(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Department of State bulletin"

\im a 



liiiliiiiiiil 




:fU 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 




ULL 



H 



^ ^ 



riN 



Qontents 



APRIL 5, 1941 

Vol. IV: No. 93— Publication 1586 




Europe: Page 

German and Italian ships in United States ports . .. 419 

Request for withdrawal of Italian Naval Attache . . 420 

Release of American citizens detained in Germany . ■ 421 
Presentation of letters of credence by the Minister of 

Hungary 421 

Contributions for relief in belligerent countries .... 422 

American Republics: 

Inter- American Development Commission: Bolivian 

Council 423 

Visit to United States of newly appointed Foreign 

Minister of Aigentina 423 

The Near East: 

New American Legation building in Liberia 424 

Commercial Policy: 

The Trade-Agreements Program: Statement by the 

Secretary of State 424 

Importation of oranges into Canada 425 

General: 

Purchase of food and clothing from abroad 426 

New-style passports 427 

Cultural Relations: 

Cooperation of women's organizations 427 

Christening of ship by daughter of President of Brazil . 429 

University of Costa Rica 429 

Visit of educators from Costa Rica and Panama . . . 430 

Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, Etc.: 

Monthly statistics 430 



[Over] 



U. S. SliPfWNTfNOFNT OF DOCUMENTS 



APR 21 '^'.: 



Qontents- 



CONTINUED. 



Treaty Information: page 

Commerce : 

Inter-American Coffee-Marketing Agreement . . . 437 
Aviation : 

Agreement With Mexico for the Reciprocal Transit 

of Military Aircraft 437 

Extradition : 

Supplementary Convention With Mexico 437 

Special Assistance : 

Financial Convention mth the Dominican Republic 

Revising the Convention of 1924 437 

Fisheries : 

Convention With Canada on Preservation of the 
Halibut Fishery of the Northern Pacific Ocean 
and the Bering Sea 438 

The Foreign Service: 

Persomiel changes 439 

Publications 440 

Legislation 440 



Europe 



GERMAN AND ITALIAN SHIPS IN UNITED STATES PORTS 



[Released to the press April 4) 

The following note has been sent by the Sec- 
retary of State to the Charge d'Affaires ad 
interim of Germany, Herr Hans Thomsen: 

"April 3, 1941. 
"Sir: 

"I am in receipt of your two notes dated 
March 31 and April 1, 1941/ respectively, re- 
garding the taking of possession and control 
of the German tanker Pauline Friedrich in 
the port of Boston and the motorship AraiKa 
at Port Everglades and the removal therefrom 
of the officers and crews. 

"I note your allegation that there is no legal 
basis in international law for the action taken 
and that it constitutes a violation of the exist- 
ing Treaty of Friendship, Commerce and Con- 
sular Rights, signed by our two Governments 
on December 8, 1923. You even go so far as 
to request that these vessels be restored to the 
'unlimited authority of the captains' and that 
the members of the crews be placed at 'liberty 
immediately' and allowed 'to return to and 
stay on board their ships', etc. 

"I am surprised at these extreme assertions 
and demands. In the first place, you do not 
state upon what principle of international 
law or upon what provision of the treaty be- 
tween our two countries you rely, and in the 
second place, you seem wholly to disregard 
the plain provisions of our statutes which make 
it a felony for the master or any other person 
in cliarge or command of a vessel, foreign or 



' Neither printed herein. 
306558 — 41 1 



domestic, or for any member of the crew or 
other person, within the territorial waters of 
the United States, wilfully to cause, or permit 
the destruction or injury of such a vessel or 
to tamper with its motive power or instru- 
mentalities of navigation; and which author- 
ize the authorities of this Government to take 
possession and control of any vessel and to re- 
move therefrom the officers and crew when 
such action is deemed to be necessary to pro- 
tect the vessel from damage or injury or to 
prevent damage or injury to any harbor or 
waters of the United States. 

"I know of no principle of international law 
which permits the masters or crews of vessels 
of a country which have sought refuge in or en- 
tered the ports of another country, to commit 
acts of destruction in disregard of local law 
and of the hosi^itality which they have been per- 
mitted to enjoy; nor is there any provision in 
the treaty between our two countries which 
lends even color of support to any such argu- 
ment. It would indeed be unthinkable that 
any civilized nation would become a party to 
a treaty containing any such j^rovision or that 
it would subscribe to any so-called principle of 
international law which would permit foreign 
vessels to be brought to its harbors and road- 
steads and there wilfully damaged and wrecked 
in violation of law and to the detriment of navi- 
gation and even the safety of its harbors with- 
out restraint or hindrance by the local sovereign. 

"On one of the vessels here in question the 
auxiliary machinery was smashed and the main 
propelling machinery was deliberately wrecked ; 

419 



420 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



and if the scuttling and burning of ships in 
other harbors of this continent may be regarded 
as indicative of what might be expected in our 
ports, it is difficult to see how your Government 
could expect this Govermnent to be oblivious to 
the situation presented. 

"An inquiry is being made concerning otlier 
features of your complaint and I shall com- 
municate with you regarding them at a later 
date. 

"Accept [etc.] Cordell Hull" 

[Released to the press April 4] 

The Secretary of State has sent the follow- 
ing note to the Royal Italian Ambassador, Don 
Ascanio del principi Colonna : 

"The Secretary of State presents his com- 
pliments to His Excellency the Royal Italian 
Ambassador and has the honor to acknowl- 
edge the receipt of his two communications 
dated March 31 and April 1, 1941,= concerning 
the taking of possession and control of certain 
Italian merchant vessels lying in ports of the 
United States and the removal therefrom of 
the officers and crews. 

"The law of the United States makes it a 
felony for the master or any person in charge 
or command of a vessel within the territorial 
waters of the United States, or for any mem- 
ber of the crew or other person, wilfully to 
cause or permit the destruction or injury of 
such vessel or to tamper with its motive power 
or instrumentalities of navigation. It also 
authorizes the authorities of the Government 
of the United States to take possession and 
control of any vessel and to remove therefrom 
the officers and crews when such action is 
deemed to be necessary to protect the vessel 
from damage or injury or to prevent damage 
or injury to any harbor or waters of the United 
States. 

"Of the twenty-seven Italian vessels in ports 
of continental United States, twenty-five of 
them were so badly damaged that extensive re- 
pairs in shipyards will be necessary to render 



' Neither printed herein. 



possible their navigation. These concerted 
and widespread acts of destruction on the part 
of officers and crews in violation of specific 
provisions of the statutory laws of the United 
States, and at a time when the vessels were 
enjoying the hospitality and protection of our 
ports cannot be viewed with equanimity. The 
Italian Ambassador must have overlooked the 
gravity of the situation when in his communi- 
cation of March 31 he registered a protest 
against the action on the part of the Federal 
authorities with respect to 'Italian properties 
and nationals'. 

"With respect to the Ambassador's specific 
inquiry as to the views and intentions of the 
Government of the United States regarding 
the ships and their crews, the Ambassador is 
informed that this matter is now receiving the 
attention of the appropriate authorities of the 
Government and will be determined in the light 
of the law and the pertinent facts. 

"The Secretary of State will communicate 
with the Ambassador concerning the other 
questions raised by him as soon as advices 
thereon shall have been received from the au- 
thorities directly concerned. 

"Department of Statk, 

''Washington, April 3, 19^:' 



REQUEST FOR WITHDRAWAL OF 
ITALIAN NAVAL ATTACH^ 

[Released to the press April 3] 

The Secretary of State has sent the following 
note to the Royal Italian Ambassador, Don 
Ascanio dei principi Colonna : 

"April 2, 1941. 
"Excellency : 

"I have the honor to state that various facts 
and circumstances have come to the attention 
of the Government of the United States con- 
necting Admiral Alberto Lais, Naval Attache 
of the Royal Italian Embassy, with the commis- 
sion by certain persons of acts in violation of 
the laws of the United States. 



APRIL 5, 1941 



421 



"The President has reached the conclusion 
that the continued presence of Acbniral Lais as 
Naval Attache of the Embassy would no longer 
be agreeable to this Government. 

"The President has directed me, therefore, to 
notify Your Excellency that Admiral Lais is 
persona non grata to this Government as Naval 
Attache of the Royal Italian Embassy at Wash- 
ington, and to request that Your Excellency's 
Govermnent withdraw him immediately from 
the United States. 

"The Royal Italian Government will no doubt 
realize that the Government of the United 
States has, in view of all the circumstances, no 
alternative course. 

"Accept [etc.] Cordeu:. Hull" 

RELEASE OF AMERICAN CITIZENS 
DETAINED IN GERMANY 

[Released to the press April 4] 

The American Embassy in Berlin reported 
on April 3 that a number of American citizens 
including Stewart Herman, an employee of the 
American Embassy in Berlin, John Paid Dick- 
son, a part-time employee of the Chicago 
Tribum and of the Mutual Broadcasting Co., 
and Artliur E. Dunning had been taken into 
custody by the German police. These and all 
other Americans taken into custody are re- 
ported to have been released. 

The Department is making representations to 
the German Foreign Office regarding the ari'est 
of Stewart Herman, which apparently took 
place without prior notification or explanation 
to the Embassy. 



PRESENTATION OF LETTERS OF CRE- 
DENCE BY THE MINISTER OF HUN- 
GARY 

[Released to the press April 3] 

The remarks of the newly appointed Min- 
ister of Hungary, Mr. George de Ghika, upon 
the occasion of the presentation of his letters 
of credence follow: 



"Mr. President: 

"In placing in your hands the letter of re- 
call of my predecessor and the one by which 
His Serene Highness the Regent of the King- 
dom of Hungary has seen fit to accredit me in 
the capacity of Envoy Extraordinary and 
Minister Plenipotentiary near the Government 
of the United States, I wish to convey to you 
my deep appreciation of the honor and privi- 
lege which has been accorded me by my Gov- 
ernment. 

"I am happy to be charged by the Regent 
of the Kingdom of Hungary to convey to you 
the expression of his high consideration for 
you, Mr. President, and of his fervent wishes 
for the happiness and prosperity of the people 
of these LTiiited States. 

"I desire to say that I bring a message of 
good will from my countrymen as well as the 
assurance of the Hungarian Government of 
its sincere desire to promote mutual under- 
standing. 

"It is my earnest hope that you, Mr. Presi- 
dent, and the Government of the United States 
will extend to me during my official residence 
in your country the same generous assistance 
and cooperation that you have so consistently 
accorded my predecessor and thus enable me to 
sustain and if possible further these friendly 
relations." 

President Roosevelt's reply to the remarks 
of Mr. George de Ghika follows: 

"Mr. Minister: 

"It gives me pleasure to welcome you to 
Washington and to accept from your hands the 
letters by which His Serene Highness the Re- 
gent of the Kingdom of Hungary has re- 
quested me to receive you in the capacity of 
Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipo- 
tentiary. I accept likewise the letter of recall 
of your distinguished predecessor Mr. John 
Pelenyi who has done so much to effect a real 
understanding between the peoples of Hun- 
gary and the United States. I shall always 
retain pleasant recollections of his residence in 
Washington. 



422 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



"You may be assured of my desire and that 
of the other officials of tlie Government of the 
United States of America to gi-ant you assist- 
ance and cooperation at all times with a view 
to strengthening the ties which have so long 
existed between our two nations. 

"I shall be grateful if you will convey to 
His Serene Highness the Regent my cordial 
thanks for his friendly message and express 
to him my earnest wishes for his health and 
the prosperity of the Hungarian people." 

CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN 
BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 

[Released to the press April 2] 

The following persons and organizations are 
now registered with the Secretary of State, 
pursuant to section 8 of the Neutrality Act of 
1939, for the solicitation and collection of con- 
tributions to be used in belligerent countries 
for medical aid and assistance or for food and 
clothing to relieve human suffering. The coun- 
tries to which contributions are being sent are 
given in parentheses.^ 

410. The American Committee for the Relief of 
Greece, Inc., 205 West Fifty-fourth Street, New 
York, N. ¥. (Greece) 

411. National Legion Greek- American War Veterans 
in America, Inc., 550 West One Hundred and 

Fifty-.seventh Street, New York, N. Y. (Greece) 

412. American Committee to Save Refugees, 156 Fifth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (France) 

413. Phalanx of Greek Veterans of America, Inc., 810 
West Harrison Street, Chicago, 111. (Greece) 

414. Namesake Towns Committee, Inc., 527 Fifth Ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y. (England) 

415. American Cameronian Aid, 159 Eastern Parkway, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. (Scotland) 

416. United Briti.sh Societies of Minneapolis, 508 
Hodgson Building, Minneapolis, Minn. (Great 
Britain and Dominions) 

417. Mid-European Food Package Service, Inc., 400 
Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Germany, 
Poland, and Luxemburg) 

418. Wellesley College Alumnae Association, Welles- 
ley College, Wellesley, Mass. (Great Britain) 



' For prior registrants, see the Bulletin of Novem- 
ber 2, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 71), pp. 382-391; and the 
Bulletin of January 11, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 81), pp. 
60-61. 



419. The American Fund for British War Aid, Hotel 
Plaza, Fifth Avenue and Fifty-ninth Street, New 
York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

420. Free French Relief Committee, 435 Park Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. (England, French Cameroons, 
and Belgian Congo) 

421. Relief for Children of Britain by Children of 
America, care of Mr. Samuel Schaefer, Eisele & 
King, 39 Broadway, New York, N. Y. (Great 
Britain) 

"422. Democracies Allied Relief, 420 Lexington Ave- 
nue, Suite 1419, New York, N. Y. (All belliger- 
ent countries) 

423. U. S. Friends of Greece, 565 Fifth Avenue, New 
York, N. Y. (Greece) 

424. War Relief Association of American Youth, In- 
corporated, 565 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
(Great Britain) 

425. Hellenic World Newspaper Co., 214 Huntington 
Avenue, Boston, Mass. (Greece) 

426. Hias Immigrant Bank, 425 Lafayette Street, 
New York, N. Y. (Poland, Austria, Czechoslo- 
vakia, the Netherlands, Belgium, France, and 
Germany) 

427. Esco Fund Committee, Inc., 113 West Fifty-sev- 
enth Street, New York. N. Y. (Great Britain) 

428. American Labor Committee to Aid British Labor, 
9 East Forty-sixth Street, New York, N. Y. 
(Great Britain) 

429. The Silver Thimble Fund of America, 26 Audu- 
bon Place, New Orleans, La. (Great Britain) 

430. Lithuanian Relief Committee for the Aid of Lithu- 
anian Victims of Tyranny and War, 307 West 
Thirtieth Street, New York, N. Y. (Germany, 
France, Italy, and Great Britain) 

431. The British Legion, Inc., 15852 Woodingham 
Drive, Detroit, Mich. (Great Britain) 

432. Young Friends of French Prisoners and Babies, 
67 East Eighty-second Street, New York, N. Y. 
(France) 

433. Montagu Club of London, care of Miss Hetty 
Brown, 558 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
(Great Britain) 

434. American Committee for British Catholic Relief, 
2428 Tracy Place NW., Wa.shington, D. C. ( British 
Isles) 

435. Friends of British Relief, Inc., 217 North Calvert 
Street, Baltimore, Md. (Great Britain) 

436. Paderewski Testimonial Fund, Inc., 37 East 
Thirty-sixth Street, New York, N. Y. (Great 
Britain) 

437. Hands Across the Sea Helpers Association, 370 
Seventy-fifth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. (United 
Kingdom) 



" Revoked at request of registrant 



APRIL 5, 1941 



423 



438. German-American Conference, New York, 109 
East Twenty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y. (Can- 
ada and the British West Indies) 

439. International Home for Refugees, 16 East Forty- 
first Street, New York, N. Y. (England, Czecho- 
slovakia, Poland, and France) 

440. Gamma Thi Beta International Sorority, 2800 
Brandywine Street NW., Washington, D.C. (Eng- 
land) 

441. Ethiopian Redemption Committee, Incorporated, 
120 South LaSalle Street, Suite 1763, Chicago, 111. 
( Ethiopia ) 

442. Callard of London, 412 South Michigan Avenue, 
Chicago, 111. (England) 

443. Franco-British Relief, 522 North Charles Street, 
Baltimore, Md. (Great Britain) 

444. Albanian Relief Fund, 431 South Huntington Ave- 
nue, Jamaica Plain, Mass. (Albania) 

445. Vitamins for Britain, Inc., 113 West Fifty-seventh 
Street, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

446. American-Lithuanian Society of Washington, 
D.C, care of Mr. Albert W. Shupienis, 1733 Twen- 
tieth Street NW., Washington, D. C. (Germany) 



American Republics 



INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT 

COMMISSION: BOLIVIAN COUNCIL 

[ReleaBed to the press b.v the Office for Coordination of Com- 
mercial and Cultural Relations Between the American 
Republics April 4] 

Nelson A. Rockefeller, Coordinator of Com- 
mercial and Cultural Relations Between the 
American Republics, announced April 4 the 
membership of the Bolivian National Council, 
the sixth of 21 councils being established by 
the Inter-American Development Coimnission 
in its program for the stimulation of trade 
among the American republics. Mr. Rocke- 
feller is Chairman of the Development Com- 
mission. 

The Bolivian Council is headed by Jesus 
Lozada, of the Bolivian Ministry of Finance. 
The other members include : 



Carlos Guachalla, Vwe Chuirman. Seiior 
Guachalla represents the Camara Na- 
cional de Comercio. 

Rene Gutierrez Guerra, of the Asociacion de 
Industrials Mineros. 

Alfonso Jiiuregui, of th© Camara Nacional 
de Industria. 

Cai'los Montes, of the Sociedad Rural Boli- 
vian a. 

Rene Ballivian, Under Secretary of Minis- 
try of National Economy. 

Emilio Diaz Romero, Secretary. Seiior Diaz 
Romero is Chief of the Departamento de 
Politica Economica del Ministerio de 
Relaciones Exteriores. 

Arrangements for the establishment of the 
Council were completed in La Paz, where an 
initial meeting has been held. Similar coim- 
cils composed of outstanding business, profes- 
sional, and technical men have been formed in 
Bi-azil, Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, and 
Chile. 



VISIT TO UNITED STATES OF NEWLY 
APPOINTED FOREIGN MINISTER OF 
ARGENTINA 

[Released to the press April 5] 

The Secretary of State announced on April 5 
that the newly appointed Argentine Foreign 
Minister, Dr. Ruiz Guinazu, who until recently 
was the Argentine Ambassador to the Vatican, 
has accepted an invitation from the President 
to visit Washington on his way back to Argen- 
tina. Acceptances have been received from 
the Argentine Government and from Dr. 
Guinazu personally. The President and the 
Secretary of State are looking forward with 
much pleasure to his visit here. The exact 
date of Dr. Guinazu's arrival is not yet 
known but it will probably be early in May. 



424 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Near East 



NEW AMERICAN LEGATION BUILDING 
IN LIBERIA 

[Released to the press April 2] 

The Amei-ican Minister to Liberia, the Hon- 
orable Lester A. Wakon, has reported that the 
new American Legation buikling in Monrovia 
was formally opened on March 31, 194L The 
occasion was marked by ceremonies attended by 
President Edwin Bai-clay of Liberia, other offi- 
cials of the Lil>erian Government, the local 
diplomatic corps, and American citizens. 

In proposing a toast to the President of the 
United States, Minister Walton stated: "Since 
1866 there ha.s l>een an American Legation in 
Monrovia, but not until now has it been housed 
in a home of its own. This building, to which 
I can refer with pardonable pride as the most 
modernly constructed on the West African 
coast, is an unmistakable attestation of my Gov- 
ernment's faith in Liberia and a forthright ex- 
pression of optimism in Libei'ia's strength and 
will to prevail as a separate, independent state 
in the community of nations." 

In remarks felicitating Minister Walton on 
the opening of the Legation, President Barclay 
declared: "Please accept my congiatulations 
upon the completion of your Legation building, 



which symbolizes the permanence of those close 
political and spiritual relations which unite our 
two Governments and peoples. I am quite sure 
it is a source of personal giatification to you 
that under your incumbency as Minister this sig- 
nificant work has been carried out.'' 

Among other speakers were Liberian Secre- 
tary of State Simpson and Monsignor John 
Collins. Papal Charge d'Affaires in Monrovia. 

The site of the Legation was dedicated on Oc- 
tober 30, 1938, during the visit to Monrovia of 
the cruiser Bohe of the United States Navy. 
In addition to the main edifice which was 
opened April 1, 1941. consisting of the Min- 
ister's residence and the Legation offices, two 
separate buildings are under construction to 
serve as residences for the Secretaries attached 
to the Legation. The buildings, which are of 
reinforced concrete and completely fireproof, 
have been constructed under the supen'ision of 
the United States Government, and all ma- 
terials have been imported from the United 
States. The Legaticm has been designed to 
meet the requirements of the local climate, with 
deep porches and loggiiis for protection from 
the heat, and wide overhangs for i^rotection 
from the tropical rains. The Legation prop- 
erty has its own water supply, consisting of 
lainwater reservoirs from which water is 
puiin)ed throughout the buildings. 



Commercial Policy 



THE TRADE-AGREEMENTS PROGRAM 

STATEMENT BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE 
[Excerpts] 



During the years preceding the outbreak of 
war in Europe, the Government strove per- 
sistently to rebuild our foreign commerce on 
a sound foundation, in the interest of the 
great surplus-producing branches of our agri- 
culture and industry and of the Nation as a 
whole. For this purpose, six and one-half 
years ago, the Congress enacted the Trade 



Agreements Act, which provided for the nego- 
tiation of reciprocal trade agreements based 
on the unconditional most-favored-nation 
policy. 

Under this program agreements were con- 
cluded with 21 countries providing for recipro- 
cal reductions in excessive and unreasonable 
trade barriers and placing commerce between 



APRIL 5, 1941 



425 



ourselves and the countries concerned on a 
sound and non-discriminatory basis. About a 
year ago the Congress renewed the Trade 
Agreements Act for another three years. This 
was an immensely important step from the 
viewpoint of the vital interests of the country. 

The work of rebuilding our international 
trade under the trade-agreements program in 
the wake of the difficulties which were the aft- 
ei-math of the first world war was necessarily 
a slow process. The task was only partially 
csmpleted when widespread war again broke 
out. Since then, the war-time dislocation of 
world trade has imposed new burdens on some 
groups of our producers . . . through tempo- 
rary loss of some important foreign markets. 

Through negotiation and in other ways, the 
Government has sought persistently, wherever 
possible, to relieve these new difficulties. It 
will continue its efforts in that direction. And 
while doing everything that may be necessary 
to facilitate the progress of national defense, 



now so vital as a result of the developments 
abroad, it will continue to do everything in its 
power toward keeping alive the principles un- 
derlying the trade-agreements program, since 
those principles constitute the only possible 
basis on which the economic life of the world 
can be rebuilt when the present wars are over. 
Our Nation has an obvious and essential 
stake in the establisliment and preservation of 
conditions of stable peace and orderly inter- 
national economic relations. Sound interna- 
tional trade is essential to both. It is also 
indispensable to the well-being of our Nation. 
Through its policy and action and through its 
collaboration with nations seeking the same ob- 
jectives the United States can and should play 
a significant role in leading the world back 
to desirable trading methods — by adhering to 
the basic ideas of sound international relation- 
ships and bj' a firm determination to help 
translate these ideas into practical realities. 



IMPORTATION OF ORANGES INTO CANADA 



[Released to the press April 5] 

The Charge d'Ajffaires ad interim of Canada 
has infoimed the Secretary of State that the 
Canadian Government has decided to exercise 
the right provided for in schedule I of the 
trade agreement between the United States of 
America and Canada signed at Washington on 
November 17, 1938, to substitute for Canadian 
Tariff Item No. 101 as it stands in that agree- 
ment, the following: 

Oranges, n. o. p. : — 

January to July, inclusive Free 

August to December, inclusive, per cubic 

foot 35 cts. 

The effect of this substitution will be that 
oranges imported into Canada from the United 
States will now be free of duty during the 
months January through July, instead of dur- 



ing the months December through April, and 
will be dutiable at 35 cents per cubic foot dur- 
ing the months August through December, in- 
stead of the months May through November 
as originally specified in the trade agreement. 

The change was effected by a Canadian 
Order in Council issued on April 1, 1941. 

The following notes have been exchanged 
between the Canadian Charge d'Affaires and 
the Secretary of State regarding this matter: 

The Canadian Charge d'Affaires ad intenm, to 
the Secretary of State 



No. 102 



Sir: 



Canadian Legation, 

Washington, March 3, 1941. 



I have the honour to inform yo^i that the 
Canadian Government has decided to exercise 



306558 — 41- 



426 

the right, provided for in Schedule I of the 
new Trade Agreement between the United 
States and Canada, signed at Washington on 
November 17, 1938, to substitute for Tariff Item 
No. 101, as it stands in that Agreement, the 
following : 

Oranges, n. o. p. : — 

January to July, inclusive Free 

August to December, inclusive per cubic 

foot 35 cts. 

I may add that the Canadian authorities had 
hoped tliat notification of the proposed change 
could have been given formally before January 
1, 1941. I understand however that the United 
States authorities will see no objection to the 
Canadian authorities exercising the right of 
substitution, reserved under the new Trade 
Agreement, at this time. 

I have [etc.] 

Merchant Mahoney 

Charge dP Affaires 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

The Seo'etary of State to the Canadian Charge 
d/ Affaires ad interim 

Department of State, 
Washington, March 15, 1941. 
Sir: 

Acknowledgment is made of the receipt of 
your note No. 102 of March 3, 1941, informing 
me that the Canadian Government has decided 
to exercise the right provided for in Schedule I 
of the new trade agreement between the United 
States and Canada, signed at Washington on 
November 17, 1938, to substitute for Tariff Item 
No. 101, as it stands in that agreement, the 
following: 

Oranges, n.o.p. : — 

January to July, inclusive Free 

August to December, inclusive per cubic 

foot 35 cts. 

In reply you are informed that this Govern- 
ment has no objection to the exercise by the 
Canadian Government of this right of substi- 
tution at this time. 
Accept [etc.] 

For the Secretary of State : 

Dean Acheson 



General 



PURCHASE OF FOOD AND CLOTHING FROM ABROAD 



[Released to the press April 1] 

The following letter has been sent by the 
Secretary of State to the Honorable Fi-ederick 
Van Nuys, United States Senate : 

"April 1, 1941. 
"Mt dear Senator Van Ntnrs: 

"Referring to our conversation and to your 
request for comment by me on the provision in 
H.R. 4124 which would prohibit the use, for 
the purchase of food and clothing from foi*- 
eign sources, of funds appropriated in the bill, 
I am glad to bring to your attention certain 



facts and considerations bearing on this matter 
which I believe 3'ou and your colleagues will 
wish to take into account. 

"In the present emergency, a provision of 
this character seems unwise in the extreme. 
Not only does it promise no benefit, and pos- 
sibly even injury, to the domestic industries 
most likely to be affected, but it runs definitely 
counter to the interests of our national defense 
and to the promotion of friendly relations with 
the other American Republics. 

"I am sure you will appreciate the impor- 
tance of maintaining close and friendly rela- 



APRIL 5, 1941 

tions with the other countries of this hemi- 
sphere, particularly in these critical times. I 
know you will also recognize the manner in 
which the enactment of a provision of the kind 
in question would interfere with the efforts 
which we have been making to strengthen our 
hemisphere defenses by this means. Enact- 
ment of legislation of this character can not 
but have a most unfortunate effect upon public 
opinion in the other American Republics, at 
the very time when it is so important that 
inter-American relations should be of a most 
friendly character. Such legislation will in- 
evitably tend to weaken the fabric of inter- 
American relations which this Government has 
so painstakingly sought to strengthen during 
recent years. 

"Sincerely yours, 

CoRDELL Hull" 

H.R. 4121, as finally passed by Congress, and 
approved by the President on April 5, 19-11 
(Public Law 29), permits the procurement 
abroad of food and clothing for the Army and 
Navy, to the extent determined by the head of 
the Department concerned. The pertinent por- 
tion reads as follows: "That no part of this 
or any other appropriation contained in this 
Act shall be available for the procurement of 
any article of food or clothing not grown or 
produced in the United States or its posses- 
sions, except to the extent that the head of the 
department concerned shall determine that ar 
tides of food or clothing grown or produced 
in the United States or its possessions cannot 



427 

be procured of satisfactory quality and in suf- 
ficient quantities and at reasonable prices as 
and when needed." 

NEW-STYLE PASSPORTS 

[Released to the press .\pril 4] 

On February 10, 1941, the American Gov- 
ernment commenced the use of a new-style 
passport, green in color. Since that date a 
program has been in process whereby old-style 
red passports which are still valid are being 
replaced by new-style documents, provided the 
passports are to be used for approved travel 
purposes. 

On and after April 10, 1941, no red passport 
will be valid for departure from tTie United 
States for foreign travel. Persons in the 
United States who possess valid or potentially 
valid red passports and who desire to travel 
abroad should submit such passports to the De- 
partment or one of its passport agencies about 
three weeks prior to their scheduled departure 
from this country, together with two recently 
taken photographs and complete information 
concerning travel plans. 

The Department has not yet determined the 
date upon which the old-style passports now 
in use abroad ai'e to be declared invalid and 
withdrawn from circulation, since the program 
of reialacement in the field requires a greater 
length of time. 

No charge is made for replacing passports, 
but only passports which have been issued 
within a period of four years and which are 
to be used for approved travel will be replaced. 



Cultural Relations 



COOPERATION OF WOMEN'S ORGANIZATIONS 



[Released to the press by the Office for Coordination of Com- 
mercial and Cultural Relations Between the American 
Republics April 1] 

Executive heads and representatives of lead- 
ing women's organizations in the United States 



conferred on April 1 with Nelson A. Rocke- 
feller, Coordinator of Commercial and Cul- 
tural Relations Between the American Repub- 
lics, to plan for more effective cooperation 



428 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



between the Coordinator's Office and organiza- 
tions interested in inter-American relations. 

The assembled women heard Mr. Rockefeller 
outline the necessity for cooperative action in- 
volving women's organizations in the field of 
inter-American relations and describe the ef- 
forts of the Coordinator's Office to implement 
the cultural and economic defense of the 
Americas. 

Concerning the role of women's organiza- 
tions in the program of the Coordinator's 
Office, he said in part : 

"A few months ago a poll was made of 
public opinion in the United States in regard 
to the other American republics. The in- 
formation secured from this poll showed us 
several very significant things that will help 
to direct our program. Perhaps the most 
important thing shown by the study is the 
very definite relation between the opinions 
of people and the amount of infonnation 
they have. For instance, when the question 
was asked whether the United States should 
lend money to Central and South American 
countries to help them build up their indus- 
tries, railroads, and defenses, 69 percent of 
those who were well informed answered in 
the affirmative. 

"The well informed were practically unan- 
imous in thinking that the United States 
should make an effort to bring about better 
understanding and closer relations with the 
other American republics, and a very large 
majority wanted this done even if it cost 
the United States a great deal of money. 

"The result of thia poll of public opinion 
indicates clearly one of the most important 
fields of action that must be covered if any 
program such as the one we are embarked 
on is to produce results. To put it bluntly, 
we must have a well-informed people. We 
can arrange for radio broadcasts, concerts, 
and lectures, but we must have listeners. 
We can stimulate the production and im- 
port of commodities from the other Amer- 
ican republics, but we must have buyers for 
those commodities. We can arrange for 



teaching of Spanish and Portuguese, but 
we must have students. 

"As I see the needs of the present situation, 
the most important fields of action for the 
people of the United States are : 

"First: As a part of the Nation's defense 
effort and as a permanent extension of the 
good-neighbor program, to stimulate a gen- 
eral movement for popular education about 
Central and South America in every com- 
munity of this country. Only so will we 
have a well-informed people; 

"Second: We should have concerted com- 
munity action to provide for the study and 
teaching of Spanish and Portuguese in 
schools and in classes established for adults ; 

"Third : We need concerted community ac- 
tion to increase purchases of products im- 
ported from the other American republics; 
and 

"Fourth : It would be most helpful to have 
concerted action among women's and other 
organizations to provide suitable hospitality 
for visitors and to establish direct and 
friendly contacts with similar gi'oups and or- 
ganizations in the other American republics. 

"There are many ways of cariying forward 
this program, but it seems to me that the 
best and most democratic way is for the men 
and women of the United States, acting 
through their many organizations, to play 
a responsible part in interpreting and furth- 
ering that part of a national program that 
most immediately affects them. You who are 
taking part in this conference today repre- 
sent many thousands of women, your organ- 
izations extend into almost every part of the 
United States, your membership includes 
every type of woman and every variety of 
women's activities. 

"In conclusion I do not need to tell you 
of the urgency of the questions we are con- 
sidering. Our entire defense program is in- 
timately related to the question of hemi- 
spheric solidarity. We in the American re- 
publics stand alone at peace in a world at 
war. We must defend the principle of 



APRIL 5, 1941 



429 



peaceful international relations, and each 
one of us must be strong so that together wo 
can withstand the shocks and strains of the 
present conflict in Europe. We must pre- 
vent the infiltration of totalitarian methods 
and ideals. Only if we are successful in do- 
ing this can we be sure that we may look 
forward to a future in which we will be able 
to build a stronger and finer democracy for 
ourselves and our children." 

The organizations represented at the meeting 
were: American Association of University 
Women, American Federation of Soroptimist 
Clubs, American Federation of Teachers, 
American Home Economics Association, Asso- 
ciated Country Women of the World, Associa- 
tion of Junior Leagues of America, Camp Fire 
Girls, Inc., General Federation of Women's 
Clubs, Girl Scouts, Inc., International Associa- 
tion of Altrusa Clubs, Inc., National Associa- 
tion of College Women, National Association of 
Colored Women, Inc., National Board of the 
Young Women's Christian Associations, Na- 
tional Committee of Church Women, National 
Congress of Parents and Teachers, National 
Council of Catholic Women, National Coun- 
cil of Jewish Women, National Council of 
Negro Women, National Council of Women 
of the United States, Inc., National Educa- 
tion Association of the United States, National 
Federation of Business and Professional Wom- 
en's Clubs, National League of Women Vot- 
ers, National Society of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution, National Women's 
Trade Union League of America, Woman's 
National Farm and Garden Association, and 
Zonta International. 

CHRISTENING OF SHIP BY DAUGHTER 
OF PRESIDENT OF BRAZIL 

[Eeleased to the press March 30] 

The American Ambassador at Rio de 
Janeiro', the Honorable Jefferson Caffery, has 
advised the Depai'tment that Senhora Alzira 
Vargas do Amaral Peixoto, daughter of His 
Excellency Getulio Vargas, President of Bra- 



zil, has agreed to christen the new Moore- 
McCormack Lines passenger ship Rio de, 
JuTieiro, which is to be launched in Chester, 
Pa., on April 12. Senhora Alzira Vargas do 
Amaral Peixoto, accompanied by her hus- 
band, Comdr. Ernani do Amaral Peixoto, Gov- 
ernor of the State of Rio de Janeiro, will leave 
Rio de Janeiro on April 5 by air en route to 
the United States. 

The Rio de Janeiro is one of the new fleet of 
passenger ships being built with Government 
assistance for operation by the Moore-McCor- 
mack Lines between Atlantic ports of the 
United States and of South America. 

UNIVERSITY OF COSTA RICA 

The inauguration of the University of Costa 
Rica on March 7, 1941 marked an important 
milestone in the development of educational 
institutions in the Americas. Attending the 
opening ceremonies were representatives of 
prominent universities in each of the other 
American republics. The University of Mich- 
igan was invited to be the representative of 
United States universities. The American 
Minister to Costa Rica, Mr. William H. Horni- 
brook, acted as the representative of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan. 

On the occasion of the inauguration the Sec- 
retary of State sent the following message of 
greeting : 

"I am happy to send greetings to the newly 
established University of Costa Rica on the 
occasion of the inauguration of its courses 
of instruction. I am sure that this new in- 
stitution of higher learning is destined to 
play an important role in the cultural 
progress of Costa Rica and intellectual life 
of the hemisphere." 

The receipt of this message and also of in- 
formation concerning a promise of contribu- 
tions by institutions in the United States, of 
books for the University were aclmowledged 
by the Costa Rican Minister of Education in a 
letter to Minister Hornibrook on March 13. 



430 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



VISIT OF EDUCATORS FROM COSTA 
RICA AND PANAMA 

[Released to the press April 5] 

Dr. Fernando Centeno Giiell, an outstand- 
ing leader in the field of education in Costa Rica, 
will arrive in New York on April 6, on board 
the S. S. Quirigua. Three days later, on April 
9, Dr. Jeptha B. Duncan, Rector of the National 
University of Panama, will arrive in New York 
on board the S. S. Chiriqui. Both of these dis- 
tinguished educators are coming to the United 
States at the invitation of the Department of 
State. 

After arriving in the United States, both Dr. 
Giiell and Dr. Duncan will proceed to Washing- 
ton, where detailed plans for their sojourns in 
this country will be arranged in cooperation with 
officials of the Department of State. During 
their visits here they will meet and confer with 
educators interested in their particular fields. 
Dr. Giiell is anxious to investigate the organiza- 



tion and administrative practices of institutions 
for abnormals. Dr. Duncan is interested in ad- 
ministrative problems of universities. 

Dr. Jeptha B. Duncan has had a distinguished 
career as an educator and as a well-known jour- 
nalist. Before being appointed Rector of tlae 
University of Panama, he held various posts of 
importance, including that of Secretary of Edu- 
cation and also that of Secretary General of the 
Panama Meeting of Foreign Ministers. 

Dr. Centeno Giiell is Director of the "Escuela 
de Enseiianza Especial" in San Jose. He is par- 
ticularly well qualified for the work in which 
he is engaged. After graduating from the 
Liceo de Costa Rica and the University of Ma- 
di'id in Spain, he completed a course of study 
in the education of abnormals at the Pedagogi- 
cal Seminary of Madrid. He is also the author 
of several books, one of which is a collection of 
lectures delivered by him at the Ateneo de 
Madrid. 



Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, Etc. 



MONTHLY STATISTICS 



[Released to the press JIarch .'U ] 

Note : In the tables set forth below relating to 
arms export licenses issued and arms exported, statis- 
tics concerning shipments authorized and made to the 
British Commonwealth of Nations, the British Empire, 
British mandates, and British armed forces elsewhere 
are not listed separately as heretofore but are com- 
bined under the heading British Commonwealth of 
Nations. This change in the presentation of the sta- 
tistics is introducetl in order to prevent the dissemina- 
tion of military information of interest to the national 
defense. 

The figures relating to arms, the licenses for the 
export of which were revoked before they were used, 
have been subtracted from the figures appearing in the 
cumulative column of the table below in regard to 
arms export licenses issued. These latter figures are 
therefore net figiu-es. They are not yet final and 
definitive since licenses may be amended or revoked at 



any time before being used. They are, however, ac- 
curate as of the date of this press release. 

The statistics of actual exports in these releases 
are believed to be substantially complete. It is pos- 
sible, however, that some shipments are not included. 
If this proves to be the fact, statistics in regard to 
such shipments will be included in the cumulative 
figures in later releases. 

Arms Export Licenses Issued 

Tlie table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war li- 
censed for export by the Secretary of State 
during the year 1941 up to and including the 
month of February : 



APRIL 5, 1941 



431 



Country of destination 



Aden.' 
Angola- 



Total. 
Argentina. . 



Total. 



Australia.* 
Baiiamas.* 
Bflgian Congo., 

Total 



Bermuda.' 
Bolivia 



Total. 



Brazil . 



Category 



Value of export licenses issued 



February 
1941 



(!) 
(2) 



I (4) 

III (2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 



(1) 
(2) 



I (4) 

IV (1) 

(2) 



Total. 



British Conimonwcalth of 
Nations, the British E:i)- 
pire, British mandates and 
British armed forces else- 
where. 



VII 



I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 

II 

III (n 

(2) 

IV (!) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (1) 
(2) 

VII (1) 
(2) 



$1. 400. 00 



1,400.00 



283.00 



855. 00 
4, 468. 00 
1,900.00 



36, 050. 00 



43, 55fi. 00 



98.051.00 
7, 240. 00 



105. 291. 00 



864.00 



343.00 



20.00 



15,198.50 
5, 430. 00 
1,900.00 

13,800.00 
8,410.00 



2 months end- 
ing February 
28, 1941 



$4, 400. 00 
120.00 



4, 620. 00 



443. 00 
60.00 

5, 554. 00 

6, 375. 00 
1.900.00 
7, 470. OS 

27, 465. 70 
51,390.00 



100, 657. 84 



98,051.00 
7, 240. 00 



105, 291. 00 



155.00 
864. 00 
5.54. 40 



1, 573. 40 



46, 101. .TO 



63, 



366, 
735, 
369, 
719, 
178, 
90, 



517. 69 
186.79 
063. 50 
138.77 
178. 08 
000. 00 



,690. 
43, 
24, 
32, 



341.00 
200.00 
867. 85 
849. 24 



', 442, 
,059, 

1, 

30. 
270, 



930. 07 
721.17 
666. 00 
966.00 
633. 20 
370. 50 



433. 00 

55.25 

123.00 

60.00 

45. 484. 50 

5, 905. OO 

3, 600. 00 

14,711.70 

23,421.00 

21.180.00 

114,973.45 



2. 384, 
11. 192, 

7, 786, 
66, 308, 

1, 278, 
90, 

122, 998. 

60, 

1,674, 

237, 

16, 

28, 189, 

84.907, 



1, 3,52, 
270, 



861. 68 
712. 23 
963. 60 
479. 40 
734. 68 
000. 00 
.50. 00 
868. 67 
880. 54 
151.04 
648. 93 
250.00 
5S6. 38 
316. 17 
666. 00 
244.00 
507. 20 
376. 50 



Total 118,045,629.46 277.742,296.82 

•See British Commonwealth (jf Nations. 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


February 
1941 


2 months end- 
ing February 
28, 1941 


British Guiana.* 

Burma.* 

Canada.' 

Chile ... . 


I (3) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 


$38,080.00 

9.60 

3.687.31 


$38 080 00 




9.60 
3.687.31 
2, 100. 00 




20. 333. 00 
8. 300. 00 


20.333.00 
22,315.00 
12 898 92 








Total 


70.409.91 


99. 423. 83 




I (3) 
III (1) 
(2) 
V (2) 
VII (2) 






5, 099. 25 




6. 307, 732. 00 
2, 600. 00 


6, 307, 732. 00 
2.600.00 
3. 175. 00 




2.64 


245. 002. 64 


Total 


6, 310, 234. 64 


6, 563, 508. 89 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




Colombia ..... 


17.00 


17.00 




3, 430. 50 
353.00 
70.00 




26.00 






24, 280. 00 




1,162.00 


3. 675. 29 
2.700.00 






Total 


1,206.00 


34. 425. 79 




IV (1) 

V (1) 
(2) 

VII (1) 




Costa Rica 




59.00 






22, 286. 00 




1, 000. 00 
217. 20 


1,000.00 
217.20 


Total 


1.217.20 


23, 562. 20 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (1) 

(2) 




Cuba.. 


39.00 

183.00 

620. 00 

3. 373. 00 

1.195.00 

2.488.00 


39.00 




183. 00 
1,375.00 
4, 524. 00 
1,195.00 
3,848.80 

732. 00 








Total 


7.898.00 


11 896.80 




I (4) 

IV (1) 

(2) 

VII (2) 








110.00 




426. 40 
39.00 
10.00 


426.40 
69.32 
60.00 


Total 


475. 40 


665.72 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (3) 
VU (2) 




Ecuador . 


126. 10 
133. 68 


126. 10 




133. 68 
60 50 




1.411.00 


1,540.00 
30, 000. 00 




25.00 


91.00 


Total 


1,695.78 


31,941.28 



432 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


February 
1941 


2 months end- 
ing February 
28, 1941 




IV 

I 
V 


(1) 

(4) 
(2) 


.$178. 50 


$178. 50 






El Salvador 


22.25 
170.00 


22.25 




170.00 


Total 


192. 25 


192. 25 




V 

I 
III 


(2) 

(2) 
(4) 
(5) 

(2) 




Fiji.* 


4,810.00 


4, 810. 00 






French Indochina 




16. 000. 00 






17,900.00 






10.000.00 






3. 730. 00 








Total - 




47, 630. 00 




I 

VII 


(4) 
(2) 






Gibraltar.* 
Gold Coast.* 

Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland.* 


12,600.00 
197. 335. 54 


636, 000. 00 




197, 335. .54 


Total 


209, S35. 54 


732, 335. 54 




IV 

V 

VII 


(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 








2, 547. 00 




1,300.00 


1, 300. 00 
6, 000. 00 




194.40 


194.40 
1, 175. 00 








Total - 


1, 494. 40 


10, 216. 40 




IV 

VII 


(1) 

(2) 
(2) 




Haiti 




27.00 




14.6.8 
.10 


14.68 
.10 


Total 


14.78 


41.78 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 




Honduras - 


213.00 
649. 00 


213.00 




649.00 
20, 000. 00 








Total 


862. 00 


20. 862. 00 




V 

I 

V 


(2) 

(2) 
(2) 




Hong Kong.* 


484.00 


484. 00 






India.' 
Iran 




10, 864. 60 




900. 64 


900.64 


Total 


900. 64 


11,766.24 




rv 

V 


(2) 
(2) 








6.21 




1,170.00 


1,170.00 


Total 


1,170.00 


1, 175. 21 


Jamaica.* 
Kenya.* 











Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


February 
1941 


2 months end- 
ing February 
28, 1941 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 


$888. 00 
2, .560. 00 
2, 600. 00 
172,900.00 
778. 59 
3,360.00 
7,145.85 
8,537.00 


$888.00 




5, 281. 50 

2,799.00 

210.400.00 

10,598.69 

8,765.00 
11,811.60 

9,252.00 


Total 


198,649.44 


269, 785. 69 




I (4) 
V (2) 




Mozambique 


29.60 


29.60 




422. 45 








Total 


29.60 


462. 06 




I (2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(6) 
(6) 

HI (1) 
(2) 

rv (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




Netherlands Indies 


74,000.00 

444,000.00 

6,850,051.72 

310. 00 

820,000.00 


204, 000. 00 




444,000.00 

6,871,398.04 

327,310.00 

820,000.00 

1,954,940.00 






760. 00 




650.00 
141. 97 


650. 00 
1,066.47 
5, 600. 00 




2,321.00 

24,000.00 

6, 203. 80 

345,000.00 


76,902.81 

58,000.00 

6, 473. 60 

346,000.00 


Total 


7, 565, 678. 49 


10,114,890.92 




I (1) 

(4) 

V (2) 






264.30 
108. 66 


264.30 




832.42 
3, 622. 00 








Total 


372. 86 


4, 618. 72 




IV (2) 

V (I) 
(3) 




Newfoiuidland.* 
New Zealand.* 




4,304.00 








Palestine.* 


18,600.00 
1,660.00 


24,000.00 




1,650.00 


Total 


20.260.00 


26, 660. 00 




IV (2) 

V (3) 




Pnrnrjifly 


49.00 


49.00 




1,650.00 








Total 


49.00 


1, 599. 00 




V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 




Peru 


3,631.25 

5, 542. 00 

20,430.00 

1,218.69 


5, 631. 25 




27,802.00 

140,069.00 

1, 674. 69 


Total 


30, 821. 94 


175, 176. 94 



•See British Commonwealth of Nations. 



APRIL 5, 1941 



433 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destinal ion 


February 
1941 


2 months end- 
ing February 
28, 1941 




I 
V 


(4) 
(3) 




$46,112.00 






15,000.00 








Total 




61,112.00 




I 
VII 


(3) 
(4) 
(1) 






Southern Rhodesia.' 
South- West Africa.' 
Straits Settlements.* 


$36,000.00 

1,800.00 

323.00 


36, 000. 00 




1,800.00 
323.00 


Total - 


38,123.00 


38,123.00 




I 
IV 

V 


(1) 

(I) 
(2) 
(2) 






63.04 

1,160.00 

133.43 


98.10 




1,674.00 
224. 93 
314. 11 








Total 


1, 3.56. 47 


2,311.14 




VII 

IV 
V 


(2) 

(I) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 




Trinidad.* 
Turkey 




132, 360. 00 








Union of South Africa.' 
Uruguay 




231.00 




175.00 

20,300.00 

314.00 


2,666.00 

21,900.00 

506. 00 


Total -.- 


20,789.00 


25, 303. 00 




IV 

V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 








26, 202. 00 




7.00 

38.50 

16,935.00 

879. 15 


1,883.00 
3,902.50 
24,113.00 
1, 646. 59 
3, 076. 00 








Total 


17, 859. 65 


60, 823. 09 








Grand total . 


132, 748, 799. 45 


296, 570, 937. 49 











*See British Commonwealth of Nations. 



During the month of February, 478 arms ex- 
port licenses were issued, making a total of 
928 such licenses issued during the current year. 

AltJIS EXPOKTED 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of 
the arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
exported during the year 1941 up to and in- 
chiding the month of February under export 
licenses issued by the Secretary of State. 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 




2 months end- 






February 1941 


inp February 
28, 1941 


Aden.* 








Argentina 


I (4) 




.$453. 00 




IV (1) 


$7,172.00 


7,172.00 




(2) 




314.00 




V (2) 


4, 222. 00 


30, 822. 50 




VII (1) 




24, 750. 00 




(2) 


1, 349. 00 


8,154.00 


Total 


12, 743. 00 


71, 665. 50 








Australia.* 






Bermuda.* 










I (4) 




155. 00 




IV (1) 


864. 00 


864. 00 




(2) 


547.40 


547.40 




VII (1) 


288.80 


649.80 


Total . 


1, 700. 20 


2, 216. 20 




I (3) 




Brazil -*. 




13,075.00 




(5) 




73, 924. 00 




IV (1) 




31, 284. 00 




V (1) 


18, 712. 00 


39, 562. 00 




(2) 


15, 862. 80 


16, 604. 10 




(3) 


10, 550. 00 


21,268.00 


Total 


45, 124. 80 


195, 717. 10 




I (1) 




British Commonwealth of 


1,879,937.51 


1,900.942.23 


Nations, the British Em- 


(2) 


274,054.39 


2, 410. 613. 95 


pire, British mandates, and 


(3) 


878, 028. 00 


1.327,940.00 


British armed forces else- 


(4) 


3, 189, 604. 21 


4. .145, .■.22. 08 


where. 


(5) 


1,043,416.00 


1,049,637.00 




(6) 


85, 680. 00 


8.5. 6S0. 00 




II 


100.00 


100. 00 




III (1) 


11,959,459.00 


34, 426, 287. 04 




(2) 


10, 960. 00 


16.180.00 




IV (1) 


196, 400. 29 


449, 600. 26 




(2) 


242, 516. 06 


893, 710. 37 




V (1) 


853, 848. 00 


1, 543, 238. 00 




(2) 


1,312.671.47 


2, 658, 203. 74 




(3) 


9, 033, 360. 00 


14,523,770.03 




VI (2) 


149. 00 


149.00 




VII (1) 


368, 740. 50 


518,069.50 




(2) 


86,417.00 


202, 257. 38 


Total 


31,415,400.43 


66, 551, 900. 58 




IV (1) 
(2) 




Chile 


699.00 
265.85 


699 00 




205. 85 




V (1) 




68,417.00 




(2) 




80.00 




VII (1) 


2, 187. 00 


2, 187. 00 




(2) 


12, 894. 00 


12,894.00 


Total 


16.045.85 


84, 542. 85 




III (1) 




China 


2, 270. 734. 00 


2, 604, 354. 00 




(2) 




99, 430. 00 




V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 




34, 100. 00 






154, 319. 00 






12,820.00 



434 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BXJLLETIN 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


February 1941 


2 months end- 
ing February 
28, 1941 


China— Continued. 


VII 


(1) 

(2) 


$139,000.00 
263,500.00 


$139,000.00 
263,500.00 


Total 


2,673,234.00 


3, 307, 523. 00 




I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(4) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




Colombia 


18.80 

596. 00 

70.00 

15,000.00 

3, 575. 29 


18.80 




933. 00 

70.00 

29, 280. 00 

3, 675. 29 

2, 700. 00 








Total 


19,260.09 


36, 677. 09 




I 

IV 

V 

Vlt 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(« 
(2) 
(1) 




Costa Rica 




13.00 






125.00 




2, 237. 00 


2. 244. 00 
22, 286. 00 




1,430.00 


3, 650. 00 
641.00 








Total 


3,667.00 


28, 859. 00 




I 

IV 
VII 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 




Cuba 




8,644.00 




620.00 
697. 86 
88.00 


1,675.00 

4. 815. 36 

855.00 


Total 


1, 305. 86 


16. 889. 36 




I 

VII 


(1) 
(3) 
f4) 
(2) 




Curasao 




8, 600, 00 




15,000.00 
50.00 


15.000.00 
110.00 
50.00 


Total . - . 


15,050.00 


23, 660. DO 




VII 

IV 

V 

VII 


(1) 

(4) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 








1.053.00 


Ecuador 




60.00 




10.00 

29,812.00 

66.00 


10.00 

29.812.00 

66.00 


Total 


29,888.00 


29,948 00 




IV 


(1) 
(2) 




Egypt 


1,955.00 


2 210 00 




52.00 








Total 


1,955.00 


2 262 00 




I 

V 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 




El Salvador 


44.00 


44 00 




1,600.00 






600.00 








Total 


44.00 


2,144.00 


Fiji.* 

Gold Coast.' 

Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland.' 









Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


February 1941 


2 months end- 
ing February 
28, 1941 


Greece - .... 


I 

vn 


(4) 
(2) 


$28. 300. 00 
76,510.00 


$28 300 00 




76. 510. 00 


Total 


104,810.00 


104 SIO 00 




IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 




Guatemala .. 




25 50 






280.00 






5,000.00 
1, 175 00 












Total 




6, 480. 50 




IV 


(1) 
(2) 




Haiti... 










8 00 








Total... 




35 00 




I 

IV 
V 


(4) 
(2) 
(1) 






Honduras 




128 00 






435.00 






20,000.00 








Total 




20,563.00 




V 

I 

V 


(2) 

(2) 
(3) 




Hong Kong.' 

Iceland 


484.00 


484 00 






India.' 


33, 750. 00 
7,600.00 


33,750.00 
7,600.00 




Total 


41, 350. 00 






I 

V 


(2) 
(2) 






47,865.00 






148, 000. 00 








Total 


47,865.00 


195 865 00 




I 

IV 
V 

vn 


(4) 
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




Jamaica.' 
Kenya.' 

Leeward Islands.' 
Mexico. 


27, 600. 00 


27 600 00 




331.50 




112,500.00 

496.69 

1, 164. 00 

351. 00 

724. 00 


134, 985. 00 

896. 59 

6,664.00 

1,821.76 

724.00 


Total 


142, 735. 59 


171,822.84 




I 

I 

II 
in 


(4) 

(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(6) 
(6) 

^ 

(2)L 






29.60 


29.60 






Netherlands Indies.. 


186. 00 

238,353.00 

4,654.00 

1,101.00 

119, 087. 00 

6,823.00 

106,020.00 

347, 360. 00 

750.00 


186.00 




316,668.00 

46,104.00 

1,942.84 

119,087.00 
69,228.00 

106,020.00 

477, 620. 00 
fe 750.00 



'See British Commonwealth of Nations. 



APRIL 5, 1941 



435 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


February 1941 


2 months end- 
ing February 
28, 1941 


Netherlands Indies— Con. 


IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 

(2) 

(1) 

(2) 
(3) 
(1) 


$4,942.00 
513. 87 


$16,132.00 

4,097.61 

160, 925. 00 




33, 530. 05 
16,750.00 


117, 105. 65 

50,250.00 

270.00 








Total 


879, 069. 92 


1, 486, 286. 10 




I 

V 


(1) 
(4) 
(2) 








304. 00 




1,034.86 


1,034.86 
3, 522. 00 








Total 


1,034.86 


4, 860. 86 




IV 
V 


(2) 
(1) 




Newfoundland.* 

New Guinea, Territory of.* 

New Zealand.* 


4,117.00 


4,117.00 




3, 600. 00 








Total 


4,117.00 


7, 617. 00 




V 

IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 

(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 




Northern Rhodesia.* 
Palestine.* 


7,500.00 


17, 277. 00 






Peru 




963.00 




3, 481. 00 
995.40 
456.00 


5, 481. 00 

33, 210. 40 

456.00 


Total 


4,932.40 


40, 110.40 




I 

V 


(4) 
(2) 
(3) 




Portugal 


58.18 


46, 170. 18 




200.00 






16, 000. 00 








Total 


58.18 


61, 370. 18 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




Southern Rhodesia.* 
South-West Africa.* 
Straits Settlements.* 


20,667.00 
642.00 


20, 667. 00 




1,156.00 
112.00 




1,000.00 


1, 000. 00 


Total 


22,309.00 


22, 935. 00 




III 

V 
VII 


(2) 
(2) 
(2) 




Trans-Jordan.* 

Trinidad.* 

Turkey 


19, 056. 86 
46, 958. 20 
138,714.00 


19, 066. 86 




46, 958. 20 
138,714.00 


Total 


204,729.06 


204, 729. 06 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


February 1941 


2 months end- 
ing February 
28, 1941 


Union of South Africa.* 


I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 


$292.49 

231.00 

1, 677. 33 

3,282.00 

65.00 


$335. 40 




231.00 

1,716.33 

4,882.00 

175.00 

385.00 








Total 


5,447.82 


7 723 82 




IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






782.00 

1,876.00 

3, 372. 50 

36, 935. 00 

805.30 


782 00 




1,876.00 
4, 586. 60 
44,113.00 
1,683.95 
3, 076. 00 








Total 


43, 770. 80 


66, 017. 45 








Grand total 


35,745,661.46 


72,804,324 40 









Arms Import Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of origin of the 
arms, ammunition, and im])lements of war 
licensed for import by the Secretary of State 
during the month of Febniary 1941 : 



Country of origin 


Category 


Value 


Total 


Argentina 


VII (2) 


$2.00 


$2.00 


Bahrein Islands 


IV (1) 


136. 00 


136. 00 


Canada 


I (1) 
(2) 


1,134.00 
250.00 










(4) 


700.00 


53,243.00 




V (2) 


450.00 






VII (2) 


50,709.00 




Great Britain and Northern 


I (2) 


17,975.00 




Ireland. 


(3) 


2, 975. 00 






(4) 


115.60 






(5) 


1,135.00 


22, 500. 51 




III (2) 


100.00 






V (2) 


200.01 




Total 






75,881.51 











*8ee British Commonwealth of Nations. 



During the month of February, 24 import 
licenses were issued, making a total of 44 such 
licenses issued during the current year. 



436 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Categories of Arms, Ammunition, and Imple- 
ments OF War 

The categories of arms, ammunition, and 
implements of war in the appropriate column 
of the tables prhited above are the categories 
into which those articles were divided in the 
President's proclamation of May 1, 1937, enu- 
merating the articles which would be con- 
sidered as arms, ammunition, and implements 
of war for the purposes of section 5 of the 
joint resolution of May 1. 1937 [see the Bulle- 
tin of January 11, 1941 (vol. IV. no. 81). pp. 
76-77]. 

Special Statistics in Regard to Arms Exports 
To Cuba 

In compliance with article II of the con- 
vention between the United States and Cuba 
to suppress smuggling, signed at Habana, 
March 11, 1926, which reads in part as follows : 

"The High Contracting Parties agree that 
clearance of shipments of merchandise by wa- 
ter, air, or land, from any of the ports of 
either country to a port of entry of the other 
country, shall be denied when such shipment 
comprises articles the importation of which is 
prohibited or restricted in the country to 
which such shipment is destined, unless in this 
last case there has been a compliance with the 
requisites demanded by the laws of both coun- 
tries." 

and in compliance with the laws of Cuba 
which restrict the importation of anns, ammu- 
nition, and implements of war of all kinds by 
requiring an import permit for each shipment, 
export licenses for shipments of arms, ammu- 
nition, and implements of war to Cuba are re- 
quired for the articles enumerated below in 
addition to the articles enumerated in the Pres- 
ident's proclamation of May 1, 1937 : 

(1) Arms and small arms using ammunition 
of caliber .22 or less, othei- than those classed 
as toys. 

(2) Spare parts of arms and small arms of 
all kinds and calibers, other than those classed 
as toys, and of gims and machine guns. 



(3) Ammunition for the arms and small 
arms under (1) above. 

(4) Sabers, swords, and military machetes 
with cross-guard hilts. 

(5) Explosives as follows: explosive pow- 
ders of all kinds for all purposes; nitrocellu- 
lose having a nitrogen content of 12 percent or 
less; diphenylamine ; dynamite of all kinds; 
nitroglycerine; alkaline nitrates (ammonium, 
potassium, and sodium nitrate); nitric acid; 
nitrobenzene (essence or oil of mirbane) ; sul- 
phur; sulphuric acid; chlorate of potash; and 
acetones. 

(6) Tear gas (CHsCOCH.Cl) and other 
similar non-toxic gases and apparatus designed 
for the storage or projection of such gases. 

The table printed below indicates, in re- 
spect to licenses authorizing the exportation 
to Cuba of the articles and commodities listed 
in the preceding paragraph, issued by the Sec- 
retary of State during February 1941, the 
number of licenses and the value of the articles 
and commodities described in the licenses : 



Number of licenses 


Section 


Value 


Total 


41 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(5) 


$840. 75 

219. 40 

9, 278. 40 

21,089.16 






$31, 427. 71 



The table printed below indicates the value 
of the articles and commodities listed above ex- 
ported to Cuba during February 1941 under 
licenses issued by the Secretaiy of State : 



(1) 

(2) 
(3) 

(5) 



Value 



$1, 718. 75 

107. 17 

13, 797. 00 

12, 810. 62 



Total 



$28,433.54 



Helium 

No licenses authorizing the exportation of 
helium gas under the provisions of the act ap- 
proved September 1, 1937, and the regulations 
issued pursuant thereto, were applied for or 
issued during the month of February 1941. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



COMMERCE 

INTER-AMERICAN COFFEE-MARKETING 
AGREEMENT 

ColoTnbia 

By a note dated March 22, 1941, the Director 
General of the Pan American Union informed 
the Secretary of State that the instrument of 
ratification by Colombia of the Inter- American 
Coffee-Marketing Agreement signed at Wash- 
ington on November 28, 1940, was deposited 
with the Union on March 20, 1941. The in- 
strument of ratification is dated February 28, 
1941. 

AVIATION 

AGREEMENT WITH MEXICO FOR THE RECIP- 
ROCAL TRANSIT OP MILITARY AIRCRAFT 

On April 1, 1941, the Mexican Ambassador 
at Washington and the Under Secretary of 
State signed an agreement between the United 
States and Mexico to facilitate the reciprocal 
transit of military aircraft. Under this agree- 
ment the military aircraft of either country 
may transit within 24 hours the territory of the 
other over routes designated by the latter 
country, enjoying the facilities of regular land- 
ing points on land and sea. 

The agreement is subject to denunciation 
unilaterally whenever the conditions which led 
to its negotiation have, in the opinion of the 
denouncing country, disappeared. Aircraft of 
either country in transit at the time of denun- 
ciation shall have 24 hours within which to 
leave the territory of the other. 

The agreement requires ratification by the 
constitutional branch of each Govermnent, and 
it will become effective on the day on which 
ratifications are exchanged. 



EXTRADITION 
SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION WITH MEXICO 

The Supplementary Extradition Convention 
between the United States and Mexico signed at 
Mexico City on August 16, 1939, was proclaimed 
by the President on April 4, 1941. 

The convention becomes an integral pait of 
the Extradition Treaty of February 22. 1899 
(Treaty Series 242), between the United States 
and Mexico. It makes an extraditable crime of 
the crime of accessory before or after the fact 
to any of the crimes made extraditable in the 
Extradition Treaty of 1899 or in the supple- 
mentary extradition conventions signed on 
June 25. 1902 (Treaty Series 421) and 
December 23, 1925 (Treaty Series 741). 

The Senate gave its advice and consent to 
ratification of the supplementary convention on 
November 26, 1940, and the President ratified it 
on December 20, 1940. Mexico ratified the con- 
vention on January 28, 1941. Ratifications 
were exchanged at Mexico City on February 17, 
1941. In accordance with the terms of article 
III the sup])lementary convention will come 
into force 10 days after publication by the coun- 
try last publishing. Publication of the sup- 
plementary convention by Mexico was made 
on March 22, 1941. The proclamation by the 
President constitutes publication on the part 
of the United States, and tlie supplementary 
convention will, therefore, come into force on 
April 14, 1941. 

SPECIAL ASSISTANCE 

FINANCIAL CONVENTION WITH THE DOMINI- 
CAN REPUBLIC REVISING THE CONVENTION 
OF 1924 

In accordance with the provisions of article 
IX of the convention bet\veen the United 
States of America and the Dominican Repub- 

437 



438 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BXJLLETIN 



lie signed at Washington on September 24, 
1940, modifying the convention of December 
27, 1924 (Treaty Series 726) between the two 
countries, which provided for the assistance of 
the United States of America in the collection 
and application of the customs revenues of the 
Dominican Republic, notes were exchanged on 
March 31 between the two Governments at the 
capital of the Dominican Republic agreeing 
that all the necessary measures have now been 
taken by both Governments to put the provi- 
sions of the new convention into operation. 

One of these measures was the establishment 
of a depository bank by the Dominican Gov- 
ernment, which is the sole depository of all 
revenues and funds of whatsoever nature of 
the Dominican Government. This bank is to 
make no disbursements for the account of the 
Dominican Government until certain payments 
have been made including the transmission of 
the funds, through an official acting as the rep- 
resentative of the holders of the 1922 and 1926 
bonds, to pay interest and amortization 
charges on outstanding dollar bonds. 

The branch of the National City Bank of 
New York, located at Ciudad Trujillo, has 
been designated as the sole depository bank, 
and Mr. Oliver P. Newman, of Washington, 
D. C, has been named as the official represent- 
ing the bondholders. These designations were 
made by the two Governments acting in ac- 
cord. 

By the termination of the Dominican Cus- 
toms Receivership, administered since 1905 by 
an official appointed by the President of the 
United States of America, and with the trans- 
fer of its functions to the appropriate authori- 
ties of the Dominican Government, a new era 
in American-Dominican relations has begun, 
marking another important milestone in the 
development of the good-neighbor policy. 

In connection with the termination of the 
General Receivership of Dominican Customs, 
Secretary Hull on April 2 addressed the fol- 
lowing telegram to Seiior Arturo Despradel, 
Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Dominican 
Republic : 



"I desire on this day which begins a new 
era in the friendly and neighborly relations 
between our countries, to send my felicitations 
and good wishes to Your Excellency and to 
the Dominican Government and people. 

CoRDELL Hull" 

The Secretary also sent to the Honorable 
Thomas Pearson, Deputy General Receiver of 
Dominican Customs, the following telegram: 

"On the termination of the General Receiv- 
ership of Dominican Customs, I desire to ex- 
press my appreciation for the fine record of 
service rendered by you and the many officers 
and emi^loyees of the Receivership, both Do- 
minican and American, during the last third 
of a century. I extend to all of you the thanks 
of this Government and my best wishes for 
your future success and happiness. 

CoRDELL Hull" 

The following reply from the Minister for 
Foreign Affairs has been received by the Sec- 
retary of State: 

[Translation] 

"April 2, 1941. 
"I have the honor to express to Your Excel- 
lency my deep gratification for the cordial con- 
gratulations which you have conveyed to the 
people and Government of the Dominican Re- 
public and for your kind wishes on the occa- 
sion of the putting into operation of the 
Trujillo-HuU agreement. This transcendental 
event strengthens the sincere friendship exist- 
ing between our two countries, reaffirming the 
high ideals of justice and good understanding 
in which these friendly relations are inspired. 

Arturo Despradel" 

FISHEEtlES 

CON\^NTION WITH CANADA ON PRESERVA- 
TION OF THE HALIBUT FISHERY OF THE 
NORTHERN PACIFIC OCEAN AND THE BER- 
ING SEA 

Regidations of the International Fisheries 
Commission adopted pursuant to the Pacific 
Halibut Fishery Convention between the 
United States and Canada signed on January 



APRIL 5, 1941 

29, 1937 (Treaty Series 917), were approved by 
the President of the United States on March 22, 
1941, and on behalf of Canada by an Order in 
Council of March 10, 19-11. Tliese regulations 
supersede all previous regulations adopted pur- 
suant to the above convention, except as to 
offenses occurring prior to the approval of the 
new regulations. The regulations are printed 
in full in the Federal Reghter of April 2, 1941 
(vol. 6, no. 64), pp. 1757-1759. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press April 5] 

The following changes have occurred in 
the American Foreign Service since March 22, 
1941: 

The assignment of Wesley Frost, of Berea, 
Ky., as Consul General at Wellington, New Zea- 
land, has been canceled. Mr. Frost has now been 
appointed Minister to Paraguay. 

Thomas D. Bowman, of Smithville, Mo., Con- 
sul General at Naples, Italy, has been assigned 
as Consul General at Rome, Italy. 

A. Dana Hodgdon, of Leonardtown, Md., 
Consul at Naples, Italy, has been assigned as 
Consul and Second Secretary of Embassy at 
Rome, Italy, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Basil D. Dahl, of Wisconsin, Consul at Ba- 
tavia, Java, Netherlands Indies, has been as- 
signed as Consul at Wellington, New Zealand. 

William Clarke Vyse, of Washington, D. C, 
Consul at Shanghai, China, has been assigned as 
Consul at Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

R. Horton Henry, of Arizona, Consul at 
Buenos Aires, Argentina, has been designated 
Second Secretary of Embassy at Buenos Aires, 
Argentina, and will serve in dual capacity. 

C. Burke Elbrick, of Louisville, Ky.," Vice 
Consul at Lisbon, Portugal, has been designated 
Third Secretary of Legation at Lisbon, Portu- 
gal. 



439 

Henry E. Stebbins, of Massachusetts, Vice 
Consul at London, England, has been designated 
Third Secretary of Embassy at London, Eng- 
land, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Glen W. Bruner, of Sterling, Colo., Vice Con- 
sul at Kobe, Japan, has been assigned as Vice 
Consul at Taihoku, Japan. 

William E. Cole, Jr., of Fort Totten, N. Y., 
Vice Consul at Naples, Italy, has been assigned 
as Vice Consul at Rome, Italy. 

Livingston D. Watrous, of Fort Hamilton, 
N. Y., Vice Consul at Agua Prieta, Mexico, has 
been assigned as Vice Consul at Ciudad Juarez, 
Mexico. 

Charles W. Adair, Jr., of Xenia, Ohio, Vice 
Consul at Nogales, Mexico, has been assigned 
as Vice Consul at Mexico City, Mexico. 

Irven M. Eitreim, of Mt. Vernon, S. Dak., 
Vice Consul at Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, has 
been assigned as Vice Consul at Mexico City, 
Mexico. 

W. Horton Schoellkopf, Jr., of Miami, Fla., 
Vice Consul at Mexicali, Mexico, has been as- 
signed as Vice Consul at Ciudad, Juarez, 
Mexico. 

David H. McKillop, of Chestnut Hill, Mass., 
having been appointed Foreign Service officer, 
unclassified ; Vice Consul of Career ; and Secre- 
tary in the Diplomatic Service of the United 
States, has been assigned as Vice Consul at 
Ziirich, Switzerland. 

Thomas B. Clark, of Texas, Vice Consul at 
Shanghai, China, has been appointed Vice Con- 
sul at Agua Prieta, Mexico. 

Paul C. Seddicmn, of Washington, D. C, 
Vice Consul at London, England, has been 
appointed Vice Consul at Toronto, Ontario, 
Canada. 

William J. Porter, of Fall River, Mass., Vice 
Consul at Baghdad, Iraq, has been appointed 
Vice Consul at Beirut, Lebanon. 

Joseph M. Roland, of Pennsylvania, has been 
appointed Vice Consul at Vienna, Germany. 

Herman Moss, of New York, has been ap- 
pointed Vice Consul at Genoa, Italy. 



440 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BXJLLETIN 



Publications 



Dki'mmjiknt of State 

Not KM' t<i Bearers of Passports. Revised to Feliru- 
siry 1, 1041. Passport Series 2. Publication lOii.'. 
iv, 76 pp. Free. 

Passport Visa Fees: Arrangement Between the 
United States of America and Sweden— Effected by 
exchanges of notes dated September 4 and 11 and 
October 5. 1939. Executive Agreement Series 198. 
Publication 1577. 3 pp. 5^. 

Extradition : Supplementary Convention Between 
the United States of America and Guatemala — Signed 
at Guatemala City February 20, 1940; proclaimed 
March 3, 1941. Treaty Series 968. 5 pp. 50. 



The following publication may be of interest 
to readers of the Bulletin: 

Fourth Annual Report of the President of the 
Philippines to the President and the Congress of the 
United States, Covering the Period January 1 to June 
30, 1939. (H. Doc. 983, 76th Cong., 3d sess.) vl, 41 
pp.. tables. 10«i. 



Legislation 



An Act To anuMul the tirst paragraph of section 22 
of the Act of February 23, 1931 (46 Stat. 1210) [au- 
Ihorizing the Secretary of State to order Foreign Serv- 
ice officers to the United States for certain duties]. 
Approved March 17, 1941. (Public Law 17, 77th Ong., 
1st. sess.) 1 p. 5^. 

First Deficiency Appropriation Act, 1941 : An Act 
Making appropriations to supply deficiencies in cer- 
tain apiiropriations for the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1941, and prior fiscal years, to provide supplemental 
appropriations for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1941, 
and for other purposes [includes additional funds for 
Department of State, pp. 11-12]. Approved April 1, 
1941. (PubllcLaw25, 77th Song., 1st sess.) 29 pp. of. 

Department of State Appropriation Bill for 1942: 
Hearings Before the Subcommittee of the Committee 
on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Seventy- 
seventh Congress, First Session, on the Department of 
State Appropriation Bill for 1942. 469 pp. ,50^. 



U- S eOVERHMENT PRINTING OFFICEi 1941 



For sale b.v the SnperinteDclent of Documents, Waehiugton, D. C. — Price 10 cents Subscription price, .f 2.7." a year 

Pl'BLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIBECTOE OP THE BUBKAU OF THE BDDOBT 



^y<^r-^'^-^L^ 



A_ 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 



Qontents 



APRIL 12, 1941 

Vol. IV: No. 94— Publication 1589 




Greenland: 

Agreement relating to the defense of Greenland : 

Statement by the President 

Announcement by the Department of State .... 

Text of the agreement 

Exchange of notes between the Secretary of State 
and the Minister of Denmark 

Europe: 

Invasion of Yugoslavia: 

Statement by the Secretary of State 

Message of the President to the King of Yugoslavia . 
Proclamations and regulations concerning the neu- 
trality of the United States in the war between 

Germany and Italy, and Yugoslavia 

Instructions to Minister in Yugoslavia 

Reports from Legation in Yugoslavia 

Request by Italian Government for withdrawal of 
American military attache 

Canada: 

Death of Minister to the United States 



General: 

Control of exports in national defense 

The Foreign Service: 

Persomiel changes 

Cultural Relations: 

Offer of scholarships in Colombia . . 



Page 

443 

443 
445 

447 



448 
449 



449 
452 
452 

453 
453 

454 
456 
457 



[Over] 



M. S. SUPERIfJTEt^uENT OF DOCUMENTS 

MAY 8 1941 



Qontents- 



-CONTINUED. 



Cultural Kelations — Continued. Page 

Visit of Chilean newspapermen to the United States . 458 
Pathologist from the United States to lecture in 

Colombia 458 

Publications: 

Publication of "The Territorial Papers of the United 

States", Volume IX 459 

Treaty Information: 
Naval and air bases: 

Agreement Relating to the Defense of Greenland . 460 
Aviation : 

Agreement With Mexico for the Reciprocal Transit 

of Military Ah'craft 460 

Extradition : 

Supplementary Treaty With Switzerland .... 461 
Commerce : 

Inter- American Coffee-Marketing Agreement . . 461 
Conciliation : 

Treaty With Liberia 461 

Flora and fauna : 

Inter-American Convention on Nature Protection 

and Wildlife Preservation 461 

Indian affairs: 

Convention Providing for the Creation of an Inter- 
American Indian Institute 462 

Regulations 462 

Legislation 462 



Greenland 



AGREEMENT RELATING TO THE DEFENSE OF GREENLAND 

STATEMENT BY THE PRESIDENT 



[Released to the press by the White House April 10] 

Yesterday we signed an agreement with the 
Danish Minister in Washington, who acts on 
behalf of the King of Denmark as sovereign of 
Greenland, including Greenland in our system 
of cooperative hemispheric defense. 

This agreement was signed on the aimiversary 
of the day on which German troops invaded 
Deimaark. 

Last May the Greenland Councils requested 
the United States to keep in mind the exposed 
position of the Danish flag in Greenland. I at 



once offered to make available relief, if neces- 
sary ; and to assure a continued flow of necessary 
supplies for the island. The present step is a 
new proof of our continuing friendliness to Den- 
mark. Under the present circmnstances the 
Government in Denmark cannot, of course, act 
in respect of its territory in the Western Hemi- 
sphere, but we propose to make sure that when 
the German invasion of Denmark has ended, 
Greenland will remain a Danish colony. Mean- 
while, we earnestly hope for the quick liberation 
of Denmark from her present invaders. 



ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



[Released to the press April 10] 

The Department of State announced April 
10 the signing on April 9, 1941 of an agreement 
between the Secretary of State, acting on behalf 
of the Government of the United States of 
America, and the Danish Minister, Henrik de 
Kauffmaim, acting on behalf of His Majesty 
the King of Denmark in his capacity as sover- 
eign of Greenland. 

The agreement recognizes that as a result 
of the present European war there is danger that 
Greenland may be converted into a point of ag- 
gression against nations of the American Con- 
tinent, and accepts the responsibility on behalf 
of the United States of assisting Greenland in 
the maintenance of its present status. 

The agreement, after explicitly recognizing 
the Danish sovereignty over Greenland, proceeds 



to grant to the United States the right to locate 
and construct airplane landing fields and facili- 
ties for the defense of Greenland and for the 
defense of the American Continent. 

The circumstances leading up to the agree- 
ment are as follows. 

On April 9, 1940 the German Army invaded 
and occupied Denmark, and that occupation 
continues. In condemning this mvasion Presi- 
dent Roosevelt said : 

"Force and military aggression are once 
more on the march against small nations, in 
this instance through the invasion of Den- 
mark and Norway. These two nations have 
won and maintained during a period of many 
generations the respect and regard not only 
of the American people, but of all peoples, 

443 



444 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



because of theii" observance of the highest 
standards of national and international 
conduct. 

"The Government of the United States has 
on the occasion of recent invasions strongly 
expressed its disapprobation of such unlaw- 
ful exercise of force. It here reiterates, with 
undiminished emphasis, its point of view as 
expressed on those occasions. If civilization 
is to survive, the rights of the smaller nations 
to indejDendence, to their territorial integrity, 
and to the unimpeded opportunity for self- 
government must be respected by their more 
powerful neighbors." 

This invasion at once raised questions as to the 
status of Greenland, which has been recognized 
as being within the area of the Monroe Doctrine. 
The Government of the United States announces 
its policy of maintenance of the status quo in 
the Western Hemisphere. 

On May 3, 1940 the Greenland Councils, 
meeting at Godhavn, adojjted a resolution in 
the name of the people of Greenland reaffirm- 
ing their allegiance to King Christian X of 
Denmark, and expressed the hope that so long 
as Greenland remained cut off from tire mother 
country, the Government of the United States 
would continue to keep in mind the exposed 
position of the Danish flag in Greenland and 
of the native and Danish population of Green- 
land. The Government of the United States 
expressed its willingness to assure that the 
needs of the population of Greenland would be 
taken care of. 

On July 25, 1940, the consultation of Ameri- 
can Foreign Ministers at Habana declared that 
any attempt on the part of a non-American 
state against the integrity or inviolability of 
the territory, the sovereignty, or the political 
independence of an American state should be 
considered an act of aggression, and that they 
would cooperate in defense against any such 
aggression. In a further declaration, known as 
the Act of Habana, it declared that the status 
of regions in this continent belonging to Euro- 
pean powers was a subject of deep concern to 
all of the governments of the American 
republics. 



During the summer of 1940 German activ- 
ity on the eastern coast of Greenland became 
apparent. Three ships proceeding from Nor- 
wegian territory under German occupation ar- 
rived off the coast of Greenland, ostensibly for 
commercial or scientific purposes; and at least 
one of these ships landed parties nominally for 
scientific purposes, but actually for meteor- 
ological assistance to German belligerent oper- 
ations in the north Atlantic. These parties 
were eventually cleared out. In the late fall 
of 1940, air reconnaissance appeared over East 
Greenland under circumstances making it plain 
that there had been continued activity in that 
region. 

On March 27, 1941, a German bomber flew 
over the eastern coast of Greenland and on the 
following day another German war plane like- 
wise reconnoitered the same territory. Under 
these circumstances it appeared that further 
steps for the defense of Greenland were neces- 
sary to bring Greenland within the system of 
hemispheric defense envisaged by the Act of 
Habana. 

The Government of the United States has no 
thought in mind save that of assuring the safety 
of Greenland and the rest of the American Con- 
tinent, and Greenland's continuance under Dan- 
ish sovereignty. The agreement recognizes ex- 
plicitly the full Danish sovereignty over Green- 
land. At the same time it is recognized that so 
long as Denmark remains under German oc- 
cupation the Government in Denmark cannot 
exercise the Danish sovereign powers over 
Greenland under the Monroe Doctrine, and the 
agreement therefore was signed between the 
Secretary of State and the Danish Minister in 
Washington, acting as representative of the 
King of Denmark in his capacity as sovereign 
of Greenland, and with the concurrence of the 
Governors of Greenland. 

The step is taken in furtherance of the tra- 
ditional friendliness between Denmark and the 
United States. The policy of the United States 
is that of defending for Denmark her sover- 
eignty over Greenland, so that she may have 
a full exercise of it as soon as the invasion is 
ended. The agreement accordingly provides 
that as soon as the war is over and the danger 



APRIL 12, 1941 



445 



has passed, the two Governments shall promptly 
consult as to whether the arrangements made 



by the jjresent agreement shall continue or 
whether they shall then cease. 



TEXT OF THE AGREEMENT 



Whereas: 

One. After the invasion and occupation of 
Denmark on April 9, 1940 by foreign military 
forces, the United Greenland Councils at their 
meeting at Godhavn on May 3, 1940 adopted in 
the name of the people of Greenland a resolu- 
tion reiterating their oath of allegiance to King 
Christian X of Denmark and expressing the 
hope that, for as long as Greenland remains cut 
off from the mother country, the Government of 
the United States of America will continue to 
hold in mind the exposed position of the Danish 
flag in Greenland, of the native Greenland and 
Danish population, and of established public 
order ; and 

Two. The Governments of all of the American 
Republics have agreed that the status of regions 
in the Western Hemisphere belonging to Euro- 
pean powers is a subject of deep concern to the 
American Nations, and that the course of mili- 
tary events in Europe and the changes resulting 
from them may create the gi-ave danger that 
European ten-itorial possessions in America may 
be converted into strategic centers of aggression 
against nations of the American Continent ; and 

Three. Defense of Greenland against attack 
by a non- American power is essential to the 
preservation of the peace and security of the 
American Continent and is a subject of vital 
concern to the United States of America and 
also to the Kingdom of Denmark; and 

FouB. Although the sovereignty of DeiUBark 
over Greenland is fully recognized, the present 
circumstances for the time being prevent the 
Government in Denmark from exercising its 
powers in respect of Greenland. 

Therefore, 

The undersigned, to wit: Cordell. HuLii, Sec- 
retary of State of the United States of America, 
acting on behalf of the Government of the 
United States of America, and Henrik de 
Katjtfmann, Envoy Extraordinary and Minis- 



ter Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the King 
of Denmark at Washington, acting on behalf 
of His Majesty the King of Denmark in His 
capacity as sovereign of Greenland, whose 
authorities in Greenland have concun-ed herein, 
have agreed as follows: 

Article I 

The Government of the United States of 
America reiterates its recognition of and respect 
for the sovereignty of the Kingdom of Deimiark 
over Greenland. Recognizing that as a result 
of the present European war there is danger 
that Greenland may be converted into a point of 
aggression against nations of the American 
Continent, the Government of the United States 
of America, having in mind its obligations 
under the Act of Habana signed on July 30, 
1940, accepts the responsibility of assisting 
Greenland in the maintenance of its present 
status. 

Article II 

It is agreed that the Government of the 
United States of America shall have the right 
to construct, maintain and o^jerate such landing 
fields, seaplane facilities and radio and meteoro- 
logical installations as may be necessary for the 
accomplishment of the purposes set forth in 
Article I. 

Article III 

The grants of the rights specified in Ai'ticle 
II shall also include the right to improve and 
deepen harbors and anchorages and the ap- 
proaches thereto, to install aids to navigation 
by air and by water, and to construct roads, 
communication services, fortifications, repair 
and storage facilities, and housing for person- 
nel, and generally, the right to do any and all 
things necessary to insure the efficient opera- 
tion, maintenance and protection of such de- 
fense facilities as may be established. 



446 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETEST 



Article IV 

The landing fields, seaplane, harbor and other 
defense facilities that may be constructed and 
operated by the Government of the United 
States of America under Articles II and III 
■will be made available to the airplanes and ves- 
sels of all the American Nations for purposes 
connected with the common defense of the 
Western Hemisphere. 

Article V 

It is agreed that the Government of the United 
States of America shall have the right to lease 
for such period of time as this Agreement may 
be in force such areas of land and water as may 
be necessai-y for the construction, operation and 
protection of the defense facilities siDecified in 
Articles II and III. In locating the aforesaid 
defense areas, the fullest consideration consist- 
ent with military necessity shall be given to the 
welfare, health and economic needs of the na- 
tive population of Greenland. It is agreed, 
however, that since the paramount objective 
sought is the early attainment of an adequate 
defense establishment in Greenland, the utili- 
zation of any area deemed by the Government 
of the United States of America to be needed 
for this purpose shall not be delayed pending 
the reaching of an agi'eement upon the precise 
terms of a formal lease. A description of such 
areas, by metes and bounds, and a statement of 
the purpose for which they are needed shall in 
each case be communicated to the Danish au- 
thorities in Greenland as soon as practicable, 
and the negotiation of a formal lease shall be 
undertaken within a reasonable period of time 
thereafter. 

Article VI 

The Kingdom of Demiiark retains sover- 
eignty over the defense areas mentioned in 
the preceding articles. So long as this Agree- 
ment shall remain in force, the Government of 
the United States of America shall have ex- 
clusive jurisdiction over any such defense area 
in Greenland and over military and civilian 
personnel of the United States, and their fami- 



lies, as well as over all other persons within such 
areas except Danish citizens and native Green- 
landers, it being understood, however, that the 
Government of the United States may turn 
over to the Danish authorities in Greenland for 
trial and punishment any person committing 
an offense within a defense area, if the Govern- 
ment of the United States shall decide not to 
exercise jurisdiction in such case. The Danish 
authorities in Greenland will take adequate 
measures to insure the prosecution and punish- 
ment in case of conviction of all Danish citizens, 
native Greenlanders, and other persons who may 
be turned over to them by the authorities of the 
United States, for offenses committed within 
the said defense areas. 

Article VII 

It is agreed that the Government of the United 
States of America shall have the right to estab- 
lish and maintain postal facilities and commis- 
sary stores to be used solely by military and 
civilian personnel of the United States, and 
their families, maintained in Greenland in con- 
nection with the Greenland defense establish- 
ment. If requested by the Danish authorities 
in Greenland, arrangements will be made to en- 
able persons other than those mentioned to pur- 
chase necessary supplies at such commissary 
stores as may be established. 

Article VILE 

All materials, supplies and equipment for the 
construction, use and operation of the defense 
establishment and for the personal needs of 
military and civilian personnel of the United 
States, and their families, shall be permitted 
entry into Greenland free of customs duties, 
excise taxes, or other charges, and the said per- 
sonnel, and their families, shall also be exempt 
from all forms of taxation, assessments or other 
levies by the Danish authorities in Greenland. 

Article IX 

The Government of the United States of 
America will respect all legitimate interests in 



APRIL 12, 19 H 



447 



Greenland as well as all the laM's, regulations 
and customs pertaining to the native popula- 
tion and the internal administration of Green- 
land. In exercising the rights derived from this 
Agreement the Goverimient of the United States 
will give sympathetic consideration to all repre- 
sentations made by the Danish authorities in 
Greenland with respect to the welfare of the. 
inhabitants of Greenland. 

Articue X 

This Agreement shall remain in force until 
it is agreed that the present dangers to the peace 
and security of the American Continent have 
passed. At that time the modification or termi- 
nation of the Agreement will be the subject of 
consultation between the Government of the 
United States of America and the Government 
of Denmark. After due consultation has taken 



place, each party shall have the right to give the 
other party notice of its intention to terminate 
the Agreement, and it is hereby agreed, that at 
the expiration of twelve months after such 
notice shall have been received by either party 
from the other this Agreement shall cease to be 
in force. 

Signed at Washington in duplicate, in the 
English and Danish languages, both texts hav- 
ing equal force, this 9th day of April, nineteen 
hundred and forty-one. 

[seal] Cordell Hull 

Secretary of State of the 
United States of Amenm. 

[sEAii] Henrik Kauttmann 

Envoy Extraordinary and 
Minister Plenipotentiary 
of Hi^ Majesty the King of 
Denmcerk at Washington 



EXCHANGE OF NOTES BETWEEN THE SECRETARY OF STATE AND THE MINISTER OF DENMARK 



The Secretary of State to the Minister of 
Denmark 

Department of State, 
Washington, April 7, 191^1. 
Sir: 

I have the honor to refer to the informal con- 
versations which you have had with officers of 
the Department of State during which tlie con- 
cern of the Government of the United States was 
expressed over the effect of recent military de- 
velopments, particularly affecting Greenland, 
upon the maintenance of the peace and security 
of the United States and the rest of the 
American Continent. 

You are also aware of the interest of the Gov- 
ernment of the United States in maintaining 
unimpaired the safety of Greenland and the 
sovereigiit}^ of Denmark over that island. My 
Government has continuously had in mind the 
desire expressed by the United Greenland Coun- 
cils at their meeting at Godhavii on May 3, 1940 
that the Government of the United States of 
America would continue to hold in mind the ex- 



posed position of the Danish flag in Greenland 
and of the native Greenland and Danish popula- 
tion of the island. 

My Government has taken note of the unusual 
situation in which Greenland now finds itself. 
The Kingdom of Denmark is at present under 
occupation by a foreign army. The Govern- 
ment of the United States has condemned that 
invasion as a violation of Danish sovereign 
rights, and has repeatedly expressed its friendly 
concern and its most earnest hope for the com- 
plete and speedy liberation of Denmark. Al- 
though the Government of the United States 
fully recognizes the sovereignty of the Kingdom 
of Denmark over Greenland, it is unhappily 
clear that the Government in Denmark is not 
in a position to exercise sovereign power over 
Greenland so long as the present military 
occupation continues. 

Greenland is within the area embraced by 
the Monroe Doctrine and by the Act of Havana, 
witli which you are familiar, and its defense 
against attack by a non-American power is 



448 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



plainly essential to the preservation of the peace 
and security of the American continent, and 
of the traditional policies of this Government 
respecting the Western Hemisphere. 

My Govermnent has consequently proposed 
measures for the adequate defense of Greenland 
consistent with the obligations of the United 
States under the Act of Havana signed on July 
30, 1940. In doing so it is animated by senti- 
ments of the completest friendliness for Den- 
mark, and believes that by taking these steps it 
is safeguarding the eventual re-establishment 
of the normal relationship between Greenland 
and the Kingdom of Denmark. 

I have the honor to enclose a draft of the 
proposed agreement relating to the defense of 
Greenland, which I believe embodies the ideas 
agreed upon in the course of our various con- 
versations. 

Accept [etc.] Cordell Huix 

The Minister of Denmark to the Secretary of 
State 

Royal, Danish Legation, 
Washington, D.C., Ajyinl 5, 19Jtl. 
Sm: 

I have received your note of the seventh in- 
stant concerning the defense of Greenland to- 
gether with a draft of a proposed agreement 
regarding the same subject. 



It is with appreciation that I note your re- 
newed assurance that, although the present cir- 
cumstances prevent the Government in Den- 
mark for the time being from exercising its 
powers in respect of Greenland, your Govern- 
ment fully recognizes the Sovereignty of the 
Kingdom of Denmark over the island. At the 
same time I wish to convey to you my feelings 
of gratitude for the expression of friendly con- 
cern of your Government and its earnest hope 
for the complete and speedy liberation of 
Denmark. 

I share your view that the proposed agree- 
ment, arrived at after an open and friendly 
exchange of views, is, under the singularly un- 
usual circumstances, the best measure to assure 
both Greenland's present safety and the future 
of the island under Danish Sovereignty. 

Furthermore, I am of the opinion that the 
terms of the agreement protect, as far as pos- 
sible, the interests of the native population of 
Greenland whose welfare traditionally has been 
the paramoimt aim of Denmark's policy in 
Greenland. 

I, therefore, shall accept and sign the agree- 
ment as proposed, acting on behalf of His Ma- 
jesty, the King of Denmark, in His capacity of 
Sovereign over Greenland, whose authorities 
in Greenland have concurred herein. 

I avail [etc.] Henrik Kauffmann 



Europe 



INVASION OF YUGOSLAVIA 



STATEMENT BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE 



(Released to the press April 6] 

The following statement was issued by the 
Secretary of State after consultation with the 
President : 

"The barbaric invasion of Yugoslavia and 
the attempt to annihilate that country by brute 
force is but another chapter in the present 



planned movement of attempted world conquest, 
and domination. Another small nation has been 
assaulted by the forces of aggression and is 
further proof that there are no geographical 
limitations or bounds of any kind to their move- 
ment for world conquest. 

"The American people have the greatest sym- 



APRIL 12, 1941 

pathy for the nation which has been thus so 
outrageously attacked, and we follow closely 
the valiant struggle the Yugoslav people are 
making to protect their homes and preserve 
their liberty. 



449 

"This Government with its policy of helping 
those who are defending themselves against 
would-be conquerors is now proceeding as 
speedily as possible to send military and other 
supplies to Yugoslavia." 



MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT TO THE KING OF YUGOSLAVIA 



[Released to the press April 8] 

The President has addressed the following 
telegram to His Majesty King Peter II of Yugo- 
slavia : 

"April 8, 1941. 

"The people of the United States have been 
profoundly shocked by the unprovoked and 
ruthless aggression upon the people of Yugo- 
slavia. The Government and people of the 
United States are witnessing with admiration 
the courageous self-defense of the Yugoslav 



people, which constitutes one more shining ex- 
ample of their traditional bravery. 

"As I have assured Your Majesty's Govern- 
ment, the United States will speedily furnish 
all material assistance possible in accordance 
with its existing statutes. 

"I send Your Majesty my most earnest hopes 
for a successful resistance to this criminal assault 
upon the independence and integrity of your 
country. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt" 



PROCLAMATIONS AND REGULATIONS CONCERNING THE NEUTRALITY OF THE UNITED STATES IN 
THE WAR BETWEEN GERMANY AND ITALY, AND YUGOSLAVIA 



[Released to the press April 11] 

Proclamation of a State or War Between 
Germany and Italy, on the One Hand and 
Yugoslavia, on the Other Hand 

by the president of the united states 
of america 

A Produnujttion 

Whereas section 1 of the joint resolution of 
Congress approved November 4, 1939, provides 
in part as follows : 

"That whenever the President, or the Con- 
gress bj' concurrent resolution, shall find that 
there exists a state of war betMeen foreign 
states, and that it is necessary to promote the 
security or preserve the peace of the United 
States or to protect the lives of citizens of the 
United States, the President shall issue a 
proclamation naming the states involved ; and 
he shall, from time to time, by proclamation, 
name other states as and when they may 
become involved in the war," 
30§994 — ji 3 



And whereas it is further provided by sec- 
tion 13 of the said joint resolution that 

"The President may, from time to time, 
promulgate such rules and regulations, not 
inconsistent with law as may be necessary and 
proi>er to can\y out any of the provisions of 
this joint resolution; and he may exercise 
any power or authority conferred on him by 
this joint resolution through such officer or 
officers, or agency or agencies, as he shall 
direct." 

Now, THEREFORE, I, FrANKUN D. RoOSEVELT, 

President of the United States of America, 
acting under and by virtue of the authority con- 
ferred on me by the said joint resolution, do 
hereby proclaim that, Germany and Italy hav- 
ing wantonly attacked Yugoslavia, a state of 
war exists between Germany and Italy, on the 
one hand, and Yugoslavia, on the other hand, 
and that it is necessary to promote the security 
and preserve the peace of the United States and 
to protect the lives of citizens of the United 
States. 



450 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



And I do hereby enjoin upon all officers of the 
United States, charged with the execution of the 
laws thereof, the utmost diligence in preventing 
violations of the said joint resolution and in 
bringing to trial and punishment any ofl'enders 
against the same. 

And I do hereby delegate to the Secretary of 
State the power to exercise any power or au- 
thority conferred on me by the said joint reso- 
lution, as made effective by this ray proclama- 
tion issued thereunder, which is not specifically 
delegated by Executive order to some other of- 
ficer or agency of this Government, and the 
power to promulgate such rules and regulations 
not inconsistent with law as may be necessary 
and proper to carry out any of its provisions. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 

Done at the City of Washington this 10th day 
of April, in the year of our Lord 

[seal] nineteen hundred and forty-one, and 
of the Independence of the United 
States of America the one hundred and sixty- 
fifth. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 

By the President: 
CoRDELL Hull 

Secretary of State. 
[No. 2473] 

[Released to the press April 11] 

Modification of a Combat Area 

BY THE president OF THE UNITED STATES OF 
AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Whereas section 3 of the joint resolution of 
Congress approved November 4, 1939, provides 
as follows: 

"(a) Whenever the President shall have is- 
sued a proclamation under the authority of 
section 1 (a), and he shall thereafter find that 
the protection of citizens of the United States 
so requires, he shall, by proclamation, define 
combat areas, and thereafter it shall be un- 
lawful, except under such rules and I'egula- 



tions as may be prescribed, for any citizen of 
the United States or any American vessel to 
proceed into or through any such combat 
area. The combat area so defined may be made 
to apply to surface vessels or aircraft, or both. 

"(b) In case of the violation of any of the 
provisions of this section by any American 
vessel, or any owner or officer thereof, such 
vessel, owner, or officer shall be fined not 
more than $50,000 or imprisoned for not more 
than five years, or both. Should the owner 
of such vessel be a corporation, organization, 
or association, each officer or director partici- 
pating in the violation shall be liable to the 
penalty hereinabove prescribed. In case of 
the violation of this section by any citizen 
traveling as a passenger, such passenger may 
be fined not more than $10,000 or imprisoned 
for not more than two years, or both. 

"(c) The President may from time to time 
modify or extend any proclamation issued 
under the authority of this section, and when 
the conditions which shall have caused him 
to issue any such proclamation shall have 
ceased to exist he shall revoke such proclama- 
tion and the provisions of this section shall 
thereupon cease to apply, except as to offenses 
committed prior to such revocation." 

And avhereas on June 11, 1940, I issued a 
proclamation ^ in accordance with the provision 
of law quoted above defining a combat area. 

Now, THEREFORE, I, FrANKXIN D. RoOSEVELT, 

President of the United States of America, 
acting under and by virtue of the authority con- 
ferred on me by section 3 (c) of the joint resolu- 
tion of Congress approved November 4, 1939, 
do hereby modify my proclamation of June 11, 
1940, defining combat area.s into which it shall 
be unlawful, except under such rules and regu- 
lations as shall be prescribed, for any citizen of 
the United States or any American vessel, 
whether a surface vessel or an aircraft, to pro- 
ceed, by eliminating from the scojDe of that 
proclamation the combat area defined in the 
second numbered section thereof as: 



'Bulletin of June 15, 1940 (vol. II, uo. .51), pp. 
941-643. 



APRIL 12, 1941 



451 



"Beginning at the intersection of the North 
Coast of Italian Somaliland with the merid- 
ian of 50° longitude east of Greenwich; 

"Thence due north to the mainland of 
Arabia ; 

"Thence eastward along the coast of Arabia 
to the meridian of 51° east longitude; 

"Thence due south to the mainland of 
Italian Somaliland ; 

"Thence westward along the coast of Italian 
Somaliland to the point of beginning." 

And I do hereby proclaim that it shall no 
longer be unlawful for any citizen of the United 
States or any American vessel, whether a sur- 
face vessel or an aircraft, to proceed into or 
through the area defined above. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
of America to be afiixed. 
Done at the City of Washington this 10th day 
of April, in the year of our Lord 
[seal] nineteen hundred and forty-one, and 
of the Independence of the United 
States of America the one hundred and sixty- 
fifth. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 
By the President: 
Cordell Hull 

Secretary of State. 

[No. 2474] 

The following regulations have been codified 
under Title 22 : Foreign Relations ; Chapter I : 
Department of State ; Subchapter A : The De- 
partment, in accordance with the requirements 
of the Federal Register and the Code of Federal 
Eegidatiom^ : 

Part 161 — Solicitation and Collection or 
Funds and Contributions - 

Additional Regulations 

§ 161.21 ontrib'utions for use in Yugoslavia. 
The rules and regulations (22 CFR 161.1-16) 



under section 8 of the joint resolution of Con- 
gress approved November 4, 1939, which the 
Secretary of State promulgated on November 
6, 1939,^ henceforth apply equally to the solicita- 
tion and collection of contributions for use in 
Yugoslavia. (54 Stat. 8; 22 U. S. C, Supp. V, 
2t5j-7; Proc. No. 2473, April 10, 1941) 

Cordell. Hull, 
Secretary of State. 
April 11, 1941. 

Part 149 — Commerce With States Engaged 
in Armed Conflict * 

Additional Regulations 

§ 149.1 Exportation^ or transportation of ar- 
ticles or materials. ***** (j^^ Yugoslavia. 
The regulations under section 2 (c) and (i) of 
the joint resolution of Congress approved 
November 4, 1939, which the Secretary of State 
promulgated on November 10 " and November 
25,'' 1939, henceforth apply equally in respect 
to the export or transport of articles and mate- 
rials to Yugoslavia. ( 54 Stat. 4, 6; 22 U. S. C, 
Supp. V, 245J-1; Proc. No. 2473, April 10, 
1941) 

Cordell Hull, 
Secretary of State. 

April 11, 1941. 

Part 156 — Traatl ^ 

Pursuant to the provisions of section 5 of the 
joint resolution of Congress, approved Novem- 
ber 4, 1939, and of the President's proclamation 
of April 10, 1941, the regulations in 22 CFR 
156.1 and 156.2 of November 6, 1939,« as 
amended November 17, 1939,^ April 25, 1940," 



' The mimber of this part ha.s been clianged from 
40 to 161. 



"4 F. R. 4510. 

*Tlie uumber of this part ha.s been clianged from 
12 to 149. 

°22 CFR 149.1 (a)-(d), 4 F. R. 4598. 

•^22 CFR 149.1 (G). 4 F. R. 4701. 

'The number of this part has been changed from 
55C to 156. 

' 4 F. R. 4509. 

" 4 F. R. 4640. 

"• 5 F. R. 1597. 



452 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



May 11, 1940," June 10, 1940,^= and November 
15, 1940,^^ are hereby amended to read as 
follows : 

§ 156.1 American diplomatic^ consular^ mili- 
tary, and naval ofp^cers. American diplomatic 
and consular officers and tlieir families, mem- 
bers of tlieir staffs and their families, and Amer- 
ican military and naval officers and personnel 
and their families may travel pursuant to orders 
on vessels of France; Germany; Poland; or the 
United Kingdom, India, Australia, Canada, 
New Zealand, the Union of South Africa; Nor- 
way; Belgium; the Netherlands Indies; Italy; 
Greece; and Yugoslavia if the public service 
re<iuires. (54 Stat. 7; 22 U. S. C\. Supp. V, 
245J-4; Proc. No. 2473, April 10, 1941) 

§ 156.2 Other American, citizen.^. Other 
American citizens may travel on vessels of 
France ; Germany ; Poland ; or the United King- 
dom, India, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, 
the Union of South Africa; Norway; Belgium; 
the Netherlands; Italy; Greece; and Yugo- 
slavia: Provided, however. That travel on or 
over the north Atlantic Ocean, north of 35 de- 
grees north latitude and east of 66 degrees west 
longitude or on or over other waters adjacent 
to Europe or over the continent of Europe or 
adjacent islands shall not be permitted except 
when specifically authorized by the Passport 
Division of the Department of State or an 
American dii:)lomatic or consular officer abroad 
in each case. (54 Stat. 7 ; 22 U. S. C, Supp. V, 
245J-4; Proc. No. 2473, April 10, 1941) 

CoRDELL Hull, 
Secretary of State. 

April 11, 1941. 

INSTRUCTIONS TO MINISTER IN YUGOSLAVIA 

[Released to the press April 6] 

The Secretary of State has informed the 
American Minister in Yugoslavia, Mr. Arthur 
Bliss Lane, that this Government would prefer 
that the Minister remain with tlie Yugoslav 



" 5 F. R. 1695. 
"^ 5 F. R. 2211. 



"5F.R.453a 



Government but that he should maintain at all 
times a senior member of his staflf in charge 
of the Legation in Belgrade. 

REPORTS FROM LEGATION IN YUGOSLAVIA 

[Released to the press April 8] 

The Secretary of State announced April 8 
that he had received the following telegram from 
the American Embassy in London, transmitting 
a message from Mr. Arthur Bliss Lane, Ameri- 
can Minister to Yugoslavia: 

"Following me.ssage from Minister Lane in 
Yugoslavia to the Secretary of State was tele- 
phoned by Air Ministry, which stated that it 
had been received from the British Air Attache 
at Belgrade and had been given to him by the 
First Secretary of the American Legation: 

" 'Seventh. Latest news by messenger from 
Belgrade confirms all members of Legation are 
safe up to 6 o'clock last night and no casualties 
among other Americans so far known. Have 
been unable communicate Belgrade and com- 
munication Department problematical. Am 
endeavoring to follow Government. Have with 
me American correspondents Brock, Bevis, 
Chinigo, Hill, St. John and Brown, all well.' " 

(Released to the press April 12] 

The Department of State on April 12 re- 
ceived a message from a member of the Ameri- 
can Legation staff in Yugoslavia, which message 
w;^s filed late in the afternoon of April 11, to the 
effect that all members of the Belgrade Lega- 
tion staff, together with their families, were 
safe in Belgrade. The message reported that 
the residence of the American Minister, Mr. 
Arthur Bliss Lane, had been virtually destroyed 
but that the Legation offices and Consulate were 
still intact. 

The message reported further that Mr. Rob- 
ert B. Macatee, First Secretary of the Legation 
in Belgrade, is now with the Yugoslav Govern- 
ment somewhere in Yugoslavia and that Col. 
Louis J. Fortier is absent from Belgrade 
and is accompanying the Yugoslav military 
authorities. 



APRIL 12, 1941 



453 



In addition to reporting the safety of the 
staff of the American Legation in Belgrade, the 
message stated that Mr. Cavendish W. Cannon, 
Third Secretary of the American Legation at 
Athens, and Mrs. Cannon, who had been on their 
way to the United States, are also safe in 
Belgrade. 

EEQUEST BY ITALIAN GOVERNMENT 
FOR WITHDRAWAL OF AMERICAN 
MILITARY ATTACH^ 

[Released to the press April 9] 

By note of April 2, 1941," the Secretary of 
State notified the Royal Italian Ambassador 
that Admiral Alberto Lais, Naval Attache of 
the Royal Italian Embassy, was persona non 
grata to this Government and requested that 
the Royal Italian Government withdraw him 
immediately from the United States. 

The Secretary of State has now been informed 
by the Royal Italian Ambassador in a note 
dated April 8 that Admiral Lais has ceased 
from his functions and will leave this country 
without delay. 

In the same note, the Royal Italian Ambassa- 
dor stated that Capt. William C. Bentley, 
Jr., Assistant Military Attache and Assistant 
Military Attache for Air of the United States 
Embassy in Rome, is persona non grata to the 
Royal Italian Government, and requested that 
he be withdrawn immediately from Italy. 



Canada 



DEATH OF MINISTER TO THE 
LTNITED STATES 

[Released to the press April 8] 

The following statement has been made by the 
Secretai'y of State : 



'Bulletin of April 5, liMl (vol. IV, no. 93), p. 420. 



"It is with deep sorrow that I have learned 
of the death of the Honorable Loring C. 
Christie, Minister of Canada. His long resi- 
dence in the United States, from the time he 
attended Harvard University, during his years 
with the United States Department of Justice, 
his presence at the Washington Arms Confer- 
ence, and finally his assignment as Minister of 
Canada, gave him a deep appreciation and 
understanding of the problems confronting our 
two countries. The death of this distinguished 
statesman and loyal servant of Canada will be 
a distinct loss to his Government and to his 
country, as well as to his many friends and col- 
leagues in the United States." 

[Released to the press April f>] 

The Secretary of State has addressed the fol- 
lowing telegram to the Prime Minister of 
Canada, the Right Honorable W. L. Mackenzie 
King: 

"April 8, 1941. 

"The news of the death of the Honorable 
Loring C. Christie has caused me deep personal 
grief. Knowing him as I have, I appreciate the 
high quality of the service which he rendered 
Canada. I extend to you and to your fellow 
countrymen my profound .sympathy upon his 
untimely death. 

CoRDELL Hull" 

The Secretary has received the following 
reply from Prime Minister Mackenzie King: 

"April 8, 1941. 
"My colleagues and I are deeply grateful for 
the kind expression of your sympathy in the 
passing of Mr. Loring C. Christie. Your 
moving tribute to Mr. Christie's service to 
Canada will be warmly appreciated by the peo- 
ple of Canada who know of Mr. Christie's 
earnest devotion to the cause of friendship be- 
tween our respective countries. 

W. L. Mackenzie King'' 



General 



CONTEOL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL DEFENSE 



In accordance with the provisions of the 
Executive order of January 15, 1941, the Secre- 
tary of State on April 12 issued the general 
licenses indicated on the following list, autlior- 
izing the exportation to various countries of 
certain of the articles and materials named in 
the proclamations, regulations and Executive 
orders issued pursuant to section 6 of the Export 
Control Act approved July 2, 1940. 

Collectors of Customs have been authorized 
to permit, without the requirement of individual 



license, the exportation of any of the articles 
and materials enumerated in the following list, 
to the respective countries named in tlie list, but 
the exijorter is required to indicate the appro- 
priate license nmnber on the sliipper's export 
declaration filed with the collector. 

Those articles and materials for which no gen- 
eral licenses have been issued but which are sub- 
ject to the requirement of an export license will 
continue to require individual licenses for their 
exportation. 



GENERAL LICENSES FOE Rt.-BBER TIKES AND CERTAIN OILS 



Destination 



Canada 

Great Britain 

Cuba 

Argentina 

Bolivia.-- 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Costa Rica 

Curasao 

Dominican Republic 

Ecuador 

El Salvador 

Guatemala.- 

Haiti 

Honduras 

Mexico 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Paraguay 

Peru-- -- 

Surinam 

UruRuay 

Venezuela 

Aden 

Australia 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Bermuda- 

British East Africa-.. 

British Guiana 

British Honduras 

454 



Rubber 
tires 



GCY 1 

GCY2 

GCY 3 

GCY 4 

GCY 5 

GCY 6 

GCY 7 

GCY 8 

GCY 9 

GCY 10 

GCY 11 

GCY 12 

GCY 13 

GCY 14 

GCY 15 

GCY 16 

GCY 17 

GCY 18 

GCY 19 

GCY 20 

GCY 21 

GCY 22 

GCY 23 

GCY 24 

GCY 2.') 

GCY 26 

GCY 27 

GCY 28 

GCY 29 

GCY 30 

GCY 31 

GCY 32 



Petrolatum 
and petro- 
leum jelly, 
including 
medicinal, 
cosmetic, lu- 
bricant, rust 
preventative, 
polishes, and 
soap grades 



QELl 

GEL 2 

GELS 

GEL 4 

GEL 5 

GEL 6 

GEL 7 

GEL 8 

GEL 9 

GEL 10 

GEL II 

GEL 12 

GEL 13 

GEL 14 

GEL 15 

GEL 16 

GEL 17 

GEL 18 

GEL 19 

GEL 20 

GEL 21 

GEL 22 

GEL 23 

GEL 24 

GEL 25 

GEL 26 

GEL 27 

GEL 28 

GEL 29 

GEL 30 

GEL 31 

GEL 32 



Coconut 
oil, edible 

and 
inedible 



GEM 1 

GEM 2 

GEM 3 

OEM 4 

GEM 5 

OEM 6 

GEM 7 

GEM 8 

GEM 9 

GEM 10 

GEM 11 

GEM 12 

GEM 13 

GEM 14 

GEM 15 

GEM 16 

GEM 17 

GEM 18 

GEM 19 

GEM 20 

GEM 21 

GEM 22 

GEM 23 

GEM 24 

GEM 25 

GEM 26 

GEM 27 

GEM 28 

GEM 29 

GEM 30 

GEM 31 

GEM 32 



Fatty acids 
(vegetable 
and petro- 
leum 
origin) 



GEN 1 

OE.\' 2 

GEN 3 

GEN 4 

GEN 6 

OENO 

GEN 7 

GEN 8 

GEN 9 

GEN 10 

GEN 11 

GEN 12 

GEN 13 

GEN 14 

OEN 15 

GEN 16 

GEN 17 

OEN 18 

GEN 19 

OEN 20 

GEN 21 

GEN 22 

GEN 23 

GEN 24 

GEN 25 

GEN 26 

OEN 27 

GEN 28 

GEN 29 

GEN 30 

GEN 31 

GEN 32 



Palm kernel 

oils, palm oils 

and oils 

obtainable 

from all 

varieties of 

palm kernels, 

both refined 

and crude 



GEO 1 

GEO 2 

GEO 3 

GEO 4 

GEO 5 

GEOO 

GEO 7 

GEO 8 

GEO 9 

GEO 10 

GEO 11 

GEO 12 

GEO 13 

GEO 14 

GEO 15 

GEO 16 

GEO 17 

GEO 18 

GEO 19 

GEO 20 

GEO 21 

GEO 22 

GEO 23 

GEO 24 

GEO 25 

GEO 26 

GEO 27 

GEO 28 

GEO 29 

GEO 30 

GEO 31 

GEO 32 



Animal, 
fish and 
marine 
mammal 
oils, fats 
and grease, 
edible and 
inedible 



GER 1 

GER2 

GER 3 

GER 4 

GER 5 

GER 6 

GER 7 

GER 8 

GER 9 

GER 10 

GER 11 

GER 12 

GER 13 

GER 14 

GER 15 

GER 16 

GER 17 

GER IS 

GER 19 

GER 20 

GER 21 

GER 22 

GER 23 

GER 24 

GER 25 

GER 26 

GER 27 

GER 28 

GER 29 

GER 30 

GER 31 

GER 32 



Vegetable 
oils, and fats, 
inedible and 
edible (in- 
cluding all 
vegetable oils 
e-xccpt olive, 
cottonseed, 
coconut, palm 
and pine oils) 



GES 1 

0ES2 

GES 3 

GES 4 

GES 5 

GESO 

GES 7 

GES 8 

GES 9 

GES 10 

GES II 

GES 12 

GES 13 

GES 14 

GES 15 

GES 16 

GES 17 

GES 18 

GES 19 

GES 20 

GES 21 

GES 22 

GES 23 

GES 24 

GES 25 

GES 26 

GES 27 

GES 28 

GES 29 

GES 30 

GES 31 

GES 32 



Olive oil 
edible and 

inedible, 
sulphured 

or foots 



GET 1 

GET 2 

GET 3 

GET 4 

GET 5 

GET 6 

GET 7 

GETS 

GET 9 

GET 10 

GET 11 

GET 12 

GET 13 

GET 14 

GET 15 

GET 10 

GET 17 

GET 18 

GET 19 

GET 20 

GET 21 

GET 22 

GET 23 

GET 24 

GET 25 

GET 20 

GET 27 

GET 28 

GET 29 

GET 30 

GET 31 

GET 32 



Cottonseed 
oil, crude 
and refined 



GEU 1 

GEU2 

GEU 3 

GEU 4 

GEU 6 

GEU 6 

GEU 7 

GEU 8 

GEU 9 

GEU 10 

GEU 11 

GEU 12 

GEU 13 

GEU 14 

GEU 15 

GEU 16 

GEU 17 

GEU 18 

GEU 19 

GEU 20 

GEU 21 

GEU 22 

GEU 23 

GEU 24 

GEU 25 

GEU 26 

GEU 27 

GEU 28 

GEU 29 

GEU 30 

GEU 31 

GEU 32 



APRIL 12, 1941 



455 



GBNEBAL LICENSES FOR BUBBEK TIBES AND CERTAIN OILS — Continued 



Destination 



British Malaya 

British Pacific Islands. 

Burma 

Ceylon 

Cyprus 

Eire 

Falkland Islands 

Gambia 

Gibraltar 

Gold Coast- 

India 

Jamaica 

Leeward Islands 

Mauritius Island 

Newfoundland _ 

New Zealand 

Nigeria 

Northern Rhodesia 

Palestine.- .- 

St. Helena Island 

Seychelles Islands 

Sierra Leone 

Southern Rhodesia 

Trinidad and TobaEO.. 
Union of South Africa- 
Windward Islands 

Egypt 

Anglo-Egyptian Sudan 

Greenland - . . 

Iceland 



Rubber 
tires 



GOY 
GOY 
QCY 
GCY 
QCY 
GCY 
GCY 
GCY 
GCY 
GCY 
GCY 
GCY 
QCY 
GCY 
GCY 
GCY 
GCY 
GCY 
GCY 
QCY 
GCY 
QCY 
QCY 
QCY 
GCY 
QCY 
GCY 
GCY 
GCY 
GCY 



Petrolatum 
and petro- 
leum jelly, 
including 
medicinal, 
cosmetic, lu- 
bricant, rust 
preventative, 
polishes, and 
soap grades 



GEL 33 
GEL 34 
GEL 35 
GEL 36 
GEL 37 
GEL 38 
GEL 39 
GEL 40 
GEL 41 
GEL 42 
GEL 43 
GEL 44 
GEL 45 
GEL 46 
GEL 47 
GEL 48 
GEL 49 
GEL 50 
GEL 51 
GEL 52 
GEL 63 
GEL 54 
GEL 55 
GEL 66 
GEL 57 
GEL 68 
GEL 59 
GEL 60 
GEL 61 
GEL 62 



Coconut 

oil. edible 

and 

inedible 



OEM 33 
OEM 34 
GEM 36 
OEM 36 
OEM 37 
GEM 38 
GEM 39 
GEM 40 
GEM 41 
GEM 42 
GEM 43 
GEM 44 
OEM 45 
GEM 46 
GEM 47 
GEM 48 
GEM 49 
GEM 50 
GEM 51 
GEM 52 
GEM 53 
GEM 54 
GEM 55 
GEM 66 
OEM 57 
GEM 5S 
OEM 69 
GEMfiO 
OEM 61 
OEM 62 



Fatty acids 
(vegetable 
and petro- 
leum 
origin) 



GEN 33 
GEN 34 
GEN 35 
GEN 38 
GEN 37 
GEN 38 
GEN 39 
GEN 40 
GEN 41 
GEN 42 
GEN 43 
GEN 44 
GEN 45 
OEN46 
GEN 47 
QEN 48 
GEN 49 
QEN .50 
GEN 61 
GEN 52 
GEN ,63 
GEN 54 
GEN 55 
GEN 66 
GEN 67 
GEN 68 
GEN 69 
GEN 60 
GEN 61 
GEN 62 



Palm kernel 

oils, palm oils 

and oils 

obtainable 

from all 

varieties of 

palm kernels, 

both refined 

and crude 



GEO 33 
GEO 34 
GEO 35 
GEO 36 
GEO 37 
QE0 38 
GEO 39 
GEO 40 
GEO 41 
GEO 42 
GEO 43 
GEO 44 
GEO 45 
GEO 46 
GEO 47 
GEO 48 
GEO 49 
GEO 50 
GEO 61 
GEO 52 
GEO 63 
GEO 54 
GEO 56 
GEO 56 
GEO 57 
GEO 58 
GEO 59 
GEO 60 
GEO 61 
GEO 62 



Animal, 
fish and 
marine 
mammal 
oils, fals 
and grease, 
edible and 
inedible 



Vegetable 
oils, and fats, 
inedible and 
edible (in- 
cluding all 
vegetable oils 
except olive, 
cottonseed, 
coconut, palm 
and pine oils) 



GER 33 
GER 34 
GER 36 
GER 36 
GER 37 
GER 38 
GER 39 
GER 40 
GER 41 
GER 42 
GER 43 
GER 44 
GER 45 
GER 46 
GER 47 
GER 48 
GER 49 
GER 50 
GER 61 
GER 52 
GER 63 
GER 54 
GER 55 
GER 56 
GER 67 
GER 58 
GER 59 
GER 60 
GER 61 
GER 62 



GES 33 
GES 34 
GES 35 
QES 36 
GES 37 
GES 38 
QES 39 
GES 40 
GES 41 
GES 42 
GES 43 
GES 44 
GES 45 
GES 46 
GES 47 
GES 48 
GES 49 
GES 50 
GES 51 
QES 62 
GES 63 
GES 54 
GES 65 
GES 56 
GES 57 
GES 58 
GES 59 
QES 60 
GES 61 
QES 62 



Olive oil 
edible and 

inedible, 
sulphured 

or foots 



GET 33 
GET 34 
GET 35 
GET 36 
GET 37 
GET 38 
GET 39 
GET 40 
GET 41 
GET 42 
GET 43 
GET 44 
GET 45 
GET 46 
GET 47 
GET 48 
GET 49 
GET 50 
GET 51 
GET 52 
GET 53 
GET 54 
GET 55 
GET 57 
GET 68 
GET 58 
GET 59 
GET 60 
GET 61 
GET 62 



Cottonseed 
oil, crude 
and refined 



QEU 33 
GEU 34 
QEU 36 
GEU 36 
QEU 37 
GEU 38 
GEU 39 
GEU 40 
GEU 41 
GEU 42 
GEU 43 
GEU 44 
GEU 45 
QEU 46 
GEU 47 
GEU 48 
GEU 49 
GEU 50 
GEU 51 
QEU 62 
GEU 53 
GEU 64 
QEU 56 
GEU 56 
GEU 57 
GEU 58 
QEU 59 
GEU 60 
GEU 61 
GEU 62 



GENEKAL LICENSES FOB MISCELLANEOUS 
COMMODITIES 



GENERAL LICENSES FOB MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES- 

contimied 



Commodity 


Canada 


Great 
Britain 




GCQl 


GCQ2 




OCZ 1 


Grz2 


Paper base stock* purified wood pulp 


GFB 1 


GFB 2 


Cork 


GFCl 
GFDl 


GFC 2 


Figr bristles - - - 


OFD2 


Kapok 


QFK 1 


gfk:2 


Naphthalene, phenol, aniline 


GKA 1 


GKA 2 


Phthalic anhydride, dibutyl, phthalate, die- 


GKBl 


GKB2 


thyl phthalate, dipropylphthalate. 






