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Full text of "Department of State bulletin"

JV9 9353.1^36 



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Given By 



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35 3. i A 

THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BT T IT ¥ TET HP """ ^ ^ 




VOLUME IV • Numbers 80-105 



January 4— June 28, 194.1 




UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1941 



I pi 



poJr 

THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 



Vol. IV: No. 80- Publicatio 



JANUARY 4, 1941 

*544 



Qontents 




General : Page 

Address by the President 3 

Kemarks by Assistant Secretary Berle 8 

Loss of American nationality 9 

Statement regarding proposals by private individuals on 

international affairs 12 

American Eepublics : 

Colombian debt 12 

Suspension of tonnage duties for vessels of Uruguay ... 13 

Fishery mission to Peru 13 

Payment by Mexico under Special Claims Convention of 

1934 14 

Inter-American Development Commission : Brazilian 

Council 14 

Europe : 

Meeting of the Intergovernmental Committee on Ref- 
ugees 15 

New Year message from the King of Italy 16 

Contributions for relief in belligerent countries 16 

The Department : 

Resignation of Assistant Secretary Grady 28 

Appointment of officers 29 

The Foreign Service : 
Personnel changes 29 

Treaty Information : 
Sovereignty : 

Convention on the Provisional Administration of Eu- 
ropean Colonies and Possessions in the Americas . . 30 

[Over] 



^T OF DOCUMENTS 

JAN 16 JS4J 

Treaty Information — Continued. 

Postal : Page 

Universal Postal Convention of 1939 30 

Restriction of war : 

Convention Relating to the Treatment of Prisoners of 

War (Treaty Series No. 846) 30 

Commerce : 

Reciprocal Trade Agreement with Venezuela (Execu- 
tive Agreement Series No. 180) 31 

Nature Protection and Wildlife Preservation : 

Convention on Nature Protection and Wildlife Preser- 
vation in the Western Hemisphere 31 

Commercial Policy : 

Allocation of tariff quota on crude petroleum and fuel 
oil . 34 

Publications 34 

Regulations 35 



General 



ADDRESS BY THE PRESIDENT 1 



[Released to the press by the White House December 29] 

This is not a fireside chat on war. It is a talk 
on national security; because the nub of the 
whole purpose of your President is to keep you 
now, and your children later, and your grand- 
children much later, out of a last-ditch war for 
the preservation of American independence and 
all of the things that American independence 
means to you and to me and to ours. 

Tonight, in the presence of a world crisis, my 
mind goes back eight years ago to a night in the 
midst of a domestic crisis. It was a time when 
the wheels of American industry were grinding 
to a full stop, when the whole banking system 
of our country had ceased to function. 

I well remember that while I sat in my study 
in the White House, preparing to talk with the 
people of the United States, I had before my 
eyes the picture of all those Americans with 
whom I was talking. I saw the workmen in 
the mills, the mines, the factories; the girl be- 
hind the counter; the small shopkeeper; the 
farmer doing his spring plowing; the widows 
and the old men wondering about their life's 
savings. 

I tried to convey to the great mass of Ameri- 
can people what the banking crisis meant to 
them in their daily lives. 

Tonight, I want to do the same thing, with 
the same people, in this new crisis which faces 
America. 

We met the issue of 1933 with courage and 
realism. 



'Delivered from the White House over a Nation- 
wide network and broadcast to foreign countries over 
short wave December 29, 1040, 9 : 30 p. in. 
283652 — 11 1 



We face this new crisis — this new threat to 
the security of our Nation — with the same 
courage and realism. 

Never before since Jamestown and Plymouth 
Kock has our American civilization been in 
such danger as now. 

For, on September 27, 1940, by an agreement 
signed in Berlin, three powerful nations, two 
in Europe and one in Asia, joined themselves 
together in the threat that if the United States 
interfered with or blocked the expansion pro- 
gram of these three, nations — a program aimed 
at world control — they would unite in ultimate 
action against the United States. 

The Nazi masters of Germany have made it 
clear that they intend not only to dominate all 
life and thought in their own country, but also 
to enslave the whole of Europe, and then to use 
the resources of Europe to dominate the rest 
of the world. 

Three weeks ago their leader stated, "There 
are two worlds that stand opposed to each 
other." Then in defiant reply to his opponents, 
he said this : "Others are correct when they say : 
'With this world we cannot ever reconcile our- 
selves.' ... I can beat any other power in the 
world." So said the leader of the Nazis. 

In other words, the Axis not merely admits 
but proclaims that there can be no ultimate 
peace between their philosophy of government 
and our philosophy of government. 

In view of the nature of this undeniable 
threat, it can be asserted, properly and categori- 
cally, that the United States has no right or 
reason to encourage talk of peace until the day 
shall come when there is a clear intention on the 
part of the aggressor nations to abandon all 

3 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



thought of dominating or conquering the world. 

At this moment, the forces of the states that 
are leagued against all peoples who live in free- 
dom are being held away from our shores. The 
Germans and Italians are being blocked on the 
other side of the Atlantic by the British, and 
by the Greeks, and by thousands of soldiers and 
sailors who were able to escape from subjugated 
countries. The Japanese are being engaged in 
Asia by the Chinese in another great defense. 

In the Pacific is our fleet. 

Some of our people like to believe that wars 
in Europe and in Asia are of no concern to us. 
But it is a matter of most vital concern to us 
that European and Asiatic war-makers should 
not gain control of the oceans which lead to this 
hemisphere. 

One hundred and seventeen years ago the 
Monroe Doctrine was conceived by our Govern- 
ment as a measure of defense in the face of a 
threat against this hemisphere by an alliance in 
continental Europe. Thereafter, we stood on 
guard in the Atlantic, with the British as 
neighbors. There was no treaty. There was 
no "unwritten agreement". 

Yet, there was the feeling, proven correct by 
history, that we as neighbors could settle any 
disputes in peaceful fashion. The fact is that 
during the whole of this time the Western 
Hemisphere has remained free from aggression 
from Europe or from Asia. 

Does anyone seriously believe that we need to 
fear attack while a free Britain remains our 
most powerful naval neighbor in the Atlantic? 
Does anyone seriously believe, on the other 
hand, that we could rest easy if the Axis powers 
were our neighbor there ? 

If Great Britain goes down, the Axis powers 
will control the continents of Europe, Asia, 
Africa, Australasia, and the high seas — and 
they will be in a position to bring enormous 
military and naval resources against this hemis- 
phere. It is no exaggeration to say that all of 
us in the Americas would be living at the point 
of a gun — a gun loaded with explosive bullets, 
economic as well as military. 

We should enter upon a new and terrible era 
in which the whole world, our hemisphere in- 



cluded, would be run by threats of brute foi-ce. 
To survive in such a world, we would have to 
convert ourselves permanently into a militaris- 
tic power on the basis of war economy. 

Some of us like to believe that even if Great 
Britain falls, we are still safe, because of the 
broad expanse of the Atlantic and of the 
Pacific. 

But the width of these oceans is not what it 
was in the days of clipper ships. At one point 
between Africa and Brazil the distance is less 
than from Washington to Denver — five hours 
for the latest type of bomber. And at the north 
of the Pacific Ocean, America and Asia almost 
touch each other. 

Even today we have planes which could fly 
from the British Isles to New England and back 
without refueling. And the range of the mod- 
ern bomber is ever being increased. 

During the past week many people in all 
parts of the Nation have told me what they 
wanted me to say tonight. Almost all of them 
expressed a courageous desire to hear the plain 
truth about the gravity of the situation. One 
telegram, however, expressed the attitude of the 
small minority who want to see no evil and hear 
no evil, even though they know in their hearts 
that evil exists. That telegram begged me not 
to tell again of the ease with which our Ameri- 
can cities could be bombed by any hostile, power 
which had gained bases in this Western Hem- 
isphere. The gist of that telegram was : "Please, 
Mr. President, don't frighten us by telling us 
the facts." 

Frankly and definitely there is danger 
ahead — danger against which we must prepare. 
But we well know that we cannot escape danger, 
or the fear of it, by crawling into bed and pull- 
ing the covers over our heads. 

Some nations of Europe were bound by 
solemn non-intervention pacts with Germany. 
Other nations were assured by Germany that 
they need never fear invasion. Non-interven- 
tion pact or not, the fact remains that they were 
attacked, overrun, and thrown into the modern 
form of slavery at an hour's notice or even with- 
out any notice at all. As an exiled leader of one 
of these nations said to me the other day : "The 



JANUARY 4, 1941 

notice was a minus quantity. It was given to my 
government two hours after German troops had 
poured into my country in a hundred places." 

The fate of these nations tells us what it 
means to live at the point of a Nazi gun. 

The Nazis have justified such actions by vari- 
ous pious frauds. One of these frauds is the 
claim that they are occupying a nation for the 
purpose of ''restoring order". Another is that 
they are occupying or controlling a nation on 
the excuse that they are "protecting it" against 
the aggression of somebody else. 

For example, Germany has said that she was 
occupying Belgium to save the Belgians from 
the British. Would she hesitate to say to any 
South American country, "We are occupying 
you to protect you from aggression by the 
United States"? 

Belgium today is being used as an invasion 
base against Britain, now fighting for its life. 
Any South American country, in Nazi hands, 
would always constitute a jumping-off place for 
German attack on any one of the other republics 
of this hemisphere. 

Analyze for yourselves the future of two other 
places even nearer to Germany if the Nazis won. 
Could Ireland hold out ? Would Irish freedom 
be permitted as an amazing exception in an un- 
f ree world ? Or the islands of the Azores which 
still fly the flag of Portugal after five centuries? 
We think of Hawaii as an outpost of defense 
in the Pacific. Yet, the Azores are closer to our 
shores in the Atlantic than Hawaii is on the 
other side. 

There are those who say that the Axis powers 
would never have any desire to attack the West- 
ern Hemisphere. This is the same dangerous 
form of wishful thinking which has destroyed 
the powers of resistance of so many conquered 
peoples. The plain facts are that the Nazis have, 
proclaimed, time and again, that all other races 
are their inferiors and therefore subject to their 
orders. And most important of all, the vast, re- 
sources and wealth of this hemisphere constitute 
the most tempting loot in all the world. 

Let us no longer blind ourselves to the un- 
deniable fact that the evil forces which have 
crushed and undermined and corrupted so many 
others are already within our own gates. Your 



Government knows much about them and every 
day is ferreting them out. 

Their secret emissaries are active in our own 
and neighboring countries. They seek to stir 
up suspicion and dissension to cause internal 
strife. They try to turn capital against labor 
and vice versa. They try to reawaken long 
slumbering racial and religious enmities which, 
should have no place in this country. They are 
active in every group that promotes intolerance. 
They exploit for their own ends our natural ab- 
horrence of war. These trouble-breeders have 
but one purpose. It is to divide our people) 
into hostile groups and to destroy our unity and 
shatter our will to defend ourselves. 

There are also American citizens, many of 
them in high places, who, unwittingly in most 
cases, are aiding and abetting the work of these 
agents. I do not charge these American citizens 
with being foreign agents. But I do charge 
them with doing exactly the kind of work that 
the dictators want done in the United States. 

These people not only believe that we can 
save our own skins by shutting our eyes to the 
fate of other nations. Some of them go much 
further than that. They say that we can and 
should become the friends and even the partners 
of the Axis powers. Some of them even suggest 
that we should imitate the methods of the dicta- 
torships. Americans never can and never will 
do that, 

The experience of the past two years has 
proven beyond doubt that no nation can appease 
the Nazis. No man can tame a tiger into a kitten 
by stroking it. There can be no appeasement 
with ruthlessness. There can be no reasoning 
with an incendiary bomb. We know now that 
a nation can have peace with the Nazis only at 
the price of total surrender. 

Even the people of Italy have been forced to 
become accomplices of the Nazis; but at this 
moment they do not know how soon they will 
be embraced to death by their allies. 

The American appeasers ignore the warning 
to be found in the fate of Austria, Czecho- 
slovakia, Poland, Norway, Belgium, the Nether- 
lands, Denmark, and France. They tell you that 
the Axis powers are going to win anyway ; that 
all this bloodshed in the world could be saved ; 



6 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



and that the United States might just as well 
throw its influence into the scale of a dictated 
peace, and get the best out of it that we can. 

They call it a "negotiated peace". Nonsense ! 
Is it a negotiated peace if a gang of outlaws sur- 
rounds your community and on threat of ex- 
termination makes you pay tribute to save your 
own skins? 

Such a dictated peace would be no peace at all. 
It would be only another armistice, leading to 
the most gigantic armament race and the most 
devastating trade wars in history. And in these 
contests the Americas would offer the only real 
resistance to the Axis powers. 

With all their vaunted efficiency and parade 
of pious purj)ose in this war, there are still in 
their background the concentration camp and 
the servants of God in chains. 

The history of recent years proves that shoot- 
ings and chains and concentration camps are not 
simply the transient tools but the very altars 
of modern dictatorships. They may talk of a 
"new order" in the world, but what they have 
in mind is but a revival of the oldest and the 
worst tyranny. In that there is no liberty, no 
religion, no hope. 

The proposed "new order" is the very oppo- 
site of a United States of Europe or a United 
States of Asia. It is not a government based 
upon the consent of the governed. It is not a 
union of ordinary, self-respecting men and 
women to protect themselves and their freedom 
and their dignity from oppression. It is an 
unholy alliance of power and pelf to dominate 
and enslave the human race. 

The British people are conducting an active 
war against this unholy alliance. Our own fu- 
ture security is greatly dependent on the out- 
come of that fight. Our ability to "keep out of 
war" is going to be affected by that outcome. 

Thinking in terms of today and tomorrow, I 
make the direct statement to the American 
people that there is far less chance of the 
United States getting into war if we do all we 
can now to support the nations defending them- 
selves against attack by the Axis than if we 
acquiesce in their defeat, submit tamely to an 
Axis victory, and wait our turn to be the object 
of attack in another war later on. 



If we are to be completely honest with our- 
selves, we must admit there is risk in any course 
we may take. But I deeply believe that the 
great majority of our people agree that the 
course that I advocate involves the least risk 
now and the greatest hope for world peace in 
the future. 

The people of Europe who are defending 
themselves do not ask us to do their fighting. 
They ask us for the implements of war, the 
planes, the tanks, the guns, the freighters, which 
will enable them to fight for their liberty and 
our security. Emphatically we must get these 
weapons to them in sufficient volume and quickly 
enough, so that we and our children will be 
saved the agony and suffering of war which 
others have had to endure. 

Let not defeatists tell us that it is too late. It 
will never be earlier. Tomorrow will be later 
than today. 

Certain facts are self-evident. 

In a military sense Great Britain and the 
British Empire are today the spearhead of re- 
sistance to world conquest. They are putting 
up a fight which will live forever in the story 
of human gallantry. 

There is no demand for sending an American 
Expeditionary Force outside our own borders. 
There is no intention by any member of your 
Government to send such a force. You can, 
therefore, nail any talk about sending armies 
to Europe as deliberate untruth. 

Our national policy is not directed toward 
war. Its sole purpose is to keep war away from 
our country and our jDeople. 

Democracy's fight against world conquest is 
being greatly aided, and must be more greatly 
aided, by the rearmament of the United States 
and by sending every ounce and every ton of 
munitions and supplies that we can possibly 
spare to help the defenders who are in the front 
lines. It is no more unneutral for us to do that 
than it is for Sweden, Russia, and other nations 
near Germany to send steel and ore and oil and 
other war materials into Germany every day. 

We are planning our own defense, with the 
utmost urgency; and in its vast scale we must 
integrate the war needs of Britain and the other 
free nations resisting aggression. 



JANUARY 4, 1941 



This is not a matter of sentiment or of con- 
troversial personal opinion. It is a matter of 
realistic military policy, based on the advice 
of our military experts who are in close touch 
with existing warfare. These military and 
naval experts and the members of the Congress 
and the administration have a single-minded 
purpose — the defense of the United States. 

This Nation is making a great effort to pro- 
duce everything that is necessary in this emer- 
gency — and with all possible speed. This 
great effort requires great sacrifice. 

I would ask no one to defend a democracy 
which in turn would not defend everyone in the 
Nation against want and privation. The 
strength of this Nation shall not be diluted by 
the failure of the Government to protect the 
economic well-being of all citizens. 

If our capacity to produce is limited by ma- 
chines, it must ever be remembered that these 
machines are operated by the skill and the 
stamina of the workers. As the Government is 
determined to protect the rights of workers, so 
the Nation has a right to expect that the men 
who man the machines will discharge their full 
responsibilities to the urgent needs of defense. 

The worker possesses the same human dig- 
nity and is entitled to the same security of po- 
sition as the engineer or manager or owner. 
For the workers provide the human power that 
turns out the destroyers, the airplanes, and the 
tanks. 

The Nation expects our defense industries to 
continue operation without interruption by 
strikes or lock-outs. It expects and insists that 
management and workers will reconcile their 
differences by voluntary or legal means, to con- 
tinue to produce the supplies that are so sorely 
needed. 

And on the economic side of our great defense 
program, we are, as you know, bending every 
effort to maintain stability of prices and with 
that the stability of the cost of living. 

Nine days ago I announced the setting up of a 
more effective organization to direct our gigan- 
tic efforts to increase the production of muni- 
tions. The appropriation of vast sums of money 
and a well-coordinated executive direction of 



our defense efforts are not in themselves enough. 
Guns, planes, and ships have to be built in the 
factories and arsenals of America. They have 
to be produced by workers and managers and 
engineers with the aid of machines, which in 
turn have to be built by hundreds of thousands 
of workers throughout the land. 

In this great work there has been splendid co- 
operation between the Government and indus- 
try and labor. 

American industrial genius, unmatched 
throughout the world in the solution of produc- 
tion problems, has been called upon to bring its 
resources and talents into action. Manufac- 
turers of watches, of farm implements, lino- 
types, cash registers, automobiles, sewing 
machines, lawn mowers, and locomotives are 
now making fuses, bomb-packing crates, tele- 
scope mounts, shells, pistols, and tanks. 

But all our present efforts are not enough. We 
must have more ships, more guns, more planes — 
more of everything. This can only be accom- 
plished if we discard the notion of "business as 
usual". This job cannot be done merely by 
superimposing on the existing productive 
facilities the added requirements for defense. 

Our defense efforts must not be blocked by 
those who fear the future consequences of sur- 
plus plant capacity. The possible consequences 
of failure of our defense efforts now are much 
more to be feared. 

After the present needs of our defense are 
past, a proper handling of the country's peace- 
time needs will require all of the new productive 
capacity — if not more. 

No pessimistic policy about the future of 
America shall delay the immediate expansion 
of those industries essential to defense. 

I want to make it clear that it is the purpose 
of the Nation to build now with all possible 
speed every machine and arsenal and factory 
that we need to manufacture our defense mate- 
rial. We have the. men, the skill, the wealth, 
and above all, the will. 

I am confident that if and when production of 
consumer or luxury goods in certain industries 
requires the use of machines and raw materials 
essential for defense purposes, then such produc- 



8 



DEPARTMENT OK STATE BULLETIN 



tion must yield to our primary and compelling 
purpose. 

I appeal to the owners of plants, to the man- 
agers, to the workers, to our own Government 
employees, to put every ounce of effort into pro- 
ducing these munitions swiftly and without 
stint. And with this appeal I give you the 
pledge that all of us who are officers of your 
Government will devote ourselves to the same 
whole-hearted extent to the great task which 
lies ahead. 

As planes and ships and guns and shells are 
produced, your Government, with its defense 
experts, can then determine how best to use them 
to defend this hemisphere. The decision as to 
how much shall be sent abroad and how much 
shall remain at home must be made on the basis 
of our over-all military necessities. 

We must be the great arsenal of democracy. 
For us this is an emergency as serious as war 
itself. We must apply ourselves to our task 
with the same resolution, the same sense of 
urgency, the same spirit of patriotism and sac- 
rifice, as we would show were we at war. 

We have furnished the British great ma- 
terial support and we will furnish far more 
in the future. 

There will be no "bottlenecks" in our deter- 
mination to aid Great Britain. No dictator, no 



combination of dictators, will weaken that de- 
termination by threats of how they will con- 
strue that determination. 

The British have received invaluable military 
support from the heroic Greek Army and from 
the forces of all the governments in exile. 
Their strength is growing. It is the strength of 
men and women who value their freedom more 
highly than they value their lives. 

I believe that the Axis powers are not going 
to win this war. I base that belief on the latest 
and best information. 

We have no excuse for defeatism. We have 
every good reason for hope — hope for peace, 
hope for the defense of our civilization and for 
the building of a better civilization in the fu- 
ture. 

I have the profound conviction that the 
American people are now determined to put 
forth a mightier effort than they have ever yet 
made to increase our production of all the im- 
plements of defense, to meet the threat to our 
democratic faith. 

As President of the United States I call for 
that national effort. I call for it in the name of 
this Nation which we love and honor and which 
we are privileged and proud to serve. I call 
upon our people with absolute confidence that 
our common cause will greatly succeed. 



REMARKS BY ASSISTANT SECRETARY BERLE 



[Released to the press December 29] 

For several years now great world forces have 
been gathering and moving toward a collision. 
A group of dictators believed and still insist 
that force alone rules the earth, and that they 
have the force. Free nations, including our 
own, have held to the faith that freedom and 
not slavery, reason and not force, love and not 
hate, alone make life worthwhile. In 1039 the 



= Delivered December 2!>, 1040, 8 p. in., on a broad- 
cast entitled "America's Outlook for 1941" arranged 
by the Mutual Broadcasting System. 



two forces finally met. In 1940, the resulting 
war has ranged all the way from the Arctic to 
Africa and from England to China. 

We now enter a new year. 

It will bring greater responsibility for all of 
us — for the people who are speaking to you to- 
night and for you who are listening. It can- 
not be otherwise. 

For we are responsible for defending the in- 
heritance of freedom which made America 
what it is and made you and me what we are. 
We have to defend against fear and lies and 



JANUARY 4, 1941 



9 



race hates carefully cultivated from overseas. 
We have to defend against weaknesses in our- 
selves — against the temptation of profiteering 
and against concealed bribes from anti-Ameri- 
can systems who think that any American 
businessman will sell out for a quick profit. 
We shall have to face facts, however unpleas- 
ant ; and we shall have to work, perhaps harder 
than for many years. 

We shall have greater responsibility to help 
other nations, who propose, as we do, to main- 
tain their independence and their way of life. 
We shall have to use all our glorious economic 
strength to work with oiu' neighbors in South 
America. We shall have to help Britain with 
her defense; to help China in her gallant strug- 
gle for existence. 

We shall have to make possible an organiza- 
tion of peace, so that every nation which really 



wishes peace may have it- — peace on a basis of 
justice under law, and on a basis so just in 
economics that it will permit the citizens of 
every country to live in reasonable comfort, if 
they will renounce conquest. As a richest coun- 
try, we shall have to be generous. As a strong 
country, we shall have to keep peace. As the 
most productive country in the world, we shall 
have to make our work count for the most. 

I hope that the year 1941 may see the dark 
international clouds begin at last to clear. Yet 
this can happen only if we make it so; no other 
nation has the power. Our happiness in the 
new year rests in our own hands. It will be a 
year of work, and struggle, and sacrifice; but 
with it comes the only joy worthwhile — the hap- 
piness that is earned in the service of a great 
faith and a steadfast country. 



LOSS OF AMERICAN NATIONALITY 



The following regulations have been codified 
under Title 22: Foreign Relations (Chapter I: 
Department of State), in accordance with the 
requirements of the Federal Register and the 
Code of Federal Regulations : 

[Departmental Order 908] 

Part 19 — Loss of Nationality Under the Act 
Approved October 14, 1940 

formal renunciation of american nationality 

§ 19.1 Form for renunciation of American 
nationality. The following form is hereby pre- 
scribed under which a person who is a national 
of the United States, whether by birth or natu- 
ralization, and who shall have attained the age 
of 18 years may make a formal renunciation of 
his American nationality before a diplomatic 
or consular officer of the United States in a for- 
eign state : 

[Here follows the form entitled "Oath of 



Renunciation of the Nationality of the United 
States".] 

§ 19.2 Effective date for use of form. The 
foregoing form for the making of a formal 
renunciation of nationality before a consular 
officer of the United States in a foreign state 
shall not be used before January 12, 1941, when 
the Nationality Act of 1940 becomes effective. 
(Sec. 401 (f). 54 Stat. 1169) 

[seal] Cordkia, Hull, 

Secretary of State. 

January 2, 1941. 

[Departmental Order 909] 

Part 19 — Loss of Nationality Under the Act 
Approved October 14, 1940 

certification of the loss of american 
nationality 

§ 19.3 Certificate of diplomatic or consular 
officer. Whenever a diplomatic or consular of- 



10 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



ficer of the United States has reason to believe 
that a person while in a foreign country has lost 
his American nationality under any provision 
of chapter IV of the Nationality Act of 1940 
(54 Stat. 1168), he shall certify the facts upon 
which such belief is based to the Department of 
State in writing in the following form : 

[Here follows the form entitled "Certificate 
of the Loss of the Nationality of the United 
States".]* 

§ 19.4 Affidavit of expatriated person, (a) 
When obtainable, an affidavit executed in quad- 
ruplicate by the expatriated person should be 
attached to each copy of the certificate of the 
officer (§19.3). 

This affidavit should contain in substance : 

(1) That the affiant has voluntarily expa- 
triated himself by the performance of one of 
the acts or the fulfillment of the conditions spec- 
ified in chapter IV of the Nationality Act of 
1940 (54 Stat. 1168) ; 

(2) That his permanent residence in the 
United States, if he ever had one, has been vol- 
untarily abandoned and that the expatriated 
person neither intends nor desires to resume 
residence in the United States in the immediate 
or near future ; 

(3) If naturalized in the United States, that 
the naturalization certificate is or has been sur- 
rendered voluntarily because of his expatria- 
tion ; 

(4) That the affiant neither intends nor de- 
sires to preserve his allegiance to the United 
States but intends and desires to preserve his 
new allegiance, if one has been acquired. 

(b) Where it is not possible for the officer who 
executes the certificate of expatriation to obtain 
an affidavit from the expatriated person, he 
should exercise care in setting forth in his cer- 
tificate such information as he may have which 
tends to support his belief that the individual 
concerned in the certificate has become expatri- 
ated.* 



*§§ 19.3 to 19.7, inclusive, issued under authority of 
see. 501, 54 Stat 1171. 



§ 19.5 Amplification of certificate. When 
preparing a certificate of expatriation the form 
abovementioned should be amplified in appro- 
priate cases by adding a paragraph thereto set- 
ting forth the names, places and dates of birth, 
and present addresses of the spouse and chil- 
dren, if any, of the individual concerned and 
whether any such person is considered to have 
acquired foreign nationality. The certificate, 
however, is not to be regarded as a certificate 
of expatriation of the spouse or children of any 
person in whose case a certificate of expatriation 
is prepared.* 

§ 19.6 Preparation of certificate for person 
who shall have attained the age of 18 years. 
A certificate should be prepared in any case of 
a person coming within the scope of chapter 
IV who shall have attained the age of 18 years, 
except in the case of a person who shall have 
been naturalized in a foreign state through the 
naturalization therein of a parent having legal 
custody, or who is a minor and residing in a 
foreign state with or under the legal custody of 
a parent who has lost American nationality, in 
which case a certificate of expatriation shall not 
be executed until the child concerned shall have 
attained the age of 23 years without having ac- 
quired or resumed permanent residence in the 
United States.* 

§ 19.7 Execution of certificate in quadrupli- 
cate. The certificate should be executed in 
quadruplicate. Two copies thereof should be 
sent to the Department, one of which should be 
the original, and two should be retained in the 
files of the office in which it was executed. 
After the Department of State shall have ap- 
proved the certificate it will so advise the ap- 
propriate diplomatic or consular officer, who 
will thereafter make a notation on the two 
copies retained by him to the effect that the cer- 
tificate has been approved by the Department 
under the date of the instruction to the diplo- 
matic or consular officer and who will there- 
after forward a copy of such certificate to the 
person to whom it relates.* 

[seal] Cokdell Hull, 

January 2, 1941. Secretary of State. 



JANUARY 4, 1941 

[Departmental Order 910] 

Part 19 — Loss of Nationality Under the Act 
Approved October 14, 1940 

issue of certificates of american nationality 

§ 19.8 Application for certificate of Ameri- 
can nationality. Any person who acquired the 
nationality of the United States at birth and 
who is involved in any manner in judicial or 
administrative proceedings in a foreign state in 
connection with which the establishment of his 
nationality in the United States is pertinent, 
may apply for such a certificate in the form 
herein prescribed. In the United States, includ- 
ing Alaska and Hawaii, the application must 
be executed before a clerk of a Federal court or 
a State court authorized by section 301 (a) of 
the Nationality Act of 1940 (54 Stat. 1140) to 
naturalize aliens within the jurisdiction in 
which the applicant resides or before an agent 
of the Department of State. In a foreign 
country the application must be executed be- 
fore a diplomatic or consular officer of the 
United States. In an insular possession of the 
United States the application must be executed 
before a person in the office of the Chief Execu- 
tive who has authority to administer oaths, ex- 
cept that in the Commonwealth of the Philip- 
pines it must be executed before a person having 
similar authority in the office of the United 
States High Commissioner to the Philippine 
Islands. When an application is executed be- 
fore a diplomatic or consular officer it should be 
in duplicate. There should be submitted with 
the application documentary evidence estab- 
lishing that the applicant is involved in judicial 
or administrative proceedings pending in a for- 
eign country in connection with which the es- 
tablishment of his nationality of the United 
States is pertinent. There should be affixed to 
each application, including the duplicate appli- 
cation when required, a photograph of the ap- 
plicant not more than 3 by 3 inches and not less 
than 214 by 2V2 inches in size, unmounted, 
printed on thin paper showing the full front 
view of the features of the applicant, and taken 
within G months of the date when submitted. A 



11 



separate photograph, which must be identical to 
that affixed to the application, should be sub- 
mitted, in order that it may be affixed to the cer- 
tificate of nationality if and when issued. The 
original copy of the application should in all 
cases be submitted to the Department of State.* 

§ 19.9 Evidence of nationality to accompany 
application for certificate. Each application for 
a certificate of nationality must be accompanied 
by evidence of nationality of the character which 
is required by the Rules Governing the Granting 
and Issuing of Passports in the United States 
issued by the President on March 31, 1938, or 
any rules which may subsequently be issued by 
him. If the applicant has previously submitted 
satisfactory evidence of American citizenship in 
connection with an application for a passport or 
registration, it will not be necessary for him to 
duplicate such evidence. It will, however, be 
necessary for the applicant to satisfy the Secre- 
tary of State that he has not expatriated him- 
self under the Nationality Act of 1940 or any 
prior act.* 

§ 19.10. Form of application for certificate of 
nationality. The application must be in the 
following form: 

[Here follows the form entitled "Application 
for a Certificate of Nationality for Use in a 
Judicial or Administrative Proceeding in a For- 
eign State".]* 

§ 19.11 Form of certificate of nationality. 
Uf>on the approval of such an application a cer- 
tificate of nationality for use in a judicial or ad- 
ministrative proceeding in a foreign state shall 
be issued in the following form : 

[Here follows the form entitled "Certificate 
of Nationality".]* 

§ 19.12 Transmission of certificate of nation- 
ality to foreign state. When a certificate of 
nationality is issued, it shall be transmitted 
through official channels to the judicial or ad- 
ministrative officer of the foreign state in which 
it is to be used.* 

[seal] Cordell Hull, 

January 2, 1941. Secretary of State. 



*§§ 19.8 to 19.12, inclusive, issued under authority of 
see. 502, 54 Stat. 1171. 



12 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



STATEMENT REGARDING PROPOSALS 
BY PRIVATE INDIVIDUALS ON IN- 
TERNATIONAL AFFAIRS 

[Released to the press December 30] 

In reply to press inquiries regarding state- 
ments attributed today to Mr. Verne Marshall, 
of the "No Foreign War Committee", on the 
subject of peace proposals said to have been 
brought from Europe in October 1939 by Mr. 
William Rhodes Davis, the Department of State 
tonight issued the following statement: 



"Naturally individual citizens often volun- 
teer to the State Department information and 
suggestions pertaining to some phase of inter- 
national affairs. These are always courteously 
received. Nothing, however, has come to the 
State Department on the subject mentioned 
which has proved feasible. 

"Furthermore, the Government can only con- 
duct important international affairs effectively 
through duly authorized and official channels 
created for that purpose." 



American Republics 



COLOMBIAN DEBT 



[Released to the press December 31] 

The Government of the Republic of Colom- 
bia, after maintaining full debt service on its 
6-percent bonds, $25,000,000 of which were is- 
sued through the usual private financial chan- 
nels in 1927, and $35,000,000 in 1928, finally, in 
1933. was forced to suspend payments. How- 
ever, before suspending payments, approxi- 
mately $3,800,000 of the first issue and 
$5,000,000 of the second issue had been paid, 
reducing the amount of bonds then outstand- 
ing from $60,000,000 to approximately $51,200,- 
000. In 1933 the Colombian Government made 
an additional payment in non-interest-bearing, 
deferred-interest certificates of $1,799,53-1, 
which were redeemed at maturity in 1937, and 
in 1934 a further payment in 12-year 4-percent 
funding certificates of $3,743,145, which it has 
regularly serviced. 

Since that time the Colombian Government 
has carried on prolonged negotiations with rep- 
resentatives of the bondholders, in an effort to 
reach an agreement as to payment and an in- 
terest rate that the Colombian Government felt 
it would be able to meet. No permanent agree- 
ment has vet been reached. 



About a year ago the Department of State, 
with the cooperation of the Treasury Depart- 
ment and the Federal Loan Administrator, 
acting merely as friendly intermediaries, began 
meeting with representatives of the Colombian 
Government and the Foreign Bondholders Pro- 
tective Council, Inc., of New York, in the hope 
of finding some common ground of adjustment 
that would be acceptable to both parties. 

Some progress was made, and in the expecta- 
tion of reaching a permanent agreement during 
1940 the Colombian Government this year has 
paid 3 percent on both issues, amounting to 
approximately $1,350,000, and has expended 
approximately $400,000 in the purchase and 
retirement of bonds. These bonds and approxi- 
mately $6,000,000 face value of bonds thereto- 
fore purchased by the Colombian Government 
have been canceled so that the total outstanding 
amount at the. present time on both issues is 
about $44,000,000, with accrued interest at 6 per- 
cent of $12,200,000. 

The Colombian Government now offers to re- 
fund the principal of $44,000,000 and accumu- 
lated interest at 3 percent amounting to $6,- 
100,000, a total of about $50,100,000, with new 



JANUARY 4, 1941 



13 



3-percent bonds of a maturity of 25 (o 30 years, 
the exact date to be indicated in the formal 
detailed offer to be issued shortly. To service 
the new bonds it offers to make available $1,800.- 
000 per year for five years and $2,000,000 per 
year thereafter. The amounts not required for 
interest at 3 percent per annum are to be de- 
voted entirely to the purchase in the market and 
cancelation of the new bonds. 

While the Government of the United States 
has no direct interest in the matter, the Depart- 
ment of State, the Treasury Department, and 
the Federal Loan Administrator have acted as 
friendly intermediaries to assist the parties in 
reaching an agreement, and they are of the opin- 
ion that in view of conditions that have pre- 
vailed since 1932, the offer of the Colombian 
Government constitutes a fair effort on its part 
to adust its obligations. They recognize, of 
course, that the bondholders must make their 
own decision. 



SUSPENSION OF TONNAGE DUTIES 
FOE VESSELS OF URUGUAY 

A proclamation (no. 2452) providing that 
"the foreign discriminating duties of tonnage 
and imposts within the United Slates" be "sus- 
pended and discontinued so far as respects the 
vessels of Uruguay and the produce, manufac- 
tures, or merchandise imported in said vessels 
into the United States from Uruguay or from 
any other foreign country; the suspension to 
t<ike effect from December 10, 1940, and to con- 
tinue so long as the reciprocal exemption of ves- 
sels belonging to citizens of the United States 
and their cargoes shall be continued, and no 
longer", was signed by the President on Decem- 
ber 28, 1940. 

The text of this proclamation appears in full 
in the Federal Registt r for January 1, 1941 
(vol. 6, no. 1), page 1. 



FISHERY MISSION TO PERU 



I Released to the press January 3] 

En route from the United States today were 
two experts in the Fish and Wildlife Service of 
the Department of the Interior detailed by the 
President to assist the Peruvian Government in 
conducting a survey of its sea-fishery resources. 
A third expert will follow shortly, completing 
the personnel of the mission. 

The assignments were effected under the pro- 
visions of the act of Congress, approved May 3, 
1939, 3 which authorizes the President to detail 
employees of the Federal Government having 
special scientific, technical, or professional 
qualifications to the American republics at the 
request of the government concerned and in 
agreement therewith. The Fishery Mission to 

' 53 Stat. 652. 



Peru represents a further practical demonstra- 
tion of this Government's broad policy of co- 
operation with our neighbors to the south, the 
services of over 30 experts and specialists in the 
fields of highway engineering, immigration 
procedure, customs tariffs and statistics, com- 
mercial policy, taxation, monetary problems, 
library administration, etc., having been pre- 
viously detailed to the American republics under 
the same act. 

Under the terms of an agreement with the 
Peruvian Government, R. H. Fiedler, Chief, 
Division of Fishery Industries, will serve as 
Chief of the Mission. He will be assisted by 
N. D. Jarvis, an Associate Technologist of the 
Fishery Industries Division in charge of prac- 
tical fishery preservation demonstrations, and 
by Milton J. Lobell, a biologist of the Division 
of Fishery Biology, 



14 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



PAYMENT BY MEXICO UNDER SPE- 
CIAL CLAIMS CONVENTION OF 1934 

[Released to the press December 31] 

The Ambassador of Mexico formally pre- 
sented to the Secretary of State today his Gov- 
ernment's check for $500,000 in payment of the 
seventh annual instalment, due January 1, 1941, 
in accordance with article II of the convention 
between the United States of America and the 
United Mexican States, signed at Mexico City 
on April 24, 1934, providing for the en bloc 



settlement of the claims presented by the Gov- 
ernment of the United States to the Commission 
established by the Special Claims Convention, 
concluded September 10, 1923. 

The Ambassador of Mexico also presented a 
check covering interest due under article III of 
the convention of April 24, 1934. 

The Secretary of State requested the Am- 
bassador of Mexico to convey to his Govern- 
ment an expression of this Government's 
appreciation. 



INTER- AMERICAN 



DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION: BRAZILIAN 
COUNCIL 



[Released to the press by the Office for Coordination of 
Commercial and Cultural Relations Between the American 
Republics December 30] 

Five Brazilian business and financial leaders 
will constitute the first of the 21 national coun- 
cils to be established by the Inter- American De- 
velopment Commission, Nelson A. Rockefeller, 
Chairman, announced December 29. Mr. Rocke- 
feller also serves as Coordinator of Commercial 
and Cultural Relations between the American 
Republics. 

An outgrowth of the Inter-American Finan- 
cial and Economic Advisory Committee organ- 
ized following the Conference of Panama, the 
Inter-American Development Commission is 
designed (1) to stimulate the increase of non- 
competitive imports from Latin America to the 
United States; (2) to stimulate and increase 
trade between the Latin American countries; 
and (3) to encourage development of industry 
in Latin America, with particular regard to the 
production of consumer goods. 

The members of the new Commissao 
Brasileira de Fomento Inter-Americano are : 

Leonardo Truda, member, Consehlo do 
Comercio do Brasil ; chairman, commercial 
and economic mission to Caribbean coun- 
tries, 1940; former president, Bank of 
Brazil; chairman 

Valentim F. Boucas, secretary, Technical 
Council of Economics and Finance; vice 
chairman 



Alvaro Catao, director, Compania Costera 
Heitor Freire de Carvalho, manager, Paulista 

Railway 
Jose Nabuco, lawyer; delegate to Economic 

Conference, London, 1933 

Jose Jobim, of the Brazilian consular service, 
has been designated executive secretary by Min- 
ister of Foreign Affairs Oswaldo Aranha, who 
was instrumental in securing the services of 
the entire Commission. Mr. Rockefeller said 
the active cooperation of Foreign Minister 
Aranha expedited organization of the Brazil- 
ian Council. 

Duties of the Brazilian Council were ex- 
plained to the members in Rio de Janeiro this 
week by George W. Magalhaes and J. Rafael 
Oreamuno, member and vice chairman, respec- 
tively, of the parent Inter-American Develop- 
ment Commission. 

In addition to Mr. Rockefeller and the two 
members now in Brazil, the parent Commis- 
sion comprises Renato de Azevedo and Carlos 
Campbell del Campo. John C. McClintock 
serves as executive secretary. 

Proceeding from Rio de Janeiro, Messrs. 
Magalhaes and Oreamuno will visit each of the 
other nine South American capitals to organize 
similar national councils. At a later date, 
groups will be established in the remaining 11 
American republics, including the United 
States. 



Europe 



MEETING OP THE INTERGOVERNMENTAL COMMITTEE ON 

REFUGEES 



[Released by the Intergovernmental 
Committee on Refugees Janunry 3] 

Representatives of the 32 nations holding 
membership in the Intergovernmental Commit- 
tee on Refugees have been notified of a meeting 
in the Dominican Republic from January 30 to 
February 3 to inspect the Sosua colony, "test 
tube" of refugee settlement in the Western 
Hemisphere, it was announced January 3 by 
Alfred Wagg, 3d, secretary of the Intergovern- 
mental Committee. 

The meeting will be held on the first anniver- 
sary of the signing of the agreement between 
the Dominican Government and the Dominican 
Republic Settlement Association, which pro- 
vided for the settlement of European refugees 
in the Caribbean republic. 

The meeting will open in the National Palace 
at Ciudad Trujillo, and His Excellency Dr. 
Troncoso de la Concha, President of the Domin- 
ican Republic, will preside. James N. Rosen- 
berg, President of the Dominican Republic 
Settlement. Association, will report on the work 
of the Association for the first year. 

The meeting will be addressed by representa- 
tives of the governments holding membership in 
the Intergovernmental Committee on Refugees, 
including a representative of the Government of 
the United States, and Mr. George Warren, 
representing President Roosevelt's Advisory 
Committee on Political Refugees. Moreover, 
messages will be read from the leaders in the 
refugee field, such as the Honorable Lord Win- 
terton, Chairman of the Intergovernmental 
Committee; Sir Herbert Emerson, Director of 
the Committee; and the Honorable Myron C. 
Taylor, American Vice Chairman. 

When the representatives of the nations hold- 
ing membership in the Intergovernmental Com- 
mittee meet in Ciudad Trujillo it will be the first 



time they have gathered together since the meet- 
ing in Washington in October 1939, when Presi- 
dent Roosevelt warned that between 10 and 20 
million refugees would be thrown on the world's 
mercy by the present war. 

At that meeting the officers of the Intergov- 
ernmental Committee adopted, as a first step 
in meeting this awesome problem, a program for 
a "test tube" settlement in the Dominican Re- 
public, to be financed by private capital. 

The Dominican Republic Settlement Associa- 
tion was organized, with a capital of $10,000,- 
000. It was organized along the lines of the 
charter companies which in the seventeenth cen- 
tury first settled America. 

The Dominican Republic agreed to allow 100,- 
000 refugees to settle within its borders. Gen- 
eralissimo Trujillo, who took an active interest 
in the settlement as a concrete humanitarian 
measure, personally contributed an estate of 
65,000 acres, and buildings and equipment, at 
Sosua, for the colony. 

In its first months the Dominican Settlement 
Association encountered its principal difficulty 
in transporting refugee colonists to their new 
homeland. 

Prospective colonists were chosen for their 
adaptability in agriculture and were trained as 
agriculturists before leaving Europe. 

In spite of difficulties, 500 families have suc- 
cessfully been transplanted to the Sosua colony. 
Already, they have placed 3,000 acres in agri- 
culture and have established their own dairy 
industry. 

The Falk Foundation of Pittsburgh contrib- 
uted $50,000 to make a complete economic sur- 
vey of the Dominican Republic with the view of 
ascertaining the proper business and agricul- 
tural pursuits to be followed by the colonists. 
This survey is being undertaken by Dr. Dana G. 



16 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Miinro. Director of the School of Government 
of Princeton University, and is supervised by 
the Brookings Institution. 

The meeting in the Dominican Republic will 
not be a formal meeting of the Intergovern- 
mental Committee on Refugees, but rather a 
"report meeting" at which progress will be 
shown. 

The following are members of the Intergov- 
ernmental Committee: Argentina, Australia, 
Belgium, Bolivia. Brazil. Canada, Chile, Colom- 
bia, Costa Rica. Cuba, Denmark, Dominican 
Republic, Ecuador, France, Guatemala, Haiti, 
Honduras, Ireland, Mexico, Netherlands, New 
Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Panama, Para- 
guay, Peru, Sweden, Switzerland, United King- 
dom, United States. Uruguay, and Venezuela. 

NEW YEAR MESSAGE FROM THE 
KING OF ITALY 

[ Re leased to the press December 31] 

The following is a translation of a message 
from the King of Italy to the President : 

'•Rome, December -■>. WJfi. 
"On the approach of the New Year I wish 
in express to you. Mr. President, all my most 
cordial good wishes for the people of the 
United States and for you personally. 

YlTTORIO EmANUELE" 

The following is the President's reply to the 
King of Italy : 

•'The White House, 

"December 30, 1940. 
"I greatly appreciate Your Majesty's cordial 
message. I extend to Your Majesty my most 
sincere wishes for your personal welfare and 
my hope that during the year to come the 
Italian people may be enabled to enjoy the 
blessings of a righteous peace. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt" 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN 
BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 

[Released to the press January 3] 

The following tabulation shows contributions 
collected and disbursed during the period Sep- 
tember 6, 1939, through November 30, 1940, as 
shown in the reports submitted by persons and 
organizations registered with the Secretary of 
State for the solicitation and collection of con- 
tributions to be used for relief in belligerent 
countries, in conformity with the regulations 
issued pursuant to section 8 of the act of Novem- 
ber 4. 1939. as made effective by the President's 
proclamation of the same date. 

This tabulation has reference only to contri- 
butions solicited and collected for relief in bel- 
ligerent countries (France; Germany; Poland; 
the United Kingdom, India, Australia, Canada, 
New Zealand, and the Union of South Africa; 
Norway; Belgium; Luxemburg; the Nether- 
lands; Italy; and Greece) or for the relief of 
refugees driven out of these countries by the 
present war. The statistics set forth in the tabu- 
lation do not include information regarding 
relief activities which a number of organiza- 
tions registered with the Secretary of State may 
be carrying on in non-belligerent countries, but 
for which registration is not required under the 
Neutrality Act of 1939. 

The American National Red Cross is required 
by law to submit to the Secretary of War for 
audit "a full, complete, and itemized report of 
receipts and expenditures of whatever kind". 
In order to avoid an unnecessary duplication of 
work, this organization is not required to con- 
form to the provisions of the regulations gov- 
erning the solicitation and collection of contri- 
butions for relief in belligerent countries, and 
the tabulation does not, therefore, include in- 
formation in regard to its activities. 



JANUARY 4, 1941 



17 



Contributions for Relief in Belucerent Countries 



Funds .spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Nov. 30. 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



Accion Democrata Espafiola, Kan Francisco, Calif., Mar. 

29, 1940. France 

Allied Relief Ball, Inc., New York, N. Y., Apr. 4, 1940. 

Great Britain and France 

Allied Relief Fund, New York, N. Y., June 4, 1940.° 
United Kingdom, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, 
and Norway 

American Aid for German War Prisoners, Buffalo, N. Y., 
Sept. 27, 1940. Canada - - 

American Association for Assistance to French Artists, 
Inc., New York, N. Y., Jan. 3, 1940. France 

American Association of University Women, Washington, 
D.C., May 23, 1940. France, Great Britain, Sweden, 
Palestine, Canada, and Switzerland 

American Auxiliary Committee de 1'Union des Femmes de 
France, New York, N. Y., Nov. 8, 1939. France and 
Great Britain. ._ - 

American Board of Missions to the Jews, Inc., Brooklyn, 
N. Y., July 5, 1940. France, Belgium, and Germany-. 

American Civilian Volunteers, New York, N. Y., May 27, 
1940. » France 

American Committee for Christian Refugees, Inc., New 
York, N. Y., Sept. 26, 1939. Germany and France 

American Committee for the German Relief Fund, Inc., 
New York, N. Y., Mar. 27, 1940. Germany, Poland, 
Canada, Dutch Guiana, British West Indies, and 
Jamaica . -- 

American Committee for the Polish Ambulance Fund, 
Chicago, 111., Feb. 12, 1940. France and Poland 

American Dental Ambulance Committee, New York, 
N. Y., Mar. 12, 1940. United Kingdom 

American Employment for General Relief, Inc., New 
York, N. Y., May 1, 1940. England, France, Norway, 
Poland, Belgium, Luxemburg, and the Netherlands 

American Federation for Polish Jews, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Sept. 14, 1939. Poland 

American Field Hospital Corps, New York, N. Y., Dec 
12, 1939. France, Belgium, Holland, and England 

American Field Service, New York, N. Y., Sept. 27, 1939. 
France, Great Britain, and British East Africa 

American and French Students' Correspondence Ex- 
change, New York, N. Y., Dec. 20, 1939. France and 
England 

American-French War Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 14, 1939. France and Great Britain 

American Friends of Britain, Inc., New York, N. Y., Aug. 
30, 1940. Great Britain.. 

American Friends of Czechoslovakia, New York, N. Y., 
Nov. 2, 1939. Great Britain, France, and Bohemia- 
Moravia 

American Frieniis of the Daily Sketch War Relief Fund, 
New York, N. Y., Dec. 1, 1939.< Great Britain 

American Friends of France, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 
21, 1939. France 



$308. 19 
52, 696. 35 

1, 461, 043. 62 
2,011.66 
14, 037. 76 

11.735.02 

20, 888. 75 

3, 089. 07 

None 

11,801.86 

40, 662. 59 
30, 793. 69 
3. 249. 52 

3,115.00 

6, 244. 30 
224, 113. 37 
329, 140. 54 

7,614.77 
46,369.51 

7, 377. 73 

29, 433. 92 

2,771.95 

323, 027. 01 



$125.00 

39, 964. 39 

997, 521. 99 

5.73 

9, 166 IK 

6, 277. 50 

11,693.70 

3, 044. 60 

None 

11,801.86 

28, 300. 00 
26, 243. 20 
3, 133. 02 

None 

5,1)20.75 

105,340.20 

272, 299. 54 

3,399.50 
28,649.06 

2, 450. (X) 

23, 641. 42 

2. 357. 00 
167,822.76 



$55.51 
12,731.96 

94, 292. 17 

126. 24 

3, 506. 60 

569.85 

2, 844. 21 
44.47 
None 
None 

9, 258. 72 

2, 255. 85 

101. 50 

2, 580. 11 

376. 14 

22, 040. 45 

16, 290. 94 

1, 228. 95 
8, 257. 70 
1,916.67 

5,117.69 

None 

33, 626. 58 



$127.68 
None 

369, 229. 46 

1, 879. 69 
1,365. 13 

4, 887. 67 

6, 350. 84 
None 
None 
None 

3, 103. 87 

2, 294. 64 

15. 00 

534. 89 

847. 41 

96, 732. 72 

40, 550. 06 

2, 986. 32 
9, 462. 75 
3,011.06 

674. 81 
414.95 



None 
None 

$82, 621. 67 

45. 00 

1,605.15 

None 

4,936.84 
None 
None 
None 

None 

471.00 
None 

None 
7,651.43 
1,500.00 

None 

None 

51,894.20 

None 

19, 240. 00 
None 



■ The registration of this organization was revoked on Nov. 30, 1940, at its own request. Since Nov. 30, this organization has operated under regis- 
tration no. 208, in the name of the British War Relief Society, Inc. 

» The registration of this organization was revoked on Oct. 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 
e No report for the month of November has been received from this organization. 



18 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, dad- of registration and 
destination of contributions 


Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Funds spent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Nov. 30, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 


American Friends of a Jewish Palestine, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., May 9, 1940. Palestine, Germany, Poland, 


$4, 782. 84 

97, 772. 74 
5, 266. 05 
18, 205. 55 
200.00 
4,563.03 
5, 355. 00 

2, 777. 430. 44 

1, 396. 82 
3, 310. 63 
1,080.22 
5,150.51 

2, 616. 34 
20, 245. 53 
10, 920. 68 

1,39434 
22, 187. 93 
10, 827. 14 
9, 551. 11 
2, 829. 27 
10, 210. 87 
273.50 
206. 91 

2, 214. 90 

13, 986. 07 

1,155.91 
2, 213. 13 
27, 082. 98 
5, 376. 48 


$1, 927. 02 

90, 706. 27 
3, 786. 50 
12,515.28 
200.00 
3,000.00 
None 

2, 534, 613. 72 
1.115.77 
2, 128. 10 
180.07 
3, 460. 50 
1, 266. 30 

11, 646. 86 
6,500.00 

564.38 

12, 196. 33 
7,000.00 
6. 017. 53 
2,600.00 
9, 266. 45 

225.00 
183.30 

1,156.10 

9, 508. 98 

742.00 

975. 00 

8, 243. 00 

3,005.46 


$2. 855. 82 

6, 765. 40 
368.09 
702. 16 
None 

1, 092. 74 
None 

242, 816. 72 

None 

194. 18 

269.58 

82.62 

664.33 

6, 682. 22 

324. 93 

354. 34 

841.71 

288.45 

703.99 

7.50 

453. 10 

None 

12. 63 

85.67 
745. 57 

97. 16 

207. 36 

11,707.57 

1,962.66 


None 

$301. 07 
1,111.46 
4,988.11 
None 
470.29 
5, 355. 00 

None 

281.05 

988.35 

630.57 

1,607.39 

685. 71 

1,906.45 

4, 095. 75 

475. 62 

9, 149. 89 

3, 538. 69 

2, 829. 59 

221. 77 

491. 32 

48.50 

10.98 

973. 13 
3, 731. 52 

316.75 
1, 030. 77 
7, 132. 41 

408.36 


None 

$14,512.17 

4,911.50 

12, 112. 14 

None 

None 

None 

51.00 

2, 100. 00 
None 
None 
None 

1, 184. 10 

21,431.07 

650.00 

296.50 

2, 826. 56 
None 
None 
None 

1, 430. 00 
None 
None 

725.00 

1, 565. 88 

30.00 

None 

13, 468. 00 

33, 182. 50 




American Friends Service Committee, Philadelphia, Pa., 
Nov. 9, 1939. United Kingdom, Poland, Germany, 
France, Norway, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Italy. - 

The American Fund for Breton Relief, New York, N. Y., 


None 


American Fund for French Wounded, Inc., Boston, 


$806. 32 


American Fund for Wounded in France, Inc., Worcester, 


American German Aid Society, Los Angeles, Calif., Nov. 




The American Hospital in Britain, Ltd., New York, 




The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, 
Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 29, 1939. United King- 
dom, Poland, Germany, France, Norway, Belgium, 




American McAH Association, New York, N. Y., Jan. 3, 




American-Polish National Council, Chicago, 111., Aug. 




American War Godmothers, Pittsburgh, Pa., Mar. 6, 1940. 




American Women's Hospitals. New York, N. Y., Sept. 14, 




American Women's Unit for War Relief, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Jan. 15, 1940. France 

American Women's Voluntary Services, Inc., New York, 


33.70 


Les Amis de la France a Puerto Rico, San Juan, P. R., 




Les Amities Fcminines de la France, New York, N. Y., 




Les Anciens Combattants Francais de la Grande Guerre, 




Anthracite Relief Committee, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Sept. 




Anzac War Relief Fund, New York, N. Y., May 23, 1940. 




Associated Polish Societies Relief Committee of Webster, 




Associated Polish Societies' Relief Committee of Worces- 
ter, Mass., Worcester, Mass., Sept, 14, 1939. Poland 

Association of Former Juniors in France of Smith College, 


None 


Association of Former Russian Naval Officers in America, 




Association of Joint Polish-American Societies of Chelsea, 




L'Atelier, San Francisco. Calif., Jan. 29, 1940. France 

Mrs. Mark Baldwin, New York, N. Y., Mar. 4, 1940. 


847.00 


Basque Delegation in the United States of America, New 




Belgian Relief Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y., June 14, 1940. 


1, 726. 00 


Belgian Relief of Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif., 
May 27, 1940. Belgium, France, and Great Britain 


None 



<* The registration of this organization w as revoked on Nov. 30, 1940, at the request of registrant. 



JANUARY 4, 1941 



19 



Contributions for Rkukk in - Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Nov. 30, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



Belgian War Relief Fund, Manila, P. I., Juno 7, 1940. 
Belgium 

The Benedict Bureau Unit, Inc., New York, N. Y., Nov. 

29, 1939. France 

Bethel Mission of Eastern Europe, Minneapolis, Minn., 

Nov. 27, 1939. Poland 

Bishops' Committee for Polish Relief, Washington, D.C., 

Dec. 19, 1939. Poland 

Board of National Missions of the Presbyterian Church in 

the United States of America, New York, N. Y., Sept. 

26. 1939. Great Britain, France, and Germany 

British-American Ambulance Corps, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., June 11, 1940. Greece, England, and France 

British-American Comfort League, Quincy, Mass., Feb. 

21. 1940. England 

British-American War Relief Association, Seattle, Wash., 

Nov. 17, 1939. United Kingdom and allied countries. . . 

British Sailors' Book and Relief Society, New York,N. Y., 
May 2, 1940. Bermuda, Canada, and the British West 
Indies 

British War Relief Association of Northern California, 
San Francisco, Calif., Oct. 20, 1939. Great Britain and 
France 

The British War Relief Association of the Philippines, 
Manila, P. I., Apr. 11, 1940. • All belligerent countries. 

The British War Relief Association of Southern California, 
Los Angeles, Calif., Dec. 8, 1939. Groat Britain and 
Greece 

British War Relief Fund, Dayton, Ohio, Sept. 12, 1940. 
Great Britain 

British War Relief Society, Inc., New York, N. Y., Dec. 
4, 1939. Great Britain, Newfoundland, and British 
East Africa. 

Bundles for Britain, New Y'ork, N. Y., Dec. 28, 1939. 
Great Britain and Dominions 

Caledonian Club of Idaho, Boise, Idaho, Jan. 25, 1940. 
Scotland.. - 

California Denmark Fund, San Francisco, Calif., Nov. 20, 
1940. Denmark 

Canadian Women's Club of New York City, Inc., New 
Y'ork, N. Y\, Oct. 23, 1940. Great Britain, Canada, and 
Newfoundland.: _ _ 

Catholic Medical Mission Board, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Jan. 17, 1940. India, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, 
and the Union of South Afiica „. 

The Catholic Student War Relief of Pax Romana, Wash- 
ington, D. C, Dec. 13, 1939. Poland, France, Ger- 
many, and Great Britain _ 

Central Bureau for the Relief of the Evangelical Churches 
of Europe, New York, N. Y., May 14, 1940. All belliger- 
ent countries 

Central Committee Knesseth Israel, New Y'ork, N. Y., 
Oct. 27, 1939. Palestine-. 

Central Committee for Polish Relief, Toledo, Ohio, Feb. 
29, 1940. Poland 

Central Council of Polish Organizations, New Castle, Pa., 
Nov. 7, 1939. France, Poland, and England 

Centrala, Passaic, N. J., Oct. 12, 1939. Poland 

Cercle Francais de Seattle, Seattle, Wash., Nov. 2, 1939. 
France and Great Britain 

Chester (Delaware Co., Pa.) Polish Relief Committee, 
Chester, Pa., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland and France 



$2, 009. 06 

5, 481. 17 

12, 280. 02 

393, 932. 18 

6, 308. 03 

740, 636. 43 

2,311.08 

30, 145. 46 

2, 980. 03 

106, 903. 63 
69, 558. 45 

291,451.60 
161. 51 

1, 751, 287. 95 
489, 643. 22 



1,244.86 

16,246.29 

38, 089. 57 

829. 87 

2, 869. 73 

1, 452. 72 

2, 549. 45 
8, 075. 96 



$51. 38 

2, 846. 74 

8, 530. 40 

250, 324. 31 

5, 281. 30 

247, 406. 32 

1, 163. 70 

24, 853. 49 

25.00 

75, 505. 00 
65, 230. 48 

260, 531. 93 
149.00 

796, 074. 73 

174, 793. 72 

300.30 

None 



1,014. 50 

10, 984. 00 

24, 647. 45 

600. 00 

1,995.80 
1, 300. 75 

658.28 

5, 995. 46 



$2. 50 
1,008.43 
3, 548. 81 

55.23 

738. 01 

74, 461. 88 

222.84 

2, 075. 26 

2, 339. 61 

3, 423. 33 
1,443.87 

19, 185. 57 
9.20 

168,683.91 

128,457.06 

164. 57 

None 

213.90 



165. 41 

3, 547. 62 

13,442.12 

226. 77 

43.76 
11.65 

560. 24 

694. 04 



$1,955. 18 

1, 626. 00 

200. 81 

143, 552. 64 

288.72 

418, 768. 23 

924.54 

3, 216. 71 

615. 42 



11,734. 10 
3.31 

786, 529. 31 

186, 392. 44 

12.77 

None 

1,144.49 



$227. 50 
None 
None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

2, 576. 00 

9, 923. 00 

56, 246. 90 
317. 22 

82, 109. 12 
None 

417,114.75 

46(1, 555. 44 

None 

None 

None 



1,714.67 


None 


None 


None 


103. 10 


None 


830.17 


None 


140.32 


1,900.00 


1, 330. 93 


2, 775. 00 


1,386.46 


1,677.30 



■ No report for the month of November has been received from this organization. 



20 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Rkmef ini Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Church of the Pilgrimage, Plymouth, Mass., Nov. 5, 1940.' 
England 

Commission for Polish Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Sept. 12, 1939.» Poland 

The Commission for Relief in Belgium, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., May 21, 1940. Belgium and Luxemburg 

Committee for Aid to Children of Mobilized Men of the 

XX" Arrondissement of Paris, New York, N. Y., Jan. 

15, 1940. France- 

Committee of French-American Wives, New York, N. Y., 

Nov. 15, 1939. France and Great Britain 

Committee of Mercy, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 16, 

1939. France, Great Britain, Norway, Belgium, the 
Netherlands, and their allies 

Committee for Relief in Allied Countries, Washington, 
D. C, Feb. 2, 1940. France, Great Britain, Poland, 
Norway, Belgium, Luxemburg, and the Netherlands... 

Committee for the Relief for Poland, Seattle, Wash., Nov. 
24, 1939. Poland. __ 

Committee Representing Polish Organizations and Polish 
People in Perry, N. Y., Perry, N. Y., Oct. 23, 1939. 
Poland 

Czechoslovak Relief, Chicago, 111., July 25, 1940. Czech- 
oslovakia, Great Britain and Dominions, France, and 
Belgium 

District of Columbia Federation of Women's Clubs, 
Washington, D. C, Aug. 14, 1940. Great Britain 

The Emergency Aid of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa., 
Oct. 13, 1939. Great Britain, Franco, Norway, Belgium, 
Luxemburg, and the Netherlands 

Emergency Relief Committee for Kolbuszowa, New 
York, N. Y., Mar. 13, 1940. Poland 

Emergency Rescue Committee, New York, N. Y., Aug. 3, 

1940. France, United Kingdom, Belgium, Norway, 
and the Netherlands. _ 

English-Speaking Union of the United States, New York, 

N. Y., Dec. 26, 1939. Great Britain, Canada, and 

France 

Erste Pinchovor Kranken Unterstuzungs Verein, Inc., 

Brooklyn, N.Y., Apr. 22, 1940. Poland 

The Fall River British War Belief Society, Fall River, 

Mass., Sept. 26, 1940. Great Britain... 

Federated Council of Polish Societies of Grand Rapids, 

Mich., Grand Rapids, Mich., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland... 
Federation of Franco-Belgian Clubs of Rhode Island, 

Woonsocket, R.L.Nov. 15,1939. France and England.. 
Federation of French Veterans of the Great War, Inc., 

Now York, N. Y., Oct. 11, 1939. France 

Fellowship of Reconciliation, New York, N. Y., Jan. 20, 

1940. France, England, and possibly Germany. __ 

Fortra, Inc., New York, N. Y., Mar. 7, 1940. Germany 

and Poland 

Foster Parents' Plan for War Children, Inc., New York, 

N. Y„ Sept. 21, 1939. Franco 

Franco-American Federation, Salem, Mass., July 9, 1940. 

France - 

French Colonies War Relief Committee, New York, 

N. Y., Aug. 20, 1940. France 



$148. ,50 

510, 459. 15 

8, 790. 92 

4, 923. 40 
21,993.04 



4, 523. 03 
2, 441. 83 



15, 705. 52 
2, 058. 30 

54, 752. 58 
5, 729. 85 



275. 00 

2, 076. 31 

7, 594. 30 

5, 817. 61 

10, 204. 30 

590.21 

630, 646. 82 

117,686.47 

636. 30 

323.22 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$148. 50 

453, 953. 87 

4, 165. 00 

3, 365. 63 
15,969.71 



2, 500. 00 
2, 162. 72 



5, 402. 90 
1,687.19 

37, 650. 28 
None 



86, 



1.02 



None 
1, 000. 91 
4, 450. 93 
2, 483. 07 
8, 086. 09 

531.21 
461, 984. 52 
67, 430. 43 

None 

None 



Funds spent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



None 

$53. 555. 24 

2, 743. 33 

None 
2, 596. 63 



1,805.60 
255.71 



'J, mis. L'S 
2, 300. 05 



190. 63 
889. 19 
4I7.SO 
506.53 
Nono 
71, 323. 72 
25, 506. 43 
None 
222. 77 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Nov. 30, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



None 
$2, 950. 04 
1, 882. 59 

1, 557. 77 
3, 426. 70 



217. 43 
23.40 



10, 108. 73 
None 

8, 094. 02 
3, 429. 80 

31, 433. 71 

8,697.51 

275.00 

884. 77 

2, 254. 18 

2, 916. 74 

1,611.68 

59.00 

97, 338. 58 

24, 749. 61 

636.30 

100.45 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



None 

$1,500.00 

None 

None 
4, 529. 59 



None 
None 



30, 400. 00 
None 

11. 783. 93 
None 

None 

80. 304. 94 
None 
Nono 

3, 200. 00 
1, 199. 93 
804.70 
None 
Nono 
None 
None 
None 



' The registration of this organization was revoked on Nov. 7, 1940, at the request of registrant. 

» This registrant serves primarily as a clearinghouse for the distribution abroad of contributions received from other registrants; these receipts and 
disbursements are not included in the figures here given, since they are shown elsewhere in this tabulation following the names of the original collecting 
registrants. 



JANUARY 4, 1941 



21 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Coi ntriks — Ontiimrcl 



French Committee for Relief in France, Detroit, Mich., 
Oct. 17, 1939. France and Great Britain 

French Relief Association, Kansas City, Mo., Feb. 3, 
1940. France - 

French War Relief, Inc., Los Angeles, Calif., Nov. 16, 

1939. France 

French War Relief Fund of Nevada, Reno, Nev., June 

21. 1940. France . 

French War Relief Fund of the Philippines, Manila, P. I., 

May 1, 1940." France . - 

French War Veterans, Los Angeles, Calif., Dec. 5, 1939. 

France.. 

Friends of Children, Inc., New York, N. Y., June 13, 1940. 

Great Britain, France, Belgium, and the Netherlands.. 
Friends of Dover, England Fund, Dover, N. H., Oct. 25, 

1940. England. 

The Friends of Israel Refugee Relief Committee, Inc., 

Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 23, 1939. Canada, France, and 
England 

The Friends of Normandy, New York, N. Y., Dec. 18, 
1939. France - 

Friends of Poland, Chicago, 111., Dec. 6, 1939. Poland.... 

Fund for the Relief of Men of Letters and Scientists of 
Russia, New York, N. Y., Apr. 29, 1940. France, 
Czechoslovakia, and Poland. 

Funds for France, Inc., New York, N. Y., Aug. 14, 1940. 
France. ._ 

General Gustav Orliez Dreszer Foundation for Aid to 
Polish Children, Washington, D. C, Nov. 3, 1939. 
Poland . 

General Taufflieb Memorial Relief Committee for France, 
Santa Barbara, Calif., Nov. 17, 1939.' France and 
England 

German-American Relief Committee for Victims of Fas- 
cism, New York, N. Y., Apr. 18, 1940. France and 
Great Britain 

Mrs. George Gilliland, New York, N. Y., Aug. 10, 1940. 
Northern Ireland -.- 

Golden Rule Foundation, New York, N. Y., Nov. 2, 1939. 
Poland and Palestine 

Grand Duke Vladimir Benevolent Fund Association, New 
York, N. Y., Jan. 8, 1940. France 

Grand Lodge, Daughters of Scotia, Hartford, Conn., 
Feb. 16, 1940. Scotland 

Great Lakes Command, Canadian Legion of the British 
Empire Service League, Detroit, Mich., July 5, 1940. 
Great Britain and Canada 

Greater New Bedford British War Relief Corps, New 
Bedford, Mass., Dec. 19, 1939. Great Britain 

Greek War Relief Association, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Nov. 18, 1940. Greece 

Hadassah, Inc., New York, N. Y., Nov. 15, 1939. Pales- 
tine . 



Hamburg-Bremen Steamship Agency, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Mar. 21, 1940. Germany and Poland 

Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., Aug. 30, 1940. 
Great Britain 

Hebrew Christian Alliance of America, Chicago, 111., Jan. 
3,1940. England, Germany, and Poland 



$3, 754. 43 

882.76 

42, 425. 44 

None 

5, 556. 16 

822. 81 

16,551.71 

1,015.00 

14, 329. 33 

2, 445. 50 
1,421.95 

545. 38 
12, 763. 84 



550.38 
14, 583. 39 

2, 346. 44 
9, 262. 81 
116, 334. 98 
962, 676. 67 
221, 059. 81 
83, 130. 06 
2, 674. 20 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$1, 883. 07 
393 62 
19, 907. 64 
None 
500.00 
407.75 
4, 301. 31 
None 

2, 312. 42 

1,500.00 
680.00 

128.37 
1.2.50.00 



1.726.40 

990.95 
159. 25 
82.00 
370. 79 
11,523.95 

855.96 

7, 241. 68 

None 

768, 484. 09 

180, 151. 18 

None 

2, 575. 00 



Funds snent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



$297. 57 
134. 01 
6,103.38 
None 
10. 00 
171.66 

5, 816. 63 

None 

6, 488. 67 

160.00 
92.26 

58.71 
6, 936. 39 



52.10 

766.86 
None 
None 
30.70 
None 

73.35 

415.67 

None 

39,001.05 

50, 900. 83 

3, 726. 43 

99.20 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Nov. 30, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



$1,573.79 

366. 13 

16, 714. 52 

None 

5, 046. 46 
243.40 

6, 433. 77 
1, 015. 00 

5, 528. 24 

785.50 
649.69 

368.30 

4, 577. 45 



645. 51 

442. 63 
None 
None 

148. 89 
3. 059. 44 

1, 416. 13 

1, 605. 46 

116,334.98 

155, 191. 53 

None 

79, 403. 63 

None 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



$30, 339. 50 
996.17 
217. 60 
None 
None 
None 
26, 526. 88 
None 



None 



None 
None 



None 
None 



None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
779. 93 
None 
61, 009. 36 
None 
None 
None 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



» No report for the month of November has been received 
' The registration of this organization was revoked on Nov 



from this organization. 
30, 1940, at the request of registrant. 



22 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

Contributions fob Relief ini Belligerent Countries— Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration and 
destination of cnntrihutions 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Nov. 30, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



A. Seymour Houghton, Jr., et al., New York, N. Y., Nov 
27, 1939. France 

Humanitarian Work Committee, Glen Cove, N. Y., 
Sept. 30, 1939. Poland 

Independent British War Relief Society of Rhode Island 
Greenwood, R. I., June 14, 1940. Great Britain 

Independent Kinsker Aid Association, New York. N. Y 
Jan. 3, 1940, Poland - - 

International Children's Relief Association, New York, 
N. Y., Oct. 1, 1940. Great Britain.... 

International Committee of Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciations, New York, N. Y., Sept. 22, 1939. All belliger- 
ent countries --- 

International Federation of Business and Professional 
Women, Wheeling, W. Va., July 5, 1940. Poland, 
Czechoslovakia, Norway, Belgium, France, and the 
Netherlands 

International Relief Association for Victims of Fascism, 
New York, N. Y., Sept. 25, 1939. France, England, 
and Germany 11, 741.86 

Isthmian Pro-British Aid Committee, Ancon, C. Z., Sept. 
20, 1940. England 

Joint Committee of the United Scottish Clans of Greater 
New York and New Jersey, Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan. 30, 
1940. Scotland 

Junior Relief Group of Texas, Houston, Tex., May 29, 
1940. United Kingdom, France, Netherlands, Belgium, 
and Norway 

Marthe Th. Kahn, New York, N. Y., Apr. 16, 1940 
France 

The Kindergarten Unit, Inc., Norwalk, Conn., Oct. 3 

1939. France, Poland, United Kingdom, India, Aus- 
tralia, and New Zealand . ... 

The Kosciuszko Foundation, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
May 24, 1940. Poland 

The KyfThaeuser, League of German War Veterans in 
U. S. A., Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 27, 1939. Poland, 
Germany, and Canada .. 65,440.02 

Lackawanna County Committee for Polish Relief, Scran 
ton, Pa., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland 

Ladies Auxiliary of the Providence Branch of the Fed- 
eration of the Italian World War Veterans in the United 
States, Providence, R. I., Oct. 1, 1940. Italy 

LaFayette Preventorium, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept 

21. 1939. France 

La France Post, American Legion, New York, N. 

Feb. 7, 1940. France and Great Britain 

Mrs. Nancy Bartlett Laughlin, New York, N. Y., Jan 

31. 1940. France 

League of American Writers, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

May 6, 1940. France, England, Poland, and Norway-^ 2,784. 

League of Polish Societies of New Kensington, Arnold and 
vicinity, New Kensington, Pa., Nov. 17, 1939. Poland- . 

Legion of Young Polish Women, Chicago, HI., Oct. 2, 1939, 
Poland 16,228.73 

The Little House of Saint Pantaleon, Philadelphia, Pa., 
Sept. 30, 1939. France and England 

Lord Mayor of Plymouth's Services Welfare Fund, Ply- 
mouth, Mass., Nov. 5, 1940.* England. 

The Maple Leaf Fund, Inc., New York, N, Y., Apr. 19, 

1940. Canada, United Kingdom, and France 54,844.30 

i The registration of this organization was revoked on Nov 



$13, 992. 34 

2, 910. 00 

1, 033. 05 

None 

None 

36, 883. 50 



, 527. 52 
None 



10, 000. 00 
25.00 

892. 85 

6, 450. 00 

42, 831. 27 

7, 225. 56 

2, 490. 89 

8, 647. 13 
925. 00 
40U 00 

1, 560. 52 
1.498.24 

9, 642. 00 
25, 460. 68 

693. 16 

13.901.11 
9, 1940, at 



$156. 86 
62.38 
19.00 
None 
None 

5, 655. 63 



329. 36 
406.90 

5, 515. 60 
831. 80 

None 

4, 212. 37 

385. 79 

None 
1,223.61 

78.19 
2, 716. 50 

36.26 

42.09 

18, 135. 23 
the request of 



$5, 805. 96 

507. 20 

1,028.37 

699. 30 

None 

25, 570. 48 



None 
147. 55 



156. 02 
193. 69 

None 
None 

7, 093. 16 
632. 30 

58.23 
7,126.97 

274. 53 
8.60 

None 

482. 53 
3, 870. 23 
1, 383. 22 

None 

22, 807. 96 
registrant. 



$773 .05 

185.00 

1,150.00 

None 

None 

None 



2, 020. 00 
None 



None 
None 



1, 933. 00 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
11. 14 
2, 400. 00 
None 

18, 874. 29 
None 

76,848.00 



JANUARY 4, 1941 



23 



Contributions fob Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



for relief in 
countries 
named 



lion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



Unexpended 

balance as of 
Nov. 30, 1940, 
including cost 

of goods pur- 
chased and 

still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



Medical and Surgical Supply Committee of America, 
New York, N. Y., Aug. 5, 1940. Poland, Great Britain, 
France, Netherlands, Norway, Luxemburg, Belgium, 
and Greece -- 

Mennonite Central Committee, Akron, Pa., Feb. 13, 1940. 
Great Britain, Poland, Germany, France, and Canada.. 

Methodist Committee for Overseas Relief, New York, 
N. Y., Sept. 4, 1940. France, Poland, Czechoslovakia, 
Norway, Belgium, the Netherlands, and United King- 
dom 

Milford, Connecticut, Polish Relief Fund Committee, 
Milford, Conn., Nov. 6, 1939. Poland... 

The Mobile Circle for Benefit of the Royal Navy Hospital 
Comforts Fund, Mobile, Ala., Sept. 18, 1940. British 
Isles 



Monmouth War Relief, Red Bank, N. J., Sept. 12, 1940. 

England and France 

The Mother Church, the First Church of Christ, Scientist, 

in Boston, U. S. A., Boston, Mass., Apr. 25, 1940. 

Canada, France, and the United Kingdom 

Fernanda Wanamaker Munn (Mrs. Ector Munn), New 

York, N. Y., Nov. 25, 1939. France and England 

National Christian Action, Inc., New York, N. Y., May 

23, 1940. Norway and Denmark 

Near East Foundation, Inc., New York, N. Y., Nov. 28, 

1940. Greece 

Netherlands War Relief Committee, Manila, P. I., May 

27, 1940.* Netherlands 

The New Canaan Workshop, New Canaan, Conn., July 1, 

1940. British Empire . - 

New Jersey Broadcasting Corp., Jersey City, N. J., Sept. 

13, 1939. Poland 

Nicole do Paris Relief Fund, New York, N. Y., July 1, 

1940. France... 

North Side Polish Council Relief Committee of Milwau- 
kee, Wis., Milwaukee, Wis., Dec. 5, 1939. Poland 

Norwegian Relief, Inc., Chicago, 111., May 1, 1940. Nor- 



Nowe-Dworer Ladies Benevolent Association, Inc., New 
York, N. Y., Oct. 25, 1939. Poland 

Nowiny Publishing Apostolate, Inc., Milwaukee, Wis., 
Sept. 26, 1939. Poland. 

Nowy Swiat Publishing Co., Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 

11, 1939. Poland and France 

Order of Scottish Clans, Boston, Mass., Jan. 25, 1940. 

Scotland 

Over-Seas League Tobacco Fund, New York, N. Y., Aug. 

19, 1940. British Empire 

The Pacific Steam Navigation Company, Cristobal, C. 7,., 

Oct. 16, 1940. England - 

Paderewski Fund for Polish Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Feb. 23, 1940. Poland.. 

Parcels for Belgian Prisoners, Washington, D. C, Nov. 

12, 1940. 1 Germany 

Parcels for the Forces, New York, N. Y., Oct. 9, 1940. 

Great Britain.. 

The Paryski Publishing Co., Toledo, Ohio, Sept. 15, 

1939. Poland and Great Britain 

The Pawtucket and Blaekstone Valley British Relief 

Society of Rhode Island, Pawtucket, R. I., Feb. 

26, 1940. Great Britain 



$20, 752. 54 
29,910.20 

5, 560. 40 
405. 33 

1,390.36 
2, 123. 27 

177, 300. 69 
14, 480. 05 
1,134.31 

25, 413. 13 
3, 478. 25 
9, 652. 89 
1, 210. 55 

227. 00 

1, 581. 48 

396.611.25 

806. 14 

5, 407. 16 

26, 865. 37 

6, 254. 88 
36, 735. 17 

143. 50 
1 13, 553. 76 



5, 854. 28 
7, 477. 33 



$500. 34 
21, 585. 46 

5, 000. 00 
250.20 

838.32 
642. 45 

10, 175. 88 

6, 994. 60 

None 

5, 000. 00 

1, 253. 87 

7, 483. 50 

826. 17 

14S. 00 

1, 400. 28 

None 

None 

4, 589. 86 

25, 677. 50 

3, 377. 00 

30, 454. 05 

137.55 

60. 000. 00 



$6, 283. 46 
4, 494. 84 

560. 40 
84.62 

.35 
295.82 

2, 982. 53 

5, 381. 51 

829.78 

6, 092. 82 

16.50 

679. 85 

384. 38 

51.00 

19.18 

11,982.59 

141.00 

None 

103. 39 

None 

6, 281. 12 

5.95 

33, 078. 01 



2, 643. 54 
6, 866. 33 



4, 527. 10 
None 



None 
70. 51 

551. 69 
1,185.00 

164, 142. 28 
2, 103. ! 

304.53 

14, 320. 31 

2, 207. 88 

1, 489. 64 

None 

28.00 

162. 02 

384, 628. 66 

665. 14 

S17.30 

1, 084. 48 

2, 877. 88 

None 

None 

20, 475. 75 



$70, 770. : 
8, 663. 02 

None 
None 

618. 14 
165. 00 

15,927.85 
5, 427. 28 
None 
None 
None 
2, 200. 00 
None 
None 
1, 300. 00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
15.00 
None 



None 
611.00 



35.40 
None 



* No report for the month of November has been received from this organization. 

1 No complete report for the month of November has been received from this organization. 



24 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Rki.ief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Funds spent 

for relief In 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Nov. 30, 1910, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent, 
to countries 
named 



Ocl 



Pclham Overseas Knitting Circle, Pelham, N. 
17, 1940. Scotland- 

Polish Aid Fund Committee of Federation of Elizabeth 
Polish Organizations, Elizabeth, N. J., Sept. 23, 1939. 
Poland and England 

Polish Aid Fund Committee of St. Casimir's Roman 
Catholic Church of the City of Albany, N. Y., Albany, 
N. Y., Jan. 22, 1940. Poland 

Polish-American Associations of Middlesex County, N. J., 
Sayreville, N. J., Jan. 22, 1940. Poland 

Polish-American Citizens Relief Fund Committee, Shir- 
ley, Mass., Dec. 16, 1939. Poland 

Polish-American Council, Chicago, III., Sept. IS, 1939. 
Poland... 

Polish-American Forwarding Committee, Inc., New 
York, N. Y., Mar. 28, 1940. Poland and Germany 

Polish-American Volunteer Ambulance Section, Inc. 
(Pavas), New York, N. Y., Feb. 13, 1940. France and 
England - 

Polish Broadcasting Corp., New York, X. Y., Sept. 2:i, 
1939. Poland-.-. - - 

Polish Business and Professional Men's Club, Los Angeles, 
Calif., Nov. 17, 1939. Poland 

Polish Central Committee of New London, Conn., New 
London, Conn., Oct. 13, 1939. Poland 

Polish Central Council of New Haven, New Haven, 
Conn., Sept. 29, 1939. Poland 

Polish Civic League of Mercer County, Tronton, N. J., 
Sept. 19, 1939. Poland 

Polish Civilian Relief Fund, Passaic, N. J., Oct. 27, 1939. 
Poland 

Polish Falcons Alliance of America, Pittsburgh, Pa., 
Sept. 20, 1939. Poland 

Polish Inter-Organization "Centrala" of Waterbury, 
Waterbury, Conn., Feb. 28, 1940. Poland 

Polish Literary Guild of New Britain, Conn., New Brit- 
ain, Conn., Sept. 21, 1939. Poland 

Polish National Alliance of the United States of North 
America, Chicago, 111., Sept. 27, 1939. Poland 

Polish National Council of Montgomery County, Amster- 
dam, N. Y., Oct. 12, 1939." Poland...- 

Polish National Council of New York, New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 14, 1939. France and Poland 

The Polish Naturalization Independent Club, Worcester, 
Mass., Sept. 20, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief of Carteret, N. J. Carteret, N. J., Oct. 11, 
1939. Poland - 

Polish Relief Committee of Boston, Boston, Mass., Sept. 
14, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Brockton, Mass., Brockton, 
Mass., Sept. 25, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Cambridge, Mass., Cam- 
bridge, Mass., Sept. 16, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Columbia County, Hudson, 
N. Y., Mar. 15, 1940. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Delaware, Wilmington, Del., 
Sept. 22, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee, Detroit, Mich., Sept. 11, 1939. 
Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Fitchburg, Fitchburg, Mass., 
Mar. 29, 1940. Poland 



9, 033. 85 

2, 705. 17 

1, 057. 05 
427. 01 

458, 151. 12 
5. 944. 78 

29, 120. 00 

2, 658. 83 
474. 50 

1, 332. 17 
4, 049. 19 
7, 246. 54 
4, 350. 01 

11,469.43 
742. 25 

3, 070. 59 
302, 941. 12 

4, 412. 62 
98, 963. 82 

3, 762. 99 
1,382.91 
9,070.85 
1,835.48 

2, 728. 82 

None 

7,995.12 

159,568.04 

749.80 



$296. 43 

7, 946. 85 

426.32 

800.00 

362, 06 

264, 321. 15 

3, 542. 55 

19, 769. 05 

None 

314. 23 

991. 24 

3, 316. 65 

6, 392. 86 

3, 025. 00 

11,102.23 

607.76 

2,000.00 

231, 065. 00 

2, 910. 00 
77,911.30 

3, 200. 00 
800.00 

7,101.19 

1, 201. 27 

1, 142. 30 

None 

7, 189. 84 

108, 646. 73 

460.40 



15.00 

9.60 

80.82 

25.17 

12, 490. 70 

3, 702. 30 

170.56 

35.30 

158.27 

148. 57 

51.26 

1.59 

J51.42 

20.00 

25. 50 

13.00 

1, 947. 90 

97.54 

12, 564. 07 

9.65 

13.00 

424.84 

247.67 

396.04 

None 

240. 46 

6, 238. 43 

41.09 



1,072.00 

2, 269. 25 

176. 23 

39.78 

181, 339. 27 

None 

9, 180. 39 

2, 623. 53 

2.00 

189.36 

681.28 

S. r i2 09 

1,1173.59 
347. 20 
108 99 

1.057.59 
69, 928. 22 

1, 405. 08 

8, 488. 46 
553. 34 
569. 91 

1,544.82 
386.64 

1, 19(1. 48 

None 

564.82 

44, 682. 88 

248.31 



None 
$1. 600. 00 

1,200.00 

None 

425. 00 

100, 500. 00 

None 

256 .40 

None 

None 

75.00 

1,800.00 

4,000.00 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

5,000.00 

289, 633. 50 

None 

45.00 

2, 600. 00 

360.00 

600. 00 

None 

4, 250. 00 

62, 974. 00 

130.00 



' No report for the month of November has been received from tbis organization. 



JANUARY 4, 1941 



25 



Contributions fob Relief in 1 Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Polish Relief Committee, Flint, Mich., Sept. 18, 1939. 

Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Holyoke, Mass., Holyoke, 

Mass., Nov. 4, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Jackson, Mich., Jackson 

Mich., Nov. 9, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee, New Bedford, Mass., Oct. 31, 

1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Philadelphia and vicinity, 

Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 12, 1939. Poland.. .-.. 

Polish Relief Committee of the Polish National Home As- 
sociation, Lowell, Mass., Nov. 27, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee, Taunton, Mass., Dec. 13, 1939. 

Poland -- 

Polish Relief Fund of Fall River, Mass., Fall River, 

Mass., Nov. 8, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund, Jersey City, N. J., Sept. 12, 1939. 

Poland 

Polish Relief Fund, Jewett City, Conn., Oct. 3, 1939. 

Poland 

Polish Relief Fund of Meriden, Meriden, Conn., Oct. 12, 

1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund, Middletown, Conn., Sept. 23, 1939. 

Poland .- 

Polish Relief Fund, Niagara Falls, N. Y., Oct. 26, 1939. 

Poland. _ 

Polish Relief Fund of Palmer, Mass., Three Rivers, Mass., 

Oct. 20, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund of Syracuse, New York, and vicinity, 

Syracuse, N. Y., Oct. 31, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund Committee, Los Angeles, Calif., Dec. 

13, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund Committee of Milwaukee, Wis., Mil- 
waukee, Wis., Sept. 26, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund Committee of Passaic and Bergen 

Counties, Inc., Passaic, N. J., Sept. 22, 1939. Poland.. 
Polish Union of the United States of North America, 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Sept. 8, 1939. Poland 

Polish United Societies of Holy Trinity Parish, Lowell, 

Mass., Sept. 20, 1939. Poland 

Polish War Sufferers Relief Committee (Fourth Ward), 

Toledo, Ohio, Sept. 21, 1939. Poland 

Polish Welfare Council, Schenectady, N. Y., Sept. 22, 

1939. Poland 

Polish White Cross Club of West Utica, Utica, N. Y., Oct. 

20, 1939. Poland 

Polish Women's Fund to Fatherland, Lawrence, Mass., 

Sept. 23, 1939." Poland 

Polish Women's Relief Committee, New York, N. Y., Nov 

24, 1939. France, Poland, and Germany 

Polski Komitet Ratunkowy (Polish Relief Fund), Bing- 

hamton, N. Y., Sept. 25, 1939.° Poland 

Pulaski Civic League of Middlesex County, N. J., South 

River, N.J. , Sept. 30, 1939. Poland 

Pulaski League of Queens County, Inc., Jamaica, N. Y., 

Oct. 21, 1939. Poland 

Queen Wilhelmina Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y., May 17, 

1940. Netherlands, France, Poland, United Kingdom, 
India, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Union of South 
Africa, Norway, Belgium, and Luxemburg — 



$6, 727. 13 
6, 043. 99 
1, 849. 10 
10, 628. 43 
46. 802. 60 
2, 876. 54 
2, 884. 77 

1. 251. 29 
61.348.81 

1, 603. 35 
1,806.69 
4, 776. 56 
2, 778. 60 
1,811.90 
12,370.16 
790.04 
16, 593. 75 
13, 763. 06 
2, 166. 24 
4, 085. 32 
6, 379. 46 

5. 964. 30 
7, 269. 10 

6, 789. 56 
8, 296. 14 
3. 886. 00 

639.29 

7, 758. 93 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$5, 171.64 

5, 160. 56 

649.60 

7, 397. 24 

33, 310. 00 

1, 826. 00 

2, 757. 00 
1,000.00 

53, 610. 95 
1, 360. 90 

1, 500. 00 
3, 061. 37 

2, 500. 00 
620.46 

8, 869. 00 
448.00 
13, 732. 72 
9, 472. 81 
2, 000. 00 

1, 788. 31 
6, 262. 36 
5,260.36 
5, 262. 70 

2, 321. 10 
2, 817. 24 
2, 619. 04 

None 
7, 400. 00 



Funds spent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



$1,436.76 

208.35 

293.16 

913. 63 

882.04 

481.28 

25.17 

30.10 

1,961.80 

238.67 

27.90 

18.20 

70.80 

219.24 

2, 511. 99 

190.66 

1, 019. 06 

1, 773. 69 

None 

168.26 

117.09 

57.32 

424.81 

642. 34 

2, 745. 68 

272.48 

86.00 

172. 15 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Nov. 30, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
In kind sent 
to countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



676.1 
906.34 
2, 317. 56 
11,610.46 
570.26 
102.60 

221. 19 
5.876.C 

3.78 

278. 79 

1,696 

207.80 

972. 20 
989. 17 
151.48 

1,841.97 

2, 616. 66 

166.24 

2, 128. 75 

None 

646.63 

1, 581. 59 

2, 826. 12 

2, 733. 32 

994.48 

554.29 

186.78 



None 

$775. 00 

760.00 

3, 850. 00 

None 

None 
1, 375. 00 

None 

1, 675. 00 

900.00 

None 

None 

None 
4,004.95 
1,850.00 

150.00 
11,607.40 
3, 678. 00 

None 
1, 240. 00 

None 
6, 150. 00 
1, 800. 00 
1,800.00 
2, 068. 80 

780.00 
None 
None 



■ No report for the month of November has been received from this organization. 

• No complete report for the month of November has been received from this organization. 



26 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions fob Relief in' Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Nov. 30, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



Refugees of England, Inc., New York, N. Y., July 12, 

1940. ;j Great Britain, France, and French Cameroons.. 
Relief Agency for Polish War Sufferers, Willimantic, 

Conn., Sept. 29, 1939. Poland 

Relief Committee of United Polish Societies, Chicopee, 

Mass., Oct. 21, 1939. Poland 

Relief for French Refugees in England, Washington, D. C, 

Dec. 26, 1939. France and Great Britain 

Relief Fund for Sufferers in Poland Committee, Kenosha, 

Wis., Sept. 25, 1939. Poland .. 

Relief Society for Jews in Lublin, Los Angeles, Calif., Dec. 

13. 1939. Poland-. 

Royal Air Force Benevolent Fund, New York, N. Y., 

Nov. 26, 1940. Great Britain 

Russian Children's Welfare Society, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Sept. 29, 1939. Germany, France, and Poland. 

St. Andrews (Scottish) Society of Washington, D.C., 
Washington, D.C., June 18, 1940. Scotland- 

St. Stephens Polish Relief Fund of Perth Amboy, N. J., 
Perth Amboy, N. J., Sept. 27, 1939. Poland. 

The Salvation Army, New York, N. Y., May 23, 1940. 
England, France, Norway, Belgium, and the Nether- 
lands 

San Angelo Standard, Inc., San Angelo, Tex., Oct. 28, 
1940.0 England 

Save the Children Federation, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 8, 1939. England, Poland, Belgium, and the 
Netherlands 

Schuylkill and Carbon Counties Relief Committee for 
Poland, Frackville, Pa., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland.. 

Scots' Charitable Society, Boston, Mass., May 9, 1940. 
Scotland 

Scottish Clans Evacuation Plan, Port Washington, N. Y., 
Nov. 19, 1940. Great Britain 

Le Secours Francais, New York, N. Y., Sept. 11, 1940/ 
France 

Secours Franco-Americain — War Relief, Pittsburgh, Pa., 
Nov. 20, 1939. Great Britain 

The Seventh Column, Inc., West Fairlee, Vt., June 12, 
1940. France and England 

Share a Smoke Club, Inc., Ithaca, N. Y., Nov. 14, 1939. 
England, France, Norway, Belgium, and the Nether- 
lands 

Sociedades Hispanas Aliadas, San Francisco, Calif., Mar. 

29. 1940. France 

Sociedades Hispanas Confederadas, Brooklyn, N. Y., 

Jan. 22, 1940. France. 

SocieW Francaise de St. Louis, Inc., St. Louis, Mo., Nov. 

15, 1939. France 

Society Israelite Francaise de Secours Mutuels de New 

York, New York, N. Y., June 4, 1940. France 

Society of the Devotees of Jerusalem, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Dec. 18, 1939. Palestine 

Solidaridad Internacional Antifascista, New York, N. Y., 

Oct. 17, 1940. France 



$37, 249. 75 
2, 868. 67 

7, 757. 94 
19, 788. 84 

4, 320. 94 
909.08 
None 

8, 308. 43 
902. 96 

2, 992. 66 

201,915.67 
103.00 

150,917.44 
6, 097. 24 
1,013.26 
1,979.00 
13,981.02 
2, 026. 28 
None 

688.70 
1, 277. 72 
31, 199. 12 
852. 81 
317.00 
14,944.19 
5, 969. 25 



$9, 529. 10 

2. 104. 98 

7, 336. 97 

16, 396. 81 

3, 866. 50 

175.00 

None 

5, 742. 92 

831.31 

None 

148. 627. 05 
103.00 

105, 098. 72 
5, 555. 71 
1,000.00 
1, 960. 24 
2,000.00 
1,644.44 
None 

350.00 
None 
30, 240. 87 
373. 49 
200.00 
7, 900. 00 
None 



$11,192.83 
184. 53 

None 
635.86 
365. 41 
287.82 

None 
2, 113. 57 

71.65 

None 

1, 775. 03 
None 

34, 789. 60 
45.00 
None 
None 
5, 624. 80 
108. 35 
None 

113.60 
706. 13 
958.25 

57. 56 



.Vis. 31 



$16, 527. 82 
579. 16 
420. 97 

2, 756. 17 
89.03 
446.28 
None 
451.94 
None 

2, 992. 66 

51,513.59 
None 

11,029.12 
496. 53 
13.26 
18.76 
6, 466. 22 
273. 49 
None 

225.10 

671. 69 
None 
421. 76 
114.20 
363. 32 
5, 370. 94 



$5, 004. 50 

716.46 

2, 560. 00 

5, 723. 95 

1,000.00 

None 

None 

1, 166. 20 

None 

None 

25, 562. 00 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
2, 240. 10 
None 

None 
None 
None 
8.00 
None 
None 
None 



p This registrant serves primarily as a clearing house for the distribution abroad of contributions collected by other registrants; these receipts and 
disbursements are not included in the figures here given, since they are shown elsewhere in this tabulation following the names of the original collecting 
registrants. 

« The registration of this organization was revoked on Nov. 14, 1940, at the request of the registrnt. 

' The figures given here are for the months of October and November only, since Le Secours Francais did not commence operations under registration 
no. 112 until Oct. 1. 



JANUARY 4, 1941 



27 



Contributions for Relief in Beixigerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration and 
destination of contributions 



The Somerset Workroom, Far Hills, N. J., Apr. 25, 1910. 

Franco and Great Britain 

Le Souvenir Francals, Detroit, Mich., May 1, 1940. 

France and Belgium 

Spanish Refugee Relief Campaign, New York, N. Y., 

Sept. 20, 1939. Franco.. 

Springfield and Vicinity Polish Relief Fund Committee, 

Springfield, Mass., Sept. 23, 1939. Poland 

Superior Council of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, 

New York, N. Y., Apr. 5, 1940. France 

Miss Heather Thatcher, Hollywood, Calif., Nov. 19, 1940. 

Great Britain 

Toledo Committee for Relief of War Victims, Toledo, 

Ohio, Sept. 19, 1939. Poland 

Tolstoy Foundation, Inc., New York, N. Y., Oct. 17, 1939. 

France, Poland, England, and Czechoslovakia. 

Mrs. Walter R. Tuckerman, Bethesda, Md., Nov, 24, 

1939. Great Britain _. 

Edmund Tyszka, Hamtramck, Mich., Sept. 19, 1939. 

Poland 

Ukranian Relief Committee, New York, N. Y., June 28, 

1940. Germany, France, England, and Italy 

L'Union Alsacienne, Inc., New York, N. Y., Oct. 28, 

1939. France 

Unitarian Service Committee of the American Unitarian 

Association, Boston, Mass., May 23, 1940. France, 

British Isles, and the Netherlands 

United American-Polish Organizations, South River, 

N. J., South River, N. J., Oct. 20, 1939. Poland 

United American-Spanish Aid Committee, New York, 

N. Y., Apr. 29, 1940. United Kingdom and France 

United Bilgorayer Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., Mar. 

21, 1940. Poland 

United British War Relief Association, Somerville, Mass., 

June 14, 1940. Great Britain and Northern Ireland 

United Charity Institutions of Jerusalem, New York, 

N. Y., Oct. 13, 1939. Palestine. 

United Committee for French Relief, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Oct. 26, 1939. France and England 

United Fund for Refugee Children, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Sept. 21, 1939. Poland, France, and England.... 
United German Societies, Inc., Portland, Oreg., Portland, 

Oreg., Jan. 8, 1940. Germany 

United Nowy Dworer Relief Committee, New York, 

N. Y., Jan. 3, 1940. Poland 

United Opoler Relief of New York, New York, N. Y., 

Dec. 9, 1939. Poland... 

United Polish Committees in Racine, Wis., Racine, Wis., 

Nov. 2, 1939. Poland 

United Polish Organizations of Salem, Mass., Salem, 

Mass., Oct. 20, 1939. Poland 

United Polish Societies of Bristol, Conn., Bristol, Conn., 

Sept. 29, 1939. Poland 

United Polish Societies of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, Calif., 

Oct. 21, 1939. Poland 

United Reading Appeal for Polish War Sufferers, Reading, 

Pa., Sept. 22, 1939. Poland and England 

Universal Committee for the Defense of Democracy, New 

York.N. Y., Oct. 16,1940. England and France 

Mrs. Paul Verdier Fund, San Francisco, Calif., Oct. 11, 

1939. France 

Woman's Auxiliary Board of the Scots' Charitable Society, 

Inc., Waverley, Mass., Feb. 28, 1940. Scotland 



$13,674.45 

58.00 

38, 062. 61 

1.213.44 

310.00 

2, 620. 50 

6, 763. 89 

20,264.11 

3, 910. 25 

3, 073. 96 

451. 20 

2, 449. 40 

29, 543. 70 

3, 249. 72 
4, 309. 78 
1,326.97 
5,410.57 

55, 549. 74 

122, 216. 48 

5,161.15 

2, 732. 02 

832.96 

889. 85 

2, 185. 14 

2, 618. 23 

1,221.19 

2, 922. 46 

8,101.60 

507. 10 

4, 207. 41 
2, 316. 97 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$6, 397. 52 
None 
12,934.58 
1,100.00 
310.00 
2, 600. 00 
4, 826. 07 
11,735.64 

2, 559. 18 

3, 073. 96 
108.50 
400.27 

17,451.04 

2, 400. 00 

2, 067. 15 

None 

4, 080. 00 

30, 156. 58 

79, 520. 63 

918. 15 

2, 499. 94 

84.70 

None 

1, 350. 00 

2, 080. 32 

576. 80 

2, 462. 10 

6, 889. 14 

None 

3, 897. 31 



Funds spent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



$1, 104.96 

None 

24,031.23 

• 54.20 

None 

20.50 

629. 79 

4, 328. 76 

3.95 

None 

175. 89 
585. 47 

4, 978. 03 
136. 94 

2, 206. 52 
160.44 

1,028.59 
25, 759. 22 
12, 268. 10 

3, 644. 17 
135. 99 
191.96 

35.21 
235.52 
437.91 

26.75 
355. 48 
140. 13 

512. 90 
114.31 

14.17 



Unexpended 

balance as of 
Nov. 30, 1940, 
including cost 

of goods pur- 
chased and 

still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



$6,171.97 

58.00 

1,096.80 

59. 24 

None 

None 

1, 30S. 03 

4,189.71 

1,347.12 

None 

166.87 



712. 78 
36.11 

1, 166. 63 
301.98 
None 
30, 427. 75 
698.83 
96.09 
556.30 
854.64 
599. 
100. 00 
617.64 
104. 
1, 072. 33 
None 

195. 79 
87.90 



$10,878.40 
None 
16, 486. 00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
200.00 
315.00 

100. 08 
None 
None 
None 
378.00 
None 
8, 504. 52 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
595. 00 
300.00 
None 
None 
None 
3, 282. 00 
None 



28 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions fob Relief in 1 Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration and 
destination of contributions 


Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Funds spent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Nov. 30, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 


Women's Allied War Relief Association of St. Louis, Clay- 
ton, Mo., Dec. 18, 1939. Great Britain and France 

Registrants whose registrations were revoked prior to 
Nov, 1, 1940, and who had no balance on hand as of that 


$8, 882. 56 
617, 174. 96 


$6, 538. 30 
431, 450. 24 


$8.02 
88, 893. 31 


$2, 336. 24 
None 


$8. 933. 60 
1,341,611.16 


None 








17, 192, 740. 57 


11, 142, 660. 25 


1,693,861.73 


4, 374, 754. 30 


3, 767, 256. 62 









• It is not possible to strike an exact balance in these published totals, since some registrants have included in their expenditures moneys available 
from loans or advances, which are not considered by the Department to be "funds received" and hence are not reported as such. 



The Department 



RESIGNATION OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY GRADY 



[Released to the press by the White House December 30] 

The President has received the following 
letter of resignation, under date of December 
28, 1940, from the Honorable Henry F. Grady, 
Assistant Secretary of State : 
"My Dear Mr. President: 

"It is with genuine regret that I tender you 
my resignation as Assistant Secretary of State. 
I am compelled to do so as personal considera- 
tions necessitate my returning to private life. 

"I have been associated with you in several 
capacities for most of the time since you became 
President. It has been a rare privilege and 
great happiness to have cooperated in a small 
way in the epochal work you are doing for our 
country and the world. Of course I am at 
your command at any time and for any service I 
can render you and the country. 
"Faithfully yours, 

Henry F. Grady'' 



In accepting the resignation, the President. 
on December 30, wrote Mr. Grady as follows: 

"My Dear Henry: 

"It is with very great regret that I have 
learned of your decision to resign from Govern- 
ment service. And I accept your resignation 
most reluctantly; only because I understand the 
compelling personal considerations involved. It 
has always been a pleasure to work with you. 

"Your loyal and able work in the important 
post of Assistant Secretary of State, as in your 
earlier posts of high responsibility in the service 
of the Government, has been a source of deep 
personal as well as official satisfaction to me. 

"I am particularly grateful for your typically 
warm-hearted and generous offer to be of fur- 
ther service to your country and I shall not fail 
to bear it in mind. 

"With best wishes for success and happiness 
in your new work. 

"Very sincerely yours, 

Franklin D. Roosevelt" 



JANUARY 4, 1941 



29 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

[Released to the press December 31] 

The following recent appointments to offices 
in the Department have been made by the Sec- 
retary of State: 

Mr. George L. Brandt, a Foreign Sei-vice of- 
ficer of class II, was designated on December 
27 to serve as Chief of the Special Division, 
effective January 2, 1941. 

On the same date, Mr. James Hugh Keeley, 
Jr., a Foreign Service officer of class III, was 
designated Assistant Chief of the Special Divi- 
sion, also effective January 2, 1941. 

Mr. William E. DeCourcy, a Foreign Service 
officer of class IV, was designated on December 
27 to serve as an Executive Assistant to the As- 
sistant Secretary of State, Mr. Breckinridge 
Long, effective as from December 23, 1940. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press January 4] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since December 28, 
1940: 

Career Officers 

George K. Donald, of Mobile, Ala., Consul 
General at Southampton, England, has been 
assigned as Consul General at Windsor, Ont., 
Canada, and will proceed to his post upon the 
closing of the office at Southampton. 

Frederick P. Hibbard, of Denison, Tex., First 
Secretary of Legation and Consul at Bucharest, 
Rumania, has been designated First Secretary 
of Legation at Lisbon, Portugal. 

Parker W. Buhrman, of Botetourt County, 
Va., Consul General at Basel, Switzerland, has 



been assigned as Consul General at Glasgow, 
Scotland. 

Marshall M. Vance, of Dayton, Ohio, Consul 
at Windsor, Ont., Canada, has been assigned as 
Consul at Basel, Switzerland. 

Angus I. Ward, of Chassell, Mich., First Sec- 
retary of Embassy and Consul at Moscow, 
IT. S. S. R., has been assigned as Consul at 
Vladivostok, U. S. S. R., where a consulate gen- 
eral will be established. 

Eugene M. Hinkle, of New York, N. Y., 
Second Secretary of Legation and Consul at 
Ciudad Trujillo, Dominican Republic, has been 
designated Second Secretary of Embassy and 
Consul at Berlin, Germany, and will serve in 
dual capacity. 

Edward P. Lawton, of Savannah, Ga., Second 
Secretary of Embassy at Habana, Cuba, has 
been designated Second Secretary of Legation 
and Consul at Ciudad Trujillo, Dominican 
Republic, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Sidney H. Browne, of Short Hills, N. J., Con- 
sul at Buenos Aires, Argentina, has been as- 
signed as Consul at Genoa, Italy. 

Carl Breuer, of Locust Valley, Long Island, 
N. Y., Vice Consul at Lima, Peru, has been 
assigned as Vice Consul at La Guaira, Vene- 
zuela. 

Robert B. Memminger, of Charleston, S. C, 
Vice Consul at Zagreb, Yugoslavia, has been 
designated Third Secretary of Legation and 
Vice Consul at Montevideo, Uruguay, and will 
serve in dual capacity. 

William P. Snow of Bangor, Maine, Third 
Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul at 
Stockholm, Sweden, has been assigned as Vice 
Consul at Lima, Peru. 

Fred E. Waller, of Michigan, Vice Consul at 
Paris, France, has been appointed Foreign 
Service officer and assigned as Vice Consul at 
St. John's, Newfoundland. 

Non-career ( )fficers 

Donald H. Nichols, of New Mexico, Vice Con- 
sul at Moscow, IT. S. S. R., has been appointed 
Vice Consul at Vladivostok, U. S. S. R. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



SOVEREIGNTY 

CONVENTION ON THE PROVISIONAL ADMINIS- 
TRATION OF EUROPEAN COLONIES AND 
POSSESSIONS IN THE AMERICAS 

Costa Rica 

By letter dated December 20, 1940 the Direc- 
tor General of the Pan American Union in- 
formed the Secretary of State that the instru- 
ment of ratification by Costa Rica of the 
Convention on the Provisional Administration 
of European Colonies and Possessions in the 
Americas, signed at Habana on July 30, 1940, 
was deposited with the Union on December 17, 
1940. 

The convention has been ratified by the 
United States of America, Costa Rica, and the 
Dominican Republic. 

POSTAL 

UNIVERSAL POSTAL CONVENTION OF 1039 
Albania 

By a note dated October 28, 1940, the Swiss 
Minister at Washington informed the Secre- 
tary of State that the Legation of Italy at Bern 
notified the Government of the Swiss Con- 
federation by a communication dated October 
11, 1940 of the adherence of Albania to the 
Universal Postal Convention signed at Buenos 
Aires on May 23, 1939 and to the following acts 
signed on the same day : 

Arrangement concerning parcel jjost 
Arrangement concerning letters and parcels 

of declared value. 
Arrangement concerning money orders 
Arrangement concerning collections 
Arrangement concerning postal transfers 
Arrangement concerning subscriptions to 
newspapers and periodicals 
30 



Egypt 

The American Minister to Egypt transmitted 
to the Secretary of State with a despatch dated 
October 17, 1940 a translation of a decree pub- 
lished in the Journal Official No. 137, of October 
14, 1940, promulgating the Universal Postal 
Convention and subsidiary arrangements signed 
at Buenos Aires on May 23, 1939. The decree 
states that the instrument of ratification by 
Egypt of the following acts was deposited with 
the Argentine Government on August 16, 1940. 

Universal postal convention, and annexes 
Arrangement concerning letters and par- 
cels of declared value, and annexes 
Arrangement concerning parcel post, and 

annexes 
Arrangement concerning collections 
Arrangement concerning subscriptions to 

newspapers and periodicals 
Arrangement concerning money orders, and 
annexes 

RESTRICTION OF WAR 

CONVENTION RELATING TO THE TREATMENT 
OF PRISONERS OF WAR (TREATY SERIES NO. 
846) 

Italy 

In execution of the provisions of article 85 
of the Convention Relating to the Treatment of 
Prisoners of War, signed at Geneva on July 27, 
1929, the Swiss Minister at Washington trans- 
mitted to the Secretary of State, with a note 
dated December 5, 1940, the official Italian trans- 
lation of the convention, which was furnished to 
the Swiss Government by the Italian Govern- 
ment for transmittal to the states parties to the 
convention. 



JANUARY 4, 1941 



31 



COMMERCE 

RECIPROCAL TRADE AGREEMENT WITH VENE- 
ZUELA (EXECUTIVE AGREEMENT SERIES NO. 
180) 

The President signed a proclamation on De- 
cember 28, 1940, allocating for the period from 
January 1 to December 31, 1941, inclusive, 
among countries of supply, the quantity of crude 
petroleum and fuel oil entitled to a reduction 
in the rate of import tax under the trade agree- 
ment with Venezuela, signed on November 6, 
1939. The agreement provides for a reduction 
in the import tax on crude petroleum, topped 
crude petroleum, and fuel oil derived from pe- 
troleum, including fuel oil known as gas oil, 
from y 2 ^ to y±i per gallon on an annual quota 
of imports not in excess of 5 percent of the total 
quantity of crude petroleum processed in re- 
fineries in the continental United States during 
the preceding calendar year. Imports above 
these amounts are taxable at y$ per gallon. 

Under the terms of the proclamation, the 
shares of the total imports of such petroleum 
and fuel oil entitled to a reduction in the rate 
of import tax are allocated among countries 
of supply on the basis of the proportions of the 
total imports for consumption in the United 
States supplied during the calendar year 1939. 
The following allocations of the tariff quota are 
set forth in the proclamation : 

United States of Venezuela 70.4 percent 

Kingdom of the Netherlands 
(including its overseas ter- 
ritory) 21.3 percent 

Republic of Colombia 3.2 percent 

Other foreign countries 5. 1 percent 

BT THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF 
AMERICA. 

A Proclamation. 

Whereas it is provided in the Tariff Act of 
1930 of the Congress of the United States of 
America, as amended by the Act of June 12, 
1934, entitled "AN ACT To amend the Tariff 
Act of 1930'' (48 Stat. 943), which amending 
Act was extended by Joint Resolutions of Con- 



gress, approved March 1, 1937 (50 Stat. 24) and 
April 12, 1940 (Public Res. No. 61, 76th Cong.), 
as follows: 

Sec. 350. (a) For the purpose of expanding 
foreign markets for the products of the United 
States (as a means of assisting in the present 
emergency in restoring the American standard 
of living, in overcoming domestic unemploy- 
ment and the present economic depression, in 
increasing the purchasing power of the Ameri- 
can public, and in establishing and maintaining 
a better relationship among various branches 
of American agriculture, industry, mining, and 
commerce) by regulating the admission of for- 
eign goods into the United States in accordance 
with the characteristics and needs of various 
branches of American production so that for- 
eign markets will be made available to those 
branches of American production which re- 
quire and are capable of developing such out- 
lets by affording corresponding market oppor- 
tunities for foreign products in the United 
States, the President, whenever he finds as a 
fact that any existing duties or other import 
restrictions of the United States or any foreign 
country are unduly burdening and restricting 
the foreign trade of the United States and that 
the purpose above declared will be promoted 
by the means hereinafter specified, is author- 
ized from time to time — 

(1) To enter into foreign trade agreements 
with foreign governments or instrumentalities 
thereof; and 

(2) To proclaim such modifications of exist- 
ing duties and other import restrictions, or such 
additional import restrictions, or such continu- 
ance, and for such minimum periods, of existing 
customs or excise treatment of any article cov- 
ered by foreign trade agreements, as are re- 
quired or appropriate to carry out any foreign 
trade agreement that the President has entered 
into hereunder. No proclamation shall be made 
increasing or decreasing by more than 50 per 
centum any existing rate of duty or transferring 
any article between the dutiable and free lists. 
The proclaimed duties and other import restric- 
tions shall apply to articles the growth, produce, 



32 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



or manufacture of all foreign countries, whether 
imported directly, or indirectly : Provided, That 
the President may suspend the application to 
articles the growth, produce, or manufacture of 
any country because of its discriminatory treat- 
ment of American commerce or because of other 
acts or policies which in his opinion tend to de- 
feat the purposes set forth in this section ; and 
the proclaimed duties and other import restric- 
tions shall be in effect from and after such time 
as is specified in the proclamation. The Presi- 
dent may at any time terminate any such procla- 
mation in whole or in part. 

Whereas, pursuant to the said Tariff Act of 
11)30, as amended, I entered into a modus vivendi 
and a definitive agreement on November 6, 1939, 
with the. President of the United States of 
Venezuela ; 

Whereas, by my proclamation of November 
16, 1939, I did make public the said modus 
vivendi and definitive agreement, including two 
Schedules annexed to each of them, to the end 
that the said modus vivendi and every part 
thereof should be observed and fulfilled by the 
United States of America and the citizens 
thereof on December 16, 1939, and thereafter 
during its continuance in force, and that the 
said definitive agreement should be so observed 
and fulfilled upon its entry into full force, as 
provided for in Article XIX of the said defini- 
tive agreement; 

Whereas, by my proclamation of November 
27, 1940, 1 did proclaim the entry into full force 
on December 14, 1940 of the said definitive 
agreement ; 

Whereas, Article II of the said definitive, 
agreement provides as follows: 

Articles the growth, produce or manufacture 
of the United States of Venezuela, enumerated 
and described in Schedule II annexed to this 
Agreement and made a part thereof, shall, on 
their importation into the United States of 
America, be exempt from ordinary customs 
duties in excess of those set forth and provided 
for in the said Schedule. The said articles shall 
also be exempt from all other duties, taxes, fees, 
charges or exactions, imposed on or in connec- 
tion with importation, in excess of those im- 



posed on the day of the signature of this Agree- 
ment or required to be. imposed thereafter under 
laws of the United States of America in force on 
the day of the signature of this Agreement. 

Whereas, Schedule II annexed to the said 
definitive agreement provides in part as fol- 
lows: 



Internal 

Revenue 

Code 

Section 


Description of Article 


Rate of Import 
Tax 


3422 


Crude petroleum, topped crude petro- 
leum, and fuel oil derived from petro- 
leum including fuel oil known as gas 






Provided, That such petroleum and fuel 
oil entered, or withdrawn from ware- 
house, for consumption in any calendar 
year in excess of 5 per centum of the 
total quantity of crude petroleum proc- 
essed in refineries in continental 
United States during the preceding 
calendar year, as ascertained by the 
Secretary of the Interior of the United 
States, shall not be entitled to a reduc- 
tion in tax by virtue of this item, but 
the rate of import tax thereon shall not 











Whereas, Article VII of the said definitive 
agreement reads as follows : 

In the event the Government of the. United 
States of America or the Government of the 
United States of Venezuela regulates imports 
of any article in which the other country has 
an interest either as regards the total amount 
permitted to be imported or as regards the 
amount permitted to be imported at a specified 
rate of duty, the Government taking such ac- 
tion shall establish in advance, and give public 
notice of, the total amount permitted to be 
imported from all countries during any speci- 
fied period, which shall not be shorter than 
three months, and of any increase or decrease 
in such amount during the period, and if shares 
are allocated to countries of export, the share 
allocated to the other country shall be based 
upon the proportion of the total imports of such 
article from all foreign countries supplied by 
the other country in a previous representative 
period, account being taken in so far as prac- 
ticable in appropriate cases of any special fac- 



January 4, 194 1 



33 



tors which may have affected or may be affecting 
the trade in that article. 

Whereas, Article VI of the Trade Agreement 
between the United States of America and the 
Kingdom of the Netherlands, entered into on 
December 20, 1935, pursuant to the said Tariff 
Act of 1930, as amended, and now in force be- 
tween the two countries, provides in part as 
follows : 

7. If the Government of the United States 
of America establishes or maintains any form 
of quantitative restriction or control of the im- 
portation or sale of any article in which the 
Kingdom of the Netherlands has an interest, or 
imposes a lower duty or charge on the importa- 
tion or sale of a specified quantity of any such 
article than the duty or charge imposed on im- 
portations in excess of such quantity, the Gov- 
ernment of the United States of America will 
allot to the. Kingdom of the Netherlands a 
share of the total quantity of such article per- 
mitted to be imported or sold, or permitted to 
be imported or sold at such lower duty or 
charge, during a specified period, equivalent to 
the proportion of the total importation of such 
article which the Kingdom of the Netherlands 
supplied in a basic period prior to the imposi- 
tion of such quantitative restriction on such ar- 
ticle, unless it is mutually agreed to dispense 
with such allotment. . . . 

