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Full text of "Department of State bulletin"

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Given By 



TJ. S. SUPT. OF DOCUMEMTS 




THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 




ULLETIN 



VOLUME V • Numbers 106-131 



July 5-December 27, 1941 






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UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1942 



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U. S. SUPERINTfNOENT OF OnCIIMfNTS 
MAY 14 1942 



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THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



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JULY 5, 1941 
Vol. V, No. 106— Publication 1619 







ontents 



General 

Independence Day Address by the President .... 
Dedication of Longstreet monument site at Gettysburg: 

Address by Assistant Secretary Long 

Death of Ignace Paderewski : Statement by Acting 

Secretary of State Welles 

Control of exports in national defense 

American Republics 

U. S. memorandum in support of Uruguayan proposal to 
treat American republics engaged in war as non- 
belligerents 

Payment by Mexico on agrarian claims 

Europe 

Contributions for relief in belligerent countries .... 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes 



Treaty Information 

Indian affairs: Convention Providing for an Inter- 
American Indian Institute 

Telecommunications : International Telecommunica- 
tion Convention 

Legislation 

Publications 

Regulations 



Page 

3 



10 
10 

11 

11 
11 
12 
12 




<? <5IIOCIM»i-rr.irM-iiT /^r- 



General 



INDEPENDENCE DAY ADDRESS BY THE PRESIDENT ^ 



[Released to the press by the White House July 4] 

My Fellow Americans : 

111 1776, on the fourth clay of July, the Rep- 
resentatives of the several States in Congi-ess 
assembled, declaring our independence, as- 
serted that a decent respect for the opinion of 
luanldnd required that they should declare the 
reasons for their action. In this new crisis, 
we have a like duty. 

In 1776 we waged war in behalf of the great 
principle that government should derive its 
just powers from the consent of the governed — 
in other words, representation chosen in free 
elections. In the century and a half that fol- 
lowed, this cause of human freedom swept 
across the world. 

But now, in our generation — in the past few 
years — a new resistance, in the form of several 
new practices of tyranny, has been making such 
headway that the fundamentals of 1776 are be- 
ing struck down abroad, and definitely they are 
thi'eatened here. 

It is, indeed, a fallacy, based on nq, logic at 
all, for any Americans to suggest that the rule 
of force can defeat human freedom in all the 
other parts of the world and permit it to sur- 
vive in the United States alone. But it has 
been that childlike fantasy itself — that misdi- 
rected faith — which has led nation after nation 
to go about their peaceful tasks, relying on the 
thought, and even the promise, that- they and 
their lives and their goverimient would be al- 



' Broadcast from Hyde Park, N. Y., July 4, 1941. 
200962 — 41 1 



lowed to live when the juggernaut of force 
came their way. 

It is simple — I could almost say simple- 
minded — for us Americans to wave the flag, to 
reassert our belief in the cause of freedom, and 
to let it go at that. 

Yet, all of us who lie awake at night — all of 
us who study and study again — know full well 
that in these days we cannot save freedom with 
pitchforks and muskets alone, after a dictator 
combination has gained control of the rest of 
the world. 

We know that we cannot save freedom in our 
own midst, in our own land, if all around us — 
our neighbor nations — have lost their freedom. 

That is why we are engaged in a serious, in 
a mighty, in a unified action in the cause of the 
defense of the hemisphere and the freedom of 
the seas. We need not the loyalty and unity 
alone ; we need speed and efficiency and toil and 
an end to backbiting, an end to the sabotage 
that runs far deeper than the blowing up of 
munitions plants. 

I tell the American people solemnly that the 
United States will never survive as a happy 
and fertile oasis of liberty surrounded by a 
cruel desert of dictatorsliip. 

And so it is that when we repeat the great 
pledge to our country and to our flag, it must 
be our deep conviction that we pledge as well 
our work, our will, and, if it be necessary, our 
very lives. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

DEDICATION OF LONGSTREET MONUMENT SITE AT GETTYSBURG 

ADDRESS BY ASSISTANT SECRETARY LONG ' 



[Released to the press July 2) 

We iU'e assembled today to participate in 
the arrangement for a memorial to James 
Longstreet, General in the Army of the Con- 
federacy, one of its most distinguished sons, 
one of its outstanding military leaders, subse- 
quently a patriotic servant of the re-united 
country, and a courageous American. 

He and those who participated in the epochal 
struggle in this valley and over these hillsides 
contributed, all unconsciously, to the solidifica- 
tion of a great nation. On this battlefield of 
Gettysburg was born the modern United States. 
The sons of those who struggled here have 
lived to rebuild a divided nation, to unify a 
variety of thought, to provide a more equitable 
distribution of the opportunities of life, to 
evolve a national purpose. 

These seeds were planted at Gettysburg. Here 
they were sanctified with the blood of contend- 
ing brothers. And here again on the scene of 
Gettysburg the flower of those seeds is her- 
alded by the name ''America". 

When we say "America" we mean a land 
of plenty and of peace, a land of happiness 
and of contentment, a land of fair-dealing at 
home and of honorable contacts with other 
lands. But we in America realize that much 
as we love peace we cannot really enjoy peace 
if the rest of the world is at war; that as much 
as we desire happiness we cannot really be 
happy when sorrow and suffering run rampant 
through the world and threaten our own domes- 
tic order; that we can have no assurance we 
can have fair-dealing from other governments 
which violate their every solemn undertaking. 

It is all very alluring for us to sit com- 
placently in our comfortable homes and think 
in illusory vein that war will not come to us 



'Delivereil at ceremoiiie.s at Gettysburg battlefield, 
Gettysburg, Pu., July 2, 1941. 



here — that the stories we hear of Europe and 
of Asia and of Africa are, after all, happenings 
thousands of miles away — that it cannot hap- 
pen here. It is all too easy to be deceived by 
stretches of fertile fields which run out beyond 
horizons and to feel that no danger from 
abroad could carry this far. So thought Po- 
land. So thought Norway, stretching way up 
into the Arctic Ocean. So thought Greece, 
bathed by the warm water of the Mediter- 
ranean. So it was thought on the tropic sands 
of Africa, in the distant recesses of China, far 
Indochina, and old Siam down near the 
Equator. And so thought Russia — the most 
recent example of an unholy ambition to de- 
stroy nations, to enslave then- peoples, to rob 
them of their resources, to dominate a world. 
We must not be beguiled by such thoughts of 
complacent illusion. AVe must understand that 
ilistance measured in miles has been reduced to 
inclies, that time has been decimated and space 
rendered of no protective value. We must 
understand that the actual waging of that 
thing called war has changed. There was a 
time that it commenced when the shooting be- 
gan. But now it has precursors the conse- 
quences of which ai'e worse if possible than the 
devastation of actual military combat. There 
is the insidious infiltration of whisper- 
ing agents casting doubt upon the justice of 
our own position, faintly praising the qualities 
of the intending invader. Then come agents 
of trouble and discord, inciting opposition at 
home, making disturbance in centers of me- 
chanical production. Then the saboteurs to 
throw monkey-wrenches into the machinery — 
all with the object of creating discord and dis- 
may and of rendering nugatory efficient or- 
ganization. The radio becomes the instrument 
of insidious voices. Doubt is cultivated. Fear 
is propagated — fear, the worst of our foes, the 
ally of threatening force. 



JULY 5, 1941 



Another precursor is economic penetration, 
to destroy markets abroad, to gain footholds 
in the territory of your neighbors, and, when 
economic and financial conditions have been 
sufficiently cultivated, to institute political con- 
trol over some not distant country. Once 
political control is established, then the mili- 
tary armies arrive — through the air, on the 
water, by land — and from the new base the 
cowering inhabitants become servitors, even 
unwilling partners, of mechanized military au- 
tocracy in preparation for its next plunge, with 
a histoi-y of suffering in its wake and a promise 
of sorrow for the next victim, unless stopped 
in its mad career. 

We have determined that in America these 
things shall not happen. They cannot happen 
if we unite as a nation in carrying forward a 
mighty program of defense, if we build 
speedily, adequately, and efficiently. 

You may be assured that your Government is 
fully alive to the situation confronting the 
United States. The officers of your Govern- 
ment are on guard. We only hope that each 
American citizen realizes for himself the situ- 
ation as it actually exists and the consequences 
for himself and his family unless all of us join 
in a mighty effort for defense. 

President Koosevelt has proclaimed a full na- 
tional emergency. That fact alone should make 
every man and woman in America realize that 
the danger is direct. The President has called 
upon all loyal citizens to place the Nation's needs 
first in mind and in action to the end that we 
may mobilize and have ready for instant use 
all of the physical powers, all of the moral 
strength, and all of the material resources of 
this Nation. 

The call has gone foi'th. Let us respond to 
it with the spirit and the courage exhibited by 
the men of Gettysburg. Wliether we are in the 
armed forces, in the factories, or on the farms, 
let each of us resolve to make his own worth- 
while contribution to the cause of safeguarding 
the Nation during this critical period. Gettys- 
burg echoes the call to the service of a united 
and determined nation. 



DEATH OF IGNACE PADEREWSKI 

STATEMENT BY ACTING SECRETARY OT STATE 
WELLES 

[Released to tlie press June 30] 

I was deeply shocked to learn this morning 
of the death in New York of Mr. Paderewski, 
the first President of Poland, an outstanding 
artist of genius of the last three generations, 
and a foremost champion of freedom and demo- 
cratic ideals. 

I have asked the Polish Ambassador on his 
return to Washington today to accord me an 
opportunity immediately upon his arrival per- 
sonally to convey to him the deep sorrow of the 
President at the loss of this great Polish patriot. 
I shall also convey to him an expression of grief 
on behalf of the Government and people of the 
United States. 

The spirit of Mr. Paderewski which illumi- 
nated his whole life is by no means extinguished ; 
the influence of his personality, character, and 
genius must persist. It will continue to inspire 
for many years to come those who are struggling 
for the highest ideals of humanity. The Ameri- 
can Nation is proud to have counted among its 
friends this great citizen of Poland who, among 
his other distinguished services, has done so 
much to assist in creating a deeper understand- 
ing between the peoples of the United States 
and those of Poland and of strengthening the 
ties of friendship which have already become 
traditional between the two countries. 

CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL 
DEFENSE 

[Released to the press July 5] 

The President announced on July 5 that he 
had approved a recommendation of Brig. Gen. 
Russell L. Maxwell, Administrator of Export 
Control, and had issued on July 3 a procla- 
mation (no. 2496) adding certain vegetable 
products and chemicals to the list of articles 
and materials subject to export control under 
authority of section 6 of the act of Congress 
entitled "An Act To expedite the strengthen- 
ing of the national defense", approved July 
2, 1940. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Administrator of Export Control has 
issued Export Control Schedule 12 ' which sets 
forth in detail the specific items placed under 
control pursuant to the above-mentioned 
proclamation. 

The effective date of the proclamation plac- 
ing these articles and materials under export 
control is July 23, 1941. The test of this 
proclamation appears in the Federal Register 
of July 8, 1941 (vol. 6. no. 131). pages 3263- 
3265. 

Petroleum Products 

Collectors of customs were informed on 
June 26, 1941 as follows : 

''Tetraethyl lead, ethyl fluid, petrolatum and 
petroleum jelly should not be considered pe- 
troleum products, and licenses for the exporta- 
tion of these articles and materials may accord- 
ingly be honored, in respect to the shipments 
described therein, even though exportation is 
made fi'om a port located on the Atlantic 
coast. 

"However, white mineral oil is held to fall 
within the classification of 'other petroleiun 
products' and is therefore subject to the re- 
strictions outlined in the Department's tele- 
gram of June 20.- 

"General licenses <^EE 1 iind 2, authorizing 
the exportation of certain petroleum products 
to Canada and to Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland, respectively, have been extended to 
include all naphtha, mineral spirits, solvents 
and other finished light products. 

"Furthermore, general licenses GED l, 2, and 
(>3 authorizing the exportation of lubricating 
oils have been extended to include all lubricat- 
ing greases." 

Collectors of customs were informed on July 
2 that where reference was made in the Depart- 
ment's telegram of June 20 to those petroleum 
products listed in Export Control Schedule 
10 ^^ which wei-e not, prior to that date, subject 



' 6 F.R. 3283. 

'Bulletin of .June 21, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 104), pp. 
7f50-751. 

'• 6 F.R. 3059. 



to the requirement of an export license, it has 
been held that this refers exclusively to the 
petroleum products falling within the descrip- 
tion opposite the following letters as set forth 
in the left-hand margin of Export Control 
Schedule 10: C, H, K, L, M, N, P, Q, R, s, T, U, 
V, and X. 

Accordingly collectors were informed that 
under present definitions general licenses GB6 
and GEH do not permit the exportation of 
petroleum coke. 

General Licenses 

[Released to the press June 30] 

In accordance with the provisions of the Exec- 
utive order of March 15, 1941 ^ the Secretary 
of State announced that certain additional gen- 
eral licenses had been issued authorizing the 
exportation of various articles and materials 
designated by the President as necessary to the 
national defense pursuant to section 6 of the 
Export Control Act approved July 2, 1940. The 
table printed below shows the countries and the 
articles and materials to which these licenses 
are applicable. 

It was also announced that existing general 
licenses authorizing the exportation of asbestos 
have been extended to include brake blocks and 
linings, mattress covers and fillers, clutch fac- 
ings, packing, sheets, and tweeds and yarns 
fabricated from asbestos. 

Furthermore, certain existing general licenses 
authorizing the exportation of petroleum prod- 
ucts to Canada and to Great Britain and North- 
ern Ireland have been extended, as follows: 
GEA 1 and 2 to include all crude oils ; GEB l and 2 
to include all gasolines; GED 1 and 2 to include 
all lubricating oils and greases ; and GEE l and 
2 to include all naphtha, mineral spirits, 
solvents, and other finished light products. 

Collectors of customs have been authorized 
to permit, without the requirement of individual 
licenses, the exportation of these articles and 



'Bulletin of March 15, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 90), 
pp. 284-285. 



JULY 5, 1941 



materials to the countries named, but the ex- 
porter is required to indicate the appropriate 
license number on the shipper's export declara- 
tion filed with the collector. Those articles and 



materials for which no general licenses have 
been issued, but which are subject to the require- 
ment of an export license, will continue to 
require individual licenses for their exportation. 



Country 


Diesel and 
diesel-cUectrlc 
locomotives, 
diesol engines 
(marine & 
stationary) 


Electric gener- 
ating sets pow- 
ered by diesel 
engines 


Kerosene, gas 
oil, distillate 
fuel oil, resid- 
ual fuel oil 


Liquefied pe- 
troleum gases, 
paraffin wax 

funreftned 
and refined), 

petrnleum 
asphalt, pe- 
troleum coke, 

petroleum 

products 
n. e. s. 


Gasoline- 
production 
equipment 


Lubricating- 

oil-production 

equipment 


Tetraethyl- 
lead-produc- 
tion equip- 
ment 


Canada _. .- 


GDO 1 

GDO 2 
GDO 63 


*GDM 1 

*GDM 2 
*GDM 63 


GEF 1 

GEF 2 
GEF 63 


GEI 1 

GEI 2 
GEI 63 








Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland 

Philippine Islands . - 


GQG2 


GQL2 


GQT2 











♦Effective July 2, 1941, these same general licenses will also authorize exportations of electrical machinery 
and apparatus (containing mica). See the Bulletin of June 21, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 104), p. 749. 



[Released to the press July 3] 

The Secretai-y of State announced on July 3 
the issuance of general licenses, in accordance 
with the provisions of the Executive order of 
March 15, 1941, authorizing the exportation of 
station, warehouse, and factory industrial 
trucks of any capacity, powered by electric 
storage batteries or gasoline motors; motor 
trucks and busses powered by diesel or serai- 
diesel engines; and motor truck and bus diesel 
and semi-diesel engines, as follows: License 
no. GDP 1 for Canada; no. GDP 2 for Great 
Britain and Northern Ireland; and no. GDP 63 
for the Philippine Islands. 

Existing general licenses authorizing the ex- 
portation of cobalt have been extended to in- 
clude cobalt salts and compounds. These li- 
censes are: No. GBT i for Canada; no. GBT 2 
for Great Britain and Northern Ireland; and 
no. GBT 63 for the Philippine Islands. 

Collectors of customs have been authorized to 
permit, without the requirement of individual 
license, the exportation of the articles and ma- 
terials named to Canada, to Great Britain and 
Northern Ireland, and to the Philippine 
Islands, but the exporter is required to indicate 
the appropriate general-license number on the 
shipper's export declaration filed with the col- 
lector. 



(Released to the press July 3] 

The Secretary of State announced on July 3 
that, in accordance with the provisions of the 
Executive order of March 15, 1941, two addi- 
tional general licenses have been issued for 
shipments parsing through the United States. 

The first of these general licenses, GIT-n/b, 
authorizes the expoitation, without individual 
license, of .shipments passing thi'ough the 
United States from the Netherlands Indies to 
any country in group B * or to Bahamas, Bar- 
bados, Bermuda, British Guiana, British Hon- 
duras, Canada, Falkland Islands, Jamaica, Lee- 
ward Islands, Newfoundland, Trinidad and 
Tobago, and Windward Islands. 

The other general license. GIT-B/N, author- 
izes the exportation fi-om the United States, 
without individual license, of shipments pass- 
ing through the United States from any coun- 
ti-y in group B, or from any country specifically 
named in the above list, to the Netherlands 
Indies. 



' For the names of the countries to which these gen- 
eral licenses are applicable, see the Bulletin of May 10, 
1941 (vol. IV, no. 98), pp. 560-561. 



American Republics 



U. S. MEMORANDUM IN SUPPORT OF URUGUAYAN PROPOSAL TO TREAT 
AMERICAN REPUBLICS ENGAGED IN WAR AS NON-BELLIGERENTS 



[Released to the press July 2] 

On July 2 the Government of Uruguay made 
public in Montevideo the following text of a 
memorandum handed by the Acting Secretary 
of State. Mr. Sumner Welles, to the Minister 
of LTniguay in Washington, Mr. J. Richling, 
on July 1, 1941 : 

"Memorandum 

"The Acting Secretary of State of the United 
States of America desires to inform His Ex- 
cellency the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the 
Oriental Republic of L^ruguay of the gratifi- 
cation with which the Government of the 
United States has learned of the views of the 
Government of Uniguay as communicated by 
Dr. Guani in his memorandum of June 21, 
1941.' 

"The Government of Uruguay has once 
again lighted the way toward a constructive 
and practical cooperation between all of the 
American Republics at this moment which is 
more critical than any which has transpired 
since the achievement of their independence. 

"A black night of fear and destruction and 
organized murder has engulfed almost all of 
Europe and a great part of the rest of the 
world. Aggie«sion without comparison in his- 
tory for its deliberately planned frightfulness 
has annihilated the independence of one coun- 
try after another. The right inherent in every 
man and woman to worship God has been nith- 
lessly and metliodically destroyed. The cul- 
tures of centuries, tlie cultures from which 
every one of the American nations has derived 
its own national inspiration have not only been 
temi^orarily blotted out but an endeavor is be- 
ing made to extirpate them forever. No coun- 



• Not printed herein. 



try anywhere, today, is secure from this un- 
masked lust for power and loot which has no 
limit but domination of the entire world. 

"In view of this situation, the Government 
of L^ruguay addresses itself to the other Amer- 
ican Republics urging positive implementation 
of the policy of hemisphere solidarity already 
unanimously adopted by the American nations 
at previous inter-American conferences. 

"Uruguay recalls that its great liberator 
Artigas, over a hundred years ago, recognized 
the common interests of the peoples of the 
Western Hemisphere and suggested the under- 
taking of an offer of recipi'ocal and mutual 
assistance. Uruguay recollects that during the 
World War of 1914-1918 it adopted, long be- 
fore its general acceptance in this hemisphere, 
the policy that any act susceptible of affecting 
adversely the rights of any nation of the 
Americas should be considered as constituting 
an offense committed against all the American 
nations, and should bring about a uniform and 
common reaction. 

"Pursuant to this policy, Uruguay declared 
in 1917 that it would not treat as a belligerent 
any American country which, in defense of its 
own rights, should find itself in a state of 
war with nations of other continents. Finally, 
Uruguay recalls that the policy of solidarity 
which it espoused twenty-five years ago has 
now been accepted by all the other American 
countries in a series of inter- American instru- 
ments and, therefore, inquires of the other 
American Republics, whether, in their judg- 
ment, the moment is not opportune to give new 
content and definition to the policy of inter- 
American solidarity. 

"The Goverimient of the United States wel- 
comes the opportunity afforded by the initia- 
tive of the Government of Uniguay briefly to 



JULY 5, 1941 

restate the policies which it is presently 
pursuing. 

"In the fiist place, the Government of the 
United States has considered it axiomatic that 
the security of each of the American Republics 
was dependent upon the security of all. It was 
for this simple but basic reason that it whole- 
heartedly supported at Buenos Aires, Lima, 
Panama, and Habana the several agreements 
to make inviolate the peace, security and 
territorial integrity of the Americas. 

"In tlie second place, the President of the 
United States has frequently declared, the last 
time formally before the chiefs of mission of 
the other American Republics in Washington 
on ]May i27 last,^ the unshakable determination 
of the United States to give aid to whatever 
extent and in whatever quantity may lie within 
its power, to countries prepared to resist the 
forces of aggression. The Congress has jDassed 
legislation to enable the transfer of equipment 
and supplies to such countries, and practical 
assistance on a stupendous scale is now being 
furnished. 

"In pursuance of these two policies, the one 
of hemispheric solidarity, the other of aid to 
countries resisting aggression — but both of 
them with one end in view, namely, the security 
of the Western Hemisphere — the Government 
t)f the United States has offered and extended 
cooperative assistance of various types to the 
other American Republics. The economic and 
financial resources of the United States, th'j 
naval and air base facilities acquired from 
Great Britain and from Denmark, and military 
and naval materiel, have been made available 
to all the American Republics on the fullest 
cooperative basis for the common defense of 
the New World. 

"Equally significant of the desire and pur- 
pose of the United States to afford the greatest 
possible opportunity for realizing to the full 
the principle of hemispheric solidarity and 
defense, there was incorporated in the Neutral- 



9 

ity Act of 1939 a provision excepting, subject 
to certain conditions not here important, Amer- 
ican states from the operation of the act when 
engaged in war against a non-American state 
or states. 

"The safety of the Americas hangs in the 
balance today. Constructive and far-sighted 
action now on the part of all the American 
Republics acting together will ensure the 
preservation for future generations of those 
liberties and other blessings which our fore- 
fathers so laboriously gained. 

"The Government of the United States wel- 
comes and wholeheartedly supports the present 
initiative of the Govermnent of Uruguay, and 
earnestly hopes that it may secure the common 
approval of the Governments of all of the 
American Republics. 

"Department of State, 

^'■Washington, July 1, WJfiy 

PAYMENT BY MEXICO ON AGRARIAN 
CLAIMS 

[Released to the press June 30] 

The Mexican Ambassador at Washington on 
June 30 handed to the Acting Secretary of State 
the Mexican Government's check for one million 
dollars in payment of the amount due June 30, 
1941 on account of the claims of American citi- 
zens whose lauds in Mexico have been expropri- 
ated since August 30, 1927 under the Mexican 
agrarian program. The arrangement under 
which the payment became due was effected 
by this Government's note of November 9, 1938 
and the Mexican Government's reply of Novem- 
ber 12, 1938.^ 

This represents the third payment by Mexico 
on account of these claims, the first and second 
payments of one million dollars having been 
made on May 31, 1939 and June 29. 1940, respec- 
tively, under the arrangement of November 
9-12! 1938. 

The claims in question are under active con- 
sideration by the Agrarian Claims Commission, 
United States and Mexico. 



' BuUrtin of May 31, 1941 (vol. IV, uo. 101), pp. 
647-653. 



"Press Releases of November 19, 1938 (vol. XIX, 
no. 477), pp. 339-342. 



10 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Europe 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN 
BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 

A tabulation of contributions collected and 
disbursed during the period September (5, 1939 
tlirough May 31, 1941, as shown in the reports 
submitted by persons and organizations regis- 
tered with the Secretary of State for the solici- 
tation and collection of contributions to be used 
for relief in belligerent countries, in confonn- 
ity with the regulations issued pursuant to 
section 3(a) of the act of May 1, 1937, as made 
effective by the President's proclamations of 
September 5, 8, and 10, 1939, and section 8 of 
the act of November 4, 1939, as made effective 
by the President's proclamation of the same 
date, has been released by the Department of 
State in mimeographed form and may be ob- 
tained from the Department upon request 
(press release of July 5, 1941, 59 pages). 

This tabulation has reference only to contri- 
butions solicited and collected for relief in bel- 
ligerent countries (France; Germany; Poland; 
the United Kingdom, India. Australia, Canada. 
New Zealand, and the Union of South Africa; 
Norway; Belgium; Luxembourg; the Nether- 
lands; Italy; Greece; Yugoslavia; Hungary; 
and Bulgaria) or for cbe relief of refugees 
driven out of these countries bj' the present 
Avar. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

(Released to the press July 5) 

The following changes have occuri'ed in the 
American Foreign Service since June 21, 1941 : 

William C. Burdett, of Knoxville, Tenn., 
Counselor of Embassy and Consul General at 



Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, has been assigned for 
duty in the Department of State as Director of 
the Foreign Service Officers' Training School. 

George D. Hopper, of Danville, Ky., Consul 
General at Winnipeg. Manitoba, Canada, has 
been assigned as Consul General at St. John's, 
Newfoundland. 

The designation of James T. Scott, of 
Georgia, as Commercial Attache at Athens, 
Greece, has been canceled. In lieu thereof, Mr. 
Scott has been assigned as Consul at Beirut, 
Lebanon. 

The assignment of Harold B. Quarton, of 
Algona, Iowa, as Consul General at Genoa, 
Italy, has been canceled. In lieu thereof, Mr. 
Quarton has been assigned for duty in the De- 
[)artment of State. 

Marcel E. Malige, of Lapwai, Idaho, Second 
Secretary of Embassy and Consul at Rio de 
Janeiro, Brazil, has been assigned as Consul 
at Martinique, French West Indies. 

Vinton Chapin, of Boston, Mass., Second 
Secretary of Embassy at London, England, has 
been designated Second Secretary of Legation 
at Dublin, Ireland. 

Mason Turner, of Torrington, Conn., Consul 
at Lima, Peru, has been assigned as Ccmsul at 
Perth, Australia. 

Archibald R. Randolph, of Virginia, Third 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at 
Bogota, Colombia, has been assigned as Vice 
Consul at Caracas, Venezuela. 

Adrian B. Colquitt, of Savannah, Ga., Vice 
Consul at Martinique, French West Indies, has 
been assigned as Vice Consul at Calcutta, India. 

Elim O'Shaughnessy, of New York, N. Y., 
Vice Consul at Rio de Janeiro. Brazil, has been 
designated Third Secretary of Embassy at Rio 
de Janeiro, Briizil, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

William Frank Lebus, Jr., of Cynthiana, Ky., 
Clerk at Puerto Cortes, Honduras, has been 
appointed Vice Consul at Puerto Cortes, Hon- 
duras. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



INDIAN AFFAIRS 

CONVENTION PROVIDING FOR AN INTER-AMERICAN 
INDIAN INSnrUTE 

Panama. 

The Mexican Ambassador at Washington 
informed the Secretary of State by a note dated 
June 27, 1941 that the Panamanian Minister 
at Mexico City, in a note dated May 26, 1941, 
notified the Government of Mexico of the 
adherence of Panama to the Convention Pro- 
viding for an Inter- American Indian Institute, 
which was opened for signature at Mexico City 
on November 1, 1940. The adherence of Panama 
was made in accordance with section 2 of 
article 16 of the convention and is subject to 
the constitutional approval of the National 
Assemblv of Panama. 



TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATION CONVENTION 

Thailand 

According to notification no. 382 dated May 
1, 1941 from the Bureau of the International 
Telecommunication Union at Bern the Lega- 
tion of Thailand at Lisbon informed the 
Bureau by a letter dated March 25, 1941 that 
the Thai Government had approved the re- 
visions as adopted at Cairo in April 1938 of the 
General Radio Regulations and Additional 
Radio Regulations, the Telegraph Regulations 
and Telephone Regulations, annexed to the 
International Telecommunication Convention 
of 1932. 



Legislation 



Joint Resolution To autliorize the President of the 
United States to invite the governments of the coun- 
tries of the Western Hemisphere to participate in a 
meeting of the national directors of the meteoro- 
logical services of those countries, to be held in the 
United States as soon as practicable, in 1941 or 1942; 
to invite Regional Commissions III or IV of the In- 
ternational Meteorological Organization to meet con- 
currently therewith ; and to authorize an appropria- 
tion for the expenses of organizing and holding such 
meetings. [S. J. Res. 81.] Approved June 24, 1941. 
(Public Law 125, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 1 p. 5<t. 

An Act To amend .sections 4613 and 4614 of the 
Revised Statutes of the United States to include cap- 
tnres of aircraft as prizes of war. [S. 992.] Approved 
June 24, 1941. (Public Law 127, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 
1 p. 5^. 

Joint Resolution To pennit travel by a ship of 
Canadian registry between American ports. [S. J. 
Res. 65.] Approved June 26, 1941. (Public Law 134, 
77th Cong., 1st sess.) 1 p. 



An Act Slaking appropriations for the Department 
of State, the Department of Commerce, the Depart- 
ment of Justice, and the Federal Judiciary, for the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1942, and for other pur- 
poses. [H.R. 4276.] Approved June 2S, 1941. (Public 
Law 135, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) [Department of State 
Appropriation Act, 1942, pp. 1-15.] 44 lip. 

Extending the Period for the Sale or Destruction 
of Articles Imported for Exhibition at the New York 
and San Francisco World's Fairs of 1940. (H. Rept. 
774 and S. Rept. 500, 77th Cong., 1st sess., on H.J. 
Res. 173.) 5 pp. each. 

Instruction at the United States Military Academy 
To Be Given to One Person From Each American 
Republic. (S. Rept. 497, 77th Cong., 1st sess., on 
S. 206.) 4 pp. 

Supplemental Estimate for Foreign Air-Mall Trans- 
portation: Communication From the President of the 
United States Transmitting Supplemental Estimate of 
Appropriation for the Post Office Department for 
Foreign Air-Mail Transportation, Fi.scal Year 1942, 

11 



12 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Amounting to $613,486. (S. Doc. 87, 77tli Cong., 1st 
sess.) 2 pp. 

Second Deficiency Appropriation Bill for 1941 : 
Hearings Before the Subcommittee of tlie Committee 
on Appropriations, United States Senate, 77th Cong., 
1st .sess., on H.R. 5166, an Act Maliing Appropriations 
To Supply Deficiencies in Certain Appropriations for 
the Fiscal Tear Ending June 30, 1941, and for Prior 
■Piscal Years, To Provide Supplemental Appropriations 
for the Fiscal Tear Ending June .30, 1942, and for 
Other Purposes. [Department of State, pp. 10f»-lll.] 
ii. 111 pp. 



Publications 



Dep.vrtmext of State 

Extradition : Supplementary Convention Between 
the United States of America and Mexico — Signed at 
Mexico City August 16, 1939 : proclaimed April 4, 1941. 
Treaty Series 967. 4 pp. 5fl. 

Otiieb Go\-erniment Agencies 

The St. Lawrence Survey, Part V : The St. Lawrence 
Seaway and Futiu-e Transportation Requirements. 
xvi, S3 pp., tables, charts. (Department of Com- 
merce. ) 150. 



Regulations 



The following Govprnment regulations may 
be of interest to readers of the Bulletin: 

General Licenses Under Executive Order No. 8389, 
Aijril 10, 1940, as Amended, and Regulations Issued 
Pursuant Thereto : 

[Amendment to] General License No. 29. June 
27.1941. (Treasury Department.) Federal RegU- 
trr. July 1, 1941 (vol. 6, no. 127), p. 3174. 

[Amendments to] General Licenses No. 2, 5, 25, 
27, and [revocation of] General Licenses No. 16 
and 23. June 30, 1941. (Treasury Department.) 
Federal Register. July 2. 1941 (vol. 6, no. 128), 
pp. 3214-3215. 
General Rulings Under Executive Order No. 8389, 
April 10, 1940, as Amended, and Regulations Issued 
Pursuant Thereto : [Ajnendment to] General Ruling 
No. 6. June 27, 1941. (Treasury Department.) Fed- 
eral Register, July 1, 1941 (vol. 6, no. 127), p. 3174. 

Values of Foreign Moneys. July 1, 1941. (Treasury 
Department.) [1941 Department Circular No. 1.] 
Fedenil Register. July 3, 1941 (vol. 6, no. 129), pp. 
32::52-3233. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.' 

PUBLISHED WEBKLV WITH THE APPUOVAU OP THE DIHECTOK OF THE BCEEAU OF THE BCDGEir 



OS 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 

JULY 12, 1941 
Vol. V, No. 107— Publication 1622 

lontents 

Iceland page 

Defense of Iceland by United States forces 15 

American Republics 

Priority aid for construction of steel miU in Brazil . . 19 

Representation of United States business in other 

American republics 20 

Anniversary of the Declaration of Argentine Independ- 
ence 21 

Europe 

Survivors of the S. S. Zamzam 22 

The Near East 

Suspension of tonnage duties for vessels of Burma . . 22 

Commercial Policy 

International Wheat Meeting 23 

Cultural Relations 

Visit of distinguished Argentinean 24 

The Ditpartment 

Appointment of officers 25 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes 25 

Foreign Service Regulations 26 

International Conferences, Commissions, Etc. 
Third General Assembly of the Pan American Institute 

of Geography and History 26 

(OVEBj 




U. S, S|lPfl-fl^.':^^'nFl^!T Of DOCUMENTS 
JUL 30 1941 







ontents-coTiTiNVET). 



General Page 

Control of exports in national defense 27 

Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, Etc. 

Monthly statistics 28 

Regulations 36 

Publications 36 

Legislation 37 



Iceland 



DEFENSE OF ICELAND BY UNITED STATES FORCES 



[ Released to the press by the White House July 7] 

The text of a message from the President to 
the Congress, dated July 7, 1941, transmitting 
a message received from the Prime Minister 
of Iceland and the reply of the President of 
the United States, relating to use of United 
States forces in Iceland, follows: 

To THE Congress of the United States : 

I am transmitting herewith for the infor- 
mation of the Congress a message I received 
from the Prime Minister of Iceland on July 
first and the reply I addressed on the same 
day to the Prime Minister of Iceland in re- 
sponse to this message. 

In accordance with the understanding so 
reached, forces of the United States Navy have 
today arrived in Iceland in order to supple- 
ment, and eventually to replace, the British 
forces which have until now been stationed 
in Iceland in order to insure the adequate de- 
fense of that country. 

As I stated in my message to the Congress 
of September third last ' regarding the acquisi- 
tion of certain naval and air bases from Great 
Britain in exchange for certain over-age 
destroyers, considerations of safety from over- 
seas attack are fundamental. 



^Bulletin of September 7, 1940 (vol. Ill, no. 63), 
p. 201. 



The United States cannot permit the occu- 
pation by Germany of strategic outposts in 
the Atlantic to be used as air or naval bases 
for eventual attack against the Western Hemi- 
sphere. We have no desire to see any change 
in the present sovereignty of those regions. 
Assurance that such outposts in our defense- 
frontier remain in friendly hands is the very 
foundation of our national security and of the 
national security of every one of the independ- 
ent nations of the New World. 

For the same reason substantial forces of 
the United States have now been sent to the 
bases acquired last year from Great Britain 
in Trinidad and in British Guiana in the 
south in order to forestall any pincers move- 
ment undertaken by Germany against the 
Western Hemisphere. It is essential that Ger- 
many should not be able successfully to employ 
such tactics through sudden seizure of stra- 
tegic points in the south Atlantic and in the 
north Atlantic. 

The occupation of Iceland by Germany 
would constitute a serious threat in three 
dimensions : 

The threat against Greenland and the north- 
ern portion of the North American Continent, 
including the Islands which lie oS it. 

15 



16 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The threat against all shipping in the north 
Atlantic. 

The threat against the steady flow of muni- 
tions to Britain — which is a matter of broad 
policy clearly approved by the Congress. 

It is, therefore, imperative that the ap- 
proaches between the Americas and those 
strategic outposts, the safety of which this 
country regards as essential to its national 
security, and which it must therefore defend, 
shall remain open and free from all hostile 
activity or threat thereof. 

As Commander-in-Chief I have conse- 
quently issued orders to the Navy that all 
necessary steps be taken to insure the safety 
of communications in the approaches between 
Iceland and the United States, as well as on 
the seas between the United States and all 
other strategic outposts. 

This Government will insure the adequate 
defense of Iceland with full recognition of the 
independence of Iceland as a sovereign state. 

In my message to the Prime Minister of Ice- 
land I have given the people of Iceland the 
assurance that the American forces sent there 
would in no way interfere with the internal 
and domestic affairs of that country, and that 
inmiediately upon the termination of the pres- 
ent international emergency all American 
forces will be at once withdrawn, leaving the 
people of Iceland and their Government in full 
and sovereign control of their own territorj'. 
Fkanklin D Roosevelt 

The White House, 
July 7, 19^1. 



Message sent iy the Pnme Minister of Iceland 
to the Presidoit of the United States 

In a conversation of June 24th, the British 
Minister explained that British forces in Ice- 
land are required elsewhere. At the same time 
he stressed the immense importance of ade- 
quate defense of Iceland. He also called my 
attention to the declaration of the President 
of the United States to the effect that he must 



take all necessary measures to ensure the safety 
of the Western Hemisphere — one of the Presi- 
dent's measures is to assist in the defense of 
Iceland — and that the President is therefore 
prepared to send here immediately United 
States troops to supplement and eventually to 
replace the British force here. But that he 
does not consider that he can take this course 
except at the invitation of the Iceland Govern- 
ment. 

After careful consideration of all the cir- 
cumstances the Iceland Government, in view of 
the present state of affairs, admit that this 
measure is in accordance with the interest of 
Iceland, and therefore are ready to entrust the 
protection of Iceland to United States on the 
following conditions : 

1. United States promise to withdraw all 
their military forces land, air and sea from Ice- 
land immediately on conclusion of present war. 

2. United States further promise to recog- 
nize the absolute independence and sovereignty 
of Iceland and to exercise their best efforts 
with those powers which will negotiate the 
peace treaty at the conclusion of the present 
war in order that such treaty shall likewise 
recognize the absolute independence and sov- 
ereignty of Iceland. 

3. United States promise not to interfere 
with Government of Iceland neither while their 
armed forces remain in this country nor after- 
wards. 

4. United States promise to organize the 
defense of the country in such a way as to 
ensure the greatest possible safety for the in- 
habitants themselves and assure that they suffer 
minimum disturbance from military activities; 
these activities being carried out in consulta- 
tion with Iceland authorities as far as possible. 
Also because of small population of Iceland 
and consequent danger to nation from presence 
of a numerous army, great care must be taken 
that only picked troops are sent here. Military 
authorities should be also instructed to keep 
in mind that Icelanders have been unarmed 
for centuries and are entii-ely unaccustomed 



JtTLY 12, 1941 



17 



to military discipline and conduct of troops 
towards the inhabitants of the country should 
be ordered accordingly. 

T). United States undertake defense of the 
country without expense to Iceland and promise 
compensation for all damage occasioned to the 
inhabitants by their military activities. 

6. United States promise to further interests 
of Iceland in every way in their power, in- 
cluding that of supplying the country with 
sufficient necessities, of securing necessary 
shipping to and from the country and of mak- 
ing in other respects favorable commercial and 
trade agreements with it. 

7. Iceland Government expects that declara- 
tion made by President in this connection will 
be in agreement with these promises on the 
part of Iceland, and Government would much 
appreciate its being given the opportunity of 
being cognizant with wording of this declara- 
tion before it is published. 

8. On the part of Iceland it is considered 
obvious that if United States undertake defense 
of the country it must be strong enough to 
meet every eventuality and particularly in the 
beginning it is expected that as far as possible 
effort will be made to prevent any special 
danger in connection with changeover. Iceland 
Government lays special stress on there being 
sufficient airplanes for defensive purposes 
wherever they are required and they can be 
used as soon as decision is made for United 
States to undertake the defense of the ^country. 

This decision is made on the part of Iceland 
as an absohitely free and sovereign state and it 
is considered as a matter of course that United 
States will from the beginning recognize this 
legal status of the country, both states imme- 
diately exchanging diplomatic representatives. 



Message s&nt hy the President of the United 
States in. response to a message from, the 
Prime Minister of Iceland 

I have received your message in which you 
have informed me that after careful considera- 
tion of all the circumstances, tlie Iceland Gov- 



ernment, in view of the present state of affairs, 
admits that the sending to Iceland of United 
States troops to supplement and eventually to 
replace the present British forces there would 
be in accoi-dance with the interests of Iceland 
and that, therefore, tlie Iceland Government is 
ready to entrust the protection of Iceland to 
the United States on the following considera- 
tions: 

1. United States promise to withdraw all 
their military forces land, air and sea from 
Iceland immediately on conclusion of present 
war. 

2. United States further promise to recog- 
nize the absolute independence and sovereignty 
of Iceland and to exercise their best efforts 
with those powers which will negotiate the 
peace treaty at the conclusion of the present 
war in order that such treaty shall likewise 
recognize the absolute independence and sov- 
ereignty of Iceland. 

3. United States promise not to interfere 
with Government of Iceland neither while 
their armed forces remain in this country nor 
afterwards. 

4. United States promise to organize the 
defense of the country in such a way as to 
ensure the greatest possible safety for the in- 
habitants themselves and assure that they 
suffer minimum disturbance from military 
activities; these activities being carried out in 
consultation with Iceland authorities as far as 
possible. Also because of small population of 
Iceland and consequent danger to nation from 
presence of a numerous army, great care must 
be taken that only picked troops are sent here. 
Military authorities should be also instructed 
to keep in mind that Icelanders have been un- 
armed for centuries and are entirely unaccus- 
tomed to military discipline and conduct of 
troops towards the inhabitants of the country 
should be ordered accordingly. 

5. United States undertake defense of the 
country without expense to Iceland and 
promise compensation for all damage occa- 
sioned to the inhabitants by their military 
activities. 



18 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



6. United States promise to further inter- 
ests of Iceland in every way in their power, 
inchiding that of supplying the country with 
sufficient necessities, of securing necessary 
shipping to and from the country and of mak- 
ing in other respects favorable commercial and 
trade agreements with it. 

7. Iceland Government expect that declara- 
tion made by President in this connection will 
be in agreement with these promises on the 
part of Iceland, and Government would much 
appreciate its being given the opportunity of 
being cognizant with wording of this declara- 
tion before it is published. 

8. On the part of Iceland it is considered 
obvious that if United States undertake de- 
fense of the country it must be strong enough 
to meet every eventuality and particularly in 
the beginning it is expected that as far as 
possible efforts will be made to prevent any 
special danger in connection with change-over. 
Iceland Government lays special stress on there 
being sufficient airplanes for defensive purposes 
wherever they are required and they can be 
used as soon as decision is made for United 
States to undertake tlie defense of the country. 

You further state that this decision is made 
on the part of Iceland as an absolutely free 
and sovereign state and that it is considei'ed 
as a matter of course that the United States 
will from the beginning recognize the legal 
status of Iceland, both states immediately 
exchanging diplomatic representatives. 

I take pleasure in confirming to you hereby 
that the conditions set forth in your commu- 
nication now under acknowledgment are fully 
acceptable to the Government of the United 
States and that these conditions will be ob- 
served in the relations between the United 
States and Iceland. I may further say that 
it will give me pleasure to request of the Con- 
gress its agreement in order that diplomatic 
representatives may be exchanged between our 
two countries. 

It is the announced policy of the Government 
of the United States to undertake to join with 



the other nations of the Western Hemisphere 
in the defense of the New World against any 
attempt at aggression. In the opinion of this 
Government, it is imperative that the integ- 
rity and independence of Iceland should be 
preserved because of the fact that any occu- 
pation of Iceland by a power whose only too 
clearly apparent plans for world conquest in- 
clude the domination of the peoples of the New 
World would at once directly menace the 
security of the entire Western Hemisphere. 

It is for that reason that in response to your 
message, the Government of the United States 
will send immediately troops to supplement and 
eventually to replace the British forces now 
there. 

The steps so taken by the Government of 
the United States are taken in full recogni- 
tion of the sovereignty and independence of 
Iceland and with the clear understanding that 
American military or naval forces sent to Ice- 
land will in no wise interfere in the slightest 
degree with the internal and domestic af- 
fairs of the Icelandic people; and with the 
further understanding that immediately upon 
the termination of the present international 
emergency, all such military and naval forces 
will be at once withdrawn leaving the people 
of Iceland and their Government in full sov- 
ereign control of their own territory. 

The people of Iceland hold a proud position 
among the democracies of the world, with a 
historic tradition of freedom and of individual 
liberty which is more than a thousand years 
old. It is, therefore, all the more appropriate 
that in response to your message, the Govern- 
ment of the United States, while undertaking 
this defensive measure for the preservation of 
the independence and security of the democra- 
cies of the New World should at the same 
time be afforded the privilege of cooperating 
in this manner with your Government in the 
defense of the historic democracy of Iceland. 

I am communicating this message, for their 
information, to the Governments of all of the 
other nations of the Western Hemisphere. 



American Republics 



PRIORITY AID FOR CONSTRUCTION OF STEEL MILL IN BRAZIL 



[Released to the press July 0] 

Priority aid for the construction of a $45,- 
000,000 steel mill in Brazil has been assured 
by the Office of Production Management, act- 
ing on recommendations of the Department of 
State. 

The decision to aid Brazil through priorities 
is in accordance with this Government's policy 
of assisting the other American republics to 
obtain essential materials in this country, so 
far as this is compatible with our own defense 
requirements. 

The National Steel Company of Brazil has 
already started ground-breaking operations. 
The priority aid, permitting the company to 
obtain steel, machinery, and many other kinds 
of equipment promptly, is designed to make 
possible the completion of this mill within two 
and one-half to three years. 

Of the total cost of $45,000,000, the sum of 
$20,000,000 is being supplied through a loan 
from the Export-Import Bank. The rest is 
being supplied by the Brazilian Governmjent 
and Brazilian financial institutions. The 
$20,000,000 supplied by this country is to be 
spent in the United States, through contracts 
with from 250 to 300 different manufacturers 
and suppliers. 

The contracts and orders involved will be 
given priority ratings sufficiently high to 
secure adequate deliveries, without delaying 
deliveries of our own defense contracts. 

As a result of the conversations held at 
Washington in the early part of 1939 between 
Dr. Oswaldo Aranha, the Foreign Minister of 
Brazil, and officials of this Government,^ a 



'See Press Releases of March 11, 1939 (vol. XX, 
no. 493), pp. 174-182. 



commitment was made on the part of the 
United States to assist Brazil in the develop- 
ment of its economic resources and of its 
industries. 

The steel-mill project was thereafter pre- 
sented by the Brazilian Government as the 
most important single item in this program. 
Such a mill is of major importance to Brazil 
and also is of considerable interest to the 
United States. Not only will it provide for 
the utilization of a portion of Brazil's vast 
natural resources but it will also tend to im- 
prove the general standard of living of the 
country and thereby increase the market for 
products of the United States. 

The output of the Brazilian steel mill will to 
that extent relieve the pressure on American 
industries in the prosecution of the Brazilian 
re-armament program. 

In consideration of the foregoing factors 
and in the light of the demands on the Ameri- 
can defense program, the Office of Production 
Management, acting upon the recommenda- 
tions of the Department of State, which were 
concurred in by the Army and Navy Munitions 
Board, the Office of Price Administration and 
Civilian Supply, and the Coordinator of Com- 
mercial and Cultural Relations Between the 
American Republics, agreed to give the project 
the consideration which it deserves with a view 
to granting the necessary priorities for the 
equipment destined for the mill. The OPM's 
Priorities, Production, and Purchases Divi- 
sions, and the Army and Navy JSIunitions 
Board have accordingly worked out a program 
which will permit construction of the mill 
according to schedule and without interference 
with the defense program. 

19 



20 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



REPRESENTATION OF UNITED STATES RUSINESS IN OTHER AMERICAN 

REPURLICS 



[Released to the press by the Office of the Coordinator of 
Commercial and Cultural Relations Between the Ameri- 
can Republics July 11] 

Undesirable agents in Central and South 
America of United States business firms have 
lost more than 1,000 accounts since the Fed- 
eral Goverimient moved to eliminate all agents 
discovered to be engaged in anti-American ac- 
tivities. In some cases a single anti-American 
firm has lost as many as 15 accounts, and many 
have lost 5 or more accounts. 

Despite the complexity and expense of termi- 
nating contractual i-elations, more than 50 per- 
cent of the United States business being 
handled by anti-American agents has so far 
been canceled, and work is proceeding to elim- 
inate the balance. 

With the cooperation of 17,000 export firms 
in this country, a close check is being kept of 
all new or prospective representatives or new 
accounts that companies in this country under- 
take. So far only one case has come to the 
attention of the Government where a United 
States firm inadvertently had taken on an 
agent who had been dropped by a competitor. 
This was immediately rectified. It ic not an- 
ticipated that there will be any further cases, 
but if there are, appropriate steps will be taken 
to see that thej' are rectified. 

As a result of the Government's program, 
which has been undertaken jointly by the De- 
partments of Commerce and State and the 
Office of the Coordinator, machinery has been 
set up to insure a continuous flow of informa- 
tion both on undesirable firms and on satis- 
factory agencies which are available to United 
States agents in the other republics. A large 



amount of important information is being 
systematically collected and analyzed and 
is being made available to all Government 
departments and agencies for tlieir use in 
administration of their defense duties. 

The records today contain information con- 
cerning some 5,000 firms in Latin America. Of 
this number over 1,000 are, on the basis of 
present information, definitely known to be 
identified with ant i- American activities and, 
therefore, undesirable as connections of United 
States companies under existing conditions. 

A further result of the Government's pro- 
gram has been the replacement by many United 
States companies having branch operations or 
traveling representatives in Latin America, of 
certain managers, employees, and traveling 
representatives. In addition, there have been 
numerous liquidations or reorganizations of un- 
desirable agencies as the result of the loss or 
threatened loss of United States business ac- 
counts. In a number of important cases such 
steps have resulted in the elimination of anti- 
American influence in the firms. 

In commenting on the progress of this pro- 
gram. Nelson A. Rockefeller, Coordinator of 
Commercial and Cultural Relations Retween 
the American Republics, said: "The Govern- 
ment has had excellent cooperation from the 
export industry as a whole, including the trade 
associations concerned with foreign-trade prob- 
lems. Exporters in this country recognize the 
importance of having their interests and the 
interests of the Nation represented in the other 
American republics at all times by firms and 
individuals whose loyalty to the policy of 
hemisphere solidarity cannot be questioned." 



JULY 12, 1941 21 

ANNIVERSARY OF THE DECLARATION OF ARGENTINE INDEPENDENCE 



(ReleaBOd to the press July !)] 

The following message from the Pi'esident of 
the United States was read on his behalf on 
radio programs to be transmitted to Argentina 
by the Columbia Broadcasting System and the 
National Broadcasting Co. on July 9, 1941: 

"I am particularly glad to have the oppor- 
tunity to send the greetings of the people and 
Government of the United States of America 
to the people and Government of the Republic 
of Argentina on this day commemorating the 
Declaration of Argentine Independence in 
1816 which consolidated the ardent and per- 
sistent efforts of the people of that great 
country to win liberty for themselves and their 
children. This day, following within a few 
days as it does the anniversary of the Declara- 
tion of Independence of the United States of 
America, emphasizes the close relationship be- 
tween the ideals and aspirations of the peoples 
of our two Republics. The spiritual affinity 
between Argentina and the United States, to 
which the Acting President of the Argentine 
Nation, Dr. Ramon Castillo, alluded in his 
generous e.xpressions only a few days ago on 
tlie Fourth of July, has grown ever stronger 
during the century and more since the seeds 
of that affinity were sown. 

"The Government of the United States is 
proud to participate actively in the celebration 
of this anniversary through the representation 
from its armed forces which the Argentine 
Government cordially invited to Buenos Aires 
for the occasion. This pride is more than justi- 
fied in the commemoration of unwavering 
devotion to the principle of liberty and in the 
recognition of the firm determination of the 
free people of this hemisphere to maintain that 
principle for which their forefathers so val- 
iantly fought. During these critical times, 
when the American republics are confronted 



with the active danger presented by the chal- 
lenge abroad today to the Christian civilization 
which they cherish as a precious heritage, it is 
especially heartening to paiticii)ate in an elo- 
quent expression of the imity of ideals which 
firmly binds the chain of free republics of 
this hemisphere. 

"In paying tribute to the memories of those 
brave patriots who brought the Argentine 
Republic into existence and to their successors 
who built upon this achievement to make the 
gi'eat nation that is Argentina today, we may 
take courage and inspiration and the strength 
of conviction to preserve the liberty for which 
they were prepared to give the last full 
measure of devotion." 

[Released to the press July fl] 

The President has sent the following tele- 
giam to the Acting President of Argentina, 
His Excellency Dr. Ramon Castillo: 

"The White House, 

''July 8, 194.1. 

"The anniversary of the Declaration of Ar- 
gentine Independence has afforded me an op- 
portunity, of which I am deeply appreciative, 
to send greetings on behalf of the people and 
Government of the United States to the peo- 
ple and Government of your great country. 
This occasion, which commemorates a declara- 
tion so closely related to the one in this coun- 
try which Your Excellency so generously 
remembered only a few days ago, again em- 
jihasizes the profound spiritual affinity of the 
peoples of Argentina and the United States in 
their unflagging efforts to gain and maintain 
lasting freedom. 

"1 send Your Excellency the assurances of 
my highest regard. 

Franklin D Roosevelt" 



401090 — 41- 



22 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Acting Secretary of State, Sumner 
Wellci^, has sent the following telegram to His 
Excellency Dr. Enrique Ruiz-Guinazu, Min- 
ister of Foreign Afl'airs and Worship of the 
Argentine Eepublic: 

"July 8, 1941. 

"On the anniversary of the declaration of 
Argentine independence, I send most cordial 
greetings of the Government of the United 
States to the Government of the Great Argen- 
tine nation and best wishes for the welfare of 
the Argentine people. It is deeply hearten- 
ing during this period of emergency to be 
vividly reminded by this celebration that the 
ideals and governing principles of the peoples 
of our two Republics are firmly rooted in the 
same ground of liberty. 

"Please accept my best wishes for Your 
Excellency's personal well-being and happiness. 
SuMXXR Welles" 



Europe 



The Near East 



SUSPENSION OF TONNAGE DUTIES FOR 
VESSELS OF BURMA 

A proclamation (no. 2495) providing that 
"the foreign discriminating duties of tonnage 
and imposts within the United States" be 
"suspended and discontinued so far as respects 
the vessels of Burma and the produce, manu- 
factures, or merchandise imported in said ves- 
sels into the United States from Burma or 
from any other foreign counti-y; the suspen- 
sion to take effect from June 10, 1941, and to 
continue so long as the reciprocal exemption of 
vessels belonging to citizens of the United 
States and their cargoes shall be continued, 
and no longer", was signed by the President 
on July 1, 1941. The text of this proclama- 
tion appears in full in the Federal Register of 
July 8, 1941 (vol. 6, no. 131), page 3263. 



SURVIVORS OF THE S. S. "ZAMZAM" 

[Released to the press July 11] 

As a result of extended negotiations with 
the German Government, it has been arranged 
that the American ambulance drivers who were 
on the Zamzam when she was sunk on April 
17, 1941, in the South Atlantic, subsequently 
landed in France and up to the present de- 
tained by the German authorities in occupied 
France, will now be released. 

The ambulance drivers will proceed to 
Lisbon, from which point they will be repatri- 
ated to the United States on the U.S.S. West 
Point which is proceeding to exchange Ger- 
man and Italian consular personnel for Ameri- 
can consular persoimel from German- and 
Italian-held territories. The ship is expected 
to sail from Lisbon July 25 direct for New 
York, arriving there about August 1. 

A list of American ambulance drivers to be 
repatriated to the United States on the U.S.S. 
West Point, follows: 

George Butcher, of Chula Vista, Calif. 

Michael Clark, of New York, N. Y. 

Ray Colcord, Jr., of Tulsji, Okla. 

.James W. Crudgingtoii, of Carmel, Calif. 

William A. Davidson, of Worcester, Mass. 

Henry Emsheimer, of New York, N. Y. 

Pliilip N. Faverslaam, of Concord, Mass. 

George C. Finneran, of Rye, N. Y. 

Thomas O. Greenough, of Staunton, Va. 

Raymond Haviland, of St. Louis, Mo. 

Frederick W. Hoeing, of Rochester, N. Y. 

Arthur T. Jeffress, of California. 

Donald King, of Chevy Chase, Md. 

Arthur Krida, Jr., of South Kent, Conn. 

John Morris, of New York, N. Y. 

.\rthur Mueller, of Butte, Mont. 

Robert Lewis Redgate, of Rye, N. Y. 

John W. Ryan, of Newton, Mass. 

James W. Stewart, of Oneonta, N. Y. 

George O. Ticheoner, of East Orange, N. J. 

William A. Wydenbruck-Loe, of New York, N. Y. 



Commercial Policy 



INTERNATIONAL WHEAT MEETING 



[Releiised to the press July 9 J 

At the invitation of the Government of the 
United States, officials of the Governments of 
Argentina, Australia, Canada, and the United 
Kingdom have come to Washington to discuss 
with officials of this Government the present 
situation and the outlook with respect to inter- 
national trade in wheat and to consider what 
steps might be recommended to their Govern- 
ments with regard to the wheat-surplus prob- 
lem. Those who will participate in the 
discussions are as follows: 

Argentina 

Mr. Anselmo M. Viacava, Commercial Counselor, 
Argeutiue Embassy, Washington 
Au.^tralia 

Mr. F. P. McDougall, Economic Adviser to the 
Australian Government 
Canada 

Mr. George H. Mclvor, Chief Commissioner, Canadian 
Wheat Board 

Mr. R. V. Biddulph, European Commissioner, 
Canadian Wheat Board 

Mr. Charles Wilson, Chief, Agricultural Branch, 
Dominion Bureau of Statistics 

Mr. A. M. Shaw, Director of Marketing Service.s, 
Dominion Department of Agriculture 

Mr. J. E. Coyne, Financial Attach^, Canadian Lega- 
tion, Washington ^ 
United Kingdom 

Mr. H. F. Carlill, Chief British Representative, 
Chairman of the International Wheat Advisory 
Committee 
United States 

Mr. Leslie A. Wheeler, Director, Otflce of Foreign 
Agricultural Relations, Department of Agriculture 

Mr. R. M. Evans, Administrator, Agricultural 
Adjustment Administration, Department of Agri- 
culture 

Mr. Harry C. Hawkins, Chief, Division of Com- 
mercial Treaties and Agreements, Department of 
State 



(Alternate: Mr. Jacques J. Reinstein, Principal 
Divisional Assistant, Division of Commercial 
Treaties and Agreements, Department of State) 
Mr. Loyd V. Steere, Agricultural Attach^, American 
Embassy at London 
International Wheat Advisory Committee 
Mr. Andrew Cairns, Secretary 

The first meeting will take place at the De- 
jmrtment of State on July 10. Subsequent 
meetings will be held at the Department of 
Agriculture. 

[Released to the press July 10] 

The remarks of the Acting Secretary of 
State, Mr. Sumner Welles, at the opening ses- 
sion of the International Wheat Meeting at 
Washington, July 10, 1941, follow : 

"I am happy to welcome you to Washington, 
and I want to express my gratification that 
all your Governments have considered it de- 
sirable to participate in these discussions. This 
meeting is a practical example of the con- 
stantly increasing collaboration which is tak- 
ing place between the American republics and 
the countries of the British Commonwealth. 
This developing habit of cooperation and the 
contacts being made by officials who are con- 
cerned with the problems involved in our mu- 
tual relations will undoubtedly assist us in 
meeting and overcoming many difficulties we 
would once have regarded as insuperable. 

"The mere discussion of problems of mutual 
interest will not suffice, however. If we are 
to avoid the recurrence after the present war 
of the economic dislocations which marked the 
period following the last war, with tlieir tragic 
effects upon the standards of living of all coun- 
tries, and their incentive to domestic unrest 
and international violence, we must devise 

23 



24 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



practical means of assuring the restoration of 
healthy international trade based on the prin- 
ciple of equality of treatment. If we fail to 
do so, we will find ourselves again treading the 
path which has once before led us to disaster. 

"All of us today are faced with grave and 
difficult problems. Our preoccupation with the 
most immediate of tliese problems, howev.'r, 
should not blind us to the necessity of keep- 
ing longer-term objectives clearly in mind. 
Neither should the problems of war prevent 
us from working towards solutions which will 
enable us to deal with questions of peace. 
Many of our current problems can be solved 
only on the basis of assurances as to the plans 
and programs of other countries in dealing 
with similar problems now and after the war. 
I do not think it is an overstatement to say 
that the shape of the post-war world will be 
determined in no small measure by tlie actions 
which we take during the wai'. 

"In calling the present meeting to discuss 
tlie international wheat situation, the Govern- 
ment of the United States has had in mind the 
fact that all of us who are wheat producers 
are faced at present with problems of a some- 
what similar character, altliough of varying 
degrees of intensity. All of us ai'e faced with 
growing surpluses of wheat. I am informed 
that the prospect is that in another year these 
surpluses will probably total a billion and a 
half bushels, a quantity which may well hang 
over the international wheat markets for years. 
As producers and as holders of these surpluses, 
we have a common interest in the possibilities 
which may exist of providing for their orderly 
liquidation. We have a common interest in 
the conditions which will prevail in the inter- 
national wheat market when the war is over. 
We have a common interest in the restoration 
of the prosperity fif our purcliasers of wheat 
and in the need for relief in devastated areas 
immediately after the war. 

"As officials who have responsibihties in con- 
nection with tlie wheat-export policies of your 
respective Governments, tliese problems merit 
your most serious consideration. I trust that, 



as a result of your study of the wheat situa- 
tion, you will find it possible to recommend 
constructive measures for the solution of these 
problems which will be to the mutual advan- 
tage of all our countries. 

"I wish you all success in achieving the satis- 
factory results which we all anticipate from 
this meeting."' 



Cultural Relations 



VISIT OF DISTINGUISHED 
ARGENTINEAN 

[Released to the press July 12] 

Dr. Jose A. Saralegui, distinguished medical 
scientist of Buenos Aires, will arrive in New 
York on July 14 aboard the S.S. Argentina to 
visit this country at the invitation of the 
Department of State. 

Dr. Saralegui is a specialist in the field of 
radiology, having been a founder of the Argen- 
tine Society of Radiology and Electrology and 
liaving served as Chief of Radiology and 
Physiotherapy of the Rivadavia Hospital. As 
a writer in his specialty he has been active as 
cliief editor of the Radiology Section of the 
Review of the Argentine Medical Association. 

After his graduation with honors from the 
School of Medical Sciences of Buenos Aires, 
Dr. Saralegui studied in Eurojie for two years. 
At various times since completing his European 
studies, he has been engaged in teaching as a 
professor in the School of Medical Sciences of 
the National University of Buenos Aires. He 
has contributed to his nation's medical advance- 
ment by participation in various national 
medical congl-esses and as .secretary of the 
Argentine Medical Association. 

The work of Dr. Saralegui is also well known 
outside his own country. He was a delegate 
to the Congress of the American X-Ray So- 
ciety in Washington and is a corresponding 
member of the same group. In addition, he 
served as a member of the Ligue Franco- 
Anglo-Americaine Contre le Cancer and lias 



JULY 12, 1941 



25 



collaborated with other medical journals in 
Argentina and abroad. At present, Dr. Sara- 
legui is on the Board of the Instituto Cultural 
Argentine Norteamericano. As a member of 
this organization he is much interested in 
United States affairs and in the promotion of 
cultural exchange between this country and 
Argentina. 

On his arrival in New York, Dr. Saralegui 
will be met by an officer of the Department of 
State and will then proceed to Washington 
where he will confer with Department of State 
officials in connection with plans for his stay 
in this country. 



The Foreign Service 



The Department 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

The following departmental orders have been 
signed by the Acting Secretary of State, Mr. 
Sumner Welles: 

Departmental Order 91^9 {signed July 1) : 

"Mr. Walter N. Wabnsley, Jr., a Foreign 
Service officer of Class VII, is hereby desig- 
nated an Assistant Chief of the Division of 
tlie American Republics, effective as of June 
30, 1941." 

Departmental Order 952 {signed July 9) : 

"Mr. Max W. Thornburg has been appointed 
a Special Assistant to the Under Secretary of 
State, effective July 7, 1941, and has been as- 
signed to the Office of the Adviser on Inter- 
national Economic Affairs. He will act as 
consultant on petroleum matters." 

departmental Order 953 {signed July 10) : 

"Mr. Monnett B. Davis, a Foreign Service 
officer of Class I, is hereby assigned as Chief of 
the Division of Foreign Service Administra- 
tion, effective July 12. Mr. Davis is, under 
this assignment, authorized to perform all of 
fhe duties and functions incident to the posi- 
tion of Chief of the Division of Foreign 
Service Administration." 

401090—41 3 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press July 12] 

The following changes have occurred in tlie 
American Foreign Service since July 5, 1941 : 

J. Klahr Huddle, of Fort Recovery, Ohio, 
now serving in the Department of State, has 
been designated Counselor of American Lega- 
tion at Bei-n, Switzerland. 

Jefferson Patterson, of Dayton, Ohio, First 
Secretary of Embassy at Berlin, Germany, has 
been designated First Secretary of Embassy 
and Consul at Lima, Peru, and will serve in 
dual capacity. 

The assignment of Thomas McEnelly, of 
New York, N. Y., as Consul at Istanbul, Tur- 
key, has been canceled. 

The assignment of Don C. Bliss, Jr., of 
Biloxi, Miss., as Consul at London, England, 
has been canceled. In lieu thereof, Mr. Bliss 
has been designated Acting Commercial At- 
tache at London, England. 

Charles H. Deny, of Macon, Ga., Consul at 
Perth, Western Australia, has been assigned as 
Consul at Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. 

Lewis V. Boyle, of California, Consul at 
Agua Prieta, Sonora, Mexico, died on June 30, 
1941. 

Cloyce K. Huston, of Crawfordsville, Iowa, 
Second Secretary of Legation at Bucharest, 
Rumania, has been assigned for duty in the 
Department of State. 

The assignment of Gei'ald Warner, of 
Northampton, Mass., as Consul at Tokyo, 
Japan, has been canceled. In lieu thereof, Mr. 
Warner has been assigned as Consul at Kobe, 
Japan. 

William C. Trimble, of Baltimore, Md., who 
has been serving as Third Secretary of Em- 
bassy and Vice Consul at Paris, Fi-ance, has 
been designated Third Secretary of Embassy 
and Vice Consul at Lima, Peru, and will serve 
in dual capacity. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETUSi 



The assignment of Alfred H. Lovell, Jr., of 
Michigan, as Vice Consul at Singapore, Straits 
Settlements, has been canceled. In lieu 
thereof, Mr. Lovell has been designated Third 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at 
Bogota, Colombia, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

Kenneth Buren Wasson, of Brooklyn, N. Y., 
has been appointed Vice Consul in the Embassy 
at Lima, Peru. 

FOREIGN SERVICE REGULATIONS 

On July 5, 1941, the President signed Execu- 
tive Order 8818 amending the Foreign Service 
Regulations of the United States (Chapter 
XV: Documentation of Merchandise). For 
text of this order see the Federal Register of 
July 9, 1941 (vol. 6, no. 132), pages 3313-3314. 



International Conferences, 
Commissions, Etc. 



THIRD GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE 
PAN AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF GEOG- 
RAPHY AND HISTORY 

The Third General Assembly of the Pan 
American Institute of Geography and History, 
which met in Lima, Pei'u, from March 30 to 
April 8, 1941, was attended by official delegates 
from all of the 21 American republics. Dele- 
gates from the United States of America were 
listed in the BulUtin of March 22, 1941 (vol. 
IV, no. 91), page 343. Dr. Bolton, Dr. Shot- 
well, and Dr. Whitaker, who were appoiiUed 
as delegates, did not, however, attend. 

The Pan American Institute of Geogi-aphy 
and History, an official inter-American organi- 
zation with headquarters in Mexico City, was 
established pursuant to a resolution adopted by 
the Sixth International Conference of Ameri- 
can States for the purpose of collecting and 
disseminating information on geographical and 
historical questions of mutual interest to the 



American republics. An assembly, held peri- 
odically and composed of delegates from the 
American republics, directs and reviews the 
work of the Institute. 

The discussions of the Third General Assem- 
bly were divided into four sections, two for 
geography and two for history, as follows : 

I. Physical and mathematical geogi'a- 
phy — topography, geodesy, cartog- 
raphy, and geomorphology 
II. Human geography, ethnography, his- 
torical geography, economic geog- 
raphy, and biological geography 

III. Pre-Columbian history and archaeology 
and colonial history 

IV. History of the American revolutions 
and post-revolutionary history 

Each section elected its own chairman, and 
Mr. S. W. Boggs, delegate from the United 
States of America, was designated chairman 
of section I. More than 100 papers were pre- 
sented during the meetings of these sections. 
A Board of Directors for the Institute was 
named to serve until the next Assembly, tlie 
United States member being Dr. John C. 
^lerriam. 

A total of 54 resolutions was approved by 
the delegates. Many of these evidenced the 
theme of Pan American solidarity and recom- 
mended further cooperation between the 
American nations along geographic and his- 
torical lines in the creation of commissions 
and other inter- x\.merican entities; the prep- 
aration and publication of maps and books; 
the exchange of professors and students of 
anthropology; the development of geographic 
courses and the establishment of geographic 
institutes; the preservation of flora and fauna; 
the study of factors which might determine the 
adaptation to living conditions at different ele- 
vations above sea level; and the establishment 
of libraries. The Institute was directed to 
undertake the compilation and publication of 
varied material, including an American his- 
torical atlas of the sixteenth, seventeenth, 
eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 



JULY 12, 1941 



27 



One important resolution related to the crea- 
tion of a commission on cartography, to be 
established in the Pan American Institute of 
Geography and History. The purpose of this 
commission is the facilitation and development 
of the most modern methods in making maps 
in the countries of the Western Hemisphere in 
accordance with their own map-making needs. 



A' detailed account of the Assembly will be 
published by the Peruvian Government. 

At the final general session, the Assembly 
agreed to meet next in December 1942 at Cara- 
cas, Venezuela, the date coinciding with the 
Bolivar Centenary. This will be a special 
meeting; the next regular meeting will be held 
in Santiago, Chile, probably in 1944. 



General 



CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL DEFENSE 



[Keleiised t» tlic press July 9] 

The Secretary of State announced on July 9 
that general license GDG 2, authorizing the 
exportation to Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland of certain machine tools and allied 
products, had been amended to include only 
precision instruments for use in the metal- 
working industries. At the same time, it was 
announced that new general licenses author- 
izing the exportation of machine tools and al- 
lied products to Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland had been issued, as follows: 

License No. GT)A 2 for machinery for melting or casting 
(iDB 2 for machinery for pressing into 

form 
GDC 2 for machinery for cutting or grind- 
ing 
GDD 2 for machinery for weldi.ig 
GDE 2 for abrasives and abrasive products 
GDF 2 for plastic molding machines and 

presses 
GDH 2 for construction, conveying, mining, 

and quarrying machinery 
GDK 2 for hydraulic pumps 
GDL2 for tools incorporating industrial 
diamonds 

Collectors of customs have been authorized 
to permit, without the requirement of individ- 
ual license, the exportation of any of the ar- 
ticles and materials enumerated in the above 
list to Great Britain and Northern Ireland, but 
the exporter is required to indicate the ap- 
propriate general-license number on the ship- 
per's export declaration filed with the collector. 



Collectors of customs were informed on July 
11, 1941 as follows: 

"Further reference is made to the final sen- 
tence of the Department's telegram of June 20,^ 
stating that no licenses outstanding as of that 
date authorizing the exportation of petroleum 
products would be valid, with certain excep- 
tions, for shipments from any port located on 
the Atlantic coast. 

"This should not be construed as a revocation 
of licenses issued prior to June 20 in which a 
port on the Atlantic coast was named as the 
jjroposed port of exit. Such licenses are valid 
for exportations from any port of exit other 
than those on the Atlantic coast and it was 
intended that persons holding valid licenses 
but unable to export through Atlantic coast 
ports should nevertheless be able to make ship- 
ments of petroleum products from other ports 
of exit. 

"Unless a license showing a date of issuance 
subsequent to June 20 specifically names a port 
of exit located on the Atlantic coast, it should 
not be honored for the exportation of petro- 
leum products through such a port. Hence 
the rule that licenses are valid for exportation 
from any port of exit is modified to that 
extent." 



' See the Bulletin of June 21, 1941 (vol. IV, no. 104), 
pp. 750-751. 



28 

Numbers assigned to every country for which 
general licenses are now in existence follow : 

Canada 1 

Great Britain and Northern Ireland '1 

Cuba 3 

Argentina 4 

Bolivia ■'> 

Brazil 6 

Chile T 

Colombia 8 

Costa Rica 9 

Curasao, including Aruba, Bonaire, St. Eustatius, 

Saba, and St. Martin (Netherlands portion) 10 

Dominican Republic It 

Ecuador 12 

El Salvador 13 

Guatemala 14 

Haiti 15 

Honduras 16 

Mexico 17 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

Nicaragua 18 

Panama 19 

Paraguay 20 

Peru 21 

Surinam 22 

Uruguay 23 

Venezuela 24 

Au.stralia (except Papua and the Territory of New 
Guinea under mandate) and Nauru, mandated 

territory 26 

Bahamas 27 

Barbados 28 

Bermuda 29 

Newfoundland 47 

New Zealand 48 

Palestine and Trans-Jordan 51 

Union of South Africa, including South-West 

Africa 57 

Egypt 59 

Greenland — 61 

Iceland . 62 

Philippine Islands 63 



Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, Etc. 



MONTHLY STATISTICS 



[Relea.sed to the press July 10] 

NoTK : In the tables set forth below relating to 
arms-export licenses issued and arms exported, statis- 
tics concerning shipments authorized and made to the 
British Commonwealth of Nations, the British Empire, 
British mandates, and the armed forces elsewhere of 
Great Britain and its allies are not listed separately 
but are combined under the heading British Common- 
wealth of Nations. 

The figures relating to arms, the licenses for the 
export of which were revoked before they were used, 
have been subtracted from the figures appearing in 
the cumulative column of the table below in regard 
(o arms-export licen.ses issued. These latter figures are 
therefore net figures. They are not yet final and 
definitive since licenses may be amended or revoked 
at any time before being used. They are, however, 
accurate as of the date of this press release. 

The statistics of actual exports In these releases are 
believed to be substantially complete. It Is possible, 
however, that some shipments are not Included. If 
this proves to be the fact, statistics in regard to 
such shipments will be included in the cumulative 
figures in later releases. 



Arms-Export Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of 
the arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
licensed for export by the Secretary of State 
dui-ing the year 1941 up to and including the 
month of May : 





Category 


Value of export license.s issued 


t'imntry of rtestinatioi 


May 1941 


5 months end- 
ing May 31, 
1941 




I (4) 

V (1) 

(2) 




$16. 07 






3, 150. 00 




$193. 37 


313. 37 


Total 


193.37 


3, 479. 44 




I (1) 
(4) 

III (2) 

IV (1) 

t2) 








62. 35 




154.00 


892.00 
60.00 




440.00 
435.00 


19,644.00 
8,530.00 



JULY 12, 1941 



29 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


May 1941 


5 months end- 
ing May 31, 
1941 


Argentina— Continued. 


V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(3) 


$7, 106. 28 


$9, 005. 28 
33, 348. 08 
















136, 400. 00 


187, 790. no 




144, 534. 28 


308, 632. 47 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
VII (1) 






642.00 


697.00 




864.00 
















86.64 


808.64 


Total 


628.64 


20, 443 04 




I (1) 
(2) 
(4) 
(5) 

III (I) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 






76.26 










427, 946. 87 
6, 696. 00 
54, 000. 00 


430, 144. 67 
5, 696. 00 
54. 000. 00 










1, 925. 60 
123. 800. 00 
12, 812. 00 
31, 674. 72 


17, 124. 60 
459. 264. 00 

70, 529. 67 
262. 025. 72 








Total 


667, 830. 44 


1,407,296.06 




I (1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 

II 

III (1) 
(2) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VI (2) 

VII (1) 
(2) 


Nations, the Britisli Em- 
pire, British mandates, and 
the armed forces elsewhere 
of Great Britain and its 
allies. 


38, 178. 35 

2, 593, 254. 60 

3, 856, 269. 00 
6, 226, 170. 62 
1, 672, 399. 00 
4,131,151.00 

150. 00 

47, 992, 739. 30 

115,912.00 

45, 162. 40 

68, 642. 45 

1, 250, 998. 00 

4, 136, 217. 60 
5,447,198.40 

4, 718. 00 

4, 865, 568. 14 

495, 940. 00 


27, 604, 175. 67 

18, 725, 679. 79 

30, 301, 876. 70 

108, 102. 883. 13 

6, 099, 567. 68 

21, 637, 014. 00 

6, 354, 748. 00 

323, 498, 064. 09 

209, 813. 87 

1, 922. 613. 66 
3, 434, 985. 30 

■^ 1. 879, 643. 00 

51, 190, 650. 22 

48, 453, 198. 37 

7. 467. 00 

16, 940, 627. 23 

2, 218, 431. 37 


Total 


82, 929, 568. 76 






I (3) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 




Chile 




38, 080. 00 




















4, 300. 00 
103.86 


6, 400. 00 
28, 352. 86 




4,000.00 
14, 198. 00 


4. 388. 80 
27, 096. 92 


Total 


22,601.85 






I (2) 
III (1) 




China _._ 










6, 307, 732. 00 





Category 


Value of export licenses Issued 


Country of destination 


May 1941 


6 months end- 
ing May 31, 
1941 


China— Continued. 


(2) 
V (2) 

(3) 
VII (1) 

(2) 




$2,500.00 
16, 776. 00 
987, 700. 00 


















245,002.64 






Total 




8, 364, 628. 89 




I (1) 
(4) 
(6) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






$49.28 

84.30 

6, 500. 00 

184. 00 


49.28 

101.30 

6, ,500. 00 

4, 601. 60 








6,200.00 








2, 500. 00 


26,780.00 
3, 675. 29 
2,944.00 










Total 


9, 317. 58 


63,628.87 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 


Costa Rica 




2.00 

1, 078. 55 

196.00 




1,019.55 
171.00 




2, 775. 60 

4. 000. 00 

164.00 


3, 869. 20 

4, 000. 00 

481.20 


Total 


8, 130. 15 






I (1) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
VII (1) 

(2) 




Cuba 








317. 56 


600. 55 










2,906.00 


8, 974. 00 












744 60 








Total 


3, 222. 56 


25, 661. 33 




IV (2) 
VII (1) 




















Total 








I (1) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (3) 
VII (1) 

(2) 




















76.00 


266. ,50 
1. 797. 44 












1, 106. 00 






91.00 








Total 


76.00 


33, 624. 92 




I (4) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 






22.00 
167.00 

164.00 






207.00 
6, 300. 00 

364.00 
3,000.00 






43.20 






3, 615. 00 








Total 


363. 00 


13. 640. 46 



30 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 

I (4) 

V (2) 

(3) 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country of destination 


May 1941 


6 months end- 
ing May 31, 
1841 






$130.00 






4, 810. 00 




$3,980.00 


3,980.00 




3,980.00 


8,920.00 




I (2) 
(4) 
(6) 

III (2) 








16,000.00 






18, 404. 00 






10,000.00 






3, 730. 00 






48,134.00 




IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 










2, 547. OO 






15.000.00 




3,262.00 


4,634.00 
5,000.00 






194.40 






1, 445. 75 










3,262.00 


28,821.15 




I (4) 

IV (1) 

(2) 

VII (2) 






547.60 
23.83 


547.60 




60.83 
14.68 






.10 










571.33 


613. 11 




I (4) 

IV (2) 

V (1) 
(2) 








213.00 






649.00 






20,000.00 






169.00 












21.031.00 




I (2) 

V (2) 

(3) 






Iran 




10. 864. 60 






900.64 






7,000.00 












18, 765. 24 




I (I) 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








2, 178. 10 
3, 583. 86 

200.00 
8, 165. 65 
233, 000. 00 
8, 070. 60 
1,600.00 
2, 247. 26 

908.00 


2, 945. 70 




18,631.46 
8,371.50 
43, 613. 67 
504,150.00 
27, 972. 19 
10, 255. 00 
17,797.30 
42,975.00 


Total 


259,853.46 


676,711.82 




I (4) 

V (1) 
(2) 








29.60 






2,000.00 






655.82 












2,685.42 




I (1) 

(4) 

IV (1) 

(2) 










284.30 




360.08 
18.00 
1.60 


1, 495. 17 
18.00 
48.60 





Category 


Value of export licenses issued 


Country ot destination 


May 1941 


6 months end- 
ing May 31, 
1941 




V (2) 

(3) 




$3, 622. 00 






28, 850. 00 










$379. 68 


34,198.07 




I (4) 

IV (2) 
VII (1) 






116. 10 


116. 10 






Nicaragua _ _ 




9,311.00 




1,360.00 












10,671.00 




V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 










26, 000. 00 




295.00 


770.00 
1,650.00 




1.96 


1.95 




296.95 


28,421.96 




I (4) 

IV (2) 

V (3) 






106. 35 
3, 889. 00 


106.35 




3,938.00 
1, 550. 00 








Total ---- 


3,995.36 


5,594.35 




IV (1) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 








19.90 






268. 231. 25 




6,728.04 

29, 816. 25 

912.00 


48, 762. 04 

177,116.25 

4,410.69 

585.00 








Total --- 


37,466.29 


499, 125. 13 




I (4) 

m (1) 

V (2) 
(3) 








66, 203. 20 






96. 600. 00 






3, 400. OO 






23,500.00 








Total 




188, 703. 20 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 










149.93 




135.00 


2,999.00 
374.28 




64.80 


378.91 




199.80 


3,902.12 




I (3) 

(4) 

V (2) 

vn (1) 

(2) 








660, 000. 00 




39,979.00 
8,082.65 


770,464.00 

8. 082. 66 

138,220.00 




2,680.00 


146, 740. 00 




60, 741. 65 


1, 623, 606. 65 




I (1) 
(4) 

rv (1) 

(2) 

V (1) 

(2) 

VII (15 






185.60 
46.00 


367.20 




1,198.00 
311.00 




460.00 

2,500.00 

102.60 


9,661.00 

39, 440. 00 

720.80 

5,683.60 








Total ---- 


3. 294. 10 


57,181.60 



JULY 12, 1941 



31 



Country of destination 


Category 


Value of expor 
May 1941 


licenses Issued 

5 months end- 
ing May 31, 
1941 




IV (1) 
(2) 

V (2) 
(3) 

VII (1) 
(2) 


$26, 202. 00 






1,883.00 




$2, 770. 00 
25,007.00 


10, 132. 60 
90,896.00 
6, 609. 74 




555.00 


3, 632. 00 


Total 


28,332.00 


139,355.24 










84,168,936.33 


681, 689, 996. 28 









During the month of May, 516 arms-export 
licenses were issued, making a total of 2,517 
such licenses issued during the current year. 

Arms Exported 

The table printed below indicates the char- 
acter, value, and countries of destination of 
the arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
exported during the year 1941 up to and in- 
cluding the month of May under export licenses 
issued by the Secretary of State: 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


May 1941 


6 months end- 
ing May 31, 
1941 




V (1) 
(2) 


















Total 




3,270.00 




I (4) 
III (1) 

«) 
rv (1) 

(2) 
V (1) 

(2) 

(3) 
VII (1) 

(2) 
























$220.00 
61.00 


14, 481. on 
2,991.00 




12,221.00 


.58, 547. 50 










35,650.00 


43, 804. 00 


Total 


48,152.00 


193, 725. 50 




I (4) 

rv (1) 

(2) 
VII (1) 












864 00 












1,371.80 






Total 




3,057.20 




I (1) 

(2) 
(3) 




BrazU.... 














14,626.00 


62,200.00 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 




5 months end- 








May 1941 


ing May 31, 
1941 


Brazil— Continued. 




(4) 


$425,619.00 


$425,952.70 






(6) 


6, 274. 00 


79,198.00 




111 


(11 




683,200.00 






(2) 






IV 


(1) 


17,651.00 


79, 478. 60 






(2) 


2,8.56.00 


9, 772. 63 




V 


(1) 


140, 350. 00 


602,991.00 






(2) 


8,937.76 


84, 164. 86 






(3) 


62, 493. 72 


172,649.72 


Total .. 


677, 706. 47 


1,997,172.41 




I 


(1) 


British Commonwealth of 


61,038.03 


2,207,662.61 


Nations, the British Em- 




(2) 


3, 054, 646. 00 


11,167,866.51 


pire, British mandates, and 




(3) 


2,390,746.00 


8, 339, 447. 00 


the armed forces elsewhere 




C4) 


5, 684, 096. 90 


22,894,471.76 


of Oreat Britain and its 




(6) 


1,689,432.00 


6, 978, 595. 00 


allies. 




(6) 


4,381,896.00 


6, 992, 234. 00 




11 




243, 647. 00 


1, 267, 559. 00 




111 


(1) 


27,716,279.00 


127, 484, 666. 04 






(2) 


2, 232. 00 


36, 561. 13 




IV 


(1) 


268, 115. 10 


1, 216, 182. 33 






(2) 


267, 547. 31 


2,242,441.93 




V 


(1) 


466, 334. 00 


3,320,281.00 






(2) 


2,648,921.59 


10,793,111.82 






(3) 


3,060,567.90 


37,617,674.07 




VI 


(2) 


133.00 


2,677.00 




Vll 


(1) 


2, 344, 678. 80 


4,768,086.18 






(2) 


397, 665. .60 


1,067,926.02 


Total 


54, 656, 866. 13 


247,366,231.40 




TTT 


en 


Chile 


24, 000. 00 


433, 560. 00 
1, 283. 60 




IV 


(1) 


119.60 






(2) 


633. 96 


1, 284. 86 




V 


(1) 

(?) 


