million dollars for the Export-Import Bank of 
Washington, making possible the planning of a 
careful program balanced between public 
works, loans for productive purposes, and other 
similar arrangements. At the same time, in 



handling our own purchases for defense it was 
possible for the United States to purchase stocks 
of goods from the other American republics and 
thereby to relieve the strain on exchange. 

We are midway in this combined program of 
military, political and economic cooi)eration 
now. 

I believe that we are doing something more 
than merely taking care of an emergency. I 
think we are forging the pattern for a new 
method of handling world affairs. 

In the American Continent we have the con- 
ception of peace without empire — the coopera- 
tive peace which arises from understanding and 
willingness to cooperate. It may well be that 
we are forging the outlines for a system of 
world peace which will prove to be the pattern 
of the next century. 



THE DEFENSE OF THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE 

Address by Assistant Secretary Eerie = 



[Released to the press November 22) 

The defense of the Western Hemisphere, both 
military and economic, is now an accepted 
policy of the Government of the United States. 
It is likewise a part of the settled doctrine of 
all of the 21 American nations. Let me give you 
a brief review of how we are going about it. 

The defense of the hemisphere is dominated 
by one very simple fact. The United States is 
safe so long as no ovei"seas aggressive power 
gains a foothold or can establish a base in the 
New World. Fortunately, that same fact is the 
dominant consideration in the defense of every 
other American republic. The American family 
of nations thus starts with a single proposition. 
They cannot permit any overseas power to es- 
tablish control, directly or indirectly, over any 
territory in the Western Hemisphere. 

Although this was the main reason for pro- 
claiming the Monroe Doctrine more than a cen- 



' Delivered on America's Town Meeting of the Air 
program, conducted by the Town Hall, Inc., New Tork 
City, November 21, 1940, and broadcast over the blue 
network of the National Broadcasting C!o. 



tury ago, we took a long time in this country 
before recognizing that the Monroe Doctrine 
and hemispheric defense went together. "We in 
the United States, and the otlier American re- 
publics, talked about it, and thought it over, 
and made various proposals. But nothing 
tangible was done about it until Christmas Eve, 
1938. The scene was the great Inter- American 
Conference at Lima. An elaborate discussion 
had taken place between delegations represent- 
ing the 21 American nations — a discussion 
which had been followed closely by every 
European power. Propaganda by two of the 
totalitarian countries had been freely used in 
an effort to break up the Conference ; and diplo- 
matic pressure was not wanting. But the 
American Continent had the example of Europe 
before its eyes. The Munich crisis was fresh 
in everyone's mind, and the conflict in Europe 
had already cast its shadow before it. On that 
Christmas Eve, amid cheers, Secretary Hull, 
one of the great architects of the hemisphere, 
rose to salute the convention as it approved a 
document now known as the Declaration of 



446 



DEPABTMEiISTT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Lima. That declaration was, in substance, a 
statement that the policy of each and all of the 
21 countries from thence forward would be to 
defend and maintain the independent institu- 
tions of this hemisphere against direct threat 
by military aggression, or indirect threat by 
propaganda, or seizure from within. Each 
nation reserved the right to take such inde- 
pendent measures to that end as the circum- 
stances might require. 

The second great step was taken by Presi- 
dent Roosevelt on April 14, 1939, immediately 
after the German armies had destroyed what 
was left of Czechoslovakia. He spoke before 
the Governing Board of the Pan American 
Union, and he pointed out that we were pro- 
tected from the tragic fate of the Old World 
mainly because we were pledged to a new and 
powerful ideal — that of the community of na- 
tions. He went on to say that we of the United 
States were prepared to maintain the American 
I^eace "and to defend it to the fullest extent of 
our strength, matching force to force if any 
attempt is made to subvert our institutions, or 
to impair the independence of any one of our 
group". He added that a like defense would be 
given in the economic field, should any country 
be attacked by the method of economic pressure. 
This was the pledge of the United States to 
defend the hemisphere. 

The President had previously declared that 
the United States would not stand idly by if our 
sister nation of Canada were threatened with 
domination by any other empire. The subject 
was thus closed, hemispheric defense becoming 
a part of the American doctrine. 

So much for the obligation. This is how the 
hemisphere has gone about preparing its de- 
fense. 

Let us first talk of military affairs. 

Upon the outbreak of the war the American 
republics declared a neutrality zone and set up 
a cooperative neutrality patrol carried out by 
warships and by aircraft. At the same time 
they arranged matters so that American ports 
and American supplies should not be freely 
available to naval vessels of countries at war. 
These arrangements make it very difficult to 



carry on naval warfare on this side of the 
Atlantic. 

This removed the immediate danger and at 
the same time provided an outer screen of de- 
fense. 

When last summer the Battle of France ended 
in a French defeat, a second danger arose. 
There are colonies of France and of Holland in 
this hemisphere: the Guianas, on the shoulder 
of Brazil, and the Dutch and French West In- 
dies, in the Caribbean Sea. Measures were at 
once taken to make sure that these colonies could 
not be used by the conqueror as centers of ag- 
giTssion. This was agreed to by the 21 republics 
at Habana last July; and active measures for 
assuring the peace of these colonies have been 
going on ever since. The right of any one Amer- 
ican country to enter upon and defend any of 
these colonies in case of necessity was recog- 
nized. This necessarily implied a considerable 
increase of facilities for the American navies, 
and particularly our own. 

Promptly after that, the United States Gov- 
ernment arranged with the British Government 
to acquire a string of naval bases nuining from 
Newfoundland on the north to British Guiana 
on the south; and these are now in process of 
active organization. At once Secretary Hull 
announced that the bases were open, mider the 
customary cooperative arrangements, to the 
other American republics. 

Realizing that defense means meeting an at- 
tack at any point, staff conversations have been 
held between the military commandei'S of the 
various republics and of the United States, in- 
cluding our own General Staff. Recently, the 
commanders of many of the Central and South 
American armed forces attended a meeting in 
Washington for the further exchange of in- 
formation and the formulation of plans. The 
air defense was not overlooked; and measures 
for this purpose are also being carried forward. 

In result, there is already in being the 
method, the plan, and the means of defense — 
means which will grow as our armament pro- 
gram proceeds. 

This is the exact opposite of what happened 
in Europe. Great Britain had to stand idly by 



NOVEMBER 23, 1940 



447 



while the Germans completed their plans for 
tiie invasion of Norway. In this hemisphere 
plans have boon made by which an adequate 
force for resistance will l)e first. 

The other necessary method of defense is 
economic. We have already seen, from Euro- 
pean experience, that a strong economic power 
can weaken and perhaps even crush a smaller 
nation by ruining^ its market, destroying its 
trade, creating distress within the country, and 
then using that pressure to upset its govern- 
ment and institutions. 

Dii-ectly after the outbreak of the war, an 
Inter-American Economic Advisory Committee 
was set up. Its precise task was to work out 
ways and means to meet the economic problems 
of the countries which were hard hit by the war. 
Threats were being made from the other side 
of the Atlantic that a totalitarian Europe could 
ruin the economic life of the Americas, and 
would do so unless governments friendly to 
totalitarianism were set up. Plainly, economic 
defense was as necessary as military defense. 

The Committee met in Washington, and meets 
there now once a week. It began by assuring 
free communication. The ships which link our 
continents were kept running, and the freight 
rates were kept reasonable. On our side, we 
expanded the Export-Import Bank, finally ap- 
propriating 500 million dollars so that money 
should be available where necessary to finance 
activities in those countries whose normal mar- 
kets had been cut off by the war and blockades. 
This program is being carried out in consulta- 
tion with the authorities of the various Ameri- 
can republics and is being administered by Mr. 
Jesse Jones, now Secretary of Commerce. The 
United States Treasury has likewise been hold- 
ing conversations with various countries look- 
ing toward the strengthening of money and 
currency in this hemisphere. A noted repre- 
sentative of the Argentine Republic is carrying 
on these discussions with our Treasury now. 
So far as possible, this Government has endeav- 
ored to assist other American republics, which 
had to buy from us the supplies that they for- 
merly bought from Europe, so that these goods 

276467 — 10 2 



can be bought and can be paid for. In ex- 
change, much material which we need for our 
own defense is being bought from the other 
American republics. 

In longer view, all of the American nations 
have been endeavoring to expand their trade 
each with the other. A notable arrangement 
was recently concluded between Argentina and 
Brazil for the exchange of surplus products. 
Negotiations are now going forward for an 
agreement to stabilize the coffee market. Bra- 
zil is setting up a steel industry, using her own 
natural resources, with the assistance of both 
Brazilian and American capital, and American 
steel companies have supplied experts in con- 
struction. Rubber, which we now import from 
the East Indies, is beginning to be grown again 
in Central and South America. 

The cooperation of private concerns is being 
sought ; in this country President Roosevelt has 
appointed Mr. Nelson Rockefeller coordinator 
of South American activities, and one of his 
fields is to assist cooperation between concerns 
in the United States and concerns elsewhere in 
the western world. 

On our side we are prepared to carry out 
President Roosevelt's pledge that this country 
"will give economic support, so that no Ameri- 
can nation need surrender any fraction of its 
sovereign freedom to maintain its economic 
welfare". 

I think peaceful cooperation between inde- 
pendent countries has never gone so far as in 
this, the American family of nations. This is 
the Cooperative Peace — the peace which is pos- 
sible because the right of the smallest is con- 
sidered as great as the right of the strongest; 
because there is respect for law and for inter- 
national justice; because the way of the ag- 
gressor is not the American way of life. 

In the dark picture of international affairs 
this at least is one bright area. It is the pattern 
of our western world. I like to think that we 
are slowly forging the framework for a larger 
relation between nations which may prove to 
be the means of peace; wliich may give hope 
again to the world when its warfare is accom- 
plished. 



448 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



PAN AMERICAN SOLIDARITY 

Address by Assistant Secretary Grady 



[Released to the press November 22] 

You, the members of the State Teachers As- 
sociations, in convention at Fort Worth, Tex., 
and at Richmond, Va., and I, in Washington, 
the Nation's Capital, are privileged to meet 
together today in the School of the Air of the 
Americas to discuss a matter of vital importance 
to every one of us, namely. Pan American soli- 
darity. 

Tlie American republics came into being as a 
result of the rebellion of the New World against 
the forces of tyranny and oppression of the 
Old. In their determination to build a new 
civilization in a new world, and in their strug- 
gle to found new homes in an uncompromising 
wilderness, the American peoples became keenly 
aware of the interdependent nature of society 
and learned from experience that liberty and 
equality in human relations provide the best 
basis for securing the economic, social, and 
political cooperation essential to the task before 
them. 

It became clear to the American peoples, 
furthermore, that, if they were to succeed in 
their great purpose, these principles of democ- 
racy must serve also as the basis of their rela- 
tions with the rest of the world. So determined 
were they to attain the fullest possible develop- 
ment of their ideals and potentialities, and so 
strong was their conviction that this was pos- 
sible only on the basis of freedom and equality 
in the world community, that they were willing 
to fight for independence. 

The Monroe Doctrine clearly indicates our 
interest in protecting democratic institutions in 
the New World from the intrusion of alien 
ideologies and foreign political systems. In as 
much as these institutions are, figiiratively 
speaking, the roots of civilization in the Ameri- 
cas, the attack to which democracy is now 
subject is potentially a threat, not only to the 
political independence of the American states, 



' Delivered to the Texas and Virginia State Teachers 
Associations in convention at Port Worth, Tex., and 
Richmond, Va., November 22, 1940. on the School of 
the Air of the Americas broadcast. 



but also to the economic welfare, the spiritual 
values, and the national cultures of their peo- 
ples. Thus, it is a threat to your economic 
well-being, your aspirations, and your liberty. 
That is why I say that Pan American solidarity 
is of vital importance to every one of us, for 
in miion there is strength, and our strength and 
the strength of our American neighbors to hold 
out against the forces of terrorism and aggres- 
sion which have swept across Europe and are 
spreading throughout the world will be in- 
creased by the ever-gi'owing political, economic, 
and cultural cooperation among the American 
republics. 

A landmark of outstanding importance in 
this growing cooperation is the meeting of the 
American republics at Habana last July, at 
which they joined together, as free and equal 
nations, to give force to the Monroe Doctrine, 
in order that the principles of democracy mak- 
ing possible such a meeting and such action 
might be protected and preserved in their 
relations with each other. 

So long as the American republics realize 
that democracy is the source of its own strength, 
so long as they remain true in practice to its 
principles and institutions, and so long as they 
cooperate in its interests, they need have no 
fear of dictators. 

International relations will always be un- 
stable and war will always be imminent in any 
world dominated by force and oppression. 
Only in a woi'ld in which all peoples are free 
and have equal opportunity to realize the full 
development of their economic, social, and cul- 
tural potentialities can international security 
and harmony long prevail. 

The American republics have, therefore, aside 
from considerations of their own security and 
happiness, the responsibility and sacred trust 
of keeping alive and strengthening the princi- 
jDles of democracy in their relations with each 
other in order that there may be found in inter- 
American solidarity a nucleus around which a 
peaceful and prosperous world may in time be 
built. 



KOVEMBKR 23, 194 

COMMERCIAL TRENDS IN THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS 

Address by Harold D. Finley * 



449 



lUcleased to the press November 20] 

It is nri honor to be present at tliis dinner for 
the dislinfjuisiicd Consul General of the Argen- 
tine Kepiiblic in New Orleans, Senor Servente. 
On behalf of the Department of State, I should 
like to extend cordial greetings to him, the 
other distinguished consular representatives of 
the American republics stationed at this great 
American seaport, and the citizens of Louisiana 
who have come here to do them honor. It is 
gratifying, in these days when democracy is 
being tested, that all of us here are co-workers 
in and supporters of the great cause of hemi- 
spheric solidarity. 

I wish also to allude tfi the presence here of 
one of the outstanding women in the service of 
the United States Government — one of our fel- 
low workers in the Department of State, Mrs. 
Ruth B. Shipley. You will want, I am sure, to 
know about her, for, as Chief of the Depart- 
ment's Passport Division, it is her organization 
that issues American passports to you, my fellow 
citizens, if and when you ai« entitled to receive 
them. Through her devotion to the public in- 
terest, an American passport coiitinue.s to be as 
fine a tiavelor's credential as any travel docu- 
ment in the world, and I am happy to say that, 
after issuing one to herself, she is to be a pas- 
senger on this good ship as it carries the greet- 
ings of the Mississi])pi to the Orinoco, the 
Amazon, and the Rio de la Plata. 

May I congratulate you. Mr. Pedrick, and 
your company upon the ha])py initiative which 
has inspired this dinner and upon the vision 
and spirit which has inspired this steamship 
service which links New Orleans with our sister 
republics on the east coast of South America. 

A steamship line thrives when its bottoms are 



'Delivered at a dinner in honor of the Argentine 
Consul General at New Orleans, Seiior Unenzo A. 
Servente. aboard the S. S. Dcltargcntino. at New Or- 
leans, La., November 20, 1940. Mr. Finley is Assistant 
Chief of the Division of the American Republics, 
Department of State. 



full both on the outward and homeward voy- 
ages — that is, when there exists between the 
countries it serves a mutually beneficial ex- 
change of goods. Not so long ago there were 
many people in the United States, as elsewhere, 
who still believed that it was advantageous for 
a nation to export as much as it could and im- 
port as little. These people thought that our 
foreign customers could continue to buy our 
worthy United States products without giving 
them at the same time the opportunity to obtain 
dollar exchange with which to do so. Happily, 
that fallacy has become extinct, and in its place 
there has been adopted as one of the foundations 
of the good-neighbor policy a program of mu- 
tually profitable trade. We wish quite natu- 
rally still to sell to our sister republics as nuich 
as we can, but in return we are also prepared to 
buy from them as much as we can. 

So long !Ls peace endured, the United States 
was willing and eager to extend this same policy 
toward all the nations of the world. The trade- 
agreements program during the pa.st six years 
made notable progress. Under the leadership 
of my chief, that gi-eat Secretary of State Cor- 
dell Hidl, the United States sought as a policy 
everywhere to reduce trade barriers and to sub- 
stitute for thoughts and fears of war a pacific 
and beneficial exchange of goods between all 
countries. Unfortimately, some European and 
Asiatic leaders had set their hearts on war. 
Reciprocal-trade development, one of the basic 
principles of our foreign policy, has since been 
necessarily circumscribed in so far. and only 
in so far, as concerns the countries which have 
become belligerents or whose territories lie in 
theaters of hostilities. 

But not so trade with the American repub- 
lics! To the great credit of the 21 American 
countries, since the outbreak of the war 15 
months ago, not a single citizen of any of our 
republics sailing in any ship under their respec- 
tive flags has been inconvenienced or delayed 
on account of the present war while traveling 



450 



DEPAE.TMENT 01" STATE BPTJ.KTIN 



in the waters of this hemisphere. There has 
been among our citizens here in American 
waters not a single sliipboard casualty. The 
war, so far as it affects the safety of travel of 
our citizens, has thus far been effectively kept 
from our shores. In addition, the war has stim- 
ulated to a degree which is every day more ap- 
parent the profit which comes from liberal 
exchanges of goods within the hemisphere. 

The race to arm in Europe and Asia, and then 
the outbreak of war, has not failed, of course, 
to affect profoundly the economic life of all the 
21 American republics. During these recent 
3'ears it was not enough for some countries out- 
side this hemisphere to have international pay- 
ments balanced globally as in normal times, but 
the restrictive method of bilateral barter was 
often substituted to throw an established world 
economic system out of gear. Simultaneously, 
the allegedly free and willing citizens of totali- 
tarian countries were prohibited by their gov- 
ernments from buying the American goods they 
liked in whatever quantity they could afford. 
Their subsistence needs, not to speak of luxuries, 
went for war purposes. They might drink only 
as much of the good coffee and cocoa of the 
Americas, for example, as authoritative govern- 
ment permitted, or consume as many of the 
other products of the rich earth of the Ameri- 
cas as their war-restricted economy allowed. 
Barter, plus necessity for stocks of strategic 
materials, brought in its wake inevitable ex- 
change restrictions and other artificial barriers 
to a free exchange of goods. And now, war has 
comjjletely closed many of the Old World mar- 
kets and at the same time has made it impossible 
for us of the Americas to buy those products 
which Old World skills made attractive to our 
civilization. War in Asia has added to the 
dislocation. 

Fortunately for all of us as we hasten to 
place our respective countries in a state of 
effective defense, the republics of this hemi- 
sphere possess, almost without exception, the 
essentials we now need both for defense and for 
maintaining unimpaired a high standard of 
living. Our first large problem is that we are 
by the blessings of God, world suppliers of 



many commodities, and with the closing of 
European, and to some extent Asiatic, markets, 
almost all of our countries, including, as well, 
the United States, have problems of overpro- 
duction and of surpluses. 

Great stocks of foodstuffs here look wistfully 
at semi-starvation in Europe and Asia, where 
hunger is the inevitable ally of total war. 

The problems of disposing of surpluses here 
in the United States and in the other American 
republics are receiving the unremitting atten- 
tion of all of us. We in the United States will 
buy from our southern neighbors as much as we 
can and are seeking constantly and persistently 
to lend our cooperation and our financial re- 
sources to keep the economic machinery of the 
Americas in good running order. 

This is not easy. With the best will in the 
world, we in the United States, for example, 
cannot possibly drink all the coffee which this 
hemisphere produces. Of course we shall do our 
best to drink all we can. But, we are cooperat- 
ing with all the coffee-jiroducing countries in 
working out a plan which it is hoped will 
temper the economic shock of a surplus by in- 
suring here a fair price for this excellent 
American commodity. 

In practical support of the good-neighbor 
policy, moreover, the United States is lending 
its hearty cooperation to fostering the produc- 
tion in this hemisphere of commodities, which 
can be produced here but which formerly were 
obtained elsewhere. American industry is 
working with our southern neighbors in finding 
soils and climatic conditions where rubber, one 
of the basic commodities of our times, can be 
grown successfully. Quinine, another essential, 
can be and is being produced successfully in the 
higlilands of Central America. Only recently 
a contract was concluded for the purchase of 
large quantities of Bolivian tin during the next 
5 years. In collaboration with other American 
republics, studies and surveys are being has- 
tened to show what woods, resins, fibers, and 
plants can be successfully cultivated in various 
areas in this hemisphere, what metals can be 
produced, which can all find a ready and profit- 
able market in the United States and in other 



NOVEMBER 2 3, 1940 



451 



American countries. Large retail distributors 
in the United States have joined witli govern- 
ment agencies to inform the governments and 
businessmen of our southern neighbors as to 
what manufactured products, formerly pro- 
duced in Europe and Asia, might now success- 
fully utilize their skills and industrial aptitudes. 
Simultaneously, the United States Government, 
imder a compreliensive plan for cooperation 
with tlie other American republics, has con- 
tinued and will continue to lend the services of 
American exi^erts to those countries of this 
hemisphere which desire technical and scientific 
assistance. One corollary is, of course, that the 
more we buy from the other American repub- 
lics, the more they will have dollar exchange 
with which to buy from us. A further corol- 
lary is that every one of us will l^e thus stronger 
in defense. 

Many problems remain to be solved. It is 
relatively easy to increase our purchases fi'om 
the American republics of products which com- 
plement our own; it is relatively difficult when 
such products are supplemental. But we who 
work in government are confident that none of 
these problems will lie finally unsolvable, be- 
cause not only do we see clearly some of the steps 
ahead, but we have the friendly and willing 
cooperation at Washington and at Buenos Aires, 
at Bogota and Quito, at Hubana and ."Santiago — 
everywhere throughout the Americas — of men 
of good will, of patience and knowledge, who 
are bringing their great talents to this important 
task. 

That task is easier because the good-neighbor 
policy, based as it is on mutual respect and 
confidence in each other as sovereign partners 
in hemispheric business, has brought into being 
an atmosphere in which our mutual problems 
can be discussed with cordial understanding and 
solved with cooj^eration and energ}-. Twenty- 
one American republics here gallantly face a 
war-torn world, voluntarily choose to defend the 
Pan American way of life, and are determined 
unalterably to oppose and stamp out whatever 
is subversive to their system. 

"We in this hemisphere must not permit the 
peace which happily reigns in our respective 



countries to lead us to any feeling that there 
is no need to press ardently our efforts to pre- 
serve our safety and strengthen the measures 
which we must take for our mutual defense. 
There is almost certainly not a single country 
in this hemisphere where the greatest caution, 
where the greatest diligence and perseverance, 
should not be exercised to defend it and its 
neighbors from subversive elements and activ- 
ities. 

We must continue to find out who oiu' enemies 
are, what they do, what their organizations and 
intentions are. This will lead us into no per- 
secution on account of nationality, of race or 
creed or religion. But I dare say, ladies and 
giMitlt'inen, that the time has come when busi- 
nessmen throughout the American republics 
will wish carefully to examine whether their 
organizations, or tiie profits from the sales of 
their goods, are being utilized at home or abroad 
to support sj-stems and ideologies abhorrent to 
the Pan American way of life. The time has 
come when all our citizens engaged in business 
will wish, in the long-range protection of their 
own interests as well as the safety of the Amer- 
icas, to assure themselves that their representa- 
tives at home and abroad are pro-Pan-America. 
AVe should, every one of us, see to it that the 
profits from Pan American merchandise are not 
used to support propaganda or activities in- 
tended to destroy our system. To do less, in face 
of the gi'ave danger which has compelled us 
here in the United States to arm to an unpre- 
cedented degree, and, in peace time — against all 
previous precedents of this country — to call our 
young men into service for defense, would l>e 
to give aid and comfort to the forces of destruc- 
tion which oppose democracy today. I should 
like to leave you with this thought. Therein 
is one way in which every one of us engaged in 
the great business of this hemisphere can con- 
tribute effectively to defense. 

Your government, and the other goverimients 
of the American republics, my fellow citizens, 
are moving rapidly and resolutely toward a de- 
fensive preparedness unparalleled in history. It 
will be a defense as total as war has become 
total. It will be a democratic defense — defense 



452 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



by democratic methods and democratic strength. 
It must be heartening to every citizen of all our 
respective countries to know that all of us stand 
united in this great task and that each of us has 
a part to take in building for eventual peace. 
Our efforts will show, I think, that democratic 
methods — those which we freely choose — demo- 
cratic methods invoked by the free peoples of 
this hemisphere, will prove as effective and 
strong as any man has yet devised. 



REPORTS REGARDING AIR AND 
NAVAL BASES IN URUGUAY 

[Released to the press November 22] 

At the press conference of the Acting Secre- 
tary of State November 22, a correspondent 
said: 

"Mr. Secretary, all of us here consider that 
you have from time to time made fairly clear 
our position on the bases in Latin America, but 
recentlj' there seems to have been a flood of prop- 
aganda from Spain and continued misunder- 
standing in some of the Latin American coun- 
tries, and we have, as a result, the action of the 
Uruguayan Senate refusing to approve of any 
agreement that might be made on bases and so 
forth down there. I think there is a general 
misunderstanding in some countries concerning 
our position, and I wonder if you would care 
again to clarify both our position and our 
IJolicy." 

The Acting Secretary replied: 

"I am relieved when you say that you gentle- 
men think I have made it clear. I have seen, 
as you have, a gi'eat deal of propaganda which 
was undoubtedly intended to confuse the issues 
and to make out something which was not the 
case, and, therefore, I again repeat that at no 
time has this Government discussed with the 
government of any other American republic the 
cession through sale or lease of any naval or 
other bases, nor has it made any suggestion 
which would in any sense, if carried out, have 
infringed in any degree the sovereignty of any 
of the other American republics." 



[Released to the press November 23] 

The American Ambassador to Spain, Alexan- 
der W. Weddell, has reported to the Depart- 
ment that the Uruguayan Minister at Madrid 
has issued the following statement to the 
Spanish press: 

"In relation to the comments of the Spanish 
press in respect of the negotiations which the 
Uruguayan Cabinet is carrying on at the pres- 
ent time in matters within its competence, the 
Minister of Uruguay considers himself obliged 
to note that according to the telegraphic infor- 
mation which he has just received from his 
Government the version of the cession of naval 
bases to any country is completely inexact. It 
is a question of steps in connection with 'collec- 
tive continental military defence' which are 
being taken in the same form with the Argen- 
tine Republic and the other American states. 

"In the telegraphic despatch which the Uru- 
guayan Chancery received from Montevideo it 
is added that far from there being discrepancies 
between the American countries there exists a 
solidarity of purpose among them also improv- 
ing the resolutions of the Pan American 
conference." 



PAN AMERICAN AVIATION DAY 
PROCLAMATION 

[Released to the press by the White House] 

Pan American Aviation Day 
by the president of the united states or 

AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Whereas the past ten years have witnessed 
an amazing development of civil aviation in 
the American republics; and 

Whereas the easy and rapid intercourse made 
possible by this development has already con- 
tributed in a substantial manner to a better 
understanding and friendship among the peo- 
ples of the American republics and brought 



NOVEMBER 23, 194 



453 



regions heretofore considered commercially in- 
accessible within the radius of world markets; 
and 

Where.\s bj' Public Resolution No. 105, ap- 
proved October 10, 1940, the Congress of the 
United States, considering this progress and 
appreciating the important role which it is pos- 
sible for civil aviation to play in fostering the 
development of closer cultural and economic 
relations between the peoples of the American 
republics, authorized the President of the 
United States to designate December 17 of each 
year as Pan American Aviation Day : 

Now, TIIEItEFORE, I, FraNKUN D. RoOSENTLT, 

President of the United States of America, do 
hereby designate December 17, 1940, the anni- 
vei-sary of the first successful flight of a heavier- 
than-air machine, and December 17 of each suc- 
ceeding jear as Pan American Aviation Daj', 
and do hereby call upon all officials of the Gov- 
ernment, the Governors of the forty-eight 
States, our possessions, and the people of the 
United States generally to observe with appro- 
priate ceremonies this day as Pan American 
Aviation Day. 

Ix WITNESS WHEREOF, I liave hereunto set my 
hand aiul caused the seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this 18" 
day of November in the year of our Lord 
nineteen hundred and forty, and of the Inde- 
pendence of the United States of 
[seal] America the one hundred and sixty- 
fifth. 

Franklin D. Roo6e\-elt 
By the President : 
Sumner Welles 

Acting Secretary of State. 
[No. 2446] 

PRESS INTERVIEW BY THE 
PRESIDENT OF ARGENTINA 

Comments by Acting Secretary Welles 

[Released to the press November 22) 

In response to a request by newspaper corre- 
spondents for comment upon an interview 



granted by the President of Argentina to the 
United Press on November 19, the Acting 
Secretary of State said : 

"I have read the interview granted by Presi- 
dent Ortiz of Argentina to the United Press on 
November 19 with the utmost interest and at- 
tention. I hope it will be studied by every 
section of jjublic opinion in this country. It 
.sets forth clearly and succinctly the true inter- 
pretation of enlightened Pan-Americanism as 
evidenced by the agreements reached by the 
American republics at Buenos Aires, Lima, 
Panama, and Habana. The statements con- 
tained in the interview constitute an inspiration 
to all of those who are working for Pun Ameri- 
can collaboration and the maintenance of our 
democratic institutions in the New World." 