War gas chemicals, including: 


GKCl 


QKC2 


Omega chloroacetophenone 






Chloropicrin 






Dicyanodiamide 






Monochloroacetic acid 






Chloreacetyl chloride 






Ethylene chlorhydrine 






Sulphur chlorides 






Arsenic trichloride 






Nitroderivatives of benzene, toluene, xylene, 


QKD 1 


QKD 2 


naphthalene, and phenols (commonly referr- 






ed to as coal tar) in addition to those specifi- 






ed in the proclamation of May 1, 1937. 







Commodity 


Canada 


Great 
Britain 


Commercial explosives, including: 


GKE 1 


GKE 2 


T'entaerythrite 






Nitroguanidine 






fiuanidine nitrate 






Dynamite 






Blasting gelatin and other similar com- 






pounds 






Lead azide 






Sodium azide 






Nitroglycerin 






Nitrostarch 






Nitromannite 






Detonators 






Blasting caps 






Synthetic rubber materials, including: 


GKFl 


GKF2 


Styrene 






Thiodiglycol 






Acrylonitrile 






Butadiene 






Butylene 






Chloroprene 






Vinylidene chloride 







456 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTTLLETIN 



GBNEEAL LICENSES FOR MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES- 

continued 



Commodity 



Formaldehyde and acetic aldehyde. — 

Hexamethylene tetramine 

lodiDe -- 

Sodium chlorate 

Tartaric acid 

Synthetic rubber-like compounds, including: 

Polymers and copolymers of butadiene 

Acrylonitrilo 

Butylene 

Chloroprene 

Styrene 

Vlnylidene chloride, etc. 

Alkyd resins -- 

Strychnine and salts thereof 

Nux vomica 

Vegetable-oil seeds (including palm kernels).. 
Vegetable and other oil-bearing raw material 

(including copra and palm nuts). 



Canada 



OKOl 
GKH 1 
GKIl 
GKJl 
GKKl 
GKPl 



GKRl 
GKS 1 
GKV 1 

OEW 1 
GEXl 



Great 
Britain 



GKa2 
GKH 2 
GKI2 
GKJ2 
GKK2 
QKP2 



OKR 2 

GKS 2 
GKV 2 
OEW 2 
GEX2 



Collectors of Customs were notified by the De- 
partment of State on April 3, 1941 that addi- 
tional general licenses have been issued permit- 
ting the exportation to Tanada and to Great 
Britain and Northern Ireland of the following 
articles and materials which are subject to the 
requirement of an export license : 

Great Britain and 
Northern Ireland Canada 

Atrophine GCI 2 GCI 1 

Bellacionna GCH 2 GCH 1 

Sole leather GCI 2 GCJ 1 

Belting leather GCK 2 GCK 1 

Link trainers GCL 2 GCL 1 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press April 12] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since April 5, 1941 : 

Career Officers 

Richard P. Butrick, of Lockport, N. Y., Con- 
sul at Shanghai, China, has been designated 
Counselor of Embassy at Peiping, China. 

Curtis T. Everett, of Nashville, Tenn., Con- 



sul at Geneva, Switzerland, has been designated 
First Secretary of Embassy at Paris, France. 

James P. Moffitt, of New York, N. Y., Consul 
at Amsterdam, Netherlands, has been assigned 
as Consul at Caracas, Venezuela. 

Warden McK. Wilson, of Indianapolis, Ind., 
First Secretary of Legation at Lisbon, Portugal, 
has been designated First Secretary of Embassy 
at Rome, Italy. 

Edwin Carl Kemp, of St. Petei'sburg, Fla., 
Consul General at Bremen, Germany, has been 
assigned as Consul General at Halifax, Nova 
Scotia, Canada. 

H. Coit MacLean, of New York, now serving 
in the Department of State, has been designated 
Commercial Attache at Santiago, Chile. 

Clarence C. Brooks, of New Jersey, Com- 
mercial Attache at Santiago, Chile, has been 
assigned as Consul at Buenos ^Ures, Argentina. 

Don C. Bliss, Jr., of Mississippi, Consul at 
Calcutta, India, has been assigned as Consul at 
London, England. 

Walter H. Sholes, of Oklahoma City, Okla., 
Consul General at Lyon, France, has been as- 
signed as Consul General at Basel, Switzerland. 

The assignment of JNIarshall M. Vance, of 
Dayton, Ohio, as Consul at Basel, Switzerland, 
has been canceled. Mr. Vance has now been 
assigned as Consul at Lyon, France. 

Glemi A. Abbey, of Dodgeville, Wis., now 
serving in the Department of State, has been 
designated Second Secretary of Embassy and 
Consul at London, England, and will serve in 
dual capacity. 

James W. Riddleberger, of Woodstock, Va., 
Second Secretarj' of Embassy at Berlin, Ger- 
many, has been assigned for duty in the Depart- 
ment of State. 

Robert D. Coe, of Cody, Wyo., now serving 
in the Department of State, has been designiated 
Second Secretary of Embassy and Consul at 
London, England, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

Homer M. Byington, Jr., of Norwalk, Conn., 
Second Secretary of Legation and Consul at Bel- 
grade, Yugoslavia, has been assigned for duty in 
the Department of State. 



APRIL 12, 1941 



457 



Barry T. Benson, of Texas, Consul at Cal- 
cutta, India, has been designated Second Sec- 
retary of Embassy and Consul at Bogota, Co- 
lombia, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Waldo E. Bailey, of Jackson, Miss., Vice Con- 
sul at Nairobi, Kenya, East Africa, has been as- 
signed as Vice Consul at London, England. 

Jacob D. Beam, of Princeton, N. J., now serv- 
ing in the Department of State, has been desig- 
nated Third Secretary of Embassy and Vice 
Consul at London, England, and will serve in 
dual capacity. 

Daniel V. Anderson, of Dover, Del., Vice Con- 
sul at Bombay, India, has been designated Third 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at Bo- 
gota, Colombia, and will serve in dual capacity. 

H. Bartlett Wells, of North Plainfield, N. J., 
Third Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul at 
Managua, Nicaragua, has been assigned as Vice 
Consul at Eeykjavik, Iceland. 

Kandolph A. Kidder, of Beverley Fai-ms, 
Mass., Vice Consul at Sydney, Australia, has 
been designated Third Seci'etary of Legation 
at Canberra, Australia, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

The following have been appointed American 
Foreign Service Officers, Unclassified; Vice 



Consuls of Career; and Secretaries in the Diplo- 
matic Service of the United States; and they 
have now been assigned as Vice Consuls at the 
posts indicated : 



Philip H. Bagby, 
Don V. Catlett, 

Ralph N. Clough, 
William A. Crawford, 
Juan de Zengotita, 

Thomas P. Dillon, 
George McM. Godley, 

2d., 
Caspar D. Green, 
David H. Henry, 2d., 
Oscar C. Holder, 



Richmond, Va. : Casablanca 

Birch Tree, Cindad 

Mo. : Xrujillo 

Seattle, Wash. : Toronto 

Meadville, Pa. : Habana 
Philadelphia, 

Pa. : Habana 

Clinton, Mo. : Toronto 



Rye, N. Y. : Marseille 

Hiram, Ohio : Habana 
Geneva, N. Y. : Montreal 
NevF Orleans, 

La. : Montreal 

J. Jefferson Jones, 3d., Newbern, Tenn. : Mexico City 
Richard B. Mudge, Belmont, Mass. : Barranquilla 

Richard A. Poole, Summit, N. J. : Montreal 

Hubert O. Sanderhoff, Pasadena, Calif. :Vancouver 
Harold Shullaw, Wyoming, 111. : Windsor 

Temple Wanamaker, 
Jr., Seattle, Wash. : Barcelona 

NoN-CAREER OiTICEKS 

Kobert H. Macy, of Washington, D.C., Vice 
Consul at Acapulco de Juarez, Mexico, has been 
appointed Vice Consul at Monterrey, Mexico. 



Cultural Relations 



OFFER OF SCHOLARSHIPS IN COLOMBIA 



Of particular mterest in the field of inter- 
American cultural relations is the recent an- 
nouncement made by the National University 
of Bogota that it has established places in the 
iustitutiou for two students from each of the 
other American republics. 

Dr. Nieto Caballero, Eector of the National 
University, explained that openings are avail- 
able for students from the United States who 
have completed the equivalent of a high-school 
education, and that students interested in avail- 
ing themselves of this opportunity shoidd com- 



municate with the Colombian Embassy in Wash- 
ington where they may present their credentials 
and applications. These applications will 
then be judged by the Colombian Ambassador, 
who wUl transmit certain of them to the 
National University in Bogota for selection of 
the two most worthy students, who will be 
granted places in any of the various faculties 
of the University. 

These places may be considered as limited 
scholarships only, since they carry no monetary 



458 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



stipend or other extraordinary scholastic priv- 
ileges with them. However, they are scholar- 
ship concessions, inasmuch as the number of Co- 
lombian applicants for the various schools of 
the university is annually much greater than the 
institution can grant. 

The Department has been informed that the 
plan was not formulated pursuant to the Buenos 
Aires convention of 1936, but was conceived in 
the spirit thereof. 

A further report from Bogota states that the 
Ministry of National Education of the Repub- 
lic of Colombia issued, on January 31, 1941, a 
resolution whereby credits received by any na- 
tive-bom citizen of any American country in 
the secondary schools of his comitry will be 
accepted, provided they have been issued by 
officially recognized educational institutions. 

The Ministry of Education of Colombia sug- 
gests that persons who desire to have their 
scholastic credits accepted and to continue their 
studies in Colombia should notify the Ministry 
of Education beforehand in order that any diffi- 
culties may be promptly solved. 

VISIT OF CHILEAN NEWSPAPERMEN 
TO THE UNITED STATES 

The seven Chilean newspapermen ^^ who have 
been working on papers in the United States 
for several months as a part, of a plan arranged 
by the American Ambassador to Chile through 
the Department of State in cooperation with 
the Office of the Coordinator of Commercial 
and Cultural Relations Between the American 
Republics are to make a tour of the United 
States beginning April 12. 

The tour has been arranged by the Publish 
ers' Reciprocal Program, a non-profit organiza- 
tion, the purpose of which is to encourage the 
exchange between piiblishers of North, Central, 
and South America of authentic feature articles 
on the peoples and countries of the Western 
Hemisphere. 

Edward C. Johnston, director of the Pub- 
lishers' Reciprocal Program and vice president 



"See the Bulletin of February 1, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 
»i),V- 131. 



of the Western Newspaper Union, has volun- 
teered his services to conduct the Chilean news- 
papermen on the coast-to-coast tour. The trip 
is planned in order to give the Chilean journal- 
ists a first-hand impression of all sections of 
the United States so that thereby they will be 
able to write more authoritatively on this 
country upon their return to Chile. 

PATHOLOGIST FROM THE UNITED 
STATES TO LECTURE IN COLOMBIA 

Dr. William McKee German, pathologist of 
tlie Good Samaritan Hospital, Cincinnati, will 
give a three months' postgraduate course in 
pathology at the Faculty of Medicine of the 
National University of Colombia in Bogota. 
Dr. and Mrs. German will sail fi'om New York 
on the S. S. Jamaica on April 16, 1941. 

Dr. German, who has studied at the Cancer 
Institute in Madrid and other European med- 
ical centers, will deliver his course in Spanish 
and will illustrate it with specimens which he. 
has been especially preparing during recent 
weeks. Dr. German, who was born in Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., was graduated from the LTniversity 
of Michigan and has received from that insti- 
tution the degrees of A. B., M. S., and M. D. 
He is a member of the American Medical Asso- 
ciation, Ohio State Medical Association, the 
American Society of Clinical Pathologists, and 
is President of the Ohio Pathological Associa- 
tion. Dr. German's visit to Colombia has 
been made possible through the award of a 
travel grant by the Department of State, made 
as a result of a desire expressed last year by 
Dr. Jorge Cavelier, Dean of the Faculty of 
Medicine of the National University of Colom- 
bia, to have a professor of pathology from the 
United States give a course at the University 
in Bogota. The Department of State made the 
award to Dr. German in the belief that the series 
of lectures he will deliver and the contacts he 
will make in Colombia will contribute in an 
eflFective mamier to the strengthening of rela- 
tions between the members of the medical pro- 
fession in the United States and Colombia. 



Publications 



PUBLICATION OF "THE TERRITORIAL PAPERS OP THE 
UNITED STATES", VOLUME IX 



[Released to the press April 7] 

Advance copies of volume IX of the series 
entitled The Territorial Papers of the United 
States, published by the Department of State 
under the authority of an act of Congi-ess, were 
received by the Department today. 

The volume contains the official papers, found 
in the Federal archives in Washington, D. C, 
relating to Orleans Territory, and covers the 
period from the transfer of the Province of 
Louisiana to the United States m 1803 to the ad- 
mission of the Territory as the State of Louisi- 
ana in 1812. The documents here published 
present a detailed, documentary history of the 
external relations and internal administration 
of the Territory and disclose a wide variety of 
problems involved in the extension of American 
government and law, and American fiscal, mili- 
tary, land, and Indian policies to what was 
virtually a foreign country. 

A variety of circumstances made the adminis- 
tration of the territorial government of Orleans 
not only difficult but frequently eventful. 
Spanish troops remained in the Territory for 
more than a year after the transfer of the coun- 
try to the United States and constituted a threat 
to the safety of the territorial government until 
their departure. The presence of Spanish forces 
on the Texas and Florida frontiers gave rise to 
one alarm after another throughout the terri- 
torial period. The Burr affair probably caused 
more excitement in New Orleans than in any 
other place in the Nation. Although the Indians 
never presented much of a problem to the terri- 
torial government, the danger of a slave up- 
rising was always present and finally culminated 
in a bloody outbreak in 1810. The unsettled 
state of American foreign relations during this 
period made the arrival of every British, French, 
or Spanish man-of-war or privateer a possible 



source of danger to the safety of New Orleans. 
Recurring epidemics of yellow fever swept that 
city and took heavy toll of the territorial 
officers. 

The framework of the volume is the corre- 
spondence between the Department of State, 
which administered the Territory, and the ter- 
ritorial officers. In the letters from the Sec- 
retary of State are found instructions concern- 
ing the establislunent and administration of the 
machinery of the territorial government, in- 
terpretations of the laws under which the Ter- 
ritory was governed, and advice concerning 
appointments and internal policies. Letters 
from the governor and other officers describe 
the organization of the executive and legislative 
branches of the territorial government, the es- 
tablishment of local governing areas, and the 
institution of American courts and legal sys- 
tems. This correspondence is supplemented by 
materials selected from many of the archives in 
Washington other than those of the Department 
of State. The letters of Presidents Jefferson 
and Madison further illumine the administra- 
tion of the Territory, and in addition, contain 
frequent mention of the state of affairs at home 
and abroad. The correspondence between the 
Secretary of the Treasury and the land officers 
furnishes a rather complete exjDosition of the 
land question in lower Louisiana, complicated 
as it was by its background of ancient French 
and Spanish grants. The records of the War 
Department and the Indian Office describe the 
handling of Indian affairs and the administra- 
tion of Indian agencies and factories. Corre- 
spondence derived from the War Department 
also includes material relating to the occupation 
of Louisiana, the policing of the frontiers, the 
foi'tification of the approaches to New Orleans, 
the suppression of slave uprisings, measures 

459 



460 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



taken during the Burr affair, and the occupa- 
tion of West Florida in 1810. The files of the 
Senate and House of Representatives have 
yielded petitions, correspondence, and draft 
bills, all of which contribute to an understand- 
ing of the political situation in the Territory. 
Not more than ten papers out of all the docu- 
ments which comprise the volume have been 
jjreviously published. 

The correspondence of the territorial oiBcials 
and of the Federal officials stationed in Orleans 
to their superiors in Washington, frequently 
touched on matters other than purely adminis- 
trative concerns. The documents here embodied 
consequently include materials on the social, 
economic, and political history of the Territory, 
and they should be of use and interest to investi- 
gators in those fields. 

Volume I of The Temtorial Papers of the 
United States was issued in preliminary form; 
it contains a table of the various officials ap- 
pointed to administer each territory. It will be 
reissued in final form at the conclusion of the 
series and will then contain papers of a gen- 
eral and miscellaneous character. Volumes II 



and III contain papers relating to the Terri- 
tory Northwest of the River Ohio, commonly 
known as the Northwest Territory. Volume IV 
embodies the official records of the Territory 
South of the River Ohio, or the Southwest 
Territory, which became the State of Tennessee. 
Volumes V and VI relate to the Territory of 
Mississippi, and volumes VII and VIII deal 
with the Territory of Indiana. Volume X, the 
first of two volumes on the Territory of Michi- 
gan, will be published during the next cal- 
endar year. The volumes of the series are thus 
to be issued in the order of the creation of each 
territorj'. The documents selected for inclu- 
sion are accompanied by explanatory footnotes, 
and each volume is supplied with a detailed 
index. 

Dr. Clarence E. Carter, of the Division of 
Research and Publication in the Department of 
State, is the editor of the series. Volume IX 
of the Temtomd Papers will be available 
shortly and may be obtained from the Super- 
intendent of Documents, Government Printing 
Office, Washington, D.C., for $2.50 a copy. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



NAVAL AND AIR BASES 

AGREEMENT RELATING TO THE DEFENSE OF 
GREENLAND 

All agreement relating to the defense of 
Greenland was signed on April 9, 1941 by the 
Secretary of State, acting on behalf of the Gov- 
ernment of the United States of America, and 
by the Danish Minister in Washington, acting 
on behalf of His Majesty the King of Denmark 
in his capacity as sovereign of Greenland. The 
text of the agreement and an exchange of notes 
between the Secretary of State and the Danish 
Minister appear in this Bulletin under the head- 
ing "Greenland." 



AVIATION 



AGREEMENT WITH MEXICO FOR THE RECIP- 
ROCAL TRANSIT OF MILITARY AIRCRAFT 

On April 8, 1941 the President ratified the 
Agreement between the United States and 
Mexico To Facilitate the Reciprocal Transit 
of Military Aircraft Through the Territories 
and Territorial Waters of the Two Countries 
which was signed at Washington on April 1, 
1941. The Senate gave its advice and consent 
to the ratification by the President on April 3, 
1941. The agreement will enter into force upon 
the exchange of the instruments of ratification. 



APRIL 12, 1941 



461 



EXTRADITION 

SUPPLEMENTABY TREATY WITH SWITZERLAND 
On April 11, 1941, the President issued his 
proclamation of the supplementary extradition 
treaty between the United States and Switzer- 
land, signed at Bern by Mr. Leland Harrison, 
American Minister to Switzerland, and Mr. 
Johannes Baumann, Federal Councilor, Chief 
of the Federal Department of Justice and Po- 
lice, on January 31, 1940. 

An extradition treaty between the United 
States and Switzerland, signed May 14, 1900,^*= 
which embraces the crimes generally extra- 
ditable under treaties to which the United States 
is a party, is still in force. The present supple- 
mentary extradition treaty adds the crime of ex- 
tortion to the treaty of 1900 and substitutes 
"traffic in women and children" ; "sequestration, 
defined as the illegal detention or imprisonment 
of an individual, or other unlawful deprivation 
of his freedom", and "kidnapping", in place of 
"abduction" and "kidnapping of minors", which 
are in the treaty of 1900. 

The Senate gave its advice and consent to 
the ratification of the supplementary treaty on 
November 26, 1940, and the President ratified 
it on December 20, 1940. It was ratified by 
Switzerland on February 4, 1941. The ratifica- 
tions of the two Governments were exchanged 
at Washington on April 8, 1941, and the treaty 
entered into force on that date. 

COMMERCE 

INTER-AIVIERICAN COFFEE-MARKETING 
AGREEMENT 

Costa Rica — Horuluras 

By two letters dated April 3 and 5, 1941 the 
Director General of the Pan American Union 
informed the Secretary of State that the instru- 
ments of ratification by Costa Rica and by Hon- 
duras of the Inter- American Coffee-Marketing 
Agreement signed at Washington on November 
28, 1940, were deposited with the Union on April 
1, and April 2, 1941, respectively. The instru- 
ment of ratification by Costa Rica is dated 
March 27, 1941, and that of Honduras is dated 
March 17, 1941. 



' Treaty Series 354. 



CONCILIATION 

TREATY WITH LIBERIA 

The conciliation treaty between the United 
States and Liberia signed at Monrovia on Au- 
gust 21, 1939 was proclaimed by the President 
on April 4, 1941. 

This treaty provides for the establishment 
of a Permanent International Commission to 
which disputes which may arise between the 
Governments of the two countries may be sub- 
mitted for investigation and report when there 
has been failure of settlement through ordinary 
diplomatic proceedings, and the Governments 
do not have recourse to adjudication by a com- 
petent tribunal. 

Advice and consent to ratification of the treaty 
was given by the Senate on November 26, 1940, 
and the President ratified the treaty on Decem- 
ber 20, 1940. This ratification was exchanged 
for the ratification of Liberia at Monrovia on 
Marcli 13, 1941. The treaty came into force on 
the exchange of ratifications. It will remain in 
force continuously unless and until terminated 
by one year's written notice given by either 
party to the other. 

With the entry into force of tliis treaty there 
are now in effect conciliation treaties between 
the United States and 38 countries. Of the 30 
Bryan Peace Treaties signed by this Govern- 
ment in 1913-14, 19 are in force at the present 
time; and of the conciliation treaties signed 
during 1928-31, sometimes referred to as the 
Kellogg Peace Treaties, 18 are now in force. 

FLORA AND FAUNA 

INTER-AMERICAN CONVENTION ON NATURE 
PROTECTION AND WILDLIFE PRESERVATION 

Vmted States 

On April 7, 1941 the Senate gave its advice 
and consent to the ratification by the President 
of tlie Inter-American Convention on Nature 
Protection and Wildlife Preservation which 
was opened for signature at the Pan American 
Union on October 12, 1940. 

The convention has been signed by the fol- 
lowing countries: The United States of Amer- 
ica, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, 
Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, 



462 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, Uruguay, and Ven- 
ezuela. It will enter into effect three months 
after the deposit of not less than five ratifica- 
tions. 

INDIAN AFFAIRS 

CONVENTION PROVIDING FOR THE CREATION 
OF AN INTER-AMERICAN INDIAN INSTITUTE 

Hondv/ras 

The American Legation at Tegucigalpa 
transmitted to the Department with a despatch 
dated April 4, 1941, a copy of La Gac.eta, the 
official gazette of Honduras, dated April 1, 1941, 
whicli publishes decree no. 70 of February 11, 
1941, by which the Honduran Government rati- 
fies the Convention Providing for the Creation 
of an Inter-American Indian Institute signed 
at Mexico City on November 29, 1940. 



Regulations 



The following Government i-egailations may 
be of interest to readers of the Bulletin: 

Export Control Schedule No. 2 [including as of 
April 1.5, 1941 tbe forms, conversions, and derivatives 
of articles and materials designated in proclamations 
issued pursuant to section 6 of the act of July 2, 1940, 
and superseding some items in Export Control Schedule 
No. 1]. April 1, 1941. (Administrator of Export Con- 
trol. ) Federal Register of April 8, 1941 (vol. 6, no. 68) , 



pp. 1S14-1S17 (The National Archives of the United 
States). 

Export Control Schedule A [including effective 
April 15, 1941 the forms of articles and materials desig- 
nated in Proclamation No. 2465 of March 4, 1941, issued 
pursuant to section 6 of the act of July 2, 1940]. April 
1, 1941. (Administrator of Export Control.) Federal 
Register of April S, 1941 (vol. 6, no. 68), p. 1814 (The 
National Archives of the United States). 



Legislation 



Purchase of Foreign Merchant Vessels for National 
Defense : Communication From the President of the 
United States Transmitting a Draft of a Proposed Joint 
Resolution Authorizing the Purchase or Requisition of 
Any Foreign Merchant Vessel Lying Idle in Waters 
Within the Jurisdiction of the United States Which Is 
Necessary to the National Defense. (S. Doc. 42, 77th 
Cong., 1st sess.) 2 pp. 5<i. 

Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1942 : An Act 
Making appropriations for the Executive Office and sun- 
dry independent executive bureaus, boards, commis- 
sions, and offices, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1942, 
and for other purposes [including not to exceed $220,000 
for administrative expenses of the Export-Import Bank 
of Washington ; $100,000 for "all necessary expenses to 
enable the President to utilize the services of the Pub- 
lic Roads Administration in fullfilling the obligations 
of the United States under the Convention on the Pan- 
American Highway between the United States and 
other American Republics" ; and $975,0tX> for "foreign- 
service pay adjustment of officers and employees of the 
United States in foreign countries due to appreciation 
of foreign currencies"]. Approved April 5, 1941. 
(PubUc Law 28, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 35 pp. 10«i. 



U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1941 



For sale by tlie Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents Subscription price, $2.70 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH .THE APPROVAL OP THE DIEECTOE Or THE BUBEAU OP THE BDDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 



Qontents 



APRIL 19, 1941 
Vol. IV: No. 95 — Publication 1590 




American Republics: Page 
Pan America and Hemisphere Defense: Address by- 
Assistant Secretary Long 465 

Pan American Day: Statement by the Secretary of 

State 468 

Inter-American Union of the Caribbean 469 

Greenland: 

Contmued recognition by the United States of the 

Minister of Denmark 469 

The Far East: 

Pact between the Soviet Union and Japan . . . . : 472 

Europe: 

Proclamation and regulations concerning the neutrality 
of the United States in the war between Hungary and 
Yugoslavia : 472 

General: 

Control of exports in national defense ; 474 

Question of compulsory military training for aliens . : 478 

The Department: 

New duties involving foreign purchasing operations . 479 

Regulations : , : 480 

Cultural Relations: 

The Human Factor in Inter- American Relations: 

Addi'ess by Charles A. Thomson : ; 481 

[Over] 



Wi bi b. 



oENT OF OOCUMENKi 

MAY 8 1941 



Qontents- 



CONTINUED. 



Treaty Information: Page 

Sovereignty : 

Convention on the Provisional Administration of 
European Colonies and Possessions in the 

Americas 484 

Diplomatic ofBcers: 

Pan American Convention 484 

Military mission: 

Detail of United States Military Adviser to the Re- 

momit Service of the Peruvian Army 484 

Flora and fauna: 

Convention on Nature Protection and Wildlife 

Preservation m the Western Hemisphere .... 484 
Conventions With Canada and Mexico Regardmg 

Migratory Birds 485 

Telecommunications : 

International Telecommunication Convention . . . 485 

Portuguese Marconi Radio Company 486 

Conamerce : 

Inter-American Coffee Agreement 486 

Publications 488 

Legislation 488 



American Republics 



PAN AMERICA AND HEMISPHERE DEFENSE 

ADDRESS BY ASSISTANT SECRETARY LONG* 



[Released to the press April 17) 

In these gloomy days of dictators' aggres- 
sions and war it is good to meet with the Daugh- 
ters of the American Revohition and to draw 
inspiration from the tradition you represent. 
Glory is born in travail, and Peace and Happi- 
ness are the children of Bravery and Determina- 
tion. The fruitful results of these character- 
istics of your ancestors have blessed our Nation 
these many years, and it is with renewed vigor 
and determination today we turn aside from the 
quiet of our ordinary lives to prepare to repel 
the only real challenge which has ever been made 
to the institutions they founded. We turn with 
confidence, in vigilance to prepare the defense 
so strong that even the reckless will retire. 

This threat against these institutions of ours 
is directed not alone at us but at our whole hem- 
isphere — at the whole group of nations in the 
South as well as in the North of America which 
have accepted the same political philosophy, 
which have established their respective inde- 
pendences, which have learned to love their lib- 
erties, their right to live as individual nations, 
their peace, and their hapi^iness. But, in the 
face of the threat there emerges Pan America. 
United we stand — from Hudson Bay to the 
Straits of Magellan. 

The nations of the Americas, in the face of the 
gravest danger which has yet threatened them, 
are now actively engaged in the defense of our 



' Delivered before the Continental Congress of tlie 
National Society, Daughters of the American Revolution, 
Washington, April 17, 1941. 

311360 — 11 1 



hemisphere. The American peoples are for- 
tunate that a solid foimdation for this common 
defense exists in their mutual adherence to the 
Pan American ideal. That ideal is the natural 
product of similarities of origin, of parallel de- 
velopment, of geographic proximity, and of mu- 
tual interest in the preservation of their demo- 
cratic tradition and their independent existence. 
I should like to enlarge briefly upon these bases 
of Pan Americanism. 

The jaeoples of the Americas have an essen- 
tially similar origin. The great countries of 
this hemisphere each had their beginnings in 
settlements founded by the vigorous colonizers 
wliich the emerging national states of Western 
Europe sent across the seas to the shores of the 
New World. These colonists, whether they were 
Sjianish, Portuguese, British, French, Dutch, or 
whether they were from any of the other les- 
ser colonizing countries of Western Euroi^e, 
brought with them certain common character- 
istics of western Christian civilization. Fur- 
thermore, witli their establislunent in new and 
usually primitive surroundings they all became 
subject to the environmental influences of the 
New World. They suffered hunger, disease, iso- 
lation from their parent states and from one 
another, and they were confronted with similar 
problems in dealing with the native peoples 
whom they found. Each was thrown largely on 
its own resources and developed an independ- 
ence of action and of thought. Despite local 
differences these universal influences of coloni- 
zation in the new continents left a similar lasting 

465 



466 

imprint on the embryonic new societies wliich 
were established here and there throughout the 
hemisphere. 

To similarities of origin must be added kin- 
dred experiences during the long period that 
the new societies remained in colonial status. 
While their respective mother countries served 
as necessary sources of supplies and of addi- 
tional settlers and in innumerable other ways 
contributed to the establishment of civilization 
in these western settlements, they were all char- 
acterized by a common tendency to consider the 
colonies as existing primarily for the benefit 
and aggrandizement of the parent states. The 
result was a universal attempt to restrict com- 
merce to the closed circles of rival imperial 
systems; to govern the colonies primarily ac- 
cording to administrative convenience rather 
than for local benefit ; and, finally, to utilize the 
American colonies as pawns in the chronically 
recurrent imperial struggles which they fought 
among themselves. 

As the colonial period wore on, the new so- 
cieties made significant advances towards ma- 
turity. Natural increases in population were 
supplemeJited by constant additions through 
immigration from Europe. Despite the gener- 
ally selfish economic regulation of the mother 
countries, a measure of wealth was accumulated 
by the colonists. From the early nuclei of set- 
tlement on the fringes of the continent, bold 
pioneers — Anglo-American frontiersmen, the 
Paulistas of Brazil, French coureurs de iois, 
and Spanish-speaking soldiers, priests, and set- 
tlers — pushed into the hinterland and opened 
up new territories to civilization. In the proc- 
ess of so doing they came under the influence of 
frontier conditions which held significant im- 
plications for the development of democracy. 
Pei'haps most important of all, the consolidation 
of colonial society brought with it increasing 
opportunity for thought; for the development 
of political leadership; and, most important of 
all, a devotion to America — these indispensable 
prerequisites of future independence. 

Finally, against this background of similar 
origin and development, there broke out in the 
last quarter of the eighteenth century a revolu- 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

tionary movement which brought mdependence 
from the mother countries. Fundamentally, 
this great upheaval was the consummation of 
colonial experience. It represented the inevita- 
ble collision between the forces of colonial ma- 
turity and of selfish metropolitan control. The 
American Revolution began in 1776 with a Dec- 
laration of Independence by 13 of England's 
North American colonies, but it did not end with 
the confirmation of their freedom in 1783. 
Eather, it was a struggle which spread through- 
out the length and breadth of both the American 
continents during a long half-century, a strug- 
gle which ended only on the Andean battlefield 
of Ayacucho, where in 1824 the last important 
forces of Imperial Spain were routed by a pa- 
triot army drawn from many parts of South 
America. The example of freedom set by the 
English colonists, shortly reinforced by that of 
the French Revolution, was seized upon by the 
colonists of Spain and Portugal, who proceeded 
to wrest their independence fi'om their mother 
countries during the Napoleonic upheaval and 
its aftermath in Europe. We of the Western 
Hemisphere shall do well to look beyond our 
national boundaries as we seek, in the great 
deeds of our liberators, inspiration for the pres- 
ervation and development of our democratic 
ideal. We shall do well to remember that Wash- 
ington and Bolivar, Hidalgo, San Martin, and 
the Emperor Dom Pedro I of Brazil, fought not 
only for local independence, but that they were 
all soldiers in the great cause of the liberty of 
all the Americas. 

Let us bear in mind, too, in these days of 
threat, that the independence of America, once 
gained, was confirmed and protected by the 
common interest which the American countries 
from the very first felt in each other and by the 
common realization of the need for cooperation. 
Without denying the importance of the aid ex- 
tended by Great Britain, who conceived the 
freedom of the former colonies of Spain and 
Portugal to be to her own interest, we must re- 
alize that the continued independence of the 
Americas would have been in a precarious condi- 
tion had it not been for the measures which the 
new nations of the Western Hemisphere took to 



APRIL 19, 1941 



467 



help eacli other. Let us not forget that in those 
distant days the still weak United States not 
only looked with benevolent interest upon the 
valorous attempts of her southern sisters to free 
themselves but hastened to stimulate that free- 
dom by sending observers to the emerging na- 
tions and by leading the world in extending 
recognition to their governments. The promul- 
gation of the Monroe Doctrine in 1823 by the 
President of the United States was a bold affir- 
mation of this Nation's faith in the principle of 
continental American independence, and in 
those troubled days it was welcomed as such by 
the struggling countries of the south. On more 
than one occasion it has served as a protective 
shield against intervention from without, be- 
hind which the nations of America have been 
able to develop to a point which now makes pos- 
sible their effective cooperation in the common 
defense. In view of the fact that the United 
States was the first of the American nations to 
establish and to organize its independence, it is 
natural that its republican form of government, 
based upon the principle of the separation of the 
executive, legislative, and judicial branches, 
should have served as an inspiring model for 
these newly freed sister states. From that time 
dates one of the strongest bonds of inter-Ameri- 
can unity, namely, the mutual satisfaction that 
we each possess a republican form of govern- 
ment. BraziFs profitable imperial experience 
of nearly seven decades offers no fundamental 
exception to this republican tradition, for it was 
constitutional in its form, represented the popu- 
lar desire, and in time gave way before the de- 
mand for republican organization. Another 
imperial episode in the history of independent 
America, that of Maximilian in Mexico, was 
imposed from without and fell because of the 
opposition of the Mexican people. 

Fortunately, this early cooperation in the 
winning of independence and the consolidation 
of democratic government has continued, of late 
in an ever-increasing measure, between the na- 
tions of this hemisphere. It was early realized 
by leaders in many different regions that this 
cooperation must be implemented by a regular 
machinery of mutual consultation. From the 



time of the first partially successful Pan Ameri- 
can Congress at Panama in the year 1826 called 
by Simon Bolivar, the Liberator of northern 
South America, there has been progress toward 
the present successful system of Pan American 
conferences and consultative meetings. This 
natural movement has resulted in enormous 
benefits of mutual knowledge and has made re- 
liance upon one another a cardinal principle of 
the international life of this hemisphere. It has 
made it possible for the leaders in the govern- 
ments of the 21 American republics to come to 
know each other personally and it has built 
up a confidence which transcends national 
boundaries. 

But the development of machinery for effec- 
tive cooperation on the part of the governments 
of the American countries is only part of that 
increasing unity of the Americas which at pres- 
ent vitalizes our common defense. For those 
similarities of experience which characterized 
the European colonies have continued since they 
became independent nations. As an illustration 
of the dominant spirit which imbues all the so- 
cieties of these nations, let me call your atten- 
tion to the disposition which all of us have 
shown to welcome to our shores peoples from 
other parts of the world who have desired to 
participate in our democratic way of life. A 
vast flood of immigrants from all the countries 
of Europe has enriched our national and inter- 
national life by contributing the best of their 
native cultures to our own. In receiving them, 
our dominant consideration has been their will- 
ingness to become Americans, and the vast ma- 
jority of them have become devoted citizens of 
their new countries. The nations of this hemi- 
sphere have been proud of their ability to ab- 
sorb these new citizens. The strength of these 
nations derives, not from an inhumane and un- 
scientific philosophy of fanatical racialism, but 
from their ability to draw recruits from men of 
good will of the most varied origins. 

In one transcendent respect our unity since 
independence has progressed immeasurably. 
Before we of the Western Hemisphere won our 
freedom, our trade among ourselves was so 
hampered by prohibitions and restrictions im- 



468 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTTLLETIN 



posed by the jealousies of our mother countries 
that it could not grow naturally. Since that 
time, trade between the United States and the 
other American republics has developed enor- 
mously, while commerce between the states to 
the south has lately assumed an importance 
which promises to draw them ever closer to- 
gether. Despite difficulties imposed by the facts 
of economics — notably the presence of competi- 
tive products in certain of the American nations 
with attendant problems of exchange — the 
hemisphere as a whole is remarkably self-suf- 
ficient and, through the cooperation of its com- 
ponent states, is finding it possible to solve these 
problems and to maintain its economic equilib- 
rium mitil such time as trade with the rest 
of the world again becomes possible. In other 
words, there is an economic basis for Pan Amer- 
icanism, as well as the political basis. 

It would be foolish to deny that we of the 
Western Hemisphere are possessed of many dif- 
ferences. We speak different tongues. Vary- 
ing ethnic groups predominate in our respective 
nations. Our hemisphere possesses every type 
of climate which exists in the habitable world, 
with consequent profound differences in our 
methods of living. Some of our nations have 
attained varying degrees of industrialization 
because of variations in the distribution of 
strategic raw materials. Others rely largely 
upon agriculture, mining, and other occupations. 
But these differences do not nullify our essen- 
tial unity. Rather, we accept many of them as 
entirely desirable variations which contribute 
to the richness and many-sidedness of our inter- 
American heritage. Those which operate to 
cause frictions and to set us apart, those upon 
which the enemies of American unity seize to 
work us ill, we overcome by means of frank 
consultation and by practical imderstanding. 

We should be wilfully blind, too, if we were 
to forget the unfortunate lapses from the Pan 
American ideal which liave occurred among the 
American states from time to time during our 
history. Some of us in the past have been 
guilty of infractions of the neighborly spirit. 
Some of us have preferred wilful ignorance of 
our sister nations to good will and understand- 



ing. Upon occasion, circumstances have con- 
spired to enable strong characters to seize 
power and to subordinate the instruments of 
government to serve their personal ends. But 
these have been the exceptions in our inter- 
American system. And nothing so forcibly 
demonstrates the power of the inter-American 
ideal as the fact that invariably these aberra- 
tions and distortions have ended with the re- 
affirmation of our common principles. No 
American nation has ever relinquished our 
mutual democratic goal. On the contrary, 
each has held tenaciously to that ideal. Today 
each prizes its own form of government and is 
happy in the knowledge that each of its neigh- 
bors has a similar form ; that there is no threat 
within the hemisphere to our respective inde- 
pendence or freedom; and that our total co- 
operation is our mutual protection. 

Our own Government is lending aid to those 
countries abroad which resist aggressions and 
at the same time is cooperating with our 
neighbors in this hemisphere for our mutual 
defense. And our neighbors are cooperating 
with us. So Pan America today, conscious of 
its common history, is engaged in hemisphere 
defense — defense of our religious, our eco- 
nomic, our political independences — defense 
against the menace of a ruthless domination 
from abroad. Pan America is engaged in de- 
fense of our common heritage, of our mutual 
institutions, of our respective cultures — de- 
fense of those things which are America and 
which will continue to be America. 

PAN AMERICAN DAY 

STATEMENT BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE 
[Released to the press April 14] 

Today, the anniversary of the founding of 
the Pan American Union, the 21 republics 
of the Western Hemisphere are joining in 
the annual observance of Pan American 
Da}'. These celebrations bring each year a re- 
newed consciousness and appreciation of the 
high concept of international relations devel- 
oped in the Americas under the aegis of this great 
international organization. 



APRIL 19, 1941 



469 



In these days of brutal disregard of interna- 
tional morality in some sections of the world, 
Pan American Day acquires a new significance 
and affords the people of the Americas an oppor- 
tunity to reaffirm their unswerving devotion to 
those ideals of mutual respect and sanctity of 
the pledged word which constitute the keystone 
of inter- American relations. 

On this memorable anniversary, may the peo- 
ple of the United States join with their brothers 
in the other American republics in re-dedicating 
their thoughts and energies to the defense and 
preservation of those high principles of free- 
dom, justice, and order under law, upon which 
the independent nations of the New World were 
founded. 

INTER-AMERICAN UNION OF THE 
CARIBBEAN 

[Released to the press April 14] 

This Goverimient has accepted the invitation 
of the Government of Haiti to participate in the 
Third Meeting of the Inter- American Union of 
the Caribbean which will convene at Port-au- 



Prince on April 22, 1941, and the President has 
approved the designation of the Honorable John 
C. White, American Minister to Haiti, as dele- 
gate on the part of the United States of America. 

The Inter- American Union of the Caribbean 
which has its headquarters at Habana, Cuba, was 
organized for the purpose of convening meet- 
ings "to further closer relations and to con- 
tribute toward the development of cultural as 
well as economic and tourist relations among the 
nations in this portion of the New World". The 
meetings of the Inter-American Union are at- 
tended by private and organizational delegates 
as well as by representatives of the several gov- 
ernments. The first meeting was convened by 
the "Sociedad Colombista Panamericana" of Ha- 
bana in October 1939, while the second meeting 
was held in Ciudad Trujillo from May 31 to June 
6, 1940. This Government was represented at 
the latter meeting by Mr. Eugene M. Hinkle, then 
Charge d'Affaires ad interim at Ciudad Tru- 
jillo, and Chief Justice Emilio del Toro Cuevas 
of the Supreme Court of Puerto Rico. 

The agenda of the forthcoming meeting 
cover social, cultural, and scientific questions. 



Greenland 



CONTINUED EECOGNITION BY THE UNITED STATES OF THE 

MINISTER OF DENMARK 



[Released to the press April II] 

The Danish Minister, Mr. Henrik de Kauff- 
mann, on April 14 informed the Secretary of 
State that he had received a telegram from the 
Foreign Office in Copenhagen recalling him as 
Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipo- 
tentiary of the Kingdom of Demnark accredited 
to the Government of the United States, and 
that his action and authority in signing as the 
official representative of his Government the 



447. 



'BuUetin of April 12, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 94), pp. 445- 



agreement relating to Greenland ^ had been dis- 
claimed by the purported official authorities in 
Copenhagen. 

On August 26, 1939, the President received 
Mr. de Kauffmann's letters of credence as Danish 
Minister to the United States,^ and he has since 
been recognized in that capacity as the official 
representative of the Kingdom of Denmark. 

On Ajsril 9, 1940, Denmark was invaded by 
the German Army. Since that date an army of 



'Bulletin of August 26, 1939 (vol. I, no. 9), pp. 163- 



164. 



470 

occupation, understood to total 200,000 Ger-| 
man troops, has remained in subjugation of that 
country, and no act of the Danish Government 
since that time has been taken or can be taken 
save with the consent of the occupying power or 
as a result of its dictation. 

In view of the foregoing, the Government of 
the United States has consistently held since 
April 9, 1940, and now holds, that the Govern- 
ment of Denmark can only be regarded as a gov- 
ernment which is patently acting under duress 
and which is in no sense a free agent. 

The agreement recently entered into by the 
Secretary of State and by the Danish Minister 
was entered into by this Government, as made 
clear at that time, because of the desire of the 
United States in this time of world emergency 
to insure the security and integrity of Greenland 
as a part of the Western Hemisphere, and at the 
same time to assist the local authorities of 
Greenland in preserving intact the territory of 
that Danish colony so that once the present world 
emergency has passed, the Government of Den- 
mark might once more be enabled to exercise 
fully its sovereign powers over that territory. 

The Government of the United States feels 
confident that the Danish Government and peo- 
ple will unquestionably recognize that the meas- 
ures undertaken by this Government have been 
taken in their interest and with full recognition 
of the sovereignty of Denmark over Greenland, 
as well as with the hope and belief that the time 
is not far distant when that sovereignty can 
once more be freely exercised by a free and in- 
dependent Danish Government. 

The Danish Minister has informed the Secre- 
tai'y of State that he regards the orders of recall 
issued to him by the authorities in Copenhagen 
as issued under duress and tliat he consequently 
believes it his duty to disregard such orders. 

The Secretary of State by direction of the 
President has informed the Danish Minister 
that because of the reasons above set forth, this 
Government will continue to recognize him as 
the duly authorized Minister of Denmark in 
Washington. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

The texts of the exchange of notes between the 
Secretary of State and the Danish Minister 
follow : 

The Minister of Denmark to the Secretary 
of State 

April 13, 1941. 
Sm: 

Point four in the preamble to the agreement 
relating to the defense of Greenland signed by 
you and by me on the ninth instant reads : 

"Although the sovereignty of Denmark over 
Greenland is fully recognized, the present 
circumstances for the time being prevent the 
Government in Denmark from exercising its 
powers in respect of Greenland . . ." 

With this situation in mind and in accordance 
with our understanding I informed the Govern- 
ment in Denmark of the agi'eement only when it 
was made public at noon on April 10th. 

I did this in a telegraphic message to the 
Foreign Office in Copenhagen that was deliv- 
ered after some delay on April 11th. 

I indicated that I had signed the agreement 

". . . acting on behalf of His Majesty the 
King of Denmark in His capacity as sover- 
eign of Greenland, whose authorities in 
Greenland have concuiTed herein, . . ." 

and I explained the reasons for my action, add- 
ing 

"Under the circumstances, there was, to me, 
no doubt but that I must, in the interests of 
Denmark and Greenland, take this unusual 
step. The Government in Denmark will not, 
as long as Denmark is occupied, be able to ob- 
tain full information as to the background 
and necessity for this action. I, therefore, re- 
quest that judgment of my decision be with- 
held until Denmark again is fre«, and the Dan- 
ish Government and public can come to know' 
tlie situation that made the step necessary. I 
earnestly beg His Majesty the King and the 
Danish Government to be assured that I have 
acted in the way which I felt to be right, after 
careful consideration and according to my best 



APRIL 19, 1941 



471 



belief and the dictates of my conscience, ful- 
filling my allegiance to His Majesty the 
King". 

I thereupon received from the Foreign Office 
in Copenhagen at 4 : 30 P.M. Saturday, April 
12, 1941, a telegram, the English translation of 
which reads as follows: 

"The Go\-ernment strongly disapproves the 
fact that you, without authorization from 
here, and contrary to the constitution, have 
concluded an agi'eement with the Govern- 
ment of the United States regarding the 
defense of Greenland. You are, therefore, 
by Eoyal Decree of April 12, 1941 recalled 
from your post as Denmark's Minister to 
Washington. The Legation will temporarily 
be in charge of Mr. Blechingberg, Counselor 
of Legation, as Charge d'Affaires. You are 
requested immediately to notify the Presi- 
dent of the above, and to add that letters of 
recall wnll be forwarded later. You are re- 
quested to return at once to Copenhagen. 
Acknowledge receipt by telegram." 

From press reports I have furthermore 
learned that the Government in Denmark yes- 
terday also declared the agreement of April 9, 
1941 relating to the defense of Greenland to be 
considered as void, but this Legation has hith- 
erto received no official communication from 
Copenhagen to that effect. 

On April 10, 1940, the day after the occu- 
pation of Denmark by German military forces, 
I issued a public statement declaring, that I 
would work for one thing, the reestablishment 
of a free and independent Denmark. Since that 
time as before my conduct has been dictated 
solely by what I have believed to be to the true 
interest of my King and my country. My work 
would have been impossible without the sympa- 
thetic understanding and cooperative attitude 
of the American Government for which I am 
deeply grateful. 

My conduct in the situation that has arisen 
now will be dictated by the same convictions. 
I believe the action taken in Copenhagen with 
regard to my recall and in respect to the 
agi'eement of the 9th instant to have been taken 

311360—41 2 



under duress. Consequently I consider it to 
be invalid both from the point of view of 
Danish and of generally recognized common 
law. 

I believe it to be my duty towards my King 
and my countiy to cai-ry on the work that was 
entrusted to me when I was appointed Danish 
Minister to Washington by a free Danish Gov- 
ernment and to let myself be guided by the same 
principles as hitherto. This attitude of mine 
has the full support of all the other members 
of the Danish Foreign service stationed in the 
United States. 

I have the honor, Mr. Secretai'y, to ask you 
please to bring this to the knowledge of the 
President. 

The earnest hope for a speedy liberation of 
Denmark, expressed by President Roosevelt 
when the agreement relating to the defense of 
Greenland was made public three days ago will 
haVe brought encouragement to all Danes. I 
beg leave to ask you, Sir, to convey to the 
President the gratitude of my countrymen. 

I avail [etc.] Henrik Kauffmann 

The Secretary of State to the Minister of 
Denmark 



April 14, 1941. 



5 IK: 



Acknowledgment is made of your note of 
April 13, 1941 advising that the Government in 
Denmark purports to have recalled you from 
your post as Minister of Denmark. Cognizance 
has likewise been taken of your statement that 
you consider this action to have been taken 
under duress and to be invalid both from the 
point of view of Danish and of generally recog- 
nized common law, in view of the existing occu- 
pation of Denmark by German military forces. 

My Government considers it to be the fact 
that the Government in Denmark in this respect 
is acting under duress, and in consequence I 
have the honor to advise that it continues to 
recognize you as the duly authorized Minister 
of Denmark in Washington. It renews its hope 
for the speedy liberation of Denmark. 

Accept [etc.] Cordell Hull, 



472 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Far East 



PACT BETWEEN THE SOVIET UNION 
AND JAPAN 

[Released to the press April U) 

In reply to inquiries at his press conference 
April 14, the Secretary of State made the fol- 
lowing statement: 



"The significance of the pact between the So- 
viet Union and Japan relating to neutrality, as 
reported in the press today, could be overesti- 
mated. The agreement would seem to be 
descriptive of a situation which has in effect 
existed between the two countries for some 
time past. It therefore comes as no surprise, 
although there has existed doubt whether the 
two Governments would or would not agree 
to say it in writing. The policy of this Govern- 
ment, of course, remains unchanged." 



Europe 



PROCLAMATION AND REGULATIONS CONCERNING THE NEU- 
TRALITY OF THE UNITED STATES IN THE WAR BETWEEN 
HUNGARY AND YUGOSLAVIA 



[Released to the press April 16) 

Proclamation of a State of War Between 
Hungary and Yugoslavia 

BT THE president OF THE UNITED STATES OF 
AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Whereas section 1 of the joint resolution of 
Congi-ess approved November -4, 1939, provides 
in part as folloM^s: 

"That whenever the President, or the Con- 
gress by concurrent resolution, shall find that 
there exists a state of war between foreign 
states, and that it is necessary to promote the 
security or preserve the peace of the United 
States or to protect the lives of citizens of the 
United States, the President shall issue a proc- 
lamation naming (he states involved; and he 
shall, from time to time, by proclamation, 
name other states as and when they may be- 
come involved in the war." 

And whereas it is further provided by sec- 
tion 13 of the said joint resolution that 

"The President may, from time to time, pro- 
mulgate such rules and regulations, not in- 



consistent with law, as may be necessary and 
proi>er to carry out any of the provisions of 
this joint resolution; and he may exercise any 
power or authority conferred on him by this 
joint resolution through such officer or offi- 
cers, or agency or agencies, as he shall direct." 

Now, Therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, 
President of the United States of America, act- 
ing under and by virtue of the authority con- 
ferred on me by tiie said joint resolution, do 
hereby proclaim that, Hungary having without 
justification attacked Yugoslavia, a state of war 
exists Ijetween Hungary and Yugoslavia and 
that it is necessary to promote the security and 
l^reserve the peace of the United States and to 
protect the lives of citizens of the United States. 

And I do hereby enjoin upon all officers of 
the United States, charged with the execution 
of the laws tliereof, the utmost diligence in pre- 
venthig violations of the said joint resolution 
and in bringing to trial and punishment any 
offenders against the same. 

And I do hereby delegate to the Secretary of 
State the power to exercise any power or au- 
thority conferred on me by the said joint reso- 
lution, as made effective by this my proclama- 



APRIL 19, 1941 



473 



tion issuexl thereunder, which is not specifically 
delegated by Executive order to some other of- 
ficer or agency of this Government, and the 
power to promulgate such rules and regulations 
not inconsistent with law as may be necessary 
and jjroper to carry out any of its provisions. 

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
of America to be aflBxed. 

Done at the City of Washington this 15" day 
of April, in the year of our Lord 

[seal] nineteen hundred and forty-one, and 
of the Independence of the United 
States of Amei'ica the one hundred and sixty- 
fifth. 

Franklin D. Rooseatxt 

By the President : 
CoRDELL Hull 

Secretary of State. 
[No. 2-1771 

The following regulations have been codified 
under Title 22: Foreign Relations (Chapter I, 
Department of State; Subchapter C, Neutral- 
ity) in accordance with the requirements of the 
Federal Register and the Code of Federal Reg- 
ulations: 

Part 149 — Commerce With States Engaged in 
Armed Conflict * 

Additional Regulations 

§ 149.1 Exportation or transportation of ar- 
ticles or inaterials. 



(1) Hungary, llie regulations under sec- 
tion 2 (c) and (i) of the joint resolution of 
Congress approved November 4, 1939, which the 
Secretary of State promulgated on November 
1(J ^ and November 25," 1939, henceforth apply 



equally in respect to the export or transport of 
articles and materials to Hungary. (54 Stat. 
4, 6 ; 22 U.S.C, Supp. V, 245J-1 ; Proc. No. 2477,' 
April 15, 1941) 

CoRDELL Hull, 

Secretary of State. 
April 16, 1941. 

Part 156— Travel » 

Pur^iant to the provisions of section 5 of the 
joint resolution of Congress, approved Novem- 
ber 4, 1939, and of the President's proclamation 
of April 10, 1941 (6 F.R. 1905), the regulations 
in 22 CFR 156.1 and 156.2 of November 6, 1939," 
as amended November 17, 1939,"' April 25, 
1940," May 11, 1940,^- June 10, 1940,^' Novem- 
ber 15, 1940," and April 11, 1941,'^ are hereby 
amended to read as follows : 

§ 156.1 Anierican diplomatic, considar, mili- 
tary , and naval oncers. American diplomatic 
and consular officers and their families, members 
of their statfs and their families, and American 
military and naval officers and personnel and 
their families may travel pursuant to orders on 
vessels of France ; Germany ; Poland ; or the 
United Kingdom, India, Australia, Canada, 
New Zealand, the Union of South Africa; Nor- 
way; Belgium; the Netherlands; Italy; Greece; 
Yugoslavia; and Hungary if the public service 
requires. (54 Stat. 7; 22 U.S.C, Supp. V, 
245J-4; Proc. No. 2477,' April 15, 1941) 

§ 156.2 Other A me r ic an citizens. Other 
American citizens may travel on vessels of 
France ; Germany ; Poland ; or the United King- 
dom, India, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, 



*The number of this part has been cbangpd from 12 
to 149. 
' 22 CFR 149.1 ( a ) - ( d ) . 4 F.R. 4598. 
"22 CFR 149.1 (e). 4 F.R. 4701. 



' See supra. 

* The nuiiilier of thU part has been changed from .'iSC 
to 156. 
" 4 F.R. 4509. 
'"4 F.R. 4640. 
" 5 F.R. 1597. 
" 5 F.R. 1695. 
" 5 F.R. 2211. 
" 5 F.R. 4532. 
" 6 F.R. 1921. 



474 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



the Union of South Africa; Norway; Belgium; 
the Netherlands; Italy; Greece; Yugoslavia; 
and Hungary : Provided, however, That travel 
on or over the north Atlantic Ocean, north of 
35 degrees north latitude and east of 66 degrees 
west longitude or on or over other waters adja- 
cent to Europe or over the continent of Europe 
or adjacent islands shall not be permitted ex- 
cept when specifically authorized by the Pass- 
port Division of the Department of State or an 
American diplomatic or consular officer abroad 
in each case. (54 Stat. 7 ; 22 U.S.C, Supp. V, 
245J-4; Proc. No. 2477,"^ April 15, 1941) 

CoRDELL Hull, 

Secretai^ of State. 
Apkil 16, 1941. 



Part 161 — Solicitation and Collection of 
Funds and Contributions " 

Additional Regulations 

§ 161.22 Contributions for use in Hungary. 
The rules and regulations (22 CFR 161.1-16) 
under section 8 of the joint resolution of Con- 
gress approved November 4, 1939, which the 
Secretary of State promulgated on November 
6, 1939,^' henceforth apply equally to the solici- 
tation and collection of contributions for use in 
Hungary. (54 Stat. 8; 22 U.S.C, Supp. V, 
245J-7; Proc. No. 2477,i^» April 15, 1941) 

CoRDELL Hull, 

Secretary of State. 

April 16, 1941. 



General 



CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL DEFENSE 



[Released to the press April 15] 

The President announced he had approved 
the recommendation of Brig. Gen. Russell L. 
Maxwell, Administrator of Export Control, and 
had issued two proclamations placing additional 
articles and materials under export control. 

The first proclamation, to become effective 
April 15, covers machinery, while the second, 
to become effective May 6, 1941, places six addi- 
tional products under control, including some 
vegetable fibers, caffein, and casein. 

Pursuant to the provisions of Executive order 
8712, Brigadier General Maxwell announced 
the issuance of Export Control Schedules cov- 



ering the forms, conversions, and derivatives of 
these items which will become subject to the 
provisions of the export-licensing system. 

Export Control Schedule No. 3,^* covering 
machinery, includes only construction and con- 
veying machinery and certain mining, well, and 
pumping machinery. Export Control Schedule 
No. 4,^^ covering the other items on the second 
proclamation, will be available within a few 
days. 

The texts of the proclamations follow : 



161. 



"" See ante. 



' The number of this part has been changed from 40 to 

' 4 F.R. 4510. 

'Not printed herein. 



APRIL 19, 1941 



475 



Control of the Export of Certain Articles 
AND Materials 

BT the president OF THE UNITED STATES OF 
AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Whereas section 6 of the act of Congress en- 
titled "An Act To expedite the strengthening 
of the national defense", approved July 2, 1940, 
provides as follows : 

"Sec. 6. Whenever the President determines 
that it is necessary in the interest of national 
defense to prohibit or curtail the exportation 
of any military equipment or munitions, or 
component parts thereof, or machinery, tools, 
or materials, or supplies necessary for the 
manufacture, servicing, or operation thereof, 
he may by proclamation prohibit or curtail 
such exportations, except under such rules 
and regulations as he shall prescribe. Any 
such proclamation shall describe the articles 
or materials included in the prohibition or 
curtailment contained therein. In case of 
the violation of any provision of any procla- 
mation, or of any rule or regulation, issued 
thereunder, such violator or violators, upon 
conviction, shall be punished by a fine of not 
more than $10,000, or by imprisonment for 
not more than two years, or by both such fine 
and imprisonment. The authority granted 
in this section shall terminate June 30, 1942, 
unless the Congress shall otherwise provide." 

Now, therefore, I, Franklin D. Eoosevelt, 
President of the United States of America, act- 
ing under and by virtue of the authority vested 
in me by the aforesaid act of Congress, do here- 
by proclaim that upon the recommendation of 
the Administrator of Export Control I have de- 
termined that it is necessary in the interest of the 
national defense that on and after April 15, 1941, 
the following-described articles and materials 
shall not be exported from the United States ex- 
cept when authorized in each case by a license as 
provided for in Proclamation 2413 of July 2, 
1940,^^ entitled "Administration of section 6 of 
the Act entitled 'An Act To expedite the 



strengthening of the national defense' approved 
July 2, 1940" : 

Machinery 
In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this 14" day 
of April, in the year of our Lord 
[seal] nineteen hundred and forty-one, and 
of the Independence of the United 
States of America the one hundred and sixty- 
fifth. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 
By the President : 
Cordell Hull 

Secretary of State. 

[No. 2475] 

Control of the Export of Certain Articles 
AND Materials 

BY the president OF THE UNITED STATES 
OF AMERICA 

A Proclamation 
Whereas section 6 of the act of Congress en- 
titled "An Act To expedite the strengthening of 
the national defense", approved July 2, 1940, 
provides as follows: 

"Sec. 6. Whenever the President determines 
that it is necessary in the interest of national 
defense to prohibit or curtail the exportation 
of any military equipment or munitions, or 
component parts thereof, or machinery, tools, 
or materials, or supplies necessary for the 
manufacture, servicing, or operation thereof, 
he may by proclamation prohibit or curtail 
such exportations, except under such rules and 
regulations as he shall prescribe. Any such 
proclamation shall describe the articles or ma- 
terials included in the prohibition or curtail- 
ment contained therein. In case of the vio- 
lation of any provision of any proclamation, 
or of any rule or regulation, issued thereun- 
der, such violator or violators, upon convic- 
tion, shall be punished by a fine of not more 

'°5 F. R. 2467; Bulletin of July 6, 1940 (vol. Ill, 
no. 54), pp. 12-13. 



476 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



than $10,000, or by imprisonment for not more 
than two years, or by both such fine and 
imprisonment. The antliority granted in this 
section shall terminate June 30, 1942, unless 
the Congi-ess shall otherwise provide." 

Now, THEREFORE, I, FeANKLIN D. RoOSE\'ELT, 

President of the United States of America, act- 
ing under and by virtue of the authority vested 
in me by the aforesaid act of Congress, do 
hereby proclaim that upon the recommendation 
of the Administrator of Export Control I have 
determined that it is necessary in the interest of 
the National defense that on and after May 6, 
1941, the following-described articles and mate- 
rials shall not be exported from the United 
States except when authorized in each case by a 
license as provided for in Proclamation 2413 of 
July 2, 1940,-'' entitled "Administration of sec- 
tion 6 of the Act entitled 'An Act To expedite 
the strengthening of the national defense' ap- 
proved July 2, 1940" : 

(1) Vegetable fibers and manufactures 

(2) Theobromine 

(3) Caffein 

(4) Sodium cyanide 

(5) Calcium cyanide 

(6) Casein 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this 14" day 
of April, in the year of our Lord 

[seal] nineteen hundred and forty-one, and 



of the Independence of the United 
States of America the one hundred and sixty- 
fifth. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 
By the President: 
CoRDELL Hull 

Secretary of State. 
[No. 2476] 



[Released to the press April 16] 

In accordance with the provisions of the 
Executive order of January 15, 1941,^^ the 
Secretary of State on April 14, 1941 issued the 
general licenses indicated on the following lists, 
authorizing the exportation to various countries 
of certain of the articles and materials named 
in the proclamations, regulations, and Execu- 
tive orders issued pursuant to section 6 of the 
Export Control Act approved July 2, 1940. 

Collectors of Customs have been authorized 
to permit, without the requirement of indi- 
vidual license, the exportation of any of the 
articles and materials enumerated in the fol- 
lowing lists, to the respective countries named 
in the lists, but the exporter is required to 
indicate the appropriate license number on the 
Shipper's Export Declaration filed with the 
collector. 

Those articles and materials for which no 
general licenses have been issued, but which are 
subject to the requirement of an export license, 
will continue to require individual licenses for 
their exportation. 



^5 F. R. 2467; Bulletin of July 6, 1940 (vol. Ill, 
no. 54), pp. 12-13. 



''Bulletin of January 18, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 82), 
p. 91. 



APRIL 



477 



Destination 



Canada — -- 

Great Britain 

Cuba 

Argentina --- - 

Bolivia 

Brazil - -- 

Chile 

Colombia 

Costa Rica 

Curacao 

Dominican Republic 

Ecuador 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Haiti 

Honduras 

Mexico 

Nicaragua 

Panama --- 

Paraguay 

Peru -- 

Surinam 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

Aden- 

Australia 

Bahamas 

Barbados- 

Bermuda 

British East Africa 

British Guiana - - - 

British Honduras 

British Malaya — 

British Pacific Islands. .. 

Burma 

Ceylon 

Cyprus 

Eire -. 

Falkland Islands 

Gambia 

Gibraltar 

Gold Coast 

India 

Jamaica 

Leeward Islands 

Mauritius Island 

Newfoundland 

New Zealand 

Nigeria 

Northern Rhodesia 

Palestine 

St. Helena Island 

Seychelles Islands , 

Sierra Leone 

Southern Rhodesia 

Trinidad and Tobago.-. 
Union of South Africa.. 

Windward Islands 

Egypt 

Anglo-Egyptian Sudan. 

Greenland 

Iceland- 



Non-proprietary 

and proprietary 

preparations 

containing 

quinine 



Cadmium pig- 
ments, includ- 
ing cadmium 
sulfide and 
cadmium 
lithopone 



GASP 1 
GASP 2 
GASP 3 
GASP 4 
GASP 5 
GASP 6 
GASP 7 
GASP 8 
GASP 9 
GASP 10 
GASP 11 
GASP 12 
GASP 13 
GASP 14 
GASP 15 
GASP 16 
GASP 17 
GASP 18 
GASP 19 
GASP 20 
GASP 21 
GASP 22 
GASP 23 
GASP 24 
GASP 25 
GASP 26 
GASP 27 
GASP 28 
GASP 29 
GASP 30 
GASP 31 
GASP 32 
GASP 33 
GASP 34 
GASP 35 
GASP 36 
GASP 37 
GASP 38 
GASP 39 
GASP 40 
GASP 41 
GASP 42 
GASP 43 
GASP 44 
GASP 45 
GASP 46 
GASP 47 
GASP 48 
GASP 49 
GASP 50 
GASP 51 
GASP 62 
GASP 63 
GASP 64 
GASP 55 
GASP 56 
GASP 57 
GASP 58 
GASP 59 
GASP 60 
GASP 61 
GASP 62 



GCMP 1 
OCMP 2 
GCMP 3 
GCMP 4 
GCMP 6 
GCMP 6 
GCMP 7 
GCMP 8 
GCMP 9 
GCMP 10 
GCMP 11 
OCMP 12 
GCMP 13 
GCMP 14 
GCMP 15 
GCMP 16 
GCMP 17 
GCMP 18 
OCMP 19 
OCMP 20 
OCMP 21 
OCMP 22 
GCMP 23 
GCMP 24 
GCMP 25 
GCMP 26 
OCMP 27 
OCMP 28 
OCMP 29 
GCMP 30 
GCMP 31 
GCMP 32 
COMP 33 
GCMP 34 
GCMP 35 
OCMP 36 
OCMP 37 
GCMP 38 
GCMP 39 
GCMP 40 
GCMP 41 
GCMP 42 
OCMP 43 
GCMP 44 
OCMP 45 
GCMP 46 
OCMP 47 
OCMP 48 
OCMP 49 
GCMP 50 
GCMP 51 
OCMP 52 
GCMP 63 
OCMP 54 
OCMP 56 
GCMP 56 
GCMP 57 
OCMP 68 
GCMP 59 
GCMP 60 
GCMP 61 
GCMP 62 



Chrome pigments 
containing 10 per- 
cent or more chro- 
mium, including 
chromic oxide 
(chrome green), 
lead chromate 
(chrome yellow), 
and zinc chromate 



Titanium pig- 
ments, includ- 
ing titanium 
dioxide 



OADP 1 
OADP 2 
GADP 3 
GADP 4 
GADP 5 
GADP 6 
GADP 7 
OADP 8 
OADP 9 
GADP 10 
OADP 11 
GADP 12 
GADP 13 
GADP 14 
GADP 16 
GADP 16 
GADP 17 
GADP 18 
OADP 19 
GADP 20 
GADP 21 
GADP 22 
OADP 23 
GADP 24 
GADP 25 
GADP 26 
OADP 27 
OADP 28 
GADP 29 
OADP 30 
GADP 31 
GADP 32 
GADP 33 
GADP 34 
OADP 35 
GADP 36 
GADP 37 
GADP 38 
GADP 39 
OADP 40 
GADP 41 
GADP 42 
GADP 43 
GADP 44 
GADP 45 
OADP 46 
OADP 47 
OADP 48 
GADP 49 
GADP 50 
GADP 51 
OADP 52 
GADP 53 
OADP 54 
GADP 65 
GADP 66 
GADP 67 
OADP 68 
OADP 69 
GADP 60 
GADP 61 
GADP 62 



Zinc pigments, 
including zinc 
oxide, leaded 
zinc oxide, zinc 
sulfide, and 
lithopone 



GCNP 1 

QCNP 2 
GCNP 3 
GCNP 4 
GCNP 5 
GCNP 6 
GCNP 7 
GCNP 8 
GCNP 9 
GCNP 10 
GCNP 11 
GCNP 12 
QCNP 13 
GCNP 14 
GCNP 15 
GCNP 16 
GCNP 17 
GCNP 18 
GCNP 19 
GCNP 20 
GCNP 21 
GCNP 22 
GCNP 23 
GCNP 24 
GCNP 25 
GCNP 26 
GCNP 27 
GCNP 28 
GCNP 29 
GCNP 30 
GCNP 31 
GCNP 32 
GCNP 33 
GCNP 34 
GCNP 36 
GCNP 36 
GCNP 37 
GCNP 38 
OCNP 39 
GCNP 40 
GCNP 41 
GCNP 42 
GCNP 43 
GCNP 44 
GCNP 46 
GCNP 46 
GCNP 47 
GCNP 48 
OCNP 49 
GCNP 60 
GCNP 61 
OCNP 52 
GCNP 53 
GCNP 54 
QCNP 55 
OCNP 66 
OCNP 67 
OCNP 68 
GCNP 69 
GCNP 60 
GCNP 61 
GCNP 62 



GBZP 1 
GBZP 2 
OBZP 3 
GBZP 4 
GBZP 6 
OBZP 6 
OBZP 7 
GBZP 8 
OBZP 9 
GBZP 10 
GBZP 11 
GBZP 12 
GBZP 13 
QBZP 14 
OBZP 15 
GBZP 16 
GBZP 17 
QBZP 18 
GBZP 19 
OBZP 20 
GBZP 21 
GBZP 22 
OBZP 23 
GBZP 24 
OBZP 25 
OBZP 26 
OBZP 27 
GBZP 28 
GBZP 29 
OBZP 30 
OBZP 31 
OBZP 32 
GBZP 33 
GBZP 34 
GBZP 35 
OBZP 36 
OBZP 37 
OBZP 38 
GBZP 39 
GBZP 40 
OBZP 41 
GBZP 42 
OBZP 43 
GBZP 44 
GBZP 45 
GBZP 46 
GBZP 47 
GBZP 48 
GBZP 49 
GBZP 50 
GBZP 51 
GBZP 62 
GBZP 63 
OBZP 64 
OBZP 66 
OBZP 66 
OBZP 57 
GBZP 58 
GBZP 69 
GBZP 60 
GBZP 61 
GBZP 62 



478 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Secretary of State has sent the following 
circular letter to all collectors of customs : 

"April 12, 1941. 

'■'■ Individual Shipvients Not Exceeding $25 in 
Value 

"In accordance with the provisions of the 
final Iparagraph of Export Control Schedule 
No. 1, dated March 15, 1941, it has been de- 
termined that it is necessary in the interest of 
the national defense that licenses be required 
for the exportation of the forms, conversions 
and derivatives listed in Schedule No. 1 and 
supplements thereto of the following articles 
and materials designated in the President's 
proclamations issued pursuant to section 6 of 
the Export Control Act, regardless of the fact 
that such exportation may be in individual 
shijDments not exceeding $25 in value : 

"Aircraft parts, equipment, and accessories other 
than those listed in the President's Proclama- 
tion of May 1, 1937. 

Atropine. 

Balancing Machines. 

Belladonna. 

Beryllium. 

Bromine. 

Equipment and parts which can be used, or adapted 
to use, for the production of aviation motor fuel 
or tetraethyl lead. 

Equipment for the production of aviation lubri- 
cating oil. 



Ethylene dibromide. 

Fire Control instruments, military search lights, 
aerial cameras, and other types of military 
equipment containing optical elements. 

Gauges. 

Industrial Diamonds. 

Mercury. 

Mica. 

Optical elements for fire control instruments, air- 
craft instruments, etc. 

Optical glass. 

Plastics, optically clear. 

Platinum group metals. 

Quartz crystals. 

Quinine. 

Radium. 

Tools incorporating Industrial diamonds. 

Uranium. 

Well and refining machinery. 

"The above ruling will become effective on 
April 15, 1941, and any prior ruling which you 
have received from the Department is hereby 
rescinded insofar as such a ruling may be in 
conflict with the foregoing. 

"You are requested to exercise due diligence 
to prevent any abuse of the $25 exemption privi- 
lege described in the regulations and to report 
to the Department immediately any evidence 
of such abuse insofar as concerns the shiijment 
of articles other than those listed above which, 
as stated, do not fall within the purview of the 
privilege." 



QUESTION OF COMPULSORY MILITARY TRAINING FOR ALIENS 



On April 15, 1941, the Secretary of State 
addressed the following letter to the Honorable 
Sam Eayburn, Speaker of the House of 
Kepresentatives : 

"The Selective Training and Service Act of 
1940 provides for the registration of all male 
aliens within specified ages residing in the 
United States and makes such aliens who have 
declared their intention to become citizens of 
the United States liable for training and 
service. 

"The Department has received communica- 
tions from a number of foreign diplomatic 



missions complaining that nationals of their 
countries are being drafted for training and 
service. Some of these complaints are based 
on treaty provisions and the Mexican Em- 
bassy has taken the position that the draft- 
ing of its nationals for military service is con- 
trary to the principles of international law. 
The Department is desirous of honoring the 
ti-eaty obligations of this Government and after 
conferences with the other interested agencies 
of the Government it has concluded that the 
appropriate way to solve the problem is by the 
amendment of the Selective Training and Serv- 



APRIL 19, 1941 



479 



ice Act. It is therefore suggested that the pro- 
posed amendment, a copy of wliich is enclosed,-- 
be enacted into law. It may be added that the 
matter has been brought to the attention of the 



President and has been approved by him. It 
has also been approved by the Attorney Gen- 
eral and by the Deputy Director of the Selective 
Service System." 



The Department 



NEW DUTIES INVOLVING FOREIGN PURCHASING OPERATIONS 



[Released to the press by the White House April 15] 

The following exchange of letters between 
the President and the Secretary of the Treasury 
is given to the press for its information : 

"March 12, 1941. 
"Mx DEAR Mr. President : 

"As I indicated to you in my letter of March 
5, it is my opinion that, with the signing of the 
Lend-Lease Bill, there will no longer be any 
need for the Liaison Committee which you 
established on December 6, 1939, to coordinate 
foreign inilitai-y purchases with our domestic 
program. 

"The Committee has handled approximately 
2,000 requests between July, 1940, and March, 
1941. Of these, over 1,000 were Britisli, and 
some 700 Dutch, with the balance representing 
the American Kei^ublics and a few other coun- 
tries, such as Eussia, Portugal and Iran. 

"It is my understanding that purchasing 
operations by all countries in the war zone will 
come under tlie lend-lease procedure, althougli 
in certain instances, such as the Dutcli East In- 
dies, the country itself may continue to buy for 
cash. Tlie purchasing operations of foreign 
countries not included in this lend-lease area de- 
pend basically on questions of foreign policy 
rather than upon questions of production. 
This is specifically true in the case of Russia, 



" Not printed herein. The suggested amendment 
would provide that an alien might become exempt 
from selective military service by withdrawing his 
declaration of intention to become a citizen, and that 
such action would permanently bar such an alien from 
citizenship. 



and it is also true with respect to all the 
American Republics. 

"Because of this situation it is my recom- 
mendation that the Liaison Committee be dis- 
banded and that all foreign countries outside 
the lend-lease area desiring to purchase mili- 
tary supplies in this country be advised to 
submit their needs to the Secretary of State. 

"I believe I can be most useful as a member 
of your new advisory committee and the mem- 
bers of my office experienced in handling British 
purchasing operations can be of the greatest 
assistance if they are instructed to devote their 
full energies to assisting Harry Hopkins in the 
detailed problems involved in the lend-lease 
administration. They already have instruc- 
tions to assist him in any way and to the full 
extent he desires. 

"I would appreciate it if you would notify 
the Secretary of War and the Secretaiy of the 
Navy that the original Liaison Conmiittee has 
been dissolved and that all foreign purchasing 
operations outside of the lend-lease area will 
henceforth be the responsibility of the Secretary 
of State. 

"Faithfully, 

Henry Morgenthau, Jr." 



"April 14, 1941. 
"Dear Mr. Secretary : 

"Thank you for your letter of March 12th 
concerning the operations of the Liaison Com- 
mittee for the coordination of foreign and 
domestic military purchases. 



480 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



"I would like to thank this committee for the 
work which it has done in the past year, and 
may I express my appreciation to you for your 
sincere and continuous efforts to make war ma- 
tei'ials available to those countries defending 
themselves against aggressor nations. 

"The work of the Liaison Committee as a co- 
ordinating body for foreign and domestic mili- 
tary purchases is no longer useful since the 
signing of the Lend-Lease Act and will be 
dissolved. Purchasing oi^erations by all coun- 
tries in the Lend-Lease area will be supervised 
by Harry Hopkins, and such operations by all 
other countries which must necessarily involve 
consideration of foreign policy will be processed 
by the Department of State. 
"Sincerely yours, 

Franklin D. Koosevixt"' 



The following departmental order was issued 
by the Secretary of State on April 16, 1941 : 

DepartTnental Order No. 936 

The Division of Commercial Treaties and 
Agreements, in addition to its functions and re- 
sponsibilities as defined in Depai-fmental Order 
No. 854 of June 29, 1940,-^ shall have responsi- 
bility for coordinating the activities of the De- 
partment in assisting foreign governments, and 
purchasers sponsored by foreign governments, 
to purchase and export from the United States 
such articles as the public interest may permit 
or require. The extent, if any, to which this 
function will include responsibility for assist- 
ance to any foreign government under the pro- 
visions of the Act of March 11, 1941, will be de- 
termined by instructions to be issued by the 
President and Departmental Orders in further- 
ance thereof. In carrying out tliis function, the 
Division of Commercial Treaties and Agree- 
ments shall have responsibility for enlisting the 
collaboration of the geogi-aphical and other di- 
visions concerned in the formulation and coor- 
dination of policy ; for initiating and coordinat- 



ing action; for dealing with the Department's 
correspondence and contacts with our represen- 
tatives abroad, and with representatives of for- 
eign governments in this country; and for 
establishing and maintaining effective liaison 
with other interested departments and agencies 
of the Government. 

Mr. Charles P. Curtis, Jr., has been appointed 
a Special Assistant to the Under Secretary of 
State, effective April 1, 1941, to assist in the cor- 
relation of international political and economic 
policies of the United States with the defense 
policies of the United States in regard to the 
foregoing activities. Mr. Curtis shall perform 
such other duties as may be assigned to him by 
the Under Secretary of State. 

The symbol designation of Mr. Curtis' office 
shall be TA/C. 

The provisions of this Order shall be effective 
as of April 1, 1941, and shall supersede the pro- 
visions of any existing Order in conflict 
therewith. 

CoRDELL Hull 



Regulations 



^Bulletin of July 6, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 54), p. 16. 



The following Govermnent regulations may 
be of interest to readers of the Bulletin: 

Export Control Schedule No. 3 [covering, effective 
April 1.5, 1941, forms, conversions, and derivatives 
of articles and materials designated in Proclamation 
No. 2475 of April 14, 1941]. April 15, 1941. (Adminis- 
trator of Export Control.) Federal Rei/ister, April 18, 
1941 (vol. 0, no. 7(5), p. 2(X)4 (Tlie National Archives 
of the United States). 

Export Control Schedule No. 4 [covering, efl'ective 
May fi, 1941, forms, conversions, and derivatives 
of articles and materials designated in Proclamation 
No. 2476 of April 14, 1911]. April 17, 1941. (Admin- 
istrator of Export Control.) Federal Register, April 
19, 1941 (vol. 6, no. 77), pp. 2033-2035 (The National 
Archives of the United States). 



Cultural Relations 



THE HUMAN FACTOR IN INTER-AMERICAN RELATIONS 



ADDRESS BY CHARLES A. THOMSON" 



I consider it a privilege to accept the invita- 
tion of the Pan American Society of Massacliu- 
setts to take jjart in this celebration of Pan 
American Day. This evening we need not take 
time, I think, to argne that the American na- 
tions must stand together in the face of the pres- 
ent world situation. We are fortunate that as 
a result of the good-neighbor policy past sus- 
picion and hostility have been removed, and 
that our relations with the other American re- 
publics are on a more friendly basis than at any 
time in the history of this Nation. It is clear, 
moreover, that for long years to come our lot is 
indissolubly joined with that of our neighbors 
in this hemisphere. We can well be heartened 
by the growth of inter- American cooperation in 
both the political and the economic sphere. But 
this rising structure of cooperation, if it is to 
be permanently secure, must rest on a broad and 
enduring understanding among the peoples of 
all the republics in this New World. If the 
American nations are to re-enforce each other 
in the tasks of the present and the future, it is 
essential that our people have not merely a su- 
perficial knowledge but a deep and sympathetic 
understanding of the habits and customs, the 
ideas and ideals, the ways of thinking and feel- 
ing of the countries which share with us this 
hemisphere. Only from this basis of sympa- 
thetic understanding can we evolve lasting solu- 
tions of political, economic, and social problems. 

In the great enterprise of forging this inter- 
American understanding it is of supreme im- 
portance that our whole people and our every 
resource contribute to the task in hand. We are 



"Delivered before the Pan American Society of 
Massachusetts, Cambridge, Mas.s., April 14, 1941. Mr. 
Thomson is Chief of the Division of Cultural Relations, 
Department of State. 



embarked on a program which must be a joint 
effort— a joint effort of all the American re- 
publics and, in each country, a joint effort- of 
private institutions and the government. It is 
a program that obviously caimot be carried out 
by governments alone. The United States 
Government desires to do its part, and for that 
reason the Divi.sion of Cultural Relations was 
established in the Department of State, and more 
recently Mr. Nelson Eockefeller was named by 
the President as Coordinator of Commercial 
and Cultural Relations Between the American 
Republics. Similarly the program probably 
cannot be carried out entirely by private initia- 
tive. But, the active collaboration of non-offi- 
cial agencies and organizations is indispensable 
to its success. The creation of your own Society 
is in itself implicit recognition of the essential 
contribution to be made by groups outside of 
government. 

In the development of understanding between 
nations, persons are the primary medium of ex- 
change. I want to speak particularly of this 
medium tonight, because our neighbors in the 
other republics especially value the person-to- 
person relationship. Much more than we, they 
have eyes for the individual rather than the 
organization. 

In line with this emphasis the Department of 
State has extended travel grants to a considera- 
ble number of distinguished journalists, novel- 
ists, and other writers, historians, educators, 
artists, and musicians to visit the United States 
for a two or three months' period. They are 
given every facility to meet leaders in the United 
States in whom they are particularly inter- 
ested and to visit universities, colleges, museums 
and art galleries, and similar institutions. The 
response of these institutions in providing wel- 

481 



482 



DEPARTMENT OP STATE BULLETIN 



come and attention to the visitors has been one 
of the most encouraging and heartening fea- 
tures of this activity. In addition, organiza- 
tions such as your own have arranged programs 
of hospitality and entertainment which have 
gone far to make our visitors feel at home. 
Among those who have come to the United 
States are : A leading novelist of Brazil, who is 
literary adviser to one of his coimtry's most 
important publishing houses, and who in re- 
cent years has translated into Portuguese vari- 
ous books of the United States; the head of the 
National Museum of Peru, who has given par- 
ticular attention to the Indian progi-am of the 
United States, in view of Peru's own large In- 
dian population; two leading professors — onej 
in law and one in architecture — from Argentine 
universities ; the dean of the School of Fine Arts 
of the University of Chile and the director of 
the National Gallery of that Republic, together 
with two of Chile's best-known historians ; the 
director of rural education in Haiti ; and a dis- 
tinguished educator and classical scholar from 
Ecuador. I regret that time does not permit 
me to refer to all those who have recently hon- 
ored this country with a visit. 

These visits not only provide the leaders of 
thought and opinion in our neighboring repub- 
lics with an opportunity to see the United States 
as it is and to correct many one-sided and dis- 
torted views which have been all too common 
concerning this country; they also afford our 
own people opportunity to modify mistaken no- 
tions concerning the "other Americans". The 
result is reciprocal enlightenment. 

During the coming months a still larger group 
of professional and artistic leaders of the other 
American republics is expected. In like man- 
ner, a number of outstanding leaders of the 
United States have been invited to visit South 
and Central America for lectures and contacts 
with intellectual circles in those countries. 
Thornton AVilder, novelist and dramatist, is now 
on an extended trip to Colombia, Ecuador, and 
Peru. John Erskine is to lecture in Argentina 
and Uruguay on literary and musical trends in 
the United States. President Isaiah Bowman 
of The Johns Hopkins University will visit the 



west coast of South America during the coming 
summer. Thus those who shape thought and 
opinion in the American republics are being 
more closely linked in common understanding 
and fruitful cooperation. 

Through persons of leadership it is also possi- 
ble to extend the frontiers of understanding 
widely among the peoples of the American 
reijublics by the use of the agencies of mass 
commmiication, such as the press, the radio, and 
the motion picture. One recent activity along 
this line has been the visit to the United States 
of seven Chilean newspapermen, arranged by 
American Ambassador Claude G. Bowers, in 
collaboration with Dean Carl Ackerman of the 
School of Journalism of Columbia University 
and the Educational Travel Department of the 
Grace Line. Seven American newspapers — 
one in Boston, one in New York, two in Wash- 
ington, one in PhiladeliDhia, one in Detroit, and 
one in Los Angeles — accepted Mr. Bowers' invi- 
tation to assist in this enterprise and have co- 
operated generously to make it a success. Each 
Chilean journalist is spending approximately 
two months with the host newspaper, writing 
articles both for that publication and for his 
home paper in Chile. Before leaving for Chile, 
the journalists are making a tour of inspection 
throughout the United States. 

The examples I have cited so far deal with 
activities which may have immediate effects in 
the improvement of inter-American understand- 
ing. But it is important also to keep in mind 
the long view. The future growth of inter- 
American cooperation will depend in large 
measure on the degree to which students from 
the other American republics become acquainted 
with the best in the intellectual and artistic life 
of this counti-y. During my last visit to South 
America nothing impressed me more than the 
warm friendship for the United States ex- 
pressed by men and women, formerly students 
here, who are now in positions of leadership 
and influence. 

Here again is an opportunity which calls for 
the fullest possible cooperation, on the part of 
official as well as non-official agencies. The De- 
partment of State administers in cooperation 



APRIL 19, 1941 



483 



with the Office of Education the exchange of 
students and also of professors under the Con- 
vention for the Promotion of Inter-American 
Cuhural Relations, signed at Buenos Aires. 
This instrument provides for the annual ex- 
change of two graduate students or teachers and 
one professor between each of the ratifying 
countries. To date 15 of the 21 American re- 
publics have ratified this convention. Already 
a total of 14 graduate students are now study- 
ing in the United States on these official fellow- 
ships. Similarly 10 American students are at 
work in the other republics. Six American pro- 
fessors have accepted invitations to lecture in 
Chile, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, 
Guatemala, Nicaragua, and Venezuela. 

These official exchanges represent a token 
move indicative of the recognition by the gov- 
ernment of the significant results which flow 
from the interchange of students and profes- 
sors. But the eifectiveness of any program in 
this field rests primarily on the cooperation of 
colleges, universities, and similar institutions. 
In 1940-41, these institutions have some 1,400 
students from the other American republics. 
The extension of fellowships has been an im- 
portant factor in increasing the number of out- 
standing students, especially from the more dis- 
tant countries of South America. In 1933-34 
the number of fellowships granted to students 
from the Hispanic- American countries by the 
colleges and universities of the United States 
through the Institute of International Educa- 
tion numbered 15. In the present academic year 
the figure is 82. Additional fellowships have 
been granted by the Guggenheim, the Rockefel- 
ler, and other foundations. The Department of 
State has been able as the result of a special 
appropriation from the Congress to make avail- 
able a limited number of travel grants to stu- 
dents awarded fellowships, who might other- 
wise be prohibited by the high costs of travel 
fi-om taking advantage of these opportunities. 
It is indeed encouraging to note increasing em- 
phasis on this phase of inter-American activities. 
Thirteen of the leading universities of the Mid- 
dle West now have under consideration a pro- 
gram by which each institution would make 



available annually 10 tuition fellowships to stu- 
dents from the other American republics. Uni- 
versities in other sections of the country have 
taken similar action. 

The difference in vacation periods affords a 
special ojiportunity for short-term exchanges. 
In contrast with the June-September vacation 
in the United States, most of the countries of 
South America have their long vacation from 
December to March. Thus students from the 
United States can visit the countries in the 
southern continent at a time when their uni- 
versities are in full swing, and, vice versa, 
students from those nations can come to this 
country during our academic year. From 
January to March of this year a special vaca- 
tion session was held at the University of 
North Carolina which was attended by more 
than a hundred students and professional 
leaders from South America. This signally 
successful venture was made possible by coop- 
eration with the University on the part of the 
Pan American Union, the Institute of Interna- 
tional Education, the Grace Line and the Am- 
erican Republics Line, and the Office of the 
Coordinator. Another group of 30 Chilean 
students was granted generous facilities at 
Columbia University. 

As a result of their stay in the United States 
these young people had opportunity to revise 
the notions of this country they had previously 
drawn from the motion picture and other 
sources. They found that the American family 
is not what it usually appears to be on the 
screen. They were stimulated by the friendly 
relationship between professor and students 
found in the North American university and 
by the atmosphere of university life. 

Thus the two Americas are coming to know 
and understand and respect each other through 
what William James called "the invisible mo- 
lecular forces that work from individual to 
individual." I would not overlook the diffi- 
culties that lie in the way — cultural differences, 
language barriers, racial, economic, and social 
complexities. But none of these are insuper- 
able. They may be overcome through the de- 



484 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



termination of our people to create in this 
hemisphere a realistic and enduring sense of 
mutual dependence and unity. So step by step 
we may advance toward that ideal recently 
outlined by Under Secretary Sumner Welles 
when he said: "We stand today a united con- 



tinent, united not for aggression but for social 
betterment and self-defense, united in the de- 
termination to uphold those great freedoms 
which the New World cherishes, and united as 
sovereign and independent equals in a great 
enterprise of safeguarding civilization." 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



SOVEREIGNTY 

CONVENTION ON THE PROVISIONAL ADMIN- 
ISTRATION OF EUROPEAN COLONIES AND 
POSSESSIONS IN THE AMERICAS 

Peini 

The Director General of the Pan American 
Union informed the Secretary of State by a 
letter dated April 11, 1941, that the instnunent 
of ratification by Peru of the Convention on 
the Provisional Administration of European 
Colonies and Possessions in the Americas, 
signed at Habana July 30, 1940, was deposited 
with the Union on April 4, 1941. The instru- 
ment of ratification is dated March 6, 1941. The 
countries which have deposited ratifications of 
this convention are the United States of 
America, Brazil, Costa Rica, Dominican Repub- 
lic, and Peru. 

DIPLOMATIC OFFICERS 

PAN AMERICAN CONVENTION 

Peru 

The Director General of the Pan American 
Union informed the Secretary of State by a 
letter dated April 11, 1941, that the instrument 
of ratification by Peru of the Diplomatic Offi- 
cers Convention, signed at the Sixth Interna- 
tional Conference of American States, Habana, 
February- 20, 1928, was deposited with the Union 
on April 4, 1941. The instrument of ratification 
is dated ]\Iarch 6, 1941. 

The coimtries which have deposited ratifica- 
tions of this convention are Brazil, Chile, Co- 



lombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, 
Ecuador, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, 
Uruguay, and Venezuela. 

MILITARY MISSION 

DETAIL OF UNITED STATES MILITARY AD- 
VISER TO THE REMOUNT SERVICE OF THE 
PERUVIAN ARMY 

In response to the request of the Republic of 
Peru an agreement was signed on April 15, 1941 
providing for the detail of an officer of the 
United States Army of the grade of colonel to 
advise the Remount Service of the PeruvLan 
Army. The term of the agreement is for three 
years. 

Other provisions follow the general lines of 
previous agreements negotiated with certain of 
the American republics concerning the detail of 
United States Army and Navy officers to advise 
(heir armed forces. 

FLORA AND FAUNA 

CONVENTION ON NATURE PROTECTION AND 
WILDLIFE PRESERVATION IN THE WEST- 
ERN HEMISPHERE 

United States 

On April 15, 1941, the President ratified the 
Convention on Nature Protection and Wildlife 
Preservation in the Western Hemisphere, which 
was opened for signature at the Pan American 
Union on October 12, 1940. 



APRIL 19, 1941 



485 



CONVENTIONS WITH CANADA AND MEXICO 
REGARDING MIGRATORY BIRDS 

On April 15, 1941, the President, under 
authority grunted in the Migratory Bird 
Treaty Act, approved and proclaimed amenda- 
tory regulations submitted to him by the Act- 
ing Secretary of the Interior, designating as 
closed area certain lands and waters adjacent 
to, or in the vicinity of the Ai'ansas National 
Wildlife Kefuge in Texas. 

The proclamation, which concerns the migra- 
tory birds included in the Convention for the 
Protection of Migratory Birds signed between 
the United States and Great Britain, in respect 
of Canada, on August 16, 1916 (Treaty Series 
628), and in the Convention for the Protection 
of Migratory Birds and Game Mammals be- 
tween the United States and Mexico, signed 
February 7, 19:56 (Treaty Series 912), is printed 
in the Federal Register for April 18, 1941 (vol. 
6, no. 76), page 1995. 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATION 
CONVENTION 

GiMtemala 

Accoi'ding to notification no. 370, dated No- 
vember 16, 1940, from the Bureau of the Inter- 
national Telecommunication Union at Bern, 
the notification that Guatemala had ratified 
the International Telecommunication Conven- 
tion (Treaty Series 867), signed at Madrid on 
December 9, 1932, and that it had approved the 
Cairo Revisions (1938) of the Telegraph Regu- 
lations, including the Final Protocol, and the 
General and Additional Radio Regidations 
(Treaty Series 948) , was received by the Bureau 
November 8, 1940. With respect to the General 
Radio Regulations, Guatemala made reserva- 
tions which read in translation as follows: 

"A. In case it should, in the future, find it 
impossible to effect suitably and to its satis- 
faction any radio service whatever, regard- 
less of the cause of such impossibility, such 
as the fact that all the suitable and adequate 
frequencies have ah'eady been registered pro- 
visionally or reserved in favor of other 
countries for stations building or planned, or 



that such frequencies are used by operating 
stations, Guatemala reserves the right to use 
the adequate frequencies which it may deem 
necessary, notwithstanding the stipulations 
of paragraphs 1 to 6 of article 7 of the Gen- 
eral Regulations (figures 79 to 91) or other 
contrary provisions, which would then be of 
no effect, while trying in every case and so 
far as possible to respect such stipulations. 

"B. In case it should find it impossible in 
the future to carry on radio broadcasting on 
the territory of the nation and that of the 
former Federation of Central America, as 
well as the international broadcasting serv- 
ices, due to insufficiency or congestion of the 
bands which are allocated to such services, 
Guatemala reserves the right to use fre- 
quencies close to the bands allotted to broad- 
casting in which it is not possible for it to 
work satisfactorily; it will choose such fre- 
quencies in a manner so as to disturb as little 
as possible the services ah-eady existing and 
pi'eviously registered by the International 
Telecommunication Union at Bern. 

"C. Guatemala declares furthermore that it 
reserves the right to continue to use the fre- 
quencies of 6460 kcs. (46.44 M.) and 6400 kcs. 
(46.88 M.) now usetl by transmitting stations 
TGWB of the "Voice of Guatemala" and 
TGQZ of the "Voice of Quezaltenango" re- 
spectively, unless the next or subsequent inter- 
American or world conferences allot two 
other frequencies to it in the 49 M. band, fre- 
quencies which it considers equivalent to those 
previously used from the point of view of 
absence of interference and the value of 
propagation or of the transmitting radius. 

"D. Likewise, in view of the unfavorable 
conditions in the region, Guatemala declares 
that it does not accept the restrictions fixed 
for the band of 8010 to 8195 kcs. (37.45 to 
36.61 M.) and reserves the right to use the 
frequencies included in this band for its 
broadcasting services, while respecting the 
vested interests of the services already exist- 
ing, so far as they have been registered by the 
Bureau of the International Telecommunica- 
tion Union at Bern." 



486 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtrLLETIN 



PORTUGUESE MARCONI RADIO COMPANY 

There is printed below a translation of an an- 
nouncement appearing in the above-mentioned 
notification no. 370, regarding the Portuguese 
Marconi Radio Company: 

"It appears from a communication that we 
have just received from the Spanish Legation 
at Bern that, on June 13, 1939, the Embassy 
of Portugal in Spain communicated to the 
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Spain that the 
Portuguese Marconi Radio Company has ad- 
hered to the International Telecommunica- 
tion Convention, signed at Madrid December 
9, 1932, as well as to the various Regulations 
annexed thereto.'' 

COMMERCE 

INTER-AMERICAN COFFEE AGREEMENT 

Under the terms of a protocol signed April 
15, 1941, by the United States and a number 
of the other American republics which have rati- 
fied the Inter-American Coffee Agreement, the 
agreement will be put into force immediately 
as between these countries, pending the ratifica- 
tion or approval of the agreement by all of the 
signatory governments. The protocol was 
signed on behalf of the United States by the 
Under Secretary of State, Mr. Sumner Welles. 
It was also signed by representatives of the Gov- 
ernments of Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, El 
Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, 
and Peru. 

The protocol will remain open for signature 
to all of the signatory governments which have 
ratified or approved the agreement. 

The Inter-American Coffee Agreement was 
signed at Wa.shington on November 28, 1940 by 
the United States and fourteen of the other 
American i-epublics. The Senate gave its ad- 
vice and consent to the ratification of the agree- 
ment on February 3, 1941. The agreement was 
ratified by the President on February 12, 1941 
and the instrument of ratification of the United 
States was deposited with the Pan American 
Union on April 14, 1941. 

The agreement, the text of which is printed 
in the Bulletin of November 30, 1940 (vol. Ill, 



no. 75) , pages 482-488, establishes a program for 
the orderly marketing of coffee in international 
trade by means of limitations on the exportation 
of coffee from the coffee-producing countries of 
the Western Hemisphere and on the importation 
of coffee into the United States. It grew out 
of a resolution adopted at the Habana Meeting 
of Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the American 
Republics in July 1940 which entrusted to the 
Inter-American Financial and Economic Ad- 
visory Committee the study of steps to be taken 
to promote the orderly marketing in interna- 
tional trade of commodities of primary impor- 
tance to the economic life of the countries of 
the Western Hemisphere, with a view to assur- 
ing equitable terms for both i^roducers and 
consumers. 

The present agreement is the result of months 
of study on the part of representatives of 15 
American republics to deal with the abnormal 
and distressing situation which has arisen with 
regard to coffee, one of the most important com- 
modities in the economy of this hemisphere. As 
a result of hostilities abi'oad, European mar- 
kets for coffee were shut off or greatly curtailed 
and surpluses piled up in the producing coun- 
tries, with the result that prices declined to 
record low levels and the purchasing power of 
the coffee-producing American republics for the 
increased volume of goods and services which 
they needed from the United States was 
seriously affected. 

The Inter-American Coffee Agreement is an 
attempt to provide effective measures for bring- 
ing the sujiplies of coffee in the international 
markets more nearly into line with existing de- 
mand at prices which will be reasonable to both 
producers and consumers. The agreement is to 
remain in force until October 1, 1943, although 
any government may withdraw from the agree- 
ment at any time after one year's prior notice. 
Provision is also made for termination by 
unanimous agreement before October 1, 1943 in 
the case of special and extraordinary circum- 
stances and for its continuance after October 1, 
1943 if this is agreed to by all the participating 
governments. 



APRIL 19, 1941 



487 



The Inter-American Coffee Agreement will 
be under the administration of an Inter- Ameri- 
can Coffee Board, which will have its seat in 
Washington and which will be composed of a 
delegate from each of the contracting govern- 
ments. The President has approved the desig- 
nation, as the delegate of the United States on 
the Board, of Mr. Paul C. Daniels, Assistant 
Chief of the Division of the American Kepub- 
lics. Department of State. 

After the signing of the i)i-otocol the Presi- 
dent issued his proclamation -^ on the same date, 
April 15, 1941, declaring that the agreement 
would enter into force on April 16, 1941 in 
respect of the obligations of the United States. 
The text of the agreement is included in the proc- 
lamation and the protocol is annexed thereto. 
As a result of the President's proclamation, the 
import quotas on coffee provided in the agree- 
ment became effective on April 16, in accord- 
ance with the provisions of a joint resolution of 
Congress, approved April 11, 1941.'" 

The text of the protocol is printed below : 

Protocol to the Intee-American Coffee 
Agreement 
Whereas : 

The second and third paragraphs of Article 
XX of the Inter-American Coffee Agreement, 
signed at Washington on November 28, 1940, 
provide that; 

"The Agreement shall be ratified or ap- 
proved by each of the signatory Governments 
in accordance with its legal requirements and 
shall come into force when the instruments of 
ratification or approval of all the signatory 
Governments have been deposited with the 
Pan American Union. As soon as possible 
after the deposit of any ratification the Pan 
American Union shall inform each of the sig- 
natory Governments thereof. 

"If, within ninety days from the date of 
signature of this Agreement, the instruments 
of ratification or approval of all the signa- 
tory Governments have not been deposited, 
the Governments which have deposited their 



'Not printed herein. 

'Public Law 33, 77th Cong., 1st sess. 



instruments of ratification or approval may 
put the Agreement into force among them- 
selves by means of a Protocol. Such Pro- 
tocol shall be deposited with the Pan Ameri- 
can Union, which shall furnish certified copies 
thereof to each of the Governments on behalf 
of which the Protocol or the present Agree- 
ment was signed." ; 

And whereas ninety days have elapsed since 
the date of signature of the said Agreement 
without the instruments of ratification or ap- 
proval of all the signatory Governments having 
been deposited with the Pan American Union; 

The Governments of Brazil, Colombia, Costa 
Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Hon- 
duras, Mexico, Peru and the United States of 
America which have deposited their respective 
instruments of ratification or approval with the 
Pan American Union, being desirous of bring- 
ing the said Agreement into force among them- 
selves, have agreed as follows: 

Article I 

The Parties to the present Protocol agree 
to proceed immediately to put into force among 
themselves the Inter- American Coffee Agree- 
ment, signed at Washington on November 28, 
1940. 

Article II 

The present Protocol is operative as regards 
eacli Contracting Party on the day following the 
date of signature by such Party. 

Pending the deposit with the Pan American 
Union of the instruments of ratification or 
approval by all the signatory Governments of 
the said Agreement of November 28, 1940, the 
present Protocol shall remain open for signa- 
ture by each signatory of the Inter-American 
Coffee Agreement on or after the date on 
which it shall deposit its instrument of ratifi- 
cation or approval thereof. 

Article III 

The present Protocol, signed in one original 
in the English, Spanish, Portuguese and French 
languages, all of which texts are equally authen- 
tic, shall be deposited with the Pan American 
Union at Washington, which shall transmit cer- 



488 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



tified copies thereof to all the signatories of the 
Inter-Ainerican Coffee Agreement. 

In witness whereof the undersigned, duly 
authorized by their respective Governments, 
have signed the present Protocol and have 
affixed their respective seals hereto. 

Done at the City of Washington, this fif- 
teenth day of April, 1941. 

For Brazil : 

E. Penteado [seal] 
For Colombia: 

Gabriel Tukbat [seal] 

For Costa Rica : 

OcTAVio Beeohe [seal] 

For El Salvador: 

Hector David Castro [seal] 

For Guatemala: 

Enrique L«jpez Herrakte [seal] 

For Haiti : 

Jacques C. Antoine [seal] 

For Honduras: 

Julian R. Caceres [seal] 

For Mexico : 

F. Castillo Najera [seal] 
For Peru : 

Eduardo Garland [seal] 

For the United States of America : 

Sumner Welles [seal] 



Publications 



Department of State 

Radiobroadcasting: Agreement Between the United 
States of America and Mexico— Effected by exchange 
of notes signed August 24 and 28, 1940; effective Marcli 
29, 1941. Executive Agreement Series 196. Publica- 
tion 1579. 4 pp. 50. 

Haitian Finances: Supplementary Agreement Be- 
tween the United States of America and Haiti Further 
Modifying the Agreement of August 7, 1933 for the 
Temporary Postponement During 1941 of Certain In- 



terest Payments — Signed February 13, 1941. Execu- 
tive Agreement Series 201. Publication 1582. 2 pp. 50. 
Diplomatic List, April 1941. Publication 1585. U, 
100 pp. Subscription, $1 a year ; single copy, 100. 

Other Government Agencies 

Mexican Government Publications : Guide to the more 
important publications of the National Government of 
Mexico, 1821-1936. (Library of Congress.) 333 pp. 
$1.25 (cloth). 



Legislation 



Joint Resolution Affirming and approving nonrecog- 
nitiou of the transfer of any geographic region in this 
hemisphere from one non-American power to another 
non-American power, and providing for consultation 
with other American republics in the event that such 
transfer should appear likely. Approved April 10, 1941. 
(Public Law 32, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 1 p. 50. 

Joint Resolution To carry out the obligations of the 
United States under the Inter-American Coffee Agree- 
ment, signed at Washington on Novemlx'r 28, 1940, and 
for other purposes. Approved April 11, 1941. (Public 
Law 33, 77th Cong., 1st sess. ) 1 p. 5(f. 

Foreign Intercourse — Department of State : Com- 
munication From the President of the United States 
Transmitting Draft of Proposed Provision Pertaining 
to the Salary Appropriation of the Department of 
State Under the Heading "Foreign Intercour.se" in the 
Department of State Appropriation Acts for Fiscal 
Years 1941 and 1942. ( S. Doc. 43, 77th Cong., 1st sess. ) 
2 pp. 50. 

Draft of Proposed Bill Authorizing the President to 
Requisition Any Foreign Merchant Vessel Lying In 
Waters of the United States : Message From the Presi- 
dent of the United States Transmitting a Draft of a 
Proposed Bill To Authorize and Empower the President 
of the United States To Requisition or Take Over the 
Title To Any Foreign Merchant Vessel Which Is Lying 
in Any Waters of the Unitetl Statesi. (H. Doc. 166, 77th 
Cong., 1st sess.) 2 pp. 50. 

Adverse Report on H. Res. 22 Requesting the Presi- 
dent To Transmit Information to the House of Repre- 
sentatives [regarding activities by the Nazi govern- 
ment and the Communist Party in other American re- 
publics]. (H. Rept. 112, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 1 p. 



U. S. 60VCRNHENT PRINTING OPFICEi It4l 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents Subscription price, $2.76 a year 

PDBLIBHED WBBKLY WITH THE APPEOVAL OF THE DIBECTOB OF IHB BOBKAC OF THB BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 





j^ 



Qontents 



APRIL 26, 1941 
Vol. IV: No. 96 — Publication 1593 




General: Page 
The United States and the World Situation: Address by 

the Secretary of State 491 

Exchange of defense articles with Canada 494 

Europe: 

Proclamation and regulations in connection with the war 

between Bulgaria, and Yugoslavia and Greece . . . 495 

Report from Legation in Yugoslavia 496 

Death of United States military air observer .... 497 

The President's statement on the war in Greece . . . 497 

Contributions for relief in belligerent coimtries . . . 497 

American Republics: 

Inter-American Development Commission: Peruvian 

Council 511 

The Department: 

Research Organization and Procedure Within the De- 
partment of State: Address by E. Wilder Spaulding . 512 

Cultural Relations: 

Visit of educators from Bolivia and Cuba SKi 

Dentist from United States to conduct clinics in South 

America 517 

The Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 517 

[Over] 



U- S. SUPERINTFNDFNT OF DOCUMfNTi 

MAY 15 1941 



Qontents 



-CONTINUED. 



Treaty Information: Page 

Commerce: 

Inter-American Coffee Agreement 518 

Women and children: 

Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in 

Women of Full Age 519 

Navigation: 

Agreement for a Uniform System of Maritime Buoy- 
age and Rules Annexed Thereto 520 

Health: 

Vetermary Conventions 520 

Flora and fauna: 

Convention on Nature Protection and Wildlife 

Preservation in the Western Hemisphere .... 520 
Aviation: 

Agreement With Mexico for the Reciprocal Transit 

of Military Aircraft 520 

Publications 521 



General 



THE UNITED STATES AND THE WORLD SITUATION 



ADDRESS BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE' 



[Released to the press April 24] 



Fellow Members and Guests of the American 
Society of International Law : 

On the occasion of this our tliirty-fifth an- 
nual meeting I shall undertake to discuss briefly 
certain acute phases of the world situation 
which are of vital interest to all of us. 

We are in the midst of desperately serious 
days which involve all peoples and all nations. 
Unfortunately, many people fail to grasp the 
nature of this world-wide crisis and its mean- 
ing to our country. 

Too many people assume that the present 
struggle is merely an ordinary regional war, 
and that when it comes to an end the side which 
is victorious will collect indemnities but other- 
wise leave the defeated nations more or less as 
they were before the conflict began. This as- 
sumption would prove entirely erroneous should 
the aggressor powers be the winners. As waged 
by them this is not an ordinary war. It is a 
war of assault by these would-be conquerors, em- 
ploying every method of barbarism, upon na- 
tions which cling to their right to live in free- 
dom and which are resisting in self-defense. 

The would-be conquerors propose to take unto 
themselves eveiy part of every conquered na- 
tion : the territory, the sovereignty, the posses- 
sions of every such nation. They propose to 
make the people of each conquered nation into 
serfs; to extinguish their liberties, their rights, 



'Delivered at the thirty-fifth auuual meeting of the 
American Society of International Law, Washington, 
April 24, lEMl, and broadcast over the blue network of 
the National Broadcasting Co. Mr. Hull Is President 
of the Society. 



their law, and their religion. They systemati- 
cally uproot everything that is high and fine in 
life. 

Such is the movement which is extending 
rajjidly throughout the world. 

If experience shows anything, it shows that 
no nation anywhere has the slightest reason to 
feel that it will be exempted from attack by the 
invader, any more than, in a town overrun by 
bandits, the wealthiest citizen might expect to 
be free from attack. 

Every thinking man can answer the question 
for himself by simply calling the roll of the 
wretched victims of world-aggression who are 
now in a condition of semi-slavei'y and whose 
every hope of again enjoying the blessings of 
civilization depends only on the defeat or fail- 
ure of the movement of conquest. So it is in 
Austria, Czechoslovakia, Poland, Norway, Den- 
mark, Holland, Belgium, Albania, Luxemburg, 
France, Rumania, Hungary, Bulgaria, Yugo- 
slavia. Many right-thinking people have not 
been able to conceive that this would happen. 
To them it has seemed incredible. Yet the 
physical facts are now before our very eyes, 
and the agony of the period through which the 
world is passing is marked by the most terrible 
events. As the armies of invasion move on, they 
bring with them blasted houses, families driven 
out to starve, civilian dead in the fields. When 
fighting is over, the administration of the in- 
vader offers no relief. Homes are plundered; 
families are separated; churches are closed; 
food is denied ; semi-slavery is introduced. Mili- 
tary f rightfulness is merely replaced by civilian 
terror. Every resource of organized fiendish- 

491 



492 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



ness is set to work to subjugate and cow the 
individual and to use the conquered territory as 
a springboard for new aggressions. 

The conckision is phiin. Now, after some 15 
nations have lost everything that makes life 
worth living, it is high time that the remaining 
free countries should arm to the fullest extent 
and in the briefest time humanly possible and 
act for their self-preservation. 

Some among us, doubtless with the best of in- 
tentions, still contend that our country need not 
resist until armed forces of an invader shall have 
crossed the boundary line of this hemisphere. 
But this merely means that there would be no 
resistance by the hemisphere, including the 
United States, until the invading countries had 
acquired complete control of the other four con- 
tinents and of the high seas, and thus had ob- 
tained every possible strategic advantage, re- 
ducing us to the corresponding disadvantage of 
a severely handicapped defense. This is an ut- 
terly short-sighted and extremely dangerous 
view. 

Events have shown beyond possible question 
that the safety of this hemisphere and of this 
country calls for resistance wherever resistance 
will be most effective. In my judgment our 
safety and security require that, in accordance 
with the declared policy of the legislative and 
executive branches of the Government, aid must 
be supplied without hesitation to Great Britain 
and those other countries that are resisting the 
sweep of the general conflagration. This policy 
means, in practical application, that such aid 
must reach its destination in the shortest of time 
and in maximum quantity. So ways must be 
found to do this. 

You and I are familiar with the questions 
sometimes raised when we speak of aid to other 
nations. Why, it is asked, should we interest 
ourselves in the defense of other coimtries? 
Surely the answer is terribly clear. 

Those nations that are making resistance are 
primarily seeking to save themselves, their 
homes, and their liberties. Great Britain for 
instance is acting primarily for her own safety. 
The United States, both in its direct defense ef- 
fort and ill the aid which it extends to the re- 



sisting nations, is likewise acting jDrimarily for 
its own safety. As safety for the nations that 
are offering resistance means security for us, aid 
to them is an essential part of our own defense. 
Every new conquest makes available to the ag- 
gressor greater resources for use against the re- 
maining free peoples. Our aid to the resisting 
nations is not the mere crusading of a world- 
benefactor. It is based on the definite knowl- 
edge that every free nation anywhere is a bastion 
of strength to all the remaining free peoples 
everywhere. 

Sometimes the same confusion of thought is 
expressed in a different question. Why, it is 
asked, should we care who wins? Is not this 
merely the traditional and recurrent struggle 
for power? Does it make any difference to 
America? Wliat difference does it make to 
America ? 

It makes a fateful difference. In a world 
which was, in the main, devoted to the cause of 
peace and in which no nation had designs upon 
the Western Hemisphere, we could, perhaps, 
take a detached attitude. But evidence has been 
piling up over several years which makes it per- 
fectly plain that one group of powers actually 
does have designs both upon the New World and 
upon the principles, the possessions, and the way 
of life that are ours. All the military move- 
ments and official acts and utterances of these 
powers have confirmed the knowledge that we 
too are included in their plans for world domi- 
nation. Our freedom and our wealth inevitably 
make us magnets for their machine of force. 

Yes, it makes a difference who wins — the dif- 
ference between whether we stand with our backs 
to the wall with the other four continents against 
us and the high seas lost, alone defending the 
last free territories on earth, or whether we keep 
our place in an orderly world. 

Again, it is asked. How are we in danger? 
Are not these idle fears? Since one warring 
nation cannot successfully invade Britain across 
20 miles of the English Channel how can any 
nation invade us from across three thousand 
miles of the Atlantic? 

The reason why the English Channel has not 
been successfully crossed is that the British have 



APRIL 26, 1941 



493 



maintained control of that Channel. Forty 
million determined Britons in a heroic resist- 
ance have converted their island into a huge 
anned base out of which proceeds a steady 
stream of sea and air power. It is not water 
that bars the way. It is the resolute detennina- 
tion of British sea power and British arms. 
Were the control of the seas by the resisting 
nations lost, the Atlantic would no longer be an 
obstacle — ratlier, it would become a broad 
highway for a conqueror moving westward. 
Our protection would be enormously lessened. 

Those Americans who, in effect, are saying 
that a British defeat would not matter to us, 
signally overlook the fact that the resulting de- 
livery of the high seas to the invader would 
create colossal danger to our own national de- 
fense and security. Tlie breadth of the sea may 
give us a little time. It does not give us safety. 
Safety can only come from our ability, in con- 
junction with other peace-loving nations, to 
prevent any aggi'essor from attaining control of 
the high seas. 

Some, hoping that this crisis may end, ask 
whether some sort of peace cannot be made — a 
peace that will end the struggle in Europe and 
that will permit us to resume our normal life. 
I wish this were possible. But one obstinate 
fact stands in the way. One of the contending 
groups not only does not wish peace, as we 
understand peace, but literally does not believe 
in peace. That group uses the word, it is true — 
as it was used by the aggressor at the time of 
the Munich arrangement in 1938. Peace to that 
grouj) is merely a convenient cloak for a con- 
tinuing undeclared, under-cover war, as France 
and many other nations to their misery have 
discovered. Behind the deceptive protection of 
the word "peace" the rulers of that group ac- 
cumulate vast striking-forces. They infiltrate 
shock troops disguised as peaceful travelers and 
businessmen. They set up organizations for 
spying, sabotage, and propaganda. They en- 
deavor to sow hatred and discord. They use 
every tool of economic attack, bribery, corrup- 
tion, and local disturbance to weaken the coun- 
tries with which they are at "peace", until a 
military movement can easily complete the task 
of subjugation. That kind of peace is nothing 



more than a trap — a trap into which many na- 
tions fell in earlier phases of this movement for 
world conquest when its true nature was not 
understood. Indeed, the dictator nations make 
no secret of their plans. They scornfully state 
their ideas, arrogantly confident that the law- 
abiding nations will not take them seriously — 
until it is too late successfully to resist them. 

Finally, there are those who sometimes won- 
der whether aid to freedom-loving nations and 
a vigorous policy of defending our interests will 
not irritate some aggressor into attacking us. 
This theory assumes that a lawless invader will 
become "irritated" if its intended victim dares 
to defend itself at the most effective stage. 
Under this theory, the only way to avoid giving 
such "irritation" is to submit. 

No nation is going to attack us merely be- 
cause it is our policy to defend ourselves. 
Neither, for that matter, are any aggressor 
going to let us alone merely because we attempt 
to placate them. In the philosophy of the con- 
querors, an attack is justified whenever and 
wherever it looks easy and convenient and 
serves their purposes. There is no possible safe- 
guarding our security, except by solid strength, 
placed when and where it is most effective. 

The best, indeed the only way, of allaying 
the fears and doubts and questions of those who 
are in anxiety is for us, one hundred and thirty 
millions of Americans, to rise in our might and 
I^roceed as one man in the Herculean task of 
equipping this Nation to the fullest for its self- 
defense. These prej^arations should not be for 
a month or for a year, but they must continue as 
long as our safety is threatened. 

The countries that have set about to impose 
their rule upon the world have turned their 
backs upon all the ordinary peacetime ways of 
work and living. They dreamed of force, they 
have created force, and they are now using it to 
the full. In their preparations and in their 
warfare they have demanded everything of 
their peoples. Ordinary family life, leisure, 
personal enjoyment, pursuit of private inter- 
est — all of these have been swept aside. Every- 
thing has been given over to the creation and 
use to the utmost of force, 



494 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



For US, the task of safeguarding our security 
requires the full, continuous, patriotically in- 
sisired effort of each and every one of us. The 
energies of those who control the operation of 
our factories and their machines, together with 
the labor of those who make and operate the ma- 
chines, must be devoted to the attainment of 
maximum production. Each and all must work 
with a sense that what they do or do not do is im- 
portant in determining whether this counti'y 
shall be secure. Every part of our vast produc- 
tive machine that can serve to produce military 
supplies must be put to that purpose. The de- 
sire to continue ordinary ways of business must 
yield to the needs of the crisis. Individuals and 
groups have no right at this time to think or act 
primarily in terms of their pei-sonal interest to 
the detriment of the general national good. 

Wliat we do in tlie production of the fighting 
instruments needed by ourselves and by the free 
countries of the world now becomes a measure of 
our intelligence. 

There are those who are too easily discouraged 
when the news is temporarily unfavorable. 



Powerful propaganda machines endeavor to 
spread that discouragement. It is not the tradi- 
tion of those who love liberty to yield to dis- 
couragement. That is not the American tradi- 
tion. Our country owes its place in history to 
the fact that the people become more resolute 
and determined as danger and difficulty increase. 

There can be no temporizing with lawlessness 
or with disregard for the elemental rights of na- 
tions and peoples. 

Although the task is huge, though time is 
pressing, and though the struggle may continue 
for a long time, I am confident that at the end 
there will come a better day. We are at work not 
only at the task of insuring our own safety but 
also at the task of creating ultimate conditions 
of peace with justice. We can help to lay a firm 
foundation for the independence, the security, 
and the returning prosperity of the members of 
the family of nations. I have absolute faith in 
the ultimate triumph of the principles of hu- 
manity, translated into law and order, by which 
freedom and justice and security will again pre- 
vail. 



EXCHANGE OF DEFENSE ARTICLES WITH CANADA 



[Released to the press by the White House April 20] 

At the conclusion of a conference between 
President Roosevelt and Prime Minister Mac- 
kenzie King of Canada on April 20, 1941, the 
following statement was issued : 

"Among other important matters, the Presi- 
dent and the Prime Minister discussed measures 
by which the most prompt and effective utiliza- 
tion might be made of the productive facilities 
of North America for the purposes both of local 
and hemisphere defense and of tlie assistance 
which in addition to their own programs both 
Canada and the United States are rendering to 
Great Britain and the other democracies. 

"It was agi-eed as a general principle that in 
mobilizing the resources of this continent each 
country should provide the other with the de- 
fense articles which it is best able to produce, 
and, above all, produce quickly, and that pro- 



duction programs should be coordinated to this 
end. 

"While Canada has expanded its j^roductive 
capacity manyfold since the beginning of the 
war, there are still numerous defense articles 
wliich it must obtain in the United States, and 
purchases of this character by Canada will be 
even greater in the coming year than in the past. 
On the other hand, there is existing and poten- 
tial capacity in Canada for the speedy produc- 
tion of certain kinds of munitions, strategic ma- 
terials, aluminum, and ships, which are urgently 
required by the United States for its own pur- 
poses. 

"While exact estimates cannot yet be made, 
it is hoped that during the next 12 months Can- 
ada can supply the United States with between 
$200,000,000 and $300,000,000 worth of such de- 
fense articles. This smn is a small fraction of 
the total defense program of the United States, 



APRIL 26, 1941 

but- many of the articles to be provided are of 
vital importance. In addition, it is of great 
importance to the economic and financial rela- 
tions between the two countries that payment by 
the United States for these supplies will mate- 
rially assist Canada in meeting part of the cost 
of Canadian defense purchases in the United 
States. 