68,417.00 


207, 351. 00 
20,413.00 
18 087 75 






(31 






VTI 


rn 




2,187.00 
12,898.92 






(2) 








Total. .. 


:<\ 170. 66 


697,066.13 




T 


(?) 






238, 249. 26 
4.622,818.00 




III 


m 


2,018,464.00 






C) 








rv 


(2) 




1,514.30 




V 


rn 




34, 100. 00 






(?) 




405,560.00 
291, 620. 00 




VII 


(3) 

(1) 






119,320.00 


258, 320. 00 






(2) 


128,625.00 


392, 126. 00 


Total... 


2,499,659.00 


6,350,241.65 




I 
rv 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 








35.80 






810.00 






959.00 




v 


(2) 


27.60 


97.50 






(3) 


2,600.00 


36,780.00 




Vll 


(1) 




3, 676. 29 






(2) 




2, 700. 00 








Total 


2,627.60 


44,967.69 



32 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


May 1941 


5 months end- 
ing May 31, 
1941 




I (4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (1) 
(2) 

VII (1) 


$20,761.00 
1,019.55 


$20, 774. 00 




1, 144. 55 

2, 513. 00 






22, 286. 00 






3. 744. Ofl 






736.00 










21, 780. 55 


61, 197. 55 




I (1) 
(4) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 

(2) 

V (2) 
VII (1) 

(2) 






95.00 


134.00 




8, 629. 00 




6,750.00 


6, 750. 00 
1,719.00 






6, 527. 36 






1, 195. 00 




3, 828. 00 
12.50 


7, 605. SO 
12.50 




10, 685. 50 


32, 572. 66 




IV (2) 
VII (1) 






266.00 


266.00 




1,957.00 










266.00 


2,223.00 




I CD 
(4) 

IV (1) 
(2) 

V (3) 
VII (2) 






83.20 


119.20 




81.00 




81. .-iO 
226.44 


190.50 

877. 44 

29,812.00 






66.00 










391. 14 


31, 146. 14 




I (4) 

V (1) 

(2) 

(3) 

VII (1) 








66.00 




2,000.00 
35.00 


3,600.00 

535.00 

3,000.00 




43.20 


43.20 




2,078.20 


7, 244. 20 




I (4) 
V (2) 






130.00 


130.00 




6,295.00 










130.00 


6, 425. 00 




I (4) 
IV (2) 






60.50 
361.90 


60.50 




361.90 




422.40 


422. 40 




IV (1) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

VII (2) 




1 




25.50 




16,000.00 


15, 000. 00 
502,00 






5,000.00 






1,175.00 








Total 


15,000.00 


21, 702. 50 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Toiuilry of destiuation 


May 1941 


5 months end- 
ing May 31, 
1941 




IV 
VII 


(1) 

(2) 
(2) 




$27.00 




$14. 68 


22.68 
.10 










14.68 


49.78 




I 

IV 

V 


(4) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 






213.00 
649.00 


341.00 




1,084.00 
20,000.00 






169.00 








Total 


862.00 


21, 594. 00 




I 
III 

V 


(2) 
{« 
(2) 
(3) 






3, 800. 00 
684, 000. 00 
62, 512. 00 


44, 615. 00 




762, 940. 00 
63, 461. 44 
7,600.00 










750, 312. 00 


878, 616. 44 




V 

I 

IV 
V 

VII 


(2) 

(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 








469.00 












45.00 






35, 934. 60 




2,650.00 
2, 369. 00 
186, 368. 00 
4. 706. 60 
1, 164. 00 
8, 396. 00 
3,078.00 


7,831.50 
20, 590. 02 
439, 353. 00 
7,430.19 
8, 897. 00 
18, 245. 26 
24, 228. 00 




208,631.60 


562, 554. 56 




I 

V 


(4) 
(2) 








29.60 




422.45 


422. 46 


Total '. 


422.45 


452. 05 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(2) 
(2) 








304.00 






1, 088. 86 




47.00 


47.00 
3, 622. 00 








Total 


47.00 


4,961.86 




IV (2) 

V (1) 
VII (1) 






5,194.00 


9,311.00 




3,500.00 




1, 360. 00 


2,720.00 


Total 


6,554.00 


1.6, 531. 00 




V 


(1) 
(2) 
(3) 








19, 277. 00 




70.00 


26.6. 00 
1,6,60.00 








Total 


70.00 


21,182.00 



JULY 12, 1941 



33 





Category 


Value of actual exports 


Country of destination 


May 1941 


5 months end- 
ing May 31, 
1941 




I 
IV 

V 
VII 


(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(1) 
(2) 




$219.00 






19.90 






1,203.00 




$141, 600. 00 


268,081.00 
33,810.40 




26,694.00 
1,801.20 


69, 684. 00 

3, 498. 69 

685.00 










170,095.20 


377, 100. 99 




I 

V 


(4) 
(2) 
(3) 






20,091.20 
2,500.00 


66, 261. 38 




2,835.00 
15.000.00 










22, 591. 20 


84, 096. 38 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 








20, 667. 00 




47.00 
135.00 

61.00 
667.00 


100.00 

3,241.00 

295.00 

667.00 

1,000.00 








Total 


910.00 






I 
m 

V 
VII 


(3) 
(4) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 






536,026.00 
692,091.00 


536 026. 00 




692,091.00 






46,958 20 




5, 360. 00 


144, 074. 00 


Total 


1,233.477.00 


1,438,206.06 




I 

IV 
V 


(1) 
(4) 
(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 












439 49 




80.00 


311.00 
5, 218. 33 




4, 200. 00 
20.00 


24,182.00 

1,0.36.00 

385.00 








Total .. . 


4,300.00 






IV 
V 

VII 


(1) 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(I) 
(2) 






7,628.00 


16,036.00 
1, 883. 00 






135, 000. 00 

820.00 

18, 000. 00 

231.04 

1.00 


135, 000. 00 
10, 386. 10 
62,113.00 
5, 060. 94 
3, 077. 00 


Total 


161,680.04 


233, 556. 04 




V 


(2) 






5,920.00 








60,487,701.61 


260, 510, 548. 81 







Arms-Import Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates the charac- 
ter, value, and countries of origin of the arms, 
ammunition, and implements of war licensed 
for import by the Secretary of State during 
the month of May 1941 : 



Country of origin 


Category 


Value 


Total 


Bolivia 


I (4) 

V (3) 
I (2) 

(3) 
(4) 

V (2) 

vn (1) 

(2) 

V (3) 

III (1) 

IV (1) 

V (3) 

V (3) 
VII (1) 

V (2) 

V (3) 


$32.'j, 000. 00 

1, 000. 00 
6H3. 00 

36. 960. 00 
nil. 215. 63 
420.00 
77,355.00 
6, 495. 00 
3,000.00 

m. 00 

100.00 
44.000.00 

2, 000. 00 
135,000.00 

2, 962. 00 
1,000.00 














733, 108. 63 


Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland. 


44,1.50.00 




[ 137,000.00 
2, 962. 00 










Total - - 




1, 247, 220. 63 











During the month of May, 29 import licenses 
were issued, making a total of 149 such licenses 
issued during the current year. 

Categories of Arms, Ammunition, and 
Implements or War 

The categories of arms, ammunition, and im- 
plements of war in the appropriate column of 
the tables printed above are the categories into 
which those articles were divided in the Presi- 
dent's proclamation of May 1, 1937, enumer- 
ating the articles which would be considered 
as arms, ammunition, and implements of war 
for the purposes of section 5 of the joint reso- 
lution of May 1, 1937, as follows : 

Category I 

(1) Rifles and carbines using ammunition in 
excess of caliber .22, and barrels for those 
weapons ; 



34 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



(2) Machine guns, automatic or autoloading 
rifles, and machine pistols using ammunition 
in excess of caliber .22, and barrels for those 
weapons ; 

(3) Guns, howitzers, and mortars of all cali- 
bers, their mountings and barrels; 

(4) Ammunition in excess of caliber .22 for 
the arms enumerated under (1) and (2) above, 
and cartridge cases or bullets for such ammuni- 
tion ; filled and unfilled projectiles for the arms 
enumerated under (3) above; 

(5) Grenades, bombs, torpedoes, mines and 
depth charges, filled or unfilled, and apparatus 
for their use or discharge; 

(6) Tanks, military armored vehicles, and 
armored trains. 

Category II 

Vessels of war of all kinds, including air- 
craft carriers and submarines, and armor plate 
for such vessels. 
Category III 

(1) Aircraft, unassembled, assembled, or dis- 
mantled, both heavier and lighter than air, 
which are designed, adapted, and intended for 
aerial combat by the use of machine guns or of 
artillery or for the carrying and dropping of 
bombs, or which are equipped with, or which 
by reason of design or construction are pre- 
pared for, any of the appliances referred to in 
paragraph (2) below; 

(2) Aerial gun mounts and frames, bomb 
racks, torpedo carriers, and bomb or torpedo 
release mechanisms. 

Category IV 

(1) Revolvers and automatic pistols using 
ammunition in excess of caliber .22; 

(2) Ammunition in excess of caliber .22 for 
the arms enumerated under (1) above, and 
cartridge cases or bullets for such ammunition. 
Category V 

(1) Aircraft, unassembled, assembled or dis- 
mantled, both heavier and lighter than air, 
other than those included in Category III; 

(2) Propellers or air screws, fuselages, hulls, 
wings, tail units, and under-carriage units; 

(3) Aircraft engines, unassembled, assem- 
bled, or dismantled. 



Category VI 

(1) Livens projectors and flame throwers; 

(2) a. Mustard gas (dichlorethyl sulphide) ; 

b. Lewisite (chlorvinyldichlorarsineand 

dichlordivinylchlorarsine) ; 

c. Methyldichlorarsine ; 

d. Diphenylchlorarsine ; 

e. Diphenylcyanarsine ; 

f . Diphenylaminechlorarsine ; 

g. Phenyldichlorarsine ; 
h. Ethyldichlorarsine ; 
i. Phenyldibromarsine; 
j. Ethyldibromarsine; 
k. Phosgene; 

1. Monochlormethylchlorf ormate ; 

m. Trichlormethylchlorformate(diphos- 

gene) ; 
n. Dichlordimethyl Ether; 

0. Dibromdimethyl Ether; 
p. Cyanogen Chloride; 

q. Ethylbromacetate; 

r. Ethyliodoacetate; 

s. Brombenzylcyanide ; 

t. Bromacetone; 

u. Brommethylethyl ketone. 

Category VII 

(1) Propellant powders; 

(2) High explosives as follows : 

a. Nitrocellulose having a nitrogen con- 

tent of more than 12% ; 

b. Trinitrotoluene; 

c. Trinitroxylene; 

d. Tetryl (trinitrophenol methyl nitra- 

mine or tetranitro methylaniline) ; 

e. Picric acid; 

f. Ammonium picrate; 

g. Trinitroanisol ; 

h. Trinitronaphthalene ; 
i. Tetranitronaphthalene; 
j. Hexanitrodiphenylamine ; 
k. Pentaerythritetetranitrate (Penthrite 
or Pentrite) ; 

1. Trimethylenetrinitramine (Hexogen 

or T.) ; 
m. Potassium nitrate powders (black 
saltpeter powder) ; 



JULY 12, 1941 



35 



n. Sodium nitrate powders (black soda 
powder) ; 

o. Amiitol (mixture of ammonium ni- 
trate and trinitrotoluene) ; 

p. Ammonal (mixture of ammonium ni- 
trate, trinitrotoluene, and pow- 
dered aluminum, with or without 
other ingredients) ; 

q. Schneiderite (mixture of ammonium 
nitrate and dinitronaphthalene, 
with or without other ingredients). 

Special Statistics in Eegard to Arms 
Exports to Cuba 

In compliance with article 11 of the conven- 
tion between the United States and Cuba to 
suppress smuggling, signed at Habana, March 
11, 1926, which reads in part as follows: 

"The High Contracting Parties agree that 
clearance of shipments of merchandise by 
water, air, or land, from any of the ports of 
either country to a port of entry of the other 
country, shall be denied when such shipment 
comprises articles the importation of which is 
prohibited or restricted in the country to which 
such shipment is destined, unless in this last 
case there has been a compliance with the 
requisites demanded by the laws of both 
countries." 

and in compliance with the laws of Cuba which 
restrict the importation of arms, ammunition, 
and implements of war of all kinds by requir- 
ing an import permit for each shipment, export 
licenses for shipments of arms, ammunition, 
and implements of war to Cuba are required 
for the articles enumerated below in addition 
to the articles enumerated in the President's 
proclamation of May 1, 1937: 

(1) Arms and small arms using ammunition 
of caliber .22 or less, other than those classed 
as toys. 

(2) Spare parts of arms and small arms of 
all kinds and calibers, other than those classed 
as toys, and of guns and machine guns. 



(3) Ammunition for the arms and small 
arms under (1) above. 

(4) Sabers, swords, and military machetes 
with cross-guard hilts. 

(5) Explosives as follows: explosive pow- 
ders of all kinds for all purposes; nitro cellu- 
lose having a nitrogen content of 12 percent or 
less; diphenylamine; dynamite of all kinds; 
nitroglycerine; alkaline nitrates (ammonium, 
potassium, and sodium nitrate); nitric acid; 
nitrobenzene (essence or oil of mirbane) ; sul- 
phur; sulphuric acid; chlorate of potash; and 
acetones. 

(6) Tear gas (CoBUCOCaci) and other simi- 
lar nontoxic gases and apparatus designed for 
the storage or projection of such gases. 

The table printed below indicates, in respect 
to licenses authorizing the exportation to Cuba 
of the articles and commodities listed in the 
preceding paragraph, issued by the Secretary 
of State during May 1941, the number of 
licenses and the value of the articles and com- 
modities described in the licenses: 



Number of licenses 


Section 


Value 


Total 


49 


(1) 

(2) 

(3) 

(5) 


$1,073.95 

220.83 

4,412.00 

27, 199. 84 


. 




[ $32, 906. 62 



The table printed below indicates the value 
of the articles and commodities listed above 
exported to Cuba during May 1941 under 
licenses issued by the Secretary of State : 



Section 


Value 


Total 


(1).... 


$1, 530. 95 

174, 62 

18, 130. 90 

32, 265. 66 




(2) _. _. 




(3)... 


[ $52, 102. 13 


(6). 









Tin -Plate Scrap 

During the month of May no licenses author- 
izing the exportation of tin-plate scrap were 
issued. 



36 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETES' 



HELItTM 

The table pi'inted below gives the essential 
information in regard to the licenses issued 
during the month of May 1941 authorizing the 
exportation of helium gas under the provisions 
of the act approved on September 1, 1937, and 
the regulations issued pursuant thereto: 



Applicant for license 


Purchaser in 
foreign country 


Country of 
destination 


Quan- 
tity In 
cubic feet 


Total 
value 


The Linrte Air Prod- 
ucts Co. 

The Cheney Chemi- 
cal Co. 


NeooNeonCo. 

Cheney Chem- 
icals Ltd. 


Hong Kong.. 
Canada 


0.706.... 
30 


$30 
10 



Regulations 



The following Government regulations may 
be of interest to readers of the Bullefin: 

Export Control Schedule No. 12. [Includes, ef- 
fective July 23. 1941. the forms. couTersions, and de- 
rivatives of articles and materials designated in 
Proclamation 2496, of hides and rubber (Proclama- 
tion 2413). "f vegetable fibers and manufactures 
(Proclamation 2476), and of machinery (Proclama- 
tion 2475).] Federal Register. July 8, 1941 (vol. 6. 
no. 131). pp. 3283-3284. 

Load Lines : Temporary variance for sea and Great 
Lakes eoastwi.se voyages. [Order No. 131.] July 5, 
1941. (Commerce Department: Bureau of Marine In- 
spection and Navigation.) Federal RegUter, July 8. 
1941 (vol. 6. no. 131), pp. 3295-3296. 

General Licenses Under Executive Order No. 8389. 
April 10, 1940. as Amended, and Regulations Issued 
Pursuant Thereto: 

Amendments of General Licenses No. 12. 20, 26. 
28, and 31, as amended, under Executive Order 
No. 8389. April 10, 1940. as amended, and regu- 
lations is.-ued pursuant thereto, relation to trans- 
actions in foreign exchange, etc. July 8. 1941. 
(Treasury Department.) Federal Register, July 
10. 1941 (vol. 6. no. 133), p. 3349. 

General License No. 52, under Executive Order 
No. 83S!t. April 10. 1940. as amended, and regu- 
lations issued pursuant thereto, relating to trans- 
actions in foreign exchange, etc. [licensing any 
transaeriou on behalf of Spain]. July 11, 1941. 
(Treasury Department.) Federal Register, July 
12, 1941 (vol. 6, no. 135), p. 3404. 



Amendment of General Ruling No. 4, as Amended, 
Under Executive Order No. 8389, April 10, 1940. as 
Amended, and Regulations Issued Pursuant Thereto. 
Relating to Transactions in Foreign Exchange. Etc. 
July 8. 1941. (Treasury Department.) Federal Reg- 
ister, July 10. 1941 (vol. 6. no. 133). p. 3350. 

Regulations Relating to Transactions in Foreign 
Exchange, Transfers of Credit, Payments, and the 
Export and Withdrawal of Coin, Bullion, and Cur- 
rency ; and to Reports of Foreign Property Interests 
in the United States : Public Circular No. 1, Under 
Executive Order No. 8389, April 10, 1940, as Amended, 
and Regulations Issued Pursuant Thereto, Relating to 
Transactions in Foreign Exchange. Etc. July 9, 1941. 
(Treasury Department.) Federal Register, July 11, 
1941 (vol. 6. no. 134), p. 3371. 

Canal Zone Regulations : Operation and Navigation 
of Panama Canal and Adjacent Waters (inspection 
and control of vessels in Canal Zone waters). Ap- 
proved July 8. 1941. Federal Registfr, July 12, 1941 
(vol. 6, no. 135). p. 3407. 




Department of State 

Naval Mission : Additional Article to the Agreement 
of December 12, 1940 Between the United States of 
America and Ecuador — Signed April 30, 1941. Execu- 
tive .\greemeut Series 206. Publication 1613. 3 pp. 5(*. 

Official Exchange of Professors, Teachers, and Grad- 
uate Students Under the Convention for the Promotion 
of Inter -American Cultural Relations. Inter-Anieriean 
Series 20. Publication 1612. 5 pp. 5?*. 

Conciliation: Treaty Between the United States of 
America and Liberia — Signed at Monrovia August 21, 
1939; proclaimed by the President April 4, 1941. 
Treaty Series 908. 3 pp. 54. 

Extradition : Supplementary Treaty Between the 
United States of America and Switzerland — Signed at 
Bern January 31, 1940; proclaimed by the President 
April 11, 1941. Treaty Series 969. 3 pp. 50. 

Extradition: Supplementary Treaty Between the 
United States of America and Ecuador — Signed at 
Quito September 22, 1939; proclaimed by the Presi- 
dent May 19, 1941. Treaty Series 972. 5 pp. 5^. 

Other Government Agencies 

Final Report of H. H. Martin. Acting Agent of the 
United States. Before the Mixed Claims Commission, 
United States and Germany, Established Under the 
Agreement of August 10, 1922, Between the United 



JTJLT 12, 1G41 



37 



states of America and Germany— Jurisdiction Ex- 
tended by the Agreement of December 31, 1928, 
Between the Two Governments. 1941. vlil, 129 pp. 
150. 

Trade of United States with Japan, China, Hong 
Kong, and Kwantung. International reference serv- 
ice, vol. I, no. 10. (Commerce Department: Bureau 
of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Division of Re- 
gional Information in cooperation with Division of 
Foreign Trade Statistics.) 5 pp. 50. 

Living and office-operating costs in Trinidad, British 
West Indies. International reference service, vol. I, 
no. 15. (Commerce Department: Bureau of Foreign 
and Domestic Commerce, Latin American Section of 
Division of Regional Information, based on report of 
American Consulate at Port of Spain.) 2 pp. 5<f. 

Economic conditions in Guatemala in 1940. Inter- 
national reference service, vol. I, no. 16. (Commerce 
Department : Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Com- 
merce, American Republics Unit of Division of Inter- 
national Economy, based on report of American 
Legation at Guatemala). 7 pp. 50. 

United States trade with Canada in 1940. Interna- 
tional reference service, vol. I, no. 17. (Commerce 
Department : Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Com- 
mei'ce, Divi.sion of International Economics and 
Division of Research and Statistics.) 9 pp. 50. 

Labor conditions in Latin America. Latin Amer- 
ican Series 8. (Labor Department: Bureau of Labor 
Statistics.) 22 pp. Free. 

Agricultural cooperatives in Argentina, by Juan L. 
Teuembaum. May 1941. 49 pp. (Pan American 
Union.) [Series on cooperatives no. 17.] Free. 



Foreign trade of Latin America — Report on trade 
of Latin America with special reference to trade with 
United States, under general provisions of tariff act 
of 1930: Part II, Commercial policies and trade rela- 
tions of Individual Latin American countries. Section 
19: Dominican Republic. (Tariff Commission.) viii, 
54 pp. EVee. 



Legislation 



Promoting the National Defense by Limiting the 
Entry of Certain Aliens into the United States. (H. 
Rept. 875 and Part II of H. Rept. 875 [minority 
views], 77th Cong., 1st scss., on H.R. 4873.) 3 pp. 
each. 

United States Forces in Iceland : Message From 
the President of the United States Transmitting a 
Message Received From the Prime Minister of Iceland 
and the Reply of the President, Relating to Use of 
United States Forces in Iceland. (H. Doc. 307, 77th 
Cong., 1st sess. ) 5 pp. 

Relief of Certain Basque Aliens. ( S. Rept. 518, 77th 
Cong., 1st sess., on S. 314.) 2 pp. 

Second Deficiency Appropriation Act, 1941 : An Act 
Making appropriations to supply defieiencies in cer- 
tain appropriations for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1941, and for prior fiscal years, to provide supple- 
mental appropriations for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1942, and for other purposes. [H.R. 5166.] (Pub- 
lic Law 150, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) Approved July 3, 
1941. [Department of State, pp. 23, 34, 38, 40.] 41 pp. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PCBLI8HBD WEEKLY WITH THD APPROVAL OF THE DIEECTOE OF THE BDBEAU OF THE BDDQEiT 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BUL 



J 



H 



1 r 

J 



TIN 



JULY 19, 1941 
Vol. V, No. 108— Publication 1625 



G 



ontents 




General page 

The proclaimed list of certain blocked nationals ... 41 

Control of exports in national defense 43 

Analysis of State Department appropriations for the 

fiscal year 1942 44 

American Republics 

Export licensing and priorities matters: Statements by 

Sumner Welles .'54 

Presentation of letters of credence by the Minister of 

Haiti 58 

Europe 

Closing of German and Italian Consulates in the United 

States 59 

The Near East 

Safety of Americans in Syria and Lebanon 65 

Cultural Relations 

Reduced postage rates on books to the other American 

republics 66 

Professors from the United States to teach at National 

University of Panama 67 

Regulations 67 

Treaty Information 

Military Mission: Detail of a United States Militaiy 

Mission to Costa Rica 67 

The Foreign Service 

Foreign Service regulations 68 

Legislation 68 

Publications 68 



=wi Liiiiiiu'lOENT OF DOCUMENTS 

AUCi 7 1941 



General 



THE PROCLAIMED LIST OF CERTAIN BLOCKED NATIONALS 



[Released to the press July 17] 

As a further step in view of the unlimited na- 
tional eniergenc}- declared by the President, he 
has today issued a proclamation authorizing 
the promulgation of a list of persons which 
will be known as "The Proclaimed List of Cer- 
tain Blocked Nationals". The list will consist 
of certain persons deemed to be acting for the 
benefit of Germany or Italy or nationals of 
those countries and persons to whom the ex- 
portation, directly or indirectly, of various 
articles or materials is deemed to be detrimental 
to the interest of national defense. The list 
will be prepared by the Secretary of State act- 
ing in conjunction with the Secretary of the 
Treasury, the Attorney General, the Secretary 
of Commerce, the Administrator of Export 
Control, and the Coordinator of Commercial 
and Cultural Relations between the American 
Republics. 

Simultaneously with the issuance of the 
proclamation, a proclaimed list was issued by 
the designated Government officials containing 
the names of more than 1,800 persons and busi- 
ness institutions in the other American repub- 
lics. This list is the result of long and inten- 
sive investigations and studies by the interested 
governmental agencies. The list will be jDub- 
lished in the Federal Register'^ and may be 
obtained in pamphlet form from various gov- 
ernmental institutions and the Federal Reserve 
banks. From time to time there will be addi- 
tions to and deletions from the list, which will 



be made public. The President gave warning 
that anyone serving as a cloak for a person on 
the list will have his name added forthwith to 
the list. 

The list will have two principal functions. 
In the first place, no article covered by the Ex- 
port Control Act of July 2, 1940 may be ex- 
ported to persons named in the list except under 
special circumstances. Secondly, persons on 
the list will be treated as though they were na- 
tionals of Germany or Italy within the meaning 
of Executive Order 8389, as amended, under 
which, on June 14, 1941, the freezing control 
was extended to all of the countries of the con- 
tinent of Europe and nationals thereof.^ 

At the time of the issuance of the proclama- 
tion, it was also announced that in attaining 
the objectives of Executive Order 8389, as 
amended, all efforts are being made to cause the 
least possible interference with legitimate inter- 
American trade. With that end in view the 
Treasury Department has issued a general 
license with respect to inter-American trade 
transactions and the financial transactions inci- 
dental thereto involving persons in the other 
American republics who may be nationals of a 
European country designated in the order. 
This general license will permit such classes 
of transactions without the necessity of apply- 
ing for specific licenses. 

The general license, however, will not apply 
to persons so long as their names apjiear on the 
proclaimed list. In addition, exporters and 



^Federal Register of July 19, 1941 (vol. 6, no. 140), 
pp. 355T-3573. 

402631—41 1 



'See Bulletin of June 14, 1941 (vol. iv, no. 103), 
p. 718. 

41 



42 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETrN 



importers in the United States may from time 
to time be advised by their banks, or otherwise, 
that instruct ions have been issued by the Secre- 
tary of the Treasury requiring specific'-license 
applications for trade transactions involving 
certain persons in the other American republics 
who are not named on the proclaimed list. 

Furthermore, financial transactions which are 
not incidental to licensed trade transactions are 
not covered by the general license. With respect 
to such purely financial transactions, appropri- 
ate specific licenses will have to be obtained 
from the Treasury Department. 

The proclaimed list will also serve as a guide 
to United States firms in the selection of agents 
and representatives in the other American 
republics. 

The text of the proclamation follows: 

AUTHORIZIXG A PrOCL-MMED LiST OF CeBTAIN 

Blocked N.\tionals and Controixing Cer- 
tain Exports 

by the presroent of the united states of 

AMERICA 

A Proclamation 

I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, President of the 
United States of America, acting under and by 
virtue of the authority vested in me by Section 
5 (b) of the Act of October 6, 1917 "(40 Stat. 
415) as amended and Section 6 of the Act of 
July 2, 1940 (54 Stat. 714) as amended and 
by virtue of all other authority vested in me, 
and by virtue of the existence of a period of 
unlimited national emei-gency and finding that 
this Proclamation is necessary in the interest of 
national defense, do hereby order and proclaim 
the following: 

Section 1. The Secretary of State, acting in 
conjunction with the Secretary of the Treasury, 
the Attorney General, the Secretary of Com- 
merce, the Administrator of Export Control, 
and the Coordinator of Commercial and Cul- 
tural Relations Between the American Re- 
publics, shall from time to time cause to be 
prepared an appropriate list of 



(a) certain persons deemed to be, or to 
have been acting or purporting to act, di- 
rectly or indirectly, for the benefit of, or 
under the direction of, or under the juris- 
diction of, or on behalf of, or in collabora- 
tion with Germany or Italy or a national 
thereof; and 

(b) certain persons to whom, or on whose 
behalf, or for whose account, the exporta- 
tion directly or indirectly of any article or 
material exported from the United States, 
is deemed to be detrimental to the interest 
of national defense. 

In similar manner and in the interest of na- 
tional defense, additions to and deletions from 
such list shall be made from time to time. Such 
list and any additions thereto or deletions there- 
from shall be filed pursuant to the provisions of 
the Federal Register Act and such list shall be 
known as "The Proclaimed List of Certain 
Blocked Nationals". 

Section 2. Any person, so long as his name 
appears in such list, shall, for the purpose of 
Section 5 (b) of the Act of October 6, 1917, as 
amended, and for the purpose of this Procla- 
mation, be deemed to be a national of a foreign 
country, and shall be treated for all purposes 
under Executive Order No. 8389, as amended, as 
though he were a national of Germany or Italy. 
All the terms and provisions of Executive Order 
No. 8389, as amended, shall be applicable to 
any such person so long as his name appears in 
such list, and to any property in which any such 
person has or has had an interest, to the same 
extent that such terms and provisions are appli- 
cable to nationals of Germany or Italy, and to 
property in which nationals of Germany or 
Italy have or have had an interest. 

Section 3. The exportation from the United 
States directly or indirectly to, or on behalf 
of, or for the account of any person, so long as 
his name appears on such list, of any article or 
material the exportation of which is prohibited 
or curtailed by any proclamation heretofore or 
hereafter issued under the authority of Section 
6 of the Act of July 2, 1940, as amended, or of 
any other military equipment or munitions, or 



JULY 19, 1941 



43 



component parts thereof, or machinery, tools, 
or material, or supplies necessary for the manu- 
facture, servicing, or operation thereof, is 
hereby prohibited under Section 6 of the Act 
of July 2, 1940, as amended, except (1) when 
authorized in each case by a license as provided 
for in Proclamation No. 2413 of July 2, 1940, 
or in Proclamation No. 2465 of March 4, 1941, 
as the case may be, and (2) when the Adminis- 
trator of Export Control under my direction 
has determined that such prohibition of expor- 
tation would work an unusual hardship on 
American interests. 

Section 4. The tei-m "person" as used herein 
means an individual, partnership, association, 
corporation or other organization. 

The term "United States" as used herein 
means the United States and any place subject 
to the jurisdiction thereof, including the Philip- 
pine Islands, the Canal Zone, and the District 
of Columbia and any other territory, depend- 
ency or possession of the United States. 

Section 5. Nothing herein contained shall be 
deemed in any manner to limit or restrict the 
provisions of the said Executive Order No. 8389, 
as amended, or the authority vested thereby in 
the Secretary of the Treasury and the Attorney 
General. So far as the said Executive Order 
No. 8389, as amended, is concerned, "The Pro- 
claimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals", 
authorized by this Proclamation, is merely a 
list of certain persons with respect to whom and 
with respect to whose property interests the 
public is specifically put on notice that the pro- 
visions of such Executive Order are applicable ; 
and the fact that any person is not named in 
such list shall in no wise be deemed to mean 
that such person is not a national of a foreign 
country designated in such order, within the 
meaning thereof, or to affect in any manner the 
application of such order to such person or to 
the property interests of such person. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set 
my hand and caused the seal of the United 
States of America to be affixed. 



Done at the city of Washington this 

17th day of July, in the year of our Lord 

nineteen hundred and forty-one, 

[seal] and of the Independence of the 

United States of America the one 

hundred and sixty-sixth. 

Franklin D Roosevei/t 
By the President: 
Sumner Welles 

Acting Secretmy of State 

CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL 
DEFENSE 

[Released to the press July 15] 

General Licenses 

The Secretary of State announced on July 
15 the issuance of general licenses, in accord- 
ance with the provisions of the Executive order 
of March 15, 1941, authorizing the exportation 
of camelback to various destinations as follows : 



Country of destination 



Canada 

Great Britain and Northern Ireland . 

Cuba 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Costa Rica 

Curagao 

Dominican Republic 

Ecuador 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Haiti 

Honduras 

Mexico 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Surinam 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

Australia 



QATA I 
GATA2 
QATA 3 
0ATA4 
OATA5 
GATA6 
QATA 7 
QATA 8 
QATA 9 
QATA 10 
QATA 11 
QATA 12 
QATA 13 
QATA 14 
QATA 15 
QATA 16 
QATA 17 
QATA IS 
QATA 19 
QATA 20 
QATA 21 
QATA 22 
QATA 33 
QATA 24 
QATA 26 



44 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Country of destination 


General 
license no. 




GATA 27 




DATA 28 




GATA 29 




GATA 47 




GATA 48 




GATA 51 




GATA 57 


Egypt 


GATA 59 




GATA 61 




GATA 62 




GATA 63 







Collectors of customs have been authorized 
to permit, without the requirement of indi- 
vidual license, the exportation of camelback to 
the destinations listed above, but the exporter 
is required to indicate the appropriate genei'al 
license number on the shipper's Export Decla- 
ration filed with the collector. 

Collectors of customs were informed on July 
12 that general licenses for exports destined 
for the Philijjpine Islands have been amended 
as follows: No. GCK 63 has been amended to 
read "belting leather" rather than "leather 
belting" and No. GCJ 63 has been amended to 
read "sole leather" rather than "leather soles". 

Collectors were also informed on that date 
that no license is required for the exportation 
of "Drano" and "Windex". 

T^XLiMiTED Licenses 

Collectors of customs were informed on July 
12 that additional unlimited licenses have been 



issued to the British Purchasing Commission 
authorizing exportation to the various parts of 
the British Empire of the products in the fol- 
lowing list. Collectors were authorized to ac- 
cept shipments against these licenses without 
presentation of the license form. 

To Hong Kong, Oceania, and New Guinea (British) : 
zinc pigments, including zinc oxide, leaded zinc oxide, 
zinc sulfide, and lithopone ; titanium pigments, in- 
cluding titanium dioxide; non-proprietary and pro- 
prietary preparations containing quinine ; clirome 
pigments containing 10 percent or more chromium, 
including chromic oxide (chrome green), head chro- 
mate (chrome yellow), and zinc ehromate; and cad- 
mium pigments, including cadmium sulfide and cad- 
mium lithopone. 

To British East Africa, British Malaya, British West 
Africa. Cyprus, Falkland Islands, and St. Helena : 
iron and steel tanks. 

To Aden, Anglo-Egyptian Sudan, Australia, Bahamas, 
Barbados, Bermuda. British East Africa, British 
Guiana, British Honduras, British Malaya, Briti.sh 
West Africa, Burma, Ceylon, Cypnis, Egypt. Falk- 
land Islands, Gibraltar, Hong Kong, India, Ireland. 
Jamaica, Leeward Islands, Mauritius, Newfound- 
land, New Guinea (British), New Zealand, Northern 
Rhodesia, Oceania (British), Palestine and Trans- 
Jordan, St. Helena, Seychelles and dependencies. 
Southern Rhodesia, Trinidad and Tobago, Union of 
South Africa, and the Windward Islands : vegetable- 
oil seeds ; piue oil ; vegetable and other oil-bearing 
raw materials; and rosin. 

To Aden, Anglo-Egyptian Sudan, British East Africa, 
British Guiiina, British Honduras, British Malaya, 
British West Africa, Burma, Ceylon. Cyprus, Falk- 
land Islands. Gibraltar, Hong Kong, India, Ireland 
(Eire), Jamaica, Leeward Islands, Mani'itius, New 
Guinea (British), Northern Rhodesia, Oceania (Brit- 
ish), St. Helena, Seychelles and dependencies. South- 
ern Rhodesia, Trinidad and Tobago, and the Wind- 
ward Islands : camelback. 



ANALYSIS OF STATE DEPARTMENT APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE FISCAL 

YEAR 1942 



The first of the following tables shows the 
increases and decreases in the State Depart- 
ment's appropriations for the 1942 fiscal year 
as compared with the 1941 fiscal year. The 
second table shows increases and decreases 



■made by Congress in the 1942 budget estimates 
submitted by the President. 

The Department's appropriation bill for 1942 
was approved by the President on June 28, 
1941 (Public Law 135). 



JULY 19, 1941 



45 



RECAPITULATION OF TABLE NO. I 
Department of State Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1942 Compared With 1941 



Appropriation title 


Appropriations 
tor 1942 


Appropriations 
for 1941 


Increases (+), de- 
creases (-) for 1942 


Reasons for increases or decreases 


Department Proper 


$3, 318, 440 


$3, 272, 580 


+ $45,860 




Foreign Service (exclusive of 


13, 681, 900 


13, 559, 500 


+ 122,400 


See attached statement of details. 


Emergency Fund). 










Emergency Fund 


500, 000 


1, 225, 000 


-72.5,000 


General decrease. 


Foreign Service Buildings 


450, 000 


300, 000 


+ 150,000 


General increase. 


International Obligations 


3, 548, 900 


3, 733, 000 


-184, 100 


See attached statement of details. 


Grand Total 


21, 499, 240 


22, 090, 080 


-590,840 


The 1941 column includes supplemental 
appropriations totaling $1,968,500 
which were made available before 
submission of the 1942 budget to 
Congress, most of which were for 
emergencies for which funds are not 
provided in the regular budget. The 
1942 column includes, therefore, only 
regular annual appropriations, and 
funds for emergencies for 1942 will 
again be requested as supplemental 
appropriations. 


Deduct appropriations in- 




-1, 968, 500 


+ 1, 968, 500 




cluded above in 1941 col- 










umn which were provided 










in supplemental appro- 










priation acts. 










Total of appropria- 


21, 499, 240 


20, 121, 580 


+ 1,377,660 




tions contained in 










ANNUAL appropria- 










tion ACTS. 











TABLE NO. I 
Department of State Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1942 Compared With 1941 



Appropriation title 


Appropriations 
for 1942 


Appropriations 
tor 1941 


Increases (+), de- 
creases (-) for 1942 


Reasons tor increases or decreases 


Department Proper 










Salaries, Department of 










State: 










Regular - 


$2, 724, 440 


$2, 660, 480 


+ $63, 960 


The increase allowed for regular salaries 


Emergency .. 




135, 200 


-135,200 


is for 33 additional permanent posi- 










tions. 










The 1941 column includes supplemental 










appropriations for emergency posi- 










tions for which funds are not pro- 










vided in the regular budget. 










The 1942 column includes therefore only 










regular positions, and funds for emer- 










gency positions for 1942 will again be 










requested as supplemental appropria- 










tions. 



46 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BTTLLETIN 



TABLE NO. I— Continued 
Depabtment of State Appkopeiations foe Fiscal Tear 1942 Compabed With 1941 — Continued 



Appropriation title 



Reasons (or increases or decreases 



Department Proper — Con. 
National Defense Activi- 
ties (Export Licensing). 



$150,000 



+ $150,000 



Contingent Expenses, De- 
partment of State. 



166,600 



$157, 400 



+ 9,200 



Printing and Binding, De- 
partment of State. 



210, 900 



-26, 100 



Passport Agencies, De- 
partment of State. 



Collecting and Editing 
Official Papers of the 
Territories of the United 
States. 

Total Department 
Proper. 

Foreign Service 

Salaries of Ambassadors 
and Ministers. 



52, 500 



14, 000 



-5,000 



3, 318, 440 



3, 272, 580 



635, 000 



660, 000 



+ 45,860 



-25,000 



For the fiscal year 1941 allocations 
totaling $88,000 were made for this 
work from the emergency fund for 
the President. The project was be- 
gun in 1941 and did not require 
salaries on a full annual basis. The 
increase of $62,000 in the appropria- 
tion for 1942 over funds available for 
1941 will provide funds more nearly 
on a full annual basis. 

Increases were allowed of $6,750 for an 
educational motion-picture program; 
$300 for newspapers; $1,000 for tele- 
phone service; $5,000 for travel; 
$1,050 for motor vehicles; $600 for 
books, maps, and periodicals; and 
$3,000 for expenses of the Committee 
on Reciprocity Information. These 
increases are offset by non-recurring 
items of $8,500 contained in the 1941 
appropriation and not repeated for 
1942. 

Increases were allowed of $2,200 for 
acta, congressional documents, etc.; 
$700 for cultural-relations pamphlets; 
$450 for envelopes; $1,100 for forms; 
$1,000 for letterheads; and $450 for 
printing for the Committee on Reci- 
procity Information. These increases 
were offset by non-recurring items 
of .$32,000 contained in the 1941 
appropriation and not repeated for 
1942. 

This decrease was based on the assump- 
tion that temporary employees re- 
quired at these Agencies during rush 
periods in normal years would prob- 
ably not be required in 1942. 

The reduction of $11,000 is in the item 
for printing. 



The reduction of $25,000 was made on 
the assumption that salary lapses 
resulting from unfilled positions would 
be considerably higher than in nor- 
mal years. 



JULY 19, 194 1 



47 



TABLE NO. I— Continued 
Department of State Appropriations for Fiscal Th:ab 1942 Compared With 1941 — Continued 



Appropriation title 


Appropriations 
for 1942 


Appropriations 
for 1941 


Increases (+), de- 
creases (-) for 1942 


Reasons for increases or decreases 


Foreign Service — Con. 










Salaries of Foreign Service 


$4, 232, 600 


$4, 160, 000 


-1- $66, 600 


The increase is to provide for automatic 


Officers. 








promotions. 


Transportation, Foreign 


717, 200 


723, 000 


-5, 800 


Increases were allowed of $10,000 for 


Service. 








temporary details; and $2,000 for 
regional conferences. These increases 
are offset by a non-recurring item of 
$17,800 for transfers of ambassadors 
and ministers which were provided 
for 1941 on the basis of an inaugural 
year and are estimated for 1942 on 
the normal average requirements of 
a non-inaugural year. 


Office and Living Quar- 


2, 138,000 


2, 153,000 


-15,000 


The reduction of $15,000 was made on 


ters, Foreign Service. 








the basLs of estimated requirements. 


Cost of Living Allow- 


338, 500 


338, 500 




No change. 


ances, Foreign Service. 








Representation Allow- 


163, 000 


150, 000 


-M3, 000 


The increase of $13,000 was provided to 


ances, Foreign Service. 








permit certain increases in the allow- 
ances to officers who are required to 
incur this expense. 


Foreign Service Retire- 


621, 700 


609, 000 


-1-12, 700 


This increase is required pursuant to 


ment and Disability 








the computation by the actuary of 


Fund. 








the Treasury in accordance with 
existing law. 


Salaries, Foreign Service 


2, 867, 000 


2, 837, 000 


-1-30, 000 


This increase was provided to allow 


Clerks. 








administrative promotions within 
wage scales for alien clerks. 


Miscellaneous Salaries and 


730, 000 


097, 000 


4-33, 000 


Increases were allowed of $9,000 for 


Allowances, Foreign 








promotions; and $24,000 for 8 cour- 


Service. 








iers at $3,000 per annum each. 


Contingent Expenses, For- 


1, 238, 900 


1, 226, 000 


-1- 12, 900 


Increases were allowed of $55,000 for 


eign Service. 








travel expenses in connection with ex- 
tended courier service and $5,000 for 
transfer to the Navy Department for 
radio broadcasts. These increases 
are offset by non-recurring items of 
$47,100 contained in the 1941 appro- 
priation and not repeated for 1942. 


Total Foreign Serv- 


13, 681, 900 


13, 559, 500 


+ 122, 400 




ice (Exclusive of 










Emergency Fond). 










Emergencies Arising in 


500, 000 


1, 225, 000 


-725,000 


Appropriation for 1941 includes funds 


the Diplomatic and Con- 








appropriated for specific emergencies, 


sular Service. 








and if such funds are required for 1942 
supplemental appropriations will be 
provided. 



402631 — 41- 



48 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



TABLE NO. I— Continued 
Depaetment of State Appeopbiations fob Fiscal Tbiae 1942 Compabed With 1941 — Continued 



Appropriation title 


Appropriations 
tor 1942 


Appropriations 
(or 1941 


Increases (+) , de- 
creases (-) tor 1942 


Reasons for increases or decreases 


Foreign Service Buildings 


$450, 000 


$300, 000 


4-$150, 000 


General increase. 


Fund. 










International Obliga- 










tions. 










United States Contribu- 


1, 026, 600 


1, 083, 000 


-56,400 


This decrease results fi;om the following: 


tions to International 








An increase of $3,139 is provided for 


Commissions, Con- 








the Inter-American Radio OfBce at 


gresses, and Bureaus. 








Habana. A decrease of $10,783 is 
made in the International Labor Or- 
ganization, of which $8,783 is in the 
quota and $2,000 in the expenses. 
No funds were appropriated for 1942 
for the International Institute of 
Agriculture, resulting in a reduction 
of $48,756. 


Convention for Promotion 


100, 000 


94, 500 


+ 5, 500 


A general increase to provide for in- 


of Inter-American Cul- 








creased salaries to professors when 


tural Relations. 








that is found to be necessary. 


International Boundary 


200, 000 


198, 000 


-1-2,000 


The increase is required for additional 


Commission, United 








expenses necessitated by the regular 


States and Mexico (Reg- 








Commission in connection with the 


ular Commission) . 








operation and maintenance of com- 
pleted construction projects. 


Rio Grande Rectification 








1939 appropriation was continued avail- 


Project. 








able for 1940, 1941, and 1942. No 
new funds appropriated. 


Lower Rio Grande Flood 


950, 000 


950, 000 




No change. 


Control Project. 










Rio Grande Canalization 


440, 000 


810, 000 


-370,000 


General decrease in construction work. 


Project. 










Cordova Island Boundary 


6, 500 




-t-6, 500 


New project. 


Fence. 










Fence Construction, Inter- 


25, 000 




+ 25,000 


New project. 


national Boundary. 






International Boundary 


43, 000 


43, 000 




No change. 


Commission, United 










States and Canada and 










Alaska and Canada. 










Salaries and Expenses, In- 


27, 000 


27, 000 




No change. 


ternational Joint Com- 










mission, United States 










and Great Britain. 










Special and Technical 


48, 500 


48, 500 




No change. 


Investigations, Inter- 










national Joint Commis- 










sion, United States and 










Great Britain. 










International Fisheries 


28, 000 


28, 000 




No change. 


Commission. 










Pacific Salmon Fisheries 


40, 000 


35, 000 


+ 5,000 


Increase provided for more extensive 


Commission. 








studies and operations. 


Arbitration of Claim Be- 


14, 000 




+ 14, 000 


Treaty obligation to be undertaken. 


tween the United States 








and the Netherlands. 











JULY 19, 1941 

TABLE NO. I— Continued 
Department op State Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1942 Compared With 1941 — Continued 



49 



Appropriation title 


Appropriations 
for 1942 


Appropriations 
for 1941 


Increases (+), de- 
creases (-) for 1942 


Reasons for increases or decreases 


International Obliga- 










tions — Continued. 










Mixed Claims Commis- 




$15, 500 


— $15, 500 


Non-recurring. 


sion, United States and 








Germany. 










Agrarian Claims Commis- 




15, 000 


— 15, 000 


Non-recurring. 


sion, United States and 








Mexico. 










Meeting of Treasury 




3, 000 


- 3, 000 


Non-recurring. 


Representatives, Quito, 








Ecuador. 










Alaskan International 




12, 000 


-12,000 


Non-recurrino^. 


Highway Commission. 






Cooperation with the 










American Republics: 










State Department — 










Selection, translation. 


$70, 000 


40, 000 


+ 30, 000 


More extensive program. 


and dissemination 










of Government 










publications to the 










other American 










Republics. 










Preparation of an 


7,000 




-1- 7, 000 


New project. 


American bound- 








ary document. 










Division of Cultural 










Relations: 










Travel of advisory 


10, 000 


12,000 


-2,000 


General decrease. 


committees. 










Travel grants for 


45, 000 


30, 000 


+ 15,000 


More extensive program. 


educational, pro- 










fessional, cultur- 










al, and artistic 










leaders of the 










United States and 










other American 










Republics. 










Travel grants for 


40, 000 


12,000 


-f 28, 000 


More extensive program. 


students from 










the other Ameri- 










can Republics 










who have re- 










ceived scholar- 










ships from edu- 










cational institu- 










tions in the 










United States. 










Visiting professors 


32, 000 


15, 000 


+ 17,000 


More extensive program. 


and speciahsts to 










be loaned upon 










invitation to other 










countries. 











50 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



TABLE NO. I— Continued 
Department op State Appropriations fob Fiscal Year 1942 Compared With 1941 — Continued 



Appropriation title 


Appropriations 
for 1942 


Appropriations 
for 194 1 


Increases (+), de- 
creases (-) for 1942 


Beasons for increases or decreases 


International Obliga- 










tions — Continued. 










Loan of Govern- 


$25, 000 


$25, 000 




No change. 


ment experts and 








technicians to 










governments of 










other American 










Republics. 










Total State Depart- 
ment. 


229, 000 


134, 000 


+ $95,000 




Other Department s — 










Department of Agri- 


50, 000 




+ 50, 000 


New project. 


culture. 








Department of Com- 










merce: 










Civil Aeronautics 


10, 000 




+ 10,000 


New project. 


Board. 








Administrator of 










Civil Aero- 










nautics: 










Standard meteor- 




2,500 


— 2, 500 


Non-recurring. 


ological serv- 








ices. 










Civilian Pilot 


15,000 


20, 000 


-.5,000 


General decrease. 


Training. 










Coast and Geodetic 










Survey: 










Tidal Investiga- 


13, 000 


10, 000 


+ 3,000 


More extensive program. 


tions. 










Magnetic obser- 


10, 000 




+ 10, 000 


New project. 


vations. 








Gravity surveys. - 


9,000 


9,000 




No change. 


Revision of Hy- 




5, 000 


— 5, 000 


Non-recurring. 


drographic 








Manual. 










Weather Bureau 


15,000 




+ 15, 000 


New project. 


Federal Security 








Agency: 










Public Health Ser- 


40, 000 


45, 000 


—5, 000 


General decrease. 


vice. 










Office of Education, 


12, 500 


10, 000 


+ 2,500 


More extensive program. 


Interior Department: 










Fish and Wildlife 


15, 300 


15,000 


+ 300 


More extensive program. 


Service. 










Geological Survey.^ 


50, 000 


25, 000 


+ 2.5,000 


More extensive program. 


Travel Bureau 


25, 000 


12, 500 


+ 12,500 


More extensive program. 


Travel Bureau 




18, 000 


-18,000 


Non-recurring. 


(Travel brochure 






and information 










booklet). 











JXTLY 19, 1941 



Department of State 



51 



TABLE NO. I— Continued 
Appropriations fob Fiscal, Year 1942 Compared With 1941— Continued 



Appropriation title 


Appropriations 
for 1942 


Appropriations 
for 1041 


Increases (+), de- 
creases (- ) for 1942 


Reasons for increases or decreases 


Other Departments — Con. 










Labor Department: 










Children's Bureau. 


$15, 000 


.$7, 500 


+ 7,500 


More extensive program. 


Women's Bureau 




5,000 


-5,000 


Discontinued. 


Library of Congress: 






Hispanic Founda- 


3,500 


5,500 


-2,000 


General decrease. 


tion. 










Division of Music: 










Bibliograpliy 


3,900 


3,000 


+ 900 


More extensive program. 


Recordings 


9, 500 




+ 9, 500 


New project. 

More extensive program. 


Division of Docu- 


5, 100 


3,400 


+ 1,700 


ments. 










Law Library 


7,000 


6,600 


+ 400 


More extensive program. 


Office of Librarian 


6, 000 




+ 6, 000 


New project. 


(Duplication of 








Materials). 










Smithsonian Institu- 










tion: 










Cooperation in con- 


39, 000 


19, 500 


+ 19,500 


More extensive program. 


nection with the 










preservation of 










flora and fauna 










of other Ameri- 










can Republics. 










Increased coopera- 


5,000 


2,500 


+ 2,500 


More extensive program. 


tion with scien- 










tific museums in 










other American 










Republics. 










Sending interna- 


500 


500 




No change. 


tional exchanges 






to Argentina and 










Brazil by mail 










instead of freight. 










Preparation of 


12, 000 


6,000 


+ 6,000 


Intensification of program. 


handbook of 










South American 










Indians. 










United States Tariff 




5,000 


-5,000 


Discontinued. 


Commission, 






Total, Cooperation 


600, 300 


370, 500 


+ 229,800 




With the American 










Republics. 










Total International 


3, 548, 900 


3, 733, 000 


- 184, 100 




Obligations. 











52 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



TABLE NO. I— Continned 
Department of State Appeopbiations for Fiscal Yeab 1942 Compabed With 1941 — Continued 



Appropriation title 


Appropriations 
for 1942 


Appropriations 
for 1941 


Increases (+), Ae- 
creases (-) for 1942 


Reasons for increases or decreases 


Grand Total.. 


$21, 499, 240 


$22, 090, 080 
-1,968,500 


-590,840 
+ 1, 968, 500 


The 1941 column includes supplemental 
appropriations totaling $1,968,500 
which were made available before 
submission of the 1942 budget to 
Congress, most of which were for 
emergencies for which funds are not 
provided in the regular budget. The 
1942 column includes, therefore, only 
regular annual appropriations, and 
funds for emergencies for 1942 will 
again be requested as supplemental 
appropriations. 


Deduct appropriations in- 


cluded above in 1941 col- 
umn which were provided 
in supplemental appropria- 
tion acts. 






Total of appropria- 
tions Contained in 
Annual Appropria- 
tion Acts. 


21, 499, 240 


20, 121, 580 


-1-1,377,660 





Appropriation for Foreign Service Pat Adjustment 
(Contained in Independent Offices Appropriation Bill) 



Appropriation title 


Appropriation 
for 1942 


Appropriation 
for 1941 


Increase (-(-), de- 
crease (-) tor 1942 


Reasons for increase or decrease 


Foreign Service Pay Adjust- 
ment. 


$975, 000 


$1, 280, 000 


-$305,000 


General decrease. 



TABLE NO. I— PART 2 

Department of State Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1942 Compared With 1941 

(Supplemental and Deficiency Appropriations Made Subsequent to the Submission of the 1942 Budget) 



Appropriation title 



Department Proper 

Salaries, Department of State 

Contingent Expenses, Department of State- 
Printing and Binding, Department of Stat€- 

ToTAL, Department Proper 



$300, 000 



$36, 000 

102, 500 

10, 000 



154, 500 



JULY 19, 1941 



53 



TABLE NO. I— PART 2— Continued 

Department of State Appropriations for Fiscal Yeah 1942 Compared With 1941 — Coutinued 

(Supplemental and Deficiency Appropriations Made Subsequent to the Submission of the 1942 Budget) — Continued 



Appropriation title 



Foreign Service 

Transportation, Foreign Service 

Salaries, Foreign Service Clerks 

Miscellaneous Salaries and Allowances, Foreign Service. 
Contingent Expenses, Foreign Service 



Total, Foreign Service. 



International Obligations 

International Joint Commission — Salaries and Expenses. 
Mixed Claims Commission, United States and Germany. 
Eighth Pan American Child Congress 



Total, International Obligations. 



Grand Total of Sdpplementals and Deficiencies. 



$300, 000 



$330, 000 

94, 000 

18, 000 

785, 000 



1, 227, 000 



2,000 
9,500 
9,000 



20, 500 



1, 402, 000 



TABLE NO. II 

Department of State — Fiscal Year 1942 



Appropriation title 



Approved by 

President for 

submission to 

Congress 



Appropriation 

approved by 

Congress 



Increase (+) 
Decrease (— ) 



Department op State; 

Salaries, Department of State 

National Defense Activities 

Contingent Expenses, Department of State 

Printing and Binding, Department of State 

Passport Agencies, Department of State 

Collecting and Editing Official Papers of the Territories of the United 
States ,:• 

Total, Department of State 

Foreign Service: 

Salaries, Ambassadors and Ministers 

Salaries, Foreign Service Officers 

Transportation, Foreign Service 

Office and Living Quarters, Foreign Service 

Cost of Living Allowances, Foreign Service 

Representation Allowances, Foreign Service 

Foreign Service Retirement and Disability Fund 

Salaries, Foreign Service Clerks 

Miscellaneous Salaries and Allowances, Foreign Service 

Contingent Expenses, Foreign Service 

Emergencies Arising in the Diplomatic and Consular Service . 

Total, Foreign Service 

FoBBiQN Service Bdildingb Fund 



$2, 728, 300 

156, 000 

170, 100 

210, 900 

57, 500 

20, 000 



.'F2, 724, 440 

150, 000 

166, 600 

210, 900 

52, 500 

14, 000 



-$3, 860 
-6,000 
-3, 500 



3, 342, 800 



3, 318, 440 



-5,000 
- 6, 000 
-24,360 



660, 000 
4, 232, 600 

717, 200 
2, 153, 000 

338, 500 

170, 000 

621, 700 
2, 867, 000 

730, 000 
1, 238, 000 

500, 000 



635, 000 
4, 232, 600 

717, 200 
2, 138, 000 

338, 500 

163,000 

621, 700 
2, 867, 000 

730, 000 
1,238,900 

500, 000 



-25,000 



-15,000 
-7,000 



14, 228, 900 



14, 181, 900 



-47, 000 



500, 000 



450, 000 



-50.000 



54 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



TABLE NO. II— Continued 
Depabtment 01' State — Fiscal Yeab 1042 — Continued 



Appropriation title 



Approved by 

President for 

submission to 

Congress 



Increase (.+) 
Decrease (— ) 



International Obligations: 

Contributions, Quotas, etc 

Convention for tlie Promotion of Inter-American Cultural Relations. - 
Mexican Boundary Commission — 

Regular Commission 

Lower Rio Grande Flood Control 

Rio Grande Canalization 

Fence Construction on the Cordova Island Boundarj', Texas 

Fence Construction on the International Boundary 

International Boundary Commission, United States and Canada and 

Alaska and Canada 

International Joint Commission, United States and Great Britain — 

Salaries and Expenses 

Special and Technical Investigations 

International Fisheries Commission 

International Pacific Salmon Fisheries Commission 

Arbitration of Claim between the United States and the Netherlands. 
Cooperation with the American Republics 



$1, 077, 367 
111, 500 

206, 200 

950, 000 

490, 900 

6,500 



43, 000 

27, 000 
48, 500 

28, 000 
40, 000 
15, 000 

706, 800 



51, 026, 600 
100, 000 

200, 000 

950, 000 

440, 000 

6, 500 

25, 000 

43, 000 

27, 000 
48, 500 

28, 000 
40, 000 
14, 000 

600, 300 



Total, International Obligations. 



3, 750, 767 



3, 548, 900 



Grand Total. 



21, 822, 467 



21, 499, 240 



-$50, 767 
-11,500 

-6,200 



- 50, 900 
+ 25,000 



- 1, 000 
■ 106, 500 



-201, 867 



-323,227 



American Republics 



EXPORT LICENSING AND PRIORITIES MATTERS 

STATEMENTS BY SUMNER WELLES 



On July 19, 1941 Mr. Sumner Welles, Chair- 
man of the Inter-American Financial and 
Economic Advisory Committee, made a state- 
ment to the Committee with reference to or- 
ganization for considering and handling export 
control and related policies as follows : 

"The broad program in which the United 
States is engaged of production of materials 
and equipment essential to national and con- 
tinental defense has led to a situation of scarcity 
with respect to many commodities and the es- 
tablishment by the United States of a system 
of control of the export and, in many cases, the 
domestic consumption of such items. At the 



present time some 60 percent, by value, of the 
articles exported from the United States are 
subject to export licensing and/or priorities. 

"It is the objective of this policy on the one 
hand to restrict the exportation, and in some 
ca.ses domestic consumption, of goods pro- 
duced in the United States to amounts con- 
sistent with the demands of the defense pro- 
gram, while on the other hand to facilitate in 
so far as is feasible the exportation to the 
other American nations of at least their es- 
sential import requirements, and in general as 
large amounts of particular United States prod- 
ucts as are consistent with the exigencies of de- 



JULY 19, 1941 



55 



fense. A separate but related phase of policy 
concerns the acquisition abroad of strategic ma- 
terials essential to the defense program, and, in 
general, the utilization of the materials of the 
hemisphere in the continental defense. 

"It is the view of the United States that 
these objectives are of interest and importance 
to all of the American republics, and that they 
may best be realized by the creation of an inter- 
American system of export control involving 
strict restriction and control of the exportation 
of products outside of the Western Hemisphere 
with a maximum of free commerce within the 
hemisphere which is compatible with defense 
requirements. To this end the United States 
has been seeking in individual conversations the 
fullest cooperation of all of tlie American re- 
publics, and it is the opinion of the Government 
of the United States that such cooperation 
could most advantageously take the form of the 
establishment by each of the American republics 
of a system of export control over : 

"1. Materials subject to export control by 
the United States which are exported to the 
other American republics by the United States 
or which are produced in the other American 
republics. 

" (a) The United States will continue to per- 
mit exports to the other American republics in 
all cases unless United States stocks of the com- 
modity in question are dangerously small and 
are essential to the defense program. In the 
cases of products the supply of which is not 
affected by such considerations an attempt will 
be made to issue licenses freely for use within 
the American republics or at least in amounts 
up to the recent import requirements of the 
nations in question. 

"It has been found possible to issue general 
licenses for the export of certain of such prod- 
ucts to all of the other American republics. 
Moreover, it is possible to issue general licenses 
to products in this category for export to 
American republics which also control the ex- 
portation and re-exportation of such products, 
whether imported from the United States or 
elsewhere or produced do,mestically. Such 



general licenses greatly facilitate trade among 
the American republics. 

"(b) In the case of articles of the greatest 
stringency and importance to the defense pro- 
gram, it has been and it will continue to be 
necessary to impose a system of priorities as 
between the demands of the defense program, 
the requirements of the other American repub- 
lics, and civilian consumption in the United 
States. In these cases it will at best be possible 
to grant priorities for only the most urgent 
requirements of the other American republics, 
and, in view of the control thus obtained, it 
will be possible to simplify the administrative 
procedure by issuing general licenses for the 
exportation of articles for which sucli priorities 
have been granted. 

"(c) In the case of all other articles the 
United States supply of which is less than the 
several demands, it will be necessary to impose 
some quantitative restriction on exports, and, 
in many cases, on domestic consumption. In 
all of these cases an effort will be made, if it is 
at all possible, to fulfil the most urgent require- 
ments of the other American republics, defer- 
ring fulfilment of less urgent requirements 
imtil the supply situation improves. In these 
cases exportations must be individually li- 
censed, and it will be necessary that the Gov- 
ernment of the United States be assured that 
the materials so exported reach their specific 
destinations. 

"2. Strategic materials and materials impor- 
tant in the national and continental defense, 
which are produced in the American republics. 

"(a) This is an essentially separate though 
closely related phase of policy involved in the 
defense program. As a result of the gi-eat 
expansion in production, there exist in the 
United States strong commercial markets for 
most, if not all, strategic and critical materials 
produced in the Western Hemisphere. More- 
over, the appropriate agencies of the Govern- 
ment of the United States stand ready to give 
consideration to purchasing supplies of such 
commodities as a regular part of its program 
for building up its own defense reserves and 
stock-piles. 



56 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTJLLETm 



"This approach on the part of the United 
States for cooperative action among the Ameri- 
can republics has met with a most gratifying 
general response, and, indeed, many of the other 
American republics had already embarked on 
similar and related courses of action. At tine 
present time all of the American republics have 
established, or are actively considering, some 
form of export control directed to ends similar 
to those set forth above. As a result, the United 
States has been in a position already to issue gen- 
eral licenses for the export to Argentina, Bra- 
zil, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic, respec- 
tively, of lists of commodities in category 1 (a) 
mentioned above, as well as of certain commodi- 
ties which are subject to priority approval. Ar- 
rangements for the issuance of similar general 
licenses for the export of commodities in these 
categories to a number of additional American 
republics are also being completed. 

"With respect to the related policy of acqui- 
sition of strategic materials, appropriate agen- 
cies of the United States have entered into 
arrangements for the purchase of many com- 
modities from individual producers, groups of 
producers, or the Governments of a number of 
the American republics. 

"As is inevitable, the several systems of ex- 
port control already imposed or in contempla- 
tion, although they point towards the same 
end, differ considerably in scope and form. 
There arise as a result a number of practical 
problems such as, for example, the question of 
the control only of the re-exportation of articles 
imported from one particular country as con- 
trasted with control over all exports of the 
particular articles, whether imported from any 
source or produced domestically. Another 
problem which gives rise to extensive and com- 
plex administrative difficulties lies in applica- 
tion by the several republics of controls to 
varying lists or groups of commodities. As a 
result, the United States, and other nations, 
have been compelled to limit the issuance of 
general licenses and to restrict the exportation 
and re-exportation of the goods therein covered 
to such other American republics as happen to 
control the particular item. 



"Commerce among the American nations can 
obviously be made most free mider present 
world conditions which have occasioned the im- 
position of all of these types of export control, 
if all of the American republics adopt parallel 
systems of export control thug establishing an 
inter-Ajnerican system. To this end, the Gov- 
ernment of the United States suggests: 

"1. That the Inter-American Financial and 
Economic Advisory Committee undertake the 
consideration of problems of export control and 
the formulation of a plan for an inter-Amer- 
ican control system. 

"2. That the matter appropriately be re- 
ferred to Subcommittee II on Commercial 
Problems. 

"3. That Subcommittee II elicit information 
from the several delegates and governments re- 
garding the essential import requirements of 
ihe individual American republics, and con- 
cerning the various systems of export control 
already established by a number of them. 

"4. That Subcommittee II consider the steps 
towards a broad hemisphere program of con- 
trol already taken by a number of the republics, 
and formulate detailed recommendations for 
an inter-American system which would permit 
a maximum of freedom of interchange among 
the American republics. 

'Tf this suggestion meets with general ap- 
proval, the Government of the United States 
is prepared to place at the disposal of the Ad- 
visory Committee and Subcommittee II infor- 
mation regarding the policies and administra- 
tive procedures with respect to export licensing 
and priorities controls established by it; spe- 
cial arrangements entered into with and gen- 
eral licenses issued for exports to particular 
American republics which have adopted some 
form of export control; data available to it 
regarding the systems of control in effect in 
other American nations; and such information 
as it has collected with regard to the import 
requirements for certain materials of some of 
the American republics." 



JTTLY 19, 1941 



57 



On July 17, 1941 Mr. Sumner Welles made a 
statement to the Inter- American Financial and 
Economic Advisory Committee with respect to 
procedure of the United States Government for 
considering and handling export, licensing and 
priorities matters relating to exports to the 
other American republics, as follows : 

"On June 19, 1941 I made a statement to the 
Inter-American Financial and Economic Ad- 
visory Committee with reference to organiza- 
tion for considering and handling export con- 
trol and related policies. In that statement I 
summarized the objectives of the United States 
system of export control, and pointed out that 
these objectives are of interest and importance 
to all of the American republics. I indicated 
at that time that the response among the Amei-- 
ican republics in individual conversations with 
the United States had been most gratifying. 
Since that time this Committee has adopted a 
resolution embodying a report of Subcommittee 
II recommending that the Governments of all 
of the American republics establish parallel sys- 
tems of export control, and several additional 
American republics have taken legislative or 
executive action to establish such systems. 

''The report of Subcommittee II referred to 
touched on, but did not elaborate on, another 
important aspect of the general problem — that 
is, the procedures and organization required to 
carry out effectively such a policy of export con- 
trol. I wish today to indicate the arrangements 
determined by the Government of the United 
States for handling export licensing and pri- 
orities questions relating to exports to the other 
American republics. 

"The Government of the United States is 
establishing two parallel procedures for han- 
dling all export licensing and priorities matters, 
depending on whether the import requirements 
in question are those, on the one hand, of a 
Government of an American republic or relate 
to needs which a Government wishes to sponsor, 
or those, on the other hand, of any other persons 
or concerns in the other American republics. 



"Government and Government-sponsored 
Needs 

"The several American Governments are re- 
quested to take up all matters relating to gov- 
ernment and government-sponsored needs di- 
rectly with the Department of State. The vari- 
ous Governments are requested to submit to the 
Department of State lists of materials and 
products covering one or more quarters and 
broken down as far as possible into projects — 
such as governmental demands, governmental 
corporations and utilities, and other particular 
projects which they wish directly to sponsor. 

"The Governments of the American republics 
are requested to designate a single representa- 
tive or agency which will present these lists of 
materials and products required, which will in- 
dicate on behalf of the particular government 
the relative order of preference of the various 
requests listed, and which will be in a position 
to discuss the lists and any particular items re- 
quired with the Department of State. 

"To the extent that it is agreed to be desirable, 
certain of the listed items will be pi'ocured by 
the Government of the United States directly 
for the account of the other American Govern- 
ment in question. Other items on the lists, sub- 
ject to the approval of the Department of State, 
will be transmitted to the Administrator of 
Export Control for preferential processing, as 
necessary, through the Office of Production 
Management, the Army and Navy Munitions 
Board, and other appropriate agencies. 

"Other EEQUiKEivrENTS or the American 
Repttblics 

"The Administrator of Export Control will 
undertake to furnish information to, and to 
service United States manufacturers and export- 
ers, and likewise importers in the other Ameri- 
can republics, in all aspects of the problem in- 
cluding priorities questions and shipping avail- 
abilities. He will undertake to furnish regular 
and complete information regarding such mat- 
ters and to take every appropriate step to f acili- 



58 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



tate a maximum of free movement within the 
Western Hemisphere which is compatible with 
the requirements of national and continental 
defense. 

"The Department of State and the Adminis- 
trator of Export Control will thus, in their re- 
spective spheres, furnish to the Governments of 
the other American republics and to business- 
men of the Western Hemisphere full assistance 
in carrying out to the greatest extent possible 
during this period of emergency, trade in the 
essential imports of the other American nations. 
This procedure will make it unnecessary for 
governmental organizations, business concerns, 
and individuals to approach a number of agen- 
cies of the United States Government in arrang- 
ing for a particular export transaction. 

"Applications for specific export licenses will 
continue to be received by the Division of Con- 
trols of the Department of State." 

PRESENTATION OF LETTERS OF CRE- 
DENCE BY THE MINISTER OF HAITI 

I Released to the press July 14] 

A translation of the remarks of the newly 
appointed Minister of Haiti, Mr. Femand 
Dennis, upon the occasion of the presentation of 
his letters of credence, follows : 

"Mr. PEEsmENT: 

"I have the honor to place in Your hands the 
Letters which accredit me near the Government 
of the United States of America as Envoy Ex- 
traordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, at 
the same time as those which terminate the mis- 
sion of my very eminent predecessor. 

"No mission can be more flattering than that 
of representing one's coimtry near the great 
American Democracy, at this time, particularly, 
when, guided by one of its most illustrious presi- 
dents, it assures, in the more and more anxious 
hours through which Humanity is passing, such 
powerful aid, such generous assistance against 
those who are leading the conflict in the World 
for the destruction of Liberty and Justice, this 
common ideal of all the democracies. 



"To aid in this so noble task, to contribute to 
this work of defense of what is so dear to us: 
liberty, each country of this hemisphere wishes 
to contribute fully from what it possesses — how- 
ever little that may be — in the formidable 
struggle which threatens our shores. 

"It is botli a great honor and a very great joy 
for me to confirm, here, the full adherence of my 
counti-y to this common defense policy organ- 
ized and pursued by Your Excellency's Govern- 
ment within the framework of Pan ^Vmerican- 
ism, a complete adherence which the Chief of 
the Haitian Nation proclaimed so solemnly on 
May 15 last, on assuming his high oflSce. 

"It is, therefore, Mr. President, with all con- 
fidence that I begin my mission near Your Ex- 
cellency and Your Government, convinced as I 
am, that I shall always meet with efficacious aid 
and the greatest good will for the accomplish- 
ment of a task which is particularly pleasant for 
me and by which I am deeply honored." 

The President's reply to the remarks of Mr. 
Femand Deimis f oUows : 

"Mr. Minister : 

"It is most gratifying to me to receive from 
your hands the Letter by which His Excellency 
President Elie Lescot accredits you as Envoy 
Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary 
of Haiti near the Government of the United 
States of America. I also acknowledge the 
Letters of Recall of your esteemed predecessor, 
now the President of the Republic. 

"I share with you the sense of the obligation 
of the nations of this Hemisphere to join in the 
efforts to safeguard the ideals of liberty to 
which the peoples of all the American Repub- 
lics owe their independence. Your statements 
at this time when those ideals are increas- 
ingly threatened from abroad are particularly 
heartening. 

"I look forward happily to the continuation 
of the cordiality which characterized the rela- 
tions between the Governments of our two 
countries during the mission in Washington 
of your illustrious predecessor, His Excellency 



JULY 19, 1941 



59 



M. Elie Lescot. You may be assured that tlie 
officials of this Government will welcome the 
opportunity which your mission affords to as- 
sist in making more effective our joint efforts 
to promote a still better understanding between 
the peoples of our two countries. 

"I ask you to convey to His Excellency Presi- 
dent Lescot my best wishes for his welfare and 
for the greater prosperity of the Republic 
whose destiny he now guides." 



E 



urope 



CLOSING OF GERMAN AND ITALIAN 
CONSULATES IN THE UNITED 
STATES 

[Released to the press July 15] 

Names of Gennan consular officials and em- 
ployees, and members of their families, sched- 
uled to leave the United States for Lisbon on the 
S.S. West Point, sailing from New York on July 
16, 1941, follow : 

GBStMAN CONSUIATB IN BOSTON, MASS. 



OFFICIALS 



Dr. Herbert Scholz 
Liselotte Scholz 
Wilhelm Scholz 
Manfred Scholz 
Emll Kurth 
Gerhard Boldt 
Edith Boldt 
Uta Boldt 



Consul 

Wife 

Son (5 .years) 

Son (3 years) 

Butler 
Consular secretary 

Wife 

Daughter (29 months) 



EMPLOYEES 



Rudolf Lohrengel 
Baby Patty Lohrengel 
Elisabeth Essig 
Erna Guhl 



Assistant 

Wife 
Assistant 
Stenographer 



German Consttlate Geneiral in Chicago, III. 
officials 



Dr. Georg Krause-Wichmann 
Armgard Krause-Wichmann 
Renate Krause-Wichmann 
Armgard Krause-Wichmann 
Marie Zeissler 



Consul 
Wife 

Daughter (4 years) 
Daughter (2 years) 
Servant 



Hellmut Heerling 
Ruth Heerling 
Hellmut Klaus Rudolf 

Heerling 
Wilhelm Friebel 
Emma Friebel 
Elizabeth Friebel 
Alfred Lliders 
Johanna Liiders 
Alfred Robert Liiders 
Lotte Liiders 
Ernst Gemming 
Anna Gemming 
Walter Gemming 
Gerda Gemming 
Helene Zierhut 
Heinz Johannsen 
Hilde Johannsen 
Uwe Johannsen 
Ingeborg Johannsen 



Attache 
Wife 
Son (1^/2 months) 

Chancelor 

Wife 

Daughter (23 years) 
First consular secretary 

Wife 

Son (14 years) 

Daughter (5 years) 
First consular secretary 

Wife 

Son (5 years) 

Daughter (lyear) 

Servant 
Consular secretary 

Wife 

Son (2 years) 

Daughter (8 months) 



KMPLOYEES 



Dr. Bruno Siemers 
Fritz Heberling 
Elisabeth Heberling 
Dietrich Fritz Heberling 
Brigitte Elisabeth Heberling 
Hedwig Haase 
Martha Grause 
Frieda Kuhhuann 
Paula Dreehsler 
Margarethe Hannemann 
Edith Weigert 
Wilhelm Haensgen 
Agnes Haensgen 
Karl Schmid 
Edmund Westphal 
Karl Lippig 
Agnes Lippig 
Heinz Lippig 
Dorothy Lippig 
Norman Lippig 



Assistant 
Assistant 

Wife 

Son (3 years) 

Daughter (9 months) 
Stenographer 

Mother 
Stenographer 
Stenographer 

Sister 
Stenographer 
Assistant 

Wife 
Assistant clerk 
Assistant clerk 
Assistant clerk 

Wife 

Son (18 years) 

Daughter 

Son (5 years) 



Geieman Consulate in Clb:veland, Ohio 



OFTTCLiLS 



Karl Kapp 
Amaranth Kapp 
Nele Kapp 
Peter Kapp 
Eckart Briest 
Fritz von Alpen 
Wilhelm Schaefer 
Kiithe Schaefer 
Frithjof Schaefer 
Roswitha Schaefer 
Karl Riidiger Schaefer 



Consul general 

Wife 

Daughter (21 years) 

Son (17 years) 
Vice consul 
Chancelor 
Consular secretary 

Wife 

Son (5 years) 

Daughter (2 years) 

Son (4 months) 



60 

Johann Boden 
Margarete Boden 
Hans Peter Boden 
Georg Hoff 



Hans Ohrmann 
Franz Russold 
Anita Dora Rorig 



Consular secretary 

Wife 

Son (1% years) 
Clerk 



EMPLOYEES 



Assistant 
Assistant 
Stenographer 



German Consulate in Los Angexbs, Cauf. 



OFFICIALS 



Dr. Georg Gyssllng 
Angelika Gyssling 
Johann Strauss 
Mrs. Christine Boone 
Max von Kellenbach 
Lydia von Kellenbach 
Maria Theresla von Kellen- 
bach 
Karl Otto von Kellenbach 



Consul general 

Daughter (13 years) 

Butler 

Housekeeper 
Chancelor 

Wife 

Daughter (26 years) 

Son (27 years) 



EMPLOYEES 



Kurt Werner 
Bertha Werner 
Harriett Draegert 
Ingeborg Meyer 
Rudolf Kleffner 
Kurt Hinsch 
Liselotte Hinsch 



Assistant 

Wife 
Stenographer 
Stenographer 
Assistant 
Assistant 

Wife 



Gekman Consulate in New Orleans, La. 



OFFICIALS 



Edgar Freiherr Spiegel von 
und zu Peckelsheim 

Erna Freifrau Spiegel von 
und zu Peckelsheim 

Heuriette Vogtsjohanns 

Berthold Rasmus 

Lisbeth Rasmus 

Walter Ehling 

Elisabeth Ehling 

Dr. Anton Wagner 

Johannes Schmaus 

Hildegard Schmaus 

Jutta Schmaus 



Consul general 
Wife 

Maid 
Chancelor 

Wife 
First consular secretary 

Wife 
Commercial attach^ 
Clerk 

Wife 

Daughter (6 months) 



EMPLOYEES 



Erich Koechlin 
Elisabeth Koechlin 
Martha Freitag 
Anna Humelbrunner 



Assistant 

Wife 
Stenographer 
Stenographer 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

German Consulate in San Juan, Puerto Rico 
officials 



Henry Freese 
Martha Freese 
Marga Freese 
Maria Freese 



Consul 
Wife 

Daughter (19 years) 
Daughter (11 years) 



German Consulate General in New York, N. T. 



Dr. Hans Borchers 
Adelheid Borchers 
Helene Verhoff 
Giistav Albert Mueller 
Dr. Friedhelm Drager 
Erna Drager 
Siegmar Lurtz 
Hans-Richard Hirschfeld 
Ruth Hirschfeld 
Heinz Thorner 
Eva Thorner 
Kamilla Thorner 
Bernhart Gustav Lippert 
Luise Marie Lippert 
Diana BernstortI Lippert 
Peter Hubert Schmidt 
Gertrude Schmidt 
Guenther Schmidt 
Peter Schmidt 
Irmgard Schmidt 
Karl Polstorff 
Katharina Polstorff 
Hertha Polstorff 
Irmgard PolstorfC 
Bernhard Trauer 
Clara Trauer 
Bernhard Trauer 
Johannes Vogel 
Charlotte Vogel 
Peter Wilhelm Vogel 
Ursula Anna Vogel 
Ursula Momberg 
Lu(l\^'lg Schlich 
Erica Schlich 
Ingeborg Schlich 
Gerhard Schlich 
Else Seitz 
Karl Loerky 
Hilde Loerky 
Erika Loerky 
Richard Loerky 
Hans-Joachim Geier 
Margarethe Geier 
Edith Maria Geier 



Consul general 

Wife 

Maid 
Consul 
Consul 

Wife 
Consul 
Consul 

Wife 
Consul 

Wife 

Daughter (1 year) 
Vice consul 

Wife 

Daughter (7 months) 
Cliancelor 

Wife 

Son (18 years) 

Sou (17 years) 

Daughter (15 years) 
Chancelor 

Wife 

Daughter (18 years) 

Daughter (17 years) 
Consular secretary 

Wife 

Son (17 years) 
Consular secretary 

Wife 

Sou (4 years) 

Daughter (2 years) 

Maid 
Consular secretary 
Wife 

Daughter (7 years) 

Son (1^ years) 

Maid 
Consular secretary 
Wife 

Daughter (13 years) 

Son (2 years) 
Consular secretary 

Wife 

Daughter (9 months) 



JtJLT 19, 1941 

Georg Schadt 
Rosa Schadt 
Walter Schadt 
Donald Schadt 



61 



Clerk 
Wife 

Son (10 years) 
Son (6 years) 



EMPLOYEES 



Fritz Kellermeier 

Else Kellermeier 

Otto Borsdorf 

Minna Borsdorf 

Lotte Borsdorf 

Walter H. Schellenberg 

Gotthard Raehmel 

Hans Raven 

Heinrich Moritz Schaf- 

hausen 
Fritz Zeglin 
Bertha Zeglin 
Margot Zeglin 
Wilhelm Frerichs 
Margot Magda Emmy 

Frerichs 
Josef Franz Bauer 
Wolfgang Manner 
Beatrice Manner 
Sigrid Manner 
Margarete Manner 
Wilhelm Engel-Emden 
Margarethe Engel 
Frieda Sachs 
Pauline Uhrig 
Ruth Uhrig 
Richard Uhrig 
Elsa Fastenrath 
Emil Fastenrath 
Klara Koch 
Anna Alles 
Liese Busche 
Elisabeth Schellenberg 
Maria Susanne Etzel 
Anneliese Janke 
Louise LoefEke 
Anneliese Prinz 
Gertraude Erika Christier 
Anneliese Fischer 
Marie Louise Roessler 



Assistant 

Wife 
Assistant 

Wife 

Daughter (12 years) 
Assistant 
Assistant 
Assistant 
Assistant 

Assistant 

Wife 

Daughter (5 years) 
Assistant 

Wife (stenographer) 

Assistant 
Clerk 

Wife 

Daughter (2 years) 

Daughter (3 months) 
Night watchman 

Wife 
Stenographer 

Sister 

Niece (15 years) 

Nephew (7 years) 
Stenographer 

Husband 
Stenographer 
Stenographer 
Stenographer 
Stenographer 
Stenographer, 
Stenographer 
Stenographer 
Stenographer 
Stenographer 
Stenographer 
Stenographer (Haiti- 

more) 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Gebmait Consulate in Philadelphia, Pa, 
officials 



Erich Windels 
Liddy Windels 
Emma Kohlstrunk 
Heinrich Schafhausen 
Josephine Schafhausen 
Alexandra Schafhausen 



Consul general 
Wife 
Cook 
Vice consul 
Wife 
Daughter (28 years) 



EMPLOYEES 



Ernst Matthias 
Hanna Matthias 
Dieter Matthias 



Assistant 
Wife 
Son (2 months) 



German Consulate General in San Francisco, Calif. 



OFFICIALS 



Fritz Wiedemann 
Anna-Luise Wiedemann 
Eduard Wiedemann 
Anna Hafner 
Otto Denzer 
Gertrud Denzer 
Hermann Loeper 
Emmi Loeper 
Helmut Rubarth 
Hildegard Rubarth 



Consul general 

Wife 

Son 

Housekeeper 

Vice consul 

Wife 
Chancelor 

Wife 
Consular secretary 

Wife 



employees 



Kurt Beyer 
Margit Beyer 
Eleanore Beyer 
Christel Wagener 
Erna Schrader 
Margarethe Lange 
Hedwig von Wrangel 
Ingeborg Moerschner 
Annl Jijrgens 
Friedo Petersen 



Assistant 

Wife 

Daughter (11 years) 
Stenographer 
Stenographer 
Stenographer 

Aunt 
Stenographer 

Mother 
Night watchman 



German Consulate in St. Louis, Mo. 

OFFICIAIS 



Agnes Nostitz 
Walpurga Weber 



Widow of Heinz Nostitz 
Maid 



Herbert Diel 
Margarete Diel 
Friedrich Ernst Miiller 
Katharina MiiUer 
Susanne MiiUer 
Alois Schneider 



Consul general 

Wife 
First consular secretary 

Wife 

Daughter (18 years) 
Clerk 



62 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTJLLETIN 



EMFLOTBES 


John Rehm 


Employee 




Eva Opderbeck 


Stenographer 


Anna Rehm 


Wife 


Etidolf Opderbeck 


Husband 


Magnus Sander 


Employee 


Rudolf Georg Opderbeck 


Son (2 years) 


Hermine Sander 


Wife 


Alfred Schorsch 


Assistant 


Wenier Schade 


Employee 


Johanna Schorsch 


Mother 


Edith Schade 


Wife 


Elisabeth Schorsch 


Wife 


Elisabeth Josepha Schuster 


Employee 


Alfred Schorsch 


Son (12 years) 


Paul S'eLfert 


Employee 


Rudolf Schorsch 


Son (10 years) 


Paul Seifert 


Father 


Hertha Bell 


Stenographer 


Paula Seifert 


Mother 


John Beil 


Husband 


Karl Seifert 


Brother 


Herbert Beil 


Son (9 years) 


Hildegard Wenzel 


Employee 


Emilie Beltz 


Mother 


Ingeborg Weldhaas 


Employee 






Walter Ernst Weidhaas 


Father 


MISCEIXANEiOUS 


Friedrich Zimmer 


Employee 






Elisabeth Zimmer 


Wife 


Marie Lehnert 


Wife of consular sec- 


Karl Eduard Laser 


Employee 




retary August Leh- 


Emily Laser 


Wife 




nert, at the German 


Karl Laser 


Son 




Legation in Ciuflad 


Lorraine Laser 


Daughter 




Trujillo, Dominican 


Martha Laser 


Daughter 




Republic 


Anna Koerner 


Employee 


Gertrud Lehnert 


Daughter (7 years) 


Ernst Kordel 


Employee 






Thea Adelgunde Kordel 


Wife 


Gekman Libkakt 


OF Information 


Charlotte Winder 


Stenographer 


IN New Yoke, N. Y. 