The Far East 



DETENTION IN FRENCH INDOCHINA 
OF AMERICAN VICE CONSUL AND 
PRESS CORRESPONDENT 

[Released to tbe press November 23] 

The American Consul at Hanoi, Charles S. 
Reed, 2d, has reported that Vice Consul Robert 
W. Rinden, acting under Mr. Reed's instruc- 
tions, on November 21 drove, in company with 
a correspondent of the United Press, Melville 
Jacoby, by a warehouse at Haiphong, where it 
was reported that Japanese soldiers were en- 
camped under an American flag. Tlie news- 
paper correspondent, who was stated to possess 
a photographer's permit issued by the appro- 
priate authorities, took some pictures of the 
l^rojjerty in question. The car in which Vice 
Consul Rinden and Mr. Jacoby were riding was 
subsequently pursued and stopped by Japanese 
soldiers, who attempted to force them out of 
the car and to seize the correspondent's camera. 
The Vice Consul identified himself to an 
English-speaking Japanese army officer, but the 
Vice Consul and Mr. Jacoby were taken into 
the center of Haiphong under a guard of Japa- 
nese soldiers, who prevented them from entering 



454 



DEPABTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



the Hotel Europe by stopping them on the side- 
walk, forming a semicircle, and training their 
rifles upon them. Subsequently French official's 
arrived and, after discussion between those 
officials and the Japanese, the Japanese guard 
withdrew and the two Americans were taken, 
apparently by French authorities, to French 
military headquarters. Vice Consul Rinden 
and Mr. Jacoby returned to Hanoi on the night 
of November 21. 

Consul Reed reported that he has lodged a 
protest in the matter with the Governor Gen- 
eral of French Indochina and with the Japanese 
Consul General at Hanoi. 

The Department is telegraphing appropriate 
American officials to make further representa- 
tions in reirard to this matter. 



The Foreign Service 



Europe 



ACCIDENTAL DEATH OF AMERICAN 
CORRESPONDENT IN YUGOSLAVIA 

[Released to the press November 10] 

The American Minister to Yugoslavia, Mr. 
Arthur Bliss Lane, reported to the Department 
of State November 19 that, according to infor- 
mation received by the American Military 
Attache from the Yugoslav War Office, Mr. 
Ralph D. Barnes, an American citizen and cor- 
respondent of the New York Herald Tribune, 
was killed, as were three other occupants of a 
British Blenheim plane, when the plane crashed 
on the morning of November 18 near Danilov- 
grad in Montenegro. The Foreign Office con- 
firmed Mr. Barnes' identity. Mr. Lane is 
sending an official of the legation to make a 
complete investigation at the scene of the acci- 
dent. 

According to reports, the airplane was carry- 
ing a large number of bombs and the bodies of 
the four occupants were found over a radius of 
300 meters frona the wrecked plane. 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press November 23] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since November 9, 
1940: 

Career Oiticers 

The assignment of James G. Carter, of Bruns- 
wick, Ga., as Consul to Funchal, Madeira, has 
been canceled. Mr. Carter has now been as- 
signed as Consul at Tananarive, Madagascar, 
where a consulate will be established. 

Carlton Hurst, of AVashington, D. C, Consul 
at Berlin, Gennany, has been designated Sec- 
ond Secretary of Embassy at Berlin, Germany, 
and will serve in dual capacity. 

H. Francis Cunningham, Jr., of Lincoln, 
Nebr., Vice Consul at Berlin, Germany, has been 
designated Third Secretary of Embassy at Ber- 
lin, Germany, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Brewster H. Morris, of Villanova, Pa., Vice 
Consul at Berlin, Gennany, lias been designated 
Third Secretary of Embassy at Berlin, Ger- 
many, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Non-career Oiticers 

Robert H. Macy, of Washington, D. C, 
American clerk formerly assigned to Riga, Lat- 
via, has been appointed Vice Consul at Aca- 
pulco, Guerrero, Mexico. 

Paul Dean Thompson, of Los Angeles, Calif., 
Vice Consul at London, England, has been 
appointed Vice Consul at Dublin, Ireland. 

Frederick L. Royt, of Milwaukee, Wis., Vice 
Consul at Guayaquil, Ecuador, has been ap- 
pointed Vice Consul at Valparaiso, Chile. 

Samuel A. Mcllhenny, Jr., of Tex., Vice 
Consul at Valparaiso, Chile, has been appointed 
Vice Consul at Valdivia, Chile. 



The Department 



RESIGNATION OF JOSEPH E. DA VIES AS SPECIAL ASSISTANT TO THE 

SECRETARY OF STATE 



IKi-lonsoil til the prc88 November 10] 

The Secretary of State on November 19 reluc- 
tantly accepted the resi<Tnation of the Honor- 
able Joseph E. Davies as Si>ecial Assistant to 
the Secretary of State, eflfective Januai^ 2, 1941. 
The Secretary of State aiitliorizcd the publica- 
tion of the texts of Mr. Davies' letter of resigna- 
tion and Secretary Hull's reply. The texts 
follow : 

"NOVEMUEK I'J, li)4U. 

"Mt Dear Mr. Secretary : 

"Herewith I submit my resignation as Spe- 
cial Assistant to the Secretary of State to take 
effect Jaiuuiry 2, 1941. 

"It is with regiet that I contemplate retiring 
from service under your distinguished leader- 
ship; but my inability during the four years 
in which I have served under you to devote any 
attention to my personal atfairs now makes it 
necessary for me to ask to be relieved of further 
public .service at this lime. Should, however, 
the piesent emergency become more acute at 
any time, I want you to know that I shall be 
standing by. available to your call. 

"May I express to you and to my colleagues 
in the Foreign Service my appreciation of the 
uniform kindness and consideration which 
have been shown to me during my term in the 
Diplomatic Corps under your distinguished 
administration. 

"With assurances of my gi-eat admiration 
and i-espect, I am 

"Sincerely yours, 

Joseph E. Davies" 



"November 19, 1940. 
"Mt dear Mr. DA^^ES : 

"I have today received with the greatest re- 
gret your resignation as Special Assistant to the 



Secretary of State to take effect January 2, 1941. 

"Your services to this Government as Am- 
bassador to tlie Union of Soviet Socialist Re- 
publics, as Ambassador to Belgium and Min- 
ister to Lu.xemburg and as Special Assistant to 
the Secretary of State have been characterized 
by the highest order of ability. 

"During the years of your service abroad your 
reports to the Department of State — which in- 
cluded surveys of political, economic and indus- 
trial developments in many parts of Europe 
which you visited in the interest of this Govern- 
ment — were unusually accurate and informative 
and constitute an outstanding contribution to 
the political and economic history of pre-war 
Europe. The accuiacy of the forecasts which 
these reports contained disclosed exceptional 
good judgment and ability. 

"During the present recent emergency your 
contribution to the work in the Department of 
State was particularly valuable in assessing 
conditions in Europe as reported from abroad 
and in handling emergency matters such as the 
evacuation and repatriation of American citi- 
zens from Europe and the Orient. 

"Throughout the period of your oflBcial serv- 
ice the conduct of your duties was in accordance 
with the best traditions of the Foreign Service 
of this Government. 

"Because of your statement to me that you 
feel it necessary to retire and to devote your 
attention to your personal affairs, I am reluc- 
tantly compelled to accept your resignation. I 
am glad to know, however, from your letter 
under acknowledgment, that you will be avail- 
able for further service in the event of need. 

"With the assurances of my warm per.sona] 
regard, believe me 

"Yours very sincerely, 

Cordell Hull" 

455 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



OPIUM 

Convention and Protocol for the Suppres- 
sion of the Abuse of Opium and Other 
Drugs, The Hague, 1912 (Treaty Series 
No. 612) 

BuTTna 

By a circular letter dated March 13, 1940 the 
Secretary General of the League of Nations in- 
formed the Secretary of State that by a com- 
munication dated February 20, 1940 the Royal 
Netherlands Government, at the request of the 
British Legation at The Hague, informed the 
Secretary General of the following: 

"Burma, which formerly participated in the 
International Opium Convention of 1912 as a 
pai't of India, was separated from India on 
April 1st, 1937 and now possesses the status of 
an Overseas Territory of His Majesty. The 
Convention and Protocol should be regarded as 
applying to Burma, as an Overseas Territory 
of His Majesty, from the date of separation 
from India, in virtue of the declaration made 
by the signatories for Great Britain when sign- 
ing these instruments." 



LABOR 

Convention Concerning Statistics of Wages 
and Hours of Work, 1938 

Effypt 

By a circular letter dated October 16, 1940 
the Secretary General of the League of Nations 
informed the Secretary of State that on October 
5, 1940 the formal ratification by the Egyptian 
Government of the Convention Concerning Sta- 

456 



tistics of Wages and Hours of Work in the 
Principal Mining and Manufacturing Indus- 
tries, Including Building and Construction, and 
in Agriculture, adopted by the International 
Labor Conference at its twenty-fourth session, 
Geneva, June 2-22, 1938, was registered with the 
Secretariat. 

The ratification excludes parts III and IV of 
the convention, in accordance with the first 
jjaragraph of its article 2. 

According to information received from the 
League of Nations, the convention has been rati- 
fied by Denmark, Egypt, Netherlands, New Zea- 
land, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, and Union 
of South Africa. 



Regulations 



The following Government regulations may 
be of interest to readers of the Bulletin: 

Registration and Fingerprinting of Aliens in Accord- 
ance With the Alien Registration Act of 1940 : Amended 
Regulations Governing the Exemption of Foreign Gov- 
ernment Officials and Members of Their Families From 
Registration and Fingerprinting in Accordance With 
the Alien Registration Act, 1940. (Department of 
Justice: Immigration and Naturalization Service.) 
[First Supplement to General Order No. C-21.] No- 
vember 14, 1940. Federal Register, November 20, 1940 
(vol. 5, no. 226), p. 4560 (The National Archives of 
the United States). 



NOVEMBER 23, 1940 



Publications 



Department of State 

Diplomatic List, November 1940. Publication 1523. 
II, 94 pp. Subscription, $1 a year; single copy, lOt. 

Mixcil Cliiiins Ciimmissioii, United States and Ger- 
iiian.v : Opinions and Decisions in the Sabotage Claims 
IliMidcd Down June lo, 1!)39, and October 30, 1939, and 
Appendix, xvi, 324, xxx pp. 40('. 

Mixed Claims Commission, United States and Ger- 
many : Decisions and Opinions From January 1, 1933, to 
October .30, 19.39 (Excepting Decisions In the Sabotage 



457 

Claims of June 15 and October 30, 1939) and Appendix, 
1933-39. Iv, 142, xiv pp. 200. 

Other Go%-ernment Agexcies 

The following Government, publications is- 
sued recently may be of interest to readers of 
the Bulletin: 

Wartime Control of Ocean Freight Itates in Foreign 
Trade: World Survey. (Department of Commerce: 
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.) Trade 
Promotion Series 212. iv, 4S pp., illus. 10^. 

Naturalization Laws [May 9, 1918-July 19, 1940]. 
(Compiled by Elmer A. Lewis, superintendent, Docu- 
ment Room, House of Representatives.) 136 pp. loj?. 



U. S. SOVCRNHENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1940 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WBEKI.Y WITH THE APPBOVAL OP THE DIRECTOR OP THE BIRE.\C OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 




LETIN 




NOVEMBI'R 30, 1940 
Vol. Ill: No. 75 - Publication I^JI 

Qo life /its 

American REPrBLics: Pogo 
Intcr-Anicrican Maritime Conference: Address by the 

Under Secretary of State 461 

Intcr-Anierioaii nov('l()[)iiu'iit Commission 464 

Pan American Health Dvl^ prochimation 465 

Europe: 

American representation near the Belgian Government . 466 

The Foreign Service: 

Retirement of Hug;h R. Wilson 466 

Personnel chaiijjes 466 

Commercial Policy: 

Trade agreements with Switzerland and Venezuela . . 467 

Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, etc.: 

Monthly statistics 467 

Treaty Information: 
Commerce: 

Trade Agreement with Switzerland (Executive Agree- 
ment Series No. 90) 480 

Trade Agreement with Venezuela (Executive Agree- 
ment Series No. 180) 481 

Promotion of peace: 

Treaties with Australia, Canada, and New Zealand 
Amendmg the Treaty for the Advancement of 
Peace with Great Britain, signed September 15, 

1914 481 

Treaty with the Union of South Africa Amending the 
Treaty for the Advancement of Peace with 
Great Britain, signed September 15, 1914 . . . 482 
iJ^W [Over] 



Treaty Information — Continued. Page 

Conciliation: 

Conciliation Treaty with Liberia 482 

Extradition: 

Supplementary Extradition Treaties with Ecuador, 

Guatemala, Mexico, and Switzerland 482 

Customs: 

Agreement with Brazil for Reciprocal Customs Priv- 
ileges for Diplomatic and Consular Personnel . . 482 
Agriculture: 

Inter-American Coffee Marketing Agreement . . . 482 



uf uocuMtwrs 
0£C 13 J940 



American Republics 



INTER-AIMERICAN MARITIME CONFERENCE 
Address by the Under Secretary of State ' 



[ KeleaH*Hl to (he presH Novi*mber 2'i\ 

I wish to extend to nil of you on behalf of the 
InttT-Ainericiin Financial anil Eccjnnniic Ad- 
visory C'oniniitliH" a cnidial welconie to this 
I iiter-Aiuerican Maritime Conference. The Ad- 
visory Conmiiltw* in actiM<; as host to this Con- 
IViThce is iniiiri'ssi'il witli a dt'i-j) sense of tiie 
sifinitieance of the occasion. Tlie Conference 
whicli is tliiis assembled to<lay is one of liie most 
eoiRTete and practical eviilences of inter-.Vuieri- 
can cooperation so far manifested. 

We aiv ^ralliered here to discuss and consider, 
in an alniospliere <if jieace and friendship, the 
natuie aiul causes of certain problems which 
have arisen in tlie fiehl of inter- American ship- 
pinjx as a conscipience of war across the seas. 

Tiiis Conference has been called by the Inter- 
American Financial and Economic Ailvisory 
Committi-c, which, as is well known, was estab- 
lisiied in accordance with a resolution of the 
Meeting of Ministei-s of Foreijrn Aflaii-s of the 
American Ri'pnblics held at Panama in Sep- 
tember 1939. The Connnittee was established 
for the purpose of i)rovidin<r a convenient 
means for the discussion of the serious crises 
in the economic and financial field which are the 
inevitable consequence for us, in this hemi- 
sphere, of the outbreak of war in otlier parts 
of the world. 

Since its establishment, this Inter- American 
Advisory Connnittee has been actively occupied 



' Delivered November 25. 1940 at the opeiiiiig ses.sion 
of the Conference nt the Pan American Union by Under 
Secretary of State Welles, who is chairman of the 
luter-American Financial and Economic Advisory 
Committee. 



in the discussion of these common problems, in 
the exploration of their cau.ses, and in the de- 
termination of the possible means of remedy. 
Unquestionably the free and informal discus- 
sions to which its sessions and those of its sub- 
committi'es have been devoted have in tliem- 
.'^•Ives alone In-en of substantial benefit in 
clarifying the character of these problems. In 
appropriate circmnstances there have been 
fornndated specific j)roposals of a remedial and 
constructive character for recommendation to 
the governments of our respective countries, 
which are thus placed in a position to consider 
the practicability of atl(jptin<r. tlironoh estab- 
lished dijdomatic and governmental procedures, 
the measures which have thus hoeu suggested. 
It is obvicjus, from the most sui>erficial glance 
at the facts of our geogra|)hical situation, that 
the transportation of our commerce by sea- 
going ve.s.sels constitutes one of the outstanding 
elements of the economic relations between our- 
selves as well as with the world outside our 
hemisphere. To those actpiainteil with the ex- 
tent to which the shipping of overseas nations 
participated in the maritime connnerce of the 
Western Hemisphere, it was to be exi^ected that 
among the consecjuences of the outbreak and 
spread of warfare overseas would be found im- 
l)ortant disturbances in sliipping services. It 
was, in the circmnstances, therefore, inevitable 
that matters affecting the interests of those con- 
cerned with the various asi>ects of ocean ship- 
ping should find early and urgent place among 
the questions brought before this Advisory 
Committee for its consideration. 

461 



462 



DEPABTMEiNT OF STATE BULLETIN 



In the corresponding circumstances of a quar- 
ter century ago, wlien on a previous occasion the 
outbreak of major warfare in Europe had set in 
motion developments which had serious impact 
upon our economic well-being, the consequences 
experienced in the field of shipping were not 
only difficult but shattering to the economy of 
the New AVorld. It is unnecessary for me to 
enlarge upon these circumstances. I may point 
out, however, that the lesson afforded by that 
experience has not been ignored. Tlie experi- 
ences of 25 years ago have been fruitfully 
studied in subsequent years in the formulation 
of our respective national shipping policies. 
Speaking for the United States, I may mention 
that the replacement of older tonnage with mod- 
ern vessels had already been initiated on the 
basis of an improved merchant-marine policy 
adopted in 1936, and recent developments have 
resulted in a material acceleration of that re- 
placement program. 

It is significant and notable that, in contrast 
to the situation created a quarter century 
earlier, such shipping shortages as have de- 
veloped in the commerce of the American states 
in the current period have been relatively lim- 
ited and brief, and our urgent needs have been 
met by the allocation of tonnage withdrawn 
from other routes, or by newly constructed 
vessels. 

Nevertheless, Avhile a repetition of the most 
acute and critical consequences was thus fore- 
stalled, it was inevitable that the ever-spread- 
ing scene of hostilities should result in the need 
for some adjustments and corrections in the 
shipping situations facing the nations of our 
hemisphere. Questions of services, of rates, 
and of other aspects of shipping arose, which 
called for solutions. Througli the helpful co- 
operation which our peoples have been extend- 
ing to each other in ever-increasing measure, 
these questions have been largely reduced to 
relatively unimportant proportions. The com- 
merce of the Western Hemisphere is now mov- 
ing regularly and without great handicaps. 
The machinery of informal consultation and 
discussion established in the Inter-American 
Financial and Economic Advisory Committee 
has facilitated the prompt and satisfactory solu- 



tion of many such problems of importance and 
significance. 

In the course of the consideration given to 
these various shipping matters which have been 
brought to the attention of the Inter- American 
Advisory Committee, it has been observed that 
in connection with some of them, the difficulties 
have arisen, in part at least, or have been in- 
fluenced by lack of a complete common under- 
standing of the basic essentials governing the 
shii^ping business and of the various differences 
in point of view and approach to the subject 
arising in different circmnstances. The shii)- 
ping business is known to be an enterprise of 
the most complex nature. The shipper, the| 
carrier, the governments, the general public, 
and a number of other interests are concerned 
in its operation. It is subject, in ordinary times, 
to competitive influences from every quarter of 
the globe, to cyclical fluctuations depending 
upon general business activity^ and requires 
heavy cajjital investment in shijis, which is sub- 
ject to a concealed but inexorable depreciation 
as the vessels wear out and grow obsolete. The 
questions which arise in connection with the 
ojjeration of so complicated an activity tend 
naturally therefore to be complex themselves, 
reflecting the widely differing jjositions and 
points of view of the parties at interest. The 
individual interests concerned may be found to 
view their problems from widely varying as- 
pects. Therefore the satisfactory adjustment 
of the questions arising from these differences 
of viewpoint requires an adequate mutual un- 
derstanding not only of these varying points of 
view, but also of the real circumstances of the 
business itself. 

Therefore it soon became apparent that in 
view of the importance of shipping matters in 
the economic life of our hemisphere, the fullest 
and most satisfactory operation of the informal 
means of discussion and mutual cooperation 
provided through the establishment of the In- 
ter-American Advisory Committee, so far as 
shipping jjroblems might be concerned, required 
not only the giving of individual study to the 
liarticular questions raised from time to time, 
but also the develojament of a more complete 
common understanding of the background of 



NOVEMBER 3 0, 194 



463 



facts and necessities and their reiiition to exist- 
ing conditions. In short, the situation pointed 
to (he need for a general round-table discussion 
of all of the various aspects of shipping with 
wliich our nations in this hemisphere are con- 
cerned. It appeared likewise clear that such 
discussion, to be most fruitful, should be held in 
the most informal atmosphere to encourage the 
most full and free discussion, without the bur- 
den of res])onsibility attendant ujjon a more 
formal conference endowed with ultimate au- 
thority. 

The present Conference is the outcome. It is 
a conference called by the Inter-American 
Financial and Economic Advisory Committee. 
It is therefore free from any obligation to 
frame conclusions or conventions of a binding 
character, and it is therefore free to explore the 
situations with which it will be concerned, most 
freely and fully in all of their pertinent aspects. 
Thus the ground is laid for an unhampered 
approach to the most complete mutual under- 
standing of each other's problems in this field 
and of the pertinent circumstances on which 
these problems rest. Such an imderstanding 
will be ileveloped through the freest exchange 
of information, experience, and points of view. 
So, by ac(|u:iinting each oilier with the nature 
of our problems in this field, we will thereby 
obtain a more complete, fully developed, and 
well-rounded understanding of their detei'niin- 
ing causes. The individual questions that will 
continue to ari.se can be more effectively and 
completely dealt with on the basis of this mutual 
understanding. 

In order that the most useful and fruitful dis- 
cussions may take place at this Conference, it has 
been preceded by a substantial degree of prej)ar- 
atory endeavor. In its earliest state, the sug- 
gestion that such a conference be held was 
considered by the third subcommittee of the 
Advisory Committee, which had been the medi- 
um for dealing with the individual problems 
and questions in the shipping field that had 
been presented for the Advisory Committee's 
attention. For the purpose of developing the 
suggestion more fully, a special subcommittee 
was established, which framed the terms of the 



jiroposed conference and fornudated the agenda 
and the regulations. These were all approved 
by the Advisory Committee, which extended the 
invitations to your governments to be repre- 
sented at, and to participate in, this Conference. 

Each of you, I am confident, is bringing out 
of the wealth of his own and his associates' ex- 
perience an important contribution to this pur- 
pose. In order to assist in reducing this varied 
experience to a useful, Avell-rounded. and accu- 
rate background of conunon imderstanding 
which it is the primary objective of this Confer- 
ence to attain, the United States Maritime Com- 
mission has, after extensive labor and study, 
prepared a series of informational papers and 
discussions on the various topics of your 
agenda. These are naturally drawn from the 
extended experience of my Government with 
shipping problems, and particidarly the full 
experience of more recent years. These papers 
have been prepared for submission to you in 
the hope that they may lx> of definite assistance 
in providing a clear basis of fact and analysis 
for your discussions. 

The fact that this Conference is of an essen- 
tially advisory and consultative character, in 
line with the character of its sponsorship, leads 
me to make one further observation concerning 
the measure in which your deliberations may be 
judged to be fruitful of accomplishment. In 
a field of endeavor so complex as that of ship- 
ping, in which essential facts of any situation 
are in times like these subject to almost daily 
change in the face of developments in the world 
situation, it woidd be idle to seek by conference 
to devise specific solutions for individual prob- 
lems. Such solutions must naturally be left for 
current handling and adjustment by all of the 
best means available. The measure of success 
of your deliberations will be there ff)re not neces- 
sarily the nature or number of specific resolu- 
tions or recommendations which may emerge, 
but perhaps rather the degree to which these 
discussions develop a more accurate knowledge 
of the factual circumstances pertinent to the 
shipping business and our relations to it, and a 
fuller and broader comprehension of the origin 
and character of the circumstances out of which 



464 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



eiicli other's problems in this Held arise. "What 
we all hope may be accomplished in this Confer- 
ence is the accumulation of common knowledge 
and mutual understanding to serve our govern- 
ments and peoples the better in the subsequent 
handling of the many and complicated problems 
in this field with which we will undoubtedly 
continue to be faced. 

In conclusion I desire to give expression to 
one further consideration which adds to the 
significance of this Conference. This is the 
first special confei'ence of representatives of the 
American states called under the sponsorship 
of the Inter-American Financial and Economic 
Advisory Committee. Just as the establish- 
ment of that Advisory Committee set up a piec- 
edent — a new means for dealing in informal 
and convenient manner with the problems aris- 
ing within its scope, with a latitude and flexibil- 
ity freed of the responsibilities and restraints 
incumbent in the normal course of dii)lomatic 
relations — so this Conference creates a prec- 
edent. It sets a precedent for gathering to- 



gether responsible and experienced and expert 
representatives of our goveriunents to discuss 
their common problems and to achieve a com- 
mon understanding, free from the formal at- 
mosphere of an official international conference. 
The degree to which this means of informal co- 
operative endeavor between our nations may 
constitute a useful instrument in the further- 
ance of our close and friendly cooperative rela- 
tions will, in considerable measure, depend 
upon the degree to which, after this Conference 
has completed its course, you leave it with the 
conviction that the time and effort were well 
and usefully spent. 

It is therefore with a deep sense of the sig- 
nificance of this occasion that I extend to you 
the most cordial welcome and, in declaring this 
Inter-American Maritime Conference open, ex- 
press to you on behalf of the Inter-American 
Financial and Economic Advisory Committee 
its most heartfelt good wishes that your labors 
may have most useful and fruitful results. 



INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 



[Released to the j)ress by the OfRee foi* T'oordination of 
ComniiTcial and t'uUural Kelntions Bclwei'n the .Vmcii- 
ean Reinililics Novi'mhei- 21] 

Two members of the Inter- American Devel- 
opment Commission have been designated to 
establish branch agencies throughout South 
America, Nelson A. Rockefeller, chairman of 
the Commission, announced on November 27. 
Mr. Rockefeller also serves the Council of Na- 
tional Defense as Coordinator of Commercial 
and Cultural Relations Between the American 
Republics. - 

J. Rafael Oreamuno, vice chairman of the 
Commission and former Minister of Costa Rica 
in Washington, will sail on the S. S. Uruguay 
from New York City on November 30. He will 
be joined in Rio de Janeiro by George W. Magal- 
haes. Commission member, who will fly from 
Miami on December 8. Mr. Magalhaes is a spe- 

^ See the Bulletin nf August 24, 1040 (vol. Ill, uo. 61), 
p. I'll. 



cial representative of the Westinghouse Electric 
International Co., New York City. 

Mr. Oreamuno and Mr. Magalhaes will visit 
at this time the following countries: Argentina, 
Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, 
Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela. In 
each of these South American countries they 
will organize a five-man group which will carry 
out the program of the Inter-American Devel- 
opment Commission in Washington. These 
groups will be drafted from the ranks of indus- 
try, finance, agriculture, and the professions in 
each country. All governments concerned have 
given their assent to the proposed expansion. 

At a later date, a second mission will estab- 
lish similar agencies in Costa Rica, Cuba, the 
Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, 
Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, and 
Panama. 

The Inter-American Development Commis- 
sion was established on June 3, 1940 as a work- 



NOVEMBER 3 0, 194 



46o 



ing unit of the Iiitei-Anierican Fiuaiuiul and 
Economic Advisory Coniniittee. wliicli was 
orjranized followin^T tin* incctin;: ">f Koivipii 
Ministfi-s at Pananiii in VMS. Wiu-rcas the 
paifnt IukIv is composed of repi-esentatives of 
tlie 21 American rcpuhlics, tlie Commission 
consists of only fiv<' mi'mlMM-s. wlio aiv, in addi- 
tion to Mr. R<Kkeft'ller and the two Conmiis- 
sionei-s alK)Ht to cnihark for Siuth America. 
Renatotle Azevcdo. Ni-w York ivpivst'ntative of 
the LK)yd Brasileiro Na\ ijpilion Co.. and Carlos 
CampU'll del Canipn. commercial coini.selor of 
the Embassy of Chile in the United States. 

The Commission is desifjnated as a perma- 
nent commission which shall compile liasic in- 
formation, establish contacts U'twwn intei-ested 
parties, and recommend in each case or in gen- 
eral the facilities and assurances wliicli tliese 
pnterpris<'s should obtain from the Latin Amer- 
ican frovernments. Thes*' enterprises are devoted 
to {(i) tlie exploration and exploitation of the 
mineral resources in Latin .\merica; (/*) the 
cultivation and marketing of agricultural and 
foi-est products; and (<■) the establishment and 
development of industrial i)lants. 

The Commission is carrying out the assign- 
ment along the following lines: (1) by stinui- 
lating the increase of non-competitive imports 
from I..atin -Vmerica to the l''nited States; 
(•2) by slinuilating and increasing trade be- 
tween the Latin American countries themselves; 
and (3) by encouraging development of indus- 
try in Latin America, i)articularly along the 
lines of j)rixluction of consumer goods. 