"Insofar as Canada's defense purchases in the 
United States consist of component parts to be 



495 

used in equipment and munitions which Canada 
is producing for Great Britain, it was also 
agreed that Great Britain will obtain these parts 
under the Lease-Lend Act and forward them to 
Canada for inclusion in the finished article. 

"The technical and financial details will be 
worked out as soon as possible in accordance 
with the general principles which have been 
agreed upon between the President and the 
Prime Minister." 




PROCLAMATION AND REGULATIONS IN CONNECTION WITH THE 
WAR BETWEEN BULGARIA, AND YUGOSLAVIA AND GREECE 



[Released to the press April 25] 

Proclamation of a State of War Between 
Bulgaria, on the One Hand, and Yxtgoslavia 
AND Greece, on the Other Hand 

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF 
AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Whereas section 1 of the joint resolution of 
Congress approved November 4, 1939, provides 
in part as follows : 

"That whenever the President, or the Con- 
gress by concurrent resolution, shall find that 
there exists a state of war between foreign 
states, and that it is necessai'y to promote the 
security or preserve the peace of the United 
States or to protect the lives of citizens of the 
United States, the President shall issue a proc- 
lamation naming the states involved; and he 
shall, from time to time, by proclamation, name 
other states as and when they may become in- 
volved in the war." 

And whereas it is further provided by sec- 
tion 13 of the said joint resolution that 

"The President may, from time to time, pro- 
mulgate such rules and regulations, not incon- 



sistent with law, as may be necessary and proper 
to carry out any of the provisions of this joint 
resolution; and he may exercise any power or 
authority conferred on him by this joint resolu- 
tion through such officer or officers, or agency 
or agencies, as he shall direct." 

Now, Therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, 
President of the United States of America, 
acting under and by virtue of the authority 
conferred on me by the said joint resolution, 
do hereby proclaim that, Bulgaria having 
without justification attacked Yugoslavia and 
Greece, a state of war exists between Bulgaria, 
on the one hand, and Yugoslavia and Greece, 
on the other hand, and that it is necessary to 
jiromote the security and preserve the peace of 
the United States and to protect the lives of 
citizens of the United States. 

And I do hereby enjoin upon all officers of 
tlic United States, charged with the execution of 
the laws thereof, the utmost diligence in pre- 
venting violations of the said joint resolution 
and in bringing to trial and punishment any 
offenders against the same. 

And I do hereby delegate to the Secretary of 
State the power to exercise any power or au- 
thority conferred on me by the said joint reso- 
lution, as made effective by this my proclama- 



496 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



tion issued thereunder, which is not specifically 
delegated by Executive order to some other 
officer or agency of this Government, and the 
power to promulgate such rules and regulations 
not inconsistent with law as may be necessary 
and proper to carry out any of its provisions. 

In ■vv^TNEss whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 

Done at the City of Washington this 24th day 
of April, in the year of our Lord 
[sEAii] nineteen hundred and forty-one, and 
of the Independence of the United 
States of America the one hundred and sixty- 
fifth. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 
By the President : 
CoRDELL Hull, 

Secretainj of State. 

[No. 2479] 
[Released to tlie press April 2.j] 

Solicitation and Collection of Funds and 
Contributions ^ 

The Secretary of State announces that the 
rules and regulations under section 8 of the joint 
resolution of Congress approved November 4, 
1939," which he promulgated on November 6, 
1939,' henceforth apply equally to the solicita- 
tion and collection of contributions for use in 
Bulgaria. 

April 25, 1941. 

[Released to the press April 25] 

Commerce With States Engaged in Armed 
Conflict ^ 

The Secretary of State announces that the 
regulations under section 2(c) and (i) of the 



joint resolution of Congress approved Novem- 
ber 4, 1939,* which he promulgated on Novem- 
ber 10 and November 25, 1939,^ henceforth apply 
equally in respect to the export or transport of 
articles and materials to Bulgaria. 
April 25, 1941. 



[Released to the press April 25] 

Travel ' 

The Secretary of State announces that the 
regulations under section 5 of the joint resolu- 
tion of Congress approved November 4, 1939,* 
which he promulgated on November 6," and 
amended November 17, 1939,' henceforth apply 
equally in respect to travel by citizens of the 
United States on vessels of Bulgaria. 

April 25, 1941. 



REPORT FROM LEGATION IN YUGO- 
SLAVIA 

[Uc/leased to the press April 22] 

The Department has been informed by the 
American Minister in Belgrade, Mr. Arthur 
Bliss Lane, that all American citizens in Bel- 
grade, including Mrs. Fortier,^ are safe. The 
message adds that the foreign members of the 
Leg-ation staff are also well. 



' These regulations in codified form appear in 6 F. R. 
2160. 

"54 Stat. 4. 



'Bidh'tw of November 11, 1939 (vol. I, no. 20), pp. 
482-^84. 

'54 Stat. 4. 

^Biillctit)s of November 11, 1939 (vol. I, no. 20), pp. 
485-486, and November 25, 1939 (vol. I, no. 22), p. 588, 
respectively. 

'Bulletin of November 11, 1939 (vol. I, no. 20), pp. 
480-181. 

'Bulletin of November 18, 1939 (vol. I, no. 21), pp. 
553-555. 

° Wife of American military attach^ in Belgrade. 



APRIL 2 6, 1941 



497 



DEATH OF UNITED STATES MILITARY 
AIR OBSERVER 

[Released to the press April :;2] 

The American Minister in Cairo on April 21 
sent the following telegram to the Department 
of State: 

"It is with profound regret that I inform the 
Department that word has just been received 
that Colonel Gerald Brower U.S. military air 



observer R.A.F. Middle East was killed on 
April 20 at El Obeid 250 miles southwest of 
Khartoum. 

"Details will be furnished the War Depart- 
ment by the Military Attache to the Legation. 

"Please convey to the members of Colonel 
Brewer's family sincere condolences on my be- 
half and on behalf of the members of the Lega- 
tion." 



THE PRESIDENT'S STATEMENT ON THE WAR IN GREECE 



[Released to the iiress by the White House April 2ri] 

The following statement by the President was 
made April 25 when he received a delegation 
of the Greek patriotic society, Ahepa : 

"Tlie heroic struggle of the Hellenic people to 
defend their liberties and their homes against 
the aggression of Germany after they had so 
signally defeated the Italian attempt at inva- 
sion has stirred the hearts and aroused the sym- 
pathy of the whole American people. 

"During the Hellenic War of Independence 
more than a century ago, our young Nation, 
prizing its own lately won independence, ex- 
l)ressed its ardent sympathy for the Greeks and 
hoped for Hellenic victory. That victory was 
achieved. 



"Today, at a far more perilous period in the 
history of Hellas, we intend to give full effect 
to our settled policy of extending all available 
material aid to free jjeoples defending them- 
selves against aggression. Such aid has been 
and will continue to be extended to Greece. 

"Wliatever may be the temporary outcome of 
the present phase of the war in Greece, I be- 
lieve that the Greek people will once more ulti- 
mately achieve their victory and regain their 
political independence and the territorial integ- 
rity of their country. In that liigh objective, 
the people of Greece and their Government can 
count on the help and support of the Govern- 
ment and tlie peojile of the United States." 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 



[Releascii to the press April 26] 

The following tabulation shows contributions 
collected and disbursed during the period Sep- 
tember 6, 1939 through March 31, 1941, as shown 
in the rejjorts submitted by persons and organi- 
zations registered with the Secretary of State 
for the solicitation and collection of contribu- 
tions to be used for relief in belligerent coun- 
tries, in conformity with the regulations issued 
pursuant to section 8 of the act of November 4, 
1939 as made effective by the President's procla- 
mation of the same date. 



This tabulation has reference only to contri- 
butions solicited and collected for relief in bel- 
ligerent countries (France; Germany; Poland; 
the United Kingdom, India, Australia, Canada, 
New Zealand, and the Union of South Africa; 
Norway; Belgium; Luxemburg; the Nether- 
lands; Italy; and Greece) or for the relief of 
refugees driven out of these countries by the 
present war. The statistics .set forth in the tabu- 
lation do not include information regarding re- 
lief activities which a number of organizations 
registered with the Secretary of State may be 



313038—41- 



498 

carrying on in nonbelligerent countries, but for 
Tvliich registration is not required under the 
Neutrality Act of 1939. 

The American National Ked Cross is required 
by law to submit to the Secretary of War for 
audit "a full, complete, and itemized report of 
receipts and expenditures of whatever kind". 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

In order to avoid an unnecessary duplication of 
work, this organization is not required to con- 
form to the provisions of the regulations gov- 
erning the solicitation and collection of con- 
tributions for relief in belligei'ent countries, and 
the tabulation does not, therefore, include in- 
formation in regard to its activities. 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds re- 
ceived 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Mar. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Accion Dem5crata Espanola, San Francisco, Calif., 
Mar. 29, 1940.' France.. -. 

Albanian Relief Fund, Jamaica Plain, Mass., Mar. 21, 
1941. Albania 

The Allied Civilian War Relief Society, Inc., New 
York, N. Y., Dec. 27, 1940. Great Britain 

Allied Relief Ball, Inc., New York, N. Y., Apr. 4, 1940. 
Great Britain and France. 

American Aid for German War Prisoners, Buffalo, 
N. Y., Sept. 27, 1940. Canada, Australia, New Zea- 
land, Great Britain, and the Netherlands 

American Association for Assistance to French Artists, 
Inc., New York, N. Y., Jan. 3, 1940. France 

American .\ssociation of University Women, Washing- 
ton, D. C, May 23, 1940. France, Great Britain, and 
Canada 

American .Auxiliary Committee de I'Union des Femmes 
de France, New York, N. Y., Nov. 8, 1939. France, 
Great Britain, and Germany 

American Board of Missions to the Jews, Inc., Brooklyn, 
N. Y., July 5, 1940. France, Belgium, and Germany.. 

American Cameronian Aid, Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan. 17, 
1941. Scotland .- 

American Committee for British Catholic Relief, 
Washington, D. C, Mar. 4, 1941. Great Britain 

American Committee for Christian Refugees, Inc., New 
York, N. Y., Sept. 26, 1939. Germany and 
France 

American Committee for the German Relief Fund, Inc., 
New York, N. Y., Mar. 27, 1940. Germany, Poland, 
Canada, Dutch Guiana, British West Indies, Ja- 
maica, New Zealand, and Australia 

American Committee for the Polish Ambulance Fund, 
Chicago, 111., Feb. 12, 1940. France, Poland, and 
England 

The American Committee for the Relief of Greece, Inc., 
New York, N. Y., Jan. 2, 1941. Greece 

American Committee to Save Refugees, New York, 
N. Y., Jan. 3, 1941. France 

American Dental Ambulance Committee, New York, 
N. Y., Mar. 12, 1940. United Kingdom 

American Employment for General Relief, Inc., New 
York, N. Y., May 1, 1940. England, France, Nor- 
way, Poland, Belgium, Lu.xemburg, and the Nether- 
lands 

American Federation for Polish Jews, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Sept. 14, 1939. Poland 



$312. 19 

345. 00 

643. 78 

62, 696. 35 

7,350.90 

17, 107. 87 

22, 729. 69 

27, 628. 62 

8, 185. 38 

267. 10 

1,914.00 

16, 402. 50 

62, 800. 84 

33, 405. 03 

128.35 

3, 396. 62 

3, 269. 62 

4,013.00 
6, 244. 30 



$125.00 

None 

382. 80 

39, 964. 39 

4.741.00 
11,611.03 

11,327.50 

15,302.93 

8, 039. 60 

115.00 

908.00 

16, 402. 60 

47, 876. 47 

27,941.16 

None 
1,246,25 
3,133.02 

None 
5, 020. 76 



$130. 18 
330.00 
160.98 
None 

1, 992. 45 
1, 446. 91 

10, 762. 63 

7, .509. 00 
None 
86.76 
823. 44 

None 

1, 844, 82 

3, 094. 18 

128. 35 

1, 596. 41 

35.00 

190.92 
847.41 



None 
None 
$36.50 
None 

2, 328. 76 
1,655.16 

None 

6,43!*. 66 
None 
None 
None 

None 

24.00 

471.00 
None 
None 
None 

None 
7, 651. 43 



None 
None 
None 
None 

$105. 50 
None 

None 

130. 33 
None 
None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

75.00 

1, 229. .W 

None 

None 
None 



$57. 01 

15.00 

None 

12, 731. 96 

617. 46 
4. 149.93 

rm. 16 

4, 8 1 '1, ,69 
14.6. 78 
65.35 
182. .66 

None 

13,079.56 

2. 369. 69 

None 
5,63. 90 
101,. 60 

3, 822. 08 
376.41 



•The registration of this organization was revoked on Dec. 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 



APRIL 2G, 1941 



499 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds re- 
ceived 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Mar. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


American Field Hospital Corps, New York, N. Y., 
Dec. 12, 1939. France, Belgium, Holland, United 
Kingdom, Greece, Albania, and Ethiopia-. 

American Field Service, New York, N. Y., Sept. 27, 
1939 France, Great Britain, and Greece 


$250, 438. 73 
382, 894. 78 

9, 572. 45 

61, 304. 85 

9, 852. 52 

37, 388. 05 

4,200.83 

337,713.79 

4, 782, 84 

180. 762. 73 

5, 266. 05 
C23. 63 


$185, 626. 36 
325, 286. 76 

4. 728. 83 
40.171.64 

5, 260. 77 

29, 026. 42 

3,357.00 

193, 42S. 49 

1,927.02 

165, 282. 56 

3, 786. 50 

None 


$29, 526. 13 
38, 298. 87 

2, 593. 88 

9, 724. 41 
913.57 

2, 005. 95 

812. 33 

107,357.08 

None 

None 

1,111.46 

420.00 


$2, 694. 20 
None 

None 

67,913.90 

None 

19, 240. 00 

None 

19, 904. 96 

None 

38, 725, 67 

4,911.50 

None 


$2, 248. 00 
None 

None 
674. 00 
None 

None 
None 
None 

None 

None 
None 
None 


$35, 286. 24 
19,309.15 


American and French Students' Correspondence Ex- 
change, New York, N. Y., Dec. 20, 1939. France and 
England - 


2, 249. 74 


American-French War Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., 


11,408.80 


American Friends of Britain, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Aug 30, 1940 Great Britain 


3, 678. 18 


American Friends of Czechoslovakia, New York, N. Y., 
Nov. 2, 1939. Great Britain, France, and Bohemia- 
Moravia 


6, 355. 08 


American Friends of the Daily Sketch War Relief Fund, 
New York, N. Y., Dec. 1, 1939. Great Britain.. 

American Friends of France, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 21, 1939. France, Germany, and England 

American Friends of a Jewish Palestine, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., May 9, 1940. Germany, Poland, France, and 


31.50 
30, 928. 22 

2. 855. 82 


American Friends Service Committee, Philadelphia, 
Pa., Nov. 9, 1939. United Kingdom, Poland, Ger- 
many, France, Norway, Belgium, the Netherlands, 
and Italy 


1.5, 480. 17 


The American Fund for Breton Relief, New York, N. Y., 
Oct. 31, 1939. France and England... 


368,09 


The American Fund for British War Aid, New York, 
N. Y., Feb. 1, 1941. Great Britain 


203. 63 


American Fund for French Wounded, Inc., Boston, 
Mass., Jan. 3, 1940. England and France 

American German Aid Society. Los Angeles, Calif., 
Nov 15. 1939. Germany and Canada 


20. C78. 0.5 
.'i, 915. 84 
7,210.00 


16,9.55.97 

4, 525. 00 

416.60 


2, 670. 43 

91. -22 

6. 793. 40 


18, 207. 72 
None 
None 


1, 198.00 
None 
None 


1,051.65 
1. 299. 62 


The American Hospital in Britain, Limited, New York, 
N. Y., July 24, 1940. Great Britain 


None 


The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, 














Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 29, 1939. United King- 
dom, Poland, Germany, France, Norway, Belgium, 
Lu.xemburg. and the Netherlands 


3, 478, 734. 14 
None 

3, 662. 62 

6, 447. 24 
24,381.76 

1,082.22 
12,894.68 

4,611.87 
28, 046. 53 
10,920.68 


3,142,711.80 
None 
3,115.77 
3, 939. 70 
22, 559. 22 
182. 07 
12,682.06 
3, 205. 02 
1.5, 405. 32 
6, 500. 00 


None 

None 

546. 85 

1,994.39 

1,182.71 

630. 57 

None 

688. 37 

2, 722. 68 

4.095.76 


51.00 
None 

4, 350. OO 
None 
None 
None 
50. 00 

2, 493. 65 

36,107.89 

650, 00 


None 
None 
300.00 
None 
None 
2.45 
None 
450. 15 
None 
107. 77 


330, 022. 34 


American Labor Committee to Aid British Labor. New 
York, N Y., Feb. 17, 1941.' Great Britain 


None 


American McAll Association, New York, N. Y., Jan. 3, 
1940. England.. . ... 


None 


American-Polish National Council, Chicago, 111., Aug. 
14, 1940. Poland 


613.15 


The American School Committee for Aid to Greece, Inc., 
Princeton, N. J., Dec. 16, 1940. Greece 


639. 83 


American War Godmothers, Pittsburgh, Pa., Mar. 6, 
1940. France 


269. ,58 


Americau Women's Hospitals, New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 14; 1939. France, England, and Greece 


212.62 


American Women's l^nit for War Relief, Inc., New 
York., N. Y., Jan. 15, 1940. France 


718.48 


American Women's Voluntary Services, Inc., New 
York, N. Y., Feb. 13, 1940. England 


9, 918, 53 


Les Amis de la France a Puerto Rico, San Juan, P. R., 
Dec. 20. 1939.' France 


324. 93 



' The registration of this organization was revoked on Mar. 31, 1941, at the request of registrant. 
* The regi.stration of this organization was revoked on Dec. 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 



600 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

CoNTHIBDTIONS FOR HeLIEF IN BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 


Funds re- 


Funds spent 
for relief in 


Unexpended 

balance as of 
Mar. 31, 1941, 
including cost 

of goods pur- 
chased and 

still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 


destination of contributions 


ceived 


countries 
named 


in kind sent 

to countries 

named 


licity, affairs, 

campaigns, 

etc. 


Les Amities Ffiniinines de la France, New York, N. Y., 














Dec. 19, 1939. France and England 


$1, 890. 39 


$1,063.80 


$306. 49 


$(89. 32 


$88. 60 


$520. 10 


Lcs Ancicns Combattants Frang ais de la Grande Guerre, 














San Francisco, Calif., Oct. 26, 1939. France.. 


26, 319. 45 


23, 647. 66 


1, 393. 60 


3. 296. 31 


230.00 


1,378.19 


Anthracite Relief Committee, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Sept. 














8, 1939. Poland 


11,427.14 


7, 000. 00 


4, 138. 69 


None 


None 


288. 45 


Anzac War Relief Fund, New York, N. Y., May 23, 














1940. Australia and New Zealand 


14. 057. 91 


8, 442. 78 


3, 607. 67 


None 


None 


2, 007. 46 


Associated Polish Societies Relief Committee of Web- 












ster, Mass., Webster, Mass., Sept. 21, 1939 Poland... 


3, 059. 30 


2,900.00 


147. 10 


None 


None 


12.20 


Associated Polish Societies' Relief Committee of Worces- 














ter, Mass., Worcester, Mass., Sept. 14, 1939. Poland. . 


11,232.97 


9, 266. 46 


1,513.42 


1,430.00 


None 


453. 10 


Association of Former Juniors in France of Smith Col- 














lege, New York, N. Y., Dec. 18, 1939. France 


303. 60 


226. 00 


78.60 


None 


None 


None 


Association of Former Russian Naval Officers in Amer- 














ica, Long Island City, N. Y., Feb. 21, 1940. France.. 


330. 41 


254.30 


57.40 


None 


None 


18.71 


Association of Joint Polish-American Societies of Chel- 














sea, Mass., Chelsea, Mass., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland.... 


2, 740. 68 


1,456.10 


1, 130. 47 


725.00 


None 


154.01 


L' Atelier, San Francisco, Calif., Jan. 29, 1940. France.. 


17, 733. 74 


15, 298. 98 


1,465.03 


2,617.88 


None 


969.73 


Mis. Mark Baldwin, New York, N. Y., Mar. 4, 1940. 














France 


1,456.03 


1,362.00 


6.87 


30.00 


None 


97.16 


Basque Delegation in the United States of America, 














New York, N. Y., Dec. 19, 1939. France 


2,213.13 


975. 00 


1, 030. 77 


None 


None 


207.36 


Belgian Relief Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y., June 14, 










1940." Belgium, Fiance, and England 


33, 531. 92 


9, 339. 36 


12,003.92 


18, 36& 00 


176. 00 


12, 188. 64 


Belgian Relief of Southern California, Los Angeles, 










Calif., May 27, 1940. Belgium, France, and Great 














Britain 


6, 005. 41 


3, 767. 33 


230. 67 


33, 182. 60 


None 


2, 017. 41 


Belgian War Relief Fund, Manila, P. I., June 7, 1940. 














Belgium... 


2,171.62 


2, 069. 80 


99.32 


360.00 


None 


2.50 


The Benedict Bureau Unit, Inc., New York, N. Y., 














Nov. 29, 1939. France 


5,481.17 


4, 426. 74 


46. 00 


None 


None 


1,008.43 


Bethel Mission of Eastern Europe, Minneapolis, Minn., 














Nov. 27, 1939. Poland 


15,695.01 


10, 966. 40 


140. 05 


None 


None 


4, 489. 66 


Bishops' Committee for Polish Relief, Washington, 














D. C, Dec. 19, 1939. Poland, England, France, and 














Italy.. 


396, 580. 59 


308. 324. 31 


88 193 55 


None 


None 


62.73 


Board of National M issions of the Presbyterian Church 






<J^f iuv, v^f 








in the United States of America, New York, N. Y., 














Sept. 26, 1939. Cinat Britain, France, and Germany. 


6, 944. 85 


6. 331. 30 


866. 72 


None 


None 


746. 83 


British-American Ambulance Corps, Inc., New York, 














N. Y., June 11, 1940. Greece, England, and France.. 


1,123,609.31 


608, 827. 18 


468,439.24 


None 


None 


116, 342. 89 


British-American Comfort League, Quincy, Mass., 














Feb. 21, 1940. England 


3,672.54 


2, 069. 60 


1, 245. 92 


None 


None 


367. 02 


British-American War Relief Association, Seattle, 










Wash., Nov. 17, 1939. United Kingdom and allied 














countries _ 


66, 617. 46 


69, 721. 61 


3, 648. 62 


11,793.00 


882 65 


3, 347. 43 


The British Legion, Inc., Detroit, Mich., Feb. 26, 1941.' 












Great Britain 














British Sailors' Book and Relief Society, New York, 














N. Y., May 2, 1940. Bermuda, Canada, and the 














British West Indies 


3, 773. 73 


126. 00 


72.71 


16, 944. 65 


226.00 


3, 676. 02 


British War Relief Association of Northern California, 




San Francisco, Calif., Oct. 20, 1939. Great Britain 














and France 


211,338.32 


178, 476. 48 


28, 638. 09 


84, 028. 13 


None 


4, 224. 75 



" The registration of this organization was revoked on Feb. 10, 1941, at the request of registrant. 
' No report has been received from this organization. 



APRIL 26, 1941 



501 



Contributions fob Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name o( registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds re- 
ceived 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Mar. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



The British War Relief Association of the Philippines, 
Manila, P. I., Apr. 11, 1940.' France, Germany, Po- 
land, United Kingdom, India, Australia, Canada, 
New Zealand, and the Union of South Africa 

The British War Relief Association of Southern Califor- 
nia, Los Angeles, Calif., Dec. 8, 1939. Great Britain 
and Greece 

British War Relief Fund, Dayton, Ohio., Sept. 12, 1940. 
Great Britain 

The British War Relief Society, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Dec. 4, 1939. United Kingdom, Canada, France, Bel- 
gium, the Netherlands, Norway, and Greece 

Bundles for Britain, New York, N. Y., Dec. 28, 1939. 
Great Britain and Dominions... 

Caledonian Club of Idaho, Boise, Idaho, Jan. 25, 1940.t 
Scotland 

California Denmark Fund, San Francisco, Calif., Nov. 
20, 1940. Denmark.- 

Callard of London, Chicago, 111., Mar. 13, 1941. Great 
Britain. 

Canadian Women's Club of New York City, Inc., New 
York, N. Y., Oct. 23, 1940. Great Britain and Canada. 

Catholic Medical Mission Board, Inc., New York, N. Y.. 
Jan. 17, 1940. India. Australia, Canada, New Zealand, 
and the Union of South Africa.. 

The Catholic Student War Relief of Pax Romans, 
Washington, D. C, Dec. 13, 1939. Poland, France, 
Germany, and Great Britain 

Central Bureau for the Relief of the Evangelical Churches 
of Europe, New York, N. Y., May 14, 1940. All bel- 
ligerent countries 

Central Committee Knesseth Israel, New York, N. Y., 
Oct. 27, 1939. Palestine 

Central Committee for Polish Relief, Toledo, Ohio, 
Feb. 29, 1940.1 Poland 

Central Council of Polish Organizations, New Castle, 
Pa., Nov. 7, 1939. France, Poland, and England 

Cercle Fran^aisde Seattle, Seattle, Wash., Nov. 2, 1939. 
France and Great Britain 

Comit§ Pro Francia Libre, San Juan, P. R., Dec. 19, 
1940. England and France 

Commission for Polish Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 12, 1939.11 Poland and England 

The Commission for Relief in Belgium, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., May 21, 1940. Belgium, Luiemburg, France, 
and England 

Committee of French-American Wives, New York, 
N. Y., Nov. LI, 1939. France and Great Britain. 

Committee of Mercy, Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 18, 
1939. France. Great Britain, Norway, Belgium, the 
Netherlands, and their allies 



$108,417.60 

395, 800. 02 
394. 55 

6, 910, 209. 28 

1, 379, 804. 44 

964. 87 

765. 71 

None 

5, 869. 80 

1.074.26 

1,912.76 

45, 628. 21 

45. 906. 80 

859. 66 

3, HO. 62 

8, 538. 32 

2, 660. 92 

696, 016. 46 

13, 815. 92 
28, 739. 92 

77, 479. 93 



$99, 573. 86 

328, 031. 63 
381.00 

4, 108, 909. 16 

686, 245. 75 

800. 30 

None 

None 

3, 889. 74 

None 

1, .574. 63 

25, 679. 75 

30, 294. 50 

500.00 

1,995.80 

3, 294. 92 

1,000.00 

613,439.28 

9, 165. 00 
21,320.95 

49, 199. 95 



$2, 399. 87 

20, 628. 99 
4.35 

2, 279, 425. SO 
416, 703. 12 
None 
711.87 
None 
325. 77 

1.074.25 

12S.22 

12, 984. 57 

None 

132. 39 

1, 088. 60 

764.39 

1,446.65 

21, 185. 37 

1,866.92 
3,412.71 

16, 492. 25 



$538. 50 

139, 606. 50 
None 

1, 088, 778. 40 

1, 255, 614. 14 

None 

None 

None 

1,513.62 

3, 820. 00 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 

2, 775. 00 
None 

1, 600. 00 

None 
5, 781. 14 

7, 190. 00 



$41.87 

34. 50 
None 

159, 602. 46 
24, 818. 75 
None 
None 
None 
26.25 

9.50. 00 

None 



$6, 443. 87 

47, 139. 40 
9.20 

621,874.32 

276. 865. 67 

164. 57 

63.84 

None 

1, 654. 29 

None 

209. 91 



None 


6,963.89 


None 


15, 612. 30 


None 


227.27 


None 


46.12 


None 


1,479.01 


None 


214. 27 


None 


61,391.81 


None 


2, 784. 00 


212. 70 


4,006.26 


None 


11,787.73 



•No reports for the months of February and March have been received from this organization. 

tNo report for the month of March has been received from this organization. 

tThe registration of this organization was revoked on Mar. 31, 1941, at the recjuest of registrant. 

IIThis registrant serves primarily as a clearing-house for the distribution abroad of contributions collected by other registrants; these receipts and 
disbursements are not included in the figures here given, since they are shown elsewhere in this tabulation following the names of the original colle( ling 
registrants. 



502 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in ]Jelligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds re- 
ceived 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Unexpended 

balance as of 
Mar. 31, 1941, 
including cost 

of goods pur- 
chased and 

still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 


Funds spent 
for adrainis. 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Committee for Eelief in Allied Countries, Washington, 
D. C, Feb. 2, 1940. France, Great Britain, Poland, 
Norway, Belgium, Lu.\emburg, and the Netherlands. 

Committee for the Relief for Poland, Seattle, Wash., 
Nov. 24, 1939. Poland 

Committee Representing Polish Organizations and 
Polish People in Perry, N. Y., Perry, N. Y., Oct. 23, 
1939. Poland .-. 


$4,623.03 
2,441.83 

197.00 

52, 381. 96 


$2, 500. 00 
2, 162. 72 

197.00 

36, 175. 28 


$217.43 
23.40 

None 

14, 309. 79 


None 
None 

None 

$35,160.00 


None 
None 

None 

None 


$1,805.00 
255. 71 


Czechoslovak Relief, Chicago, 111., July 25, 1940. Czecho- 
slovakia, Great Britain and Dominions, France, and 


1,896.89 


District of Columbia Federation of Women's Clubs, 




Washington, D. C, Aug. 14, 1940.1 Great Britain.... 

Dodecanesian League of America, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Dec. 16, 1940. Greece 


2, 385. 87 
14. 554. 02 


1,983.19 
13. 155. 50 


None 
821.00 


None 
None 


None 
None 


402. 68 
577. 52 


The Emergency Aid of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa., 
Oct. 13, 1939." Great Britain, France. Norway, Bel- 




gium, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, and Greece 

Emergency Relief Committee for Kolbuszowa, New 
York N Y Mar 13, 1940 t Poland 


100,194.45 
6, 934. 77 

12, 249. 45 


71.771.73 
None 

10, 500. 70 


10, 678. 44 
3,954.97 

None 


11,783.93 
None 

None 


None 
None 

None 


17,744.28 
2 979 80 


Emergency Rescue Committee, New York, N. Y., Aug. 
3, 1940. France, United Kingdom, Belgium, Norway, 


1,688.75 


English-.Speaking Union of the United States, New 
York, N. Y., Dec. 26, 1939. Great Britain, Canada, 
France, Norway, Belgium, Lu.vemburg, the Nether- 




lands, Germany, and the Union of South .\frica 

Erste Pinchover Kranken Unterstuzungs Verein, Inc., 


143.034.02 


123, 485. 75 


12, 267, 92 


164,747.46 


$644. 42 


7, 280. 35 


Brooklyn, N. Y., Apr. 22, 1940.t Poland . 


275.00 


None 


275.00 


None 


None 


None 


Esco Fund Committee, Inc., New York, N. Y., Feb. 13, 




1941. Great Britain 


14,703.50 


12,174.66 


1, 295. 35 


None 


None 


1 233 49 


Ethiopian Redemption Committee, Inc., Chicago, 111., 
Mar. 13, 1941.11 Ethiopia 




Ethiopian World Federation, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Dec. 21, 1940. Ethiopia and Great Britain 


213. 10 
6,722.39 
9, 328. 32 

6, 786. 64 


None 
5, 723. 20 
7, 900. 63 

4,401.16 


213. 10 
515. 93 
538. 50 

1, 937. 94 


None 

None 

3, 200. 00 

1,628 43 


60.00 
None 
100.00 

None 


None 


The Fall River British War Eelief Society, Fall River, 
Mass., Sept. 26, 1940. Great Britain 


483. 26 


Federated Council of Polish Societies of Grand Rapids, 
Mich., Grand Rapids, Mich., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland. 

Federation of Franco-Belgian Clubs of Rhode Island, 
Woonsocket, R. I., Nov. 15, 1939. France and Eng- 


889. 19 
447. 54 


Federation of French Veterans of the Great War, Inc., 
New York, N. Y., Oct. 11, 1939. France and Ger- 




many. 


12, 634. 43 


10,621.09 


1 , 360. '20 


1,864.70 


None 


653. H 


Federation of the Italian World War Veterans in the 




X'. S. A., Inc , New York, N. 'i , Dec 19, 1940. Italy.. 
Fellowship of Reconciliation, New York, N. Y., Jan. 20, 
1940. France, England, and Germany 


226.847.55 

1, 232. 96 

1,088,335.87 

163,843.29 


212, 882. 50 

.531.21 

886,854.62 

91, 722. 31 


13,312 91 

701. 75 

74, 574. 58 

29,211.20 


None 
None 
None 
None 


None 
None 
None 
None 


6.52. 14 
None 


Fortra, Incorporated, New York, N. Y., Mar. 7, 1940. 
Germany and Poland 


r26 906 67 


Foster Parents' Plan for War Children, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Sept. 21, 1939. France and England 


4'2, 909 78 



TThe registration of this orpanizatiun was revoked on Mar. 29, 1941. at the request of registrant. 
*No complete report for the month of March has been received from this orcanization. 
tNo report for the month of March has been received from this organization. 
iThe registration of this organization was revoked on Nov. 30, 1940, at the request of registrant. 
No report has been received from this organization. 



APRIL 26, 1041 



503 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — ContiiuRHl 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds re- 
ceived 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Mar. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Franco-American Federation, Salem, Mass., July 9, 

1940. • France -.. -.. 

Franco-British Relief, Baltimore, Md., Mar. 16, 19411 

Great Britain. __ _ 

Free French Relief Committee, New York, N. Y., 

Feb. 3, 1941. England, French Cameroons, and 

Belgian Congo - 

French Colonies War Relief Committee, New York, 

N. Y., Aug. 20, 1940. France 

French Committee for Relief in France, Detroit, Mich., 

Oct. 17, 1939. France and Great Britain. 

French Relief Association, Kansas City, Mo., Feb. 3, 

1940. France - 

French War Relief, Inc., Los Angeles, Calif., Nov. 16, 

19.39. France 

French War Relief Fund of Nevada, Reno, Nev., Jtme 

21, 1940. France 

French War Relief Fund of the Philippines, Manila, 

P. I., May 1, 1940.* France _ 

French War Veterans, Los Angeles, Calif., Dec. 5, 1939. 

France 

Friends of British Relief, Inc., Baltimore, Md., Mar. 7, 

1941. t Great Britain 

Friends of Children, Inc., New York, N. Y., June 13, 

1940. Great Britain, France, Belgium, and the 

Netherlands.- 

The Friends of Israel Refugee Relief Committee, In- 
corporated, Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 23, 1939. Canada, 

France, and England 

Friends of Poland, Chicago, 111., Dec. 6, 1939. Poland- . 
Fund for the Relief of Men of Letters and Scientists of 

Russia, New York, N. Y., Apr. 29, 1940. France and 

Poland - - 

Gamma Phi Beta International Sorority, Washington, 

D. C, Mar. 11, 1941.11 Great Britain 

German-American Conference, New York, N. Y., Mar. 

11, 1941. Canada and the British West Indies 

German-American Relief Committee for Victims of 

Fascism, New York, N. Y., Apr. 18, 1940. Great 

Britain and France... 

Mrs. George Gilliland, New York, N. Y., Aug. 10, 1940. 

Northern Ireland 

Golden Rule Foundation, New York, N. Y.j Nov. 2, 

19.39. Poland and Palestine 

Grand Duke Vladimir Benevolent Fund Association, 

New York, N. Y., Jan. 8, 1940. France.... 

Grand Lodge, Daughters of Scotia. Hartford, Conn., 

Feb. 16, 1940. Scotland- 

Great Lakes Command, Canadian Legion of the British 

Empire Service League, Detroit, Mich., July 5, 1940. 

Great Britain and Canada 



$636. 30 



$300. 00 



$336. 30 



None 



None 



1,914.59 



None 



14, 867. 21 



9, 691. 25 


6, 275. 84 


400.10 


None 


4, 529. 77 


2, 473. 96 


1, 195. 71 


491. 33 


44.371.22 


30, 968. 54 


None 


None 


5, 658. 46 


600.00 


822. 81 


507. 76 


8, 577. 62 


8, 049. 67 


28,985.65 


14, 850. 44 


20, 565. 46 


6, 250. 81 


1, 443. 10 


680.00 



631.95 



None 



3, 845. 69 


1,907.31 


209.25 


194. 25 


937. m 


937. 00 


655.38 


370.79 


R. 196. 37 


16,034.70 



9, 607. 70 



4, 130. 39 
175.83 

1, 669. 77 
475. 97 

5, 401. 51 

None 

6, 048. 46 

143.40 

None 

2, 807. 36 



7, 195. 79 
668.43 



604.28 



None 

697. 07 

16.00 

None 

148, 14 

3.161.67 

2, 85S. 00 



$1, 706. 99 
None 
31,110.23 
2, 837. 17 
257. 89 
None 
None 
None 
None 

41, 923. 91 



None 
None 



None 



None 

242. 25 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 



* No report for the month of March ha.4 been received from this organization. 

iNo complete report has been received from this organization. 

iThe registration of this organization was revoked on Mar. 31, 1941, at the request ol registrant. 

lINo report has been received from this organization. 



$1,073.60 
None 
972.61 
280.83 
83.20 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 



None 
None 



None 



None 



None 



Nono 



$284. 52 
224. 27 
386. 04 
228.41 
8, 001. 17 
None 
10.00 
171. 66 
528.05 

11,327.86 



7,118.86 
94.67 



None 



82.00 


1,311.21 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


36.45 


None 


None 



2,391.61 



504 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds re- 
ceived 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Unexpended 

balance as of 
Mar. 31, 1941, 
including cost 

of goods pur- 
chased and 

still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
Ucity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Greater New Bedford British War Relief Corps, New 
Bedford , Mass. . Dec. 19, 1939. Great Britain - _ _ 


$21,708.13 

10.047.81 

3, 435, 820. 27 

1, 273. 796. 01 

344. 727. 88 

191. 6C 

120,914.06 

5, 120. 84 
None 

35, 632. 14 

20, 204. 63 

3, 903. 76 

5, 507. 59 

1,924.78 

60.00 

210, 110. 10 

73.00 
None 

13, 498. 89 
321.50 

11,915.92 

11,842.10 
232.25 

1, 222. 21 
9,191.13 


$19, 864. 70 

9, 500. 00 

3. 002, 646. 66 

967,601.70 

270, 209. 23 
95.25 
None 

4, 625. 00 
None 

IS. 467. 34 
14,07.6.31 
3, 360. 00 
3, 482. 80 
None 
None 

100, 432. 81 

73.00 
None 

9, 171. 03 
None 

8, 906. 00 

10.000,00 
180.25 

892. 85 
8. 906. 20 


$1,243.07 

492. 98 

275. 965. 55 

253, 379. 46 

None 
86.91 

9.6, 019. 78 

None 
None 

5, 147. 85 
.^ 94.1. 31 
467.91 
2, 003. 67 
1, 924. 78 
45.00 

96, 549. 75 

None 
None 

None 
275.25 

973. 89 

156. 02 
41.44 

None 
None 


$2, 125. 93 

None 

342, 755. 40 

83, 734. 77 

None 
None 
None 

None 

None 

None 
773.06 
185. OO 
2, 476. 00 
None 
None 

None 

None 
None 

2, 020. 00 
None 

None 

None 
None 

None 
None 


None 

None 

None 

$3, 850. 28 

None 
None 

None 

None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 

None 
None 

None 
None 

None 

None 
None 

None 
None 


$610.36 


The Greek Fur Workers Union, Local 70, New York, 


54.83 


Greek War Relief Association, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Nov. 18,1940. Greece - - 

Hadassah, Inc., New York, N. Y., Nov. 15, 1939. Pales- 


157, 309. 17 
62, 914. 86 


Hamburg-Bremen Steamship Agency, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Mar. 21, 1940. Germany, Poland, France, Bel- 
gium, Norway, Luxemburg, and the Netherlands 

Hands Across the Sea Helpers Association, Brooklyn. 
N Y., Mar. 11, 1941. United Kingdom 


77,981.70 
9.50 


Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., Aug. 30, 1940. 
Great Britain - .- 


25, 894. 28 


Hebrew-Christian Alliance of America, Chicago, 111., 
Jan. 3, 1940. England, Germany, Poland, France, and 
Italy - -- 


496. 84 


Hellenic World Newspaper Co., Boston, Mass., Feb. 10, 
1941 Greece 


None 


Bias Immigrant Bank, New York, N. Y., Feb. 12, 1941. 
Poland, Czechoslovakia, the Netherlands, Belgium, 
France, and Germany- _ -- -- 

A. Seymour Houghton. Jr., el al.. New York, N. Y., 


1,916.95 
185.88 


Humanitarian Work Committee, Glen Cove, N. Y., 
Sept 30, 1939. Poland 


75.85 


Independent British War Relief Society of Rhode Island, 
Greenwood, R. I., June 14, 1940. Great Britain 

Independent Kinsker Aid Association, New York, 
N. Y., Jan. 3. 1940. Poland . _.. 


21.12 
None 


International Children's Relief Association, New York, 
N. Y., Oct. 1, 1940. Great Britain 

International Committee of Yoimg Men's Christian 
Associations, New York, N. Y., Sept. 22, 1939. United 
Kingdom, Canada, Poland, France, India, Norway, 


15.00 
13, 027. 54 


International Federation of Business and Professional 
Women, Wheeling, W. Va., July 5, 1940.! Poland, 
Norway, Belgium. France, and the Netherlands 

International Home for Refugees, New York, N. Y., 
Mar. 11, 1941. England, Poland, and France 


None 
None 


International Relief Association for Victims of Fascism, 
Now York, N. Y., Sept. 25, 1939. France, England, 


4, 327. 86 


Isthmian Pro-British Aid Committee, Ancon, C. Z., 


46.25 


Joint Committee of the United Scottish Clans of Greater 
New York and New Jersey, Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan. 30, 
1940. Scotland 


2, 036. 03 


Junior Relief Group of Te.xas, Houston. Tex., May 29, 
1940. United Kingdom, France, Netherlands, Bcl- 


1 , 686. 08 


Marthe Th. Kahn, New York, N. Y., Apr. 16, 1940. 
France 


10. 56 


The Kindergarten Unit. Inc., Norwalk, Conn., Oct. 3, 
1939. France. Poland, United Kingdom, India, Aus- 
tralia, and New Zealand 


329. 36 


The Kosciuszko Foundation, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
May 24, 1940. Poland -_ 


836. 06 



'No report for the month of March has been received from this organization. 



APRIL 26, 1941 



505 



CoNTKiBUTioNs FOE Reliep IN BELLIGERENT CotTNTRiES — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds re- 
ceived 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Mar. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



The Kyflhaeuscr. League of Oerman War Veterans in 
U. S. A., Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 27, 1939. Poland, 
Germany, Canada, and Jamaica 

Lackawanna County Committee for Polish Relief, 
Scranton, Pa., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland 

Ladies Au.\iliary of the Providence Branch of the Fed- 
eration of the Italian World War Veterans in the 
United States, Providence, R. 1., Oct. 1, 1940. Italy . 

LaFayette Preventorium, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 21, 1939. France 

La Franco Post, American Legion, New York, N.Y., 
Feb. 7, 1940. France, Great Britain, and Greece 

Mrs. Nancy Bartlett Laughhn, New York, N. Y., Jan. 
31, 1940. France 

League of American Writers, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
May 6, 1940. France, England, Poland, and Nor- 



way.. 



League of Polish Societies of New Kensington, Arnold, 
and Vicinity, New Kensington, Pa., Nov. 17, 1939. 
Poland 

Legion of Young Polish Women, Chicago, 111., Oct. 2, 

1939. Poland, France, Great Britain, Germany 

Liberty Link Afghan Society, Detroit, Mich., Dec. 17, 

1940. Great Britain 

Lithuanian National Fund, Brooklyii, N. Y., Dec. 14, 

1940. Germany and France 

Lithuanian Relief Committee for the Aid of Lithuanian 
Victims of Tyranny and War, New York, N. Y., Feb. 
25, 1941. Great Britain, Germany, France, and Italy.. 

The Little House of Saint Pantaleon, Philadelphia, Pa., 
Sept. 30, 1939. France and England 

The Maple Leaf Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y., Apr. 19, 
1940. Canada, United Kingdom, and France 

Medical and Surgical Relief Committee of -America, New 
York, N. Y., Aug. 5, 1940. Poland, Great Britain, 
France, Netherlands, Norway, Luxemburg, Belgium, 
and Greece 

Mennonite Central Committee,' Akron, Pa., Feb. 13, 
1940. Great Britain, Poland, Germany, France, Can- 
ada, and the Netherlands 

Methodist Committee for Overseas Relief, New York, 
N. Y., Sept. 4. 1940. France, Poland, Norway, Bel- 
gium, the Netherlands, United Kingdom, India, Aus- 
tralia, Canada, Germany, Greece, and Italy. 

Mid-European Food Package Service, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Jan. 24, 1941. Germany, Poland, and Luxem- 
burg.. 



Milford, Conn., Polish Relief Fund Committee, MU- 
ford. Conn., Nov. 6, 1939. Poland 

The Mobile Circle for Benefit of the Royal Navy Hos- 
pital Comforts Fund, Mobile, Ala., Sept. 18, 1940. 
British Isles 

Monmouth War Relief, Red Bank, N. J., Sept. 12, 
1940. England, France, and Greece 

Montagu Club of London, New York, N. Y., Mar. 3, 
1941.* Great Britain 

The Mother Church, the First Church of Christ, Scien- 
tist, in Boston, U.S.A., Boston, Mass., Apr. 25, 1940. 
Canada, France, and the United Kingdom 

Fernanda Wanamaker Munn (Mrs. Ector Munn), 
New York, N. Y., Nov. 25, 1939. France and Eng- 
land 



$'.13. 17.S. 21 
9, 527. 57 

7, 047. 68 
20, 936. 22 

1, 585. 32 
606. 00 

3, 744. 83 

2, 964. 19 
16, 790. 39 

2,018.45 
401.99 

113.03 
37, 195. 53 
140, 542. 29 

49, 326. 73 
58, 279. 09 

22, 779. 59 

162,5.83.86 
406. 33 

4, 724. 29 
7, 421. 65 



$78, 704. 20 

7, 225. 56 

7, 026. 57 

8, 662. 53 

1, 040. 00 
606.00 

2, 292. 72 

I, 498. 24 

11,272.05 

None 

200 00 

None 
32,920.11 
46, 134. 67 

12, 962. 84 
36, 865. 34 

19, 538. 84 

99, 829. 26 
250. 20 

3,124.29 

3, 521. 19 



$3,252.12 
1, 470. 21 

21.11 

7,651.87 

159. 53 

None 

None 

1, 029. 24 

2, 612. 97 

2,018.45 

185.99 

95.48 

4,179.86 

61,400.55 

21, 364. 15 
13, 694. 40 

None 

34, 667. 94 
70.51 

1, 507. 70 

2, 830. 07 



$13,410.79 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 

15.18 

2, 400. 00 
None 
None 
None 

None 

25, 657. 54 

203, 186. 91 

154,571.30 



None 

None 
None 

1,374.64 
960.00 



265, 669. 54 



16, 438. 44 



9, 425. 40 



199, 204. 40 



1, 408. 44 



225, 429. 1 



7, 765. ; 



None 


$11,221.89 


None 


831.80 


None 


None 


None 


4, 621. 82 


None 


385. 79 


None 


None 



None 

None 

None 
None 
None 

None 

$528. 70 

None 

24,441.00 
20,601.40 

None 

None 
None 

None 
None 



14,313.60 



638. 06 



1, 452. 11 

436. 71 

2, 905. 37 

None 
16.00 

17.55 

96.66 

33, 007. 07 

14, 999. 74 
7, 819. 36 

3, 240. 75 

28, 086. 66 
84.62 

92.30 
1, 070. 39 



17,917.93 



6, 604. 60 



HNo report has been received from this organization. 
313038 — 41 3 



506 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds re- 
ceived 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Unexpended 

balance as of 
Mar. 31, 1941, 
including cost 

of goods pur- 
chased and 

still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Namesake Towns Committee, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Jan. 6, 1941. England 

National Christian Action, Inc., Brooklyn, N. Y., May 

23,1940.^ Norway and Denmark 

National Legion Greek-. Vmerican War Veterans in 

America, Inc., New Yorli, N. Y., Jan. ?, 1941. Greece. 
Near East Foundation, Inc., New York, N. Y., Nov. 28, 

1940. Greece 

Netherlands War Relief Committee, Manila, P. I., May 

27, 1940.' Netherlands 

The New Canaan Workshop, New Canaan, Conn., July 

1, 1940. British Empire 

New Jersey Broadcasting Corporation, Jersey City, 

N. J., Sept. 13,1939. Poland--- 

Nicole de Paris Relief Fund, New York, N. Y., July 1, 

1940. France - 

North Side Polish Council Relief Committee of Milwau- 
kee, Wis., Milwaukee. Wis., Dec. 5, 1939. Poland 

Norwegian Relief, Inc., Cliicago, 111., May 1, 1940. Nor- 
way 

Nowiny Publishing Apostolate, Inc., Milwaukee, Wis., 

Sept. 26, 1939. Poland -- -. 

Nowy-Dworer Ladies and United Relief Association, 

New York, N. Y., Doc. 20, 1940. Poland 

Nowy Swiat Publishing Co., Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Sept. 11, 1939. Poland, France, Great Britain, and 

Italy 

The Order of Ahepa, Washington, D. C, Jan. 1, 1941. 

Greece 

Order of Scottish Clans, Boston, Mass., Jan. 25, 1940. 

Scotland 

Over-Seas League Tobacco Fimd, New York, N. Y., 

Aug. 19, 1940. British Empire 

The Pacific Steam Navigation Company, Cristobal, 

C. Z., Oct. 16, 1940. England - 

Paderewski Fund for Polish Relief, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Feb. 23, 1940. Poland and Great Britain 

Paderewski Testimonial Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y., 

Mar. 10, 1941. Great Britain and France 

Parcels for Belgian Prisoner.":, Washington, D. C, Nov. 

12, 1940. Germany --. 

Parcels for the Forces, Inc., New '^'ork, N. Y., Oct. 9, 

1940. Great Britain. -. 

The Paryski Publishing Co., Toledo, Ohio. Sept. 15, 

1939. Poland and Great Britain 

The Pawtucket and Blackstone Valley British Relief 

Society of Rhode Island, Pawtucket, R. L, Feb. 26, 

1940.t Great Britain and Germany 

Pelham Overseas Knitting Circle. Pelham, N. Y., 

Oct. 17, 1940. Scotland 

Phalanx of Greek Veterans of America, Inc., Chicago, 

111.. Jan. 3, 1941. Greece 



$5, 951. 86 

1, 138. 41 

556. 00 

118,433.39 

4, 484. 30 
12,116.97 

1, 210. 55 
227. 00 

2, 302. 97 
478. 388. 29 

5, 580. 91 
2, 548. 13 

28, 270. 04 

122. 280. 73 

19. 839. 35 

111,716.18 

580. 85 

135, 624. 33 

None 

15,498.05 

50, 781. 74 

8, 395. 06 

16, 820. 71 
1,076.82 
7,010.97 



$5, 005. 00 
200. 00 
None 

44,000.00 

1, 253. 87 
10,441.09 

820. 17 

148.00 

2, 088. 16 

71,600.00 

4, 589. 86 

1,881.90 

27, 346, 31 

82, 692. 85 

3, 377. 00 

80,036.11 

567. 85 

75, 000. 00 

None 

2, 423. 00 
32, 907. 12 

7, 584. 48 

9, 529. 41 

726. 51 

5,027.18 



$502, 96 

None 

466. 28 

50, 672. 61 

3, 187. 93 

1,487.02 

None 

28.00 

195. 63 
392, 535. 98 

991. 05 

196. 94 

820. 34 

39, 587. 88 

16, 462. 35 

None 

None 

22, 897. 35 

None 

13, 076. 05 

None 

810.58 

6, 454. 96 

195. 56 

1, 627. 76 



$300.00 
None 
None 
None 
None 

3, 075. 00 
None 
None 

1, 300. 00 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
340.00 
None 
None 
None 
35.40 
None 

None 
342. 64 
None 



None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
$30. 00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
39. 25 
None 



'The registration of this organization was revoked on Feb. 28, 1941, at the request of registrant. 

•No report tor the month of March has been received from this organization. 

tNo complete report for the month of March has been received from this organization. 



APRIL 2 6, 1941 



507 



Contributions fob Relief in Belligfrent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds re- 
ceived 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Mar. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



Polish Aid Fund Committee of Federation of Elizabeth 
Polish Organizations, Elizabeth, N. J., Sept. 23, 1939. 
Poland and England 

Polish Aid Fund Committee of St. Casimir's Roman 
Catholic Church of the City of Albany, N. Y., Al- 
bany, N. Y., Jan. 22. 1940. Poland 

Polish American Associations of Middlesex County, 
N. J., SayreviUe, N. J.. Jan. 22, 1940. Poland 

Polish-American Citizens Relief Fund Committee, 
Shirley, Mass., Dec. 16, 1939. Poland 

Polish-American Council, Chicago, 111., Sept. 15, 1939. 
Poland- 

Polish-American Forwarding Committee, Inc., New- 
York, N. Y., Mar. 28, 1940. Poland and Germany 

Polish-American Volunteer Ambulance Section, Inc. 
(Pavas), New York, N. Y., Feb. 13, 1940. France and 
England 

Polish Broadcasting Corporation, New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 23, 1939. Poland.. ._ 

Polish Business and Professional Men's Club, Los An- 
geles, Calif., Nov. 17, 1939. Poland 

Polish Central Commiitee of New London, Coim., New 
London, Conn., Oct. 13, 1939. Poland 

Polish Central Council of New Haven, New Haven, 
Conn., Sept. 29, 1939. Poland and Germany. 

Polish Civic League of -Mercer County, Trenton, N. J., 
Sept. 19, 1939. Poland 

Polish Civilian Relief Fund, Passaic, N. J., Oct. 27, 
1939. Poland---- 

Polish Falcons Alliance of America, Pittsburgh, Pa., 
Sept. 20, 1939. Pol.ind 

Polish Inter-Organizalion "Centrala" of Waterbury, 
Waterbury, Conn., Feb. 28, 1940. Poland... .- 

Polish Literary Guild of New Britain, Conn., New 
Britain, Conn., Sept. 21, 1939. Poland 

Polish National Alliance of the United States of North 
America, Chicago, 111., Sept. 27, 1939. Poland and 
England 

Polish National Council of Montgomery County, 
Amsterdam, N. Y., Get. 12. 1939. Poland 

Polish National Council of New York, New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 14, 1939. France, Poland, England, and Ger- 
many 

The Polish Naturalization Independent Club, Worce- 
ster, Mass., .Sept. 20, 1939. Poland and England 

Polish Relief of Carteret, N. J., Carteret, N. J., Oct. 11, 
1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Boston, Boston, Mass., 
Sept. 14, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Brockton, Mass., Brockton, 
Mass., Sept. 25, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Cambridge, Mass., Cam- 
bridge, Mass., Sept. 16, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Chester and Delaware 

County, Chester, Pa., Sept. 15, 1939. England 

Polish Relief Committee of Columbia County, Hudson, 

N. Y., Mar. IS, 1940. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Delaware, Wilmington, Del., 

Sept. 22, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee, Detroit, Mich., Sept. 11, 1939. 

Poland, Germany, and Scotland 

Polish Relief Committee of Fitchburg, Fitchburg, 
Mass., Mar. 29, 1940. Poland... , 



$9, 178. 56 

3, 077. 94 
1,057.05 

432. 36 
590, 670. 93 
12, 200. 83 

29, 482. 29 
2, 696. 83 
474. 50 
1,656.18 
4. 434. 12 
8, 934. 79 

4, 666. 62 
12.172.97 

742. 26 

3. 290. 69 

321,788.69 

4, ."193. 36 

112, 239. 31 
4, 710. 83 
1, 480. 67 
10, 083. 94 
1, 966. 31 
3, 082. 73 

8, 367. 06 

None 

9, 277. 73 
164,925.81 

749. 80 



$8, 446. 85 

426.32 

800. 00 

362. 06 

374, 396. 60 

7, 800. 49 

19, 769. 05 

None 

314.23 

1,201.64 

3, 376. 32 

6, 392. 86 

3, 025. 00 

12,162.97 

607. 76 

2, 000. 00 

258, 336. 00 
3. 193. 03 

90, 276. 96 

4, 141. 00 

800.00 

8, 351. 19 

I, 236. 27 

1, 704. 80 

7, 022. 96 

None 

7, 930. 08 

121.646.73 

460. 40 



$716. 71 

2, 642. 02 

176. 23 

45.13 

200, 126. 14 

None 

9, 642. 68 

2, 660. 63 

2.00 

205.97 

1, 006. 54 

2, 539. 69 

1, 289. 20 

None 

108. 99 

1, 277. 69 

61. 065. 74 
1.282.87 

7, 769. 39 
545. 98 
667. 67 

1, 251. 86 
472. 37 
969. 58 
640. 06 
None 

1,099.33 

35, 807. 83 

248. 31 



$1, 600. 00 

I, 200. 00 

None 

425. 00 

118.500.00 

None 

270. 40 
None 
None 
76.00 
1,800.00 
4,000.00 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
8, 000. 00 

393, 354. 00 

None 

46.00 

2, 620. 00 

360. 00 

600. 00 

2, 128. 70 

None 

4, 850. 00 

73, 374. 00 

130.00 



None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 

$174,479.00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
460. 00 
None 
None 



$15.00 

9.60 

80.82 

25.17 

16, 149. 19 

5, 499. 18 

170. 66 
35.30 

158.27 

148. 67 

51.26 

2.34 

251.42 
20. 00 
25. 50 
13.00 

2, 386. 96 
117.46 

14, 192. 96 

23.85 

13.00 

480. 89 

247.67 

408. 36 

694. 04 

None 

248.32 

7,471.25 

41.09 



508 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETEST 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Polish Relief Committee, Flint, Mich., Sept. 18, 1939. 

Poland. — 

Polish Relief Committee of Holyoke, Mass., Holyoke, 

Mass., Nov. 4. 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Jackson, Mich., Jackson, 

Mich., Not. 9, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee, New Bedford, Mass., Oct. 31, 

1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Philadelphia and Vicinity, 

Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 12, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of the Polish National Home 

Association, Lowell, Mass., Nov. 27, 1939. Poland... 
Polish Relief Committee, Taunton, Mass., Dec. 13, 1939. 

Poland 

Polish Relief Fund of Fall River, Mass., Fall River, 

Mass., Nov. 8, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund, Jersey City, N. J., Sept. 12, 1939. 

Poland 

Polish Relief Fund, Jewett City, Conn., Oct. 3, 1939. 

Poland -.. 

Polish Relief Fund of Meriden, Meriden, Conn., Oct. 

12, 1939. PolanrL... 

Polish Relief Fund, Middletown, Conn., Sept. 23, 

1939. Poland ._ _-. 

Polish ReUef Fund, Niagara Falls, N. Y., Oct. 26, 1939. 

Poland 

Polish Relief Fund of Palmer, Mass., Three Rivers, 

Mass., Oct. 20. 1939. Poland _. 

Polish Relief Fund of Syracuse, N. Y., and Vicinity, 

Syracuse, N. Y., Oct. 31, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund Committee, Los Angeles, Calif., 

Dec. 13, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund Committee of Milwaukee, Mil- 
waukee, Wis., Sept. 26, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund Committee of Passaic and Bergen 

Counties, Inc., Passaic, N. J., Sept. 22, 1939. Po- 
land 



Polish Union of the United States of North America, 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Sept. 8, 1939. Poland 

Polish United Societies of Holy Trinity Parish, Lowell, 

Mass., Sept. 20, 1939. Poland , 

Polish War Sufferers Relief Committee (Fourth Ward), 

Toledo, Ohio, Sept. 21, 1939. Poland and Germany.. 
Polish Welfare Council, Schenectady, N. Y., Sept. 22, 

1939.1 Poland , 

Polish White Cross Club of West Utica, Utica, N. Y., 

Oct. 20, 1939. Poland and England -.. 

Polish Women's Fund to Fatherland, Lawrence, Mass., 

Sept. 23, 1939. Poland 

Polish Women's Relief Committee, New York, N. Y., 

Nov. 24, 1939. France, Poland, and Germany 

Polski Komitet Ratunkowy (Polish Relief Fund), 

Binghamton, N. Y., Sept. 25, 1939. Poland and 

England 

Pulaski Civic League of Middlesex County, N. J., 

South River, N. J., Sept. 30, 1939. Poland 

Pulaski League of Queens County, Inc., Jamaica, N. Y., 

Oct. 21, 1939. Poland 



Funds re- 
ceived 



$6, 810. 36 
7, 892. 37 
I, 924. 43 
11, 689. 84 
52, 639. 61 
3, 220. 33 

3, 443. 49 
1, 622. 74 

64, 777. 53 
1, 763. 30 
I, 806. 09 
4, 974. 54 
3. 154. 54 
2, 220. 57 

12, 574. 07 
887. 31 

21, 963. 55 

14, 986. 16 
2, 513. 33 

4, 321. 90 
7, 085. 22 
6, 313. 53 
8, 418. 91 
6, 246. 64 

11,926.15 

5, 073. 54 
639. 29 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$5, 171. 64 

6, 956. 09 

649. 60 

9, 367. 27 

47, 851. 96 
2, 021. 00 

2. 757. 00 
1, 252. 00 

53, 510. 95 
1,521.90 
I. 500. 00 

3, 264. 37 
2, 839. 32 
1, 146. 46 
8, 991. 69 

493. 00 
17, 732. 72 

11,315.10 
2, 150. 00 
3, 816. 31 
6, 712. 36 
5, 270. 35 
6, 647. 05 
3, 175. 40 
4,802.48 

3, 544. 56 
None 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Mar. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



7,862.66 I 7,400.00 

*No report for the month of March has been received from this organization. 



$200. 73 
658. 16 
981. 21 

1, 357. 75 

3, 691. 56 
599. 68 
661. 32 
325. 62 

9, 263. 65 

2.73 

278. 79 

1, 691. 97 
244.52 
847.28 

1.069.49 
193. 75 

2, 920. 01 

1, 891. 42 

363. 33 

336. 88 

264. 74 

985. 86 

1, 198. 59 

2, 373. 90 

3,821.97 

1, 172. 32 
654.29 
290. 41 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 



$416. 45 
I, 109. 10 

750. 00 
4, 350. 00 

None 

None 
1, 375. 00 

None 

1, 675. 00 
900. 00 

None 

None 

None 

4, 404. 95 

1, 850. 00 

150.00 

11,607.40 

4, 008. 00 
None 
1, 240. 00 
None 
6. 150. 00 
1,900.00 
2, 660. 00 

2, 289. 77 

1,215.00 
None 
None 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affaurs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



$25. 65 


$1, 437. 98 


None 


278.12 


None 


293.62 


None 


964. 82 


None 


996.09 


None 


699.65 


None 


25.17 


None 


45.12 


None 


2, 002. 93 


None 


238. 67 


None 


27.90 


None 


18.20 


None 


70.80 


None 


226.83 


None 


2, 512. 89 


None 


200.56 


.500. 00 


1,310 22 


60.00 


1,779.64 


None 


None 


None 


168.71 


None 


118. 12 


None 


57.32 


None 


573.27 


376.00 


697. 34 


149. 71 


3,301.70 


None 


366. 66 


None 


85.00 


None 


172. 15 



APRIL 26, 194 1 



509 



Contributions fob Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds re- 
ceived 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Mar. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind sent 
to countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Queen WUhelmina Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y., May 
17, 1940. Netherlands, France, Poland, United King- 
dom, India, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Union 
of South Africa, Norway, Belgium, Luxembiu-g, and 


$387,798.29 
69, 946. 26 

3, 610. 42 
None 

8,711.89 
25, 467. 32 

4, 661. 66 
960.33 

21,057.16 

17,076.75 

2,397.43 

6,585.43 

2,992.66 

214, 889. 11 

315, 276. 77 
6, 779. 27 

1, 437. 96 
11, 760. 27 
24, 425. 32 

2. .523. 35 
None 

688.70 

85.00 

877. 72 

31, 199. 12 


$186, 949. 56 

30,845.60 

2, 336. 93 

None 

8. 374. 88 

21,. 5.58. 21 

4, 235. 20 

175. 00 

14,111.35 

13, 792. 07 

831.31 

6, 000. 00 

None 

187, 249. 26 

230, 716. 16 
6. 565. 54 
1, 437. 96 
9,975.90 
11,818.30 
1, 751. 47 
None 

550.00 

None 

None 

30, 240 87 


$168,412.41 

20, 487. 64 

1, 028. 37 

None 

327. 01 

2,701.26 

55.60 

490. 51 

5, 402, 74 

1, 0211. 03 

1,214.79 

1,585.43 

2,992.66 

25, 692. 16 

8,054.72 
168. 73 
None 
993.99 

1,921.15 
640. 17 
None 

25.10 
8.5.00 
171. 59 
None 


None 

$12,381.94 

716. 46 

None 

2, 722. 50 

6, 544. 06 

1,250.00 

None 

None 

1,166.20 

Nono 

None 

None 

147, 149. 10 

None 
None 
None 
None 
657. 17 
2,947.60 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 


None 
$200.00 
None 
None 
None 
30.75 
None 
None 
Nono 
4,044.10 
None 
None 
None 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
288.26 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 


$32, 436. 32 

18, 613. 01 

245. 12 


Refugees of England, Inc., New York, N. Y., July 12, 


ReUef Agency for Polish War Sufferers, Willimantic, 


Relief for Children of Britain by Children of America, 
New York, N. Y.. Feb. 6, 1941. Great Britain 

Relief Committee of the United Polish Societies, Chico- 
pee Mass Oct 21, 1939 Poland 


None 
10 00 


Relief for French Refugees in England, Washington, 
D. C, Dec. 26, 1939. France and Great Britain 

Relief Fund for Sufferers in Poland Committee, Keno- 
sha, Wis , Sept. 25, 1939, Poland 


1, 197. 85 
370. 86 


Relief Society for Jews in Lublin, Los Angeles, Calif., 
Dec 13 1939 Poland 


294 82 


Royal Air Force Benevolent Fund of U.S.A., Inc., 
New York, N. Y., Nov. 26, 1940. Great Britain 

Russian Children's Welfare Society, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Sept. 29, 1939. Germany, France, and Poland- 

St. Andrew's (Scottish) Society of Washington, D.C., 
AVashineton D C June 18 1940 Scotland 


1, 543. 07 

2, 863. 65 
351 33 


Samts Constantino and Helen Greek Orthodox Church, 
Washington D C , Dec 23, 1940. Greece 


None 


St. Stephen's Polish Relief Fund of Perth Amboy, N. J., 
Perth Amboy, N J , Sept. 27, 1939. Poland 


None 


The Salvation Army, New York, N. Y., May 23, 1940. 
England, France, Norway, Belgium, and the Nether- 
lands - - 


1, 947. 69 


Save the Children Federation, Incorporated, New York, 
N. Y., Sept. 8, 1939. England, Poland, Belgium, and 


76, 505. 89 


Schuylkill and Carbon Coimties Relief Committee for 

Poland, Frackville, Pa., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland 

Scots' Charitable Society, Boston, Mass., May 9, 1940. 


45.00 


Scottish Clans Evacuation Plan, Port Washington, 
N Y Nov 19 1940 Great Britain 


790.38 


Le Secours Franfais, New York, N. Y., Sept. 11, 1940. 


10,685.87 


Secours Franco-Amfricain— War Relief, Pittsburgh, 

Pa., Nov. 20, 1939. Great Britata..-. 

The Seventh Column, Inc., West Fairlee, Vt., June 12, 


131. 71 


Share a Smoke Club, Inc., Ithaca, N. Y., Nov. 14, 1939. 
England, France, Norway, Belgium, and the Nether- 


113.60 


The Silver Thimble Fund of America, New Orleans, La., 
Feb. 18, 1941. Great Britain 


None 


Sociedades Hispanas Aliadas, San Francisco, Calif., 
Mar. 29, 1940. ^ France . 


706. 13 


Sociedades Hispanas Confederadas, Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Jan. 22, 1940. France 


958. 25 



IIThis registrant serves primarily as a clearing-house for the distribution abroad of contributions collected by other registrants; these receipts and 
disbiu-sements are not included in the figures here given, since they are shown elsewhere in this tabulation following the names of the origical collecting 
registrants. 
^ The registration of this organization was revoked on Jan. 31, 1941, at the request of registrant. 



510 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Coutimied 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 


Funds re- 


Funds spent 
for relief in 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Mar. 31, 1941. 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
In kind now 
on hand 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 


destination of contributions 


ceived 


countries 
named 


in kind sent 

to countries 

named 


licity, affairs, 

campaigns, 

etc. 


Soci6t6 Franfaise de St. Louis, Inc., St. Louis, Mo., 














Nov. 15, 1939. France 


$852. 81 


$373. 49 


$421. 76 


$8.00 


None 


$57. 56 


Socifte Israelite Fran^aise de Secours Mutuels de New 














York, New York, N. Y., June 4, 1940. France 


1,364.46 


710.00 


604.45 


None 


None 


50.00 


Society of the Devotees of Jerusalem, Inc., New York, 














N. Y., Dec. 18, 1939. Palestine 


19, 217. 31 


10,900.00 


62.54 


None 


None 


8, 254. 77 


Solidaridad Internacional Antlfascista, New York, 














N. Y., Oct. 17, 1940. France. 


6. 081. 24 


None 


4, 571. 58 


None 


None 


1,509.66 


The Somerset Workroom, Far Hills, N. J., Apr. 25, 1940. 














France and Great Britain... 


IS. 330. 07 


10, 164. 60 


3, 808. 44 


13. 351. 65 


None 


1. 357. 03 


Le Souvenir Francais, Detroit, Mich., May 1, 1940. 














France and Belgium 


247.00 


175.00 


12.00 


None 


None 


60.00 


Spanish Refugee Relief Campaign, New York, N. Y., 














Sept. 20, 1939. France 


41, 503. 70 


14,454.58 


2,122.89 


16,486.00 


None 


24, 926. 23 


Springfield and Vicinity Polish Relief Fund Committee, 














Springfield, Mass.. Sept. 23, 1939. Poland _ 


1,336.65 


1, 100. 00 


170. 45 


None 


None 


66.20 


Superior Council of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, 














New York, N. Y.. .\pr. 5, 1940. France 


310.00 


310.00 


None 


None 


$500.00 


None 


Miss Heather Thatcher, Hollywood, Calil., Nov. 19, 














1940. Great Britain 


5,809.05 


2, 600. 00 


3,151.66 


None 


None 


57.39 


Toledo Committee for Relief of War Victims, Toledo, 














Ohio, Sept. 19, 1939. Poland 


7, 552. 69 


6, 242. 82 


673. 19 


None 


None 


636.68 


Tolstoy Foundation, Inc., New York, N. Y., Oct. 17, 














1939. France, Poland, and England 


33, 551. 17 


17,898.89 


5, 690. 57 


None 


None 


9,961.71 


Mrs. Walter R. Tuckerman, Bethesda, Md., Nov. 24, 














1939. Great Britain and Greece 


3, 912. 69 


3, 828. 99 


79.75 


None 


None 


3.95 


Edmund Tyszka, Hamtramck, Mich., Sept. 19, 1939. 














Poland 


3, 105. 46 


3,073.96 


31.50 


None 


None 


None 


i. \jit*ij"_*-_ — .,--- ______ — — - _---_----■------., . — 

Ukrainian Relief Committee, New York, N. Y., June 28, 




1940. Germany, France, England, and Italy 


582.26 


353. 46 


17.91 


200.00 


10.00 


210.89 


L'Union Alsacienne, Inc., New York, N. Y., Oct. 28, 














1939. France - 


2,460.40 


1,400.27 


474.66 


315. 00 


None 


585.47 


Unitarian Service Committee of the American Unitarian 




Association, Boston, Mass., May 23, 1940. France, 














British Isles, and the Netherlands 


58, 522. 37 


27, 074. 74 


18,271.98 


1, 100. 00 


None 


13. 175. 65 


United American Polish Organizations, South River, 














N. J., South River, N. J., Oct. 20, 1939. Poland 


3, 788. 63 


2, 400. 00 


1, 251. 59 


None 


None 


136. 94 


United Bilgorayer Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., Mar. 














21, 1940. Poland 


2, 167. 73 


200.00 


1,401.94 


None 


None 


665. 79 


United British Societies of Minneapolis, Minneapolis, 




Minn., Jan. 21, IMl. Great Britain and Dominions. . 


2, 505. 00 


1,500.00 


320.28 


None 


None 


684.72 


United British War Relief Association, Somerville, 














Mass., June 14, 1940. Great Britain... 


8, 634. 32 


6.379.93 


971.06 


725.00 


None 


1, 283. 33 


United Charity Institutions of Jerusalem, New York, 














N, Y., Oct. 13, 1939. Palestine 


81. 460. 28 


46, 023. 86 


123.13 


None 


None 


3,5.313,29 


United Committee for French Relief, Inc., New York, 














N. Y.. Oct. 26, 19.39. France, England, and Germany,. 


132,431.49 


91.600-68 


26.078.66 


S. 987, 42 


408. 65 


14,862 15 


United Fund for Refugee Children, Inc.. Kew York, 














N. Y., Sept. 21, 1939. Poland, France, and England.. 


8, 122. 60 


1,640.89 


None 


None 


None 


6,481.71 


United German Societies, Inc., Portland, Oreg., Port- 














land. Oreg., Jan. 8, 1940. Germany... 


2, 959. 77 


2, 499. 94 


323.84 


None 


None 


135. 99 


United Opoler Relief of New York, New York, N. Y., 














Dec. 9, 1939. Poland 


1,497.98 


100.00 


1.350.41 


None 


None 


47.67 


United Polish Committees in Racine, Wis., Racine, 




Wis., Nov. 2, 1939. Poland 


2, 286. 98 


1,950.00 


101.46 


None 


None 


235.62 


United Polish Organizations of Salem, Mass., Salem, 




Mass., Oct. 20, 1939. Poland... 


2.885.23 


2,295.33 


152.00 


595.00 


Nunc 


437.91 


United Polish Societies of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, 














Calif., Oct. 21, 1939. Poland 


3, 390. 20 


2, 962, 10 


66.38 


None 


None 


361. 72 


United Reading Appeal lor Polish War Suflerers, Read- 














ing, Pa., Sept. 22, 1939. Poland and England 


9, 017. 33 


7, 639. 14 


1, 236. 52 


None 


None 


141. 67 



APRIL 26, 1941 



511 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds re- 
ceived 


Funds spent 

for relief In 

countries 

named 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Mar. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
In kind sent 
to countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


V. S. Friends of Greece, New York, N. Y., Feb. 7, 1941.' 
Greece 


None 
$587. 10 
4, 207. 41 
1, 486. 50 
1, 212. 33 
40.00 
3, 747. 77 

16, 042. 67 
280. 43 

562, 502. 44 


None 
None 
$3, 701. 52 
None 
None 
None 
3, 689. 40 

12, 721. 66 
None 

455, 470. 80 


None 
$31. 18 
195. 79 

1. 486. 50 
160.85 

10.00 
36.58 

2, 838. 69 
183. 40 

None 


None 
None 
$3, 282, 00 
None 
None 
None 
None 

20, 667. 26 
None 

1,343,891.16 


None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 

None 


$3,043.00 
555. 92 
310. 10 
None 
1, 051. 48 
30.00 
21.79 

482. 42 
97.03 

100,200.23 


Universal Committee for the Defense of Democracy, 
New York, N. Y., Oct. 16, 1940. England and France- 
Mrs. Paul Verdier Fund, San Francisco, Calif., Oct. U, 
1939. France 


Vitamins for Britain, Inc., New York, N. Y., Mar. 22, 
1941. Great Britain 


War Relief Association of American Youth, Inc., New 
York, N. Y., Feb. 7, 1941. Great Britain 


Wellesley College Alumnae Association, Wellesley, 
Mass., Jan. 31, 1941. Great Britain 


Woman's Auxiliary Board of the Scots' Charitable 
Society, Inc., Everett, Mass., Feb. 28, 1940. Scotland- 
Women's Allied War Relief Association of St. Louis, 
Clayton, Mo., Dec. 18, 1939. Great Britain and 
France . ..- 


Young Friends of French Prisoners and Babies, New 
York, N. Y., Feb. 28, 1941. France --.- 

Registrants whose registrations were revoked prior to 
Mar. I, 1941, and who had no balance on hand as of 
that date . 




Total* 


30, 303, 833. 05 


21,161,425.67 


6, 190, 950. 77 


6, 540, 368. 64 


442,960.05 


2,968,027.96 





*No report for the month of March has been received from this organization. 

^It is not possible to strike an exact balance in these published totals, since some registrants have included in their expenditures moneys available 
from loans or advances, which are not considered by the Department to be "funds received" and hence arc not reported as such. 



American Republics 



INTER - AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT 
COMMISSION: PERUVIAN COIXNCIL 

[Released to the Press by the Office tor Coordination of Com- 
mercial and Cultural Relations Between the American 
Republics April 23] 

Nelson A. Rockefellei-, Coordinator of Com- 
mercial and Cidtural Relations Between the 
American Republics, announced on April 23 the 
membership of the Peruvian National Council, 
the seventh of 21 councils being established by 
the Inter-American Development. Conamission in 
its program for the .stimulation of trade among 
the American republics. Mr. Rockefeller is 
chairman of the Development Commission. 

The Peruvian Council is headed by Benjamin 



Roca, former Peruvian Minister of Finance. 
The other members include : 

Hector Boza, Vice Chairman. Senor Boza is 
former Minister of Fomento and a leading 
figure in the mining indu.stry of Peru. 

Alfredo Ferreyros, a leading exporter and cot- 
ton merchant. 

Augusto Maurer, President of Sociedad Na- 
cional de Industria. 

Carlos Alayza, engineer and former Minister of 
Fomento. 

Arrangements for the establisliment of the 
Council were completed in Lima, where an ini- 
tial meeting has been held. Similar councils 
composed of outstanding business, professional, 
and technical men have been formed in Brazil, 
Argentina, LTruguay, Paraguay, Chile, and 
Bolivia. 



The Department 



RESEARCH ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURE WITHIN THE 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

ADDRESS BY E. WILDER SPAULDING" 



[Released to the press April 23] 

The National Resources Committee has 
pointed out that most Government research is 
practical — not pure or fundamental. That is 
particularly true of the research conducted in 
the Department of State. For the first century 
of our national life research was generally re- 
garded as a luxury on which public funds should 
not be lavished. It was only in the last decades 
of the nineteenth century that "those hateful 
persons called Original Researchers", as James 
M. Barrie has labeled them, invaded our Gov- 
ernment offices. But they penetrated very slowly 
into the old Department of State building. 

Only a few years ago it was possible for an 
Assistant Secretary like Alvey A. Adee to carry 
in his own memory most of the thi-eads and 
precedents of Amei'ican foreign policy, to ex- 
amine personally every fairly significant deci- 
sion made in the Department, and to advise each 
new Secretary of State when he was running 
counter to established policies. Today foreign 
policy is so complex that the Secretary of State 
could not expect to rely on the memory of any 
one adviser. He must be able to call not only 
upon men \ersed in general departmental prac- 
tice but he must have available experts in nearly 
every brancli of the political and social sciences. 

Burdened as it has been for many years with 
an ever-increasing accumulation of pressing cur- 
rent problems, the Department has been able to 
indulge only in the most practical kind of 
research. Most of it has of course been in the 
obvious fields of American and foreign diplo- 
macy, intei'national law, and economics. The 
Department has been able to operate with a 
modest research staff in these fields largely be- 



" Delivered before the Seventh Conference of Teachers 
of International Law, Washington, April 25, 1941. 

512 



cause its precedents and research sources have 
been so well centralized and organized. 

First and foremost among the sources to be 
consulted when the Department requires back- 
ground for the solution of a given situation are 
the voluminous files of diplomatic, consular, 
and general correspondence in the Division of 
Communications and Records. That Division 
is the central filing office for the entire Depart- 
ment. Divided into nine primary classes its 
files are so carefully organized and subdivided 
that it is possible for the researcher to consult, 
on short notice, all of the Department's corre- 
spondence of the last 35 years on such subjects 
as "fabulous and supposedly fictitious estates" 
in Class 0, documentation of merchandise in 
Class 1, imj^ort trade in Class 6, and financial 
conditions in a given foreign country in Class 8. 
The scores of officers, searchers, and clerks in 
the Division of Communications and Records 
are adept at using the Division's classification 
manual which requires over one hundred pages 
to outline the thousands of categories under 
which the correspondence is filed. 

The Department's Library, which is said to 
have been founded by Jefferson in 1789, is a 
second source for research within the Depart- 
ment. Always a special library, it was for- 
merly devoted largely to foreign and domestic 
law, history, and politics. Its 250,000 titles 
must now include, however, books and periodi- 
cals on nearly every phase of economics and 
even on such subjects as sociology, psychology, 
and personnel management. The Department's 
Library calls constantly upon other libraries in 
Washington for the loan of material needed by 
the Department's staff. The maps and atlases 
which the Department requires are cataloged 
and filed in the Office of the Geographer. 



APRIL 26, 1941 



513 



If a researcher must push his investigations 
into the source material back of 1906 he must 
either go himself to Tlie National Archives to 
consult the earlier diplomatic and consular cor- 
respondence there, or he must borrow the rec- 
ords he needs through the DeiJartment's Divi- 
sion of Researcli and Publication. If he de- 
cides to have them sent to him at the Depart- 
ment he will find that they arrive within half a 
day of the time they are ordered. If he decides 
to go himself to the Archives he will find ex- 
pert assistance awaiting him in the Archives' 
Division of State Department Archives. 

The Depai'tment's researcher can also turn to 
the facilities of other Government agencies in 
Washington — the Library of Congress for gen- 
eral reference and establishments like the De- 
partments of Commerce and Agriculture for 
more specialized assistance. 

It was estimated some time before the inau- 
guration of the great national-defense program 
that while American universities spent approxi- 
mately 25 percent of their budgets on research, 
the Federal Government expended only about 2 
percent of its budget for that purpose. The 
State Department's research costs probably fall 
about midway between the universities' 25 per- 
cent and the Government's 2 percent. It would 
be almost impossible, however, to estimate ex- 
actly what the Department spends each year 
on research. Too many variables are involved. 

It is not even possible to make lists of the 
offices which do or do not conduct research. 
If the mere collection of data is research then a 
majority of the divisions of the Department en- 
gage in it. If pure research is meant then it 
must be admitted that it is not often conducted 
in the Depai'tment of State. Between these two 
extremes there is the practical research which 
involves the evaluation or interpretation, as 
well as the compilation, of the data needed to 
throw light on a given situation. This kind of 
pi'actical research is performed not only in the 
offices and divisions specializing in research but 
also by officers or staff members here and there 
througliout the Department. There is no large 
research pool and the ever-present task of study- 
ing and analyzing the background of current 



problems is in consequence well distributed 
throughout the Department. 

By pointing out that there is no central re- 
search pool I do not mean to suggest that there 
is no consistency in handling such work. The 
pi'ocedure may not be uniform but it is gener- 
ally consistent. Perhaps I can best show what 
I mean by explaining how a typical case might 
be handled. 

Let us assume that the chief of one of the for- 
eign legations at Washington visits the Secre- 
tary of State and presents him with a formal 
note involving American policy with respect to 
a certain leased territory. The Secretary dis- 
cusses the matter with one of his principal ad- 
visers and they decide that no decision should 
be made until the several aspects of the problem 
have been well explored. The I^gal Adviser 
sees at once that there may be complications in 
his phase of the subject, and he therefore as- 
signs one of his lawyers, an Assistant Legal Ad- 
viser, to an examination of the legal problems 
involved. As a matter of fact, the Office of the 
Legal Adviser, with its 20 or 25 lawyers trained 
in all phases of international law and in most 
phases of domestic law, is one of the principal 
research offices of the Department. The law 
room of the Department's Library has been 
placed near the Office of the Legal Adviser in 
order to accommodate Mr. Hackworth's law- 
yers, who also make constant use of the Library 
proper and of the files of the Division of Com- 
munications and Records. The Legal Adviser, 
with the assistance of several members of his 
staff, is now engaged in the compilation of what 
will soon be one of the Department's most useful 
aids to research, the new Digest of Intenmtwnal 
Law. 

When the Assistant Legal Adviser has finished 
his researches his chief, Mr. Hackworth, will 
pa.ss judgment upon his findings and may send 
them to the Secretary of State with a brief cov- 
ering memorandum embodying his recommen- 
dations. 

Meanwhile, the Under Secretary, Assistant 
Secretary, Political Adviser, or Special Assist- 
ant with whom the Secretary had discussed the 
problem has sent the foreign diplomat's note 



514 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



on to the chief of the interested policy division 
with instructions to look into the matter and 
report his recommendations. You will recall 
that there are in the Department four regional 
divisions, the Division of Far Eastern Affairs, 
the Division of the American Republics, the 
Division of European Affairs, and the Division 
of Near Eastern Affairs. In all probability the 
note will go to one of these divisions, whose 
chief will call in one of his subordinates, per- 
haps the man at the particular "count rj' desk", 
and ask him to look very carefully into the 
matter. 

The man at the country desk is very often 
the individual who must do the major share of 
the spade work. If he is a Foreign Service 
officer on duty for three or four years in the 
Department, as many of the country-desk men 
are, he has had abundant expei'ience in working 
on problems like the one we are discussing both 
in the Department and in the field. If he is not 
a Foreign Service officer he has probably served 
for many years in the Department and knows 
how to use the office files, the Department's gen- 
eral files, and the Department's Library; and 
he may be the possessor of an advanced degree 
in international law or relations or economics, 
who has been trained in research at one of the 
country's outstanding universities. Even 
though his desk is clutteied with routine cor- 
respondence, reports, and memoranda, he will 
turn at once to this important problem. He 
will call on the Division of Communications 
and Records for two or three files which he 
knows will contain relevant papers. He will 
send a messenger to the Library for the best 
books in the field. He will consult the reference 
librarian, who will remind liim that they have 
some helpful official documents recently sent to 
the Department by the American Legation in 
the country in question. He will re-read some 
carbons of recent despatches which he has re- 
tained in his own office. He may recall that in 
tlie 1890's there was a parallel case which might 
be illuminating, and he will then call on the 
Division of Research and Publication for some 
account of that earlier incident. The Division 
of Research and Publication may then have to 



call on The National Archives before it can make 
its report. The Legal Adviser's memorandum 
on the case will probably be routed on its way 
to the Secretary of State to the country-desk 
officer, who will be guided by its findings. 

Harassed as he is by a multitude of lesser 
problems, the country-desk officer will manage 
to gather, comjiile, and digest the material he 
has called for, all within two or three days. He 
will then incorporate it into a comprehensive 
memorandum concluding with his recommenda- 
tions and send it on to his division chief. The 
chief will add his comments and he may also 
draft, or have drafted, an appropriate note to 
the Minister who called on the Secretary of 
State. He will then carry or send the file on to 
his superior, who in turn may summarize the 
whole matter in a concise memorandum state- 
ment for the Secretary of State. 

There are desk officers scattered throughout 
the entire Department who, like the hypotheti- 
cal country-desk officer I have mentioned, must 
perforce carry on what we may describe as ad 
hoc research. Most of them are in the so-called 
jjolicy divisions ; some are assistants to the As- 
sistant Secretaries or to the Political Advisers; 
others are in the technical or administrative 
divisions. 

Of the Department's research divisions I have 
so far dwelt only upon the Office of the Legal 
Adviser and the four regional divisions. I shall 
not attempt a roster of all the other divisions 
that engage in research, but some of them should 
be mentioned in order that the research picture 
may be complete in more of its details. 

The Treaty Division not only performs the 
duties of a treaty secretariat but it collects and 
analyzes data regarding the treaties to which the 
United States is a party, and it is always able 
to furnish a fund of information on the back- 
ground of any American treaty or formal inter- 
national agreement. In the same field the small 
Office of the Editor of the Treaties compiles 
and edits the splendid Miller edition of the 
Treaties and Other International Acts of the 
United States of America. The Passport Divi- 
sion has its experts on nationality and citizen- 
ship and a small research section which com- 



APRIL 26, 1941 



515 



piles, maintains, and analyzes precedents, regu- 
lations, legislation, and court decisions in the 
passport and citizenship) field. The Office of the 
Adviser on International Economic Affairs, 
which is responsible directly to the Secretary 
of State, must analj'ze and advise with respect 
to a host of economic pi-oblems. Its trained 
economists not only make use of the innumer- 
able reports on fiscal, trade, and other economic 
subjects sent in by American Foreign Service 
offices abroad, and of the Department's files and 
Library, but they also call continually for sta- 
tistical and informational data upon such 
agencies as the Departments of the Treasury, of 
Commerce, and of Agriculture, and the United 
States Tariff Commission. 

The accent njion economics in the foreign 
policy of recent years is reflected in the work of 
the comparatively large Division of Commercial 
Treaties and Agreements, formerly the Trade 
Agreements Division. Like the rest of the De- 
partment in this period of stress it may have 
but little time for basic research. Yet its econo- 
mists and trade experts are constantly called 
upon for studies and reports on varied phases 
of international commercial policy. If the data 
which its several divisional assistants and ex- 
perts have in their own files is not adequate, and 
if the Department's files and Library do not 
supply their needs, the Division of Commercial 
Treaties and Agreements can turn, as it con- 
stantly does turn, to other branches of the Gov- 
ernment. Wlaen working on trade agreements, 
for instance, it goes to the Tariff Commission 
for data on import items, to the Commerce De- 
partment for data on export items, to the De- 
partment of Agriculture for information on 
agricultural commodities, and to the Treasury 
Department for data on customs and tariff class- 
ifications. All the information thus obtained 
nuist be digested and analyzed for the informa- 
tion of the officers responsible for the conclusion 
of the trade agreement or commercial treaty. 
Much of the groundwork for the trade agree- 
ments is done by the various subcommittees of 
the Interdepartmental Trade Agreements Com- 
mittee, which are virtually little research agen- 
cies in themselves. 



It was Browning who wrote : 

"As is your sort of mind. 
So is your sort of search : you'll find 
What you desire." 

If, to avoid the pitfalls Browning had in mind, 
research should be carefully separated from 
policy-making, then the kind of research we 
conduct in our Division of Research and Pub- 
lication approaches the ideal in that respect at 
least. The Division of Research and Publica- 
tion does researches of a historical and politi- 
cal (but not policy) character. It has a Re- 
search Section of experts with doctoral degrees 
who must examine and digest all of the more 
important of the Department's diplomatic cor- 
respondence preliminary to its compilation and 
printing in the Foreign Relations volumes — 
tliose compilations of basic diplomatic papei-s 
which so often furnish in a few pages the 
whole essential background of a given situa- 
tion. It must utilize the experience acquired 
by its experts in the course of the Foreign Rela- 
tions work by furnishing memoranda and re- 
ports on a varied assortment of historical prob- 
lems. It must search out and line up the papers 
in the Department's files of the 1906-18 period 
which visiting professors and researchers de- 
sire to consult, and it is usually called upon to 
answer the many inquiries on the history of 
American foreign policy that come to the De- 
partment through the mails. The Division of 
Research and Publication maintains the De- 
partment's contacts with The National Archives 
and many of those with the Library of Con- 
gress. In this Division are the Department's 
Library with its trained librarians and the Of- 
fice of the Geographer, whose task is by no 
means an easy one in these days when geogra- 
phy luis ceased to be static or merely political. 
The Geographer must know the best maps and 
atlases in the field, he must be able to construct 
maps wlien they are not obtainable commer- 
cially, and he must be ready to furnish advice 
and well-documented memoranda on all kinds 
of geographical questions from the extent of 
the territorial seas to contested international 
boundaries. 



616 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



I have mentioned above some of the basic aids 
to research and reference which are being com- 
piled in the Department — the annual volumes of 
Foreign Relations of the United States, Mr. 
Hunter Miller's Treaties and Other Interna- 
tional- Acts of the United States of Amenca. 
and Mr. Green H. Hack worth's forthcoming 
Digest of International Law. Occasionally an 
expert on the Department's staff produces a more 
specialized study for publication like Dr. Mar- 
jorie Whiteman's Damages in Inteniatioiud 
Law. At the present time the Research Section 
of the Division of Research and Publication is 



engaged in the compilation of the records of 
American participation in the Paris Peace Con- 
ference, a project which will run into a large set 
of volumes tefore it is completed as a component 
part of the Foreign Relations series. 

Thus the research work performed in the De- 
I^artment is varied both as to method and as to 
character. Certainly in these times of stress, 
when the Department requires adequate back- 
gi"ound for the ever-increasing number of dif- 
ficult problems confronting it, research must be 
constant and far-reaching. 



Cultural Relations 



VISIT OF EDUCATORS FROM BOLIVIA AND CUBA 



[Released to the press April 21 ] 

Dr. Roberto Prudencio, professor of economic 
science at the Univei'sity of La Paz, Bolivia, 
arrived in New York April 21 on the S.S. Santa 
Ele7ia. 

Dr. Prudencio is generally recognized as one 
of the leading litei'ary critics in Bolivia and is a 
leader in the younger literary element. He is a 
prominent member of the Bolivian Committee 
on Intellectual Cooperation and is editor of 
"Kollasuyo", a literary review. He was recently 
elected a member of the Bolivian House of 
Deputies. 

While in the United States at the invitation 
of the Department of State Dr. Prudencio will 
devote himself to studies in the field of literature 
and romance languages and teaching methods 
in those subjects. 

[Released to the press April 26] 

Dr. Raul Maestri Arredondo arrived in Wash- 
ington by air from Habana April 26. Dr. 
Maestri is one of the distinguished leaders of the 
other American rej^ublics invited to visit the 



United States under the current program of 
strengthening cultural relations between the 
United States and those republics. 

Dr. Maestri, who was educated in Cuba, re- 
ceived his degi-ee as Doctor in Public Law in 
1929 and as Doctor in Civil Law in 1937. He 
won a scholarship entitling huu to two years of 
study in Europe between 1929 and 1931. Dur- 
ing this time he also acted as correspondent of 
the important Habana newspaper Diario de la. 
Marina. He subsequently became a member of 
tlie editorial staff of this newspaper and was 
sent to Washington as its sj^ecial correspond- 
ent in 1933. In 1934 he was appointed Secre- 
tary of the Cuban Embassy in Washington, and 
he served in the Ministry of State of the Re- 
public of Cuba from 1935 to 1940. He was sec- 
retary of tlie Cuban delegation to the Eighth 
American Scientific Congress held in Washing- 
ton in 1940. He is now assistant director of the 
Diario de la Marina. 

Works published by Dr. Maestri include the 
follo^^-ing: El Latifundismo en la Economia 
Cuhana, graduation thesis at the University of 



APRIL 2 6, 1941 



517 



Habaiia, 1920; Arango y Parrrfio, El Estadista 
shi E.^tculo, 1937; CapifaUsmo y Anti-capi- 
talismo, 1939; El Conde de Pozos Dulces, 1940; 
translation and prologue of the work of Prof. 
H. von Beckerath of Duke University, N. C. ; 
The Problem of Economy in the Crisis of Cul- 
ture, Santiago de Chile, 1937, etc. He has also 
delivered lectures in the United States at George 
Washington University, Washington, D. C, and 
at the University of Miami, Fla. 

DENTIST FROM UNITED STATES TO 
CONDUCT CLINICS IN SOUTH AMER- 
ICA 

Dr. Roy F. West, of Seattle, Wash., an expert 
in the field of oral surgeiy, will be the guest 
clinician of the American Dental Society in 
Buenos Aires during June and July of this 
year. Dr. W^est, who has conducted dental 
clinics in all of the large cities of the United 
States and Canada, i^lans also to visit Monte- 
video, Uruguay, where a clinic has been ar- 
ranged before the local dental society, and Rio 
de Janeiro, where two clinics will be held. 
Other clinics will be conducted by Dr. West at 
Lima, Peru, and Santiago, Chile. 

He plans to display 4,000 feet of colored mo- 
tion-picture film which he is taking with him, 
showing the various surgical operations of the 
mouth, and 300 colored slides of all the pro- 
caine-local-anesthetic injections and mouth 
surgery. In addition to lecturing. Dr. West 
will do operative work on patients. 

Dr. West, who will be accompanied by Mrs. 
West and by Dr. and Mrs. John Ryan, of Mt. 
Vernon, Wash., will sail the first part of May. 
Dr. Ryan, one of the foremost dentists in the 
State of Washington, is also taking clinical 
material with him in order to give demonstra- 
tions. 

It is hoped that the projected trip of Dr. West 
and Dr. Ryan will contribute in an important 
way to bringing about closer relations among 
the dental groups of this hemisphere. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Reloasod to (he press April 2G] 

The following changes have occui-red in the 
American Foreign Service since April 12, 1941 : 

Career Officers 

George R. Merrell, of St. Louis, Mo., Consul 
at Harbin, Manchuria, has been assigned as 
Consul at Calcutta, India. 

Harold Shantz, of Rochester, N. Y., First 
Secretary of Legation and Consul General at 
Helsinki, Finland, has been designated First 
Secretary of Embassy at London, England. 

Samuel R. Thompson, of Los Angeles, Calif., 
Consul at Cardiff, Wales, has been assigned as 
Consul at Valencia, Spain. 

Herve J. L'Heureux, of Manchester, N. H., 
Consul at Antwerp, Belgium, has been assigned 
as Consul at Lisbon, Poi'tugal. 

Dale W. Maher, of Joplin, Mo., Consul at 
Cologne, Germany, has been assigned as Consul 
at Lyon, France. 

James B. Pilcher, of Dothan, Ala., Second 
Secretary of Embassy at Peiping, China, has 
been assigned as Consul at Amoy, China. 

Sheridan Talbott, of Bardstown, Ky., Consul 
at Valencia, Spain, has been assigned as Consul 
at Cardiff, Wales. 

Edward G. Trueblood, of Evanston, 111., now 
serving in the Department of State, has been 
designated Second Secretary of Embassy at 
Mexico City, Mexico. 

Carl E. Christopherson, of Iowa, now serving 
in the Department of State, has been assigned 
as Consul at Calcutta, India. 

James E. Parks, of Rocky Mount, N. C, 
Consul at London, England, has been assigned 
as Consul at Colon, Panama. 



518 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BXTLLETIN 



Perry Ellis, of Kiverside, Calif., Vice Consul 
at Habana, Cuba, has been assigned as Vice 
Consul at Singapore, Straits Settlements. 

Charles S. Millet, of Eichmond, N. H., Vice 
Consul at Harbin, Manchuria, has been assigned 
as Vice Consul at Shanghai, China. 

William O. Boswell, of New Florence, Pa., 
Vice Consul at Georgetown, British Guiana, has 
been designated Third Secretary of Legation at 
Lisbon, Portugal. 



NoN-CAEEER Officers 

Alfred J. Pedersen, of Boston, Mass., Vice 
Consul at Bilbao, Spain, has been appointed 
Vice Consul at Shanghai, China. 

Charles H. Stephan, of Staten Island, N. Y., 
Vice Consul at Tokyo, Japan, has been ap- 
pointed Vice Consul at Kobe, Japan. 

Henry P. Kiley, of Bridgeport, Conn., Vice 
Consul at Montreal, Canada, has been appointed 
Vice Consul at Port-au-Prince, Haiti. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



COMMERCE 



INTER-AMERICAN COFFEE AGREEMENT 

Guatemala 

By a letter dated April 15, 1941 the Director 
General of the Pan American Union informed 
the Secretary of State that the instrument of 
ratification by Guatemala of the Inter-Ameri- 
can Coffee Agreement was deposited with the 
Union on April 9, 1941. The instrument of 
ratification is dated April 1, 1941. 

Haiti 

By a letter dated April 16, 1941 the Director 
General of the Pan American Union informed 
the Secretary of State that the instrument of 
ratification by Haiti of the Inter-American 
Coffee Agreement signed at AYashington on 
November 28, 1940, was deposited with the 
LTnion on April 8, 1941. The instrument of 
ratification is dated March 25, 1941. 

Allocation of the Quota for Countries Not Sig- 
natories of the Agreement 

On April 21, 1941, the President signed an 
Executive order allocating the coffee quota pro- 
vided under the Inter-American Coffee Agree- 
ment for countries not signatories of the agree- 



ment. This allocation became effective on April 
22, 1941. 

Under the Inter- American Coffee Agreement, 
which became effective with respect to the 
United States on April 16, 1941, quotas have 
been established on imports of coffee into the 
United States from each of the 14 coffee-pro- 
ducing American republics which signed the 
agreement, and on imports from all other for- 
eign countries. LTnder article VII of the agree- 
ment the entry for consumption of coffee in the 
United States from countries which are not 
signatories of the agreement is limited to a basic 
annual quota of 355,000 bags of 60 kilograms 
net or equivalent quantities. The agreement 
provides that all coffee entered for consumption 
in the LTnited States between October 1, 1940 
and September 30, 1941, inclusive, is to be 
charged against the quotas for the first quota 
year. 

Available statistics indicate that if imports 
from the non-signatory countries continue at 
present levels the quota for such countries for 
the current year ending September 30, 1941 will 
be filled in the near future. 

Section 2 of the joint resolution approved 
April 11, 1941 authorizes the President, among 
other things, to allocate the quota for countries 
which are not signatories of the agreement "in 



APRIL 26, 1941 



519 



order to make available the types of coffee usu- 
ally consumed in the United States". 

In order to assure that a part of the quota for 
the non-signatory countries will be available 
during the remainder of the present quota year 
for imports of certain high-quality coffees which 
are needed in the United States for the manu- 
facture of high-grade blends of roasted coffee, 
it has been decided to allocate this quota on the 
basis provided for in the Executive order. 

Under this order 20,000 bags of the 355,000- 
bag quota are reserved for imports of Mocha, 
and 20,000 bags for imports of other Arabica. 
However, in order that an opportunity may be 
furnished for the importation of available types 
of coffee other than Arabica in the event the 
quotas for Arabica coffees are not utilized, the 
allocation will cease at the end of August 1941. 
This will permit the entry of coffee, without re- 
gard to type, during the month of September 
1941, up to the amount of the unfilled quota for 
the non-signatory countries. 

The text of the Executive order follows: 

Executive Order 

Allocating the Quota Under the Inter-Amer- 
ican Coffee Agreement for Countries Not Sig- 
natories OF THE Agreement 

"Whereas under the Inter-American Coffee 
Agreement signed on November 28, 1940, and 
the joint resolution of Congress approved April 
11, 1941 (Public Law 33, 77th Cong., 1st sess.), 
the entry for consumption in the United States 
of coffee produced in countries which are not 
signatories of the Inter- American Coffee Agree- 
ment is limited to a basic annual quota of 355,000 
bags of 60 kilograms net or equivalent quanti- 
ties; and 

Whereas I find that it is necessary to allocate 
tlie said quota in order to make available the 
types of coffee usually consumed in the United 
States: 

Now, THEREFORE, by virtue of the authority 
vested in me by section 2 of the said joint reso- 
lution of April 11, 1941, it is hereby ordered as 
follows : 



1. No more than the following-named quan- 
tities (in bags of 60 kilograms net or equivalent 
quantities) of the types of coffee specified below, 
produced in countries not signatories of the In- 
ter-American Coffee Agreement, may be entered 
for consumption in the United States from the 
effective date of this order to Augu.st 31, 1941, 
inclusive: 

(a) Arabica: 

(1) Mocha, 20,000 bags. 

(2) Other Arabica, 20,000 bags. 

(b) Species other than Arabica: The number 
of bags calculated by deducting from 315,000, 
the number of bags of coffee produced in such 
countries and entered for consumption from and 
including October 1, 1940, to the effective date of 
this order, as determined and made public by 
the Secretary of the Treasury. 

2. This order shall become effective on the day 
following the day it is filed in the Division of the 
Federal Register, the National Archives. 

Franklin D. IIoose\t;lt 
The White House, 
April 21, 1941. 

[No. 8738] 

WOMEN AND CHILDREN 

convention for the suppression of the 
traffic in women of full age 

Turkey 

According to a circular letter from the Acting 
Secretary General of the League of Nations 
dated April 1, 1941, the instrument of adherence 
by Turkey to the Convention for the Suppres- 
sion of the Traffic in Women of Full Age, signed 
at Geneva on October 11, 1933, was deposited 
with the Secretariat on March 19, 1941. 

The convention has been ratified or ad- 
hered to by the following countries: Afghanis- 
tan, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, 
Chile, Cuba, Czechoslovakia, Finland, Greece, 
Hungary, Iran, Ireland, Latvia, Mexico, Nether- 
lands, including the Netherlands Indies, Suri- 
nam and Curagao, Nicaragua, Norway, Poland, 
Portugal, Rumania, Sudan, Sweden, Switzer- 
land, Turkey, and the Union of South Africa. 



520 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTTLLETEN 



NAVIGATION 

AGREEMENT FOR A UNIFORM SYSTEM OF 
MARITIME BUOYAGE AND RULES ANNEXED 
THERETO 

Turhe^j 

By a circular letter dated April 1, 1941 the 
Acting Secretary General of the League of 
Nations informed the Secretary of State that 
the instrument of ratification by Tiu'key of the 
Agreement for a Uniform System of Maritime 
Buoyage and Kules Annexed Thereto, signed at 
Geneva on May 13, 1936, was deposited with 
the Secretariat on March 19, 1941. 

The agreement has been ratified by the fol- 
lowing countries: Belgium, Great Britain and 
Northern Ireland, Egypt, Finland, India, Iran, 
Latvia, Turkey, and the Union of South Africa, 
including the mandated territory of South- 
West Africa. 

HEALTH 

VETERINARY CONVENTIONS 

Turkey 

According to a circular letter from tlie Acting 
Secretary General of the League of Nations 
dated April 1, 1941 the instrument of ratifi- 
cation by Turkey of the following conventions, 
signed at Geneva on February 20, 1935, was de- 
posited with the Secretariat on March 19, 1941 : 

1) Convention for the Campaign Against 
Contagious Diseases of Animals, and 
Declaration annexed thereto ; 

2) Convention Concerning the Transit of 
Animals, Meat, and Other Products of 
Animal Origin; and 

3) Convention Concerning the Export and 
Import of Animal Products (other than 
meat, meat preparations, fresh animal 
products, milk and milk products) . 

The first-named convention has been ratified 
or adhered to by Belgium, Bulgaria, Iraq, 



Latvia, Poland, Rumania, Union of Soviet So- 
cialist Republics, and Turkey. 

The second- and third-named conventions 
have been ratified by Belgium, Bulgaria, Lat- 
via, Rumania, Union of Soviet Socialist Repub- 
lics, and Turkey. 

FLORA AND FAITNA 

CONVENTION ON NATURE PROTECTION AND 
WILDLIFE PRESERVATION IN THE WESTERN 
HEMISPHERE 

G'u<demala 

By a letter dated April 18, 1941 the Director 
General of the Pan American Union informed 
the Secretary of State that the Convention on 
Nature Protection and Wildlife Preservation 
in the Western Hemisphere, which was opened 
for signature at the Pan American Union on 
October 12, 1940, was signed on behalf of Guate- 
mala on April 9, 1941. 

AVIATION 

AGREEMENT WITH MEXICO FOR THE RECIP- 
ROCAL TRANSIT OF MILITARY AIRCRAFT 

The Agreement between the United States 
and Mexico to Facilitate the Reciprocal Transit 
of Military Aircraft through the territories and 
territorial waters of the United States and 
Mexico, which was signed on April 1, 1941, was 
under its terms put into effect on April 25 by 
the exchange of the ratifications of the two 
Governments, made on that day by Under Sec- 
retary of State Sumner Welles and Dr. Fran- 
cisco Castillo Najera, Mexican Ambassador at 
Washington. 

The agi-eement is one of the steps in the co- 
operation between the United States and other 
American republics for the defense of the West- 
ern Hemisphere which have been undertaken in 
view of the present conditions of possible threats 
of armed aggression against the American Con- 
tinent. 



APRIL 26, 1941 



Publications 



Department of State 



521 

can Republics — Signed at Habana December 13, 1937; 
notification of approval by the United States of America 
communicated to the Government of Cuba July 18, 1038. 
Executive Agreement Series 200. Publication 1584. 
lOy pp. 15^. 



Radlocommunlcations : Arrangement and Annex Be- 
tween the United States of America and Other Auieri- 



U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1941 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents - - . . Subscription price, ?2.7o a year 
PUBLI.SHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 




THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 




MAY 3, 1941 

Vol. IV: No. 97— Publication 1598 

Qontents 

General: Pa?e 

Foreign Trade — Two Opposing Systems: Address by 

Raymond H. Geist 525 

American Republics: 

Resolution regarding requisitioning of foreign-flag 

vessels in American ports 531 

Europe: 

Report from Legation in Greece 532 

Property of Greece in the United States 532 

The Far East: 

Visit to Washington of new Chinese Foreign Minister . 532 

The Department: 

Coordination of activities of the Department in admin- 
istration of Lend-Lease Act 532 

Appointment of ofEcers 533 

International Conferences, Commissions, Etc.: 

Eighth Pan American Child Congress 533 

Inter-American Commission on Tropical Agriculture . 534 

Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, Etc.: 

Monthly statistics 535 

The Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 542 

Promotions 543 

[Over] 



U. S. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS 
MAY 15 1941 



Qontents- 



-CONTINUED. 



Publications: Paee 

Hackworth's "Digest of International Law", Volumes 

I and II 544 

Regulations 545 

Treaty Information: 
Aviation: 

Agreement With Mexico for the Reciprocal Transit 

of Military Aircraft 546 

Finance: 

Tax Convention With Canada 546 

Agreement With Finland 547 

Flora and fauna: h 

Convention on Nature Protection and Wildlife | 

Preservation in the Western Hemisphere .... 547 
Naval and military missions: 

Additional Articles to the Agreements of December 
12, 1940, Providing for United States Naval and 

Military Aviation Missions to Ecuador 547 

Telecommunications: 

International Telecommunication Convention, Re- 
visions of Cairo, 1938 547 

Legislation 548 



I 

I 



General 



FOREIGN TRADE— TWO OPPOSING SYSTEMS 

ADDRESS BY RAYMOND H. GEIST ^ 



[Released to the press Jlay 2| 

Mr. President : 

I wish, first of all, to express my appreciation 
of the honor which you have conferred by in- 
viting me to participate in this annual gather- 
ing of the Foreign Trade Club of New York 
Univei-sity, held jointly with Delta Phi Epsilon, 
National Foreign Service Fraternity. It is 
most fitting that young men who are in the uni- 
versities today and will be the leaders of this 
country tomorrow, should have every oppor- 
tunity to evaluate, study, and appraise the is- 
sues involved in the great struggle now going 
on in the world, and to gain, so far as it is pos- 
sible, an accurate conception not only of the 
causes but also some idea of the possible ulti- 
mate results. The subject, like the struggle it- 
self, is so vast and complicated in its elements 
that it is not possible in the space of a short 
address to add much to what has already been 
spoken and written, not only in this country 
but throughout the world. On that account I 
propose to limit what I have to say to a short 
discussion of the foreign trade of the United 
States, particularly how it has been affected 
by the events which jDreceded the outbreak of 
hostilities, how it is affected by the course of the 
war, and finally in what measure the fate of our 
international commerce is bound up with the 
outcome of the conflict. 



' Delivered at the thirteenth annual dinner of the 
Foreign Trade Club of New York University held 
jointly with Delta Phi Epsilon, National Foreign Serv- 
ice Fraternity, New York, N. Y., May 2. Mr. Geist is 
Chief of the Division of Commercial Affairs, Depart- 
ment of State. 



The economists of the world in their studies 
of the numerous problems involved have traced 
the development of the present international 
crisis to causes which have affected most radi- 
cally the structure, not only of international 
economic relations but in many cases even of 
society itself. Undoubtedly, the growths of 
populations and the demands of larger lunnbers 
of people in all countries of the world for a 
higher standard of living and for a larger share 
of the world's goods, particularly in an age 
when technical achievements have brought such 
goods almost within reach of millions who have 
not had them, have forced governments every- 
where to take a hand in affairs which affect the 
economic well-being of its citizens. Conse- 
quently, diplomacy has increasingly become as- 
sociated with economic and trade questions. 
This development, namely, the intervention of 
the government in the complete economic af- 
fairs of the state, in itself would not necessarily 
be a hindrance to the normal commercial inter- 
course between nations provided that the mo- 
tives were in the general interest of "welfare" 
and not "power" economics. 

It must be remembered that nations and peo- 
ples have been struggling for thousands of years 
to establish not only governmental and social 
institutions but also systems of trade and en- 
terprise which afford the greatest good to the 
greatest number. These evolutions have been 
slow. Society has been extremely reluctant to 
throw over systems based upon free enterprise 
which in the past and over long i>eriods of time, 
as in the nineteenth century, have been produc- 
tive of great welfare, wealth, and happiness to 

525 



526 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



a progressing world. The commercial policy 
of the United States has been based upon such 
ancient principles. Throughout the world 
these principles have found general support; 
and while many nations have been forced to 
adojat measures in times of crisis which affected 
adversely the economic stability of their neigh- 
bors, there has not been in any general sense 
a rejjudiation in princijjle of the long-estab- 
lished methods of international commercial in- 
tercourse. Indeed, it was not until 1931, when 
the liquidity panic of that year caused a col- 
lapse in the capital market, that in certain coun- 
tries foundations were laid for the introduction 
of far-reaching systems of "power" economics 
which have culminated in the present struggle. 
Wliile the crisis of 1931 marked perhaps a cer- 
tain stage in the disintegration of the trading 
system commonly practiced throughout the 
world, there is no reason to assert that the whole 
structure could not have been restored to a 
healthy basis had international cooperation 
been complete. However, with gi'owing na- 
tionalism in certain countries struggling to seize 
tlie helm of state and economic insecurity threat- 
ening most countries both from within and from 
without, there was lacking, owing to numerous 
deep-seated causes, the necessary vitality among 
the nations of the world to maintain intact the 
international economic structure. In looking 
back upon the events which followed the great 
war, it is clear that many mistakes have been 
made in affording readjustment and economic 
security to those nations most directly affected 
by the conflict. Not only the measures taken 
collectively by countries united in pursuit of 
certain political aims but decisions made indi- 
vidually on the basis of domestic needs and 
internal policy contributed to causes which 
eventually led to the i^resent situation. 

The outstanding development during this 
period of disintegration during the last decade 
was the resolve of certain countries to abandon 
the traditional principles of international com- 
mercial intei'course and link up the economic 
apparatus to the state's machinery for the ac- 
complishment of the political objectives to 
which the nation was committed. The actual 



measures adopted and put gradually into prac- 
tice in the realm of foreign trade were regarded 
by some observers to have been induced by in- 
ternal necessity and in order to meet temporary 
situations. The control of foreign exchange, 
tlae adoption of import and eventually export 
quotas, the introduction of bilateral barter ar- 
rangements, and finally the policy of the totali- 
tarian governments of drawing certain coun- 
tries almost to the point of being submerged 
within the trading orbit of their own states, con- 
stituted a departure so radical from what had 
been the traditional system that the very struc- 
ture of world trade and its equilibrium was af- 
fected. Tliis practice on the part of the totali- 
tarian states went hand in hand through the last 
decade with the utmost effort to establish au- 
tarchial units, the purpose of whicli was to build 
up a self-contained economy and establish, with 
unerring security, uni^recedented militaristic 
strength. Even treaty structure was altered; 
and arrangements between states made to insure 
orderly economic relations over a long period of 
time became short-lived, almost ephemeral ; and 
during this period numerous agreements were 
made with countries which liad economically be- 
come, in part, if not wholly, subservient to their 
powerful neiglibor. While this process con- 
tinued, international economic organization be- 
came affected in all jjarts of the world. Nations 
which had carried on normal trade with coun- 
tries which had been drawn into the totalitarian 
vortex found their markets dwindling and their 
trade declining. A distinction must sharply be 
made between the system of exchange control 
and its concomitant processes adopted and fol- 
lowed as a national policy in international com- 
mercial relations and tlie use of the same devices 
as a temporary expedient though under com- 
pelling necessity. Certain countries in this 
hemisphere have also adopted exchange control 
but not in preference to a system of interna- 
tional cooperation in monetary exchange. 

The most alarming fact in the development 
under discussion is that where restrictions, reg- 
ulations, and discriminatory practices have been 
deliberately adopted as a permanent policy, no 



MAY 3, 1941 



527 



less has been achieved than the imposition upon 
a considerable section of the trading world of a 
system which is incompatible with the welfare 
of its inhabitants. There are a number of obvi- 
ous reasons why this country could not accejat 
such a system. It presupposes, first of all, a 
master state that, over and above its preroga- 
tives of sovereignty, imposes upon all less pow- 
erful members a subordinate role, which mem- 
bers are compelled, in fact ordered, to adjust 
their national economies and productive proc- 
esses to the needs of the other. This means per- 
manent isolation of such countries from the gen- 
eral system of world trade, a denial of their 
own progress in the search after liigher living 
standards, and the danger that their common 
economic status will progi-essively deteriorate as 
victims of foreign exploitation. To contem- 
plate this state of existence for millions of 
people is to envisage a new era of economic 
enthrallment. 

Never in the history of the world has state- 
craft been more ingenious and mventive in de- 
vising means of gaining control not only of do- 
mestic economy but particularly of foreign trade 
for the purpose of attaining self-sufficiency, mil- 
itary and political aims in the international field. 
Few of the devices used by the totalitarian coun- 
tries failed to have immediate and far-reaching 
effect upon the trade of most countries, includ- 
ing that of the United States. Foreign-ex- 
change control reduced the volume of American 
exports in the earliest stages of the process; 
(luantitative regulations in the form of import 
quotas soon affected the major exports from this 
country. The situation was further aggravated 
by the use of multiple currencies, trading mo- 
nopolies, exclusive trade arrangements with 
other states, the bilateral balancing of trade, 
and the consummation of barter-deals. It be- 
came clear to those who closely obseiwed the 
working of these devices that the aims were not 
economic but political. This conclusion is most 
important in establishuig the conviction that 
the use of these devices could be of little use in 
reconstructing international trade and interna- 
tional economic relations in the post-war period. 



As the map of Europe changes and a larger 
number of European countries go into the red, 
so far as the foreign trade of the United States 
is concerned, we no longer need to define the 
trends in our overseas commerce in terms of ex- 
ports and imports, favorable and unfavorable 
balance of trade, and other criteria commonly 
applied in gauging the shifts in the world's eco- 
nomic picture. Our opportunities to carry on 
jDeaceful commerce with nations abroad are 
shrinking before the advances of armies which, 
in reality, are not exerting their pressure to as- 
sure political conquests alone but are in fact 
waging economic war primarily on peoples and 
countries such as ours, whose right to trade in 
those areas is forcibly denied. Our commerce 
is exposed to a process of attrition which is 
bound to extend itself, not only during the pres- 
ent conflict but increasingly thereafter, if the 
totalitarian method of trading endures, by two 
persisting processes: the first is by encroach- 
ment of arbitrary fiat, the behest of force, dam- 
ming up the streams of commerce behind dikes 
of steel ; and second by the steady impoverish- 
ment of vast numbers of people, though far out- 
side the conquered areas, whose economic exist- 
ence is affected by the changed order. Eetro- 
gressive developments sucli as these arrest, like 
the ravages of disease, human progress itself. 
But it is safe to predict that no arbitrary force 
is jjowerful enough to resist the will of the hu- 
man race to forge onward toward the goal of 
economic betterment and advancement. 

Our foreign trade, since the outbreak of war, 
has undergone rapid changes, some of which 
have been in line with our policy of alleviating 
the effect of the impact of war upon our own 
national economy, building up national defense, 
and affording aid to the countries at war with 
the Central European powers. Besides, action 
has been started of which the purpose is to 
support to the fullest extent the economies of 
nations in this hemisphere, which, like the 
United States, were immediately affected by the 
loss of trade with the European coimtries. This 
historic program, of which the effects will be to 
change the course of world events and the des- 



528 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



tinies of millions of people, is now getting 
steadily under way. It has perforce changed 
the character of imports and exports; but the 
Government's policy has been not to dislodge 
the established channels of trade and interrupt 
the exchange of goods with other countries 
growing out of peace-time needs as far as this 
is permissible under present conditions. The 
revision in November 1939 of the Neutrality 
Act, enabling this country to export anns and 
ammunitions, has given a tremendous stimula- 
tion to our export activity. The enactment of 
lease-lend legislation and the approj^riations 
made by Congress to carry out the provisions 
of the bill will further augment the volume of 
exports in proportion to production of Ameri- 
can industry and its expanding capacity. In 
industrial achievement the success of this coun- 
try in turning out arms and ammunition to 
swell this vital export trade is second in im- 
portance only to the program of national de- 
fense. The major role that exports have played 
in the present pieparedness program cannot be 
underestimated. Before the United States was 
aware of the significance of events in Europe, 
certain countries had caused the acceleration of 
our defense industries by increasing their im- 
ports from America to supplement their own 
defense-production. This afforded us a start in 
expanding our own armaments industries dur- 
ing the months that have passed when we might 
have been profitably producing for our own 
national interests. The shipping of war mate- 
rials, in view of the status of the struggle abroad 
and the policy adopted by our Government and 
the people of the United States in affording aid 
to Great Britain and her allies, increasingly 
lends to our export trade a special character 
brought about by the exigencies of the national 
situation. The prospect that this type of com- 
merce will steadily increase as time goes on is 
forecast by the trend of events abroad. Like- 
wise, the establishment of military bases of 
defense along the Atlantic seaboard, in the Car- 
ribean area, the Panama Canal Zone, and the 
outposts of the Pacific will further accelerate 
the export- of defense materials and equipment. 