Whereas, a Trade Agreement was entered 
into between the United States of America and 
the Republic of Colombia on September 13, 
1935, pursuant to the said Tariff Act of 1930, 
as amended, and is now in force between the 
two countries; 

Whereas, the Kingdom of the Netherlands, 
the United States of Venezuela, and the Repub- 
lic of Colombia have an interest in the importa- 
tion into the United States of America of crude 
petroleum, topped crude petroleum, and fuel oil 
derived from petroleum including fuel oil 
known as gas oil ; 

Whereas, by my proclamation of December 
12, 1939, I did proclaim the allocation among 
countries of production, on the basis therein set 
forth, of the quantity of crude petroleum, 
topped crude petroleum, and fuel oil derived 



from petroleum including fuel oil known as gas 
oil, entitled to a reduction in the rate of import 
tax by virtue of the said item 3422 of Schedule 
II of the said modibs vivendi and definitive 
agreement during the period from December 16, 
1939 to December 31, 1940, inclusive ; 

Whereas, the allocation to the Kingdom of 
the Netherlands (including its overseas terri- 
tories), to the United States of Venezuela and 
to the Republic of Colombia, of shares of the 
total quantity of such petroleum and fuel oil 
entitled to a reduction in the rate of import tax 
by virtue of the said item 3422 of Schedule II 
annexed to the said definitive agreement is re- 
quired and appropriate, during the calendar 
year 1941, to carry out the said trade agreement 
of December 20, 1935 between the United States 
of America and the Kingdom of the Nether- 
lands, the said definitive agreement of Novem- 
ber 6, 1939 between the United States of America 
and the United States of Venezuela and the said 
trade agreement of September 13, 1935 between 
the United States of America and the Republic 
of Colombia; 

Whereas, I find that imports for consumption 
into the United States of America from all coun- 
tries, of such petroleum and fuel oil during the 
calendar year 1939 were representative of the 
trade in such articles ; 

Whereas, I find that the proportions of total 
imports into the United States of America for 
consumption of such petroleum and fuel oil sup- 
plied by the United States of Venezuela, the 
Kingdom of the Netherlands (including its 
overseas territories) , the Republic of Colombia 
and by all other foreign countries, respectively, 
during the calendar year 1939, were as follows : 

United States of Venezuela 70. 4 per centum 

Kingdom of the Netherlands (includ- 
ing its overseas territories) 21. 3 per centum 

Republic of Colombia 3. 2 per centum 

Other foreign countries 5. 1 per centum 

Now, therefore, be it known that I, Franklin 
D. Roosevelt, President of the United States of 
America, acting under the authority conferred 
by the said Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, do 
hereby proclaim that, of the total aggregate 
quantity of crude petroleum, topped crude pe- 
troleum, and fuel oil derived from petroleum in- 



34 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



eluding fuel oil known as gas oil, entitled to a 
reduction in the rate of import tax by virtue of 
the said item 3422 of Schedule II of the said 
definitive agreement of November 6, 1939 be- 
tween the United States of America and the 
United States of Venezuela, no more than 70.4 
per centum shall be the produce or manufacture 
of the United States of Venezuela, nor more 
than 21.3 per centum, the produce or manufac- 
ture of the Kingdom of the Netherlands (includ- 
ing its overseas territories), nor more than 3.2 
per centum, the produce or manufacture of the 
Republic of Colombia, nor more than 5.1 per 
centum, the produce or manufacture of other 
foreign countries, such percentages to be ap- 
plied during the calendar year 1941. 

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set 
my hand and caused the Seal of the United 
States of America to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this twenty- 
eighth day of December in the year 

[seal] of our Lord one thousand nine hun- 
dred and forty, and of the Inde- 
pendence of the United States of America the 
one hundred and sixty-fifth. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 

By the President: 
Cordell Hull, 

Secretary of State. 



NATURE PROTECTION AND WILDLIFE 
PRESERVATION 

CONVENTION ON NATURE PROTECTION AND 
WILDLIFE PRESERVATION IN THE WESTERN 
HEMISPHERE 

Brazil 

The Director General of the Pan American 
Union informed the Secretary of State by a 
letter dated December 30, 1940 that the Conven- 
tion on Nature Protection and Wildlife Preser- 
vation in the Western Hemisphere, which was 
opened for signature at the Pan American 
Union on October 12, 1940, was signed on behalf 
of Brazil on December 27, 1940. 



Commercial Policy 



ALLOCATION OF TARIFF QUOTA ON 
CRUDE PETROLEUM AND FUEL OIL 

The text of a proclamation signed by the 
President on December 28, 1940 allocating for 
the period from January 1 to December 31, 1941, 
inclusive, among countries of supply, the quan- 
tity of crude petroleum and fuel oil entitled to a 
reduction in the rate of import tax under the 
trade agreement with Venezuela appears in this 
Bulletin under the heading "Treaty Informa- 
tion". 



Publications 



Department or State 

Emergency Regulation of Level of Rainy Lake and of 
Other Boundary Waters in the Rainy Lake Watershed : 
Convention Between the United States of America and 
Canada — Signed September 15, 1988; proclaimed by the 
President October 18, 1940. Treaty Series No. 961. 
3 pp. 50. 

Other Government Agencies 

The following Government publications 
issued recently may be of interest to readers of 
the Bulletin: 

Foreign Trade of the United States in Agricultural 
Products. (Department of Agriculture: Foreign Agri- 
cultural Relations Office.) June 1940. 34 pp. (proc- 
essed ) . 

Pan American Sanitary Bureau. Annual Report of 
the Director, Hugh S. dimming, Fiscal Tear 1939-40. 
September 1940. 36 pp. 

The Foreign Trade of Latin America. Report on 
Trade of Latin America, With Special Reference to 
Trade With the United States. Part II (in 20 sec- 
tions') : Commercial Policies and Trade Relations of — 
Bolivia. [Section 2.] vii, 4<> pp., illus. (processed. ) 
Paraguay. [Section 7.] vii, 44 pp., illus. (proc- 
essed. ) 



4 When complete, the 20 sections of part II will cover 
the commercial policy and foreign trade of each of the 
20 Latin American republics. 



JANUARY 4, 1941 



35 



Regulations 



The following Government regulations may 
be of interest to readers of the Bulletin: 

Revision of Prorations of the [Sugar] Quota for For- 
eign Countries Other Than Cuba. (Department of 
Agriculture: Agricultural Adjustment Administration.) 
[G. S. Q. R. Series 7, No. 1, Rev. 2, Amendment 1.] 
December 30, 1940. Federal Register, January 1, 1941 



(vol. 6, no. 1), pp. 1-2 (The National Archives of the 
United States). 

New Regulations Governing Preexamination of Aliens 
Within the United States. (Department of Justice: 
Immigration and Naturalization Service.) [General 
Order No. C-27.] December 31, 1940. Federal Register, 
January 4, 1941 (vol. 6, no. 3), pp. 65-67. 

New Regulations Governing the Arrest and Deporta- 
tion of Aliens. (Department of Justice: Immigration 
and Naturalization Service.) [General Order No. C- 
26.] December 31, 1940. Federal Register, January 4, 
1941 (vol. 6, no. 3), pp. 68-73. 



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PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APrKOVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 



JANUARY 11, 1941 
Vol. IV: No. 81 — Publication 1547 



Qontents 




General: Pag6 
Address by Leo Pasvolsky: The United States in the 

World Economy, 1940 39 

Export control in national defense 52 

Budget recommendations for the Department of State, 

1942 54 

Europe: 

Lease of naval and air bases from Great Britain .... 56 

Refugee problem in France 57 

New Year message from Marshal Petain of France . . 59 

Greenland 60 

Contributions for relief in belligerent countries .... 60 

The Near East: 

Purchase of American missionary school by Iran ... 61 

American Republics: 

Visit to United States of leaders in the professions, the 

arts, and education 62 

Representation of United States business in other 
American republics: Statement by Nelson A. Rocke- 
feller 63 

Cooperation by Panama in continental solidarity and 

defense 64 

Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, etc.: 

Monthly statistics 64 

[Over] 



"■S.SUPER,NT FNDfNT0FD0CTOTS 
FEB 6 1941 







'ontents- 



-CONTINUED 



The Foreign Service: p ag6 

Death of Consul General Murphy 79 

Elevation of diplomatic mission in Uruguay to rank of 

embassy 79 

Treaty Information: 
Claims: 

Convention with Norway for the Disposition of the 
Claims of Christoffer Hannevig and George R. 

Jones 80 

Consular: 

Consular Convention with Lithuania 80 

Finance: 

Convention with France for the Avoidance of 

Double Taxation 80 

Postal: 

Universal Postal Convention of 1939 80 

Publications: 

Agreement with Honduras for the Exchange of 

Official Publications 82 

Regulations 82 

Publications 82 

Legislation 82 



General 



ADDRESS BY LEO PASVOLSKY 1 

THE UNITED STATES IN THE WORLD ECONOMY, 1940: SOME ASPECTS OP OUR FOREIGN 

ECONOMIC POLICY 



The subject which is under discussion this 
afternoon should be considered from two broad 
points of view. It is necessary to examine, 
first, the position of the United States in the 
present-day world economy ; and, secondly, the 
position of this country with respect to the 
world economy which is now, and which will be 
for some time ahead, in the making. 

Both of these aspects of the subject before us 
are dominated by the existence of wide-spread 
and still-spreading war. We are in the pres- 
ence of an armed conflict which not only has 
suddenly disrupted and distorted preexistent 
economic relations and conditions, but which 
is bound to leave a profound imprint on the 
world economy of the post-war period. Its 
effects are felt and will be felt for a long time 
to come by all nations, irrespective of whether 
or not they are directly involved in the conflict 
itself. 

I propose, accordingly, to describe briefly the 
impact of more than a year of war upon the 
international economic relations of the United 
States. I propose, next, to deal with some 
basic factors of the outlook for the future, 
so far as it is discernible at this time. 



1 Delivered before the Fifty-third Animal Meeting of 
the American Economic Association, New Orleans, De- 
cember 30, 1940. Mr. Pasvolsky is Special Assistant to 
the Secretary of State. 
285002—41 1 



The most important element in thfe coun- 
try's economic relations with the rest of the 
world is foreign trade. In this field, signifi- 
cant changes have occurred during the war 
period. 

The total values of both our exports and our 
imports have shown marked increases since the 
outbreak of war in Europe. Exports rose 
from $2,941,000,000 in September-August 
1938-39, to $4,016,000,000 in the corresponding 
period of 1939-40; and general imports, from 
$2,132,000,000 to $2,625,000,000. However, 
these global figures conceal important changes 
in the direction and commodity composition of 
our foreign trade. 

As regards exports, the period has been one 
of steadily contracting markets in some parts 
of the world and steadily expanding ones in 
other parts. From the outbreak of the war, 
because of the naval-blockade measures taken 
by the Allied Powers, Germany and the terri- 
tories formerly comprising Austria, Czechoslo- 
vakia, and most of Poland practically 
disappeared as direct markets for our goods. 
Starting last spring, a number of European 
countries, as they became engulfed by German 
occupation in rapid succession, ceased to be mar- 
kets for American products. This was the ex- 
perience of Denmark, Norway, the Netherlands, 
Belgium, and France. With Italy's entry into 

39 



40 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



the war, our exports to the countries of southern 
and southeastern Europe have either disap- 
peared or have become greatly reduced. 

Today, virtually the entire continent of Eu- 
rope west of the Soviet Union, as well as some 
parts of Africa and the Near East, is cut off 
from the channels of sea-borne trade by the 
far-flung nature of the British naval blockade. 
On the other hand, there has been a great ex- 
pansion of our exports to the United Kingdom, 
Canada, and the other parts of the British 
Empire, as well as a substantial increase of sales 
to Latin America and the Far East. The Brit- 
ish countries alone accounted for over 50 per- 
cent of the billion-dollar increase which 
occurred in our exports during the first year of 
the European war. 

More than half of the increase of exports was 
caused by rapidly mounting sales of finished 
manufactures, reflecting mainly the growing 
demand for aircraft and other implements of 
war. More than one third represented semi- 
manufactures. Crude materials showed a sub- 
stantial rise. The largest single increase oc- 
curred in the exports of iron and steel-mill 
products. On the other hand, there was a 
marked decline in our exports of tobacco and 
of various types of foodstuffs, with the conse- 
quent growth of accumulated stocks of these 
commodities. 

Our imports have increased much less than 
our exports. Here, again, the exigencies of war 
have played a decisive role. Blockade meas- 
ures affect the exports of the blockaded coun- 
tries as well as their imports. The British 
productive effort has been more and more di- 
rected toward war output. These factors have 
necessarily retarded our imports of finished 
manufactures. On the other hand, the expan- 
sion of our domestic industrial activity has been 
reflected in increased imports of raw materials. 
Moreover, with the emphasis in our domestic 
economy shifting to production for defense, the 
importation of certain strategic raw materials 
is being stimulated. 

The fact that during the first year of war in 
Europe our exports expanded by over a bil- 
lion dollars and our imports by less than 500 



millions resulted in a substantial increase of 
the already large export surplus in our bal- 
ance of trade. This export surplus amounted 
to $1,391,000,000 in September-August 1939-40, 
as compared with $809,000,000 in the corre- 
sponding period of 1938-39. 

The export surplus was offset mainly by im- 
portation of gold, which has been coming into 
the country at a more rapid pace than ever. 
During the 12 months preceding the outbreak 
of war in Europe, our net imports of gold were 
$4,061,000,000; during the 12 months immedi- 
ately following the outbreak of war, they were 
$4,632,000,000. 

The gold imports came in, of course, in re- 
sponse to other stimuli, as well as the need to 
pay for purchases of American products. 
Considering the fact that several of the bellig- 
erent countries have been selling some of their 
American investments, and taking into ac- 
count other items in our balance of international 
payments, it is clear that only a relatively small 
part of the gold shipments has been used for 
the purpose of paying for goods already pur- 
chased. A far greater part came either in 
search of safety or in preparation for future 
payments. 

Although most of this vast inflow of gold 
has come from monetary reserves rather than 
from new production, the war has not so far 
produced disordered foreign exchanges. This 
has been so principally because of the existence 
of stringent exchange control in the United 
Kingdom and the other British countries and 
because of the virtual disappearance of trade 
between the continent of Europe and the rest 
of the world. On the other hand, the growing 
severity of exchange control, in the countries 
directly involved in war as well as in many 
countries not directly involved, has had serious 
effects on our trade. From the point of view 
of our policy in this field, the outstanding de- 
velopment has been the decision to place under 
license the funds belonging to several European 
countries which have been overrun in the course 
of present hostilities. 

The increased exports from the United States 
have been financed without recourse to new 



JANUARY 11, 1941 



41 



loans. Credits have been extended to several 
South American countries and some direct in- 
vestment has taken place there. Small loans 
have been made to the Scandinavian countries. 
Some credits have been furnished to China. 
The total amount, however, has been very small. 
Under the operation of the Johnson Act, no 
loans have been made to any of the principal 
belligerents. Under the Neutrality Act, pur- 
chases of war supplies have been on a cash 
basis. 

The operation of the Neutrality Act, as re- 
vised shortly after the outbreak of war in 
Europe, combined with the general effect of war 
conditions, has had important repercussions 
upon our shipping situation. Our merchant 
marine has practically ceased its trans- Atlantic 
service. Shipments to Europe now take place 
predominantly under the British flag, and this 
has resulted in diversion of much of the British 
and other shipping from their accustomed trade 
routes. Although our ships have found new 
opportunities in the Western Hemisphere and 
elsewhere, our sea-borne commerce experiences 
many shipping difficulties. As regards the 
Western Hemisphere, an Inter-American Mari- 
time Conference was recently held in an attempt 
to find solutions for certain of these difficulties. 

II 

Broadly speaking, the foreign economic pol- 
icy of the United States since the outbreak of 
war in Europe has been directed toward two 
main objectives : First, to cushion the impact of 
war conditions on our domestic economy, so far 
as it is affected by international factors; and, 
second, to facilitate the program of national de- 
fense which has been rendered imperative by 
developments abroad. These objectives have 
been pursued in relation to each other, as well 
as in relation to other basic policies. Their pur- 
suit has resulted in measures with respect to 
both exports and imports, some of which have 
promoted and some of which have necessarily 
retarded our foreign commerce. 

As regards exports, the first point to be noted 
concerns the implications and effects of the Neu- 
trality Act, as revised in November 1939. The 



"cash-and-carry" provision of that act, adopted 
as a means of reducing the risks of this country's 
involvement in war, has probably had a re- 
tarding influence on our export trade. On the 
other hand, the elimination of the rigid arms 
embargo, which constituted the principal fea- 
ture of the November revision, has rendered 
possible the exportation of certain important 
war supplies. These exports not only have 
helped to sustain our total foreign sales on a 
high and rising level, but have enabled us to 
implement the policy of rendering all practi- 
cable material assistance to countries which are 
victims of attack. At the same time, they have 
been instrumental in building up specialized 
productive capacity in this country essential 
to the creation of the instrumentalities of na- 
tional defense. 

Next, with respect to exports, mention should 
be made of the repeated and persistent efforts on 
the part of the Government to mitigate in the 
interest of our commerce the severity of wartime 
trade controls. While recognizing, of course, 
that decision as to the operation of such con- 
trols, both as regards blockade measures and as 
regards the choice of commodities permitted to 
be imported, must necessarily rest with the bel- 
ligerents imposing them, the Government has 
sought, through formal and informal negotia- 
tions and with a substantial measure of success, 
to secure the application of these measures in a 
reasonable manner. In this respect, the exist- 
ence of trade agreements, especially those with 
the United Kingdom and Canada, has served 
an extremely useful purpose. This was also 
true with respect to France, prior to that coun- 
try's military collapse. 

An interesting feature of our recent export 
policy has been the abandonment, shortly 
after the outbreak of the war, of export sub- 
sidies on cotton and, more recently, of such 
subsidies on wheat flour shipped to certain 
parts of the Far East. War conditions have 
rendered no longer operative most of the con- 
siderations which originally led to the adoption 
of these measures. 

The most striking feature of our export pol- 
icy during the war period has been the adoption 



42 

of a far-reaching system of export control as 
an element of the national-defense program. 
By an act of Congress, approved July 2, 1940, 
broad powers were vested in the President to 
place under license the exportation of various 
strategic and other essential commodities. By 
proclamation dated July 2, the President pro- 
hibited the exportation of a number of speci- 
fied articles and materials, except when author- 
ized by licenses issued by the Secretary of 
State. The licensing actually began on July 
5, under a procedure closely resembling that 
used during the World War by the War Trade 
Board. 

The list of commodities for which export 
licenses are required has been expanded several 
times. It comprises such important basic ma- 
terials as aluminum, many petroleum products, 
iron and steel scrap, several non-ferrous metals, 
mica, graphite, mercury, and others. It in- 
cludes aircraft and aircraft engines, as well as 1 
plans and specifications for aircraft and en- 
gines; various types of machine tools; equip- 
ment and specifications for the production of 
aviation motor fuel; all arms, ammunition, and 
implements of war as defined by the Presiden- 
tial proclamation of May 1, 1937; and many 
other articles. 

All interested departments and agencies of 
the Government take part in the formulation 
of policies with respect to the application of 
export control. These include the Departments 
of State, Treasury. Commerce, and Agriculture ; 
the Army and Navy Munitions Board; the Ad- 
visory Commission to the Council on National 
Defense ; and the Maritime Commission. In the 
administration of control, the basic criteria are 
the interests of national defense broadly inter- 
preted to include continental defense and mate- 
rial aid to Great Britain and other victims of 
attack. Accordingly, licenses are usually issued 
more liberally for exportation to the countries 
of the Western Hemisphere and to the United 
Kingdom than to other parts of the world. 

As regards imports, the appropriate agencies 
of the Government have been watching care- 
fully the effects of war conditions upon the im- 
portation into this country of competitive com- 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

modities. In only one instance thus far a 
special arrangement had to be made, namely, a 
supplementary trade agreement with Canada, 
regulating the importation of silver-fox furs. 

Activity on the part of the Government has 
been necessary to insure delivery of some com- 
modities essential to American industry, the ob- 
taining of which has been rendered difficult by 
the operation of naval blockades. Examples 
of this are found in cases of graphite, mica, 
mercury, and other materials. 

The outstanding Government activity in the 
field of imports has been in connection with 
national defense. As a part of the defense 
program, vigorous action has been taken to 
build up stock-piles of what the Army and 
Navy Munitions Board has designated as stra- 
tegic and critical materials. A part of the 
funds appropriated for national defense is 
being used for this purpose. By special Con- 
gressional authorization, the Reconstruction 
Finance Corporation is also engaged in financ- 
ing the importation of stocks of essential indus- 
trial materials. Stock-piles of tin and other 
ferro-alloys, of rubber, and of various other 
commodities are rapidly accumulating. 

Another aspect of the national-defense, pro- 
gram relating to the import problem consists 
of efforts to find "new sources close enough to 
this country so that thei - e may be reasonable 
expectation that access to them will not be dis- 
rupted". This relates primarily to the Western 
Hemisphere and is a factor of some importance 
in inter-American economic relations. 

Ill 

Inter- American economic relations occupy a 
special place and loom large today in the for- 
eign economic policy of the United States. 
They are an important part of the "Good 
Neighbor" program for the Western Hemi- 
sphere, which is one.of the foundation stones of 
the entire structure of this country's foreign 
policy and one of the essential features of the 
national-defense effort. 

The basic conception of inter-American rela- 
tions on which this country proceeds is simple. 
The 21 American republics have in common 



JANUARY 11, 1941 



43 



certain interests and certain aspirations. Al- 
though removed geographically and historically 
from the conflicts and controversies which are 
in progress on the other sides of the Atlantic 
and the Pacific Oceans, the American nations, in 
view of the character and implications of the 
Avars now going on in Europe and in Asia, have 
a common and overriding interest in insuring 
their own security and, if possible, preventing 
war from reaching their shores. To this end, 
they must, by common effort, create impreg- 
nable means of national and continental de- 
fense. Confronted with the present-day chal- 
lenge to the right of nations to independence 
and to freedom from intervention in their 
domestic affairs, the American nations are con- 
scious of the imperative need for individual 
and common action directed toward the preser- 
vation of their enjoyment of that fundamental 
right, 

At the same time, neither the United States 
nor the other nations of the Western Hemi- 
sphere have any desire to isolate themselves 
from the rest of the world and concentrate their 
efforts on building up a system based on the 
concept of national or regional self-containment. 
They are a part of the world, and their own 
present and future are inextricably bound up 
with what happens in the other important areas 
of the earth. Both from the short-run and the 
long-run points of view, they have always been, 
and they are today, vitally interested in the kind 
of world mankind is to live in, and in making 
their contribution toward helping to shape rela- 
tions among all nations along the lines of peace 
and progress. 

Successful effort in all of these directions re- 
quires political stability and economic strength 
within the American nations, and political sol- 
idarity and economic cooperation among them. 
The creation and constant reinforcement of 
such solidarity and cooperation have been the 
keynotes of numerous inter-American confer- 
ences and of continuous effort through diplo- 
matic, commercial, cultural, and other channels. 

In the economic field, a program of coopera- 
tive inter-American action to meet the impact 
of war conditions was inaugurated in September 



1939 at the first Consultative Meeting of Minis- 
ters of Foreign Affairs of the American Repub- 
lics, held at Panama, At that meeting, it was 
resolved that "in view of the present circum- 
stances, ... it is more desirable and neces- 
sary than ever to establish a close and sincere 
cooperation between the American republics 
in order that they may protect their economic 
and financial structures, maintain their fiscal 
equilibrium, safeguard the stability of their 
currencies, promote and expand their indus- 
tries, intensify their agriculture, and develop 
their commerce". 

To this end, it was decided "to create an 
Inter-American Financial and Economic Advi- 
sory Committee consisting of 21 experts in eco- 
nomic problems, one for each of the American 
republics". The Committee was duly consti- 
tuted a few weeks later, and it has been meeting 
in Washington ever since. 

As time went on and as the economic repercus- 
sions of war both on the present and on the 
future became intensified, the obvious need for 
more and more vigorous inter- American action 
led to a comprehensive review of the whole prob- 
lem at the Second Meeting of the American 
Ministers of Foreign Affairs at Habana in July 
of this year. The conclusions reached there 
were summed up in a resolution on economic 
cooperation, in the "whereas" part of which it 
was stated that 

". . . The war now in progress has increased 
the disruption in the channels of international 
commerce and the curtailment of markets for 
certain products of the Americas ; the existence 
of surpluses of commodities, the exportation of 
which is essential to the economic life of the 
countries of the Americas, is economically, so- 
cially, financially, and in other respects a mat- 
ter of great importance to the masses of the 
population and ... to the Governments of 
the entire Continent; it must be anticipated 
that these difficulties will exist as long as the 
war continues and that some of them, as well 
as other new ones, will exist after the war ends ; 
and it is of great importance that the economic 
development of the American countries be di- 
rected towards a diversification of their produc- 



44 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



tion and, at the same time, towards an increase 
in their consumption capacity." 

The short-run and the long-run objectives of 
inter-American economic policy were stated as 
follows in the substantive part of the 
resolution : 

"The Second Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Kepublics 
Resolves : 

"One. To declare: 

"(a) That the American nations continue 
to adhere to the liberal principles of inter- 
national trade, conducted with peaceful mo- 
tives and based upon equality of treatment 
and fair and equitable practices; 

"(b) That it is the purpose of the Ameri- 
can nations to apply these principles in their 
relations with each other as fully as present 
circumstances permit ; 

"(c) That the American nations should be 
prepared to resume the conduct of trade with 
the entire world in accordance with these 
principles as soon as the non-American 
nations are prepared to do likewise; 

" (d) That, in the meantime, the American 
nations shall do everything in their power to 
strengthen their own economic position; to 
improve further the trade and other economic 
relations between and among themselves; 
and to devise and apply appropriate means 
of effective action to cope with the difficul- 
ties, disadvantages and dangers arising from 
the present disturbed and dislocated world 
conditions; and 

"(e) That the American nations consider it 
necessary to maintain or improve the normal 
economic situation established between them 
in order to assure the preservation or im- 
provement of the position enjoyed in their 
respective markets. 

"Two. To strengthen and expand the activi- 
ties of the Inter-American Financial and Eco- 
nomic Advisory Committee as the instrument 
for continuing consultation among the Ameri- 
can Republics with respect to economic and 
trade matters and arrangements, having in 



mind especially the immediate situations which 
must be met as a result of the curtailment and 
changed character of important foreign mar- 
kets. . . . 

"Three. Specifically, to instruct the said Com- 
mittee that it proceed forthwith: 

"(a) To cooperate with each country of 
this Continent in the study of possible meas- 
ures for the increase of the domestic consump- 
tion of its own exportable surpluses of those 
commodities which are of primary impor- 
tance to the maintenance of the economic life 
of such countries; 

"(Z>) To propose to the American nations 
immediate measures and arrangements of mu- 
tual benefit tending to increase trade among 
them without injury to the interests of their 
respective producers, for the. purpose of pro- 
viding increased markets for such products 
and of expanding their consumption; 

" (<?) To create instruments of inter- Ameri- 
can cooperation for the temporary storing, 
financing and handling of any such commod- 
ities and for their orderly and systematic 
marketing, having in mind the normal con- 
ditions of production and distribution 
thereof ; 

"(d) To develop commodity arrangements 
with a view to assuring equitable terms of 
trade for both producers and consumers of 
the commodities concerned ; 

"(e) To recommend methods for improv- 
ing the standard of living of the peoples of 
the Americas, including public health and 
nutrition measures; 

"(/) To establish appropriate organiza- 
tions for the distribution of a part of the 
surplus of any such commodity, as a humani- 
tarian and social relief measure ; 

"(g) To consider, while these plans and 
measures are being developed, the desirability 
of a broader system of inter-American coop- 
erative organization in trade and industrial 
matters, and to propose credit measures and 
other measures of assistance which may be 
immediately necessary in the fields of eco- 
nomics, finance, money, and foreign 
exchange." 



JANUARY 11, 1941 



45 



The comprehensive program of economic ac- 
tion embodied in the Habana resolution was, in 
large measure, the result of proposals made by 
the Government of the United States. In plac- 
ing these proposals before the meeting, Secretary 
Hull said : 

"The Government of the United States of 
America has already utilized its existing agen- 
cies to enter into mutually advantageous coop- 
erative arrangements with a number of Amer- 
ican republics in connection with programs for 
the development of their national economies 
and by way of assistance to their central banks 
in monetary and foreign-exchange matters. 

"It is now taking steps which will make pos- 
sible the extension of both the volume and char- 
acter of the operations of such agencies. When 
these steps have been completed, the Govern- 
ment of the United States of America will be in 
a position to expand its cooperative efforts with 
other American nations in the fields of long- 
term development and of monetary and ex- 
change matters. 

"It will also be able to participate in imme- 
diate joint action with other nations of this 
hemisphere to meet pressing trade situations 
which may arise before the program outlined 
has come into operation. 

"Finally, it will be enabled to enter effectively 
into the cooperative program as it proceeds, as- 
sisting in the temporary handling and orderly 
marketing of the important commodities of the 
hemisphere; implementing, on its part, the 
commodity agreements which are developed; 
and carrying out other operations involving 
such export products." 

Several of the steps to which Mr. Hull re- 
ferred have since been taken. The Congress has 
increased by $500,000,000 the funds at the dis- 
posal of the Export-Import Bank, these new 
funds to be used for inter-American economic 
operations, "to assist in the development of the 
resources, the stabilization of the economies, and 
the orderly marketing of the products of the 
countries of the Western Hemisphere". The 
bank is now working on specific proposals and 

285502 — 41 2 



requests coming from various American coun- 
tries. It has already entered into a number of 
transactions, notable among which has been the 
extension of credit for financing a steel-mill 
project in Brazil and the provision of a general 
credit for Argentina. Conversations between 
the United States Treasury and other appro- 
priate agencies of the Government, on the one 
hand, and representatives of several American 
countries on the other, are in progress with 
respect to financial, monetary, and foreign- 
exchange matters. Steps have been taken to 
increase purchases of strategic materials. 

In order to promote the Government's ac- 
tivities in the field of inter- American relations, 
the President has set up, under the Council of 
National Defense, an Office for Coordination of 
Commercial and Cultural Relations between the 
American Republics. This office is engaged in 
intensive study of the problems involved and 
in correlating and stimulating action on the 
part of the appropriate operating agencies of 
the Government. 

The Government is taking an active part in 
the work of the Inter- American Financial and 
Economic Advisory Committee. The presence 
in Washington of competent economic experts 
of all the American republics makes for speedier 
and more effective discussion of specific ques- 
tions and problems. The Committee has pre- 
pared the statute of an Inter- American Bank, 
which now awaits ratification by the several 
countries. It has created an Inter-American 
Development Commission, with official and busi- 
ness participation, as an agency for long-range 
economic development in the various American 
countries. It has set up special groups to study 
individual export commodities with the view to 
recommending to the governments measures to 
be taken with respect to the handling of such 
commodities. The furthest advanced of these 
studies relates to coffee, a concrete marketing 
agreement with regard to which is now pending 
before the 15 governments concerned. Action 
with respect to corn has also received extended 
consideration. Vigorous attention has been 
given to other phases of the Habana program. 



46 



IV 



The foregoing is, in its salient features, the 
story of the effects to date of war in Europe 
on the principal elements of this country's eco- 
nomic relations with the world and of the 
foreign economic policies pursued by the Gov- 
ernment of the United States in the light of 
these developments. From the policy point of 
view, it is a story of adaptation to conditions 
some of which are in large measure outside of 
our control ; of effective utilization of available 
instruments of action in defense of the national 
interest; and of the forging of new tools to 
cope with new and extraordinary conditions. 

Since no one can foretell when the present 
war will end, this country is bound to be con- 
fronted, for a period of unpredictable duration, 
with the continued operation, possibly in an in- 
creasingly aggravated form, of some of the 
factors which have thus far influenced its for- 
eign economic relations. It will also, in all 
probability, be confronted with the rise of new 
factors. As we look ahead, therefore, it is 
well to envisage some of the more important of 
these possibilities and probabilities. 

So long as the British naval-blockade meas- 
ures continue to function, they must neces- 
sarily continue to have a dominant influence 
upon our exports to the continent of Europe 
and to areas adjacent to Europe. Under these 
circumstances, it is to be anticipated that our 
shipments to virtually the entire continental 
portion of Europe will remain on an extremely 
low level. On the other hand, Great Britain's 
requirements for our products are likely to ex- 
pand still further. 

In connection with Great Britain's purchases 
of war materials in this country, the question 
has already arisen with regard to payment for 
such purchases. As the war progresses, Great 
Britain is confronted with a double shrinkage 
of her dollar-exchange resources, resulting from 
the using up of her accumulated reserves of 
gold and of dollar securities and from a possible 
decline of exports to this country. Accord- 
ingly, as the President announced on Decem- 
ber 17, plans are being worked out under which 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

we would, in our own best national interest, 
extend appropriate aid to Great Britain in 
financing her war requirements. 

Such action is of obvious and pressing im- 
portance in implementing effectively our estab- 
lished policy of giving all possible material aid 
to Great Britain and of creating, at the same 
time, in our own country maximum productive 
capacity in the specialized fields of military 
supplies. It is also important from a longer- 
run point of view. In considering, as we must, 
the problem of the future reconstruction proc- 
ess, it is necessary for us to take serious account 
of the great difficulties which might arise in 
that respect if Great Britain's international 
financial resources should become depleted in 
the conduct of the war. 

As our national-defense program gains mo- 
mentum, it is to be anticipated that there will 
be increased emphasis on purchases of essential 
commodities, especially on the Government ac- 
count, and probably an extension of the already 
existing system of export control. The con- 
tinuation and possible intensification of war 
are bound to produce greater uncertainty with 
regard to the accessibility of some important 
sources of supply of many essential materials. 
This will dictate the need of rapid and vigorous 
action toward increasing our reserves of such 
commodities. Conservation of these reserves 
as well as of the domestic production of some 
essential raw materials may dictate the need 
of placing more commodities on the export- 
control lists. The extension of these lists may 
also result from a growing absorption of our 
industrial capacity into the military prepared- 
ness effort. 

While some of our exportable commodities 
are thus being, and more may be later, placed 
on a license or even embargo basis because they 
are needed at home, the exigencies of war trade 
conditions are bound to create increasing dif- 
ficulties with respect to certain other exportable 
commodities, especially in agriculture. As I 
have indicated, the 16 months of war have 
already resulted in abnormal accumulations of 
unsalable surpluses of many of our important 
exportable farm products. The prospect ahead, 



JANUARY 11, 1941 



47 



so long as war conditions continue to exist, is 
one of further accumulations or of curtailed 
production — in neither case a desirable alterna- 
tive. To some extent, the difficulty will be less- 
ened by increased domestic consumption re- 
sulting from expansion of general business 
activity, caused, in turn, partly by the increased 
exports of war supplies. But the handling of 
our agricultural problem growing out of war- 
time loss of important foreign markets will still 
represent a formidable task. 

The problem of exportable surpluses cut off 
from their normal outlets is one which we have 
in common, and will continue to have in com- 
mon, with our neighbors to the south of us. For 
them, the problem is even more important and 
far more acute than it is for us. While some 
of the American republics are more, and some 
are less, dependent on overseas markets, all 
of them taken together normally ship to Europe 
about one half of their total exports. Our nor- 
mal sales to Europe are also approximately 50 
percent of our total exports. But in our case, 
because of the great variety of our exports, loss 
of foreign markets for some commodities may 
be compensated for, in the aggregate, by in- 
creased exports of other commodities, as has 
recently been the case. The exports of the other 
American republics are highly concentrated, in 
the case of some countries consisting over- 
whelmingly of only one or two products. In 
our case, because of our ample financial re- 
sources, even a diminution of total exports 
does not mean inevitably an immediate loss of 
necessary imports. In the cases of the other 
American countries, unless they can borrow, loss 
of exports does mean an immediate and often 
disastrous loss of badly needed imports. Being 
debtor countries, loss of imports means to them 
increased difficulty in meeting their foreign 
obligations. Being financially poor countries, 
it means, in varying degrees, grave internal 
difficulties. 

Aid to the other American countries, which 
would enable them to meet the hardships caused 
by the already existing and prospective accu- 
mulations of unsalable surpluses resulting from 
the exigencies of war conditions, is an impor- 



tant element in our immediate program of inter- 
American economic relations. The availability 
or non-availability of such aid may in some in- 
stances spell the difference between domestic 
stability and instability, which is obviously a 
matter of great concern to us. Aid of this sort 
may take the form of loans to individual coun- 
tries which would enable them, by thus supple- 
menting their own financial resources, to handle 
their particular problems. It may take the 
form of additional purchases by us. It may 
take the form of multilateral marketing agree- 
ments, financed jointly by the countries con- 
cerned and in some cases predominantly by the 
United States. In connection with such com- 
modity agreements, special action by Congress 
may be necessary to make possible our partici- 
pation in them, since they would involve some 
measures for the regulation of our imports or 
exports of the commodities involved. 

Because of the lack of variety in the produc- 
tion and exports of the other American coun- 
tries, the number of commodities which may 
require action is relatively small. Only a few 
of them are competitive with our production. 
While, under certain circumstances, to which I 
shall presently refer, extraordinary measures 
with respect to these commodities may have 
long-range importance, their immediate objec- 
tive is to relieve the strains of wartime disloca- 
tion of world trade routes — strains resulting 
both in domestic economic difficulties and in 
shortage of means of payment for foreign pur- 
chases, especially from the United States. 

Other important elements in our program of 
inter- American economic relations to which in- 
creasing attention is bound to be given in the 
immediate future may be listed as follows : 
Promotion of regular trade relations through 
the conclusion of trade agreements and in other 
ways; increased purchases in the Western 
Hemisphere of strategic raw materials; invest- 
ment in productive enterprises designed to pro- 
mote the diversification of production especially 
along the lines of stimulating the output of 
commodities for which markets can readily be 
found in the United States or in other parts of 
the hemisphere, including materials of strategic 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



value; aid in strengthening the monetary and 
foreign-exchange position of countries which 
are in need of such assistance; implementation 
of various other provisions of the Habana 
resolution. 

V 

It is clear that the process of adaptation to 
conditions largely outside of our control, of 
effective utilization of available instruments of 
action in defense of the national interest, and 
of the forging of new tools to cope with new and 
extraordinary conditions is bound to continue 
for some time and to determine the position of 
this country in a world economy dominated by 
war. But while giving our attention to the 
immediate problems thus brought forward, we 
must keep clearly in mind long-range objectives 
and problems. It is of the utmost importance 
that we look ahead to the time when war will 
come to an end, and the stupendous task will 
begin of reconstructing world economy on a 
peace basis. For our thinking and our action 
now may have an important bearing upon what 
happens then. 

Just as no one can foretell when the present 
war will end, so no one can be certain today pre- 
cisely what forces and what basic ideas will 
shape post-war international economic rela- 
tions. But, after all, the range of possibilities 
is relatively limited. The crux of the problem 
will lie — in the post-war period, as it did in the 
period preceding the war — in the choice of trad- 
ing methods, which in turn will be determined 
by the underlying policies of the principal 
trading nations. 

During the years immediately preceding the 
outbreak of war in Europe, two opposing tend- 
encies were operative in the field of interna- 
tional commercial relations. One was the tend- 
ency to subject trade to a greater and greater 
measure of control through the introduction 
and manipulation of higher and more effective 
trade barriers. The other was the tendency to 
liberate trade from the excesses of these ever- 
growing restraints. 

In some of its phases, the restrictive tendency 
was directed toward the achievement of na- 
tional economic self-sufficiency. In its extreme 



phase, it represented a policy of using control 
over foreign trade as an instrument of political 
and military power for the attainment of both 
domestic and international political aims. In 
either case, the same devices were employed. 
The most important among these were the fol- 
lowing: Prohibitive customs duties; quantita- 
tive regulation in its manifold varieties; for- 
eign-exchange control, frequently accompanied 
by the use of multiple currencies; trading mo- 
nopolies; barter transactions; bilateral balanc- 
ing of trade; bilaterally exclusive trade ar- 
rangements ; and other forms of discriminatory 
commercial treatment. 

The outstanding example of the use of these 
devices as an instrument of political action was 
in the case of Germany. By rigid regimenta- 
tion of the trade process, by drastic selection 
of imports, and by aggressive policies toward 
weaker countries, Germany succeeded in making 
the substantially reduced volume of her inter- 
national commerce serve the needs of her vast 
rearmament program and of her general prepa- 
rations for war. Many countries used the vari- 
ous devices of trade control in the name and 
for the purpose of economic defense — in most 
instances as a line of least resistance from the 
viewpoint of domestic policy. In all cases, the 
operation of the restrictive tendency served to 
divert international commerce into artificial 
channels and to reduce both the volume and the 
economic benefits of trade, with attendant dis- 
astrous consequences upon general production, 
employment, and standards of living. 

The other pre-war tendency was based on the 
concept that the proper function of interna- 
tional trade is to enable each nation to secure 
the greatest practicable access to the resources 
of the entire world and the largest practicable 
outlets for its own surplus production, thereby 
opening to each nation wider economic oppor- 
tunities than those afforded by the resources 
and markets confined within its frontiers — the 
availability of such opportunities being essen- 
tial to modern economic organization and to 
improvement of living standards. Under this 
concept, international trade, in order to yield 
the greatest practicable measure of economic 



JANUARY 11, 1941 



49 



benefit, must operate on terms of mutual ad- 
vantage and on the basis of non-discriminatory 
treatment. 

It stands to reason that, from this point of 
view, international trade is inevitably reduced 
jn effectiveness when individual nations or 
groups of nations seek, through the use of ex- 
cessive and unreasonable restrictions, to shut 
themselves off into self-contained units, or to 
monopolize the economic resources of any area, 
without regard to the burdens which such poli- 
cies impose upon the peoples of other nations or 
to the ultimate effects of such policies upon their 
own people. Trade cannot prosper when at- 
tempts at exclusive trade arrangements between 
pairs of countries or the use of other means of 
discriminating in favor of some, and against 
other, countries render difficult a triangular and 
multilateral flow of commerce, which is neces- 
sary if traders are to be able, as nearly as pos- 
sible, to buy and sell wherever they find it most 
advantageous to do so. Trade cannot prosper 
when its financial basis is impaired by insta- 
bility of foreign-exchange rates, by control 
over foreign-exchange transactions, or by 
break-down of a sound structure of interna- 
tional commercial and investment credit. 

The pre-war tendency directed toward the 
removal of these trade-diverting and trade- 
destroying devices foimd its clearest expression 
in the Trade Agreements Program of our Gov- 
ernment. Under that policy, a vigorous effort 
was made to bring about a general reduction 
of excessive and unreasonable trade barriers 
and to place international commerce more and 
more on the basis of reasonable regulation and 
of the greatest possible measure of non-discrim- 
inatory treatment — conditions under which, in 
the past, world trade had attained its highest 
degree of development and usefulness. 

The 21 trade agreements negotiated by the 
United States between 1934 and 1939, together 
with efforts in a similar direction on the part 
of many other countries, represented substantial 
headway for the trade-liberating tendency. 
Like many other peacetime efforts, its scope 
became greatly limited by the outbreak of 
hostilities. 



The war has greatly intensified the restrictive 
tendency. That has been a natural process, 
since the control devices which that tendency 
brings into being are, in fact, weapons of 
economic warfare. Not only the belligerents 
but all nations have adopted, in varying de- 
grees, militant economic measures. Our own 
country, as I have indicated, has done so and 
may have to do more in this respect. But all 
this does not necessarily mean that, when the 
war is over, international economic relations 
will thenceforth inevitably be dominated by 
this type of trade methods, although it may well 
mean that the conflict between the two sharply 
opposing tendencies which were operative be- 
fore the war will be even sharper in the post- 
war period. 

The nature of the post-war conflict of 
tendencies as regards methods of international 
trade and the conditions under which that con- 
flict will take place will depend on a number 
of factors. Of great importance in this respect 
will be the extent to which countries which, be- 
fore the war, were the protagonists of the trade- 
liberating tendency — and especially our coun- 
try — succumb to the temptation of embarking, 
during and immediately after the war, upon 
policies of trade regimentation and control 
beyond the temporary needs of current condi- 
tions. And, obviously, much will depend upon 
the outcome of the war itself. 

In this latter connection, quite apart from 
any subjective preferences, hopes, or desires, 
several possibilities need to be considered in an 
objective attempt at an appraisal. Such an 
appraisal must necessarily involve a large ele- 
ment of speculation. But, in times like the 
present, prudence and wisdom demand, as 
extremely useful insurance, a. visualization of 
alternative possibilities and preparation for 
developments which may or may not eventuate. 

VI 

From the point of view of commercial policy, 
the crucial question after the war will be 
whether or not any of the great trading nations 
will follow the restrictive trade tendency as a 
deliberate policy for the attainment of other 



50 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



than economic aims. This would be the case 
if, as a result of the war, Germany under her 
present leadership should succeed in establish- 
ing and maintaining control over most of the 
continent of Europe and perhaps over some ad- 
jacent areas. In that event she would undoubt- 
edly attempt, as the next immediate step, to 
organize the territory under her domination 
into a single economic unit, with Berlin as the 
focal point. That in itself would be a tremen- 
dously important new factor in the world trade 
situation. But the real extent of its signifi- 
cance would depend upon the methods which 
the German leaders would choose or find them- 
selves able to adopt with respect to the economic 
relationship between the area under their 
control and the rest of the world. 

So far as one can tell at this stage, the proba- 
bilities are against their choosing the way of 
thorough-going economic isolation. No area 
which they are likely to be able to seize by con- 
quest is capable of providing for even a rea- 
sonable degree of self-sufficiency. Nor would 
such a policy be in consonance with their openly 
expressed ambitions. It is far more probable 
that the German leaders would attempt, at 
least for some time to come, to deal with the 
rest of the world on the basis of the type of 
methods which they employed for Germany 
proper before the war: highly centralized and 
rigorously regimented control of the trade proc- 
ess, combined with aggressive attitude and ac- 
tion in commercial negotiations and arrange- 
ments, possibly again as a tool in the service 
of a policy of further conquest. 

If this should happen, the United States 
would face a grave and difficult situation. Our 
foreign commerce would unquestionably decline, 
and we might find it necessary to adopt tem- 
porarily even more far-reaching measures of 
economic defense than during the war period, 
while pushing still further our preparations for 
armed defense. But there is no reason to be- 
lieve that, as a result of such developments, 
we, too, would be compelled or would find it 
advisable to adopt the German trading methods 
and thus, through our abject surrender, make 



likely a complete triumph in the world of that 
economically destructive system. 

A situation such as is here envisaged might 
resolve itself into another war forced upon the 
world by the leaders of Germany, or it might 
lead to an economic struggle of great severity. 
I have no doubts as to the final outcome of either 
of these conflicts, though one may well shudder 
in contemplating the price that would have to 
be paid in either case. I firmly believe that, 
with sufficient vision and determination else- 
where in the world, Germany, even if successful 
in the present war to the extent which is here 
assumed for the sake of discussion, would, unless 
she decides to risk another and even greater war, 
find herself in the end compelled by force of 
circumstance to abandon most, if not all, of her 
now-favored trading methods — after inflicting 
great losses and great suffering upon herself and 
upon the entire world. 

I hold this belief for two main reasons. In 
the first place, there is, in my opinion, serious 
doubt as to the ability of Germany, through her 
present methods, to create a powerful economic 
unit out of the divergent and enslaved portions 
of her would-be domain. And in the second 
place, our country is fully capable, in my opin- 
ion, of mobilizing enough economic power be- 
hind a program of sound economic relations to 
make reasonably certain that such a program 
would eventually prevail. 

I am convinced that if we, in this country, 
adhere unreservedly to our own ideas of what 
to us are desirable international trade methods 
and economic relations; if we insist, even at 
the cost of rejecting ostensible temporary ad- 
vantages, on dealing as far as possible on our 
basis of trade ; if we exert every effort to make 
that basis effective over as large as possible 
an area of the world through cooperation with 
all nations willing' and able to direct their in- 
ternational economic policies toward objectives 
similar to ours — then there would be more than 
substantial hope, even under the conditions here 
envisaged, for an eventual return to economic 
sanity in the entire world. 

From this point of view, our economic rela- 
tions with the other American nations would 



JANUARY 11, 1941 



51 



be of the greatest importance. Each of the 
American republics is fully cognizant of the 
clangers which would confront it if it had to 
face alone attempts at economic aggression on 
the part of a Germany in control of vast Euro- 
pean areas. In close economic collaboration 
among themselves, the American nations would 
possess great economic power — for their own 
protection and as a factor in the shaping of 
the post-war world economy. As Secretary 
Hull said at the Habana meeting: 

"The American nations can build a system 
of economic defense that will enable each of 
them to safeguard itself from the dangers of 
economic subordination from abroad and of 
economic distress at home. It is no part of our 
thought to obstruct in any way logical and nat- 
ural trade with Europe or with any other por- 
tion of the world, but rather to promote such 
trade with nations willing to meet us, in good 
faith, in a spirit of friendly and peaceful pur- 
pose, and on a plane of frank and fair dealing. 
Against any other kind of dealing, we naturally 
will protect ourselves." 

For this purpose, the program embodied in 
the Habana resolution would provide an am- 
ple foundation. Through commodity arrange- 
ments of the kind envisaged there and through 
the other types of action provided for, it should 
be possible for the Western Hemisphere to go 
far toward attaining both the short-run and the 
long-run objectives on which the 21 American 
republics are in agreement today. 

If Germany and her partners are not suc- 
cessful in their attempt at wide-spread conquest, 
if the continent of Europe and the other areas 
of the world, now conquered or under threat of 
subjugation by force, are again organized into 
a number of independent and sovereign nations 
or, perhaps, into groups of voluntary associa- 
tions, the factor of economic aggression will be 
removed. That would be a fact of immense 
significance, but it would not, of itself, mean an 
immediate and automatic return to desirable 
forms of international economic relations. 
There would still be necessarily an extremely 



difficult period of transition from war to peace, 
during which many extraordinary measures 
and policies would be retained from the war 
period and, perhaps, some new ones introduced. 
Even given universal willingness and deter- 
mination to restore the world economy as speed- 
ily as possible to a peaceful basis, there would 
still be the tremendous task of re-directing basic 
policies toward the reestablishment of friendly 
and constructive international relations. 

In this eventuality, too, an economically col- 
laborating and, therefore, economically strong 
Western Hemisphere, sincerely devoted to the 
ideal of economic cooperation for the mutual 
benefit of all concerned and ready to take a posi- 
tion of leadership in abandoning, as quickly as 
circumstances permit, such excessive restraints 
on trade as may be forced by the distortions and 
disruptions of abnormal international relations, 
will be a factor of great importance. 

Through its own policy and action, through 
its whole-hearted participation in a system of 
inter-American collaboration, and through co- 
operation with all nations seeking the same ob- 
jectives, the United States can and should, in its 
own interest, play a role of great importance in 
the post-war economic situation. The essential 
elements of that role, in my opinion, should be : 
( 1 ) adherence to the basic ideas of sound inter- 
national economic relations, to the establishment 
of which this country made so marked a contri- 
bution in the years immediately preceding the 
war; (2) firm determination to help translate 
these ideas into practical realities; and (3) will- 
ingness to use for that purpose its great economic 
and financial resources. 

In my discussion, 1 have excluded the even- 
tuality of our participation in war, either in the 
immediate future or later. But I am certain 
that, even if that should unhappily occur, the 
basic considerations of our foreign economic 
policy which I have attempted to set forth would 
not be altered. 

It goes without saying that, during the war or 
after the war, we must do everything that is 
necessary to protect our national interest and to 
promote the well-being of our people. In the 
difficult and perilous times through which we 



52 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



live, we must be prepared, so far as is humanly 
possible, to meet any contingencies that may 
confront us. But in so doing, we must con- 



which we seek to attain. And we must handle 
our day-to-day problems and decisions in such 
a way as to make least difficult, later on, the 



stantly keep before our eyes the basic objectives attainment of these all-important objectives 



EXPORT CONTROL IN NATIONAL DEFENSE 



The President announced January 10 that he 
had approved the recommendation of Col. Rus- 
sell L. Maxwell, Administrator of Export Con- 
trol, and had issued a proclamation placing six 
additional materials under the export-licensing 
system. These materials, the exportation of 
which must now be controlled due to the ac- 
celerating needs of the national-defense pro- 
gram, are copper, brass, bronze, zinc, nickel, 
and potash. 

The effective date of the proclamation placing 
these materials under export control will be 
February 3, 1941. 

The texts of the President's Proclamation 
and the Executive Order of January 10, 1941, 
follow : 

Administration of Section 6 of the Act En- 
titled "An Act To Expedite the Strength- 
ening of the National Defense" Approved 
July 2, 1940 

by the president of the united states of 

AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Whereas section 6 of the act of Congress 
entitled "An Act To expedite the strengthening 
of the national defense," approved July 2, 1940, 
provides as follows : 

"Sec. 6. Whenever the President determines 
that it is necessary in the interest of national 
defense to prohibit or curtail the exportation 
of any military equipment or munitions, or 
component parts thereof, or machinery, tools, 
or material, or supplies necessary for the man- 
ufacture, servicing, or operation thereof, he may 
by proclamation prohibit or curtail such expor- 
tation, except under such rules and regulations 



as he shall prescribe. Any such proclamation 
shall describe the articles or materials included 
in the prohibition or curtailment contained 
therein. In case of the violation of any provi- 
sion of any proclamation, or of any rule or 
regulation, issued hereunder, such violator or 
violators, upon conviction, shall be punished 
by a fine of not more than $10,000.00 or by im- 
prisonment for not more than two years, or by 
both such fine and imprisonment. The au- 
thority granted in this section shall terminate 
June 30, 1942, unless the Congress shall other- 
wise provide." 

NOW, THEREFORE, I, FrANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT, 

President of the United States of America, 
acting under and by virtue of the authority 
vested in me by the aforesaid act of Congress, 
do hereby proclaim that upon the recommenda- 
tion of the Administrator of Export Control 
I have determined that it is necessary in the 
interest of the national defense that on or after 
February 3, 1941, the following-described arti- 
cles and materials shall not be exported from 
the United States except when authorized in 
each case by a license as provided for in Proc- 
lamation No. 2413 of July 2, 1940, entitled 
"Administration of section 6 of the act entitled 
'An Act to expedite the strengthening of the 
national defense' approved July 2, 1940.": 

1. Copper 

2. Brass and Bronze 

3. Zinc 

4. Nickel 

5. Potash 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 



JANUARY 11, 19 41 



53 



Done at the City of Washington this 10" 
day of January, in the year of our 
[seal] Lord nineteen hundred and forty- 
one, and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the one hundred and 
sixty-fifth. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 
By the President: 
Cordell Hull 

Secretary of State. 

[No. 2453] 
Executive Order 

prescribing regulations governing the expor- 
tation of articles and materials designated 
in the president's proclamation of january 
10,1941, issued pursuant to the provisions of 
section 6 of the act of congress approved 
july 2, 1910, and amending regulations of 
july 2, 194 0, covering the exportation of 
certain articles and materials. 

Pursuant to the authority vested in me by the 
provisions of section 6 of the Act of Congress 
approved July 2, 1940, entitled "An Act To 
expedite the strengthening of the national de- 
fense," I hereby prescribe the following addi- 
tional regulations governing the exportation of: 

1. Copper 

2. Brass and Bronze 

3. Zinc 

4. Nickel 

5. Potash 

1. As used in my proclamation of January 10, 
1941, issued pursuant to the provisions of sec- 
tion 6 of the Act of Congress approved July 2, 
1940, and in these regulations, the above articles 
and materials shall be construed to include : 

A. Copper: 

Ore, concentrates, matte, and unre- 
fined copper including blister, 
black or coarse, converter, and 
anodes 6401 

Refined copper in bars, billets, 
cakes, ingots, slabs and other 
commercial shapes 6412 

2S5502— 41 3 



Old and scrap copper 


6413 


Pipes and tubes 


6422 


Plates and sheets 


6423 


Rods 


6424 


Wire: 




Bare 


6425 


Insulated wire and cable: 




Rubber-covered wire 


6430 


Weatherproof wire 


6431 


Other insulated wire 


6435 


Other primary fabrications 


6412' 


Fabrications for munitions pur- 




poses 


6439' 


Alloys, other than brass and 




bronze 




B. Brass and Bronze: 




Scrap and old 


6440 


Ingots and other commercial 




shapes 


6441 


Bars and rods 


6448 


Plates and sheets 


6450 


Pipes and tubes 


6453 


Wire (bare or insulated) 


6457 


Other primary fabrications 


6479 1 


Fabrications for munitions pur- 




poses 


6479' 


C. Zinc: 




Ore, concentrates, and dross 


6570 


Cast in slabs, plates, or blocks 


6571 


Rolled in sheets and strips 


6572 


Other forms including scrap 


6573 


Alloys 


6573 


Dust 


6586 


Manufactures containing 20% or 




more zinc 


6589* 


D. Nickel: 




Ores, concentrates, and matte 


6545 


Metal in any form including in- 




gots, bars, rods, sheets, plates, 




and scrap 


6545 


Alloys containing 10% or more 




nickel including scrap j 


6545 
6610 


I 
Nickel compounds (chemical) 





containing 10% or more 
nickel 



8399* 



54 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



E. Potash: 
Potassium Salts and Compounds 8356 

Potassium hydroxide (KOH) 
Potassium carbonate (K 2 C0 3 ) 
Potassium chlorate (KC10 3 ) 
Potassium perchlorate (KC10 4 ) 
Potassium cyanide (KCN) 
Potassium iodide (KI) 
Potassium nitrate (KN0 3 ) 
Potassium permanganate 

(KM n 4 ) 
Potassium acetate (KC 2 H 3 2 ) 
Potassium bicarbonate 

(KHC0 3 ) 
Potassium b i t a r t rate 
(KHGAQ.) 
Potassic Fertilizer Materials: 8531 

Potassium chloride (KC1) 
Potassium sulphate (K 2 S0 4 ) 
All other potassic fertilizer ma- 
terials containing 27% or 
more potassium oxide 
(K 2 0) equivalent 
All combinations and mixtures of 
any of the foregoing contain- 
ing potash salts of 27% or 
more potassium oxide (K 2 0) 
equivalent 



2. The numbers in parenthesis following each 
material or article designated in paragraph 1 
hereof correspond to the "Commodity Num- 
ber" prefixed to the "Commodity Description" 
as set out in Schedule B, "Statistical Classifica- 
tion of Domestic Commodities Exported from 
the United States," effective January 1, 1939, 
as amended, issued by the United States De- 
partment of Commerce. The words are con- 
trolling and the numbers are for statistical 
classification only. An asterisk (*) indicates 
that the classification herein is not co-extensive 
with that in said Schedule B. 

3. Regulation 1 of the Regulations issued 
July 2, 1940, pursuant to the Act of July 2, 1940, 
is modified only in so far as it applies to Cop- 
per, Brass and Bronze, Zinc, Nickel, and Potash 
in accordance with the foregoing classifications. 
Regulations 2 to 12 inclusive of the Regulations 
issued July 2, 1940, pursuant to the Act of July 
2, 1940, are applicable to exportation of Copper, 
Brass and Bronze, Zinc, Nickel and Potash. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 

The White House, 
January 10, 19 %1. 

[No. 8631] 



BUDGET RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE DEPARTMENT 
OF STATE, 1942 



The budget for 1942, sent by the President 
to Congress January 8, 1941, describes the rec- 
ommendations for the Department of State as 
follows : 

"The estimates of this Department for the 
fiscal year 1942, exclusive of construction proj- 
ects and trust accounts, amount to $19,768,928, 
a net decrease of $261,152 below the comparable 
appropriations for the fiscal year 1941. This 
net decrease is made up as follows : $32,780 for 
the Office of the Secretary of State, and 
$555,600 for the Foreign Service, less increases 
of $327,228 for international obligations, com- 
missions, bureaus, etc. 



"The net decrease of $32,780 in the estimates 
for the Office of the Secretary of State consists 
of $67,380 for personal services, $26,100 for 
printing and binding, and $5,000 for collecting 
and editing official papers of Territories of the 
United States, a total decrease of $98,480, from 
which are deducted increases of $53,000 for 
national defense activities, and $12,700 for 
contingent expenses. 

"The estimate for salaries of Foreign Service 
officers shows a net increase of $66,600 for auto- 
matic promotions as authorized by law. The 
estimate for salaries of Foreign Service clerks, 
is increased $30,000 to provide salary rates of 
alien clerks which will more nearly conform to 



JANUARY 11, 1941 



55 



local wage standards. For salaries and allow- 
ances of miscellaneous employees in the Foreign 
Service, there is a net increase, of $33,000, in- 
cluding $24,000 for eight additional couriers 
due to unsettled conditions abroad, and $9,000 
to adjust salaries of alien clerks more nearly in 
line, with local wage standards. 

"The estimate for transportation of Foreign 
Service officers and employees shows a net de- 
crease of $5,800. This is accomplished by a 
reduction of $17,800 in the allowance for trans- 
portation of ambassadors and ministers, offset 
by increases of $2,000 for regional conferences 
in the Western Hemisphere, and $10,000 for tem- 
porary details of employees caused by unsettled 
world conditions. 

"There is a net increase of $12,900 in con- 
tingent expenses of the Foreign Service, com- 
posed principally of $55,000 for travel expenses 
of eight additional couriers, and $5,000 for radio 
broadcasts to foreign posts; less decreases of 
$14,180 for household furniture, $25,000 for re- 
pairs to Government buildings, $2,500 for re- 
turning old records to the National Archives, 
$2,336 for Foreign Service regulation binders, 
$2,150 for motor vehicles, and $864 for radio 
receivers. 

"In the estimate for the Foreign Service re- 
tirement and disability appropriated fund, 
there is an increase of $12,700 to provide for the 
current annual cost, interest on the deficit, and 
an annual amount for amortization which will 
place the fund in a position to meet all obliga- 
tions within the next 44 years. 

"The estimate for representation allowances 
has been increased from $150,000 to $170,000, 
more nearly to meet the requirements of the 
Service. There is recommended for United 
States contributions to international commis- 
sions, congresses, and bureaus for the fiscal year 
1942, $1,074,228, as against $1,083,000 for the 
fiscal year 1941, a decrease of $8,772. An esti- 
mate is included for a new item of $15,000 for 
arbitration of claims between the United States 
and the Netherlands. 

"The estimate for emergencies arising in the 
diplomatic and consular service has been de- 
creased $725,000. Should the amount recom- 



mended be insufficient to provide for unforeseen 
emergencies, there is a provision in this appro- 
priation that whenever the President finds a 
state of emergency exists, endangering the lives 
of American citizens in any foreign country, he 
may make available for expenditure for the pro- 
tection of such citizens not to exceed $500,000 
by transfer to this appropriation from the 
various appropriations under the head "Foreign 
Intercourse," and that reimbursements by 
American citizens to whom relief has been ex- 
tended shall be credited to any appropriation 
from which funds have been transferred for 
such purposes. 

"The estimate for the convention for promo- 
tion of inter-American cultural relations con- 
tains a net increase of $17,000, composed princi- 
pally of $24,000 to provide a maximum annual 
salary of $3,000 to professors going from the 
United States to other American republics ; less 
a decrease of $6,930 because of the failure of 
Colombia to ratify the convention. 

"An increase of $8,200 is recommended for the 
International Boundary Commission, United 
States and Mexico, to provide principally for an 
engineering investigation to determine the uses 
of the waters of the Colorado River along the 
boundary between the United States and 
Mexico. 

"The estimate for the International Pacific 
Salmon Fisheries Commission contains an in- 
crease of $5,000 to match the amount it is under- 
stood will be appropriated by Canada for this 
activity. 

"There is an increase of $336,300 in the 
estimate for cooperation with the American 
republics, composed principally of $47,040 for 
selecting, translating, and disseminating Gov- 
ernment publications to the other American 
republics; $101,000 for travel of students, pro- 
fessors, and educational, professional, and 
artistic leaders, including not only citizens of 
the United States, but of the other American 
republics; $50,000 for survey of noncompeti- 
tive plant resources of the American republics; 
$25,000 for a survey of strategic and deficient 
minerals; $22,500 for cooperation in maternal 
and child welfare; $15,000 for student training 



56 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



in weather forecasting ; $13,000 for tidal inves- 
tigations and magnetic observations; $12,500 
for the promotion of travel between the Amer- 
ican republics; and $43,840 for various cultural 
projects sponsored by the Library of Congress. 

"Appropriations for the fiscal year 1941 for 
various international commissions and confer- 
ences, and miscellaneous items, which will not 
be required for the fiscal year 1942, amount 
to $45,500. 

"The expenditures from trust accounts for 
the fiscal year 1942 are estimated at $2,816,880, 
an increase of $7,700 above the fiscal year 1941. 

"Dej)art?n-ent of State, Public Wtxrks 

"The estimates of appropriations under the 
Department of State for the fiscal year 1942 
amount to $1,947,400, a decrease of $112,600 



from the 1941 appropriations. Nonrecurring 
projects in 1941 amount to $962,029, thus 
providing a gross increase for 1942 of $849,429. 
"The 1942 estimate provides $500,000 for 
public buildings for diplomatic and consular 
establishments abroad, an increase of $200,000. 
The principal building projects to be con- 
structed in 1942 will be located in Latin Amer- 
ica and Australia. The estimate provides 
$950,000 for continuing the lower Rio Grande 
flood-control project, the same amount that 
was appropriated for 1941. An estimate of 
$490,900 is included for completion of the con- 
trol and canalization of the Rio Grande. The 
estimate provides $6,500 for the construction 
of a fence on the Mexican border around Cor- 
dova Island at El Paso, Tex., as an aid to 
the enforcement of the alien and smuggling 
laws." 



Europe 



LEASE OF NAVAL AND AIR BASES FROM GREAT BRITAIN 



[Released to the press January 11] 

The President has designated the following 
American officials to proceed to London to work 
out the technical details of the formal leases in 
connection with the military bases of the United 
States in Newfoundland, Bermuda, the Ba- 
hamas, Jamaica, St. Lucia, Trinidad, Antigua, 
and British Guiana agreed upon in the exchange 
of notes between the Governments of the United 
States and Great Britain, dated September 2, 
1940 : 2 

Mr. Charles Fahy, Assistant Solicitor General, 

Department of Justice 
Col. Harry J. Malony, Field Artillery, United 

States Army 
Comdr. Harold Biesemeier, United States Navy 

These officials will proceed to London via Lis- 
bon, departing on the clipper plane from New 
York City on January 17, 1941. 

2 See the Bulletin of September 7, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 
63), pp. 199-200. 



[Released to the press January 12] 

The Secretary of State announced January 
12 that a final agreement has been reached by 
the Governments of the United States and the 
United Kingdom on the sites for the United 
States Naval, Army, and air bases in the Island 
of Trinidad. The sites are those recommended 
by the board of United States experts, headed 
by Rear Admiral John Wills Greenslade, who 
visited Trinidad last autumn. 

In connection with this agreement, the Gov- 
ernor of Trinidad has made public the following 
statement : 

"Final agreement has now been reached on 
the sites for the United States Naval, Army, and 
air bases in the Island of Trinidad. 

"These sites comprise an area of some 11 
square miles for a naval base in the North West 
Peninsula of the Island and an area of some 18 
square miles in the center of the Island for the 
main army and air base, together with small 
areas elsewhere for an auxiliary air field, supply 



JANUARY 11, 19 41 



57 



wharves, and water supply and recreation 
facilities. 

"The proposals made by the United States 
mission which visited Trinidad in October of 
last year appeared to the Government of Trini- 
dad to involve the risk of some disturbance of 
the normal life of the community. Moreover 
the site selected for the naval base comprises 
and commands access to an area and resort that 
have for many years formed the main holiday 
grounds of the people of the Island. These 
considerations led the Government of Trinidad 
to put forward an alternative scheme based upon 
their own proposals for the reclamation of some 
25 square miles of marsh land on the west coast 
of the Island, which had been formulated be- 
fore there was any question of United States 
bases in Trinidad by Mr. Robert Grinnell, the 
American Chairman of the Trinidad Housing 
and Town Planning Commission, and Mr. R. H. 
Beard, who was responsible for the construction 



of the new deep-water wharves at Port-of- 
Spain. The examination of this alternative 
scheme necessitated somewhat longer consulta- 
tion in the case of Trinidad than was necessary 
in that of certain other bases. 

"After careful and sympathetic consideration 
of the alternative scheme the United States Gov- 
ernment have regretfully decided that it would 
be impossible to adopt it and His Majesty's 
Government in the United Kingdom, with the 
full concurrence of the Government of Trini- 
dad, have notified their acceptance of the origi- 
nal proposals. In doing so they have pointed 
out that their decision involves certain sacri- 
fices on the part of the people of Trinidad and 
have expressed the hope that the United States 
authorities will do all they can to minimize 
any disturbance in the normal life of the com- 
munity which the establishment of the bases 
may cause. The United States Government 
have readily given this assurance." 



REFUGEE PROBLEM IN FRANCE 



[Released to the press January 9] 

The following note has been sent by the Sec- 
retary of State to the Ambassador of the 
French Republic, Gaston Henry-Haye : 

"The Secretary of State presents his compli- 
ments to His Excellency the Ambassador of the 
French Republic and has the honor to acknowl- 
edge the receipt of his note of November 25, 
1940 8 requesting the assistance of the Govern- 
ment of the United States of America in the 
Solution of the problem of refugees, primarily 
those of German origin, now in unoccupied 
France. 

"1. The view of the French Government is 
noted that the recent forced migration to 
French unoccupied territory of thousands of 
refugees of German nationality and the 
Jewish religion has seriously aggravated the 
difficulties of the French Government. The 
French Government, in consequence, is obliged 
to care for and feed these persons in addition 
to the many hundreds of thousands of refugees 



' Not printed herein. 



of other nationalities who have sought asylum 
on the territory of France. 

"2. It is noted, however, that, in the opinion 
of the French Government, the refugee prob- 
lem can be solved only through a more equitable 
distribution of refugees, particularly those of 
the Jewish religion, among the 'different coun- 
tries'. Based on the information furnished to 
the Intergovernmental Committee on Political 
Refugees, the countries of the American Hem- 
isphere must be prepared to make a material 
contribution in this sense. 

"3. Finally it is noted that His Excellency the 
French Ambassador expresses the hope that, in 
view of the fact that it is not possible to hold a 
meeting of the Intergovernmental Committee 
in the present circumstances, this Government 
will be prepared to study with the French Gov- 
ernment the ways and means of organizing 
immigration to the American Hemisphere of 
foreign nationals now on French territory, par- 
ticularly Jews. It is hoped that this Govern- 
ment through the Pan American Union or 
otherwise will approach the other American 



58 

Governments with a view to enlisting their sup- 
port of this project. 

"■4. It is stated in conclusion that the French 
Government has refrained for the present from 
making a direct approach to the other Amer- 
ican Governments. 

"5. While this Government appreciates the 
serious predicament in which the French Gov- 
ernment finds itself as a consequence of the 
forced migration in mass of German nationals 
to French territory and while it is disposed to 
assist in solving the refugee problem to the full 
extent of the existing laws and practices of this 
country it believes that, in order that there may 
be no misunderstanding of its position, it is 
desirable to reiterate on this occasion the basic 
principles underlying President Koosevelt's in- 
vitation of March 1938 to the American Gov- 
ernments and others to consult on ways and 
means of relieving the pressure brought to bear 
on all countries by the chaotic unregulated 
migration from Germany and the countries 
under its control of German citizens who for 
political, racial or religious reasons were re- 
garded by the German Government as undesir- 
able. The basic principles enunciated at that 
time and which were accepted as fundamental 
by the Intergovernmental Committee through- 
out its sessions and are controlling in the rela- 
tions in respect to migration between this Gov- 
ernment and the other American Governments 
are (a) that no distinctions shall be made be- 
tween refugees on grounds of race, nationality 
or religion; (b) that no country shall be asked 
or expected to receive a greater number of im- 
migrants than is permitted by prevailing prac- 
tices and existing laws. 

"6. In other words the fundamental prin- 
ciples on which action looking to the orderly 
migration of numbers of people to the Western 
Hemisphere have been and continue to be 
founded are (a) equality of treatment in the 
resettlement of refugees from Europe of all 
races, nationalities and creeds; (b) full respect 
for the sovereign rights of the immigration 
states in regulating migration currents accord- 
ing to their individual interests and in strict 
accordance with their respective laws, 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

"7. At no time in its deliberations has the 
Intergovernmental Committee admitted the 
possibility that a distinction can be drawn be- 
tween one and another category of refugees. 

"8. It has been recognized throughout the 
intergovernmental discussions that the right 
of determining the type and extent of immigra- 
tion into a given country cannot be delegated 
to any outside authority. Moreover, it has been 
made plain repeatedly that this Government 
would not wish to suggest or be party to any 
international action which might be inter- 
preted as placing pressure on any Government 
or Governments to take action in the field of 
migration contrary to or irreconcilable with 
their practices and laws. 

"9. Subject to these considerations and the 
added fact that the laws of the United States 
regarding immigration are quite explicit and do 
not permit of any further liberalization this 
Government is prepared to make and is making 
every consistent effort to contribute effectively 
to relieve the pressure caused by the overconcen- 
tration of refugees in certain countries, includ- 
ing France. A maximum number of persons 
who can fulfill the requirements is being re- 
ceived in this country under the present quotas 
established by American law and in addition 
very many persons are being admitted perma- 
nently to the territory of the Philippine Com- 
monwealth and temporarily to American terri- 
tory as visitors or in transit to other countries. 
"10. It is noted in this connection that many 
persons who have fulfilled the requirements for 
admission to the United States and have re- 
ceived visas have not been able to leave French 
territory owing to the fact that the French Gov- 
ernment has been unwilling or has failed to 
grant the required exit permits with the con- 
sequence that these persons have not been able 
to proceed to the United States and remain on 
French territory where they must be cared for 
and fed. 

"11. It is the impression of this Government, 
moreover, that the other American Governments 
are likewise receiving persons in substantial 
numbers who can qualify for admission to their 
respective territories under their laws and prac- 



JANUARY 11, 1941 



59 



tiees and that persons qualifying for admission 
to these other American countries have, too, 
encountered difficulties in receiving exit permits 
from the French Government, and, as a conse- 
quence, remain to be cared for and fed on 
French territory. 

"Finally, reference should be made to the 
fact that in addition to the persons who are 
being received in various American countries 
by infiltration, settlers who can fulfill certain 
specified requirements are being admitted in 
increasing numbers to the settlement estab- 
lished upon the invitation of the Dominican 
Government, under the aegis of the Intergov- 
ernmental Committee and at the direction of 
an American association at Sosua, in the Do- 
minican Kepublic. These persons who are care- 
fully selected in Europe by an agent of the 
Dominican Republic Settlement Association 
have also in many instances failed to receive 
the necessary permission of the French authori- 
ties to leave and remain to be supported in 
France. 

"12. The basic aim of the action undertaken 
by this Government through the Intergovern- 
mental Committee and otherwise has been to 
bring order out of chaos in the migration of 
persons driven from their countries or coun- 
tries of origin who must be resettled elsewhere. 
In fulfilling this aim the American Govern- 
ment has made it clear from the outset that it 
could not support or be party to any measures 
which would encourage the spread from points 
outside the Western Hemisphere to the West- 
ern Hemisphere of forced migration in which 
people in great numbers are intended to be 
driven anarchically upon the receiving states 
with unhappy consequences to the economic 
and social equilibrium of all. To permit the 
spread of this condition to the Western Hem- 
isphere would be to impede not promote the 
solution of a problem which ultimately must 
be settled in an orderly manner and in calm 
consultation by Governments of countries where 
there is said to be overpofmlation, Govern- 
ments of countries of temporary reception and 
Governments of countries of final settlement. 



"13. Accordingly, while this Government 
holds the view that the time will come when 
such conditions of order and peace will prevail 
in the world as will warrant a humane and 
orderly approach to the migration problem by 
the Governments collaborating in mutual con- 
fidence and mutual respect, it does not believe 
that any useful purpose can be served by dis- 
cussing migration problems bilaterally with 
the French Government or multilaterally with 
the several Governments at this time. Present 
world conditions operate to cau^e governments 
in many instances to forego the free exercise 
of their authority, and the essential require- 
ments for a constructive solution of the funda- 
mental problems of migration and resettlement 
do not prevail. 

"Department of State, 

"Washington, Dccemoer 27, 1940." 

NEW YEAR MESSAGE FROM MARSHAL 
PETAIN OF FRANCE 

[Released to the press January 9] 

A translation of a message received by Presi- 
dent Roosevelt from Marshal Petain of France 
follows : 

"Vichy, Jamwry 2, 1941. 
"In this New Year which is beginning I wish 
to extend to you the personal good wishes I feel 
for you and your family, as well as for the 
prosperity of the United States. 

Philippe Petain" 

The President has transmitted the following 
reply to Marshal Petain: 

"January 8, 1941. 

"Your very kind message of good will for 
me and for my family, and for the prosperity 
of the United States was delayed in transmis- 
sion and has just reached me. I hasten to con- 
vey to you my deep appreciation. 

"My heart goes out to France in these days 
of her travail and I pray that the French people 
may soon once again enjoy the blessings of 
peace with Liberty, Equality and Fraternity. 

"Please accept my most cordial personal 
wishes for the coming year. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt" 



60 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



GREENLAND 

[Released to the press January 9] 

The United States has sent no troops to 
Greenland nor has it established any air or 
naval bases in that Danish Colony. 

The facts are as follows: 

In connection with the signature on August 
4, 1916 of the convention with Denmark for the 
cession of the Danish West Indies, a declara- 
tion was made by the Secretary of State to the 
effect that the United States would not object 
to the extension by Denmark of her political and 
economic interests to the whole of Greenland. 
The United States has taken no action in Green- 
land which would impair the validity of this 
declaration. 

In 1920 the Government of the United States 
stated that it would not be disposed to recog- 
nize the right of a third government to acquire 
Greenland should the Danish Government de- 
sire to dispose of that territory. The occupa- 
tion of Demnark by German troops in April 
1940 carried with it the potentialities of a new 
situation with respect to Greenland which re- 
quired consideration by this Government in the 
light of the position which it assumed in 1920 
and which it has continued to maintain. The 
occupation of Denmark also led to an approach 
to the Government of the United States by the 
Greenland authorities who expressed their con- 
cern over the effect upon Greenland of the 
course of events in Denmark by which Green- 
land had been deprived of free communication 
with Copenhagen, of the possibility of obtain- 
ing food and other supplies from Denmark, and 
of facilities for placing Greenland exports on 
the Danish market. 

In response to this approach and other re- 
quests made by the Greenland authorities on 
their own initiative, the Government of the 
United States with the full agreement of the 
Greenland authorities has taken the following 



steps, none of which has operated to the injury 
of any legitimate interests: 

1. An American Consulate was provisionally 
established at Godthaab to facilitate the han- 
dling of the numerous questions which have 
arisen with respect to the purchase in the United 
States of food and other supplies for Greenland 
and of the sale of Greenland products in this 
country. 

2. An American Red Cross representative was 
sent to Greenland to determine on the spot and 
in consultation with the Greenland authorities 
what relief was needed by the inhabitants of 
Greenland. 

3. In view of the heavy demands from many 
parts of the world for arms and ammunition 
manufactured in this country, the Government 
of the United States has facilitated the pur- 
chase in the United States by the Greenland 
authorities of a quantity of arms for the use of 
the small number of policemen employed by the 
Greenland authorities to patrol the cryolite 
mine at Ivigtut, which is Greenland's major 
economic asset. 

CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN 
BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 

[Released to the press January 4] 

The following persons and organizations are 
now registered with the Secretary of State, pur- 
suant to section 8 of the Neutrality Act of 1939, 
for the solicitation and collection of contribu- 
tions to be used in belligerent countries for 
medical aid and assistance or for food and cloth- 
ing to relieve human suffering. The countries 
to which contributions are being sent are given 
in parentheses. For prior registrants, see the 
Department's press release of October 28, 1940. 

385. Friends of Dover, England, Fund, 158 Washing- 
ton Street, Dover, N. H. (England) 

a 386. San Angelo Standard, Inc., 17 South Chad- 
bourne, San Angelo, Tex. (England) 



" Revoked at request of registrant. 



JANUARY 11, 1941 



61 



" 387. Church of the Pilgrimage, Towu Sqnare, Ply- 
mouth, Mass. (England) 

"388. Lord Mayor of Plymouth's Services Welfare 
Fund, Plymouth, Mass. (England) 

389. Parcels for Belgian Prisoners, 1780 Massachusetts 
Avenue, Washington, D.C. (Germany) 

390. Greek War Relief Association, Inc., 730 Fifth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Greece) 

391. Miss Heather Thatcher, 1334y 2 Miller Drive, Sun- 
set Boulevard, Hollywood, Calif. (Great Britain) 

392. Scottish Clans Evacuation Plan, "Shorewood", Port 
Washington, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

393. California Denmark Fund, 348 Jules Avenue, San 
Francisco, Calif. (Denmark) 

394. Royal Air Force Benevolent Fund, care of Mrs. 
Esther Anthony, 515 Madison Avenue, Suite 2501, 
New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

395. Near East Foundation, Inc., 17 West Forty-sixth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (Greece) 

396. Wellesley Club of Washington, care of Mrs. Ernest 
J. McCormick, Apartment 743, Arlington Village, Ar- 
lington, Va. (Great Britain) 

397. American Committee for the Syrian Orphanage in, 
Jerusalem, 5100 Sixty-third Street, Woodside, Long 
Island, N. Y. (Palestine, Germany, and British East 
Africa ) 

398. Lithuanian National Fund, 359 Union Avenue, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. (Germany and France) 

399. The American School Committee for Aid to 
Greece, Inc., Fuld Hall, Institute for Advanced Study, 
Princeton, N. J. (Greece) 

400. Dodecanesian League of America, Inc., 211 West 
Thirty-third Street, New York, N. Y. (Greece) 

401. Liberty Link Afghan Society, The Whittier, 415 
Burns Drive, Detroit, Mich. (Great Britain) 

402. Federation of the Italian World War Veterans 
in the U. S. A., Inc., 626 Fifth Avenue, New York, 
N. Y. (Italy) 

403. Coniite' Pro Francia Libre, 7 Roosevelt Street, 
Miramar, Santurce, P. R. (England) 

404. Nowy-Dworer Ladies & United Relief Association, 
40 East Seventh Street, New York, N. Y. (Poland) 

405. The Greek Fur Workers Union, Local 70, 253 West 
Twenty-eighth Street, New York, N. Y. (Greece) 

406. Ethiopian World Federation, Inc., 2667 Eighth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Ethiopia, Kenya, Anglo- 
Egyptian Sudan. Palestine, and Great Britain) 

407. Saints Constantine and Helen Greek Orthodox 
Church, care of Mr. Soterios Nicholson, Burlington 
Hotel, Washington, D.C. (Greece) 



408. The Allied Civilian War Relief Society, Inc., care 
of Mr. Robert C. Flack, 36 West Forty-fourth Street, 
New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

409. The Order of Ahepa, Investment Building, Wash- 
ington, D.C. (Greece) 



The Near East 



1 Revoked at request of registrant. 



PURCHASE OF AMERICAN MISSION- 
ARY SCHOOL BY IRAN 

[Released to the press Jauuary 9] 

Following a decision of the Iranian Govern- 
ment to take over all foreign educational in- 
stitutions in Iran for the purpose of unifying 
the educational system, a friendly agreement 
was reached by that Government and the Pres- 
byterian Board of Foreign Missions as a re- 
sult of which the Iranian Ministry of Educa- 
tion is already making use of the Board's 
extensive educational properties in Iran and 
has effected the initial payment stipulated in 
the agreement. 

The properties involved include Alborz Col- 
lege at Tehran and other educational institu- 
tions located in the capital and in Hamadan, 
Resht, and Tabriz. The agreement provides 
for the payment in instalments of a total sum 
of $1,200,000, the final payment being due on 
December 21, 1943. 

The Department was kept informed of the 
progress of the negotiations leading to the 
conclusion of the agreement, and from time to 
time offered such comment to the parties con- 
cerned as was considered fair and reasonable. 
The Department is gratified to note that the 
termination of the Board's educational work 
in Iran, which was carried on for more than 
a century, has been effected on a friendly and 
mutually satisfactory basis. 



American Republics 



VISIT TO UNITED STATES OF LEADERS IN THE PROFESSIONS, 
THE ARTS. AND EDUCATION 



[Released to the press January 5] 

The Division of Cultural Relations of the 
Department of State has extended invitations to 
30 distinguished educational, professional, and 
artistic leaders of the other American republics 
to visit the United States. Funds to defray the 
cost of these trips were provided in the Second 
Deficiency Act of 1940. Arrangements for the 
itineraries of the visitors are being worked out 
in cooperation with the colleges and universi- 
ties of the United States. 

The interests of the persons invited include 
writing and journalism, education, history, 
architecture, engineering, physiology, sociology 
and anthropology, music and the fine arts, and 
classical studies. Most of the visits will be 
made between January and April 1941 since the 
summer- vacation periods in the South Ameri- 
can countries usually run from the end of 
December to the last of March. 

The first visitors invited under this program 
have already arrived in the United States. 
Father Aurelio Espinosa Polit, S.J., Director of 
the Colegio de Cotocollao, of Quito, Ecuador, 
reached New York on December 16. Since that 
time, he has been in touch with scholars in the 
universities in and near Washington and Balti- 
more. He also plans to visit other universities, 
notably, Princeton, Fordham, Harvard, Chi- 
cago, and Northwestern. His itinerary will 
also take him to Phillips Academy, Andover, 
Massachusetts, and to St. Louis and Cincinnati. 

Father Espinosa is one of the most distin- 
guished Latinists and Hellenists of Ecuador 
and one of the most noted in Spanish America. 
He has taught Latin and Greek for many years 
62 



in the Colegio de Cotocollao. His translations 
of Virgil are considered among the best that 
have been done in Spanish. Father Espinosa 
has published a large number of critical works 
on Virgil and other classical authors as well as 
a considerable body of original poetry. He was 
trained in Belgium, France, and Spain and 
studied two years at the University of Cam- 
bridge in England. 

The second visitor to arrive is Commander 
Fernando Romero, of Lima, Peru. Com- 
mander Romero is an officer in the Peruvian 
Navy, an instructor in the Naval College, and 
also a distinguished sociologist and novelist. 
He arrived in New York on the Santa Clara 
on December 30 and will spend the first week 
of his stay in this country in "Washington, 
where the Pan American Union has arranged 
a lecture in Spanish by him for January 7 on 
Peruvian music and folklore. Later he will 
visit Northwestern, Chicago, Vanderbilt, Fisk, 
and Atlanta universities. 

For several years Commander Romero has 
been interested in the study and investigation of 
Negro folklore and survivals in Peru. One of 
his earliest works on the subject was a study en- 
titled La Costa Zaniba. He has also published 
a considerable number of short stories, the best 
known collection of which is that entitled Doce 
Cuentos de la Selva, based on his personal travel 
and observations in the Department of Loreto 
and his residence of many months in Iquitos. 
Commander Romero was the founder and is the 
present director of the Peruvian literary group 
known as "Insula". He has collaborated widely 
in the Peruvian and foreign press and in pe- 
riodicals on literary and sociological topics. 



JANUARY 11, 1941 



63 



REPRESENTATION OF UNITED STATES BUSINESS IN OTHER 
AMERICAN REPUBLICS 

STATEMENT BY NELSON A. ROCKEFELLER 4 



[Released to the press by the Office for Coordination of 
Commercial and Cultural Relations Between the Ameri- 
can Republics January 8] 

As a defense measure, the Office of the Co- 
ordinator has undertaken a continuing study 
of the representation of United States busi- 
ness in the other American republics in cooper- 
ation with the Department of State and other 
interested Government agencies. The first 
phase of the study is now completed, and its 
results are being made available to the inter- 
ested Government departments. 

Shortly after the Office of the Coordinator 
was established on August 16, 1940, a mission 
sponsored by this Office undertook a compre- 
hensive study in Central and South America in 
cooperation with United States Foreign Serv- 
ice officers. The mission was headed by Percy 
L. Douglas, on leave of absence from the Otis 
Elevator Company, International Division, 
and included John Lockwood, New York 
lawyer, and George H. Butler, of the State 
Department, as well as a group of technical 
assistants. The mission returned to the United 
States in December after visits to 18 of the 
other 20 American republics and has reported 
to the Coordinator. 

The work of correlating the findings on a 
hemisphere basis is nearing completion. Ex- 
amination of the country-by-country reports 
discloses the following facts: 

1. That United States business is frequently 
represented in Central and South America by 
firms and individuals now known to support 
objectives contrary to the best interests of the 
American republics. 

2. That these representatives often use ad- 
vertising appropriations of United States busi- 
ness firms to force newspapers and in some 
instances radio stations to adopt anti-American 
editorial policies. 



* Coordinator of Commercial and Cultural Relations 
Between the American Republics. 



3. That many employees of United States 
companies or their affiliates in Central and 
South America are known members of local 
anti-American organizations. 

4. That many anti-American firms, which 
formerly sold only European products, have 
now succeeded in obtaining agencies for United 
States business. These new connections are 
keeping them alive and enabling them to main- 
tain their trade contacts. In many instances, 
they openly declare they will return to their 
former lines at the expiration of the war. 

5. That many of these agents who now rep- 
resent United States firms are obtaining through 
this medium confidential trade information 
which is made available to anti-American 
powers. 

6. That profits thus derived from representa- 
tion of United States firms are being used to 
finance operations of propaganda agencies in 
Central and South America. 

7. That many of the firms representing 
United States companies also serve as centers 
for distribution of anti-American literature and 
propaganda. 

8. Many of the larger anti-American firms 
have established their own purchasing agents 
in the United States and with the goods ob- 
tained in this market remain in business. 

9. Officers and employees of a number of 
firms, representing United States businesses, are 
officials of anti- American powers. 

The purpose of the mission was to discover 
the extent of such practices and their effect on 
hemisphere defense. The mission's findings in- 
dicate that the majority of our exporting firms 
are not represented in Central and South Amer- 
ica by agents with non- American connections, 
but that there are a sufficient number to make 
this a serious concern from a defense point of 
view. It should be emphasized also that in 
many cases the firms involved have had no 
knowledge of the anti-American activities of 



64 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



their agents, and thus they have unwittingly 
contributed to our own difficulties and to those 
of our neighbors. In many cases, the connec- 
tions are traceable to recent non- American pres- 
sures, the application of which could not have 
been foreseen when the connection was estab- 
lished. 

Many United States companies have already 
taken steps to remedy the situation by cooper- 
ating with the nationals in the countries in 
which they operate to appoint agents friendly 
to inter-American solidarity. It is confidently 
anticipated that our exporting firms as a whole 
will cooperate as soon as they are apprised of 
the situation as it relates to their interests. 

COOPERATION BY PANAMA IN CONTI- 
NENTAL SOLIDARITY AND DEFENSE 

[Released to the press January 11] 

President Roosevelt has received the follow- 
ing telegram from President Arias of Panama : 

"Panama, January 7, 1941. 
"Having been duly informed of Your Excel- 
lency's message to the Congress of the great 
friendly and sister nation, I take pleasure in 



congratulating you and in saying at the same 
time both in my own name and in that of the 
Panamanian Government and people that the 
Republic of Panama will cooperate by all means 
within its reach to assuring territorial and 
political integrity of our continent and strength- 
ening the wise policy of the good neighbor 
which is championed by Your Excellency and 
which tends to the strengthening of the con- 
sciousness of inter-American solidarity on the 
basis of mutual respect and in common devo- 
tion to republican and democratic ideals. 

Arnulfo Arias" 

In reply, President Roosevelt has transmitted 
the following message to the President of 
Panama, Senor Arnulfo Arias: 

"January 10, 1941. 
"It is with deep appreciation and gratifica- 
tion that I have received Your Excellency's cor- 
dial message which so warmly reaffirms the co- 
operation of the Republic of Panama in all that 
concerns continental solidarity and defense, and 
emphasizes the common devotion of our two 
countries to the principles of democracy. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt" 



Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, etc. 



MONTHLY STATISTICS 



[Released to the press January 7] 

Note: The figures relating to arms, the licenses for 
the export of which were revoked before they were 
used, have been subtracted from the figures appearing 
in the cumulative column of the table below iu regard 
to arms export licenses issued. These latter figures 
are therefore net figures. They are not yet final and 
definitive since licenses may be amended or revoked 



at any time before being used. They are, however, 
accurate as of the date of this press release. 

The statistics of actual exports in these releases are 
believed to be substantially complete. It is possible, 
however, that some shipments are not included. If 
this proves to be the fact, statistics in regard to such 
shipments will be included in the cumulative figures in 
later releases. 



JANUARY 11, 1941 

Arms Export Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
licensed for export by the Secretary of State 
during the year 1940 up to and including the 
month of November : 



65 





Category 


Value of export licenses Issued 


Country of destination 


November 
1940 


11 months 
ending No- 
vember 30, 
1940 




in (2) 

V (2) 


$487.00 
BO, 625. 00 


$487. 00 




60, 625. 00 


Total 


61, 112. 00 






IV (1) 
I (1) 

I (4) 

V (1) 
(2) 




















103. 35 












24.00 




























I (2) 
(4) 
(5) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 














463.00 


5, 930. 00 
2, 300. 00 




33,000.00 


33, 000. 00 




466.00 

314.00 

14, 200. 00 

2, 134. 00 


14, 527. 00 
10, 646. 00 
54, 225. 00 
201, 663. 61 
40, 937. 50 




24, 795. 00 


44, 669. 84 
93, 384. 51 








Total 


75, 351. 00 






I (1) 
(4) 

HI (1) 
(2) 

rv (i) 

(2) 

V (1) 

(2) 

(3) 

VII (1) 






179. 95 
468.97 






1, 481. 86 
2, 026, 820. 00 












1, 494. 55 




51.86 


644.97 
25, 648. 00 




69, 884. 00 

2, 170, 408. 00 

18,000.00 


987, 467. 25 

4, 387, 279. 58 

61, 474. 86 


Total 


2, 258, 992. 78 






IV (1) 

I (4) 

IV (2) 

V (2) 








136.00 












17.29 






1.87 






23.00 








Total 


1 42.16 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


November 
1940 


11 months 
ending No- 
vember 30, 
1940 




I 

III 
IV 
V 


(1) 

(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 










103, 200. 00 

28, 779. 00 

2, 292, 000. 00 


















20, 746. 00 










419, 400. 00 






Total 




3,108,367.00 




I 

IV 

V 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 












$170. 50 


255.20 










2,400.00 


9,400.00 


Total 


2, 570. 50 


17, 746. 04 




i 

IV 
V 

vn 


(4) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




1,606.00 


















2,884.60 








1, 156. 20 


3, 691. 54 










2, 761. 20 


63, 369. 64 




i 
in 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 










687.00 


9, 176. 00 

1,897,325.00 

76, 720. 00 

75,000.00 

1, 342, 700. 00 




62, 020. 00 












18, 283. 58 


85, 093. 33 




45, 000. 00 
6, 000. 00 
5, 669. 00 


1,006,418.00 
216,200.11 
301, 678. 50 




137,659.58 


5, 044, 523. 08 




IV 

V 

vn 


(2) 
(1) 

Cll 

(1) 
(2) 























325. 95 


2, 158. 31 










325. 95 






i 

IV 
VII 


(t) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 








12.00 






98.69 






129.20 






108. 30 
















i 
i 

IV 


(4) 

(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 










2.43 


















133. 54 






765. 26 






136.00 








Total 




1,424.79 



66 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN" 





Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


Category 


November 
1940 


11 months 
ending No- 
vember 30, 
1940 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
C6) 

II 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (2) 

VII (1) 
(2) 


$5,172.80 
239, 912. 21 
7S3. 653. 00 
9, 237. 61 
128, 568. 50 


$794, 795. 44 




605, 229. 29 
992, 476. 00 
502, 079. 97 
438, 254. 00 
51, 840. 00 




26, 918. 00 


26.918.00 
27, 088. 202. 00 




396.00 

549. 45 

1, 065. 11 


4, 537. 00 
353, 558. 64 
65, 465. 88 
975, 000. 98 




110,806.20 
620, 363. 76 
95.00 
101,435.00 
63, 426. 50 


4,441,955.22 

9,511,134.69 

36. 193. 00 

389, 731. 88 

128, 636. 43 




2, 091, 604. 14 


46, 396, 008. 42 




I 12) 
(4) 
(.5) 
(6) 

III U) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII U) 
12) 








3, 040. 00 






37, 431. 28 






8, 650. 00 






3, 630. 00 
409, 560. 00 




750.00 


53, 819. 00 
7, 442. 38 




390, 000. 00 
20, 333. 00 
8, 300. 00 


396, S00. 00 
23, 740. 50 
38,835.00 
2, 363. 00 






12, 607. 15 




419,383.00 


997, 918. 31 




I (2) 
(4) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




Cbina 




352,440.00 




850. 00 


850.00 
2, 529, 106. 22 






138, 849. 74 












3, 226. 71 




68, 200. 00 


225, 000. 00 






3, 374, 225. 35 












931, 000. 00 










69. 050. 00 


11,666,804.76 




I (0 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
13) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








30.00 




64.12 

3, 660. 50 

327.00 


309. 12 

5, 971. 40 

1, 389. 76 

333, 750. 00 






15,818.00 




11, 000. 00 


76, 995. 00 




1,125.00 


6, 030. 00 




16, 176. 62 






I (4) 

IV (1) 

(2) 






20, 766. 00 

18.70 

2, 300. 60 


24, 520. 00 




7, 977. 20 
5,314.85 





Category 


Value of eiport licenses issued 


Country of destination 


November 
1940 


11 months 
ending No- 
vember 30, 
1940 


Costa Rica— Continued. 


V 

vn 


(1) 

(3) 
(1) 
(2) 


$58, 700. 00 


$83, 700. 00 






14, 604. 70 




696. 36 


2, 823. 12 
24.00 










82, 481. 66 


146, 219. 49 




i 

IV 

v 

VII 


(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
CM 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 








143.00 




10.00 

23.00 

3, 885. 00 

217. 45 


131, 558. 00 
3,388.50 
16, 961. 00 
11,811.95 






2,000.00 




1, 638. 88 


5, 736. 68 
751. 00 










5,774.33 


179. 880. 73 




I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(3) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 








19, 846. 20 




50, 000. 00 
12, 450. 00 


50, 000. 00 
14, 591. 89 
2, 529. 90 




60.00 


691.28 

106, 109. 00 




406.00 


9, 695. 26 
69, 950. 00 






22.50 










62, 906. 00 


263, 436. 03 




V 

I 

IV 
V 

vn 


(3) 

(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(1) 








2, 040. 00 












306. 52 




52.00 


3, 037. 50 
846. 32 




800.00 
340.00 


1, 400. 00 
1,841.80 




1, 192. 00 


7, 432. 14 




i 

IV 

V 

VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 








208.52 






213. 00 






199.00 






18, 707. 00 






2, 047. 00 






226.00 




82.00 


982.00 




82.00 


22, 582. 62 




i 
ill 

IV 
V 


(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 




E t 




837. 50 






3, 310. 00 






1, 680. 21 




2, 485. 00 


2, 485. 00 
69, 938. 00 






2,331.31 






16,993.00 




225, 875. 00 


225, 935. 00 




228, 360. 00 


323, 510 02 




I 


(1) 
(4) 








125,052.00 







1,111.00 



JANUARY 11, 1941 



G7 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


November 
1940 


11 months 
ending No- 
vember 30, 
1940 




III 
IV 

V 

VII 


(i) 
(i) 

(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




$18,200.00 




































Total 








I 


(1) 
(4) 
















6, 456. 42 
















I 

IV 

V 
VII 


(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 










19, 660. 00 






538, 669. 60 






3, 806, 493. 89 












141.02 






44, 640. 29 






35, 056. 00 






641,032.50 








Total 




6, 086, 544. 80 




I 

in 

rv 

V 
VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 

(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 
















1, 204, 202. 71 






42, 071. 00 






452, 145. 50 






28,111,023.00 












30.00 


















11,950,423.01 






1, 644, 697. 00 






2.00 






56, 593. 00 








Total 








i 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
















305. 50 






3, 836. 00 






530. 90 




$6, 000. 00 


6,000.00 




6,000.00 






V 

i 
in 

IV 
V 

VII 


(2) 

(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




Gold Coast 


2,400.00 


2, 400. 00 


Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland. 


1,500.00 
1,124.00 

527, 049. 00 

371. 35 

79, 100. 00 

1,490,000.00 


7, 611, 459. 50 
22, 980, 402. 18 

6,941,149.52 
61,972,025.61 
15, 199, 639. 10 
287, 966, 579. 75 




021,805.28 
115.50 


1,740,502.59 
4,361,894.85 




214, 056. 00 

914, 100. 00 

150, 100. 00 

2,017,616.00 


26, 221, 740. 40 

138, 354, 632. 00 

14, 076, 903. 94 

7, 699, 285. 80 


Total 


6,016,936.13 


595, 240, 355. 38 





Category 


Valne of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


November 
1940 


11 months 
ending No- 
vember 30, 
1940 




I (3) 
(4) 
(5) 

IV (1) 

V (3) 
















90, 900. 00 


















Total 








I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 










1,015.48 








$1,000.00 


7, 674. 65 




















Total 


1, 000. 00 






IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
VII (1) 

(2) 


















21, 500. 00 


21,500.00 
















21, 500. 00 






IV (11 
(2) 

V (1) 
VII (1) 




Haiti 






























Total 




8, 664. 81 




I (1) 

(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

VII (2) 














128.00 


818.00 




435.00 


2, 286. 00 




















Total 


563. 00 


18, 155. 90 




I (1) 

(2) 
(41 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(21 
(3) 

VI (2) 








2, 040. 75 
938.00 
















7, 363. 00 






67.75 




125, 000. 00 
6, 875. 60 
21, 554. 00 


125, 000. 00 
29. 707. 60 
46, 304. 00 








Total 


153, 429. 60 


213, 344. 20 




IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

VII (2) 


























763. 00 














Total 




11,012.00 




I (1) 

(4) 

III (1) 
















7, 311. 94 




150, 000. 00 


150, 000. 00 



68 



DEPARTMENT OP STATE BULLETIN" 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


November 
1940 


11 months 
ending No- 
vember 30, 
1940 




IV 
V 

VI 

VII 


(i) 

(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 
(2) 




$3, 704. 14 








$470, 000. 00 
23, 044. 00 
118,000.00 


539. 100. 00 
24, 778. 40 
119,000.00 




106.00 


106.00 


Total 


761, 150. 00 


851. 506. 77 




I 
ni 

V 


(2) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 




Iran 






































i 

in 

V 


(2) 

(2) 
(2) 






Iraq 




47, 865. 00 






27, 165. 00 


















223, 030. 00 




V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 






































V 

IV 
V 


(2) 

(1) 
(2) 
(2) 










13,610.00 




















2, 400. 00 


2.400.00 


Total 


2,400.00 






I 

IV 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 




















714.00 






35.00 
















VII 

I 
I 
I 

rv 

V 

VI 

VII 


(2) 

(2) 

(4) 

(1) 
(4) 
(6) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2; 
(1) 
(2) 












































62.00 
22.00 






27, 552. 26 




1, 280. 00 

263.00 

86, 825. 00 

3, 217. 00 


22, 407. 30 

1, 286. 20 

627, 750. 40 

11, 612. 63 










217. 75 
7, 945. 00 


17, 716. 00 
66,220.00 


Total 


98,831.76 


817, 837. 79 




I 


(1) 
(4) 












164.61 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


November 
1940 


11 months 
ending No- 
vember 30, 
1940 


Mozambique — Continued. 


V 


(i) 

(2) 
(3) 


























356, 354. 61 




I 

V 


(2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(2) 
(3) 


















































I 

III 
IV 
V 

VI 
VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(6) 
(6) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 








$812. 15 
12, 492. 00 






3,510,842.00 
1, 263, 000. 00 




38, 806. 61 


4,125.113.87 










477, 620. 00 


6, 168, 738. 10 




31, 805. 00 
429.69 


202, 987. 66 
61,363.06 




149, 641. 60 


590. 461. 40 


















160, 749. 30 










711. 506. 95 






I 

I 

IV 


(4) 

(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 


















62.80 
41.12 






1, 273. 00 
















93.92 






IV 
V 


(2) 
(2) 














1,460.00 
















I 

in 

IV 
V 

VII 


(4) 
(1) 
0) 
(2) 
(3) 
(I) 






































10,000.00 


21, 045. 00 




10, 000. 00 






I 

IV 
V 

vn 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 














9, 000. 00 






1, 208. 00 




39, 000. 00 


39, 000. 00 






















39, 000. 00 


114,350.00 



JANUARY 11, 1941 



69 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


November 
1940 


11 months 
ending No- 
vember 30, 
1940 




I 

IV 


(2) 
(4) 
(1) 

(2) 




$278. 50 












30.25 






89.04 












418. 79 




I 

IV 


(1) 

(4) 
(1) 










336.80 






198. 27 




$51.00 


76.50 




61.00 


611.57 




I 
III 

IV 

V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 








70.00 
225.00 






36, 480. 00 


















222.00 
































Total 








IV 

V 


(2) 
(3) 








273.60 


3, 276, 60 












273.60 






I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 


























8,804.76 








3, 300. 00 


31, 166. 00 




2, 187. 20 


1, 380. 00 
4,449.66 








Total 


6, 487. 20 


70, 909. 41 




I 

IV 


14) 
(2) 




















Total 








I 

IV 
V 

VII 

I 

IV 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 

(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 








390.60 






















7,957.00 

69.86 
390.00 


32, 757. 58 
86, 666. 00 
2, 209. 86 
1, 520. 50 


Total 


8, 807. 46 


524. 505. 94 
























422.00 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


November 
1940 


11 months 
ending No- 
vember 30, 
1940 




V 

VII 


(i) 

(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




























17, 000. 00 














I 

IV 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 




































Total. 








V 

I 

V 


(2) 

(1) 
(2) 












































I 

rv 

V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




















$106.00 


805.56 












160, 580. 26 






Total 


106.00 






I 
I 


(4) 

(1) 
(4) 
















Spain 


























I 
I 

IV 

vn 


(1) 

(2) 
(4) 
(2) 
(1) 






































193. 80 


616. 80 


Total. 


193. 80 






i 

in 

IV 
V 


(2) 
(4) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 






























29,091.67 


120, 511. 20 








Total 


29, 091. 67 






IV 

I 

III 
rv 


(1) 

(1) 
(4) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
























99.06 


160.83 
1, 543. 84 










245.91 


593. 82 



70 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


November 
1940 


11 months 
ending No- 
vember 30, 
1940 




V 


(1) 

(2) 
(3) 
















211, 260. 00 








$344.97 


345, 269. 84 




IV 

I 

IV 

V 
VII 


(1) 

(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 






8, 925. 00 










6.32 


6.32 








47.21 
7,200.00 


47.21 
7, 522. 32 






2, 977. 00 






162. 45 










7, 252. 53 






III 
IV 

V 
VII 


(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 






19, 056. 86 


24, 666. 86 




33.00 






6.20 






139, 760. 00 




6, 354. 00 


123,131.00 


Total 


25, 410. 86 


287, 597. 06 




I 
in 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 
































574,000.00 




1, 942. 00 


1,942.00 




18.34 
100, 000. 00 
177, 700. 00 


36, 438. 50 

3, 444, 553. 00 

302,217.28 










25, 720. 00 


65,948.00 




305, 380. 34 






V 

i 

IV 
V 

VII 


(3) 

(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




Union of Soviet Socialist Re- 
publics. 


12,820.00 


12, 820. 00 




43.00 










138.00 

34, 725. 00 

625.00 

377.00 


8, 163. 63 

88, 325. 00 

725. 40 

377.00 
















35, 908. 00 






I 

III 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 






































192. 70 






298,860.00 




174.00 
6,080.00 


66, 689. 30 
142, 350. 00 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


November 
1940 


11 months 
ending No- 
vember 30, 
1940 


Venezuela — Continued. 


VII (1) 

(2) 


$2, 578. 74 


$19, 656. 43 








Total 


7, 832. 74 






IV (2) 
VII (2) 






















Total 








V (2) 
(3) 
























Total 
















13, 778, 479. 28 











During the month of November, 362 arms 
export licenses were issued, making a total of 
4,397 such licenses issued during the current 
year. 

Arms Exported 

The table printed below indicate^ the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
exported during the year 1940 up to and in- 
cluding the month of November under, export 
licenses issued by the Secretary of State : 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


November 
1940 


11 months 
ending No- 
vember 30, 
1940 




V (2) 

I (4) 

V (1) 
(2) 


$14, 400. 00 








































I (2) 
(4) 
(5) 

III (2) 

rv (i) 

(2) 
V (1) 

(2) 

(3) 
VII (1) 

(2) 
































1, 055. 00 


11, 958. 00 




12, 600. 00 
579.00 


62, 525. 00 
162. 720. 48 










2, 126. 00 


70, 616. 31 


Total 


16, 260. 00 


65tt 645. 63 



JANUARY 11, 1941 



71 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


November 
1940 


11 months 
ending No- 
vember 30, 
1940 




I 0) 
(4) 

m (i) 

IV (1) 

(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 


$132. 60 

421. 46 

61, 730. 00 

1, 223. 00 

74.00 


$1, 143. 03 




879.63 

8, 013, 055. 00 

1, 359. 55 

583.00 

13, 296. 00 




6, 346. 40 
245, 670. 00 


677, 145. 40 

1, 269, 683. 00 

33, 474. 86 










305, 597. 35 


9,910,619.37 




IV (1) 

I (4) 
IV (2) 








136.00 












17.29 


















19.16 




I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 










217.00 






49, 450. 00 


















69.00 






20, 745. 00 












119,997.00 












1,371,094.79 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 

(2) 










48.00 






16.00 






74.84 






8,000.00 




2,000.00 


4,500.00 




2, 000. 00 


12, 638. 84 




I (4) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






77.00 


1,851.00 




1,528.00 






19, 000. 00 




2, 820. 00 


3, 861. 69 




370.00 


2, 393. 24 

1.50 










3, 267. 00 


87, 376. 43 




!i (i) 

(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 








1,773.00 










15, 250. 00 
194.00 


29, 475. 00 
17, 265. 00 
568, 450. 00 




18, 682. 58 
2, 956. 00 
52, 500. 00 
25, 598. 05 
4,300.00 


68, 622. 33 
30, 091. 14 
737,441.00 
154, 986. 88 
309, 989. 25 
2.00 










119, 480. 63 


1,926,583.60 




IV (2) 

V (3) 








14.32 






2,500.00 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


November 
1940 


11 months 
ending No- 
vember 30, 
1940 


British Guiana— Continued. 


VII (1) 
(2) 


$933. 95 


$2, 168. 31 








Total 


933.95 


6, 352. 63 




IV (1) 

(2) 

VII (1) 

(2) 








15.00 












129.20 


















270. 50 




I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 










90 00 






400.00 












472.00 






142.00 








Total 




1, 333. 64 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 

II 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (2) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








20, 335. 77 

134, 762. 60 

2,669.00 

7, 223. 68 


693, 786. 52 




301,035.94 
43, 552. 00 
389, 551. 30 










13, 500. 00 
117,000.00 


13, 600. 00 
10, 232, 827. 00 




950.48 
562. 05 


64, 212. 49 
76, 405. 01 




26, 370. 85 
247, 696. 76 


1,880,841.84 
4, 860, 494. 86 




49, 106. 00 
11, 409. 34 


225, 153. 13 
113,841.23 


Total 


631, 676. 43 


19, 879, 631. 20 




I (2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




























































161.00 


176.00 








Total.. 


161. 00 


184, 594. 45 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 




China 
















850.00 




































176, 600. 00 




40, 200. 00 
970, 436. 00 


1, 678, 897. 05 

2, 444, 943. 00 



72 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


November 
1940 


11 months 
ending No- 
vember 30, 
1940 




VII (1) 

(2) 




$334, 724. 00 
















$1, 010, 635. 00 


7, 281, 053. 86 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








30.00 




102. 12 


279.12 
2, 228. 20 




46.00 


2, 095. 76 






14,281.00 




6,000.00 
30.78 
925.00 


60, 956. 00 
1, 057. 78 
5, 830. 00 




7, 103. 90 


425, 107. 86 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








1, 292. 00 




1, 003. 70 
1, 597. 60 
SS, 700. 00 


6, 634. 20 
2, 161. 85 
83, 700. 00 










725.00 


2,960.26 










62, 026. 30 


150, 732. 31 




I (2) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(3) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








70.00 




43, 670. 00 


105, 713. 00 










3, 226. 00 


17, 299. 00 




3,000.00 


11, 925. 60 






















49, 895. 00 


213, 408. 32 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 








7, 072. 20 










895. 00 
80.00 


2, 304. 90 
660. 96 




753.00 


5, 036. 26 






22.60 










1, 698. 00 


177, 220. 71 




I (2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (1) 






96.52 


306.52 




2, 972. 60 












600. 00 






1, 501. 80 








Total 


96.52 


6, 227. 14 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 








208.52 






238.00 






191. 00 




307.00 


17, 397. 00 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


November 
1940 


11 months 
ending No- 
vember 30, 
1940 




V (2) 

VII (1) 

(2) 




$2, 047. 00 






225.00 






900.00 








Total- -_ .-.. 


$307. 00 


21, 206. 52 




I (2) 
(3) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 




Egypt 


202.50 


202.50 




2, 680. 00 




54.00 


80.21 

63,519.00 






989. 31 




210, 100. 00 


210, 160. 00 


Total 


210, 356. 50 


267, 631. 02 




I (1) 
(4) 

m (i) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

VII (2) 








125, 052. 00 






1, 233. 00 






18, 200. 00 






76.00 






6, 460. 40 






1, 700. 00 






375.00 






8, 350. 00 












161,446.40 




I (4) 

I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

vn (a) 








6, 375. 00 


6, 456. 00 










325.50 






184, 310. 00 






494, 950. 00 






1,364,078.89 












951.50 






141.02 




1, 860. 00 


136, 614. 00 
1,200,063.00 






571, 019. 00 








Total 


1,850.00 


6, 273, 948. 91 




I (1) 

(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








78.00 






1, 202, 979. 71 






41,323.00 






593, 495. 50 






53, 907, 979. 00 






20, 845. 00 






368, 315. 00 






646, 000. 00 






3, 927, 169. 82 






10, 345, 638. 00 






2.00 






66, 593. 00 












71, 010, 318. 03 




I (4) 

IV (1) 

(2) 










51.00 






3,836.00 




134.00 


145.00 


Total...- 


134.00 


4, 032. 00 




I (4) 




French West Africa 




33.83 



JANUARY 11, 1941 



73 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


November 
1040 


11 months 
ending No- 
vember 30, 
1940 


Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland. 


I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 


$2, 153. 50 
1, 672, 096. 42 
265, 319. »0 
1, 015, 324. 35 
1, 075, 402. 00 
8, 041, 474. 00 


$4, 998, 982. 50 
11,979,150.94 

2, 772, 848. 20 
17, 405, 885. 58 

2, 850, 390. 60 

68, 643, 268. 00 

22,001.00 




165, 636. 00 
698, 064. 65 


776, 150. 01 

1, 806, 325. 84 

68, 000. 00 




940,361.00 

4, 053, 286. 00 

40, 873. 00 

99, 816. 00 


6, 637, 730. 79 
23,821,965.48 
8, 239, 849. 06 
3, 078, 193. 50 




18, 069, 804. 82 


153, 100, 741. 50 




I (3) 
(4) 
(6) 








150.00 






50.00 


















86, 050. 00 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

(4) 

rv (i) 

(2) 










1,015.48 


















1,731.57 












106.00 












10, 645. 00 




i (i) 

(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
VII (1) 

(2) 










37.00 






12.00 






186.00 






1,336.00 




21, 500. 00 


21, 600. 00 
226.80 




1,300.00 


6, 464. 00 




22, 800. 00 


29, 761. 80 




IV (1) 
(2) 

vn (i) 

(2) 








1, 601. 35 




7.66 


30.66 
24.30 
















7.66 


1,662.31 




I (1) 

(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

vn (2) 








27.90 




290.00 


696.00 




323.00 


1, 844. 00 










247.00 


638.00 




860.00 


116,806.90 




I (1) 

(2) 
(4) 

rv (i) 

V (2) 
(3) 


























7, 363. 00 










8, 250. 00 


24, 800. 00 




1 8, 250. 00 


63, 617. 60 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


November 
1940 


11 months 
ending No- 
vember 30, 
1940 




IV 

V 

vn 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 

(2) 




$1, 920. 00 






363.00 






7, 890. 00 






763.00 






69.00 












11, 001. 00 




i 

IV 
V 

VI 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 






India 




3, 241. 20 






7, 959. 60 






3, 605. 64 






1, 145. 60 






67, 500. 00 






1,499.40 






1,000.00 






3, 511. 00 












89,462.44 




V 


(1) 

(2) 






Iran 


$21, 475. 00 


73, 015. 00 




93.00 










21, 475. 00 


73, 108. 00 




in 

IV 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 




Ira 




694, 963. 00 


















25.85 












722, 248. 22 




V 


a) 

(2) 
(3) 










116, 823. 00 
























153, 473. 60 




IV 


(1) 
(2) 










346.00 






41.45 












387.45 




V 

IV 
V 

I 


(2) 

(1) 

(3) 

(1) 
(4) 










4, 143. 00 












618.00 












18, 077. 00 












251.45 


















588.73 




I (1) 

(4) 
(6) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (2) 

VII (1) 
(2) 










116. 00 




22.00 


52.26 




3.300.00 


20, 582. 30 
1, 023. 20 




32, 343. 00 
2, 169. 00 
1,200.00 


531,425.40 

6, 836. 00 

37, 555. 08 

175.50 




455. 25 
249.00 


18, 161. 00 
56, 481. 00 




39, 738. 25 


672, 519. 16 



74 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


November 
1940 


11 months 
ending No- 
vember 30, 
1940 




I 
V 


(i) 

w 
(i) 

(2) 
(3) 






















15, 494. 00 














Total 








I 

III 
V 


(2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 






Netherlands 










47.60 












9, 674. 00 






163, 472. 50 






187,137.50 


Total 








I 
III 

IV 
V 

VI 
VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(0 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 








$75.42 
124, 167. 00 
39, 665. 10 
144, 564. 00 
772, 462. 00 






241, 640. 00 

557, 058. 82 

679, 028. 00 

2,832,612.00 






76, 305. 75 




2, 144. 59 

4, 287. 00 

5, 588. 00 
39, 542. 00 


18, 987. 26 
338. 964. 00 
315, 685. 50 
285, 489. 00 
4, 950. 00 




11,856.00 


242, 265. 30 


Total 


1, 144, 351. 11 


5, 594, 248. 41 




I 
I 

IV 


(4) 

0) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 


New Caledonia 




















874.99 


1, 177. 40 




14.79 


255. 11 


Total _ 


889.78 


3,496.61 




IV 
V 


(2) 
(2) 


New Guinea, Territory of 








210.00 


2, 710. 00 


Total 


210.00 


2, 727. 25 




I 

IV 
V 

vn 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 




29, 903. 00 


189, 235. 00 














16,540.00 














Total 


29, 903. 00 


219,801.15 




i 

IV 
V 
VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 






34, 827. 00 






















4, 035. 00 






480.00 












1, 292. 00 








Total 




52, 243. 00 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


November 
1940 


11 months 
ending No- 
vember 30, 
1940 




I 
IV 


(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 






















88.00 








Total 








I 

rv 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 






























Total -. 








i 
in 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 






















36, 493. 20 






1,354,114.00 
























644.00 








Total 








V 

I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(3) 

(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 

('-') 

0) 

(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 








































8, 781. 78 












21, 807. 13 






174.00 






1, 447. 00 




$1, 459. 00 


4, 379. 60 










1,459.00 






I 

IV 


(4) 
(2) 














11,215.45 








Total 








IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 

ID 
('.') 
(3) 
U) 
(2) 


























3, 036. 00 


26,747.00 




70.00 
390.00 


2, 210. 00 
1,521.00 




3, 496. 00 






I 

III 

IV 
V 

VII 


0) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
0) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




















877, 298. 00 
30.00 






422.00 






44, 235. 91 






64, 265. 00 
























998,851.47 



JANUARY 11, 1941 



75 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


November 
1940 


11 months 
ending No- 
vember 30, 
1940 




I CD 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 






















6.00 












175. 00 




V (2) 

I (1) 

V (2) 










600.00 










$260.00 
















260.00 


1, 020. 00 




I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

rv (i) 

(2) 
V (2) 




































15, 108. 00 


125, 740. 00 




15, 108. 00 






I (1) 
(4) 




Spain 


130.00 
25.00 






25.00 




155.00 






I (1) 

I (2) 
(4) 

rv (2) 

VII (1) 


















































12, 165. 41 




I (2) 
(4) 

m (i) 

(2) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 










108, 000. 00 






65, 307. 00 












4,000.00 




27, 813. 00 


205, 814. 00 
65, 000. 00 




















Total 


27,813.00 


4, 633, 236. 98 




I (1) 
(4) 

III (2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 














23.36 






1, 543. 84 




683.00 


17,063.89 
94.61 






66, 250. 00 






14,482.00 






193, 120. 00 










683.00 


299, 004. 96 




IV (1) 

(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 








153.00 






18.00 




8.32 


3, 122. 32 

18, 625. 00 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


November 
1940 


11 months 
ending No- 
vember 30, 
1940 




vn 


(1) 

(2) 




















$8.32 






i 
in 

IV 
V 

vn 


(2) 
(5) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 
























7, 561. 00 


25, 010. 00 










24,382.00 


326, 262. 10 














Total 


31,943.00 






i 
in 

IV 

v 

VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 












108 


583.01 




50, 204. 00 

3, 625. 00 

768, 794. 00 

4, 575. 00 


204, 890. 70 

14, 507. 00 

1,950,400.00 

49, 621. 64 






















827, 202. 08 


2, 922, 898. 35 




V 

I 

IV 
V 
VII 


(3) 

(« 

(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 




Union of Soviet Socialist Re- 
publics. 