PAN AMERICAN HEALTFI DAY 
PROCLAMATION 

(RrleasMl to tlie press by the White Houne] 

Pax American Health Day 

by the president of the i nitizd statf.s 
of america 

A ProrJ-amation 

Where.\s the Fourth Pan American Confer- 
ence of National Directors of Health, held in 



^^'a^hillgton in May 1!I40, adnpte<l a resoiutioii 
recommending "that a 'Health Day' be held 
annually in the countries of the Pan American 
I'nion": and 

Whereas the National Health Authorities of 
the American Republics have agreed upon the 
second day of Deceinlx'r, 1!)40. as the date for 
the first celebration of Pan American Health 
Day, inasmuch as this is the annivereary of the 
o|)ening date of the Fii-st Pan American Sani- 
tary C<jnference, in 19()*2. marking the begin- 
ning of inter-American cooperation in one of 
the fields most important to progress, civiliza- 
tion, and the general well-being — that <»f Pub- 
lic Health; and 

Whereas the Diivctor of the Pan American 
Sanitary Hiiicau and the Surgeon (leneral of 
the United States Public Health Service have 
re(|ue,sted that the United States Government 
and the |H'ople render their fullest cooperation 
and support to this new demonstration of the 
unity of interests and ideals f)f the countries of 
the Western Ilemispheiv: 

Now. TIIEREh-oRE. I. FraNKLIN D. RoOSE\-ELT. 

President of the United States of America, do 
hereby designate the second day in DecemlK-r 
of this ami of each succeeding year as Pan 
American Health Day. and do hereby call upon 
the citizens of our country to celebrate the day 
api)ropriately, do invite similar action on the 
part of the (lovernors of the several States, 
Territories, and island iK)s.sessions of the 
United States, and. in order that our jjeople 
may become better informed concerning the 
imi)ortance of Pan American cooperation in the 
field of public health and of the work which 
has l)eeii and i.s being done in this field, do in- 
vite the medical, sanitary, dental, pharmaceu- 
tical and nursing professions, the scientific 
groups, all organs of opinion, including the 
I)ress, radio, and the motion picture industry, 
and all agencies and individuals interested in 
health, and esjX'cially public health and ;^cliool 
authorities, to join with each other and with 
similar bodies in our sister Republics in the 
celebration of Pan American Health Day. thus 
emphasizing once more the ties that bind our 
countries together. 



466 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 

Done at the City of Washington this twenty- 
third day of November, in the year of 
[seal,] our Lord nineteen hundred and forty, 
and of the Independence of the United 
States of America the one hundred and sixty- 
fifth. 

Franklin D. Koosevelt 

By the President : 
Sumner Welles 

Acting Secretary of State. 

[No. 2447] 



Europe 



AMERICAN REPRESENTATION NEAR 
THE BELGIAN GOVERNMENT 

[Released to the press November 29] 

The resignation of the Honorable John 
Cudahy as American Ambassador to Belgium 
does not leave this Government without repre- 
sentation near the Belgian Government, as it 
will be recalled that Theodore C. Achilles has 
been appointed and is acting as Charge d'Af- 
faires ad interim near the Belgian Government 
in London. 



The Foreign Service 



RETIREMENT OF HUGH R. WILSON 



[Released to the press November 24] 

The Secretary of State announced on Novem- 
ber 24 that the retirement of Hugh R. Wilson 
from active service under the Foreign Service 
retirement and disability system has been ap- 
proved effective December 31, 1940. At the same 
time. Secretary Hull released the text of the 
following letter which he has written to Mr. 
Wilson and which is self-explanatory : 

"My dear Mr. Wilson : 

"You will recall that at the time of your 
resignation as Ambassador to Germany which 
became effective on January 31, 1940, you con- 
sented at my urgent request to become for a 
short period my Special Assistant in certain im- 
portant and confidential work for which, by 
reason of your long and varied experience in 
the Foreign Service, you were particularly well 
qualified. 

"As the work which I asked you to undertake 
has now been satisfactorily completed, your re- 
tirement from active service under the Foreign 
Service retirement and disability system has 



been approved, effective December 31, 1940. 
You will shortly receive formal instructions re- 
garding your retirement and the amount of the 
annuity to which you are entitled under the law. 

"I do not wish to let pass the opportunity for 
adding a personal word of very sincere appre- 
ciation for your splendid cooperation in the 
difficidt tasks with which we have been faced in 
recent months and to congratulate you on the 
termination of a long and successful career in 
the Foreign Service of the United States which 
carried you to the highest rank. 

"With all good wishes for your personal wel- 
fare and hapi^iness, 

"Very sincerely youi-s, 

CoRDELL Hull" 

PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press November 30] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since November 23, 
1940: 



NOVEMBER 30, 1940 



467 



Caheer Officers 

Charles W. Lewis, Jr., of Ann Arbor, Mich., 
Swoncl Setietarv of I>e;;ati(>n and Consul at 
San Jose, Costa Kica, has liot'n assigned for duty 
in the Department of State. 

Chailt's E. Bohlen,<>f Ipswich, ^^ass., Second 
Secretary of Embassy and Consul at Moscow, 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, has been 
desi;,'mited Second Secretary of Embassy ut 
Tokyo, Japan. 

Llewellyn E. Thompson, Jr., of Las Animas, 
C<jIo., now serving in the Department of .State, 
has been designated Seccjud Secretary of Em- 
bu.ssy and Consul at Moscow, Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

•Mai-selis C. Parsons, Jr., of Rye, N. Y., Vic© 
Consul at Batavia, Java, Netherlands Indies, 
lias been a.ssignwl as Vice Consul at Z(igivb, 
Yugoslavia. 

William H. C.-rdell, of Ward, Ark., Vice 
Consul at Seville, Spain, has U'en assigne*! as 
Vice Consul at Lisbon, Portugal. 

Scott Lyon, of Columbus. Ohio, now serving 



in the Department of State, has been assigned 
as Vice Consul at Lisbon, Portugal. 

Non-career OrFiCERh 

Jack G. Dwyre, of Colorailo. Vice Consul at 
Windsor, Ont., Canada, has been appointed Vice 
Consul at Guayaquil, Eciutdor. 

The American Consulate at Gibraltar was 
temix>rarily closed on November 11. 1940. 



Commercial Policy 



TRADE A(;HK1:MKNTS with SWITZER- 
LAND AND VENEZUELA 

Announcements to the press ix'garding the 
signing of supplementary proclamations in con- 
nection with the trade agreements Ix'tween the 
United States and Switzerland and the United 
States and Venezuela apjx'ar in this Bitllctln 
under the lieading "Treaty Information". 



Traffic in Arms, Tin- 1' laic Scrap, etc. 



iMOMHLY STATISTICS 



[Released to the press Novi-mhir 281 

Note: The flgiires relating to arms, the licenses for 
the export of which were revuke*! before they were 
Used, have l)een subtracted from (he llgures apiJeariiig 
In tlie cumulative column of the table below In regard 
to urnis export Ik'enses Issued. These latter figures are 
therefore net figures. They are not yet final and 
definitive since licenses may be amended or re%'oked at 
any time before l)eing used. They are, however, ac- 
curate as of the date of this press relea.se. 

The statistics of actual exports in these releases are 
believed to be substantially complete. It is possible, 
however, that some shipments are not included. If 



this proves to be the fact, statistics In regard to such 
shipments will be included in the cumulative figures in 
later releases. 

Arms Export Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of the 
arms, anununition, and implements of war li- 
censed for export by the Secretary of State dur- 
ing the year 1940 up to and including the month 
of October : 



277564 — *0- 



468 



DEPARTMENT OP STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of export licenses 
issued 


Country of destination 


October 1940 


10 months 
ending Octo- 
ber 31, 1940 




IV 

I 

I 
V 


(1) 
(1) 

(4) 

(1) 

(2) 




$67.00 








Anglo-Egyptian Sudan 


$103. 35 


103. 36 






24.00 






3. 200. 00 






630.00 








Total --- 




3, 864. 00 




I 

III 
IV 

V 
VII 


(2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 










24,095 50 






5, 477 00 






2, 300. 00 






5, 151.84 




4,010.00 
3, 738. 00 


14, 072. 00 
10,332.00 
40, 026 00 




21, 367. 00 


199, 529. 51 
40, 937. 60 




19,846.00 


19, 874. 84 
93 384 51 








Total - 


48, 960. 00 


465, 179 70 




I 
III 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 




Australia -- .. --- 


162. 49 
451.66 


946 61 




1,012.88 
2,026,820 00 






13, 680. 00 




1,223.00 
84.11 


1, 494. 66 

693. 11 

25, 648 00 




281, 029. 00 
931,300.00 


917, 973. 25 

2, 216, 871. 68 

33,474 86 








Total 


1,214,260.16 


5,238,513.84 




IV 

I 

IV 
V 


(1) 

(4) 
(2) 
(2) 


Bahrein Islands . 




136 00 












17 29 






1.87 




23.00 


23.00 


Total 


23.00 


42 16 




I 
III 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




Belgium 




217 00 






103, 200. 00 






28, 779. 00 






2,292,000.00 
69 00 










20, 745. 00 






243, 957. 00 






419 400 00 








Total 




3, 108, 367. 00 




I 

IV 
V 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 








16.00 
84.70 
74 84 










8,000.00 
7,000.00 




2,000.00 


Total 


2,000.00 


16, 175. 64 





Category 


Value of export licenses 
issued 


Country of destination 


October 1940 


10 months 
ending Octo- 
ber 31, 1940 


Bolivia 


T 


f41 




$1, 774. 00 




TV 


(21 




1, 528. 00 




V 


(11 




6, 500. 00 






(2) 


$2,820.00 


2, 884. 60 






(3) 




45 384 00 




VII 


(1) 
(2) 


369. 10 


2, 636. 34 
1.50 








Total 


3, 189. 10 






I 


(1) 




Brazil 




1,773.00 






(2) 




8, 488. 00 






(3) 




1, 897, 325. OO 






(41 




14, 700. 00 






(6) 


75,000.00 


75, 000. 00 




in 


(11 




1, 342, 700. 00 






(2) 




1, 734. 00 




IV 


(1) 


16, 187. 00 


67, 409. 75 






(2) 


198. 00 


30, 106. 14 




V 


(1) 


250,000.00 


956, 918. 00 






(2) 


23,221.24 


206,700.11 






(3) 


3, 000. 00 


296, 009. 50 


Total 


367, 606. 24 


4, 897, 863. 60 




TV 


(?1 




British Guiana .__ 




14.32 




v 


(11 




2,500 00 






(31 




2,500.00 




VII 


(1) 
(2) 


608.00 


1, 832. 36 
1, 680. 00 








Total 


608.00 


8, 626. 68 




T 


(41 




British Honduras 




12.00 




TV 


(21 




98.69 




VII 


(1) 




129 20 






(2) 




108 30 








Total 




348 19 




I 
T 


(41 
(21 






British North Borneo 




2.43 








Burma 




400. 00 






(41 




133. 64 




TV 


(11 




755. 25 






(21 




136.00 








Total - . 




1, 424. 79 




I 


(I) 






Canada 


7, 096 65 


789 658 44 






(21 


163, 841. 61 


366,317.08 






(31 


167, 900. 00 


208,818.00 






(41 


10, 660. 25 


492, 842. 36 






(61 




436, 408. 00 






(61 


8,640.00 


61,840.00 




III 


(11 
f?1 


6, 306, 600. 00 


27, 122, 702. 00 
4, 141.00 




IV 


(1) 


430. 10 


353, 009. 19 






(21 


666. 97 


54,468.09 




V 


(1) 


6. 000. 00 


975, 000. 98 






(2) 


1,314,797. 16 


4,331,149.02 






(3) 


429, 754. 74 


8,890,770.93 




VT 


(21 




36 098 00 




VII 


(11 


118,654.00 


288, 296. 88 






(21 


21,310.00 


66, 209. 93 


Total 


8, 565, 250. 48 


44, 466, 729. 90 



NOVEMBER 30, 1940 



469 





Category 


Value of export licenses 
Issued 


Country of d>»tlnatloa 


October 1940 


10 months 
ending Octo- 
ber 31, 1940 


Chile 


I (2) 




$3,040 00 




(4) 


$160.00 


37, 431. 28 




(5) 


3,2oaoo 


8,690.00 




(«) 




3,630.00 




HI (1) 




409 560 00 




IV (1) 




93,009 00 




(2) 




7, 442. 38 




V (1) 




6,800.00 




(2) 




3, 407. 50 




(3) 




30,939.00 




VII (1) 


3,34&00 


2.3G3.00 




(2) 




12,607 19 








Tola! 


^7aaoo 


678, 935. 31 




I (2) 




China ... 




392,440 00 




III (1) 




2, 929, 106 22 




(2) 


809. &4 


138,849.74 




IV (1) 




178.60 




(2) 




3, 22a 71 




V (1) 




I9A,M0. 00 




(2) 


4,6«0.ftS 


2,711.492.98 




(3) 




3,371.225 39 




VII (1) 


382.290.00 


1, 4tt). 479 M 




(2) 


57o,ooaoo 


031. 000. 00 


Total 


067, 840. 19 


11.SS7.7M. 76 




I (■) 




Colombia 




30.00 




(4) 


88.00 


249.00 




IV (1) 




2.310 00 




(2) 


383.00 


1, 062. 78 




V (1) 
(2) 




333, 750. (10 




831.00 


19.818,00 




(3) 


{,000.00 


65.999.00 




VII (1) 




1,098.09 




(2) 




4,909.00 








Total 


S, 302. 00 


429, 174. 79 




I (4) 




Costa Rica 




3. 7M. 00 




IV (1) 


212.20 


7.998.90 




(2) 


2,007.00 


3.014.29 




V (1) 




29.000.00 




(2) 


4,288.00 


7, 299. 62 




(3) 


1,S00.00 


14.6W.70 




vn (1) 


96.90 


2. 126. 76 




(2) 


24.00 


24.00 


Total 


8,128.10 


63.737 83 




I (2) 
(4) 




Cuba 




143.00 




21.00 


131.548.00 




IV (1) 




3.365.50 




(2) 




13, 076 00 




V (1) 


3,894.50 


11, 594. 50 




(2) 


3,030.60 


7,530.60 




<3) 




2.000.00 




vn (1) 


88.00 


4,097.80 




(2) 




751 00 








Total 


7,034.10 


174. 106 40 




I (1) 




Curacao . 


136 20 


19 846 20 




(4) 


16. SO 


2,141.89 





Category 


Value of export licenses 
issued 


Country of destination 


October 1940 


10 months 
ending Octo- 
ber 31, 1940 


C uiatao— Continued. 


IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 


$116. 40 
14.70 


$2,629.00 

641.28 

106.109.00 

9,289.26 

99,950.00 

22.60 




763.00 
2,000.00 








Total 


3.036.80 


200,930.03 




V (3) 

I (2) 

IV (1) 

(2) 

V (2) 
VU (1) 


Denmark ... 




2,040.00 






Dominican Republic 








989.90 
3.32 


2,989.60 
816.32 
COO 00 






1 901 80 








Total 


992.82 


h 240. 14 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
vn (1) 

(2) 






208.62 
213 00 








43.00 
307.00 


199.00 
19,46Z00 
2,047 00 






226.00 






900 00 








Total 


350.00 


23,265.92 




I (2) 
(3) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 


Ei!>T)t 










3.310 00 






1.680 21 




19,650.00 


69,938.00 
2.331.31 






16 993 00 






60 00 








Total „.. . 


19,650.00 


96,160.02 




I (1) 

(4) 

UI (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

vn (2) 


El Salvador 




126,062.00 
1 111 00 










18,200.00 
76 00 










6,460 00 




1,700.00 


1,700.00 
379l00 






8,360 00 








TotaL 


1,700.00 


161,324.00 




I (1) 
(4) 


Fiji 


21,290.00 
6,375.00 


21,250.00 
6,456.42 




Total 


27,625.00 






I (2) 
(3) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
vn (1) 

(2) 




Finland 




19 660 00 






638.569.60 

3,806,493.89 

951 50 














141 02 






44.640 29 






39, 056. 00 






641,032.60 






Total 




5,086,544.80 



470 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BUTJ.F.TIK 



Country of destination 



Value of export licenses 
issued 



Category 



France. 



Total. 



Ill 



rv 



VII 



Frencli Indochina 



Total. 



Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland. 



Total. 



Qieece.. 



Total.. 

Greenland... 



Total.. 

Guatemala. . 



Total., 



I (1) 

(4) 

IV (1) 

(2) 



October 1940 



10 months 
ending Octo- 
ber 31, 194(1 



$338. 00 

1, 204, 202. 71 

42, 071. 00 

452. 145. 50 

28,111.023.00 

10. 337. OO 

30.00 

376. 315. 00 

546. 000. 00 

11, 950, 423. 01 

1, 644, 697. 00 

2.00 

56, 593. 00 



44, 394, 177. 22 



(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(6) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 



III 



IV 



I (3) 
(4) 
(5) 

IV (1) 

V (3) 



I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
C2) 



IV (1) 
(2) 

VII (1) 
(2) 



$1, 

33, 

1,351, 

17, 666. 

1. 898, 

69. 497. 



879. 60 
365. 67 
260.00 
484. 35 
132. 00 
812. 90 



5, 
628, 



691. 65 
616.44 



689, 
£8,231, 



601. 06 
010. 00 



168, 630. 00 



170.072,373.56 



157, 634. 75 



1, 300. 00 



78.50 

305.50 

3, 836. 00 

530.90 



4, 750. 90 



7,609, 

22, 979, 

6,414, 

61,971, 

15, 120, 

288,687, 

146, 

1, 118, 

4,361, 

968. 

26, 008. 

137, 446, 

13, 926, 

5, 681, 



959. 60 
278. 18 
100. 52 
654.26 
639. 10 
891.76 
140. 14 
697. 31 
779. 35 
000. 00 
705. 40 
332.00 
803. 94 
669. 80 



591, 341, 651. 25 



150.00 

60.00 

90, 900. 00 

21.00 

167, 634. 76 



218, 765. 76 



1,015.48 

578. 30 

6, 674. 66 

1,731.57 

540.00 

106.00 



10. 645. 00 



186.00 
1. 340. 00 

226. 80 
6. 464. 00 



8, 216. 80 





Category 


Value of export licenses 
issued 


Country of destination 


October 1940 


10 months 
ending Octo- 
ber 31, 1940 


Haiti - . 


IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
VU (1) 




$1, 609. 86 






30.66 






7,000.00 






24.30 








Total 




8, 664. 81 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

VII (2) 








$27.90 


69.90 




690.00 






388.00 




187.00 


1,861.00 
10.000.00 






4,213.00 




260.00 


391.00 


Total . ... 


474.90 


17, 592. 90 




I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VI (2) 








2, 04Q. 75 






938.00 






1 803 10 






7,363 00 






67.75 






22. 832. 00 






24, 750. 00 






120 00 








Total 




59, 914. 60 




IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

VII (2) 










1 920.00 






374.00 






7, 890. OO 






763.00 






65 00 








Total - 




11,012.00 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (2) 




India 




3, 276. 74 






7,311.94 






3, 704. 14 






780 65 




1,600.00 
265.00 


69,100.00 
1,734.40 
1,000.00 






3 468.00 








Total - -- 


1,865.00 


90, 366. 77 




I (2) 

HI (1) 

V (1) 
(2) 




Iran 




37 500 00 






760 000 00 






112,000.00 




170.00 


263. 00 


Total . ... 


170.00 


909,763 00 




I (2) 
III (2) 
V (2) 








47, 865. 00 






27, 166. 00 






148, 000. 00 








Total 




223, 030. 00 




V (1) 
(2) 






Ireland 




116 823 00 




614.81 


3,786.41 



XOVEMBER 3 0, 194 



471 





Category 


Value of export licenses 
Issued 


Coiintry of destlnatioD 


October 1940 


10 months 
ending Octo- 
ber 31, 1940 


Ireland— Contlnaed. 


(3) 




$33,380 00 








Total 


$514.81 


153,968.41 




V 
IV 


(2) 

(1) 

(2) 


Italy 




13.6ia0O 






Jamaica - 




123.00 
41 45 












Total 




164.45 




I 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 






Kooya 




107.00 

6a 00 










714.00 






35,00 








Total 








vn 
I 

I 
I 

IV 
V 

vn 


(2) 

(2) 

(4) 

(1) 
(4) 
(S) 
(1) 
(2) 
(I) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 






I^Mward Islands 








■ 




.Macau 




A55.00 








Maurilliu 




137.00 








Mcjiro 


•07. 3S 


88a 10 
27, 53a 20 






112.50 




5,090.00 


21,127.30 
1,023.x 




5fl.743.00 

829.00 

1,200.00 


541.925.40 

8. 395. S3 

42,055.00 

175.50 




4.993.25 


17,498.25 
58,275 00 








Total 


69,462.60 


719,006.04 




I 

V 


(1) 
(4) 

(1) 
(2) 
(3) 












1M.61 






283,200 00 






17, 174 00 






SS,7I0 00 








Total 




356.354.61 




I 

V 


(2) 
(4) 
(S) 
(2) 
(3) 




N'elber lands 




12,866.00 
47.50 










1S5.00 






17,942 19 






63,300 00 








Totol 




94,3ia69 




I 

m 
rv 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 


■■ 


N'etberlaods IndlM 


73l42 

50,400 00 

288.000.00 

261,729.25 

11,850.00 

8,649.000.00 

1,320.000.00 


75.42 
3.498,350.00 
1.263.000.00 
4,358,157.26 
2, 316. 45a 00 
8,890,S0a00 
4,691. lia 10 
9 081 SO 






102.861.00 
2,389.43 


171,182 6.'5 
6a93a47 





Category 


Value of export llcenjics 
Issued 


Country of destination 


October 1940 


10 months 
ending Octo- 
ber 31, 1940 


Netberlands Indies— Cent. 


V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (1) 
VU (1) 

(2) 


$4,287.00 
102,770.60 
67,000.00 


$649,813.12 

442,312 80 

527, 169. 27 

4,950.00 

338 80 










160 749 30 








Total 


11,160,362.70 


27,044,472 09 




I (4) 

I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 


New Caledonia 












Xowfoundland 




140 fj^ 




60.99 


1.231.88 




14.79 


255.11 


Toul 


75.78 


3,576.26 




IV (2) 

V (2) 


New Guinea, Territory of 




17 25 




210 00 


1,460.00 


Total 


2iaoo 


1,477.25 




I (4) 

in (1) 
rv (1) 

V (2) 

(3) 

VU (1) 


NVnr Zealand 




0(Ut ~rjn iMi 


















161,594. 9.', 




14,000.00 


144,230.00 
11 045 00 








Total 


14,000.00 


2.500.691.95 




I 0) 

(2) 

IV (1) 

V (2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 


Nicaragua 




02 500.00 
9 000 00 










1.208.00 
480.00 










870 00 






1,292.00 






Total 




75,350.00 




I (2) 
(4) 

rv (1) 

(2) 




NiReria 










21 00 






30 25 






80 04 








Total 




418 79 




I (1) 

(4) 
IV (1) 






Northern Rhodesia 




336 80 






198 27 






V SO 








Total 




560 57 




I «) 

(2) 
(« 

ni (1) 

(2) 

IV (I) 
(2) 

V (1) 

(2) 
(3) 

1 






Xorway 




70 00 






450 00 






36,545 00 






712,000 00 






280.00 






222 00 






121.00 






2,200.00 






39,604.00 






1,515.00 








ToUl 


1 


793,007.00 



472 



DEPABTMEiNT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value ol export licenses 
issued 


Country of destination 


October 1940 


10 months 
endinc Octo- 
ber 31, 1940 


FalestiDe - 


IV (1) 
(2) 

V (3) 


$,5,991.00 
2, 787. 40 


$5,991.00 




2, 787. 40 
1, 400. 00 








Total 


8, 778. 40 


10, 178. 40 




I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








12, .500. 00 






3, 900. 00 






6, 600. 00 






8, 804. 76 






1, 207. 00 






27, 866. 00 






174.00 






1, 380. 00 






2, 262. 46 






728.00 








Total 




65, 422. 21 




I (4) 
IV (2) 










384. 80 






12, 150. 46 








Total 




12, 535. 26 




IV; (1) 
« (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






Peru - --- 


32.00 


7, 682. 90 




240.00 






393, 138. 50 




10,800.00 


24,800.68 
86, 666. 00 






2. 140. 00 






1, 130. 60 








Total - 


10,832.00 


615, 698. 48 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 
(2) 




Portugal . -- 




61.80 






44.00 






30.00 






422.00 






4, 300. OO 






49, 269. 94 






61,125.00 






841. 76 






17, 000. 00 








Total. 




133, 084. 50 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 




Portuguese Guinea ._ 


150.00 
8.00 
26.00 
8.00 


150 00 




8.00 
26.00 
8.00 


Total. 


192.00 


192 00 




V (2) 

I (1) 

V (2) 




Rumania 




600 00 








Baudi Arabia... 




260 00 






760 00 








Total. 




1, 020. 00 




I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 




Southern Rhodesia 




601 60 




238. 60 


466.00 






487 30 






96.62 





Category 


Value of export licenses 
issued 


Country of destination 


October 1940 


10 months 
ending Octo- 
ber 31, 1940 


Southern Rhodesia— Cont. 


V (2) 


$354. 26 


$160, 680. 26 


Total 


692. 76 


162, 930. 24 




I (4) 

I (1) 
(4) 




South-West Africa 


217. 12 


217. 12 










130.00 






25.00 








Total 




165.00 




I 0) 

I (2) 

(4) 

IV (2) 

vn (1) 






Straits Settlements 




9.12 












11,644.50 






1.64 






2.47 






323.00 








Total 




11,971.61 




I (2) 
(4) 

ni (2) 

IV (2) 

V (2) 
(3) 










108,000.00 






65, 307. 00 






4, 000. 00 






233, 625. OO 






91,419.63 






247, 298. 00 








Total 




749,649.53 




IV (I) 

I (1) 

(4) 

III (2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 






Switzerland 




20.00 












27, 906. 72 




5.26 


61.77 
1, .543. 84 






18,309.89 




66.10 


310. 91 
66,250.00 






19, 245. 74 






211,260.00 








Total 


70.35 


344,887.87 




IV (1) 

V (2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 

(2) 




Trinidad 




153.00 




28.32 


322.32 
18, 625. 00 






2, 977. 00 






162. 46 








Total .. 


28.32 


22, 239. 77 




III (2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (2) 




Turkey 




5, 610. 00 






33,00 






6.20 






139,760.00 






116,777.00 








Total 




262, 186. 20 




1 (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
HI (1) 
IV (1) 
(2) 










308.00 






200, 000. 00 






65, 500. 00 




33.68 

120, 000. 00 

12.45 

163.16 


667.61 

674, 000. 00 

287,422.15 

36, 420. 16 



NOVEMBER 3 0, 194 



473 





Category 


Value of export licenses 
issued 


Country of dcstlDation 


October 1940 


10 months 
cndinK Octo- 
ber 31, 1940 




V 

vn 


(1) 

(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




$3, 344, SS3. 00 






124,517.28 






338,360.00 




$saoo 


206.00 
40,228.00 








Total 


120,2N.29 


^002,08Z20 




I 
IV 

V 

VII 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(I) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 






160.49 

132 30 

1,138.33 


429.49 




1.654.30 
8,025.63 
S3 600 00 






100.40 




2,653.88 


2,653.88 
660.00 








Total 


4,094.00 


67, 123. 70 




I 
III 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(I) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




Vooozuiila....... ... ----. - 




184.30 






229.00 

100.55 

163,970 00 




31.00 






4,881.60 






192 70 






298,860.00 




1,608.00 

11,000.00 

1,627.46 

S.0O 


6^SI5.30 

137.270.05 

1A,8S4.4S 

21, 132 40 


Total 


I4.3«1.4< 


710, 260. 30 




IV 
VII 


(2) 
(2) 




Windward Islands 




10.00 






135.37 








Total 




145.37 




V 


(2) 
(3) 






YuKosiavla 




9,411.75 






30. 78a 00 








Total 




40, 191. 75 










Grand total 


192,887,727.14 


753, 896. 955. 40 









Durinji t he month of October. 419 aiTns export 
licenses were issued, niiikint; a total of 4,0:^5 such 
licenses issued during the current year. 

Akms Exported 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war ex- 
ported during the year 1940 up to and including 
the month of October under export licenses is- 
sued by the Secretary- of State : 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


October 1940 


10 months 
cndlne Octo- 
horSl, IIMO 




I 
V 


(4) 

(1) 

(2) 




$24.00 






3,200.00 






620.00 








Total 




3,844.00 




I 

III 
IV 

V 

vn 


(?) 