The character of the trade with other coun- 
tries has been altered by the adoption of export 
controls which was initiated by an act of Con- 
gress approved July 2, 1940,= and proclaimed 
by the President on the same day. Specific 
articles and materials may not be exported with- 
out license. The several subsequent proclama- 
tions of the President have expanded the list of 
articles and materials put under control. This 
naeasure has also contributed to factors which 
change the character of exports and steadily 
place our commerce abroad on an emergency 
basis. Besides, the various blockades exercised 
by the belligerents have had far-reaching reper- 
cussions on our foreign commerce. The changes 
which have necessarily come about, both with 
respect to the character and tlie volume of im- 
ports, have been largely induced by the necessity 
for defense. An analysis of the position of raw 
materials essential to om- industrial processes 
indicates to what extent we are dependent upon 
commodities found in other parts of the world. 
Wars affect vitally the accessibility of such ma- 
terials; and the economic paralysis, which on 
this account could strike certain of our indus- 
tries, needs no elaboration. Our Goverimient 
has been quick to act with respect to this major 
2)roblem of our import trade. An integral part 
of the defense program now in progress is to 
lay in stores and adequate supplies of such ma- 
terials — the stock-piles which the Army and 
Navy Munitions Boards have been buildmg up. 
Importations of this character are being 
financed by the Reconstruction Finance Cor- 
poration. Besides, urgent activity is being de- 
veloped by various departments and agencies 
of the Govermnent to establish and develop 
sources of strategic and critical materials within 
our own defense area. The loss of imports from 
countries with which we normally trade has 
equally dislocated substantial segments of our 
commerce as well as theirs. Our imports, like 
our exports, had become affected before tlie war 
by the monojjolistic practices of the totalitarian 
states and by their efforts to restrict the ex- 



'54 Stat. 712. 



MAY 3, 1941 



529 



change of goods to certain areas and render 
impossible the triangular and multilateral flow 
of goods, upon which basis alone world trade 
can prosper. 

The hard times of the pi'esent emergency have 
accentuated as never before the interdependence 
of the nations in this hemisphere, interdepend- 
ence not only political and strategically defen- 
sive but also economical. Through the far-see- 
ing policy of the President and his great col- 
laborator, the Secretary of State, a basis in 
friendship has been laid between this country 
and the other republics in this hemisphere for 
economic collaboration which will have not only 
far-reaching and lasting effects upon the indus- 
trial and productive characters of the nations 
of this hemisphere but upon the trade structure 
of the whole world. These effects will be 
permanently beneficent to western life. The 
vast economic resources of this hemisphere have 
not been fully developed in the fac^ of cheaper 
production in other parts of the globe and on 
account of the more ready accessibility of cer- 
tain basic materials. But now the combined 
strength, ingenuity, technical skill, and capital 
of the nations of the Americas are being set in 
motion to accomplish unprecedented progress 
wherever the advances may be made. The pro- 
gram for this historical development was 
couched in firm and clearly worded language at 
the First Consultative Meeting of Miiiistei's of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Eepublics held 
at Panama in September 1939. It was resolved 
that : 

"In view of the present circumstances, . . . 
it is more desirable and necessary than ever to 
establish a close and sincere cooperation between 
the American Eepublics in order that they may 
proteet their economic and financial structures, 
maintain tlieir fiscal equilibrium, safeguard the 
stability of their currencies, promote and ex- 
pand their industries, intensify their agiicul- 
ture, and develop their commerce." ^ 

The intensification of agriculture, the expan- 
sion of industries, and the development of com- 



' Bulletin of October 7, 19S9 (vol. I, no. 15), p. 324. 



merce between the nations of this hemisphere 
call for the united effort of all our peoples on a 
scale never before attempted in the history of 
these continents. While the rest of the world is 
becoming impoverished and disiiipted, it must 
be our aim to grow ever stronger and more pro- 
ductive in the essential wealth of civilized life 
so that the standard of living among us shall 
steadily rise, that out of our abundance the rest 
of the world, sinking deeper into disorganiza- 
tion and poverty, may draw its means of re- 
covery. A more inclusive expression of the 
policy which the nations of this hemisphere 
have adopted and which indicated the immedi- 
ate as well as tlie long-term view of our common 
purpose was contained in the resolution adopted 
in July 1940 when the Second Meeting of the 
Ministers of Foi-eign Affairs of the American 
Republics resolved to declare: 

"One. (a) That the American nations con- 
tinue to adhere to the liberal principles of inter- 
national trade, conducted with peaceful motives 
and based upon equality of treatment and fair 
and equitable practices; 

"(b) That it is the purpose of the American 
nations to apply these principles in their rela- 
tions with each other as fully as present circum- 
stances pemiit; 

"(c) That the American nations should be 
prepared to resume the conduct of trade with 
the entire world in accordance with these prin- 
ciples as soon as the non-American nations are 
prepared to do likewise ; 

"(d) That, in the meantime, the American 
nations shall do everything in their power to 
strengthen their own economic position ; to im- 
prove further the trade and other economic rela- 
tions between and among themselves ; and to de- 
vise and apply appropriate means of effective 
action to cope with the difficulties, disadvan- 
tages, and dangers arising from the present dis- 
turbed and dislocated world conditions; and 

"(e) That the American nations consider it 
necessary to maintain or improve the normal 
economic situation established between them in 
order to assure the preservation or improve- 
ment of the position enjoyed in their respective 
markets. 



530 

"Two. To strengthen and expand the activi- 
ties of the Inter-American Financial and Eco- 
nomic Advisor^' Committee as the instrument 
for continuing consultation among the Ameri- 
can Eepublics with respect to economic and 
trade matters and arrangements, having in mind 
especially the immediate situations which must 
be met as a result of the curtailment and 
changed character of important foreign mar- 
kets. . . . 

"Three. Specifically, to instruct the said Com- 
mittee that it proceed forthwith : 

"(a) To cooperate with each country of this 
Continent in the study of possible measures for 
the increase of the domestic consumption of its 
own exportable surpluses of those commodities 
which are of primary importance to the main- 
tenance of the economic life of such countries ; 

"(b) To propose to the American nations im- 
mediate measures and arrangements of mutual 
benefit tending to increase trade among them 
without injury to the interests of their respec- 
tive producers, for the purpose of providing in- 
creased markets for such products and of ex- 
panding their consumption ; 

"(c) To create instruments of inter- American 
cooperation for the temporary storing, financ- 
ing and handling of any such commodities and 
for their orderly and systematic marketing, 
having in mind the nonnal conditions of pro- 
duction and distribution thereof ; 

"(d) To develop commodity arrangements 
with a view to assuring equitable terms of trade 
for both producers and consumers of the com- 
modities concerned ; 

"(e) To recommend methods for improving 
the standard of living of the peoples of the 
Americas, including public health and nutrition 
measures ; 

"(f) To establish appropriate oi'ganizations 
for the distribution of a part of the surplus of 
any such commodity, as a humanitarian and 
social relief measure; 

"(g) To consider, while these plans and meas- 
ures are being developed, the desirability of a 
broader system of inter- American cooperative 
organization in trade and industrial matters. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

and to propose credit measures and other meas- 
ures of assistance which may be immediately 
necessary in the fields of economics, finance, 
money, and foreign exchange." ■* 

I shall not pause at this moment to enumerate 
and describe the measures which have already 
been talceu under the terms of this resolution, 
such as the appropriations made by Congress to 
increase the funds of the Export-Import Bank, 
which are to be used "to assist in the develop- 
ment of the resources, the stabilization of the 
economies, and the orderly marketing of the 
products of the Western Hemisphere"; the 
credits which the Bank has extended ; the meas- 
ures which have got under way to augment the 
purchases of strategic materials from other 
American republics, etc. The steps which have 
to be undertaken, like other processes in world 
movements, get under way slowly, because a full 
realization of the tasks to be perf omied has not 
been apprehended by those whose collaboration 
in the business, industrial, and technical field is 
necessary. With a fuller understanding of the 
scope of the conflict which is slowly spreading 
and gathering momentum, undertakings on vast 
scales will be launched to carry out the policies 
which the statesmen of this hemisphere have 
adoj^ted. 

Bound up with the determination of the peo- 
ple of this country and of the other American 
nations to preserve individual liberty, free pri- 
vate enterprise, and self-government is the un- 
alterable resolve to perpetuate our right of 
trading throughout the world in accordance 
with a system of international commerce suit- 
able to our form of government, our institu- 
tions, and our concept of law and order. We 
have steadily followed this system in our deal- 
ings with other nations in the past, particidarly 
in the trade agreements concluded on the basis 
of "the most favored nation treatment". It is 
our resolve not to abandon this policy. 

Furthermore, let me warn against the futile 
speculations of theorists who would have us 



'Bulletin of Angust 24, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 61), pp. 
141-142. 



MAY 3, 104 1 



531 



deviate from sound principles in international 
trade and espouse methods of dealing repugnant 
to our way of life. If in the international 
sphere we reject political and social systems 
harmful to mankind, we must also repudiate 
the economic practices upon which they are 
based. 



If we hold fast to faith in our destiny, we 
shall create an invincible and advancing civili- 
zation upon the foundations of our inexhaust- 
ible resources and rear a new edifice where en- 
lightenment, based upon material, moral, and 
spiritual progress, will finally decide the future 
of humanity. 



American Republics 



EESOLUTION REGARDING REQUISITIONING OF FORE IGN-FLAG 
VESSELS IN AMERICAN PORTS 



The Inter- American Financial and Economic 
Advisory Committee, representing the 21 Amer- 
ican republics, at a meeting at the Pan Amer- 
ican Union on April 26, 19-11, unanimously 
adopted a resolution recognizing the right of 
each of these republics to requisition foreign- 
flag vessels in their ports. The Under Secre- 
tary of State, Mr. Sumner Welles, represents 
the Government of the United States on the 
Committee, which was set up as a result of 
action taken at the Meeting of Foreign Min- 
isters of the American Republics at Panama in 
1939. The text of the resolution follows: 

''Whereas: 

"Subparagraph (D) of Article 2, Resolution 
IV, on economic cooperation, of the Meeting of 
Foreign Ministers of the American Republics at 
Panama in 1939 charged the Inter-American 
Financial and Economic Advisory Committee 
with studying and proposing to the Govern- 
ments the most effective measures for mutual co- 
operation to lessen or offset dislocations in the 
trade of the American republics resulting from 
the present war; 

"The commerce of the American republics 
has normally been carried on in large measure 
in merchant vessels of non-American powers, 
many of which ai"e not available for such trade 
because of the increasing rate of destruction of 
the means of maritime transportation by the 
belligerent nations, the consequent increased 
diversion of such vessels to other trades, and the 

314733 — 41 2 



prolonged stationing by their owners of a large 
number of such vessels in American ports in- 
terrupting their normal commercial activities; 
and 

"The resulting shipping shortage has preju- 
diced and is prejudicing the connnerce of and 
among the American Republics, creating a very 
grave problem for the fundamental right of the 
nations of the Americas to preserve the trade 
which is essential to their normal existence; 

''Some of the American republics have al- 
ready been forced to take steps with a view to 
remedying this situation ; and 

"Bearing in mind the recommendations of the 
Inter-American Neutrality Committee, which 
were adopted by Resolution I of the Second 
Meeting of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of 
the American Republics at Habana in July 1940, 

''The Inter-American Financial and Eco- 
nomic Advisory Committee 
"Resolats : 

"To reconmiend to the fxovernments of the 
American Republics : 

"a. That they declare that the foreign flag ves- 
sels in American ports, the normal commercial 
activities of wliich have been interrupted as a 
consequence of the war, may now be utilized by 
the American republics in accordance with the 
ndos of international law and the provisions 
of their respective national legislations, in such 
a manner as to promote the defense of their 
economies as well as the peace and security of 



532 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



the continent. The utilization of said vessels 
may be effected by the American republics either 
tln-ou^'li agreements with tlie owners of the ves- 
sels or by virtue of the right of each of the 
American re|)ublics to assume complete jurisdic- 
tion and control over such vessels, and as they 
may deem it convenient to satisfy their own 
refiuirements. 

"b. That just and adequate compensation for 
the utilization of the said vessels be made in 
accordance wth the conuuonly accepted rules of 
internaticmal law and the national legislations 
of each of the American republics. In the de- 
termination of this compensation, the damages 
which might have been caused and the other 
obligations resulting by the presence of these 
ships in the ports in which they may be, shall 
be taken into consideration. 

"c. That they reaffirm their full right to the 
free navigation of those vessels, both in their 
national and international trade, once they are 
under the flag of any one of the American re- 
publics, and that they agree upon measures 
tending to facilitate the effective exercise of 
said right.-' 



Europe 



REPORT FROM LEGATION IN GREECE 

[Released to the press May 2] 

A telegram has been received from the Ameri- 
can Minister at Athens, Greece, Mr. Lincoln 
MacVeagh, dated April 29, 1941, transmitted 
via the German Foreign Office in Berlin, stat- 
ing that all Americans in Athens are safe and 
well. The telegram adds that the occupation of 
the city has been carried out in an orderly and 
peaceable manner. 

PROPERTY OF GREECE IN THE 
UNITED STATES 

On April 28, 1941, the President signed Ex- 
ecutive Order 8746 extending all the provisions 
of Executive Order 8389 of April 10. 1940, as 
amended, to "property in which Greece or any 
national thereof has at any time on or since 



April 28, 1941, had any intei'est of any nature 
whatsoever, direct or indirect . . ." The text 
of Executive Order 8746 appears in the Federal 
Register of April 30, 1941 (vol. 6, no. 84), page 
'2187, and the regulations of the Treasury De- 
partment issued April 28, 1941 under authority 
of tills order, appear in the same issue of the 
Federal Register, page 2190. 



The Far East 



VISIT TO WASHINGTON OF NEW 
CHINESE FOREIGN MINISTER 

[Released to the press April 29] 

In reply to a query the Secretary of State 
said on April 29 that Dr. Quo Tai-chi, the newly 
appointed Chinese Foreign Minister, is in the 
city for some days on a visit of courtesy and 
friendship as he goes home ^ to assume his duties 
as Chinese Foreign Minister. During his 
courtesy call at the Department April 29 there 
was a brief general interchange of international 
information. 

A luncheon in honor of His Excellency Dr. 
Quo Tai-chi was given by the Secretary of State 
on May 2, 1941, at the Carlton Hotel, Wash- 
ington, D.C. The guests included the Chinese 
Ambassador, the Counselor of the Chinese 
Embassy, the Chinese Military Attache, the 
President of the Bank of China (Dr. T. V. 
Soong). and officials of the United States 
Government. 



The Department 



COORDINATION OF ACTIVITIES OF 
THE DEPARTMENT IN ADMINISTRA 
TION OF LEND-LEASE ACT 

The following departmental order (no. 939) 
was signed by the Secretary of State on April 
30, 1941 : 



^' From his recent post as Cliiaese Ambassador in 
Luudoii. 



533 



"Mr. Lynn R. Edminster, in addition to such 
otlier duties and responsibilities as may be as- 
signed to him, sliall have responsibility for co- 
ordinating the activities of the Department re- 
lating to the administration of the Act of March 
11,1941 (the Lend-Lease Act). In carrying out 
this function, Mr. Edminster shall have resjjon- 
sibility for enlisting the collaboration of the in- 
terested divisions and offices of the Department, 
particularly those charged \yith functions in- 
volving the formulation of policies; for initiat- 
ing and coordinating action; and for establish- 
ing and maintaining effective liaison with other 
interested departments and agencies of the Gov- 
ermnent. When appropriate, he shall represent 
the Department on such interdepartmental com- 
mittee or committees as may be established or 
maintained for the purpose of coordinating the 



activities of the interested departments and 
agencies of the Government in the administra- 
tion of the Act of March 11, 1941. 

"The provisions of this Order shall be effec- 
tive as of April 1, 1941, and shall supersede the 
provisions of any existing Order in conflict 
therewith." 

APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

By Departmental Order 936, Mr. Richard 
Pattee was designated an Assistant Chief of the 
Division of Cultural Relations, effective April 
25, 1941. 

Mr. George Atcheson, Jr., a Foreign Service 
officer of class IV, was designated, by Depart- 
jnental Order 937, an Assistant Chief of the 
Division of Far Eastern Affairs, effective April 
29, 1941. 



International Conferences, Commissions, Etc. 



EIGHTH PAN AMERICAN CHILD CONGRESS 



[Released to tlie press May 1] 

Tlie Eight]) Pan American Child Congress is 
to be held in Washington, D.C., during tlie lat- 
ter part of 1941 or early in 1942. In view of 
the heavy responsibilities of organizing an im- 
portant international meeting of this nature, 
the Secretary of State has deemed it advisable 
to request several Government officials and lead- 
ers in the field of child welfare to serve upon 
an Organizing Committee to formulate and per- 
fect plans for the Congi-ess. Accordingly, he 
has designated the following persons as mem- 
bers of the Organizing Committee of the Eighth 
Pan American Child Congress: 

Miss Katharine F. Lenroot, Chief, Chil- 
dren's Bureau, Department of Labor; 
United States Member of the Interna- 
tional Council of the American Interna- 
tional Institute for the Protection of 
Childhood; Chairman of the Committee 



William G. Carr, Pli.D., Director of Re- 
search, National Education Association, 
Washington, D.C. 

Henry F. Helmholz, M.D., Professor of 
Pediatrics, Mayo Foundation of the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, Rochester, Minn. 

Warren Kelchner, Ph.D., Chief, Division 
of International Conferences, Depart- 
ment of State 

Tlie Reverend Bryan J. McEntegart, Di- 
rector, Division of Children, Catholic 
Charities of the Archdiocese of New 
York, New York, N. Y. 

Thomas Parran, M.D., Surgeon General, 
Public Health Service, Federal Security 
Agency 

Jolm W. Studebaker, LL.D., Commissioner, 
United States Office of Education, Fed- 
eral Security Agency 



534 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Mi-s. Elisabeth Shirley Enochs, Office of the 
Chief of the Children's Bureau, Depart- 
ment of Labor, Secretary to the Com- 
mittee 

This Government is a member of the Ameri- 
can International Institute for the Protection of 
Childhood, with headquarters at Montevideo, 
Urugiuiy, and funds for United States partici- 
pation in the work of the Institute are appro- 
priated annually by Congress. The Governing- 
Board of the Pan American Union and the 
Council of the American International Institute 
for the Protection of Childhood proposed that 
the Eighth Pan American Child Congress be 
lield in the United States. This plan was agree- 
able to the appropriate officials of the executive 
departments, and the Congress of the United 
States indicated its concurrence by making a 
small ai^propriation available for the expenses 
of organizing and holding the meeting. 

INTER-AMERICAN COMMISSION ON 
TROPICAL AGRICULTURE 

[Released to the press May 3] 

The Governing Board of the Pan American 
Union at its meeting held on June a, 19-10 recom- 
mended the creation of an Inter-American Com- 
mission on Tropical Agriculture to study recom- 
mendations of the Eighth American Scientific 
Congi-ess concerning the establishment of an In- 
ter-American Institute of Tropical Agriculture 
and the promotion of rubber production in the 
Western Hemisphere. 

The Governing Board recently requested the 
United States to designate a representative on 
the Commission. The President has now ap- 
proved the designation of Dr. Earl N. Press- 
man, Assistant Director, Office of Foreign Agri- 
cultural Relations, Department of Agriculture, 



as this Government's representative on the Com- 
mission. 

[Released to the press by the Pan .\merican Union April 30] 

The Inter-American Commission on Tropical 
Agriculture made public on April 30 an offer it 
has received from the Government of Venezuela 
of 4,000 acres of valuable agricultural land for 
the establishment in Venezuela of the Inter- 
American Institute of Tropical Agriculture, fol- 
lowing a meeting h'.dd at the Pan Amei'ican 
Union. 

The property offered by Venezuela for the lo- 
cation of the Institute is situated about two 
miles from Puerto Cabello and includes forest, 
farm, and pasture lands. The property is 
crossed by a paved highway. A railroad line 
also crosses the property, connecting it with 
Caracas, La Guaira, Valencia, and Maracay. 
The Government has also offered to hold in re- 
serve an additional 6,000 acres for the future 
expansion of the work of the Institute. 

The establishment of an inter-American ex- 
perimental center dedicated to the teaching of 
agriculture and the carrying out of research 
work on plant diseases, soil studies, seed im- 
provement, etc., was originally proposed at the 
First Inter-American Conference on Agricul- 
ture, which met in Wiishington in 1930. 

The Eighth American Scientific Congress, 
which met in Washington in May 1949, en- 
dorsed this proposition and recommended to the 
Pan American Union the creation of a special 
commission to study the matter with a view to 
putting the Institute into operation as soon as 
possible. The commiasion was created in June 
1940 by the Governing Board of the Pan Amer- 
ican Union and has been meeting regularly at 
the Pan American Union. It consists of rep- 
resentatives of Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia, Costa 
Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Peru, 
Venezuela, and the United States. 



Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, Etc. 



MONTHLY STATISTICS 



[ Rfleiused to the press May 3] 

Note: In the tables set foi-tli liclow relating to amis 
export licenses issued and arms exiHirted, statistics con- 
cerning sliipinents authorized and made to the British 
Commonwealth of Nations, the British Empire, British 
mandates, and British armed force.s elsewhere are not 
listed separate!.? but are combined under the heading 
British Commonwealth of Nations. 

The figures relating to arms, the licenses for the 
export of which were revolied before they were used, 
have been subtracted from the figures appearing in 
the cumulative column of the table below in regard to 
arm.s export licenses i.ssued. These latter figures are 
therefore net figures. They are not yet final and defin- 
ilive since licen.ses ma.v be amended or revolved at ;iii.v 
lime before being used. They are, liowever, accurate 
as of the date of this press relea.se. 

The statistics of actual exports in these releases are 
believed to be substantially complete. It is possible, 
however, that some shipments are not included. If 
this proves to be the fact, statistics in regard to such 
shipments will be included in the cumulative figures 
in later release,?. 

Arms Export Licenses Issited 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of the 
arms, amniiinition, and implements of war 
licensed for export by the Secretary of State 
during the year 1941 up to and including the 
month of March: 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


March 1941 


3 months 

ending March 

31, 1941 


Aden.* 

Angola 


V (1) 
(2) 




$4, 400. 00 
120 00 












Total 




4, 520. 00 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


March 1941 


3 months 

ending March 

31, 1941 




I 

ni 

IV 
V 

VII 


(4) 
(2) 

(1) 

(21 

(1) 

(2) 
(3) 

(2) 




$443. no 






60.00 






5, 554. 00 
6 375 00 






1,900.00 




$25, 878. 00 


33, 348. 08 
27, 465. 76 






61 390 00 








Total 


26, 878. 00 


126 535 84 




I 

V 


0) 
(21 




Austraha.' 
Baliamas.' 
Belgian Congo 




98, 051. 00 






7, 240. 00 








Total 




105, 291. 00 




I 

IV 

V 
VII 


(41 
(11 
(21 
(11 
(11 




Bermuda.* 
Bolivia 




155 00 






864. 00 






554. 40 




1, 40O 00 
722. 00 

2, 122. 00 


1, 400. 00 
722.00 


Total- 


3 695 40 




I 
III 

IV 
V 

VII 


(11 
(21 
(41 
(21 
(11 
(21 
(11 
(21 
(3) 
(11 




Brazil - - 


47.50 


480 50 




55.25 




1, 587. 70 

295. 00 

1,683.00 

304, 964. 00 

9, 569. 26 

60, 371. 00 


1, 710. 70 

60 00 

45, 779. .50 

7. 588. 00 

308. 564. 00 

24. 280. 96 

83. 792. 00 

21, 180 00 








Total. 


378, 617. 46 


493 490 91 




I 
II 

lU 
IV 


(11 
(2) 
(31 
(41 
(6) 
(61 

(11 
(21 
(11 

(2) 




British Commonwealth of 
Nations, the British Em- 
pire, British mandates, and 
British armed forces else- 
where. 


11,408.43 

3. 483. 262. 06 

7,382.095.00 

20. 265, 341. 63 

294, 492. 00 

1,350,000.00 


2, 396. 270, 01 

14. 627. 974. 29 

15,169,058.50 

85.407.030.15 

1. 572. 518. 68 

1.440.000.00 

60.00 




35,021,589.00 

14,021.33 

18, ,524. 92 

3, 2.58, 715. 44 


157. 528, 183. 07 

64,901.87 

1, 692, 675. 96 

3, 496, 364, 37 



•See British Commonwealth of Nations. 



686 



536 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country ot destination 


March 1941 


3 months 

ending March 

31, 1941 


British Commonwealth of 
Nations, etc.— Continued. 


V 0) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (2) 

VII (n 

(2) 


$558, 375, 00 

16. 989. 210. 70 

5, 328, 963. .'57 

205.00 

4, 518, 498. .59 

1.59,743.00 


$574, 625. 00 

45, 178, 797. OH 

40, 236, 279. 74 

2, 449. on 

5, 871, 0O5, 79 

430, 119. .50 


Total - 


98, 6.54, 445. 67 


375, 688, 303. 01 




I (3) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




British Guiana.* 

Burma.* 

Canada.* 

Chile 




38,080.00 




575.00 


584. 60 
3,687.31 






2, 100. 00 




7, 066. 00 

9, 787. 75 

388,80 


27, 399. 00 

32, 102. 75 

388.80 

12, 898. 92 








Total 


17, 817. ,55 


117,241.38 




I (2) 
III (1) 

(2) 
V (2) 

(3) 
VII (2) 




China 


5, 099. 25 


5,099.25 




6, 307, 732. 00 






2. 500. 00 




12, 600. 00 
987,700.00 


15,775.00 
987, 700. OO 
245, 002. 64 








Total - 


1, 005, 399. 25 


7, 563, 808. 89 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




Colombin 


987.00 


17.00 

4, 417. 60 

353.00 






70.00 






24, 280. 00 






3, 575. 29 




49.00 


2, 749. 00 


Total 


1,036.00 


3.5,461.79 




IV (1) 

V (1) 
(2) 

VII (1) 








.59.00 






22, 286. 00 




93.60 


1, 093. 60 
217.20 








Total 


93.60 


23. 655. 80 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (1) 

(2) 




Cuba 


95.00 


134.00 




183.00 






1,375. on 




1,263.00 


6, 787. 00 
1, 195.00 




2, 091. 48 
12.50 


5, 940. 28 
744. .50 


Total 


3, 461. 98 


15, 338. 78 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


March 1941 


3 months 

ending March 

31, 1941 




I 

IV 

V 
VII 


(1) 

(4) 

(1) 

(2) 
(3) 
(2) 


$36, 750. 00 
2,325.00 


$36, 750. 00 




2, 435. 00 
426. 40 




151.56 
2,000.00 


190. 58 

2,000.00 

60.00 








Total 


41, 226. 56 


41, 861. 96 




IV 
VII 


(2) 
(1) 






266. 00 
903.60 


266. 00 




903.60 


Total 


1, 169. 60 


1, 169. 60 




I 

IV 

V 
VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 






83.20 

22 00 

109.00 

248.00 


209.30 




155.68 

159.50 

1, 788. 00 

30, 000. 00 







91.00 








Total 


462 20 


32, 403. 48 




IV 

I 

V 
VII 


(1) 

(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 








178.50 












22.25 




2,000.00 


2,000.00 
170. 00 




3,000.00 
43.20 


3,000.00 
43.20 


Total 


5, 043. 20 


5, 235. 45 




V 

I 
III 


(2) 

(2) 
(4) 
(5) 
(2) 




Fiji.* 




4, 810. 00 












16, 000. 00 






17,900.00 






10, 000. 00 






3, 730. 00 








Total 




47, 630. 00 




I 

VII 


(3) 
C4) 
(2) 






Gibraltar.* 

Gold Coast.* 

Great Britain and Northern 

Ireland.* 
Greece 


309,600.00 
2,633,100.00 


309, 500. 00 

3, 168, 100. 00 

197, 335. 54 








Total . .- 


2,942,600.00 


3, 674, 93.5. 54 




IV 
V 

VII 


(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




Guatemala 




2, 547. 00 




72.00 


1,372 00 
6, 000. 00 






194. 40 






1,175.00 








Total 


72.00 


10, 288. 40 



•See British Commonwealth of Nations. 



537 



Country of destination 



Haiti - 



Total - 
Honduras- - 



Total.. 



Hong Kong.* 
Iceland 



India.' 
Iran... 



Total. 



Iraq. 



Total. 



Jamaica.* 
Kenya.* 

Leeward Islands.* 
Mexico --- 



Total... 
Mozambique. 



Total— 

Netherlands Indies. 



Category 



IV (1) 

(2) 

VII (2) 



I (4) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 

(2) 



V (2) 



(2) 
(2) 



IV (2) 

V (2) 



IV 



(n 
«) 
(1) 

(2) 
V (1) 

(2) 

(3) 
VII (1) 

(2) 



III 



IV 



(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(6) 
(6) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 



Value of export licenses issued 



March 1941 



3 months 

ending March 

31, 1941 



$169. 00 



106. 60 
10. 049. 60 



20, 587. 02 

40, 350. 00 

8, 136. 00 



324. 00 
21,411.00 



100, 964. 22 



250.00 
67, 500. 00 



31, 617. 40 
299, 000. 00 



$27. 00 

14.68 

.10 



41.78 



213. 00 

649. 00 

20, 000. 00 

169. 00 



21, 031. 00 



484.00 



10, 864. 60 
900. 64 



11, 765. 24 



5.21 
1, 170. 00 



106. 60 

10, 937. 60 

5, 281. 50 

23, 386. 02 

250, 750. 00 

18, 734. 59 

8, 755. 00 

12, 135. 60 

30, 537. 00 



360, 623. 91 



29.60 
422. 45 



452. OS 



9, 635. 00 
1, 939. 47 



390, S76. 73 
24, 187. 50 



250.00 

271,500.00 

444, 000. 00 

5, 903, 015. 44 

626, 310. 00 

820, 000. 00 

1,954,940.00 

750.00 

10, 185. 00 

3, 005. 94 

.5, 500. 00 

467, 779. 54 

82, 187. 50 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


March 1941 


3 months 

ending March 

31, 1941 


Netherlands Indies— Cont. 


VII 


(1) 

(2) 


$289. OO 
400, 000. 00 


$.5, 762. 60 
745, 000. 00 


Total --- 


1, 225, 295. 10 


11,340,186.02 




I 

IV 

V 


(1) 

(4) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 




264. 30 
148.08 
47.00 






980. ,50 

47.00 

3, 522. 00 




28,850.00 


28, 850. 00 


Total 


29, 309. 38 


33, 663. 80 




IV 
VII 


(2) 
(1) 


New Guinea, Territory of.* 
Newfoundland . * 
New Zealand.* 
Nicaragua 


5, 194. 00 
1, 360. 00 


9,311,00 
1, 360. 00 




Total 


6. 5.54. 00 


10 671 00 




V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




Palestine.* 

Panama 


2,000.00 
300.00 


26, 000. 00 

300.00 

1 650 00 








Total - - 


2, 300. 00 


27, 950. 00 




IV 
V 


(2) 
(3) 


Paraguay _ 




49 00 






1 5.50 00 








Total - 




1, 599. 00 




IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 






Peru 


19.90 


19 90 




5 631 25 




11,040.00 


38, 842. 00 
140, 069. 00 




1,824.00 
585. 00 


3, 498. 69 
585.00 


Total 


13,468.90 


188 645 84 




I 

V 


(4) 
(2) 
(3) 












1.50. 00 
5, 000. 00 


150, nfi 
20, 000. on 


Total 


5,150.00 


fifi 2f)2 on 




I 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(1) 




Southern Rhodesia.* 
South-West Africa.* 
Straits Settlements.* 
Surinam . .. - 


27, 142. 50 
8, 100. 00 


^7 i4'7 'ill 




8. ino. on 










258.40 


581.40 


Total 


35, 500. 90 


73, f^23. 90 









*See British Commonwealth of Nations. 



538 



DEPAiRTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


March 1941 


3 months 

ending March 

31, 1941 


Thailand 


I 
IV 

V 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 


$51.83 

1, 190. 00 

149. 35 


$149. 93 




2, 864. 00 
374.28 
314. 11 








Total . . 


1, 391. 18 


3, 702. 32 




vn 

I 

IV 

V 


(2) 

(U 
(i) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 




Trinidad." 
Turkey 




132. 360. 00 








Union of South Africa " 
Uruguay. 


181.60 
352.00 


181. 60 
352. 00 
231.00 




1, 932. 00 

2. 400. 00 

44.80 


4, 598. 00 

24, 300. 00 

550.80 


Total 


4, 910. 40 


30, 213. 40 




IV 

V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 








26, 202. 00 






1, 883. 00 




1,300.00 


5, 202. 50 
24, 113.00 




4,443.31 


6,089.90 
3, 076. 00 








Total 


5,743.31 


66, 566. 40 








Grand total 


104, 510. 101. 46 


400, 366. 892. 60 











• See British Commonwealth of Nations. 

During the month of Marcli, 504 arms export 
licenses were issued, inakinga total of 1,432 such 
licenses issued during the current year. 

Ahms Exported 

Tlie table printed below indicates the charac- 
ter, value, and countries of destination of the 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war ex- 
ported during the j'ear 1941 up to and including 
the month of March under export licenses issued 
by the Secretary of State : 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


March 1941 


3 months end- 
ing March 31, 
1941 


Aden.* 


V (1) 
(2) 


$3,150.00 
120. 00 


$3, 150. 00 




120.00 


Total 


3, 270. 00 


3,270.00 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 




3 months end- 








March 1941 


ing March 31, 
1941 




T 


(4) 




$453.00 




in 


(1) 


$33,000.00 


33, 000. 00 






(2) 


60.00 


60.00 




IV 


(1) 


15.00 


7, 187. 00 






(2) 


16.00 


330.00 




V 


(1) 


1, 900. 00 


1,900.00 






(2) 


15, .504. 00 


46, 326, 50 




VTf 


(11 




24, 750. 00 






(2) 




8, 1,54. 00 








Total 


50, 495. 00 


122. 160. 50 










Au.^tralia.* 






Bahamas.* 










Bermuda.* 












I 
IV 


(4) 

CD 




155.00 






864. nn 






O) 




547. 40 




VII 


(n 


722. 00 


1,371.80 


Total 


722.00 


2, 938. 2U 




I 


(1) 

(3) 






90.00 
7, 175. 00 


90.00 




20, 250. 00 






(4) 


269.70 


269. 70 






(5) 




73, 924. 00 




III 


(2) 


60.00 


60. 00 




IV 


(n 


15, U)S. 50 


46, 482. 50 






(2) 


2.471.63 


2, 471. 63 




V 


(1) 


216, 679. 00 


256, 241. 00 






(2) 


39, 623. 80 


56, 227. 90 






(3) 


27, 162. 00 


48, 430. 00 


Total 


308,729.63 


504, 446. 73 




I 


(1) 




British Commonwealth of 


181, 554. 42 


2, 082, 196. 65 


Nations, the British Em- 




(2) 


2, 167, 261. 56 


4, 577. 87.5. 51 


pire, British ninndates, and 




(3) 


601,045.00 


2, 199, 369. 00 


British armed forces else- 




(4) 


5.745,390.64 


10,290,912.72 


where. 




(5) 


2,615,615.00 


3, 665, 252. CO 






(6) 


99, 385. 00 


185. 065. 00 




II 
in 


(I) 




100. 00 




21,71.5,0,52.00 


59,336,711.04 






(2) 


9, 205. 00 


26, 385. 00 




IV 


(1) 


264, 698. 76 


714, 299. 02 






(2) 


657, 148. 12 


1.450, 858. 49 




V 


(1) 


559, 387. 00 


2, 102, 625. 00 






(2) 


1,482,331,01 


4,318,949.75 






(3) 


12, 146, 357. 94 


26, 670, 127. 97 




VI 


(2) 


2, 095. 00 


2, 244. 00 




VII (1) 


986. 271. 80 


1, 604, 341. 30 






(2) 


63, 621. 60 


266,878.98 


Total 


49. 196, 419. 85 


119,392,491.43 










British Guiana.* 






British Honduras.* 










Burma* 










Canada.* 










Chile 


m 


fn 


409,560.00 


409.560.00 




IV 


(1) 


465. 00 


1,164.00 






(2) 


385.06 


650.91 



>&ee British Commonwealth of Nations, 



MAY 3, 1941 



539 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


March 1941 


3 months end- 
ing March 31, 
1941 


Chile— Continued. 


V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
t2) 


$70, 617. 00 
20, 333. 00 
18,087.75 


$138,934.00 

20,413.00 

18. 087. 75 

2, 187. 00 




4.92 


12, 898. 92 


Total 


619, 352. 73 


603, 895. 68 




I (2) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






5, 099. 25 


6, 099. 25 




2, 604, 364. 00 






99, 430. 00 




1,514.30 


1,614.30 
34, 100. 00 




2.30,612.00 
101,450.00 


384, 931. 00 
114,270.00 
139, 000. 00 






263, 500. 00 


Total 


338, 675. 65 


3, 646, 198. 56 




I (4) 

IV (2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




Colombia 


17.00 
26.00 


36.80 




959. 00 
70.00 




6,000.00 


34, 280. 00 
3, 675. 29 






2, 700. 00 








Total 


5,043.00 


41, 620. 09 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V fl) 
(2) 

VII (1) 








13.00 






125.00 




269.00 


2,613.00 
22. 286. 00 






3, 660. 00 




195.00 


736. 00 


Total - 


464. 00 


29. 323. 00 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (1) 






39.00 
21.00 

70.00 

1, 195. 00 

2, 922. 80 


39 00 




8, 566. 00 
1, 676. 00 
4, 885. 36 
1,19.5.00 
3, 777. 80 


Total 


4, 247. 80 


20, 137. 16 




I (1) 
(3) 
(4) 

VII (2) 


Curagao 




8, 500. 00 
16,000.00 










110.00 




10.00 


60.00 


Total 


10.00 


23, 670. 00 








Dominican Republic _ 




1. 053. 00 




1 (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 








36.00 
21.00 
109.00 
84.00 


36 00 




81.00 
109.00 
94.00 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


March 1941 


3 months end- 
ing March 31, 
1941 




V 
VII 


(3) 
(2) 




$29, 812. 00 






66.00 








Total 


$260. 00 


30, 198. OO 




IV 


(1) 
(2) 




Egypt --. 


3,910.00 


6, 120. 00 
52.00 








Total - . 


3,910.00 


6, 172. 00 




I 

V 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 




El Salvador 




44.00 




1, 600. 00 






500.00 








Total 




2, 144. 00 




V 

I 

VII 


(2) 

(i) 
(2) 






Fiji.* 


1,610.00 


1,510.00 






Gold Coast.* 

Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland.* 


2,236,390.00 
70, 122. 34 


2, 264, 690. 00 




146,632.34 


Total 


2, 306, 512. 34 


2, 411, 322. 34 




IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 








25.50 






280.00 






6,000.00 






1, 175. 00 








Total 




6,480.60 




IV 
VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(2) 






Haiti 




27.00 




8.00 




.10 


.10 


Total 


.10 


35.10 




I 

IV 
V 


(4) 
(2) 
(1) 








128.00 






435. 00 






20, 000. 00 








Total 




20, 663. 00 




V 

I 
ni 

V 


(2) 

(2) 
(1) 
(3) 






Hong Kong.* 




484.00 








India.* 

Iran -_ 


7. 065. 00 
78,940.00 


40, 816. 00 




7S, 940. 00 
7, 600. 00 








Total - 


86, 005. 00 


127, 355. 00 




I 

V 


(2) 
(2) 




Iran . 




47, 865. 00 




148, 000. 00 








Total 




19,5,865.00 



•See British Commonwealth of Nations. 



540 



DEPAiRTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


IVIarch 1941 


3 months end- 
ing March 31, 
1941 




V (2) 

I (1) 

(4) 

IV (1) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 

(2) 


$469. 00 


$469. 00 


Jamaica.' 
Kenya.* 
Leeward Islands.* 




45.00 

888.00 

2, 550. 00 

94, 700. 00 

412.00 


45. 00 




28. 388. 00 

2,881.50 

229, 685. 00 

1,308.59 

5, 564. 00 




7, 315. 26 
12, 481. 00 


9, 137.00 
13, 205. 00 


Total 


118,391.25 


290 214 09 




I (4) 

I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 

II 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




Mozambique 




29.60 








Netherlands Indies 




186. 00 




181, 777. 00 
276, 000. 00 
34, 645. 00 
373,414.00 
6,045.00 


498,345.00 
322, 104. 00 

36, 587. 84 
492,501.00 

75, 273. 00 
106, 020. 00 




1,332,108.00 


1,809,728.00 
750. 00 




6, 427. 00 
135, 860. 00 


43, 324. 00 
139, 957. 61 
160, 925. 00 




74,986.00 


192,091.65 
50, 250. 00 




388. 80 
30, 000. 00 


658.80 
30, 000. 00 


Total 


2, 461, 650. 80 


3,958.701.90 




I (1) 

(4) 

V (2) 






304.00 




54.00 


1,088.86 
3, 622. 00 








Total 


54.00 


4, 914. 86 




IV (2) 

V (1) 




Newfoundland.* 
New Guinea, Territory of.' 
New Zealand * 
Nicaragua.. 




4, 117. 00 






3, 500. 00 








Total 




7, 617. 00 




V (1) 
(3) 






Northern Rhodesia.* 

Palestine.* 

Panama 


2. 000. 00 
1, 650. 00 


19,277.00 
1. 650. 00 


Total 


3,650.00 


20, 927. 00 




IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 




Peru - 


19.90 


19.90 




963. 00 






6, 481. 00 




600.00 
9,214.00 


33, 810. 40 
9,214.00 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


March 1941 


3 months end- 

mg March 31, 

1941 


Peru— Continued. 


VII (1) 

(2) 


$1,241.49 
685. 00 


$1, 697. 49 
585. 00 


Total 


11, 660. 39 


51, 770. 79 




I (4) 

V (2) 

(3) 








46, 170. 18 






200.00 






15, 000. 00 








Total 




61, 370. 18 




I (2) 
(3) 

(4) 
VII (1) 






Southern Rhodesia.* 
South- West Africa.* 
Straits Settlements.* 
Surinam 


8, 100. 00 

36,000.00 

1, 000. 00 

387.60 


8, 100. 00 




36, 000. 00 

1,000.00 

387.60 


Total 


45, 487. 60 


45, 487. 60 




I (1) 

(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (3) 








20, 667. 00 




19.00 
560.00 
49.00 


19.00 

1,716.00 

161.00 

1, 000. 00 








Total 


628.00 


23, 563. 00 




III (2) 
V (2) 
VII (2) 




Trans-Jordan.* 

Trinidad.* 

Turkey 




19, 056. 86 






46, 958. 20 






138, 714. 00 












204, 729. 06 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(21 
(3) 






TTnion of Soutli Africa.* 




335. 49 






231.00 




2,418.00 


4, 133. 33 

4,882.00 

675.00 

385 00 




600.00 








Total 


2, 918. 00 


10,641.82 




IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




Venezuela 


7, 626. 00 
7.00 


8, 408. 00 




1,883.00 
4, ,586. 50 






44, 113.00 




1, 357. 84 


2, 941. 79 

3, 076. 00 








Total 


8, 990. 84 


65, 008. 29 




V (2) 








5, 920. 00 








Grand total 


55, 469, 516. 88 


131, 944, 697. 37 









* See British Commonwealth of Nations. 



MAY 3, 1941 

Akms Import Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the charac- 
ter, value, and countries of origin of the arms, 
aninumition, and implements of war licensed for 
import by the Secretary of State during the 
month of March 1941 : 



Country of origin 


Category 


Value 


Total 




V 


(?.) 


$51.00 


$51.00 




I 


(1) 

(2) 


304.00 
3, 010. 00 












14) 


1, 116.70 








(6) 


200.00 


101. 895. 7 




IV 


(1) 


105.00 






VII 


C2) 


97,160.00 




Costa Rica - ... 


V 


(2) 


1, 430. 00 


1, 430. 00 


Great Britain and Northern 


I 


(2) 


7, 800. 00 




Ireland. 




(3) 


2, 000. 00 








(4) 


70. 00 


21, 895. 00 






(6) 


12, 000. 00 






in 


(1) 


25.00 




Netherlands Indies 


I 


(1) 


150. 00 






IV 


(1) 
(2) 


10.00 
5.00 


165. 00 


Trinidad 


I 


(4) 


5.00 


5.00 






Total - 




126, 441. 70 











During the month of March, 30 import li- 
censes were issued, making a total of 74 such 
licenses issued during the current year. 

Categories or Arms, Ammunition, and Imple- 
ments OF War 

The categories of arms, ammunition, and im- 
plements of war in the appropriate column of 
the tables printed above are the categories into 
which those articles were divided in the Presi- 
dent's proclamation of May 1, 1937, enumerat- 
ing the articles which would be considered as 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war for 
the purjjoses of section 5 of the joint resolution 
of May 1, 1937 [see the BulJetin of Januaiy 11, 
1941 (Vol. IV, no. 81), pp. 76-77]. 

Special Statistics in Regard to Arms Exports 
TO Cuba 

In compliance with article II of the conven- 
tion between the United States and Cuba to 
suppress smuggling, signed at Habana, March 
11, 1926, which reads in part as follows : 



541 

"The High Contracting Parties agree that 
clearance of shipments of merchandise by 
water, air, or land, from any of the ports of 
either country to a port of entry of the other 
country, shall be denied when such shipment 
comprises articles the importation of which, is 
prohibited or restricted in the country to which 
such shipment is destined, unless in this last 
case there has been a compliance with the requi- 
sites demanded by the laws of both countries." 

and in compliance with, the laws of Cuba which 
restrict the importation of arms, ammunition, 
and implements of war of all kinds by requir- 
ing an import permit for each shipment, export 
licenses for shipments of arms, ammunition, and 
implements of war to Cuba are required for the 
articles enumerated below in addition to the 
articles enumerated in the President's procla- 
mation of May 1, 1937: 

(1) Arms and small arms using ammunition 
of caliber .22 or less, other than those classed as 
toys. 

(2) Spare parts of arms and small arms of 
all kinds and calibers, other than those classed 
as toys, and of guns and machine guns. 

(3) Ammunition for the arms and small arms 
under (1) above. 

(4) Sabers, swords, and military machetes 
with cross-guard hilts. 

(5) Explosives as follows : explosive powders 
of all kinds for all purposes; nitrocellulose hav- 
ing a nitrogen content of 12 percent or less; 
diplienylamine; dynamite of all kinds; nitro- 
glycerine; alkaline nitrates (ammonium, po- 
tassium, and sodium nitrate); nitric acid; ni- 
trobenzene (essence or oil of mirbane) ; sul- 
phur; sulphuric acid; chlorate of potash; and 
acetones. 

(6) Tear gas (CeHsCOCHXl) and other 
similar non-toxic gases and apparatus designed 
for the storage or projection of such gases. 

The table printed below indicates, in respect 
to liceii,ses authorizing the exportation to Cuba 
of the articles and commodities listed in the pre- 
ceding paragraph, issued by the Secretary of 
State during March 1941, the number of licenses 
and the value of the articles and commodities 
described in the licenses : 



542 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Number of licenses 


Section 


Value 


Total 


47 


(1) 

(2) 

(3) 

(5) 


$1. 003. 25 

322. 86 

10, 8(i8. 42 

18, 710. 95 


1 




> $30,905.48 



The table printed below indicates the value of 
the articles and commodities listed above ex- 
ported to Cuba during March 1941 under 
licenses issued by the Secretary of State : 



Section 



(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(5) 



Value 



$218. 00 

714.01 

6, 319. 82 

14, 571. SO 



Total 



.$20, 823. 63 



Tin-Plate Sckap 
During the month of March no licenses au- 



thorizing the exportation of tin-plate scrap were 

issued. 

Helium 

The table printed below gives the essential 
information in regard to the licenses issued dur- 
ing the montli of March 1941, authorizing the 
exportation of helium gas under the provisions 
of the act approved on Septembei- 1, 1937, and 
the regulations issued pui-suant thereto: 



Applicant for license 


Purchaser 
in foreign 
country 


Country 
of desti- 
nation 


Quan- 
tity in 
cubic 
feet 


Total 
value 


The Ohio Chemical & 

Mfg. Co. 
CoiTigan Dispatch Co. _ 

The Cheney Chemical 
Co. 


Dr. R. L. Eod- 

riquez. 
Dr R. L. Rod- 

riquez. 
Mazza & Co 


Mexico.- . 

Mexico 

Argentina. 


20 

21.4 

50 


$6.60 
7.00 
10.00 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 



[Released to the press May 3] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since April 26. 1941 : 

Frank C. Lee, of Salida, Colo., Consul Gen- 
eral at Amsterdam. Netherlands, has been desig- 
nated First Secretary of Embassy at Berlin, 
Germany. 

Richard P. Butrick, of Lockport, N. Y., Con- 
sul at Shanghai, China, has been designated 
Counselor of Embassy at Peiping, China. 

Willard L. Beaulac, of Pawtucket, R. I.. 
Counselor of Embassy at Habana, Cuba, has 
been designated Counselor of Embassy at 
Madrid, Spain. 

Maynard B. Barnes, of Vinton, Iowa, First 
Secretary of Embassy at Paris, France, has been 
"assigned for duty in the Department of State. 

Henry S. Waterman, of Seattle, Wash., Con- 
sul at Bordeaux, France, has been assigned as 
Consul at Monterrey, Mexico. 



Lewis Clark, of Montgomery. Ala., now serv- 
ing in the Department of State, has been desig- 
nated Second Secretary of Legation and Consul 
at Ottawa, Canada, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

John H. Lord, of Plymouth, Mass., Consul at 
Rotterdam, Netherlands, has been assigned as 
Consul at Amsterdam, Netherlands. 

Hiram Bingham, Jr., of New Haven, Conn., 
Vice Consul at Marseille, France, has been as- 
signed as Vice Consul at Lisbon, Portugal. 

John S. Service, of Oberlin, Ohio, Vice Con- 
sul at Shanghai, China, has been designated 
Third Secretary of Embassy at Nanking, China. 

W. Perry Cieorge, of Gadsden, Ala., Consul at 
Barcelona, Spain, has been assigned for duty 
in the Department of State. 

Carl H. Boehringer, of Michigan, Vice Con- 
sul at Osaka, Japan, has been designated Third 
Secretary of Embassy at Tokyo, Japan. 



MAY 3, 1941 



543 



T. Eliot Weil, of Pleasantville, N. Y., Third 
Secretary of Embassy at Nanking, China, has 
been assigned as Vice Consul at Shanghai, 
China. 

Harry M. Donaldson, of West Newton, Pa., 
Vice Consul at Lisbon, Portugal, has been as- 
signed as Vice Consul at Marseille, France. 

Forrest K. Geerken, of Minneapolis, Minn., 
Vice Consul at Colon, Panama, has been as- 
signed as Vice Consul at Mexico, D. F., Mexico. 

The assignment of Marselis C. Parsons, Jr., of 
Eye, N. Y., as Vice Consul at Zagreb, Yugo- 



slavia, has been canceled. Mr. Parsons has now 
been assigned as Vice Consul at Lisbon, Por- 
tugal. 

Elwood Williams, 3d, of New York, N. Y., 
Vice Consul at Winnipeg, Canada, has been 
assigned for duty in the Department of State. 

Milton Patterson Thompson, of Chattanooga, 
Tenn., Vice Consul at Habana, Cuba, has been 
assigned as Vice Consul at Nuevitas, Cuba. 

Thomas J. Cole, of Cincinnati, Ohio, Vice 
Consul at Geneva, Switzerland, has been ap- 
pointed Vice Consul at Habana, Cuba. 



PROMOTIONS 



[Released to the press April 30] 

The following Foreign Service officers were 
promoted effective May 1, 1941 : 

From class II to class I 

Erie R. Dickover, of California 
Paul Knabenslnie, of Ohio 
Kenneth S. Pattou, of Virginia 
Lowell C. Pinkerton, of Missouri 
Walter Tliurston, of Arizona 

From class III to class II 

Raymond E. Cox, of New York 

George K. Donalcl. of Alahania 

Frederick P. Hil)l)ard, of Texas 

Rohert F. Kelley, of Massacliusetts 

H. Earle Russell, of Sliehigan 

Clarence J. Siiiker. of tlie District of Columbia 

From class IV to class III 

Parker W. Buhrman, of Virginia 
William E. DeCourcy, of Texas 
Edwin Carl Kemp, of Florida 
Lucicn Mennninger, of South Carolina 
.Jefferson Patterson, of Ohio 
John Randolph, of New York 
Christian T. Steger. of Virginia 
Harold L. Williamson, of Illinois 

From, class V to class IV 

George H. Butler, of Illinois 
Fayette J. Flexer, of Illinois 
Kaleigh A. Gibson, of Illinois 
Julian F. Harrington, of Massachusetts 
Edmund B. Montgomery, of Illinois 
Austin R. Preston, of New York 
Joseph C. Satterthwaite, of Michigan 



From class V to class IV — Continued 

Paul C. Squire, of Massachusetts 
George Tait, of Virginia 

From class VI to class V 

Charles E. Bohlen, of Mas.sachusetts 
John M. Cabot, of Massachusetts 
Walton C. Ferris, of Wisconsin 
W. Perry George, of Alabama 
Franklin C. Gowen, of Pennsylvania 
John H. Lord, of Massachusetts 
James W. Riddleberger, of Virginia 
Alan N. Steyne, of New York 
George P. Waller, of Alabama 
James R. Wilkinson, of Wiscon.sin 
Frances E. Willis, of California 

From class VII to class VI 

Ware Adams, of Georgia 
Homer M. Byington, Jr., of Connecticut 
William W. Corcoran, of Massachusetts 
Everett F. Drumright, of Oklahoma 
Elbridge Durbrow, of California 
Harvey Lee Milbourne, of West Virginia 
Harold B. Minor, of Kansas 
Harry E. Stevens, of California 
Llewellyn E. Thompson, Jr., of Colorado 
Mason Turner, of Oonner'ticut 
Carlos J. Warner, of Ohio 
niomas C. Wasson, of New Jersey 
Eric C. Wendelin, of Massachn.setts 

From class VIII to class VII 

Theodore C. Achilles, of the District of Columbia 

John Davies, Jr.. of Ohio 

C. Burke Elbrick, of Kentucky 



544 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



From class VIII to clans VII — Contiuued 

Richard S. Huestis, of New York 
Foy D. Kohlor, of Ohio 
Harrison Lewis, of California 
F. Ridgway Liuea weaver, of Pennsylvania 
Robert G. McGregor, Jr., of New Yorls 
Maurice Pasquet, of New Yorli 
George W. Renchard, of Michigan 
Arthur L. Richards, of California 
Henry E. Stebhins, of Massachusetts 
Francis Bowtlen Stevens, of New York 
Laurence W. Taylor, of California 
Clare H. Tinilierlake, of Michigan 
Robert F. Woodward, of Minnesota 

From unclassified (.4) to class VIII 

William K. Ailshie, of Idaho 

E. Tomlin Bailey, of New Jersey 

Glen W. Bruner, of Colorado 

Andrew B. Foster, of Pennsylvania 

Norris S. Hasclton, of New Jersey 

Easton T. Kelsey, of Michigan 

Donal F. McGonigal, of New York 

Douglas MacArthur, 2d, of the District of Coliunbia 

J. Graham Parsons, of New York 

.John C. Pool, of Delaware 

William P. Snow, of Maine 

Carl W. Strom, of Iowa 

Arthur R. Williams, of Colorado 



From unclassified (B) to unclassifled (A) 

W. Stratton Anderson, Jr., of Illinois 

William Barnes, of Massachusetts 

Aaron S. Brown, of Michigan 

Harlan B. Clark, of Ohio 

William E. Cole, Jr., of New York 

Herbert P. Fales, of California 

Forrest K. Geerken, of Minnesota 

Jule L. Goetzmann, of Illinois 

Edmund A. Gullion, of Kentucky 

King.sley W. Hamilton, of Ohio 

Frederick D. Hunt, of the District of Columbia 

Francis C. Jordan, of North Carolina 

G. Wallace La Rue, of Missouri 

Perry Laukhuff, of Ohio 

Gordon H. Mattison, of Ohio 

Roy M. Melbourne, of Virginia 

John Fremont Melby, of Illinois 

Herbert V. Olds, of Massachusetts 

Elim O'Shaughnessy, of New York 

Paul Paddock, of Iowa 

G. Frederick Reinhardt, of California 

Milton C, Rewinkel, of Minnesota 

Walter Smith, of Illinol.s 

Charles W. Thayer, of Pennsylvania 

David A. Thomasson, of Kentucky 

Ray L. Thurston, of Wisconsin 

Evan M. Wilson, of Pennsylvania 

William Witman, 2d, of Pennsylvania 



Publications 



HACKWORTH'S "DIGEST OF INTERNATIONAL LAW" 

VOLUMES I AND II 



[Released to tlie press .Xpril ^7] 

There were released on April 28 the first two 
volumes of the new Digest of Internatwnal Law 
by Green H. Hackworth, who has been the De- 
partment of State's Legal Adviser since 1925. 

The last preceding digest on international 
law prepared in this country was that by John 
Bassett Moore, i^iiblished by the Government in 
1906. The new digest does not revise earlier 
digests or incorporate material published in 
them; instead it deals with material and events 
originating in the period subsequent to 1906 
which have hitlierto not been covered by a study 
of general scope. The work will be of immeas- 



urable value to officials of the Government in 
providing precedents and background for the 
formulation of decisions on questions of law 
and policy currently arising, as well as to others 
who are interested in or who deal with matters 
pertaining to international law and related sub- 
jects. The material has been selected largely 
from the vast accumulation of diplomatic cor- 
respondence of the Department of State ; state- 
ments by foreign offices and treatise-writers; 
pronouncements by judicial and administrative 
tribunals, national and international; interna- 
tional agreements; legislative enactments; etc. 



MAY 3, 1941 



545 



Volume I ' contains five chapters. Chapter I 
deals with the general nature of "International 
Law", its sanction, its source, its relationship to 
municipal law, its development, and efforts 
looking to its codification. 

Chapter II, relating to "States and their Gov- 
ernments", deals with the nature and classifica- 
tion of states, the rights and duties of states, and 
kinds of governments. It includes a section on 
mandates, a subject peculiar to the period in 
question. 

Chapter III treats of the "Eecognition" of 
states, of governments, and of belligerency. It 
covers the methods, prerequisites, conditions, 
and effect of re^^ognition ; also the effect of non- 
recognition. 

Chapter IV, on "Territory and Sovereignty 
i)f States", deals with methods of acquisition 
and loss of territory; effects of changes of sov- 
ereignty; and changes in the territorial posses- 
sions of the United States in the period covered ; 
etc. 

Chapter V, on "National Jurisdiction and 
Territorial Limits", has to do particularly with 
boundaries, rivers, straits, bays, etc., and the 
marginal sea, including problems arising in con- 
nection therewith. 

II 

Volimie II ' contains at the outset a chapter 
on "National Jurisdiction" covering such sub- 
jects as the supremacy of the territorial sover- 
eign ; authority over persons and property with- 
in the national domain; legal remedies; police 
and other regulations relating to such matters 
as freedom of speech and of the press, religious 
freedom, and the practice of professions ; mar- 
tial law (not to be confused with the law of war, 
which is covered in a later volume) ; punish- 
ment for crimes committed outside the territo- 
I'ial jurisdiction; jurisdiction over foreign ves- 
sels in territorial waters; the inviolability of 
territory ; and the duty of states to restrain in- 
jurious agencies. 



Chapter VII relates, on the other hand, to 
the "Exemptions from Territorial Jurisdiction" 
of foreign states, their sovereigns, their mili- 
tary forces, vessels of war, other public vessels 
and property, and of state agencies or instru- 
mentalities. It reviews the rights of the United 
States in extraterritorial countries and explains 
their present status. Finally, the chapter deals 
with the subject of "Asylum" as another type 
of exemption from territorial jurisdiction. 

Chapter VIII, the final chapter in the volume, 
is devoted to the subject of "The High Seas and 
Connecting Waterways." It discusses the im- 
portant subjects of freedom of the seas, na- 
tionality of vessels, and interoceanic canals. 

Tlie manuscript for four additional volumes 
is practically completed. It is intended that 
(here .shall be, in all, seven volumes with an ad- 
ditional index volume. Since the basic expense 
oi printing this work is borne by the Depart- 
ment of State, the Government Printing Office 
is able to offer the book to others at a nominal 
sum ($2 for volume I and $1.75 for volume 
II) covering only the cost of running off addi- 
tional volumes for sales purposes. 



Regulations 



The following.Government regulations may 
be of interest to readers of the Bidlet'ui: 

Export Coutrol Schedule No. -5 [coveriug, effective 
Aiiril 24, 1041, forms, couver.sions, and derivatives of 
sole leather (item 3 of Proclamation 2460 of February 
25,1941)]. April 24, 1941. (Administrator of Export 
Control.) Federal Register, April 29, 1&41 (vol. 6, no. 
83), p. 2171. 

Revalidation and Replacement of Non-Resident 
Alleu.s' Border Crossing Identification Cards. April 29, 
1941. (Immigration and Naturalization Service: De- 
partment of Justice.) [First Supplement to General 
Order No. C-23.] Federal Register, May 1, 1941 (vol. 
6, no. 85), p. 2214. 



* Publication 1506. 
'Publication 1521. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



AVIATION 



AGREEMENT WITH MEXICO FOR THE RECIP- 
ROCAL TRANSIT OF MILITARY AIRCRAFT 

On April 28, 1941, the President proclaimed 
the Agreement with Mexico to Facilitate the 
Eeciprocal Transit of Military Aircraft 
through the territories and territorial waters 
of the two countries signed at Washington on 
April 1, 1941. The agreement will shortly be 
printed as Treaty Series 971. 

FINANCE 

TAX CONVENTION WITH CANADA 

The Canadian Government advises the De- 
partment that among the resolutions intro- 
duced in Parliament by the Honorable J. L. 
Ilsley, the Canadian Minister of Finance, in 
presenting the third War Budget on April 29, 
1941, was one which reads as follows: 

"That the rate of tax imposed by section 
9B (2) of the Act (Income War Tax Act) on 
all non-residents be increased from 5 per centum 
to 15 per centum and that the exemption in re- 
spect of interest payable in a currency other 
than Canadian be repealed." 

It was further provided that the enactment 
founded on this resolution would come into 
force on April 30, 1941. 

On December 30, 1936 a convention relating 
to income taxation was signed at Washington 
between representatives of the United Stated 
and Canada (Treaty Series 920) whereby the 
following reciprocal provisions were brought 
into force with I'espect to income taxation of the 
two countries : 

"(a) The rate of income tax imposed by one 
of the Contracting States, in respect of income 
derived from sources therein, upon individuals 
residing in the other State, who are not en- 
gaged in trade or business in the taxing State 

546 



and have no office or place of business therein, 
shall not exceed five per centum for each taxable 
year, so long as an equivalent or lower rate of 
income taxation is imposed by the other State 
upon individuals residing in the former State 
who are not engaged in trade or business in 
such other State and do not have an office or 
place of business therein. 

"(b) The rate of income tax imposed by one 
of the Contracting States, in respect of divi- 
dends derived from sources therein, upon non- 
resident foreign corporations organized under 
the laws of the other State, which are not en- 
gaged in trade or business in the taxing State 
and have no office or place of business therein, 
shall not exceed five per centum for each taxable 
year, so long as an equivalent or lower rate of 
income taxation on dividends is imposed by the 
other State upon corporations organized under 
the laws of the former State which are not en- 
gaged in trade or business in such other State 
and do not have an office or place of business 
therein. 

"(c) Either State shall be at liberty to in- 
crease the rate of taxation prescribed by para- 
graphs (a) and (b) of this article, and in such 
case the other State shall be released from the 
requirements of the said paragraphs (a) 
and (b)." 

In his speech presenting the budget to Parlia- 
ment Mr. Ilsley discussed this matter and said : 

". . . in view of the very drastic increases in 
taxes upon Canadian residents since the out- 
break of the war we think it reasonable to in- 
crease the tax on non-residents under the Income 
War Tax Act from 5 per cent to 15 per cent. 
This rate, it will be noticed, is still lower than 
the effective rate of I6I/2 per cent jsayable under 
the United States laws on income going abroad 
to foreign countries in general, and very much 
lower than the cori'esponding rate applied by 



MAY 3, 194 1 



547 



the United Kingdom. The raising of this rate 
will mean that the United States will be re- 
leased from the requirements of the reciprocal 
tax convention of December 1936." 

In view of the action taken by the Canadian 
Government, the Government of the United 
States considers that it is released from the 
requirements contained in paragraphs (a) and 
(b) of the convention above-quoted. The 
Treasury Department has been advised accord- 
ingly- 

AGREEMENT WITH FINLAND 

On May 1, 1941 the Minister of Finland, Mr. 
Hjahnar J. Procojie, and the Secretary of the 
Treasury, Mr. Henry Morgenthau, Jr., signed 
an agreement under which the Republic of Fin- 
land will undertake to pay the sum of $235,398 
to the United States in ten aimual payments 
with interest at three percent. 

The sum of $235,398 was payable by Finland 
to the United States on December 15, 1940, but 
was postponed mider a joint resolution of Con- 
gress approved on June 15, 1940.* 

Under the terms of the agreement, Finland 
has agreed to pay annually $27,390.12. These 
payments are to be made in two instalments of 
$13,095.06 on June 15 and on December 15 of 
each year. The first payment under this agree- 
ment will be due on June 15, 1941. 

FLORA AND FAUNA 

CONVENTION ON NATURE PROTECTION AND 
WILDLIFE PRESERVATION IN THE WESTERN 
HEMISPHERE 

United States 

The instrument of ratification by the United 
States of the Convention on Nature Protection 
and Wildlife Preservation in the Western Hem- 
isphere, which was opened for signature at the 
Pan American Union on October 12, 1940, was 
deposited with the Union on April 28, 1941. 



"See the Bulletin of December 7, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 
76), pp. 501-503. 



The United States thus becomes the first 
country to deposit its instrument of ratification 
of this convention, which has been signed by 15 
other American republics. 

NAVAL AND MILITARY MISSIONS 

ADDITIONAL ARTICLES TO THE AGREEMENTS 
OF DECEMBER 12, 1940, PROVIDING FOR 
UNITED STATES NAVAL AND MILITARY 
AVIATION MISSIONS TO ECUADOR 

On April 30, 1941 separate additional articles 
to the Naval Mission Agreement (Executive 
Agreement Series 188) and the Military Avia- 
tion Mission Agreement (Executive Agreement 
Series 189) between the United States and Ecua- 
dor of December 12, 1940, were signed by Cor- 
dell Hull, Secretary of State, and Senor Capitan 
Col(3n Eloy Alf aro. Ambassador of Ecuador at 
Washington. 

The two agreements signed on December 12, 

1940, each effective for a period of four years 
from the date of signature, contain provisions 
for the detail of officers of the United States 
Army and Navy to advise the anned forces of 
Ecuador similar to provisions contained in 
agreements between the United States and cer- 
tain other American republics. 

The additional articles signed on April 30, 

1941, which will shortly be printed as Executive 
Agreement Series 206 and Executive Agreement 
Series 207, respectively, relate to the accommo- 
dations to be provided for each member of the 
respective missions and each dependent member 
of his family and to the transportation of the 
household effects, baggage, and automobiles of 
such members. 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATION CON- 
VENTION, REVISIONS OF CAIRO, 1938 

Brazil 

The American Ambassador to Brazil trans- 
mitted to the Department with two despatches 
dated April 7, 1941, translations of two decrees 
jiublished in the Diario Official of April 2, 1941, 



548 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



whereby the Government of Brazil approves the 
Eevisions of the General and Additional Radio 
Regulations and the Telegraph Regulations an- 
nexed to the International Telecommunication 
Convention of 1932, as adopted at Cairo on 
April 8 and April 4, 1938, respectively. The 
decrees, dated March 31, 1941, state that the 
regulations will be considered effective as of 
January 1, 1939. 



Legislation 



Joint Resolution Autliorizing the President of tlic 
United States of America to proclaim October 11, 1941, 
General Pulaski's Memorial Day for the observance 
and commemoration of the death of Brigadier General 
Casimir Pulaski. Approved April 24, 1941. (Public 
Law 41, 77th Cong., 1st. sess.) 1 p. 5^. 

Utilization of Idle Foreign Merchant Tonnage [in 
American port.s ; authorizing requisition or purchase 
by the President during the emergency]. (H. Kept. 
440, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 22 pp. 

Copies of Nati.ualization Papers of Parent To Be Is- 
sued to His or Her Children. (H. Kept. 462, 77th 
Cong., 1st sess.) 2 pp. 50. 



Acknowledging the Felicitations of the Congress of 
Costa Rica [on passage by U. S. Congress of Lend- 
I^ase hill]. (H. Rept. 463, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 
Ip. 5«;. 

National Defense Activities — Department of State: 
Communication From the President of the United 
States Transmitting a Proposed Amendment to the 
Annual Budget for the Fiscal Year 1942, Involving 
an Increase of $103,000 for National Defense Activities, 
Department of State, Emergency Fund for the Presi- 
dent [covering administration of export-control work]. 
(S. Doc. 50, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 2 pp. 50. 

Supplemental Estimate of Appropriations for the 
Department of State: Communication From the Presi- 
dent of the United States Transmitting Supplemental 
Estimate of Appropriations for the Department of 
Slate, for the Fiscal Years 1941 and 1942, Amounting 
to .$611,000 [including $390,000 for salaries. Depart- 
ment of State, 1941 and 1942; $70,tXlO for contingent 
expenses. Department of State, 1941 ; .$1(1,000 for print- 
ing and binding, Department of State, 1941 ; and $135,- 
000 for contingent expenses. Foreign Service, 1941]. 
(H. Doc. 192, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 3 pp. 50. 

Proposed Inter-American Highway ; Message From 
the President of the United States Transmitting a Re- 
port of the Secretary of State and a Draft of ProiMsed 
Legislation To Enable the United States To Cooperate 
With the Governments of the American Republics In 
Central America in the Survey and Construction of the 
Proposed Inter-American Highway Witliln the Borders 
of Those Republics. (H. Doc. 197, 77th Cong., 1st 
sess.) 4 pp. 50. 



U, S GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE; 1941 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington. D. C. — Price 10 cents Subscription price, $2.73 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH .THE APPROVAL OF THE DIHECTOB OF THE BDEEAD OF THE BCDOET 



>VVJt^' 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 



MAY 10, 1941 
Vol. IV: No. 98— Publication 1599 



Qontents 



Europe: Page 
Revocation of registrations of two organizations solic- 
iting contributions for relief in belligerent countries . 551 
Anniversary of the liberal constitution of Poland . . . 552 

American Republics: 

Visit of chiefs of naval general staffs of other American 

republics 553 

Visit to the United States of Argentine Minister of 

Foreign Relations 556 

Death of Bolivian good-will flyer 556 

Proposed inter-American highway 557 

Australia: 

Visit to the United States of the Prime Minister of 

Australia 559 

General: 

Control of exports in national defense 559 

Cultural Relations: 

Visit of distinguished leaders from Bolivia 562 

Awards in novel contest 562 

The Uniao Cultural Brasil - Estados Unidos .... 563 
Presentation of books to institutions in other American 

republics 563 

The Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 564 

[Over] 




Qontents 



—CONTINUED. 



I 



Publications: Page 

International exchange 565 

Treaty Information: 
Agriculture: 

Agreement With Haiti for the Development of Hai- 
tian Agriculture and Economy 567 

Finance: 

Agreement With Haiti 567 

Flora and fauna: 

Convention on Nature Protection and Wildlife Pres- 
ervation in the Western Hemisphere 568 

Opium and other dangerous drugs: 

International Opium Convention 568 

Convention for Limiting the Manufacture and Regu- 
lating the Distribution of Narcotic Drugs .... 569 
Telecommunications : 

International Telecommunication Convention . . . 569 

Regulations 570 

Legislation 570 



U- S. SUPFRINTFNDENT OF DOCUMEWTS 

JUN 10 1941 



Europe 



REVOCATION OF REGISTRATIONS OF TWO ORGANIZATIONS SOLIC- 
ITING CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 



[Released to the press May 10] 

The Secretary of State has canceled the regis- 
trations, pursuant to the rules and regulations 
promulgated under section 8 of the Neutrality 
Act of 1939 governing the solicitation and col- 
lection of contributions to be used for relief in 
belligerent countries, of the Fedeiation of the 
Italian World War Veterans in the U.S.A., Inc., 
626 Fifth Aveiuie, New York, N.Y., and the 
Ladies Auxiliary of the Providence Branch of 
the Federation of the Italian World War Vet- 
erans in the United States, 296 Atwells Avenue, 
Providence, R.I. 

The following letters from the Secretary of 
State notifying those organizations of the revo- 
cation were sent May 8, 1941 : 

"Federation of the Italian World War Vet- 
erans IN the U.S.A., Inc., 

''G26 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
"Sirs: 

"Reference is made to your registration pursu- 
ant to the rules and regulations promulgated un- 
der section 8 of the Neutrality Act of 1939 gov- 
erning the solicitation and collection of contri- 
butions to be used for relief in belligerent coun- 
tries. Section 8 (b) of the Neutrality Act per- 
mits such solicitation and collection of contribu- 
tions only by persons and organizations who are 
not acting for or on behalf of a belligerent gov- 
ernment or any agency or instrumentality there- 
of. In your application for registration you 
named the Community Welfare Fund of Torino, 
Naples, Palermo, Bari, Venezia, Roma, Catania, 
and Reggio Calabria as distributors in Italy of 



contributions collected by your organization. 
In that application an oath was taken to the ef- 
fect that these organizations were not acting for 
or on behalf of a belligerent government and, 
in view of this sworn statement, the application 
was accepted. Subsequent investigation, how- 
ever, has given this Department reason to be- 
lieve that the distributors named in your appli- 
cation for registration are not qualified dis- 
tributors and that they are so closely identified 
with the Italian Government that they must be 
regarded as organizations acting for or on be- 
half of that Government. 

"It would appear, therefore, that the solicita- 
tion and collection of contributions for distribu- 
tion by the distributors named in your aj^plica- 
tion for registration constitutes a violation of 
section 8 of the Neutrality Act and the rules and 
regulations pi-omulgated thereunder, and it has 
been determined that pursuant to the authority 
vested in the Secretary of State by paragi-aph 
(7) of the rules and regulations, your registra- 
tion shall be revoked as of May 10, 1941. After 
that date you will be without legal authority 
to engage in the solicitation and collection of 
contributions to be used for relief in belligerent 
countries. You are requested to submit a report 
concerning your activities during the period 
May 1 to May 10 at your earliest convenience 
for which purpose blank forms are enclosed. 
You are further requested to inform the De- 
partment in regard to the disposition of any 
funds remaining on hand at the time of the 
revocation of your registration. 

551 



552 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



''It will be imdei'stood, of course, that the 
revocation of your registration does not preclude 
this Depaitment or any otlier Department or 
agency of this Government from taking such 
other action in regard to this matter as may be 
deemed appropriate." 



"Ladies Auxiliary of the Peovidenoe Branch 
or THE Federation of the Italian World 
War Veterans in the United States, 
"^.9ff Atuiells Avenue, Providence, R. I. 
"Mesdames : 

"Reference is made to your registration pur- 
suant to the rules and regulations promulgated 
under section 8 of the Neutrality Act of 1939 
governing the solicitation and collection of 
contributions to be used for relief in belliger- 
ent countries. Section 8 (b) of the Neutrality 
Act permits such solicitation and collection of 
contributions only by persons and organiza- 
tions who are not acting for or on behalf of a 
belligerent government or any agency or instru- 
mentality thereof. In your application for 
registration you named 'Opere Assistenziali 
Italiane (Branch: Vedove ed Orfani di Guer- 
ra), Roma', subsequently corrected to read 
'Associazione Nazionale Famiglie dei Caduti in 
Guerra, Via Manin No. 9, Roma, branch of the 
Opere Assistenziali Italiane', as distributor in 
Italy of contributions collected by your organ- 
ization. In that application an oath was taken 
to the effect that this organization was not act- 
ing for or on behalf of a belligerent govern- 
ment and, in view of this sworn statement, the 
application was accepted. Subsequent investi- 
gation, however, has given this Department 
reason to believe that the distributor named in 
your application for registration is not a quali- 
fied distributor and that it is so closely identi- 
fied with the Italian Government that it must 
be regarded as an organization acting for or on 
behalf of that Government. 

"It would appear, therefore, that the solici- 
tation and collection of contributions for dis- 
tribution by the distributor named in your 
application for registration constitutes a viola- 



tion of section 8 of the Neutrality Act and the 
rules and regulations promulgated thereunder, 
and it has been determined that jiursuant to the 
authority vested in the Secretary of State by 
paragraph (7) of the rules and regulations, 
your registration shall be revoked as of May 
10, 19-11. After that date, you will be without 
legal authority to engage in the solicitation 
and collection of contributions to be used for 
relief in belligerent countries. You are re- 
quested to submit a report concerning your ac- 
tivities during the jDeriod May 1 to May 10 at 
your earliest convenience for which purpose 
blank forms are enclosed. You are further re- 
quested to mform the Department in regard 
to the disposition of any funds remaining on 
hand at the time of the revocation of your 
registration. 

"It will be understood, of course, that the 
revocation of your registration does not preclude 
this Department or any other Department or 
agency of this Government from taking such 
other action in regard to this matter as may be 
deemed appropriate." 



ANNIVERSARY OF THE LIBERAL 
CONSTITUTION OF POLAND 

[Released to the press May 5] 

The following telegrams were exchanged by 
President Roosevelt and the President of the 
Republic of Poland, Wladyslaw Raczkiewicz, 
upon the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary 
of Poland's liberal constitution of 1791 : 

"The White House, 

May 3, IHI. 
"On this Polish national day, the 150th anni- 
versary of Poland's liberal constitution of 1791, 
I wish to convey through you to the Polish Gov- 
ernment and people, in behalf of the Govern- 
ment and people of the United States, assur- 
ances of our unfailing friendship and under- 
standing, and confidence in the final triumph 
of the forces of democracy. 

Franklin D Roosevelt" 



MAY 10, 1941 



553 



[Released to the press May 9] 

"LoiraoN, May 6, 19^1. 
"I hasten to convey to you Mr. President, my 
most sincere thanks for your cordial message on 
our national day the anniversary of Poland's 
constitution of 1791. In this hour of struggle 
in defense of the foundations of our Christian 
civilization when the Polish people are fighting 
for their vei^y survival your words expressing 
the sympathies of the great American democ- 
racy will bring a ray of light into the dark 



shadows cast by the most brutal and ruthless 
oppressors. Friendship and admiration for the 
American Nation have always been present in 
Polish hearts and today more than ever before 
we feel confident that the dauntless forces of 
freedom inherent in the American people and 
their strong faith in the victory of democracy 
will contribute towards the final triumph of 
ideals for which humanity has always been pre- 
pared to make the liighest sacrifice. 

Wladtslaw RAczKimvicz" 



American Republics 



VISIT OF CHIEFS OF NAVAL GENERAL STAFFS OF OTHER 

AI^IERICAN REPUBLICS 



At the invitation of Admiral Stark, Chief of 
Naval Operations, the chiefs of the naval gen- 
eral staffs of Argentina, Bi'azil, Chile, Colombia, 
Cuba, Ecuador, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, Uru- 
guay, and Venezuela arrived in Washington on 
May 7 on a visit to the United States. They 
will remain in Washington until May 12, when 
they will depart on a tour of inspection of vari- 
ous naval establishments, including those on the 
west coast. 

[Released to the press May 8] 

The following remarks were made by the Sec- 
retary of State in welcoming tiie visiting chiefs 
of naval general staffs of other American 
republics : 

"I am very pleased to welcome you. If our 
naval forces needed stimulation more than they 
have been stimulated, they would get it from 
contacts with you. I know it will be a source 
of pleasure and satisfaction for all our officials 
to extend evei'y possible courtesy and facility 
to you. You come here not only at a most in- 
teresting but a most important time from the 
standpoint of our mutual welfare and safety. 



"I have for long years emphasized in confer- 
ences here and with you in Latin America the 
viewpoint that any threat to the safety of any 
one among our 21 republics was a threat to the 
safety of all of them. For some years that was 
minimized by many statesmen and even Army 
and Navy men, but new developments of un- 
precedented nature, which signified a world- 
wide movement of conquest, have brought more 
sharply to each the actual danger or threat not 
only to one but to all of the American republics. 

"As we see this threat of danger the more im- 
portant we find it to collaborate together and 
to cooperate in every practical way for the pur- 
pose of increasing the effectiveness of our agen- 
cies and means of common defense against the 
common danger, which has no geographical lim- 
its in its ultimate objectives. We shall have a 
common objective in resisting a common danger. 

"I wish each of you a most satisfactory visit. 
I am sure we shall profit from this exchange of 
ideas as much if not more than you." 

The Under Secretary of State, the Honorable 
Sumner Welles, on May 10, 1941 gave a dinner 



554 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



at the Sulgrave Club in honor of the chiefs of 
naval general staffs from other American re- 
publics. A list of the chiefs of staff attending 
the dinner, and their aides, follows. 

Vice Admiral Jose Machado de Castro e 
Silva, Chief of the Naval General Staff 
of Brazil 
Aide: Lt. Frederico G. Huet de Oliveira 
Sampaio 
Vice Admiral Julio AUard P., Chief of the 
Naval General Staff of Chile 
Aide: Lt. Comdr. Hernan H. Cubillos 
Vice Admiral Jose Guisasola, Chief of the 
Naval General Staff of Argentina 
Aide : Comdr. Teodoro Hartung 
Kear Admiral Gustavo A. Schroder, Chief 
of the Naval General Staff of Uruguay 
Aide: Lt. Gabriel Ketamoso-Irastorza 
Rear Admiral Carlos Rotalde G. del V., Chief 
of the Naval General Staff of Peru 
Aide : Comdr. Ernesto Rodriguez 
Commodore David Coello Ochoa, Chief of the 
Naval General Staff of Mexico 
Aide : Comdr. Manuel Zermefio Araico 
Capt. Julio Diez Argiielles y Fernandez 
Castro, Chief of the Naval General Staff 
of Cuba 
Aide: Lt. Felipe Cadenas y Aguilera 
Col. Francisco Tamayo Cortes, Chief of the 
Naval General Staff of Colombia 
Aide : Lt. Antonio J. Tanco 
Comdr. Cesar A. Mogollon Cardenas, Chief 
of the Naval General Staff of Ecuador 
Aide : Comdr. Francisco Fernandez Madrid 
Comdr. Antonio Picardi, Chief of the Naval 

G«neral Staff of Venezuela 
Comdr. Ramon Diaz Benza, Chief of the 
Naval General Staff of Paraguay 
Aide : Lt. Adolfo Roig-Franco 

Other guests included the heads of diplomatic 
missions and naval attaches in the United States 
of other American republics. Members of the 
Congress of tlie United States, officers of the 
United States Navy and Marine Corps, and 
officials of the Pan American Union and the 
Department of State, 



The Under Secretary of State made the fol- 
lowing remarks at the dinner which he gave on 
May 10, 1941 : 

"I am deeply conscious of the privilege of 
having with us tonight as our honored guests, 
these distinguished officers in whom are vested 
the command of the Navies of the Western 
Hemisjihere. 

"It is needless for me to say that their visit 
at any time M'ould be a source of the greatest 
l^leasure to the Government of the United 
States. 

"But at a moment such as this, I know that 
we all realize that the visit with wliich we are 
honored is of outstanding importance. It is a 
further and convincing demonstration o^ the 
determination of the Americas to collaborate 
together for the advancement and protection of 
their mutual interests. 

"During these latter years, the American re- 
publics — the sovereign and independent associ- 
ates of the Western Hemisphere — have, I am 
thankful to say, been drawn very closely 
together. 

"Five years ago our Governments had the 
wisdom to interpret correctly the sinister sig- 
nificance of the storm clouds that were already 
then fast arising on the world horizon, 

"At the Inter-American C-onference for the 
Maintenance of Peace held at Buenos Aires, the 
great Capital of the Argentine Republic, in De- 
cember of 1936, the American nations, by com- 
mon accord, agreed upon the steps which they 
considered necessary to enable them to maintain 
the peace of the Americas and to insure the 
security of the Western Hemisphere. 

"Today the peoples of the Americas know that 
they confi'ont powers bent upon world domina- 
tion, and upon the obliteration of all of the free- 
doms which we Americans most dearly cherish — 
freedom of worship, freedom of speech, and 
freedom of thought. And yet the American na- 
tions are confident of their own strength as they 
face the conflagration which is fast spreading 
in the west, and in the east, because of their 
knowledge that there is no misunderstanding 



MAY 10, 1941 



555 



which separates them and no fears or suspicions 
which divide them. 

"We all of us recognize that in our unity lies 
our strength. 

"We have pledged ourselves to the defense of 
our New World and to the preservation of our 
liberties. It is incumbent upon us to make this 
pledge a reality so strong, so powerful, that no 
alien forces, however powerful, will ever be en- 
abled to encroach upon this hemisphere. 

"My country throws open its portals to you. 
We appreciate this opportunity to show you 
why we are supremely confident that no success- 
ful assault can be made upon the security of any 
American country. 

"We want you to see our ships and our ship- 
yards, our airjilanes and our airplane factories, 
our equipment and the industry that makes it. 

"We want you to see the scope and extent of 
our present defenses and to learn of the plans 
for their improvement and enlargement. 

"In the name of my Government I can assure 
you that to the utmost extent of its ability, the 
United States stands prepared to play its full 
part in the defense of the Western Hemisphere 
and to assist its neighbors to the limits of its 
power, should that task ever become necessary. 

"My Government is grateful for your visit. 
It trusts that your stay among us will be as use- 
ful and as satisfactory to you as it is to us. We 
hope that we may have the privilege of seeing 
you often in our midst. 

"I ask you to join with me in a toast to the 
Presidents of the 21 American republics and to 
the freedom and liberty of our nations which 
can be and which will be, because of our con- 
tinued cooperation, rendered secure." 

The Chief of the Naval General Staff of the 
Argentine Republic, Vice Achiiiral Jose Gui- 
sasola, made the following remarks at the dinner 
given by the Under Secretary of State on May 
10, 1941 : 

"Mr. Under Secretary of State : 

"Your presence here on this happy occasion 
and the fortunate fact that I have been requested 
by my colleagues of the nations of Latin Amer- 



ica to reply to your kind words of welcome en- 
able me to phrase words of thanks for your 
amiable reception at dinner, and, prizing the dis- 
tinction with which my friends, the other Chiefs 
of Naval General Staffs of the Americas, have 
honored me, I desire to express my feelings in 
these few words. 

"Gentlemen, interpreting the feeling of those 
we represent from the American navies, al- 
though at the same time it is a very obvious 
thing, as we all know how the kind invitation 
of Admiral Stark, the Chief of Naval Opera- 
tions, has warmed our hearts, I desire to call at- 
tention to and make public oui' recognition of 
our sincere appreciation of this wonderful invi- 
tation, especially as it comes to us from the 
American Navy which as an organization re- 
flects the virtues and warm hospitality which 
is such an outstanding trait of their people. 

"Our navies are closely and intimately asso- 
ciated ; a common viewpoint of ideals and ends 
guides us ; the same very love of our profession 
makes us kin ; one common hope of progress and 
development unites us in the struggle for those 
things which are conmion to all of us, and for 
the continued advance towards those objectives 
which constitute the fundamental bases of our 
institutions and freedom. 

"Confirmation of these concepts is the inter- 
esting program conceived by our kind host. Its 
realization will be for us without doubt an ex- 
ample of efficiency and fitting testimony of the 
power of the United States. 

"It is a matter of innermost satisfaction to me 
that they have entrusted these matters to the 
wise direction and matcUess efficiency of their 
sailors, so closely related many of them with 
ours in their daily labors and pursuits. And 
leaving for a moment my main theme I wish to 
thank them and their higher authorities for the 
efficient collaboration which without stint they 
have always given us. 

"In these times in which we live, complex and 
transitional as they are, marking the end of one 
epoch and the beginning of another, this visit, 
or rather this assembly, of the senior representa- 
tives of our navies, now that mutual understand- 



556 

ing find frank speech between the people of this, 
our Western Hemisphere, is so clearly necessary, 
assumes a significant value. 

"If we seek in the American way of life for 
reasons which may explain this truth we will 
find that history, the directives of the right and 
international justice, and a close interlinking of 
interests makes us kin, proving the existence of 
feeling common to all our peoples. 

"I speak of this America that takes such legiti- 
mate pride in having made himian harmony an 
invariable rule in their i-elations with each 
other; in this America which, becoming free, 
opened its gates wide to all men who, attracted 
by the fertility of its soil and protected by the 
most liberal laws, came to enrich its soil with 
their toil and energy, and thus to fashion their 
and America's future. With their strength of 
soul and manly energy they have worked for 
the progress of the generous land that gave them 
shelter. 

"I believe with you. Sir, that the common im- 
derstanding and mutual knowledge of people 
one with another, their respect for each other's 
institutions and culture, and their innermost 
feelings, paves the way to true bonds of friend- 
ship ; this indeed is a creative policy of sincerity 
without suspicions, neighborliness without in- 
hibitions, friendship without conditions. 

"This hour, fateful as it is in history, goes 
beyond that; it fosters a very profound senti- 
ment and makes for a oneness of imderstanding 
and affection. 

"Mr. Under Secretary of State, thanking you 
again in the name of the Chiefs of the Naval 
General Staffs of the American navies and for 
myself for your presence here, which we so 
highly appreciate for its true worth, I wish you 
as much happiness as you have given us by your 
so cordial welcome." 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF AR- 
GENTINE MINISTER OF FOREIGN 
RELATIONS 

His Excellency the Minister of Foreign Rela- 
tions of the Argentine Republic and Seiiora de 
Ruiz-Guiiiazu will arrive in Washington from 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

New York the afternoon of Tuesday, May 13, 
1941, for a visit as guests of the Government of 
the United States, extending until the morning 
of Mdj 17. They will be received at the Union 
Station by an ofiicial reception committee, 
headed by the Secretary of State and Mrs. Hull 
and will then be escorted to the Larz Anderson 
house, 2118 Massachusetts Avenue, which has 
graciously been placed at the disposal of the 
Government by the Society of the Cincinnati, 
for the duration of the visit of the Foreign 
Minister. 

The party will be comprised of the following : 

His Excellency Enrique Ruiz-Guiiiazu, 
Minister of Foreign Relations of the Ar- 
gentine Republic 
Seiiora de Ruiz-Guinazu 
Seiiorita CeUna Ruiz-Guiiiazu 
Senorita Maria Luisa Ruiz-Guinazu 
Sailor Alfonso Ruiz-Guinazu 
Seiiorita Carmen Ruiz-Guiiiazii 
Sefiorita Magdellena Ruiz-Guinazu 
Seiior Guillermo Uriburu, secretary 

Arrangements made for their entertainment 
in Washington include dinners given by the 
Secretary of State, the Under Secretary of 
State, and the Argentine Ambassador; a stag 
luncheon given at the Wliite House by the Pres- 
ident; and visits to Arlington National Ceme- 
tery and Mount Vernon. The party will also 
attend the reception in honor of the President 
of the United States at the Pan American Union 
on Wednesday evening, May 14. 

They will depart for New York the following 
Saturday morning. 

DEATH OF BOLIVIAN GOOD WILL 
FLYER 

[Released to the press May 10] 

Funeral services for the Bolivian good-will 
flyer, Cupt. Rafael Suarez-Rivas, who crashed 
at tlie Washington Airport on May 8, will be 
held at the Fort Myer Post Chapel on Monday, 
May 12, 1941. Representatives of the State De- 
partment, Army officers, and the attaches of 
several of the diplomatic missions in Washing- 
ton will be present at the services. 



MAY 10, 1941 



557 



The i-emains will be flown to La Paz in an 
Army plane, M'hich will take off from Boiling 



Field shortly after the completion of the funeral 

services. 



PROPOSED INTER-AMERICAN HIGHWAY 



The President on May 1, 1941 transmitted to 
the Congress of the United States a draft of 
proposed legislation authorizing the appropria- 
tion of a simi not to exceed 20 million dollars 
to enable the United States to cooperate with the 
Governments of the Republics in Central Amer- 
ica, that is with the Governments of the Re- 
publics of Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, 
Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama, in the sur- 
vey and construction of the proposed inter- 
American highway within the borders of those 
republics.^ 

The Secretary of State, in his report trans- 
mitting the draft bill to the President, stated 
that the section of the highway in question is 
approximately 1,550 miles in length, reaching 
from the Panama Canal to the border between 
Guatemala and Mexico, where it would connect 
with the jSIexican section of the highway and 
provide direct transportation from Lai'edo, 
Tex., to the Canal Zone. 

Principal reasons why it is considered de- 
sirable for the United States to make a direct 
contribution in the completion of the highway 
were set forth by the Secretary of State as fol- 
lows: (1) Improved transportation within and 
between the several countries and the United 
States; (2) development of new lands and new 
natural resources, and increased consumption 
of American imports; (3) increased employ- 
ment and maintenance of economic structures; 
(4) increased tourist trafSc; (5) increased mar- 
ket for American automobiles, parts, garage 
equipment, etc. ; (6) defense value; and (7) the 
fact that from 80 to 90 percent or more of the 
amounts aijpropriated under this bill would be 
spent for the purchase of American machinei-y 
and equipment, for ti'ansportation thereof on 
American vessels, and for salaries of American 



engineers, resulting in between 16 and 18 mil- 
lion dollars of additional American exports, 
not to mention increased employment afforded 
thereby in the United States and Central 
America. 

The report stated in part : "The definite ad 
vantages which the United States, as well as 
the Central American countries, would derive 
from the completion of the highway, at least 
as far south as the Panama Canal, have long 
been recognized ^* and, during the past few 
months, increased consideration has been given 
to the ways and means of completing this road 
in the near future. This highway has been the 
subject of numerous conferences between the 
Departments of State, War, and Navy, and the 
Public Roads Administration. The conclusion 
has been reached that the road cannot be com- 
pleted witliiu the forseeable future without 
the assumption of a substantial part of the 
necessary expenditures by the Government of 
the United States, and that the completion of 
the road is of such interest to this Government 
that such direct participation by it is justi- 
fied. . . . While defense considerations have 
not motivated the suggestion for an outright 
contribution by this Government to the con- 
struction of the highway, the War and Navy 
Departments believe that a through highway 
from the United States to the Panama Canal 
would be of real value from the standpoint of 
the defense of the Caribbean area. The impor- 
tance of political stability in all the countries 
of the Western Hemisphere at this time can 
hardly be exaggerated and this is in turn 
largely dependent upon the maintenance of 
economic stability. The project contemplated 
by this proposed legislation will contribute 
directly to the maintenance of order, as im- 



' H. Doc. 197, 77th Cong., 1st sess. 

.116446 — 41 2 



' See S. Doc. 224, 73d Cong., 2d sess, 



558 

proved communications will give the estab- 
lished governments in these countries materially 
more eifective control over any attempted sub- 
versive activities within their borders and the 
actual work of construction would substantially 
assist in safeguarding the economic situation in 
these countries." 

The first official cooperative action directed to- 
ward the construction of an all-American high- 
way took the form of a resolution passed by the 
Fifth International Conference of American 
States at Santiago, Chile, as early as 1923.= 
Since that time the United States has partici- 
pated in a number of highway conferences, sev- 
eral of which have had as their primary purpose 
promoting the development of an inter-Amer- 
ican highway. At the Inter- American Confer- 
ence for the Maintenance of Peace, held at 
Buenos Aires in 1936, a Convention on the Pan 
American Highway was signed by the 21 Amer- 
ican republics^ and has since been ratified by 
11 of the signatory governments. The Fourth 
Pan American Highway Congress, which will 
be held in Mexico City from September 15 to 24 
of this year, will be attended by a delegation 
from the United States. 

Tlie Government of the United States has at 
various times appropriated sums to cover its 
share of survey and construction work on the 
proposed highway. In 1930, $50,000 was appro- 
priated by Congress to enable the Secretary of 
State to cooperate with the several governments 
members of the Pan American Union in carry- 
ing out a reconnaissance survey of the route of 
the proposed inter-American highway." A 
further sum of $1,000,000 was appropriated in 
1934 to enable the United States to cooperate 



^ See Report of the Delegates of the United States of 
America to the Fifth Internatknml Conference of 
American States. Held at Santiago, Chile, March 25 
to May 3, 1923 (Governmeut Printing Office, 1924), 
pp. 168, 169. 

° Treaty Series 927. 

* See Press Releases, No. 38, June 21, 1930 (Depart- 
ment of State publication no. 83), pp. 325-326. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

with those governments in the survey and con- 
struction of the highway, subject to "the receipt 
of assurances satisfactory to the President from 
such governments of their cooperation in such 
survey and construction". In the same year an 
additional sum of $75,000 was made available to 
the Secretary of Agriculture for making loca- 
tion surveys, plans, and estimates.^ In 1938, 
$34,000 from accumulated administrated funds 
was made available to the Secretary of Agricul- 
ture for the continuation of cooperation. In the 
same year $50,000 was appropriated to enable the 
Secretary of State to continue in the collabora- 
tion, but was limited by the terms of the act to 
expenditures for engineering advice and assist- 
ance and, as in the case of previous appropria- 
tions, was subject to the receipt of assurances 
satisfactory to the President of the continued 
cooperation of the governments concerned in 
the project. 

A loan of $2,000,000 was made to Nicaragua 
in 1939 for construction of a section of the Intei-- 
American Highway. In 1940 a loan of $4,- 
600,000 was made to Costa Kica for the same 
purpose. These loans are being expended under 
the supervision of officials of the Public Roads 
Administration of the United States. 

A credit of $1,150,000 was recently extended 
by the Export-Import Bank to the Government 
of Ecuador, $900,000 of which was intended for 
expenditure on road construction, with pref- 
erence being given to highways that ^rill 
complete an international highway through 
Ecuador. 

The present bill " provides that expenditures 
in any country of such sums appropriated by 
the Congress of the United States "shall be 
subject to the receipt of a request therefor and 
of satisfactory assurances from the government 
of that country that appropriate commitments 
have been made by such government to assume 
at least one-third of such proposed expendi- 



' See statement by the Secretary of State in Press 
Releases, No. 247, June 23, 1934 {Department of State 
publication no. 60.5), pp. 424-425. 

"S. 1461 (77th Cong., 1st se.ss.K 



MAY 10, 1941 



559 



tures". It further provides that "all expendi- 
tures by the United States under the provisions 
of this Act for material, equipment, and sup- 
plies shall, whenever practicable, be made for 
products of the United States or of the country 
in which such survey or construction work is 
beins; carried on". 



Australia 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF THE 
PKIME MINISTER OF AUSTRALIA 

His Excellency the Right Honorable Robert 
G. Menzies, Prime Minister of Australia, ar- 
rived in the United States on May 9, 1941 for a 
series of conferences with President Roosevelt 
and other high officials of the United States 
Government. 



[Eeleased to the press May 10] 

The following guests attended the luncheon 
given by the Secretary of State in honor of the 
Prime Minister of Australia at the Carlton 
Hotel,May 10, 1941: 

The Honorable Ralph William Close, K.C., 
Minister of the Union of South Africa 

The Right Honorable Richard G. Casey, 
D.S.O., M.C., Minister of Australia 

Tlie Honorable Leighton McCarthy, K.C., 
Minister of Canada 

The Honorable Walter F. George, United 
States Senate 

The Honorable Sol Bloom, House of Repre- 
sentatives 

The Honorable Sumner Welles, Under Secre- 
tary of State 

The Honorable George T. Summerlin, Chief 
of Protocol, Department of State 

The Honorable James Clement Dunn, Ad- 
viser on Political Relations, Department 
of State 



General 



CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL DEFENSE 



[Released to the press May 6] 

In accordance with the provisions of the Ex- 
ecutive order of January 15, 1941,' the Secretary 
of State on May 5, 1941 issued the general 
licenses indicated below, authorizing the expor- 
tation to Canada and to Great Britain and 
Northern Ireland of certain of the articles and 
materials named in the proclamations, regula- 
tions, and Executive orders issued pursuant to 
section 6 of the Export Control Act approved 
July 2, 1940. 

General licenses GBL 1 and GBL 2 for bro- 
mine have been amended to include theobromine 
and theobromine salts and compounds. 



Commodity 


Canada 


Great Brit- 
ain and 
Northern 
Ireland 


Vcgetab'e fibers and manufactures, 
including unmanufactured hemp, 
sisal or henequen, istle or tam- 
pico, ramie, sunn and manvi- 
factures. 

Calcium cyanide, sodium C3-anide.. 

Caftein. 


GFF 1 

GKL 1 
GKMl 
GKNl 
GDI 1 


GFF 2 

GKL 2 
GKM 2 


C'asein . 


GKN 2 


Ball bearings and parts, roller bear- 
ings and parts, balls and rollers 
for bearings. 


GDI 2 



'Bulletin of January IS, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 82), p. 01. 



Collectors of customs have been authorized 
to permit without the requirement of individual 
license the exportation of any of the articles 



560 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



and materials enumerated in the above list to 
the i-espective countries named in the list, but 
the exporter is required to indicate the appro- 
priate license number on the shipper's export 
declaration filed with the collector. 

Those articles and materials for which no 
general licenses have been issued, but w-hich are 
subject to the requirement of an export license, 
will continue to require individual licenses for 
their exportation. 

[Released to the press May 6] 

The President signed the following Executive 
oi-der on May 6, 1941, the effect of which is to 
subject shipments in transit through the United 
States to the system of export licenses. 

Executive Order 
Amendment of Executive Order No. 8712 " or 
March 15, 1941, Prescribing Regulations 

Go^'ERNING THE EXPORTATION OF ArTICIES AND 

Materials Designated in Proclamations Is- 
sued Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 6 
OF the Act of Congress Approved July 2, 1940 

By virtue of and pursuant to the authority 
vested in me by section 6 of the act of Congress 
approved July 2, 19'40, entitled "An Act to ex- 
pedite the strengthening of the national de- 
fense" (54: Stat. 712, 714), I hereby amend 
Executive Order No. 8712 of March 15, 1941, 
prescribing regulations governing the exporta- 
tion of articles and materials designated in 
proclamations issued pursuant to the provisions 
of section 6 of the act of Congress approved 
July 2, 1940, by striking out and revoking para- 
graph numbered 11 thereof. 

Franklin D Roosev-elt 

The White House, 
May €, 1941. 

LNo. 8752] 

[Released to the press May 10] 

In accordance with the provisions of the Ex- 
ecutive order of January 15, 1941, the Secretary 



'6 F.R. 1501 ; Bullet in of March 15, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 
90), pp. 284-285. 



of State on May 9, 1941, issued general licenses 
for all articles and materials which require yel- 
low export licenses, as follows : 

1. General License GIT-A/A for shipments 

passing through the United States from 
any country in Group A to any other 
country in Group A. 

2. General License GIT-A/B for shipments 

passing through the United States from 
any country in Group A to any country 
in Group B. 

3. General License GIT-B/A for shipments 

passing through the United States from 
any country in Group B to any country 
in Group A. 
The two groups of countries to which these 

general licenses are applicable are set forth in 

the following lists. 

Oroup A 
Aden 

Anglo-Egyptian Sudan 

ArsTBALiA, Including Nanni, mandated territory 
Bahamas 
Barbados 
Bermuda I8l.\nd8 
British East Africa, including: 

Kenya 

Uganda 

Tanganyika, mandated territory 
British Gul\na 
British Honduras 
British Malaya, including: 

British North Borneo 

Brunei 

Federated Malay States 

Sarawals 

Straits Settlements 

Unfederuted Malay States 

Christmas Island (Indian Ocean) 

Cocos Islands 
British New Guinea, including: 

Papua, territory of Australia 

Territory of New Guinea, mandated territory 
British West Africa, including : 

Nigeria 

British Cameroons 

Gambia 

Sierra Tjeone 

Gold Coast 

Togoland 

Northern Territories 

Ashanti 



MAY 10, 1941 



561 



BUKMA 

Canada 
Ceylon 

Cyprus 

EOY'PT 

Falicland Islands, incUidlug South Georgia 

Gibraltar 

GREiiT Britain, including Northern Ireland 

Hong Kong 

India 

Irexand 

Jamaica 

Leeward Islands, including: 

Antigua (with Barbuda and Redonda) 

British Virgin Islands 

Anguilhi Island 

Antigua Island 

Barbuda Island 

Dominica Island 

Jost van Dykes Island 

St. Christopher Island 

Nevis Island 
Mauritius Island, including : 

Rodrigues Island 

Diego Garcia Island 
Ne\vfoundland 
New Zealand 
Northern Rhodesia 
Oceania, including: 

British Solomon Islands 

Fiji Islands 

Gilbert and Ellice Islands 

New Hebrides Islands 

Pitcairn Island 

Tonga 

Santa Cruz Islands 

Solomon Islands 

Cook Islands 

Western Samoa, mandated territory 
Palestine 

Papua [see under British New Guinea] 
St. Helena Island, including: 

A.scension Island 

Gough Island 

Inaccessible I.sland 

Nightingale Island 

Tristan da Cunha Island 
Se:yohelles Islands, including: 

Admirantes Islands 

Aldabra Islands 

Alphonse Island 

Assumption Island 

Astove Island 

Bijoutier Island 

Coetivy Island 

Cosmoledo Islands 



Farquhar Island 

Flat Island 

Providence Island 

St. Francois Island 

St. Pierre Island 
SouTHEaiN Rhodesia 
Trinidad and Tobago 
Union of South Africa, including 

South-West Africa 
Windward Islands, including: 

Grenada 

Grenadines 

St. Lucia 

St. Vincent 

Carriacou Island 

Oroup B 
Argentina 
Bolivia 
Brazil 
Chile 
Colombia 
Costa Rica 
Cuba 
Curasao, including : 

Aruba 

Bonaire 

St. Eustatius 

Saba 

St. Martin (Netherlands portion) 
Dominican Republic 
El Salvador 
Ecuador 
Greenland 
Guatemala 
Haiti 
hondxteas 
Iceland 
Mexico 
Nicaragua 
Panama 
Paraguay 
Peru 
Surinam 
Uruguay 
Venezuela 

[Released to the press May 10] 

Tlie President announced May 10 that he had 
approved the recommendation of Brig. Gen. 
Russell L. Maxwell, Administrator of Export 
Control, and had issued a proclamation placing 
eight additional materials under the export- 
licensing system.^ 



"For text of this proclamation (no. 2482), see 6 
F.R. 2373. 



562 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Tlio articles and materials, the exportation of 
which must now be controlled due to the accel- 
erating needs of the national-defense program, 
are Hyoscyamus (henbane). Stramonium, Co- 



lumbium, Tantalum, Cryolite, Fluorspar, Chem- 
ical wood pulps. Digitalis seeds. 

The effective date of the proclamation placing 
these articles and materials under export control 
is June 3, 1941. 



Cultural Relations 



VISIT OF DISTINGUISHED LEADERS FROM BOLIVIA 



[Released to the press May 7] 

Dr. Carlos Salamanca, professor of constitu- 
tional law at the University of Cochabamba, 
Bolivia, and member of the Bolivian Chamber 
of Deputies, arrived in New York aboard the 
S.S. Santa CImu on May 5. He proceeded to 
"Washington on May 6, where he plans to remain 
for a week or ten days. 

Dr. Salamanca is considered one of the ablest 
of Bolivia's younger lawyers and officeholders. 
He is a nephew of former President Daniel Sala- 
manca of Bolivia. Wliile in the United States, 
Dr. Salamanca hopes to visit a number of the 
leading universities. 

Dr. Roberto Prudencio, a member of the Bo- 



livian Chamber of Deputies, is also now in 
Washington on the Department's invitation. 
Prior to leaving Bolivia, Dr. Salamanca and 
Dr. Prudencio were asked by the Chamber of 
Deputies to present its greetings to the House 
of Representatives in Washington. 

The Depai-tment arranged an official luncheon 
in honor of these distinguished visitors on 
Wednesday, May 7, at the Cosmos Club. In- 
vited were the Bolivian Minister, Dr. Luis Fer- 
nando Guachalla; the Firet Secretaiy of the 
Bolivian Legation, Dr. Carlos Dorado Chopi- 
tea; and officials of the Department, the Pan 
American Union, the Library of Congress, and 
the Carnegie Institution. 



AWARDS IN NOVEL CONTEST 



Four writers, from Peru, Ecuador, Brazil, 
and Mexico, who competed successfully in the 
prize-novel contest sponsored by the Division 
of Intellectual Cooperation of the Pan Ameri- 
can Union, were honored at a dinner in New 
York City on April 14, 1941, at which the prize 
awards were presented before a distinguished 
gathering of persons in the field of literature. 
The Mexican writer, Seiior Miguel Angel 
Menendez, was unable to be present. 

Mr. Archibald MacLeish, Librarian of Con- 
gress, who presided at the meeting, expressed 
the interest of the Department in the competi- 
tion by reading the following letter from the 
Secretary of Stat« : 



"April 12, 1941. 
"Mt Dear Mr. MacLeish: 

"I have been interested to learn of the en- 
couragement given to writers in the other 
American republics as a result of which works 
by outstanding novelists are soon to be made 
available to the reading public in this country. 
Effoits to inci'ease cultural interchange along 
these lines seem eminently well directed and 
should be jjroductive of excellent results. It is 
especially encouraging to note the growing in- 
terest in this country in the writers and the 
literature of our neighboring republics, and it 
is my hope that this tendency will continue and 
that its tempo may be accelerated. It is un- 



MAY 10, 1941 



563 



deniable that students who wish to understand 
thoroughly a country's psychology and customs 
must turn to the interpretative writings of its 
great men of letters. By working toward 
this closei- understanding it is my hope that 
the friendship which so happily prevails to- 
day among the American republics may be 
strengthened and reinforced. 
"Sincerely yours, 

CoRDELL Hull" 

Speakers included Henry Seidel Canby, Low- 
ell Thomas, Blair Niles, and Nelson Rockefeller, 
whose adch'ess was telephoned from Washington. 

Giro Alegria, 32-year-old Peruvian author, 
received the first prize of $2,500, offered jointly 
by the publishing house of Farrar and Rinehart 
and the magazine "Redbook" for his novel "El 
Mundo es Ancho y Ajeno". Honorable men- 
tion was accorded to Enrique Gil Gilbert, of 
Ecuador, for "Nuestro Pan" ; to Cecilio J. Car- 
neiro, of Brazil, for "A Fogueira"; and to 
Miguel Angel Menendez, of Mexico, for 
"Nayar". 

The prize-winning novel will be published in 
English by Farrar and Rinehart and will ap- 
pear serially in "Redbook". Extracts from the 
novels of the three authors who received hon- 
orable mention will also appear in the magazine 
and will carry awards of $1,500 each. 

The winning novels were selected from among 
27 manuscripts which had received preliminary 
judgment in their countries of origin. The final 
selection committee consisted of Blair Niles, 
John Dos Passos, and Ernesto Montenegro, of 
Chile, who is now lecturing in the United States. 

A dramatization by Stephen Vincent Benet 
of a scene from the prize-winning novel was 
presented at the dinner. The program was 
broadcast over the National Broadcasting Com- 
pany in the United States, and parts of the 
program, including the dramatization and 
awarding of the prizes, were broadcast in SjDan- 
ish by short wave to listeners in the other 
American republics. 



THE UNIAO CULTURAL BRASIL- 
ESTADOS UNIDOS 

A recent circular to the Department request- 
ing publications from Government and private 
sources for The Uniao Cultural Brasil - Estados 
Unidos describes the activities of the Uniao as 
follows. 

The Uniao Cultural Brasil - Estados Unidos 
is a non-profit organization founded in Sao 
Paulo in 1938 to promote better cultural rela- 
tions between tlie United States and Brazil. It 
comprises gi'aduates of Brazilian and American 
universities, students, intellectuals in general, 
and businessmen interested in the development 
of Brazilian-American understanding. The 
Uniao is administered by a board of directors 
and presided over by a Professor of the Univer- 
sity of Sao Paulo. It has an advisory council 
composed of 20 members, including the Ameri- 
can Consul General at Silo Paulo, Brazil. 

The main purposes of the society are as 
follows : 

(a) To receive distinguished leaders from the 
United States in Bi'azil, helping them to obtain 
all kinds of desired information ; 

(b) To grant and promote fellowships and to 
arrange visits of professors and students as well 
as facilities for traveling; 

(c) To hold lectures, round-table meetings, 
etc., on both countries; 

(<l) To divulge information by means of pub- 
lications, books, and translations, as well as to 
guide tourists; 

(e) To maintain an American reference li- 
brary; 

(/) To make Brazil better known in the 
United States, and the United States better 
known in Brazil; and 

(g) To suggest to the authorities necessai-y 
measures for the development of cultural inter- 
change between the two countries. 

PRESENTATION OF BOOKS TO IN- 
STITUTIONS IN OTHER AMERICAN 
REPUBLICS 

A despatch from the American Legation in 
Ecuador reports that a consignment of books 



564 

donated by the World Publishing Company of 
Cleveland, Ohio, and sent in care of the Lega- 
tion through the International Exchange Serv- 
ice of the Smithsonian Institution, has been 
received and presented to the American School 
of Quito, which was opened last year. 

Shipments of books from other sources to 
institutions in the other American republics in- 
clude those which have been collected and 
shipped through the personal efforts of Mrs. 
Malcolm McLeod, wife of a professor of the 
University of Pittsburgh. 

Mrs. McLeod has reported to the Department 
the shipment of fifty-six boxes of books to 
Quito, Ecuador, for the Colegio Americano; 
nine boxes to San Antonio de los Banos, Cuba, 
for the Biblioteca Publica ; one box to Buenos 
Aires, Argentina, for the Colegio Nacional 
"Marino Moreno"; one box to Caracas, Vene- 
zuela, for Professor Gomez Milla ; one box to 
Cundinamarca, Colombia, for the Liceo Na- 
cional de Varones; and two boxes to La Paz, 
Bolivia, for the American Institute. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press May 10] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since May 3, 1941: 

Richard Ford, of Oklahoma City, Okla., 
Consul at Montreal, Canada, has been assigned 
as Consul at Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Winthrop R. Scott, of Cleveland, Ohio, First 
Secretary of Embassy at Caracas, Venezuela, 
has been designated First Secretary of Legation 
and Consul at Helsinki, Finland, and will serve 
in dual capacity. 

Richard F. Boyce, of Lansing, Mich., Consul 
at Callao-Lima, Peru, has been designated 
Second Secretary of Embassy at Lima, Peru, 
and will serve in dual capacity. 

Herndon W. Goforth, of North Carolina, 
Consul at Matamoros, Mexico, has been assigned 
as Consul at Cartagena, Colombia. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

George Tait, of Monroe, Va., Consul at Man- 
chester, England, has been assigned as Consul 
at Montreal, Canada. 

Earnest E. Evans, of Rochester, N. Y., Con- 
sul at Bradford, England, has been assigned as 
Consul at Matamoros, Mexico. 

The assignment of Samuel R. Thompson, of 
Los Angeles, Calif., as Consul at Valencia, 
Spain, has been canceled. Mr. Thompson will 
remain as Consul at Cardiff, Wales. 

The assignment of Sheridan Talbott, of 
Bardstown, Ky., as Consul at Cardiff, Wales, 
has been canceled. Mr. Talbott will remain as 
Consul at Valencia, Spain. 

Stewart E. McMillin, of Lawrence, Kans., 
Consul at Caracas, Venezuela, has been assigned 
as Consul at Bradford, England. 

The assignment of Sidney H. Browne, of 
Short Hills, N. J., as Consul at Genoa, Italy, 
has been canceled. Mr. Browne has now been 
assigned as Consul at Saigon, French Indochina. 
James C. H. Bonbright, of Rochester, N. Y., 
Second Secretary of Legation and Consul at 
Belgrade, Yugoslavia, has been assigned as Con- 
sul at Budapest, Hungary. 

Mason Turner, of Torrington, Conn., Consul 
at Callao-Lima, Peru, has been designated Sec- 
ond Secretary of Embassy at Lima, Peru, and 
will serve in dual capacity. 

Donald W. Smith, of Washington, D. C, 
Assistant Commercial Attache at Tokyo, Japan, 
has been assigned for duty in the Department 
of State. 

Leys A. France, of Ohio, Consul at Mexico, 
D.F., Mexico, has been assigned as Consul at 
Ottawa, Canada. 

Edward S. Maney, of Pearsall, Tex., Consul 
at London, England, has been assigned for duty 
in the Department of State. 

Harrison Lewis, of Beverly Hills, Calif., now 
serving in the Department of State, has been 
designated Third Secretary of Embassy and 
Vice Consul at Berlin, Germany, and will serve 
in dual capacity. 

George F. Scherer, of New York, N. Y., Vice 
Consul at Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, has been 
assigned for duty in the Department of State. 



MAY 10, 1941 

Hartwell Joluison, of Aiken, S. C, now serv- 
ing in the Department of State, has been desig- 
nated Third Secretary of Legation at Guate- 
mala, Guatemala. 

Hector C. Adam, Jr., of Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Third Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul 
at Montevideo, Uruguay, has been assigned as 
Vice Consul at Hamilton, Bermuda. 

David M. Clark, of Peimsylvania, Vice Con- 
sul at Callao-Lima, Peru, has been designated 
Third Secretary of Embassy at Lima, Peru, 
and will serve in dual capacity. 



565 

Wilham P. Snow, of Bangor, Maine, Vice 
Consul at Callao-Lima, Peru, has been desig- 
nated Tliird Secretary of Embassy at Lima, 
Peru, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Ralph C. Getsinger, of Detroit, Mich., Vice 
Consul at Hamburg, Germany, has been 
assigned as Vice Consul at Cologne, Germany. 

Clay Merrell, of Oklahoma, Vice Consul at 
Hamilton, Bermuda, has been appointed Vice 
Consul at Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. 

Adam Beaumont, of Massachusetts, Vice Con- 
sul at Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, has been 
appointed Vice Consul at Quebec, Canada. 



Publications 



INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE 



The international exchange of publications of 
the United States Government is a long-estab- 
lished activity, having its formal international 
origin in an offer contained in a circular of May 
16, 1867 from the Smithsonian Institution wliich 
was transmitted to foreign governments, and 
the acceptance thereof by various govern- 
ments.^" Informal exchanges were conducted 
by the Smithsonian Institution as long ago as 
1850." 

On March 15, 1886 representatives of eight 
countries, including the United States, signed a 
convention at Brussels, Belgium, for the inter- 
national exchange by freight or other means 
of official documents and scientific and literary 
publications, as well as a convention for the mi- 
mediate exchange by mail of official journals and 
parliamentary annals and documents.^- In ad- 
dition to the original signatories a number of 
other countries have ratified one or both of the 
two conventions. 



"See H. Ex. Doc. 172, 47th Omg.. 1st se.ss., p. 05. 

"■ See the Report of the Secretary of the Smithsonian 
Institution . . . for the Year Ended June 30, 194O. Ap- 
pendix 6 ("Report on the Tntorniitioual Exchange 
Service"), p. 61. 

'= Treaty Series 381 and 382; Malloy's Treaties . . . , 
vol. II, pp. 1059 and 1962. 



In accordance with arrangements growing 
out of the 1867 circular and the two 1886 con- 
ventions, the Library of Congress receives from 
the Govermnent Printing Office a sufficient 
number of copies of each Government publica- 
tion for distribution in international ex- 
change; ^^ the International Exchange Sei'vice 
of the Smithsonian Institution is the transmit- 
ting agency for both outgouig and incoming 
shipments ; and the Library of Congress is the 
depository in this country of the exchange col- 
lections received periodically from foreign 
governments. 

One of the instruments adopted at the Inter- 
American Conference for the Maintenance of 
Peace, Buenos Aires, Argentina, in December 
1936, was the convention on interchange of pub- 
lications, signed December 23, 1936,^^ which 
provides among other things that (1) each of 
the parties to the convention shall furnish a col- 
lection of works by or about its men of letters 
and science to each of the other parties, and (2) 
each party shall provide copies of its official 
publications to each other party. The United 



■^'44 U. S. C. 22s ; 44 U. S. C. (siipp. V) 139, 139a, 169, 
183, 196a, 280a. 

" Treaty Series 954. 



566 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



States ratified this convention in 1939 with the 
understanding that bihvteral agreements might 
be entered into setting forth the number of 
copies of official publications to be exchanged, 
the procedures to be followed, etc. 

Progress is being made at the present time 
toward the furnisliing of representative col- 
lections of American books to the 11 other 
American republics that have deposited their 
instruments of ratification of the convention of 
December 23, 1936. As regards the furnishing 
of official publications, a number of bilateral 
agreements have been concluded in recent years 
not only with parties to the Buenos Aires Con- 
vention but with other countries as well. Of 
the countries mentioned in the list below, Brazil, 
Nicaragua, and Peru are parties to the Buenos 
Aires Convention. 

Bilateral agreements for the systematic ex- 
change of official publications have been con- 
cluded by the United States with the following 
countries during the years indicated : " 1936, 
Peru ; 193'7\ Mexico, Chile ; 1938, Cuba, Mexico, 
Estonia, Finland ; 1939, Argentina ; 19Jt.O, Nica- 
ragua, Brazil, Honduras. 

The agreement of 1937 with Mexico provides 
for the immediate exchange by mail of official 
journals and parliamentary documents (the 
Federal Register, the Congression^il Record, and 
certain documents in the congressional series on 
the part of the United States, and correspond- 
ing documents on the part of Mexico) ; its pro- 
visions are similar to those of the second of the 
two conventions of 1886. The other agree- 
ments provide for a general exchange of serial 
and occasional publications issued by the several 
branches of the res^oective governments. 

In addition to conducting the negotiations 
which culminate in the conclusion of the agree- 
ments, the Department of State and its missions 
abroad render all practicable assistance in the 
carrying out of the existing international ex- 
change agreements, in discussing with foreign 
goverimients the question of furnishing par- 



" Executive Agreement Series 103, 108, 112, 123, 134, 
138, 139, 162, 171, 176, 194. 



ticular publications which the Library of Con- 
gress desires to receive, in arranging for in- 
formal exchanges between agencies of the 
United States Government and the correspond- 
ing agencies of other goverimients, etc. This 
work is performed, in the Department of State, 
by the Division of Research and Publication in 
collaboration with other interested divisions. 

Since the outbreak of the European war in 
September 1939, various difficulties have arisen 
in connection with the general problem of the 
acquisition of publications from Europe for 
the Library of Congress and other Government 
libraries in Washingion, whether by purchase, 
gift, or exchange. The Department and the 
Foreign Service have endeavored to safeguard, 
as far as possible, the continued flow of pub- 
lications from war areas to the Library of Con- 
gress and to the special Government libraries. 

The following statements regarding interna- 
tional shipment of the exchange material are 
quoted from the Report on the International 
Exchange Service, fiscal year ended June 30, 
1940,^'^ pages 60 ff. : 

". . . At the close of the fiscal year the in- 
terchange of publications was suspended be- 
tween the United States and all European coun- 
tries except Great Britain, Finland, and the 
Soviet Republic. Shipments to Finland are 
being made via Petsamo, and shipments to the 
U.S.S.R., by way of Vladivostok. 

"Shipments of exchanges to Spain, which had 
been held up since 1936, were resumed in April 
1940 ; but, on account of the disruption to ship- 
ping conditions due to the spread of the Euro- 
pean war, it was not possible to continue trans- 
missions to that country. 