12, 820. 00 


155,308.00 










132. 30 
1,623.00 
10, 800. 00 


1, 654. 30 
7, 130. 30 
45, 904. 00 






















12, 455. 30 






I 
III 

IV 

V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 
















































4, 507. 00 
19, 650. 00 
3, 630. 40 
1, 850. OO 


69, 095. 30 
146, 973. 00 
20, 644. 48 
17, 740. 40 


Total 


29, 637. 40 






V 


(1) 
(2) 

(3) 














26, 806. 75 














Total 
















22, 745, 483. 30 


295, 897, 849. 53 











76 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Arms-Export Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of origin of the arms, 
ammunition, and implements of war licensed 
for import by the Secretary of State during the 
month of November 1940 : 



Country of origin 


Category 


Value 


Total 




I (1) 

<4) 

VU (2) 

V (1) 
(3) 

V (2) 
I (2) 

W 
II 

V (2) 
(3) 

vn (i) 

I (4) 

V (2) 
(3) 

V (2) 


$25.00 

4,504.95 

12, 807. 60 

67, 200. 00 

10, 000. 00 

432.00 

2, 840. 00 

640.00 

4,000.00 

16, 400. 00 

25,000.00 

76.00 

1,000.00 

200.00 

1,500.00 

1,500.00 


| 




[ $17, 337. 45 




432.00 








\ 48, 855. 00 
1,000.00 








1,500.00 






Total..-. --_ --. 




148, 024. 45 











During the month of November, 32 import 
licenses were issued, making a total of 211 such 
licenses issued during the current year. 

Categories of Arms, Ammunition, and Imple- 
ments or War 

The categories of arms, ammunition, and im- 
plements of war in the appropriate column of 
the tables printed above are the categories into 
which those articles M*ere divided in the Presi- 
dent's proclamation of May 1, 1937, enumerat- 
ing the articles which would be considered as 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war for 
the purposes of section 5 of the joint resolution 
of May 1, 1937, as follows : 

Category I 

(1) Rifles and carbines using ammunition in 
excess of caliber .22, and barrels for those 
weapons ; 

(2) Machine guns, automatic or autoloading 
rifles, and machine pistols using ammunition in 
excess of caliber .22, and barrels for those 
weapons ; 



(3) Guns, howitzers, and mortars of all cali- 
bers, their mountings and barrels ; 

(4) Ammunition in excess of caliber .22 for 
the arms enumerated under (1) and (2) above, 
and cartridge cases or bullets for such ammu- 
nition; filled and unfilled projectiles for the 
arms enumerated under (3) above; 

(5) Grenades, bombs, torpedoes, mines and 
depth charges, filled or unfilled, and apparatus 
for their use or discharge; 

(6) Tanks, military armored vehicles, and 
armored trains. 

Category II 

Vessels of war of all kinds, including aircraft 
carriers and submarines, and armor plate for 
such vessels. 

Category III 

(1) Aircraft, unassembled, assembled, or dis- 
mantled, both heavier and lighter than air, 
which are designed, adapted, and intended for 
aerial combat by the use of machine guns or of 
artillery or for the carrying and dropping of 
bombs, or which are equipped with, or which by 
reason of design or construction are prepared 
for any of the appliances referred to in para- 
graph (2) below; 

(2) Aerial gun mounts and frames, bomb 
racks, torpedo carriers, and bomb or torpedo 
release mechanisms. 

Category IV 

(1) Revolvers and automatic pistols using 
ammunition in. excess of caliber .22; 

(2) Ammunition in excess of caliber .22 for 
the arms enumerated under (1) above, and 
cartridge cases or bullets for such ammunition. 

Category V 

(1) Aircraft, unassembled, assembled or dis- 
mantled, both heavier and lighter than air, 
other than those included in Category III; 

(2) Propellers or air screws, fuselages, hulls, 
wings, tail units, and under-carriage units ; 

(3) Aircraft engines, unassembled, assem- 
bled, or dismantled. 



JANUARY 11, 1941 

Category VI 

(1) Livens projectors and flame throwers; 

(2) a. Mustard gas (dichlorethyl sulphide) ; 

b. Lewisite (Chlorvinyldichlorarsineand 

dichlordivinylchlorarsine) ; 

c. Methyldichlorarsine; 

d. Diphenylchlorarsine ; 

e. Diphenylcyanarsine ; 

f . Diphenylamineehlorarsine ; 

g. Phenyldichlorarsine ; 
h. Ethyldichlorarsine ; 

i. Phenyklibromarsine ; 

j. Ethyldibromarsine; 
k. Phosgene; 

1. Monochlormethylehlorformate ; 
m. Trichlormethylchlorformate (diphos- 

gene) ; 
n. Dichlordimethyl Ether; 

0. Dibromdimethyl Ether; 
p. Cyanogen Chloride; 

q. Ethylbromacetate ; 

r. Ethyliodoacetate; 

s. Brombenzylcyanide ; 

t. Bromacetone; 

u. Bromniethylethyl ketone. 

Category VII 

(1) Propellant powders; 

(2) High explosives as follows : 

a. Nitrocellulose having a nitrogen con- 

tent of more than 12% ; 

b. Trinitrotoluene; 

c. Trinitroxylene; 

d. Tetryl (trinitrophenol methyl nitra- 

mine or tetranitro methylaniline) ; 

e. Picric acid; 

f . Ammonium picrate ; 

g. Trinitroanisol ; 

h. Trinitronaphthalene; 
i. Tetranitronaphthalene; 
j. Hexanitrodiphenylamine; 
k. Pentaerythritetetranitrate (Penthrite 
or Pentrite) ; 

1. Trimethylenetrinitramine (Hexogen 

or T f ) ; 
m. Potassium nitrate powders (black salt- 
peter powder) ; 



77 

n. Sodium nitrate powders (black soda 
powder) ; 

o. Amatol (mixture of ammonium nitrate 
and trinitrotoluene) ; 

p. Ammonal (mixture of ammonium ni- 
trate, trinitrotoluene, and powdered 
aluminum, with or without other 
ingredients) ; 

q. Schneiderite (mixture of ammonium 
nitrate and dinitronaphthalene, with 
or without other ingredients). 

Special Statistics in Regard to Arms Exports 
to Cuba 

In compliance with article II of the conven- 
tion between the United States and Cuba to 
suppress smuggling, signed at Habana, March 
11, 1926, which reads in part as follows: 

"The High Contracting Parties agree that 
clearance of shipments of merchandise by water, 
air, or land, from any of the ports of either 
country to a port of entry of the other country, 
shall be denied when such shipment comprises 
articles the importation of which is prohibited 
or restricted in the country to which such ship- 
ment is destined, unless in this last case there 
has been a compliance with the requisites de- 
manded by the laws of both countries." 

and in compliance with the laws of Cuba which 
restrict the importation of arms, ammunition, 
and implements of war of all kinds by requir- 
ing an import permit for each shipment, export 
licenses for shipments of arms, ammunition, 
and implements of war to Cuba are required 
for the articles enumerated below in addition 
to the articles enumerated in the President's 
proclamation of May 1, 1937 : 

(1) Arms and small arms using ammunition 
of caliber .22 or less, other than those classed 
as toys. 

(2) Spare parts of arms and small arms of 
all kinds and calibers, other than those classed 
as toys, and of guns and machine guns. 

(3) Ammunition for the arms and small arms 
under (1) above. 



78 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



(4) Sabers, swords, and military machetes 
with cross-guard hilts. 

(5) Explosives as follows: explosive pow- 
ders of all kinds for all purposes; nitrocellulose 
having a nitrogen content of 12 percent or less; 
diphenylamine; dynamite of all kinds; nitro- 
glycerine; alkaline nitrates (ammonium, potas- 
sium, and sodium nitrate); nitric acid; nitro- 
benzene (essence or oil of mirbane) ; sulphur ; 
sulphuric acid ; chlorate of potash ; and acetones. 

(6) Tear gas (C„H 5 C0CH 2 C1) and other 
similar non-toxic gases and apparatus designed 
for the storage or projection of such gases. 

The table printed below indicates, in respect 
to licenses authorizing the exportation to Cuba 
of the articles and commodities listed in the 
preceding paragraph, issued by the Secretary 
of State during November 1940, the number of 
licenses and the value of the articles and com- 
modities described in the licenses: 



Number of licenses 


Section 


Value 


Total 




(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(5) 


$873. 75 
2, 058. 65 
5, 660. 00 
5, 460. 97 


. 




| $14,051.37 



The table printed below indicates the value 
of the articles and commodities listed above 
exported to Cuba during November 1940 under 
licenses issued by the Secretary of State: 



Section 


Value 


Total 


(1) 


$729.50 

211.00 

7. 539. 46 

7, 626. 32 




(2).. .-.- -. 




(3) 


$16. 106. 28 


(5) 









Tin-Plate Scrap 

The table printed below indicates the number 
of licenses issued during the year 1940, up to 
and including the month of November, author- 
izing the export of tin-plate scrap under the 
provisions of the act approved February 15, 
1936, and the regulations issued pursuant 
thereto, together with the number of tons 
authorized to be exported and the value 
thereof : 



Country of 
destination 


November 1940 


11 months ending 
November 30, 1940 


Quantity 
in long 
tons 


Total value 


Quantity 
in long 
tons 


Total value 




236 


$4, 680. 00 


4,269 


$79, 689. 70 







During the month of November, 3 tin-plate 
scrap licenses were issued, making a total of 55 
such licenses issued during the current year. 

Helium 

The table printed below gives the essential 
information in regard to the licenses issued dur- 
ing the month of November 1940, authorizing 
the exportation of helium gas under the provi- 
sions of the act approved on September 1, 1937, 
and the regulations issued pursuant thereto: 



Applicant for license 


Purchaser in 
foreign country 


Country of 
destination 


Quantity 

in cubic 
feet 


Total 
value 


Electrical Products, 


Neon Produots 


Canada... 


.2118 


$27.00 


Consolidated. 


of Western 
Canada, Ltd. 








The Linde Air Products 


Dominion Ox- 


Canada... 


.2824 


27.20 


Co. 


ygen Com- 
pany, Ltd. 








The Cheney Chemical 


Dr.M. U. Lleo.. 


Cuba 


10 


3.25 


Co. 











The Foreign Service 



DEATH OF CONSUL GENERAL MURPHY 



[Released to the press January 7] 

It is with profound regret that the Depart- 
ment of State has learned, from telegrams re- 
ceived January 7 from the American Charge 
d'Affaires in Berlin and from the American 
Consul at Hamburg, that Mr. James Joseph 
Murphy, Jr., American Consul General at Ham- 
burg, died at his post the night of January 6. 
According to the attending physicians, Mr. 
Murphy died of a brain stroke following a brief 
illness from meningitis. 

Until his assignment as Consul General at 
Hamburg on August 2, 1940, Mr. Murphy had 
for a number of years rendered outstanding 
service in charge of the commercial work of the 
Department, having been appointed Chief of 
the Consular Commercial Office on March 24, 
1931. 

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Josephine. 
Armstrong Murphy, of Washington, D. G, and 
by his mother, Mrs. James J. Murphy, of Phila- 
delphia. His biography follows : 



I/tkphy, James Joseph, Jr. — born iu Philadelphia, 
Pa., November 19, 1887; University of Pennsylvania, 
LL.B. 1911. and graduate work; member of bar of 
Pennsylvania ; law practice 1911-10 ; appointed, after 
examination, consular assistant August 30, 1916; as- 
signed as vice consul at Genoa October 26, 1916; vice 
consul of career of class three September 27, 1919; 
assigned to Genoa October 22, 1919; class two May 24, 
1920 ; assigned to Lucerne September 15, 1921 ; class 
one November 17, 1921 ; consul of class seven June 22, 
1922; Foreign Service officer of class eight July 1, 1924 ; 
assigned to Santo Domingo September 24, 1925 ; class 
seven December 17, 1925 ; assigned to the Department 
May 23, 1928; in charge of political section, Consular 
Commercial Office, May 6, 1929; class six October 16, 
1929 ; resigned March 23, 1931 ; appointed chief, Consular 
Commercial Office, at $5,600 in the Department of State 
March 24, 1931; representative of the Department of 
State, Sixth General Congress of the International 
Chamber of Commerce, Washington, 1931 ; appointed a 
Foreign Service officer of class three, a Consul General, 
and a Secretary in the Diplomatic Service on August 
7, 1939 ; assigned as Consul General at Hamburg August 
2, 1940. 



ELEVATION OF DIPLOMATIC MISSION IN URUGUAY TO RANK 

OF EMBASSY 



[Released to the press January 11 ] 

The Secretary of State announced January 
11 that the President has given his approval to 
raising the status of the American Legation in 
Uruguay to the grade of an Embassy. The 
Government of Uruguay is taking similar action 
with respect to its Legation in Washington. 

The elevation of our diplomatic mission in 
Montevideo to the rank of Embassy gives evi- 



dence in a tangible form to the increasingly 
cordial relations between the United States and 
Uruguay. In recent years the traditional bonds 
of friendship, culture, and commerce between 
the two countries have been greatly strength- 
ened. Formal recognition of this increasingly 
important relationship between Uruguay and 
the United States is of particular significance, 
at this critical stage of world affairs. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



CLAIMS 

CONVENTION WITH NORWAY FOR THE DISPOSI- 
TION OF THE CLAIMS OF CHRISTOFFER 
HANNEVIG AND GEORGE R. JONES 

On September 26, 1940, the Senate, by unani- 
mous consent, agreed to the request of the 
Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Rela- 
tions, that three conventions before the Senate 
be returned to the Secretary of State "without 
the advice and consent of the Senate to their 
ratification, in view of the political changes 
effected through military operations in Europe 
since these conventions were signed". The con- 
vention with Norway signed on March 28, 1940 
providing for the disposition of a claim of the 
Government of Norway against the Govern- 
ment of the United States on behalf of Chris- 
toffer Hannevig, a Norwegian subject, and a 
claim of the Government of the United States 
against the Government of Norway on behalf 
of the late George R. Jones, an American citi- 
zen, was included in the request and was re- 
turned to the Department of State and filed 
among the "Unperfected Treaties". 

CONSULAR 

CONSULAR CONVENTION WITH LITHUANIA 

On September 26, 1940, the Senate, by unani- 
mous consent, agreed to the request of the 
Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Rela- 
tions, that three conventions before the Senate 
be returned to the Secretary of State "without 
the advice and consent of the Senate to their 
ratification, in view of the political changes 
effected through military operations in Europe 
since these conventions were signed". The 
convention with Lithuania signed on May 10, 
1940 defining the duties, rights, privileges, 
exemptions, and immunities of consular officers 
of each country in the territory of the other 



country was included in the request and was 
returned to the Department of State and filed 
among the "Unperfected Treaties". This con- 
vention had previously been approved by the 
Committee on Foreign Relations and was on 
the Executive Calendar of the Senate. 

FINANCE 

CONVENTION WITH FRANCE FOR THE AVOID- 
ANCE OF DOUBLE TAXATION 

On September 26, 1940, the Senate, by unani- 
mous consent, agreed to the request of the 
Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Rela- 
tions, that three conventions before the Senate 
be returned to the Secretary of State "without 
the advice and consent of the Senate to their 
ratification, in view of the political changes 
effected through military operations in Europe 
since these conventions were signed". The con- 
vention with France signed on July 25, 1939 
for the avoidance of double taxation and the 
establishment of rules of reciprocal administra- 
tive assistance in the case of income and other 
taxes, and protocol was included in the request 
and was returned to the Department of State 
and filed among the "Unperfected Treaties". 
This convention had previously been approved 
by the Committee on Foreign Relations and 
was on the Executive Calendar of the Senate. 

POSTAL 
UNIVERSAL POSTAL CONVENTION OF 1939 

There are printed below tables showing the 
status on November 8, 1940 of the ratifications 
and adherences to the Universal Postal Con- 
vention and Agreements signed at Buenos Aires 
on May 23, 1939. This information was fur- 
nished by the Argentine Ministry of Foreign 
Relations and Worship : 



JANUARY 11, 1941 



81 



Ratifications 



United States of America b 

Greece e 

Australia, Commonwealth of.. 

Netherlands d 

Netherlands Indies d 

Surinam and Curacao * 

Saudi Arabia 

Philippines, Commonwealth of 

Belgium • 

Belgian Congo 

Japan ' 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Finland 

Paraguay 

Mexico 

Denmark » 

Egypt* 

New Zealand 

Vatican City-State 



A, B, C, D, E, F, G. 
A 



A, B, C, D, E, F, G. 
A, B, C, D, E, P.... 

A, B, C, D, F 

A, B, C, D 

A 



A, B, D, E, F, G.._. 
A, B 

A, B, C, D, E 

A, B, C, D, E, F, G. 
A, B, C, D, E, F, G. 
A, B, C, D, F, G— . 
A, B, C, D, E, F, G. 
A 



A, B, C, D, E, F, G. 
A, B, C, D, F, G___ 
A, B 

A, B, C, D, E, F, G. 



Feb. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
May 
May 
May 
June 
June 
June 
July 
Fjuly 
fjuly 
tSept. 



Aug. 16 
Oct. 5 
Nov. 5 



1940 
1940 
1940 
1940 
1940 
1940 
1940 
1940 
1940 
1940 
1940 
1940 
1940 
1940 
1940 
1940 
1940 



Feb. 24, 1940 

Mar. 28, 1940 

Apr. 5, 1940 

Apr. 5, 1940 

Apr. 5, 1940 



May 
May 
May 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Nov. 



July 
Oct. 



1940 
1940 
1940 



13, 1940 
30, 1940 
30, 1940 
12, 1940 
16, 1940 
8, 1940 



11, 1940 
2, 1940 



Oct. 5, 1940 



Adherences 



Indochina. 

Italy' 

Yemen 

Spain ' 

Hungary.. 



A, B, C, D 

A, B, C, D, E, F, G. 
A, B, C, D, E, F, G. 



A, B, C, D, E, F, G 



Dec. 4, 1939 

Dec. 30, 1939 

Feb. 17, 1940 

Apr. 8, 1940 

May 24, 1940 



"The titles of the ratified acts are as follows: (A) Universal Postal Convention and annexes; (B) Agreement con- 
cerning letters and boxes with declared value and annexes: (C) Agreement concerning parcel post and annexes; (D) Agreement 
concerning money orders and annex; (E) Agreement concerning postal transfers and annex; (F) Agreement concerning 
recoveries and annex; (G) Agreement concerning subscriptions to newspapers and periodicals and annex. 

* The Government of the United States of America has declared that the Universal Postal Agreement is valid for the 
United States of America, all the possessions of the United States of America, according to Art. 8 (1st) of this Convention, 
for Samoa and the Panama Canal Zone. 

Ratification effected by Obligatory Law 2146, published in No. 543 of the Official Bulletin of the Greek Government. 

d The instrument of ratification includes the Netherlands, the Netherlands Indies, Surinam and Curacao, but each country 
ratifies only the act indicated. 

" The Minister Plenipotentiary of Belgium to the Government of the Argentine Republic has declared that the rati- 
fications effected concerning items A and B are valid at the same time for Belgium and the colony of the Belgian Congo, it 
being understood that the effects of the ratifications made in the name of the latter will be extended to Ruanda-Urundi, ad- 
ministratively uuited to the Belgian Congo. 

'The Government of Japan has declared that this ratification includes Japan proper, Chosen, and the whole of the 
other Japanese dependencies. 

"The Legation of Denmark in the Argentine Republic informed by note verbale, dated July 16, 1940, that His Majesty the 
King had ratified the convention and all the postal agreements; the Argentine Chancellery being in expectation of the 
instrument. 

"The Government of Egypt, in view of the present difficulties in communications, requested the Government of the 
Argentine Republic to consider its telegram communicating its ratification as the instrument of the latter itself, pending the 
arrival of the original document at the Argentine Chancellery. 

* Including Italian East Africa, the colonies, and Italian possessions. 

1 Information is being awaited from the Embassy of Spain establishing the acts to which Spain will adhere and what 
territories will be included. 



82 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



PUBLICATIONS 

AGREEMENT WITH HONDURAS FOR THE 
EXCHANGE OF OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS 

By an exchange of notes dated November 8, 
1940 and December 2 and 12, 1940, an agree- 
ment was entered into between the United States 
and Honduras, effective December 12, 1940, for 
the exchange, of certain official publications. 
The office for the exchange of publications on 
the part of the United States is the Smithsonian 
Institution and on the part of Honduras is the 
Office of Exchange of the Ministry for Foreign 
Affairs. A list of the official publications to be 
furnished regularly by each Government to the 
other is annexed to the agreement. 



Regulations 



The following Government regulations may 
be of interest to readers of the Bulletin: 

Values of Foreign Moneys. (Treasury Department: 
Office of the Secretary.) [1941, Department Circular 
No. 1.] January 1, 1941. Federal Register, January 9, 
1941 (vol. 6, no. 6), pp. 197-198 (The National Archives 
of the United States). 

Regulations Under the Nationality Act of 1940; 
Other Changes. (Department of Justice: Immigra- 
tion and Naturalization Service.) [General Order No. 
C-28.] January 9, 1941. Federal Register, January 11, 
1941 (vol. 6, no. 8), pp. 230-251 (The National Archives 
of the United States). 



Publications 



Department of State 

Exchange of Official Publications: Agreement Be- 
tween the United States of America and Brazil — 
Effected by exchange of notes signed June 15 and 24, 
1940; effective June 24, 1940. Executive Agreement 
Series No. 176. Publication 1527. 17 pp. 50. 



Other Government Agencies 

The following Government publication issued 
recently may be of interest to readers of the 

Bulletin: 

Fifth Report of the National Munitions Control 
Board, for the Period Jan. 1, 1940 to June 30, 1940. 
(H. Doc. 876, 76th Cong., 3d sess.) 177 pp. 200. 



Legislation 



Address of the President of the United States, De- 
livered Before a Joint Session of the Two Houses of 
Congress January 6, 1941, First Session of the Seventy- 
Seventh Congress, 1941. (H. Doc. 1, 77th Cong., 1st 
sess. ) 6 pp. 50. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OP THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 



JANUARY 18, 1941 
Vol. IV: No. 82— Publication 1550 

Qontents 

General: Page 
Statements by the Secretary of State before the House 

Foreign Affairs Committee 85 

Export control in national defense 91 

Visit of members of the American Legion to Great 

Britain 94 

Europe: 

Lease of air bases in St. Lucia from Great Britain . . 94 

Sabotage claims against Germany 94 

American Republics: 

Cooperation of motion-picture industry in promotion 

of inter- American relations 95 

Visit to United States of leaders in the professions, the 

arts, and education 96 

Presentation of letters of credence: 

Ambassador of Chile 98 

Ambassador of Panama 99 

The Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 100 

International Conferences, Commissions, etc.: 
North American Regional Radio-Engineering Con- 
ference 101 

[Over] 







Qontents- 



CONTINUED. 



Treaty Information: 

Agriculture: Page 

Inter-American Coffee-Marketing Agreement . . . 102 
Telecommunications: 

International Telecommunication Convention 

(Treaty Series Nos. 867 and 948) 102 

Legislation 104 

Regulations 104 



General 



STATEMENTS BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE BEFORE THE HOUSE 
FOREIGN AFFAIRS COMMITTEE * 



[Released to the press January 15] 

Mr. Chairman, Members of the 

Committee on Foreign Affairs : 
We are here to consider a bill designed to 
promote the defense of the United States. I 
shall not discuss the technical details of the 
proposed measure, since that will be done by 
other departments of the Government more 
directly concerned with these matters. I shall 
place before you briefly the controlling facts 
relating to the manner in which the dangers 
that now confront this hemisphere and, there- 
fore, this Nation have arisen, and the circum- 
stances which render imperative all possible 
speed in our preparation for meeting these 
dangers. 

During the past eight years, our Government 
has striven, by every peaceful means at its dis- 
posal, to secure the establishment in the world 
of conditions under which there would be a rea- 
sonable hope for enduring peace. We have pro- 
ceeded in the firm belief that only if such con- 
ditions come to exist will there be a certainty 
that our country will be fully secure and safely 
at peace. The establishment of such conditions 
calls for acceptance and application by all 
nations of certain basic principles of peaceful 
and orderly international conduct and rela- 
tions. 

Accordingly, in the conduct of our foreign 
relations, this Government has directed its 
efforts to the following objectives: (1) Peace 
and security for the United States with advo- 



1 Delivered January 15, 1941. 

286906 — 41 1 



cacy of peace and limitation and reduction of 
armament as universal international objectives; 
(2) support for law, order, justice, and moral- 
ity and the principle of non-intervention; (3) 
restoration and cultivation of sound economic 
methods and relations, based on equality of 
treatment; (4) development, in the promotion 
of these objectives, of the fullest practicable 
measure of international cooperation; (5) pro- 
motion of the security, solidarity, and general 
welfare of the Western Hemisphere. 

Observance and advocacy of the basic princi- 
ples underlying these policies, and efforts to- 
ward their acceptance and application, became 
increasingly important as three nations, one 
after another, made abundantly clear, by word 
and by deed, their determination to repudiate 
and destroy the very foundations of a civilized 
world order under law and to enter upon the 
road of armed conquest, of subjugation of other 
nations, and of tyrannical rule over their 
victims. 

The first step in this fatal direction occurred 
in the Far East in 1931 with forceful occupa- 
tion of Manchuria in contravention of the pro- 
visions of the Nine Power Treaty and of the 
Kellogg-Briand Pact. The equilibrium in the 
Far East which had been established by the 
Washington Conference treaties of 1921-1922 
became seriously disturbed by the setting up 
by forceful means in a part of China of a 
regime under Japanese control under the name 
of "Manchukuo". This control over Manchuria 
has been marked by the carrying out of a policy 

85 



86 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



of discrimination which has resulted in forcing 
out American and other foreign interests. 

During the years that followed, Japan went 
steadily forward in her preparations for ex- 
pansion by force of arms. In December 1934, 
she gave notice of her intention to terminate 
the naval treaty of February 6, 1922. She then 
proceeded with intensified construction of mili- 
tary and naval armaments, at the same time 
undertaking, from time to time, limited actions 
directed toward an extension of her domination 
over China and involving disregard and de- 
struction of the lawful rights and interests of 
other countries, including the United States. 

In July 1937, the armed forces of Japan em- 
barked upon large-scale military operations 
against China. Invading forces of more than 
a million men occupied large areas along the 
seaboard and in the central provinces. In these 
areas there were set up puppet regimes which 
instituted systems of controls and monopolies 
discriminatory in favor of the interests of the 
invading country. 

It has been clear throughout that Japan has 
been actuated from the start by broad and am- 
bitious plans for establishing herself in a 
dominant position in the entire region of the 
Western Pacific. Her leaders have openly de- 
clared their determination to achieve and 
maintain that position by force of arms and 
thus to make themselves masters of an area 
containing almost one half of the entire popu- 
lation of the world. As a consequence, they 
would have arbitrary control of the sea and 
trade routes in that region. 

Previous experience and current develop- 
ments indicate that the proposed "new order" 
in the Pacific area means, politically, domina- 
tion by one country. It means, economically, 
employment of the resources of the area con- 
cerned for the benefit of that country and to 
the ultimate impoverishment of other parts of 
the area and exclusion of the interests of other 
countries. It means, socially, the destruction 
of personal liberties and the reduction of the 
conquered peoples to the role of inferiors. 

It should be manifest to every person that 
such a program for the subjugation and ruth- 



less exploitation by one country of nearly one 
half of the population of the world is a mat- 
ter of immense significance, importance, and 
concern to every other nation wherever located. 

Notwithstanding the course which Japan has 
followed during recent years, this Government 
has made repeated efforts to persuade the 
Japanese Government that her best interests 
lie in the development of friendly relations 
with the United States and with other coun- 
tries which believe in orderly and peaceful 
processes among nations. We have at no time 
made any threats. 

In Europe, the first overt breach of world 
order was made by Italy, when, in 1935, that 
country invaded and conquered Ethiopia, in 
direct contravention of solemnly accepted obli- 
gations under the Covenant of the League, of 
Nations and under the Kellogg-Briand Pact. 
In 1939, Italy seized Albania in violation of 
unequivocal treaty obligations. In the summer 
of 1940, she entered the European war on the 
side of Germany with the openly avowed pur- 
pose of participating with that country in a 
remodeling of the world on the basis of a 
"new order" founded upon unlimited and un- 
restricted use of armed force. Finally, with- 
out provocation, she has attacked Greece. 

Throughout this period, the Government of 
the United States made known to the Govern- 
ment of Italy its anxious concern over the 
growing deterioration of peaceful international 
relationships. Both on the occasion of the 
Italo-Ethiopian controversy and during the 
period preceding Italy's entry into the Euro- 
pean war, this Government addressed numerous 
communications to the Government of Italy in 
an effort to prevent new breaches of world order. 

Germany, from the time that Hitler and his 
associates came to power in 1933, began fever- 
ishly to construct vast armaments, while follow- 
ing a program of repeatedly made and repeat- 
edly broken promises as a part of a skillful 
diplomatic game designed to lull the suspicions 
of other countries. After employing for several 
months at the Disarmament Conference in Ge- 
neva tactics which have since become a distinct, 
pattern of German policy — further demands as 



JANUARY 18, 1941 



87 



previous demands are met — Germany, in Octo- 
ber 1933, rendered impossible any effective inter- 
national agreement for limitation of armaments 
by withdrawing from the Disarmament Con- 
ference. There then followed nearly six years 
during which Germany, having determined upon 
a policy of unlimited conquest, moved inevi- 
tably toward the catastrophe of war. 

Germany's work of preparation followed two 
main lines. The first consisted in the creation 
of armed force. To this end, her entire national 
economy was transformed into a highly regi- 
mented and highly disciplined war economy. 
Every phase of national activity became har- 
nessed to the requirements of preparation for 
war. More than half of the national income was 
expended for military purposes. Foreign trade 
and foreign payments became rigidly controlled 
for the same purpose. The pi'oduction of 
planes and tanks and guns and all the other 
countless accessories of a modern war machine 
became the immediate objective of the whole na- 
tional effort. 

The second line consisted of a series of steps 
directed toward improving the strategic posi- 
tion of Germany. The first of these was the 
occupation and fortification of the Rhineland 
in 1936, in direct violation of the Locarno 
Treaty, voluntarily entered into by Germany 10 
years earlier. Then followed, in rapid succes- 
sion, the absorption of Austria, in direct viola- 
tion of pledges given by Hitler to respect the sov- 
ereignty and independence of that country ; the 
dismemberment and final seizure of Czechoslo- 
vakia, in spite of Hitler's assurances after the 
seizure of Austria that Germany desired no ad- 
ditional territory in Europe and in violation of 
a solemn pledge to respect the independence of 
that country, officially given in October 1938; 
the annexation of Memel ; and finally, on Sep- 
tember 1, 1939, a brutal attack upon, and the dev- 
astation and partitioning of, Poland. 

The period of the war has witnessed the 
invasion and occupation of Denmark, Norway, 
Holland, Belgium, and Luxemburg, in violation 
of the scrupulously observed neutrality of these 
countries and in contravention, in the cases of 



some of these countries, of assurances expressly 
given by Germany of her intention to respect 
their independence and sovereignty; the inva- 
sion and partial occupation of France; the 
splitting up of Rumania and the German 
occupation of the remaining portion of that 
country. 

These seizures have been accomplished 
through a combined use of armed force applied 
from without and of an almost unbelievable 
amount of subversive activity from within. 
Each of the invaded and occupied countries has 
been subjected to a reign of terror and despot- 
ism. By word and by deed, the invaders have 
made unmistakably clear their determination 
to impose permanently upon these unfortunate 
countries a rule of tyranny frequently reminis- 
cent of the worst pages of ancient history. 

So long as there seemed to remain even a 
faint hope of inducing the leaders of Germany 
to desist from the course which they were fol- 
lowing, the Government of the United States 
neglected no opportunity to make its voice 
heard in restraint. It went further, and re- 
peatedly offered its assistance in economic read- 
justments which might promote solution of the 
existing difficulties by peaceful means. All 
hope disappeared when the Nazi legions struck 
at Poland and plunged Europe into a new war. 

Since then, it has become increasingly ap- 
parent that mankind is today face to face, not 
with regional wars or isolated conflicts, but 
with an organized, ruthless, and implacable 
movement of steadily expanding conquest. 
We are in the presence of forces which are 
not restrained by considerations of law or 
principles of morality; which have, fixed no 
limits for their program of conquest; which 
have spread over large areas on land and are 
desperately struggling now to seize control of 
the oceans as an essential means of achieving 
and maintaining their conquest of the other 
continents. 

Control of the high seas by law-abiding 
nations is the key to the security of the Western 
Hemisphere in the present-day world situation. 
Should that control be gained by the partners 



88 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



of the Tripartite Pact, the danger to our coun- 
try, great as it is today, would be multiplied 
manyfold. 

It is frequently said that there can be no 
clanger of an invasion of the New World. It 
is said : As Germany has not been able to cross 
the British Channel, how can she cross the 
Atlantic? 

German forces could cross the Channel in 
an hour's time were it not for the fact that 
Britain, now thoroughly prepared and well 
armed, is fighting every hour of the day to 
prevent that crossing and is fortified with ev- 
ery known device to repel a landing. The 20 
miles of water between continental Europe and 
Britain are under British, not German, control. 
Were Britain defeated, and were she to lose 
command of the seas, Germany could easily 
cross the Atlantic — especially the South At- 
lantic — unless we were ready and able to do 
what Britain is doing now. Were the Atlantic 
to fall into German control, the Atlantic would 
offer little or no assurance of security. 

Under these conditions our national security 
would require the continuous devotion of a 
very great part of all our work and wealth for 
defense production, prolonged universal mili- 
tary service, extremely burdensome taxation, 
unending vigilance against enemies within our 
borders, and complete involvement in power 
diplomacy. These would be the necessities of a 
condition as exposed as ours would be. 

Great Britain is today a veritable fortress. 
So will this country be when our preparations 
for armed defense are completed. Most likely, 
however, it will not be by direct and frontal at- 
tack that the would-be invaders will undertake 
the conquest of this country, if they ever have 
a chance to embark upon such an enterprise. 
It is rather to be anticipated that their efforts 
would first be directed against other portions 
of this hemisphere more vulnerable than this 
country, and then against us. 

Subversive forces are hard at work in many 
American countries, seeking to create internal 
dissension and disunion as a now familiar prel- 
ude to armed invasion. Today these forces are 
held in check and are being steadily eradicated. 



But the entire situation would change if con- 
trol of the high seas were to pass into the hands 
of the would-be attackers. Under such condi- 
tions, the difficulties of continental defense 
would demand from us vastly greater efforts 
than we are now called upon to envisage. 

The most serious question today for this coun- 
try is whether the control of the high seas shall 
pass into the hands of powers bent on a program 
of unlimited conquest. It is in this light, above 
all, that we should order our present-day think- 
ing and action with respect to the amount of 
material assistance which our country is pre- 
pared to furnish Great Britain. 

On no other question of public policy are the 
people of this country so nearly unanimous and 
so emphatic today as they are on that of the 
imperative need, in our own most vital interest, 
to give Great Britain and other victims of at- 
tack the maximum of material aid in the shortest 
possible space of time. This is so because it is 
now altogether clear that such assistance to 
those who resist attack is a vital part of our 
national self-defense. In the face of the forces 
of conquest now on the march across the earth, 
self-defense is and must be the compelling con- 
sideration in the determination of wise and 
prudent national policy. 

For us to withhold aid to victims of attack 
would not result in a restoration of peace. It 
would merely tend to perpetuate the enslave- 
ment of nations already invaded and subju- 
gated and provide an opportunity for the 
would-be conquerors to gather strength for an 
attack against us. 

The protagonists of the forces against which 
we are today forging the instrumentalities of 
self-defense have repudiated in every essential 
respect the long-accepted principles of peaceful 
and orderly international relations. They have 
disregarded every right of neutral nations, 
even of those to which they themselves had 
given solemn pledges of inviolability. Their 
constantly employed weapons for the govern- 
ment of their unfortunate victims are unre- 
stricted terrorization, firing squads, deceit, 
forced labor, confiscation of property, concen- 
tration camps, and deprivations of every sort. 



JANUARY 18, 1941 



89 



The most scrupulous observance by peaceful 
countries of legal concepts provides today no 
security whatever. Many nations which trusted 
to the integrity of their intentions and the care 
with which they observed their legal obliga- 
tions have been destroyed. 

I am certain that the day will come again 
when no nation will have the effrontery and the 
cynicism to demand that, while it itself scoffs at 
and disregards every principle of law and order, 
its intended victims must adhere rigidly to all 
such principles — until the very moment when 
its armed forces have crossed their frontiers. 
But so long as such nations exist, we cannot and 
must not be diverted — either by their threats or 
by their hypocritical protests — from our firm 
determination to create means and conditions 
of self-defense wherever and in whatever form 
we find essential to our own security. 

The present bill sets up machinery which will 
enable us to make the most effective use of our 
resources for our own needs and for the. needs 
of those whom, in our own self-defense, we are 
determined thus to aid. The great problem of 
democracy is to organize and to use its strength 
with sufficient speed and completeness. The 
proposed legislation is an essential measure for 
that purpose. This bill will make it possible for 
us to allocate our resources in ways best calcu- 
lated to provide for the security of this Nation 
and of this continent in the complex and many- 
sided conditions of danger with which we are, 
and are likely to be, confronted. Above all, it 
will enable us to do all these things in the 
speediest possible manner. And, overwhelm- 
ingly, speed is our greatest need today. 

[Released to the press January 15] 

The Secretary of State, the Honorable Cor- 
dell Hull, testifying before the Committee on 
Foreign Affairs of the House of Representa- 
tives January 15 was asked about the extent and 
maimer in which the proposed measures of 
H. R. 1776 affects existing law, both domestic 
and international. The Secretary of State 
answered as follows: 

"Having in mind the provisions of section 
3 (a) it follows that: 



"(1) The Johnson Act: 

"This act would not appear to be involved 
for the reason that it does not apply to this Gov- 
ernment, or to a public corporation created by 
or in pursuance of special authorization of Con- 
gress, or to a corporation in which the Govern- 
ment has or exercises a controlling interest, as 
for example the Export-Import Bank. 

"(2) The Neutrality Act of 1939: 
"Section 7 of this act, which prohibits the 
extension of loans or credits to a belligerent 
government, is not by its terms made applicable 
to this Government but it does apply to a corpo- 
ration such as the Export-Import Bank. In 
any event the prohibition would be superseded 
by the new act so far as transactions by this 
Government are concerned. 

"(3) United States Code, Title 18: 

"Section 23 makes it unlawful to fit out or 
arm in the United States a vessel with intent 
that it shall be employed in the service of a for- 
eign belligerent against a power or people with 
which the United States is at peace. 

"Section 24 makes it unlawful to increase or 
augment in our ports the force of a ship of war 
or other armed vessel belonging to a belligerent 
power. 

"Section 33 makes it unlawful during a war 
in which the United States is neutral to send 
out of our jurisdiction any vessel built, armed, 
or equipped as a vessel of war for delivery to a 
belligerent nation. 

"These provisions would be superseded by the 
new act. 

" (4) The Hague Convention of 1907: 
"Hague Convention XIII of 1907 states in 
article VI that 'the supply, in any manner, 
directly or indirectly, by a neutral power 
to a belligerent power, of warships, ammu- 
nition, or war material of any kind whatever, is 
forbidden'. 

"Article XVII states that in neutral ports 
belligerent warships 'may only carry out such 
repairs as are absolutely necessary to render 
them seaworthy, and may not add in any man- 
ner whatsoever to their fighting force'. 



90 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



"Article XVIII states that belligerent war- 
ships may not make use of neutral ports for 
'replenishing or increasing their supplies of 
war material or their armament'. 

"The Convention is not applicable to the 
present European war for the reason that it 
provides in article XXVIII that it shall not 
apply unless 'all the belligerents are parties 
to the Convention'. Great Britain and Italy 
are not parties to the Convention. 

"It may be urged that the j:>rovisions of the 
United States Code and the quoted provisions 
of the Hague Convention are declaratory of 
international law on the subjects mentioned 
and that to do the things contemplated by the 
proposed act would render us unneutral. This 
would be largely true under ordinary circum- 
stances but we are not here dealing with an 
ordinary war situation. Rather, we are con- 
fronted with a situation that is extraordinary 
in character. 

"The rules relating to the rights and duties 
of neutrals and those relating to the rights 
and duties of belligerents complement each 
other, that is to say, belligerents are forbidden 
to do certain things which infringe the rights 
of neutrals and neutrals are forbidden to do 
certain things which prejudice the rights of 
belligerents. For example, the Hague Conven- 
tion just referred to states in article I that 
belligerents are bound to respect 'the sovereign 
rights of neutral Powers and to abstain, in neu- 
tral territory or neutral waters, from any act 
which would, if knowingly permitted by any 
Power, constitute a violation of neutrality'. 
Belligerents are forbidden to use neutral ports 
and waters as a base of naval operations against 
their adversaries. (Article V.) 

"Germany and Italy have paid no attention 
to such provisions, which are representative of 
international law on the subject, but have at 
will and without notice occupied by force the 
territory of neutral countries, and, having sub- 
jugated those countries, are using their terri- 
tories against their adversaries. One of these 
countries, namely, Denmark, had a formal 
treaty, signed May 31, 1939, with Germany by 
which it was agreed that in no case would force 
be resorted to; another, namely, Norway, had 



a formal assurance, on September 4, 1939, from 
the German Government that under no cir- 
cumstances would Germany interfere with Nor- 
way's inviolability and integrity and that Nor- 
wegian territory would be respected. Neither 
agreement nor the law of neutrality served as 
any protection to these and other countries when 
it suited the convenience of the belligerents to 
occupy their territories. Nothing but force has 
prevented these belligerents from carrying out 
their preconceived determination to conquer and 
subjugate other peaceful countries and peoples. 
Their purpose of world-wide conquest has been 
boldly proclaimed. They readily admit that 
their philosophy is inconsistent with and di- 
rectly opposed to that of the democracies and 
insist that the latter is outmoded and must give 
way to their own notions regarding the conduct 
of international relations. Having in mind 
what has taken place and is taking place under 
our very eyes, it is idle for us to rely on the 
rules of neutrality or to feel that they afford 
us the slightest degree of security or protection. 
Nothing but a realistic view of current develop- 
ments can be regarded as a sane view. 

"Aside from the question of neutrality, which, 
as I have stated, has proved to be illusory when 
it has stood in the way of these ambitious ag- 
gressors, it is a recognized principle, older than 
any rule of neutrality, that a state is entitled 
to defend itself against menaces from without 
as well as from within. This is the essence of 
sovereignty. It was definitely recognized by 
all the signers of the Kellogg-Briand Pact. 

"We may be told that the invading powers 
have no designs on this hemisphere, but the 
countries which are now occupied by their mil- 
itary forces had similar assurances. Such as- 
surances are mere words. We cannot, as pru- 
dent people, afford to rely upon such assurances 
and delay implementing our defense until we 
ascertain what in practice those aggressors have 
in mind. 

"Some, of the conquered countries, and other 
unconquered, have possessions near this conti- 
nent. Are we to suppose that, if circumstances 
should permit, these possessions would not be 
occupied by the conquering nations and that 



JANUARY 18, 1941 



91 



they would not be used as bases from which 
to continue their quest for world domination — 
political and economic? Our interest, it seems 
to me, lies in taking nothing for granted. We 
are amply warranted, as a measure of self- 
defense and in the protection of our security, to 
allow supplies to go to the countries who are 



directly defending themselves and indirectly de- 
fending us against the onrush of this unholy 
determination to conquer and dominate by force 
of arms. We are merely trying to protect our- 
selves against a situation which is not of our 
making and for the prevention of which we 
exerted our every energy." 



EXPORT CONTROL IN NATIONAL DEFENSE 



[Released to the press by the White House January 15] 

The President announced the issuance on Jan- 
uary 15 of an Executive order authorizing, at 
the discretion of the Administrator of Export 
Control, the use of general licenses for export- 
control purposes. 

The general licenses will expedite shipments 
in those cases where rigorous controls are not 
required in the defense program. Full infor- 
mation as to the quantities leaving the country 
will be continuously available, and defense 
needs will continue to be the paramount con- 
sideration. 

The President stated that in the recommenda- 
tion to him, Col. Russell L. Maxwell, Adminis- 
trator of Export Control, had pointed out that 
general licenses, where they could be utilized, 
would facilitate the handling of applications, 
reduce the time involved, and assist exporters 
by making it unnecessary to obtain specific li- 
censes for such articles and materials as are 
permitted export under general license. 

[Released to the press January 15] 

The text of the Executive order follows : 

"Executive Order 

"additional regulations governing the expor- 
tation of articles and materials described 
in certain proclamations of the president 

"Pursuant to the authority vested in me by 
section 6 of the act of Congress, approved July 
2, 1940, entitled An act to expedite the strength- 
ening of the national defense,' I hereby pre- 
scribe the following additional regulations 
governing the exportation of the articles and 
materials named in Proclamations No. 2413 of 

286906—41 i! 



July 2, 1940, No. 2417 of July 26, 1940, No. 2423 
of September 12, 1940, No. 2428 of September 
30, 1940, No. 2449 of December 10, 1940, No. 2451 
of December 20, 1940, and No. 2453 of January 
10, 1941 : 

"1. Except as may be prohibited by the Neu- 
trality Act of 1939 (54 Stat, 4), the Secretary 
of State may issue general licenses authorizing 
the exportation to all or certain areas or destina- 
tions of any of the above-designated articles 
and materials, and forms, conversions, and de- 
rivatives thereof, in accordance with rules and 
regulations prescribed by the President or such 
specific directives as may from time to time be 
communicated to the Secretary of State through 
the Administrator of Export Control. 

"2. Paragraphs 5, 10, and 11 of the regula- 
tions prescribed by the President July 2, 1940, 
governing the exportation of articles and ma- 
terials designated in Proclamation No. 2413 of 
that date, shall be inapplicable to the general 
licenses herein authorized. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt" 

"The White House, 
"January 15, 194J." 

[No. 8640] 
[Released to the press January 17] 

The following telegram was sent by the Secre- 
tary of State to Mr. C. H. Callaghan, Manager, 
Maritime Association of the Port of New York: 

"January 17, 1941. 
"Your telegram, January 10. 2 



1 Not printed herein. 



92 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE IJULLETIX 



"The purpose of the present licensing system 
is to control exports in the interests of the na- 
tional defense of this country and that purpose 
is being accomplished. It is, of course, unfor- 
tunate that export interests are undergoing cer- 
tain inconveniences in order that these national 
defense interests may be protected. The De- 
partment fully appreciates the difficulties which 
have been caused by the unavoidable delay in 
acting upon the enormous mass of applications 
received since December 29 for license to export 
iron and steel products. Every effort is being 
and has been exercised by present limited per- 
sonnel to expedite issuance of licenses. Ap- 
proximately 10,000 licenses were issued during 
the period December 30 to January 16, inclu- 
sive, and licenses are now being issued at the 
rate of approximately 800 a day. In view of the 
pertinent provisions of law and of the findings 
of those agencies of the government charged 
with protecting the interests of the national de- 
fense, it is not possible to postpone the applica- 
tion of the licensing requirement to these 
products. I have every reason to believe that in 
the very near future the Department will be 
able to act upon all applications more 
promptly. 

Cordell Hull" 

[Released to the press January 18] 

The following circular telegram was sent 
January 17 to all collectors of customs: 

"In accordance with the provisions of the 
Executive order of January 15, 1941, the Sec- 
retary of State has today issued the following 
general licenses for the export to Canada of 
articles and materials named in proclamations 
and regulations issued pursuant to section 6 of 
the Export Control Act of July 2, 1940 : 

"License No. GAA 1 for aluminum 
No. GAB 1 for antimony 
No. GAC 1 for asbestos 
No. GAD 1 for chromium 
No. GAE 1 for cotton linters 
No. GAF 1 for flax 
No. GAH 1 for hides 
No. GAI 1 for industrial diamonds 
No. GAJ 1 for manganese 
No. GAK 1 for magnesium 



"License No. 


GAL 1 for manila fiber 


No. 


GAM 1 for mercury 


No. 


GAN 1 for mica 


No. 


GAO 1 for molybdenum 


No. 


GAP 1 for optical glass 


No. 


GAQ 1 for platinum group metals 


No. 


GAR 1 for quartz crystals 


No. 


GAS 1 for quinine 


No. 


GAT 1 for rubber 


No. 


GAU 1 for silk 


No. 


GAW 1 for toluol 


No. 


GAX 1 for tungsten 


No. 


GAY 1 for vanadium 


No. 


GAZ 1 for wool 


No. 


GBA 1 for ammonia 


No. 


GBB 1 for chlorine 


No. 


GBC 1 for dimethylauiline 


No. 


GBD 1 for diphenylamine 


No. 


GBE 1 for nitric acid 


No. 


GBF 1 for nitrates 


No. 


GBG 1 for nitrocellulose 


No. 


GBH 1 for soda lime 


No. 


GBI 1 for sodium acetate 


No. 


GBJ 1 for strontium 


No. 


GBK 1 for sulphuric acid 


No. 


GBL 1 for bromine 


No. 


GBM 1 for ethylene 


No. 


GBN 1 for ethylene dibromide 


No. 


GBO 1 for methylamine 


No. 


GBT 1 for cobalt 


No. 


GCA 1 for aircraft parts 


No. 


GCB 1 for armor plate 


No. 


GCC 1 for shatter proof glass 


No. 


GCD 1 for plastics, optically clear 


No. 


GCF 1 for fire control instruments 


No. 


GEA 1 for petroleum — crude oil 


No. 


GEB 1 for gasoline 


No. 


GEC 1 for tetraethyl lead 


No. 


GED 1 for lubricating oil 


No. 


GEE 1 for naphtha 


No. 


GFA 1 for iron and steel scrap 


No. 


GGA 1 for iron ore 


No. 


GGB 1 for pig iron 


No. 


GGC-a 1 for ferromanganese 


No. 


GGC-b 1 for spiegeleisen 


No. 


GGC-d 1 for ferrosilicon 


No. 


GGC-e 1 for ferrochrome 


No. 


GGC-f 1 for ferrotungsten 


No. 


GGC-g 1 for ferrovanadium 


No. 


GGC-h 1 for ferrocolumbium 


No. 


GGC-k 1 for ferroearbontitanium 


No. 


GGC-m 1 for fwrophosphorus 


No. 


GGC-p 1 for fcrromolybdenum 


No. 


GHA 1 for ingots 



" Licenses Nos. GHA 
iron and steel products. 



1 to GMZ 1 relate exclusively to 



JANUARY 18, 1941 



93 



"License No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 



GHB 1 for billets 

GHC 1 for blooms 

GHD 1 for slabs 

GHE 1 for sheet bars 

GHM 1 for wire rods 

GMA 1 for structural shapes 

GMB 1 for steel piling 

GMC 1 for plates 

GRID 1 for skelps 

GME 1 for rails 

GMF 1 for splice bars and tie plates 

GMG 1 for bars 

GMH 1 for hoops and baling bands 

GMJ 1 for pipe and tubes 

GMK 1 for drawn wire 

GML 1 for nails and staples 

GMM 1 for barbed wire 

GMN 1 for woven wire fence 

GMO 1 for bale ties 

GMP 1 for fence posts 

GMR 1 for black plate 

GMS 1 for tin plate 

GMU 1 for strip 

GMV 1 for wheels 

GMW 1 for axles 

GMX 1 for track spikes 

GMY 1 for castings 

GMZ 1 for forgings 

GQG 1 for equipment for gasoline pro- 
duction 

GQL 1 for equipment for lubricating 
oil production 

GQT 1 for equipment for tetraethyl 
lead production 

GDG 1 for the export of the following 
specifically enumerated machine tools 
and allied products: 

"Pipe threading machines ; metal 
cutting band saws ; power driven 
hack saws ; keyseating machines ; 
disc grinding machines ; car wheel 
and locomotive wheel presses; burr- 
ing machines — gear ; chamfering 
machines — gear; burnishing ma- 
chines — gear ; planers — crank ; bench 
power presses ; saw sharpening ma- 
chines ; filing machines ; pipe bend- 
ing machines; thread chaser grind- 
ers; burnishing machines; riveting 
machines; grinding machines — 
portable with flexible shaft ; center- 
ing machines; arbor presses (hand, 
air and hydraulic) ; nibbling ma- 
chines; grinders — lathe tool; gear 
lapping machines; gear shaving 
machines ; polishing machines ; heat 
treating furnaces; foundry ma- 



chines ; cold saws up to a capacity 
of 10-inch round stock; twist and 
other drills; reamers; milling cut- 
ters ; hobs ; taps ; dies ; die heads ; 
shear knives ; abrasives and abrasive 
products containing emery, corun- 
dum, or garnet, as well as abrasive 
paper and cloth; plastic moulding 
machines and presses; measuring 
machines; gauges; testing ma- 
chines; balancing machines; hy- 
draulic pumps; tools incorporating 
industrial diamonds. 

"The following, as defined in Executive order 
of January 10, 1941, effective February 3, 1941 : 

"License No. GBP 1 for potash 
No. GBW 1 for copper 
No. GBX 1 for brass and bronze 
No. GBY 1 for nickel 
No. GBZ 1 for zinc 

"It will be observed that these general licenses 
cover all the articles and materials for which 
export licenses are required except arms, am- 
munition, and implements of war as listed in the 
President's proclamation of May 1, 1937; tin- 
plate scrap ; graphite ; plans, specifications, and 
other documents containing descriptive or tech- 
nical information within the purview of the 
President's proclamations of September 12, 1940, 
and December 20, 1940; and all machine tools 
other than those specifically enumerated under 
license No. GDG 1. 

"All other articles and materials for which a 
license is required may be permitted to proceed 
freely to Canada under the appropriate general 
license listed above and without an individual 
license covering the particular shipment. Sta- 
tistics concerning these exportations should be 
reported in the customary manner under the 
general license numbers listed above." 

In view of the issuance of the general licenses 
referred to, individual applications for license 
to export the articles and materials in question 
to Canada are being returned to the applicants. 

The following circular telegram was sent 
January 21, 1941, to all collectors of customs: 

"Reference my telegram January 17, general 
license for the export of steel sheet to Canada 



94 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



bears license number GMT 1 and general license 
for the export of tin to Canada bears license 
number GAV 1. Please also be informed that 
it is not required that the exporter state the 
license number on shipper's export declaration 
or other documents." 3 



VISIT OF MEMBERS OF THE AMER- 
ICAN LEGION TO GREAT BRITAIN 

[Released to the press January 18] 

The Secretary of State has had under con- 
sideration the request of the American Legion 
and on January 18 informed the National Com- 
mander, Mr. Milo J. Warner, that in this in- 



stance he would issue the necessary passports 
for a group composed of three members of the 
Legion headed by the National Commander to 
visit Great Britain. The Secretary of State was 
informed that the American Legion member- 
ship is engaged in a number of civilian national- 
defense efforts in the United States. The 
principal purpose of the mission, which is un- 
official in character, is to study the manner in 
which civilian defense efforts have been con- 
ducted in Great Britain, with a view to gaining 
information by first-hand studies to supplement 
official and unofficial reports now available to 
the Legion which would be of assistance in the 
Legion's efforts to aid the United States in 
preparing this country for national defense. 



Europe 



LEASE OF AIR BASES IN ST. LUCIA FROM GREAT BRITAIN 



[Released to the press January 18] 

The Secretary of State announced January 
18 that a final agreement has been reached be- 
tween the Governments of the United States 
and the United Kingdom on the sites for the 
United States air bases in the Island of St. 
Lucia. The sites are those recommended by the 
United States experts. 

In connection with this agreement, the Gov- 
ernor of St. Lucia has made public the follow- 
ing statement: 

"Final agreement has now been reached be- 
tween the United States and British Govern- 



3 A circular telegram dated January 22, 1041, sent to 
all collectors of customs, reads as follows : 

"It has now been determined that exporters shall 
henceforth be required to state the license number on 
shipper's export declaration or other documents. The 
Department's telegram of January 21 is amended ac- 
cordingly." 



ments in regard to the location of the sites in 
St. Lucia which, in accordance with the agree- 
ment of September 2nd, are to be leased to the 
United States Government for the establish- 
ment of air bases in the Island. 

"In addition to the site at Gros Islet Bay 
which, as has already been announced, is to be 
leased for the establishment of a seaplane base, 
it has now been agreed at the request of the 
United States Government to lease to them a 
site for a land plane base at Vieuxfort." 



SABOTAGE CLAIMS AGAINST 
GERMANY 

The United States Supreme Court, in a deci- 
sion by Mr. Chief Justice Hughes, handed down 
on January 6, 1941, in litigation instituted by 
certain parties, on behalf of whom awards had 



JANUARY 18, 1941 



95 



been entered by the Mixed Claims Commission, 
United States and Germany, confirmed the de- 
cision of the Commission in the Sabotage Claims 
rendered on October 30, 1939. This decision, in 
effect, confirmed the 153 awards entered by the 



Commission on behalf of American nationals 
for damages suffered in the fires and explosions 
resulting from German sabotage at Black Tom 
and Kingsland, N. J., on July 30, 1916 and 
January 11, 1917, respectively. 



American Republics 



COOPERATION OF MOTION-PICTURE INDUSTRY IN PROMOTION 
OF INTER-AMERICAN RELATIONS 



[Released to the press by the Office for Coordination of Com- 
mercial and Cultural Relations Between the American 
Republics January 15] 

Nelson A. Rockefeller. Coordinator of Com- 
mercial and Cultural Relations Between the 
American Republics, announced January 14 a 
wide-scale program for the use of motion pic- 
tures as a medium for promotion of closer rela- 
tions and better understanding among the 
American republics. He announced the ap- 
pointment of Hollywood committees representa- 
tive of the producers, stars, writers, and direc- 
tors, to cooperate in carrying out the program, 
and detailed initial steps taken to date. 

"The motion-picture industry," said Mr. 
Rockefeller, "was among the first to organize 
itself for cooperation with the Coordinator's 
Office. In conferences over the past few weeks 
with John Hay Whitney, Director of the Motion 
Picture Division of the Coordinator's Office, 
representatives of the industry have formed 
cooperating committees to make more effective 
the whole range of its contribution ; in feature 
films, short subjects, and newsreels." 

Several pictures scheduled for production in 
the near future may be photographed either in 
whole or in part in Central and South America. 
A special committee has been formed to investi- 
gate production facilities now available in Cen- 
tral and South America, as well as desirable 
locales. 

Mr. Whitney, who is now on the Coast hold- 
ing conferences with leaders of the industry, 
said that the Motion Picture Producers and 
Distributors of America have agreed to appoint 



an expert on ways of life in the other American 
republics to serve in the office of the Code Ad- 
ministrator in Hollywood. This person will 
cooperate with all of the producers to insure 
authenticity in films involving Central and 
South America and to advise on language and 
historical problems. Mr. Whitney also said 
that the leading studios in Hollywood have ap- 
pointed, or will appoint, special representatives 
who will concentrate on South and Central 
American aspects of production. In certain 
cases, companies have already sent for repre- 
sentatives in Central and South America to 
confer on this problem. 

"The program outlined by the industry is to 
be based solely on the presentation of entertain- 
ment films," said Mr. Whitney. "Our Amer- 
ican screen has always attracted the greatest 
audiences in the world because of its freedom of 
expression and expression of freedom. The pro- 
ducers feel that through sympathetic study of 
the cultural bonds existing among the American 
republics, elements of screen entertainment, 
heretofore undiscovered or not fully utilized, 
can be found and brought to life on the screen 
and this, we know, will do much to create, a 
better understanding among the nations of this 
hemisphere." 

In announcing appointments to the commit- 
tee, Mr. Rockefeller said that the executive com- 
mittee, which will be headed by Y. Frank Free- 
man, President of the Association of Motion 
Picture Producers, will direct the program to 
be undertaken in cooperation with Mr. Whitney, 



96 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



representing the Coordinator's Office. Serving 
on this committee are: Edward Arnold, Sam 
Briskin, Frank Capra, Sheridan Gibney, Sam- 
uel Goldwyn, Louis B. Mayer, George Schaefer, 
David O. Selznick, Walter Wanger, Cliff Work, 
and Harry M. Warner. 

Personnel of cooperating committees as an- 
nounced by Mr. Rockefeller follows: 

Committee on Visits to South America: 
Joseph Schenck, Chairman, Edward Arnold, 
Kenneth Thomson, and Benjamin Thau. 

Committee on South American Film Facil- 
ities: Sam Briskin, Chairman, E. J. Mannix, 
Sol Wurtzel, Major Nathan Levinson, Keith 



Glennan, Sol Lesser, J. D. McDonough, and 
William Koenig. 

Committee of the Academy of Motion Picture 
Arts and Sciences: Walter Wanger, Chairman, 
Frank Capra, Major Nathan Levinson, James 
Stewart, and Robert Riskin. 

Short Subjects Committee: Gunther Lessing, 
Chairman, Jack Chertok, Gordon Hollings- 
head, and Hugh McCollum. 

Art Direction Committee: Cedric Gibbons, 
Chairman, Richard Day, William Cameron 
Manzies, and Jack Otterson. 

Committee on Story Material : Sheridan Gib- 
ney, Chairman, Kenneth MacKenna, Milton 
Krims, and Kenneth McGowan. 



VISIT TO UNITED STATES OP LEADERS IN THE PROFESSIONS, 
THE ARTS, AND EDUCATION 



[Released to the press January 16] 

Three distinguished citizens of the other 
American republics will arrive in New York 
on January 20 on invitations extended by the 
Department of State to visit the United States. 
Seiior Mario J. Buschiazzo, well-known archi- 
tect of Buenos Aires, and Senhor Erico Veris- 
simo, outstanding young Brazilian novelist and 
publisher, will arrive aboard the American Re- 
publics' S. S. Argentina. Dr. Emilio Rodri- 
guez Demorizi, prominent historian and re- 
cently named Director of the National Archives 
of the Dominican Republic, is a passenger 
aboard the Puerto Rico Line's S. S. Coamo. 
Sehores Buschiazzo and Rodriguez are accom- 
panied by their wives. 

They will proceed directly to Washington, 
D. C, where detailed plans for their sojourn in 
this country will be worked out. 

During his stay in the United States Sehor 
Buschiazzo will endeavor to familiarize himself 
with architectural developments here by means 
of contact with the American Institute of Archi- 
tecture, visits to various universities, et cetera. 

Senhor Verissimo is a native of Porto Alegre, 
Brazil. He is the author of several outstanding 
novels and is active in the publishing company 



Livraria do Globo of that city, which is one of 
the largest in South America. He was recently 
elected Vice President of the Brazilian-Ameri- 
can Cultural Institute of Porto Alegre. His 
novel Olhae os Lirios do Campo (Behold the. 
Lilies of the Field) is understood to be the best- 
selling Brazilian novel at the present time. He 
plans to visit a number of American universities 
during his stay in this country, as well as to 
confer with writers. 

Dr. Rodriguez is a lawyer as well as an his- 
torian and is Secretary of the National Academy 
of History of the Dominican Republic. He 
was recently appointed Director of the National 
Archives of that country. While in the United 
States he wishes to spend considerable time in 
Washington conferring with officials of The 
National Archives and of the Library of Con- 
gress. He also plans to visit Harvard Univer- 
sity and possibly other universities. 

[Released to the press .Tanuary 1G] 

A group of 85 students, teachers, and profes- 
sional men and women from Chile, Peru, Ecua- 
dor, and Colombia arrived in New York Mon- 
day, January 13, on the Santa Lucia of the 
Grace Line to attend the special winter session 
of the University of North Carolina, organized 



JANUARY 18, 1941 



97 



for South Americans. This is the first time 
that an American university has arranged for a 
six-weeks session devoted to courses and work 
of specific interest to persons from the other 
American republics. 

This large group includes university students, 
professors, architects, physicians, lawyers, lit- 
erary men, and members of congress. The 
party will spend a day and a half in Washing- 
ton en route to Chapel Hill, North Carolina, ar- 
riving in Washington on the afternoon of Jan- 
uary 17 and leaving the following night. The 
four universities of the District of Columbia 
are acting as joint hosts at a luncheon at the 
Mayflower Hotel on Saturday, January 18. 

In addition to sightseeing and visits to points 
of interest in and around Washington, they 
will be received at the Department of State at 
10 : 15 Saturday morning, January 18. Mr. 
Welles will speak briefly on behalf of the De- 
partment in extending a cordial welcome to the 
United States. 

[Released to the press January 18] 

Mr. Welles extended greetings on behalf of 
the Government to the visiting group and paid 
tribute to this type of exchange of leaders of 
the intellectual life of the American republics. 
He stressed the fact that this cooperative action 
is on the basis of each country's maintaining its 
personality and individuality. He cited the 
necessity of retaining the independence and lib- 
erty of action of all the republics in this time 
of crisis. He wished them an enjoyable and 
profitable stay in the United States. 

[Released to the press January 17] 

Six members of the Faculty of Medicine of 
the University of Habana will arrive in Miami 
on January 17, 1941 en route to New York 
where they will spend the week of January 20- 
27, 1941 in lectures and consultation at the Cor- 
nell University Medical College. The Habana 
faculty members compose the Permanent Com- 
mittee for Exchange which for the past two 
years has been cooperating with a similar com- 
mittee at the Cornell medical school in an an- 
nual exchange, of undergraduate students and 



teaching personnel between the two institutions. 

In line with this Government's program for 
the promotion of closer cultural relations be- 
tween the United States and the other American 
republics and in order to make it possible for 
the Permanent Committee to accept an invita- 
tion of the Cornell University Medical College, 
the Department of State has been pleased to 
make available to the members of the Habana 
committee travel grants from funds provided 
by the Second Deficiency Appropriation Act 
of 1940. 

The delegation from Cuba includes Dr. Angel 
Vieta-Barahona, Dean of the Faculty of Medi- 
cine; Dr. Alberto Inclan, Acting Chairman of 
the Committee and one of Cuba's most outstand- 
ing orthopedic surgeons; and Dr. C. E. Finlay, 
prominent ophthalmologist and a son of the 
Cuban physician who first advanced the theory 
that yellow fever is transmitted by a specific 
mosquito. Other members of the committee are 
Dr. Alfredo Antonetti, Vice Chairman, a spe- 
cialist in tuberculosis; Dr. Felix Hurtado, a 
leading pediatrician; and Dr. Edward Mc- 
Gough, Assistant Secretary. 

The annual exchange arrangement between 
the two universities provides for four under- 
graduate students or members of the teaching 
staff of the Cornell University Medical College 
to study tropical diseases or other subjects of 
special interest in Habana each summer for a 
period of six weeks, during which time they are 
given room and board by the University of 
Habana. In return, three undergraduates or 
members of the teaching staff of the University 
of Habana Medical School study at Cornell for 
periods of eight weeks. Board and room are 
furnished by Cornell University Medical Col- 
lege and the New York Hospital. 

During the coming week the Cuban doctors 
will give lectures in their fields of specialization 
and consult with the Permanent Committee at 
Cornell regarding the furtherance of the plan 
described above. The detailed program for the 
visit is being worked out by the authorities of 
the Cornell University Medical College and the 
New York Hospital. 



98 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



PRESENTATION OF LETTERS OF 
CREDENCE 

AMBASSADOR OF CHILE 

[Released to the press January 17] 

A translation of the remarks of the newly 
appointed Ambassador of Chile, Seiior Don 
Rodolfo Michels, upon the occasion of the pres- 
entation of his letters of credence, January 17, 
1941, follows: 

"Your Excellency: 

"I have the honor to place in Your Excel- 
lency's hands the letters of recall of my prede- 
cessor, Sehor Don Alberto Cabero, and the 
letters of credence which accredit me near Your 
Excellency as Ambassador Extraordinary and 
Plenipotentiary of the republic of Chile. 

"The existence of strong family ties, friendly 
relationships from many private and official 
visits to this country, make it especially pleasing 
for me to come to the United States as the repre- 
sentative of Chile. 

"Our common cultural, industrial, commer- 
cial, and other interests during several genera- 
tions have produced the basis for a close 
understanding and friendship between our two 
countries, and it is my ardent desire not only 
to continue this happy tradition but to stimu- 
late, broaden, and strengthen it. 

"We know that the world is today passing 
through one of the most severe tests to which 
destiny might have subjected it, struggling in an 
environment of calamities and uncertainties in 
all fields. My Government, as the signatory of 
inter-American treaties and through other ex- 
pressions, has for its part done everything 
which might tend to maintain the best integrity 
and solidarity of this hemisphere. We have 
dedicated ourselves to this task unstintingly, nor 
shall we cease in the continuation of our efforts 
for the peaceful development of this continent 
through more intensive cultural, economic, and 
financial relations with our sister nations. 

"We are aware of the position of Your Excel- 
lency's Government and the position of my Gov- 
ernment with relation to the events that are now 
shaking the world. Today, more than ever, co- 
operation between our two countries is neces- 



sary. North Americans and South Americans 
are bound indissolubly by the material and spir- 
itual interests of a common destiny peculiar to 
the Western Hemisphere. In this association, 
my country shares the desire of the United 
States of America for international peace, so 
indispensable for the well-being and progress 
of humanity. 

"The friendly spirit that animates Your Ex- 
cellency's administration encourages me in my 
task and leads me to hope that I may be worthy 
of the good-will of Your Excellency and of 
your collaborators which is so necessary for the 
success of my mission. 

"I am particularly charged to convey to Your 
Excellency the best wishes of the President of 
the Republic of Chile and of the Chilean people 
for the prosperity of the United States of Amer- 
ica and for the personal happiness of her illus- 
trious President, to which wishes I beg leave to 
add my own." 

The President's reply to the remarks of Senor 
Don Rodolfo Michels follows: 

"Mr. Ambassador : 

"I receive with pleasure the letters with which 
His Excellency the President of Chile accredits 
you as his Ambassador Extraordinary and 
Plenipotentiary near the Government of the 
United States of America, and I accept the let- 
ters concluding the mission of your distin- 
guished predecessor, Sehor Don Alberto Cabero, 
with whom it was my privilege to have the most 
friendly relations. 

"In view of the many friendships you have 
already established in this country during past 
sojourns with us, it is particularly pleasing for 
me to welcome you to the official and personal 
relationships which will accompany your new 
position. Your intimate acquaintance, with 
American life should also contribute effectively 
to the development of mutual understanding 
between our two countries. 

"We are fortunate indeed that the Govern- 
ments and the peoples of Chile, and the United 
States share common hopes and aspirations. 
Our fundamental faith in the principles of 
democracy and our ardent desire that there may 



JANUARY 18, 1941 



99 



soon be found a firm foundation for interna- 
tional peace provide solid bases for our coopera- 
tion in the peaceful development that is the 
rightful heritage of our fellow citizens. Your 
Excellency may be sure that it will be the un- 
varying guiding principle of the officers of this 
Government to work constructively with Your 
Excellency and the members of your staff in 
bringing to practical fruition every feasible 
project for the strengthening of our cultural, 
commercial, and political relations. The natural 
and spontaneous friendship between our peoples 
will immeasurably facilitate this daily collabo- 
ration and our larger efforts in support of the 
principles that govern free peoples. 

"In expressing appreciation on behalf of the 
Government of the United States of America as 
well as on my own part for the generous good 
wishes which Your Excellency has brought from 
your illustrious President and the Chilean peo- 
ple, I send every hope for the increasing pros- 
perity of the Chilean people and the i:>ersonal 
well-being of His Excellency President Aguirre 
Cerda." 

AMBASSADOR OF PANAMA 

[Released to the press January 17 J 

A translation of the remarks of the newly 
appointed Ambassador of Panama Sehor Dr. 
Carlos N. Brin upon the occasion of the presen- 
tation of his letters of credence, January 17, 1941, 
follows : 

"Mr. President : 

"It is a high honor for me to hand to Your 
Excellency the credentials by which His Excel- 
lency the President of the Republic of Panama 
accredits me as Ambassador Extraordinary and 
Plenipotentiary near the Government of the 
United States of America, and, at the same time, 
to present the letter of recall of my predecessor. 

"It is particularly gratifying to me to present 
to Your Excellency my credentials on the eve 
of your third inauguration as constitutional 
President of this great democracy. For the 
first time in the history of the United States 
of America its people have selected the same 
citizen to rule over its destinies during three 



consecutive presidential periods, this constitut- 
ing the clearest recognition of your distin- 
guished qualities as a democrat and governor. 
I desire for this reason to make known to Your 
Excellency the singular satisfaction which your 
re-election has inspired in the Panamanian Gov- 
ernment and people, for it signifies the continua- 
tion of the good-neighbor policy, inaugurated 
by Your Excellency with such healthy and 
promising results. 

"I have accepted the offer to designate me as 
Ambassador with which His Excellency Presi- 
dent Dr. Arnulfo Arias has honored me, fully 
aware of the high sense of responsibility and in 
the confidence that in the fulfillment of my 
mission the years of pleasant memories which 
I passed in the halls of one of the universities in 
this Capital will be of great aid to me, years 
during which I learned to know and appreciate 
the high culture and manner of thinking of this 
great and noble people. 

"The numerous and transcendental interests 
which unite our two countries make me see that 
there is much important work to be done, and 
in this connection my Government is for- 
tunately imbued with the fullest spirit of co- 
operation toward this great democracy, within 
the boundaries of its dignity and mutual re- 
spect; of this it has given proofs, it is giving 
proofs, and it will continue to give proofs in the 
certainty that its attitude will meet a sympa- 
thetic echo in the hearts of the illustrious Gov- 
ernment of Your Excellency. 

"In view of the benefits of various kinds 
which the 'New Deal' policy has brought to the 
people of the United States, the Panamanian 
Government proposes to follow this enlight- 
ened and redeeming pattern, for the purpose of 
giving to the Isthmian people the 'new deal' 
which would bring it to the level of culture 
which it deserves, which would better its condi- 
tions of life, which would enhance Panamanian 
national institutions, and which would provide 
better facilities for the battle of life and for 
welfare, not to one group, not to one class, but 
to all alike. 

"With hard work, with sacrifices, with perse- 
verance, within our limitations and our national 



100 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



consciousness, Panama, secure always in its un- 
changeable friendship for its traditional friend 
of the North, will go on working toward a bril- 
liant future which takes into account the vital 
interests of its citizens and which keeps before 
the national conscience the realization of its 
great destinies. 

"Excellency, in the name of His Excellency 
President Arias, in the name of the Panamanian 
people which have the greatest sympathy for 
yours, knowing that they can count on the 
friendship and respect of this country, and in 
my own name, I venture to present to you hearty 
and cordial greetings and wishes for the per- 
sonal welfare of Your Excellency and for the 
prosperity of the United States of America." 

The President's reply to the remarks of Senor 
Dr. Carlos N. Brin follows : 

"Mb. Ambassador: 

"I accept with pleasure the letters by which 
His Excellency the President of Panama has 
accredited you as Ambassador Extraordinary 
and Plenipotentiary near the Government of 
the United States of America, and receive like- 
wise the letter of recall of your distinguished 
predecessor. 

"Your mission in this Capital, Mr. Ambas- 
sador, begins under the most auspicious circum- 
stances. The years you spent here as a student, 
in preparation for the distinguished career 
which has been yours in the profession of medi- 
cine, and your several subsequent visits to this 
country, have familiarized you with the life and 
thought of our people and, I trust, with our 
friendly and neighborly wish to enhance in 
every practicable, way within our power the 
welfare and aspirations of the Panamanian 
people. My Government, Mr. Ambassador, will 
assist and facilitate your mission, and I can 
assure you heartily of my sincere good wishes 
and augury for its success. 

"The Panama Canal, which has brought our 
two countries into close association on the 
Isthmus of Panama, and which has brought us 
so many and significant benefits, has also 
brought us grave responsibilities. Our partner- 
ship in that great enterprise, which is the es- 



sence of the new treaty recently effective between 
us, is the special interest, not only of our two 
countries but of the other American republics. 
In these strenuous days, it is gratifying and 
encouraging to me, as it will be to all who share 
our mutual concern for freedom, to note the 
reaffirmation which Your Excellency so happily 
brings of the sincere and wholehearted desire of 
the Panamanian Government to cooperate fully 
in the great and important task of defense. I 
can assure Your Excellency of the unstinted 
cooperation of the United States of America. 
You and I realize full well that the advantages 
which our two countries, with all the other de- 
mocracies, derive from the preservation of our 
way of life, will be ours only so long as defense 
is sure and certain. That great and noble ob- 
jective now merits our common sacrifice and 
devotion. 

"I thank you, Mr. Ambassador, for the cordial 
wishes which you have formulated on behalf of 
His Excellency President Arias, the Panama- 
nian people and yourself, and I shall be glad if 
you will in turn accept my fervent good wishes 
for the welfare of His Excellency and the pros- 
perity of the people of Panama." 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press January 18] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since January 4, 
1941: 

Career Officers 

H. Lawrence Groves, of Pennsylvania, Com- 
mercial Attache at Athens, Greece, has been 
designated Commercial Attache and assigned 
as Consul at Shanghai, China. 

Owen L. Dawson, of Illinois, Agricultural 
Attache at Shanghai, China, has been assigned 
as Consul at Shanghai, China, in addition to 
his designation as Agricultural Attache. 



JANUARY 18, 1941 



101 



H. Merrell Benninghoff, of Rochester, N. Y., 
Second Secretary of Embassy at Peiping, 
China, has been designated Second Secretary of 
Embassy at Tokyo, Japan. 

Paul S. Guinn, of Pennsylvania, Consul at 
Vienna, Germany, has been designated Second 
Secretary of Embassy and Consul at Berlin, 
Germany, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Stanley G. Slavens, of Austin, Tex., Consul 
at Tokyo, Japan, has been assigned as Consul 
at Osaka, Japan. 

Walter P. McConaughy, of Montevallo, Ala., 
Consul at Osaka, Japan, has been assigned as 
Consul at Tokyo, Japan. 

James B. Henderson, of San Francisco, Calif., 
Vice Consul at Beirut, Lebanon, has been as- 
signed for duty in the Department of State. 

Beppo R. Johansen, of Clearwater, Fla., Vice 
Consul at Harbin, Manchuria, China, has been 
designated Third Secretary of Embassy at 
Peiping, China. 

Max W. Schmidt, of Bettendorf, Iowa, Third 
Secretary of Embassy at Tokyo, Japan, has been 



assigned for duty in the Department of State. 

Jay Dixon Edwards, of Corvallis, Oreg., 
Language Officer at the American Embassy, 
Tokyo, Japan, has been assigned as Vice Consul 
at Harbin, Manchuria, China. 

Richard H. Hawkins, Jr., of Pittsburgh, Pa., 
Vice Consul at Brisbane, Australia, has been 
assigned as Vice Consul at Sydney, Australia. 

Alfred T. Wellborn, of New Orleans, La., Vice 
Consul at Montreal, Canada, has been assigned 
for duty in the Department of State. 

NON-CAREER OfFICEES 

Alfred J. Pedersen, of Boston, Mass., Vice 
Consul at Bogota, Colombia, has been appointed 
Vice Consul at Bilbao, Spain. 

Charles E. Hulick, Jr., of Easton, Pa., Clerk 
at Leipzig, Germany, has been appointed Vice 
Consul at Bucharest, Rumania. 

The American Consular Agency at Djibouti, 
French Somali Coast, was closed effective 
December 31, 1940. 



International Conferences, Commissions, Etc. 



NORTH AMERICAN REGIONAL RADIO-ENGINEERING 
CONFERENCE 



[Released to the press January 14] 

A radio-engineering conference will be con- 
vened in Washington on Tuesday, January 14, 
for the purpose of harmonizing the action of 
the radio administrations of Canada, Cuba, 
Dominican Republic, Haiti, Mexico, and the 
United States, so that the assignment of fre- 
quencies to broadcasting stations in the stand- 
ard broadcasting band will be in conformity 
with the provisions of the North American 
Regional Broadcasting Agreement, signed at 
Habana December 13, 1937. The provisions of 
this convention will become effective March 29, 
1941. 

Assistant Secretary of State Breckinridge 
Long, on behalf of the Secretary of State, will 
welcome the representatives of the various for- 



eign governments, many of whom are making 
their first visit to the United States. 

The following representatives will attend the 
conference : 

Canada: Mr. Donald Manson; Mr. J. W. Bain, 
Department of Transport; Mr. K. A. Mac- 
kinnon; Mr. W. G. Richardson, Canadian 
Broadcasting Corporation ; Mr. Ronald Mac- 
donnell, Canadian Legation, Washington. 

Cuba: Mr. Francisco Suarez Lopetequi; Mr. 
Guillermo Morales; Mr. Alfonso Hernandez 
Cata ; Mr. Armando Mencia, Director, Inter- 
American Radio Office. 

Dominican Republic: The Honorable Andres 
Pastoriza, Minister of the Dominican 
Republic. 



102 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Haiti: The Honorable Elie Lescot, Minister of 
Haiti. 

Mexico : Mr. Juan C. Buchanan ; Mr. Salvador 
Tayabas. 

United States : 

Department of State: Mr. Thomas Burke, 
Chief, Division of International Commu- 
nications; Mr. Francis Colt de Wolf, Di- 
vision of International Communica- 
tions; Mr. Harvey B. Otterman, Divi- 
sion of International Communications; 
Mr. Edward Wailes, Division of Euro- 
pean Affairs; Mr. Philip Bonsai, Acting 
Chief, Division of the American Repub- 
lics; Mr. Guillermo Suro, Acting Chief, 
Central Translating Office. 



Federal Commtmwations Commission: 
Comdr. T. A. M. Craven, Commissioner ; 
Mr. E. K. Jett, Chief Engineer; Mr. An- 
drew D. Ring, Assistant Chief Engineer; 
Mr. Gerald C. Gross, Chief, International 
Division; Mr. Joseph L. Rauh, Jr., As- 
sistant General Counsel. 

The first meeting will be opened in the con- 
ference room of the Department of State at 11 
a. m. on January 14. It is expected that some 
of the subsequent meetings to discuss purely 
technical matters will be held at the Federal 
Communications Commission. At the conclu- 
sion of these technical discussions the confer- 
ees will hold a final meeting in the Department 
of State. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



AGRICULTURE 

INTER AMERICAN COFFEE-MARKETING 
AGREEMENT 

Colombia 

The American Embassy at Bogota reported 
by a despatch dated January 2, 1941, that the 
Colombian Government had approved by Law 
100 of 1940 the Inter- American Coffee-Market- 
ing Agreement signed at Washington on No- 
vember 28, 1940. The text of the law is pub- 
lished in the Diario Ofteial No. 24547 of Decem- 
ber 26, 1940. 

Peru 

The American Ambassador to Peru reported 
by a telegram dated January 14, 1941, that the 
Council of Ministers approved on January 10, 
1941, the Inter-American Coffee-Marketing 
Agreement signed at Washington on November 
28, 1940. As the Congress delegated in 1940 
broad powers to the Executive in economic and 
financial matters ratification of this agreement 
by the Peruvian Congress will not be necessary. 



El Salvador 

The American Minister (o El Salvador re- 
ported by a telegram dated January 3, 1941, 
that the Inter-American Coffee-Marketing 
Agreement, signed on November 28, 1940, was 
ratified by the Salvadoran Government without 
reservation on January 2, 1941. 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATION CON- 
VENTION (TREATY SERIES NOS. 867 AND 
948) 

Guatemala 

There is printed below, in translation, the text 
of a decree published in the Diario de Centro 
America of January 7, 1941, and the text of the 
ratification by the President of Guatemala of 
the International Telecommunication Conven- 
tion and the Telegraph Regulations signed at 
Madrid on December 9, 1932, and the General 
and Additional Radio Regulations signed at 
Cairo on April 8, 1938 : 



JANUARY 18, 1941 



103 



"Decree number 2Jf56 

"The Legislative Assembly of the Republic of 
Guatemala Decrees : 

"Article 1. The International Telecommuni- 
cation Convention and the Telegraphic Regu- 
lations signed in Madrid in 1932, as well as the 
General and Additional Radio Communications 
Regulations signed in Cairo in 1938 are ap- 
proved, with the reservation that Guatemala 
accepts no obligation relative to Paragraph 3 
of Article 26 (tariff schedules) nor to Article 31 
(fixing of monetary equivalents) of the Madrid 
convention ; and with the reservations A, B, C 
and D which the technical report of the special 
commission named by Guatemala specified with 
regard to the General Regulations revised at 
Cairo. 

"Article 2. Guatemala chooses the sixth cate- 
gory for the support of the offices of the Inter- 
national Union at Berne, with the quota of 
three units in each case. 

"Passed to the Executive for ratification and 
exchange thereof. 

"Given in the Palace of The Legislative 
Power : in Guatemala, the 26th of April, 1940. 
"L. F. Mendizabal, President 
"Alfr. Palomo Rodriguez, Secretary 
"F. Hernandez de Leon, 

Secretary 
"Government House: Guatemala, May 6, 
1940. 

"Let it be published and executed. 

"Jorge Ubico" 
"The Secretary of State in the 
Office of Foreign Affairs, 
Carlos Salazar." 



"Jorge Ubico, President of the Republic 
"Whereas, 

"The Legislative Assembly in Decree No. 
2456 of April 26 of the present year, resolved 
as follows: 

" 'The International Telecommunication 
Convention and the Telegraphic Regulations 
signed in Madrid in 1932, as well as the Gen- 
eral and Additional Radio Communications 



Regulations signed in Cairo in 1938 are ap- 
proved, with the reservation that Guatemala 
accepts no obligation relative to Paragraph 3 of 
Article 26 (tariff schedules) nor to Article 31 
(fixing of monetary equivalents) of the Madrid 
convention; and with the reservations A, B, C 
and D, which the technical report of the special 
commission named by Guatemala specified with 
regard to the General Regulations revised at 
Cairo,' 

"Whereas, 

"The reservations A, B, C and D made in the 
technical report, dated February 19, 1940, to 
which the Decree No. 2456 refers, read textually 
as follows : 

" 'A. That, should it become evident in the 
future that it is impossible for Guatemala to 
perform duly and satisfactorily any service of 
radiocommunications, whatever may be the rea- 
son occasioning this impossibility, including 
that that all favorable and adequate frequencies 
have been previously registered in favor of other 
countries in provisional form in reserve for sta- 
tions proposed or in construction, or are being 
used by stations in operation, the right is re- 
served to use the adequate frequencies that may 
be deemed necessary notwithstanding the stipu- 
lations in subparagraphs 1 to 6 of article 7 of 
the Regulations, paragraphs 79 to 91 of the 
same, or others that may be contrary to the 
above, which will remain null and void; but in 
every case an effort will be made to fulfill their 
stipulations as far as jiossible. 

" 'B. That, should it become evident in the 
future that it is impossible duly to perform the 
services of radio broadcasting in the territory 
of the Nation and in that of the former Federa- 
tion of Central America, as well as services of 
international broadcasting, in the bands as- 
signed for those purposes, by reason of their 
insufficiency in extent or state of congestion, the 
right is reserved to employ frequencies in the 
bands of radio broadcasting next to those which 
it was impossible to use satisfactorily, frequen- 
cies which will be chosen with a view to causing 
the least possible disturbance to existing serv- 
ices previously registered in the Offices of the 



104 

International Union of Telecommunications at 
Berne. 

" 'C. In addition it is declared that the right 
is reserved to continue using the frequencies of 
6460 kilocycles, 46.44 meters and 6400 kilocycles, 
46.88 meters, now used by the radio stations 
TGWB of "The Voice of Guatemala" and 
TGQA of "The Voice of Quezaltenango", re- 
spectively, unless and until at the next Inter- 
American or World Conferences two other fre- 
quencies are assigned to them in the 49 meter 
band which will be equivalent in their opinion 
to those mentioned above, with regard to free- 
dom from interference and magnitude of range 
and dissemination. 

"'D. In like manner, considering the un- 
favorable conditions in its region, the Republic 
of Guatemala chooses not to accept the limita- 
tions fixed in the band of 8010 kilocycles/seg. 
37.45 meters, to 8195 kilocycles/seg. 36.61 
meters and reserves the right to employ the fre- 
quencies therein included for its services of 
radio broadcasting, respecting the rights al- 
ready acquired for existing services, provided 
that they are registered in the Offices of the 
International Union of Telecommunications at 
Berne.' 

"Whereas, 

"In the Decree above mentioned the Legis- 
lative Assembly resolved to choose the sixth 
category for the support of the offices of the 
International Union at Berne, with a quota of 
three units in each case. 
"Therefore : 

"By virtue of the powers conferred upon me 
by the Constitution of the Republic, I ratify 
the above mentioned International Telecom- 



DEPAIRTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

munication Convention and Telegraphic Regu- 
lations and the General and Additional Radio 
Communications Regulations, with the reserva- 
tions specified above and with the understand- 
ing that Guatemala chooses the said sixth cate- 
gory for the support of the offices of the Inter- 
national Union at Berne, with a quota of three 
units in each case. 

"In witness whereof I sign the present Rati- 
fication, attested with the Great Seal of the Re- 
public and countersigned by the Secretary of 
State in the Office for Foreign Affairs, on the 
19th of August, 1940. 

"Jorge Ubico 

"Carlos Salazar" 



Legislation 



Report of Secretary of State and Draft of Proposed 
Bill In re Employees of the Foreign Service : Message 
From the President of the United States Transmitting 
Draft of a Proposed Bill To Amend the First Para- 
graph of Section 22 of the Act of February 23, 1931 
(46 Stat. 1210), Accompanied by a Report From the Sec- 
retary of State. (H. Doc. No. 50, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 
4 pp. 50. 



Regulations 



The following Government regulation may be 
of interest to readers of the Bulletin: 

Registration of Certain Organizations Carrying on 
Activities Within the United States. (Department of 
Justice.) Approved January 10, 1941. Federal Regis- 
ter; January 15, 1941 (vol. 6, no. 10), pp. 369-370 (The 
National Archives of the United States). 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 



yd^^JT 



sTW 



<^>Vc^ 






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THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



i>ULI 



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ETIN 



Qontents 



JANUARY 25, 1941 

Vol. IV: No. 83— Publication 1556 




Europe: _ Page 

Lifting of so-called "moral embargo" on exports to the 

Soviet Union 107 

German flag incident 108 

Visit to Washington of H.R.H. the Grand Duchess of 

Luxemburg 109 

American Republics: 

Joint survey of Cuban agricultural resources .... 109 
Visit to United States of prominent Haitian citizen . . 110 

Smathers resolution 110 

The Far East: 

Visit of Mr. Lauchlin Currie to Chungking 110 

General: 

Congratulatory messages to the President 110 

Withdrawal of public land in New Mexico for use of the 

Department of State 117 

International Conferences, Commissions, Etc: 
North American Regional Radio-Engineering Confer- 
ence 117 

Treaty Information: 
Promotion of Peace: 

Treaty Between Brazil and Venezuela for the Pacific 

Settlement of Disputes 118 

[Over] 






Content ^-continued. 

Treaty Information — Continued. 

Sovereignty: Page 
Convention on the Provisional Administration of 
European Colonies and Possessions in the Ameri- 
cas 118 

International Law: 

Convention on Maritime Neutrality (Treaty Series 

No. 845) 118 

Extradition : 

Supplementary Extradition Treaty With Ecuador . . 118 
Nature Protection and Wddlife Preservation: 

Convention on Nature Protection and Wildlife 

Preservation in the Western Hemisphere .... 118 
Telecommunications : 

North American Regional Broadcasting Agreement . 119 

Regulations 119 

Legislation 120 

Publications 120 



Europe 

LIFTING OF SO-CALLED "MORAL EMBARGO" ON EXPORTS TO THE 

SOVIET UNION 



[Released to the press January 22] 

A communication reading as follows has been 
handed to the Soviet Ambassador, Constantine 
A. Oumansky : 

"Department of State, 
"Washington, January ..'7, 1941. 

"My Dear Mr. Ambassador : 

"Following our recent conversations, I am 
happy to inform you that the Government of 
the United States of America has decided that 
the policies set forth in the statement issued to 
the press by the President on December 2, 1939, 1 
and generally referred to as the 'moral embargo', 
are no longer applicable to the Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics. 

"This decision is being communicated to in- 
terested American manufacturers and exporters. 

"I am, my dear Mr. Oumansky, 
"Very sincerely yours, 

Sumner Welles" 

In the statement issued to the press by the 
President on December 2, 1939, the hope was 
expressed that American manufacturers and 
exporters of airplanes, aeronautical equipment, 
and materials essential to airplane manufac- 
ture, would bear in mind before negotiating 
contracts for the exportation of these articles 
that the American Government and the Amer- 
ican people had for some time pursued the 
policy of wholeheartedly condemning the un- 



provoked bombing and machine-gunning of 
civilian populations from the air. 

In a statement issued to the press on Decem- 
ber 15, 1939, 2 the Department of State took the 
position that molybdenum and aluminum were 
included among "materials essential to airplane 
manufacture". On December 20, 1939, 3 the De- 
partment of State issued a statement to the press 
to the effect that after consultation with the 
War and Navy Departments it had decided, as 
an extension of the announced policy of this 
Government in regard to the sale to certain 
countries of airplanes, aeronautical equipment, 
and materials essential to airplane manufacture 
that the national interest suggested that for the 
time being there should be no further delivery 
to these countries of plans, plants, manufactur- 
ing rights, or technical information required 
for the production of high quality aviation 
gasoline. 

The President's statement of December 2, 
1939, and the Department's supplementary 
statements of December 15, 1939, and December 
20, 1939, referred to above, are no longer appli- 
cable to the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. 

All of the articles and materials covered by 
what has generally been referred to as the 
"moral embargo" are included in the list of 
articles and materials now subject to the export- 
license system. 



1 See the Bulletin of December 16, 1939 (vol. I, no. 25), 
p. 686. 



2 See itia., p. 685. 

3 See the Bulletin of December 23, 1939 (vol. I, no. 
26), p. 714. 



107 



108 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
have been subject to the export-license system 
since November 29, 1935. 4 The definition of 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war now 
in effect is contained in the President's procla- 
mation of May 1, 1937. 5 In that proclamation 
are listed aircraft of all types, aircraft arma- 
ment, and all major aircraft parts. On July 2, 
1940,° the President, by proclamation, added to 
the list, of articles and materials, subject to the 
export-license system, aluminum, molybdenum, 
and aircraft parts other than those listed in his 



proclamation of May 1, 1937. In his proclama- 
tion of September 12, 1940, T the President added 
to the list of articles and materials, subject to 
the export-license system, equipment which can 
be used, or adapted to use, for the production 
of aviation motor fuel from petroleum, petro- 
leum products, hydrocarbons, or hydrocarbon 
mixtures ; and equipment which can be used, or 
adapted to use, for the production of tetraethyl 
lead; and any plans, specifications, or other 
documents containing descriptive or technical 
information relating to either of the above. 



GERMAN FLAG INCIDENT 



[Released to the press January 21] 

The Secretary of State made public on Janu- 
ary 21 the following exchange of notes with the 
German Embassy : 

[Translation] 

"The German Embassy, II S. F., 

"Washington, D. C, January 18, 1941. 
"Mr. Secretary or State : 

"I have the honor to inform you of the fol- 
lowing occurrence : 

"As the day of the founding of the German 
Eeich in the year 1871, January 18 was declared 
a German national holiday which is to be ob- 
served by the display of the German Reich flag 
by all German Reich offices in Germany as well 
as abroad. In conformity with the pertinent 
instructions issued by the German Reich Gov- 
ernment the German Consul General in San 
Francisco todaj* displayed the prescribed Ger- 
man Reich flag from his office. 

"The German Consul General in San Fran- 
cisco has just informed me that the German 
Reich flag placed by him on his office was today 



4 See Press Releases of September 28, 1935 (vol. 
XIII, no. 313), pp. 221-224, and of December 7, 1935 
(vol. XIII, no. 323), pp. 492-493. 

6 See the Bulletin, of January 11, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 
SI), pp. 7C-77. 

"See the Bulletin of July 0, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 54), 
pp. 12-13. 



at noon forcibly taken down from its staff by 
unknown persons in the presence, of a large 
shouting throng of people and was torn to 
pieces by the throng. The perpetrator or per- 
petrators appear to have climbed by the fire- 
escape up to the ninth floor of the office build- 
ing housing the Consulate General, without 
being prevented from doing so by the local 
police. 

"In the name of the German Reich Govern- 
ment I make the most emphatic protest against 
this act which represents a serious violation of 
the right, prescribed by treaty and recognized 
in international law, of the German Consul 
General in San Francisco to raise the German 
Reich flag over his office. I am permitted to 
express the expectation that the Government 
of the United States will adopt all appropriate, 
measures to bring the perpetrators to responsi- 
bility and to submit them to merited punish- 
ment and that the Government of the United 
States will also take all appropriate steps in 
order to prevent a repetition of occurrences 
of this nature. 

"I request your Excellency to make it pos- 
sible for me immediately to furnish my Gov- 
ernment, with a report in this regard. 

"Accept [etc.] Thomsen" 



'See the Bulletin of September 14, 1940 (vol. Ill, 
no. 64), pp. 213-214. 



JANUARY 2 5, 1941 



109 



"January 19, 1941. 
"My Dear Mr. Charge d 1 Affaires : 

"I have received your note of January 18, 
1941 regarding a report reaching you from the 
German Consul General in San Francisco that 
the German Reich flag was forcibly taken down 
by unknown persons from the ninth floor of 
the office building housing the Consulate 
General. 

"I hasten to express the regret of the Gov- 
ernment of the United States at such an inci- 
dent and have requested that the appropriate 
agencies of this Government should make an 
immediate investigation, after which I shall 
communicate with you again. 

"I remain, Mr. Charge d'Affaires, 
"Very sincerely yours, 

Cordell Hull" 



VISIT TO WASHINGTON OF H.R.H. THE 
GRAND DUCHESS OF LUXEMBURG 

[Released to the press January 23] 

Her Royal Highness the Grand Duchess of 
Luxemburg will visit Washington informally 
as the guest of the President and Mrs. Roose- 
velt from February 12 to February 14. 

Grand Duchess Charlotte will be accom- 
panied by : 

H.R.H. the Prince of Luxemburg 
H.R.H. the Hereditary Grand Duke of 

Luxemburg 
Madame Josef Bech, Lady-in-Waiting 
Lieutenant Konsbruck, Aide. 

A reception committee of American officials 
will meet the royal party on arrival at Union 
Station shortly after noon on February 12. 
An informal schedule has been arranged for 
the visit and will be announced later. 



American Republics 



JOINT SURVEY OF CUBAN AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES 



[Released to the press January 25] 

Three representatives of the United States 
Department of Agriculture will leave Washing- 
ton on January 26 to participate in a joint sur- 
vey of Cuban agricultural resources. The sur- 
vey is being conducted in connection with the 
general program for assistance to Cuban agri- 
culture proposed by the Cuban economic mis- 
sion to the United States of October 1940. 

The officers now en route to Cuba are : Gari- 
baldi Laguardia, Principal Agricultural 
Economist, Agricultural Adjustment Adminis- 
tration; William T. Shaddick, Assistant State 
Director, Farm Security Administration; and 
Dr. Paul G. Minneman, Foreign Service officer 
on detail to the Department of Agriculture. 



They will be joined in Habana by H. F. Blaney, 
Irrigation Engineer, Soil Conservation Service, 
and Dr. Wilson Popenoe, Tropical Agricul- 
turist, United Fruit Company, on detail to the 
Department of Agriculture. Mr. Laguardia 
will act as leader of the group. 

The United States party will work with 
Cuban officials on all of the proposals for agri- 
cultural development made by the Cuban eco- 
nomic mission. Particular attention will be 
given to: (a) the development of irrigation 
works; (b) the development of new non- 
competitive crops; and (c) the development of 
a system of rural rehabilitation. It is antici- 
pated that about two months will be required for 
completion of the survey. 



110 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



VISIT TO UNITED STATES OF PROMI- 
NENT HAITIAN CITIZEN 

[Released to the press January 25] 

M. Maurice Dartigue of Port-au-Prince, 
Haiti, will arrive in New York on January 25 
aboard the Panama Mail S. S. Aneon, on an in- 
vitation extended by the Department of State 
to visit the United States. 

M. Dartigue is a native of Cayes, Haiti. He 
is a specialist on rural education in the Na- 
tional Agricultural Production and Rural Edu- 
cation Service and is a member of the Techni- 
cal Council on Education in Haiti. He is the 
author of several publications dealing with 
rural education in Haiti in recent years, in addi- 
tion to having written articles on education for 
periodicals and newspapers, chiefly in Port- 
au-Prince. He received a Master of Arts de- 
gree from Columbia University in 1931. M. 
Dartigue will first visit Washington, where a 
detailed itinerary will be prepared for him. It 
is expected that he will visit Atlanta Univer- 
sity, Fisk University in Nashville, and possibly 
several universities in the Middle West which 
specialize in rural education. 

SMATHERS RESOLUTION 

[Released to the press January 25] 

In response to inquiries with regard to the 
Smathers resolution 8 which would authorize 



the admission of Cuba as a State of the Union, 
the Secretary said emphatically that this reso- 
lution was introduced without the knowledge 
or consent of either the White House or the 
State Department, and added that the proposal 
is completely contrary to the policy of the ad- 
ministration and has not even been thought of 
by either the President or the Secretary of 
State, 



The Far East 



VISIT OF MR. LAUCHLIN CURRIE TO 
CHUNGKING 

[Released to the press by the White House January 23] 

At the invitation of the Chinese Government, 
Lauchlin Currie, Administrative Assistant to 
the President, is taking a short leave of absence 
for the purpose of visiting Chungking. He ex- 
pects to return about the first of March. He 
will be accompanied by Emile Despres, Senior 
Economist in the Division of Research and 
Statistics of the Board of Governors of the Fed- 
eral Reserve System. The purpose of their visit 
is to secure first-hand information on the gen- 
eral economic situation in China and to consult 
with the Chinese Government on matters per- 
taining to this situation. Mr. Currie bears per- 
sonal greetings from the President to Gen- 
eralissimo Chiang Kai-shek. 



General 



CONGRATULATORY MESSAGES TO THE PRESIDENT 



[Released to the press January 25] 

Texts of congratulatory messages received by 
President Roosevelt upon his inauguration, to- 
gether with the replies which have been trans- 
mitted by the President, follow: 



8 S. J. Res. 25, 77th Cong., 1st sess., introduced by the 
Honorable William H. Smathers, of New Jersey. 



Translated message from the Acting President 
of the Argentine Republic, Ramon S. CastUlo, 
and President RooseveWs reply 

Buenos Aires, Argentina, 

January 20,10 * 4 1. 

Upon the assumption by Your Excellency for 
the third time of the Presidency of the greatest 



JANUARY 25, 1941 

democracy of the Continent, I am pleased to send 
you the felicitations of the Argentine Govern- 
ment and people, with renewed confidence in the 
success of the great principles and aspirations 
which inspire your administrative acts and 
which distinguish your eminent republican 
leadership. 

Ramon S. Castillo 

January 23, 1941. 
I greatly appreciate the congratulations and 
good wishes conveyed in Your Excellency's mes- 
sage to me on the occasion of my inauguration 
as President. I extend my best wishes for the 
happiness and prosperity of the Argentine peo- 
ple and for the welfare of their Government. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Translated message from the President of 
Brazil, Getulio Vargas, and President Roose- 
velt's reply 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 

January 20, 19 41. 
I have the honor to present to Your Excel- 
lency, in my name and in that of the Brazilian 
Government and people, the most fervent con- 
gratulations on your entry in the present his- 
toric circumstances upon the third Presidential 
term, expressing as well the most particular 
wishes for your personal happiness. 

Getulio Vargas 

January 23, 1941. 
I wish to express my sincere thanks for Your 
Excellency's gracious message congratulating 
me upon my inauguration as President. Your 
good wishes are warmly appreciated. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



111 

Rio de Janeiro, January 20, 1941. 

I wish to send my personal congratulations 

on the day when for the third time and at the 

gravest turning-point of their history, the 

American people entrust to you their destiny. 

oswaldo aranha 

January 23, 1941. 
It was most gracious of you to send me a cor- 
dial message upon my inauguration as Presi- 
dent, and I take this opportunity of expressing 
deep appreciation and my best wishes. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Message from the Governor General, of Canada, 
the Earl of Athlone, and President Roose- 
velt's reply 

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, 

January 20, 1941. 
I send you my warmest congratulations on 
the occasion of your inauguration. 

Athlone 

January 23, 1941. 
I thank you for your very kind personal mes- 
sage. I am deeply appreciative. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Message from Minister of Foreign Affairs of 
Brazil, Oswaldo Aranha, and President 
Roosevelt's reply 



Message from Prime Minister Mackenzie King 
of Canada, transmitted through the Canadian 
Legation in Washington on January 21, and 
President Roosevelt's reply 

My colleagues in the Government of Canada 
join with me in extending to you our heartiest 
congratulations upon your assumption of office 
for a third term as President of the United 
States. Our united wish and prayer is that 
you may be vouchsafed wisdom and strength 
commensurate with the responsibilities of your 
great office at this most critical of all times in 
the affairs of the world. Warmest personal 
regards. 

Mackenzie King 



112 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



January 24, 1941. 
Your gracious message congratulating me on 
my third inauguration is very greatly appre- 
ciated. Please tell your colleagues in the Gov- 
ernment of Canada that their message has 
touched me closely and accept my warmest per- 
sonal regards. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Translated message from the President of Chile, 
Pedro Aguirre Cerda, and President Roose- 
velt's reply 

Santiago, Chile, 

January 20, 1941. 
On the occasion of the initiation of your third 
presidential term, I take pleasure in offering 
Your Excellency, together with my warmest 
congratulations, my fervent wishes for Your 
Excellency's personal happiness, for the increas- 
ing prosperity of the exemplary democracy 
whose destinies Your Excellency will continue 
to guide, and my wishes that, during Your Ex- 
cellency's new term, the bonds of friendship and 
solidarity which happily unite our respective 
countries may be tightened. 

Pedro Aguirre Cerda 

January 23, 1941. 
It is with deep appreciation that I have re- 
ceived your cordial felicitations upon my inau- 
guration as President. I am particularly happy 
to receive your message, which offers me the 
oj^portunity to reiterate my hope that, together 
with the other American republics, our nations 
may work in unison for the welfare and 
security of the Western Hemisphere. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Message from the Chairman, of the National 
Government of China, Lin Sen, and Presi- 
dent Roosevelt's reply 

Chungking, January 17, 1941 
On behalf of the Chinese government and 
people it gives me great pleasure to tender to 



Your Excellency heartiest, congratulations upon 
your inauguration for the third term as Presi- 
dent of the United States of America. I sin- 
cerely hope that the ever increasing cordiality 
which marks the relations between our two 
countries will be continued and strengthened 
during your administration. I also wish Your 
Excellency the best of health and the United 
States of America every welfare and prosperity. 

Lin Sen 

January 23, 1941. 
I have received and much appreciate your 
kind telegram of January 17 in which you were 
so good as to send me, on behalf of the Chinese 
Government and people, congratulations upon 
my third inauguration in the office of President 
of the United States. I cordially reciprocate 
both your good wishes and the hope you ex- 
j)ress for the continuing growth of the friendly 
relations between our two countries, which have, 
come to be traditionally regarded by the Gov- 
ernment and people of the United States as 
strong and enduring. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Message from the Minister of Finance of China, 
II. H. Rung, and President Roosevelt's reply 

Chungking, January 20, 1941. 
Please accept my heartiest congratulations 
upon your inauguration as third-term President 
of your great country. May God give you 
health and strength during this grave world 
crisis so that your efforts on behalf of democ- 
racies will be crowned with success thus ensur- 
ing just peace and enduring prosperity for all 
nations. 

H. H. Kung 

January 22, 1941. 
I wish to thank you for your telegram of 
January 20 containing a cordial message of 
felicitations upon my third inauguration in the 
office of President of the United States. The 
sentiments contained in your message and the 
spirit which prompted you to send it are much 



JANUARY 2 5, 1941 



113 



appreciated and I take this opportunity of 
extending to you my personal best wishes. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



self and for the happiness and prosperity of 
the people of Costa Rica. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Translated message from the President of 
Colombia, Eduardo Santos, and President 
Roosevelt's reply 

Bogota, Colombia, 

January 20, 191(1. 
I present to Your Excellency, on the inau- 
gural date of your third Presidential term, the 
wishes of the Government and people of Colom- 
bia that success may crown your efforts, and 
that the ideals of democracy and justice, of 
which you are the loftiest exponent, may be 
strengthened in the American Continent and 
in the entire world. 

Eduardo Santos 

January 23, 1941. 
I deeply appreciate the kind thoughts ex- 
pressed in your message and am looking for- 
ward to a continued advancement of the great 
work of inter- American cooperation. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Translated message from the President of Costa 
Rica, Rafael Calderon Guardia, and Presi- 
dent Roosevelt's reply 

San Jose, Costa Rica, 

January 20, 1941. 
Upon the inauguration today of Your Excel- 
lency's third Presidential term, I take great 
pleasure in again presenting my felicitations for 
the confidence which your country has so justly 
shown you, and to renew, with my best wishes 
for your continued great success, the expression 
of my highest, distinguished, and unfailing 
consideration. 

R. Calderon Guardia 

January 23, 1941. 
I thank you most sincerely for Your Excel- 
lency's heartening and gracious message. 
Please accept my personal good wishes for your- 



2'rcmslated message from the President of the 
Dominican Republic, Manuel de Jesus Tron- 
coso de la Concha, and President Roosevelt s 
reply 

Ciudad Trujillo, 
January 20, 1941. 
At the beginning of Your Excellency's new 
Presidential term, I offer the best wishes of the 
Dominican people and Government, and my 
own, for your most complete success in your 
high office, for the greatness and prosperity of 
the American people, and for the personal well- 
being of Your Excellency. 

M. de J. Troncoso de la Concha 

January 23, 1941. 
I greatly appreciate the congratulations and 
good wishes conveyed to me in Your Excel- 
lency's telegram upon the occasion of my in- 
auguration as President of the United States of 
America. I extend my best wishes for your 
personal welfare and for the continued pros- 
perity of the people of the Dominican Republic. 
Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Translated message from the President of Ecua- 
dor, Carlos Arroyo del Rio, and President 
Roosevelts reply 

Quito, Ecuador, 
January ..'/, 1941. 
Upon Your Excellency's entering for the third 
time upon the term during which you will 
direct the destinies of your great people, I am 
pleased to express to you my best wishes for the 
success of your administration and the assur- 
ance that it will redound to the benefit of the 
consolidation of democracy and the greatness of 
the destinies of America. 

C. A. Arroyo del Rio 



114 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



January 23, 1941. 
I thank Your Excellency most sincerely for 
your gracious message of felicitation. Please 
accept my good wishes for your personal wel- 
fare and for the happiness and prosperity of the 
people of Ecuador. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Mi ssage from the President of Finland, Risto 
Ryti, and President Roosevelt's reply 

Helsinki, January 20, 1941. 
Upon this day I beg Your Excellency to ac- 
cept my heartiest congratulations and my warm- 
est wishes for the welfare of Your Excellency 
and the prosperity and happiness of the people 
of the United States. 

Risto Rtti 

January 23, 1911. 
I deeply appreciate your gracious message of 
felicitation. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Translated message from the Marshal of France, 
Henri Ph ilippe Pet am, and President Roose- 
velt's reply 

Vichy, January 20, 1941. 
On the day when, called by the confidence of 
Congress, Your Excellency assumes for the third 
time the high functions of the President of the 
United States, I wish to address to you my warm 
felicitations and to assure you of my most 
cordial sentiments. 

Philippe Petain 

January 23, 1941. 
I warmly appreciate your kind message of 
congratulation. On behalf of the American 
people and in my own name I assure you of our 
sincere good wishes for you and for the French 
people. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Tegucigalpa, Honduras, 

January 20, 191,1. 
Upon the occasion of Your Excellency's in- 
auguration for a third Presidential term, it 
gives me the greatest pleasure to express to you 
my sincere felicitations and the sentiments of 
solidarity of the Government of Honduras with 
the Government over which Your Excellency so 
worthily presides. 

Tiburcio Carias A. 

January 23, 1941. 
I deeply appreciate your kind message upon 
my inauguration as President and extend my 
best wishes to you and to the people of Hon- 
duras. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Message from the Emperor of Japan, Hirohito, 
and President Roosevelt's reply 

Tokyo, January 19, 1941. 
I take great pleasure in sending you my cor- 
dial congratulations on your inauguration of 
the third tenure as President of the United 
States. I earnestly wish that the friendly rela- 
tions between our respective countries may be 
strengthened during your term of the exalted 
office. 

Hirohito 

January 23, 1941. 
I greatly appreciate your cordial telegram of 
congratulation, and I heartily reciprocate the 
friendly sentiments which Your Majesty has 
been so good as to express. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Translated message from the President of 
Honduras, Tibwrcio Carias Andino, and, 
President Roosevelt's reply 



Message from the President of Liberia-, Edwin 
J. Barclay, and President Roosevelt's reply 

Monrovia. January 20. 1941. 
On your assumption of office as President of 
the United States for the third time I extend 
you my felicitations and best wishes. It is the 
hope of the Government and people of this 
country that the great work you have under- 
taken in these troublous times for the restora- 



JANUARY 25, 1941 

tion of world peace will have a satisfactory 
issue. 

Edwin J. Barclay 

January 23, 1941. 
I sincerely appreciate Your Excellency's cor- 
dial felicitations upon my inauguration as 
President of the United States and am happy 
to reciprocate your good wishes. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Translated message from the President of 
Mexico, Manuel Avila Camacho, and Presi- 
dent Roosevelt's reply 

Mexico, D. F., January 20, 19^1. 
On this date on which Your Excellency, for 
the third time, assumes the high responsibili- 
ties entailed by the post of President of the 
United States I wish to express to Your Ex- 
cellency my most cordial congratulations at the 
confidence which the great American people 
have shown in your person. The moment in 
which I send Your Excellency these words of 
felicitation is one of very significant historic 
importance, both as respects the anxieties 
aroused in all free nations of the New World 
by the development of the present international 
conflict and as respects whatever concerns the 
spirit of true collaboration and sincere sym- 
pathy with which our Governments are begin- 
ning the tasks of their administration. On so 
happy an occasion I take pleasure in wishing 
complete success for Your Excellency's admin- 
istration, and I hope that the work which cir- 
cumstances have entrusted to you may be car- 
ried out for the good of peace and democratic 
ideals and the international Pan American pol- 
icy which constitute the solid basis of the friend- 
ship uniting our republics. With my best 
wishes for the prosperity of the American peo- 
ple and for Your Excellency's personal well- 
being, I avail myself of the occasion to renew 
to you the assurances of my personal esteem 
and my highest consideration. 

Manuel Avila Camacho 



115 

January 23, 1941. 

I am happy to receive your cordial message 
of felicitation and deeply appreciate the gen- 
erous thoughts which you have expressed 
therein. 

The statements in your message concerning 
the present world situation and the need for 
true collaboration and sincere sympathy be- 
tween the Governments of our two countries 
confirm my previous belief that you and the 
Government and people of Mexico share my 
desire and that of the people of the United 
States for real understanding and cooperation. 
Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Message from Princess Juliana of the Nether- 
lands, and President Roosevelfs reply 

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, 

January 19, 19^1. 
Sincerest congratulations on your inaugura- 
tion as President and every good wish for a 
most successful Administration. 

Juliana 

January 23, 1941. 
I warmly appreciate your gracious message 
upon my inauguration as President. Mrs. 
Roosevelt joins me in sending our kindest re- 
gards and best wishes. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Translated message from, the President of Nic- 
aragua, Anastasio Somoza, and President 
Roosevelfs reply 

Managua, Nicaragua, 

January 20, 1941. 
On this day when you receive the mandate for 
a new Presidential term, I take pleasure in ex- 
pressing my warmest congratulations, since this 
occasion signifies a manifest and free expres- 
sion of the will of your great people, affirm- 
ing in the spirit of the American nations the 
assurance that only through the exercise of 



116 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



liberty can the peoples achieve the highest real- 
ization of their destiny. 

A. Somoza 

January 23, 1941. 