(4) 
(S) 
(2) 
(I) 
(3) 
(I) 
(3) 
(3) 
(1) 
(3) 










24, 095. 60 






240.00 






2,418.00 






5, 142 00 




$2,451.00 
3,738.00 


10.903.00 
10,242 00 
40,025.00 




25,399.00 


162141.48 
290,713 50 




10,845.00 
1,173.00 


19,874.84 
68,490.31 


Total 


62,606.00 


634,285.63 




I 
ni 

IV 
V 

VII 


(I) 
(4) 
(1) 
(0 
(3) 
(I) 
(3) 
(3) 
(I) 




AustrftUs 




1, 010. 53 






4S8.08 




103,460.00 


7.961,325.00 
136.55 






609.00 






13,296 00 




49,901.00 
64,837.00 


670.799.00 

1.024,013.00 

33, 474. 86 








Total 


218,298.00 


9, 606, 022. 02 




IV 

I 

IV 


(0 

(4) 
(3) 




DAhrvln Islands 




136.00 








B<^lciaD Conco -.- 




17.29 






1.87 








Total 




19.16 




I 
ni 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(3) 
(4) 
(1) 
(3) 
(I) 
(3) 
(3) 










217.00 






49, 450. 00 






28,809.79 






1, 146, 000. OO 






69.00 






20,745.00 






6,807.00 






119,997.00 








Total 




1,371,094.79 




I 
rv 

V 


(1) 
(4) 
(3) 
(I) 
(2) 










4a 00 






16.00 






74.84 






8.000.00 






2,500.00 








Total 




10, 638. 84 




I 

rv 

v 


(4) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 








21.00 
243.00 


1,774.00 




1,528.00 
19. OOO. 00 






1.041.69 




-..._.._ 


68.74L00 



474 



DEPABTMErNT OF SfTATE BXJIJ:.ETIIif 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 




10 months 








October 1940 


ending Octo- 
ber 31, 1940 


Bolivia— Continued. 


VII 


(1) 

(2) 


$141. 36 


$2,023.24 
1.60 








Total ^ 


405.36 


84, 109. 43 




T 


(n 




Brazil 


662.00 


1,773.00 






(2) 


3,050.00 


8, 488. 00 






(3) 


6,000.00 


14,225.00 






W) 


194.00 


17,071.00 




m 


(i> 




568,450.00 




IV 


0) 


17,580.00 


49, 939. 75 






(2) 


5,364.00 


27, 135. 14 




V 


(1) 


18,869.00 


684,941.00 






(2) 


11, 065. 20 


129,388.83 






(3) 


80,666.00 


305,689.25 




Vll 


(2) 




2.00 








Total 


142, 210. 20 


1,807,102.97 




IV 


(2) 




British Gniana 


7.60 


14.32 




V 


(3) 




2,600.00 




VII 


CD 
(2) 


115. 62 


1,224.36 
1, 6S0. 00 








Total 


123.02 


6, 418. 68 




IV 


(1) 




British Honduras . 




15 00 






18.00 




vn 


(1) 

(2) 




129.20 






108. 30 








Total -. 




270.50 




I 


(1) 










90 00 






400.00 




IV 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 




229.54 






472. 00 




92.78 


142.00 


Total 


92.78 


1,333 64 




I 


(1) 

(2) 




Canada 


11.990 66 


673, 460. 75 
166,283.44 






28,411.97 






(3) 


2, 064. 00 


40, 883. 00 






(4) 


64, 177. 96 


382, 327. 62 






(6) 




94, 654. 00 






(6) 


61,600.00 


61,600.00 




III 


(1) 
(2) 


1,929,334.00 


9,448,827.00 
248,681.31 




IV 


(1) 


1.5, 122. 75 


63, 262. 01 






C2) 


1,843.66 


75,842.96 




V 


0) 


6,000.00 


545,496.67 






(2) 


310, 704. 65 


1,920,414.99 






(3) 


610,944.60 


4, 481, 959. 10 




VI 


(2) 


45.00 


36,098.00 




vn 


(1) 


30,589.26 


176,047.13 






(2) 


11,286.00 


102,431.89 


Total 


2.963,114.40 


18, 508, 159. 77 




T 


C) 


Chile 




3.040.00 






(4) 








(fi) 




6,300.00 
3,630.00 






(6) 







Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


October 1940 


10 months 
ending Octo- 
ber 31, 1940 




IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




$64,054.00 
6, 747. 80 










6,800.00 






3,407 50 






82, 678 00 






15.00 






12, 607. 16 








Total 




184,433.45 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




China,. - _ . . 




1, 344. 00 






468, 005. 00 






860.00 






23, 753. 00 






1, 782, 445. 57 




$3,060.64 


21,674.64 
268.80 






6, 649. 00 


* 


62,000.00 
118,239.66 
881,217.00 


176,600.00 
1, 638, 697. 05 
1,474,508.00 

334, 724. OO 






342, 000. 00 








Total 


1,064,617.19 


6,270,418.86 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 
(2) 






30.00 






177.00 




293.00 


2,228.20 
2, 049. 76 






348, 350. 00 




1,730.00 


14,281.00 

44,966.00 

1, 027. 00 










4,906.00 








Total 


2,023.00 


418, 003 96 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




Costa Rica 


1,288.00 

6,393.20 

366.00 


1, 292. 00 




6,630.60 

664.25 

26, 000. 00 






22, 057. 00 




3,000.00 


31,976.00 
2, 236. 26 






51.00 








Total 


10,046.20 


88,706.01 




I (2) 
(4) 

m (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 


Cuba 




70.00 




35,167.00 


62, 043. 00 
43, 350. 00 




870.00 

2,372.00 

3, 894. 50 

30.60 


3, 315. 60 
14,074.00 
11,694.60 

8,925.60 
12, 876. 00 




962.80 


6,613.72 
761.00 








Total 


43,286.90 


163, 613. 32 




I (1) 
(4) 






6,487.20 
16.60 


7,072.20 




2.141.89 



NOVEMBER 30, 194 



475 





Category 


Value of actual eiporta 


Country of deatlnatlon 


October 1940 


10 months 
endlni! Octo- 
ber 31, 1940 


Can(SO— CoDtlnuwl. 


IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
m 
(1) 

(2) 
(3) 
(2) 


tll«.40 

14.70 

8i7.00 


$1,409.90 

810.98 

104,832 00 

4.283.28 




2.000.00 


M. ISO. 00 
22.10 








ToUI 


9^491.80 


17^ 522. 71 




I 
IV 

V 

vn 


P) 

0) 

m 
m 
(1) 




DotnlDlcan Republic .-.•.- 




210.00 




2,118.10 
331.32 


2,972.80 
848.32 
800.00 






1,801.80 








Total 


2^449.82 


8,130.82 




I 
rv 

v 

vn 


0) 
(4) 

(I) 

(2) 
(2) 

(1) 

(2) 








108.0 






238.00 






191.00 






17.090.00 




1,(B&00 


2.047.00 
229.00 






900.00 








ToWl 


1,028.00 






I 

IV 
V 


(3) 
(4) 

(1) 

(2) 
(2) 




Egypt .................... 




1880.00 






28.21 






a. 618. 00 






889.31 






80.00 








Total 




67,274.82 




I 

in 
rv 

V 

vn 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
C2) 
(2) 






El Salvador 


- 


128^08^00 




1,233.00 






18,200.00 






78.00 




24.00 
1,700.00 


8,480.40 

1.700.00 

376 00 






8,380.00 








Total 


1. 72100 


181, 448. 40 




I 
I 

m 

rv 

V 

vn 


(« 

0) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(1) 
0) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 




FIJL 


81.00 


81.00 






Finland 




328.80 






184,310.00 






494.980.00 






1. 3M. 078. 89 






2, 321, 498. 00 






981.80 




141.02 

iS84.00 


141.02 

134.764.00 

1,200,083.00 




83,400.00 


671,019.00 


Total 


88,123.02 


^27%098.91 




I 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 




Franc© 




78.00 






1,202,979.71 






41,323.00 






803,498.60 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


October 1940 


10 months 
endlnc Octo- 
ber 31, liMO 




in (1) 
(2) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (I) 
(2) 




$83,907,979.00 






20,846.00 






368,318.00 






646.000.00 






3. 927. 189. 82 






10, 346, 838. 00 






2.00 






66,693.00 








ToUI 




71,010,3ia03 




I (4) 

rv (1) 

(2) 










61.00 






3,836.00 






11.00 








ToUl 




3.898.00 




I «) 

I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(8) 

III (1) 
(2) 

rv (1) 

(2) 

V (1) 

(2) 

(3) 

vn (1) 

(2) 










33 83 








Great Britain aid N'ortbaro 
Ireland. 


$38.^000.00 

984.288.26 

62,330.00 

828, 757. 00 

840.872.00 

10.177,778.00 


4,996,830.00 
10,307.054.82 

2.507,829.20 
10.390.681.23 

1,774,988.80 

80,601,794.00 

22.001.00 




4^6S8.16 
394,791.74 


610, 814. 01 

1,106,261.20 

88.000 00 




938.34Z00 

8,181,708.00 

71,181.00 

14,012.60 


6,628.996.79 
19,768,679.48 
8,198,976.08 
2,978,377.50 


Tetal 


20,892,413.64 


134.962,683.68 




I (3) 
(4) 
<6) 


Greece - 




160 00 






60.00 






86,880 00 








Total 




88.080 00 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

rv- (1) 

(2) 






Gii<enland 




1,018.48 
678.30 










6,674.66 






1,731.57 






640.00 






106.00 








Total 




10, 648. 00 




I (1) 

(4) 

rv (1) 

(2) 

vn a) 

(2) 






nnt^t^ir^AlA 




37 00 






12.00 




27.00 


188.00 
1,336 00 






226 80 






6,164.00 








TotaL. 


27.00 


6,961 SO 




IV (1) 
(2) 

vn (1) 

(2) 




Halt! 




1 601 36 






23.00 






24.30 






6.00 








Total 




1.654.68 



476 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


October 1940 


10 months 
ending Octo- 
ber 31, 1940 




I 

IV 
V 
VII 


(1) 

(4) 
H) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 


$27.90 


$27.90 




406.00 






388.00 






1 521 00 






110, 000. 00 






3, 213. 00 






391. 00 








Total 


27.90 


115,946.90 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 








1, 168. 50 




938.00 
680.00 


938.00 

692.00 

7,363 00 




13,370.00 


18, 566. 00 
16, 550. 00 








Total 


14, 988. 00 


46, 267. 50 




IV 

V 

VH 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 








1, 920. 00 






363.00 






7, 890. 00 






763.00 






65.00 








Total 




11,001.00 




I 

IV 
V 

VI 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 








340. 25 
309.91 
26.00 


3,241.20 




7, 959. 60 
3, 606. 64 
1, 145.60 






67, 600. 00 






1,499.40 






1,000.00 




2,582.00 


3,611.00 


Total - 


3, 258. 16 


89, 462. 44 




V 


(1) 
(2) 




Iran , _ 


61, MO. 00 
93.00 


61, 640. 00 




93.00 


Total 


51, 633. 00 


51, 633. 00 




III 

IV 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 








694, 963. 00 






27, 165. 00 







94.37 






25.86 








Total 




722, 248. 22 




V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 










116,823.00 






3, 270. 60 






33, 380. 00 








Total _.. 




163, 473. 60 




IV 


(1) 
(2) 






Jamaica .... . - - 




346 OO 




13.95 


41.45 


Total . . 


13.95 


387 45 




V 
IV 


(2) 
(1) 




Japan ., 




4, 143 00 








Kenya 




618.00 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


October 1940 


10 months 

enfiing Octo- 

bnrSi, 1040 




V (3) 

I (1) 
(4) 




$18, 077. 00 








Mauritius 




261. 45 






337.28 








Total.. 




688.73 




I (!) 
(4) 
(5) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (2) 
Vn (1) 

(2) 








$60.00 


116.00 




30.26 






112.50 




1, 930. 00 


17, 282. 30 
1, 023. 20 




48,400.00 

376. 00 

21,850.00 


499,082.40 

4, 666. 00 

36,356.00 

176.50 




1,093.26 
725.00 


17,706.75 
56,232.00 


Total 


74,434.25 


632,780.91 




I (1) 
(4) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 




Mozambique 




116.00 






154.61 




1. 200. 00 
8, 190. 00 


283,200.00 
15,494.00 
66, 710. 00 








Total 


9,390.00 


364, 674. 61 




I (2) 

(4) 
(5) 

in (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 








26, 653. 00 






47.50 






165 00 






9, 674. 00 






107, 740. 00 






163, 472. 60 






187, 137. 50 








Total 




494,879.60 




I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(5) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (1) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






Netherlands Indies.. 




108.56 




8, 526. 00 
493, 791. 85 
136,771.00 
232,320.00 


117,473.00 

517, 393. 72 

534,464.00 

2,060,150.00 

740.00 




23. 786. 40 
2,708.98 


76, 305. 76 

16,842.67 

334, 677. 00 




8,758.00 
31,000.00 


310, 097. 60 

245,947.00 

4, 960. 00 






338. 80 




25, 500. 00 


230,409.30 


Total 


963, 162. 23 


4,449.897.30 




I (4) 

I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 




New Caledonia 




923. 82 








Newfoundland 


11.10 
2.17 


129.60 




302. 41 
1, 934. 50 






240.32 








Total 


13.27 


2. 606. 83 



NOVEMBER 30, 1940 



477 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of dostinatlon 


October I»40 


10 months 
ODdlDK Octo- 
ber 31. 1940 


New Guinea, Territory of 


IV 
V 


(2) 
(2) 




$17.25 




2.500.00 








Total 




2. 617. 25 




I 

IV 

V 

VII 


(4) 
(I) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 






New Zealand - - 


$80,596.00 


159, 332. 00 




202.00 




67.00 
14,000.00 


2,438.15 
16,540.00 
11,386.00 








Total 


103,662.00 


180. 898. 15 




I 

IV 

V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 








34. 827. 00 






8. 267.00 






1,264.00 




1,183.00 


1,208.00 
4 035 00 






480.00 






870.00 






1.202.00 






Total 


1.183.00 


62. 243. 00 




I 

IV 


(2) 
(4> 
(1) 
(2) 








278.50 






33.00 






30.00 






88.00 








Total 




429.50 




I 

IV 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 








336.80 
108.27 


336.80 




198.27 
25.50 








Total 


835.07 


560.57 




I 
m 

IV 
V 


0) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 




Norway ---- . 




70.00 






285.00 






36,493.20 
1,354.114.00 

2S0 00 














30 00 






137.00 






2,200.00 






644.00 








Total 




1, 394. 253. 20 




V 

I 

IV 
V 

vn 


(3) 

(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 






Palostine , 




1, 400. 00 








Panama . ... 




12,600.00 






3,900.00 






8,700.00 






8, 781. 75 






1. 207. 00 






21,807. 13 






174.00 






1,447.00 






2, 920. 60 






728.00 








Total 




62,165.48 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


October 1940 


10 months 
ending Octo- 
ber 31, 1940 


ParaffAiay . . 


I 
IV 


(4) 

(2) 




$384.80 






11,215.46 








Total 




11,600.26 




IV 
V 

vn 


(1) 

(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 








$32.00 


7, 682. 90 




240.00 






387,810.00 

22,711.00 

86,891.00 

2, 140. 00 




3.075.00 
8,171.00 






1,131.00 








Total 


11,278.00 


608,505.90 




I 
III 

IV 
V 

vn 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




Portucal 




61.80 






44.00 






877,298.00 
30.00 










422.00 






4,663.00 






44, 235 91 






64,285.00 






841.70 






17, 000. 00 








Total 




908,861.47 




I 

IV 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 








126.00 

16.00 

27.00 

6.00 


126.00 




16.00 

27.00 

6.00 


Total 


175.00 


175.00 




V 
V 

I 
rv 

V 


(2) 

(2) 

(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




Rumania . ........... 




600.00 












760.00 








Ronthf*m Rhofifffft 




495 60 






227.50 




293.06 

77.30 

36.00 

86,007.00 


646.56 

159.30 

156.04 

110,632.00 


Total 


86,412.36 


112,316.00 




IV 

vn 


(1) 

(2) 
(4) 
(2) 
(1) 




Straits Settlements . 




9 12 








Surinam ._ -. . . 




11,644.50 
1.64 










2.47 




193.80 


616.80 


Total. 


193.80 


12,165.41 




m 
rv 


(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




Sweden 




108,000.00 






65,307.00 






3, 724, 925. 00 






4,000.00 






178,001.00 



478 



DEPAHTMECNT OF STATE BUTJ.ETIN 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


October 1940 


10 months 
ending Octo- 
ber 31, 1940 


Sweden— Continued. 


V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 




$66, 000. 00 




212, 923. 98 






247, 267. 00 








Total 




4,605,423.98 




I (1) 
(4) 

III (2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 






Thailand 


$6,304.00 
13.03 


6, 427. 37 




23.36 
1,643.84 






16, 380. 89 




37.12 

30,950.00 

1,467.00 


94.61 

68, 260. 00 

14,482.00 

193, 120. 00 








Total 


38, 771. 15 


298,321.96 




IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

Vn (1) 
(2) 








153.00 






18.00 




20.00 


3,11J.OO 
18, 625. 00 




2,126.00 


2. 977.00 
162. 45 








Total 


2,145.00 


25, 049. 4S 




I (2) 
(5) 

HI (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 








148,135.00 






158. 750. 00 






1,191,084 00 




3-9.00 


17.449.00 
14,236.00 






1, 300. 20 






301,880.10 






70, 344. 00 






117,478.00 








Total 


379.00 


2. 020. 662. 30 




I (1) 

(4) 

in (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 

(2) 




Union of South Africa 




296 00 




13.00 


678. 93 
454, 000. 00 


« 


60,000.00 

7,250.00 

770,378.00 

4,800.00 

48,706.00 


154,686.70 

10.882.00 

1,181,606.00 

45,046.64 

208,380.00 

156 00 






40,064 00 








Total 


881,146.00 


2,095,696.27 




V (3) 

I (4) 

IV (1) 

(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

VII (1) 
(2) 


Union of Soviet Socialist Re- 
publics. 


21,976.00 


142,488.00 












1,622.00 






6, 607. 30 






35, 104 00 






100 40 




2,663.88 


2,653.88 
660 00 








TotaJ 


2,663.88 


46.946.58 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


October 1940 


10 months 
ending Octo- 
ber 31, 1940 


Venezuela 


I 

in 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 

(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




$111.40 






246.00 






39.00 






167, 970. 00 






3,316.60 






191.45 




$69,000.00 
23, 633. 30 
29. 192. 00 
2,166.09 


163,783.00 
54, 588. 30 

127,323.00 
17,014.08 
16, 890. 40 








Total 


123,880.39 


560, 473. 23 




V 


(1) 

(2) 
(3) 




Yugoslavia _ 




63,000.00 






26. 806. 76 






31, 080. 00 








Total 




120, 886. 76 












27,883,401.74 


272, 344, 098. 23 









Arms Import Licenses Isstted 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of origin of the arms, 
ammunition, and implements of war licensed for 
import by the Secretary of State during the 
month of October 1940: 



Country of origin 



Argentina - 
Canada 



Great Britain.. 
Mexico. 



Spain. 



Total. 



Category 



(1) 
CD 
(2) 
(4) 
(2) 
(3) 
(6) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 



Value 



$27.55 

100.00 

63. 836. 00 

115. 25 

250.00 

1, 377, 37 

6.00 

1,600.00 

4,600.00 

72.60 



Total 



$27. 55 

■ 66,677.62 

6.00 

6,200.00 

72.60 



71, 982. 67 



During the month of October, 16 import 
licenses were issued, making a total of 179 such 
licenses issued during the current year. 

Categories of Arms, Ammunition, and Impub- 
MENTS or War 

The categories of arms, ammunition, and im- 
plements of war in the appropriate column of 



NOVEMBER 3 0, 194 



479 



the tables printed above are the categories into 
which those articles were divided in the Presi- 
dent's prodamntion of May 1, 1937, enumerat- 
ing the articles whicii would l)0 considered as 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war for 
the piuposes of section 5 of the joint i-esolution 
of May 1, 11)37 [see the BuUetin of July 27, 
1940 (vol. Ill, no. 57), pp. 58-59]. 

Special St.vtistics in Reg.\rd to Arms Exports 
TO CuB.v 

In com[)liunce with Article II of the conven- 
tion between the United States and Cuba to 
suppress smuggling, signed at Habana, Marcli 
11, 1926. which reads in part as follows: 

"The High Contracting Parties agree that 
clearance of shipments of nicrcluindi.se by water, 
air, or land, from any of the ports of either 
country to a port of entry of the other country, 
shall be denied when such shipment comprises 
articles the importation of which is prohibited 
or restricted in the country to which such ship- 
ment is destineil, unless in this last case there 
has been a compliance with the requisites de- 
manded by the laws of both countries." 

and ill coiiipliance with the laws of Cuba which 
restrict the iniporlation of arms, ammunition, 
and implements of war of all kinds by retjuir- 
ing an import permit ii)v each shipment, ex- 
port licenses for shipments of arms, ammuni- 
tion, and implements of war to Cuba are 
required for the articles enumerated below in 
addition to the articles enumerated in the 
President's proclamation of May 1, 1037 : 

(1) Arms and small arms using aimnunition 
of caliber .22 or less, other than those classed as 
toys. 

(2) Spare parts of amis and small arms of 
all kinds and calibei-s, other than those classed 
as toj's, and of guns and machine guns. 

(3) Ammunition for the arms and small arms 
mider (1) above. 

(4) Sabers, swords, and military machetes 
with cross-guard hilts. 

(5) Explosives as follows : explosive powders 
of all kinds for all purposes ; nitrocellulose hav- 
ing a nitrogen content of 12 percent or less; 
diphenylamine; dynamite of all kinds; nitro- 



glycerine; alkaline nitrates (ammonium, potas- 
sium, and sodium nitrate); nitric acid; nitro- 
benzene (essence or oil of mirbane) ; sulphur; 
sulphuric acid ; chlorate of potash ; and acetones. 

(6) Tear gas (CoH5COCH.,Cl) and other 
similar n o n-toxic gases and apjKiratus de- 
signed for the storage or projection of such 
gases. 

The table printed below indicates, in respect 
to licenses authorizing the exportation to Cuba 
of the articles and commodities listed in the pre- 
ceding paragraph, issued by the Secretary of 
State iluring October 194<), the number of li- 
censes and the value of the articles and com- 
modities described in the licenses : 



Number of lioeiuos 


Sections 


Value 


Total 


30 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(5) 


$729. SO 

96.38 

9, 144. M 

4.37Z04 






$14,342.46 



The table printed Ik'Iow indicates the value of 
the articles and commodities listed above ex- 
torted to Cuba during October 1940 under 
licenses issued by the Secretary of State : 



SecUoD 



(1) 

(2) 
(3) 
(5) 



Value 



$272.00 

46.88 

S,M3.0g 

6. 391. 27 



Total 



$12, 2J3. 23 



■ Tin-Plate Scrap 

No licenses authorizing the expoi-tation of 
tin-plate scrap under the provisions of the act 
approved February 15, 1936, and the regula- 
tions issued pursuant thereto, were applied for 
or issued during the month of October 1940. 

Heuum 

The table printed below gives the essential 

information in regard to the licenses issued 
during the month of October 1940, authorizing 
the exportation of helium gas under the provi- 
sions of the act approved on September 1, 1937, 
and the regulations issued pursuant thereto: 



480 



DEPAKTMBNT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Applicant for 
license 


Purchaser in for- 
eign country 


Country of 
destination 


Quan- 
tity in 
cubic 
feet 


Total 
value 


The Ohio Chem- 


Oxygen Co. of 


Canada 


868 


.$36. 00 


ical & Mfg. Co. 


Canada, Ltd. 








The Ohio Chem- 


Compania Marx, 


Mexico - 


4 


2.50 


ical & Mfg. Co. 


S. A. 








The Cheney 


Mazza & Cia 


Argentina 


60 


16.00 


Chemical Co. 










The Linde Air 


Claude Neon Gen- 


Canada. 


. 1765 


30.00 


Products Co. 


eral Advertising, 
Ltd. 









Applicant for 
license 


Purchaser in for- 
eign country 


Country of 
destination 


Quan- 
tity in 
cubic 
feet 


Total 
value 


The Ohio Chem- 


LTngar & Cia 


Argentina 


35 


$111.60 


ical & Mfg. Co. 










The Ohio Chem- 


Lutj, Ferrando & 


Brazil 


20 


5.20 


ical & Mfg. Co. 


Cia., Ltd. 








Dayton, Price & 


Industrial Sup- 


New Zealand _ 


H 


16.00 


Co., Ltd. 


plies, Ltd. 








Dayton, Price & 


Industrial Sup- 


New Zealand. 


IH 


48.00 


Co., Ltd. 


plies, Ltd. 









Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



COMMERCE 

Trade Agreement With Switzerland (Execu- 
tive Agreement Series No. 90) 

The President on November 28, 1940 signed a 
proclamation terminating in part, as of January 
1, 1941, tlie concession on liandkerchiefs con- 
tained in item 1529 (b) of schedule II of the 
reciprocal trade agreement between the United 
States and Switzerland signed January 9, 1936. 
The effect of the proclamation will be to exclude 
from the benefit of the reduced rates of duty 
provided for in this item handkerchiefs ap- 
pliqued by hand or having drawn work made 
by hand. 

The action taken by the President was based 
on article XVI of the agreement, by which each 
counti-y has reserved the right, after consulta- 
tion witli the Government of the other country, 
to withdraw or to modify the concession granted 
on any article, if, as a result of the extension of 
the concession to third countries, such countries 
obtain the major benefit of the concession and in 
consequence thereof an unduly large increase in 
imports takes place. 

It has been ascertained that imports into the 
United States of handkerchiefs included in item 
1529 (b) of schedule II of the agreement have 



been in major part from countries other than 
Switzerland and that imports of these handker- 
chiefs have increased very considerably over the 
levels obtaining before the entry into effect of 
the reduced duties established pursuant to the 
agreement. Imports into the United States 
from all countries of handkerchiefs included in 
item 1529 (b) of schedule II of the agreement 
increased in number from 1,767,000 in the period 
February 15 to December 31, 1936 to 18,460,000 
in the calendar year 1938 and 9,865,000 in 1939. 
Of these imports the percentage imported from 
counti'ies other than Switzerland in the three 
periods referred to was 85, 95, and 80 percent, 
respectively. Comparable figures for years pre- 
ceding February 15, 1936 are not available. The 
increased imports have consisted primarily of 
hand-ornamented handkerchiefs. 

Under the proclamation, the rates of duty 
specified in item 1529 (b) of the trade agree- 
ment will, on and after January 1, 1941, apply 
only to the following: 

1529 (b) Handkerchiefs, wholly or in 
part of machine-made 
lace; handkerchiefs em- 
broidered (whether with a 
plain or fancy initial, 
monogram, or otherwise, 
and whether or not the 
embroidery is on a seal- 



NOVEMBER 3 0, 194 



481 



t each and 
30% ad val. 



loped edge), tamboured, 
appliqu^d, or from which 
threads have been omitted, 
drawn, punched, or cut, 
and with threads intro- 
duced after weaving to 
finish or ornament the 
openwork, not including 
one row of straiglit hem- 
stitching adjoining the 
hem; any of the fore- 
going, finished or un- 
finished, which contain no 
hand-nmde lace, which 
are not embroidered, 
tamboured, or appliqudd 
in any part by hand, from 
which threads have not 
been omitted, drawn, 
punched, or cut by hand, 
and having no threads 
introduced by hand to 
finish or ornament the 
openwork: 

Composed wholly or in 
chief value of cotton. ! 

Composed wholly or in 
chief value of vege- 
table fiber other than 
cotton: 

If finislicd and 

valued at 80 

cents or more per 

dozen 2# each and 

30% ad val. 
If unhemmed and 

without any 

finished edge, and 

valued at 45 cents 

or more per 

dozen 2(( each and 

30% ad val. 

Provided, That no handkerchiefs which 
were provided for in item 1529 (b) of 
schedule II of the trade agreement between 
the United States of America and Switzer- 
land, as proclaimed by the President of the 
United States of America on January 9, 
1936, shall be excluded from classification 
under this item by reason of incidental 
handwork necessarj' to finish the machine 
work or to mend or correct defects. 

The duty on handkerchiefs excluded from 
the concession by the proclamation will revert 
to the rates provided for in the Tariff Act. 



Trade Agreement With Venezuela (Execu- 
tive Agreement Series No. 180) 

A supplementary proclamation was issued by 
the President on November 27, 1940 declaring 
that the definitive trade agreement with Vene- 
zuela signed November 6, 1939 will enter into 
full force on December 14, 1940. 

The trade agreement was proclaimed by the 
President on November 16, 1939. Under the 
terms of a modits vit'eiuli with Veiu^ziicla also 
signed on November 6, 1939, the substantive pro- 
visions of the agreement have been applied pro- 
visionally by the two countries since December 
IG, 1939. In accordance with the i)rovisions of 
article XIX of the definitive agreement, it will 
enter into full force on December 14, 1940, as 
tlie re-sult of the exchange, on November 14, 
1940, of the President's proclamation of Novem- 
ber IC, 1939 and the instrument of ratification 
of the Government of the United States of 
Venezuela executed July 24, 1940. 