Marie Alles 


Stenographer 


EMPLOYEES 


Elisabeth Krakau 


Stenographer 






Hermine Moser 


Stenographer 


Dr. Matthias F. Schmitz 


Director of Library of 
Information 


Fritz Treiber 


Employee 


Elisabeth Schmitz 


Wife 


MISCEIXANBOUS 


Rolf Guenther Schmitz 


Son (6 years) 






Heinz Dieter Schmitz 


Son (3 years) 






of Guenther 


Gerhard Adler 


Employee 






Ecknig, em- 


Curt Alwardt 


Assistant 


Rudolf Ernst Ecknig 


Father 


ployee who 


Max Albrecht Blank 


Employee 


Martha Hedwig Ecknig 


Mother' 


left United 


Anni Blank 


Wife 






States re- 


Gertrud Anna Margarethe 


Employee 






cently 


Esen 








of Wilheim 


Hermann Esen 


Husband 






Heinemann, 


Walter Rudolf Fischer 


Employee 


Kaethe Heinemann 


Wife 


employee 
who left 
United 
States 


Werner August GrafC 


Employee 


Marlene Heinemann 


Daughter 


Wilhelmine Kaup 


Employee 




(4 years) 


Adolf Kaup 


Husband 






Gerda E. Kaup 


Daughter (2 years) 






recently 


Erwin Kempin 


Employee 






Margarete Kempin 


Wife 


German Nationals Who Abe Not Government 


Herman Krachenfels 


Assistant 


Offictals 


Kaethe Krachenfels 


Wife 
Assistant 


Dr. Kurt Rieth 
Eugen Buerk 




Wilheim Krippendorf 


Engineer, Chicago, 111. 


Therese Krippendorf 


Wife 


Karl Hoffmann 


Employee of German 


Stefan Kuehn 


Assistant 




Legation at Habana, 


Johanna Kuehn 


Wife 




Cuba 


Alfred Liesegang 


Employee 


Charlotte Hoffmann 


Wife 


Helmut Majewski 


Employee 


Jens Peter Hoffmann 


Son (5 years) 


Margot Meier 


Employee 


Hoffmann (Christian name 


(3 years) 


Pauline Meier 


Mother 


unknown) 




Paul Heinrich Penzhom 


Employee 


Erika Hoffmann 


(3 ir 


lonths) 



JTTLY 19, 1941 



63 



Gebman Raileoads Office 



ITAUAN Vice Consui-ate in Ai.hant, N. Y. 



BMPLOTEE8 



Ernst .Srhniitz 



Anna Sfhmitz 
Franz Berz 
Hans Portaek 
Arthur Qucitscli 
Maria Eclitha Queitsth 
Charlie Werner Queltseh 
Gustav Schiwek 

Charlotte Schiwek 
Elisabeth Bogner 
Henry C. Tange 

Marjorie Constance Tangp 
Manfred Nier 



General manager of the 
German Railroads 
Information Office 
in New York 
Wife 

Stepson (21 years) 
Director of publication 
Boolckeeper and cashier 
Wife 

Son (16 years) 
Manager, mailing de- 
partment 
Wife 
Secretary 

Clerk, information de- 
partment 
Wife 
Clerk, information de- 
partment 



Ship Physicians 
Dr. Gerhard Brecher 



Mrs. Gerhard Brecher 
Dr. Schnitzler 



Mrs. Mary Agnes Schnitzler 



Assistant at the Brews- 
ter Hospital, Jack- 
sonville, Fla. 
Wife 
Assistant at the Brews- 
ter Hospital, Jack- 
sonville, Fla. 
Wife 



Transocean News SEB\^c■E in New York, N. Y. 



EMPLOYEES 



Dr. Manfred Zapp 

Edgar Sellmann 

Guenther Tonn 

Siri Lewaldt 

Heinz Theodor Lewaldt 

George F. Lewaldt 

Ernest Kotz 

Kathe Kotz 

Ernest Guenther 

Hildegard M. Guenther 



Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Stenographer^ 

Son 

Son 
Editor 

Wife 
Editor 

Wife 



[Released to the press July 15] 

Names of Italian consular officials and em- 
ployees, and members of their families, sched- 
uled to leave the United States for Lisbon on 
the S.S. West Point, sailing from New York 
on July 16, 1941, follow : 



Ignazio Sanfelice del marches! di 


Vice consul 


Monteforte 




Marcella Ruoeco 


Maid 


Renato Roncati 


Clerk 


Italian Consl-late in B 


.\LT1M0KE, MD. 


Eugenic Morreale 


Consul 


Emilia Morreale 


Wife 


Margherita Morreale 


Daughter 


Maria Morreale 


Daughter 


Gabriella Morreale 


Daughter 


Luigia Zanor 


Maid 


Italian Consulate General 


IN Boston, Mass. 


Francesco Cancellario D'Alena 


Consul general 


Nilde Cancellario D'Alena 


Wife 


Maria Pia Cancellario D'Alena 


Daughter 


Nazzareno Boccini 


Chauffeur 


Clelia Orfei 


Maid 


Antonio Francalancia 


Clerk 


Giacinta Emilia Francalancia 


Wife 


Mercurio Nicola Antonio Fran- 


Son 


calancia 




Nicolina Francalancia 


Daughter 


Laura Filomena Francalancia 


Daughter 


Italo Manfredo Francalancia 


Son 


Margherita Francalancia 


Daughter 


Emilia Cecilia Francalancia 


Daughter 


Carlo Durigon 


Clerk 


Ada Durigon 


Wife 


Mario Conti 


Clerk 


Italian Consulate General 


in Chicago, III. 


Riccardo Moscati 


Consul general 


Giuseppe Dall'Agnol 


Chancelor 


Lorenzo Baiocchi 


Clerk 


Pietro Colbertaldo 


Clerk 


Raflaela Colbertaldo 


Wife 


Giovanni Colbertaldo 


Son 


Maria Colbertaldo 


Mother 


Piergentile Testaguzza 


Clerk 


Italian Consulate in Cleveland, Ohio 


Romeo Montecchi 


Consul 


Isabella Montecchi 


Wife 


Carlo Fumagalli 


Clerk 


Achille Martinengo 


Clerk 


Tonina Martinengo 


Wife 


Roberto Martinengo 


Son 



64 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Italian Consui-ate in Denveb, Colo. 



Giovanni Formichella 
Anny Formichella 
Leopoldo Formicliella 
Umberto Formichella 
Benito Formichella 
Romano Formichella 
Maria Naldo 



Consul 
Wife 
Son 
Son 
Son 
Son 
Maid 



Italian Consulab Agency in Fokt Worth, Tex. 
Attilio Ortolan! Consular agent 

Italian Vice Consulate at Houston, Tex. 
Luigi Nassano Acting vice consul 

Italian Consulab Agency in Indian.^polis, Ii\n. 
Vicenzo Lapenta Consular agent 

Italian Consular Agency in Johnstown, Pa. 
Angelo V. JanneUi Consular agent 

Italian Consular Agency in Lawrence, Mass. 

Ottario D'Amato 
Adelina D'Amato 



Consular agent 
Wife 



Italian Consulate in Los Angeles, Calif. 

Dlno Semplicini Consul 

Violetta Semplicini Wife 

Alberta Grimaldi Liebman Clerk 

Valerio Liebman Son 

Antonietta Albert! Clerk 

Gladys Sada Clerk 

It.^lian Consulate in Netnv Orleans, La. 

Gian Gerolamo Chiavar! Consul 

Enrico Tucci Servant 

Sisto Vaiiin Servant 

Maria Calcich Maid 

Count Alessandro Manasse! Vice Consul 

Countess Maryel Manassei Wife 

Giovanni Manasse! Child 

Alessandra Manassei Child 

Julia Bertolot Maid 

Albertino Bartolucci Clerk 

Pietro Coutrucci Clerk 

Roberto Tucci Clerk 

Italian Consulate General in New York, N. Y. 

Gaetano Vecchiotti Consul general 



Cecilia Vecchiotti 
Alfredo Spina 
Umberto Caradossi 
Cesare Pasquinelli 
Hito Sadik 



Wife 

Chauffeur 
Vice consul 
Vice consul 
Secretary 



Angelina Castello 
Michelina Cima 
Francesco Maldera 
Lucia Maldera 
Mario Mai.strello 
Maria Cogliolo 
Raffaele Di Censo 
Amelia Maghina 
Antonietta Picone 
Luigia Ferraris 
Giuseppe Rossin! 
Orazio Onomastico 
Aldo Testa 
Teresa Testa 
Ida Rinaldi 
Franca Rinaldi 
Amedeo Re 
Santina Re 
Giuseppe Re 
Carolina Nunziata Re 
R imano Salvatore Re 
Corrado Armierl 
Tommaso Canale Parola 
Antonietta Canale Parola 
Matilde Canale Parola 
Giuseppe De Martin 
Salvatore Lucchesi 
Marta Lucchesi 
Francesca Lucchesi 
Etta De Simone 



Amedea Chilov! 



Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 
Wife 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 
Wife 
Son 

Daughter 
Son 

Clerk 

Clerk 
Wife 
Daughter 

Clerk 

Clerk 
Wife 
Daughter 

Wife of the Ital- 
ian consul gen- 
eral at Lugano, 
Switzerland, re- 
siding in New 
York 

Maid 



Italian Consulate GENBUiAL in Phil.\delphia, Pa. 



Ludovico Censi 
Maria Censi 
Michela Censi 
Nicoletta Censi 
Barbara Censi 
Michele Macchiaroli 
Nicolina Ciapi Mori 
Annibale Di Febo 



Consul general 
Wife 
Daughter 
Daughter 
Daughter 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 



Italian Vice Consulate in Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Alessandro Capece Minutolo Vice consul 

Mario Musella Clerk 

Eugenio Morell! Clerk 

Maddalena Filotto Clerk 

Italian Vice Consulate in Providence, R. I. 

Vincenzo Verderosa Acting vice 



JULY 19, 1941 



65 



Italian Consui-ab Agency in Sacramento, Calif. 

Arnaldo D'Auneo Acting consular 

agent 

Italian Consulate General in San Francisco, Calif. 



Carlo Bossi 
Olga Boss! 
Gregorio Malerba 
Raimondo Manziiii 
Giovanni Mannu 
Giovanna Mannu 
Lucio Maria Mannu 
Cecilia Barsanti Manciui 
Carmelo Ilacqua 
Francesco Valente 
Italo Unti 



Consul general 

Wife 

Servant 
A'ice consul 
Clerk 

Wife 

Son 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 



Italian Consulate in Seattle, Wash. 
Antonio Toscani Millo Consul 



Giuseppe Bovio 
Fernanda Muscolo 



Clerk 
Clerk 



Italian Consular Agency in Springfield, Mass. 
Rosario Gori Consular agent 

Italian Vice Consulate in St. Louis, Mo. 



Alessandro Savorgnan 
Rosetta Savorgnan 
Elda Richieri 
Enrico Gironda 
Mario March! 



Vice consul 

Wife 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 



Italian Consular Agency in Vicksbubg, Miss. 
Andrea Bucci Consular agent 

Italian Consular Agency in Wilmington, Del. 
Carmine Vignola Consular agent 

Italian Consltlar Agency in Yonkebs, N. Y. 
Edoardo Bertolini 



Giovanna Bertolini 
Maria Rosa Bertolini 
Giorgio Bertolini 



Acting consular 
agent 
Wife 
Daughter 
Son 



Italian Totjrist Information Office in Chicago, III. 

Erminio Osti 

Muriel Osti Wife 

Alessandra Osti Daughter 



It.\ijan Totjrist Information Office in New York, 
N. Y. 

Luigo Carlo Paladini 

Allene Paladini Wife 

Guglielmo Maggini Clerk 

Bianca Maggini Wife 

Instituto Nazionale Cambi con l'Estebo in New York, 
N. Y. 



Luigi Podesta 



Representative 



Italian Ministry of Corpouations in New York, N. Y. 



Ovidio Lefebvre d'Ovidio 
Maria Lefebvre d'Ovidio 



Officer 
Wife 



Connected With the Italian Commission to the 
New York World's Fair 

Armando Tosi 
Angelo Coen Brocca 
Ruggero Astolfi 
Giuseppe Carta 
Luigi Spaggiari 



Miscellaneous 



Antonio Manfredini 



Graduate student 
at the Colorado 
School of Mines, 
Golden, Colo. 



The Near East 



SAFETY OF AMERICANS IN SYRIA AND 
LEBANON 

[Released to the press July 18] 

The American Consul General in Beirut has 
informed the Department that, following the 
signing of the armistice, all American citi- 
zens in Syria and Lebanon are well, so far as 
he has been able to ascertain, and that the 
properties of American institutions have 
suffered no damage. 



66 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Cultural Relations 



REDUCED POSTAGE RATES ON BOOKS 
TO THE OTHER AMERICAN REPUB- 
LICS 

One of the immediate results of the present 
program of inter-American cultural relations 
has been the successful negotiation of agree- 
ments for reduction of postage rates on books 
going to the other American republics. It is 
expected that these agi'eements will serve as 
a very considerable impetus to the exchange 
of publications, particularly in the field of 
education. 

The new lower rate is o cents per pound up 
to 22 pounds, on books containing no publicity 
or advertising other than that appearing on 
the covers or flyleaves. The new rate is now 
in effect to all of the other American republics. 

The demand for books, particularly of the 
scientific type and of the textbook type, has 
greatly increased during the past year, and 
the elimination of the obstacle of high postal 
rates will undoubtedly create an even greater 
demand than heretofore. The resulting in- 
creased interchange of publications will serve 
to stimulate the further growth of intellectual 
ties between the United States and the other 
American republics. 

The Postal Bulletin of April 21, 1941 gives 
a detailed description of the material which 
may be mailed under this rate. The specifi- 
cations are as follows: 

Packages of books mailed at the new rate 
should be plainly endorsed by the mailers 
"Book" or "Books". The dimensions for such 
packages shall be the same as for letters and 
other articles in the Postal Union (regular) 
mails. 

Among the publications to which the reduced 
book rate applies, are the following : 

Books permanently bound by stitching or stapling, 
or by means of spiral or plastic binding, when cov- 
ered with paper, cloth, leather, or other substantial 
material. 



Books enclosed in the usual paper jackets bearing 
advertisements of other books. 

Music books in regular bound form. 

Books consisting largely of pictures, illustrations, 
maps, such as a view book or atlas. 

Bibles with customary incidental space for 
family record. 

The above-mentioned postage rate does not 
apply to the following : 

Annual reports of organizations and Institutions : 
also reports or minutes of their conventions or other 
meetings published primarily for the benefit of 
members. 

Books containing advertisements, even though 
incidental, of other things than books, as, for in- 
stance, playing cards, merchandise, services, etc. 

Books of the loose-leaf binder type, which are not 
complete or permanent when mailed but to which 
other pages are sub.sequently to be added. 

Reports of corporations sent to stockholders. 

House organs, including publications designed 
to promote the commercial interests of a firm or 
organization. 

Trade directories in which the listings are paid 
for. 

Telephone directories. 

Publications entered as second-class matter. 

Publications consisting of pictures to be colored 
or cut out. 

Publications, including textbooks, having blank 
spaces for written ans-wers or other hand work. 

Periodical publications. 

Sheet music. 

Bound volumes of publications entered as .second- 
class matter. 

Promotional publications of nonprofit organiza- 
tions or institutions, such as schools, colleges, 
churches, fraternal societies, etc. 

Books in any other than final or permanent form. 

Publications furnished as a part of a service. 

Publications relating to furniture, household ar- 
ticles, decorations, etc., in which reference is made 
by name to the concerns manufacturing or handling 
the article featured. 

Fi-eight and passenger tariffs. 

Directories or lists of members published in the 
interest of the organizations publishing the same. 

The following are the only permissible en- 
closures with books mailed at the reduced rate : 

A single order form, and a single sheet not 
larger than approximately the size of a page, re- 
lating exclusively to the book with which enclosed. 

An invoice showing the price, etc., of the book 
may also be enclosed. 



JULY 19, 1941 



67 



PROFESSORS FROM THE UNITED 
STATES TO TEACH AT NATIONAL 
UNIVERSITY OF PANAMA 

A recent despatch from the United States 
Embassy in Panama contains the information 
that a number of professors from the United 
States have been appointed to teaching posts at 
the National University of Panama. 

Dr. Jeptha B. Dmican, Kector of the National 
University of Panama, who was awarded a 
travel grant to visit the United States at the 
invitation of the Department of State, expressed 
a desire during his stay in this country to obtain 
the services of a number of our professors for 
teaching positions at the university. Arrange- 
ments were accordingly made to carry out this 
program, and as a result several teachers are 
already in Panama or are expected to arrive 
shortly. 

Those, who have taken up residence in the 
university as a result of Dr. Duncan's plan in- 
clude the following: Dr. Gaston Litton, pro- 
fessor of libary science; Mr. Paul Peavy, pro- 
fessor of English and English literature; Dr. 
Patrick Romanell, professor of philosophy ; Dr. 
Myron Schaeffer, professor of musical appre- 
ciation, and Mr. John Cook Ward, professor of 
English and English literature. Dr. Sydney 
Markham, professor of ait appreciation, is 
expected to arrive in the near future. 

In addition to the professors mentioned above, 
it is understood that final selection will shortly 
be made of a professor of journalism,^a profes- 
sor of economics and a professor of comparative 
anatomv from the United States. 



Regulations 



The following Government regulations may 
be of interest to readers of the Bulletin: 

Regulations Relating to Transactions in Foreign Ex- 
change : General License No. 53 under Executive Order 
No. 8389. April 10, 1&40, as Amended, and Regula- 
tions Issued Pursuant Thereto [licensing, under cer- 
tain conditions, transactions ordinarily incident to im- 
porting and exporting of goods between the United 



States and any of the American republics, and also 
Canada, or between the American republics, and also 
Canada, by or on behalf of, or involving property of, 
a national of a blocked country]. (Treasury Depart- 
ment.) Federal RegiHter, July 19, 1941 (vol. 0, no. 
140), p. 3.556. 

Export Control Sohodule No. 13 [adding to, effective 
July 12, 1941, the forms, conversions, and derivatives 
of aircraft parts, equipment, and accessories other than 
those listed in Proclamation No. 2237 of May 1, 1937 
(item 4a of Proclamation No. 2413 of July 2, 1940)]. 
(Administrator of Export Control.) Federal Register, 
July 16, 1941 (vol. 6, no. 137), p. 3477. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 
MILITARY MISSION 

DETAIL OF A UNITED STATES MILITARY MISSION TO 
COSTA RICA 

In response to the request of the Government 
of Costa Rica, an agreement was signed on July 
14, 1941, at 3 o'clock by the Honorable Sumner 
Welles, Acting Secretary of State, and Senor 
Dr. Don Luis Fernandez, Minister of Costa Rica 
at Washington, providing for the detail of a 
United States Militai-y Mission to Costa Rica. 

The agreement is effective for a period of four 
years beginning with the date of signature. The 
services of the Mission may be extended beyond 
that period at the request of the Government of 
Costa Rica. 

The provisions of the agi'eement are similar 
in general to provisions contained in agreements 
between the United States and certain other 
American republics concerning the detail of offi- 
cers of the United States Army or Navy to ad- 
vise the armed forces of those countries. In 
addition to the provisions regarding its purpose 
and duration, the agreement contains provisions 
in regard to certain requisites and conditions 
affecting the fulfilment of the terms of the agree- 
ment, and provisions in regard to compensation. 

Such agreements are in effect at this time with 
respect to Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, 
Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Nica- 
ragua, Peru, and Venezuela. 



68 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Foreign Service 



FOREIGN SERVICE REGULATIONS 

On July 11, 1941 the President signed Execu- 
tive Order 8820 amending the Foreign Service 
Regulations of the United States (Chapter 
XXI : Nationality, Passports, Registration, and 
Protection) . For text of this order see the Fed- 
eral Register of July 15, 1941 (vol. 6, no. 136), 
pages 3421-3422. 



Legislation 



luter-Aniei-icau Highway: Hearings Before the Com 
mittee on Foreign Affairs, House of Representatives, 
Seventy-seventh Congress, First Session, on S. 1544, an 
Act To Provide for Cooperation With Central American 
Republics in the Construction of the Inter-American 
Highway. June 3, 1941. ii, 33 pp. 

An Act To authorize the course of Instruction at the 
United States Naval Academy to be given to not ex- 
ceeding twenty persons at a time from the American 
republics, other than the United States. [S. 207.] Ap- 
proved July 14, 1941. (Public Law 168, 77th Cong., 
1st sess.) 1 p. 

An Act To amend an Act entitled "An Act authorizing 
the temporary detail of John L. Savage, an employee of 
the United States, to service under the government of 
the State of New South Wales, Australia, and the gov- 
ernment of the Punjab, India" (Act of June 29, 1940, 



Public, Numbered 678, Seventy-sixth Congress, third 
session). [S. 1488.] Approved July 14, 1941. (Public 
Law 172, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 1 p. 

Inter American Statistical Institute : Communication 
From the President of the United States Transmitting 
Recommendation for Consideration of a Report of the 
Acting Secretary of State Asking for Legislation To 
Enable the United States To Become an Adliering Mem- 
ber of the Inter American Statistical Institute, and To 
Authorize an Annual Appropriation for the Payment 
of the Share of the United States in Support of the In- 
stitute. (H. Doc. 317, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 4 pp. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Diplomatic List, July 1941. Publication 1617. ii, 101 
pp. Subscription, $1 a year; single copy, 100. 

Detail of Military OflS^er To Serve as Director of Poly- 
technic School of Guatemala : Agreement Between the 
United States of America and Guatemala — Signed May 
27, 1941 ; effective May 27, 1941. Executive Agreement 
Series 208. Publication 1618. 10 pp. 5«;. 

Transit of Military Aircraft: Agreement Between the 
United States of America and Mexico — Signed at Wash- 
ington April 1, 1941 ; proclaimed April 28, 1941. Treaty 
Series 971. 6 pp. 5^. 

Other Government Agencies 

Italian Commercial Policy and Foreign Trade, 1922- 
1940 [from the beginning of the Fascist regime in 1922 
to Italy's entry into the war in June 1040]. (U. S. 
Tariff Commission.) xiii, 284 pp. 300. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents. Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIEECTOE OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULL 



H 



■^ m 



riN 



JULY 26, 1941 
Vol. V, No. 109— Publication 1626 







ontents 




The Far East 

Japanese military d-marche in Indochina: Statement 

by Acting Secretary of State Welles 

Informal remarks of the President to the volunteer 

participation committee 

Freezing of Japanese and Chinese assets in the United 

States 

American Republics 

Boimdary dispute between Peru and Ecuador .... 

Europe 

Exchange of representatives between the United States 
and India 

Exchange by the United States and Germany of de- 
tained nationals 

General 

Laying of cornerstone of new wing of Norwegian Lega- 
tion: Remarks by Acting Secretary of State Welles . 

American nationality 

Control of exports in national defense 

The Department 

Division of World Trade Intelligence 

Use of the original records of the Department of State . 
Appointment of officers 

International Conferences, Commissions, Etc. 
Fifth Congress of the Postal Union of the Americas and 
Spain 

Commercial Policy 

Supplemental trade-agreement negotiations with Cuba . 

[over] 



72 



73 



73 



74 



74 



75 
76 

77 

78 
78 
78 



78 



'•'•'"-^TFWFNT OF DOCUMENTS 
AUG 25 1941 



G 



11 ^6 AlfS— CONTINUED. 

Treaty Information Page 

Promotion of peace: Treaty With the Union of South 
Africa Amending the Treaty for the Advancement of 
Peace With Great Britain, Signed September 15, 

1914 81 

Militaiy mission: Agreement With Haiti 81 

Commerce: Declaration on the Juridical Personality of 

Foreign Companies 82 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes 82 

Legislation 83 

Regulations 83 

Publications 84 



The Far East 



JAPANESE MILITARY DEMARCHE IN INDOCHINA 

STATEMENT BY ACTING SECRETARY OF STATE WELLES 



[Released to the press July 24] 

In response to inquiries by press correspond- 
ents, the Acting Secretary made the following 
statement : 

"It will be recalled that in 1940 the Japanese 
Government gave expression on several occa- 
sions to its desire that conditions of disturbance 
should not spread to the region of the Pacific, 
with special references to the Netherlands East 
Indies and French Indochina. This desire was 
expressly concurred in by manj' other govern- 
ments, including the Government of the United 
States. In statements by this Government, it 
was made clear that any alteration in the exist- 
ing status of such areas by other than peaceful 
processes could not but be prejudicial to the 
security and peace of the entire Pacific area 
and that this conclusion was based on a doctrine 
which has universal application. 

"On September 23, 1940, referring to the 
events then rapidly happening in the Indo- 
cliina situation, the Secretary of State stated 
that it seemed obvious that the existing situa- 
tion was being upset and that the changes were 
being achieved under duress. Present develoj)- 
ments relating to Indochina provide clear in- 
dication that further changes are now being 
effected under duress. 

"The present unfortunate situation in which 
the French Government of Vichy and the 
French Government of Indochina find them- 
selves is, of course, well known. It is only too 
clear that they are in no position to i-esist the 
pressure exercised upon them. 



"There is no doubt as to the attitude of the 
Government and people of the United States 
toward acts of aggression carried out by use or 
threat of armed force. That attitude has been 
made abundantly clear. 

"By the course which it has followed and is 
following in regard to Indochina, the Japanese 
Government is giving clear indication that it is 
determined to pursue an objective of expansion 
by force or threat of force. 

"There is not apparent to the Government 
of the United States anj' valid ground upon 
which the Japanese Government would be war- 
ranted in occupying Indochina or establishing 
bases in that area as measures of self-defense. 

"There is not the slightest ground for belief 
on the part of even the most credulous that the 
Governments of the United States, of Great 
Britain, or of the Netherlands have any ter- 
i-itorial ambitions in Indochina or have been 
planning any moves which could have been 
regarded as threats to Japan. This Govern- 
ment can, therefore, only conclude that the 
action of Japan is undertaken because of the 
estimated value to Japan of bases in that region 
primarily for purposes of further and more 
obvious movements of conquest in adjacent 
areas. 

"In the light of previous developments, steps 
such as are now being taken by the Government 
of Japan endanger the peaceful use by peace- 
ful nations of the Pacific. They tend to jeop- 
ardize the procurement by the United States 

71 



72 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



of essential materials such as tin and rubber 
wliich are necessary for the normal economy of 
this country and the consummation of our de- 
fense program. The purchase of tin, rubber, 
oil, or other raw materials in the Pacific area 
on equal terms with other nations requiring 
these materials has never been denied to Japan. 



The steps which the Japanese Government has 
taken also endanger the safety of other areas 
of the Pacific, including the Philippine Islands. 
"Tlie Government and people of this country 
fully realize that such developments bear 
directly upon the vital problem of our national 
security." 



INFORMAL REMARKS OF THE PRESIDENT TO THE VOLUNTEER 
PARTICIPATION COMMITTEE ' 



1 Released to the press by the White House July 24] 
[Excerpt] 

There are lots of things that people don't 
quite understand. You are an information 
bureau to all of them. And I will give you 
the example. 

Here on the East Coast you have been read- 
ing that the Secretary of the Interior, as Oil 
Administrator, is faced with the problem of not 
enougli gasoline to go around in the East Coast, 
and how he is asking everybody to curtail their 
consumjDtion of gasoline. All right. Now I 
am — I miglit be called — an American citizen, 
living in Hyde Park, N. Y. And I say, "That's 
a funny thing. Why am I asked to curtail my 
consumption of gasoline when I read in the 
papers that thousands of tons of gasoline are 
going out from Los Angeles — West Coast — to 
Japan ; and we are helping Japan in what looks 
like an act of aggression?" 

All right. Now the answer is a very simple 
one. There is a world war going on, and has 
been for some time — nearlj' two years. One of 
our efforts, from the very beginning, was to 
prevent the s]n-ead of that world war in certain 
areas where it hadn't started. One of those 
areas is a place called tlie Pacific Ocean — one 
of the largest areas of the earth. There hap- 
pened to be a place in the South Pacific where 
we had to get a lot of things — rubber, tin, and 
so forth and so on — down in the Dutch Indies, 
the Straits Settlements, and Indochina. And 
we had to help get the Australian surplus of 
meat and wheat, and corn, for England. 



' July 24, 1941. 



It was very essential, from our own selfish 
point of view of defense, to prevent a war from 
starting in the South Pacific. So our foreign 
policy was — trying to stop a war from break- 
ing out down tliere. At the same time, from 
the point of view of even France at that time — 
of course, France still had her head above 
water — we wanted to keep that line of supplies 
from Australia and New Zealand going to the 
Near East — all their troops, all their supplies 
that they have maintained in Syria, North 
Africa, and Palestine. So it was essential for 
Great Britain that we trj- to keep the peace 
down there in the South Pacific. 

All right. And now here is a nation called 
Japan. ^Miether they had at that time aggres- 
sive purposes to enlarge their empire south- 
ward, tliey didn't have any oil of their own 
up in the north. Now, if we cut the oil off, 
they probably would have gone down to the 
Dutch East Indies a year ago, and you would 
have had war. 

Therefore, there was — you might call — a 
method in letting this oil go to Japan, with 
the hope — and it has worked for two years — 
of keeping war out of the South Pacific for 
our own good, for the good of tlie defense of 
Great Britain, and the freedom of the seas. 

You people can help to enlighten the average 
citizen who wouldn't hear of that, or doesn't 
read the papers carefully, or listen to the radio 
carefully, to understand what some of these 
apparent anomalies mean. So, on the informa- 
tion end, I think you have got just as great a 
task as you have in the actual organization 
work. 



JULY 26, 1941 73 

FREEZING OF JAPANESE AND CHINESE ASSETS IN THE UNITED STATES 



[Released to the press by the White House July 25] 

In view of the unlimited national emergency 
declared bv the President, he issued, on July 25. 
an P^xecutive order freezing Japanese assets in 
the United States in the same manner in which 
assets of various European countries were 
frozen on June 14, 1941.- This measure, in 
effect, brings all financial and import and ex- 
]iort trade transactions in which Japanese in- 
terests are involved under the control of the 
Government and imposes criminal iienalties for 
violation of the order. 

This Executive order, just as the order of 
June 14. 1941, is designed among other things 
to prevent the use of the financial facilities of 
the United States and trade between Japan and 



F. R. n"15 (Ex. Or. 8S32). 



the United States in ways harmful to national 
defense and American interests, to prevent the 
liquidation in the United States of assets ob- 
tained by duress or conquest, and to curb sub- 
vei-sive activities in the United States. 

At the specific request of Generalissimo 
Chiang Kai-shek, and for the purpose of help- 
ing the Chinese Government, the President has, 
at the same time, extended the freezing control 
to Chinese assets in the United States. The 
administration of the licensing system with re- 
spect to Chinese assets will be conducted with 
a view to strengthening the foreign trade and 
exchange position of the Chinese Government. 
The inclusion of China in the Executive order, 
in accordance with the wishes of the Chinese 
Government, is a continuation of this Govern- 
ment's policy of assisting China. 



American Republics 



BOUNDARY DISPUTE BETWEEN PERU AND ECUADOR 



[Released to tbc press July 24] 

The following telegram was sent, mutatis 
mutandis, on July 24 by the Acting Secretarj' 
of State, Mr. Sumner Welles, to the Minister 
of Foreign Affairs of Peru, Dr. Alfreelo Solf 
y Muro, and the Minister of Foreign Affairs 
of Ecuador, Dr. Julio Tobar Donoso : 

'•I desire to express to Your Excellency the 
whole hearted support by the Government of 
the United States of the appeal which has been 
addressed to you and to His Excellency the 
Minister of Foreign Affairs of Peru (Ecuador) 
by His Excellency the Minister of Foreign 
Affairs of the Argentine Republic in relation 
to recent developments on the frontier between 
Peru and Ecuador. 

"I am sure that Your Excellency will agree 
with me that it would be impossible for the 
three powers which have offered their good 



offices to assist in relieving the situation unless 
immediate measures are taken to i-estore quiet 
in the frontier region. I venture to express 
the hope that Your Excellency will be able to 
announce to the three Governments tendering 
their good offices that such measures either 
have been taken or may immediately be taken. 
"I have had the honor of addressing an 
identic message to the Minister of Foreign 
Affairs of Peru (Ecuador)." 

The following is a translation of the appeal 
addressed, mutath mutandis., to the Govern- 
ments of Peru and Ecuador by the Minister of 
Foreign Affairs of Argentina, Dr. Ruiz- 
Guiiiazii : 

"Press news which unfortunately seems to be 
confirmed reports further incidents occurring 
on the Peruvian-Ecuadoran border, in spite of 



74 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



the appeals made bj' all America to those two 
countries coupled with fraternal desires for 
peace which both Governments accepted with 
words of noble adherence. 

"At a time when in response to this common 
aspiration, we are preparing to study the bases 
for conciliation which have been offered, the 
renewed aggravation of the conflict, the re- 
sponsibility for which is not ours to determine, 
delays a purpose which it is the duty of all, 
at this hour, to maintain and to strengthen both 
for the sake of continental unity and for the 
spirit of solidarity with which we have, from 
all our causes made a common cause. 

"The Argentine Government therefore ad- 
dresses a supreme appeal to the Government of 
Peru (Ecuador) so that, conscious of its re- 
sponsibilitj', and so far as is in its power, the 
activities reported in the press be suspended, 
with the view at least to permit an effective 
start of the conciliation the proceedings which, 
with such justified and necessary hopes were to 
be initiated in Buenos Aires."' 



Europe 



EXCHANGE OF REPRESENTATIVES 
BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES 
AND INDIA 

[Released to the press July 21] 

Tlie Government of the United States and 
the British Government, in consultation with 
the Government of India, have agreed to an 
exchange of representatives on a reciprocal 
basis between the United States and India. 

It is expected that an American Foreign 
Service officer will be designated to represent 
the United States in the capacity of Connnis- 
sioner at Delhi, the capital of India. 

The representative of the Government of 
India in the United States appointed by the 



Governor General is Sir Girja Shankar Bajbai, 
who will bear the designation of Agent General 
for India in the United States and who, it is 
understood, will assume his duties in Wash- 
ington in the earlv autumn. 



The nomination of Thomas M. Wilson, a 
Foreign Service officer of class I, to act as 
Commissioner of the United States of America 
to India, with rank of Minister, was confirmed 
by the Senate on July 24, 1941. 

EXCHANGE BY THE UNITED STATES 
AND GERMANY OF DETAINED NA- 
TIONALS 

As the result of an arrangement between the 
United States and Germany, four American 
citizens who had been held in custody bj- the 
German authorities for alleged offenses of a 
political nature have been exchanged for four 
German nationals who had been detained ni 
this country. 

The American citizens are Jay Allen and 
Richard Hottelet, American newspaper corre- 
spondents,' and Frank Nelson and Ivan Jacob- 
sen, former employees of the American Con- 
sulate in Oslo, Norway. They are underetood 
tc have departed from Germany with the 
American consular group. 

Three of the German nationals, Manfred 
Zapp, Guenther Tonn, and Eugen Buerk, had 
been charged with failure to register as agents 
of a foreign principal in violation of the For- 
eign Agent Registration Act of 1938,- and the 
fourth, Kurt Rieth, had been held on charges 
that he had made misrepresentations at the 
time of his entry into the United States as a 
temporary visitor in March 1941. The Ger- 
mans sailed from the United States for Lisbon 
July 16 on the West Point. 



I 



' See the BuUetin of March 22, 1941, p. 333. 
- .^2 Stat. 631. 



General 



LAYING OF CORNERSTONE OF NEW WING OF NORWEGIAN LEGATION 

REMARKS BY ACTING SECRETARY OF STATE WELLES = 



[Released to the press July 22] 

We are met here today to join in the dedi- 
cation of the new wing of the Norwegian Lega- 
tion in Washington. 

These ceremonies are surely symbolic of the 
hope and of the faith with which we meet. 

Those of US who are citizens of the United 
States are taking part in these dedication cere- 
monies not only because of the welcome priv- 
ilege which it affords us of rendering this trib- 
ute to our traditional friends, the heroic people 
of Norway, but also because we can thus best 
evidence our conviction that the Kingdom of 
Norway of the past, as we have known it, some 
day — and we trust that day will come soon — 
will once more be free and independent. 

We here in the United States will always re- 
member the superb courage with which the 
Norwegian people fought in the defense of 
their homes and of their liberties against the 
overwhelmingly superior strength of an invader 
who had treacherously taken them by surprise. 
We know how bravely they are still fighting 
with their allies on sea and land in many parts 
of the world. 

We shall always remember the heroism of 
their Monarch and of their Crown Prince. 
And we have heard with emotion the words of 
that same Monarch when he said to his people 
only a few days ago, "Hold out. Don't lose 
courage. And be assured that Norway will 
once again be free and independent, provided 
that we all continue to do our duty and our 
utmost to reach our goal in the battle which is 
now being fought." 

Those words seem to us to exemplify the soul 
of a people which will never admit defeat and 
which will never be cowed by alien domination. 

But in a larger sense, these ceremonies con- 



'July 22, 1941. 



stitute an act of faith in the ultimate victory of 
the forces of human liberty ; in the triumph of 
civilization itself over the forces of barbarism. 

I feel that there are joined with us in spirit 
here today, as silent witnesses, the peoples of all 
of the other counti-ies which have been merci- 
lessly overrun during these past two years. I 
know that they believe as we do that out of this 
holocaust into which the nations of the earth 
have been plunged by the criminal obsession of 
world conquest of one man and of the satellites 
who surround him, there can come no peace 
until the Hitlerite government of Germany has 
been finally and utterly destroyed. 

For I am confident that the cause of liberty 
and of freedom will not go down to defeat. 
The determination and courage of free men and 
women everywhere must now be exercised to the 
full limit of endurance until their victory is 
won. 

And yet, I do not doubt that millions are 
asking tonight — millions in England and in 
China — millions of enslaved peoples in Nor- 
way and in the other countries now temporarily 
occupied — millions in the countries which have 
not experienced war — yes, and millions in Ger- 
many and in Italy — are asking, What does the 
future hold for us after this struggle is over? 

Does the end of the present carnage mean 
only a return to ruined homes; to the graves 
of slaughtered wives and children; to poverty 
and want; to social upheaval and economic 
chaos ; to the same gray and empty years of con- 
fusion and bitterness, so barren in vision and 
in human accomplishment, which marked the 
decades after the termination of the last war? 

It seems to me that those of us who are for- 
tunate enough to be able to live as citizens of 
the free American republics have our great 
responsibility in the framing of the answer 
to that question. 

75 



76 

For we all of us now see clearly, if we did 
not before, that no matter how great our Ameri- 
can capacity for defense may be, no matter how 
perfect our hemispheric system may become, 
our future welfare must inevitably be contingent 
upon the existence in the rest of the world of 
equally peace-minded and equally secure peoples 
who not only will not, but cannot, become a 
source of potential danger to us in the New 
World. 

I feel it is not premature for me to suggest 
that the free governments of peace-loving na- 
tions everywhere should even now be consider- 
ing and discussing the way in which they can 
best prepare for the better day which must 
come, when the present contest is ended in the 
victory of the forces of liberty and of human 
freedom and in the crushing defeat of those 
who are sacrificing mankind to their own lust 
for power and f<n- loot. 

At the end of the last war, a great President 
of the United States gave his life in the struggle 
to further the realization of the splendid vision 
which he had held up to the eyes of suffering 
humanity — tlie vision of an ordered world 
governed by law. 

The League of Nations, as he conceived it, 
failed in part because of the blind selfishness of 
men here in the United States as well as in 
other parts of the world; it failed because of 
its utilization by certain powei's primarily to 
advance their own political and commercial am- 
bitions; but it failed chiefly because of the fact 
that it was forced to operate, by those who dom- 
inated its councils, as a moans of maintaining 
the sfahis quo. It was never enabled to operate 
as its chief spokesman had intended, as an elas- 
tic and impartial instrument in bringing about 
peaceful and equitable adjustments between na- 
tions as time and circumstance proved necessary. 

Some adequate instrumentality must unques- 
tionably be found to achieve such adjustments 
when the nations of the earth again undertake 
the task of restoring law and order to a disas- 
trously shaken world. 

But whatever the mechanism which may be 
devised, of two things I am unalterably 
convinced : 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

First, that the abolition of offensive arma- 
ments and the limitation and reduction of de- 
fensive armaments and of the tools which make 
the construction of such armaments possible, 
can only be undertaken through some rigid form 
of international super-vasion and control, and 
that without such practical and essential control 
no real disarmament can ever be achieved ; and 

Second, that no peace which may be made 
in the future would be valid or lasting unless 
it established fully and adequately the natural 
rights of all peoples to equal economic enjoy- 
ment. So long as any one people or any one 
government possesses a monopoly over natural 
resources or raw materials which are needed by 
all peoples, there can be no basis for a world 
order based on justice and on peace. 

I cannot believe that people of good-will 
will not once more strive to realize the great 
ideal of an association of nations through which 
the freedom, the happiness, and the security of 
all peoples may be achieved. 

That word, security, represents the end upon 
which tlie hearts of men and women eveiywhere 
today are set. 

Whether it be security from bombing from 
the air, or from mass destruction; Mhether it 
be security from want, disease, and starvation; 
whether it be security in enjoying that in- 
alienabk^ riglit which everj- human being should 
possess of living out his life in peace and happi- 
ness, people throughout the length and breadth 
of the world are demanding security, and free- 
dom from fear. 

That is the objective before us all today — to 
try to find the means of bringing that to pass. 

"Not in vain the distance beacons." 

AMERICAN NATIONALITY 

Additional regidations issued pursuant to the 
Nationality Act of 1940 governing procedure 
for overcoming presumption of expatriation 
were issued jointly on July 12, 1941 by the 
Department of State and the Department of 
Justice. The full text of the regulations in 
codified form is printed in the Federal Regis- 
ter of July 22, 1941, pages 3581 and 3579. For 
previous regulations, see the BuUsthi of Jan- 
uary 4, 1941, page 9. 



JULY 2 6, 194 1 



77 



CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN 
NATIONAL DEFENSE 

Collectors of customs were informed on Jul}' 
21 as follows: 

"General license GUS-H 19 has been issued 
today authorizing: exportations to Panama of 
articles and materials subject to export control 
requii-ed for hi<Thwa}' projects under super- 
vision Public Koads Administration. License 
GUS-H 9 authorizes same exportations to Costa 
Rica and GUS-H 18 to Nicaragua. You are 
authorized to permit such exportations against 
these general licenses only when presented with 
certification by United States Despatch Agent 
that material meets above specified require- 
ments." 

Collectors of customs were informed on July 
24, 1941 that the following general licenses have 
been issued to become effective immediately: 





Canada 


Great 
Britain 


Philip- 
pine 
Islands 


Derris root, squill, cube root, pyre- 


GKU 1 

GKR 1 
GKX 1 

GKO 1 
GKWl 


GKU 2 

GKR 2 
GKX 2 

GKG 2 
GKW2 


GKU 63 


Alkyd resins, urea formaldehyde resins, 
and phenol formaldehyde resins 


GKR 63 
GKX 63 


Acetic acid, acetic aldehyde, and formal- 


GKG 63 




GKW 63 







The following general licenses have been 
issued to become effective August 1, ,1941, as 
follows: 





Canada 


Great 
Britain 


Philip- 
pine 
Islands 




GKW: 
OKY I 
GKZ 1 


GKW 2 
GKY 2 
GKZ 2 


GKW 63 


Butyl Acetate 


GKY 63 




GKZ 63 







"Reference is made to the President's procla- 
mation of July 17, 1941,^ regarding exports to 
blocked nationals, and to the list of such 
blocked nationals which has been furnished 
you by the Commissioner of Customs." 

"The regulations applicable to exportations 
to consignees named in the list of blocked na- 
tionals shall be effective on and after July 27, 
1941. On and after July 27 both an export 
license and an official statement of the fact that 
it has been determined that the prohibition of 
the exportation would work unusual hardships 
on American interests should be required in re- 
spect to exportations to the consignees named 
in the list of blocked nationals in accordance 
with the President's proclamation of July 17. 

"The requirement that the name and address 
of each ultimate consignee be set forth either in 
the export declaration or in a document sub- 
mitted as a supplement thereto shall become 
effective on August 11, 1941. A statement re- 
garding this requirement appears in Export 
Control Schedule Z, copies of which are be- 
ing furnished you by the Commissioner of 
Customs." ' 

[Released to the press July 24] 

In accordance with the provisions of the 
Executive order of March 15, 1941, the Secre- 
tary of State on July 24 issued general license 
no. GIT-P/CA, which authorizes the passage 
through the Canal Zone, without the require- 
ment of an individual export license, of in- 
transit shipments of articles and materials 
under export control to Panama from all other 
foreign destinations and from Panama to all 
other foreign destinations. This license applies 
only in respect to shipments which are im- 
ported into or exported from Panama and which 
pass in transit through the Canal Zone. 



On July 23, 1941, collectors of customs were 
informed as follows : 



'■ Bulletin of July 19, 1941, p. 41. 
'6 F.R. 3557. 
• 6 F.R. 3584. 



78 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Department 



DIVISION OF WORLD TRADE 
INTELLIGENCE 

The following departmental order (no. 956) 
was signed by the Acting Secretary of State on 
July 21, 1941 : 

"There is hereby established in the Depart- 
ment of State a Division of World Trade In- 
telligence, the routing symbol of which will be 
WT, to handle the activities and problems en- 
visaged in the President's Proclamation of July 
17, 1941, relating to trade with aliens whose 
interests are inimical to the United States. 

"Mr. John S. Dickey is designated Acting 
Chief of the Division which will function in 
its present quarters in the Department of Com- 
merce Building under the general administra- 
tive supervision of Assistant Secretary Dean 
Acheson in close collaboration with the Division 
of Commercial Affairs and the other divisions 
and offices of the Department concerned. . . . 

"The provisions of this Order shall be 
effective on July 21, 1941." 

USE OF THE ORIGINAL RECORDS OF 
THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

[Released to the press July 21] 

The following departmental order (no. 95c>) 
was signed by the Acting Seci'etary of State on 
July 18, 194l": 

"By Departmental Order 796 of June 19, 
1939,^ the confidential or unpublished records 
of the Department prior to December 31, 1918 
were made available for consultation by persons 
who are not officials of the United States Gov- 
ernment, subject to conditions set forth in that 
order. The provisions of that order are hereby 



amended to make available to such persons the 
lecords of the Department up to January 1, 
1921, with the exception of the Department's 
unpublished records concerning the Paris Peace 
Conference of 1919 and related subjects. After 
the publication of the Paris Peace Conference 
volumes of Foreign Relations of the United 
States, consideration will be given to the possi- 
bility of making the records on the Peace Con- 
ference and related subjects available to quali- 
fied persons." 

APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

By Departmental Order 958, the Acting Sec- 
retary of State designated Miss Marjorie Moss 
as an Assistant Chief of the Visa Division, 
effective on the date of the order, July 24, 1941. 



International Conferences, 
Commissions, Etc. 



' Bulletin of July 1, 1939, p. 10. 



FIFTH CONGRESS OF THE POSTAL 
UNION OF THE AMERICAS AND 
SPAIN 

[Released to the press July 22] 

This Government has accepted the invitation 
of the Brazilian Government to participate in 
the Fifth Congress of the Postal Union of 
the Americas and Spain, which will convene at 
Rio de Janeiro on September 1, 1941, and the 
President has approved the designation of the 
following persons as the official delegates on the 
part of the United States : 

Mr. John E. Lamlell, director, International Postal 

Service, Post Office Department 
Mr. George R. Hartman. chief of section, International 

Postal Service, Post Office Department 

Tlie United States is a member of the Postal 
Union of the Americas and Spain and con- 
tributes an annual sum toward the expenses of 
the International Office of the Union. 



Commercial Policy 



SUPPLEMENTAL TRADE-AGREEMENT NEGOTIATIONS WITH CUBA 



[Released to the press July 26] 

On July 26, 1941 the Acting Secretnry of 
State issued formal notice of intention to nego- 
tiate a trade agreement with the Government 
of Cuba supplemental to the agreement con- 
cluded August 24, 1934 as amended by the sup- 
plementary agreement signed on December 18, 
1939.= 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
issued simultaneously a notice setting the dates 
for the submission to it of information and 
views in writing and of applications to appear 
at public hearings to be held by the Committee, 
and fixing the time and place for the opening 
of the hearings. 

There follows a list of products which will 
come under consideration for the possible grant- 
ing of concessions by the Government of the 
United States. Representations which inter- 
ested pereons may wish to make to the Com- 
mittee for Reciprocity Information need not be 
confined to tlie articles appearing on this list 
but may cover any article of actual or potential 
interest in the import or export trade of the 
United States with Cuba. However, only the 
articles contained in the list issued July 26 or 
in any supplementary list issued later will come 
under consideration for the possible granting of 
concessions by the Government of the United 
States. 

Suggestions with i-egard to the form and con- 
tent of presentations addressed to the Commit- 
tee for Reciprocity Information are included 
in a statement released by that Committee on 
December 13, 1937. 



Lisit of Products on Which the United States 
Will Consider Granting Concessions to 
Cuba 

Note: For the purpose of facilitating identi- 
fication of the articles listed, reference is made 
in the list to the paragraph numbers of the 
tariff schedules in the Tariff Act of 1930. 

In the event that articles which are at pres- 
ent regarded as classifiable under the descrip- 
tions included in the list are excluded there- 
from by judicial decision or otherwise prior to 
the conclusion of the agreement, the list will 
nevertheless be considered as including such 
articles. 



United 
States 
Tariff 
Act of 
1930 
Paragraph 



'Executive Agreement Series 67 and 165, respec- 
tively. 



Description of article 



Earthy or mineral substances wholly 
or partly manufactured and articles, 
wares, and materials (crude or ad- 
vanced in condition), composed 
wholly or in chief value of earthy or 
mineral substances, not specially pro- 
vided for, whether susceptible of 
decoration or not, if not decorated 
in any manner: 
Marble chip or granite 

Sugars, tank bottoms, sirups of cane 
juice, melada, concentrated melada, 
concrete and concentrated molasses, 
testing by the polariscope not above 
75 sugar degrees, and all mixtures 
containing sugar and water, testing 
by the polariscope above 50 sugar 
degrees and not above 75 sugar de- 
grees _ 

and for each additional sugar degree 
shown by the polariscopic test 



■ 96° sugar $0,009 per pound. 



Present rate of 
duty (applicable 
to Cuban products) 



24% ad valorem 



$0.006165 per lb. 

$0.000135 per lb. 
additional, and 
fractions of a de- 
gree in propor- 
tion* 



79 



80 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



United 






States 




Present rate of 


Tariff 


DcvScription of article 


duty (applicable 


Act of 

1930 

Paragraph 




to Cuban products) 


502 


Molasses and sugar sirups, not spe- 

^ cially provided for; 

If containing soluble nonsugar solids 
(excluding any foreign substance 
that may have been added) equal 
to more than 6 per centum of the 
total soluble solids: 






Testing not above 48 per centum 


$0.0013 H per gal.' 




total sugars. 






'I'esting above"^487per centum 


$0.0014% addi- 




total sugars. 


tional for each 
per centum of 
total sugars and 
fractions of a per 
centum in pro- 
portion.' 




Other; 






Testing not above 48 per centum 


$0,002 per gal. 




total sugars. 






Testing above 48 per centum total 


.$0.0022 additional 




sugars. 


for each per cen- 
ttmi of total sugars 
and fractions of 
a per centum in 
proportion. 


S02 


Molasses not imported to be commer- 


$0.00024 per lb. of 




cially used for the extraction of sugar 


total sugars 




or for human consumption. 




601 


Wrapper tobacco, and filler tobacco 
when mixed or packed with more 
than 35 per centum of wrapper to- 
bacco; 






If unstemmed _ --- 


$1.20 per lb. 


601 


Filler tobacco not sjiecially provided 
for. other than cigarette leaf tobacco; 






If unstemmed 


$0,175 per Ib.« 




If stemmed 


$0.25 per lb.' 


603 


Scrap tobacco 


$0,175 per lb.' 


605 


Cigars and cheroots]o( all kinds. 


$2.25 per lb. and 
12W% ad valorem 


701 


Beef and veal, fresh, chilled, or frozen.. 


$0.M8 per lb. 


"43 


Grapefruit ._ 


$0,012 or $0,006 per 






lb.'' 



' These rates nf duty, applicable to imports of Cuban origin, were 
reduced following the granting of a concession on the products affected 
in the trade agreement with the United Kingdom, effective January 1, 
1939. That a.erecment limits the quantity of molasses and sugar sirups 
which may be entered from all countries in any calendar year, at the 
reduced rates under these items, to a total of 1,500,000 gallons. 

« Under the snpplementary trade agreement with Cuba, effective 
December 23, I'li'i reductions in duty were granted on stemmed or un- 
stemmed filler tobacco (other than cigarette leaf tobacco) and scrap tobac- 
co of Cuban oricin, the reduced rates being applicable to a quota of 
22,000,000 poup'ls (unstemmed equivalent) in any calendar year; any 
imports from Cuba in excess of this quantity being subject to rates of 
$0.28 per lb. on unstemmed filler tobacco and scrap tobacco and $0.40 per 
lb. on stemmc'l filler tobacco. These rates were bound against increase. 

' The rate of duty applicable to Cuban grapefruit when imported and 
entered for consumption during the period from .\ugust 1 to September 30 
inclusive, in any year, was reduced from $0,012 to $0,006 per lb., the maxi- 
mum reduction permitted under the authority of the Trade Agreements 
Act, in the trade agreement with Cuba effective September 3, 1934. 



Department of State 

supplemental tk.\de-agfeement negotiations 
with cuba 

Puhlic Notice 

Pursuant to section 4 of an act of Congress 
approved June 12. 1934, entitled "An Act to 
Amend the Tariff Act of 1930", as extended by 
Public Resolution 61. approved April 12. 1940. 
and to Executive Order 6750 of June 27. 1934, 
I hereby give notice of intention to negotiate 
a trade agreement with the Government of Cuba 
to supplement and amend the agreement, signed 
August 24, 1934 as amended by the supplemen- 
tary agreement signed December 18. 1939. 

Ail presentations of information and views 
in writing and applications for supplemental 
oral presentation of views witli resjiect \o the 
negotiation of such agi-eement should be sub- 
mitted to the Committee for Reciprocity Infor- 
mation in accordance with the announcement 
of this date issued by that Committee concern- 
ing the manner and dates for the submission of 
briefs and applications, and the time set for 
public hearings. 

Sumner AVelle.s 
Acting Secretary of State 

Washington, D. C, 

July 26, 19hU 

Committee for Reciprocity Information 

strpklemental trade-agreement negotiations 
with cuba 

Public Notice 

Closing date for submission of briefs, August 
23, 1941 ; closing date for application to be heard, 
August 23. 1941 ; public hearings ojien, Septem- 
ber 8, 1941. 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
hereby gives notice that all information and 
views in writing, and all applications for sup- 
plemental oral presentation of \news, in regard 
to the negotiation of a supplemental trade 
agreement with the Government of Cuba, of 
which notice of intention to negotiate has been 



JULY 26, 1941 

issued by the Acting Secretary of State on tliis 
date, shall be submitted to the Committee for 
Keciprocity Information not later than 12 
o'clock noon, August 23, 1941. Such commu- 
nications should be addressed to "The Chair- 
man, Committee for Reciprocity Information, 
Tariff Commission Building, Eighth and E 
Streets NW., Washington, D. C." 

A public hearing will be held, beginning at 
10 a.m. on September 8, 1941, before the Com- 
mittee for Reciprocity Information, in the hear- 
ing room of the Tariff Commission in the Tariff 
Commission Building, where supplemental oral 
statements will be heard. 

Six copies of written statements, either type- 



81 

written or printed, shall be submitted, of which 
one copy shall be sworn to. Appearance at 
hearings before the Committee may be made 
only by those persons who have filed written 
statements and who have within the time pre- 
scribed made written application for a hearing, 
and statements made at such hearings shall be 
under oath. 

By direction of the Committee for Reciprocity 
Information this 26th day of July 1941. 
E. M. Whitcomb 

Acting Secretary 
Washixgton, D. C, 
July 26, IHl. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



PROMOTION OF PEACE 

TREATY WITH THE UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA AMEND- 
ING THE TREATY FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF PEACE 
WITH GREAT BRITAIN, SIGNED SEPTEMBER 15, 1914 

[Released to the press July 22] 

Reference is made to the Department's press 
release of March 19, 1941 concerning the Treaty 
for the Advancement of Peace between the 
United States and the Union of Sou^h Africa.^ 

The treaty provides for the establishment of 
an international commission to be appointed 
within six months of the date of the exchange 
of ratifications. The commission will be com- 
posed of five members, consisting of one na- 
tional member chosen by each of the partici- 
pating Govermnents and one non-national 
member chosen by each Government from some 
third country. The fifth member, or joint 
commissioner, will be chosen by agreement be- 
tween the Govermnent of the United States and 
the Government of the Union of South Africa, 



' See Bulletin of March 22, 1941, p. 344. 



it being understood that he shall be a citizen of 
some country of which no other member of 
the commission is a citizen. 

The President has designated the following- 
named persons to serve on the international 
commission on behalf of this Government : 

The Honorable Elbert Duncan Thomas, United States 
Senate, American national commissioner 

His Excellency Dr. Sao-Ke Alfred Sze, Former Chinese 
Ambassador to the United States, American non- 
national commissioner 

MILITARY MISSION 

AGREEMENT WITH HAITI 

In conformity with the request of the Gov- 
ernment of Haiti an agreement was signed at 
Port-au-Prince on May 23, 1941 providing for 
the detail to Haiti of ofBcere of the United 
States Army to cooperate with the Haitian 
Government, the Chief of Staff of the Garde 
d'Haiti, and the personnel of the Garde d'Haiti 
with a view to enhancing the efficiency of the 
Garde d'Haiti. 



82 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The agi'eement. is made eii'ective for a peinorl 
of four years from the date of signature. The 
provisions are similar in general to pro^^sions 
contained in agi'eements between the United 
States and other American republics concerning 
the detail of officers of the United States Army 
to advise the armed forces of those countries. 

COMMERCE 

DECLARATION ON THE JUnmiCAL PERSONALITY OF 
FOREIGN COMPANIES 

United States 

The instrument of ratification by the United 
States of the Declaration on the Juridical Per- 
sonality of Foreign Companies, which was 
opened for signature at the Pan American 
Union on June 25, 1936 and signed by the 
United States on June 23, 1939, was deposited 
with the Union on July 10, 1911. The ratifica- 
tion was made subject to the understandings as 
follows : 

"1. It is understood that tlie companies de- 
scribed in the Declaration shall be permitted to 
sue or defend suits of any kind, without the re- 
quirement of registration or domestication. 

"2. It is further understood that the Govern- 
ment of the United States may terminate the 
obligations arising under the Declaration at 
any time after twelve months' notice given in 
advance." 



The Declaration has been signed by the 
United States of America, Chile, Dominican 
Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Nicaragua, 
Peru, and Venezuela. 

When signing the Declaration statements 
formulating its principle were made by Chile 
and the Dominican ReiDublic, which read in 
translations as follows : 

For Chile: 

"On signing the present Protocol, the Repre- 
sentative of Chile formulates as follows the 
principle of the above-inserted Declaration on 
the Juridical Personality of Foreign Com- 
panies ; 



■'Mercantile companies constituted mider the 
laws of one of the signatory States with domicile 
in the territory thereof, not having any com- 
pany office, branch, or representation in any 
other of the signatory States may, nevertheless, 
appear in court in the territory of these latter 
as plaintiffs or as defendants, subject to the laws 
of the country, and execute civil and commercial 
acts which are not contrary to its laws, except 
that, for the continued realization of the said 
acts so that they amount to a fulfilling of the 
function of the company the mercantile com- 
pany must have special authorization from the 
competent authorities according to the laws of 
the country where such acts are to be carried 
out." 

For the Dominican Republic : 

"On signing the present Protocol, the Repre- 
sentative of the Dominican Republic formulates 
as follows the principle of the Declaration 
inserted above : 

'"Companies established under the laws of one 
of the Contracting States with domicile in the 
territory thereof, not having any company 
office, branch, or representation in any other of 
the Contracting States, may, nevertheless, exe- 
cute in the territory of the said States juridical 
acts which are not contrary to their laws and 
may appear in court as plaintiffs or defendants, 
subject to the laws of the country." 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press July 2(5] 

Tlie following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since July 12, 1941: 

Career Officers 

Samuel W. Honaker, of Piano, Tex., on detail 
in the Department of State, has been assigned 
as Consul General at Istanbul, Turkey. 



JULY 26, 1941 



83 



George H. Winters, of Downs, Kans., Consul 
at Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, has been 
assigned for duty in the Department of State. 

Walter H. McKinney, of Sault Ste. Marie, 
Mich., Consul at London, England, has been 
assigned for duty in the Department of State. 

Theodore C. Acliilles, of Washington, D. C, 
Third Secretary of Embassy at London, 
England, has been assigned for duty in the 
Department of State. 

Archibald R. Randolph, of Casanova, Va., 
Vice Consul at Caracas, Venezuela, has been 
designated Assistant Commercial Attache at 
that post. 

Joe D. Walstrom, of Mexico, Mo., Vice Consul 
at Buenos Aires, Argentina, has been designated 
Assistant Commercial Attache at that post. 

Tlie assignment of William C. Trimble, of 
Baltimore, Md., as Third Secretary of Embassy 
and Vice Consul at Lima, Peru, has been can- 
celed. In lieu thereof, Mr. Trimble has been 
designated Tliird Ssci'etary of Embassy at 
Mexico City, Mexico. 

Russell W. Benton, of Buffalo, N. Y., Vice 
Consul at London, England, has been assigned 
for duty in the Department of State. 

William Barnes, of Belmont, Mass., Third 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at 
Buenos Aires, Argentina, has been assigned for 
duty in the Department of State. 

XON-CAREEB OFFICERS 

Erich W. A. Hoffmann, of Milwaukee, Wis., 
Vice Consul at Moscow, U.S.S.R., has been 
assigned as Vice Consul at Manila, P. I. 

Sabin J. Dalferes, of Donaldsonville, La., who 
has been serving as Vice Consul at Hamburg, 
Germany, has been assigned as Vice Consul at 
Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico. 

Edward S. Parker, of Calhoun Falls, S. C, 
who has been serving as Vice Consul at Cologne, 
Germany, has been assigned as Vice Consul at 
Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Mexico. 

James A. Noel, of San Diego, Calif., Vice 
Consul at Mazatlan, Sinaloa, Mexico, has been 
assigned as Vice Consul at Guadalajai'a, Jalisco, 
Mexico. 



Legislation 



.Joint Resolution To amend further the amended 
joint resolutiou, approved August 16, 1937 {.50 Stat. 
668), concerning the importation of articles for ex- 
hibition at the New York World's Fair, to permit 
transfer of liability for duty on articles so imported, 
and to further amend the amended joint resolution 
approved May 18, 1937 (50 Stat. 187), concerning the 
importation of articles for exhibition at the Golden 
Gate International Exposition, to permit transfer of 
liability for duty on articles so imported, and for other 
purposes. [H. J. Res. 173.] Approved July 18, 1941. 
(Public Law 18.5, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 2 pp. 

Copyright — Preserving the Rights of Authors. 
(S. Rept 571, 77th Cong., 1st sess., on H. R. 4826.) 
2 pp. 

Punishment for Sabotage Against Materials Intended 
for Export. (H. Rept. 981, 77th Cong., 1st sess., on 
H. R. 10.54.) 3 pp. 

Strategic and Critical Materials. (H. Rept. 982, 
77th Cong., 1st sess., on H. Res. 162.) [Includes state- 
ment on functions of the Department of State in the 
administration of export control, p. 11.] 42 pp. 

Resolution Extending greetings and felicitations to 
the Chamber of Deputies and people of the Republic 
of Argentina on the occasion of the celebration of 
the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Anniversary of tlie 
Declaration of Argentine Independence. (H. Res. 268, 
77th Cong., 1st sess.) July 9, 1941. 2 pp. 



Regulations 



The following Government regulations may 
be of interest to readers of the BidJetin: 

Restrictions on Imports and Exports Subject to Proc- 
lamation No. 2497 and the Proclaimed List of Certain 
Blocked Nationals. (Treasury Department: Bureau 
of Customs.) [Treasury Decision 50433.] July 22, 
1941. 6 Federal Register 3672. 

Export Control Schedule No. 14 [designating as of 
August 1, 1941 the forms, conversions, and derivatives 
of copper, brass and bronze, and zinc (items 1, 2, and 
3, respectively, proclamation 2453) to supersede the 
same in Export Control Schedules 1 ; 1, 2, and 8 ; and 
1 and 2, respectively ; and adding to the forms, conver- 
sions, and derivatives of chemicals (item 1, proclama- 



84 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BCTLLETIN 



tion 2496).] July 22, 1&41. (Administrator of Export 
Control.) 6 Federal Register 3Q72. 

Export Control Schedule Z [determining that effec- 
tive July 21, 1941 the forms, conversions, and deriva- 
tives of other military equipment or munitions, or 
component parts thereof, or machinery, tools, or ma- 
terial, or supplies necessary for the manufact\iic, 
servicing, or operation thereof (section 3 of proclama- 
tion of July 17, 1941) shall consist of the commodities 
listed.] July 19, 1941. (Administrator of Export 
Control. ) 6 Federal Register 3584. 



Publications 



Depaetment of State 

Treaties Submitted to the Senate, 1940: Procedure 
During 1940 on Certain Treaties Submitted to the 
Senate 1923-1940 and Their Status as of December 31, 
1940. Publication 1620. iv, 12 pp. 100. 

Publications of the Department of State (a list 
cumulative from October 1, 1929). July 1, 1941. 
Publication 1621. 26 pp. Free. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, J2.75 a year 

PDBUSBEO WEEKLY WITH THE APPBOVAI, OF THB DIBECTOB Or THE BDBEAU OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 



AUGUST 2, 1941 
Vol. V, No. 110— Publication 1628 







ontents 



The Far East Page 

Agreement between Japanese and French Governments 
regarding French Indochina: Statement by Acting 
Secretary of State Welles 87 

Europe 

Relations with the Provisional Government of Czecho- 
slovakia 88 

Contributions for relief in belligerent countries: 

List of registrants 89 

Tabulation of contributions 90 

Government personnel arriving from Europe 90 

American Republics 

Boundary dispute between Ecuador and Peru .... 93 
Office ot the Coordinator of Inter- American Affairs . . 94 
Visit of members of House Appropriations Subcommit- 
tee to other American republics 95 

Comment by Acting Secretary of State Welles on state- 
ment by Senator Clark of Idaho 96 

General 

Economic Defense Board 97 

The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals: 

Issuance of Supplement No. 1 98 

Purpose of the list 99 

Immigration visa statistics 99 

Control of exports in national defense 100 

Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, Etc. 

Monthly statistics 101 

[over] 




y.S. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMtNU 

AUG 35 1941 



Contents-coNTiNVEv. 



The Foreign Service page 

Personnel changes 104 

International Conferences, Commissions, Etc. 

International Assembly of Surgeons 104 

Treaty Information 

Commerce: Inter- American Coffee Agreement .... 105 
Telecommunications: International Telecommunication 

Convention 105 

Legisl.\tion 105 

Regulations 105 

Publications - 106 



The Far East 



AGREEMENT BETWEEN JAPANESE AND FRENCH GOVERNMENTS 
REGARDING FRENCH INDOCHINA 

STATEMENT BY ACTING SECRETARY OF STATE WELLES 



[Roleused to the press August 2] 

The Acting Secretary of State, Mr. Sumner 
Welles, issued the following statement on Au- 
gust 2 in reply to inquiries from the press con- 
cerning the agreement entered into between the 
French and Japanese Govermnents regarding 
French Indochina : 

"The French Government at Vichy has given 
repeated assurances to the Government of the 
United States that it would not cooperate with 
the Axis powers beyond the obligations imposed 
on it by the armistice, and that it would defend 
the territory under its control against any 
aggressive action on the part of third jDOwers. 

"This Government has now received informa- 
tion of the terms of the agi'eement between the 
French and Japanese Governments covering the 
so-called 'common defense' of French Indo- 
china. In effect, this agi'eement virtually turns 
over to Japan an important part of the French 
Empire. 

"Effort has been made to justify this agree- 
ment on the ground that Japanese 'assistance' 
is needed because of some menace to the terri- 
torial integrity of French Indochina by other 
powers. The Government of the United States 
is unable to accept this explanation. As I 
stated on July 24, there is no question of any 

405424 — 41 1 



threat to French Indochina, unless it lies in the 
expansionist aims of the Japanese Government. 

"The turning over of bases for military 
operations and of territorial rights under pre- 
text of 'common defense' to a power whose 
territorial aspirations are apparent, here pre- 
sents a situation which has a direct bearing 
upon the vital problem of American security. 
For reasons which are beyond the scope of any 
known agreement, France has now decided to 
permit foreign troops to enter an integral part 
of its Empire, to occupy bases therein, and to 
prepare operations within French territory 
which may be directed against other peoples 
friendly to the people of France. 

"The French Government at Vichy has re- 
peatedly declared its determination to resist 
all encroachments upon the sovereignty of its 
territories. However, when German and 
Italian forces availed themselves of certain 
facilities in Syria to carry on operations 
directed against the British, the French Gov- 
ernment, although this was a plain encroach- 
ment on territory under French control, did 
not resist. But when the British undertook 
defense operations in the territory of Syria, 
the French Goveriunent did resist. 

"Under these circumstances, this Govern- 
ment is impelled to question whether the 

87 



88 



DEPABTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



French Government at Vichy in fact proposes 
to maintain its declared policy to pi'eserve for 
the French people the territories both at home 
and abroad which have long been under 
French sovereignty. 

"This Government, mindful of its traditional 
friendship for France, has deeply sympa- 
thized with the desire of the French people to 
maintain their territories and to preserve them 



intact. In its relations with the French Gov- 
ernment at Vichy and with the local French 
authorities in French territories, the United 
States will be governed by the manifest effec- 
tiveness with which those authorities endeavor 
to protect these teri'itories from domination 
and control by those powers which are seeking 
to extend their rule by force and conquest, or 
by the threat thereof." 



Europe 



RELATIONS WITH THE PROVISIONAL GOVERNMENT OF CZECHOSLOVAKIA 



[Released to the press July 30] 

The American Ambassador to Great Britain, 
Mr. John G. Winant, has been instructed to 
deliver the following note to the Foreign Min- 
ister of the Provisional Government of Czecho- 
slovakia in Great Britain : 

"The Secretary of State has directed me to 
inform Your Excellency that the Government 
of the United States, mindful of the traditional 
friendship and special interest, which has ex- 
isted between the peoples of the United States 
and Czechoslovakia since the foundation of the 
Czechoslovak Republic, has watched with ad- 
miration the efforts of the people of Czecho- 
slovakia to maintain their national existence, 
notwithstanding the suppression of the institu- 
tions of free government in their country. 

"The American Government has not acknowl- 
edged that the temporary extinguishment of 
their liberties has taken from the people of 
Czechoslovakia their rights and privileges in 
international affairs, and it has continued to 
recognize the diplomatic and consular repre- 
sentatives of Czechoslovakia in the United 
States in the full exercise of their functions. 

"In furtherance of its support of the na- 
tional aspirations of the people of Czechoslo- 



vakia the Government of the United States is 
now i^repared to enter into formal relations 
with the Provisional Government established 
at London for the prosecution of the war and 
tlie restoration of the freedom of the Czecho- 
slovak people, under the Presidency of Dr. 
Bcnes, and while continuing its relations with 
the Czechoslovak Legation at Washington, 
would be pleased to accredit to the Provisional 
Government an Envoy Extraordinary and 
Minister Plenipotentiary, to reside in London, 
for the conduct of relations pending the rees- 
tablishment of the Government in Czecho- 
slovakia. 

"I shall later communicate with Your 
Excellency regarding the diplomatic represent- 
ative whom my Government would like to 
designate." 

It should be noted that the relations between 
the Government of the United States and the 
Provisional Government of Czechoslovakia 
will, in accordance with the above note, be con- 
ducted in a manner similar to that applicable 
to other Governments temporarily established 
in London, or in the coui'se of establishment 
there. 



AUGUST 2, 1941 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN 
BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 

LIST OF REGISTRANTS 
[Released to the press July 28] 

The following persons and organizations are 
now registered with the Secretary of State, pur- 
suant to section 8 of the Neutrality Act of 1939, 
for the solicitation and collection of contribu- 
tions to be used in belligerent countries for 
medical aid and assistance or for food and cloth- 
ing to relieve liuman suifering.^ The countries 
to which contributions are being sent are given 
in parentheses. 

•162. La Prevoyance, in care of Mr. Gaston Thierry, 
8 Garrison Street, Boston, Mass. (France) 

463. Tlie Canadian-American Council, 72 First Avenue, 
Westwood. N. J. (Canada) 

464. Albanian War Victims Relief Association, Room 
1117, 205 West Wacker Drive, Chicago, 111. (Albania) 

465. American Jugoslav Defense League, Napredak 
HaU, Lawrence Road, Cupertino, Calif. (Yugo- 
slavia) 

466. Coordinating Council of French Relief Societies, 
Inc., 4 West Fifty-eighth Street, New York, N. Y. 
(France) 

467. British Distressed Areas Fund, Inc., 8745 Sunset 
Boulevard, Hollywood, Calif. (England) 

468. War Relief and Bundles for Scotland, 1606 North 
Cahuenga Boulevard, Hollywood, Calif. (Scotland) 

469. United Free France. 465 Lexington Avenue, New 
York, N. Y. (Free France) 

470. American Friends of Yugoslavia, Inc., Room 808, 
8 West Fortieth Street, New York, N. Y. (Yugo- 
slavia) 

471. The Queen Elizabeth Fund, Inc., 317-325 South 
State Street, Dover, Del. (Great Britain) 

472. Universalist General Convention, 6 Beacon Street, 
Boston, Mass. (England and France) 

473. Anglo-American Lodge No. 78 of the American 
Order Sons of St. George, 17 East Forty-second 
Street, New York, N.Y. (Great Britain) 

474. Jugoslav War Relief Association of Southern 
California, in care of Mr. Ivo H. Lopizich, 111 West 
Seventh Street, Los Angeles, Calif. (Yugoslavia) 

475. Brooke County Allied War Relief, Follansbee, 
W.Va. (Great Britain and Greece) 



^For prior registrants, see the Bulletin of May 17, 
1941, p. 584. 



476. American Red Mogen Dovid for Palestine, Inc., 
220 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y. (Palestine) 

477. Houston War Fund, Inc., in care of Mr. T. J. 
Caldwell, Union National Bank, Houston, Tex. 
(Great Britain) 

478. Yugoslav Relief Committee of America, 2659 
South Lawndale Avenue, Chicago, 111. (Yugo.slavia) 

479. Bandwagon Ball, Inc., in care of Mrs. William 
Astor Chanler, 141 East Nineteenth Street, New 
York, N.Y. (England and Greece) 

480. National Catholic Welfare Conference, Bishops' 
Relief Committee, 1312 Massachusetts Avenue NW., 
Washington, D.C. (All belligerent countries) 

481. Bristol Whittaker Fund, In care of Mr. Gordon 
D. Donald. 500 North Broad Street, Elizabeth, N.J. 
(Great Britain) 

482. Merchant Sailors League, Inc., 284 Maiu Street, 
Buffalo, N.Y. (Canada and British Empire) 

483. Aid to British Pharmacists, In care of Mr. S. L. 
Hilton, 1033 Twenty-second Street NW., Washing- 
ton, D.C. (England) 

484. Walter Heidmann Company, 80 Wall Street, New 
York, N.Y. (Germany, Poland, and Netherlands) 

485. Tadeusz Stefan Wolkowski, 2 East Twenty-third 
Street. New York, N.Y. (Belgium, Netherlands, 
France, and Poland) 

486. Lithuanian National Relief Fund, Suite 1212, 134 
North LaSalle Street, Chicago, 111. (Germany) 

487. Yugoslav-American Relief Conunittee, Inc., 1905 
West Schiller Street, Chicago, 111. (Yugoslavia) 

488. The Croatian Fraternal Union of America, 3441 
ForlTes Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. (Yugoslavia) 

489. Jugoslav Relief Fund Association, 258 West 
Thirty-third Street, Chicago, 111. (Yugoslavia) 

490. Britain-at-Bay Aid Society, 41 Magnolia Drive. 
Dobbs Ferry, N.Y. (England) 

491. The American-British Art Center, Inc., 44 West 
Fifty-sixth Street, New York, N.Y. (United King- 
dom aud Canada) 

492. Committee for Yugoslav War Relief, Suite 750, 
Russ Building, San Francisco, Calif. (Yugoslavia) 

493. Yugoslav War Relief Association of State of 
Washington, 2411 Bigelow Avenue North, Seattle, 
Wash. (Yugoslavia) 

494. Paisley Buddies War Relief Society, 598 Engle- 
wood Avenue, Detroit, Mich. (Scotland) 

495. Mr. Alfred S. Campbell, Sevenoaks Farm, Lam- 
bertville, N.J. (England) 

496. Bay Ridge Allied Belief, 370 Seventy-fifth Street, 
Brooklyn, N.Y. (Great Britain) 

497. Armenian General Benevolent Union, 432 Fourth 
Avenue, New York, N.Y. (Syria, Palestine, Cyprus, 
Greece, and Bulgaria) 

498. White and Manning Dance Relief, 98 California 
Avenue, Highland Park. Mich. (Great Britain) 



90 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



TABULATIO'N OF CONTRIBUTIONS 

A tabulation of contributions collected and 
disbursed during the period September 6, 1939 
through June 1941, as shown in the reports sub- 
mitted by persons and organizations registered 
with the Secretai-y of State for the solicitation 
and collection of contributions to be used for 
relief in belligerent countries, in conformity 
with the regulations issued pursuant to section 
3 (a) of the act of May 1, 1937, as made eflPective 
by the President's proclamations of September 
5, 8, and 10, 1939, and section 8 of the act of 
November 4, 1939, as made eflfective by the Pres- 



ident's proclamation of the same date, has been 
released by the Department of State in mimeo- 
graphed form and may be obtained from the 
Department upon request (press release of July 
31, 1911,60 pp.). 

This tabulation has reference only to contri- 
butions solicited and collected for relief in bel- 
ligerent countries (France; Germany; Poland; 
the United Kingdom, India, Australia, Canada, 
New Zealand, and the Union of South Africa ; 
Norway; Belgium; Luxembourg; the Nether- 
lands; Italy; Greece; Yugoslavia; Hungary; 
and Bulgaria) or for the i-elief of refugees 
driven out of these countries by the present war. 



GOVERNMENT PERSONNEL ARRIVING FROM EUROPE 



[Released to the press July 31] 

A list of United States Government personnel 



arriving in New York August 1, 1941 on the 
West Point follows : 



Foreign Service Officers 



Home address 



Henry H. Balch and wife 

William H. Beach 

Sidney A. Belovsky 

Hiram Bingham, Jr 

Ellis A. Bonnet 

Roy E. B. Bower 

Thomas D. Bowman 

Charles C. Broy and three children 

Robert L. Buell 

George R. Canty 

Harry E. Carlson 

William G. Conklin 

Peter K. Constan 

Sabin J. Dalferes 

Richard M. de Lambert 

Hasell H. Dick... 

Edmund J. Dorsz and wife 

Edward A. Dow and wife and daughter 
Edward A. Dow, Jr 



Genoa 

Antwerp 

Bremen 

Lisbon 

Amsterdam 

Munich 

Rome 

Brussels 

Leipzig 

Amsterdam 

Vienna 

.A. n twerp 

Belgrade 

Hamburg.- 
Antwerp... 
Bordeaux.. 
Stuttgart.. 

Leipzig 

Brussels 



Consul general. 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul general 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice consul 

Vice consul 

Vice consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul general 
Vice consul 



Madison, Ala. 
Concord Wharf, Va. 
Hornell, N. Y. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Eagle Pass, Tex. 
Alameda, Calif. 
Smithville, Mo. 
Sperryville, Va. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Boston, Mass. 
Joliet, 111. 
Metuchen, N. J. 
Boston, Mass. 
Donaldsonville, La. 
Raton, N. Mex. 
Sumter, S. C. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Omaha, Nebr. 
Omaha, Nebr. 



AUGUST 2, 1941 



91 



Foreign Service Officers — Continued. 



Maurice P. Dunlap 

Dwight W. Fisher and wife 

Man^^on Gilbert 

Edmuncl A. Gullion 

Arnlioth G. Heltberg 

Theodore J. Hohenthal and wife 

Phil H. Hubbard and wife and two daughters 

Richard S. Huestis 

John D. Johnson 

Easton T. Kelsey 

Alfred W. Klieforth 

C. Porter Kuykendall and wife 

Francis A. Lane 

John H. Lord 

Erik W. Magnuson and wife 

Donal F. McGonigal 

Roy McWilliams and wife 

John J. Meily and wife 

Lucien Memminger and wife and daughter 

Orsen N. Nielsen 

Herbert V. Olds 

Brigg A. Perkins 

Austin R. Preston and son 

Karl L. Rankin and wife 

Sydney B. Redecker and wife and son 

Leslie E. Reed and wife and daughter 

Joseph M. Roland 

Lester L. Schnare 

Byron B. Snyder 

Frederick A. Sterling 

Laurence W. Taylor 

Hugh H. Teller and wife > 

Charles T. Terry and wife 

Samuel R. Thompson 

Alfred R. Thomson 

J. Kittredge Vinson 

George P. Waller 

Frederick L. Washbourne and wife 

Howard F. Withey and wife 

John R. Wood and wife and three children 

Archer Woodford 



Bergen 

Antwerp 

Brussels 

Salonika 

Bergen 

Vienna 

Milan 

Rotterdam 

Salonika 

Oslo.. 

Cologne 

Konigsberg 

Bremen 

Rotterdam 

Hamburg 

Amsterdam 

Biarritz 

Zagreb 

Copenhagen 

Munich 

Rotterdam 

Oslo 

Oslo 

Belgrade 

Frankfort on the 

Main. 
Athens 

Vienna 

Milan 

Genoa 

Stockholm 

Paris 

Stuttgart 

Venice 

Cardiff 

Hamburg 

Cologne 

Luxembourg 

Florence 

Trieste.. 

Paris. 

Hamburg 



Title 



Consul 

Vice consul 

Vice consul 

Vice consul 

Vice consul 

Vice consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice consul 

Consul general 

Consul 

Vice consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Vice consul 

Acting consular 
agent. 

Consul 

Consul general 

Consul general 

Vice consul 

Vice consul 

Consul 

Consul and commer- 
cial attach^. 
Consul 

Consul general and 
first secretary. 

Vice consul 

Consul 

Vice consul 

Minister 

Vice consul 

Vice consul 

Vice consul 

Consul 

Consul general 

Vice consul 

Consul 

Vice consul 

Consul 

Vice consul 

Consul 



Home address 



St. Paul, Minn. 
Washington, D. C. 
Evansville, Ind. 
New Castle, Ky. 
Oakland, Calif. 
Berkeley, Calif. 
Poultney, Vt. 
Ticonderoga, N. Y. 
Highgate, Vt. 
Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Boalsburg, Pa. 
Towanda, Pa. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Plymouth, Mass. 
Chicago, III. 
Troy, N. Y. 
Chicago, 111. 

Allentown, Pa. 
Charleston, S. C. 
Beloit, Wis. 
Lynn, Mass. 
Berkeley, Calif. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

St. Paul, Minn. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Macon, Ga. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
Texas. 

Bakersfield, Calif. 
Montague, Mich. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
Silver Spring, Md. 
Houston, Tex. 
Montgomery, Ala. 
Washington, D. C. 
Reed City, Mich. 
Jacksonville, Fla. 
Paris, Ky. 



92 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTJLLETEN 



Foreign Sebvice Clebks 

Name Home address 

Alex T. Alexopoulos and wife and 

three children Beaumont, 

Tex. 

Rita Altobelll New York, N. Y. 

Vincent Anderson Seattle, Wash. 

Anna G. Antoniades and two chil- 
dren Huntington, L. I., 

N. Y. 

Marie Belaeff and mother New York, N. Y. 

Beatrice Bergen Lynn, Mass. 

Louise H. Bittner Bloomington, III. 

Maggie Carlson Illinois. 

William C. Caton and wife and 
daughter Champaign, 111. 

Samuel C. Chambers and wife Chicago, 111. 

Helen E. Clark New York, N. Y. 

Olga Parkan de Bona New York, N. Y. 

Philbert Deyman Hibbing, Minn. 

Ragnhild Dunker Boston, Mass. 

Louise Eberle New York, N. Y. 

Frank Ellis and wife and two chil- 
dren Zanesville, Ohio. 

Walter Engele (Not known) 

Ernestine Etzel and son Johnstown, Pa. 

Fred Feekart (Not known) 

Helene Fischer New York, N. Y. 

Ethel Fjelle Minneapolis, 

Minn. 

Henry C. Furstenwalde and wife and 
daughter New York. N. Y. 

Gerd A. Gillhoff Holyoke, Mass. 

Olga Haag Jersey City, N. J. 

Raymond R. Hall and wife and son._ Chicago, 111. 

Francis Hejno and wife and daugh- 
ter New York, N. Y. 

Louise Hertweck New York, N. Y. 

Ur.sula Hosang Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Edith Johansen Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Sofia Kearney and mother (Not known) 

Frank Keller and wife New York, N. Y. 

Ethel Keyser San EYancisco, 

Calif. 

Kurt Kinne . (Not known) 

Gerllnde Kubach (Not known) 

Dorthea Lamjie and son Farming dale, 

L. I., N. Y. 

Ivan Lavretsky and wife New York, N. Y. 

Ruth Lobig New York, N. Y. 

Charles Meehan and two daugh- Seneca Falls, 
ters N. Y. 