I have received Your Excellency's heartening 

message with great pleasure. In expressing my 

sincere appreciation, I wish also to express my 

best wishes for your well-being and happiness. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Translated message from the President of Peru, 
Manuel Prado y Ugarteche, and President 
RooseveWs reply 

Lima, January 21, 1941. 
On beginning your third term, I am pleased 
to express to you the most cordial congratula- 
tions of the Peruvian Government and people 
and my sincere hopes for your success. I hope 
that during the period Your Excellency con- 
tinues directing the destinies of your great na- 
tion, our friend, the good relations which it has 
always maintained with Peru will be strength- 
ened even more and that the base in which rests 
the intimate and robust continental relationship 
will become more solid. Please accept also my 
sincere wishes for your personal happiness. 
Manuel Prado 

January 24, 1941. 
I greatly appreciate Your Excellency's cordial 
message on the occasion of my inauguration. 
I take pleasure in seizing this opportunity to 
extend my best wishes for your personal welfare 
and the prosperity of the Peruvian people. 
Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Message from the President of Poland, Wlady- 
slaw RaczMeioicz, and President RooseveWs 
reply 

London, January 31, 1941. 
On the historic day when Your Excellency 
assumes for the third time the Presidency of 
the United States of America I beg to send to 



you in my own name as well as on behalf of the 
Polish Nation, which received with the greatest 
satisfaction the news of your re-election, most 
sincere wishes of further successful work for 
the happiness of your country and for the good 
of humanity which looks forward to the United 
States for the defence of righteousness and 
democracy. 

Wladtslaw Raczkiewicz 

January 23, 1941. 
I deeply appreciate Your Excellency's kind 
message of congratulation. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Translated message from the President of Uru- 
guay, Alfredo Baldomir, and President 
RooseveWs reply 

Montevideo, January 20, 1941. 
I beg Your Excellency to accept my best and 
most cordial wishes for the success and pros- 
perity of your administration in the new term 
which i9 now beginning, and my hope that 
during its course there may continue to be ex- 
hibited the wisdom and understanding which 
are so characteristic of you, and which have 
rendered such high service to the democracy, 
liberty, and labor which rule the peaceful and 
happy life of the American Continent. 

Alfredo Baldomir 

January 23, 1941. 
It is with great pleasure that I have received 
Your Excellency's cordial message upon my in- 
auguration as President of the United States 
of America. Continued and friendly coopera- 
tion between the sovereign republics of the 
American continent will insure the maintenance 
of their free institutions and preserve the se- 
curity of the New World. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



Translated message from the President of Ven- 
ezuela, Eleazar Lopez Contreras, and Presi- 
dent RooseveWs reply 



JANUARY 2 5, 1941 



117 



Caracas, Venezuela, 

January 20, If) 1,1. 
On this occasion on which Your Excellency 
begins your new Presidential term, I am pleased 
to send you my personal congratulations and my 
most sincere wishes for the greatest success of 
your new administration. 

E. Lopez Coxtreras 

January 23, 1941. 
I thank you for your very kind personal mes- 
sage. I am deeply appreciative. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 



ary 25, 1941 (vol. 6, no. 17), p. 599 (The Na- 
tional Archives of the United States). 



Message from Prince Regent Paul of Yugo- 
slavia, and President Roos&ceWs reply 

Belgrade, January 20, 191,1. 
At the moment of your taking up for the 
third time the Presidency of the United States 
of America, I beg Your Excellency to accept my 
sincerest congratulations and my best wishes 
for your personal happiness and the prosperity 
of the American people. 

Paul 

January 23, 1941. 
I deeply appreciate your Royal Highness' 
congratulations upon the occasion of my inaugu- 
ration as President and I am happy to recipro- 
cate your good wishes. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 

WITHDRAWAL OF PUBLIC LAND IN 
NEW MEXICO FOR USE OF THE DE- 
PARTMENT OF STATE 

On January 23, 1941, the President issued an 
Executive order (no. 8649) withdrawing certain 
public lands in. New Mexico for the use of the 
Department of State in connection with the Rio 
Grande Canalization project. The text of this 
order appears in the Federal Register for Janu- 



International Conferences, 
Commissions, Etc. 



NORTH AMERICAN REGIONAL RADIO- 
ENGINEERING CONFERENCE 

[Released to the press January 22] 

The chief technical representatives from 
Canada, Cuba, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, 
Mexico, and the United States, who are attend- 
ing a regional broadcasting conference in 
Washington, announced January 22 thai the 
technical committee of the conference, which is 
meeting at the Federal Communications Com- 
mission, is making very satisfactory progress in 
the solution of the engineering details arising 
from the radio-frequency notifications of the 
various governments which are parties to the 
North American Regional Broadcasting Agree- 
ment, Habana, 1937. While some rectifications 
of a minor character are required in the various 
notifications by reason of unavoidable conflicts 
of an engineering nature, all delegates are most 
optimistic of an early solution. 

The work of the technical committee involves 
the assignment of frequencies in the standard 
broadcast band to nearly 1,300 radio broadcast- 
ing stations in the North American region, so 
that these stations may operate simultaneously 
with a minimum of interference to their respec- 
tive services. 

This constitutes an engineering problem which 
requires consideration of each separate fre- 
quency assignment. Obviously, no valid state- 
ment of frequency assignments can be made 
until the work of the committee has been com- 
jneted and referred back to the conference as a 
whole, which holds its plenary sessions at the 
Department of State. 



Treaty Information 



COMPILED IN THE TREATY DIVISION 



PROMOTION OF PEACE 

TREATY BETWEEN BRAZIL AND VENEZUELA 
FOR THE PACIFIC SETTLEMENT OF DISPUTES 

The American Embassy at Rio de Janeiro 
reported by a despatch dated January 10, 1941, 
that ratifications of the Treaty for the Pacific 
Settlement of Disputes between Brazil and 
Venezuela signed on March 30, 1940, were 
exchanged on January 9, 1941. 

SOVEREIGNTY 

CONVENTION ON THE PROVISIONAL ADMINIS- 
TRATION OF EUROPEAN COLONIES AND 
POSSESSIONS IN THE AMERICAS 

Brazil 

The Director General of the Pan American 
Union informed the Secretary of State by a let- 
ter dated January 16, 1941, that the instrument 
of ratification by Brazil of the Convention on 
the Provisional Administration of European 
Colonies and Possessions in the Americas, 
signed at Habana on July 30, 1940, was dej^os- 
ited with the Union on January 14, 1941. The 
instrument of ratification is dated November 
26, 1940. 

The following countries have deposited in- 
struments of ratification of the convention: 
United States of America, Brazil, Costa Rica, 
and Dominican Republic. 

INTERNATIONAL LAW 

CONVENTION ON MARITIME NEUTRALITY 
(TREATY SERIES NO. 845) 

Colombia 

The Director General of the Pan American 
Union informed the Secretary of State by a 
letter dated January 21, 1941, that the instru- 
ment of ratification by Colombia of the Con- 
vention on Maritime Neutrality, signed at the 
Sixth International Conference of American 
118 



States held at Habana, Cuba, February 20, 1928, 
was deposited with the Union on January 17, 
1941. 

The convention has been ratified by the United 
States of America, Bolivia, Colombia, Domini- 
can Republic, Ecuador, Haiti, Nicaragua, and 
Panama. 

EXTRADITION 

SUPPLEMENTARY EXTRADITION TREATY WITH 
ECUADOR 

On January 23, 1941, ratifications were ex- 
changed at Washington of the Supplementary 
Extradition Treaty between the United States 
and Ecuador, signed at Quito on September 
22, 1939. 

This treaty is considered as an integral part 
of the Extradition Treaty of June 28, 1872, 
between the two countries (Treaty Series No. 
79), and enlarges the list of crimes on account 
of which extradition may be granted under that 
treaty. It will "come into force ten days after 
its publication in conformity with the laws of 
the High Contracting Parties, such period to 
be computed from its publication in the country 
last publishing, and it shall continue and ter- 
minate in the same manner as the said Treaty 
of June 28, 1872". 

NATURE PROTECTION AND WILDLIFE 
PRESERVATION 

CONVENTION ON NATURE PROTECTION AND 
WILDLIFE PRESERVATION IN THE WESTERN 
HEMISPHERE 

Colombia 

The Director General of the Pan American 
Union informed the Secretary of State by a 
letter dated January 21, 1941, that the Con- 
vention on Nature Protection and Wildlife 
Preservation in the Western Hemisphere, which 



JANUARY 2 5, 1941 



119 



was opened for signature at the Pan American 
Union on October 12, 1940,° was signed on be- 
half of Colombia on January 17, 1941. 

El Salvador 

The American Minister to El Salvador trans- 
mitted to the Secretary of State with a despatch 
dated January 11, 1941, a copy and translation 
of decree no. 110 of December 21, 1940, pub- 
lished in the Diario Oficial of January 8, 1941, 
by which El Salvador ratifies the Convention on 
Nature Protection and Wildlife Preservation 
in the Western Hemisphere, which was opened 
for signature at the Pan American Union Oc- 
tober 12, 1940. fl 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

NORTH AMERICAN REGIONAL BROADCASTING 
AGREEMENT 

The North American Regional Broadcasting 
Agreement signed on behalf of the United 
States, Canada, Cuba, Dominican Republic, 
Haiti, and Mexico, at Habana on December 13, 
1937, was proclaimed by the President on Jan- 
uary 23, 1941. The Senate of the United States 
gave its advice and consent to ratification of 
the agreement on June 15, 1938, and it was 
ratified by the President on June 30, 1938. The 
ratification of the United States was deposited 
with the Cuban Foreign Office on July 21, 1938. 
Ratifications were deposited by Cuba, January 
12, 1938; Haiti, June 27, 1938; Canada, De- 
cember 22, 1938; and Mexico, March 29, 1940. 
The agreement became valid among the above- 
named five countries on March 29, 1940, the date 
of the deposit of the ratification of Mexico, and 
certain of its provisions became effective on that 
date. The other provisions will become effective 
one year later, namely, March 29, 1941. 

The North American Regional Broadcasting 
Agreement establishes technical principles ap- 
plicable throughout the North American region 
and is designed to accord to all participating 



states adequate broadcasting facilities and to 
eliminate international radio interference. It 
undertakes to establish within the standard 
broadcast band (which by the agreement is 
fixed at 550 to 1,000 kc.) three principal classi- 
fications of channels, namely, clear, regional, 
and local, the same classifications now used in 
the United States. The clear channels are de- 
signed to permit service over wide areas free 
from objectionable interference, and provision 
is made for the operation of so-called dominant 
and secondary stations which may use the same 
clear channel subject to restrictions of power, 
mileage separation, and consequent avoidance 
of interference, with the use where necessary of 
directional antennae. Regional channels are 
intended to permit a number of stations to oper- 
ate with limited power and each within a re- 
stricted area. Local channels will permit 
the operation of a number of stations on each, 
with still less power and smaller service area. 
Specific assignment of frequencies is made by 
the agreement to each class of channels. All 
participating states are permitted to use all re- 
gional and local channels subject to the engi- 
neering standards prescribed by the agreement, 
and the clear channels are to be distributed 
among the participating states so that there 
may be accommodated a maximum number of 
stations with a minimum of interference. The 
agreement is for a period of five years but is 
subject to denunciation at the expiration of one 
year from the date of notification thereof. 



Regulations 



"See the Bulletin of October 12, 19-10 (vol. Ill, no. 
6S), p. 308. 



The following Government regulation may be 
of interest to readers of the Bulletin: 

Amended Regulations Governing Number of Copies 
of Certain Forms Required in Preexamination and De- 
portation Procedures. January 22, 1941. [General 
Order No. C-29.] (Immigration and Naturalization 
Service, Department of Justice.) Federal Register, 
January 25, 1941 (vol. G, no. 17), p. GOO (The National 
Archives of the United States). 



120 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Legislation 



Supplemental Estimate of Appropriation for Admin- 
istrative Expenses, Export-Import Bank, for 1941 : 
Communication from the President of the United States 
Transmitting Supplemental Estimate of Appropriation 
for Administrative Expenses, Export-Import Bank of 
Washington, for the Fiscal Year 1941, Amounting to 
$10,000. (H. Doc. No. 52, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 2 pp. 

w. 

Supplemental Estimates of Appropriations for the 
State Department, 1941 and 1942: Communication 
From the President of the United States Transmitting 
Three Supplemental Estimates of Appropriations for 
the Department of State, for the Fiscal Tears 1941 and 
1942, Amounting to $26,000 (for participating in and 
organizing the Third General Assembly of the Pan 
American Institute of Geography and History, Lima, 
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1941-12). (H. Doc. 53, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 4 pp. 50. 



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Reciprocal Trade : Supplementary Agreement Be- 
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Amending With Regard to Fox Furs and Skins the 
Agreement of November 17, 1938 — Signed at Washing- 
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ary 1, 1940. Executive Agreement Series No. 184. 
Publication 1540. 7 pp. 5^. 

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PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE AIT-ROYAL OP THE DIRECTOR OF TTIE BUREAU OF THE BUDOET 



^ 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

H 



BULI 



H 11 




FEBRUARY 1, 1941 

Vol. IV: No. 84— Publication 1559 



Qontents 




General: 

The United States and the World Crisis: Address by 

the Under Secretary of State 

Control of exports in national defense 

Death of William Gibbs McAdoo 

Passport statistics 

American Republics: 

Distinguished visitors from Chile and Peru 

Visit of Chilean newspapermen to the United States . . 

Travel grant to American educator 

Fishery mission to Peru 

Message from Regional Conference of the River Plate 
Republics 

Canada: 

Death of the Under Secretary of State for External 
Affairs 

Europe: 

Presentation of letters of credence by the British 

Ambassador 

Contributions for relief in belligerent countries .... 
The Near East: 

Italian air attack on American missionaries in Anglo- 
Egyptian Sudan 

Death of the Prime Minister of Greece 

[Over] 



123 

128 
128 
129 

130 
131 
131 
132 

134 



134 



135 
136 



148 
151 



' 



Qontents^comwvED. 



International Conferences, Commissions, Etc.: Page 

North American Regional Radio-Engineering Meeting . 151 

Treaty Information: 
Agriculture: 

Inter- American Coffee-Marketing Agreement ... 152 
Sovereignty : 

Final Act of the Second Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics at 

Habana, 1940 152 

Telecommunications : 

Regional Radio Convention for Central America, 
Panama, and the Canal Zone (Treaty Series No. 

949) 152 

International Telecommunication Convention, Revi- 
sions of Cairo, 1938 (Treaty Series No. 948) ... 152 

The Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 153 

Publications 153 

Regulations 153 

Legislation 153 



General 



THE UNITED STATES AND THE WORLD CRISIS 



ADDRESS BY THE UNDER SECRETARY OF STATE 1 



[Released to the press January 31] 

You have asked me to speak to this great an- 
nual gathering of the New York University 
Alumni Association on some of the basic issues 
with which the people of the United States to- 
day are confronted in the determination of this 
Nation's foreign policy. I have welcomed your 
invitation because of my abiding conviction that 
so long as the American people have available 
the true facts concerning the main factors in- 
volved in the shaping of their Nation's foreign 
policy, they will accurately appraise the funda- 
mental issues involved. In other words, I be- 
lieve that the United States has proved, and 
will continue to prove, that democracy works in 
the realm of foreign policy as well as in the realm 
of domestic policy. 

However much I, as an individual, may dis- 
sent from the point of view which has recently 
been publicly expressed by many Americans 
with regard to the course which our foreign 
policy should take, as an American citizen I 
give thanks that they are guaranteed the right 
to speak their opinions freely. That freedom 
has proved to be one of the cornerstones of our 
system of government. 

It is apparent to all of us here tonight that the 
Nation is confronting what is probably the most 
critical moment it has had to face during the 
days of its independent life. All thinking men 
and women throughout the United States today 
are searching their minds and hearts in the effort 



1 Delivered by Mr. Welles at the annual dinner of the 
Alumni Association of the New York University School 
of Law, New York City, January 30, 1941. 



to reach a conclusion as to what is best for the 
United States. 

I am going, tonight, in an effort to clarify 
some of these issues with which we are all 
grappling, to remind you of certain of the de- 
velopments of the past few years and the way 
in which these recent developments have culmi- 
nated in the crisis of the present. 

At this moment of apprehension and disquiet, 
I am glad that I can commence this brief discus- 
sion with a reference to one aspect of our foreign 
relations which should be a matter of profound 
satisfaction to every American citizen. I refer, 
of course, to the relations which exist between 
the United States and the other 20 republics of 
our hemisphere, and to the existence between the 
peoples of the New World of a solidarity and 
of an identity of interests which a scant eight 
years ago would have seemed incredible, 

The existence of this real and practical Pan 
Americanism is not the result of chance, and it 
is by no means a mere by-product of the events 
which have taken place in other parts of the 
world. It is the result of constructive statesman- 
ship on the part of every one of the 21 American 
governments. We have all of us made our con- 
tribution to its existence. But there is no greater 
danger to its continuance than that any one of us 
should take it as a matter of course. Its con- 
tinued vitality depends upon the constant will- 
ingness on the part of every one of the 21 sover- 
eign republics of the New World to continue to 
make such contributions, moral and material, as 
are required to insure the joint security and wel- 
fare of all. 

123 



124 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Some of us may remember that as far back as 
February 1936 the President of the United 
States, because of the mounting dangers which 
he saw so clearly already looming on the world 
horizon, took the initiative in suggesting to the 
governments of the other American republics 
that a conference be held between them while 
the world was still at peace, so that they might 
determine the steps which they might best take 
to safeguard the peace and the security of the 
Western Hemisphere. 

That Conference of Buenos Aires was held 
more than four years ago, and it is because of 
the agreements there reached, later enhanced and 
strengthened at the Conference of Lima in 1938, 
that, when the conflagration broke out, the 
American republics were solidly united and pre- 
pared to deal with emergencies as they arose. 

And it was under the agreements there 
adopted that the Foreign Ministers of the 
American nations met at Panama within three 
weeks after the outbreak of war. At Panama, 
by unanimous accord, permanent committees 
were constituted, one to sit at Washington and 
one at Kio de Janeiro. The former, which has 
remained in continuous session, has been deal- 
ing with all of the economic and financial prob- 
lems with which the American republics have 
been beset since the outbreak of the war, and 
has already been enabled greatly to relieve the 
economic strain, which in many instances would 
have been calamitous save for the practical so- 
lutions which this committee has been enabled 
to devise. The second committee was charged 
with the study and the recommendation of so- 
lutions for all of the problems which have arisen 
which affected the neutrality of the Americas. 

A second meeting of the American Foreign 
Ministers, held at Habana last July, was again 
productive of great practical benefits to all of 
our countries, and through the measures there 
adopted safeguards were established which 
would function in the event that the repercus- 
sions of the war raging beyond the Atlantic 
threatened the security of the New World. 

In the present emergency, when so many of 
our neighbors find themselves with their normal 



export markets either completely cut off or se- 
riously curtailed, this Government is prepared 
to render all practicable economic cooperation. 
Furthermore, so far as our own national re- 
quirements and the policies which we are pur- 
suing make it possible, we are preparing to 
render them likewise all possible material as- 
sistance, so that they may prepare for their own 
self-defense and, more than that — in full accord 
with the spirit of our traditional policy, and 
with the great principles unanimously agreed 
upon at Buenos Aires, that any threat to the 
peace of any American republic will be regarded 
as a threat to the peace of all of them — the 
United States will join in the defense of the 
independence and integrity of any one of its 
American neighbors against any aggression 
from abroad. 

We stand today a united continent, united 
not for aggression but for social betterment 
and self-defense, united in the determination 
to uphold those great freedoms which the New 
World cherishes, and united as sovereign and 
independent equals in a great enterprise of 
safeguarding civilization. 

During these same years we have seen three 
nations, two in Europe and one in Asia, under- 
take to arrogate to themselves the creation of a 
new world order in which they would be the 
overlords. 

None of us here tonight, I am sure, would for 
a moment deny that the world order which has 
prevailed since 1914 was an order which left 
much to be desired, but I am equally sure that 
we would likewise agree that the kind of new 
world order envisaged in every official declara- 
tion uttered by the spokesmen for the partners 
in the Tripartite Pact — a world order charac- 
terized by the denial to the individual of the 
rights of freedom to worship, freedom to speak, 
and freedom to think; carried out by fraud 
and by deceit; and founded upon brutal con- 
quest — is not a new order but the oldest which 
the world has known. It is the world chaos of 
the Stone Age, and if such an order is imposed 
upon the world not only will our modern civi- 
lization vanish, but mankind will revert to 
barbarism. 



FEBRUARY 1, 1941 



125 



Throughout these past years your Govern- 
ment has, time and again, made every effort 
within its power and within its traditional 
policies to bring its influence to bear so that 
the tragic calamity from which men today are 
suffering might be averted. When the history 
of these years can be written the people of the 
United States will give full recognition to the 
efforts which the President has made to pre- 
serve world peace. 

Tonight I want to remind you of one of 
these efforts. You will remember that on 
April 14, 1939 the President, conscious, as he 
said, of the fact that millions of human beings 
were in constant fear of a new war, addressed 
a message to the Chancelor of the German 
Eeich. 2 He offered to the nations of the world 
the full cooperation and participation of this 
Government in negotiations for bringing about 
an international agreement upon the limitation 
and reduction of armaments, and for reaching 
agreements through which every nation of the 
world might be enabled to buy and sell on 
equal terms in the world market, as well as to 
possess the assurance of obtaining the materials 
and products of a peaceful economic life. In 
order that these negotiations might be 
promptly undertaken and humanity thereby be 
relieved of the increasing fear with which it 
was beset, the President asked the German 
Government to give assurance that its armed 
forces would not attack or invade the inde- 
pendent nations of Europe and of the Near 
East, 

As you all know, to that message the German 
Chancelor made no direct reply ; but in a public 
address which he made two weeks later Hitler 
stated that "Mr. Roosevelt believes that the 
tide of events is once more bringing the threat 
of arms, and that if this threat of arms con- 
tinues a large part of the world is condemned 
to a common ruin. As far as Germany is con- 
cerned, I know nothing of this kind of threat to 
other nations . . ." And he continued by say- 
ing, "All states bordering on Germany have re- 



2 See the Press Relrases of April 15, 1939 (vol. XX, 
no. 498), pp. 291-293. 



ceived much more binding assurances, and 
above all suggestions, than Mr. Roosevelt has 
asked from me in his curious telegram." Four 
months later, as the result, as we now know, of 
plans decided upon long before, Poland was 
invaded; and subsequently Norway and Den- 
mark, the Netherlands, Luxemburg, and Bel- 
gium — to all of which countries the German 
Government, had given the "binding assur- 
ances" to which Hitler had referred. 

That, it would seem, is the basic issue which 
is raised when a few well-intentioned persons 
in this country and in others urge that the in- 
fluence of this Government again be exercised 
in behalf of a negotiated peace. Under condi- 
tions in Europe today could American public 
opinion conceivably favor a negotiation for 
peace which would sanction the continued en- 
slavement of the nations now occupied by Ger- 
man military forces? But more than that, the 
negotiation of any lasting peace must be predi- 
cated upon the sincere desire of all the parties 
to such a settlement to abide by the agree- 
ments reached and to carry out the pledges 
which they make. From the record of the 
German Government of the past eight years 
and in the light of the citation which I have 
read to you, is it possible to imagine that any 
peace arrived at under present conditions would 
be worth the paper on which it was written? 

A cynical and flagrant disregard for the 
sanctity of the pledged word has become one 
of the most tragic symptoms of the impair- 
ment of our modern civilization. 

There also are some who seem to feel that, 
no matter what the outcome of the present war 
may be, the United States would nevertheless 
remain immune from attack, secure in its geo- 
graphical isolation, and be able to continue, 
at least after a period of relatively brief world 
readjustment, its normal mode of life, 

It is essential for us at this time to think 
that assertion out — and to think it out clearly 
and dispassionately. 

If the Axis Powers succeed in imposing their 
rule in Europe, and in Africa and in the Far 
East, the control of the Atlantic Ocean will 
pass immediately from the hands of powers 



126 

which have been traditionally friendly to the 
United States, and whose control of the seas 
has in no way jeopardized American security, 
to the hands of powers which have proclaimed 
their intention of dominating the world. 

It has been asserted that if an invading force 
has so far been unable successfully to traverse 
the 20 miles across the English Channel, it 
would be absurd to suppose that the 3,000 miles 
of the Atlantic Ocean would not constitute a 
complete safeguard for the United States. In 
my judgment, those who make this assertion 
overlook certain primary facts. 

The reason why the 20 miles of the English 
Channel have not been successfully crossed is 
because the British Navy controls the ap- 
proaches to the British Isles and, together with 
the Royal Air Force, has thereby been en- 
abled to prevent any successful attempt of in- 
vasion of England. If that force wei'e dis- 
sipated, the Atlantic Ocean would no longer 
remain under the control of a power whose 
control of it offers no threat to us. And more 
than that, the United States does not as yet 
possess two fleets. So long as there is no satis- 
factory guaranty of stability of peace in the 
Pacific and the United States Navy remains 
based in the Pacific, control of the Atlantic 
by a sea power friendly to the United States 
is an essential part of our own national se- 
curity. 

We are all of us fully familiar with the ar- 
guments that no successful crossing of the At- 
lantic by a hostile air power or a hostile 
invading force could be undertaken so long as 
we are properly prepared to defend ourselves. 
Those who take this point of view seem to en- 
vision ultimate danger to the United States in 
the event of a victory by the Axis Powers solely 
in the nature of an immediate attack directed 
against continental United States. They over- 
look, I believe, a more probable and a more 
logical sequence of events. 

The other American republics depend to the 
extent of one half of their total exports upon 
the European market. Some of the greatest 
of the South American nations depend almost 
entirely upon Europe for their export trade. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BU~LLET1N 

Because of the fact that these other American 
nations produce the same commodities as we 
ourselves produce, there is clearly no oppor- 
tunity for the United States, in the event of a 
German domination of Europe, to take more 
than a relatively small percentage of such ex- 
ports in addition to those which they now con- 
sume. And yet the very lives of some of our 
neighbors depend upon the continuation of 
their export trade. Under the German barter 
system, with all of its complicated and at- 
tendant political manipulation, the Axis pow- 
ers would inevitably attempt to impose a com- 
mercial and financial stranglehold upon these 
neighbors of ours, and would at the same time 
commence immediately to undertake that same 
policy of political infiltration as a result of 
commercial concessions which has been carried 
out in so many instances in their dealings with 
the smaller nations of Europe. 

If, as a result of this combination of pressure 
and penetration, the successful conquerors of 
other continents were enabled to find receptive 
elements in the populations of some of the 
South American nations, it would not be long 
before subversive movements on a large scale 
would be undertaken. Should these prove suc- 
cessful, physical invasion would soon follow. 

Were this moment to arrive, we would, of 
course, undertake to join our neighbors in the 
defense of the Americas; and yet, until and un- 
less our own sea power had reached the full 
total now planned or under construction and 
was thus prepared to guard two oceans, the 
menace to our security through the passage of 
the control of the high seas to unfriendly 
hands is to my mind overwhelmingly apparent. 

What we have sought to do throughout these 
years is to uphold in every practicable way 
those principles of international law and order 
upon which alone we have believed a peaceful 
and a healthy world system could be based. 
In our relations with the nations of the Far 
East we have asked for nothing more than re- 
spect for universally applicable principles and 
for those international engagements into which 
the powers of the Far East had freely entered ; 
and we have announced our willingness at any 



FEBRUARY 1, 1941 

time, in accordance with the terms of the en- 
gagements to which we were parties, to nego- 
tiate by pacific methods modifications thereof. 
We have insisted as well upon respect for the 
rights of the United States, and of American 
citizens, arising from treaties or recognized 
and generally accepted tenets of international 
law. 

It is grimly humorous to learn that the Gov- 
ernment of the United States is accused by 
official spokesmen for the Japanese Govern- 
ment of pursuing an aggressive policy in the 
Far East, and to hear that one of the reasons 
for this alleged aggression on our part is the 
further allegation that we have placed our line 
of defense in the Western Pacific. We are 
also informed by some of these gentlemen that, 
since the United States upholds the principles 
of the Monroe Doctrine and its application to 
the Western Hemisphere, there can be no legiti- 
mate objection on the part of the American 
people because the Empire of Japan desires to 
establish its own brand of new order in the 
Far East. 

As I have already stated, the United States 
has made every endeavor to promote friend- 
ship with all other powers, provided their poli- 
cies made such friendship possible. The 
United States has never attempted nor has it 
intended to extend its hegemony or jurisdic- 
tion in the Pacific area during these recent 
years. Its lines of defense are determined 
solely by the acts and by the policies of other 
nations. Those lines of defense are fixed solely 
by what we estimate is required, in the light of 
such policies and acts by others, to insure the 
inviolability and the safety of our territory. 

The Monroe Doctrine is and always has been 
a policy of self-defense and not a policy of ag- 
gression. It provides merely that the United 
States will not permit the further acquisition 
of territory within the Western Hemisphere 
by non-American powers, or the imposition of 
the political systems of non-American nations 
upon the nations of the New World. It has 
never questioned the title to or control, by 
non-American powers, of those possessions in 



127 

the New World which they held at the time 
when the Doctrine was proclaimed. And fur- 
thermore the United States has at no time 
maintained that the Monroe Doctrine vests in 
the United States either political hegemony 
within the Western Hemisphere or the right to 
exclusive or preferential economic or commer- 
cial advantages. All nations have always en- 
joyed within the Western Hemisphere the same 
rights to trade on equal terms as those enjoyed 
by the 21 independent American republics. 

It is well, I think, to emphasize the distinc- 
tion between the Monroe Doctrine, whose prin- 
ciples are now embodied in the multilateral 
agreements of the American republics, and the 
kind of political, commercial, and economic 
hegemony proclaimed as the basis of the new 
order which some Japanese desire to establish 
in the Far East. 

In the ever-widening vortex in which so 
many of the nations of the world are plunged, 
the immediate question which confronts every 
American citizen is what is the wisest and saf- 
est policy for their Government to pursue. 

I believe today that the people of this coun- 
try are almost unanimous in supporting as the 
essential basis of their foreign policy a na- 
tional rearmament, in such measure as to in- 
sure at the first possible moment the security 
of the New World. 

As the President and Secretary Hull have 
frankly stated to the American people, every 
course which the United States may today pur- 
sue is necessarily fraught with danger. 

But, in my judgment, the course which is 
least fraught with danger, and which is most 
likely to make it possible for the American 
people to stay out of war, is for this country 
to increase its production of armaments to such 
an extent as to make it possible for us to make 
available to Great Britain on an ever-increasing 
scale the armaments which she requires in or- 
der successfully to continue her war of self- 
defense. 

The help which we have already rendered 
Great Britain through making it possible for 
her to purchase munitions in the United States 



128 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



has been of great assistance to her in the wag- 
ing of a brilliant and successful battle against 
her opponents. 

If we desire to insure that the control of the 
Atlantic Ocean shall not pass to unfriendly 
hands and that other friendly nations like 
China and Greece can continue successfully to 
withstand the forces of world enslavement, the 
American people must be prepared in their 
own self-defense to render all necessary assist- 
ance which America can produce. 

The provisions of the legislation now pend- 
ing in the Congress, if enacted into law, would 
greatly facilitate that task. I believe that the 
time has come when, in the manner proposed, 
every branch of the Government and every ele- 
ment in our population must cooperate so that 
these essential objectives may speedily and effi- 
ciently be attained. 

The hope for the salvation of modern civi- 
lization, and for the preservation of those 
cherished institutions upon which the structure 
of our own national life rests, lies in the tri- 
umph of free men and free women. Their vic- 
tory is our security. The decisions which we 
here make during these present weeks will in 
great degree determine the final outcome. 

CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL 
DEFENSE 

The following circular telegram from the 
Secretary of Stale was sent to all collectors of 
customs : 

"January 29, 1941. 

"Reference is made to the Department's pre- 
vious circular airmail letters in regard to the 
interpretation of the regulations issued pursu- 
ant, to the Export Control Act approved on 
July 2, 1940. 

"It has now been determined that until fur- 
ther notice the term 'Aluminum', as used in 
the regulations referred to above, shall be in- 
terpreted in such manner as to include alumi- 
num foil. Accordingly, licenses shall hence- 



forth be required for the exportation of alumi- 
num foil." 

Applications for articles and materials in 
the following list, for destinations other than 
the British Empire, must be accompanied by 
affidavits in addition to a copy of the order 
from the foreign purchaser. 

The affidavits should report statistics regard- 
ing exports to the country concerned since 
January 1, 1937, except as noted by asterisks : 



1. 


Abrasives 




17. 


Quinine 


2. 


Aluminum compounds 


18. 


Rubber 




(urea, uramon, 


am- 


19. 


Silk 




rnoniuni phosphate, 


20. 


Strontium 




a m m o n i u m 


sul- 


21. 


Tin 




phate) 




22. 


Toluol 


3. 


Ammonium 




23. 


Tungsten 


4. 


Antimony 




24. 


Zinc* 


5. 


Asbestos 




25. 


Potashf 


6. 


Bromine 




26. 


Cobalt 


7. 


Ethylene 




27. 


Cotton linters 


8. 


Ethylene dibrom 


ide 


28. 


Dimethylaniline 


9. 


Chromium 




29. 


Industrial diamonds 


10. 


Copper* 




30. 


Iron and steel* 


11. 


Brass* 




31. 


Magnesium 


12. 


Bronze* 




32. 


Manila fiber 


13. 


Nickel* 




33. 


Manganese 


14. 


Methylamine 




34. 


Mercury 


15. 


Nitrates 




35. 


Hides 


16. 


Platinum 









•Affidavits for exportation since Jan. 1, 1935. 
tAlso for the Union of South Africa. New Zealand, and 
Australia. 

DEATH OF WILLIAM GIBBS McADOO 

I Released to the press February I J 

The Secretary of State issued the following 
statement on February 1 : 

"I am greatly distressed to learn of the pass- 
ing of Senator McAdoo. We were warm per- 
sonal friends for over a period of 30 years. His 
long record of splendid, unstinted, and loyal 
public service is ample testimony of the loss 
sustained by the country in his death. He was 
one of the outstanding leaders of the times and 
will be grievously missed by countless friends 
and by the general public throughout the Na- 
tion and abroad." 



FEBRUARY 1, 1941 

PASSPORT STATISTICS 

[Released to the press January 30] 

The following information concerning per- 
sons procuring passports or renewals has been 
compiled from passport and renewal applica- 
tions received by the Department of State dur- 
ing the calendar year ending December 31, 
1940: 

OCCUPATION 



Accountant- 
Actor 

Architect 

Artist 



Banker, broker 

Buyer, exporter, importer 

Clerk, secretary 1, 

Contractor 

Doctor 

Draftsman 

Druggist 

Engineer 1, 

Executive li 

Farmer, rancher 

Florist 

Housewife 3, 

Interior decorator 

Laborer (common) 

Laborer (skilled) 

Lawyer 

Librarian 

Manufacturer 

Merchant 

Miscellaneous 

Missionary 

Musician 

None L 

Nurse 

Religious 

Restaurateur 

Retired 

Salesman 1, 

Scientist 

Servant 

Student 2, 

Teacher 1, 

Technician 

Tradesman 

Writer 



385 
223 

69 
159 
408 
404 
840 

S3 
459 

63 

19 
496 
467 
361 

26 
194 

14 
516 
119 
413 

59 
269 
406 
695 
775 
172 
809 
400 
506 

78 
385 
018 
353 
210 
270 
408 
197 

87 
438 



Total 26, 253 

destination 
Africa 396 

Australia and New Zealand 570 

Bermuda 1, 945 

290218—41 2 



129 

Canada and Newfoundland 728 

Eastern Europe 48 

Far East 5,291 

Latin America 15, 508 

Near East 607 

Western Europe 1, 528 

OBJECT OF TRAVEL 

Commerce 3, 628 

Education 601 

Employment 3, 439 

Family affairs 706 

Health 185 

Personal business 5, 414 

Pleasure 10, 380 

Profession 446 

Religion 1, 352 

Science 102 

APPLICANT 

Native 22, 963 

Naturalized 3, 290 

Male 16, 661 

Female 9, 592 

ADDITIONAL PERSONS INCLUDED IN PASSPORTS 

Adults 2,325 

Minors 2,712 

PREVIOUS PASSPORTS 

Number of applicants having been previously 

issued American passports 8, S82 

DISTRIBUTION BY STATES 

Alabama 107 

Alaska 17 

Arizona 239 

Arkansas 77 

California 5, 330 

Colorado 197 

Connecticut 517 

Delaware 79 

District of Columbia 333 

Florida 554 

Georgia 151 

Idaho 56 

Illinois 1, 364 

Indiana 265 

Iowa 160 

Kansas 126 

Kentucky 95 

Louisiana 407 

Maine 113 

Maryland 297 

Massachusetts r— 1, 200 

Michigan 467 

Minnesota _-, 265 

Mississippi , 85 

Missouri 358 

Montana 87 



130 

Nebraska 72 

Nevada 38 

New Hampshire 61 

New Jersey 1,302 

New Mexico 81 

New York City 4, 262 

New York State 2,148 

North Carolina 156 

North Dakota 22 

Ohio 856 

Oklahoma 280 

Oregon , 208 

Pennsylvania 1, 216 

Rhode Island 124 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

South Carolina 68 

South Dakota 34 

Tennessee - 118 

Texas 1, 067 

Utah 144 

Vermont 30 

Virginia . 251 

Washington 462 

West Virginia 60 

Wisconsin 216 

Wyoming 31 

Total 26, 253 

" Exclusive of New York City. 




DISTINGUISHED VISITORS FROM CHILE AND PERU 



Three well-known educators from Chile and 
the Director of the Museums of Peru, who have 
heen invited to visit the United States by the 
Department of State, arrived in Washington 
on January 29 and will remain in this city 
until February 4. Two of the Chilean visitors 
are authorities on fine arts. Sen or Domingo 
Santa Cruz is in charge of artistic education 
in Chile and is Dean of the School of Fine 
Arts of the University of Chile. He is accom- 
panied by Sehor Carlos Humeres, who is the 
Director of the School of Fine Arts, and by 
Senor Eugenio Pereira Salas, whose book on 
the history of music in Chile has just been pub- 
lished by the press of the University of Chile. 
Senora de Pereira is also a member of the 
party; she is a professor in the Conservatory 
of Music and a concert singer who has given 
special study to songs by Chilean composers. 

During their stay in Washington the visitors 
have been in touch with persons and organiza- 
tions in which they are interested, including 
the Smithsonian Institution, the Library of 
Congress, the American Council of Learned 
Societies, and the American Association of 
Museums. Various affairs in their honor have 
been arranged, including a small luncheon at 
the Cosmos Club on January 31, and a recep- 
tion at the Pan American Room of the May- 



flower Hotel on Sunday afternoon, February 2. 

A luncheon in honor of Sehor Luis Valcarcel, 
the Director of the Museums of Peru, will be 
held at the Cosmos Club on February 3, at- 
tended by representatives of the Peruvian 
Embassy, by the Director of the Pan American 
Union, and by representatives of other artistic 
organizations in Washington. Dr. Valcarcel 
plans to spend a week or more in Washington 
in consultation with various institutions and 
to then visit a number of museums and uni- 
versities in the United States. In addition to 
being Director of Museums, Dr. Valcarcel is 
also President of the Writers' Association of 
Peru and is a professor at San Marcos 
University, Lima. 

Senor Valcarcel and Senor Pereira were 
guests of honor at the annual dinner of the 
American Council of Learned Societies held on 
January 31 at the Washington Hotel. They 
were introduced by the chairman, and each de- 
livered a brief address. On the same evening 
the other members of the Chilean party were 
guests at a concert of chamber music in the 
Library of Congress. 

The Chilean Embassy entertained in honor of 
the Chilean visitors and a group of 22 Chilean 
students attending a special winter school at 
Columbia University at a reception on Febru- 



FEBRUARY 1, 1941 



131 



ary 1. The Chilean group will proceed to 
Philadelphia on the afternoon of February 3, 
■where they will be guests of honor at various 
musical and artistic events, including the con- 
cert of the Philadelphia Orchestra Association 
on Monday evening, February 3. On Febru- 
ary 5 they will proceed to New York for a stay 
of several weeks, to visit museums, etc. 

Seiior Pereira plans to return to Washing- 
ton during the month of March to carry out 
special research in the Library of Congress in 
connection with various historical studies in 
which he is engaged. He is preparing, for pub- 
lication, an exhaustive study of United States 
relations with Chile. 

The National Gallery of Art has expressed 
its intention of inviting Sefior Santa Cruz and 
Seiior Humeres to attend its formal opening 
on March 17. 

VISIT OF CHILEAN NEWSPAPEEMEN 
TO THE UNITED STATES 

[Released to the press January 29] 

Seven American newspapers have each in- 
vited a representative of a Chilean newspaper 
to visit this country and join its staff for a 
period of about two months. This plan has 
been worked out as a result of the initiative- 
of the Honorable Claude G. Bowers, American 
Ambassador to Chile, by direct negotiation 
with the American newspapers concerned, and 
with the collaboration of Dean Carl Ackerman, 
of the School of Journalism of Columbia Uni- 
versity, and Mr. J. Stanton Robbins, Chief of 
the Educational Travel Department of the 
Grace Line. 

The following list shows the persons selected, 
the Chilean newspaper represented (all in San- 
tiago except where otherwise specified), and 
the host newspaper in the United States : 



Chilean newspaper 
El Diario Ilustrado 
El Impartial 
El Mercurio 
El Mercurio 

(Valparaiso) 
La Bora 
La Nation 
La Union 

(Valparaiso) 



Individual 
Manuel Vega 
Rafael Valdivieso 
Carlos Eastman 
Francisco le Dantec 

Joaquin Muirhead 
Guillermo Valenzuela 
Luis Ignaeio Silva 



American newspaper 
Washington Star 
Detroit News 
New York Times 
Philadelphia Bulletin 
Washington Post 
Los Angeles Times 
Boston Qlobe 

It is expected that the journalists will reach 
New York on February 10 and sail for Chile 
on April 11. With the exception of brief visits 
to Washington and New York, each visiting 
newspaperman will be attached to the Ameri- 
can newspaper to which he has been assigned. 

The leading newspapers of Chile will be 
represented in this undertaking. El Diario 
Ilustrado is one of the leading conservative 
newspapers of Santiago. El Impartial is the 
oldest afternoon newspaper, of independent but 
generally conservative attitude. The so-called 
dean of the Chilean press, El MercuHo, will 
have a representative from both its Santiago 
and Valparaiso staffs. La Hora is an important 
morning daily, which reflects the viewpoint of 
the radical party, the titular head of which is 
the Chief Executive of Chile, His Excellency 
Don Pedro Aguirre Cerda. La Nation is an in- 
dependent morning newspaper sympathetic to 
the Aguirre Cerda administration. La Union 
is one of the leading newspapers of Valparaiso. 



TRAVEL GRANT TO AMERICAN 
EDUCATOR 

Dr. Elmer L. Sevringhaus, President of the 
Association for the Study of Internal Secre- 
tions, of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, 
Wisconsin, will receive a Government travel 
grant through the Department of State in order 
to enable him to visit Argentina and Uruguay 
and lecture before professional groups. The 
grant is being made under the provisions of the 
Second Deficiency Appropriation Act of 1940, 
which provided funds for the exchange of dis- 
tinguished cultural, professional, and artistic 
leaders between the United States and the other 
American republics. 



132 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Dr. Sevringhaus, the first American citizen to 
receive one of these travel grants, will depart 
from Miami by plane on February 20 and ar- 
rive in Buenos Aires on February 24, going by 
way of Santiago, Chile. He will spend the 
period February 26 to March 12 in Montevideo, 
where he will deliver a series of lectures and 
will also be able to attend the Second Pan Ameri- 
can Congress of Endocrinology. From March 
13 to 18, inclusive, he will give a series of lec- 
tures in Buenos Aires, returning thereafter by 
plane to the United States, where he will arrive 
about March 23 at Miami. 

Dr. Sevringhaus' lectures will serve to ac- 
quaint his professional colleagues in Buenos 
Aires and Montevideo with the latest advances 
in the study of endocrinology in the United 
States and the contributions of scientists in this 
country to the body of knowledge on this im- 
portant subject. At the same time, he will be 
able to inform himself at first-hand of the latest 
developments in the study of endocrinology in 
the countries he visits. 



The following is a biographical statement re- 
garding Dr. Sevringhaus : 

Born in New Albany, Indiana, February 9, 
1894 ; University of Wisconsin, A.B. 1916, A.M. 
1918 ; Harvard University, M.D. 1921 ; Assist- 
ant in Organic Chemistry and Physiological 
Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, 1916-19; 
Assistant Professor, 1921-25; Associate Profes- 
sor, 1925-27; Professor of Medicine, 1927—; 
Chemist, Wisconsin General Hospital, 1924-35; 
Associate Physician, 1927 — ; Consultant, Wis- 
consin Psychiatrical Institute, 1924 — ; Mem- 
ber of the American Association for the Study 
of Internal Secretions (President) ; American 
Society of Biological Chemists; American Medi- 
cal Association ; Fellow of the American College 
of Physicians; American Society of Clinical In- 
vestigation; Central Society for Clinical Re- 
search; Interurban Clinical Club. His special 
fields of investigation are endocrinology and 
metabolism. 



FISHERY MISSION TO PERU 



[Released to the press January 27] 

Bound for Callao, Peru, the 80-foot purse- 
seiner Pacific Queen cleared San Pedro harbor, 
California, the night of January 25. Char- 
tered by the Fish and Wildlife Service, United 
States Department of the Interior, in behalf of 
the Peruvian Government, the vessel carries 
Milton J. Lobell, biologist and third member of 
a scientific mission detailed by the President to 
assist the Peruvian Government in conducting 
a survey of its fishery resources. 

Cooperation of the Service experts was ef- 
fected at the request of the Peruvian Govern- 
ment, and, pursuant to arrangements therewith, 
the survey group will be composed of R. H. 
Fiedler, Chief, Division of Fishery Industries, 
who will serve as chief of the mission; N. D. 
Jarvis, Associate Technologist, also of the 
Fishery Industries Division, in charge of prac- 
tical fishery-preservation demonstrations; and 
Milton J. Lobell, Biologist, recently returned 
from the Byrd Antarctic Expedition and trans- 



ferred temporarily from the Division of Fishery 
Biology to head the mission's study of fishing 
methods and various phases of fishery biology. 

Mr. Fiedler and Mr. Jarvis sailed from New 
York for Peru on January 3. 3 Mr. Fiedler's 
detail to Peru will cover about two months, 
while those of Messrs. Jarvis and Lobell will be 
extended for a period of approximately four 
months. 

Upon their arrival in Callao, the three United 
States scientists, accompanied by six Peruvian 
experts, will immediately begin the survey. 
Their work will consist of practical demonstra- 
tions in fish-capturing methods; collection of 
specimens; and the expert exploration of the 
variance in abundance, life habits and history, 
and migration of fishes along the 1,400-mile 
coast of Peru. 

Mr. Fiedler will study and make recommen- 
dations in all phases of fishery production, 



3 See the Bulletin of January 4, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 
p. 13. 



FEBRUARY 1, 19 41 



133 



marketing, distribution, financing, and ware- 
housing methods. 

According to Mr. Fiedler, "these studies and 
researches will not be exhaustive and conclusive, 
but will be for the purpose of outlining the 
fields in which subsequent investigation, re- 
search, and experimentation should be directed. 

"The three of us will conduct a general study 
to evaluate the present nature, extent, and mag- 
nitude of the fisheries and fishing industries of 
Peru. We will utilize new types of fishing 
gear; demonstrate and conduct research in the 
packing of fishery products; and, after study 
of data collected during the survey, will make 
recommendations for improvement of the 
Peruvian fisheries, and outline a research pro- 
gram in fisheries to be conducted by the 
Peruvian Government. This latter envisages 
the development of a plan of administra- 
tive organization for a Peruvian Bureau of 
Fisheries." 

With these experts went complete machinery 
and equipment, for the work; also a large, 
modern, portable cold-storage cabinet for 
holding fish in retail stores; together with 
newest-type cartons, wrappers, and shipping 
containers for fishery products. The boat 
carried, in addition, for donation to the Peru- 
vian Government, a compact library of refer- 
ence publications on the fisheries of the North 
American Continent, which volumes will form 
the nucleus of a library for the new Bureau 
of Fisheries to be established in Peru. 

For carrying out the actual fishing work, 
the 105-ton, 240-HP Diesel-motored vessel, the 
Pacific Queen, built at Tacoma, Washington, 
in 1939, has been chartered for the duration of 
the survey. Outfitted at San Francisco, the 
80-foot, refrigerated, purse-seiner Pacific 
Queen is capable of fishing with every gear — 
purse seine, gill net, otter trawl, harpoon, troll- 
and hand-lines ; is equipped with crab and lob- 
ster pots, and complete gear for tonging and 
dredging. In addition, specialized marine 
scientific equipment consists of plankton tow 



nets, bottom-sampling dredges and grabs, and 
Nansen-Knudsen bottles for water sampling, 
pickling vats, fathometer, meterwheel, and the 
newest-type Herrington current meter. 

Mr. Lobell, biologist of the survey, will ac- 
company the Pacific Queen from Seattle to 
Callao, which will be the working headquarters 
of the Service scientists while in Peru. Carl 
M. Hansen, who sailed with Raoul Amundsen 
on the Norwegian North-Polar Expedition 
(1918-25) and has fished all waters south to 
the equator, will captain the vessel. Max 
Odenwahl, appointed chief engineer, is expert 
in operation of refrigerated vessels, of which 
the Pacific Queen represents the latest in con- 
struction. Six practical fishermen, according 
to Mr. Lobell, have been selected "because of 
their detailed and intimate knowledge of all 
types of gear as well as their general char- 
acter". These eight, in addition to a cook, 
comprise the vessel's crew. It is probable that 
other Peruvian vessels will accompany the 
expedition. 

Dr. Eduardo Garland, Counselor of the Pe- 
ruvian Embassy here, has been designated by 
his Government to act as liaison officer in 
Washington. He concluded final arrange- 
ments and details prior to the departure of 
the mission to Peru. 

In addition, the Peruvian Government has 
designated a committee in Peru, having official 
status, which will constitute a liaison agency 
for the purpose of enabling the members of 
the mission, while in South America, to main- 
tain contact with the appropriate officials of 
the Peruvian Government, and to arrange for 
transportation within the country and other 
details. The membership of this committee 
includes, among others, at least six Peruvian 
technicians — two qualified in economics, two in 
chemistry and engineering, and two in biology. 
These men will accompany the Service's inves- 
tigators during the survey and will probably 
have charge of the organization that will carry 
out the recommendations of the mission after 
it departs from Peru, 



134 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



MESSAGE FROM REGIONAL CONFER- 
ENCE OF THE RIVER PLATE RE- 
PUBLICS 

[Released to the press February 1] 

The following message, in translation, has 
been received by the President from His Ex- 
cellency Alberto Guani, Foreign Minister of 
Uruguay, who is serving as President of the 
Regional Conference of the River Plate 
Republics : 

"Montevideo, January 28, 1941. 
"Fully appreciating the presence of the dip- 
lomatic representative of the United States of 
America and recalling the generous partici- 
pation of your Government in the Chaco Peace 
Conference, I have the honor on behalf of the 
delegations attending the Regional Conference 
of the Countries of the River Plate to extend 
to Your Excellency the most sincere expression 
of friendship toward the Government and peo- 
ple of the United States of America together 
with best wishes for the personal well-being of 
His Excellency the President and the pros- 
perity of our sister nation. 

Alberto Guani" 

The President has transmitted the following 
reply : 

"January 31, 1941. 

"I have received with great pleasure your 
kind telegram of January 28 expressing your 
friendly appreciation of the presence of the 
representative of this country at the conference 



of the five great republics at present assembled 
in Montevideo. 

"Please convey to the assembled delegates 
my warm appreciation for their expression of 
friendship and my hope that their deliberations 
will mark another step toward further cement- 
ing relations among the countries of this 
Hemisphere. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt" 



Canada 



DEATH OF THE UNDER SECRETARY 
OF STATE FOR EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 

[Released to the press January 28] 

The following message was sent to the Prime 
Minister of Canada, W. L. Mackenzie King, 
by the Secretary of State upon the death of 
Dr. O. D. Skelton, Under Secretary of State 
for External Affairs of Canada : 

"January 28, 1941. 
"It is with deep sorrow that I have received 
the news of the death of Dr. Skelton. Canada 
has lost a splendid public servant and the 
United States a good friend who will be par- 
ticularly remembered in this country for his 
contributions toward a closer understanding 
between the American and Canadian peoples. 
Cordell Hull" 



Europe 



PRESENTATION OP LETTERS OF CREDENCE BY THE BRITISH 

AMBASSADOR 



[Released to the press January 30] 

The following remarks were made by the 
newly appointed Ambassador of Great Britain, 
the Eight Honorable the Viscount Halifax, 
K.G., upon the occasion of the presentation of 
his letters of credence, January 24, 1941 : 

Mr. President: 

In handing you today the Royal letter ac- 
crediting me as His Majesty's Ambassador to 
the United States, I am instructed by the King, 
my August Sovereign and Master, to convey to 
you his friendly greetings and to express his 
earnest hope for the happiness and prosperity 
of the United States. 

The sudden death of my distinguished pred- 
ecessor, the Marquess of Lothian, deprived 
Great Britain of a representative who knew 
and loved the United States of America and 
who had laboured unceasingly to draw still 
more close the ties which unite our two coun- 
tries. His Majesty's Government are gratified 
to know that his labours were not unfruitful. 

In these heroic and tragic days, when it is 
the privilege of my country to be the champion 
against brutal wrong-doing of all that the 
American and British Nations hold most dear, 
my Sovereign has deemed it expedient to en- 
trust to me, as a member of his war cabinet, 
the task which the late Ambassador had so 
worthily discharged. 

Following his example, and in accordance 
with my instructions, I shall do all in my power 
to maintain and strengthen the close relations 
which now for many years have so happily 
existed between Great Britain and the United 
States. I know that in this important task I 
shall receive your support, Mr. President, and 
that of your administration. 

I take up my office at a time when the help 
which the people of the United States are 
giving to the people of Great Britain assumes 
an ever-increasing importance. That assist- 



ance has already been invaluable, and its con- 
tinuance as your nation speedily develops its 
unrivaled industrial strength, will assuredly 
secure the triumph of the cause on which you, 
no less than we, are resolved. 

In conclusion I would say how deeply I ap- 
preciate the honour of representing His Maj- 
esty in the United States. I have been a vis- 
itor here before, and I welcome the opportunity 
thus afforded to me of acquiring a more inti- 
mate knowledge of this great people whose 
qualities and achievements I have already 
learnt to respect. 

The President's reply to the remarks of the 
Viscount Halifax follows: 

Mr. Ambassador : 

I am delighted, Mr. Ambassador, to welcome 
you to Washington and to receive from your 
hands the letters which accredit you, a member 
of the British war cabinet, as His Britannic 
Majesty's Ambassador Extraordinary and 
Plenipotentiary to the United States. 

I greatly appreciate the friendly personal 
greeting and the expression of good wishes for 
the United States which you have just con- 
veyed to me from His Britannic Majesty, and 
I take this occasion to reaffirm the warm 
friendly feeling of myself and of the American 
people for the Government and people of Great 
Britain and of the whole British Common- 
wealth of Nations. 

The tragic and untimely death of your dis- 
tinguished predecessor, Lord Lothian, came as 
a profound shock to all of us who had been 
privileged to know him. He had deeply im- 
pressed us all with his sincere friendship for 
the United States and with his untiring efforts 
toward closer understanding between English- 
speaking peoples. 

Great Britain and the United States have 
long been linked by intimate bonds of blood 

135 



136 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



and friendship. I feel confident, Mr. Ambas- 
sador, that your presence in the United States 
will increasingly strengthen these strong ties 
between our two countries. 

Let me assure you that in all your work 
here you may always count upon my full co- 
operation and the cooperation of the various 



agencies of this Government. I want to assure 
you further of our firm determination to con- 
tinue on an ever-increasing scale our assistance 
to Great Britain and to make available muni- 
tions and supplies now flowing from the rap- 
idly expanding industrial facilities of the 
United States. 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOE RELIEF IN BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 



[Released to the press January 31] 

The following tabulation shows contribu- 
tions collected and disbursed during the period 
September 6, 1039, through December 31, 1940, 
as shown in the reports submitted by persons 
and organizations registered with the Secretary 
of State for the solicitation and collection of 
contributions to be used for relief in belliger- 
ent countries, in conformity with the regula- 
tions issued pursuant to section 8 of the act of 
November 4, 1939, as made effective by the 
President's proclamation of the same date. 

This tabulation has reference only to con- 
tributions solicited and collected for relief in 
belligerent countries (France; Germany; Po- 
land; the United Kingdom, India, Australia, 
Canada, New Zealand, and the Union of South 
Africa ; Norway ; Belgium ; Luxemburg ; the 
Netherlands; Italy; and Greece) or for the re- 



lief of refugees driven out of these countries 
by the present war. The statistics set forth 
in the tabulation do not include information re- 
garding relief activities which a number of or- 
ganizations registered with the Secretary of 
State may be carrying on in non-belligerent 
countries, but for which registration is not re- 
quired under the Neutrality Act of 1939. 

The American National Bed Cross is required 
by law to submit to the Secretary of War for 
audit "a full, complete, and itemized report of 
receipts and expenditures of whatever kind". 
In order to avoid an unnecessary duplication of 
work, this organization is not required to con- 
form to the provisions of the regulations gov- 
erning the solicitation and collection of con- 
tributions for relief in belligerent countries, 
and the tabulation does not, therefore, include 
information in regard to its activities. 



Contributions foe Relief in Belligerent Countries 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



Action Democrata Espafiola, San Francisco, Calif., 
Mar. 29, 1940.° France 

The Allied Civilian War Relief Society, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Dec. 27, 1940. Great Britain 

Allied Relief Ball, Inc., New York, N. Y„ Apr. 4, 1940. 
Great Britain and France 

American Aid for German War Prisoners, Buffalo, N. Y„ 
Sept. 27, 1940. Canada 

American Association for Assistance to French Artists, 
Inc., New York, N. Y., Jan. 3, 1940. France 

American Association of University Women, Washing- 
ton, D. C, May 23, 1940. France, Great Britain, 
Sweden, Palestine, Canada, and Switzerland.. 

American Auxiliary Committee de I'Union des Femmes 
de France, New York, N. Y., Nov. 8, 1939. France, 
Great Britain, and Germany 

American Board of Missions to the Jews, Inc., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., July 5, 1940. France, Belgium, and Ger- 
many 



$312. 19 

105. 98 

52, 696. 35 

3,433.53 

14,501.44 

14, 862. 73 



$125.00 

None 

39, 964. 39 

2,005.73 

9, 216. 03 

11,327.50 



$57. 01 

None 

12,731.96 

203. 79 

3, 512. 14 

604.96 



$130. 18 

105. 98 

None 

1, 224. 01 

1,773.27 

2, 930. 27 



None 
None 
None 
$70.00 
1, 605. 15 

None 



None 
None 
None 
$330.00 
None 

None 



» The registration of this organization was revoked on Dec. 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 



FEBRUARY 1, 1941 

Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



137 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



American Committee for Christian Refugees, Inc., New 

- York, N. Y., Sept. 26, 1930. Germany and France 

American Committee for the German Relief Fund, Inc., 
New York, N. Y., Mar. 27, 1940. Germany, Poland, 
Canada, Dutch Guiana, British West Indies, and 
Jamaica - 

American Committee for the Polish Ambulance Fund. 
Chicago, 111., Feb. 12, 1940. France, Poland, and 
England.. 

American Committee for the Syrian Orphanage in 
Jerusalem, Woodside, Long Island, N. Y., Dec. 3, 1940. 
Palestine, Germany, and British East Africa. 

American Dental Ambulance Committee, New York, 
N. Y., Mar. 12,1940. United Kingdom 

American Employment for General Relief, Inc., New 
York, N. Y., May 1, 1940. England, France, Norway, 
Poland, Belgium, Luxemburg, and the Netherlands-. 

American Federation for Polish Jews, Inc., New York, 
N. Y„ Sept. 14, 1939. Poland - -- 

American Field Hospital Corps, New York, N. Y., Dec. 
12, 1939. France, Belgium, Holland, and England... 

American Field Service, New York, N. Y., Sept. 27, 

1939. France, Great Britain, British East Africa, 
Greece, and French African Colonies- 

American and French Students' Correspondence Ex- 
change, New York, N. Y., Dec. 20, 1939. France and 
England... 

American-French War Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 14, 1939. France and Great Britain.. 

American Friends of Britain, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Aug. 30, 1940. Great Britain. 

American Friends of Czechoslovakia, New York, N. Y., 
Nov. 2, 1939. Great Britain, France, and Bohemia- 
Moravia - 

American Friends of the Daily Sketch War Relief Fund, 
New York, N. Y., Dec. 1, 1939. Great Britain.. 

American Friends of France, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 21, 1939. France, Germany, and England. 

American Friends ofaJewish Palestine, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., May 9, 1940. Palestine, Germany, Poland, 
France, and the United Kingdom 

American Friends Service Committee, Philadelphia, 
Pa., Nov. 9, 1939. United Kingdom, Poland, Ger- 
many, France, Norway, Belgium, the Netherlands, 
Italy, and Portugal 

The American Fund for Breton Relief, New York, N. Y„ 
Oct. 31, 1939. France and England.. 

American Fund for French Wounded, Inc., Boston, 
Mass., Jan. 3, 1940. France and England 1 

American-German Aid Society, Los Angeles, Calif., 
Nov. 15, 1939. Germany and Canada 

The American Hospital in Britain, Ltd., New York, 
N. Y., July 24, 1940. Great Britain 

The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, 
Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 29, 1939. United King- 
dom, Poland, Germany, France, Norway, Belgium, 
Luxemburg, and the Netherlands... 

American McAll Association, New York, N. Y., Jan. 
3, 1940. England - 

American-Polish National Council, Chicago, 111., Aug. 
14, 1940. Poland -- -- 

The American School Committee for Aid to Greece, Inc., 
Princeton, N. J., Dec. 16, 1940. Greece 

American War Godmothers, Pittsburgh, Pa., Mar. 6, 

1940. France.. - 



None 
3, 249. 52 

3, 200. 00 

6, 244. 30 

228, 545. 49 

334, 947. 13 

8, 509. 01 
50, 513. 63 
8, 492. 33 

31,649.08 

3, 453. 87 
338,401.98 

4, 782. 84 

117,235.32 

5, 266. 05 
18, 606. 45 

4, 663. 28 
5, 355. 00 

2, 955, 505. 88 
1,915.12 
4,133.47 
14, 642. 62 
1,080.22 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



None 
3,133.02 

None 

5,020.75 

185,621.42 

292, 208. 43 

4, 238. 42 
30, 267. 33 
4, 450. 00 

25, 286. 42 

2, 357. 00 

182, 360. 49 

1,927.02 

107,861.17 

3, 786. 50 

13, 206. 47 

3, 425. 00 

None 

2, 073, 193. 83 

1,615.77 

2, 932. 40 

12,519.03 

180.07 



Funds spent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



None 
101.50 

3. 082. 69 

376. 14 

24, 608. 39 

16,975.92 

1,411.13 
9, 499. 51 
2, 890. 80 

5, 592. 46 

None 

34, 272, 17 

2, 855. 82 

9, 073. 08 
368.09 
796.83 

1, 092. 74 
None 

282, 312. 05 
None 
374.28 
195. 12 



Unexpended 
balance a! of 

Dec. 31, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 

clia ril and 

still on hand 



None 
15. 00 

117.31 

847. 41 

18,315.68 

25, 762. 78 

2, 859. 46 
10, 746. 79 
1,151.53 

770. 20 

1, 096. 87 

121,769.32 

None 



None 
299.35 
826.79 
1, 928. 47 
630. 57 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



None 
None 

None 
7,651.43 
2, 694. 20 

None 

None 

58, 234. 60 

None 

19, 240. 00 

None 

19,904.96 

None 



301.07 


14,612.17 


1,111.46 


4,911.60 


4, 603. 15 


13, 719. 24 


146. 54 


None 


5, 355. 00 


None 



61.00 
2, 800. 00 
None 
None 
None 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



290218—41- 



-3 



138 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contkibutions fob Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Funds spent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 


American Women's Ilospitals, New York, N. Y., Sept. 


$5, 895. 34 
3, 613. 22 
23, 565. 36 
10, 920. 68 
1,422.69 
23, 867. 77 
10, 827. 14 
11,028.97 
2, 829. 27 

10, 349. 67 
273.50 
241.91 

2, 214. 90 

14, 606. 07 

1, 195. 91 
2, 213. 13 
27, 082. 98 

5, 391. 48 
2,009.06 
5, 481. 17 
13, 390. 42 

394, 340. 50 

6, 564. 83 

837, 816. 37 

2, 661. 23 

51,702.12 


$5, 792. 72 
1,423.70 

14, 200. 56 

6, 500. 00 

614.38 

14, 772. 83 
7,000.00 

8, 206. 53 
2, 600. 00 

9, 266. 45 
225.00 

204. 30 

1,156.10 
10, 143. 98 

1,042.00 

976. 00 

8,243.00 

3, 005. 46 

51.38 

2, 846. 74 

9, 505. 40 

266, 324. 31 

5, 306. 30 

293,011.84 

1, 392. 70 

26, 189. 49 


$102. 62 
664. 33 
8, 026. 92 
324.93 
391. 89 
950.37 
288.45 
746. 98 
7.50 

453. 10 

None 

12.85 

85.67 
752. 06 

97.10 

207.36 

11,707.67 

1, 962. 66 

2.50 

1, 008. 43 

3, 867. 89 

62.73 

738. 01 

89, 374. 54 

244.88 

2, 178. 59 


None 
$1, 525. 19 
1,337.88 
4, 095. 75 
416.42 
8, 144. 57 
3, 538. 69 

2, 075. 46 
221. 77 

630. 12 

4S. 50 
24.76 

973. 13 

3, 710. 03 

56.76 
1,030.77 
7, 132. 41 

423. 36 

1, 955. 18 

1, 626. 00 

17.13 

127, 953. 46 

520.52 

455, 429. 99 

1,023.65 

23, 334. 04 


$50.00 

1, 184 10 

25, 283. 03 

650.00 

296.50 

3, 051. 56 

None 

None 

None 

1,430.00 

None 

None 

725.00 
1,565.88 

30.00 

None 

13, 468. 00 

33, 182. 50 
227.50 
None 
None 

None 

None 
None 
None 

6, 076. 00 




American Women's Unit for War Relief, Inc., New York, 


$207. 40 


American Women's Voluntary Services, Inc., New York, 




Les Amis de la France a Puerto Rico, San Juan, P. R., 




Les Amities Feininines de la France, New York, N. Y., 




Les Anciens Combattants Francais de la Grande Guerre, 

San Francisco, Calif., Oct. 26, 1939. France 

Anthracite Relief Committee, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Sept. 


320.00 


Anzac War Relief Fund, New York, N. Y., May 23, 




Associated Polish Societies Relief Committee of Web- 
ster, Mass., Webster, Mass., Sept. 21, 1939. Poland .. 

Associated Polish Societies' Relief Committee of Wor- 
cester, Mass., Worcester, Mass., Sept. 14, 1939. 


None 


Association of Former Juniors in France of Smith Col- 
lege, New York, N. Y., Dec. IS, 1939. France. -- 

Association of Former Russian Naval Officers in Arner- 


None 


Association of Joint Polish-American Societies of Chelsea, 

Mass., Chelsea, Mass., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland 

L'Atelier, San Francisco, Calif., Jan. 29, 1940. France.. 
Mrs. Mark Baldwin, New York, N. Y., Mar. 4, 1940. 


None 
847.00 


Basque Delegation in the United States of America, 




Belgian Relief Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y., June 14, 




Belgian Relief of Southern California, Los Angeles, 
Calif., May 27, 1940. Belgium, France, and Great 




Belgian War Relief Fund, Manila, P. I., June 7, 1940.' 




The Benedict Bureau Unit, Inc., New York, N. Y., 




Bethel Mission of Eastern Europe, Minneapolis, Minn., 




Bishops' Committee for Polish Relief, Washington, 
D. C, Dec. 19, 1939. Poland, England, France, 
Switzerland, Hungary, Rumania, Italy, and Portugal.. 

Board of National Missions of the Presbyterian Church 
in the United States of America, New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 26, 1939. Great Britain, France, and Germany... 

British-American Ambulance Corps, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., June 11, 1940. Greece, England, and France 

British-American Comfort League, Quincy, Mass., 


None 

None 
None 
None 


British-American War Relief Association, Seattle, 
Wash., Nov. 17, 1939. United Kingdom and allied 


346. 55 



> The registration of this organisation was revoked on Dee. 31, 1940, at the request, of the registrant. 
■ No report for the month of December has been received from this organization. 



FEBRUARY 1, 1941 

Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries— Continued 



139 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



British Sailors' Book and Relief Society, New York, 
N. Y., May 2, 1940. Bermuda, Canada, and the 
British West Indies 

British War Relief Association of Northern California, 
San Francisco, Calif., Oct. 20, 1939. Great Britain 
and France 

The British War Relief Association of the Philippines, 
Manila, P. I., Apr. 11, 1940." All belligerent countries. 

The British War Relief Association of Southern Cali- 
fornia, Los Angeles, Calif., Dec. 8, 1939. Great Britain 
and Greece.-. 

British War Relief Fund, Dayton, Ohio, Sept. 12, 1940. 
Great Britain 

The British War Relief Society, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Dec. 4, 1939. (Combined with the Allied Relief Fund, 
Inc., Dec. 1, 1940.) United Kingdom, Canada, 
France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Norway, Kenya, 
and Newfoundland- 

Bundles for Britain, New York, N. Y., Dec. 28, 1939. 
Great Britain and Dominions 

Caledonian Club of Idaho, Boise, Idaho, Jan. 25, 1940. 
Scotland _.. . - 

California Denmark Fund, San Francisco, Calif., Nov. 
20, 1940. Denmark 

Canadian Women's Club of New York City, Inc., New 
York, N. Y., Oct. 23, 1940. Great Britain, Canada, 
and Newfoundland - 

Catholic Medical Mission Board, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Jan. 17, 1940. India, Australia, Canada, New Zea- 
land, and the Union of South Africa 

The Catholic Student War Relief of Pax Romana, 
Washington, D. O., Dec. 13, 1939. Poland, France, 
Germany, and Great Britain. 

Central Bureau for the Relief of the Evangelical 
Churches of Europe, New York, N. Y., May 14, 1940. 
All belligerent countries 

Central Committee Knesseth Israel, New York, N. Y., 
Oct. 27, 1939. Palestine 

Central Committee for Polish Relief, Toledo, Ohio, 
Feb. 29, 1940. Poland... 

Central Council of Polish Organizations, New Castle, 
Pa., Nov. 7, 1939. France, Poland, and England 

Centrala, Passaic, N. J., Oct. 12, 1939."" Poland 

Cercle Francais de Seattle, Seattle, Wash., Nov. 2, 1939. 
France and Great Britain 

Chester (Delaware County, Pa.) Polish Relief Com- 
mittee, Chester, Pa., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland and 
France 

Commission for Polish Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 12, 1939.' Poland and England 

The Commission for Relief in Belgium, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., May 21, 1940. Belgium, Luxemburg, France, 
and England 

Committee for Aid to Children of Mobilized Men of the 
XX" Arrondissement of Paris, New York, N. Y., 
Jan. 15, 1940.<< France 



$3, 141. 22 


$125. 00 


125, 876. 68 


88, 445. 65 


78, 892. 88 


73, 769. 77 


323, 171. 33 


274, 220. 71 


318. 70 


309.50 



4,075,925.60 
631,947.40 



26, 595. 14 
39, 593. 72 



2, 871. 73 
1, 452. 72 



8,316.71 
541,111.46 



5, 365. 63 



2, 385, 732. 24 

200, 499. 16 

300.30 

None 

452. 65 



1, 014. 60 

11,764.75 

25, 731. 60 

500.00 

1, 995. 80 
1, 436. 61 

658.28 

6, 310. 16 

471,563.47 



5, 365. 63 



4, 131. 92 
1, 639. 51 



290, 063. 15 

148, 526. 29 

164. 57 

None 

238.77 



171.41 

4, 758. 83 

13, 862. 12 

226. 77 

45.10 
16.11 



694. 04 
56, 094. 80 



33,299.11 
3, 483. 60 

23, 727. 35 
None 

1, 400, 129. 91 

282,921.95 

12.77 

25.00 

971. 58 



252. 63 

10,081.66 
None 
132. 89 

830.83 

None 



1,312.51 
13, 453. 19 



None 



None 



61, 250. 36 
326.27 

96, 326. 36 
None 



463, 408. 75 

628, 230. 37 

None 

None 

524.11 



None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
1,900.00 

2, 775. 00 

1, 960. 00 
1, 500. 00 



None 



• No report for the month of December has been received from this organization. 

< The registration of this organization was revoked on Dec. 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 

« This registrant serves primarily as a clearing house for the distribution abroad of contributions received from other registrants; these receipts and 
disbursements are not included in the figures here given, since they are shown elsewhere in this tabulation following the names of the original collecting 
registrants. 



140 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Funds spent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con 

tributions 

in kind now 

on hand 


Committee of French-American Wives, New York, 
N. Y., Nov. 15, 1939. France and Oreat Britain 

Committee of Mercy, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 16, 
1939. France, Groat Britain, Norway, Belgium, the 


$23, 743. 05 

63, 362. 20 

4, 623. 03 
2,441.83 

197.00 

30, 618. 71 
2,120.30 
5, 189. 00 

72, 819. 28 
6, 008. 17 

6, 851. 36 

112, 864. 26 

275.00 

2, 699. 12 

8, 756. 30 

5,81126 

10, 204. 30 

None 

590.21 

796, 934. 16 

128, 669. 51 

636. 30 

346. 42 

3, 724. 09 

892. 76 

39,961.09 


$16, 309. 71 

43, 669. 84 

2,500.00 
2, 162. 72 

197. 00 

7, 402. 90 

1, 749. 19 

None 

53, 204. 21 
None 

5, 960. 70 

98, 301. 21 

None 

1,501.37 

7, 612. 93 

2, 890. 29 

8,086.09 

None 

531. 21 

643, 166. 72 

68, 075. 09 

None 

None 

2, 473. 96 

393. 62 

24, 632. 54 


$2, 826. 43 

7, 927. 85 

1,805.60 
265.71 

Nono 

257.12 

371.11 
None 

11, 298. 32 
2,961.85 

890.66 

4, 980. 10 
None 
244.71 
889.19 

418. 92 

506.53 

None 

None 

82,571.77 

27, 990. 16 

None 

222.77 

351. 10 

134.01 

6, 340. 49 


$4,606.91 

11,764.51 

217.43 
23.40 

None 

22, 958. 69 

None 

5, 189. 00 

8, 316. 75 
3, 044. 32 

None 

9, 582. 95 
275.00 
953.04 
254.18 

2, 504. 05 

1,611.68 

None 

69.00 

71, 195. 67 

32, 604. 26 

636.30 

123.65 

899.03 

365. 13 

8, 988. 06 


$4, 763. 69 

3, 965. 00 

None 
None 

None 

34, 300. 00 
None 
None 

11,783.93 

None 

None 

95, 188. 69 

None 

None 

3,200.00 

1, 199. 93 
864.70 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
31,110.23 
996.17 
236.10 


$592. 75 


Committee for Relief in Allied Countries, Washington, 
D. C, Feb. 2, 1940. France, Great Britain, Poland, 
Norway, Belgium, Luxemburg, and the Netherlands- 
Committee for the Relief for Poland, Seattle, Wash., 


None 


Committee Representing Polish Organizations and 
Polish People in Perry, N. Y., Perry, N. Y., Oct. 23, 




Czechoslovak Relief, Chicago, 111., July 25, 1940. 
Czechoslovakia, Great \ Britain and Dominions, 




District of Columbia Federation of Women's Clubs, 

Washington, D. C, Aug. 14. 1940. Great Britain-... 

Dodecanesian League of America, Inc., New York, 


None 


The Emergency Aid of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa., 
Oct. 13, 1939. Great Britain, France, Norway, Bel- 
gium, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, and Greece 

Emergency Relief Committee for Kolbuszowa, New 


None 


Emergency Rescue Committee, New York, N. Y., Aug. 
3, 1940. France, United Kingdom, Belgium, Norway, 




English-Speaking Union of the United States, New 
York, N. Y., Dec. 26, 1939. Great Britain, Canada. 


256. 15 


Erste Pinchover Kranken Unterstuzungs Verein, Inc., 

Brooklvn, N. Y., Apr. 22, 1940.' Poland 

The Fall River British War Relief Society, Fall River, 


None 


Federated Council of Polish Societies of Grand Rapids, 
Mich., Grand Rapids, Mich., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland. 

Federation of Franco-Belgian Clubs of Rhode Island, 
Woonsocket, R. I., Nov. 15, 1939. France and Eng- 


100.00 
64.25 


Federation of French Veterans of the Great War, Inc., 
New York, N. Y., Oct. 11, 1939.» France 

Federation of the Italian World War Veterans in the 
U. S. A., Inc., New York, N. Y., Dec. 19, 1940. Italy- 
Fellowship of Reconciliation, New York. N. Y., Jan. 20, 

1940. France, England, and possibly Germany 

Fortra, Inc., New York, N. Y., Mar. 7, 1940. Germany 


400.00 

None 
None 


Foster Parents' Plan for War Children, Inc., New York, 




Franco-American Federation, Salem, Mass., July 9, 




French Colonies War Relief Committee, New York, 




French Committee for Relief in France, Detroit, Mich., 




French Relief Association, Kansas City, Mo., Feb. 3, 


871.83 


French War Relief, Inc., Los Angeles, Calif., Nov. 16, 
1939. France — 


83.20 



I The registration of this organization was revoked on Nov. 30, 1940, at the request of registrant. 
» No complete report for the month of December has been received from this organization. 



FEBRUARY 1, 1941 

Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



141 



French War Relief Fund of Nevada, Reno, Nev., June 

21, 1940. France 

French War Relief Fund of the Philippines, Manila, 

P. I., May 1, 1940.' France 

French War Veterans, Los Angeles, Calif., Dec. 5, 1939. 

France 

Friends of Children, Inc., New York, N. Y., June 13, 

1940.' Great Britain, France, Belgium, and the Neth- 
erlands 

Friends of Dover, England, Fund, Dover, N. H., Oct. 

25, 1940.' England - 

The Friends of Israel Refugee Relief Committee, Inc., 

Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 23, 1939. Canada, France, and 

England. 

The Friends of Normandy, New York, N. Y., Dec. 18, 

1939. France 

Friends of Poland, Chicago, 111., Dec. 6, 1939. Poland.. 
Fund for the Relief of Men of Letters and Scientists of 

Russia, New York, N. Y., Apr. 29, 1940. France, 

Czechoslovakia, and Poland 

Funds for France, Inc., New York, N. Y., Aug. 14, 1940.' 

France - 

General Gustav Orlicz Dreszer Foundation for Aid to 

Polish Children, Washington, D. C, Nov. 3, 1939. 

Poland.. -. 

General Taufflieb Memorial Relief Committee for 

France, Santa Barbara, Calif., Nov. 17, 1939.* France 

and England 

German-American Relief Committee for Victims of 

Fascism, New York, N. Y., Apr. 18, 1940. Great 

Britain and France 

Mrs. George Gilliland, New York, N. Y., Aug. 10, 1940. 

Northern Ireland 

Golden Rule Foundation, New York, N. Y., Nov. 2, 

1939. Poland and Palestine 

Grand Duke Vladimir Benevolent Fund Association, 

New York, N. Y., Jan. 8, 1940. France 

Grand Lodge, Daughters of Scotia, Hartford, Conn., 

Feb. 16,1940. Scotland 

Great Lakes Command, Canadian Legion of the British 

Empire Service League, Detroit, Mich., July 5, 1940. 

Great Britain and Canada 

Greater New Bedford British War Relief Corps, New 

Bedford, Mass., Dec. 19, 1939. Great Britain. _. 

The Greek Fur Workers' Union, Local 70, New York, 

N. Y., Dec. 21, 1940. Greece 

Greek War Relief Association, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Nov. 18, 1940. Greece 

Hadassah, Inc., New York, N. Y., Nov. 15, 1939. Pales- 
tine 

Hamburg-Bremen Steamship Agency, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Mar. 21, 1940. Germany and Poland 

Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., Aug. 30, 1940. 

Great Britain 

Hebrew-Christian Alliance of America, Chicago, 111., 

Jan. 3, 1940. England, Germany, Poland, France. 

and Italy _ __. 



None 
$5, 556. 46 



16, 551. 71 
1, 048. 00 



2, 455. 50 
1,421.95 



1. 601. 39 
13, 079. 17 



10, 249. 97 

7, 174. 30 

1,081,694.49 

1,055,238.09 

266, 042. 37 



3,1120. St 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



None 
$500. 00 



4.301.31 
1,048.00 



1,500.00 
680. 00 



192. 70 
4, 199. 90 



277.00 

370. 79 

15, 034. 70 

2, 247. 23 

8, 046. 68 

None 

1,000,345.00 

824, 508. 97 

231,126.43 

None 

3, 625. 00 



Funds spent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



None 
$10. 00 



5, 816. 63 
None 



167.00 
93.29 



None 
None 



54.83 
24, 787. 26 
42, 895. 29 
58, 807. 44 
14, 409. 48 

295. 84 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



None 

$5, 046. 46 

243. 40 

6. 433. 77 
None 



788. 50 
648. 66 



821. 65 
845. 16 



645. 51 

657. 12 
None 
None 
151.89 
655. 14 

1, 329. 36 
1, 781. 62 
7, 119. 47 
56, 562. 23 
187, 833. 83 
None 
96, 764. 58 

None 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



None 
None 
None 

$26, 526. 88 
None 



None 
None 



None 
None 



80.00 

90.00 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
1, 115. 93 

None 
5, 789. 41 
62, 649. 91 

None 

None 

None 



* No reports for the months of November and December have been received from this organization. 
•' No report for the month of December has been received from this organization. 

' The registration of this organization was revoked on Dec. 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 

* The registration of this organization was revoked on Nov. 30, 1940, at the request of registrant. 



142 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Funds spent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



A. Seymour Houghton, Jr., it at., New York, N. Y., 
Nov. 27, 1939. France 

Humanitarian Work Committee, Glen Cove, N. Y., 
Sept. 30, 1939. Poland 

Independent British War Relief Society of Rhode 
Island, Greenwood, R. I., June 14, 1940. Great 
Britain 

Independent Kinsker Aid Association, New York, 
N. Y.,Jan. 3, 1940. Poland - 

International Children's Relief Association, New York, 
N. Y., Oct. 1, 1940. Great Britain - 

International Committee of Young Men's Christian 
Associations, New York, N. Y., Sept. 22. 1939. All 
belligerent countries _ 

International Federation of Business and Professional 
Women, Wheeling, W. Va., July 6, 1940. Poland, 
Czechoslovakia, Norway, Belgium, France, and the 
Netherlands 

International Relief Association for Victims of Fascism, 
New York, N. Y., Sept. 25, 1939. France, Enjland, 
and Germany. - 

Isthmian Pro-British Aid Committee, Ancon, C. Z., 
Sept. 20, 1940. England 

Joint Committee of the United Scottish Clans of Greater 
New York and New Jersey, Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan. 30, 
1940. Scotland.. - -- 

Junior Relief Group of Texas, Houston, Tex., May 29, 
1940. United Kingdom, France, Netherlands, Bel- 
gium, and Norway 

Marthe Th. Eahn, New York, N. Y., Apr. 16, 1940. 
France... 

The Kindergarten Unit, Inc., Norwalk, Conn., Oct. 3, 
1939. France, Poland, United Kingdom, India, Aus- 
tralia, and New Zealand - 

The Kosciuszko Foundation, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
May 24, 1940. Poland 

The Kyffhaeuser, League of German War Veterans in 
U.S.A., Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 27, 1939. Poland, 
Germany, Canada, and Jamaica.. 

Lackawanna County Committee for Polish Relief. 
Scranton, Pa., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland 

Ladies Auxiliary of the Providence Branch of the Fed- 
eration of the Italian World War Veterans in the 
United States, Providence, R. I., Oct. 1, 1940. Italy. . 

LaFayctte Preventorium, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 

21. 1939. France.. .- 

La France Post, American Legion, New York, N. Y., 

Feb. 7, 1940. France, Great Britain, and Greece 

Mrs. Nancy Bartlett Laughlin, New York, N. Y„ Jan. 

31.1940. France - 

League of American Writers, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

May 6, 1940. France, England, Poland, and Norway.. 
League of Polish Societies of New Kensington, Arnold 

and Vicinity, New Kensington, Pa., Nov. 17, 1939. 

Poland.. 

Legion of Young Polish Women, Chicago, IU., Oct. 2, 

1939. Poland. France, and Great Britain 

Liberty Link Afghan Society, Detroit, Mich., Dec. 17, 

1940.' Oreat Britain. 

Lithuanian National Fund, Brooklyn, N. Y., Dec. 14, 

1940. Germany and France 

The Little House of Saint Pantaleon, Philadelphia, Pa., 

Sept. 30, 1939. France and England 



$20, 193. 53 


$14,075.34 


3, 691. 96 


3, 220. 00 


3, 227. 12 


1, 033. 05 


974. 82 


None 


None 


None 


123,667.87 


45, 658. 27 



12, 292. 78 
272.15 



11, 842. 10 
227.25 

1, 222. 21 
4, 655. 45 

72, 019. 27 
8, 86S. 42 

4, 334. 92 
20,714.47 
1, 585. 32 
477. .50 
2,976.80 

2, 942. 19 
16, 259. 68 



8, 045. 66 
None 



10, 000. 00 
25.00 

892.85 

7, 450. 00 

58, 509. 61 
7. 225. 56 

3, 981. 76 

8, 647. 13 
925.00 
406.00 

1, 713. 72 

1, 498. 24 
10, 433. 21 



$170. 23 
75.85 

19.60 
None 
None 



4, 247. 12 
17.85 



329.36 
423.73 

7, 559. 81 
831.80 

None 

4, 503. 49 

385. 79 

None 
1,263.08 

436. 71 

2. 794. 50 



200.00 
28. 093. 41 



11.00 
36.26 



$5, 947. 96 
396. 11 

2, 174. 47 
974. 82 

None 

70, 778. 76 



None 
254.30 



156. 02 
193. 69 

None 
None 

5, 949. 85 
811.06 

353.16 

7, 563. 85 
274.53 
71.50 
None 

1, 007. 24 
3,031.97 



$773. 05 
185.00 

1, 150. 00 
None 
None 

None 



2, 020. 00 
None 



None 
None 

None 
None 

7,416.00 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
13.14 

2,400.00 
None 



None 
20, 495. 64 



' No complete report has been received from this organization. 



FEBRUAKY 1, 1941 

Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



143 



The Maple Leaf Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y., Apr. 19, 
1940. Canada, United Kingdom, and France 

Medical and Surgical Supply Committee of America, 
New York, N. Y., Aug. 5, 1940. Poland, Great 
Britain, France, Netherlands, Norway, Luxemburg, 
Belgium, and Greece 

Mennonite Central Committee, Akron, Pa., Feb. 13, 
1940. Great Britain, Poland, Germany, France, and 
Canada 

Methodist Committee for Overseas Relief, New York, 
N. Y„ Sept. 4, 1940." France, Poland, Czechoslo- 
vakia, Norway, Belgium, the Netherlands, United 
Kingdom, India, Australia, Canada, Germany, 
Greece, and Italy... _ 

Milford, Conn., Polish Relief Fund Committee, Mil- 
ford, Conn., Nov. 6, 1939. Poland 

The Mobile Circle for Benefit of the Royal Navy Hos- 
pital Comforts Fund. Mobile, Ala., Sept. 18, 1940. 
British Isles 

Monmouth War Relief, Red Bank, N. J., Sept. 12, 1940. 
England and France 

The Mother Church, The First Church of Christ, 
Scientist, in Boston, U.S.A., Boston, Mass., Apr. 
25, 1940. Canada, France, and the United Kingdom 

Fernanda Wanamaker Munn (Mrs. Ector Murm), 
New York, N. Y., Nov. 25, 1939. France and Eng- 
land 



National Christian Aciion, Inc., Brooklyn, N. Y., May 

23, 1940. Norway and Denmark 

Near East Foundation, Inc., New York, N. Y., Nov. 

28, 1940. Greece 

Netherlands War Relief Committee, Manila, P. I., 

May 27, 1940.™ Netherlands 

The New Canaan Workshop, New Canaan, Conn., 

July 1, 1940. British Empire 

New Jersey Broadcasting Corporation, Jersey City, 

N. J., Sept. 13, 1939. Poland. 

Nicole de Paris Relief Fund, New York, N. Y., July 1, 

1940. France 

North Side Polish Council Relief Committee of Mil- 
waukee, Wis., Milwaukee, Wis., Dec. 5, 1939. Poland 
Norwegian Relief, Inc., Chicago, 111., May 1, 1940. 

Norway 

Nowe-Dworer Ladies Benevolent Association, Inc., 

New York, N. Y., Oct. 25, 1939." Poland 

Nowiny Publishing Apostolate, Inc., Milwaukee, Wis., 

Sept. 26, 1939. Poland. 

Nowy Swiat Publishing Co., Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Sept. 11, 1939. Poland, France, Great Britain, and 

Italy 

Order of Scottish Clans, Boston, Mass., Jan. 25, 1940. 

Scotland - - 

Over-Seas League Tobacco Fund, New York, N. Y„ 

Aug. 19. 1940. British Empire 

The Pacific 8team Navigation Co., Cristobal, C. Z., 

Oct. 16, 1940. England 

Paderewski Fund for Polish Relief, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Feb. 23, 1940. Poland and Great Britain 



$85, 472. 93 

29, 565. 35 
37,361.87 

5, 560. 40 
405.33 

1, 547. 61 

2, 404. 97 

204, 202. 66 

15,110.72 
1, 138. 41 
49, 321. 85 

3, 579. 30 
11,329.08 

1, 210. 55 
227.00 

1,600.09 

411,484.35 

806.14 

5, 500. 16 

27, 353. 17 

7,866.70 

64,428.94 

279.95 

188,000.32 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$22, 317. 33 

1, 383. 34 
24, 460. 46 



5,000.00 
260.20 



None 
13,000.00 

1, 253. 87 

8, 983. 60 
826.17 
148.00 

1.400.28 
None 
None 

4,689.86 

26. 542. 05 
3, 377. 00 
44, 476. 27 
267.65 
64,500.00 



Funds spent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



560.40 
84.62 

31.69 

594.75 



10, 357. 69 
16.50 
740.68 
384.38 
51.00 
19.18 
12, 168. 26 
141.00 
None 

103.39 

None 

9, 953. 67 

12.40 

33, 746. 40 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



None 
70.51 

677. 70 
1,167.77 

179, 276. 14 

2,674.64 

297.53 

26, 964. 26 

2,308.93 

1,604.98 

None 

28.00 

180.63 

399, 326. 10 

665.14 

910.30 

707.73 

4, 489. 70 

None 

None 

19, 753. 92 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



None 
None 

618. 14 
166.00 

15,927.85 

5, 427. 28 
None 
None 
None 

2, 575. 00 
None 
None 

1. 300. 00 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
40.00 
None 



■ No report for the month of December has been received from this organization. 

1 The registration of this organization was revoked on Dec. 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 



144 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Parcels for Belgian Prisoners, Washington, D. C, Nov. 

12, 1940. Germany... 

Parcels for the Forces, New York, N. Y., Oct. 9, 1940. 

Great Britain _ 

The Paryski Publishing Co., Toledo, Ohio, Sept. 15, 

1939. Poland and Great Britain.. 

The Pawtucket and Blackstone Valley British Relief 

Society of Rhode Island, Pawtucket, R. I., Feb. 26, 

1940. Great Britain 

Pelham Overseas Knitting Circle, Pelham, N. Y., Oct. 

17, 1940. Scotland... 

Polish Aid Fund Committee of Federation of Elizabeth 

Polish Organizations, Elizabeth, N. J., Sept. 23, 1939. 

Poland and England 

Polish Aid Fund Committee of St. Casimir's Roman 

Catholic Church of the City of Albany, N. Y., Albany, 

N. Y., Jan. 22, 1940. Poland 

Polish-American Associations of Middlesex County, 

N. J., Sayreville, N. J., Jan. 22, 1940. Poland... 

Polish-American Citizens Relief Fund Committee, 

Shirley, Mass., Dec. 16, 1939. Poland 

Polish-American Council, Chicago, 111., Sept. 15, 1939. 

Poland 

Polish-American Forwarding Committee, Inc., New 

York, N. Y., Mar. 28, 1940. Poland and Germany. . . 
Polish- American Volunteer Ambulance Section, Inc. 

(Pavas), New York, N. Y., Feb. 13, 1940. France 

and England 

Polish Broadcasting Corporation, New York, N. Y., 

Sept. 23, 1939. Poland 

Polish Business and Professional Men's Club, Los 

Angeles, Calif., Nov. 17, 1939. Poland -. 

Polish Central Committee of New London, Conn., New 

London, Conn., Oct. 13, 1939. Poland 

Polish Central Council of New Haven, New Haven, 

Conn., Sept. 29, 1939. Poland.. 

Polish Civic League of Mercer County, Trenton, N. J., 

Sept. 19, 1939. Poland..-. 

Polish Civilian Relief Fund, Passaic, N. J., Oct. 27, 1939. 

Poland... 

Polish Falcons Alliance of America, Pittsburgh, Pa., 

Sept. 20, 1939. Poland 

Polish Inter-Organization "Centrala" of Waterbury, 

Waterbury, Conn., Feb. 28, 1940. Poland 

Polish Literary Guild of New Britain, Conn., New 

Britain, Conn., Sept. 21, 1939. Poland 

Polish National Alliance of the United States of North 

America, Chicago, III., Sept. 27, 1939. Poland 

Polish National Council of Montgomery County, Am- 
sterdam, N. Y., Oct. 12, 1939. Poland 

Polish National Council ofNew York, New York, N.Y., 

Sept. 14, 1939. France and Poland 

The Polish Naturalization Independent Club, Worcester 

Mass., Sept. 20, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief of Carteret, N. J., Carteret, N. J., Oct. 11, 

1939. Poland... 

Polish Relief Committee of Boston, Boston, Mass., 

Sept. 14, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Brockton, Mass., Brockton, 

Mass., Sept. 25, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Cambridge, Mass., Cam- 
bridge, Mass., Sept. 16, 1939. Poland 



Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Funds spent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31, 1910, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 


$6,221.24 


$198.00 


None 


$6, 023. 24 


None 


None 


20, 330. 86 


13, 475. 00 


$10,974.08 


None 


$35.40 


None 


7, 910. 33 


7, 451. 08 


None 


459. 25 


None 


None 


9, 345. 14 


3, 954. 56 


738.56 


4, 652. 02 


None 


None 


902.57 


447.42 


48.64 


406.51 


None 


None 


9, 190. 22 


8, 446. 85 


15.00 


728.37 


1, 500. 00 


None 


2, 780. 67 


426. 32 


9.60 


2, 344. 75 


1, 200. 00 


None 


1,057.05 


800.00 


80.82 


176.23 


None 


None 


427. 01 


362. 06 


25. 17 


39.78 


425.00 


None 


509. 041. 87 


339, 582. 40 


13, 167. 98 


156, 291. 49 


118,500.00 


None 


8, 584. 16 


5, 923. 65 


4, 442. 58 


None 


None 


None 


29, 482. 29 


19, 769. 05 


170. 56 


9, 542. 68 


255.40 


$10. 00 


2,675.83 


None 


35.30 


2, 640. 53 


None 


None 


474.50 


314.23 


158. 27 


2.00 


None 


None 


1, 400. 74 


1,044.24 


148. 57 


207.93 


75.00 


None 


4, 107. 69 


3,316.65 


51. 26 


739. 78 


1,800.00 


Nono 


7, 246. 69 


6, 392. 86 


1.74 


852. 09 


4,000.00 


None 


4, 416. 37 


3,025.00 


251.42 


1, 139. 95 


None 


None 


11,698.30 


11,102.23 


20. 00 


576. 07 


None 


None 


742.25 


607. 76 


25.50 


108.99 


None 


None 


3, 163. 09 


2,000.00 


13.00 


1,150.09 


None 


None 


308, 953. 67 


232, 165. 00 


2, 058. 82 


74, 729. 85 


None 


None 


4, 463. 27 


2,960.00 


107. 06 


1, 396. 21 


8,000.00 


None 


104, 504. 53 


89, 914. 05 


13,021.08 


1, 569. 40 


365, 617. 50 


174, 486. 50 


4, 499. 84 


4, 125. 00 


22.85 


351.99 


None 


None 


1,402.92 


800.00 


13.00 


589.92 


45.00 


None 


9, 283. 89 


7, 201. 19 


425. 32 


1, 657. 38 


2,600.00 


None 


1, 845. 48 


1, 236. 27 


247. 67 


361. 54 


350.00 


None 


2, 881. 99 


1, 642. 30 


400.17 


839.52 


600.00 


None 



FEBRUARY 1, 1941 



145 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Polish Relief Committee of Columbia County, Hudson, 

N. Y., Mar. 15, 1940. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Delaware, Wilmington, 

Del., Sept. 22, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee, Detroit, Mich., Sept. 11, 1939. 

Poland — 

Polish Relief Committee of Fitchburg, Fitchburg, Mass., 

Mar. 29, 1940. Poland ._ 

Polish Relief Committee, Flint, Mich., Sept. 18, 1939. 

Poland - 

Polish Relief Committee of Holyoke, Mass., Holyoke, 

Mass., Nov. 4, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Jackson, Mich., Jackson, 

Mich., Nov. 9, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee, New Bedford, Mass., Oct. 31, 

1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Philadelphia and vicinity, 

Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 12, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of the Polish National Home 

Association, Lowell, Mass., Nov. 27, 1939. Poland.. . 
Polish Relief Committee, Taunton, Mass., Dec. 13, 1939. 

Poland _ 

Polish Relief Fund of Fall River, Mass., Fall River, 

Mass., Nov. 8, 1939. Poland _ 

Polish Relief Fund, Jersey City, N. J., Sept. 12, 1939. 

Poland 

Polish Relief Fund, Jewett City, Conn., Oct. 3, 1939. 

Poland.. __ _ 

Polish Relief Fund of Meriden, Meriden, Conn., Oct, 

12, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund, Middletown, Conn., Sept. 23, 1939. 

Poland 

Polish Relief Fund, Niagara Falls, N. Y., Oct. 26, 1939. 

Poland __ 

Polish Relief Fund of Palmer, Mass., Three Rivers, 

Mass., Oct. 20, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund of Syracuse, N. Y., and vicinity, 

Syracuse, N. Y., Oct. 31, 1939. Poland .. 

Polish Relief Fund Committee, Los Angeles, Calif., 

Dec. 13, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund Committee of Milwaukee, Wis., 

Milwaukee, Wis., Sept. 26, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund Committee of Passaic and Bergen 

Counties, Inc., Passaic, N. J., Sept. 22, 1939. Poland. . 
Polish Union of the United States of North America, 

Wilkes-Barre. Pa., Sept. 8, 1939. Poland... 

Polish United Societies of Holy Trinity Parish, Lowell, 

Mass., Sept. 20, 1939. Poland 

Polish War Sufferers Relief Committee (Fourth Ward), 

Toledo, Ohio, Sept. 21, 1939. Poland 

Polish Welfare Council, Schenectady, N. Y., Sept. 22, 

1939. Poland 

Polish White Cross Club of West Utica, Utica, N. Y., 

Oct. 20, 1939. Poland and England 

Polish Women's Fund to Fatherland, Lawrence, Mass., 

Sep t. 23, 1939. Poland.. 

Polis h Women's Relief Committee, New York, N. Y., 

N ov. 24, 1939. France, Poland, and Germany 

Polski Komitet Ratunkowy (Polish Relief Fund), Bing- 

hamton, N. Y., Sept. 25. 1939. Poland 

Pulaski Civic League of Middlesex County, N. J., South 

River, N. J., Sept. 30, 1939. Poland 

Pulaski League of Queens County, Inc., Jamaica, N. Y., 

Oct. 21, 1939. Poland. 



None 
$8, 449. 67 
161,027.38 
749.80 
6, 785. 38 
6, 494. 64 
1,849.10 
10, 711. 23 
49. 973. 04 
2, 876. 54 
2, 884. 77 
1, 347. 59 
62, 296. 75 
1,642.00 
1, 806. 69 
4, 890. 34 
2,815.32 
1,820.90 
12,374.08 
800.81 
17, 149. 88 
13, 927. 94 
2, 206. 24 
4, 085. 32 
6, 491. 99 
6. 176. 86 
7, 559. 88 
6, 186. 94 
8, 402. 55 
4, 200. 69 
639.29 
7, 862. 56 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



None 

$7, 439. 84 

108, 646. 73 

460. 40 

5. 171. 64 
5,910.56 

649.60 
7, 867. 27 
43, 630. 64 
1, 825. 00 
2, 757. 00 

1, 252. 00 
53,510.95 

1, 400. 90 
1,500.00 
3, 136. 37 

2, 500. 00 
620.46 

8, 869. 00 
448.00 
13, 732. 72 
9,512.01 
2,150.00 
2, 916. 31 
6, 262. 36 
5, 260. 35 

5. 317. 65 
3, 162. 10 

3, 343. 36 
2, 955. 97 

None 
7, 400. 00 



Funds spent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



None 

$240. 40 

6, 306. 70 

41.09 

1, 437. 98 

208.35 

293.35 

913.63 

922. 69 

481.28 

25.17 

32.85 

2, 002. 93 

238.67 

27.90 

18.20 

70.80 

222. 12 

2,512.89 

195. 56 

1,080.38 

1,773.69 

None 

168. 71 

117.09 

57.32 

450.11 

697.34 

2, 723. 50 

341.66 

85.00 

172. 15 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



None 

$769. 37 

46, 073. 89 

248.31 

175. 76 

375. 73 

906.15 

1, 930. 33 

5, 419. 71 

570. 26 

102. 60 

62.74 

6, 782. 87 

2.43 

278. 79 

1,735.77 

244.52 

978. 32 

992.19 

157. 25 

2, 336. 78 

2, 642. 24 

56.24 

1, 000. 30 

112.54 

859. 19 

1, 792. 12 

2. 327. 50 

2, 335. 69 

903.06 

554.29 

290.41 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



None 

$4,850.00 

62, 974. 00 

130.00 

416. 45 

775.00 

750.00 

4, 350. 00 

None 

None 

1,375.00 

None 

1, 575. 00 

900.00 

None 

None 

None 

4,004.95 

1,850.00 

150.00 

11,607.40 

4, 008. 00 

None 

1, 240. 00 

None 

6,150.00 

1,800.00 

2.660.00 

2, 068. 80 

930.00 

None 

None 



146 



DEPARTMENT 0(F STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions fob Relief in Belligebent Countries — Continued 



Queen Wilhelmina Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
May 17, 1940. Netherlands, France, Poland, United 
Kingdom, India, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, 
Union of South Africa, Norway, Belgium, and 
Luxemburg . 

Refugees of England, Inc., New York, N. Y., July 12, 
1940.» Groat Britain, France, and French Cameroons. 

Relief Agency for Polish War Sufferers, Willimantic, 
Conn., Sept. 29, 1939. Poland 

Relief Committee of United Polish Societies, Chicopee, 
Mass., Oct. 21, 1939. Poland... 

Relief for French Refugees in England, Washington, 
D.C., Dec. 26, 1939. France and Great Britain 

Relief Fund for Sufferers in Poland Committee, Ken- 
osha, Wis., Sept. 25, 1939. Poland 

Relief Society for Jews in Lublin, Los Angeles, Calif., 
Dec. 13, 1939. Poland -. 

Royal Air Force Benevolent Fund of U. S. A., Inc., 
New York, N. Y., Nov. 26, 1940. Great Britain 

Russian Children's Welfare Society, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Sept. 29, 1939. Germany, France, and Poland . . 

St. Andrews (Scottish) Society of Washington, D.C., 
Washington, D.C., June 18, 1940. Scotland. 

Saints Constantine and Helen Greek Orthodox Church, 
Washington, D.C., Dec. 23, 1940. Greece.. 

St. Stephens Polish Relief Fund of Perth Amboy, N. J., 
Perth Amboy, N. J., Sept. 27, 1939. Poland 

The Salvation Army, New York, N. Y., May 23, 1940. 
England, France, Norway, Belgium, and the Nether- 
lands 

Save the Children Federation, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 8, 1939. England, Poland, Belgium, and the 
Netherlands 

Schuylkill and Carbon Counties Relief Committee for 
Poland, Frackvilie, Pa., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland 

Scots' Charitable Society, Boston, Mass., May 9, 1940. 
Scotland - — 

Scottish Clans Evacuation Plan, Port Washington, 
N. Y., Nov. 19, 1940. Great Britain 

Le Secours, Franeais, New York, N. Y., Sept. 11, 1940. 
France 

Secours Franco-Americain — War Relief, Pittsburgh, Pa., 
Nov. 20, 1939. Great Britain. _. 

The Seventh Column, Inc., West Fairlee, Vt., June 
12, 1940. « France and England.. 

Share A Smoke Club, Inc., Ithaca, N. Y., Nov. 14, 1939. 
England, France, Norway, Belgium, and the Nether- 
lands 

Sociedades Hispanas Aliadas, San Francisco, Calif., Mar. 
29, 1940. France... 

Sociedades Hispanas Confederadas, Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Jan. 22, 1940. France- - 

Society Francaise de St. Louis, Inc., St. Louis, Mo., Nov. 
15, 1939. France 

Society Israelite Francaise de Secours Mutuels de New 
York, New York, N. Y., June 4, 1940. France 

Society of the Devotees of Jerusalem, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Dec. 18, 1939. Palestine 



$380, 330. 18 
49, 895. 45 

3, 297. 22 
8, 303. 62 

20,261.84 

4, 337. 05 
941.08 

None 

12, 257. 62 

902.96 

4, 048. 43 

2, 992. 66 

208, 347. 76 

195, 085. 31 
6, 247. 24 
1, 023. 26 
3, 716. 63 
18, 180. 47 
2,032.28 
None 

688.70 
1, 277. 72 

31, 199. 12 
852.81 
317.00 

16, 043. 09 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$182, 233. 30 
14, 962. 59 
2,111.93 
7, 859. 56 
16, 816. 78 

3. 884. 70 
175.00 
None 

6,742.92 
831.31 
None 
None 

184, 723. 78 

141, 176. 22 

5. 705. 71 
1,000.00 
2,964.00 
5, 829. 66 

1. 662. 72 
None 

560.00 
None 
30, 240. 87 
373. 49 
200. 00 
8,900.00 



Funds spent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



$30, 751. 18 
12.670.62 
187.63 
None 
742.44 
366.06 
294.82 
None 
2, 330. 63 
71.65 
None 
None 

1, 782. 36 

47, 336. 96 
45.00 
None 
83.62 
6, 706. 53 
128.25 
None 

113.60 
706.13 
958.26 
57.56 
2.80 
7, 120. 81 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



$167, 345. 70 

22, 262. 24 

997.66 

444.06 

2, 702. 62 

86.29 

471.26 

None 

4, 184. 17 

None 

4, 048. 43 

2, 992. 66 

21, 841. 62 

6, 672. 13 
496.63 
23.26 
668.91 

6, 644. 38 
241.31 
None 

25.10 
571. 69 

None 
421.76 
114.20 

22.28 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



None 

$r,, 825. 60 

716. 46 

2, 660. 00 



5, 



.10 



1, 250. 00 

None 
None 
1, 166. 20 
None 
None 
None 

52, 402. 00 

None 
None 
None 
None 
128.67 

2, 611. 10 
None 

None 
None 
None 
8.00 
None 
None 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



■> This registrant serves primarily as a clearinghouse for the distribution abroad of contributions collected by other registrants; these receipts and 
disbursements are not included in the figures here given, since they are shown elsewhere in this tabulation following the names of the original collecting 
registrants. 

« No report for the month of December has been received from this organization. 



FEBRUARY 1, 1941 



147 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Funds spent 
for relief in 
countries 



Funds spent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



Solidaridad Internacional Antifascista, New York, 

N. Y., Oct. 17, 1940. France 

The Somerset Workroom, Far Hills, N. J., Apr. 25, 1940. 

France and Great Britain 

Le Souvenir Frangais, Detroit, Mich., May 1, 1940. 

France and Belgium 

Spanish Refugee Relief Campaign, New York, N. Y., 

Sept. 20, 1939. France 

Springfield and Vicinity Polish Relief Fund Committee, 

Springfield, Mass., Sept. 23, 1939. Poland 

Superior Council of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, 

New York, N. Y., Apr. 5, 1940. France. 

Miss Heather Thatcher, Hollywood, Calif., Nov. 19. 

1940. Great Britain 

Toledo Committee for Relief of War Victims, Toledo, 

Ohio, Sept. 19, 1939. Poland 

Tolstoy Foundation, Inc., New York, N. Y., Oct. 17, 

1939. France, Poland, England, and Czechoslovakia.. 
Mrs. Walter R. Tuckerman, Bethesda, Md., Nov. 24, 

1939. Great Britain 

Edmund Tyszka, Hamtramck, Mich., Sept. 19, 1939. 

Poland 

Ukrainian Relief Committee, New York, N. Y., June 28, 

1940. Germany, France, England, and Italy 

L'Union Alsacienne, Inc., New York, N. Y., Oct. 28, 

1939. France.. __ _. 

Unitarian Service Committee of the American Unitarian 
Association, Boston, Mass., May 23, 1940. France, 
British Isles, and the Netherlands.. 

United American-Polish Organizations, South River, 
N. J., South River. N. J., Oct. 20, 1939. Poland 

United American Spanish Aid Committee, New York, 
N. Y., Apr. 29, 1940.' United Kingdom and France. ... 

United Bilgoraycr Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y , Mar. 
21, 1940. Poland. 

United British War Relief Association, Somerville, 
Mass., June 14, 1940. Great Britian and Northern 
Ireland. 

United Charity Institutions of Jerusalem, New York, 
N. Y., Oct. 13, 1939. Palestine..- 

United Committee for French Relief, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Oct. 26, 1939. France, England, and Germany 

United Fund for Refugee Children, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Sept. 21, 1939. Poland, France, England, and 
Palestine.. 

United German Societies, Inc., Portland, Oreg., Port- 
land, Oreg., Jan. 8, 1940. Germany 

United Nowy Dworer Relief Committee, New York, 
N. Y., Jan. 3, 1940.' Poland 

United Opoler Relief of New York, New York, N. Y., 
Dec. 9, 1939. Poland 

United Polish Committees in Racine, Wis., Racine, 
Wis., Nov. 2, 1939. Poland 

United Polish Organizations of Salem, Mass., Salem, 
Mass., Oct. 20, 1939. Poland 

United Polish Societies of Bristol, Conn., Bristol, 
Conn., Sept. 29, 1939. Poland 

United Polish Societies of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, 
Calif., Oct. 21, 1939. Poland 

United Reading Appeal for Polish War Sufferers, Read- 
ing, Pa., Sept. 22, 1939. Poland and England 

» The registration of this organization was revoked on 
■ The registration of this organization was revoked on 



$5, 942. 66 

14, 1S2. 45 

58.00 

38, 919. 20 

1, 229. 31 
310.00 

2, 620. 50 
7, 157. 57 
29, 849. 86 
3, 910. 25 
3, 093. 46 
451. 26 

2, 449. 40 

35, 810. 84 
3, 249. 72 
4. 309. 78 
1,326.97 

6, 871. 20 
60, 427. 64 
124, 057. 67 

6.768.70 
2, 766. 62 
935. 12 
889.85 
2, 272. 19 
2, 787. 02 
1,226.85 
2, 962. 48 
8. 746. 76 



None 

$7, 770. 52 

None 

13, 434. 68 

1. 100. 00 

310.00 

2, 600. 00 

5, 826. 07 

12,505.64 

2, 809. 62 

3, 073. 96 

150.46 

1, 400. 27 

18,4.51.04 

2, 400. 00 
2,067.15 

None 

5, 524. 85 
32, 829. 30 
80, 520. 63 

918. 15 
2, 499. 94 

231.90 

None 
1,950.00 
2, 295. 32 

676.80 
2, 562. 10 
6, 889. 14 



$829. 87 

1,149.93 

None 

24, 261. 41 

54.20 

None 

20.50 

629. 79 

6, 589. 90 

3.95 

None 

175. 89 

585.47 

6, 918. 33 
136. 94 

2, 206. 52 
160. 44 

1,053.59 
27, 857. 43 
13, 106. 67 

5, 677. 63 
136.99 
217.04 

35.21 
235.52 
437. 91 

26.75 
355.48 
140.13 



$5, 112. 79 

5, 262. 00 

58. 00 

1,223.21 

75.11 

None 

None 

701. 71 

10,754.32 

1, 096. 68 

19.50 

124. 91 

463.66 

10.441.47 

712. 78 

36.11 

1, 166. 63 

292.76 

None 
30, 430. 37 

172.92 
130. 69 
486.18 
854.64 
86.67 
53.79 
623.30 
44.90 



None 
$11,191.16 
None 
16,486.00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
200.00 
315.00 

100.00 
None 
None 
None 

375.00 

None 

8, 504. 52 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
596.00 
300.00 
None 
None 



Dec. 15, 1940, for failure to comply with the rules and regulations. 
Dec. 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 



148 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Funds spent 
for administra- 
tion, publicity, 
affairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31, 1940, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 


Universal Committee for the Defense of Democracy, 

New York, N. Y., Oct. 16, 1940. England and France. 

Mrs. Paul Verdier Fund, San Francisco, Calif., Oct. 11, 


$532. 60 
4, 207. 41 


None 
$3, 897. 31 


$524.40 
114.31 


$8.20 

195. 79 


None 
$3, 282. 00 


None 


Wellesley Club of Washington, Arlington, Va., Nov. 29, 




Woman's Auxiliary Board of the Scots' Charitable So- 
ciety, Inc., Waverley, Mass., Feb. 28, 1940. Scotland. - 

Women's Allied War Relief Association of St. Louis, 
Clayton, Mo., Dec. 18, 1939. Great Britain and 


2, 879. 33 
14, 483. 18 
518, 361. 71 


2, 847. 40 

7, 757. 58 

432, 594. 90 


21.79 

351.64 

88, 935. 40 


10.14 

6, 373. 96 

None 


None 

9, 638. 85 

1,341,611.16 


None 


Registrants whose registrations were revoked prior to 
Dec. 1, 1940, and who had no balance on hand as of that 










20, 491, 086. 09 


13, 899, 650. 54 


1, 942, 731. 69 


4, 685, 141. 61 


4, 144, 067. 94 


$276, 994. 18 







' No complete report has been received from this organization. 

■ It is not possible to strike an exact balance in these published totals, since some registrants have included in their expenditures moneys available 
from loans or advances, which are not considered by the Department to be "funds received" and hence are not reported as such. 



The Near East 



ITALIAN AIR ATTACK ON AMERICAN MISSIONARIES IN ANGLO- 
EGYPTIAN SUDAN 



[Released to the press January 31] 

On August 30, 1940, the American Legation 
at Cairo reported the receipt of information 
from the Sudan government authorities con- 
cerning an attack from the air upon a station 
of the Sudan Interior Mission at Doro, Upper 
Nile Province, which took place on August 23, 
as a result of which Dr. and Mrs. Robert 
Grieve were killed and Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth 
Oglesby were wounded. All of the victims 
were citizens of the United States. 

As a consequence of the occurrence, the 
American Charge d'Affaires ad interim at 
Eome, acting under instructions from the De- 
partment, delivered the following communi- 
cation to the Italian Government on Novem- 
ber 1, 1940 : 



"On August 23, 1940, shortly after nine 
o'clock in the morning, two Italian aircraft at- 
tacked the compound of the Sudan Interior 
Mission at Doro in the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan, 
resulting in the killing of Dr. and Mrs. Robert. 
C. Grieve and the wounding of the Reverend 
and Mrs. C. K. Oglesby, all American citizens. 

"As soon as my Government learned of the 
occurrence, the American Legation at Cairo 
was instructed to make a most thorough in- 
vestigation of all the facts and circumstances 
concerning the incident so far as might be 
possible, based in particular on eye-witness 
sources. That investigation has now been 
completed and, under instructions of my Gov- 
ernment, I have been directed to acquaint the 
Royal Italian Government with what follows. 



FEBRUARY 1, 1941 



149 



"An American branch of the Sudan Interior 
Mission, an international missionary organiza- 
tion with American, British and Canadian 
branches, has been established for some time at 
Doro, with a mission station also at Chali. 
For some six months prior to August 23, 1940, 
the mission at Doro consisted of the Reverend 
and Mrs. C. K. Oglesby, Dr. and Mrs. R. C. 
Grieve, all American citizens, and Miss Zullah 
Walsh, a British subject, ordinarily resident 
of Australia. 

"Doro, like Chali, is a small open undefended 
village and, apart from the mission compound, 
is exclusively native. There are no military or 
police posts at Doro mission station or in the 
village of Doro or any military works of any 
character. The village itself consists of some 
15 native tukls. 

"Mr. Malcolm I. Forsberg, an American citi- 
zen, of the Sudan Interior Mission at Chali has 
declared in a sworn affidavit that 'having 
learned from three Greek traders from Kur- 
muk passing through Chali on their way to 
Melut of disorders in the Kurmuk area and 
bearing in mind the nearness of Chali and 
Doro to Kurmuk', he addressed on July 27, 
1940, a letter to the Commander, Italian Army 
at Did, Ethiopia, reading as follows: 
"'Sir: 

" 'This is to inform you that there are two 
men one woman and a child at Chali all of 
whom are Americans. There are two men and 
three women at Doro one young lady of whom 
is Australian. The rest are Americans. We 
are engaged solely in missionary work among 
the Uduk and Maban tribes. We have placed 
an American flag on one of the houses at 
Chali. 

" 'Sincerely yours, 

" 'M. I. FoRSBERG, 

" ''Sudan Interior Mission.'' 

"According to Mr. Forsberg's affidavit, he 
received on August 5, 1940 the following com- 
munication dated August 2, 1940 from the 
Commander Italian Army, Kurmuk (signature 
illegible) : 



" 'Mr. M. I. Forsberg, 

" 'Sudan Interior Mission, 
'"Chali. 

" T have received your letter of which I un- 
derstand the presence of your mission in my 
territory. I shall be glad to see you all, men 
and women, here at Kurmuk every one with 
his own passport. I hope that the travel by 
Chali and Doro to Kurmuk may afford like 
to you. Please accept my best wishes to ladies 
and my salutations to gentlemen. 

"'Commander Italian army Kurmuk.' 