PROMOTION OF PEACE 

Treaties With Australia, Canada, and New 
Zealand Amending the Treaty for the 
Advancement of Peace With Great Britain, 
signed September 1.% 1914^ 

On November 2G, 1940 the Senate gave its 
advice and consent to the ratification by the 
President of the three treaties between the 
United States and Australia, Canada, and New 
Zealand, respectively, signed on September 6, 
1940, amending in their application to each of 
those dominions the provisions which concern 
the organization of commissions for the settle- 
ment of disputes contained in the Treaty for the 
Advancement of Peace between the United 
States and Great Britain, signed at Washington 
on September 15, 1914. 



" See the Bulletin of September 7, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 
63), page 207. 



482 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Treaty With the Union of South Africa 
Amending the Treaty for the Advance- 
ment of Peace With Great Britain, signed 
September 15, 1914 * 

On November 26, 1940, the Senate gave its 
advice and consent to ratification by the Presi- 
dent of the treaty between the United States 
and the Union of South Africa, signed on April 
2, 1940, amending in tlieir application to the 
Union of South Africa the provisions which 
concern the organization of commissions for 
the settlement of disputes contained in the 
Treaty for the Advancement of Peace between 
the United States and Great Britain, signed 
September 15, 1914. 

CONCILIATION 
Conciliation Treaty With Liberia 

On November 26, 1940, the Senate gave its 
advice and consent to ratification by the Presi- 
dent of the Conciliation Treaty between the 
LTnited States and Liberia signed on August 21, 
1939. 

EXTRADITION 

Supplementary Extradition Treaties With 
Ecuador, Guatemala, Mexico, and Switzer- 
land 

On November 26, 1940 the Senate gave its 
advice and consent to the ratification by the 
President of the supplementary extradition 
treaties between the United States and Ecuador, 
signed September 22, 1939 ; Guatemala, signed 
February 20, 1940; Mexico, signed August 16, 
1939 ; and Switzerland, signed January 31, 1940. 

CUSTOMS 

Agreement With Brazil for Reciprocal 
Customs Privileges for Diplomatic and 
Consular Personnel 

By an exchange of notes dated October 11, 
1940, an agreement was entered into between 
the United States and Brazil which provides, on 
a basis of reciprocity, that the diplomatic and 
consular representatives of each counti-y ac- 
credited to the other country, and the clerical 
personnel attached to their respective offices 



who are nationals of the United States and of 
Brazil, will be permitted to import, free from 
the payment of duties, articles for their personal 
use, if they are not engaged in any other private 
occupation for gain and if tlie article is not one 
tlie importation of which is prohibited by the 
laws of the L^nited States or by the laws of 
Brazil. 

AGRICULTURE 

Inter-American Coffee Marketing 
Agreement 

On November 28, 1940, fifteen American re- 
publics, including the United States, signed an 
agi-eement providing for the orderly marketing 
of coffee. The ceremony took place at the Pan 
American Union. 

The American reiiublics that signed the agree- 
ment are United States of America, Brazil, Co- 
lombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, 
Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Hon- 
duras, IMexico, Nicaragua, Peru, and Venezuela. 

The principal object of the agreement, which 
was drafted by the Inter-Ajnerican Financial 
and Economic Advisory Committee, is to allo- 
cate equitably the market of the United States 
and that of the rest of the world among the vari- 
ous coffee-producing countries through the 
adoption of basic annual export quotas for each 
country. An un2:)recedented step in the eco- 
nomic history of the American republics, this 
agreement is the first of its kind ever entered 
into by these countries. The study of the coffee 
problem was entrusted to the Inter-American 
Financial and Economic Advisory Committee 
by a resolution of the recent Habana Meeting of 
the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the Ameri- 
can Rei^ublics (resolution XXV ^). 

The Chairman of the Inter- American Finan- 
cial and Economic Advisory Committee, Mr. 
Sumner Welles, declared that the new coffee 
agreement is another practical achievement in 
the field of inter-American relations. He ex- 
pressed gratification at the effective labors of 
the committee charged with the negotiation of 
this agreement and emphasized the high spirit 



'See the Bulletin of April 6, 1940 (vol. II, no. 41), 
page 365. 



' See the Bulletin of August 24, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 6), 
p. 141. 



XOVEMBER 30, 194 

of cooperation and helpfulness shown by the 
delegates of all the participating countries. The 
Iiiter-Anierican Coffee Marketing Agreement, 
he said, may well be considered as another con- 
crete manifestation of the broad principles of 
hemispheric cooperation laid down in recent 
conferences of the American republics. 

The text of the agreement is printed below : 

The Governments of Brazil, Colombia, Costa 
Rica. Cuba, (he Dominican Republic. Ecuador. 
El Salvador, Guatemala. Haiti, Honduras, Mex- 
ico, Nicaragua, Peru, the United States of 
America and Venezuela, 

Considering that 

in view of the unbalanced situation in tlie in- 
ternational trade in coffee affecting tlie economy 
of the Western Hemisphere, it is necessary and 
desirable to take ^teps to promote the orderly 
marketing of coffee, with a view to assuring 
terms of trade e<|uitablc for both j)roducei"s and 
consumers by adjusting the supply to demand. 
Have accordingly agreed as follows: 

Article I 

In order to allocate equitably the market of 
ihe United Slates of America for coffee among 
the various coffee producing countries, the fol- 
lowing quotas are adopted as basic annual 
([uota;* for tlie exportation of coffee to the 
United States of America from the other coun- 
tries participating in this Agreement : 

Bags of 60 KUnprams yet, 
I'roducinu Country or Jiquivalent Quantitict 

Brazil 9. 3tK), 000 

Colombia 3, 150, 000 

Costa Rica 200, 000 

Cuba 80, 000 

Iloiniiiican Republic 120,000 

Eiiiador 150, 000 

El .Salvador 600,000 

Guatemala 535, 000 

Haiti 275, 000 

Honduras 20, 000 

Mexico 475, 000 

Nicaragua 105. 000 

Peru 25, 000 

Venezuela 420, OOO 

Total 15, 545, 000 



483 

For the control of the quotas for the United 
States market, the official import statistics com- 
piled by the United States Department of 
Commerce shall be used. 

Article II 

The following quotas have been adopted as 
basic annual quotas for the exportation of coffee 
to the market outside the United States from 
the other countries particiiKiting in this Agree- 
ment : 

Bai/s of 60 Kilouranin Set, 
Producing Counlrv or Equivalent Quantities 

Brazil 7, Si:i, 000 

CoUimbin 1. 07!), 000 

Costa Rica 242,000 

Cuba. 02. 000 

Dominican Republic 138,000 

Ecuador 80, 000 

El Salvador 527,000 

Guatemala 312. 000 

Haiti 327, (100 

IIondura.s 21, 000 

Mexico 239, 000 

Nicaragua H'l. WK) 

Peru ■13, 000 

Venezuela 606, 000 

Total 11. 612, 000 

Article HI 

The Inter-American Coffee Board provided 
for in Article IX of this Agieement shall have 
the authority to increase or decrease the quotas 
for the United States market in order to adjust 
supplies to estimated requirements. No such in- 
crease or decrease shall be made oftencr than 
(mce every six months nor shall any change at 
any one time exceed 5 percent of the basic 
quotas specified in Article I. The total increase 
or decrease in the first quota year shall not 
exceed o i>ercent of such basic rpiotas. Any in- 
crease or decrease in the quotas shall remain in 
effect until superseded by a new change in 
quotas, and the quotas for any quota year shall 
be calculated by applying to the basic quotas 
the weighted average of the changes made by 
the Board during the same year. Except as 
provided in Articles IV, V and VII, the per- 
centage of each of the participating countries 
in the total quantity of coffee which these coun- 



484 



DEPABTMBNT OF STATE BULLETIN 



tries may export to the United States market 
shall be maintained unchanged. 

The Board shall also have the authority to 
increase or decrease the export quotas for the 
market outside the United States to the extent 
that it deems necessary to adjust supplies to esti- 
mated requirements, maintaining unchanged 
the percentage of each of the participating coun- 
tries in the total quantity of coffee to be exported 
to that market, except as provided in Articles 
IV, V and VII. Nevertheless, the Board shall 
not have the authority to distribute these quotas 
among determined countries or regions of the 
market outside the United States. 

Article IV 

Each producing country participating in this 
Agreement undertakes to limit its coffee exports 
to the United States of America during each 
quota year, to its respective export quota. 

In the event that, due to unforeseen circum- 
stances, a country's total exports of coffee to the 
United States of America exceed in any quota 
year its export quota for the United States mar- 
ket, that quota for the following year shall be 
decreased by the amount of the excess. 

If any producing country participating in 
this Agreement has exported in any quota year 
less than its quota for the United States market, 
the Board may increase that country's quota for 
the immediately following quota year by an 
amount equal to the deficiency for the preceding 
quota year, up to the limit of 10 percent of the 
quota for such previous year. 

The provisions of this Article shall also apply 
to the export quotas for the market outside the 
United States. 

Any exportation of coffee to the market out- 
side the United States which may be lost by 
fire, inundation or any other accident, before 
arriving at any foreign port, shall not be 
charged against the quota of the respective 
country corresponding to the date of shipment, 
provided that the loss is duly established before 
the Inter-American Coffee Board. 

Article V 

In view of the possibility of changes in the 
demand for coffee of a particular origin in the 



market outside the United States, the Board is 
empowered, by a two-thirds vote, to transfer, 
on the request of any participating coimtry, a 
])art of that country's quota for the United 
States market to its quota for the market out- 
side the United States in order to bring about 
a better balance between supply and demand 
in special types of coffee. In such cases, the 
Board is authorized to make up the resulting 
deficiency in the total quota for the United 
States market by increasing the quotas of the 
other producing countries participating in this 
Agreement in proportion to their basic quotas. 

Article VI 

Each producing country participating in this 
Agreement shall take all measures necessary on 
its part for the execution and operation of this 
Agreement and shall issue for each coffee ship- 
ment an official document certifying that the 
shipment is within the corresponding quota 
fixed in accordance with the provisions of this 
Agreement. 

Article VII 

The Govermnent of the United States of 
America shall take all measures necessary on its 
part for the execution and operation of this 
Agreement and shall limit, during each quota 
year, the entry for consumption into the United 
States of America of coffee produced in the 
countries listed in Article I to the quotas as 
established in the said Article or as modified 
pursuant to other provisions of this Agreement, 
it being understood that notice of any modified 
quotas will be communicated by the Board to 
the Governments of the countries participating 
in this Agreement. 

The Government of the United States of 
America also undertakes to limit the total entry 
for consumption of coffee produced in countries 
other than those listed in Article I of this Agree- 
ment to a basic annual quota of 355,000 bags of 
60 kilograms net or equivalent quantities. The 
quota on such coffee shall be increased or de- 
creased by the same proportion and at the same 
time as the global quota of the participating 
countries for the United States market. 

In the event that due to unforeseen circum- 



NOVEMBKH 3 0, 1940 



485 



stances any quota is exceeded during any quota 
year, tliat quota for the foliowinp year shall 
l)e decreased bj' the amount of the excess. 

Article VIII 

III the event tliat tliere should Ite foreseen an 
imminent sliorla<ie of i-offee in the l'nite<l States 
market in relation to its requirements, the Inter- 
Americiin Coffee Board sliall liave tlie authority, 
as un emei'^ciicy measure, (o increase the (juotas 
for the United States market, in proportion to 
tile l)asir quotas, up to I lie (|nantily neressai'V to 
satisfy thesu requirements even tiioufrii in this 
manner the limits six?<?ified in Article III may be 
exceeded. Any memlier of the Boai'il may re- 
quest such an increu.se anil the increase may be 
authorized by a one-third vote of the Board. 

AMieii, t)\vinjr to six-cial circumstances, it may 
i)e nece.ssary for the purposes of the present 
Agreement to reduce the quotas for the United 
States market by a iierceiitage greater tlian that 
established in Article III, the Inter-American 
Coffee Board shall also have the authority to 
exceed the percentage of reduction beyond the 
limits established by the said Article III, pro- 
vided that this is approved by tlie unanimous 
vote of the Board. 

Abticxe IX 

The present Agreement shall be under the 
administration of a Board, which sliall be known 
as the "Inter-American Coffee Board", and 
whicli sliall be composed of delegates represent- 
ing the Governments of the participating 
countries. 

Each Government shall appoint a delegate to 
the Board upon approval of the Agreement. In 
the absence of the delegate of any participating 
country, his Government shall appoint an alter- 
nate who shall act in place of the delegate. 
Subsequent appointments shall be communi- 
cated by the respective Governments to the 
Chairman of the Board. 

The Board shall elect fi'om among its mem- 
bers a Chairman and a Vice-Chairman who shall 
hold office for such period as it may determine. 

The seat of the Board shall be in Washington. 
D. C. 



Articij: X 

The Board shall have the following powers 
and duties in addition to those specifically set 
forth in other Articles of this Agreement : 

(a) The general administration of the pres- 
ent Agi-eement ; 

(b) To appoint any employees that it may 
consider necessary and determine their powei-s, 
duties, compensation and duration of employ- 
ment; 

(c) To ap|)oint an Executive Committee and 
such other i)ernianent or temporary committees 
as it considers advisable, and to determine their 
functions and duties; 

(d ) To approve an annual budget of expenses 
and fix the amount to be contributed by each 
l)articii)ating Government in accordance with 
the principles laid down in Article XIII; 

(e) To seek such information as it may deem 
necessary- to the proper ojx'ration and adminis- 
tration of this Agreement; and to pulilish such 
information as it may consider desirable; 

(f) To make an annual report cfivering all of 
its activities ami any other matters of interest 
in connection with this Agieement at the end of 
each quota year. This report shall be trans- 
mitted to each of the participating Govern- 
ments. 

Articu: XI 

The Board shall undertake, as soon as possi- 
ble, a study of the problem of coffee surpluses 
in the producing countries participating in this 
Agi-eement. and shall also take appropriate 
steps with a view to working out satisfactory 
methods of financing the storage of such sur- 
pluses in cases where such action is urgently 
needed to stabilize the coffee industry. Upon 
request, the Board shall assist and advise any 
participating Government which may desire to 
negotiate loans in connection with the oi)eration 
of this Agreement. The Board is also author- 
ized to render assistance in matters relating to 
the classification, storage and handling of coffee. 

Articu: XII 

The Board shall appoint a Secretary and take 
all other necessary measures to establish a Secre- 



486 

tariat which shall be entirely free and inde- 
pendent of any other national or international 
organization and institution. 

Article XIII 

The expenses of delegates to the Board shall 
be defrayed by their respective Governments. 
All other expenses necessary for the administra- 
tion of the present Agreement, including those 
of the Secretariat, shall be met by annual con- 
tributions of the Governments of the participat- 
ing countries. The total amount, manner and 
time of payment shall be determined by the 
Board by a majority of not less than two-thirds 
of the votes. The contribution of each Govern- 
ment shall be proportionate to the total of its 
respective basic quotas, except that the Govern- 
ment of the United States of America will ac- 
cept as its contribution an amount equal to 33V^ 
percent of the total required contribution. 

Article XIV 

Regular meetings of the Board shall be held 
on the first Tuesday of January, April, July 
and October. Special meetings shall be called 
by the Chairman at any other time at his discre- 
tion, or upon written request of delegates repre- 
senting not less than five of the participating 
Governments, or fifteen percent of the quotas 
specified in Article I, or one third of the votes 
established in Article XV. Notice of all special 
meetings shall be communicated to the delegates 
not less than three days before the date fixed for 
the meeting. 

The presence of delegates representing not 
less than 75 percent of the total votes of all the 
participating Governments shall be necessary 
to constitute a quorum for a meeting. Any par- 
ticipating Government may, through its dele- 
gate, by written notice to the Chairman, ap- 
point the delegate of another participating Gov- 
ernment to represent it and to vote on its behalf 
at any meeting of the Board. 

Except as otherwise provided in this Agree- 
ment, decisions of the Board shall be taken by a 
simple majority of the votes, it being imder- 
stood that, in every case, the computation shall 



DEPABTMBNT OF STATE BUT.T.ETIN 

be calculated on the basis of the total votes of 
all the participating Governments. 

Article XV 

The votes to be exercised by the delegates of 
the participating Governments shall be as 
follows : 

Brazil , 9 

Colombia 3 

Costa Rica , 1 

Cuba 1 

Domiuican Republic , 1 

Ecuador 1 

EI Salvador , 1 

Guatemala 1 

Haiti 1 

Honduras 1 

Mexico 1 

Nicaragua 1 

Peru 1 

United States of America 12 

Venezuela 1 

Total 36 

Article XVI 

The official reports of the Board to the par- 
ticipating Governments shall be written in the 
four official languages of the Pan American 
Union. 

Article XVII 

Tlie participating Governments agree to 
maintain, in so far as possible, the normal and 
usual operation of the coffee trade. 

Article XVIII 

The Board is authorized to apjioint advisoi-y 
committees in the important markets, to the end 
that consumers, importers and distributors of 
green and roasted coffee, as well as other inter- 
ested persons, may be given an opportunity to 
express their views concerning the operation of 
the program established under this Agi-eement. 

Article XIX 

If the delegate of any participating Govern- 
ment alleges that any participating Govern- 
ment has failed to comply with the obligations 
of the present Agreement, the Board shall de- 



NOVEMBER 30, 194 



487 



cide whether any infringement of the Agree- 
ment has taken place, and, if so, wliat measui-es 
shall be reconnnended to correct the situation 
arising therefrom. 

Article XX 

The present Agreement shall be deposited 
with the Pan Americiin Union at Washington, 
which shall transmit authentic certified copies 
thereof to the signatory Goveriunents. 

The Agi-eement shall be ratified or approved 
by each of the signatory Governments in ac- 
cordance with its legal requirements and shall 
come into force when the instruments of ratifi- 
cation or approval of all the signatory Gov- 
ernments have been deposited with the Pan 
American Union. As soon as possible after the 
deposit of any ratification the Pan American 
Union shall inform each of the signatory Gov- 
ernments thereof. 

If, within ninety days from the date of 
signature of this Agreement, the instruments of 
ratification or approval of all the signatory 
Governments have not been deposited, the Gov- 
ernments whicli have deposited their instru- 
ments of ratification or approval may put the 
Agi'eement into force among themselves by 
means of a Protocol. Such Protocol shall be 
deposited witli the Pan American Union, which 
shall furnish certificil copies thereof to each of 
the Governments on behalf of which the Proto- 
col or the present Agreement was signed. 

Article XXI 
As long as the present Agreement remains in 
force, it shall prevail over provisions incon- 
sistent therewith which may be contained in any 
other agreement previously concluded between 
anj- of the participating Governments. Upon 
the termination of the present Agreement, all 
the provisions which may have been tempo- 
rarily suspended by virtue of this Agreement 
shall automatically again become operative 
miless they have been definitively terminated for 
other reasons. 

Article XXII 

The present Agreement shall apply, on the 
part of the United States of America, to the 



customs territory of the United States. Ex- 
ports to the United States of America and quotas 
for the United States market shall be understood 
to refer to the customs territory of the United 
States. 

Article XXIII 

For the purpose of this Agreement the fol- 
lowing definitions are adopted: 

(1) "Quota year" means the period of twelve 
months beginning October 1. and ending Sep- 
tember 30 of the following calendar year. 

(2) "Producing countries participating in this 
Agreement"' means all participating countries 
except the United States of America. 

(3) '"The Board" means the Inter-American 
Coffee Board provided for in Article IX. 

Article XXIV 

Subject to the eventuality covered by Article 
XXV, the present Agreement shall remain in 
force until October 1, 1943. 

Not less than one year prior to Octolx-r 1, 
1943 the Board shall make recommendations to 
the participating Governments as to the con- 
tinuation or otherwise of the Agreement. The 
recommendations, if in favor of continuation, 
may suggest amendments to the Agreement. 

Each participating Government shall signify 
to the Board its acceptance or rejection of the 
reconunendations referred to in the immediately 
preceding paragi'aph within six montlis after 
the date of the receipt of such recommendations. 
This period may be extended by the Board. 

If said recommendations are accepted by all 
the participating Governments, the jjarticipat- 
ing Governments undertake to take such meas- 
ures as may be necessary to carry out said 
recommendations. The Board shall draw up a 
declaration certifying the terms of said recom- 
mendations and their acceptance by all the par- 
ticipating Governments, and the present Agi-ee- 
ment shall be deemed to be amended in accord- 
ance with this declaration as fi'om the date 
specified therein. A certified co^jy of the 
declaration together with a certified copy of the 
Agreement as amended shall be communicated 



488 

to the Pan American Union and to each of the 
participating Governments. 

The same procedure for making amendments 
or for the continuation of the Agreement may 
be followed at any other time. 

Article XXV 

Any of the participating Governments may 
withdraw from the present Agreement after 
prior notification of one year to the Pan Ameri- 
can Union which shall promptly inform the 
Board. If one or more participating Govern- 
ments representing 20 percent or more of the 
total quotas specified in Article I of this Agi-ee- 
ment withdraw therefrom, the Agreement will 
thereui:)on terminate. 

Article XXVI 

In the event that because of special and ex- 
traordinary circumstances the Board should 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTJULETTN 

believe that the period fixed by Article XXIV 
for the duration of this Agreement might be 
reduced, it shall immediately notify all the 
participating Governments which, by unani- 
mous agi-eement, may decide to terminate this 
Agreement prior to October 1, 1943. 

Transitory Article 

All coffee entered for consumption into the 
United States of America between October 1, 
1940 and September 30, 1941, both inclusive, 
shall be charged against tlie quotas for the first 
quota year. 

All coffee exported to the market outside the 
United States between October 1, 1940 and Sep- 
tember 30, 1941, both inclusive, shall be charged 
against the quotas for the first quota year. 

Done at the City of Washington, in English, 
Spanish, Portuguese and French, the 28th day 
of November, 1940. 



U-S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE^ 1940 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents . - . - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

POBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIBECTOB OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 






y 






THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 



DECEMBER 7, 1940 
Fo/. Ill: No. yd - Publication /5JJ> 



Qonfcnts 



General: Page 

Natioiiiil Dpfonsc as Kclated to Religious and Cultural 
Diversity within the Framework of Undivided 
Political Loyalty: Address by Assistant Secrotaiy 

Long 491 

Some Aspects and Implications of ■\jnerican For- 
eign Policy in the Present World Situation: Address 
by Lynn R. Edminster 494 

Ei'rope: 

Postponement of debt payments by Finland 501 

Aid to Greece 503 

Detention by German police of clerk in American 

Embassy in Paris 504 

Contributions for relief in belligerent comi tries .... 504 

Americ.\n Republics: 

Pan American Aviation Day: Statement by the Sec- 
retary' of State 515 

Inter-American Maritime Conference 516 

C.\N.\D.\ : 

Great Lakes Seaway and Power Conference : 

Message of President Roosevelt 518 

Address by Assistant Secretary Berle 520 

Conservation of foreign exchange by Canada .... 521 

[Over] 




The Far East: Pas'- 

Credit to Chinese Government •')21 

Commercial Policy: 

Allocation of tariff quota on heavy cattle 522 

The Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 523 

Treaty Information: 
Indian Affairs: 

Convention Providing for the Creation of an Inter- 
American Indian Institute 524 

Education : 

Convention for the Promotion of Inter-American 

Cultural Relations (Treaty Series No. 928) . . . 524 
Convention Concerning Peaceful Orientation of 

Public Instruction 524 

Convention Concerning Facilities for Educational 

and Publicity Films 525 

Exhibitions: 

Convention Concerning Artistic Exhibitions (Treaty 

Series No. 929) 525 

Extradition: 

Supplementary Extradition Convention with Co- 
lombia 525 

Nature Protection and Wildlife Preservation: 

Convention on Natiu-e Protection and Wildlife Pres- 
ervation in the Western Hemisphere 525 

Publications: 

Convention on Interchange of Publications (Treaty 

Series No. 954) 525 

Telecommunications : 

Convention with Panama Providing for the Transfer 

to Panama of Two Naval Radio Stations .... 525 
Ti'ansit : 

Convention on the Pan American Highway (Treaty 

Series No. 927) 526 

Regulations 526 

Publications 526 



General 



NATIONAL DEFENSE AS RELATED TO RELIGIOIS AND CrLTlRAL 
DIVERSITY WITHIN THE FRAIMP^WORK OF I'NDIVIDED POLITICAL 
LOYALTY 

Address by Assistant Secretary Long ' 



IRoIpusim] lo the prci*s l>oopmber 4 I 

Mr. Chairman, Members of the Institute 
FxiR Hirnuj 1'ni)ki{stani>in<j: I iini very liiippy 
to be bere tonifjbt and to take part in your 
discussions. 

It would be difficult to clioo.se at this time a 
tojjic more vital in the life of our jx'ople thai\ 
the tlicnic of yi)nr Institute, with its enipiiasi^ 
on freedom of ihon^rht and <if con.si'ienrc witliin 
the framework of undivided political loyalty. 
These arc <rivat culturai values which, in hap- 
pier days, we were accustomed to take for 
gianted. But in the perilous times through 
which we live today, they need frequent and 
vigorous re-affirnialion as guideposts of indi- 
vidual and national conduct. For the ,very 
Concei)ts that underlie them are today subjected 
to a powerful challengt% which carries with it 
great dangers to our way of life and to the 
things which we. Americans, most dearly 
cherish. 

And it is freedom of thought, freedom of 
speech, religious lil)erty — the freedom to pursue 
our individual lives and to develop our cultural 
concepts — which is the basis of American po- 
litical doctrine. It is the security of that 
fi'eedom which has been the constant ol)jective 
of America, and it is the continuation of 



'Delivered before the National Conference of Chris- 
tians and Jews, in cooperation with the University of 
North Carolina and the Catholic Conference of the 
South. Chapel Hill, K. C, December 3, 1940. 

279157—40 1 



that freedom which demands our coordination 
today. It is the refutation of the challenge to 
all these things which tinds us in sympal belie 
and determined accord. 

In times of grave |)eril. nothing is more im- 
portant for the safety and sei-iirity of a nation 
tlian that its peo))le re<'ognize clearly liie na- 
Inic of the dangers whirh confront them. 
Without such recognition, no nation. Iiowevei- 
large, however bountifidly endowed willi ma 
terial resources, can civate for itself means of 
self-defens<' sufticieiit to ward otf all [xissible 
menace. A clear and coni'ageous visualization 
by our people of the dangers which looni on 
(air horizon is this country's greatest neeij 
today. 

Thei-e are dangers from without, and there 
are dangers from within. 

All nations are menaced today by a relent- 
less march across the earth of invaders of 
peaceful and peace-seeking mitions. of destroy- 
ei-s of human freedom and decency. Many 
free and sovereign nations have already been 
invaded, subjugated, reduced to slavery. No 
nation is immtme from this present and grow- 
ing threat. No nati<m can hope to defend it- 
self agsiinst it siive as it creates for itself 
adequate means of defense. 

For our country-, as for any country, na- 
tional defense requires, fii-st. a sufficiency of 
physical weapons. So long as audacious mili- 
tary autocracy is on the march, no one can 

4!11 



492 



DEPABTMBNT OF STATE BULLETIN 



foresee the point at which we can safely pause 
in the process of creating such weapons for 
defense. To place reliance merely upon the 
availability of vast potential resources is to 
fall into the quicksands of certain danger. 
Tlie maps of Europe, Asia, and Africa are 
replete with examples which testify to the 
truth of that assertion. These potential re- 
sources must be transformed into actual arma- 
ments of the greatest striking power known to 
science and technology before they can become 
the means of staying the hand of attack when 
raised agamst us or of repelling it successfully 
should it ever be thrust at us. Our incom- 
parable resources are today being rapidly 
transformed into such weapons. 

National defense requii'es, second, a suffi- 
ciency of trained men to wield the physical 
weapons. Modern war demands, as warfare 
has always demanded, a high quality of cour- 
age. But courage alone will not suffice. Un- 
trained courage pitted against trained and 
mechanized troops is magnificent, but it is not 
effective. Our people have courage, surpassed 
by none. What we need is courage combined 
with training, and such training we are now 
providing for our citizens. 

But even these are not enough. The forces 
against which national defense is necessary 
have developed new techniques of attack. Un- 
der these techniques, the way forward for ad- 
vancing ships, tanks, planes, and columns of 
men is paved by words that divide and weaken. 
This art of breaking down a nation has been 
as thoroughly and rutlilessly devised and di- 
rected as the work of military commands 
calculating how best to destroy an opposing 
force. 