"Sets of United States governmental docu- 
ments are now forwarded to 104 foreign deposi- 
tories, a decrease of 4 sets from last year. Sixty 
of these depositories receive full sets and 44, 
l^artial sets. 

"There are sent to foreign depositories [by 



' See ante, p. 565, footnote 11, 



MAY 10, 1941 



567 



mail] 104 copies of the Congressional Record 
and the Federal Register. . . ." 

The Report cited above also contains lists of 
the depositories of the full and partial sets, the 
depositories of the CoJigressional Recoi'd and 
tlie Federal Register, and the names of the ex- 
change agencies in foreign countries. 



The following publications have been re- 
leased by the Dei:)artment of State: 

Digest of International Law by Green Hajwooil Hack- 
worth, Legal Adviser of the Department of StiUe. 
Volume I, Chapters I-V. Publication IfiOO. x, 803 pp. 
$2. 



Digest of International Law by Green Haywood 
Hackworth, Legal Adviser of the Department of State. 
Volume II, Chapter VI-VIII. Publication 1521. vi, 
829 pp. $1.75. 

Publications of the Department of State (a list cumu- 
lative from October 1, 1029). April 1, 1041. Publica- 
tion 1588. 26 pp. Free. 

Index to the Department of State Bulletin, Volume 
III : Numbers 54-79, July 6-December 28, 1940. Pub- 
lication 1591. 22 pp. 

Tenure and Disposition of Real and Personal Prop- 
erty : Supplementary Convention Between the United 
States of America and Great Britain and Northern Ire- 
land, Australia, and New Zealand. Signed at Washing- 
ton May 27, 1936; proclaimed March 17, 1941. Treaty 
Series 964. 4 pp. S^*. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



AGRICULTURE 

AGREEMENT WITH HAITI FOR THE DEVEL- 
OPMENT OF HAITIAN AGRICULTURE AND 
ECONOMY 

The Governments of the United States of 
America and the Republic of Haiti announced 
May 6, 1941 that an agreement has been reached 
in principle regarding a long-term program of 
cooperation in the development of Haitian agri- 
culture and economy. The central feature of 
this program will be a broad plan of rubber de- 
velopments; an increase in banana plantings; 
the planting of oil croj^s, spices, drug plants, 
food plants, and fiber plants; cacao improve- 
ment; the development of Haitian forestry re- 
sources ; and the stimulation of small handicraft 
industries. Although details for the cari-ying 
out of the project are yet to be worked out, it is 
contemplated that the development will begin 
at carefully selected central plantations from 
which a small grower industry may be stimu- 
lated and directed aiid technical information 
and assistance provided. Tlie program is based 
on numerous surveys and long experience of the 



United States Department of Agriculture, which 
has already established in Haiti breeding gar- 
dens for rubber plants and an exj^eriment 
station. 

This cooperative program will also involve 
an extension in the amount of up to $500,000 
in the existing contract entered into in 1938 by 
tlie Export-Import Bank and tlie J. G. White 
Engineering Corporation, to permit the comple- 
tion of certain highway and irrigation projects 
now in process and to provide adequate trans- 
portation facilities to the areas suitable for the 
rubber and general agricultural development. 

FINANCE 

AGREEMENT WITH HAITI 

The Governments of the United States of 
America and the Republic of Haiti announced 
May 6, 1941 that an agreement has been reached 
in i:)rinciple to modify the agreement for the 
Haitianization of the Garde, Withdrawal of 
Military Forces from Haiti, and Financial Ar- 
rangement between the two countries signed 
on August 7, 1933 (Executive Agreement Series 



568 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



46) ." For some time it has been hoped that the 
fiscal machinery originally set up under the 
Treaty with Respect to the Finances, Ei-onomic 
Development, and Tranquillity of Haiti, signed 
on September 16, 1915 (Treaty Series 623), 
which has expired, could be modernized in order 
to meet Haitian asjjirations and still provide a 
desirable measure of security to the holders of 
Haitian bonds issued in 1922. 

It is anticipated that under the agreement 
eventually to be concluded, the National Bank 
of the Republic of Haiti will assimie responsi- 
bility for the control and operation of the 
Haitian budget, the Haitian Govenmient's ac- 
counting and disbursing systems, the collection 
of customs and internal revenues, and super- 
vision over other financial matters. 

At the same time the National Bank of the 
Republic of Haiti would become the sole de- 
pository of Haitian Government funds, and 
during the first ten days of each month, the 
Haitian Minister of Finance would make avail- 
able to a representative of the holders of the 
bonds of 1922 one-twelfth the sum necessary to 
service the outstanding bonds under existing 
agreements between the two Governments. The 
Bank would receive irrevocable orders to make 
no payments for the account of the Haitian 
State until the service of the bonds has been 
provided. 

The Board of Directors of the National Bank 
would be composed of seven directors, four 
Haitians and three Americans. The Haitian 
members would include the Haitian Minister of 
Finance as well as representatives of Haitian 
economy ; the American members would consist 
of the representative of the holders of the bonds 
of 1922, an economist, and a commercial banker. 
Decisions of the Board would require the assent 
of five directors. 

In any year when Haitian revenues exceed 
$7,000,000, additional sums would be made 
available to the representative of the bond- 
holders for purposes of amortization of the 



"For modifications of the agreement see Executive 
Agreement Series 117, 128. 150, 183, and 201 



1922 bonds in accordance with article VII of 
the bond contract. 

The Office of Fiscal Representative and Dep- 
uty Fiscal Representative would be abolished, 
and the j^roperty belonging to the organization 
of the Fiscal Representative woidd become the 
property of the National Bank of the Republic 
of Haiti. 

The conclusion of a final agreement along the 
broad lines indicated above would be a further 
milestone in the development of the good-neigh- 
bor policy which has sought to revise so far as 
possible all unusual and extraordinary relation- 
shijjs between the United States and the other 
American republics which have been inherited 
from the past. 

FLORA AND FAUNA 

CONVENTION ON NATURE PROTECTION AND 
WILDLIFE PRESERVATION IN THE WESTERN 
HEMISPHERE 

Haiti 

The Director General of the Pan American 
Union informed the Secretary of State by a 
letter dated May 1, 1941 that the Convention on 
Nature Protection and Wildlife Preservation in 
the AVestern Hemisphere, which was opened for 
signature at the Pan American Union on 
October 12, 1940, was signed on behalf of Haiti 
on April 29, 1941. 

OPIUM AND OTHER DANGEROUS 
DRUGS 

INTERNATIONAL OPIUM CONVENTION 

Paraguay 

The American Legation at Asuncion trans- 
mitted to the Department with a despatch dated 
April 24, 1941, a copy and translation of Decree 
No. 60.56 dated March 31, 1941 whereby Para- 
guay adheres to the International Opium Con- 
vention signed at Geneva on February 19, 1925. 

According to information received from the 
League of Nations the countries which have 
ratified or adhered to the convention are as 
follows: Belgimn, Bolivia, Brazil, British Em- 
pire, State of Sarawak, Bahamas, Bunna, Can- 



MAY 10, 194 1 



569 



ada, Australia, New Zealand (including West- 
ern Samoa), Union of South Africa, Ireland, 
India, Bulgaria, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, 
Cuba, Czechoslorakia, Free City of Danzig, 
Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, 
Egypt, El Salvador, Estonia, Finland, France, 
Germany, Greece, Haiti, Hungary, Honduras, 
Iraq, Italy (including colonies), Japan, Latvia, 
Liechtengtein, Lithuania, Luxemburg, Monaco, 
the Netherlands (including Netherlands Indies, 
Surinam, and Curasao), New Hebrides, Nor- 
way, Poland, Portugal, Rumania, San Marino, 
Spain (including Spanish colonies and Spanish 
Morocco), Sudan, Sweden, Switzerland, Thai- 
land (Siam) , Turkey, Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics, Uruguay, Venezuela, and Yugo- 
slavia. 



CONVENTION FOR LIMITING THE MANUFAC- 
TURE AND REGULATING THE DISTRIBUTION 
OF NARCOTIC DRUGS 

Paraguay 

The above-mentioned Decree No. 6056 of 
March 31, 1941 provides also for the adherence 
of Paraguay to the Convention for Limiting 
the Manufacture and Regulating the Distribu- 
tion of Narcotic Drugs signed at Geneva on 
July 13, 1931 (Treaty Series 863). 

According to information received from the 
League of Nations the countries which have 
ratified or adhered to the convention are as 
follows: United States of America, Afghanis- 
tan, Albania, Saudi Arabia, Belgium, Brazil,. 
Great Britain and Northern Ireland, British 
Honduras, British Solomon Islands Protector- 
ate, Ceylon, Cyprus, Falkland Islands and de- 
pendencies, Gambia (colony and protectorate), 
Gibraltar, Gold Coast (colony, Ashanti, North- 
ern Territories, Togoland under British man- 
date). Hong Kong, Kenya (colony and protec- 
torate), Leeward Islands (Antigua, Dominica, 
Montserrat, St. Christopher and Nevis, Virgin 
Islands) , Mauritius, Nigeria (colony, protector- 
ate, Cameroons under British mandate). North 
Borneo, Noilhern Rhodesia, Nyasaland Pro- 
tectorate, Sarawak, Seychelles, Sierra Leone 
(colony and protectorate), Somaliland Protec- 



torate, Straits Settlements, Tanganyika Terri- 
tory, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Uganda 
Protectorate, Zanzibar Protectorate, Southern 
Rhodesia, Newfoundland, Barbados, Bermuda, 
British Guiana, Fiji, Federated Malay States 
(Negri Sembilan, Pahang, Perak, Selangor), 
Unfederated Malay States (Kedah, Perils, and 
Brunei), Palestine (excluding Trans- Jordan), 
St. Helena and Ascension, Trans-Jordan, 
Windward Islands (Grenada, St. Vincent), 
Burma, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Union 
of South Africa, Ireland, India, Bulgaria, 
Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, 
Czechoslovakia, Free City of Danzig, Denmark, 
Dominican Republic, Egypt, Ecuador, El Sal- 
vador, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, 
Greece, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, 
Iran, Iraq, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, 
Litliuania, Luxemburg, Mexico, Monaco, the 
Netherlands (including the Netherlands Indies, 
Sm-inam, and Curasao), Nicaragua, Norway, 
Panama, Pei'u, Poland, Portugual, Rumania, 
San Marino, Spain, Sudan, Sweden, Switzer- 
land, Thailand (Siam) , Turkey, Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics, Uruguay, and Venezuela. 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATION 
CONVENTION 

Iraq 

The Spanish Ambassador at Washington in- 
formed the Secretary of State by a note dated 
April 28, 1941, that the declaration of adherence 
by the Government of Iraq to the International 
Telecommunication Convention, with the an- 
nexed regulations, signed at Madrid on Decem- 
ber 9, 1932, has been received by the Spanish 
Government. 

According to Notification 379 of March 16, 
1941 from the Bureau of the International Tele- 
conmiunication Union at Bern, the notice of 
adherence was received by the Spanish Govern- 
ment on February 26, 1941. 

Paraguay 

By a note dated April 28, 1941 the Spanish 
Ambassador at Washington informed the Sec- 



570 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



retary of State that the Government of Para- 
guay ratified, by decree of June 23, 1940, the 
International Telecommunication Convention 
signed at Madrid on December 9, 1932. 



Regulations 



The following Government regulations may 
be of interest to readers of the Bulletin: 

Export Control Schedule No. 6 [covering, eflfective 
May 6, 1941, the forms, conversions, and derivatives of 
caffein (item 3 of Proclamation 2476 of April 14, 1941) ]. 
May 1, 1941. (Administrator of Export Control.) 
Federal Register, May 6, 1941 (vol. 6, no. 88), p. 2279. 

Alien Seamen : Admission and Deportation. May 6, 
1941. (Department of Justice: Immigration and Nat- 
uralization Service.) [General Order No. C-31.] Fed- 
eral Register, May 8, 1941 (vol. 6, no. 90), p. 2334. 



Legislation 



Admission of Insane Persons of Foreign Service to 
St. Elizabeths Hospital. (H. Rept. 512, 77th Cong., 1st 
sess., on H. R. 4498.) [Incorporates letter from the 
Secretary of State to the Spealjer of the House of Repre- 
sentatives, dated April 18, 1941, in support of legisla- 
tion.] 1 p. 

Exemption from internal revenue taxes, on basis of 
reciprocity, of articles imijorted by consular officers and 
employees of foreign states for their personal or oflBcial 
use. ( S. Rept. 237, 77th Cong., 1st sess., on H. R. 3835. ) 
[Incoriwrates letter from the Secretary of State to 
Representative Doughton dated March 14, 1941 setting 
forth the ijurixise of the legislation.] 3 pp. 

Additional Urgent Deficiency Appropriation Bill, 
Fiscal Year 1941 : 

Hearings Before the Subcommittee of the Com- 
mittee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, 
77th Cong,, 1st sess. (Department of State, pp. 137- 
150.) 176 pp. 

H. Rept. 506, 77th Cong., 1st sess., on H. R. 4669. 
(Department of State, pp. 7, 13.) 14 pp. 



U S GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1941 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WMH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIEECTOH OF THE BDKEAU OF THE BUDGET 



€LA 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



.O \j JLiJL/ 






riN 



MAY 17, 1941 
Vol. IV: No. 99 — Publication 1605 



Qontents 

Commercial Policy: Page 
National Foreign-Trade Week: 

Statement by the President 57.3 

Radio address by the Secretary of State 573 

Trade-agreement negotiations with Argentina .... 576 

Trade-agreement negotiations with Uruguay 581 

Europe: 

Relations with the French Republic: Statement by the 

President of the United States 584 

Contributions for relief m belligerent countries . . . . 584 

American Republics: 

Bomidary dispute between Ecuador and Peru: Friendly 

offices of Argentina, Brazil, and the United States . . 596 
Adch'oss by the Secretary of State welcoming the 

Argentine Minister of Foreign Afl'airs 598 

Inter- American Development Commission: Colombian 

Council 599 

General: 

Control of exports hi national defense 600 

American citizens living abroad 601 

Cultural Relations: 

Committees to advise Department of State in cultural- 
relations program 603 

Colombian-American Cultural Institute, Inc. . ; s . . 605 

[Over] 




' - '^^mEm,T OF mumm 
JON 10 1941 



Qontents- 



CONTINUED. 



Treaty Information: Page 

Commerce: 

Inter-American Coffee Agreement 606 

Trade-agreement negotiations with Ai'gentina and 

Uruguay 606 

Indian affairs: 

Convention Providing for the Creation of an Inter- 
American Indian Institute 606 

Kegulations 607 

Publications 607 

Legislation 607 



Commercial Policy 



NATIONAL FOREIGN-TRADE WEEK 

STATEMENT BY THE PRESIDENT 



[Released to tbe press by the White House May 17] 

As we join in the observance of National For- 
eign-Trade Week this year, we know that we 
are facing a world-wide crisis of truly desper- 
ate intensity. Totalitai'ian aggression is now 
reaching out into nearly every quarter of the 
globe. It has become clear that this aggression 
menaces not only our foreign trade and our 
national business prosperity but also the very 
social and spiritual framework of our demo- 
cratic way of life. Already, and to a very seri- 
ous extent, military and economic aggi-ession 
have circumscribed the area within which the 
principles upon M'hich we base our international 
commercial relations can operate. 

International commerce in a world dominated 
by totalitarianism would never be carried on for 
tlie mutual benefit of all. It would be rigor- 
ously controlled for the sole advantage of those 
nations and ruling groups which already have 
declared their determination to conquer the 
world and to subordinate to their own profit 
the welfare of all other peoples. 

That this is the fact is attested by official or 
inspired German announcements. Trade in 
such a world would be merely another weapon 
for further rutliless aggression and subjugation. 



Therefore, it is idle for us to talk of future 
foreign trade unless we are ready, now, to de- 
fend the principles upon which it is and must 
be based. That defense calls most urgently on 
every American for his immediate and utmost 
effort. Otherwise there can be no foreign trade 
of the future on fair terms, under democratic 
principles. 

During the past seven years the United States 
has made real progi-ess toward the rebuilding 
of world commerce on the principles of mutual 
benefit, fair-dealing, and friendly cooperation 
among nations. Despite the economic and 
spiritual blackout of certain countries, we are 
continuing to make progxess toward this objec- 
tive in cooperation with our good neighbors to 
the south and elsewhere. 

Both now, and after the emergency shall 
have passed, the United States must continue 
its leadership in the preservation and promotion 
of liberal economic policies. Only through that 
leadership can this country fulfil its responsi- 
bility in the rebuilding of a world economy 
froni the chaos into which it has been plunged 
by destructive trade restrictions, born largely 
of greed and unreasoning fear, and by rutliless 
aggression. 



RADIO ADDRESS BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE' 



Tonight we inaugurate another annual Na- 
tional Foreign-Trade Week. Again, as a year 
ago, it comes in the midst of war. You know as 



' Delivered from the studios of the National Broad- 
casting Co., Washington, May 18, 1941. The address 
was beamed for the Far East, a Spanish translation 
was beamed for the American republics, and transla- 
tions into Italian, German, and French were beamed 
for Europe. 

317787—41 1 



well as I that now there is little use in our talk- 
ing about and jjlanning for foreign trade unless 
the outcome of the war is favorable to the free 
peoples of the world. For trade means free 
bargaining to mutual advantage. To us it does 
not mean exploitation by military cliques 
backed by cannon. And so, for the present, our 
foreign trade consists more and more, and will 
consist more and more, of making and placing 

573 



674 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



in the hands of nations which are resisting un- 
lawful attack the tools of self-defense. This 
trade, like all trade, is futile if the goods pro- 
duced do not reach those for whom they are 
intended. 

We are a practical people. AVlien we set our- 
selves to a task we finish it. We have set our- 
selves to the task of arming and supplying those 
whose successful defense is vital to our security. 
I have said before, and I repeat : we will not per- 
mit this purpose to be frustrated. We will find 
a way to insure that the weapons pouring in 
ever gi-eater volume from our factories will 
reach the hands which eagerly await them. 
Only as we stand strong and united in this pur- 
pose, can we look forward to a brighter clay. 

We have seen during the past year the con- 
tinued spread of ruthless aggression by nations 
bent upon world-domination. We have seen the 
enslavement of every nation which was so un- 
fortunate as to stand in the way and was not 
strong enough to repel aggression. Nations 
which were unable to protect themselves have 
been crushed by military frightfulness that has 
known no bounds. In each territory taken over, 
organized brutality has been carried to tlie ut- 
most lengths in order to coerce conquered peo- 
ples into unwilling support of new conquests and 
an ever-widening circle of enslavement. 

The safety of our Nation, as of every free 
nation, is in mortal danger so far as our people 
permit themselves to be lulled into a false sense 
of security bj- those who mistakenly assume that 
two oceans plus a natural desire to be at peace 
with all the world will protect us. The para- 
mount purpose of the leaders of the movement 
of conquest is to secure control of the high seas, 
which contiol is essential to the execution of 
their program of world-domination. Every 
consideration of our own defense and safety re- 
quires that we see to it that Great Britain 
receives adequate supplies for her successful 
resistance. 

At this critical moment we must not be 
weakened by internal division; we must devote 
our whole energy to essential tasks. The produc- 
tion and transfer of essential supplies to those 
countries which are actively resisting aggres- 



sion demand sacrifice of time and substance and 
making of maximum eifort, on the part of each 
and every American citizen. Delays in meeting 
full schedules of production of essential mili- 
tary supplies, whether caused by business com- 
l)lacency or by strikes, can and should be 
avoided for they gravely endanger the safety 
of the Nation. Our gi'eatest possible national 
effort must be made, not for the sake of other 
counti'ies, but primarily for the sake of and to 
insure our own security. Either the spread of 
lawlessness in the world must be brought to a 
halt or we shall soon find ourselves surrounded 
by aggressors and compelled to fight, virtually 
alone and against great odds, for our own 
national existence. 

These are obvious dangers that lie immedi- 
ateh' ahead. But they are not the only dangers. 
To get a more complete picture of what they in- 
volve, it is necessary to envisage the kind of an 
economic world that would exist if the would-be 
conquerors were to win. Their current pro- 
nouncements and practices provide an ample 
warning on that score. 

The key to their economic program is con- 
tained in one simple word — conquest. Every 
territory that they conquer is reduced forthwith 
to an economic master-and-slave relationship. 
The economic structure of the enslaved country 
is forcibly re-shaped and systematically subor- 
dinated to the economy of the ruling country. 
Within the entire tributary area, autarchy or 
economic self-sufficiency is set up as the central 
feature of economic policy. At the center of 
this widely dispersed web of captive nations, the 
master country wields its vastly enlarged poM'- 
ers in an unceasing efl'ort to ensnare, overwhelm, 
and enslave every remaining free nation in the 
world. 

The tragic experience of the conquered coiui- 
tries of Europe provides unassailable evidence 
of how this system is applied in the field of 
trade. Under it, trade is reduced essentially to 
enforced barter. The would-be conqueror 
forces delivery to him, at his own jirice, of the 
goods he wants; and enforces this arrangement 
by every device of discrimination and arbitrary 
control. There is not the slightest pretense of 



MAY 17, 1941 



575 



promoting mutually profitable trade with other 
countries upon the basis of equality and fair- 
dealing. It is a system based upon the princi- 
ple, not of economic cooperation, but of eco- 
nomic spoliation. 

In the face of these facts, no one need be in 
doubt as to the situation that would confront 
this Nation, in the realm of trade as elsewhere, 
in the event of an Axis victory. For the past 
seven years our Government has taken the lead- 
ership in an effort to re-open the channels of 
international trade and thus to assist in world 
economic restoration, with resulting political 
stability, from which all countries, great and 
small, would benefit. It has proceeded through- 
out upon broad principles of cooperation and 
fair-dealing, and has recognized that only mu- 
tually profitable trade can be truly beneficial and 
enduring. These principles are broad enough 
to include every country willing to cooperate in 
a program of economic peace. By the same 
token they stand at the oi^posite pole from the 
predatory policies and methods of the totali- 
tarians. Between the two systems there can be 
no workable adjustment. 

After the first World War an attempt was 
made to reorganize the world on a sound basis. 
New institutions were created, and new methods 
of cooperation were established. All peoples 
shared the hope that a new era in international 
relations hud begun. 

Unhappily, shortly after the close of the 
World War, power fell into the hands of groups 
M-hich advocated political and economic nation- 
alism in tlieir most extreme forms. The inev- 
itable effects, politically, economically, and so- 
cially, during the years that followed were 
utterly disastrous. The outcome was division 
and weakening, and final break-down, of the 
necessary international foundation on which 
peace is based. 

Knowing these facts as we do, it is none too 
early to lay down at least some of the principles 
by which policies must be guided at the con- 
clusion of the war, to press for a broad program 
of world economic reconstruction and to con- 
sider tentative plans for the application of those 
policies. 



The main principles, as proven by experience, 
are few and simple : 

1. Extreme nationalism must not again be 
permitted to express itself in excessive trade 
restrictions. 

2. Non-discrimination in international com- 
mercial relations must be the rule, so that inter- 
national trade may grow and prosper. 

3. Raw-material supplies must be available to 
all nations without discrimination. 

4. International agreements regulating the 
supply of commodities must be so handled as to 
protect fully the interests of the consuming 
countries and their people. 

5. The institutions and arrangements of in- 
ternational finance must be so set up that they 
lend aid to the essential enterprises and the 
continuous development of all countries, and 
permit the payment through processes of trade 
consonant with the welfare of all countries. 

Measures taken to give effect to these prin- 
ciples must be freely open to every nation which 
desires a peaceful life in a world at peace and 
is willing to cooperate in maintaining that 
peace. 

Such a program has strength and endurance. 
It will stand long after the war-built arrange- 
ments forced on disheartened or imprisoned peo- 
ples by military conquest have fallen to pieces 
and have vanished utterly. 

There still are people who do not see that if, 
when the present conflict ends, we do not have 
a system of open trade, they will not be able 
either to buy or to sell except on terms really 
laid down by the military foi'ces and political 
authorities of the countries with which they have 
to deal. 

Unless a system of open trade becomes firmly 
established, there will be chronic political 
instability and recurrent economic collapse. 
There will never be peace in any real sense of 
the term. 

In the final i-eckoning, the problem becomes 
one of establishing the foundations of an in- 
ternational order in which independent nations 
cooperate freely with each other for their mu- 
tual gain — of a world order, not new but re- 
newed, which liberates rather than enslaves. 



576 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



We shall not be able to do this until we have 
a world free from imminent military danger and 
clear of malign political intrigue. At present 
the world is scourged by both. We can expect 
no healthy development until the menace of 
conquest has been brought to an end. Only then 
will the time have arrived when steel is valued, 
not in terms of the bombs that can be made of 
it, but in terras of the instruments of peaceful 
life into which it can be forged ; and when for- 
eign trade has reverted again from cargoes of 
weapons and explosives to commodities that 
nourish and heal and enrich their consumers. 



This Nation is resolved to evade no issues and 
to face harsh facts. We believe that there can 
be created a safer and more prosperous world. 
We have the tools — the resources, the brains, 
the hands — with which to help make it such. 
But first the tide of force must be turned back. 
Once that is done, we and other nations can re- 
establish an open, cooperative, economic life in 
which trade may increase, economic welfare may 
grow, civilization may advance, and the peace- 
ful and benevolent instincts of masses of now 
prostrate people may once more flourish in the 
really worthwhile ways of life. 



TRADE-AGREEMENT NEGOTIATIONS WITH ARGENTINA 



[Released to the press May 13] 

On May 13, 1941 the Secretary of State issued 
formal notice of intention to negotiate a trade 
agreement with the Government of Argentina. 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
issued simultaneously a notice setting the dates 
for the submission to it of information and 
views in writing and of applications to appear 
at public hearings to be held by the Committee, 
and fixing the time and place for the opening 
of the hearings. These dates, time, and place 
are the same as those fixed in the notice issued 
by the Committee in connection with the notice 
of intention to negotiate a trade agreement with 
Uruguay issued May 13 by the Secretary of 
State. 

There follows a list of products which will 
come under consideration for the possible grant- 
ing of concessions l)y the Government of the 
United States. Representations which inter- 
ested persons may wish to make to the Commit- 
tee for Reciprocity Information need not be 
confined to the articles appearmg on this list, 
but may cover any articles of actual or potential 
interest in the import or export trade of the 
United States with Argentina. However, only 
the articles contained in the list issued May 13 
or in any supplementary list issued later will 
come under consideration for the possible grant- 
ing of concessions by the Government of the 
United States, 



With respect to products appearing on both 
the following list and the list issued in connec- 
tion with the notice of intention to negotiate a 
trade agreement with Uruguay, it will not be 
necessary to submit separate written or oral 
statements to the Committee. 

Suggestions with regard to the form and con- 
tent of presentations addressed to the Commit- 
tee for Reciprocity Information are included in 
a statement released by that Committee on 
December 13, 1937. 

A compilation showing the total trade be- 
tween the United States and Argentina during 
the years 1929-40 inclusive, together with the 
prmcipal products involved in the trade be- 
tween tlie two countries during the years 1939 
and 1940, has been i^repared by the Department 
of Commerce and may be obtained upon request 
from the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Com- 
merce in Washington or from any district or 
cooperative office. 

List of Products on Which the United States 
Will Consider Granting Concessions to 
Argentina 

Note : The rates of duty indicated are those 
now applicable to products of Argentina. 
Wliere the rate is one which has been reduced 
pursuant to a previous trade agreement by 50 
percent (the maximum permitted by the Trade 
Agreements Act) it is indicated by the symbol 



MAY 17, 1941 



577 



MR. Where the rate represents a reduction 
pursuant to a previous trade agreement, but less 
than a 50-percent reduction, it is indicated by 
the symbol R. Where a rate has been boimd 
against increase, but has not been reduced in a 
previous trade agreement, it is indicated by the 
symbol B; likewise, items which have been 
bound free of duty are indicated by the sym- 
bol B. 

For the purj^ose of facilitating identification 
of the articles listed, reference is made in the 
list to the paragraph mmibers of the tariff sched- 
ules in the Tariff Act of 1930, or, as the case 
may be, to the appropriate sections of the In- 
ternal Revenue Code. The descriptive phrase- 
ology is, however, in many cases limited to a 
narrower field than that covered by the num- 
bered tariff paragrai^h or section in the Inter- 
nal Revenue Code. In such cases only the 
articles covered by the descriptive phraseology 
of the list will come under consideration for the 
granting of concessions; furthermore, in the 
case of articles indicated by an as,terisk, con- 
sideration for the granting of concessions is to 
be limited to selected Argentine specialties 
within the descriptive phraseology shown. 

In the event that articles which are at present 
regarded as classifiable under the descriptions 
included in the above list are excluded there- 
from by judicial decision or otherwise prior to 
the conclusion of the agreement, the list will 
nevertheless be considered as including such 
articles. 



United 
States 
Tariff 
Act of 
1930 
Para- 
graph 



Description of article 



AU medicinal preparations of 
animal origin, not specially 
provided for. 

Beryllium: 

Oxide or carbonate, not 
specially provided for. 

Casein or lactarene and mix- 
tures of which casein or lac- 
tarene is the component ma- 
terial of chief value, not spe- 
cially provided for. 



Present rate of 
duty 



25% ad val. 

25% ad val. 
bHt per lb. 



Symbol 



United 
States 
Tarin 
Act of 
1930 
Para- 
graph 



35 



79 
208 (a) 

20S (h) 
•218 (f) 



•218 (g) 



Description of article 



Mats, natural and uncom- 
pounded, but advanced in 
value or condition by shred- 
ding, grinding, chipping, 
crushing, or any other proc- 
ess or treatment whatever 
beyond that essential to 
proper paclsiiig and the pre- 
vention of decay or deteriora- 
tion pending manufacture, 
not containing alcohol. 

Extracts, dyeing and tannmg, 
not containing alcohol: 
Quebracho 

Glycerin, crude 

Glycerin. reGned — 

Oils, vegetable: 

Sunflower-- 



Beryllium.- 

Mica, unmanufactured: 

Valued at not above 15i per lb- 
Mica, ground or pulverized — 
Table and kitchen articles and 
utensils, and all articles of 
every description not spe- 
cially provided for, com- 
posed wholly or in chief 
value of glass, blown or 
partly blown in the mold 
or otherwise, or colored, cut, 
engraved, etched, frosted, 
gilded, ground (except such 
grinding as is necessary for 
fitting stoppers or for pur- 
poses other than ornamenta- 
tion), painted, printed in 
any manner, sand-blasted, 
silvered, stained, or deco- 
rated or ornamented in any 
manner, whether filled or 
unfilled, or whether their 
contents be dutiable or free 
(except articles cut or 
engraved and valued at not 
less than $1 each). 
Tabic and kitchen articles and 
utensils, composed wholly or 
in chief value of glass, when 
pressed and unpolished, 
whether or not decorated or 
ornamented in any manner 
or ground (except such 
grinding as is necessary for 
fitting stoppers or for pur- 
poses other than ornamenta- 
tion), whether filled or un- 
filled, or whether their con- 
tents be dutiable or free. 



Present rate of 
duty 



5% ad val. 



15% ad val. 
Hot per lb_- 
ijisi per Ib- 



20% ad val. (plus 
Hit per lb. 
under Sec. 
24»l(b) of the 
Internal Reve- 
nue Code; see 
below). 

25% ad val. 



a per lb. 
15% ad val. 
60% ad val. 



50% ad val. 



Symbol 



ME 



R 
B 



578 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



United 
States 
Tariff 
Act of 
l'J30 
Para- 
graph 



232(a) 
302 (c) 

409 
701 



705 



706 



Description of article 



710 



718 (a) 



Onyx, in block, rough or 

squared only. 
Tungsten ore or concentrates-. 



Osier or willow, including chip 
of and split wHIdw, prepared 
(or basketmakcrs' use. 

Tallow -.- - 



718 (b) 



719 (4) 



Oleo oil and nleo stearin. 



Present rale of 
duty 



o( 



;it. including 



Extract 
fluid. 
Meats, prepared or preserved, 
not specially provided for 
(except meat pastes other 
than liver pastes, packed in 
air-tight containers weigh- 
ing with their contents not 
more than 3 ounces each). 
Romano, Pecorino, Reggiano, 
Parmesano, Provoloni, 
Sbrinj, and Uuya cheeses in 
their original loaves. 
Birds, dead, dressed or un- 
dressed, fresh, chilled, or 
frozen (except chickens, 
ducks, geese, guineas, and 
turkeys). 
Fish, prepared or preserved in 
any manner, w hen packed in 
oil or in oil and other sub- 
stances: 
Anchovies: 
Of a value not e.\coe<ling 
9i per lb. including the 
weight of the immedi- 
ate container only. 
Of a value exceeding 
9i per lb. including the 
weight of the immedi- 
ate container only. 
Fish, prepared or jireserved in 
any manner, when packe<l in 
air-tight containers weighing 
with their contents not more 
than 15 lbs. each (except fish 
packed in oil or in oil and 
other substances): 

Anchovies 

Fish, pickled or salted (except 
fish packed in oil or in oil and 
other substances and except 
fish packed in air-tight con- 
tainers weighing with their 



05 j! percu. ft. 

50* per lb. on the 
metallic tung- 
sten contained 
therein. 

35% ad val. 



Hi per lb. (plus 3« 
per lb. under 
Sec. 2491 (a) of 
the Internal 
Revenue Code; 
see below) . 

H per lb. (plus 3« 
per lb. under 
Sec. 2491 (c) of 
the Internal 
Revenue Code; 
see below). 

I5tf per lb 

6i per lb. but not 
less than 20% 
ad val. 



Symbol 



~i per lb. but not 
less than 35% ad 
val. 



5* per lb. 



44% ad val. 



30% ad val. 



MR 



25% ad val. 



United 
States 
Tariff 
Act of 
1930 
Para- 
graph 



725 



Description of article 



749 
•751 



762 
763 



764 

772 

774 

775 
779 

802 

802 

802 

803 

804 



804 
1101 (a) 



Present rate of 
duty 



contents not more than 15 
lbs. each): 
Anchovies, whether or not 
boned, in unmediate con- 
tainers weighing with 
their contents more than 
15 lbs. each and contain- 
ing each not more than 
10 lbs. of anchovies net 
weight. 
Macaroni, vermiceUi, noodles, 
and similar alimentary 
pastes: 
Containing eggs or egg 

products. 
Containing no eggs or egg 
products. 
Grapes (including hothouse 
grapes) in bulk, crates, bar- 
rels or other packages. 



Plums, prunes, and pruuelles. 
green or ripe, not in brine. 

Pears: Green, ripe, or in brine. 

All jellies, jams, marmalades, 
and fruit batters. 

Flaxseed-.- — 

Grass seeds and other forage 
crop seeds: 
Alfalfa - 

Canary seed- - 

Tomatoes, prepared or pre- 
served in any manner. 

Asparagus in its natural state.. 

Corned-beef hash 

Broom corn- --- 

Brandy 

Cordials, liqueurs, kirsch-was- 
ser and ratafia. 

Bitters of all kinds containing 
spirits. 

Champagne and all other 
sparkling wines. 

Still wines produced from 
grapes (not including ver- 
mouth), containing 14 per 
centum or less of absolute 
alcohol by volume, in con- 
tainers holding each 1 gal- 
lon or less. 

Vermouth, in containers hold- 
ing each 1 gallon or less. 

Wools: Donskoi, Smyrna, Cor- 
dova, Valparaiso, Ecuador- 
an, Syrian, Aleppo, Georgi- 
an, Turkestan, Arabian, 
Baghdad, Persian, Sistan, 
East Indian, Thibetan, 
Chinese, Manchurian, 
Mongolian, Egyptian, 
Sudan, Cyprus, Sardinian, 



m per lb. 
weight. 



Symbol 



3t per lb. 
2i per lb. 



2H per cu. ft. of 


B (as to 


such bulk or the 


h t - 


capacity of the 


house 


packages, ac- 


grapes). 


cording as im- 




ported. 




Va per lb. 




M<perlb. 




20% ad val. - 


R 



65^ per bu. of 56 lbs 



a per lb 

5i«perlb--- 
50% ad val. 



50% ad val. 

35% ad val. 

$20. per ton of 2,000 
lbs. 

$2.50 per proof gal- 
lon. 

$2.50 per proof gal- 
lon. 

$2.50 per proof 
gallon. 

$3. per gallon 

75< per gallon 



MR 
R 



MR 
MR 
MR 
MR 
R 



62H^ per gallon - - . 



MR 



MAY 17, 1941 



579 



Description of article 



Pyrenean, Oporto, Iceland, 
Scotch Blackface, Black 
Spanish, Kerry, Haslock, 
and Welsh Mountain; simi- 
lar wools without merino 
or English blood; all other 
wools of whatever blood or 
origin not liner than 40s; all 
the foregoing— 
In the grease or washed 

Scoured 

On the skin 

Sorted, or matchings, if 
not scoured. 
Any of the foregoing entered or 
withdrawn from warehouse 
under bond and used in the 
manufacture of press cloth, 
camel's hair belting, knit or 
felt boots, heavy fulled 
lumbermen's socks, rugs, 
carpets or any other floor 
coverings. 
Wools, not specially provided 
for, not finer than 44s: 
In the grease or washed 



Scoured . 



On the skin - 



Sorted, or matchings, if 

not scoured. 
Dressed furs and dressed fur 
skins, not dyed; 
Dog, goat and kid, hare, 

lamb and sheep (except 

caracul and Persian 

lamb). 
Hides and skins of cattle of the 
bovine species (except hides 
and skins of the India water 
bulTalo imported to be used 
in the manufacture of raw- 
hide articles), raw or un- 
cured, or dried, salted, or 
pickled. 
Boots, shoes, or other footwear 
(including athletic or sport- 
ing boots and shoes), made 
wholly or in chief value of 
leather, not specially pro- 
vided for. 
Boots, shoes, or other footwear 
(including athletic or sport- 
ing boots and shoes), the up- 
pers of which are composed 
wholly or in chief value of 
wool, cotton, ramie, animal 
hair, fiber, rayon or other 
synthetic textile, silk, or sub- 
stitutes for any of the fore- 



Present rate of 
duty 



2^t per lb. of clean 
content. 

27i per lb. of clean 
content. 

22(iper lb. of clean 
content. 

25f! per lb. of clean 
content. 

Free, subject to the 
provisions of 
paragrnph 1101 
of the TariS Act 
of 1930, as 
amended. 



29^ per lb. of clean 

content. 
32^ per lb. of clean 

content. 
27|iperlb. of clean 

content. 
300 per lb. of clean 

content. 
15 to 25% ad val. . . 



10%adval. 



10 to 30% ad val.. 



35% ad val. 



Symbol 



United 
States 
Tariff 
Act of 
1930 
Para- 
graph 



liR% 



R (iu 
part). 



Description of article 



1627 



R (in 

part) . 



1681 



going, whether or not the 
soles are composed of leather, 
wood, or other materials. 
Bags, baskets, belts, satchels, 
cardcases, pocketbooks, jewel 
boxes, portfolios, and other 
boxes and cases, not jewelry, 
wholly or in chief value of 
leather or parchment, and 
manufactures of leather, raw- 
hide, or parchment, or of 
which leather, rawhide, or 
parchment is the component 
material of chief v.tIuc. not 
specially provided for. 
Any of the foregoing perma- 
nently fitted and furnished 
with traveling, bottle, drink- 
ing, dining or luncheon, sew- 
ing, maniciu'e, or similar sets. 
Dog food, manufactured, unfit 
for human consumption, not 
specially provided for. 
Mat^, natural and uncom- 
potmded and in a crude state, 
not advanced in value or con- 
dition by shredding, grind- 
ing, chipping, crushing, or 
any other process or treat- 
ment whatever beyond that 
essential to proper packing 
and the prevention of decay 
or deterioration pending 
manufacture, not containing 
alcohol. 
Argols, tartar, and wine lees, 
crude or partly refined, con- 
taining less than yo per 
centum of potassium bi- 
tartrate, and calcium tar- 
trate, crude. 
Blood, dried, not specially 

provided for. 
Bones; Crude, steamed, or 
ground; bone dust, bone 
meal, and bone ash; and 
animal carbon suitable only 
for fertilizing piu-poses. 
Dyeing or tanning materials: 
Quebracho wood, whether 
crude or advanced in 
value or condition by 
shredding, grinding, 
chipping, crushing, or 
any similar process, and 
not containing alcohol. 
Furs and fur skins, not special- 
ly provided for, undressed: 

Guanaquito.,. 

Nutria -. -.- 

Wildcat - 

Ocelot- 

Hare 

Otter 



Present rate of 
duty 



UH to 
val. 



35% ad 



,35 or .50% ad vaU- 



20% ad val. 



Free. 



Free. 



Free. 



Free. 



Free. 



Symbol 



R (in 

part). 



R (in 
part). 



Free. 
Free. 
Free. 
Free. 
Free. 
Free.. 



.•!17787— 41- 



580 



United 
States 
Tariff 
Act of 
1930 
Para- 
graph 



1685 



1693 
1694 



Description of article 



1766 



Lamb and sheep (except 
caracul and Persian 
lamb). 
Fox (other than silver or 
black fox) . 

Seal - 

Tankage of a grade used chiefly 
for fertilizers, or chiefly as an 
ingredient in the manufac- 
ture of fertilizers. 
Hair of horse and cattle (in- 
cluding calf), cleaned or un- 
cleaned, drawn or undrawn, 
but unmanufactured, not 
specially provided for: 

Body hair 

Other 

Hoofs, unmanufactured.- 

Horns and parts of, including 
horn strips and tips, unman- 
ufactured. 
Minerals, crude, or not ad- 
vanced in value or condition 
by refining or grinding, or by 
other process of manufacture, 
not specially provided for; 

Beryl and beryllium 

Sausage casings, weasands, in- 
testines, bladders, tendons, 
and integuments, not spe- 
cially provided for. 
Skins of all kinds, raw, and 
hides not specially provided 
for: 
Horse, colt, ass, and mule- 

Carpincho- 

Sheep and lamb.. --. 

Goat and kid 

Tankage, unfit for human con- 
sumption. 



Present rate of 
duty 



Free. 

Free. 

Free. 
Free. 



Free... 
Free. 
Free. 
Free. 



Free. 
Free. 



Symbol 



Free. 
Free. 
Free. 
Free. 
Free. 



Internal 
Revenue 
Code Sec- 
tion 


Description of article 


Present rate of 
import tax 


2491 (a) 
2491 (b) 




30 per lb. 




iHt per !b. 


2491 (c) 


Oleo oil and oleo stearin 


30 per lb. 









Department of State 
trade-agreement negotiations with argentina 

Public Notice 

Pursuant to section 4 of an act of Congress 
approveii June 12, 1934, entitled "An Act to 
Amend the Tariff Act of 1930", as extended by 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

Public Kesolution 61, approved April 12, 1940, 
and to Executive Order 6750, of June 27, 1934, 
I hereby give notice of intention to negotiate a 
trade agreement .with the Government of Ar- 
gentina. 

All presentations of information and views 
in writing and applications for supplemental 
oral presentation of views with respect to the 
negotiation of such agreement shoukl be sub- 
mitted to the Committee for Reciprocity Infor- 
mation in accordance with the announcement of 
this date issued by that Committee concerning 
the manner and dates for the submission of 
briefs and applications, and the time set for 
public hearings. 

CoRDELL Hull 

Secretaty of State 

Washington, D. C, 
May 13, 191,1. 

Committee for Reciprocitt Information 

trade-agreement negotiations with 
argentina 

Public Notice 

Closing date for submission of briefs, June 12, 
1941 ; closing date for applications to be heard, 
June 12, 1941; public hearings open, June 23, 
1941. 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
hereby gives notice that all information and 
views in writing, and all applications for sup- 
plemental oral presentation of views, in regard 
to the negotiation of a trade agreement with 
the Government of Argentina, of which notice 
of intention to negotiate has been issued by the 
Secretary of State on this date, shall be sub- 
mitted to the Committee for Reciprocity Infor- 
mation not later than 12 o'clock noon, June 12, 
1941. Such communications should be addressed 
to "Chairman, Committee for Reciprocity In- 
formation, Tariff Commission Building, Eighth 
and E Streets NW., Washington, D.C." 

A public hearing will be held beginning at 
10 a. m. on June 23, 1941, before the Committee 



MAY 1?, 1941 



581 



for Reciprocity Information in the hearing 
room of the Tariff Commission in tlie Tariff 
Commission Building, wliere supplemental oral 
statements will be heard. 

Six copies of written statements, either type- 
written or printed, shall be submitted, of wliich 
one copy shall be sworn to. Appearance at 
hearings before the Committee may be made 
only by those persons who have filed written 
statements and wlio have within the time pre- 



scribed made written application for a hearing, 
and statements made at such hearings shall be 
under oath. 

By direction of the Committee for Reciprocity 
Information this 13th day of May 1941. 

E. M. Whitcomb 
Acting Seereta/ry 
Washington, D. C, 
May 13, Whl. 



TRADE-AGREEMENT NEGOTIATIONS WITH URUGUAY 



[Released to the press May 13] 

On May 13, 1941 the Secretary of State is- 
sued foi'mal notice of intention to negotiate a 
trade agTcement with the Govermnent of 
Uruguay. 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
issued simultaneously a notice setting the dates 
for the submission to it of information and 
views in writing and of applications to appear 
at public hearings to be held by the Committee, 
and tixing the time and place for the opening of 
the hearings. These dates, time, and place are 
the same as those fixed in the notice issued by 
the Committee in connection with the notice 
of intention to negotiate a trade agreement with 
Argentina issued May 13 by the Secretary of 
State. 

There follows a list of products which will 
come under consideration for the possible 
gi'anting of concessions by the Government of 
the United States. Representations which in- 
terested persons may wish to make to tlie Com- 
mittee for Reciprocity Information need not be 
confined to the articles appearing on this list 
but may cover any articles of actual or potential 
interest in the import or export trade of the 
United States with Uruguay. However, only 
the articles contained in the list issued May 13 
or in any supplementary list issued later will 
come under consideration for the possible 
granting of concessions by the Government of 
the United States. 



With respect to jaroducts appearing on both 
the following list and the list issued in connec- 
time with the notice of intention to negotiate a 
trade agreement with Argentina, it will not be 
necessary to submit separate written or oral 
statements to the Committee. 

Suggestions with regard to the form and con- 
tent of presentations addressed to the Commit- 
tee for Reciprocity Information are included in 
a statement i-eleased l)y that Committee on De- 
cember 13, 1937. 

A compilation showing the total trade be- 
tween tlie United States and Uruguay during 
the years 1929-40 inclusive, together with tlie 
principal products involved in the trade be- 
tween the two countries during the years 1939 
and 1940, has been prepared by the Department 
of Commerce and may be obtained, upon re- 
quest, from the Bureau of Foreign and Domes- 
tic Commerce in Washington or from any dis- 
trict or cooperative office. 

Li fit of Products on Which the United States 
Will Consider Granting Concessions to 
Uruguay 

Note: The rates of duty indicated are those 
now applicable to products of Uruguay. Wliere 
the rate is one which has been reduced pursuant 
to a previous trade agreement, it is indicated 
by the symbol R. Where a rate has been bound 
against increase, but has not been reduced in 
a previous trade agreement, it is indicated by 



582 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



the symbol B ; likewise, items which have been 
bound free of duty are indicated by the symbol 
B. 

For the purpose of facilitating identification 
of the articles listed, reference is made in the list 
to the paragraph numbers of the tariff schedules 
in the Tariff Act of 1930, or, as the case may be, 
to the appropriate sections of the Internal Reve- 
nue Code. The descriptive phraseology is, how- 
ever, in many cases limited to a narrower field 
than that covered by the numbered tariff para- 
graph or section in tlie Internal Revenue Code. 
In such cases only the articles covered by the 
descriptive phraseology of the list will come 
under consideration for the granting of con- 
cessions. 

In the event that articles which are at pres- 
ent regarded as classifiable under the descrip- 
tions included in the above list are excluded 
therefrom by judicial decision or otherwise 
prior to the conclusion of the agreement, the list 
will nevertheless be considered as including such 
articles. 



United 
States 
Tariff 
Act of 
1930 
Para- 
graph 


Description of article 


Present rate of 
duty 


Symbol 


19 
42 


Casein or lactarene and mix- 
tures of which casein or lac- 
tarene is the component ma- 
terial of chief value, not 
specially provided for. 


SH^perlb. 

Mciiperlb, 

1^5f(perlb 

Miiperlb. fplus3* 
per lb. under 
Sec. 2491 (a) of 
the Internal 
Revenue Code; 
see below). 

It per lb. (plus 3i 
per lb. under 
Sec. 2491 (c) of 
the Internal 
Revenue Code; 
see below) 

15* per lb 


R 


42 
701 


Glycerin, refined - 

Tallow 


R 


701 
705 


Oleo oil and oleo stearin 

Extract of meat, including 
fluid. 

Meats, prepared or preserved, 
not specially provided for 
(except meat pastes other 
than liver pastes, packed 
in air-tisht containers weigh- 
ing with their contents not 
more than 3 ounces each) . 


B 


706 


6(! per lb. but not 
less than 20% ad 
val. 





United 








States 








TariS 

Act of 

1930 


Description of article 


Present rate of 
duty 


Symbol 


Para- 








graph 








762 


Flaxseed - 


65* per bu. of 66 








lbs. 




lini (a) 


Wools: Donskoi, Smyrna, 
Cordova, Valparaiso, Ecua- 
doran, SjTian, Aleppo, Geor- 
gian, Turkestan, Arabian, 
Baghdad, Persian, Sislan, 
East Indian, Thibetan, Chi- 
nese, Manchurian, Mon- 
golian, Egyptian, Sudan. 
Cyprus, Sardinian, Pyre- 
nean. Oporto, Iceland, 
Scotch Blackface, Black 
Spanish, Kerry, Haslock, 
and Welsh Mountain; simi- 
lar wools withotit merino or 
English blood; all other 
wools of whatever blood or 
origin not finer than 40s; all 
the foregoing— 








In the grease or washed — 


24* per lb. of clean 
content. 






Scoured . 


37* per lb. of clean 
content. 














22* per lb. of clean 
content. 












Sorted, or raatchings, if not 


2,5* per lb. of clean 






scoured. 


content. 




1102 (a) 


Wools, not specially provided 
for, not finer than 44s; 








In the grease or washed — 


29* per lb. of clean 
content. 






Scoured 


32* per lb. of clean 
content. 














27* per lb. of clean 
content. 












Sorted, or matchings, if 


30* per lb. of clean 






not scoured. 


content. 




ma (a) 


Hides and skins of cattle of the 
bovine species (except hides 
and skins of the India water 
buffalo imported to be used 
in the manufacture of raw- 
hide articles), raw or un- 
curcd, or dried, salted, or 
pickled. 


10% ad val. 




1603 


Agates, unmanufactured _ _ 


Free. 




1625 


Blood, dried, not specially 
provided for. 


Free. 




1627 


Bonos: Crude, steamed, or 
ground; bone dust, bone 
meal, and bone ash; and 
animal carbon suitable only 
for fertilizing purposes. 


Free. 




1685 


Tankage nf a grade used chiefly 
for fertilizers, or chiefly as 
an ingredient in the manu- 
facture nf fertilizers. 


Free 


B 


1755 


Sausage casings, weasands, in- 
testines, bladders, tendons, 
and integuments, not spe- 
cially provided for. 


Free. 




1780 


Tankage, unfit for himian con- 
sumption. 


Free. 





MAY 17, 1941 



Internal 
Revenue 
Code Sec- 
tion 


Description of article 


Present rate of 
import tax 


2-191 (a) 
2491 (0) 


Tallow -. 


3i per lb. 




3t per lb. 







Committee for Recipkocitt Information 
trade-agreement negotiations with uruguay 

Public Notice 

Closing date for submission of briefs, June 
12, 1941 : closing date for applications to be 
lieard, June 12, 1941; public hearings open, 
June 23, 1941. 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
hereby gives notice that all information and 
views in writing, and all applications for sup- 
plemental oral presentation of views, in regard 
to the negotiation of a trade agreement with the 
Government of Uruguay, of which notice of in- 
tention to negotiate has been issued by the Sec- 
retary of State on this date, shall be submitted 
to the Committee for Reciprocity Information 
not later than 12 o'clock noon, June 12, 1941. 
Such coiumunications should be addressed to 
"Chairman, Committee for Reciprocity Infor- 
mation, Tariff Commission Building, Eighth 
i;nd E Streets NAV., Washington, D. C." 

A public hearuig will be held beginning at 
10 a. m. on June 23, 1941, before the Committee 
for Reciprocity Information in the hearing 
room of the Tariff Commission in the Tariff' 
Commission Building, where supplemental oral 
statements will be heard. 

Six copies of written statements, either type- 
written or printed, shall be submitted, of which 
one copy shall be sworn to. Appearance at 
hearings before the Committee may be made 



583 

only by those persons who have filed written 
statements and who have within the time pre- 
scribed made written application for a hearing, 
and statements made at such hearings shall be 
under oath. 

By direction of the Committee for Reciproc- 
ity Information this 13th day of May 1941. 

E. M. Whitcomb 

Acting Secretary 
Washington, D.C, 
May 13, mi. 



Department of State 
tr.\de-agreement negotiations ^vith uruguay 

Public Notice 

Pursuant to section 4 of an act of Congress 
appro\-ed June 12, 1934, entitled "An Act to 
Amend the Tariff Act of 1930", as extended by 
Public Resolution 61, approved April 12, 1940, 
and to Executive Order 6750, of June 27, 1934, 
I hereby give notice of intention to negotiate 
a trade agi-eement with the Government of 
Uruguay. 

All presentations of information and views 
in writing and applications for supplemental 
oral presentation of views with respect to the 
negotiation of such agreement should be sub- 
mitted to the Committee for Reciprocity In- 
formation in accordance with the Hunouncement 
of this date issued by that Committee concern- 
ing the manner and dates for the submission of 
briefs and applications, and the time set for 
public hearings. 

CoKDELL Hull 

Secretary of State 

Washington, D.C, 
May 13, 1941. 



Europe 



RELATIONS WITH THE FRENCH REPUBLIC 

STATEMENT BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES 



[Released to the press May 15] 

The policy of this Government in its relations 
■with the French Republic has been based upon 
the terms of the armistice between Germany and 
France and upon recognition of certain clear 
limitations imposed upon the French GoA^ern- 
ment by this armistice. Furthermore, we have 
had assurances given by the head of the French 
State on behalf of his Government that it did 
not intend to agree to any collaboration with 
Germany which went beyond the requirements 
of that armistice agreement. This was the least 
that could be expected of a France which de- 
manded respect for its integrity. 

The people of France, who cherish still the 
ideals of liberty luid free institutions and guard 
that love of these priceless jjossessions in their 
minds and hearts, can be counted on to hold out 



for these principles until the moment comes for 
their reestablishment. It is inconceivable they 
will willingly accept any agreement for so- 
called "collaboration" which will in reality 
imply their alliance with a military power whose 
central and fundamental policy calls for the 
utter destruction of liberty, freedom, and popu- 
lar institutions everywhere. 

The people of the United Slates can hardly 
believe that the present Government of France 
could be brought to lend itself to a plan of 
voluntary alliance implied or otherwise which 
would apparently deliver up France and its 
Colonial Empire, including French African 
colonies and their Atlantic coasts, with the 
menace which that involves to the peace and 
safety of tlie Western Hemisphere. 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 



[Released to the press May IC] 

The following persons and organizations are 
now registered with the Secretary of State, pur- 
suant to section 8 of the Neutrality Act of 1939, 
for the solicitation and collection of contribu- 
tions to be used in belligei'ent countries for 
medical aid and assistance or for food and 
clothing to relieve human suffering. The coun- 
tries to which contributions are being sent are 
given in parentheses. 

*1. Polslio Naroilowy Koinitet w Ameryce, 1002 Pitts- 
ton Avenue, Soraiiton, I'a. (Poland) 

2. Save the Chiklren Foundation, Inc., One Madison 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (formerly luternational 
Save the Chiklivn Fund of America, Inc.) (Great 
Britain, Poland, Belgium, and the Netherlands) 

3. Anthracite Relief Committee, 53-59 North Main 
Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. (Poland) 

584 



4. Polish Union of the United States of North Amer- 
ica, 53-59 North Main Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
(Poland) 

5. Polish Relief Committee, 1.550 East Canfield Avenue, 
Detroit, Mich. (Poland, Germany, and Scotland) 

• i. Nowy Swiat Publishing Co., Inc., 380 Second Ave- 
mie. New York, N. Y. (Poland, France, Great Brit- 
ain, and Italy) 

7. Polish Relief Committee of Philadelphia and Vicin- 
ity, 3111 Richmond Street, Philadelphia, Pa. (Po- 
land) 

*8. Walter Golanski and Edmund P. Krotkiewicz, co- 
partners of Polish Radio Programs Bureau, 11301 
.Joseph Campau Avenue, Hamtramck, Mich. (Po- 
land) 

9. Polish Relief Fund. Hotel Plaza, Jersey City, N. J. 
(Poland) 

10. Commission for Polish Relief, Inc., 420 Lexington 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (formerly American Com- 



*Revoked at request of registrant. 



MAY 17, 1941 



585 



mittee for Relief of Polish Nou-Combataiit Women, 
Children, Refugees) (Poland and England) 

*11. New Jersey Broadcasting Coriioration, 2S66 Hud- 
son Boulevard, Jerse.v City, N. J. (Poland) 

12. American Federation for Polish Jews, Inc., 225 
West Thirty-fourth .Street, New York, N. Y. (for- 
merly Federation of Polish Jews in America, Inc.) 
(Poland) 

*13. Rekord Printing & Publishing Comiiany, 603-605 
North Shaniokin Street, Shamokin, Pa. (Poland) 

*14. Central Council of Polish Organizations in Pitts- 
burgh, 3509 15utler Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. (Poland) 

15. American AVomen's Hospitals, 50 West Fiftieth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (France, Great Britain, 
and Greece) 

*16. American Committee for Civilian Relief in Pdland, 
401 Broadway, New York, N. Y. ( Poland ) 

*17. Polish Club of Washington, Stansbury Hall, 5832 
Georgia Avenue NW., Washington, D. C. (Poland) 

18. American French War Relief, Inc., 744 Fifth Ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y. ( formerly French and American 
Association for the Relief of War Sufferers) (France 
and Great Britain) 

*19. Polish Emergency Council of Essex County, N.J., 
Room 610, 700 Broad Street, Newark, N. J. (Poland) 

*20. Central Committee of the United Polish Societies, 
Bridgeport, Conn., 405 Barnuni Avenue, Bridgeport, 
Conn. (Poland) 

21. Associated Polish Societies' Relief Committee of 
Worcester, Mass., 15 Richland Street, Worcester, 
Mass. (Poland) 

22. Polish National Council of New York, 25 St. Marks 
Place, New York, N. Y. (Poland. France, England, 
and Germany) 

23. Polish Relief Committee of Boston, Room 30,3. 11 
Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. (Poland) 

*24. Central Citizens Committee, Room 3, Edwin Build- 
ing, 9701 Joseph Canipau Avenue, Detroit, Midi. 
(Poland) 

25. Lackawanna County Oimmitteo for Polish Relief, 
1213 Prospect Avenue, Scranton, Pa. (Poland) 

26. Polish-American Council, 1018 Noble Street, Chi- 
cago, 111. (formerly The Council of Polish Organi- 
zations in the United States of America, 1200 North 
Ashland Avenue, Chicago, 111.) (Poland) 

*27. James F. Hopkins. Inc., 6559 Hamilton Avenue, 
Detroit, Mich. (Poland) 

28. PolLsh Relief Committee of Chester and Delaware 
County. 2718 West Third Street, Chester, Pa. (for- 
merly Chester (Delaware Co., Pa.) Polish Relief 
Connnittee ) (England) 

29. Federa -d Council of Poli.sh Societies of Grand 
Rapids, Mich., in care of Mr. Sigmund S. Zaniierowski, 
908 Grand Rapids Trust Building, Grand Rapids, 
Mich. (Poland) 

30. The Paryski Publishing Co., 11.54 Nebraska Avenue, 
Toledo, Ohio. (Poland and Great Britain) 



*31. Mod.)eska Educational League Welfare Club at 
The International Institute, 303 Condley Drive, To- 
ledo, Ohio. (Poland) 

32. Schuylkill and Carbon Counties Relief Committee 
for Poland, Spring and Line Streets, Frackville, 
Pa. (Poland) 

*33. Holy Rosary Polish Roman Catholic Clnirch, 6 
Wall Street, Passaic, N. J. (Poland) 

34. Association of Joint Polish-American Societies of 
Chelsea, Mass., in care of St. Stanislaus Roman 
Catholic pectory, 163 Chestnut Street, Chelsea, 
Mass. (Poland) 

*35. Club Amical Fran(;ais, International Center of the 
Y.W.C.A.. 2431 East Grand Boulevard, Detroit, Mich. 
(France, Poland, and Great Britain) 

*36. Polish National Catholic of The Holy Saviour 
Church, 500 North Main Street, Union City, Conn. 
(Poland) 

37. Committee of Mercy, Inc., 254 Fourth Avenue, New 
York, N. Y. ( France, Great Britain, Norway, Bel- 
gium, and Netherlands) 

*3S. Kuryer Publishing Company, 747 North Broad- 
way, Milwaukee, Wis. (Poland) 

*39. Polish Falcons of America, First District, Inc., 
188 Grand Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. (Poland) 

40. Polish Relief Committee of Cambridge, Mass., 28 
Sixth Street, Cambridge, Mass. (Poland) 

*41. Poland War Suflferers Aid Committee, 6968 Broad- 
way, Cleveland, Ohio (formerly Polish Committee to 
Aid Poland's War Sufferers) (Poland) 

*42. Polish Welfare Association, 1450 River Street, 
Hyde Park, Mass. (Poland) 

43. Polish Relief Committee, 3809 Industrial Avenue, 
Flint, Mich. (Poland) 

*44. The Polish National Alliance of Brooklyn, United 
States of America, 142 Grand Street, Brookl.vn, N. Y. 
(Poland) 

45. Polish Civic League of Mercer County, 822 Ohio 
Avenue, Trenton, N. J. (Poland) 

*46. Polish-.Vinerican Central Civic Committee of South 
Bend, Ind., 1101-07 Western Avenue, South Bend, 
Ind. (Poland) 

47. Toledo Committee for Relief of War Victims, 1116 
Nebraska Avenue, Toledo, Ohio. (Poland) 

48. Edmund Tyszka, 11403 Joseph Campau Avenue, 
Hamtramck, Mich. (Poland) 

49. The Polish Naturalization Independent Club, 45 
Millbury Street, Worcester, Mass. (Poland and 
England) 

50. Polish Falcons Alliance of America, 97-99 South 
Eighteenth Street, Pitt.sburgh, Pa. (Poland) 

*51. Circle of Poles of St. Hedwig, Polish American 
Citizen's Committee, 17 Orange Street, New Britain, 
Conn. (Poland) 



♦Revoked at request of registrant. 



586 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTJLLETIN 



52. Spanish Rofusee Relief Campaign, 381 Fourth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (France) 

53. Polish United Societies of Holy Trinity Parish, 
310 High Street, Lowell, Mass. (Poland) 

54. American Friends of France, Inc., SCO Paris Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. (France, Germany, and England) 

t55. American Committee for Aid to British Medical 
Societies, Empire State Buildirg, New York, N. Y. 
(formerly American Committee for Aid to British 
Medical Society, 1G60 Crotona Park East, New York, 
N. Y.) (Great Britain) 

56. Associated Polish Societies Relief Committee of 
Webster, Mass., 51 Whitcomb Street, Webster, Mass. 
(Poland) 

57. Foster Parents' Plan for War Children, Inc., 55 
West Forty-second Street, New York, N. Y. (France 
and England) 

58. LaFayette Preventorium, Inc., 251 Fourth Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. (France) 

t50. United Fund for Refugee Children, Inc., 233 West 
Forty-second Street, New York, N. Y. (formerly Beth- 
Lechem, Inc.) (Poland, France, and England) 

60. Polish War Sufferers Relief Committee (Fourth 
Ward, Toledo. Ohio), 2929 Lagrange Street, Toledo, 
Ohio. (Poland and Germany) 

*61. Central Spanish Committee for Relief of Refugees, 
647 Earle Building, Washington, D.C. (France) 

62. Polish Literary Guild of New Britain, Conn., in 
care of Mrs. Helen E. Bloch, 69 Biruta Street, New 
Britain, Conn. (Poland) 

63. Polish Relief Fimd Committee of Passaic and 
Bergen Counties, in care of Mr. Stanley J. Polack, 145 
Passaic Street, Pas.saic, N. J. (Poland) 

(54. United Reading Appeal for Pulish War Sufferers, 
904 Chestnut Street, Reading, Pa. (Poland and 
England) 

65. International Committee of Young Men's Chris- 
tian Associations, 347 Madison Avenue, New York, 
N. Y. (All belligerent countries) 

*66. Medem Committee, Inc., 175 East Broadway, New 
York, N. Y. (Poland) 

67. Polish Welfare Council, 910 Bridge Street, Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. (Poland) 

(58. Polish Relief Committee of Delaware, in care of 
Mrs. Angela C. Turoczy, 302 Matthes Avenue, Elm- 
hurst, Wilmington, Del. (Poland) 

69. Polish AVomcn's Fund to Fatherland, 31 Basswood 
Street, Lawrence, Mass. (Poland) 

70. Polish Relief Fund, 164 Court Street, Middletowii, 
Conn. (Poland) 

71. Polish B.roadcasting Corijoration, 260 East One 
Hundred and Sixty-first Street, New York, N. Y. 
(Poland) 

72. Polish Aid F^nid Committee of Federation of Eliza- 
beth Poli.sh Organizations, 111-115 First Street, Eliza- 
beth, N. J. (Poland) 

73. Springfield and Vicinity Polish Relief Fund Com- 
mittee, 91 Charles Street, Springfield, Mass. ( Poland) 



74. International Relief Association for Victims of 
Fascism, Room 310, 20 Vesey Street, New York, N. Y. 
(France, Great Britain, and Germany) 

*75. Polish Medical Relief Fund of Mt. Desert Island, 
Maine, Bar Harbor, Maine. (Poland) 

76. Polish Relief Committee of Brockton, Mass., 40 
Emerson Avenue, Brockton, Mass. (Poland) 

*77. Polish Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Pennsyl- 
vania, 2961 Richmond Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Poland) 

*78. The Catholic Leader, 480 Burritt Street, New Brit- 
ain, Conn. (Poland) 

79. Relief Fund for Sufferers in Poland Committee, 
2514 Fiftieth Street, Kenosha, Wis. (Poland) 

80. Polski Komitet Ratunkowy (Polish Relief Fund), 
In care of Mr. Peter Majka, 25 Miles Street, Bing- 
hamton, N. Y. (Poland and England) 

*81. Scott Park Mothers and Daughters Club, 712 De- 
troit Avenue, Toledo, Ohio. (Poland) 
*82. California State Committee for Polish Relief, 

10202 Washington Boulevard, Culver City, Calif. 

(Poland) 
83. Polish Relief Fund Committee of Milwaukee, in 

care of Mr. J. P. Michalski, 703 W. Mitchell Street. 

Milwaukee, Wis. (Poland) 
*84. Ruth Stanley de Luze (Baroness de Luze), "Luth- 

any", Pleasantville Road. BriarclifE Manor, N. Y. 

( France) 
*S5. Polish Relief Committee of Gardner, Mass., 227 

Pine Street, Gardner, Mass. (Poland) 

86. Board of National Missions of the Presbyterian 
Church in the United States of America, 156 Fifth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain, France, 
and Germany) 

87. American Committee for Christian Refugees, Inc., 
287 Fourth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (formerly Amer- 
ican Committee for Christian German Refugees) 
(Germany and France) 

88. Nowiny Publishing Apostolate, Inc., 1226 W. Mit- 
chell Street, Milwaukee, Wis. (Poland) 

*89. Polish Relief Fund of Irvington, New Jersey, 415 

Sixteenth Avenue, Irvington, N. J. (Poland) 
90. St. Stephen's Polish Relief Fund of Perth Amboy, 

N. J., 490 State Street, Perth Amboy, N. J. (Poland) 
*91. Polish Army Veterans As.sociation of America, 

Inc., 56 St. Marks Place, New York, N. Y. (Poland) 
*92. Holy Cross Relief Fund Association of New 

Britain, Conn., Holy Cross Rectory, Biruta Street, 

New Britain, Conn. (Poland) 
*93. United Polish Societies of Hartford, Conn., Polish 

National Home, 100 Governor Street, Hartford, Conn. 

(Poland) 



''Revoked at request of registrant. 
tRevoked for failure to observe rules and regu- 
lations. 



MAY 17, 1941 

94. American Field Service, Room 1531, 120 Broadway, 
New York, N. Y. (France, Great Britain, and 
Greece) 

95. Polish National Alliance of the United States of 
North America, 1514-20 West Division Street, Chi- 
cago, III. (Poland) 

*96. The Reverend John Wieloch, 5 Church Street, 

Miller.s Fall, Mas.s. (Poland) 
*97. Orrin S. Good, 1410 Old National Bank Building, 

Spokane, Wash. (Great Britain) 
*98. United Polish Societies of Bristol, Conn., 462 North 

Main Street, Bristol. Conn. (Poland) 

99. Rus.slan Children's Welfare Society, Inc., 51 East 
One Hundred and Twenty-first Street, New York, 
N. Y. (Germany, France, and Poland) 

100. The American Jewish Joint Distrihution Com- 
mittee, Inc., 100 East Forty-second Street, New York, 
N. Y. (All belligerent countries) 

101. Polish Central Council of New Haven, St. Stanis- 
laus School Building, 9 Eld Street, New Haven, Conn. 
(Poland and Germany) 

102. Relief Agency for Polish War Sufferers, Polish 
National Home, Ives Street, Willimantic, Conn. 
(Poland) 

103. The Little House of Saint Pantaleon, 2201 DeLan- 
cey Street, Philadelphia, Pa. (France and England) 

tl04. Connecticut Radio Bureau, 185 Sherman Avenue, 
Meriden, Conn. (Poland) 

105. Pulaski Civic League of Middlesex County, N.J., 
13 Miller Street, South River, N.J. ( Poland ) 

106. Humanitarian Work Committee, Polish National 
Home, 10 Hendrick Avenue, Glen Cove, N.Y. (Po- 
land) 

*107. Mr.s. W. Forbes Morgan, 320 Park Avenue, New 

York, N.Y. (Poland) 
flOS. Association Franco-Americaint de.s Parrains et 

Marraines de Guerre des U.S.A., Raleigh Hotel, Wa.sh- 

ington, D.C. (France) 

109. Legion of Young Polish Women, 1166 Milwaukee 
Avenue, Chicago, 111. (Poland, France, Great Britain, 
and Germany) 

110. Polish Relief Fund, 10 Main Street, Jewett City, 
Conn. ( Poland ) 

*111. The Kindergarten Unit, Inc., 128 East Avenue, 
Norwalk, Conn. (France, Poland, Great Britain, 
India, Australia, and New Zealand) 

112. Le Secours Frangais, 745 Fifth Avenue, New York, 
N.Y. (formerly Le Paquet au Front) (France) 

*113. International Artists' Community Club, 701 Barr 
Building, Washington, D. C. (Poland) 

*114. The Federation of Polish Societies, 45 Furnace 
Street, Little Falls, N. Y. (Poland) 

*115. Polish Interorganization Council, 5000 Lonyo 
Avenue, Detroit, Slich. (Poland) 

*116. Mrs. Bradford Norman, Jr., in care of Mr. Brad- 
ford Norman, Jr., Commercial National Bank and 
Trust Company, 56 Wall St., New York, N. Y. 
(France) 

317787 — Jl 3 



587 

117. Polish Relief of Carteret, N. J., 42 Hudson Street, 
Carteret, N. J. (Poland) 

118. Federation of French Veterans of the Great War, 
Inc., 610 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (France 
and Germany) 

11!). Mrs. Paul Verdier Fund, 199 Geary Street, City 

of Paris Dry Good.? Stores Company, San Francisco, 

Calif. (France) 
120. Polish National Council of Montgomery County, 

243 Church Street, Amsterdam, N. Y. (Poland) 
*121. Centrala, 1-3 Monroe Street, Passaic, N. J. 

(Poland) 

122. Polish Relief Fund of Meriden, 9 West Main 
Street, Meriden, Conn. (Poland) 

123. United Charity In.stitutions of Jerusalem, 207 East 
Broadway, New York, N. Y. (Palestine) 

*124. United Polish Societies of Immaculate Conception 
Church, in care of Mr. Klemens Markowski, 36 Hill 
Street, Southington, Conn. (Poland) 

*125. Allied Relief Fund, 57 William Street, New York, 
N. Y. (formerly the French and British Relief 
Funds) (United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Neth- 
erlands, and Norway) 

*126. Polish Welfare Association of the Archdiocese of 
Chicago, 203 North Wabash Avenue, Chicago, 111. 
(Poland) 

127. Polish Central Committee of New London, Conn., 
362 Main Street, New London, Conn. (Poland) 

128. The Emergency Aid of Pennsylvania, Twentieth 
and Sansom Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. (Great Brit- 
ain, France, Greece, Norway, Belgium, Luxemburg, 
and Netherlands) 

*129. United Polish Roman Catholic Parish Societies 
of Greenpoint, Brooklyn, N. Y., St. Stanislaus Kostka 
Roman Catholic Church, 607 Humboldt Street, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. (Poland) 

*130. East Chicago (Stizeus' Committee for Polish War 
Sufferers and Refugees, 4902 Indianapolis Boulevard, 
East Chicago, Ind. (Poland) 

*131. Committee for the Relief of War Sufferers in 
Poland, 1505 Cass Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. (formerly 
Citizens Committee for Relief of War Sufferers in 
Poland) (Poland) 

*132. United Polish Central Council of Connecticut, 
471 Park Avenue, Bridgeport, Conn. (Poland) 

133. French Committee for Relief in Fi-ance, 12245 
Abington Avenue, Detroit, Mich. (France and Great 
Britain) 

134. Tolstoy Foundation, Inc., Room 54, 289 Fourth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (formerly Tolstoy Founda- 
tion for Russian Welfare and Culture) (France, 
Poland, Czechoslovakia, and England) 

*13-5. Polish Relief Association, Town of North Hemp- 
stead, 120 Jericho Turnpike, Mineola, Long Island, 
N. Y. (Poland) 



*Revoked at request of registrant. 

tRevoked for failure to observe rules and regulations. 



588 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



♦136. American Society for British Medical and Civil- 
ian Aid, Incorporated, 46 Cedar Street, New York, 
N. Y. (formerly American Society for British Medi- 
cal and Hospital Aid, Incorporated) (Great Britain 
and France) 

137. United American Polish Organizations, South 
River, N.J., 13 Jackson Street, South River, N. J. 
(Poland) 

138. United Polish Organizations of Salem, Mass., in 
care of Mrs. Sallie Augustynowicz, 5 Turner Street, 
Salem, Mass. (Poland) 

139. Briti-sh War Relief Association of Northern Cali- 
fornia, 316-322 Shell Building, San Francisco, Calif. 
(Great Britain and France) 

140. Polish Relief Fund of Palmer, Mass., 20 Oak Street, 
Three Rivers, Mass. (Poland) 

141. Polish White Cross Club of West Utica, 1410 Mar- 
tin Street, Utica, N. Y. (Poland and England) 

*142. Fund for the Relief of Scientists, Men of Letters, 

and Artists of Moscow, in care of Eitingon Schild Co., 

Inc., 224 West Thirtieth Street, New York, N. Y. 

(France and Great Britain) 
*143. St. Michael's Roman Catholic Parish, 75 Derby 

Avenue, Derby, Conn. (Poland) 
*144. The Polish Relief Committee, 11 East Lexington 

Street, Baltimore, Md. (Poland) 
*145. The Maryland Committee for the Relief of 

Poland's War Victims, 11 East Lexington Street, 

Baltimore, Md. (Poland) 

146. Pulaski League of Queens County, Inc., 108-11 
Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, Queens County, N. Y. 
(Poland) 

147. Relief Committee of United Polish Societies, 142 
Cabot Street, Chicopee, Mass. (Poland) 

148. United Polish Societies of Los Angeles, 4200 Avalon 
Boulevard, Los Angeles, Calif. ( Poland ) 

149. Committee Representing Polish Organizations and 
Polish People in Perry, N. Y., 20 Elm Street, Perry, 
N. Y. (Poland) 

150. The Friends of Israel Refugee Relief Committee, 
Inc., 710 Witherspoon Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Canada, France, and Great Britain) 

*151. Nowe-Dworer Ladies Benevolent Association, 
Inc., In care of Mi.ss Beatrice Stone, 203-05 Lafayette 
Street, New York, N. Y. (Poland) 

152. French War Relief Fund of San Francisco, French 
Library, 414 Mason Street, San Francisco, Calif, (for- 
merly Les Anciens Combattauts Frangais de la Grande 
Guerre) (France) 

153. Polish Relief Fund, Echo Club, 341 Portage Road, 
Niagara Falls, N. Y. (Poland) 

154. United Committee for French Relief, Inc., Peat, 
Marwiek, Mitchell and Company, attention Mr. E. M. 
Field, 70 Pine Street, New York, N. Y. (France, 
England, and Germany) 



155. Polish Civilian Relief Fund, St. Joseph's School 
Hall, Monroe Street, Passaic, N. J. (Poland) 

*156. Polish Aid Association of the Sixth Congressional 
District, Including Perham and Browerville, Minn., 
Little Falls, Minn. (Poland) 

157. Central Committee Knesseth Israel, 214 East Broad- 
way, New York, N. Y. (Palestine) 

*158. Polish Relief Committee of Nassau County, N. Y., 
450 Front Street, Hempstead, N. Y. (Poland) 

159. L'Union Alsacienne, Inc., 45 West Fifty-second 
Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 

160. The American Fund for Breton Relief, Mr. John L. 
Swasey, Bankers Trust Company, 10 Wall Street, 
New York, N. Y. (France and England) 

161. Polish Relief Fund of Syracuse, N. Y., and Vicinity, 
1411 West Genesee Street, Syracuse, N. Y. (Poland) 

162. Polish Relief Committee, 1680 Acushnet Avenue, 
New Bedford, Mass. (Poland) 

163. American Friends of Czecho-Slovakia, Room 2213, 
8 West Fortieth Street, New York, N. Y. (Great 
Britain, France, and Bohemia and Moravia) 

*1G4. The Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church, Little 
Falls, N. Y., Sacred Heart Rectory, Furnace Street, 
Little Falls, N. Y. (Poland) 

165. Golden Rule Foundation, 60 East Porty-.second 
Street, New York, N. Y. (Poland and Palestine) 

166. United Poli.sh Committees in Racine, Wis., 1809 
Howe Street, Racine, Wis. (Poland) 

*167. Saint Adalbert's Polish Relief Association, Polish 

National Home, Thompsouville, Conn. (Poland) 
168. Cerele Pramjais de Seattle, 308 Marion Street, 

Seattle, Wash. (France and Great Britain) 
*169. General Gustav Orlicz Dreszer Foundation for 

Aid to Polish Children, Kennedy-Warren, Wa.shing- 

ton, D. C. (Poland) 
170. Polish Relief Committee of Holyoke, Mass., 200 

Main Street, Holyoke, Mass. (Poland) 
*171. Ware Polish Relief Fund, Pulaski Street, Ware, 

Mass. (Poland) 

172. Milford, Conn., Polish Relief Fund Committee, 61 
Lafayette Street, Milford, Conn. (Poland) 

173. Central Council of Polish Organizations, 103 West 
Miller Street, New Castle, Pa. (Great Britain, 
Poland, and Prance) 

*174. Polish Relief Committee, 138 Bernard Street, 
Rochester, N. Y. (Poland) 

175. Polish Relief Fund of Fall River, Mass., 872 Globe 
Street, Fall River, Mass. (Poland) 

176. American Auxiliary Committee de I'Union des 
Femmes de France, 56 East Sixty-eighth Street, New 
York, N. Y. (Prance, Great Britain, and Germany) 

*177. Massachusetts Relief Committee for Poland, 340 
Main Street, Worcester, Ma.ss. (Poland) 

*178. Southbridge Allied Committee for Relief in Po- 
land, 10 Old Sturbridge Road, Southbridge, Mass. 
(Poland) 



♦Revoked at request of registrant. 



MAY 17, 1941 



589 



179. American Friends Service Committee, 20 South 
Twelfth Street, Philadelphia, Pa. (Great Britain, 
Poland, Germany, France, Norway, Belgium, Nether- 
lands, and Italy) 

*180. Refugies d'Alsace-Lorraine en Dordogne, 48G 
California Street, San Fi'ancisco, Calif. (France) 

•181. United Polish Societies of Manchester, 1.58 Eld- 
ridge Street, Manchester, Conn. (Poland) 

182. Polish Relief Committee of Jackson, Mich., 1425 
Joy Avenue, Jackson, Mich. (Poland) 

183. Share A Smoke Club, Inc., 504 Stewart Avenue, 
Ithaca, N. Y. (Great Britain, France, Norway, Bel- 
gium, and Netherlands) 

184. Committee of French-American Wives, 18 East 
Forty-sixth Street, New York, N. Y. (France and 
Great Britain) 

185. Hadassah, Inc., 1860 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 
(Palestine) 

186. Federation of Franco-Belgian Clubs of Rhode 
Island, in care of Mr. J. O. Oury, Post Office Box 950, 
Woonsocket, R. I. (France and England) 

187. Society Frangaise de St. Louis, Inc., in care of 
Miss Irma Ponscarme, 5630 Pershing Avenue, St. 
Louis, Mo. (France) 

188. American-German Aid Society, 2206 West Twenty- 
first Street, Los Angeles, Calif. (Germany) 

189. Fi-ench War Relief, Inc., 1209 Pershing Square 
Building, 44S South Hill Street, Los Angeles, Calif. 
(France) 

*190. General Taufflieb Memorial Relief Committee for 

France, 265 Miramar Avenue, Santa Barbara, Calif. 

(France and Great Britain) 
*191. Polish Business and Professional Men's Club, 

Inc., 138 West Sixty-fourth Street, Los Angeles, Calif. 

(Poland) 

192. Leagiie of Polish Societies of New Kensington, 
Arnold, and Vicinity, 857 Kenneth Avenue, New 
Kensington, Pa. (Poland) 

193. British-American War Relief Association, Room 
1819, Exchange Building, Seattle, Wash. (Great 
Britain and Greece) 

*194. The Fashion Group, Inc., 30 Rockefeller Plaza, 

New York, N. Y. (France) 
195. Secours Franco-American — War Relief, 2555 

Woodward Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. (Great Britain) 
*196. Mrs. Carroll Greenough, 1408 Thirty-first Street 

NW., Washington, D. C. (France) 
♦IG'?. The United Polish Societies of Bronx County, 

706-09 Courtlandt Avenue, Bronx, New York, N. Y. 

(Poland) 

198. Committee for the Relief for Poland, in care of 
Mr. Stephen F. Kluck, 946 Twentieth North, Seattle, 
Wash. (Poland) 

199. Polish Women's Relief Committee, 149 East Sixty- 
seventh Street, New York, N. Y. (France, Poland, 
and Germany) 

200. Mrs. Walter R. Tuckerman, Edgemoor, Bethesda, 
Md. (Great Britain) 



201. Fernanda Wanamaker Munn, 17 East Ninetieth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 

202. The Kyffhaeuser, League of German War Veterans 
in U.S.A., 1802 West Erie Avenue, I'hiladelphia, Pa. 
(Poland, Germany, Canada, and Jamaica) 

203. Bethel Mission of Eastern Europe, 2316 West 
Fifty-fourth Street, Minneapolis, Minn, (formerly 
Bethel Mission of Poland, Inc.) (Poland) 

204. Polish Relief Committee of the Polish National 
Home Association, 10 Coburn Street, Lowell, Mass. 
(Poland) 

205. A. Seymour Houghton, Jr., ct al, 30 Broad Street, 
New York, N. Y. (France) 

206. The Benedict Bureau Unit, Inc., in care of Mr. J. 
Henry Harper, 30 Broad Street, New York, N. Y. 
(France) 

207. American Friends of the Daily Sketch War Relief 
Fund, 15 Broad Street, New York, N. Y. (Great 
Britain) 

208. The British War Relief Society, Inc., 730 Fifth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. ( United Kingdom, Canada, 
France, Belgium, Netherlands, Norway, and Greece) 

209. French War Veterans, 5722 Benner Street, Los 
Angeles, Calif. (France) 

210. North Side Polish Council, Relief Committee of 
Milwaukee, Wis., 2962 North Bremen Street, Mil- 
waukee, Wis. (Poland) 

211. Friends of Poland, 5558 South Fairfield Avenue, 
Chicago, 111. (Poland) 

212. The British War Relief Association of Southern 
California, Studio 43, Ambassador Hotel, Los Ang- 
eles, Calif. (Great Britain) 

213. United Opoler Relief of New York, in care of Mr. 
Joe Grossman, 790 Dawson Street, New York, N. Y. 
(Poland) 

214. American Field Hospital Corps, 610 Fifth Avenue. 
New York, N. Y. (formerly American Volunteer Am- 
bulance Corps) (The United Kingdom, Greece, Al- 
bania, France, Belgium, Holland, and Ethiopia) 

*215. Mrs. Larz Anderson, 19 Congress Street, Boston, 
Mass. (France) 

216. The Catholic Student War Relief of Pax Romana, 
Pax Romana Office, Catholic University of America, 
Washington, D. C. (Poland, France, Germany, and 
Great Britain) 

217. Polish Relief Fund Committee, in care of Mrs. K. 
Troy, 4351% Avalon Boulevard, Los Angeles, Calif. 
(Poland) 

218. Polish Relief Committee, 30 Chandler Avenue, 
Taunton, Mass. (Poland) 

219. Relief Society for Jews in Lublin, 1206 South 
Lacieuega Boulevard, Los Angeles, Calif. (Poland) 

*220. American Fund for Wounded in France, Inc., 
72 Pearl Street, Worcester, Mass. (France) 

221. Polish-American Citizens Relief Fimd Committee, 
R.F.D. Box No. 42A, Shirley, Mass. (Poland) 



*Revoked at request of registrant. 



590 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



*222. Irvin McD. Garfield, 30 State Street, Boston, Mass. 
(Great Britain) 

223. Society of the Devotees of Jerusalem, Inc., 400 
East Houston Street, New York, N. Y. (Palestine) 

224. Association of Former Juniors in France of Smith 
College, in care of Smith College Club, 34 East Fiftieth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 

*225. The Friends of Normandy, 993 Park Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. (France) 

226. Women's Allied War Relief Association of St. 
Louis, 21 Dartford Avenue, Clayton, Mo. (France 
and Great Britain) 

227. Basque Delegation in the United States of Amer- 
ica, 30 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (France) 

228. Greater New Bedford British War Relief Corps, 
74 Penniman Street, New Bedford, Mass. (Great 
Britain) 

229. Les Amities Femiuines de la France, in care of Miss 
B. A. Weill, 315 East Sixty-eighth Street, New York, 
N. Y. (France and England) 

230. Bishops' Committee for Polish Relief, 1312 Massa- 
chusetts Avenue NW., Washington, D.C. (Poland, 
England, France, and Italy) 

231. American and French Students' Correspondence 
Exchange, in care of Prof. H. C. Olinger, School of 
Education, New York University, Washington Square, 
New York, N. Y. (France and England) 

*232. Les Amis de la France a Puerto Rico, Ponce de 
Leon Avenue and Cuervillas Street, San Juan, P. R. 
(France) 

233. English Six-aking Union of the United States, 30 
Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. (France, Great 
Britain, Union of South Africa, Germany, Canada, 
Norway, Belgium, Luxemburg, and Netherlands) 

234. Relief for French Refugees in England, in care of 
Mrs. A. G. Pinckney, Riggs National Bank, 1503 Penn- 
sylvania Avenue NW., Washington, D.C. (formerly 
Urgent Relief for France) (France and Great 
Britain) 

235. Bundles for Britain, in care of Mr. John Delafleld, 
20 Exchange Place, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain 
and Dominions) 

236. American Fund for French Wounded, Inc., 256 
Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. (France and Eng- 
land) 

237. Hebrew Christian Alliance of America, 3508 Ogden 
Avenue, Chicago, 111. (Poland, Germany, and Great 
Britain ) 

*238. United Nowy Dworer Relief Committee, in care of 
Mr. Louis Kirsteln, 2528 Cruger Avenue, Bronx, New 
York, N. Y. (Poland) 

239. American Association for Assistance to French 
Artists, Inc.. in care of Mrs. David Randall-Maclver, 
535 Park Avenue. New York, N. Y. (France) 

240. Independent Kinsker Aid Association, in care of 
Mr. Benjamin W. Salzman, Secretary, ,51 West Mosholu 
Parkway, New York, N. Y. (Poland) 



241. American McAU Association, 297 Fourth Avenue, 

New York, N. Y. (England) 
*242. Lafayette Fund, in care of Miss Susan W. Street, 

235 East Seventy-third Street, New York, N. Y. 

(France) 

243. The Grand Duke Vladimir Benevolent Fimd Asso- 
ciation, 562 West One Hundred and ITorty-fourth 
Street (Apartment 63), New York, N. Y. (France) 

244. United German Societies, Inc., 310 Southwest 
Ninth Avenue, Portland, Oreg. (Germany) 

*245. Mobile Surgical Unit, Inc., 29 East Sixty-ninth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (formerly Emily Morris 
(Mrs. Lewis Spencer Morris)) (France) 

246. American Women's Unit for War Relief, Inc., in 
care of Comtesse de Janze, 888 Park Avenue, New 
York, N. Y. (formerly American Unit for War Relief 
Association ) ( France ) 

*247. Committee for Aid to Children of Mobilized Men 
of the XX" Arrondissement of Paris, in care of Mr. 
Bernard Douglas, 35 West Thirty-fourth Street, New 
York, N. Y. (Prance) 

248. Catholic Medical Mission Board, Inc., 8 West 
Seventeenth Street, New York, N. Y. (India, Aus- 
tralia, Canada, New Zealand, and the Union of South 
Africa ) 

*249. Polish I'oung Men'.s Club, Danielsou, Conn. (Po- 
land ) 

250. Fellowship of Reconciliation, 2S29 Broadway, New 
York, N. Y. (France, England, and Germany) 

251. Sociedades Hisi>anas Confederadas, 59^61 Henry 
Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. (France) 

252. Polish American Associations of Middlesex County, 
N. J., St. Stanislaus Kostka Rectory, Sandfield Road, 
Sayreville, N. J. (Poland) 

253. Polish Aid Fund Committee of St. Casimir's 
Roman Catholic Church in the City of Albany, N. Y., 
in care of Miss Valeria C. Sowek, 111 Central Avenue, 
Albany, N. Y. (Poland) 

'*254. American Emergency Volunteer Ambulance Corps, 
Inc., 60 Wall Tower, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain 
and France) 

*255. Polish Roman Catholic Priests Union, Group No. 
3, of New York Archdiocese, in care of The Reverend 
Felix F. Burant, 101 East Seventh Street, New York, 
N. Y. (Poland and France) 

256. Caledonian Club of Idaho, 418 North Fifth Street, 
Boise, Idaho. (Scotland) 

257. Order of Scottish Clans, 150 Causeway Street, Bos- 
ton, Mass. (Scotland) 

2.58. L'Atelier, Room 806, DeYoung Building, San 

Francisco, Calif. (France) 
259. Joint Committee of the United Scottish Clans of 

Greater New York and New Jersey, in care of Mr. 

Alex McF. Malcolm, 1880 De Kalb Avenue, Brooklyn, 

N. Y. (Scotland) 



♦Revoked at request of registrant. 



MAY 17, 1941 



591 



*260. Mrs. Nancy Bartlett Laughlin, 139 Bast, Sixty- 
sixth Street, New Yorli, N. Y. (France) 

*261. Relief Coordination Service, 315 Lexington Ave- 
nue, New Yorii, N. Y. (France) 

262. Committee for Relief in Allied Countries, Dum- 
barton Oaks, Georgetown, Washington, D. C. 
(France, Great Britain, Poland, Luxemburg, Bel- 
gium, Netherlands, and Norway) 

*263. Children'.s Crusade for Children, in care of Mr. 
Harry Scherman, Treasurer, 385 Madison Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. (France and Poland) 

2(>1. French Relief Association, in care of Mr.s. Halbert 
White, President, .'')431 Wyandotte Street, Kansas 
City, Mo. (France) 

2(55. La France Post, American Legion, 610 Fifth Ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y. ( France, Great Britain, and 
Greece) 

266. American Committee for the Polish Ambulance 
Fimd, in care of Dr. Peter F. Czwalinski, Wicker 
Park Medical Center, 1530 Nortli Damen Avenue, 
Chicago, 111. (France, Poland, and England) 

267. Polish-American Vohinteer Ambulance Section 
(Pavas), Inc., 597 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
(France and England) 

2f)8. American Women's Voluntary Services, 7 Ea.st 
Fifty-first Street, New York, N. Y. (England) 

269. Meunonite Central Committee, Akron, Pa. (Great 
Britain, Poland, Germany, France, Canada, and Neth- 
erlands) 

270. Grand Lodge Daughters of Scotia, 71 Cabot Street, 
Hartford, Conn. (Scotland) 

*271. Kate R. Miller, 277 Park Avenue, Apartment 8- K, 

New York. N. Y. (France) 
*272. Spanish Committee Pro-Masonic Refugees, 95 

Roosevelt Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 

273. Association of Former Russian Naval Officers in 
America, 44-44 Twenty-first Street, Long Island City, 
N. Y. (France) 

274. British-American Comfort League, Post Office Box 
284, Quincy, Mass. (England) 

275. Paderewski Fund for Polish Relief, Inc., 37 East 
Thirty-sixth Street, New York, N. Y. (Poland and 
Great Britain) 

276. The Pawtucket and Blackstone Valley British Re- 
lief Society of Rhode Island, Post Office Box No. 1094, 
Pawtucket, R. I. (Great Britain and Germany) 

*277. Five for France, Box 267, Atlanta University, At- 
lanta, Ga. (France) 

278. Woman's Auxiliary Board of the Scots' Charitable 
Society, Inc., 170 Bell Rock Street, Everett, Mass. 
(Scotland) 

279. Polish Inter-Organization "Centrala" of Water- 
bury, 87 Oak Street, Waterbury, Conn. ( Poland ) 

*280. Central Committee for Polish Relief, in care of 
Mr. A. A. Pawlowski, 908 Detroit Avenue, Tirlcdo, 
Ohio. (Poland) 



*281. Helena Rubinstein-Titus, 300 Park Avenue, New 

York, N. Y. (Poland) 
♦282. Foyers du Soldat, Savoy Plaza, New York, N. Y. 

( France ) 

283. Mrs. Mark Baldwin, 25 Claremont Avenue, Apart- 
ment 5A, New York, N. Y. (France) 

284. American War Godmothers, 601 Clyde Street, 
I'ittsbnrgh, Pa. (France) 

285. Fortra, Incorporated, Suite 312, 61 Broadway, 
New York, N. Y. (Germany and Poland) 

286. American Dental Ambulance Committee, in care 
of Mr. Benjamin L. Barringer, 32 Broadway, New 
York, N. Y. (United Kingdom) 

287. Emergency Relief Committee for Kolbuszowa, in 
care of Mr. Irving Jackman, 276 Fifth Avenue, New 
York, N. Y. (Poland) 

288. Polish Relief Conmiittee of Columbia County, 
Sacred Heart Church Rectory, 75 North Second 
Street, Hudson, N. Y. (Poland) 

289. Hamburg-Bremen Steamship Agency, Inc., 218 
East Eighty-sixth Street, New York, N. Y. (Ger- 
many, Poland, France, Belgium, Norway, Luxemburg, 
and Netherlands) 

290. United Bilgorayer Relief, Inc., in care of Mr. David 
Goldstein, 93 Pitt Street, New York, N. Y. (Poland) 

291. American Committee for the German Relief Fund, 
Inc., Room 2410, 10 East Fortieth Street, New York, 
N. Y. (Canada, Jamaica, British West Indies, Dutch 
Guiana, Australia, New Zealand, Germany, and Po- 
land) 

292. Polish-American Forwarding Committee, Inc., 542 
Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Poland and Ger- 
many) 

293. Polish Relief Committee of Fitchburg, 167 Sum- 
mer Street, Fitchburg, Mass. (Poland) 

*294. Accion Democrata Espanola, 831 Broadway, San 

Francisco, Calif. (France) 
*295. Sociedades Hispaiuus Aliadas, 831 Broadway, San 

Francisco, Calif. (France) 
296. Allied Relief Ball, Inc., in care of Mr. Alfred C. 

Howell, 524 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Great 

Britain and France) 
*297. Greater New York Committee to Save Spanish 

Refugees, Room 1004, 55 West Forty-second Street, 

New York, N. Y. (France and United Kingdom) 

298. Superior Council of the Society of St. Vincent de 
Paul, 28!) Fourth Aveiuie, New York, N. Y. (France) 

299. The British War Relief A.ssociation of the Philip- 
pines, in care of Fleming and Williamson, Post Office 
Box 214, Manila, P. I. (All belligerent countries) 

300. Marthe Th. Kahn, 390 Riverside Drive, New York, 
N. Y. (France) 

*301. Club des Femmes de France, 190 Beacon Street, 
Boston, Mass. (France) 



•Revoked at request of registrant. 



592 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



302. German-American Relief Committee for Victims 
of Fascism, 381 Fourth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
(France and Great Britain) 

303. The Maple he&t Fund, Inc., 601 Fifth Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. (Canada, United Kingdom, and 
France) 

*304. Erste Plnchover Kranken Uuterstuzungs Verein, 
Inc., In care of Mr. Alexander Kekoler, 110 Maujer 
Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. (Poland) 

♦SO."). American Association of Teachers of French, 
Washington Chapter, in care of Mrs. Corrington Gill, 
2630 Adams Mill Eoad NW., Washington, D. C. 
(France) 

306. The Somerset Workroom, Far Hills, N. J. (Great 
Britain and France) 

307. The Mother Church, The First Church of Christ, 
Scientist, in Boston, U.S.A., 107 Falmouth Street, 
Boston, Mass. (Canada, France, and the United 
Kingdom) 

308. Fund for the Relief of Men of Letters and Scien- 
tist.? of Ru.ssia, 310 West Ninety-ninth Street, New 
York, N. Y. (France, Czechoslovakia, and Poland) 

t309. United American Spanish Aid Committee, 200 
Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (formerly North 
American Spanish Aid Committee) (France and 
United Kingdom) 

310. Le Souvenir Fran<;ais, International Center, 2431 
East Grand Boulevard, Detroit, Mich. (France and 
Belgium) 

311. American Employment for General Relief, Inc., 383 
Madi.son Avenue, Room 1201. New York, N. Y. (Eng- 
land, France, Norway, Poland, Belgium, Luxemburg, 
and Netherlands) 

312. French War Relief Fund of the Philippines, Post 
Office Box 597, 46 Escolta, Manila, P. I. (formerly 
Mr. Maxime L6vy) (France) 

313. Norwegian Relief, Inc., 135 South La Salle Street, 
Chicago, 111. (Norway) 

314. British Sailors' Book and Relief Society, in care 
of Mr. Donald Neville-Willing. 18 East Seventieth 
Street, New York, N. Y. ( Bermuda, Canada, British 
West Indies, and Newfoundland) 

315. League of American Writers, Inc., 381 Fourth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. ( France, England, Poland, 
and Norway) 

316. Scots' Charitable Society, 355 Newbury Street, 
Boston, Mass. (Scotland) 

317. American Friends of a Jewish Palestine, Inc., 285 
Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Palestine, Ger- 
many, Poland, France, and the United Kingdom) 

318. Central Bureau for Relief of the Evangelical 
Churches of Europe, 297 Fourth Avenue, New York, 
N. Y. (All belligerent countries) 

319. Queen Wilhelmina Fund, Inc., Holland House, 10 
Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. (The Nether- 
lands, France, Poland, United Kingdom, India, Aus- 
tralia, New Zealand, Canada, the Union of South 
Africa, Norway, Belgium, Luxemburg, and Germany ) 



320. The Commission for Relief in Belgium, Inc., 420 
Lexington Avenue, New York, N. Y. (France, Eng- 
land, Belgium, and Luxemburg) 

♦321. National Christian Action, Inc., 70 Third Avenue, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. (Norway) 

322. Unitarian Service Committee of the American Uni- 
tarian Association, 25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 
(France, British Isles, and Netherlands) 

323. The Salvation Army, Inc., 122 West Fourteenth 
Street, New York, N Y. (England, France, Nether- 
lands, Belgium, and Norway) 

324. American Association of University Women, 1(334 
Eye Street, Washington, D. C. (France, Great 
Britain, and Canada) 

325. Anzac War Relief Fund, 405 Lexington Avenue. 
New York, N. Y. (Australia and New Zealand) 

326. The Kosciuszko Foundation, Inc., 149-151 East 
Sixty-seventh Street, New York, N. Y. (Poland) 

327. Belgian Relief of Southern California, 3511 West 
Olympic Boulevard, Los Angeless, Calif. (Belgium, 
France, and Great Britain) 

*328. American Civilian Volunteers, in care of Mr. 
Gerard Richardson, Hotel Peter Cooper, Lexington 
Avenue and Tliirty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y. 
(France) 

329. Netherlands War Relief Committee, in care of Mr. 
J. M. E. Nikkels, Netherlands India Commercial 
Bank, 21 Plaza Moraga, Manila, P. I. (Netherlands) 

330. Junior Relief Group of Texas, 1111 Main Street, 
Houston, Tex. (The United Kingdom, France, Neth- 
erlands, Belgium, and Norway) 

■"331. Vincennes, France, Committee of Vincennes, Ind., 
112 North Seventh Street, Vincennes, Ind. (France) 

332. Soei6t^ Israelite Francaise de Secours Mutuels de 
New York, in care of Mr. Gaston Meyer, Secretary, 
2305 Grand Avenue, New York, N. Y. (France) 

333. Belgian War Relief Fund, in care of Mr. L. V. 
Casteleyn, 344 Regina Building, Manila, P. I. 
( Belgium ) 

334. British-American Ambulance Corps, Inc., 420 Lex- 
ington Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain and 
France) 

*335. Allied Food Relief Committee, 46 Cedar Street, 

New York, N. Y. (England and France) 
336. The Seventh Column, Inc., West Fairlee, Vt. 

(France and England) 
3:^7. Friends of Children, Inc., 36 West Forty-fourth 

Street, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain, France, 

Belgium, and Netherlands) 
*338. Belgian Relief Fimd, Inc., Room 426, Graybar 

Building, 420 Lexington Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

(Belgium, France, and England) 



♦Revoked at request of registrant. 

tRevoked for failure to observe rules and regula- 



tions. 



MAY 17, 1941 



593 



339. United British Wnr Relief Association, 16 Sargent 
Avenue, Somerville, Mass. (Great Britain) 

340. Independent Uritisli War Relief Society of Rhode 
Island, in care of Mrs. Agnes S. Hutcheon, Main 
Avenue, Greenwood, R. I. (Great Britain) 

341. St. Andrew's (Scottish) Society of Washington, 
D.C., In care of Robert A. Grahame, Inc., 1524 K 
Street, NW., Washington, D. C. (Scotland) 

342. French War Relief Fund of Nevada, 210 South 
Center Street, Reno, Nev. (France) 

343. Ukrainian Relief Committee, 78 St. Marlis Place, 
New York, N. Y. (Germany, France, England, and 
Italy) 

344. The New Canaan Workshop, New Canaan, Conn. 
(British Empire) 

345. Nicole de Paris Relief Fund, 23 East Fifty-fifth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 

346. International Federation of Business and Profes- 
sional Women, in care of Miss Isabelle Claridge, 
Valley Camp Coal Company, Wheeling, W. Va. (Po- 
land, Norviuy, Belgium, Holland, and France) 

347. American Board of Missions to the Jews, Inc., 27 
Throop Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. (France, Belgium, 
and Germany) 

348. Great Lakes Command, Canadian Legion of the 
British Empire Service League, 1841& Santa Ro.sa 
Avenue, Detroit, Mich. (Great Britain and Canada) 

*349. Scottish Games of New Jersey Association, Bus 
23, Fairhaven, N. J. (Great Britain) 

350. Franco-American Federation, in care of Mr. Philip 
L. Morency, Secretary, 9 Cherry Street, Salem, Mass. 
(France) 

351. Refugees of England, Inc., Room 607, 511 Fifth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. ( Great Britain and France ) 

*352. American Friends of German Freedom, 342 Madi- 
son Avenue, New York, N. Y. (England and France) 

*353. The Louisiana Guild for British Relief, 4.534 St. 
Charles Avenue, New Orleans, La. (British Empire) 

354. The American Hospital in Britain, Limited, 321 
East Forty -second Street, New lork, N. Y. (Great 
Britain) 

355. Czechoslovak Relief, 4049 West Twenty-sixth Street, 
Chicago, 111. (Czechoslovakia, Great Britain and 
Dominions, France, and Belgium) 

356. Emergency Rescue Committee, 122 East Forty- 
second Street, New York, N. Y. (France, United 
Kingdom, Belgium, Norway, and Netherlands) 

357. Metlical and Surgical Relief Committee of Amer- 
ica, 420 Lexington Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Great 
Britain, France, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, 
Luxemburg, Belgium, Greece, and Yugoslavia) 

358. Mrs. George Gilliland, 530 East Eighty-fifth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (Northern Ireland) 

*359. District of Columbia Federation of Women's 
Clubs, Broad Branch and Grant Roads, Washington. 
D.C. (Great Britain) 



3C0. American-Polish National Council, in care of Mr. 

V. M. Spunar, 4730 North Lawndale Avenue, Chicago, 

111. (Poland) 
*361. Funds for Fi-ance, Inc., 32 East Fifty-seventh 

Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 

362. Over-Seas League Tobacco Fund, in care of Lam- 
bert and Feasley, 9 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, 
N. Y. (British Empire) 

363. French Colonies War Relief Committee, 322 Con- 
vent Avenue, New York, N. Y. (formerly Mutual 
Society of French ColoniaLs, Inc.) (France) 

*361. The Canadian Society of New York, Room 500, 
2 Wall Street, New York, N. Y. (Canada and Great 
Britain ) 

365. American Friends of Britain, Inc., 724 Fifth Ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

366. Harvard University, in care of Mr. John M. Rus- 
sell, 20 University Hall, Cambridge, Mass. (Great 
Britain) 

367. Methodist Committee for Overseas Relief, 150 
Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (France, Poland, 
Norway, Belgium, Netherlands, United Kingdom, 
India, Australia, Canada, Germany, Greece, and 
Italy) 

368. British War Relief Fund, 16a5 Hearthstone Drive, 
Dayton, Ohio. (Great Britain) 

369. Monmouth War Relief, Red Bank, N. J. (Eng- 
land, France, and Greece) 

*370. Polish Prisoner's of War Relief Committee, Box 
20, Station W, Brooklyn, N. Y. (Germany) 

371. The Mobile Circle for Benefit of the Royal Navy 
Hospital Comforts Fiuid, in care of Miss Hilda 
Broadwood, Chairman, Route 2, Mobile, Ala. (Brit- 
ish Isles) 

372. Isthmian Pro-British Aid Committee, Post Office 
Box 621, Ancon, C. Z. (England) 

373. The Pall River British War Relief Society, 79 
Campbell Street, Fall River, Mass. (Great Britain) 

374. American Aid for German War Prisoners, 16 
Duerstein Street, Buffalo, N. Y. (Canada, Australia, 
Great Britain, Netherlands, and New Zealand) 

t375. Ladies Auxiliary of the Prcnitlence Branch of the 
Federation of the Italian World War Veterans in 
the United States, 296 Atwells Avenue, Providence, 
R. I. (Italy) 

376. International Children's Relief Association, in care 
of Mr. John W. D'Arcy, 342 Madison Avenue, Suite 
905, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

377. Parcels for the Forces, Inc., 30 Rockefeller Plaza, 
New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

*378. William Henry Mooring, 272 South La Peer 
Drive, Beverly Hills, Calif. (England) 

379. The Pacific Steam Navigation Company, Crist6bal, 
C. Z. (England) 



♦Revoked at request of registrant. 
tRevoked for failure to observe rules and regu- 
lations. 



594 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



380. Univerisal Committee for the Defense of Democ- 
racy, 357 West Fifty-fifth Street, New York, N. Y. 
(England and France) 

381. Pelhaui Overseas Knitting Circle, 2.52 Irving 
Place, Pelham, N. Y. (Scotland) 

*382. Solldaridad Internacional Autifascista, Post Of- 
fice Box 81, Station D, New York, N. Y. (France) 

*383. Blizaheth Arrten Employees Association, 081 Fifth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

384. Canadian Women's Club of New York City, Inc., 
Savoy Plaza Hotel, Fifth Avenue at Fifty-eighth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain, Canada, 
and Newfoundland) 

•385. Friends of Dover England Finid, 158 Washington 
Street, Dover, N. H. (England) 

*386. San Angelo Standard, Inc., 17 South Chadbourne, 
San Angelo, Tex. (England) 

*387. Church of the Pilgrimage, Town Square, Plymouth, 
Mass. (England) 

*388. Lord Mayor of Pl.\Taouth"g Services Welfare 
Fund. Plymouth, Mass. (England) 

389. Parcels for Belgian Prisoners, 1718 Massachusetts 
Avenue, Washington, D.C. (Gennany) 

390. Greek War Relief A.ssociatlon, Inc., 730 Fifth Ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y. (Greece) 

391. Mi.ss Heather Thatcher, 1334i/j Miller Drive, Sun- 
set Boulevard, Hollywood, Calif. (Great Britain) 

392. Scottish Clans Evacuation Plan, "Shorewood" 
Port Wa.shington, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

393. California Denmark Fund, 348 Jules Avenue, San 
Francisco, Calif. (Denmark) 

394. Royal Air Force Benevolent Fund of U.S.A., Inc., 
.515 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Great 
Britain) 

395. Near East Foundation, Inc., 17 West Forty-sixth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (Greece) 

*3n6. Wellesley Club of Washington, in care of Mrs. 
Ernest J. McCormick, Apartment 743, Arlington Vil- 
lage, Arlington, Va. (Great Britain) 

♦397. American Committee for the Syrian Orphanage 
in Jerusalem, 5106 Sixty-third Street, Woodside, Long 
Island. N. Y. (Palestine, Germany, and British East 
Africa ) 

398. Lithuanian National Fund, 359 Union Avenue, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. (Germany and France) 

399. The American School Committee for Aid to Greece, 
Inc., Fuld Hall, Institute for Advanced Study, Prince- 
ton, N. J. (Greece) 

400. Dodecanesian League of America, Inc., 211 West 
Thirty-third Street, New York, N. Y. (Greece) 

401. Liberty Link Afghan Society, The Whittier, 415 
Burns Drive, Detroit, Mich. (Great Britain) 

t4(J2. Federation of the Italian World War Veterans 
in the U. S. A., Inc., 626 Fifth Avenue, New York, 
N. Y. (Italy) 

403. Comity Pro Francia Libre, Post Office Box 783, 
San Juan, P. R. (England and Prance) 



404. Nowy-Dworer Ladies and United Relief Associa- 
tion, in care of Mr. J. Gertner, 1021 Bryant Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. (Poland) 

405. The Greek Fur Workers Union, Local 70, 253 West 
Twenty-eighth Street, New York, N. Y. (Greece) 

406. Ethiopian World Federation, Inc., 2667 Eighth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. ( Ethiopia and Great Brit- 
ain) 

407. Saints Constantine and Helen Greek Orthodox 
Church, in care of Mr. Soterios Nicholson, Burling- 
ton Hotel, Washington, D. C. (Greece) 

40S. The Allied Civilian War Relief Society, Inc., in 
care of Mr. Robert C. Flack, ,36 West Forty-fourth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

409. The Order of Ahepa, Investment Building, Wash- 
ington, D.C. (Greece) 

410. The American Committee for the Relief of Greece, 
Inc., 205 West Fifty-fourth Street, New York, N. Y. 
(Greece) 

411. National Legion Greek-American W^ar Veterans 
in America, Inc., 550 West One Hundred and Fifty- 
seventh Street, New York, N. Y. (Greece) 

412. American Committee to Save Refugees, 156 Fifth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (France) 

413. Phalanx of Greek Veterans of America, Inc., 810 
West Harrison Street, Chicago, 111. (Greece) 

414. Adopt A Town Committee, Inc., 527 Fifth Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. (formerly Namesake Towns Com- 
mittee, Inc.) (England) 

415. American Cameronian Aid, 159 Eastern Parkway, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., (Scotland) 

416. United British Societies of Minneapolis, .508 Hodg- 
son Building, Minneapolis, Minn. (Great Britain 
and Dominions) 

417. Mid-European Food Package Service, Inc., 400 
Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Germany, Po- 
land, and Luxemburg) 

418. Wellesley College Alumnae Association, Wellesley 
College, Wellesley, Mass. (Great Britain) 

419. The American Fund for British War Aid, in care 
of Mr. L. Stewart Gatter, 36 West Forty-fourth 
Street, New York. (Great Britain) 

420. Free French Relief Committee, 435 Park Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. (England, French Cameroons, Bel- 
gian Congo, and Nigeria) 

421. Relief for Children of Britain by Children of 
America, in care of Mr. Samuel Schaefer, Eisele & 
King, 39 Broadway, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

*422. Democracies Allied Relief, 420 Lexington Avenue, 
Suite 1419, New York, N. Y. (All belligerent coun- 
tries) 

♦423. U. S. Friends of Greece, 565 Fifth Avenue, New 
York, N. Y. (Greece) 



♦Revoked at request of registrant. 
tRevoked for failure to observe rules and regula- 
tions. 



MAY 17, 1941 



595 



•424. War Relief Assoeiatlou of American Youth, Inc., 
5G5 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

*425. Hellenic World Newspaper Co., 214 Huntington 
Avenue, Boston, Mass. (Greece) 

426. Hias Immigrant Bank, 425 Lafayette Street, New 
York, N. Y. (Poland, Netherlands, Belgliun, France, 
and Germany) 

427. Esco Fund Committee, Inc., 11.3 West Fifty-seventh 
Street, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

*428. American Labor Committee to Aid British Labor, 
9 Bast Forty-sixth Street, New York, N. Y. (Great 
Britain ) 

429. The Silver Thimble Fund of America, 26 Audubon 
Place, New Orlean.s, La. (Great Britain) 

430. Lithuanian Relief Committee for the Aid of Lithu- 
anian Victims of Tyranny and War, 307 West 
Thirtieth Street, New York, N. Y. (Germany. 
France, Italy, and Great Britain) 

431. The British Legion, Inc., 13123 Indiana Avenue, 
Detroit, Mich. (Great Britain) 

432. Young Friends of Fl-ench Prisoners and Babies, 
67 East Eighty-second Street, New York, N. Y. 
(France) 

433. Montagu Club of London, in care of Miss Hetty 
Brown, 558 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
(Great Britain) 

434. American Committee for British Catholic Relief, 
2428 Tracy Place NW., Washington, D.C. (British 
Isles) 

*435. Friends of British Relief, Inc., 217 North Calvert 
Street, Baltimore, Md. (Great Britain) 

436. Paderewski Testimonial Funil, Inc., 37 East Thir- 
ty-sixth Street, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

437. Hands Across the Sea Helpers Association, 505 Ov- 
ington Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. (United Kingdom) 

438. German- American Conference, New York, 109 East 
Twenty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y. (Canada and 
British West Indies) 

439. International Home for Refugees, 16 East Forty- 
first Street, New York. N. Y. (England, Poland, and 
France) 

440. Gamma Phi Beta International Sorority, 2800 
Brandywine Street NW., Washington, D.C. (Eng- 
land) 

441. Ethiopian Redemption Committee, Incorporated. 
120 South LaSalle Street, Suite 1763, Chicago, 111. 
(Ethiopia) 

442. Callard of London, 412 South Michigan Avenue, 
Chicago, 111. (England) 

443. Franco-British Relief, 522 North Charles Street, 
Baltimore, Md. (Great Britain) 



444. Albanian Relief Fund, 431 South Huntington Ave- 
nue, Jamaica Plain, Mass. (Albania) 

445. Vitamins for Britain, Inc., 113 West Fifty-seventh 
Street, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

446. American-Lithuanian Society of Washington, 
D.C, in care of Mr. Albert W. Shupienis, 1733 Twen- 
tieth Street NW., Wa.shington, D. C. (Germany) 

447. Franco-American Committee for the Relief of War 
Victims, Hotel Plaza, Fifth Avenue and P'ifty-ninth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 

448. Penny-A-Plane, Suite 807, 386 Fourth Avenue, New 
York, N. Y. (United Kingdom) 

449. Comity de Franceses Lil)rcs de Puerto Rico, Box 
522, Mayague-s, P. R. (British Empire) 

450. Newtown Committee for Child Refugees, Inc., in 
care of Mrs. Jerome P. Jackson, Chairman, Sandy 
Hook, Conn. (England) 

451. Robert E. Lee Memorial Fnundation, Inc., Strat- 
ford, Va. (Great Britain) 

452. Grand Lodge, Free and Acci'pted Masons, State of 
New York, 71 West Twent.v-third Street, New York, 
N. Y. (Great Britain) 

453. British Aid Committee, in care of Capt. Cliff oril 
Payne, Post Office Box 20U7, Balboa, C. Z. (Great 
Britain ) 

454. Serb National Federation, 3414 Fifth Avenue. Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. (Yugoslavia) 

455. Club Ukraine, 210-218 Grand Street, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. (Great Britain, Germany, Poland, Italy, and 
France) 

456. Caledonian Pipe Bands Lanarkshire Relief Fund, 
1630 Newcastle Road, Grosse Point, Mich. (Scot- 
land) 

457. Union for the Protection of the Human Person, 
12 West Seventy-sixth Street, New York, N. Y. 
(France) 

458. Secours Franco-Beige, I.3O David Street, New 
Bedford, Mas.s. (England, France, and Belgium) 

459. Ukrainian Gold Cross, Inc., 149 Second Avenue. 
New York, N. Y. (France, Poland. Germany, Great 
Britain, and Italy) 

460. American Committee for Luxemburg Relief, Inc., 
Room 508, 109 North Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. 
(France and England) 

461. American Friends of Canada, in care of Blake, Stinj 
& Curran, 29 Broadway, New York, N. Y. (Canada 
and Great Britain) 



♦Revoked at request of registrant 



American Republics 



BOUNDARY DISPUTE BETWEEN ECUADOR AND PERU: FRIENDLY 
OFFICES OF ARGENTINA, BRAZIL, AND THE UNITED STATES 



[Released to the press May 13] 

The text of an identic telegram sent May 8, 
19-il, mutatiK mutandis, by the Secretary of 
State to the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of 
Ecuador and Pern, together with translations 
of the replies received fi'om the Governments of 
Ecuador and Peru, follows. 

Identic telegram from the Secretary of State to 
the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of Ecuador 
and Peru 

The Governments of Argentina, Brazil and 
the United States are deeply concerned by the 
continuance, particularlj' at a time when con- 
tinental solidarity is vital, of the difficulties 
which for over a century have perturbed the 
relations between Peru and Ecuador. 

The Governments of the two countries in- 
volved have given many proofs of their earnest 
desire to remove this cause of friction between 
them. They have been in almost constant dis- 
cussion and negotiation over a jjeriod of many 
years in an effort to agree upon a common 
boundary. However, in spite of the fact that 
some progiess has been made and that the two 
parties have agreed to submit the matter to 
arbitration, it must be recognized that as of the 
present date tlie controversy contains serious 
possibilities of dangerous developments. 

Other continents are aflame with hate and 
violence. Every day the theater of war extends 
to wider horizons. 

Confronted with a crisis in world affairs of a 
magnitude heretofore totally unknown, the 
American Eepublics have frequently declared, 
and at the meeting of Foreign Ministers held at 
Habana in July 1940 reiterated, their irrevoc- 
able determination to omit no effort to prevent 
any controversy which might impair their soli- 
darity. The continuance of any situation that 
results in the impairment of harmonious rela- 
596 



tions between two of the American Republics 
diminishes and undermines the strength of that 
solidarity. 

Conscious of the desire of both the Govern- 
ment of Peru and the Goverimient of Ecuador 
to settle their long-standing boundary dispute, 
as repeatedly evidenced by both countries, and 
impressed by the necessity, in this critical hour, 
of the American Republics drawing ever closer 
together in an unshakable determination to 
maintain unimpaired their peace, territorial in- 
tegrity, and security, the Go'S'ernments of Ar- 
gentina, Brazil and the United States tender 
their friendly services in furthering the prompt, 
equitable and final settlement of the dispute to 
tlie Government of Peru and to tlie Government 
of Ecuador to be availed of by those Govern- 
ments, together with the services of such othei' 
Governments as they are both desirous of invit- 
ing, in such manner as may be deemed appro- 
priate and advantageous. 

The Govennnents of Argentina, Brazil and 
the United States earnestly and sincerely hope 
that the Governments of Peru and Ecuador ap- 
preciative of the high motives which have in- 
spired this action, will give the proposal their 
most attentive and urgent consideration. 



Accept [etc.] 



CoRDELL Hull 



The Ecuadoran Minister of Foreign Affairs to 
the Secretary of State 

The Ecuadoran Government has had the 
lionor of receiving a message in which Your 
Excellency so graciously communicated to it 
that the Governments of the United States of 
America, Argentina and Brazil, motivated by 
the necessity in this critical hour of a closer rap- 
prochement between the American republics, 
disturbed by the continuation of the difficulties 



MAY 17, 1941 



597 



wliicli for more than a centuiy have disturbed 
the relations between Ecuador and Peru and 
fully cognizant of the desire of both paities to 
solve their ancient difference over boundaries, 
offered them friendly services together -n-ith 
those of any otlier Govenunents that it might 
seem desirable to invite in order to promote the 
prompt, equitable and final solution of this con- 
troversy. My Government, which concurs fully 
\\ith the sentiments, desires and proposals ex- 
pressed in this message and persuaded that this 
solution is, as Your Excellency says so elo- 
quently, a vital factor for the unity and solidar- 
ity of the continent in this moment of disquiet- 
ing expectations, and being under an obligation 
to show itself especially worthy of the motives 
of your pacific offer, accepts with pleasure the 
generous services of the illustrious Governments 
of the United States of America, Argentina and 
Brazil. I am honored in being able to assure 
the American Goveniment of the gratitude of 
Ecuador and to applaud so fine an act of fel- 
lowship and high understanding of the neces- 
sities and destinies of America. I trust fully 
that Peru is equally devoted to those same ideals 
of fraternity for the glory and benefit of the 
continent and honor of our countries now called 
to a close-knit union and mutual aid for the fu- 
ture. [I believe with absolute faith] that the 
assistance of these Governments and that of 
others which might be designated will have the 
most complete and prompt success in the equi- 
table and final solution of the controversy. 
I present [etc.] Julio Tobar Donoso 



The Peruvian Minister of Foreign Ajfairs to 
the Secretary of State 

The Government of Peru has received the 
cablegram in which Your Excellency is good 
enough to advise it that the Governments of the 
Argentine Republic, Brazil and the United 
States of America offer "their friendly services 
in furthering the prompt, equitable and final 
settlement of the [boundary] dispute" pending 
between Ecuador and Peru, in the hope of re- 
moving, under these grave circumstances, any 



situation which by prejudicing "the harmonious 
relations between two of the American repub- 
lics diminishes and undermines the strength of 
that [continental] solidarity". 