Roberta Meyerkort Port Gibson, 

Miss. 

Mrs. Hedwig Oeder New York, N. Y. 

Teresa Offie Sharon, Pa. 

Josefa Otten New York, N. Y. 



Bovio Pallucca and wife and two 

sons Kansas. 

William Paternoster and wife and 

son New York, N. Y. 

Matthew O. Peters and father Clare, Mich. 

Forrest Pfeiffer and wife Harrison, Nebr. 

Joseph A. Ponti Vallejo, Calif. 

Henry Puetz (Not known) 

Josepli St. Onge and wife Maryland. 

E. M. Sampson North Carolina. 

Harry Schramm and wife New York, N. Y. 

Charles Sehwanitz and wife . San Antonio, 

Tex. 

Jerome Stenger New York, N. Y. 

Ferdinand C. Stephan San Francisco, 

Calif. 
Anthony Stevens and wife and three 

children Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Robert Stevens (Not known) 

Katie Tilly New York, N. Y. 

Anneliese von Eitzen New York, N. Y. 

Wives and Families of Officeks and Empfotees of 
THE Department of State 

Miss Susan Evans 

Mrs. Julian B. Foster and three children 

Mrs. Frank C. Lee and daughter 

Mrs. Osborne MacAuley 

Mrs. Thomas McEnelly 

Mrs. Marie L. Morrison 

Mrs. Guglielma Pepe 

AMhJucAN Battle Monuments Commission 

Marius Aneder.sen 

Henry R. Browu 

George Constantinides and wife 

Percy Cradick and wife and daughter 

William Dorsey 

Daniel F. Gibbs and wife and daughter 

Adolphe Kaess and wife 

William Moses and wife 

Col. T. Bentley Mott and wife 

Orlando Overstake and wife and daughter 

Ceasar Santini 

Arthur E. Stephans 

Public He.\lth StmcEONs 

Don S. Cameron and wife 

Frederick Kreuger and wife and daughter 

Vernon B. Link and wife 

War, Navy, and Treasury Departments Pebsonnp' 

Yvette Cross 

United States Naval Attach^ Inge 

Mrs. HoUingshead 

Joseph E. Martin, Jr. 

Col. Bernard Peyton 

Elizabeth Wasson and mother 



American Republics 



BOUNDARY DISPUTE BETWEEN ECUADOR AND PERU 



[Released to the press August 1] 

The folloNTing messages were sent on August 
1, 1941 by the President of the United States to 
the Presidents of Ecuador and Peru : 

To the President of Ecuador 

I have just been informed of the agreement 
which has been reached by the Governments of 
Ecuador and Peru to take measures which will 
prevent the recurrence of the recent hostilities 
in the frontier region between the two countries. 
This agreement constitutes a notable triumph 
for those principles of peace and continental 
solidarity to which all of the American repub- 
lics adhere. It thei'efore gives me pleasure to 
congratulate Your Excellency both on my be- 
half and on that of the people of the United 
States on the taking of a step which will ensure 
the continuing discussion of the frontier ques- 
tion between Ecuador and Peru and its eventual 
solution in an atmosphere of harmony and good 
will. 

To the President of Peru 

The announcement that Peru and Ecuador 
have agreed upon a cessation of hostilities justi- 
fies the confidence which is shared by all of the 
American republics that differences between the 
nations of this continent will never again be rec- 
onciled except through the peaceful processes 
which have been devised for the purpose and to 
which we all adhere. I take this opportunity of 
congratulating Your Excellency upon this aus- 
picious occasion and of expressing my very best 
wishes for your personal welfare and that of the 
Peruvian people. 



The following messages were sent by the Act- 
ing Secretary of State, Mr. Sumner AVelles, to 
the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of Ecuador and 
Peru: 

To the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Ecuador 

It is with a sense of the most profound satis- 
faction that I learned of the agreement 
which has been reached regarding the cessation 
of hostilities between Ecuador and Peru. I 
wish to congratulate you for the outstanding 
part which you played in achieving this result. 
I know that we both share the conviction that 
this restoration of peaceful conditions in the 
frontier region is a guarantee that further dis- 
cussions of the points at issue between the two 
Governments will be carried out in that atmos- 
phere of good will and mutual understanding 
which has come to characterize the relations of 
the American republics among themselves. 

To the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Peru 

It gives me the greatest satisfaction to con- 
gratulate Your Excellency upon the agreement 
for the cessation of hostilities between Peru and 
Ecuador. A situation which was a source of 
legitimate and profound concern to all the 
American republics is thus, I am confident, now 
terminated and the further consideration of all 
pending questions between the two countries 
may now proceed in accordance with those prin- 
ciples of peaceful discussion and mutual rmder- 
standing which the American republics hope 
may always prevail in this Hemisphere. 

93 



94 DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTILLETrN 

OFFICE OF THE COORDINATOR OF INTER-AMERICAN AFFAIRS 



Executive Order 

establishing the office of the coordinator of 
inter-american affairs in the execttitve 
office of the president and defining its 
functions and duties 

By virtue of the authority vested in me by 
tlie Constitution and statutes of the United 
States, and in order to define further the 
functions and duties of the Office for Emer- 
gency Management with respect to the un- 
limited national emergency declared by tlie 
President on May 27, 1941, and to provide for 
the development of commercial and cultural re- 
lations between the American Republics and 
thereby increasing the solidarity of this Hemi- 
sphere and furthering the spirit of cooperation 
between the Americas in the interest of Hemi- 
sphere defense, it is hereby ordered as follows: 

1. There is established within the Office for 
Emergency Management of the Executive Office 
of the President the Office of the Coordinator of 
Inter-American Affairs, at the head of which 
there shall be a Coordinator apjsointed b,y the 
President. The Coordinator shall discharge and 
perform his duties and responsibilities under the 
direction and supervision of the President. The 
Coordinator shall serve as such without com- 
pensation, but shall be entitled to actual and 
necessary transportation, subsistence, and other 
expenses incidental to the performance of his 
duties. 

2. Subject to such policies, regulations, and 
directions as the President may fi'om time to 
time prescribe, the Office of the Coordinator of 
Inter- American Affairs shall: 

a. Serve as the center for the coordination of 
the cultural and commercial relations of the 
Nation affecting Hemisphere defense. 

b. Formulate and execute programs, in co- 
operation with the Department of State which, 
by effective use of governmental and private 
facilities in such fields as the arts and sciences, 
education and travel, the radio, the press, and 



the cinema, will further the national defense 
and strengthen the bonds between the nations 
of the Western Hemisphere. 

c. Formulate, recommend, and execute pro- 
grams in the commercial and economic fields 
which, by the effective use of governmental and 
private facilities, will further the commercial 
well-being of the Western Hemisphere. 

d. Assist in the coordination and carrying 
out of the purposes of Public Resolution No. 
83 ajjproved June 15, 1941, entitled "To au- 
thorize the Secretaries of War and of the Navy 
to assist the governments of American repub- 
lics to increase their military and naval estab- 
lishments, and for other purposes." 

e. Review existing laws and recommend such 
new legislation as may be deemed essential to 
the effective realization of the basic cultui'al 
and commercial objectives of the Government's 
program of Hemisphere solidarity. 

f. Exercise and perform all powers and func- 
tions now or heretofore vested in the Office for 
Coordination of Commercial and Cultural Re- 
lations Between the American Republics, estab- 
lished by order of the Council of National De- 
fense on August 16, 1940. 

g. Keep the President informed with respect 
to progress made in carrying out this Order; 
and perform such other related duties as the 
President may from time to time assign or 
delegate to it. 

3. In the study of problems and in the execu- 
tion of programs, it shall be the policy of the 
Office of the Coordinator of Inter-American 
Affairs to collaborate with and to utilize the 
facilities of existing departments and agencies 
which perform functions and activities affect- 
ing the cultural and commercial aspects of 
Hemisphere defense. Such departments and 
agencies are requested to cooperate with the 
Coordinator in arranging for appropriate clear- 
ance of proposed policies and measures involv- 
ing the commercial and cultural aspects of In- 
ter-American affairs. 



AUGUST 2, 1941 



95 



4. Within the limits of funds appropriated or 
allocated for purposes encompassed by this Or- 
der, the Coordinator may contract with and 
transfer funds to existing governmental agen- 
cies and institutions and may enter into con- 
tracts and agreements with individuals, edu- 
cational, informational, commercial, scientific, 
and cultural uistitutions, associations, agencies, 
and industrial organizations, firms, and cor- 
porations. 

5. The Coordinator is authorized and directed 
to take over and carry out the provisions of any 
contracts heretofore entered into' by the Office 
for Coordination of Commercial and Cultural 
Relations Between the American Republics, es- 
tablished by order of the Council of National 
Defense on August 16, 1940. The Coordinator 
is further authorized to assume any obligations 
or responsibilities which have heretofore been 
undertaken by the said Office for and on behalf 
of the United States Government. 

6. There is hereby established within the Office 
of the Cooi'dinator of Inter- American Affairs a 
Committee on Inter-American Affairs, consist- 
ing of the Coordinator as Chairman, one 
designee each from the Departments of State, 
Treasury, Agriculture, and Commerce, the 
President of the Export-Import Bank and such 
additional representatives from other agencies 
and departments as may be designated by the 
heads of such departments or agencies at the 
request of the Coordinator of Inter-American 



Affairs. The Committee shall consider and cor- 
relate proposals with respect to the commercial, 
cultural, educational, and scientific aspects of 
Hemisphere defense relations, and shall make 
recommendations to the appropriate Govern- 
ment departments and agencies. 

7. The Coordinator may provide for the 
internal organization and management of the 
Office of the Coordinator of Inter-American 
Affairs. The Coordinator shall obtain the 
President's approval for the establishment of 
the principal subdivisions of the Office and the 
appointment of the heads thereof. The Co- 
ordinator may appoint such committees as may 
be required for the conduct of the activities of 
his office. 

8. Within the limits of such funds as may be 
appropriated to the Coordinator or as may be 
allocated to him by the President, the Coordi- 
nator may employ necessary personnel and make 
provisions for necessary supplies, facilities, and 
services. However, the Coordinator shall use 
such statistical, informational, fiscal, personnel, 
and other general business services and facilities 
as may be made available to him through the 
Office for Emergency Management. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 

The White House, 
July 30, 19^1. 

[No. 8840] 



VISIT OF MEMBERS OF HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS SUBCOMMITTEE TO OTHER 

AMERICAN REPUBLICS 



[Released to the press July 27] 

Congressman Louis C. Rabaut, of Michigan, 
chairman of the Subcommittee of the Com- 
mittee on Appropriations which deals with the 
provision of funds for the activities of the De- 
partment of State, and four of his colleagues 
on that Subconmiittee will depart August 
11 from Miami on a trip of approximately two 
months to a number of the other American re- 
publics. The other members of the Committee 
making the trip with Mr. Rabaut are John M. 



Houston, of Kansas, Harry P. Beam, of Illi- 
nois, Vincent F. Harrington, of Iowa, and Al- 
bert E. Carter, of California. Tliey will be 
accompanied by Jack K. McFall, secretary of 
the Subcommittee, and Guy W. Ray, Foreign 
Service officer now on duty in the Department 
of State. 

The primary purpose of this tour will be to 
gain a firet-hand knowledge of the work of this 
Government's Foreign Service establislunents. 
At this time, when the complexity and number 



96 



DEPAETMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



of the problems confronting our Government 
in the realm of foreign policy are daily in- 
creasing, it is of particular importance that 
there be established between the legislative and 
executive branches of the Govermnent a clear 
understanding as to the requirements of the 
situation. The trip of Mr. Rabaut and his 
colleagues will, in this respect, supply a highly 
valuable amplification and extension of the 
detailed annual hearings before the Subcom- 
mittee at wliich representatives of the State 
Department explain their requirements and 
are cross-examined by the members of the 
Subcommittee. 

In addition to the activities of the State De- 
partment, a large number of other agencies of 
the Government are engaged, under the aus- 
pices of the Interdepartmental Committee on 
Cooperation with the Other American Repub- 
lics, in projects designed to promote mutual 
understanding and good-will through the exe- 
cution of constructive projects involving joint 
contributions on the part of our Government 
and of the governments of the other American 
republics. Mr. Rabaut and his colleagues will 
have an opportunity of seeing these projects, 
which their support has made possible, in 
actual operation and will thus be able to 
evaluate the results being obtained. 

The members of the Committee will have an 
opportunity to obtain a first-hand knowledge 
of the other American countries, which will 
enable them to gain a better understanding of 
the needs of common defense, the importance 
of collaboration by this Government with the 
govenmients of the other American republics, 
and the wide range of activities which are re- 
quired to make this collaboration fully effec- 
tive. This knowledge and understanding will 
be useful to the members of the Committee in 
presenting to their colleagues in the Congress 
matters relating to the defense and solidarity 
of the American republics. 



This visit by members of the Committee was 
discussed several months ago in connection 
with hearings on the Department's appropria- 
tion bill, and Secretary Hull is quoted in the 
record of the hearings as stating that such a 
trip would be of real value to the Goverimient 
and as expressing the hope that the Committee 
would be able to carry out the plan. Mr. 
Welles expressed the opinion in a recent letter 
to Chairman Rabaut tha' developments in the 
international situation during the past few 
months strengthen and render even more 
urgent the reasons for the proposed trip by 
members of the Appropriations Subcommittee. 



COMMENT BY ACTING SECRETARY OF 
STATE WELLES ON STATEMENT BY 
SENATOR CLARK OF IDAHO 

[Released to the press July 29] 

In answer to an inquiry at his press confer- 
ence July 29 with regard to a statement 
attributed to Senator Clark, of Idaho, attack- 
ing the good-neighbor policy, the Acting Secre- 
tary of State, Mr. Sumner Welles, stated : 

"I feel that all that it is really necessary for 
me to say is that the statement as such seems 
to me to be unbelievable, and I am quite sure 
it does not reflect the views or the opinions of 
the American people. I am positive, of course, 
that it is not shared by any responsible author- 
ity in the Government. It is a point of view 
utterly at vai'iance with the policy that has 
been pursued by this administration in its rela- 
tions with the other American republics during 
the past nearly nine years, and the benefits of 
this policy, I think, have been appreciated so 
fully, not only by the other American republics 
but by the people of the United States as well, 
as to make any serious comment from me 
unnecessary." 



General 



ECONOMIC DEFENSE BOARD 



[Released to tlie press by the White House July 30] 

Executive Order 

establishing the economic defense board 

By virtue of the authority vested in me by 
the Constitution and statutes of the United 
States, by virtue of the existence of an unlim- 
ited national emergency, and for the purpose 
of developing and coordinating policies, plans, 
and programs designed to protect and 
strengthen the international economic relations 
of the United States in the interest of national 
defense, it is hereby ordered as follows: 

1. The term "economic defense," whenever 
used in this Order, means the conduct, in the 
interest of national defense, of international 
economic activities including those relating to 
exports, imports, the acquisition and disposi- 
tion of materials and commodities from foreign 
countries including preclusive buying, transac- 
tions in foreign exchange and foreign-owned 
or foreign-controlled property, international 
investments and extensions of credit, shipping 
and transportation of goods among countries, 
the international aspects of patents, interna- 
tional communications pertaining to commerce, 
and other foreign economic matters. ^ 

2. There is hereby established an Economic 
Defense Board (hereinafter referred to as the 
"Board"). The Board shall consist of the 
Vice President of the United States, who shall 
serve as Chairman, the Secretary of State, the 
Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of 
War, the Attorney General, the Secretary of 
the Navy, the Secretary of Agriculture, and the 
Secretary of Commerce. The Chairman may, 
with the approval of the President, appoint 
additional members to the Boai-d, Each mem- 
ber of the Board, other than the Chairman, 
may designate an alternate from among the 
officials of his Department, subject to the con- 



tinuing approval of the Chairman, and such 
alternate may act for such member in all mat- 
ters relating to the Board. 

3. In furtherance of such policies and objec- 
tives as the President may from time to time 
determine, the Board shall perform the follow- 
ing functions and duties : 

a. Advise the President as to economic defense 
measures to be taken or functions to be per- 
formed which are essential to the effective de- 
fense of the Nation. 

b. Coordinate the policies and actions of the 
several departments and agencies carrying on 
activities relating to economic defense in order 
to assure unity and balance in the application 
of such measures. 

c. Develop integrated economic defense plans 
and programs for coordinated action by the de- 
partments and agencies concerned and use all 
appropriate means to assure that such plans and 
programs are carried into effect by such depart- 
ments and agencies. 

d. Make investigations and advise the Presi- 
dent on the relationship of economic defense 
(as defined in paragraph 1) measures to post- 
war economic reconstruction and on the steps 
to be taken to protect the trade position of the 
United States and to expedite the establishment 
of sound, peace-time international economic 
relationships. 

e. Review proposed or existing legislation 
relating to or affecting economic defense and, 
with the approval of the President, recommend 
such additional legislation as may be necessary 
or desirable. 

4. The administration of the various activi- 
ties relating to economic defense shall remain 
with the several departments and agencies now 
charged with such duties but such administra- 
tion shall conform to the policies formulated or 
approved by the Board. 

97 



98 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



5. In the study of problems and in the fonmi- 
lation of programs, it shall be the policy of the 
Board to collaborate with existing departments 
and agencies which perform functions and ac- 
tivities pertaining to economic defense and to 
utilize their services and facilities to the maxi- 
mum. Such departments and agencies shall co- 
operate with the Board in clearing proposed 
policies and measures involving economic de- 
fense considerations and shall supply such in- 
formation and data as the Board may require in 
performing its functions. The Board may ar- 
range for the establishment of conmaittees or 
groups of advisers, representing two or more 
departments and agencies as the case may re- 
quire, to study and develop economic defense 
l^lans and programs in respect to particular com- 
modities or services, geographical areas, types 
of measures that might be exercised, and other 
related matters. 

6. To facilitate unity of action and the maxi- 
mum use of existing services and facilities, each 
of the following departments and agencies, in 
addition to the departments and agencies repre- 
sented on the Board, shall designate a responsi- 
ble officer or officers, subject to the approval of 
the Chaii-man, to represent the department or 
agency in its continuing relationships with the 
Board : The Departments of the Post Office, the 
Interior, and Labor, the Federal Loan Agency, 
the United States Maritime Commission, the 
United States Tariff Commission, the Federal 
Trade Commission, the Board of Governors of 
the Federal Reserve System, the Securities and 



Exchange Commission, the National Resources 
Planning Board, the Defense Communications 
Board, the Office of Production Management, 
the Office of Price Administration and Civilian 
Supply, the Office for Coordination of Com- 
mercial and Cultural Relations Between the 
American Republics, the Permanent Joint 
Board on Defense, the Administrator of Export 
Control, the Division of Defense Aid Reports, 
the Coordinator of Information, and such addi- 
tional departments and agencies as the Chair- 
man may from time to time determine. The 
Chairman shall provide for the systematic con- 
duct of business with the foregoing departments 
and agencies. 

7. The Chairman is authorized to make all 
necessary arrangements, with the advice and 
assistance of the Board, for discharging and 
performing the responsibilities and duties re- 
quired to carry out the functions and authorities 
set forth in this Order, and to make final deci- 
sions when necessary to expedite the work of 
the Board. He is further authorized, within the 
Imiits of such funds as may be allocated to the 
Board by the President, to employ necessary per- 
sonnel and make provision for the necessary sup- 
plies, facilities, and services. The Chairman 
may, with the approval of tlie President, 
appoint an executive officer. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 

The White House, 
July SO, 1941. 

[No. 8839] 



THE PROCLAIMED LIST OF CERTAIN BLOCKED NATIONALS 



ISSUANCE OF SUPPLEMENT NO. 1 



[Released to the press July 29] 

Pursuant to the procedure contemplated in 
the proclamation of the President promulgated 
July 17, 1941 ^ providing for the prejjaration 
of a list of certain blocked nationals, the Sec- 



" BuUetin of Jul.v 19, 1941, p. 42. 
"6 Federal Register 3773. 



retary of State, acting in conjunction with the 
Secretary of the Treasury, the Attorney Gen- 
eral, the Secretary of Commerce, the Adminis- 
trator of Export Control, and the Coordinator 
of Commercial and Cultural Relations Between 
the American Republics, has issued Supplement 
No. 1,2 dated July 28, 1941, to "The Proclaimed 
List of Certain Blocked Nationals" dated July 



AUGUST 2, 1941 



99 



17, 1941.^ Supplement No. 1 contains such de- 
letions and amendments as are immediately pos- 
sible. Additions to the list and further dele- 
tions will be made from time to time on the 
basis of continuing study. 

PURPOSE OF THE LIST 
(Released to the press July 29] 

At the press conference July 29, the Acting 
Secretary of State, Mr. Sumner Welles, in re- 
sponse to inquiries from the press, said : 

"The chief effect of the publication of the 
list of blocked nationals is to deny the benefits 
of inter-American trade to persons who have 
hitherto been using large profits to finance sub- 
versive activities aimed at undermining the 
peace and independence of the Western Hemi- 
siDhere. Trade that had previously been 
usurped by such anti-American interests is now 
being transferred into the hands of persons, 
largely citizens of the other republics, who are 
devoted to the best interests of the countries in 
which they reside, all of which are committed 
to the solidarity of the Americas in the face of 
threats from abroad. 

"Recent events liave emphasized the correct- 
ness of the charge that the totalitarian powers 
are striving to disturb the peace of this hemi- 
sphere and to extend their disruptive control 
over the affairs of American republics. Swift 
action by the governments affected has nipped 
dangerous plans of the totalitarians in the bud 
and indicates the determination of the American 
republics to defend their integrity and peace. 
The issuance of the proclaimed list, marking 
persons who are contributing to these anti- 
American activities, is but another step in block- 
ing the efforts of those who have sinister designs 
on the Americas. 

"A great many American firms have for sev- 
eral months been voluntarily changing their 
trade connections when it became evident that 
their business was in the hands of groups un- 
friendly to inter- American interests. Publica- 
tion of the list of blocked nationals is a clarify- 
ing step in marking those who under present 



' 6 Federal Register 3557. 



conditions should not participate in vital inter- 
American transactions. Such a step is of the 
utmost importance in view of the steady increase 
in trade between the United States and the other 
American republics, and at a time when the 
United States is making every effort to see that 
essential materials are made available to the 
other republics for use in their defense efforts. 
"The list as first published is of course not 
final. Changes have already been announced; 
and other deletions, as well as additions, will be 
made in order that the list may reflect accurately 
the results of continuing study of the firms and 
persons involved. This Government will show 
the greatest zeal in removing names whenever 
altered situations with respect to individual 
firms warrant such action." 

IMMIGRATION VISA STATISTICS 

[Released to the press August 1] 

During the fiscal year ended June 30, 1940, 
American consular officers abroad issued 57,573 
quota and 21,757 non-quota immigration visas, 
making a total of 79,330 immigration visas, as 
compared with a total of 82,666 immigration 
visas issued in the fiscal year 1939, and as com- 
pared with a total of 74,948 immigration visas 
in the fiscal year ended June 30, 1938. 

Of the total of 79,330 immigration visas issued 
in the fiscal year 1940, "new" immigrants re- 
ceived the 57,573 quota visas and 18,778 of the 
non-quota visas, or a total of 76,351. The re- 
maining 2,979 non-quota visas were issued to 
students, whose admission into the United 
States is on a temporary basis, and to aliens 
previously lawfully admitted into the United 
States for permanent residence who were re- 
turning from temporary absences. Of the 
76,351 "new" immigrants, 13,846, or approxi- 
mately 18 percent, consisted of fathers, mothers, 
and husbands of American citizens, and wives 
and unmarried minor children of lawful alien 
residents of the United States. 

The annual immigration quotas for all coun- 
tries total 153,774, against which 57,573 quota 
visas were issued in the fiscal year 1940, repre- 
senting an under-issue of approximately 63 per- 



100 



DEPABTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



cent. Forty-seven percent of the quota immi- 
gration visas issued in the fiscal year 1940 were 
received by persons chargeable to the quota for 
Germany, including former Austria, as com- 
pared with 46 percent in 1939. 

The quotas for the following countries were 
fully issued during the 1940 fiscal year: Aus- 
tralia, Cliina, Free City of Danzig, Greece, 
Hungary, Palestine, Turkey, and the Philip- 
pine Islands. 

Of the 18,778 non-quota visas (not including 
students and returning residents) issued in the 
fiscal year 1940, 12,163, or approximately 64 
percent, were received by persons born in 
countries of the Western Hemisphere. Of the 
latter number 7,955 visas were issued to persons 
born in Canada, as compared with 7,811 in the 
fiscal year 1939, and 1,876 visas were issued 
to Mexican-bom persons, as compared with 
2,262 in the pi-evious fiscal year. 

Owing to disturbed conditions abroad the 
demand for immigration visas has increased 
since a few months prior to the end of the fiscal 
year of 1940, as compared with the several pre- 
ceding years. By June 30, 1940, the total 
number of aliens registered at consular offices 
as intending quota immigrants amounted to 
720,108, as compared with 657,353 on June 30, 

1939, and 317,606 on June 30, 1938. Of the 
total number of aliens registered on Jmie 30, 

1940, 301,935 were chargeable to the quota for 
Germany, 125,562 to the quota for Poland, 
87,685 to the quota for Czechoslovakia, and 
40,284 to the quota for Hungary. These figures 
do not include the non-quota immigration-visa 
demand, of which no register is kept by con- 
sular officers. 

CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL 
DEFENSE 

(Released to the press July 28] 

In accordance with the provisions of the 
Executive order of March 15, 1941,^ the Secre- 
tary of State amiounced that general licenses 
were issued on July 28 authorizing the exporta- 
tion to various coimtries of certain articles and 



' Bulletin of March 15, 1941, p. 284, 



materials named in the proclamations, regula- 
tions, and Executive orders issued pursuant to 
section 6 of the Export Control Act approved 
July 2, 1940. 

Collectors of customs have been authorized to 
permit, without the requirement of individual 
license, the exportation of any of the articles 
and materials enumerated in the following list 
to the respective countries named in the list, 
but the exporter is required to indicate the 
appropriate license number on the shipper's 
export declaration filed with the collector. 

The following general licenses are effective 
immediately : 

General Licenses to Canada 
License No. oKu 1 for derris root, squill, cube root, 
pyrethrum, and rotenone 

GKB 1 for alkyd resins, urea formalde- 
hyde resins, and phenol form- 
aldehyde resins 

GKX 1 for acetone 

GKG 1 for acetic acid, acetic aldehyde, 
and formaldehyde 

OKW 1 for methanol 

Oeiieral Licenses to Great Britain 

License No. gku 2 for derris root, squill, cube root, 
pyrethrum, and rotenone 
GKB 2 for alkyd resins, urea formalde- 
hyde resins, and phenol form- 
aldehyde resins 
GKX 2 for acetone 
GKG 2 for acetic acid, acetic aldehyde, 

and formaldehyde 
GKw2 for methanol 

General Licenses to the Philippine Islands 
License No. gku 63 for derris root, squill, cube root, 
pyrethrum, and rotenone 

GKB 63 for alkyd resins, urea form- 
aldehyde resins, and phenol 
formaldehyde resins 

GKX 63 for acetone 

GKG 63 for acetic acid, acetic aldehyde, 
and formaldehyde 

GKw63 for methanol 

The following general licenses become effec- 
tive on August 1, 1941 : 

General Licenses to Canada 
License No. gkw 1 for butanol 

OKT 1 for butyl acetate 
6KZ 1 for ethyl acetate 



AUGUST 2, 1941 



101 



General Licenses to Great Britain 
License No. gkw 2 for butanol 

GKY 2 for butyl acetate 
GKZ 2 for ethyl acetate 

General Llcenseg to the Philippine Islands 
License No. gkw 63 for butanol 

GKY 63 for butyl acetate 
GKZ 63 for ethyl acetate 

[Released to the press by the White House August 1] 

It was announced on August 1 that the Presi- 
dent has directed the Administrator of Export 
Control to initiate further regulation in respect 
to the export of petroleum products in the inter- 
est of the national defense. 

The action will have two immediate effects. 
It will prohibit the exportation of motor fuels 
and oils suitable for use in aircraft and of cer- 
tain raw stocks from which such products are 
derived to destinations other than the Western 
Hemisphere, the British Empire, and the unoc- 
cupied territories of other countries engaged in 
resisting aggression. It will also limit the ex- 
portation of other petroleum products, except 
to the destinations referred to above, to usual or 
pre-war quantities and provide for the pro-rata 
issuance of licenses on that basis. 

[Released to the press August 1] 

All valid licenses authorizing the exportation 
of petroleum products to countries other than 
the following were revoked August 1 : Coun- 
tries of the Western Hemisphere, the British 
Empire, and the unoccupied territories of other 
countries resisting aggression. The holders of 



these licenses have been informed that, if they 
wish to re-submit applications for licenses, these 
applications would be promptly considered in 
accordance with the policy set forth in the 
statement issued by the President concerning the 
exportation of petroleum products. 

Pending applications for licenses to export 
petroleum products to countries other than those 
referred to above were returned to the applicants 
with the same suggestion. 

General license no. GEH, issued by the Sec- 
retary of State on June 20, authorizing the ex- 
portation from those ports located on any coast 
of the United States except the Atlantic coast of 
certain petroleum products,^ has been revoked 
in respect to shipments to countries other than 
those referred to above. Exports to such coun- 
tries will be permitted upon the issuance of in- 
dividual licenses in accordance with the policy 
set forth in the President's statement. 

[Released to the press August 2] 

Genei-al license no. GEG has been extended 
indefinitely authorizing the exportation from 
those ports which are located on the Atlantic 
coast to those countries of the Western Hemi- 
sphere designated under the caption of Group 
B ^ in a list released June 20, 1941, of those 
petroleum products listed in Export Control 
Schedule No. 10 ^ which have not, prior to 
June 20, 1941, been subject to the requirement 
of a license under the export-control regula- 
tions. Accordingly, this general license did 
not expire on July 31, 1941. 



Traffic in Arms, Tin-Plate Scrap, Etc. 



MONTHLY STATISTICS 



[Released to the press August 2] 

Note: The Department, In order that military in- 
formation of interest to the national defense may not 
be improperly disseminated, will henceforth publish 
data relating to arms-export licenses issued and arms 
exported in the form set forth below. 



The figures relating to arms, the licenses for the 
export of which were revoked before they were used, 



^Bulletin of June 21, 1941, p. 750. 
''Bulletin of May 10, 1941, p. 561. 
' 6 Federal Register 3059. 



102 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



have been subtracted from the figures appearing in 
the cumulative columns of the table below in regard 
to arms-export licenses issued. These latter figures 
are therefore net figures. They are not yet final and 
definitive since licenses may be amended or revoked 
at any time before being used. They are, however, 
accurate as of the date of this press release. 

The statistics of actual exports in these releases are 
believed to be substantially complete. It is possible, 
however, tliat some shipments are not included. If 
this proves to be the fact, statistics in regard to 
such shipments will be included in the cumulative 
figures in later releases. 

Akms-Expoet Licr.NSEs Issued 

The table printed below indicates by cate- 
gory subdivision the value of the arms, ammu- 
nition, and implements of war licensed for 
export by the Secretary of State during the 
year 1941 up to and including the month of 
June. 



Category 



I (1)-. 
(2).. 
(3).. 
W) 
(6).. 
(6).. 

n 

in (1)-. 

(2).. 

IV (1)- 
(2). 

V (D- 

(2). 
(3). 

VI (2). 

VII (1). 
(2). 



Export licenses issaed 



$6, 206. 29 
6. 947, 383. 78 
315, 271. 20 
38, 243. 358. 49 
2,855,984.00 
53. 003, 673. 25 



13, 789. M2. 65 

6, 926. 56 

330,388.80 

145, 438. 66 

2,729.574.00 

7.425,968.83 

59. 977, 880. 26 

1,275.00 

3,618,937.75 

757,041.00 



190, 045. 250. 52 



$27. 614, 816. 19 

28, 175, 432 67 

26.064,061.90 

147, 756, 533. 99 

7, 977. 717. 68 

74. 640. 687. 25 

6, 351, 748. 00 

344, 052, 078. 74 

240. 298. 43 

2. 387, 594. 24 

3, 694, 121. 83 
6.017,943.53 

68,881.730.22 

110, 129. 230. 11 

8, 742. OO 

21,029.135.72 

3,638.136.23 



I (1)-.- 

(2) 

(3) 

(4) 

(5) 

(6) 

11.-- 

in (1) 

(2) 

IV (1) 

(2) 

V (1) 

(2) 

(3) 

VI C2) 

VII (1) 

(2) 

Total 



Actual exports 



$144. 
1.727, 
1.879. 
3, 119, 
2, 379, 
3, 079, 



1. 553, 
1,796, 
7, 735, 



687. 36 
956.00 
892.20 
092. 19 
322,00 
790.00 
948. 00 
298.00 
450.25 
437.83 
920.71 
578.28 
456. 45 
246.41 
912.00 
754. 84 
073. 95 



1. 815. 77 
i, 156. 76 
1,908.20 
1.911.88 
■.115.00 
;.O74.00 
1,507.00 
!, 687.04 
), 223. 21 
>.751.41 
1, 818. 76 
!, 630. 28 
1, 608. 91 
), 768. 95 
r, 489. 00 
).011.69 
), 678. 49 



4S, 796, 815. 47 312.331,156.28 



Arms-Import Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates by category 
subdivision the value of the arms, ammunition, 
and implements of war licensed for import by 
the Secretary of State during the month of June 
1941: 



866,663.037.70 



I (2)...- 

(3)..-. 

(4).... 

(6)..- 
Ill (1)..- 

(2) ... 
V (1)...- 

(2)..- 

'3).... 
VII 0).... 

(2) — - 

Total 



$10.00 
0, 900. 00 
7, 209. 00 
12,050.00 
125.000.00 
400. 00 
40. 333. 00 
2,600.00 
68, 700. 00 
38, 200. 00 
4, 160. 00 



305. 562. 00 



Asms Exported 

The table printed below indicates by category 
subdivision the value of arms, ammunition, and 
implements of war exported during the year 
1941 up to and including the month of June 
under export licenses issued by the Secretary of 
State : 



Categories of Arms, Ammunition, and 
Implements of War 

The categories of arms, ammunition, and im- 
plements of war in the first column of the three 
tables printed above are the categories into 
which those articles were divided in the Presi- 
dent's proclamation of May 1, 1937. enumerating 



AUGUST 2, 1941 



103 



the articles which would be considered as arms, 
ammunition, and implements of war for the 
purposes of section 5 of the joint resolution of 
May 1, 1937 [see the Bulletin of July 12, 1941, 
pp. 33-35]. 

Special Statistics in Kegard to Arms Exports 
TO Cuba 

In compliance with article II of the conven- 
tion between the United States and Cuba to sup- 
press smuggling, signed at Habana, March 11, 
1926, which reads in part as follows : 

"The High Contracting Parties agi-ee that 
clearance of shipments of merchandise by wa- 
ter, air, or land, from any of the ports of either 
country to a port of entry of the other country, 
shall be denied when such shipment comprises 
articles the importation of which is prohibited 
or restricted in the country to which such ship- 
ment is destined, unless in this last case there 
has been a compliance with the requisites 
demanded by the laws of both countries." 

and in compliance with the laws of Cuba which 
restrict the importation of arms, ammunition, 
and implements of war of all kinds by requir- 
ing an import permit for each shipment, export 
licenses for shipments of arms, ammunition, and 
implements of war to Cuba are required for the 
articles enumerated below in addition to the 
articles enumerated in the President's procla- 
mation of May 1, 1937 : 

(1) Arms and small arms using ammunition 
of caliber .22 or less, other than those classed as 
toys. 

(2) Spare parts of arms and small arms of all 
kinds and calibers, other than those classed as 
toys, and of guns and machine-guns 

(3) Ammunition for the arms and small arms 
under (1) above. 

(4) Sabers, swords, and military machetes 
with cross-guard hilts. 

(5) Explosives as follows : explosive powders 
of all kinds for all purposes; nitrocellulose hav- 
ing a nitrogen content of 12 percent or less; 
diphenylamine; dynamite of all kinds; nitro- 



glycerine ; alkaline nitrates (ammonium, potas- 
sium, and sodium nitrate); nitric acid; nitro- 
benzene (essence or oil of mirbane) ; sulphur; 
sulphuric acid ; chlorate of potash ; and acetones. 
(6) Tear gas (CacoCH^Ci) and other sim- 
ilar non-toxic gases and apparatus designed 
for the storage or projection of such gases. 

The table printed below indicates, in respect 
to licenses authorizing the exportation to Cuba 
of the articles and commodities listed in the pre- 
ceding paragraph, issued by the Secretary of 
State during June 1941, the number of licenses 
and the value of the articles and commodities 
described in the licenses : 



Number of licenses 


Section 


Value 




(1) 


$2, 255. 30 




(2) 

(3) 


67.26 
16, 709. 50 




(6) 


7. 973. 07 










27.005.12 









The table printed below indicates the value of 
the articles and commodities listed above ex- 
ported to Cuba during June 1941 under licenses 
issued by the Secretary of State : 



Section 


Value 




S9S6.25 




163.80 




9.209.00 




7, 886. 55 












18,245.60 











Tin-Plate Scrap 

During the month of June no licenses author- 
izing the exportation of tin-plate scrap were 
issued. 

Helium 

The table printed below gives the essential 
information in regard to the licenses issued 
during the month of June 1941 authorizing the 
exportation of helium gas under the provisions 
of the act approved on September 1, 1937, and 
the regulations issued pursuant thereto : 



104 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Applicant for 


Purchaser in for- 


Country of 


Quantity 


Total 


license 


eign country 


destination 


feet 




Goodyear Aircraft 


J. A. Boettner, 


Canada... 


7.000 


$294.00 


Corp. 


Goodyear Air- 
craft Corp. 








The Ohio Chemical 


CompaiSia Man, 


Mexico.-.. 


g 


4.00 


& Manufacturing 


S. A. 








Co. 











The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

On July 29, 1941, the Senate confirmed the 
nomination of Anthony J. Drexel Biddle, Jr., of 
Pennsylvania, Ambassador to Poland, to serve 
concurrently and without additional compensa- 
tion as Minister near the Government of Yugo- 
slavia now established in London. Mr. Biddle 
will continue to serve concurrently as Ambassa- 
dor near the Government of Belgium and as 
Minister near the Governments of Norway and 
the Netherlands now established in London. 

[Released to the press August 1] 

The follo^ving changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since July 26, 1941 : 

Career Officers 

North Winship, of Macon, Ga., Counselor of 
Legation at Pretoria, Transvaal, Union of South 
Africa, has been assigned as Consul General at 
Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 

Herbert C. Hengstler, of Middletown, Ohio, 
Consul General at Toronto, Ontario, Canada, is 
retiring from the Foreign Service, effective Jan- 
uary 1, 1942. 

Alfred T. Nester, of Geneva, N. Y., Consul at 
Guayaquil, Ecuador, has been assigned as Con- 
sul General at Guayaquil, Ecuador. 



Caldwell S. Johnston, of Reno, Nev., Vice 
Consul at Montreal, Quebec, Canada, has been 
assigned as Consul at Montreal, Quebec, Canada. 

Non-career Officers 

The assignment of Thomas B. Clark, of 
Reagan, Tex., as Vice Consul at Agua Prieta, 
has been canceled. Mr. Clark is retiring from 
the Foreign Service, effective March 1, 1942. 

Davis A. Guttman, of New York, N. Y., has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Asuncion, 
Paraguay. 



International Conferences, 
Commissions, Etc. 



INTERNATIONAL ASSEMBLY OF 
SURGEONS 

[Released to the press August 1] 

This Government has accepted the invitation 
of the Mexican Government to participate in 
the International Assembly of Surgeons, which 
will be held in Mexico City from August 10 to 
14, 1941. The President has approved the 
following persons as official delegates on the 
part of the United States: 

Cupt William Seaman Bainbridge, Medical Corps, 
United States Naval Reserve, Retired, New York, 
N. Y. 

Surg. Jolin R. Murdock, Public Health Service. 

There will be three categories of delegates 
to this meeting, namely, members of the Inter- 
national College of Surgeons, official delegates, 
and private delegates who will attend in their 
individual capacity. 



AUGUST 2, 1941 



105 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 
COMMERCE 

INTER-AMERICAN COFFEE AGREEMENT 

Venezuela 

By a letter dated July 28, 1941, the Director 
General of the Pan American Union informed 
the Secretary of State that the instrument of 
ratification by Venezuela of the Inter- American 
Coffee Agreement, which was signed at Wash- 
ington on November 28, 1940, was deposited with 
the Union on July 22, 1941. The instrument of 
ratification is dated June 30, 1941. 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATION CONVENTION 

Guatemala 

By a note dated July 14, 1941, the Spanish 
Ambassador at Washington informed the Sec- 
retary of State that the instrument of ratifica- 
tion by Guatemala of the International Tele- 
communication Convention signed at Madrid 
December 9, 1932 was deposited with the Span- 
ish Government on April 15, 1941. The Am- 
bassador's note states also that the General 
Kadio Regulations, the Additional Radio Regu- 
lations, and the Telegraph Regulations as re- 
vised at Cairo in 1938, were included in the 
ratification with "reservations which the Gov- 
ernment of Guatemala makes with respect 
thereto". 



Legislation 



Compensation for Disability or Death Resulting From 
Injury to Persons Employed at Military, Air, and Naval 
Bases Acquired by the United States From Foreign 
Countries. (H. Kept. 1070, 77th Cong., 1st sess., on S. 
1&12.) 7 pp. 

Strategic and Critical Materials : Hearings Before a 
Subcommittee of the Committee on Military Affairs, 
United States Senate, 77th Cong., 1st sess.. Relative to 
Strategic and Critical Materials and Minerals, May 15, 
19, 21, 26, June 4, 11, 16, and July 1, 1941. iv, 307 pp. 



Regulations 



Providing for Admission to St. Elizabeth's Hospital 
of Insane I'ersons Belonging to the Foreign Service of 
the United States. (S. Rept. 598, 77th Cong., 1st sess., 
on H.R. 4498.) 3 pp. 



The following Goverimient regulations may 
be of interest to readers of the Bulletin: 

Regulations Relating to Transactions in Foreign Ex- 
change, Transfers of Credit, Payments, and the Export 
or Withdrawal of Coin, Bullion and Currency ; and to 
Reports of Foreign Property Interests in the United 
States : Amendment to Regulations [to include China 
and Japan]. July 26, 1941. (Treasury Department.) 
6 Federal Register 3722. 

General Licenses Under Executive Order 83S9, April 
10, 1940, as Amended, and Regulations Issued Pur- 
suant Thereto : 

Amendment of General License No. 13, as 
Amended, Under Executive Order No. 8389, April 
10, 1940, as Amended, and Regulations Issued PuV 
suant Thereto, Relating to Transactions in For- 
eign Exchange, etc. July 26, 1941. (Treasury 
Department.) 6 Federal Register 3722. 

Granting of General Licenses Nos. 54, 55, 56, 57, 
58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, C6, 67, 68, and 69 Under 
Executive Order No. 8389, April 10, 1940, as 
Amended, and Regulations Issued Pursuant 
Thereto Relating to Transactions in Foreign Ex- 
change, etc. July 26, 1941. (Treasury Depart- 
ment.) 6 Federal Register 3722-3726. 

Registration and Fingerprinting of Aliens in Accord- 
ance With the Alien Registration Act, 1940 : Regula- 
tions Governing Replacement of Lost, Mutilated or 
Destroyed Alien Registration Receipt Cards. July 30, 
1941. (Department of Justice: Immigration and Nat- 
uralization Service.) [Fourth Supplement to General 
Order No. C-21.] 6 Federal Register 3825. 

Customs Regulations of 1937, Further Amended to 
Dispense With Consular Invoices for Certain Merchan- 
dise Transferred From a Foreign-Trade Zone Into Cus- 
toms Territory. July 29, 1941. (Treasury Depart- 
ment: Bureau of Customs.) [Treasury Decision 
50438.] 6 Federal Register 3858. 



106 



Publications 



Department of State 

Military Aviation Mission : Additional Article to the 
Agreement of December 12, 1940 Between the United 
States of America and Ecuador — Signed April 30, 1941. 
Executive Agreement Series 207. 2 pp. 50. 



department of state bxjlletin 
Other Government Agencies 

statistical Classification of Imports Into the United 
States, With Rates of Duty and Regulations Govern- 
ing the Preparation of Monthly, Quarterly, and Annual 
Statements of Imports, Effective January 1, 1941. (De- 
partment of Commerce : Bureau of Foreign and Domes- 
tic Commerce.) 241 pp. 500. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIEECTOE OF THB BUREAU OF THE BUDQEiT 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BU 









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ontents 



71 rm 



TIN 

AUGUST 9, 1941 
Vol. V, No. Ill— Publication 1631 



Europe Page 

Economic assistance to the Soviet Union 109 

Address by Assistant Secretaiy of State Berle .... 110 

American Republics 

Increase in coffee quota Ill 

Boundary dispute between Ecuador and Peru .... 112 
Letter of appreciation on behalf of the President of 

Paraguay and Senora de Morinigo 112 

General 

Statement by the Secretary of State 1 13 

Suspension of International Load Line Convention . . 114 

Control of exports in national defense 116 

Commercial Policy 

Agreement with the Soviet Union 115 

International Wheat Meeting 116 

The Department 

Consultant on international petroleum matters. . . . 117 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes 117 

Cultural Relations 

Distinguished visitor from Chile 118 

Chilean committee for mterchange of art with the 

United States 119 

[over] 




U, S. SUPERINTFNnENT OF DOCUMENTS 

AUG 25 1941 



G 



ontents-coNTifivEu 



Treaty Information Page 

Commerce: Agreement With the Soviet Union . ... 119 

Economic Assistance: Soviet Union 120 

Extradition: Treaty With Great Britain 120 

Restriction of War: Convention Relatmg to the Treat- 
ment of Prisoners of War 121 

Navigation: International Load Line Convention. . . 121 
International Law: Convention on Kights and Duties 

of States 121 

Indian Aflairs: Convention Providing for an Inter- 
American Indian Institute 121 

Regulations 122 

Legislation 122 



Europe 



ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE TO THE SOVIET UNION 



[Released to the press August 5] 

The Department of State made public on Au- 
gust 5, 1941 the following exchange of notes 
between the Acting Secretary of State of the 
United States, Mr. Sumner Welles, and the Am- 
bassador of the Union of Soviet Socialist Repub- 
lics, Mr. Constantino A. Oumansky : 

The Acting Sea'etary of State to the Ambassa- 
dor of the Soviet Union 

August 2, 1941. 
My Dear Mr. Ambassador : 

I am pleased to inform you that the Govern- 
ment of the United States has decided to give all 
economic assistance practicable for the purpose 
of strengthening the Soviet Union in its strug- 
gle against armed aggression. This decision 
has been prompted by the conviction of the Gov- 
ernment of the United States that the strength- 
ening of the armed resistance of the Soviet 
Union to the predatory attack of an aggressor 
who is threatening the security and independ- 
ence not only of the Soviet Union but ulso of all 
other nations is in the interest of the national 
defense of the United States. 

In accordance with this decision of the Gov- 
ernment of the United States and in order to 
implement the policy enunciated above, the Gov- 
ernment of the United States is giving the most 
friendly consideration to I'equests from the Gov- 
ernment, institutions, or agencies of the Soviet 
Union relative to the placing in this country of 
orders for articles and materials urgently re- 
quired for the needs of the national defense of 
the Soviet Union and, for the purpose of pro- 



moting the speedy completion and delivery of 
such articles and materials, is extending to these 
orders priority assistance upon the principles 
applicable to the orders of countries struggling 
against aggression. 

In order to facilitate the extension of eco- 
nomic assistance to the Soviet Union, the De- 
partment of State is also issuing unlimited li- 
censes permitting the export to the Soviet Union 
of a wide variety of articles and materials 
needed for the strengthening of the defense of 
that country, in accordance with the principles 
applicable to the furnishing of such articles and 
materials as are needed for the same purpose by 
other countries resisting aggression. 

The appropriate authorities of the Govern- 
ment of the United States, in pursuance of the 
decision to which I have above refeiTed, are also 
giving their favorable consideration to requests 
for the extension of available American ship- 
ping facilities for the purpose of expediting the 
shipment to the Soviet Union of articles and 
materials needed for the national defense of 
that country. 

I am [etc.] Sumner Welles 

The Anibassador of the Soviet Union to the 
Acting Secretary of State 

August 2, 1941. 
My Dear Mr. Acting Secretary : 

I am pleased to take notice of the contents of 
your communication of this date in which you 
informed me that the Government of the United 
States has decided to give all economic assistance 
practicable for the purpose of strengthening the 

109 



no 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Soviet Union in its struggle against armed ag- 
gi-ession. You add that this decision has been 
prompted by the conviction of the Government 
of the United States that the strengthening of 
the armed resistance of the Soviet Union to the 
predatory attack of an aggressor who is threat- 
ening the security and independence not only of 
the Soviet Union but also of all other nations is 
in the interest of the national defense of the 
United States. 

On behalf of my Government, I wish to em- 
phasize the correctness of the view that the ag- 
gressor who has treacherously invaded my 
coimtry is threatening tlie security and inde- 
pendence of all freedom loving nations and that 
this threat naturally creates a community of 
interest of national defense of those nations. 
My Government has directed me to express to 
the Government of the United States its grati- 
tude for the friendly decision of the Government 
of the United States and its confidence that the 
economic assistance 3'ou refer to in j'our note 
will be of such scope and carried out with such 
expedition as to correspond to the magnitude 
of the military operations in wliich the Soviet 
Union is engaging, in offering anned resistance 
to the aggressoi" — a resistance which, as you so 
justly observed, is also in the interest of the na- 
tional defense of the United States. 

I am also pleased to note your statement that : 

"In accordance with this decision of the Gov- 
ernment of the United States and in order to 



imjDlement the policy enunciated above, the 
Government of the United States is giving the 
most friendly consideration to requests from 
the Government, institutions, or agencies of the 
Soviet Union relative to the placing in this 
country of orders for articles and matei'ials 
urgently required for the needs of the national 
defense of the Soviet Union and, for the pur- 
pose of promoting the speedy completion and 
delivery of such articles and materials, is ex- 
tending to these orders priority assistance upon 
the principles ajiplicable to the orders of coun- 
tries struggling against aggression. 

''In order to facilitate the extension of eco- 
nomic assistance to the Soviet Union, the De- 
partment of State is also issuing unlimited li- 
censes permitting the export to the Soviet 
Union of a wide variety of articles and mate- 
rials needed for the strengthening of the de- 
fense of that country, in accordance with the 
principles applicable to the furnishing of such 
articles and materials as are needed for the same 
purpose by other countries resisting aggression. 

'"The appropriate authorities of the Govern- 
ment of the United States, in pursuance of the 
decision to which I have above referred, are also 
giving their favorable consideration to requests 
for the extension of available American ship- 
ping facilities for the purpose of expediting the 
shipment to the Soviet Union of articles and 
materials needed for the national defense of 
that coimtry." 

I am [etc.] Constantine A. Oumanskt 



ADDRESS BY ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF STATE BERLE ' 



[Released to the press August 9] 

We meet today in the hospitality of the Grand 
Duchy of Luxembourg, a state which through 
the endless changes of European history has 
given an example of devotion to fi'eedom and 
independence. Let it stand as a symbol of the 



' At the reception given in Washington, D. C, by the 
Grand Duchess of Luxembourg in honor of George P. 
Waller, Consul of the United States of America, August 
8, 1941. 



many small nations which have mightily con- 
tributed to the life of Europe. 

Though this .small countiy is today submerged 
by irresistible force, we know beyond question 
that the processes of force can create no lasting 
result. Though its civilian population is 
literally enslaved, its mind and heart will not 
and cannot be broken. 

An invading army has seized its territory. A 
conqueror, claiming to establish a "new order", 



AUGUST 9, 1941 



111 



has put its young men to work at forced labor ; 
and has taken its girls from their homes, has 
forced them into German industry, and pro- 
poses to make them, if possible, mothers of alien 
children. This is the grim reality behind fine 
phrases about a "new order". 

Yet there is no shadow of doubt that the 
nations of Europe and the people of Europe, 
great and small, wait only for the opportunity 
to break the chains of this temporary barbar- 
ism, and to reestablish the laws and customs of 
civilization. 

My Government is happy in the knowledge 
that the lot of the people of Luxembourg has 
been in some slight degree alleviated by the 
representative there of the Foreign Service of 
the United States, Consul Waller. 

It is the plan of this Government, when the 
tide of barbarity shall be rolled back, to tuni 
the full measure of its economic strength to 
bringing help, relief, and sustenance to the tens 
of millions of families in many countries who 
are now hungry, cold, homeless, sick, separated, 
or in prison by the ruthless act of a group of 
tyrants. 



Out of the shadows there emerge the outlines 
of the world to come. 

In it, small nations will be able to live in free- 
dom and in peace, in a family of nations ruled 
by law which respects the right of the weak as 
well as the strong. The basis of existence must 
be national. But a necessary condition must be 
a general accord under which all countries are 
assured of participation in the economic life of 
the world and under which all races are assured 
the right to live in conditions of equality and 
self-respect. 

Modern life has provided the tools, the 
capacity, and the transport which can assure 
freedom from want. It has created the com- 
munications which can guarantee freedom of 
information and of science. It can and must 
create the law which gives freedom from fear. 

In the day of reconstruction the voices of 
those who suffer now will not be forgotten. We 
are bold to think that the sorrow of the present 
is the prelude to a coming age more secure, more 
brilliant, more gracious, and more free than any 
we have yet seen. 



American Republics 



INCKEASE IN COFFEE QUOTA 



[Released to the press August 5] 

Pursuant to provisions of article VII of the 
Inter-American Coffee Agreement (Treaty 
Series 970)^ the quota for imports of coffee into 
the United States from countries which ai'e not 
signatories of the agi-eement is to be increased 
in proportion to the increase in the quotas for 
countries which are signatories of the agree- 



'BiiUefhi of November .30, 1940, p. 48:i. 



ment, authorized by the resolution of the Inter- 
American Coffee Boai-d on August 2, 1941. By 
virtue of this resolution of the Board the total 
quota for the signatory countries for the cur- 
rent quota-year ending September 30, 1941 will 
be increased, effective August 11, 1941, from 
1.5,804,757 bags of 60 kilograms net to 16,239,240 
bags. The corresponding increase in the quota 
for non-signatory countries is from 360,932 bags 
to 370,854 bags. 



112 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BUI.LETIN 



BOUNDARY DISPUTE BETWEEN 
ECUADOR AND PERU 

(Released to the press August 7] 

Texts of telegrams from the President of 
Peru, His Excellency Manuel Prado, and the 
Minister of Foreign Affairs of Peru, His Excel- 
lency Alfredo Solf y Muro, in reply to tele- 
grams of congratulations from the President of 
the United States and the Acting Secretary of 
State on the occasion of the suspension of hos- 
tilities between Peru and Ecuador,^ follow: 

The President of Peru to the President of the 
United States 

I wish to express my appreciation to Your 
Excellency for your courteous congratulations 
on the occasion of the suspension of frontier 
hostilities betM'een Peru and Ecuador. Tlie 
Peruvian Government will omit no effort to re- 
establish normality in its relations with the 
Ecuadoran Government and to maintain them 
in an atmosphere of peace and cooperation. I 
beg of Your Excellency to accept my fervent 
wishes for the happiness of the American people 
and for your personal welfare. 

The Minister of Foreign Affairs of Peru to the 
Acting Seci'etary of State of the United 
States 

I am very grateful for your kind telegram 
of congratulations. It is my privilege to assure 
Your Excellency that my Government will al- 
ways be disposed to cooperate effectively for the 
maintenance of peace in the Americas, the 
strengthening of continental solidarity and in 
the maintenance of a pacific and cordial under- 
standing with Ecuador which will permit the 
happy solution of our differences. 

LETTER OF APPRECIATION ON BEHALF 
OF THE PRESIDENT OF PARAGUAY 
AND SENORA DE MORINIGO 

[Released to the press August 6] 

The Department of State has made public 
the following translation of a letter from the 



' Bulletin of August 2, 1941, p. 93. 



Minister of Paraguay in the United States, 
Seiior Dr. Don Juan Jose Soler, to the Act- 
ing Secretary of State, Mr. Sumner Welles: 

"Washington, July 28, J94J. 
"Mr. Secretary: 

"I have the honor to inform Your Excellency 
that yesterday Seiiora Dolores F. de Morinigo 
and her son, Higinio, departed by airplane of 
the Pan American Airways on their return to 
Paraguay. Seiiora de Morinigo arrived at 
Miami on May 7 last, invited by President 
Roosevelt to submit her son, who was suffering 
from the effects of infantile paralysis, to a spe- 
cialized treatment at the Warm Springs Foun- 
dation, Georgia. 

"I am accordingly pleased to express to Your 
Excellency : 

"(1) The reiteration of the appreciation of 
President Morinigo for the deference which he 
has been shown and which he has accepted, 
both for the respect in which it affects him per- 
sonally and for its high value as American 
cordiality. This appreciation, directed in the 
first instance to the host, President Roosevelt, 
extends to Your E.xcellency as a spontaneous 
and effective cooperator in the conception and 
carrying out of this noble initiative. 

"(2) Senora de Morinigo requested me, be- 
fore leaving, to convey officially through the 
worthy intermediation of Your Excellency, to 
Her Excellency, Mrs. Roosevelt, to Mrs. Cor- 
dell Hull, and to Mrs. Sumner Welles, and the 
distinguished ladies of American society to 
whom Seiiora de Morinigo is obligated, the 
expi-essions of her gratitude for the reception 
at the White House, for the teas given in her 
honor, and for the numerous and courteous at- 
tentions received on the occasion of her visit 
to Washington and recently on departing from 
Miami. 

"(3) The general health of the child has im- 
proved notably and the difficulties have begun 
to give way with the treatment applied. Effec- 
tive progress has been noted in the movement 
of the muscles and the manner of walking. 
The deformities which were beginning to be 
visible in the bone structure of the child due to 



AUGUST 9, 1941 

defective locomotion have been corrected. 
Now, with adequate orthopedic apparatus, this 
locomotion approaches normality. No oper- 
ation has been performed, since the doctor be- 
lieves that only after two years would condi- 
tions be appropriate to perform one, for which 
purpose the treatments and massages that are 
recommended will be continued in Paraguay. 
In addition, the doctor wishes to receive re- 
ports periodically concerning the condition of 
the child. All of these recommendations will 
be followed out by Dr. Eaul Pena, who was 
sent to Warm Springs expressly to receive the 
pertinent instructions. 

"Finally, I do not wish to conceal from Your 
Excellency the satisfaction and the intimate 



113 

appreciation with which Sefiora de Morinigo 
has regarded the efforts of the eminent Chief 
Surgeon, Dr. C. E. Irwin, to combat the effects 
of the disease, as well as the endeavors of the 
Director of the Foundation and all of the ad- 
ministrative personnel to provide her with a 
tranquil and comfortable stay in Warm 
Springs. 

"Having complied with the pleasant duty 
with wliich I have been charged by the Pres- 
ident of the Republic and Sefiora de Morinigo, 
I take advantage of this opportmiity to greet 
you, Mr. Secretary, with my highest considera- 
tion and personal esteem. 

Juan Jose Soler" 



General 



STATEMENT BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE 



[Released to the press August 4 ] 

At his press confez-ence on August 4, the 
Secretary of State made the following state- 
ment : 

"I think that no rational person needs any 
argument to convince him that during the 
weeks of my absence the most clinching demon- 
stration has been given of what some of us for 
some years have insisted was being planned. 
That is, that there is a world movement of con- 
quest by force, accompanied by methods of gov- 
erning the conquered peoples that are rooted 
mainly in savagery and barbarism. That situ- 
ation calls for ever-increasing preparations 
for our national defense and ever-increas- 
ing production of military supplies both for 
ourselves and for those who are resisting the 



would-be world conquerors. On these points 
there should be absolute unity among the Amer- 
ican people, in the first place, and among the 
other free peoples who have not yet been con- 
quered. With full effort and ever-increasing 
production and preparation for defense, when- 
ever and wherever such defense is most effec- 
tive, a successful resistance to the present world 
movement of invasion and destruction can be 
made and, in my judgment, undoubtedly will be 
made. I feel very strongly that with unity of 
purpose, maximum effort, and firm determina- 
tion, the remaining free peoples of the world 
will win and that those who are at present the 
victims of the forces of barbarism can hope for 
the restoration of their human rights and 
liberties." 



114 DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

SUSPENSION OF INTERNATIONAL LOAD LINE CONVENTION 



[Released to the press August 9] 

The President lias issued a proclamation de- 
claring the International Load Line Conven- 
tion, signed at London July 5, 1930 (Treaty Se- 
ries 858), suspended in the ports and waters of 
the United States, so far as the United States is 
concerned, for the duration of the present emer- 
gency. 

The convention contains provisions with re- 
si^ect to the placing of load lines on ships en- 
gaged in international voyages other than ships 
of war, ships solely engaged in fishing, pleasure 
yachts, and ships not carrying cargo or pas- 
sengers, and those of less than 150 tons, flying 
the flags of the contracting parties. 

The proclamation is based upon an opinion of 
the Attorney General dated July 28, 1941 ^ in 
which he concluded that peacetime commerce 
and voyages were assumed as the basis of the 
convention; that the present situation with re- 
spect to shipping is wholly different from that 
obtaining at the time the convention was 
signed ; and that the conditions essential to tlie 
operation of the convention and assumed as the 
basis for it are almost in complete abeyance. 
He pointed out that of the 36 countries which 
became parties to the convention, 10 are at war 
and 16 are under military occupation and that 
in these circumstances the Government of the 
United States is free to declare the convention 
inoperative or suspended. 

In view of the pressing need for tonnage in 
the trade between the United States and the 
other American republics, particularly tanker 
facilities for petroleum products, the shortage 
in which has a direct bearing upon national and 
hemispheric defense, the Department of State 
has conferred with the American republics that 
are parties to the convention, namely, Argen- 
tina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Mexico, Panama, 
Peru, and Uruguay, all of which have agreed to 
the suspension. 

The load lines will be fixed during the period 
of the suspension by the Secretary of Commerce, 



pursuant to provisions of the act of Congress 
approved March 2, 1929 - stipulating that no 
line shall be established which in the judgment 
of the Secretary '"is above the actual line of 
.safety". 

The British Government, which is the de- 
positaiy of the convention, has been informed 
of this Government's action. 

The text of the proclamation, entitled "Sus- 
pending the International Load Lines Conven- 
tion in Ports and Waters of the United States 
and in so far as the United States of America is 
Concerned" is printed below : 

By the President of the United States of 
America 

A Proclamation 

Whereas a convention establishing uniform 
jjrinciples and rules with regard to the limits to 
which ships on international voyages may be 
loaded, entitled "International Load Lines Con- 
vention", was signed by the respective plenipo- 
tentiaries of the United States of America and 
certain other countries at London on July 5,' 
1930; and 

Whereas, following ratification by the United 
States of America and certain other countries, 
the Convention, in accordance with Article 24 
thereof, came into force with respect to the 
United States of America and cei-tain other 
countries on January 1, 1933; and 

Whereas the provisions of the Convention 
were carefully formulated "to promote safety of 
life and property at sea" in time of peace by 
regulating the competitive loading of merchant 
ships employed in the customary channels of 
international trade; and 

Whereas the conditions envisaged by the Con- 
vention have been, for the time being, almost 
wholly de.stroyed, and the partial and imperfect 
enforcement of the Convention can operate only 
to prejudice the victims of aggression, whom it 



' 40 Op. Att. Gen., No. 24. 



'45 Stat. 1492. 



AUGUST 9, 1941 



115 



is the avowed purpose of the United States of 
America to aid; and 

Whereas it is an implicit condition to the 
binding effect of the Convention that those con- 
ditions envisaged by it should continue without 
such material change as has in fact occurred; 
and 

Whereas under approved principles of inter- 
national law it has become, by reason of such 
changed conditions, the right of the United 
States of America to declare the Convention 
suspended and inojjerative : 

Now, THEREFORE, I, FrANKLIN D. RoOSEVELT, 

President of the United States of America, exer- 
cising in behalf of the United States of America 
an unquestioned right and privilege under ap- 
proved principles of international law, do pro- 
claim and declare the aforesaid International 
Load Lines Convention suspended and inopera- 
tive in the ports and waters of the United States 
of America, and in so far as the United States of 
America is concerned, for the duration of the 
present emergency. 

In waTNESS whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States of 
America to be affixed. 

Done at the City of Washington this 9th day 



of August, in the year of our Lord nineteen 

hundred and forty-one, and of the 

[seal] Independence of the United States 

of America the one hundred and 

sixty-sixth. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 
By the President: 
CoRDELL Hull 

Secretary of State. 

[No. 2500] 

CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL 
DEFENSE 

[Released to the press August 4] 

The Secretary of Stat« annoimced on August 
i the issuance of general licenses GATE i for the 
exportation of rubber-belting to Canada and 
GATE 63 for the exportation of rubber-belting 
to the Philippine Islands. 

Collectors of customs have been authorized 
to permit, without the requirement of indi- 
vidual license, the exportation of any of the 
articles and materials enumerated above, to the 
respective countries named, but the exporter is 
required to indicate the appropriate license 
number on the shipper's export declaration 
filed with the collector. 



Commercial Policy 



AGREEMENT WITH THE SOVIET UNION 



[Released to the press August 5] 

The commercial agreement between the 
United States of America and the Union of the 
Soviet Socialist Republics which was pro- 
claimed on and became effective on August 6, 
1937 and which was renewed for successive 
periods of one year on August 5, 1938, August 
2, 1939, and August 6, 1940,^ was continued in 



' Executive Agreement Series 105, 132, 151, and 179. 
406325 — 41 2 



force for another year, that is, until August 6, 
1942, by identic notes exchanged at Washington 
on August 2, 1941 by the Acting Secretary of 
State of the United States, Mr. Sumner Welles, 
and the Ambassador of the Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics, Mr. Constantino A. 
Oumansky. 

Although it is expected that in the coming 
year the character and amoimt of United States 
trade with the Soviet Union will be governed 



116 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



largely by the defense needs of the United 
States and of the Soviet Union and other coun- 
tries struggling against the forces of armed 
aggression rather than by the usual commer- 
cial considerations, the exchange of notes will 
insure the continuance during the emergency 
period of our established commercial relations 
with the Soviet Union on the basis of the 1937 
commercial agreement. 

The following table gives the value in dollars 
of exports to and imports from the Soviet 
Union in the agreement years: 

[Source: Official records of the United States Department of Commerce.) 



Agreement year (beginning August) 



1935-36 

1936-37 

1937-38 

1938-39 

1939-40 

1940-41 (10 months) '"- 



U.S. domestic 

exports to 
U.S.S.R. (in 
tiiousands of 
U.S. dollars) 



33, 286 
30, 987 
64, 338 
50, 160 
73, 636 
57, 481 



U.S. import* 
for consump- 
tion from 
U.S.S.R. (in 
thousands of 
U.S. dollars) 



21,200 

23, 240 
22, 874 

24, 739 
24, 773 
22, 710 



• Preliminary data for the 10 months, August 1940 through May 1941. 

The text of the identic notes exchanged 
follows : 



"Washington, August 2, 1941- 
"Excellency : 

"In accordance with the conversations which 
have taken place, I have the honor to confirm on 
behalf of my Government the agreement which 
has been reached between the Governments of 
our respective countries that the agreement 
regarding commercial relations between the 
United States of America and the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Kepublics recorded in the ex- 
change of notes of August 4, 1937 = between the 
Ambassador of the United States of America 
at Moscow and the People's Commissar for 
Foreign Affairs of the Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics, which came into force on August 6, 

1937, on the date of proclamation thereof by the 
President of the United States of America and 
approval thereof by the Council of People's 
Commissai-s of the Union of Soviet Socialist Re- 
publics and which was renewed on August 5. 

1938, August 2. 1939, and August 6, 19-40 shall 
continue in force until August 6, 1942. 

"The present agreement shall be proclaimed 
by the President of the United States of America 
and approved by the Council of People's 
Commissars of the Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics. 

"Accept [etc.]" 



INTERNATIONAL WHEAT MEETING 



[Released to the press August 4] 

There follows the text of a statement prepared 
for the press by officials of the Governments of 
Argentina, Australia, Canada, the United 
Kingdom, and the United States, who convened 
in Washington on July 10, 1941 ^ to consider the 
present situation and outlook with respect to 
international trade in wheat : 

"The representatives of Argentina, Australia, 
Canada, the United Kingdom and the United 
States of America who have been considering 
world wheat problems in Washington since the 
tenth of July recessed on the third of August to 



meet again on the eighteenth of August. A pro- 
visional draft agreement is being submitted to 
the Governments forthwith, together with a re- 
quest for instructions which will enable the 
delegates to prepare a definitive text when they 
reconvene. 

"The range of the wheat discussions has been 
considerably wider than hitherto. The prob- 
lems of furnishing post-war relief to countries 
which have suffered from the devastation of war 
occupied a prominent place in the agenda. The 
need for an equitable sharing of world markets 
to avoid cut-throat competition was fully con- 



' Bulletin of July 12, 1941, p. 28. 



' Bulletin of August 10, 1940, p. 106. 



AUGUST 9, 1941 i 

sidered as a new phase of an old problem. 
Stocks available for export at the end of July 
1941 amounted to about two years' normal re- 
quirements of imported wheat and, in conse- 
quence, the representatives of the exporting 
countries have been compelled to face the neces- 
sity of controlling production in order to pi'e- 
vent stocks from continuing to rise above their 
present record high level. 

"The representatives have recognized that 
when the war is over European agriculture will 
be distorted, livestock herds will be severely re- 
duced by the acute shortage of feed grains, farm 
equipment will be dilapidated, and, in conse- 
quence, there will be urgent need and oppor- 
tunity for reconstruction. 

"The advance of knowledge about the rela- 
tionship of food to health suggests that this 
reconstruction should result in the provision 
for each country of diets more adequate for 
health and happiness, thus improving upon pre- 
war conditions. 

"Much progress has been made in the consid- 
eration of all these problems in the hope that 
by the establishment of an ever-normal granary 
and of a large pool of relief wheat, the con- 
sumers of the world may be guaranteed abun- 
dant post-war supplies at prices reasonable 
both to them and to producers and free of 
charge to those in need of relief." 



The Department 



CONSULTANT ON INTERNATIONAL 
PETROLEUM MATTERS 

[Released to the press August 6] 

The appointment of Max W. Thornburg as a 
Special Assistant to the Under Secretary of 
State to act as consultant to the State Depart- 
ment on international petroleum matters was 
announced in the Bulletin of July 12, 1941, page 
25. Because of tlie close connection between pe- 
troleum matters and other international eco- 
nomic questions, Mr. Thornburg was assigned 



117 

to the Office of the Adviser on International 
Economic Affairs. 

The vital role played by oil in the present 
war and in our own national-defense efforts has 
given it a weight in shaping many State De- 
partment policies that waiTants a specialist 
within that Department who is acquainted with 
the oil problems of various foreign countries. 

Mr. Thornburg, while devoting his special 
attention to the State Department's interest in 
petroleum problems, will work closely with the 
Office of the Petroleum Coordinator. He will 
keep that Office cuiTently acquainted with the 
international aspects of tlie petroleum prob- 
lem and will infoim the State Department of 
the plans and policies formulated by the Co- 
ordinator in meeting his responsibilities. 

Mr. Thornburg was graduated in engineering 
from the University of California in 1917 and 
from the University of Grenoble (France) . He 
served in the A. E. F. during the World War. 
For the past 20 years he has held positions in 
the oil industry, both in the production and dis- 
tribution fields. Mr. Thornburg has resigned as 
vice president of the Bahrein Petroleum Co. to 
place at the service of the Government his large 
experience gained in the Middle and Far East 
and, since the outbreak of the present war, in 
London, where he has worked with British oil- 
supply authorities. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

The Senate on August 7, 1941 confirmed 
the nomination of Lii;coln MticVeagh, of Con- 
necticut, now Envoy Extraordinary and Min- 
ister Plenipotentiary of the United States of 
America to Greece, as Envoy Extraordinary 
and Minister Plenipotentiary to Iceland. 

[Released to the press August 9] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since August 1. 
1941: 



118 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Career Officers 

Carlos C. Hall, of Kingman, Ariz., Consul 
at Medellfn, Colombia, has been designated 
Second Secretary of Legation and Consul at 
La Paz, Bolivia, and will serve in dual ca- 
pacity. 

Kobert G. McGregor, Jr., of New Eochelle, 
N. Y., Consul at Mexico, D. F., Mexico, has 
been designated Second Secretary of Embassy 
at that post. 

William C. AfFeld, Jr., of Minneapolis, 
Minn., Vice Consul at Kobe, Japan, has been 
assigned as Vice Consul at Caracas, Venezuela. 

Stephen E. Aguirre, of El Paso, Tex., Third 
Secretary of Embassy at Mexico, D. F., Mex- 
ico, has been assigned as Vice Consul at Mexi- 
cali, Baja California, Mexico. 

Vernon L. Fluharty, of Worthington, Ohio, 
Third Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul 
at Bogota, Colombia, has been assigned as Vice 
Consul at Medellfn, Colombia. 

James M. Gilchrist. Jr., of Chicago, 111., has 
been appointed Foreign Service Officer, Un- 
classifiecl, Secretary in the Diplomatic Service, 
and Vice Consul, and has been assigned for 
duty in the Department of State. 

Byron Wliite, of Fayetteville, N. C, has been 
appointed Foreign Service Officer, Unclassified, 
Secretary in the Diplomatic Service, and Vice 
Consul, and has been assigned as Vice Consul 
at Nogales, Sonora, Mexico. 

Non-career Officers 

Raymond Phelan, of San Jose, Calif., Vice 
Consul at Barranquilla, Colombia, has been 
appointed Vice Consul at Agua Prieta, Sonora, 
Mexico. 

James M. Bowcock, of Denver, Colo., who 
has been serving as Vice Consul at Munich, 
Germany, has been appointed Vice Consul at 
Tenerife, Canary Islands. 

J. Brock Havron, of "VVliitwell, Tenn., Vice 
Consul at Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico, has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Acapulco de 
Juarez, Guerrero, Mexico. 

Francis M. Withey, of Reed City, Mich., Vice 
Consul at Nice, France, has been appointed 
Vice Consul at Tampico, Tamaulipas, Mexico. 



Cultural Relations 



DISTINGUISHED VISITOR FROM 
CHILE 

[Released to the press August 6] 

Sefiorita Magdalena Petit, of Santiago, Chile, 
will arrive in New York on August 11 aboard 
the S.S. Santa Lucia of the Grace Line on an 
invitation extended by the Department of State 
to visit the United States. 

Senorita Petit comes from a family dedi- 
cated to science and the arts and as a child 
manifested an early interest in an intellectual 
and artistic career. In the field of music she 
collaborated with the Bach Society, attracting 
wide attention with her original compositions. 
Later, foi-saking a musical career, she devoted 
her time to writing. In the latter field of en- 
deavor she has become very successful and is 
the author of La Qu'mtrala (novel), K'lmera- 
hmd (play), La Quintrala (a dramatization 
of the novel), Diego Portales (biography), 
Lofi Pincheita (novel, recently adapted for 
the screen), and Vn. Autm- en Busca de 
Re present acion. 

In 1932 her historical novel, Diego Portales, 
won a prize. Tliis novel is a noteworthy recon- 
struction of an important Chilean epoch and 
a psychological portrait of a minister of state. 
It is a good example of the author's favorite 
genre, the psychological novel, which is per- 
haps attributable to her French inheritance. 
Her latest novel, Los Pincheira (1939), por- 
trays in a romantic setting the lives of Chilean 
bandits. 

Seilorita Petit has also contributed articles 
to various magazines, including Atenea and 
Nosotros. At present she is much engrossed in 
the theater and has published several plays. 
She is particularly interested in the "little 
theater movement" and its development in 
Chile. 

Seiiorita Petit will come to Washington 
shortly after her arrival in New York in order 
to confer with officers of the Department of 
State regarding the itinerary of her visit in the 
United States. 



AUGUST 9, 1941 

CHILEAN COMMITTEE FOR INTER- 
CHANGE OF ART WITH THE UNITED 
STATES 

A recent letter addressed to the Honorable 
Claude G. Bowers, American Ambassador at 
Santiago, Chile, by Senor Domingo Santa 
Cruz, Dean of the Faculty of Fine Arts of the 
University of Chile, contained the informa- 
tion that a special committee had been organ- 
ized to encourage cultural relations in the field 
of art between Chile and the United States. 
The committee plans to aid in the exchange of 
art exhibits between the two countries and also 
to make it possible for persons interested in art 
in the two countries to meet and communicate 
with one another. 

The committee is composed of the following 
persons : 

Domingo Santa Cruz, dean of the Faculty of Fine Arts 
and professor of composition of the National Con- 
servatory of Music, president 

Jos6 Perotti, director of the School of Applied Arts and 
professor of modeling 

Samuel Negrete, director of the National Conservatory 
of Music and professor of composition 

Carlos Humeres, director of the School of Fine Arts 
and professor of history of art 



119 

Julio Ortiz de Zarate, director of the National Mu- 
seum of Fine Arts and head professor of metal arts 
in the School of Applied Arts 

Carlos Isamitt, president of the National Association 
of Composers 

Romano De Dtiminicis, secretary of the Faculty of 
Fine Arts and professor of morphology and his- 
tory of art 

Jorge Caballero, commissary of expositions of the fac- 
ulty and professor of painting in the School of 
Fine Arts 

Eugenio Pereira Salas, professor of history of Ameri- 
can art in the School of Fine Arts and secretary 
of the Chile -United States Cultural Institute 

Hector Banderas, painter and professor of the School 
of Applied Arts 

Senora Filomena Salas wiU serve as secretary 
of the committee. 

This committee plans to work in close cooper- 
ation with the Chilean Committee on Intellec- 
tual Cooperation, as well as with the Chile - 
United States Cultural Institute. 

The formation of the committee is the direct 
result of recent visits made by several of its 
members to the United States at the invitation 
of the Department of State. Members who 
have visited the United States under the pro- 
gram for bringing distinguished visitors of the 
other American republics to the United States 
are Senor Domingo Santa Cruz, Dr. Carlos 
Humeres, and Dr. and Senora Pereira Salas. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



COMMERCE 

AGREEMENT WITH THE SOVIET UNION 

The commercial agreement between the 
United States of America and the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics which was pro- 
claimed on and became effective on August 6, 
1937 and which was renewed for successive 
periods of one year on August 5, 1938, August 



2, 1939, and August 6, 1940 (Executive Agree- 
ment Series 105, 132, 151, and 179), was con- 
tinued in force for another year, that is, until 
August 6, 1942, by identic notes exchanged at 
Washing-ton on August 2, 1941 by the Acting 
Secretary of State of the United States and 
the Ambassador of the Soviet Union. The text 
of tlie identic notes appears in this Bidletin 
under the heading "Commercial Policy". 



120 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE 

Soviet Union 

An exchange of notes dated August 2, 1941 
between the Acting Secretary of State and the 
Ambassador of the Soviet Union regarding the 
decision of the Government of tlie United States 
to give economic assistance to the Soviet Union 
in its struggle against armed aggression, ap- 
pears in this Bulletin under the heading 
"Europe". 

EXTRADITION 

TREATY WITH GREAT BRIT.UN 

Burma 

There is printed below the text of a note dated 
July 22, 1941 from the British Ambassador at 
Washington to the Secretary of State i-egard- 
ing the participation of Burma as an Overseas 
Territory of His Majesty the King in the Ex- 
tradition Treaty between the United States and 
Great Britain signed on December 22, 1931 
(Treaty Series 849) : 

"No. 463. British Embassy, 

'■'Washington, D. C. July 22nd, 19^. 
"Sir: 

"I have the honour to inform you, in accord- 
ance with instructions from His Majesty's 
Principal Secretary of State for Foreign Af- 
fairs, that His Majesty's Government in the 
United Kingdom have had mider consideration 
the position of Burma in relation to the Extra- 
dition Treaty between the United Kingdom and 
the United States of America signed at London 
on the 22nd December, 1931. 

"2. Article 2 of the said Treaty provides that 
for the purposes of that Treaty 'the territory of 
His Britannic Majesty shall be deemed to be 
Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the Chan- 
nel Islands and the Isle of Man, and all parts of 
His Britannic Majesty's Dominions overseas 
other than those enumerated in Article 
14 . . . ' . Article 14 provides that His Ma- 
jesty may accede to the Treaty on behalf of the 
Dominion of Canada, the Conmionwealth of 
Australia, the Dominion of New Zealand, the 
Union of South Africa, the Irish Free State and 



Newfoundland — and India. The fourth para- 
graph of Article 18 contains a provision to the 
effect that on the entry into force of the Treaty 
of the 22nd December, 1931, the provisions of 
Article 10 of the Treaty of the 9th August, 1842 
[Treaty Series 119], of the Convention of the 
12th Jidy, 1889 [Treaty Series 139], of the Sup- 
plementary Convention of the 13th December, 
1900 [Treaty Series 391], and of the Supple- 
mentary Convention of the 12th April, 1905 
[Treaty Series 458], relative to extradition, 
should cease to have effect, save that in the case 
of each of the Dominions and India, mentioned 
in Article 14, those provisions should remain in 
force until such Dominion or India should have 
acceded to the Treaty of the 22nd December, 
1931, or until replaced by other treaty arrange- 
ments. 

"3. At the time when the Treaty entered into 
force in relation to the countries covered by 
Article 2, the term 'India' in article 14 of the 
Treaty of 1931 included Burma. His Majesty 
has however not acceded to the Treaty in re- 
spect of India, which therefore continues to be 
bound by the earlier treaty arrangements men- 
tioned in the preceding paragraph, and conse- 
quently, as Burma inherits from India such 
international obligations as are applicable, 
Burma, though now separated from India, con- 
tinues to be bound by the earlier treaty 
arrangements. 

"4. Since the 1st April, 1937, the date of 
separation from India, Burma has possessed the 
status of an Overseas Territory of His Majesty 
The King. The Government of Burma having 
now expressed the wish to participate in the 
Treaty, I have the honour to propose to Your 
Excellency that Burma should be regarded as 
participating in the said Treaty of 1931 as from 
the 1st November, 1941, as if Burma had been 
included at the time of its signature in the 
territories enumerated in the first paragraph of 
Article 2 of the Treaty. 

"5. Kequisitions for the extradition of fugi- 
tive criminals who have taken refuge in Burma 
should be addressed to the Governor of Burma. 
"6. If this proposal is agreeable to the United 
States Government, I have the honour to sug- 



AUGUST 9, 1941 

gest that the present note and Your Excel- 
lency's reply hereto should be regarded as plac- 
ing upon record the agreement i-eached in the 
matter and that this agreement should be 
terminable by either party by a notice given in 
accordance with the provisions of Article 18. 
"I have [etc.] 

"(For the Ambassador) 

N. M. Butler" 

The proposal contained in the above note was 
accepted by this Government, and the Am- 
bassador was so informed by a note dated 
August 1, 1941. According to the agreement 
reached in the exchange of notes, Burma shall 
be considered as participating in the Extradi- 
tion Treaty of 1931 as from November 1, 1941. 

RESTRICTION OF WAR 

CONVENTION RELATING TO THE TREATMENT OF 
PRISONERS OF WAR 

Colombia 

The Swiss Minister at "Washington transmit- 
ted to the Secretary of State with a note dated 
July 25, 1941 a certified copy of the proces-ver- 
bal of the deposit of the instrument of ratifica- 
tion by Colombia of the Convention Eelating to 
the Treatment of Prisoners of War, signed at 
Geneva July 27, 1929 (Treaty Series 846). The 
deposit of the instrument of ratification took 
place on June 5, 1941. 

In accordance Avith the provisions of article 
92 of the convention the ratification will become 
effective six months from the date of the deposit, 
namely, December 5, 1941. 



According to the information of the Depart- 
ment the following countries have deposited in- 
struments of ratification or of adherence to the 
convention : Aden, United States of America, 
Australia, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, Bulgaria, 
Burma, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, 
Czechoslovakia, Denmark, Egypt, Estonia, 
France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Hun- 
gary, India, Iraq, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Mex- 
ico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, 
Portugal, Kumania, Spain, Sweden, Switzer- 
land, Thailand (Siam) , Turkey, Union of South 
Africa, and Yugoslavia. 



121 
NAVIGATION 

INTERNATIONAL LOAD LINE CONVENTION 

On August 9, 1941 the President issued a proc- 
lamation suspending in the ports and waters of 
the United States the International Load Line 
Convention signed at London July 5, 1930 
(Treaty Series 858) , for the duration of the pres- 
ent emergency. An announcement to the press, 
together with the text of the proclamation, ap- 
pear in tills BuUetin under the heading "Gen- 
eral". 

INTERNATIONAL LAW 

CONVENTION ON RIGHTS AND DUTIES OF STATES 

Haiti 

The American Minister to Haiti reported by 
a despatch dated August 2, 1941 that the Presi- 
dent of Haiti signed on July 17, 1941 the Decree 
Law No. 14, ratifying on behalf of the Govern- 
ment of Haiti the Convention on Rights and 
Duties of States signed at the Seventh Interna- 
tional Conference of American States, Monte- 
video, on December 2(5, 1933 (Treaty Series 
881). 



The countries which have deposited instru- 
ments of ratification or of adherence to this con- 
vention are the United States of America, Bra- 
zil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Domini- 
can Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, 
Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, and 
Venezuela. 

INDIAN AFFAIRS 

CONVENTION PROVIDING FOB AN INTER-AMERICAN 
INDIAN INSTITUTE 

El Salvador — Honduras 

By a telegram dated August 1, 1941 the Amer- 
ican Ambassador to Mexico reported that he had 
been informed by the Mexican Foreign Office 
that the instruments of ratification by El Salva- 
dor and by Mexico of the Convention Providing 
for an Inter- American Indian Institute, signed 
at Mexico City on October 29, 1940, had been 
deposited on July 30, 1941 and July 29, 1941, 
respectively. 