Some of the phases of these evil techniques 
have well been called "the strategy of terror". 
In these phases the purpose is to stimulate fear 
and thus paralyze defense. Other phases might 
be called "the strategy of the wisliful illu- 
sion". In these phases, the would-be assailant 
actually presents himself as the bearer of some 
desired benefit. Peoples are told that they are 
to be delivered from some oppressor or other, 
or that when the struggle is over they will 



be better off than before. Still another aspect 
might be called "the strategy of creating hate". 
This uses the medium of lies and exaggerations 
to convert into vital differences all the small 
frictions or dislikes that will always be found 
in any community. The objective is that by 
exaggerating our differences of thought and by 
assuming ungenerous attitudes toward the 
rights of other groups to exercise their own 
liberties we would lend actual aid and con- 
siderable comfort to the forces without, which 
seek our destruction through internal discord. 

Against dangers such as these we need, as 
weapons of defense, spiritual and moral 
strength and undivided loyalty to the best that 
is in us as individuals and as a nation. Here, 
again, we have in our possession all the neces- 
sary elements out of which these weapons are 
fashioned. But here, again, we cannot be se- 
cure by merely taking these things for granted. 

This great country of ours was reclaimed 
from the wilderness by generations of men and 
women who crossed the oceans in search of 
freedom — freedom of body, of mind, and of 
spirit. They and their descendants and the 
millions who came after them have built ujDon 
the broad expanses of America a nation, "con- 
ceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposi- 
tion that all men are created equal". 

Our people's greatest achievement is that 
we have found a way of life in which many 
races can live together in peace and in friend- 
ship; in which many religions and many sys- 
tems of thought can exist side by side without 
any one of them seeking — much less attain- 
ing — domination over the others. We have 
learned the great lesson of a true civilization: 
that freedom of thought and freedom of re- 
ligion, with their necessary concomitant — 
freedom of expression — based on mutual tolera- 
tion and mutual respect among individuals and 
groups who follow the teachings of their own 
choice, are among the most potent forces for the 
spiritual and moral enrichment of the commun- 
ity and of the nation and the surest guaranty 
of national unity. 

We have achieved our way of life because 
of our unflagging devotion to the great prin- 



DEOEMBEU 7, 1940 



493 



ciple of equality of opportunity. Upon that 
vital principle we have built our institutions 
of popular government — government of laws 
by the consent of the governed. Under that 
system of government, our citizens have been 
free to develop their individual potentialities 
in as favorable conditions as have ever been 
enjoyed by any people in history. Ours has 
been an exi)eriment in democracy, of the results 
of whicli we are justly i)roud. 

But a system of government such as oui-s will 
endure, and the incalculable benefits which it 
confers ujion us who live untlcr it will continue, 
only so long as an overwhelming majority of 
our citizens accept and practice the responsi- 
bilities which attach to the great privilege of 
citizenship. Among those responsibilities none 
is more essential than willingness to subordi- 
nate individual and group differences and in- 
terests to the common good of the nation. 

In a regimented and autocratic nation the 
interests of individuals ai"e suboi-dinate to the 
interests of the state — but the nature of the 
state itself is determined by the will of the all- 
powerful rulers, not by the will of the people. 
There is a world of difference between the im- 
posed, the tyraniiiially enforced discipline of 
an autocratic state and the voluntary discipline 
of a democracy, in which the people themselves 
determine the form of government under which 
they live and willingly accept the measure of 
self-restraint necessary in order that that form 
of government may function effectively. 

Let us by all means have in our Nation a 
gi'eat diversity of thought and of belief. With- 
out such diversity, the lives of individuals and 
the life of the Nation will be dull and barren, 
and there will result a far lower type of ex- 
istence than man has been vouchsafed by cen- 
turies of civilized progress. But let us beware 
lest that diversity lose its essential basis of 
mutual toleration and mutual respect on the 
part of individuals and of groups and thus 
become a deadly poison of social and political 
dissension and discord — to be exploited for sin- 
ister purposes by enemies from without or 
enemies from within. 

These enemies are numerous and they are 



ruthless. They are ever on the alert in their 
striving to turn to their own advantage the 
many dangers which beset us from within. 

Complacency is one of these dangers. An- 
other is weakening of faith in the everlasting 
worth of individual liberty and of the institu- 
tions of popular government as the most effec- 
tive system for the preservation and function- 
ing of liberty. Seeking refuge in cynicism and 
narrow self-interest is still another. Lack of 
willingness to accept whatever sacrifices may 
l)e needed to make certain that our national 
freedom and independence and our national in- 
stitutions shall be preserved is yet another. 

TVe must never forget the old but unshake- 
ably true precept that eternal vigilance is the 
price of freedom. There are people in our 
coiuitry who permit themselves to be lulled 
into a false sense of security — and who do 
their best to influence the rest of us to do the 
same — by honestly, though mistakenly, think- 
ing and saying that a direct military attack 
against the United States is a "physical im- 
possibility". There are some who seek to prop- 
agate these dangerous ideas as agents of 
foreign powers. Against both the sincere, but 
misguided, and the sinister attempts to sow in 
our midst these dangerous seeds of weakness. 
we must be constantly on guard. Only by 
facing realities unflinchingly and coura- 
geously, only by sparing no effort required by 
the circumstances of the times through which 
we live, can we be truly vigilant and uncon- 
querably strong. 

And only as a united people — united in pur- 
pose and in determination — can we face, with- 
out fear, whatever perils may confront us. 
Only so can we create for ourselves impreg- 
nable national defenses. 

I have noticed with gi-eat interest on the 
striking cover of a i)amphlet recently distribu- 
ted by the National Conference of Christians 
and Jews these two mottoes: "No ocean sepa- 
rates us from our enemies within"', and 
"National defense demands national unity". 
These two phrases should be proclaimed from 
every housetop of the Nation. But even more 
important than that, they should be indelibly 



494 



DEPAKTJIEXT OF STATE BULLETIN 



engraved in the minds and hearts of every one 
uf unr citizens. 

Our Nation has no more united purpose than 
to remain secure and at peace. But peace and 
security for us will be a vain hope — a hoi)e 
betrayed — unless we double and treble our 
national effort in the directions I have indi- 
cated. When forces of I'uthlessness and vio- 
lence are abroiid in the world, i)eace and 
seciu'ity arc tlie prixilefres of the strong, not of 
the weak — of those who are physically stroug. 
spiritually strong, and morally strong — of 
those who are ])rei)ared and willing to defend 
themselves and tlie tilings they cherish. 

History has imposed upon us who live today 
a task of innnense gravity and difficulty. The 
work and the sacrifices wliich are needed for the 
performance of that task are but a small price 
to pay for the stupendous privilege of meas- 
uring up to the responsibilities of the present 
tragic moment. That we do measure up to 



it nnist be our constant concern. Groups with 
different thoughts, groups of different religions, 
groups free to think and to worship God as 
they will, must unite in spiritual and moral 
appreciation of the rights enjoyed by their own 
as well as other gi-oups for the common benefit 
of all — for the security of the common liberty. 
United in defense of our mutual rights we are 
strong enough to maintain our respective liber- 
tie>s and to repel the menace of a rampant mili- 
tary autocracy. 

I have not the slightest doul)t in my own 
mind as to either the ability or the determina- 
tion of our people to preserve for ourselves and 
our posterity the way of life of which we, of 
today, are the proud inheritors. That way of 
life — the way of free men — has endured on our 
continent foi' more tlian a century and a half. 
It will continue to endure, how-ever powerful 
the forces that may attempt to challenge it. 



SOME ASPECTS AND IMPLICATIONS OF AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY 

IN THE PRESENT WORLD SITUATION 

Address by Lynn R. Edminster - 



[ItolcaK^Ml tu tln' pi-ess December tij 

This meeting of wheat growers in the Pacific 
Northwest takes place at a time when the minds 
of all of us are filled with concern over the 
critical situation which exists in the world to- 
da}'. The impact of wars abroad upt)n the 
daily life and activity of millions of our peo- 
ple, and above all the serious threat which has 
ariseji to the safety and security of our country, 
have made foreign relations and national de- 
fense the all-impoitant bu.'^iness of the mo- 
ment — whether we like it or not. 

You people, as producers of a great world 
staple like wheat, are of course immediately 
and directly concerned with the international 
situation as it affects supply and demand con- 

- Delivered at the thirteenth aumtal meeting of the 
Eastern Oregon Wheat League, Pendleton, Oreg., De- 
cember 6, 1940. Mr. Edminster i.s Special Assistant 
to the Secretarv of State. 



diti<ins witii respect to yoni- ])aiticular com- 
niodity. I assume, however, that others on 
your program will deal with tliis phase. 
Hence I want to talk to you simply as citi- 
zen.s — citizens anxious not only for the imme- 
diate safety and .security of this Nation, but 
also for the preservation of conditions in the 
world in which liberty-loving nations like our 
own will be able in the future to live in se- 
curity and to dedicate their efforts to construc- 
tive, and not destructive, ends. 

I choose these words deliberately. When I 
say "constructive'" ends, I mean the further 
advance, and not the relapse into barbarism, 
of the ci\"ilization, which, with endless patience 
anil sacrifice, mankind lias built up through 
(he ages. I mean the oppoi'tunity to work for, 
and the prospect of achieving, a constant bet- 
terment of conditions of life, and hence the in- 
creased happiness, of the masses of the people. 



DECEMBER 7, 194 



495 



Tliat must always In- tlu' central cuiRt'in of 
democratic govermuent ; and if wo are {joiiiji 
to preserve and extetul this ()p]><)rt unity for 
linnian advaiKenicnt, we cannot \n\t i)e ap- 
|irciiensive when nations wliicii Ixiast supreme 
conlenipt fur free institutions set tiiemselves 
upon tlie patli of world con(|uest. 

We are all aware of I lie danjrerous state of 
affairs tlial exists in the world today. It has 
now become unmislakahly clear that the wars 
going on in other parts of the world are liy 
no means merely local or re<;ional conflicts 
which this Nation can ignore in safety while 
it turns its eyes inward and preoccupies itself 
solely with internal atrair>. If there are ihost- 
who once believed this, they can surely no 
longer be under any illusion. When the 
President of the United States says, as in a 
recent address, that "it can no longer be dis- 
puted that forces of evil which are bent on 
coiupiest of the world will destroy whomever 
ami whenever they can destroy"', we know that 
he is speaking from the record and not from 
mere speculation. 

AVhile I ordinarily avoid K-ngtiiy ((U(JtatioM.-, 
I am now going to make an exce|)tion to prove 
the rule. I want to (|uote at some length from 
a recent adilress of Secretary Hull, because he 
has saitl much better than I could possibly say 
the things that should be emphasized at this 
point. I quote : 

"The appalling tragedy of the pre>ent worl.l 
situation lies in the fact that peacefully dis- 
posed nations failed to recognize in time the 
true nature of the aims and ambitions which 
have actuated the rulers of the heavily arming 
nations. Recoiling from the mere contempla- 
tion of the possibility of another widespread 
war, the peoples of the peaceful nations per- 
mitted themselves to be lulled into a false sense 
of sectnity by the assurances made by these 
rulers that their aims were limited. This con- 
tinued even as succeeding events left less ami 
less room for doubt that, behind the screen of 
these assurances, preparations were being made 
for new attempts at widespread conquest. To 
mask still further this monstrous ileception, 
, these rulers and their satellites attempted to 



brand as 'war mongers" and 'imperialists" all 
who warned against the clearly emerging 
dangers, and poured upon them vituperation 
and abuse. 

"The rulers of these nations have repudiated 
and violateil in e\ery essential respect the long- 
accepted principles of i)eaceful antl orderly 
intei'iiational relations. Merciless armed at- 
tack; unrestrained terrorization through 
slaughter of non-combatant men, w(»men, and 
children; deceit, fraud, and guile; forced labor; 
confiscation of property: imposed starvation 
and deprivations of every sort — all these are 
weapons constantly used by the coni|ueroi-s for 
the invasion and subjugation of other nations. 

''They adhere to no geographic lines and they 
fix no time-limit on their programs of invasion 
and destruction. They cynically disregard 
every right of neutral naticms, and. having 
occupied several such countries, they then pro- 
ceed to warn all peaceful nations that they 
must remain strictly neutral until an invading 
force is actually crossing their borders. They 
have as a fixed objective the securing of con- 
trol of the high s«'as. They threaten peace- 
ful nations with the direst consequences if 
those tuitions do not remain acquiescent, 
while the conqueiors are seizing the other conti- 
nents and most of the seven seas of the earth. 

"Li>t no one comfort himself with the de- 
lusion that these are mere excesses or exigencies 
of war, to be voluntarily abandoned when 
fighting ceases. By deed and by utterance, the 
would-l)e conquerors have nuide it abundantly 
clear that they are engaged upon a relentless 
attemi)t to transform the civilized world as 
we have known it into a world in which man- 
kind will be reduced again to the degradation 
of a master-and-slave relationship among na- 
tions and among individuals, maintained bj' 
brute force." 

In the face of this grave situation, the su- 
preme task which this country faces today is 
the task of protecting the legitimate interests 
and the safety and security of this Nation. The 
crux of the problem is to accomplish this all- 
important objective, if it is humaidy possible 



496 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



to do SO — as I earnestly hope and believe it is — 
without involving this country in war. 

If we are to proceed effectively toward this 
objective, we cannot afford, however, to permit 
ourselves to be confused and misled meanwhile 
by loose and irresponsible talk about "getting 
this country involved in foreign wars". We 
need to make more use of our brains and less 
use of fear-mongering slogans. Every intelli- 
gent adult in this country knows that any major 
war anywhere in the world profoundly affects 
the interests and the welfare of the people of 
this country. In that sense no major war any- 
where in the world is "foreign" to the United 
States. But getting involved in war simply 
because of that fact is an entirely different mat- 
ter. To assert or imjjly, without the slightest 
justification, that any responsible government 
would recklessly lead its people into wholesale 
bloodshed while there still remains any possi- 
bility, consistent with the national security, of 
avoiding such a course is extravagant talk which 
ought not to be indulged. For it can only tend 
to undermine public confidence, foster disunity, 
and weaken our social fabric at a time when 
the very safety of the Kepublic requires that 
those charged with the heavy responsibility of 
government shall have the full confidence and 
support of a united people. 

The question is not one of good or bad in- 
tention. We all want peace. We are all agreed 
that war is a scourge that ought to be banished 
forever from this earth. But we are in the 
presence of a condition and not a theory; and 
we shall get neither peace nor security by merely 
wishing for them. "We know", as Chester 
Davis, agriculture's representative on the Na- 
tional Defense Advisory Commission, said in a 
recent address, "that nations holding resources 
which strong predatory nations covet, or which 
stand between them and the realization of their 
plans for world dominion, cannot be weak and 
Jive" ; that "the nation which is rich in resources 
but unorganized to employ them powerfully and 
swiftly in military action, if need arises, does 
not command the respect of predatory powers ; 
. . . has no weight by the standards of a world 
dominated by force". In short, we know — to 
quote Secretary Hull once more — that "to have 



peace we must have security" and "to have 
security, we must be strong". 

In dealing with this crisis in our foreign re- 
lations and the national defense, the Govern- 
ment has been active, as you know, on several 
fronts. 

First, and of the utmost urgency, we are arm- 
ing. Our military, naval, and air foi-ces are 
being strengthened as rapidly as possible. Cre- 
ating new facilities for production — new plants, 
new tooling, etc. — requires time. Nevertheless, 
as of approximately the middle of November, 
nearly nine billion dollars in contracts had 
already been let to American industry. A vast 
progi-am of military and teclmical training of 
our enormous manpower has been set in motion. 
Exports of certain materials necessary for 
national defense have been stringently regu- 
lated ; and steps have also been taken to assure 
the availability of adequate supplies of strategic 
and critical materials for which we are depend- 
ent in whole or in part upon imj^orts. The 
arrangement with Great Britain by which we 
acquired long-time leases on eight strategically 
located naval and air bases designed to protect 
our Atlantic seaboard was a tremendously 
imjjortant step. Defense consultations are 
under way with our neighbors both to the north 
and to the south. Vigorous measures are being 
taken to deal with subversive activities directed 
fi-om abroad. America has, indeed and at last, 
awakened to the dangers of her present situation 
and is acting with characteristic vigor and 
resourcefulness to meet them. 

Second, we are striving in every way to create 
closer ties and a spirit of solidarity with all the 
Americas and to establish, with them, a sys- 
tem of continental defense. Fortunately, the 
groundwork for such effort did not have to be 
laid at the eleventh hour. Thanks to our good- 
neighbor policy and to the many concrete acts 
by M-hich it has been implemented during the 
past seven years, the groimdwork had already 
been laid. 

I wish there were time to review the steps 
by which this spirit of collaboration and of 
solidarity has been achieved. It is a glorious 
chapter in the history of inter- American rela- 
tions. It is a stoi-y that goes back to the inter- 



497 



American conference at Montevideo in 1933, at 
whicli were laid fnuiidations for the Ixiiiding of 
closer ties — political, economic, and cultural — 
between the 21 American republics. I particu- 
larly stress, as {rrowinp out of that conference, 
two thinj::s. The first is the reinforcement 
jriven the doctrine of non-intervention in the 
internal or external affairs of other nations, a 
doctrine to which this country, by numerous 
specific actions, has subsequently <:;iven evidence 
of its concrete sujiport. The second is the 
unanimous approval secured, under the initia- 
tive of the United States, for a liberal prof^ram 
of traile policy — a progi-am wliich was shortly 
thereafter set into motion, in our own coimtry, 
through the adoption of the Trade A<j:reements 
Act, as a result of which our trade relations 
with many countries, both inside and outside 
the Western Hemisphere, have since iieen lifted 
out of the sorry state into which they were 
precipitated by earlier tariff enactnient.s, 
notably the Hawley-Smoot Act. By successive 
stages, in later conferences — at Buenos Aires, 
late in l!):iG: at IJnia, late in \^'^^■ in Panama, 
in the autunni of VMl); and at Hai)ana, last sum- 
mer — the foundations for increased solidarity 
and for closer colla])oration in matlei-s of com- 
mon concern to this hemisphere wei-e greatly 
strengthened. 

I^articularly woidd I emphasize the steps 
taken, since the outbreak of war in Europe, to 
insure the peace and security of this hemis- 
l)here. In conformity with policy and pro- 
cedure set up at Buenos Aires in 1936 and 
Lima in 1938, the conferences held at Panama, 
shortly after the outbreak of war. and at 
Habana, last sunnner, adopted important 
measures to safeguard the individual and col- 
lective interests of the American republics 
from the growing threat to their peace and 
safety. Out of the Panama meeting came a 
declaration of the policy of keeping Eurojiean 
hostilities out of American waters, and the cre- 
ation of machinery for coordinating action of 
the 21 republics in dealing with common prob- 
lems relating to neutrality and to economic 
conditions brought about by the war. Out of 
the Habana meeting came, not only further 

27915 



measures of economic defense and collabora- 
tion but also — and of particular timeliness — 
steps to prevent any transfer of sovereignty in 
the Western Hemisphere from one non-Ameri- 
can nation to another. Important also was 
the agreement with respect to procedures for 
combating subversive activities in this hemi- 
sphere directed from abroad. 

A third front on which there has been con- 
structive action for the peace and safety of our 
country has been through the large and in- 
creasing material assistance which we have 
been giving to nations which, while fighting 
for their very existence against ruthless attack, 
are checking the spread of violence and thus 
reducing the threat to our own security. The 
common sense of this course of action is so 
obvious that it is scarcely a fit subject for de- 
bate. To argue that we should not give such 
assistance is tantamount, as Secretary Hull 
has .said, "to a denying of the inalienable 
right of self -defense"'. In this realm of de- 
fense, as in others, our choice is made, and 
wisely made. 

'•We will continue'', said the President of 
the United States in a recent address, "to help 
those who resist aggression, and who now hold 
the aggi-essors far from our shores. . . . We 
have learned that if we seek to appease them 
[the aggressors] by withholding aid from 
those who stand in their way, we oidy hasten 
the day for their attack upon us. 

"The people of the United States, the people 
of all the Americas, reject the doctrine of 
appeasement. They recognize it for what it 
is — a major weapon of the aggressor nations." 

Finally, it is necessary to mention one other 
major phase of the Government's activity and 
concern in this great crisis — not so spectacular 
as the rest but vastly important none the less. 
I refer to the constant effort, through word and 
deed, to keep alive those principles, ideas, and 
ideals which are basic to the establishment of 
solid foundations for lasting peace. This is a 
task which must never be neglected. 

Let no confirmed cynic ever delude us into 
thinking that the widespread flouting of such 
principles of conduct by certain powerful, ag- 



498 



iDEPARTMEiNT OF STATE BULLETIN 



gressor nations has now relegated tliem to a 
state of impotence in the evohition of human 
affairs. There is a power in ideas and ideals 
wliicli transcends the sinister plottings and 
schemings of evil men and supplies the under- 
lying impulse for the forward march of civiliza- 
tion itself. No mere dictator or combination of 
dictators can extinguish them. They have tri- 
umphed before, and under their powerful im- 
petus the world will rally once again and 
resume its forward march. 

In international affairs we identify these prin- 
ciples by such exi)ressions as faithful observ- 
ance of international obligations and pledges; 
resort to orderly, peaceful processes, rather than 
to force, in the settlement of disputes; and non- 
interference in the internal affairs of other na- 
tions. In the broad pages of history they find 
expression in the age-long quest for fi-eedom, 
for the recognition of the spiritual dignity and 
sanctity of each individual human being. In 
the family and in the community they are ex- 
emplified in the pi-actice of honesty, tolerance, 
and good-will as cardinal principles of living; 
in being a "good neighbor", with all that im- 
plies. To those people who profess to see in 
the bloody struggle now being waged in other 
parts of the world no issue involving these great 
human values, no issue in teims of the future 
safety of our democratic ideals and institutions, 
no issue at all save a struggle between rival im- 
perialisms — to such people I would commend 
a more careful reading of the pages of history. 
Had the torch of human liberty and progress 
been entrusted into the hands of people who 
view the matter solely in this light, I am afraid 
it would have burned out long ago. 

In rebuilding the edifice of world peace it is 
not enough, however, that we should strive only 
for the reasseition of those moral and legal 
principles which are indispensable to orderly 
international relations. We are obliged to rec- 
ognize — indeed, for the past seven years our 
Government has recognized, and has acted upon 
the recognition — that no peace can be enduring 
which does not rest upon solid economic foun- 
dations. 

You are, of course, broadly familiar with the 
efforts wliich our Government has made in the 



past seven years to re-open the channels of 
international trade and, in other ways as well, 
to strengthen the economic foundations of 
peace. Through the trade-agreements pro- 
gram real progress had been made before tlie 
outbreak of the war in Europe. Trade agree- 
ments were entered into with a large number 
of countries, including some of the most im- 
portant in our foreign-trade relations. Not- 
withstanding attempts by self-seeking interests 
in this country to juggle the facts and to be- 
little what was accomplished, there is not the 
slightest cpiestion that the agreements entered 
into were, upon the whole, distinctly beneficial, 
both in safeguarding our export trade against 
tlie inroads of increasing trade barriers in for- 
eign countries and in reversing the process so 
as to bring about many positive increases in 
export outlets for pioducts of our farms and 
factories. The facts to support this statement 
are so definitely a matter of public record that 
I need not pause to repeat them. 

These results were achieved, however, in the 
face of tremendous difhculties — difficulties 
which did not recede as time passed but which, 
on the contrary, were intensified with the ap- 
proach and final outbreak of hostilities in 
Europe. Today, in this sphere, as in others, 
the picture is by no means comforting. Trade 
with the belligerent countries has been either 
shut off completely or — as in the case of Great 
Britain and her allies — subordinated to the 
necessities of war. These circumstances have 
temporarily deprived us of the benefit of some 
of the most valuable concessions obtained in 
our trade agreements with certain countries. 
Still more important, war upon the vast scale 
which we are now witnessing unleashes tre- 
mendous forces the impacts of which upon 
international trade and international economic 
relations generally in the more distant future 
are necessarily uncertain and unpredictable. 

But the fact that things look dark and un- 
certain at this time is no excuse for yielding to 
an attitude of pessimism and futility. Be- 
cause the difficulties we confront are great, the 
cliallenge is also great. To this Nation, more 
than to any otlier single one, circumstances 
have bequeathed the task of leadership in con- 



DECEMBER 7, 1940 



499 



servin<i dining wartime, and in re-asserting and 
extending after the war, those basic policies 
and i)rini'iple,s which are essential to general 
reconstruction and progress throughont the 
world ; and in no sphere is this more important 
than in the sphere of trade. 

In tiie face of tiiis sitnation, our [nopei- 
conrse with respect to trade policy — at least 
so fai' as one can see into the fnture — seems 
clear. Our first job is to keep the trade-agree- 
ments program intact and in operation to the 
fullest extent that conditions permit. There 
are many reasons why this should be done. 

An iiTiportant innnediate consideration is the 
fact that, under the trade agreements now in 
effect, our foreign-trade interests are better 
safeguarded from the disruptive effects of war 
conditions than they would be if we did not 
have tiie agreements. Our agreements with 
(H)untries outside the war area are still power- 
ful stiumlants to our trade with them; while 
even those witli countries at war from which 
our trade is not cut oil' by blockade afford 
us a better Iever;ige for lf)oking after onr 
interests than we would have in the absence 
of agreements. 

Furthermoie, there is no reason at all why 
it should necessarily be assumed that further 
extension of the scope of the program is im- 
possible at the present time. In fact, there 
are urgent reasons why every effort should be 
made to extend its scope, particularly in the 
Western Hemisphere. Because of the very 
large and increasing export balance of this 
country and the shortage of dollar exchange 
available to other countries, we are facing a 
situation which, uidess we can find ways of 
further liberalizing our trade relations and 
enabling such countries to .sell us more goods, 
is certain to undermine our position as a great 
exporting and creditor nation. We cannot 
afford to overlook the unfavorable conse- 
quences, from the standpoint both of our 
export trade and of national defense, of a 
progressive exhaustion of dollar-exchange re- 
.sources available to the British Empire in c(m- 
nection with its prosecution of the war. And 
there are especially urgent reasons from the 
standpoint of inter-Americun solidarity and 



hemisphere defense why we sliould lose no 
opportunity at this time further to improve 
our trade relations witii the other American 
republics. 

Consider for a moment the situation in 
which the countries to the south of us now find 
tjiem.selves. The difficulties of the intenui- 
tional-trade-and-paynients position of the 20 
other American repid)lics, as a group, have be- 
come extremely critical as a result of the war. 
Partly owing to obstacles which these coini- 
tries have confronted in making normal pur- 
chases from P]urope, our exports to them in- 
creased from $49(),(W0,000 during the 12 months 
ending .Vugust 1039 (the year jireceding the 
outbreak of tlie war in Europe) to $7:{;5,(iOO,(lUi) 
in the succeeding 12-iniiiiili period — an increase 
of $243,()0().()()0 or nearly .'.() jx'rcent. Mean- 
while, our imports from these countries in- 
creased by only a little over 31 percent — from 
$469,(1(10.000 to $(')1 6.000.000, an increase of 
$147,000,000. In merchandise alone, therefore, 
our export surplus in trade with these coun- 
tries increased during the fiist year of the war 
from $21,000,000 to $117.000,000— or by not far 
short of $100,000,000. Their position was still 
further complicated by a $17,000,000 decline in 
net gold and silver shipments to the United 
States during the same period; and also by a 
probable increase in net payments due the 
United States on account of invisible trade 
items, such as interest, dividends, etc. 

The situation of these countries is made far 
more ditiicult becau.se of the fact that, owing 
to the blockage of exchange arising out of 
Latin-American exports to the United King- 
dom, they have practically no important source 
of free foreign exchange outside the United 
States. With British war effort preventing 
the United Kingdom from supplying Latin- 
American needs in liquidation of such blocked 
exchange, and with trade cut oif from the Ger- 
man-controlled areas, the American republics 
are largely unable to meet their import require- 
ments except as they find means of purchasing 
from the LTnited States. Unless they can fur- 
ther increase their sales to the United States, 
the eventual outcome must certainlj- be a heavy 
decline in our export sales to them. 



500 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULI^TIN 



And SO, as matters stand, it comes down to the 
proposition where, from the standpoint both of 
safeguarding our future trade interests and of 
hemisphere defense, we are compelled to make 
every reasonable effort to improve our trade re- 
lations in the Western Hemisphere — and of 
course elsewhere if we can. We are simply not 
in a position these days where we can afford 
to go into spasms over the purchase by our 
Navy Department of an insignificant quantity 
of imported canned corned beef from South 
America. By all means, let us avoid sacrific- 
ing the legitimate and reasonable interests of 
our own producers; but let us not "stop the 
steamboat to blow the whistle" over things like 
that. Let us remember that we must think also 
of the broader interests, the safety and secu- 
rity, of the Nation as a whole, of which we are 
all a part. 