My Government, highly appreciating these 
proposals, recalls that it is the second time that 
Argentina, Brazil and the United States of 
America have taken this position. In 1910, a 
serious condition of tension having been caused 
hj the Ecuadoran rejection of the Spanish arbi- 
tration, the three countries succeeded in remov- 
ing the danger of a conflict. They then asked 
for the withdrawal of the forces encamped on 
the frontiers and proposed the final settlement 
of the dispute through the mediation, which 
Ecuador rejected, affirming "that Ecuador is 
the only one who has to decide wliether or 
not the dispute with Peru affects her vital 
interests, the national honor and the sov- 
ereignty of the State itself". According to the 
Ecuadoran Government direct arrangements 
were the "most decorous means" and "most fit- 
ting for sister nations" to put an end to the dis- 
pute, "with no other judge than the good offices 
of our most illustrious and great friends". 

While noting these facts, which constitute 
the best proof that Peru is not responsible for 
the prolongation of the dispute, my Government 
must re-state, in the first place, the unwavering 
juridical position of my country of respect for 
the popular will from wliich our nationalities 
emerged, the basic principle in the argument 
maintained by Peru in the arbitration proceed- 
ings at Madrid and repeated in the Washington 
conferences. It is therefore an unavoidable 
duty to declare that my Government cannot ad- 
mit that, at any time, the sovereign rights of 
Peru over the provinces of Tubes, Jaen and 
Mainas which, in 1821, swore the independence 
of Peru under the aegis of General San Martin 
and which afterward participated in the defini- 
tive establishment of the Peruvian State, and 
have been represented in the congresses of Peru 
up to the present time, be made a matter of ar- 
gument. Peru is disposed to settle her bound- 
ary dispute, but not to admit a controversy 
concerning the nationality of provinces which 
have been a part of Peru for one liundred and 



598 

twenty yesirs, and in which are large Penivian 
populations which have expressed their ener- 
getic protest against the separatist claims of 
Ecuador. Peru's position is one of most fer- 
vent adherence to peace, but she demands, also, 
respect for her international personality. To 
discuss the nationality of three Peruvian prov- 
inces or merely to begin with an assumed right 
to do so, would imply the intention to disinte- 
grate the personality of Peru, formed by her 
constituent parts since her independence, to re- 
vise the work of American independence and 
the principles of obedience to the popular will in 
the formation of nationalities and to introduce 
a grave confusion in the international order, 
which is based on respect for the personality of 
States fixed by their sacred initial constitution. 
The situation created by regrettable incidents 
which lead the friendly Governments to fear 
•'the possibility of dangerous developments'" 
will readily disappear, as has happened on pre- 
vious occasions, with the simple observance of 
Ecuador of the status quo guaranteed by agi'ee- 
ments concluded since independence. In con- 
sonace with the principles stated, which Your 
Excellency will probably appreciate, the Gov- 
ernment of Peru accepts the good offices offered 
by the Governments of Argentina, Brazil and 
the United States of ilnierica, to the end that 
the atmosphere of cordiality and sincere col- 
laboration between the two countries may be 
restored. 



I avail [etc.] 



Alfredo Solf t Muko 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

[Released to the press May 16] 

In response to an inquii*y as to the reaction in 
Peru to the offer of the Governments of Argen- 
tina, Brazil, and the United States of their 
friendly offices in order to bring about a de- 
finitive solution of the Ecuador-Peru boimdary 
dispute, the Seci-etary of State made the fol- 
lowing statement on May 16: 

"I am glad to have the opportunity of re- 
iterating once again that this Government was 
motivated in offering to Ecuador and Peru its 
friendly offices solely by the most friendly desire 
to assist in settling, once and for all, the long- 
standing boundary dispute between those two 
neighboring countries. This Government is 
happy to have been associated with the Govern- 
ments of Argentina and Brazil in this tender 
of friendly offices. 

"In some quarters it has been insinuated that 
this Government participated in this friendly 
initiative in order to obtain bases on the Gala- 
pagos Islands. I wish to take this opportunity 
to state categorically and definitely that the 
United States has not, in any way, discussed with 
Ecuador the question of bases on the Galapagos 
Islands. Moreover, the willingness of this Gov- 
ernment to consider making available to Ecua- 
dor two coastal patrol vessels and military sup- 
plies has absolutely no relation to the offer of 
friendly good offices but derives solely from a 
general policy of this Government made known 
to each and every one of the American republics, 
to cooperate so far as possible in military and 
naval matters for the purpose of strengthening 
the defense of the Western Hemisphere." 



ADDRESS BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE WELCOMING THE 
ARGENTINE MINISTER OP FOREIGN AFFAIRS = 



[Released to the press by the Pau American tlnion May 16) 

On behalf of the Pan American Union, of my 
colleagues, and of myself, I extend to you the 
warmest possible welcome. Please be assured 
that our friendship and best wishes will follow 
you in the work of the high post to which you 
have been called. 



All of us here are aware of the momentous 
obligations which devolve on those who conduct 
foreign relations of nations in these historic 



* Delivered at the special session of the Goveruing 
Board of the Pan American Union in honor of the 
Minister of Foreign Affairs of Argentina, Dr. Enrique 
Rtiiz-Guiuazil. May 16, IMl. 



MAY 17, 1941 



599 



days. In the inter-American family of nations 
we feel that we have a particular contribution 
to make. 

The world struggle has at length clarified it- 
.•relf into a single great issue. Shall the peace 
and organization of the world be carried on 
by free and independent nations which have 
learned to work together, or shall the world be 
organized and dominated under barbaric meth- 
ods by a single master group maintaining itself 
by force? 

The American nations, beyond all others, have 
learned to live together, to work together, to 
join in solving common problems. We have 
achieved a unity in which no nation is afraid, 
and no nation's voice is unheal d. The strength 
of any one of us is at the disposition of all; 
the problems of any one of us are the concern 
of all. 

Timid voices sometimes ask whether, in the 
world of today, such a group can maintain itself 
against jjower organized for concjuest. To that 
I answer, without hesitation, and with unlimited 
faith, that we can. 

The present effort to build vrorld mastery by 
foi'ce will be defeated and will end within a rea- 
sonable length of time, just as all other such 
efforts throughout history have collapsed — al- 
though we shall have to pass through hardship 
and sacrifice before the end finally comes. 

Already the portion of the world now in 
captivity or bondage looks to the Americas for 
rescue from a life of vassalage, of semi-slavery, 
of fear, of want, and of intolerance. We must 
live up to the faith which has been given us by 
uncounted millions, even beyond the seas. We 
must do this bj^ standing together in a friend- 
ship so firm that nothing shall divide us; by 
working together so generously that none can 
instill fear or suspicion, and by making avail- 
able as freely as we can the huge resources which 
are the inheritance of the New World. As na- 
tions and as individuals, Americans have been 
vouchsafed the highest honor and responsibility 
ever granted to a group of peoples. 



JVIr. Minister, you have been called to a great 
position in this common task. On behalf of the 
Governing Board of the Pan American Union 
and of all our fellow Americans, I am privileged 
to extend to you our sincere wish for your per- 
sonal welfare and for the fullest measure of 
success, as Minister of Foreign Affairs of our 
sister Republic of the Argentine. 

INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT 
COMMISSION: COLOMBIAN COUNCIL 

[Released to the press by tJie Office for Coordination of Com- 
mercial and Cultural Relations Between tlie American 
Republics May 1 4 ] 

Nelson A. Rockefeller, Coordinator of Com- 
mercial and Cultural Relations Between the 
•Xjnerican Republics, announced on May 14 the 
membership of the Colombian National Coun- 
cil, the eighth of 21 councils being established 
by the Inter- American Development Commis- 
sion in its program for the stimulation of trade 
among the American republics. Mr. Rocke- 
feller is Chairman of the Development Com- 
mission. 

The Colombian Council is headed by Mariano 
Roldaii, Minister of Economia Nacional and 
Chairman of the Instituto de Fomento Indus- 
trial. The other members include : 

Roberto ilic-helsen, as vice cliairinan. Sefuir Miclielsen 
is geuei'al manager of tlio Banco do Colombia. 

Luis Soto del Corral, prominent Colonil)ian lianlicr. 

Cipriauo Hestrepo Jaramillo, head of the Compania 
Tabaealera Colombiaua. 

Rafael Obregon, prominent Colombian textile maini- 
facturer. 

Gabriel Durana Camacho, general manager of the 
Instituto de Fomento Industrial. 

Camilo Villa Carrasquilla, civil engineer, as secre- 
tary general of the Council. 

Arrangements for the establishment of the 
Council were completed in Bogota, where an 
initial meeting has been held. Similar councils 
composed of outstanding business, professional, 
and technical men have been formed in Brazil, 
Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, Chile, Bolivia, 
and Peru. 



600 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



General 



Country of destination 



CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL 
DEFENSE 

[Released to the press May 12] 

In accordance with the provisions of the 
Executive order of March 15, 1941, the Secre- 
tary of State, on May 6, 1941, issued the general 
licenses enumerated on the following list, 
authorizing the exportation to various countries 
of lead pigments, which are among the articles 
and materials designated by the President as 
necessary to the national defense, pursuant to 
section 6 of the Export Control Act approved 
July 2, 1940. 

Collectors of customs have been authorized 
to permit, without the requirement of individual 
license, the exportation of lead pigments to the 
respective countries named in the list, but the 
exporter is required to indicate the appropriate 
license number on the shipper's Export Declara- 
tion filed with the collector. 

Those articles and materials for which no 
general licenses have been issued, but which are 
subject to the requirement of an export license, 
will continue to require individual licenses for 
their exportation. 



Country of destination 



General 
license no. 



Canada 

Great Britain 

Cuba 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Costa Rica 

Curagao 

Dominican Republic 

Ecuador 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Haiti 

Honduras 

Mexico 



GCUP 1 

GCUP 2 

GCUP 3 

GCUP 4 

GCUP 5 

GCUP 6 

GCUP 7 

GCUP 8 

GCUP 9 

GCUP 10 

GCUP 11 

GCUP 12 

GCUP 13 

GCUP 14 

GCUP 15 

GCUP 16 

GCUP 17 



Nicaragua 

Panama 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Surinam 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

Aden 

Australia 

The Bahamas 

Barbados 

Bermuda Islands 

British East Africa 

British Guiana 

British Honduras 

British West Africa 

Burma 

Ceylon 

Cyprus 

Ireland 

Falkland Islands 

Gibraltar 

India 

Jamaica 

Leeward Islands 

Mauritius Island 

Newfoundland 

New Zealand . 

Northern Rhodesia 

Palestine 

St. Helena Island 

Seychelles Islands 

Southern Rhodesia 

Trinidad and Tobago _ _ 
Union of South Africa.. 

Windward Islands 

Egypt 

Anglo-Egyptian Sudan. 

Greenland 

Iceland 



General 
license no. 



GCUP 18 


GCUP 19 


GCUP 20 


GCUP 21 


GCUP 22 


GCUP 23 


GCUP 24 


GCUP 25 


GCUP 26 


GCUP 27 


GCUP 28 


GCUP 29 


GCUP 30 


GCUP 31 


GCUP 32 


GCUP 33 


GCUP 35 


GCUP 36 


GCUP 37 


GCUP 38 


GCUP 39 


GCUP 41 


GCUP 43 


GCUP 44 


GCUP 45 


GCUP 46 


GCUP 47 


GCUP 48 


GCUP .^,0 


GCUP 51 


GCUP 52 


GCUP 53 


GCUP 55 


GCUP 56 


GCUP 57 


GCUP 58 


GCUP 59 


GCUP 60 


GCUP 61 


GCUP 62 



Great Britain iuclude.s Northern Ireland 
Curagao includes : 

Aruba 

Bonaire 

Saba 

St. Eustatius 

St. Martin (Netherlands portion) 
Australia includes Nauru, mandated territory 
British East Africa includes : 

Kenya 

Uganda 

Tanganyika, mandated territory 



MAY 17, 1941 

Biitisli West Africa includes: 

Nigeria 

British Camoroons, mandated territory 

Gambia 

Sierra Leone 

Gold Coast 

British Togoland, mandated territory 

Northern Territories 

Ashanti 
Falldand Ishtnds include South Georgia 
Leeward Islands include: 

Antigua (with Barbuda and Redonda) 

British Virgin Islands 

Anguilla Island 

Antigua Island 

Barbuda Island 

Dominica Island 

Jost van Dykes Island 

St. Christopher Island 

Nevis Island 
Mauritius Island includes: 

Eodrigues Island 

Diego Garcia Island 
St. Helena Island includes : 

Ascension Lsland 

Gough Island 

Inaccessible Island 

Nightingale Island 

Tristan da Cunha Island 
Seychelles Islands include : 

Admirantes Islands 

Aldabra Islands 

Alphonse Island 

Assumption Island 

Astove Island 

Bijoutier Island 

Coetivy Island 

Cosmoledo Islands 

Farquhar Island 

Flat Island 

Providence Island 
St. Francois Island 
St. Pierre Island 
Union of South Africa includes South-West Africa 
Windward Islands include: 
Grenada 
Grenadines 
St. Lucia 
St. Vincent 
Carriacou Island 

Collectors of customs were informed by cir- 
cular telegram dated May 7, 1941 that pursuant 
to the provisions of the Executive order signed 



601 

May 6 " license will be required for in-transit 
shipments. License will not be required for ar- 
ticles or materials which leave the territorial 
limits of the United States aboard the same 
vessel or vehicle on which they arrived and were 
not at any time unladen in United States terri- 
tory. 

[Released to the press May 16] 

The Secretary of State announced May 16 
that, in addition to the general licenses issued 
(,n May 9,* a further general license, GIT-B/B, 
has been issued for shipments passing through 
the United States from any country in Group 
B to any other country in Group B. 

Collectors of customs were notified on May 
10, 1941 that general licenses GCY 1 through 
GCY 62, issued for the exportation to all re- 
publics of the Western Hemisphere and to all 
territories of the British Empire, with certain 
exceptions, for rubber tires,^ have been amended 
to include rubber tubes as well. 

Additional unlimited licenses have been 
issued to the British Iron and Steel Corpora- 
tion and the British Purchasing Commission 
authorizing the exportation of brass, bronze, 
copper, and nickel to British West Africa, 
British East Africa, British Malaya, and the 
Seychelles Islands. Prior release certificates 
will be required. Collectors of customs were 
notified of the above on May 15. 

AMERICAN CITIZENS LIVING ABROAD 

[Released to the press May 15] 

The foDowing estimate of the number of 
American citizens living abroad, as of January 
1, 1941, has been compiled from reports received 
from American considates in all parts of the 
world. This estimate includes only those whose 
residence abroad has a permanent or semi- 



' Bulletin of May 10, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 98), p. 560. 

* Bullet in of May 10, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 98), pp. 560- 
561. 

'BuUethi of April 12, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 94), pp. 4.54- 
455. 



602 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtJLLETIN 



permanent character and therefore excludes 
tourists and all others whose sojourn abroad 
was considered to be only transitory. 

Special attention is called to the fact that be- 
cause of the disturbed conditions existing in 
certain ai-eas of the world it has been impossible 
in many cases for consular officers to obtain ex- 
act figiu'es as to the number of American citi- 
zens residing in tlieir respective districts. How- 
ever, this statement, based on all available 
sources of information, may be considered as a 
reasonably accurate estimate of Americans liv- 
ing abroad as of Januaiy 1, 1941. 

American Citizens Living Abroad, as of 
January 1, 1941 

south america 

Argentina 3,009 

Bolivia 510 

Brazil 4,240 

Chile 1,281 

Colombia 2, 797 

Ecuador 562 

Paraguay 92 

Peru__/_ 1,692 

Uruguay 210 

Venezuela 3, 394 

Total 17,787 

MEXICO AND CENTRAL AMERICA 

British Honduras 160 

Costa Rica 1,237 

El Salvador 283 

Guatemala 1, 128 

Honduras 1, 070 

Mexico 13,014 

Nicaragua 649 

Panama 7, 222 

Total 24,769 

WEST INDIES AND BERMUDA 

Bahamas 235 

Barbados 345 

Bermuda -. — 588 

Cuba 5,531 

Curagao . 1, 743 

Dominican Republic 3, 158 

Haiti 467 

Jamaica 703 

Trinidad 637 

Total 13,407 



CANADA AND NEWFOUNDLAND 

Canada 164, 354 

Newfoundland 614 

St. Pierre-Miquelon 9 

Total 164,977 

EUROPE 

Albania 170 

Belgium 578 

British Isles 6, 145 

Bulgaria , 80 

Czechoslovakia 218 

Danzig, Free City of 10 

Denmark 895 

Estonia — 38 

Finland 337 

France 3,000 

Germany 5, 111 

Gibraltar 5 

Greece 2,086 

Hungary 358 

Ireland" 2,382 

Italy 14,567 

Latvia 70 

Lithuania 140 

Luxemburg 14 

Malta 145 

Netherlands 774 

Norway 726 

Poland 239 

Portugal 5, 85o 

Lisbon 589 

Oporto 536 

Madeira 230 

Azores 4, 500 

Rumania 369 

Spain and Canary Islands 2, 185 

Sweden 1,409 

Switzerland 1, 261 

Union of Soviet Socialist Republics 213 

Yugoslavia 1, 521 

Total 50, 901 

AFRICA 

Algeria — 60 

Belgian Congo 940 

Egypt 552 

Kenya 437 

Liberia 261 

Morocco 110 

Nigeria 543 

Union of South Africa 1,946 

Tunisia 95 

Total 4,944 



MAY 17, 1941 



603 



ASIA 

Arabia 35 

Ceylon 74 

China 6,700 

French Indochina 124 

Hong Kong 1,280 

India 3,599 

Iran 117 

Iraq 497 

Japan 5,295 

Netherland East Indies 476 

Palestine 8,500 

Straits Settlements 450 

Syria 1,446 



Tliailand 90 

Turkey (including Turkey in Europe) 263 

Total 28, 946 

PACIFIC ISLANDS 

Fiji Islands 15 

Society Islands 13 

AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND 

Australia ^ 1, 832 

New Zealand 293 

Total 2, 125 

Grand total 307, 884 



Cultural Relations 



COMMITTEES TO ADVISE DEPARTMENT OF STATE IN 
CULTURAL-RELATIONS PROGRAM 



In addition to the General Advisory Com- 
mittee,* the Piesident has approved the creation 
of six committees to advise the Department in 
specific pliases of the program of cultural 
relations. 

This action is taken in accoixlance with the 
authority contained in section 2 of the act of 
August 9, 1939, entitled "An Act to authorize 
the President to render closer and more effective 
the relationship between the American repub- 
lics" which states as follows : 

"Sec. 2. The President is authorized to cre- 
ate such advisory committees as in his judgment 
may be of assistance in carrying out the under- 
takings of this Government under the treaties, 
resolutions, declarations, and recommendations 
referred to, but no committee or member thereof 
shall be allowed any salaiy or other compensa- 
tion for services : Provided, however, That they 
may, within the limits of appropriations made 
available therefor by the Congress, which ap- 



'See the Bulletin of March 1, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 88), 
p. 230. 



propriations are hereby authorized, be paid 
tlieir actual transportation expenses and not to 
exceed $10 per diem in lieu of subsistence and 
other expenses while away from their homes in 
attendance upon meetings within the United 
States under instructions from the Secretary of 
State." 

Tliese committees will advise the Department 
of State, through the Division of Cultural 
Relations, in the fields of exchange fellowships 
and professorships; inter-American medicine 
and public health; inter- American cooperation 
in agi-icultural education; music; art; and the 
adjustment of foreign students in the United 
States. 

The Committee on Exchange Fellowships and 
Professorships will advise on the selection of 
graduate students and professors for the panels 
presented to other participating governments 
and on the selection of graduate students and 
professors from the panels presented by other 
participating governments, under the Conven- 
tion for the Promotion of Inter-American Cul- 
tural Relations; and, generally, will advise on 



604 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



matters relating to the interchange of students 
and professors. It is composed of the following 
members : 

Stephen P. Duggan, Ph.D., Director, Institute of In- 
ternational Ediu'atlon, 2 We.st Forty-fifth Street, 
New York, N. Y. ; Chainmin 

Albert L. Barrows, Ph.D., Executive Secretary, National 
Research Council, 2101 Constitution Avenue, Wash- 
ington, D.C. 

Charles G. Fenwick, Ph.D., Professor of Political 
Science, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Waldo G. Leland, Litt.D., Director, American Council 
of Learned Societies, 907 Fifteenth Street NW., Wash- 
ington, D.C. 

Henry Allen Moe, L.H.D., Secretary General, Guggen- 
heim Memorial Foundation, 551 Fifth Avenue, New 
York, N. Y. 

Arthur P. Whitaker, Ph.D., Professor of Latin Ameri- 
can History, University of Pennsylvania, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

Donald Young, Research Secretary, Social Science Re- 
search Council, 230 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

The Committee on Inter-American Medicine 
and Public Health will advise on questions aris- 
ing in the promotion of inter-American rela- 
tions in the field of medicine and allied sciences, 
especially the exchange of graduate students, 
interns, and professors; hospitality to visiting 
medical scientists from the other American re- 
publics ; and the exchange of medical literature. 
It is composed of the following members : 

Hugh S. Gumming, M.D., Surgeon General, U.S. 
Public Health Service, Retired ; Director, Pan 
American Sanitary Bureau, Washington, D.C; 
Chairman 

Bert W. Caldwell, M.D., Executive Secretary, Ameri- 
can Hospital Association, 18 East Division Street, 
Chicago, 111. 

Bowman C. Crowell, M.D., Associate Director, Ameri- 
can College of Surgeons, 40 East Erie Street, Chi- 
cago, 111. 

William D. Cutter, M.D., Secretary, Council on Medi- 
cal Education and Hospitals, American Medical 
Association, 53.^ North Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. 

Victor M. Ehlers, Chief of Sanitary Engineers, De- 
partment of Health, Austin, Tex. (representing 
sanitary engineering) 

Ernest Little, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Pharmacy 
of Rutgers University, Newark, N. J. (Chairman, 
Executive Committee of the American Association 
of Colleges of Pharmacy) 

Thomas T. Mackie, M.D., President, American Society 
of Tropical Medicine, 16 East Ninetieth Street, New 
York, N. Y. 



Leroy M. S. Miner, D.D.S., Dean, Harvard University 
Dental School, Cambridge, Mass. (representing 
American Dental Association) 

Willard C. Rappleye, M.D., Commissioner of Hospitals, 
New York, N. Y. (representing Association of Ameri- 
can Medical Colleges) 

Lowell J. Reed, Ph.D., Dean, School of Hygiene and 
Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University, Balti- 
more, Md. (representing Biometric Section, Ameri- 
can Statistical Association) 

Col. James S. Simmons, Chief, Subdivision of Preven- 
tive Medicine, Office of the Surgeon General, War 
Department, Washington, D.C. 

Wilson G. Smillie, M.D., Director of Public Health, 
Cornell University Medical College, 1300 York Ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y. (representing American Public 
Health Association) 

Julia C. Stimson, R.N., President, American Nurses' 
Association, 50 West Fiftieth Street, New York, N. Y. 

C. E. Turner, Dr.P.H., Department of Biology and 
Public Health, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
Cambridge, Mass. ( representing American Association 
for Health, Physical Education and Recreation) 

The Committee on Inter- American Coopera- 
tion in Agi-icultural Education will advise thei 
Department of State regarding agricultural ed- 
ucation ; will endeavor to stimidate the interest 
of the land-grant colleges of the United States 
in inter-American studies and students ; and will 
explain the aims of the proposed Institute of 
Tropical Agriculture. Its members are: 

Knowles A. Ryerson, M.S., Dean, College of Agriculture, 
University of California, Davis, Calif. ; Chairman 

Earl N. Bressmau, Ph.D., Assistant Director, OtBce of 
Foreign Agricultural Relations, Department of Ag- 
riculture, Washington, D.C. ; Executive Secretary 

Thomas Barbour, Ph.D., Sc.D., Director, Museum of 
Comparative Zoology, Harvard University, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

H. Harold Hume, Dean, College of Agriculture, Uni- 
versity of Florida, Gainesville, Fla. 

Fred J. Kelly, Ph.D., Chief, Division of Higher Educa- 
tion, Office of Education, Federal Security Agency, 
Washington, D. C. 

J. G. Lee, Jr., Dean, College of Agriculture, Louisiana 
State University, University, La. 

The Advisory Committee on Music will ad- 
vise the Department regarding the stimulation 
of musical interchange among the American re- 
publics and the coordination of activites in this 
country which concern inter-American music. 
It is composed of tlie following members : 



MAY 17, 1941 



605 



Warren D. Allen, President of Music Teachers National 
Association, and Professor of Music, Leland Stanford 
Junior University, California 

William Berrien, Ph.D., Adviser on Latin American 
Studies, American Council of Learned Societies, 007 
Fifteenth Street NW., Washington, D. C. 

Evans Clark, Executive Director, Twentieth Century 
Fund, New Tork, N. Y. 

Aaron Copland, President, American Composers Alli- 
ance, Hotel Empire, Broadway at Sixty-third Street, 
New York, N. Y. 

Melville Herskovits, Ph.D., Professor of Anthropology, 
Northwestern University, Evanston, 111. 

Earl V. Moore, D. Mas., Director, School of Music, Uni- 
versity of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

The Advisory Committee on Art will advise 
the Department regarding the stimulating of 
artistic interchange among the American re- 
publics and the coordination of activities in this 
country which concern reconmiendations of ,the 
Conference on Inter-American Kelations in the 
Field of Art. It is composed of the following 
members : 

Robert Woods Blis.s, President, American Federation 

of Arts, Barr Building, Washington, D.C. ; Chainnan 
John E. Abbott, Executive Vice President, Museum of 

Modern Art, 11 West Fifty-third Street, New York, 

N. Y. 
George Biddle, Croton-on-Hudson, N. Y. 
Fiske Kimball, Ph.D., Director, Philadelphia Museum 

of Art, Fairmount, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Paul Manship, President, National Sculpture Society, 

319 East Seventy-second Street, New York, N. Y. 
Grace McCann Morley, Ph.D., American Museum of 

Natural History, New York, N. Y. 
George Vaillant, Ph.D., American Museum of Natural 

History, New York, N. Y. 

The Advisory Committee on the Adjustment 
of Foreign Students in the United Sta,tes will 
advise the Department of State on problems in- 
volving the adjustment of students from abroad 
to their new environment and on plans for more 
effective guidance and hos]iitality. It is com- 
posed of the following members : 

Edgar J. Fisher, Ph.D., Assistant Director, Institute of 

International Education, 2 West Forty-fifth Street, 

New York, N. Y. ; Chairman 
Rolliu S. Atwood, Ph.D., Acting Director, Institute of 

Inter-American Affairs, University of Florida, 

Gainesville, Fla. 



Charles B. Lipman, Ph.D., Sc.D., Dean, Graduate Divi- 
sion, University of California, Berkeley, Calif. 

Martin McGuire, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School 
of Arts and Sciences, Catholic University of Amer- 
ica, Washington, D.C. 

Miss Jean McNary, Secretary, International Student 
Committee, 600 Lexington Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

John L. Mott, Director, International House, 500 River- 
side Drive, New York, N. Y. 

J. Raleigh Nelson, Ph.D., Director of the International 
Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Ralph C. Scott, Secretary, Committee on Friendly Rela- 
tions among Foreign Students, 347 Madison Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. 



COLOMBIAN-AMEKICAN CULTURAL 
INSTITUTE, INC. 

The Colombian-American Cultural Institute, 
Inc., recently organized in New York City at 21 
West Street under the auspices of leading busi- 
ness and professional men with extensive associ- 
ations in Colombia, will function in collabora- 
tion with an organization in Colombia having 
similar objectives and composed of Colombian 
citizens. 

The Institute has announced that in the broad 
and increasingly active field of cultural rela- 
tions it contemplates a comprehensive program 
to stimulate educational exchanges, scholar- 
ships, art exhibits, and other projects tending 
to promote a better mutual acquaintance be- 
tween citizens of the United States and of 
Colombia. It has the support of prominent 
persons in New York who have close ties with 
Colombia commercially, professionally, and 
socially. 

The founders of the Institute plan to invite 
outstanding men and women engaged in cul- 
tural activities in the United States to serve as 
an Advisory Council. It is expected that this 
Council will advise on the compilation of data 
to be sent to the associated group in Bogota 
concerning art galleries, musical organizations, 
literary groups and clubs, and educational, phil- 
osophical, and scientific sources, and will aid 
the Colombian members to get in touch with 
these sources whenever necessary. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



COMMERCE 

INTER-AMERICAN COFFEE AGREEMENT 

Dominican Republic 

The Director General of the Pan American 
Union informed the Secretary of State by letter 
dated May 8, 1941, that the instrnment of rati- 
fication by the Dominican Republic of the Inter- 
American Coffee Agreement, signed at Wash- 
ington on Xovember 28, 1940. was deposited 
with the Union on April 30, 1941. On the same 
date, April 80, the Charge d'Aff aires of the Do- 
minican Republic in Washington signed on 
behalf of his Government the Protocol to the 
Inter-American Coffee Agreement, which was 
opened for signature by the signatories of the 
Eigreement and deposited with the Pan Ameri- 
can Union on April 15, 1941. 

Ecuador 

By a letler dated May 6. 1941, the Director 
General of the Pan American Union informed 
the Secretary of State that the instrument of 
ratification by Ecuador of the Inter-American 
Coffee Agreement, signed at Washington on 
November 28, 1940, was deposited with the 
Union on April 29, 1941. Ou the same date, 
April 29, tiie Ambassador of Ek'uador at Wasli- 
ington signed on behalf of his Government the 
Protocol to the Inter-Amei'ican Coffee Agree- 
ment, wliich was opened for signature by the 
signatories of the agreement and deposited witli 
the Pan American Union on April 15, 1941. 



According to the terms of the protocol the 
agreement was put into force in respect of the 
Dominican Republic on May 1, 1941, and in 
respect of Ecuador on April 30, 1941, the days 
following the dates of signature of the protocol. 
606 



The countries which have signed the protocol, 
and among wliich the agreement is now effec- 
tive, are the United States of America, Brazil, 
Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, 
Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, 
Mexico, and Peru. Three original signatories 
of tlie agreement have not yet deposited their 
instruments of ratification or approval, namely, 
Cuba, Nicaragua, and Venezuehv. 

On May 9, 1941, the Secretary of the Treas- 
ury issued a declaration on the entry for con- 
sumption of coffee for the period April 22- 
Augiist 31, 1941, under the provisions of the 
Executive order (No. 8738) of April 21, 1941,' 
allocating the coffee quota of countries not sig- 
natories of the Inter-American Coffee Agree- 
ment. Tlie text of this declaration appears in 
full in the Federal Register of May 13, 1941 
(vol. 6, no. 93), page 2376. 

TRADE-AGREEMENT NEGOTIATIONS WITH 
ARGENTINA AND URUGUAY 

Formal notices issued by the Secretary of 
State on May 13, 1941, of intentions to negoti- 
ate trade agreements with the Governments of 
Argentina and Uniguay appear in this Bulletin 
imder the heading "Commercial Policy" and in 
the Federal Register of May 14, 1941 (vol. 6, 
no. 94), pages 2413-2417. 

INDIAN AFFAIRS 

CONVENTION PROVIDING FOR THE CREA- 
TION OF AN INTER-AMERICAN INDIAN IN- 
STITUTE 

Mexico 

By a note dated May 10, 1941, the Mexican 
Ambassador at Washington informed the Sec- 



' Bullet in of April 26. 1941 (vol. IV, uo. 96), p. 519. 



MAY 17, 1941 



607 



retary of State that the instrument of ratifica- 
tion by Mexico of the Convention Providing for 
the Creation of an Inter-American Indian In- 
stitute, which was opened for signature at Mex- 
ico City on November 1, 1940, was deposited 
with the Department of Foreign Rehitions of 
Mexico on May 2, 1941. 

Mexico thus becomes the first country to de- 
posit its instrument of ratification of this con- 
vention. The provisions for putting the con- 
vention into force are contained in article VII, 
which states in part : 

"AVhen any five nations shall have ratified 
this Convention and shall have appointed repre- 
sentatives on the Governing Board, the Minister 
of Foreign Affairs of the Government of Mexico 
shall call the first meeting of said body, which 
shall thereupon proceed to elect its own Chair- 
man and the Director of the Institute, . . . 

"One year after the Governing Board has 
thus been organized, it shall hold a Special 
Meeting for the purpose of electing the perma- 
nent Executive Committee, in the manner set 
forth in paragraph 2, Article VIII. . . ." 

Article XVI provides in part that "Any rati- 
fication which may be received after the present 
Convention becomes effective shall have effect 
one month from the date of the deposit of such 
ratification." 

This convention shall cease to be in effect 
whenever the number of contracting Govern- 
ments is reduced to three (art. XVII). 



Publications 



Regulations 



The following Govermnent regulations may 
be of interest to readers of the Bulletin : 

Export Control Schedule No. 8 [covering, effective 
June 3, 1941, the forms, eonversious, and derivatives 
of the articles and materials designated in Proclama- 
tion 2482 of May 10, 1041]. May 12, 1941. (Adminis- 
trator of Export Control.) Federal Rryixtcr, May VS, 
1941 (vol. 6, no. 95), pp. 2431-2433. 



Department of State 

Foreign Service List, April 1, 1941. Publication 1592. 
iv, 107 pp. Subscription, 50^ a year ; single copy, 150. 

The Program of the Depiirtment of State in Cultural 
Relations. Reprinted from the "Department of State 
Aijpropriation Bill for 1042: Hearings Before the Sub- 
committee of the Committee on Appropriations, House 
of Representatives, Seventy-seventh Congress, First 
Session, on the Department of State Appropriation Bill 
for 1942". Inter- American Series 19. Publicution 
1.594. 16 pp. 50. 

The United States in the World Economy, 1940— Some 
Aspects of Our Foreign Economic Policy : Address by 
Leo Pasvol.sky, Special Assistant to the Secretary of 
State, before the American Economic Association, New 
Orleans, La., December 30, 1940. Commercial Policy 
Series 70. Publication 1505. 29 pp. 100. 

Diplomatic List, May 1041. Publieation 1.50ti. ii, 
100 pp. Subst'riptiou, %1 a year ; single copy, 10c. 

Advancement of Peace : Treaty Between the United 
States of America and the Union of South Africa 
Amending in Their Application to the Union of South 
Africa Certain Provisions of the Treaty for the Ad- 
vancement of Peace Between the United States of 
America and Great Britain Signed September 15, 1914 — 
Signed at Washington April 2, 1940; proclaimed March 
18, 1941. Treaty Series 966. 3 pp. 50. 



Legislation 



An Act Relating to foreign accounts in Federal Re- 
serve banks and insured banks. [S. 300.] Approved 
April 7, 1941. (Public Law 31, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 
2 pp. 50. 

An Act To amend the Act entitled "An Act for the 
grading and classification of clerks in the Foreign Serv- 
ice of the United States of America, and providing com- 
pensation therefor", approved February 23, 1031, as 
amended. [S. 1123] Approved May 13, 1941. (Public 
Law 69', 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 1 p. 

Postponing Payment of Finland Indebtedness to 
United States. (S. Rept. 274, 77th Cong., 1st sess., on 
S. J. Res. 74.) [Includes letter from the Secretary of 
State to Senator George, dated May 7, 1941, in support 
of legislation.] 3 pp. 



608 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Purchase and Charter of Foreign Merchant Vessels 
for National Defense. (S. Kept. 277, 77th Cong., 1st 
sess., on H.R. 4466.) [Inchides letter from the Secre- 
tary of State to Senator Bailey, dated May 1, 1941, 
favoring the measure.] 19 pp. 

Export Control in All Territories, Dependencies, and 
Possessions of the United States, Including the Philip- 
pine Islands, the Canal Zone, and the District of 



Columbia. (S. Kept. 308, 77th Cong., 1st sess., on S. J. 
Re.s. 76.) 3 pp. 

Amending Sugar Act of 1937: Hearing Before the 
Committee on Finance, United States Senate, 77th 
Cong., 1st sess., on S. 937, a Bill To Amend Section 204 
of the Sugar Act of 1937. March 18, 1941. [Includes 
letter from the Secretary of State to Senator George, 
dated May 7, 1941, commenting on tlie bill.] iv, 60 pp. 



U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1941 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Wa.shingtoD, D. C. — Price 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

POBLISHKD WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OP THE BUKEAD OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



.O \j JL/JL/ 



T~~\ r 

LL/ 



I 




J^ 



MAY 24, 1941 
Vol. IV: No. 100 — Publication 1606 




Qonfenfs 

General: Page 
The Coining Epoch of Rebuilding: Address by Assist- 
ant Secretary Berle 611 

Control of exports in national defense 615 

Commercial Policy: 

Foreign Trade in Wartime and Beyond: Address by 

Assistant Secretary Achcson 617 

Foreign Trade and the World Crisis: Address by Lynn 

R. Edniinster 621 

Economic Issues of the Present World Conflict, With 

Particular Reference to Foreign Trade: Address by 

Raymond H. Geist 628 

The Near East: 

Return of Emperor ol Ethiopia to Addis Ababa . . . 635 

American Republics: 

Inter-American Development Commission: Ecuadoran 

Council 635 

Europe: 

Survivors of the S. S. Zamzam 636 

Cultural Relations: 

Exchange of professors, teachers, and graduate stu- 
dents 636 

Exchanges of art exhibits 638 

Activities of the Chile - United States Cultural Insti- 
tute 639 

International Conferences, Commissions, Etc.: 

Eighth Pan American Child Congress 639 

[Over] 



a." "' 



Qontents 



-CONTINUED. 



Treaty Information: ' i'age 

Commerce: 

liiler-American Cofl'ee Agreement 640 

Extradition: 

Supplementary Treaty With Ecuador 640 

Indian Ati'airs: 

Convention Providing for the Creation of an Inter- 
American Indian Institute 641 

Sovereignty: 

Convention on the Provisional Administration of Eu- 
ropean Colonies and Possessions in the Americas . 641 
Postal: 

Agreement Concerning Parcel Post, Postal Union of 

the Americas and Spain 641 

Regulations 642 

Publications 642 

Legislation 642 



General 



THE COMING EPOCH OP REBUILDING 

ADDRESS BY ASSISTANT SECRETARY BERLE ' 



LUeleasod to the press May 2'^] 

The Unitetl States is squarely in the middle 
of a dangerous situation and is facinp; some 
hard decisions. Under these circumstances the 
bluntest statement of harsh facts is required. 
I am therefore wa.stino- no time on oratory. 



We are facin<i- an attempt at military and 
naval flominatiou of the world l>v a European 
power. AVe have come to the point at which 
that attempt is nearinji' the New World. Fi'om 
here out we have to rely on our own strength, 
and our al)ility to act where necessary. This 
is the only way we can keep ourselves even 
approximately safe. 

Because we are neithei' fools nor slackers, we 
shall come (Jut of this all light . But we have got 
to think clearly, work hard, and have our cour- 
age right with us. 

This kind of world mess is not new. It is fol- 
lowing a chart familiar to every student of his- 
tory. Many of you know it already; hut if is 
worth reviewing. 

About once in every century some European 
nation has tried to make itself a world mastei-. 

Spain tried it in the sixteenth century, and 
she was checked when the Spanish Ai-mada was 
defeated in 1588. 

At the end of the seventeenth century, 
France tried it under Louis XIV. At a cer- 
tain point in the resultant wm-Jd war. battles 



'Delivered at the Guldfii .liil)ilee Celebiatiua (if tlie 
General Federation of Women's Clubs, Atlantic City, 
N. J., May 23, 1941. 
".2(in."3 — 41 1 



went on all up and down the borders oi the 
Amei-ican Colonies. That attempt was checked 
when Prime ^Minister Churchill's famous pred- 
ecessor, Miirlborough, beat the French at the 
Battle of Blenheim in 17(H. 

Again, less than l.Ml years ago. Napoleon 
tried it. He also had his fling in the New 
AVorld. He sent an ex[)edition to seize Santo 
Domingo in the AVest Indies and planned to 
use that as a base fiom whicli he could operate 
on this side of the ocean. He failed, and then 
sold Louisiana to the United States. 

Today it is a German etfort. It has reached 
the same stage which led Hitler's great j)red- 
ecessors to try to move across the Atlantic. 

II 

You do not have to be a great student of 
warfare to see why this occurs. In every case 
the circumstances have been the same. A 
woukl-be (•on(|ueror, with superior land force, 
has been able to seize substantially the entire 
continent of Europe. He usually has suc- 
ceeded in dominiiting an area which includes 
.Si)ain, France, Italy, Belgium and Holland. 
Germany, Austria, Southeastern Eui()|je. and 
Poland. Generally he nuikes temporary raids 
into Russia, North Africa, and the Near East. 

At this point the would-be world master re- 
alizes tliat this area does not and cannot live 
by itself. Certainly it has not the food, the 
materials, or the strength to keep u\t a con- 
tinuous juilitary front. It does not have the 
sujiplies to keep its people happy. It lacks 
umcli of the raw material for endless siip- 

tiU 



612 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



plies of munitions needed to keep an undigested 
mass of European peoples in continuous sub- 
jection. Conquered peoples do not enthusiasti- 
cally produce goods for conquerors. More is 
needed, and it jnust come from beyond the sea. 
Accordingly, the would-be conqueror has al- 
ways endeavored to seize sea power; and he 
commonly attempts to raid for supplies on our 
side of the Atlantic. He does this partly be- 
cause he wants to; and even more because he 
has to. 

This is the present situation. The Axis 
armies are masters of the continent of Europe. 
They are raiding in North Africa and in the 
Near East. They are endeavoring to get con- 
trol of Russia, by guile or by force. They 
have not as yet occupied and subjugated Spain, 
but they are poised for that purpose. Advance 
tentacles are already stretched toward the At- 
lantic shoulder of Africa. 

Is it common sense to suppose that the at- 
tempt will stop there? Western Europe is 
already in distress. Some more supplies can 
undoubtedly be squeezed from a reluctant Rus- 
sia, but only at the expense of imposing greater 
misery on the Russian people already in want. 
It is not merely a question of foodstuffs. To 
maintain tlie military machine which has to 
liold tliis huge and rickety fabric together, 
there must be essential war supplies: standard 
supplies like steel, oil, copper, and coal, of 
which Europe has some, though not an abun- 
dance ; rarer supplies necessary in modern ma- 
chine warfare; nickel, tin, tungsten, wolfra- 
mite, mercury, rubber, and others. The West 
European combination as a matter of eco- 
nomics does not add up. 

On this side of the Atlantic, in North and 
in South America, there are great sources of 
many of these supplies. To get it, two things 
are necessary. The first is to control the sea, 
and particularly the Atlantic. The second is 
to knock out or immobilize any force strong 
enough to check an invader. 

We know that this is a part of the present 
plan. We have heard it from the camp talk 
of the German armies. We have seen it in 
propaganda not intended for American ears. 



We have found it in a succession of intrigues 
and plots carried on in the other American 
republics. 

To this plan, of course, the greatest single 
obstacle is the existence of Britain; and that 
is why the successful defense of Britain is 
now an essential element in the defense of 
the United States and of the New World. 
Peaceful control of the sea has been shared 
in recent years between Great Britain and our- 
selves: and, as a result, we have not had to 
ring New York with anti-aircraft guns; we 
have not had to fortify every island in the 
Caribbean Sea ; and we have not had to main- 
tain a mobile army to make sure that no enemy 
attempted a landing in Canada, in northern 
New England, or on the southern coast. But 
if sea control passes into the hands of a group 
bent on conquest, your safety is gone, and with 
it the kindly life which has been America's 
greatest gift to her children. 

So, in a critical hour, we now stand to arms 
and watch the great guard points. We watcli 
the northern bridge, Canada, Greenland, Ice- 
land. We watcli the central gates, the Atlantic 
islands, the West Indies. We watch the south- 
ern bridge, the shoulder of Brazil, lying over 
against the African coast on the other side of 
the Atlantic narrows. 

Our ability to guard them and keep them, 
which at the moment rests in large measure 
on the British ability to maintain herself and 
on our ability to use naval and air strength, 
is the price we must pay if we are to keep 
the United States free from the cataract of 
liorior which has engulfed Europe fi'om Fin- 
isterre to the Persian Gulf, and from the 
Mediterranean to the Arctic Circle. 

Ill 

Behind this explosion, as behind earlier 
world struggles, there lies a driving instinct to 
reach some new basis of affairs. I believe that 
the main outlines of the new foundation are 
already beginning to appear. 

Certain great lessons have been learnt in the 
])ast 30 years. 



MAY 2 4, 1941 



613 



IV 

We have learned that the life of every nation 
is divided into two parts. One part of this is 
national and cannot be anything else. The cul- 
ture, the thought, the poetry, the music, the 
art, the science, and the productive genius of 
nations lie in national life, wliich is the or- 
ganized fellowship of like-minded people. It 
is Norwegian, or it is Spanish; it is French, or 
it is Czech; it is Italian, or it is German. 
These race brotherhoods belong together. To 
destroy them is a crime against civilization. 
The first and greatest lesson of the war has 
been that national units are essential if the 
life of the world is to go on. 

But the second and still greater lesson is 
that no nation exists by its own strength. If 
it lives at all, it can do so only because it is 
part of an international fabric. Even the 
strengtli of war-making powers was nothing- 
more than the saved-up supplies which they 
had gathered during earlier peaceful periods 
when they joined in the common life of the 
famiij' of nations. 

For the blunt fact is that no nation, however 
great, is capable of making war alone. It must 
either conquer allies, reducing them to enslaved 
assistance, as Napoleon tried to do and as imi- 
tators now seek to do ; or it must find associates 
who will join in a common effort for a common 
purpose, in free and open partnership. 

But if the single-unit nation cannot make war 
alone, neither can it make peace alone. To live 
at all it must draw supplies from every part of 
the world and must send back its own products. 
The foundation of national life is thus inter- 
national; and every laborer, factory manager, 
businessman, and statesman knows that this is 
true. For that reason, Secretary Hull recently 
laid down as a defined and guiding principle, 
the clear necessity of reestablishing open ex- 
change between nations. Otherwise, interna- 
tional life is reduced to a group of armed bands 
marauding for supplies. 

It is easy to say "Open exchange between 
nations", but it is not so easy to realize just how 
you are going to get it. Although great dreams 



are more needed today than ever before, great 
realities are still more essential. So let us look 
at certain of these realities. 

International life, it is now clear, depends on 
steady and rational distribution of supplies. 
That di.stribution is normally taken care of by 
commerce. But we have learned that if for 
any reason commerce does not satisfy the needs 
of all, the flow of supplies has to go on just the 
same. 

The machinery for arranging this is called 
"finance". In the old days that meant money- 
lenders, or later, banks and bankers, which were 
private institutions and were guided, not un- 
naturally, by whether they could make money 
out of the business. No one has any objection 
to that ; but whenever this kind of finance is not 
enough, there must be a finance that works any- 
how. And so we have already built, although 
slowly, the institutions of the new finance — a 
finance which is a public servant and never a 
private master. This finance justifies its ex- 
istence if it keeps this flow of supplies steadily 
moving. Its business is to take goods from their 
place of origin and put them in the hands of 
the people who need them. Its work is to pro- 
vide tools for willing people ; and to build fac- 
tories, and open mines, and develop resources. 
Its business is to call back from each the con- 
tribution he can make and put that again where 
it is most needed. These are the great public 
institutions which are already emerging as a 
part of the permanent modern machinery of life. 

Just now, because the greatest need is for de- 
fense, this new finance is opening up raw mate- 
rials, drawing them from their supply, putting 
them together as tools of defense, taking the 
finished munitions to the ships which this finance 
also is building, and placing the arms in the 
hands of men resolved to defend their free life. 

AVhile it is doing this, it is also sending food 
and medicine and civilian supplies to those 
areas which are m distress and which we can 
reach. The new finance is not a dream. It is 
a working, going concern. 

When this progi'am of defense, relief, and 
supply was worked out, we were glad to accept 
the help of the old finance so far as it would 



614 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



jio; but we could nut limit any ett'ort by old 
financial tests. The new institutions were al- 
I'eady there. They are working not only in the 
United States, but in many parts of the world : 
in our sister republics in the American Hemi- 
.sphere; in Ciinada and the British Conmion- 
wealth; in Britain, herself. 

Can anyone doubt that this system will con- 
tinue and be applied with equal eflect when the 
time comes, as come it will, to reconstruct and 
rebuild the life of peace? 

For, wlien the present emei'gency is over, we 
shall face the titanic task of turning tens of mil- 
lions of men from the work of defense and of 
war into the work of peaceful life. In earlier 
times the war effort simply stopped; and men 
were left- to find their own way back into peace- 
time employment as best they could. No clear- 
thinking person believes that to be possible now. 
No humane perst)n would think of trying it. So 
we shall have to use the new instruments and 
tools of finance to reestablish the new life which 
is desired and is necessary when the war closes. 
There is enough useful work to be done in the 
United States alone to take up the energies which 
we have been forced to put into defense, so that 
occupation and opportunity will exist for sub- 
stantially everyone. 

But I think we shall also wish to do this not 
only for ourselves but for other like-minded 
peoples as well. The food and products of 
the Americas will be urgently needed in many 
parts of the world. We on our side will need 
materials and other products if we are to re- 
build on a scale equal to the new conceptions 
of life. AVe shall have to fit our work into that 
of other nations as widely as may be possible. 
We may have to begin on a relief basis, as hap- 
pened in 1920; but it must evolve into a more 
solid and permanent system of nnitual ex- 
change of benefits as the new and broader in- 
ternational basis is established. There is no 
apparent reason why this cannot be done. It 
is quite as easy to work together rebuilding a 
fruitful world as to cooperate in pi'oviding 
for the common defense on a "lend-lease" basis. 

The twin institutions of finance and inter- 
national distribution, conceived as a basis for 



tlu' peaceful life of peoples, cannot be exclusive 
in character. They must be open to every peo- 
ple who wish to take their part in a peacefvil 
world. 

Finally, the modern international order 
necessarily assumes that there will be a com- 
mon fund of ideas. This can only come from 
the free flow of information and ideas. Civ- 
ilization is always a joint product; it has never 
existed as tlie sole achievement of any people 
or of any race. 

Attempts at international organization at the 
close of world struggles are not new. But they 
have historically had one recurrent weakness. 
Most attempts have been made to build fi-om 
the top down. Yet the real drive for a new 
organization hast come from the bottom up. 
The men who most need and yearn for a new 
world are not generals, chiefs of state, or people 
of high position. They are the little people 
throughout the world: the men who have 
fai-med a piece of land, worked in mills, run 
little shoi^s, or tiudged on foot carrying a 
shovel or a gun, as their luck may have had it. 
It is for these that the new world must be cre- 
ated. The foundation of society, national and 
international, must lie in the satisfaction of the 
elementary desires of hundreds of millions of 
men who want to make a life for themselves, 
and, while making it, to be free of fear of sud- 
den conquest, free of fear of oppression in 
thought or spirit, and free of the fear of being 
tossed onto a scrap heap by military or eco- 
nomic processes over which they have no 
control. 

I cannot but believe that the United States 
has an opportunity to play a decisive part in 
this coming epoch of rebuilding. 

Our great and particular political contribu- 
tion to the world is that we have solved the 
jji-obleni of bringing together peoples of many 
races, of many languages, and of different 
backgrounds. We have set up a way of life in 
which all these groups live together in peace, 
work together in happiness, and join together 
in creating a common and fruitful life. Eu- 
rope, in all her long history, has never been able 
to do this. More than any other group, we have 



MAY 24, 1941 



615 



found it possible to end those liatreds which 
liave divided men in the Old World. Because 
of tliis, we know that there can be and will be 
no "new order'' based on mastery by force and 
undermined by the hatred of subjugated na- 
tions. Because of this we know that there can 
be no true peace until life is passible without 
fear, without oppression, and on a basis which 
provides both tlie physical materials of life and 
respect for the spiritual and intellectual inde- 
pendence which makes life worthwhile. 

No one recoj^jnizcs more than we do the need 
of finding a common denominator for the many 
races and nations elsewhere in the world. It 
is mere tragedj' that that attempt lias been 
perverted into a claim that a connnon denom- 
inator can be provided by forcibly imposing a 
single master on these nations. 

"We recognize the common denominator of 
free and cooperative efl'ort. But we can never 
recognize the connnon denominator of a com- 
mon slavery. 



I have absolute faith in the outcome of the 
l^resent struggle. Even in conquered Europe 
there is a general awareness that the whole 
structure will break down of its own weight 
before very long. But if this is to occur, it 
nuist be done because of positive acts on our 
part; and it will happen through an endless 
amount of courage and hard work. 

You do not get the foundatiftn of a peaceful 
world by merely wishing. You can defeat the 
establishment of that foundation by disunity 
and by selfishness and by intrigue. 

The social consequences of the struggle mlist 
and will be vastly to improve the position of 
labor; but the quickest way for labor to lose 
the advantages which lie plainly at hand is 
to permit their operations to be twisted by 
racketeers or distorted by seekers for power or 
undermined by agents of foreign political 
intrigue. 

What we call business, the private operations 
of manufacturing and selling, ought to emerge 
from this less spectacularly speculative than 
they have been before, but more certain and 



more stable. But you cannot have this if any 
business group tries to play its position against 
the safety of the whole group. P]ven in pol- 
itics, the free right of opposition can be dis- 
torted into a mere use of factional intrigue. 
Primarily we must rely on the patriotism and 
common sense of our country to keep these 
occasional abuses within bounds. But that can 
be done only if a public opinion so strong and 
so clear tliat it cannot be mistalcen, insists on 
tile paramount right of all to safety and to 
cooperative action. 

Unless I misread the signs, tlie whole Amer- 
ican Nation is lapidly becoming unified. 
Plenty of peoi)]e hiive tiied to divide it. They 
have had a fair hearing; and tlie attempt to 
divide has already failed. As increasingly 
tliey realize the overwhelming significance of 
tlie AuKM-ican attitude, a steadfast and stern 
resolve emeiges to prevent the success of a 
world system which at length would spell tlis- 
aster not only to American life but to the 
liopes and desires of uncounted millions 
throughout the world. 

We have reached the point where the dic- 
tates of charity coincide with the dictates of 
com,mon sense; whei^e our self-interest leads 
us to join our efforts with those of other free 
peoples. Tlie connnon denominator is estab- 
lishing itself, and the issue becomies clear. 

We shall meet that issue with reason, but 
we shall also meet it with strength. We shall 
meet it without hatred, but we shall also meet 
it without yielding an inch of the great prin- 
ciple on which the ITnited States was founded, 
on which tlie New World has successfully main- 
tained the greatest area of peaceful life known 
in history, and on which there has been es- 
tablished the greatest mechanism yet seen for 
the progressive improvement of the life of all 
j)eoples. 

CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL 
DEFENSE 

Collectors of customs were notified on May 
19, 1941 that additional unlimited licenses have 
been issued to the British Purchasing Commis- 
sion and the British Iron and Steel Corpora- 



616 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



tit)ii for tlie exportation of aircraft parts 
(other than those enumerated in the Presi- 
dent's proclamation of May 1, 1937 -) to Aden, 
Anglo-Egyptian Sudan, Australia, Barbados, 
British Guiana, British Honduras, Burma, 
Ceylon, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Jamaica, 
Leeward Islands, New Guinea, New Zealand, 
Newfoundland, Northern Rhodesia, Oceania, 
Palestine, Southern Rhodesia, Trinidad and 
Tobago, Union of South Africa, and the Wind- 
ward Islands. 



On May 23, 1941, collectors of customs were 
notified that effective June 1, 1941, clearance 
will be refused to any proposed exportation 
under the unlimited licenses issued to the Brit- 
ish Purchasing Commission and the Britisli 
Iron and Steel Corporation, unless a properly 
signed prior-release certificate is presented for 
each shipment, when such exportation is con- 
signed to any destination in the British Em- 
pire, with the following exceptions : Australia, 
Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda, Canada, Egypt, 
Great Britain and Northern Ireland, New- 
foundland, New Zealand, Palestine, and the 
Union of South Africa (including British 
South- West Africa). 



[Released to the press May 21] 

The Secretary of State announced on May 21 

that, in addition to the general licenses issued 

on May 9 and May 15,^ further general licenses 

have been issued for shipments passing through 

the United States as follows : * 

1. General License GIT-Ph/A for shipments 

passing through the United States from the 

Philippine Islands to any country in Group 

A; 



2 2 F.R. 778. 

' See the Bulletins of May 10, 1041 (vol. IV, no. 08), 
p. 560, and of May 17, 1941 (.vol. IV, no. 99), p. 601. 

' For the names of the two groups of countries to 
which these general licenses are applicable, see the 
BuUetin of aiay 10, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 9S), pp. 560-."i61. 



2. General License GIT-Ph/B for shipments 

passing through the United States from the 
Philippine Islands to any country in Group 

3. General License GIT-F/B for shipments 

passing through the United States from 
Finland to any country in Group B; 

4. General License GIT-P/B for shipments 

passing through the United States from 
Portugal to any country in Group B ; 

5. General License GIT-S/B for shipments 

passing through the United States from 
Spain to any country in Group B. 

Collectors of customs have been instructed to 
refuse clearance to any exportation under gen- 
eral license GIT-F/B, GIT-P/B, or GIT-S/B 
unless evidence of the issuance of a Certificate 
of Origin and Interest for each shipment is pre- 
sented to the collector at the port of exit. 

Whenever an exportation is made under one 
of the general licenses which have been issued 
for shipments passing through the United 
States, the departing vessel will furnish to the 
collector of customs at the port of exit, in 
accordance with the usual procedure, an extra 
copy of its in-transit manifest. 



The Secretary of State notified collectors of 
customs on May 24, 1941 of the revocation of 
general licenses for the exportation of certain 
articles and materials to certain destinations, as 
listed below : Q^eat Britain 

and Northern 
Canada Ireland 

Atrophine GCI 1 GCI 2 

Belladonna GCH 1 GCH 2 

CaftVin GKM 1 GKM 2 

Collectors were also notified that general li- 
censes GBL 1 (Canada) and GBL 2 (Great 
Britain and Northern Ireland) for bromine 
had been amended by deleting therefrom theo- 
bromine and theobromine salts and compounds.' 

The effect of these revocations is that indi- 
vidual licenses are required for exportations of 

° See the Bulletins of April 12, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 94), 
p. 456, and of May 10, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 98), p. 559. 



MAT 24, 1941 

the commodities named above, including all 
forms, conversions, and derivatives thereof set 
forth in the various Export Control Schedules, 
regardless of the destination of such exporta- 
tions. 

Collectors of customs have been instructed 
that when there is a discrepancy in weight or 
value between the amount shown on an export 
license and the amount which it is desired to 
ship, any question of the proper tolerance to 
be allowed will be determined as follows : 

n. For all articles and materials requiring export li- 
cense, a ten percent (10%) tolerance by weight or 
volume over the amount specified on the license is 
allowed, except as noted below. 

Pharmaceuticals and fin- 
ished drugs 1% 

Platinum and platinum 
group metals 1% 

Industrial diamonds nearest carat 

Radium and radium salts nearest 100 milligrams 

Uranium and uranium 
salts nearest 100 milligrams 



617 

I). This tolerance shall be allowed only when the unit 
of quantity called for on the license application is 
in terms of weight or volume and shall not be allowed 
where the unit of quantity called for is in terms of 
number of units. 

c. In all cases the tolerance shall be allowed on the 
basis of the actual quantity stated. Examples of 
this interpretation are as follows: 

(1) If the quantity shown on the license is 
"100,000 lbs.," not more than 110,000 lbs. may be 
exported. 

(2) If the quantity shown on the license is 
"100,000 lbs. 10% more or less," not more than 
110,000 lbs. may be exported. 

(3) If the quantity shown on the license is "ap- 
proximately 100,000 lbs.," not more than 110,000 
lbs. may be exported. 

d. In the case of partial shipments the tolerance al- 
lowed shall be included with the last shipment. The 
tolerance in such cases is ten percent (10%), except 
as noted, of the grcss amount licensed for export. 

y. A tolerance of ten percent (10%) in value over the 
value specified on tlie license Is allowed on all 
shipments. 



Commercial Policy 



FOREIGN TRADE IN WARTIME AND BEYOND 

ADDRESS BY ASSISTANT SECRETARY ACHESON' 



[Released to the press May 21] 

Baltimore has always been linked with the 
world. It is a junction of ocean highways 
which spread out, fanwise, to every land. 
Along these highways, through its shipping and 
coimnerce, the city receives in full force the 
shock of world events. In the dictionary of 
Baltimore there is no such word as isolation. 

This has always been true of seaports. They 
face outward toward the world. The growth 
of their commerce has been interwoven with the 
development of their civilizations, as bear wit- 



' Delivered at a luncheon of the Baltimore Associa- 
tion of Commerce, in connection with the celebration 
of National Foreign-Trade Week, Baltimore, Md., May 
21, 1041. 

320053—41 2 



ness the great trading-centers from Antioch 
and Carthage, Venice and Genoa, on to our own 
day. 

Those who live in them know that whoever 
controls the sea controls the order to which the 
trade of the world — and in large measure the 
life of the world — must conform. This may be 
a free order or it may be the order of tank eco- 
nomics. It may be a system of trade to the 
mutual advantage of buyer and seller or a sys- 
tem of exploitation backed by cannon and, less 
ostentatiously, by restrictions wliich funnel the 
products of the world to the master people at 
prices and upon terms which they dictate. 
These terms are not the mere details of a bill 
of sale, but may, as we have seen in Europe, go 



618 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



to the whole structure of a people's domestic 
life and foreign relations. 

You, whose lives are closely connected with 
sea-borne trade, know also that upon the sea 
distiuice is not a matter of miles but of costs 
and that trade connection is not a matter of 
geographical location but of available mar- 
kets. In terms of normal coal-transportation 
costs Buenos Aires is no further from Norfolk 
than Xorfolk is from West Virginia; and, in 
terms of wheat-transportation costs, Kansas 
City is three times as far away from New York 
as Liverpool. The statute mile is unimpor- 
tant in sea-borne trade. The existence of the 
market is everything. So far as effecting a 
transaction in wheat is concerned, New York 
and Buenos Aires might as well be on different 
planets. 

All of this means, as you well know, that 
our security and relations in this hemisphere 
are vitally affected by the outcome of this war. 
There is only one possible and tolerable out- 
come for us. Hemisphere solidarity means that 
we all know this and will govern ourselves ac- 
cordingly. It does not mean that this hemi- 
sphere is, or will become, economically self- 
sufficient. Before this war over half of the 
products of South America went outside the 
hemisphere in tonnage owned outside of it. It 
will do so again. The most elementary inter- 
ests of self-preservation warn us that these 
products must go under a control of the seas 
which insures free and fair trade, and not under 
one which would be used to subordinate all 
sellers in foreign markets, economically and 
politically, to the new order of the tank. 

Over a century ago the Baltimore clippers, 
sailing close-hauled, were faster than any pirate 
or privateer which lurked in the West Indian 
waters. This city became a great port for 
transshipment of the European - West Indian 
trade. But finally the menace of these ugly 
customers was no longer to be endured and the 
Navy ended it once and for all. Today not 
even a modern Baltimore clipper could elude 
the jDiracy of tank economy. It can be ended 
only at the source and by the only means which 
pirates understand and respect. 



To bring this about, our foreign trade has 
undergone a drastic transformation. Today, 
in ever-increasing proportion, it is carried on 
or controlled by the Government. It is di- 
rected to two principal objectives : First to pro- 
duce and to place in the hands of those whose 
defense is vital to our security the tools of vic- 
tory and the means of subsistence; second, to 
supply our friends, and particularly the other 
American republics, with the necessities from 
which they have been cut off by the war. To 
do this has required the deflection of shipping 
to new routes, the restriction of normal com- 
mercial exports by a licensing system, govern- 
ment purchasing and importation of strategic 
materials where shortages may threaten — in 
general, the subordination of individual com- 
mercial consideration to those of national pol- 
icy and security. 

The extent and nature of this transformation 
in our trade is mirrored in the commercial and 
industrial life of Baltimore. The abandon- 
ment of trans-Atlantic steamship lines, deflec- 
tions in the normal flow of commerce, the 
shifting of vessels to other routes have had 
their effects in the harbor. But the outstand- 
ing fact is the increase in the activity of the 
port, for Baltimore has assumed a leading role 
in the task before us. 

The weapons and foodstuffs which American 
workers and farmers are producing to wm this 
war are moving over Baltimore's docks in ever- 
increasing quantities. Supplies for our defense 
bases in Bermuda, Trinidad, and the Canal 
Zone are loaded for shipment at this port. A 
large volume of the strategic and critical mate- 
rials which are being purchased abroad is 
brought into the country at Baltimore, where 
it is distributed to the factories producing for 
national defense or held in storage for later 
use. A substantial part of our expanded war- 
time trade with Latin America is centered here. 
This increased traffic has required new piers, 
additional equipment for the handling of bulk 
commodities, more warehouses, and an expan- 
sion of rail-terminal facilities. 

Baltimore is one of the world's principal 
ship-building and repair ports. It has en- 



MAY 24, 1941 



619 



larged existing plants and added new facilities 
to supply this country and Great Britain with 
miicli-needed ships. The Government's vital 
ship-building program is already well under 
way in these plants. 

A thousand factories within sight of the port 
ai'e on war work. Medium bombers, whicli may 
liold the key to victory, come from the great 
Martin plant. Baltimore is doing a vital job 
and has a vital stake in the outcome. The future 
of foreign trade, with which its own future is 
bound up, depends on our output of arms, ships, 
and supplies and on our assuring their delivery. 

The Nation has overnight passed from a state 
where there appeared to be too much of every- 
thing to one in which there is an immediate or 
threatened shortage of many vital commodities. 
And so, by priority orders and export control, 
the Government restricts their use to the essen- 
tial ends of national policy. 

As oiu' armament prijgram has advanced, the 
list of commodities subject to export control has 
grown. Each item is added after careful and 
thorough investigation. In carrying out this 
work the Administrator of Export Control, 
General Maxwell, has the advice and assistance 
of many agencies of the Government. Standing 
committees of the Departments of State, Treas- 
ury, and Agriculture, of the Army and Navy 
Munitions Board, the Office of Production 
Management, the Maritime Commission, the sta- 
tistical and information services of the Depart- 
ment of Conmierce and of the Tariff Commis- 
sion consider each commodity which is proposed. 
They consider the amounts available within the 
country, the needs and prosi^ective needs of the 
defense program, the existing currents of trade 
and the effect which restriction will liave upon 
them, the needs, military and civilian, of other 
countries which are dependent upon us for es- 
sential supplies. All of these matters are in- 
vestigated and carefully weighed. There is no 
desire to interfere with trade for the mere pur- 
pose of interference. 

When an article is put on the control list, 
decisions must be made in regard to the grant- 
ing or refusing of applications for licenses. 



These decisions must be determined by a vari- 
ety of factors. In many cases the supplies of 
critical commodities are hardly sufficient, or 
may be actually insufficient, for the needs of 
the defense program, even with curtailed civil- 
ian consumption. In these cases licenses must 
be refused except in the most unusual situa- 
tions. In other cases there may be some sur- 
plus for export ; and in these cases it becomes 
impoi'tant that the exports shall go to those 
countries to wliich we have responsibilities. 
In order that we may be assured that they are 
to be used by such countries and not deflected 
to other uses, which would in turn create a 
shortage, we are endeavoring to work out ar- 
rangements with our neighbors in this hemi- 
sphere by which they will institute systems of 
control over the commodities which are con- 
trolled here. Such a system has been worked 
out with Cuba. The result is to permit greater 
freedom in the issuing of licenses, because we 
know that the commodities will be used in the 
importing country for needs the necessity of 
which we recognize. 

But whatever the policy, the task of admin- 
istration is great. More than a thousand ap- 
plications are received daily. The mere physi- 
cal task of handling these is a large one. There 
is no automatic way of disposing of them. 
Each applicant is entitled to and receives fair 
and equitable consideration. Each country 
which requires commodities from us is entitled 
to present its needs fully. 

The basic difficulty comes from the fact, 
which is true in the great majority of cases, 
tliat there is not enough to go around and that 
competing requests must be weighed against 
one another. Wlien one adds to this the fact 
that our knowledge of our own needs and of 
our own supplies is constantly changing, both 
through expansion of our program of manufac- 
ture and growth in our knowledge of the facts, 
the pei-plexities of administration begin to be 
clear. 

There is another field of our foreign trade 
which is affected by the ]>resent emergency — 
the field of imports. The Government has 
found tl^at the control of exports alone will not 



620 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



assure us of sufficient supplies of many critical 
materials. It has been necessary for the Gov- 
ei'nment itself, through agencies such as the 
Metals Reserve Company and the Rubber Re- 
serve Company, to enter foreign markets as a 
purchaser and to import into this country quan- 
tities of rubber, antimony, chrome, manganese, 
tin, tungsten, abaca, copper, nitrates, quartz 
crystals, mercury, graphite, mica, and other 
materials. 

Finally, overhanging the whole area of our 
foreign trade, there is the limiting factor of 
shipping space. There are not enough ships. 
When tonnage has been allocated for the essen- 
tial needs of the lease-lend policy, for the car- 
riage of badly needed commodities to this coun- 
try and the transportation to other countries 
of the materials without wliich their life cannot 
go on, there is not enough left even for the re- 
stricted trade which is possible under the pres- 
ent necessary controls. And so, here again, we 
find a constricting factor, imposed not by 
governmental fiat but by the very facts of the 
situation. 

So the picture of foreign trade in wartime is 
a picture of a purposive trade, directed first to 
the needs of those whose fighting forces we are 
supporting and second to the needs of those who 
are our friends in this crisis. It is a trade 
necessarily controlled and restricted by the Gov- 
ernment and controlled and I'estricted by the 
limitations of shipping s^jace. In other words, 
it is a trade molded by our position in a world 
at war. 

'Wliat lies beyond this war-time trade, re- 
stricted at every turn and directed to urgent 
national aims? No one is wise enough to fore- 
see the post-war world or to set out now the 
steps and mechanisms by which trade can be 
released and returned to the needs of peace and 
restoration. But on Sunday night last, Mr. 
Hull gave the principles which must guide us 
in meeting the jn-oblems of those trying days.' 

'See the Bulletin of May 17, 1941 (vol. IV, uo. 99), 
p. 575. 



They are no magic formula to salvation, no 
flashy improvisation. They come from the ex- 
perience and wisdom of a man who understands 
and believes as few do the fundamental, moral 
verities. They are the principles which have 
guided him through a long and devoted public 
service. They are the principles which, if 
adopted after the last war, might have spared 
the world much of the misery of these present 
days. Wliat gives his statement power is not 
merely the authority with which he speaks, but 
the basic rightness of what he says. 

What Mr. Hull has pointed out again and 
again is that if nations use their power to 
build up positions of special privilege for 
tliemselves and exclude others from the means 
to a better life, those others, when their turn 
comes, will use force to destroy' the system and 
impose another even more harsh. Whatever 
may be said of the post-war world, one thing 
is sure if it is to be a world of hope. It 
must be a world in which those who are will- 
ing to work and trade honestly, fairly, and 
peacefully, must have full opportunity to do 
so. They may not arbitraiilj' be excluded 
from the markets where they may buy the ma- 
terials with which to work and may sell what 
they have produced. 

It makes no difference that the restriction 
takes the form of prohibitive taxation or a 
trick of finance or a j^referential agreement 
or a monopolistic practice. The result is the 
same. The result is exclusion froni opportu- 
nity by arbitrary force. It is not too soon 
for us to realize the responsibilities of our 
position and our power. For better or for 
worse we are adrift in space upon this earth 
with other men. W^e are a part of it and not 
apart from it. Neither in war nor peace can 
we avoid the choice of cour.ses which our very 
position forces upon us. Even inaction is a 
choice, the choice of surrender to forces which 
have no doubts of their purpose or their power. 
The paths lie clear before us. We have reached 
a fork. In Lincoln's words, we can "meanly 
lose or nobly save the last best hope of earth". 



MAY 24, 1041 



621 



FOREIGN TRADE AND THE WORLD CRISIS 

ADDRESS BY LYNN R. EDMINSTER' 



[Released to the press May 21] 

It is a very real privilege to join with the 
Association of Commerce of this great city 
on the occasion marking your observation of 
National Foreign-Trade Week. It is all the 
more a pleasure because your chief executive 
officer, Leverett Lyon, is a friend of long stand- 
ing whom I have known since the days in 
"Washington when we were colleagues at the 
Brookings Institution. 

We celebrate annual Foreign-Trade AYeek 
this year under the lengthening shadow of 
wars across the seas. Our thoughts at this 
time ai'e inevitably dominated by the grave 
crisis through which the world is passing and 
the resulting menace to the security of our own 
country. That is the setting in which not only 
the problem of foreign trade, but all of our 
great national problems, must necessarily be 
considered. 

As the point of departure for idj remarks, I 
am going to assume that everyone here recog- 
nizes the vital importance of international 
trade to the economic life of the world and of 
our own country. I am going to take it for 
granted that you would all like to look forward 
to the prospect, in the years that lie ahead, of 
healthy trade relations, not only between this 
country and other countries, but also through- 
out the entire world. Starting from that prem- 
ise, I shall center my discussion around three 
main propositions: 

First. If we wish to foster trade with other 
countries on the basis of equality as a free and 
sovereign nation, we shall need, first of all, 
to make sure of our continued existence as a 
free and sovereign nation. That is a question 
of national security — and a highly pertinent 



'Delivered before the Chicago As.sociation of Com- 
merce at a luncheon meeting in observance of National 
Foreign-Trade Week, Chicago, 111., May 21, 1941. Jlr. 
EdmlnstPr is Special Assistant to the Secretary of 
State. 



one, in view of what is now transpiring in 
the world. 

Second. The extent to which our foreign 
trade, and world trade as a whole, can be made 
to thrive in the future will depend in part upon 
the kind of world in which we are living — 
whether it is a world in which constructive 
trade and other economic relationships can 
exist. 

Third. Successful maintenance and growth 
of our foreign trade will depend also upon our 
own will and determination to deal with the 
problem constructively, with the assistance of 
the necessary instrumentalities of government 
ffir doing so. 

The first of these propositions — national se- 
curity — naturally assumes the first and most 
important place in any realistic discussion at 
this time. A few years ago it would have 
seemed academic even to raise the question of 
our national security as a preface to a discus- 
sion of foreign trade. Today it would be aca- 
demic not to raise it, for it is the all-important 
issue now before us. Certainly the prospects 
for our foreign trade cannot, at best, be better 
than our prospects for remaining a free and 
independent people. 

We are passing through a fateful year in 
the history of our country'. The grim struggle 
now going on in Europe, in Africa, and in 
Asia has for us the gravest implications. 
Upon the outcome of this far-flung war of 
Axis aggression hinges the decision as to 
whether we, as a nation, can go forward in 
freedom and in peace and security toward the 
building of a better America, within a world 
order based on law and justice; or whether, 
on the other hand, we must fight for our very 
existence against the darkest menace, the most 
terrible man-made scourge of modern times. 
Together with every other country that prizes 
its liberty and its independence, we in this 
country are today challenged by evil forces 



622 

which, as Secretary Hull has so aptly said, 
are bent upon transforming "the civilized 
world as we have known it into a world in 
which mankind will be reduced again to the 
degradation of a master-and-slave relationship 
among nations and among individuals, main- 
tained by brute force". 

This challenge is not vague or remote. It is 
present; it is concrete; and the peril it holds 
for us is imminent. The inclusion of this 
hemisphere and of this country within the to- 
talitarian program of world conquest is in- 
herent in the very nature of the totalitarian 
system, and no further proof is required. But 
if further proof were necessary, it is sufficient 
to point out, as Secretary Hull and others have 
repeatedly done, that evidence has been piling 
up for several years, in the official acts and 
utterances of the aggressor powers, confirming 
the knowledge that we too are included in their 
plans for world domination — that they do 
definitely have designs both upon the New 
World and upon the principles, the possessions, 
and the way of life that ai'e ours. 

To indulge in loose and wishful thinking in 
the face of such grave conditions is suicidal. 
And yet it is a fact that many perfectly sincere 
and patriotic people are still confused and mis- 
led about the whole thing. They cling tena- 
ciously to illusions which should long since have 
been dispelled by what is going on in the world 
from day to day, almost under their very eyes. 
Let me give you a few illustrations : 

Example No. 1 : The widely held notion that 
this is merely a regional war; that it matters 
little to us which side wins. 

To say that this is a regional war is a com- 
plete misconception — and a most dangerous one. 
For, as Secretary Hull has pointed out : 

". . . This is not an ordinary war. It is a 
war of assault by these would-be conquerors, 
employing every method of barbarism, upon na- 
tions which cling to their right to live in free- 
dom and which are resisting in self-defense. 
The wovdd-be conquerors propose to take unto 
themselves every . . . conquered nation : the 
territory, the sovereignty, the possessions of 
every such nation. They propose to make the 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

people of each conquered nation into serfs; to 
extinguish their liberties, their rights, their law, 
and their religion. They systematically uproot 
everything that is high and fine in life. Such 
is the movement which is extending rapidly 
throughout the world." 

Fortunately, the great majority of our people 
now understand this. They realize that it 
would be criminally short-sighted for this coun- 
try to remain aloof and indifferent while the 
whole cumulative impact of successful aggres- 
sion gathers its maximiun force for the final 
blow against us. They rightly sense that such a 
fate would be our only reward for looking the 
other way while other nations, one after the 
other, were being victimized. That is why they 
have demanded that we give the utmost material 
aid to the nations that are resisting invasion. 

Example No. 2 : The strange idea some people 
have that the monster which has unloosed itself 
upon one victim-nation after another will pres- 
ently curl up, satisfied, under a shady tree by 
the side of a brook, go to sleep, and awaken 
transformed into a civilized and law-abiding 
member of human society. In their gi-eat 
urge to believe what they want to believe, such 
people ignore not only the acts and pronounce- 
ments of the aggressors but the forces that are 
inherent in any system based on conquest. 

Example No. 3 : The contention one frequently 
hears that we should turn our backs on world 
events while we "put our own house in order". 
If we are to put our own house in order — as 
every thinking person must wish to do — we shall 
first have to make sure that we possess the house. 
For, as someone has said : "If an eighty-ton tank 
is bearing down on one's house, one doesn't de- 
fend it by hanging better curtains in the living 
room or by giving the domestic help a box- 
spring bed." 

Example No. 4 : The distorted ideas concern- 
ing national defense which people acquire who 
listen credulously to the superficial ])ronounce- 
ments of self-appointed, amateur military strat- 
egists regarding the alleged invulnerability of 
this continent to attack, as against the exjjert 
opinions of men who are actually entrusted with 
the responsibility for our national defense. 



AIAY 24, 1941 



623 



These are the people who ask, for example, 
how an attacker whicli has thus far failed to 
get across the English Channel can get across 
the Atlantic. They do not realize that the 
clue to success or failure in either case is con- 
trol of the sea; that sea-lanes can be highways 
for attack no less than bulwarks for defense, 
depending upon who controls them; that the 
reason the English Channel has not been 
crossed is the British Navy and the British 
air force. They do not stop to ask themselves 
how the coast lines of the Americas, from 
Labrador and Alaska on the north to Cape 
Horn on the south, are going to be protected 
from the landing of hostile forces if the sea- 
lanes leading to them fall under hostile con- 
trol ; and how we are going to prevent the 
acquisition of such control by powers which, 
if victorious, will possess ship-building facil- 
ities that now exceed our own by the ratio of 
seven to one. At the same time, they leave 
entirely out of the reckoning all of the other 
malign and insidious weapons of attack — sub- 
versive activities, economic aggression, and so 
on — M'hicli are a familiar part of totalitarian 
warfare and which prepare and ease the way 
to military conquest. 

Example No. 5 : The defeatist position taken 
by those who say the Axis is going to win, 
therefore wliy continue to help those who are 
resisting. 

Such persons not only offer no respectable 
proof that, with adequate material assistance 
from this country, such an outcome cannot be 
prevented, but still worse — they are comipletely 
oblivious to the dire consequences which would 
follow for this country if such an outcome is 
not prevented. They would apparently prefer 
to see us begin defending ourselves only at 
the last line of defense — only after being com- 
pletely encircled by a totalitarian alliance 
which is backed by the resources of two-thirds 
of the world and bent upon employing all of 
the ingenious and insidious devices of total 
warfare to complete its program of world 
conquest. Such faith in this country's being 
able, alone if necessary, to defend itself against 
all comers is, of course, moving; and if things 



ever come to that, we shall no doubt give a 
good account of ourselves, however great the 
sacrifice nuist be. But it does not and cannot 
explain why we should go out of the way to 
get into such a deplorable situation. 

Example No. 6 : The idea held by some who 
feel that, while we should give full material aid 
to the countries that are resisting invasion, nev- 
ertheless, since the aggi"essors might win in 
spite of such aid, perhaps we had better slyly 
keep one foot in the other doorway and not get 
too much committed to one side. 

Briefly, the answer to this is that democracy 
is worth, defending; that once it begins tem- 
porizing with dictatorships, whose power and 
prestige rest upon persecution, pillage, and 
plunder, it will be signing its own death 
warrant. 

Example No. 7: The idea that real peace is 
possible at this time. Those good people who 
talk hopefully of making peace, most loudly of 
all after each military success of the Axis, are 
victims of gross self-deception. In some myste- 
rious way they succeed in convincing themselves 
that a genuine and safe peace can be made at 
a time wlien the aggressors are in full posses- 
sion of their loot, intoxicated with victory, and 
in no mood to make any sort of peace except 
one which would enable them to consolidate 
their ill-gotten gains and prepare the way for 
an early resumption of their program of world 
conquest. 

These are but a few of the examples of be- 
fuddled thinking that might be cited. Some of 
our people are a prey to all of these false no- 
tions, and more besides ; others, to some of them ; 
still others are in such a state of confusion that 
they hardly know what to believe. 

Meanwhile, however, precious time is pass- 
ing. The weeks and months that lie immedi- 
ately ahead are crucial. For they will deter- 
mine whether or not this country is going to 
find itself surrounded and compelled to fight, 
virtually alone and against great odds, for its 
very existence as a free nation. Were the 
Axis to win this war, this sinister possibility 
would become a stark reality. Let th.ere be no 
illusions about that. The program of the ag- 



624 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



gressors is one of unbridled conquest, with no 
territorial limits M-hatsoever. Toward weak- 
ness anywhere, be it enemy, neutral, or even 
ally, it holds only supreme contempt. Its only 
god is force. With such a system no compro- 
mise is possible. It will go on ruthlessly at- 
tempting to devour all that lies in its path, 
unless and until it is stopped. 

We are pledged to give all material aid to 
the victims of aggression, and the big job is 
to make our efforts effective. That means, 
among other things, that the help we are giv- 
ing must arrive. It means, also, that there is 
no time for lethargy, for internal division and 
strife, or for chasing rainbows. Ruthless ag- 
gression and contemptuous defiance of every 
rule of law and of decency in international 
affairs must be brought to a halt. 

Self-evident though these things may seem 
to be, I am convinced that large numbers of 
our people do not even yet realize how truly 
formidable are the dangers for us that inhere 
in the present world situation. They know, of 
course, that there is danger. But to recognize 
that danger exists is one thing; to recognize 
that the danger is powerful, imminent, and 
compelling, is another. Unless and until our 
people, in overwhelming niunbers, have keyed 
their thinking and their actions to the second 
of these premises, our maximum national effort 
in meeting this great crisis will not be forth- 
coming. 

So much with regard to national security. 
I come now to my second proposition, namely, 
that our efforts to rebuild trade after the pres- 
ent hostilities have ceased will depend upon the 
kind of world we are living in. 

Were a large part of the world to fall under 
totalitarian domination, the difficulties which 
we would face in the economic field would be 
an inseparable and an extremely potent phase 
of the whole broad challenge that would await 
us. The key to the economic program of the 
aggressors— as Secretary Hull has but recently 
reminded us — is contained in one simple 
word — "conquest". They systematically loot 
every territory conquered, uproot its economic 
structure, and reduce it to a condition of a 



vassalage. All of this enhanced and highly 
centralized power is then brought to bear 
against the remaining individual, free nations 
of the world with a view to forcing them into 
subjection. 

The methods they have applied in the field 
of trade are an illustration. Those methods 
are well known. They are aggressive in the 
extreme. They are such as to reduce trade 
essentially to a process of forced barter, in 
which the weaker country is compelled to take 
for pay whatever suits the fancy of the lord- 
and-master — and "like it". Not economic 
peace, but economic plunder, is the watchword. 
The whole system is simply a part of the com- 
prehensive strategy of total warfare by which- — 
whether in wartime or under cover of a purely 
nominal peace — the struggle for world dom- 
ination is waged. Free enterprise does not 
exist. In the very nature of the case, the 
sj'stem involves the complete subordination of 
individual freedom and initiative in business, 
industry, and trade to the will and purposes 
of government dictatorships. 

All this stands in sharp contrast to the 
trade policies which our Government has been 
pursuing in recent years. Those policies rest 
upon the principle of equality of treatment and 
of cooperation. They rest upon a recognition 
of the fact that the expansion of international 
trade to that healthy volume which redounds to 
the best interests of all countries requires the 
pursuit of trade policies which encoui'age the 
flow of three-cornered, or multilateral, trade. 
They reject as short-sighted and impracticable 
the imitation by this country of trading meth- 
ods pursued by many other countries in recent 
years, to their own sorrow. I refer to the great 
host of trade-diverting and trade-destroying 
schemes — restrictive quotas, clearing and com- 
pensation agreements, and other discriminatoiy 
devices — which have in recent j'ears infested in- 
ternational trade, sapping the world's economic 
vitality like so many leeches. 

In the realm of trade no less than in the realm 
of hemisphere and national defense as a whole, 
it is essential, therefore, that we exercise the 
utmost foresight and vision at this time. We 



MAY 24, 1941 



625 



must understand clearly what the implications 
of Axis ascendancy would be. 

Upon this subject we do not have to theorize. 
The record speaks for itself. We know that 
trade wonld be used as a powerful economic 
weapon for totalitarian penetration and con- 
quest in the Western Hemisphere. Every pos- 
sible advantage would be taken by totalitarian 
dictatorships of the dependence of this hemi- 
sphere upon over-seas markets for the sale of its 
vast surpluses of agricultural and other extrac- 
tive products. A Europe under the domination 
of a buyer's monopoly maintained by a foreign 
dictatorship would be used as a powerful le- 
vei'age for compelling countries in this hemi- 
sphere to comply with the demands of the 
would-be conquerors. Were the war to end in 
complete totalitarian domination of all Europe, 
including the British Isles, farmers and other 
producers of surplus products in the Western 
Hemisphere would be faced with far more seri- 
ous gluts of unsalable surpluses than any they 
have heretofore experienced. If anyone sup- 
jjoses that the dictators would fail to exploit 
this oppoi-tunity to the full in pressing forward 
their propaganda of penetration into this hemi- 
sphere, he must be completely oblivious to what 
has been happening in the world during the past 
few years. 

The implications of all this should be clear. 
We cannot afford to neglect any opportunity, 
in dealing with the totalitarian menace, to take 
hostages f(n' the future. In the realm of trade 
as in every other donuiin, while we must hope 
for the best we must plan to cope with the 
worst. We cannot afford to allow a situation 
to develop where we shall be at the mercy of 
the totalitarian countries in things economic 
any more than in things military — particularly 
as the line between these two grows less and 
less distinct. We must be prepared to deal 
with totalitarian aggression in all of its mani- 
fold and insidious phases. 

You know, of course, of the steps that have 
been taken to bring about wholehearted co- 
operation among the American republics for 
their common welfare and defense. You know 
also that an important phase of this effort is 

320053 — 11 3 



the promotion of inter-American economic soli- 
darity, and that the surplus problem is one 
of the most difficult problems in that s])here. 
Efforts are being made to effect a more orderly 
marketing of surpluses and to bring about co- 
operative readjustments of production more 
nearly accommodated to existing and prospec- 
tive market outlets. Other measures include 
encouragement, where feasible, of complemen- 
tary agricultural production and of industriali- 
zation in countries whei'e such development 
would help to create a better internal economic 
balance and hence to raise tlie purchasing 
power and living standards of the people. 

Alleviative measures such as these can and do 
reduce our dependence upon over-seas markets 
and therefore strengthen our hands in dealing 
with the totalitarian menace. It is essential to 
recognize, however, that the goal at which they 
aim is not hemisphere economic self-sufficiency, 
for that is something which is neither attainable 
nor desirable. "It would be utterly unrealis- 
tic", as Mr. Dean Acheson, Assistant Secretary 
of State, recently remarked in an address before 
a large farm gathering at Des Moines, "to sup- 
pose that there is any magic by which this hemi- 
sphere — whether as applied to agriculture or 
any other phase of its economy — can suddenly 
lift itself out of the rest of the world and 
blithely charge off the consequences to its profit 
and loss account." For the fact is, as Mr. Ache- 
son further pomted out, that the Western 
Hemisphere is closely mtegrated economically 
with the rest of the world, and particularly with 
Europe, as a result of the trade and other rela- 
tionships which have been built up over a long 
])eriod of years. Hence farmers and other pro- 
ducers of exportable surpluses simply cannot 
afford to throw up their hands in dismay and 
write off the whole European situation as hope- 
less for the future. 

It follows from all this that our country 
should exercise leadership, in policy and in ac- 
tion, in an endeavor to establish and maintain 
the largest possible sphere in the world within 
which ti'ade and other economic relations can 
be conducted on the basis of liberal principles 
and of cooj3eration to the mutual advantage of 



626 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



all nations which are willing to participate. 
Mark carefully what I say. I am not suggest- 
ing an exclusive economic alliance, but exactly 
the reverse. What I am suggesting is that 
those parts of the world which are willing to 
engage in trade and other economic relations 
on the basis of cooperation and fair-dealing 
should work together for their common interest 
and for their common defense against aggres- 
sive economic policies pursued by the totali- 
tarians for purposes of self-aggrandizement. 
Every nation willing to participate in a system 
based upon principles of equality, fair-dealing, 
and cooperation for mutual advantage, would 
be welcomed with open arms. 

Some of the broad principles upon which such 
a program should be based were set forth by 
the Secretary of State in his radio address of 
last Sunday, inaugurating this year's Foreign- 
Trade Week.* They are brief, and I want to 
repeat them : 

"1. Extreme nationalism must not again be 
permitted to exj^ress itself in excessive trade 
restrictions. 

"2. Non-discrimination in international com- 
mercial relations must be the rule, so that in- 
ternational trade may grow and prosper. 

"3. Raw-material supplies must be available 
to all nations without discrimination. 

"4. International agreements regulating the 
supply of commodities must be so handled as to 
protect fully the interests of the consuming 
countries and their people. 

''5. The institutions and arrangements of in- 
ternational finance must be so set up that they 
lend aid to the essential enterprises and the con- 
(inuous development of all countries, and per- 
mit the payment through processes of trade con- 
sonant with the welfare of all countries." 

No time can be too soon to start working 
toward these broad objectives. Above all, it is 
essential that we be prepared to make the utmost 
use of machinery already available and adapted 
to such use — as. for example, in the field of 



" See the BuUvtin of May 17, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 99), 
pp. 573-576, 



trade. And tliis brings me to the third proposi- 
tion which I emphasized at the outset, namely, 
that the maintenance and extension of our for- 
eign trade will depend in part upon the extent 
of our determination to do so and the practical 
instrumentalities of government which we 
muster for its accomplishment. 

For the past seven years we in this country 
have had such an instrumentality, namely, the 
Trade Agreements Act. Through the trade- 
agreements program real progress in re-open- 
ing the channels of foi'eign trade had been 
made before the outbreak of the war in Europe. 
There is not the slightest question that the 
agreements entered into were distinctly bene- 
ficial both in safeguarding our export trade 
from further losses and, in many cases, in 
actualh' increasing the flow of trade as com- 
pared with the lean years which preceded. 
These results were achieved, moreover, in spite 
of conditions throughout the world which were 
highly unfavorable. Unfortunately, as time 
passed, these conditions became even less favor- 
able. With the outbreak of war, trade with 
some countries was completely cut oflF, and with 
others, subordinated to the necessities of war. 
Naturally, therefore, we have been temporarily 
deprived of the benefit of some of the most 
valuable concessions obtained in our trade 
agi'eenients with certain countries; although 
with a considerable number of countries the 
agreements are still fimctioning without let 
or hindrance. 

In any case, however, the disniptions caused 
by war-time conditions have no bearing upon 
the merits of the agreements us such. On the 
contrary, such conditions emphasize all the 
more the need for keeping the whole program 
intact and available for further use whenever 
conditions jaermit. The jjrinciples on which 
the trade-agreements program is based are in 
direct antithesis to those exemplified in the 
methods of trade pursued by the totalitarian 
countries. They are precisely the principles on 
which any fair and equitable program of co- 
operation between free nations in the realm of 
trade must be based. Adaptations in order to 



MAY 24, 1941 



627 



meet particuhir circumstances may be required 
ill the future, as in the past. But the basic 
])rinciples and machinery of the Trade Agree- 
ments Act are intrinsically sound. 

Nor should it be assumed that the further 
use of the trade-agreements machinery is some- 
thing that necessarily resides in a dim and 
distant future. The broad program of coop- 
eration to wliich reference has just been made 
is not a mere theoretical concept; it is a spe- 
cific job that needs to be Avorked at right now. 
Indeed, there are very urgent reasons why 
every ei!'ort should be made to extend the scope 
of the trade-agreements program at this time. 

There are i^articularly strong reasons why 
its scope should be extended in the Western 
Hemisphere. Without going into detailed fig- 
ures, suffice it to say that, in considerable part 
as a result of the war, serious difficulties have 
been created for many of these countries in 
acquiring dollar exchange with which to pur- 
chase the greatly increased supplies of goods 
which must now be imported from this coun- 
try. Unless we can contrive somehow to in- 
crease the sales of these countries to us, it is 
difficult to see how they can continue to import 
from us in anything like the quantities which 
they have recently been importing. Thus, 
quite apart from broader considei'ations having 
to do with our good-neighbor policy and the 
strengthening of our continental defense, there 
are very immediate and practical reasons for 
.seeking to extend the scope of the trade-agree- 
ments program in this hemisphere. In this 
connection, the lecent public announcement of 
intention to negotiate trade agreements with 
Argentina and Uruguay should be welcomed 
as a constructive development. 

Nor is it i)npossible that a broad pi'ogi'am 
for closer economic cooperation between this 
country and the Briti-sh Empire might be fa- 
cilitated throngli the use of existing machinery 
for improving jiresent and future trade rela- 
lions between the British Empire and the 
United States. Certainly there are extremely 
weighty reasons of both an immediate and a 
long-range character for making the effort. 
In laying the groundwork for future interna- 



tional economic cooperation, it is essential that 
we take all possible immediate steps to assure 
that the lai"gest possible grouping of countries 
shall be formed as the nucleus for such coop- 
eration. To that end the closest possible co- 
operation between the United States and the 
British Empire is indispensable. 

There are some who would have us twirl 
our thumbs idly as we drift along toward an 
uncertain post-war fate. They are dispensers 
of poor advice. This applies whether in the 
field of trade or in other respects. Because 
one cannot be certain of the shape of things 
to come is surely no reason why he should re- 
frain from doing his bit toward shaping them. 
The same thing is true, on a larger scale, 
with respect to the pursuit of great national 
policies formulated for the common welfare, 
whether in the field of trade or otherwise. 
We are in the nudst of kaleidoscopic changes 
in the world, and quite naturally we shall 
have to adapt our methods of pursuing great 
national objectives to the changing circum- 
stances of our times. But we shall get exactly 
nowhere if Ave set ourselves adrift in turbulent 
seas, without knowing our destination, without 
chart or compass, and without even attempting 
to glimi)se the stars. 

I do not subscribe to the philosophy of 
drift — or its malignant twin, "the wave of the 
future". The only "wave of the future", so 
far as I am concerned, is the American flag, in 
terms of the great liberal and humanitarian 
ideals for which it stands, and I propose to 
do my part to see that it keeps waving. We 
in this country, and liberty-loving peoples 
everywhere, can fashion our own destiny if we 
but muster the will to do so. 

I repeat: this is a fateful moment in the 
history of our country. If we do not think 
quickly and wisely, and act boldly, in the face 
of the grave crisis which now confronts us. our 
cup will surely be filled with bitterness. 

The world cannot remain half-slave and 
half-free. Either the forces of barbarism 
which have been unloosed will be halted and 
defeated, or else they will swallow up every- 



628 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



thing in (heir path. That is the issue today 
that transcends all others, for this Nation and 
every nation that prizes its liberty. The 
vision, the loyalty, the resourcefulness, and the 



courage of the American people are the best 
possible guaranty that this great issue will be 
successfully met and that our precious freedom 
will be preserved. 



ECONOMIC ISSUES OF THE PRESENT WORLD CONFLICT, WITH 
PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO FOREIGN TRADE 



ADDRESS BY RAYMOND H. GEIST " 



[Released to the press May 22] 

The system of liberal economy which up to 
a few years ago was practiced by most nations 
of the world is definitely an historical growth, 
having received its greatest extension and ap- 
plication during the nineteenth century when 
industrial and technical progress made a most 
striking advance. Based upon free private en- 
terjarise and the use of gold as an international 
monetary means of exchange, the structure of 
national economy in most countries favored 
and facilitated the exchange of goods in inter- 
national commerce, promoted movement in the 
world's capital markets, and in general sup- 
ported the growths of jjopulations and made 
for higher living standards in those countries 
where the influences of modern methods were 
most freely at work. The international as- 
pects of this development were reflected in the 
liberal trade princiijles which most countries 
maintained in their dealings with each other, 
the pi'otection accorded foreign enterprise, and 
the generally common acceptance of the doc- 
trine of "the most-favored-nation treatment". 

Besides, the system of liberal economy in 
vogue throughout the world made possible a 
general development of international trade 
based on practices which were in harmony with 
the fundamental principles of civilized life — 
principles which grew out of proper conce])ts 
of international conduct, rights, and obliga- 



° Delivered before the National Industrial (Jonfereiiee 
Board, Inc., New York, N. Y., May 21, 1941. Mr. Geist 
is Chief of the Division of Commercial Affairs, Depart- 
ment of State. 



tions among nations. Moreover, there was em- 
bodied in the liberal system of trade the great 
heritage of the past, the enlightened struggle 
of mankind toward higher living standards 
through material, moral, and cultural progress. 
The ills which this system endured were tem- 
porary. Its vitality is that of civilization 
itself. 

During the last decade an opposing system 
has developed in certain coimtries which may be 
characterized as "closed economy", based pri- 
marily upon the control of private enterprise 
by the state. Kejecting gold as the interna- 
tional medium of exchange, the closed system of 
economy utilizes a regional monetary unit which 
is nothing else than a fiction of value, having no 
more direct relation to real property than the 
figures which record its worth. National econ- 
omy under the closed system is reduced to three 
basic fundamentals: materials, manpower, and 
food. Tlie autarchic totalitarian process fa- 
vors self-sufficiency at any cost; and the strain 
which a nation endures under a system of closed 
economy alfects adversely those three funda- 
mentals. Materials become scarce ; labor is ex- 
ploited; while food becomes either dearer or 
lacking. 

In international trade the system of closed 
economy is chiefly identified by a policy of re- 
stricting the interchange of goods witiiin defined 
spheres of influence on a basis of discrimination 
and monopolistic dealings. 

In view of these two opposing systems now 
struggling for supremacy, it may be profitable 
to examine the consequences of the permanent 
establishment of either. 



MAT 24, 1941 



629 



The political benefits of a liberal system are 
manifold, particularly in the international 
field. Nations are committed to a policy of law 
and order, on which basis alone international 
cooijeration can exist. Friendly intercourse 
fosters not only the free exchange of goods, but 
the dissemination of cultural values, whereby 
the common effort to advance civilization is 
strengthened and promoted. Besides, only 
through the comi^lete restoration of a liberal 
process of economy throughout the world can 
political equality among nations be restored 
and progress assured. The fostering of com- 
mon institutions is impossible in a world break- 
ing up into regional self-contained units. The 
elimination of cooperative effort among nations 
interrupts the advance of science and progress 
in many spheres where international collabora- 
tion has performed fruitful and beneficial work. 

Wliile the advantages in the international 
field could be further expanded, the mainte- 
nance throughout the world of the principles 
of economy, toward which civilized nations 
through the past centuries have been striving, 
benefits more immediately and vitally individual 
nations. Fonns of representative government 
adapted to the temperament and traditions of 
the people are more readily assured. The free- 
dom of the individual to pursue his own destiny 
within the scope of national opportunities 
through the cultivation of the arts and sciences 
through education and religion are only pos- 
sible in a state where the economical processes 
are based upon liberal and enlightened i^rin- 
ciples. Likewise, only in such a state is there 
equality of opportunity for all classes of society 
in the exercise of their political rights. 

If, as a result of the present struggle, nations 
will be constrained to adopt a policy of self- 
sufficiency, closing their doors to the free play 
of international commercial intercourse, there 
will be no relaxation on the part of certain 
countries of their efforts to maintain their 
trade position and advantages by force. In- 
creasingly, under such circumstances, domi- 
nated countries will be compelled to limit inter- 
course with the outside world, accepting with a 
position of isolation also one of political in- 



feriority. They will be deprived of cooper- 
ating in any scheme of international collabora- 
tion, which collaboration, in the general con- 
fusion arising in international relations, will 
disappear except in certain areas like our own 
where basic principles will be defended. How- 
ever, under these circumstances the conditions 
of peace will be similar to those of war, and 
the consequences the same. Political idealisms 
will be rampant as well as aggressive interfer- 
ence in all parts of the world with the surviv- 
ing flow of commerce. Tlie existence of eco- 
nomic blocs created by force, as the totali- 
tarian states intend, and those created by 
necessity, as the choice may have to be, will 
be tantamount to an armistice leading to 
greater preparations for rival action in the 
international field. 

Such a state of affairs will necessarily have 
profound influence upon the political destiny 
of nations. The situations induced will con- 
strain most countries to establish authoritarian 
regimes to meet the general threat. The indi- 
vidual will be sacrificed to the common needs 
and to efforts of the state to survive, resulting 
in a loss of those rights whicli have been guar- 
anteed in constitutions from the days of Magna 
Charta to the ^Dresent time. 

In many lands the great "Yea", the affirma- 
tion of rights contained in constitutions, will 
have to yield to the great "Nay", under which 
those fi'eedoms disappear. 

The permanent reestablishment in the world 
of liberal economic forms, the abandonment 
of self-sufficiency and autarchic processes, and 
the agreement of nations to trade with each 
other on just terms, will have profound effect 
in the realm of international trade. Essen- 
tiallj-, this would mean the restoration of the 
world's commerce on sound lines, on a basis of 
equality for all, non-discrimination, and the 
general application of the most-favored-nation 
principle ; the rational distribution of raw ma- 
terials and agricultural products; the restora- 
tion of the gold standard as the international 
medium of exchange; the develojiment of the 
world's markets for vastly increased volumes 



630 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



of manufactured goods, particularly of con- 
sumption goods, and the extension of trans- 
portation by land, sea, and air. In the field 
of transportation alone science and technique 
have made such progress that it may be said 
the world is literally like the charger gnashing 
spiritedly at the bit, ready to plunge forward 
toward goals of new achievement. The pro- 
gram of developing international highways, 
the means of friendly intercourse among peo- 
ples, can be accomplished only in an era of 
good understanding and in conjunction with 
trading systems in which all may construc- 
tively participate. Under such favorable con- 
ditions alone will the movement of capital be 
possible. The investment of funds in new en- 
terprises is an essential element in progress. 
Only in an era of confidence will private in- 
vestors utilize their experience and capital in 
furthering projects at home and abroad for 
the common good. 

If the private-enterprise system survives the 
threatening crisis toward which we are moving, 
the national pattern of economic pi'ogress will 
follow in most essentials an enlightened world 
order. Only the removal of fear will luiloose 
the investment of capital. With the return of 
security and the consequent limitation of arma- 
ments the individual nations will be able, at 
least, to face more resolutely the problems of 
the national budgets, restore solvency to gov- 
ernment, and provide for partial liquidation of 
the national debts. The standard of living will 
be raised in all countries, as, under a restored 
position, the world's reservoir of plenty will be 
available as never before to mitigate the suf- 
fering wliich has been imposed upon millions of 
people. With the permanent reestablishment 
in the world of a liberal economy, each nation 
benefitting from the common exchange of goods 
will be able to develop its resources, services, 
and production in a new era of progi'ess and 
advancement, Wliatever may be the specula- 
tions of the economists as to the future, one 
thing is sure : the retrogi-ession which has beset 
our way of life can only be arrested by a re- 
assertion and reestablishment of the fundamen- 
tal principles on which human life is based. 



In turning to the international field, the pic- 
ture is dark if we contemplate the economic 
consecjuences of the permanent establishment 
in the world of a system of closed economy. 
It is false to say that we have little experience 
or knowledge of the political and social frame- 
work which would prevail in a post-war world 
should totalitarian economic methods become 
solidly and incontestably instituted. We may 
lull ourselves into dreams of security by as- 
suming that our fears are groundless, and that 
the methods adopted by the totalitarians since 
1933 in relation to foreign trade would be 
generously revised to suit our convenience. In 
other words, even from the grim reality of 
experience we must assume nothing until the 
proof of our n;iscalculation is upon us. It is 
a highly dangerous doctrine to assert, as some 
economists have done, that "there is no reason 
to assume that the totalitarian economic pol- 
icies in the international field in the past are 
a perfect indication of what those policies will 
be in the future". Why shoidd we have to 
indulge in idle assumptions concerning facts 
which, judging amply from the past and pres- 
ent, cannot possibly mislead us regarding the 
future. What are the facts of the past and 
how are we to interpret these facts in terms of 
the future? 

In a .system of closed economy, world trade 
will be separated into and confined witliin lim- 
ited areas. Within these areas great inequality 
of economiic opportunity will prevail chiefly 
as a result of the political restraint imposed 
by force. National units will be separated 
from world markets and compelled to find 
their economic existence within the sphere to 
which their resources may be maladjusted and 
imperfectly adapted. This may come about by 
force as in the case of certain industrial na- 
tions in Europe or by being shut out of over- 
seas markets as may be the fate of agricultural 
countries in this hemisphere. Undoubtedly, in 
the light of the last eight years, world trade 
will be based upon unsound lines. Inequality 
of treatment and discriminatory practices will 
be far more direct and ruthless in a world 
incapable of resistance than during a period 



MAY 24, 1941 



631 



when policy and moderation had their useful 
political ends. Under such circumstances the 
conflict of interests would be world-wide. It 
must not be assumed that spheres of influence 
can be logically carried out. This would re- 
sult in an unending struggle to get free from 
political and economic restraint and break 
across the boundaries of isolation. 

Under any circumstances, owing to develop- 
ments during the great war, the monetai-y sit- 
uation presents problems of the first magnitude; 
and breaking the world up into autarchic, self- 
contained spheres would carry the maladjust- 
ment further and introduce such confusion into 
the exchange situation that with the abandon- 
ment of the gold standard by certain principal 
powers the chaos would be irremediable. Raw 
materials, agricultural products, and manufac- 
tured goods would become the true media of 
exchange. In this barter process there would 
result inequality in the value of the world's 
goods. Arbitrary price-fixing by the state, 
whose dictate would be law, would facilitate 
the acquisition of vast quantities of merchan- 
dise far below intrinsic value, inducing chronic 
scarcity in other areas where there was no op- 
portunity to compete. For instance, rubber 
from the Far East may become available to the 
totalitarian states at a fraction of the present 
market price in exchange for goods at abnor- 
mally high barter costs, while none might be 
available to countries of this hemisphere. 

Under a system where goods and goods alone 
are the intrinsic value entering into commer- 
cial intercourse, the utilization of cheap labor 
would play a decisive role. The standard of 
living would be depressed in order to increase 
quantities; and victim states would gradually 
sink to serfdom. It is clear from the nature 
f)f the present struggle and the character of 
the communities in which aggression has had 
its origin that great industrial centers alone are 
in conflict. Agricultural countries have either 
become victims or are destined to succumb in 
some measure to the process of totalitarian, in- 
ternational coordination. In its eventual de- 
velopment the struggle of manufactured goods 
against both agricultural products and raw 



materials will be decided in favor of the first. 
Movements in the exchange of goods, it may be 
admitted, tend to equalize and normalize the 
factors involved, such as price, labor costs, and 
supply and demand; but in giving weight to 
such, considerations, we must remember that 
these factors can operate only in a free and 
competitive world market, where the abnormal 
restraints incident to totalitarian control are 
absent. Besides, an economic hegemony can 
only proceed from and be maintained by an in- 
dustrial community possessing a vast military, 
productive potentiality. This is the pivot upon 
which all is hung. It is idle to contemplate 
entering into trade arrangements with such a 
community without accepting the facts upon 
which the existence of the overlordship is based. 
In any totalitarian order the agricultural and 
raw-material countries will be the subject 
states; and they will have to accept all and 
every condition imposed. 

Trading between blocs as an outgrowth of 
the present world conflict can be nothing less 
than continuous economic warfare, in which 
struggle the free exchange of goods between 
merchants will be eliminated and the whole 
process confined to the governments of the par- 
ticipating states. In the management of this 
trade the role of the master state will be 
supreme, determining jjrices, quantities, terms, 
qualities, and all other conditions entering into 
tlie transaction. Discriminatory practices will 
be carried out with impimity and adopted jaer- 
manently as a right. 

In order to maintain the military supremacy 
on which the totalitarian, economic, and jioliti- 
cal hegemonj' is based, trade in strategic and 
critical materials will receive special treatment, 
tlie evolution of which will be to deprive dem- 
ocratic blocs of supplies which would render 
their ultimate defense more potent. Under 
these circumstances the consummation of 
treaties will be impossible. Every basis of 
negotiation will be destroyed by inherent dis- 
trust and by arbitrary political considerations 
of such gravity and magnitude that interna- 
tional commercial intercourse between existing 
blocs will be reduced to sheer opportunism and 



632 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



exploitatiim. It is true that the record of the 
totalitarian countries before the war demon- 
strated no marked gains in their trade except 
in specific areas, and that while they gained in 
some they lost in others. We might defend 
ourselves at home against competition from 
states employing cheap labor by denying to 
them most-favored-nation treatment or subject- 
ing them to countervailing duties ; but it must 
be remembered that the trade which the totali- 
tarian coimtries sacrificed increasingly after 
1933 in tlie United States and in other coun- 
tries was due to their own choice in deliber- 
ately adopting trade policies inimical to our 
interests and designed specifically to further 
the ends of the total military state. It is 
futile to attempt to make deductions favorable 
to our eventual post-war position by demon- 
strating the inexorable workings of economic 
laws in a world where their operations will be 
suspended by force. 

If the world breaks asunder into blocs, the 
problems become highly complex preeminently 
in the economic field. In Europe the permanent 
authority will remain in those industrial centers 
where the great militai-y machine has been pro- 
duced, exerting an autocratic hegemony over 
states which Iiave been conquered or forcibly 
coordinated. Tlie industrial production thus 
concentrated in the liands of the master state, 
and the process of consolidation going hand in 
hand with a world-wide expansion supported 
by military strength, the economic existence of 
the rest of the world would be permanently on 
the defensive. Under the supreme authority 
achieved, the process of acquiring ownership in 
the industrial establishments of conquered and 
coordinated states is a logical process, which 
carried to its conclusion conceiitrates in the 
hands of the master state an economic unity of 
immense and unprecedented power. Cartels 
c^n be built up not only within the bloc itself 
but may be extended to comprise similar indus- 
tries in another allied bloc, with the control so 
vast that the remaining world production would 
not be an estunable factor. For instance, 
sources of crude rubber under certain eventuali- 
ties could share this fate. Concentration of 



power woidd further be extended by the arbi- 
trary fixing of prices not only of maiuifactured 
goods but of the raw materials and agricultural 
products taken in exchange. The national debt, 
the steady costs of armaments and of military 
establishments would be liquidated through the 
wealth derived from conquered states. The sys- 
tem of trade founded on exploitation of labor 
at home and abroad and on the unequal ad- 
vantage obtained in the exchange of goods would 
steadily enrich the master state, setting up a new 
feudal aristocracy of enriched overlords, mili- 
tary chieftains, and the all-powerful ruler — the 
fulfillment of the theory of race. 

Thus, in a system of closed economy, with the 
totalitarian aims brought to their logical con- 
clusion, the process of exploiting the conquered 
and coordinated states would be carried out in 
deadly earnest. The general rationalization of 
productive labor in all affected countries would 
begin. Cheaper productive costs would be ob- 
tained by decrease in wages and lower standards 
of living. Community life in agricultural and 
raw-material-producing countries would be fur- 
ther simplified by abridgment in educational 
facilities, curtailment of welfare establishments, 
abolition of national youth organizations, and 
other cultural and nationalistic movements con- 
sidered inimical to the newly established order. 

Vast systems of transportation would be or- 
ganized under control of the master state. 
Railroads of all contiguous countries would be 
put under one management and operated as a 
single unit in order to assure the maximum of 
efficiency. Transport on inland waterways, air 
service, postal service, and other public utilities 
would be in the control of the central authorities. 

The final process in the bloc would bring 
about the rationalization' of industry itself to 
the highest point of efficiency, while the econ- 
omies of controlled areas would be reestablished 
on a complementary basis. Competing indus- 
tries in other countries would be destroyed, 
transferred, or taken over. Readjustments 
would be made in agricultural production on 
the basis of a general scheme to meet the needs 
of the master state. In short, a vast system of 
planned economy would extend throughout the 



633 



entire bloc with pressure exerted on the con- 
quered and the coordinated states to subordi- 
nate their economies and processes to the major 
plan of building up a centralized super-state, 
of which the purpose would be the ever-increas- 
ing extension of military and economic power. 
The system of economic penetration employed, 
however, to coordinate countries outside of the 
bloc merits closer studj'. It must be borne in 
mind that the position of the democracies and 
totalitarian states, vis-a-vis each other, is un- 
equal in certain vital characteristics. The lat- 
ter employ methods in their dealings not in 
accord with rules of conduct laid down in in- 
ternational law and in observing comity among 
nations. It is permitted to hit below the belt 
and take any advantage which may be obtained 
either by fair and open dealings or by sub- 
terfuge and pretense. The results justify the 
means, however violent those means might be. 

If totalitarian trade penetration was accom- 
plished through fair competition, where the 
accepted standards of commercial rivalry were 
the deciding factors, countries like the United 
States could accept the challenge with equa- 
nimity. Or again, if international trade, as 
conducted by the totalitarian states, was lim- 
ited to the exchange of goods, other countries 
participating in these transactions could defend 
their commercial interests. But the methods 
are more subtle than those indicated; and the 
ends in view far transcend that of obtaining 
an advantageous commercial bargain. 

Totalitarian states proceed in their relations 
with other countries with the aim of accom- 
plishing a total program : economic, political, 
and military. The first is the opening wedge 
by which the relations are established ; the sec- 
ond creates followers and adherents which in 
certain instances, as we have already seen, 
bring about a change of government; the last 
step accomplishes a military tie-up, according 
to which the totalitarian state obtains strategic 
advantages. 

Those countries which have surpluses and 
no markets are the most ready victims of totali- 
tarian methods. They are offered higher prices 
than commonly obtained in free markets, at- 



tractive terms, and the assurance of steady 
trade. Though the transaction is on a barter 
basis, both parties derive real advantages. The 
totalitarian state, controlling labor costs and 
in most instances the prices of raw materials, 
offers manufactured goods in exchange at ad- 
vantageous values both to itself and to the 
partner in the transaction. Wliere there is 
danger of formidable competition, or where 
opposing political influences of a third state 
might impede such transactions, a large number 
of agents are secretly set to work to attack 
the prestige and integrity of the competing 
state, undermine the standing of those friendly 
to the rival, and eventually by threats and 
bribes secure an advantageous position in the 
government concei'ued. 

The passive attitude which democratic na- 
tions have assumed in the past toward programs 
of aggression pursued by totalitarian countries 
and their world-wide application in interna- 
tional trade of the self-sufficiency policy, has 
resulted in an extensive entrenchment of these 
forces, which calls for more realistic analysis by 
American business of the present international 
problems and of the eventual consequences. No 
one can forecast the possible shifts in the ulti- 
mate alignment of the potential factors involved 
in this struggle, or at what point the engulfment 
of totalitarian economic penetration will be ar- 
rested or turned back. We must anticipate the 
extension of this system in wider areas of the 
world's surface, in regions where similar poli- 
cies have already been adopted or are in the 
making. If, as the result of the maximum ef- 
fort of defense which our Nation chooses to 
make during this critical period of the world's 
history, we shall eventually find our position 
with that of our neighbors shrunk to the con- 
fines of this hemisphere, reorganization of our 
vast industrial processes on the basis of un- 
precedented economic stringency will neces- 
sarily take place. In order to ameliorate the 
impact of this intra-evolutionary industrial 
process in the western world, it would seem 
that our minimum effort would have to accom- 
plish at least the preservation of our interna- 
tional trade with the other English-speaking 



634 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



countries and indispensable sources of raw ma- 
terials outside of this hemisphere. Tliis in- 
volves the freedom of the seas and of the main- 
tenance thereon of the highways of interna- 
tional commerce. From this goal we dare not 
turn back ! 

Industrial and agricultural developments in 
this country, in Canada, and in the republics 
of Latin America, which have been going for- 
ward from the middle of the seventeenth cen- 
tury, have not been predicated on world events 
imposing hemispheric isolation. The whole 
economy of the western world has been based 
upon a system of free private enterprise, the 
gold standard, and liberal trade methods in 
international commerce. In this respect we are 
bound to resist to the utmost basic changes ! 
The strength of our position lies in the irre- 
sistible potentialities we possess, namely, the 
concentration of vast economic, financial, and 
industrial resources in the United States and 
our association with a group of friendly nations 
on a plane of equality committed to a policy 
of mutual support and helpfulness. We must 
assure the supplies of raw materials essential 
to our industries. If these were controlled by 
hostile blocs, the conditions and prices under 
which they became available would leave us no 
other choice than to manufacture substitutes or 
do without. No nation in the world is more 
dependent, for instance, on crude rubber than 
the United States. Our whole process of life, 
being a nation on wheels, is built around the 
automobile, of which the elimination, or mak- 
ing it so expensive as to be out of the reach 
of the ordinary citizen, would be a national 
catastrophe. 

The dependence of the United States and 
agricultural comitries of this hemisphere on 
European markets for the disposal of their 
products will persist whether Europe is con- 
trolled by a self-sufficiency bloc or not. If th.e 
process of international disintegration gives 
rise to such a bloc, the dilemma is clear : either 
such countries must submit to foreign exploi- 
tation or undergo economic readjustment so far- 
reaching and radical as to disrupt economic 
processes over a long period of time. The sacri- 



fices which nations ai-e prepared to make in na- 
tional emergencies are different from those they 
are willing to bear in times of peace. If the na- 
tions of this hemisphere were compelled to adjust 
their international commercial relations among 
themselves so as to face a combination of for- 
eign blocs committed to self-sufficiency and to- 
talitarian methods, government would have to 
take over such trade. In the absence of a com- 
mon monetary standard, such trade would be 
on a barter basis with resultant confusion, dis- 
crimination, and instability characteristic of 
such practices. We have embarked upon a pro- 
gi-am of economic collaboration with countries 
of Latin America which has been widely dis- 
cussed and commented upon in all its phases and 
needs no further elaboration here. However, 
nothing is more important at this time than con- 
tinued progress in maintaining in this hemi- 
sphere the liberal trade principles incorporated 
in the trade-agreements program sponsored by 
the Secretary of State. Whatever is the out- 
come of the world contlict, collaboration and 
inter-American solidarity will enable all the 
nations of this hemisphere to stand together and 
face with confidence the task of world economic 
and political reconstruction. 

Finally, let me point out that the effects of 
a system of closed economy and totalitarian 
self-sufficiency in the world along the lines al- 
ready projected by the protagonists of those 
schemes would have devastating consequences 
in this country. The measure of disadvantage 
would not only extend to the general loss of 
our export and import markets in countries 
conti'olled by the totalitarians, but we would 
be forced, together with the other countries of 
tlie Americas, into far-reaching dislocations of 
our industrial and agricultural econonaies. 
This grave possibility has been widely con- 
templated and more widely discussed by those 
comjietent to evaluate the economic potentiali- 
ties of our country. 

Decisions made today will determine the fu- 
ture of this hemisphere for generations to come. 
It would be fatal to the welfare of these con- 
tinents if we were compelled to adopt methods 
which would slowly undermine our common 



MAY 24, 1941 



635 



prosperity and our democratic way of life. 
Unless we act in time this country may be 
faced, alone in the realm of international trade, 
with insuperable problems of supreme impor- 
tance, finding means, namely, to compensate 
in this liemis^Dhere the loss of overseas markets ; 
to readjust agricultural industries to tit the 
pattern of self-sufficiency; to retain liberal in- 
ternational-trade policies in a world committed 
to discriminatory practices; to adhere to gold 
as an international medium of exchange when 
a great sector of the trading-world is operat- 
ing on fictitious monetary standards; and to 
maintain price structure when labor costs and 
prices of raw materials are fixed by the dic- 
tator's will. 

A just contemplation of the world position 
rightly poses the question : whether the deadly 
peril confronting this Nation lies more in the 
vicissitudes of the struggle itself or in the 
cancerous post-war economical pi'ocesses of a 
Punic peace. 



notable occasion and my best wishes for Your 
Majesty's health and happiness. 