122 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Regulations 



Legislation 



Export Control Schedule No. 15 [determining tbat 
effective August 2, 1941 the forms, conversions, and 
derivatives of petroleum products and tetraethyl lead 
(items 1 and 2, respectively, Proclamation 2417) shall 
consist of the commodities listed (superseding petro- 
leum products and tetraethyl lead as listed in Export 
Control Schedule No. 10)]. August 2, 1941. (Admin- 
istrator of Export Control.) 6 Federal Register 3888. 



Relief of Certain Basque Aliens. (H. Rept. 1103, 
77th Cong., 1st sess., on H.R. 1&44.) 3 pp. 

Making Eligible for Citizenship Any Alien Not Ra- 
cially Ineligible to Naturalization Heretofore Admitted 
to the United States for Permanent Residence Under 
Special Act of Congress. (H. Rept. 1111, 77th Cong., 
1st sess., on H.R. 5428.) 4 pp. 



tlNTIHG OFFIC 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents - - - - Sub.scription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEBKLT WITH THE APPHOVAL OF THE DIEECTOB OF THE BnBEAD OF THE BUDGET 



9^^3,1 H-i<: 



o 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 



AUGUST 16, 1941 
Vol. V, No. 112— Publication 1632 



C 



ontents 




General Page 
Joint declaration of the President of the United States 

and the Prime Minister of Great Britain 125 

America's ObUgations and Opportunities: Address by 

Wallace McClure 126 

Control of exports in national defense 132 

Europe 

Assistance to the Soviet Union: Joint message from the 
President of the United States and the Prune 
Minister of Great Britain to the President of the 
Soviet of People's Commissars of the U.S.S.R. . . . 134 

Death of Director General of the British Purchasing 

Commission 135 

Canada 

Permanent Joint Board on Defense 135 

The,Far East 

Repatriation of Americans m Japan 135 

Commercial Policy 

Agreement with the Soviet Union 136 

Supplementary trade agreement with Canada .... 136 

Cultural Relations 

Travel grants to students from the other American 

republics 136 

The Department 

Passes for entrance to Department of State 140 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes 1^0 

[over] 



U, S, SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS 
SEP 5 1941 







0/lf 6 AliS— CONTINUED 

Treaty Information Page 

Promotion of peace: Treaties With Australia, Canada, 
and New Zealand Amending the Treaty for the Ad- 
vancement of Peace With Great Britain, Signed 
September 15, 1914 141 

Commerce: 

Supplementary Trade Agreement With Canada . . . 142 

Agreement With the Soviet Union 143 

Inter-American Coffee Agreement 143 

Sovereignty: Convention on the Provisional Adminis- 
tration of European Colonies and Possessions in the 
Americas 143 

Indian affairs: Convention Providing for an Inter- 
American Indian Institute 143 

Regulations 144 

Legislation 144 

Publications 144 



General 



JOINT DECLARATION OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES AND THE 
PRIME MINISTER OF GREAT BRITAIN 



[Released to the press by the White House August 14] 

The following statement was signed by the 
President of the United States and the Prime 
Minister of Great Britain : 

"The President of the United States and the 
Prime Minister, Mr. Churchill, representing 
His Majesty's Government in the United King- 
dom, have met at sea. 

"They have been accompanied by officials of 
their two Governments, including high-ranking 
officers of their Military, Naval, and Air 
Services. 

"The whole problem of the supply of mu- 
nitions of war, as provided by the Lease-Lend 
Act, for the armed forces of the United States 
and for those countries actively engaged in 
resisting aggression has been further examined. 

"Lord Beaverbrook, the Minister of Supply 
of the British Government, has joined in these 
conferences. He is going to proceed to Wash- 
ington to discuss further details with appro- 
priate officials of the United States Govern- 
ment. These conferences will also cover the 
supply problems of the Soviet Union. 

"The President and the Prime Minister have 
had several conferences. They have considered 
the dangers to world civilization arising from 
the policies of military domination by conquest 
upon which the Hitlerite government of Ger- 
many and other governments associated there- 
with have embarked, and have made clear the 
stress which their countries are respectively tak- 
ing for their safety in the face of these dangers. 

"They have agreed upon the following joint 
declaration : 



"Joint declaration of the President of the 
United States of America and the Prime Min- 
ister, Mr. Churchill, representing His Majesty's 
Govermnent in the United Kingdom, being met 
together, deem it right to make known certain 
common principles in the national policies of 
their respective countries on which they base 
their hopes for a better future for the world. 

"First, their countries seek no aggrandize- 
ment, territorial or other; 

"Second, they desire to see no territorial 
changes that do not accord with the freely 
expressed wishes of the peoples concerned; 

"Third, they respect the right of all peoples 
to choose the form of government under which 
they will live; and they wish to see sovereign 
rights and self-government restored to those 
who have been forcibly deprived of them; 

"Fourth, they will endeavor, with due re- 
spect for their existing obligations, to further 
the enjoyment by all States, great or small, vic- 
tor or vanquished, of access, on equal terms, to 
the trade and to the raw materials of the world 
which are needed for their economic prosperity ; 

"Fifth, they desire to bring about the fullest 
collaboration between all nations in the eco- 
nomic field with the object of securing, for all, 
improved labor standards, economic advance- 
ment, and social security; 

"Sixth, after the final destruction of the Nazi 
tyranny, they hope to see established a peace 
which will afford to all nations the means of 
dwelling in safety within their own boundaries, 
and which will afford assurance that all the men 
in all the lands may live out their lives in free- 
dom from fear and want ; 

125 



126 

"Seventh, such a peace should enable all men 
to traverse the high seas and oceans without 
hindrance ; 

''Eighth, they believe that all of the nations 
of the world, for realistic as well as spiritual 
reasons, must come to the abandonment of the 
use of force. Since no future peace can be 
maintained if land, sea, or air armaments con- 
tinue to be employed by nations which threaten, 
or may threaten, aggression outside of their 
frontiers, they believe, pending the establish- 
ment of a wider and permanent system of gen- 
eral security, that the disarmament of such na- 
tions is essential. They will likewise aid and 
encourage all other practicable measures which 
will lighten for peace-loving peoples the crush- 
ing burden of armaments. 

Franklin D Eoosevelt 
Winston S CHtmcHrLL" 

[Released to the press August 14] 

At liis press conference on August 14 the 
Secretary of State, when asked for comment 



DEPARTJVIEKT OF STATE BULLETIN 

upon the joint declaration of the President of ' 
the United States and the Prime Minister of 
Great Britain, said : 

"It is a statement of basic principles and 
fundamental ideas and policies that are uni- 
versal in their practical application. They have 
heretofore been generally accepted by all civil- 
ized nations and were being strongly supported 
until certain comitries decided to launch a uni- 
versal movement to destroy the whole structure 
of civilized relations between nations and to 
establish a system of rule over peoples who 
would be conquered, based, as I said some days 
ago, largely on barbarism and savagery.^ That 
interruption is still going on. 

"As I said, they are the basic doctrines and 
policies that have received the support of all 
civilized nations and should continue to receive 
their support until they are completely restored 
throughout the world." 



AMERICA'S OBLIGATIONS AND OPPORTUNITIES 



ADDRESS BY WALLACE McCLURE = 



[Released to the press August 13] 

Speaking at Denver in 1911 at the tercen- 
tenary celebration of the King James transla- 
tion of the Bible into English, the former 
President of Princeton, then Governor of New 
Jersey, pointedly asserted that "not a little of 
the history of liberty lies in the circumstance 
that the moving sentences of this Book were 
made familiar to the ears and the understand- 
ings of those peoples who have led mankind in 
exhibiting the forms of govermnent and the im- 
pulses of reform which have made for freedom 
and for self-government among mankind." If 
Woodrow "Wilson was right in so asserting, it 
surely follows that this English-speaking na- 
tion of ours, and particularly you and other 
groups like yours who, as special students of the 



Bible, must be considered leaders in your cor- 
porate capacity and as individuals in your sepa- 
rate communities, have opportunities for serv- 
ice to mankind and obligations to live up to 
them which are not universally possessed and 
the possession of which must be accounted a 
privilege and a responsibility of the first order 
in human affairs. 

It is of importance that you should be keenly 
alive to this responsibility as you turn aside 
momentarily from your general purpose of 



' BuUetin of August 9, 1941, p. 113. 

' Delivered on the occasion of "I Am An American 
Day" before the Massanetta Springs Summer Bible 
Conference Encampment, Harrisonburg, Va., August 13, 
1941. Dr. McClure is Assistant Chief of the Treaty 
Division, Department of State. 



AUGUST 16, 1941 



127 



Bible study to celebrate "I Am An American 
Day" and to invoke the patriotic impulse which 
it implies. It is uniquely fortunate for us that 
the scene of our assembly, acutely conscious as 
we are of the lengthening shadow of the cur- 
rent world cataclysm, should be in what we 
may not inaccurately think of as the locality 
of Woodrow AVilson's birth, the place of the 
nativity of the Commander in Chief of the 
American Army and Navy in the most recent 
of his country's ordeals at arms. For, as you 
are poignantly aware, it is hardly half an 
hour's drive from this spot where we hold our 
evening's discourse, that, 85 years ago, this 
great American President and great world 
statesman of the First World War was born. 
He was born, moreover, into the household of a 
man of the church, a man who knew and who 
taught the Bible and who was prepared to ed- 
ucate his son in public service according to 
Christian precept. 

Some of you, doubtless, were present in May 
of this year when he who is President of the 
United States in these multiplying months of 
the Second World War, the Commander in 
Chief's trusted lieutenant in the First, dedi- 
cated the old manse at Staunton as a perma- 
nent memorial, saying of Woodrow Wilson, 
"We applaud his judgment and his faith." 

That judgment and that faith, touching the 
needs of humanity in days which many of us 
yet vividly remember, can hardly be a false 
guide to us today who, here in the Valley of 
Virginia, are seeking to understand a book that 
teaches us to serve our fellow men, teaches us 
that the pursuit of happiness is most successful 
when we follow the precept, "Even as ye would 
that men should do to you, do ye even so to 
them." 

Patriotism claims sei^vice as its essence, serv- 
ice flowing from love of country, service that 
genuinely contributes to the public welfare. 
He is the greatest patriot who is the staunchest 
practitioner of the Golden Rule. He is the 
greatest statesman who so leads his people that 
in the great world neighborhood they love their 
neighbors as themselves. Wilson was such a 



statesman. As was said of him at the time by 
a distinguished Japanese minister of the Gos- 
pel, he seemed to rise above the imbecilities of 
war and to know no hatreds. 



The thoughts of the Chief of the American 
State were centered upon the construction of 
peace ; and, indeed, as the Acting Secretary of 
State said a few weeks ago, he "gave his life 
in the struggle to further the realization of the 
splendid vision which he had held up to the 
eyes of suffering humanity — the vision of an 
ordered world governed by law. 

"The League of Nations, as he conceived it," 
Mr. Welles continued, "failed in part because of 
the blind selfishness of men here in the United 
States. . . ." ^ To patriots gathered in any 
community of our country to ponder upon the 
implications of the phrase, "I am an Amer- 
ican", this truth is of supreme concern. Blind 
selfishness is the nemesis of patriotism. We 
can no more serve country at the same time 
giving ear to greed than we can serve both 
God and Mammon. But to build for our coun- 
try and our people an ordered and law-gov- 
erned world in which to be and live is to rise 
to patriotic heights unparalleled save by those 
who, in its early beginnings, gave this country 
being and created for it national life. They 
did their part : it is for us of this day and time, 
if we would worthily carry on their work, to 
lend our influence to the end that the whole 
human neighborhood shall be for all of us a 
place in which our children can abide in peace 
and happiness. 

To this end let those who now aimlessly cry 
"Peace, peace", when there is no peace, rather 
give the full tide of their energy to preparing 
for a just peace when the time for peace ar- 
rives. Their non-cooperation now serves only 
to build up an antipathy for them that will 
render them impotent when the time of their 
matchless opportunity comes — their opportu- 
nity to thwart the greed and reactionism that 



' Bulletin of July 26, 1941, p. 76. 



128 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



will as surely endeavor to assert itself on the 
morrow of the Second as it did in the wake of 
the First World War. The supreme test of 
patriotism now is and will be the exhibition of 
unshakable determination that the old myopia, 
the old stubborn self-seeking that has made of 
the world a battlefield, will not succeed in mak- 
ing the kind of a peace that can only lead to 
broken peace again, and, in endless vicious 
spirals, to fast-moving preparation for a third 
world war. 

The League of Nations failed for other rea- 
sons in addition to the selfishness of some of our 
fellow citizens here in the United States, chief 
among them that "it was forced to operate, by 
those who dominated its councils, as a means of 
maintaining the status quo.'''' It was never en- 
abled to operate, Mr. Welles continued, in the 
way that Wilson had intended, "as an elastic 
and impartial instrument in bringing about 
peaceful and equitable adjustments between 
nations as time and circumstance proved 
necessary." 

The patriot who is also a student of affairs 
well knows that no human institution stands 
and moves not. All things human change, and 
where there is no progress there is sure to be 
backsliding. The patriotism of the future will 
therefore be prepared at whatever sacrifice to 
see that the world's j^eace machinery is kept dil- 
igently in steady motion forward, "stretching 
itself to the measure of the times", as Wilson 
said was essential in the Federal Constitution, 
and vigorously eliminating all disruptive influ- 
ences, whether springing from stupidity or 
greed, before they develop into the malignancy 
of war. The patriotism of the future cannot 
confine itself to national frontiers — for the 
peojjles' pursuit of happiness cannot be carried 
on altogether within the physical confines of 
their respective territorial boundaries. 

Yet it remains true, of coui'se, that within 
those frontiers the need for comjDletely self- 
forgetful service is as great as ever, for there are 
those who continually seek to blind us with false 
contentions that the supposed demands of their 
tiny group, or money-making endeavor, or re- 
stricted community, are the needs of the Nation 



and that failure to support special legislation 
for the fulfillment of those demands is unpa- 
triotic and "un-American". Precisely the re- 
verse is more often true. Patriotism has no con- 
nection with all of us doing without in order 
that a few of us may have a disproportionate 
share of a diminishing national income. 

Every man wlao would in good conscience 
take part in the celebration of future "I Am An 
American Days" must always take his stand un- 
alterably against all forms of special privilege 
and must seek the maximum of production of 
the good things of life to be distributed as 
widely as possible toward meeting every indi- 
vidual's legitimate needs and reasonable wishes. 
That this shall be time is the most obvious pre- 
requisite of economic security, and economic 
security is a fundamental condition of content- 
ment, respect for law, local, national, and world 
order, and the maintenance of peace. 



II 



It is therefore a matter of prime importance 
as we prepare for the reconstruction of our 
affairs as human beings after the present world 
war, (hat we think in terms of reducing and 
eliminating barriers to trade, well knowing that 
such barriers are likewise barriers to the crea- 
tion and enjoyment of material goods, and well 
knowing that to neglect this basic phase of our 
national life is to neglect alike our opportunities 
and our obligations. 

Inaugurating the Foreign-Trade Week in 
Maj' of the present year Secretary Hull, in a 
radio address beamed to reach well-nigh all the 
world remarked that 

". . . it is none too early to lay down at 
least some of the principles by which policies 
must be guided at the conclusion of the war, 
to press for a broad program of world economic 
reconstruction and to consider tentative plans 
for the application of those policies. 

"The main principles, as proven by expe- 
rience, are few and simple: 

"1. Extreme nationalism must not again be 
permitted to express itself in excessive trade 
restrictions. 



AUGUST 16, 19 41 

"2. Non-discrimination in intei-national com- 
mercial relations must be the rule, so that inter- 
national trade may grow and prosper. 

"3. Raw-material supplies must be available 
to all nations without discrimination. 

"4. International agreements regulating the 
supply of commodities must be so handled as 
to protect fully the interests of the consuming 
countries and their people. 

"5. The institutions and arrangements of 
international finance must be so set up that they 
lend aid to the essential enterprises and the 
continuous development of all countries, and 
permit the payment through processes of trade 
consonant with the welfare of all countries." ^ 

This is a program of enlightenment. It lays 
the foundation for plenty. "Too many human 
relationships, within and among nations," Mr. 
Hull liad said on a former occasion, "rest upon 
the shifting sands of selfish search for immedi- 
ate advantage." 

Now immediate or special advantage for 
some is all but invariably at the expense of 
the more important long-term welfare not only 
of the public generally but even of the sup- 
posed beneficiaries. For the curtailment of 
production and distribution, reducing as it does 
the common wealth, nnist shortly threaten the 
very privileges that are carved out of it and 
bi"ing down together, whether in war or eco- 
nomic depression, both the favored few and 
the underprivileged many. "Barbarism rather 
than civilized existence becomes the scheme of 
life" when such counsels are in the ascendancy. 

The desire for wealth, if it is wisely directed, 
is a desire for a world community in which 
all are prosperous, not one in which the wealthy 
must constantly be on guard against the ma- 
chinations, sometimes real, sometimes imagi- 
nary, of those who have been deprived of 
opportunity to be wealthy also. It seems incon- 
testable that "protection" against the "pauper 
labor" of the rest of the world has cost Ameri- 
can labor far more than would ever have been 
given up through reasonable collaboration with 
their fellow workers elsewhere, evidenced by 



129 

more encouragement of the exchange of the re- 
spective national products than has heretofore 
been vouchsafed. We who are Americans, cele- 
brating today that fact, can hardly be proud of 
our lack of judgment to say nothing of our 
selfishness. After all, liberality and equality 
are matters of common sense even more than of 
right and wrong. Self-interest that is not en- 
lightened defeats its own purpose. With en- 
lightenment, under the scarcely to be challenged 
rule that in the little world that ours has be- 
come what is best for all is best for each, it 
ceases to be selfish. 

A liberal economic basis for a world or- 
ganized for peace is the objective of every 
patriot who has learned the lesson that the 
years have taught, who has seen how economic 
strife leads to poverty, poverty to anger, anger 
to war. 

ni 

It is war we have — shooting war all around 
the world. We in the United States have not 
ceased to strive to put out the fire that has 
crept steadily nearer with the months of our 
current years. We may do well to pause for 
a few moments in order to remind ourselves 
of the cumulative events of the decade now 
coming to an end. 

In his testimony before the Committee on 
Foreign Affairs in January of this year, when 
the bill that has become "An Act further to 
promote the defense of the United States" was 
under consideration. Secretary Hull outlined 
the steps by which international relations had 
deteriorated since the present reign of lawless- 
ness began.- 

The first of the steps in this fatal direction 
occurred in 1931 with the forceful occupation of 
Manchuria, "in contravention of the provisions 
of the Nine Power Treaty and of the Kellogg- 
Briand Pact", upsetting the order created by 
the Washington Conference of 1921-1922, and 
the setting up in a part of China of the "Man- 
chukuo" regime under Japanese control, estab- 
lished and maintained by force of arms. In 



' Bulletin of May 17, 1941, ij. 575. 



• Biilletin of January 18, 1941, p. 85. 



130 

July 1937, Japan embarked upon the present 
phase of its large-scale military operations 
against China, employing invading forces of 
more than a million men and setting up new 
puppet regimes where deemed expedient. Jap- 
anese sijokesmen have left no doubt of an in- 
tention to obtain forceful mastery of an area 
containing almost one half of the entire popu- 
lation of the earth, with consequent arbitrary 
control of the sea and trade routes in that 
region — "a matter of immense significance, im- 
portance, and concern to every other nation 
wherever located." "Previous experience and 
ciu-rent developments". Secretary Hull re- 
minded his former colleagues in the House of 
Representatives, "indicate that the proposed 
'new order' in the Pacific area means, politi- 
cally, domination by one country. It means, 
economically, employment of the resources of 
the area concerned for the benefit of that coun- 
try and to the ultimate impoverishment of other 
parts of the area and exclusion of the interests 
of other countries. It means, socially, the de- 
struction of personal liberties and the reduc- 
tion of the conquered peoples to the role of 
inferiors." 

Italy made the first overt breach of world 
order to be charged to a European country. 
This occurred with the conquest of Ethiopia in 
1935, "in direct contravention of solemnly ac- 
cepted obligations under the Covenant of the 
League of Nations and under the Kellogg- 
Briand Pact." This was followed in 1939 by 
the seizure of Albania "in violation of unequiv- 
ocal treaty obligations", and in 1910 by the 
Italian entry into the war being waged by 
Germany for a "new order" based upon "un- 
limited and unrestricted use of armed force", 
and by the attack upon Greece. 

From the time Hitler and his associates came 
into power in 1933, Germany began the feverish 
construction of vast armaments — accompanied 
by an accumulating array of broken promises. 
Continuing his testimony, Mr. Hull said: 
"After employing for several months at the 
Disarmament Conference in Geneva tactics 
which have since become a distinct pattern of 
German policy — further demands as previous 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

demands are met — Germany, in October 1933, 
rendered impossible any effective international 
agreement for limitation of armaments by 
withdrawing from the Disarmament Confer- 
ence. There then followed nearly six years 
during which Germany, having determined 
upon a policy of unlimited conquest, moved in- 
evitably toward the catastrophe of war." The 
entire German economy became harnessed to 
belligerent preparation. More than half of the 
national income was expended for military 
purposes. 

Contemporaneously occurred a series of 
movements for sti-engthening the German 
strategic position: the occupation and fortifi- 
cation of the Rhineland in direct violation of 
tlie Locarno Treaty ; the absorption of Austria, 
in direct violation of pledges given by Hitler 
to respect its sovereignty and independence; 
the dismemberment and eventual seizure of 
Czechoslovakia, in direct contravention of the 
most solemn assurances; the annexation of 
Memel. Then came, in quick succession be- 
ginning two years ago, the brutal devastation 
of Poland, and, despite neutrality on their part 
scrupulously observed, the invasion and occu- 
pation of Denmark, Norway, Holland, Bel- 
gium, and Luxembourg; the defeat of France, 
with augmenting pressure to violate the armis- 
tice agreed upon with that country; and sub- 
sequently the seizure of Rumania, the disrup- 
tion of Yugoslavia, and the overthrow of 
Greece. And now, in climax, a treaty notori- 
ously entered into as a part of this wild plunge 
into destiny is itself accorded the fruits of the 
same contemptuous attitude, and Russia be- 
comes the scene of what has been described as 
the greatest battle in human history. 

In the face of such a record dare anyone say 
that there exists no danger to the American 
republics? Replying to allegation that, since 
Germany has not been able to cross the English 
Channel, its armed forces cannot cross the 
Atlantic, Secretary Hull said: 

"German forces could cross the Channel in 
an hour's time were it not for the fact that 
Britain, now thoroughly prepared and well 



AUGUST 16, 1941 



131 



armed, is fighting eveiy hour of the day to pre- 
vent that crossing and is fortified with every 
known device to repel a landing. The 20 miles 
of water between continental Europe and Brit- 
ain are under British, not Geiman, control. 
Were Britain defeated, and were she to lose 
command of the seas, Germany could easily 
cross the Atlantic — especially the South At- 
lantic — unless we were ready and able to do 
what Britain is doing now. Were the Atlantic 
to fall into German control, the Atlantic would 
offer little or no assurance of security. 

"Under these conditions our national secur- 
ity would require the continuous devotion of 
a very great part of all our work and wealth 
for defense production, prolonged universal 
military service, extremely burdensome taxa- 
tion, unending vigilance against enemies within 
our borders, and complete involvement in power 
diplomacy. These would be the necessities of a 
condition as exposed as ours would be." 

That is why, throughout this lengthening 
crisis, your Government by both word and deed 
has constantly endeavored to stay the hand of 
the aggressor and to encourage the utilization 
of procedure within the bounds of law and 
order. It continues to do so. 

In the conduct of your international rela- 
tions it has directed its efforts to the following 
objectives: 

". . . (1) Peace and security for the United 
States with advocacy of peace and limitation 
and reduction of armament as universal inter- 
national objectives; (2) support for law, order, 
justice, and morality and the principle of non- 
intervention; (3) restoration and cultivation 
of sound economic methods and relations, based 
on equality of treatment; (4) development in 
the 23romotion of these objectives, of the full- 
est practicable measure of international co- 
operation; (5) promotion of the security, soli- 
darity, and general welfare of the Western 
Hemisphere." 

In proceeding by whatever legitimate means 
have been available toward the attainment of 
these objectives, the United States has not 
turned its back upon pre-war peace machinery: 

407759—41 2 



only this morning the old system of treaties for 
the advancement of peace, inaugurated by Sec- 
retary of State William Jennings Bryan prior 
to the First World War, was confirmed by the 
exchange of ratifications of treaties between 
this country and three members of the British 
Commonwealth of Nations, Australia, Canada, 
and New Zealand.' 

We cannot tell what expenditure of our 
strength and our substance will be required of 
us that the task of consolidating our safety 
through the restoration and preservation of 
order may be completed; but after the force 
of the aggressor has been met by superior force 
in defense, after the method of unification by 
the sword has been outlawed and rendered 
ridiculous by an accomplished unification 
through intelligence, we shall come to realize 
that more basic than the power of armed might 
is the power of persuaded and convinced col- 
laboration. We shall then realize the essential 
truth of Secretary Hull's words with which he 
addressed, on Christmas Eve, 1938, the Eighth 
International Conference of American States 
at Lima : 

"There are those who think the world is based 
on force. Here, within this continent, we can 
confidently deny this. And the course of his- 
tory shows that noble ideas and spiritual forces 
in the end have a greater triumph. Tonight 
especially we can say this, for on this night 
nearly two thousand years ago there was born 
a Son of God who declined force and kingdoms 
and proclaimed the great lesson of universal 
love. Without force His Kingdom lives today 
after a lapse of nineteen centuries. It is the 
principality of peace ; the peace which we here 
hope in humble measure to help to give by His 
gi-ace to the continent of the Americas." - 

The peace that we hope may be given to the 
continents of America we likewise hope may be 
given to the world, "We of America", as Wood- 
row Wilson once said, "long since learned that 
intellectual development and moral fitness are 



' See p. 141. 

^ Press Releases of December 24, 1938, p. 478. 



132 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtTLLETIN 



the most powerful elements of national advance- 
ments." Just after Christmas, 1918, standing 
in his grandfather's church at Carlisle, close by 
the Scotch border and in the midst of a country 
from which so much of religious inspiration has 
been brought into the Valley of Virginia, Wil- 
son uttered his belief that wliile the First World 
War, concluded by the Armistice of a few 
weeks previous, had "... brought the nations 
temporarily together in a combination of 
physical force we shall now be drawn together 
in a combination of moral force that will be 
irresistible. 

"It is moral force that is irresistible. It is 
moral force as much as physical that has de- 
feated the effort to subdue the world. Words 
have cut as deep as the sword. The knowledge 
that wrong was being attempted has aroused 
the nations. They have gone out like men upon 
a crusade. No other cause could have drawn 
so many nations together. They knew that an 
outlaw was abroad who proposed unspeakable 
things. It is in quiet places like this all over 



the world that the forces accumulate which pi'es- 
ently will overbear any attempt to accomplish 
evil on a large scale. Like the rivulets gather- 
ing into the river and the river into the seas, 
there come from communities like this streams 
that fertilize the consciences of men, and it is 
the conscience of the world that we are trying 
to place upon the throne which others would 
usurp." 

May it not be that from quiet places such 
as Massanetta Springs, where patriots are as- 
sembled to celebrate "I Am An American Day", 
patriots who have learned the "stern lessons of 
duty" which Wilson learned from his Carlisle 
grandfather, there is growing irresistibly in 
these days the universal pledge that this war 
against force as the primary method of conduct- 
ing human affairs shall be won and that there 
shall be established and faithfully maintained 
an order of human affairs that is hospitable to 
the enjoyment of life by human beings whose 
personal worth, individual dignity, and pursuit 
of happiness are the foundation of government. 



CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL DEFENSE 



Unumited Licenses 

Unlimited licenses were issued on July 23, 
1941 to the Belgian Congo Purchasing Commis- 
sion, 630 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y., for 
exportation of the following articles and ma- 
terials to the Belgian Congo: 

Iron and steel 'products 

Structural shapes, steel piling, skelps, rails, 
splice bars and tie plates, bars, hoops and baling 
bands, pipe and tubes, wire and wire rope, 
barbed wire, woven-wire fence, bale ties, fence 
posts, black plate, steel sheets strip, axles, wheels, 
track spikes, castings, forgings, ingots, billets, 
blooms, slabs, sheet bars, wire rods, drums and 
containers, and storage tanks. 

Ferroalloys 

Ferromanganese, spiegeleisen, ferrosilicon, 
ferrochrome, ferrotungsten, ferrovanadium, fer- 



rocolumbium, ferrocarbontitanium, ferrophos- 
phorus, and ferromolybdenum. 

Rubber tires and tubes 

Solid tires for automobiles and motor trucks, 
other casings and tubes, automobile inner tubes, 
automobile casing (other automobile casings), 
and automobile casing (truck and bus casings). 

Lead pigments 

Red lead pigments, in oil and dry. 

Borax 

Boric acid and borax glass. 

Zinc pigments 

Lithopone, zinc sulphide, and zinc oxide, in- 
cluding leaded zinc oxide. 

Miscellaneous 

Phosphoric acid, gauges, and abrasives and 
abrasive products. 



AUGUST 16, 1941 



133 



The Belgian Congo Purchasing Commission 
will furnish a prior-release certificate to each 
exporter authorized to make use of their un- 
limited licenses in the same manner as the pro- 
cedure now being followed by the British Pur- 
chasing Commission. Collectors of customs 
were authorized on August 4 to permit exporta- 
tions to the Belgian Congo against licenses is- 
sued to the Belgian Congo Purchasing Com- 
mission upon presentation of such prior-release 
certificate but without requiring the presentation 
of the actual license. 

Collectors of customs were informed on 
August 14, 1941 that additional unlimited 
licenses have been issued to the Netherlands 
Purchasing Commission for exports of the fol- 
lowing articles or materials to Curasao, Suri- 
nam, and the Netherlands Indies : 

Petroleum-refining machinery, including parts; well- 
drilling machinery, including petroleum and gas-well- 
drilling apparatus and parts and other well-drilling 
apparatus and parts; the following electrical ma- 
chinery and apparatus containing mica subject to export 
control — radio-transmitting sets, tubes, and parts ; radio 
receiving sets, complete ; radio tubes or valves for 
receiving sets ; radio-transmitting sets, tubes, and parts. 
Tetraethyl lead ; aircraft parts, equipment, and acces- 
sories, other than those listed in the President's procla- 
mation of May 1, 1937; asbestos manufactures — not 
valid for the exportation of crude asbestos ; petroleum — 
crude oil ; gasoline ; petrolatum and petroleum jelly ; 
liquefied petroleum gases, paraffin wax, petroleum as- 
phalt, other petroleum products n.e.s., including white 
mineral oil; lubricating oil and grease ; ^kerosene, gas 
oil and distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil ; naphtha for 
cleaning fluids, solvents, paints thinners, etc. 

Collectors were also informed that license 
DG 623 has been substituted for license dj 350 
to authorize the exportation of gauges only to 
the Netherlands Indies. License DJ 350 has 
been canceled. 

The Commission will give to approved ap- 
plicants for the use of the unlimited licenses 
a numbered certificate setting forth all essen- 
tial data concerning the particular shipment. 
The exporter will be instructed to present this 
certificate to collectors of customs, and when 
this certificate is presented, collectors are au- 



thorized to permit the exportation to be made 
against their unlimited license. In the ab- 
sence of such certificate, exportations should 
not be permitted against the unlimited licenses 
issued to the Netherlands Purchasing Commis- 
sion. Applicants who do not wish to make 
use of the unlimited licenses may apply to the 
Department for an individual license in the 
usual manner. 

General Licenses 

[Released to the press August 11] 

The Secretary of State announced on August 
11 the issuance of general license gam 63, au- 
thorizing the exportation of mercury com- 
pounds, not to include metallic mercury, to the 
Philippine Islands. 

[Released to the press August 13] 

The Secretary of State on August 12 revoked 
all general licenses for the export of silk, ex- 
cept the general license authorizing exports to 
the Philippine Islands, and all individual 
licenses for the export of silk, except a very 
small number authorizing shipments to meet 
the urgent defense needs of countries resisting 
aggression. 

[Released to the press August 16] 

The Secretary of State announced on August 
16 that, in accordance with the provisions of 
the Executive order of March 15, 1941,^ two 
additional general in-transit licenses had been 
issued for shipments passing through the 
United States. 

The first of these licenses, git-B/bc, author- 
izes the clearance, without individual license, 
of shipments in transit through the United 
States to the Belgian Congo from any country 
in Group B - or any one of the following 



' Bulletin of March 15, 1941, p. 284. 

' Group B comprises the following countries : Argen- 
tina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, 
Curagao, Dominican Republic, EI Salvador, Ecuador, 
Greenland, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras. Iceland, Mex- 
ico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Surinam, 
Uruguay, Venezuela. 



134 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BXJIiLETIN 



countries : Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda, Brit- 
ish Guiana, British Honduras, Canada, Falk- 
land Islands, Jamaica, Leeward Islands, New- 
foundland, Trinidad and Tobago, Windward 
Islands. 

The second general license, GIT-BC/B, author- 
izes the clearance from the United States, with- 
out individual license, of shipments in transit 
through the United States from the Belgian 
Congo to any country in Group B or to any 
country named in the above list. 

License RequifvEments 

Collectors of customs have been informed of 
the following rulings which have been made re- 
cently respecting the requirements of an export 
license for certain articles and materials: 

License required 

Bituminous emulsion (asphaltic road oil) ; 
asbestos wick or rope (packing) ; mixtures of 
vegetable oils ; j'arn composed of silk and wool ; 
tractor winches capable of lifting three or more 
tons and not shipped with tractor; used silk 
stockings (they are considered in the classifica- 
tion "waste silk and used silk rags") ; and the 



following items of metal-working machinery, 
previously exempt: Portable tools driven by 
fractional horse-power motors or by com- 
pressed air; spare or I'eplacement parts for 
machine tools; and portable welding equip- 
ment (single-operator sets, gasoline- or elec- 
tric-motor driven, with capacity up to 600 
amperes). 

Machinery, motors, and similar equipment, 
owned and operated in Mexico or Canada, but 
brought to the United States for servicing or 
repairs, may be shipped back across the border 
without being subject to licensing requirements. 

No license required 

Crossties (iron and steel railway ties) ; gum 
arable; brass working barrels with bronze ball 
valves for deep-well pumps; barium pellets 
ready for assembling into radio tubes; rubber 
thread; diesel-powered tractors; locomotives 
not diesel-electric; aluminum hydrate; medici- 
nal castor oil or drums therefor ; asbestos brake 
lining or block attached to brake band or shoe; 
pipe cutters, handpowered; emery-wheel dress- 
ers not incorporating industrial diamonds; 
digitalin ; and completely finished articles made 
from synthetic resins. 



Europe 



ASSISTANCE TO THE SOVIET UNION 



JOINT MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES AND THE PRIME MINISTER OF GREAT BRITAIN 
TO THE PRESIDENT OF THE SOVIET OF PEOPLE'S COMMISSARS OF THE U.S.S.R. 



[Released to the press August 15] 

The following text of a joint message from 
President Roosevelt and Prime Minister 
Churchill was delivered personally on Friday 
afternoon, August 15, by the British and Amer- 
ican Ambassadors to Josef Stalin, President of 
the Soviet of People's Commissars of the 
U.S.S.R. : 

"We have taken the opportunity afforded by 
the consideration of the report of Mr. Harry 



Hopkins on his return from Moscow to consult 
together as to how best our two countries can 
help your country in the splendid defense that 
you are making against the Nazi attack. We 
are at the moment cooperating to provide you 
with the very maximum of supplies that you 
most urgently need. Already many shiploads 
have left our shores and more will leave in the 
immediate future. 

"We must now turn our minds to the con- 
sideration of a more long term policy, since 



AUGUST 16, 194 1 



135 



there is still a long and hard path to be trav- 
ersed before there can be won that complete 
victory without which our efforts and sacrifices 
would be wasted. 

"The war goes on upon many fronts and be- 
fore it is over tiiere may be further fighting 
fronts that will be developed. Our resources 
though immense are limited, and it must be- 
come a question as to where and when those re- 
sources can best be used to further the greatest 
extent our common effort. This applies equally 
to manufactured war supplies and to raw 
materials. 

"The needs and demands of your and our 
armed services can only be determined in the 
light of the full knowledge of the many fac- 
tors which must be taken into consideration in 
the decisions that we make. In order that all of 
us may be in a position to arrive at speedy de- 
cisions as to the apportionment of our joint 
resources, we suggest that we prepare for a 
meeting to be held at Moscow, to which we 
would send high representatives who could dis- 
cuss these matters directly with you. If ihis 
conference appeals to you, we want you to know 
that pending the decisions of that conference we 
shall continue to send supplies and material as 
rapidly as possible. 

"We realize fully how vitally important to 
the defeat of Hitlerism is the brave and stead- 
fast resistance of the Soviet Union and we feel 
therefore that we must not in any circum- 
stances fail to act quickly and immediately in 
this matter on planning the program for the 
future allocation of our joint resources. 

Franklin D Koosevelt 
Winston S CiroECHiUi" 

DEATH OF DIRECTOR GENERAL OF 
THE BRITISH PURCHASING COMMIS- 
SION 

[Released to the press August 15] 

The Secretary of State on August 15 made the 
following statement: 

"I was exceedingly sorry to learn of the death 
of Arthur Purvis. Since he first came to this 
country in November 1939 his dealings with this 



Government as Director General of the British 
Purchasing Commission and Chairman of the 
British Supply Council proved him to be both 
a true Englisliman and a man who out of his 
own experiences fully understood American 
problems and believed in the mutual benefits of 
Anglo-American cooperation." 



Canada 



PERMANENT JOINT BOARD ON 
DEFENSE 

[Released to the press August 15] 

The anniversary of the meeting at Ogdens- 
burg, N.Y., at which President Roosevelt and 
Prime Minister Mackenzie King of Canada dis- 
cussed mutual problems of defense in relation 
to the safety of Canada and the United States 
and reached agreement on the creation of a 
Permanent Joint Board on Defense,^ will occur 
on Sunday, August 17. It will be marked by an 
international broadcast featuring Mayor Fio- 
rello H. La Guardia and Col. O. N. Biggar, 
K.C., respective chairmen of the American and 
Canadian Sections of the Board. The broad- 
cast will be at 5 : 30 p.m. eastern daylight-sav- 
ing time and carried over the N.B.C.-C.B.S. 
networks. 



The Far East 



REPATRIATION OF AMERICANS IN 
JAPAN 

(Released to the press August 16] 

In accordance with its policy of assisting 
Americans abroad to return home during the 
present world disturbance, the DeiJartment has 
recently had under active consideration the 
question of providing transportation to the 



' See Uie Bulletin of August 24, 1940, p. 154. 



136 

United States for those American citizens in 
Japan who desire to return to this country and 
whose plans for return have been disrupted by 
the recent cancelation of regular sailings of 
trans-Pacific passenger vessels from Japanese 
ports. 

Consideration was given by this Government 
to the possibility of diverting to Japan for this 
purpose, with the proffered cooperation of the 
American President Lines, the steamship Presi- 
dent Ooolidge, which was scheduled to leave 
Shanghai on August 14 on its homeward voyage. 
The time available toward effort to make the 
necessary arrangements was short. The matter 
was discussed by the Department of State, 
the American Embassy at Tokyo, and the 
Japanese Foreign OiEce. It developed that 
among American citizens who desired to take 
passage from Japan at this time there were ap- 
proximately 20 officials and something over 100 
private citizens. The Japanese Foreign OfBce 
indicated that the Japanese Government was 
willing to permit the President Coolidge to 
enter a Japanese port for the purpose only of 
taking off' American official personnel. Under 
these circumstances it has seemed advisable and 
has been decided that the President Coolidge 
adhere to her regular schedule and proceed di- 
rectly from Shanghai to San Francisco without 
calling at a Japanese port. 

The Department is continuing to give its 
close and serious attention to the question of 
providing transportation for American citizens 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

desiring to return to the United States from 
Japan, as well as for Americans elsewhere. 



Commercial Policy 



AGREEMENT WITH THE SOVIET 
UNION 

[Released to the press August 14] 

On August 6, 1941 the President issued his 
proclamation of the agreement effected by an 
exchange of notes dated August 2, 1941 ^ by the 
Acting Secretary of State and the Soviet Am- 
bassador extending until August 6, 1942 the 
agreement concerning commercial relations be- 
tween the United States of America and the 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, signed on 
August 4, 1937 and extended annually in Au- 
gust 1938, 1939, and 1940. The agreement of 
August 2, 1941 was approved by the Council 
of the People's Commissars on August 4, 1941. 

SUPPLEMENTARY TRADE AGREEMENT 
WITH CANADA 

An announcement regarding the exchange of 
ratifications between the United States and 
Canada of the supplementary trade agreement 
signed December 13, 1940, appears in this Bul- 
letin under the heading "Treaty Information". 



Cultural Relations 



TRAVEL GRANTS TO STUDENTS FROM THE OTHER AMERICAN REPUBLICS 



Travel grants have been awarded by the Gov- 
ernment of the United States under the appro- 
priation for the fiscal year 1942 to 37 students 
from the other American republics, as part of 
the program to develop closer inter-American 
relations. These grants were made available to 
persons who otherwise would not have been 



able to take advantage of scholarships which 
had been awarded them in the United States, 
principally through the Institute of Interna- 
tional Education of New York, N. Y. Payment 
of their necessary travel expenses from their 



' Bulletin of August 9, 1941, p. 115. 



ArrctrsT le, 1941 



137 



homes to this country and return was authorized 
under an appropriation voted by the Seventy- 
seventh Congress. 

The geographical allocation of awards to stu- 
dents for study in the United States is as fol- 
lows: Argentina (3), Brazil (14), Chile (10), 
Colombia (2), Costa Rica (1), Ecuador (1), 
Haiti (1), Honduras (1), Peru (3), and Uru- 
guay (1). These students have been awarded 
fellowships at the following institutions in this 
country : George Peabody College for Teachers 
(2), Vanderbilt University (2), University of 
Pennsylvania (1), Northwestern University 
(1), Curtis Institute of Music (1), University 
of Chicago (1), University of Kansas (2), Col- 
orado School of Mines (1), Florida State Col- 
lege for Women (2), Wittenberg College (2), 
Iowa State College (1), Oregon State College 
(1), Oberlin College (1), Tufts College (1), 
University of Florida (1), Stanford University 
(1), Hamilton College (1), University of Michi- 
gan (2), Mount Holyoke College (2), Smith 
College (1), Williams College (1), West Vir- 
ginia University (1), Cornell University (1), 
State College of Washington (1), RadcliflPe Col- 
lege (1), Women's College of the University of 
North Carolina (1), Bowling Green State Uni- 
versity (1), State College of Agriculture and 
Engineering, Raleigh, N. C. (1), Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute (1), and Fenn College (1). 

The following wide range of interests is re- 
vealed by the fields of study in which these in- 
dividuals are to specialize: American history, 
journalism, economics, practical pedagogy, gen- 
eral education, musical education for children, 
education through radio, physical education, 
methods of teaching painting and drawing, 
teaching of English in secondary schools, school 
administration and supervision of rural educa- 
tion, American literature, phonetics and the 
English language, American geogi'aphy, dra- 
matics, romance philology, music, social sci- 
ences, anthropology, philosophy, mathematics, 
electrical engineering, insurance, soil chemistry, 
prospecting and exploring metallic ore deposits, 
animal feeding, plant physiology, housing and 
urbanization. 



Brief biographies of the students awarded 
travel grants follow : 

Argentina 

Juan Horacio Buelink, of Buenos Aires, has 
the degree of Doctor in Economic Sciences from 
the University of Buenos Aires. He will study 
insurance in the United States at the University 
of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Florence Chaudet, of Cordoba, is a graduate 
of the Institute of Languages of the National 
University of that city and is at present a teacher 
of French. She comes to this coimtry to study 
English and French literature at Mount Hol- 
yoke College, South Hadley, Mass. 

Rebecca Sokol is a teacher of American litera- 
ture in Buenos Aires, and wishes to further her 
studies in American literature in the United 
States. She will attend Smith College, North- 
ampton, Mass. 

Brazil 

Jorge Barata studied at the University of 
Brazil and is connected with the Ministry of 
Education in Rio de Janeiro. He comes to the 
United States to study school administration 
and supervision of rural education at the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Jorge Freire Campello is a graduate of the 
University of Sao Paulo. He plans to study 
school administration at Vanderbilt University, 
Nashville, Tenn. 

Octavio da Costa Eduardo is a graduate of 
the University of Sao Paulo and is at present 
engaged in anthropological research. He will 
continue the.se studies, supplemented by sociol- 
ogy, at Northwestern University, Chicago, lU. 

Isaac Feldman is first violinist of the Munici- 
pal Theater in Rio de Janeiro and will continue 
his musical studies at the Curtis Institute, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

Cecilia de Cerqueira Leite Gon^alves is a 
senior at the University of Brazil and plans to 
study education, particularly education through 
radio, at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, 
Kans., which is granting free maintenance. The 
Kansas Federation of Women's Clubs is pro- 
viding her tuition. 



138 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Joao Tavares Nieva de Figueiredo, of Eio de 
Janeiro, is a mining engineer in the Brazilian 
Bureau of Mines. He will take postgraduate 
work at the Colorado School of Mines, Golden, 
Colo. 

Yolanda Leite is a graduate of the Faculty of 
Philosophy of the University of Sao Paulo and 
is at present engaged in teaching French. She 
will study phonetics and English at Vanderbilt 
University, Nashville, Tenn. 

Benjamin Moraes Filho is a graduate of the 
University of Rio de Janeiro and is president 
of a school he founded in 1935. He will study 
general education and practical pedagogy at 
the George Peabody College for Teachers at 
Nashville, Tenn. 

Haydee Vieira Moraes is a graduate of the 
University of Rio de Janeiro and is teaching in 
that city. She will also study at the George 
Peabody College and will specialize in musical 
education for children. 

Dr. Roberto Menezes de Oliveira, of Rio de 
Janeiro, will study cardiology at the University 
of Michigan. He has been in charge of the 
Department of Radiology and Cardiology at the 
Navy Aviation Hospital in Rio de Janeiro. 

Dr. Joao Hortencio de Medeiros is a graduate 
of the Engineering School at Rio de Janeiro and 
is assistant engineer at the Marine Arsenal in 
that city. He will continue his engineering 
studies at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 
Troy, N. Y. He is to receive the $500 award 
for maintenance established by the Women's 
Auxiliary of the American Society of Mechan- 
ical Engineers in memory of the late Calvin W. 
Rice. 

Armando de Sa Pires is a graduate of the 
Law School of the University of Brazil. He 
will study English and American literature at 
Wittenberg College, Springfield, Ohio. 

Maria Luisa Ribeiro is a senior at the Uni- 
versity of Brazil and comes to the United States 
to study ijhonetics and English as well as the 
teaching of English in secondary schools at 
Florida State College for Women, Tallahassee, 
Fla. 



Samuel Marino Politi is a graduate of the 
University of Sao Paulo and assistant professor 
at that University. He will study economics at 
the University of Chicago, Chicago, 111. Mr. 
Politi has been proposed for the Alpha Delta 
Phi Fraternity exchange which would provide 
his maintenance. 

Chile 

Carlos Barry Silva is a student at the Insti- 
tuto Pedagogico of the University of Chile, and 
will study psychology, mathematics, and jour- 
nalism at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, 
Kans., where his maintenance is being provided 
at the Delta Upsilon Fraternity and tuition by 
the Rotary Club District Assembly. 

Ismael Jordan Squella is a student at the 
Catholic University of Chile and will continue 
his studies in animal feeding and related prob- 
lems at the Iowa State College of Agriculture 
and Mechanic Arts at Ames, Iowa. 

Guido Alfonso Jorquera Alvarez is a grad- 
uate of the University of Concepcion, where he 
is at present engaged in teaching. He comes 
to the United States to study soil chemistry at 
Oregon State College, Corvallis, Oreg. 

Manuel Olguin Machado is at present teach- 
ing and taking graduate work at the Institute 
Pedagogico of the University of Chile. He will 
study philosophy at Oberlin College, Oberlin, 
Ohio. 

Armando Pereda Oviedo is a graduate of the 
University of Concepcion. He will study at 
Tufts College, Medford, Mass., where he will 
specialize in education, psychology, and Eng- 
lish and American literature. 

Mario Perez de Arce Lavin, of Santiago, is a 
senior at the School of Architecture of the Uni- 
versity of Chile. He wishes to continue these 
studies in the United States and will be at the 
University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla. 

Danilo Poklepivic Petricic graduated from 
the University of Chile and is at present an elec- 
trical engineer employed in Santiago. He will 
take postgraduate courses in electrical engineer- 



AUGUST 16, 1941 



139 



iiiil at Stanford University, Palo Alto, Calif., 
where the Phi Delta Theta Fraternity will pro- 
vide tuition and maintenance. 

Ramon Sepiilveda Bravo is a senior special- 
izin<j in English at the University of Chile, in 
preparation for a teaching career. He will 
study English, education, and English and 
American literature at Hamilton College, 
Clinton, N. J. 

Pedro de Vidts is a graduate of the School 
of Engineering of the University of Chile, and 
is head of the Engineering Section of the Pub- 
lic Housing Agency. He comes to the .United 
States to study housing problems at the State 
College of Agriculture and Engineering, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

Maria Elena "Watt Torres is a student at the 
University of Concepcion and wishes to con- 
tinue her studies in sociology and American and 
English literature in the United States. Her 
scholarship will be at the Florida State Col- 
lege for Women, Tallahassee, Fla., and is made 
possible by a cash stipend from the Florida 
Federation of Women's Clubs. 

Colombia 

Elvira Calle Villegas is a graduate student 
in education at Bogota and wishes to come to 
the United States preparatory to becoming a 
teacher of English and French in her own 
country. She will study at Mount Holyoke 
College, South Hadley, Mass. 

Gustavo Correa Forero is a graduate of the 
Escuela Normal Superior and is at present pro- 
fessor of Latin at the Colegio Antonio Nariiio of 
Bogota. He will study Romance philology 
with special emphasis on Spanish philology at 
Williams College, Williamstown, Mass. 

Costa Rica 

Odilie Cantillano Vives is a normal-school 
graduate and has studied at the Santa Cecilia 
Music School in San Jose. She wishes to study 
American geography and history at West Vir- 
ginia University, Morgantown, W. Va., where 
her tuition and maintenance have been made 



available by the West Virginia Federation of 
Women's Clubs. 

EcuadoT 

Carlos Alberto Cordova G. is a student at 
the University of Cuenca and will study at 
Bowling Green State University, Bowling 
Green, Ohio. 

Haiti 

Pierre G. Sylvain is a graduate of the ficole 
Nationale de Droit and studied at Cornell Uni- 
^•ersity in the summer session of 1933. He is at 
present director of the Agricultural Colony of 
Pourcine. He will study plant physiology and 
do research on tropical fruits at Cornell Uni- 
versity, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Honduras 

Margarita Lopez Castro is a normal-school 
graduate and will study methods of education 
in the United States at the State College of 
Washington, Pullman, Wash. 

Peru 

Daniel Dubuc V. is a graduate of the National 
School of Physical Education at Lima and is 
at present a teacher of physical education. He 
will study physical education as it applies to 
boys' camps and out-door schools for children 
at Wittenberg College, Springfield, Ohio. 

Rafael Infante Jaramillo, of Barranco, is a 
graduate of La Salle High School in Lima and 
the Military School of Chorrillos. He comes 
to the United States to take a course in engi- 
neering at Fenn College, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Maria Luisa Saco Miro-Quesada is a graduate 
of the University of San Marcos of Lima and is 
at present teaching. She will study methods 
of teaching painting and drawing at Radcliffe 
College, Cambridge, Mass. 

Uniguay 

Antoinette Portes is a graduate of the Lycee 
Frangais in Montevideo and will study at the 
Women's College of the University of North 
Carolina, Greensboro, N. C, where she will 
specialize in English and American literature. 



140 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Department 



The Foreign Service 



PASSES FOR ENTRANCE TO DEPART- 
MENT OF STATE 

[Released to the press August 13) 

On and after August 14, 1941 passes -will be 
required for all persons entering the Depart- 
ment of State. All officials and employees of 
the State Department and the other agencies of 
the Government occupying the building have 
been furnished witli the necessai-y identification, 
and the following regulations will apply to 
visitors : 

An information desk will be maintained in the 
main lobby at the Pennsylvania Avenue en- 
trance to the building. During regular hours, 
two or more State Department information 
clerks will be stationed at desks near this en- 
trance for the purpose of facilitating the ad- 
mission of officials and other visitors to the 
Department. Representatives of other Govern- 
ment departments. Members of Congress, mem- 
bers of the Diplomatic Cor^DS, and representa- 
tives of the press carrying White House cre- 
dentials will be admitted at the main entrance 
and the diplomatic entrance upon appropriate 
identification. 

The information clerk of the Department will 
obtain from all other visitors their names, the 
purpose of their visit, and the name of the per- 
son or office to be visited. Upon satisfactory 
identification the visitor will be issued a pass 
which he will be instructed to sun-ender upon 
departure from the building. A i-ecord card 
of visitors' passes indicating pertinent informa- 
tion will be prepared and retained by the in- 
formation clerk. In case of doubt, a telephone 
inquiry will be made to the officer or office to 
which the visit is proposed prior to the issuance 
of the visitor's pass. 

No bundles, packages, or other property may 
be removed from the building except in cases 
where appropriate property passes have been 
issued by the Director of Persoimel. 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press August 16] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since August 9, 1941 : 

Career Officers 

Robert F. Kelley, of Boston, Mass., First 
Secretary of Embassy at Ankara, Turkey, has 
been designated Counselor of Embassy at An- 
kara, Turkey. 

Frederick P. Hibbard, of Denison, Tex., First 
Secretary of Legation at Lisbon, Portugal, has 
been designated Counselor of Legation at Lis- 
bon, Portugal. 

The assignment of Warden McK. Wilson, of 
Indianapolis, Ind., as First Secretary of Em- 
bassy at Rome, Italy, has been canceled. In 
lieu thereof Mr. Wilson has been assigned for 
duty in the Department of State. 

Joseph C. Satterthwaite. of Tecumseh, Mich., 
Second Secretary of Embassy at Ankara, 
Turkey, has been designated First Secretary 
of Embassy at Ankara, Turkey. 

George H. Butler, of Evanston, 111., Second 
Secretary of Embassy at Lima, Peru, has been 
designated First Secretary of Embassy at Lima, 
Peru. 

Fayette J. Flexer, of Joliet, 111., Second Sec- 
retary of Embassy and Consul at Santiago, 
Chile, has been designated First Secretai-y of 
Embassy and Consul at Santiago, Chile, and 
will continue to serve in dual capacity. 

Raleigh A. Gibson, of Decatur, 111., Second 
Secretary of Embassy at Mexico, D.F., Mexico, 
has been designated First Secretary of Em- 
bassy at Mexico, D.F., Mexico. 

Homer S. Fox, of Manistique, Mich., Acting 
Commercial Attache at London, England, has 
been assigned for duty in the Department of 
State. 

Calvin H. Oakes, of Charleston, S. C, Consul 
at Calcutta, India, has been assigned for duty 
in the Department of State. 



AUGUST 16, 1941 



141 



The following persons have been appointed 
Foreign Service Officers, Unclassified; Vice 
Consuls of Career; and Secretaries in the Dip- 
lomatic Service of the United States ; and they 
have been assigned as Vice Consuls at their re- 
spective posts: 

William \V. Walker, of Asheville, CoI6n 

N. C. 
Walter W. Birge, Jr., of Xcw York, Nuevo Laredo 

N. Y. 
John H. Burns, of Pauls Valley, Okla_- Ciudad Juarez 

Kenneth A. B.vrns, of Greele.v, Colo Nogales 

David LeBreton, Jr., of Washington, Monterrey 

D. C. 
John A. Calhoun, of Berkeley, Calif— Tijuana 
Ernest V. Siracusa, of Huntington Mexico, D. F. 

Beach, Calif. 
James P. Speer, 2d, of Comanche, Mt^xico, D. F. 

Okla. 



Walter L. Smith, of Harrisburg, Pa 

William L. Blue, of Memphis, Tenn 

Alden M. Haupt, of Chicago, 111 

Wilfred V. MacDonald, of St. Louis, 
Mo. 

W. Paul O'Neill, Jr., of Rydal, Pa 

F. Lester Sutton, of Brldgeton, N. J 

Paul F. DuVivier, of New York, N. Y- 



Edwin W. Martin, of Oberlin, Ohio 



Edward L. Freers, of Cincinnati, Ohio. 
James S. Triolo, of Alameda, Calif 



Agiia Prieta 
Niagara Falls 
Vancouver 
Winnipeg 

Winnipeg 

Windsor 

St. John's, 
Newfound- 
land 

Hamilton, 
Bermuda 

Port-of-Spain 

Bogota 



Non-career Officers 

Jame.s E. Callahan, of Allston, Mass., Vice 
Consul at Cork, Ireland, has been appointed 
Vice Consul at Montreal, Quebec, Canada. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



PROMOTION OF PEACE 

TREATIES WITH AUSTRALIA, CANADA, AND NEW ZEA- 
LAND AMENDING THE TREATY FOR THE ADVANCE- 
MENT OF PEACE WITH GREAT BRITAIN, SIGNED 
SEPTEMBER 15, 1914 

[Released to the press August 13] 

The Secretary of State, Mr. Cord^ll Hull, and 
the British Ambassador at Washington, Lord 
Halifax, the Canadian Charge d'Aii'aires ad 
interim, Mr. H. H. Wrong, and the Australian 
Minister, Mr. Richard Gardiner Casey, ex- 
changed ratifications on August 13, 1941, at 11 
a.m., of treaties between the United States and 
New Zealand, Canada and Australia, respec- 
tively, signed on September 6, 1940,^ amending 
in their application to each of those dominions 
the provisions which concern the organization 
of commissions for the settlement of disputes 
contained in the Treaty for the Advancement 



' See the BiiUrtin of September 7, 1940, p. 2(17. 



of Peace between the United States and His Bri- 
tannic Majesty, applicable to the British Em- 
pire, signed at Washington September 15, 1914 
(Treaty Series 602) . The Senate of the United 
States gave its advice and consent to the ratifi- 
cation of the three amending treaties on Novem- 
ber 26, 1940, and the President ratified them on 
December 20, 1940. The three treaties have 
been ratified by His Britannic Majesty for the 
three dominions concerned. 

The treaty of 1914 between the United States 
and His Britannic Majesty provided for the 
establishment of an international commission 
of five members, the duties of which were to 
make investigations and reports to the Gov- 
ernments with reference to disputes arising be- 
tween the United States and Great Britain 
(meaning any part of the British Empire) and 
referred to the commission by the Governments. 
One member of the commission was chosen from 



142 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



its own citizens by the Government of the 
United States and one member from its own 
citizens by tlie Government of Great Britain; 
one member was chosen by each Government 
from some tliird country; and a fifth member 
was chosen by agreement between tlie two Gov- 
ernments from a country of which no other 
member of the commission is a citizen. Tlae 
treaty of 1914 also provides that in tlie event 
the interests affected by any dispute about to 
be investigated should be mainly interests of 
one of the self-governing dominions of the Brit- 
ish Empire the dominion concerned might fur- 
nish a list of persons from which a member of 
the commission would be appointed to serve in 
place of the British national member. 

The amendatory treaties with xVustralia, Can- 
ada, and New Zealand provide for the estab- 
lislunent of a separate connnission between the 
United States and each of those dominions in- 
stead of a single commission established in the 
way provided under the treaty of 1914, on 
which, in cases in which the interests involved 
might be mainly interests of one of the several 
dominions, one member might be appointed 
from a list recommended by the dominion con- 
cerned. The commission established under 
each of the amendatory treaties will consist of 
five members, the same number as the com- 
mission established under the treaty of 1914 
with Great Britain. One national and one 
non-national member will be appointed by the 
United States, and one national and one non- 
national member will be appointed by Austra- 
lia, Canada, and New Zealand, respectively. 
The fifth member of the several commissions 
will be chosen by agreement between the Gov- 
ernment of the United States and the Gov- 
ernments of Australia, Canada, and New 
Zealand, respectively, from a country of which 
no other member of the commission is a citizen. 

The substantive provisions of the treaty of 
1914 between the United States and Great Brit- 
ain as to the type of disputes to be submitted 
to the commission and other matters are made 
an integral part of the treaties between the 
United States and Australia, Canada, and New 



Zealand, respectively, for observance and ful- 
fillment between the United States and each of 
the dominions. The relations between the 
United States and the United Kingdom under 
the treaty of 1914 and the constitution of the 
commission to investigate and report on dis- 
putes that might arise between them are not 
affected by the amendatory treaties. 

An amendatory treaty similar to those be- 
tween the United States and Australia, Canada, 
and New Zealand was signed with the Union of 
Soutli Africa on April 2, 1940 (Treaty Scries 
906). Ratifications were exchanged on March 
11, 1941,^ and the treaty was proclaimed by the 
President on March 18, 1941. 

COMMERCE 

SUPPLEMENTARY TRADE AGREEMENT WITH CANADA 

[Ucleaspd to tUe press August i:i] 

On August 13, 1941, at 11 a.m., the Secretary 
of State, Mr. Cordell Hull, and the Charge 
d'Affaires ad interim of Canada, Mr. H. H. 
Wrong, exchanged the duplicate original of the 
President's proclamation of the supplementary 
trade agreement between the United States and 
Caiuida signed on December 13, 1940- and the 
ratification of that agreement by His Britannic 
Majesty for Canada. 

This agreement, which relates solely to silver 
or black foxes, silver- or black-fox furs and 
skins, and related articles, amends the trade 
agreement between the United States and Can- 
ada signed November 17, 1938 (Executive 
Agreement Series 149), by imposing quantita- 
tive limitations on imports of all of those 
articles into the United States and prescribing 
the rate of import duty on silver- or black- fox 
furs and skins imported into the United States. 

Pursuant to its own terms the agreement 
came into force provisionally on December 20, 
1940. It was proclaimed by the President on 
December 18, 1940. As also provided in the 
agreement it came into force definitively on 



• See the BuUcUn of March 15, 1941, p. 293. 
'See the Bulletins of December 14, 1940, p. 553, and 
December 21, 1940, p. 575. 



AUGUST 16, 1941 



143 



August 14, the day following the date of the 
exchange of the President's proclamation and 
the King's ratification. 

AGREEMENT WITH THE SOVIET UNION 

An announcement regarding the proclama- 
tion by the President of the commercial agree- 
ment with the Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics effected by an exchange of notes dated 
August 2, 1941 (see the Bulletin of August 9, 
1941, page 115), appears in this Bulletin under 
the heading "Commercial Policy". 

INTER-AMEmCAN COFFEE AGREEMENT 

VeTiezuela 

The American Ambassador to Venezuela 
transmitted to the Secretary of State with a 
despatcli dated August 1, 1941, a copy of the 
Gaceta Oficial of Venezuela of July 31, 1941 
containing the text of a law passed by Congi-ess 
on June 9, 1941 and signed by the President of 
Venezuela on June 30, 1941 approving the Inter- 
American Coffee Agreement (Treaty Series 
970) opened for signature on November 28, 1940 
at the Pan American Union. 

SOVEREIGNTY 

CONVENTION ON THE PROVISIONAL ADMINISTRATION 
OF EUROPEAN COLONIES AND POSSESSIONS IN THE 
AMERICAS 

ArgentiiM 

The American Ambassador to Argentina in- 
formed the Secretary of State in a despatch 
dated July 30, 1941 that the Chamber of Dep- 
uties of the Government of Argentina approved 
unanimously on July 24, 1941 the Convention 
and the Act of Habana on the Provisional Ad- 
ministration of European Colonies and Posses- 
sions in the Americas signed at Habana July 
30, 1940. 

Haiti 

The American Minister to Haiti transmitted 
to the Secretary of State with a despatch dated 
August 2, 1941, a copy of the official bulletin 



of the Republic of Haiti, dated July 21, 1941, 
containing tlie text of Decree Law 13 of July 
17, 1941, ratifying the Convention on the Pro- 
visional Administration of European Colonies 
and Possessions in the Americas signed at 
Habana July 30, 1940. 

INDIAN AFFAIRS 

CONVENTION PROVIDING FOR AN INTER-AMERICAN 
INDIAN INSTITUTE 

Bolivia 

The Mexican Ambassador at Washington in- 
formed the Secretary of State by a note dated 
July 30, 1941 that the Plenipotentiary of the 
Republic of Bolivia at Mexico City signed on 
December 18, 1940 the Convention Providing 
for an Inter- American Indian Institute, which 
was opened for signature at Mexico City on 
November 1, 1940. 

Honduras 

By a telegram dated August 1, 1941 the 
American Ambassador to Mexico reported that 
he had been informed by the Mexican Foreign 
Office that the instrument of ratification by 
Honduras of the Convention Providing for an 
Inter-American Indian Institute, opened for 
signature at Mexico City on November 1, 1940, 
had been deposited on July 29, 1941. This in- 
formation was erroneously stated as applying 
to Mexico instead of Honduras in the Bulletin 
of August 9, 1941, page 121. 

United States 

By a despatch dated August 7, 1941 the 
American Ambassador to Mexico reported that 
on August 1, 1941 the instrument of ratification 
by the United States of the Convention Provid- 
ing for an Inter-American Indian Institute, 
opened for signature at Mexico City on Novem- 
ber 1, 1940 and signed on the part of the United 
States on November 29, 1940, was deposited 
with the Mexican Foreign Office. 



144 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Regulations 



Portugal or any national thereof has any interest]. 
6 Federal Register 4046. 



Export Control Schedule No. 16. [Determines, effec- 
tive August 27, 1941, additional forms, conversions, 
and derivatives of vegetable products, machinery, 
chemicals, and cadmium {items in Proclama ions 2496, 
2475, 2496. and 2463, respectively).] August 8, 1941. 
(Administrator of Export Control.) 6 Federal Regis- 
ter 4004. 

Load Lines: Foreign Voyages During the National 
Emergency. August 9, 1941. (U.S. Department of 
Commerce: Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navi- 
gation.) [Order No. 135.] 6 Federal Register 4010. 
[See also correction to this order in 6 Federal Register 
4077.] 

Order of the Council of National Defense Revoking 
the Order Creating the OflBce for Coordination of 
Commercial and Cultural Relations Between the Amer- 
ican Republics [the functions and duties of this office 
having been taken over by the newly established Office 
of the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs in the 
Executive Office of the President]. (Council of Na- 
tional Defense.) 6 Federal Register 4063. 

General Licenses Under Executive Order 8389, April 
10, 1940, as Amended, and Regulations Issued Pur- 
suant Thereto Relating to Transactions in Foreign 
Exchange, etc. : 

General License No. 9 [authorizing certain purchases 
and sales by U.S. banking institutions for accounts of 
nationals of blocked countries]. 6 Federal Register 
4045. 

General License No. 70 [licensing transactions by or 
on behalf of Portugal or involving property in which 



Legislation 



Providing for the Representation of the Government 
and People of the United States in the Observance of 
the Two-Hundredth Anniversary of the Coming of Rev. 
Henry Melchior Muhlenberg to the American Colonies. 
(H. Rept. 958, 77th Cong., 1st sess., on H.J. Res. 208.) 
5 pp. 

Amending the Alien Registration Act. (H. Rept. 1151, 
77th Cong., 1st sess., on S. 1512. ) 2 pp. 

Clearance and Entry for Certain Vessels. (H. Rept. 
1158, 77th Cong., 1st sess., on H.R. 5289.) 4 pp. 

Amending the Nationality Act of 1940 To Preserve 
the Nationality of Citizens Residing Abroad. (H. Rept. 
1170, parts 1 and 2, 77th Cong., 1st sess., on H.R. 5511.) 
2 pp. each. 

Prohibiting the Purchase of Foreign-Grown Cotti.n 
With Public Funds. (S. Rept. 657, 77th Cong., 1st sess., 
on S. 1831.) 3 pp. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Foreign Service List, July 1, 1941. Publication 1627. 
iv, 107 pp. Subscription, 500 a year ; single copy, 150. 

Diplomatic List, August 1941. Publication 1629. ii, 
101 pp. Subscription, ,$1 a year; single copy, 100. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents. Washington, D. C— Price. 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PCBLISHBD WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOK OF THE BCREAD OF THE BUDGET 



■^ 



c, 



5<r3. ( 



/}% 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



.B U jL 



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'^ rm 



J 



riN 



AUGUST 23, 1941 
Vol. V, No. 113— Publication 1633 



C 



ontents 



Europe Pae* 
Message of the President to the Congress regarding con- 
ference at sea with British Prime Minister .... 147 

Dehvery of planes to the Middle East 147 

Visit to the United States of H. R. H. the Duke of 

Kent 148 

American Republics 

Allocation of coffee quota 148 

General 

Nationality regulations 149 

Foreign merchant marine training ships 149 

Control of exports in national defense 150 

Commercial Policy 

Supplemental trade-agreement negotiations with Cuba . 1 52 

Cultural Relations 

Committees to advise the Department of State in cul- 

tm'al-relations program 154 

The Department 

Appointment of officers 156 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes 156 

Legislation 156 

Publications 157 




•J-S'SUPEWfNOENTOFOOCliMfNTT, 

SEP 5 1947 







Onf 6 AliS— CONTINUED 



Treaty Information Page 

Promotion of peace: Treaties with Australia, Canada, 
and New Zealand amending the treaty for the ad- 
vancement of peace with Great Britahi signed 

September 15, 1914 157 

Commerce: 

Supplementary trade agreement with Canada . . . 157 
Declaration on the Juridical Personality of Foreign 

Companies 157 

Supplemental trade agreement with Cuba 158 

Fisheries: Protocol amending the agreement of June 8, 

1937 for the regulation of whaling 158 

Flora and fauna: Conventions with Canada and Mexico 

regarding migratory birds 158 

Regulations 158 



Europe 



MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT TO THE CONGRESS REGARDING CONFERENCE 
AT SEA WITH BRITISH PRIME MINISTER 



[Released to the press by the White House August 21] 

To THE Congress of the United States : 

Over a week ago I held several important 
conferences at sea with the British Prime 
Minister. Because of the factor of safety to 
British, Canadian, and American ships and 
their i>ersonnel, jio prior announcement of 
these meetings could pi'operly be made. 

At the close, a public statement by the Prime 
Minister and the President was made. I quote 
it for the information of the Congress and for 
the record : 

[For text of public statement which follows 
here, see Bulletin of August 16, 1941, p. 125.] 

The Congress and the President having 
heretofore determined through the Lend 
Lease Act on the national policy of American 
aid to the democracies which East and West 
are waging war against dictatorships, the 
military and naval conversations at these 
meetings made clear gains in furthering the 
effectiveness of this aid. 

Furthermore, the Prime Minister and I are 
arranging for conferences with the Soviet 
Union to aid it in its defense against the 
attack made by the principal aggressor of the 
modern world — Germany. 



Finally, the declaration of principles at this 
time presents a goal which is worth while for 
our type of civilization to seek. It is so clear 
cut that it is difficult to oppose in any major 
particular without automatically admitting a 
willingness to accept compromise with Nazism ; 
or to agree to a world peace which would give 
to Nazism domination over large numbers of 
conquered nations. Inevitably such a peace 
would be a gift to Nazism to take breath — 
armed breath — for a second war to extend the 
control over Eui'ope and Asia to the American 
Hemisphere itself. 

It is perhaps unnecessary for me to call at- 
tention once more to the utter lack of validity 
of the spoken or written word of the Nazi 
government. 

It is also unnecessary for me to point out 
that the declaration of principles includes of 
necessity the world need for freedom of reli- 
gion and freedom of information. No society 
of the world organized under the announced 
principles could survive without these freedoms 
which are a part of the whole freedom for 
which we strive. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 

The White House, 
August £, 194.1. 



DELIVERY OF PLANES TO THE MIDDLE EAST 

[Released to the press by the White House August 18] 

The President announced on August 18, 1941, 
an important step to speed delivery of planes 
direct to the British forces in the Middle East. 



Agreements have been concluded under which 
the Pan American Airways System will ferry 
aircraft from the United States to West Africa 
and will then ferry those planes on to the 
Middle East. 

147 



148 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



In connection with the ferry system Pan 
American Airways is establishing an air- 
transport service from West Africa to the 
Middle East, and plans are under way for a 
transport service from the United States to 
West Africa. Planes owned by the United 
States Government will be used by Pan Ameri- 
can, and they will be operated by American 
personnel. The route of delivery is so ar- 
ranged that it will nowhere pass through the 
zone of actual warfare. 

The transport services will supplement the 
ferry system by returning ferry personnel and 
carrying spare plane parts and items essential 
to effective delivery of aircraft to the Middle 
East. The route will also be available for 
general commercial use, providing direct air 
service from New York or Baltimore to Africa. 

The ferry system and the transport services 
provide direct and speedy deliveiy of aircraft 
from the "arsenal of democracy" to a critical 
point in the front against aggression. The im- 
portance of this direct line of communication 
between our country and strategic outposts in 
Africa cannot be overestimated. 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF 
H. R. H. THE DUKE OF KENT 

[Released to the press August 20] 

His Royal Highness the Duke of Kent, who 
is at present in Canada, will arrive by air- 
plane at the La Guardia Airport Saturday, 
August 23, at 2 : 30 p. m. daylight-saving time, 
accompanied by Mr. J. A. Lowther, his private 
secretary, and Wing Comdr. Sir Louis Greig. 
Immediately thereafter they will go to Hyde 
Park to visit the President and Mrs. Roosevelt. 

The Duke of Kent and his party will accom- 
pany the President to Washington, where they 
will arrive Monday, August 25. The Duke 
will go direct from the Union Station to the 
Naval Air Station at Anacostia and will then 
leave for a visit to the military and naval 
reservations in the area of Norfolk, Va. The 
party will return later in the day to the White 
House, where His Royal Highness will remain 
and attend a small informal dinner that 
evening. 

On the morning of Tuesday, August 26, 
the Duke of Kent will visit the Glenn L. 
^lartin plant in Baltimore, returning to Wasli- 
ington late in the afternoon. After a brief 
stop in Washington, the Duke of Kent will 
depart that evening for Canada. 



American Republics 



ALLOCATION OF COFFEE QUOTA 



[Released to the press August 22] 

The President yesterday signed an Execu- 
tive order allocating the coffee quota estab- 
lished pursuant to provisions of the Inter- 
American Coffee Agreement for countries not 
signatories of the agreement. This allocation 
becomes effective on October 1, 1941. 

The quotas are expressed as percentages of 
the total quota for the countries which are 
not signatories of the agi-eement, rather than 
in actual quantities in bags, to obviate the ne- 
cessity of issuing a new Executive order in the 



event the import quotas are modified pursuant 
to the procedure set forth in the agreement. 
The percentages correspond to the proportion 
of coffee imports into the United States from 
countries which are not signatories of the agree- 
ment supplied during the 4-year period 1937- 
40 by each of the groups of countries to which 
allocations are made by the Executive order. 
The allocations established by the Executive 
order are designed to afford each non-signatory 
country an opportunity to supply a fair share 
of the total quota for such countries and, at the 



AUGUST 23, 1941 



149 



same time, to insure adequate supplies of cer- 
tain special types of coffee needed in this 
country for blending purposes. Termination 
of the allocation order one month prior to the 
end of the quota year provides a certain 
amount of flexibility which is deemed desirable. 
It means that during the month of September 
1942 the onJy restriction on the importation 
into the United States of coffee from countries 
which are not signatories of the Inter- Ameri- 
can Coffee Agreement will be the total quota 
established for all such countries pursuant to 
the terms of that agreement. 

The text of the order is as follows : 

Allocating the Quota Under the Inteh- 
American Coffee Agreement for Countries 
Not Signatories of the Agreement 

Whereas I find that it is necessary to allocate 
the quota established under the Inter- American 
Coffee Agreement, signed on November 28, 

1940, for countries which are not signatories of 
the said agreement in order to afford such coun- 
tries an opportunity to supply a fair share of 
the quota : 

Now, therefore, by virtue of the authority 
vested in me by section 2 of the joint resolution 
of Congress approved April 11, 1941 (Public 
Law 33, 77th Cong., 1st sess.), it is hereby 
ordered as follows: 

1. For the quota year beginning October 1, 

1941, the quota limiting entries for consump- 
tion of coffee produced in countries which are 
not signatories of the Inter-American Coffee 
Agreement shall be allocated as follows: 

British Empire, except Aden and 

Canada 33. 04 percent 

Kingdom of the Netherlands and its 

possessions 361. 77 percent 

Aden, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia 7. 24 percent 

Other countries not signatories of the 

Inter-American Coffee Agreement 22. 95 percent 

2. During the effective period of this order, 
no coffee produced in the countries specified in 
paragi'aph 1 may be entered for consumption in 
excess of the respective quotas calculated by 
applying the percentages specified in para- 



gi-aph 1 to the total quota for countries not 
signatories of the Inter-American Coffee 
Agreement. 

3. This order shall cease to be effective on 
September 1, 1942. 

Frankun D KoosEVEiyr 
The Whtte House, 
Aufftisf 21, 19U. 

[No. 8863] 



General 



NATIONALITY REGULATIONS 

Regulations under the Nationality Act of 
1940 regarding the issuance of certificates of 
identity for admission to the United States to 
prosecute an action under section 503 of the 
act were issued on August 19, 1941 by the 
Department of State, with the approval of 
the Department of Justice. The text of the 
regulations in codified form is printed in the 
Federal Register of August 22, 1941, page 
4298. 

FOREIGN MERCHANT MARINE 
TRAINING SHIPS 

An Executive order (no. 8850) of August 
16, 1941, authorizes the Commandant of the 
Coast Guard, in the interest of national de- 
fense, to "purchase, charter, requisition the 
use of, or the possession of, any or all foreign 
vessels designed as merchant marine training 
ships which are lying idle in waters within 
the jurisdiction of the United States". He 
was also authorized and directed "to operate 
any or all of such vessels in the training of 
Coast Guard cadets and merchant marine 
personnel", to "repair, reconstruct, or recondi- 
tion any or all of such vessels", and to make 
to the owner of any vessel taken "just com- 
pensation for such vessel or 'the use thereof". 
The full text of the proclamation is printed 
in the Federal Register of August 20, 1941, 
page 4179. 



150 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL 
DEFENSE 

[Released to the press August 19] 

The President on August 19, 1941, signed a 
proclamation [no. 2503] adding six articles 
and materials to the list of those subject to 
export control by virtue of section 6 of the act 
of July 2, 1940. 

The additional articles and materials, which 
will be brought under control as of September 
10, 1941, ai-e as follows : 

1. Furs 

2. Synthetic fibers 

3. Wood 

4. Natural asphalt or bitumen 

5. Nonferrous metals 

6. Precious metals 

The text of the proclamation is printed in 
the Federal Register of August 21, 1941, page 
4231. 

[Released to the press August 20] 

The Secretary of State announced on August 
20, 1941 the issuance of general licenses for 
the exportation of new commodities which will 
be placed under export control on August 27. 
The new general licenses wiU bear the following 
numbers : 





Canada 


Great Britain 

and Northern 

'Ireland 


PhUipplne 
Islands 


Drugs, herbs, leaves, and roots: 

Acoaite leaves and roots.'. _. 

Colchlcum roots and seeds. 

Industrial chemicals: 
Citric acid 


OLA 1 
GLB 1 

GLC 1 
OLD 1 


OLA 2 
OLB 2 

GLC 2 
GLD 2 


OLA 63 
GLB 63 











In addition to the foregoing, several forms, 
conversions, and derivatives of material already 
under export control will i-equire a license for 
their exportation on August 27, but will be 
included with other material of the same 
nature under existing general licenses. The 
newly licensable forms, conversions, and deriva- 
tives, together with the existing general 
licenses under which they may be exported, are 
as follows: 









Philippine 
Islands 




Canada 


and Northern 
Ireland 


Electrical machinery and appa- 








ratus: 








Radio transmitting sets, tubes, 








and parts, in addition to those 








containing mica, subject to 










GDM 1 


GDM 2 


ODM 63 


Coal-tar products: 










GCX 1 


OCX 2 






OCX 1 


GCX 2 




Chemical specialities: 








Chromium tanning mutures. . . 


GADl 


GAD 2 


GAD 63 


Phenol-formaldehyde resins: 








Unfabricated in powder, flake 








or liquid form, sheets, plates. 








rods, tubes, and other unfin- 








ished forms 


GKRl 


GKR 2 


GKR 63 


Urea-formaldehyde resins: Un- 








fabricated in powder, flake, or 








liquid form, sheets, plates, 








rods, tubes, and other unfln- 










GKR I 


GKR 2 


GKR 63 


Drugs, herbs, leaves, and roots: 




PjTethrum or insect flowers. 








powder, or extract 


QKU 1 


GKU2 


OKU 63 


Cadmium: 








Dross, flue dust, residues, and 










GCMl 


GCM2 


OCM63 







[Released to the press August 21] 

The Secretary of State announced on August 
21 that general license GWW has been issued 
authorizing the exportation of all articles and 
materials listed in Export Control Schedule 
No. 17 ' to the following countries : 

Group A ' 

Group B ' 

Netherlands Indies 

China (valid only when shipment is made via 

Burma) 
Belgian Congo 
Tahiti 

New Caledonia 
Marquesas Islands 
French Cameroons 
French Equatorial Africa 
Turkey 
Iraq 
French West Indies (D^sirade, Guadeloupe, Les 

Saintes, Martinique, Marie Galante, St. Martin — 

northern part, St Bartholomew) 
French Guiana 
Miquelon and St. Pierre 



'6 Federal Register 4136. 

'Bulletin of May 10, 1941, pp. 560-561. 



AUGUST 2 3, 1941 

Liberia 

Union of Soviet Socialist Republics 

Philippine Islands 

Collectors of customs have been authorized 
to permit exportations of articles and materials 
listed in Export Control Schedule No. 17 to the 
foregoing countries without the requirement 
of an individual license. 

[Released to the press August 23] 

The Secretary of State announced on August 
23 the issuance of general license G-62, authoriz- 
ing the exportation to Iceland of all articles 
and materials under export control, with the 
exception of the following: 

1. Arms, ammunition, and implements of war 

2. Tin-plate scrap 

3. Helium 

4. Articles and materials designated in the 

President's Proclamation No. 3465, dated 
March 4, 1941 (technical data) 

5. Graphite 

6. Radium 

7. Uranium 

8. Titanium 

9. Atropine 

10. Belladonna 

11. Caffein 

12. Theobromine 

13. Hyoscyamus (henbane) 

14. Digitalis seeds 

15. Cork 

Those excepted articles above-named will 
continue to require an individual license for 
their exportation to Iceland. 

Collectors of customs have been instructed 
to permit the exportation of articles and mate- 
rials, other than those above listed, to Iceland 
without requiring the presentation of an 
individual license. 

Collectors of customs were informed on 
August 22 that general licenses GDQ l, GDQ 2, 
and GDQ 63 authorizing the exportation of 
grinding mills and classifiers and equipment 
therefor have been issued for Canada, Great 
Britain and Northern Ireland, and the Philip- 
pine Islands, respectively. 

Collectors of customs were informed on Au- 
gust 20, 1941 "that general license GEG, as 



151 

now interpreted, authorizes the exportation 
from those ports which are located on the At- 
lantic Coast to those countries of the Western 
Hemisphere designated as Group B ' . . . of 
those petroleum products designated by the 
following letter reference and name in Export 
Control Schedule No. 15 : - 

G— Crude Oil 

D — Natural Gasoline 

G — Motor Fuel 

H — Motor Fuel 

K— Naphtha, Mineral Spirits, Solvents, Tractor 

Fuels, and other light products 
L — Kerosene 

M— Gas Oil and Distillate Fuel Oil 
N— Residual Fuel Oil 
Q— Motor OU 
R — Other Lubricating Oil 
S — Lubricating Grease 
T — Liquefied Petroleum Gases 
U— Paraffin Wax 
V— Asphalt 
X — Other Petroleum Products 

"If any of the above mentioned petroleum 
products also corresponds to the definitions set 
forth in paragraphs A, B, E, F, I, J, O, P, or 
W, in Export Control Schedule No. 15, its 
exportation is not permissible under general 
license no. GEG. 

"General license no. GEH governs the expor- 
tation of the same petroleum products which 
may be exported under general license no. 
GEG. General license no. GEH, as now inter- 
preted, authorizes the exportation of those 
petroleum products from any port not located 
on the Atlantic coast to those countries of 
the Western Hemisphere designated in Group 
B . . . and to the Netherlands Indies, Free 
China, the Free French Territories, and the 
Belgian Congo." 

Collectors of customs were informed on Au- 
gust 20, 1941 that the following affidavit will 
be required on certain exportations of petro- 
leum products, as further defined below : 



' Bulletin of May 10, 1941, p. 561. 
» 6 Federal Register 3888. 



152 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



"New Petroleum AFTiDAvrr 

"It is not possible to obtain by commercial 
distillation from any of the Petroleum Prod- 
ucts covered by this export declaration being 

shipped under Export Control License No. 

more than 3% of a fraction having an 
A.S.T.M. end point of 300 degrees Fahrenheit 
which will have, with the addition of 3 cc of 
tetraethyl lead per gallon, an octane niunber 
of the A.S.T.M. Knock Test Method of 80 or 
more. In addition, it is not possible to obtain 
by commercial distillation, as distillate or resid- 
uum, products having more than 60 seconds, 
Saybold Universal, viscosity at 210 degrees F. 
with a viscosity index of 60 or more. 



"The above affidavit, executed by the shipper 
or by an officer or duly authorized agent of 
the shipper, properly notarized, will now be 
required on all Export Declarations covering 



any of the petroleum products which are iden- 
tified as follows in Export Control Schedule 
No. 15 : 

C — Cnide Oil 

H— Motor Fuel 

K — Naphtha, Mineral Spirits, Solvents, Tractor 

Fuels, and other light products 
li — Kerosene 

M— Gas Oil and DistUlate Fuel Oil 
N— Residual Fuel Oil 
Q— Motor Oil 
R— Other Lubricating Oil 

when any such items are submitted for ship- 
ment under either individual or general license 
to destinations other than those in the British 
Empire, the Western Hemisphere, Netherlands 
Indies, Philippine Islands, Free China, Bel- 
gian Congo, the U. S. S. R., or the Free French 
Territories. . . . 