In this connection, I want to take the liberty 
of quoting once more from a recent address by 
Chester Davis — a man whose sincere concern 
for the welfare of American farmers I am sure 
none would wish to question. I quote : 

"Our hemispheric relationships and prob- 
lems ought to be looked at clearly and cou- 
rageously by every organized farm group in 
America. We cannot be military friends and 
economic enemies with Latin America at one 
and the same time. Farmers through their or- 
ganizations must study this problem at once and 
with care. Economic and military dictator- 
ships are sweeping most of the world's area into 
their systems. If we are to keep the Western 
Hemisphere free from their grasp, the United 
States and Latin America must learn to work 
together, to trade together, and to develop to- 
gether. I hope that the farmer's voice at the 
council table when plans to that end are being 
studied will be constructive, not obstructive." 

So much for foreign trade policy as of today. 
What of the future? 

With the whole world in a state of rapid flux, 
all statements with reference to the future are 
subject to qualification in the light of changes 
which cannot now be clearly foreseen. No man 
is wise enough to tell you at this time exactly 
what kind of world this is going to be when hos- 



tilities finally cease. Tremendous issues — the 
fate of millions of people — now hang in the bal- 
ance. Nevertheless, there are some thoughts 
with reference to post-war trade policy that I 
want to leave with you. 

There are certain basic principles and poli- 
cies in the field of trade that are fundamentally 
sound — so sound that they are mere truisms; 
and there are others, taking a great variety of 
forms but coming in final analysis to essen- 
tially the same thing, which are fundamentally 
unsound. It is not mere theory, it is a fact — 
a truism — that the expansion of international 
trade to that healthy volume which redounds 
to the best interests of all countries requires the 
pursuit of trade policies which encourage the 
flow of three-cornered, or multilateral, trade. 
That is the type of policy embodied in the Trade 
Agreements Act. It is equally a fact, a truism 
— notwithstanding the strenuous efforts of some 
of our self-appointed, "super-practical" advisers 
on foreign-trade policy to refute the obvious — 
that policies and practices which tend to re- 
duce international trade essentially to bilateral 
barter inevitably diminish its volume far be- 
low the levels essential to world economic health. 
Such are the great host of trade-diverting and 
trade-destroying schemes — restrictive quotas 
and licensing systems, clearing and compensa- 
tion agreements, and other ingenious and dis- 
criminatory devices — which have in recent 
years infested international trade, sapping the 
world's economic vitality like so many leeches. 

If these things be true— and they are true — 
the main issues in the realm of trade policy 
which this country seems likely to confront 
after the war will have to do, not with broad 
objectives of policy, but with tactics to be pur- 
sued in striving for those objectives. So far as 
the objectives themselves are concerned, it 
seems obvious that we should not only con- 
tinue after the war, but should redouble, our 
efforts to reopen the channels of trade thi'ough 
the pursuit, to the full extent that circum- 
stances i)ermit, of jjolicies and principles 
which have already been tested and which we 
know to be intrinsically sound. 

The antithesis of these principles is exem- 
plified in the methods of trade which have 



501 



been pursued by the totalitarian countries. 
Those methods are well known. They are 
aggressive in the e.xtreme. They do not rest 
primarily upon etononiic considerations; they 
are essentially politico-military in character, 
designed to weuiien and even to subjugate 
those countries against which they are di- 
rected. They are predicated on the principle 
not of economic peace but of ccononiic war- 
fare. Tiiey are but a part of tiie comprelien- 
sive strategy of total warfare by which — 
wlictlier in wai-time or under cover of a purely 
nominal peace — tlie struggle for world domi- 
nation is being waged by such countries. In 
the very nature of tlie case, they involve the 
complete subordination of individual freedom 
and initiative in the fields of business, indus- 
try, and trade to the will and purposes of 
goveriunent dictatorsiiips. Precisely to the 
extent that these metiiods gain ascendancy in 
(lie world will the ditliculties of going forward 
witli a sound program of trade expansion, 
based upon tlie principle of cooperation and 
nuitual advantage, be enhanced. 

The trade policies wiiich this country has 
been i)ui'suing rest upon the principle of equal- 
ity of treatment and of cooperation. They 



seek, by peaceful methods and on a basis of 
fair dealing, to clear away excessive barriers 
to trade, to the mutual advantage of all coun- 
ti"ies. If there is to be a re-ordering of inter- 
national economic relations at the close of the 
war upon a basis in which these principles of 
fair-dealing and of cooperation can flourish, 
then — as I have said on previous occasions — 
the situation at that time must be one in which 
there is maximum opportunity to work for 
such a settlement and work for it with a rea- 
sonable prospect of constnictive accomplish- 
ment. Certaiidy there can be no such oppor- 
tunity in a world where policies of economic, 
political, and military aggression are in the 
ascendancy — where there is not even a will to 
peace. 

And .So. you .see. I have come back to the 
place where I starte<l. This country is today 
confronted with a great crisis, involving the 
future safety and security of our people and 
of our democratic institutions. We are striv- 
ing to tlie utmost to meet this crisis in a man- 
ner worthy of a great, free people. With the 
vision, the resourcefulness, and the courage of 
a free iieople, we shall meet it. 



Europe 



POSTPONEMENT OF DEBT PAYMENTS BY FINLAND 



[Released to the press November 30] 

By a note of November 20, 1940 the Minister 
of Finland has informed this Government that 
his Government will avail itself of the option 
of postponement granted Finland by Public 
Resolution Xo. 84, approved on June 1.5, 1940, 
so far as concerns the pajTnent due December 
15, 1940. 

The texts of a note fi-om the Secretary of 
State dated June 22, 1940, a note from the 
Minister of Finland, dated November 20, 1940, 



and the acknowledgment of the Secretary of 
State dated November 29, follow : 

June 22, 1940 

The Honorable Hjalmak J. Procope, 

Minister of Finland. 
Sir: 

The President of the United States approved 
on June 15, 1940 Public Resolution No. 84, 
which reads as follows: 



502 

"Joint Kesolution 
"To authorize the postponement of payaieiit 
of amounts payable to the United States by 
the Republic of Finland on its indebtedness 
under agreements between that Republic and 
the United States dated May 1, 1923, and May 
23, 1932. 

•'■Resolved by the Senate and Home of Repre- 
sentatives of the United States of Amenca in 
Congress assembled, That the Republic of Fin- 
land, at its option, may jiostpone the payment 
of amounts payable to the United States of 
America during the period from January 1, 
1940, to December 31, 1940, inclusive, under 
the agreements between that Republic and the 
United States of America dated May 1, 1923, 
and May 23, 1932; and, in the event of the 
exercise of the option herein granted, the 
Secretary of the Treasury is authorized to 
make, on behalf of the United States of 
America, an agreement with the Republic of 
Finland for the payment of the postponed 
amount, with interest at the rate of 3 pei- 
eentiun per annum beginning January 1, 1941, 
in ten annuities, the first to be paid during the 
calendar year beginning January 1, 1941, and 
one during each of the nine calendar years 
following, each annuity payment to be payable 
in one or more installments: Provided^ hoiv- 
evet\ That the amounts postponed shall bear 
interest at the rate of 3 per centum per annum 
from the date payment of such amounts was 
postponed to January 1, 1941. 

"Sec. 2. The agreement authorized in the 
first section of this joint resolution shall be in 
such form that annuity payments thereunder 
shall, unless otherwise provided in such agree- 
ment, (1) be in accordance with the agreement 
with the Republic of Finland dated May 1, 
1923, and (2) be subject to the same terms and 
conditions as payment under the agreement 
dated May 1, 1923.'' 

In order that appiopriate effect may be given 
to Public Resolution No. 84, I should be glad 
to be informed, at as early a date as may be 
convenient, whether your GovernmenI will 
exeicise (he option gianted therein. 

Accept [etc.] Cordell Hull 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

November 20, 1940 
His Excellency the Honorable Cordell Hull, 
Secretary of State, 

Department of State, 
Washington, D. C. 
Excellency : 

Referring to Your Excellency's note of June 
2nd, 1940 regarding the Public Resolution No. 
84 approved on June 15th, 1940 by the President 
of the United States to authorize the postpone- 
ment of payment of amounts payable to the 
United States by the Republic of Finland dur- 
ing the period from January 1, 1940 to Decem- 
ber 31, 1940 under the agreements dated May 
1st, 1923 and May 23rd, 1932, I have the honor 
to submit to Your Excellency the following. 

In spite of the many difficulties confronting 
Finland at present and notwithstanding her 
limited resources that are badly needed in the 
rehabilitation of the country, it is the firm 
intention and desire of the Finnish Government 
to maintain her credit record and to keep all 
her obligations in the same way as she has 
always done in the past. 

However, the Finnish Government has with 
sincere gratitude noted the above mentioned 
Resolution, which, having been passed by both 
Houses of the Congress, was enacted by the 
President of the United States on the 15th 
of June, 1940, and offei-s the Finnish Govern- 
ment the opportunity of the jjostponement of 
payments specified therein. My Government 
appreciates this renewed proof of understand- 
ing and sympathy, so much the more as They 
see in this Resolution itself and in the debates, 
which preceded it a sign of willingness on the 
part of the United States Govermnent for a 
more extensive consideration of the two debt 
agreements to which the Resolution refers. 

Under these circumstances and taking into 
consideration the present difficulties confronting 
Finland, my Government most gratefully ac- 
cepts the offer contained in the said Resolution. 
In consequence of the aforesaid I have the 
honor, under instructions from my Government, 
most respectfully to inform Your Excellency 
that my Government is ready to enter into an 
agreement for (he postponement of the ijayment 



l>KCKMIiKK 7, 1!I4() 



503 



of anioiiiits j)ayal)l(' by Finland In I hi' United 
States on December 15th, 1940, as provided for 
in the Piihlir Resohition No. 84. 
Atrept [i'ic.] H. J. Procopk 



NOVE.MBEU 29, 1!)4() 

Tlie Honorable Hjalmar J. Procopk, 

Minisfer of Finland. 
Sir: 

I have tiic honor ti) acknowledfre the receipt 
of yonr note of November 2<l, 1940 in wliich you 



refer to Pnblic Ki'solu(i(in No. 84, apjjroved 
June 15, 1940, and inform me that your Govern- 
ment is ivady to enter into an ajrreement for the 
jMhStponement of the payment of amounts pay- 
able by Finland to the United States on Decem- 
l)er 15. 1940, as provided for in tlic said Public 
Resolution No. 84. 

I have tran.^mitted this information to the 
Secretary of the Treasury, and shall be <rlad 
to make a further reply to your conuuunication 
in due course. 

Accept [etc.] Cordell Hull 



AID TO GREECE 



[iti'lojised to the press l>ereiiiber 71 

The texts of a messa<;:e from the Kin;: of 
(ireece, (Jeorfie II, to President Koosexflt ami 
tile hitter's reply are as follows: 

"Rov.\L Greek Legation, 
WAsniNtiTON, December 3, lOJfO. 

"'i'o the PHEsn)KNT oK THE UnITED St.\TES : 

"III this iiiim- in which my country is en- 
;ra^cd in a hard and unequal strug{i;le, forced 
upon it by an enemy whose actions are moti- 
vated by cruelty and violence, I am deeply 
moved by the warm sympathy and the keen 
interest manifested by the great Nation whose 
destinies you guide. 

•'The noble .Vmerican jjcople have often in 
the past rendered assistanci; to my country in 
ail critical moments of its histoi-y, and the 
recent organization of the (Jreek War Relief 
Association is further proof that phiiheilenism 
contimu's to inspire Americans of today in 
their lofty aims. 

"(iiiardinns across the seas id' the ideals for 
whicii throiiglioiit the centuries Greeks have 
lived and died, Americans today are aware 
that the (ireek nation is again fighting for 
tlie jirinciples of justice, truth and liberty, 
without which life for us is inconceivable. 

"T wish to assure you that with the help of 
the .Mmighty, we will march forward until our 



sacred struggle is crowned with success. .\11 
moral and material assistance will strengthen 
the heroic Greek army and will bring it nearer 
to victory. 



Georoe II 



R" 



"Dece-mukr ."•, 1940. 
'■lli> .Majesty Georoe II, 
King of Greece. 

''I thank Your Majesty for your friendly 
message which comes at a time when all free 
peoples are deeply impressed by the courage 
and steadfastness of the Greek nation. 

"The Americtui Red Cross lias already sent 
siib.stantial amounts of funds and supplies for 
the relief of suffering in your country and I 
am sure that my countrymen will give gen- 
erously to the new organizations which are 
being established for tlie same purpose. 

"As Your Majesty knows, it is the settled 
policy of the United States (ioveriiment to ex- 
tend aid to those governments and |)eoples who 
defend themselves against aggression. I as- 
siu-e Your Majesty that steps are being taken 
to extend such aid to Greece which is defend- 
ing itself so valiantly. 

Fraxklin D. Roose\-elt"' 



504 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTJLI^TIN 



DETENTION BY GERMAN POLICE OF CLERK IN AMERICAN EMBASSY 

IN PARIS 



[Released to the press December 6] 

The Department of State has received a re- 
port from the American Embassy in Paris con- 
cerning the detention by German police of Mrs. 
Elizabeth Deegan, a clerk in the American Em- 
bassy. Paris is under a military government. 

On the morning of December 1, two German 
civilians, presumably members of the German 
secret police, called at the apartment of Mrs. 
Deegan and invited her to go to the Cherche 
Midi prison to visit one or more British pris- 
oners. This was the second time within a week 
that Mrs. Deegan had been invited by the Ger- 
man authorities to visit acquaintances at the 
Cherche Midi prison. On December 1, she ac- 
companied the officers. Later in the day she 
returned under escort to her apartment to ob- 
tain warm clothing. In the evening a friend 



of hers received a message from an unspecified 
source that she was comfortably lodged and that 
while it would be impossible for her to be at 
the Embassy for work on December 2, she 
would doubtless report for duty on December 3. 

Mrs. Deegan did not report for work on the 
morning of December 3. 

Appropriate action is being taken by the 
American Embassy in Paris. 

[Ueleased to the press December 7] 

The American Charge d'Affaires in Paris, 
Mr. Maynard B. Barnes, reported under date of 
December 6, 1940 that Mrs. Elizabeth Deegan 
was in a small private hotel where she was still 
held by the German authorities. She was well 
treated and was in good health. The Charge 
d'Affaires was hopeful that she would be 
released shortly. 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 



[Released to the press December 2] 

The following tabulation showsl contribu- 
tions collected and disbursed during the period 
December 6, 1939, through October 31, 1940, 
as shown in the reports submitted by persons 
and organizations registered with the Secre- 
tary of State for the solicitation and collection 
of contributions to be used for relief in bellis- 
erent countries, in confoi-mity with the regu- 
lations issued pursuant to section 8 of the act 
of November 4, 1939, as made effective by the 
President's proclamation of the same date. 

This tabulation has reference only to contri- 
butions solicited and collected for relief in 
belligerent countries (France; Germany; Po- 
land; the United Kingdom, India, Australia, 
Canada, New Zealand, and the Union of South 
Africa; Norway; Belgium; Luxemburg; the 
Netherlands; and Italy) or for the relief of 



refugees driven out of these countries by the 
present war. The statistics set forth in the 
tabulation do not include information regard- 
ing relief activities which a number of organi- 
zations registered with the Secretary of State 
may be cari-ying on in non-belligerent coun- 
tries, but for which registration is not re- 
quired under the Neutrality Act of 1939. 

The American National Red Cross is re- 
quired by law to submit to the Secretary of 
War for audit "a full, complete, and itemized 
report of receipts and expenditures of what- 
ever kind". In order to avoid an unnecessary 
duplication of work, this organization is not 
required to conform to the provisions of the 
regulations governing the solicitation and col- 
lection of contributions for relief in belligerent 
countries, and the tabulation does not, there- 
fore, include information in regard to its 
activities. 



DEOEMBEB 7, 194 



505 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds re- 
ceived 



I Unexpended 
I [ Funds spent balance as of 

Funds spent ' fur adminls- Oct. 31, I'MO, 



for relief in 

countries 

named 



tration. pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



including 
cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

band 



Estimated ' Estimated 
value of con- value of 
tributions in j contribu- 



Icind sent to 

countries 

named 



tions in 
kind now 
on band 



Acci6n Dem6crata Espaflola, San Francisco, Calif., Mar. 29, 

1940. France 

Allied Relief Ball. Inc., New York, N. Y., Apr. 4, 1940. Great 

Britain and France 

Allied Kellcl Fund, New York, N. Y., June 4, 1940. United 

Kingdom, France, Belgium, tbe Netherlands, and Norway 

American Aid lor German War Prisoners, Buffalo, N. Y., Sept. 

27, 1940. Canada 

American .Association for Assistance to French Artists, 

Inc., New York, N. Y., Jan. 3, 1940. France 

American Association of University Women, Washington, D. C, 

May 3, 1940. France and Great Britain 

American Auxiliary Committee de I'Unlon des Femmes dc 

France, New York, N. Y., Nov. 8, 1939. France and Great 

Britain 

American Board of Missions to tbe Jews, Inc., Brooklyn, N. Y., 

July 5, 1940. France, Belgium, and Germany 

American Civilian Volunteers, New York, N. Y., May 27, 1940. 

Franco 

American Committee for Christian Refugees, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Sept. 26. 1939. Germany and France 

American Committee for tbe German Relief Fund, Inc., New 

York, N. Y., Mar. 27, 1940. Germany, Poland, and Canada.. 
American Committee for the Polish Ambulance Fund, Chicago, 

111., Feb. 12. 1940. France and Poland 

American Dental Ambulance Committee, New York, N. Y., 

Mar. 12. 1940. United Kingdom... 

American Employment tor General Relief, Inc., New York, 

N. Y, May 1, 1910. England, France, Norway, Poland, Bel- 
gium, Luxemburg, and the Netherlands 

A nuTican Federation for Polish Jews, Inc., New York, N. Y. , 

Sept. 14. 1939. Poland 

American Field Hospital Corps. New York. N. Y., Dec. 12, 1939. 

France, Belgium, Holland, and England 

American Field Service, New York, N. Y., Sept. 27, 1939. France, 

Great Britain, and British East Africa 

American and French Students' Correspondence Exchange, New 

York, N. Y., Dec. 20, 1939. France and England 

.\merican-French War Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 14, 

1939. France and Great Britain 

American Friends of Britain, Inc., New York, N. Y., Aug. 30. 

1940. Great Britain 

American Friends of Czechoslovakia, New York, N. Y., Nov. 2, 

1939. Great Britain, France, and Bohemia-Moravia 

American Friends of the Daily Sketch War Relief Fimd, New 

York, N. Y., Dec. 1, 1939. Great Britain 

American Friends of France, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 12, 

1939. France -.- 

American Friends of a Jewish Palestine, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

May 9, 1940. Palestine, Germany, Poland, France, and United 

Kingdom... 

American Friends Service Committee, Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 

9, 1939. United Kingdom, Poland, Germany, France, Norway, 

Belgium, the Netherlands, and Italy 

The .\merican Fund for Breton Relief, New York, N. Y., Oct. 31, 

1939. Franceand England 

American Fund for French Wounded, Inc., Boston, Mass., Jan. 

3. 1940. France and England 

American Fund for Wounded in France, Inc., Worcester, Mass., 

Dec. 15. 1939. France... 

American-German Aid Society, Los Angeles, Calif., Nov. 15, 1939. 

Germany and Canada _. , 

279157 — JO 3 



$308.19 

82,696.35 

1, 309, 305. 13 

None 

13, 445. 26 

10. 246. 85 

20,675.65 
2,220.96 
None 
11,801.86 
38,502.89 
30,793.69 
3,239.52 

2,954.60 

6,2M.30 
223, SOI. 47 
319, 728. 57 

7,428.02 
43,522.04 

4,193.07 
27,201.92 

2,77L95 
333,388.18 

4, 782. 84 

95,883.03 
6,286.05 

17, 655. 18 
200.00 
4,069.50 



$126.00 

38, 101 00 

860, 272. 38 

None 

8,628.77 

4, 277. 50 

11,693.70 
2,194.60 
None 
11,80L88 
28,000.00 
26,243.20 
3,133.02 

None 

6, 020. 76 

105,611.64 

280,688.04 

3,324.85 

26,930.89 

2, 460.0* 

22,084.12 

2, 357. 00 

168,180.94 

1, 927. 02 

89, 329. 77 
3, 786. 60 

11,694.77 

None 

3,000.00 



$55.51 

12,731.96 

79,960.66 

None 

3, 271. 16 

549.23 

2,493.40 
26.36 
None 
None 
7,258.01 
2,186.63 
101.60 

2,160.03 

376. 14 

19, 712. 64 

15, 192. 32 

1,116.95 

7, 405. 71 

1,064.97 

4,473.37 

None 

32,583.44 

2,866.82 

6,553.28 
368.09 
617.42 
None 

1,022.65 



$127.68 

1,860.39 

369, 072. 09 

None 

1,645.33 

5,419.12 

6,488.55 

None 

None 

None 

3,244.88 

2,363.86 

5.00 

794.47 

847.41 

98, 177. 19 

43, 948. 21 

2,984.22 

9, 186. 44 

678.10 

644.43 

414.95 

142, 623. 80 

None 

None 

1,111.46 

5, 242. 99 

200.00 

46.85 



None 
None 
$64, 271. 98 
None 
1, 605.16 
None 

4,93«.&1 
None 
None 
None 
None 
471.00 
None 

None 
7,651.43 
1,600.00 

None 

None 
49,753.00 

None 
19,240.00 

None 
11,256.11 

None 

14.512.17 

4,911.60 

10, 627. 90 

None 

None 



None 
None 
$9. 701. 05 
None 
None 
None 

673.10 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 

1, 194. 20 
None 
None 

1, 568. 20 
None 
None 
None 

8, 648. 85 

None 

None 
None 
618.66 
None 
None 



50G 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date ot registratiOQ, and 
destination of contributions 



The American Hospital in Britain, Limited, New York, N. Y., 

July 24, 1940. Great Britain 

The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, Inc., New 
York, N. Y., Sept. 29, 1939. United Kingdom, Poland, Ger- 
many, France, Norway, Belgium, Luxembiu-g, and the Nether- 
lands 

American McAU Association, New York, N. Y., Jan. 3, 1940. 

England - - -- --- 

American-Polish National Council, Chicago, 111., Au?. 14, 1940. 

Poland -- 

American War Godmothers, Pittsburgh, Pa., Mar. 6, 1940. 

France - 

American Women's Hospitals, New York, N. Y., Sept. 14, 1939. 

France and England 

American Women's Unit for War Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Jan. 15, 1940. France..-. 

American Women's Voluntary Services, Inc., New York. N. Y., 

Feb. 13, 1940. England 

Les Amis de la France i Puerto Rico, San Juan, P. R., Dec. 20, 

1939. France - , 

Les AmitiSs Ffminines de la France, New York, N. Y., Dec. 19, 

1939. France and England 

Les Anciens Combattants Fran^ais de la Grande Guerre, San 

Francisco, Calif., Oct. 26, 1939. France 

Anthracite Relief Committee, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Sept. 8, 1939 

Poland -- 

Anzac War Relief Fund, New York, N. Y., May 23, 1940. Aus- 
tralia and New Zealand 

Elizabeth Arden Employees Association, New York, N. Y., 

Oct. 22, 1940.<" Great Britain 

Associated Polish Societies Relief Committee of Webster, Mass., 

Webster, Mass., Sept. 21, 1939. Poland _... 

Associated Polish Societies' Relief Committee of Worcester, 

Mass., Worcester, Mass., Sept. 14, 1939. Poland.. 

Association of Former Juniors in France of Smith College, New 

York, N. Y., Dec. 18, 1939. i' France. 

Association of Former Russian Naval Officers in America, New 

York, N. Y., Feb. 21, 1940. France 

Association of Joint Polish-American Societies of Chelsea, Mass., 

Chelsea, Mass., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland 

L'Atelier, San Francisco, Calif., Jan, 29, 1940. France 

Mrs. Mark Baldwin, New York, N. Y., Mar. 4, 1940. France — 
Basque Delegation in the United States of America, New York, 

N. Y., Dec. 19, 1939. France _ 

Belgian Relief Fund, Inc., Now York, N. Y., June 14, 1940. 

Belgium, France, and England _ 

Belgian Relief of Southern California. Los Angeles, Calif., May 

27, 1940. Belgium, France, and Great Britain 

Belgian War Relief Fund, Manila, P. I., June 7, 1940." Belgium.. 
The Benedict Bureau Unit, Inc., New York, N. Y., Nov. 29, 

1939. France 

Bethel Mission of Eastern Europe, Minneapolis, Minn., Nov. 

27, 1939. Poland..- 

Bishops' Committee for Polish Relief, Washington, D. C, Dec. 

19, 1939. Poland... 

Board of National Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the 

United States of America, New York, N. Y., Sept. 26, 1939. 

Great Britain, France, and Germany 

British-American .\mbulance Corps, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

June 11, 1940. England and France 



Funds re- 
received 



$5, 345. 00 

2. 664. 254. 62 

776. 07 

3, 186. 54 

1, 080. 22 
3, 727. 76 

2, 460. 80 
21. 806. 14 
10, 920. 68 

1, 310. 26 
20, 760. 55 
10, 827. 14 

8, 937. 36 
11,347.03 

2, 829. 27 
9, 985. 85 

273.50 

198. 91 

2, 087. 08 

13, 267. 69 

1.149.91 

2, 205. 13 

23. 963. 76 

5. 369. 28 
1,682.90 

5,481.17 

11,, 594. 80 

384, 498. 07 

6,312.83 
565, 896. 15 






Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



None 

$2, 436, 028. 51 

542. 45 
1,514.30 

180. 07 
3, 008. 40 
1. 182. 73 
9.421.74 
0, 500. 00 

514. 38 
10, 696. 33 
7, 000. 00 

5, 566. 20 
None 

2, 600. 00 

6, 768. 45 
225.00 
133. 30 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



1,000.00 


8, 273. 98 


992. 00 


975. 0(1 


7, 839. 00 


2, 430. 60 


None 


846. 74 


8, 280. 40 


166,324.31 


5, 270. 50 


187, 709. 22 



None 

$228,226.11 

None 

95. 18 

269. 68 

57. 62 

664. 33 

11,531.86 

299.93 

349. 62 

fi.54. 41 

288. 45 

424. 89 

1, 329. 96 

7. .50 

453. 10 

None 

8.41 

85.67 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Oct. 31. 1940, 

including 

cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

hand 



735. 92 


97.16 


205.67 


10,542.01 


1,'J45. 17 


2.50 


1,007.89 


3,057.85 


55.23 


738. 01 


53, 534. 44 



$5, 345. 00 

None 
233. 62 

1.577.06 
630. 57 
601. 74 
613. 74 
852. 54 

4, 120 75 
446.26 

9.415.81 

3, 538. 69 
2, 946. 27 

10,017.07 
221.77 

2, 766. 30 

48.50 
67.20 

1.001.41 

4, 257. 79 

60.75 

1, 024. 46 

5, 582. 76 

992. 51 
1, 680. 40 

3, 626. 54 
256. 55 

218,118.53 

304. 32 
324, 652. 49 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



None 

$51.00 

1,600.00 

None 

None 

None 

821.90 

20, 466. 46 

650. 00 

29(1, 50 

2, 826. .56 

None 

None 

None 

None 

1, 430. 00 

None 

None 

None 

1, 565. 88 

30.00 

None 

9, .566. 00 

33, 182. 50 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 



Estimated 
value of 
contribu- 
tions in 
kind now 
on hand 



None 

$100. 00 

None 

2.45 

None 

17.05 

None 

107, 77 

None 

295. 00 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
847.00 
None 

None 

5. 628. 00 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 



» The registration of this organization was revoked on Oct. 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 
* No report for the month of October hgs been received from this organization. 



DECEMBER 7, 1940 

Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



507 



Name of registrant, location, date of reclslratlon. and 
destination of contributions 


Funds re- 
ceived 


Funds spent 

for relief i;i 

countries 

named 


Funds spent 
for admmLs- 
tration. pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Oct. 31. 1940. 

including 
cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of 

contribu- 
tions Id 

kind now 
on band 


Brltlsh-AmcricaD CoiDfort League, Quiocy, Mass., Feb. 21, 1040. 
£nglaD<l ... 


$1,500.38 

27,626.23 

2,795.00 

86.771.51 

33.727.48 

272,00213 

151.51 

1,318,101.00 

326.867.54 
477.64 

407.22 

1.074.28 

1. 177.36 

15, 274. 29 

36,406.87 

707.00 

2.834.83 
1,46a 72 

2,M9.45 

6.050.42 

436,812.22 

8,790.02 

4,923.40 
21,699.77 

58,386.52 

4.523.03 ! 