Franklin D Koosevelt" 



The Near East 



RETUKN OF EMPEROR OF ETHIOPIA 
TO ADDIS ABABA 

[Released to the press May 20] 

The President has sent the following message 
to His Imperial Majesty Haile Selassie I, Em- 
peror of Ethiopa : 

"Mat 20, 1941. 
"I have received Your Majesty's message ^'' 
informing me of your return to Addis Ababa, 
and I assure you of the satisfaction with which 
I have received these tidings. On behalf of the 
people and Government of the United States I 
have great pleasure in extending to Your 
Majesty my most sincere felicitations on this 



American Republics 



' Not printed herein. 



INTER - AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT 
COMMISSION : ECUADORAN COUNCIL 

[Released to tlie press by the OflSce for Coordination of Com- 
mercial and Cultural Relations Between the American 
Republics May 22] 

Nelson A. Rockefeller, Coordinator of Com- 
mercial and Cultural Relations Between the 
American Republics, announced on May 22 the 
membership of the Ecuadoran National Coun- 
cil, the ninth of 21 councils being established 
by the Inter-American Development Commis- 
sion in its program for the stimulation of trade 
among the American republics. Mr. Rocke- 
feller is Chairman of the Development Com- 
mission. 

The Ecuadoran Council is headed by Dr. 
Antonio Quevedo, foi'iiier Ecuadoran Minister 
of Foreign Affairs, and Director of the Central 
Bank of Ecuador. The other members include : 

Jiiaii Marcos, as vice chairman. SeBor IVIarcos is a 
prominent banker, industrialist, and agriculturist. 

Ingeniero Carlos Freile Larrea, former Minister of 
Finance, and now Director of Central Bank of 
Ecuador. 

Clemeute Yerovi, President of the Banco Hipotecario 
del Ecuador. 

Enrique Coloma Silva, Director General de Minerla y 
Petroleo. 

Dr. L. Neftali Ponce, of the Ministry of Foreign Af- 
fairs, as secretary of the Ecuadoran Council. 

Arrangements for the establishment of the 
Comicil were completed in Quito, where an in- 
itial meeting has been held. Similar councils 
composed of outstanding business, professional, 
and technical men have been fonned in Brazil, 
Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, Chile, Bolivia, 
Peru, and Colombia. 



636 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtlLLETm 



Europe 



SURVIVORS OF THE S. S. "ZAMZAM" 

[Released to the press May 21] 

The American Ambassador to France, Ad- 
miral William D. Leahy, reported to the De- 
partment of State the morning of May 21 that 
the American Consul at Bordeaux, Mr. Henry 
S. Waterman, had telephoned the Embassy as 
follows : 

"American survivors from Zamzam at Saint 
Jean de Luz 62 men, 53 women, 25 children 
under 11. Am leavmg immediately and will 
report fully. German naval authorities have 
no objection American survivors leaving via 
Spain, Portugal." 

The American Charge d'Aifaires at Berlin, 
Leland B. Morris, cabled the Department of 



State the morning of May 21 that the German 
news bureau that morning carried the follow- 
ing item : 

"It is stated in official circles that a warship 
captured the steamer Zamzam which, was carry- 
ing war material for England in the middle 
of April in accordance with prize law and sunk 
it after rescuing the crew and passengers. The 
passengers have now been landed in a west 
French port by a German merchant ship." 

The American Consul in Boi'deaux has re- 
ported to the Department that the majority of 
the American citizens who were rescued from 
the Zamzam are safe and well at Biarritz. 
Eight other American citizens are said to be 
en route to Bordeaux. 

The Consul also reported that Ned Laugh- 
inghouse, of Wilson, N. C, and Francis J. 
Vicovari, of New York, N. Y., had been 
wounded and had remained in the hospital on 
board the German vessel. 



Cultural Relations 



EXCHANGE OF PROFESSORS, TEACHERS, AND 
GRADUATE STUDENTS 



The Department of State, in conjunction with 
the United States Office of Education in the 
Federal Security Agency, administers the of- 
ficial exchange of professors, teachers, and grad- 
uate students between the Governments of the 
United States and the other American republics 
M-hich have ratified the Convention for Inter- 
American Cultural Relations.^^ 

The convention, signed on December 23, 1936 
by the United States and the 20 other American 
republics at the Inter-American Conference for 
the Maintenance of Peace held in Buenos Aii-es, 



" Treaty Series 028. 



provides for the biennial exchange of one pro- 
fessor and the annual exchange of two teachers 
or graduate students between the United States 
and each of the other republics which has 
ratified this convention. To date, the Govern- 
ments of Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, 
the Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Haiti, 
Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Para- 
guay, Peru, Venezuela, and the United States 
have ratified the convention. 

Founded upon the thesis that peace and 
orderly progress is best grounded upon the 
mutual understanding of the fundamental so- 
cial, political, and economic ideals among peo- 



MAY 24, 1941 



637 



pies of all nations, the exchange program is 
designed to make available to the peoples of 
the other American republics a more accurate 
l<iiowledge of the progress of science, the hu- 
manities, and the technology of the United 
Stales, and, in receiving the visiting professore, 
teachers, and graduate students from those na- 
tions, to attain a similar dift'usion in this country 
of the intellectual attainments of their peoples. 
The United States, in fulfilling its obligations 
assumed by ratification of the convention, is 
carrying on a program definitely educational in 
character directed toward the development of a 
truer and more realistic luiderstanding between 
the people of the United States and their neigh- 
bors to the south. 

Leaflets and application forms explaining 
the provisions of the convention have been 
distributed by the Office of Education to the 
colleges, universities, scientific institutions, and 
technical schools of this country for professors, 
teachers,^^ and graduate students interested in 
submitting applications for official exchange 
professorshijjs and fellowships. These ex- 
changes are available to professors, teachers, 
or graduate students in library science, the 
humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, 
luw, medicine, pharmacy, journalism, technol- 
ogy, and engineering. All preliminary work 
in the selection of nominees for professorships 
and fellowships is handled by the Office of 
p]ducation, which receives the applications of 
candidates. Inquiries concerning further de- 
tails should be addressed to the United States 
Office of Education, Federal Security Agency, 
Washington, D.C. 

No limitation as to color, sex, or creed will 
be made in the nominations for the exchange 
posts. The utmost possible latitude has been 
allowed in the field of intellectual activity in 
which professors, teachers, and students may 
engage, to encourage applications from those 
interested in any field of learning for which 
facilities may exist in the country in which the 
applicant is interested. Prospective exchange 



"^ "Teachers" as distinguished from "professors" is 
understood to refer to teachers in primary or sec- 
ondary schools. 



professors or teachers and students are required 
to describe a particular project of lectures or 
of research or study in the country for which 
application is made. Appropriate information 
from qualified persons given as references as 
to the value of the undertaking and the abil- 
ity of the individual to carry it out, will also 
be required. Similar statements attested to by 
recognized instructors should indicate the fel- 
lowship applicant's ability to do independent 
study. An adviser in the United States on 
their research project is required of the ap- 
plicants for the fellowships. 

Specific requisites adopted by the Govern- 
ment as qualifications for applicants include 
proof of American citizenship, good health, 
and, in the case of teachers or graduate stu- 
dents, references as to good moral character 
and intellectual ability, together with suitable 
personal qualities. 

Graduate students api:)lying for fellowships 
must be under 35 years of age and must 
have a practical reading, writing, and sjDeaking 
knowledge of the language of the country for 
which application is made. At the time of 
making application, the student or teacher must 
have initiated his program of graduate study, 
although in exceptional cases, a selection may 
be made from those who have completed a four- 
year course. 

In order to be eligible for an exchange pro- 
fessorship an applicant must occupy a position 
of professorial rank in a college, university, or 
technical institution and must have done schol- 
arly work in the field of his specialization. A 
list of the professor's publications in the field in 
which he expects to teach will be required. 
Ability to lecture in the language of the country 
for which application is made is desirable; how- 
ever, candidates for Braz'l will be considei'ed 
if they offer Spanish or French instead of 
Portuguese. 

The Government of the United States pre- 
pares, from the applications received for the 
student- or teacher-exchange fellowships, a 
panel of five names for each of the countries 
with which it has entered into the exchange 
relationship. From this list of five, the receiv- 



638 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



iiig government selects two to whom the award 
will be granted. 

From the applications received for exchange 
professorehips, a complete list of professors 
available for exchange service from the tnit- 
standing universities, scientific institutions, and 
technological schools of the country is prepared 
and communicated by the United States to each 
of the other governments each alternate year. 
From this list each of the other countries selects 
a visiting professor, who will give lectures in 
various centers, conduct regular courses of in- 
struction, or pursue sj)ecial research in some 
designated institution, and who, it is expected, 
will in other appropriate ways promote better 
understanding between the nations cooperating. 
Preference is given to teaching rather than to 
research work in the selection of nominees. 

Expenses involved in the exchange program 
are shared by the participating governments. 
In the case of fellowships, the nominating 
government pays the round-trip travel costs to 
the country chosen, together with such expenses 
as may be incidental to the travel of the gradu- 
ate students or teachers selected. The receiv- 
ing government pays tuition and subsidiary 
expenses, together with board and lodging, at 
the institution designated. Exchange fellow- 
ships cover a single academic year. Under ex- 
ceptional circumstances, they may be renewed 
for one additional year. 

All expenses incident to the exchiinge of pro- 
fessors are met by the sending government. 
Such, expenses include travel to and from the 
country to which exchange professors are sent, 
as well as maintenance and local travel costs 
during the period of residence in the foreign 
country. The term of an exchange professor 
will not exceed two years, unless he shall have 
been included on the next list after first being 
selected, and thereafter again selected. By 
agreement between the two interested govern- 
ments, the term of an exchiinge professor may 
be limited to less than two years and another 
selection made from the current list. Vacancies 
caused by the voluntary withdrawal of an 
exchange professor or by his death or inability 
to continue service, will likewise be filled from 
the current list. 



EXCHANGES OF ART EXHIBITS 

Two plans for the exchange of art exhibits 
in the field of cultural relations have recently 
been completed. In the United States the 
Office for Coordination of Commercial and Cul- 
tuial Relations Between the American Repub- 
lics has collected three groups of paintings by 
contemporary artists to be sent on tours to 
other American republics. In Cliile the In- 
stituto de Informacion Campesina of the Junta 
de Exportacion Agricola has assembled a 
group of sketches bj^ rural cliildren for exhi- 
bition at tlie international conference of the 
New Education Fellowship at the University 
of Michigan. 

The tliree groups of paintings by artists of 
the United States comprise more than 200 oil 
paintings and 100 water colors. An exhibi- 
tion of the first group will be held in Buenos 
Aires at the end of June. Subsequently, the 
paintings will be sliown at Rosario, Argentina ; 
Montevideo, Uruguay; and Rio de Janeiro and 
Sao Paulo, Brazil. The second group of paint- 
ings will be exhibited at about the same time 
in jMexico City. This group will then be sent 
to Santiago, Chile, for an opening on Septem- 
ber 1 in conjiuiction with the festival of the 
four-hundredth anniversary of the founding 
of Santiago. Subsequently, this exliibition 
will be shown in Lima, Peru, and in Quito, 
Ecuador. The third group of paintings will 
open in Bogota, Colombia, in the middle of 
July and will later be sent to Caracas, Vene- 
zuela, and Habana, Cuba. 

A special liandbook, entitled "Contemporary 
Painting in the United States", prepared to 
accompany the exhibitions, includes 5 color re- 
productions, 130 half-tones, biographical notes, 
and a bibliography. Twenty-five thousand 
copies have been printed in Spanish and 5,000 
in Portuguese. 

In the announcement of the exhibit it is 
stated that "the pictures have been selected on 
a basis of esthetic quality, but at the same time 
consideration was given to the subject matter 
in order to select subjects that would be of 
greatest interest to our neighbors. The lend- 
ers of the paintings have considered cultural 



MAY 2 4, 1941 



639 



exchanges between the Aniericiin republics of 
sucli importance that they have generously 
stripped their galleries of their most prized 
woi-ks of outstanding artists of the United 
States." 

The exhibit of children's art, which is to be 
shown at Ann Arbor, Mich., from July 6 to 12, 
1941, has been forwarded to the University of 
Micliigan through the cooperation of the Amer- 
ican Embassy in Santiago. The sketches were 
selected from a collection of more than 2,000 
drawings submitted by children studying in the 
rural schools of Chile. In selecting the 
sketches particular consideration was given to 
those which displayed the greatest originality 
and to those which depicted scenes of the life 
of the children. 

ACTIVITIES OF THE CHILE-UNITED 
STATES CULTURAL INSTITUTE 

A recent despatch to the Department from 
the American Embassy in Santiago contains 
the information that the Chile-United States 
Cultui'al Institute has inaugurated a series of 
three English classes weekly. The lessons are 
being offered on a free basis to persons desiring 
to acquire a knowledge of English. 

Recently it was announced over the Insti- 
tute's radio hour that anyone desiring to ex- 
change Spanish lessons for English lessons 
should communicate with the Institute. As 
many as 107 Chileans have already applied and 
more are registering daily. As it was impos- 
sible to find enough people speaking English 
who were willing to exchange individual Eng- 
lish lessons, it was decided that three classes of 
about 30 persons would be given. 

Mrs. W. Rex Crawford is giving her serv- 
ices to conduct these classes and is being assisted 
by a number of exchange students. Mrs. Craw- 



ford is the wife of Prof. W. R«x Crawford of 
the University of Pennsylvania, who is at pres- 
ent serving as an exchange professor in Chile 
under the terms of the Buenos Aire's Conven- 
tion of 1936 for the Promotion of Inter- Ameri- 
can Cultural Relations. 



International Conferences, 
Commissions, Etc. 



EIGHTH PAN AMERICAN CHILD 
CONGRESS 

[Released to Uie pi'ess May 24] 

Official invitations on behalf of the President 
have now been extended by the Department of 
State to the governments of the other 20 Ameri- 
can republics to participate officially in the 
Eighth Pan American Child Congi-ess, which 
will be in session in Washington, D. C, from 
March 28 to April 4, 1942." 

Tlie Organizing Committee, with the collabo- 
ration of the Pan American Union, the Pan 
American Sanitary Bureau, the American In- 
ternational Institute for the Protection of 
Childhood, and interested officials of the Gov- 
enunent departments and private oi-ganizations, 
is formulating plans for the Congi-ess. The 
program will be announced within the near 
future. 

A meeting of the Organizing Committee was 
Jield May 24. 



'■'Sm> (he /iidlctiii (.f May 3, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 97), 
lip. 533-534. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



(COMMERCE 

INTER-AMERICAN COFFEE AGREEMENT 

On May 21, 1941, the President signed an 
Executive order establishing conversion factors 
for use in administering the quotas on imports 
of coffee established pursuant to the Inter- 
American Coffee Agreement signed on Novem- 
ber 28, 1940. The text of the Executive order 
follows : 

Executive Ordek 
Establishing Conversion Factors for Use in 
Administering Quotas on Imports of Coffee 

Wheiseas the entry for consumption of coffee 
in the United States is limited to the quotas 
provided for in the Inter-American Coffee- 
Agreement signed on November 28, 1940; and 

Whereas such quotas are expressed in terms 
of bags of 60 kilograms net, or equivalent quan- 
tities; and 

AVhereas the term "bags of 60 kilograms net" 
is applicable only to raw (gi-een) coffee; and 

Whereas it is necessary and desirable that 
provision be made for determining the equiv- 
alent of a bag of coffee of 60 kilograms net in 
terms of pounds, and for determining the weight 
of roasted coffee in terms of the weight of raw 
(green) coffee: 

Now, THEREFORE, by Virtue of the authority 
vested in me by section 2 of the joint resolution 
of Congress approved April 11, 1941 (Public 
Law 33, 77th Cong., 1st Sess.), I hereby estab- 
lish the following con^'ersion factors for use in 
administering the quotas on imports of coffee 
provided for in the said agreement : 

1. One bag of 60 kilograms of coffee shall be 
considered to be the equivalent of 132.276 pounds 
of coffee. 
640 



2. One pound of roasted coffee shall be con- 
sidered to be the equivalent of 1.2 pounds of 
raw (green) coffee. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 
The White House, 
May 21, 19^1. 

[No. 8758] 
EXTRADITION 

SUPPLEMENTARY TREATY WITH ECUADOR 

On May 19, 1941 the President issued his 
proclamation of the supplementary extradition 
treaty between the United States and Ecuador 
signed at Quito on September 22, 1939, by Mr. 
Boaz Long, American Minister to Ecuador, and 
Julio Tobar Donoso, Minister of Foreign 
Affairs of Ecuador. 

An extradition treaty between the United 
States and Ecuador signed on June 28, 1872 
(Treaty Series 79) is still in force. The pres- 
ent supplementary extradition treaty adds a 
large nmnber of crimes to tliose enumerated 
in the treaty of 1872, and makes an extraditable 
offense of participation in, as an accessory 
before or after the fact or an attempt to com- 
mit, any of the crimes enumerated in either the 
treaty of 1872 or the supplementary treaty. 
The supplementary treaty is made an integral 
part of the treaty of 1872. 

The Senate gave its advice and consent to 
ratification of the supplementary treaty on No- 
vember 26. 1940. It was ratified by the Presi- 
dent on December 20, 1940 and by Ecuador on 
December 11, 1940. The ratifications of the 
two Governments were exchanged at Washing- 
ton on January 23, 1941, and the treaty under 
its terms will come into effect 10 days after the 
President's proclamation thereof, namely, on 
May 29, 1941. 



MAY 24, 1941 

INDIAN AFFAIRS 

CONVENTION PROVIDING FOR THE CREATION 
OF AN INTER-AMERICAN INDIAN INSTITUTE 

Nicwragua 

By a note dated May 10, 1941, the Mexican 
Ambassador at Washington informed the Sec- 
retary of State that the adherence by Nica- 
ragua to the Convention Providing for the 
Creation of an Inter-American Indian Insti- 
tute, wliich was opened for signature at Mexico 
City on November 1, 19-10, was notified to the 
Mexican Government by a communication 
from the Minister for Foreign Affairs of Nica- 
ragua dated April 18, 1941. 

The Ambassador's note states that the con- 
vention has now been signed by tlie United 
States of America, Bolivia, Costa Rica, Cuba, 
Ecuador, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, and 
Peru. 

SOVEREIGNTY 

CONVENTION ON THE PROVISIONAL ADMIN- 
ISTRATION OF EUROPEAN COLONIES AND 
POSSESSIONS IN THE AMERICAS 

Pamumi 

By a letter dated May 15, 1941, the Director 
General of the Pan American Union informed 
the Secretary of State that the instrument of 
ratification by Panama of the Convention on 
the Provisional Administration of European 
Colonies and Possessions in the Americas, 
signed at the Second Meeting of the Ministers 
of Foreign Affairs of the American Republics 
at Habana, July 30, 1940. was deposited with 
the Union on May 13, 1941. The instrument 
of ratification is dated April 30, 1941. 

POSTAL 

AGREEMENT CONCERNING PARCEL POST, 
POSTAL UNION OF THE AMERICAS AND 
SPAIN 

According to the terms of article 13 of the 
Agreement Concerning Parcel Post signed at 
the Fourth Congress of the Postal Union of 
the Americas and Spain held at Panama in 
December 1936, the agreement may be modified 
in the interval which transpires between con- 



641 

grasses, following the procedure established by 
the Convention of the Universal Postal Union 
in force. In order to become effective the mod- 
ifications must obtain unanimity of votes if 
it is a question of introducing new provisions 
or modifying the provisions of article 13 or 
articles 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, and 9. 

By a note dated May 14, 1941, the Uru- 
guayan Minister at Washington informed this 
Government of the amendments to the agree- 
ment proposed by the Department of Mails 
and Telegraphs of Brazil, which have been ap- 
proved by all the parties concerned. 

A translation of the Minister's note contain- 
ing the amendments, which are i^rinted in ital- 
ics, follows : 

"Legation of Uruguay, 
Washington, D. C. 
"Mr. Secretary or State: 

"I have the honor to inform Your Excellency 
tliat I have received instructions from my Gov- 
ernment to bring the following to the knowl- 
edge of Your Excellency : 

"The Director of the International Office of 
the Postal Union of the Americas and Spain, 
with headquarters at Montevideo, has notified 
this Chancellery that the amendments to the 
Agreement relative to Parcel Post signed at 
Panama on December 22, 1936, proposed by the 
Department of Mails and Telegi^aphs of Brazil, 
have been approved by the unanimous vote of 
the parties concerned. The Brazilian proposal 
was sent to all the administrations of the Postal 
Union of the Americas and Spain by circular 
note number 4390, of July 2, 1940. 

"Articles 3, 4 and 8 of the Panama Parcel- 
Post Agreement are worded in the following 
way: 

" 'Article 3, number 2 : [The division of 
weight for parcels will be the following:] Up 
to 1 kilogram; from 1 to 3 kUograms; from 3 
to 5 kilograms; fi-om 5 to 10 kilograms; from 
10 to 15 kilograms ; from 15 to 20 kilograms. 

" 'Articxe 4, NUMBER 2 : The rates of origin, 
transit and destination are fixed for each coun- 
ti'y in gold francs or their equivalent, as fol- 
lows : 25 centimes for parcels up to 1 kilogram ; 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Jfi centimes for 'parcels from 1 to 3 kilograms; 
50 centimes for 'parcels from 3 to 5 kilograms; 
100 centimes for parcels from 5 to 10 kilograms ; 
150 centimes for parcels from 10 to 15 kilo- 
grams; 200 centimes for parcels from 15 to 20 
kilograms. 

'"Article 8, number 1, paragraph 2: The 
sender will be entitled on that account to an 
ijulenniity equivalent to the actual amount of 
loss, rifling or damage. This indemnity may not 
exceed: 10 gold francs for each parcel up to 1 
kilogram; 13 gold francs for each parcel from 
1 to 3 kilograms; 2S gold francs for each parcel 
from, 3 to 6 kilograms ; 40 gold francs for each 
parcel from 5 to 10 kilograms; 55 gold fi'ancs 
for each parcel from 10 to 15 kilograms ; 70 gold 
fi-ancs for each parcel from 15 to 20 kilograms. 

" 'The changes adopted will not take effect 
for at least three months after notification 
thereof (Article 23 of the Universal Postal 
Convention). 

"The provisions of Article 13 of the said 
Agreement having been complied with, and in 
virtue of Article 22 of the Convention of the 
Universal Postal Union, which applies in this 
case, the Government of Uruguay must make 
known to the other Governments the amend- 
ments approved, so that they may take effect 
accordingly. 

"Accept [etc.] J. Kichling 

"Mat 14, 1941." 



Regulations 



The following Government regulations may 
be of interest to readers of the Bulletin; 

Registration and Fingerprinting of Aliens in Ac- 
cordance With the Aliens Registration Act, 1940: 
Amended Regulations Governing Registration Officers 
and Places of Registration. May 22, 1941. (Depart- 
ment of Justice : Immigration and Naturalization Serv- 
ice.) [File No. 2-7.] Federal Reyister. May 24, 1941 
(vol. 6, no. 1(12), p. 256U. 

Silver and Black Fox Quota : Declaration of the 
Secretary of the Treasury Pursuant to the Supple- 
mentary Trade Agreement With Canada Signed on 
December 13. 1940 (T. D. 50295), Determining the 



Quota of Silver or Black Foxes Valued at Le.ss Than 
.$250 Each and Whole Silver or Black Fox Furs and 
Skins (With or Without Paws, Tails, or Heads) With- 
out Reference to the Country of Exportation, Which 
Jlay Be Entered, or Withdrawn From Warehouse, for 
Consumption During the Period May 1 to November 
;». 11141. May Iti, 1941. (Treasury Department: 
Bureau of Customs.) [T. D. .50390.] Federal Regis- 
ter, May 21, 1941 (vol. G, no. 99), p. 2507. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Naval Mission : Agreement Between the United 
States of America and Venezuela — Signed March 24, 
1941: effective March 24. 1941. Executive Agreement 
Scries 20!^. Publication 1.597. 11 pp. 5«*. 



Legislation 



Purchase and Charter of Foreign-owned Vessels : 
Hearings Before the Committee on Merchant Marine 
and Fisheries. Hon.se of Representatives. 77th Cong.. 
1st .sess., on H. R. 40.S8, a Bill To Authorize the United 
States Maritime Connni.ssion To Charter and Purchase 
Available Vessels of Domestic and Foreign Registry 
and To Provide Necessary Insurance and Reinsurance 
for Such Vessels and Their Operations; and H. J. Res. 
107, a Resolution Authorizing the Purchase of Foreign 
Merchant Vessels for National Defense, and for Other 
Purposes. April 17, 22, and 23, 1941. [Includes state- 
ment by Assistant Secretary of State, Breckinridge 
Long.] iv, 150 pp. 

Purchase and Charter of Foreign Merchant Vessels 
tor National Defen.se: Hearings Before the Committee 
on Commerce, United States Senate, 77th Cong., 1st 
sess., on S. J. Res. 67, a Joint Resolution Authorizing 
the Purchase of Foreign Merchant Vessels for National 
Defense, and for Other Purpo.ses; and H. R. 4466, an 
Act To Authorize the Acquisition by the LTnited States 
of Title to or the Use of Domestic or Foreign Merchant 
Vessels for Urgent Needs of Commerce and National 
Defense, and for Other Purposes. May 1, 7, S, and 12, 
l!i41. [Incorporates letter from the Secretary of State 
to Senator Bailey, dated May 1, 1941, commenting on 
the proposed legislation.] iv. 143 pp. 



MAY 24, 1941 



643 



Additional Urgent Deficiency Appioiiiiiiticm Bill, 
Fiscal Year 1941: 

Hearings Before tlie Subcommittee of tlie Com- 
mittee on Appropriations, United States Senate, 77tli 
Cong., 1st sess., ou H. R. 4e&<l, a Bill Making 
Appropriations To Supply Additional Urgent Defi- 
ciencies in Certain Appropriations for the Fiscal Year 
Ending June 30, 1941, and for Other Purposes. 
[Ma.v 13, 1941.1 [Department of Slate, pp. .-)-]4.| 
ii, 30 pp. 

S. Kept. .'ill.'. 77th Cong.. 1st sess., on H, R. 4669. 
- Pl>- 

Departments of State, Commerce, and Justice, and 
llie Federal Judiciary Appropriation Bill for 1942: 

Hearings Before the Subcommittee of the Com- 
mittee on Appropriations, United States Senate, 
77th Cong., 1st sess., on H. R. 4276, a Bill Making 
Appropriations for the Department of State, tlie 
Department of Commerce, the Department of Jus- 
tice, and the Federal Judiciary, for the Fiscal Year 
Ending June 30, 1942, and for Other Purposes. 
[April 30, 1941.] [Department of State, pp. 1-87.] 
ii, 289 pp. 

S. Rept. 311, 77th C<ing., 1st .sess., ou H.U, 427ii. 
7 pp. 

Supervision and Detention of Certain Aliens : Heat 
ings Before Sulicomniittee No. 2 of the Committee 
nil tlie Judiciary, House of Representatives, 77th Cong., 
1st .sess., on H. R. 3. a Bill To Invest the Circuit Courts 
of Appeals of the United Slates With Original ana 
Exclusive Jurisdiction To Review the Order of Deten- 
tion of Any Alien Ordered Deported From the United 
States Whose Deportation or Departure From the 
United States Otherwise Is Not Effectuated Within 
90 Days After the Date the Warrant of Deportation 
Shall Have Become Final : To Authorize Such Deten- 



lion Orders in Certain Cases; To Provide Places for 
Such Detention; and For Other Purposes. Subse- 
(piently Amended and Reported as a Bill To Provide 
for Supervision and Detention of Certain Deportable 
.Miens; To Establish a Board ft>r the Suiiervision of 
Deportable Aliens: To Provide for the R^cWef «f 
Certain Aliens fnim lieport.-ilioii and For Other 
Purposes : 

March 19, 1941. Serial No. 2. pp. iv, 1-25. 

[Recommitted to the Ciunniittee on the Judiciary 
April 18. 1941] April 21, 22, 25, and 30, and May 2 
and 5, 1941. Serial No. 2— Part II. pp. vi, 27-202. 

Royalty Payments : Hearings Before the Committee 
on Patents, House of Repre.sentatives, 77th Cong., 1st 
.seas., on H.J. Res. 32, II.J. Ites. 73, tiiid H.J. Res. 
123, Joint Resolutions To Define the Principle of 
International Reciprocity in tlie Protection of Ameri- 
can Patents, Trade-marks, Secret Formulas and Proc- 
esses, and Copyrights by Providing a Method For 
Assuring the Payments of Amounts Due to Persons 
in the United States From Users Thereof in Countries 
Restricting International Payments From Their Terri- 
tories. April 15, 1941. iv, 74 pp. 

Amending Section 204 (a) of the Sugar Act of 
1937. (H. Rept. 614, 77th Cong., 1st sess., ou H. R. 
35S2. ) 6 pp. 

Amending Section 204 of tlie Sugar Act of 1937. (S. 
Rept. 338, Parts 1 and 2, 77th Cong., 1st sess., on 
S. 937.) [Adverse report and minority views.] [In- 
cludes a letter from the Secretary of State to Senator 
(Jeorge opposing the measure.] 7 pp. 

An Act To exempt from internal-revenue taxes, on 
the basis of reciprocity, articles imported by consular 
officers and employees of foreign states for their per- 
sonal or oflicial use. [H. R. 3835.] Approved May 
9, 1941. (Public Law 58, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 1 p. 



U S SOVERNMtNr PRINTING OFFlCEi 1941 



For salp l).v tlie Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents _ Subscription price, .$-.75 a year 

PfBLISHED WEEKLY WITH iTHE .\PPROVAL OF THE niHECTOR OF THE BURE.il,' OF THE Bl'DGET 



^1^3. I f^-^o 



TH 



E DEPARTMENT OF STATE 




H 



TIN 



Qontents 



MAY 31, 1941 
Vol. IV: No. 101— Publication 1608 




General: Page 

Radio address by the President 647 

Proclamation of unlimited national emergency .... 654 
Food and Foreign Policy: Address by Assistant Secre- 
tary Berle 655 

Control of exports in national defense: 

Extension of export control to the Philippine Islands . 657 
General licenses for exports to Brazil, Cuba, and Ar- 

gentuia 658 

Issuance of mdimited licenses 660 

The Far East: 
Exchange of letters between the Secretary of State and 

the Appomted Minister for Foreign Affairs of China. 661 

Europe: 

Survivors of the S. S. Zamzam 662 

Commercial Policy: 

Import quotas on wheat and wheat flour: 

Proclamation by the President 663 

Exchange of notes with Canada 665 

Cultural Relations: 

Inter-American collaboration in the field of social wel- 
fare 666 

Engmeers from other American republics to study in the 

United States 667 

Physician from the United States to lecture in Colom- 
bia 667 

Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, Etc.: 

Monthly statistics 668 

[Over] 



"■ * ^^''f^'NTOVDENT OF OOCUMEN 

Jl^N 13 1941 



Qontents- 



CONTINUED. 



The Department: Page 

Appointment of officers 675 

The Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 675 

Treaty Information: 
Commerce: 

Inter-American Coffee Agreement 676 

Postal: 

Universal Postal Convention 676 

Military mission: 

Detail of United States Army Officer as Director of 

the Polytechnic School of Guatemala 676 

Indian affairs: 

Convention Providing for the Creation of an Inter- 
American Indian Institute 677 

Publications 677 

Legislation 677 



General 



EADIO ADDRESS BY THE PRESIDENT 



(Released to the press by the White House May 27] 

I am speaking tonight from the White House 
in the presence of the Governing Board of the 
Pan American Union, the Canadian Minister, 
and their families. The members of this Board 
are the ambassadors and ministers of the Amer- 
ican republics in Washington. It is appropriate 
that I do this. Now, as never before, the unity 
of the American republics is of supreme im- 
portance to each and every one of us and to the 
cause of freedom throughout the world. Our 
future independence is bound up with the future 
independence of all of our sister republics. 

The pressing problems that confront us are 
military problems. We cannot afford to ap- 
l^roach them from the point of view of wishful 
thinkers or sentimentalists. Wliat we face is 
cold, hard fact. 

The first and fundamental fact is that what 
started as a European war has developed, as the 
Nazis always intended it should develop, into 
a world war for world-domination. 

Adolf Hitler never considered the domination 
of Europe as an end in itself. European con- 
quest was but a step toward ultimate goals in 
all the other continents. It is mimistakably 
apparent to all of us that, unless the advance 
of Hitlerism is forcibly checked now, the West- 
ern Hemisphere will be within range of the 
Nazi weapons of destruction. 

For our own defense we have accord- 
ingly undertaken certain obviously necessary 
measures. 



'Delivered May 27, 1941. 
321089 — 41 1 



First, we joined in concluding a series of 
agi'eements with all the other American re- 
publics. This further solidified our hemisphere 
against the common danger. 

And then, a year ago, we lamiched, and are 
successfully carrymg out, the largest armament- 
l)roduction program we have ever undertaken. 

We have added substantially to our splendid 
Navy, and we have mustered our manpower to 
build up a new Army which is already worthy 
of the highest traditions of our military 
service. 

We instituted a policy of aid for the democ- 
racies — the nations which have fought for the 
continuation of human liberties. 

This policy had its origin in the first month 
of the war, when I urged upon the Congi-ess re- 
peal of the arms-embargo provisions in the 
Neutrality Law. In that message of Septem- 
ber 1939, I said, "I should like to be able to 
offer the hope that the shadow over the world 
might swiftly pass. I cannot. The facts com- 
pel my stating, with candor, that darker periods 
may lie ahead." 

In the subsequent months, the shadows deep- 
ened and lengthened. And the night spread 
over Poland, Denmark, Norway, Holland, 
Belgium, Luxemburg, and France. 

In June 1940, Britain stood alone, faced by 
the same machine of terror which had over- 
whelmed her allies. Our Government rushed 
arms to meet her desperate needs. 

In September 1940, an agi-eement was com- 
pleted with Great Britain for the trade of 50 
destroyers for 8 important off-shore bases. 

647 



648 



bEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



In March 1941, the Congress passed the Lend- 
Lease Bill and an appropriation of seven bil- 
lion dollars to implement it. This law realisti- 
cally provided for material aid "for the govern- 
ment of any country whose defense the Presi- 
dent deems vital to the defense of the United 
States". 

Our whole program of aid for the democracies 
has been based on hard-headed concern for our 
own security and for the kind of safe and 
civilized world in which we wish to live. Every 
dollar of material we send helps to keep the 
dictators away from our own hemisjjhere. 
Every day that they are held off gives us time 
to build more guns and tanks and planes and 
ships. 

We have made no pretense about our own self- 
interest in this aid. Great Britain understands 
it — and so does Nazi Germany. 

And now — after a year — Britain still fights 
gallantly, on a "far-flung battle line". We have 
doubled and redoubled our vast production, in- 
creasing, month by month, our material supply 
of tools of war for ourselves and Britain and 
China — and eventually for all the democracies. 

The supply of these tools will not fail — it will 
increase. 

With greatly augmented strength, the United 
States and the other American republics now 
chart their course in the situation of today. 

Your Government knows what terms Hitler, 
if victorious, would impose. They are, indeed, 
the only terms on which he would accept a so- 
called "negotiated" peace. 

Under tliose terms, Germany would literally 
parcel out the world — hoisting the swastika 
itself over vast territories and populations and 
setting up puppet governments of its own choos- 
ing, wholly subject to the will and the policy of 
a conqueror. 

To the people of the Americas, a triumphant 
Hitler would say, as he said after the seizure of 
Austria, and after Munich, and after the seizure 
of Czechoslovakia : "I am now completely satis- 
fied. This is the last territorial readjustment 
I will seek." And he would of course add : "All 
we want is peace, friendship, and profitable 
trade relations with you in the New World." 



And were any of us in the Americas so in- 
credibly simple and forgetful as to accept those 
honeyed words, what would then happen ? 

Those in the New World who were seeking 
profits would be urging that all that the dic- 
tatorships desired was "peace". They would 
oppose toil and taxes for more American arma- 
ment. Meanwhile, the dictatorships would be 
forcing the enslaved peoples of their Old-World 
conquests into a system they are even now or- 
ganizing — to build a naval and air force in- 
tended to gain and hold and be master of the 
Atlantic and the Pacific as well. 

They would fasten an economic stranglehold 
upon our several nations. Quislings would be 
found to subvert the governments in our re- 
publics; and the Nazis would back their fifth 
columns with invasion, if necessary. 

I am not speculating about all this. I merely 
repeat what is already in the Nazi book of 
world-conquest. They plan to treat the Latin 
American nations as they are now treating the 
Balkans. They plan then to strangle the United 
States of America and the Dominion of Canada. 

The American laborer would have to com- 
pete with slave labor in the rest of the world. 
Minimum wages, maximum hours ? Nonsense ! 
Wages and hours would be fixed by Hitler. The 
dignity and power and standard of living of 
the American worker and farmer would be gone. 
Trade unions would become historical relics 
and collective bargaining a joke. 

Farm income? What happens to all farm 
surpluses without any foreign trade? The 
American farmer would get for his products 
exactly what Hitler wanted to give. He would 
face obvious disaster and complete regimenta- 
tion. 

Tariff walls — Chinese walls of isolation — 
would be futile. Freedom to trade is essential 
to our economic life. We do not eat all the 
food we can produce; we do not burn all the 
oil we can pump; we do not use all the goods 
we can manufacture. It would not be an 
American wall to keep Nazi goods out; it would 
be a Nazi wall to keep us in. 

The whole fabric of working life as we know 
it — ^business, manufacturing, mining, agricul- 



MAY 31, 1941 



649 



ture — all would be mangled and crippled under 
such a system. Yet to maintain even that 
crippled independence would require pemna- 
nent conscription of our manpower; it would 
curtail the funds we could spend on education, 
on housing, on public works, on flood control, 
on health. Instead, we should be permanently 
pouring our resources into armaments; and, 
year in and year out, standing day and night 
watch against the destruction of our cities. 

Even our right of worship would be threat- 
ened. The Nazi world does not recognize any 
God except Hitler; for the Nazis are as ruthless 
as the Communists in the denial of God. What 
place has religion which preaches the dignity 
of the human being, of the majesty of the hu- 
man soul, in a world where moral standards 
are measured by treachery and bribery and fifth 
columnists ? Will our children, too, wander off, 
goose-stepping in search of new gods? 

We do not accept, and will not permit, this 
Nazi "shape of things to come". It will never 
be forced upon us if we act in this present 
crisis with the wisdom and the courage which 
have distinguished our country in all the crises 
of the past. 

The Nazis have taken military possession of 
the greater part of Europe. In Africa they 
have occupied Tripoli and Libya, and they are 
threatening Egypt, the Suez Canal, and the 
Near East. But their plans do not stop there, 
for the Indian Ocean is the gateway to the 
East. 

They also have the armed power at any mo- 
ment to occupy Spain and Portugal; and that 
threat extends not only to French North Africa 
and the western end of the Mediterranean, but 
also to the Atlantic fortress of Dakar, and to the 
island outposts of the New World — the Azores 
and Cape Verde Islands. 

The Cape Verde Islands are only seven hours' 
distance from Brazil by bomber or troop-carry- 
ing planes. They dominate shipping routes to 
and from the South Atlantic. 

The war is approaching the brink of the 
Western Hemisphere itself. It is coming very 
close to home. 



Control or occupation by Nazi forces of any 
of the islands of the Atlantic would jeopardize 
the immediate safety of portions of North and 
South America and of the island possessions of 
the United States and of the ultimate safety 
of the continental United States itself. 

Hitler's plan of world-domination would be 
near its accomplislmient today, were it not for 
two factors: One is the epic resistance of Brit- 
ain, her Colonies, and the great Dominions, 
fighting not only to maintain the existence of 
the Island of Britain, but also to hold the Near 
East and Africa. The other is the magnificent 
defense of China, which will, I have reason to 
believe, increase in strength. All of these, to- 
gether, prevent the Axis from winning control 
of the seas by ships and aircraft. 

The Axis powers can never achieve their ob- 
jective of world-domination unless they first 
obtain control of the seas. This is their supreme 
purpose today; and to achieve it, they must 
capture Great Britain. 

They could then have the power to dictate 
to the Western Hemisphere. No spurious argu- 
ment, no appeal to sentiment, and no false 
pledges like those given by Hitler at Munich, 
can deceive the American people into believing 
that he and his Axis partners would not, with 
Britain defeated, close in relentlessly on this 
hemisphere. 

But. if the Axis powers fail to gain control of 
the seas, they are certainly defeated. Their 
dreams of world-domination will then go by 
the board ; and the criminal leaders who started 
this war will suffer inevitable disaster. 

Both they and their people know this — and 
they are afraid. That is why they are risking 
everything they have, conducting desperate 
attempts to break through to the command of 
the ocean. Once they are limited to a continu- 
ing land war, their cruel forces of occupation 
will be unable to keep their heel on the necks of 
the millions of innocent, oppressed peoples on 
the continent of Europe; and in the end, their 
whole structure will break into little pieces. 
And the wider the Nazi land effort, the greater 
the danger. 



650 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



We do not forget the silenced peoples. The 
masters of Germany — those, at least, who have 
not been assassinated or escaped to free soil — 
have marked these peoples and their children's 
children for slavery. But those people, spiritu- 
ally unconquered : xVustrians, Czechs, Poles, Nor- 
wegians, Dutch, Belgians, Frenchmen, Greeks, 
Southern Slavs — yes, even those Italians and 
Germans who themselves have been enslaved — 
will prove to be a powerful force in disrupting 
the Nazi system. 

Yes, all freedom — meaning freedom to live, 
and not freedom to conquer and subjugate other 
peoples — depends on freedom of the seas. All 
of American history — North, Central, and 
South American history — has been inevitably 
tied up with those words "freedom of the seas". 

Since 1799, when our infant Navy made the 
West Indies and the Caribbean and the Gulf of 
Mexico safe for American ships ; since 1804 and 
1805 when we made all peaceful coimnerce safe 
from the depredations of the Barbary pirates; 
since the War of 1812, which was fought for 
the preservation of sailors' rights; since 1867, 
when our sea power made it possible for the 
Mexicans to expel the French Army of Louis 
Napoleon, we have striven and fought in de- 
fense of freedom of the seas — for our own ship- 
ping, for the commerce of our sister republics, 
for the right of all nations to use the highways 
of world trade — and for our own safety. 

During the first World War we were able to 
escort merchant ships by the use of small 
cruisers, gimboats, and destroyers; and this 
type of convoy was effective against sub- 
marines. In this second World War, however, 
the problem is greater, because the attack on 
the freedom of the seas is now fourfold: first, 
the improved submarine; second, the much 
gi-eater use of the heavily armed raiding 
cruiser or hit-and-run battleship; third, the 
bombing airplane, which is capable of destroy- 
ing merchant ships seven or eight hundred 
miles from its nearest base ; and fourth, the de- 
struction of merchant ships in those ports of the 
world which are accessible to bombing attack. 

The battle of the Atlantic now extends from 
the icy waters of the North Pole to the frozen 



continent of the Antarctic. Throughout this 
huge area, there have been sinkings of merchant 
ships in alarming and increasing numbers by 
Nazi raiders or submarines. There have been 
sinkings even of ships carrying neutral flags. 
There have been sinkings in the South Atlantic, 
off West Afi-ica and the Cape Verde Islands; 
between the Azores and the islands off the 
American coast; and between Greenland and 
Iceland. Great numbers of these sinkings have 
been actually within the watei-s of the Western 
Hemisphere. 

The blunt truth is this — and I reveal this 
with the full knowledge of the British Govern- 
ment : the present rate of Nazi sinkings of mer- 
chant ships is more than three times as high 
as the capacity of British shipyards to replace 
them ; it is more than twice the combined British 
and American output of merchant ships today. 

We can answer this peril by two simultaneous 
measures: First, by speeding up and increasing 
our great ship-building progi'am; and second, 
by helping to cut down the losses on the high 
seas. 

Attacks on shipping off the very shores of 
land which we are determined to protect, present 
an actual military danger to the Americas. 
And that danger has recently been heavily 
underlined by the presence in Western Hemi- 
sphere waters of Nazi battleships of gi'cat 
striking-power. 

Most of the supplies for Britain go by a 
northerly route, which comes close to Greenland 
and the nearby island of Iceland. Germany's 
heaviest attack is on that route. Nazi occupa- 
tion of Iceland or bases in Greenland would 
bring the war close to our continental shores 
because they are stepping-stones to Labrador, 
Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, and the northern 
United States, including the great industrial 
centers of the North, East, and the Middle West. 

Equally, the Azores and the Cape Verde Is- 
lands, if occupied or controlled by Gei'many, 
would directly endanger the freedom of the 
Atlantic and our own physical safety. Under 
German domination they would become bases 
for submarines, warships, and airplanes raid- 
ing the waters which lie immediately off our 



MAY 31, 1941 



651 



own coasts and attacking the shipping in the 
South Atlantic. Tliey would provide a spring- 
board for actual attack against the integrity 
and independence of Brazil and her neighbor- 
ing republics. 

I have said on many occasions that the United 
States is mustering its men and its resources 
only for purposes of defense — only to repel 
attack. I repeat that statement now. But we 
must be realistic when we us the word "at- 
tack"; we have to relate it to the lightning 
speed of modern warfare. 

Some people seem to think that we are not 
attacked until bombs actually drop on New 
York or San Francisco or New Orleans or Chi- 
cago. But they are simply shutting their eyes 
to the lesson we must learn from the fate of 
every nation that the Nazis have conquered. 

The attack on Czechoslovakia began with the 
conquest of Austria. The attack on Norway 
began with the occupation of Denmark. The 
attack on Greece began with occupation of Al- 
bania and Bulgaria. The attack on the Suez 
Canal began with the invasion of the Balkans 
and North Africa. The attack on the United 
States can begin with the domination of any 
base which menaces our security — north or 
south. 

Nobody can foretell tonight just when the 
acts of the dictators will ripen into attack on 
this hemisphere and us. But we know enough 
by now to realize that it would be suicide to 
wait until they are in our front yard. 

Wlien your enemy comes at you in a tank or 
a bombing plane, if you hold your fire until you 
see the whites of his eyes, you will never know 
what hit you. Our Bunker Hill of tomorrow 
may be several thousand miles from Boston. 

Anyone with an atlas and a reasonable knowl- 
edge of the sudden striking-force of modern 
war, knows that it is stupid to wait until a 
probable enemy has gained a foothold from 
which to attack. Old-fashioned common sense 
calls for the use of a strategy which will prevent 
such an enemy from gaining a foothold in the 
first place. 

We have, accordingly, extended our patrol 
in north and south Atlantic waters. We are 



steadily adding more and more ships and planes 
to that patrol. It is well known that the 
strength of the Atlantic Fleet has been greatly 
increased during the past year, and is constant- 
ly being built up. 

These ships and planes warn of the presence 
of attacking raiders, on the sea, imder the sea, 
and above the sea. The danger from these 
raiders is greatly lessened if their location is 
definitely known. We are thus \ie'mg fore- 
warned; and we shall be on our guard against 
efforts to establish Nazi bases closer to our 
hemisphere. 

The deadly facts of war compel nations, for 
simple self-preservation, to make stern choices. 
It does not make sense, for instance, to say, "I 
believe in the defense of all the Western Hemi- 
sphere", and in the next breath to say, "I will 
not fight for that defense until the enemy has 
landed on our shores". And if we believe in the 
independence and integrity of the Americas, we 
must be willing to fight to defend them just as 
much as we would to fight for the safety of our 
own homes. 

It is time for us to realize that the safety of 
American homes even in the center of our coun- 
try has a definite relationship to the continued 
safety of homes in Nova Scotia or Trinidad or 
Brazil. 

Our national policy today, therefore, is this : 

First, we shall actively resist wherever neces- 
sary, and with all our resources, every attempt 
by Hitler to extend his Nazi domination to the 
Western Hemisphere, or to threaten it. We 
shall actively resist his every attempt to gain 
control of the seas. We insist upon the vital 
importance of keeping Hitlerism away from any 
point in the world which could be used and 
would be used as a base of attack against 
the Americas. 

Second, from the point of view of strict naval 
and military necessity, we shall give eveiy pos- 
sible assistance to Britain and to all who, with 
Britain, are resisting Hitlerism or its equivalent 
with force of arms. Our patrols are helping 
now to insure delivery of the needed supplies 
to Britain. All additional measures necessary 
to deliver the goods will be taken. Any and all 



652 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



fui'ther methods or combination of methods, 
which can or should be utilized, are being de- 
vised by our military and naval technicians, 
who, with me, will work out and put into effect 
such new and additional safeguards as may be 
needed. 

The delivery of needed supplies to Britain is 
imperative. This can be done ; it must be done ; 
it will be done. 

To the other American nations — 20 republics 
and the Dominion of Canada — I say this : The 
United States does not merely propose these 
purposes, but is actively engaged today in carry- 
ing them out. 

I say to them further: You may disregard 
those few citizens of the United States who 
contend that we are disunited and cannot act. 

There are some timid ones among us who say 
that we must preserve peace at any price — lest 
we lose our liberties forever. To them I say: 
Never in the history of the world has a nation 
lost its democracy by a successful struggle to 
defend its democracy. We must not be defeated 
by the fear of the very danger which we are pre- 
paring to resist. Our freedom has shown its 
ability to survive war, but it would never sur- 
vive surrender. "The only thing we have to 
fear is fear itself." 

There is, of course, a small group of sincere, 
patriotic men and women whose real passion for 
peace has shut their eyes to the ugly realities of 
international banditry and to the need to resist 
it at all costs. I am sure they are embarrassed 
by the sinister support they are receiving from 
the enemies of democracy in our midst — the 
Bundists and Fascists and Communists and 
every group devoted to bigotry and racial and 
religious intolerance. It is no mere coincidence 
that all the argmnents put forward by these 
enemies of democracy — all their attempts to 
confuse and divide our people and to destroy 
public confidence in our Government — all their 
defeatist forebodings that Britain and democ- 
racy are already beaten — all their selfish 
promises that we can "do business" with Hit- 
ler — all of these are but echoes of the woi'ds that 
have been poured out from the Axis bureaus of 



propaganda. Those same words have been used 
before in other countries — to scare them, to 
divide them, to soften them up. Invariably, 
those same words have formed the advance 
guard of physical attack. 

Your Government has the right to expect of 
all citizens that they take loyal pai-t in the com- 
mon work of our common defense — take loyal 
part from this moment forward. 

I have recently set up the machinery for 
civilian defense. It will rapidly organize, lo- 
cality by locality. It will depend on the or- 
ganized effort of men and women everywhere. 
All will have responsibilities to fulfil. 

Defense today means more than merely fight- 
ing. It means morale, civilian as well as mili- 
tary ; it means using every available resource ; 
it means enlarging every useful plant. It 
means the use of a gi-eater American common 
sense in discarding rumor and distorted state- 
ment. It means recognizing, for what they are, 
racketeers and fifth columnists, who are the 
incendiary bombs of the moment. 

All of us know that we have made very great 
social progress in recent years. We propose to 
maintain that jjrogress and strengthen it. 
Wlien the Nation is threatened from without, 
however, as it is today, the actual production 
and transportation of the machinery of defense 
must not be interrupted by disputes between 
capital and capital, labor and labor, or cajjital 
and labor. The future of all free enterprise — 
of capital and labor alike — is at stake. 

This is no time for capital to make, or be 
allowed to retain, excess profits. Articles of de- 
fense must have undisputed right-of-way in 
every industrial plant in the country. 

A nation-wide machinery for conciliation and 
mediation of industrial disputes has been set 
up. That machinery must be used promptly — 
and without stoppage of woi-k. Collective bar- 
gaining will be retained, but the American 
people expect that impartial recommendations 
of our Govermnent services will be followed 
both by capital and by labor. 

The overwhelming majority of our citizens 
expect their Governjiient to see that the tools of 



I 



MAY 31, 194 1 



653 



defense ai'e built; and for the very purpose of 
preserving the deniocriitic safeguards of botli 
labor and management, this Government is 
determined to use all of its power to express the 
will of its people and to prevent interference 
with the production of materials essential to our 
Nation's security. 

Today the whole world is divided between 
human slavery and human freedom — ^between 
pagan brutality and the Christian ideal. 

We choose human freedom — whicii is the 
Christian ideal. 

No one of us can waver for a moment in his 
courage or his faith. 

We will not accept a Hitler-dominated world. 
And we will not accept a world, like the post- 
war world of the 1920's, in Mhich the seeds of 
Hitlei-ism can again be planted and allowed to 

gl'OW. 

We will accept only a world consecrated to 
freedom of speech and expression — freedom of 
every person to worship God in his own way — 
freedom from want — and freedom from terror- 
ism. 

Is such a world impossible of attainment ? 

Magna Cliarta, the Declaration of Independ- 
ence, the Constitution of the United States, the 
Emancipation Proclamation, and every other 
milestone in human progress — all were ideals 
which seemed impossible of attainment, yet they 
were attained. 

As a military force, we were weak when we 
established our indeijendence, but we success- 
fully stood off tyrants, powerful in their day, 
who are now lost in the dust of history. 

Odds meant nothing to us then. Shall we 
now, with all our potential strength, hesitate to 
take every single measure necessary to maintain 
our American liberties? 

Our people and our Government will not hesi- 
tate to meet that challenge. 



As the President of a united and determined 
people, I say solenmly : 

We reassert the ancient American doctrine of 
freedom of the seas. 

We reassert the solidarity of the 21 American 
republics and the Dominion of Canada in the 
preservation of the independence of the hemi- 
sphere. 

We have pledged material support to the other 
democracies of the world— and we will fulfil 
that pledge. 

We in the Americas will decide for ourselves 
whether and when and where our American 
interests are attacked or our security threatened. 

We are placing our armed forces in strategic 
military position. 

We will not hesitate to use our armed forces 
to repel attack. 

We reassert our abiding faith in the vitality 
of our constitutional republic as a perpetual 
home of freedom, of tolerance, and of devotion 
to the Word of God. 

Therefore, with profound consciousness of my 
responsibilities to my countrymen and to my 
country's cause, I have tonight issued a procla- 
mation that an unlimited national emergency 
exists and requires the strengthening of our de- 
fense to the extreme limit of our national power 
and authority. 

The Nation will expect all individuals and all 
groups to play their full parts without stint and 
without selfishness and without doubt that our 
democracy will triumjjhantly survive. 

I repeat the words of the Signers of the Decla- 
ration of Independence — that little band of 
patriots, fighting long ago against overwhelm- 
ing odds, but certain, as are we, of ultimate 
victory : "With a firm reliance on the protection 
of Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to 
each other our lives, our fortunes, and our 
sacred honor." 



321089—41- 



654 



DEPARTMENT OP STATE BULLETIN 



PROCLAMATION OF UNLIMITED NATIONAL EMERGENCY 



[Released to the press May 27] 

Proclaiming That an Unlimited National 
Emergency Confronts This Country, 
Which Requires That Its Military, Naval, 
Air and Civilian Defenses Be Put on the 
Basis of Eeadiness to Repel Any and All 
Acts or Threats of Aggression Directed 
Toward Any Part of the Western Hemi- 
sphere 

BY THE president OF THE UNITED STATES OF 
AMERICA 

A ProcJamation 

Whereas on September 8, 1939 because of 
the outbreak of war in Europe a proclamation ^ 
was issued declaring a limited national emer- 
gency and directing measures "for the purpose 
of strengthening our national defense within 
the limits of peacetime authorizations", 

Whereas a succession of events makes plain 
that tlie objectives of tlie Axis belligerents in 
such war are not confined to those avowed at 
its connnencement, but include overthrow 
throughout the world of existing democratic 
order, and a worldwide domination of peoples 
and economics through the destruction of all 
i-esistance on land and sea and in the air, and 

Where.\s indifference on the part of the 
United States to the increasing menace would 
be perilous, and common prudence requii'es that 
for the security of this nation and of this hemi- 
sphere we should pass from peacetime authori- 
zations of military strength to such a basis as 
will enable us to cope instantly and decisively 
with any attempt at hostile encirclement of this 
hemisphere, or the establishment of any base for 
aggression against it, as well as to repel the 
threat of predatory incursion by foreign agents 
hito our territory and society, 

Now, THEREFORE, I, FrANKLIN D. RoOSEVELT, 

President of the United States of America, do 



"-i F.R. 3a51; niilhliii of September 9, 1939 (vol. I, 
11(1. 11), p. 216. 



proclaim that an unlimited national emergency 
confronts this country, which requires that its 
military, naval, air and civilian defenses be put 
on the basis of readiness to repel any and all 
acts or threats of aggression directed toward 
any pait of the Western Hemisphere. 

I call upon all the loyal citizens engaged in 
production for defense to give precedence to the 
needs of the nation to the end that a system of 
government that makes private enterprize pos- 
sible may survive. 

I call upon all our loyal workmen as well as 
employers to merge their lesser differences in 
the larger effort to insure tlie survival of the 
only kind of government which recognizes the 
rights of labor or of capital. 

I call upon loyal state and local leaders and 
officials to cooperate with the civilian defense 
agencies of the United States to assure our 
internal security against foreign directed sub- 
version and to put every community in order 
for maximum productive effort and minimum 
of waste and unnecessary frictions. 

I call upon all loyal citizens to place the 
nation's needs first in mind and in action to 
the end that we may mobilize and have ready 
for instant defensive use all of the physical 
powers, all of the moral strength and all of 
the material resources of this nation. 

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 

Done at the City of Washington this twenty- 
seventh day of May, in the year of 

[seal] our Lord nineteen himdred and 
forty-one, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the one hun- 
dred and sixty-fifth. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 

By the President: 
Cordell Hull 

Secretary of State 

[No. 2487] 



MAY 31, 1941 



655 



FOOD AND FOREIGN POLICY 



ADDRESS BY ASSISTANT SECRETARY BERLE ' 



[Released to the press May 27] 

Let me first congratulate you for assembling, 
in a particularly trying time, to consider 
methods of improving tlie healtli of the coun- 
try. Never was work more useful and never 
more necessary. 

Your task is to consider tlie problems of 
nutrition in this country and how they must be 
met. That is really a problem of how effectively 
to distribute the huge stocks of supplies which 
are readily available. To me you assign a less 
happy subject of the jjolicy of the Government 
toward nutrition outside the United States. 
There, due to the effects of war, blockades, and 
counter-blockades, the problem is vastly less 
happy. 

It has been, and is, the consistent policy of 
the United States to make food resources avail- 
able, so far as possible, to those countries which 
need them. In normal times we rely on com- 
merce to take the surplus stocks of food which 
we have to the points where they are needed. 
But where normal commerce does not accom- 
plish this result, this Government has histori- 
cally supplemented the supply by sending food 
at its own expense or at the expense of American 
organizations. 

In the years following the World War, as you 
know, this Government through various organi- 
zations financed and sent food to Russia, Poland, 
Germany, Austria, Belgium, France, and sent 
less amounts to other countries. This process 
started immediately after the Armistice of 1918, 
and it continued for several years. Only when 
the normal processes of re-opened trade made 
it possible for the populations of these coun- 
tries to obtain adequate food through normal 
channels did we cease to send relief. We did it 
without drawing political distinctions; and we 
did it on the straightforward theory that a land 
of plenty had a duty to humanity. 



' Delivered at the National Nutrition Conference for 
Defense, Washington, May 27, 1941. 



During the present war, the Govermnent has 
followed, so far as possible, the same policy. 
Naturally it has had to be modified by changed 
conditions and by the exigencies of military 
situations which we did not create. 

The chief agency which acts in conjunction 
with the Govermnent in its relief policy is, as 
you all know, the American Red Cross. 

To the extent possible, we have endeavored 
to send food and supplies into those countries 
not under actual military occupation which 
were in need. We took the view that two as- 
surances are required : firet, arrangements 
which make sure that the supplies actually 
reach the people who need them and preferably 
by distribution through the American Red 
Cross or agencies designated by it, and second, 
that the effect of such supplies will not in- 
crease hunger and want elsewhere; for, of 
course, nothing is accomplished by shipping 
food and relief into an area if the only effect is 
to stimulate military seizures of other food and 
supplies withm that area. 

Relief of this sort has taken various forms, 
depending on circimistances. In some cases — 
Finland, for instance — loans have been made 
permitting purchases of food here and its ship- 
ment abroad. Shiploads of relief have been 
sent to unoccupied France. Other shiploads of 
food have been sent to Spain. Certain move- 
ments of food have been facilitated to certain 
of the unoccupied French colonies. Supplies 
were actually on the way to Greece when she 
was invaded. 

In many cases, unhappily, the possibility of 
sending relief has been severely limited. The 
difficulties of transjjort and distribution have 
frequeritly been extreme. Where we have had 
to choose, the first concern has been the send- 
ing of supplies for children, especially milk and 
vitamins. 

Only recently, arrangements were made to 
send two shiploads of food to Ireland. 



656 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



We have not. felt that the iDolicy of relief 
could be determined wholly by arguments over 
the question of who is responsible for the dis- 
tress. We realize perfectly that the forces of 
invasion and aggi'ession are the direct cause of 
the want and hunger and starvation of great 
populations. It would be very easy to say that 
we ought simply to leave the problem to the 
people who are responsible for creating it. But 
that is not a complete answer. The popula- 
tions of these countries still have to live; and 
in their children may very well lie the hope for 
a free and civilized Europe. 

Instead, therefore, of asking "Wlio is respon- 
sible for this?", we have asked "Will the relief 
actually do any good? Or will it merely feed 
one gi'oup in one place and increase misery else- 
where by encouraging or assisting invaders or 
aggressors to requisition or seize or buy with 
worthless currency or otherwise take away for 
themselves food which ought to go to the popu- 
lations of these countries?" If the latter hap- 
pens, plainly the lelief given does not assist in 
the slightest. 

The technique of modern economic warfare 
has developed endless ways for draining a 
country dry of its essential food supplies. They 
can be seized to feed armies of occupation; or 
they can be bought with currency which the 
occupied country is forced to print and turn 
over to its invaders ; or their export can be re- 
quired to fulfil some barter trade agreement 
M-hich has been forced on the country. In such 
cases, shipments of relief to the population do 
not assist that population unless it wei-e possible 
to establish virtually an economic-control sys- 
tem in neutral hands within the country. This 
is extremely difficult in time of war within 
military lines. 

There is a widespread misconception that the 
food difficulties in Europe are chiefly due to 
the blockade. Such information as we have in- 
dicates that the chief difficulty is due to the 
disturbance of crops and harvests and transport 
and local distribution, and to the requisitioning 
and economic policies pursued on the Continent 
itself. The German Goverimient has stated 



authoritatively that it does not consider that 
an invader has any responsibility for feeding 
the population of the country which it has in- 
vaded, and that it will, as a matter of course, 
assure that Germany will receive the benefits 
of whatever supplies do exist in Europe to the 
extent that she needs them. In the light of this, 
the difficulty of carrying on any effective policy 
of feeding in territory occupied within military 
lines must be sufficiently obvious. 

Let me pass, for a moment, from the very 
grim picture in Europe to one other subject 
which I hoi^e may oiler a happier aspect. It is 
commonly said that there are gi'eat food sur- 
pluses in the Americas, and this is true. But 
most of these surpluses would promptly dis- 
appear if all of the Americas were fed accord- 
ing to the standards which the National 
Nutrition Conference for Defense is here to 
discuss. The farmers of Canada, of the United 
States, and of many of the South American re- 
publics would not be worried over "overseas 
markets" if every family on the American Con- 
tinent had the food which it ought to have to 
improve the health of the Americans of the 
future. The Department of Agriculture has 
been giving careful thought to this problem and 
has been working out plans for consideration 
which I hope, within the not too distant future, 
may offer some fascinating possibilities. Al- 
though the United States is the best-fed country 
in the world, there are millions of people who do 
not, and some who cannot, obtain the food that 
they really need. This is even more true in 
many of the other American republics. The 
problem is partly one of finance — but if it were 
only that I am confident we could solve it in a 
relatively short time. Still more, it is a problem 
of education. Let me say that whenever the 
problem of education is solved, I am confident 
that the economic relations between the Ameri- 
cas are close enough so that a solution will be 
found to the problem of payment. In the Amer- 
icas, at least, we have passed that jjoint. Wlien- 
ever the resources are there, and the need is 
there, we can work out ways of getting the sup- 
ply to the need. 



MAY 31, 1941 



657 



111 its international aspect, the problem of 
proper feeding combines three great elements. 
Tlie first is the scientific element — the careful 
analysis by groups such as yourselves of what is 
really needed and the expert education of the 
public to insist that the need be fulfilled. 

Tlie second is economic — the working out of 
ways and means by which the supplies, which 
we know do exist, can be put in tlie localities 
where they ought to be used. 

The third is sentimental, or if you like, 
moral — the feeling which everyone ought to 
have that the providence of God put these sup- 
plies in the world to be used for the strengthen- 
ing of life ; and that it is the job of everyone to 
see that they are so used. 

CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL 
DEFENSE 

EXTENSION OF EXPORT CONTROL TO THE 
PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 

[Released to the press May 28] 

Control of the export of strategic and critical 
articles and materials needed in the national- 
defense program was extended May 28, by proc- 
lamation of President Roosevelt, to the Philip- 
pine Islands, as the President signed a joint 
resolution of Congress authorizing such exten- 
sion. 

Export control was established originally 
within the United States under the provisions 
of section 6 of the act of July 2, 1940. It now 
provides a control over every exit for goods 
and materials from the United States and in- 
sures that all articles and materials needed in 
the expanding defense program will be held 
available. 

Licenses will be issued in the Philippine 
Islands by the High Commissioner acting on 
behalf of the Secretary of State. 

Since there is no District Court of the United 
States in the Philippine Islands, jurisdiction of 
oflFenses committed in the Philippine Islands 
in violation of the Export Control Act has been 
conferred on the Philippine Courts. 

The text of the proclamation follows; 



Administration of Section 6 of the Act En- 
titled "An Act To Expedite the Strength- 
ening OF THE National Defense" Approved 
July 2, 1940 

BY the president OF THE UNITED STATES OF 
AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

Whereas section 6 of the act of Congress 
entitled "An Act To expedite the strengthening 
of the national defense", approved July 2, 1940, 
provides as follows : 

"Sec. 6. WHienever the President determines 
that it is necessary in the interest of national 
defense to prohibit or curtail the exportation 
of any military equipment or munitions, or 
component parts thereof, or machinery, tools, 
or material or supplies necessary for the 
manufacture, servicing or operation thereof, 
he may by proclamation prohibit or curtail such 
exportation, except under such rules and regu- 
lations as he shall prescribe. Any such procla- 
mation shall describe the articles or materials 
included in the prohibition or curtailment con- 
tained therein. In case of the violation of any 
provision of any proclamation, or of any rule 
or regulation, issued hereunder, such violator or 
violators, upon conviction, shall be jiunished by 
a fine of not more than $10,000, or by imprison- 
ment for not more than two years or by both 
such fine and imprisonment. The authority 
granted in this Act shall terminate June 30, 
1942, unless the Congress shall otherwise 
provide." 

And WHEREAS the joint resolution of Con- 
gress approved May 28, 1941 provides as 
follows : 

"That the provisions of section 6 of the Act 
of Congress entitled 'An Act to expedite the 
strengthening of the national defense', ap- 
proved July 2, 1940 (54 Stat. 714), shall be 
applicable to all Territories, dependencies, and 
possessions of the United States, including the 
Philippine Islands, the Canal Zone, and the Dis- 
trict of Columbia, and the several courts of fii-st 
instance of the Commonwealth of the Philip- 



658 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



pine Islands shall have jurisdiction of offenses 
committed in the Philippine Islands in violation 
of the provisions of that section or of any procla- 
mation, or of any rule or any regulation, issued 
thereunder." 

Now, THEREFORE, I, FrANKLIN D. RoOSEVELT, 

President of the United States of America, 
acting under and by virtue of the authority 
vested in me by the said act of Congress and 
the said joint resolution, do hereby proclaim 
that upon the recommendation of the Admin- 
istrator of Export Control I have determined 
that it is necessary in the interests of the na- 
tional defense that on and after this date the 
articles and materials described in the procla- 
mations heretofore issued pursuant to the said 
section 6 shall not be exported from the Ter- 
ritories, dependencies, and possessions of the 
United States, including the Philippine Islands, 
the Canal Zone, and the District of Columbia, 
except when authorized in each case by license. 
For all Territories, dependencies, and posses- 
sions of the United States, including the Philip- 
pine Islands, the Canal Zone, and the District 
of Columbia, licenses shall be issued in accord- 
ance with Proclamations 2413 * of July 2, 1940 
and 2465 ' of March 4, 1941, and the rules and 
regulations prescribed by Executive Orders 
8712 « and 8713 " of March 15, 1941, as they 
may be from time to time amended. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this 28th 

day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen 

hundred and forty-one, and of the 

[seat.] Independence of the United States 

of America the one hundred and 

sixty-fifth. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 

By the President: 
CoRDELii Hull 

Secretary of State 
[No. 2488] 



GENERAL LICENSES FOR EXPORTS TO BRAZIL, 
CUBA, AND ARGENTINA 

[Released to the press May 20] 

In view of legal prohibitions which have 
recently been placed by the Government of 
Brazil ujjon re-exportations from that country, 
it has been found possible for this Government 
to issue general licenses for the export to Brazil 
of certain of the articles and materials named 
in proclamations and regulations issued pur- 
suant to section 6 of the Export Control Act of 
July 2, 1940. Accordingly, under the authoriza- 
tion of the provisions of the Executive order of 
March 15, 1941,* the Secretary of State on May 
29 issued the following general licenses to 
authorize exports to Brazil : 

License No. GAB 6 for antimony 

GAC 6 for asbestos — other than Rhodesian 
crysotile, Rhodesian amosite, Rhodesian 
blue fiber, or Arizona fiber and asbestos 
manufactures containing more than 
10% Rhodesian crysotile, Rhodesian 
amosite, Rhodesian blue fiber, or 
Arizona fiber 

GBB 6 for chlorine 

GAD 6 for chromium 

GAH 6 for hides — cattle and horse 

General licenses were also issued for the ex- 
portation of iron and steel, other than alloy, of 
the following classifications : 

License No. GMG 6 for bars 
GMT 6 for sheets 
GMU 6 for strip 
GMS 6 for tin plate 
GMA 6 for structural shapes 
GME 6 for rails 
GMJ 6 for pipe and tube 



'5 F.R. 2467; Biillctw of July 6, 1940 (vol. III. no. 
54), pp. 12-13. 

'6 F.R. 1300; Bulletin, of March 8, IfWl (vol. IV, 
no. 89). pp. 245-246. 

'6 F.R. 1501; Bulletin of March 15, 1941 (vol. IV, 
no. 90), pp. 284-285. 

'(i F.R. 1502; Bulletin of March 15. 1941 (vol. IV, 
no. 90), pp. 283-284. 

' Bulletin of March 15, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 90), pp. 284- 
285. 



MAY 31, 1941 



659 



License No. GMK 6 for wire 

GHM 6 for wire rods 



GAO 6 for niolylKleiiuiii 

GBG 6 for nitrocellulose — containing less 

than 12% nitrogen 
GAR 6 for quartz crystals 
GAU 6 for silk — other than silk parachute 

cloth and silk cartridge cloth suitable 

for powder bags 
GBH 6 for soda lime 
GBI 6 for sodium acetate 
GBJ 6 for strontium chemicals 
GBK 6 for sulphuric acid 
GAY 6 for vanadium 
GAZ 6 for wool 

Collectors of customs have been authorized to 
permit the exportation to Brazil, without the 
requirement of an individual license, of any of 
thei articles and materials mentioned above. 
The exporter is required, however, to indicate 
the appropriate license number on the export 
declaration for the shipment which he proposes 
to export. Those articles and materials for 
which no general license to export to Brazil has 
been issued (i. e., those articles and materials 
which are subject to the export-license require- 
ment but which are not included in the above 
list) will continue to require individual licenses 
for their exportation. 

[Released to the press May 29] 

The Secretary of State announced on May 29 
that the list of articles and materials for the 
exportation of M'hich to Cuba general licenses 
were issued on March 26 " has now been revised 
as follows : 

License No. GAB 3 for antimony 

GAC S for asbestos— other than Rhode- 
sian crysotile, Bhodesian amosite, 
Rhodesian blue fiber or Arizona fiber 
and asbestos manufactures containing 
more than 10% Rhodesian crysotile, 
Rhodesian amosite. Rhodesian blue fiber 
or Arizona fiber 

GBL 3 for bromine 

GBB 3 for chlorine 

GAD 3 for chromiiun 

GBM 3 for ethylene 

GBN 3 for ethylene dibromide 

GAH 3 for hides — cattle and horse 



General licenses were also issued for the ex- 
portation of iron and steel, other than alloy, of 
the following classifications: 

License No. GMG 3 for bars 
GMT 3 for sheets 
GM.'? 3 for tin plate 
GMA 3 for structural shapes 
GME 3 for rails 
GMJ 3 for pipe and (ul)e 
GMK 3 for wire 
GHM 3 for wire rods 



'Bulletin of March 29, 1&41 (vol. IV, no. 92), p. 379. 



GBO 3 for methylamine 

GAO 3 for molybdenum 

GAR 3 for quartz crystals 

GAU 3 for silk — other than silk parachute 

cloth and silk cartridge cloth suitable 

for powder bags 
GBH 3 for soda lime 
GBI 3 for sodium acetate 
GBJ 3 for strontium chemicals and 

metals 
GAY 3 for vanadium 
GAZ 3 for wool 

It will be noted that the definitions of a.sbestos 
and silk which may be exported under general 
licenses numbers GAC 3 and GAU 3, respectively, 
have been considerably modified. Furthermore, 
tlie following general licenses the issuance of 
which was announced on March 26 have been re- 
voked because of national defense requirements : 

License No. GAT 3 for rubber 
GAW 3 for toluol 
GHA 3 for ingots 
GMC 3 for plates 
GMB 3 for pilings 
GM\' 3 for wheels 
GMW 3 for axles 
GMX 3 for spikes 

Aiaplications for individual licenses for the 
exportation of those commodities for wliich the 
general licenses have been revoked may still be 
submitted to the Department of State. 
[Released to the press May 29] 

The Secretary of State annotmced on May 29 
that it has been found possible for this Govern- 
ment to issue general licenses for the export to 
Argentina of certain of the articles and mate- 
rials named in proclamations and regulations 
issued i^ursuant to section 6 of the Export Con- 
trol Act of July 2, 1940. Accordingly, under 



660 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



the iiutliority of the provisions of the Executive, 
order of Marcli 15, 1941, general licenses have 
Ix-en issued authorizing the exportation to 
Argentina of iron and steel, other than alloy, of 
the following classifications : 

License Xo. GMG 4 for liars 
GMT 4 for sheets 
GMU 4 for strip 
GMS 4 for tin plate 
GMA 4 for structural shapes 
GME 4 for rails 
(iM.T 4 for pipe and tube 
GMK 4 for wire 
GHM 4 for wire rods 

In the event of any extension of the legal pro- 
hibitions placed by the Government of Argen- 
tina iipon re-exportations from that country, it 
will be possible to give consideration to issuing 
general licenses for other articles and mate- 
rials in addition to those specified above. 

Collectors of customs have been authorized to 
permit the exportation to Argentina, without 
the requirement of an individual license, of any 
of the articles and materials mentioned above. 
The exporter is required, however, to indicate 
the appropriate license number on the export 
declaration for the shipment which he proposes 
to export. Those articles and materials for 
which no general licenses to expoi't to Argentina 
have been issued (i. e., those articles and mate- 
rials which are subject to the export-license re- 
quirements, but which are not included in the 
above list) will contiiuie to require individual 
licenses for their exportation. 

ISSUANCE OF UNLIMITED LICENSES 

Additional unlimited licenses have been is- 
sued to the British Iron and Steel Corporation 
for exportation to Sierra I^eone and the Unfed - 
erated Malay States of the following articles or 
materials, and collectors of customs were author- 
ized on May 27, 1941 to accept shipments against 
those licenses without presentation of the 



license form. Prior release certificates will be 
lequired. 

Structural shapes, steel piling, plates, black 
[)late, .skelps, rails, splice bars and tie plates, 
merchant bars, alloy bars, tool steel bars, cold 
finished bars, concrete reinforcing bars, hoops 
and baling bands, pipe and tube, barbed and 
twisted wire, woven wire fence, bale ties, fence 
l)osts, tin plate, sheets, strip, axles, wheels, track 
spikes, castings, forgings, ingots, billets, blooms, 
slabs, sheet bars, skelp, wire rods, iron ore, pig 
iron, spiegeleisen, ferromanganese, ferrovana- 
dium, ferrotungsten, ferrochrome, ferrosilicon, 
ferrocolumbium, ferrophosphorus, ferromolyb- 
denum, and ferrocarbontitanium. 

In addition to the above, an unlimited license 
was issued for shipments of drawn wire to 
Sierra Leone. 

Additional unlimited licenses have been issued 
to the Netherlands Purchasing Commission for 
exportation to Curasao and Surinam of the fol- 
lowing articles or materials, and collectors of 
customs were authorized on May 21, 1941 to 
accept shipment against these licenses in accord- 
ance with previous instructions.^" 

Sheet bars, pig iron, iron oi'e, iron and steel 
scrap, skelps, bars, steel sheets, wnre rods, struc- 
tiu'al shapes, hoops and baling bands, bale ties, 
fence posts, tinplate, i^ipe and tubes, billets, 
blooms, slabs, ingots, steel piling, rails, splice 
bars and tie plates, axles, wheels, track spikes, 
castings, forgings, black plate, plates, drawn 
wire, barbed wire, strip, woven wire fence, 
shear knives, hobs, dieheads, milling cutters, 
reamers, twist and other drills, taps, dies, grind- 
ing wheels (abrasives), gauges, copper, nickel, 
ferrocarbontitanium, ferrocolumbium, ferro- 
molybdenum, ferrophosphorus, ferrosilicon, 
ferrochrome, ferrotungsten, ferrovanadium, 
ferromanganese, spiegeleisen, and steel tanks 
unassembled. 



" See the Bulletin of March 29, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 92), 
p. 380. 



The Far East 



EXCHANGE OF LETTERS BETWEEN THE SECRETARY OF STATE 
AND THE APPOINTED MINISTER FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS OF 
CHINA 



[Released to tbe press May 31] 

The Af pointed Chinese Minister for Foi'eign 
Affairs to the Secretai^ of State 

San Francisco, May 26, 194.1. 

My Dear Mr. Secretary: 

I am shortly to depai't from the United 
States for China and wish to send you a word 
of farewell and of thanks for the cordial hos- 
pitality extended to me during my brief stay 
in Washington. 

It was \ery gratifying to me to receive in 
person during our conversations the extended 
account which you were so good as to give me 
of the attitude and policy of the United States 
in regard tn problems, both economic and po- 
litical, which are of concern to the whole 
world, and especially to your Government and 
mine, in this unhappy period of disturbance, 
violence and distress. 

With the general principles of the foreign 
policy of the United States, which were set 
forth in j'our public statement of July 16, 1937," 
I have long been familiar. I could, therefore, 
readily appreciate the importance which, as you 
indicated in our conversations, your Govern- 
ment attaches to the principles of world order 
imder law and of equality of treatment among 
nations, and to general recognition of the need 
for freer international trade and for broader 
cultural exchange. My Government shares the 
desire and the hope of your Government that 
there may be brought about by processes of 
agreement conditions in world affairs in which 
those principles will be universally accepted 
and applied. 



You will recall that on August 12, 1937, there 
was sent to you a communication from my Gov- 
ernment endorsing the principles enumerated 
in your statement of July 16, 1937,^=^ and stating 
that China's policy was therefore in full har- 
mony with the views of the Government of 
the United States. Such was the position of 
China then, and such is its position now. 

My country has for nearly four years been 
fighting in self-defense. During this period the 
Government and people of the United States 
have shown great friendship and sympathy for 
the Government and people of China. Tlie 
Chinese Govermnent and people deeply appre- 
ciate the attitude, the policy, and the action of 
the Government of the United States. We feel, 
moreover, that our attitude, objectives and 
policies are constantly evolving along lines more 
and more completely in liarmony with those 
of the United States. 

My people are traditionally believers in non- 
discrimination in international commercial rela- 
tions and in the broad principles of cooperation 
and fair-dealing among nations which are im- 
plicit in the faithful observance of international 
agreements and the adjustment of problems in 
international relations by processes of peace- 
ful negotiation and agreement freely arrived at. 
AVe believe in and subscribe to the principle of 
equality of commercial opportunity and non- 
discriminatoi'y treatment. Our Government 
gave clear indication of this nearly a centui-y ago 
when there were being negotiated the first trea- 
ties between China and Occidental countries. 

Upon restoration of peace, the Chinese Gov- 
ernment desires and expects to seek and to effect 
the fullest application of those principles in its 
own economy and in its political and economic 
relations with other countries. 



^^ Press Releases of .luly 17, 1937 (vol. XVII, no. 
407), pp. 41-42. 

321089 — 41 3 



''Ibid., August 21. 1937 (vol. XVII, no. 412;, p. 123. 



661 



662 

With many pleasant recollections of my visit 
to Washington, and witli my kindest personal 
regards, I am, my dear Mr. Secretary, 
Yours sincerely, 

Quo Tai-chi 



The Secretm-y of State to the Appointed Chinese 
Minister for Foreign Affairs 

Department of State, 
Washington, May 31, 1941. 

Mt De.ar Mr. Minister : 

I acknowledge the receipt of and thank you 
for your letter of May 26, 19-11 in regard to your 
visit to Washington and to our conversations 
during your short sojourn here. 

We greatly enjoyed your visit. 

It is very gratifying to receive in your letter 
reaffirmation of the endorsement by the Chinese 
Government and people of the general and 
fundamental principles which this Government 
is convinced constitute the only practical 
foundation for an international order wherein 
independent nations may cooperate freely with 
each other to their mutual benefit. 

As you know, the program in which the Gov- 
ernment and people of the United States put 
their trust is based upon and revolves about the 
principle of equality of treatment among na- 
tions. This principle comprehends equality in 
international relations in a juridical sense, non- 
discrimination and equality of opportunity in 
commercial relations, and reciprocal interchange 
in the field of cultural developments. Implicit 
in this principle is respect by each nation for 
the rights of other nations, performance by each 
nation of established obligations, alteration of 
agreements between nations by processes not of 
force but of orderly and free negotiation, and 
fair dealing in international economic relations 
essential to peaceful development of national 
life and mutually profitable growth of interna- 
tional trade. One of the purposes of this pro- 
gi-am is to effect the removal of economic and 
other maladjustments which tend to lead to 
political conflicts. 

As you are also aware, the Government and 
people of the United States have long had a 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

profound interest in the welfare and progress 
of China. It goes without saying that the Gov- 
ermnent of the United States, in continuation of 
steps already taken toward meeting China's 
aspirations for readjustment of anomalies in 
its international relations, expects when condi- 
tions of peace again prevail to move rapidly, by 
processes of orderly negotiation and agreement 
u-ith the Chinese Government, toward relin- 
quishment of the last of certain rights of a spe- 
cial character which this coimtry, together with 
other countries, has long possessed in China by 
virtue of agi-eements providing for extraterri- 
torial jurisdiction and related practices. 

This Government welcomes and encourages 
every advance made by lawful and orderly 
processes by any country toward conditions of 
peace, security, stability, justice and general 
welfare. The assurances given in Your Excel- 
lency's letter under acknowledgment of Chma's 
support of the principle of equality of treat- 
ment and nondiscrimination in economic rela- 
tions should have wholesome effect both during 
tlie present period of world conflict and when 
hostilities shall have ceased. 

The Government of the United States is dedi- 
cated to support of the princii^les in which the 
people of this country believe. Without reser- 
vation, we are confident that the cause to which 
we are committed along with China and other 
countries — the cause of national security, of fair 
dealing among nations and of peace with 
justice — will j^revail. 

With kindest regards and best wishes, I am, 
my dear Mr. Minister, 
Sincerely yours, 

CORDELL HuiiL, 



Europe 



SURVIVORS OF THE S. S. "ZAMZAM" 

[Released to the press May 31] 

The American Ambassador at Madrid, Mr. 
Alexander W. Weddell, has informed the De- 
partment that he has made arrangements with 



MAY 31, 1941 



663 



the cooperation of the Spanish authorities to 
take care of the American survivors from the 
S.S. Zarmam upon their release by the German 
autliorities to representatives of tlie Embassy 
at the Franco-Spanish border and to expedite 
their journey through Spain to the Portuguese 
border. At the Portuguese border they will be 
met by representatives of the American Lega- 
tion in Portugal. They will be taken to Lisbon, 
from which point they will be returned to the 
United States. The American Export Lines in 
New York City have telegraphed their repre- 
sentative at Lisbon, instructing him to expedite 
the departure of the survivoi-s on Export Lines' 
ships to New York and to that end to accord 
I^reference in granting accommodations to these 
distressed Americans. The Department of 
State continues in close touch by telegraph with 
its officers at Bordeaux, Madrid, and Lisbon 
regarding the situation. 

Ambassador Weddell reported on the night 
of May 29 as follows : 

"Clark [DuWayne G. Clark, of California, 
Assistant Commercial Attache of the Embassv 



at Madrid] reported by telephone this evening 
that he visited Biarritz today with Poland 
[George W. Poland, Jr., of Virginia, private 
secretary to Ambassador WeddellJ and that he 
considered the passport details were progress- 
ing so well that they could anticipate that Zam- 
zam survivors would be able to enter Spain on 
Saturday morning in transit to the Portuguese 
frontier, reaching there according to schedule 
aiiout noon on Sunday. The group will be 
transported in three cars attached to the reg- 
ular train leaving San Sebastian for Fuentes 
Onoro Saturday evening and will be accom- 
panied by Clark. 

"Arrangements for securing the collective 
Portuguese visa from the Portuguese Consul at 
San Sebastian have been completed and the 
Spanish authoiities Iiave granted permission 
for the transit tlu'ough Spain for the 140 sur- 
vivors. Clark reports that he anticipates no 
delays on the part of the German authorities in 
delivering the group at the frontier as previously 
arranged and that he and Poland have been 
\ery courteously treated by the German 
authorities." 



Commercial Policy 



IMPORT QUOTAS ON WHEAT AND WHEAT FLOUR 



PROCLAMATION BY THE PRESIDENT 



[Released to the press by the White House] 

The following proclamation, entitled "Impos- 
ing Quotas on Imjiorts of Wheat and Wheat 
Flour", has been issued by the President: 

Whereas pursuant to section 22 of the Agri- 
cultural Adjustment Act of 1933 as amended by 
section 31 of the act of August 24, 1935 (49 Stat. 
750, 773), as amended by section 5 of the act of 
February 29, 1936 (49 Stat. 1148, 1152), as re- 
enacted by section 1 of the act of June 3, 1937 
(50 Stat. 246), and as further amended by the 



act of January 25, 1940 (54 Stat. 17), I caused 
the United States Tariff Commission to make an 
investigation to determine whether wheat or 
wheat products are being or are practically cer- 
tain to be imported into the United States under 
such conditions and in sufficient quantities as to 
render or tend to render ineffective or materially 
interfere with the program undertaken with re- 
spect to wheat under the Soil Conservation and 
Domestic Allotment Act, as amended, or to re- 
duce substantially the amount of any product 



664 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtrLLETIN 



processed in the United States from wheat ; and 
Whereas, iu the course of the investigation, 
after due notice, hearings were held, at which 
parties interested were given opportunity to be 
present, to produce evidence, and to be heard, 
and, in addition to the hearings, the Commis- 
sion made such investigation as it deemed neces- 
sary for a full disclosure and presentation of 
the facts; and 

Whereas the Commission has made findings 
of fact and has transmitted to me a report of 
such findings and its recommendations based 
thereon, together with a transcript of the evi- 
dence submitted at the hearings, and has also 
transmitted a copy of such report to the 
Secretary of Agriculture : 

Now, THEEEEORE, I, FrANKLIN D. RoOSEVTLT, 

President of the United States of America, do 
hereby find, on the basis of such investigation 
and report, that wheat and wheat flour are prac- 
tically certain to be imported into the United 
States under such conditions and in sufficient 
quantities as to tend to render ineffectiA'C and 
materially interfere with the program under- 
taken witli respect to wheat under the Soil Con- 
servation and Domestic Allotment Act, as 
amended, and to reduce substantially the 
amount of flour processed in the United States 
from wheat produced in the United States. 
Accordingly, I hereby proclaim that the total 
quantities of wheat and wheat flour originating 
in any of the countries named in the following 
table which may be entered, or withdrawn from 
warehouse, for consumption in any period of 
12 months, commencing j\Iay 29, shall not ex- 
ceed the quantities shown opposite each of said 
countries, which quantities I hereb^v find and 
declare shown by the investigation to be nec- 
essary to prescribe in order that the entry of 
wheat and wheat flour will not render or tend 
to render ineffective or materially interfere with 
the program undertaken with respect to wheat 
under the Soil Conservation and Domestic 
Allotment Act, as amended, or reduce substan- 
tially the amount of any product processed in 
the United States from wheat produced in the 
United States: 





Import quotas 


Country 


Wheat 
(Bushels) 


Wheat flour, 
semolina, 
crushed or 

cracked 

wheat, and 

similar wheat 

products 

(Pounds) 




705, 000 




China 


24,000 
13,000 
13,000 

8,000 
75,000 

1,000 






Hong Kong 




Japan _ . . 






100 




Germany. 


100 
100 


5,000 
S 000 


Syria - -- 




1,000 
1,000 
1.000 

14,000 
2,000 

12,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1 000 


Chile.-- -- 




Netherlands. . 


100 

2.000 

100 




Italv 


Cuba 


France 


1,000 


Greece . . . 




100 




X'riigiiay 








1,000 

1.000 










1,000 


Norway. 




1 000 


Canary Islands 




1,000 




1.000 
100 
100 
100 
100 








Brazil 




Union of Soviet Socialist Republics 












Total -- 


SOD, 000 


4, 000. 000 







I find and declare that the total quantity of 
wjieat or wheat flour which may he. entered 
hereunder with respect to each of the countries 
named herein is not less than 50 per centum of 
the average annual quantity of wheat or wheat 
flour, respectively, which was imported from 
each of such countries during the period from 
January 1, 1929, to December 31, 1933, both 
dates inclusive, and that durhig the period 
named no wheat or wheat flour originating in 
any foreign countiies other than those enu- 
merated in the foregoing table was imported 
into the United States. No wheat or wheat 
flour originating in any other foreign country 
shall be permitted to be entered, or withdrawn 
from warehouse, for consumption during the 
effectiveness of this proclamation. 



MAY 3 1, 1941 



665 



As used in this prochiination, "wheat flour" 
inchides semolina, crushed or cracked wheat, 
and similar wheat products. Except as used in 
the first paragraph, "wheat" and "wheat flour" 
do not include wheat or wheat flour unfit for 
Inunan consumption. 

I'his proclamation shall become etTcctive on 
the 20th day of May 1941. 

In witness wiiereof, I have hereunto sot my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States 
to be affixed. 



Done at the City of Washington this 28th 
day of May, in the year of our 
[seal] Lord nineteen hundred and forty- 
one, and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the one hundred and 
sixty-fifth. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 
By the President: 

CORDELL HtTLL 

Secrctanj of State 
I No. 2489] 



EXCHANGE OF NOTES WITH CANADA 



[Released to the press May 20] 

In connection with the approval by the Presi- 
dent on I\fay 28 of a report of the Tariff Com- 
mission recommending the establishment of 
import quotas on wheat and wheat flour, the 
Department of State made public the following 
exchange of notes dated May 28, 1941 between 
the Acting Under Secretary of State for Ex- 
ternal Affairs of Canada, the Honorable Norman 
Robertson, and the American Minister to Can- 
ada, the Honorable Jay Pierrepont Moft'at : 

The American Minister to the Secretary of 
State for External Affairs of Canada 

Sir: 

I have been instructed to call to your atten- 
tion the fact that, due to legislative action look- 
ing toward an increase in the income of Ameri- 
can wheat producers there has been a substantial 
rise in the price of wheat in the United States. 
Asa result of this development the spread be- 
tween the price of wheat in the United States 
an<l the price of wheat in Canada has materially 
widened, thus making practicable an abnormal 
importation of Canadian wheat into the United 
States for consumption. 

In view of the prospects of a record carry- 
over of wheat in the United States, prospects 
for a l)etter than average wheat production this 
year and extremely limited possibilities for ex- 
jiort, it is obvious that the United States is faced 



with a surplus problem of its own. Further- 
more, the importation of appreciable quantities 
of wheat from Canada would materially inter- 
fere with the purposes of the wheat progi'am 
of the United States set forth in the preceding 
paragraph. 

In view of this situation, the Goverimient of 
the United States regretfidly finds it necessary 
on the basis of the findings of the United States 
Tariff Commission to place a limitation on the 
importation of Canadian wheat. Such action, 
however, will not a2:)ply to the movement of 
Canadian wheat into the United States for mill- 
ing in bond and export, or to Canadian wheat 
moving through the United States for export. 
In the latter connection, moreover, the Govern- 
ment of the United States is anxious to collabo- 
rate closely with Canadian wheat authorities in 
making the most effective use of the available 
storage facilities in the United States. 

In taking the action referred to above, the 
Govermnent of the United States recognizes 
that the wheat problem is, in fact, an interna- 
tional pioblem and one in which the Govern- 
ments of Canada and the United States have 
nuitual interests. It is for this reason that the 
Government of the United States welcomes the 
recent indication of the Canadian Government 
of its willingness to resume discussions on an 
international basis of the whole wheat surplus 
problem. The Government of the United 



666 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtTLLETIN 



States accordingly proposes to extend invita- 
tions for such discussions in Washington in the 
near future. 

In addition to such discussions, however, tlie 
Government of the United States feels that 
there is a need for continuing consultation be- 
tween appi-opriate authorities of our two Gov- 
ernments with a view to preventing to the full- 
est possible extent divergencies in our respec- 
tive wheat progi-ams and i^olicies. It is believed 
such collaboration would be in accord with the 
purposes of the two Governments to work to- 
ward a closer integi-ation of the economies of 
both countries. The Government of the United 
States would accordingly welcome an expres- 
sion of the ^•iews of the Canadian Government 
on this subject. 

Accept [etc.] Pierkepont Moffat 



The Act'my Under Secretary of State for 
External Affairs of Canada to the American 
Minister 
Sir: 

I have the honour to acknowledge receipt of 
your note of May 28, 1941, and in reply to in- 
form you that the Canadian Government appre- 
ciates fully the nature of the wheat program 
now being undertaken in the United States. In 
view of the circumstances described in your 
Note I am glad to be able to assure you that 
Canada is prepared to cooperate by avoiding, so 
far as may be possible, any action which would 
be likely to embarrass your Government in the 



execution of measures designed to improve the 
domestic jjosition of wheat producers in the 
United States. 

2. The Canadian Government is gratified to 
note that nothing will be done to impede the 
movement through the United States of Cana- 
dian wheat destined for export from American 
seaboard ports, or for milling in bond for 
export. As you are aware this movement 
through the United States is important in order 
to maintain the regular and continuous ship- 
ment of Canadian wheat overseas. 

3. In view of the problem of surplus wheat 
with wliich the governments of almost all the 
major exporting countries are now confronted, 
and having in mind the altered conditions and 
prospects for trade resulting from the war, the 
Canadian Government welcomes the proposal 
that the discussions of this problem with the 
United States Government and other interested 
governments should be resumed. 

4. Apart from discussion of the international 
problem, the Canadian Government recognizes 
the value of, and is willing to participate in, 
continuing consultations on this subject as it 
affects the United States and Canada. It is 
assumed that these consultations will embrace 
such aspects of tlie problem as the mutually 
advantageous use of storage facilities in the 
United States and Canada, as well as all deci- 
sions in the field of wheat policy which, al- 
though taken by one Government, may have a 
bearing on the interest of the other. 

Accept [etc.] Norman Robertson 



Cultural Relations 



INTER- AMERICAN COLLABORATION IN THE FIELD OF 

SOCIAL WELFARE 



Directors and representatives of 17 schools of 
.social woi'k in 11 of the American republics ar- 
rived in New York between May 29 and June 2 
to spend a month in study, observation, and 
consultation with social-work leaders in the 
United States. 



The visit was arranged by the Office of the 
Coordinator of Commercial and Cultiu-al Rela- 
tions Between the American Republics, the De- 
partment of State, and the Department of 
Labor. Invitations, conveyed through the De- 
partment of State, were issued by the Executive 



MAY 31, 1941 



667 



Committee of the American Association of 
Schools of Social Work and the Advisory Com- 
mittee on Inter-American Cooperation in Social 
AVelfare Work of the Children's Bureau, U. S. 
Department of Labor. 

The visitors from the other Americas will 
visit schools of social work and social agencies 
in New York, Chicago, Cleveland, Philadelphia, 
and Washington. They will confer with officials 
of public and private agencies, directors of so- 
cial-work schools, and representatives of the 
Children's Bureau and other Federal agencies 
concerned with health and welfare. They will 
also visit rural social-work projects in Illinois, 
Indiana, Maryland, and Virginia and will at- 
tend the National Conference of Social Work in 
Atlantic City. 

The 11 countries represented are: Argentina, 
Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, 
Mexico, Paraguay , Peru, Uruguay, and 
Venezuela. 

ENGINEERS FROM OTHER AMERICAN 
REPUBLICS TO STUDY IN THE 
UNITED STATES 

A gi'oup of outstanding young engineei's from 
the other American republics will spend a year 
in the United States studying the methods and 
techniques of the Rural Electrification Ad- 
ministration as the result of a cooperative effort 
by the governments of the American republics 
concerned to facilitate a mutual luiderstanding 
of technical electrification problems. 

The Rural Electrification Administration, in 
cooperation witli the Department of Agricul- 
ture, the Department of State, and the Office of 
the Coordinator of Commercial and Cultural 
Relations Between the American Republics, has 
developed and is carrying out the project. 

When details of the plan had been completed 
the Department of State transmitted invitations 
to other American republics asking each of 
them to select a candidate. It was requested 
that the candidates be between 20 and 30 years 
of age, preferably single, and gi-aduates of a 
high-ranking engineering school. Two engi- 
neers from Peru and Uruguay, Seiior Lopez- 
Jimenez and Senor Rossi, respectively, have 



already been selected and are expected to reach 
Washington about the middle of June. Each of 
them has won considerable distinction in his 
own country, and both have a working knowl- 
edge of English. Argentina and Mexico have 
already suggested candidates, and it is expected 
that other countries will do so during the next 
few weeks. 

During the earlier part of their stay in Wash- 
ington the visiting engineers will work as stu- 
dent members of the Rural Electrification Ad- 
ministration staff with trainees from United 
States engineering schools, and, after a short 
period of orientation, they will be given train- 
ing and practical duties in keeping with their 
experience and ability. 

Certain funds for this new project for the 
bettering of cultural relations in the field of 
engineering have been made available by the 
Office of the Coordinator of Commercial and 
Cultural Relations Between the American Re- 
publics. During the engineers' sojourn in the 
United States the Rural Electrification Ad- 
ministration will make arrangements for their 
housing, their training, and inspection trips, 
which will include assignments with leading 
manufacturers of electrical supplies and equip- 
ment. At tlie end of their course of study, the 
engineers will be assigned to visit Rural Electri- 
fication Administration systems throughout the 
LTnited States accompanied by construction and 
operations engineers. 

PHYSICIAN FROM THE UNITED 
STATES TO LECTURE IN COLOMBIA 

[Released to tbe press May 31] 

Dr. Hem-y K. Beecher, a professor at the 
Harvard Medical School and a member of the 
stafl' of the Massachusetts General Hospital, 
will give a series of lectures on the pharmacol- 
ogy of anesthesia and its clinical applications 
at the National Uiiiversity of Colombia at 
Bogota during the latter part of June and early 
July. Dr. Beecher's lecture course has been 
arranged as the result of a desire expressed by 
the Faculty of Medicine of the National Uni- 
versity of Colombia to have a physician versed 
in the subject of the pharmacology of anesthesia 



668 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



give a coiu-se at that university. His visit to 
Colombia has been made possible through a 
travel grant awarded to him by the Department 
of State. Dr. Beecher, accompanied by Mrs. 
Bee^her, will sail from New York on June 6, 
1941 on tlie S.S. Santa Elena. 

Dr. Beecher was born in Wichita, Kans., on 
February 4, 1904. He attended the University 
of Kansas, receiving an A.B. degree in 1926 and 
an A.M. degree in 1927. He graduated from 
Harvard Medical School in 1932, receiving an 
M.D. degree cium Imude. Four years later, lie 



was appointed instructor in anesthesia at Har- 
vard, and subsequently became an associate pro- 
fessor in the same subject. Dr. Beecher studied 
for a year in Europe in 1934-35. 

The Department of State has awarded the 
travel grant to Dr. Beecher in the belief that 
the series of lectures he will deliver and the 
contacts he will make in Colombia will con- 
tribute in an effective manner to the strengthen- 
ing of relations between the members of the 
medical profession in the Umted States and 
Colombia. 



Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, Etc. 



MONTHLY STATI>STICS 



[Released to tbe press May 29] 

Note: Iu the tables set forth below relating to arms- 
export licenses issued aud arms exported, statistics 
concerning shipments authorized and made to the 
British Commonwealth of Nations, the British Empire, 
British mandates, and British armed forces elsewhere 
are not listed separately but are combined under the 
heading British Commonwealth of Nations. 

The figures relating to arms, the licenses for the 
export of which were revoked before they were used, 
have been subtracted from the figures apijeariug iu 
the cumulative column of the table below in regard 
to arms-export licenses issued. These latter figures 
are therefore net figures. They are not yet final and 
definitive since licenses may be amended or revoked 
at any time before being used. They are, however, 
accurate as of the date of this press relea.se. 

The statistics of actual exports in these releases are 
believed to be substantially complete. It is possible, 
however, that some shipments are not included. If 
this proves to be the fact, statistics In regard to such 
shipments will be included in the cumulative figures 
in later releases. 

Arms-Export Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of 
the arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
licensed for export by the Secretary of State 
during the year 1941 up to and including the 
month of Aj^ril: 





Category 


Value of e.xport licenses issued 


Country o( destination 


AprU 1941 


4 months end- 
ing April 30, 
1941 


Angola 


I (4) 

V (1) 

(2) 


$16.07 


$16 07 




3 160 00 






120 00 








Total 


lfi.07 


3 286 07 




I (1) 
(4) 

III (2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






62.35 
214.00 


62 35 




738. 00 
60.00 




13.660.00 
1,837.00 


19,204.00 
8, 212. 00 
1 900 00 






33,348 08 




2,000.00 
19,845.00 


29, 465. 76 
19, 846. 00 
51,390 00 








Total . 


37, 698. 35 


164 215 19 




I (I) 

V (1) 

(2) 

(3) 




Belgian Congo . 




98,051.00 
10, 420. 00 
7, 285. 00 
19, 235. 60 




10, 420. 00 

45.00 

19, 236. 60 


Total 


29, 700. 60 


134,991.50 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
VII (1) 






166 00 






864.00 




119. 00 
16,000.00 


673. 40 

17,400.00 

722.00 








Total 


16,119.00 


19,814.40 



MAY 31, 1941 



669 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 




4 montlis end- 






April 1941 


ing .\pril 30, 
1941 


Brazil .. 


I (1) 
(2) 




$480. 60 




$6, 750. 00 


6, 806. 26 




(4) 


487.00 


2, 197. 70 




III (2) 


1, 500. 00 


1,500.00 




IV (1) 


32,631,00 


78,410.60 




(2) 


7.611.00 


15,199.00 




V (1) 


28, 90O. 00 


335, 464. OO 




(2) 


33, 436. 71 


57,717.67 




(3) 


146,659.00 


230,461.00 




VII (1) 




21,180.00 








Total 


257,974.71 


749, 465. 62 




I (1) 




British Commonwealth of 


25,006,445.94 


27, 402, 665. 95 


Nations, the British Em- 


(2) 


828,221.00 


15, 456, 345. 29 


pire, British mandates, and 


(3) 


7, 904, 919. 20 


28, 735, 607. 70 




(4) 


4, 273, 525. 27 


89,675,730.42 




(5) 




1, 656, 958. 68 




(6) 


4, 432, 563. 00 


6, 872, 563. 00 




II 


6, 354, 648. 00 


6, 354, 598. 00 




III (1) 


77,566,176.02 


235, 093, 369. 09 




(2) 


25. 652. 00 


90,553.87 




IV (1) 


172,979.30 


1, 865, 655. 26 




(2) 


26, 642. 35 


3,623,006.72 




V (1) 


38. 000. 00 


612,625.00 




(2) 


390,098.60 


45, 526, 665. 68 




(3) 


2,618,297.23 


42, 854, 576. 97 




VI (2) 




2, 449. 00 




VII (1) 


6,196,765.50 


12, 067, 771. 29 




(2) 


349,976.33 


780, 095. 83 


Total 


136,183,809.74 


617,470, 117.75 




I (3) 




Chile 




38, 080. 00 




III (1) 


300, 000. 00 


300, oon no 




IV (1) 




584. 60 




(2) 




3, 687. 31 




V (1) 




2, 100. 00 




(2) 


8.50.00 


28,249.00 




(3) 


7, 600. 00 


39, 602 75 




VII (1) 




388. 80 




(2) 




12,898.92 








Total 


308, 350. 00 


425, 591. 38 




I (2) 




China - --- 


463, 600. 00 


468, 699. 25 




III (1) 




6,307,732.00 




(2) 




2, 600. 00 




V (2) 
(3) 

vn (1) 




15, 775. 00 






987, 700. 00 




337,120.00 


337, 120. 00 




(2) 




245, 002. 64 








Total 


800, 720. 00 


8, 364, 628. 89 




I (4) 








17.00 




IV (1) 




4, 417. 60 




(2) 


227.00 


580.00 




V (1) 


6, 200. 00 


6, 200. 00 




(2) 


2, 227. 50 


2, 297. 60 




(3) 




24, 280. 00 




vn (1) 




3, 575. 29 




(2) 


195.00 


2,944.00 


Total.- - 


8.849.50 


44,311.29 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


April 1941 


4 months end- 
ing April 30, 
1941 


Costa Rica 


I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

VII (1) 


$2,00 


$2.00 




59.00 




24,00 


24.00 
22, 280. 00 






1,093.60 




100, 00 


317.20 


Total -.. 


126,00 


23, 781. 80 




I (1) 
W 

III (1) 

IV CD 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (1) 

(2) 




Cuba 




134.00 






183. 00 




6, 750, 00 
44,00 
282. 00 


6, 750. 00 
1,419.00 
6, 069. 00 
1, 195. 00 






5, 944. 28 






744. 60 








.Total 


7,076.00 


22,438.78 




I (1) 
(4) 
(5) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (3) 
VII (2) 




Curasao 


1,179.57 


37, 929. 67 




2, 435. 00 




1,960.00 


1, 950. 00 
426. 40 






190. 56 






2, 000. 00 






60.00 










3, 129. 57 


44,991.53 




IV (2) 
VII (1) 








206. 00 






903,60 








Total 




1,169.60 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (3) 
VII (1) 

(2) 










209. 30 






166. 68 




81.50 
9.44 


190.50 

1, 797. 44 

30, 000. 00 




1, 106. 00 


1, 106. 00 
91.00 








Total 


1, 195. 94 


33,548.92 




IV (1) 

I (4) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








178. 50 










67.00 

40.00 

4, 300. 00 

30.00 


89.25 




40.00 

6, 300. 00 

200.00 

3, 000. 00 






43.20 




3, 615. 00 


3,615.00 


Total ,. 


8,052 00 


13, 287. 45 




I (4) 
V (2) 




Finland 


130.00 


130.00 




4, 810. 00 








Total 


130. 00 


4, 940. 00 




I (2) 
(4) 
(5) 




French Indochina 




16, 000. 00 




504.00 


18, 404. 00 
10, 000. 00 



670 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


AprU 1941 


4 months end- 
ing April 30, 
1941 


French Indochina— Cont. 


III 


(2) 




$3, 730. 00 






Total 


$604. 00 


48. 134. 00 




I 
III 

vn 


(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(6) 
(6) 
(1) 
(2) 






17, 850. 00 


17.850.00 




309. 500. 00 




1, 757, 473. 46 

20,000.00 

249,300.00 

1, 800, 000. 00 


4. 925, 673. 46 
20,000.00 

249,300.00 
1,800,000.00 

197, 335. 54 








Total 


3, 844, 623. 46 


7,519,559.00 




IV 
V 

VII 


(2) 

CD 

(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 








2,547.00 




15,000.00 


15.000.00 
1.372.00 






6,000.00 






194. 40 




270. 75 


1,445.75 


Total. 


15, 270. 75 


25, 569. 15 




IV 
VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(2) 








27.00 






14.68 






.10 








Total 




41.78 




I 

IV 

V 


(4) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 










213. 00 






649. 00 






20. 000. 00 






169.00 








Total 




21. 031. 00 




I 
III 

V 
VI 


(2) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 








). 600. 00 

107. 00 

1,296,000.00 

2, 598. 00 

211,682.08 

48, 000. 00 

300. 00 


1,600.00 




107. 00 

1,296,000.00 

2,598.00 

212, 166. 08 

48, 000. 00 

300. 00 


Total 


1, 560, 287. 08 


1, 560, 771. 08 




I 

V 


(2) 
(2) 
0) 








10, 864. 60 






900.64 




7, 000. 00 


7, 000. 00 


Total 


7. 000. 00 


18. 765. 24 




IV 
V 


(2) 
(2) 




Iraq 




6.21 






1. 170. 00 








Total 




1,176.21 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 






Mexico - 


661.00 
4,110.00 
2, 890. 00 
12, 062. 00 
22, 400. 00 
1, 167. 00 


767. 60 




15, 047. 60 
8, 171. 50 
35. 448. 02 
271, 150. 00 
19,901.69 
8, 765. 00 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


AprU 1941 


4 months end- 
ing April 30, 
1941 


Mexico— Continued. 


VII (1) 

(2) 


$3, 414. 45 
11, 630. 00 


$15,650.05 
42,067.00 


Total - - 


58, 234. 45 


416. 858. 36 




I (4) 

V (1) 

(2) 




Mozambique 




29.60 


2. 000. 00 
233. 37 


2.000.00 
655. 82 


Total 


2. 233. 37 


2, 685. 42 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(6) 
(6) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






68.20 
348. 970. 00 


308.20 




620. 470. 00 
444, 000. 00 




1, 396, 599. 59 

1, 219, 700. 00 

10, 564. 000. 00 

43.488.000.00 


7, 298, 616. 03 

1,846,010.00 

11,384,000.00 

45, 442. 940. 00 

750. 00 




1,006.00 
24, 834. 42 


11.191.00 
27, 840. 36 
5, 500. 00 




10, 145. 00 


477. 924. 64 
82, 187. 60 




750.00 


6,612.60 
745, 000. 00 










67,053,063.21 


68, 393, 249. 23 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (2) 

V (2) 
(3) 




New Caledonia 




264. 30 


164.59 


1,135.09 
47 00 






3. 622. 00 






28, 850. 00 






Total 


164. 69 


33,818.39 




IV (2) 
VII (1) 








9,311.00 






1,360.00 








Total 




10,671.00 




V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 










26. 000. 00 




175. 00 


475.00 
1,660 00 








Total 


176.00 


28, 125. 00 




IV (2) 

V (3) 








49.00 






1, 550. 00 








Total 




1, 599. 00 




IV (1) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






Peru 




19.90 




262, 600. 00 
3, 192. 00 
7,231.00 


268, 231. 25 

42, 034. 00 

147. 300. 00 

3. 498. 69 






685. 00 








Total 


273, 023. 00 


461. 668. 84 



MAY 31, 1941 



671 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


April 1941 


4 months end- 
ing April 30, 
1941 




I 

III 

V 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 


$20,091.20 

96, 600. 00 

3, 260. 00 

3,500.00 


$66, 203. 20 




95, 600. 00 
3,400.00 
23,500.00 


Total 


122, 441. 20 


188, 703. 20 




I 
VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(1) 








27, 142. 60 






8, 100. 00 






36, 000. 00 






1,800.00 




3, 250. 00 
193. 80 


3,250.00 
775. 20 


Total 


3, 443. 80 


77, 057. 70 




I 

IV 
V 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 








149.93 






2, 864. 00 






374.28 






314.11 








Total 




3, 702. 32 




I 

VII 


(3) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 






Turkey - 


60, 000. 00 
730, 485. 00 
138, 220. 00 

11, 700. 00 


50,000.00 




730,485.00 
138, 220. 00 
144, 060. 00 


Total 


930, 406. 00 


1, 062, 766. 00 




I 

IV 

V 

VII 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
C2) 
(1) 




Uruguay 




181. 60 




800. 00 

80.00 

4, 503. 00 

12, 640. 00 

67.60 

6, 583. 60 


1,152.00 
311.00 

9, 101. 00 

36, 940. 00 

618. 30 

6, 583. 60 


Total 


23, 674. 10 


53, 887. 60 




IV 
V 
VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 








26, 202. 00 






1, 883. 00 




2, 160. 00 

41,776.00 

619. 84 

1.00 


7, 362. 50 

65, 889. 00 

6, 609. 74 

3, 077. 00 


Total 


44, 456. 84 


111,023.24 








Grand total 


201,601.837.23 


607, 561. 519. 33 









ported during the year 1941 up to and including 
the month of April under export licenses issued 
by the Secretary of State : 



During the month of April, 569 arms-export 
licenses were issued, making a total of 2,001 
such licenses issued during the current year. 

Arms Exported 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of the 
arms, aimnunition, and implements of war ex- 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country ot destination 




4 months 








April 1941 


ending 










April 30, 1941 


Angola 


V 


en 




$3, 150. 00 






(2) 




120.00 








Total 




3, 270. 00 




T 


(4) 






Argentina 


$289.00 


742.00 




TIT 


di 




33, 000. 00 






f?i 




60.00 




IV 


(1) 


7, 074. 00 


14, 261. 00 






(2) 


2,600.00 


2,930.00 




V 


fit 




1,900.00 






m 




46, 326. 60 






(3) 


13, 450. 00 


13,450.00 




VTT 


C\) 




24, 760. 00 






(2) 




8, 154. 00 








Total 


23,413.00 


145, 673. 50 




I 
IV 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 








155.00 






864.00 




119. 00 


666.40 




VII 


(1) 




1,371.80 








Total 


119.00 


3, 057. 20 




I 


0) 

(2) 




Brazil 


46.00 
7, 470. 00 


135.00 




7, 470. 00 






(3) 


17, 425. 00 


37, 676. 00 






(4) 


64.00 


333. 70 






(5) 




73, 924 00 




III 


(1) 
f21 


683, 200. 00 


683, 200. 00 
60.00 




IV 


(1) 


15,345.00 


61, 827. 60 






(2) 


4, 445. 00 


6, 916. 63 




V 


(1) 


106,400.00 


362,641.00 






(2) 


18, 999. 21 


76, 227. 11 






(3) 


61,626.00 


110,066.00 


Total 


815,019.21 


1, 319, 465. 94 




I 


(1) 




British Commonwealth of Na- 


42,162.93 


2, 137, 724. 58 


tions, the British Empire, 




(2) 


2, 915, 871. 00 


7, 493, 746. 51 


British mandates, and Brit- 




(3) 


2, 970, 963. 00 


5, 246, 007. OO 


ish armed forces elsewhere. 




(4) 


3, 965, 514. 30 


14, 246, 686. 02 






(5) 


984, 205. 00 


4, 655, 142. 00 






(6) 


1, 350, 000. 00 


1, 535, 066. 00 




II 




907,792.00 


907, 892. 00 




III 


(1) 


29,824,815.00 


89, 944, 969. 04 






(2) 


6, 781. 13 


32, 669. 13 




IV 


(1) 


180, 576. 21 


894, 875. 23 






(2) 


353,369.02 


1,968,279.51 




V 


(1) 


691, 397. 00 


2,694,022.00 






(2) 


2, 844, 816. 28 


7, 210, 960. 03 






(3) 


7, 739, 598. 20 


34, 409, 726. 17 




VI 


(2) 


200.00 


2,444.00 




vn 


(1) 


898,851.88 


2, 679, 677. 18 






(2) 


160, 189. 20 


483, 567. 18 


Total... 


55,726,101.15 


176, 443, 251. 58 



672 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value or actual exports 


Country of destination 


April 1941 


4 months 

endms 

April 30, 1941 


Chile 


III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




$409, 560. 00 






1, 164. 00 






050. 91 






138, 934. 00 






20, 413. 00 






18, 087. 75 






2, 187. OO 






12, 898. 92 








Total 




603, 895. 58 




I (2) 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 










5,099.26 






2, 604, 354. 00 




$3, 250. 00 


106,046.00 
1, 514. 30 






34, 100. 00 






405, 650. 00 




177,250.00 


291,620.00 
139. 000. 00 






263, 500. 00 








Total 


180, 500. 00 


3, 860, 682. 66 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








35.80 




810. 00 


810.00 
959. 00 






70.00 






34, 280. 00 






3, 676. 29 






2, 700. 00 








Total 


810.00 


42, 430. 09 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

VII (1) 








13.00 






125. 00 






2, 513. 00 






22, 286. 00 




94.00 


3, 744. 00 
736. 00 








Total 


94.00 


29,417.00 




I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (1) 








39.00 




64.00 

44.00 

1,642.00 


8, 629. 00 
1, 719. 00 
6, 527. 36 
1, 195. 00 






3, 777. 80 








Total 


1, 750. 00 


21,887.16 




I (1) 

(3) 

(4) 

V (3) 

VII (2) 








8,600.00 






16, 000. 00 






110.00 




2,000.00 


2, 000. 00 
60.00 








Total 


2,000.00 


25, 670. 00 




VII (1) 

I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 






904.00 


1, 957. 00 










36.00 






81.00 






109.00 




557. 00 


651.00 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


April 1941 


4 months 

ending 

April 30, 1941 




V 
VII 


(3) 
(2) 




$29,812.00 






66.00 








Total 


$557.00 


30, 756. 00 




IV 


(1) 
(2) 








0, 120. 00 






62.00 












6, 172. 00 




I 
V 


(4) 
(1) 
C2) 
(3) 








22.00 


66.00 




1, 600. 00 






600.00 




3,000.00 


3, 000. 00 




3, 022. 00 


6, 166. 00 




V 

I 
III 

V 
VII 


(2) 

(3) 
(4) 
(6) 
(1) 
(3) 
(2) 






4, 785. 00 


6, 296. 00 








173,320.00 

1,537,475.00 

20, 000. 00 

2, 060, 000. 00 

105, 040. 00 


173, 320. 00 




2, 882. 365. 00 
20, 000. 00 

2,060,000.00 
105, 040. 00 
146, 632. 34 








Total 


3, 895, 835. 00 


5, 387, 357. 34 




IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(2) 








25.50 




222.00 


502.00 
5, 000. 00 






1,175.00 








Total -- -.- 


222. 00 


6, 702. 60 




IV 
VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(2) 




Haiti 




27.00 






8.00 






,10 








Total - 




35.10 




I 

IV 
V 


(4) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 










128.00 






435. 00 






20, 000. 00 




169.00 


169. 00 


Total 


169. 00 


20. 732. 00 




I 
III 

V 


(2) 
(1) 
(2) 






1, 600. 00 
960,000.00 
376, 886. 00 


1, 600. 00 




960, 000. 00 
377,370.00 




1, 338, 486. 00 


1, 338, 970. 00 




I 
III 

V 


(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




Iran 




40,816.00 






78, 940. 00 




949. 44 


949. 44 
7,600.00 








Total 


949.44 


128, 304. 44 




I 

V 


(2) 
(2) 








47,865.00 




1, 170. 00 


149,170.00 


Total 


1, 170. 00 


197, 035. 00 



MAY 31, 1941 



673 





Category 


Value of actual e.\ports 


Country of destination 


April 1941 


4 months 

ending 

April 30, 1941 




V (2) 

I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




$169. 00 












46.00 




$7, 546. 60 
2, 400. 00 
18,221.02 
23, 300. 00 

1,415. on 

2, 169. 00 

712. 25 

7, 945. 00 


35,934.60 

6, 281. 50 
18, 221. 02 

262,985.00 
2, 723. 59 

7, 733. 00 
9, 849. 25 

21, 150. 00 


Total 


63, 708. 87 


353, 922. 96 




I (4) 

I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 

II 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








29.60 










214.00 
16, 364. 00 

156, 270. 00 
39, 528. 00 

221, 620. 00 


400.00 




514,709.00 
478, 374. 00 

76,115.84 
714,021.00 

75, 273. 00 






106, 020. 00 




769,114.00 


2, 578, 842. 00 
750.00 




13,748.00 
2, 465. 50 


57,072.00 

6, 563. 11 

160, 925. 00 




45,444.55 


238, 3G6. 20 
50, 250. 00 




626.00 


1, 572. 80 
30, 000. 00 








Total 


1, 265, 293. 06 


5, 089, 253. 95 




I (I) 

(4) 

V (2) 




New Caledonia 




304.00 






1,088 86 






3, 622. 00 








Total 




4 914 86 




IV (2) 

V (1) 
VII (1) 






Nicaragua 




4,117 00 






3, 500. 00 




1, 360. 00 


1,360.00 


Total 


1, 360. 00 


8, 977. 00 




V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 




Panama .. 




19 277 00 




185.00 


185. 00 
1, 650. 00 








Total 


185. 00 


21,112.00 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




Peru . 


219. 00 


219 00 




19.90 




240. 00 
121,000.00 


1,203.00 
126,481.00 
33, 810. 40 




33, 776. 00 


42, 990. 00 
1,697 49 






585.00 








Total 


155, 235. 00 


207, 005. 79 





C ategory 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


April 1941 


4 months 

ending 

April 30, 1941 


Portugal 


I 
V 


(4) 
(2) 
(3) 




$16, 170. 18 




$135. 00 


335. 00 
15, 000. 00 


Total.. ._ 


135. 00 


61, 605. 18 




I 
VII 


(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(1) 




Surinam 




8, 100. DO 






36, 000. 00 






1, 000. 00 




193. 80 


681.40 


Total 


193. 80 


45,681.40 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 




Thailand 




20, 667. 00 




347. 00 

1, 390. 00 

73.00 


63.00 

3, 106. 00 

234. 00 

1, 000. 00 








Total 


1, 497. 00 


25, 060. 00 




III 

V 
VII 


(2) 
(2) 
(2) 




Turliey 




19, 066. 86 






46, 958. 20 






138, 714. 00 








Total 




204, 729. 06 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 






Uruguay . . 


61.60 
104. 00 


61 60 




439.49 
231. 00 




1, 085. 00 

15,100.00 

341.00 


5. 218. 33 

19, 982. 00 

1,016.00 

3S6. 00 








Total-. 