"It is to be noted that the above affidavit is 
not required for the exportation of those pe- 
troleum products which may be exported to 
certain destinations of the Western Hemisphere 
under general license no. GEG." 



Commercial Policy 



SUPPLEMENTAL TRADE-AGREEMENT NEGOTIATIONS WITH CUBA 



(Released to thf press August 19) 

Public notice of intention to negotiate a 
trade agreement with the Government of Cuba 
was issued on July 26, 1941. In connection 
with that notice, there was published a list of 
products on which the United States will con- 
sider the granting of concessions to Cuba, and 
it was announced that concessions on products 
not included in the list would not be considered 
unless supplementary' announcement were 
made. 

The Secretary of State announced today, 
August 19, additional products on which the 
United States will consider granting conces- 
sions to Cuba. 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
has prescribed that all information and views 



in writing and all applications for supplemen- 
tal oral presentation of views relating to prod- 
ucts included in this supplementary list shall 
be submitted to it not later than 12 o'clock 
noon, September 6, 1941. 

Suggestions with regard to the form and 
content of presentations addressed to the Com- 
mittee for Reciprocity Information are in- 
cluded in a statement released by that Com- 
mittee on December 13, 1937. 

Supplement to the List of Products on Which 
the United States Will Consider Granting 
Concessions to Cuba 

Pursuant to section 4 of an act of Congress 
approved June 12, 1934. entitled "An Act to 



AUGUST 23, 1941 

Amend the Tariff Act of 1930", as extended 
by Public Resolution 61, approved April 12, 
1940, and to Executive Order 6750, of June 27, 
1934, public notice of intention to negotiate a 
trade agreement with the Government of Cuba 
was issued on July 26, 1941. In connection 
with that notice, there was published a list of 
products on which the United States will con- 
sider the granting of concessions to Cuba, and 
it was announced that concessions on products 
not included in the list would not be consid- 
ered unless supplementary announcement were 
made. 

I hereby announce that the products de- 
scribed in the attached list have been added 
to the list issued on July 26, 1941. 

CORDEIiL HULIi 

Secretary of State 

Washington, D. C, 
August 18, 1941. 

In the event that articles which are at pres- 
ent regarded as classifiable under the descrip- 
tions included in the following list are 
excluded therefrom by judicial decision or 
otherwise prior to the conclusion of the sup- 
plementary agreement, the list will nevertheless 
be considered as including such articles. 



153 



United 

States 

Tariff Act 

of 1930 



Description of article 



All medicinal preparations of animal 
origin, not specially provided for. 

Chemicals, drugs, medicinal and sim- 
ilar substances, whether dutiable 
or free, when imported in capsules, 
pills, tablets, lozenges, troches, am- 
poules, jubes, or similar forms, in- 
cluding powders put up in medic- 
inal doses. 

Drugs of animal origin which are nat- 
ural and uncompounded and not 
edible, and not specially provided 
for, but which are advanced in 
value or condition by shredding, 
grinding, chipping, crushing, or 
any other process or treatment what- 
ever beyond that essential to the 
proper packing of the drugs and the 
prevention of decay or deteriora- 
tion pending manufacture, and sot 
containing alcohol. 



Present rate of 
duty (applicable to 
Cuban products) 



Not less than 20% 
ad val. 



United 
States 

Tariff Act 
of 1930 

Paragraph 


Description of article 


Present rate of 

duty (applicable to 

Cuban products) 


706 


Frog legs, fresh, chilled, frozen, pre- 


$0.04S per lb., but 




pared, or preserved. 


not less than 16% 
ad val. 


746 




$0.12 per lb. 


7S2 


Fruits in their natural state, or in 
brine, pickled, dried, desiccated, 
evaporated, or otherwise prepared 
or preserved, and not specially pro- 
vided for. 


28% ad val.« 


763 


Fruit pastes and fruit pulps 


28% ad val. » 






$0,028 or 0.014 per 






lb." 



" The rate of duty, applicable to imports of Cuban origin, 
wag reduced on dried, desiccated, or evaporated bananas fol- 
lowing the granting of a concession on such products in the 
trade agreement with Costa Rica, eCfectlve August 2. 1937. 
That agreement reduced the general rale of duty on these 
products from 35% ad val. to 17%% ad val. and the rate to 
Cuba was thereby automatically reduced to 14% ad val., in 
accordance with the provision in the Cuban trade agreement 
under which imports from Cuba are entitled to a rate of duty 
not less than 20% below the lowest rate applicable to imports 
of similar products originating in any other country. The 
reduced general rate of duty was bound against increase in 
the trade agreement with Ecuador, effective October 23, 1938. 

The rate of duty, applicable to imports of Cuban origin, 
was reduced on prepared or preserved guavas, not specially 
provided for. following the granting of a concession on these 
products In the trade agreement with Haiti, effective June 3, 
1935. That agreement reduced the general rate of duty on 
these products from 35% ad val. to 17%% ad val. and the 
rate to Cuba was thereby automatically reduced to 14% ad 
val., as in the ease noted above of dried, desiccated, or evapo- 
rated bananas. The reduced general rate of duty on prepared 
or preserved guavas was subsequently bound against increase 
in trade agreements with Honduras, Guatemala, El Salvador, 
and Costa Rica. 

' The rate of duty on mango pastes and pulps, and guava 
pastes and pulps, of Cuban origin, was reduced from 28% ad 
val. to 14% ad val. in the trade agreement with Cuba effective 
September 3, 1934. 

" The rate of duty applicable to imports of Cuban origin of 
"lima beans, green or unripe, in their natural .state, when im- 
ported and entered for consumption during the period from 
December 1 to the following May 31, inclusive, in any years", 
was reduced from $0,028 to $0,014 per lb. in the trade agree- 
ment with Cuba effective September 3, 1934. The duty on 
green or unripe lima beans of Cuban origin remained at the 
rate of $0,028 per lb. for any imports during the remainder of 
the year. The purpose of including lima beans in the present 
additional list of products upon which the United States will 
consider the possible granting of concessions to Cuba in the 
proposed supplementary trade agreement, is to modify the 
language of the concession in the original Cuban agreement 
so that it may conform more clbsely to the language of Para- 
graph 765 of the Tariff .\ct of 1930. It is not contemplated 
that any action which may be taken in the proposed supple- 
mentary agreement under this paragraph will result in a 
change in either the present seasonal period during which the 
reduced rate of duty applies to lima beans of Cuban origin, or 
in the rate of duty, which has already been reduced during 
the seasonal period by the maximum extent permitted under 
the Trade Agreements Act. 



154 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETS 



Committee for Rbciprocitt Information 

supplemental trade- agreement negotiations 
with cuba 

Public Notice 

Supplementary List of Products 

Closing date for submission of briefs, Septem- 
ber 6, 1941; closing date for application to 
be heard. September 6, 1941 ; public hearings 
open, September 8, 1911. 

The Committee for Reciprocity Informa- 
tion hereby gives notice that all information 
and views in writing, and all applications for 
supplemental oral presentation of views, with 
regard to the supplementary list of products 
announced by the Secretary of State on this 
date in connection with the negotiation of a 
supplemental trade agreement with the Gov- 
enunent of Cuba, shall be submitted to the 
Committee Jor Reciprocity Information not 
later than 12 o'clock noon, September 6, 1941. 
Such communications should be addressed to 
"The Chairman, Committee for Reciprocity 
Information, Tariff Commission Building, 
Eighth and E Streets NW., Washington, D. C." 



A public hearing will be held, beginning at 
10 a. m. on September 8, 1941, before the Com- 
mittee for Reciprocity Information, in the 
hearing room of the Tariff Commission in the 
Tariff Commission Building, when supplemen- 
tal oral statements will be heard with regard 
to the products contained in the supplementary 
list, unless persons interested in these products 
request that they be heard at a later date 
acceptable to the Committee. 

Six copies of written statements, either type- 
written or printed, shall be submitted, of which 
one copy shall be sworn to. Appearance at 
hearings before the Committee may be made 
only by those persons who have filed written 
statements and who have within the time pre- 
scribed made written application for a hearing, 
and statements made at such hearings shall be 
under oath. 

By direction of the Committee for Reciproc- 
ity Information this 18th day of August 1941. 
E. M. Whitcomb 
Acting Secretary 

Washington, D. C., 
August IS, 19^1. 



Cultural Relations 



COMMITTEES TO ADVISE THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE IN CULTURAL- 
RELATIONS PROGRAM 



On July 31, 1941 the President appointed 
four committees to advise the Department of 
State, through the Division of Cultural Rela- 
tions, on certain phases of the program of 
cultural relations. This action was taken 
pursuant to section 2 of the act of August 9, 
1939, "An Act to Authorize the President to 
Render Closer and More Effective the Rela- 
tionship between the American Republics". 
These committees are authorized to serve until 
June 30, 1942. 



The General Advisory Committee is to ad- 
vise the Department, through the Division, of 
Cultural Relations, on general policy in the 
planning and execution of the program of 
cultural relations and to serve as a coordinat- 
ing body for the other advisory committees. 
It is composed of the following persons: 

Robert G. Caldwell, Ph.D., Dean of Humanities, Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology 
Ben M. Cherrington, Ph.D., Director, Foundation for 



AUGUST 23, 1941 



155 



the Advancement of the Social Sciences, Univer- 
sity of Etenver 

Steiihen Diiggan, Ph.D., LL.D., Director, Institute of 
International Education 

Waldo G. Leland, Ph.D., Litt.D., Director, American 
Council of Learned Societies 

The Honorable Archibald MacLeish, Librarian of 
Congress 

Mr. Carl H. Milam, Secretary, American Library 
Association 

Beardsley Ruml, Ph.D., Dean, Department of Social 
Sciences, University of Chicago 

James T. Shotweli, Ph.D., LL.D., Chairman, National 
Committee of the United States of America on 
International Intellectual Cooperation 

George N. Shustor, President, Hunter College 

John W. Studcbaker, LL.D., Commissioner of Educa- 
tion, Federal Security Agency 

The Honorable Henry A. Wallace, Vice President of 
the United States. 

The Advisory Committee on Inter-American 
Cooperation in Agricultural Educa^tion will 
advise the Department of State regarding 
agricultural education, particularly in connec- 
tion with the Department's work with land- 
grant colleges of the United States in inter- 
American studies and exchange students, and 
in the proposed Institute of Tropical Agricul- 
ture. This committee has as its chairman, 
Knowles A. Ryerson, M.S., Assistant Dean, 
College of Agriculture, University of Cali- 
fornia, Davis, Calif. Other members of the 
committee are: 

Earl N. Bressman, Ph.D., Assistant Director, Office 
of Foreign Agricultural Relations, Department of 
Agriculture, Executive Secretary 

Thomas Barbour, Ph.D., Sc.D., Director, Museum of 
Comparative Zoology,. Harvard University 

Homer J. Henuey, Ph.D., Dean of Agriculture, Colo- 
rado State College 

H. Harold Hume, Dean, College of Agriculture, Uni- 
versity of Florida 

Fred J. Kelly, Ph.D., Chief, Division of Higher 
Education, Office of Education, Federal Security 
Agency 

J. G. Lee, Jr., Dean, College of Agricultui-e, Louisiana 
State University 

Edgar J. Fisher, Ph.D., Assistant Director, 
Institute of International Education, is chair- 
man of the Advisory Committee on the Adjust- 
ment of Foreign Students in the United States. 



This committee is to advise the Department of 
State on problems involving the adjustment of 
students from abroad to their new environment 
and on plans for more effective guidance and 
hospitality. The other members are: 

Rollin S. Atwood, Ph.D., Acting Director, Institute 

of Inter-American Affairs, University of Florida 
Gladys Bryson, Professor, Smith College 
Ben M. Cherrington, Ph.D., Profe.ssor of International 

Relations, University of Denver 
Charles W. Hackett, Ph.D., Professor of Latin 

American History, University of Texas 
Charles B. Lipman, Ph.D., Sc.D., Dean, Graduate 

Division, University of California 
Martin McGuire, Ph.D., Dean, Graduate School of 

Arts and Sciences, Catholic University of America 
Mr. John L. Mott, Director, International House, New 

York 
J. Raleigh Nelson, Ph.D., Director, International 

Center, University of Michigan 

The Advisory Committee on Exchange Fel- 
lowships and Professorships will advise on 
general matters relating to the interchange of 
students and professors, and specifically on the 
selection of gi-aduate students and professors 
under the Convention for the Promotion of 
Inter-American Cultural Relations. The com- 
mittee is under the chainnanship of Stephen 
Duggan, Ph.D., LL.D., Director, Institute of 
International Education, and is composed of 
the following members : 

Albert L. Barrovps, Ph.D., Executive Secretary, 
National Research Council 

Charles G. Fenwick, Ph.D., Professor of Political 
Science, Bryn Mawr College 

Waldo G. Leland, Ph.D., Litt.D., Director, American 
Council of Learned Societies 

Arthur P. Whitaker, Ph.D., Professor of Latin Ameri- 
can History, University of Pennsylvania 

Donald Young, Research Secretary, Social Science 
Research Council 

In order to increase the cooperation between 
the Department of State and the Office of the 
Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs several 
persons who are active in the work of the latter 
office were selected to serve on the committees. 
In addition every effort was made to have 
represented on the committees the point of view 
of different sections of the country. 



156 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Department 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

By Departmental Order 960, Mr. Lloyd C. 
Mitchell was appointed an Assistant Chief of 
the Division of Accounts, effective as of August 
16, 1941. 

Mr. Eobert M. Carr was appointed, by De- 
partmental Order 962, an Assistant Chief of 
the Division of Commercial Treaties and 
Agreements, effective as of August 18, 1941. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

The Senate, on August 21, 1941, confirmed 
the nomination of Willys R. Peck, of Califor- 
nia, now Counselor of Embassy in China, as 
Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipo- 
tentiarj' of the LTnited States of America to 
Thailand. 

[Released to the press August 23] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since August 16, 
1941: 

Career Officers 

George C. Howard, of Washington, D. C, 
who has been serving as Commercial Attache 
at Stockholm, Sweden, has been designated 
Second Secretary of Embassy and Consul at 
Bogota, Colombia, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

The assignment of Clarence C. Brooks, of 
West Hoboken, N. J., as Consul at Buenos 
Aires, Argentina, has been canceled. In lieu 
thereof, Mr. Brooks has been designated Sec- 
ond Secretary of Embassy at Santiago, Chile. 

Robert L. Buell, of Rochester, N. Y., Second 
Secretary of Embassy and Consul at Berlin, 



Germany, has been assigned as Consul at 
Singapore, Straits Settlements. 

Francis H. Styles, of Falls Church, Va., 
Consul at Dublin, Ireland, has been designated 
Second Secretary of Legation at Dublin, Ire- 
land, and will sei^e in dual capacity. 

The following persons have been appointed 
Foreign Service Officers, Unclassified; Vice 
Consuls of Careef ; and Secretaries in tJie Dip- 
lomatic Service of the United States ; and have 
been assigned as Vice Consuls at their respec- 
tive posts: 

Bobert H. MoBride, of Pontiac, Mich__-Habana, Cuba 

Gray Bream, of Casper, Wyo Halifax, N. S., Canada 

Robert S. Folsom, of West Somerville, 

Mass Port-au-Prince, Haiti 

Stuart W. Rockwell, of Radnor, Pa--Panania, Panama 
Charles W. Smith, of Burbank, 

Calif Vancouver, B. C. Canada 

Non-career Officers 

Robert W. Weise, Jr., of Minneapolis, Minn., 
has been appointed Vice Consul at Santiago, 
Chile. 

Henrj^ Dearborn, of Andover, Mass., has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Barranquilla, 
Colombia. 



Legislation 



An Act To provide compensation for disability or 
death resulting from injury to persons employed at 
military, air, and naval bases acquired by the United 
States from foreign countries, and on lands occupied 
or used by the United States for military or naval 
purposes outside the continental limits of the United 
States, including Alaska, Guantanamo, and the Philip- 
pine Islands, but excluding the Canal 2Jone, and for 
other purposes. [S. 1642.] Approved- August 16, 
1941. (Public Law 208, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 2 pp. 

Joint Resolution Providing for the representation of 
the Government and people of the United States in 
the observance of the two hundredth anniversary of 
the coming of Doctor Henry Melchior Muhlenberg to 
the American colonies. [S. J. Res. 40.] Approved 
August 16, 1941. (Public Law 209, 77th Cong., 1st 
sess.) 2 pp. 



AUGUST 23, 1941 



157 



An Act To provide for the establishment of the 
Coronado International Memorial, In the State of 
Arizona. [S. 752.] Approved August 18, 1941. (Pub- 
lie Law 216, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 2 pp. 

Statement by the Prime Minister of England and 
the President of the United States: Message From the 
President of the United States Transmitting a Public 
Statement Made by Both Prime Minister of England 
and the President of the United States With Regard 
to the Declaration of Principles Necessary Under the 
Code of the Two Countries. (H. Doc. 358, 77th Cong., 
1st sess.) 3 pp. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Temporary Diversion for Power Purposes of Addi- 
tional Waters of the Niagara River Above the Falls : 
Arrangement Between the United States of America 
and Canada — Effected by exchange of notes signed at 
Washington May 20, 1941. Executive Agreement 
Series 209. Publication 1630. 3 pp. 50. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



PROMOTION OF PEACE 

treaties with AUSTRALIA, CANADA, AND NEW ZEA- 
LAND AMENDING THE TREATY FOR THE ADVANCE- 
MENT OF PEACE WITH GREAT BRITAIN SIGNED 
SEPTEMBER 15, 1914 

[Released to the press August 21] 

On August 21, 1941, the President issued his 
proclamations of the treaties between the 
United States and Australia, Canada, and 
New Zealand, respectively, amending in their 
application to each of those Dominions certain 
provisions of the Treaty for the Advancement 
of Peace between the United States and His 
Britannic Majesty signed at Washington Sep- 
tember 15, 1914 (Treaty Series 602). The 
three amending treaties were signed on Septem- 
ber 6, 1940, and the ratifications of the Presi- 
dent of the United States and His Britannic 
Majesty were exchanged at Washington August 
13, 1941. 

COMMERCE 

SUPPLEMENTARY TRADE AGREEMENT WITH CANADA 
[Beleased to the press August 21] 

On August 21, 1941 the President issued his 
proclamation in regard to the exchange of rati- 
fications of the supplementary trade agreement 



between the United States and Canada, signed 
on December 13, 1940, amending in regard to 
silver or black foxes, silver- or black- fox furs 
and skins, and related articles, the trade agree- 
ment between the United States and Canada 
signed on November 17, 1938 (Executive 
Agreement Series 149). The supplementary 
agreement came into force provisionally on 
December 20, 1940 and, as is declared by the 
President's proclamation, definitively on Au- 
gust 14, 1941, the day following the exchange 
of ratifications. 

DECLARATION ON THE JURIDICAL PERSONALITY OF 
FOREIGN COMPANIES 

[Released to the press August 21] 

United States 

On August 21, 1941, the President issued 
his proclamation of the Protocol containing a 
Declaration on the Juridical Personality of 
Foreign Companies, which was opened for 
signature by the states members of the Pan 
American Union at the Pan American Union 
on June 25, 1936 and was signed by the Secre- 
tary of State on June 23, 1939, with two in- 
terpretative understandings.' The Senate gave 



' See the Bulletin of July 26, 1941, p. 82. 



158 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



its advice and consent to ratification of the 
Protocol, subject to the two understandings on 
June 12, 1941. It was ratified by the President 
on June 23, 1941, and the ratification of the 
United States, inchiding the two underetand- 
ings, was deposited with the Pan American 
Union on July 10, 1941. The Republic of 
Venezuela deposited its ratification of the 
Protocol on September 23, 1937. 

The Declaration in the Protocol provides 
that foreign companies constituted under the 
laws of one country and having their seats in 
its territory may engage in any commercial 
activity in countries in which they do not have 
a permanent establishment, branch, or agency, 
which is not contrary to the laws of such coun- 
tries, and may enter appearances in the courts 
as plaintiffs or defendants. 

SUPPLEMENTAL TRADE AGREEMENT WITH CUBA 

Public notice of intention to negotiate a trade 
agreement Mith the Government of Cuba was 
issued on July 26, 1941, and a list of products 
on which the United States will consider 
granting concessions to Cuba was published in 
the Bulletin of July 26. Additional products 
on which the United States will consider 
granting concessions to Cuba were announced 
by the Secretary of State on August 19, 1941 
and are published in this Bulletin under the 
heading "Commercial Policy". 

FISHERIES 

PROTOCOL AMENDING THE AGREEMENT OF JUNE 8, 
1937 FOR THE REGULATION OF WHALING 

Canada 

By a note dated August 13, 1941 the British 
Ambassador at Washington informed the 
Secretary of State that the instrument of rati- 
fication of the Canadian Government of the 
Protocol signed in London on June 24, 1938 
(Treaty Series 944) amending the Agreeinent 
for the Regulation of Whaling signed Jmie 8, 
1937 (Treaty Series 933), was deposited in the 
archives of the Foreign Office of the British 
Govermnent on July 21, 1941. The countries 



which have now deposited their respective in- 
struments of ratification or accession to the 
Protocol are the United States, Canada, Den- 
mark, Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, and 
Norway. 

FLORA AND FAUNA 

CONVENTIONS WITH CANADA AND ME.\ICO REGARDING 
MGRATORY BIRDS 

On August 16, 1941, the Pi-esident issued a 
proclamation (no. 2501) amending previous 
regulations governing the "hunting, taking, 
capture, killing, possession, sale, purchase, 
shipment, transportation, carriage, exporta- 
tion, and importation of migi-atory birds and 
parts, nests, and eggs thereof," included in the 
terms of the Convention for the Protection of 
Migratory Birds, signed by the United States 
and Great Britain, in respect of Canada, on 
August 16, 1916 (Treaty Series 628) and the 
Convention with Mexico for the Protection of 
Migratory Birds and Game Mammals, con- 
cluded February 7, 1936 (Treaty Series 912). 

The full text of the proclamation is printed 
in the Federal Register of August 21, 1941, 
page 4232. 



Regulations 



Export Control Schedule No. 17 [determining, effec- 
tive August 29, 1941, additions to the forms, con- 
versions, and derivatives of rubber (proclamation 
2413), chemical wood pulps (proclamation 2482), 
iron and steel (proclamation 2449), non-ferrous metals 
(proclamations 2413, 2453, and 2464), machinery 
(proclamation 2475), and chemicals (proclamation 
2496). August 15, 1941. (Administrator of Export 
Control.) 6 Federal Register 4136. 

Regulations Relating to Transactions in Foreign 
Exchange . . . and to Reports of Foreign Property 
Interests in the United States : Amendment of Public 
Circular No. 1, August 18, 1941 [extending the time 
from July 14 to September 30, 1941 within which 
such reports shall be filed] ; and Instructions for 
Preparation of Reports on Form TFR-300 of All 
Foreign-Owned Property Subject to the Jurisdiction 
of the United States, August 16, 1941. (Treasury 
Department.) 6 Federal Register 4196. 



AUGUST 23, 1941 159 

Nationality Under the Act of 1940: [Issuance of] Section 503 of the Nationality Act of 1940. August 

Certificate of Identity for Admission to the United 20, 1941. (Department of Justice: Immigration and 

States To Prosecute an Action Under Section 503 of Naturalization Service.) [General Order C-33.] 6 

the Act. August 19, 1941. (Department of State and Federal Register 4295. 

Rules Governing Broadcast Services Other Than 

Department of Justice.) 6 Federal Register 4298 and c-t.jjT./.i.r j ^ j-* 

1, . ivc, V, u ■/ Standard Broadcast [amendments regarding frequency 

^-^"- assignments to international broadcast stations]. 

Admission [to the United States] of Holders of August 18, 1941. (Federal Communications Commis- 

Certificates of Identity To Prosecute an Action Under sion.) 6 Federal Register 4303. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF T HB DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THB BUDQBT 



3^ i.//3<5 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 



AUGUST 30, 1941 
Vol. V, No. 114— Publication 1635 







ontents 



American Republics Page 

Anniversary of the declaration of Uruguayan inde- 
pendence: 

Remarks by the Under Secretary of State 163 

Message from the President of the United States . . 164 
Use of foreign-flag merchant vessels in American 

ports 16S 

The Far East 

Military mission to China 166 

Europe 

Contributions for relief in belligerent countries .... 166 

General 

Control of exports in national defense 167 

Warrants of precedence for vessels carrying strategic 

and critical materials 168 

Cultural Relations 

Travel grants to students 168 

Medical specialist from the United States to lecture in 

other American republics 169 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes 170 

The Department 

Appointment of officers 170 

Regulations 170 




U, S, SIIPERINTFNnENT OF DOCUMENTS 







ontents-coNTiNVED 



Treaty Information Page 

International law: Convention on Rights and Duties 

of States 171 

Sovereignty: Convention on the Provisional Adminis- 
tration of European Colonies and Possessions in 

the Americas 171 

Opium: 

Convention for Limiting the Manufacture and Regu- 

lathig the Distribution of Narcotic Drugs . . . 171 

Intel-national Opium Convention 172 

Industrial property: Poland 172 

Labor: 

Convention Concern mg Safety Provisions in the 

Building Industry 172 

Convention Concerning Workmen's Compensation 

for Occupational Diseases (Revised 1934) ... 173 
Military and naval missions: 

Detail of United States Army Officer as Director of 
the Military Academy of the National Guard of 

Nicaragua 173 

Naval mission to Colombia 173 

Fisheries: Pacific Halibut Fisherj^ Convention With 

Canada 173 

Flora and fauna: Convention on Nature Protection 
and WUdlife Preservation in the Western Hemi- 
sphere 174 



American Republics 



ANNIVERSARY OF THE DECLARATION OF URUGUAYAN INDEPENDENCE 

REMARKS BY THE UNDER SECRETARY OF STATE ' 



[Released to the press August 25] 

We are commemorating today the anniver- 
sary of the independence of Uruguay. In the 
celebration of this historic anniversary, the 
peojjle of Uruguay are joined in spirit by the 
people of the United States and, likewise, I feel 
sure, by the peoples of all of the other American 
republics throughout the length and breadth of 
the Western Hemisphere. 

For, in the greatness of their spirit and in 
their steadfast devotion to freedom, the Uru- 
guayan peojDle have come to symbolize for all of 
us the very word "independence". Throughout 
the course of their independent life they have 
unfailingly advanced the cause of human lib- 
erties and the cause of social betterment. They 
have contributed a high example to all democ- 
racies and to all other peace-loving peoples, not 
only within the Western Hemisphere but 
throughout the entire world. 

I count it a special privilege to, speak tonight 
on the same program with one of the most dis- 
tinguished statesmen of the Americas, Dr. Juan 
Carlos Blanco, the first Uruguayan Ambassador 
to the United States. 

He has succeeded as the diplomatic repre- 
sentative in Washington of Uruguay, Don Jose 
Richling, who is regarded as a personal friend 
by innumerable citizens of the United States, 
both within and without this Government, and 

' Delivered by Mr. Welles in Spanish over the facili- 
ties of the international short-wave stations of the 
National Broadcasting Co., stations WNBI and WRCA, 
in New York, August 25, 1941. 
4109S:; — 41 



who has rejiresented his country in Washington 
with such ability for so many years. 

The arrival in this country of Dr. Blanco as 
the first Ambassador of the Republic of Uru- 
guay marks the raising in formal rank of the 
diplomatic representation in our two countries 
and signalizes once more the recognition by our 
two nations of the outstanding importance of 
the relations between them. 

SjDurred by repeated evidences of the deeply 
rooted spirit of independence possessed by the 
Uruguayan people, I believe it is imperative at 
this time for all of us to give a renewed empha- 
sis to the constant need for vigilance and precau- 
tion against attempts — bold or subtle — to under- 
mine our free institutions. The Uruguayan 
Govermnent, supported by the alertness of a 
citizenry quickly sensitive to any threat to their 
liberty, was among the first of the American 
governments to bring into the light of day the 
stealthy plotting of subversive elements directed 
by alien powers determined to extend their 
deadly tyramiy to the Western Hemisphere. 
The Uruguayan Government has been dili- 
gently aware of the need not only for constant 
vigilance within its own borders, but for the 
systematic cooperation of all of the American 
republics in the strengthening and integration 
of their moral and material defense. 

To assist in systematizing such cooperation, 
the distinguished Minister of Foreign Ati'airs of 
Uruguay, Dr. Alberto Guani, suggested to the 
governments of the other American republics 
only a few weeks ago that thej" decide jointly 

163 



164 

not to treat as a belligerent any nation of the 
Americas that might be forced into war with a 
non-American nation. As in 1917, when the 
Uruguayan Government took simihir coopera- 
tive action, the immediate and important effect 
of this practical measure would be to make the 
port facilities of all of the American republics 
available to the public vessels of all American 
nations engaged in the defense of the continent. 

These instances of Uruguayan initiative, 
among many others which I might cite, are typ- 
ical of the policy of the Republic of Uruguay 
in all that relates to practical inter-American 
collaboration and to the defense of the inde- 
pendence and integi-ity of the Americas. 

The other nations of the Americas are equally 
aware of the need for drastic action to uproot 
un-American influences. Whenever these 
threats to our freedom have been brought out 
into the open, the citizens of one Amei'ican 
country after another have shown the same firm- 
ness of will, the same decision, in maintaining 
the liberties for which our forefathers fought 
and died. 

There is another form of precaution, how- 
ever, which I feel it necessary to mention. That 
is the precaution now becoming essential for 
all of us to husband the supplies of materials 
which are so urgently required by the coun- 
tries valiantly resisting the dictatorships in 
their vain attempt at world conquest, and thus 
assisting in insuring the safety of the Western 
Hemisphere. 

Stupendous as is the productive capacity of 
the Americas, the demand today for certain 
categories of goods is far greater than can be 
met from existing output. Strict economy in 
the United States in the utilization of certain 
materials is, and may be increasingly, neces- 
sary. I wish, however, officially to state that, so 
far as concerns the type of goods of which the 
United States is the principal or sole supplier, 
they will be made available on an equal basis 
to the people of the other American republics 
as liberally as they are to the people of this 
country. 

Moreover, we in the United States expect to 
supply in increasing volume the defense mate- 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

rials urgently needed from us by the other 
American govermnents. 

We will be able to do this not only because 
of rapidly increasing facilities of production 
but also because we know we can count upon the 
full cooperation of the other American repub- 
lics themselves in taking accurate stock of their 
greatest individual needs so that those that are 
the most urgently required by each national 
economy may be met fii^st. 

I can think of no occasion more appropriate 
than this — the celebration of the national holi- 
day of the Republic of Uruguay — to reaffirm 
the determination of the Government of the 
United States to collaborate to the fullest ex- 
tent with its sister republics in the defense of 
the Western Hemisphere, in the preservation 
of our common liberties, and in making every 
possible practical contribution to the mainte- 
nance of the stability of our respective na- 
tional economies during this critical period of 
world upheaval. 

This anniversary of Uruguayan independ- 
ence is a reminder to us all that the cause of 
freedom can best be served by the same spirit 
of self-sacrifice, courage, and determination as 
that displayed more than a century ago by the 
intrepid Artigas and his group of devoted 
followers. 

To the Government and people of Uruguay 
I extend in the name of the Government of 
the United States our greetings and best 
wishes on this anniversary, which has become 
a day of outstanding significance in the his- 
tory of the New World. 

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED 

STATES 

[Released to the press August 26] 

The President of the United States has sent 
the following telegram to His Excellency, Gen. 
Alfredo Baldomir, President of the Oriental 
Republic of Uruguay: 

"The White House, August 25, 191^1. 

"This aimiversary of the independence of 
Uruguay gives me the welcome opportunity 



AUGUST 30, 194 1 



165 



to extend to Your Excellency my cordisil felici- 
tations and best wishes for the security and 
peace of the people of Uruguay. 

"As I look back over the past year, I am 
particularly impressed by the many coura- 
geous and practical demonstrations which Your 



Excellency and Your Government have given 
of devotion to those ideals of freedom and 
democracy which the people of the United 
States are proud to share with the people of 
Ui'uguay. 

Franklin D Rooseaklt" 



USE OF FOREIGN-FLAG MERCHANT VESSELS IN AMERICAN PORTS 



[Released to the press by the Pan American Union August 28] 

The Inter- American Financial and Economic 
Advisory Committee announced on August 28 
that in its plenary session of that date, it had 
formally adopted and jDlaced into effect, with 
the approval of the governments of all of the 
American republics, a plan for the effective use 
in the interests of inter-Anierican commerce of 
the foreign-flag merchant vessels lying inactive 
in the ports of the American Continent. The 
text of the plan is as follows : 

Plans for Placing Skips in American Ports into 
Service 

(1) The basic principle of the plan is that 
the vessels now lying in American ports shall 
be utilized in accordance with the resolution of 
April 26, 1941 ^ in such a manner as to promote 
the defense of the economies of the American 
republics as well as the peace and security of 
the continent. 

(2) To this end there should be an immediate 
transfer of such vessels to active service. Just 
and adequate compensation for such vessels 
shall be made. 

(3) In order to attain the maximum efficiency 
in the operation of available shipping, there 
must be the closest cooperation among the mari- 
time authorities of the ship-operating nations 
of the Western Hemisphere in planning the 
most effective use of all available vessels. This 
cooperation must extend to the allocation of 
particular vessels to the several trade routes; 
to efficient scheduling where more than one ship- 

' Bulletin of May 3, 1041, p. .531. 



ping line serves an individualport or nation; 
to the diversion of at least minimum shipping 
facilities to those nations not reasonably ade- 
quately served and in which there lie no or not 
sufficient inactive vessels to alleviate at least 
partially the situation; and to the exchange or 
inter-change among the ship-operating nations 
of vessels of various types in order that each 
may operate the type of vessels which it is in a 
position to handle and which are appropriate 
to the type of commerce to be borne. 

(4) It is recognized that several of the Amer- 
ican nations operate merchant marines and are 
in a position to handle efficiently the operation 
of some or all of the inactive vessels lying in their 
ports. Other American republics may not have 
the appropriate organization to operate ships 
or may not desire to undertake to do so. In such 
cases, the Government of the United States and 
United States shipping companies are prepared, 
in the closest cooperation and coordination with 
services provided by other ship-operating na- 
tions of the Western Hemisphere, to o^Derate 
for their account or in any other appropriate 
way those vessels other American republics do 
not operate themselves. The Government of 
the United States is also prepared to make ap- 
propriate arrangements to take over and oper- 
ate any such vessels in general services. 

(5) The Government of the United States 
has been informed that the British Government 
agrees to recognize the transfers of vessels re- 
sulting from this plan of operation and to waive 
its belligerent rights so long as the following 
conditions ai'e met : 



166 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



(a) The vessels transferi-ed are operated in 
accordance with this plan. 

(&) The vessels are operated under the flag of 
any American republic in inter-American trade, 
or by the Goverimient of the United States in 
general services in accordance with paragraph 

(4). 

(c) Such service of the vessels now inactive 
shall not result in the diversion of any other 
vessels owned or controlled by Governments or 
nationals of an American republic to services 
inimical to the interests of Great Britain. 

(d) Any funds or proceeds from such vessels 
shall not be made available to the governments 
or nationals of the countries whose flags they 
flew until the present war is terminated. 

(c) Crews of the vessels shall be nationals of 
the countries whose flag the vessels fly or shall be 
comprised of officers and personnel satisfactory 
to the Inter-American Financial and Economic 
Advisory Committee. 

(6) The Government of the United States is 
prepared to render through the Maritime Com- 
mission every possible technical assistance and 
cooperation to the Governments of the other 
American republics. 

The Committee is continuing to study details 
incident to the actual placing of the vessels into 
service and is esjiecially considering i)roposals 
of the British Government for the implementa- 
tion of paragraph 5 of the plan. 



The function of the mission will be to study, 
in collaboration with Chinese and other authori- 
ties, the military situation in China, the need of 
the Chinese Government for materiel and mate- 
rials; to formulate recommendations regard- 
ing types and quantities of items needed; to 
assist in procurement in this country and in 
delivery in China of such materiel and mate- 
rials; to instruct in the use and maintenance 
of articles thus provided : and to give advice and 
suggestions of appropriate character toward 
making lend-lease assistance to China as effec- 
tive as possible in the interest of the United 
States, of China, and of the world effort in 
resistance to movements of conquest by force. 

The sending of this mission is in keej^ing with 
and is on parallel lines to the sending of a simi- 
lar mission to the Soviet Union. The purposes 
of the two missions are identical. 

General Magruder has had long experience in 
China, where he twice served as military attache. 
He, therefore, will be working on familiar 
ground, among people he knows well and to 
whom he is well known. An adequate staff of 
thoroughly qualified officers will accompany 
General Mxigruder. 



Europe 



The Far East 



MILITARY MISSION TO CHINA 

(Released to the press by the White House August 26] 

This Government is preparing to send a mili- 
tary mission to China. The mission will be sent 
for the purpose of assisting in carrying out the 
purposes of the Lend-Lease Act. It is being 
organized and it will operate under the direc- 
tion of the Secretary of War. Its chief will be 
Brig. Gen. John Magi'uder. 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN 
BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 

A tabulation of contributions collected and 
tlisbursed during the period September 6, 1939 
through July 1941, as shown in the reports 
submitted by persons and organizations regis- 
tered with the Secretary of State for the solici- 
tation and collection of contributions to be 
used for relief in belligerent countries, in con- 
formity with the regulations issued pursuant 
to section 3 (a) of the act of May 1, 1937 as 
made effective by the President's proclama- 
tions of September 5, 8, and 10, 1939, and sec- 
tion 8 of the act of November 4, 1939 as made 



AUGUST 3 0, 1941 



167 



effective by the President's proclamation of 
the same date, has been released by the De- 
partment of State in mimeographed form and 
may be obtained from the Department upon 
request (press release of August 28, 1941, 
55 pp.). 

This tabulation has reference only to con- 
tributions solicited and collected for relief 



in belligerent countries (France; Germany; 
Poland; the United Kingdom, India, Aus- 
tralia, Canada, New Zealand, and the Union 
of South Africa; Norway; Belgium; Luxem- 
bourg; the Netherlands; Italy; Greece; Yugo- 
slavia; Hungary; and Bulgaria) or for the 
I'elief of refugees driven out of these coun- 
tries by the present war. 



General 



CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL DEFENSE 



[Released to the press August 27] 

The President, on August 27, 1941, signed a 
proclamation (no. 2506) making subject to ex- 
port control all military equipment or munitions 
or component jaarts thereof, or machinery, tools, 
or materials, or supplies necessary for the manu- 
facture, servicing, or operation thereof, which 
had not been made subject to such control under 
previous proclamations. 

Pursuant thereto, Lt. Col. William E. Chick- 
ering, Acting Administrator of Export Con- 
trol, issued Export Control Schedule No. 19,^ 
effective upon the signing of the proclamation, 
which prescribes the forms, conversions, and 
derivatives of the additional articles and mate- 
rials placed under control. This includes 
numerous animal products, vegetable jiroducts, 
textile fibers, and manufacturers. 

It was announced at the State Department 
that general licenses will be issued covering the 
exportation of these commodities from the 
United States and its territories and possessions 
but not from the Philippine Islands. This will 
not include exports to consignees whose names 
appear on the Proclaimed List of Certain 
Blocked Nationals. It was also stated that 
United States exporters need only place general- 
license symbols gwt on export declarations cov- 
ering shipments of any of these commodities. 



' 6 Federal Regixtrr 4470. 



The practical effect of the foregoing will be 
to limit the exportation from the Philippine 
Islands of the materials to which reference is 
made, but to permit them to flow freely from the 
United States. 

The text of the proclamation is printed in the 
Federal Register of August 29, 1941, page 4469. 

[Released to the press August 28] 

The Secretary of State announced on August 
28 the issuance of general license G-Al author- 
izing the exportation to Newfoundland of all 
the articles and materials for the exportation of 
which to Canada general licenses were in effect 
as of this date. 

The Secretary also announced the consolida- 
tion of all general licenses authorizing exporta- 
tions to Canada under one license, G-1. This 
license number should henceforth be used by 
exporters in lieu of the license numbers hereto- 
fore used to identify general licenses authoriz- 
ing exports to Canada. The consolidation re- 
ferred to herein does not change in any way the 
list of articles and materials for which gen- 
eral licenses were in effect on this date in respect 
to shipments to Canada. 

[Released to the press August 30] 

The Secretary of State announced on August 
30 the issuance of four additional general 
licenses authorizing shipments in transit 



168 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



through the United States between other coun- 
tries of the Western Hemisphere and the 
U.S.S.R., and between British Empire ports 
and the U.S.S.R. 

License GIT-B/R authorizes in-transit shipments 

through the United States from other countries of 

the Western Hemisphere to the U.S.S.R. 
License GIT-R/B authorizes in-transit shipments 

through the United States from the U.S.S.R. to other 

countries of the Western Hemisphere. 
License GIT-A/R authorizes in-transit shipments 

through the United States from countries of the 

British Empire to the U.S.S.R. 
License GIT-R/A authorizes in-transit shipments 

through the United States from the U.S.S.R. to 

countries of the British Empire. 

Collectors of customs were notified on August 
25 that the following affidavit, executed by the 
shipper or by an officer or duly authorized agent 
of the shipper, will be required on all export 
declarations covering shipments of "Other 
Motor Fuel and Gasoline" designated as Item 
G of Export Control Schedule No. 15 when 
shipped to destinations other than those in the 
British EmfDire, Western Hemisphere, Nether- 
lands Indies, Philippine Islands, Free China, 



Belgian Congo, the Free French Territories, 
and the U.S.S.R.: 

"This motor fuel does not conform to the defi- 
nitions of either High Octane Motor Fuel or 
Medium Octane Motor Fuel designated as Items 
E and F of Export Control Schedule No. 15. 



Tlie affidavit must be notarized. 



WARRANTS OF PRECEDENCE FOR VES- 
SELS CARRYING STRATEGIC AND 
CRITICAL MATERIALS 

On August 26, 1941, the President issued an 
Executive order (no. 8871) authorizing the 
U. S. Maritime Commission to issue warrants to 
American and foreign vessels which will give 
them precedence in docking, sailing, and load- 
ing privileges in order to expedite the movement 
of strategic and critical materials in and out of 
United States i:)orts. The text of this order 
appears in the Federal Reghter of August 29, 
1941, page 4469. 



Cultural Relations 



TRAVEL GRANTS TO STUDENTS 



[Released to the press August 2D] 

A number of students from tlit other Ameri- 
can republics have been awarded travel grants 
in addition to those previously listed in \\\% Bul- 
letin of August 16, 1941, page 136. This brings 
to 43 the total number of such grants awarded 
by the Government of the United States under 
the appropriation for the fiscal year 1942. 
These grants were made available to persons 
who otherwise would not have been able to take 
advantage of scholarships which had been 
awarded them in the United States, principally 
through the Institute of International Educa- 



tion of New York, N. Y. Payment of their 
necessary travel expenses from their homes to 
this country and return has been authorized 
under an appropriation voted by the Seventy- 
seventh Congress. 

The geographical allocation of these addi- 
tional awards to students for study in the 
United States is as follows: Argentina, 1; 
Brazil, 1 ; Chile, 1 ; Colombia, 1 ; and Uruguay, 
2. 

Brief biographies of the students awarded 
travel grants follow : 



AUGUST 3 0, 1941 



169 



Argentina 

Horace H. Pozzo is a second -year law stu- 
dent at the University of Buenos Aires. He is 
the recipient of a scholarship covering tuition 
and maintenance, plus a cash stipend of $300 to 
study English, American history, American lit- 
erature, and dramatics at Bard College, New 
York. 

Brazil 

Manoel Marques de Carvalho replaces Jorge 
Barata who was forced to decline his appoint- 
ment. Senhor Carvalho is head of the Section 
of Applied Psychology at the National Institute 
for the Study of Education, Ministry of Educa- 
tion, Eio de Janeiro. His scholarship includes 
tuition and room at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, where he will study psychology'. 

Wanda Galvao of Siio Paulo, who has been 
teaching English and Portuguese, has received a 
scholarship to study American literature and 
history at George Peabody College for Teachers, 
Nashville, Tenn. 

Chile 

Marmaduke Grove, a graduate in civil engi- 
neering from the University of Cliile, has been 
awarded a scholarship to study seismic struc- 
tures at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, 
Kans. His maintenance will be provided at the 
Delta Upsilon Fraternity and tuition by the 
Rotary Club District Assembly. He replaces 
Carlos Barry Silva who was unable to accept 
his appointment. 

Amanda Parada Hernandez is in her final 
year at the School of Nursing of the Uni- 
versity of Chile. She has a scholarship to 
study at the College of St. Teresa, School of 
Nursing, which is connected with the Mayo 
Clinic, Rochester, Minn. 

Golomhia 

Milciades Martinez Gustin, a graduate of 
the faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Univer- 
sity of Bogota, is the recipient of a tuition 
scholarship at Iowa State College of Agi-i- 
culture and Mechanic Arts, Ames, Iowa, 
where he will study genetics and obstetrics. 
The Institute of International Education has 
provided a stipend for his maintenance. 



Uruguay 

Yvonne Desscnt, a gi-aduate of the Lycce 
Fran^-ais in Montevideo, has received a schol- 
arship covering tuition and maintenance at 
Mary Baldwin College, Staunton, Va. 

Adolfo Halty Dube graduated from the 
School of Architecture of the University of 
Montevideo and is at present a decorator and 
architect in Montevideo. His scholarship in- 
cludes tuition at the University of Illinois, 
Urbana, 111., where he will study painting and 
aesthetics. 

Joao Tavares Nieva de Figueiredo, who was 
scheduled to study at the Colorado School of 
Mines, will now follow a jjost-graduate course 
in prospecting and exploring metallic-ore de- 
posits at the University of Minnesota, Min- 
neapolis, Minn. 

Two students from the United States have 
been awarded travel grants to studj' in the 
other American republics: 

Hubert E. Mate, of Birmingham, Ala., has 
been awarded a grant to study Brazilian lit- 
erature in Siio Paulo, Brazil. 

Ulrich H. Williams, of Brooklyn, N. Y., is 
the recipient of a grant to study botany, ge- 
netics, and agronomy at Rio de Janeiro, with 
special emphasis on the economic plants of 
Brazil. 



MEDICAL SPECIALIST FROM THE 
UNITED STATES TO LECTURE IN 
OTHER AMERICAN REPUBLICS 

[ Released to the press August 30 ] 

Dr. Esmond R. Long, Director of the Henry 
Phipps Institute for Study, Treatment, and 
Prevention of Tuberculosis and one of the best- 
known tuberculosis specialists in this country, 
was invited by the Government of Colombia to 
go to Bogota to advise on the use of a large 
sum of money given to the Colombian Govern- 
ment by a philanthropist for the building of a 
tuberculosis hospital in Bogota. 

In order to take advantage of Dr. Long's 
presence in South America, the Governments of 
Panama, Costa Rica, and Venezuela extended 



170 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



invitations to him to visit their respective coun- 
tries and lecture on tuberculosis, which he is now 
doing. Dr. Long's visit to these countries has 
been made possible through a travel gi-ant 
awarded to him by the Dejjartment of State. 

Dr. Long was born in Chicago, 111. He was 
graduated from the University of Chicago and 
received from that institution the degrees of 
A.B. and Ph.D.. obtaining his M.D. from Rush 
Medical College (University of Chicago). 
Later he did post-graduate work at the German 
University of Prague. He is special consultant 
in tuberculosis, United States Office of Indian 
Affairs, pi-esident of the Wistar Institute of 
Anatomy and Biology, member of the American 
Medical Association, member of the American 
Association of Pathologists and Bacteriologists 
and of various other health and medical 
associations. 

The Department of State has awarded the 
travel grant to Dr. Long in the belief that the 
series of lectures he is delivering and the con- 
tacts he is making in Panama, Costa Rica, and 
Venezuela will contribute in an effective manner 
to the strengthening of relations between the 
members of the medical profession in the United 
States and these three countries. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press August 30] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since August 2S. 
1941 : 

Career Officehs 

Henry H. Balch. of Madison, Ala., who has 
been serving as Consul General at Genoa, Italy, 
is retiring from the Foreign Service effective 
February 1, 1942. 

Harold D. Finley, of Saratoga Springs. 
N. Y., now serving in the Department of State, 
has been designated First Seci-etary of Embassj' 
at Mexico, D.F., Mexico. 



Karl L. Rankin, of South Bridgton, Maine, 
who has been serving as Commercial Attache 
and Consul at Belgrade, Yugoslavia, has been 
designated Commei-cial Attache at Cairo, 

Egypt- 
George F. Bogai'dus, of Des Moines, Iowa, has 
been appointed Foreign Service Officer, Un- 
classified, Secretary in the Diplomatic Service, 
and Vice Consul, and has been assigned as Vice 
Consul at Montreal, Canada. 

Herbert F. N. Schmitt, of Grand Rapids, 
Mich., has been appointed Foreign Service Offi- 
cer, Unclassified, Secretary in the Diplomatic 
Service, and Vice Consul, and has been assigned 
as Vice Consul at Quebec, Canada. 

Non-career Officers 

Robert C. Bates, of Great Falls, Mont., has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Georgetown, 
British Guiana. 

William L. Brewster, of Brownsville, Tex., 
has been appointed Vice Consul at Torreon, 
Mexico. 



The Department 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

By Departmental Order 963, Mr. Guillermo 
A. Suro was appointed Chief of the Central 
Translating Office, effective as of August 20, 
1941. 



Regulations 



Export Control Schedule No. 19 [prescribing, effective 
August 27, 1941, tbe forms, conversions, and deriva- 
tives of additional articles and materials placed under 
control by Proclamation 'J'lOo, including animal prod- 
ucts, vegetable products, textile products, and manu- 
factures]. August 27, IWl. (Administrator of Ex- 
port Control.) 6 Federal Register 4470. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



INTERNATIONAL LAW 

CONVENTIO'N ON RIGHTS AND DUTIES OF STATES 

Haiti 

By a letter dated August 20, 1941 the Director 
General of the Pan American Union informed 
the Secretary of State that the instrument of 
ratification by Haiti of the Convention on 
Rights and Duties of States signed at Monte- 
video December 26, 1933 (Treaty Series 881), 
was deposited with the Union on August 13, 
1941. The instrument of ratification is dated 
July 24, 1941. 



The countries which have now deposited their 
respective instruments of ratification or adher- 
ence to this convention are the United States of 
America, Brazil, Chile, Colombia. Costa Rica, 
Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salva- 
dor, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Nica- 
ragua, Panama, and Venezuela. 

SOVEREIGNTY 

CONVENTION ON THE PROVISIONAL ADMINISTRATION 
OF EUROPEAN COLONIES AND POSSESSIONS IN THE 
AMERICAS 

Haiti 

By a letter dated August 20. 1941 tlie Director 
General of the Pan American L^nion informed 
the Secretary of State that the instrument of 
ratification b}- Haiti of the Convention on 
the Provisional Administration of European 
Colonies and Possessions in the Americas, signed 
at the Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Aiiairs of the American Republics at 
Habana July 30, 1940 (Treaty Series 199), was 
deposited with the Union on August 13, 1941. 
The instrument of ratification is dated July 24, 
1941. 



Guatemala 

By a letter dated August 21, 1941 the Direc- 
tw' General of the Pan American Union in- 
formed the Secretary of State that the instru- 
ment of ratification by Guatemala of the Con- 
vention on the Provisional Administration of 
European Colonies and Possessions in the 
Americas, signed at the Second Meeting of the 
Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the American 
Republics at Habana July 30, 1940, was de- 
posited with the Union on August 14. 1941. 
The instrument of ratification is dated July 28, 
1941. 



Instruments of ratification of the Convention 
on the Provisional Administration of European 
Colonies and Possessions in the Americas have 
now been deposited with the Pan American 
Union by the United States of America, Brazil, 
Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, 
Haiti, Panama, and Peru. 

OPIUM 

CONVENTION FOR LIMITING THE MANUFACTURE AND 
REGULATING THE DISTRIBUTION OF NARCOTIC 
DRUGS 

Para.gxKiy 

By a circular letter dated July 7, 1941, the 
Under Secretary General of the League of Na- 
tions informed the Secretary of State that the 
instrument of ratification by Paraguay of the 
Convention for Limiting the Manufacture and 
Regulating the Distribution of Narcotic Drugs, 
signed at Geneva July 13, 1931 (Treaty Series 
863), was deposited on June 25, 1941, with the 
Secretariat. 

171 



172 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



INTERNATIONAL OPIUM CONVENTION 

Paraguay 

By a circular letter dated July 7, 1941, the 
Under Secretary General of the League of Na- 
tions informed the Secretary of State that the 
instrument of ratification by Paraguay of the 
International Opium Convention, signed at 
Geneva February 19, 1925, was deposited on 
June 25, 1941, with the Secretariat. 

INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY 

Poland 

There is printed below a translation of a note 
from the Swiss Minister at Washington to the 
Secretary of State and a translation of the en- 
closure therewith from the German Legation at 
Bern to the Swiss Government concerning the 
protection of literary and industrial property in 
Poland : 

'•August 9, 1941. 
"Mr. Secretary of State : 

''By order of my Government I have the honor 
to advise you that the German Legation at Bern 
has, under date of June 6, informed the Swiss 
Government, in the terms of the note a copy of 
which is attached herewith, of the regime which 
is applied in the matter of industrial property 
in the General Government of Poland, in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of the Paris Con- 
vention of Union for the Protection of Indus- 
trial Property and of the Madrid Arrangement 
relative to the Suppression of False Indications 
of Origin on Goods, previously signed by the 
Polish Government. 

"Please accept [etc.] Charles Bruggmann'' 

[Enclosure — Translation] 

"A 2482 German Legation 

"The German Legation has the honor, in 
accordance with instructions received, to ad- 
vise the Swiss Government of the following: 
"The former Polish Kepublic adhered to the 
Multilateral Treaties listed below in the mat- 
ter of Protection of Industrial Property and 
Protection of Literary and Artistic Copyright. 



"(1) The Paris Convention of Union of 
March 20, 1883, for the Protection of Indus- 
trial Property, revised at Brussels November 
14, 1900, at Washington June 2, 1911 and at 
The Hague November 6, 1925. 

"(2) The Madrid Arrangement of April 14, 
1891, for the Suppression of False Indications 
of Origin on Goods, Revised June 2, 1911, and 
at The Hague November 6, 1925. 

"(3) The Bern Convention for the Protec- 
tion of Literary and Artistic Copyright of 
September 9, 1886, revised at Berlin November 
13, 1908 and at Rome June 2, 1928. 

"With regard to the legal status created by the 
establishment of the General Government, the 
German Legation is instructed to make the fol- 
lowing communication to the Government of 
the Swiss Confederation as the Depositary of 
the treaties in question: 

" "The carrying out of the international obli- 
gations [flowing] from the above-named agree- 
ment — in so far as no special war measures have 
been or shall in the future be taken with respect 
to the rights of enemy aliens — is guaranteed 
hereafter as in the past in the General Govern- 
ment; for persons residing in the General 
Government, therefore, the rights they have 
from the above treaties will be claimed hence- 
forth, on a basis of reciprocity.' 

"The German Legation has the honor to re- 
quest of the Swiss Government, in accordance 
with instructions, an acknowledgment of the 
above communication. 

''The German Legation is happy to avail 
[etc.] 

"Bern, June 6, IBIp^y 

LABOR 

CONVENTION CONCERNING SAFETY PROVISIONS IN 
THE BUILDING INDUSTRY 

Mexico 

By a circular letter dated July 28, 1941 the 
Acting Legal Adviser of the Secretariat of the 
League of Nations informed the Secretary of 
State that the instrument of ratification by Mex- 



AUGUST 3 0, 194 1 



173 



ico of the Convention Concerning Safety Pro- 
visions in the Building Industry, adopted by tlie 
International Labor Conference at its twenty- 
thii-d session (Geneva, June 3-23, 1937), was 
registered Mith the Secretariat on July 4, 1941. 
The letter also states that the convention will 
come into force, in accordance with article 20 
thereof, 12 months after the date of the regis- 
tration by the Secretariat of the Mexican rati- 
fication, one previous ratification of this conven- 
tion having already been received, namely, that 
of Switzerland, on May 23, 1940. 

CONVENTION CONCERNING WORKMEN'S COMPENSA- 
TION FOR OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES (REVISED 
1934) 

Iraq 

By a circular letter dated August 5, 1941 the 
Secretary General of the League of Nations in- 
formed the Secretary of State that the instru- 
ment of ratification of Iraq of the Convention 
Concerning Workmen's Compensation for Oc- 
cupational Diseases (Revised 1934), adopted by 
the International Labor Conference at its eight- 
eenth session (Geneva, June 4-23, 1934), was 
registered with the Secretariat on July 25, 1941. 

MILITARY AND NAVAL MISSIONS 

DETAIL OF UNITED STATES ARMY OFFICER AS 
DIRECTOR OF THE MILITARY ACADEMY OF THE 
NATIONAL GUARD OF NICARAGUA 

[Released to the press August 25] 

In response to the request of the Government 
of Nicaragua, there has been signed by the Sec- 
retary of State and the Minister of Nicaragua at 
Washington, Senor Dr. Don Leon DeBayle, an 
agreement providing for a continuation of the 
detail of an officer of the United States Army to 
serve as Director of the Military Academy of 
the National Guard of Nicaragua. The agree- 
ment was signed on August 25, 1941. 

The agreement is in effect a continuation of a 
similar agreement between the United States 
and Nicaragua signed May 22, 1939 (Executive 
Agreement Series 156). Like the agreement of 
May 22, 1939, the new agreement contains provi- 
sions similar in general to provisions contained 
in agreements betM-een the United States and 



certain other American republics providing for 
the detail of officers of the United States Army 
or Na^^ to advise the armed forces of those 
countries. The agreement will shortly be 
printed as Executive Agreement Series 217. 

NAVAL MISSION TO COLOMBIA 
[Released to the press August 30] 

An agreement was signed on August 30, 1941 
by Cordell Hull, Secretary of State, and Senor 
Dr. Gabriel Turbay, Ambassador of Colombia 
at Washington, making certain modifications 
in the Naval Mission Agreement between the 
United States and Colombia which was signed 
on November 23, 1938 (Executive Agreement 
Series 140), effective for a period of four years 
from that date. 

The supplementary agreement is made effec- 
tive from the date of signature for the remain- 
der of the period during which the agreement 
of 1938 continues in effect, and modifies in cer- 
tain respects the provisions of the agreement 
of 1938 relating to the method of making com- 
pensation to the members of the mission for 
their services in Colombia. 

FISHERIES 

PACIFIC HALIBUT FISHERY CONVENTION WITH 
CANADA 

By a letter dated August 21, 1941 Mr. Ed- 
ward W. Allen, Secretary of the International 
Fisheries Commission, informed the Secretary 
of State that, pursuant to the Pacific Halibut 
Fishery Convention between the United States 
of America and Canada signed January 29, 1937 
(Treaty Series 917) and the regulations adopted 
thereunder, the Commission deems the limit of 
catch in area 3 as defined in the regulations will 
be attained at midnight September 14 and that 
accordingly areas 3 and 4 will at that time be 
closed to all halibut fishing for the duration of 
the closed season established by the regulations. 
The letter also states that the Commission has 
annoimced that permits for the retention and 
landing of halibut taken incidental to fishing 
for other species in any area will become invalid 
at midnight October 4, 1941. 



CONVENTION ON NATURE PROTECTION AND WILDLIFE 
PRESERVATION IN THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE 



174 DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

FLORA AND FAUNA on Nature Protection and Wildlife Preservation 

in the Western Hemisphere, which was opened 
for signature at the Pan American Union on 
October 12, 1940, was deposited with the Union 
Guatemdo, 0,^ August 14, 1941. The instrument of ratifi- 

The Director General of the Pan American cation is dated July 28, 1941. 
Union informed the Secretary of State by a let- The United States deposited its instrument 

ter dated August 21, 1941 that the instrument of ratification of this convention on April 28, 
of ratification by Guatemala of the Convention 1941. 



For sale by the Superintendent or Documents, Washington. D. C. — Price. 10 cents - - - - Subscription price. ?2.7o a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE BOEEAD OF THE BUDGET 



^^^^.1 Alo 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 



SEPTEMBER 6, 1941 
Vol. V, No. 115— Publication 1638 



G 



ontents 




General 

Labor Day address by the President 

Control of exports in national defense 

Acquisition of idle foreign merchant vessels 

Europe 

American mission to the Soviet Union 

Lend-lease assistance to the Government of Poland . . 

American Republics 

Remarksof President of Mexico on foreign policy . . . 

Presentation of letters of credence by the Ambassador of 

Uruguay 

International Conferences, Commissions, Etc. 

Fourth Pan American Highway Congress 

Second Inter- American Travel Congress 

Cultural Relations 

Exchange of professors, teachers, and graduate stu- 
dents 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes 

Regulations 

[OVEU] 



Page 

177 
179 
180 

180 
181 

181 
181 

183 
184 



184 



186 

187 







U. S, SUPFRINTFNDENT OF DOCUMENTS 
1341 

on tent s—coNTmvED 



The Depaktment 

Appointment of Special Assistant to tlic Under Secre- 
tary of State 188 

Treaty iNFOKiViATioN 

Military niission: Agreement w itli Bolivia 188 

Postal: Universal Postal Convention, 1939 188 

Industrial property: Convention for the Protection of 

Industrial Property 188 

Sovereignty: Convention on the Provisional Adminis- 
tration of Ein-opean Colonies and Possessions in the 
Americas 188 

Publications 189 

Legislation 189 



General 



LABOR DAY ADDRESS BY THE PRESIDENT ' 



[Released to the press by the White House September 1] 

On this day — this American holiday — we 
celebrate the rights of free laboring men and 
women. 

The preservation of these rights is now vitally 
important not only to us who enjoy them but to 
the whole future of Christian civilization. 

American labor now bears a tremendous re- 
sponsibility in the winning of this most brutal, 
most terrible of all wars. 

In our factories and shops and arsenals we are 
building weapons on a scale great in its magni- 
tude. To all the battle fronts of the world these 
weapons are being dispatched, by day and by 
night, over the seas and through the air. And 
this Nation is now devising and developing new 
weapons of unprecedented power toward the 
maintenance of democracy. 

Why ai'e we doing this? Why are we deter- 
mined to devote our entire industrial effort to 
the prosecution of a war which has not yet ac- 
tually touched our own shores? 

We are not a warlike people, "^e have never 
sought glory as a nation of wan-iors. We are 
not interested in aggression. We are not inter- 
ested — as the dictators are — in looting. We do 
not covet one squai-e inch of the ten-itory of any 
other nation. 

Our vast effort and the unity of purpose 
which inspires that effort are clue solely to our 
recognition of the fact that our fundamental 
rights — including the rights of labor — are 
threatened by Hitler's violent attempt to rule 
the world. 



' Broadcast from the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, 
Hyde Park, N. Y., September 1, 1&41. 



These rights were established by our fore- 
fathers on the field of battle. They have been 
defended — at great cost but with great success — 
on the field of battle, here on our own soil and in 
foreign lands and on all the seas all over the 
world. 

There has never been a moment in our history 
when Americans were not ready to stand up as 
free men and fight for their rights. 

In times of national emergency one fact is 
brought home to us clearly and decisively — the 
fact that all of our rights are interdependent. 

The right of freedom of worship would mean 
nothing without freedom of speech. And the 
rights of free labor as we know them today could 
not survive without the rights of free enterprise. 

That is the indestructible bond that is between 
us — all of us Americans: Interdependence of 
interests, privileges, opportunities, responsibili- 
ties — interdependence of rights. 

That is what unites us — men and women of all 
sections, of all races, of all faiths, of all occupa- 
tions, of all political beliefs. That is why we 
have been able to defy and frustrate the enemies 
who believed they could divide us and conquer 
us from within. 

These enemies all know that we possess a 
strong Navy, gaining in strength. They know 
that that Navy, as long as the Navies of the 
British Empire and the Netherlands and Nor- 
way and Russia exist, can together guarantee 
the freedom of the seas. These enemies know 
that if these other Navies are destroyed, the 
American Navy cannot now, or in the future, 
maintain the freedom of the seas against all the 
rest of the world. 



177 



178 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



These enemies know that our Army is increas- 
ing daily in its all-round strength. 

These enemies know that today the chief 
American fighters in the battles now raging are 
those engaged in American industry, employers 
and employees alike. 

These enemies know that the course of Amer- 
ican production in the past year has shown 
enormous gains and that the product of these 
industries is moving to the battle fronts against 
Hitlerism in increasing volume each day. 

But these enemies also know that our Ameri- 
can effort is not yet enough, and that unless we 
.step up the total of our production and more 
greatly safegiuird it on its journeys to the bat- 
tlefields, these enemies will take heart in push- 
ing their attack in old fields and new. 

I give solenm warning to those who think 
that Hitler has been blocked and halted thai 
they are making a very dangerous assumption. 
When in any war your enemy seems to be mak- 
ing slower progress than he did the year be- 
fore, that is the very moment to strike with 
redoubled force — to throw more energy into the 
job of defeating him — to end for all time the 
menace of world conquest and thereby end all 
talk or thought of any peace founded on a com- 
promise with evil itself. 

And we know that a free labor system is the 
very foundation of a functioning democracy. 
We know that one of the first acts of the Axis 
dictatorships has been to wipe out all the prin- 
ciples and standards which labor has been able 
to establish for its own preservation and 
advancement. 

Trade unionism is a forbidden philosophy 
under these rule-or-niin dictators. For trade 
unionism demands full freedom of expression 
and peaceful assembly. Trade unionism has 
helped to give to every one who toils the posi- 
tion of dignity which is his due. 

The present position of labor in the United 
States as an interdependent unit in the life of 
the Nation has not come about by chance. It 
has been an evolutionary process of a healthy 
democracy at work. 

Hitler has not worked that way. He will not, 
he cannot work that way. Just as he denies all 



rights to individuals, he must deny all rights to 
groups — of labor, of business, of learning, of the 
church. He has abolislied trade unions as ruth- 
lessly as he has persecuted religion. 

No gi-oup of Americans has realized more 
clearly what Nazi domination of the world 
means than has organized labor — what it means 
to their standard of living, their freedom, their 
lives. No group has a greater stake in the defeat 
of Nazism, in the preservation of the funda- 
mental freedoms, in the continuance of democ- 
racy throughout the world. 

We have already achieved much ; it is impera- 
tive that we achieve infinitely more. 

The singlemindedness and sacrifice with 
which we jointly dedicate ourselves to the pro- 
duction of the weapons of freedom will deter- 
mine in no small part the length of the ordeal 
through which humanity must pass. 

We camiot hesitate, we cannot equivocate in 
the great task before us. The defense of Amer- 
ica's freedom must take precedence over every 
private aim and over every private interest. 

We are engaged on a grim and perilous task. 
Forces of insane violence have been let loose by 
Hitler upon this earth. We must do our full 
part in conquering them. For these forces may 
be unleashed on this Nation as we go about our 
business of protecting the proper interests of 
our country. 

The task of defeating Hitler may be long and 
arduous. There are a few appeasers and Nazi 
sympathizers who say it cannot be done. They 
even ask me to negotiate with Hitler — to pray 
for crumbs from his victorious table. They do, 
in fact, ask me to become the modern Benedict 
Arnold and betray all I hold dear — my devotion 
to our freedom, to our churches, to our country. 
This course I have rejected — I reject it again. 

Instead, I know that I speak the conscience 
and determination of the American people when 
I say that we shall do everything in our power 
to crush Hitler and his Nazi forces. 

American workers and American farmers, 
American businessmen and American church- 
men — all of us together — have the great re- 
sponsibility and the great privilege of laboring 



SEPTEMBER 6, 1941 

to build a democratic world on enduring foun- 
dations. 

May it be said on some future Labor Day by 
some future President of the United States that 
we did our work faithfully and well. 

CONTROL OF EXPORTS IN NATIONAL 
DEFENSE 

Executive Order 

amending regul.vti0n8 governing the exporta- 
tion of articles and materials designated in 
proclamations issued pursuant to the pro- 
visions of section 6 of the act of congress 
approved july 2, 1940 

By virtue of and pursuant to the authority 
vested in me by section 6 of the act of Congress 
approved July 2, 1940, entitled "An Act To ex- 
pedite the strengthening of the national de- 
fense", 54 Stat. 712, 714, as amended, I hereby 
prescribe that sections 7 and 8 of Executive 
Order 8712,^ dated March 15, 1941, shall be 
amended to read as follows : 

7. Export licenses shall not be transferred 
except by written authorization of the Secretary 
of State. All export licenses are subject to rev- 
ocation without notice. If not revoked, licenses 
are valid for one year from the date of issuance. 

8. No article or material, the exportation of 
which is prohibited or curtailed pursuant to the 
said section 6, shall be loaded or carried onto an 
exporting carrier for export by water or by air 
or presented to such an exporting carrier for 
loading or presented to the collector of customs 
for inspection and clearance for exportation 
until an original license therefor, or such other 
document as the Secretary of State shall pre- 
scribe, has been presented to the collector of 
customs at the port at which the article or mate- 
rial is to be so loaded, carried, or presented. No 
such article or material shall be mailed for ex- 
portation until an original license, or such other 
dociunent as the Secretary of State shall pre- 



179 

scribe, has been presented to the postmaster at 
the post office where the article or material is to 
be mailed. If the article or material is to be 
exported by any means of export other than by 
water, air, or mail, such license or other docu- 
ment need not be presented to the collector of 
customs prior to loading, carrying onto, or pres- 
entation to, the exporting carrier, but must be 
presented to the collector of customs at the port 
of exit prior to inspection by the customs in- 
spectors or other export inspection officials at 
that port, and at all events prior to exportation. 
Upon specific authorization to collector of cus- 
toms or postmaster by the Secretary of State, 
the presentation of a license may be waived. 
Frankun D Roosevelt 
The. White House, 
September 2, 19^1. 



[No. 8889] 

[Released to the press September 5] 

The Secretary of State on September 5 invited 
attention to the fact that general license GWW,^ 
which authorizes the exportation of the articles 
and materials set forth in Export Control 
Schedule 17,' is not valid for forms, conversions, 
and derivatives set forth in schedules other than 
Schedule 17. 

The Department has been informed that many 
exporters have misunderstood the scope of gen- 
eral license GWW and are acting in the belief 
that all forms, conversions, and derivatives of 
the materials referi'ed to in Export Control 
Schedule 17 are included imder GWW, instead of 
those precisely specified in that schedule. 

Collectors of customs were informed on Au- 
gust 29, 1941 that additional unlimited licenses 
have been issued to the British Purchasing Com- 
mission for the exportation of petroleum coke, 
naphtha, mineral spirits, solvents, and other 
light products to the following parts of the 



' Bulletin of March 15, 1941, p. 284. 



' Bulletin of August 23, 1941, p. 1.50. 
' 6 Federal Register 4136. 



180 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



British Empire : Aden, Anglo-Egyptian Sudan, 
Australia, Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda, Brit- 
ish East Africa, British Guiana, British Hon- 
duras, British Malaya, British West Africa, 
Burma, Ceylon, Cyprus, Egypt, Falkland Is- 
lands, Gibraltar, Hong Kong, India. Ireland 
(Eire), Jamaica, Leeward Islands. Mauritius. 
Newfoundland, New Guinea (British), New 
Zealand. Northern Rhodesia, Oceania (British), 
Palestine and Trans-Jordan, St. Helena, Sey- 
chelles and Dependencies, Southern Rhodesia, 
Trinidad and Tobago, Union of South Africa, 
and the Windward Islands. 



ACQUISITION OF IDLE FOREIGN 
MERCHANT VESSELS 

The President, on September 2, 1941, signed 
an Executive order (no. 8881)^ amending Exec- 
utive Order 8771, of June 6, 1941,= so that the 
provisions thereof shall be applicable to "any or 
all foreign merchant vessels, including all ap- 
purtenances thereto as described in said order, 
Ij'ing idle in waters within the jurisdiction of 
the United States, including the Philippine Is- 
lands and the Canal Zone, at any time after June 
6, 1941 and up to and including June 30, 1942." 



Europe 



AMERICAN MISSION TO THE SOVIET UNION 



(Released to the press by the White House September 3) 

Announcement was made on September 3 of 
appointment by the President of the members 
of the mission to the Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics as follows: 

W. Averell Harriman, now serving as the PreskleutV 
Special Representative in London on Material Aid 
to the British Empire, chairnmn 

Maj. Gen. James H. Burns, Executive Officer, Division 
of Defense Aid Reports associated with Harry L. 
Hopliins. General Burns has served with distinc- 
tion in the Ordnance Deijartment of the Army 

Maj. Gen. George H. Brett, Chief of Air Corps, at present 
on a special mission to Great Britain and the 
Middle East in connection with deliveries of Amer- 
ican aircraft 

Admiral William Harrison Standley, U.S. Navy, former 
Chief of Naval Operations, 1933-37. Admiral 
Standley was a member of the Delegation of the 
United States to the General Disarmament Con- 
ference held in London, 1934; also a delegate on 
the part of the United States to the London Naval 
Conference of 1935 



William L. Batt, Deputy Director, Production Division, 
Office of Production Management ; Chairman, Busi- 
ness Advisory Council for the Department of Com- 
merce. Mr. Batt is President of S. K. F. Industries, 
Inc., and Chairman of the Board, American Man- 
agement Association 

The mission will join with a similai'ly consti- 
tuted British mission under the chairmanship of 
Lord Beaverbrook for a conference in Moscow 
with the Government of the Soviet Union re- 
garding the supplying to the Soviet Union by 
the United States and Great Britain of muni- 
tions, raw materials, and other supplies needed 
by the Soviet Union for her defense against 
German aggression. 

The holding of this conference was agreed to 
between the President and the Prime Minister 
at their recent meeting at sea. 



' 6 Federal Register 4551. 
'Bulh'iin of June 7, 1^1, p. 701. 



SEPTEMBER 6, 1941 

LEND-LEASE ASSISTANCE TO THE GOVERNMENT OF POLAND 



181 



(Released to the press by the White House September 4] 

The President announced on September 4 
tliat he had authorized the transfer of various 
defense articles to the Government of Poland 
under the Lend-Lease Act and declared tJiat 
the gallant resistance of the forces of the Gov- 
ernment of Poland is "vital to the defense of the 
United States". 

This action, the President said, demonstrates 
our intention to give material support to "the 
fighting determination of the Polish people to 



establish once again the independence of which 
thej' were so inhumanly deprived". 

Polish troops are now training m Canada for 
action overseas. Under the President's order, 
machine guns, submachine guns, rifles, artillery 
equipment, trucks, and other supplies will be 
sent to these troops in the near future. 

The President stressed the importance of this 
new aid to the Government of Poland as a con- 
tinuing expression of "the policy of the United 
States to extend aid to all who resist aggres- 
sion". 



American Republics 



REMARKS OF PRESIDENT OF MEXICO ON FOREIGN POLICY 



[Released to the piess September 2) 

At the Secretary of State's press conference 
on September 2 a correspondent inquired 
whether the Secretary had read the remarks of 
the President of Mexico concerning the inter- 
national situation generally, and relations with 
the United States pai'ticularly, at the openfng 
of the Mexican Congress on September 1. 

The Secretary replied that he had noted with 
interest and appreciation the remarks of the 
President of Mexico which had feo forcefully 
showed Mexico's determination to support those 
forces resisting threats of aggi-ession agahist 



this hemisphere, and to maintain an independ- 
ent i^osition in the face of totalitarian threats. 
It is also gratifying to note Mexico's coopera- 
tion with the policies announced by this Gov- 
ernment. 

With respect to the President's comment on 
pending negotiations with this Government, the 
Department is gratified to note the hopefulness 
of tlie President of Mexico with respect to the 
settlement of all problems and claims between 
the two Governments. This Government, of 
course, hopes very much for such an early out- 
come. 



PRESENTATION OF LETTERS OF CREDENCE BY THE 
AMBASSADOR OF URUGUAY 



[Released to the press September 3] 

A translation of the remarks of the newly ap- 
pointed Ambassador of Uruguay, Senor Dr. Don 
Juan Carlos Blanco, upon the occasion of the 
presentation of his letters of credence, follows : 



"Mr. President: 

"I have the honor to present to Your Excel- 
lency the letter of recall of my distinguished 
predecessor, as well as the credentials which 
accredit me as Ambassador Extraordinary and 



182 

Plenipotentiary of Uruguay near the Govern- 
ment of the United States. 

"The United States is a great and powerful 
nation, animated by an idealistic and cordial 
spirit, and Uruguay is a highly progressive na- 
tion experiencing a commercial development of 
the greatest importance. 

"The fact that both peoples are essentially 
democratic and love individual liberty, purity 
of electoral suffrage, and administrative hon- 
esty has created the mutual sympathy which 
binds our two nationalities together and has led 
them to a cordial collaboration. 

"I consider it a privilege to have been desig- 
nated by the President of Uruguay, General 
Architect Alfredo Baldomir, to be the first Am- 
bassador in the United States. I am well aware 
of the honor it is to cultivate relations with the 
gi-eat President who is a symbol of personal vir- 
tues and whose actions now represent the con- 
science of men of many countries of the world. 
"I wish to tell you, Mr. President, that the 
Republic of Uruguay, which has lived for long 
years in pence and prosperity, wishes to bind 
even closer its political and commercial ties with 
tlie United States, as well as to contribute with 
faith and decision to the collective defense of our 
continents. 

"The policj' of the good neighbor personified 
in the person and in the generous directives of 
Your Excellency have had a happy and deep 
repercussion in my country and I wish to tell you 
also that the Government and people of Uru- 
guay are disposed to support that policy, which 
is undoubtedly destined to assure a very happy 
life for the peoples of these continents, thus real- 
izing the destinies pointed out by Washington 
and, in Uruguay, by Artigas." 

President Roosevelt's reply to the remarks of 
Seiior Dr. Don Juan Carlos Blanco follows : 

"Mr. Ambassador: 

"It gives me profound pleasure to receive tlie 
letters by which His Excellency the President 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

of Uruguay has accredited you as the first Am- 
bassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary 
near the Government of the United States of 
America. I accept also the letters concluding 
the mission of your distinguished predecessor, 
Mr. Richling, whose relations with officials of 
this Government have been upon an exception- 
ally friendly basis. 

"It is, to my mind, particularly appropriate 
that the relations between Uruguay and the 
United States should be marked at this time 
by the excliange of Ambassadors. This rais- 
ing in the formal rank of the representation ex- 
changed by our two Governments is a re-affirma- 
tion of the deep spirit of friendship and co- 
operation wliich has long existed between our 
peoples and Governments, and is a recognition 
of the still greater significance which has been 
given to those close relations by the mutual ef- 
forts of our two Governments for the defense 
of the American Continent and its peaceful 
economic development. 

"I am deeply appreciative of Your Excel- 
lency's generous statement concerning the par- 
ticipation of the United States and the officers 
of this Government in efforts toward better in- 
ternational relations. 

"Tliere are indeed great similarities between 
the ideals and aspirations of the peoples of 
Uruguay and the United States, both of whom 
cherish deeply in their hearts the spirit of 
democracy; both are determined to defend that 
essential right of free men to govern the national 
life tlirough freely chosen representatives. 

"You may be sure, Mr. Ambassador, that it 
will always be a pleasure for me and for my 
collaborators to discuss with you the many mat- 
ters that are of mutual interest to our peoples 
and Governments, and every endeavor will be 
made to cooperate with you in facilitating rela- 
tions between our two countries. 

"I wish to take advantage of this opportunity 
to request you to inform your distinguished 
President, General Alfredo Baldomir, that I 
send him my warmest personal greetings and 
wishes for his well-being, and also that the Gov- 



SEPTEMBER 6, 194 1 



183 



eminent of the United States — as one of the 21 
American governments deeply concerned with 
the safety of the American Continent — is pro- 
foundly appreciative of the very constructive 
actions of the Government of Uruguay toward 
the consolidation of the moral and material de- 



fenses of the continent. These actions are, I 
believe, extremely effective means of perpetu- 
ating for our descendants the happy benefits 
which our forefathers won under the leadership 
of those gi-eat patriots, Artigas and Washing- 
ton." 



International Conferences, Commissions, Etc. 



FOURTH PAN AMERICAN HIGHWAY CONGRESS 



[Released to the press September 4] 

The President has approved the designation 
of the persons indicated in the list printed be- 
low as members of the delegation of the United 
States of America to the Fourth Pan American 
Highway Congress, which will be in session in 
Mexico City from September 15 to 24, 1941. 
This meeting will be held concurrently with the 
Second Inter-American Travel Congress, at 
which this Government will also be represented 
officially. 

The United States has sent official delegates 
to all of the preceding highway congresses 
which have met periodically in the capitals of 
the American republics to discuss questions per- 
taining to highway planning, engineering, 
maintenance, and finance. Special emphasis 
will be given at the forthcoming Congress to 
topics affecting the Pan American Highway, 
which is assuming a position of commanding 
importance as an integral part of the hemi- 
spheric-defense program. 

Delegates 

Thp Honorable Josh Lee, U.S. Senator from Okla- 
homa, ehairman of the delegation 

The Honorable Wilburu Cartwright, U.S. Representa- 
tive from Oklahoma 

The Honorable Luther A. Johnson, U.S. Representa- 
tive from Texas 

The Honorable Jesse P. Wolcott, U.S. Representative 
from Michigan 
412764 — 41 2 



Edwin W. James, Chief, Division of Highway Tran.s- 
port. Public Roads Administration 

William F. Machold. A.ssistant Director, Commercial 
and Financial Division, Office of the Coordinator 
of Inter-American AfEairs, Office for Emergency 
Management 

John Van Ness Philip, Member, Pan American High- 
way Finance Committee 

Hal G. Sours, President, American Road Builders' 
Association, Columbus, Ohio 

J. S. Williamson, President, American Association of 
State Highway Officials, Columbia, S.C. 

Technical Advisers 

John Abbink, President, Business Publishers' Inter- 
national Corporation, New York, N.Y. 

Wainwright Bridges, Clerk, Committee on Roads, 
House of Representatives 

Roy W. Crum, Director, Highway Research Board, 
National Research Council 

Raleigh A. Gibson, Second Secretary, American Em- 
bassy, Mexico, D.F., Mexico 

Stephen James, Director, Pan American Highway 
Confederation 

Barton P. Root, Public Utilities Unit, Bureau of For- 
eign and Domestic Commerce, Department of 
Commerce 

Charles M. Upham, Engineer-Director, American 
Road Builders' Association 

Secretary 

Morris N. Hughes, Consul, American Consulate Gen- 
eral, Mfeico, D.F., Mexico 

Assistant Secretary 

Miss Hannia Cabrera, Public Roads Administration 



184 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

SECOND INTER-AIVIERICAN TRAVEL CONGRESS 



[Released to the press September 4] 

The Second Inter- American Travel Congress 
will be in session in Mexico City from Septem- 
ber 15 to 24, 1941. This conference, which will 
be held under the auspices of the Mexican Gov- 
ernment, will meet concurrently with the 
Fourth Pan American Highway Congress. 

The First Inter-American Travel Congress 
was held in San Francisco in April 1939 and 
was attended by representatives of the govern- 
ments of practically all of the American repub- 
lics as well as the Dominion of Canada. The 
Second Congress will continue studies initiated 
at San Francisco embracing a wide range of 
subjects affecting railway, steamship, airway, 
and highway interests and the improvement and 
coordination of their facilities. 

The President has approved the designation 
of the persons indicated in the following list as 
members of the delegation on the part of the 
Government of the United States to the forth- 
coming Congress : 



Delegates 
The Honorable John H. Kerr, U.S. Representative 

from North Carolina, chairman of the dtlegation 
William P. Blocker, American Consul General, Ciiuiad 

Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico 
Newton B. Drury, Director, National Park Service, 

Department of the Interior 
L. C. Elliott, Regional Manager, Civil Aeronautics 

Administration, Fort Worth, Tex. 
Warren Kelchner, Chief, Division of International 

Conferences, Department of State 
W. Bruce Macnamee, Chief, United States Travel 

Bureau, Department of the Interior 
W. Creighton Peet, Jr., Secretary, United States 

Maritime Commission 
L. Welch Pogue, General Counsel, Civil Aeronautics 

Board 
W'alter C. Bundle, Chief, Travel Section, Office of the 

Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs, Office for 

Emergency Management 
Secretary 
John W. Carrigan, Third Secretary, American Em- 
bassy, Mexico, D.F., Mexico 
Assistant Secretary 

Harry H. Pierson, Divisional Assistant, Division of 

Cultural Relations, Department of State 



Cultural Relations 



EXCHANGE OF PROFESSORS, TEACHERS, AND GRADUATE STUDENTS 



[Released to the press September 2] 

The Department of State aimounces that in 
accordance with the provisions of the Conven- 
tion for the Promotion of Inter- American Cul- 
tural Relations, the following panels of gradu- 
ate students have been submitted to the Amer- 
ican republics named : 

To Colombia 
Thais White Daywood. 1407 N. Alta Vista Boulevard, 

Hollywood, Calif. 
Frank Marion Duffey, South Charleston, Ohio 
Robert Louis Gilmore, 1700 LeRoy, Berkeley, Calif. 
Roger Meldrum Hughes, 2428 Laurel Avenue, Omaha, 

Nebr. 
Ella Pettit Levett, 550 Huger Street, Charleston, S.C. 



To Costa Rica 
Lucie Elliott Adams, ."i26 Fillmore Street, Denver, 

Colo. 
Henry Leonardo Coster, 2643 Broadway, Walnut 

Park, Calif. 
Albert Fort Gardner, 841 Vi Levering Avenue, Los 

Angeles, Calif. 
Theodore Lawrence White, Box 387, Falfurrias, Tex. 
Miuter Wood, 327 Davis Street, Conway, Ark. 