$528.70 

21,394.40 

25.00 

61.851.08 

31. 238. 24 

246.103.01 

139.00 

630.30^88 

104. 183. 65 
300.30 

None 

None 

1.014.50 

8.2M.00 

23.436.35 

500.00 

1.790.90 
1.300.75 

658.28 

5.985.46 

380.353.87 

4.165.00 

3.365.63 
14,669.71 

39,058.76 

2,50a00 


$207.84 

1,899.34 

1.944.18 

2. 817. 17 

705.58 

15.801.27 

0.20 

119,352 54 

76,457 80 
164.57 

None 

None 

135.41 

3.029.57 

lZ9;t).52 

126.82 

42.42 
11.65 

560.24 

661.52 

51.4-a31 

2.743.33 

None 
2,452 82 

6. 79a 03 

1. 80S. 60 


$772. 84 

4,332 40 

826.72 

22.103.26 

1.783.66 

10.907.85 

3.31 

568.445.58 

146,226.09 
12 77 

407.22 

1,074.25 

27. 45 

4, 02a 72 

None 

80.18 

1,001.51 
138.32 

1,330.93 

31Z44 

4,988.04 

1.882.59 

1. 557. 77 
4.577.24 

12,537.73 

217. 43 


None 

$1,835.00 

6.823.00 

47,581.09 

280.12 

69.079.75 

None 

331,374.26 

239. 170. 24 
None 

None 

3.820.00 

Noae 

None 

None 

None 

None 
1,900.00 

2,775.00 

1,677.30 

1,500.00 

None 

None 
4,429.50 

2,060.00 

None 




Britlsh-.\iiK'rican War Relief Association, Seattle, Wash., Nov. 


$602 65 


British Sailors' Book and Uelicf Society, New York, N. Y., May 
2. 1940. Bermuda. Canada, and the British West Indies 

British War Relief Associatiun of .N'orthern California. San FraD- 
Cisco. Calif. Oct. 20. 1939. Oreat Britain and France 


63.75 
1,482 37 


The BrIlLsh War Relief Association of the Philippines, Manila, 
P. I.. .\pr 11.1940.* All iH'liiRorent countries . 


None 


The British War Relief Association of Suuthcra California, Los 
AnBele.". Call!.. Dec. 8. 1939. Oreat Britain 


672 00 


British War Relief Fund, Dayton, Ohio, Sept. 12, 1040. Great 
Britain 


None 


British War Relief Society. Inc.. New York. N. Y.. Dee. 4. 1939. 
Oreat Britain. Newfoundland, and British East Africa . 


4 000 00 


Bundles lor Britain. New York. N. Y., Dec. 28, 1939. Great 
Britain and Dominions 


25. 615 75 


Caledonian Cluh of Idaho, Boi.se. Idaho. Jan. 25. 1040. Scotland. 

Canadian Women's Club of New York City. Inc., New York. 
N. Y., Oct. 23, 1910. Great Britain, Canada, and Newfound- 
land 


None 


Calhoiio Medical Mission Board, Inc., New York, N. Y., Jan. 
17, 1940. India, Australia, Canada. New Zealand, and the 


700.00 


The Catholic Student War Relief of Va\ Romana. Washington. 

D. C. Dec. 13, 1939. Poland. Franc. Oeriiiany. and Ureal 

Britain 

Central Bureau for the Relief of the Evangelical Churches of 

Europe. New York, N. Y., May 14. 1940. All belligerent 

countries 


None 

None 


Central Committee Kncsseth Israel, New York, N. Y., Oct. 27, 


None 


Central Committee for Polish Relief, Toledo, Ohio, Feb. 29, 1040. 
Poland -— . 


Xooe 


Central Council of Polish Organitations, New Castle, Pa., Nov. 




Centrala Passaic N J Oct 12. Iy39 Poland 


NODO 


Ccrcl.) Francals de Seattle, Seattle. Wash., Nov. 2. 1939. France 
and Ori'at Britain 


None 


Chester (Delaware County. Pa.) Polish Relief Committee, Ches- 


None 


Commiiision lor Polish Relief. Inc.. .Vew York, N. Y., Sept. 12, 
1939 J Poland 


None 


The Commission for Relief in Belgium. Inc., New York, N. Y., 


None 


Commit lee for Aid to Children of Mobilited Men of the XX" 
Arrondis-semcnt of Paris. New York, N. Y.. Jan. 15, 1940. 
France . 


None 


Committee for FreDch-American Wives, New York, N. Y., Nov. 


487.00 


Committee of Mercy. Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 16, 1930. 
France. Oreat BritaiD, Norway, Belgium, the Netherlands, 


None 


Committee for Relief in -Allied Countries. Washington. D. C. 
Feb. 2. 1940. France. Great Britain. Poland. Norway. Bel- 
gium, Luxemburg, and the Netherlands 


None 



' No reports for the months of -August. September, and October have bccD received from this organization. 

''This registrant serves primarily as a clearinehouse for the distribution abroad of contributions received from other registrants; these receipts and dis- 
bursements are not included in the figures here given, since they are shown elsewhere in this tabulation following the names of the original collecting registrants. 



508 



BEPABTMECNT OF STATE BXILLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date ef registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds re- 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration , pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Oct. 31, 1940, 

including 
cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of 

contribu- 
tions in 

kind now 
on hand 


Committee for the Relief of Poland, Seattle, Wash., Mov. 24, 
1939. Poland 


$2, 426. 23 

197. 00 

12, 662. 75 

2, 058. 30 

42, 504. 72 
6, 332. 35 

51, 161. 44 

92, 629. 25 

276.00 

1, 148. 63 

7,994.07 

5, 336. 58 

10, 754. 18 

690. 21 

441,603.25 

111,967.62 

6, 760. 22 

636. 30 

252. 60 

3, 709. 65 

866.26 

41, 146. 62 

None 

6, 553. 96 
822. 81 

14, 664. SO 

950. 00 

13,415.87 

2, 445. 50 
1, 421. 96 


$2, 162. 72 

197.00 

4.547.24 

1,687.19 

30,648.62 
None 

10. 196. 65 

77, 663. 98 

None 

None 

4, 450. 93 

1, 892. 49 

8, 086. 09 

531. 21 

361.514.52 

67,091.07 

4, 175. 20 

None 

None 

1, 648. 07 

332.90 

15, 560. 38 

None 

None 
407. 75 

3, 843. 46 

None 

1,877.17 

1, 600. 00 
680.00 


$265. 71 
None 
61.89 
371.11 

7,796.63 
2, 289. 69 

9, 532. IS 

3,811.74 

None 

100.09 

1,450.62 

413.66 

481.63 

None 

66, 801. 72 

23, 536. 70 

2, 5S5. 02 

None 

203.90 

239.70 

125. 96 

5. 553. 93 

None 

10.00 
171.66 

4, 276. 32 

None 

6, 3S0. 91 

160.00 
92.26 


$7.80 

None 

8,063.62 

None 

4, 169. 67 
3,042.76 

31, 433. 71 

11,263.53 

275. 00 

1,048.54 

2. 092. 62 

3. 030. 64 
2, 186. 56 

59.00 

13, 187. 01 

31, 339. 85 
None 
636.30 

48.70 

1,921.78 

407. 40 

20,031.31 

None 

6, 543, 96 
243. 40 

6, 646. 02 

950. 00 

6,161.79 

785. 60 
649.69 


None 

None 

$13, 900. 00 

None 

9,852.48 
None 

None 

63,087.97 

None 

None 

3,200.00 

277.55 

864. 70 

None 

None 

None 
None 
None 

None 

29. 679. 06 

631, 17 

195, 47 

None 

None 
None 

21. 077. 07 

None 

None 

None 
None 




Committee Representing Polish Organizations and Polish People 
in Perry, New York, Perry, N. Y., Oct. 23, 1939. Poland 

Czechoslovak Relief, Chicago, III., July 26, 1940. Czechoslo- 
vakia, Great Britain and Dominions. France, and Belgium 

District of Columbia Federation of Women's Clubs, Washmgton, 
D. C, Aug. 14, 1940. Great Britain- 


None 
None 


The Emergency Aid of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 
13, 1939. Great Britain, France, Norway, Belgium, Luxem- 
burg, and the Netherlands - . . - 




Emergency Relief Committee for Kolbuseowa, New York, N. Y., 
Mar. 13, 1940. Poland 

Emergency Rescue Committee, New York, N. Y., Aug. 3, 1940. 
France, United Kingdom, Belgium, Norway, and the Nether- 
lands . - 


None 
None 


English-Speaking Union of the United States, New York, N. Y., 
Dec 26, 1939 Great Britain, Canada, and France 


$442 30 


Erste Pinchover Kranken Unterstuzungs Verein, Inc., Erooklyn, 
N. Y., Apr. 22, 1940. Poland 




The Fall River British War Relief Society, Fall River, Mass., 
Sept. 26, 1940. Great Britain 




Federated Council of Polish Societies of Grand Rapids, Michigan 
Grand Rapids, Mich., Sept 15,1939. Poland 

Federation of Franco-Belgian Clubs of Rhode Island, Woon- 
socket, R. I., Nov. 15. 1939. France and England -. 


100.00 
229 63 


Federation of French Veterans of the Great War, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Oct. 11, 1939. France 


200 00 


Fellowship of Reconciliation, New York, N. Y., Jan. 20, 1940. 




Fortra, Incorporated, New York, N. Y., Mar. 7. 1940. Germany 
and Poland 


None 


Foster Parents' Plan for War Children, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 21. 1939. France 




Foyers du Soldat. New York, N. Y., Mar. 2, 1940.' France 

Franco-American Federation, Salem. Mass., July 9, 1940. France- 
French Colonies War Relief Committee (formerly Mutual 

Society of French Colonials, Inc.), New York, N. Y., Aug. 20, 

1940. France 


None 
None 

None 


French Committee for Relief in France, Detroit, Mich., Oct. 17, 
1939. France and Great Britain 


615. 45 


French Relief Association, Kansas City, Mo., Feb. 3, 1940. 
France 


1, 136. 83 


French War Relief, Inc., Los Angeles, Calif., Nov. 16. 1939. 
France 


83 20 


French War Relief Fund of Nevada, Reno, Nev., June 21, 1940. 
France 


None 


French War Relief Fund of the Philippines, Manila, P. I., May 1 , 
1940.' France 


None 


French War Veterans, Los Angeles, Calif., Dec. 5, 1939. France... 
Friends of Children, Inc., New York, N. Y., June 13, 1910. Great 


None 


Friends of Dover, England Fund, Dover, N. H., Oct. 25, 1940. 




The Friends of Israel Refugee Relief Committee, Incorporated, 
Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 23, 1939. Canada, France, and England. 
The Friends of Normandy, New York, N. Y., Dec. 18, 1939. 


None 


Friends of Poland, Chicago, 111., Dec. 6, 1939. Poland 


None 



• The registration of this organization was revoked on Oct. 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 
/ No report for the month of October has been received from this organization. 



DECEMBEU 7, 194 



509 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of re^tratiOD, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds re- 
ceived 


Fimds spent 

for relief In 

coimtries 

named 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Oct. 31, 1940, 

Including 
cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of 

contribu- 
tions in 

kind now 
on hand 


Fund for the Relief of Men of Letters and Scientists of Russia, 














New York, N. Y., Apr. 29, 1940. France, Cicchoslovakla, and 














Poland 


$499.53 


$128. 37 


$43.71 


$327.46 


None 


None 


Funds for Franco, Inc., New York, N. Y., Aug. 14. 1940. France. , 


9,908.84 


1,000.00 


5, 152. 18 


3,756.66 


None 


None 


General Gustav Orlicz Dreszer Foundation for Aid to Polish 














Children, Washington, D. C, Nov. 3. 1939. Poland 


89145 


400.00 


325.04 


169. 41 


None 


None 


Ooncrul Taufllleb Memorial Relief Committee for France, Santa 














Barbara, Calif., Nov. 17, 1939. France and England- 


2, 424. 01 


1,726.40 


52.10 


645.51 


$80.00 


None 


German-.\mcrican Relief Committee for Victims of Fascism, Now 














York, N. Y., Apr. 18, 1940. France and Great Britain 


2,400.34 


805.23 


712.12 


882.99 


None 


None 


Mrs. George GillUand, New York, N. Y., Aug. 10, 1940. North- 














ern Ireland 


159.25 


159.25 


None 


None 


None 


None 


Golden Rule Foundation, New York, N. Y., Nov. 2, 1839. Po- 




land and Palestine 


82.00 


8zao 


None 


None 


None 


None 


Grand Duke Vladimir Benevolent Fund Association, New York, 




N. Y., Jan. 8, 1940. France 


542.88 


370.79 


29.20 


142L89 


None 


None 


Grand I-odge, Daughters of Scotia, Hartford, Conn., Feb. 16, 




1940. Scotland 


13,5)1.71 


11,523.95 


None 


2,017.76 


Nona 


None 


Great Lakes Command, Canadian Legion of the British Empire 














Service League, Detroit, Mich., July 6, 1940. Great Britain 














and Canada - 


1,399.83 


101.92 


17.40 


1,280.51 


None 


None 


Greater New Bedford British War Relief Corps, New Bedford, 




Mass., Dec. 19, 1939. Great Britain 


8,243.12 


6,357.68 


392.72 


1,492.72 


779.93 


None 


Margaret-Greble Orccnough (Mrs. Carroll Greenough), Wash- 




ington. D. C, Nov. 21, 1939.' Franco 


1,073.00 


445.00 


None 


628.00 


None 


None 


llada,<»ah. Inc., New York, N. Y., Nov. 15, 1939.' Palestine. ... 


936,818.10 


650.956.39 


32,030.67 


24, 831. W 


66,078.31 


None 


Uamburg-Dremen Steamship Agency, Inc., New York, N. Y., 














Mar. 21, 1940. Germany and Poland 


137, 050. 84 


109, 595. 16 


32,609.23 


None 


None 


None 


Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., Aug. 30, 1940. Great 














Britain 


54,487.06 


None 


2; 917. 20 


61,569.86 


None 


None 


Hebrew-Christian Alliance of America, Chicago, HI., Jan. 3, 1940. 




England, Germany and Poland - 


1,781.89 


1,775.00 


6.89 


None 


None 


None 


A. Seymour Houghton, Jr., (( al.. New York, N. Y., Nov. 27, 1939. 














France.. 


18,542.51 


6,677.09 


144.21 


11,721.21 


757.30 


None 


Humanitarian Work Committee, Glen Cove, N. Y., Sept. 30, 




1839. Poland 


3,539.58 


2,910.00 


62.38 


667.20 


185.00 


None 


Independent British War Relief Society of Rhode Island, Green- 




wood, R. I., June 14, 1940. Great Britain 


1,716.94 


283.05 


19.60 


1,414.29 


250.00 


None 


Independent Rinsker Aid Association, Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan. 3, 




1940. Poland 


697.30 


None 


None 


697.30 


None 


None 


International Children's Relief Association, New York, N. Y., 




Oct. 1, 1940. Great Britain... 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


International Committee of Young Men's Christian Associations, 




New York, N. Y., Sept. 22, 19.39. All belligerent countries 


47,387.99 


30,833.50 


3, 542. 87 


13,011.62 


None 


None 
















Wheeling. W. Va., July 5, 1940. Poland, Czechoslovakia, Nor- 














way, Belgium, France, and the Netherlands 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


International Relief Association for Victims of Fascism, New 














York, N. Y., Sept. 25, 1939. France, England, and Germany.. 


10,571.49 


7, 270. 60 


4,145.03 


None 


2,020.00 


None 


Isthmian Pro-British Aid Committee, Ancon. C. Z., Sept. 20, 














1940. England -. 


31.00 


None 


1.20 


29.80 


None 


None 


Joint Committee of the United Scottish Clans of Greater New 














York and New Jersey, Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan. 30, 1940. Scot- 














land - 


6,506.58 


3,501.00 


1,397.21 


1,608.37 


None 


None 


Junior Relief Group of Texas, Houston, Tex., May 29, 1940. 




United Kingdom, France. Netherlands, Belgium, and Norway. 


11.842.10 


10,000.00 


1,686.08 


156.02 


None 


None 


Marthe Th. Kahn, New York, N. Y.. Apr. 16. 1940. France.-. 


227.25 


25.00 


8.56 


193.69 


None 


None 


The Kindergarten Unit, Inc., Norwalk, Conn., Oct. 3, 1939. 




























Zealand.... __ 


1, 222. 21 


892.85 


329.36 


None 


None 


Nona 



• The registration of this organization was revoked on Sept. 30, 1940, at the request of registrant. 
» No report for the month of October has been received from this organization. 



510 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds re- 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Oct. 31, 1940, 

including 
cost of goods 

purchased 

and still on 

hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of 

contribu- 
tions in 

kind now 
on hand 


The Kosciuszlto Foundation, Inc., New Yorli, N. Y., May 24, 














1940. Poland 


$4, 133. 12 


$4, 200. 00 


$376. 25 


None 


None 


None 


Der Kyffhaeuserbund, League of German War Veterans in 














U. S. A., Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 27, 1939. Poland, Qermany, 














and Canada 


46, 943. 06 


40, 697. 00 


4, 487. 27 


$1, 76S. 79 


$560. 00 


None 


Lackawanna County Committee for Polish Relief, Scranton, Pa., 














Sept. 15. 1939. Poland 


8,689.66 


7, 226. 56 


831.80 


632. 30 


None 


None 


Ladies Auxiliary of the Providence Branch of the Federation of 




the Italian World War Veterans in the United States, Provi- 














dence. R. I., Oct. 1, 1940. Italy- _ 


508. 75 


488,35 


None 


20.40 


None 


None 


Lafayette Fund, New York, N. Y., Jan. 2, 1940.' France 


2, 027. 50 


2, 019. 91 


7.59 


None 


None 


None 


LaFayette Preventorium, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 21, 1939. 














France --. - -. 


19, 920. 47 


8, 697. 13 


4, 199. 11 


7, 124. 23 


None 


None 


La France Post, American Legion, New York, N. Y., Feb. 7, 1940. 














France and Great Britain 


1,585.32 


925. 00 


385. 79 


274, 53 


None 


None 


Mrs. Nancy Bartlett Laughlin, New York, N. Y., Jan. 31, 1940. 














France 


314.50 


306. 00 


None 


8.60 


None 


None 


League of American Writers, Inc., New York, N. Y., May 6, 




1940.' France, England, Poland, and Norway, 














League of Polish Societies of New Kensington, Arnold and Vicin- 














ity, New Kensington, Pa., Nov. 17, 1939. Poland 


2,058.96 


1,363.77 


78.19 


617 00 


2,400.00 


None 


Legion of Young Polish Women, Chicago, 111., Oct. 2, 1939. Po- 














land 


16, 203. 23 


9,642.00 


2, 696. 70 


3,864.47 


None 


None 


The Little House of Saint Pantaleon, Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 














30, 1939. France and England.... 


26, 007. 57 


22, 375. 14 


36.26 


2, 596. 17 


17, 483. 42 


None 


The Maple Leaf Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y., Apr. 19, 1940. 














Canada, United Kingdom, and France.. 


45, 695. 36 


8, 194. 75 


14, 829. 41 


22,671.20 


49,142.00 


.$2,ooaoo 


Massachusetts Relict Committee for Poland, Worcester, Mass., 














Nov. 9, 1939.* Poland 


5,211.50 


5, 209. 75 


1.76 


None 


None 


None 


Medical and Surgical Supply Committee of America, New York, 




N. Y., Aug. 5, 1940. Poland, Great Britain, France, Nether- 














lands, Norway, Luxemburg, and Belgium 


10, 050. 74 


458.49 


4. 766. 60 


10, 83.5. 75 


42, 192. 37 


7, 450. 00 


Mennonite Central Committee, Akron, Pa., Feb. 13, 1940. Great 














Britain, Poland, Germany, France, and Canada 


24, 199. 27 


19, 485. 40 


3, 289. 95 


1, 423. 80 


8, 663. 02 


1, 938. 60 


Methodist Committee for Overseas Relief, New York, N. Y., 














Sept. 4, 1940. France, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Norway, 














Belgium, the Netherlands, and United Kingdom 


5, 560. 40 


5.000.00 


560.40 


None 


None 


None 


Milford, Connecticut, Polish Relief Fund Committee, Milford, 














Conn., Nov. 6, 1939. Poland 


405. 33 
111.00 


350.20 
111.00 


84. 62 
None 


70.51 
None 


None 
None 


None 


Kate R. Miller, New York, N. Y., Feb. 19, 1940.' France... 


None 


The Mobile Circle for Benefit of the Royal Navy Hospital Com- 














forts Fund, Mobile, Ala., Sept. 18, 1940. British Isles 


1, 214. 36 


386. 78 


.35 


827. 23 


140.00 


None 


Monmouth War Relief, Red Bank, N. J., Sept. 12, 1940. Eng- 














land and France 


1,333.27 


87.46 


170.61 


1,069.21 


None 


None 


William Henry Mooring, Beverly Hills, Calif., Oct. 14, 1940.< 




England 


261. 42 


261.42 


None 


None 


None 


None 


The Mother Church, The First Church of Christ, Scientist, in 




Boston, U. S. A., Boston, Mass., Apr. 25, 1940. Canada, 














France, and the United Kingdom. 


157,372.41 


7,676.38 


2, 197. 81 


147, 498. 22 


4,110.30 


3, 245. 35 






N. Y., Nov. 25, 1939. France and England 


14,051.14 


6, 788. 69 


5, 346. 51 


1,915.94 


5, 408. 17 


1,414.80 


National Christian Action, Inc., New York, N. Y., May 23, 1940. 














Norway and Denmark 


1,134.31 


None 


825. 28 


309. 03 


None 


None 


Netherlands War Relief Commi'ttee, Manila, P. I., May 27, 1940.' 




Netherlands 


3,308.95 


1, 253. 87 


16 50 


2,038.58 


None 


None 


The New Canaan Workshop, New Canaan, Conn., July I, 1940. 




British Empire 


9,611.50 


7,260.00 


608, 90 


1,762.60 


1,650.00 


None 



i This organization has been requested to submit revised reports. Pending receipt of these reports, no complete figures are 
* The registration of this organization was revoked on Oct. 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 
' No report for the month of October has been received from this organization. 



available. 



DECEMBER 7, 194 

Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



511 



Name of rcgLstranl, location, date of ref^istration, and 
deslioatioD of contributions 



Funds re- 
ceived 



Funds spent 
Funds spent for admini^- 
for relief In ! tration. pub- 



countne-s 
named 



licity.alTairs, 

campaigns, 

etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
on. :ii. l!MO, 

including 
cost of goods 

purchn.sed 

and still on 

hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of 

contribu- 
tions iu 

kind now 
on hand 



New Jersey Broadcasting Corporation, Jersey City, N. J., Sept. 

13, 1939. Poland 

Nicole do Paris Relief Fund, Now York, N. Y., July 1, 1940. 

France 

North Side Polish Council Relief Committee of Milwaukee, 

Wis., Milwaukee, Wis., Dec. 6, 1939. Poland 

Norwegian Kcllcf, Inc., Chicago, 111., May 1, 1940. Norway 

Nowe-Dworor Ladies Benevolent Association, Inc., New York, 

N. Y.. Oct. 25, 1939. Poland ._ 

Nowiny Publishing .\i)ostolatc. Inc., Milwaukee, Wis., Sept. 28, 

1939. Poland 

Nowy Swiat Publishing Co., Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 11, 

1939. Poland and France _. 

Order of Scottish Clans, Boston, Mass., Jan. 2S, 1940. Scotland^. 
Over-Seas League Tobacco Fund, New York, N. Y., Aug. 19, 

1940. British Empire 

The PaclBc Steam Navigation Company, Crist5bal, C. Z., Oct. 

16, 1910. England 

Padcrewskl Fund for Polish Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., Feb. 

23, 1940. Poland 

Parcels for the Forces, New York, N. Y., Oct. 9, 1940. Great 

Britain 

The Paryskl Publishing Co., Toledo, Ohio, Sept. 15, 1939. 

Poland and Great Britain _ 

The Pawtucket and Blackstone Valley British Relief Society of 

Rhode I.sland, Pawtucket, R. I., Feb. 26, 1940. Great Britain. 
Pclham Overseas Knitting Circle, Pclham, N. Y., Oct. 17, 1940. 

Scotland 

Polish Aid Fund Committee of Federation of Elitatieth Polish 

Organisations, Elizabeth, N. J., Sept. 23. 1939. Poland 

Polish Aid Fund Committee of St. Casimir's Roman Catholic 

Church of the City of Albany, New York, Albany, N. Y., Jan. 

22, lU-lO. Poland 

Polish-American Associations of Middlesex County, New Jersey, 

Sayrevillc, N. J, Jan. 22, 1940. Poland 

Polish-American Citizens Relief Fund Committee, Shirley, 

Mass., Dec. 16, 1939. Poland 

Polish- American Council, Chicago, 111., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland. . 
Polish-American Forwarding Committee, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Mar. 28, 1940. Poland and Germany 

Polish-Ainerican Volunteer .\mbulance Section, Inc. (Pavas), 

New York, N. Y., Fob. 13, 1940. France and England 

Polish Broadcasting Corporation, New York, N. Y., Sept. 23, 

1939. Poland 

Polish Business and Professional Men's Club, Los Angeles, Calif., 

Nov. 17, 1939. Poland -. 

Polish Central Committee of New London, Connecticut, New 

London, Conn., Oct. 13, 1939 

Polish Central Council of New Haven, New Haven, Conn., 

Sept. 29, 1939. Poland 

Polish Civic League of Mercer County, Trenton, N. J., Sept. 19, 

1939. Poland 

Polish Civilian Relief Fund, Passaic, N. J., Oct. 27, 1939. Poland.. 
Polish Falcons Alliance of America, Pittsburgh, Pa., Sept. 20, 

1939. Poland 

Polish Inter-Organization "Centrala" of Waterbury, Water- 

bur>-. Conn., Feb. 28, 1940. Poland... 

Polish Literary Guild of New Britain, Connecticut, New Britain, 

Conn., Sept. 21. 1939. Poland 

Polish National Alliance of the United States of North America, 

Chicago, 111., Sept. 27, 1939. Poland 

Polish National Council of Montgomery County, Amsterdam, 

N. Y., Oct. 12, 1939. Poland - 



$1,2I0.SS 

199.00 

1, 578. 48 
371, 028. 73 

806.14 

5, 170. 21 

26,845.17 
5,080.89 

24, 915. 63 

None 

111,660.91 

S, 452. 41 

«,8M.33 

6,781.16 

587.98 

8,862.97 

2.66Z32 

1,057.05 

427.01 
435, 702. 24 

3. 198. 27 

29,120.00 

2,558.12 

474.60 

1,294.10 

3,945.26 

6,915.78 
4, 313. 67 

11,213.03 

742.25 

3.015.59 

299, 482. 37 

4,412.62 



*828.17 

None 

1, 400. 28 
None 

None 

4,589.80 

25, 677. 80 
3, 377. OO 

21, 103. 84 

None 

60,000.00 

1,405.44 

6,682.03 

3,916.56 

201.36 

7,946.85 

226.32 

800.00 

350.31 
259,303.05 

1, 817. 35 

19,769.05 

None 

314.23 

994.24 

3, 316. 65 

6,39Z86 
3,025.00 

1I,10Z23 

607.76 

2,000.00 

231,065.00 

2,910.00 



$384.38 

51.00 

19.18 
11,414.48 

141.00 

None 

103.39 
None 

3,811.79 

None 

32,416.33 

2,701.64 

None 

674.84 

15.00 

15.00 

7.00 

80.82 

21.67 
11,759.75 

3,040.80 

133.36 

35.30 

158. r 

148.57 

51.26 

1.49 
232.90 

20.00 

25.50 

13.00 

1,838.87 

97.54 



None 

$148. 00 

im. 02 
359,614.25 

665.14 

680.35 

1,064.28 
2, 303. 89 

None 

None 

19, 244. 58 

None 

184.30 

2,159.76 

371.62 

901.12 

2,429.00 

176.23 

55.03 
164, 639. 44 

None 

9, 217. 59 

2, 522. 82 

2.00 

151.29 

577. 35 

521. 43 
1,055.77 

90 80 

108.99 

1, 002. 59 

66, 578. 50 
1,405.08 



None 

None 

$1,300.00 
None 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

35.40 

None 

None 

None 

1,500.00 

1,200.00 

None 

350.00 
100, 500. 00 

None 

255.40 

None 

None 

75.00 

1,800.00 

4,000.00 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

5,000.00 



None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

$75.00 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 



512 



DEPABTMETSfT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions fob Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Polish National Council of New York, New York, N. Y., Sept. 

14, 1939. France and Poland 

The Polish Naturalization Independent Club, Worcester, Mass., 

Sept. 20, 1939. Poland-- 

Polish Prisoners of War Relief Committee, Brooklyn, N. Y., 

Sept. 14, 1940." Germany - 

Polish Relief of Carteret, New Jersey, Carteret, N. J., Oct. 11, 

1939. Poland --.. 

Polish Relief Committee of Boston, Boston, Mass., Sept. 14, 1939. 

Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Brockton, Massachusetts, Brockton, 

Mass., Sept. 25, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Cambridge, Massachusetts, Cam- 
bridge, Mass., Sept. 16, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Columbia Coimty, Hudson, N. Y., 

Mar. 15, 1940. Poland- -- - - 

Polish Relief Committee of Delaware, W