"On August 5, date of receipt of the fore- 
going, Mr. Forsberg, according to his sworn 
statement, sent the following reply to the Ital- 
ian Commander at Kurmuk: 

" 'The Commander 

" 'Italian Army at Kurmuk. 
"'Dear Sir: 

"T received your letter of August 2, 1940, 
today. I will send word concerning your 
wishes to our missionaries in Doro. It will be 
a number of days before we can get an an- 
swer from them. We have no means to take 
us to Kurmuk. It would be dangerous for the 
child and for the ladies to travel in the wet 
now when there is malaria. One of the ladies 
at Doro (near Boin) is going to have a baby 
and is very ill from that. She also is just re- 
covering from Malaria. It would be very hard 
for her to travel now. We will appreciate it 
if you will let us stay in our houses at Chali 
and Doro until you occupy this territory. 
" 'Sincerely yours, 

" 'M. I. Forsberg. 
" 'Sudan Inferior Mixtion.'' 

"Mr. Forsberg further avers that following 
the despatch of the letter quoted above 'he 
received no communication from the Italian 
military authorities'. According to other in- 
formation, it appears that the mission at Doro 
had had at no time any communication with 
the Italian military authorities. 

"At about 9:15 a. m. on August. 23, 1940 
members of the mission station at Doro were 
attracted by the sound of aircraft engines. 



150 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Upon an observation of the sky, two aircraft 
were to be seen about a mile distant flying 
apparently in a westerly direction along and 
over the approximate course of the Yabus 
Kiver, whose nearest point is about a mile 
from the southern boundary of the mission 
compound. 

"As a result of the noise made by the air- 
craft engines, Dr. and Mrs. Grieve and the 
Keverend and Mrs. Oglesby left their houses 
and stood together on the open ground to ob- 
serve the airplanes. Miss Walsh was standing 
on the porch along the south side of her house. 

"Suddenly the two airplanes changed their 
course toward the compound. As they did so, 
Dr. Grieve and Mr. Oglesby held extended a 
United States flag, measuring some six by four 
feet, while their wives stood a little distance 
south of them. 

"The two aircraft, flying one after the other, 
crossed the southern boundary of the compound 
at a height of not more than one thousand 
feet, possibly less, inasmuch as the details of 
the planes were plainly distinguishable from 
the ground. In an affidavit of Mr. Oglesby 
the aircraft are described as Italian single- 
engined bi-planes. It is added that the ver- 
tical tricolor national markings were painted 
upon the tail fins of the aircraft. 

"When the aircraft were only a short dis- 
tance from the four Americans standing in 
the open, the second airplane, flying slightly to 
the west of the airplane in the lead, dived to- 
ward the group discharging its bombs. There 
were three almost simultaneous explosions. 

"The airplanes flew over the eastern corner 
of Miss Walsh's house in a northeasterly direc- 
tion, passing over the native village where at 
least two more bombs were dropfied which 
fell in the fields. 

"Dr. and Mrs. Grieve were struck by the 
first bombs, Dr. Grieve having fallen partly 
covered by the United States flag, which was 
perforated by shrapnel or bomb splinters in 
no less than twenty-four places. Mr. and Mrs. 
Oglesby were wounded, Mr. Oglesby only 
slightly in the shoulders, but Mrs. Oglesby had 
sustained about thirty small shrapnel wounds 



on the arms and in the back with three major 
wounds in the legs and was still reported suf- 
fering from mental shock as late as October 
21, 1940. 

"The airplanes almost immediately after- 
ward returned and dropped a considerable ad- 
ditional number of bombs. They then de- 
parted in an easterly direction. 

"When the airplanes had finally departed Mr. 
and Mrs. Oglesby were assisted into their house, 
while Dr. and Mrs. Grieve were carried into 
the clinic. Dr. Grieve died at about 10 : 30 
a. m. and Mrs. Grieve that same day about 5 : 30 
p. m. 

"Altogether a considerable number of bombs, 
some high explosive, and some incendiary, were 
dropped in or around the mission compound. 
The first salvo of three bombs were high 
explosive or shrapnel bombs while, an incendi- 
ary bomb destroyed a house belonging to the 
Reverend and Mrs. Oglesby. 

"From the above facts it is clear that : 

"The airplanes making the attack were Ital- 
ian, in accordance with the sworn statements 
of two eye-witnesses. 

"The Italian military authorities at Kurmuk 
had knowledge prior to the attack on Doro 
of the presence there of American missionaries 
and of their non-combatant character. 

"Doro is an open undefended village with 
no military or police posts or any military 
works of any character. 

"The attack on Doro by Italian airplanes 
was consequently a deliberate and wanton 
assault on a non-military objective and on non- 
combatant civilians, including four American 
citizens. 

"My Government is confident that the Royal 
Italian Government will promptly condemn 
the acts of those responsible for the brutal un- 
provoked attack against the four American 
citizens concerned and that prompt steps will 
be taken to punish those guilty of an outrage 
shocking to all those who continue to pre- 
serve any respect for the principles of civilized 
behavior. My Government must of course 
make full reservations concerning the subse- 
quent entering of claims for compensation for 



FEBRUARY 1, 19 41 

the killing of Dr. and Mrs. Grieve, the wound- 
ing of the Reverend and Mrs. Oglesby and for 
any property damage suffered by American 
interests." 

The following interim reply, dated Novem- 
ber 6, 1940, was received from the Foreign 
Office by the Embassy at Rome : 

"Detailed information in the premises has 
been requested of the competent military au- 
thorities. 

"However, as it relates to facts supposed to 
have occurred more than two months ago in a 
distant locality it is very probable that a re- 
port on the matter cannot be received for 
sometime. 

"Much more expeditious procedure on the 
part of North America [sic] would have been 
to have requested information concerning the 
bombardments in question simultaneously from 
Cairo and from Rome. 

"That among other things would probably 
have resulted in a composition different from 
your note of November 1 which in its con- 
cluding portion contains criticisms of the Ital- 
ian armed forces which cannot but be rejected 
in toto" 

No further comunication on the subject has 
been received from the Italian Government. 



DEATH OF THE PRIME MINISTER OF 
GREECE 

[Released to the press January 31] 

The Secretary of State has sent the follow- 
ing message to the Prime Minister of Greece, 
Alexandre Koryzis. 

"January 30, 1941. 
"It is with a profound sense of sorrow that 
I have learned of the death of His Excellency 
General John Metaxas, Prime Minister of 
Greece. Please accept my most sincere sym- 
pathy in this great loss to Greece in the hour 
of her struggle for freedom. 

Cordell Hull" 



151 

[Released to the press February 1] 

The Secretary of State has received the fol- 
lowing message from the Prime Minister of 
Greece in reply to the Secretary's telegram of 
condolences on the death of His Excellency 
General John Metaxas on January 30, 1941 : 

"Athens, February 1, 1941. 
"The deep sympathy which Your Excel- 
lency has been good enough to express in the 
great sorrow which has just struck Greece in 
the moment when she is fighting for liberty 
and which in this grave hour has deprived her 
of the services of her illustrious chief, John 
Metaxas, has moved me profoundly and I beg 
of you to accept the assurances of my sincere 
gratitude. This expression constitutes a new 
proof of the interest and of the assistance 
which the noble American nation, true to its 
traditions, has not ceased to offer to Greece in 
the unequal struggle which she is conducting. 
For this the Royal Government and the Greek 
people are infinitely grateful. 

Alexandre Koryzis" 



International Conferences, 
Commissions, Etc. 



NORTH AMERICAN REGIONAL RADIO- 
ENGINEERING MEETING 

[Released to the press January 31] 

The North American Regional Radio-Engi- 
neering Meeting held its final session in the 
Department of State on the afternoon of Jan- 
uary 30, 1941. This meeting was composed of 
representatives of Canada, Cuba, the Domini- 
can Republic, Haiti, Mexico, and the United 
States. It undertook a scientific allocation of 
frequencies in the standard broadcasting band 
(550 to 1,600 kilocycles) for the North Ameri- 
can region as established by the North Ameri- 
can Regional Broadcasting Agreement, which 
was signed in Habana on December 13, 1937, 
and which is to become effective on March 29, 
1941. 



152 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



This study involved consideration of the fre- 
quencies and other characteristics of 1,234 
broadcasting stations and required the solu- 
tion of problems arising from approximately 
200 conflicts, many of them of a complex 
nature. Regardless of the technical difficulties 
encountered, the meeting was marked by an 
unusual degree of cooperation which it is be- 



lieved augurs well for the efficiency of broad- 
casting in the North American region. 

At the final session the representatives of the 
participating governments signed a set of rec- 
ommendations which upon being approved by 
their radio administrations will become effec- 
tive on March 29, 1941. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



AGRICULTURE 

INTER-AMERICAN COFFEE-MARKETING 
AGREEMENT 

Costa Rica 

The American Minister to Costa Rica re- 
ported by a telegram dated January 23, 1941, 
that the Inter-American Coffee-Marketing 
Agreement signed at Washington on Novem- 
ber 28, 1940, was ratified by Costa Rica on 
January 22, 1941. 

United States 

On January 31, 1941, the Committee on 
Foreign Relations of the Senate reported 
favorably to the Senate, without amendment, 
the Inter-American Coffee-Marketing Agree- 
ment, signed on November 28, 1940, with the 
recommendation that the Senate advise and 
consent to its ratification. 

SOVEREIGNTY 

FINAL ACT OF THE SECOND MEETING OF THE 
MINISTERS OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS OF THE 
AMERICAN REPUBLICS AT HABANA, 1940 

Nicaragua 

The American Minister to Nicaragua re- 
ported by a despatch dated January 7, 1941, 
that the Oficial Gaceta (no. 280) of Decem- 
ber 17, 1940, publishes the text of the Final 
Act of the Second Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics, 
signed at Habana July 30, 1940, and the text. 



of an Executive decree dated December 4, 1940, 
approving the Final Act on behalf of Nica- 
ragua. 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

REGIONAL RADIO CONVENTION FOR CENTRAL 
AMERICA, PANAMA, AND THE CANAL ZONE 
(TREATY SERIES NO. 949) 

Hoiulwras 

The American Minister to Honduras re- 
ported by a despatch dated January 23, 1941, 
that the Honduran Congress approved on De- 
cember 20, 1940, the Regional Radio Conven- 
tion for Central America, Panama, and the 
Canal Zone, signed at Guatemala City on De- 
cember 8, 1938. 

The convention has been ratified by the 
United States of America in behalf of the Ca- 
nal Zone; Guatemala; and Nicaragua. 

INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATION CON- 
VENTION, REVISIONS OF CAIRO, 1938 (TREA- 
TY SERIES NO. 948) 

( 'olombva 

The American Embassy at Bogota reported 
by a despatch dated December 30, 1940, that 
the. Colombian Government had approved the 
General Radio Regulations and Final Protocol, 
and the Additional Radio Regulations and Fi- 
nal Protocol, signed at Cairo on April 4, 1938, 
by law 99 of 1940, published in the Diario 
Ofirial (no. 24547) of December 26, 1940, 



FEBRUARY 1, 1941 



153 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press February 1] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since January 18, 
1941: 

Gilson G. Blake, of Mr, Washington, Md., 
Consul at Rome, Italy, has been designated 
Second Secretary of Embassy at Rome, Italy, 
and will serve in dual capacity. 

Stuart Allen, of St. Paul, Minn., Consul at 
Lyon, France, has been assigned as Consul at 
Georgetown, British Guiana. 

Douglas Flood, of Kenilworth, 111., Vice 
Consul at Naples, Italy, has been designated 
Third Secretary of Embassy at Rome, Italy. 

Adrian B. Colquitt, of Savannah, Ga., Vice 
Consul at Cayenne, French Guiana, has been 
assigned as Vice Consul at Martinique, French 
West Indies. 

Roland K. Beyer, of Kaukauna, Wis., Vice 
Consul at Toronto, Canada, has been assigned 
for duty in the Department of State. 



Publications 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Waterway : Agreement 
Between the United States of America and Canada — 
Effected by exchange of notes signed October 14 and 
31 and November 7, 1940. Executive Agreement 
Series No. 187. Publication 1541. 3 pp. 50. 

Haitian Finances : Supplementary Agreement Be- 
tween the United States of America and Haiti Fur- 
ther Modifying the Agreement of August 7, 1933 
(Executive Agreement Series No. 46) — Signed Septem- 
ber 27, 1940; effective October 1, 1940. Executive 
Agreement Series No. 183. Publication 1543. 2 pp. 
50. 



Regulations 



The following Government regulation may 
be of interest to readers of the Bulletin: 

Articles 262, 299, and 1366 of the Customs Regu- 
lations of 1937 Amended. Approved January 27, 1941. 
(Bureau of Customs, Treasury Department.) [T. D. 
50317.] Federal Register, January 29, 1941 (vol. 6, 
no. 19), pp. 645-646 (The National Archives of the 
United States). 



Legislation 



Independent Offices Appropriation BiU, 1942 [in- 
cludes a recommendation for an appropriation of 
$975,000 to provide for the adjustment of Foreign 
Service pay]. (H. Rept. 15, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 
p. 14. 100. 

Independent Offices Appropriation Bill for 1942: 
Hearings Before the Subcommittee of the Committee 
on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Seventy- 
seventh Congress, First Session . . . Part 1 [includes 
hearings on Foreign Service pay adjustment (pp. 130- 
138], ii, 901 pp. $1.25. Part 2 [includes hearings on 
the Export-Import Bank of Washington (pp. 60-71), 
and the State Department Annex Building (pp. 231- 
232)], ii, 585 pp. 600. 

Lend-Lease Bill : Hearings Before the Committee 
on Foreign Affairs, House of Representatives, Sev- 
enty-seventh Congress, First Session, on H. R. 1776, 
a Bill Further To Promote the Defense of the United 
States, and for Other Purposes. January 1941. [In- 
cludes statements by the Secretary of State, pp. 
2-7, 1 7-51 passim.] iv, 692 pp. 650. 

Supplemental Estimates of Appropriations for the 
Department of State, 1941 : Communication From the 
President of the United States Transmitting Four 
Supplemental Estimates of Appropriations for the De- 
partment of State, for the Fiscal Year 1941, Amount- 
ing to $1,092,000 [includes an additional amount of 
$94,000 for salaries of Foreign Service clerks, 1941 ; 
an additional amount of $18,000 for miscellaneous 
salaries and allowances, Foreign Service, 1941; an 
additional amount of $330,000 for transportation, For- 
eign Service, 1941; and an additional amount of 
$650,000 for contingent expenses, Foreign Service, 
1941]. (H. Doc. No. 65, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 3 pp. 



4 For text of this statement, see the Bulletin of Jan- 
uary 18, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 82), pp. 85-91. 



:INTIHG 0FFIC 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - - Subscription price, $2 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OP THE BUREAU OF THE BUDOET 






THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 





FEBRUARY 8, 1941 
Vol. IV: No. 85 — Publication 1561 



Qontents 




General : 

Control of exports in national defense 

Congratulatory message to the President upon inaugu- 
ration 

Eukope : 

Courtesy calls of British Ambassador 

Block allotments under immigration quotas . . . . 
Suspension of tonnage duties for vessels of New Zea- 
land 

American Republics: 

Panamanian refunding plan 

Committee for Coordination of Inter-American Ship- 
ping 

Presentation of letters of credence by the Cuban Am- 
bassador 

International Conferences, Commissions, Etc. : 

Second Pan American Congress of Endocrinology . . 

The Department: 

Appointment of Dean G. Acheson as Assistant Secre- 
tary of State 

Death of R. Walton Moore 

Death of Stuart J. Fuller 

Appointment of divisional officers 

Executive Committee on Commercial Policy . . . . 

The Foreign Service: 
Nominations of ambassadors and ministers . . . . 

Personnel changes 

Foreign Service regulations 

[Over] 



Page 

157 
161 

161 
162 

162 

163 
163 
164 

165 



166 
166 
167 
168 
168 

168 
169 
170 



Qontents 






-CONTINUED 



Teeatt Information : 

Sovereignty : Page 

Convention on the Provisional Administration of Eu- 
ropean Colonies and Possessions in the Americas . 170 
Extradition : 

Supplementary Convention With Guatemala . . . 170 
Non-aggression : 

Pact Between Bolivia and Chile 171 

Agriculture : 

Inter-American Coffee-Marketing Agreement . . . 171 

Kegulations 171 

Publications 171 

Legislation 171 



General 



CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL DEFENSE 



[Released to the press February 4] 

The President announced on February 4 that 
he had approved the recommendation of Col. 
Russell L. Maxwell, Administrator of Export 
Control, and issued a proclamation placing well 
and refining machinery, radium, uranium, and 
calf and kip skins under the export-licensing 
system. 

These articles and materials, the exportation 
of which must now be controlled due to the ac- 
celerating needs of the national-defense pro- 
gram, will be subject to control on February 10, 
1941. 

The texts of the proclamation and of Execu- 
tive orders prescribing regulations pertaining 
thereto follow : 

Control of the Export of Certain Articles 
and Materials 

by the president of the united states of 

AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Whereas section 6 of the act of Congress 
entitled "An Act To expedite the strengthening 
of the national defense," approved July 2, 1940, 
provides as follows: 

"Sec. 6. Whenever the President determines 
that it is necessary in the interest of national 
defense to prohibit or curtail the exportation of 
any military equipment or munitions, or com- 
ponent parts thereof, or machinery, tools, or ma- 
terials, or supplies necessary for the manufac- 
ture, servicing, or operation thereof, he may by 
proclamation prohibit or curtail such exporta- 
tion, except under such rules and regulations as 
he shall prescribe. Any such proclamation shall 



describe the articles or materials included in the 
prohibition or curtailment contained therein. 
In case of the violation of any provision of any 
proclamation, or of any rule or regulation, is- 
sued hereunder, such violator or violators, upon 
conviction, shall be punished by a fine of not 
more than $10,000.00 or by imprisonment for 
not more than two years, or by both such fine 
and imprisonment. The authority granted in 
this section shall terminate June 30, 1942, unless 
the Congress shall otherwise provide." 

Now, therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, 
President of the United States of America, act- 
ing under and by virtue of the authority vested 
in me by the aforesaid act of Congress, do here- 
by proclaim that upon the recommendation of 
the Administrator of Export Control I have 
determined that it is necessary in the interest 
of the national defense that on and after Febru- 
ary 10, 1941, the following-described articles 
and materials shall not be exported from the. 
United States except when authorized in each 
case by a license as provided for in Proclama- 
tion No. 2413 J of July 2, 1940, entitled "Admin- 
istration of section 6 of the Act entitled 'An 
Act To expedite the strengthening of the na- 
tional defense' approved July 2, 1940." : 

(1.) Well and refining machinery 

(2.) Radium 

(3.) Uranium 

(4.) Calf and kip skins. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 



a 5 F.R. 2467; Bulletin of July 6, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 
54), pp. 12-13. 

157 



158 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Done at the city of Washington this 4th day 

of February, in the year of our Lord nineteen 

hundred and forty-one, and of the 

[seal] Independence of the United States 

of America the one hundred and 

sixty-fifth. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 
By the President: 
Cordell Hull 

Secretary of State. 
[No. 2456] 
Executive Order 
Prescribing Regulations Governing the Ex- 
portation of Articles and Materials Desig- 
nated in the President's Proclamation of 
February 4, 1941, Issued Pursuant to Section 
6 of the Act of Congress Approved July 2, 
1940, and Amending Regulations of January 
15, 1941, Covering the Exportation of Certain 
Articles and Materials 

Pursuant to the authority vested in me by the 
provisions of section 6 of the act of Congress ap- 
proved July 2, 1940, entitled "An Act To ex- 
pedite the strengthening of the national de- 
fense," I hereby prescribe the following addi- 
tional regulations governing the exportation of 
the articles and materials named in my procla- 
mation of February 4, 1941 : 

1. The articles and materials named in my 
proclamation of February 4, 1941, pursuant to 
section 6 of the act of July 2, 1940, shall be con- 
strued to include the following: 

(1.) Well mid refining machinery: B F 

Petroleum and gas well equip- 7342 7750* 

meut and parts, including 7340 
well drilling machinery and 
parts 
Petroleum refining m achinei y, 7349 7750* 

equipment and parts 
(2.) Radium: 

Metal 6640* 6640* 

Salts and compounds S399* 8399* 

(3.) Uranium: 
Metal 6640* 6640* 

Salts and compounds S399* 8399* 

Minerals 6245* 6640* 

(4.) Calf and kip skins: 
Calf skins 0206 0205 

0206 
Kip skins 0207 0205 

0206 



2. The numbers appearing in the columns 
designated B and F in paragraph 1 hereof refer 
to the numbers in Schedule B "Statistical Classi- 
fication of Domestic Commodities Exported 
from the United States", and Schedule F "For- 
eign Exports (Re-Exports)", respectively, 
issued by the United States Department of 
Commerce, both effective January 1, 1941. The 
words are controlling and the numbers are in- 
cluded solely for the purpose of statistical 
classification. An asterisk (*) indicates that the 
classification herein is not co-extensive with that 
in said Schedules B and F. 

3. Regulations 2 to 12 inclusive 2 of the Reg- 
ulations issued July 2, 1940, pursuant to section 
6 of the act of July 2, 1940, are applicable to the 
exportation of the articles and materials listed 
in paragraph 1 (1.) through (4.) inclusive. 

4. Executive Order No. 8640 3 is hereby 
amended to include within its provisions the 
articles and materials named in my proclama- 
tion of February 4, 1941. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 
The White House, 
Februai'y 4, 19J4. 

[No. 8668] 

Executive Order 
Prescribing Regulations Governing the Ex- 
portation of Articles and Materials Desig- 
nated in Proclamation No. 2449 of December 
10, 1940 

Pursuant to the authority vested in me by the 
provisions of section 6 of the act of Congress 
approved July 2, 1940, entitled "An Act To ex- 
pedite the strengthening of the national de- 
fense," I hereby prescribe the following 
additional regulations governing the exporta- 
tion of: 

Iron and Steel 

1. As used in Proclamation No. 2449 4 of De- 
cember 10, 1940, issued pursuant to the provi- 



2 5 F.R. 2469. 

3 6 F.R. 455 ; Bulletin of January 18, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 
S2), p. 91. 

* 5 F.R. 4903; Bulletin of December 14, 1940 (vol. Ill, 
no. 77), pp. 529-530. 



FEBRUARY 8, 1941 



159 



sions of section 6 of the act of Congress 
approved July 2, 1940, and in these regulations, 
the terms "iron" and "steel" shall be construed 
to include the following forms, conversions, and 
derivatives : 



Iron Ore: 

Iron Ore 
Iron and Steel Semimanufactures: 
Pig Iron 
Iron and Steel Scrap: 

No. 1. Heavy melting steel 

scrap (Category 2) 
No. 2. Heavy melting steel 
scrap (Category 3) 
Hydraulically compressed and 
baled sheet scrap (Categor- 
ies 7 & 8) 
Cast and burnt iron scrap (Cate- 
gories 1, 9, 10, 11, 12) 
Other (Categories 4, 5, 6, 13) (In- 
cludes heavy shoveling steel, 
selected rail scrap, machine 
shop turnings, wire shorts, 
rerolling rails, rejects, etc.) 
Tin-plate scrap (Includes Tin-plate 
clippings, cuttings, stampings, 
trimmings, skeleton sheets, and 
all other miscellaneous pieces of 
discarded tin plate, which result 
from the manufacture of tin 
plate, and of tin-bearing articles 
from tin plate) (Placed under 
export control, Executive Or- 
der, effective April 16, 1936) 
Tin-plate circles, strips, cobbles, and 

scroll-shear butts 
Waste-waste tin plate 
Terneplate waste-waste, clippings, 

and scrap 
Iron and Steel Products: 

Steel ingots, blooms, billets, slabs, 
sheet bars, and tin-plate bars 
(Include ingot iron, and other 
iron made in steel-making 
furnaces) : 
Not containing alloy " h 
Alloy steel, including stainless 
Iron and Steel Bars and Rods (In- 
clude rounds, flats, squares, 
etc.): 
Steel Bars, cold finished 
Iron Bars 

Concrete reinforcement bars (In- 
clude deformed and twisted) 



I'. 



6001 



6010. 2 



6010. 3 



6010. 7 



6013 
6014 



0016 
6010 



6020 
6021 



6640* 



620!)-' 



6200 + 



6209* 



6209* 
6209* 



6209* 



6029 
6029 



6029 
6029 



Other steel bars, including drill 
rods, merchant bars, tool 
steel bars, and drill steel: 
Not containing alloy 
Stainless steel " 

Alloy steel other than stainless h 
Wire Rods 
Iron and Steel Plates, Sheets, Skelp, 
and Strips (Include waste and 
waste-wasteplate, sheet and 
strip) : 
Plates: 

Armor plate, other than that 
listed in the President's 
Proclamation of May 1, 
1937 
Boiler plate 

Other plates, not fabricated 
(Include hot and cold 
rolled): 
Not containing alloy 
Stainless steel ° 
Alloy steel other than stain- 
less * 
Skelp iron and steel (Consists of 
long strips used in the manu- 
facture of pipes and tubes) 
Iron and Steel, Galvanized: 
Iron Sheets 
Steel Sheets 
Steel Sheets, Black, t'ngalvauized 
(Include hot and cold rolled): 
Not containing alloy 
Stainless steel ° 

Alloy steel, other than stainless 4 
Iron Sheets, Black (Include ma- 
terial under }i" in thickness in 
6033-6036) 
Strip, Hoop, Band, and Scroll Iron 
or Steel: 
Cold Rolled: 

Not containing alloy 
Stainless steel ° 

Alloy steel, other than stain- 
less * 
Hot Rolled: 

Not containing alloy 
Stainless steel " 

Alloy steel, other than stain- 
less b 
Tin plate and Taggers' tin (Include 

waste tin plate) 
Terneplate (Includes waste terne- 
plate "1 



B 


F 


6023 


6029 


6025 


6029 


6026 


6029 


6029 


6029 



6031. 1 
6031. 5 



6031. 9 



603'J 



6037. 1 
6037. 5 



6209* 



6209* 
6209* 



6033 


6209* 


6034 


6209* 


6035. 1 


6209* 


6035. 5 


6209* 


6035. 9 


6209* 



6209 + 



6209* 
6209* 



6037. 9 6209* 



6038. 1 


6209 ; 


6038. 5 


6209 


6038. 9 


6209 ; 


6041 


6209 


6042 


6209 



See footnotes at end of table. 



160 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Steel Mill Manufactures: 
Structural iron and steel: 

Water, oil, gas, and other stor- 
age tanks complete, and 
knocked-down material for 
permanent or temporary B 
installation 6043 

Structural shapes, not fabri- 
cated (Include heavy, light, 
and bar-sized structural 
shapes) 
Fabricated structural iron or 

steel 
Plates, fabricated, punched, or 

shaped 
Steel piling 
Railway-track materials: 
Rails: 

60 pounds and over per yard 605 1 
Less than 60 pounds per 

yard 
Relaying rails 
Rail joints, splice bars, fish- 
plates, and tieplates 
Switches, frogs, crossings, and 

derails 
Railroad spikes (Include railroad 
screw spikes) 
Tubular products and fittings: 
Boiler tubes: 
Seamless 
Welded 
Casing and oil-line pipe: 

Seamless 
. Welded 
Seamless black pipe, other than 

casing and oil-line 
Cast-iron pressure pipe 
Cast-iron soil pipe 
Welded black pipe: 
Steel 

Wrought iron 
Welded Galvanized pipe: 
Steel 

Wrought iron 
Rigid electrical conduit of iron 

or steel 
All other iron and steel pipe 
(Include riveted pipe and 
mechanical steel tubing) 
Wire and manufactures: 

Iron or steel wire, uncoated (In- 
cludes plain steel, stainless 
steel," and alloy steel other 
than stainless ') 
Galvanized wire 
Barbed wire 
Woven-wire fencing 
Wire rope and wire strand: 

Wire rope and cable, not insu- 
lated 6087.1 



B 

6087.5 



F 
609 1* 



F 

62 OS* 



6045 


6209* 


6046 


6209* 


6047 


6209* 


6050 


6209* 



6052 


6209* 


6053 


6209* 


6054 


6209* 


6055 


6209* 


6058 


6209* 


6060 


6209* 


6061 


6209* 


6062 


6209* 


6063 


6209* 


6064 


6209* 


6067* 


6209* 


6068* 


6209* 


6070 


6209* 


6071 


6209* 


6072 


6209* 


6073 


6209* 



7094.1 7099* 



6077 



6081 


6091* 


6082 


6091* 


6083 


6091* 


6085 


6091* 



609 1=1 
609 li 



6091* 



6091^ 
60911 



60911 



6104.1 



6104.9 



6105.2 



c,i (i.-,.:: 



6107 
6108 



6209* 



6091* 



6091* 
6091* 



6091* 



6091* 
6091* 



6091* 



6101 


6209* 


6102 


6209* 


7452* 


7485* 



6209* 



6209* 



Wire strand 
Electric welding rods and wire of 

iron or steel 
Welding rods and wire of iron or 

steel (other than electric) 
Bale ties 

Electrical and telephone trans- 
mission wires of iron or steel, 
coated with aluminum, cop- 
per, or other metals 
Insulated wire and cable having 

an iron or steel core 
Twisted wire 

Other coated wire of iron or 
steel (List galvanized under 
6082) 
Castings and forgings: 

Grey-iron castings (Include 

semi-steel castings) 
Malleable-iron castings 
Ingot molds 
Steel-castings: 

Not containing alloy ° * 
Alloy steel, including stain- 
less 
Railway car wheels and axles 
(Exclude railway car tires, 
locomotive wheels, tires, 
and axles): 
Railway car wheels 
Railway' car axles, without 

wheels 
Railway car axles, fitted 
with wheels 
Iron and steel forgings (Exclude 
steel grinding balls) : 
Not containing alloy " * 
Alloy steel including stainless 
Advanced Manufactures: 
Fence posts 

Metal drums and containers, 
filled or unfilled, for oil, gas, 
and other liquids 
Tool bits or tool bit blanks 
Ferro Alloys: 
Ferrochrome 
Ferrocolumbium 
Ferromanganese and spiegeleisen 
Ferromolybdenum 
Ferroph osphorus 
Ferrosilicon 
Ferrotitanium and ferro-carbon- 

titanium 
Ferrotungsten 
Ferrovanadium 

" Stainless steel: All steel (other than tool steels) 
containing 9 percent or more of chromium, with or 
without other alloys, or a combined content of 18 per- 
cent or more of chromium and other alloys. 



6105. 1* 6209* 



62(19* 



6209* 



6209* 
6209* 



6209* 



6205* 


6209* 


6122* 


6209* 


6209* 


6209* 


6220.5 


6220* 


6220.9* 


6220* 


6213 


6220* 


6220.9* 


6220* 


6220.9* 


6220* 


6220.9* 


6220* 


6220.9 


6220* 


6220.9 


6220* 


6220.9 


6220* 



FEBRUARY 8, 1941 

* Alloy steel other than stainless: Steel where the 
minimum of the range specified in any of the elements 
named exceeds the following percentage: nickel, over 
0.40 percent; chromium, over 0.30 percent; copper, over 
0.50 percent; manganese, over 1.65 percent; silicon, 
over 0.50 percent; molybdenum, over 0.10 percent; 
vanadium, tungsten, cobalt, titanium, and zirconium, 
any percent. 

2. The numbers appearing in the columns 
designated B and F in paragraph 1 hereof refer 
to the numbers of Schedule B "Statistical Clas- 
sification of Domestic Commodities Exported 
from the United States", and Schedule F "For- 
eign Exports (Re- Exports)", respectively, is- 
sued by the United States Department of Com- 
merce, both effective January 1, 1941. The 
words are controlling and the numbers are in- 
cluded solely for the purpose of statistical clas- 
sification. An asterisk (*) indicates that the 
classification herein is not co-extensive with that 
in said Schedules B and F. 

3. Paragraphs d., h., 1., t., and u., of regula- 
tion 1 5 of the regulations issued July 2, 1940 
pursuant to the act of July 2, 1940, so far as they 
apply to ferro-alloys, are modified in accord- 
ance with the foregoing list of forms, conver- 
sions, and derivatives. Regulations 2 to 12, 5 
inclusive, of the regulations issued July 2, 1940, 
pursuant to the act of July 2, 1940, are, appli- 
cable to the exportation of iron and steel. 

4. The regulations herein prescribed shall be 
effective February 15, 1941, and shall supersede 



161 

those in Executive Order No. 8607 6 of Decem- 
ber 10, 1940. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 
The White House, 

February 4, 1941. 

[No. 8669] 

CONGRATULATORY MESSAGE TO THE 
PRESIDENT UPON INAUGURATION 

[Released to the press February 6] 

The President has received the following 
message from the Chairman of the Presidium 
of the Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union : 
"Moscow, January 27, 1941. 

"On occasion your new inauguration to the 
post of President, I beg you to accept my sin- 
cere congratulations and the best wishes of 
personal happiness for you and of prosperity 
for the American people. 

M. Kalinin" 

The President has transmitted the following 
reply : 

"The White House, 

u February S, 1941. 
"I have received with deep appreciation Your 
Excellency's cordial felicitations upon my in- 
auguration as President of the United States 
and am happy to reciprocate your good wishes. 
Franklin D. Roosevelt" 



Europe 



COURTESY CALLS OF BRITISH AMBASSADOR 

[Released to the press February 4] 

The Secretary of State has sent the following 
telegram to Mr. R. Douglas Stuart, Jr., Direc- 
tor of "America First Committee" : 



5 5 F. R. 2469. 

"5 F. R. 4903; Bulletin of December 14, 1940 (vol. 
Ill, no. 77), pp. 530-531. 



"February 4, 1941. 

"Your telegram February 1, 1941. 

"According to information available to the 
Department of State the British Ambassador 
who has but recently arrived in this country 
made a series of pro forma courtesy calls a few 
clays ago in and about the Capitol in the course 



162 

of which he visited the Chairman of the Senate 
Committee on Foreign Relations and the Chair- 
man of the House Committee on Foreign 
Affairs. The Department does not consider 
that such calls constituted a departure from 
established precedents. 

Cordell Hull" 

This telegram was in reply to the following 
telegram from Mr. Stuart: 

"February 1, 1941. 

"Press reports today state that Lord Halifax, 
British Ambassador to the United States, has 
had conversations with Senator George and 
Representative Bloom, during which, according 
to Lord Halifax himself, they discussed the 
timetable of the war bill now pending in 
Congress-. 

"Since these conversations were obviously 
more than courtesy calls and were, in fact, 
efforts to influence the legislative branch of our 
Government, we assume that you are making 
a full inquiry into the conduct of the British 
Ambassador. In the name of the America 
First Committee, I ask you to make a public 
report of your inquiry and to take appropriate 
action. 

"Americans are anxious to extend the greatest 
hospitality to any representative of the valiant 
British people. But we are still a self-govern- 
ing nation. We cannot abide efforts on the 
part of any representative of any foreign gov- 
ernment to influence legislation pending before 
Congress. Any such effort is a matter for im- 
mediate action by you. 

R. Douglas Stuart, Jr." 

BLOCK ALLOTMENTS UNDER IMMI- 
GRATION QUOTAS 

(Released to the press February 3] 

The Department of State has been informed 
by the quota-control office for the German and 
Polish immigration quotas that block allotments 
of quota numbers under these quotas have been 
sent to a number of American consular offices 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

in Canada, Mexico, and Cuba for allotment in 
February to persons applying for immigration 
visas at those consular offices. A number of 
Czechoslovak quota numbers for issuance in 
March have also been distributed to American 
consular offices in Canada, Mexico, and Cuba, 
and Czechoslovak numbers are available for 
issuance at Habana in the current month of 
February. The consular offices to which num- 
bers have been sent are Habana, Mexico City, 
Tijuana, Mexicali, Ciudad Juarez, Nogales, 
Monterrey, Nuevo Laredo, Montreal, Toronto, 
Niagara Falls, Windsor, and Vancouver. 

Block allotments under the Hungarian quota 
have been sent to Habana and Montreal and 
individual allotments to several other consular 
offices. The allotments made will exhaust the 
Hungarian quota for February. 

It is anticipated that further block allotments 
under the German, Polish, Czechoslovak, and 
Hungarian quotas will be distributed to consu- 
lar offices in nearby countries from month to 
month. In this connection, it is pointed out that 
no more than 10 percent of the annual immi- 
gration quotas may be issued in any one calendar 
month. 

SUSPENSION OF TONNAGE DUTIES 
FOR VESSELS OF NEW ZEALAND 

A proclamation (no. 2455) providing that 
"the foreign discriminating duties of tonnage 
and imposts within the United States" be "sus- 
pended and discontinued so far as respects the 
vessels of New Zealand and the produce, manu- 
factures, or merchandise imported in said ves- 
sels into the United States from New Zealand or 
from any other foreign country; the suspension 
to take effect from January 17, 1941, and to 
continue so long as the reciprocal exemption of 
vessels belonging to citizens of the United States 
and their cargoes shall be continued, and no 
longer", was signed by the President on Janu- 
ary 31, 1941. 

The text of this proclamation appears in full 
in the Federal Register for February 4, 1941 
(vol. 6, no. 23), page 727. 



American Republics 



PANAMANIAN REFUNDING PLAN 



[Released to the press February 3] 

On April 4, 1940 the Republic of Panama, 
through a prospectus duly registered with the 
Securities and Exchange Commission, made an 
offer to holders of Republic of Panama 5-per- 
cent 35-year bonds, Series A, due May 15, 1963, 
pursuant to a Plan for the Readjustment of the 
External Debt of the Republic of Panama. 
This Plan was to become effective when so de- 
clared by the Republic on or before October 25, 
1940 after the holders of at least 80 percent of 
the principal amount of 5-percent bonds should 
have assented to the Plan by depositing their 
bonds under the Plan. 

Apparently due in part to conditions result- 
ing from the war in Europe, including the in- 
vasion and occupation of countries in which 
substantial amounts of the 5-percent bonds are 
held, deposits of 80 percent of the pi'incipal 
amount of the bonds were not received by Octo- 
ber 25, and the Panamanian Government has 
since extended the offer by successive periods of 
one month. By an announcement published 
January 24, 1941, the Ambassador of Panama 
gave notice to holders of the 5-percent bonds 
that the Republic of Panama had agreed to an 
extension of the period of the Plan and Deposit 
Agreement to and including February 24, 1941, 
adding that the Republic believes that with this 
extension sufficient time has been given to all 
bondholders to make a decision, and does not 
intend to grant any further extension of time 
within which the necessary assents to the Plan 
may be received in order to enable the Republic 
to declare it effective. The announcement also 
suggested that in order that sufficient time be 
available for the preparation of all documents 
in connection with essential parts of the Plan, 
holders of 5-percent bonds. Series A, who desire 
to assent to the Plan, deposit their bonds not 
later than February 10, 1941. The Ambassa- 



dor of Panama has supplemented this formal 
announcement by a statement on the same lines 
issued to the press on February 3, 1941. 

The Foreign Bondholders Protective Council 
has issued a statement discussing the Plan and 
saying that the Council feels that it is to the 
interest of the bondholders to accept the Plan 
offered and recommends that they do so. Hold- 
ers of very close to 80 percent of the bonds have 
deposited or agreed to deposit their bonds. It 
is believed that part of the delay in obtaining 
assents may be due to the difficulty of communi- 
cation with widely scattered holders of the 
bonds. It is therefore hoped that wide pub- 
licity can be given to the Panamanian Govern- 
ment's announcement of January 24 and state- 
ment of February 3. 

The consummation of the Plan, which in- 
volves the application to the service of Pana- 
manian dollar bonds of the full amount of the 
increased annuity payable to Panama by the 
United States Government under the treaty of 
March 2, 1936 and of the income of the consti- 
tutional fund of Panama established by the 
Constitution of the Republic, in 1904, would be 
a very helpful development in the relations 
between the two countries. 

COMMITTEE FOR COORDINATION 
OF INTER-AMERICAN SHIPPING 



for Coordination of Com- 
is Between the American 



[Released to the press by the Offic 
mercial and Cultural Relatio 
Republics February 7) 

With a view to assuring adequate tonnage for 
continued movement of inter-American prod- 
ucts, there has been created, with the approval 
of the President, a Committee for Coordination 
of Inter-American Shipping, composed of 
James V. Forrestal, Under Secretary of the 
Navy, Rear Admiral Emory S. Land, Chairman 
of the Maritime Commission, and Nelson A. 



164 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Rockefeller, Coordinator of Commercial and 
Cultural Relations Between the American 
Republics. 

The Committee will seek to coordinate the 
shipping requirements of the Central and South 
American trades with the supply of vessel ton- 
nage under the jurisdiction of the Maritime 
Commission and with the needs of the military 
branches of the Government. The Committee 
proposes, through cooperation with the ship- 
ping companies, to plan use of available 
tonnage in an effort to insure adequate trans- 
portation for cargoes to be moved in both 
directions during 1941. 

Estimates of the Maritime Commission indi- 
cate that adequate shipping will be available to 
handle the requirements of inter-American 
trade in 1941 if the vessels now operating are 
retained in this service and with the addition of 
certain vessels now intended for the trade. At 
present there are, the Maritime Commission 
estimates, approximately 119 vessels regularly 
serving the east and west coasts of South 
America. Fifty-four of these fly the flag of the 
United States, 22 are of Norwegian ownership, 
and the balance are operated under other flags, 
including those of Central and South America. 

In establishing this Committee the Govern- 
ment does so with the recognition that the un- 
interrupted flow of commerce between the 
United States and Central and South American 
nations is directly related to the national- 
defense program and to the economic welfare 
of the American republics. 

PRESENTATION OF LETTERS OF CRE- 
DENCE BY THE CUBAN AMBASSADOR 

[Released to the press February 5] 

A translation of the remarks of the newly 
appointed Ambassador of Cuba, Sehor Dr. 
A urelio Fernandez Concheso, upon the occasion 
of the presentation of his letters of credence, 
follows : 

"Honorable Mr. President: 

"I have the honor to deliver into Your Ex- 
cellency's hands the letters of credence by which 
the Honorable Col. Fulgencio Batista, President 



of the Republic of Cuba, accredits me near 
Your Excellency as Ambassador Extraordinary 
and Plenipotentiary of the Cuban Government 
in the United States of America, and the letters 
of recall of my distinguished predecessor, Dr. 
Pedro Martinez Fraga. 

"To be able to express my sincere admiration 
for the great North American democracy, which 
has always given unequivocal proofs of real 
friendship for my country, constitutes for me a 
very felicitous opportunity, and I am made 
happy by the fact that my President has desig- 
nated me for such a high mission, which I pro- 
pose to fulfill with all the patriotic zeal of which 
I am capable by drawing closer than ever, if 
this be possible, the traditional ties of friend- 
ship and mutual comprehension which unite 
Cuba with the people over whom Your Excel- 
lency presides with such great prestige. 

"Cuba does not forget that it was the generous 
North American people who in a decisive man- 
ner helped to assure victory in the war which 
we carried on to win our national independence, 
and that our people, united to your own, con- 
tributed in the World "War of 1914 their efforts 
to bring about the triumph over the viciousness 
of man of the democratic spirit which has 
inspired all of the political philosophy of our 
America. 

"It is not, therefore, difficult to affirm that in 
the present historical juncture in which Amer- 
ica finds itself menaced, Cuba is among the first 
of the nations of the American continent to offer 
its aid in the face of the dangers which threaten 
American solidarity, justice, and law. 

"Cuba, conscious of its historic mission on the 
continent, is working intensely and in an ele- 
vated spirit of international collaboration to the 
end that the destiny of America which pre- 
occupies Your Excellency may culminate with 
effective success for human rights which our 
democracies sustain as the sole instrument 
capable of guaranteeing the liberty and happi- 
ness of our peoples. 

"In the prosecution of my obligations, Mr. 
President, I shall do everything within my 
reach to fulfill my Government's instructions 
with zeal and devotion and to collaborate effec- 



FEBRUARY 8, 1941 



165 



tively with your Government in our great 
democratic undertakings. 

"There has been confided to me, Mr. Presi- 
dent, the agreeable mission of expressing to 
Your Excellency in the name of the President 
of the Republic of Cuba his most sincere wishes, 
to which I have the honor of joining my own, 
for the personal happiness of Your Excellency 
and for the prosperity of your people, whom 
you have had the wisdom of leading with such 
ability toward their destiny, which today is the 
destiny of all America. You have won the af- 
fection of your people and the profound respect 
of all nations which, while desiring to live in 
peace, conceive peace possible oidy if founded 
in democracy, law, and justice, in the defense 
of which Cuba, together with the United States 
of America, is prepared to incur all the risks 
inherent in the circumstances." 

The President's reply to the remarks of Senor 
Dr. Aurelio Fernandez Concheso follows: 

"Me. Ambassador : 

"It has given me great pleasure to receive 
from you the letters by which the President of 
Cuba, His Excellency Fulgencio Batista, has 
accredited you as Ambassador Extraordinary 
and Plenipotentiary of the Republic of Cuba 
near the Government of the United States, and 
I am happy to grant you formal recognition in 
this high and important capacity. I have also 
received from your hands the letters of recall 
of your distinguished predecessor, Dr. Pedro 
Martinez Fraga, who during almost four years 
as Ambassador of your Republic in Washington 
earned the friendly esteem and respect of all 
with whom he came in contact. 

"It is with a deep sense of gratitude, that I 
hear your generous references to the happy col- 
laboration between the valiant people of Cuba 
and the American nation in bringing to a happy 
conclusion the great struggle of Cuba for in- 
dependence and sovereignty, and I am reminded 
with a sense of profound appreciation of the 
spontaneous response of Cuba in 1917, when 
this country entered the World War in contin- 
uation of the struggle for freedom. With free- 



dom, liberty, and the rule of law more seriously 
threatened today than ever before, it is ex- 
tremely gratifying to receive your further as- 
surances that Cuba is prepared once more to 
demonstrate its solidarity with the cause which 
all free nations espouse. 

"I thank you for your assurance that in ful- 
filling the high mission which has been en- 
trusted to you, you will collaborate in every way 
with this Government, and I assure you that 
the officers of this Government will take great 
satisfaction in cooperating wholeheartedly and 
sincerely with you. 

"The history of Cuban- American relations 
encourages me. in the firm belief that the ele- 
ments of mutual good-will and understanding 
sol essential to the successful working out of 
economic problems, are abundantly present in 
the case of those in both our countries who have 
occasion to deal with these problems. 

"I am confident that through your repoi-ts to 
your Government, your eminent President, who 
paid us the signal honor of visiting this capital 
two years ago, will continue in the assurance of 
our desire for the closest possible ties of friend- 
ship and collaboration. 

"In welcoming you to Washington, Mr. Am- 
bassador, I wish to convey to you my sincere 
wishes that your stay in the United States will 
be enjoyable to you personally and in every way 
useful and beneficial to our two countries." 



International Conferences, 
Commissions. Etc. 



SECOND PAN AMERICAN CONGRESS 
OF ENDOCRINOLOGY 

[Released to the press February 6] 

This Government has accepted the invitation 
of the Government of Uruguay to be repre- 
sented at the Second Pan American Congress 
of Endocrinology which will be held at Monte- 
video, Uruguay, from March 5 to 8, 1941, and the 
President has approved the designation of the 



166 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



following persons as delegates on the part of 
the United States of America : 

Elmer L. Sevringhaus, M.D., President, 
Association for the Study of Internal 
Secretions, University of Wisconsin, 
Madison, Wis., Chairman, of the Dele- 
gation. 

George W. Corner, M. D., Director, Depart- 
ment of Embryology, Carnegie Institu- 
tion of Washington, Baltimore, Md. 

Herbert M. Evans, M.D., Director, Insti- 
tute of Experimental Biology, Uni- 
versity of California, Berkeley, Calif. 

F. C. Koch, Ph.D., Chairman, Department 
of Biochemistry, University of Chicago, 
Chicago, 111. 



Oscar Riddle, Ph.D., Department of Ge- 
netics, Carnegie Institution of Washing- 
ton, Cold Spring Harbor, Long Island, 
N. Y. 

Raymond L. Zwemer, M. D., Department of 
Anatomy, College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, Columbia University, New 
York, N. Y. 

The principal purposes of the Pan American 
Congresses of Endocrinology are to promote 
the development and improvement of this 
branch of medicine and to encourage closer 
collaboration among the specialists throughout 
the Americas. 



The Department 



APPOINTMENT OF DEAN G. ACHESON AS ASSISTANT SECRETARY 

OF STATE 



The Honorable Dean G. Acheson took the 
oath of office February 1, 1941, as Assistant 
Secretary of State, filling the vacancy created 
by the recent resignation of Assistant Secretary 
Henry F. Grady. The office designation is 
A-A. 

Mr. Acheson was born in Middletown. Conn., 
on April 11, 1893, and received an A. B. from 



Yale in 1915 and an LL.B. from Harvard in 
1918. He served as an ensign in the United 
States Navy during the World War. From 
1919 to 1921 he was private secretary to Justice 
Brandeis of the United States Supreme Court. 
Since that time, he has been engaged in the 
practice of law, except from May to November 
1933, when he served as Under Secretary of the 
Treasury. 



DEATH OF R. WALTON MOORE 



[Released to the press February 8] 

The Honorable R. Walton Moore, Counselor 
of the Department of State, died at his home at 
Fairfax, Va., shortly after 7 o'clock the morn- 
ing of February 8. 

The Secretary of State has issued the follow- 
ing statement : 

"I make the announcement of the death of 
Mr. R. Walton Moore with a sentiment of deep 
personal sorrow. By his passing from this life 



I have lost a dear friend and the country has 
lost one of its ablest citizens, whose long years 
have been spent in faithful service to its wel- 
fare. His interests knew no narrow bounds; 
his abilities carried him to ever wider fields of 
service. From state legislator he entered upon 
a distinguished legal career of national scope, 
followed by more than a decade of service in the 
House of Representatives. The third and final 
phase of his career began in 1933 when he came 



FEBRUARY 8, 1941 



167 



to the Department of State as Assistant Secre- 
tary. As Counselor of the Department since 
1937 he gave of his wisdom, his ripe experience 
of fourscore years, and spent his strength in the 
stress of a period of gravest concern to his coun- 
try. At all times he gave himself to the duties 
and obligations of his position in the Depart- 
ment of State. As an authority on constitu- 
tional and international law his counsel was 
invaluable in such matters as recognition and 
neutrality, particularly the multifarious ques- 
tions connected with the latter subject. Often 
called upon by his position as Counselor to meet 
with the representatives of foreign governments 
he maintained the best traditions of the diplo- 
matic relationship. I have spoken so far only 
of his political accomplishments, using that 
term in its most inclusive significance. He was 
likewise a scholar, as all who have heard him 
speak on historical and legal subjects recog- 
nized. His vital interest in educational fields 
was only another expression of his broad and 
varied interests. 

"We mourn the death of Mr. Moore as be- 
reaving those who have been associated with 
him through the past years of an inspiring 
friendship. We can give him now only that 
tribute of devotion which is the just meed of the 
distinguished and unfaltering patriot whose 
last strength and final breath were given in 
service to the public good." 



His biography follows: 

Robert Walton Moore, — Born in Fairfax, Va., Feb- 
ruary 26, 1859 ; educated at the University of Virginia 
and admitted to the State bar in 1SS0; State Senator, 
18S7-90; Presidential Elector, 1892; Member of the 
Virginia Constitutional Convention, 1901-1902 ; Special 
Counsel before the Interstate Commerce Commission, 
1907-1S, and Assistant Chief Counsel of the United 
States Railroad Administration, 1918-19; elected to the 
House of Representatives (Sixty-sixth Congress) in 
1919 to fill a vacancy, and reelected for five terms, 
1921-31, from the Eighth Congressional District of Vir- 
ginia ; served as a member of the Committee on Foreign 
Affairs ; appointed Assistant Secretary of State, Septem- 
ber 19, 1933, and Counselor of the Department of State, 
May 20, 1937 ; Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Sec- 
ond Export-Import Bank of Washington, D.C., 1934-36; 
Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Export-Import 
Bank of Washington, 1934—11 ; Member of the Depart- 
ment of State Committee on International Civil Avia- 
tion, 1935-38, and Chairman of the Interdepartmental 
Committee on Civil International Aviation, 1935-3S; 
Member of the Central Committee of the American Red 
Cross, 1936-41; Chairman, United States - Canada 
Aviation Conference, Washington, DC, 1938; Mem- 
ber of the International Joint Commission, United 
States and Canada, 1939; Member of the Board of 
Regents of the Smithsonian Institution, 1922-41 ; Mem- 
ber of the Board of Visitors, University of Virginia and 
William and Mary College; Member of the State Board 
of Education of Virginia ; Member of the American Bar 
Association, and of the Virginia State Bar Association 
(President, 1911) ; Phi Beta Kappa, and LL.D. (Wil- 
liam and Mary College). 



DEATH OF STUART J. FULLER 



[Released to the press February .'!] 

The Secretary of State on February 3 made 
the following statement in regard to the death 
on the night of February 2, at his home in 
Washington, of Mr. Stuart Jamieson Fuller. 
Since 1931 Mr. Fuller has been an Assistant 
Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs in 
charge of matters which relate to international 
cooperation to suppress the abuse, of narcotic 
drugs. 

'T am deeply grieved at the death of Mr. 
Fuller. Mr. Fuller entered the Foreign Service 
in 1906 and the Department of State in 1930. 
In all of his assignments he rendered service of 



an outstanding character to his Government, 
and he possessed a unique capacity for making 
friends. Especially conspicuous were his serv- 
ices while Consul at Iquitos, Peru, in investigat- 
ing conditions in the Putumayo rubber-produc- 
ing areas, Consul General at Large in the Far 
East, Consul General at Tientsin, and this 
Government's representative on the Opium Ad- 
visory Committee. He was looked upon by 
those associated with him, both in this country 
and abroad, as a foremost authority on the sub- 
ject of the international traffic in drugs and as 
one of the leaders in the control of this traffic. 
In his death our Government has lost a loyal 



168 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



and efficient Government servant. His loss will 
be deeply mourned by all of those who had the 
privilege of knowing him." 

His biography follows: 

Stuart Jamibson Fuller. — Born in Keokuk, Iowa, 
May 4, 1880; University of Minnesota, 1896-98; Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, LL.B. 1903 ; in railway and mer- 
cantile business until 1906; Vice and Deputy Consul 
General at Hong Kong, April 20, 1906 ; Consul at Gote- 
borg, Sweden, July 26, 1909; in charge of the Consulate 
at Naples, October 12, 1910; Consul at Iquitos, April 
12, 1912 ; at Durban, September 18, 1913 ; Consul General 
at Large November 24, 1913; Consul General at Tient- 
sin, China, September 6, 1919 ; representative on Haiho 
Conservancy Commission (Tientsin), 1922-23; in busi- 
ness in Calcutta 1924-26, Far East, 1927-30 ; Divisional 
Assistant in the Department of State, July 12, 1930; 
Assistant Chief, Division of Far Eastern Affairs, April 
1, 1931 ; Representative in expert and advisory capacity, 
fifteenth to twenty-fourth sessions of League of Nations 
Advisory Committee on Traffic in Opium and Other 
Dangerous Drugs, Geneva, 1932-39; Delegate of the 
United States to Conference for the Suppression of 
the Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs, Geneva, 1936; 
Adviser, twentieth session International Labor Confer- 
ence, Geneva, 1936. 

Mr. Fuller is survived by his widow, Mrs. Anne Regan 
Fuller of Washington, D.C. ; by two sons: Stuart J. 
Fuller, Jr., and Regan Fuller; and by a brother, Mr. 
Isaac Sutton Fuller, of Evanston, 111. 

APPOINTMENT OF DIVISIONAL 
OFFICEKS 

The following recent appointments to offices 
in the Department have been made by the 
Secretary of State : 



Avra M. Warren, a Foreign Service officer of 
class I, was assigned as Chief of the Visa Divi- 
sion, effective January 21, 1941. 

Leland W. King, Jr., was appointed an 
Assistant Chief of the Foreign Service Build- 
ings Office, effective as of December 23, 1940. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE ON 
COMMERCIAL POLICY 

The following departmental order, no. 919, 
dated February 5, 1941, has been issued : 

"Reference is made to Executive Order No. 
7260 dated December 31, 1935 continuing the 
functions of the Executive Committee on Com- 
mercial Policy and defining its membership. 
Section 2 of this Order provides : 

" 'The Chairman of the said Committee shall 
be a representative of the Department of State 
who shall be appointed by the Secretary of 
State. The representatives of the member de- 
partments and agencies shall be designated by 
the respective heads of such departments and 
agencies.' 

"It is hereby ordered that Dean G. Acheson, 
Assistant Secretary of State, shall be the repre- 
sentative of the Department of State on the 
Executive Committee on Commercial Policy 
and shall serve as Chairman thereof, with 
authority to add other representatives of the 
Department. 

"Departmental Order No. 807 of August 18, 
1939 7 is hereby revoked. 

Cordell Hull" 



The Foreign Service 



NOMINATIONS OF AMBASSADORS AND MINISTERS 



The President, on February 6, 1941, submitted 
to the Senate the following nominations of am- 
bassadors and ministers : 

John G. Winant, of New Hampshire, to be 
Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipoten- 



tiary of the United States of America to Great 
Britain. 

Anthony J. Drexel Biddle, Jr., of Pennsyl- 
vania, now Ambassador Extraordinary and 



' Designating Henry F. Grady as the representative 
of the Department of State. 



FEBRUARY 8, 1941 



169 



Plenipotentiary to Poland, to serve concur- 
rently and without additional compensation as 
Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipoten- 
tiary near the Government of Belgium now es- 
tablished in London; and as Envoy Extraor- 
dinary and Minister Plenipotentiary near the 
Governments of Norway and the Netherlands, 
also now established in London. 

William Dawson, of Minnesota, now Ambas- 
sador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to 
Panama, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and 
Plenipotentiary of the United States of Amer- 
ica to Uruguay. 8 

Clarence E. Gauss, of Connecticut, now 
Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipoten- 
tiary to Australia, to be Ambassador Extraor- 
dinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States 
of America to China. 

Edwin C. Wilson, of Florida, now Envoy 
Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to 
Uruguay, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and 
Plenipotentiary of the United States of Amer- 
ica to Panama. 

Bert Fish, of Florida, now Envoy Extraor- 
dinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Egypt, 
to be Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Pleni- 
potentiary of the United States of America to 
Portugal. 

Nelson T. Johnson, of Oklahoma, now Am- 
bassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to 
China, to be Envoy Extraordinary and Minister 
Plenipotentiary of the United States of Amer- 
ica to Australia. 

Alexander C. Kirk, of Illinois, now Counselor 
of Embassy at Rome with the honorary rank of 
Minister, to be Envoy Extraordinary and Min- 
ister Plenipotentiary of the United States of 
America to Egypt. 

Jay Pierrepont Moffat, of New Hampshire, 
now Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Pleni- 
potentiary to Canada, to serve concurrently and 
without additional compensation as Envoy Ex- 
traordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary near 
the Government of Luxemburg, now established 
in Canada. 



8 See the Bulletin of January 11, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 
81), p. 79. 



Herbert Claiborne Pell, of Rhode Island, now 
Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipoten- 
tiary to Portugal, to be Envoy Extraordinary 
and Minister Plenipotentiary of the United 
States of America to Hungary. 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press February 8] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since February 1, 
1941: 

Career Officers 

J. Rives Childs, of Lynchburg, Va., now 
serving in the Department of State, has been 
designated First Secretary of Legation and 
Consul at Tangier, Morocco. 

Hooker A. Doolittle, of Utica, N. Y., First 
Secretary of Legation and Consul at Tangier, 
Morocco, has been assigned as Consul at Tunis, 
Tunisia. 

Joel C. Hudson, of St. Louis, Mo., Second 
Secretary of Embassy and Consul at Berlin, 
Germany, has been assigned for duty in the 
Department of State. 

Gerald Warner, of Northampton, Mass., Con- 
sul at Taihoku, Japan, has been assigned as 
Consul at Tokyo, Japan. 

The assignment of Walter P. McConaughy, 
of Montevallo, Ala., as Consul at Tokyo, Japan, 
has been canceled. Mr. McConaughy has now 
been designated Second Secretary of Embassy 
at Peiping, China. 

George W. Renchard, of Detroit, Mich., Third 
Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul at Ot- 
tawa, has been assigned for duty in the 
Department of State. 

Ralph J. Blake, of Portland, Oreg., Consul at 
Tokyo, Japan, has been assigned as Consul at 
Taihoku, Japan. 

The following Foreign Service officers, Vice 
Consuls at their respective posts, have been as- 
signed to the Department of State for duty in 
the Foreign Service Officers' Training School, 
effective April 1, 1941 : 



170 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Wymlierley DeR. Coerr, New Haven, Conn. ; Montreal 
Thomas J. Corey, Glenilale, Calif. ; Vancouver 
Lewis E. Gleeck, Jr., Chicago, 111. ; Vancouver 
Alfred H. Lovell, Jr., Ann Arbor, Mich. ; Montreal 
Frederick J. Mann, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Toronto 
Richard H. Post, Quoque, N. Y. ; Windsor 
M. Robert Rutherford, Missoula, Mont.; Winnipeg 
Joseph J. Wagner, Jamaica Park, N. Y. ; Habana 
Meredith Weatherby, Waco, Tex.; Habana 
Charles H. Whitaker, Boston, Mass.; Habana 
Julian L. Nugent, Jr., Pecos, N. Mex. ; Mexico City 
Kenneth R. Oakley, Fort Smith, Ark.; Mexico City 
Joseph Palmer, 2d, Belmont, Mass. ; Mexico City 
George D. Henderson, Palo Alto, Calif.; Ciudad Juarez 
Wallace W. Stuart, Greeueville, Tenn. ; Ciudad Juarez 
Richard A. Johnson, Moline, 111. ; Naples 
Donald B. Calder, New York, N. Y. ; Zurich 



Non-career Officers 

Charles H. Stephan, of Staten Island, N. T., 
Vice Consul at Nagoya, Japan, has been ap- 
pointed Vice Consul at Tokyo, Japan, upon the 
closing of the office at Nagoya, Japan. 

FOREIGN SERVICE REGULATIONS 

On February 4, 1941, the President signed 
Executive Order No. 8672 amending the For- 
eign Service Regulations of the United States 
(Chapter XVI: General Instructions Relating 
to Navigation). For text of this order see the 
Federal Register of February 7, 1941 (vol. 6, 
no. 26), p. 805 (The National Archives of the 
United States). 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



SOVEREIGNTY 

CONVENTION ON THE PROVISIONAL ADMINIS- 
TRATION OF EUROPEAN COLONIES AND 
POSSESSIONS IN THE AMERICAS 

Peru 

The American Ambassador to Peru reported 
by a telegram dated January 29, 1941, that the 
Peruvian Congress approved on January 28, 
1941, the ratification of the Convention on the 
Provisional Administration of European Col- 
onies and Possessions in the Americas, signed 
at Habana on July 30, 1940. 

EXTRADITION 

SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION WITH 
GUATEMALA 

The American Charge d'Affaires ad interim 
at Guatemala City reported by a telegram dated 
February 6, 1941, that ratifications were ex- 
changed on that day of the Supplementary 



Extradition Convention between the United 
States and Guatemala signed on February 20, 
1940. 

This convention, which is made an integral 
part of the Extradition Convention of Febru- 
ary 27, 1903, between the two countries (Treaty 
Series No. 425), supplements that convention 
by adding to the list of crimes and offenses for 
which extradition may be sought, the crime or 
offense of violation of the laws prohibiting or 
regulating the traffic in narcotics, when the 
penalty to which violators are liable is one 
year's imprisonment or more. 

The supplementary convention will enter into 
force 10 daj 7 s after its publication in accordance 
with the laws of the High Contracting Parties, 
the period to run from the date of its publica- 
tion in the country last publishing, and it will 
continue and terminate in the same manner as 
the convention of 1903. 



FEBRUARY 8, 1941 



171 



NON-AGGRESSION 

PACT BETWEEN BOLIVIA AND CHILE 
The American Ambassador to Chile reported 
by a despatch dated January 22, 1941, that a 
Pact of Non-aggression between Chile and Bo- 
livia was signed at La Paz on January 16. 1941. 
The text of the agreement was published in El 
Mercurio of January 17, 1941. Both Govern- 
ments condemn wars of aggression, they re- 
affirm their complete accord in the doctrine of 
non-recognition of territorial annexation by 
force, and confirm their adherence to the prin- 
ciple of article 8 of the Convention on Rights 
and Duties of States, signed at Montevideo on 
December 26, 1933, which states "no state has 
the right to intervene in the internal or external 
affairs of another". 



AGRICULTURE 

INTER-AMERICAN COFFEE-MARKETING 
AGREEMENT 

United States 

On February 3, 1941, the Senate gave its 
advice and consent to ratification by the Presi- 
dent of the Inter-American Coffee-Marketing 
Agreement signed at Washington on November 
28, 1940. 



Regulations 



The following Government regulations may 

be of interest to readers of the Bulletin: 

Rules of General Application, Amendments. January 
30, 1941. (Committee for Reciprocity Information.) 
Federal Register, February 5, 1941 (vol. 6, no. 24) , p. 774 
(The National Archives of the United States). 



Publications 



Department of State 

Air Transport Services : Arrangement Between the 
United States of America and Canada Giving Effect to 
Article III of the Air Transport Arrangement Signed 
August 18, 1939 (Executive Agreement Series No. 159) — 
Effected by exchange of notes signed November 29 and 
December 2, 1940: effective December 3, 1940. Execu- 
tive Agreement Series No. 186. Publication 1537. 5 pp. 

■V- 

Publications of the Department of State (a list cumu- 
lative from October 1, 1929). January 1, 1941. Publi- 
cation l. r >46. 24 pp. Free. 

Reciprocal Customs Privileges for Foreign Service 
Personnel : Agreement Between the United States of 
America and Brazil — Effected by exchange of notes 
signed October 11, 1940; effective October 11, 1940. 
Executive Agreement Series No. 185. Publication 1549. 
3 pp. 50. 



Legislation 



Retirement and Disability Fund of the Foreign Serv- 
ice: Message From the President of the United States 
Transmitting a Report [by the Secretary of State] 
Concerning the Retirement and Disability Fund of the 
Foreign Service. (H. Doc. 66, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 
6 pp. 50. 

Supplemental Estimates of Appropriation for the 
Department of State, Fiscal Year 1941 : Communication 
From the President of the United States Transmitting 
Two Supplemental Estimates of Appropriation for the 
Department of State, for the Fiscal Year 1941, 
Amounting to $11,500 and a Draft of a Proposed Pro- 
vision Pertaining to the Appropriation "Salaries, Am- 
bassadors and Ministers," of the Department [including 
$9,500 for the Mixed Claims Commission, United States 
and Germany, 1941, and $2,000 for salaries and expenses 
of the International Joint Commission, United States 
and Great Britain, 1941]. (H. Doc. 72, 77th Cong., 
1st sess.) 3 pp. 50. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULI 



.j j 



ETIN 



FEBRUARY 15, 1941 
Vol. IV: No. 86— Publication 1562 



Qontents 




General: Page 

Control of exports iu national defense 175 

Control of vessels in territorial waters of the United 

States and the Canal Zone 179 

American Republics: 

Financial agreement with Haiti 179 

Visit of Chilean newspapermen to the United States . 180 
Inter-American Development Commission: Argentine 

Council 181 

Merchandising Advisory Service for other American 

republics 182 

Student officers from other American republics in 

United States Army Service Schools 182 

The Far East: 

Presentation of letters of credence by the Japanese 

Ambassador 183 

Suspension of tonnage duties for vessels of India . . . 184 

The Near East: 

Air attack on American missionaries in Anglo-Egyptian 

Sudan 184 

The Department: 

Designation of Assistant Secretary Acheson as member 

of Foreign Service Boards 185 

International Conferences, Commissions, Etc.: 
Pan American Resources Commission and Pan Ameri- 
can Soil Conservation Commission 185 

[Over] 



Qontents- 



U. S, SUPERIN 

MAR 4 



-CONTINUED. 



The Foreign Service: Page 

Foreign Service examination 186 

Designation of Herschel V. Johnson as honorary Min- 
ister to Great Britain 188 

Nominations of ambassadors and ministers 188 

Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, Etc.: 

Monthly statistics 188 

Treaty Information: 
Agriculture: 

Inter-American Coffee-Marketing Agreement . . . 202 
Finance: 

Agreement With Haiti for the Temporary Postpone- 
ment During 1941 of Certain Interest Payments . 202 
Fisheries: 

Convention, Agreement, and Protocol for the Regula- 
tion of Whaling (Treaty Series Nos. 880, 933, and 

944) 202 

Nature protection and wildlife preservation: 

Convention on Nature Protection and Wildlife Pres- 
ervation in the Western Hemisphere 202 

Restriction of war: 

Convention for the Amelioration of the Condition of 
the Wounded and the Sick of Armies in the Field 

(Treaty Series No. 847) 202 

Judicial decisions: 

Reciprocal Trade Agreement With France (Execu- 
tive Agreement Series No. 146) 203 

Special assistance: 

Financial Convention With the Dominican Republic 

Revising the Convention of 1924 203 

Publications 204 



General 



CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL DEFENSE 



The Division of Controls of the Department 
of State has issued the following statements : 

"In an effort to expedite exports to the British 
Empire of copper, bronze, brass, and nickel 
products subject to the requirement of export 
licenses in accordance with the President's 
proclamation of January 10, 1941, 1 the British 
Purchasing Commission has made arrangements 
to coordinate such shipments to the countries of 
the Empire. The British Purchasing Commis- 
sion has already obtained unlimited licenses 
authorizing the exportation to those destina- 
tions of all the above-mentioned products as 
defined in the President's Executive order of 
January 10, 1941. 2 

"In order to obtain a clearance of shipments 
for exportation of these particular products, it 
is necessary for the shipper to communicate with 
the British Purchasing Commission, the Wil- 
lard Hotel, Washington, D.C., attention of Capt. 
W. C. Coventry. 

"It will also be necessary for every company 
exporting such copper, bronze, brass, and nickel 
products to the British Empire in connection 
with these unlimited licenses, to supply statistics 
every 10 days regarding their actual exporta- 
tions. These statistics should be forwarded to 
the British Purchasing Commission, which in 
turn is required to present summaries to the 
interested branches of this Government. 



1 See the Bulletin of January 11, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 
81), pp. 52-53. 
* Ibid., pp. 53-54. 



"Applications for license to export to the 
British Empire the articles and materials re- 
ferred to in the unlimited licenses which have 
been issued to the British Purchasing Commis- 
sion, are being returned to the applicants with 
the suggestion that they communicate with the 
Commission." 



"In an effort to expedite exports to the British 
Empire of the iron and steel products subject to 
the requirement of export licenses in accordance 
with the President's proclamation of December 
10, 1940, 5 the British Iron & Steel Corporation 
has made arrangements to coordinate such 
shipments to the countries of the Empire. The 
British Iron & Steel Corporation has already ob- 
tained blanket licenses authorizing the exporta- 
tion to those destinations of all the iron and 
steel products as denned in the President's Ex- 
ecutive order of December 10, 1940. 4 

"In order to obtain a clearance of shipments 
for exportation of these particular steel prod- 
ucts, it is necessary for the shipper to communi- 
cate with the British Iron & Steel Corporation, 
43 Exchange Place, New York, New York, at- 
tention of Mr. R. W. Finlayson. 

"It will also be necessary for every company 
exporting such iron and steel products to the 
British Empire in connection with these blanket 
licenses to supply statistics every 10 days re- 



3 See the Bulletin of December 14, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 
77), pp. 529-530. 
4 1 Oid., pp. 530-531. 

175 



176 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



garding their actual exportations. These statis- 
tics should be forwarded to the British Iron & 
Steel Corporation, which in turn is required to 
present summaries to the interested branches of 
this Government. 

"Applications for license to export the articles 
and materials referred to in the blanket licenses 
which have been issued to the British Iron & 
Steel Corporation are being returned to the ap- 
plicants with the suggestion that they communi- 
cate with the Corporation." 



On February 12, 1941, the Secretary of State 
sent the following circular telegram to collectors 
of customs at ports of exit along the United 
States -Mexican border: 

"Reference is made to previous letters of in- 
terpretation regarding the regulations issued 
pursuant to section 6 of the Export Control Act 
approved on July 2, 1940. 

"Until further notice, you may permit with- 
out the requirement of a license the exportation 
to Mexico, for use in that country, of shipments 
of solder and of all articles and materials enu- 
merated in the Executive order issued by the 
President on February 4, 1941, 5 governing the 
exportation of iron and steel products, in cases 
where the shipment does not exceed $25 net 
value. You are requested to exercise due dili- 
gence to prevent any abuse of this privilege and 
to report to the Department of State immedi- 
ately any evidence of such abuse." 



The following circular telegrams to all collec- 
tors of customs have been sent recently bj' the 
Secretary of State: 

"February 11, 1941. 
"Pending further instructions, no licenses will 
be required for the export of the following types 
of 'metal drums and containers, filled or un- 
filled, for oil, gas, and other liquids', referred 



to in the Executive order of February 4, 1941,° 
governing the exportation of iron and steel : 

" k (l) Metal containers of less than five gal- 
lons' capacity. 

"'(2) Metal drums and containers with ca- 
pacity of five or more gallons but less than thirty 
gallons except those containing or clearly in- 
tended to contain gasoline, lubricating oil, or 
crude oil. 

"'(3) Metal drums or containers, regardless 
of size, containing chemicals and related prod- 
ucts as classified in Schedule B, "Statistical 
Classification of Domestic Commodities Ex- 
ported from the United States." ' 

"Licenses are required for the export on or 
after February 15 of all metal drums and con- 
tainers referred to in the Executive order other 
than the three classes specifically exempted 
above. It should be noted that all of the drums 
and containers subject to license must contain 
or be designed to contain liquids, and that those 
containing or designed to contain exclusively 
solids or gases do not fall under the licensing 
requirement. 

"Licenses previously issued for the export of 
petroleum products bearing license numbers 
commencing with the letters EA, EB, EC, ED, 
or EE do not authorize the exportation of 
drums or containers even though these articles 
may be mentioned on the license. Licenses au- 
thorizing the exportation of drums or containers 
will bear license numbers beginning with the 
letters HP. Licenses issued for the export of 
drums and containers will not authorize the 
exportation of liquids contained therein. These 
liquids must be licensed separately if they are 
among the articles and materials for which an 
export license is required. 

"Unlimited licenses have been issued to the 
British Iron and Steel Corporation for the ex- 
port to the British Empire of the drums and 
containers referred to above, and all exporta- 
tions of these articles to that destination may be 
made under those licenses." 



' See the Bulletin of February S, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 85), 
pp. 158-161. 



" Ibid, 



FEBRUARY 15, 1941 



17/ 



"February 11, 1941. 
"In accordance with the provisions of the 
President's Executive Order No. 8640 of Janu- 
ary 15, 1941, 7 the Secretary of State has today 
issued general license no. GUS authorizing the 
exportation to any foreign destination of any 
articles or materials to which the provisions of 
Executive Order No. 8640 have been, or may be, 
made applicable, provided such shipments are 
consigned to the United States Government or 
an agency thereof, and provided further that the 
articles or materials are furnished or intended 
for the use of the United States Government or 
one of its instrumentalities. Collectors of cus- 
toms may permit shipments to depart under this 
general license and without the requirement of 
an individual export license upon the presenta- 
tion by the shipper of satisfactory evidence that 
the shipment is consigned to the United States 
Government, to an agency thereof, or to a con- 
signee acting for one of the foregoing. Collec- 
tors of customs may in their discretion accept 
in lieu of other documentary evidence a state- 
ment on the export declaration by the shipper to 
the effect that the exportation described therein 
is for the account of the United States Govern- 
ment or an agency thereof. The documents cov- 
ering each shipment exported under general 
license no. GUS shall show that the United 
States Government or an agency thereof is the 
ultimate consignee." 3 



"February 12, 1941. 
"I refer to the Department's circular tele- 
grams regarding unlimited licenses which have 
been issued to the British Iron and Steel Cor- 
poration and the British Purchasing Commis- 
sion, authorizing the exportation of various 
products listed in the President's several procla- 
mations and Executive orders. Photostatic 
copies of these unlimited licenses were presented 



to you recently, and you were authorized to 
permit exportations against these licenses to the 
various countries of the British Empire. 

"Additional unlimited licenses have been is- 
sued to the aforementioned organizations for 
the exportation of the additional iron and steel 
items enumerated in the President's Executive 
Order of February 4, 1941 (referred to in my 
other letter of this date). In lieu of photostatic 
copies of these unlimited licenses, it has been 
deemed feasible to inform you of the number 
assigned to each unlimited license by letter, and 
this will serve as authorization to permit expor- 
tations against such licenses. The appropriate 
license number should be set forth on the Ship- 
per's Export Declaration by the exporter. 

"The license numbers referred to are as 
follows : 

"Metal drums and containers, filled or unfilled, 
for oil, gas, and other liquids: 



' See the Bulletin of January 18, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 
82), p. 91. 

8 Applications for license authorizing exportations 
covered hy the above-mentioned general license are 
being returned to the applicants. 



"Great Britain 
Ireland 
Australia 
New Zealand 
Newfoundland 
Union of South Africa 
Burma 
India 

Southern Rhodesia 
Aden 

Bahama Islands 
Leeward Islands 
Windward Islands 
British Guiana 
British Honduras 
Gold Coast 
Hong Kong 
Jamaica 

Straits Settlements 
Trinidad 

Unfederated Malay States 
Tanganyika Territory 
South-West Africa 
Palestine 

Northern Rhodesia 
Nigeria 
Kenya 
Egypt 
Ceylon 
Barbados 

Anglo-Egyptian Sudan 
Bermuda 



HP 
HP 
HP 
HP 
HP 

HP 6 

HP 7 

HP 8 

HP 9 

HP 10 

HP 11 

HP 12 

HP 13 

HP 14 

HP 15 

HP 16 

HP 17 

HP 18 

HP 19 

HP 20 

HP 21 

HP 22 

HP 23 

HP 24 

HP 25 

HP 26 

HP 27 

HP 28 

HP 29 

HP 30 

HP 31 

HP 32 



178 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



"Water, oil, gas and other storage tanks com- 
plete, and knocked-down material for permanent 
or temporary installation: 



"Great Britain 
Ireland 
Australia 
New Zealand 
Newfoundland 
Union of South Africa 
Burma 
India 

Southern Rhodesia 
Aden 

Bahama Islands 
Leeward Islands 
Windward Islands 
British Guiana 
British Honduras 
Gold Coast 
Hong Kong 
Jamaica 

Straits Settlements 
Trinidad 

Unfederated Malay States 
Tanganyika Territory 
South-West Africa 
Palestine 

Northern Rhodesia 
Nigeria 
Kenya 
Egypt 
Ceylon 
Barbados 

Anglo-Egyptian Sudan 
Bermuda 



HT 1 

HT 2 

HT 3 

HT 4 

HT 5 

HT 6 

HT 7 

HT 8 

HI 9 

HT 10 

HT 11 

HT 12 

HT 13 

HT 14 

HT 15 

HT 16 

HT 17 

HT 18 

HT 19 

HT 20 

HT 21 

HT 22 

HT 23 

HT 24 

HT 25 

HT 26 

HT 27 

HT 28 

HT 29 

HT 30 

HT 31 

HT 32 



"Those unlimited licenses previously issued 
to the British Iron and Steel Corporation and 
the British Purchasing Commission continue in 
full force and effect." 



"Additional general licenses have likewise 
been issued for the exportation to Canada of 
those new iron and steel products placed under 
the licensing requirement by the Executive 
Orders of February 4, 1941." These license 
numbers are as follows: 

"Metal drums and containers, filled or un- 
filled, for oil, gas, and other liquids : — GHP 1. 

"Water, oil, gas and other storage tanks com- 
plete, and knocked-down material for perma- 
nent or temporary installation : — GHT 1. 

"Petroleum and gas well equipment and parts, 
including well drilling machinery and parts; 
Petroleum refining machinery, equipment and 
parts:— GQM1. 



"See the Bulletin of February 8, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 
85), pp. 158-161. 



"February 12, 1941. 

"Reference is made to the Department's 
previous circular air mail letters in regard to 
the interpretation of the regulations issued pur- 
suant to the Export Control Act approved on 
July 2, 1940. 

"The Executive Order issued by the Presi- 
dent on December 10, 1940, setting forth those 
iron and steel products requiring a license for 
their exportation, has been superseded by a new 
Executive Order, dated February 4, 1941 and 
effective on and after February 15, 1941. Copies 
of the new Executive Order are attached. 9 It 
will be noted that while there has been some 
reclassification of the materials requiring 
license, the classifications are in general the 
same as those found in the proclamation of De- 
cember 10, 1940. There have been, however, 
some additions and deletions, and these are fully 
covered in an information sheet released by the 
Department, copies of which are also enclosed. 10 

"All licenses for the exportation of iron and 
steel products issued by the Department up to 
and including February 14, 1941 are valid and 
should be accepted by you, even though pre- 
sented on and after February 15, 1941. 

"The President also issued a second Executive 
Order on February 4, 1941, requiring a license 
for the exportation of well and refining ma- 
chinery, radium, uranium and calf and kip 
skins. This Executive Order becomes effective 
on and after February 10, 1941. Copies are 
enclosed. 9 

"As you have been informed, the Administra- 
tor of Export Control has ruled that aluminum 
foil is now subject to the export licensing re- 
quirement. Aluminum foil, however, is not 
considered to mean paper-backed aluminum foil 
or foil which is colored or color-stamped or 
printed. 



' Not printed herein. 



FEBRUARY 15, 1941 

"No license is required for the exportation of 
brass buttons (Proclamation of January 10, 
1941), but brass screws, tacks, bolts, rivets and 
other primary fabrications are subject to the 
requirement of an export license." 

CONTROL OF VESSELS IN TERRITO- 
RIAL WATERS OF THE UNITED 
STATES AND THE CANAL ZONE 

On February 11, 1941, the President issued 
Executive Order No. 8677 providing, with re- 
gard to employment of the land and naval forces 
in the control of vessels in the territorial waters 
of the United States and the Canal Zone, 11 that 
"upon request of the Secretary of the Treasury 
or the Governor of the Panama Canal (or of 



179 

such officers as are designated in regulations 
prescribed pursuant to section 1 of Title II of 
the said act of June 15, 1917) for assistance in 
the control of vessels in the territorial waters of 
the United States or in the territorial waters of 
the Canal Zone, respectively, those in command 
of the land and naval forces of the United 
States shall employ such part of the forces under 
their respective commands as may be necessary 
and available to render the assistance requested : 
Provided, that any such request by the Governor 
of the Panama Canal shall ... be subject to the 
approval of the commanding officer designated 
therein." 

The text of this Executive order appears in 
full in the Federal Register of February 13, 1941 
(vol. 6, no. 30), page 935. 



American Republics 



FINANCIAL AGREEMENT WITH HAITI 



[Released to the press February 14] 

The Department of State announces that it 
has reached an agreement in principle with the 
Government of the Republic of Haiti which, 
when formalized and ratified by the necessary 
legislation in Haiti, will suspend certain past 
undertakings of the Government of Haiti to 
the Government of the United States to the 
extent necessary to permit the fiscal representa- 
tive at Port-au-Prince to postpone remittance 
to the fiscal agents of the loans of 1922 and 
1923 (National City Bank of New York) of 
one-third the interest at the rate of 6 percent, 
due on the outstanding bonds of the Republic 
of Haiti on April 1 and October 1, 1941. It is 
expected that an accord will soon be reached 
between the United States and Haitian Govern- 
ments providing for this postponement and 



11 See the Bulletin of June 29, 1940 (vol. II, no. 53), 
pp. 707-708. 



modifying the accord concluded between them 
on August 7, 1933 to that extent. 12 

The Republic of Haiti, in inviting the atten- 
tion of the bondholders — through the medium 
of the Foreign Bondholders Protective Coun- 
cil, Incorporated — to its long record of punc- 
tual payment of the interest on its outstanding 
debt and, until in recent years, of full amortiza- 
tion thereon, has stated that the closing of 
European markets to Haitian agricultural 
products, particularly coffee, cotton, and sugar, 
has resulted in serious repercussions on Haitian 
economy. Thus, the failure this year of Euro- 
pean countries to purchase Haitian coffee has 
resulted in an unsold present surplus of about 
200,000 bags (of 60 kilos each) which can be 
disposed of neither in Europe on account of 
war conditions, nor in the United States be- 

\ See infra, p. 202. 



180 



DEPARTMENT OF .STATE BULLETIN 



cause of the coffee-quota arrangement which 
limits the exports of Haitian coffee to the United 
States to 275,000 bags (an amount considerably 
greater than any past marketings in the United 
States). Simultaneously, European markets 
have been closed to Haitian cotton, the crop 
of which this year amounts to about 3,000,000 
kilograms, as well as to a portion of the Haitian 
sugar production, about 35,000 tons, which can 
find little market elsewhere owing to war 
conditions. 

Foreseeing the difficulties which these restric- 
tions were apt to bring about in its economy, the 
Haitian Government several months ago re- 
duced its budgetary expenditures by about 20 
percent and has reduced all Government sal- 
aries from 5 percent to 25 percent. In spite of 
these economies, which have reduced the essen- 
tial services of the Government to a bare mini- 
mum, the present forecast is nevertheless for a 
deficit in operating expenses during the present 



fiscal year ending September 30, 1941. In these 
circumstances, and with its cash position re- 
duced, the Haitian Government has reluctantly 
appealed to the Foreign Bondholders Protec- 
tive Council, Incorporated, which has now ex- 
pressed itself as accepting a postponement in the 
payment of one-third of the interest at the rate 
of 6 percent due on the coupons of the bonds 
which are payable April 1 and October 1, 1941. 
In view of the situation as thus explained, the 
Department is entering into the agreement with 
the Haitian Government described above. 

A further announcement will be made when 
the formal accord which is expected to be con- 
cluded between the two Governments has been 
signed. This accord will not affect the accord of 
September 27, 1940 which permits the fiscal rep- 
resentative at Port-au-Prince not to remit to 
the fiscal agents any amortization payments 
through the present fiscal year which ends Sep- 
tember 30, 1941. 



VISIT OF CHILEAN NEWSPAPERMEN TO THE UNITED STATES 



[Released to the press February 10] 

The seven Chilean newspapermen who have 
been invited to visit the United States by a 
group of American newspapers 13 arrived in New 
York on Monday morning, February 10, aboard 
the Grace Line S.S. Santa Clara. They were 
met in New York by the Assistant Chief of the 
Division of Cultural Relations, Mr. Edward G. 
Trueblood. 

The group will spend Monday and Tuesday 
in New York City where a varied program of 
activities in their honor has been arranged. 
They will arrive in Washington at 4 : 30 
Wednesday afternoon, February 12, and will 
be met at the Union Station by the Director 
General of the Pan American Union, and by 
the representatives of the Chilean Embassy, 
of the Department, and of local newspapers. 
While in Washington they will reside at the 
Mayflower Hotel. 



"See the Bulletin of February 1, 1941 (vol. IV, 
no. 84), p. 131. 



The Washington program for this group is as 
follows: Wednesday evening, February 12, din- 
ner at home of Mr. Eugene Meyer of the Wash- 
ington Post. On Thursday, February 13, they 
will be received formally at the Pan American 
Union at 10 a.m.; at noon they will attend a 
Department of State press conference; at 1 p.m. 
they will be guests at a luncheon in the Metro- 
politan Club given by Mr. Robert H. Patchin, 
Vice President, W. R. Grace and Company, on 
behalf of the Grace Line and W. R. Grace and 
Company ; and from 5 to 8 p.m. the Chilean Em- 
bassy is holding a small reception in their honor. 
On Friday the group will attend the regular 
White House press conference at 10 : 30 a.m. and 
will be guests at a luncheon given in their honor 
by the Overseas Club in the Willard Hotel. The 
newspapermen will proceed Friday afternoon 
or evening to their respective host papers in this 
country, two remaining in Washington as the 
guests of the Washington Post and the Wash- 
ington Star. 



FEBRUARY 15, 1941 



181 



Senor Carlos Eastman, who is to be the guest 
of the New York Times, is a graduate of the 
Chilean Naval Academy and at present is chief 
accountant of El Mercurio of Santiago. His 
wife is accompanying him to the United States. 

Sehor Francisco le Dantec, who represents El 
Mercurio of Valparaiso, will be attached to the 
Philadelphia Bulletin. He has worked for 
many years on the staff of El Mercurio of Val- 
paraiso and at present is assistant editor. 

Sehor Joaquin Muirhead is a member of the 
staff of La Hora of Santiago and will remain 
in Washington with the Washington Post. His 
specialties in reporting are national defense and 
politics. 

Sehor Luis Ignacio Silva, from La Union to 
the Boston Globe, is completing his studies for 
the Chilean bar and is a brother of the editor 
and publisher of La Union. 

Sehor Rafael Valdivieso, from El Impartial 
to the Detroit News, is one of the editors of 
El Impartial. He is a law student and expects 
to receive his degree in law this year. 

Sehor Guillermo Valenzuela, from La Nation 
to the Los Angeles Times, is chief of the cable 
department and translator. He has been at- 
tached to La Nation since 1935. He has also 
been a public official in the Ministry of Public 



Education and has a law degree from the Uni- 
versity of Chile. He specializes in history, lan- 
guages, and bibliography. 

Sehor Manuel Vega, from El Diario Ilustrado 
to the Washington Star, is the literary editor of 
El Diario Ilustrado and considered one of the 
important contemporary writers in Chile. 

[Released to the press February 13] 

At. his press conference February 13, the Sec- 
retary of State said: 

"I am glad to see some visiting friends here 
who have paid us the fine compliment to come 
a long way to pay their respects and to fellow- 
ship with us for a time. I have the most pleasant 
recollections of my visit to Chile and of the ex- 
ceptional hospitality and courteous treatment I 
uniformly received. I can scarcely think of a 
more important or desirable act of cooperation 
between the Governments and the peoples of the 
Americas than visits back and forth of repre- 
sentatives of the press and especially of those 
who are starting out in this splendid profession. 
The results are bound to be. mutually beneficial 
and desirable from every standpoint, so I wel- 
come you young men here and hope you will 
have a thoroughly enjoyable and profitable 
stay." 



INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION: ARGENTINE 

COUNCIL 



[Released to the press by the Office for Coordination of Com- 
mercial and Cultural Relations Between the American 
Republics February 14] 

Membership of the Argentine national coun- 
cil, the second of 21 councils 14 being established 
by the Inter-American Development Commis- 
sion in its program for stimulation of trade be- 
tween the American republics, was announced 
February 14 by Nelson A. Rockefeller, chair- 
man. Mr. Rockefeller is also Coordinator of 
Commercial and Cultural Relations Between the 
American Republics. 

The. council will have as its chairman Dr. 



14 For announcement regarding the first council of 
the Commission, see the Bulletin of January 4, 1941 
(vol. IV, no. SO), p. 14. 
294397—41 2 



Raul Prebisch, general manager of the Banco 
Central, who sailed for home last week after 
two months in the United States, in which he 
assisted in arranging a credit of $110,000,000 
extended by the Export-Import Bank and the. 
Treasury Department to Argentina. 

Arrangements for establishment of the coun- 
cil were completed in Buenos Aires, where an 
initial meeting was held this week, by J. Rafael 
Oreamuno, vice chairman, and George W. Ma- 
galhaes, who serve with Mr. Rockefeller, Renato 
de Azevedo, and Carlos Campbell del Campo as 
members of the parent Commission. 

The Inter-American Development Commis- 
sion is an outgrowth of the Inter-American Fi- 



182 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



nancial and Economic Advisory Committee or- 
ganized following the Conference of Panama. 15 
It was established to stimulate the increase of 
non-competitive imports from Central and 
South America to the United States, increase 
trade between the Central and South American 
countries, and to encourage development of in- 
dustry in Central and South America with 
particular regard to the production of con- 
sumer goods. 

Members of the Argentine council, in addi- 
tion to Chairman Prebisch, follow: 

Luis Colombo, President, Union Industrial 
Argentina 

Dr. Alejandro Shaw, President, Confedera- 
cion Argentina del Comercio, la Industria 
y la Production 

Arnaldo Massone, prominent businessman 

Dr. Aldolfo Bioy, President, Sociedad 
Eural Argentina 

Dr. Raul C. Migone, Chief of the Office of 
International Unions, Ministry of For- 
eign Relations, Buenos Aires, secretary of 
the council 

John C. McClintock, of the Coordinator's 
Office, is executive secretary of the parent 
Commission. 

MERCHANDISING ADVISORY SERV- 
ICE FOR OTHER AMERICAN RE- 
PUBLICS 

In an address released to the press February 
8 by the Office for Coordination of Commercial 
and Cultural Relations Between the American 
Republics and delivered before the League of 
Women Voters in New York City February 8, 
Mr. Nelson A. Rockefeller, Coordinator of 
Commercial and Cultural Relations Between 
the American Republics, described, among 
other things, a new project which is being 
undertaken by the Inter-American Develop- 
ment Commission and which has as its pur- 
pose the increase of trade between the 
American republics. This project is the 
"creation of a Merchandising Advisory Serv- 
ice to be operated by the Inter-American De- 



16 See the Bulletin of November 30, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 
75), pp. 464-^65. 



velopment Commission for the benefit of the 
producers and exporters of the other American 
republics." 

Mr. Rockefeller said : 

"The Commission has recognized that Cen- 
tral and South American countries, princi- 
pally exporters of raw materials, have paid 
little heed to problems attendant upon mer- 
chandising of other products in the United 
States market. 

"The Commission therefore decided to create 
a Merchandising Advisory Service with head- 
quarters in New York, which will be effectively 
staffed to provide the necessary assistance to 
exporters from our neighboring republics. It 
is believed that this Service will help them 
expand the markets for their products in this 
country. The advice and recommendations 
will be carried back to the producing countries 
through the local country units of the Develop- 
ment Commission. In the United States closer 
relations will be promoted between exporters 
of the other republics and such organizations 
as our National Retail Dry Goods Association, 
grocery, pharmaceutical, and other trade 
groups. We are confident that this Service 
will help to broaden the United States market 
for products from these nations and cause the 
introduction of items with which the consumer 
market in the United States is not now 
familiar. 

"The same impulse which has caused us to 
plan establishment of a Merchandising Service 
for Central and South American exporters has 
impelled our office to invite the American Asso- 
ciation of Advertising Agencies to undertake 
through its Export Service Bureau a series of 
extensive studies of markets and advertising 
media in each of our neighboring republics. 
The results of these studies are to be made 
available to all American exporters and adver- 
tisers through the Association and through the 
Department of Commerce. . . ." 

STUDENT OFFICERS FROM OTHER 
AMERICAN REPUBLICS IN UNITED 
STATES ARMY SERVICE SCHOOLS 

In December 1940 the Chief of Staff of the 
United States Army, Gen. George C. Marshall, 



FEBRUARY 15, 1941 



183 



issued invitations to many of the other Amer- 
ican republics to send student officers to United 
States Army Service Schools. It was felt that 
the best possible training could be given to these 
junior officers in the same courses that officers of 
the United States Army are now taking in pur- 
suance of our rearmament program. These 
courses at our Service Schools are designed for 
reserve officers and have the object of equipping 
a young man with the necessary training and 
background so that he can act as a first-class 
commander or subordinate in a fighting tactical 
unit. 

The other American republics replied with 
enthusiasm to this invitation, with the result 



that 45 junior officers are at present in three 
United States Service Schools — 29 in the in- 
fantry school at Fort Benning, Ga., 9 at the field 
artillery school at Fort Sill, Okla., and 7 at the 
coast artillery school at Fort Monroe, Va. The 
students are expected to remain in these schools 
for the duration of the courses, which in each 
case is approximately three months. At the 
termination of the courses they will be assigned 
to regular Army tactical units for approxi- 
mately three months more of field service. Dur- 
ing their stay at the Service Schools they will 
share the accommodations of officers of the 
United States Army and will be treated exactly 
like their brothers-in-arms. 



The Far East 



PRESENTATION OF LETTERS OF CREDENCE BY THE JAPANESE 

AMBASSADOR 



[Released to the press February 14] 

The remarks of the newly appointed Japa- 
nese Ambassador, Admiral Kichisaburo No- 
mura, upon the occasion of the presentation of 
his letters of credence, February 14, 1941, 
follow : 

"Mr. President: 

"His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, my 
August Sovereign, has been graciously pleased 
to entrust me with the mission of representing 
him as Ambassador to the United States of 
America. I have the honor, Mr. President, to 
present to you herewith my letters of credence, 
together with the letters of recall for my prede- 
cessor, Mr. Kensuke Horinouchi. 

"I wish to assure you that it is a source of 
real pleasure to me to be stationed in your great 
country, where I have a large number of friends, 
among whom I am happy to count you, Mr. 
President, as one of the oldest and closest. 

"The recent developments in Japanese - 
American relations have unfortunately been 
such as to cause considerable concern on both 



sides of the ocean. It is needed now, more than 
ever, to bring about a better understanding of 
each other's position in order to secure the in- 
terests and well-being of our two nations, 
thereby preserving the peace of the Pacific and 
maintaining the traditional friendship between 
us. Toward that end I am resolved to do all 
that I can; and I hope, Mr. President, that 
in my endeavors I may merit your confidence 
and be accorded the high privilege of your 
cooperation. 

"In conclusion I desire to express my most 
earnest hope for the prosperity of the people 
of the United States and for your personal 
health and happiness." 

The President's reply to the remarks of Ad- 
miral Kichisaburo Nomura follows: 

"Mr. Ambassador: 

"I am glad to receive from you the letters of 
credence by which His Majesty the Emperor of 
Japan has accredited you as Ambassador to the 
United States of America and to welcome you 



184 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



to this country in that capacity. I accept also 
the letters of recall of your distinguished prede- 
cessor, Mr. Kensuke Horinouchi. 

"There are, as you have stated, developments 
in the relations between the United States and 
Japan which cause concern. I welcome your 
assurance that, in the interests of the traditional 
friendship between our two countries and of the 
well-being; of the American and of the Japanese 
peoples, you are resolved to do all you can to 
bring about a better understanding. I am confi- 
dent of your devotion to this objective, and I 
feel that your long associations with the Ameri- 
can people specially qualify you for your mis- 
sion. You may be sure that I and other officers 
of the Government stand ready at all times to 
facilitate in every appropriate and practicable 
way your performing of your duties as Ambas- 
sador to this country. 

"It affords me especial pleasure to renew our 
former association. 

"I thank you for the good wishes which you 
have extended both to me and to the people of 



the United States. In reciprocating these good 
wishes I request that you convey to His Majesty 
the Emperor of Japan my hope for his contin- 
ued health and well-being." 

SUSPENSION OF TONNAGE DUTIES 
FOR VESSELS OF INDIA 

A proclamation (no. 2457) providing that 
"the foreign discriminating duties of tonnage 
and imposts within the United States" be "sus- 
pended and discontinued so far as respects the 
vessels of India and the produce, manufactures, 
or merchandise imported in said vessels into the 
United States from India or from any other for- 
eign country; the suspension to take effect from 
January 17, 1941, and to continue so long as the 
reciprocal exemption of vessels belonging to 
citizens of the United States and their cargoes 
shall be continued, and no longer", was signed 
by the President on February 6, 1941. 

The text of this proclamation appears in full 
in the Federal Register of February 11, 1941 
(vol. 6, no. 28), page 849. 



The Near East 



AIR ATTACK ON AMERICAN MISSIONARIES IN ANGLO-EGYPTIAN 

SUDAN 



[Released to the press February 10] 

A more detailed note from the Italian Gov- 
ernment addressed to the American Embassy in 
Rome has been received in response to an 
American protest concerning an attack from 
the air upon a station of the Sudan Interior 
Mission at Doro, Upper Nile province, which 
took place on August 23, 1940. 16 The note ver- 
bal, with its enclosure dated January 31, 1941, 
reads as follows : 

"With reference to the Embassy's letter of 
November 1, 1940, the Ministry of Foreign Af- 
fairs has the honor to enclose a copy of the re- 



1,1 See the Bulletin of February 1, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 
84), pp. 148-151. 



port from the competent Italian military 
authorities regarding the alleged bombardment 
of Doro. The said authorities after careful in- 
vestigation state that it is to be excluded that 
the air action in question was carried out by 
Italian airplanes and emphasize the point that 
the Government of the Province concerned had 
in fact given orders that the two missions whose 
presence at Doro and Chali was perfectly well 
known should be left undisturbed where they 
were." 

The translation of the enclosure with the 
Italian note verbal follows: 

"The careful investigation immediately or- 
dered by the high command in Italian East 
Africa has given the following; results : 



FEBRUARY 15, 1941 



185 



'"At Chali (Kurmnk) there is a group of 
American missionaries composed of two men, 
one -woman and one boy; another group of 
American missionaries composed of two men 
and three women carries on its work at Doro. 

" 'These missionaries in due time informed 
the commander of the Kurmuk garrison that 
they belonged to the Sudan Interior Mission 
and that they were engaged in religious work 
exclusively. 

" 'The Galla Sidama Government gave in- 
structions that these missions be left undis- 
turbed where they are. 

" 'The report of the bombardment of the said 
mission as broadcast by the British is in so far 
as we are concerned unfounded. 

" 'The Galla Sidama Government has caused 
an investigation to be made and states that it is 
to be excluded. We have twice bombarded the 
locality of Daga River Post and there is cor- 
roborating proof that this was the locality and 
not another. Furthermoi'e the dates on which 
the bombardments took place do not coincide. 

" 'The crews of the planes which carried out 
this action likewise confirm that the locality 
bombarded was beyond possibility of mistake 
Daga River Post (which is easily identifiable 
because of its location on the Daga River), and 
not Doro. 

" 'The only matter which is known to us is 
that during our first bombardment of Kurmuk 
(then British) on July 13th last a missionary 
who was in that locality was wounded in the 
shoulder but not seriously.' " 



The Department 



DESIGNATION OF ASSISTANT SECRE- 
TARY ACHESON AS MEMBER OF 
FOREIGN SERVICE BOARDS 

On February 7, 1941, the Secretary of State 
signed the following Departmental Order 
(No. 920) : 

"The Honorable Dean G. Acheson, Assistant 



Secretary of State, has been designated a mem- 
ber of the Board of Foreign Service Personnel, 
the Board of Examiners for the Foreign Serv- 
ice, and the Foreign Service Officers' Training 
School Board, effective as of February 1, 1941." 



International Conferences, 
Commissions, Etc. 



PAN AMERICAN RESOURCES COMMIS- 
SION AND PAN AMERICAN SOIL CON- 
SERVATION COMMISSION 

[Released to the press February 11] 

The Eighth American Scientific Congress 
during the sessions held at Washington in May 
1940 adopted resolutions recommending the es- 
tablishment of a Pan American Resources Com- 
mission and a Pan American Soil Conservation 
Commission. Subsequently, the Governing 
Board of the Pan American Union authorized 
the creation of these new inter- American bodies 
and requested the governments of the American 
republics to designate their representatives on 
the respective Commissions. 

Under the arrangement approved by the Gov- 
erning Board of the Pan American Union, the 
Pan American Resources Commission will be 
charged with the responsibility of preparing an 
inventory of world natural resources and of 
formulating policies and programs designed to 
assure the conservation and prudent utilization 
of natural resources for the welfare of all na- 
tions. It is anticipated that the Pan American 
Soil Conservation Commission will take steps 
to encourage the expansion of soil-conservation 
programs in the 21 American republics, as well 
as the exchange of trained personnel and tech- 
nical information, with a view to effecting a 
coordinated approach to the conservation prob- 
lem on a continental basis. The Governing 
Board of the Union has recommended that the 
Soil Conservation Commission be composed of 
the Ministers of Agriculture of the American 
republics or their designates. 



186 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The President has approved the designation 
of the Honorable Frederic A. Delano, Chairman 
of the National Resources Planning Board, as 
this Government's representative on the Pan 
American Resources Commission. With the ap- 



proval of the President, Mr. Hugh H. Bennett, 
Chief of the Soil Conservation Service, Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, will serve as the designate 
of the Secretary of Agriculture on the Pan 
American Soil Conservation Commission. 



The Foreign Service 



FOREIGN SERVICE EXAMINATION 



[Released to the press February 13] 

The following candidates were successful in 
the recently completed Foreign Service exam- 
ination : 

Philip H. Bagby. of Richmond, Va. ; born in 
Richmond July 16, 1918; attended University 
of Virginia 1935-36; Harvard University 
1936-39 (B.A.). 

Walter W. Birge, Jr., of New York City; 
born in St. Louis, Mo., May 21, 1913; attended 
Harvard University 1931-35 (A.B.) ; George 
Washington University 1939-40. 

William L. Blue, of Memphis, Term.; born 
in Memphis Aug. 8, 1914; attended Southwest- 
ern College 1932-36 (A.B.) ; Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity 1936-37 (M.A.) ; Fletcher School of 
Law and Diplomacy 1937-39. 

George F. Bogardus, of Des Moines, Iowa; 
born in Des Moines June 6, 1917; attended Har- 
vard University 1935-39 (B.S.). 

Gray Bream, of Casper, Wyo. ; born in Albion, 
Ind., Nov. 3, 1914; attended Midland College 
1932-36 (A.B.) ; University of Chicago 1937-39 
(M.A.), now working toward Ph.D. 

John H. Burns, of Pauls Valley, Okla. ; born 
in Pauls Valley Dec. 12. 1913 ; attended Denison 
University 1931-32; University of Oklahoma 
1932-35 (B.A.). 

Kenneth A. Byrns, of Greeley, Colo. ; born in 
Dickinson, N. Dak., Feb. 18, 1912 ; attended Colo- 
rado State College 1930-33, June-Aug. 1934 
(A.B. June 1935); San Diego State College 
(Calif.) 1937-39; George Washington Univer- 
sity (1939-40 — candidate for A.M. in Foreign 
Service), 



John A. Calhoun, of Berkeley, Calif. ; born in 
Berkeley Oct. 29, 1918; attended University of 
California (Berkeley) 1935-39 (A.B.) ; Har- 
vard University 1939-40 (M.A.). 

Ralph N. Clough, of Seattle, Wash. ; born in 
Seattle Nov. 17, 1916; attended University of 
Washington 1935-36, 1937-39 (B.A.) ; Lingnan 
University, Canton, China, 1936-37; Fletcher 
School of Law and Diplomacy 1939^0 (M.A.). 

Don V. Catlett, of Birch Tree, Mo. ; born in 
Birch Tree Feb. 14, 1918 ; attended Springfield 
State Teachers College 1936-40 (A.B.). 

William A. Crawford, of Meadville, Pa. ; born 
in New York City Jan. 14, 1915; attended Hav- 
erford College 1932-36 (B.A.) ; University of 
Madrid, Spain, summer 1936; Fcole Libre des 
Sciences Politiques, Paris, 1936-38. 

Juan de Zengotita, of Philadelphia, Pa. ; born 
in Philadelphia Mar. 13, 1914; attended Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania 1933-34; Columbia 
University 1934-38 (A.B.) ; Columbia Univer- 
sity School of Law 1938-39. 

Thomas P. Dillon, of Clinton. Mo.; born in 
Superior, Wis., June 28, 1916; attended Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh 1933-38 (B.A. 1937, M.A. 
1938) ; Harvard University 1938-40 (M.A.). 

Paul F. DuVivier, of New York City; born 
in New York City Feb. 4, 1915; attended 
Princeton University 1934-38 (A.B.) ; George- 
town University School of Foreign Service 
1938-40 (M.S.). 

Robert S. Folsom, of West Somerville, Mass. ; 
born in Cincinnati, Ohio, Apr. 29, 1915; at- 
tended Tufts College 1934-38 (A.B.) ; Fletcher 



FEBRUARY 15, 1941 



187 



School of Law and Diplomacy 1938^10 (A.M. 
1939, M.A.L.D. 1940). 

Edward L. Freers, of Cincinnati, Ohio ; born 
in Cincinnati Mar. 10, 1912; attended Yale Uni- 
versity 1929-33 (B.A.). 

Paul E. Geier, of Cincinnati, Ohio; born in 
Cincinnati Nov. 19, 1914; attended Harvard 
College 1932-36 (A.B.) ; Harvard Law School 
1936-39 (LL.B.). 

James M. Gilchrist, Jr., of Chicago, 111. ; born 
in Chicago Aug. 19, 1914; attended Cornell Uni- 
versity 1934-39 (A.B.). 

George McM. Godley, 2d, of Rye, N. Y. ; born 
in New York City Aug. 23, 1917; attended Yale 
University 1935-39 (BA.) ; University of 
Chicago, fall and winter 1939-40. 

Caspar D. Green, of Hiram, Ohio; born in 
Hiram Feb. 13, 1915; attended Hiram College 
1932-36 (BA.) ; Ohio State University, 2 quar- 
ters, 1936; Kent State University, summer 
1937; Ohio State University 1938-39 (M.A.). 

Alden M. Haupt, of Chicago, 111.; born in 
New York City Jan. 18, 1916; attended Harvard 
University 1933-34, 1935-38 (BA.) ; Cam- 
bridge University 1934-35 ; University of Berlin 
Sept. 1938-Mar. 1939. 

David H. Henry, 2d, of Geneva, N. Y. ; born 
in Geneva May 19, 1918 ; attended Hobart Col- 
lege 1935-37 ; Institut de Touraine, fall of 1937 ; 
Universite de Paris (Sorbonne) 1937-38; Co- 
lumbia University 1938-39 (A.B.). 

Oscar C. Holder, of New Orleans, La.; born 
in Pass Christian, Miss., Aug. 7. 1911 ; attended 
Harvard College 1929-33 (A.B.) ; Leland 
Stanford Business School 1933-34. 

J. Jefferson Jones, 3d, of Newbern, Tenn. ; 
born in Newbern Mar. 29, 1916; attended Uni- 
versity of Tennessee 1934-35; Georgetown 
University 1935-39 (B.S. in Foreign Service) ; 
La Universidad Nacional de Mexico, summer of 
1937. 

David LeBreton, Jr., of Washington, D. C. ; 
born in Washington Jan. 25, 1913; attended 
Princeton University 1930-35 (A.B.) ; Ecole des 
Sciences Politiques 1932-33 ; University of Vir- 
ginia Law School (LL.B.). 



David H. McKillop, of Chestnut Hill, Mass. ; 
born in Globe, Ariz., Feb. 2, 1916 ; attended Har- 
vard College 1933-37 (A.B.) ; Harvard Law 
School 1937-38; Harvard Graduate School 
(M.A.). 

Wilfred V. MacDonald, of St. Louis, Mo.; 
born in St, Louis Sept. 27, 1913 ; attended Cor- 
nell University 1930-31 ; Washington University 
(St. Louis) 1931-36 (B.S.). 

Edwin W. Martin, of Oberlin, Ohio ; born in 
Madura, India, of American parents, Aug. 31, 
1917; attended Oberlin College 1935-39 (A.B.) ; 
Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy 1939^0 
(A.M.). 

Richard B. Mudge, of Belmont, Mass.; born 
in Melrose, Mass., Sept, 9, 1915 ; attended Duke 
University one semester 1934-35 ; Tufts College 
one semester 1935 ; Harvard University 1935-36, 
1937-39 (B.S.). 

W. Paul O'Neill, Jr., of Rydal, Pa.; born in 
Jamestown, R, I., July 18, 1915; attended 
Princeton University 1934-38 (A.B.). 

Richard A. Poole, of Summit, N. J. ; born in 
Yokohama, Japan, of American parents, Apr. 
29, 1919; attended Haverford College 1936-40 
(B.S.). 

Stuart W. Rockwell, of Radnor, Pa,; born in 
New York City Jan. 15, 1917; attended Har- 
vard College 1935-39 (A.B.). 

Lubert O. Sanderhoff, of Pasadena, Calif.; 
born in Alma, Mich., July 31, 1914; attended 
Pasadena Junior College 1929-33 (AA.) ; 
University of California at Los Angeles 
1933-35 (A.B.) ; Princeton University 1939-40. 

Herbert F. N. Schmitt, of Grand Rapids, 
Mich.; born in Grand Rapids June 14, 1917; 
attended Colgate University 1935-39 (A.B.). 

Harold Shullaw, of Wyoming, 111.; born in 
Peoria, 111., Dec. 5, 1916 ; attended Knox College 
1934-38 (A.B.). 

Ernest V. Siracusa, of Huntington Beach, 
Calif.; born in Coalinga, Calif., Nov. 30, 1918; 
attended Fullerton Junior College 1936-38 
(AA.) ; Stanford University 1938-40 (B.A.). 

Charles W. Smith, of Burbank, Calif. ; born 
in Garden Grove, Calif., May 14, 1914; attended 



188 

Glendale Junior College 1930-32 (A.A.) ; 
University of California at Los Angeles 
1932-34 (B.A.). 

Walter L. Smith, of Harrisburg, Pa. ; born in 
Washington, D. C, Sept. 20, 1917; attended 
Georgetown University School of Foreign Serv- 
ice 1935-39 (graduated). 

James P. Speer, 2d, of Comanche, Okla. ; born 
in Comanche Oct. 13, 1917; attended George 
Washington University 1935-39. 

F. Lester Sutton, of Bridgeton, N. J.; born 
in Bridgeton Jan. 28, 1915; attended DePauw 
University 1932-36 (A.B.) ; Fletcher School of 
Law and Diplomacy 1936-37 (M.A.) ; George- 
town University Foreign Service School 1939 
and 1940. 

James S. Triolo, of Alameda, Calif. ; born in 
San Francisco, Calif., Apr. 18, 1914; attended 
Stanford University 1931-35 (A.B.), 1935-36 
(A.M.). 

Temple Wanamaker, Jr., of Seattle, Wash.; 
born in Seattle July 16, 1918; attended Stan- 
ford University 1936-40 (B.A.). 

Byron White, of Fayetteville, N. C. ; born in 
Syracuse, N. Y., June 21, 1906; attended College 
of William and Mary 1924-25; University of 
North Carolina 1925-28 (A.B.), 1928-29; 
George Washington University 1938-40. 



DETAETMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

DESIGNATION OF HERSCHEL V. 
JOHNSON AS HONORARY MINISTER 
TO GREAT BRITAIN 

[Released to the press February 14] 

Mr. Herschel V. Johnson, at present Counse- 
lor of the American Embassy in London, during 
the period of his incumbency in that office will 
have the honorary rank of Minister. 

Mr. Herschel V. Johnson was born at Atlanta, 
Ga., on May 3, 1894. He graduated from the 
University of North Carolina in 1916. He saw 
overseas service with the United States Army 
from 1917 to 1919 and was commissioned a cap- 
tain. He entered the Foreign Service in 1920 
and served at Bern, Sofia, the Department, Te- 
gucigalpa, Mexico City, and again in the De- 
partment as Chief of the Division of Mexican 
Affairs. He was assigned to the Embassy at 
London as First Secretary in 1934 and was des- 
ignated Counselor of the Embassy in 1937. 

NOMINATIONS OF AMBASSADORS AND 
MINISTERS 

On February 10, 1941, the Senate confirmed 
the Executive nominations of certain ambassa- 
dors and ministers which had been submitted to 
the Senate on February 6, 1941. For a list of 
these nominations, see the Bulletin of February 
8. 1941 (vol. IV, no. 85), pages 168-169. 



Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, Etc. 



MONTHLY STATISTICS 



[Released to the press February 13] 

Note: The figures relating to arms, the licenses for 
the export of which were revoked before they were used, 
have been subtracted from the figures appearing in the 
cumulative column of the table below in regard to arms 
export licenses issued. These latter figures are there- 
fore net figures. They are not yet final and definitive 
since licenses may be amended or revoked at any time 
before being used. They are, however, accurate as of 
the date of this press release. 

The statistics of actual exports in these releases are 
believed to be substantially complete. It is possible, 
however, that some shipments are not included. If this 



proves to be the fact, statistics in regard to such ship- 
ments will be included in the cumulative figures in later 
releases. 

Arms Export Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war li- 
censed for export by the Secretary of State 
during the year 1940 up to and including the 
month of December: 



FEBRUARY 15, 1941 



189 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


December 
1940 


12 months end- 
ing December 
31, 1940 




III 
V 


(2) 

(2) 




$487. 00 






50, 625. 00 
















IV 
I 

I 

V 


(1) 
(1) 

w 
(1) 

(2) 










57.00 








Anglo-Egyptian Sudan 














24.00 












630. 00 
















I 

III 

IV 

V 

VII 


r:> 

(4) 
(6) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2; 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 
















5, 930. 00 






2, 300. 00 






33, 000. 00 






5, 151. 84 




$180. 80 
100. 00 


14, 707. 80 
10, 746. 00 
54, 225. 00 






201, 663. 51 






40, 937. 50 




24, 750. 00 
6, 805. 00 


44, 624. 84 
100, 189. 51 




31, 835. 80 


537, 571. 50 




I 
III 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 

(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 




334.20 
839. 70 


1, 459. 76 
2, 321. 55 


















279. 80 


924. 77 
25, 648. 00 




53, 200. 00 
26, 800. 00 


1,040,657.25 
4, 414, 079. 58 










81, 453. 70 






IV 

I 

IV 
V 


(1) 

(4; 

(2) 

(2) 


























1.87 






23.00 
















I 
ni 

IV 
V 


0) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
































69. 00 






20, 745. 00 






243, 957. 00 














Total.. 








i 

IV 


(4) 
0) 
(2) 
















255.20 




76.60 


15L44 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


December 
1940 


12 months end- 
ing December 
31, 1940 




V 


(i) 

(2) 




















$76.60 






I 

rv 

V 
VII 


(4) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




































649.80 


4, 341. 34 










649. 80 






I 
III 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(51 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 






135. 00 
















287.70 


77,007.70 
















243.70 
2, 047. 33 
6, 950. 00 

442.60 
21,918.00 


85, 937. 03 
32, 753. 47 
1,013,368.00 
216,642.71 
323, 596. 50 




32, 624. 33 






D7 

V 

vn 


(2) 
(1) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 
































1, 680. 00 














i 

IV 

vn 


(4) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 












































i 
i 

IV 
V 


(4) 

(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 










2.43 












400.00 






133.54 






755. 25 










42.50 


42.50 


Total 


42.50 


1,467.29 




i 

ii 
hi 

IV 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 

(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 






5,314.51 

960, 448. 36 

197, 670. 20 

149,964.66 

6, 000. 00 


800, 109. 93 




1,561,165.65 

1, 190, 146. 20 

652, 044. 63 

444, 254. 00 

51.840.00 




50.00 
62, 668. 00 


26, 968. 00 

27. 140. 870. 00 

4, 537. 00 




8, 959. 80 
212.12 


362.413.44 
55, 678. 00 



190 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of export licenses Issued 


Country of destination 


December 
1940 


12 months end- 
ing December 
31,1940 


Canada— Continued. 