To the Dominical) Republic 
Joseph Hysen Alii, 1131 East Huron Street, Ann 

Arbor, Mich. 
James David DeMarchi, 791 East Union Street, Mil- 

lersburg. Pa. 
Anson Conant Piper, 63 Bowdoiu Street, Newton 

Highlands, Mass. 



SEPTEMBER 6, 1941 



185 



Harris Dean Stallings, 625 Thirteenth Avenue, Brook- 
ings, S. Dali. 
William Sylvane S'tokes, 1225 MontebeUo BoTilevard, 

Montebello, Calif. 
To Mexico 
James Dunbar Bell, 602:i Woodlawu Avenue, Chicago, 

III. 
Thomas Ewiiig Cotner, Jr., 319 Oak Cliff Boulevard, 

Dallas, Tex. 
Herbert Passin, 2431 North Bernard Street, Chicago, 

111. 
Stanley Linn Robe, 2343 Columbia Street, Eugene, 

Oreg. 
Francis A. Robinson, lOlS South Main Street, Mt. 

Pleasant, Mich. 
To Panama 
Edward Phillips Chynoweth, 623 Howard Place, Mad- 
ison, Wis. 
Dorothea Daly, 58 Franklin Street, Northampton, 

Mass. 
Jack Chalmers Herman, 3142 State Street Drive, New 

Orleans, La. 
Henry Irwin Jorgensen, 14 Los Laureles Avenue, 

Salinas, Calif. 
George Wilson Willoughby, Scattergood Hostel, West 

Branch, Iowa 
To Paraguay 

Lucia Fraucina Hamilton, 1111 Seventeenth Street 

South, Birmingham, Ala. 
Frederic Haven Hensler, 3301 East Mercer Street, 

Seattle, Wash. 
William Mackey, 1018 Grandview Avenue, Boulder, 

Colo. 
Grant Parrish, 862 Sherman Avenue, Salt Lake City, 

Utah 
Ernest Emory Stowell, 2811 South Lamont, Spokane, 

Wash. 
To Venezuela 
Robert Carlyle Beyer, 1392 West Minnehaha Avenue, 

St. Paul, Minn. ^ 

Claudia De Wolf, 132 High Street, Bristol, R. I. 
Milton L. Genilel, 106 Fort Washington Avenue, New 

York. N. Y. 
G. Alonzo Stanford, Shelby, Mich. 
Eleanor Zygler Willis, 1525 Arch Street, N.S., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

Each Governineiit receiving a panel lias the 
privilege of selecting two persons from the five 
nominated to receive fellowships. The Gov- 
ernment of Panama has just selected Edward P. 
Chynowetli and Dorothea Daly to receive fel- 
lowships in that country. 

The following students have been selected 
from panels submitted to the Department of 
State by the other American republics : 



From Brazil 
Ernanl Calbucci 
Rodolfo Ernesto Henser 
Frederico Herrmann, Jr. (alternate) 

From Chile 

Marfa Marchant de Gonzalez Vera (renewal) 

Laura Vergara Santa Cruz 

Renato Salazar Justiniano (alternate) 

From the Dominican Republic 

AmSrico Alejandro Martinez y Martinez (renewal) 
Oscar Rafael BatUe Morel (renewal) 

From Nicaragua 
Rodolfo Abaflnza Salinas (renewal) 
Eduardo Montealegre Callejas 
Rodrigo S.lnchez (alternate) 

Prof. Arthur S. Aiton of the Department of 
History of the University of Michigan, who was 
.selected by the Government of Costa Kica as 
exchange professor under the convention/ sailed 
from New Orleans on August 16 for San Jose, 
Costa Rica. Professor Aiton is scheduled to 
lecture on history at the University of Costa 
Rica. 

The following supplementary list of exchange 
professors has been submitted by the United 
States in identical panels to the other ratifying 
governments. This list supplements the list 
prepared as of January 1, 1940,^ and the two 
lists will be in effect until December 31, 1941. 

Pierre Crabites, Special Lecturer, Law School, Louisi- 
ana State University 

Ralph Warner Hammett, Associate Professor in Archi- 
tecture, University of Michigan 

William Titus Home, Professor of Plant Pathology ami 
Plant Pathologist, Citrus Exiieriment Station, 
Riverside, Calif. 

Everett W. Lord, former Dean of the College of Busi- 
ness Administration, Boston University 

Percy Alvin Martin. Professor of History, Stanford 
University 

Robert Gatlin Reeves, Pi-ofessor of Biology, Texas Agri- 
cultural and Mechanical College 

Paul Reece Rider, Professor of Mathematics, Washing- 
ton University (St. Louis, Mo.) 

James Sykes, Assistant Professor of Music, Colorado 
College 

Samuel Stanley Wilks, Associate Professor of Mathe- 
matics, Princeton University 



' Bulletin of March 15. 1941, p. 289. 
- Bulletin of April 6, 1940, p. 357. 



186 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



This oflBcial exchange of students and pro- 
fessors is indicative of the interest of the vari- 
ous governments concerned. The provisions of 
the Buenos Aires Convention serve to supple- 
ment the efforts of private organizations and 
institutions in the field of cultural relations. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press September 6] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since August 30, 
1941: 

Career Officers 

Dudley G. Dwyre, of Fort Collins, Colo., First 
Secretary of Legation and Consul General at 
San Jose, Costa Rica, has been designated First 
Secretary of Legation at Guatemala, Guate- 
mala. 

Robert L. Smyth, of Berkeley, Calif., First 
Secretary of Embassy at Peiping, China, has 
been assigned for duty in the Department of 
State. 

Paul C. Squire, of Boston, Mass., who lias 
been serving as Consul at Venice, Italy, has been 
assigned as Consul at Geneva, Switzerland. 

Earl L. Packer, of Ogden, LTtah, who has been 
serving as Consul at Dresden, Germany, has 
been designated First Secretary of Legation at 
Dublin, Ireland. 

Richard B. Haven, of Chicago, 111., who has 
been serving as Consul at Turin, Italy, has been 
assigned as Consul at Tenerife, Canary Islands. 

Guy W. Ray, of Wilsonville, Ala., now serv- 
ing in the Department of State, has been desig- 
nated Second Secretary of Embassy at Mexico, 
D. F., Mexico. 

Foy D. Kohler, of Toledo, Ohio, who has been 
serving as Third Secretary of Legation and Vice 
Consul at Athens, Greece, has been designated 
Third Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul at 
Cairo, Egypt, and will serve in dual capacity. 



Phil H. Hubbard, of Poultney, Vt., who has 
been serving as Consul at Milan, Italy, has been 
assigned as Consul at Ziirich, Switzerland. 

J. Kenly Bacon, of Newton, Mass., Second 
Secretary of Legation and Consul at Port-au- 
Prince, Haiti, has been assigned for duty in the 
Department of State. 

Arthur R. Williams, of Golden, Colo., Vice 
Consul at Cali, Colombia, has been assigned as 
Consul at Cali, Colombia. 

Stephen E. Aguirre, of El Paso, Tex., Vice 
Consul at Mexicali, Mexico, has been assigned 
as Consul at Mexicali, Mexico. 

George Lewis Jones, Jr., of Parkton, Md., who 
has been serving as Assistant Commercial At- 
tache at Athens, Greece, has been designated 
Third Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul 
at Cairo, Egypt, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Reginald P. Mitchell, of Jacksonville, Fla., 
now serving in the Department of State, has 
been designated Third Secretary of Legation and 
Vice Consul at Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and will 
serve in dual capacity. 

Fred K. Salter, of Sandersville, Ga., who has 
been serving as Vice Consul at Frankfort on the 
Main, Germany, has been assigned as Vice 
Consul at London, England. 

William N. Fraleigh, of Summit, N. J., who 
has been serving as Third Secretary of Legation 
and Vice Consul at Athens, Greece, has been as- 
signed as Vice Consul at Istanbul, Turkey. 

Lubert O. Sanderhoff, of Pasadena, Calif., 
now serving in the Department of State, has 
been assigned as Vice Consul at Ciudad Juarez, 
Mexico. 

Kenneth A. Byrns, of Greeley, Colo., Vice 
Consul at Nogales, Mexico, has been assigned as 
Vice Consul at Mexico, D. F.. Mexico. 

John Fremont Melby, of Bloomington, 111., 
Third Secretary of Embassy at Caracas, Vene- 
zuela, has been assigned for duty in the Depart- 
ment of State. 

Robert J. Cavanaugh, of Rock Island, 111., 
Vice Consul at Montreal, Canada, has been ap- 
pointed Foreign Service Officer, Unclassified, 
Secretary in the Diplomatic Service, and Vice 
Consul, and has been assigned as Vice Consul at 
Montreal, Canada. 



SEPTEMBER 6, 1941 

The following Foreign Service officers, vice 
consuls at their respective posts, have been as- 
signed to the Department of State and will at- 
tend the Foreign Service School: 

Stewart G. Anderson, of Chicago, 111 Toronto 

Charles W. Adair, Jr., of Xenia, Ohio__ Mexico, D.F. 

H. Gardner Ainsworth, of New Or- 
leans, La Winnipeg 

Leonard J. Cromie, of New Haven, 

Conn Montri'jil 

\V. William Duff, of New Castle, Pa— Habana 

Irveu M. Eitreim, of Mount Vernon, S. 

DaU Mexico, V.F. 

C. Vaughau Ferguson, Jr., of Schenec- 
tady, N. Y Winnipeg 

Richard E. Gnade, of Oil City, Pa Vancouver 

John M. McSweeney, of Boston, Mass Montreal 

Claude G. Ross, of Huntington Park, 

Calif Mexico, D.F. 

Robert Rossow, Jr., of Culver, Ind Vancouver 

Harry H. Schwartz, of Los Angeles, 

Calif Vancouver 

Bromley K. Smith, of San Diego, Calif. Montreal 

Henry T. Smith, of Atlanta, Ga Matamoros 

Oscar S. Straus, 2d, of Purchase, N. Y, Montreal 

John L. Topping, of New York, N. Y_. Montreal 

Andrew B. Wardlaw, of Greenville, 

S. C Toronto 

Livingston D. Watrous, of Fort Hamil- 
ton, N. Y Ciudad Juarez 

Eraser Wilkins, of Baltimore. Md Halifax 



NON-CAREEK OFFICERS 

Manson Gilbert, of Evansville, Ind., who has 
been serving as Vice Consul at Brussels, Bel- 
gium, has been appointed Vice Consul at Port- 
au-Prince, Haiti. 

Albert J. Cope, Jr., of Salt Lake City, Utah, 
who has been serving as Vice Consul at Stutt- 
gart, Germany, has been appointed Vice Consul 
at Lisbon, Portugal. 

Frank H. Cussans, of Ada, Ohio, who has 
been serving as Vice Consul at Bordeaux, 
France, has been appointed Vice Consul at Ge- 
neva, Switzerland. 

J. Stanford Edwards, of Brooklyn, N. Y., 
who has been serving as Vice Consul at Copen- 
hagen, Denmark, has been appointed Vice Con- 
sul at Glasgow, Scotland. 

Julius C. Jensen, of Casper, Wyo., who has 
been serving as Vice Consul at Stuttgart, Ger- 



187 

many, has been appointed Vice Consul at Zurich, 
Switzerland. 

Charles M. Gerrity, of Scranton, Pa., who has 
been serving as Vice Consul at Frankfort on the 
Main, Germany, has been appointed Vice Con- 
sul at Dublin, Ireland. 

Buford G. Rogers, of Mount Olive, Miss., who 
has been serving as Vice Consul at Bordeaux, 
France, has been appointed Vice Consul at 
Bern, Switzerland. 

Carroll C. Parry, of St. Louis, Mo., who has 
been serving as Vice Consul at Vienna, Ger- 
many, has been appointed Vice Consul at Lis- 
bon, Portugal. 

Jolin A. Lehrs, of Maryland, who has been 
serving as Vice Consul at Copenhagen, Den- 
mark, has been appointed Vice Consul at Basel, 
Switzerland. 

Francis A. Lane, of Chicago, 111., who has 
been serving as Vice Consul at Bremen, Ger- 
many, has been appointed Vice Consul at Cork, 
Ireland. 

Thomas R. Flack, of Chicago, 111., who has 
been serving as Vice Consul at Vienna, Ger- 
many, has been appointed Vice Consul at Basel, 
Switzerland. 

Francis B. Moriarty, of Washington, D. C, 
who has been serving as Vice Consul at Turin, 
Italy, has been appointed Vice Consul at Mal- 
aga, Spain. 

Harold M. Granata, of Grasmere, Staten Is- 
land, N. Y., who has been serving as Vice Con- 
sul at Rome, Italy, has been appointed Vice Con- 
sul at Seville, Spain. 

T. Monroe Fisher, of Strasburg, Va., who has 
been serving as Vice Consul at Florence, Italy, 
has been appointed Vice Consul at Bilbao, 
Spain. 



Regulations 



Export Control Schedule No. 20 [adding, effective 
August 30, 1941, certain wood and paper products to the 
forms, conversions, and derivatives of the articles and 
materials designated in Pi-oclamation 2506]. August 
30, 1941. (Administrator of Export Control.) 6 Fed- 
eral Register 4535. 



188 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Department 



APPOINTINIENT OF SPECIAL ASSISTANT 
TO THE UNDER SECRETARY OF 
STATE 

Departmental Order 964, signed by the Secre- 
tary of State on September 2, 1941, reads as 
follows : 

"Mr. Charles Bunn has been appointed a Spe- 
cial Assistant to the Under Secretary of State, 
effective September 2, 1941, vice Mr. Charles P. 
Curtis, Jr., resigned. 

"The symbol designation of Mr. Bumi's office 
shall be TA/B. 

"Departmental Order No. 935 of April IG, 
1941 ^ is amended accordingly." 



POSTAL 

UNFVERSAL POSTAL CONVENTION, 19.39 

Finland 

The American Legation at Helsinki trans- 
mitted to the Department with a despatch dated 
July 24. 1941 a copy of Finland's Treaty Series 
for 1941, Issue No. 13-14, which contains the 
text of the Universal Postal Convention signed 
at Buenos Aires on May 23, 1939, and the achnin- 
istrative decree signed on May 30, 1941, bringing 
the convention into effect in respect of Finland 
on July 1, 1941. 

The decree states that the convention was rati- 
fied by Finland on June 28, 1940, and that the 
Argentine Government was notified of the rati- 
fication on the same date. 



INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 
MILITARY MISSION 

AGREEMENT WITH BOLIVIA 

[Released to the press September 4] 

In response to the request of the Govenmient 
of Bolivia, an agreement was signed on Septem- 
ber 4, 1941 by Cordell Hull, Secretary of State, 
and Senor Dr. Don Luis Fernando Guachalla, 
Minister of Bolivia at Washington, providing 
for the detail of a United States military avia- 
tion mission to Bolivia. 

The agi-eement, which is made effective for a 
period of four years beginning with the date of 
signature, contains provisions similar in general 
to provisions contained in agi-eements between 
the United States and certain other American 
republics providing for the detail of officers of 
the United States Army or Navy to advise the 
armed forces of those countries 



' Bulletin of April 19, 1941, p. 480. 



CONVENTION FOR THE PROTECTION OF INDUSTRIAL 
PROPERTY 

By a note dated April 10, 1941 the Swiss Min- 
ister at Washington transmitted to the Secretary 
of State a copy of a note dated March 29, 1941 
b}' which the Legation of the Slovak Republic 
at Bern informed the Swiss Federal Council of 
the adherence of its Government to the Conven- 
tion for the Protection of Industrial Property 
as revised at The Hague November 6, 1925. 

The Minister's note added that the adherence 
would become effective on May 10, 1941. 



SOVEREIGNTY 

CONVENTION ON THE PROVISIONAL ADMINISTRATION 
OF EUROPEAN COLONIES AND POSSESSIONS IN THE 
AMERICAS 

The Convention on the Provisional Adminis- 
tration of European Colonies and Possessions in 
the Americas, signed at the Second Meeting of 
the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the Ameri- 
can Republics at Habana July 30, 1940, will en- 
ter into force when two thirds of the American 
republics have deposited their respective instru- 
ments of ratification. The Treatj^ Series cita- 



SEPTEMBER 6, 1941 



189 



tion given for this convention on page 171 of 
the Bulhfin of August 30, 1941 was erroneously 
inchided. 

The Act of Habana Concerning the Provi- 
sional Administration of European Colonies 
and Possessions in the Americas, contained in 
the Final Act of the Second Meeting of Minis- 
ters of Foreign Affairs of the American Eepub- 
lics, signed July 30, 1940, is printed as Execu- 
tive Agreement Series 199. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Index to the Department of State Bulletin, volume 
IV : numbers SO-105, January 4-June 28, 1941 . Publi- 
t-atiou 1634. 29 pp. 



Othek Government Agencies 

Summary of the Activities of the Office of the Co- 
ordinator of Inter-American AfCairs. 14 pp. (Proc- 
essed. ) August 29, 1941. [Copies are obtainable free 
from the Office of the Coordinator, Room 5411, Depart- 
ment of Commerce Building.] 



Legislation 



Clearance and Entry for Certain Vessels. (S. Kept. 
671, 77th Cong., 1st .sess.) 4 pp. 

Inter-American Statistical Institute: Hearings Be- 
fore the Committee on Foreign Affairs, House of Repre- 
sentatives, 77th Cong., 1st sess., on H.J. Res. 219, a Joint 
Resolution To Enable the United States To Become an 
Adhering Member of the Inter-American Statistical 
Institute, July 29, 1941. [Incorijorates report, dated 
July 12, 1941, from the Acting Secretary of State to the 
President in support of legislation.] 14 pp. 



Fur sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Wasbini^ton, D. C. — Price 10 cents - - - - Subsciiption price. $2.75 a year 

Pl'BLISHBD WEEKLY WITH THH APPBUVAL OF THE DIRECTOH OP THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGEir 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BUL 



J 



^ 



^ rm 



I 



riN 



SEPTExMBER 13, 1941 
Vol. V, No. 116— Publication 1640 







ontents 



National Defense Page 

Address by the President 193 

Sinking of the S.S. Steel Seafarer in the Red Sea . . . 197 

Smking of the S.S. Sessa southwest of Iceland .... 199 

Smking of the S.S. Montana west of Iceland 200 

Damage to the S.S. Arkansan at Suez 200 

Licensing of e.xports 200 

Monthly statistics on traffic in arms, ammunition, 

etc 202 

Europe 

Memorandum of British Government on distribution 

of lend-lease material 204 

American Republics 

Brazil: Anniversary of independence 206 

General 

The Faith and Philosophy of Democratic Govern- 

^ ment: Address by Assistant Secretary Berle 207 

Cultural Relations 

Music Advisory Committee 211 

Physicians from other American republics to study in 

the United States 212 

The Department 

Appomtment of officers 213 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes 213 

[over] 








,,S.c,,PEPmTFNntNT0FD0ClWEHT8 
SEP 25 1C-.1 



ontents-coNT^iNVEo 



Treaty Information Pag« 

Finance: Agreement with Haiti 214 

Telecommunications: International Telecommunica- 
tion Convention 215 

Regulations 215 



National Defense 



ADDRESS BY THE PRESIDENT 



[Released to the press by the White House September 11] 

Mt Fellow Americans : 

The Navy Department of the United States 
has reported to me that on the morning of Sep- 
tember fourth the United States destroyer 
Greer, proceeding in full daylight towards Ice- 
land, had reached a point southeast of Green- 
land. She was carrying American mail to Ice- 
land. She was flying the American flag. Her 
identity as an American ship was unmistakable. 

She was then and there attacked by a sub- 
marine. Germany admits that it was a German 
submarine. The submarine deliberately fired 
a torpedo at the Greer, followed later by an- 
other torpedo attack. In spite of what Hitler's 
propaganda bureau has invented, and in spite of 
what any American obstructionist organization 
may prefer to believe, I tell you the blunt fact 
that the German submarine fired first upon this 
American destroyer without warning, and with 
deliberate design to sink her. 

Our destroyer, at the time, was in waters 
which the Government of the United States had 
declared to be waters of self-defense — surround- 
ing outposts of American protection in the 
Atlantic. 

In the north, outposts have been established 
by us in Iceland, Greenland, Labrador, and 
Newfoundland. Through these waters there 
pass many ships of many flags. They bear food 
and other supplies to civilians; and they bear 
materiel of war, for which the people of the 
United States are spending billions of dollars, 
and which, by congressional action, they have 



'Broadcast from the White House, September 11, 
1941. 

413S26 — 41 1 



declared to be essential for the defense of their 
own land. 

The United States destroyer, when attacked, 
was proceeding on a legitimate mission. 

If the destroyer was visible to the submarine 
when the torpedo was fired, then the attack was 
a deliberate attempt by the Nazis to sink a 
clearly identified American warship. On the 
other hand, if the submarine was beneath the 
surface and, with the aid of its listening devices, 
fired in the direction of the sound of the 
American destroyer without even taking the 
trouble to learn its identity — as the official Ger- 
man communique would indicate — then the at- 
tack was even more outrageous. For it indi- 
cates a policy of indiscriminate violence against 
any vessel sailing the seas — belligerent or non- 
belligerent. 

This was piracy — legally and morally. It 
was not the first nor the last act of piracy which 
the Nazi Government has committed against 
the American flag in this war. Attack has 
followed attack. 

A few months ago an American-flag mer- 
chant ship, the Robin Moor, was sunk by a 
Nazi submarine in the middle of the South 
Atlantic, under circumstances violating long- 
established international law and every prin- 
ciple of humanity. The passengers and the 
crew were forced into open boats hundreds of 
miles from land, in direct violation of interna- 
tional agreements signed by the Government of 
Germany. No apology, no allegation of mis- 
take, no offer of reparations has come from the 
Nazi Government. 

In July 1941, an American battleshii? in 

193 



194 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



North American waters was followed by a sub- 
marine which for a long time sought to maneu- 
ver itself into a position of attack. The peri- 
scope of the submarine was clearly seen. No 
British or American submarines were within 
hundreds of miles of this spot at the time, so 
the nationality of the submarine is clear. 

Five days ago a United States Navy ship on 
jiatrol picked up three survivors of an Ameri- 
can-owned ship operating under the flag of our 
sister Republic of Panama — the S. S. Sessa. 
On August seventeenth, she had been first tor- 
pedoed without warning and then shelled, near 
Greenland, while carrying civilian supplies to 
Iceland. It is feared that the other members 
of her crew have been drowned. In view of the 
established presence of German submarines in 
this vicinity, there can be no reasonable doubt 
as to the identity of the attacker. 

Five days ago, another United States mer- 
chant ship, the Sfeel Scafarei\ was sunk by a 
German aircraft in the Red Sea two hundred 
and twenty miles south of Suez. She was 
bound for an Egyptian port. 

Four of the vessels sunk or attacked flew the 
American flag and were clearly identifiable. 
Two of these ships were wai-ships of the Ameri- 
can Navy. In the fifth case, the vessel sunk 
clearly carried the flag of Panama. 

In the face of all this, we Americans are keep- 
ing our feet on the ground. Our type of dem- 
ocratic civilization has outgrown the thought 
of feeling compelled to fight some other nation 
by reason of any single piratical attack on one 
of our ships. We are not becoming hysterical 
or losing our sense of proportion. Therefore, 
what I am thinking and saying does not relate 
to any isolated episode. 

Instead, we Americans are taking a long- 
range point of view in regard to certain funda- 
mentals and to a series of events on land and 
on sea which must be considered as a whole — 
as a part of a world pattern. 

It would be unworthy of a great nation to 
exaggerate an isolated incident or to become 
inflamed by some one act of violence. But it 
would be inexcusable folly to minimize such 
incidents in the face of evidence which makes it 



clear that the incident is not isolated but part 
of a general plan. 

The imjDortant truth is that these acts of 
international lawlessness are a manifestation of 
a design which has been made clear to the 
American people for a long time. It is the 
Nazi design to abolish the freedom of the seas 
and to acquire absolute control and domination 
of the seas for themselves. 

For with control of the seas in their own 
hands, the way can become clear for their next 
step — domination of the United States and the 
Western Hemisphere by force. Under Nazi 
control of the seas, no merchant ship of the 
United States or of any other American re- 
public would be free to carry on any peaceful 
commerce, except by the condescending grace 
of this foreign and tyrannical power. The At- 
lantic Ocean which has been, and which should 
always be, a free and friendly highway for us 
would then become a deadly menace to the com- 
merce of the United States, to the coasts of the 
United States, and to the inland cities of the 
United States. 

The Hitler Government, in defiance of the 
laws of the sea and of the recognized rights of 
all other nations, lias presumed to de<:lare, on 
paper, that great areas of the seas — even in- 
cluding a vast expanse lying in the Western 
Hemisphere — are to be closed, and that no ships 
may enter them for any purpose, except at peril 
of being sunk. Actually they are sinking ships 
at will and without warning in widely sepa- 
rated areas both within and far outside of these 
far-flung pretended zones. 

This Nazi attempt to seize control of the 
oceans is but a counterpart of the Nazi plots 
now being carried on throughout the Western 
Hemisphere — all designed toward the same end. 
For Hitler's advance guards — not only his 
avowed agents but also his dupes among us — 
have sought to make ready for him footholds 
and bridgeheads in the New World, to be used 
as soon as he has gained control of the oceans. 

His intrigues, his plots, his machinations, his 
sabotage in this New World are all known to 
the Government of the United States. Con- 
spiracy has followed conspiracy. 



SEPTEMBER 13, 1941 



195 



Last year a plot to seize the Government of 
Uruguay was smashed by the prompt action of 
that country, which was supported in full by 
her American neighbors. A like plot was then 
hatching in Argentina, and that Government 
has carefully and wisely blocked it at every 
point. More recently, an endeavor was made 
to subvert the Government of Bolivia. AVithin 
the past few weeks the discovery was made of 
secret air-landing fields in Colombia, within 
easy range of the Panama Canal. I could mul- 
tiply instances. 

To be ultimately successful in world-mastery. 
Hitler knows that he must get control of the 
seas. He must first destroy the bridge of ships 
which we are building across the Atlantic, over 
which we shall continue to roll the implements 
of war to help destroy him and all his works 
in the end. He must wipe out our patrol on 
sea and in the air. He must silence the British 
Navy. 

It must be explained again and again to 
people who like to think of the United States 
Navy as an invincible protection, that this can 
be true only if the British Navy survives. That 
is simple arithmetic. 

For if the world outside the Americas falls 
under Axis domination, the shipbuilding facili- 
ties which the Axis powers would then possess 
in all of Europe, in the British Isles, and in the 
Far East would be much greater than all the 
shipbuilding facilities and potentialities of all 
the Americas — not only greater but two or 
three times greater. Even if the United States 
threw all its resources into such a situation, 
seeking to double and even redouble the size 
of our Navy, the Axis powers, in control of the 
rest of the world, would have the man-power 
and the physical resources to outbuild us several 
times over. 

It is time for all Americans of all the Amer- 
icas to stop being deluded by the romantic no- 
tion that the Americas can go on living hap- 
pily and peacefully in a Nazi-dominated world. 

Generation after generation, America has 
battled for the general policy of the freedom of 
the seas. That policy is a very simple one — 
but a basic, fundamental one. It means that 



no nation has the right to make the broad oceans 
of the world, at great distances from the actual 
theater of land war, unsafe for the commerce 
of others. 

That has been our policy, proved time and 
time again, in all our history. 

Our policy has applied from time inunemo- 
rial — and still applies — not merely to the At- 
lantic but to the Pacific and to all other oceans 
as well. 

Unrestricted submarine warfare in 1941 con- 
stitutes a defiance — an act of aggression — 
against that historic American policy. 

It is now clear that Hitler has begun his cam- 
paign to control the seas by ruthless force and 
by wiping out every vestige of international law 
and hmnanity. 

His intention has been made clear. The 
American people can have no further illusions 
about it. 

No tender whisperings of appeasers that Hit- 
ler is not interested in the Western Hemisphere, 
no soporific lullabies that a wide ocean protects 
us from him can long have any effect on the 
hard-headed, far-sighted, and realistic Ameri- 
can people. 

Because of these episodes, because of the 
movements and operations of German warships, 
and because of the clear, repeated proof that the 
present Government of Germany has no respect 
for treaties or for international law, that it has 
no decent attitude toward neutral nations or 
human life — we Americans are now face to face 
not with abstract theories but with cruel, relent- 
less facts. 

This attack on the Greer was no localized 
military operation in the North Atlantic. This 
was no mere episode in a struggle between two 
nations. This was one determined step towards 
creating a permanent world system based on 
force, terror, and murder. 

And I am sure that even now the Nazis are 
waiting to see whether the United States will by 
silence give them the green light to go ahead on 
this path of destruction. 

The Nazi danger to our Western World has 
long ceased to be a mere possibility. The dan- 
ger is here now — not only from a military enemy 



196 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



but from an enemy of all law, all liberty, all 
morality, all religion. 

There has now come a time when you and I 
must see the cold, inexorable necessity of saying 
to these inhuman, unrestrained seekers of 
world-conquest and permanent world-domina- 
tion by the sword — "You seek to throw our chil- 
dren and our children's children into your form 
of terrorism and slavery. You have now at- 
tacked our own safety. You shall go no 
further." 

Normal practices of diplomacy — note-writ- 
ing — are of no possible use in dealing with 
international outlaws who sink our ships and 
kill our citizens. 

One peaceful nation after another has met 
disaster because each refused to look the Nazi 
danger squarely in the eye until it actually had 
them by the throat. 

The United States will not make that fatal 
mistake. 

No act of violence or intimidation will keep 
us from maintaining intact two bulwarks of 
defense: first, our line of supply of materiel 
to the enemies of Hitler ; and second, the free- 
dom of our shipping on the high seas. 

No matter what it takes, no matter what it 
costs, we will keep open the line of legitimate 
commerce in these defensive waters. 

"We have sought no shooting war with Hit- 
ler. We do not .seek it now. But neither do 
we want peace so much that we are willing to 
pay for it by permitting him to attack our 
naval and merchant ships while they are on 
legitimate business. 

I assume that the German leaders are not 
deeply concerned by what we Americans say 
or publish about them. We cannot bring about 
the downfall of Nazism by the use of long- 
range invective. 

But when you see a rattlesnake poised to 
strike, you do not wait until he has struck be- 
fore you crush him. 

These Nazi submarines and raiders are the 
rattlesnakes of the Atlantic. They are a men- 
ace to the free pathways of the high seas. 
They ai'e a challenge to our sovereignty. They 
hammer at our most precious rights when they 



attack ships of the American flag — symbols of 
our independence, our freedom, our very life. 

It is clear to all Americans that the time has 
come when the Americas themselves must now 
be defended. A continuation of attacks in our 
own waters, or in waters which could be used 
for further and greater attacks on us, will in- 
evitably weaken American ability to repel 
Hitlerism. 

Do not let us si^lit hairs. Let us not ask our- 
selves whether the Americas should begin to 
defend themselves after the fifth attack, or the 
tenth attack, or the twentietli attack. 

The time for active defense is now. 

Do not let us split hairs. Let us not say — 
''We will only defend ourselves if the torpedo 
succeeds in getting home, or if the crew and the 
passengers are drowned." 

This is the time for prevention of attack. 

If submarines or raiders attack in distant 
waters, they can attack equally well within sight 
of our own shores. Their very presence in any 
waters which America deems vital to its defense 
constitutes an attack. 

In the waters which we deem necessary for 
our defense, American naval vessels and Ameri- 
can planes will no longer wait until Axis sub- 
marines lurking under the water, or Axis raiders 
on the surface of the sea, strike their deadly 
blow — first. 

Upon our naval and air patrol — now operat- 
ing in large number over a vast expanse of the 
Atlantic Ocean — falls the duty of maintaining 
the American policy of freedom of the seas — 
now. That means, very simply and clearly, 
that our patrolling vessels and planes will pro- 
tect all merchant ships — not only American 
ships but ships of any flag — engaged in com- 
merce in our defensive waters. They will pro- 
tect them from submarines; they will protect 
them from surface raiders. 

This situation is not new. The second Presi- 
dent of the United States, John Adams, ordered 
the United States Navy to clean out Euro- 
pean privateers and European ships of war 
which were infesting the Caribbean and South 
American waters, destroying American com- 
merce. 



SEPTEMBER 13, 1941 



197 



The third President of the United States, 
Thomas Jefferson, ordered the United States 
Navy to end the attacks being made upon 
American ships by the corsairs of the nations of 
North Africa. 

My obligation as President is historic; it is 
clear; it is inescapable. 

It is no act of war on our part when we de- 
cide to protect the seas which are vital to 
American defense. The aggression is not ours. 
Ours is solely defense. 

But let this warning be clear. From now on, 
if German or Italian vessels of war enter the 
waters the protection of which is necessary for 
American defense they do so at their own 
peril. 

The orders which I have given as Com- 
mander-in-Chief to the United States Army and 
Navy are to carry out that policy — at once. 

The sole responsibility rests upon Germany. 
There will be no shooting unless Germany 
continues to seek it. 

That is my obvious duty in this crisis. That 
is the clear right of this sovereign Nation. 



That is the only step possible, if we would keep 
tight the wall of defense which we are pledged 
to maintain around this Western Hemisphere. 

I have no illusions about the gravity of this 
step. I have not taken it hurriedly or lightly. 
It is the result of months and months of con- 
stant thought and anxiety and prayer. In the 
protection of your Nation and mine it cannot be 
avoided. 

The American people have faced other gi'ave 
crises in their history — with American courage 
and American resolution. They will do no less 
today. 

They know the actualities of the attacks upon 
us. They know the necessities of a bold defense 
against these attacks. They know that the 
times call for clear heads and fearless hearts. 

And with that inner strength that comes to a 
free people conscious of their duty and of the 
righteousness of what they do, they will — with 
Divine help and guidance — stand their ground 
against this latest assault upon their democracy, 
their sovereignty, and their freedom. 



SINKING OF THE S.S. "STEEL SEAFARER" IN THE RED SEA 



[Released to the press September 10] 

The Department has received the following 
preliminary report of the master of the Steel 
Seafarer on the sinking of that vessel : 

"At 21 : 38 Greenwich mean time^th Septem- 
ber ship proceeding Suez Shadwan Light 294 
degi'ees 121^ miles. Aircraft heard and two 
seconds later two explosions on starboard side 
by number four hold. No flames seen. Plane 
flew low over ship starboard to port with en- 
gines shut off. Ship took list to port then 6 
degrees to starboard settled and sank quickly by 
stem. Wireless out of action. Boats and crew 
in water in 5 minutes pulled away from ship 
just clear when ship disappeared. Boats made 
for Shadwan two arriving 08 : 40 Greenwich 
mean time other boat became separated owing 
to wind and rough sea. After repairs two boats 
proceeded to Hurghada to report by telegram 



one boat adrift. Kemaining boat and crew since 
reported returning Suez in tanker arriving to- 
morrow 10th September." 

This report was forwarded by the American 
Legation in Cairo which stated that more de- 
tailed information would be transmitted as soon 
as possible. 

[Released to the press September 11] 

The text of the affidavit executed by the 
Master of the S. S. Steel Seafarer^ Captain 
Halliday, before the American Vice Consul at 
Suez on September 9, 1941, follows: 

"At 23 : 38 hours Egyptian mean time on 
September 5, 1941, the SS Steel Seafarer was 
proceeding towards the port of Suez. Shad- 
wan Island bore 294 degrees true distance 12^/2 
miles. Only the ship's side lights (port and 



198 



DEPABTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



starboard) were burning in accordance witli 
instructions given to me by the British naval 
authorities in Aden, and had been burning for 
about an hour and a half. The superstructure 
of the ship was white, and the ship was carry- 
ing a deck load of white cases. The flags 
painted on the ship's side were not lighted up. 
The moon was full, however, there were no 
clouds and the visibility was perfect. The flag 
was flying from the stern. Suddenly an air- 
plane was heard and seen approaching from 
the starboard side. It was flying very low, just 
clearing the masts. About two seconds after it 
was heard it flew right over the bridge, and as 
it was full moon and the atmosphere was clear, 
the plane was easily seen to have two motors. 
About two seconds later two explosions oc- 
curred, which to me appeared to be about num- 
ber four and five holds. 

"All lights went out and the steerage gear 
jammed. The vessel took about a five degi-ee 
port list then about a six degree starboard list, 
then straightened up and was settling down 
fast by the stern. When the explosion took 
place I immediately rang the general alarm and 
sent Mr. Scuka, my third officer, to call the 
wireless operator and send an SOS, but Mr. 
Abernethy, the wireless operator, arrived in 
the wheel house and then the passengers' room. 
He tried both the main and emergency radio 
sets but could get no results with either. He 
then assisted in sending off distress rockets but 
the vessel was sinking so fast this had to be 
abandoned. Mr. Pratt, the chief officer, was 
supervising the lowering of the life boats. I 
instructed him to get all the crew in the life 
boats and for the twin screw life boats on the lee 
side to remain alongside. Mr. Scuka, the third 
officer, was sent to see the conditions aft and he 
came back and reported that the well was awash 
aft, so he was sent to get into a life boat. Cath- 
wright, A.B., came and reported that all the 
crew's quarters were flooded and also that all 
bulkheads and doors were twisted and jammed. 

"At this time I saw that the vessel could not 
be saved and she was sinking fast. I decided 
she must be abandoned. Cathwright, A.B., had 



searched through the crew's quarters, but all 
were gone and I went down to starboard mid- 
ships alley way shouting if all were out, and 
as I had not seen my chief engineer, I went 
into his room and felt around but he also was 
gone. I opened the engine room door, but all 
was in darkness. I shouted: 'Are all out?' 
When Mr. Pratt, chief officer, Cathwright, 
A.B., and myself left the ship, her stern was 
just under water, and bj' the time we got away 
about 100 feet, she sank by the stern straight 
down. The foremast was carried away before 
she went under. 

"There were no casualties, and injuries were 
limited to minor scratches. 

"The ship sank, in my opinion, approxi- 
mately 23 : 53 hours Egyptian mean time." 

[Released to the press September 13] 

The Department is informed by the Ameri- 
can Legation in Cairo that the remainder of 
the crew of the S.S. Steel Seafarer arrived in 
Suez on the afternoon of September 11, 1911. 

The affidavit of Joseph M. C. Scuka, the third 
officer of the vessel, sworn to before the Ameri- 
can Vice Consul in Port Said on September 
11, 1941, is printed below. 

After confirming the information contained 
in the affidavit of D. Halliday, the master of 
the Steel Seafarer, he continued — 

"I was standing alongside the captain when 
I heard a motor that sounded as if it belonged 
to a plane. We looked towards the apparent 
direction of the plane and saw it approach- 
ing toward us on the starboard side. The 
moon was full and directly overhead. The vis- 
ibility was perfect; I could even see the plane's 
exhaust sparkling. It was a twin-motored 
plane, very large and heavily built with a 
snub nose. I have consulted today Italian and 
German silhouettes of planes and I firmly be- 
lieve that the plane I saw was most probably a 
Junkers 88 or at any rate a German plane and 
not an Italian plane. 

"The plane passed directly over the ship 
about 250 feet, as well as I can judge, above 
the mainmast. About two seconds after the 



SEPTEMBER 13, 1941 



199 



plane was clear of the ship I heard a muffled 
explosion [apparent omission] to me to be be- 
low the water line. About a second later I 
heard another explosion which appeared to be 
a little louder than the first. 

"I believe that the plane could have had no 
difficulty in identifying the ship owing to tho 



following facts : The ship's superstructure was 
painted white; the masts and stacks buff. I 
am unable to say whether the flags painted on 
the ship's sides and the one flying from the 
stern were visible to the plane although there 
was brilliant moonlight." 



SINKING OF THE S.S. "SESSA" SOUTHWEST OF ICELAND 



[Released to the press September 0) 

Tlie State Department has been informed by 
the Navy Department that on Saturday morn- 
ing, September 6, the Navy picked up three sur- 
viving members of the crew of the S. S. Sessa 
about 300 miles southwest of Iceland. Twenty- 
four members of the crew are um-eported and are 
presumed lost. 

The State Department is informed that the 
survivoi-s stated that the ship had been sunk by 
a torpedo on August 17. There was one Amer- 
ican citizen member of the crew. His name is 
lacking and he is not one of the survivors. 
Names of the three survivors have not been 
furnished to the Department of State. 

The Sessa was a former Danish vessel which 
was acquired from the Danish Government 
under the authority of the recent law permit- 
ting the taking over of idle foreign-flag shi]5s 
in American waters (Public Law 101). The 
vessel was under Panamanian registry and was 
transporting supplies for and owned by the 
(Tovernment of Iceland. The cargo consisted of 
foodstuffs, cereals, lumber, and other general 
cargo and did not include arms, ammunition, or 
implements of war. 

[Released to the press September 10] 

The Department of State has been informed 
by the Navy Department that the names of the 
survivors of the S.S. Sessa picked up by the 
U.S.S. Lafhsdale are as follows : 

H. K. Bjerregaard, age 37, chief mate, a citizen of 

Odense, Denmark 
G. L. T. (Gote) Ljunggren, age 32, able seaman, a 

Swedish citizen 

413826 — 41 2 



J. (Joao) de Oliveira Correia, age 2,^, able seaman, a 
Portuguese citizen 

The Navy Department states that the sur- 
vivors are not now on board the U.S.S. Lans- 
dale but that prior to their debarkation the fol- 
lowing statements \v'ere obtained from them : 

The Sessa was torpedoed without warning 
midnight, August 17, about SOO miles fi-om 
Reykjavik (about 7 p.m. eastern standard time) 
while proceeding to that port from New York. 
After torpedoing, the Sessa was struck amid- 
ship by two shells. The Sessa sank two minutes 
after being torpedoed. 

[Released to the press September 10] 

The American Consul at Reykjavik, Mr. 
Bertel E. Kuniholm. reports that survivors of 
the S.S. Sessa state that the Sessa. was running 
darkened with dimmed navigational lights 
when struck at 10 p. m. ship's time by torpedo. 
Survivors describe light conditions as deep twi- 
light. Mate thinks visibility was so low that 
submarine could not have seen ship's markings. 
Ship struck by torpedo starboard side just for- 
ward bridge. Listed to starboard, sinking 
almost immediately. 2 shells fired, 1 striking 
bridge probably killing Captain, Third Mate 
and Quartennaster. other striking bunker- 
house. Submarine not seen nor did survivors 
see gunfire flashes. Forward raft probably de- 
stroyed by torpedo explosion. No chance use 
lifeboats. 6 men reached after-raft by swim- 
ming. 2 Portuguese and 1 Canadian died on 
raft. Survivors saw no other boats or rafts 
and were unable to reach other seaman in water. 



200 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



SINKING OF THE S.S. "MONTANA" 
WEST OF ICELAND 

[Released to the press September 12] 

The Department of State has been informed 
that the American-owned cargo ship Montana 
under Panama registry (formerly Danish 
Paula), requisitioned by the United States 
Maritime Commission on August 2, 1941, sailed 
from Wilmington, N. C, for Iceland at 9 a.m., 
August 29, with a cargo of lumber for the Ice- 
land Government. 

According to a message from the Navy De- 
partment received at 12 noon September 12 the 
ship was observed by aircraft to be torpedoed 
in latitude 63° 40' north and longitude 35° 50' 
west at 13:45 Greenwich central time (8:45 
eastern standard time) on September 11. The 
message said that the crew took to the boats. 

The Montana had on board about 1,500,000 
feet of lumber, was due in Reykjavik, Iceland, 
on September 11, and was to discharge her 
cargo at Reykjavik and three other Iceland 
ports. 

The crew of 26 included 18 Danish citizens; 
5 Norwegian citizens; 1 Greek citizen; 1 Bel- 
gian citizen; 1 Spanish citizen; no American 
citizens. 

DAMAGE TO THE S.S. "ARI^ANSAN" AT 
SUEZ 

[Released to the press September 13] 

The State Department has been informed by 
the American Legation at Cairo that the steam- 
ship Arkansa7i, an American-flag vessel owned 
by the American-Hawaiian Steamship Com- 
pany of New York and San Francisco, which 
was operating between the United States and 
the Red Sea, is reported to have been hit by shell 
fragments and some of plates pierced in a 
heavy air raid over Suez on the night of Sep- 
tember 11. 

The vessel, which was built in 1921 and has a 
gross tonnage of 6,997, left New York on July 
19, 1941. She arrived at Port Sudan on Sep- 
tember 5 and left for Suez on September 8, ap- 
parently arriving there some time before the 
bombing. 



There were 38 men in the crew. Thirty-six 
of these were American citizens, one was Brit- 
ish, and one Dutch. No casualties have been 
reported but further details will be obtained as 
soon as possible. 

LICENSING OF EXPORTS 

[Released to the press September 8] 

The Secretary of State announced on Sep- 
tember 8 that a revision has been made in the 
Department's system of numbering export li- 
censes, and that all general licenses issued by the 
Department are being replaced by a single gen- 
eral license for each country. 

This consolidation of numerous licenses under 
one nimiber does not alter the list of articles and 
materials which may be exported to the respec- 
tive countries under general license. 

General licenses will be designated hereafter 
by the letter "G" followed by the number as- 
signed to the respective countrj' of destination. 
As an example, general license number "G-1" 
authorizes the exportation to Canada of all those 
commodities previously authorized by numer- 
ous separate general licenses. "V\1ien any addi- 
tional commodities are added to the list of those 
authorized to be exported to Canada under gen- 
eral license, they will be included imder license 
number ''G-1". 

The foregoing arrangement will also apply 
to exportations which are now being made under 
general licenses '-OWW" and "GWY". The latter 
symbols will no longer be used. 

Exporters are requested to set forth the new 
license numbers on shippers' export declarations 
when making exportations authorized by gen- 
eral licenses. 

The number assigned to each foreign country 
for the purpose of general licenses will be found 
in the following list : 

1. Canada 

2. Great Britain and Northern Ireland 

3. Cuba 

4. Argentina 

5. Bolivia 

6. Brazil 

7. Ctiile 

8. Colombia 

9. Costa Rica 



SEPTEMBER 13, 1941 



201 



Curagao (including the islands of Curagao; Aruba; 
Bonaire; Saba; St. Eustatius; and St. Martin, 
southern part) 

Dominican Republic 

Ecuador 

El Salvador 

Guiitemala 

Haiti 

Honduras 

Mexico 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Surinam 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

Aden 

Australia (except Papua and the Territory of New 
Guinea under mandate) including Nauru, man- 
dated territory 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Bermuda 

British East Africa (including Kenya; Uganda; 
Nyasaland ; Zanzibar ; and Tanganyika, mandated 
territory) 

British Guiana 

British Honduras 

British Malaya (including British North Borneo; 
Brunei; Federated Malay States; Sarawak; 
Straits Settlements; Unfederated Malay States; 
Christmas Island, Indian Ocean ; Cocos ( Keeling) 
Islands) 

British West Africa ( including Nigeria ; British 
Cameroons, mandated territory ; Gambia ; Sierra 
Leone ; Gold Coast, including Ashanti and North- 
ern Territory ; and British Togoland, mandated 
territory) 

Burma 

Ceylon 

Cyprus 

Ireland (Eire) 

Falkland Islands (including South Georgia) 

Gibraltar 

Hong Kong 

India 

Jamaica 

Leeward Islands (including Antigua, Barbuda, 
Redonda, St. Christopher (St. Kitts) I.sland, 
Nevis Island, Anguilla Island, Montserrat, Som- 
brero, and British Virgin Islands) 

Mauritius (including Rodrigues Island and Diego 
Garcia Island) 

Newfoundland 

New Zealand 

New Guinea, British (comprising Papua or British 



New Guinea ; and Territory of New Guinea, man- 
dated territory) 

50. Northern Rhodesia 

51. Palestine and Tran.s-Jordan 

52. St. Helena (including Ascension Island, Gough 

Island, Inacce.ssible Island, Nightingale Island, 
and Tristan da Cunha Island) 

53. Seychelles and Dependencies 

54. Oceania, British (including British Solomon Is- 

lands ; Fiji Islands ; Gilbert and Ellice Islands ; 
New Hebrides Islands ; Pitcairn Island ; Tonga 
or Friendly Islands ; Santa Cruz Islands ; Cook 
Islands; and Western Samoa, mandated terri- 
tory) 

55. Southern Rhodesia 

56. Trinidad and Tobago 

57. Union of South Africa (including South-West 

Africa) 

58. Windward Islands (including Grenada, Grenadines, 

St. Lucia, St. Vincent, and Dominica) 

59. Egypt 

60. Anglo-Egyptian Sudan 

61. Greenland 

62. Iceland 

63. Philippine Islands 

64. Netherlands Indies 

65. China 

66. Belgian Congo 

67. Bahrein Islands 

68. French West Indies (including I)(§sirade; Guade- 

loupe ; Les Saintes ; Martinique ; Marie Galante ; 
St. Martin, northern part; and St. Bartholomew) 

69. French Guiana 

70. Miquelon and St. Pierre 

71. French Oceania (all French possessions in the 

Pacific) 

72. French Cameroons 

73. French Equatorial Africa 

74. Iraq 

75. Liberia 

76. Union of Soviet Socialist Republics 

77. Turkey 

78. Syria 

79. All other destinations 

[Released to the press September 8] 

The Secretary of State announced on Sep- 
tember 8 that the general licenses authorizing 
exportations to Canada (Ci-1) ; Great Britain 
and Northern Ireland (G-2) ; and Newfound- 
land (^-47) have been amended to include 
shellac and titanium. 

General license G-62, authorizing exporta- 
tions to Iceland, has been amended to include 
titaniimi. The exportation of shellac to Iceland 



202 



DKPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



is already authorized under general license 
G-62. 

[Released to the i)ress September 10] 

The Secretary of State announced on Septem- 
ber 10 that general licenses authorizing ex- 
portations to numerous foreign coimtries have 
been amended to include certain additional 
commodities. 

General licenses G-l to G-66, both inclusive, 
and Ci-68 to G-77, both inclusive, have been 
amended to include the forms, conversions, and 
derivatives of commodities listed in Export 
Control Schedule 18' under the hearings: 

Aaimal Products 

Textile Fibers and Mamifaetiu-es 

Nonruetallic Minerals 

Nouferrous Metals 

Prerioiis Metals 



General licenses g-i, authorizing exporta- 
tions to Canada; G-2, authorizing exportations 
to Great Britain and Northern Ireland; G-47, 
authorizing exportations to Newf omidland ; 
Ct-G2, authorizing exportations to Iceland; and 
fi-63, authorizing exportations to the Philip- 
jiine Islands, have been amended to include the 
fonns, conversions, and derivatives listed in 
Export Control Schedule 18 under the heading 
Leather". 



General license G-63, authorizing exporta- 
tions to the Philippine Islands, has been 
amended to include the forms, conversions, and 
derivatives listed in Export Control Schedule 
18 under the heading "Wood and Paper". 



MONTHLY STATISTICS ON TRAFFIC IN ARMS, AMMUNITION, ETC. 



[Released to the press September 8] 

Note: The figures relating to arms, the licenses 
for the export of whicli were revoked before they 
were used, have been subtracted from the figures ai>- 
pearing in the cumulative column of the table below 
in regard to arms-export licenses issued. These latter 
figures are therefore net figures. They are not yet 
final and definitive since licenses may be amended 
or revoked at any time before being used. They are, 
liowever, accurate as of the date of this press release. 

The statistics of actual exports in these releases 
are believed to be substantially complete. It Is pos- 
sible, however, that some shipments are not included. 
If this proves to be the fact, statistics in regard to 
such shipments will be included in the cumulative 
figures in later releases. 

Arms-Export Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates by cate- 
gory subdivision the value of the arms, ammu- 
nition, and implements of war licensed for ex- 
port by the Secretary of State during the year 
1941 up to and including the month of July: 



Category 


July 1941 


Export licenses 
issued for 7 

months ending 
July 31, 1941 


I 


(1) 


$34,236.94 
9, 253, 692. 51 
12,689,159.80 
6, 978, 609. 62 

176,000.00 

2, 737, 635. 50 
3, 404, 222. 10 

129,644,097.70 

2, 522. 00 

81, 746. 10 

161, 157. 12 

312, 209. 25 

3, 387, 257. 49 
22, 221, 684. 25 

1, 243. 50 
5, 040, 960. 06 
1, 834, 635. 60 


$27,610,902.84 
36, 406, 786. 10 




(2) 




(3).... 


38, 753, 221. 70 




(4) 


151,490,149.45 




(5) 






(6) 


77, 378, 322. 75 


IT 






rrr 


(1) 


473, 696, 176. 44 




(2) 


242. 820. 43 


IV 


(1) 


2, 469, 340. 34 




(2) 


3, 8.55, 278. 95 


v 


(1). 


6, 329, 012. 78 




(2) 


02, 268, 763. 61 




(3) 


132, 350, 166. 86 


VI 


(2) 


9, 985. 50 


VIT 


(1) 


26, 070, 096. 68 




(2) 


5, 472, 771. 73 










196,960,030.24 


1, 057, 976, 191. 85 









' 6 Federal Register 4664. 



Arms Exported 

The table printed below indicates by category 
subdivision the value of arms, ammunition, and 
implements of war exported during the year 



SEPTEMBER 13, 1941 



203 



1941 up to and including the month of July 
under export licenses issued by the Secretary of 
State : 



$25, 850. 38 
967, 295. 00 
1,S75,899.00 
16, 489, 130. 28 
1,517,855.00 
4, 726, 472. 00 



31.924,378.00 

86, 224. 00 

297, 560. 85 

190. 957. 09 

1, 688, 886. 00 

1, 673. 500. 15 

5, 762, 653. 81 

218. 75 

2, 056, 204. 74 

789, 191. 00 



69, 072, 276. 05 



Actual exports 

for 7 months 

eliding July 31, 

1941 



$2, 399, 666. 15 
14, 153, 461. 76 
12, 274. 807. 20 
42, 746. 042. 16 
10, 954, 970. 00 
14, 338, 546. 00 

1, 484. 507. 00 
187, 137, 065. 04 

291. 447. 24 
1, 930, 312. 26 

2, 675, 775. 85 
8, 262, 516. 28 

15,076,109.06 
63, 23S, 422. 76 
7, 707. 75 
11.482, 150.33 
2, 949, 935. 49 



381, 403, 432. 33 



Arms-Import Licenses Issued 

The table printed below indicates by category 
subdivision the value of the arms, ammunition, 
and implements of war licensed for import by 
the Secretary of State during the month of 
July 1941 : 



1 (1) 

(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 

IV (I) 

V (1) 
(2) 
(3) 

vn (2) 



072.00 

000. on 

084.00 
706. 00 
50.00 
000.00 
148. 90 
000. 00 
671-92 
307. 57 
780. 00 



Categories of Arms, Ammunition, and Imple- 
ments or War 

The categories of arms, ammunition, and im- 
plements of war in the first column of the tables 
printed above are the categories into which 
those articles were divided in the President's 
proclamation of May 1, 1937, enumerating the 
articles which would be considered as arms, 

413826—41 3 



ammunition, and implements of war for the 
purposes of section 5 of the joint resolution of 
May 1, 1937 [see the Bulletin of July 12, 1941, 
pages 33-35]. 

Special Statistics in Kegard to Arms Exports 
TO Cuba 

In compliance with article II of the conven- 
tion between the United States and Cuba to 
suppress smuggling, signed at Habana, March 
11, 1926, which reads in part as follows : 

"The High Contracting Parties agree that 
clearance of shipments of merchandise by 
water, air, or land, from any of the ports of 
either country to a port of entry of the other 
country, shall be denied when such shipment 
comprises articles the importation of which is 
prohibited or restricted in the country to which 
such shipment is destined, unless in this last 
case there has been a compliance with the 
requisites demanded by the laws of both coun- 
tries." 

and in compliance with the laws of Cuba which 
restrict the importation of arms, ammunition, 
and implements of war of all kinds by requir- 
ing an import pennit for each shipment, ex- 
port licenses for shipments of arms, ammuni- 
tion, and implements of war to Cuba are re- 
quired for the articles enumerated below in 
addition to the articles enumerated in the Presi- 
dent's proclamation of May 1, 1937 : 

(1) Arms and small arms using ammunition 
of caliber .22 or less, other than those classed 
as toys. 

(2) Spare parts of arms and small arms of 
all kinds and calibers, other than those classed 
as toys, and of guns and machine guns. 

(3) Ammunition for the arms and small arms 
under (1) above. 

(4) Sabers, swords, and military machetes 
with cross-guard hilts. 

(5) Explosives as follows: explosive pow- 
ders of all kinds for all purposes; nitrocellulose 
having a nitrogen content of 12 percent or less; 
diphenylamine ; dynamite of all kinds; nitro- 
glycerine; alkaline nitrates (ammonium, po- 
tassium, and sodium nitrate) ; nitric acid; 



204 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



nitrobenzene (essence or oil of mirbane) ; sul- 
phur; sulphuric acid; chlorate of potash; and 
acetones. 

(6) Tear gas (CH.COCH.Cl) and other similar 
non-toxic gases and apparatus designed for the 
storage or projection of such gases. 

Tlae table printed below indicates, in respect 
to licenses authorizing the exportation to Cuba 
of the articles and commodities listed in the 
preceding paragraph, issued by the Secretary of 
State during July 1941, the number of licenses 
and the value of the articles and commodities 
described in the licenses : 



Number of licenses 


Section 


Value 


Total 


31 


(1) 

(2) 


$1, 7S0. 75 

172.00 

4.111.07 

22, 423. 67 










(3) 






(5) 











The table printed below indicates the value 
of the articles and commodities listed above 
expoi'ted to Cuba during July 1941 mider licenses 
issued by the Secretary of State : 



(1) 

(2) 
(3) 
(5) 
(6) 



$808.00 

236. UO 

3, 127. 00 

5. 388. 06 

20. 677. 00 



Helium 

The table printed below gives the essential 
information in regard to the licenses issued dur- 
ing the month of July 1941 authorizing the 
exportation of helium gas under the provisions 
of the act approved on September 1, 1937, and 
the regulations issued pursuant thereto : 



Applicant for license 


Purchaser in 
foreign country 


Country of 
destination 


Quantity 

in cubic 

feet 


Total 
value 


Puritan Compressed 
Gas Corp. 


Audrain y Me- 
dina. 


Cuba 


84. 


$30.00 



Europe 



MEMORANDUM OF BRITISH GOVERNMENT ON DISTRIBUTION OF LEND-LEASE 

MATERIAL 



[Released to the press September 10] 

The text of a memorandum by the British 
Government, together with an exchange of let- 
ters concerning it between Mr. Anthony Eden, 
British Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, 
and Mr. John G. Winant, American Ambassa- 
dor to Great Britain, follows : 

"Foreign Office, S. W. 1, 

"■10th September, 19^1. 
"My Dear Ambassador, 

"With reference to the conversations about 
Lend-Lease material which have recently taken 
place in London and in which you have par- 



ticipated, I enclose a memorandum on the policy 
of His Majesty's Government in the United 
Kingdom with regard to exports from this 
country and with regard to the distribution 
here of Lend-Lease material. I shall be glad 
if you will transmit it to your Government. 
"Yours sincerely, 

Anthony Eden" 

[Enclosure] 

"Memorandum. 

"1. All materials which we obtain under the 
Lend-Lease Act are required for the prosecu- 



SEPTEMBER 13, 1941 



205 



tion of the War eflFort. This pi'inciple governs 
all questions of the distribution and use of such 
goods and His Majesty's Government have 
taken and will continue to take action to secure 
that these goods are not in any case diverted 
to the furtherance of private interests. 
'■'■Expo7't Policy. 

''2. Lend-Lease materials sent to this country 
have not been used for export and every effort 
will be made in the future to ensure that they 
are not used for export, subject to the principle 
that where complete physical segregation of 
Lend-Lease materials is impracticable domestic 
consumption of the material in question shall 
be at least equal to the amounts received under 
Lend-Lease. 

"3. His Majesty's Government have not ap- 
plied and will not apply any materials similar 
to those supplied under Lend-Lease in such a 
way as to enable their exporters to enter new 
markets or to extend their export trade at the 
expense of United States exporters. Owing to 
the need to devote all available capacity and 
man-power to war production, the United King- 
dom export trade is restricted to the irreducible 
minimum necessary to supply or obtain mate- 
rials essential to the war effort. 

"4. For some time past, exports from the 
United Kingdom have been more and more con- 
fined to those essential (I) for the supply of 
vital requirements of overseas countries, par- 
ticularly in the sterling empire ; (H) for the ac- 
quisition of foreign exchange, particularly in 
the Western Hemisphere. His Majesty's Gov- 
ernment have adopted the policy summarized 
below : 

"(I) No materials of a type the use of which 
is being restricted in the United States on the 
gi'ounds of short supply and of which we obtain 
supplies from the United States either by pay- 
ment or on Lend-Lease terms will be used in ex- 
ports with the exception of the following special 
cases : 

"(a) Material which is needed overseas in 
connection with supplies essential to the war 
effort for ourselves and our Allies, and which 
cannot be obtained from the United States. 



"(b) Small quantities of such materials 
needed as minor though essential components 
of exports which otherwise are composed of 
materials not in short supply in the United 
States. 

"(c) Kepair parts for British machinery and 
plant now in use, and machinery and plant 
needed to complete installations now under 
construction, so long as they have already been 
contracted for. 

"Steps have been taken to prevent the export 
(except to Empire and Allied territories) of 
such goods which do not come within the ex- 
ceptions referred to in (a), (b) and (c) above. 

"(II) Materials similar to those being pro- 
vided under Lend-Lease which are not in short 
supply in the United States will not be used 
for export in quantities greater than those 
which we ourselves produce or buy from any 
source. 

'•'■ Distribution in the United Kingdom of Lend- 
Lease goods. 
"5. The general principle followed in this 
matter is that the remuneration received by 
the distributors, whatever the method of dis- 
tribution, is controlled and will be no more 
than a fair return for the services rendered in 
the work of distribution. The arrangements 
rigorously exclude any opportunity for a spec- 
ulative profit by private interests from dealing 
in Lend-Lease goods. In most cases, Lend- 
Lease supplies will be distributed through or- 
ganizations acting as agents of His Majesty's 
Government in the strict sense of the term and 
not as principals. Where for strong practical 
reasons this cannot be done a full explanation 
will be supplied to the United States Adminis- 
tration and their concurrence sought before- 
hand in any alternative arrangements proposed. 
The justification for retaining existing chan- 
nels of distribution operating under strict Gov- 
ernment control, is that the creation of elabo- 
rate new organizations in their place would in- 
evitably result in loss of efficiency and the 
wasteful use of manpower, and retard the war 
effort. In the distribution of Lend-Lease 



206 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



goods there will be no discrimination against 
United States firms. 

"6. Food is a special case. Only some 5 or 
6 percent in tonnage of the total British food 
suppl}' is coming from the United States and 
without great practical complications it would 
be impossible to have a separate system for the 
distribution of Lend-Lease food. Food dis- 
tribution is carried out in the United King- 
dom by wholesalers, to whom the Government 
sells food as principals. In fact, the Minis- 
try of Food has established a close control over 
all distributive margins so that neither the 
wholesalers nor the retailers receive any greater 
remuneration than is adequate to cover the 
cost of the services performed. No food ob- 
tained on Lend-Lease terms is or will be sold 
at uncontrolled prices. Thus the general ar- 
rangements as regards the issue of Lend-Lease 
food fit into His Majesty's Government's pol- 
icy of stabilising the whole price level of food- 
stuffs, a policy to which the Government con- 
tributes £100 millions a year. 



"7. In some cases direct free distribution is 
practicable and will be adopted. For example, 
some milk products (including Lend-Lease sup- 
jjlies from the United States) are distributed 
direct and free of charge to children and others 
in need through schools, clinics and hospitals. 
The distribution is undertaken by State agen- 
cies and the cost of the distribution is borne by 
the Government. 

"Seitember 10, 1941." 



"London, September 10, lOJ^l. 
"Dear Mr. Eden : 

"Thank you for your letter of September 
10th, enclosing a memorandum on United King- 
dom export policy and on the distriliution of 
Lend-Lease material. I have caused the memo- 
randum to be transmitted immediately to Wash- 
ington for the information of my Government. 
"Sincerely yours, 

John W. Winant" 



American Republics 



BRAZIL: ANNIVERSARY OF INDEPENDENCE 



[Roleased to the press September V] 

The following message was read on behalf of 
the President of the United States on radio 
progi-ams transmitted to Brazil on September 
7, 1941 : 

"On this memorable date, we in the United 
States of North America join with you, the 
Government and people of Brazil, in commemo- 
rating the 'grito de Ypiranga' — that resound- 
ing assertion of Brazilian independence which 
was so eloquently voiced by Dom Pedro. 

"This spirit of independence makes us kin- 
dred peoples who can understand, appreciate, 
and respect each other's feelings and main- 
springs of action. The further ties that bind us 
in friendship and mutual interest are many and 
strong. They are also ancient and enduring. 



"Brazil has shown constant devotion to the 
sentiment of fraternity toward all her sister 
nations of the Americas, in deed as well as in 
word. Brazil has steadily rendered service to 
the cause of peaceful arbitration. Brazil har- 
bors no aggressive designs against any nation. 
Brazil's policies have constantly been based upon 
continental friendship and solidarity. The 
United States is in accord with Brazil in these 
principles; it will continue to support them 
with all its moral and material resources. 

"Because of this fundamental sympathy of 
spirit and purpose, President Vargas' recent 
greeting of friendship upon the occasion of our 
own independence day was particularly touch- 
ing to the hearts of the people of the United 
States. Because of it also, it is deeply gratify- 



SEPTEMBER 13, 194 1 



207 



ing to me to return this greeting on behalf of 
the people of my country on this anniversary 
of Brazil's emergence as an independent force 
devoted to the principles of justice and frater- 
nity among independent nations — an emergence 
which we ai'e proud of having been first to 
recognize. 

"Aggression and conquest are now grinding 
hitherto great, happy, and peaceful nations into 
the most abject misei-y and poverty. No nation 
is safe against them. Never was the world 
more in need of a re-establishment of the ideals 
of peace and justice for which Brazil has so 
constantly stood. I know that they will always 
receive support from a Brazil always growing 
in prosperity and prestige." 

(Released to the press September 8] 

The President has sent the following telegram 
to the President of Brazil, His Excellency Dr. 
Getulio Vargas : 

"The WnrTE House, 

"■September 7, 1^1. 

"It gives me the greatest pleasure to greet 
Your Excellency and to extend to you my cor- 
dial congratulations and my sincere good wishes 
for your personal welfare and for the increasing 
happiness and prosperity of the people of Brazil 
on this anniversai-y of Brazil's independence. 

"It is profoundly encouraging to me, as it 
must be to you, to find in the fruitful and cor- 
dial relations which have prevailed between our 
two peoples since the date we are today com- 
memorating a demonstration and a vindication 



of those principles upon which the world of the 
future must be based and to the preservation 
of which our two peoples, in common with those 
of the other American republics, are pledged. 
I am especially happy to have this opportunity 
of expressing my gratitude for the spirit of har- 
mony and cooperation with which you and the 
distinguished members of your Government 
have inspired all discussions of matters of 
mutual interest to our two countries. 

Fr.\nkijn D Roosevelt" 



The Secretary of State has sent the following- 
telegram to His Excellency Oswaldo Aranha, 
Minister for Foreign Relations of Brazil: 

"September 7, 1941. 

"On this memorable date in the history of 
Brazil and of the new world, it gives me the 
greatest satisfaction, after a year in which the 
relations between our two Governments have 
grown closer than ever before, to send to Your 
Excellency my most cordial greetings and to 
express to you my very deep appreciation of 
your friendlj' and constant cooperation during 
the past year. The American republics, con- 
fronted by the menace of those forces of ag- 
gression and conquest which have been un- 
leashed in the world, have need more than ever 
of the firm adherence which Your Excellency 
has demonstrated to the principle of conti- 
nental solidarity for continental defense. 

"Please accept my best wishes for the per- 
sonal happiness and health of Your Excellency. 
CORnELL Htjix" 



General 



THE FAITH AND PHILOSOPHY OF DEMOCRATIC GOVERNMENT 

ADDRESS BY ASSISTANT SECRETARY BERLE i 



(Released to the press September 9] 

You are assembled here to discuss the faith 
and philosophy of democratic government. 
This is all to the good. You realize perfectly 
that you are not talking theory. If what you 
think and say is valid, you yourselves and the 



groups which you represent and influence will 
be drawn almost at once into vivid action. 



' Delivered at the first meeting of the Conference on 
Science, Philosophy, aud Religion at Columbia Univer- 
sity, September 8, 1941. 



208 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



In saying that you are at once drawn into 
tlie field of action, I am not talking academics. 

There are in the United States organizations 
who raise their impetus from foreign powers 
and who follow the deliberations of such groups 
as yours. Note is taken of names and utter- 
ances. The individuals are classified according 
to their views. In due time they are card- 
indexed chiefly for the use of the German Gov- 
ernment. If any of you seem as though you 
might be made of use in a Fascist movement, 
that is recorded. If your minds and hearts place 
you as instinctive enemies, that too is recorded. 
All of this information is kept for future refer- 
ence, and as opportunity appears it will turn 
up in the propaganda or political campaigns 
which are a recognized part of the total war. 
There is nothing unnatural about this, and 
most of us in times like these are only too glad 
to stand up and be counted for the faith that 
is in us. I mention the fact because philosophi- 
cal discussions today are not mere mental exer- 
cises. They are a definite part of a world strug- 
gle. I hope they will become an ever greater 
part. In conferences like these we begin to 
approach those ultimate questions which will 
determine the history of the next era. 

Let me present as a thesis the proposition that 
faith is dynamic and that it is today shaping 
the course of events. Further, the faith which 
we profess and is universal in application of 
necessity must conquer. It will win the present 
war. It will organize the ensuing peace. Be- 
cause the democratic method we profess is the 
political expression of a universal faith, I have 
absolute conviction that at long last it will 
triumph in the cataclysmic struggle now going 
forward. 

This is not the observation of a preacher. It 
is the cold conclusion of a student of affairs. 

Faith is a belief in values so strong that it 
constrains the individual to act above and be- 
yond his apparent personal interests. It is that 
quality of belief in the kinds of value which 
prompts and requires men to do things which 
are intrinsically dangerous, to achieve results 
which by mechanical standards are impossible 



and which in consequence can give the lie to 
apparently overmastering force. The processes 
of its action are incalculable, though we know 
of certain things it can do. 

It can make men act together, for a common 
faith creates brotherhood and alliances by the 
mere fact of its being. 

It can baffle, frustrate, and eventually convert 
even enemies, for it corresponds to a human — 
perhaps a divine — desire which experience 
shows is a part of every human mind and heart. 

These are not abstractions. History teaches 
as its clearest lesson that no nation can be con- 
quered unless it is willing to accept conquest. 
If it preserves a faith in itself, the conqueror 
has failed; if he is not ultimately destroyed, he 
is finally reduced to impotence. 

In the earliest recorded history we have rec- 
ords of two great captivities — the Jewish cap- 
tivity in Egypt and the Jewish captivity in 
Babylon. By all physical and worldly stand- 
ards survival of the Jewish faith and mainte- 
nance of the Jewish nation were literally im- 
possible. Yet the two greatest empires of their 
time met something with which they could not 
cope. The captive might be a slave; but in his 
mind he was free. He had qualities which made 
even his captors seek him in times of stress. 
His fellow captives were not fellow slaves but 
brothers. His spiritual leaders, though they 
were reduced to servitude, were none the less 
captains in a great struggle. 

Shortly after the crucifixion of Christ and in 
the name of the new and universal faith which 
thus reached the Western World, there appeared 
the most amazing proof of the determining 
quality of dynamic faith. All revolutionary 
techniques we know today are merely elabora- 
tions of the method worked out by St. Paul in 
the white heat of his passicm to bring about the 
establisliment of a world based on the principle 
of loving your neighbor as yourself. You re- 
call the story of that astonishing period. 

Because the faith he professed was universal 
and because it included everyone St. Paul could 
and did salute as a brother anyone from em- 
peror to slave. Now the quality of finding him- 
self part of a brotherhood — especially if you 



SEPTEMBEH 13, 194 1 



209 



have been isolated and oppressed — is the most 
thrilling experience that can come to a man. 
Groups started throughout the entire eastein 
empire. The man who was yesterday a com- 
mon soldier, a simple laborer, or a serf regarded 
as an animal suddenly found himself part of a 
family. Even his oppressor ceased to be the 
embodiment of force and became merely an ex- 
tremely wayward brother. Perhaps St. Paul's 
greatest propaganda value (as we should say 
today) occurred during his imprisonment in 
Rome while he was awaiting trial and ultimate 
execution. He was guarded by Roman legion- 
aries to whom he talked. In the Roman Empire 
as in Nazi Germany today life offered very little 
to the common soldier. He was ticketed for a 
hopeless life and ultimate death. To him the 
idea that he was also a man, a part of the great 
historical process, an heir of God, must have had 
a superlative splendor. The guards in St. 
Paul's prison were changed often and sent to all 
parts of the Empire with the result that endless 
cells of Christianity appeared unexplicably all 
over the Empire. This faith that a prisoner 
could impart to his jailer so that a leader any- 
where could share with anyone he chanced to 
meet was a new factor in an Empire built on 
mere personal ambition. You could not meet it 
with armies. You had no ideas which could 
conquer it. Students of this history tell me that 
there is on record a letter from an exceedingly 
puzzled Roman official to his chief wondering 
how you could deal with this — and finding no 
answer. 

Let us translate this experience into modern 
terms. 

The decrees in most of Europe today require 
that a Jew shall wear a yellow star of David. 
This is intended as a badge of dishonor. But 
seen through the eyes of a dynamic faith it be- 
comes a signal of brotherhood. In the tactics 
of passive resistance there is no greater advan- 
tage possible than to be able to distinguish your 
friends and allies from your enemies. So far 
from being the badge of shame which was the 
idea of the ojipressor, it is actually becoming 
the outward and visible symbol of an inward 
and unconquerable strength. 



"WTiat happened nearly three thousand years 
ago in Babylon can happen — and will happen — 
again. Today there is not a single captivity. 
There are many. The Polish Catholic is like- 
wise condemned to wear a separate badge in the 
conquered parts of Europe. By this he knows 
when he meets his brothers of that faith. In 
the unhappy history of Poland this has oc- 
curred before. Never has it been possible to 
kill by any such means that invincible quality 
which has made Poland a continuous factor in 
victory or defeat. You could multiply in- 
stances in the black tale of present-day Europe 
from the Arctic Ocean to the Adriatic, from 
Brest to the banks of the Dnieper Rivei\ The 
outstanding fact is that though armies move 
and can destroy and kill, they cannot build. 
The waste they create is slowly but with deadly 
certainty swallowing the resources of the con- 
quering forces. At this moment there are 
groups of experts in Berlin anxiously reckoning 
their expenditures in destruction and realizing 
that they cannot replace the munitions, the 
civilian supplies, and the lives they have wasted. 
Only dynamic faith and human cooperation can 
build; and without building there is no con- 
tinuing flow of resources by which national life, 
let alone conquest, can be continued. 

To you, the difficulties which are already be- 
ginning to appear in civil and military fronts 
of Europe are readily explicable. For the the- 
ory of the Nazi conquest was not universal but 
particular; it included few and excluded al- 
most everyone. The Nazi "faith" eliminates a 
great part of humanity. The plan of setting 
up a "master race" was in any case scientifi- 
cally silly ; but politically and militarily it was 
infinitely worse. By excluding five-sixths of 
the people in its chosen areas, it arrayed 
against itself the forces it most needed. Be- 
cause these forces were relegated to lowly and 
humble positions they were less visible and 
less easy to deal with. It is fairly easy for 
the gauleiter of an alleged master race to im- 
prison or shoot a civil governor and put in one 
of his own men. But he cannot find, still less 
shoot, all of the people who keep the drains 
open or the streets clean, who keep the water 



210 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



flowing into the houses or the lights lighted in 
the thoroughfares. 

In modern life the ultimate controls lie with 
the little people who actually labor with their 
hands on the mechanisms which keep civiliza- 
tion going. Wlienever they stop wanting to 
do these things or whenever the civilization 
they are supposed to operate with the sweat of 
their brows ceases to be an expression of the 
faith they have, the machine stops going. Still 
worse, it may go into reverse. In that mo- 
ment the master becomes not a dominant force 
but a hunted figure. The conqueror walks the 
streets in constant fear. His armed forces, 
though not a word is said, know that they are 
surrounded by a force they do not under- 
stand — a force which one day will mean that 
they will not eat. The would-be rulers of an 
empire become a handful of people, with arms 
in their hands it is true, but with their backs 
against a wall. 

This is what is happening on the Continent 
of Europe today. There is not a single fraction 
of the entire mechanism which its Nazi con- 
querors can trust. The more intelligent of 
those conquerors are desperately seeking for 
some exit from a situation which they them- 
selves have created. Yet there can be no exit 
so long as they profess and practice an outlaw 
faith which by their own choice cuts them off 
as effectively from most of mankind as though 
they were lepers. 

With this new demonstration of a very old 
historical truth you will perhaps understand 
why some of us have never doubted the final 
victory over the present disaster. We have 
seen it happen too often! We know that by 
mathematical calculation a year ago last June 
it seemed impossible that Britain should not be 
forced to her knees. Military experts added up 
their figures and could come to no other con- 
clusion. The Germans were so sure of it that 
they found it inconceivable that a sane British 
Government should not recognize what were as- 
sumed to be "facts" and promptly negotiate 
peace. They were so sure of their supremacy 
that they apparently expected the United States 
as a friend of England to counsel her to give in. 



The British did not believe it and we did not 
believe it. The course of the next few months 
showed that there was more to a world struggle 
and a world revolution than mere military 
mathematics. 

We have seen the same thing happen in China. 
We are seeing it occur elsewhere. We have 
seen that the countries standing by their faith 
even though it meant temporary eclipse are 
today actually more alive and more vigorous 
than those which abandoned their faith and 
accepted the outlaw doctrine of exclusive force. 

In the long run the universal faith which 
begins with the assumption that all men are 
brothers and which backs that up by sharing 
with them the conduct of affairs, invariably 
produces in every line of endeavor an ultimate 
superiority. This is the quality of democracy. 

Because of this very conviction in the tri- 
umph of universal faith and any government 
based on it, it is well that we consult together 
to see what we can do to strengthen that faith 
and action. By definition faith must be a be- 
lief so strong that it requires men to act not 
merely in their own interest but in the interest 
of all of the brotherhood. Unless the will is 
strong enough to translate faith into life and 
action, the belief scarcely merits the dignity of 
the great word "faith". 

Many people come to me in Washington, 
chiefly to ask a single question, "What can I 
do in this situation?" Commonly their desire 
is to offer their services to the Government. 
And I have always answered, "Look around. 
Everyone cannot go into the Army and the 
Navy nor can everyone enter the Government 
service. Is there anything you can do where 
you are?" For faith is a total conception. You 
defend it with armies if need be. You forward 
it by the conventional work of the state. But 
both these activities are only a mere fraction 
of the aggi-egate life of a nation. 

As Americans we ai-e a brotherhood, and we 
are proud to say that that brotherhood excludes 
no one. As a Nation we are proud that our 
friendship and our brotherhood are open to 
every country which meets us in like spirit. 
We do not have nations or nationalities as ene- 



SEPTEMBER 13, 1941 



211 



mies. We do struggle against lawlessness and 
against cruelty, against hatred and against op- 
pression, against fear and slavery and want. So 
far as we can we must eliminate all of those 
qualities within the United States. If there- 
fore anyone carries on the struggle against in- 
justice or want or race hatred or selfishness in 
his own community he has joined in the strug- 
gle for the liberation of the world. Any ele- 
ment, however small, of strength that he can 
contribute adds to the strength of the Nation 
and to the strength of that free faith which 
alone will create a world in which we are will- 
ing to live. 

As individuals the faith of a democracy de- 
mands that we recognize as brothers the people 
high and low with whom we have daily contact. 
If there is injustice, political or economic, 
within our circle our faith demands that we 
join in insisting that the wrong be righted. Do 
not think that this is a counsel of abstractions. 
We have watched the propaganda techniques 
of unfriendly countries. We have seen that 
they try first to create injustice where that can 
be done, and then to capitalize the result as a 
proof that this faith we profess is a meaning- 
less thing. 

It is at this point that we justifiably call in 
what used to be called "science" and what today 
we may call technique. 

The techniques of modern life — our engi- 
neering, our chemistry, our medicine, and our 
military armaments: our industrial organiza- 
tion and our methods of supplj' — are tools only. 



In and of themselves they do nothing. What 
they achieve is the desire of men's minds. 

It so happens that in my academic work I 
have had much to do with what is called the 
"social sciences". It took a long time for mod- 
ern economists to learn that economy is not 
merely the result of production and distribu- 
tion but that it reflects the aggregate desires of 
men in respect of the world in which they wish 
to live. This was not an easy lesson. Yet the 
fact is that the world we live in is the world 
we want to live in; it is the product of our 
desires carried into execution by our rapidly 
widening techniques. 

But these techniques are superb. On the 
physical side we now have in our hands the 
tools which can create any condition we really 
desire. If we want a population living in rela- 
tive ease, we can have it. If we want a popula- 
tion physically feeble and interested only in 
minor luxuries, we can have that. In older 
times it used to be said that people got the kind 
of government they deserved. Today it can 
certainly be said of us that our people will live 
the kind of life, will create the kind of com- 
munities, and will build the kind of cities they 
truly wish. 

America has at her command the power to 
defend the faith that is in her. She has the 
power to create a civilization unmatched in 
history, when the need of defense shall have 
passed. To you whose duty it is to strengthen 
her faith, we bid God-speed. 



Cultural Relations 



MUSIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



[Released to the press September 12J 

On September 2, 1941 President Roosevelt 
approved the appointment of the Advisory 
Committee on Music to advise the Department 
of State through the Division of Cultural Rela- 
tions regarding the stimulation of musical inter- 



change among the American republics and the 
coordination of activities in this country which 
concern inter-American music.^ 



' For advisory committees in other fields of cultural 
relations and their memberships, see the Bulletin of 
May 17, 1941, p. 603, and August 23, 1941, p. 154. 



212 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The i^ersonnel of the Committee, which is to 
serve jointly during the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1942, for the Office of the Coordinator of 
Inter-American Affairs and for the Depart- 
ment of State, is as follows: 

Warren D. Allen, Professor of Music, Stanford Uni- 
versity, Stanford University, Calif. 

Marshall Bartliolomew, Director, Yale University Glee 
Club, New Haven, Conn. 

John W. Beattie, Mus.D., Dean, School of Music, 
Northwestern University, Evanston, 111. 

William Berrien, Ph.D., Adviser on Latin American 
Studies, American Council of Learned Societies, 
Washington, D. C. 



Evans Clark, Executive Director, Twentieth Century 
Fund, New York, N. Y. 

Aaron Copland, President, American Composers Alli- 
ance, New York, N. Y. 

Earl V. Moore, Mus.D., Director, School of Music, 
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

RnsseU V. Morgan, Mus.D., Director of Music, Cleve- 
land Public Schools and Professor of Music, West- 
ern Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Carleton Sprague Smith, Ph.D., Chief of Music Divi- 
sion, New York Public Library, New York, N. Y. 

Davidson Taylor, Assistant to the Vice President, Co- 
lumbia Broadcasting System, New York, N. Y. 



PHYSICIANS FROM OTHER AMERICAN REPUBLICS TO STUDY IN THE 

UNITED STATES 



In cooperation with the Department of 
State and the Pan American Sanitary Bureau, 
the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs has 
awarded fellow.ships to eight physicians from 
five American republics for special graduate 
study in the United States. These physicians 
from Brazil, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, 
Paraguay, and Venezuela will study at out- 
standing medical institutions in the United 
States. 

The physicians who will receive fellowships 
and the institutions to which they have been 
assigned are as follows : 
Brazil 

Dr. Aurelio Monteiro, who graduated from the Na- 
tional School of Medicine of Rio de Janeiro, receiving 
honors in gynecology, is a member of the Society of 
Medicine and Surgery of Rio de Janeiro and of the 
Brazilian Society of Gynecology, and was also winner 
of the 1939 Gynecology Prize of the Society of Medicine 
and Surgery. Preparatory to becoming an assistant in 
the Department of Surgery of the National School of 
Medicine of Rio de Janeiro, Dr. Monteiro will study at 
the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. 

Dominican Republic 

Dr. Rafael Arturo BatUe, who graduated from the 
National University of Santo Domingo in 1938, will 
study under Dr. Hugh Young at the Brady Urological 
Institute of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. 
Upon his return to his own country, Dr. BatUe will 
head the Urological Service of the new hospital which 
the Government has opened at Ciudad Trujillo. 



Dr. L. F. Thomen, who graduated from the University 
of Santo Domingo in 19o6 and from Tulane University 
in 1938, will study in the Johns Hopkins School of 
Hygiene and Public Health in Baltimore and later will 
visit the State Health Departments of Virginia and 
Georgia. 

Mexico 

Dr. Feliciano Palomino-Dena, who graduated from 
the Army Medical School in Mexico City, is a major 
in the Medical Corps of the Mexican Army and has 
been director of the aiexican Federal Hospital for Drug 
Addicts. He will study ophthalmology at Columbia 
University, New York City, or at the Eye and Ear In- 
firmary of Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. 

Dr. Rodolfo Vera-Barriguete, who graduated from the 
Army Medical School in Mexico City, is now studying 
at the Tuberculosis Division of the Health Departments 
of the District of Columbia and Baltimore. After com- 
pleting his studies there, he will go to the Henry Phipps 
Institute in Philadelphia. 

Pabaqtjat 

Dr. Rafll Pena, Director of Health and Chief of the 
National Health Laboratories of Paraguay, is studying 
and observing the activities of the District of Columbia 
Health Department and the Health Departments of the 
States of Virginia, Georgia, and New York. Later Dr. 
Pena will visit the Venereal Disease Clinic of the 
United States Public Health Service at Hot Springs, 
Ark., and will attend meetings of public-health 
societies. 

Venezttei.a 

Dr. R. A. Salas- Victoria, of the Venezuelan Ministry 
of Health, will study public-health subjects at the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, including field work. 