16, 691. 60 


27,333 42 




IV 
V 
VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




Venezuela. 




8, 408. 00 
1, 883. 00 








4,979.60 


9, 666. 10 
44,113.00 




1,888.11 


4,829.90 
3, 076. 00 








Total 


6, 867. 71 


71 876 00 




V 


(2) 








6,920.00 






Grand total 


63, 507, 072. 83 


195,746,872.20 









Arms-Import Licenses Issued 

Tlie table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of origin of the arms, 
ammunition, and implements of war licensed for 
import by the Secretary of State during the 
month of April 19il ; 



674 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtlLLETIN 



Country of origin 


Category 


Value 


Total 




V (2) 

V (1) 
(3) 

I (I) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 

V (2) 
VII (2) 

V (2) 
I (3) 

(4) 

V (3) 

V (3) 
I (1) 


$3, 000. 00 

25, 000. 00 

1,000.00 

875.00 

335. 00 

6, 600. 00 

1, 320. 25 

1, 150. 00 

4, 620. 80 

135,240.00 

45.00 

20, 000. 00 

460. 00 

10,000.00 

375.00 

150. 00 


$3, ooa 00 








26, OOO. 00 




149,041.05 
45.00 


Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland. 

Mexico. --. -_ 


30, 460. 00 
375. 00 




150. 00 






Total 




209,071.05 











During the month of April, 46 import licenses 
were issued, making a total of 120 such licenses 
issued during the current year. 

Categories or Akms, Ammunition, and Imple- 
ments or Wak 

The categories of arms, ammunition, and im- 
plements of war in the appropriate column of 
the tables printed above are the categories into 
which those articles were divided in the Presi- 
dent's proclamation of May 1, 1937, enumerat- 
ing the articles which would be considered as 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war for 
the purposes of section 5 of the joint resolution 
of May 1, 1937 [see the Bulletin of January 11, 
1941 ("vol. IV, no. 81), pp. 76-77]. 

Special Statistics in Regard to Arms 
Exports to Cuba 

In compliance with article II of the conven- 
tion between the United States and Cuba to 
suppress smuggling, signed at Habana, March 
11, 1926, which reads in part as follows: 

"The High Contracting Parties agi-ee that 
clearance of shipments of merchandise by water, 
air, or land, from any of the ports of either 
country to a port of entry of the other country, 
shall be denied when such shipment comprises 
articles the importation of which is prohibited 
or restricted in the country to which such ship- 
ment is destined, unless in this last case there 



has been a compliance with the requisites de- 
manded by the laws of both comitries." 

and in compliance with the laws of Cuba which 
restrict the importation of arms, ammunition, 
and imi^lements of war of all kinds by requiring 
an import permit for each shipment, export 
licenses for shipments of arms, ammunition, and 
implements of war to Cuba are required for the 
articles enumerated below in addition to the 
articles enumerated in the President's procla- 
mation of May 1, 1937 : 

(1) Arms and small arms using ammimition 
of caliber .22 or less, other than those classed as 
toys. 

(2) Spare parts of arms and small arms of 
all kinds and calibers, other than those classed 
as toys, and of guns and machine guns. 

(3) Ammunition for the arms and small 
arms under (1) above. 

(4) Sabei-s, swords, and militaiy machetes 
with cross-guard hilts. 

(5) Explosives as follows: explosive pow- 
ders of all kinds for all purposes; nitrocellulose 
having a nitrogen content of 12 percent or less; 
diphenylumine; dynamite of all kinds; nitro- 
glj'Cerine; alkaline nitrates (ammonium, potas- 
Bium, and sodium nitrate); nitric acid; nitro- 
benzene (essence or oil of mirbane) ; sulphur; 
sulphuric acid; chlorate of potash; and ace- 
tones. 

(6) Tear gas (CeHsCOCH^Cl) and other 
similar non-toxic gases and apparatus designed 
for the storage or projection of such gases. 

The table printed below indicates, in respect 
to licenses authorizing the exportation to Cuba 
of the articles and commodities listed in the pre- 
ceding paragraph, issued by the Secretary of 
State during April 1941, the number of licenses 
and the value of the articles and commodities 
described in the licenses : 



Number of licenses 


Section 


Value 


Total 


53 


(1) 

(2) 

(3) 

(5) 


$1, 948. 25 

590. 12 

24, 030. 90 

19, 260. 67 






$45,829.94 



MAY 31, 1941 



675 



The table printed below indicates the vahie of 
the ai'ticles and commodities listed above ex- 
ported to Cuba during April 1941 under licenses 
issued by the Secretary of State : 



Section 



(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(5) 



Value 



$335.00 

92.00 

9, 778. 00 

12.481.89 



Total 



$22, 686. 89 



Tin-Plate Scrap 
During the month of April no licenses au- 
thorizing the exportation of tin-plate scrap 
were issued. 

Helium 

The table printed below gives the essential in- 
formation in regard to the licenses issued dur- 
ing the month of April 1941 authorizing the 
exportation of helium gas under the provisions 
of the act approved on September 1, 1937, and 
the regulations issued pursuant thereto : 



Applicant for license 


Purchaser in 
foreign coun- 
try 


Country of 
destination 


Quantity 

in cubic 

feet 


Total 
value 


The Ohio Chemical 
& Mfg. Co. 


Dr. W. R. 
Lovelace, II. 


Mexico 


6 


$3.00 



The Department 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

Mr. John C. Ross was appointed, by Depart- 
mental Order 940, an Assistant Chief of the 
Division of Commercial Treaties and Agree- 
ments, effective April 16, 1941. 

By Departmental Order 942, Mr. Christian 
M. Ravndal, a Foreign Service officer of class 
IV, was designated as Assistant Chief of the 
Division of the American Republics. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the pre.ss May 31] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since May 10, 1941: 

Donald R. Heath, of Topeka, Kans., First 
Secretary of Embassy at Berlin, Germany, has 
been designated First Secretary of Embassy and 
Consul at Santiago, Chile, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

Ellis O. Briggs, of Lopsfield, Maine, First 
vSecretary of Embassy and Consul at Santiago, 
Chile, has been designated First Secretary of 
Embassy at Habana, Cuba. 

William C. Vyse, of Washington, D. C, 
Consul at Buenos Aires, Argentina, has been 
assigned for duty in the Department of State. 

Ware Adams, of Savannah, Ga., Second Sec- 
retary of Embassy and Consul at Rio de Janeiro, 
Brazil, has been designated Second Secretary of 
Embassy and Consul at London, England, and 
will serve in dual capacity. 

Eric C. Wendelin, of Quincy, Mass., now 
serving in the Department of State, has been 
designed Second Secretary of Embassy at 
Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

John McGilchrist, Consular Agent at Gre- 
nada, British West Indies, died May 10, 1941. 

Joseph Flack, of Doylestown, Pa., Counselor 
of P]mbassy and Consul General at Madrid, 
Spain, has been designated Counselor of Em- 
bassy at Caracas, Venezuela. 

Ivan B. White, of Salem, Oreg., now serving 
ill the Department of State, has been designated 
Third Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul 
at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

Carl W. Strom, of Decorah, Iowa, Vice Con- 
sul at Ziirich, Switzerland, has been a&signed 
for duty in the Department of State. 

Ray L. Thurston, of Madison, Wis., now serv- 
ing in the Department of State, has been as- 
signed as Vice Consul at Bombay, India. 



676 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Jolm W. Tuthill, of Cambridge, Mass., Vice 
Consul at Windsor, Ontario, Canada, has been 
assigned for duty in the Department of State. 

George P. Wilson, of Pennsylvania, formerly 
Vice Consul at Lyon, France, died at Lyon, 



France, on May 17, 1941. 

Arthur J. Eomero, of San Francisco, Calif., 
Clerk in the American Embassy at Buenos 
Aires, Ai-gentina, has been appointed Vice 
Consul at Buenos Aires, Argentina. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



COMMERCE 



INTER-AMERICAN COFFEE AGREEMENT 
Nicaragua 

By a letter dated May 19, 1941 the Director 
General of the Pan American Union informed 
the Secretary of State that the instrument of 
ratification by Nicaragua of the Inter- American 
Coffee Agreement, signed at "Washington on 
November 28, 1940, was deposited with the 
Union on May 13, 1941. At the time of the 
deposit of the instrument of ratification the 
Nicaraguan Minister at Washington signed on 
behalf of his Govennnent the Protocol to the 
Inter-American Coffee Agreement which was 
opened for signature by the signatories of the 
agreement and deposited with the Pan Ameri- 
can Union on April 1.5, 1941. 

POSTAL 

UNIVERSAL POSTAL CONVENTION 

The Postmaster General transmitted to the 
Secretary of State with a letter dated February 
14, 1941, a translation of a circular of the Inter- 
national Bureau of the Universal Postal Union 
at Bern, dated December 4, 1940, transcribing 
a telegram from the Postal Administration of 
the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics re- 
garding the status in international postal rela- 
tions of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. The 
text of the telegram follows : 

"By order of my Government, I have to in- 
form you that, as a result of the entry of the 
Soviet Socialist Republics of Latvia, Lithuania 



and Estonia into the USSR, the exchange of 
correspondence and parcel post with the said 
Republics .since December 1, 1940, cannot be 
effected otherwise than under the conditions pre- 
scribed by the Universal Postal Convention, the 
Declared-Value Agreement, as well as by the 
individual bilateral Agieements in force be- 
tween the USSR and other countries. 

"Since the allied Republics forming the 
USSR are not separately members of the Uni- 
versal Postal Union, the above Republics, after 
their entry into the USSR (i. e., the SSR of 
Latvia on August 5 last, the SSR of Lithuania 
on August 3 last, and the SSR of Estonia on 
August 6 last), ceased to be members of the 
Universal Postal Union. 

"Please bring the foregoing to the attention 
of all the Administrations of the Universal 
Postal Union." 

MILITARY MISSION 

DETAIL OF UNITED STATES ARMY OFFICER AS 
DIRECTOR OF THE POLYTECHNIC SCHOOL 
OF GUATEMALA 

In response to the request of the Government 
of Guatemala, an agreement was signed May 
27, 1941 by Cordell Hull, Secretary of State, 
and Senor Dr. Don Adrian Recinos, Minister 
of Guatemala at Washington, providing for the 
detail of an officer of the United States Army 
to serve as Director of the Polytechnic School 
of the Republic of Guatemala. 

The agreement is made effective for a period 
of one year beginning with the date of signa- 



MAY 31, 1941 



677 



ture, and the services of the officer may be ex- 
tended beyond that period at the request of the 
Government of Guatemala. 

The provisions of the agreement are similar 
in. general to provisions contained in agree- 
ments between the United States and certain 
other American republics concerning the detail 
of officers of the United States Army or Navy 
to advise the armed forces of those countries. 
In addition to the provisions regarding its pur- 
pose and duration, the agreement contains pro- 
visions in regard to compensation and to cer- 
tain requisites and conditions affecting the 
fulfillment of the terms of the agi'eement. 

INDIAN AFFAIRS 

CONVENTION PROVIDING FOR THE CREATION 
OF AN INTER-AMERICAN INDIAN INSTITUTE 

El Salvador 

The American Ambassador to Mexico trans- 
mitted to the Secretary of State with a despatch 
dated May 19, 1941 a translation of a letter 
which he had received from the Secretary of 
the Inter-American Indian Institute stating 
that El Salvador had ratified the Convention 
Providing for the Creation of an Inter- Ameri- 
can Indian Institute, which was opened for 
signature at Mexico City on November 1, 1940. 
No date was given for the deposit of the in- 
strument of ratification. 

The letter states that the convention has also 
been ratified by Honduras and Mexico. 

United States 

On May 26, 1941 the Senate gave its advice 
and consent to the ratification by the President 
of the Convention for the Creation of an Inter- 
American Indian Institute, which was opened 
for signature at Mexico City on November 1, 
1940 and signed on behalf of the United States 
on November 29, 1940. 



Publications 



Department of State 

^VmLTuaii Delegations to International Conferences, 
Congresses, and Expositions and AmeriPan Representa- 
tion on International Institutions and Commissions, 
With Relevant Data. Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1940. 
(Compiled in the Division of International Confer- 
ences.) Conference Series 49. Publication 1587. vi, 
177 pp. 25^ 

Military and Military Aviation Mission : Agreement 
Between the United States of America and Brazil — 
Signed January 17, 1941 ; effective January 17, 1941. 
Executive Agreement Series 202. Publication 1600. 
11 pp. 50. 

Defense of Greenland: Agreement Between the 
United States of .\merica and Denmarit and Exchange 
of Notes — Agreement signed April 9, 1941. Executive 
Agreement Series 204. Publication 1602. 9 pp. 50. 



Legislation 



Inter-American Banii : Hearings Before a Subcom- 
mittee of the Committee on Foreign Relations, United 
States Senate, 77th Cong., 1st sess., on Executive K 
(76th Cong., 3fl sess.), a Convention for the Establish- 
ment of an Inter-American Bank, Signed on Behalf of 
the United States of America on May 10, 1940. May 
5 and 6, 1941. [Includes statement by Assistant Secre- 
tarj' of State Berle.] iv, 66 pp. 

Meeting of Directors of Meteorological Services of 
Western Hemisphere Countries : Message From the 
President of the United States Transmitting Recom- 
mendation for Legislation Authorizing the President 
of the United States To Invite the Governments of the 
Countries of the Western Hemisphere To Participate 
in a Meeting of the National Directors of the Mete- 
orological Services of Those Countries, and for Other 
Purposes. (H. Doc. 224, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) [In- 
cludes report from the Secretary of State.] 5 pp. 

Suitplemental Estimate of Appropriation for the De- 
partment of State, 1941 and 1942 : Communication From 



678 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



the President of the United States Transmitting a Sui> 
plemental Estimate of Appropriation for the Depart- 
ment of State, for the Fiscal Years 1941 and 1942, 
Amounting to $6,000. (H. Doc. 233, 77th Cong., 1st 
sess.) 1 p. 

Copyright — Preserving the Rights of Authors. (H. 
Rept. 619, 77th Cong., 1st sess., on H.R. 482G.) 3 pp. 

Acquisition of Idle Foreign Merchant Vessels. (H. 
Rept. 620, 77th Cong., 1st sess., on H. R. 446(3.) 5 pp. 



Additional Urgent Deficiency Appropriation Act, 1941 : 
An Act Malting appropriations to supjily additional 
urgent deficiencies in certain appropriations for the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1941, and for other purposes. 
Approved May 24, 1941. [H.R. 4069.] (Public Law 
73, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) [Department of State, pp. 
6-7.] 7 pp. 

Inter- American Highway. (S. Rept. 354, 77th Cong., 
1st sess., on S. 1544.) [Includes report of Secretary 
of State on draft of proposed bill.] 4 pp. 



U. S. COVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE; 1941 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Wasbington, D. C. — Price 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a yeai- 

PUBLISHED WEEKLl- WITH THE APPEOVAL OF THE DIEECTOK OF THE BDEEAD OF THE BDDQET 



^ 



j:3V 



H ?.» 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



.O ^ JL^ 



J 



*- ^T li^ 






riN 



JUNE 7, 1941 
Vol. IV: No. 102 — Publication 1610 




Qontents 

Europe: Page 

Relations with the French RepubUc 681 

Protest of the Yugoslav Government against creation of 

"Independent State of Croatia" 682 

Contributions for relief in belligerent countries .... 683 

Canada: 

Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Waterway Project .... 697 

The Near East: 

Safety of Americans in Iraq 699 

American Republics: 

Remarks of the Secretary of State welcoming the Min- 
ister of Foreign Affairs of Panama 699 

Regulations for meetings of consultation of Ministers 

of Foreign Affairs 700 

Conference of Police and Judicial Authorities .... 700 

Inter-American Development Commission: Venezuelan 

Council 700 

Visit to Washington of the wife of the President of 

Paraguay 701 

General: 

Acquisition of idle foreign merchant vessels 701 

Entry of aliens into the United States 702 

Control of exports in national defense 704 

Commercial Policy: 

Trade-agreement negotiations with Ai'gentina .... 707 

[Over] 



Qontents 



-CONTINUED. 



Treaty Information: Page 

Flora and fauna: 

Convention on Nature Protection and Wildlife Pres- 
ervation in the Western Hemisphere 709 

Waterways: 

Exchange of notes providing for temporary diversion 
for power purposes of additional waters of the 

Niagara River 709 

Indian affairs: 

Convention Providing for the Creation of an Inter- 
American Indian Institute 710 

Telecommunications: 

International Telecommunication Convention, Re- 
visions of Cairo, 1 938 710 

The Foreign Service: 

Personnel changes 711 

Legislation 711 

Regulations 712 

Publications 712 



Europe 



RELATIONS WITH THE FRENCH REPUBLIC 



[Released to the press June •'»] 

In response to inquiries, Secretary Hull said 
on June 5 : 

"We have received some preliminary reports 
from Ambassador Leahy. Frankly we are very 
much concerned about the situation which 
seems to be growing up. As you know, we 
have throughout our history been sympathetic 
(o the true aspirations of France. We have 
fought beside her. Her cause has been our 
cause. The principles of free, representative 
government by the people have been the bases 
of the democratic institutions of both of our 
countries. 

"In her present difficult situation we have 
given concrete evidence of our sympathetic 
friendship and thought for the well-being of 
the French people and the French Empire. 

"We have continued to maintain full and 
friendly diplomatic relations with the Frencli 
Government at Vichy and have received its 
emissaries freely in this country. We have 
given the fullest and most sympathetic con- 
sideration to financial problems connected with 
the maintenance of French establishments, not 
only in this hemisphere but in the Far East, 
both dijjlomatic and semi-official services. 

"We have, through Admiral Leahy, the 
American Ambassador at Vichy, consistently 
conveyed to the French Government our under- 
.standing of the difficulties of their position and 
our determination to be of every assistance we 
could in solving their problems for the ultimate 
benefit of the French people. We have made 
clear to the French Government that a basic 



122020- 



policy of this Government was to aid Great 
Britain in her defense against those same 
forces of conquest -^^hich had invaded and are 
subjugating France. 

"We have aided in the furnishing of food- 
stuffs for unoccupied France, and children's 
suj^plies are now being distributed tlu'ough the 
American Red Cross, and we iiad planned the 
continuation of these services. 

"AVe have facilitated the passage of ships 
from this hemisphere to France's African 
colonies. 

"We have collaborated with the other Ameri- 
can republics as well as with the French 
Government in safeguarding the welfare and 
maintaining the integrity of the French posses- 
sions in the Western Hemisphere. 

"In collaboration with the French Govern- 
ment we have arranged for the maintenance of 
tlie economic stability of the French North 
African territories by providing facilities for 
increasing trade and the purchase from us of 
conunodities urgently needed by the people of 
North Africa with a view to maintaining their 
previous status as an integi-al part of the French 
Empire. 

"Happily, whenever such action was neces- 
sary, Ambassador Leahy hiis been able to assure 
the Vichy Government that this Nation had no 
other interest in any territories of the French 
Empire than their preservation for the French 
people. 

■'We have given tlie most sympathetic con- 
sideration to the financial problems arising out 
of the fi-eezing of Frencli funds. 

681 



U, S, Sl.PE'^NTFNnF.NT OF DOCUMENTS 
JUK30 1941 



682 



DEPAETMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



"It has been the determined policy of this 
Governn\ent to continue friendly and helpful 
cooperation with France in the present difficult 
situation, in which its action is restricted and 
limited by the terms of its armistice with Ger- 
many and Italy. This policy has been based 
upon assurances by the French Government that 
there was no intention on its part to exceed the 
stiict limitations imposed by those terms. 

"It would seem scarcely believable that the 
French Government at Vichy should adopt the 
policy of collaboration with other powers for the 
purpose of aggression and oppression, despite 
indications appearing in our preliminai-y re- 
ports. Such action would not only be yielding 



priceless rights and interests beyond tlie re- 
quirements of a harsh armistice but it would at 
once place France in substantial political and 
military subservience and would also make her, 
in part, tlie instrument of aggression against 
many other peoples and nations. This could 
only be utterly inimical to the just rights of 
other countries, to say nothing of its ultimate 
effects on the liberties, the true interests, and the 
welfare of the people of France. 

"We are therefore undertaking as speedily as 
possible to assemble every material fact and 
circumstance calculated to shed light on this 
alleged course of the French Government." 



PROTEST OF THE YUGOSLAV CtOVERNMENT AGAINST CREATION 
OF "INDEPENDENT STATE OF CROATIA" 



[Released to the press June 4] 

The Minister of Yugoslavia to the Secretary 
of State 

Mat 12, 1941. 
Sir: 

I have the honor to convey to Your Excel- 
lency the following statement which I have been 
instructed to make by my Goverimient: 

In the course of the first few days following 
the unprovoked attack on Yugoslavia the Ger- 
man ainiy occupied a pait of the territoi-y of 
tlie Banovine of Croatia including its capital 
city Zagreb. Acting under the protection of 
the army of occuf)ation the notorious conspira- 
tor, Ante Pavelic, who had been sentenced to 
death by French courts for the assassination of 
the late King Alexander, proclaimed, with the 
support of a small group of partisans having no 
following whatever among the Croat people, a 
so-called "Independent State of Croatia." The 
legitimate representatives of the Croat people 
in the Yugoslav government as well as those of 
the autonomous authorities of the Banovine of 



Croatia have been forced to withdraw under the 
onslaught of enemy armies. 

It is, of course, a cardinal principle of Inter- 
national Law that military occupation of terri- 
tory in the course of hostilities does not change 
the juridical status of the territory thus occu- 
pied and that occupation by enemy armies pro- 
vides no legal basis for the establishment of a 
new juridical status within such territory. In 
consequence, the establishment of so-called "In- 
dependent Croatia" imposed by, or at the insti- 
gation of the authorities of occupation is devoid 
of any basis in law and constitutes a patent 
violation of the Law of Nations to which the 
Yugoslav Government continues to adhere. 

The Royal Yugoslav Government desires to 
register its most emphatic protest against this 
uidawful action of the German Reich and con- 
siders null and void all acts relating to the crea- 
tion of the so-called "Independent State of 
Croatia", the sole object of which is to dismem- 
ber the national territory of the Kingdom of 
Yugoslavia. 

Accept [etc.] Constantin Fotptch 



JUNE 7, 1941 



683 



The Minister of Ytigoslamia to the Secretary of 
State 

Mat 24, 1941. 
Mr. Secretary : 

I have the honor to refer to my note of May 
12, 1941 and, acting under the instructions of 
my Government, to convey to Your Excellency 
the following communication: 

In the course of ceremonies staged in Kome 
on May 18th last purported agreements were 
signed ceding to Italy integral parts of the na- 
tional territory of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. 
By virtue of further agreements entered into 
with representatives of the so-called "Independ- 
ent State of Croatia" that "state", previously es- 
tablished on Yugoslav territory by the military 
authorities of occupation, has been declared by 
the Italian Government to be a hereditary mon- 
archy under Italian protection, thus establish- 
ing in effect if not in name an annexation of 
these territories by the Italian Government. 

These agreements were entered into with the 
same persons who, instigated and aided by the 
military authorities of occupation, had usurped 
power in Croatia without consultation with or 
participation of its people, in direct violation 
of their essential rights and in total disregard of 
their vital interests. 

Tlie Koyal Yugoslav Government protests 
against this new violation of the integrity of 
its national territory and against the separation 
of the Croat people who, through their legiti- 
mate representatives within the Royal Govern- 
ment continue the struggle for the liberation of 
Yugoslavia, which includes all Croat territory, 
and recognize His Majesty King Peter the Sec- 
ond as their only legitimate Sovereign. 

Accept [etc.] 

CONSTANTIN FoTITCH 



The Under Secretary of State to the Mimster 
of Yugoslavia 

Mat 28, 1941. 
Sir: 

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt 
of your note of May 12, 1941 concerning the 
creation of the so-called "Independent State of 
Croatia". I obsei-ve that the Royal Yugoslav 
Government desires to register its most em- 
phatic protest against this unlawful action of 
the German Reich and considers nidi and void 
all acts relating to the creation of the so-called 
"Independent State of Croatia", the sole object 
of which is to dismember the national territory 
of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. 

I also wish to refer to your note of May 24, 
1941 concerning the purported agreements said 
to have been signed in Rome on May 18 last 
providing for the cession to Italy of integi-al 
parts of the national territory of the Kingdom 
of Yugoslavia. I note that the Royal Yugo- 
slav Government protests against this new vio- 
lation of its integrity and against the separa- 
tion of the Croat people who, through their 
legitimate rejD resent at ives within the Royal 
Government continue the struggle for the lib- 
eration of Yugoslavia, which includes all Ci'oat 
territory, and recognize His Majesty King 
Peter the Second as their only legitimate 
Sovereign. 

I desire to thank you for your courtesy in 
furnishing me with this expression of your 
views and to reiterate the indignation of this 
Government and the American people at the 
invasion and multilation of Yugoslavia by 
various memljer states of the Tripartite Pact. 

Accept [etc.] 

For the Secretary of State: 

Sumner Welles 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 



[Released to the press June 3] 

The following tabulation shows contributions 
collected and disbursed during the period Sep- 



tember 6, 1939 through April 30, 1941, as shown 
in the reports submitted by persons and organ- 
izations registered with the Secretary of State 



684 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



for (he solicitation and collection of contribu- 
tions to be used for relief in belligerent coun- 
tries, in conformity with the regulations issued 
pursuant to section 8 of tlie act of November 4, 
1939 as made effective by the President's procla- 
mation of the same date. 

This tabulation has reference only to contri- 
butions solicited and collected for relief in bel- 
ligerent countries (France: Germany; Poland; 
the United Kingdom, India, Australia, Canada, 
New Zealand, and Union of South Africa : Nor- 
way ; Belgium ; Luxemburg : Netherlands : 
Italy; Greece; Yugoslavia; Hungary; and Bul- 
garia) or for the relief of refugees driven out 
of these countries by the present war. Tlie 
statistics set forth in the tabulation do not 



include information regarding relief activities 
which a number of organizations registered 
with the Secretary of State may be carrying on 
in non-belligerent countries, but for which regis- 
tration is not required under the Neutrality Act 
of 1939. 

The American National Red Cross is required 
by law to submit to the Secretary of War for 
audit "a full, complete, and itemized report of 
receipts and expenditures of whatever kind". 
In order to avoid an unnecessary duplication 
of work, this organization is not required to 
conform to the provisions of the regulations 
governing the solicitation and collection of con- 
tributions for relief in belligerent countries, and 
the tabulation does not, therefore, include in- 
formation in regard to its activities. 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Adopt A Town Committee, Inc. (formerly Namesake 
Towns Committee, Inc.), New York, N. Y., Jan. 6, 
1941. England 

Albanian Relief Fund, Jamaica Plain, Mass., Mar. 21, 
1941. Albania 

The Allied Civilian War Relief Society, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Dec. 27, 1940. Great Britain__ 

Allied Relief Ball, Inc.. New York, N. Y., Apr. 4, 1940. 
Great Britain and France 

American Aid for German War Prisoners, Buffalo, N. Y., 
Sept. 27,1940. Canada. Australia, New Zealand, Great 
Britain, and the Netherlands 

American Association for Assistance to French Artists, 
IncNew York, N. Y., J.an. 3, 1940. France 

American Association of University Women, Washing- 
ton, D. C, May 23, 1940. France, Great Britain, and 
Canada 

American Auxiliary Committee de I'Union des Femmes 
de France, New York, N. Y., Nov. 8, 1939. France, 
Great Britain, and Germany 

American Board of Missions to the Jews, Inc., Brooklyn, 
N. Y., July 5. 1940. France, Belgium, and Germany. . 

American Cameronian Aid, Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan. 17, 
1941. Scotland 

American Committee for British Catholic Relief, Wash- 
ington, D. C, Mar. 4, 1941. Great Britain 

American Committee for Christian Refugees, Inc., New 
York, N. Y., Sept. 26, 1939. Germany and France 

American Committee for the German Relief Fund, Inc., 
New York, N. Y., Mar. 27, 1940. Germany, Poland, 
Canada, Dutch Guiana, British West Indies. Jamaica, 
New Zealand, and Australia 



Funds 
received 



.$6, 773. 05 
780.00 
B27. 18 

52. 696. 35 

8.315.85 
17,691.27 

24, 412 68 

30.174.02 

8, 601. 00 

267. 10 

7.217.70 

16, 402. 50 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



.$5, S05. 00 

None 

461. 20 

39, 964. 39 

6,117.74 
12, 514. .53 

13,327. .50 

17, 169. 83 

8, 439. 60 

11.5.00 

.5, 408. 00 

16, 402. 50 

48, 708. 09 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Apr. 30, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



$423. 29 
696. 45 
165.23 
None 

1,443.67 
645. 05 

10, 445. 72 

7, 430. 32 
None 
84.09 

1, 366. 40 
None 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



.$300. 00 
None 
36. .50 
None 

2, 694. 75 
1,656.15 

None 

6. 738. 97 
None 
None 
None 
None 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



None 
None 
None 
None 

$189.50 
None 

None 

479. 80 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



$544. 76 

83.56 

.75 

12. 731. 96 

754.44 

4. .531.69 

639. 46 

5. 673. 87 
161. 40 

68.01 
443.30 
None 

13, 736. 48 



JUNE 7, 194 1 



685 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of regislrant, location, date of registratiou, and 
destination of contributions 



American Committee for the Polish Ambulance Fund, 

Chicago, 111., Feb. 1:', 1940. France, Poland, and 

England - $33,405.03 $29,456.53 

The American Committee for the Relief of Greece, Inc., 

New York, N. v., Jan. 2, 1941. • Greece 249.35 33.35 

American Committee to Save Refugees, New York, 

N. Y., Jan. 3, 1941. France -- -. 3,667.30 1,596.25 

American Dent;il Ambulance Committee, New York 

N. Y., Mar. 12, 1940.* United Kingdom 3,269.62 3,168.02 

American Employment for General Relief, Inc., New 

York, N. Y.. May 1, 1940. England, France, Norway, 

Poland, Belgium, Luxemburg, and the Netherlands — 4.370.50 None 

American Federation for Polish Jews, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Sept. 14, 1930. Poland 6,244.30 .5,020.75 

American Field Hospital Corps, New York, N. Y., Dec. 

12, 1939. France, Belgium, Holland, United King 

dom, Greece, .\lbania, and Ethiopia 256, 173.47 187,626.30 

American Field Service, New York, N. Y., Sept. 27, 

1939. France, Great Britain, and Greece - 402,672.36 337,386.36 

American and French Students' Correspondence Ex- 
change, New York, N. Y., Dec. 20, 1939. France and 

England --.. 10,099 42 5,32S<. 53 

American-French War Relief, Inc.. New York, N. Y 

Sept. 14, 1939. France and Great Britain 64,27953 47,979.28 

American Friends of Britain, Inc., New York, N. Y 

Aug. 30, 1940. Great Britain 11.688.11 6,863.86 

American Friends of Czechoslovakia, New York, N. Y., 

Nov. 2, 1939. Great Britain, France, and Bohemia- 
Moravia 38,371.55 31.851.42 

American Friends of the Daily Sketch War Relief Fund 

New York, N. Y., Dec. 1, 1939.t Great Britain 4,200.83 3,357.00 

American Friends of France, Inc., New York, N. Y. 

Sept. 21, 1939. France, Germany, and England. 338,271.24 202,728.49 

American Friends of a Jewish Palestine, Inc., New 

York, N. Y., May 9, 1940. Germany, Poland, France, 

and the United Kingdom 4,782.84 1,927.02 

American Frien<ls Service Committee, Philadelphia, 

Pa., Nov. 9, 1939. United Kingdom, Poland, Ger- 
many, France, Norway, Belgium, the Netherlands, 

and Italy.... 189,782.73 173,449.53 

The American Fund for Breton Relief, New York, N. Y 

Oct. 31, 1939. France and England.- 5,266.05 3,786.60 

The American Fund for British War Aid, New York, 

N. Y., Feb. 1, 1941. Great Britain 623.63 104.00 

American Fund for French Wounded, Inc., Boston, 

Mass., Jan. 3, 1940. England and France. 21,850.11 18,543.36 

American German Aid Society, Los Angeles, Calif., 

Nov. 15, 1939. Germany and Canada 5.930.84 4,625.00 

The American Hospital in Britain, Limited, New York, 

N. Y., July 24, 1940. Great Britain 7.270.00 W0.36 

The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, 

Inc., New York, N. Y., Sept. 29, 1939. United King- 
dom, Poland, Germany, France, Norway, Belgium, 

Luxemburg, and the Netherlands 3,754,211.40 3,380,124.66 

American-Lithuanian Society of Washington, D. C 

Washington, D. C, Mar. 25, 1941. Germany. 131.02 None 

•The registration of this organization was revoked on Apr. 30, 1941, at the request of 
tNo report for the month of April has been received from this organization. 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Apr. 30, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



$1. 529. 36 

None 

1, 387. 41 

None 

328. 73 
847. 41 

28. 579. 18 
44,211.75 

2,116 54 

9, 056. 66 

702. 19 

97.48 

812. 33 

97, 779. 20 

None 

None 
1,111.46 

None 
2, 079. 09 

105. 86 
6, 769. 64 

None 

102. 83 
gistrant. 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 






$471.00 
75.00 
None 

None 

None 
7. 651. 43 

2, 694. 20 
None 

None 

68. 912. 00 

None 

19, 240. 00 

None 

19, 904. 96 

None 

42, 121. 62 

4,911.50 

None 

19, 973. 74 
None 
None 

51.00 
None 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



None 

None 

$1, 229. 60 

None 

None 
None 

2, 248. 00 
None 

None 

1,317.05 

None 

None 
None 
None 

None 

None 
None 
None 
1,383.48 
None 
None 

None 
None 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



$2. 419. 14 
216.00 
683. 64 
101. 60 

4.041.77 
376. 14 

39. 967. 93 
21, 074. 26 

2, 654. 35 
7, 243. 60 
4, 122. 00 

6, 422. 65 

31.50 

37, 763. 56 

2, 866. 82 

16, 333. 20 

368.09 

519. 63 

1, 227. 67 

1, 299. 98 

None 

374, 086. 74 
28.19 



686 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 


Funds 


Funds spent 
for relief in 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Apr. 30, 1941, 
including cost 
of poods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 


destination of contributions 


received 


countries 
named 


kind sent to 

countries 

named 


licity, affairs, 

campaigns, 

etc. 


American McAll Association, New Yorlc, N. Y., Jan. 3, 














1U40. England 


$3, 663. 78 


$3,115.77 


$548. 01 


$4. 2.50. 00 


$500, 00 


None 


American -Polish National Council, Chicago, Dl., Aug. 














14, 1940. Poland 


7, 108. 93 


3, 939. 70 


2, 506. 73 


None 


None 


$662. 50 


The American School Committee for Aid to Greece, 














Inc., Princeton, N. J., Dec. 16, 1910. Greece 


26. 169. 61 


24, 578. 45 


951.33 


None 


None 


639. 83 


American War Godmothers, Pittsburgh, Pa., Mar. 6, 














1940. France 


1.082.22 


198.87 


613.77 


None 


2.45 


269. 58 


American Women's Hospitals, New York, N. Y., Sept. 




14, 1939. France, England, and Greece 


17, 760. 25 


14.192.20 


3, 303. 53 


50.00 


None 


264. 52 


American Women's Unit for War Relief, Inc., New 




York, N. Y., Jan. 16, 1940. France -_. 


4. 895. 51 


3. 347. 42 


787.86 


3,817.66 


63.50 


760. 23 


American Women's Voluntary Services, Inc., New 














York, N. Y., Feb. 13, 1940. England 


29. 486. 10 


16. 674. 89 


2, 461. 24 


41, 775. 75 


None 


10,349.97 


Les Amis de la France a Puerto Rico, San Juan, P. R., 














Dec. 20, 1939. t France 


10, 920. 68 


6, 500. 00 


4, 095. 75 


650.00 


107. 77 


324. 93 


Les Amities FSminines de la France, New York, N. Y., 














Dec. 19, 1939. France and England 


1,921.87 


1, 133. 00 


267. 12 


634.12 


None 


521. 76 


Anthracite Relief Committee, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Sept. 














8, 1939. Poland _ 


11,427.14 


7,000.00 


4, 138. 69 


None 


None 


288.46 


Anzac War Relief Fund, New York, N. Y., May 23, 




1940. Australia and New Zealand 


20,661.11 


lU, 059. 63 


8. 349. 97 


None 


None 


2,261.51 


Associated Polish Societies Relief Committee of Web- 














ster, Mass., Webster, Mass., Sept. 21, 1939. Poland.. 


3, 059. 30 


2, 9U0. 00 


147. 10 


None 


None 


12.20 


Associated Polish Societies' Relief Committee of 














Worcester, Mass., Worcester, Mass., Sept. 14, 1939. 














Poland 


11, 469. 22 


9. 266. 45 


1. 749. 67 


1,430.00 


None 


463. 10 


Association of Former Juniors in France of Smith 




College, New York, N. Y., Dec. 18, 1939. France.... 


303. .511 


225. on 


78.50 


None 


None 


None 


Association of Former Ru.ssian Naval OlTicers in Ameri- 














ca, Long Island City, N. Y., Feb. 21, 1940. France.. 


342. 41 


264. 30 


OS. 53 


None 


None 


19.58 


Association of Joint Polish-American Societies of Chel- 














sea, Mass., Chelsea. Mass., Sept. 15. 1939. Poland... 


2, 782. 79 


1.456. 10 


1. 172, 68 


725. 00 


None 


164. 01 


L'Atelier, San Francisco, Calif., Jan. 29, 1940. France. . 


17. 766. 38 


15. 328. 79 


1. 461. 37 


2. 617. 88 


None 


976. 22 


Mrs. Mark Baldwin, New York, N. Y., Mar. 4, 1940. 














France - 


1. 493. 03 


1. 392. 00 


3. .87 


30.00 


None 


97. 16 


Basque Delegation in the United States of America, 




New York, N. Y., Dec. 19, 1939. France.. 


2,213.13 


975. 00 


1.030.77 


None 


None 


207. 36 


Belgian Relief Fund, Inc., New York. N. Y., June 14, 














1940. II Belgium, France, and England 


3.3.531.92 


9. 339. 36 


12.003 92 


18, 368. 00 


176. 00 


12, 188. 64 


Belgian Relief of Southern California, Los Angeles, 














Calif., May 27, 1940. Belgium, France, and Great 














Britain 


7, 864. 91 


5. 675. 83 


147. 22 


33, 182. 50 


None 


2. 041. 86 


Belgian War Relief Fund, Manila, P. I., June 7, 1940. 














Belgium 


2. 202. 92 


2. 069. 80 


130. 62 


350.00 


None 


2. ,50 


The Benedict Bureau Unit, Inc., New York, N. Y., 














Nov. 29, 1939. France 


.5.481.17 


4, 426. 74 


46,00 


None 


None 


1. 008. 43 


Bethel Mission of Eastern Europe, Minneapolis, Minn., 




Nov. 27, 1939. Poland 


16. 646. 87 


11. 765. 40 


41,69 


None 


None 


4. 838. 78 


Bishops' Committee for Polish Relief, Washington, 














D. C, Dec. 19, 1939. Poland, England, France, and 














Italy 


396, 140. 81 


346. 324. 31 


49, 763, 77 


None 


None 


62.73 


Board of National Missions of the Presbyterian Church 












in the United States of America, New York, N. Y., 














Sept. 2t!, 1939. Great Britain, France, and Germany.. 


6. 889. 85 


5.331.30 


811,72 


None 


None 


746. 83 


British-American Ambulance Corps, Inc., New York. 














N. Y., June 11, 1940. Greece, England, and France 


1. 255. 784. 20 


592. 798. 19 


491.878.14 


None 


None 


171,307.87 



JThe registration of this organization was revoked on Dec. 31, 1940, at the request of registrant. 
3The registration of this organization was revoked on Feb. 10, 1941, at the request of registrant. 



JUNE 7, 1941 



687 



Contributions for Relief in Belliqerext Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Apr. 30, 1941. 
Including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, alTairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


British-American Comfort League, Quincy, Mass., 
Feb 21 1940. England 


$4, 680. 8,') 

68.401.84 

50.00 

4, 046. 87 
251, 353. 23 

128,128.98 

42S, 961. 62 
415. 56 

8,039,328.89 

1, 567 689. 58 

964.87 

808. 71 

14.84 

6, 565. 40 

1, 074. 25 

2, 397. 54 

52. 499. 98 
48, 852. 49 
3, 128. 86 

5, 583. 32 
100.50 

3, 801. 67 


$3. 042. 40 

69, 721. 51 

None 

125. 00 

215, 190. 15 

118, 145. 23 

302, 757. 18 
402. 00 

5, 178, 153. 74 

812, 627. 40 

800.30 

None 

14.84 

4, 073. 96 

None 

2, 081. 63 

31, 679. 75 

32,565.39 

1, 995. 80 

3, 294. 92 

None 
2, 126. 00 


$1.210. 10 

n, 160. &i) 

60. 00 

46. 58 

31, 636. 93 

3,311.79 

13, 405. 67 
4.36 

2, 263, 459. 09 
428,867.45 
None 
754.87 
None 
743. 13 

1, 074. 25 

76.00 

12. 964. 59 

None 

1, 086. 60 

809. 39 

100.50 

1. 364. 18 


None 

$11,793.00 

None 

19, 042. 75 

88, 453. 47 

606. 15 

179, 837. 50 
None 

1,48.5,300.94 

1, 476, 462. 25 

None 

None 

None 

1,813.87 

4,670.00 

None 

None 
None 
None 
2, 775. 00 
None 
None 


None 

$1,632.05 

None 

325. 00 

2. 125. 75 

23. 07 

None 
None 

251,568.1i2 

63, 134. 25 

None 

None 

None 

7.50 

1, 200. 00 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
140.60 


$392. 29 


British-American War Relief Association, Seattle. 

Wash., Nov. 17, 1939. United Kingdom and Orenec.. 
The British Legion, Inc., Detroit, Mich., Feb. 20, 1941. 

Great Britain - . 


3,519.44 
None 


British Sailors' Book and Relief Society, New York, 
N. Y., May 2, 1940. Bermuda, Canada, and the 
British W^est Indies - 


3, 875. 29 


British War Relief Association of Northern California, 
San Francisco, Calif., Oct. 20, 1939. Great Britain 


4, 626, 15 


The British War Relief Association of the Philippines, 
Manila, P. I., Apr. 11, 1940.1 France, Germany, 
Poland, United Kingdom, India, Australia, Canada, 


6,671.96 


The British War Relief Association of Southern Cali- 
fornia, Los Angeles, Calif., Dec. 8, 1939. Great 


52, 738. 77 


British War Relief Fund, Dayton, Ohio, Sept. 12, 1940. 


9.20 


The British War Relief Society, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Dec. 4, 1939. France, Belgium, the Netherlands, 
United Kingdom, Norway, Canada, and Greece 

Bundles for Britain, New York, N. Y., Dec. 28, 1939. 


607, 716. 06 
316, 194. 73 


Caledonian Club of Idaho, Boise, Idaho, Jan. 25, 1940.1 


164.57 




53.84 


CaUard of London, Chicago, lU., Mar. 13, 1941. Great 
Britain 


None 


Canadian Women's Club of New York City, Inc., New 
York, N. Y., Oct. 23, 1940. Great Britain and Canada. 

N. Y., Jan. 17, 1940. India, Australia, Canada, New 


1,748.31 
None 


The Catholic Student War Relief of Pax Romana, 
Washington, D. C, Dec. 13, 1939. Poland, France, 
Germany, and Great Britain 


239. 91 


Churches of Europe, New York, N. Y., May 14, 
1940 All belligerent countries 


7, 815. 64 


Central Committee Knesseth Israel, New York, N. Y., 
Oct. 27, 1939. Palestine 


16. 287. 10 


Central Council of Polish Organizations, New Castle, 

Pa., Nov. 7, 1939. France, Poland, and England 

Cercle Frangais de Seattle, Seattle, Wash., Nov. 2, 1939. 


46.46 
1.479.01 


Comity de Franceses Libres de Puerto Rico, Mayagues, 
P. R., Apr. 4, 1941. British Empire - -- 


None 


Comite Pro Francia Libre. San Juan, P. R., Dec. 19, 
1940. England and France --- 


311.49 



INo report for the month of April has been received from this organization. 



322020—41- 



688 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name ot registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Apr. 30, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Commission for Polish Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 12, 1939.* Poland and England 


$742, 765. 69 

13,815.92 
30. 170. 81 

77, 289. S7 

4. 523. 03 
2, 441. 83 

197.00 

54, 936. 74 

14, 554. 02 

100, 194. 45 
7, 144. 27 

13.073.03 

104. 962. 11 
275.00 

15, 129. 07 
None 
213. 10 

7. 196. 23 
9. 383. 36 

7, 075. 75 

12,636.43 

309, 746. 25 


$668, 259. 37 

9, 165. 00 
21.680.95 

."M, 752 20 

2. 500. 00 
2. 162. 72 

197.00 

36, 741. 77 
13, 166. 50 

71,771.73 
100.00 

11.260.70 

132.012.32 

None 

12, 174. 66 

None 

N(me 

6. 223. 93 

7, 900. 63 

4,401. 16 

10, 861. 09 

297, 687. 25 


$11,627.33 

1,861.15 
4.422.71 

14,819.78 

217.43 
23.40 

None 

17,214.82 
821. 00 

10,678.44 
4, 046. 07 

None 

24, 876. 88 
275.00 

1, 62.";. 37 

None 
213. 10 
479. 14 
693. 44 

2, 226. 74 
1,096.45 

11,205.64 


$1,600.00 

None 
5.781. 14 

6, 390. 00 

None 
None 

None 

35, 160. 00 
None 

11, 783. 93 
None 

None 

179, 628. 12 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
3, 200. 0<1 

1, 628. 43 

1, 864. 70 

None 


None 

None 
$332. 20 

None 

None 
None 

None 

None 
None 

None 
None 

None 

1, 034. 17 
None 
None 
None 
60.00 
None 
100.00 

10.73 
None 
None 


$62, 878 99 


The Commission for Relief in Belgium, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., May 21, 1940. Belgium, Luxemburg, France, 


2, 789. 77 


Committee of French-American Wives, New York, 
N. Y.. Nov. 15, 1939. France and Great Britain 

Committee of Mercy, Inc.. New York, N. Y., Sept. 16, 
1939. France, Great Britain, Norway, Belgium, the 


4,067.15 
11, 717. 89 


Committee for Relief in Allied Countries, Washington, 
D.C., Feb. 2, 1940. France, Great Britain, Poland, 
Norway, Belgium, Luxemburg, and the Netherlands, 

Committee for the Relief for Poland, Seattle, Wash., 
Nov 24 1939 Poland 


1. 805. 60 
255 71 


Committee Representing Polish Organizations and 
Polish People in Perry, N. Y., Perry, N. Y., Oct. 23, 
1939 Poland .- 


None 


Czechoslovak Relief, Chicago, 111., July 25, 1940. Czech- 
oslovakia, Great Britain and Dominions, France, 


980. 15 


Dodecanesian League of America, Inc., New York, 


677. 52 


The Emergency Aid of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 
Pa., Oct. 13, 1939. t Great Britain, France, Norway, 
Belgium, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, and Greece. 

Emergency Relief Committee for Kolbuszowa, New 
York. N. Y., Mar. 13, 1940. Poland 


17,744.28 
2, 999. 20 


Emergency Rescue Committee, New York, N. Y., 
Aug. 3, 1940. France, United Kingdom, Belgium, 
Norway, and the Netherlands 


1 812.33 


English-Speaking Union of the United States, New 
York, N. Y., Di'C. 2«, 1939. Great Britain, Canada, 
France, Norway, Belgium, Luxemburg, the Nether- 
lands, Germany, and the Union of South Africa 

Erste Pinchover Ivranken I'nterstuzunes Verein, Inc.. 
Brooklyn, N. Y., Apr. 22, I940.t Poland -.. 


8,072.91 


Esco Fund Committee, Inc., New York, N. Y., Feb. 13, 
1941. Great Britain -.. - 


1,329.04 
1, 370. 28 


Ethiopian Redemption Committee, Inc., Chicago, 111., 


Ethiopian World Federation, Inc., New York, N. Y., 




The Fall River British War Relief Society, Fall River, 


493. 16 


Federated Council of Polish Societies of Grand Rapids, 
Mich., Grand Rapids, Mich.. Sept. 15, 1939. Poland. 

Federation of Franco-Belgian Clubs of Rhode Island, 
Woonsocket, K. I.. Nov. 15, 1939. France and Eng- 


889.29 
447. 85 


Federation of French Veterans of the Great War, Inc., 
New York, .\. Y.. (id. 11. 1939. France and Germany. 

Federation of the Italian World War A'eterans in the 
U.S.A., Inc., New York, N. Y., Dec. 19, 1940.1 Italy 


678.89 
853.36 



•This refiistrant serves primarily as a clearing-house for the distribution abroad of contributions received from other registrants; these receipts and 
disbursements are not included in the figures here given, since they are shown elsewhere in this tabulation following the names of the original collecting 
registrants. 

tNo complete reports for the months of March and April have been received from this organization. 

JThe registration of this organization was revoked on Nov. 30, 1940, at the request of registrant. 

"No report for the month of April has been received from this organization. 

IThc registration of this organization w?s revoked on May 10, 1941, for failure to observe the rules and regulations. 



JUNE 7, 1941 



689 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contiibutions 


Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Apr. 30, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Fellowship of Reconciliation, New York, N. Y., Jan. 20, 
1940 France, England, and Germany 


$2, 667. 02 

1,144,798.04 

193.141.06 

591. 00 

636. 30 

6. 900. 55 

16, 596. 04 

406.60 

4, 699. 77 

1, 490. 38 

48, 182. 14 

None 

6, 558. 46 

27, 330. 40 
822. 81 

30, 629. 11 

21.925.92 
1, 443. 10 

1, 974. 59 
38. 60 
11.50 

3, 629. 41 

977. 85 

937.00 

565. 38 

19, 374. 02 

1, 526. 50 

21, 759. 51 


$1,781.21 

927, S80. 52 

110,734.71 

None 

300.00 

580. 10 

6, 258. 86 
None 
2, 693. 96 
491. 33 
29, 709. 14 
None 
500.00 

24, 997. 66 
507. 76 

15,681.1)0 

6, 6.50. 81 
680.00 

631.96 
None 
None 

1.907.31 
194. 25 
937.00 
370. 79 
15,034.70 
None 

14, 606. 44 


$608. 38 

82, 206. 04 

26, 226. 01 

418. 00 

336. 30 

6, 269. 62 

8, 443. 62 
180.33 

1,608.41 
7.59. 93 

9,916.60 
None 

5, 048. 46 

809. 85 
143. 40 

2,287.93 

8, 125. 34 
667. 92 

658.28 
None 
111.50 

312.26 
662.19 
None 
148, 14 
4, 339. 32 
1, 626. 50 

3,647.77 


None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
$1,731.10 

5, 796. 05 
None 
31, 879. 44 
2, 837. 17 
257. 89 
None 
None 

3. 295. 31 
None 

44,765.88 

None 
None 

None 
None 
None 

242. 25 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 


None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
$986. 16 

None 
None 
486. 62 
480. 83 
83.20 
None 
None 

230.00 

None 

None 

None 
None 

None 
None 
None 

82.00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 


$177 43 


Fortra, Incorporated, New Y'ork, N. Y., Mar. 7, 1940. 




Foster Parents' Plan for War Children, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Sept. 21, 1939. France and England. 

Franco- American Committee for the Relief of War Vic- 
tims, New Y'ork, N. Y., Mar. 27, 1941. France 

Franco-American Federation, Salem, Mass., July 9, 
1940. France 

Franco-British Relief, Baltimore, Md., Mar. 15, 1941. 
Great Britain 


67,180.34 
173.00 
None 
50.83 


Free French Relief Committee, New York, N. Y., Feb. 
3, 1941. England, French Cameroons, Belgian Congo, 


1, 893. 66 


French Colonies War Relief Committee, New York, 
N. Y'., Aug. 20, 1940. France 


226. 27 


French Committee for Relief in France, Detroit, Mich., 
Oct. 17, 1939. France and Great Britain 


397. 40 


French Relief Association, Kansas City, Mo., Feb. 3, 


239. 12 


French War Relief, Inc., Los Angeles, Calif., Nov. 16, 
1939 France 


8, 497. 40 


French War Relief Fund of Nevada, Reno, Nev., June 
21, 1940. France 

French War Relief Fund of the Philippines, Manila, 
P. I., May 1, 1940.* France 


None 
10.00 


French War Relief Fund of San Francisco {formerly 
Les Anciens Combattants Frangais de la Grande 
Guerre), San Francisco, Calif., Oct. 26, 1939. France 

French War Veterans, Los Angeles, Calif., Dec. 5, 1939. 


1, 522. 89 
171.66 


Friends of Children, Inc., New Y'ork, N. Y., June 13, 
1940. Great Britain, France, Belgium, and the 
Netherlands 


12, 659. 68 


The Friends of Israel Refugee Relief Committee. Incor- 
porated, Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 23. 1939. Canada, 
France, Great Britain, the Netherlands, Norway, 


7, 249. 77 


Friends of Poland, Chicago, 111., Dec. 6, 1939. Poland.. 
Fund for the Relief of Men of Letters and Scientists of 

Russia, New York, N. Y., Apr. 29, 1940. France and 

Poland.... 

Gamma Phi Beta International Sorority, Washington, 

D. C, Mar. 11, 1941. Great Britain 

German-American Conference, New York, N. Y.,Mar. 

11, 1941. Canada and the British West Indies 

German-American Relief Committee for Victims of 

Fascism, New York, N. Y., Apr. 18, 1940. Great 


96.18 

684.36 
72.85 
None 

1. 409. 85 


Mrs. George Gilliland, New York, N. Y., Aug. 10, 1940. 
Northern Ireland .. 


121.41 


Golden Rule Foundation, New Y'ork, N. Y., Nov. 2, 
1939 Poland and Palestine 


None 


Grand Duke Vladimir Benevolent Fund Association, 


36.46 


Grand Lodge, Daughters of Scotia, Hartford, Conn., 
Feb 16, 1940 Scotland - - - 


None 


Grand Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, State of New 
Y'ork, New York, N. Y., Apr. 15, 1941. Great Bntam.- 

Great Lakes Command, Canadian Legion of the British 
Empire Service League. Detroit, Mich., July 6, 1940. 
Great Britain and Canada - 


None 
3, 606. 30 



•No reports for the months of March and April have been received from this organization. 



690 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Contimied 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Greater New Bedford Britisti War Relief Corps, New 
Bedford, Mass., Dec. 19, 1939. Great Britain 

The Grci'k Fur Workers Union, Local 70, New York, 
N. Y., Dec. 21, 19*0. Greece.. 

Greek War Kclief .Association, Inc., New Y'ork, N. Y., 
Nov. 18, 1940. Greece ..- --- --.. 

Hadassali, Inc., New Y'ork, N. Y'., Nov. 15, 1939. Pales- 



tine. 



Hamburg-Bremen Steamship Agency, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Mar. 21, 1940. Germany, Poland, France, 
Beli^ium, Norway, Lu.xembur^, and the Netherlands.. 

Hands Across the Sea Helpers .Yssociation, Brooklyn, 
N. Y., Mar. 11, 1941. United Ivingdom 

Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., Aug. 30, 1940. 
Great Britain - 

Hebrew-Christian Alliance of America, Chicago, 111.. 
Jan. 3, 1940. England, Germany, Poland, France, 
and Italy.. 

Hellenic World Newspaper Co., Boston, Mass., Feb. 10, 
1941. t Greece 

Hias Immigrant Bank, New Y'ork, N. Y., Feb. 12, 1941. 
Poland, Czechoslovakia, the Netherlands, Belgium, 
France, and Germany 

A. Seymour Houghton, Jr., et nL, New Y'ork, N. Y'., 
Nov. 27, 1939. France 

Hxmianitarian Work Committee, Glen Cove, N. Y., 
Sept. 30, 1939. Poland 

Independent British War Relief Society of Rhode Is- 
land, Greenwood, R. I., June 14, 1940. Great Britain. 

Independent Kinsker Aid Association, New Y'ork, 
N. Y'., Jan. 3, 1940. Poland. 

International Children's Relief Association, New York, 
N. Y., Oct. I, 1940. Groat Britain 

Internetional Committee of Y'oung Men's Christian 
Associations, New Y'ork, N. Y'.. Sept. 22, 1939. France, 
Germany, Poland, the United Kingdom, India, -Au- 
stralia, Canada, New Zealand, the Union of South 
.\frica, Norway, Belgium, Luxemburg, the Nether- 
lands. Italy, Greece. Y'ugo,slavia, ami Bulgaria 

International Federation of Business and Professional 
Women, Wheeling, W. Va., July 5, 1940. Poland, 
Norway, Belgium, France, and the Netherlands 

International Home for Refugees, New Y'ork, N. Y'., 
.M;ir. 11. 1941. England, Poland, and France. 

International Relief .Association, Inc. (formerly Inter- 
national Relief .Association for Victims of Fascism), 
New York, N. Y'., Sept. 25, 1939. France, England, 
and Germany -- 

Isthmian Pro-British .Aid Committee, Ancon, C. '/,., 
Sept. 20. 1940. England 

Joint Committee of the United Scottish Clans of Greater 
New York and New Jersey, Brooklyn, N. Y'., Jan. 30, 
1940. Scotland 

Junior Relief Group of Texas, Houston, Tex., May 29, 
1940. t United Kingdom, France. Netherlands, Bel- 
gium, and Norway .- 

Marthe Th. Kahn, New Y'ork, N. Y'., -Apr. 16, 1940. 
France — 



Funds 
received 



$23, 443. 65 

10,077.81 

4.710.094.45 

1, 377. 374. 42 

370. 247. 03 

313, 29 

120. 914. 06 

.5.120.84 
None 

25. 632. 14 
20, 205. 44 
3.941.79 
6.017.73 
2, 141. 00 
60.00 



229, 488. 



73.00 
None 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$20, 86a 20 

9.600.00 

3, 467. 045. 55 

957. 082. 70 

291.846.37 
246. 05 
None 

4, 625. 00 
None 

18, 467. 34 
14. 075. 34 
3, 360. 00 
4, 062. 80 
None 
None 



117,723.35 

73.00 
None 



12.996.34 


8. 659. 50 


369. 55 


None 


12. 309. 85 


8, 900. OO 


11,842.10 


10.156.02 


232. 25 


180. 25 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Apr. 30, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on band 



$1,876.34 

522. 98 

1,067,836.58 

346. 695. 67 

None 

40.74 

80, 819. 67 

None 
None 

5, 147. 85 
5, 890. 01 
505. 94 
1,930.42 
2,141.00 
35.00 



96, 189. 97 

None 

None 

None 
322.40 

1, 367. 82 

None 
41.44 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


$2,125.93 


None 


$707. 11 


None 


None 


54.83 


342. 755. 40 


$35, 000. 00 


195, 212. 32 


95, 060. 00 


2, 614. 23 


56. 696. 05 


None 


None 


83,611.47 


None 


None 


27.60 


None 


None 


40. 094. 39 


None 


None 


495. 84 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


1,916.95 


773.05 


21.35 


240.09 


185. 00 


None 


75.85 


3, 255. 00 


None 


24.51 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


26.00 


None 


None 


15, 574. 85 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


2, 020. 00 


None 


4, 336. 84 


None 


None 


47. 15 


None 


None 


2, 036. 03 


None 


None 


1.686. OS 


None 


None 


10.56 



tThe registration of this organization was revoked on Apr. 30, 1941, at the request of registrant. 



JUNE 7, 1941 



691 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name o( registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



The Kindercnrton Unit. Inc., Norwallf, Conn., Oct. 3, 
19.39.} France. Poland, United Kingdom, India, 
Australia, and New Zealand 

The Kosciuszko Foundation, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
May24. 1940. Poland , ._ -_. 

The Kytlhaeuser, League of German War Veterans in 
U. S. A., Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 27, 1939. Poland, 
Oermany. Canada, and Jamaica 

Lackawanna County Committee for Polish Relief, 
Scranton, Pa., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland 

Ladies Au.\iliary of the Providence Branch of the Feder- 
ation of the Italian World War Veterans in the United 
States, Providence, R. I., Oct. 1, 1940.|| Italy... 

LaFayette Preventorium, Inc., New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 21, 1939. France.- 

La France Post, .American Legion, New York, N. Y., 
Feb. 7, 1940. France, Great Britain, and Greece 

Mrs. Nancy Bartlett Laughlin, New York, N. Y., Jan. 
31, 1940.t France---- - 

League of American Writers, Inc., New York, N. Y. , 
May 6, 1940. France, England, Poland, and Norway. 

League of Polish Societies of New Kensington, .Arnold, 
and Vicinity, New Kensington, Pa., Nov. 17, 1939. 
Poland - -- 

Robert E. Lee Memorial Foundation, Inc., Stratford, 
Va., Apr. 16, 1941. Great Britain 

Legion of Young Polish Women, Chicago, III., Oct. 2, 

1939. Poland, France, Great Britain, and Germany. - 
Liberty Link Afghan Society, Detroit, Mich., Dec. 17, 

1940. Great Britain 

Lithuanian National Fund. Brooklyn, N. Y., Dec. 14, 

1940. Oermany and France 

Lithuanian Relief Committee for the .\id of Lithuanian 
Victims of Tyranny and War, New York, N. Y., Feb. 
25, 1941. Great Britain, Germany. Franc*, and Italy. 

The Little House of Saint Pantaleon, Philadelphia, Pa., 
Sept. 30. 1939. France and England 

The Maple Leaf Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y., Apr. 19, 
1940. Canada, United Kingdom, and France. -.. 

Medical and Surgical Relief Committee of America, 
New York, N. Y., Aug. .5, 1940. Poland. Great Brit- 
ain, France, Netherlands, Norway, Luxemburg, 
Belgium, Greece, and Yugoslavia 

Mennonite Central Committee, .\kron. Pa., Feb. 13, 
1940. Great Britain, Poland, Germany, France, 
Canada, and the Netherlands 

Methodist Committee for Overseas Relief, New York, 
N. Y., Sept. 4 1940. France, Poland, Norway, Bel- 
gium, the Netherlands. United Kingdom. India, 
-\ustralia. Canada, Germany, Greece, and Italy 

Mid-European Food Package Service, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Jan. 24, 1941. Germany, Poland, and Lu.\em- 
burg 

Milford. Conn., Polish Relief Fund Committee, Mil- 
ford, Conn., Nov. 6, 1939. Poland 



Funds 
received 



$1,222.21 
9. 637. 54 

101. 386. 64 
9, 527. 57 

7.420.18 
20, 955. 22 

1, 585. 32 
606.00 

3, 909. 70 

2, 964. 19 
164.28 

16.815.55 

2. 722. 25 

478.64 

129.57 
39. 265. 53 
155, 449. 30 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



36, 913. 65 

207, 656. 34 
405. 33 



$892. S5 
9, 3.50. 20 

86, 038. 95 
7, 225. 56 

7, 398. 84 
8. 662. 53 
1,040.00 
606.00 
2,431.22 

1,498.24 

None 

il.272.05 

None 

200.00 

100.00 
36, 302. 36 
59, 096. 25 

17,976.32 
38, 990. 34 

33. 038. 84 

145.912.20 
250.20 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
A()r. 30, 1941. 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



None 
None 

$3. OW. 92 
1,470.21 

21.34 
7, 669. 87 
124. 53 
None 
None 

1,029.24 

160.28 

2, 634. 98 

2. 722. 25 

262.64 

12.02 
3, 867. 61 
58,042.23 

18. 223. 64 
17. 120. 72 

None 

30,361.87 
70.51 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



None 
None 

$14. 813. 62 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
15. 18 

2. 400. 00 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 

30, 317. 49 

2,W. 987. 06 

173, 771. 60 
25. 165. 92 

None 

None 
None 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on band 



14. 477. 30 

None 

None 
None 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



None 


$329. 36 


None 


876. 64 


None 


12,309.77 


None 


831. 80 


None 


None 


None 


4, 622. 82 


None 


420.79 


None 


None 


None 


1, 478. 48 


None 


436. 71 


None 


4.00 


None 


2, 908. 52 


None 


None 


None 


16.00 


None 


17. 35 


$08.75 


9.5. 56 


None 


38, 310. 82 



17, 195. 29 
8,388.31 

3, 874. 81 

31, 382. 27 
84.62 



JThe registration of this organization was revoked on Mar. 31, 1911. at the request of registrant. 

IIThe registration of this organization was revoked on May 10, 1941, for failure to observe the rules and regiJations. 

tThe registration of this organization was revoked on Apr. 30, 1941, at the request of registrant. 



692 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Nome of registrant . location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Apr. 30, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in Itind now 
on hand 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, aflairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



The Mobile Circle for Benefit of the Royal Navy Hos- 
pital Comforts Fimd, Mobile. Ala., Sept. 18, 1940. 
British Isles 

Monmouth War Relief, Red Bank, N. J., Sept. 12, 1940. 
England, France, and Greece _ 

Montagu Club of London, New York, N. Y., Mar. 3, 
1941. Great Britain 

The Mother Church, the First Church of Christ, Scien- 
tist, in Boston. U..S.A., Boston, Mass., Apr. 25, 1940. 
Canada, France, and the United Kingdom 

Fernanda Wanamaker Munn, New York, N. Y., Nov. 
25, 1939. France and England 

National Legion Greek-American War Veterans in 
America, Inc.. New York, N. Y., Jan. 3, 1941. Greece. 

Near East Foundation, Inc., New York. N. Y., Nov. 28, 
1940. Greece 

Netherlands War Relief Committee, Manila, P. I., May 
27, 1940.1 Netherlands 

The New Canaan Workshop, New Canaan, Conn., 
July 1, 1940. British Empire 

New Jersey Broadcasting Corporation, Jersey City, 
N. J., Sept. 13, 1939.* Poland 

Newtown Committee for Child Refugees, Inc., Sandy 
Hook, Conn., Apr. 15, 1941. Great Britain 

Nicole do Paris Relief Fund, New York, N. Y., July 1, 
1940. France 

North Side Polish Council ReUef Committee of Mil- 
waukee, Wis., Milwaukee. Wis., Dec. 5, 1939. Poland 

Norwegian Relief, Inc., Chicago, III., May 1, 1940. Nor- 
way. . 



Nowiny Publishing .4postoIate, Inc., Milwaukee, Wis., 
Sept. 2B, 1939. Poland. 

Nowy-Dworer Ladies and United Relief Association. 
New York. N. Y.. Doc. 50. 1940. Poland 

Nowy Swiat Publishing Co.. Inc.. New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 11. 1939. Poland. France. Great Britain, and 
Italy... 



The Order of Ahepa, Washington, D. C, Jan. I. 1941. 
Greece ._ 

Order of Scottish Clans. Boston, Mass., Jan. 26, 1940. 
Scotland- 

Over-Seas League Tobacco Fund, New York, N. Y., 

Aug. 19, 1910. British Empire 

The Pacific Steam Navigation Company, Cristobal, 

C. Z., Oct. 16, 1940. England 

Paderewski Fund for Polish Relief, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Feb. 23, 1940. Poland and Great Britain 

Paderewski Testimonial Fund, Inc.. New York. N. Y., 

Mar. 10. 1941. Great Britain and France.. 

Parcels for Belgian Prisoners. Washington. D. C. Nov. 

12. 1940. Germany 

Parcels for the Forces. Inc., New York, N. Y., Oct. 9. 

1940. Great Britain 

The Ppryski Publi.shing Co., Toledo. Ohio. Sept. 1.?. 

1939. Pobnd and Great Britain 

The Pawtucket and Blackstone Valley British Relief 

Society of Rhode I.sland. Pawtucket. R. I., Feb. 26, 

1940. Great Britain and Germany , 

Pelham Overseas Knitting Circle, Pelham, N. Y., Oct. 

17, 1940. Scotland.. 



$.',. 054. 36 

7. 989. 61 

200. 00 

284, 185. .55 

17. .334. 52 

739. 00 

139, 899. 73 

4.605.05 

13,210,00 

1, 210. 55 
430. 58 
227. 00 

2, 302. 97 
497, 890. 18 

5, 596. 91 

2, ,'■.48. 13 

28, 534. 18 
129,033.39 

21,127.64 

122,977.04 

702. 91 

137. 517. 12 

3, 949. 12 
1.^,881.20 
61, 373. 78 

8. 586. 36 

20. 265. 62 
1, 428. 96 



$4. 203. 43 
4, 223. 91 

200. on 

.59, 232. 76 

9, 425. 40 

None 

58, 323. 00 

1,253.87 

10, 487. 63 

826. 17 

81.40 

148.00 

2. OSS. 16 
71,600.00 

4, 589. 86 
1.881.90 

2,8. 110.56 
92, 911. 84 

3. 377. 00 
89, 558. 74 

686. 36 
S,";, 000. 00 

6. 000. 00 

4. 763. 63 
39, 955. 60 

7. 671. 73 

14, .551.76 
671. 51 



$746. 63 
3. 308. 78 

None 

203, 046. 47 

2,201.81 

693. 42 

54, 617. 87 

3,321.68 

1,481.91 

None 

349. IS 

28.00 

196. 63 

409. 965. 05 

1. 007. 05 

196. 94 

320, 24 
36,121.65 
17, 750. 64 

None 

None 
12. 472. 88 

None 
11,117.57 

None 
914.63 

4,842.41 
578. 19 



$1,472.20 
896. 00 
None 

289,032,14 

8, 587, 56 

None 

None 

None 

3, 476. 00 

None 

13. .50 

None 

1,300.00 

None 

None 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
390. 00 
None 
None 
None 
36. 40 
None 

None 
342. 64 



None 
None 
None 

$38, 478. 20 
247. 75 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
150.00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
39. 26 



INo report for the month of April has been received from this organization, 

•The registration of this organization was revoked on Apr. 30, 1941, at the request of registrant. 



JUNE 7, 1941 



693 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Coiitinucfi 



Name of repstrant. location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds 
received 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Apr. 30, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 


Penny-A-Plane, New York, N. Y., Apr. 1, 1941. Oreat 


$89.40 
8,110.17 

9. 230. 26 

3. H3.94 
1.0.57.05 

432. 36 

616. 320. 66 

13.404,81 

29, 482. 29 

2. 695. 83 
474. 50 

1,55(;. 18 

4. 525. 53 
8. 969. 49 
4, 772. 02 

12. 172. 97 
828. 81 

3. 338. 09 

324, 216. 32 

4. .593. 36 

114.418.63 

5. 042. 46 

1 . 676. 75 

10. .148. 17 

2. 001. 31 
3,148.06 
8. 369. 06 

None 
9,335.38 


None 
$.5,027. 18 

8. 946. 85 

426. 32 

8ai. 00 

362. 06 

426. 495. 40 

8,521.88 

21, 012. R.-. 

None 

314.23 

1.201.64 

3. 393. 54 

S. 392. 86 

3. 625. 00 

12. 1.52.97 

607. 76 

2, 000. 00 

258, 336. 00 
3. 193. 03 

94. 575. 96 
4.491.00 

snoon 

S. 489. 19 
1,386.27 
1,704.80 

7, 032. 96 

None 

8, 504. 42 


$33. 36 
2. 726. 96 

263.41 

2. 678. 02 

176.23 

45. 13 

169. 064. 24 

None 

8, 272, 62 

2. 654. 03 

2.00 

205. 97 

l.OSO. 73 
574. 09 
896. 20 
None 
195. 55 

1.325.09 

63,386.11 
1.282.87 

.5.315.31 
.527. 61 
863. 75 

1,4.54.18 
367.37 

1, 0.34. 91 
642.06 
None 
582. 64 


None 
None 

$1.. 500. on 

1,200.00 

None 

425.00 

118. .500.00 

None 

.303. 40 
None 
None 
75.00 
1, 800. 00 
4, 000. 00 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
8. 000. no 

39.5, 490. 00 

None 

45.00 

2, 620. 00 

350.00 

625. 20 

2, 128. 70 

None 

5, 250. 00 


None 
.None 

None 

None 
None 
None 
N^one 
None 

None 
None 
.None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 

$180,041.00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
150. 00 


$.56 04 


Phalanx of Greek Veterans of America, Inc., Chicago, 
111., Jan. 3, 1941. Orcece 




Polish Aid Kund Committee of Federation of Elizebeth 
Polish Organizations, Elizabeth, N. J., Sept. 23, 1939. 
Poland and England -. 


20 00 


Polish Aid Fund Committee of St. Casimir's Roman 
Catholic Church of the City of Albany, N. Y., Albany, 
N. Y., Jan. 22, 1940. Poland 


9.60 


Polish-American Associations of Middlesex County, 

N. J., SajTcvillc, N. J., Jan. 22, 1940. Poland 

Polish-American Citizens Relief Fund Committee, 


80.82 
25. 17 


Polish-American Council, Chicago, 111., Sept. 15, 1939. 
Poland . - . 


20 761 02 


Polish-American Forwarding Committee, Inc., New 
York. N. Y., Mar. 28, 19 JO. Poland and Germany. . . 

Polish-American Volunteer Ambulance Section, Inc. 
fPavasl, New York, N. Y., Feb. 13, 1940. France 


6, 044. 22 
196. 82 


Polish BroadcastinK Corporation, New York, N. Y., 
Sept. 23 1939 Poland - . 


41.80 


Polish Business and Professional Men's Club, Los An- 
geles, Calif., Nov. 17, 1939.t Polend 


158.27 


Polish Central Committee of New London, Conn., New 
London, Conn , Oct 13, 1939. t Poland 


148.57 


Polish Central Council of New Haven, New Haven, 
Conn Sept 29 1939 Poland and Germany 


51.26 


Polish Civic League of Mercer County. Trenton, N. J., 
Sept 19, 1939 Poland 


2.54 


Polish Civilian Relief Fund, Passaic, N. J., Oct. 27, 


251.42 


Polish Fplcons Alliance of America, Pittsburgh, Pa., 
Sept 20 1939. Poland .... 


20. 00 


Polish Inter-Orgonization "Centrala" of Waterbury, 
Watcrbury Conn Feb 28, 1940 Poland 


25. .50 


Polish Literary Guiild of New Britain, Conn., New 


13.00 


Polish National AH'ance of the United States of North 
.Vmerica, Chicago 111., Sept. 27, 1939. Poland and 


2. 494. 21 


Polish National council of Montgomery County, Am- 
sterdam, N. Y -001.12,1939. Poland 


117.46 


Polish National Council of New York, New York, N. Y.. 
Sept. 14. 193 9. France, Poland, England, and Ger- 


14, .527. 36 


The Polish Naturalization Independent Club, Worces- 
Polish ReUef of Carteret, N. J., Carteret, N. J., Oct. 11. 


23.85 
13.00 


Polish Relief Committee of Boston, Boston, Mass., 
.=!ept. 11. 19,39. Poland 

Polish R e'ief Committee of Brockton, Mass., Brockton, 
Mass • Sept 25 1939 Poland _- .-- . 


.504. 80 
247.67 


Polish Relief Committee of Cambridge, Mass., Cam- 
bridge, Mass., Sept. 16. 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Chester and Delaware 
County, Chester, Pa., Sept. 15, 1939. England 

Polish Relief Committee of Columbia County, Hu dson, 
N Y M*\r 15 1910 Poland --- -. 


408.35 
694.04 
None 


Polish Relief Committee of Delaware, Wilmington, Del., 
Sept. 22, 1939. Poland -.. 


248. 32 



•The registration of this organization was revoked on 
{ No report for the month of April has been received 



Apr. 30, 1941, at the request of registrant, 
from this organization. 



694 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETm 
CoNTRiBnTioNs FOR Relief IN BELLIGERENT CoDNTBiES — Continued 



Name of registrant, locition, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Polish Relief Committee, Detroit, IVIich., Sept. II, 1939. 

Poland, Germany, and Scotland 

Polish Relief Committee of Fitchburg, Fitchburg, IMass., 

Mar. 29, 1940. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee, Flint, Mich., Sept. 18, 1939. 

Poland- - 

Polish Relief Committee of Holyoke, Mass., Holyoke, 

Mass., Nov. 4, 1939. Poland _ 

Polish Relief Committee of Jackson, Mich., Jackson, 

Mich., Nov. 9, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee, New Bedford, Mass., Oct. 31, 

1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Philadelphia and Vicinity, 

Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 12, 1939. Poland _ _ 

Polish Relief Committee of the Polish National Home 

Association, Lowell, Mass., Nov. 27, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee, Taunton, Mass., Dec. 13, 1939. 

Poland - -- -- - 

Polish Relief Fund of Fall River, Mass., Fall River, 

Mass., Nov. 8, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund, Jersey City, N. J., Sept. 12, 1939. 

Poland -- 

Polish Relief Fund, Jewett City, Conn., Oct. 3, 1939. 

Poland , 

Polish Relief Fund of Meriden, Meriden, Conn., Oct. 12, 

1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund, Middletown, Conn., Sept. 23, 1939. 

Poland 

Polish Relief Fund, Niagara Falls, N. Y., Oct. 26, 1939. 

Poland 

Polish Relief Fund of Palmer, Mass., Three Rivers, 

Mass., Oct. 20, 1939. Poland- 

Polish Relief Fund of Syracuse, N. Y., and Vicinity, 

Syracuse. N. Y.. Oot. 31. 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund Committee, Los Angeles, Calif., 

Dec. 13, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund Committee of Milwaukee, Milwau- 
kee, Wis., Sept. 215, 1939. Poland.. 

Polish Relief Fund Committee of Passaic and Bergen 

Counties, Inc., Passaic, N. J., Sept. 22. 1939. Poland 
Polish Union of the United States of North America, 

Wilkes-Barro, Pa., Sept. 8, 1939. Poland 

Polish United Societies of Holy Trinity Parish, Lowell, 

Mass., Sept. 20, 1939. Poland 

Polish War Sufferers Relief Committee (Fourth Ward), 

Toledo. Ohio, Sept. 21, 1939. Poland and Germany.. 
Polish Welfare Council, Schenectady, N. Y., Sept. 22, 

1939. Poland 

Polish White Cross Club of West Utica, Utica, N. Y,, 

Oct. 20. 1939.11 Poland and England 

Polish Women's Fund to Fatherland, Lawrence, Mass., 

Sept. 23. 19.39. Poland 

Polish Women's Relief Committee, New York, N. Y., 

Nov. 24, 1939. France, Poland, and Germany 

Polski Komitet Ratunkowy (Polish Relief Fund), Bing- 

hamton, N. Y., Sept. 25, 1939. Poland and England.. 
Pulaski Civic League of Middlesex County, N. J., South 

River, N. J., Sept. 30, 1939. Poland. 

Pulaski League of Queens County, Inc., Jamaica, N. Y., 

Oct. 21, 1939. Poland.- 



Funds 
received 



$16.5, 842. 50 
749, 80 

10, 040. 18 
8, 657. 61 
1, 924. 43 

12, 256. 70 

53, 325. 68 
3, 298. 54 
3,489.14 
I, 654. 96 

65, 128. 88 

1, 802. 85 
1, 806. 69 
4, 974. 54 

3. 558. 69 

2, 259. 25 
12. 574. 07 

1,091.69 
22,201.44 
15,161.61 

2, 540. 33 

4, 375. 10 
7, 155. 01 
6, 756. 10 
8, 436. 13 

6, 516. 64 
12, 442. 54 

5, 162. 34 
639.29 

7, 862. 56 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$121. 646. 73 

460. 40 

5,171.64 

6. 956. 09 

649.60 

9, 477. 68 

48, 016. 40 

2, 043. 00 

2, 757. 00 
1, 252. 00 

53, 510. 95 
1, 561. 90 

1. 500. 00 

3, 264. 37 

2. 839. 32 
1,148.46 
8,991.69 

583. 00 
17, 732. 72 
11, 697. 10 

2, 500. 00 

3, 916. 31 

6, 712. 36 
5, 665. 35 

7, 692. 91 
3, 175. 40 
S, 816. 98 
3, 632. 74 

None 
7, 400. 00 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Apr. 30. 1941. 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



$36, 644. 52 
248. 31 

2, 446. 85 
1. 423. 40 

981. 12 

1.808.98 

4,313.19 

640. 89 

706. 97 

346. 62 

9, 612. 34 

2.28 

278. 79 

1,691.97 

648.48 

883.54 

1,069.49 

240. 43 

3, 085. 30 

1, 684. 87 

40.33 
290. 08 
324.63 
1,021.43 
169. 95 

2, 643. 90 
3,311.42 
1, 172. 94 

554.29 



290.41 
IIThe registration of this organization was revoked on Apr. 30, 1941, at the request of registrant. 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



$73, 374. 00 
130. 00 
416. 45 

1. 109. 10 
760. 00 

4, 850. 00 
None 
None 

1, 375. 00 
None 

1, 575. 00 
900.00 

None 

None 

None 

4. 404. 95 

1,850.00 

460. 00 

11.607.40 

4, 058. 00 

None 

1, 240. 00 

None 

6, 150. 00 

1,900.00 

2, 660. 00 
2,331.12 
1, 215 00 

None 
None 



Estimated 
val ue of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



None 


$7, 651. 25 


None 


41.09 


$25. 65 


2,421.69 


None 


278. 12 


None 


293.71 


None 


970.04 


None 


996.09 


None 


614.65 


None 


25.17 


None 


56.34 


None 


2,006.59 


None 


238.67 


None 


27.90 


None 


18.20 


None 


70.80 


None 


227. 25 


None 


2, 512. 89 


None 


268. 26 


500. 00 


1, 383. 42 


None 


1, 779. 64 


None 


None 


None 


168. 71 


None 


118.12 


None 


69.32 


None 


573. 27 


415. 00 


697. 34 


116. 16 


3, 314. 14 


None 


356. 66 


None 


85.00 


None 


172. 15 



JUNE 7, 1941 



695 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Countries — Continued 



Name of resistrant, location, date of repistratioii, and 
destination of contributions 



Queen Wilhelmina Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y., May 
17, 1940. Netherlands, France, Poland, United King- 
dom, India. Australia, New Zealand, Canada. Union 
of South Africa, Norway, Belgium, Luxemburg, and 
Germany 

Refugees of England, Inc., New York, N. Y., July 12, 
1940.1 Great Britain. _ 

Relief .\gency for Polish War Sufferers, Willimantic, 
Conn., Sept. 29, 1939. Poland 

Relief for Children of Britain by Children of America, 
New York, N. Y., Feb. 6, 1941. Great Britain.. 

Relief Committee of the United Polish Societies, Chico- 
pec, Mass., Oct. 21, 1939. Poland 

Relief for French Refugees in England, Washington, 
D. C, Dec. 26, 19.39. France and Great Britain 

Relief Fund for Sufferers in Poland Committee, Keno- 
sha, Wis., Sept. 2.5, 1939. Poland 

Relief Society for Jews In Lublin, Los Angeles, Calif., 
Dee. 13, 1939. Poland 

Royal .\ir Force Benevolent Fund of U.S..\., Inc., New 
York, N. Y., Nov. 20, 194(>. Great Britain 

Russian Children's Welfare Society, Inc., New York, 
N. Y., Sept. 29, 1939. Germany, France, and Poland.. 

St. Andrew's (Scottish) Society of Washington, D.C., 
Washington, D. C, June 18, 1940. Scotland 

Saints Constantine and Helen Greek Orthodo.x Church, 
Washington, D. C, Dec. 23, 1940. Greece 

St. Stephen's Polish Relief Fund of Perth Amboy, N. J., 
Perth Amboy, N. J., Sept. 27, 1939. Poland 

The Salvation Army, New York, N. Y., May 23, 1940. 
England, France, Norway, Belgium, and the Nether- 
lands 

Save the Children Federation, Incorporated, New York, 
N. Y., Sept. 8, 1939. England, Poland, Belgium, and 
the Netherlands 

Schuylkill and Carbon Counties Relief Committee for 
Poland, Frackville, Pa., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland 

Scots' Charitable Society, Boston, Mass., May 9. 1940. 
Scotland 

Scottish Clans Evacuation Plan, Port Washington, 
N.Y.,Nov. 19,1940. Great Britain 

Le Secours Francjais, New York, N. Y., Sept. II, 1940. 
Fr ance and possessions 

Secours Franco-Am^ricain— War Relief, Pittsburgh, 
Pa., Nov. 20, 1939. Great Britain.. 

The Seventh Column, Inc., West Fairlee, Vt., June 12, 
19-10. France and England 

Share A Smoke Club, Inc., Ithaca, N. Y., Nov. 14, 1939. 
England, France, fvlorway, Belgium, and the Nether- 
lands 

The Silver Thimble Fund of America, New Orleans, 
La., Feb. 18, 1941. Great Britain... 

Sociedades Hispanas -Miadas, San Francisco, Calif.. 
Mar. 29, 1940.* France 

Sociedades Hispanas Confederadas, Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Jan. 22, 1940. France 



Funds 
received 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$389, 602. 68 
83, 035. .58 

3, 617. 42 

None 
9, 130. 29 
2.5, 591. 87 

4. 670. 46 
971. 52 

40, 813. 50 
19,013.38 
2, 496. 18 
6, 645. 43 
•2, 992. 66 

215,017.85 

348, 506. 04 
6, 814. 27 
1.437.96 
12, 399. 05 
34,511.95 
2, 523. 35 
None 

688. 70 

90.60 

877. 72 

31, 199. 12 



$186. 919. .56 

.56, 670. 33 

2, 336. 93 

None 

8. 374. 88 

22. 370. 54 

4. 235. 20 

175.00 

32.471.08 

1.5,032.07 

831.31 

5, 000. 00 

None 

187, 822. 21 

263. 686. 00 
6. 600. 54 
1,437.96 
10. 975. 90 
16,986.74 
1, 832. 85 
None 

550.00 

None 

None 

30, 240. 87 



Une.vpended 
balance as of 
Apr. 30, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



$169,78.5. 14 
6, 273. 44 
1,035.37 

None 

701.06 

2. 005. 10 

64.40 

496. Ii4 
.5, 282. 29 

932. 70 
1,304.24 
1,645.43 
2, 992. 66 

■25, 241. 43 

9, 584. 20 
168.73 
None 
452.00 

.5, 168. 85 
558. 79 
None 

25.10 
52. 74 
171. 59 

None 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



None 

$1.!, 396, 94 

716. 46 

None 

2, 722. .50 

6,611.80 

1,2.50 00 

None 

.\^onc 

1, 160.20 

None 

None 

None 

151,728.85 

None 
None 
None 
None 
657. 17 
3, 316. 85 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 



Estimated 
value ofcon- 

tributions 

in kind now 

on hand 



None 
$200. 00 
None 
None 
None 
43.00 
-Vone 
None 
.Vone 
4, 354. 35 
None 
None 
None 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
376. 64 
None 
None 

None 

55.00 
None 
None 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, affairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



$32, 867. 68 

20,091.81 

246. 12 

None 

54.35 

1.216.23 

370. 80 

299.88 

3, 059. .59 

3,048.61 

360. 03 

None 

None 

1,954.21 

85, 236. 84 
45.00 
None 
971. 15 

12, 356. 36 
131.71 
None 

113.60 

37.76 
706.13 
958.25 



IThis registrant serves primarily as a clearing-house for the distribution abroad of contributions collected by other registrants; these receipts and 
disbursements are not included in the figures here given, since they are shown elsewhere in this tabulaticjn following the names of the original collecting 
registrants. 

'The registration of this organization was revoked on Jan. 31, 1941, at the request of registrant. 

322020—41 3 



096 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
Contributions fob RBLiiar in Belligeiieni' Countries — CoutiuueU. 



NauR' of registrant, location, date of rcf^'istraliou, and 
destination of contributions 



Sociftf Francaisc de St. Louis, Inc., St. Louis, Mo., 

Nov. l.\ 1939. France 

Soei^t^ Israelite Fran^aise de Secours Mutuels de New 

York, New York, N. Y., June 4, 1940. France 

Society of the Devotees of Jerusalem, Inc., New York, 

N. Y., Doc. 18, 1939. Palestine - 

Solidaridad Internacional Antifascists, New York, 

N. Y.. Oct. 17, 1940.t France 

The Somerset Workroom, Far Hills, N. J., Apr. 25, 1940. 

France and Great Britain .-. 

Le Souvenir Fran^ais, Detroit, Mich., May 1, 1940. 

France and lielf^iutn 

Spanish Refugee Relief Campaign, New York, N. Y., 

Sept. 20, 1939. France - 

Springfield and Vicinity Polish Relief Fund Committee, 

Springfield, Mass., Sept. 23, 1939. Poland 

Superior Council of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, 

New York, N.Y., Apr. .'■., 1940. France 

Miss Heather Thatcher, Hollywood, Calif., Nov. 19, 

1940. Great Britain 

Toledo Committee for Relief of War Victims, Toledo, 

Ohio, Sept. 19, 1939. Poland 

Tolstoy Foundation, Inc., New York, N. Y., Oct. 17, 

1939. France, Poland, and Ensland 

Mrs. Walter R. Tuckernian, Betliesda, Md., Nov. 24, 

1939. Great Britain and Greece 

Edmund Tyszka, Hamtramck, Mich., Sept. 19, 1939. 

Poland 

Ukrainian Relief Committee. New York, N. Y., .Tune 

28. 1940. Ocrmany, France, England, and Italy 

L'Union Alsacionne, Inc., Now Y'ork, N. Y., Oct. 28, 

1939. France 

Unitarian Service Committee of the American Unitarian 

Association, Boston, Mass., May 23, 1940. France. 

British Isles, and the Netherlands 

United American Polish Organinations, South River, 

N. J., South River. N. J., Oct. 20, 1939. Poland 

United Bilgorayer Relief, Inc., New York, N. Y., Mar. 

21, 1940. Poland 

United British Societies of Minneapolis, Minneapolis, 

Minn., Jan. 21, 1941. Great Britain and Dominions. 
United British War Relief Association, Somerville, 

Mass., June 14, 1940. Great Britain 

United Charity Institutions of Jerusalem, New York, 

N. Y., Oct. 13, 1939. Palestine 

United Committee tor French Relief, Inc., New Y'ork, 

N. Y., Oct. 26, 1939. France, England, and Germany. 
United Fund for Refucee Children. Inc.. New York, 

N. Y.. Sept. 21, 19.39.} Poland, Franco, and England 
United Gorman Societies, Inc., Portland, Oreg., Port- 
land, Oreg.. Jan. 8, 1940. Germany 

United Opoler Relief of Now York, New York, N. Y., 

Dec. 9, 1939. Poland . 

United Polish Committees in Racine, Wis., Racine, 

Wis., Nov. 2. 1939. Poland 

United Polish Organizations of Salem, Mass., Salom, 

Mass.. Oct. 20, 1939. Poland 

United Polish Societies of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, 

Calif., Oct. 21, 1939. Poland 



Funds 
received 



$S.'i2. SI 

1. 770. 4.i 
20, 330. 13 

6. 081. 24 

10, 865. 07 

260. 00 

41,296.70 

1,395.33 

310.00 

5. 985. 72 

7, 552. 69 
33,118. IS 

3,983.41 

3. 105. 46 

5H2. 2<) 

2. 608. 42 

69. 160. 77 

3. 788. 53 
2, 196. 98 
2. 515. 00 

8, 854. 34 
87,121.34 

133, 727. 48 
8. 122. W 
3, 185. 77 
1,497.98 
2, 330. 73 

2, 932. 83 

3, 390. 20 



Funds spent 

for roliof in 

countries 

named 



$373. 49 

710.00 

11,4IX). IKJ 

None 

10,771.30 

200.00 

14,704. ,58 

1.100.00 

310.00 

5, 296. 66 

6, 242. 82 
18, 398. 89 

3,964.42 

3, 073. 96 

3.53. 46 

1, 400. 27 

13, 274. 74 

3, 400. 00 

20.00 

1, 500. 00 

7, 209. 90 
49, 462. 36 
94, 000. 68 

1. 640. 89 

3, 0O3. 69 

100. 00 

1, 9.50. 00 

2, 295. 32 
2. 962. 10 



Une.x I tended 
balance as of 
Apr. -.m, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
cha.sod and 
still on hand 



$421.76 

1.012.88 

386. 99 

4,571.58 

4,512.27 

None 

2, 383. 43 

229. 13 

None 

None 

673. 19 

4. 6.57. .58 

15.07 

:;i. 50 

17,91 

622. 68 

11.259.18 

251. 59 

1,426.19 

330.28 

337. 62 

500.22 

24, 442. 76 

None 

46.09 

1,3.50.41 

145. 21 

199.60 

60, 38 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kin<i sent to 
countries 
named 



$8.00 
None 
None 
None 

13.531.95 
None 

16, 486. 00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
20O. 00 
315.00 

I, 1{UJ. 110 

None 
None 
None 
725.00 
None 
8, 987. 42 
None 
None 
None 
None 
595.00 
None 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on hand 



None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
$500.00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
10,00 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

614. 76 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 

None 



F'unds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, aftairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



$57. 56 

53. 57 

8, 543. 14 

1.509. Wj 

1,581.50 

60.00 

24. 208, 69 

66. 20 

None 

69.07 

636. 68 

10.061.71 

3.96 

None 

210. 89 

583. 47 

11,035.85 

136. 91 

571. 79 

684.72 

1, 306. 82 

37, 168. 76 

15,284.04 

6,481.71 

135. 99 

17.57 

235. 62 

437. 91 

361.72 



tThe registration of this organization was revoked on Mar. 31, 1941, at the request of registrant. 

JThe registration of this organization was revoked on Apr. 30. 1941, lor failure to observe the rules and regulations, 



JUNE 7, 1941 



697 



Contributions fob Rkhkf in Bku-igkhent Countries — Coiilinued. 



Nanir of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Ifnitcd Reading Appeal for I'olisli \\'ar SiiITerers, Head- 
ing. I'a., Sept. 22, li):iy. Poland and England 

U.S. FriendsotGreece,NewYork,N. Y., Fcb.7, 1941.11 
Greece 

Universal Committee for the Defense of Democracy, 
New York, N. Y., Oct. 16, 1940. England and 
Franc* 

Mrs. Paul Verdier Fund, San Francisco, Calif., Oct. 11, 
1939. France 

Vitamins for Britain, Inc., New York, N. Y., Mar. 22, 
1941. Great Britain, _ 

War Relief Association of American Youth, Inc., New 
York, N. Y., Feb. 7, 1941. || Great Britain 

Wellesley College Alumnae Association, Wellesley, 
Mass., Jan. 31, 1941. Great Britain -.. 

Woman's Auxiliary Board of the Scots' Charitable 
Society, Inc., Everett, Mass., Feb. 28, 1940. Scotland. 

\Voinen's Allied War Relief Association of St. Louis, 
Clayton, Mo., Dec. 18, 1939. Great Britain and 
France 

Young Friends of French Prisoners and Babies, New 
York, N. Y., Feb. 28, 1941. France 

Registrants whose registrations were revoked prior to 
Apr. 1, 1941, and who had no balance on hand as of that 
date 

Total!- - - 



Fnn<ls 
received 



.$9, 398. 14 
None 

611.10 
4, 207. 41 
1,496.50 
1,212.33 

126.86 
1. 200. 77 

18, 550. 59 
486. 93 

565, 646. 01 



34. 272, 360. 69 



Finids spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$7,931.29 
None 

None 
3,701.52 
None 
None 
None 
4, 148. .W 

14,697.43 
None 

466, 460. 95 



23, 955, 850. 26 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Ajir. 30, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



.$1,325. 18 
None 

31.28 

195. 79 
1, 480. 35 

160. 85 
57.00 
30.48 

3, 306. 93 
302. 90 

None 



, 1)14. 052. 66 



Kstimatcfl 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



None 
None 

None 
.$3, 282. 00 
None 
None 
None 
None 

25, 078. 9 1_ 
None 

1.343,891.16 



Kslinialed 
value of con- 
tributions 
in kind now 
on liand 



None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 

None 



639, 989. 59 



Funds si)cnt 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, adairs, 
campaigns, 
etc. 



$141.07 
3, 043. 00 

57'J. 82 

310. 10 

16. 15 

1,051.48 

69.86 

21.79 

486.23 

184. 03 

102,353.65 



3, 324, 456. 20 



IIThe registration of this organization was revoked on Apr. 30, 1941, at the request of registrant. 

lit is not possible to strike an exact balance in these published totals, since some registrants have included in their expenditures moneys available 
from loans or advances, which arc not considered by the Department to be "funds received" and hence are not reported as such. 



Canada 



GREAT LAKES - ST. LAWRENCE WATERWAY PROJECT 



li;clea.sed to the press by the White House .Iinic 5] 

The President sent the following message to 
Congress on June 5, 1941 : 

To 'PHE Congress of the United States : 

I recommend authorization of construction of 
the St. Lawrence Seaway and Power Project, 
pur.suaiu to the agreement of March 19, 1941, 



witli Canada,^ as an integral paTt of the joint 
defense of the North American Continent. 

Production and more production is the key- 
note of our all-out race for national defense. 
Electric power and transportation are limiting 



^Biillitiii of March 22, lfl41 (vol. IV, no. 01), 
;?07-313. 



pp. 



698 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



fiictors in the prodiKlioii oi' i)l:ines, guns, tanks, 
and ships. 

The enemies of deniocniey are developing 
every hydroelectric resource and every water- 
way from Norway to the Dardanelles. Are we 
to allow this continent to be out-niatched because 
short-sighted interests oppose the development 
of one of our gi-eatest resources ? 

Your action on this project will either make 
available or withhold 2.200,000 horsepower of 
low-cost electric power for the joint defense of 
North America. 

Your action on this project will either open 
or keep bottled up one of the greatest trans- 
portation resources ever offered a people. 

Both countries need the power. Both face 
power shortages which threaten to grow more 
serious as the demands of the defense program 
multiply with almost incredible rapidity. 

Let us remember that it takes tens of thonsands 
of kilowatt-hours of electricity to produce the 
materials that go into a single airplane. Our 
present alnminnm program alone calls for more 
than 10 billion kilowatt-hours a year. It is 
constantly expanding with the need for more 
planes to outstrip the aggressors. 

Steam power-jjlant construction offers no 
substitute for St. Lawrence power. No steam 
plants can provide the large blocks of low-cost 
electric energy required iov certain essential de- 
fense industries. Furthermore, we are going 
to need all our capacity to pi'oduce steam power- 
plant equipment to meet the tremendous de- 
mands which are glowing in other parts of the 
country and to build power installations to 
drive our merchant and naval vessels. 

Our defense production is a gigantic assem- 
l)ly line. Transportation is its conveyor belt. 
If raw materials cannot flow freely to our great 
industrial plants and the products cannot move 
continuously to the front, defense breaks down. 
Bottlenecks in transportation are as serious as 
shortages of power. 

Expanding production is going to burden the 
lailroads to the limit. We are expanding their 
rolling stock as fast as we can. but even the 
present oitlers for new cars and locomotives 
are competing for manufacturing capacity 



which could otherwise produce tanks and other 
items of heavy armament. 

The Seaway will help prevent transportation 
bottlenecks. It will provide a great highway 
to and from important defense-production 
areas. It will cut by more than a thousand 
miles the stretch of dangerous open water which 
must be traveled by supplies to Great Britain 
and strategic North Atlantic bases. It will in- 
crease our cajiacity to build ships. 

The Great Lakes today hold many sliipways 
and dry docks, as well as resources of men and 
materials for shipbuilding. They are bottled 
up because we have delayed completing the Sea- 
way. If we start the Seaway now. scores of 
additional merchant ships may be built in 
coastal yards freed by transferring a portion of 
the longer-term naval program to the Great 
Lakes. 

The St. Lawrence Project must be expedited. 
No comparable power, shipbuilding, and trans- 
portation facilities can be made available in the 
time required to construct this project. 

In dealing with the present emergency, too 
many people have underestimated the degi-ee 
to which our resources will be taxed. We can- 
not afford to make any more mistakes of that 
kind. 

I am advised that we can build the St. Law- 
lence Project in four yeais. Under emergency 
pressure it may be completed in less time. I 
should like to agree with the people who say 
that the country's danger will lie over sooner 
than that. But the course of world events gives 
no such assurance; and we have no right to take 
chances with the national safety. 

I know of no single project of this nature 
more important to this country's future in peace 
or war. Its authorization will demonstrate to 
the enemies of democracy that, however long 
the effort, we intend to outstrip them in the race 
of production. In the modern world, that race 
determines the rise and fall of nations. 

I hope that authorizaticm will not be delayed. 
Franklin D Roosevelt 

The White House, 
June 5, 1941. 



JUNE 7, 1941 



699 



The Near East 



SAFETY OF AMERICANS IN IRAQ 

[Released to the press June -f] 

Mr. Paul Knabenshiie, Minister Resident and 
Consul General at Baghdad, has reported to tlie 
Department that all Americans ill Baghdad are 
safe and well and that while he has received 
no definite news of Americans outside of Bagh- 



dad they are believed to be safe. He also re- 
ported that five Amei'ican women who previ- 
ously were evacuated are now safe in Basrah 
or India. 

[Released to the press June 5] 

Mr. Knabenshue has reported to the Depart- 
ment that he has received information from 
British official sources in Basrali that all Ameri- 
cans in the Basrah area are safe and well. Mr. 
Knabenshue added that "thus all Americans in 
Iraq now are safely accounted for". 



American Republics 



REMAEKS OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE WELCOMING THE 
MINISTER OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS OF PANAMA 



[Released to the press June 4] 

The Secretary of State made the following 
remarks at the meeting of the special session of 
the Governing Board of the Pan American 
Union held in honor of the Minister of Foreign 
Affairs of Panama, Dr. Raul de Roux, on June 
4, 1941 : 

"My colleagues of the Governing Board have 
entrusted to me the privilege of extending to 
you a cordial welcome on behalf of the Pan 
American Union. 

"From the time of its earliest history, the con- 
ception of inter- American solidarity has been 
associated with the name of Panama. It was 
there that the historic conference of American 
republics was first called. The hospitality of 
Panama has been many times enjoyed by all of 
us; and only two years ago the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American republics met 
in Panama and there worked out the policies 



which have strengthened the unity of purpose of 
the American republics. 

"Since its founding, the Republic of Panama 
lias steadily cooperated in furthering the cause 
of the unity of the Americas. This was a wise 
and statesmanlike policy, since every considera- 
tion of strategy, of economics, and of political 
relations makes it clear that the attitude of 
Panama has played a vital part in the life of the 
American family of nations. It is natural that 
in this critical hour the American republics ap- 
preciate the cooperation of your country in as- 
suring the continued security and independent 
life of the American republics. 

"In welcoming you, Mr. Minister, let me also 
offer our warmest wishes for the welfare of your 
people, for the progress and prosperity of your 
country, and for the continuance of the brilliant 
role which it has heretofore played in the cause 
of inter-American solidarity." 



700 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



REGULATIONS FOR MEETINGS OF CONSULTATION OF MINISTERS 

OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS 



[Released to the press by the Pan American Union June 41 

The Governing Board at its regular monthly 
session on June 4 approved the definitive regula- 
tions of the Meetings of Consultation of the 
Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the American 
Republics. These regulations were drawn up 
pursuant to a recommendation of the Second 
Meeting of Consultation held at Habana in July 
1940.= 

The definitive regulations provide that any 
government which desires to initiate the pi"o- 
cedure of consultation shall transmit to the Gov- 
erning Board of the Pan American Union the 
questions with which it desires the consultation 



to deal and the approximate date on which the 
Meeting should be held. On the basis of this 
proposal and after consultation with the other 
governments, the Governing Board will pre- 
pare the definitive agenda. 

The regulations further provide that the 
Meetings of Consultation shall be attended by 
the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the Ameri- 
can Republics or their personal representatives. 
Technical advisers may accompany the Foreign 
Ministers but they shall not have the right to 
vote. A resolution adopted at the Habana Con- 
ference provided that the Third Meeting of 
Consultation shall be held in Rio de Janeiro. 



CONFERENCE OF POLICE AND JUDICIAL AUTHORITIES 



[Released to the press by the Pan American Union June 4] 

The Governing Board of the Pan American 
Union, meeting on June 4, 1941 in regular 
monthly session, received from a special com- 
mittee which had been appointed to consider the 
matter, a draft program for an Inter- American 
Conference of Police and Judicial Authorities 
provided for in a resolution adopted at the Sec- 
ond Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs of 
the American Republics held at Habana in July 
last.' The purpose of the Conference will be 
to draft conventions and recommendations to 
assure the most complete and effective defense of 
the American republics against acts of an un- 
lawful character as well as against any other 
unlawful activities which may effect the insti- 
tutions of American states. 

. . . The report submitted to the Governing 
Board was formulated by the special committee 



°- BnVctin. of August 24, ]f)40 (vol. Ill, no. 61). pp. 
137-138. 

'Ihid.. pp. 130-131. 



composed of the Ambassador of Argentina, 
Felipe A. Espil ; the Minister of Uruguay, J. 
Ridding; and the Minister of Costa Rica, Luis 
Fernandez. The committee fiu-ther recom- 
mended that the project of program be sent to 
the governments of the American republics with 
the reciuest that their observations thereon be 
transmitted to the Pan American Union not 
later than October 15, when the definitive 
agenda will be prepared. The exact place and 
date of meeting of the Conference will be de- 
termined later by the Governing Board. 

INTP]R-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT 
COMMISSION : VENEZUELAN COUNCIL 

(Released to the press by the Office of the Coordinator of 
Comraercial and Cultural Relations Retween the .Ameri- 
can Republics June fi] 

Nelson A. Rockefeller. Coordinator of Com- 
mercial and Cultural Relations Between the 
American Republics, announced on June 6 the 
membership of the Venezuelan National Coun- 



JUNE 7, 1941 



701 



cil, the tenth of 21 councils being established by 
the Inter-American Development Commission 
in its program for the stimulation of trade 
among the American republics. Mr. Rocke- 
feller is Chairman of the Development Com- 
mission. 

The Venezuelan Council is headed by Dr. 
Oscar Augusto Machado, Director de la Com- 
pania Anonima la Electricidad de Cai'acas. 
The other members include: 

Alfredo Brandt, as Vice Chairman. Seiior Brandt is 
Presidente del Banco Mercantil y Agricola. 

R. Telle Berrizbeitia, Director-Gerente de la Companfa 
Anfmima Naeional Manufacturera de Cnucho y 
Neinnaticos General, and Director del Banco Central. 

Andres Sucre, merchant and Director del Banco 
Caracas. 

Pedro I. Aguerrevere, geologist and former Director 
del Banco Central. 

Julio Planchart, as General Advisor to the Council. 
Sefior Planchart is Director de Polltica Econ6mica 
en el Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores. 

J. A. Calcafio, as Secretary of the Council. Sefior 
Calcario is Jefe de la Oficina del Comercio Exterior 
en el Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores. 

Arrangements for the establishment of the 
Council were completed in Caracas, where an 
initial meeting has been held. Similar councils 
composed of outstanding business, professional, 
and technical men have been formed in Brazil, 
Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, Chile, Bolivia, 
Peru, Colombia, and Ecuador. 



\'TSIT TO WASHINGTON OF THE WIFE 
OF THE PRESIDENT OF PARAGUAY 

[Hpleaspd to the press June 71 

Sefiora de Morinigo, wife of the President 
of Paraguay, and her son, Higinio Emilio 
Morinigo, who has been undergoing treatment 
as the President's patient at the Warm Springs 
Foundation, will arrive by plane at Washing- 
ton Airport Sunday, June 8, where they will 
be met by the following representatives of the 
Department of State and Paraguayan Lega- 
tion: 

Mr. Philip Bonsai, Acting Chief, Division of American 

Republics 
Mr. Stanley Woodward, Acting Chief, Division of 

Protocol 
Mr. Andrew E. Donovan, Division of the American 

Republics 
The Minister of Paraguay and Senora de Soler 
Dr. Leo S. Rowe, Director General, Pan American 

Union 

Seiiora de Morinigo and her son will stop at 
the Wardman Park Hotel June 8-11, inclusive, 
and again on June 13 and 14, following a visit 
to New York City. 

While in Washington Seiiora de Morinigo 
will be received by Mrs. Roosevelt at the White 
House and will also be entertained at tea by 
the Secretary of State and Mrs. Hull and the 
Under Secretary of State and Mrs. Welles. She 
will visit the Pan American Union and be the 
guest of honor at a reception given by the 
Paraguayan Minister and Senora de Soler be- 
fore her departure. 



General 



ACQUISITION OF IDLE FOREIGN MERCHANT VESSELS 



Pursuant to section 1 of the act of Congress 
approved June 6. 1941 authorizing the acquisi- 
tion by the United States of title to or the use 
of domestic or foreign merchant vessels for 
urgent needs of commerce and national defense,* 



* Public Law 101. 



the President on June 6, 1941 issued an Execu- 
tive order (No. 8771) authorizing the United 
States Maritime Commission "to purcha.se, 
requisition, charter, requisition the use of, or 
take over the title to, or the possession of, any 
or all foreign merchant vessels which are lying 
idle in waters within the jurisdiction of the 



702 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



United States, inclurliiig the Philippine Islands 
and the Canal Zone, including all tackle, ap- 
parel, furniture, spare parts and equipment, 
and all stores, including fuel, aboard such ves- 
sels or appertaining thereto, for the use and 
disposition hereinafter directed." 

The Commission was further authorized, "to 
such extent and upon such terms and conditions 
as the Commission shall deem desirable and con- 
ducive to the national defense : 

"(a) To operate any or all of such vessels, 
either directly or by agent, in any service of 
the United States, or in any commerce, foreign 
or coastwise. 

"(b) To charter or lease any or all of such 
vessels to any persons for operation in any serv- 



ice of the United States, or in any commerce, 
foreign or coastwise: Provided, that no vessel 
shall be transferred, chartered, or leased to any 
belligerent government without the approval of 
the President. 

"(c) To document any or all of such vessels 
under the laws of the United States or any neu- 
ti-al country of the "Western Hemispliere. 

"(d) To make such other use or disposition 
of any or all of such vessels as the President 
may hereafter direct. 

"(e) To repair, equip, and man such vessels 
and to do whatever may be necessary to accom- 
l^lish the purposes of the said act or this order." 

The Commission was also directed to deter- 
mine and make to the owners of such vessels 
just compensation for the vessels or for their use. 



ENTRY OF ALIENS INTO THE UNITED STATES 



[Released to the press June 71 

EXECUTH'E OkDER 

Documents Required of Aliens Entering the 
United States 

By viiiue of and pursuant to the authority 
vested in me by the act of May 22, 1918, 40 
Stat. 559, as extended by the act of March 2, 
1921, 41 Stat. 1205, 1217, and by section 1752 
of the Revised Statutes of the United States, and 
in connection with the Alien Registration Act, 
1940, approved June 28, 1940 (54 Stat. 670), 
I hereby prescribe the following regulations per- 
taining to documents required of aliens entering 
the UnUed States (which regulations shall be 
applicable to Chinese and to Philippine citizens 
who are not citizens of the United States, ex- 
cept as may be otherwise provided by special 
laws and regulations governing the entry of 
such persons) : 

PART I 

1. Nonimmigrants must present unexpired 
passports or official documents in the nature of 
passports issued by the governments of the coun- 



tries to which they owe allegiance or other travel 
documents showing their origin and identity, 
as prescribed in regulations issued by the Secre- 
tary of State, and valid passport or other non- 
unmigrant visas. 

2. A noninunigi'ant alien who is passing in 
transit through the United States may present a 
transit certificate granted by an authorized 
officer of the United States. 

3. A nonimmigrant alien who enters the 
United States for a period not exceeding ten 
days, laiiding temporarily while the vessel on 
which he is a passenger is in port, or crossing the 
border, entering and departing via the same 
port of entry, may present a limited entry 
certilicate gi'anted by an authorized officer of 
the United States. 

4. A nonimmigrant alien who is a citizen of 
Canada, Newfoundland, or Mexico, or who is a 
British subject domiciled in Canada or New- 
foundland, may present a nonresident alien's 
border-crossing identification card issued by an 
authorized officer of the United States, if he is 
entering the United States for a period of less 
than thirty days. 



703 



5. The Secretai'v of State is authorized to 
define cases of emergency in whi(!h the passport 
and visa requirements may be waived for a 
nonimmigrant alien. 

6. No passpoi-t visa, transit certificate, limited 
entry certificate, or nonresident alien's border- 
crossing identification card shall be gianted to 
an alien whose entry would be contrary to the 
public safety nor to an alien who is unable to 
eatablish a legitimate purpose or reasonable need 
for the proposed entry. 



Spain of April 11, 1899, has preserved his alle- 
giance to Spain, may present a passport visa, 
in lieu of an immigration visa, for entry into 
Puerto Kico. Such aliens may be admitted into 
Puerto Rico without regard to the provisions 
of the Immigration Act of 1924, except section 
23. ( Act of May 2G, 192G, ch. 400, 44 St at. 657. ) 
f). The Secretary of State is authorized to 
define cases of emergency in which the pass- 
port and immigration visa requirements may 
be waived for an immigrant alien. 



PART II 

1. Immigrants must present unexpired pass- 
ports, or official documents in the nature of 
passports, issued by the governments of the 
countries to which they owe allegiance, or other 
travel documents showing their origin and 
identity, prescribed in regulations issued by the 
Secretary of State, and valid immigration visas 
granted by the consular officers of the United 
States in accordance with the requirements of 
the Immigration Act of 1924 and the I'egulations 
issued thereunder. 

2. An alien innnigrant who has previously 
been legally admitted into the United States 
for permanent residence, has departed there- 
from and has returned from a temporary visit 
abroad, may present, in lieu of an immigration 
visa, an unexpired permit to reenter, issued pur- 
suant to section 10 of the Immigration Act of 
1924. The bearer of such a permit to reenter 
is not required to present a passport. 

3. An alien immigrant who has previously 
been legally admitted into the United States 
for permanent residence and who has frequent 
occasion to cross the land borders of the United 
States may present, in lieu of an immigration 
visa or a pei-mit to reenter, a resident alien's 
border-crossing identification card. The bearer 
of such a border-crossing identification card is 
not required to present a passport. 

4. An immigrant Spanish national who on 
April 11, 1899 (whether adult or minor) was 
a bona fide resident of Puerto Rico or adjacent 
islands which comprised the Province of Puerto 
Rico, and who, in accordance with Article IX 
of the treaty between the United States and 



PART ni 

The Executive Secretary of the Panama 
Canal is hereby authorized to issue passport 
visas, transit certificates, limited entry certifi- 
cates, and immigration visas to aliens coming 
to the United States from the Canal Zone. The 
Governor of American Samoa is hereby 
authorized to issue passport visas, transit 
certificates, limited entry certificates, and im- 
migration visas to aliens coming to the United 
States from American Samoa. The Governor 
of Guam is hereby authorized to issue passport 
visas, transit certificates, limited entry certifi- 
cates, and immigration visas to aliens coming 
to the United States from Guam. 

PART IV 

The documentary requirements for aliens 
applying for admission into American posses- 
sions outside the United States are to be pre- 
scribed by the competent authorities in such 
possessions. 

PART V 

The definitions contained in section 28 of the 
Immigration Act of 1924 shall be regarded as 
applicable to this order, except as otherwise 
specified herein. 

PART VI 

The Secretary of State and the Attorney Gen- 
eral are hereby authorized to make such addi- 
tional rules and regulations, not inconsistent 
with this order, as may be deemed necessary for 
carrying out the provisions of this order and the 
statutes mentioned herein. 



704 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



PART vn 

This order shall take effect immediately and 
shall supersede and cancel the provisions of 
Executive Order No. 8430 <" of June 5, 1940 en- 
titled "Documents Eequired of Aliens Entering 
the United States" but shall not supersede Ex- 
ecutive Order No. 4049 of July 14, 1924 entitled 
"Documents Required of Aliens Entering the 



United States on Airships", or Executive Order 
No. 8429 ' of June 5, IMO entitled "Documents 
Required of Bona Fide Alien Seamen Entermg 
the United States." 

Franklin D Roosevelt 
The White House, 
June3,J-ni. 

[No. S766] 



CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL DEFENSE 



[Released to tbe press June 6] 

The Secretary of State notified collectors of 
customs on June 6 of the revocation of certain 
general licenses previously issued for the ex- 
portation of licensable articles and materials to 



certain destinations, as set forth in the follow- 
ing list. 

The effect of these revocations is that individ- 
ual licenses will now be required for exporta- 
tions of these commodities to the destinations 
named. 



Destination 


Nonproprie- 
tary and pro- 
prietary prep- 
arations con- 
taining quinine 


Cadmium pig- 
ments, includ- 
ing cadmium 
sulfide and 
cadmium lith- 
opone 


Chrome pigments 
containing 10 
percent or more 
chromium, in- 
cluding chromic 
oxide (chrome 
green), lead 
chromate 
(chrome yel- 
low), and zinc 
chromate 


Titanium pig- 
ments, includ- 
ing titanium 
dioxide 


Zinc pigments, 
including zinc 

oxide, leaded 
zinc oxide, zinc 

sulfide, and 
lithopone 


Aden - 


GASP 25 
GASP 30 
G.\SP 31 
GASP 32 
GASP 33 
GASP 34 
GASP 35 
GASP 36 
GASP 37 
GASP 38 
GASP 39 
GASP 40 
GASP 41 
GASP 42 
GASP 43 
GASP 44 
GASP 46 
GASP 46 
GASP 49 
G.\SP 60 
GASP 62 
G.iSP 53 
GASP 54 
GASP 65 
GASP 56 
GASP 58 
GASP 60 


GCMP 25 
QCMP 30 
QCMP 31 
GCMP 32 
GCMP 33 
GCMP 34 
GCMP 36 
GCMP 36 
GCMP 37 
GCMP 38 
GCMP 39 
QCMP 40 
QCMP 41 
QCMP 42 
QCMP 43 
QCMP 44 
QCMP 45 
QCMP 46 
GCMP 49 
QCMP 50 
QCMP 52 
QCMP 53 
QCMP 54 
QCMP 55 
QCMP 66 
QCMP 58 
GCMP 60 


GADP 25 
GADP 30 
GADP 31 
GADP 32 
GADP 33 
GADP 34 
GADP 35 
GADP 36 
GADP 37 
GADP 38 
GADP 39 
GADP 40 
GADP 41 
GADP 42 
GADP 43 
GADP 44 
GADP 45 
GADP 46 
GADP 49 
GADP 50 
GADP 62 
GADP 63 
GADP .54 
GADP 66 
GADP 56 
GADP 58 
QADP 60 


GCNP 25 
GCNP 30 
GCNP 31 
GCNP 32 
GCNP 33 
GCNP 34 
GCNP 35 
QCNP 36 
GCNP 37 
QCNP 38 
GCNP 39 
GCNP 40 
GCNP 41 
QCNP 42 
GCNP 43 
GCNP 44 
QCNP 45 
QCNP 46 
QCNP 49 
GCNP 50 
GCNP 52 
GCMP 53 
QCMP 54 
GCMP 55 
GCMP 56 
GCMP 58 
GCMP 60 


QBZP 25 




QBZP 30 




QBZP 31 




GBZP 32 




QBZP 33 




QBZP 34 




GBZP 35 


Ceylon . . _ 


GBZP 36 




GBZP 37 


Eire (Iioland) 


GBZP 38 




GBZP 39 




GBZP 40 




GBZP 41 


Gold Coast 


GBZP 42 




GBZP 43 




GBZP 44 


Leeward Islands 


GBZP 46 




GBZP 46 




GBZP 49 




GBZP 50 


St. Helena Islands - 


GBZP 52 




QBZP 63 




GBZP 64 




GBZP 65 


Trinidad and Tobago - -- 


GBZP 66 


Windward Islands - 


GBZP 68 




GBZP 60 







'5 F.R. 2147; Bulletin of June S, 1940 (vol. II, no. 
50), pp. 622-624. 



'5 F.R. 2145; Bulletin of June 8, 1940 (vol. II, no. 
50), pp. 620-621. 



JUNE 7, 1941 



705 



Destination 


Lead pigments 


Rubber tires 
and tubes 


Petrolatum and 
petroleum jelly, 
including me- 
dicinal, cosmetic, 
lubricant, rust 
preventative, 
polishes, and 
soap grades 


Coconut oil, 

edible and 

inedible 


Palm-kernel oils, 

palm oils, and 

oils obtainable 

from all varieties 

of palm kernels, 

both refined and 

crude 


Animal, flsh, 
and marine- 
mammal oils, 
fats and grea.se, 
edible and 
inedible 


Aden 


GCUP25 
GCUP30 
GCUP31 
Q CUP 32 


GCY 25 
GCY 30 
GCY 31 
GCY 32 
GCY 33 
GCY 34 
GCY 35 
GCY 36 
GCY 37 
GCY 38 
GCY 39 
GCY 40 
GCY 41 
GCY 42 
GCY 43 
GCY 44 
GCY 46 
GCY 46 
GCY 49 
GCY 50 
GCY 52 
GCY 63 
GCY 54 
GCY 55 
GCY 56 
GCY 58 
GCY 60 


GEL 25 
GEL 30 
GEL 31 
GEL 32 
GEL 33 
GEL 34 
GEL 35 
GEL 36 
GEL 37 
GEL 38 
GEL 39 
GEL 40 
GEL 41 
GEL 42 
GEL 43 
GEL 44 
GEL 45 
GEL 46 
GEL 49 
GEL 50 
GEL .52 
GEL 53 
GEL 54 
GEL 55 
GEL 56 
GEL 58 
GEL 60 


GEM 25 
GEM 30 
GEM 31 
GEM 32 
GEM 33 
GEM 34 
GEM 36 
GEM 36 
GEM 37 
GE.M 38 
GE.M 39 
GEM 40 
GEM 41 
OEM 42 
GEM 43 
GEM 44 
GEM 45 
GEM 46 
GEM 49 
GEM 50 
GEM 62 
GEM 53 
GEM 54 
GEM 66 
GEM 66 
GEM 58 
GEM 60 


GEO 25 
GEO 30 
GEO 31 
GEO 32 
GEO 33 
GEO 34 
GEO 35 
GEO 36 
GEO 37 
GEO 38 
GEO 39 
GEO 40 
GEO 41 
GEO 42 
GEO 43 
GEO 44 
GEO 46 
GEO 46 
GEO 49 
GEO 60 
GEO 52 
GEO 53 
GEO 64 
GEO 65 
GEO 56 
GEO 58 
GEO 60 


GER 28 


British East Africa - 


GER 30 




GER 31 




GER 32 


British Malaya 


GER 33 






GER 34 




GCUP 36 
GCUP 36 
GCUP 37 
GCUP 38 
GCUP 39 


GER 35 


Ceylon 

Cyprus . - _