V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (2) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






$557, 624. 59 

134, 873. 75 

45.00 

7,384.00 

76, 552. 00 


4, 999, 579. 81 

9, 646, 008. 44 

36, 238. 00 

296,115.88 

205, 188. 43 




2, 157, 766. 99 


48,448,158.41 




I (2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 

m (i) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








3, 040. 00 






37, 431. 28 






8, 650. 00 






3, 630. 00 












53, 819. 00 




265. 85 


7,708.23 

396, 800. 00 




80.00 


23, 820. 50 






2,363.00 






12, 607. 15 










345. 85 


998, 264. 16 




I (2) 
(4) 

m (i) 

(2) 

IV ' (1) 

(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




China 




352, 440. 00 


















140, 740. 80 






178.60 






3, 226. 71 




34, 100. 00 


259, 100. 00 






3, 374, 225. 35 






1, 400, 475. 56 
















34, 100. 00 


11.707,407.75 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1, 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








30.00 




18.80 


277. 92 




596. 00 


1, 985. 76 




4, 700. 00 

5, 000. 00 

243.00 


20, 518. 00 
81,995.00 
1, 301. 09 
6, 030. 00 










10, 557. 80 






I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






30.00 
17.00 






24, 537. 00 




772.00 


6,086.85 
















191.58 


3,014.70 










1,010.58 






I (2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 












88.00 


131, 646. 00 




1, 871. 00 


18, 832. 00 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


December 
1940 


12 months end- 
ing December 
31, 1940 




V (l, 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






































$1, 959. 00 






I (1) 
(3) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

Vn (2) 












15,000.00 


65, 000. 00 






























59, 950. 00 












Total 


15,000.00 


278, 436. 03 




V (3) 

I (2) 

IV (1) 

(2) 

V (2) 
Vn (1) 










































713.00 


2, 554. 80 


Total 


713.00 


8, 145. 14 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 

vn (i) 

(2) 






36.00 
81.00 
15.00 


244.52 




294.00 
214.00 




























132.00 


22, 714. 52 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

m (2) 
rv (i) 

(2) 

V (1) 

(2) 




Egypt 


39.00 


39.00 










3,310.00 




142. 00 


1, 822. 21 




255.00 

72.00 


70, 193. 00 
2, 403. 31 




10, 500. 00 


236, 435. 00 




11,008.00 


334, 618. 02 




I (1) 

(4) 

III (1) 
rv (i) 

(2) 
V (1) 

(2) 
VII (2) 








125, 052. 00 




44.00 


1, 155. 00 












6,460.00 




1, 600. 00 
600. 00 


3, 300. 00 
875. 00 










2, 144. 00 


163,468.00 




I (1) 
(4) 








21, 250. 00 






6, 456. 42 








Total 




27, 706. 42 



FEBRUARY 15, 1941 



191 





Category 


Value of export licenses Issued 


Country of destination 


December 
1940 


12 months end- 
ing December 
31, 1940 




I (2) 
(3) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (1) 

(2) 
















3, 806, 493. 89 








































5, 086, 544. 80 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (i) 

(2) 












































30.00 
























1, 644, 697. 00 


























VII (1) 

I (1) 

(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 








$144.40 




















































in (i) 

V (2) 








9, 230, 149. 00 


9, 230, 149. 00 














9,230,149.00 


9, 232, 549. 00 




i (i) 

(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 

II 

III (I) 
(2) 

rv (i) 

(2) 
V (1) 

(2) 

(3) 
VII (1) 

(2) 




Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland. 


2, 161. 00 

3, 775, 402. 50 

156, 333. 00 

6,225,737.17 


7, 613, 620. 50 
26, 755, 804. 68 

6, 097, 482. 52 
68, 197, 762. 78 




2, 250, 000. 00 

13, 400. 00 

59, 396, 580. 00 

122. 00 

34, 477. 20 

2, 771, 548. 82 


2, 250, 000. 00 

13, 400. 00 

332, 506, 252. 85 

146, 262. 14 

1,770.879.79 

7, 133, 043. 67 




2,966,260.40 
20,119,274.00 


29, 174, 000. 80 
156,575,911.00 




192,000.00 


7, 891, 285. 80 




97, 903, 296. 09 


675, 470, 249. 57 




I (3) 
(4) 
(5) 












733, 500. 00 


733, 550. 00 
90, 900. 00 





Category 


Value of export licenses Issued 


Country of destination 


December 
1940 


12 months end- 
ing December 
31, 1940 




IV 

V 


ti) 

(3) 




$21.00 
157,634.75 










Total.- 


$733, 600. 00 


982, 255. 75 




I 

rv 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 






1,015.48 










7, 674. 65 




























11,645.00 




IV 
V 

VII 


m 

(2) 

a) 

(2) 

(3) 
(1) 
(2) 






25.50 
















280.00 
5, 000. 00 


280.00 
5, 000. 00 






6, 464. 00 








5, 306. 50 






IV 

V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 

(1) 
(1) 












8.00 


38.66 
















8.00 






I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




























































I 

IV 
V 

VI 


(1) 
(2) 
W 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 










2, 040. 75 






















































Total 




213, 344. 20 




D7 
V 
VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 










1, 920. 00 






374.00 






7, 890. 00 




442. 00 


1,205.00 
65.00 








Total - -... 


442.00 


11,454.00 




I 

in 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 








3, 193. 74 




217.00 
38,000.00 


7, 494. 94 
188, 000. 00 



192 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


December 
1940 


12 months end- 
ing December 
31, 1940 


India— Continued. 


IV 
V 

VI 
VII 


(1) 

(2) 

(1) 

(2) 
(3) 
(2) 
(2) 


$93. 50 


$3, 797. 64 










3, 382. 00 


28,160.40 






















41, 692. 50 






I 
III 

V 


(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 


















400.00 


400.00 




70, 162. 00 
56, 600. 00 


70, 425. 00 
56, 600. 00 




127, 162. 00 






I 
III 

V 


(2) 
(2) 
(2) 




























Total 








V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 






































V 
IV 
V 


(2) 

(1) 
(2) 
(2) 


























27.36 


68.81 










27.36 






I 

IV 

V 


0) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 






144.00 






















177,100.00 


177,100.00 




177,244.00 


178,160.00 




VII 

I 
I 
I 

IV 

V 

VI 
VII 


(2) 

(2) 

(4) 

(1) 
(4) 
(5) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 




135. 38 
































































28,005.00 
2, 211. 38 
3, 492. 00 


655, 755. 40 
13, 823. 91 
45, 547. 00 




11, 070. 00 


28, 786. 00 
66, 220. 00 








44, 778. 38 


862, 616. 17 











Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


December 
1940 


12 months end- 
ing December 
31. 1940 




I 
V 


(1) 

(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 








































356, 354. 61 




I 

V 


(2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(2) 
(3) 








12,866.00 


































89, 390. 69 




I 

n 
in 

IV 
V 

VI 
VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 

(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 




Netherlands Indies * 


$214. 19 


1, 101. 76 




46, 160. 00 
292, 501. 94 
239, 853. 00 


1, 309, 160. 00 
4,417,615.81 

2, 556, 303. 00 




106, 020. 00 
3, 740, 908. 80 


106, 020. 00 
8, 909, 646. 90 




850. 00 
240. 00 


203, 837. 65 
61,603.06 




386. 665. 28 
86, 013. 60 


977, 126. 68 
609, 509. 47 




2,600.00 


2, 938. 80 










4, 902, 026. 81 


32, 381, 099. 45 




I 


(1) 

(4) 




508.10 
257.00 






1,180.82 




765. 10 






I 

IV 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 






































3, 615. 70 




IV 
V 


(2) 
(2) 












505.00 


1, 965. 00 




505.00 






I (4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 

(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 






250, 132. 00 


516, 882. 00 












14.00 


14.00 




















Total 


250, 146. 00 






I 

IV 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 




















1,208.00 



FEBRUARY 15, 1941 



193 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


December 
1940 


12 months end- 
ing December 
31, 1940 


Nicaragua— Continued. 


V 
VII 


(i) 

(2) 
(3) 
(1) 


$3,600.00 


$42, 500. 00 






















3,500.00 






I 
IV 


(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 


















30.25 






















I 

IV 
V 


(1) 

(4) 
(1) 
(2) 


























787.00 


787. 00 




787.00 






I 

m 
rv 

V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 


























712,000.00 
280.00 






222.00 






2, 200. 00 




























IV 

V 


(2) 

(3) 
















1,400.00 
















I 

rv 

V 

vn 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 
















3, 900. 00 






















5, 700. 00 


35, 266. 00 












4, 449. 66 
















5, 700. 00 






i 

rv 


(4) 
(2) 














12, 150. 45 
















i 
rv 

v 

VII 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 






Peru 


219. 00 

54.57 

1, 749. 00 






7. 637. 47 
1.989.00 




227.40 


25, 027. 98 






2,209.86 














Total - 


2, 249. 97 


563, 798. 91 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


December 
1940 


12 months end- 
ing December 
31, 1940 




I 

IV 
V 

VH 


(1) 

(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




$51. 80 
102. 18 




$58. 18 












4, 300. 00 
49, 469. 94 




200.00 






















258. 18 


133, 342. 68 




I 
IV 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 








































V 

I 

V 


(2) 

(1) 
(2) 




































Total. 








I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 








106.00 
















283.50 


770. 80 
















389. 50 






I 
I 


(4) 

(1) 
(4) 
















Spain 


















Total 








I 
III 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 








33, 150. 00 

335, 248. 00 

9, 882, 353. 04 






335, 248. 00 
9, 882, 353. 04 




10,250,751.04 


10, 250, 760. 16 




I 

rv 

vn 


(2) 
(4) 
(2) 
(1) 








11, 644. 50 






1.64 






2.47 




129.20 


646.00 




129.20 


12, 294. 61 




I 

in 

IV 
V 


(2) 
(4) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 








108, 000. 00 






65, 307. 00 






4,000.00 






233, 625. 00 






120,511.20 






247, 298. 00 












778, 741. 20 




IV 


(I) 






Switzerland 




20.00 



194 



DEPAKTMEIST OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


December 
1940 


12 months end- 
ing December 
31, 1940 




I 

III 

rv 

V 


(1) 

W 
(2) 

(1) 

(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




















$665.00 
87.00 


18,974.89 
611.43 






19, 245. 74 
212, 460. 00 

347, 117. 64 




1, 200. 00 
1, 952. 00 




IV 

i 

IV 
V 
VII 


(1) 

(4) 

(1) 
(2) 

CM 
CD 
(1) 
(2) 






























47.21 










15, 000. 00 


33, 625. 00 










15, 000. 00 










III 

IV 

V 
VII 


12) 
(1) 
(2) 
(->> 
(2) 




















6.20 




34, 158. 20 


173, 918. 30 










34, 158. 20 






I 

III 

IV 
i v 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
1(2) 
(3) 
(1) 

.2) 
























868.48 
9, 230, 149. 00 


1, 536. 09 
9, 804, 149. 00 




415.00 
328. 23 

900, 000. 00 
25, 000. 00 

159, 000. 00 


287,837.15 
36, 748. 39 
4, 344, 553. 00 
327, 217. 28 
497, 260. 00 
















10,315,760.71 


15, 597, 484. 91 




IV 
V 
VII 


(2) 
(3) 
(2) 






























38, 558. 34 




I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 






227.00 






1,654.30 
10, 359. 63 
46, 325. 00 

1, 510. 40 
762.00 

2, 653. 88 




2, 196. 00 

3, 000. 00 

785. 00 

385. 00 












Total 


6, 593. 00 


64, 624. 70 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


December 
1940 


12 months end- 
ing December 
31, 1940 




I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 














$74. 52 


175. 07 






















3, 410. 00 

32, 000. 00 

259.29 


70, 099. 30 
174, 350. 00 
19, 951. 72 










35, 779. 81 






IV (2) 
VII (2) 


























145. 37 




V (2) 
(3) 
















30, 780. 00 
























136,471,756.08 











During the month of December, 403 arms ex- 
port licenses were issued, making a total of 
4,800 such licenses issued during the current 
year. 

Arms Exported 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war ex- 
ported during the year 1940 up to and including 
the month of December under export licenses 
issued by the Secretary of State. 





Cate- 
gory 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


December 
1940 


12 months 
on'ling De- 
cember 31, 
1940 




V (2) 

I (4) 

V (1) 
(2) 


$34, 700. 00 


















3, 200. 00 






620.00 








Total 




3, 844. 00 



FEBRUARY 15, 1941 



195 





Cate- 
gory 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


December 
1940 


12 months 
ending De- 
cember 31, 
1940 




I 

III 
IV 

V 

VII 


(2) 
(4) 
(8) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




$24, 095. 50 






240. 00 






2, 418. 00 






6, 142. 00 




$180. 80 

100.00 

1, 700. 00 


12, 138. 80 
10, 342. 00 
64, 225. 00 
162,720.48 






290, 713. 50 










1, 371. 00 


71, 987. 31 




3, 351. 80 






I 

III 
IV 

V 

VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 






168.69 

134. 01 

51, 370. 00 






1,013.54 

8, 064, 425. 00 




279.80 


862. 80 




59, 228. 00 

1, 604, 604. 00 

18,000.00 


636, 373. 40 

2, 874, 187. 00 

51,474.86 




1, 733, 674. 40 






IV 

I 

IV 


(1) 

(« 
(2) 










































I 
III 

IV 

V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 








































20, 745. 00 


























I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
















16.00 




110.50 


110. 60 




















Total 


110.50 






I 

IV 

V 

vn 


(4) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 






1, 629. 00 


3,380.00 
























1,299.60 


3, 692. 84 
1.50 










2, 828. 60 


90, 205. 03 





Cate- 
gory 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


December 
1940 


12 months 
ending De- 
cember 31, 
1940 


Brazil 


I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

in (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 








$687. 00 
19, 100. 00 


9, 175. 00 
48, 575. 00 
17,265.00 
787, 150. 00 
69, 281. 03 
31, 584. 84 
819, 889. 00 
161,054.88 
309, 989. 25 




218,700.00 

658. 70 

1, 493. 70 

82, 448. 00 

6, 068. 00 












Total 


329, 155. 40 


2, 255, 739. 00 




IV (2) 

V (3) 
VII (1) 

(2) 




































6, 352. 63 




IV (1) 
(2) 

VII (1) 
(2) 










































I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 






















229. 54 
















42.60 


42.50 




42.50 






I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 

II 

HI (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (2) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






15, 827. 05 
437, 405. 76 
210, 166. 00 

69, 579. 72 
211,263.00 






738,441.70 
253, 718. 00 
459, 131. 02 
305, 907. 00 




18.00 
1,394,334.00 


13,518.00 
11,627,161.00 




1, 120. 70 

157. 57 
3, 832. 41 
153, 244. 08 
250,169.30 
95.00 
23, 080. 00 
12, 703. 85 


65,333.19 
76, 562. 58 
557, 328. 98 
2, 034, 085. 92 
5,110,664.16 
36, 193. 00 
248, 833. 13 
126. 545. 08 


Total 


2, 783, 586. 44 






I (2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 

IV (1) 
(2) 




Chile 








325. 28 


37, 479. 28 
5, 300. 00 






3, 630. 00 






54, 054. 00 




1,885.32 


7, 633. 12 



196 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Cate- 
gory 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


December 
1940 


12 months 
ending De- 
cember 31, 
1940 




V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




$6, 800. 00 






3, 407. 50 






52, 678. 00 






176.00 






12, 607. 15 










$2, 210. 60 


186, 805. 05 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

(4) 

in (i) 

(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




China 




1, 344. 00 






468, 005. 00 






850.00 






23, 753. 00 






1, 782, 445. 57 






21,574.64 






268.60 




1, 707. 41 

31, 100. 00 

25, 673. 00 

1, 051, 591. 00 


7, 356. 41 

238, 700. 00 
1, 704, 570. 05 
3, 496, 534. 00 

334, 724. 00 






342, 000. 00 










1,110,071.41 


8, 422, 125. 27 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








30.00 






279.12 
2,228.20 




12.00 


2, 107. 76 
348, 350. 00 




5, 531. 00 

6,000.00 

243.00 


19, 812. 00 
55, 956. 00 
1, 300. 78 
5, 830. 00 










10, 786. 00 


435, 893. 86 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






30.00 
2, 155. 00 


30.00 




3, 447. 00 
6, 534. 20 




961.00 


3, 122. 85 
83, 700. 00 












31, 976. 00 




24.00 


2, 984. 26 
51.00 










3, 170. 00 






I (2) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 












17, 454. 00 


123,167.00 
















217.45 


11,811.95 










809.00 


7, 322. 72 










18, 480. 45 


231,888.77 




I (1) 
(3) 






4, 235. 00 
10, 000. 00 






10, 000. 00 





Cate- 
gory 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


December 
1940 


12 months 
ending De- 
cember 31, 
1940 


Curacao — Continued. 


(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2, 
(3) 

VII (2) 


$2, 450. 00 


$4, 591. 89 
















406.00 


5, 442. 26 






22.50 










17, 091. 00 






I (2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (1) 














2, 972. 50 










800.00 


1, 400. 00 










800. 00 






I (U 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (1) 

(2) 


















15. 00 
633. 00 


206.00 
18, 030. 00 












900.00 










648.00 






I (2) 
(3) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 














2, 680. 00 






80.21 




13, 685. 00 
1, 579. 00 
16, 993. 00 
21,000.00 


67, 204. 00 

2, 568. 31 

16, «93. 00 

231, 160. 00 




53, 257. 00 






I (1) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

VII (2) 




















18, 200. 00 






76.00 












1, 700. 00 






375.00 






8, 350. 00 
















I (4) 

I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

(4) 

in (i) 
rv (i) 

(2) 
V (2) 

(3) 
VII (2) 




























184, 310. 00 












1,364,078.89 






2, 321, 496. 00 












141.02 




2, 177. 04 


138,791.04 
1, 200, 063. 00 














Total 


2,177.04 


6,276,125.95 



FEBRUARY 15, 1941 



197 





Cate- 
gory 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


December 
1940 


12 months 
ending De- 
cember 31, 
1940 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

m (i) 

(2) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




$78.00 












41, 323. 00 
















































2.00 






56, 593. 00 












71.010,321.03 




I (4) 

IV (1) 

(2) 








$127. 52 


178. 52 




3,836.00 




24.00 


169.00 




151.52 


4,183.52 




I (4) 

I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 

II 

ni (i) 

(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








33.83 








Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland. 


2,984.00 

1,425,295.50 

372, 745. 00 

1, 748, 257. 60 

614,000.00 

13,400.00 

13, 650, 148. 00 


5,001,966.50 
13,404,446.44 
3, 145, 593. 20 
19,154,143.18 
3, 464, 390. 60 
13, 400. 00 
82,293,416.00 
22,001.00 




93, 182. 60 
719,010.00 


869,332.61 
2, 525, 335. 84 




751,925.00 

3,617,874.00 

268, 249. 00 

13,400.00 


7, 389, 655. 79 
27, 439, 839. 48 
8, 508, 098. 06 
3,091,593.50 




23, 290, 470. 70 


176,391,212.20 




I (3) 
(4) 
(5) 








150.00 




570, 500. 00 


570, 550. 00 










570, 500. 00 






I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 














578. 30 












1,731.57 






540.00 






105.00 








Total. . 




10, 645. 00 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
VII (» 

(2) 










37.00 






12.00 






186. 00 






1, 336. 00 






21,500.00 






226.80 






6, 464. 00 








Total 




29,761.80 





Cate- 
gory 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


December 
1940 


12 months 
ending De- 
cember 31, 
1940 




IV (1) 

(2) 

VII (1) 

(2) 






































I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

VII (2) 


























































116,806.90 




I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

IV (1) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 










1, 158. 50 






















$125, 000. 00 
6, 876. 00 
21, 554. 00 


125,000.00 
25, 442. 00 
46, 354. 00 




153, 430. 00 


206, 947. 50 




IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

VII (2) 








1,920.00 
















442.00 


1, 205. 00 
65.00 










442.00 


11,443.00 




I (1) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (2) 

VII (2) 








3,241.20 










77, 000. 00 


77, 000. 00 
3, 605. 64 










78, 333. 00 


145, 833. 00 






1, 000. 00 










106.00 


106.00 




155, 439. 00 


244,901.44 




V (1) 
(2) 




Iran 


34, 360. 00 


107, 375. 00 




93.00 










34. 360. 00 


107, 468. 00 




III (1) 

(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 




Iraq 




694. 963. 00 






27, 165. 00 






94.37 






25.85 












722, 248. 22 




V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 










116,823.00 






3, 270. 60 






33, 380. 00 












153,473.60 



198 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Cate- 
gory 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


December 
1940 


12 months 
ending De- 
cember 31, 
1940 




IV 
V 


(i) 

C2) 

(2) 




$346. 00 






41.45 




$2, 400. 00 


2, 400. 00 




2, 400. 00 


2, 787. 45 




V 

I 

IV 
V 


(2) 

(1) 
(1) 
(2) 








4, 143. 00 








Kenya 


144.00 


144. 00 




618.00 




56, 000. 00 


56, 000. 00 




56, 144. 00 


56, 762. 00 




V 

I 


(3) 

(1) 
(4) 








18, 077. 00 












251.45 






337.28 












588.73 




I 

IV 
V 

VI 
VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(5) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 









577. 00 
5, 400. 00 


693.00 




5, 452. 26 
112.50 




510.00 


21,092.30 
1, 023. 20 




76, 725. 00 
835.00 


008, 150. 40 
7, 670. 00 
37, 556. 00 






175.60 




8,058.75 


26, 219. 75 
56, 481. 00 










92, 105. 75 


764, 624. 91 




I 

V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 








116.00 






154. 61 






283, 200. 00 






15, 494. 00 






















I 

III 

V 


(2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 






















155.00 






9,674.00 


















187, 137. 50 








Total.. 








I 
ni 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 






Netherlands Indies 


351.00 
218,680.00 
21,123.00 
212,583.00 
181, 350. 00 
476, 784. 00 


534.98 
460, 320. 00 
578, 181. 82 
891,611.00 
181, 350. 00 
3, 505, 408. 00 




10, 612. 00 
4, 933. 11 
155, 425. 00 
101, 168. 00 
161,000.00 


86, 917. 75 
23, 920. 37 
494, 389. 00 
416,853.50 
446, 489. 00 





Cate- 
gory 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


December 
1940 


12 months 
ending De- 
cember 31, 
1940 




VI 
VII 


(D 
(i) 

(2) 








$2, 600. 00 


2, 938. 80 










1,546,609.11 






I 
I 

IV 


(4) 

(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 








923. 82 










52.80 
41.12 


182. 40 




1, 218. 52 
1,934.60 
















93.92 


3, 590. 53 




IV 

V 


(2) 
(2) 






























I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
0) 








44, 488. 00 










1, 510. 45 


3,948.60 






11,386.00 










45, 998. 45 


265, 799. 60 




I 

IV 

V 

VH 


(1) 

(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 






34, 827. 00 


























39, 000. 00 


39, 000. 00 




















Total 


39,000.00 






I 

IV 


(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 














33.00 












88.00 








Total.. 




429.50 




I 

IV 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 






















25.50 
















I 

III 
rv 

V 


0) 
(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
















285.00 






























137.00 






2,200.00 






644.00 








Total 




1,394,253.20 



FEBRUARY 15, 1941 



199 





Cate- 
gory 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


December 
1940 


12 months 
ending De- 
cember 31, 
1940 




V (3) 

t (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

rv (i) 

(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




$1,400.00 










12. 500. 00 












8, 700. 00 






8, 781. 75 






1,207.00 






21,807.13 












1,447.00 




$728. 00 


8, 107. 60 
728.00 










728.00 


64. 352. 48 




I (4) 
IV (2) 








384.30 


935.00 


12, 150. 45 




935.00 






I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




Peru 


390.60 

5157 


390.60 




7, 637. 47 












25, 747. 00 




























445. 17 






I (1) 
(4) 

in (i) 
rv (i) 

(2) 
V (1) 

(2) 

(3) 
VII (1) 

(2) 












































44, 235. 91 






























. . 998, 851. 47 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 
















16.00 






27.00 






6.00 








Total - 




175.00 




V (2) 

I (1) 

V (2) 










600.00 












260.00 






















I 0) 
(2) 
(4) 








106.00 
238.60 
54.00 


601.60 




466.00 
699.56 





Cate- 
gory 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


December 
1940 


12 months 
ending De- 
cember 31, 
1940 


Southern Rhodesia— Cont 


IV 
V 


(1) 

(2) 


$170. 00 


$329.30 




354.26 


126,094.26 




922. 76 


128,316.76 




I 


(1) 

(4) 


Spain 


























I 

I 

IV 
VII 


(0 

(2) 
(4) 

(2) 
(1) 






































323.00 


839.80 


Total 


323.00 






I 

III 

rv 
v 


(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
O) 
(2) 
(3) 


























4,000.00 


































4,633,236.98 




i 

in 

IV 

\ 


(1) 
(4) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
0) 
(2) 
(3) 






5, 808. 00 
40.35 






63.70 




930. 00 
320.40 


17, 993. 89 
414.91 




2, 119. 00 


16, 601. 00 








Total 


9,217.75 






IV 

V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 


















4, 800. 00 


7,922.32 






2,977.00 














Total 


4,800.00 






I 

ni 

IV 

V 
VII 


(2) 
(5) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 








148, 135. 00 






158, 750. 00 






1,191,084.00 






25, 010. 00 






14, 236. 00 






1, 306. 20 












70, 344. 00 






117,478.00 








Total 




2, 052, 605. 30 



200 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Cate- 
gory 


Value of actual exports 


Country or destination 


December 
1940 


12 months 
endinp De- 
cember 31, 
1940 




I (1) 




$296. 00 




(4) 
III (1) 




583. 01 






454, 000. 00 




IV (1) 


$35, 000. 00 


239, 890. 70 




(2) 


3,992.34 


18, 499. 34 




V (1) 


440,048.00 


2, 390, 448. 00 




(2) 


12,763.00 


68, 864. 64 




(3) 


124,079.00 


332, 459. 00 




VII (1) 

(2) 




156.00 






40, 064. 00 










615,882.34 


3, 545, 260. 69 




V (3) 









155,308.00 


publics. 


I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 






g 5 




299.00 






1,654.30 






7. 130. 30 




(2) 


7, 197. 00 


27, 646. 00 




(3) 




100.40 




VII (1) 


377. 00 


377.00 








2, 653. 88 








660.00 










I (1) 
(2) 


7, 574. 00 


40, 520. 88 






111.40 




(4) 




246.00 




III (1) 

IV (1) 

(2) 




39.00 






167,970.00 










V (1) 




191.45 




(2) 




163,783.00 




(3) 


154.00 


69, 249. 30 




VII (1) 


17, 000. 00 


163,973.00 




(2) 


1,197.81 


21,842.29 






5.00 


17, 745. 40 














18,356.81 


608, 467. 44 




V (1) 

(2) 














(3) 












31,080.00 


Total 
















Orand total 












32, 752, 470. 42 


328,883,814.95 



Arms Import Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of origin of the arms, 
ammunition, and implements of war licensed for 
import by the Secretary of State during the 
month of December 1940: 



Country of origin 


Category 


Value 


Total 




V (2) 
IV (1) 

(2) 

V (1) 
(3) 

I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 

in (2) 

VII (2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

I (2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 


$350.00 

90.40 

100.00 

2, 500. 00 

7, 000. 00 

2fi0.00 

1,037.00 

894. 65 

373, 229. 50 

4, 500. 00 

1, 500. 00 
5, 000. 00 
1,000.00 
4, 400. 00 

2, 890. 00 
500. 00 

2, 351. 38 

3, 492. 00 
1,500.00 






1 




190. 40 
1 ™ n 




| 9, 500. 00 




> 379, 921. 15 








| 8, 790. 00 
| 




| 7, 343. 38 

















During the month of December, 30 import 
licenses were issued, making a total of 241 such 
licenses issued during the current year. 

Categories of Arms, Ammunition, and 
Implements of War 

The categories of arms, ammunition, and 
implements of war in the appropriate column 
of the tables printed above are the categories 
into which those articles were divided in the 
President's proclamation of May 1, 1937, enu- 
merating the articles which would be con- 
sidered as arms, ammunition, and implements 
of war for the purposes of section 5 of the. joint 
resolution of May 1, 1937 [see the BuUetin of 
January 11, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 81), pp. 76-77]. 

Special Statistics in Regard to Arms Exports 
to Cuba 

In compliance with article II of the conven- 
tion between the United States and Cuba to 
suppress smuggling, signed at Habana, March 
11, 1926, which reads in part as follows: 

"The High Contracting Parties agree that 
clearance of shipments of merchandise by 
water, air, or land, from any of the ports of 
either country to a port of entry of the other 
country, shall be denied when such shipment 
comprises articles the importation of which is 



FEBRUARY 15, 1941 

prohibited or restricted in the country to which 
such shipment is destined, unless in this last 
case there has been a compliance with the requi- 
sites demanded by the laws of both countries." 
and in compliance with the laws of Cuba which 
restrict the importation of arms, ammunition, 
and implements of war of all kinds by requiring 
an import permit for each shipment, export 
licenses for shipments of arms, ammunition, 
and implements of war to Cuba are required for 
the articles enumerated below in addition to 
the articles enumerated in the President's 
proclamation of May 1, 1937 : 

(1) Arms and small arms using ammunition 
of caliber .22 or less, other than those classed 
as toys. 

(2) Spare parts of arms and small arms of all 
kinds and calibers, other than those classed as 
toys, and of guns and machine guns. 

(3) Ammunition for the arms and small arms 
under (1) above. 

(4) Sabers, swords, and military machetes 
with cross-guard hilts. 

(5) Explosives as follows: explosive pow- 
ders of all kinds for all purposes; nitrocellulose 
having a nitrogen content of 12 percent or less; 
diphenylamine; dynamite of all kinds; nitro- 
glycerine; alkaline, nitrates (ammonium, potas- 
sium, and sodium nitrate); nitric acid; nitro- 
benzene, (essence or oil of mirbane) ; sulphur; 
sulphuric acid ; chlorate of potash ; and acetones. 

(6) Tear gas (C 6 H 6 C0CH 2 C1) and other 
similar non-toxic gases and apparatus designed 
for the storage or projection of such gases. 

The table printed below indicates, in respect 
to licenses authorizing the exportation to Cuba 
of the articles and commodities listed in the pre- 
ceding paragraph, issued by the Secretary of 
State during December 1940, the number of li- 
censes and the value of the articles and com- 
modities described in the licenses: 



Number of licenses 


Section 


Value 


Total 




(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(5) 


$2, 253. 30 

291.00 

12,796.50 

9, 514. 33 


j 




\ $21,855.13 



201 

The table printed below indicates the value of 
the articles and commodities listed above ex- 
ported to Cuba during December 1940 under 
licenses issued by the Secretary of State : 



Section 


Value 


Total 




$533. 00 
4,221.00 
5, 306. 58 


1 




\ $10,000.58 


(5) ... 


] 







Tin-Plate Scrap 

The table printed below indicates the number 
of licenses issued during the year 1940, up to and 
including the month of December, authorizing 
the export of tin-plate scrap under the provi- 
sions of the act approved February 15, 1936, 
and the regulations issued pursuant thereto, to- 
gether with the number of tons authorized to be 
exported and the value thereof : 





December 1940 


12 months ending De- 
cember 31, 1940 


Country of destination 


Quantity 
in long 
tons 


Total 
value 


Quantity 
in long 
tons 


Total 
value 




65 


$1,257.50 


4,334 


$80, 947. 20 







During the month of December, 2 tin-plate 
scrap licenses were issued, making a total of 57 
such licenses issued during the current year. 

Helium 

The table printed below gives the essential 
information in regard to the licenses issued dur- 
ing the month of December 1940, authorizing 
the exportation of helium gas under the provi- 
sions of the act approved on September 1, 1937, 
and the regulations issued pursuant thereto: 



Applicant for license 


Purchaser in 
foreign 
country 


Country of 
destination 


Quantity 

in cubic 

feet 


Total 
value 


Puritan Compressed 
Gas Corporation. 

The Lindc Air Prod- 
ucts Co. 


Audrain Y 

Medina. 
Nicolas L. J. 

Van Haaren. 


Cuba 

Argentina. -. 


84 
0. 0332 


$30.00 
2.00 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



AGRICULTURE 

INTER-AMERICAN COFFEE-MARKETING 
AGREEMENT 

United States 

On February 12, 1941, the President ratified 
the Inter-American Coffee-Marketing Agree- 
ment signed at Washington on November 28, 
1940. 

FINANCE 

AGREEMENT WITH HAITI FOR THE TEMPORARY 
POSTPONEMENT DURING 1941 OF CERTAIN 
INTEREST PAYMENTS 

On February 13, 1941, there was signed at 
Port-au-Prince an accord between the United 
States and the Republic of Haiti putting into 
effect the agreement in principle which the two 
governments had previously reached regarding 
the postponement of the payment of one third 
of the interest due on the outstanding bonds of 
the Republic of Haiti on April 1 and October 1, 
1941." 

FISHERIES 

CONVENTION, AGREEMENT, AND PROTOCOL FOR 
THE REGULATION OF WHALING (TREATY 
SERIES NOS. 880, 033, AND 944) 

The joint regulations of the Secretary of the 
Treasury and the Secretary of the Interior con- 
cerning whaling, issued under the authority con- 
tained in the Whaling Treaty Act of May 1, 
1936 (49 Stat. 1246; U. S. C, Supp. V, title 16, 
sees. 901-915), to give effect to the Convention 
for the Regulation of Whaling (Treaty Series 
No. 880, 49 Stat., pt. 2, 3079), the International 
Agreement for the Regulation of Whaling 
(Treaty Series No. 933, 52 Stat. 1460), and the 
Protocol Amending the Inteniational Agree- 



17 See supra, p. 179. 
202 



ment (Treaty Series No. 944, 53 Stat. 1794), are 
published in the Federal Register of February 
14, 1941 (vol. 6, no. 31 ) , page 952. These regula- 
tions, which were approved February 7, 1941, 
supersede the regulations concerning whaling 
which were approved on March 18, 1940. 

NATURE PROTECTION AND WILDLIFE 
PRESERVATION 

CONVENTION ON NATURE PROTECTION AND 
WILDLIFE PRESERVATION IN THE WESTERN 
HEMISPHERE 

Chile 

By a letter dated January 24, 1941, the Direc- 
tor General of the Pan American Union 
informed the Secretary of State that the Con- 
vention on Nature Protection and Wildlife 
Preservation in the Western Hemisphere, which 
was opened for signature at the Pan American 
Union on October 12, 1940, was signed on behalf 
of Chile on January 22, 1941. 

RESTRICTION OF WAR 

CONVENTION FOR THE AMELIORATION OF THE 
CONDITION OF THE WOUNDED AND THE SICK 
OF ARMIES IN THE FIELD (TREATY SERIES 
NO. 847) 

Ireland 

By a note dated January 31, 1941, the Minis- 
ter of Ireland at Washington informed the 
Secretary of State in accordance with article 10, 
paragraph 2, of the Convention for the Amelio- 
ration of the Condition of the Wounded and 
the Sick of Armies in the Field, signed at 
Geneva July 27, 1929, which has been signed but 
not yet ratified by Ireland, that his Government 
has authorized the Irish Red Cross Society 
(Cuman Croise Deirge nah Eireann) to render 
assistance to the regular medical service of the 
Irish armed forces. 



FEBRUARY 1, 1941 



203 



JUDICIAL DECISIONS 

RECIPROCAL, TRADE AGREEMENT WITH FRANCE 
(EXECUTIVE AGREEMENT SERIES NO. 146) 

On January 15, 1941, the United States Cus- 
toms Court, Third Division, rendered a deci- 
sion in the case of Bryant & Hefferman, Inc. v. 
United States (CD. 417). 

In this suit the plaintiff sought to recover cer- 
tain customs duties alleged to have been illegally 
exacted by the collector at New York upon mer- 
chandise invoiced as treated coal. Duty was 
assessed thereon at 30 per centum ad valorem 
under paragraph 216 of the Tariff Act of 1930, 
as amended by the trade agreement entered into 
between the United States and France. The 
plaintiff claimed that the product should be en- 
titled to free entry as coal under the provisions 
of paragraph 1650. 

Paragraph 1650 of the free list provides : 

"Par. 1650. Coal, anthracite, semianthracite, 
bituminous, semibituminous, culm, slack, and 
shale ; coke ; compositions used for fuel in which 
coal or coal dust is the component material of 
chief value, whether in briquets or other 
form: . . ." 

Paragraph 216, as amended by the trade 
agreement between the United States and 
France, reads in part as follows: 

"Par. 216. Articles or wares composed wholly 
or in part of carbon or graphite, wholly or 
partly manufactured, not specially provided for 
. . . 30% ad val." 

The plaintiff contended that the term "coal" 
as found in paragraph 1650 is without qualifi- 
cation or limitation and therefore embraces 
every kind and class of merchandise properly 
referable thereto, either directly or as a species 
the genus of which is included within the tariff 
nomenclature, citing Schade v. United States, 
5 Ct. Cust. Appls. 465, T. D. 35002, and relying 
upon the cases of Tower v. United States, C. D. 
204, and Allen Forwarding Co. v. United States, 
Abstract 27728. 

The Govermnent, upon the other hand, con- 
tended that as the coal had been ground and 



screened its physical properties were changed, 
and the gas treatment transformed its chemical 
properties so that the resulting product con- 
sisted of a relatively uniform granular mass 
with the basic chemical structure altered from 
that of coal and having a new use. As authority 
for its contention, th»Government cited United 
States v. Meier, 136 Fed. 764; Holt v. United 
States, Abstract 42312; Vandegrift v. United 
States, T. D. 38521 ; Stone v. United States, 7 Ct. 
Cust. Appls. 173, T. D. 36492; Allen Forward- 
ing Co. v. United States, Abstract 27728; and 
Saloman v. United States, 26 C. C. P. A. 302, 
C. A. D. 32. 

The court, following its decision in the case 
of Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Ltd. v. United 
States, C. D. 397, and the cases therein cited, 
came to the conclusion and so held that bitu- 
minous coal subjected to a treatment of sul- 
phur trioxide gas so that the sulphur and 
oxygen content of natural coal is increased, 
thereby making the product, known as treated 
coal, valuable in softening water in addition 
to its use as a fuel, is entitled to entry free of 
duty under the eo nomine provision as to "Coal 
. . j. bituminous" in paragraph 1650, Tariff 
Act of 1930. 

Judgment was entered in favor of the plaintiff 
directing the collector to re-liquidate the entry 
and to make a refund of all duties taken. 

SPECIAL ASSISTANCE 

FINANCIAL CONVENTION WITH THE DOMINI- 
CAN REPUBLIC REVISING THE CONVENTION 
OF 1924 

On February 14, 1941, the Senate gave its 
advice and consent to the ratification by the 
President of the Convention between the United 
States and the Dominican Republic signed on 
September 24, 1940, modifying the convention 
of December 27, 1924 (Treaty Series No. 726) 
relating to the collection and application of 
customs in the Dominican Republic. 18 



"See the Bulletin of September 28. 1940 (vol. Ill, 
no. 66), p. 271. 



204 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Publications 



Department of State 

Reciprocal Trade : Agreeiu^BjU Between the United 
States of America and Venezuela, With Related Notes — 
Signed November 6, 1939; effective provisionally De- 
cember 16, 1939; effective definitively December 14, 
1940. Executive Agreement Series No. 180. Publica- 
tion 1539. 34 pp. 100. 

Admission of Chinese Into the United States : Visa 
Supplement B of the Foreign Service Regulations, 
Notes to Section XXII-2: January 1941. Immigra- 
tion Series 3. Publication 1542. 35 pp. 150. 

Treaty Information, Cumulative Index: Bulletins 



70-117 Inclusive, July 1935-June 1939. Publication 
1548. 92 pp. 150. 

Military Aviation Mission : Agreement Between the 
United States of America and Ecuador — Signed De- 
cember 12, 1940; effective December 12, 1940. Execu- 
tive Agreement Series No. 189. Publication 1551. 9 
pp. 5^. 

Foreign Service List, January 1, 1941. Publication 
1552. iv, 107 pp. Subscription, 500 a year ; single 
copy, 150. 

Diplomatic List, February 1941. Publication 1560. 
ii, 97 pp. Subscription, $1 a year ; single copy, 100. 

Other Government Agencies 

Balance of International Payments of the United 
States in 1939. (Department of Commerce: Bureau of 
Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Economic Series 8.) 
illus., 87 pp. 150. 



9 



sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents ----- - - Subscription price, $2.7;" a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH <THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OP THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

, II II 



BULI 



H II 




FEBRUARY 22, 1941 

Vol. IV: No. 87— Publication 1567 

Qontents 

Commercial Policy: Page 

World Crisis and the American Farmer: Address by 

Assistant Secretary Acheson 207 

General: 

Comment by the Under Secretary of State 211 

Control of exports in national defense 211 

Passport requirements for British possessions in the 

Western Hemisphere 212 

The Department: 

Senate confirmation of nomination of G. Rowland 

Shaw as Assistant Secretary of State 212 

The Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 212 

Nominations of ministers 212 

Senate confirmation of nomination of Alexander C. 

Kirk as Minister to Saudi Arabia 212 

Foreign Service regulations 213 

Treaty Information: 
Extradition: 

Supplementary convention with Mexico 213 

Supplementary convention with Guatemala .... 213 
Industrial property : 

Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property 

(Revised 1934) (Treaty Series 941) 213 

Arrangement Concerning the Suppression of False 

Indications of Origin on Merchandise 213 

[Over] 




U,S * <: ENT OF DOCUMENTI 

MAR 11 1941 



Qontents 



—CONTINUED. 



Treaty Information — Continued. Page 

Industrial property — Continued. 

Arrangement Concerning the International Registra- 
tion of Factory or Trade Marks 214 

Arrangement Concerning the International Deposit of 

Industrial Designs and Models 214 

Legal assistance: 

Protocol on Uniformity of Powers of Attorney Which 

Are To Be Utilized Abroad . . . 214 

Legislation 214 

Publications 215 



Commercial Policy 



WORLD CRISIS AND THE AMERICAN PARMER 



ADDRESS BY ASSISTANT SECRETARY ACHESON : 



[Released to the press February 22] 

This annual meeting of the National Farm 
Institute comes at a turning point in the history 
of this country and of the world. The year in 
which we are now living will reveal whether we, 
as a nation, may pursue, unmolested, our destiny 
as a liberty-loving people ; or whether we must 
face a death struggle for the preservation of our 
liberties and our independence. 

We are today face to face — to use the Presi- 
dent's words — with "forces of evil which are 
bent on conquest of the world", forces which 
"will destroy whomever and whenever they can 
destroy". And these forces, as Secretary Hull 
has stated, have made it abundantly clear, by 
deed and by utterance, "that they are engaged 
upon a relentless attempt to transform the civ- 
ilized world as we have known it into a world in 
which mankind will be reduced again to the 
degradation of a master-and-slave relationship 
among nations and among individuals, main- 
tained by brute force." 

Let there be no illusion. For every man, wo- 
man, and child in this country — for farmers no 
less than for everyone else — the issues at stake 
are so vast that they transcend every other con- 
sideration. The defeat of those who are holding 
the last fringes of Europe against the forces 
of ruthless aggression would be a reverse to us 
of incalculable and perhaps irreparable effect. 
We find ourselves today directly in the path of 



1 Delivered at the Fifth Annual National Farm Insti- 
tute, Des Moines, Iowa, February 21, 1941. 



a hostile alliance which is making the most 
powerful play in history to control all Europe 
and Asia and which makes no secret of its ambi- 
tions in this hemisphere. Those nations which 
are resisting the forces of aggression stand 
today as bastions before us. It seems incon- 
ceivable that any American could any longer be 
so naive as to suppose that, if these bulwarks 
across the seas were to go down, this Nation 
would be spared a grim struggle for its very ex- 
istence, a struggle in which all of the familiar 
devices of totalitarian warfare would be em- 
ployed to the hilt against us. 

And yet there are some who refuse squarely to 
face the realities. They delude themselves with 
all kinds of wishful thinking. They cannot ad- 
just their minds to the facts of the world situa- 
tion with which this country is now confronted. 
They consistently ignore the impacts of modern 
technology upon world relations — impacts 
which have brought all parts of the world into 
ever closer geographical proximity. They ig- 
nore the manifold forms — cruel and insidious — 
of totalitarian aggression. They fail utterly to 
grasp the basic implications of sea power. They 
comfort themselves with superficial allusions to 
the great width of the Atlantic Ocean as com- 
pared with the English Channel, while failing 
to recognize that the defense afforded by water 
is contingent upon control of the sea. They can- 
not seem to understand that oceans are excel- 
lent highways for attack, once they fall under 
the control of the attacker. In the face of a 
supreme crisis which threatens our very ex- 

207 



208 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



istence as a free nation, they tell us that we 
should give our exclusive attention to "putting 
our own house in order". They forget that the 
question which is thrust upon us is whether we 
shall continue to be the masters of our own 
household; whether we shall have the oppor- 
tunity of "putting our own house in order". 

The relentless logic of this situation has neces- 
sitated the great efforts being put forth for the 
national defense. It has been hard for us as 
a nation to grasp, quickly and fully, the sinister 
implications for us of the rapid spread of inter- 
national lawlessness and brigandage. We have 
lived so long in security, behind the. shelter of 
friendly sea power, that we have come to think 
of our security almost as if it were ordained by 
Providence in recognition of our special merit. 
In the face, however, of the rapidly unfolding 
events in Europe and Asia, the overwhelming 
majority of our people have sensed the real 
meaning of this struggle for us. That is why 
they are supporting, with increasing and grati- 
fying unity, all phases of the national-defense 
program. 

Upon one phase of the defense program there 
has been virtual unanimity from the very begin- 
ning of the emergency — and especially since the 
collapse of France. All of us are agreed upon 
the urgent necessity of re-arming at the rapidest 
possible rate, and upon the necessity of gaining 
adequate time in which to re-arm. The crux of 
the problem is how best to make our great re- 
sources effective in behalf of nations overseas 
which are battling for their lives, while we gain 
the precious time which we must have. The 
only means of gaining that time lies in giving 
all material assistance to the nations which are 
fighting aggression so that they can withstand 
the powerful assaults of the invaders. This is 
a matter on which the overwhelming portion of 
our people are now agreed. 

Unfortunately, when it comes to actual per- 
formance, some who, while professing — -no 
doubt sincerely — to favor all material aid to the 
victims of aggression, in practice refuse to sup- 
port adequate and immediate measures to that 
end. They still cannot believe that we who have 
had every gift of nature are now denied the 



most precious of them all — time. There are 
risks, no matter what we do — but there is the 
greatest risk, if we do nothing. All of us want 
to see this country spared the horrors of par- 
ticipation in war. There is no difference on that 
score. But every American worthy of his salt, 
first and foremost, is determined to preserve the 
independence of this Nation of free people at 
whatever sacrifice. 

I am profoundly convinced that our best — in- 
deed our only — chance of safeguarding our 
interests as a free and independent nation lies 
in extending adequate and timely material aid 
to Britain and the other victims of aggression. 
Unless we do extend effective aid, we shall face, 
virtually alone, the full impact of totalitarian 
aggression into this hemisphere. If that situa- 
tion should arise — as it surely will if the axis 
triumphs and Britain goes down — the question 
will no longer be whether this country can keep 
out of war but how soon and under what con- 
ditions a war will be forced upon us. 

Another phase of defense which has not been, 
and must not be, neglected is the establishment 
of the solidarity of the Americas and a system 
of continental defense. The protection of the 
Panama Canal, so essential for our defense, is 
but one of the many considerations involved. 
If totalitarian aggression, in all of its sinister 
forms, is to be kept out of the United States, it 
must be kept out of this hemisphere. 

Fortunately for our present efforts, the good- 
neighbor policy and the many specific acts which 
have given it content have laid strong founda- 
tions for a solid inter-American front in the 
present emergency. I can here mention only 
briefly the work that has been done toward 
building closer ties — political, economic, and 
cultural — between the 21 American republics. 

In 1933 the Inter-American Conference at 
Montevideo greatly reinforced the doctrine of 
non-intervention in the internal or external af- 
fairs of other nations and also gave approval 
and impetus to the liberal principles of trade 
policy which took concrete form in the United 
States the following year with the adoption of 
the Trade Agreements Act. Building upon the 
foundations laid down at Montevideo, a series 



FEBRUARY 2 2, 1941 



209 



of subsequent inter-American conferences — 
those at Buenos Aires in 1936. at Lima in 193S, 
at Panama in 1939, and at Habana last sum- 
mer — have carried forward the work of creating 
an effective system of solidarity and collabora- 
tion in matters of common concern to the West- 
ern Hemisphere. The conferences held since the 
outbreak of war in Europe — those at Panama 
and at Habana — were concerned especially with 
developing and carrying forward a broad pro- 
gram of hemisphere defense. Growing out of 
these conferences has come the adoption of a 
variety of measures designed to present a solid 
front in the Western Hemisphere against future 
encroachment of all kinds — military, economic, 
and cultural — from outside the hemisphere. Of 
necessity, many of these measures have been 
concerned with the more immediate aspects of 
the war-time emergency. 

There has, however, been full recognition of 
the fact that short-term measures are not 
enough. It is clear that maintenance of the fu- 
ture solidarity of the Americas in the interests 
of hemisphere defense involves difficult eco- 
nomic problems of a long-range character. The 
Western Hemisphere, as its economy is organ- 
ized today, produces vast surpluses of agricul- 
tural and other extractive products which have 
hitherto been disposed of in markets outside 
the Western Hemisphere. This is a matter of 
fundamental concern from the standpoint not 
only of our national defense but also of the 
particular interests of American farmers. It is 
of the utmost importance both to themselves and 
to the entire Nation that farmers in this country 
acquaint themselves with the problems involved 
and think them through clearly and with broad 
vision. 

It is obvious that both short-term and long- 
term measures for alleviating the surplus situa- 
tion and minimizing its effects are called for; 
and, as many of you know, much study and ef- 
fort are now being given to this subject. They 
include the stimulation of complementary, in 
the place of competitive, forms of agricultural 
production in this hemisphere; readjustments 
of production on the basis of cooperative plan- 
ning amongst the producing countries; and in- 

295656—41 2 



ter-American cooperation also with respect to 
programs for the orderly world marketing of 
hemisphere surpluses. Also of importance are 
measures to increase consumption in this hemi 
sphere of things which are produced within the 
hemisphere. One way of doing this is to reduce 
trade barriers, as illustrated by the trade agree- 
ments now in effect between the United States 
and 11 of the American republics. Another 
means is by encouraging healthy industrializa- 
tion in other parts of the hemisphere, thus cre- 
ating better-balanced national economies and 
increased purchasing power among the other 
republics. 

It would be utterly unrealistic, however, to 
suppose that there is any magic by which tliis 
hemisphere — whether as applied to agriculture 
or any other phase of its economy — can suddenly 
lift itself out of the rest of the world and blithely 
charge off the consequences to its profit and loss 
account. For the fact is that the Western Hem- 
isphere is closely integrated economically with 
the rest of the world, and particularly with 
Europe, as a result of the trade and other rela- 
tionships which have been built up over a long 
period of years. AVe can take steps to reduce 
dependence upon export markets beyond our 
hemisphere, and we are doing so. But unless 
we wish to face the prospect of the most violent 
readjustments in both agricultural and other 
phases of our economic life, we cannot afford to 
take a defeatist attitude toward the world situ- 
ation. We must recognize from the outset that, 
in spite of all feasible measures, this hemisphere 
will continue to have a vital stake in the restora- 
tion of orderly conditions in other parts of the 
world on terms which, as Mr. Nelson Rocke- 
feller 2 has recently said, will not only protect 
the future of democracy but which will make it 
possible for our surpluses to be fairly and freely 
sold. 

This hemisphere does not contain the essential 
characteristics of a self-contained economic area. 
While pushing forward all feasible measures of 
sound readjustment, it must, in its own best 



2 Coordinator of Commercial and Cultural Relations 
Between the American Republics. 



211) 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



interests, Look elsewhere for market outlets for 
large surpluses of extractive products. This is 
true of our country as well as of the other Amer- 
ican nations. Unless we would deceive our- 
selves, we must look forward to the necessity of 
maintaining access to markets outside- the hemi- 
sphere which are capable of absorbing large 
quantities of our surpluses. 

This basic fact has important implications 
from the standpoint of trade policy. It is clear 
that we shall continue to need access to the 
markets afforded by the large laboring popula- 
tions of industrial countries overseas. Vast as 
is the consuming power of industrial United 
States, it is not great enough to absorb the agri- 
cultural surpluses which arise from our own 
production plus that of the other American re- 
publics. Hut our access to overseas markets 
must be such that we do not stand at the mercy 
of foreign buyers. The prospect of having to 
sell our surpluses in a Europe which is under 
the domination of a buyers' monopoly main- 
tained by a foreign dictatorship is one which 
farmers in this hemisphere cannot afford to face 
with equanimity. Above all things, this hemi- 
sphere must continue to have unrestricted access 
to the great British market. Should the war 
end in the closing not only of the continental 
European market but also of the British mar- 
ket — "closing" except for such limited access as 
might suit the convenience of totalitarian dic- 
tatorship — American farmers will inevitably 
face severe measures of readjustment, at great 
sacrifices to themselves and to our entire national 
economy. 

In their own immediate interest as producers, 
it follows, therefore, that farmers in this coun- 
try cannot afford to throw up their hands in 
dismay and write off the whole European situa- 
tion as hopeless for the future. The steps which 
are being taken in this hemisphere to strengthen 
our position in anticipation of the possible con- 
tinuance of unfavorable conditions in other 
parts of the world are obviously all to the good. 
Meanwhile, however, nothing but harm can 
come from the adoption of a defeatist atti- 



tude — a policy of retreat. American agri- 
culture has a tremendous direct stake in the out- 
come of the war as it will affect I he kind of 
outside world with which we in this hemisphere 
and in this country will have to do business in 
the future. 

But the stake of the American farmer in the 
outcome of the war is much broader than that. 
Like all other citizens, farmers have a vital in- 
terest in the preservation of American inde- 
pendence and American liberty, under condi- 
I ions which will permit the orderly development 
of our economic life and hence rising standards 
of living for our people. 

I have already emphasized the threat to our 
national security which is inherent in the pres- 
ent world situation. Were the aggressor na- 
tions to triumph in this war, this Nation would 
face the necessity of maintaining vast and un- 
precedented armaments on a permanent basis. 
There would be no escape from this dilemma. 
In the final analysis, this stupendous burden 
must fall upon every element of our population 
but with crushing effect upon agriculture. 
Greatly increased taxes and the dissipation of a 
huge part of our national effort in unproduc- 
tive pursuits would be a dead weight upon the 
living standards of our people. And you know 
that that weight falls first upon the food and 
clothing which come from the soil. With for- 
eign markets closed or controlled, the farmer 
would find that the expansion of the domestic 
market which has been going forward for the 
past eight years would be reversed. He would 
find here, as the people of Europe have found, 
that the alternative is guns or butter, and it 
wotdd have to be guns. 

And so I say to you, as farmers and as citi- 
zens: the hour of supreme national trial is upon 
us — this year and now. The attitudes which 
we take and the decisions we make in this very 
year — 1941 — penetrate to the very fundamentals 
of the problem of our continued existence as a 
free and independent nation. 

First and last, we are all Americans, and our 
greatest responsibility today is to preserve for 



211 



ourselves and our children t ho great promise on 
which this Nation was founded and has devel- 
oped and prospered. We cannot meet this re- 
sponsibility unless wi are willing to play our 
pari in world affairs. We cannot afford to 
shrink from the realities of our position; and if 
we falsely attempt to do so. our folly will recoil 
upon us. These are times which call for vision 
and courage. Small men with small views can- 
not do big things. If we become a prey to nar- 
row conceptions ami to moral weakness in this 
great crisis, we shall be false to the greatness of 
this country which has produced us and all we 
have and are. Policies of retreat can lead only 
id national disaster. I beg of each of you to 
take to your hearts the words which Lincoln said 
to your fathers in the darkest hours of another 
national crisis: 

"Fellow citizens, we cannot escape history. 
We of this Congress and this Administration 
will be remembered in spite of ourselves. No 
personal significance or insignificance can spare 
one ()]• another of us. The fiery trial through 
which we pass will light us down in honor or 
dishonor to the latest generation. . . . We — 
even we here — hold the power and bear the re- 
sponsibility. . . . We shall nobly save or 
meanly lost' the last, best hope of earth." 



General 



COMMENT 
BY THE UNDEE SECRETARY ( )F STATE 

In response to questions of newspaper corre- 
spondents at his press conference February 18. 
regarding reported remarks of spokesmen of 
foreign governments, including statements at- 
tributed to Japanese officials that Japan had no 
intention of attacking British and Dutch in- 
terests in the South Pacific; minimizing re- 
ports of anxiety on the part of Great Britain, 
the United States, and other countries; and 
declaring, among other things, that everything 



would be all right if the United State:- would 
withdraw to the Western Hemisphere, the 
Under Secretary of State, Sumner Welles, 
made the following general statement: 

"In the very critical world condition which 
exists today, the Government of the United 
States is far more interested in the deeds of 
other nations than the statements which some 
of their spokesmen may make.'' 

CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL 
DEFENSE 

The following circular letter to all collectors 
of customs was sent by the Secretary of State 
February '20. 1041: 

••Reference is made to the Department's air 
mail circular letters of July 18. 1940 and of 
August .">. 1940 in regard to the interpretation 
of the regulations issued by the President pur- 
suant to section 6 of the Export Control Act. 
approved on July 2, 1940. 

"With reference to the Department's letter of 
July 1*. you may, pending further instructions, 
permit without the requirement of a license the 
exportation of all chemicals, except quinine 
sulphate, conforming to the United States 
Pharmacopeia (U. S. P.), the National Formu- 
lary (N. F.). or the Chemically Pure Analyti- 
cal Reagent (C. P. A. R.) standards, which 
contain as ingredients any of the basic materials 
or chemicals listed in the regulations referred 
to above, provided the total quantity of any one 
chemical per shipment shall not exceed 100 
pounds. Your particular attention is invited to 
the exception in respect to quinine sulphate and 
to the fact that all shipments of this material, 
except such as fall within the purview of the 
following paragraph, are subject to the require- 
ment of an export license, whether or not they 
conform to the standards mentioned. All ship- 
ments of mercury, which is a metal and not a 
chemical, also require an export license unless 
they fall within the terms of the following 
paragraph. 



212 



DEPARTMENT OE STATE BULLETIN 



"As you were informed in the Department's 
Idler of August 5, you may, until further notice. 
permit without the requirement of a license the 
exportation of all medicinal, dental and pro- 
prietary preparations in bottles, tubes, vials, 
capsules, boxes or other containers for indi- 
vidual consumption. 

"You arc requested to exercise due diligence 
to prevent any abuse of the above-described 
privileges and to report to the Department of 
State immediately any evidence of such abuse." 

PASSPORT REQUIREMENTS FOR BRIT- 
ISH POSSESSIONS IN THE WESTERN 
HEMISPHERE 

l Released to tlie press Februa r.v 1 7 ] 

American citizens proceeding to Newfound- 
land, Bermuda. Jamaica, Antigua, St. Lucia, 
Trinidad, and British Guiana should be in pos- 
session of valid passports. Army and Navy 
personnel proceeding to these points, who have 
been documented by the War or Navy Depart- 
ments, are exempt from this requirement. Per- 
sons proceeding on a continuous voyage on ves- 
sels which touch at these places do not need pass- 
ports provided they are remaining at the places 
mentioned only while the ships on which they 
are traveling are in port. 

At least 10 days "will be required after an ap- 
plication is submit ted before a passport will be 
granted. It will also be necessary for persons 
bearing passports to obtain British visas. 



The Foreign Service 



The Department 



SENATE CONFIRMATION OF NOMINA- 
TION OF G. HOWLAND SHAW AS 
ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF STATE 

On February 20. 1!>41, the Senate confirmed 
the Executive nomination of Mr. G. Howland 
Shaw as Assistant Secretary of State. Mr. 
Shaw is now Chief of the Division of Foreign 
Service Personnel of the Department. 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press February 21] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since February 8, 
1941: 

James G. Carter, of Brunswick. Ga., Consul 
at Tananarive, Madagascar, has been assigned 
as Consul General at Tananarive, Madagascar. 

George E. Seltzer, of Brooklyn, N. Y., Consul 
at Ponta Delgada, Sao Miguel (St. Michael), 
Azores, will retire from the Foreign Service 
effective July 1, 1941. 

Robert P. Joyce, of Pasadena. Calif., Second 
Secretary of Legation and Consul at Belgrade, 
Yugoslavia, has been designated Second Secre- 
tary of Embassy at Habana, Cuba. 

Alfred R. Thomson, of Silver Spring, Md., 
Consul General at Dresden, Germany, has been 
assigned as Consul General at Hamburg, Ger- 
many. 

NOMINATIONS OF MINISTERS 

On February 21, the Senate received the fol- 
lowing Executive nominations: 

Pierre de L. Boal. of Pennsylvania, now a 
Foreign Service officer of class I and Counselor 
of Embassy at Mexico, D. F.. Mexico, to be 
Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipoten- 
tiary of the United States of America to 
Nicaragua. 

Wesley Frost, of Kentucky, now a Foreign 
Service officer of class I and lately Counselor 
of Embassy at Santiago, Chile, to be Envoy 
Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of 
the United Slates of America to Paraguay. 

SENATE CONFIRMATION OF NOMINA- 
TION OF ALEXANDER C. KIRK AS 
MINISTER TO SAUDI ARABIA 

On February 20, 1941, the Senate confirmed 
the Executive nomination of Mr. Alexander C. 



FEBRUARY 22, 1941 



213 



Kirk, now Envoy Extraordinary and Minister 
Plenipotentiary to Egypt, to be also Envoy Ex- 
traordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to 
Saudi Arabia, 

FOREIGN SERVICE REGULATIONS 

On February 19, 1941, tbe President signed 



Executive Order No. 8689 amending the For- 
eign Service. Regulations of the United States 
(Chapter XVII: Civil Vessels and Aircraft). 
For text of this order see the Federal Register 
of February 21, 1941 (vol. 6, no. 36), pp. 1083- 
1085 (The National Archives of the United 
States). 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



EXTRADITION 

SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION WITH MEXICO 

The American Ambassador to Mexico re- 
ported by a telegram dated February 17, 1941, 
that the exchange of ratifications of the Supple- 
mentary Extradition Convention between the 
United States and Mexico signed on August 16, 
1939, took place at Mexico City on February 17, 
1941. 

This convention is made an integral part of 
the extradition treaty of February 22, 1899, be- 
tween the two countries (Treaty Series 242), 
and it is agreed that it shall be applied when 
cases arise to all the crimes listed in that treaty 
and to the further crimes added by the supple- 
mentary extradition conventions of June 25, 
1902 (Treaty Series 421) and December 23, 1925 
(Treaty Series 741). 

This supplementary convention will enter 
into force 10 days after its publication in con- 
formity with the laws of the contracting parties, 
such period to be computed from its publication 
in the country last publishing, and it will con- 
tinue and terminate in the same manner as the 
treaty of February 22, 1899. 

SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION WITH 
GUATEMALA 

The American Legation at Guatemala re- 
ported in a telegram dated February 18, 1941, 
that according to information received from the 
Guatemalan Government the publication on its 



part of the Supplementary Extradition Con- 
vention signed with the United States on Febru- 
ary 19, 1940, ratifications of which were ex- 
changed on February 6, 1941, would take place 
on February 18, 1941. 

The convention will therefore enter into force 
10 days after its publication on behalf of the 
United States, which will be the country last 
publishing it, 

INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY 

CONVENTION FOR THE PROTECTION OF INDUS- 
TRIAL PROPERTY (REVISED 1934) (TREATY 
SERIES 941) 

Morocco {French ) 

By a note dated February 11, 1941, the Swiss 
Minister at Washington informed the Secretary 
of State that the French Embassy at Bern, by a 
note dated November 25, 1940, notified the Swiss 
Federal Council of the adherence of Morocco to 
the Convention for the Protection of Industrial 
Property, revised at London on June 2, 1934. 
The note adds that the adherence became effec- 
tive on January 21, 1941. 

ARRANGEMENT CONCERNING THE SUPPRES- 
SION OF FALSE INDICATIONS OF ORIGIN ON 
MERCHANDISE 

Morocco (French) 

The above-mentioned note of February 11, 
1941, from the Swiss Minister states also that 
the French Embassy at Bern notified the Swiss 



214 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Federal Council of the adherence of Morocco 
to the Arrangement Concerning the Suppression 
of False Indications of Origin on Merchandise, 
revised at London on June 2, 1934. The adher- 
ence became effective on January 21, 1941. 

ARRANGEMENT CONCERNING THE INTERNA- 
TIONAL REGISTRATION OF FACTORY OR 
TRADE MARKS 

Morocco {French) 

By a note dated February 11, 1941, the Swiss 
Minister at Washington informed the Secretary 
of State that the French Embassy at Bern in- 
formed the Swiss Federal Council by a note 
dated November 25, 1940, of the adherence of 
Morocco to the Arrangement concerning the In- 
ternational Registration of Factory or Trade 
Marks, as revised at London on June 2, 1934. 
The note adds that the adherence became effec- 
tive on January 21, 1941. 

ARRANGEMENT CONCERNING THE INTERNA- 
TIONAL DEPOSIT OF INDUSTRIAL DESIGNS 
AND MODELS 

Morocco (French) 

The above-mentioned note of the Swiss Minis- 
ter dated February 11, 1941, adds that the 
French Embassy at Bern notified the Swiss Fed- 
eral Council by its note of November 25, 1940, 
of the adherence of Morocco to the Arrange- 
ment Concerning the International Deposit of 
Industrial Designs and Models, as revised at 
London on June 2, 1934. The note states that 
the adherence became effective on January 21, 
1941. 

LEGAL ASSISTANCE 

PROTOCOL ON UNIFORMITY OF POWERS OF 
ATTORNEY WHICH ARE TO BE UTILIZED 
ABROAD 

El Salvador 

By a letter dated February 15, 1941, the 
Director General of the Pan American Union 
informed the Secretary of State that the instru- 
ment of ratification by El Salvador of the 
Protocol on Uniformity of Powers of Attorney 
Which Are To Be Utilized Abroad, which was 
opened for signature at the Pan American 



Union on February 17, 1940, was deposited with 
the Union on February 6, 1941. 

The instrument of ratification which is dated 
December 9, 1940, contains reservations which 
read, in translation, as follows : 

"(a) Article IX, as respects its application 
in El Salvador, shall be considered as reading 
as follows: 

" 'Article IX. The Powers granted in any of 
the countries of the Pan American Union in 
accordance with the foregoing vjrovisions and 
in conformity with the laws of the country of 
origin, shall, for their execution in any other 
country of the Union, be considered as granted 
before a competent notary of the country in 
which they may be executed, without prejudice, 
however, to the necessity of protocolizing the 
instruments in the cases referred to in Article 
VII.' 

"(b) The reservation is made to Article VIII 
that official activity of the attorney, as plaintiff 
or defendant, cannot be admitted in judicial 
or administrative matters for which Salvadoran 
laws require that representation be accredited 
by a special power." 



Legislation 



Change in Text of the Appropriation, "Salaries, Am- 
bassadors and Ministers," 1942: Communication From 
the President of the United States Transmitting an 
Amendment to the Budget for the Fiscal Year 1942 In- 
volving a Change in the Test of the Appropriation, 
"Salaries, Ambassadors and Ministers," Fiscal Year 
1942, and the Draft of a Proposed Provision Pertaining 
to the Same Appropriation for the Fiscal Year 1941 
[making the appropriation available for the salary of 
an Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to 
Uruguay at the rate of $17,500 per annum]. (H. Doc. 
117, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 2 pp. 5^. 

To Promote the Defense of the United States : Hear- 
ings Before the Committee on Foreign Relations, United 
States Senate, Seventy-seventh Congress, First Session, 
on S. 275, a Bill Further To Promote the Defense of the 
United States, and For Other Purposes. 

Parti: Jan. 27 to Feb. 3, 1941. iv, pp. 1-306. 
35tf. 

Part 2 : Feb. 4 to Feb. 10, 1941. iv, pp. 307-830. 

Part 3 : Feb. 11, 1941. iv, pp. 831-914. 



FEBRUARY 2 2, 1941 

Facts and Pertinent Provisions of Law in Cases of 
Certain Aliens: Letter From the Attorney General 
Transmitting a Report Stating All of the Facts and 
Pertinent Provisions of Law in Cases of Certain Aliens 
Whose Deportations Have Been Suspended for More 
Than 6 Months ; to the Committee on Immigration and 
Naturalization. (H. Doc. 47, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) iv, 
124 pp. 150. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Allocation of Tariff Quota on Heavy Cattle During 
the Calendar Year 1941 : Proclamation by the President 
of the United States of America Issued November 30, 
1940 Pursuant to Article III of the Reciprocal Trade 
Agreement Between the United States of America and 
Canada Signed November 17, 1938, and Related Notes. 
Executive Agreement Series No. 190. Publication 1554. 
7 pp. 50. 

Allocation of Tariff Quota on Crude Petroleum and 
Fuel Oil : Proclamation by the President of the United 



215 

States of America, Issued December 12, 1939 Pursuant 
to Article VII of the Reciprocal Trade Agreement Be- 
tween the United States of America and Venezuela 
Signed November 6, 1939. Executive Agreement Series 
No. 191. Publication 1557. 5 pp. 50. 

Termination in Part of Concession on Handkerchiefs : 
Proclamation by the President of the United States of 
America Issued November 28, 1940 Pursuant to Article 
XVI of the Reciprocal Trade Agreement Between the 
United States of America and Switzerland Signed Jan- 
uary 9, 1936, and Related Notes. Executive Agreement 
Series No. 193. Publication 1558. 12 pp. 50. 

Telecommunication : Convention Between the United 
States of America and Other Powers — Signed at Madrid 
December 9, 1932; proclaimed June 27, 1934. Treaty 
Series No. 867 [Reprint, exclusive of General Radio 
Regulations, Final Protocol, and Additional Radio Reg- 
ulations; Supplemented by Treaty Series No. 948]. 
60 pp. 100. 

Other Government Agencies 

Twenty-fourth Annual Report of the United States 
Tariff Commission : 1940. vi, 61 pp. (H. Doc. 15, 77th 
Cong., 1st sess.) 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 



s*U 



"VWl -"Wa*» 



E DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

.A )l A 



.O U JL^ 



i 



Ml 




Vol. IV: No. 



MARCH 1, 1941 
-Publication 1568 



Qontents 




General: Pa i; e 

Control of exports in national defense 219 

Europe: 

Declarations of war by belligerent countries 224 

United States exports to the Union of Soviet Socialist 

Republics 227 

American Republics: 

Air tour by the Inter-American Escadrille 228 

Cultural Relations: 

Address by the President 229 

Membership of Vice President Wallace on the General 

Advisory Committee on Cultural Relations .... 230 

Lectures by distinguished Americans in other American 

republics 230 

Meeting in Mexico City of the Council of Rural Educa- 
tion 231 

Translation into Portuguese of "Epic of America" . . 231 

Publications 231 

Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, Etc.: 

Monthly statistics 232 

International Conferences, Commissions, Etc.: 

North American Regional Radio-Engineering Meeting . 236 

The Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 238 

Examination 239 

Nominations 239 

[Over] 



U. S, £ 

MAR Z2, 1941 



Qontents 



CONTINUED. 



Treaty Information: Page 

Diplomatic officers: 

Pan American Convention 239 

Telecommunications: 

North American Regional Radio Agreement . . . 240 
Education : 

Convention for the Promotion of Inter-American 

Cultural Relations (Treaty Series 928) 240 

Agriculture : 

Convention for the Unification of the Methods of 

Keeping and Operating Cattle Herd books .... 240 
Commerce : 

Inter-American Coffee-Marketing Agreement . . . 240 
Nature protection and wildlife preservation: 

Convention on Nature Protection and Wildlife 

Preservation in the Western Hemisphere 240 



General 



CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL DEFENSE 



[Released to the press February 25] 

The President announced February 25 the 
issuance of two proclamations, with accompany- 
ing Executive orders, recommended to him by 
Brig. Gen. Russell L. Maxwell, Administrator 
of Export Control. These proclamations ex- 
tend the export-licensing system to include ad- 
ditional articles and materials needed in our 
domestic defense program. 

The first proclamation, which becomes effec- 
tive March 10, 1941, includes Belladonna. 
Atropine, Sole Leather, and Belting Leather. 

The second proclamation, which becomes 
effective immediately, includes Beryllium, 
Graphite electrodes, and Aircraft pilot trainers 
(used for ground instruction). 

The texts of the proclamations and Executive 
orders follow: 

Control or the Export of Certain Articles 

AND MATERLVLS 

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF 
AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Whereas section 6 of the act of Congress en- 
titled "An Act To expedite the strengthening 
of the national defense," approved July 2. 1940, 
provides as follows : 

"Sec. 6. Whenever the President determines 
that it is necessary in the interest of national 
defense to prohibit or curtail the exportation 
of any military equipment or munitions, or 
component parts thereof, or machinery, tools, 
or material, or supplies necessary for the manu- 
facture, servicing, or operation thereof, he may 
by proclamation prohibit or curtail such expor- 

297233 — 41—1 



tation, except under such rules and regulations 
as he shall prescribe. Any such proclamation 
shall describe the articles or materials included 
in the prohibition or curtailment contained 
therein. In case of the violation of any provi- 
sion of any proclamation, or of any rule or reg- 
ulation, issued hereunder, such violator or 
violators, upon conviction, shall be punished by 
a fine of not more than $10,000, or by imprison- 
ment for not more than two years, or by both 
such fine and imprisonment. The authority 
granted in this section shall terminate June 30, 
1942, unless the Congress shall otherwise 
provide." 

Xow, therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, 
President of the United States of America, act- 
ing under and by virtue of the authority vested 
in me by the aforesaid act of Congress, do hereby 
proclaim that upon the recommendation of the 
Administrator of Export Control I have deter- 
mined that it is necessary in the interest of the 
national defense that on and after March 10, 
1941, the following-described articles and ma- 
terials shall not be exported from the United 
States except when authorized in each case by 
a license as provided for in Proclamation No. 
2413 » of July 2, 1940, entitled "Administration 
of section 6 of the Act entitled 'An Act To ex- 
pedite the strengthening of the national defense' 
approved July 2. 1940" : 

(1) Belladonna 

(2) Atropine 

(3) Sole Leather 

(4) Belting Leather 



'5 F.R. 2467: Bulletin of July 6, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 
54), pp. 12-13. 

219 



220 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



In witness whereof, I have hereunto set 
my hand and caused the seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this 25th day 

of February, in the year of our Lord nineteen 

hundred and forty-one, and of the 

[seal] Independence of the United States 

of America the one hundred and 

sixty-fifth. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 
By the President : 
Cordell Hull 

Secretary of State. 
[No. 2460] 

Control of the Export of Certain Articles 
and Materials 

by the president of the united states of 

AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Whereas section 6 of the act of Congress en- 
titled "An Act To expedite the strengthening 
of the national defense," approved July 2, 1940, 
provides as follows : 

"Sec. 6. Whenever the President determines 
that it is necessary in the interest of national de- 
fense to prohibit or curtail the exportation of 
any military equipment or munitions, or com- 
ponent parts thereof, or machinery, tools, or 
materia], or supplies necessary for the manu- 
facture, servicing, or operation thereof, he may 
by proclamation prohibit or curtail such expor- 
tation, except under such rules and regulations 
as he shall prescribe. Any such proclamation 
shall describe the articles or materials included 
in the prohibition or curtailment contained 
therein. In case of the violation of any provi- 
sion of any proclamation, or of any rule or reg- 
ulation, issued hereunder, such violator or vio- 
lators, upon conviction, shall be punished by a 
fine of not more than $10,000, or by imprison- 
ment for not more than two years, or by both 
such fine and imprisonment. The authority 
granted in this section shall terminate June 30, 
1942, unless the Congress shall otherwise pro- 
vide." 



Now, therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, 
President of the United States of America, act- 
ing under and by virtue of the authority vested 
in me by the aforesaid act of Congress, do hereby 
proclaim that upon the recommendation of the 
Administrator of Export Control I have deter- 
mined that it is necessary in the interest of the 
national defense that on and after this date the 
following-described articles and materials shall 
not be exported from the United States except 
when authorized in each case by a license as pro- 
vided for in Proclamation No. 2413 of July 2, 
1940, entitled "Administration of section 6 of 
the Act entitled 'An Act To expedite the 
strengthening of the national defense' approved 
July 2, 1940.": 

(1) Beryllium 

(2) Graphite electrodes 

(3) Aircraft fiilot trainers 

In witness avhereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this 25th day 
of February, in the year of our Lord 
[seal] nineteen hundred and forty-one, and 
of the Independence of the United 
States of America the one hundred and sixty- 
fifth. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 
By the President : 
Cordell Hull 

Secretary of State. 
[No. 2461] 

Executive Order 
Prescribing Regulations Governing the Ex- 
portation of Articles and Materials Desig- 
nated in the President's Proclamation of 
February 25, 1941, Issued Pursuant to Sec- 
tion 6 of the Act of Congress Approved July 2, 
1940, and Amending Regulations of January 
15, 1941, Covering the Exportation of Certain 
Articles and Materials 

Pursuant to the authority vested in me by the 
provisions of section 6 of the act of Congress 
approved July 2, 1940, entitled "An Act To 
expedite the strengthening of the national de- 



MARCH 1, 1941 



221 



fense," I hereby prescribe the following addi- 
tional regulations governing the exportation of 
the articles and materials designated in my 
proclamation of February 25, 1941 : 

1. The articles and materials designated in 
my proclamation of February 25, 1941, pursuant 
to section 6 of the act of July 2, 1940, shall be 
construed to include the following: 

(1.) Belladonna: B F 

Belladonna Leaves, U.S.P. 
( Belladonnae Folium) : 
Belladonna Plaster, U.S.P. 
(Emplastrum Belladon- 
nae) 
Extract of Belladonna, U.S.P. 
(Extractum Belladon- 
nae) 
Fluid Extract of Belladonna 
Leaf, N.F. (Fluid extrac- 
tum Belladonnae Folii) 
Tincture of Belladonna, 
U.S.P. (Tinctura Bella- 
donnae) 
Belladonna Ointment, U.S.P. 
(Unguentum Belladon- 
na) 
Belladonna Root, U.S.P. (Bella- 
donnae Radix): 
Fluid Extract of Belladonna 
Root, U.S.P. (Fluid ex- 
tractum Belladonnae 
Radicis) 
Belladonna Liniment, N.F. 
(Linamentum Belladon- 
nae) 
(2.) Atropine: 

Atropine, U.S.P. alkaloid (atro- 
pine, atropia): 
Atropine Hydrobromide 
Atropine Hydrochloride 
Atropine Methylbromide 
Atropine Methylnitrate 
Atropine Nitrate 
Atropine Salicylate 
Atropine Sulfate, U.S.P. (At- 
ropine Sulfae) 
Atropine Sulfuric Acid 
Atropine Valerate 
(3.) Sole Leather 

Bends, backs, and sides 
(4.) Belting Leather 0330 0359* 

2. The numbers appearing in the columns 
designated B and F in paragraph 1 hereof refer 
to the numbers in Schedule B "Statistical Clas- 



2209* 



2209* 



2209* 



2209* 



2209* 



2209* 



2209* 



2209* 



2209* 



2209* 



2209* 



8127. 9* 


8180* 


8127. 9* 


8180* 


8127. 9* 


8180* 


8127. 9* 


81S0* 


8127. 9* 


8180* 


8127. 9* 


8180* 


8127. 9* 


8180* 


8127. 9* 


8180* 


8127. 9* 


8180* 


0324 


0328 



sification of Domestic Commodities Exported 
from the United States," and Schedule F "For- 
eign Exports (Re-Exports)," respectively, is- 
sued by the United States Department of Com- 
merce, both effective January 1, 1941. The 
words are controlling and the numbers are in- 
cluded solely for the purpose of statistical 
classification. An asterisk (*) indicates that 
the classification herein is not co-extensive with 
that in said Schedules B and F. 

3. Regulations 2 to 12 inclusive of the Regu- 
lations issued July 2, 1940, 2 pursuant to section 
6 of the act of July 2, 1940, are applicable to the 
exportation of the articles and materials listed 
in paragraph 1 (1.) through (4.) inclusive. 

4. Executive Order No. 8640' is hereby 
amended to include within its provisions the 
articles and materials designated in my procla- 
mation of February 25, 1941. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 
The White House, 
February 25, 1941. 

[No. 8693] 

Executive Order 
Prescribing Regulations Governing the Ex- 
portation or Articles and Materials Desig- 
nated in the President's Proclamation of 
February 25, 1941, Issued Pursuant to Section 
6 of the Act of Congress Approved July 2, 
1940, and Amending Regulations of January 
15, 1941, Covering the Exportation of Certain 
Articles and Materials 

Pursuant to the authority vested in me by 
the provisions of section 6 of the act of Congress 
approved July 2, 1940, entitled "An Act To 
expedite the strengthening of the national de- 
fense," I hereby prescribe the following addi- 
tional regulations governing the exportation of 
the articles and materials designated in my 
proclamation of February 25, 1941 : 

1. The articles and materials designated in 
my proclamation of February 25, 1941, pursu- 



2 5 F.R. 2469. 

3 6 F.R. 455; Bulletin of January 18, 1941 (vol. IV, 

no. 82), p. 91. 



222 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



B 


F 


6245* 


6640 ; 


6249* 


6640 : 


8399. 9* 


8399 1 


5473 


5960 : 


9190* 


9190 ! 



ant to section 6 of the act of July 2, 1940, shall 
be construed to include the following: 

(1.) Beryllium: 

Ores and concentrates (except 

gem varieties) 
Metal, alloys and scrap 
Beryllium salts and compounds 
(2.) Graphite electrodes 
(3.) Aircraft Pilot Trainers: 
Trainers for ground instruction 
of pilots, student pilots, 
and combat crews for air- 
craft in instrument flying, 
navigation, bombing, or 
gunnery 

2. The numbers appearing in the columns 
designated B and F in paragraph 1 hereof refer 
to the numbers in Schedule B "Statistical Clas- 
sification of Domestic Commodities Exported 
from the United States," and Schedule F "For- 
eign Exports (Re-Exports)," respectively, is- 
sued by the United States Department of Com- 
merce, both effective January 1, 1941. The 
words are controlling and the numbers are in- 
cluded solely for the purpose of statistical clas- 
sification. An nsterisk (*) indicates that the 
classification herein is not co-extensive with 
that in said Schedules B and F. 

3. Regulations 2 to 12 inclusive of the Regu- 
lations issued July 2, 1940, pursuant to section 
6 of the act of July 2, 1940, are applicable to 
the exportation of the articles and materials 
listed in paragraph 1 (1.) through (3.) in- 
clusive. 

4. Executive Order No. 8640 is hereby 
amended to include within its provisions the 
articles and materials designated in my procla- 
mation of February 25. 1941. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 
The White House, 
February 25, 19J,1. 

[No. 86941 



On February 28, 1941, the Division of Con- 
trols of the Department of State issued the fol- 
lowing informational sheet : 



"In accordance with the provisions of the 
Executive Order of January 15, 1941, 4 the Sec- 
retary of State has today issued the following 
general licenses for the export to Great Britain 
and Northern Ireland of articles and materials 
named in the proclamations, regulations, and 
Executive Orders issued pursuant to section 6 
of the Export Control Act approved July 2, 
1940: 

"License No. GAA 2 for aluminum 
No. GAB 2 for antimony 
No. GAC 2 for asbestos 
No. GAD 2 for chromium 
No. GAE 2 for cotton linters 
No. GAP 2 for flax 
No. GAH 2 for hides 
No. GAJ 2 for manganese 
No. GAK 2 for magnesium 
No. GAL 2 for manila fiber 
No. GAO 2 for molybdenum 
No. GAP 2 for optical glass 
No. GAR 2 for quartz crystals 
No. GAU 2 for silk 
No. GAW 2 for toluol 
No. GAY 2 for vanadium 
No. GAZ 2 for wool 
No. GBA 2 for ammonia 
No. GBB 2 for chlorine 
No. GBC 2 for dlmethylaniline 
No. GBD 2 for diphenylamine 
No. GBE 2 for nitric acid 
No. GBF 2 for nitrates 
No. GBG 2 for nitrocellulose 
No. GBH 2 for soda lime 
No. GBI 2 for sodium acetate 
No. GBJ 2 for strontium 
No. GBK 2 for sulphuric acid 
No. GBL 2 for bromine 
No. GBM 2 for ethylene 
No. GBN 2 for ethylene dibromide 
No. GBO 2 for methylamine 
No. GBQ 2 for beryllium 
No. GBR 2 for graphite electrodes 
No. GBT 2 for cobalt 
No. GBW 2 for copper and products 
No. GBY 2 for nickel and products 
No. GCA 2 for aircraft parts 
No. GCB 2 for armor plate 
No. GCC 2 for shatter proof glass 
No. GCD 2 for plastics, optically clear 
No. GCF 2 for Are control instruments 

* See the Bulletin of January 18, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 
84), p. 91. 



MARCH 1, 1941 



223 



'License No, 
No, 
No, 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



GEA 2 for petroleum — crude oil 

GEB 2 for gasoline 

GEO 2 for tetraethyl lead 

GED 2 for lubricating oil 

GEE 2 for naphtha 

GFA 2 for iron and steel scrap 

GGA 2 for iron ore 

GGB 2 for pig iron 

GGC 2 for ferromanganese, spiegelei- 
sen, ferrosilicon, ferrochrome, ferro- 
colurnbiuiu, ferrocarbon - titanium, 
ferrotitanium, ferrophosphorus, fer- 
romolybdenum, ferrotungsten, ferro- 
vanadium 

GHA 2 for ingots = 

GHB 2 for billets 

GHC 2 for blooms 

GHD 2 for slabs 

GHE 2 for sheet bars 

GHM 2 for wire rods 

GHP 2 for drums and containers 

GHT 2 for tanks 

GMA 2 for structural shapes 

GMB 2 for steel piling 

GMC 2 for plates 

GMD 2 for skelps 

GME 2 for rails 

GMF 2 for splice bars and tie plates 

GMG 2 for bars 

GMH 2 for hoops and baling bands 

GMJ 2 for pipe and tubes 

GMK 2 for drawn wire 
GML 2 for nails and staples 

GMM 2 for barbed wire 

GMN 2 for woven wire fence 

GMO 2 for bale ties 

GMP 2 for fence posts 

GMR 2 for black plate 

GMS 2 for tin plate 

GMT 2 for iron and steel sheets (includ- 
ing stainless steel sheets) 
No. GMU 2 for strip 
No. GMV 2 for wheels 
No. GMW 2 for axles 
No. GMX 2 for track spikes 
No. GMT 2 for castings 
No. GMZ 2 for forgings 
No. GDG 2 for the export of the following 
specifically enumerated machine 
tools and allied products : 

"Pipe threading machines ; metal cut- 
ting band saws ; power driven hack saws ; 



keyseating machines ; disc grinding ma- 
chines ; car wheel and locomotive wheel 
presses ; burring machines — gear ; cham- 
fering machines — gear; burnishing ma- 
chines — gear; planers — crank; bench 
power presses; saw sharpening machines; 
filing machines; pipe bending machines; 
thread chaser grinders; burnishing ma- 
chines ; riveting machines ; grinding ma- 
chines — portable with flexible shaft; 
centering machines; arbor presses (hand, 
air and hydraulic); nibbling machines; 
grinders — lathe tool ; gear lapping ma- 
chines; gear shaving machines; polishing 
machines; heat treating furnaces; foun- 
dry machines ; cold saws up to a capacity 
of 10-inch round stock ; twist and other 
drills; reamers; milling cutters; hobs; 
taps; dies; die heads; shear knives; 
abrasives and abrasive products contain- 
ing emery, corundum, or garnet, as well 
as abrasive paper and cloth ; plastic 
moulding machines and presses ; measur- 
ing machines ; gauges ; testing machines ; 
balancing machines; hydraulic pumps; 
tools incorporating industrial diamonds."' 



The following circular telegram to collectors 
of customs was sent by the Secretary of State 
March 1, 1941: 

"Reference is made to my telegram of Feb- 
ruary ll, 6 in regard to the export of metal 
drums and containers referred to in the Ex- 
ecutive order of February 4, 1941. 

"The three numbered paragraphs contained 
in that telegram have been amended, effective 
immediately, and henceforth, pending further 
instructions no licenses will be required for the 
export of the following types of drums and 
containers : 

"(1) Metal containers of less than five (5) 
gallons capacity. 

" (2 ) Metal drums and containers with capac- 
ity of five (5) or more gallons, but less than 
thirty (30) gallons, except those containing or 



'See the Bulletin of February 15, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 
86), p. 176. 



6 Licenses Nos. GHA 2 to GMZ 2 relate exclusively to 
iron and steel products. 



224 



DETAiRTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



clearly intended to contain gasoline, lubricating 
oil, crude oil, fuel oil, diesel oil, gas oil or Petro- 
leum Jelly (including petrolatum of low grade 
to be used as lubricant or to prevent rust) . 

"(3) Metal drums and containers regardless 
of size containing the following commodities as 
described in Schedule B, 'Statistical Classifica- 
tion of Domestic Commodities Exported from 
the United States, effective January 1, 1939' : 

"Group 00. 
Dairy Products. 

"Group 1. 
Vegetables and Preparations. 



Fruits and Preparations. 
Sugar and Related Products. 
Beverages. 
"Group 2. 
Naval Stores, Gums and Resins, except 

Pine Oil. 
Vegetable Dyeing and Tanning Extracts. 
"Group 8. 
All Descriptions, except Petroleum Jelly 
(including petrolatum of low grade to be 
used as lubricant or to prevent rust). 
"Group 9. 
Miscellaneous Office Supplies." 



Europe 



DECLARATIONS OP WAR BY BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 



The following table sets forth declarations proclamations, there are some instances of 



of war, recognitions of the existence of a state 
of war, etc., in the European war beginning in 
1939. In addition to the cases enumerated 
below of declarations of war or of the names 
of countries at war mentioned in the President's 



proclamations by governors of the various units 
of the British Empire and of colonial posses- 
sions of the Netherlands of the existence of a 
state of Mar with Germany or Italy or both. 




Germany and France 



Germany and Poland. 



"As a consequence ot the aggression 
directed by Germany against Poland, 
a state of war is found to exist between 
France and Germany, commencing 
from September 3, 1939, 5 p. m." 



[No record of a formal declaration of 
war has been found.] 



Note addressed to foreign 
powers by the French Govern- 
ment on September 3. Printed, 
in French, in the Journal officiel 
de la Ripublique fran^aise. Lois 
et dicreU. September 4, 1939, 
page 11086. 



Date of Proclama- 
tion of Neutrality 
by the President 
of the 
United States 



September 5, 
1939 



September 5, 
1939 



MARCH 1, 1941 



225 




Germany and United 
Kingdom. 



Germany and India 



Germany and Aus- 
tralia. 



Germany and New 
Zealand. 



". . . unless not later than 11 a. m., 
British Summer Time, today 3rd Sep- 
tember, satisfactory assurances to the 
above effect [that the German Gov- 
ernment "had suspended all aggressive 
action against Poland and were pre- 
pared promptly to withdraw their 
forces from Polish territory"] have 
been given by the German Govern- 
ment and have reached His Majesty's 
Government in London, a state of war 
will exist between the two countries 
as from that hour." 

British Prime Minister Chamberlain 
declared in his speech of September 3, 
1939 in the House of Commons: "No 
such undertaking was received by the 
time stipulated, and, consequently, 
this country is at war with German}'." 

["I, Victor Alexander John, Marquess 
of Linlithgow, Governor-General of 
India and ex-officio Vice- Admiral there- 
in, being satisfied thereof by informa- 
tion received by me, do hereby proclaim 
that war has broken out between His 
Majesty and Germany." (No record 
has been found of a declaration of war 
by Great Britain against Germany 
which includes India by name.)] 

". . . I, Alexander Gore Arkwright, 
Baron Gowrie, the Governor-General 
aforesaid, acting with the advice of the 
Federal Executive Council, do hereby 
proclaim the existence of war. 

"Given under my Hand and the Seal 
of the Commonwealth this third day of 
September in the year of our Lord one 
thousand nine-hundred and thirty-nine 
and in the third year of His Majesty's 
reign." 

"His Excellency the Governor-Gen- 
eral has it in command from His 
Majesty the King to declare that a state 
of war exists between His Majesty and 
the Government of the German Reich, 
and that such state of war has existed 
from 9:30 p. m., New Zealand standard 
time, on the third day of September, 
1939." 



Telegraphic instruction from 
the British Secretary of State 
for Foreign Affairs to the British 
Ambassador to Germany. This 
and Prime Minister Chamber- 
lain's speech are printed in 
British Command Paper 6106, 
Miscellaneous No. 9 (1939): 
entitled Documents Concerning 
German-Polish Relations and the 
Outbreak of Hostilities between 
Great Britain and Germany on 
September 8, 1989 (a British 
"Blue Book"), pages 175, 178. 



Proclamation of the Governor- 
General of India, dated Septem- 
ber 3, 1939. Printed in The Ga- 
zette of India Extraordinary, Sep- 
tember 3, 1939. 



Proclamation issued on Sep- 
tember 3, 1939. Printed in The 
Commonwealth of Australia Ga- 
zette, September 3, 1939. 



Statement by Viscount Gal- 
way, Governor-General of New 
Zealand. Printed in The New 
Zealand Gazette Extraordinary, 
September 4, 1939. 



Date of Proclama- 
tion of Neutrality 

by the President 
of the 

United States 



September 5, 
1939 



September 5, 
1939 



September 5, 
1939 



September 5, 
1939 



226 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 




Date of Proclama- 
tion of Neutrality 
by the President 
of the 
United States 



Germany and Union of ". . . I do by this my Proclamation 
South Africa. in the name and on behalf of His Ma- 

jesty the King declare and make known 
that from this the sixth day of Septem- 
ber, 1939, the peaceful relations be- 
tween the Union and the German Reich 
are severed and that the Union is, for 
the purposes of all laws, at war with the 
German Reich as from the aforemen- 
tioned date." 

"Now Therefore We do hereby De- 
clare and Proclaim that a State of War 
with the German Reich exists and has 
existed in Our Dominion of Canada as 
and from the tenth day of September, 
1939." 

"The Nygaardsvold [Premier of 
Norway] Government through its proc- 
lamations and conduct as well as the 
military fighting that is taking place as 
a result of its will has created a state of 
war between Norway and the German 
Reich." (Translation.) 

[No record of a formal declaration of 
war has been found.] 

[No record of a formal declaration of 
war has been found.] 

"Only one reply could be given [to 
the German Minister, who informed the 
Ministry of Foreign Affairs that "the 
German Government, therefore, found 
itself compelled to occupy the Nether- 
lands and hoped that they would offer 
no resistance, but accept the protection 
of the German Reich"] ... 3 hours 
after the Dutch forces had begun to 
resist the overwhelmingly powerful in- 
vader with all possible means: 'The 
Netherlands considered themselves at 
war with the German Reich'." [May 10, 
1940.] 

Italy and France... "Today at 4:30 P. M. [11:30 A. M., 

New York Time]* Count Ciano, at 
Chigi Palace, told the Ambassador of 
France that His Majesty the King and 
Emperor of Italy declares that Italy 
considers herself at war with France, 
beginning tomorrow, June 11. 
Brackets in New York Times. 



Germany and Canada. 



Germany and Norway 



Germany and Belgium. 

Germany and Luxem 

burg. 
Germany and Nether 

lands. 



Proclamation by Sir Patrick 
Duncan, Governor-General of 
the Union of South Africa. 
Printed in The Union of South 
Africa Government Gazette Ex- 
traordinary, September 6, 1939. 



Proclamation issued by Prime 
Minister W. L. Mackenzie King. 
Printed in The Canada Gazette 
Extra, September 10, 1939. 



Decree of the Fuhrer for the 
Exercising of Governmental 
Authority in Norway, April 24, 
1940, Reichsgesetzblatt, Teil 1, 
No. 74, p. 677 (April 26, 1940). 



The passage cited is to be found 
on page 2 of the Short Account of 
Military and Naval Operations in 
the Netherlands from lOth-lIfih 
May, 1940, issued by the Nether- 
lands Ministry of Defense. 



Communique by the Italian 
Government. Printed in the 
New York Times, June 11, 1940, 
p. 2. 



September 
1939 



September 10, 
1939 



April 25, 1940 



May 11, 1940 
May 11, 1940 
May 11, 1940 



June 10, 1940 



MARCH 1, 1941 



227 



Date of Proclama- 
tion of Neutrality 
by the President 
of the 
United States 



Italy and United 
Kingdom. 



Italy and Canada. 



Italy and New Zea- 
land. 



Italy and Australia.. 



Italy and Union of 
South Africa. 



Italy and Greece. 



"At 4:45 P. M. Count Ciano called 
the Ambassador of Great Britain and 
handed him a statement couched in 
identical terms saying that Italy con- 
siders she is at a state of war with Great 
Britain." 

"Now, Therefore, we do hereby de- 
clare and proclaim that a State of War 
with Italy exists and has existed in Our 
Dominion of Canada as and from the 
tenth day of June, 1940." 

"Prime Minister Peter Fraser stated 
today that New Zealand was at war 
with Italy from 10:30 A. M., New Zea- 
land time (7 P. M. Monday, New York 
Time)." 

"Therefore a state of war exists be- 
tween His Majesty the King and the 
King of Italy as from 9 o'clock in the 
forenoon, reckoned according to stand- 
ard time in the Australian Capital Ter- 
ritory, of 11th June, 1940." 

"... I do by this my Proclamation, 
in the name and on behalf of His 
Majesty the King, declare and make 
known that from this, the eleventh day 
of June, 1940, the peaceful relations 
between the Union and Italy are sev- 
ered and that the Union is, for the 
purposes of all laws, at war with Italy 
as from the aforementioned date." 

[The Greek Government, in a note to 
the American Legation in Athens of 
November 12, 1940, stated that a state 
of war had existed between Greece and 
Italy since October 28, 1940, at 5:30 
A. M.] 



Proclamation issued by Prime 
Minister W. L. Mackenzie King. 
Printed in The Canada Gazette 
Extra, June 11, 1940. 

An Associated Press despatch 
bearing a New Zealand date line, 
June 11, 1940. Printed in the 
New York Times, June 11, 1940, 
p. 2. 

Notification issued by Prime 
Minister Robert G. Menzies. 
Printed in The Commonwealth of 
Australia Gazette, Special, June 
11, 1940. 

Proclamation by Sir Patrick 
Duncan, Governor-General of 
the Union of South Africa. 
Printed in The Union of South 
Africa Government Gazette Extra- 
ordinary, June 12, 1940. 



[Files of the Department of 
State.] 



November 15, 
1940 



UNITED STATES EXPOETS TO THE 
UNION OF SOVIET SOCIALIST RE- 
PUBLICS 

[Released to the press March 1] 

In the course of his current discussions with 
Mr. Sumner Welles, Under Secretary of State, 
Mr. Constantine A. Oumansky, Soviet Ambas- 



sador, made the statement March 1 on behalf of 
his Government that goods which have been 
and are being purchased in the United States 
by the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, and 
including oil products and industrial equip- 
ment of all categories, are destined exclusively 
for the domestic needs of the Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics. 



American Republics 



AIR TOUR BY THE INTER-AMERICAN ESCADRILLE 



[Released to the press by the Office tor Coordination of 
Commercial and Cultural Relations Between the Ameri- 
can Republics March 1] 

Nelson A. Kockefeller, Coordinator of Com- 
mercial and Cultural Relations Between the 
American Republics, announced March 1 that 
a group of private citizens interested in the de- 
velopment of aviation in the Western Hem- 
isphere will leave Washington March 5 for a 
three months' air tour of all the American 
republics. 

The air tour will be undertaken by the Inter- 
American Escadrille, a private non-profit or- 
ganization. The Coordinator's Office has co- 
operated with the Escadrille in arrangements 
for the flight. 

The group will contact leaders of civil avia- 
tion in each of the American republics to obtain 
their views concerning the future development 
of aviation in their respective nations. As a 
background for this survey, the Coordinator's 
Office, in cooperation with other interested 
agencies of the Government, has studied most 
of the available data on the development and 
present status of civil aviation in this hemi- 
sphere. 

The flight will be led by Maj. Gen. Frank R. 
McCoy, U.S. Army, Retired, president of the 
Foreign Policy Association and director of 
the Council on Foreign Relations. General 
McCoy has had long experience in inter- Amer- 
ican relations and served as chief of several 
conciliatory missions concerned with hemi- 
sphere political and economic affairs. 

Walter Bruce Howe, who has also represented 
the United States on several missions to the 
other American republics, will accompany Gen- 
eral McCoy as personal assistant and counsel. 

Alfredo de los Rios, well-known flier and 
Chilean-born newspaperman, will serve as co- 
pilot and will present the program and aims of 
the Inter-American Escadrille. 
228 



J. M. Farris, on leave of absence from East- 
ern Airlines through the courtesy of Col. E. V. 
Rickenbacker, will serve as chief pilot, and 
Luis O. Medina, a native of Bogota, Colombia, 
will serve as mechanic. 

The mission will cover approximately 28,000 
miles on the tour, going first to Cuba and there- 
after, in this order, to Haiti, the Dominican 
Republic, Venezuela, Brazil, Paraguay, Uru- 
guay, Argentina, Chile, Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, 
Colombia, Panama, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, 
Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Mex- 
ico. The mission will fly in a Grumman twin- 
engined amphibian. 

The Inter-American Escadrille, founded in 
1935 by Mr. de los Rios, has among its directors 
Dr. James Rowland Angell, president emeritus 
of Yale University; Dr. Carlos Davila, Chilean 
diplomat, statesman, and newspaper publisher; 
Allen W. Dulles, prominent international 
lawyer; and James P. Warburg, economist and 
former Treasury official. 

Because the scope of aviation and the public 
interest in it transcends national boundaries, it 
is felt that inter- American cooperation in avia- 
tion development is highly desirable. 

The Inter-American Escadrille proposes to 
facilitate such cooperation through the estab- 
lishment of chapters or "wings" in each of the 
American republics. A detailed plan of organ- 
ization has been prepared. This will be pre- 
sented to the civil-aviation leaders in each 
country as a guide for such action as they may 
care to take. Each "wing" will be completely 
self-governing and merely affiliated with the 
international organization, the headquarters of 
which will be determined each year at a con- 
vention of representatives of the national wings. 

A detailed itinerary of the Escadrille flight 
will be made available at an early date. 



Cultural Relations 



ADDRESS BY THE PRESIDENT 



[Released to the press by the White House February 27] 

Mr. Wanger, Ladies and Gentlemen : 

I am happy to greet the motion-picture in- 
dustry of America, whose representatives are 
gathered from far and near for the Annual 
Awards Dinner of the Academy of Motion Pic- 
ture Arts and Sciences. 

In these days of anxiety and world peril our 
hearts and minds and all of our energies are 
directed toward one objective. That objective 
is the strengthening of our national defense. 
Every day we realize that more and more things 
in our life must be evaluated in just such pro- 
portion as they contribute to the national 
defense. 

The American motion picture as a national 
and international force is a phenomenon of our 
own generation. Within living memory we 
have seen it born and grow up into full ma- 
turity. We have seen the American motion 
picture become foremost in the world. We 
have seen it reflect our civilization throughout 
the rest of the world — the aims and aspirations 
and ideals of a free people and of freedom. 

That is the real reason that some govern- 
ments do not want our American films exhibited 
in their countries. Dictators — those who en- 
force the totalitarian form of government — 
think it a dangerous thing for their unfortunate 
peoples to know that in our democracy officers 
of the Government are the servants, never the 
masters of the people. 

In all that I have said on that all-important 
subject through many months past I have em- 
phasized that in the assault on the democratic 
form of government which imperils world civ- 
ilization today, our problem of national defense 



'Delivered by radio in connection with the Thir- 
teenth Annual Awards Dinner of the Academy of Mo- 
tion Picture Arts and Sciences, Hollywood, Calif., 
February 27, 1941. 



has become one of defending the entire Western 
Hemisphere — all three of the Americas — North, 
Central, and South. We can no longer con- 
sider our own problem of defense as a separate 
interest. It involves the defense of all the de- 
mocracies of all the Americas — and therefore 
in fact, it involves the future of democracy 
wherever it is imperiled by force or terror. 

An all-important factor in hemispheric de- 
fense is the Lend-Lease Bill, whose early 
enactment by the Congress we confidently antic- 
ipate. It is a pleasure here and now to acknowl- 
edge the great service which the newsreels have 
performed in acquainting the public with all 
of the implications of this measure as it takes 
its way through the various legislative stages. 

Acceptance of the task of cooperating with 
all the Americas in defending the entire West- 
ern Hemisphere, implicit in our plans for na- 
tional defense, is a natural outgrowth of our 
good-neighbor j)olicy in our relations with the 
other American republics. Happily for de- 
mocracy, the Americas stand forth today as a 
notable example of international solidarity in 
a world in which freedom and human liberty 
are threatened with extinction. 

We have been seeking to affirm our faith in 
the western world through a wider exchange of 
culture, of education, of thought, and of free 
expression among the various nations of this 
hemisphere. Your industry has utilized its 
vast resources of talent and facilities in a sincere 
effort to help the people of this hemisphere to 
come to know each other. 

In carrying on this program of advancing the 
spirit of inter-American solidarity and conti- 
nental defense our Government has established 
machinery to coordinate our growing commer- 
cial and cultural relations with the American 
republics. Our Government has invited you to 
do your share of the job of interpreting the 
people of the Western Hemisphere to one an- 

229 



230 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



other. 8 And all of us in all the 21 American 
republics are grateful that your response is so 
immediate and so wholehearted. 

I do not minimize the importance of the mo- 
tion-picture industry as the most popular me- 
dium of mass entertainment. But tonight I 
want to place the chief emphasis on the service 
you can render in promoting solidarity among 
all the people of the Americas. 

For all this and for your splendid cooperation 
with all who are directing the expansion of our 
defense forces, I am glad to thank you. In the 
weeks and months that lie ahead we in Wash- 
ington know we shall have your continued aid 
and support. 

MEMBERSHIP OF VICE PRESIDENT 
WALLACE ON THE GENERAL ADVI- 
SORY COMMITTEE ON CULTURAL 
RELATIONS 

[Released to the press February 28] 

The Department of State is pleased to an- 
nounce that the Hon. Henry A. Wallace, Vice 
President of the United States, has accepted 
membership on the General Advisory Commit- 
tee to the Department in the field of cultural 
relations. This committee was organized pur- 
suant to the provisions of section 2 of an act 
"To authorize the President to render closer 
and more effective the relationship between the 
American Republics", approved on August 9, 
1939. 

The other members of the committee, in ad- 
dition to the Chief of the Division of Cultural 
Relations, who is chairman ex officio, are as 
follows : 

Ben M. Cherrington, Ph.D., Director of the 
Foundation for the Advancement of the 
Social Sciences, University of Denver 
Stephen P. Duggan, Ph.D., Director, In- 
stitute of International Education 
Waldo G. Leland, Ph.D., Director, Ameri- 
can Council of Learned Societies 



'See the Bulletin of January 18, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 
82), pp. 95-96. 



The Honorable Archibald MacLeish, Li- 
brarian of Congress 

Mr. Carl H. Milam, Secretary, American 
Library Association 

James T. Shotwell, Ph.D., Chairman, Na- 
tional Committee of the U. S. of 
America on International Intellectual 
Cooperation 

John W. Studebaker, LL.D., U. S. Com- 
missioner of Education 

LECTURES BY DISTINGUISHED AMER- 
ICANS IN OTHER AMERICAN RE- 
PUBLICS 

[Released to the press February 27] 

Dr. Isaiah Bowman, President of The Johns 
Hopkins University ; Mr. John Erskine, author ; 
and Mr. Thornton N. Wilder, novelist and play- 
wright, have accepted invitations from the De- 
partment of State to visit other American re- 
publics to lecture and to establish contacts with 
persons in their fields of interest. The invita- 
tions have been extended under the provisions 
of the Second Deficiency Appropriation Act of 
1940, which provided funds for the exchange 
of distinguished cultural, professional, and ar- 
tistic leaders between the United States and the 
other American republics. 

Mr. Thornton N. Wilder plans to leave for 
South America on February 28, and will visit 
Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru, where arrange- 
ments are being made for him through the 
United States missions in those countries to meet 
distinguished leaders and to lecture before in- 
terested groups. Mr. Wilder formerly taught 
at the Lawrenceville School in New Jersey and 
was a member of the faculty of the University 
of Chicago from 1930 to 1936. He is a member 
of the American Academy of Arts and Letters 
and is the author of numerous novels and plays, 
among the best known of which are the The 
Bridge of San Luis Rey, The Woman of An- 
dros, Heaven Is My Destination, and Our 
Town. 

Mr. John Erskine plans to spend three months 
in Argentina and Uruguay and will leave some 



MARCH 1, 1941 



231 



time after the first of April. Arrangements 
have been made for him to lecture on literary 
and musical trends in the United States before 
various distinguished groups. Mr. Erskine 
served for many years as professor of English 
both at Amherst and at Columbia University. 
From 1928 to 1937 he was president of the 
Juilliard School of Music, and from 1935 to 
1939 was a director and chairman of the Man- 
agement Committee of the Metropolitan Opera 
Association. He is a member of the Modern 
Language Association of America; of the 
Poetry Society of America, of which he was 
president in 1922; of the American Council of 
Learned Societies ; and of the National Institute 
of Arts and Letters. Mr. Erskine is the author 
of numerous volumes of poems, essays, and his- 
torical novels. Among the best known of his 
works are The Private Life of Helen of Trcnf 
and Galahad. 

Dr. Bowman plans to leave about the middle 
of June and will return to the United States 
in September. While abroad he will travel and 
lecture in Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia. Dr. 
Bowman has had wide experience as a geog- 
rapher and geologist. In 1911 he led an expedi- 
tion to the Central Andes imder the auspices of 
the American Geographical Society. He was a 
member of various territorial commissions of 
the Peace Conference of 1919 in Paris. From 
1915 to 1935 he was a director of the American 
Geographical Society, and has among other 
posts held that of American Commissioner of 
the Permanent International Commission, 
China and the United States, since 1940. He has 
been honored on numerous occasions for his 
explorations in and publications on South 
America. 

MEETING IN MEXICO CITY OF THE 
COUNCIL OF RURAL EDUCATION 

In a recent despatch to the Department from 
the Hon. Josephus Daniels, American Ambas- 
sador to Mexico, it was stated that the Council 
of Rural Education, an organization supported 



by the Julius Rosenwald fund, had decided, in 
the interest of inter-American cooperation, to 
hold its annual meeting in Mexico City, during 
the week of February 17-22. 

Heretofore the Council has held its meetings 
in the United States, but this year its members 
planned to inspect the Mexican rural school sys- 
tem and discuss with Mexican educators sub- 
jects which are of mutual interest. The Council 
consists of a party of from 50 to 55 educators 
whose interests lie principally in the field of 
rural school systems. 

A banquet to be held during the session of the 
Council was to be attended by the Hon. Josephus 
Daniels and Mrs. Daniels, as well as by high 
officials of the Mexican Government. 

TRANSLATION INTO PORTUGUESE OF 
"EPIC OF AMERICA" 

A recent despatch from the Consul General 
in Sao Paulo, Brazil, brings the information 
that cultural relations between the United States 
and Brazil have been further enhanced by the 
publication, in Portuguese, of James Truslow 
Adams' "Epic of America". The Portuguese 
edition, translated by Jose Bento Monteiro 
Lobato, is entitled "A Epopeia Americana" and 
is published by the Cia. Editora Nacional, Rua 
dos Gusmoes, Sao Paulo, Brazil. 



Publications 



The Monroe Doctrine : Annual Message From the 
President of the United States Communicated to the 
Two Houses of Congress December 2, 1823 at the Be- 
ginning of the Eighteenth Congress, Which Convened 
on December 1, 1823, and the Habana Convention of 
the American Republics 1940. ( S. Doe. 303, 76th Cong., 
3d sess.) 55 pp. lOtf. 

Annual Report of the Governor of the Panama Canal 
for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1940. (H. Doc. 3, 
77th Cong., 1st sess.) vi, 148 pp. 200. 



Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, Etc. 



MONTHLY STATISTICS 



[Released to the press February 28] 

Note: The statistics of actual exports in these re- 
leases are believed to be substantially complete. It 
is possible, however, that some shipments are not in- 
cluded. If this proves to be the fact, statistics in 
regard to such shipments will be included in the cumu- 
lative figures in later releases. 

Arms Export Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
licensed for export by the Secretary of State 
during January 1941 : 





Cate- 
gory 


Value of ex- 




Country of destination 


port licenses 
issued 


Total 




V (3) 

V (1) 
(2) 


$12,600.00 

3,000.00 

120.00 


$12,500.00 












I (4) 


160.00 






III (2) 


60.00 






IV (1) 


4, 699. 00 






(2) 


1, 907. 00 


> 57, 101. 84 




V (2) 


7, 470. 08 






(3) 


27, 465. 76 






VII (2) 


15,340.00 






I (1) 


270.25 






(2) 


2, 999. 20 






(4) 


1, 943. 74 






III (1) 


3, 800, 000. 00 


3, 979, 904. 38 




IV (2) 


491. 74 






V (2) 


149, 189. 45 






VII (1) 


25, 010. 00 






rv (i) 


132.60 


132.60 




I (4) 
IV (2) 


155.00 
554.40 


709.40 






I (1) 

(2) 


537.00 
55.25 










(4) 


103.00 






m (2) 


60.00 






IV (1) 
(2) 


30, 286. 00 
475.00 


70, 318. 95 




V (1) 


1, 700. 00 






(2) 


911.70 






(3) 


15,011.00 






VU (1) 


21, 180. 00 






I (2) 


21, 744. 20 










(4) 


6, 896. 92 





Country of destination 


Cate- 
gory 


Value of ex- 
port licenses 
issued 


Total 




I (1) 


$4, 359. 32 






(2) 


51,171.66 






(3) 


1,417,000.00 






(4) 


85,162.81 






(5) 


648.00 






n 


50.00 






in (2) 

IV (1) 


700.00 
448.44 


■ $3,008,896.44 




(2) 


161.71 






V (1) 


16, 260. 00 






(2) 


88, 753. 50 






(3) 


1,230,875.00 






VII (1) 


113, 310. 00 






(2) 


6.00 




Chile 


V (1) 
(3) 


2, 100. 00 
14,015.00 






29, 013. 92 




VII (2) 


12,898.92 






I (3) 
V (2) 


6. 099. 25 
3, 175. 00 






263, 274. 25 




VII (2) 


245, 000. 00 






rv (i) 

(2) 


3, 430. 50 
327.00 










V (2) 

(3) 


70.00 

24, 280. 00 


33, 220. 79 




VII (1) 


2,413.29 






(2) 


2, 700. 00 






rv (i) 


59.00 






V (1) 


22, 286. 00 






IV (1) 

(2) 

vn (i) 


755.00 
1,151.00 
1, 360. 80 






3, 998. 80 




(2) 


732.00 






I (4) 


110.00 






IV (2) 


30.32 


190. 32 




VII (2) 


50.00 






rv (i) 

(2) 
V (3) 


50.50 

129.00 

30, 000. 00 






30, 245. 50 




VII (2) 


66.00 






I (2) 


188, 750. 00 






(4) 


250, 950. 00 






ni (i) 

(2) 


6,615,343.25 
4,986.10 


7, 853, 854. 24 




V (2) 


309, 644. 89 






(3) 


475, 180. 00 






I (2) 


16,000.00 






(4) 
(5) 


17,900.00 
10,000.00 


47, 630. 00 




III (2) 


3, 730. 00 






I (2) 


755, 000. 00 






(4) 


53, 220. 00 






III (1) 


12,128,184.42 


> 13, 025, 269. 63 




V (2) 


23, 653. 21 






(3) 


1 65, 212. 00 





232 



MARCH 1, 1941 



233 



Country of destination 



Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland. 



Greece 

Guatemala- 



Haiti 

Honduras. .. 
Hong Kong.. 



India 

Iran 

Iraq 

Jamaica- 
Kenya... 



Mozambique - 

Netherlands Indies. 



New Caledonia. 
Newfoundland. . 
New Zealand 



Nicaragua. 
Palestine.- 



Panama... 
Paraguay- 
Peru.. 



Cate- 
gory 



Portugal. 



I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VI (2) 

VII (1) 
I (4) 

IV (2) 

V (3) 
VII (2) 

IV (1) 

V (1) 
I (2) 

(4) 

VI (2) 
I (2) 
IV (2) 

IV (1) 
I (2) 

(4) 

in (i> 

(2) 

rv (2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

rv (i) 

(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (i) 

(2) 

V (2) 
I (2) 

(4) 
(5) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VH (1) 

I (4) 

V (2) 
I (4) 
IV (2) 
I (4) 
IV (2) 
IV (2) 
I (4) 
IV (2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

V (1) 

V (3) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VH (1) 
I (4) 

V (3) 



Value of ex- 
port licenses 
issued 



$14,075.00 

1, 638, 932. 00 

1,010.900.00 

1,178,759.15 

1,099,908.00 

81, 565, 000. 00 

1, 647, 193. 05 

190, 360. 07 

16, 362. 00 

28, 573, 964. 00 

147. 00 

1, 183, 554. 00 

622, 500. 00 

2, 547. OO 

5, 000. 00 

1,175.00 

27.00 



$118,119,154.27 



, 500. 00 
, 722. 00 



20, 000. 00 


20, 000. 00 


27, 742. 60 
2,718.00 


30, 460. 60 


132. 00 


132. 00 


10,864.60 


10, 864. 60 


5.21 


5.21 


737.10 


737. 10 


188, 750. 00 




103. 07 




3, 000, 000. 00 




1, 994. 44 


3,750,321.37 


120.33 




123, 885. 53 




435, 468. 00 




2, 731. 50 




299.00 




37, 500. 00 




9, 820. 00 


61, 136. 25 


5, 405. 00 




4, 665. 75 




715. 00 




422.45 


422.45 


130, 000. 00 


\ 


21, 346. 32 




327, 000. 00 




1, 954, 940. 00 




750. 00 
924.50 


. 2, 549, 312. 43 


5, 500. 00 




74, 581. 81 




34, 000. 00 




269. 80 




723.86 
3, 522. 00 


4, 245. 86 


7.90 
8.60 


| 16. 50 


232.50 
24.00 


| 256.50 


4, 304. 00 


4, 304. 00 


174.00 




434. 38 
66.00 


| 798. 38 


124.00 


J 


6, 825. 00 


6, 825. 00 


1, 550. 00 


1, 550. 00 


2, 000. 00 


| 


22, 260. 00 
119, 639. 00 


I 144, 355. 00 


456.00 




46,112.00 
15, 000. 00 


} 61,112.00 



Country of destination 


Cate- 
gory 


Value of ex- 
port licenses 
issued 


Total 




I (4) 

rv (i) 


$152. 12 
173.00 


| 




\ $547. 19 




(2) 


222. 07 






I (4) 
IV (2) 


18.42 
69.54 






87.96 




I (2) 


16, 185. 78 






III (1) 

rv (2) 


200, 000. 00 
12,928.00 


283, 385. 78 




V (3) 


64, 272. 00 






I (4) 

IV (1) 

(2) 


35.06 
514. 00 
91.50 






954. 67 




V (2) 


314. 11 






IV (2) 
VII (2) 


34.08 
132, 360. 00 


34.08 




132, 360. 00 


Union of South Africa 


I (2) 


566, 250. 00 


| 




(4) 


2.00 






III (1) 

IV (1) 


9, 000, 000. 00 
599.00 


\ 9, 602, 055. 09 




(2) 


102. 36 






V (2) 


35, 101. 73 


) 




IV (1) 

(2) 

V (1) 


231.00 
2,491.00 

1, 600. 00 






4,514.00 




(2) 


192.00 






IV (1) 

(2) 


26, 202. 00 
1,876.00 


^ 








V (2) 

(3) 


3, 864. 00 
7, 178. 00 


\ 42, 963. 44 




VII (1) 


767.44 






(2) 


3, 076. 00 


' 






163, 824, 527. 91 











During the month of January 450 arms export 
licenses were issued. 