SEPTEMBER 13, 1941 



213 



Dr. Francisco Scannone, graduate of the Central 
University of Venezuela, will study iu the Venereal 
Disease Clinic of the United States Public Health Serv- 
ice at Baltimore and later probably will go to the 
Public Health Service Venereal Disease Clinic at Hot 
Springs, Ark. On his return to Venezuela, Dr. Scan- 
none will be connected with the Division of Venereal 
Disease Control of his country. 



The Department 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

Mr. William C. Burdett, a Foreign Service 
officer of class I, was designated to succeed Mr. 
J. Klalir Huddle as Director of the Foreign 
Service Officers' Training School, effective Au- 
gust 28, 1941 (Departmental Order 966). 

Mr. John M. Begg was designated an Assist- 
ant Chief of the Division of Cultural Kelations, 
effective September 6, 1941 (Departmental 
Order 965). 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press September 13] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since September 6, 
1941: 

The assigmnent of Carol H. Foster, of An- 
napolis, Md., as Consul General at Johannes- 
burg, Union of South Africa, has been can- 
celed. In lieu thereof, Mr. Foster has been 
assigned for duty in the Department of State. 

Lucien Memminger, of Charleston, S. C, who 
has been serving as Consul General at Copen- 
hagen, Denmark, has been designated First 
Secretary of Legation at Pretoria, Union of 
South Africa. 

Leslie E. Reed, of St. Paul, Minn., who has 
been serving as First Secretary of Legation and 
Consul General at Athens, Greece, has been 



designated First Secretary of Legation and 
Consul General at San Jose, Costa Rica, and 
M'ill serve in dual capacity. 

Alfred W. Klieforth, of Boalsburg, Pa., who 
has been serving as Consul General at Cologne, 
Germany, has been assigned as Consul General 
at Winnipeg, Canada. 

Harold B. Quarton, of Algona, Iowa, now 
serving in the Department of State, has been 
assigned as Consul General at Keijo, Cliosen. 

Thormod O. Klath, of Sioux City, Iowa, 
Commercial Attache at Bern, Switzerland, has 
been designated Commercial Attache at Stock- 
holm, Sweden. 

John M. Cabot, of Cambridge, Mass., Second 
Secretary of Legation at Guatemala, Guate- 
mala, has been assigned for duty in the Depart- 
ment of State. 

George Alexander Armstrong, of New York, 
N. Y., Consul at Malaga, Spain, has been as- 
signed as Consul at Manchester, England. 

Howard F. Withey, of Reed City, Mich., who 
has been serving as Consul at Trieste, Italy, 
has been assigned as Consul at Veracruz, 
Mexico. 

Archer Woodford, of Paris, Ky., who has 
been serving as Consul at Hamburg, Germany, 
has been assigned as Consul at Calcutta, India. 

Richard S. Huestis, of Ticonderoga, N. Y., 
who has been serving as Consul at Rotterdam, 
Netherlands, has been assigned as Consul at 
Cardiff, Wales. 

Frederick W. Hinke, of Auburn, N. Y., Con- 
sul at Tientsin, China, has been assigned as 
Consul at Shanghai, China. 

Roy E. B. Bower, of Alameda, Calif., who 
has been serving as Consul at Munich, Germany, 
has been assigned as Consul at Calcutta, India. 

Charles E. Brookhart, of Washington, Iowa, 
Consul at London, England, has been assigned 
as Consul at Shanghai, China. 

H. Gordon Minnigerode, of Washington, 
D. C, Vice Consul at Singapore, Straits Settle- 
ments, has been designated Third Secretary of 
Legation and Vice Consul at San Jose, Costa 
Rica, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Hiram Bingham, Jr., of New Haven, Conn., 
now serving in the Department of State, has 



214 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



been assigned as Vice Consul at Buenos Aires, 
Argentina. 

James M. Gilchrist, Jr., of Chicago, 111., now 
serving in the Department of State, has been 
assigned as Vice Consul at Halifax, Canada. 

Hartwell Johnson, of Aiken, S. C, Third 
Secretary of Legation at Guatemala, Guate- 
mala, has been designated Third Secretary of 
Embassy and Vice Consul at Lima, Peru, and 
will serve in dual capacity. 

The assignment of Lewis E. Gleeck, Jr., of 
Chicago, 111., as Third Secretary of Embassy 
and Vice Consul at Moscow, Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics, has been canceled. In lieu 



thereof, Mr. Gleeck has been designated Third 
Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul at Hel- 
sinki, Finland, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Herbert V. Olds, of Lynn, Mass., who has 
been serving as Vice Consul at Rotterdam, 
Netherlands, has been assigned as Vice Consid 
at Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Edmund A. GuUion, of Lexington, Ky., who 
has been serving as Vice Consul at Salonika, 
Greece, has been assigned as Vice Consul at 
Calcutta, India. 

Boies C. Hart, Jr., of Mystic, Conn., Vice 
Consul at Shanghai, China, has been designated 
Third Secretary of Embassy at Nanking, China. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



FINANCE 



AGREEMENT WITH HAITI 



[Released to the press September 13] 

The Government of the Republic of Haiti 
announced at Port-au-Prince on September 13 
the signature by the representatives of the Gov- 
ernments of the United States and of Haiti of 
an agreement defining the financial relations 
between the two countries. The purpose of the 
agreement is to modernize the fiscal machinery 
set up in 1915 while adequately safeguarding 
the interests of the holders of the 1922 and 1923 
Haitian bonds. The offices of Fiscal Eej^re- 
sentative and Deputy Fiscal Representative are 
terminated. 

The framework of the new agreement derives 
from the negotiations conducted last April by 
President Elie Lescot of Haiti, then President- 
elect, and the Under Secretary of State of the 
United States, Sumner Welles.^ The text of 
the agreement was developed in the couree of 



' Bulletin of May 10, 1941, p. 567. 



conversations conducted in the Department 
during July with the Minister of Haiti to the 
United States, M. Fernand Dennis, and the 
Haitian Minister of Finance, M. Abel Lacroix. 

Under the agreement the National Bank of 
the Republic of Haiti is charged with tlie super- 
vision of the accounting and disbursing sj'stems 
and the collection of customs and internal rev- 
enues in the Rei^ublic. The Bank becomes the 
sole depository of Government funds and the 
Haitian Minister of Finance undertakes to 
transfer to a representative of the holders the 
sums necessary for the service of the outstand- 
ing Haitian dollar bonds. 

The Board of Directors of the reorganized 
Bank consists of six voting members, of whom 
three are citizens of Haiti and three are citizens 
of the United States. Decisions of the Board 
require a majority vote. The President of the 
Republic of Haiti appoints the Haitian mem- 
bers, while the United States members are 
chosen by agreement between the two Govern- 
ments. In this connection there were ex- 
changed simultaneously with the signature of 



SEPTEMBER 13, 1941 



215 



the agreement notes signed by the Foreign 
Minister of Haiti and the American Minister 
to Haiti agreeing upon the three United States 
members. 

Two co-presidents of the Bank are provided 
for in the agreement. One of these, the Haitian 
Minister of Finance, is ex officio tlie honorary 
president who shall preside at the meetings of 
the Board. The other co-president is one of the 
United States members of the Board who is 
designated to represent the holders of the 
1922 and 1923 bonds and to coordinate and di- 
rect the functions and activities of the two vice 
presidents who are chosen by the Board. One 
of the vice presidents is charged with supervis- 
ing and carrying out the commercial operations 
of the Bank, and the other with supervising and 
carrying out the fiscal functions of the Bank, 
under the immediate direction of the president 
responsible for such work. 

The interest and amortization service of the 
1922 and 1923 bonds constitute an irrevocable 
first lien u^Don the revenues of the Government 
of Haiti. The agreement specifies that until 
the amortization of the bonds has been com- 
pleted, the public debt of the Republic of Haiti 
shall not be increased except by agreement be- 
tween the two Governments. Furthermore it is 
provided that in the event that the total reve- 
nues of the Government should in any fiscal year 
exceed $7,000,000, additional sums shall be ap- 
plied to the sinking fund for the redemption of 
bonds. \ 

By the exchange of notes the following 
United States members of the Board have been 
designated : 

Mr. W. H. Williams, a resident of Port-au- 
Prince and the General Manager of the Na- 
tional Bank of the Republic of Haiti for a num- 
ber of years; becomes one of the co-presidents. 

Mr. Thomas Pearson, of Asheville, N. C, a 
member of the American commission to reor- 
ganize and administer the finances of Persia 
from 1922 to 1927, and from 1937 to 1941 Dep- 
uty General Receiver of Dominican Customs. 



Mr. Edward F. Roosevelt, of New York, a 
representative for several years of American 
business firms in France, Belgium, and Spain; 
from 1937 to 1939 Commissioner to South 
America for the New York World's Fair, and in 
1940 Director of Foreign Government Partici- 
pation in the Fair. 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATION CONVENTION 

Portugal — Portuguese Colonies 

By a note dated September 4, 1941 the Span- 
ish Ambassador at Washington informed the 
Secretary of State that on July 3, 1941 the 
instrument of ratification by Portugal of the 
International Telecommunication Convention 
signed at Madrid on December 9, 1932, was de- 
posited with the Spanish Government. The 
ratification includes also the Portuguese Col- 
onies. 



By a second note dated September 4, 1941 
the Spanish Ambassador informed the Secre- 
tary of State that the Embassy of Italy at 
Madrid in a note dated July 2, 1941 informed 
the Spanish Government of the adherence "of 
the independent state of the Kingdom of Croa- 
tia" to the International Telecommunication 
Convention signed at Madrid on December 9, 
1932. 



Regulations 



Export Control Schedule No. 18 [determining, effec- 
tive September 10, 1941, the forms, conversions, and 
derivatives of animal products, textile fibers and man- 
ufactures, wood and pai>er, nonmetallic minerals, non- 
ferrous metals, precious metals, as designated in Proc- 
lamation 2503; sole leather and belting leather (items 3 
and 4, Proclamation 2460) ; and asbestos (item 2c, Proc- 
lamation 2413)]. August 20, 1941. (Administrator of 
Export Control.) 6 Federal Register 4664. 



For sale by the Superintendent o£ Documents, Washington, D. C— Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PDBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIEECTOK OP THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 



SEPTEMBER 20, 1941 
Vol. V, No. 117— Publication 1641 



G 



ontents 



Europe Page 

Definition of term "United Kingdom" 219 

Return of American citizens from the British Isles . . 221 

Commercial Policy 

Requirements for entry of coffee into the United 

States 221 

National Defense 

Licensing of exports 222 

Cultural Relations 

Short-wave radio-program schedules for other American 

republics 223 

Legislation 223 

The Foreign Service 

Promotions 224 

Personnel changes 226 

Treaty Information 

Commerce: Inter-American Coffee Agi-ecment .... 227 
Telecommunications: International Telecommunication 

Convention 227 

Sovereignty: Convention on the Provisional Adminis- 
tration of European Colonies and Possessions in the 
Americas 227 

Regulations 228 

Publications 228 




U. S. SUPERINTfNDENT OF DOCUMENTS 

OCT 14 1941 



Europe 



DEFINITION OF TERM "UNITED KINGDOM" 



[Released to the press September 15] 

The President's proclamation of November 4, 
1939,' issued under section 1 (a) of the Neu- 
trality Act of 1939, proclaimed the existence 
of a state of war "... between Germany and 
France; Poland; and the United Kingdom, 
India, Australia, Canada, New Zealand and 
the Union of South Africa . . ." 

On August 27, 1941 the Secretary of State 
requested from the Acting Attorney General a 
formal opinion as to whether the term ''United 
Kingdom" as used in the proclamation might 
properly be construed as including only Eng- 
land, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland, 
and as not including the overseas territories 
and possessions of Great Britain not expressly 
enumerated in the proclamation. The Acting 
Attorney General concluded that that term is 
properly to be construed as including only 
England, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ire- 
land and not the overseas territories and pos- 
sessions of Great Britain not thus expressly 
enumerated. 

The restrictions of section 2 (a) of the Neu- 
trality Act of 1939 apply only to the carriage 
of passengers, articles, or materials to states 
named in proclamations issued under section 
1 (a) of the Act. Accordingly, transportation 
of passengers and any articles or materials in- 
cluding arms, ammunition, or implements of 
war to the overseas colonies and possessions of 
Great Britain which are not in a combat area 
and which are not specifically enumerated in 



the proclamation of November 4, 1939 is not 
prohibited by the Neutrality Act of 1939. 

The text of the Acting Attorney General's 
opinion follows : 

"Office of the Attorket General, 

''Washington, D. C, August 29, lO^l. 
"The Honorable 

"The Secretary of State. 
"Mt Dear Mr. Secretary: 

"I have your letter of August 27 ^ requesting 
my opinion whether the term 'United King- 
dom,' as used in the President's proclamation 
of November 4, 1939 (4 F.R. 4493), issued un- 
der the Neutrality Act of 1939, may be con- 
strued as 'including only England, Wales, 
Scotland and Northern Ireland and as not in- 
cluding the overseas territories and possessions 
of the British Empire'. 

"The proclamation reads in pertinent part as 
follows : 

" 'Now, Therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, 
President of the United States of America, act- 
ing under and by virtue of the authority con- 
ferred on me by the said joint resolution, do 
hereby proclaim that a state of war unhappily 
exists between Germany and France; Poland; 
and the United Kingdom, India, Australia, 
Canada, New Zealand and the Union of South 
Africa, and that it is necessary to promote the 
security and preserve the peace of the United 
States and to protect the lives of citizens of 
the United States.' 



' BiiUelin of November 4, 1939, p. 453. 
4153S3^1 



' Not printed. 



219 



220 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



"The generally accepted meaning of 'United 
Kingdom' is reflected in the definition set forth 
in "Webster's New International Dictionary of 
the English Language, Second Edition, 1939. 
Here the term is defined as follows : 

^'■'■United Kingdom, the. Great Britain and 
Ireland ; — so called from January 1, 1801, when 
the Legislative Union went into operation, to 
1922 when, after the establishment of the Irish 
Free State, the remaining portion was officially 
called the United Kingdom of Great Britain 
and Northern Ireland. By act of Parliament, 
1927, the words "United Kingdom" were 
omitted from the title of the king.' 

"This definition is entirely consistent with 
well-established English usage. Thus, in Pro- 
fessor Dicey 's work on Conflict of Laws (Sec- 
ond Edition, 1908) 'United Kingdom' is defined 
as follows (at y>- 68) : 

" ' "United Kingdom" means the United 
Kingdom of England, Scotland, and Ireland, 
and the islands adjacent thereto, but does not 
include either the Isle of Man or the Channel 
Islands.' 

See also Keith, The Governments of the British 
Empire (1935) p. 20. 

"The origin of the English usage was the 
Union of Ireland Act, which provided that 'the 
said Kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland 
shall ... be united into one Kingdom by the 
name of The United Kingdom of Great Britain 
and Ireland'; 39 & 40 G. 3, c. 67 (1800). The 
same meaning was also given to the term under 
discussion in the Interpretation Act of 1889, 52 
& 53 V. c. G3, s. 18, which iDrovided as follows : 

" 'In this act, and in every act passed after 
the commencement of this act, the following 
expressions shall, unless the contrary intention 
appears, have the meanings hereby respectively 
assigned to them, namely — 

'"(1) The expression "British Isles" shall 
mean the United Kingdom, the Channel Islands 
and the Isle of Man.' 

"Although the foregoing provision does not 
directly define 'United Kingdom,' it points ir- 



resistibly to the conclusion that 'United King- 
dom' is limited to the British Isles and does not 
include the overseas possessions, or dependen- 
cies, or mandates of the British Empire. This 
is true because that provision makes 'British 
Isles,' which clearly does not include overseas 
possessions or dependencies, more extensive 
than 'United Kingdom.' The definition in the 
Interpretation Act reflected a well-established 
usage which had been embodied in specific defi- 
nitions of the term 'United Kingdom' in pre- 
vious statutes, such as An Act to Consolidate 
and Amend the Laws relating to Bankruptcy 
and Insolvency in Ireland (1857) 20 & 21 V. 
c. 60 s. 4 ; An Act to Alter Certain Duties and 
to Amend the Laws relating to Customs (1867), 
30 & 31 V. c. 82 s. 5 ; An Act for Improving the 
Condition of Mates and Seamen and Maintain- 
ing Discipline in the Merchant Service (1850) 
13 and 14 V. c. 93, s. 2. 

"The separation of Northern and Southern 
Ireland by the Government of Ireland Act of 
1920, and the creation of the Irish Free State 
by the Irish Free State (Agreement) Act, 1922, 
12 G. 5, c. 4, required, of course, a change in 
tlie definition of the term 'United Kingdom.' 
Accordingly, statutes passed shortly after 
these acts contained the following specific 
definition : 

"'"United Kingdom" means Great Britain 
and Northern Ireland.' 

See e.g., Settled Land Act, 1925, 15 G. 5, c. 18, 
s. 117; Trustees Act, 1925, 15 G. 5, c. 19, s. 68; 
Law of Property Act, 1925, 15 G. 5, c. 20, s. 205; 
Land Registration Act, 1925, 15 G. 5, c. 21, s. 3; 
Merchant Shipping Act, 1925, 15 & 16 G. 5, c. 37, 
s. 3; Teachers Act, 1925, 15 & 16 G. 5, c. 59, s. 
18; Workmen's Compensation Act, 1925, 15 & 
16 G. 5, c. 84, s. 48; Merchandise Marks Act, 
1926, 16 & 17 G. 5, c. 53, s. 10. 

"In 1927, a new interpretation statute. Royal 
Parliamentary Titles Act, 17 G. 5, c. 4, was 
passed to reflect the change in political struc- 
ture and provided in section 2, as follows : 

" 'In every act passed and public documents 
issued after the passage of this act the expres- 
sion "United Kingdom" shall, unless the con- 



SEPTEMBER 20, 1941 



221 



text otherwise requires, mean Great Britain 
and Northern Ireland.' 

"The applicable court decisions show a uni- 
form judicial interpretation of the term 
'United Kingdom' in complete harmony with 
the legislative definitions set forth above. See 
e.g., Turribnll v. Solicitor of Inland Revenue, 
42 Sc. L.R. 15 (1904) ; DeBeers Consolidated 
Mine Ltd. v. Howe, (1906) A.C. 455; Tomalin 
V. S. Pearson & Son Ltd., (1909) 2 K. B. 61. 

"The foregoing discussion demonstrates that 
the term 'United Kingdom' is a term of art 
with a well-settled and precise meaning. No 
contrary purpose appearing, well-settled canons 
of constructions require that the term as used 
in the proclamation should be given this 
meaning. 

"For the reasons given it is my opinion that 
the term 'United Kingdom' as used in the 
proclamation of November 4. 1939, is properly 
to be construed as including only England. 
Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland and not 
the overseas territories and possessions of the 
British Empire. 

"Respectfully, 

"FlL\NCIS BiDDLE 

Acting Attorney General" 



RETURN OF AMERICAN CITIZENS FROM 
THE BRITISH ISLES 

In view of the complete lack of normal 
travel facilities from the British Isles to the 
United States, the Secretary of State, exer- 
cising the discretion resting in him under the 
Neutrality Act of 1939, has authorized Ameri- 
can citizens to travel from the British Isles to 
the United States on belligerent vessels at their 
own risk when no other means of transporta- 
tion are available, and has instructed the 
American Ambassador to work out an equi- 
table procedure. 

Some such arrangement became necessary by 
reason of the fact that under the provisions of 
the Nationality Act of 1940 certain American 
citizens now residing in the British Isles will 
lose their American citizenship on October 14, 
1941 unless they return to the United States 
by that date. 

In considering some relief for this group of 
American citizens, it was felt that similar re- 
lief should be accorded all other American 
citizens now residing in the British Isles who 
are willing to risk the danger of the journey 
across the North Atlantic on a belligerent ship 
at this time. 



Commercial Policy 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ENTRY OF COFFEE INTO THE UNITED STATES 



[Released to the press September 18] 

The President signed an Executive order on 
September 17, 1941, prescribing regulations 
pertaining to the entry of coffee into the United 
States from countries which are signatories of 
the Inter- American Coffee Agreement. 

The oi'der is designed to prevent the diver- 
sion to the United States of coffee shipped from 
the producing countries under their quotas for 
exports to the market outside the United States. 
Such diversion of coffee shipments may result 
in the filling of the United States import quotas 



before the producing countries' export quotas 
for the United States market are exhausted. 
This situation would interfere with the normal 
operations of the coffee trade and, in certain 
instances, would make it impossible for the 
traders to make deliveries in fulfilment of con- 
tracts. 

The order establishes a procedure for coordi- 
nating control of coffee exjjorts by the produc- 
ing countries with conti-ol of coffee imports by 
tlie United States. This procedure requires 
that the usual invoice of shipment certified by a 



222 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



United States consular officer shall include a 
statement signed by the officer to the effect that 
an official document required by article VI of 
the agreement has been presented sliowing that 
the coffee has been authorized for exjiortation 
to the United States, and also requires that the 
entry of coffee into the United States shall be 
made only upon presentation of such an invoice. 

This order is effective immediately, and the 
certified consular invoice described above is re- 
quired in the case of any shipment of coffee 
from a signatory country presented for entry 
for consumption in the United States on or 
after October 1, 1941 except as stated below. 

This order does not apply to shipments of 
coffee valued at less than $100. 

In cases where the invoice is late in arriving, 
the importer is permitted to make entry of the 
shipment upon the posting of a bond to produce 
the invoice within a period of six months. It 
is understood that the Secretary of the Treasury 
will exercise under existing law such authority 
regarding the posting and cancelation of the 
bond as may be appropriate and necessary to 
serve fully the purpose of the order. 

Provision is also made in the order to permit 
the entry into the United States of coffee 
shipped from the producing country on a 
through bill of lading prior to the date of the 
order. This is designed to avoid inconvenience 
or hardship that might otherwise arise when 
the new procedure comes into effect. However, 
other shipments made prior to that date, if 
valued at $100 or more, will require for entry 
into the United States an invoice certified in 
accordance with the provisions of the order. 

The text of the Executive order follows: 

ExECDTivE Order 

PRESCRIBING REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO THE 
ENTRY OF COFFEE INTO THE UNPTED STATES FROM 
COUNTRIES SIGNATORIES OF THE INTER- AMERICAN 
COFFEE AGREEMENT 

By virtue of the authority vested in me by 
section 2 of the joint resolution of Congress ap- 
proved April 11, 1941 (Public Law 33, 77th 
Cong., 1st sess.) it is hereby ordered as follows: 



1. No invoice of coffee produced in a country 
which is a signatory of the Inter-American Cof- 
fee Agreement shall be certified hereafter by a 
United States consular officer unless there shall 
be produced to the certifying officer an official 
document, required by Article VI of the Agree- 
ment, showing that the coffee is within the pro- 
ducing country's quota for exportation to 
United States customs territory. 

2. Beginning October 1, 1941, coffee produced 
in a country which is a signatory of the Inter- 
American Coffee Agreement shall not be admit- 
ted to entry for consumption in the customs ter- 
ritory of the United States unless there shall be 
produced for each shipment of such coffee an 
invoice bearing a certificate of a United States 
consular officer that there has been presented to 
him an official document required by Article VI 
of the Agreement showing that such shipment is 
within the producing country's quota for expor- 
tation to United States customs territory; ex- 
cept that any such shipment may be so entered 
without the production of such an invoice if the 
shipment is valued at less than $100, or if there 
is given a bond conditioned for the production 
of such an invoice within six months from the 
date of entry, or if the coffee was shipped from 
the producing country under a through bill of 
lading to the United States prior to the date of 
this order. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 
The White House, 

Septeviber 17, 19^1. 
[No. 8902] 



National Defense 



LICENSING OF EXPOETS 

The Office of the Administrator of Export 
Control has been placed under the Economic 
Defense Board by an Executive order of Sep- 
tember 15, 1941 (no. 8900) , which amends Exec- 
utive Order 8839 of July 30, 1941 ^ establishing 
the Board. The text of the Executive order of 



^Bulletin of August 2, 1941, p. 97. 



SEPTEMBER 20, 1941 



223 



September 15 is printed in the Federal Register 
of September 19, 1941, page 4795. 

[Released to the press September 15] 

The Secretary of State announced on Sep- 
tember 15 that general licenses G-1 to G-66 and 
G-68 to G-78 have been amended to include the 
forms, conversions, and derivations of wood 
and paper as set forth in Export Control 
Schedule 20." Contrary to a previous announce- 
ment, general license G-63 authorizing exjDorta- 
tions to the Philippines does not include Sitka 
spruce listed in Export Control Schedule 18. 

Collectors of customs were informed on Sep- 
tember 17, 1941 that, since sulfanilamide, phe- 
nolphthalein, and acetophenetidine do not fall 
within the definition of "Other finished coal- 
tar products (exclusive of medicinals)", which 
appears in Export Control Schedule 17 under 
Schedule B, number 8069.99, no license is re- 
quired for their exportation. 

On September 19, collectors were informed 
that the consolidation of general licenses does 
not alter in any respect the present status and 
the present code-symbol designations of general 
in-transit licenses or of the special petroleum 
licenses GEG and GEH. 



Cultural Relations 



SHORT-WAVE R A D I - P R O G R A M 
SCHEDULES FOR OTHER AMERICAN 
REPUBLICS 

In cooperation with the Department of State 
the Office of the Coordinator of Inter-Ameri- 
can Affairs has completed plans for the com- 
piling in Spanish, Portuguese, and English of 
short-wave radio-program schedules for mail- 
ing to the other American republics. 

Tlie schedules will be mailed regularly by the 
Office of the Coordinator to United States 
missions and to a selected mailing list in the 
other American republics. Forty thousand 



programs for the week of October 12 were dis- 
tributed in the first mailing. 

Distribution of these schedules is designed 
to supply detailed information on all short- 
wave progi'ams broadcast from this country 
which can be heard in the other American re- 
publics. Each program on the schedules is 
listed by title, the hour at which it may be 
heard, and the wave length of the broadcast- 
ing station. 

Only programs broadcast in Spanish are 
listed in the Spanish-language schedules, and, 
similarly, only Portuguese programs are listed 
in the Portuguese schedules and only English 
in the English schedules. To further facili- 
tate the location of programs, the Spanish 
schedules are published in four separate issues, 
each showing the time in effect in the area in 
which it is distributed. 



Legislation 



' 6 Federal Register 4535. 



Supplemental E.stimates of Appropriations for State 
Department, Fi.scal Tear liM2 : Communication From 
the President of the United States Transmitting Six 
Supplemental Estimates of Appropriations for the 
Fiscal Year 1942 Amounting to $3,032,300; and Two 
Drafts of Proposed Pi'ovisions Pertaining to Existing 
Appropriations, for the Department of State. (H.Doc. 
375, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 5 pp. 

Supplemental Estimate of Appropriation for Opera- 
tions Under the Lend-Lease Act : Communication From 
the President of the United States Transmitting a Sup- 
plemental Estimate of Appropriation in the Amount 
of $5,985,000,000 for Operations Under the Lend-Lease 
Act. (H.Doc. .374, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 3 pp. 

Operations Under Lend-Lease Act : Message From 
the President of the United States Transmitting Pur- 
suant to Law, the Second Report Under the Act of 
March 11, 1941, Public Law 11, 77th Cong., entitled 
"An Act Further To Promote the Defense of the 
United States, and for Other Purposes". (S.Doc. 112, 
77th Cong., 1st sess.) 32 pp. 

To Suspend Philippine Export Taxes for a Period 
of One Year : Hearings Before the Committee on Ter- 
ritories and Insular Affairs, United States Senate, 
77th Cong., 1st sess., on S. 1623, A Bill To Suspend 
the Export Tax Prescribed by Section 6 of the Act of 
March 24, 1934 (48 Stat. 456), as Amended, for a 
Period of One Year, Commencing July 1, 1941, and For 
Other Purposes. July .31 and August 4 and 6, 1941. 
Iv, 91 pp. 



The Foreign Service 



PROMOTIONS 

[Released to the press September 18] 

The following Foreign Service officers have been nominated for promotion in the Foreign 
kService, effective August 16, 1941 : 

Homo address 



From class 111 to class II 
Loyd V. Steere 

From class IV to class III 

Don C. Bliss, Jr_.. 

Austin C. Brady. 

Edward S. Crocker, 2d 

Walter J. Donnelly 

Homer S. Fox 

Harry F. Hawley 

William R. Langdon_ 

Alfred T. Nester 

Altjurt F. Nuter... 

Frank S. \Villiams__ 

From class Vto class I\' 

Clayson W. Aldridge 

William H. Beach 

Donald F. Bigelow 

John M. Corrigan 

Allan Dawson 

James O. Denby... __ 

Lynn W. Franklin 

Curtis C. Jordan _ 

David McK. Key 

Renwick S. McXiece 

Marcel E. Malige _ 

Warwick Perkins. 

J. Bartlett Richards. 

From class VI to class V 

H. Merrell Benninghofl...^ 

Joseph F. Burt. 

Vinton Chapin 

Prescott Childs 

William M. Qwynn 

Walter H. McKinney 

Clarence E. Macy 

Dale W. Maher 

Walter S. Reineck 

Thomas H. Robinson 

William A. Smale 

E. Talbot Smith 

Francis H. Styles 

Howard F. Withey 

224 



London 

London 

Rangoon 

Tokyo 

Rio de Janeiro. 

London 

Marseille , 

Mukden 

Quayaquil 

Habana 

Tokyo 

Singapore 

Antwerp 

Bern 

Durban 

La Paz 

Capetown 

Niagara Falls- 
Madras 

Rome 

Maracaibo 

Martinique 

Toronto 

Department. . . . 

Tokyo 

Valparaiso 

Dublin 

Rio de Janeiro. 

Beirut 

London 

Karachi 

Lyon 

Vancouver 

Vancouver 

Cork 

Nairobi 

Dublin 

Trieste 



Agricultural Attache 

Consul- 

Consul 

First Secretary 

Commercial Attach^ 

Assistant Commercial Attache. 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul General 

Commercial Attachfi 

Commercial Attache 

Consul 

Consul.. 

Second Secretary. 

Consul 

Consul-Second Secretary 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Second Secretary 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Foreign Service Officer 

Second Secretary 

Consul 

Second Secretary 

Consul-Second Secretary.. 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul... 

Consul. 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul.. 

Consul... 



riaremont, Calif. 



Bilo\i, Miss. 
Santa Fe, N.M. 
Fitchburg, Mass. 
Arlington, Mass. 
Central Lake, Mich. 
New York, N.Y, 
Dedham, Mass. 
Geneva, N.Y. 
New York, N.Y. 
Magee, Miss. 



Rome, N.Y. 
Concord Whart, Va. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Des Moines, Iowa 
Evansville, Ind. 
Bethesda, Md. 
Eagle Rock, Calif. 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
Lapwai, Idaho 
Baltimore, Md. 
Chevy Chase, Md. 



Rochester, N.Y. 
Fairfield, HI. 
Boston, Mass. 
Holyoke, Mass. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Denver, Colo. 
Joplin, Mo. 
Fremont, Ohio 
Princeton, N.J. 
San Diego, Calif. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Reed City, Mich. 



SEPTEMBER 2 0, 194 1 



225 



From class VII to class VI 

George M. Abbott 

Oeorge Andrews 

Lawrence S. Armstrong 

Roy W. Baker 

Ellis A. Bonnet 

Frederick W. Hinke _._ 

Charles A. Hutchinson 

John B. Ketcham 

John H. Madonne. 

James E. Parks 

James K. Penfleld _.. 

Winfleld H. Scott ._- 

Arthur F. Tower 

From class VIII to class VII 

Stephen E. Aguirre 

Daniel V. Anderson 

Waldo E. Bailey... 

Walworth Barbour 

Jacob D. Beam 

John W. Carrigan 

Bernard C. Connelly 

Merritt N. Cootes 

Earl T. Grain 

Andrew E. Donovan, 2d 

Walter C. Dowling... 

Daniel Gaudin, Jr 

James E. Henderson... 

Fred W. Jandrey 

Douglas Jenkins, Jr ... 

Henry P. Leverich 

Raymond P. Ludden 

Patrick Mallon -.. 

John P. Palmer 

Troy L, Perkins 

Paul J. Reveley 

W. Garland Richardson 

Halleck L. Rose 

Livingston Satterthwaite 

Francis L. Spaulding 

John F. Stone 

Tyler Thompson 

WUliam C. Trimble 

Milton K. Wells 

From unclassified A to class VIII 

Hector C. Adam, Jr 

Russell W. Benton 

Eoswell C. Beverstock 

William F. Busser... 

Richard W. Byrd 

Olion Curtis, Jr 

Harry M. Donaldson 

Owen W. Gaines 

Elbert Q. Mathews 

John Ordway 

Marselis C. Parsons, Jr 

George F. Scberer 

Earle C. Taylor.. 

Woodrua Wallner 

T. Eliot Weil. 

Ivan B. White. 



Marseille. 

Panama 

Nogales 

Bristol 

Amsterdam 

Tientsin 

Adelaide 

Medan 

Bern... 

Colon 

Godthaab 

Tenerife 

Kobe 

Mexicali 

Bogota 

London 

Sofia 

London.. 

Mfaico, D. F. 

Department 

Rome 

Madrid 

Bogota 

Rome.- 

Alexandria 

Department 

Melbourne 

Lisbon... 

Lisbon 

Canton 

Lfiopoldville 

London 

Kunming 

London 

Dairen 

Berlin 

Department 

Cairo 

Department 

Zurich... 

:jIiSxico, D. F 

Callao-Lima... 

Hamilton, Bermuda. 

Department 

Belfast 

Department 

Calcutta 

Port-au-Prince 

Marseille 

CiudSd Juarez 

Managua. 

London 

Lisbon 

Department 

Ankara 

Paris 

Shanghai 

Rio de Janeiro.. 



Consul 

Consul-Second Secretary.. 

Consul... 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul-Second Secretary. 

Consul 

Consul 

Consul- 

Consul 



Consul 

Vice Consul-Third Secretary.. 

Vice Consul 

Vice Consul-Third Secretary.. 
Vice Consul-Thu-d Secretary.. 

Third Secretary 

Foreign Service Ofiicer 

Third Secretary 

Third Secretary-Vice Consul.. 
Vice Consul-Third Secretary.. 

Third Secretary 

Vice Consul. ._ 

Foreign Service Officer 

Vice Consul 

Third Secretary 

Third Secretary.. 

Vice Consul 

Consul 

Vice Consul-Third Secretary.. 

Consul 

Vice Consul-Third Secretary.. 

Vice Consul 

Vice Consul-Third Secretary.. 

Foreign Service Officer 

Vice Consul-Third Secretary.. 

Foreign Service Officer 

Vice Consul 

Third Secretary 

Vice Consul 



Vice Consul 

Foreign Service Officer 

Vice Consul 

Foreign Service Officer 

Vice Consul 

Vice Consul-Third Secretary.... 

Vice Consul 

Vice Consul 

Vice Consul-Third Secretary... 

Vice Consul 

Vice Consul 

Foreign Service Officer. 

Assistant Commercial Attache. 
Vice Consul-Third Secretary... 

Vice Consul 

Vice Consul-Third Secretary... 



Cleveland, Ohio 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Rochester, N.Y. 
Buffalo, N.Y. 
Eagle Pass, Tex. 
Auburn, N.Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
New York, N.Y. 
Waco, Tex. 
Rocky Mount, N.C. 
San Francisco, Calif. 
Washington, D.C. 
Rochester, N.Y. 



El Paso, Tex. 
Dover, Del. 
Jackson, Miss. 
Lexington, Mass. 
Princeton, N. J. 
San Francisco, Calif. 
Rock Island, 111. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Huntsville, HI. 
San Francisco, Calif. 
Sea Island Beach, Qa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Berkeley, Calif. 
Neenah, Wis. 
Charleston, S. C. 
Montclair, N. J. 
Fall River, Mass. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Seattle, Wash. 
Lexington, Ky. 
East Haven, Conn. 
Richmond, Va. 
Omaha, Nebr. 
Himtingdon Valley, Pj 
Brookline, Mass. 
Wayne, Pa. 
Elmira, N. Y. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Bristow, Okla. 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Stanford Univ., Calif. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Webster Groves, Mo. 
West Newton, Pa. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Oakland, Calif. 
Washington, D. C. 
Rye, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Kennett Square, Pa. 
New York, N. Y. 
Pleasantville, N. Y. 
Salem. Oreg. 



226 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



[Released to the press September 19] 

The following Foreign Service officers have been promoted in the Foreign Service, effective 
August 16, 1941 : 



Name 


Post 


Title 


Home address 


From unclassified B to undassiped A 




Vice Consul-Third Secretary 


Portland, Oreg. 








Zurich - 


Vice Consul 


Dallas, Tex. 








Salt Lake City, Utah 


H. Francis Cunningham, Jr 




Vice Consul-Third Secretary 














Ashville. N.Y. 




Medellin 










Vice Consul-Third Secretary 

Vice Consul-Third Secretary 








Springfield Center, N.Y. 






New York, N.Y 




Parfi 


Vice Consul- 


Medford, Mass. 














Vice Consul 


Denver, Colo. 








New York, N.Y. 




Sydney and Canberra 


Vice Consul-Third Secretary 

Vice Consul 






Newark, Ohio 








New York, N.Y. 






Vice Consul 












From unclassified Cto unclassified B 




Vice Consul 


New York, N.Y. 




Helsinki 


Vice Consul-Third Secretary 

Vice Consul 








Toledo, Ohio 








Moline, 111. 




Berlin 










Vice Consul-Third Secretary 






Marseille - 


Highland Park, Hi. 






Vice Consul 


















Jamaica Park, N.Y. 











PERSONNEL CHANGES 



On September 17, 1941 the Senate confirmed 
the nomination of Anthony J. Drexel Biddle, 
Jr., of Pennsylvania, Ambassador Extraordi- 
nary and Plenipotentiary of the United States 
to Poland, to serve concurrently and without ad- 
ditional compensation as Envoy Extraordinary 
and Minister Plenipotentiary near the Provi- 
sional Government of Czechoslovakia now estab- 
lished in London. Mr. Biddle will continue to 
serve concurrently as Ambassador near the 
Government of Belgium and as Minister near 
the Goverimients of Norway, the Netherlands, 
and Yugoslavia now established in London. 



[Released to the press September 20] 

The following clianges have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since September 13, 
1941: 

Career Officers 

Maynard B. Barnes, of Vinton, Iowa, now 
serving in the Department of State, has been 
designated First Secretary of iLegation amd 
Consul at Reykjavik, Iceland, and will serve 
in dual capacity. 

George E. Merrell, of St. Louis, Mo., Consul 
at Calcutta, India, has been assigned as Consul 
General at Calcutta, India. 



SEPTEMBER 2 0, 1941 



227 



George E. Miller, of Atlantic City, N. J., Vice 
Consul at Nice, France, has been assigned as 
Vice Consul at Lisbon, Portugal. 

Bernard C. Connelly, of Rock Island, 111., 
Vice Consul at Karachi, India, has been desig- 
nated Third Secretary of Embassy and Vice 
Consul at Lima, Peru, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

M. Robert Rutherford, of Missoula, Mont., 
Vice Consul at Shanghai, China, has been as- 
signed as Vice Consul at Tientsin, China. 

Non-career Officers 

Jesse Milton Orme, of Rexburg City, Idaho, 
has been appointed Vice Consul at Curitiba, 
Brazil. 

Robert G. Wesson, of Jackson, Ohio, has been 
appointed Vice Consul at Maracaibo, Vene- 
zuela. 

Buford K. Isaacs. Jr., of Ft. Worth. Tex., has 



been appointed Vice Consul at Buenos Aires, 
Argentina. 

C. Langdon Harriss, of New York, N. Y., has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Medellin, 
Colombia. 

J. Allard Gasque, of Florence, S. C, has been 
appointed Vice Consul at La Paz, Bolivia. 

Marc L. Severe, of Sioux City, Iowa, who has 
been serving as Vice Consul at Paris, France, 
has been appointed Vice Consul at Mexico, 
D. F., Mexico. 

Arnlioth G. Heltberg, of Oakland, Calif., 
who has been serving as Vice Consul at Bergen, 
Norway, has been appointed Vice Consul at 
Reykjavik, Iceland. 

James S. Lawton, of Chicago, 111., has been 
appointed Vice Consul at Paramaribo, Surinam. 

William W. Marvel, of Baltimore, Md., has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Managua, Nica- 
ragua. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



COMMERCE 

INTER-AMERICAN COFFEE AGREEMENT 

On September 17, 1941 an Executive order 
(no. 8902) was issued prescribing regulations 
pertaining to the entry of coffee in the United 
States from countries signatories of the Inter- 
American Coffee Agreement signed November 
28, 1940. A statement issued to the press and 
the text of this Executive order appear in this 
BvZletin under the heading "Commercial 
Policy". 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATION CONVENTION 

Colombia 

The American Embassy at Bogota reported 
under date of August 19, 1941 that the Diario 



Ofkial for July 16, 1941 published the text of 
Decree 1246, dated July 10, 1941, by which the 
Colombian Government ratified the revisions 
as adopted at Cairo on April 8, 1938 of the 
General Radio Regulations and Additional 
Radio Regulations annexed to the International 
Telecommunication Convention signed at Ma- 
di-id on December 9, 1932. 

SOVEREIGNTY 

CONVENTION ON THE PROVISIONAL ADMINISTRATION 
OF EUROPEAN COLONIES AND POSSESSIONS IN THE 
AMERICAS 

G-uatemala 

By a despatch dated September 5, 1941 the 
American Minister to Guatemala reported that 
the National Legislative As.sembly of Guate- 
mala, by Decree 2543 of April 24, 1941, ap- 



228 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



proved the Convention on the Provisional Ad- 
ministration of European Colonies and Pos- 
sessions in the Americas signed at the Second 
Meeting of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of 
the American Republics at Habana July 30, 
1940. The decree was published in the Diar'w 
de Centro America of August 22, 1941. 



Regulations 



Export Control Schedule B [determining, effective 
September 20, 1941, that articles and materials desig- 
nated in Proclamation 2465 of March 4, 1&41 (6 F. R. 
1300) shall not include any patent for or registration of 
any industrial design or model in respect of any in- 
vention made in the U. S. for which a license is re- 
quired from the Commissioner of Patents], 6 Federal 
Register 4730. 

Fees and Procedure To Obtain Certifications of or 
Information From Records: Amended Regulations 
Governing Fees for Copies of Records, (Department 
of Justice: Immigration and Naturalization Service.) 
General Order No. C-28 ; Supp. 3. September 12, 1941. 
6 Federal Registei- 4780. 

Economic Defense Board : Delegation of Authority 
and Duties, Etc. [relating to export control]. Admin- 
istrative Order No. 1. September 15, 1941, 6 Federal 
Register 4818. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Diplomatic List, September 1941. Publication 163V. 
ii, 101 pp. Subscription, $1 a year ; single copy, 100, 

Other Go\'ernment Agencies 

Trade Between United States and Canada in Fresh 
Fruits and Vegetables and Effect of Trade Agreements. 
.50 pp. (Processed.) Prepared by Foreign Agricultural 
Relations Office, Department of Agriculture, in co- 
operation with Agricultural Economics Bureau, Agri- 
cultural Marketing Service, Extension Service, and 
Surplus Marlieting Administration. Free. 



International Reference Service, Vol. I. (Depart- 
ment of Commerce: Bureau of Foreign and Domestic 
Commerce.) Paper, 50 single copy; $6. a year. 

No. 25. United States trade with Latin American 

republics in 1940. 18 pp. 
No. 26. Trade of United States with Argentina in 

1940. 7 pp. 
No. 27. Economic conditions in Finland in 1940. 

5 pp. 
No. 28. Economic conditions in Canada in 1940. 

11pp. 
No. 29. Living and office-operating costs in Co- 
lombia. 5 pp. 
No. 30. Economic conditions in New Zealand dur- 
ing 1940 and early 1941. 5 pp. 
No. 31. Economic conditions in Turkey, Syria, and 

Iran in 1940 and early 1941. 10 pp. 
No. 32. Economic conditions in Switzerland in 

1940 and early 1941. 6 pp. 
No. 33. Economic conditions in Japan during 1940 

and early 1941. 9 pp. 
No. 34. Economic conditions in Spain in 1940 and 

early 1941. 6 pp. 
No. 35. British exchequer returns for 1940-41 and 

budget for year ending Mar. 1942. 9 pp. 
No. 36. Trade of United States with Netherlands 

Indies in 1940. 5 pp. 
No. 37. Economic conditions in Ecuador in 1940. 

4 pp. 
No, 38. India's economic position in 1940. 8 pp. 
No. 39. Economic conditions in Iraq in 1940. 5 pp. 
No. 40. Distribution of United States imijorts in 

occupied and unoccupied China. 7 pp. 

Neutrality act zone map for use in connection with 
Geolexigraph of neutrality act of 1939. Edition of 
Apr. 15, 1941. 11x12 in. (Processed.) (Department 
of Commerce : Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Com- 
merce. ) 

Italian commercial policy and foreign trade, 1922-40, 
report on recent developments in foreign trade of 
Italy with special reference to trade with United 
States, under provisions of sec. 332, title 3, pt. 2, tariff 
act of 1930 [with bibliography], xiii, 284 pp, 30('. 
(U.S. Tariff Commission.) 

Foreign trade of Latin America, report on trade of 
Latin America with sjwcial reference to trade with 
United States, under general provisions of sec. 332, 
pt. 2, title 3, tariff act of 1930 : pt. 2, Commercial poli- 
cies and trade relations of individual Latin American 
countries, sec, 20, Haiti, viii, 60 pp. (Processed.) 
Free. (U.S. Tariff Commission.) 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents - - Subscription price, $2.' 

PDBLISHBD WEEKLY WITH THE APPEOVAIi OF THE DIBECTOK OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGEd 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 



SEPTEMBER 27, 1941 
Vol. V, No. 118— Publication 1642 



C< 



ontents 




National Defense Pago 

The proclaimed list of certain blocked nationals ... 2.31 

Sinking of the S.S. Pink Star southwest of Iceland . . 231 

Statement of a survivor of the S.S. Sessa 232 

Europe 

Relief to occupied countries 232 

Inter-Allied Council 233 

AiMERicAN Republics 

Removal of certain restrictions on exportations of 

arms to Cuba 23.5 

Presentation of letters of credence by the Minister of 

the Dominican Republic 236 

General 

Celebration of the Jewish New Year 237 

Commercial Policy 

Entry of coffee samples 237 

I-nternational Conferences, Commissions, Etc. 

Permanent American Aeronautical Commission . . . 238 

The Foreign Service 

Pcrsomiel changes 238 

Treaty Information 

Conciliation: Treaty With Brazil Looking to the 

Advancement of the Cause of General Peace .... 239 
Commerce: Protocol to the Inter-American Coffee 

Agreement 239 

[ovbb] 



U. S. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUM£NTS 

OCT 14 1941 

fontents-coNTiNVED 

Treaty Information — Continued. Page 

Telecommunications: International Telecommunication 

Convention, Revisions of Cairo, 1938 240 

Mutual Assistance: Agreement and Protocol Between 
the United Kingdom and the Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics 240 

Publications 241 

Legislation 242 

Regulations 242 



National Defense 



THE PROCLAIMED LIST OF CERTAIN BLOCKED NATIONALS 



IBeleased to the press September 26] 

The Secretary of State acting in conjunction 
with tlie Secretary of the Treasury, the At- 
torney General, the Secretary of Commerce, the 
Executive Director of the Economic Defense 
Board, and the Coordinator of Inter-American 
Affairs, under the President's prochunation of 
July 17, 1941,^ issued on September 2G Supple- 
ment 2 to "The Proclaimed List of Certain 
Blocked Nationals".^ 

Supplement 2 contains some 300 additions to 
the list and approximately 65 deletions as well 
as a number of amendments correcting ad- 
dresses, firm names, and cross references. A 
general amendment provides that the indication 
of addresses on the list does not exclude other 
addresses and that, unless otherwise specified, 
a listed name refers to all branches of the busi- 
ness in the countrj' in question. The text of 
Sui^plement 2 appears in the Federal Register 
of September 27, 1941, page 4915. 

The additions to the list have been made on 
the basis of the continuing study Ijeing given 



these matters. These additions include a num- 
ber of firms and individuals who have been act- 
ing as "cloaks" for effecting transactions with 
firms already on the proclaimed list. As the 
President made clear on July 17, 1941 such 
"cloaks" will be summarily added to the list. 

The deletions also are the result of continuing 
study and current developments. They repre- 
sent situations in which satisfactory corrective 
action has been taken by the firms concerned and 
whei'e the appropriate authorities have been 
satisfied that removal from the list is now war- 
ranted. These situations will be kept vmder ob- 
servation to assure that such firms are not in 
the future identified directly or indirectly with 
activities inimical to the hemisphere-defense 
policies of the American republics. In a few- 
cases deletions have been made because the 
firm or individual in question is not presently 
resident or operating in the particular country. 

Additional supplements to the list will follow 
from time to time. 



SINKING OF THE S.S. "PINK STAR" SOUTHWEST OF ICELAND 



tUoleased to the press September 22] 

The State Department has been informed by 
the Navy Department that the United States 
Government-owned S.S. Pink Star was sunk on 
September 19 at latitude 61°36' north, longitude 



' BiiUetm of July 19, 1941, p. 42. 
^6 Federal Register 3557; see al.?o tlie Bidletm of 
July 19, 1941, p. 41. 



35°07' west. She sailed from New York on 
September 3 with a general cargo. The re- 
ported position at which the PinJc Star was sunk 
is approximately 45 miles northwest of the posi- 
tion of the Sessa sinking. 

The nationalities of the crew of 34 are as 
follows: 1 Danish, 6 British, 8 Canadian, 3 Bel- 
gian, 8 Dutch, 1 Polish, 1 French, 1 Portuguese, 
1 Irish, 3 Chinese, 1 Ecuadoran. 



418322 — 41- 



232 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtTLLETIN 



The Pink Star (ex-Danish ship Lundhy) was 
requisitioned by the United States Maritime 
Commission on July 12, 1941 and placed under 
Panamanian registry. She was chartered by 
the Maritime Commission to the United States 
Lines. The vessel was built in 1926 and was of 
6,850 tons deadweight. 

[Released to the press September 23] 

The State Department has been informed by 
the American Consul at Reykjavik, Iceland, 
that 23 survivors of the S.S. Pbik Star have ar- 
rived in Reykjavik in good condition. 

STATEMENT OF A SURVIVOR OF THE 
S.S. "SESSA" 

[Released to the press September 22] 

The State Department has received from the 
American Consul in Reykjavik the following ab- 
breviation of the sworn statement of the First 
Mate of the S.S. Sessa, Mr. Bjerregard : 

"On August 17, 1941 Sunday, at about 10 p.m., 
ship's time (midnight Greenwich Mean Time), 
when Sessa was at 61 degrees 26 minutes north 
latitude 30 degrees 50 minutes west longitude, I 
was in the Chief Engineer's cabin with the Sec- 
ond Engineer and steward when ship was struck 
by a torpedo. We tried to reach deck to star- 
board, but found water already coming in so 
passed through engine room reaching deck to 
port. On my way toward my lifeboat I was 
about to open my office door to get papers out of 
desk when vessel sank and I found myself swim- 
ming. While on way to office I had heard a shot 
strike bunker house and as I opened door I heard 
another hit bridge. 

"I was drawn under water but reaching sur- 
face found a telephone pole. A seaman, Ljung- 



gren, drifted close to another log. We kept to- 
gether looking for a better support, perceived 
capsized life boat and swam to it. Second engi- 
neer was picked up here also a Canadian seaman. 
Some hours later a raft on which were three 
Portuguese seamen came near. I swim to tliis 
with a line and was transferred. Engineer sank 
from exhaustion and was not seen again. 

"On the tenth day died a Portuguese coal 
passer, 84 years old and on the thirteenth day 
another Portuguese and the Canadian. On this 
day we saw an airplane which I believe flew 
less than 100 meters from us and which I believe 
must have seen us. This was about noon. It 
was a monoplane, not big. I distinguished no 
insignia and could not say if it were a land- 
plane or a seaplane. This plane, which was 
flying north, disappeared without a sign of rec- 
ognition. 

"Water ran out about forty hours before we 
were saved. Food held out till that time. 

"On nineteenth day about noon U.S.S. Lands- 
dale picked us up and brought to Reykjavik. 
With regard to sinking, at time of occurrence it 
was fairly dark-deep twilight but not night 
darkness. Weather was clear and smooth. I 
think that outline of ship could have been seen 
at 500 yards. Vessel was running with dimmed 
navigation lights and was otherwise blacked 
out. I think these lights might have been seen 
at two miles. I do not believe submarine could 
have made out ship's markings. I did not see 
sub nor perceive flash of gunfire. 

"I do not believe there can have been any 
other survivors of the attack. When day broke 
August 18 there was nothing to be seen. Other 
testimony follows." 



Europe 



RELIEF TO OCCUPIED COUNTRIES 



[Released to the press September 25] 

The following text of a letter from the Secre- 
tary of State to the Chairman of the Senate 



Foreign Relations Committee was released Sep- 
tember 25 by Senator Connally : 



SEPTEMBEK 2 7, 1941 



233 



"June 19, 1941. 
"The Honorable 

Waltee F. George, 

United States Senate. 
"My Dear Senator George : 

"I have received your letter of June 3, 1941, 
enclosing a copy of S. Res. 124 relating to a 
proposal for the supplying of relief to occupied 
countries in Europe.^ 

"This Government has a deeply sympathetic 
attitude toward all phases of distress, suffering 
and needs for relief alike in every part of the 
world, from China to Finland, and the Depart- 
ment of State is constantly observing develop- 
ments in these respects and is assembling facts 
and circumstances relating to suffering and the 
problem of its possible relief. To these ends the 
Government, in particular this Department, is 
constantly conferring with individuals, groups 
and other governments. In pursuance of its 
broad general policy in these respects and the 
application of this policy to practical relief 
purposes, this Department follows a general 
policy rather than one of advocating or op- 
posing individual or group plans or proposals 
for relief. Its conclusions with respect to par- 
ticular aspects of this problem may either sup- 
port in part or may oppose in part such indi- 
vidual or group projects. 

"Proposals similar to that contained in S. 
Res. 124 have repeatedly been brought to the 
Department's attention during the pa^st months. 
After having given the most careful and 
thorough consideration to them from the hu- 
manitarian point of view the Department has 
replied in the following sense. 

"It is clear that the responsibility and mani- 
fest duty to supply relief rests with the oc- 



cupying authorities as it is well known that 
the German authorities have removed from the 
coimtries under occupation vast quantities of 
foodstuffs belonging to the peoples of those 
countries and within those countries have di- 
verted food supplies from children to pei'sons 
working in behalf of the German military ef- 
fort. The removal of such foodstuffs is in the 
primary sense responsible for the lack of stocks 
of food in those countries at the present time. 

"The Department has no knowledge of the 
terms under which the German Government 
may have agreed to the proposal described in 
the resolution ; but, in any event, it is extremely 
difficult to understand why, in the light of the 
direct responsibility for the German Govern- 
ment to replace the stocks of food removed from 
the occu{3ied countries, and its direct responsi- 
bility for the feeding of the populations of the 
occupied territories, no effort has been made to 
have the German Government carry out the 
duty which it assumed when it undertook to 
take over by force the countries concerned. It 
is all the more difficult to understand why no 
demand has been made upon Germany to fulfill 
its obligations in this regard when the German 
Government has never put forth any claim to 
poverty of food for its own people and its huge 
armies which are striking at the roots of free- 
dom and civilization wherever they can. 

"I cannot consistently elaborate in writing 
on the difficult and highly complicated military 
and other closely allied considerations involved 
in this Resolution. 

"Under the circumstances no further com- 
ment with regard to the proposed legislation 
seems appropriate. 

"Sincerely yours, 

CoBDELL Hull" 



INTER-ALLIED COUNCIL 



Adherence to the principles set forth in the 
Roosevelt-Churchill Declaration by the govern- 
ments allied with. Great Briliiin T<-as fonnallv 



' Not printed hereto. 



declared at the second meeting of the Inter- 
Allied Council, held in London on September 
24, 1941. 

The position of the Soviet Government was 
given by its Ambassador, Mr. Maisky, in the 



234 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



following terms: "The Soviet Union defends 
the right of every nation to the independence 
and territorial integrity of its country and its 
right to establish such a social order and to 
choose such a form of government as it deems 
opportune and necessary for the better pro- 
motion of its economic and cultural prosperity." 
He added that the Soviet Union advocates the 
necessity of collective action against aggressors 
and that "the Soviet Government proclaims its 
agreement with the fundamental principles of 
the declaration of Mr. Roosevelt and Mr. 
Churchill." 

The following resolution was then adopted 
unanimously : 

"The Governments of Belgium, Czechoslo- 
vakia, Greece. Luxembourg, the Netherlands, 
Norway, Poland, Union of Soviet Socialist Re- 
publics, and Yugoslavia, and representatives of 
General de Gaulle, leader of Free Frenchmen, 
having taken note of tlie declaration recently 
drawn up by the President of the United States 
and by the Prime Minister (Mr. Churchill) on 
behalf of His Majesty's Goverimient in the 
United Kingdom, now make known their ad- 
herence to the common principles of policy set 
forth in that declaration and their intention to 
cooperate to the best of their ability in giving 
effect to them." 

The Netherlands Foreign Minister, Dr. van 
KlefFens, voted for the resolution but wished 
to make clear his Government's position con- 
cerning the words "with due respect for their 
existing obligations" in point four of the decla- 
ration.^ He declared: "My Government takes 
the reservation in point four to mean that just 
as no existing obligations are invalidated by 
that point, ipso facto no such obligations are 
thei-eby to be perpetuated." He continued: 
"Such existing obligations should not be per- 
petuated, even as exceptions, when it is clear 



' Point four reads : "Fourth, they will endeavor, with 
due respect for their existing obligations, to further 
the enjoyment hy all States, great or small, victor or 
vanquished, of access, on equal terms, to the trade and 
to the raw materials of the world which are needed 
for their economic prosperity." 



that their continued operation would seriously 
impair or diminish the beneficial effect which 
is to accrue to all from the application of the 
general rule." He expressed the belief that 
there should be no important exceptions to the 
general rule of free access to trade and raw ma- 
terials on the basis of equal opportunities for 
all, otherwise this fine principle would degen- 
erate into a fine phrase as it did following the 
last war. 

The meeting also considered the problem of 
the re-provisioning of Europe with foodstuffs 
and raw materials after the war. A resolution 
providing for the collaboration of the allied 
governments in dealing with post-war needs of 
European nations was introduced at the meet- 
ing and was generally accepted in speeches by 
the delegates, reservations being made by the 
Netherlands and Soviet representatives. The 
provisions agreed to are substantially as fol- 
lows : 

(1) That it is their [the allied governments 
and authorities] common aim to see that sup- 
plies of food and raw material should be made 
available for the post-war needs of their terri- 
tories. 

(2) That while each of the allied governments 
and authorities will be primarily resiDonsible for 
making provision for the economic needs of its 
own territories, their respective plans should be 
coordinated in a spirit of collaboration for the 
successful achievement of the common aim. 

(3) That they welcome the preparatory meas- 
ures which have already been undertaken for 
this purpose and express their readiness to col- 
laborate to the fullest extent of their power in 
pursuing the action required. 

(4) That, accordingly, each of the allied gov- 
ernments and authorities should prepare esti- 
mates of the kinds and amounts of foodstuffs 
and raw materials required for the re-provision- 
ing of its territories and the order of priority in 
which it would desire supplies to be delivered as 
soon as circumstances permit. 

(5) That the re-provisioning of Europe will 
require the most efficient employment after the 
war of the shipping resources controlled by each 



SEPTEMBER 27, 1941 



235 



governinent and of allied resources as a whole, 
as well as of those belonging to other European 
countries and that plans to this end should be 
worked out as soon as possible between the allied 
governments and authorities, in consultation as 
and when appropriate with other governments 
concerned. 

(6) That, as a tirst step, a bureau should be 
established by His Majesty's Government in the 
United Kingdom with which the allied govern- 
ments and authorities would collaborate in fram- 
ing estimates of their requirements and which, 
after collating and coordinating these esti- 
mates, would present pi'oposals to a committee 
of allied representatives under the chairmanship 
of Sir Frederick Leith-Ross. 

With the prior consent of the State Depart- 
ment, the British Foreign Minister read the 
following statement : 

"The Government of the United States has 
been advised of the purpose of this meeting and 
acquainted with the terms of the draft note 
wliich has been distributed and of the draft 
resolution which is to be presented for consider- 
ation. It has I'equested my Government to state 
to this meeting its opinion that the undertaking 



is of great prospective usefulness. It under- 
stands that the present discussions will be of an 
exploratory nature and states that it stands 
ready at the appropriate time to consider in 
what respects it can cooperate in accomplish- 
ing the aims in view. 

"It has pointed out that any plans that may 
be worked out are of great potential interest to 
the United States for various reasons. They 
might affect the current American defense effort. 
According to their substance, form, and method 
they might also affect commercial policies and 
relationships and even broader post-war ar- 
langements. For these reasons it makes the 
request that it be kept fully advised regarding 
the course of these exploratory discussions and 
that it be consulted regarding any plans that 
might emerge therefrom." 

Assurances were given by the British Foreign 
Minister that the United States Government 
will be kept fully informed of the discussions 
at and arising out of the meeting and of the 
work accomplished by the bureau and the Inter- 
Allied Council and that the United States would 
be consulted before any concrete plans are de- 
cided upon. 



American Republics 



REMOVAL OF CERTAIN RESTRICTIONS ON EXPORTATIONS OF ARMS TO CUBA 



[Released to the press September 22] 

The following proclamation has been issued 
by the President to revoke the proclamation of 
June 29, 1934^ which imposed certain i-estric- 
tions on the exportation of arms to Cuba. 

The proclamation of June 29, 1934 was issued 
because of the fact that there did not appear at 
that time to be any legal means by which this 
Government could effectively carry out its 
ti-eaty obligations with respect to the traffic in 
arms and munitions between the United States 
and Cuba except by the issuance of a proclania- 



' Press Releases of June 30, 1934, p. 454. 



tion pursuant to the joint resolution of Congress 
approved January 31, 1922. Since the exporta- 
tion of arms, ammunition, and implements of 
^^ ar to all countries is now subject to control 
under the provisions of the Neutrality Act of 
1939 and section 6 of the act of Congress ap- 
proved July 2, 1940, the control exercised under 
the above-mentioned proclamation of June 29, 
1934 is no longer necessary and it was consid- 
ered advisable that it be i-evoked. 

The text of the new proclamation follows : 
"Whereas, by a proclamation of the President 
issued on June 29, 1934, under a joint resolution 



236 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



of Congress approved by the President on Jan- 
uary 31, 1922, it was declared that there existed 
in Cuba conditions of domestic violence which 
were or wluch might be promoted by the use 
of arms or munitions of war procured from the 
United States; and 

"Whereas, by virtue of the joint resolution 
and proclamation above-mentioned it became 
unlawful to export arms or munitions of war to 
Cuba except under such limitations and excep- 
tions as should be prescribed: 

"Now, THEREFORE, I, FrANKLIN D. RoOSEV'ELT, 

President of the United States of America, do 
hereby declare and proclaim that, as the condi- 
tions in Cuba which prompted the issuance of 
the proclamation of June 29, 1934, have ceased 
to exist, the said proclamation is hereby re- 
voked. 

"In WITNESS whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the seal of the United States of 
America to be affixed. 

"Done at the city of Washington this 22nd 
day of September, in the year of our Lord nine- 
teen hundred and forty-one, and of 

[seal] the Independence of the United 
States of America the one hundred 
and sixty-sixth. 

Franklin D Roosevelt" 

"By the President : 

"CORDELL HcXJj 

^''Seerctanj of Sfafe" 
[No. 2511] 

PRESENTATION OF LETTERS OF CRE- 
DENCE BY THE MINISTER OF THE 
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC 

[Released to the press September 23] 

A translation of the remarks of the newly 
appointed Minister of the Dominican Republic, 
Dr. Jesus Maria Troncoso, upon the occasion 
of the presentation of liis letters of credence, 
September 23, 1941, follows : 

"Mr. PnEsroENT : 

"I have the honor of placing in Your Excel- 
leiicv's hands the letter which accredits me as 



Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipo- 
tentiary of the Dominican Republic before the 
Govermnent of the United States of America, 
as well as the letter of recall of my predecessor 
in this same mission. 

"I could have no greater satisfaction than 
that which I feel in appearing before Your Ex- 
cellency, for I am fully persuaded that I faith- 
fully interpret the sentiments of the Dominican 
people and Government in affirming that that 
people and that Government in this, humanity's 
hour of crisis, are thoroughly inspired by the 
ideals which govern the life of this great Nation 
which has won a place, because of its exceptional 
virtues, in the fi'ont rank of civilized nations, 
and at whose head the figure of Your Excellency 
stands out as a symbol of the spirit which it 
incarnates. 

"I am especially charged by my Government 
to state to Your Excellency that the Dominican 
Republic feels itself indissolubly bound by the 
principles of safety, liberty, and mutual assist- 
ance, under the aegis of law, which constitute 
the bond of solidarity between all the American 
republics and stimulate their effort in the prep- 
aration of continental defense which will not 
only save the conquests which mankind has 
achieved up to the present time both in the 
spiritual and in the material field but will as- 
sure, as well, the future of humanity and guide 
it toward a better world of understanding and 
fraternity. The Dominican people is pro- 
foundly convinced tliat free America is the land 
chosen by God for the germination therein of 
the seed of a new generation the aspirations of 
which will be more in harmony with the Divine 
Plan. 

"It gives me pleasure. Excellency, to be the 
interpreter of the good wishes of the Dominican 
people and its Government for the greatness 
and prosperity of the United States of America 
and for the health and personal happiness of 
Your Excellency." 

President Roosevelt's reply to the remarks of 
Dr. Jesus Mn n'a Troncoso follows : 



SEPTEMBER 27, 1041 



237 



"Mr. Minister: 

"I accept with pleasure the letters by which 
His Excellency the President of the Dominican 
Republic has accredited you as Envoy Extraor- 
dinary and Minister Plenipotentiary near the 
Government of the United States of America. 
I accept also the letters of recall of your dis- 
tinguished predecessor, Seiior Don Andres Pas- 
toriza, whose relations with the officials of this 
Government during his long and successful mis- 
sion in Washington have been upon an excep- 
tionally friendly basis. 

"I highly appreciate the sentiments which 
you so generously express. I am also gi'atified 
by the message wliich you bring that the Do- 
minican people and Govenmient share the ideals 
of the iDeople and Government of the United 
States of America, as well as their faith in the 
principle of hemispheric solidarity in the de- 
fense of the Americas and of our continental 
heritage of liberty. 

"You may be assured, Mr. Minister, that it will 
be a pleasure for me personally and for all the 
officials concerned in this Government to con- 
tinue with you the close and effective collabo- 
ration in matters of mutual interest to our Gov- 
ernments which has happily characterized our 
relations with your predecessor. 

"I thank you for the friendly wishes wliich 
you formulate on behalf of the Dominican Gov- 
ernment and I shall be glad if you will in turn 
accept my cordial good wishes for the personal 
welfare and haijpiness of your csistinguished 
father, the Pi'esident of the Dominican Re- 
public, and for the prosperity of your country." 



General 



CELEBRATION OF THE JEWISH 
NEW YEAR 

fReleaeed to the press September 22] 

The Secretary of State has issued the follow- 
ing message on the occasion of the celebration 
of tlie Jewish New Year : 

"At this season of the observance of the Jew- 

418323—41 2 



ish New Year, I desire to extend my cordial 
greetings to Americans of the Jewish faith. I 
fervently hope that the blessings of Providence 
may bring cheer during the coming twelvemonth 
to this esteemed and loyal gi'oup of our fellow 
citizens." 



Commercial Policy 



ENTRY OF COFFEE SAMPLES 

[Released to the press September 26] 

The President on September 26 signed an 
Executive order (no. 8909) authorizing the 
Secretary of the Treasury to permit the entry 
into the United States of hona-f.de samples of 
coffee without regard to the quota restrictions 
provided for in the Inter-American Coffee 
Agreement. 

The purpose of the order is to allow the entry 
of coffee samples even though the quota of the 
country producing tlie coffee has been filled, 
since it is often necess.ry or desirable that such 
samples be permitted chtry even though coffee is 
not entering the United States from such coun- 
ti'ies for sale. The order is in accord with the 
purpose of the governments participating in 
the Inter-American Coffee Agreement, as ex- 
pressed in article XVII of the agreement, to 
maintain, so far as possible, the normal and 
usual operation of the coffee trade. 

The text of the Executive oi'der follows : 

"By virtue of the authority vested in me by 
section 2 of the joint resolution of Congress ap- 
proved April 11, 1941 (Public Law 33, 77th 
Cong.), I hereby authorize the Secretary of the 
Treasury, under such conditions as he may pre- 
scribe, to permit the entry into the United 
States of bona-ftde samples of coffee for testing 
purposes without regard to the quota restric- 
tions provided for in the In tei-- American Coffee 
Agreement. 

Franklin D Roosevelt" 

"The White House, 

''Septemher SS, W^:' 

[No. 8fl09] 



238 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



International Conferences, 
Commissions, Etc. 



PERMANENT AMERICAN AERONAUTI- 
CAL COMMISSION 

[Released to the press September 23] 

The Inter- American Technical Aviation Con- 
ference, which was held at Lima, Peru, in 
September 1937. adopted a resolution providing 
for the creation of a Permanent American 
Aeronautical Commission. Tlie purpose of the 
Commission is to advance the work toward the 
unification and codification of international 
public and private air law and to develop and 
coordijiate technical activities of mutual concern 
in the field of aeronautics among the American 
republics. The resolution also provided for the 
oiganization in each of the American republics 
of a national connnission for the purpose of pre- 
paring projects and proposals for the considera- 
tion of the Permanent American Aeronautical 
Commission. The President has now approved 
the designation of the following persons as 
members of the United States National Com- 
mission of the Permanent American Aero- 
nautical Commission : 

Mr. Thomas Burke, Chief, Division of luteruational 
Coiumuuication.«, Department of State, Chairman 

Mr. Reed M. Chambers, United States Aviation Insur- 
ance Underwriters. New York, N. Y. 

Mr. John C. Cooper, Jr., Vice President and Assistant 
to the President, Pan American Airways Corporation, 
New York, N. Y. 

Mr. Richard E. Elwell, Chief Counsel and Director of 
Compliance, Civil Aeronautics Administration, De- 
partment of Commerce 

Mr. Samuel E. Gates, International Counselor, Civil 
Aeronautics Board, Department of Commerce 

Mr. Harold R. Harris, Vice President, Pan American- 
Grace Airways, Inc., New York, N. Y. 

Dr. J. C. Hunsaker, Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, Boston, Mass. 

Col. John H. Jouett, United States Army Reserve, Pres- 
ident, Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce of Amer- 
ica, Inc., Washington, D. C. 

Dr. George Lewis, Director of Aeronautical Research, 
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics 



Dr. Ross A. McFarland, Harvard University, Cam- 
bridge. Mass. 

Capt. Denis Mulliguu. United States Army Air Corps, 
Wright Field, Dayton, Ohio 

Mr. Theodore P. Wright, Assistant Chief, Aircraft 
Branch, Office of Production Management 

It has been deemed advisable to designate a 
small Executive Committee to facilitate the 
work of the larger National Commission. Witli 
the approval of the President, the Secretary of 
State has asked the following members of the 
National Connnission to serve on this Executive 
Committee : 

Mr. Thomas Biuke. Clininniiii 
Mr. Ricliard E. Elwell 
Mr. Samuel E. Gat<s 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

llt.'IiM.seU lu the press SeplciillRr :;7 | 

The following clianges have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since September 20, 
1941: 

Career Officers 

Douglas Jenkins, of Greenville, S. C, Min- 
ister to Bolivia, is retiring from the Foreign 
Service effective January' 1, 1942. 

Hasell H. Dick, of Sumter, S. C, who has 
been serving as Consul at Bordeaux, France, 
has been assignedTor dntj' in the Department of 
State. 

Albert M. Doyle, of Detroit, Mich., Consul 
at Sydney, Australia, has been assigned for duty 
in the Department of State. 

John J. Meily, of Allentown, Pa., who has 
l^een serving as Consul at Zagreb, Yugoslavia, 
has been assigned as Consul at Guadalajara, 
Mexico. 

Samuel R. Thompson, of Los Angeles, Calif., 
Consul at Cardiff, Wales, has been assigned as 
Consul at Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. 

Richard M. de Lambert, of Raton, N. Mex., 
who has been serving as Consul at Antwerp, 



SEPTEMBER 27, 194 1 



239 



Belgium, has been ussifrned as Consul at Tahili, 
Society Islands, Oceania. 

Archibald E. Gray, of Bethlehem, Pa., Con- 
sul at Baixelona, Spain, has been desigiiated 
Second Secretary of Embassy and Consul at 
Santiago, Chile, and will sei-ve in dual capacity. 

Hugh F. Ramsay, of AVashing-ton, D. C, has 
been assigned as Consul at Habana, Cuba. 



Non-career Officers 

Warren C. Stewart, of Baltimore, Md., Vice 
Consul at Lisbon, Portugal, has been appointed 
Vice Consul at Valparaiso, Chile. 

Frederick H. Weaver, of Chapel Hill, N. C. 
has been appointed Vice Consul at Rio de 
Janeiro, Brazil. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



CONCILIATION 

TREATY WITH BRAZIL LOOKING TO THE ADVANCE- 
MENT OF THE CAUSE OF GENERAL PEACE 

The Brazilian Ambassador by a note dated 
September 15, 1941 informed the Secretary of 
State that Prof. William Emmanuel Rappard, 
of Switzerland, has been appointed Brazilian 
non-national member of the Permanent Com- 
mission of Inquiry provided for by the Treaty 
Looking to the Advancement of the Cause of 
General Peace between the United States and 
Brazil signed on July 24. 1914. Professor Rap- 
pard's appointment fills the vacancy caused by 
the resignation of Prof. Max Huber of Switz- 
erland. The Ambassador's note states also that 
the mandate of Mr. Levi Carneiro as Brazilian 
national member was extended for five years 
by a decree of Apiil 25, 1941. 

The composition of the Commission is as 
follows : 

American Commissioners: 

National : Stephen Pierce Diiggan, Ph.D., LL.D., 

Litt.D., of New York 
Non-national : Raoul Dandiiraud, of Canada 
Brazilian Commissioners: 
National: Levi Carneiro 

Non-national : William Emmanuel Rappard, of Switz- 
erland 
Joint Commissioner: 

Nicolas Politis, of Greece. 



COMMERCE 

PROTOCOL TO THE INTER-.AMERICAN COFFEE 
AGREEMENT 

Venezuela 

By a letter dated Augu.st 22, 1941 the Director 
General of the Pan American Union informed 
the Secretary of State that on August 14, 1941 
Seilor Don Luis Coll-Pardo, representative of 
Venezuela on the Inter- American Financial and 
Economic Advisory Connnittee, signed in the 
name of his Government tlie Protocol to the 
Inter-American Coifee Agreement, which Avas 
opened for signature on April 15, 1941 by the 
signatories of the Inter- American Coffee Agree- 
ment of November 28, 1940. 

According to the terms of the Protocol the 
Agreement entered into force in respect of 
Venezuela on August 15, 1941. 



An Executive order, signed by the President 
September 26, 1941, authorizing the Secretary 
of the Treasury to permit enti'y into the United 
States of iona-fide samples of coffee without re- 
gard to quota restrictions provided for in the 
Inter-American Coffee Agreement, appears in 
this Bulletin under the heading "Commercial 
Policy". 



240 



DEPARTMENT OP STATE BULLETIN 



TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATION CONVENTION. 
REVISIONS OF CAIRO, 1938 

Brazil 

According to Notification 383, dated May 16, 
1941, from the Bureau of the International 
Telecommunication Union at Bern, the notice 
of the approval by Brazil of the revisions as 
adopted at Cairo on April 8, 1938 of the General 
Radio Regulations, the Telegraph Regulations, 
and the Final Telegraph Protocol, annexed to 
the International Telecommunication Conven- 
tion signed at Madrid on December 9. 1932 was 
received by the Bureau on May 14, 1941. 

MUTUAL ASSISTANCE 

AGREEMENT AND PROTOCOL BETWEEN THE UNITED 
KINGDOM AND THE UNION OF SOVIET SOCIALIST 
REPUBLICS 

There is jjrinted below the text of the agree- 
ment signed on July 12, 1941 between the United 
Kingdom and the Union of Soviet Socialist Re- 
publics providing for joint action in the war 
against Germany : 

Agreement 

for joint action by his majesty's government 
in the united kingdom and the government 
of the union of soviet socialist republics 
in the war against germany 

His Majesty's Government in the United 
Kingdom and the Government of the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Rei^ublics have concluded the 
present Agreement and declare as follows: — 

(1) The two Governments mutually under- 
take to render each other assistance and sup- 
port of all kinds in the present war against Hit- 
lerite Germany. 

(2) They further undertake that during this 
war they will neither negotiate nor conclude an 
armistice or treaty of peace except by mutual 
agreement. 



The present Agreement has been concluded in 
duplicate in the English and Russian lan- 
guages. 

Both texts have equal force. 
Moscow, 

the twelfth of Jviy, 

nineteen hundred cmd- forty-one. 
By authority of His Majesty's Government in 
the United Kingdom: 

R. Stafford Cripps, 
His Maicsty\^ Amhassador Ex- 
traordinary and PUnipotentiary 
in the Union of Soviet SocialiM 
Republics. 
By authority of the Government of the Union 
of Soviet Socialist Republics: 
V. Molotov, 
The Deputy President of the 
Council of People's Commissars 
and People'' s Commissmr for 
Foreign Affairs of the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics. 

Protocol 

to the agreement for joint action by HIS 

majesty's gov^ernment in the united king- 
dom and the government of the union of 
so\^ET socialist republics in the war 

AG.UNST GERJIANY, CONCLUDED THE TWELFTH 
OF JULY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY-ONE 

Upon the conclusion of the Agi-eement for 
Joint Action by His Majesty's Government in 
the United Kingdom and the Government of 
the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics in the 
AVar against Germany, the Contracting Parties 
have agreed that the aforesaid Agreement enters 
into force immediately upon signature and is not 
subject to ratification. 

The present Protocol has been drawn up in 
duplicate in the English and Russian languages. 

Both texts have equal force. 

Moscow, 

the twelfth of July, 

nineteen hundred and forty-one. 



SEPTEMBER 2 7, 1941 



241 



By authority of His Majesty's Government in 
the United Kingdom : 

R. Stafford Cripps, 

His Majesfy^s Ambassador Ex- 
traordinary and Plenipotenti- 
ary in the Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics. 



By authority of the Government of the Union 
of Soviet Socialist Republics: 

V. MOLOTOV, 

The Deputy President of the 
Council of People's Commis- 
sars and PeopWs Commissar 
for Foreign Affairs. 



Publications 



Department of State 

During the quarter beginning July 1, 1941 
the following publications have been released 
by the Department : ' 

1612. Official Exchange of Professors, Teachers, and 
Graduate Students Under the Convention for the 
Promotion of Inter-American Cultural Relations. 
Inter-American Series 20. 5 pp. 5^. 

1613. Naval Mission : Additional Article to the Agree- 
ment of December 12, 1940 Between the United States 
of America and Ecuador — Signed April 30, 1941. 
EJxecutive Agreement Series 206. 3 pp. 54. 

1615. Military Aviation Mission : Additional Article to 
the Agreement of December 12, 1940 Between the 
United States of America and Ecuador — Signed April 
30, 1941. Executive Agreement Series 207. 2 pp. 5«f. 

1616. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. IV, no. 105, 
June 28, 1941. 20 pp. 10^'.^ 

1617. Diplomatic List, July 1941. ii, 101 pp. Subscrip- 
tion, $1 a year ; single copy, W^. 

1618. Detail of Military Officer To Serve as Director of 
Poljlechnic School of Guatemala : ^Agreement Be- 
tween the United States of America and Guatemala — 
Signed May 27, 1941 ; effective May 27, 1941. Execu- 
tive Agreement Series 208. 10 pp. 50. 

1619. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. V, no. 106, 
July 5, 1941. 12 pp. lO^f. 

1620. Treaties Submitted to the Senate, 1940: Proce- 
dure During 1940 on Certain Treaties Submitted to 
the Senate 1923-1940 and Their Status as of Decem- 
ber 31, 1940. iv, 12 pp. 10^. 



' Serial numbers which do not appear in this list have 
appeared previously or will appear in subsequent lists. 
' Subscription, $2.75 a year. 



1621. Publications of the Department of State (a list 
cumulative from October 1, 1929). July 1, 1941. 26 
pp. Free. 

1622. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. V, no. 107, 
July 12, 1941. 25 pp. 100. 

1625. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. V, no. 

108, July 19, 1941. 30 pp. 100. 

1626. The Department of State BuUetin, vol. V, no. 

109, July 26, 1941. 16 pp. 100. 

1627. Foreign Service List, July 1, 1941. iv, 107 pp. 
Subscription, .500 a year; single copy, 150. 

1628. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. V, no. 

110, August 2, 1941. 22 pp. 100. 

1629. Diplomatic List, August 1941. ii, 101 pp. Sub- 
scription, $1 a year ; single copy, 100. 

1630. Temporary Diversion for Power Purposes of 
Additional Waters of the Niagara River Above the 
Falls : Arrangement Between the United States of 
America and Canada — Effected by exchange of notes 
signed at Washington May 20, 1941. Executive 
Agreement Series 209. 3 pp. 50. 

1631. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. V, no. 

111, August 9, 1941. 16 pp. 100. 

1632. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. V, no. 

112, August 16, 1941. 22 pp. 100. 

1633. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. V, no. 

113, August 23, 1941. 15 pp. 100. 

1634. Index to the Department of State Bulletin, vol. 
IV, nos. 80-105, January 4-June 28, 1941. 29 pp. 

1635. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. V, no. 114, 
August 30, 1941. 14 pp. 100. 

1637. Diplomatic List, September 1941. ii, 101 pp. 
Subscription, $1 a year ; single copy, 100. 

1638. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. V, no. 115, 
September 6, 1941. 15 pp. 100. 



242 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



1639. Military Mission : Agreement Between the United 
States of America and Costa Rica — Signed July 14. 
1941; effective July 14, 1941. Executive Agreement 
Series 212. 10 pp. 5(!: 

1640. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. V, no. 116, 
September 13, 1941. 2o pp. 10^. 

1641. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. V, no. 117. 
September 20, 1941. 12 pp. 10^. 

Treaty Sbsies : 

967. Extradition: Supplementary Convention Between 
the United States of America and Mexico — Signed 
;it Mexico City August 16, 1939: proclaimed April 4, 
1941. 4 pp. 5(*. 

968. Conciliation : Treaty Between the United States of 
America and Liberia — Signed at Monrovia August 21. 
1939 : proclaimed April 4, 1941. 3 pp. 5i. 

969. Extradition: Supplementary Treaty Between thr 
United States of America and Switzerland — Signed 
at Bern January 31, 1940 ; proclaimed April 11, 1941. 
3 pp. 5^: 

971. Transit of Military Aircraft: Agreement Between 
the United States of America and Mexico — Signed at 
Washington April 1, 1941: proclaimed April 28, 1941. 
6 pp. 5<;: 

972. Extradition : Supplementary Treaty Between the 
United States of America and Ecuador — Signed at 
Quito Septcml)er 22. 1939: proclaimed May 19. 1941. 
5 pp. o(*. 

The Department of State also publishes the 
slip laws and Statutes at Large. Laws are 
issued in separate series and are numberetl in 
the order in which they are signed. Treaties 
are also issued in a separate series and are num- 
bered in the order in which they are proclaimed. 
All other publications of the Department since 
October 1, 1929, are numbered consecutively in 
the order in which they are sent to press, and, 
in addition, are subdivided into series accord- 
ing to general subject. 

To avoid delay, requests for publications of 
the Department of State should be addressed 
directly to the Superintendent of Documents, 
Government Printmg Office, Washington, D. C, 
except in the case of free publications, which 
may be obtained from the Department. The 
Superintendent of Dociunents will accept de- 
posits against which the cost of publications 



ordered may be charged and will notify the 
depositor when the deposit is exhausted. The 
cost to depositors of a complete set of the pub- 
lications of the Department for a year will 
probably be somewhat in excess of $15. Orders 
may be placed, however, with the Superintend- 
ent of Documents for single publications or for 
one or more series. 

The Superintendent of Documents also has, 
for free distribution, the following price lists 
which may be of interest : Foreign Relations of 
the LTnited States; American History and Bi- 
ography; Tariff; Immigration; Alaska and 
Hawaii; Lisular Possessions; Laws; Commerce 
and Manufactures; Political Science; and Maps. 
A list of publications of the Bureau of Foreign 
and Domestic Commerce may be obtained from 
the Department of Commerce. 



Legislation 



An Act To amend section 8 of the Copyright Act of 
March 4, 1909, as amended, so as to preserve the rights 
of authors during the i)resent emergency, and for other 
purposes. [H.R. 4826.J Approved, September 25, 1941. 
(Public Law 258, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 1 p. 

An Act To dispense with the requirenieut of clearance 
and entry for certain United States vessels on the Great 
Lakes whicli touch at Canadian ports for bunker fuel 
only. [H.R. 5289.] Approved, September 25, 1941. 
(Public Law 260, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) 1 p. 



Regulations 



Sugar Quotas : Revision of Prorations of the Quota 
for Foreign Countries Other Than Cuba. September 20, 
1941. [General Sugar Quota Regulations, Series 8, 
Xo. 1, Revision 5, Amendment 1.] (Agriculture De- 
partment: Agricultural Adjustment Administration, 
Sugar Division.) 6 Federal Register 4898. 

Licenses To File Applications for Patents in Foreign 
Countries [addition of new part]. Order No. 151. 
(Patent Office.) 6 Federal Register 4900. 



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