Arms Exported 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war ex- 
ported during January 1941 under export 
licenses issued by the Secretary of State : 



Country of destination 



Aden 

Argentina 

Australia. 

Bermuda. 
Bolivia. .. 



Cate- 


gory 


V 


(2) 


I 


in 


IV 


(2) 


V 


(2) 


VII 


(1) 




(2) 


I 


0) 


m 


(ll 


V 


(2) 




(3) 


rv 


0) 


i 


Ml 


VII 


(1) 



Value of ac- 
tual exports 



$844.00 

453. 00 

314.00 

26, 600. 50 

24, 750. 00 

6, 805. 00 

220.30 

183,941.00 

13, 822. 00 

38, 800. 00 

132.60 

155.00 

361.00 



132.60 

516.00 



234 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE B1XLLETTN 



Country o( destination 


Cate- 
gory 


Value of ac- 
tual exports 


Total 




I (3) 








(5) 


73, 924. 00 






IV (1) 

V (1) 


31,284.00 
20, 850. 00 


I $150, 592. 30 




(2) 


741.30 






(3) 


10, 718. 00 






I (2) 
(4) 


21, 744. 20 
6, 896. 92 






28,641.12 




I (1) 








(2) 


75, 997. 20 






(3) 


15,091.00 






(4) 


47, 836. 71 






m a) 


2,843,687.04 






IV (1) 


127, 789. 37 


3, 352, 692. 28 




(2) 


176. 56 






V (1) 


1, 378. 00 






(2) 


99,208.27 






(3) 


130,801.28 






VII (2) 


7, 084. 00 




Chile 


V (1) 
(2) 


68, 417. 00 
80.00 






68, 497. 00 






333, 620. 00 
99, 430. 00 






(2) 






V (1) 


34,100.00 


634, 289. 00 




(2) 


154,319.00 






(3) 


12, 820. 00 






IV (2) 

V (3) 


337.00 
14,280.00 






17,317.00 




VII (2) 


2, 700. 00 






I (4) 
IV (1) 


13.00 
125.00 










(2) 


7.00 






V (1) 


22,286.00 






(2) 


2, 220. 00 






VII (1) 


641.00 






I (4) 


8,644.00 










IV (2) 


4, 217. 60 


13, 528. 50 




VII (1) 


767.00 






I (I) 
(4) 


8,500.00 
110.00 






1 8, 610. 00 




vn (i) 

I (4) 

IV (1) 

(2) 

V (2) 


1, 053. 00 
60.00 

255.00 
52.00 

619.00 


1,053.00 
60.00 








22, 926. 00 




(3) 


22,000.00 






V (1) 


1,600.00 






2, 100. 00 






500.00 






I (1) 


14,875.00 


14, 875. 00 






I (2) 


363, 200. 00 










(4) 


27, 276. 00 






in (i) 


6, 286, 210. 00 


1 6,722,197.00 




V (2) 


15,300.00 






(3) 


30, 212. 00 




Great Britain and Northern 


1 (1) 


2, 205. 00 




Ireland - 


(2) 


1,415,359.50 






(3) 


340, 194. 00 






(4) 


1,083,206.30 






HI (1) 


8, 748, 850. 00 






(2) 
IV (1) 


5,220.00 
78, 906. 00 


• 18, 556, 218. 60 




(2) 


649, 957. 80 






V (2) 


1, 173, 719. 00 






(3) 


4, 830, 007. 00 






VII (1) 


119,973.00 






(2) 


108,621.00 






rv (i) 

V (2) 


25.60 
280.00 










(3) 


5,000.00 


6, 480. 50 




VII (2) 


1, 175. 00 





Country of destination 



Haiti 

Honduras. 



Iraq 

Jamaica 

Kenya 

Leeward Islands.. 
Mexico 



Netherlands Indies . 



New Caledonia... _. 

New Guinea, Territory of 

New Zealand 

Nicaragua.. 

Palestine 

Panama 

Peru 

Portugal 

Southern Rhodesia 

South-West Africa 

Straits Settlements 

Thailand 

Trinidad 

Union of South Africa 



Cate- 
gory 



Value of ac- 
tual exports 



$27.00 

8.00 

128.00 

435.00 

20, 000. 00 

78, 000. 00 

3, 382. 00 

10, 000. 00 

148,000.00 

27.36 

3.500.00 

135. 38 

331. 50 

22, 485. 00 

400.00 

4,400.00 

1,470.75 

78, 215. 00 

41,450.00 

841.84 

63, 405. 00 

130, 260. 00 

11,190.00 

3, 583. 74 

160,925.00 

83, 575. 60 

33, 500. 00 

270.00 

304.00 

3, 522. 00 

605.00 

7,896.00 

3, 600. 00 

655.00 

9, 777. 00 

963.00 

2,000.00 

32, 215. 00 

46,112.00 

200.00 

15,000.00 

106.00 

217. 12 

185, 200.00 

1,100,950.00 

514.00 

112.00 

47.00 

15, 000. 00 

27,415.00 

868.48 

46,312.00 

430.69 

310,012.00 

30, 631. 00 

43.00 

138.00 

1,600.00 

110.00 

385.00 

1,214.00 

7,178.00 

778.65 

3,076. 00 



MARCH 1, 1941 

Arms Import Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of origin of the arms, 
ammunition, and implements of war licensed 
for import by the Secretary of State during the 
month of January 1941 : 



Country of destination 


Category 


Value 


Total 




V 

I 


(2) 
(1) 
(2) 


$800.00 
624.00 
342.00 


$800.00 














(*) 


623, 015. 24 


> 638, 491. 24 




n 




10.00 






VII 


(2) 


14,500.00 


) 


Great Britain and Northern 


I 


(2) 


1,250.00 




Ireland. 




(4) 


225.00 






V 


(3) 


10,000.00 






VII 


(2) 


5.00 






V 
V 


(2) 
(3) 


200.00 
2,000.00 


200.00 




2, 000. 00 












552, 971. 24 











During the month of January, 20 arms im- 
port licenses were issued. 

Categories of Arms, Ammunition, and 
Implements of War 

The categories of arms, ammunition, and im- 
plements of war in the appropriate column of 
the tables printed above are the categories into 
which those articles were divided in the Presi- 
dent's proclamation of May 1, 1937, enumerating 
the articles which would be considered as arms, 
ammunition, and implements of war for the 
purposes of section 5 of the Joint Resolution 
of May 1, 1937 [see the Bulletin of January 11, 
1941 (vol. IV, no. 81), pp. 76-77]. 

Special Statistics in Regard to Asms 
Exports to Cuba 

In compliance with article II of the conven- 
tion between the United States and Cuba to 
suppress smuggling, signed at Habana, March 
11, 1926, which reads in part as follows: 

"The High Contracting Parties agree that 
clearance of shipments of merchandise by water, 
air. or land, from any of the ports of either 



235 

country to a port of entry of the other country, 
shall be denied when such shipment comprises 
articles the importation of which is prohibited 
or restricted in the country to which such ship- 
ment is destined, unless in this last case there has 
been a compliance with the requisites de- 
manded by the laws of both countries." 

and in compliance with the laws of Cuba which 
restrict the importation of arms, ammunition, 
and implements of war of all kinds by requiring 
an import permit for each shipment, export 
licenses for shipments of arms, ammunition, 
and implements of war to Cuba are required 
for the articles enumerated below in addition 
to the articles enumerated in the President's 
proclamation of May 1, 1937 : 

(1) Arms and small arms using ammunition 
of caliber .22 or less, other than those classed as 
toys. 

(2) Spare parts of arms and small arms of 
all kinds and calibers, other than those classed 
as toys, and of guns and machine guns. 

(3) Ammunition for the arms and small 
arms under (1) above. 

(4) Sabers, swords, and military machetes 
with cross-guard hilts. 

(5) Explosives as follows: explosive pow- 
ders of all kinds for all purposes, nitrocellulose 
having a nitrogen content of 12 percent or less; 
diphenylamine; dynamite of all kinds; nitro- 
glycerine; alkaline nitrates (ammonium, potas- 
sium, and sodium nitrate) ; nitric acid ; nitro- 
benzene, (essence or oil of mirbane) ; sulphur; 
sulphuric acid; chlorate of potash; and ace- 
tones. 

(6) Tear gas (C 6 H 6 C0CH 2 C1) and other 
similar nontoxic gases and apparatus designed 
for the storage or projection of such gases. 

The table printed below indicates, in respect 
to licenses authorizing the exportation to Cuba, 
of the articles and commodities listed in the 
preceding paragraph issued by the Secretary 
of State during January 1941, the number of 
licenses and the value of the articles and com- 
modities described in the licenses: 



236 



Number of licenses Section 


Value 


Total 




(1) 

(2) .... 

(3) 

(5) 


$1, 377. 10 

10.02 

12, 771. 10 

40, 254. 17 






[ $54, 412. 39 



The table printed below indicates the value 
of the articles and commodities listed above 
exported to Cuba during January 1941 under 
licenses issued by the Secretary of State : 



(i) 

(2) 
(3) 
(5) 



$1, 393. 30 
1, 550. 00 
9, 760. 50 

21, 944. 90 



department of state bulletin 

Helium 

The table printed below gives the essential 
information in regard to the licenses issued dur- 
ing the month of January 1941, authorizing the 
exportation of helium gas under the provisions 
of the act approved on September 1, 1937, and 
the regulations issued pursuant thereto : 









Quan- 




Applicant for 
license 


Purchaser in 


Countrv of 




Total 


foreign country 


destination 




value 








feet 




The Linde Air 


Nicolas L. 3. Van 


Argentina 


.0332 


$2.00 


Products Co. 


Haaren. 








The Linde Air 


Dominion Oxygen 


Canada 


1.412 


136. 00 


Products Co. 


Co., Ltd. 








The Ohio Chemi- 


Compafiia Marx., 


Mexico 


3.8 


2.19 


cal & Mfg. Co. 


S. A. 










Audrain y Medina. 




84 




pressed Oas Cor- 






poration. 











International Conferences, Commissions, Etc. 



NORTH AMERICAN REGIONAL RADIO-ENGINEERING MEETING 



The North American Regional Radio-Engi- 
neering Meeting, held in Washington, D.C., 
January 14—30, 1941, for the purpose of har- 
monizing the action of the radio administra- 
tions of Canada, Cuba, Dominican Republic, 
Haiti, Mexico, and the United States, 9 made the 
following recommendations : 

"1. The representatives of the Governments 
of Canada, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, 
Haiti, Mexico, and the United States of Amer- 
ica, having met in Washington, D.C., United 
States of America, in an Engineering Confer- 
ence from January 14 to 30, 1941, for the pur- 
pose of resolving, so far as possible, all conflicts 
arising as a result of the listings of standard 



9 See the Bulletin of January 18, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 
82), pp. 101-102; January 25, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 83), 
p. 117; February 1, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 84), pp. 151-152. 



broadcast stations by these Governments com- 
municated to the interested Governments pur- 
suant to the provisions of Part III, Section 1, 
Paragraph d of the North American Regional 
Broadcasting Agreement (Habana, 1937), hav- 
ing given appropriate recognition to the sov- 
ereign rights of all countries parties to the 
Agreement to the use of every channel in the 
standard broadcast band as provided for in 
Part I, Section 4 of the Agreement, and having 
reconciled, in their technical aspects, the con- 
flicts which have arisen as a result of the afore- 
mentioned listings, recommend that the appro- 
priate radio administrations of these Govern- 
ments take such action as may be necessary to 
accomplish the following : 

"(a) To make effective prior to March 29, 
1941, such licenses, permits or authorizations 



MARCH 1, 1941 



237 



as may be necessary under the laws, regulations 
or practices of the respective countries to place 
in effect the listings of broadcast stations as set 
forth in the appendices hereto; 

"(b) To adopt immediately adequate meas- 
ures so that the crystals and associated fre- 
quency control apparatus as well as circuit tun- 
ing elements necessary for the proper operation 
of the stations in accordance with the listings 
included in the appendices hereto shall be 
installed prior to March 29, 1941 ; 

"(c) To place in effect at 0800 Greenwich 
Mean Time (3 a.m., E.S.T.) March 29, 1941, 
the actual operation of broadcast stations on fre- 
quencies and at locations in accordance with the 
listings set forth in the appendices hereto. 
When a directional antenna as required has 
not been installed, the operating power will be 
restricted to a value which will not cause any 
objectionable interference to stations of other 
countries. Each administration will take the 
necessary measures to prevent the operation of 
any station not conforming with these require- 
ments and the listings included in the appen- 
dices hereto ; 

"(d) To make adequate arrangements im- 
mediately in the manner provided for in para- 
graph (a) for the erection and operation of the 
necessary antenna system or other special con- 
struction required by the listings of the broad- 
cast stations as set forth in the appendices 
hereto ; 

"(e) To refrain from making any new sta- 
tion assignments or changes in existing assign- 
ments as to location, power, frequency, or hours 
of operation, effective prior to March 29, 1941, 
which are not specifically for the purpose of 
complying with the listings of broadcast sta- 
tions as set forth in the appendices hereto. 
This, however, does not preclude notification of 
additional assignments to be made effective 
after March 29, 1941. 

"2. In case the operation of any station in 
accordance with the listings of broadcast sta- 
tions as set forth in the appendices hereto may, 
as a result of actual measurements, be found 
to cause objectionable interference in excess of 



the amount computed in accordance with the 
standards set forth in the Agreement, negotia- 
tions may be instituted to reduce the inter- 
ference in accordance with the appropriate 
technical principles thereof. 

"3. The radio administrations shall communi- 
cate to each other as soon as possible through 
the medium of the Inter-American Radio 
Office (O.I.R.) complete description of the di- 
rectional antennas required by the listings as 
set forth in the appendices hereto. 

"4. The original of these Recommendations 
and their Appendices 10 shall be deposited in the 
Ministry of State of the Republic of Cuba at 
Habana with the original of the North Amer- 
ican Regional Broadcasting Agreement (Ha- 
bana, 1937) to which it is supplemental, and 
certified copies of these Recommendations shall 
be transmitted to the Governments through their 
respective delegations. 

"5. The Governments shall communicate to 
each other as soon as possible by telegraph and 
mail through the medium of the Inter- American 
Radio Office (O.I.R.) their acceptance of these 
recommendations. In the absence of any noti- 
fication to the Inter-American Radio Office 
(O.I.R.) prior to March 1, 1941, by any Gov- 
ernment, it will be understood that the listings 
of broadcast stations set forth in the appendices 
hereto, together with all other recommendations 
contained in this instrument, are approved and 
accepted by such Government. 

"6. Prior to March 1, 1941, no Government 
shall make public the listings of broadcast sta- 
tions of any other Government unless the latter 
shall have already made its own listings public. 

"In witness whereof, the respective repre- 
sentatives sign these Recommendations, in trip- 
licate, one copy in English, one copy in Spanish 
and one copy in French, each of which shall be 
deposited in the archives of the Government of 
Cuba through the Department of State of the 
United States of America. 



10 Owing to their extensive nature, the appendices to 
these Recommendations are not printed herein. Copies 
may be obtained in mimeographed form from the Di- 
vision of International Communications, Department of 
State. 



238 



"Done at Washington, D.C., January 30, 1941. 

"For Canada J. W. L. Bain 

Ronald MacDonnell 

"For Cuba F. Suarez Lopetequi 

G. Morales 

Alfonso Hernandez Cata 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

"For the Dominican Republic 

A. Pastoriza 

"For Haiti Jacques C. Antoine 

"For Mexico J. C. Buchanan 

S. Tatabas 

"For the United States Thomas Burke 
of America T. A. M. Craven" 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 



[Released to the press March 1] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since February 21, 
1941: 

Career Officers 

George Wadsworth, of Buffalo, N. Y., Consul 
General at Jerusalem, Palestine, has been desig- 
nated Counselor of Embassy at Rome, Italy. 

Lowell C. Pinkerton, of Louisiana, Mo., Con- 
sul General at Wellington, New Zealand, has 
been assigned as Consul General at Jerusalem, 
Palestine. 

Loyd V. Steere, of California, Agricultural 
Attache at London, England, has been assigned 
for duty in the Department of State. 

H. Earle Russell, of Battle Creek, Mich., Con- 
sul General at Johannesburg, Union of South 
Africa, has been assigned 'as Consul General at 
Casablanca, Morocco. 

Christian M. Ravndal, of Decorah, Iowa, 
Second Secretary of Embassy and Consul at 
Buenos Aires, Argentina, has been assigned for 
duty in the Department of State. 

Earl L. Packer, of Utah, First Secretary of 
Legation and Consul at Budapest, Hungary, 
has been assigned as Consul at Dresden, Ger- 
many. 

Clinton E. MacEachran, of Beverly, Mass., 
Consul General at Halifax, Nova Scotia, will 
retire from the Foreign Service effective Sep- 
tember 1, 1941. 



William W. Butterworth, Jr., of New Or- 
leans, La., Second Secretary of Embassy at 
London, England, has been assigned for duty 
in the Department of State. 

Charles H. Heisler, of Milford, Del., Consul 
at Tunis, Tunisia, has been assigned as Consul 
at Madras, India. 

Garret G. Ackerson, Jr., of Hackensack, N. J., 
Second Secretary of Legation and Consul at 
Budapest, Hungary, has been designated Sec- 
ond Secretary of Embassy and Consul at Bo- 
gota, Colombia, and will serve in dual capacity. 

John C. Shillock, Jr., of Portland, Oreg., 
Consul at Lisbon, Portugal, has been designated 
Second Secretary of Legation and Consul at 
Tangier, Morocco, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

Robert Y. Brown, of Dothan, Ala., Second 
Secretary of Legation and Consul at San Jose, 
Costa Rica, has been designated Second Secre- 
tary of Legation and Consul at Montevideo, 
Uruguay, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Jule B. Smith, of Texas, Consul at Copen- 
hagen, Denmark, has been assigned as Consul 
at Barcelona, Spain. 

T. Muldrup Forsyth, of Esmont, Va., Consul 
at Cartagena, Colombia, has been designated 
Third Secretary of Legation and Consul at 
Bucharest, Rumania, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

Henry P. Leverich, of Montclair, N. J., Third 
Secretary of Embassy at Berlin, Germany, has 



MARCH 1, 1941 



239 



been designated Third Secretary of Legation at 
Lisbon, Portugal. 

John D. Jernegan, of San Diego, Calif., Vice 
Consul at Barcelona, Spain, has been assigned 
as Vice Consul at Cartagena, Colombia. 

Frederick D. Hunt, of Washington, D. C, 
Third Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul 
at Buchai"est, Rumania, has been assigned as 
Vice Consul at Shanghai, China. 

Non-career Officers 

V. Harwood Blocker, of Hondo, Tex., Vice 
Consul at Martinique, French West Indies, has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Porto Alegre, 
Brazil. 

Jones R. Trowbridge, of Augusta, Ga., Vice 
Consul at Toronto, Canada, has been appointed 
Vice Consul at Curacao, West Lidies. 

Wallace E. Moessner, of Oklahoma, Vice 
Consul at Curacao, West Indies, has been ap- 
pointed Vice Consul at Toronto, Canada. 

FOREIGN SERVICE EXAMINATION 

[Released to the press February 27] 

A written examination for commission to the 
Foreign Service will be held commencing Sep- 
tember 8, 1941, at the following points : Atlanta, 
Boston, Chicago, Cincinnati, Denver, New Or- 
leans, New York, Philadelphia, St. Louis, St. 
Paul, San Francisco, Seattle, and Washington. 

The schedule of examinations will be similar 



to that followed in the examination of Septem- 
ber 16-19, 1940. 

The oral examinations for candidates attain- 
ing an average of 70 percent or higher on the 
written examination will probably be held in 
January 1942. The exact dates of these oral 
examinations will be announced later. 

Applicants desiring to qualify for the Foreign 
Service must be specially designated for exami- 
nation. Applications for designation (Form 
205) may be obtained from the Division of For- 
eign Service Personnel, Department of State, 
are to be addressed to the Secretary of State, and 
must be filed not later than 40 days before the 
date set for the written examination. No desig- 
nations for the examination to be held Septem- 
ber 8-11, 1941 will be made after July 29, 1941. 

FOREIGN SERVICE NOMINATIONS 

On February 28, 1941 the Senate received the 
Executive nominations of the 43 candidates who 
were successful in the recently completed For- 
eign Service examination, 11 to be Foreign Serv- 
ice officers, unclassified, vice consuls of career, 
and secretaries in the diplomatic service of the 
United States. There was also sent to the 
Senate the nomination of William W. Walker, 
of North Carolina, now serving as Vice Consul 
at Colon, Panama, to be a career officer. 



u See the Bulletin of February 15, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 
86), pp. 186-188. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



DIPLOMATIC OFFICERS 

PAN AMERICAN CONVENTION 
Peru 

The American Embassy at Lima transmitted 
to the Secretary of State with a despatch dated 
January 30, 1941, a record of the joint session 
of the Peruvian Congress on January 28, 1941, 
at which was approved the Pan American Con- 



vention on Diplomatic Officers signed at the 
Sixth International Conference of American 
States at Habana, February 20, 1928. 

The records of the Department show that the 
convention has been ratified by the following 
countries: Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, 
Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Mexico, 
Nicaragua, Panama, Uruguay, and Venezuela. 



240 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

NORTH AMERICAN REGIONAL RADIO 

AGREEMENT 

The text of the recommendations adopted by 
the North American Regional Radio-Engi- 
neering Meeting, Washington, D. C, January 
14-30, 1941, appears in this Bulletin under the 
heading "International Conferences, Commis- 
sions, Etc." 

EDUCATION 

CONVENTION FOR THE PROMOTION OF INTER- 
AMERICAN CULTURAL RELATIONS (TREATY 
SERIES 92S) 

Mexico 

By a note dated February 19, 1941, the Direc- 
tor General of the Pan American Union in- 
formed the Secretary of State that the instru- 
ment of ratification by Mexico of the Conven- 
tion for the Promotion of Inter-American Cul- 
tural Relations signed at Buenos Aires on De- 
cember 23, 1936, was deposited with the Union 
on February 15, 1941. 

The countries which have deposited instru- 
ments of ratification of this convention are the 
following: United States of America, Brazil, 
Chile. Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Re- 
public, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, 
Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, and 
Venezuela. 

AGRICULTURE 

CONVENTION FOR THE UNIFICATION OF THE 
METHODS OF KEEPING AND OPERATING CAT- 
TLE HERDBOOKS 

Yugoslavia 

The Italian Ambassador at Washington in- 
formed the Secretary of State by a note dated 
February 19. 1941, that the instrument of rati- 
fication by Yugoslavia of the Convention for 
the Unification of the Methods of Keeping and 
Operating Cattle Herdbooks, signed at Rome 
on October 14, 1936, was deposited with the 



Italian Government on November 4, 1940. 

The records of the Department show that the 
convention has been ratified by the following 
countries: Brazil, Czechoslovakia, France, Ger- 
many, Hungary, Latvia, French Morocco, and 
Tunis. 

COMMERCE 

INTER-AMERICAN COFFEE-MARKETING 
AGREEMENT 

Mexico 

The Director General of the Pan American 
Union informed the Secretary of State by a 
letter dated February 19, 1941, that the instru- 
ment of ratification by Mexico of the Inter- 
American Coffee-Marketing Agreement signed 
at Washington on November 28, 1940, was de- 
posited with the Union on February 15, 1941. 

Peru 

The Director General of the Pan American 
Union informed the Secretary of State by a 
letter dated February 17, 1941, that the instru- 
ment of approval by Peru of the Inter- Ameri- 
can Coffee-Marketing Agreement, signed at 
Washington on November 28, 1940, was de- 
posited with the Union on February 14, 1941. 
The instrument of approval is dated January 
11, 1941. 

NATURE PROTECTION AND WILDLIFE 
PRESERVATION 

CONVENTION ON NATURE PROTECTION AND 
WILDLIFE PRESERVATION IN THE WESTERN 
HEMISPHERE 

Brazil 

The Director General of the Pan American 
Union transmitted to the Secretary of State 
with a letter dated February 17, 1941, certified 
copies of the list of species furnished to the Pan 
American Union by the Government of Brazil 
for inclusion in the Annex to the Convention 
on Nature Protection and Wildlife Preservation 
in the Western Hemisphere, which was opened 
for signature at the Pan American Union on 
October 12, 1940. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH .THE APPROVAL OF TnE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 



MARCH 8, 
Vol. IV: No. 89 — Publication 



Contents 




General: 

Control of exports in national defense 

Europe: 

Closing of two Italian consulates in the United States . 
Presentation of letters of credence by the Polish 

Ambassador 

Property of Bulgaria in the United States 

Contributions for relief in belligerent countries .... 

American Republics: 

Collaboration with Mexico on plans for common 
defense 

Grant to the United States of defense sites in Panama . 

The Far East: 

Message of the Secretary of State to participants in the 
Far Eastern Lecture Series 

The Near East: 

Suspension of tonnage duties for vessels of Iran . . . 

Publications 

Cultural Relations: 

Visit of distinguished leaders from other American 
republics 

Visit of editors and scholars to other American repub- 
lics 

Journalistic exchanges between United States schools 
and Colombian students 

Student exchange between Chicago University and 
Sao Paulo School of Sociology and Politics .... 

[Over] 



1941 
1576 



Page 

243 

249 

249 
251 
251 



264 
265 



265 

266 
266 

267 
268 
269 
269 



U. S. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS 

MAR 22 1941 



Qontents 



—CONTINUED. 



The Foreign Service: Page 

Confirmation of nominations 269 

The Department: 

Appointment of G. Howland Shaw as Assistant Secre- 
tary of State 270 

Appointments of other officers 270 

Functions of Assistant Secretaries 271 

Treaty Information: 
Extradition : 

Supplementary Convention with Guatemala (Treaty 

Series 963) 272 

Arbitration : 

Treaty for the Peaceful Solution of Controversies 

Between Brazil and Venezuela 272 

Sovereignty : 

Convention on the Provisional Administration of 
European Colonies and Possessions in the Ameri- 
cas 272 

Labor : 

Convention Concerning Safety Provisions in the 

Building Industry 272 

Convention Concerning the Liability of the Shipowner 
in Case of Sickness, Injury, or Death of Seamen 

(Treaty Series 951) 272 

Finance : 

Convention for the Establishment of an Inter- 
American Bank 273 

Legislation 273 



General 



CONTROL OP EXPORTS IN NATIONAL DEFENSE 



[Released to the press March 4] 

The issuance of three proclamations, with 
accompanying Executive orders, placing addi- 
tional articles and materials under the export- 
licensing system, was announced March 4 by 
the President. 

The recommendation submitted by Brig. Gen. 
Russell L. Maxwell, Administrator of Export 
Control, stated that it was necessary in the in- 
terests of national defense to control the expor- 
tation of these items. 

The first proclamation, effective March 10, 
covers : 

(1) Cadmium 

(2) Carbon Black 

(3) Coconut Oil 

(4) Copra 

(5) Cresylic Acid and Cresols 

(6) Fatty Acids produced from vegetable 

oils under export control 

(7) Glycerin 

(8) Palm-Kernel Oil and Palm Kernels 

(9) Pine Oil 

(10) Petroleum Coke 

(11) Shellac 

(12) Titanium 

The second proclamation, effective March 24, 
covers : 

(1) Jute 

(2) Lead 

(3) Borax 

(4) Phosphates 

The third proclamation, effective April 15, 
includes plans, specifications, or technical in- 
formation utilized in connection with the pro- 

29S460 — 41 1 



duction or processing of any of the items under 
control. 

The texts of the proclamations and Executive 
orders follow : 

Control of the Export of Certain Articles 
and Materials 

by the president of the united states of 

AMERICA 

A Proclamation 
Whereas section 6 of the act of Congress 
entitled "An Act To expedite the strengthening 
of the national defense", approved July 2, 1940, 
provides as follows : 

"Sec. 6. Whenever the President determines 
that it is necessary in the interest of national 
defense to prohibit or curtail the exportation 
of any military equipment or munitions, or 
component parts thereof, or machinery, tools, or 
material, or supplies necessary for the manufac- 
ture, servicing, or operation thereof, he may by 
proclamation prohibit or curtail such exporta- 
tion, except under such rules and regulations as 
he shall prescribe. Any such proclamation 
shall describe the articles or materials included 
in the prohibition or curtailment contained 
therein. In case of the violation of any provi- 
sion of any proclamation, or of any rule or regu- 
lation, issued hereunder, such violator or vio- 
lators, upon conviction, shall be punished by a 
fine of not more than $10,000. or by imprison- 
ment for not more than two years, or by both 
such fine and imprisonment. The authority 
granted in this section shall terminate June 
30, 1942, unless the Congress shall otherwise 
provide." 

243 



244 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



NOW, THEREFORE, I, FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT, 

President of the United States of America, act- 
ing under and by virtue of the authority vested 
in me by the aforesaid act of Congress, do 
hereby proclaim that upon the recommendation 
of the Administrator of Export Control I have 
determined that it is necessary in the interest of 
the national defense that on and after March 10, 
1941, the following-described articles and mate- 
rials shall not be exported from the United 
States except when authorized in each case by 
a license as provided for in Proclamation No. 
2413 1 of July 2, 1940, entitled "Administration 
of section 6 of the Act entitled 'An Act To ex- 
pedite the strengthening of the national defense' 
approved July 2, 1940": 

(1) Cadmium 

(2) Carbon Black 

(3) Coconut Oil 

(4) Copra 

(5) Cresylic Acid and Cresols 

(6) Fatty Acids produced from vegetable 
oils under export control 

(7) Glycerin 

(8) Palm-Kernel Oil and Palm Kernels 

(9) Pine Oil 

(10) Petroleum Coke 

(11) Shellac 

(12) Titanium 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set 
my hand and caused the seal of the United 
States of America to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this 4th day 

of March, in the year of our Lord 

[seal] nineteen hundred and forty-one, 

and of the Independence of the 

United States of America, the one hundred and 

sixty-fifth. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 
By the President: 
Cordell Hull 

Secretary of State. 

[No. 2463] 



Control of the Export of Certain Articles 
and Materials 

by the president of the united states 
of america 

A Proclaimat'wn 

Whereas section 6 of the act of Congress 
entitled "An Act To expedite the strengthening 
of the national defense", approved July 2, 
1940, provides as follows: 

"Sec. 6. Whenever the President determines 
that it is necessary in the interest of national 
defense to prohibit or curtail the exportation 
of any military equipment or munitions, or 
component parts thereof, or machinery, tools, 
or material, or supplies necessary for the man- 
ufacture, servicing, or operation thereof, he 
may by proclamation prohibit or curtail such 
exportation, except under such rules and regu- 
lations as he shall prescribe. Any such proc- 
lamation shall describe the articles or mate- 
rials included in the prohibition or curtailment 
contained therein. In case of the violation of 
any provision of any proclamation, or of any 
rule or regulation, issued hereunder, such vio- 
lator or violators, upon conviction, shall be 
punished by a fine of not more than $10,000, or 
by imprisonment for not more than two years, 
or by both such fine and imprisonment. The 
authority granted in this section shall termi- 
nate June 30, 1942, unless the Congress shall 
otherwise provide." 

NOW, THEREFORE, I, FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT, 

President of the United States of America, 
acting under and by virtue of the authority 
vested in me by the aforesaid act of Congress, 
do hereby proclaim that upon the recommenda- 
tion of the Administrator of Export Control I 
have determined that it is necessary in the 
interest of the national defense that on and 
after March 24, 1941, the following-described 
articles and materials shall not be exported 
from the United States except when author- 
ized in each case by a license as provided for 
in Proclamation No. 2413 2 of July 2, 1940, 



'5 F.K. 2467. 



2 Ibid. 



MARCH S, 1941 



245 



entitled "Administration of section 6 of the 
Act entitled 'An Act To expedite the strength- 
ening of the national defense' approved July 
2, 1940": 

(1) Jute 

(2) Lead 

(3) Borax 

(4) Phosphates 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 
Done at the city of Washington this 4th day 
of March, in the year of our Lord 
[seal] nineteen hundred and forty-one, and 
of the Independence of the United 
States of America the one hundred and sixty- 
fifth. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 
By the President: 
Cordell Hull 

Secretary of State. 

[No. 2464] 

Control of the Export of Certain Articles 
and Materials 

bt the president of the united states of 

AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Whereas section 6 of the act of Congress en- 
titled "An Act To expedite the strengthening 
of the national defense", approved July 2, 1940, 
provides as follows : 

"Sec. 6. Whenever the President determines 
that it is necessary in the interest of national 
defense to prohibit or curtail the exportation 
of any military equipment or munitions, or 
component parts thereof, or machinery, tools, 
or material, or supplies necessary for the man- 
ufacture, servicing, or operation thereof, he 
may by proclamation prohibit or curtail such 
exportation, except under such rules and regu- 
lations as he shall prescribe. Any such proc- 
lamation shall describe the articles or materials 
included in the prohibition or curtailment con- 



tained therein. In case of the violation of any 
provision of any proclamation, or of any rule 
or regulation, issued hereunder, such violator 
or violators, upon conviction, shall be punished 
by a fine of not more than $10,000, or by im- 
prisonment for not more than two years, or 
by both such fine and imprisonment. The au- 
thority granted in this section shall terminate 
June 30, 1942, unless the Congress shall other- 
wise provide." 

NOW, THEREFORE, I, FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT, 

President of the United States of America, act- 
ing under and by virtue of the authority vested 
in me by the aforesaid act of Congress, do hereby 
proclaim that upon the recommendation of the 
Administrator of Export Control I have deter- 
mined that it is necessary in the interest of the 
national defense that on and after April 15, 
1941, the following-described articles and mate- 
rials shall not be exported from the United 
States except when authorized in each case by a 
license as hereinafter provided : 

Any model, design, photograph, photographic 
negative, document, or other article or material, 
containing a plan, specification, or descriptive 
or technical information of any kind (other than 
that appearing generally in a form available to 
the public) which can be used or adapted for use 
in connection with any process, synthesis, or op- 
eration in the production, manufacture, or re- 
construction of any of the articles or materials 
the exportation of which is prohibited or cur- 
tailed in accordance with the provisions of sec- 
tion 6 of the act of Congress approved July 2, 
1940, or of any basic or intermediary constituent 
of any such articles or materials. 

And I do hereby empower the Administrator 
of Export Control to issue licenses authorizing 
the exportation of any of the above-named arti- 
cles and materials in accordance with rules and 
regulations prescribed by the President. 

Proclamation No. 2423, 3 of September 12, 
1940, is hereby superseded except so far as and 
to the extent that it relates to (1) equipment 
(excluding minor component parts) which can 



'5 F.R. 3651. 



246 

be used, or adapted to use, for the production of 
aviation motor fuel (as is defined in the regula- 
tions issued pursuant to Proclamation No. 2417,' 
of July 26, 1940, as may from time to time be 
amended) from petroleum, petroleum products, 
hydrocarbon, or hydrocarbon mixtures, by proc- 
esses involving chemical change; and (2) equip- 
ment (excluding minor component parts) which 
can be used, or adapted to use, for the produc- 
tion of tetraethyl lead (as is defined in the regu- 
lations issued pursuant to Proclamation No. 
2417, of July 26, 1940, as may from time to time 
be amended ) . 

Proclamation No. 2451, 5 of December 20, 
1940, is hereby superseded so far as and to the 
extent that it relates to plans for the produc- 
tion of aviation lubricating oil. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this 4th day 
of March, in the year of our Lord 

[seal] nineteen hundred and forty-one, and 
of the Independence of the United 
States of America the one hundred and sixty- 
fifth. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 

By the President : 
Cordell Hull 

Secretary of State. 

[No. 2465] 

Executive Order 
Prescribing Regulations Governing the Ex- 
portation of Articles and Materials Desig- 
nated in the President's Proclamation of 
March 4, 1941, Issued Pursuant to Section 
6 of the Act of Congress Approved July 2, 
1940, and Amending Regulations of Jan- 
uary 15, 1941, Covering the Exportation of 
Certain Articles and Materials 

Pursuant to the authority vested in me by the 
provisions of section 6 of the act of Congress 



department of state bulletin 

approved July 2, 1940, entitled "An Act To 
expedite the strengthening of the national de- 
fense", I hereby prescribe the following addi- 
tional regulations governing the exportation of 
the articles and materials named in my procla- 
mation of March 4, 1941 : 

1. The articles and materials named in the 
said proclamation shall be construed to include 
the following: 



(1) Cadmium 

Ores and concentrates 

Metal 

Alloys 



B F 

6245* 6640* 

6249* 6640* 

6249* 6640* 



' 5 F.R. 2677, 2682. 
'5 F.R. 5229. 



Cadmium Salts and Compounds: 

Cadmium chloride 8399. 9* 8399* 

Cadmium oxide 8399. 9* 8399* 

Cadmium sulfate 8399. 9* 8399* 

Cadmium plating salts 8399. 9* 8399* 

Cadmium sulfide 8429* 8442* 

Cadmium lithopone 8429* 8442* 

(2) Carbon Black: 

Carbon black, including gas black 8423* 8442* 

(3) Coconut Oil: 

Edible 1420 1449* 

Inedible 2230 2230 

(4) Copra 2220* 2211 

(5) Cresylic Acid and Cresols 8024* 8069* 

(6) Fatty Acids produced from 2248* 2662* 

vegetable oils under export 
control 

(7) Glycerin 8314 8399* 

(8) Palm-Kernel Oil and Palm 

Kernels: 

Palm-Kernel Oil: 

Edible 1449* 1449* 

Inedible 2249* 2243* 

Palm Kernels 2220* 2220* 

(9) Pine Oil 2117 2189* 

(10) Petroleum Coke 5048 5048* 

(11) Shellac: 

Lac, crude, seed, button, and stick 2189* 2108 

Unbleached shellac 2189* 2108 

Bleached shellac 2185 2108 

(12) Titanium: 

Ores and concentrates: 

Ilmenite 6245* 6640* 

Rutile 6245* 6640* 

Metal 6249* 6640* 

Alloys 6249* 6640* 

Titanium Salts and Compounds: 

Titanium dioxide 8428 8442* 

Titanium tetrachloride 8399. 9* 8399* 

2. The numbers appearing in the columns 

designated B and F in paragraph 1 hereof 



MARCH 8, 1941 



247 



refer to the numbers in Schedule B "Statisti- 
cal Classification of Domestic Commodities Ex- 
ported from the United States", and Schedule 
F "Foreign Exports (Re- Exports)", respec- 
tively, issued by the United States Department 
of Commerce, both effective January 1, 1941. 
The words are controlling and the numbers are 
included solely for the purpose of statistical 
classification. An asterisk (*) indicates that 
the classification herein is not co-extensive with 
that in said Schedules B and F. 

3. Regulations 2 to 12 inclusive 6 of the regu- 
lations issued July 2, 1940, pursuant to section 
6 of the act of July 2, 1940, are applicable to 
the exportation of the articles and materials 
listed in paragraph 1 (1)-(12). 

4. Executive Order No. 8640 7 is hereby 
amended to include within its provisions the 
articles and materials named in my proclama- 
tion of March 4, 1941. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 
The White House, 
March 4, 1941. 

[No. 8702] 

Executive Order 
Prescribing Regulations Governing the Ex- 
portation of Articles and Materials Des- 
ignated in the President's Proclamation 
of March 4, 1941, Issued Pursuant to Sec- 
tion 6 of the Act of Congress Approved 
July 2, 1940, and Amending Regulations of 
January 15, 1941, Covering the Exporta- 
tion of Certain Articles and Materials 

Pursuant to the authority vested in me by 
the provisions of section 6 of the act of Con- 
gress approved July 2, 1940, entitled "An Act 
To expedite the strengthening of the national 
defense", I hereby prescribe the following ad- 
ditional regulations governing the exportation 
of the articles and materials named in my 
proclamation of March 4, 1941 : 



1. The articles and materials named in the 
said proclamation shall be construed to include 
the following: 

(1) Jute: B F 
Fiber 3499* 3409* 
Burlaps, except when used as 3229* 3220 

a covering for other mer- 
chandise or as a com- 
ponent part of other 
products 
Bags, except when used as a 3224 3224 

container for other mer- 
chandise 

(2) Lead: 

Ore and matte 6640* 6640* 

Pigs and bars 6507 6515* 

Sheets and pipes 6508 6515* 

Solder 6512 6515* 

(3) Borax: 

Boric acid 8308 8309* 

Borates, crude and refined 8362 8379* 

(4) Phosphates: 

Phosphoric acid 8309* 8309. 9* 

Phosphorus (elemental) 8399. 9* 8399* 

Phosphate rock containing (8513* 8551* 
20% or more phosphorus (8514* 
pentoxide (PjOj) equiva- 
lent 
Superphosphate containing 8519* 8551* 
40% or more phosphorus 
pentoxide (P2O5) equiva- 
lent 
-. The numbers appearing in the columns 
designated B and F in paragraph 1 hereof 
refer to the numbers in Schedule B "Statisti- 
cal Classification of Domestic Commodities Ex- 
ported from the United States", and Schedule 
F "Foreign Exports (Re-Exports) ", respec- 
tively, issued by the United States Department 
of Commerce, both effective January 1, 1941. 
The words are controlling and the numbers are 
included solely for the purpose of statistical 
classification. An asterisk (*) indicates that 
the classification herein is not co-extensive with 
that in said Schedules B and F. 

3. Regulations 2 to 12 inclusive s of the reg- 
ulations issued July 2, 1940, pursuant to section 
6 of the act of July 2, 1940, are applicable to the 



' 5 F.R. 2469. 
' 6 F.R. 455. 



' 5 F.R. 246'.!, 



248 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



exportation of (lie articles and materials listed 
in paragraph 1 (l)-(4). 

4. Executive Order No. 8640 9 is hereby 
amended to include within its provisions the 
articles and materials named in my proclama- 
tion of March 4, 1941. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 
The White House, 
March 4, 191,1. 

[No. 8703] 

The following circular telegrams from the 
Secretary of State were recently sent to col- 
lectors of customs : 

"March 3, 1941. 

"As used in paragraph twelve of the export 
control regulations of July 2, 1940, the term 
'in transit' is interpreted as denoting a ship- 
ment which originates in a foreign country and 
passes through territory of the United States 
to another foreign country, the consignee and 
destination in the latter foreign country having 
been named in the through bill of lading exe- 
cuted in the country of origin. Exports of 
shipments thus 'in transit' require no license. 
Articles and materials within the purview of 
the regulations which are now in, or may here- 
after be brought into, bonded warehouses, man- 
ufacturing plants and smelters are subject to 
the export license requirements." 



"March 8, 1941. 
"In accordance with the provisions of the 
Executive Order of January 15, 1941, the Sec- 
retary of State has today issued the following 
general licenses for the export to Canada and 
Great Britain of articles and materials named 
in proclamations and regulations issued pur- 
suant to section 6 of the Export Control Act 
of July 2, 1940: 

" <i F.R. 455. 



"To Canada License No. GBQ 1 for beryl- 
lium 

No. GBR 1 for graph- 
ite electrodes 
No. GCM 1 for cad- 
mium 
No. GCO 1 for carbon 

black 
No. GCP 1 for petro- 
leum coke 
No. GCT 1 for jute 
No. GCU 1 for lead 
No. GCW 1 for borax 
No. GCX 1 for phos- 
phates 
No. GEP 1 for pine oil 
No. GCS 1 for glycer- 
ine 
No. GCR 1 for cresylic 
acid and cresols 

"To Great Britain License No. GCM 2 for 
cadmium 

No. GCO 2 for 

carbon black 
No. GCP 2 for 

petroleum coke 
No. GCT 2 for 

jute 
No. GCU 2 for 

lead 
No. GCW 2 for 

borax 
No. GCX 2 for 

phosphates 
No. GEP 2 for 

pine oil 
No. GCS 2 for 

glycerine 
No. GCR 2 for 

cresylic acid 

and cresols." 



Europe 



CLOSING OF TWO ITALIAN CONSULATES IN THE UNITED STATES 



[Released to the press March 6] 

For reasons of national policy it has been 
decided that foreign consulates in certain areas 
should be closed. At the present time the Ital- 
ian Government has been requested to close its 
consulates at Detroit, Mich., and Newark, N. J., 
and to withdraw the personnel. 

[Released to the press March 6) 

On March 5, 1941, the Secretary of State 
sent the following note to His Excellency the 
Royal Italian Ambassador, Don Ascanio dei 
principi Colonna: 

"The Secretary of State presents his com- 
pliments to His Excellency the Royal Italian 
Ambassador and has the honor to refer to his 
oral communication of February 12, 1941, with 
respect to the Italian Government's request 
that the Consulates now established at Palermo 
and Naples should be moved to a place as far 
north as Rome or farther north, and to a place 
which was not on the sea coast. 

"Instructions to these offices of the American 
Government have been issued in accordance 
with this request and the supervisory consulate 
general of the United States in Italy is being 
established in Rome. 

"The Secretary of State avails himself of 
this opportunity to make request of the Ital- 
ian Ambassador that all officials of his Govern- 
ment within the territory of the United States 
will confine their movements to those areas in 
which they exercise the recognized duties of 
their respective offices. This request does not 
include the personnel of the Italian Embassy 
in Washington whose names appear on the 
Diplomatic List. It would be appreciated, 
however, if the Italian Ambassador would keep 
the Department of State currently informed 
of the movements outside of Washington of 



the military and naval personnel attached to 
the Italian Embassy. 

"As regards the Italian consular offices at 
Newark, New Jersey, and Detroit, Michigan, 
the Italian Ambassador is informed that the 
American Ambassador in Rome has been re- 
quested to convey orally to the appropriate 
Italian authorities the desire of the United 
States Government that these offices should be 
closed and that the Italian personnel be with- 
drawn from these places. Should they remain 
within the jurisdiction of the United States 
the Department of State should be kept fully 
informed of their place of residence." 

PRESENTATION OF LETTERS OF CRE- 
DENCE BY THE POLISH AMBASSADOR 

[Released to the press March 6] 

The remarks of the newly appointed Ambas- 
sador of Poland, Mr. Jan Ciechanowski, upon 
the occasion of the presentation of his letters of 
credence, March 6, 1941, follow : 

"Mr. President: 

"I have the honor to hand to Your Excel- 
lency the letters by which the President of the 
Republic of Poland recalls Count George 
Potocki from his post of Ambassador of the 
Republic of Poland to the United States. 

"The President of the Republic of Poland 
desires me to express to Your Excellency his 
sincere thanks for the kindness, the understand- 
ing, and the support which Your Excellency and 
the Government of the United States have 
given to Ambassador Potocki throughout his 
mission in Washington. 

"The President of the Republic has instructed 
me to assure Your Excellency that he is follow- 
ing with concentrated attention and admiration 
your splendid activity for the preservation of 
freedom and civilization on which the whole 
future and happiness of humanity depend. 

249 



250 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



"I have now the honor to present to Your 
Excellency the letters by which the President 
of the Republic of Poland accredits me to be 
Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotenti- 
ary of the Republic of Poland to the United 
States. 

"I beg leave to assure you, Mr. President, 
that I am deeply conscious of the honor of rep- 
resenting Poland in the United States at this 
exceptionally grave time, when the fate of my 
country and, indeed, that of human freedom 
and civilization are at stake. I am especially 
conscious of the responsibility placed upon me. 

"For nearly a year and a half Poland is 
suffering inhuman oppression at the hands of 
two ruthless invaders. 

"These two powerful neighbors of Poland 
have unprovokedly attacked and overrun her 
national territory in a concerted action of ag- 
gressive imperialism, with a view of repeat- 
ing the crime of Poland's partitions of the end 
of the eighteenth century, and of renewing 
their previous unsuccessful attempt at total 
annihilation of the Polish Nation. 

"The Polish people, irrespective of party and 
creed, united in the sacred cause of Poland's 
independence, have never for one moment de- 
parted from their attitude of calm national 
dignity and determined opposition to political 
and physical pressure ruthlessly applied by the 
invaders with unprecedented cunning and 
brutality in order to break their spirit of 
resistance. 

"The Polish armed forces continue to be ac- 
tive. The Polish Army fought gallantly 
against overwhelming forces in Poland. Af- 
ter being overpowered, those of our soldiers 
who were able to thwart the vigilance of the 
enemy, surmounted countless dangers and hard- 
ships, and succeeded by heroic migration in 
single file in crossing the greater part of the 
European Continent, in order to join the Pol- 
ish Government and to re-form the Allied Na- 
tional Polish Army on the friendly soil of 
France. After fighting bravely against the 
common enemy in Norway and on French ter- 
ritory, they refused to capitulate and migrated 
once more from that unfortunate allied country 



at the time of its surrender, in order to re- 
form their decimated forces on the friendly and 
hospitable soil of our British ally, there to 
carry on the fight against our enemy on land, 
on sea, and in the air. 

"The record of this Polish Army, of our 
Navy, and our Air Force is worthy of the 
heroic ages of history. It is, above all, the 
tangible proof of that undaunted spirit of pa- 
triotism and national consciousness which has 
always been and which, I firmly believe, will 
never cease to be one of Poland's recognized 
traditions. 

"The entire Polish Nation loyally supports 
its President and its Government, and is deter- 
mined to carry on this mortal struggle in de- 
fense of freedom and democracy to a victorious 
end. 

"These are, Mr. President, for the time be- 
ing, the principal assets of the Poland of to- 
day, which I can spread before you, but which, 
I venture to believe, in the pure primitive 
splendor of what they represent in terms of 
human endurance and sacrifice, of patriotism, 
of national consciousness and dignity, of faith 
and vitality, constitute intrinsic values bearing 
the indelible hallmarks of Poland's immor- 
tality. 

"If at this time of our history, unworthy 
though I feel, I have accepted to undertake 
the great mission entrusted to me, it is be- 
cause I have had once before the privilege of 
representing my country in the United States, 
of interpreting its deep traditional friendship 
for the American people, of explaining its 
policies to the Government of this great 
democracy. 

"In the course of my previous mission, I 
gained a fervent faith in the unfaltering spirit 
of justice and respect for the freedom of others, 
which characterizes the American people, 
whose President and Government so greatly 
contributed to the restoration of Poland's in- 
dependence after the World War. 

"I feel sure that this great and responsive 
Nation will not fail Poland in this hour of 
her struggle for her right to live in peace, in 
dignity, and democratic freedom, and that once 



MARCH S, 1941 



251 



more it will assist in her liberation from ruth- 
less Germanic and Soviet tyranny. 

"To the Polish Nation, you are, Mr. Presi- 
dent, the generally recognized personification 
of active and creative democratic statesman- 
ship. 

"To us Poles the necessity of your personal 
influence on the establishment of the new order 
in the world after the war, has become a dogma 
of faith in the future stability of peace and, 
indeed, the very survival of civilization. 

"I venture to express the hope that Your Ex- 
cellency will not refuse to grant me the in- 
valuable support of your confidence which, on 
my part, I shall ever do my very utmost to 
deserve." 

The President's reply to the remarks of Mr. 
Jan Ciechanowski follows: 

"Mk. Ambassador: 

"In receiving the letters of recall of your 
predecessor, Count George Potocki, and the 
letters accrediting you as Ambassador Ex- 
traordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Repub- 
lic of Poland to the United States, I wish to 
welcome you back to Washington. I have 
noted the expression of thanks of the Presi- 
dent of Poland for the understanding and sup- 
port shown your distinguished predecessor and 
wish to assure you of the same measure of 
support and cooperation. 

"The friendly mention made by the Presi- 



dent of Poland of our efforts in behalf of the 
preservation of freedom is appreciated. It is 
with sympathetic interest that the valiant ef- 
forts which are being made by the Government 
of Poland toward this same end are being fol- 
lowed. The loyal support given these efforts 
by the Polish people is, I am sure, a matter of 
deep satisfaction to the President and Govern- 
ment of Poland. 

"That spirit of justice and respect for free- 
dom of the people of the United States, which 
you observed on your previous mission to this 
country, I can assure you, still lives and can 
be relied upon by you in your efforts to fulfil 
your present mission." 

PROPERTY OF BULGARIA IN THE 
UNITED STATES 

On March 4, 1941, the President signed Ex- 
ecutive Order No. 8701, extending all the pro- 
visions of Executive Order No. 8389 of April 
10, 1940, as amended, to "property in which 
Bulgaria or any national thereof has at any 
time on or since March 4, 1941, had any inter- 
est of any nature whatsoever, direct or indi- 
rect . . ." The text of Executive Order No. 
8701 appears in the Federal Register of March 
5, 1941 (vol. 6, no. 44), page 1285, and the 
regulations of the Treasury Department, issued 
March 4, 1941, under authority of this order, 
appear in the same issue of the Federal Reg- 
ister, page 1291. 



CONTEIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 



[Released to the press March 4] 

The following tabulation shows contributions 
collected and disbursed during the period Sep- 
tember 6, 1939 through January 31, 1941, as 
shown in the reports submitted by persons and 
organizations registered with the Secretary of 
State for the solicitation and collection of con- 
tributions to be used for relief in belligerent 
countries, in conformity with the regulations 
issued pursuant to section 8 of the act of No- 
vember 4, 1939 as made effective by the Presi- 
dent's proclamation of the same date. 



This tabulation has reference only to con- 
tributions solicited and collected for relief in 
belligerent countries (France; Germany; Po- 
land; the United Kingdom, India, Australia, 
Canada, New Zealand, and the Union of South 
Africa; Norway; Belgium; Luxemburg; the 
Netherlands; Italy; and Greece) or for the re- 
lief of refugees driven out of these countries by 
the present war. The statistics set forth in the 
tabulation do not include information regard- 
ing relief activities which a number of organ- 
izations registered with the Secretary of State 



252 

may be carrying on in nonbelligerent countries, 
but for which registration is not required under 
the Neutrality Act of 1939. 

The American National Red Cross is required 
by law to submit to the Secretary of War for 
audit "a full, complete, and itemized report of 
receipts and expenditures of whatever kind". 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

In order to avoid an unnecessary duplication 
of work, this organization is not required to 
conform to the provisions of the regulations 
governing the solicitation and collection of con- 
tributions for relief in belligerent countries, 
and the tabulation does not, therefore, include 
information in regard to its activities. 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Jan. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Action Democrata Espanola, San Francisco, Calif., 
Mar. 29, 1940.° France 

The Allied Civilian War Relief Society, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Dec. 27, 1940. Great Britain ---. 

Allied Relief Ball, Inc., New York, N. Y., Apr. 4, 1940. 
Great Britain and France 

American Aid for German War Prisoners, Buffalo, N. Y., 
Sept. 27, 1940. Canada, British West Indies, 
Australia, New Zealand, and Great Britain 

American Association for Assistance to French Artists, 
Inc., New York, N. Y., Jan. 3, 1940. France 

American Association of University Women, Washing- 
ton, D. C, May 23, 1940. France, Great Britain, 
Sweden, Palestine, Canada, and Switzerland 

American Auxiliary Committee de l'Union des Femmes 
de France, New York, N. Y., Nov. 8, 1939. France, 
Great Britain, and Germany 

American Board of Missions to the Jews, Inc., Brooklyn, 
N. Y., July 5, 1940. France, Belgium, and Germany. 

American Cameronian Aid, Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan. 17, 
1941. Scotland.-- 

American Committee for Christian Refugees, Inc., New 
York, N. Y., Sept. 20, 1939. Germany and France.. 

American Committee for the German Relief Fund, Inc., 
New York, N. Y., Mar. 27, 1940. Germany, Poland, 
Canada, Dutch Guiana, British West Indies, and 
Jamaica 

American Committee for the Polish Ambulance Fund, 
Chicago, 111., Feb. 12, 1940. France, Poland, and 
England 

The American Committee for the Relief of Greece, Inc., 
New York, N.Y., Jan. 2, 1941. Greece 

American Committee to Save Refugees, New York, N.Y., 
Jan. 3, 1941. France 

American Committee for the Syrian Orphanage in 
Jerusalem, Woodside, Long Island, N. Y., Dec. 3, 
1940. Palestine, Germany, and British East Africa. -- 

American Dental Ambulance Committee, New York, 
N. Y., Mar. 12, 1940. United Kingdom , 

American Employment for General Relief, Inc., New 
York, N. Y., M«v 1, 1940. England, France, Nor- 
way, Poland, Belgium, Luxemburg, and the 
Netherlands ._ 

American Federation for Polish Jews, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Sept. 14, 1939. Poland. .- 

American Field Hospital Corps, New York, N. Y., Dec. 
12,1939. France, Belgium, Holland, and England 



$312. 19 

212.68 

52, 696. 35 

4, 810. 92 
14, 501. 44 

18, 186. 83 

22, 901. 28 

6, 812. 09 

17.10 

12,001.86 

59, 000. 44 

31,889.53 

None 

2, 918. 23 

None 
3, 269. 52 

3, 319. 00 

6, 244. 30 

236, 927. 58 



$125. 00 

91.70 

39, 964. 39 

3, 306. 91 
9, 216. 03 

11,327.50 

12, 493. 25 

6. 704. 60 

None 

12,001.86 

45, 300. 00 

2fi. 243. 20 
None 
900.69 

None 
3, 133. 02 

None 

5, 020. 75 

185. 928. 42 



$130. 18 
120.98 
None 

1, 069. 64 
1, 773. 27 

6, 219. 87 

6, 509. 08 
None 
16.04 



1, 712. 71 

3,316.09 

None 

1,309.63 

None 
35.00 

None 

847. 41 

22, 002. 09 



None 
$36.50 
None 

884.00 
1, 605. 15 

None 

5, 453. 96 
None 
None 
None 

None 

471.00 
None 
None 

None 
None 

None 
7, 651. 43 
2, 694. 20 



None 
None 
None 

$136.00 
None 



765. 64 
None 
None 
None 

None 

None 
None 
None 

None 
None 

None 
None 
None 



$57. 01 

None 

12, 731. 96 

434. 37 
3, 512. 14 

639. 46 

S, 898. 95 

107. 49 

1.06 

None 

11,987.73 

2, 330. 24 

None 
708.01 

None 
101.50 

3, 362. 24 
376.14 

28, 997. 07 



» The registration of this organization was revoked on Dec. 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 



MARCH 8, 1941 



253 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds re- 
ceived 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Jan. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


American Field Service, New York, N. Y., Sept. 27, 
1939. France, Great Britain, British East Africa, 


$355, 560. 01 

8, 959. 23 
52, 792. 57 
8, 497. 68 

32, 144. 58 

3, 914. 94 
338, 815. 14 

4, 782. 84 

136,832.35 
5, 266. 05 
19, 420. 45 
5, 305. 80 
5, 600. 00 

3,085,872.81 
2, 607. 62 
4, 794. 66 
20, 645. 33 
1,080.22 
6, 066. 84 
4, 162. 31 
25, 438. 82 
10, 920. 68 
1,494.19 
24, 490. 50 
10,827.14 
13, 671. 47 
2, 849. 96 


$299, 927. 83 

4, 433. 90 
33, 940. 31 

4, 450. 00 

26, 286. 42 

2,357.00 

190, 160. 49 

1,927.02 

125, 757. 89 

3,786.60 

14, 399. 72 

3, 425. 00 

None 

2, 794, 804. 77 

2, 115. 77 

2, 932. 40 

19, 648. 47 

180. 07 

5, 792. 72 
1, 423. 70 

14, 514. 75 

6,500.00 

732.56 

18, 537. 66 
7,000.00 
8,206.53 
2.600.00 


$37, 633. 29 

2, 667. 18 

8, 604. 10 

811.63 

14.38 

1, 526. 44 

113,796.68 

None 

301. 07 
1,111.46 
4, 164. 64 

696. 78 
5,600.00 

None 

491. 85 

1, 487. 98 

509.27 

630. 57 

171.50 

2,074.28 

2,284.21 

4, 095. 75 

363.74 

4. 893. 40 

3, 538. 69 

3,431.35 

242.45 


None 

None 

$55, 560. 85 

None 

19, 240. 00 

None 

19, 904. 96 

None 

14, 512. 17 
4,911.60 

15,871.69 
None 
None 

51.00 

2, 800. 00 

None 

None 

None 

50.00 

1, 184. 10 

28. 946. 51 

650.00 

489.32 

3, 170. 31 

None 

None 

None 


None 

None 

$1, 611. 50 

None 

None 
None 
None 

None 

None 
None 
728.00 
None 
None 

None 
200.00 
None 
None 
2.45 
None 
207.40 
None 
107. 77 
None 
250.00 
None 
None 
None 


$17, 998. 89 


American and French Students' Correspondence Ex- 
change, New York, N. Y., Dec. 20, 1939. France and 


1, 858. 15 


American-French War Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., 


10, 248. 16 


American Friends of Britain, Inc., New York, N. Y., 


3, 236. 05 


American Friends of Czecho-Slovakia, New York, N. Y., 
Nov. 2, 1939. Great Britain, France, and Bohemia- 


5, 843. 78 


American Friends of the Daily Sketch War Relief Fund, 


31.60 


American Friends of France, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 21, 1939. France, Germany, and England 

American Friends of a Jewish Palestine, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., May 9, 1940. Palestine, Germany, Poland, 


34, 857. 97 
2, 855. 82 


American Friends Service Committee, Philadelphia, Pa., 
Nov. 9, 1939. United Kingdom, Poland, Germany, 
France, Norway, Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy, 


10, 773. 39 


The American Fund for Breton Relief, New York, N. Y., 


368.09 


American Fund for French Wounded, Inc., Boston, 


866.19 


American-German Aid Society, Los Angeles, Calif., 


1,284.02 


The American Hospital in Britain, Limited, New York, 


None 


The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, 
Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 29, 1939. United 
Kingdom, Poland, Germany, France, Norway, Bel- 


291, 068. 04 


American McAll Association, New York, N. Y., Jan. 3, 


None 


American-Polish National Council, Chicago, 111., Aug. 


374.28 


The American School Committee for Aid to GVeece, Inc., 


587. 59 


American War Godmothers, Pittsburgh, Pa., Mar. 6, 


269.58 


American Women's Hospitals, New York, N. Y., Sept. 


102. 62 


American Women's Unit for War Relief, Inc., New 

York, N.Y., Jan. 15, 1940. France - - 

American Women's Voluntary Services, Inc., New 


664.33 
8.639.86 


Les Amis de la France a Puerto Rico, San Juan, P. R., 


324.93 


Les Amities Feminines de la France, New York, N. Y., 


397.89 


Les Anciens Combattants Francais de la Grande Guerre, 

San Francisco. Calif., Oct. 26, 1939. France.. 

Anthracite Relief Committee, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Sept. 


1,059.44 

288.45 


Anzac War Relief Fund, New York, N. Y., May 23, 


1,933.59 


Associated Polish Societies Relief Committee of Web- 
ster, Mass., Webster, Mass., Sept. 21, 1939. Poland.. 


7.50 



k The registration of this organization was revoked on Dec. 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 



254 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries- — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds re- 
ceived 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Jan. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Associated Polish Societies' Relief Committee of Worces- 
ter, Mass., Worcester, Mass., Sept. 14, 1939. Poland. __ 

Association of Former Juniors in France of Smith Col- 
lege, New York, N. Y., Dec. 18, 1939. France. 

Association of Former Russian Naval Officers in Amer- 


$10, 679. 97 
273.50 
279.41 

2, 363. 45 

14, 726. 54 

1, 299. 89 
2, 213. 13 

33, 531. 92 
5, 923. 56 
2,091.05 
5, 481. 17 

14, 040. 49 

397, 069. 84 

6, 775. 68 

930.961.92 

2, 693. 58 

67,922.31 

3, 343. 07 

145, 242. 20 
99,111.83 

346, 403. 86 
346. 70 

4, 884, 299. 06 

830, 776. 14 

964.87 

630. 16 


$9, 266. 45 

225.00 

254.30 

1, 156. 10 
10, 143. 98 

1, 192. 00 

975.00 

9, 339. 36 

3, 757. 33 
2, 045. 00 

4, 426. 74 
9, 965. 40 

266, 324. 31 

5, 306. 30 

363, 333. 44 

1, 392. 70 

50, 294. 49 

125.00 

108, 165. 48 
91,327.47 

288. 708. 23 
337. 50 

2,751,785.30 

320, 166. 89 

800.30 

None 


1960.42 
48.50 

8.14 

1,077.69 
3, 769. 90 

10.73 

1,030.77 

12, 003. 92 

166. 82 

43.55 

46.00 

146. 71 

130,682.80 

727.38 

455,484.37 

1,011.86 

4,571.66 

56.00 

32, 400. 33 
3, 209. 58 

20, 620. 47 
None 

1.778,686.11 

327, 390. 90 

None 

593. 63 


$1, 430. 00 

None 

None 

725.00 
1, 565. 88 

30.00 

None 

18, 368. 00 

33, 182. 50 

250.00 

None 
None 

None 

None 
None 
None 

8, 021. 00 

13, 127. 50 

66,951.14 
454.18 

111, 008. 34 
None 

685, 241. 40 

695,312.85 

None 

None 


None 

None 

None 

None 
$847.00 

None 

None 

176.00 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 
None 

904.65 

567.00 

None 
56.69 

90.50 

None 

None 

127,847.00 

None 

None 


$453. 10 
None 


Association of Joint Polish-American Societies of Chel- 
sea, Mass., Chelsea, Mass., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland... 
L' Atelier, San Francisco, Calif., Jan. 29. 1940. France.. 
Mrs. Mark Baldwin, New York, N. Y., Mar. 4, 1940. 


129.66 
812.66 


Basque Delegation in the United States of America, 




Belgian Relief Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y., June 14, 




Belgian Relief of Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif., 

May 27, 1940. Belgium, France, and Great Britain... 

Belgian War Relief Fund, Manila, P. I.. June 7, 1940. 


1, 999. 41 
2.50 


The Benedict Bureau Unit, Inc., New York, N. Y., 




Bethel Mission of Eastern Europe, Minneapolis, Minn., 




Bishops' Committee for Polish Relief, Washington, 
D. C, Dec. 19, 1939. Poland, England, France, Switz- 
erland, Hungary. Rumania, Italy, and Portugal 

Board of National Missions of the Presbyterian Church 
in the United States of America, New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 26, 1939. Great Britain, France, and Germany . 

British-American Ambulance Corps, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., June 11, 1940. Greece, England, and France... 

British-American Comfort League, Quincy, Mass., 


62.73 

742.00 

112, 144. 11 

289.02 


British-American War Relief Association, Seattle, 
Wash., Nov. 17, 1939. United Kingdom and allied 


3,056.16 


British Sailors' Book and Relief Society, New York, N. 
Y., May 2, 1940. Bermuda, Canada, and the British 


3, 162. 07 


British War Relief Association of Northern California, 
San Francisco, Calif., Oct. 20, 1939. Great Britian 


4,676.39 


The British War Relief Association of the Philippines, 
Manila, P. I., Apr. 11, 1940." All belligerent countries. 

The British War Relief Association of Southern Califor- 
nia, Los Angeles, Calif., Dec. 8, 1939. Great Britain 


4, 574. 78 
37, 075. 16 


British War Relief Fund, Dayton, Ohio, Sept. 12, 1940. 


9.20 


The British War Relief Society, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Dec. 4, 1939. United Kingdom, Canada, France, Bel- 
gium, the Netherlands, Norway, Kenya, and New- 


353, 827. 65 


Bundles for Britain, New York, N. Y., Dec. 28, 1939. 


183,218.35 


Caledonian Club of Idaho, Boise, Idaho, Jan. 26, 1940. 


164.57 


California Denmark Fund, San Francisco, Calif., Nov. 
20, 1940. Denmark 


36.63 



■ No report for the month of January has been received from this organization. 



MARCH 8, 1941 



255 



Contributions fob Relief in Belligebent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Canadian Women's Club of New York City, Inc., New 
York, N. Y., Oct. 23, 1940. Great Britain, Canada, 
and Newfoundland 

Catholic Medical Mission Board, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Jan. 17, 1940. India, Australia, Canada, New 
Zealand, and the Union of South Africa 

The Catholic Student War Relief of Pax Romana, Wash- 
ington, D. C, Dec. 13, 1939. Poland, France, Ger- 
many, and Great Britain .-. 

Central Bureau for the Relief of the Evangelical 
Churches of Europe, New York, N. Y., May 14, 1940. 
All belligerent countries 

Central Committee Knesseth Israel, New York, N. Y., 
Oct. 27, 1939. Palestine 

Central Committee for Polish Relief, Toledo, Ohio, 
Feb. 29, 1940. Poland 

Central Council of Polish Organizations, New Castle, 
Pa., Nov. 7, 1939. France, Poland, and England 

Cercle Francais de Seattle, Seattle, Wash., Nov. 2, 1939. 
France and Great Britain 

Comite Pro Francia Libre, Miramar, Santurce, P. R., 
Dec. 19, 1940. England and France 

Commission for Polish Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 12, 1939.'' Poland and England 

The Commission for Relief in Belgium, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., May 21, 1940. Belgium, Luxemburg, France, 
and England.— _. 

Committee of French-American Wives, New York, 
N. Y., Nov. 15, 1939. France and Great Britain 

Committee of Mercy, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 16, 
1939. France, Great Britain, Norway, Belgium, the 
Netherlands, and their allies 

Committee for Relief in Allied Countries, Washington, 
D. C, Feb. 2, 1940. France, Great Britain, Poland, 
Norway, Belgium, Luxemburg, and the Netherlands-. 

Committee for the Relief for Poland, Seattle, Wash., 
Nov. 24, 1939. Poland 

Committee Representing Polish Organizations and 
Polish People in Perry, N. Y., Perry, N. Y., Oct. 23, 
1939. Poland 

Czechoslovak Relief, Chicago, 111., July 25, 1940." Czecho- 
slovakia, Great Britain and Dominions, France, and 
Belgium 

District of Columbia Federation of Women's Clubs, 
Washington, D.C., Aug. 14, 1940. Great Britain 

Dodecanesian League of America, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Dec. 16, 1940. Greece 

The Emergency Aid of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa., 
Oct. 13, 1939. Great Britain, France, Norway, Bel- 
gium, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, and Greece 

Emergency Relief Committee for Kolbuszowa, New 
York, N. Y., Mar. 13, 1940. Poland... 

Emergency Rescue Committee, New York, N. Y., Aug. 
3, 1940. France, United Kingdom, Belgium, Norway, 
and the Netherlands 



33, 043. 03 

41, 420. 72 

859.66 

3, 059. 69 

5, 515. 32 

653. 25 

585, 739. 46 

13, 790. 92 
25, 570. 75 



4, 523. 03 
2,441.83 

197.00 

30, 618. 71 
2, 120. 30 
11,297.60 

83,140.94 
6, 730. 77 

8, 014. 15 



Funds spent 
for relief in 
countries 



1, 574. 63 

17, 129. 75 

27, 075. 01 

500.00 

1, 995. 80 

2, 684. 92 

None 
516, 328. 31 

9, 165. 00 

19, 463. 91 



2,500.00 
2,162.72 

197.00 

7, 402. 90 
1, 749. 19 
10, 500. 00 

58, 424. 76 
None 

6, 960. 70 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Jan. 31, 1941. 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



132. 89 
1, 018. 45 
1.351.39 

619. 48 
11, 646. 14 

1,852.76 
2, 814. 56 



217. 43 
23.40 

None 

22, 958. 69 
None 
339.58 

10, 713. 49 
3, 750. 97 

None 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



None 

None 
None 
None 
None 

2, 775. 00 
None 

1, 500. 00 

None 
5,213.59 



None 
None 

None 

34, 300 00 
None 
None 

11,783.93 
None 

None 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



None 
None 

None 

None 
None 
None 

None 
None 

None 



Funds spen t 
for adminis • 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



$381. 81 
None 
189.91 



None 


6,497.14 


None 


14,345.71 


None 


226.77 


None 


45.44 


None 


1, 479. 01 


None 


33.77 


None 


57, 765. 01 


None 


2,773.16 


407.75 


3, 292. 28 



None 

257.12 
371.11 
458.02 



1, 053. 46 



* This registrant serves primarily as a clearinghouse for the distribution abroad of contributions received from other registrants; these receipts and 
disbursements are not included in the figures here given, since they are shown elsewhere in this tabulation following the names of the original collecting 
registrants. 

• No complete report for the month of January has been received from this organization. 



256 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



English-Speaking Union of the United States, New 
York, N. Y., Dec. 26, 1939. Great Britain, Canada, 
and France ... 

Erste Pinchover KranKen Unterstuzungs Verein, Inc., 
Brooklyn, N. Y., Apr. 22, 1940.' Poland.. 

Ethiopian World Federation, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Dec. 21, 1940.» Ethiopia, Kenya, Anglo-Egyptian 
Sudan, Palestine, and Great Britain 

The Fall River British War Relief Society, Fall River, 
Mass., Sept. 26, 1940. Great Britain 

Federated Council of Polish Societies of Grand Rapids, 
Mich., Grand Rapids, Mich., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland. . 

Federation of Franco-Belgian Clubs of Rhode Island, 
Woonsocket, R. I., Nov. 15, 1939. France and Eng- 
land.. 



Federation of French Veterans of the Great War, Inc., 

New York, N. Y., Oct. 11, 1939. France, Germany, 

and Martinique 

Federation of the Italian World War Veterans in the 

U. S. A., Inc., New York, N. Y., Dec. 19, 1940. Italy. 
Fellowship of Reconciliation, New York, N. Y., Jan. 20, 

1940. France, England, and possibly Germany 

Fortra, Incorporated, New York, N. Y., Mar. 7, 1940. 

Germany and Poland 

Foster Parents' Plan for War Children, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Sept. 21, 1939. France and England 

Franco-American Federation, Salem, Mass., July 9, 

1940. France 

French Colonies War Relief Committee, New York, 

N. Y., Aug. 20, 1940. France - 

French Committee for Relief in France, Detroit, Mich., 

Oct. 17, 1939. France and Great Britain 

French Relief Association, Kansas City, Mo., Feb. 3, 

1940. France 

French War Relief, Inc., Los Angeles, Calif., Nov. 16, 

1939. France 

French War Relief Fund of Nevada, Reno, Nev., June 

21, 1940. France 

French War Relief Fund of the Philippines, Manila, 

P. I., May 1, 1940.* France 

French War Veterans, Los Angeles, Calif., Dec. 5, 1939. 

France 

Friends of Children, Inc.. New York, N. Y., June 13, 

1940." Great Britain, France, Belgium, and the 

Netherlands _ 

The Friends of Israel Refugee Relief Committee, Inc., 

Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 23, 1939. Canada, France, 

and England 

The Friends of Normandy, New York, N. Y. Dec. 18, 

1939.* France 

Friends of Poland, Chicago, HI., Doc. 6, 1839. Poland- 
Fund for the Relief of Men of Letters and Scientists of 

Russia, New York, N. Y., Apr. 29, 1940. France, 

Czechoslovakia, and Poland 



$124,649.21 
275. 00 



3, 126. 90 
8, 785. 47 

6, 023. 31 

10, 366. 30 

6, 663. 40 

590.21 

862, 560. 14 

138, 135. 27 

636.30 

366.98 

3,851.99 

1, 129. 76 

40,911.11 

None 

5, 558. 46 

822.81 

16,551.71 



2, 455. 50 
1,421.95 



1,627.! 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$106, 754. 81 
None 



2. 502. 29 
7, 612. 93 

3, 123. 11 

8,341.09 

None 

531. 21 

684, 111. 69 

82, 558. 63 

300.00 

None 

2, 473. 96 

452.76 

25, 795. 54 

None 

500.00 

407.76 

4, 301. 31 



2,288.50 
680.00 



192. 70 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Jan. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



$12, 232. 33 
275.00 



353. 95 
283.35 

2, 481. 28 

1, 476. 90 

6, 663. 40 

59.00 

66, 074. 76 

24, 451. 01 

336.30 

142. 71 

1,017.55 

451.09 

8, 334. 52 

None 

5, 048. 46 

243.40 

6, 433. 77 



None 
648.66 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



$129,304.21 
None 



None 
3,200.00 

1,224.93 

1, 264. 70 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
31,110.23 

2, 146. 17 
257.89 
None 
None 
None 

26, 528. 88 



None 
None 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



$420.00 
None 



None 
100.00 

66.93 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
637. 41 
71.83 
83.20 
None 
None 
None 

172. 25 



None 
None 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



/ The registration of this organi7;it ion was revoked on Nov. 30, 1940, at the request of registrant. 

• No complete report has been received from this organization. 

* No reports for the months of December and January have been received from this organization. 
' The registration cf this organization was revoked on Jan. 31, 1941, at the request of registrant. 



MARCH 8, 1941 



257 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Jan. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



General Gustav Orlicz Dreszer Foundation for Aid to 
Polish Children, Washington, D. 0., Nov. 3, 1939.' 
Poland - 

Qerman-American Relief Committee for Victims of 

Fascism, New York, N. Y., Apr. 18, 1940. Great 

Britain and France . 

Mrs. Qeorge Gilliland, New York, N. Y., Aug. 10, 1940. 

Northern Ireland 

Golden Rule Foundation, New York, N. Y. Nov. 2, 

1939. Poland and Palestine 

Grand Duke Vladimir Benevolent Fund Association, 

New York., N. Y., Jan. 8,1940. France 

Grand Lodge, Daughters of Scotia, Hartford, Conn., 

Feb. 16, 1940. Scotland 

Great Lakes Command, Canadian Legion of the British 

Empire Service League, Detroit, Mich., July 5, 1940. 

Great Britain and Canada 

Greater New Bedford British War Relief Corps, New 

Bedford, Mass., Dec. 19, 1939. Great Britain... 

The Greek Fur Workers Union, Local 70, New York, 

N.Y., Dec. 21, 1940. Greece.. 

Greek War Relief Association, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Nov. 18, 1940. Greece 

Hadassah, Inc., New York, N. Y., Nov. 15, 1939. Pales- 



tine. 



Hamburg-Bremen Steamship Agency, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Mar. 21, 1940. Germany, Poland, France, Bel- 
gium, Denmark, Norway, Luxemburg, and the 
Netherlands - 

Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., Aug. 30, 1940. 
Great Britain _ 

Hebrew Christian Alliance of America, Chicago, HI., 
Jan. 3, 1940. England, Germany, Poland, France, 
and Italy 

A. Seymour Houghton, Jr., et al., New York, N. Y., 
Nov. 27, 1939. France.. 

Humanitarian Work Committee, Glen Cove, N. Y., 
Sept. 30, 1939. Poland 

Independent British War Relief Society of Rhode Island, 
Greenwood, R. I., June 14, 1940. Great Britain 

Independent Kinsker Aid Association, New York, 
N. Y., Jan. 3, 1940. Poland 

International Children's Relief Association, New York, 
N. Y., Oct. 1, 1940. Great Britain.. 

International Committee of Young Men's Christian 
Associations, New York, N. Y., Sept. 22, 1939. All 
belligerent countries 

International Federation of Business and Professional 
Women, Wheeling, W. Va., July 5, 1940. Poland, 
Czechoslovakia, Norway, Belgium, France, and the 
Netherlands 

International Relief Association for Victims of Fascism, 
New York, N. Y., Sept. 25, 1939. France, England, 
and Germany 

Isthmian Pro-British Aid Committee, Ancon, C. Z., 
Sept. 20, 1940. England 

Joint Committee of the United Scottish Clans of Greater 
New York and New Jersey, Brooklyn, N. Y-, Jan. 30, 
1940. Scotland 



3,371.39 

196. 25 

822.00 

555. 38 

16, 204. 99 

4, 471. 57 

11, 240. 90 

9, 804. 56 

1,991,962.58 

1,124,019.36 



12,874.04 
280.65 



$434.36 

1,485.67 
194. 25 

822.00 

370. 79 

15,034.70 

3, 428. 28 

8, 406. 68 

7,000.00 

1, 750, 345. 00 

854, 114. 75 



8, 566. 06 
None 



None 

$717. 39 

2.00 

None 

151. 89 

1, 170. 29 

922. 68 

2, 403. 09 

2, 749. 73 

183, 198. 04 

222, 762. 41 



285, 290. 48 


238, 157. 79 


None 


123, 284. 06 


None 


105, 436. 43 


3, 920. 84 


3, 625. 00 


None 


20, 200. 03 


14,075.34 


5, 943. 31 


i, 723. 91 


3,210.00 


438. 06 


3, 466. 49 


1, 795. 30 


1, 651. 59 


974. 82 


None 


974. 82 


None 


None 


None 


168, 712. 13 


64, 281. 74 


96, 106. 07 



None 
262.05 



None 

$204. 25 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 

1, 475. 93 

None 

45,266.41 

70, 731. 49 

None 
None 

None 
773. 05 
135.00 
2, 025. 00 
None 
None 

None 



2, 020. 00 
None 



None 

None 
None 

None 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
$1,023.15 

None 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 



None 
None 



i The registration of this organization was revoked on Jan. 27, 1941, at the request of registrant. 
298460—41 3 



258 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Junior Relief Group of Texas, Houston, Tex., May 29, 
1940. United Kingdom, France, Netherlands, Bel- 
gium, and Norway ... 

Marthe Th. Kahn, New York, N. Y., Apr. 16, 1940. 
France 

The Kindergarten Unit, Inc., Norwalk, Conn., Oct. 3, 
1939. France, Poland, United Kingdom, India, 
Australia, and New Zealand 

The Kosciuszko Foundation, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
May 24, 1940. Poland 

The Kyflhaeuser, League of German War Veterans in 
U. S. A., Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 27, 1939. Poland, 
Germany, Canada, and Jamaica 

Lackawanna County Committee for Polish Relief, 
Scranton, Pa., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland. 

Ladies Auxiliary of the Providence Branch of the Fed- 
eration of the Italian World War Veterans in the 
United States, Providence, R. I.. Oct. 1, 1940. Italy. 

LaFayette Preventorium, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 

21. 1939. France 

La France Post, American Legion, New York, N. Y., 

Feb. 7, 1940. France, Great Britain, and Greece 

Mrs. Nancy Bartlett Laughlin, New York, N. Y., Jan. 

31. 1940. France... 

League of American Writers, Inc., New York, N, Y. 

May 6, 1940. France, England, Poland, and Norway 
League of Polish Societies of New Kensington. Arnold, 

and Vicinity, New Kensington, Pa., Nov. 17, 1939. 

Poland 

Legion of Young Polish Women, Chicago, 111., Oct. 2, 

1939. Poland. France, and Great Britain 

Liberty Link Afghan Society, Detroit, Mich., Dec. 17, 

1940. Great Britain 

Lithuanian National Fund, Brooklyn, N. Y., Dec. 14, 

1940. Germany and France _ 

The Little House of Saint Pantaleon, Philadelphia, Pa., 
Sept. 30, 1939. France and England 

The Maple Leaf Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y., Apr. 19, 
1940. Canada, United Kingdom, and France 

Medical and Surgical Supply Committee of America, 
New York, N. Y., Aug. 5, 1940. Poland, Great Britain, 
France, Netherlands, Norway, Luxemburg, Belgium, 
and Greece 

Mennonite Central Committee, Akron, Pa., Feb. 13, 
1940. Great Britain, Foland, Germany, France, and 
Canada 

Methodist Committee for Overseas Relief, New York, 
N. Y., Sept. 4, 1940. France. Poland, Czechoslovakia, 
Norway, Belgium, the Netherlands, United Kingdom, 
India, Australia, Canada, Germany, Greece, and 
Italy 

Milford, Connecticut, Polish Relief Fund Committee, 
Milford, Conn., Nov. 6, 1939. Poland 

The Mobile Circle for Benefit of the Royal Navy Hos- 
pital Comforts Fund. Mobile, Ala., Sept. 18, 1940. 
British Isles 

Monmouth War Relief, Red Bank, N. J., Sept. 12, 1940. 
England, France, and Greece 

The Mother Church, the First Church of Christ, Sci- 
entist, in Boston, U. S. A., Boston, Mass., Apr. 25, 
1940. Canada, France, and the United Kingdom 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$11, 842. 10 
232.25 

1, 222. 21 
5,544.25 

78, 464. 55 
S, 925. 72 

5, 739. 98 
20, 847. 47 
1, 585. 32 
506.00 
3, 204. 79 

2,942.19 

16, 308. 43 

60.10 

221.98 

31,326.74 

115,881.24 



16, 136. 88 
405.33 

1,829.73 
2, 974. 92 



$10, 000. 00 
25.00 

892.85 

7, 781. 20 

66, 667. 05 
7, 225. 56 

5, 715. 53 

8, 647. 13 
1,040.00 

506.00 
1,917.22 

1,498.24 
10, 433. 21 
None 
200.00 
31,222.33 
30, 585. 10 



13, 538. 84 
250.20 

838. 32 
1,342.45 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Jan. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



$156. 02 
198.69 

None 
None 

2, 641. 85 
868. 36 

24.45 
7, 629. 41 
159. 53 
None 
None 

1, 007. 24 

3, 075. 68 

60.10 

5.98 

68.15 

54, 937. 60 



None 
70.51 

954.91 
845. 56 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



None 
None 

None 
None 

$8, 822. 11 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
15.18 

2, 100. 00 

None 

None 

None 

22, 863. 74 

139, 033. 61 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



None 
None 



None 
None 

None 
None 

None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
69.05 
None 

$14,634.90 
30, 980. 20 

None 
None 

None 
None 



MARCH S, 1941 



259 



Contributions fob Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Fernanda Wanamaker Main (Mrs. Ector Munn), 
New York, N. Y., Nov. 26, 1939. France and England. 

Namesake Towns Committee, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Jan. 6, 1941. England. 

National Christian Action, Inc., Brooklyn, N. Y., May 
23, 1940. Norway and Denmark 

National Legion Greek- Ameiican War Veterans in 
America, Inc., New York, N. Y., Jan. 3, 1941. Greece 

Near East Foundation, Inc., New York, N. Y., Nov. 
28, 1940. Greece. 

Netherlands War Relief Committee, Manila, P. L, 
May 27, 1940.' Netherlands 

The New Canaan Workshop, New Canaan, Conn., 
July 1, 1940.' British Empire— .. 

New Jersey Broadcasting Corporation, Jersey City, 
N. J., Sept. 13, 1939. Poland.. 

Nicole de Paris Relief Fund, New York, N. Y., July 1, 
1940. France 

North Side Polish Council Relief Committee of Milwau- 
kee, Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wis., Dec. 5, 1939. Po- 
land 



Norwegian Relief, Inc., Chicago, III., May 1, 1940. Nor- 
way... 

Nowiny Publishing Apostolate, Inc., Milwaukee, Wis., 

Sept. 26, 1939. Poland...- 

Nowy-Dworer Ladies and United Relief Association, 

New York, N. Y. (formerly Nowe-Dworer Ladies 

Benevolent Association, Inc., and United Nowy 

Dworer Relief Committee) , Dec. 20, 1940. Poland 

Nowy Swiat Publishing Co., Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Sept. 11, 1939. Poland, France, Great Britain, and 

Italy 

The Order of Ahepa, Washington, D. C, Jan. 1, 1941. 

Greece 

Order of Scottish Clans, Boston, Mass., Jan. 25, 1940. 

Scotland 

Over-Seas League Tobacco Fund, New York, N. Y., 

Aug. 19, 1940. British Empire 

The Pacific Steam Navigation Company, Cristobal, 

C. Z., Oct. 16, 1940. England 

Paderewski Fund for Polish Relief, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Feb. 23, 1940. Poland and Great Britain 

Parcels for Belgian Prisoners, Washington, D. C, Nov. 

12, 1940. Germany 

Parcels for the Forces, New York, N. Y., Oct. 9, 1940. 

Great Britain. 

The Paryski Publishing Co., Toledo, Ohio., Sept. 15, 

1939. Poland and Great Britain 

The Pawtucket and Blackstone Valley British Relief 

Society of Rhode Island, Pawtucket, R. I., Feb. 26, 

1940. Great Britain and Germany 

Pelham Overseas Knitting Circle, Pelham, N. Y., Oct. 

17, 1940. Scotland 

Phalanx of Greek Veterans of America, Inc., Chicago, 
111., Jan. 3, 1941. Greece. 



$15,614.80 
207.14 
1, 138. 41 
None 
67, 109. 16 
4, 094. 87 
11,329.06 

1, 210. 55 
227.00 

1, 615. 09 

443, 535. 50 

5, 515. 16 

2, 294. 09 

27, 873. 04 
70, 264. 25 
8, 771. 75 
67, 944. 70 
350. 55 
123, 444. 09 
8, 602. 53 
36,165.88 
8, 116. 50 

14, 934. 36 

967.82 

5, 621. 08 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$9, 360. 40 

None 

None 

None 

23, 000. 00 

1, 253. 87 

8, 983. 50 

826. 17 

148.00 

1, 400. 28 
71,600.00 
4, 589. 86 

1,231.90 

26, 806. 29 
50, 000. 00 
3, 377. 00 
56, 023. 21 
337. S5 
68, 500. 00 
473. 00 
25, 210. 59 
7, 451. 08 

8, 529. 41 
327. 82 
None 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Jan. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



$731. 04 

113. 24 

294.53 

None 

28, 37S. 23 

2, 811. 50 

1, 604. 98 

None 

28.00 

195. 63 

359, 530. 18 

925. 30 

692. 15 

963.36 

20, 264. 25 

5, 394. 75 

None 

None 

20, 445. 00 

8, 129. 53 

None 

665. 42 

5, 598. 59 

515. 47 

5, 302. 17 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



$7, 404. 39 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
2, 575. 00 
None 
None 

1, 300. 00 
None 
None 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
120.00 
None 
None 
35.40 
None 

None 
None 
None 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



$105. 59 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
30.00 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 



* No report for the month of January has been received from this organization. 

1 No complete report for the month of January has been received from this organization. 



260 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 


Funds re- 


Funds spent 
for relief in 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Jan. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 


destination of contributions 


ceived 


countries 
named 


in kind sent 

to countries 

named 


licity, affairs, 

campaigns, 

etc. 


Polish Aid Fund Committee of Federation of Elizabeth 














Polish Organizations, Elizabeth, N. J., Sept. 23, 1939." 














Poland and England 


$9, 190. 22 


$8, 446. 85 


$728. 37 


$1, 500. 00 


None 


$15.00 


Polish Aid Fund Committee of St. Casimir's Roman 














Catholic Church of the City of Albany, New York, 














Albany, N. Y., Jan. 22, 1940. Poland 


2,834.58 


426.32 


2, 398. 66 


1, 200. 00 


None 


9.60 


Polish-American Associations of Middlesex County, 














N.J.,Sayreville,N.J.,Jan. 22, 1940. Poland 


1,057.05 


800.00 


176.23 


None 


None 


80.82 


Polish-American Citizens Relief Fund Committee, 














Shirley, Mass., Dec. 16, 1939. Poland 


432. 36 


362. 06 


45.13 


425.00 


None 


25.17 


Polish-American Council, Chicago, 111., Sept. 15, 1939. 




Poland.. _ .. . -.- 


527, 294. 29 


354, 582. 40 


158,637.43 


118,500.00 


None 


14, 074. 46 


Polish-American Forwarding Committee, Inc., New 














York, N. Y., Mar. 28, 1940. Poland and Germany 


9, 999. 69 


6, 695. 51 


None 


None 


None 


4, 966. 54 


Polish-American Volunteer Ambulance Section, Inc., 














(Pavas), New York, N. Y. , Feb. 13, 1940. France and 














England . - - 


29, 482. 29 


20, 337. 55 


8, 974. 18 


270.40 


None 


170. 56 


Polish Broadcasting Corporation, New York, N. Y-, 














Sept. 23, 1939. Poland- 


2, 688. 83 


None 


2, 653. 53 


None 


None 


35.30 


Polish Business and Professional Men's Club, Los 














Angeles, Calif., Nov. 17, 1939. Poland 


474. 50 


314.23 


2.00 


None 


None 


158.27 


Polish Central Committee of New London, Conn., 














New London, Conn., Oct. 13, 1939. Poland 


1, 503. 78 


1,151.64 


203. 57 


75.00 


None 


148. 57 


Polish Central Council of New Haven, New Haven, 














Conn., Sept. 29, 1939. Poland 


4, 251. 13 


3, 316. 68 


883.22 


1, 800. 00 


None 


51.26 


Polish Civic League of Mercer County, Trenton, N. J., 














Sept. 19, 1939. Poland 


7, 309. 11 


6, 392. 86 


914. 31 


4,000.00 


Nona 


1.94 


Polish Civilian Relief Fund, Passaic, N. J., Oct. 27, 




1939. Poland ... 


4, 460. 96 


3,025.00 


1,184.54 


None 


None 


251. 42 


Polish Falcons Alliance of America, Pittsburgh, Pa., 




Sept. 20, 1939. Poland 


12, 172. 97 


11, 602. 23 


550. 74 


None 


None 


20.00 


Polish Inter-Organization "Centrals" of Waterbury, 














Waterburv, Conn., Feb. 28, 1940. Poland 


742.25 


607.76 


108.99 


None 


None 


25.50 


Polish Literary Guild of New Britain, Conn., New 














Britain, Conn., Sept. 21, 1939. Poland. _. 


3,211.09 


2, 000. 00 


1, 198. 09 


None 


None 


13.00 


Polish National Alliance of the United States of North 














America, Chicago, III., Sept. 27, 1939. Poland 


313, 386. 93 


258, 165. 00 


53, 052. 03 


None 


None 


2,169.90 


Polish National Council of Montgomery County, Am- 














sterdam. N. Y., Oct. 12, 1939. Poland 


4, 508. 17 


2, 960. 00 


1,435.71 


8,000.00 


None 


112.46 


Polish National Council of New York, New York, 














N. Y., Sept. 14, 1939. France and Poland 


106, 332. 95 


89, 991. 05 


2, 860. 25 


392, 463. 00 


$158,669.00 


13, 481. 65 


The Polish Naturalization Independent Club, Worces- 














ter, Mass., Sept. 20, 1939. Poland and England 


4, 577. 38 


4, 125. 00 


429.53 


None 


None 


22.85 


Polish Relief of Carteret, N. J., Carteret, N. J., Oct. 11, 














1939. Poland - 


1, 440. 42 


800.00 


627.42 


45.00 


None 


13.00 


Polish Relief Committee of Boston, Boston, Mass., Sept. 




14, 1939. Poland.. -- - 


9, 610. 99 


7, 201. 19 


1, 983. 17 


2, 600. 00 


None 


426.63 


Polish Relief Committee of Brockton, Mass., Brockton, 














Mass., Sept. 25, 1939. Poland 


1,956.31 


1, 236. 27 


472. 37 


350.00 


None 


247.67 


Polish Relief Committee of Cambridge, Mass., Cam- 














bridge, Mass., Sept. 16, 1939. Poland 


2, 959. 69 


1, 642. 30 


917.22 


600.00 


None 


400.17 


Polish Relief Committee of Chester and Delaware 














County (formerly Chester, Delaware Co., Pa., Polish 














Relief Committee), Chester, Pa., Sept. 15, 1939. Ru- 
















8, 357. 06 


6, 871. 61 


791. 41 


1,960.00 


None 


694.04 


Polish Relief Committee of Columbia County, Hudson, 














N. Y., Mar. 15, 1940. Poland - 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


Polish Relief Committee of Delaware, Wilmington, Del., 




Sept. 22, 1939. Poland _ 


8, 576. 19 


7, 530. 08 


80147 


4, 850. 00 


250.00 


241.64 


Polish Relief Committee, Detroit, Mich., Sept. 11, 1939. 














Poland, Germany, Switzerland, Rumania, Hungary, 
















162, 971. 06 


108, 646. 73 


47, 796. 16 


62, 974. 00 


None 


6, 528. 17 



■ No report for the month of January has been received from this organization. 



MARCH 8. 194 1 



261 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Jan. 31, 1941. 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Polish Relief Committee of Fitchburg, Fitchburg, 

Mass., Mar. 29, 1940. Poland $749.80 $460.40 

Polish Relief Committee, Flint, Mich., Sept. 18, 1939. 

Poland 6, 798. 13 5, 171. 64 

Polish Relief Committee of Holyoke, Mass., Holyoke, 

Mass., Nov. 4, 1939. Poland 7,081.79 5,910.86 

Polish Relief Committee of Jackson, Mich., Jackson, 

Mich., Nov. 9, 1939. Poland 1,849.10 649.60 

Polish Relief Committee, New Bedford, Mass., Oct. 31, 

1939. Poland _ 11,127.14 7,867.27 

Polish Relief Committee of Philadelphia and Vicinity, 

Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 12, 1939. Poland 60,576.53 47,054.! 

Polish Relief Committee of the Polish National Home 

Association, Lowell, Mass., Nov. 27, 1939. Poland.-. 2,876.54 1,840.00 

Polish Relief Committee, Taunton, Mass., Dec. 13, 1939. 

Poland 3,007.92 2,757.00 

Polish Relief Fund of Fall River, Mass., Fall River, 

Mass., Nov. 8, 1939. Poland 1,375.59 1.252.00 

Polish Relief Fund, Jersey City, N. J., Sept. 12, 1939. 

Poland... 62,687.57 53,510.95 

Polish Relief Fund, Jewett City, Conn., Oct. 3, 1939. 

Poland 1,688.70 1,445.90 

Polish Relief Fund of Meriden, Meriden, Conn., Oct. 

12.1939. Poland 1,806.69 1,500.00 

Polish Relief Fund, Middletown, Conn., Sept. 23, 1939. 

Poland 4,890.34 3,136.37 

Polish Relief Fund, Niapara Falls, N. Y., Oct. 26, 1939. 

Poland 2,815.32 2,500.00 

Polish Relief Fund of Palmer, Mass., Three Rivers, 

Mass., Oct. 20, 1939. Poland.. 1,823.90 620.46 

Polish Relief Fund of Syracuse, N. Y., and Vicinity, 

Syracuse, N. Y., Oct. 31, 1939. Poland.. 12,451.38 8,869.00 

Polish Relief Fund Committee, Los Angeles, Calif., 

Dec. 13, 1939. Poland 829.61 488.00 

Polish Relief Fund Committee of Milwaukee, Wis., 

Milwaukee, Wis., Sept. 26, 1939. Poland 20,713.53 15,232.72 

Polish Relief Fund Committee of Passaic and Bergen 

Counties, Inc., Passaic, N.J. , Sept. 22, 1939. Poland.. 14,059.12 11,012.01 

Polish Union of the United States of North America, 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Sept. 8, 1939. Poland 2,317.34 2,150.00 

Polish United Societies of Holy Trinity Parish, Lowell, 

Mass., Sept. 20, 1939. Poland 4,085.32 2,916.31 

Polish War Sufferers Relief Committee (Fourth Ward), 

Toledo, Ohio, Sept. 21, 1939. Poland 6,692.93 6,428.78 

Polish Welfare Council, Schenectady, N. Y., Sept. 22, 

1939. Poland 6,276.86 5,260.35 

Polish White Cross Club of West Utica, Utica, N. Y., 

Oct. 20, 1939. Poland and England 8,056.11 5,317.65 

Polish Women's Fund to Fatherland, Lawrence, Mass., 

Sept. 23, 1939. Poland 5,852.44 3,175.40 

Polish Women's Relief Committee, New York, N. Y., 

Nov. 24, 1939. France, Poland, and Germany 8,915.79 3,695.73 

Polski Komitet Ratunkowy (Polish Relief Fund), 

Bingbamton, N. Y., Sept. 25, 1939. Poland, England, 

and Switzerland 4,267.04 3,468.96 

Pulaski Civic League of Middlesex County, N. J., South 

River. N. J., Sept. 30, 1939. Poland 639.29 None 

Pulaski League of Queens County, Inc., Jamaica, N. Y., 

Oct. 21, 1939. Poland 7.862.56 7,400.00 

Queen Wilhelmina Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y., May 

17. 1940. Netherlands, France, Poland, United King- 
dom, India, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Union 
of South Africa, Norway, Belgium, Luxemburg, and 

Germany 383,064.85 184,291.55 



$248. 31 
188.51 
962. 88 
906.06 

2, 296. 53 

2, 584. 46 
561. 76 
225.75 
82.15 

7, 173. 1 
4.13 
278. 79 

1, 735. 77 
244. 52 
981. 14 

1, 069. 49 
141. 05 

4, 354. 29 

1,269 
167. 34 

1,000.30 
147.06 
959. 19 

2, 187. 25 

1, 979. 70 

2, 474. 27 

441.42 

554.29 
290.41 



$130.00 

416. 45 

775.00 

760.00 

4,350.00 

None 

None 

1,375.00 

None 

1,575.00 

900.00 

None 

None 

None 

4. 004. 95 

1, 850. 00 

150.00 

11,607.40 

4,008.00 

None 

1,240.00 

None 

6,150.00 

1, 800. 00 

2,660.00 

2,068.80 

1, 215. 00 
None 
None 



None 
$25.65 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
500.00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
150.00 
None 

None 
None 
None 



262 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds re- 
ceived 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Jan. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Refugees of England, Inc., New York, N. Y., July 12, 

1940." Great Britain, France, and French Cameroons. 

Relief Agency for Polish War Sufferers, Willimantic, 


$57, 307. 71 
3,441.83 
8, 612. 62 

21,994.98 

4, 409. 15 

948. 08 

3, 698. 03 

11, 781. 57 
1, 346. 92 
5, 487. 43 
2,992.66 

208, 347. 76 

233, 553. 25 
6, 247. 24 
1, 107. 96 
6, 844. 34 
20, 736. 87 
2, 037. 28 
None 

688.70 
877. 72 
31, 199. 12 
852. 81 
367.00 


$23, 465. 15 

2, 236. 93 

7, 859. 66 

17, 379. 05 

3, 884. 70 

175.00 

2,700.00 

8, 296. 92 

831.31 

5,000.00 

None 

184, 723. 78 

167, 338. 81 
5, 705. 71 
1,000.00 
6, 975. 90 
7,329.56 
1, 662. 72 
None 

550.00 
None 
30, 240. 87 
373.49 
200.00 


$19, 506. 81 
991. 74 
653.06 

3, 744. 14 
158.39 
478.26 
531.37 
926.91 
293.90 
487.43 

2, 992. 66 

21, 841. 62 

9, 820. 89 
496.63 
107.96 
531.16 

5, 217. 52 
246.31 
None 

25.10 
171. 59 
None 
421. 76 
155.00 


$8, 700. 94 

716. 46 

2,560.00 

6,101.36 

1,250.00 

None 

None 

1, 166. 20 

None 

None 

None 

52, 402. 00 

None 
None 
None 
None 
128. 67 
2,611.10 
None 

None 
None 
None 
8.00 
None 


$950.00 
None 
None 
568.40 
None 
None 
None 
3, 766. 75 
None 
None 
None 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
601.76 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 


$14, 335. 78 
213. 16 


Relief Committee of United Polish Societies, Chicopee, 


None 


Relief for French Refugees in England, Washington, 

D. C, Dec. 26, 1930. France and Great Britain 

Relief Fund for Sufferers in Poland Committee, Keno- 


871.79 
366. 06 


Relief Society for Jews in Lublin, Los Angeles, Calif., 


294.82 


Royal Air Force Benevolent Fund of U. S. A., Inc., New 


466. 66 


Russian Children's Welfare Society, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Sept. 29, 1939. Germany, France, and Poland.. 

St. Andrews (Scottish) Society of Washington, D. C, 


2, 557. 74 
221.71 


Saints Constantino and Helen Greek Orthodox Church, 


None 


St. Stephens Polish Relief Fund of Perth Amboy, N. J., 




The Salvation Army, New York, N. Y., May 23, 1940.* 
England, France, Norway, Belgium, and the Nether- 


1,782.3(1 


Save the Children Federation, Incorporated, New York, 
N. Y., Sept. S, 1939. Poland, England, Belgium, and 


66, 393. 55 


Schuylkill and Carbon Counties Relief Committee for 

Poland, Frackville, Pa., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland.. 

Scots' Charitable Society, Boston, Mass., May 9, 1940. 


45.00 
None 


Scottish Clans Evacuation Plan, Port Washington, 


337.28 


Le Secours Francais, New York, N. Y., Sept. 11, 1940. 


8, 189. 79 


Secours Franeo-Americain— War Relief, Pittsburgh, 


128.26 


The Seventh Column, Inc., West Fairlee, Vt., June 12, 


None 


Share A Smoke Club, Inc., Ithaca, N. Y., Nov. 14, 1939. 
England, France, Norway, Belgium, and the Nether- 


113.60 


Sociedades nispanas Aliadas, San Francisco, Calif., 


706.13 


Sociedades Hispanas Confederadas, Brooklyn, N. Y., 


958.26 


Societe Francaise de St. Louis, Inc., St. Louis, Mo., 


57-56 


Society Israelite Francaise de Secours Mutuels de New 
York, New York, N. Y., June 4, 1940. France 


12.00 



■ This registrant serves primarily as a clearinghouse for the distribution abroad of contributions collected by other registrants; these receipts and 
disbursements are not included in the figures here given, since they are shown elsewhere in this tabulation following the names of the original collecting 
registrants. 

• No report for the month of January has been received from this organization. 

p The registration of this organization was revoked on Jan. 31, 1941, at the request of registrant. 



MARCH 8, 194 1 



263 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



?unds re- 
ceived 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Jan. 31, 1941, 
including cost 

of l'mimIs pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


$17, 220. 55 


$9, 400. 00 


$233. 84 


None 


None 


$7, 586. 71 


6,481.43 


None 


5, 465. 22 


None 


None 


1,010.21 


14, 986. 67 


8, 610. 72 


5, 191. 67 


$11,421.95 


$1, 727. 50 


1, 184. 28 


73.00 


None 


69.00 


None 


None 


4.00 


39, 266. 15 


13, 934. 58 


757. 03 


16, 486. 00 


None 


24, 574. 54 


1, 248. 40 


1, 100. 00 


94.20 


None 


None 


54.20 


310.00 


310.00 


None 


None 


500.00 


None 


2, 620. 50 


2, 600. 00 


None 


None 


None 


20.50 


7, 297. 01 


5, 976. 07 


684.26 


None 


None 


636.68 


31,944.01 


13, 645. 64 


8,904.46 


None 


None 


9, 393. 91 


3, 910. 25 


3, 115. 90 


790.40 


None 


None 


3.95 


3, 098. 46 


3, 073. 96 


24.50 


None 


None 


None 


510. 61 


250.46 


71.16 


200.00 


10.00 


188.89 


2, 449. 40 


1, 400. 27 


463.66 


315.00 


None 


585.47 


46,619.95 


21,975.09 


14, 227. 76 


600.00 


None 


10, 417. 10 


3, 249. 72 


2, 400. 00 


712. 78 


None 


None 


136. 94 


1,377.97 


None 


1,180.28 


None 


None 


197. 69 


296.00 


None 


206.60 


None 


None 


89.40 


7, 396. 70 


5, 709. 23 


561.19 


625.00 


None 


1, 126. 28 


64,961.20 


35, 796. 30 


None 


None 


None 


. 29, 977. 79 


126, 535. 87 


86, 060. 68 


26, 482. 25 


8, 987. 42 


318. 65 


13, 992. 94 


7, 190. 69 


1, 124. 67 


160.21 


None 


None 


5, 905. 81 


2, 879. 57 


2, 499. 94 


243.64 


None 


None 


135.99 


889.85 


None 


854.64 


None 


None 


35.21 


2, 284. 98 


1,950.00 


99.46 


None 


None 


235.52 


2,808.58 


2, 295. 32 


75.35 


595.00 


None 


437.91 



Society of the Devotees of Jerusalem, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Dec. 18, 1939. Palestine... 

Solidaridad Internacional Antifascista, New York, 

N. Y., Oct. 17, 1940. France 

The Somerset Workroom, Far Hills, N. J., Apr. 25, 1940. 

France and Great Britain... 

Le Souvenir Francais, Detroit, Mich., May 1, 1940. 

France and Belgium.. 

Spanish Refugee Relief Campaign, New York, N. Y., 

Sept. 20, 1939. France 

Springfield and Vicinity Polish Relief Fund Committee, 

Springfield, Mass., Sept. 23, 1939. Poland 

Superior Council of the Society of the St. Vincent de 

Paul, New York, N. Y., Apr. 5, 1940. France 

Miss Heather Thatcher, Hollywood, Calif., Nov. 19, 

1940. Great Britain 

Toledo Committee for Relief of War Victims, Toledo, 

Ohio, Sept. 19, 1939. Poland 

Tolstoy Foundation, Inc., New York, N. Y., Oct. 17, 

1939. France, Poland, England, and Czechoslovakia 
Mrs. Walter R. Tuckerman, Bethesda, Md., Nov. 24, 

1939. Great Britain 

Edmund Tyszka, Hamtramck, Mich., Sept. 19, 1939. 

Poland 

Ukrainian Relief Committee, New York, N. Y., June 28, 

1940. Germany, France, England, and Italy 

L'Union Alsacienne, Inc., New York, N. Y., Oct. 28, 

1939. France 

Unitarian Service Committee of the American Unitarian 

Association, Boston, Mass., May 23, 1940. France, 

British Isles, and the Netherlands 

United American Polish Organizations, South River, 

N. J., South River, N. J., Oct. 20, 1939. Poland 

United Bilgorayer Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., Mar. 

21, 1940. Poland 

United British Societies of Minneapolis, Minneapolis, 

Minn., Jan. 21, 1941. Great Britain and Dominions . . . 
United British War Relief Association, Somerville, 

Mass., June 14, 1940. Great Britain and Northern 

Ireland 

United Charity Institutions of Jerusalem, New York, 

N.Y., Oct. 13,1939. Palestine 

United Committee for French Relief, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Oct. 26, 1939. France, England, and Germany.. 
United Fund for Refugee Children, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Sept. 21, 1939. Poland, France, England, and 

Palestine .._ 

United German Societies, Inc., Portland, Oreg., Port- 
land, Oreg., Jan. 8, 1940. Germany 

United Opoler Relief of New York, New York, N. Y., 

Dec. 9, 1939. Poland 

United Polish Committees in Racine, Wis., Racine, Wis. 

Nov. 2, 1939. Poland 

United Polish Organizations of Salem, Mass., Salem, 

Mass., Oct. 20,1939. Poland 



264 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds re- 
ceived 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Jan. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on band 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


United Polish Societies of Bristol, Conn., Bristol, Conn., 


$1,226.85 
3,021.78 
8, 878. 07 
551.60 
4, 207. 41 
2, 026. 53 
3,064.60 

14, 204. 97 

546,004.91 


$576. 80 
2, 562. 10 
6, 889. 14 

None 
3. 897. 31 

None 
2, 847. 40 

9, 492. 36 

449, 829. 88 


$623. 30 

104.20 

1,848.80 

5.82 

None 

1,707.55 

195. 41 

4,260.08 

None 


$300.00 
None 
None 
None 
3. 282. 00 
None 
None 

11,814.84 

1,343,591.16 


None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 

None 


$26. 75 


United Polish Societies of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, 


355. 48 


United Reading Appeal for Polish War Sufferers, Read- 


140. 13 


Universal Committee for the Defense of Democracy, 

New York, N. Y., Oct. 16, 1940. England and France . . 

Mrs. Paul Verdicr Fund, San Francisco, Calif., Oct. 11, 


645.78 
310. 10 


Wellesley Club of Washington, Arlington, Va., Nov. 29, 


318. 98 


Woman's Auxiliary Board of the Scots' Charitable So- 
ciety, Inc., Waverley, Mass., Feb. 28, 1940. Scotland.. 

Women's Allied War Relief Association of St. Louis, 
Clayton, Mo., Dec. 18, 1939. Great Britain and 


21.79 
452.53 


Registrants whose registrations were revoked prior to 
Jan. 1, 1941, and who had no balance on hand as of that 


99, 343. 62 








23, 519, 852. 43 


16,021,237.58 


5, 276, 526. 76 


4, 693, 275. 83 


$382, 687. 52 


2, 253, 475. 43 







• It is not possible to strike an exact balance in these published totals, siDce some registrants have included id their expenditures moneys available 
from loans or advances, which are not considered by the Department to be "funds received" and hence are not reported as such. 



American Republics 



COLLABORATION WITH MEXICO ON PLANS FOR COMMON 

DEFENSE 



tReleased'to the press March 5] 

In pursuance of the declaration with refer- 
ence to mutual assistance and cooperation in 
defense of the two continents, which was drawn 
up in Habana on July 31, 1940 on the occasion 
of the second consultative meeting of the Min- 
isters of Foreign Affairs of the American re- 
publics, the Governments of Mexico and the 
United States of America have agreed to an 
exchange of views in order to coordinate suit- 
ably the progress of their common defense. 

With this purpose in view, the Government of 
Mexico has instructed the military, naval, and 



air attaches of the Mexican Embassy in Wash- 
ington to discuss with the experts designated 
by the Government of the United States the 
plans relating to the assistance which the two 
countries would render to each other in the 
event of an aggression against either of them. 
In the conversations which are now in prog- 
ress in Washington, for the purpose indicated 
above, representatives of both countries will 
study the manner of carrying out the collabora- 
tion in question, observing always the greatest 
regard for the principle of the national sover- 
eignty of the two states. 



MARCH 8, 1941 

GRANT TO THE UNITED STATES OP DEFENSE SITES 
IN PANAMA 



265 



[Released to the press March 6] 

The following statement was made by the 
Secretary of State: 

"I was most gratified, as will be all the peo- 
ple of this country as well as those of our sister 
republics in this hemisphere, to learn from the 
manifesto issued yesterday by the Panamanian 
Government that Panama will make available 
immediately to our military authorities certain 
sites in the Republic of Panama which are con- 
sidered essential for the protection and security 
of the Panama Canal. In taking this action, 



Panama has shown that the spirit of partner- 
ship in the defense of the Canal, which is one 
of the fundamentals of the General Treaty be- 
tween the two countries ratified in 1939, is a 
tangible and practical thing. 

"In accordance with the manifesto, our mili- 
tary authorities will proceed immediately to 
the preliminary preparation of these defense 
sites. I am confident that the negotiations 
which are now in progress with regard to the 
details involved will be worked out to the 
mutual satisfaction of both our Governments." 



The Far East 



MESSAGE OF THE SECRETARY OP STATE TO PARTICIPANTS IN 
THE FAR EASTERN LECTURE SERIES 10 



[Released to the press March 5] 

Almost from the very commencement of this 
country's life, our people have had continuing 
and important contact with the Far East. 

It was in 1784, over one hundred and fifty 
years ago, that a small vessel named the Em- 
p?'ess of China, out of New York, appeared at 
the mouth of the Pearl River below Canton, 
China, flying a flag which was strange to that 
region. The flag was that of the new Amer- 
ican Republic which had proclaimed its inde- 
pendence but a few years befoi'e. Our first 
treaty with any country of the Far East was 
that concluded in the year 1833 with Siam, 
now called Thailand. The part played by the 
United States in bringing about the establish- 
ment, in the middle of the nineteenth century, 
of normal international relationships between 
Japan and the rest of the world is well-known. 



'"Read by Mr. Maxwell M. Hamilton, Chief, Divi- 
sion of Far Eastern Affairs, Department of State, to 
the participants in the Far Eastern Lecture Series, 
Washington, D. C, March 5, 1941. 



American interests in the Far East, as they 
have developed through the years, have been 
many-sided in character: philanthropic, cul- 
tural, and commercial. American missionar- 
ies, who in the early years of the nineteenth 
century found their way to the Far East and 
established churches, schools, and hospitals, 
forged strong bonds between the people of the 
United States and the peoples of the Far East. 
American travelers have gone to the Far East 
as tourists, students, and writers; and many 
students from the countries of the Far East 
have been educated in American schools and 
colleges. The Far East has become an im- 
portant market for American products — cot- 
ton, tobacco, petroleum, automobiles, machin- 
ery, etc. — while this country has come to draw 
from the Far East commodities of basic im- 
portance to the economic and social life of this 
Nation — quinine, camphor, silk, tea, tin, tung 
oil, rubber, tungsten, to mention but a few. 

The development of means of communica- 
tion has brought us very close to the Far East. 



26G 

The fast ocean liner, the telegraph, the radio- 
telephone, the airplane, have so contracted the 
space in which we live and move that the coun- 
tries of the Far East, which not long ago were 
far distant, are now in a very real sense our 
neighbors. We can speak with them in a mo- 
ment, send telegrams to them in an hour, and 
even write to or visit them within a few days. 

The policy of this country toward the coun- 
tries of the Far East, as toward countries in all 
parts of the world, has been and is based upon 
the fundamental beliefs and attitudes of our 
people as a whole. The early settlers came to 
this continent in order to find and to enjoy 
greater opportunities. Our forefathers be- 
lieved strongly — as do we — in equality of op- 
portunity and in the worth of the individual. 
They believed also — as do we — in the regula- 
tion of human contacts by peaceful processes. 
This country has sought through its foreign 
policy to give expression to these beliefs. 

In our relations with the Far East as else- 
where this country has had two main ends in 
view: The promotion and protection of legiti- 
mate American rights and interests on the basis 
of respect for the legitimate rights and inter- 
ests of other countries; and the furtherance of 
peaceful and mutually beneficial relations 
among the members of the family of nations. 
In seeking to attain these ends, this country has 
favored equality of opportunity, respect for na- 
tional sovereignty, and faithful observance of 
treaties as the bases of a really durable inter- 
national order. 

Our relations with the Far East have 
brought, along with benefits, problems that 
have arisen from time to time. In the recent 
period, during most of the last 10 years, two 
countries of that region have unhappily been 
engaged in political and military conflict. 
Still more recently, the area of conflict has 
been spreading to neighboring regions. 

At such a time, there is great need for in- 
formed and intelligent discussion of Far East- 
ern questions of the kind which, I am sure, 
your Lecture Series will provide. A broad, 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

calm, and reasoned approach to those ques- 
tions — social and cultural as well as economic 
and political — will, I think, assist in further- 
ing understanding of the relationships between 
this country and the countries of the Far East 
and of our deep and natural concern in the 
problems of that area. I am happy to send 
a word of greeting and of best wishes to the 
organizers of and the participants in the Far 
Eastern Lecture Series which is opening today. 
Cordell Hull 



The Near East 



SUSPENSION OF TONNAGE DUTIES 
FOE VESSELS OF IRAN 

A proclamation (no. 2462) providing that 
"the foreign discriminating duties of tonnage 
and imposts within the United States" be 
"suspended and discontinued so far as respects 
the vessels of Iran and the produce, manufac- 
tures, or merchandise imported in said vessels 
into the United States from Iran or from any 
other foreign country; the suspension to take, 
effect from February 5, 1941, and to continue 
so long as the reciprocal exemption of vessels 
belonging to citizens of the United States and 
their cargoes shall be continued, and no 
longer", was signed by the President on Feb- 
ruary 27, 1941. 

The text of this proclamation appears in 
full in the Federal Register of March 4, 1941 
(vol. 6, no. 43), page 1229. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Naval Mission : Agreement Between the United 
States of America and Ecuador — Signed December 12, 
1940; effective December 12, 1940. Executive Agree- 
ment Series No. 188. Publication 1553. 9 pp. 50. 



Cultural Relations 



VISIT OF DISTINGUISHED LEADERS FROM OTHER AMERICAN 

REPUBLICS 



[Released to tbe press March 8] 

During the next two months distinguished 
leaders in the arts and sciences from Argen- 
tina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, and Uruguay 
will visit the United States for a period of 
travel and observation lasting from two to 
three months. During this time they will meet 
and confer with educators in this country in- 
terested in their particular fields. Ten such 
persons have already visited the United States 
on similar trips. 

The visitors are coming to this country at 
the invitation of the Department of State. 

From Argentina there will be three visitors : 
Dr. Enrique Martinez Paz, Dr. Enrique de 
Gandia, and Dr. Josue Gollan. Dr. Martinez 
Paz will arrive in New York on the S.S. 
Argentina on March 10 and will be accom- 
panied by his wife. Dr. Martinez Paz is a 
distinguished Argentine historian and lawyer 
and is a resident of Cordoba. He has taught 
for many years in the University of Cordoba, 
where he served as Dean of the Faculty of 
Law. He has also been a member of the Su- 
perior Court of Justice of the Province of 
Cordoba. In addition to his duties as a pro- 
fessor of law Dr. Martinez is the author of 
numerous studies in the fields of sociology, pol- 
itics, and law. Although plans for Dr. Mar- 
tinez' itinerary in the United States have not 
been completed, it is probable that he will visit 
the University of Pennsylvania, the Academy 
of Political Science, and similar institutions in 
Washington and New York. 

Dr. Enrique de Gandia will arrive in New 
York on March 24 on the S.S. Brazil. Dr. de 
Gandia is an Argentine historian who is the 
author of some 50 historical works and mono- 
graphs. He is also an active contributor to the 



Argentine and foreign press. He is Director 
and Administrator of El Monitor de la Educa- 
tion Comun (organ of the National Council of 
Education), and was delegate of the National 
Council of Education to the Twenty-fifth Inter- 
national Congress of Americanists at La Plata. 

Dr. Josue Gollan, an eminent chemist and 
educator, will arrive in New York on the S.S. 
Uruguay on April 7. Dr. Gollan has studied 
in Europe and has served as Dean of the Facidty 
of Pharmacy of the Universidad del Litoral in 
Santa Fe. At the present time he is Kector of 
the University. He is also the author of a num- 
ber of works in the field of chemistry. 

From Brazil the three visitors arriving in the 
United States will be: Dr. Pedro Calmon, Dr. 
A. C. Pacheco e Silva, and Dr. Jorge Americano. 

Dr. Pedro Calmon expects to arrive in the 
United States about the middle of March. Dr. 
Calmon is a Brazilian lawyer, writer, and pro- 
fessor. He is a former Deputy from the State 
of Bahia, is the editor of several newspapers, 
and at present is a practicing attorney in Bio 
de Janeiro. Dr. Calmon is also the author of 
a large number of important historical studies 
on Brazil. 

Dr. Pacheco e Silva is expected to arrive on 
April 7 on the S.S. Uruguay. He has had a 
distinguished professional career as Professor 
of the Psychiatric Clinic of the Medical School 
of the University of Sao Paulo and of the 
Paulista School of Medicine, and has served 
as Professor of Social Sciences of the School 
of Sociology and Politics of Sao Paulo, as well 
as being Director of the Sanatorio Pinel at 
Pirituba. Dr. Pacheco e Silva also has had 
the distinction of serving as President of the 
Uniao Cultural Brasil-Estados Unidos; as 
State Deputy ; as President of the Medical and 

267 



268 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Surgery Society of Sao Paulo; and as Chair- 
man of the Department of General Culture of 
the Paulista Medical Association. 

Dr. Jorge Americano will also arrive on 
April 7 and has expressed his desire to have 
his itinerary include visits to Harvard, Yale, 
Columbia, Princeton, Pennsylvania, and Chi- 
cago Universities. He also hopes to meet 
judges and members of bar associations in the 
United States. Dr. Americano served as State 
Deputy and was Attorney General of the Re- 
public for the local federal district from 1928 
to 1930. In 1933 he was appointed Professor 
of Civil Law of the University of Sao Paulo 
and subsequently became Director of the Fac- 
ulty of Law of the University as well as its 
Vice Rector and Acting Rector. He has pub- 
lished numerous works during the past 15 
years in the field of law. 

From Chile Dr. Domingo Amunategui y 
Solar plans to arrive on board the S.S. Santa 
Elena on March 10, accompanied by his wife 
and daughter. Dr. Amunategui is considered 
one of the most eminent historians of South 
America. His works are numerous and are of 
great social and historical importance. In the 
Government of Chile, Dr. Amunategui has 
served as Minister of Justice and Public In- 
struction and also as Minister of the Interior. 
He was also a professor in the Faculty of 
Philosophy in the University of Chile, and later 
became Dean of the same Faculty and subse- 
quently Rector of the University of Chile. 

From Colombia Dr. Roberto Cortazar will 



sail from Barranquilla on March 11 on the S.S. 
Quirigua and will arrive in New York on 
March 19. Dr. Cortazar has served as Profes- 
sor of Latin Syntax and of Greek in the Colegio 
del Rosario for a period of 18 years. Many 
of the persons who now direct the public ad- 
ministration of Bogota have been his students. 
He has been Secretary of the Academy of His- 
tory for many years, and at one time occupied 
the post of Chief of Departmental Public In- 
struction in Cundinamarca. Dr. Cortazar is 
the author of numerous works and has trans- 
lated various books from English into Spanish. 

From Uruguay the Department of State has 
invited Sefior Acosta y Lara and Sehor Zor- 
rilla de San Martin, both of whom are due to 
arrive in New York on April 7. Sefior Acosta 
y Lara was Dean of the Faculty of Architecture 
of the University of Montevideo for several 
years and was Uruguayan delegate to the In- 
ternational Congress of Architecture held in 
Rome. He was recently appointed President 
of the Council of Secondary Education. 

Sefior Zorrilla de San Martin is a dis- 
tinguished sculptor and painter. He has been 
honored for his sculptures at expositions both 
in Paris and in Buenos Aires. In 1940 he was 
appointed Director of the National Fine Arts 
Museum. While in the United States Sefior 
Zorrilla de San Martin hopes to have the op- 
portunity to lecture in American universities 
on the subject of South American sculpture and 
painting. 



VISIT OF EDITORS AND SCHOLARS TO OTHER AMERICAN 

REPUBLICS 



A group of twelve American editors and 
scholars sailed from New York on February 
28, as guests of the Carnegie Endowment for 
International Peace, for a two months' visit 
to other American republics. The purpose of 
the trip, Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler, Presi- 
dent of the Endowment, said, is to "offer the 
group an opportunity to increase their knowl- 
edge of Latin America, to exchange informa- 



tion and opinions with colleagues there, and to 
bring back to their professional work fresh 
impressions gained in this way". 

Members of the party are: Dr. Harold M. 
Benjamin, Dean of the University of Mary- 
land, College Park, Md. ; Dr. Donald D. Brand, 
Head of Department of Anthropology, Uni- 
versity of New Mexico, Albuquerque, N. M. ; 
W. Earl Hall, Editor, Mason City Globe- 



MARCH 8, 1941 



269 



Gazette, Iowa; William H. Hessler, Editorial 
and Foreign- News Writer, Cincinnati En- 
quirer, Ohio; Prof. Samuel Dale Myres, Jr., 
Director, Institute of Public Affairs, Southern 
Methodist University, Dallas, Tex.; Clarence 
Poe, Editor, The Progressive Farmer, Ealeigh, 
N. C. ; Clarence Roberts, Editor, The Farmer- 
Stockman, Oklahoma City, Okla. ; Roland Hall 
Sharp, Latin American specialist, The Chris- 
tian Science Monitor, Boston, Mass.; Prof. 
Graham Stuart, Stanford University, Palo 
Alto, Calif.; Dr. H. L. Walster, Dean, North 
Dakota Agricultural College, Fargo, N. Dak.; 
Malcolm W. Davis, Associate Director, Divi- 
sion of Intercourse and Education, Carnegie 
Endowment for International Peace, New 
York, N. Y. ; and Lee Morrison, Columbia 
University Press, Executive Secretary for the 
tour. 

The group plans to proceed via the west 
coast of South America to Valparaiso. From 
March 20 to March 25 they will be in Santiago, 
Chile, and from March 27 to April 1 in Buenos 
Aires, Argentina. After visiting Montevideo, 
Uruguay, their itinerary will take them to 
Brazil from April 7 to April 23. 

JOURNALISTIC EXCHANGES BE- 
TWEEN UNITED STATES SCHOOLS 
AND COLOMBIAN STUDENTS 

An interesting phase in the development of 
cultural relations among the American repub- 
lics is evidenced by the recent request of the 
Federation of Colombian Students, presented 
through the American Embassy at Bogota, Co- 
lombia, for assistance in obtaining material for 
publication in the national student organ El 
Estudiante, which is published weekly and is 
disseminated to the leading colleges and uni- 
versities of Colombia. 

The request was transmitted through the De- 
partment to the following organizations: The. 
Associated Collegiate Press, the Association 
of American Colleges, the American Associa- 
tion of Teachers of Spanish, and the Pan 
American League. 



All of these organizations responded with 
offers of cooperation, and it is expected that 
in the near future El Estvdiante will be receiv- 
ing articles written in Spanish by American 
students, dealing with the general culture of 
the United States, and with student life and 
campus activities in our universities. 

The Federation of Colombian Students is a 
newly founded organization which is nation- 
wide in scope, and has as one of its objectives 
the stimulation of closer relationships among 
students in schools in the United States and in 
Colombia. 

STUDENT EXCHANGE BETWEEN CHI- 
CAGO UNIVERSITY AND SAO PAULO 
SCHOOL OF SOCIOLOGY AND POLI- 
TICS 

The Sao Paulo School of Sociology and Poli- 
tics in Brazil has recently made arrangements 
to receive a student from the University of 
Chicago and to pay the cost of board and lodg- 
ing of the student over a period of 10 months. 

In exchange the Sao Paulo School will send 
at its own expense Asst. Prof. S. A. Politi to 
do graduate work in the University of Chi- 
cago, where he will receive board, lodging, and 
tuition for approximately one year. 

The school hopes to extend the plan to a 
large number of exchange students in the 
future. 



The Foreign Service 



CONFIRMATION OF NOMINATIONS 

On March 6, 1941, the Senate confirmed the 
nominations of Wesley Frost, of Kentucky, 
now a Foreign Service officer of class I and 
lately Counselor of Embassy at Santiago, 
Chile, to be Envoy Extraordinary and Minister 
Plenipotentiary to Paraguay; and Pierre de 
L. Boal, of Pennsylvania, now a Foreign Serv- 



270 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



ice officer of class I and Counselor of Embassy 
at Mexico, D. F., Mexico, to be Envoy Extraor- 
dinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Nica- 
ragua. 

On the same day, the Senate confirmed the 
nominations of successful candidates in the 



recent Foreign Service examination, as well as 
that of William W. Walker, now vice consul 
non-career at Colon, Panama, 11 to be Foreign 
Service officers, unclassified, vice consuls of 
career, and secretaries in the Diplomatic 
Service. 



The Department 



APPOINTMENT OF G. HOWLAND SHAW AS ASSISTANT 
SECRETARY OP STATE 



[Released to the press March 4] 

The Honorable G. Howland Shaw has been 
appointed as Assistant Secretary of State. 

By a departmental order dated March 4 [No. 
923], the Secretary of State has designated 
Mr. Shaw Fiscal and Budget Officer of the 
Department. As Fiscal and Budget Officer, 
Mr. Shaw will have supervision of the appro- 
priations of the Department and its several 
activities. 

By a separate departmental order [No. 924], 
the Secretary has charged Assistant Secretary 
Shaw with the administration of the Depart- 
ment of State and the Foreign Service and 
with supervision of matters relating to per- 
sonnel and management, appropriations of the 
Department and its several activities, consular 
affairs, Foreign Service buildings, protocol (fis- 
cal only), international conferences (fiscal 
only), and such other duties as may be assigned 
to him by the Secretary of State. 

Mr. Shaw was also designated a member 
and chairman of each of the following, re- 
placing Assistant Secretary Long in these ca- 
pacities: 

The Board of Foreign Service Personnel; 
The Board of Examiners for the Foreign 

Service ; 
The Foreign Service Officers' Training School 

Board. 

By a departmental order dated March 4 [No. 
926], Mr. Shaw was vested with the authority 



to sign travel orders and approve expenditures 
as contemplated in the Bureau of the Budget 
Circular No. 355 of April 16, 1940, entitled 
"Promulgation of Certain Amendments to the 
Standardized Government Travel Regula- 
tions, As Amended". 

APPOINTMENTS OF OTHER OFFICERS 

[Released to the press March 4] 

The Secretary of State on March 4 desig- 
nated Mr. John G. Erhardt, Foreign Service 
officer, Class I, to be Chief of the Division of 
Foreign Service Personnel, effective on that 
date. 

Also, on March 4, Mr. Carlton Savage and 
Mr. Leo D. Sturgeon were designated Assist- 
ants to the Assistant Secretary of State, Mr. 
Long, and Mr. James A. White was designated 
Assistant to Mr. Long on legislative matters. 

[Released to the press March 6] 

By a departmental order issued March 5, 
Mr. Thomas K. Finletter M'as appointed a 
Special Assistant to the Secretary of State 
and assigned to the Office of the Adviser on 
International Economic Affairs. 

Mr. Laurence C. Frank was appointed on 
March 4 an Executive Assistant to the Assist- 
ant Secretary of State and Budget Officer, Mr. 
Shaw. 



11 See the Bulletin of February 15, 1941 (vol. IV, 
no. 86), pp. 186-18S; March 1, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 88), 
p. 239. 



MARCH 8, 1941 



271 



Mr. William E. DeCourcy, Foreign Service 
officer, class IV, was also designated on March 
4 to serve as an Executive Assistant to the 
Assistant Secretary of State and Budget Offi- 
cer, Mr. Shaw. 

FUNCTIONS OF ASSISTANT 
SECRETARIES 

[Released to the press March 4] 

On March 4 the Secretary of State issued the 
following departmental order : 

Departmental Order No. 922 

There is hereby delegated to the Assistant 
Secretaries of State, respectively, the super- 
vision of functions of the Department of State 
as hereinafter enumerated : 

Assistant Secretary Berle 

Coordination of financial questions with 
questions of major policy. 

General supervision of Canadian affairs and 
affairs relating to Greenland. 

General supervision of the following units 
of the Department, including, except as other- 
wise provided, the signing of correspondence 
with respect to the work thereof: Passport 
Division; Division of International Confer- 
ences (except fiscal) ; Division of International 
Communications (aviation only) ; Division of 
Foreign Activity Correlation ; and the Trans- 
lating Bureau. 

Assistant Secretary Long 

Coordination of matters relating to the for- 
mulation and execution of foreign policies as- 
signed to him by the Secretary of State. 

General liaison work with the Senate and the 
House of Representatives and general repre- 
sentation of the Department of State at hear- 
ings before Congressional committees, except- 
ing the legislative activities relating to the 
duties and administrative functions of the As- 
sistant Secretary and Budget Officer. 

General supervision of the following units 
of the Department of State, including, except 
as otherwise provided, the signing of corre- 
spondence with respect to the work thereof: 



Visa Division ; Special Division ; Office of Phil- 
ippine Affairs; and the Division of Interna- 
tional Communications (except aviation). 

General supervision, under the direction of 
the Secretary of State, of work relating to spe- 
cial problems arising from international armed 
conflicts; and of affairs relating to interna- 
tional fisheries problems. 

Assistant Secretary Acheson 

Coordination of commercial and economic 
questions with questions of major policy. 

General supervision of the following units of 
the Department of State, including, except as 
otherwise provided, the signing of correspond- 
ence with respect to the work thereof: Divi- 
sion of Commercial Treaties and Agreements; 
Division of Controls; Treaty Division; Divi- 
sion of Commercial Affairs; and the Editor of 
Treaties. 

Assistant Secretary Shaw 

General supervision of the following units 
of the Department of State, including, except as 
otherwise provided, the signing of correspond- 
ence with respect to the work thereof : Office of 
Fiscal and Budget Affairs; Division of Person- 
nel Supervision and Management; Division of 
Accounts; Division of Communications and 
Records; Division of Foreign Service Admin- 
istration; Division of Foreign Service Person- 
nel ; Foreign Service Officers' Training School ; 
Foreign Service Buildings Office; Division of 
Research and Publication; Division of Protocol 
(fiscal only) ; and Division of International 
Conferences (fiscal only). 

It shall be understood that for budgetary 
purposes and in relation to expenditures of 
government funds, all of the divisions, offices 
and bureaus of the Department of State, in- 
cluding those specifically so indicated in this 
order, are subject to the fiscal supervision of 
the Assistant Secretary and Budget Officer. 

The provisions of this order supersede the 
provisions of all orders or parts of orders in 
conflict therewith. 

Cordell Hull 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



EXTRADITION 

SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION WITH GUATE- 
MALA (TREATY SERIES 963) 

The Supplementary Extradition Convention 
between the United States and Guatemala, 
signed at Guatemala City on February 20, 
1940, was proclaimed by the President on 
March 3, 1941. The Senate gave its advice 
and consent to ratification of the Supplemen- 
tary Convention on November 26, 1940, and the 
President ratified it on December 20, 1940. 
Ratifications were exchanged at Guatemala 
City on February 6, 1941. Publication of the 
Supplementary Convention by Guatemala in 
accordance with its laws was made on Febru- 
ary 18, 1941. In accordance with the terms 
of article IV the Supplementary Convention 
will come into force on March 13, 1941, ten 
days after publication by the country last pub- 
lishing, which, in respect of this convention, is 
the United States. 

The convention supplements the Extradition 
Treaty of February 27, 1903 (Treaty Series 
425) , between the United States and Guatemala, 
of which it is made an integral part, by adding 
several crimes to the list of crimes and offenses 
for which extradition may be sought under 
that treaty. 

ARBITEATION 

TREATY FOR THE PEACEFUL SOLUTION OF 
CONTROVERSIES BETWEEN BRAZIL AND 
VENEZUELA 

The American Embassy at Rio de Janeiro 
reported by a despatch dated February 17, 
1941, that the Treaty for the Peaceful Solution 
of Controversies between Brazil and Venezuela, 
signed at Caracas on March 30, 1940, was 
promulgated by the Brazilian Government by 
Decree No. 6712 of January 15, 1941, published 
in the Diario Official of January 17, 1941. 
272 



SOVEREIGNTY 

CONVENTION ON THE PROVISIONAL ADMINIS- 
TRATION OF EUROPEAN COLONIES AND POS- 
SESSIONS IN THE AMERICAS 

Honduras 

The American Minister to Honduras trans- 
mitted to the Secretary of State with a des- 
patch dated February 11, 1941, a copy of the 
Bidletin of the Honduran National Legisla- 
ture of February 6, 1941, which published De- 
cree No. 8, signed by the President of the 
Republic on December 23, 1941, ratifying the 
Convention on the Provisional Administration 
of European Colonies and Possessions in the 
Americas signed at Habana on July 30, 1940. 

LABOR 

CONVENTION CONCERNING SAFETY PROVI- 
SIONS IN THE BUILDING INDUSTRY 

Mexico 

The American Ambassador to Mexico re- 
ported by a despatch dated February 17, 1941, 
that the President of Mexico signed on Decem- 
ber 30, 1940, a decree approving the Convention 
Concerning Safety Provisions in the Building 
Industry, adopted by the International Labor 
Conference at its twenty-fourth session (Ge- 
neva, June 2-22, 1938). 

The records of the Department show that but 
one country has ratified this convention, namely, 
Switzerland, on May 23, 1940. 

CONVENTION CONCERNING THE LIABILITY OF 
THE SHIPOWNER IN CASE OF SICKNESS, IN- 
JURY, OR DEATH OF SEAMEN (TREATY 
SERTES 951) 

Mexico 

The American Ambassador to Mexico re- 
ported by a despatch dated February 17, 1941, 



MARCH 8, 1941 



273 



that the Diario Oficiul (no. 35, vol. cxxiv) 
of February 12, 1941, published a decree dated 
January 14, 1941, proclaiming on behalf of 
Mexico, the Convention Concerning the Liabil- 
ity of the Shipowner in Case of Sickness, In- 
jury, or Death of Seamen, adopted by the 
International Labor Conference at its twenty- 
first session (Geneva, October 6-24, 1936). 

The records of the Department show that the 
convention was ratified by the United States 
of America on October 29, 1938, and by Bel- 
gium on April 11, 1938. 

FINANCE 

CONVENTION FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF AN 
INTER-AMERICAN BANK 

Mexico 

The American Ambassador to Mexico re- 
ported by a despatch dated February 17, 1941, 
that the Diario Oficial (no. 33, vol. cxxrv) 
of February 10, 1941, published a decree ap- 
proving on behalf of Mexico the Convention 
for the Establishment of an Inter-American 
Bank, signed at Washington on May 10, 1940. 



Legislation 



Nonrecognition by United States of Transfer of Any 
Geographic Region in This Hemisphere From One 
Non-American Power to Another Non-American Power. 
(S. Rept. 76, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 2 pp. 50. 

Supplemental Estimate of Appropriation and an 
Amendment to the Budget for 1942, Department of 
State: Communication From the President of the 
United States Transmitting a Supplemental Estimate 
of Appropriation for the Department of State for the 
Fiscal Year 1941 Amounting to $37,500; and an 
Amendment to the Budget for the Fiscal Year 1942 
[$37,500 for contingent expenses for 1941; $3,139 for 
additional funds for the U. S. quota for the Inter- 
American Radio Office]. (H. Doc. 135, 77th Cong., 
1st sess.) 3 pp. 50. 

Compensation Agreed Upon [by Great Britain and 
the United States] for Leasing of Certain Locations 
To Be Used as [Naval and Air] Bases (adverse re- 
port of House Foreign Affairs Committee March 6, 
1941, to accompany H. Res. 112, including text of 
letter dated March 5, 1941 from the Secretary of State 
to Representative Sol Bloom, upon which the action 
of the Committee was based). (H. Rept. 186, 77th 
Cong., 1st sess.) 2 pp. 50. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C— Price 10 cents -.-..- Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OP THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 



MARCH 15, 1941 
Vol. IV: No. 90— Publication 1580 



Qontents 




General: Page 

Address by the President 277 

Appointment of committee to coordinate relief activi- 
ties 281 

Control of exports in national defense 283 

American Republics: 

Inter-American Development Commission: Uruguayan 

and Paraguayan Councils 287 

Europe: 

Property of Hungary in the United States 288 

Cultural Relations: 

Student group welcomed by Vice President 288 

Motion-picture-projection equipment for United States 

missions 288 

Professor and student exchanges 289 

Treaty Information: 
Commerce : 

Inter- American Coffee-Marketing Agreement ... 291 
Property : 

Supplementary Convention With Great Britain Con- 
cerning the Tenure and Disposition of Real and 

Personal Property 292 

Promotion of peace: 

Treaty With the Union of South Africa Amending 
the Treaty for the Advancement of Peace With 
Great Britain, Signed September 15, 1914 . . . . 293 
Claims : 

Convention With Canada for the Establishment of 

the Trail Smelter Arbitral Tribunal 294 

[Over] 



M M SI ] 941 



Qontcnts 



-CONTINUED. 



The Foreign Service : r age 

Personnel changes 295 

The Department: 

Appointment of officers 296 

Publications 296 

Legislation 297 



General 



ADDRESS BY THE PRESIDENT 1 



[RcleiiHcd to the plena by the White House March 15] 

This dinner of the White House Correspond- 
ents' Association is unique. It is the first one at 
which I have made a speech in all these eight 
years. It differs from the press conferences that 
you and I hold twice a week. You cannot ask 
me any questions; and everything I have to say 
is word for word "on the record". 

For eight years you and I have been helping 
each other. I have been trying to keep you in- 
formed of the news of Washington and of the 
Nation and of the world from the point of view 
of the Presidency. You, more than you realize 
it, have been giving me a great deal of informa- 
tion about what the people of this country are 
thinking. 

In our press conferences, as at this dinner to- 
night, we include reporters representing papers 
and news agencies of many other lands. To 
most of them it is a matter of constant amaze- 
ment that press conferences such as ours can 
exist in any nation in the world. 

That is especialty true in those lands where 
freedoms do not exist — where the purposes of 
our democracy and the characteristics of our 
country and of our people have been seriously 
distorted. 

Such misunderstandings are not new. I re- 
member that in the early days of the first World 
War the German Government received solemn 
assurances from their representatives in the 
United States that the people of America were 



1 Delivered at the annual dinner of the White House 
Correspondents' Association, Washington, D. C, March 
15, 1941. 

300500 — 41 1 



disunited; that they cared more for peace at any 
price than for the preservation of ideals and 
freedom ; that there would even be riots and rev- 
olutions in the United States if this Nation ever 
asserted its own interests. 

Let not dictators of Europe and Asia doubt 
our unanimity now. 

Before the present war broke out on Septem- 
ber 1, 1939, 1 was more worried about the future 
than many people — most people. The record 
shows I was not worried enough. 

That, however, is water over the dam. Do not 
let us waste time reviewing the past or fixing or 
dodging the blame for it. History cannot be 
rewritten by wishful thinking. We, the Ameri- 
can people, are writing new history today. 

The big news story of this week is this : The 
world has been told that we, as a united nation, 
realize the danger which confronts us — and that 
to meet that danger our democracy has gone 
into action. 

We know that although Prussian autocracy 
was bad enough, Naziism is far worse. 

Nazi forces are not seeking mere modifica- 
tions in colonial maps or in minor European 
boundaries. They openly seek the destruction 
of all elective systems of government on every 
continent — including our own; they seek to 
establish systems of government based on the 
regimentation of all human beings by a handful 
of individual rulers who have seized power by 
force. 

These men and their hypnotized followers call 
this a new order. It is not new. It is not order. 
For order among nations presupposes some- 

277 



278 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



thing enduring — some system of justice under 
which individuals, over a long period of time, 
are willing to live. Humanity will never per- 
manently accept a system imposed by conquest 
and based on slavery. 

These modern tyrants find it necessary to 
their plans to eliminate all democracies — elim- 
inate them one by one. The nations of Europe, 
and indeed we ourselves, did not appreciate 
that purpose. We do now. The process of the 
elimination of the European nations proceeded 
according to plan through 1939 and 1940, until 
the schedule was shot to pieces by the unbeatable 
defenders of Britain. 

The enemies of democracy were wrong in 
their calculations for a very simple reason. 
They were wrong because they believed that 
democracy could not adjust itself to the terrible 
reality of a world at war. 

They believed that democracy, because of its 
profound respect for the rights of men, would 
never arm itself to fight. 

They believed that democracy, because of its 
will to live at peace with its neighbors, could 
not mobilize its energies even in its own defense. 
They know now that democracy can still re- 
main democracy, and speak, and reach conclu- 
sions, and arm itself adequately for defense. 

From the bureaus of propaganda of the Axis 
powers came the confident prophecy that the 
conquest of our country would be "an inside 
job" — a job accomplished not by overpowering 
invasion from without, but by disrupting con- 
fusion and disunion and moral disintegration 
from within. 

Those who believed that knew little of our 
history. America is not a country which can be 
confounded by the appeasers, the defeatists, the 
backstairs manuf act urers of panic. It is a coun- 
try which talks out its problems in the open, 
where any man can hear them. 

We have just now engaged in a great debate. 
It was not limited to the halls of Congress. It 
was argued in every newspaper, on every wave 
length — over every cracker barrel in the land. 
It was finally settled and decided by the Amer- 
ican people themselves. 



The decisions of our democracy may be slowly 
arrived at, But when that decision is made, it is 
proclaimed not with the voice of any one man 
but with the voice of 130 millions. It is binding 
on all of us. And the world is no longer left in 
doubt. 

This decision is the end of any attempts at 
appeasement in our land; the end of urging us 
to get along with the dictators ; the end of com- 
promise with tyranny and the forces of oppres- 
sion. 

The urgency is now. 

We believe firmly that when our production 
output is in full swing, the democracies of the 
world will be able to prove that dictatorships 
cannot win. 

But, now, the time element is of supreme im- 
portance. Every plane, every other instrument 
of war, old and new, winch we can spare now, 
we will send overseas. That is commonsense 
strategy. 

The great task of this day, the deep duty 
which rests upon us is to move products from the 
assembly lines of our factories to the battle lines 
of democracy — Now ! 

We can have speed and effectiveness if we 
maintain our existing unity. We do not have 
and never will have the false unity of a people 
browbeaten by threats and misled by propa- 
ganda. Ours is a unity which is possible oidy 
among free men and women who recognize the 
truth and face reality with intelligence and 
courage. 

Today, at last, ours is not a partial effort. It 
is a total effort and that is the only way to guar- 
antee ultimate safety. 

Beginning a year ago, we started the erec- 
tion of hundreds of plants and we started the 
training of millions of men. 

Then, at the moment the aid-to-democracies 
bill was passed we were ready to recommend the 
seven-billion-dollar appropriation on the basis 
of capacity production as now planned. 

The articles themselves cover the whole 
range of munitions of war and of the facilities 
for transporting them. 



MARCH 15, 1941 



279 



The aid-to-democracies bill was agreed to by 
both Houses of the Congress last Tuesday after- 
noon. I signed it one half hour later. Five 
minutes later I approved a list of articles for 
immediate shipment. Many of them are on 
their way. On Wednesday, I recommended an 
appropriation for new material to the extent of 
seven billion dollars; and the Congress is mak- 
ing patriotic speed in making the appropriation 
available. 

Here in Washington, we are thinking in terms 
of speed, and speed now. And I hope that that 
watchword will find its way into every home in 
the Nation. 

We shall have to make sacrifices — every one 
of us. The final extent of those sacrifices will 
depend upon the speed with which we act 
Now! 

I must tell you tonight in plain language what 
this undertaking means to you — to your daily 
life. 

Whether you are in the armed services; 
whether you are a steel worker or a stevedore ; a 
machinist or a housewife; a farmer or a banker; 
a storekeeper or a manufacturer — to all of you 
it will mean sacrifice in behalf of country and 
your liberties. You will feel the impact of this 
gigantic effort in your daily lives. You will 
feel it in a way which will cause many incon- 
veniences. 

You will have to be content with lower profits 
from business because obviously your taxes will 
be higher. 

You will have to work longer at your bench 
or your plow or your machine. 

Let me make it clear that the Nation is calling 
for the sacrifice of some privileges but not for 
the sacrifice of fundamental rights. Most of 
us will do that willingly. That kind of sacrifice 
is for the common national protection and wel- 
fare; for our defense against the most ruthless 
brutality in history; for the ultimate victory of 
a way of life now so violently menaced. 

A half-hearted effort on our part Mill lead to 
failure. This is no part-time job. The concepts 
of "business as usual" and "normalcy" must be 
forgotten until the task is finished. This is an 
all-out effort — nothing short of all-out effort 
will win. 



We are now dedicated, from here on, to a 
constantly increasing tempo of production — a 
production greater than we now know or have 
ever known before — a production that does not 
stop and should not pause. 

And so, tonight, I am appealing to the heart 
and to the mind of every man and every woman 
within our borders who loves liberty. I ask you 
to consider the needs of our Nation at this hour 
and to put aside all personal differences until 
our victory is won. 

The light of democracy must be kept burning. 
To the perpetuation of this light, each must do 
his own share. The single effort of one indi- 
vidual may seem very small. But there are 130 
million individuals over here. There are many 
more millions in Britain and elsewhere bravely 
shielding the great flame of democracy from 
the blackout of barbarism. It is not enough for 
us merely to trim the wick or polish the glass. 
The time has come when we must provide the 
fuel in ever-increasing amounts to keep the 
flame alight. 

There will be no divisions of party or section 
or race or nationality or religion. There is not 
one among us who does not have a stake in the 
outcome of the effort in which we are now 
engaged. 

A few weeks ago I spoke of four freedoms — 
freedom of speech and expression, freedom of 
every person to worship God in his own way, 
freedom from want, freedom from fear. They 
are the ultimate stake. They may not be im- 
mediately attainable throughout the world but 
humanity does move toward those ideals 
through democratic processes. If we fail — if 
democracy is superseded by slavery — then those 
four freedoms or even the mention of them will 
become forbidden things. Centuries will pass 
before they can be revived. 

By winning now, we strengthen their mean- 
ing, we increase the stature of mankind and the 
dignity of human life. 

There is a vast difference between the word 
"loyalty" and the word "obedience". Obedience 
can be obtained and enforced in a dictatorship 
by the use of threat and extortion or it can be 
obtained by a failure on the part of government 
to tell the truth to its citizens. 



280 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Loyalty is different. It springs from the 
mind that is given the facts, that retains ancient 
ideals and proceeds without coercion to give sup- 
port to its own government. 

That is true in England and in Greece and in 
China and in the United States today. And 
in man}' other countries millions of men and 
women are praying for the return of a day when 
they can give that kind of loyalty. 

Loyalty cannot be bought. Dollars alone will 
not win this war. Let us not delude ourselves 
as to that. 

Today, nearly a million and a half American 
citizens are hard at work in our armed forces. 
The spirit and the determination of these men 
of our Army and Navy are worthy of the high- 
est traditions of our country. No better men 
ever served under Washington, or John Paul 
Jones, or Grant, or Lee, or Pershing. That is a 
boast, I admit — but it is not an idle one. 

Upon the national will to sacrifice and to work 
depends the output of our industry and our 
agriculture. 

Upon that will depends the survival of the 
vital bridge across the ocean — the bridge of ships 
which carry the arms and food for those who are 
fighting the good fight. 

Upon that will depends our ability to aid other 
nations which may determine to offer resistance. 

Upon that will may depend practical assist- 
ance to people now living in nations which have 
been overrun, should they find the opportunity 
to strike back in an effort to regain their liberties. 

This will of the American people will not be 
frustrated either by threats from powerful ene- 
mies abroad or by small, selfish groups or indi- 
viduals at home. 

The determination of America must not be 
obstructed by war profiteering. 

It must not be obstructed by unnecessary 
strikes of workers, by short-sighted manage- 
ment, or by deliberate sabotage. 

For, unless we win, there will be no freedom 
for either management or labor. 

Wise labor leaders and wise business man- 
agers will realize how necessary it is to their 



own existence to make common sacrifice for this 
great common cause. 

There is no longer the slightest question or 
doubt that the American people recognize the 
extreme seriousness of the present situation. 
That is why they have demanded, and got, a 
policy of unqualified, immediate, all-out aid for 
Britain, Greece, China, and for all the govern- 
ments in exile whose homelands are temporarily 
occupied by the aggressors. 

From now on that aid will be increased — and 
yet again increased — until total victory has been 
won. 

The British are stronger than ever in the 
magnificent morale which has enabled them to 
endure all the dark days and the shattered 
nights of the past 10 months. They have the 
full support and help of Canada, and the other 
dominions, of the rest of their Empire, and non- 
British people throughout the world who still 
think in terms of the great freedoms. 

The British people are braced for invasion 
whenever the attempt may come — tomorrow — 
next week — next month. 

In this historic crisis, Britain is blessed with a 
brilliant and great leader in Winston Churchill. 
But, no one knows better than Mr. Churchill 
liimself, that it is not alone his stirring words 
and valiant deeds which give the British their 
superb morale. The essence of that morale is in 
the masses of plain people who are completely 
clear in their minds about the one essential 
fact — that they would rather die as free men 
than live as slaves. 

These plain people — civilians as well as sol- 
diers and sailors and airmen — women and girls 
as well as men and boys — are fighting in the 
front line of civilization, and they are holding 
that line with a fortitude which will forever be 
the pride and the inspiration of all free men on 
every continent and on every island of the. sea. 

The British people and their Grecian allies 
need ships. From America, they will get ships. 

They need planes. From America, they will 
get planes. 

They need food. From America, they will 
eet food. 



MARCH 15, 1941 



281 



They need tanks and guns and ammunition 
and supplies of all kinds. From America, they 
will get tanks and guns and ammunition and 
supplies of all kinds. 

China likewise expresses the magnificent will 
of millions of plain people to resist the dismem- 
berment of their Nation. China, through the 
Generalissimo, Chiang Kai-shek, asks our help. 
America has said that China shall have our help. 

Our country is going to be what our people 
have proclaimed it must be — the arsenal of 
democracy. 

Our country is going to play its full part. 

And when dictatorships disintegrate — and 
pray God that will be sooner than any of us now 
dares to hope — then our country must continue 
to play its great part in the period of world 
reconstruction. 

We believe that the rallying cry of the dic- 
tators, their boasting about a master-race, will 
prove to be pure stuff and nonsense. There 
never has been, there isn't now, and there never 



will be, any race of people fit to serve as masters 
over their fellowmen. 

The world has no use for any nation which, 
because of size or because of military might, 
asserts the right to goose-step to world power 
over other nations or other races. We believe 
that any nationality, no matter how small, has 
the inherent right to its own nationhood. 

We believe that the men and women of such 
nations, no matter what size, can, through the 
processes of peace, serve themselves and serve 
the world by protecting the common man's se- 
curity; improve the standards of healthful liv- 
ing; provide markets for manufacture and for 
agriculture. Through that kind of peacefid 
service, every nation can increa.se its happiness, 
banish the terrors of war, and abandon man's 
inhumanity to man. 

Never, in all our history, have Americans 
faced a job so well worthwhile. May it be said 
of us in the days to come that our children and 
our children's children rise up and call us 
blessed. 



APPOINTMENT OP COMMITTEE TO COORDINATE RELIEF 

ACTIVITIES 



[Released to tbe press by the White House March 13] 

The President addressed identic letters on 
March 13 to Messrs. Joseph E. Davies, Washing- 
ton, D. C. ; Charles P. Taft, Assistant Coordi- 
nator, Health, Welfare, and Related Defense 
Activities, Washington. D. C. ; and Dr. Fred- 
erick P. Keppel, President. Carnegie Corpora- 
tion, New York City, asking them to serve as a 
committee of three, with Mr. Davies acting as 
chairman, for the purpose of studying and 
recommending methods of dealing with the rais- 
ing of funds in the United States by private 
relief activities, etc. 

The President transmitted to Messrs. Davies, 
Taft, and Keppel copies of a letter he received 
under date of March 3, 1941, from the Secretary 
of State. Mr. Hull, in his letter to the Presi- 
dent, suggested that the President appoint a 



committee of three "who are well informed on 
matters of local welfare, and foreign relief, and 
the needs for national defense". 

In his letter to Messrs. Davies. Taft, and 
Keppel the President said : 

"I am enclosing a copy of a letter I have 
received from the Secretary of State with re- 
gard to certain problems existing in the field of 
foreign relief. I would be grateful if you 
would be good enough to serve on a committee 
of three I would like to appoint for the purpose 
of making a thorough canvass of this situation 
and making recommendations with regard to the 
best methods of dealing with the problems 
which have arisen therein. 

"It would be appreciated if the committee 
would arrange to meet in Washington at an 
early date, at which time I will l>e glad to put 



282 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



at its disposal such information on the subject 
as may be available. 

''Very sincerely yours, 

Franklin D. Roosevelt" 

The following is the text of the letter written 
by Secretary Hull to the President on March 
third: 

"My Dear Mr. President : 

"Problems have arisen with regard to the 
raising of funds for private relief activities 
which I should lay before you, together with a 
suggestion for procedure which may aid in their 
solution. 

"The human suffering which has been caused 
by the conflicts raging in other portions of the 
world has called forth the humanitarian efforts 
of the American people. At the same time needs 
at home have continued, as they have in the past, 
to inspire similar efforts to relieve human need 
in this country. It seems likely that these efforts 
will be increased by the natural concern of our 
people to provide in every way for the young 
men who have been called for military training. 
In the field of foreign relief about three hundred 
organizations, most of them of a temporary na- 
ture, are now registered with the Department of 
State in order that they may solicit and collect 
contributions. 2 Here at home local private wel- 
fare agencies are continuing their efforts and 
must continue to rely on public support. We are 
also informed that some of our people are plan- 
ning to launch campaigns to finance activities in 
areas adjacent to military camps established 
under the Selective Service Act. All of these 
efforts are inspired by the finest human instincts, 
but there is growing danger that they may be 
frustrated if they are conducted without regard 
to one another and without proper coordination. 

"In the field of foreign relief many agencies 
are now raising funds without full knowledge of 
the. relief resources already at hand, the needs 
which actually require, relief, or the shipping 
available for the transportation of relief mate- 
rials. American aid is being extended to Great 



Britain, China, Greece, Finland, Spain and 
many other countries affected by the conflict 
through the American Red Cross and also 
through other organizations. While the need 
for greater coordination exists with regard to all 
of these undertakings, it is particularly appar- 
ent in British relief where the problem of ob- 
taining shipping space for the transportation of 
relief materials is already serious and requires 
discriminating knowledge as to the needs exist- 
ing and as to the most effective method of meet- 
ing them. Here it is particularly important that 
funds should not be solicited for categories of 
relief which have not been requested, or ap- 
proved, or for which shipping space is not avail- 
able. Moreover, hi other countries of Europe, 
economic and military controls as well as limita- 
tions upon transportation and communication 
facilities make effective relief operation imprac- 
ticable at the present time. 

"In relief, both at home and abroad, it is ad- 
visable that the efforts of all the relief organi- 
zations be considered in their relation to the 
program of the American Red Cross, which, as 
you indicated in your statement of October 12, 
1939, 3 holds both under the laws of the United 
States and under International Agreements an 
official status and bears definite responsibilities 
both in domestic and foreign relief and par- 
ticularly in relation to our armed forces. 

"My suggestion, therefore, would be that you 
appoint a committee of three men who are well 
informed on matters of local welfare, and for- 
eign relief, and the needs for national defense. 
This committee might very well examine the 
entire problem and make recommendations as 
to what steps might be taken to preserve local 
and essential welfare services, and to maintain 
a balance between the facilities and resources 
available for foreign war relief with particular 
regard to the financing of new welfare activi- 
ties in connection with national defense meas- 



"Faithfully yours, 



Cordell Hull" 



2 See the Bulletin of March 8, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 
pp. 251-264. 



8 See the Bulletin of October 21, 1939 (vol. I, no. 17), 
p. 404. 



MARCH 15, 1941 

CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL DEFENSE 



283 



[ Released to the press March 15] 

The President on March 15 signed an Execu- 
tive order setting forth regulations governing 
the exportation of models, designs, specifica- 
tions, etc., designated in his Proclamation 2465 
of March 4, 1941, 4 issued pursuant to section 6 
of the Export Control Act, approved July 2, 
1940. 

The text of the Executive order follows : 

Executive Order 
Prescribing Kegulations Governing the Ex- 
portation of Articles and Materials Desig- 
nated in Proclamation No. 2465 of March 4, 
1941, Issued Pursuant to the Provisions of 
Section 6 of the Act of Congress Approved 
July 2, 1940 

By virtue of and pursuant to the authority 
vested in me by section 6 of the act of Congress 
approved July 2, 1940, entitled "An Act To 
expedite the strengthening of the national de- 
fense" (54 Stat. 712, 714), I hereby prescribe 
the following regulations governing the ex- 
portation of articles and materials designated 
in Proclamation No. 2465 of March 4, 1941, 
issued pursuant to the said section 6 : 

1. The Administrator of Export Control 
shall, under my direction, determine the forms 
of the articles and materials designated hi the 
above-mentioned proclamation; and the Ad- 
ministrator may from time to time make such 
additions to or deletions from the lists of forms 
as may be necessary in the interest of national 
defense. 

2. The Administrator of Export Control 
shall cause such lists of forms to be published 
in the Federal Register. Such publication shall 
constitute notice to the public that, after the 
effective date therein stated, none of the forms 
listed shall be exported unless and until a 
license authorizing such exportation shall have 



4 See the Bulletin of March 8, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 89), 
pp. 245-246. 

300500 — 41 2 



been issued by the Administrator of Export 
Control. 

3. The forms for application for export 
licenses shall be prescribed by the Administrator 
of Export Control : Provided, That such ap- 
plications shall be required to contain adequate 
descriptions of the articles and materials to be 
exported, including type and model descrip- 
tions, if applicable. 

4. The Administrator of Export Control shall 
issue export licenses to authorize proposed ship- 
ments of the said articles and materials to 
applicants who shall have made application on 
the prescribed form, unless the Administrator of 
Export Control, under my direction, shall have 
determined that the proposed exportation would 
be detrimental to the interests of the national 
defense. 

5. The country designated on the application 
for license as the country of destination shall in 
each case be the country of ultimate destination. 
If the articles and materials to be exported are 
consigned to one country with the knowledge 
that they are intended for transshipment thence 
to another country, the latter country shall be 
named as the country of destination. 

6. Export licenses are not transferable and 
are subject to revocation without notice. If not 
revoked, licenses are valid for one year from the 
date of issuance. 

7. The original license must be presented, 
prior to exportation, to the collector of customs 
at the port through which the shipment au- 
thorized to be exported is being made. If ship- 
ment is made by mail, the license must be pre- 
sented to the postmaster at the post office at 
which the parcel is mailed, except that the Ad- 
ministrator of Export Control may authorize 
the mailing of the parcel without formal presen- 
tation of the license. 

8. No alterations may be made in export 
licenses which have been issued by the Adminis- 
trator of Export Control except by the Ad- 
ministrator or by collectors of customs or post- 
masters acting under the specific instructions of 
the Administrator. 



284 



DEPARTMENT OP STATE BULLETIN 



9. Export licenses which have been revoked 
or which have expired must be returned im- 
mediately to the Administrator of Export 
Control. 

10. Except as may be prohibited by law, the 
Administrator of Export Control may issue 
general licenses authorizing the exportation to 
all or certain areas or destinations of any of the 
above-mentioned articles and materials, and any 
of the forms thereof, in accordance with the 
rules and regulations prescribed by the Presi- 
dent. 

11. Paragraphs 3 and 7 shall not apply to the 
general licenses herein authorized. 

12. These regulations shall be effective April 
15, 1941. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 
The White House, 
March 15, 1941. 

[No. 8713] 

[Released to the press March 15] 

Under section 6 of Public 703 [Export Control 
Act], approved July 2, 1940, the President is 
authorized to prohibit or curtail the exportation 
of articles and materials considered necessary in 
the interests of national defense. Pursuant to 
these provisions of law, the President on March 
15 signed an Executive order setting forth regu- 
lations which shall be effective April 15, 1941 
and which shall, on the effective date thereof, 
supersede the regulations heretofore prescribed 
by the President governing the exportation of 
the articles and materials named in proclama- 
tions issued pursuant to section 6 of the act of 
July 2, 1940 ; except that they shall not supersede 
the regulations governing the exportation of 
articles and materials designated in Proclama- 
tion 2465 5 of March 4, 1941. 

The text of the Executive order follows : 



1 See ibid. 



Executive Order 
Prescribing Regulations Governing the Ex- 
portation of Articles and Materials Desig- 
nated in Proclamations Issued Pursuant to 
the Provisions of Section 6 of the Act of 
Congress Approved July 2, 1940 

By virtue of and pursuant to the authority 
vested in me by section 6 of the act of Congress 
approved July 2, 1940. entitled "An Act To 
expedite the strengthening of the national de- 
fense" (54 Stat. 712, 714), I hereby prescribe the 
following regulations governing the exportation 
of articles and materials designated in procla- 
mations issued, or which may hereafter be is- 
sued, pursuant to the said section 6 ; except that 
these regulations shall not apply to the articles 
and materials designated in Proclamation No. 
2465 of March 4, 1941, or proclamations amenda- 
tory thereof : 

1. The Administrator of Export Control 
shall, under my direction, determine the forms, 
conversions, and derivatives of the articles and 
materials the exportation of which has been pro- 
hibited or curtailed pursuant to section 6 of the 
act of July 2, 1940; and the Administrator may 
from time to time make such additions to or 
deletions from the lists of forms, conversions, 
and derivatives as may be necessary in the inter- 
est of national defense. 

2. The Administrator of Export Control shall 
cause such lists of forms, conversions, and de- 
rivatives to be published in the Federal Regis- 
ter. Such publication shall constitute notice to 
the public that, after the effective date therein 
stated, none of the forms, conversions, and de- 
rivatives listed shall be exported unless and until 
a license authorizing such exportation shall have 
been issued by the Secretary of State. 

3. The forms for application for export 
licenses shall be prescribed by the Secretary of 
State : Provided, That such applications shad be 
required to contain adequate descriptions of the 
articles and materials to be exported, including 
type and model descriptions, if applicable. 



MARCH 15, 1941 



285 



4. The Secretary of State shall issue export 
licenses to authorize proposed shipments of the 
said articles and materials, and forms, conver- 
sions, and derivatives thereof, to applicants who 
shall have made application on the prescribed 
form, unless the Administrator of Export Con- 
trol, under my direction, shall have determined 
that the proposed exportation would be detri- 
mental to the interests of the national defense. 

5. Regulations contained in the document 
entitled International Traffic in Arms (7th ed., 
1939), Department of State publication 1407, 
shall continue to govern the exportation of 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war, and 
tin-plate scrap, except that export licenses shall 
not be issued when in any case it shall have been 
determined by the Administrator of Export 
Control, under my direction, that the proposed 
shipment would be contrary to the interest of 
the national defense. 

6. The country designated on the application 
for license as the country of destination shall in 
each case be the country of ultimate destination. 
If the goods to be exported are consigned to one 
country with the knowledge that they are in- 
tended for transshipment thence to another 
country, the latter country shall be named as 
the country of destination. 

7. Export licenses are not transferable and 
are subject to revocation without notice. If not 
revoked, licenses are valid for one year from the 
date of issuance. 

8. The original license must be presented, 
prior to exportation, to the collector of customs 
at the port through which the shipment au- 
thorized to be exported is being made. If ship- 
ment is made by parcel post, the license must be 
presented to the postmaster at the post office at 
which the parcel is mailed. 

9. No alterations may be made in export 
licenses which have been issued by the Secretary 
of State except by the Department of State or 
by collectors of customs or postmasters acting 
under the specific instructions of the Depart- 
ment of State. 



10. Export licenses which have been revoked 
or which have expired must be returned imme- 
diately to the Secretary of State. 

11. Articles and materials entering or leaving 
a port of the United States in transit through 
the territory of the United States to a foreign 
country shall not be considered as imported or 
exported for the purpose of these regulations. 

12. Except as may be prohibited by the Neu- 
trality Act of 1939 (54 Stat. 4) , the Secretary of 
State may issue general licenses authorizing the 
exportation to all or certain areas or destinations 
of any of the articles and materials named in 
proclamations issued pursuant to section 6 of the 
act of July 2, 1940, and any of the forms, conver- 
sions, and derivatives thereof, in accordance 
with the rules and regulations prescribed by the 
President and such specific directives as may 
from time to time be communicated to the Sec- 
retary of State through the Administrator of 
Export Control. 

13. Paragraphs 3 and 8 shall not apply to the 
general licenses herein authorized. 

14. These regulations shall be effective April 
15, 1941, and shall on the effective date super- 
sede the regulations heretofore prescribed by the 
President governing the exportation of the arti- 
cles and materials named in proclamations is- 
sued pursuant to section 6 of the act of July 2, 
1940; except that they shall not supersede the 
regulations governing the exportation of articles 
and materials designated in Proclamation 2465 
of March 4, 1941. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 
The White House, 
March IS, 191,1. 

[No. 8712] 

The following circular letter was sent by the 
Secretary of State March 10, 1941, to all col- 
lectors of customs : 

"Reference is made to previous circular air 
mail letters in regard to the interpretation of 
the regulations issued pursuant to section 6 of 



286 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



the Export Control Act, approved on July 2, 
1940. 

"Pending further instructions, no license will 
be required for the exportation of the following 
iron and steel manufactured articles and mate- 
rials : 

"Anchors. 

Anvils, not parts of machines requiring licenses. 

Aprons. 

Automotive Wheels. 

Auto Wheels and Discs. 

Axles, locomotive. 

Barrel hoop steel or iron, cut to length with rounded 
ends, but not punched or otherwise fabricated, 
if shipped with requisite number of shooks for 
assembly into barrels. 

Bars or tubes, if parts of and shipped with chain 
link fence, complete or knock down. 

Belt lacing. 

Belt link conveyors. 

Boat spikes. 

Bolts. 

Brads. 

Bright Wire Goods — Screw eyes and hooks, etc. 

Card Clothing. 

Cast Iron Sash Weights if parts of and shipped with 
complete windows. 

Cement Coated Nails. 

Chains. 

Chain Link Feuce. 

Ceilings (fabricated sheet). 

Clamps, Pipe Joint. 

Clips, Malleable iron, not machined. 

Concrete Reinforcement Mesh. 

Downspouts (usually galvanized). 

Elevator Fronts. 

Expansion Joints used in asphalt road making. 

Fair Rail Anchor. 

Fence Gates. 

Flexible Metal Hose. 

Forged Compromise Angle Joints (Railway Track 
Accessories). 

Forged Tee Rail Braces (Railway Track Acces- 
sories). 

Formed Wire. 

Galvanized Corrugated Culverts. 

Galvanized Kettles. 

Grizzly Bars. 

Gutters (usually galvanized). 

Hardware Cloth. 

Horseshoe Nails. 
Insect Screen. 
Iron Lungs. 
Lock Washers. 
Locomotive Wheels. 



Morison Furnaces. 

Nails. 

Nuts. 

Napper Clothing. 

Ornamental Work. 

Perforated Grills — perforated throughout (not 

scrap ) . 
Perforated Plates — perforated throughout (not 

scrap). 
Perforated Sheets — perforated throughout (not 

scrap). 
Perforated Sheets or plates — perforated throughout 

(not scrap). 
Perforated Strips — perforated throughout (not 

scrap). 
Pipe Saddle. 
Pipe Fittings. 
Bends. 

Cast Iron Fittings for cast iron pressure pipes. 
Cast Iron Fittings for cast iron soil pipes. 
Duriron. 
Ells. 

Expansion Joints. 
Forged Steel Flanges. 
Forged Steel Pipe Fittings. 
Laterals, Cast. 
Malleable Iron Screwed. 
Nipples. 
Reducers. 
Tees. 
Unions. 

Valves, iron or steel. 

All other pipe fittings, whether iron or steel. 
Poultry Netting. 
Rail Braces. 

Railroad Clips, machined. 
Railroad Car Parts 

Assembled car couplers and parts such as coupler 
heads, coupler sockets, coupler links, coupler 
pins, coupler yokes, coupler follower plates and 
coupler knuckles. 
Assembled Brake Beams and parts such as ten- 
sion rods, brake beam struts or fulcrums, brake 
heads, brake shoes, and brake shoe keys. 
Brake Parts such as hand wheels, brake masts, 
brake triangles and brackets, brake rods and 
jaws, brake levers, brake hangers, brake 
struts, brake rachets and pawls. 
Car trucks and parts such as truck bolsters, truck 
sides, frames, truck arch bars, truck columns, 
column guides, bolster beam separators, truck 
side bearings, truck and body center bearings, 
journal wedges, journal boxes and journal box 
lids. 
Car under frames, end walls, side walls, parti- 
tions, doors, door hinges, door rollers, door 
latches, stake pockets, striking plates, draft 
lugs, buffers, sill steps, and hand holds. 



MARCH 15, 1941 



287 



Railway Cars and Parts, assembled or unassembled 
(except tanks for installation on ears, whether 
installed or not). 

Ridge Roll (usually galvanized). 

Rivets. 

Road Guard. 

Shingles (fabricated ferrous sheet). 

Screws. 

Screw Spikes (not railroad). 

Spanish Tile (fabricated ferrous sheet). 

Sheet Metal Work (usually galvanized). 

Stampings. 

Steel Cooperage Hoops, finished. 

Steel Discs. 

Steel Grinding Balls, Machined or Not. 

Staples. 

Steel Sash. 

Steel Windows. 



Storage Tank Appurtenances, if shipped separately. 

Switch Rods. 

Tacks. 

Thumbtacks. 

Tires, Locomotive and Railway Car. 

Trays, galvanized iron or steel. 

Tubular Steel Poles. 

Valves. 

Washers. 

Water Tanks (of 10 gallon capacity or less). 

Welded Fabric. 

Wheels, Locomotive. 

Wire Cloth. 

Wire Fabric. 

Wire Mesh. 

Wire Netting. 

Woven Wire Screen Cloth of Iron or Steel. 

Fencing and Gates (except woven wire fencing)." 



American Republics 



INTER- AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION: URUGUAYAN 
AND PARAGUAYAN COUNCILS 



Nelson A. Rockefeller, Coordinator of Com- 
mercial and Cultural Relations Between the 
American Republics, has announced the mem- 
bership of the Uruguayan and Paraguayan Na- 
tional Councils, the third and fourth of 21 coun- 
cils being established by the Inter-American 
Development Commission in its program for the 
stimulation of trade among the American re- 
publics. Mr. Rockefeller is Chairman of the 
Development Commission. 

Fermin Silveira Zorzi, General Manager of 
the Banco de la Republica, is Chairman of the 
Uruguayan Council. The other members are: 

Jose Brunet, President of the Chamber of 

Commerce, vice chairman 
Jacobo Varela, former Minister to the 

United States 
Ramon Alvarez Lista, President of the 

Chamber of Industries 
Ricardo Cosio, well-known businessman 
Juan F. Yriart, formerly Attache of the 

Uruguayan Legation in Great Britain, 

now in the Foreign Office, secretary 



The Paraguayan Council is headed by Oscar 
Perez Uribe, President of the Centro de Impor- 
tadores and a leading Paraguayan businessman. 
The other members include : 

Ladislao Z. Vaccaro, President of the Union 

Industrial Paraguaya and member of 

the board of the Banco Agricola, vice 

chairman 
Emigdio Arza, President of the Asociacion 

Rural Paraguaya 
Manuel Ferreira, a leading Paraguayan 

merchant 
Francisco Ferrario, of the exporting firm of 

Ferrario and Co. 
Julio J. Bajac, Director de Comercio Inter- 

nacional del Ministerio de Relaciones Ex- 

teriores, secretary 

Arrangements for establishment of the Para- 
guayan Council were completed in Asuncion, 
where an initial meeting has been held. Similar 
councils composed of outstanding business, pro- 
fessional, and technical men have been formed 
in Brazil and Argentina. 



288 



Europe 



PROPERTY OF HUNGARY IN THE 
UNITED STATES 

On March 13, 1941, the President signed 
Executive Order No. 8711, extending all the 
provisions of Executive Order No. 8389 of April 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

10, 1940, as amended, to "property in which 
Hungary or any national thereof has at any 
time on or since March 13, 1941, had any interest 
of any nature whatsoever, direct or indirect . . ." 
The text of Executive Order No. 8711 appears in 
the Federal Register of March 15, 1941 (vol. 6, 
no. 52), page 1443, and the regulations of the 
Treasury Department, issued March 13, 1941 
under authority of this order, appear in the 
same issue of the Federal Register, page 1450. 



Cultural Relations 



STUDENT GROUP WELCOMED BY VICE PRESIDENT 



The Hon. Henry A. Wallace, Vice President 
of the United States, who recently accepted 
membership on the General Advisory Commit- 
tee to the Department in the field of cultural 
relations, welcomed a group of 107 students and 
professional leaders from the other American 
republics in the Caucus Room of the Senate 
Office Building. Senators and Representatives 
from a dozen States were also on hand to greet 
the visitors. 



Vice President Wallace spoke to the visitors 
briefly in Spanish and emphasized the need of 
deeper understanding between the peoples of 
the American republics "to fortify us against 
the perils which today menace the world". 

The group of students and professional lead- 
ers, among whom were representatives from 
Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay, Chile, Ecuador, 
Colombia, and Peru, had just completed a 
special "summer school" session at the University 
of North Carolina. 



MOTION-PICTURE-PROJECTION EQUIPMENT FOR UNITED STATES 

MISSIONS 



The Office of the Coordinator of Commercial 
and Cultural Relations Between the American 
Republics has made available twenty 16 mm. 
sound-motion-picture projectors for distribu- 
tion by the Department of State to United 
States embassies and legations in the other 
American republics. The projectors are to be 
used for the showing of cultural and educa- 
tional films to interested groups. They will 
be lent for this purpose to schools, clubs, and 
other organizations. 



Various approved films, from different 
sources, will be transmitted to the missions for 
use with the projection equipment. Of par- 
ticular interest will be the 12 reels recently se- 
lected by the Interdepartmental Committee on 
Cooperation with the American Republics. 
These films, chosen from among the films pro- 
duced by various Government agencies, will 
be sound-tracked with Spanish and Portuguese 
narrations. 



MARCH 15, 1941 



289 



PROFESSOR AND STUDENT EXCHANGES 



The announcement that on February 15, 1941 
Mexico deposited with the Pan American 
Union the instrument of ratification of the Con- 
vention for the Promotion of Inter-American 
Cultural Relations signed by the 21 American 
republics at Buenos Aires December 23, 1936 
(Treaty Series 928) 6 brings to 15 the number 
of countries which have agreed to carry out 
the terms of the convention, the provisions of 
which are administered by the Department of 
State on behalf of the United States. The con- 
vention provides for the annual exchange of 
two graduate students or teachers and the bien- 
nial exchange of professors by the United States 
and each of the other ratifying republics. 

Two graduate students from the United 
States, John D. Vanderburgh and Charles C. D. 
Watland, have just been selected by the Chilean 
Government to study in Chile. Mr. Vander- 
burgh was born in San Francisco, Calif., and 
was graduated from Stanford University, 
where he is at present serving as an assistant in 
the Department of History. Mr. Watland is 
an instructor of romance languages at Johns 
Hopkins University. Born in Albert Lea, 
Minn., he is a graduate of Swarthmore Col- 
lege and received his A.M. degree from the 
University of Minnesota. From the list re- 
cently submitted by the Costa Rican Govern- 
ment the United States has selected Guillermo 
Arias and Guillermo Padilla, who will arrive 
in September to study in this country. Lists of 
names have also recently been submitted to the 
United States by the Governments of Brazil 
and Venezuela from which the Committee on 
Exchange Fellowships and Professorships is 
now making its selections. In turn the United 
States Government has submitted to Paraguay 
a list of students for selection by the Paraguayan 
Government. 

Already a total of 14 graduate students froin 
Chile, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Haiti, 



' See the Bulletin of March 1, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 88), 
p. 240. 



Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, and Venezuela 
are studying in the United States under the 
terms of the convention. Similarly 10 American 
graduate students have undertaken special 
courses of study in Chile, Brazil, Costa Rica, 
Dominican Republic, Nicaragua, Panama, and 
Veneziiela. 

Two professors, Prof. Arthur S. Aiton of the 
University of Michigan and Prof. Gordon Ire- 
land of the Portia Law School of Boston, Mass., 
will soon be leaving to fill their new appoint- 
ments — the former to lecture on history in Costa 
Rica and the latter to lecture on law in the 
Dominican Republic. Dr. Aiton is professor of 
history at the University of Michigan and has 
also lectured at the Universities of Chicago, 
California, and Seville, Spain. He is the author 
of numerous pamphlets and articles, most of 
them on the history of the other American re- 
publics. Dr. Ireland, who has practiced law 
both in the United States and in Cuba, taught at 
Harvard Law School and at Louisiana State 
University Law School before assuming his du- 
ties as professor of law at the Portia Law School 
of Boston. He has written for publication 
numerous articles on civil, comparative, and in- 
ternational law. Four professors from univer- 
sities and colleges in the United States have al- 
ready gone to teach in educational institutions 
in Chile, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and Venezuela. 

The following students from the other Amer- 
ican republics are now attending univei-sities 
and colleges in the United States : 

Jorge del Canto, from Chile, studying at 
the University of California in the field 
of Geography 

Maria M. de Gonzalez, from Chile, studying 
at Columbia University in the field of 
Education 

Eugenio Salazar, from Chile, studying at 
Catholic University in the field of Engi- 
neering 

Leopoldo Seguel, from Chile, studying at 
Columbia University in the field of Edu- 
cation 



290 

Fernando Carvajal, from Costa Rica, study- 
ing at Cornell University in the field of 
Agriculture 

Oscar R. Battle, from the Dominican Re- 
public, studying at Columbia University 
in the field of Medicine 

Americo A. Martinez, from the Dominican 
Republic, studying at Columbia Univer- 
sity in the field of Engineering 

Max Bissainthe, from Haiti, studying at 
Columbia University in the field of 
Library Science 

William Savain, from Haiti, studying at 
Columbia University in the field of 
Medicine 

Jules Blanchet, from Haiti, studying at 
Columbia University in the field of 
Economics 

Rodolfo Abaiinza, from Nicaragua, study- 
ing at American University in the field 
of Political Science 

Diego M. Dominguez, from Panama, study- 
ing at the University of Chicago in the 
field of Philosophy 

Cesar A. Quintero, from Panama, studying 
at Georgetown University in the field of 
International Law- 
Julio C. Chanii B., from Paraguay, study- 
ing at the University of Chicago in the 
field of Medicine 

United States students who have grants to 
study abroad under the terms of the convention 
are as follows: 

Barbara. B. Hadley, from Shelburne Falls, 
Mass., in Brazil, studying Sociology 

Don H. Walther, from Chapel Hill, N. C, in 
Costa Rica, studying Literature 

Charles C. Hauch, from Chicago, 111., in the 
Dominican Republic, studying Interna- 
tional Relations 

Joseph Montllor, from New York, N. Y., in 
the Dominican Republic, studying 
History 

James S. Triolo, from Alameda, Calif., in 
Panama, studying History 

George W. Luttermoser, from Detroit, 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

Mich., in Venezuela, studying Agri- 
culture 

Edith A. Bronson, from Evanston, 111., in 
Costa Rica, studying Literature 

Ira E. Chart, from Dorchester, Mass., in 
Nicaragua, studying Literature 

Dorothy Field, from Phillips, Maine, re- 
cently completed studies in Political 
Science in Chile 

Esther Mathews, from Denver, Colo., just 
completed studies in Social Science in 
Chile 

Professors from universities and colleges in 
the United States who are already in residence- 
abroad lecturing or studying at educational in- 
stitutions are as follows: 

Prof. W. Rex Crawford, of the University 
of Pennsylvania, lecturing in Chile on 
Sociology 

Prof. Carroll W. Dodge, of Washington 
University, St. Louis, Mo., lecturing in 
Guatemala on Botany 

Prof. John Ashton, of Texas A. & M. Col- 
lege, lecturing in Nicaragua on Agri- 
culture 

Prof. Charles C. Griffin, of Vassar College, 
lecturing in Venezuela on History 

The graduate students and teachers are 
chosen for nomination by a Committee on Ex- 
change Fellowships and Professorships work- 
ing in connection with the Department of State. 
The lists of nominations are then submitted 
through United States missions to the govern- 
ments of the countries which have ratified the 
convention for final selection by them. 

The expenses involved in the exchange of 
students and teachers are shared by the par- 
ticipating governments. The nominating gov- 
ernment pays the round-trip travel costs 
together with other incidental expenses. The 
receiving government pays for tuition, sub- 
sidiary expenses, board, and lodging at the in- 
stitutions in which the visiting students are 
enrolled. 

Exchange professorships are administered by 
a different method. From the applications re- 



MARCH 15, 1941 

ceived a complete list of professors available 
for exchange services from the outstanding uni- 
versities, scientific institutions, and technologi- 
cal schools of the country is prepared by the 
Department of State and communicated to each 
of the other ratifying governments each alter- 
nating year. From this list each of the other 
countries arranges to select a visiting professor 
who is then assigned to give lectures in various 
centers and to conduct regular courses of in- 
struction or pursue special research in some 
designated institution. It is further expected 
that these professors will, in other appropriate 
ways, promote better understanding between 
the cooperating nations. 

All expenses incident to the exchange of pro- 
fessors are met by the sending government. 
Such expenses include travel to and from the 
country to which exchange professors are sent, 
as well as maintenance and local travel costs 
during the period of residence in the foreign 
country. 

The primary purpose of the exchange pro- 
gram of students, teachers, and professors is to 
develop a more realistic understanding between 
the peoples of the Western Hemisphere. By 
emphasizing the essential reciprocity of cultural 
relations, the exchanges are designed to make 
available to the people of the American repub- 
lics a more accurate knowledge of progress in 



291 

the fields of the humanities, social sciences, nat- 
ural sciences, law, medicine, pharmacy, journal- 
ism, technology, engineering, and other studies. 

This official exchange of students and pro- 
fessors is indicative of the interest of the var- 
ious governments concerned. The provisions 
of the Buenos Aires convention serve to sup- 
plement the efforts of private organizations and 
institutions in the field of cultural relations. 

During the past eight years the number of 
students in the United States from the other 
American republics has increased steadily. The 
most important single agency in this country 
for the encouragement of student interchange 
is the Institute of International Education. 
During the academic year 193:3-34, 15 students 
from the other American republics came to the 
United States under the auspices of this organi- 
zation. In 1940-41 this number had increased 
to 83, all of them studying on fellowships ad- 
ministered by the Institute. In 1933-34 the 
total number of all students from the other 
American republics studying in the United 
States was 675. By 1940^41 this number had 
increased to approximately 1,400, a very en- 
couraging sign of the ever-increasing interest 
which exists in promoting cultural relations be- 
tween the United States and the other American 
republics. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



COMMERCE 



INTER-AMERICAN COFFEE-MARKETING 

AGREEMENT 

Brazil 

The Director General of the Pan American 
Union informed the Secretary of State by a 
letter dated February 25, 1941 that the instru- 
ment of ratification by Brazil of the Inter- 
American Coffee-Marketing Agreement, signed 



at Washington on November 28, 1940, was de- 
posited with the Union on February 20, 1941. 
The instrument of ratification is dated January 
17, 1941. 

El Salvador 

By a despatch dated January 17, 1941, the 
American Minister to El Salvador reported that 
the Salvadoran Government by Executive De- 
cree No. 4 of January 7, 1941 appointed Senor 



292 

Roberto Aguilar Trigueros as its delegate to the 
"Inter-American Coffee Board", established by 
article IX of the agreement. Article IX reads 
as follows: 

"Article IX 

"The present Agreement shall be under the 
administration of a Board, which shall be 
known as the 'Inter-American Coffee Board', 
and which shall be composed of delegates rep- 
resenting the Governments of the participating 
countries. 

"Each Government shall appoint a delegate 
to the Board upon approval of the Agreement. 
In the absence of the delegate of any participat- 
ing country, his Government shall appoint an 
alternate who shall act in place of the delegate. 
Subsequent appointments shall be communi- 
cated by the respective Governments to the 
Chairman of the Board. 

"The Board shall elect from among its mem- 
bers a Chairman and a Vice Chairman who shall 
hold office for such period as it may determine. 

"The seat of the Board shall be in Wash- 
ington, D. C." 

Honduras 

The American Legation at Tegucigalpa re- 
ported by a despatch dated February 27, 1941 
that the Honduran Government had approved 
I he Inter-American Coffee-Marketing Agree- 
ment signed at Washington on November 28, 
1940. Decree No. 69, approving the agreement, 
was signed on February 11. 1941 and published 
in La Gaccta for February 24, 1941. 

PROPERTY 

SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION WITH GREAT 
BRITAIN CONCERNING THE TENURE AND DIS- 
POSITION OF REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY 

On March 10, 1941. the Secretary of State 
exchanged with the British Ambassador and 
the Minister of Australia ratifications of the 
Supplementary Convention between the United 
States and Great Britain and Northern Ireland. 
Australia, and New Zealand, signed May 27, 
1936, amending the Convention between the 
United States and Great Britain for the Tenure 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

and Disposition of Real and Personal Property, 
signed March 2. 1899 (Treaty Series 146). 

The convention concerning the tenure and dis- 
position of real and personal property between 
the United States and Her Britannic Majesty 
signed on March 2, 1899 was open to be made ap- 
plicable to British colonies or foreign posses- 
sions for one year after the exchange of ratifica- 
tions of the convention, which period was ex- 
tended for one more year by a supplementary 
convention signed January 13, 1902 (Treaty 
Series 402). The period during which notices 
of adherence might be given in behalf of British 
colonies and foreign possessions expired on July 
28, 1902. The convention was also open to be 
made applicable to overseas territories of the 
United States by notice by the United States 
to the British Government but without ex- 
pressed limit of time. Within the two-year pe- 
riod the convention was made applicable by the 
British Government to a large number of over- 
seas colonies and possessions. It has been made 
applicable by the United States to Hawaii and 
Puerto Rico. There are still certain overseas 
colonies and protectorates of the United King- 
dom (Great Britain and Northern Ireland), 
Australia, and New Zealand, including man- 
dated territories, to which the convention of 
1899 has not been made applicable, and it has 
not been made applicable to any overseas terri- 
tories of the United States except Hawaii and 
Puerto Rico. 

This supplementary convention will amend 
the convention signed on March 2, 1899. so as to 
open it without limit of time for adherence in 
respect of any colony or protectorate of His 
Britannic Majesty and of any territory admin- 
istered under the authority of Great Britain 
and Northern Ireland, Australia, or New Zea- 
land, including any mandated territory, to 
which that convention has not been made ap- 
plicable. The convention will confirm the right 
which the United States now has under the con- 
vention of 1899 to extend the provisions of that 
convention to any overseas territories of the 
United States by notice to Great Britain. It 
does not have the effect of applying the conven- 
tion immediately to any additional territorj' of 
any party. 



MARCH 15, 194 1 



293 



The principal provisions of the convention 
of March 2, 1899, are as follows : 

(1) Where a citizen or subject of either 
country would become heir or devisee to real 
property in the other country, except for being 
disqualified by his alienage, he may sell the 
property and withdraw the proceeds, and the 
taxes, probate, and other charges in such cases 
shall not exceed those applicable to citizens or 
subjects. 

(2) The citizens or subjects of either country 
in the territory of the other country shall have 
full power to dispose of their personal property 
by testament, donation, or otherwise, and their 
successors shall take possession without paying 
duties in excess of those required of citizens or 
subjects. 

(3) Upon the death of a citizen of either 
country in the other country without known 
heirs or testamentary executors the local au- 
thorities shall inform the consular officer of 
the decedent's country, and the consular officer 
shall have the right to appear personally on 
behalf of the absent heirs or creditors in pro- 
ceedings relating to the estate until they are 
otherwise represented. 

The Senate of the United States gave its 
advice and consent to the ratification of the sup- 
plementary convention on June 13, 1938, and the 
President ratified it on July 5, 1938. Recom- 
mendations of ratification were made by the 
Governments of Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland, New Zealand, and Australia, and in- 
struments of ratification were executed by the 
King on their behalf on August 2, 1938, De- 
cember 18, 1939, and September 2, 1940, re- 
spectively. The supplementary convention 
entered into force upon the exchange of 
ratifications. 

PROMOTION OF PEACE 

TREATY WITH THE UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA 
AMENDING THE TREATY FOR THE ADVANCE- 
MENT OF PEACE WITH GREAT BRITAIN, 
SIGNED SEPTEMBER 15, 1914 

On March 11, 1941, the Secretary of State, 
Mr. Cordell Hull, and the Minister of the Union 



of South Africa. Mr. Ralph William Close, ex- 
changed ratifications of a treaty between the 
United States and the Union of South Africa, 
signed by them on April 2, 1940, amending in 
their application to the Union of South Africa 
the provisions which concern the organization 
of commissions for the settlement of disputes 
contained in the Treaty for the Advancement 
of Peace between the United States and Great 
Britain signed at Washington September 15, 
1914 (Treaty Series 602). The Senate of the 
United States gave its advice and consent to 
the ratification of the treaty on November 26, 
1940, and the President ratified it on December 
20, 1940. After ratification had been recom- 
mended by the Government of the Union of 
South Africa, the King of Great Britain, Ire- 
land, and the British Dominions beyond the 
Seas, Emperor of India, ratified the treaty in 
respect of the Union of South Africa. 

The treaty of 1914 between the United Stales 
and Great Britain provided for the establish- 
ment of an international commission of five 
members, the duties of which were to make in- 
vestigations and reports to the Governments 
with reference to disputes arising between the 
United States and Great Britain (meaning any 
part of the British Empire). One member of 
the commission was chosen from its own citi- 
zens by the Government of the United States 
and one member from its own citizens by the 
Government of Great Britain; one member 
was chosen by each Government from some 
third country; and a fifth member was chosen 
by agreement between the two Governments 
from a country of which no other member 
of the commission is a citizen. The treaty 
also provides that in the event the. interests af- 
fected by any dispute about to be investigated 
should be mainly interests of one of the self- 
governing dominions of the British Empire the 
dominion concerned might furnish a list of per- 
sons from which a member of the commission 
would be appointed to serve in place of the 
British national member. 

The amendatory treaty with the Union of 
South Africa provides for the establishment of 
a separate commission between the United 



294 

States and the Union of South Africa instead 
of a commission established in the way provided 
under the treaty of 1914 in cases in which the 
interests involved might be mainly interests of 
the Union of South Africa. The commission 
will consist of five members, the same number 
as the commission established under the treaty 
of 1914 with Great Britain. One national and 
one non-national member will be appointed by 
the United States, and one national and one 
non-national member will be appointed by the 
Union of South Africa. The fifth member will 
be chosen by agreement between the Government 
of the United States and the Government of 
the Union of South Africa from a country of 
which no other member of the commission is 
a citizen. 

The substantive provisions of the treaty of 
1914 between the United States and Great Brit- 
ain as to the type of disputes to be submitted 
to the commission and other matters are made 
an integral part of the treaty between the 
United States and the Union of South Africa 
for observance and fulfillment between the two 
countries. The relations between the United 
States and the United Kingdom under the 
treaty of 1914 and the constitution of the com- 
mission to investigate and report on disputes 
that might arise between them are not affected 
by the amendatory treaty. 

Amendatory treaties similar to the one be- 
tween the United States and the Union of South 
Africa were signed with Canada, Australia, and 
New Zealand on September 6, 1940. 7 They have 
been ratified by the President by and with the 
advice and consent of the Senate, but ratifica- 
tions have not yet been exchanged. 

CLAIMS 

CONVENTION WITH CANADA FOR THE ESTAB- 
LISHMENT OF THE TRAIL SMELTER ARBITRAL 
TRIBUNAL 

On March 11, 1941, the Trail Smelter Arbitral 
Tribunal, United States and Canada, constituted 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

under the convention signed at Ottawa on April 
15, 1935 (Treaty Series 893) reported to the two 
Governments its final decision in relation to 
difficulties arising through complaints of dam- 
age in northern Stevens County, Washington, 
by fumes discharged from the smelter of the 
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company at 
Trail, British Columbia. 

By the convention the Government of Canada 
agreed to pay the United States the sum of 
$350,000 in settlement of claims for damages sus- 
tained prior to January 1, 1932. It was also 
stipulated in the convention that the question 
whether additional damages were caused in the 
State of Washington subsequent to January 1, 
1932, and also the matter of the indemnity, if 
any, which should be paid therefor, should be 
determined by the Tribunal established in pur- 
suance of the convention. On April 16, 1938 the 
Tribunal reported to the two Governments its 
finding that an indemnity of $78,000 should be 
paid for damages sustained between January 1, 
1932 and October 1, 1937. 8 That sum, and also 
the sum of $350,000 paid to the United States 
by the Government of Canada was distributed to 
the individual property owners in Stevens 
County who had sustained damages. 

In the final decision reported on March 11, 
1941 the Tribunal reached the conclusion that 
the record failed to establish "that any fumiga- 
tion between October 1, 1937 and October 1, 
1940, has caused injury to crops, trees or 
otherwise." 

In pursuance of a provision in the conven- 
tion authorizing the Tribunal to decide whether 
the smelter should be required to refrain from 
causing damages in the State of Washington in 
the future, the Tribunal stated in its final deci- 
sion that 

". . . So long as the present conditions in the 
Columbia River Valley prevail, the Trail 
Smelter shall be required to refrain from caus- 
ing any damage through fumes in the State of 
Washington ; the damage herein referred to and 
its extent being such as would be re- 



' See the Bulletin of September 7, 1940 (vol. Ill, 
no. 63), pp. 207-20S. 



8 See Press Releases of April 23, 1938 (vol. XVIII, 
no. 447), pp. 494-496. 



MARCH 15, 1941 



295 



coverable under the decisions of the Courts of 
the United States in suits between private 
individuals. . . ." 

With reference to the question in relation to 
what measures or regime, if any, should be 
adopted or maintained by the smelter, the Tri- 
bunal stated 

"... since the Tribunal has, in its previous 
decision, found that damage caused by the Trail 
Smelter has occurred in the State of Washing- 
ton since January 1, 1932 and since the Tri- 
bunal is of opinion that damage maj' occur in 
the future unless the operations of the Smelter 
shall be subject to some control, in order to 
avoid damage occurring, the Tribunal now de- 
cides that a regime or measure of control shall 
be applied to the operations of the Smelter and 
shall remain in full force unless and until modi- 
fied in accordance with the provisions herein- 
after set forth . . ." 



It was further stated that "in order to pre- 
vent the occurrence of sulphur dioxide in the 
atmosphere in amounts, both as to concentration, 
duration and frequency, capable of causing 
damage in the State of Washington, the opera- 
tion of the Smelter and the maximum emission 
of sulphur dioxide from its stacks shall be regu- 
lated" as provided in the regime established by 
the Tribunal, which regime, it is stated, will, 
in the opinion of the Tribunal, "probably result 
in preventing any damage of a material nature 
occurring in the State of Washington in the 
future." 

The prescribed regime provides for the opera- 
tion of the smelter and limitations on the maxi- 
mum emission of sulphur dioxide on the basis 
of numerous factors, including inter alia, wind 
direction, wind velocity, wind turbulence, at- 
mospheric temperature, barometric pressure, 
precipitation, etc. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 



[Released to the press March 15] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
Foreign Service since March 1, 1941 : 

Career Officers 

John G. Erhardt, of Brooklyn, N. Y., First 
Secretary of Embassy and Consul General at 
London, England, has been assigned for duty in 
the Department of State. 

Joseph W. Ballantine, of Amherst, Mass., 
now serving in the Department of State, has 
been designated Counselor of Embassy at 
Peiping, China. 

Carol H. Foster, of Annapolis, Md., Consul 
General at Sao Paulo, Brazil, has been assigned 
as Consul General at Johannesburg, Union of 
South Africa. 

Raymond E. Cox, of New York, N. Y., has 
been assigned as Consul General at Wellington, 
New Zealand. 



Thomas McEnelly, of New York, N. Y, Con- 
sul at Palermo, Italy, has been assigned as 
Consul at. Istanbul, Turkey. 

Walton C. Ferris, of Milwaukee, Wis., Con- 
sul at London, England, has been designated 
Second Secretary of Embassy at London, Eng- 
land, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Howard F. Withey, of Reed City, Mich., Con- 
sul at Naples, Italy, has been assigned as Consul 
at Trieste, Italy. 

Ralph A. Boernstein, of Washington, D. C, 
Consul at Leghorn, Italy, has been assigned as 
Consul at, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada. 

Frederick P. Latimer, Jr., of New London, 
Conn., Consul at Istanbul, Turkey, has been 
assigned as Consul at Johannesburg, Union of 
South Africa. 

J. Wesley Jones, of Sioux City, Iowa, Consul 
at Rome, Italy, has been assigned for duty in 
the Department of State. 



290 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



C. Grant Isaacs, of Tennessee, Consul at Lon- 
don, England, has been designated Second Sec- 
retary of Embassy at London, England, and 
will serve in dual capacity. 

John Peabody Palmer, of Seattle. Wash.. 
Vice Consul at London, England, has been des- 
ignated Third Secretary of Embassy at London, 
England, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Walter W. Orebaugh, of Wichita, Kans., Vice 
Consul at Trieste, Italy, has been assigned as 
Vice Consul at Nice, France. 

Frederick J. Cunningham, of Massachusetts, 
Vice Consul at Sao Paulo, Brazil, has been des- 
ignated Third Secretary of Embassy and Vice. 
Consul at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and will serve 
in dual capacity. 

Elim O'Shaughnessy, of New York, N. Y., 
Vice Consul at Natal, Brazil, has been assigned 
as Vice Consul at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 

Bolard More, of Delaware, Ohio, Vice Consul 
at Lagos, Nigeria, West Africa, has been as- 
signed as Vice Consul at Zurich, Switzerland. 

Milton K. Wells, of Bristow, Okla., Vice 
Consul at Callao-Lima, Peru, has been desig- 
nated Third Secretary of Embassy at Lima, 
Peru, and will serve in dual capacity. 

John Ordway, of Washington, D. C, Vice 
Consul at Colombo, Ceylon, has been assigned 
as Vice Consul at London, England. 

Francis C. Jordan, of Greensboro, N. C, Vice 
Consul at Porto Alegre, Brazil, has been as- 
signed as Vice Consul at Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

W. Stratton Anderson, Jr., of Carlinville, 111., 
Vice Consul at Johannesburg, Union of South 
Africa, has been assigned as Vice Consul at 
Lagos. Nigeria, West Africa. 

Non-career Officers 

Harold Sims, of Tennessee, Vice Consul at 
Pernambuco, Brazil, has been appointed Vice 
Consul at Natal, Brazil. 



The Department 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

By Departmental Order No. 931, signed by the 
Secretary of State March 14, 1941, Edgar P. 
Allen, Leonard H. Price, and Hallett Jolvnson, 
a Foreign Service officer of class II, on detail 
in the Department, were designated Assistant 
Chiefs of the Division of Controls, effective 
March 14. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Strategic Reserve of Australian Wool : Agreement 
Between the United States of America and Great Brit- 
ain — Effected by exchange of notes signed December 
9, 1940 ; effective December 9, 1940. Executive Agree- 
ment Series 195. Publication 1563. 6 pp. 50. 

The Need of a Sound Commercial Policy : Address 
by Henry F. Grady, Assistant Secretary of State, he- 
fore the Chamber of Commerce, St. Petersburg, Fla., 
October 16, 1940. Commercial Policy Series 65. Pub- 
lication 1569. 8 pp. 50. 

The Political and Economic Solidarity of the Amer- 
icas: Address by Laurence Duggan, Adviser on Polit- 
ical Relations, Department of State, before the Foreign 
Policy Association, New York, N. T., November 2, 1940. 
Commercial Policy Series 66. Publication 1570. 17 
pp. 50. 

Agriculture and International-Trade Relationships : 
Address by Henry F. Grady, Assistant Secretary of 
State, before the Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation, 
Jackson, Miss., November 14, 1940. Commercial Policy 
Series 67. Publication 1571. 7 pp. 50. 

Some Aspects and Implications of American Foreign 
Policy in the Present World Situation : Address by 
Lynn R. Edminster, Special Assistant to the Secretary 
of State before the Eastern Oregon Wheat League, 
Pendleton, Oreg., December 6, 1940. Commercial Pol- 
icy Series 68. Publication 1572. 16 pp. 50. 

Diplomatic List, March 1941. Publication 1573. 
ii, 97 pp. Subscription. $1 a year : single copy, IOC. 



MARCH 15, 1941 297 



Legislation 



the Foreign Service ; Message From the President of the 
United States Transmitting Report From the Secretary 
of State and Accompanying Draft of Proposed Legisla- 
tion To Amend Section 26 (D) of the Act Entitled "An 
Act for the Grading and Classification of Clerks in the 
An Act Further to promote the defense of the United Foreign Service of the United States of America, ami 

St;i(es, and for other purposes. Approved March 11, Providing Compensation Therefor," Approved February 

1941. (Public Law 11. 77th Cong.. 1st sess. [H. R. 23, 1931, As Amended. (H. Doc. 138, 77th Cong., 1st 

1776].) 3 pp. r»j: sess.) 4 pp. 50. 

Report ami Draft of Proposed Legislation To Amend Disposition of records by the Department of State. 

the Act for Grading and Classification of Clerks in ( H. Rept. 104. 77th Cong., 1st sess. > 2 pp. 50. 



Fur sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIBECTOE OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGE'! 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

uLJ) v/ Ji A JL J JL J 1L IL X n 



MARCH 22, 1941 
Vol. IV: No. 91— Publication 1581 



Qontents 




Canada : r »s« 

Great Lakes- St. Lawrence Waterway Project: 

Address by Assistant Secretary Berle 301 

Summary of the agreement between the United 

States and Canada 304 

Message of the President to Congress and text of the 

agreement 307 

Exchange of notes between the Prime Minister of 

Canada and the American Minister to Canada . . 313 

Reports of the United States St. Lawrence Advisory 
Committee and the Canadian Temporary Great 
Lakes - St. Lawrence Basin Committee on the 
International Rapids Section of the St. Lawrence 
Deep Waterway 316 

Europe: 

The Pilgrims' luncheon address by the American Am- 
bassador to Great Britain 330 

Food relief for unoccupied France: Statements by the 

Acting Secretary of State 333 

Detention of American newspaper correspondents by 

German authorities 333 

Pillaging of church in Moscow 334 

The Far East: 

Message from Chiang Kai-shek to the President . . . 334 

General: 

The Need for Spiritual Re-birth: Statement by Cord ell 

Hull 335 

[Over] 



U,S ' SUPER| NTENDFNTOr 

APR 9 1941 



Qontents 



-CONTINUED. 



General — Continued. Pa s» 

Coordination of relief activities 336 

Protection of American holdings in foreign countries . . 337 

Control of exports in national defense 338 

Cultural Relations: 

Activities in Peru 340 

Distribution of educational motion pictures in the 

American republics 340 

Visit of educator from Colombia 341 

Creation of Music Division in the Pan American Union . 341 

Institutes engaged in promotion of cultural relations . 342 

International Conferences, Commissions, Etc.: 

Pan American Institute of Geography and History . . 343 

Treaty Information: 
Waterways : 

Great Lakes- St. Lawrence Waterway Project . . 344 
Promotion of peace: 

Treaty With the Union of South Africa Amending 
the Treaty for the Advancement of Peace With 
Great Britain, Signed September 15, 1914 . . . . 344 
Commerce : 

Inter-American Coffee-Marketing Agreement . . . 344 
Conciliation : 

Treaty With Liberia 344 

Special assistance: 

Financial Convention With the Dominican Republic 

Revising the Convention of 1924 344 

Property : 

Supplementary Convention With Great Britain Con- 
cerning the Tenure and Disposition of Real and 
Personal Property 345 

The Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 346 

Regulations 346 

Publications 346 



Canada 



GREAT LAKES - ST. LAWRENCE WATERWAY PROJECT 



ADDRESS BY ASSISTANT SECRETARY BERLE ' 



[Released to the press March 22] 

Last Wednesday, in Ottawa, the Government 
of the United States and the Government of 
Canada signed a pact which is known as the 
Great Lakes - St. Lawrence agreement. 

Now the Great Lakes- St. Lawrence develop- 
ment is the last great development possible 
in North America which could compare in im- 
portance with, let us say, the Panama Canal. 

The St. Lawrence agreement contemplates 
two huge undertakings. 

The first is the building of a dam across the 
St. Lawrence River near Massena, N. Y., capable 
of developing 2,200,000 horsepower of electric- 
ity. There are also provided additional works 
at Niagara Falls which will preserve the 
beauty of the Falls — and incidentally develop a 
large amount of additional power there. The 
United States will spend about 110 millions for 
its share. It is planned to go ahead and develop 
this electric power immediately. 

The second big job is the authorization of a 
deep-water canal around, and locks to bypass, 
the dam. This will make it possible for an 
ocean-going ship to come from anywhere in the 
seven seas and dock at Buffalo, N. Y. ; or Cleve- 
land, Ohio ; or Detroit, Mich. ; or Chicago, 111. ; 
or Duluth, Minn.; or any other Great Lakes 
port. It will connect the whole of the Middle 
West with the whole of the open sea. 

The engineers tell us that under normal condi- 
tions it will take about three and a half years 



1 Broadcast over Station WMAX, National Broad- 
casting Co., Washington, March 22, 1941. 



to build the dam and about four years to build 
the canal. This can be speeded up somewhat if 
we put the job on an emergency basis. 

We want to start work on the dam as soon 
as the Congress approves the agreement and 
passes the necessary legislation. The sooner 
the better. We have to move fast on this phase 
of it. We need the electricity — and we need it 
now. 

The Seaway is arranged a little differently. 
The agreement calls for its completion in 1948. 
But Canada and the United States have agreed 
to watch the situation so that they can push the 
Seaway at once if circumstances require it for 
the national defense. Or they can postpone 
it if in the opinion of experts war efforts call for 
handling it differently. 

There is a story behind both of these projects. 

The chapter about the dam and the need of 
electric power is the most interesting, because 
it is the most urgent. It is this. 

The Lord Almighty so built the continent of 
North America that most of the water in the 
northeast quarter of the continent forms 
streams and rivers which flow into that huge 
collection of reservoirs we call the Great Lakes. 
This is an enormous amount of water. All of 
it funnels out to the sea through a single great 
millrace, which is the St. Lawrence River. If 
that water is ever harnessed, it will make the 
largest and cheapest supply of electricity availa- 
ble anywhere in the wide world. 

Seven years ago, President Roosevelt foresaw 
the need of using this power and urged that a 

301 



302 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



treaty with Canada be ratified so that the two 
countries could harness and use it. This was 
not a partisan matter; the treaty had actually 
been negotiated when Herbert Hoover was 
President. That treaty was not ratified, prin- 
cipally owing to the activities of the railroad 
and utility lobby in Washington — a lobby 
which, incidentally, is still on the job. Oppo- 
nents of the project said — and many people 
were simple enough to believe them — that no- 
body would ever need that much power. The 
real point, of course, was that they did not 
want anyone, to interrupt a power monopoly 
which then had things pretty much its own 
way. 

Well, it is now 1941, and here is the situation. 
We are using all the electric power we can buy 
or scrape or beg in the St. Lawrence Valley and 
in the Niagara Valley above it. We are borrow- 
ing on temporary agreement all the electricity 
that Canada can spare for us. We are building 
our industries on the chance that Canada will 
graciously go on giving us the power that we 
need. But we know that Canada bitterly needs 
that power today for her own national defense. 

Still worse, we have American companies 
begging us to get vast additional quantities of 
electricity — to borrow it, or buy it, or take it 
from Canada — although Canada has none to 
give. I have, on my desk now letters from the 
O.P.M. 2 asking me to get them more power at 
Niagara; and requests from the Federal Power 
Commission asking whether we cannot get even 
more power from Canada for the St. Lawrence 
Valley. When I asked why they wanted this, 
I was told that the United States needs alumi- 
num for airplanes; and chemicals for explo- 
sives; and electric furnaces for the new metals 
we put into planes and tanks and shells and 
rifles. I was told that we could not keep up the 
schedule in our rearmament unless electric 
power could be found to make the aluminum, to 
run the plants, to weld the steel, to keep the 
assembly lines moving. 

Even if there had been no European war, and 
if we had not had to rearm, our figures show 
that we should have needed all the St. Lawrence 



' Office of Production Management. 



power by the year 1948. So we have to start 
the job in the next two or three years anyhow. 
Because we have to rearm, and because Canada 
is fighting, we need the power as rapidly as we 
can get it — we ought, in fact, to have got started 
long ago. 

So we do not have any time to lose. We must 
get the power and get started right away, and 
push it through as fast as we can. Meantime, 
we must use every temporary makeshift we can 
work out. We will use steam when we can — 
but you cannot get steam generators in quick 
time. It would take longer to get steam gen- 
erators for 2,200,000 horsepower than to build 
the dam. But we only dare to use makeshifts 
if we know that at the end of three years, or 
sooner if possible, we shall have new supplies of 
electricity coming along to keep the mills going. 

You ought to know this story for a very 
simple reason. You are going to hear it said 
that there is no sense in building the St. Law- 
rence dam : it will not be done "in time" to be 
of use in our national defense. The people 
who tell you that are the same people who 
thought in 1934 that you never would need all 
this power. Today they all agree that it was a 
mistake not to build the St, Lawrence dam seven 
years ago — and jump to the strange conclusion 
that we ought not to do it at all. These people 
are like the man with the leaky roof. When 
the weather was fair the leak didn't need to be 
mended. When rainy weather came, he said it 
couldn't be mended. Finally, the roof fell to 
pieces. 

This time we must not make the mistake that 
was made seven years ago. Everybody hopes 
that the war may be over before three years 
have passed. But since nobody can guarantee 
that, we must not take any chances. We thor- 
oughly believe that Great Britain will win this 
war, but we propose to be fully prepared for 
defense no matter what happens. We think 
that there will be total victory for peace-loving 
nations in Europe. But if there is not, we are 
going to be set for the total defense of our own 
country and our own hemisphere. That means 
having electricity, and plants, and planes, and 
ships, and guns, enough to do the job. I do not 
think we can afford to be stopped in our pre- 



MARCH 2 2, 1941 

paredness by any group of interests whose de- 
sire is to keep electricity scarce and prices high. 

The other end of the story has to do with 
the Seaway. We may well be in a position in 
which we will need that Seaway as much, if not 
more than, we need the St. Lawrence dam and 
its electric power. 

The world needs ships — millions and mil- 
lions of tons of them in ordinary peacetimes. 
In time of war, she needs even more. Now 
this war is less than a year and a half old. 
Five million tons of shipping have already 
been sunk. The German Government tells us 
that the war on shipping has only barely 
begun; they are going to uncork their really 
heavy drive to sink ships this spring. If they 
make this threat good, the ships which are the 
life line of our commerce and the bridge for 
the defense of Britain and which make the life 
of half the world possible will be at the bottom 
of the Atlantic Ocean. We are the only nation 
in the world which can build ships in large 
quantity today. We are doing so now. Every 
shipyard on the Atlantic and on the Pacific 
coasts is already working to capacity. They 
are building the merchant-ships as fast as they 
can; but they are also building the two-ocean 
navy which we know now is needed for our 
national safety. All these shipyards, taken to- 
gether, are nowhere near enough to do the job 
that has to be done. 

The logical place to do a great part of that 
job is, of course, in the Great Lakes region. It 
is far inland and cannot be attacked. It is near 
the great steel plants which make the girders 
and hulls from which the ships are built. It is 
in the area where the engines which drive the 
ships are manufactured and where the skilled 
labor is available. 

It will surprise many of you to know that 
during the World War — the first World War, in 
1917 — we built ships in the Great Lakes. And, 
God forgive us, because we had never had the 
brains to dig the St. Lawrence Canal, we cut 
these ships in two and floated them in parts 
down to Montreal and then put them together 
again. 

We could lay down a heavy cruiser at Chicago 



303 

today and have the Seaway open before she 
could be put into commission and sent out to 
sea. The moment work begins on the Seaway 
I expect you will find naval construction be- 
ginning in the Lakes — clearing the sea-coast 
yards for more immediate needs. 

That is Avhy the Great Lakes -St. Lawrence 
agreement authorizes the building of this Sea- 
way so that we can unlock the huge resources 
of the Great Lakes region with its ore and its 
industrj'. They are unlocked for use in peace 
if peace shall come; they are unlocked for na- 
tional defense if things go badly overseas. You 
will see why we have to think of this when you 
remember that the entire American merchant 
fleet is only seven million tons, and that our 
shipyards can only build a million tons a year — 
at a time when the Germans have been able to 
sink half a million tons a month. 

Again you will hear people say about the 
Seaway : "Why do it now ? It won't be ready 
in time." But I should like to ask: Well, sup- 
pose we don't do it now ; and suppose the time 
comes when we need it and are not ready? If 
we fail to fill our industrial lamp now that we 
can, when we need it most, the light will go out. 
Statesmanship has to be built on better sense 
than that. 

We have had the most careful and elaborate 
studies of the Great Lakes -St. Lawrence proj- 
ect. They show, pretty conclusively, that the 
completion of the Seaway, like the completion 
of the. St. Lawrence power, will be excellent 
business for everybody, all around. If you are 
interested, you can get those St. Lawrence sur- 
vey reports from the Government Printing 
Office. 

I believe that the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence 
project is the best answer to dictators who say 
that democracy cannot act. It is a magnificent 
undertaking in a great time. Two free na- 
tions — Canada and ourselves — here pool their 
resources in friendship, for their common wel- 
fare and their common defense. I hope you 
will support the approval of the Great Lakes - 
St. Lawrence project as a measure for protec- 
tion in need, and for production and prosperity 
when God grants us peace again. 



304 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



SUMMARY OF THE AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA 



[Released to the press March 21] 

An agreement was signed between the United 
States and Canada on March 19, 1941, pro- 
viding for the cooperative development and 
utilization of the water in the Great Lakes - 
St. Lawrence River basin for navigation and 
power. The signatories to the pact, concluded 
at Ottawa, were the Hon. Leland Olds, Chair- 
man of the Federal Power Commission; the 
Hon. Adolf A. Berle, Jr., Assistant Secretary 
of State ; and the Hon. Jay Pierrepont Moffat, 
American Minister to Canada, on behalf of 
the United States; and the Right Hon. W. L. 
Mackenzie King, Prime Minister of Canada, 
President of the Privy Council, and Secretary 
of State for External Affairs; the Hon. Clar- 
ence D. Howe, Minister of Munitions and Sup- 
ply; and Mr. John E. Read, Legal Adviser to 
the Department of External Affairs, on behalf 
of Canada. The agreement contemplates an 
early completion of the Seaway between the 
Great Lakes and the Atlantic Ocean by the 
St. Lawrence River, as well as the develop- 
ment of the vast hydro-electric resources of the 
International Rapids Section of that river. 

The agreement is subject to approval by the 
Congress of the United States and the Parlia- 
ment of Canada. 

An exchange of notes preceding the agree- 
ment revealed that the construction of this 
project is regarded as directly associated with 
both the power-supply and ship-building phases 
of our national-defense program, including the 
plan for defense of the Western Hemisphere 
and the determination to supply all possible 
aid to Great Britain, the members of the Brit- 
ish Commonwealth, and their allies. 

In a personal message to Prime Minister 
Mackenzie King, the President pointed out 
that while our countries must put forth the 
maximum immediate defense effort, we must 
also prepare for a protracted emergency which 
will call upon the industries on both sides of 
the border to meet constantly expanding de- 



mands. He called attention to the fact that, 
in terms of the time factor, the St. Lawrence 
project could be completed as soon as vessels 
of war, for which money is now being ap- 
propriated. 

The President concluded that "failure to take 
advantage of the possibilities of this project 
would be short-sighted, in no way contributing 
to an increase in our immediate defense effort, 
while limiting our defense program in the diffi- 
cult years which lie ahead". 

The essential features of the agreement may 
be summarized as follows : 

Provision for Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Basin 
Commission 

In article I the two Governments agree to 
establish and maintain a Great Lakes - St. Law- 
rence Basin Commission, consisting of not more 
than 10 members, with each Government desig- 
nating an equal number. The duties of this 
Commission would be to prepare and recom- 
mend general plans and specifications for the 
construction of works in the International 
Rapids Section, prepare a schedule allocating 
the construction of these works to the respective 
Governments, approve all contracts, and super- 
vise the construction work. The Commission 
would submit periodic reports to the two Gov- 
ernments on the progress of the work. 

Undertaking by Canada 

In article II the Government of Canada 
agrees to construct the works in the Inter- 
national Rapids Section allocated to Canada 
by the Commission, to operate and maintain 
the works in Canadian territory, and to com- 
plete, not later than December 31, 1948, the 
essential Canadian links in the deep waterway. 
There is a proviso that the period within which 
the waterway links are to be completed may be 
changed by mutual agreement to meet the re- 
quirements of continuance of war conditions or 
of defense. 



MARCH 22, 1941 

Undertaking by the, United States 

In article III the Government of the United 
States agrees to construct the works in the In- 
ternational Rapids Section allocated to the 
United States by the Commission, to operate 
and maintain the works in United States terri- 
tory, and, not later than the date of completion 
of the essential Canadian links, to complete the 
works allocated to it in the International Rapids 
Section and the works in the Great Lakes Sys- 
tem above Lake Erie required to create essential 
links in the deep waterway. 

To counterbalance expenditures already made 
by Canada in the Welland Canal link in the 
deep waterway, the Government of the United 
States also agrees to provide funds for all works 
in the International Rapids Section except ma- 
chinery and equipment for the development of 
power and works required for rehabilitation on 
the Canadian side of the boundary. 

Installation for Power and Use of Water 

In article IV the two Governments agree that 
each may arrange for the installation in its own 
territory of machinery and equipment for the 
development of power at such time or times as 
may best meet its power requirements, and that, 
except for the water which Ontario plans to 
divert from the Albany watershed into the Great 
Lakes Basin, each country shall be entitled to 
utilize one half of the natural flow of water 
available for power purposes in the Interna- 
tional Rapids Section of the St. Lawrence River. 

In this article the two Governments also agree 
that the flow of the water shall be controlled 
and regulated so as to protect the navigable 
depths in the harbor of Montreal and in the 
navigable channel of the St. Lawrence River 
below Montreal. They also agree to maintain 
facilities for 14-foot navigation during the con- 
struction period. 

Maintenance of Existing Rights 

In articles V, VI, and VII the two Govern- 
ments agree that nothing done under the agree- 
ment shall alter the rights of the Governments 
within their respective territories; that either 
Government may at any time construct at its 



305 

own cost alternative canal and channel facilities 
for navigation within its own territory; and 
that existing rights of navigation in both the 
Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence River shall 
be maintained. 

Diversions to and from the Great Lakes Basin 
In article VIII the two Governments agree 
that either country diverting waters into the 
Great Lakes System, from other watersheds 
lying wholly within its borders, shall have the 
exclusive right to the use of equivalent amounts 
of water for power below the port of entry, so 
long as it constitutes a part of boundary waters. 
In this article the two Governments also agree 
that, if any diversion of water from the Great 
Lakes -St. Lawrence System, other or greater 
than diversions permitted in either country on 
January 1, 1940, is authorized, the Government 
of such country will give immediate considera- 
tion to any representations which the other 
country may make. In case no settlement is 
reached, on the request of the other Govern- 
ment, such country will submit the matter to an 
arbitral tribunal which shall be empowered to 
direct such compensating or remedial measures 
as it deems just and reasonable. 

Preservation and Use of Niagara Falls and 
Rwer 

In article IX, the two Governments agree to 
provide for the preservation and enhancement 
of the scenic beauty of the Niagara Falls and 
River and for the most beneficial use of the 
waters of that river, as envisaged in the Final 
Report of the Special International Niagara 
Board. Such provision would include: 

(1) Plans, to be prepared by the Great 
Lakes - St. Lawrence Basin Commission, for 
works designed to distribute and control the 
waters of the Niagara River, to prevent ero- 
sion, and to insure at all seasons unbroken 
crest lines on both the American and Cana- 
dian Falls. The construction of such works 
would be arranged by exchange of notes. 

(2) Permission, on completion of such 
works, for each country to authorize an addi- 
tional diversion at the rate of 5,000 cubic feet 



306 

of water per second for power purposes 
within its borders. 

(3) Recommendation by the Commission, 
after exhaustive tests, for the best and most 
equitable use of the waters of the Niagara 
River, with particular reference to preserva- 
tion of the scenic, beauty of the Falls and 
Rapids, the requirements of navigation and 
power. The agreement provides that, on the 
basis of the Commission's recommendations, 
the Governments may by exchange of notes 
and concurrent legislation determine the 
methods by which these purposes may be 
attained. 

Claims, Damages, and Land Acquisition 

In article X the Governments agree on pro- 
visions for the disposition of claims and for 
responsibility for damages. Each Government 
assumes responsibility for the acquisition of 
lands or interests in lands in its own territory. 

Emergency Speeds Negotiations 

Negotiations leading to the present agree- 
ment were initiated in 1936. The outbreak of 
the war in 193!) and the events of 1940, which 
compelled adoption of a policy of hemispheric 
defense, made it obvious that an agreement was 
of major importance. Accordingly, the tech- 
nical features of the project were reviewed by 
experts from both Canada and the United 
States. On October 17, 1940, President Roose- 
velt allocated $1,000,000 of one of the early 
special defense appropriations to the Federal 
Power Commission and the Corps of Engineers 
of the United States Army for preliminary in- 
vestigations, particularly engineering surveys, 
of the International Rapids Section of the St. 
Lawrence River. At the same time the Presi- 
dent established a St. Lawrence Advisory 
Committee consisting of Messrs. Leland Olds, 
Chairman of the Federal Power Commission; 
Adolf A. Berle, Jr., Assistant Secretary of 
State ; Brig. Gen. Thomas M. Robins, Corps of 
Engineers, United States Army ; and Gerald V. 
Cruise, Executive Secretary and Acting Chief 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

Engineer of the New York State Power Au- 
thority. 2 The function of this Committee has 
been to advise the President in the necessary 
preliminary planning and to cooperate with 
the appropriate agencies of the Canadian Gov- 
ernment, particularly the Canadian Temporary 
Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Basin Committee, a 
comparable body designated to assist the Can- 
adian Government. These two Committees 
completed a Joint Report on January 3, 1941, 
which has been submitted to President Roose- 
velt and Prime Minister King. In this Joint 
Report the results of engineering investiga- 
tions are submitted. The principal conclusion 
contained in the report is that the so-called 
"238-242" Single Stage Control Project is the 
plan best adapted for the development of the 
International Rapids Section of the St. Law- 
rence River. Such a project, according to the 
Joint Report, "combines the essential features 
which have been continuously advocated by the 
representatives of both countries throughout 
the long period of study and negotiation de- 
voted to the undertaking", and involves a con- 
struction program arranged "so that delivery 
of power can be begim and navigation pro- 
vided within four years of the time when active 
work is initiated". Accompanying the Joint 
Report there were analyses of the main feat- 
ures of the Single Stage Project and a revised 
series of cost estimates which take into account 
rising construction costs and additional ex- 
pense likely to be incurred in expediting the 
work in the interests of national defense. 

These engineering data were submitted jointly 
by Brig. Gen. Thomas M. Robins, Corps of 
Engineers, United States Army, and the Hon. 
Guy A. Lindsay, Engineer in Charge, General 
Engineering Branch, Department of Transport 
of the Canadian Government. They were as- 
sisted by Olivier O. Lefebvre, Vice Chairman 
of the Quebec Streams Commission; T. H. 
Hogg, Chairman and Chief Engineer of the 
Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario; 
M. C. Hendry, Assistant Engineer, Hydro-Elec- 



' See the Bulletin of October 19, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 
69), pp. 316-317. 



MARCH 22, 1941 



307 



trie Power Commission of Ontario; Roger B. 
McWhorter, Chief Engineer, Federal Power 
Commission; and Gerald V. Cruise, Executive 
Secretary and Acting Chief Engineer, New 
York State Power Authority. 

Cost of International Rapids Section Project 

According to the cost estimates, the total cost 
of the project in the International Rapids Sec- 
tion will be $266,170,000. This will provide for 



completion of the 2,200,000-horsepower power 
project as well as for the deep waterway im- 
provement in this section of the river. In 
addition, there will be expenditures for the 
improvement of navigation channels, both 
below and above the International Rapids Sec- 
tion, in order that a waterway to accommodate 
vessels requiring 27-foot draft may be provided 
throughout the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence 
System, from Lake Superior to Montreal. 



MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT TO CONGRESS AND TEXT OF THE AGREEMENT 



[Released to the press by the White House March 21] 

To the Congress of the United States: 

I transmit herewith for the information of 
the Congress the text of an agreement between 
the Government of the United States and the 
Government of Canada providing for the con- 
struction of dams and power works in the inter- 
national rapids section of the St. Lawrence 
River; and providing for completion of the es- 
sential links in the Great Lakes- St. Lawrence 
Deep Waterway when the Governments of the 
United States and Canada agree that circum- 
stances require it. 

The terms of the agreement contemplate that 
it shall be made effective by concurrent legisla- 
tion of the Canadian Parliament and of the 
Congress of the United States. 

I expect to request introduction, in due course, 
of legislation designed to make this agreement 
effective. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 

The White House, 
March 21, 1941. 

[Released to the press March 21] 

The President of the United States of Amer- 
ica and His Majesty the King of Great Britain, 
Ireland and the British dominions beyond the 
Seas, Emperor of India, in respect of Canada, 
have decided to conclude an Agreement in rela- 
tion to the utilization of the water in the Great 
Lakes - St. Lawrence Basin and to that end 
have named as their respective plenipoten- 
tiaries : 



The President of the United States of 
America : 

Jay Pierrepont Moffat, 

Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Pleni- 
potentiary of the United States of 
America to Canada; 
Adolf Augustus Berle, Jr., 

Assistant Secretary of State; 
Leland Olds, 

Chairman of the, Federal Power Commis- 
sion ; 

His Majesty the King of Great Britain, Ire- 
land and the British dominions beyond the 
Seas, Emperor of India, for Canada: 

The Right Honourable W. L. Mackenzie 
King, 
Prime Minister, President of the Privy 
Council and Secretary of State for 
External Affairs; 
The Honourable Clarence D. Howe, 

Minister of Munitions and Supply; 
John E. Read, 

Legal Adviser, Department of External 
Affairs ; 

Who, after having communicated to each 
other their full powers, found in good and due 
form, have, agreed upon the following Articles : 

Preliminary Article 

For the purposes of the present Agreement, 
unless otherwise expressly provided, the exj:>res- 
sion : 



308 

(a) "Joint Board of Engineers" means the 
board appointed pursuant to an agreement be- 
tween the Governments following the recom- 
mendation of the International Joint Commis- 
sion, dated December 19, 1921; 

(b) "Great Lakes System" means Lakes 
Superior, Michigan, Huron (including Geor- 
gian Bay), Erie and Ontario, and the connect- 
ing waters, including Lake St. Clair; 

(c) "St. Lawrence River" includes the river 
channels and the lakes forming parts of the 
river channels from the outlet of Lake Ontario 
to the sea ; 

(d) "International Section" means that part 
of the St. Lawrence River through which the 
international boundary line runs ; 

(e) "Canadian Section" means that part of 
the St. Lawrence River which lies wholly within 
Canada and which extends from the easterly 
limit of the International Section to Montreal 
Harbor ; 

(f) "International Rapids Section" means 
that part of the International Section which 
extends from Chimney Point to the village of 
St. Regis; 

(g) "Governments" means the Government 
of the United States of America and the Gov- 
ernment of Canada ; 

(h) "countries" means the United States of 
America and Canada ; 

(i) "Special International Niagara Board" 
means the board appointed by the Governments 
in 1926 to ascertain and recommend ways and 
means to preserve the scenic beauty of the 
Niagara Falls; 

(j) "deep waterway" means adequate provi- 
sion for navigation requiring a controlling 
channel depth of 27 feet with a depth of 30 feet 
over lock sills, from the head of the Great Lakes 
to Montreal Harbor via the Great Lakes Sys- 
tem and St. Lawrence River, in general accord- 
ance with the specifications set forth in the Re- 
port of the Joint Board of Engineers, dated 
November 16, 1926. 

Article I 

1. The Governments agree to establish and 
maintain a Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Basin 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

Commission, hereinafter referred to as the 
Commission, consisting of not more than ten 
members of whom an equal number shall be ap- 
pointed by each Government. The duties of the 
Commission shall be : 

(a) to prepare and to recommend plans 
and specifications for the construction of 
works in the International Rapids Section 
in accordance with and containing the fea- 
tures described in the Annex attached to and 
made part of this Agreement, with such modi- 
fications as may be agreed upon by the Gov- 
ernments; 

(b) upon approval of the plans and speci- 
fications by the Governments, to prepare a 
schedule allocating the construction of the 
works in the International Rapids Section 
on such a basis that each Government shall 
construct the works within its own territory 
or an equivalent proportion of the works so 
approved ; 

(c) to approve all contracts entered into on 
behalf of either Government for the works 
in the International Rapids Section; 

(d) to supervise the construction of the 
works and to submit reports to the Govern- 
ments from time to time, and at least once 
each calendar year, on the progress of the 
works ; 

(e) upon satisfactory completion of the 
works, to certify to the Governments that 
they meet the plans and specifications drawn 
up by the Commission and approved by the 
Governments ; 

(f ) to perform the other duties assigned to 
it in this Agreement. 

2. The Commission shall have the authority 
to employ such persons and to make such ex- 
penditures as may be necessary to carry out 
the duties set forth in this Agreement. It 
shall have the authority to avail itself of the 
services of such governmental agencies, officers 
and employees of either country as may be 
made available. The remuneration, general 
expenses and all other expenses of its mem- 
bers shall be regulated and paid by their re- 
spective Governments; and the other expenses 
of the Commission, except as provided for 



MARCH 22, 1941 



309 



under Article III, paragraph (b) of this Agree- 
ment, shall be borne by the Governments in 
equal moieties. 

3. The Governments agree to permit the 
entry into their respective countries, within 
areas immediately adjacent to the Niagara 
River and the International Section to be de- 
limited by exchange of notes, of personnel em- 
ployed by the Commission or employed in the 
construction of the works, and to exempt such 
personnel from the operation of their immi- 
gration laws and regulations within the areas 
so delimited. In the event that the Commis- 
sion, pursuant to the provisions of paragraph 
1. (b) of this Article, allocates to either of 
the Governments the construction of works, 
any part of which is within the territory of 
the other Government, the latter Government 
shall make provision for the according, within 
the area in which such a part is situated, of 
such exemption from customs, excise and other 
imposts, federal, state and provincial, as may 
be reasonably practicable for the effective and 
economical prosecution of the work. Regula- 
tions providing for such exemptions may be 
settled by the Governments by exchange of 
notes. 

4. The Governments shall, by exchange of 
notes, prescribe rules and regulations for the 
conduct of the Commission. They may by 
the same means extend or abridge its powers 
and duties; and reduce or after reduction in- 
crease the number of members (provided that 
there must always be an equal number ap- 
pointed by each Government and that the total 
number of members shall at no time exceed 
ten) ; and upon completion of its duties, the 
Governments may terminate its existence. 

Article II 

The Government of Canada agrees: 

(a) in accordance with the plans and speci- 
fications prepared by the Commission and ap- 
proved by the Governments, to construct the 
works in the International Rapids Section 
allocated to Canada by the Commission; and 
to operate and maintain or arrange for the 
operation and maintenance of the works sit- 
uated in the territory of Canada ; 



(b) to complete, not later than December 
31, 1948, the essential Canadian links in the 
deep waterway, including the necessary deep- 
ening of the new Welland Ship Canal and the 
construction of canals and other works to pro- 
vide the necessary depth in the Canadian sec- 
tion of the St. Lawrence River: provided that, 
if the continuance of war conditions or the 
requirements of defence justify a modification 
of the period within which such works shall 
be completed, the Governments may, by ex- 
change of notes, arrange to defer or expedite 
their completion as circumstances may require. 

Article III 

The Government of the United States of 
America agrees: 

(a) in accordance with the plans and speci- 
fications prepared by the Commission and ap- 
proved by the Governments, to construct the 
works in the International Rapids Section allo- 
cated to the United States of America by the 
Commission; and to operate and maintain or 
arrange for the operation and maintenance of 
the works situated in the territory of the United 
States of America; 

(b) to provide, as required by the progress 
of the works, funds